o*f) IJD REVOLVINO LOAN INTERNAL SERVICE FU^fD (323,609) II749J ToUl Operating Revenue Toul Nonopenting Revenue Tnnsfeis Out 25,000 35,000 60,000 13,656 48,301 0 NctI (Loss) iO,97 • iilii Oil flt:l(TSEM5hcr Pt)WfrMiyVAL<)Rgrt^' '' • -,i MiihiiiAaiaii£> >"NJii i.i /t;'i)i,'itt f.t Beginning l-unO Hilancc Revenues Bond Proceeds Tnnsfera In TOTAL Expenditure* 7'nn*fen Oui Ending Fund Bslance TOTAL DEBT SERVICE FUND lOPEHATlNQ l ',..) • : ORIGINAL ANNUAL BUfigu tlll.ll COI. 10.640.363 41.533.518 0 4,672.686 26.849 J69. 13,238J7I 2J65.4O0 11.341.898 26,1493*9 ACTUAl. YEAR TO -BAIE. ".Hi 1.891.012 9.580.116 0 0 11,471.128 6.203.260 0 I2.268,m 11,471,121 S fECIAL ASSE SSMENT DISTRICTS Begirmmg Fund Balance Revenues Bond Proceeds Transfenln 26,167,172 17JI2,I17 0 0 24,232,041 9,179.270 67,592,572 6,116,029 TOTAL Expenditures Payment to Escrow Agent Tiansfen Out Ending Fund Balance TOTAL 44J79J99 I07JI9,9I9 16.623.654 0 0 27,455,705 36.245,920 4t,M8.0*2 5,926,942 16,168,995 44J79J99 R I PDEVELOPM ENT AGENCV Beginning Fund Ballnce Revenues Debt Proceed* '. TOTAL • : ORIGINAL AIWUAL lUfifiCI 9,94.93,9 LEGAL ADVERTISEMENT IN COMPLIANCE WITH AND PURSUANT TO N.R,S. 354.602,266.480, AND 268.030, THE CITY OF HENDERSON DOES HEREBY REPORT THE FOLLOWING: TOTAL RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE THIRD QUARTER ENDING MARCH 31,1999, OF THE 1998-99 BUDGET YEAR THE ABOVE FINANCIAL REPORT WAS PREPARED BY THE FINANCE DEPARTMENT AND FILED WITH THE CITY CLERK, MAY 12.1999,BYSTEVENM.HANSRILEY.MIKE L/ORILEY,MIKE 1977 MERCURY COUVIN 7A93S5520QS RM GARCIA, MARIO L/0 GARCIA, MARIO 1979 FORD PU VIN Xl$GKrA3349 RAO UUCERO, DANTELE UO LUCSRO, DANIELE 1986 NISSAN SENTRA VIN JNlPBllS2GU6T7y7S R^ VICTOR, CHARLES I/O VICTOR, CHARLES 1978 CHEVROLET PU VINCLN1488202S38 WO ALKIRK, SHARON L. UDALXIRE, SHARON U lASJIEPinUNCLER vm ij4rvaiarBMc7 RA)UNK uovtm 1986 PONTIAC GRAND i AM VIN 1G2NV27UX;C547417 R/O HUERCO, ANN MARIE UO HUERGO, ANN MAKIE 1987 FORD RANGER VIN IFTBR10AXHUB5945 RAO SOTO, ERIC I/O SOTO, ERIC 1989 CHRYSLER NEW YORK VIN IC3B6697KDS06557 R/O JOHNSON, JERMAINER R. L/O HI DESERT RV 197S FORD VAN VIN E14HHA04723 R/O DANIEL, GREGORY L/O DANIEL, GREGORY 1986 ItftSSAN SENTRA VIN JN1PBISS76U19836 R/OSLKIGHER, FRANCIS J. L/OSLICgHER, FRANCIS J. 1998 KAWASAKI M8CC VIN JKAEXVD12WA840M4 WO DVMLAD, FREEDOM UO DUMLAO, FREEDOM 1994 SUZUKI KATINA VIN JS1GR78AXR21 RAO COOK, STEPHEN L/O COOK, STEPHEN 198S PORD RANOn VIN 1ITBRIOA1FUB45837 RA) HARDY, MICHAEL L/O TEN P|N AUTO SALES ~ 1987 FORD TEMfO VIN 1FAMP33S2HK250476 RA>VASQUEZ, RAMIREZ L/O VASQUEZ, RAMIREZ 1976 DODGE PU VIN W14REJS235625 WO MOORE, RICHEY ALAN UO MOORE, RICHEY ALAN The Vfhicles dcsfriht-d ubtive will he mild at a public auclion to the hlght'sl hiddrr l latLsfy llir llcii iiK-urred by WALKER TOWING 2398 Silvrrwiild Dr. Hcndrnuin, NV ,m May 28,1999. Autiiim xrill he htid ut KhlNljm. We i-esi-rve the riglil l. KG AL NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITOR AND OTHERS CONCERNED Pursuant to Chapter408, Nevada Revised Statutes, notice Is hereby givin that on May 5, 1999, Contract No. 2888 between Las Vegas Paving Corporation and the State of Nevada, for construction of a portion of the SUte Highway System on US V3 irom Buchanan Boulevard In Boulder City to 1.7 kilometers east of Lakeshore Road, Clark County, Project No. SPF-093-l(9) was accepted. All creditors having claims against this contract must file their ciaiirns within thirty (30) days after acceptantx of said contract. Information relative to the manner of filing claims may be ol>tained from the Administrative Services Officer, telephone number 775-888-7070. THOMAS E. STEPHENS, P.E., DIRECTOR Nevada Department of Transportation Carson City, Nevada 89712 H—May 11,13,18,20,1999 LEGAL NOTICE You are hereby notified that you are now delinquent in the payment of rent due the undersi|;ned Lessor in accordance with the Lease Agreement In which you are the Lessee of the individual storage area known as F-3, 151 E. Sunset Road, Henderson, Nev. and your tenancy of said unit is hereby terminated. You are further notified that In accordance with Section 10 of said Lease Agreement, in order to satisfy the lien of the undersigned for the payment of the said rent, tJv wndrsiHicd at rtTM^t^c set Road, Henderson, Nevada will sell all of your right, title and interest in all personal property, goods, chatties and merchandise upon the premises and will apply the proceeds of the sale to the payment of the said rent and expense of sale. You may redeem the said property at any time prior to the sale by payment of the amount due. Certified IcUer dated this MAY 14,1999. THE BOAT BARN, INC. Mary V. Swadell, Lessor H—May 20,27, June 3,1999 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thattbeCityCoundl of the City of Henderson proposed by reading in title the following Ordinance at lU Regular Meeting, held May 18,1999, endUed: BILL NO. 1577 Z-1-99-A-1 Gibaon BusinessPork AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY AMENDD4G THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 62 EAST, M.D.B.AM., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA. FROM IG-MP (GENERAL INDUSTRUL WITH MASTER DEVELOPMENT PLAN OVERLAY) DISTRICT AND PREVIOUS CLARK COUNTY INDUSTRIAL ZONING DESIGNATION TO IG-MP (GENERAL INDUSTRIAL WITH MASTER DEVELOPMENT PLAN OVERLAY) DISTRICT, LOCATEDSOUTH OF AMERICAN PACmC DRIVE. IN THE GIBSON SPRINGS PLANNING AREA. AND OTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO. which hai been referred to a CoaBittcc of tkc Cowidl M a Whole for study and recomiBieiidatioa laod a am at laid OrtUiMM* hat bMn Wed with the CUy CWrfc far general public tcmtiny. Tht Caaunittec Meeting wUI be held June 1, 1999, at 6:45 pjB. The Council will coolidcr thii Ordinance for adoption at the Regular Metta| r the City Ca—cJI Ml Jnc 1,199t md^mj caae WH adopt ur r^iact tUi OrdhMMc wRMo 38 #yi. DATED My IS, 1999 md puMMw d Moy 38, 1999, hi UK imiavivOT • • • • ( f^vwi* VMi*M.SkHMW O^Ckrli H— Moya8.lW Thursday, May 20,1999 HMKtoraon Home Nw Page 17 LEGAL LEGAL LEGAL PubUc Auction Notice b hereby given that in accordance with NeVada Revised StRtntes 1(M.473-108.4783, the contents of the folkiwtaig storage oniti will be soU on M^r 28th, 1999 at 9KN> AM at A AAA Storage (AAA MtaiiWarehaiiMS) 1601 Athol A ve, Henderson, NV to latMy delinqucntrent and fees. 25 Jerry & Tammy Gibson #138 ^ #157 *163 #165 #175 #38 Gcrrc Forest #47 Linda Boyard #51 AUso Woody #94 Mary Prtgmorc #99 Antboinr Slieniore #111 John Gottcrer #115 andy Fletcher Regiiter at office by 8:30 AM. Payments to be made in cash on date of trie. Uniti to be vocoted by 8:00 PM. H—May 13.20,1999. David Jackson Sandra Bong Edward Nevaui Roxanne Charlto* Debbie Bemal #190/191 George Rogan #243 MkJuwl Crooks LEGAL NOTICE BEFORE THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION OF NEVADA >In Re Filing by NEVADA POWER ; ^"^"^ COMPANY of a proposed distribution tariff pursuant to the Order issued in Docket No. 97-8001. Docket No. 99-2009 NOTICE OF SUPPLEMENTAL TARIFF OLING AND NOTICE OF HEARING Nevada Power Company ("NPC") has Hied with the Public Utilities Commission of Nevada ("Commission") a suppleniciit to the proposed Uriff already designated as DMActNo. 99-2009. This fUing consists of proposed revisions to Rule 9 (Bne extensions) and Rule 15 (ParaUel Generation by End-Use Customers) and supplements NPC's filing of Februory 2, 1999 In this docket, In whkh it proposed nonprice terms and conditions for distribution service. In this filing, NPC proposes the terms and conditions under which it intends to accept requests for new physical connections (Rule 9) fhmi distribution customers or those end-use customers eligible to order facilities or construction under the proposed tivifr. NPC also proposes the provisions whkh will govern operation by an end-use customer of generating fadHties in parallel with NPC's distribution system (Rule 15). The proposed tarifb were filed pursuant to the provisions oTChopten 703 and 704 ofNRS and NAC and are on file and available for viewing by the publk at the offices of the Commission, 1150 Eost WlUiam Street, Carson City, Nevada 89701 ond the Sawyer Office BulMIng, 555 East Washington Avenue. Suite 4500, Las Vegas, Nevada 89101. Persons with a tlirect and substantial Interest in the tariffs may file Petitions for Leave to Intervene in conformance with the Commissk>n's regulations at either of the Commission's offices on or before Wednesday, June 2, 1999. Interested persons may submit Protests which conform with the Commission's regulations or other written comments at either of the Commisskin's offices. Persons already granted intervenor sUtus In Docket No. 99-2009 need not file addithmal petitions. In occordonce with the Stipulation executed by parties to this motter on or about April 15,1999 (and accepted by the Commission as reflected in its Interim Order issued April 22, 1999), if a stipulation on this supplement is not reached by June 11.1999. NPC shall file prepared testimony In support of these proposed tariffs no later than June 11, 1999; prepared testimony of intervenors is to be filed no later than June 28.1999. The Commission has legal authority and Jurisdiction to conduct a HEARING on thb filing pursuant to the provisions of imS 704.110 and 704.120. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Commission has scheduled a hearing as follows: MONDAY, JULY 12,1999 10:00 a.m. Office of the Publk UtillUes Commissk>n Sawyer Office Building 555 East Washington AvMMC '' l i i t lW i':"iair<|>^Ne9>dk^l81>'^^v^-^av • I • ^ • ,,. at which time interested persons may appear and be heard. The hearing may continue from day to day as necessary. At this thne, the Commission has scheduled July 12 and 13,1999 for this hearing. In accordance with the provisions of NRS 704.110,704.120, and the regulation on distribution service tarlflli adopted by the Commisston In Docket No. 97-8001 on November 13,1998, the Commisston will consMer evklence pertainiim to whether the proposed tariffs (Rules 9 and 15 only) conform with the regulation or whether the proposed tarUih should be found unjust, unreasonable or ui\Justly discriminatory, preferential, or otherwise In violation of any of the provisions of Chapter 704 of NRS. At the hcoring, the Oommisslon may also consider other issues related to the provi8k>ns of Chapters 703 and 704 of NRS and NAC, may discuss public comments, and may make ilecisieiis on the procedural and sul>stantive issues raised at heiuing. The Commissk>n may vole at the hearing to accept or reject, in whole or in part, the tariffs filed by NPC, or to take such other action as it deems appropriate under the circumstances. This notice has been postedns Act of 1996. Thb filing was designated by the Commbsion as Docket No. 99-4062. Interested and affected persons may obtain a copy of the Agreement from the Commissitm, and may flk comments pertaining to thb Agreement at either of the Commission's ofnces on or before Tuesday, June 1,1999. Any comments must be simultaneously served on the Commission, parties to the Agreement the Regulatory Operations Staff, and the Attorney General's Bureau of Consumer Protection-Utility Consumers' Advocate. In response to the comments filed on or before June 1,1999, the Joint Petitioners may file reply comments and legal arguments on or Iwforc Wednesday, June 16,1999. The Commission lms Jurisdiction over thb matter and legal authority to conduct proceedings punoant toChopters 703 and 704 of the Nevada Revbed Stetutes ("NRS^') and the Nevada Adminbtrative Code ("NAC) and. In partkular, NRS 704.040 and 704.120, and 47 U.S.C. {252(e). NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a publk HEARING In the above matter will be held as folMws: MONDAY, JULY 19,1999 10:00 a.m. Hearing Room B Publk Utilities Commbsion of Nevado Sawyer BuiMIng 555 East Washington Avenue, Suite 4500 Las Vegas, Nevodia at which time interested persons may appear and be heard. Pursuant to NRS 703 J20, if the Commisskm does not receive any adverse commenb regording the Agreement or a request for hearing by June 1,1999, the hearing will be canceled. Pursuant lo 47 UJS.C. S252(e) and NRS 704.120, the Commbsion will receive evidence pertaining to Ihe issues rabed by the comments that are filed and any response by Joint Petitioners regarding any dispute over the terms and conditions of the Agreement Pursuant to 47 U.S.C. S252(2)(A), the Commbsion may only reject a negotiated agreement, or any portitm thereof, if It fintb that (i) the agreement discriminates against a telecommunkatlons carrier not a party to the agreement; or (ii) the impkmentation of such agreement is not consistent with the publk Interest, convenience, and necessity. Interested and affected members of the public may also comment at the hearing. Al the hearing, the Commission may also consider issues related to the provisions of 47 U.S.C. !S251 and 252, Chapters 703 and 704 of the NRS and NAC, may dbcuss publk comments, and may make decisions on the procedural and substantive issues rabed at the hearing. Thereafter, the Commission may vote to approve or dbapprove, in whok or in part. Joint Petitioners' Agreement The Agreement b available for public viewing al the offices of the Commission: 1150 F.ast William Street Carson City, Nevada 89701 and Ihe Sawyer BuiMIng, 555 East Washington Avenue, Suite 4500, Las Vegas, Nevada 89101. Thb notice has been posted at the county courthouses In Carson City, Reno, and Las Vegas. By Ihe Commission, lil Jeimne Reynolds JEANNE REYNOLDS, Commbsion Secrctery Dated: Carson City, Nevada 5-19-99 (SEAL) H—May 20,1999 HENDERSON COLD STORAGE VACATION VACII M "" Of MiNxrn mojKT WTi IF UPON SUCH HEARING, the ChyCiTfl Of MddCltvof BRENT Hcadersoab satisfied that the pabMcwM Mi be maMfQl^-f-t:^ S b^Jnrcd by luch proposed vocatioa, the above-described right-of-way will be vacated. DATED May 17, 1999, ond Pubibfacd hi the Hendcraoa Newi on May 2t, 1999. /^StephonkOoks for Mooka M. SlmoMoo. City Clerfc H—May 28.1999 LEGAL NOTICE WALKER TOWING, A ROADONE CO. 2398SILVERWOLFDR. HENDERSON, NV 89015 FAX 702-565-7619 70^55-6220 NOTICE OF SALE Notice b hereby given lo the last Rcgbtercd and Legal Owner of: 1998 FORD ESCORT VIN 3FAKP1I35WR185812 B/O MILLER. EDWARD D/ VUMFARDOE. L/O FORD CREDIT TITLING TRUST 1970 TOYOTA PU vm RN23027658 R/O SMITH, DAVID SMITH, DAVID BRENT 1983 HONDA CIVIC VIN JHMSL5324DSt23669 WO TILLMAN, PAUL W CAROLYNC LA> NEVADA FCU 1988 FORD ESCORT VIN 1FAPP93J4JW3S2M3 WO BORCHERS, BILLIE JO BORCHERS, JAMES C L/O BORCHERS. BILLIE K) BORCHERS, JAMES J. 1989 MERCURY SABLE VIN IMBUUBUIKAMMV R/O TEPPER, JOSEPH L/O TEPPER, JOSEPH 1982 NISSAN MAXIMA VIN JN1SU01S4CT016138 R/OGREENE, VALLAPHA L)GREENE,VALLAPHA 1999 HONDA ACCORD VIN 1HGCG1651XA013797 R/O BANK OF AMERICA L/O BANK OF AMERICA 1989 MAZDA 626 VIN JMIGD2220K1732655 R/O HOLLINGSHEAD, RALPH E HOLLINGSHEAD, MARK E. L/O HOLLINGSHEAD, RALPH E. HOLLINGSHEAD, MARK S. 19r HONDA PRELUDE VINJHMBA3246HC027137 WO TAFOYA, JOE R. JR. L/O TAFOYA, JOE R. JR. 1974 FORD MAVERICK VIN 4K31FS5832 R/O WILLIAMS, WILLIAM L/O WILLIAMS, WIL UAM TbcVchklcs described above wBIbesaMatapnUkoMtlaa lathe Mgkart Mdvtosoilrfy the lien Incurred by WALKER TOWING. 2398 S U i tt oog Dr., HMderaam NVsajMK IL19M. Anctioa wfll be hiM at l:8a,m. We ft-Moar 3 rTj—e 3,19i> rv' '^ "^ir'^"*'*-" IMtfM

PAGE 17

• V" Pagii 16 HMiderMn Home News Thursday, May 20,1999 LEGAL LEGAL LEGAL LEGAL X THIRD QUARTER 19'nm UNAUDITED REVENUES Tua LicenKs 4 PemilU InlergovnnnmlaJ Revoiun C>Hr(c< for Scrvica Finn Foffeiu MiicellaiKoui ~ Proceeds ftom CapHal Uuc Tnnffenin Oain on Sak of Fixed Aueu Betinning Fund Balwce 4 TOTAl. AVAILABIX RXSOURCIS EXFINDITURES iGcncnl Cknwmmcnl '. • '.;., • • Public Safety judKwi ^;;./.:;.-':;;;. Public Woriti Culnire and Recrtalion TfantftnOut Taul Eapndtnrai aid CNktr Uaaa Endinf Fund Balance Unreaerved TOTAL GENERAL FUND REQUIREMENTS ffi^ff TAX SPECIAL REVENUE fUND OMGINAL AJMUAL yjPGfT 12^3.413 I,I9IJI0 l,<72,JJ5 l,4}3,74l 1,179,144 0 500 I0.0t}39* • 45,I4J,I5S -^.. W.OI 4.9O0,5O I4,10,777 ,777,590 MJtHOM 5,40t,9Tt IM^SIJM' Beginning Fund Balance Inlogovenunenul Revenue! Miicellaneoul Tmufenln TtJTAL > Epnditurca Tranafen Out Ending Fund Balance TOTAL 10,000 0 1.5S9,7]3 1,509,733 30,000 0 l,SS9,733 ACTUAL YEAR TO I0,t7l.li3 11,71,702 31,199,611 5,561.234 1.107.119 2.135.754 I67J22 0 0 23.4>5.54 i3JI3>M IMU,932 33.910.434 I.5M.033 4,3M.I33 9J71,00 0_ 17,610,307 ti,ai3>si 1,06IJ46 631,440 77,156 0_ 1,714,442 7,613 0 1,776,759 1,714.442 l>^INiriPAl. COURT ADMINISTRATIVE FEE ORIGINAI. ANNUAL tamsti ACTUAL YF.AR TO iJAIt fimiAliMVBWtlWP Deginning Fund Balance Revcnuca TOTAL Eipendinmi Ending Fund Balance TOTAL FORFEITED AS SETS SPECIAL REVENUE FyND 0 50,000 to.ooo 50,000 0 Beginning Fund Balance Rfvenucs TOTAL Eipendlhirei Ending Fund Balance TOTAL FINANClAL STA en .I7^T10N 0 lOO.OOO I0<,0M 100,000 0 IO<,OM SPEriAI. REV ENUE rUND Beginning Fund Balance Revenue! TOTAL Ejipeuditures Tnnifen Out Ending Fund Balance TOTAL 2,645.95 100,000 2,74S,9t9 0 100,000 2,64S,9S5 2.745,9S gtft m.)^ggga!^Rg^ ^ „;1 • • • llltXIOIOI Beginning Fund Balance Revenuei TOTAL Etpendilurci Ending Fund Balance TOTAL 1,263 0 Ui3 0 U63 FXTRABR D INARY RtPAlKS • CAflTAL PROJECTS.ORIGIN Al ANNUAL ByecEi ACTUAl. VEARTO JtAIK SUOAL Beginning Fund Balance Revenues Tranafentn TOTAL Expcndilurei Ending Fund Balance 76,7l 4,000 0 •0,7SI 0 •0.711 -.-,,-^• Ali. BirwiNnAaiJ TRUST HIND ,Bcginn0ig Fund Bklaooe RcvMuea Tranafen In •. '• .. TOTAL Ending Fund BalanM '.',' • '< TOTAL S ijLHD sAi js CAriTAL rROJEcrs FUND 151,000 70W> 221,0 22I.00* Beginning Fund Balance Revenue* LandSalea TOTAL .-A • • ; • '. • ; • • ;• Eapendiuns '. TnosftnOnl • Gndng Fund Bakno* TOTAL ^ • '" SPETIAl. RECREATION CAPITAL l,57,53l 100.000 1,400.000 jMjjai 47,400 0 3.040.131 3,ar,53i PROJECTS ruND Beginning Fund Balance Revenue* TOTAL EjqiandituRa TmsfenOul Endmi Fund Balance TOTAL 202,597 l,MW I472J7 30,000 0 I,4jf7 • ONDPaoCEEDS CAflTAL ORIGINAL ANNUAL ACTUAL YEAR TO Beginninf Fiaid Balance Revenuaa BoMll TOTAL 0 USMM TimdanOu) Twikat Fir-* -' 233,40S 165,050 29.769 368,616 33,110 72,513 27,057 79.406 2,499,062 103,633 2,M2>IS 0 0 2,602,615 4 l.93,123 ii .m m TOTAL USMll U^MM* s^ If^f. FAcnjnEs Aromsmprn ,tf^p iSrnon CAHTAL PROJErTii nff*P PlMtd DttMnN IM.U4 0 0 4J7J37 11,171.990 1,016.39* 0 0 TOTAL MMti i,ijll OM t 4.>i,dM 21IJ 4Jl.fll TOTAL iM*jn\ n,inj* t • 0 TOTAL ^*>*fj^ ai,w Mijn TOTAL 3TSJM MIJW Toul Operatilig Revenue ToUl Openiling Expcnw Toul Nonoperalmg Revenue ToUl Nonopenting Eipcnae Tianiren CKiI Net iKtnM (LMS) SEWER ENTF-RPRISE FUND CONVENTION CF^NTER ENTERPRISE FUND WATER y
o*f) IJD REVOLVINO LOAN INTERNAL SERVICE FU^fD (323,609) II749J ToUl Operating Revenue Toul Nonopenting Revenue Tnnsfeis Out 25,000 35,000 60,000 13,656 48,301 0 NctI (Loss) iO,97 • iilii Oil flt:l(TSEM5hcr Pt)WfrMiyVAL<)Rgrt^' '' • -,i MiihiiiAaiaii£> >"NJii i.i /t;'i)i,'itt f.t Beginning l-unO Hilancc Revenues Bond Proceeds Tnnsfera In TOTAL Expenditure* 7'nn*fen Oui Ending Fund Bslance TOTAL DEBT SERVICE FUND lOPEHATlNQ l ',..) • : ORIGINAL ANNUAL BUfigu tlll.ll COI. 10.640.363 41.533.518 0 4,672.686 26.849 J69. 13,238J7I 2J65.4O0 11.341.898 26,1493*9 ACTUAl. YEAR TO -BAIE. ".Hi 1.891.012 9.580.116 0 0 11,471.128 6.203.260 0 I2.268,m 11,471,121 S fECIAL ASSE SSMENT DISTRICTS Begirmmg Fund Balance Revenues Bond Proceeds Transfenln 26,167,172 17JI2,I17 0 0 24,232,041 9,179.270 67,592,572 6,116,029 TOTAL Expenditures Payment to Escrow Agent Tiansfen Out Ending Fund Balance TOTAL 44J79J99 I07JI9,9I9 16.623.654 0 0 27,455,705 36.245,920 4t,M8.0*2 5,926,942 16,168,995 44J79J99 R I PDEVELOPM ENT AGENCV Beginning Fund Ballnce Revenues Debt Proceed* '. TOTAL • : ORIGINAL AIWUAL lUfifiCI 9,94.93,9 LEGAL ADVERTISEMENT IN COMPLIANCE WITH AND PURSUANT TO N.R,S. 354.602,266.480, AND 268.030, THE CITY OF HENDERSON DOES HEREBY REPORT THE FOLLOWING: TOTAL RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE THIRD QUARTER ENDING MARCH 31,1999, OF THE 1998-99 BUDGET YEAR THE ABOVE FINANCIAL REPORT WAS PREPARED BY THE FINANCE DEPARTMENT AND FILED WITH THE CITY CLERK, MAY 12.1999,BYSTEVENM.HANSRILEY.MIKE L/ORILEY,MIKE 1977 MERCURY COUVIN 7A93S5520QS RM GARCIA, MARIO L/0 GARCIA, MARIO 1979 FORD PU VIN Xl$GKrA3349 RAO UUCERO, DANTELE UO LUCSRO, DANIELE 1986 NISSAN SENTRA VIN JNlPBllS2GU6T7y7S R^ VICTOR, CHARLES I/O VICTOR, CHARLES 1978 CHEVROLET PU VINCLN1488202S38 WO ALKIRK, SHARON L. UDALXIRE, SHARON U lASJIEPinUNCLER vm ij4rvaiarBMc7 RA)UNK uovtm 1986 PONTIAC GRAND i AM VIN 1G2NV27UX;C547417 R/O HUERCO, ANN MARIE UO HUERGO, ANN MAKIE 1987 FORD RANGER VIN IFTBR10AXHUB5945 RAO SOTO, ERIC I/O SOTO, ERIC 1989 CHRYSLER NEW YORK VIN IC3B6697KDS06557 R/O JOHNSON, JERMAINER R. L/O HI DESERT RV 197S FORD VAN VIN E14HHA04723 R/O DANIEL, GREGORY L/O DANIEL, GREGORY 1986 ItftSSAN SENTRA VIN JN1PBISS76U19836 R/OSLKIGHER, FRANCIS J. L/OSLICgHER, FRANCIS J. 1998 KAWASAKI M8CC VIN JKAEXVD12WA840M4 WO DVMLAD, FREEDOM UO DUMLAO, FREEDOM 1994 SUZUKI KATINA VIN JS1GR78AXR21 RAO COOK, STEPHEN L/O COOK, STEPHEN 198S PORD RANOn VIN 1ITBRIOA1FUB45837 RA) HARDY, MICHAEL L/O TEN P|N AUTO SALES ~ 1987 FORD TEMfO VIN 1FAMP33S2HK250476 RA>VASQUEZ, RAMIREZ L/O VASQUEZ, RAMIREZ 1976 DODGE PU VIN W14REJS235625 WO MOORE, RICHEY ALAN UO MOORE, RICHEY ALAN The Vfhicles dcsfriht-d ubtive will he mild at a public auclion to the hlght'sl hiddrr l latLsfy llir llcii iiK-urred by WALKER TOWING 2398 Silvrrwiild Dr. Hcndrnuin, NV ,m May 28,1999. Autiiim xrill he htid ut KhlNljm. We i-esi-rve the riglil l. KG AL NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITOR AND OTHERS CONCERNED Pursuant to Chapter408, Nevada Revised Statutes, notice Is hereby givin that on May 5, 1999, Contract No. 2888 between Las Vegas Paving Corporation and the State of Nevada, for construction of a portion of the SUte Highway System on US V3 irom Buchanan Boulevard In Boulder City to 1.7 kilometers east of Lakeshore Road, Clark County, Project No. SPF-093-l(9) was accepted. All creditors having claims against this contract must file their ciaiirns within thirty (30) days after acceptantx of said contract. Information relative to the manner of filing claims may be ol>tained from the Administrative Services Officer, telephone number 775-888-7070. THOMAS E. STEPHENS, P.E., DIRECTOR Nevada Department of Transportation Carson City, Nevada 89712 H—May 11,13,18,20,1999 LEGAL NOTICE You are hereby notified that you are now delinquent in the payment of rent due the undersi|;ned Lessor in accordance with the Lease Agreement In which you are the Lessee of the individual storage area known as F-3, 151 E. Sunset Road, Henderson, Nev. and your tenancy of said unit is hereby terminated. You are further notified that In accordance with Section 10 of said Lease Agreement, in order to satisfy the lien of the undersigned for the payment of the said rent, tJv wndrsiHicd at rtTM^t^c set Road, Henderson, Nevada will sell all of your right, title and interest in all personal property, goods, chatties and merchandise upon the premises and will apply the proceeds of the sale to the payment of the said rent and expense of sale. You may redeem the said property at any time prior to the sale by payment of the amount due. Certified IcUer dated this MAY 14,1999. THE BOAT BARN, INC. Mary V. Swadell, Lessor H—May 20,27, June 3,1999 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thattbeCityCoundl of the City of Henderson proposed by reading in title the following Ordinance at lU Regular Meeting, held May 18,1999, endUed: BILL NO. 1577 Z-1-99-A-1 Gibaon BusinessPork AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY AMENDD4G THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 15, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 62 EAST, M.D.B.AM., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA. FROM IG-MP (GENERAL INDUSTRUL WITH MASTER DEVELOPMENT PLAN OVERLAY) DISTRICT AND PREVIOUS CLARK COUNTY INDUSTRIAL ZONING DESIGNATION TO IG-MP (GENERAL INDUSTRIAL WITH MASTER DEVELOPMENT PLAN OVERLAY) DISTRICT, LOCATEDSOUTH OF AMERICAN PACmC DRIVE. IN THE GIBSON SPRINGS PLANNING AREA. AND OTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO. which hai been referred to a CoaBittcc of tkc Cowidl M a Whole for study and recomiBieiidatioa laod a am at laid OrtUiMM* hat bMn Wed with the CUy CWrfc far general public tcmtiny. Tht Caaunittec Meeting wUI be held June 1, 1999, at 6:45 pjB. The Council will coolidcr thii Ordinance for adoption at the Regular Metta| r the City Ca—cJI Ml Jnc 1,199t md^mj caae WH adopt ur r^iact tUi OrdhMMc wRMo 38 #yi. DATED My IS, 1999 md puMMw d Moy 38, 1999, hi UK imiavivOT • • • • ( f^vwi* VMi*M.SkHMW O^Ckrli H— Moya8.lW Thursday, May 20,1999 HMKtoraon Home Nw Page 17 LEGAL LEGAL LEGAL PubUc Auction Notice b hereby given that in accordance with NeVada Revised StRtntes 1(M.473-108.4783, the contents of the folkiwtaig storage oniti will be soU on M^r 28th, 1999 at 9KN> AM at A AAA Storage (AAA MtaiiWarehaiiMS) 1601 Athol A ve, Henderson, NV to latMy delinqucntrent and fees. 25 Jerry & Tammy Gibson #138 ^ #157 *163 #165 #175 #38 Gcrrc Forest #47 Linda Boyard #51 AUso Woody #94 Mary Prtgmorc #99 Antboinr Slieniore #111 John Gottcrer #115 andy Fletcher Regiiter at office by 8:30 AM. Payments to be made in cash on date of trie. Uniti to be vocoted by 8:00 PM. H—May 13.20,1999. David Jackson Sandra Bong Edward Nevaui Roxanne Charlto* Debbie Bemal #190/191 George Rogan #243 MkJuwl Crooks LEGAL NOTICE BEFORE THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION OF NEVADA >In Re Filing by NEVADA POWER ; ^"^"^ COMPANY of a proposed distribution tariff pursuant to the Order issued in Docket No. 97-8001. Docket No. 99-2009 NOTICE OF SUPPLEMENTAL TARIFF OLING AND NOTICE OF HEARING Nevada Power Company ("NPC") has Hied with the Public Utilities Commission of Nevada ("Commission") a suppleniciit to the proposed Uriff already designated as DMActNo. 99-2009. This fUing consists of proposed revisions to Rule 9 (Bne extensions) and Rule 15 (ParaUel Generation by End-Use Customers) and supplements NPC's filing of Februory 2, 1999 In this docket, In whkh it proposed nonprice terms and conditions for distribution service. In this filing, NPC proposes the terms and conditions under which it intends to accept requests for new physical connections (Rule 9) fhmi distribution customers or those end-use customers eligible to order facilities or construction under the proposed tivifr. NPC also proposes the provisions whkh will govern operation by an end-use customer of generating fadHties in parallel with NPC's distribution system (Rule 15). The proposed tarifb were filed pursuant to the provisions oTChopten 703 and 704 ofNRS and NAC and are on file and available for viewing by the publk at the offices of the Commission, 1150 Eost WlUiam Street, Carson City, Nevada 89701 ond the Sawyer Office BulMIng, 555 East Washington Avenue. Suite 4500, Las Vegas, Nevada 89101. Persons with a tlirect and substantial Interest in the tariffs may file Petitions for Leave to Intervene in conformance with the Commissk>n's regulations at either of the Commission's offices on or before Wednesday, June 2, 1999. Interested persons may submit Protests which conform with the Commission's regulations or other written comments at either of the Commisskin's offices. Persons already granted intervenor sUtus In Docket No. 99-2009 need not file addithmal petitions. In occordonce with the Stipulation executed by parties to this motter on or about April 15,1999 (and accepted by the Commission as reflected in its Interim Order issued April 22, 1999), if a stipulation on this supplement is not reached by June 11.1999. NPC shall file prepared testimony In support of these proposed tariffs no later than June 11, 1999; prepared testimony of intervenors is to be filed no later than June 28.1999. The Commission has legal authority and Jurisdiction to conduct a HEARING on thb filing pursuant to the provisions of imS 704.110 and 704.120. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Commission has scheduled a hearing as follows: MONDAY, JULY 12,1999 10:00 a.m. Office of the Publk UtillUes Commissk>n Sawyer Office Building 555 East Washington AvMMC '' l i i t lW i':"iair<|>^Ne9>dk^l81>'^^v^-^av • I • ^ • ,,. at which time interested persons may appear and be heard. The hearing may continue from day to day as necessary. At this thne, the Commission has scheduled July 12 and 13,1999 for this hearing. In accordance with the provisions of NRS 704.110,704.120, and the regulation on distribution service tarlflli adopted by the Commisston In Docket No. 97-8001 on November 13,1998, the Commisston will consMer evklence pertainiim to whether the proposed tariffs (Rules 9 and 15 only) conform with the regulation or whether the proposed tarUih should be found unjust, unreasonable or ui\Justly discriminatory, preferential, or otherwise In violation of any of the provisions of Chapter 704 of NRS. At the hcoring, the Oommisslon may also consider other issues related to the provi8k>ns of Chapters 703 and 704 of NRS and NAC, may discuss public comments, and may make ilecisieiis on the procedural and sul>stantive issues raised at heiuing. The Commissk>n may vole at the hearing to accept or reject, in whole or in part, the tariffs filed by NPC, or to take such other action as it deems appropriate under the circumstances. This notice has been postedns Act of 1996. Thb filing was designated by the Commbsion as Docket No. 99-4062. Interested and affected persons may obtain a copy of the Agreement from the Commissitm, and may flk comments pertaining to thb Agreement at either of the Commission's ofnces on or before Tuesday, June 1,1999. Any comments must be simultaneously served on the Commission, parties to the Agreement the Regulatory Operations Staff, and the Attorney General's Bureau of Consumer Protection-Utility Consumers' Advocate. In response to the comments filed on or before June 1,1999, the Joint Petitioners may file reply comments and legal arguments on or Iwforc Wednesday, June 16,1999. The Commission lms Jurisdiction over thb matter and legal authority to conduct proceedings punoant toChopters 703 and 704 of the Nevada Revbed Stetutes ("NRS^') and the Nevada Adminbtrative Code ("NAC) and. In partkular, NRS 704.040 and 704.120, and 47 U.S.C. {252(e). NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a publk HEARING In the above matter will be held as folMws: MONDAY, JULY 19,1999 10:00 a.m. Hearing Room B Publk Utilities Commbsion of Nevado Sawyer BuiMIng 555 East Washington Avenue, Suite 4500 Las Vegas, Nevodia at which time interested persons may appear and be heard. Pursuant to NRS 703 J20, if the Commisskm does not receive any adverse commenb regording the Agreement or a request for hearing by June 1,1999, the hearing will be canceled. Pursuant lo 47 UJS.C. S252(e) and NRS 704.120, the Commbsion will receive evidence pertaining to Ihe issues rabed by the comments that are filed and any response by Joint Petitioners regarding any dispute over the terms and conditions of the Agreement Pursuant to 47 U.S.C. S252(2)(A), the Commbsion may only reject a negotiated agreement, or any portitm thereof, if It fintb that (i) the agreement discriminates against a telecommunkatlons carrier not a party to the agreement; or (ii) the impkmentation of such agreement is not consistent with the publk Interest, convenience, and necessity. Interested and affected members of the public may also comment at the hearing. Al the hearing, the Commission may also consider issues related to the provisions of 47 U.S.C. !S251 and 252, Chapters 703 and 704 of the NRS and NAC, may dbcuss publk comments, and may make decisions on the procedural and substantive issues rabed at the hearing. Thereafter, the Commission may vote to approve or dbapprove, in whok or in part. Joint Petitioners' Agreement The Agreement b available for public viewing al the offices of the Commission: 1150 F.ast William Street Carson City, Nevada 89701 and Ihe Sawyer BuiMIng, 555 East Washington Avenue, Suite 4500, Las Vegas, Nevada 89101. Thb notice has been posted at the county courthouses In Carson City, Reno, and Las Vegas. By Ihe Commission, lil Jeimne Reynolds JEANNE REYNOLDS, Commbsion Secrctery Dated: Carson City, Nevada 5-19-99 (SEAL) H—May 20,1999 HENDERSON COLD STORAGE VACATION VACII M "" Of MiNxrn mojKT WTi IF UPON SUCH HEARING, the ChyCiTfl Of MddCltvof BRENT Hcadersoab satisfied that the pabMcwM Mi be maMfQl^-f-t:^ S b^Jnrcd by luch proposed vocatioa, the above-described right-of-way will be vacated. DATED May 17, 1999, ond Pubibfacd hi the Hendcraoa Newi on May 2t, 1999. /^StephonkOoks for Mooka M. SlmoMoo. City Clerfc H—May 28.1999 LEGAL NOTICE WALKER TOWING, A ROADONE CO. 2398SILVERWOLFDR. HENDERSON, NV 89015 FAX 702-565-7619 70^55-6220 NOTICE OF SALE Notice b hereby given lo the last Rcgbtercd and Legal Owner of: 1998 FORD ESCORT VIN 3FAKP1I35WR185812 B/O MILLER. EDWARD D/ VUMFARDOE. L/O FORD CREDIT TITLING TRUST 1970 TOYOTA PU vm RN23027658 R/O SMITH, DAVID SMITH, DAVID BRENT 1983 HONDA CIVIC VIN JHMSL5324DSt23669 WO TILLMAN, PAUL W CAROLYNC LA> NEVADA FCU 1988 FORD ESCORT VIN 1FAPP93J4JW3S2M3 WO BORCHERS, BILLIE JO BORCHERS, JAMES C L/O BORCHERS. BILLIE K) BORCHERS, JAMES J. 1989 MERCURY SABLE VIN IMBUUBUIKAMMV R/O TEPPER, JOSEPH L/O TEPPER, JOSEPH 1982 NISSAN MAXIMA VIN JN1SU01S4CT016138 R/OGREENE, VALLAPHA L)GREENE,VALLAPHA 1999 HONDA ACCORD VIN 1HGCG1651XA013797 R/O BANK OF AMERICA L/O BANK OF AMERICA 1989 MAZDA 626 VIN JMIGD2220K1732655 R/O HOLLINGSHEAD, RALPH E HOLLINGSHEAD, MARK E. L/O HOLLINGSHEAD, RALPH E. HOLLINGSHEAD, MARK S. 19r HONDA PRELUDE VINJHMBA3246HC027137 WO TAFOYA, JOE R. JR. L/O TAFOYA, JOE R. JR. 1974 FORD MAVERICK VIN 4K31FS5832 R/O WILLIAMS, WILLIAM L/O WILLIAMS, WIL UAM TbcVchklcs described above wBIbesaMatapnUkoMtlaa lathe Mgkart Mdvtosoilrfy the lien Incurred by WALKER TOWING. 2398 S U i tt oog Dr., HMderaam NVsajMK IL19M. Anctioa wfll be hiM at l:8a,m. We ft-Moar 3 rTj—e 3,19i> rv' '^ "^ir'^"*'*-" IMtfM

PAGE 18

•,* • .," • • • • (;' <;-^v 77^^!T5S?^^^^sW9PiW^^i^'"W^W^^ i^v^^^P Pag* 18 Handwson Home News Thursday, May 20, 1999 Dooley cookbook for sale The Dooley Elementary School PTA cookbook, "Dooley Delectables" has been published Recipes of students, staff and friends of'the school are detailed. The cost is $10 with all proceeds benefiting the school. The school is at 1940 Chickasaw. Lodge to honor students The Dhahran Daylight Lodge 55 will honor two students from each of Henderson's high schools for excellence in citizenship today. The awards program will begin at 2 p.m. at the Mt. Moriah Masonic Temple, 480 Greenway Road. Clark County School District Superintendent Brian Cram has accepted an invitiation to speak at the event. Mack kindergarten sign-ups ^ Two elementary schools will host kindergarten sign-ups in the next week. ^ • Sewell Elementary School, 700 E. Lake Mead Dr., will register children from 9 to' 11 a.m. and from 1 to 2 p.m. Thursday, May 27. Call 799-8940. Immunizations will be available free of charge. • Mack Elementary School, 3170 Laurel Dr., will host its kindergarten registration on Tuesday, May 25. Call 799-87760 for more information. Mack ES is a year-round elementary school. Tracks 1, 3 and 4 will be available for kindergarten placement. Students with last names beginning with A through H should register from 8 to 9 a.m., 1 through P from 9 to 10 a.m. and Q through Z from 10 to 11 a.m. Nevada State Law requires a child to be 5 years old on or before Sept. 30, to attend kindergarten. To register a child, a parents or guardian will need their birth certificate, immunization record and two proofs of address. Credit Counseling Center marks opening Credit Counseling Centers of Southern Nevada recently held a grand opening for its Henderson office, 309 W. Lake Mead Drive, Suite B. CCC is a division of Family Counseling Service of Northern Nevada in Reno and is a nonprofit United Way supported agency. CCC, a ember of the National Foundation for Consumer Credit, provides a debit management program and consumer credit education for persons that are over-extended in credit/ debit or who need help managing their personal finances, Manager Geoff Quillen said that credit counselors offers free evaluations of personal finances and recommend a course of action. Appointments are encouraged, 564-2080. THIS MONTH AT THE CONVENTION CENTER American Indian Jewelry & Art Show May 28; 2 p.m. -10 p.m. May 29, noon 9 p.m. May 30, 2 p.m. 7 p.m. Scrappin Safari II June 11-12, 9 a.m. 6 p.m. Wild West Gun Show June 19, 9 a.m. 5 p.m. June 20, 9 a.m. 4 p.m. Becker 60th anniversary Frank and Elma Becker celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary with a Mass of thanksgiving and renewal of vows at St. Peter the Apostle Church. The couple, eight-year residents of Henderson, were married May 1 in 1939, at Gesu Church in Milwaukee. Their four children attended together with their spouses and a large number of their offspring, the children are Rita, Henderson; Thomas, Biloxi, Miss.; Frank, Camarillo, Calif.; and Michael, Renton, Wash. In addition, nephews and nieces gathered for the occasion from many points in e country. Two sisters of Mr. Becker came from Wisconsin, Evelyn, age 92, Fond du Lac!?*and Margaret, 80, Milwaukee; Cecile Becker, 87, a sister-in-law who lives in Henderson, also attended with her family. Following the church ceremony the group gathered at the social hall at St. Peter's for reminiscing. Some of them hadn't seen each other for some 50 years. In the evening, 59 of them also attended the dinner and show at the Excalibur Hotel and Casino. The anniversary couple moved here from Utah where Mr. Becker had retired from U.S. Steel Corp. emd Mi^Beckejp from an advertising positioh at "ft n"eWspapfeT.' 4 I I W Elma and Frank Beck6r OUR MISSION STATEMENT Henderson Home News is dedicated to delivering its readers wiiY news and information fairly and accurately. The News' ultimate goaf is to uncover the stories which affect readers the most and relay those stories to the public. This mission is achieved by realizing we are not only reporting on the community, but understanding we are a part of the community. > Read Your News in the News'^ The Henderson Home News is publishedieVery l\iesday and Thursday containing the NCWK^ — you need to know: • LcKal Government and Planning — • Community Events -. j; • ,'. • • Pohce and Fire Reports • In-Depth Features • Educational News • High SchtK>l and Youth Sports • Classifieds • Senior News 435-7700 Subscribe Today — Pay Later! And receive Q 2-for-1 coupon good for The Reserve's Grand Safari Buffet lafRElERVE HOTEL CASINO That's just $30 for 12 months of the Henderson Home News delivered to your door every Tuesday and Thursday. Offer good for new subscribers only. NameL Signature: Address:. Ctty/State:. Zip Code; Telephone: Return to: Henderson Home News, 2 Commerce Center Dr., Henderson, NV 89014 or call 435-7700 Thursday, tvlay 20, 1999 Henderson Hom Nwt Pag* 19 Courtesy Photo CREDIT COUNSELING — From left are Harold Barcus, director, CCCS, Reno; Dr. Marlene Crisslnger, executive director. Family Counseling Service, Reno; Louise Curtis, board member. Family Counseling Service, Reno; Dr. Ron Meek, Henderton Chamber of Commerce; Geoff Quillen, manager, CCC, Henderson; Myra Davis, director. Catholic Charities; Barbara Jager, Henderson Chamber of Commerce; Roxanne Glass, Henderson Chamber of Commerce; and Kirk Douglas, Henderson Chamber of Commerce. Desert Pcttio Furniture &: IS/lirrors Check. Out These Cost Saving Specials! START AT 149 START AT 179 START AT 5 piece set from $299 Umbrella Extra 5 piece set from $399 Umtrella Extra 5 piece set from $499 Umbrella Extra 4 Contemporary Chairs. Custiions & 36" Table 4 Dinette Chairs, Cushions & 42" Table 4 Club Chairs Cushions 4 48" Table Chaise Lounges Recliner & Ottoman Umbrellas ^ ^ Wall 8'wx8' $449 with two 1/4 panels and three 2" overlays at seams Custom Decorator Mirrors from $99^^^ Mirror Gallerv in Showrooms • FREE ESTIMATES MIRRORS PURCHASE $500 OR MORE OF FURNITURE AND RECEIVE A 5% D1SC0UN| 704 W. Sunset #C2 Newest Location m (Betwee(/US95 &Bldr. Hwy)0) 566-6363 M SUNSET N A BONANZA 2125 W* Bonanza (Exit US95 at Rancho N on Rancho • Right on Bonanza • 1 bik on Right) 631-3133 Also see our Patio Cover & BBO Island Displays lOom 6pfn "'o 3 Mon Sot ,,,„ —X~ 3 Horn-5pm ""* ^ Sunday You Con Do It!... Fractions, odd subtract by Dill Honlon bhanlon(3>accessnv.com Before we can add or subtract fractions, we liave to be able to find a common denominator. A common denominator (CD) is just a number that all otfier denominators will divide into equally. The reason we need a CD is so when we add~^ fractions, we can write a denominator that tells us how many equal pieces rrtake one whole unit. While there are many ways of finding a common denominator, we will just look at two. 3 i r 1 Finding common denominators 1. Multiply the denominators together. Example Find the common denominator for 1/5 an 2/7. Multiplying. 5x7 = 35. The CD is 35." For larger denominators or numbers you are not as familiar, try this method. 2. Write the denominators as a fraction, reduce, and cross multiply. Example Rnd the common denominator for 7/20 and 5/32. Write the denominators as a fractbn and reduce. 32 8 Notice that 32 X 5 160 as is 8 X 20. The common denominator is 160. Piece of cake, don't you thinit? Now, we can add fractions. HI asked you t(Tadd 1/4 to 1/3, would the result be 2/7? Remember, the numerator tells you how many EQUAL pieces you have, the denominator tells you how many EQUAL pieces make one w^K>le unit. Looking at the foik>wing picture, we can see that's fK)t happening, so the artswer is NO, We can clearly see the pieces are not equal. So we make more cuts on the cake to make equal pieces, that's called finding a common denominator. 1_ 3_ 4 ^^_l ^^^ i — \ \ 11 1 1 1 By making the additional cuts, all the pieces are equal. Now I can add the numerators to find out how many equal pieces I hiave and bring down the denominator so I know how many equal pieces are in one whole unit. To do that without drawing a prcture, we use the folktwing algorithm. APrVSUBPRACTTOMS 1. Find the common denominator 2. Make equivalent fractk>ns 3. Add/Sub the numerators 4. Bring down the denominator 5. Reduce Example 3/5 > 1/4 35 1_ r 20 _5_ 20 20 Understanding why this works and menKXizing the algorithm are ecfually important to your future success. www.lvcyt}emnal.conVmeithsystems fl/7/ Hanlon is Math/Science Institute Coordinator for the Clark County School District and a part-time math instructor at UNLV. 1997 HBC Publications. Henderson Home News State action Lee Zaichick/News Staff ;r • • •, • r ^ • • • '' • >' • 'V^' SENIOR CELEBRATION — Julia Yurek [far left], TiffanI Finateri [middle] and Laura Connors lead the celebration after Silverado beat Durango to win zone this past weekend. The three seniors along with April Arata are playing in their fourth state tournament^this weekend in Reno. Skyhawks believe tliis is tlieir year Ray Brewer News Sports Editor After finishing fourth in the 1996 state Softball tournament, ^ Silverado coach Chuck Pope first realized his team had the potential to do something special. The '96 squad received solid contributions from four sophomores — April Arata, Laura Connors, Tiffani Finateri and Julia Yurek — in giving Pope a glimpse of what he perceived as a bright future. Some two years later the same core of players along with senior Stormy Hanson (who transferred from Rancho for the 1997 season) and a cast of other role players are back in the state spotlight. _''_' • '' • •,,.. The Skyhawks, t'resK off their fiflh straight zone championship, travel to Reno this week in search of the school's first-ever state title in any sport. Silverado will play Carson today at 4 p.m. in first round action. All the seniors agree: this year's team has the best chance to win the title — a title no southem Nevada team has won since Clark in 1993. "I just have a good feeling that we should take it," Yurek said. "I am more confident than other years... Pope has always said that this is the year we are going to take it." With Silverado going 4-0 in this past week's zone tournament and the squad putting in extra hours on the practice field. Pope has all of the confidence in the world when it comes to his team that has won 10 of its last 12 games. ^ It all boils down to Pope's philosophy that his core group of players can and will deliver as advertised. His confidence Is peaking. "When they were sophomores, I knew they had the fire," Pope said. "I knew we had six or seven,, key kids and I felt like if we wfer^ever going to win state it would be when they matured as a group of six or seven kids.", STATE SOFTBALL Galena vs Durango, noon Reed vs Bonanza, noon Wooster vs Cimarron, 2 p.m. Carson vs Silverado, 4 p.m. This maturing process — despite going through some painful growing pains earlier this season — is complete. Even though the Skyhawks ^dn't win the division title for the first time ever this season, they have picked up steam when it counts. "Everything has come together ie~ffght lime," Yufelc said. "The No. 1 thing is that this is our senior year and winning means more than anything." The dedication by the seniors is what Pope credits for the team's success. It was just at the beginning of the season when the Skyhawks lost at home to Chaparral and were forced to battle just to make the post-season. Now it's like a different team. Or at least a different attiLook at this dedication right now," Pope said, pointing to his team going through a practice drill at Tuesday's final workout of the season. "This team is going to play in state in two days and they are doing intramural drills. The kids have come a long way, further than any other team we have hadjj...They have never ^-stopped worktiig^ra." Take for example this past Saturday. The Skyhawks took their home diamond for a 9 a.m. practice hours after winning their fifth zone title in five attempts. Then, when practice was over, the players stayed for extra batting practice. • .r--r^* x..^ Track teams set for state meet Brad Tittrington News Staff Writer After three months of workouts, meets and preparation, it all comes down to this — the 1999 Nevada State Track and Field Championships. Durango High School will be filled with athletes from across the state this Friday and Saturday as they do battle to prove who is the best of the best. Afler last weekend's zone championships, the top four placers in each event have moved on now to the elite eight as they will vie for the title of state champion. Also on the line will be overall team champion where the more depth a team has, the better. The meet will be held at 4 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. Here is a look at how the the three local schools stack up. • • BASIC • • ^'^'': • ''' • :'' • • : The Wolves bring five athletes to the state meet, three boys and two girls, as well as both 3,200 relay teams. On the boys side, Rob Oslund will run the 800 and the 1,600. Oslund won the 1,600 at the zone meet and finished fourth in the 800 in leading the Wolves to an eighth place finish. ^ Nathan Juarez will run in the 1,600 at tKe state meet after finishing fourth in the event at the zone meet. Scott DeVoge will also compete in this weekend's state meet as he will run the 3,200. DeVoge finished fourth in the event at the zone meet., "They're OK," Wolves' coach Larry Burgess said. "We don't have anyone injured or sick. This week, we don't want to overtrain. We want everyone to be sharp." The boys will also compete in the 3,200 relay, an event they hold the fastest time in the state in this year. The team See TRACK Page 22 Swimming teams can't win in n See SOFTBALL .;1;I.;Page 21 Ray Brewer News Sports Editor With northern Nevada swim teams dominating each event in terms of numbers, southern Nevada teams have turned their goals in another direction for Saturday's 4A state meet — scheduled for 9 a.m. at UNLV. Sure, a team state title would be nice. But as Silverado coach Tara Crouch and Green Valley coach Joe Sill explain, it's unrealistic. Crouch's boys team and Sill's girls team each captured zone titles this past weekend. Still, both teams didn't qualify enough swimmers to compete with the northern powers in terms of depth for this weekend's meet. "We would like to place in the top three of the boys and we hope that is realistic," Crouch said. t'.'T Sill has the same outlook. "From the very beginning of the season our goal has been a top See SWIMMING Page 21 r ON THE SIDELINES ALLEN 'Jl. r.''-..^^r,' GV's athletic program passes the torch to Cim-Memorial Winning on the athletic field does a lot of things for a high school. It builds confidence. It builds pride. It buiWs... jealously. Nobody cares about beating the league's doormat team. No, it's the leader of the pack everyone shoots for — and rightfully so. Just ask any Green Valley High School student who has participated in prep sports over the past eight years. During that time, the Gators have reigned atop not only the Sunrise Division, but the entire Southern Conference — in nearly every sport. And they did it while everyone was out to beat them. Whether it was Rodger Fairless leading his baseball squad to six straight state titles or Joe Sill's boys and girls swimming teams going unbeaten year after year, the Gators were more than just competitive across the board. Golf, volleyball, basketball, softball, track, crosscountry, wrestlmg, football, soccer. It didn't matter the sport, it didn't nietter the gender. Just one look at the Sunriae Division standings or conference meet outcomes and you could bet your last dollar you'd find the Henderson school at or near the top. Through the mid-19908, no school in southern Nevada could compere its athletic prowess to that of Green Valley. None. But. ^ke it is said, all things must end. By no means are the Gators done, as they still are one of the most successful schools athletically in the valley. However, when it comes to the pinnacle of local prep sports, you have to look across the valley to a school resembling that of GVHS — in more ways than one. • Cimarron-Mehiorial High School opened for the 1991-92 school year, just like Green Valley. Just like Green Valley, it was the first school near a master-planned community. Summerlin. (Ironically, GVHS is not actuall/ located in Green Valley and CMHS is not located in Summerlin.) But unlike Green Valley, it took the Spartan athletic program a couple more years to hit its peak. But peak it did — and particularly in the so-called '^lyor' male sports this year. Unbelievably, the Spartans have won the 1998-99 4A sUte titles in football, basketball and wTMtling. And this weekend, they will try to add baseball to that list after winning the zone title last Saturday. That's an accomphshment not even the mif^ty Green Valley Gators can m.iuli. "It's all about two things," said CMHS athletic administrator Faron Springer about his teams' success this past school year. "It's the kids you have and the coaches you have. These ane the things that attribute to success, especially across the board." Like at Green Valley in the mid-908, the entire school is feeling the effects of athletic champions. "There's a lot of pride," said Springer, who coached at Basic four years ago ami lives in the Silverado zone. "You build pride through tradition. We're establishing a tradition here for years to come." It sounds a lot like a school we know here in Henderson, doesn't it? More than you know. Due to growth in the area, beginning next year Cim-Memorial's boundaries will be set. Centennial High opens to the northwest of the school and will take away from the school's last remaining growth area. Two years ago, Palo Verde opened to alleviate pressure from the other side of the community. Deja vu? Next year. Foothill High will open in Henderson which will mean Green Valle/s boundaries will be completely surrounded by Basic, Chaparral and two newer schools. Foothill and Silverado. Who would have ever thought that in 1999 Green Valley and Cim-Memorial could be referred to as inner-city schools? The fact is, times change. And they will continue to. Five years from now, we might be talking about the reign of Silverado or the emergence of powerhouses such as Foothill and Centennial. But for now, it's Cim-Memorial which is at the top of the heap, the team everyone else shoots for. Green Valley has stepped aside from that role. A role it has played since nearly the inception of the Henderson school. And while the championships may not come as plentiful for the green and blue, the memories will always remain. For Green Valley's athletic program was southern Nevada's most prominent program of the decade. And that's an honor not even the red-hot Spartans can take home this year. D.J.'i Game NolM — TTe City of Herxlerson's basketball team came in second place during this year's Corporate Challer>ge — but it was a more than respectat>d The team conststing of Brent Ashton. Barry BtaEcard. Rob Brisendina Oriana Chriatlan. Matt Hudgins Branon Jonaa. D'aurta Moalcy arxj MIka Taeel lost in the finals to the Bartary Coast, which was led by former Cheyenne HS and UNLV point guard 6hancallor Oevto and former Georgetown Hoya Irvin Church Oh Tuewtay, the News named Ray Brawar sports editor. Brewer has been with the Mews as a aportt rapoftar lor naarty three year* and is ready tor the chaNanga. I think you'N er^ some of the things he has planned for this Allen IS advertising nF>an8ger for the Henderson Horr>e fsiews. He can be reached at snensofnvOao(.com.

PAGE 19

•,* • .," • • • • (;' <;-^v 77^^!T5S?^^^^sW9PiW^^i^'"W^W^^ i^v^^^P Pag* 18 Handwson Home News Thursday, May 20, 1999 Dooley cookbook for sale The Dooley Elementary School PTA cookbook, "Dooley Delectables" has been published Recipes of students, staff and friends of'the school are detailed. The cost is $10 with all proceeds benefiting the school. The school is at 1940 Chickasaw. Lodge to honor students The Dhahran Daylight Lodge 55 will honor two students from each of Henderson's high schools for excellence in citizenship today. The awards program will begin at 2 p.m. at the Mt. Moriah Masonic Temple, 480 Greenway Road. Clark County School District Superintendent Brian Cram has accepted an invitiation to speak at the event. Mack kindergarten sign-ups ^ Two elementary schools will host kindergarten sign-ups in the next week. ^ • Sewell Elementary School, 700 E. Lake Mead Dr., will register children from 9 to' 11 a.m. and from 1 to 2 p.m. Thursday, May 27. Call 799-8940. Immunizations will be available free of charge. • Mack Elementary School, 3170 Laurel Dr., will host its kindergarten registration on Tuesday, May 25. Call 799-87760 for more information. Mack ES is a year-round elementary school. Tracks 1, 3 and 4 will be available for kindergarten placement. Students with last names beginning with A through H should register from 8 to 9 a.m., 1 through P from 9 to 10 a.m. and Q through Z from 10 to 11 a.m. Nevada State Law requires a child to be 5 years old on or before Sept. 30, to attend kindergarten. To register a child, a parents or guardian will need their birth certificate, immunization record and two proofs of address. Credit Counseling Center marks opening Credit Counseling Centers of Southern Nevada recently held a grand opening for its Henderson office, 309 W. Lake Mead Drive, Suite B. CCC is a division of Family Counseling Service of Northern Nevada in Reno and is a nonprofit United Way supported agency. CCC, a ember of the National Foundation for Consumer Credit, provides a debit management program and consumer credit education for persons that are over-extended in credit/ debit or who need help managing their personal finances, Manager Geoff Quillen said that credit counselors offers free evaluations of personal finances and recommend a course of action. Appointments are encouraged, 564-2080. THIS MONTH AT THE CONVENTION CENTER American Indian Jewelry & Art Show May 28; 2 p.m. -10 p.m. May 29, noon 9 p.m. May 30, 2 p.m. 7 p.m. Scrappin Safari II June 11-12, 9 a.m. 6 p.m. Wild West Gun Show June 19, 9 a.m. 5 p.m. June 20, 9 a.m. 4 p.m. Becker 60th anniversary Frank and Elma Becker celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary with a Mass of thanksgiving and renewal of vows at St. Peter the Apostle Church. The couple, eight-year residents of Henderson, were married May 1 in 1939, at Gesu Church in Milwaukee. Their four children attended together with their spouses and a large number of their offspring, the children are Rita, Henderson; Thomas, Biloxi, Miss.; Frank, Camarillo, Calif.; and Michael, Renton, Wash. In addition, nephews and nieces gathered for the occasion from many points in e country. Two sisters of Mr. Becker came from Wisconsin, Evelyn, age 92, Fond du Lac!?*and Margaret, 80, Milwaukee; Cecile Becker, 87, a sister-in-law who lives in Henderson, also attended with her family. Following the church ceremony the group gathered at the social hall at St. Peter's for reminiscing. Some of them hadn't seen each other for some 50 years. In the evening, 59 of them also attended the dinner and show at the Excalibur Hotel and Casino. The anniversary couple moved here from Utah where Mr. Becker had retired from U.S. Steel Corp. emd Mi^Beckejp from an advertising positioh at "ft n"eWspapfeT.' 4 I I W Elma and Frank Beck6r OUR MISSION STATEMENT Henderson Home News is dedicated to delivering its readers wiiY news and information fairly and accurately. The News' ultimate goaf is to uncover the stories which affect readers the most and relay those stories to the public. This mission is achieved by realizing we are not only reporting on the community, but understanding we are a part of the community. > Read Your News in the News'^ The Henderson Home News is publishedieVery l\iesday and Thursday containing the NCWK^ — you need to know: • LcKal Government and Planning — • Community Events -. j; • ,'. • • Pohce and Fire Reports • In-Depth Features • Educational News • High SchtK>l and Youth Sports • Classifieds • Senior News 435-7700 Subscribe Today — Pay Later! And receive Q 2-for-1 coupon good for The Reserve's Grand Safari Buffet lafRElERVE HOTEL CASINO That's just $30 for 12 months of the Henderson Home News delivered to your door every Tuesday and Thursday. Offer good for new subscribers only. NameL Signature: Address:. Ctty/State:. Zip Code; Telephone: Return to: Henderson Home News, 2 Commerce Center Dr., Henderson, NV 89014 or call 435-7700 Thursday, tvlay 20, 1999 Henderson Hom Nwt Pag* 19 Courtesy Photo CREDIT COUNSELING — From left are Harold Barcus, director, CCCS, Reno; Dr. Marlene Crisslnger, executive director. Family Counseling Service, Reno; Louise Curtis, board member. Family Counseling Service, Reno; Dr. Ron Meek, Henderton Chamber of Commerce; Geoff Quillen, manager, CCC, Henderson; Myra Davis, director. Catholic Charities; Barbara Jager, Henderson Chamber of Commerce; Roxanne Glass, Henderson Chamber of Commerce; and Kirk Douglas, Henderson Chamber of Commerce. Desert Pcttio Furniture &: IS/lirrors Check. Out These Cost Saving Specials! START AT 149 START AT 179 START AT 5 piece set from $299 Umbrella Extra 5 piece set from $399 Umtrella Extra 5 piece set from $499 Umbrella Extra 4 Contemporary Chairs. Custiions & 36" Table 4 Dinette Chairs, Cushions & 42" Table 4 Club Chairs Cushions 4 48" Table Chaise Lounges Recliner & Ottoman Umbrellas ^ ^ Wall 8'wx8' $449 with two 1/4 panels and three 2" overlays at seams Custom Decorator Mirrors from $99^^^ Mirror Gallerv in Showrooms • FREE ESTIMATES MIRRORS PURCHASE $500 OR MORE OF FURNITURE AND RECEIVE A 5% D1SC0UN| 704 W. Sunset #C2 Newest Location m (Betwee(/US95 &Bldr. Hwy)0) 566-6363 M SUNSET N A BONANZA 2125 W* Bonanza (Exit US95 at Rancho N on Rancho • Right on Bonanza • 1 bik on Right) 631-3133 Also see our Patio Cover & BBO Island Displays lOom 6pfn "'o 3 Mon Sot ,,,„ —X~ 3 Horn-5pm ""* ^ Sunday You Con Do It!... Fractions, odd subtract by Dill Honlon bhanlon(3>accessnv.com Before we can add or subtract fractions, we liave to be able to find a common denominator. A common denominator (CD) is just a number that all otfier denominators will divide into equally. The reason we need a CD is so when we add~^ fractions, we can write a denominator that tells us how many equal pieces rrtake one whole unit. While there are many ways of finding a common denominator, we will just look at two. 3 i r 1 Finding common denominators 1. Multiply the denominators together. Example Find the common denominator for 1/5 an 2/7. Multiplying. 5x7 = 35. The CD is 35." For larger denominators or numbers you are not as familiar, try this method. 2. Write the denominators as a fraction, reduce, and cross multiply. Example Rnd the common denominator for 7/20 and 5/32. Write the denominators as a fractbn and reduce. 32 8 Notice that 32 X 5 160 as is 8 X 20. The common denominator is 160. Piece of cake, don't you thinit? Now, we can add fractions. HI asked you t(Tadd 1/4 to 1/3, would the result be 2/7? Remember, the numerator tells you how many EQUAL pieces you have, the denominator tells you how many EQUAL pieces make one w^K>le unit. Looking at the foik>wing picture, we can see that's fK)t happening, so the artswer is NO, We can clearly see the pieces are not equal. So we make more cuts on the cake to make equal pieces, that's called finding a common denominator. 1_ 3_ 4 ^^_l ^^^ i — \ \ 11 1 1 1 By making the additional cuts, all the pieces are equal. Now I can add the numerators to find out how many equal pieces I hiave and bring down the denominator so I know how many equal pieces are in one whole unit. To do that without drawing a prcture, we use the folktwing algorithm. APrVSUBPRACTTOMS 1. Find the common denominator 2. Make equivalent fractk>ns 3. Add/Sub the numerators 4. Bring down the denominator 5. Reduce Example 3/5 > 1/4 35 1_ r 20 _5_ 20 20 Understanding why this works and menKXizing the algorithm are ecfually important to your future success. www.lvcyt}emnal.conVmeithsystems fl/7/ Hanlon is Math/Science Institute Coordinator for the Clark County School District and a part-time math instructor at UNLV. 1997 HBC Publications. Henderson Home News State action Lee Zaichick/News Staff ;r • • •, • r ^ • • • '' • >' • 'V^' SENIOR CELEBRATION — Julia Yurek [far left], TiffanI Finateri [middle] and Laura Connors lead the celebration after Silverado beat Durango to win zone this past weekend. The three seniors along with April Arata are playing in their fourth state tournament^this weekend in Reno. Skyhawks believe tliis is tlieir year Ray Brewer News Sports Editor After finishing fourth in the 1996 state Softball tournament, ^ Silverado coach Chuck Pope first realized his team had the potential to do something special. The '96 squad received solid contributions from four sophomores — April Arata, Laura Connors, Tiffani Finateri and Julia Yurek — in giving Pope a glimpse of what he perceived as a bright future. Some two years later the same core of players along with senior Stormy Hanson (who transferred from Rancho for the 1997 season) and a cast of other role players are back in the state spotlight. _''_' • '' • •,,.. The Skyhawks, t'resK off their fiflh straight zone championship, travel to Reno this week in search of the school's first-ever state title in any sport. Silverado will play Carson today at 4 p.m. in first round action. All the seniors agree: this year's team has the best chance to win the title — a title no southem Nevada team has won since Clark in 1993. "I just have a good feeling that we should take it," Yurek said. "I am more confident than other years... Pope has always said that this is the year we are going to take it." With Silverado going 4-0 in this past week's zone tournament and the squad putting in extra hours on the practice field. Pope has all of the confidence in the world when it comes to his team that has won 10 of its last 12 games. ^ It all boils down to Pope's philosophy that his core group of players can and will deliver as advertised. His confidence Is peaking. "When they were sophomores, I knew they had the fire," Pope said. "I knew we had six or seven,, key kids and I felt like if we wfer^ever going to win state it would be when they matured as a group of six or seven kids.", STATE SOFTBALL Galena vs Durango, noon Reed vs Bonanza, noon Wooster vs Cimarron, 2 p.m. Carson vs Silverado, 4 p.m. This maturing process — despite going through some painful growing pains earlier this season — is complete. Even though the Skyhawks ^dn't win the division title for the first time ever this season, they have picked up steam when it counts. "Everything has come together ie~ffght lime," Yufelc said. "The No. 1 thing is that this is our senior year and winning means more than anything." The dedication by the seniors is what Pope credits for the team's success. It was just at the beginning of the season when the Skyhawks lost at home to Chaparral and were forced to battle just to make the post-season. Now it's like a different team. Or at least a different attiLook at this dedication right now," Pope said, pointing to his team going through a practice drill at Tuesday's final workout of the season. "This team is going to play in state in two days and they are doing intramural drills. The kids have come a long way, further than any other team we have hadjj...They have never ^-stopped worktiig^ra." Take for example this past Saturday. The Skyhawks took their home diamond for a 9 a.m. practice hours after winning their fifth zone title in five attempts. Then, when practice was over, the players stayed for extra batting practice. • .r--r^* x..^ Track teams set for state meet Brad Tittrington News Staff Writer After three months of workouts, meets and preparation, it all comes down to this — the 1999 Nevada State Track and Field Championships. Durango High School will be filled with athletes from across the state this Friday and Saturday as they do battle to prove who is the best of the best. Afler last weekend's zone championships, the top four placers in each event have moved on now to the elite eight as they will vie for the title of state champion. Also on the line will be overall team champion where the more depth a team has, the better. The meet will be held at 4 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. Here is a look at how the the three local schools stack up. • • BASIC • • ^'^'': • ''' • :'' • • : The Wolves bring five athletes to the state meet, three boys and two girls, as well as both 3,200 relay teams. On the boys side, Rob Oslund will run the 800 and the 1,600. Oslund won the 1,600 at the zone meet and finished fourth in the 800 in leading the Wolves to an eighth place finish. ^ Nathan Juarez will run in the 1,600 at tKe state meet after finishing fourth in the event at the zone meet. Scott DeVoge will also compete in this weekend's state meet as he will run the 3,200. DeVoge finished fourth in the event at the zone meet., "They're OK," Wolves' coach Larry Burgess said. "We don't have anyone injured or sick. This week, we don't want to overtrain. We want everyone to be sharp." The boys will also compete in the 3,200 relay, an event they hold the fastest time in the state in this year. The team See TRACK Page 22 Swimming teams can't win in n See SOFTBALL .;1;I.;Page 21 Ray Brewer News Sports Editor With northern Nevada swim teams dominating each event in terms of numbers, southern Nevada teams have turned their goals in another direction for Saturday's 4A state meet — scheduled for 9 a.m. at UNLV. Sure, a team state title would be nice. But as Silverado coach Tara Crouch and Green Valley coach Joe Sill explain, it's unrealistic. Crouch's boys team and Sill's girls team each captured zone titles this past weekend. Still, both teams didn't qualify enough swimmers to compete with the northern powers in terms of depth for this weekend's meet. "We would like to place in the top three of the boys and we hope that is realistic," Crouch said. t'.'T Sill has the same outlook. "From the very beginning of the season our goal has been a top See SWIMMING Page 21 r ON THE SIDELINES ALLEN 'Jl. r.''-..^^r,' GV's athletic program passes the torch to Cim-Memorial Winning on the athletic field does a lot of things for a high school. It builds confidence. It builds pride. It buiWs... jealously. Nobody cares about beating the league's doormat team. No, it's the leader of the pack everyone shoots for — and rightfully so. Just ask any Green Valley High School student who has participated in prep sports over the past eight years. During that time, the Gators have reigned atop not only the Sunrise Division, but the entire Southern Conference — in nearly every sport. And they did it while everyone was out to beat them. Whether it was Rodger Fairless leading his baseball squad to six straight state titles or Joe Sill's boys and girls swimming teams going unbeaten year after year, the Gators were more than just competitive across the board. Golf, volleyball, basketball, softball, track, crosscountry, wrestlmg, football, soccer. It didn't matter the sport, it didn't nietter the gender. Just one look at the Sunriae Division standings or conference meet outcomes and you could bet your last dollar you'd find the Henderson school at or near the top. Through the mid-19908, no school in southern Nevada could compere its athletic prowess to that of Green Valley. None. But. ^ke it is said, all things must end. By no means are the Gators done, as they still are one of the most successful schools athletically in the valley. However, when it comes to the pinnacle of local prep sports, you have to look across the valley to a school resembling that of GVHS — in more ways than one. • Cimarron-Mehiorial High School opened for the 1991-92 school year, just like Green Valley. Just like Green Valley, it was the first school near a master-planned community. Summerlin. (Ironically, GVHS is not actuall/ located in Green Valley and CMHS is not located in Summerlin.) But unlike Green Valley, it took the Spartan athletic program a couple more years to hit its peak. But peak it did — and particularly in the so-called '^lyor' male sports this year. Unbelievably, the Spartans have won the 1998-99 4A sUte titles in football, basketball and wTMtling. And this weekend, they will try to add baseball to that list after winning the zone title last Saturday. That's an accomphshment not even the mif^ty Green Valley Gators can m.iuli. "It's all about two things," said CMHS athletic administrator Faron Springer about his teams' success this past school year. "It's the kids you have and the coaches you have. These ane the things that attribute to success, especially across the board." Like at Green Valley in the mid-908, the entire school is feeling the effects of athletic champions. "There's a lot of pride," said Springer, who coached at Basic four years ago ami lives in the Silverado zone. "You build pride through tradition. We're establishing a tradition here for years to come." It sounds a lot like a school we know here in Henderson, doesn't it? More than you know. Due to growth in the area, beginning next year Cim-Memorial's boundaries will be set. Centennial High opens to the northwest of the school and will take away from the school's last remaining growth area. Two years ago, Palo Verde opened to alleviate pressure from the other side of the community. Deja vu? Next year. Foothill High will open in Henderson which will mean Green Valle/s boundaries will be completely surrounded by Basic, Chaparral and two newer schools. Foothill and Silverado. Who would have ever thought that in 1999 Green Valley and Cim-Memorial could be referred to as inner-city schools? The fact is, times change. And they will continue to. Five years from now, we might be talking about the reign of Silverado or the emergence of powerhouses such as Foothill and Centennial. But for now, it's Cim-Memorial which is at the top of the heap, the team everyone else shoots for. Green Valley has stepped aside from that role. A role it has played since nearly the inception of the Henderson school. And while the championships may not come as plentiful for the green and blue, the memories will always remain. For Green Valley's athletic program was southern Nevada's most prominent program of the decade. And that's an honor not even the red-hot Spartans can take home this year. D.J.'i Game NolM — TTe City of Herxlerson's basketball team came in second place during this year's Corporate Challer>ge — but it was a more than respectat>d The team conststing of Brent Ashton. Barry BtaEcard. Rob Brisendina Oriana Chriatlan. Matt Hudgins Branon Jonaa. D'aurta Moalcy arxj MIka Taeel lost in the finals to the Bartary Coast, which was led by former Cheyenne HS and UNLV point guard 6hancallor Oevto and former Georgetown Hoya Irvin Church Oh Tuewtay, the News named Ray Brawar sports editor. Brewer has been with the Mews as a aportt rapoftar lor naarty three year* and is ready tor the chaNanga. I think you'N er^ some of the things he has planned for this Allen IS advertising nF>an8ger for the Henderson Horr>e fsiews. He can be reached at snensofnvOao(.com.

PAGE 20

J'^*' -i^if^VP^^il^^l^ wmm if Pag* 20 Henderson Horn* Newt Thursday, May 20,1999 Thursday, May 20,1999 Henderson Home News Page 21 1 LaRosa given second chance with Jays Ray Brw*r News Sports Editor Tom LaRosa has always been a pitcher that puts a lot of pressure on himself. He simply doesn't know any other way to pitch. Unfortunately for LaRosa, this pressure hasn't always equalled success. In fact, last season LaRosa had a miserable campaign with the Fort Myers Twins — Minnesota's Class A affiliate in the Florida State League. The 1993 Green Valley graduate says his bad outings started to'snowball. "I started the season out with some poor outings because I was trying to do too much," LaRosa, who was drafted by the Twins in the sixth round of the 1996 draft out of UNLV, said. "I put too much pressure on myself to succeed and I wasn't living up to my expectations." After what the Twins deemed an unproductive spring training they gave LaRosa his release. Call that the low point in LaRosa's career. "You are obviously pretty sad for yourself," LaRosa said. "You have hopes and dreams of making it to the big leagues. Then they call you in and say you can't make it with them. It's a big shot to the ego." But LaRosa learned fast that there are 29 other teams out there. The Toronto Blue Jays recently signed LaRosa, giving the righthander a second lease on Uve. Toronto sees a lot of upside in LaRosa and his talents, *Tommy has a real good arm," said Neil Allen, pitching coach for the Blue Jays' extended spring training in St. Catherine, Fla. "He has a good fastball and a real good slider. A majority ohhe time, he is consistent with his stuff and gets all of his pitches over," LaRosa is currently in extended spring training with the Blue Jays and anticipates being assigned to Double A Knoxville, Tenn., or the organization's High Single A Florida State League team. Now LaRosa -r who joins fellow Green Valley graduates Joe Orloski {1998) and Taylor Smith (1997) in the Blue Jays'systemis set to make amends for his disastrous performance with the Twins. "I look at this as a great opportunity to come in and play." LaRosa, who anticipates coming out of the bullpen," said. "I think they are going to give me a shot." It's a shot LaRosa deserves. "We think he just needs to be real consistent with all of his pitches," Allen said. "He has good stuff and will be just fine." At 23, LaRosa knows he is at his peak. "There is always a sense of urgency I put on myself," LaRosa said. "Like I said, I have high expectations for myseiC I have the ability to pitch at this level. When you feel that way about yourself, there is always an ur•gency to get things done." „, ^i. If you know of any Hendersonarea athletes currently in the minor leagues, we'd like to hear their story. Give us a call at 4357000 with the information. 503 Hotel Plaza Boulder City, NV 89005 (702) 291 G224 FAX: 2910111 Hid PrcicfM.nig.rje.vslclli.'i5 .COLOR USER COPIES Tt.iiiscr,(ilion UPSjFedtx iResumiiS .Futms Liminaliiig .Nolaiy .Binding SAY IT WITH COOKIES Edible Ccnicrpicro^. • Oiaer Edrly For The / /o/zVin • We Deliver "The Sweetest Bouquet In Town' • Cookie Bouquets For All Occasions • We Will Write Your Personal Message On Any Bouquet • We Copy Company Logos For Corporate Gifts Basic tries for repeat as volleyball champions Plione: 898-0440 • ritfi-M \ ,illc I'IAW .11 Slln'^^'t ax: 898-0794 ^t-vr— Gary ThicMan News Staff Writer Basic and Green Valley high schools qualified from the Sunrise Division for this year's southern Nevada zone tournament. The top four finishers in both the Sunrise and Sunset Divisions are selected to make a run for the title. This year's tournament will be held May 19-22 at Chaparral. Basic won its last six matches and held off an inspired Silverado team for a place in the tourney. The most important of the six matches during the streak was a win over the Skyhawks on the Wolves' home court. "The win over Silverado was a huge victory since it gave us a game up on the Skyhawks," Basic coach Darrin Puana said. "In addition to the one game lead it also gave us the tie breaker in case we ended the season with First Team Sunrise Division Nate Muaina, Basic; Niels Jensen, Green Valley; Ryan Hunt, Silverado. ~ .. Honorable Mention Brant Stewart, Basic; Derek \fuaina, Basic, Jeff Allen, Green Valley. identical records." A win over Rancho, couple with a Green Valley loss to Chaparral, the Wolves actually tied for third with the Gators, but will get a better seed because they recorded a better division record. Basic will open the tournament against Western. The Warriors finished with a 13-3 record. Basic will need a continued strong effort at the net from Nate Muaina, Doug Bowman and Aaron Swapp to keep its winning streak alive. "We can't do too much in the three days prip{ to the start of the tournament," Puana said. "The best we can hope for is to work on our timing and passing. I believe it helps us to have seen the teams we may play in the tournament." Green Valley will face Sunset Division champion Durango in its opening match. The Trailblazers went undefeated during the year, finishing with a 20-0 record. Green Valley started with five match victories; to take an early 5-1 record in the division. The Gators then ran into a mid-season slump, but finished strong winning six of their last eight matches. "Our kids had their back to the wall on several occasions, but each time they have given a good effort," Green Valley coach Carolyn Carpenter said. "I can always count on our kids to maintain a never-give-upk attitude." The Gators will rely heavily on senior setter Jeff Allen to play a big role in the tournament. They will also look to Niels Jensen, Matt Sugden, Greg Shavalier and Ean Zeller to lead the way defensively. "We have a tough opening match against Durango. However, we must focus on each match at hand and not look ahead to what may be," Carpenter said. "Our kids know that we must play at our pace with a total team effort for us to be at our best." Both Green VaiUey and Basic began plfty pn Wednei^axauwu Complete Banquet Facilities Weddings and Receptions Business Meetings and Luncheons Compan/ Holiday Parties Desert WiMovr Clubhouse on the beautiful Desert Willow Oojf Course in the (bothiys of Black Mountain 'The Best Services for the Best Prices' GroMps of 10 to 2$0 | Call 270-7037 for more information Member of Henderson Chamber of Commerce and Nevada Restaurant Association :^ ^' Copeland's Sports STEPHANIE STREET SHOPPING CENTER, HENDERSON Phono 4M 10M LOW PRICE GUARANTEE • FINANCING AVAILABLE 8oi> >toia fur duUils • 'Oil Juu/OkuJ uudll .^ff"*^ Vk_ A Lake Mead Christian Academy Is expanding enrollment! •^* • With a new 40,000 square foot building and convenient ^ •* Henderson location, private education is within reach! "PPI'llllMIJ mill I JLLENROLL^ffiNT" • • ^ Grade K -12 § f • t t • • ^ • I u yea MW*^ • Child ( • Affordable rates ^.,^-. • Traditional Christ-centered e ducation 9 month s choolJix^ • Low student-teacher ratio — .• • -\^• ':':-':/-.:, • '', • High parent involvement .:''':'': J'':-:^i'\'l-hK-7^• Member of the Association of Christian Schools International • Recognized by the NV Department of Education • Over 45 churches represented among student body • Competitive athletics: football, basketball, and morel • 10 year member of the Henderson community NOTURTHER FOR SUMMER CHOICES... Child Care |une 7 Aug. 20 • Summer School |une 21 |uly 16 • Grades K Adult • Affordable rates and a variety of programs • Core Academic Classes • Monday Friday • 8 a.m. -11:50 a.m. • Expressways to Learnings (for students with learning difficulties) |une 21 July 16 • Sign Language, Drama, and Mimes • Soccer & Cheerleading Vacation Bible School X *^ Blnmi ^ ..„,. Wft OPEN A NEW CopeUnd's Sport. CREDIT CARD 90 DAYS, M€> PAYMIENTS, hiCt ACCRUED INTEREST iSiSSSSSlm^'KSmm^'ttmmi^^iSZtlimSSm'Vn^ • oS^ SILVERADO SENIOR — Silverado Softball player Laura Connors, pictured making a diving catch in last week's zone tournament, is one of four seniors on the Skyhawks' roster playing in their SOFTBALL From Page 19 "The past three years we had Saturday off and we'd go celebrate Friday night," Arata said, ^his year, Pope said that he didn't want to celebrate until next Saturday. Celebrating zone is not enough." This kind of attitude is what has helped Silverado turn its season around. There were several [times earlier in the season when lit appeared Silverado was just SWIMMING From Page 19 -. going through the motions. "We jiist knew for the seniors that this is our last season," Hanson said of the turnaround. "We could either go out as losers or winners and we wanted to make a statement in the city." Winning state would be the biggest statement of all. Not to mention a great graduation present for the core group of player s thaT are leaving the five finish at state," Sill said. "Realistically, top four is within jjur reach." Even though it's hard for Sill and Crouch to stomach a top four finish after having such a great year, that's the price both programs must face in terms of swimmitig politics. Southern Nevada had 19 gams that competed in this year's zone meet, with the top four finishers in each race qualifying for state. The north, who only had 11 teams in its zone, qualifies the same number of -swimmiers ih each event. "'"• When it is all said and done, northern powers like Reno High School can win a title with points they get for just finishing a race. It's a numbers game that puts the handcuffs on the south. Unless a team — for example the 1996 Green yalley boys team — dominants in every event, a school from the south like Green Valley or Silverado won't have enough swimmers in the pool to eampo|jflts. '"] • /. (>, So, in this year's state meet there are 36 spots each for the north and south — nine events with four swimmers in each heat. In the boys meet, Reno — who won the 4A northern zone title — will have. 16 out of the north's 36 spots, On the other side, Silverado's zone championship boys team will only have eight of the south's 36 spots. With all of the number crunching thrown aside. Crouch looks for freshman Kurt Cady to conSkyhawks' program with four straight zone titles. "It [winning state] would be the best," Finateri said. "We just want to win for ourselves. Not the principal or administration. Just for us. We have stuck together through all of this." But make no doubt about it, winning this double-elimination format tournament will be no easy task. .f tinue his stellar freshman campaign and capture some state honors. "Obviously, Kurt is our best" swimmer," Crouch said; "Without him, we wouldn't have reached the level we did this year." >. Cady was a double winner in last week's zone ipeet, capturing titles in the 200IM and 100 breaststroke. ^^ In .additiM to Cady, Silverado's boys team has received contributions from s^iors Brady Hess and Patrick Dr,,. jU as well as Jon Ewing. ^.j-T^i^^ ; On the girls side, Green Valley will be led by s^iof div;ejr, Aubrie Cropper anti "sprintipr Tanya Gabriele. "We just want to aehive best STILL HENDERSON'S • 34; W .-' >: • '<" sisn u|> for i yoar of DISH Network One~Rate l>ln liK liii'l<-n'-> Top i.o CD and your eholoe of i Premium Movl.-put kii^t-K .! Amerlea-m Top loo CD plus your choice of .>tli<-i iirournnimlriK eQuallnii for t^S.qO/month. jjgi'; S<><> IjuslcProresslonal Installation Includes a TREE Off-Air or second Dish Antenna. Resort Electronics Henderson, NV 89009 (702) 564-0790 www.rcMMtelcctronkt.com • hi-.'>i TrrrnTi ono 'VHJ !
PAGE 21

J'^*' -i^if^VP^^il^^l^ wmm if Pag* 20 Henderson Horn* Newt Thursday, May 20,1999 Thursday, May 20,1999 Henderson Home News Page 21 1 LaRosa given second chance with Jays Ray Brw*r News Sports Editor Tom LaRosa has always been a pitcher that puts a lot of pressure on himself. He simply doesn't know any other way to pitch. Unfortunately for LaRosa, this pressure hasn't always equalled success. In fact, last season LaRosa had a miserable campaign with the Fort Myers Twins — Minnesota's Class A affiliate in the Florida State League. The 1993 Green Valley graduate says his bad outings started to'snowball. "I started the season out with some poor outings because I was trying to do too much," LaRosa, who was drafted by the Twins in the sixth round of the 1996 draft out of UNLV, said. "I put too much pressure on myself to succeed and I wasn't living up to my expectations." After what the Twins deemed an unproductive spring training they gave LaRosa his release. Call that the low point in LaRosa's career. "You are obviously pretty sad for yourself," LaRosa said. "You have hopes and dreams of making it to the big leagues. Then they call you in and say you can't make it with them. It's a big shot to the ego." But LaRosa learned fast that there are 29 other teams out there. The Toronto Blue Jays recently signed LaRosa, giving the righthander a second lease on Uve. Toronto sees a lot of upside in LaRosa and his talents, *Tommy has a real good arm," said Neil Allen, pitching coach for the Blue Jays' extended spring training in St. Catherine, Fla. "He has a good fastball and a real good slider. A majority ohhe time, he is consistent with his stuff and gets all of his pitches over," LaRosa is currently in extended spring training with the Blue Jays and anticipates being assigned to Double A Knoxville, Tenn., or the organization's High Single A Florida State League team. Now LaRosa -r who joins fellow Green Valley graduates Joe Orloski {1998) and Taylor Smith (1997) in the Blue Jays'systemis set to make amends for his disastrous performance with the Twins. "I look at this as a great opportunity to come in and play." LaRosa, who anticipates coming out of the bullpen," said. "I think they are going to give me a shot." It's a shot LaRosa deserves. "We think he just needs to be real consistent with all of his pitches," Allen said. "He has good stuff and will be just fine." At 23, LaRosa knows he is at his peak. "There is always a sense of urgency I put on myself," LaRosa said. "Like I said, I have high expectations for myseiC I have the ability to pitch at this level. When you feel that way about yourself, there is always an ur•gency to get things done." „, ^i. If you know of any Hendersonarea athletes currently in the minor leagues, we'd like to hear their story. Give us a call at 4357000 with the information. 503 Hotel Plaza Boulder City, NV 89005 (702) 291 G224 FAX: 2910111 Hid PrcicfM.nig.rje.vslclli.'i5 .COLOR USER COPIES Tt.iiiscr,(ilion UPSjFedtx iResumiiS .Futms Liminaliiig .Nolaiy .Binding SAY IT WITH COOKIES Edible Ccnicrpicro^. • Oiaer Edrly For The / /o/zVin • We Deliver "The Sweetest Bouquet In Town' • Cookie Bouquets For All Occasions • We Will Write Your Personal Message On Any Bouquet • We Copy Company Logos For Corporate Gifts Basic tries for repeat as volleyball champions Plione: 898-0440 • ritfi-M \ ,illc I'IAW .11 Slln'^^'t ax: 898-0794 ^t-vr— Gary ThicMan News Staff Writer Basic and Green Valley high schools qualified from the Sunrise Division for this year's southern Nevada zone tournament. The top four finishers in both the Sunrise and Sunset Divisions are selected to make a run for the title. This year's tournament will be held May 19-22 at Chaparral. Basic won its last six matches and held off an inspired Silverado team for a place in the tourney. The most important of the six matches during the streak was a win over the Skyhawks on the Wolves' home court. "The win over Silverado was a huge victory since it gave us a game up on the Skyhawks," Basic coach Darrin Puana said. "In addition to the one game lead it also gave us the tie breaker in case we ended the season with First Team Sunrise Division Nate Muaina, Basic; Niels Jensen, Green Valley; Ryan Hunt, Silverado. ~ .. Honorable Mention Brant Stewart, Basic; Derek \fuaina, Basic, Jeff Allen, Green Valley. identical records." A win over Rancho, couple with a Green Valley loss to Chaparral, the Wolves actually tied for third with the Gators, but will get a better seed because they recorded a better division record. Basic will open the tournament against Western. The Warriors finished with a 13-3 record. Basic will need a continued strong effort at the net from Nate Muaina, Doug Bowman and Aaron Swapp to keep its winning streak alive. "We can't do too much in the three days prip{ to the start of the tournament," Puana said. "The best we can hope for is to work on our timing and passing. I believe it helps us to have seen the teams we may play in the tournament." Green Valley will face Sunset Division champion Durango in its opening match. The Trailblazers went undefeated during the year, finishing with a 20-0 record. Green Valley started with five match victories; to take an early 5-1 record in the division. The Gators then ran into a mid-season slump, but finished strong winning six of their last eight matches. "Our kids had their back to the wall on several occasions, but each time they have given a good effort," Green Valley coach Carolyn Carpenter said. "I can always count on our kids to maintain a never-give-upk attitude." The Gators will rely heavily on senior setter Jeff Allen to play a big role in the tournament. They will also look to Niels Jensen, Matt Sugden, Greg Shavalier and Ean Zeller to lead the way defensively. "We have a tough opening match against Durango. However, we must focus on each match at hand and not look ahead to what may be," Carpenter said. "Our kids know that we must play at our pace with a total team effort for us to be at our best." Both Green VaiUey and Basic began plfty pn Wednei^axauwu Complete Banquet Facilities Weddings and Receptions Business Meetings and Luncheons Compan/ Holiday Parties Desert WiMovr Clubhouse on the beautiful Desert Willow Oojf Course in the (bothiys of Black Mountain 'The Best Services for the Best Prices' GroMps of 10 to 2$0 | Call 270-7037 for more information Member of Henderson Chamber of Commerce and Nevada Restaurant Association :^ ^' Copeland's Sports STEPHANIE STREET SHOPPING CENTER, HENDERSON Phono 4M 10M LOW PRICE GUARANTEE • FINANCING AVAILABLE 8oi> >toia fur duUils • 'Oil Juu/OkuJ uudll .^ff"*^ Vk_ A Lake Mead Christian Academy Is expanding enrollment! •^* • With a new 40,000 square foot building and convenient ^ •* Henderson location, private education is within reach! "PPI'llllMIJ mill I JLLENROLL^ffiNT" • • ^ Grade K -12 § f • t t • • ^ • I u yea MW*^ • Child ( • Affordable rates ^.,^-. • Traditional Christ-centered e ducation 9 month s choolJix^ • Low student-teacher ratio — .• • -\^• ':':-':/-.:, • '', • High parent involvement .:''':'': J'':-:^i'\'l-hK-7^• Member of the Association of Christian Schools International • Recognized by the NV Department of Education • Over 45 churches represented among student body • Competitive athletics: football, basketball, and morel • 10 year member of the Henderson community NOTURTHER FOR SUMMER CHOICES... Child Care |une 7 Aug. 20 • Summer School |une 21 |uly 16 • Grades K Adult • Affordable rates and a variety of programs • Core Academic Classes • Monday Friday • 8 a.m. -11:50 a.m. • Expressways to Learnings (for students with learning difficulties) |une 21 July 16 • Sign Language, Drama, and Mimes • Soccer & Cheerleading Vacation Bible School X *^ Blnmi ^ ..„,. Wft OPEN A NEW CopeUnd's Sport. CREDIT CARD 90 DAYS, M€> PAYMIENTS, hiCt ACCRUED INTEREST iSiSSSSSlm^'KSmm^'ttmmi^^iSZtlimSSm'Vn^ • oS^ SILVERADO SENIOR — Silverado Softball player Laura Connors, pictured making a diving catch in last week's zone tournament, is one of four seniors on the Skyhawks' roster playing in their SOFTBALL From Page 19 "The past three years we had Saturday off and we'd go celebrate Friday night," Arata said, ^his year, Pope said that he didn't want to celebrate until next Saturday. Celebrating zone is not enough." This kind of attitude is what has helped Silverado turn its season around. There were several [times earlier in the season when lit appeared Silverado was just SWIMMING From Page 19 -. going through the motions. "We jiist knew for the seniors that this is our last season," Hanson said of the turnaround. "We could either go out as losers or winners and we wanted to make a statement in the city." Winning state would be the biggest statement of all. Not to mention a great graduation present for the core group of player s thaT are leaving the five finish at state," Sill said. "Realistically, top four is within jjur reach." Even though it's hard for Sill and Crouch to stomach a top four finish after having such a great year, that's the price both programs must face in terms of swimmitig politics. Southern Nevada had 19 gams that competed in this year's zone meet, with the top four finishers in each race qualifying for state. The north, who only had 11 teams in its zone, qualifies the same number of -swimmiers ih each event. "'"• When it is all said and done, northern powers like Reno High School can win a title with points they get for just finishing a race. It's a numbers game that puts the handcuffs on the south. Unless a team — for example the 1996 Green yalley boys team — dominants in every event, a school from the south like Green Valley or Silverado won't have enough swimmers in the pool to eampo|jflts. '"] • /. (>, So, in this year's state meet there are 36 spots each for the north and south — nine events with four swimmers in each heat. In the boys meet, Reno — who won the 4A northern zone title — will have. 16 out of the north's 36 spots, On the other side, Silverado's zone championship boys team will only have eight of the south's 36 spots. With all of the number crunching thrown aside. Crouch looks for freshman Kurt Cady to conSkyhawks' program with four straight zone titles. "It [winning state] would be the best," Finateri said. "We just want to win for ourselves. Not the principal or administration. Just for us. We have stuck together through all of this." But make no doubt about it, winning this double-elimination format tournament will be no easy task. .f tinue his stellar freshman campaign and capture some state honors. "Obviously, Kurt is our best" swimmer," Crouch said; "Without him, we wouldn't have reached the level we did this year." >. Cady was a double winner in last week's zone ipeet, capturing titles in the 200IM and 100 breaststroke. ^^ In .additiM to Cady, Silverado's boys team has received contributions from s^iors Brady Hess and Patrick Dr,,. jU as well as Jon Ewing. ^.j-T^i^^ ; On the girls side, Green Valley will be led by s^iof div;ejr, Aubrie Cropper anti "sprintipr Tanya Gabriele. "We just want to aehive best STILL HENDERSON'S • 34; W .-' >: • '<" sisn u|> for i yoar of DISH Network One~Rate l>ln liK liii'l<-n'-> Top i.o CD and your eholoe of i Premium Movl.-put kii^t-K .! Amerlea-m Top loo CD plus your choice of .>tli<-i iirournnimlriK eQuallnii for t^S.qO/month. jjgi'; S<><> IjuslcProresslonal Installation Includes a TREE Off-Air or second Dish Antenna. Resort Electronics Henderson, NV 89009 (702) 564-0790 www.rcMMtelcctronkt.com • hi-.'>i TrrrnTi ono 'VHJ !
PAGE 22

N H • < "^•^^wppp^fpppppppf Pa9 22 Hendarson Horn* Nw Thursday, May 20, 1999 TRACK From Page 19 mnnwnmnwnw^ Thursday, May 20,1999 Hendarson Home News Page 23 dropped off a little bit at the zone meet as they finished third. Oslund, DeVoge and Juarez will team with Wes Kramer at the state meet to run the 3,200 relay. "We need to run better than we did in zone or we are not going to be right in there," Burgess said. On the girls side, Rochelle Campbell and Sally Weedman will represent the Wolves as they both qualified for the state meet. Campbell will compete in the 800, an event she finished second in at the zone meet as she helped Basic to an eighth place finish. Weedman will compete in the pole vault as she finished fourth in the zone meet. Weedman, only a freshman, will use this meet as a stepping stone for the fiiture. "This will give her valuable experience," Burgess said. "We look to the north to dominate [the pole vault]. They have three girls go over 10 feet." The girls 3,200 relay team also qualified for state as they set a new zone record last weekend and hold the fastest time in the state in that event this season. The crew will consist of Campbell, Natalie Hicken, Jennifer Bowman and Jennifer Randall. The key for the Wolves at the state meet is having good weather and having everyone compete well. "I think we've got to run like we have been running," Burgess said. "All our kids could place top four or five no problem. They have to do what they are capable of and everything else will take care of itself. "Crazy things happen in the zone and state meet. You never know what is going to happen." GREEN VALLEY The Gators head into the state meet with four boys and four girls. The Gators are coming off of last iveekend's seventh place finish in the boys and sixth place finish on the girls side. On the beys side, Qaadir Aniln will compete in the long jump after finishing third at last week's zone meet. Maurice Windham will compete in the triple jump after he finished third in that event last weekend. The Gators will also be represented by the Carro brothers, Jason and Justin, as the two finished second and third, respectively, at the zone meet. "The guys that are going to state look really good, actually," Gator coach Blaine Thompson said. "They all actually have an outside chance of winning. There is an exceptionally good field in the triple and longjump both. [In the pole vault], it just depends on who happens to be on that day." On the girls-side, Abby Miller leads the way as the junior won both the 1,600 and 3,200 events at last weekend's zone meet. Miller, after winning the state cross country title in the fall and dominating the field during the track season, is the favorite heading into the state meet. Also conipeting for the Gators will be Jessica Spoto. Spoto is a double qualifier as well as she finished third in the 200 and fourth in the 100 at the zone meet. Sarah Frei will also represent the Gators at the state meet as she finished third in the 300 hurdles at the zone meet last weekend. The final representative for Green Valley will be Michelle Muscato in the pole vault. Muscato won the pole vault at the zone meet and has dominated the valley this season. She will face some tough competition from the north during this weekend's state meet. The keys for the Gators will be the weather and what the north has to offer. "If they prepare right, [the weather I is a big advantage for the north," Thompson said. "They have been running some pretty decent times in March. When they get warm weather, it gets better. They also run at more altitude there. Here it is a little lower altitude. If it's exceptionally hot, it would give us a little bit of an advantage. The only advantage I think [for us] is you don't have to travel." SILVERADO The Silverado girls head into the state m^et with confidence after winning the southern zone title this past weekend. The Skyhawks will have eight individual athletes at the state meet as well as three relay teams. Leading the way for the Skyhawks is junior Lara Saye. Saye won the discus at the zope.. meet and is the defending state champion. She will also compete in the shot put after finishing second in that event last weekend. Also in the discus for the Skyhawks will be Sara Freels and Cherise Quimby, who finished third and fourth, respectively, last weekend. Nicole Wright will run the 100 and 200 for the Skyhawks after finishing second in both events at the zone meet. LeAnna Brink will run the 400 after finishing second last weekend and Lindsay Appuglise will run the 800 after finishing third in that event at the zone meet. Femia Durosinmi finished third in last weekend's zone meet in the triple jump to make it into the state meet and DeAnna Appuglise will run in the 400. The Skyhawks will also run in the 400, 1,600 and 3,200 relay races after qualifying last weekend. "Th^y look good," Skyhawk coach Bill Walker said. "They look like they have all season. They pretty much take things in stride. It's a little bit different this time because we don't know a whole lot about the teams we are going against. It's a different kind of week." On the boys side. Marques j^i^^ill lead the way as he led the Skyhawks to a second place Com check out the fun at the coolest place to be this summer... The Sports Club/Los Vegas! Summer Day Camp for ages 3 15 years. nswCnfonihg: Call (702) 454 6000 b^y a varktY of sports and creative artivities including a weekly field tripl THE SPORTS/CLUB/LAS VEGAS 2100 Olympic Avenue • Henderson finish in last weekend's zone meet. Rose won thf 400 and finished fourth in the 200. Also competing on the boys side will be Jay Clyde. Clyde set the zone record last weekend in winning the 800. Dustin Hudspeth will compete in the 1,600 and 3,200 aftr finishing second in both events at zone. Rosauro Belzer will compete in the 100 after finishing fourth last weekend and Joel Masaniai will compete in the shot put as he finished second at zone. Jordan Erickson is the final individual qualifier for the Skyhawks as he finished third last weekend in the discus. The Skyhawks will also run in the 800 and 1,600 relays. "It's always that time of the year where you want to do quality things without getting them too tired," Walker said. "They are pretty relaxed and loose. I tell them what they need to do and they do it. "They're feeling pretty good about themselves and I think they have a right to. They've had a good season." STAR LOANS Is opening in Henderson soon to service the fine people of this area. We will be hiring for two possibly three positions 1. MANAGER Must have some lending and collecting experience a strong business backround helpful. 2. ASST. MANAGER Business collection and customer service experience helpful. 3. CLERK Customer Service and cashiering experience helpful. We offer competive saleries and tsenefits. Submit resumes to Mr. Ben Eminger 911 N. 1st St. Grants, NM 87020 or fax to 505-285-3926 Main # 285-5410 • ggWWWgMMAl li Summer Basketball League Boys & Giris Club of Henderson SIgn-ups will be taken until May 21st Divisions: 6th 8th and 9th 12th Graduating seniors are able to participate Fees: $30.00 per person (will be placed on a team) Includes uniform, mennbership and officials fees. $250.00 per team (includes officials fees and 1999 membersiiip) HENDERSON PARKS AND REC. BASEBALIVSOFIBALL STANDINGS Pee Wee League Zone 1 W L Diamondbacks 8 2 Rebels 8 2 Champs 6 4 Roadrunners 6 4 Angels 6 4 Bluejays 3 7 Cubs 2 8 Cardinals 1 g Pee Wee League Zone 2 W L Athletics 8 1 AMstars 8 1 Bluejays 5 3 Orioles 4 5 Yankees 4 5 Stars 2 5 Diamondbacks 3 6 Twins • 0 8 Midget League W All gmnes will be played on Indoor courts For Further Information contact Andy t 565-6568 Sign-up at: 1401 Drake Street Henderson, NV 89015 Monday-Friday 12pm-7:30pm Bluejays Royals Diamondbacks Reds Cubs Padres W • *>4K Midget League SS Red Sox Mets Braves Gators Padres Rockies Jr. Zone 1/2 W L Golf at NIGHT??? SURE!!! Desert Willow Golf Course Is holding a night golf tournament on Friday, June 11th. Your $40 entry fee includes 9 holes of golf witPhcart, night balls, sunset barbeque, and prizes. It is sure to be a hit. Sign ups are now being taken for teams of 4 or individuals (we will find a team for you). ..\^: Call 263-GOLF (4653) for mor^ Iriformation. 2020 W. Horizon Ridge Pkwy.. ^ Green Valley Pkwy. & West Horizon Ridge Pkwy, Desert Willow GOLr COURSE Spartans 6 Devil Rays *6 Cardinals 5 Cubs :'.:: 4 Vols '" • • 2 Diamondbacks 2 Minor Softball Zone 3 W Diamondbacks 8 Sharks 7 Angels 7 Stars 6 24-K "4 Timberwolves 4 Panthers 3 Giants2 Dodgers 1 Wild Bunch Too 0 Major Softball Zone 3 W Braves 8 Alienators 7 Giants 6 Wild Bunch 5 Bombers 4 Red Hc^s 3 Dodgers • 2 Galaxy 1 1 Senior Co-Rec SB Crushers Pit Bulls Cobras Sonics Hehdenon Paritt and StandingtB MenaD-Summerl Stone Cold Stunners ; Sami's Sushi : Tuna Lovers < Storm i The Big Red Machine / Extreme Adv. Tours J G.L. Ministries J Lost in the Son i Mww D1 -Summer i V J&R Flooring i The Barons ROI I Mighty Mart Low Bailers Cloud Carpets Farmers Lost Boys Knights Mans C-Summar i V Timot Terminators MGM Grand Vegas Rays Primack Homes i The Tribe ; Sprint ; M&M Dirt Dudes IMans C1-8ummar I V Shonks Zonks { PT's Sunset : Hit Squad ; MeadowA/alley E Tradewinds Const. ^ The Detonators ,:,;_,; • i Gary Day Const. '-' • '" • c Gothic Landscape C Corac C-Suramar i St. Rose • • • • ::• f.; i Tee Shots ] i AR Ornamental Iron St. Thomas More Timet ; 5th Element : Maulers St. Rose II Corac 0-Summar I V Heavy Haulers ( Tornados v ( NV Palace Sliders ^ ( Serrot • [ St. Thomas More II Chnst The Servant ; Priority Mortgage Mixed Emotions ( Corac 01-Summar i KWU-TV Berry Plastic PT'S Good Wood IDC Outlaws Hutchins Drywall Central Christian Ironmen Merrill Lynch Corac Oa-Summar I V Ballpark Lounge ( Chilly Palmers Deux i Chilly Palmers -. i Post Gamers t P.T's Pub : Old Volks Home J Nevada Brake & Auto ; 1 For Christ ( Old Timers Sluggers HHBC 5 3 C Beer's 5 3 C Chilly Palmers 4 4 C Saint Thomas More 3 5 C PT's Grave Diggers 2 6 C Firebird Tire 1 7 C Mans D-Summar I W LT Those Guys 6 0 0 Pioneer Akii 5 10 Where's The Oxygen S 1 0 G.E.S.-AXMEN 3 3 0 Whiting-Tumer 3 3 0 Double Vision 2 4 0 Yamas Controls .080 One Hitters 0 6 0 HENDERSON UTTLE LEAGUE Standings fi^8/99 Rooldaa W L T Indians 12 4 Athletics 11 3 Roddes 11 4 Rangers 10 3 Rrates 9 6 1 White Sox 8 6 Orioles 7 4 Braves 7 4 1 Yankees 7 7 Dodgers 7 7 1 Marlins 6 6 2 Mets 5 8 Dianx)ndbaci(s 4 8 1 Reds 4 8 1 Phillies 4 9 Tigers 4 10 Brewers 3 7 2 Blue Jays 2 9 2 Twins IMfiora 2 12 W L T Twins 10 2 Orioles 7 4 Whits Sox 7 5 Athletics 6 6 Mariners 5 5 Roddes 3-8 Mets 2 6 1 Rangers Maiora 0 12 W L T Cardinals 4 1 Expos 4 2 Diamondbacks 3 3 Dodgers 2 3 Braves 1 2 1 Astros Juniors 1 4 W L T White Sox 3 1 Rangers 3 1 Athletes 2 1 Mariners 2 1 Orioles 1 2 Yankees 1 2 Twins 0 2 Attention Coaches: Call In standings to your representative every Sunday night for the weak. TOM'S GUNS & GUNSMITHING Af FOHDAhl b OUAIIIY TUiSf-m 1;),, ^p i!;i)V SAI SEASONAL UOUl! 2 for 1 Prime Rib whti coupon mtnt ba 21 In The Conductor's Room Only Open S pm -10 pm ^ailro.id Pciss Hotel & Casino 2100 S. iMMvHwy., Hwd. 294-5000 Dr. Mark Pay, D.O. Boai ertified Family Practice J..,.J.U|J. .,M • I. 1? Specializing In: Respirator; Illness, lit'. Asthma. Bronchitis, Mtnouncea the emphysema & Allergies) Opehfr^ Orf Als new i •Oiabeies office aU i 'Hypertension i • All facets of Pediatric care 56 N. PECOS i •Adull&Gerialhc Medicine (Between Wtqwam ft Pebble^ ^y" ^^y ^r^*^ ^ ^ •Manipulation for common 456-9100 hack injuries ( uiiU-4^ Mud M 21 Of oMw. WinfMfv EverytbtjgOnderTbeSkmtm Sunset Road At US 93/95 • (702) SAl-TTn ar HMal be Mwant OenipMa nriaa analM lalM aaaino. atanaga mrt raii ron al i Mag TlwrtiiriM If you ttiink you havea(piiLft SI N Wolves to hold Sports Physical Night The Basic Hi^ School Athletic Department would like to inform all incoming athletes of its upcoming Sports Physical Night. Athletic ph}rsicals for the 1999-2000 school year will be held Monday, May 24, b^inning at 6 p.m. for girls and 7 p.m. for boys at Basic Hi^ School, room 144. The cost is $15. Packets are available at both middle schools and at Basic prior to the phjrsical. Please bringyour completed packet to Sports Physical Nig^t. Packets must be completed and turned in prior to teemi tiyouts. Celebrating 40 years of service to Southern Nevada GOUSPKIALs $35 Mon. Thurs. $40 Fri. Sun. after 3:00 p.m. after 3:00 p. m. Can 565-7933 Todav! Black Mountain Golf & Country Club Southern Nevada's Best Kept Secret Brand New lUtxiH. ;..i^V i"-:. • '-• -. Several to Choose from (OAC) Limited Cars at this Price Don't delay Why Buy Used When You Can Buy •Brand New for Less? #3 IN THE NATION ££ll STEPMAN<)HYUnDFII 460 NO. BOULDER HIGHWAY 565-1500 IN HENDERSON OF COURSE!

PAGE 23

N H • < "^•^^wppp^fpppppppf Pa9 22 Hendarson Horn* Nw Thursday, May 20, 1999 TRACK From Page 19 mnnwnmnwnw^ Thursday, May 20,1999 Hendarson Home News Page 23 dropped off a little bit at the zone meet as they finished third. Oslund, DeVoge and Juarez will team with Wes Kramer at the state meet to run the 3,200 relay. "We need to run better than we did in zone or we are not going to be right in there," Burgess said. On the girls side, Rochelle Campbell and Sally Weedman will represent the Wolves as they both qualified for the state meet. Campbell will compete in the 800, an event she finished second in at the zone meet as she helped Basic to an eighth place finish. Weedman will compete in the pole vault as she finished fourth in the zone meet. Weedman, only a freshman, will use this meet as a stepping stone for the fiiture. "This will give her valuable experience," Burgess said. "We look to the north to dominate [the pole vault]. They have three girls go over 10 feet." The girls 3,200 relay team also qualified for state as they set a new zone record last weekend and hold the fastest time in the state in that event this season. The crew will consist of Campbell, Natalie Hicken, Jennifer Bowman and Jennifer Randall. The key for the Wolves at the state meet is having good weather and having everyone compete well. "I think we've got to run like we have been running," Burgess said. "All our kids could place top four or five no problem. They have to do what they are capable of and everything else will take care of itself. "Crazy things happen in the zone and state meet. You never know what is going to happen." GREEN VALLEY The Gators head into the state meet with four boys and four girls. The Gators are coming off of last iveekend's seventh place finish in the boys and sixth place finish on the girls side. On the beys side, Qaadir Aniln will compete in the long jump after finishing third at last week's zone meet. Maurice Windham will compete in the triple jump after he finished third in that event last weekend. The Gators will also be represented by the Carro brothers, Jason and Justin, as the two finished second and third, respectively, at the zone meet. "The guys that are going to state look really good, actually," Gator coach Blaine Thompson said. "They all actually have an outside chance of winning. There is an exceptionally good field in the triple and longjump both. [In the pole vault], it just depends on who happens to be on that day." On the girls-side, Abby Miller leads the way as the junior won both the 1,600 and 3,200 events at last weekend's zone meet. Miller, after winning the state cross country title in the fall and dominating the field during the track season, is the favorite heading into the state meet. Also conipeting for the Gators will be Jessica Spoto. Spoto is a double qualifier as well as she finished third in the 200 and fourth in the 100 at the zone meet. Sarah Frei will also represent the Gators at the state meet as she finished third in the 300 hurdles at the zone meet last weekend. The final representative for Green Valley will be Michelle Muscato in the pole vault. Muscato won the pole vault at the zone meet and has dominated the valley this season. She will face some tough competition from the north during this weekend's state meet. The keys for the Gators will be the weather and what the north has to offer. "If they prepare right, [the weather I is a big advantage for the north," Thompson said. "They have been running some pretty decent times in March. When they get warm weather, it gets better. They also run at more altitude there. Here it is a little lower altitude. If it's exceptionally hot, it would give us a little bit of an advantage. The only advantage I think [for us] is you don't have to travel." SILVERADO The Silverado girls head into the state m^et with confidence after winning the southern zone title this past weekend. The Skyhawks will have eight individual athletes at the state meet as well as three relay teams. Leading the way for the Skyhawks is junior Lara Saye. Saye won the discus at the zope.. meet and is the defending state champion. She will also compete in the shot put after finishing second in that event last weekend. Also in the discus for the Skyhawks will be Sara Freels and Cherise Quimby, who finished third and fourth, respectively, last weekend. Nicole Wright will run the 100 and 200 for the Skyhawks after finishing second in both events at the zone meet. LeAnna Brink will run the 400 after finishing second last weekend and Lindsay Appuglise will run the 800 after finishing third in that event at the zone meet. Femia Durosinmi finished third in last weekend's zone meet in the triple jump to make it into the state meet and DeAnna Appuglise will run in the 400. The Skyhawks will also run in the 400, 1,600 and 3,200 relay races after qualifying last weekend. "Th^y look good," Skyhawk coach Bill Walker said. "They look like they have all season. They pretty much take things in stride. It's a little bit different this time because we don't know a whole lot about the teams we are going against. It's a different kind of week." On the boys side. Marques j^i^^ill lead the way as he led the Skyhawks to a second place Com check out the fun at the coolest place to be this summer... The Sports Club/Los Vegas! Summer Day Camp for ages 3 15 years. nswCnfonihg: Call (702) 454 6000 b^y a varktY of sports and creative artivities including a weekly field tripl THE SPORTS/CLUB/LAS VEGAS 2100 Olympic Avenue • Henderson finish in last weekend's zone meet. Rose won thf 400 and finished fourth in the 200. Also competing on the boys side will be Jay Clyde. Clyde set the zone record last weekend in winning the 800. Dustin Hudspeth will compete in the 1,600 and 3,200 aftr finishing second in both events at zone. Rosauro Belzer will compete in the 100 after finishing fourth last weekend and Joel Masaniai will compete in the shot put as he finished second at zone. Jordan Erickson is the final individual qualifier for the Skyhawks as he finished third last weekend in the discus. The Skyhawks will also run in the 800 and 1,600 relays. "It's always that time of the year where you want to do quality things without getting them too tired," Walker said. "They are pretty relaxed and loose. I tell them what they need to do and they do it. "They're feeling pretty good about themselves and I think they have a right to. They've had a good season." STAR LOANS Is opening in Henderson soon to service the fine people of this area. We will be hiring for two possibly three positions 1. MANAGER Must have some lending and collecting experience a strong business backround helpful. 2. ASST. MANAGER Business collection and customer service experience helpful. 3. CLERK Customer Service and cashiering experience helpful. We offer competive saleries and tsenefits. Submit resumes to Mr. Ben Eminger 911 N. 1st St. Grants, NM 87020 or fax to 505-285-3926 Main # 285-5410 • ggWWWgMMAl li Summer Basketball League Boys & Giris Club of Henderson SIgn-ups will be taken until May 21st Divisions: 6th 8th and 9th 12th Graduating seniors are able to participate Fees: $30.00 per person (will be placed on a team) Includes uniform, mennbership and officials fees. $250.00 per team (includes officials fees and 1999 membersiiip) HENDERSON PARKS AND REC. BASEBALIVSOFIBALL STANDINGS Pee Wee League Zone 1 W L Diamondbacks 8 2 Rebels 8 2 Champs 6 4 Roadrunners 6 4 Angels 6 4 Bluejays 3 7 Cubs 2 8 Cardinals 1 g Pee Wee League Zone 2 W L Athletics 8 1 AMstars 8 1 Bluejays 5 3 Orioles 4 5 Yankees 4 5 Stars 2 5 Diamondbacks 3 6 Twins • 0 8 Midget League W All gmnes will be played on Indoor courts For Further Information contact Andy t 565-6568 Sign-up at: 1401 Drake Street Henderson, NV 89015 Monday-Friday 12pm-7:30pm Bluejays Royals Diamondbacks Reds Cubs Padres W • *>4K Midget League SS Red Sox Mets Braves Gators Padres Rockies Jr. Zone 1/2 W L Golf at NIGHT??? SURE!!! Desert Willow Golf Course Is holding a night golf tournament on Friday, June 11th. Your $40 entry fee includes 9 holes of golf witPhcart, night balls, sunset barbeque, and prizes. It is sure to be a hit. Sign ups are now being taken for teams of 4 or individuals (we will find a team for you). ..\^: Call 263-GOLF (4653) for mor^ Iriformation. 2020 W. Horizon Ridge Pkwy.. ^ Green Valley Pkwy. & West Horizon Ridge Pkwy, Desert Willow GOLr COURSE Spartans 6 Devil Rays *6 Cardinals 5 Cubs :'.:: 4 Vols '" • • 2 Diamondbacks 2 Minor Softball Zone 3 W Diamondbacks 8 Sharks 7 Angels 7 Stars 6 24-K "4 Timberwolves 4 Panthers 3 Giants2 Dodgers 1 Wild Bunch Too 0 Major Softball Zone 3 W Braves 8 Alienators 7 Giants 6 Wild Bunch 5 Bombers 4 Red Hc^s 3 Dodgers • 2 Galaxy 1 1 Senior Co-Rec SB Crushers Pit Bulls Cobras Sonics Hehdenon Paritt and StandingtB MenaD-Summerl Stone Cold Stunners ; Sami's Sushi : Tuna Lovers < Storm i The Big Red Machine / Extreme Adv. Tours J G.L. Ministries J Lost in the Son i Mww D1 -Summer i V J&R Flooring i The Barons ROI I Mighty Mart Low Bailers Cloud Carpets Farmers Lost Boys Knights Mans C-Summar i V Timot Terminators MGM Grand Vegas Rays Primack Homes i The Tribe ; Sprint ; M&M Dirt Dudes IMans C1-8ummar I V Shonks Zonks { PT's Sunset : Hit Squad ; MeadowA/alley E Tradewinds Const. ^ The Detonators ,:,;_,; • i Gary Day Const. '-' • '" • c Gothic Landscape C Corac C-Suramar i St. Rose • • • • ::• f.; i Tee Shots ] i AR Ornamental Iron St. Thomas More Timet ; 5th Element : Maulers St. Rose II Corac 0-Summar I V Heavy Haulers ( Tornados v ( NV Palace Sliders ^ ( Serrot • [ St. Thomas More II Chnst The Servant ; Priority Mortgage Mixed Emotions ( Corac 01-Summar i KWU-TV Berry Plastic PT'S Good Wood IDC Outlaws Hutchins Drywall Central Christian Ironmen Merrill Lynch Corac Oa-Summar I V Ballpark Lounge ( Chilly Palmers Deux i Chilly Palmers -. i Post Gamers t P.T's Pub : Old Volks Home J Nevada Brake & Auto ; 1 For Christ ( Old Timers Sluggers HHBC 5 3 C Beer's 5 3 C Chilly Palmers 4 4 C Saint Thomas More 3 5 C PT's Grave Diggers 2 6 C Firebird Tire 1 7 C Mans D-Summar I W LT Those Guys 6 0 0 Pioneer Akii 5 10 Where's The Oxygen S 1 0 G.E.S.-AXMEN 3 3 0 Whiting-Tumer 3 3 0 Double Vision 2 4 0 Yamas Controls .080 One Hitters 0 6 0 HENDERSON UTTLE LEAGUE Standings fi^8/99 Rooldaa W L T Indians 12 4 Athletics 11 3 Roddes 11 4 Rangers 10 3 Rrates 9 6 1 White Sox 8 6 Orioles 7 4 Braves 7 4 1 Yankees 7 7 Dodgers 7 7 1 Marlins 6 6 2 Mets 5 8 Dianx)ndbaci(s 4 8 1 Reds 4 8 1 Phillies 4 9 Tigers 4 10 Brewers 3 7 2 Blue Jays 2 9 2 Twins IMfiora 2 12 W L T Twins 10 2 Orioles 7 4 Whits Sox 7 5 Athletics 6 6 Mariners 5 5 Roddes 3-8 Mets 2 6 1 Rangers Maiora 0 12 W L T Cardinals 4 1 Expos 4 2 Diamondbacks 3 3 Dodgers 2 3 Braves 1 2 1 Astros Juniors 1 4 W L T White Sox 3 1 Rangers 3 1 Athletes 2 1 Mariners 2 1 Orioles 1 2 Yankees 1 2 Twins 0 2 Attention Coaches: Call In standings to your representative every Sunday night for the weak. TOM'S GUNS & GUNSMITHING Af FOHDAhl b OUAIIIY TUiSf-m 1;),, ^p i!;i)V SAI SEASONAL UOUl! 2 for 1 Prime Rib whti coupon mtnt ba 21 In The Conductor's Room Only Open S pm -10 pm ^ailro.id Pciss Hotel & Casino 2100 S. iMMvHwy., Hwd. 294-5000 Dr. Mark Pay, D.O. Boai ertified Family Practice J..,.J.U|J. .,M • I. 1? Specializing In: Respirator; Illness, lit'. Asthma. Bronchitis, Mtnouncea the emphysema & Allergies) Opehfr^ Orf Als new i •Oiabeies office aU i 'Hypertension i • All facets of Pediatric care 56 N. PECOS i •Adull&Gerialhc Medicine (Between Wtqwam ft Pebble^ ^y" ^^y ^r^*^ ^ ^ •Manipulation for common 456-9100 hack injuries ( uiiU-4^ Mud M 21 Of oMw. WinfMfv EverytbtjgOnderTbeSkmtm Sunset Road At US 93/95 • (702) SAl-TTn ar HMal be Mwant OenipMa nriaa analM lalM aaaino. atanaga mrt raii ron al i Mag TlwrtiiriM If you ttiink you havea(piiLft SI N Wolves to hold Sports Physical Night The Basic Hi^ School Athletic Department would like to inform all incoming athletes of its upcoming Sports Physical Night. Athletic ph}rsicals for the 1999-2000 school year will be held Monday, May 24, b^inning at 6 p.m. for girls and 7 p.m. for boys at Basic Hi^ School, room 144. The cost is $15. Packets are available at both middle schools and at Basic prior to the phjrsical. Please bringyour completed packet to Sports Physical Nig^t. Packets must be completed and turned in prior to teemi tiyouts. Celebrating 40 years of service to Southern Nevada GOUSPKIALs $35 Mon. Thurs. $40 Fri. Sun. after 3:00 p.m. after 3:00 p. m. Can 565-7933 Todav! Black Mountain Golf & Country Club Southern Nevada's Best Kept Secret Brand New lUtxiH. ;..i^V i"-:. • '-• -. Several to Choose from (OAC) Limited Cars at this Price Don't delay Why Buy Used When You Can Buy •Brand New for Less? #3 IN THE NATION ££ll STEPMAN<)HYUnDFII 460 NO. BOULDER HIGHWAY 565-1500 IN HENDERSON OF COURSE!

PAGE 25

tf^s.ij '!i'.iniy,i9^v\mmr^sivsiT^^ifimi^ T^'i" r ^"T-n mmmmmmmmmm^mmmm Page 24 Henderson Home News Thursday, May 20, 1999 r/'i -.'! I You won't need a trail guide to enjoy the views found at Seven Hills. In this masterplanned community you'll find a new standard of excellence in custom estate lots. Many of our custom homesites command spectacular views of the entire A Hsndmon oomniunly dsMSlopod by tie 0^^ Csnyon CUSTOM HOMESITES M'itmm'fm ggg—— T^*'tf7^r-'wrrm-vi^' • LIFESTYLES • OUTDOORS • WHAT'S PIAYING LAST WORDS CAROLYN HAX ADVICE COLUMN PAGE 3 May 20, 1999 Folk Page 1 I •fkt^"' Music and crafts at feicerfEerinial Parl<-t Boss Ann Rabiola MIele News Staff "^ Boulder City's Bicentennial Park humnied mth the sounds of folk music and story-telling last weekend, i-^c''; — Moms, dads and kids enjoyed the folk art and the art of being together as a family. .' This was the third such festival, the idea of Boulder City resident and educator James Bowen. By Saturday afternoon, Bowen had trouble remembering what day it was — he was so tired from story-telling, playing Bluegrass and just plain working on the festival. He explained he was "paying the price" for having "too much fun." Bowen said this year featured "more workshops, more kids being able to sit down with a different variety of artists, and families sitting down together and enjoying folk art." Even though Friday evening was extremely windy, the festival drew "a great turn-out" of several hundred people, Bowen said. Bowen said the festival is getting bigger and better each year. "We really want families, the community, to be able to sit down with artists and to not only watch demonstrations of the folk art, but we want them to be allowed hands-on [participation] like the Appalachian dulcimer (performed by Bowen's brother, Jerry.)," he said. "Right now there are 10 kids over there playing an instrument that they've never seen before in their life. We've got people sitting in the workshops walking away, going. This is way cool, this is too much.'" This year's workshops included music of the Steel Drums from the Rupert Henry group, Appalachian Dulcimers with Jerry Bowen, end South American Music by ^""'^"TmW"r'fhtiTfl' tgyght *he aaRs of Native American Rattles by Mignon Wall, Stone Art by Laurie Adams, and the story-telling of Antonio Sacre and Leticia Pizzino. Folk and Bluegrass music was provided by Homemade Jam and The Marty Warburton Band. Boulder City's own Dance Etc. folk dancers performed on Friday and Saturday, and the Garrett Middle School String OrchestrtMhowed its versatility by performing folk music. "It's been a wonderful experience," said Torrie Haney, volunteer leader for this year's festival. "Last year, I was a volunteer and I loved it so much... Close to 60 people ... have made this thing really work [this year.] The kids have been the best. Every age group has been involved. "The little kids working in the booth are calling the people in the booth next to them grandma and grandpa. That's the age spread, so it's wonderful," Haney said. ..i r>, .^. She also acknowledged all the festival's sponsors who not only donated their time and money but attended the festival in person. "We couldn't do it without the sponsors and the volunteers," she said. Folk dancers from Dance Etc. perform at the Folk Festival. • • I^^HPPHI^r^^ '-'v't^.^^SH^^HHHfeHi^ j^ ^^^ ^ ^^^^^^^1 1 r^' ^i^^^^H H • ^^A' ''''^^^^^1 HL f J^^I^^H I ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^m/'^^T^^B^^^^^^^^^M ^Hp^ ^^^1 1 i^B ^1^ jVm.: p ^ • l ii^H 1 • tf^-^-'' iHi#i • WF^^ m ^^F^^^^^^BH ^^^^= =1 r^^H • ^^^1 I __^tfl^^M ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ J^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^l in L^ii A -jiW^^^^^—i^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^r^.-"' '^^^^^^^^m^^^^^^^^^i Standing in front of a tre of handcrafted dreamcatdiers are Andrew Rush, David Brown and kneeling Is Wayne Putz. Teresa Doolittle of Condor demonstrates a sound of nature wfth a hand-made instrument. While this year's folk festival drew its largest audience yet, Bowen said, "it doesn't matter if we had 50 people or if we had 5,000. What matters is that it's quality and that the people that are here enjoy it." Dave Currey plays the dobro guitar along with Jim Bowen on percussion and Jerry Bowen on guitar. The group Is called th Dust Bowl Boys. For those who missed this year's folk festiy^, Bowen and friends keep the spirit of folk alive with "Great Pumpkin Patch Stories" in October. 'The event will be complete with spooky stories, hot chocolate and cider. For more information, call 294-0494. Photos: R.A.R.Miele/News Staff and Jack McGlone • i-r' I REAL ESTATE % monthly feature W! Ihws: Next week, AutonMitive "'*'^"" • ^B Red Rock Country Club unveils model homes Chuck N. BaksrNews Staff At last year's "Las Vegas Housing: 2000 and Beyond" conference at UNLV, event coordinator Arnold Stalk noted that the Las Vegas Valley has witnessed an explosion of growth that is unprecedented and has created a city and a skylipe that LB truly world-class. '^ He noted that "no ideas are considered to be too fiufetched, no plan is ignored without a second or Uiird look." He said growth has been so aggres^ve and explosive that the infrastructure cannot pompete with development appetites. Stalk said that new towns have been created Within the valley virtually overnight and megarssorts have been erected that continue to astonish tourists. ^ Sunrise Colony Co. at the Red Rock Country Club has tossed its hat into the mix with its 738iicre, private country club community located on the western edge of Summerlin, adjacent to the |H>enic Red Rock National Conservation area. The private, 24-hour guard-gated enclave is l^j j hli jhtf^ by two, 18-hole Arnold Palmer-designed golf courses and a wide variety of social and recreational amenities. Aboutl.lOO elegant homes will be built in a series of neighborhoods adjacent to the two championship golf courses and most of the homes will provide panoramic views of the golf courses, mountains or city lights. The 15 elegant model homes being unveiled showcase the finest work of four teams of renowned architects and our in-house team of professional interior designers," said Jack Conlon, president of Sunrise Colony Company. The floor plans demonstrate an innovative approach to design and the flexibility they offer will give our buyers vast opportunities to highly personalize and costoimze their selected homes. Each home will offer tkl<^ choices of exterior architectural styling and all'of our buyers will have access to the services of professional interior designers from our in-house Design Studio." Home buyers at Red Rock Country Club can choose from ftve collections of homes encompass8M RED ROCK Page 16 Courtesy photo Home buyers at Red Rook Country Club can choose from five collections of homes encompassing 17 floor plan designs. Priced from the upper $200,000 to more than 11.5 million, tlie oneend twostory designs renge from 2,156 square feet to iuHnes ttiat can be expended to more than TJ099 square feet. Home* with up to six be
PAGE 26

ii p i p w^^wp^p wt i w' • • • ""' y-^v t*t"V ^n 'y-i*-"->* -i^ i^v'^ T^^ gt.'.^ ^y Pag2 Psnortma Thursday, May 20. 1999 ^OPV^V^F^^P .4-^. Goodwill of Southern Nevada names board of directors Phil Weisman, owner of PDT Associates, Inc., has been elected chairman of the 1999 board of directors for Goodwill of Southern Nevada, Inc. Weisman has served on the board since 1995, most recently as vice chairman. Serving with Weisman on the executive committee are: vice chairman Edd Kluth, owner of Advantage Parking Service; secretary Brian Me Evilly, president of McEvilly Benefits; and treasurer Ted Atencio, retired Citibank vice president. Other board members atlarge include: NickPandelis, Hugh Barnett;^ Darryl Cronfeld, Don Davidson, Dave Haag, Geno Hill, Mark Jones, Esq., Lillian McMorris, Brenda Meehan, Kay Sholine and Carroll Varner. These outstanding members of our community donate their time and expertise to help Goodwill help our neighbors with disabilities start new careers in our community," said Steve Chartrand, president/CEO of Goodwill. "For that, we are grateful." Phil Weisman Ih 1998, 105 people with disabilities and other special needs were served through Goodwill programs and 73 individuals started new careers. Goodwill is a not-for-profit organization whose mission is to provide training, employment and job placement services for people with disabilities and other special needs to maximize the quality of life of each individual served. For more information about Groodwill of Southern Nevada, Inc., visit the Web site at www.8ngoodwill.org, or call (702)597-1107. Nevada launc^s official millennium campaign Nevada tourism officials reThe site offers a searchable site or by calling the toll-free Gathering in Elko each JanuFinance is alternative for information technology executives, survey says If they had not opted for careers in technology, many information technology executives would be busy tracking their firms' budgets and capital expenditures, according to a recent survey of chief information officers (CIOs). When asked which field they would have entered if they had not pursued positions in information technolsgy, one in five respondents (21%) said accounting and finance. Teaching ranked second, receiving 15% of the response. The survey was developed by RHI Consulting, a leading specialized consulting firm that provides information technology professionals on a project basis. Conducted by an independent research firm, the survey includes responses from 1,400 CIOs ft"om a stratified random sample of U.S. companies with more than 100 employees. CIOs were asked, "If you had not chosen a career in technology, which field would you have been most likely to pursue?" Following are the results among the more than 1,200 CIOs who cited an .alternate career in response to the question: Accounting and finance, 21%; teaching, 15%; engineering, 11%; m edicine, 9% ; business administration, 8%; entertainment/recre^alUKlWbes, 5%; law, 5%; marketing,^;JcgRitfllc i!iM(>rch, "4%othr CipponBe8 under 3%), 17%. -- ,., "; cently announced details about the state's official "Making Millennium Magic" campaign to attract visitors and the business community to a 15-month celebration marking the coming of the once-in-1,000 years occurrence, The campaign of the Nevada Commission on Tourism (NCOT), "Nevada2000: Making Millennium Magic," involves statewide events and activities, a new Web site, souvenir gifts and commemorative merchandise, and a campaign kit for the business and tourism communities. The celebration and parade of millennium events will begin this year on Nevada Day weekend, Oct. 30, and conclude on Jan. 15, 2001, the birthday of slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King. "Nevada is the place to celebrate an extraordinary event in history that none of us will ever forget," said Lt. Gov. Lorraine Hunt, NCOT chair and a member of Gov. Kenny Guinn's Nevada Millennium Committee. "We will help make the millennium extra special by giving people 15 months of events and activities that offer something to suit every taste." Millennium activities and events from glittery and glamorous to ghost towns and getaways will occur daily in Nevada throughout the celebration. "Nevada's celebration will begin this fall as a drum roll for the big event on New Year's," NCOT Executive Director Tom Tait said. "The celebration will last throughout 2000 and into 2001, covering all seasons of the year. Celebrate in Nevada and you get a bonus because our 24hour life-style allows for'Making Millennium Magic' around the clock." database of statewide events listed in the 15-month Milleur nium Countdown Calendar, special millennium-related travel packages, a virtual Millennium Gift Shop with official Nevada2000 merchandise, a campaign kit for Nevada entities to adopt the official millennium logo, and a press room with information for news media and travel writers. Visitors to the Web site events section can e-mail a special millennium postcard invitation to celebrate in Nevada. Millennium gifts and merchandise The Millennium Gift Shop carries items emblazoned with NCOrs special logo, "NV2000Making Millennium Magic," including T-shirts, golf shirts, countdown clocks, seasonable fleece vests and sweatshirts, baseball caps, teddy bears, jewelry, golf balls, water bottles, coffee mugs and other trinkets. Gifts can be ordered on-line, or callers to the millennium hotline can receive a wholesale catalog with more than 300 gift selections for large quantity purchases. Millennium toll-firee hotline Nevada's official toll-free telephone hot line for callers to receive quick, convenient information about the millennium celebration, 1-877-2000-NEV, is usable throughout the United States and Canada. International inquiries should call (775) 687-4322, the regular telephone number for the Nevada Commission on Tourism. Callers can request a 15-month Millennium Countdown Calendar and other visitor information and order NV2000 merchandise. hotline or the NCOT ofhces. (775)687-4322. Millennium events "TDuring the celebration, Nevada's wide assortment of new and popular existing events will take on a millennium focus. Events will include the nation's longest off-road race, the Nevada 2000, running July 8-15, 2000, with a 2,000-mile loop around the state, beginning and ending in Las Vegas. Old favorites include The Cowboy Poetry ary, which in 2000 will be about "Cowboys and Ranching Culture at the Millennium." Millennium events throughout Nevada will be listed on the www.2000nevada.com web site, and in a special Millennium Countdown calendar of events section of Nevada Magazine, a division ofNCOT^Nevada Magazine is found on the web at www.nevadamagazine.com. The Events Calendar will lengthen as the months roll by and new events are added. 1 AJvti! lunch, water, camera. LEAVE: baggage. !iTl1f'. • • *?* fj^ Millennium Web site Nevada's new official Millennium Web site is found at www.2000nevada.com and also is accessible through NCOT's ^^^. : wfib wwwitravelnevada.com Rl mi^^m%* NV20001ogo Nevada's millennium campaign carries the abbreviated logo NV2000 on advertising, events, and merchandise. NCOT offers Nevada's tourism and business community an opporiuniUr to unite in an official fit2^ .$elem-efl8bJS^rHBog(J?campaign "'C'kit is available tJirough the Web VASQUE* DAY HIKING. Handcrafted boots made for getting away from it all. Try on a pair today • -— RDI PROFESSIONS FiniNG SERVICE 550 C Soutii Steplianie St. In Front of Home Base 458-8977 ;^ 6p€n 7 days : • • -^ • >^^mk"Iff ./ • .-. .\T-: • :'i-i-'.v.^' LEARN TO PLAY VIDEO POKER UKE AN EXPERT FREE CLASSES AT THE RESERVE WITH BOB DANCER S^Sm!^^ ^^ *<^ve, o ''^^ Learn the Secrets of Video Poker. Cla8e for beginiier are from 7:00 to 8:00 pjn. and adviUiced classes from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m. Winning video poker strategies are taiight by one of the world's foremost experts, Bob Dancer. The classes are free so you've got nothing • milUUg to lose-and possibly a whole lot to gain. Sound fair to you? We're at 1-515 and W. Lake Mean Drive in Hendersoa SiREURyE Play smarter." tt* dab RaMTf* • ifTi* th> i1(lit to nullify or i HoM C^ifeB ki owMrt Mm opaatail by • a Lake Las Vegas Resort announce die opening of their first waterfront goormet restai^rint* La Chandele, featuring European and Contincatal cuisine. Enjoy perfectly prepared dishes by international culinary expert Executive Chef Becker as you overlook the shhrnnehag waters of the private 320-acre lake from inside the elegant Reflection Bay Golf 6. Beach Qub. Taste wines from the finac^vinqfards tn the world. And savor a gourmet lakeside experience that U the ultimate reflection of good taste. For lunch, join oi daily from 1 lt30 *ja. to 3KX) pun. Evening dining Friday and Saturday 5:30 p.m. CaU (702) 568-7383 to reserve your candlelit tafale by the bay. ReservatioiM recaaunendad. 1^ Q ^Jf^cLAKE LAS VEOAS RESORT Hnknon, nit Lab MBMI Dnvc kpft (EM) 7 md 10 Lake LM V Lvtfrd irnidr RtrtrctVm B OvM S> Be4i HuK Thursday, May 20, 1999 Panorama Pag3 Who's doing the exploiting at bachelor parties? Carol3m: $ My boyfriend will be attending a string of bachelor pari;ies for his friends in the next couple df months, and I'm sure some will be pretty raunchy, with strip bars or strippers on the agenda. Besides the fact that I don't want him hanging around naked women, I think participation in this kind of thing is degrading to humans in the extreme. He dislikes the idea of strip bars, but he wants to be with his friends, so he is going to go. The feminist voice in me says "No way, it's wrong, I'm not going to compromise my beliefs," y^t I'm in love, so what's a girl to do? How and why do womeii put up with men engaging in crude behavior? I'm sure there are other feminists in love out there who are dealing with similar issues. -E.H. Please introduce me to the man who assures his girlfriend that he in fact loves the idea of strip joints. Actually, don't. But not because' the girly world breaks my feminist heart. For every boy who's been a boy, there's a girl in pasties making him pay for the privilege. Exploitative? Sure. But who's exploiting whom, exactly? It's like deciding who occupies moral high ground, Jerry Springer's guest or his studio audience> hard to Show to help Emergency Food Program Gary Marshal announced that St. Matthew's Episcopal Church will stage an admission-free benefit show for the Church's Emergency Food Outreach Program at 7 p.m. Friday, May 28, in the Concert Hall at the Whitney Library, 5175 East Tropicana Ave. The food program has an urgent need for a van to move donated food items. Marshal, volunteer/founder of the program at St. Matthew's will be master of ceremonies and perform at the benefit. He formerly appeared as leading man in "Hallalujah, Hollywood!" at the former MGM Grand, and in "Jubilee!" at Bally's when it opened in 1981. He later went on to star in the national tour of "42nd StreetThe Musical" and also was featured in "The Phantom of the Opera" during its four-year run at the Los Angeles Music Center. .---^ • He will be joined onstage by Michael Ray Tyler, the American Dance Co., Jaymi Marshal, and the Eldorado Jazz Singers, winners of three awards .including Outstanding Choir, at the 1999 All-American Choir Festival in Orlando. Also featured will be the Herbic Dell Trio. For more information contact Gary Marshal, 898-0321. Construction contracts, ^title Insurance are topics of Lied Institute program "Construction Contracts and Law" and "Title Insurance Underwriting and Issues" will be the next topics covered in the Certified Graduate Builder's series, sponsored by the Lied Institute for Real Estate Studies in conjunction with the Southern Nevada Homebuilder's Association. The course about construction contracts will be held from-8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, May 15 on the UNLV campus, Beam Hall (BEH>, Room 108. The instructor will be Shaima Brennan of SGG Management Co.. The course about title insurance will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. May 15 on the UNLV Campus, Beam Hall (BEH), Room 109. Instructors include Kasmer Bernath, Ron Ciaramella and Lori Bobrick, all from First American Title Co. of Nevada. For more information or to register, contact Donna Weiss of the Lied InStitute at 895-44b;!l| TELL ME ABOUT IT CAROLYN HAX see when you're face down in the dirt. If the feminist in you thinks this reasoning doesn't fly, please let me introduce you to another flightless bird...".. .yet I'm in love, so what's a girl to do?" The way I see it, the two real issues are one you cited — your boyfriend among nudies — and one you just touched on, the dingy film that seems to settle on anyone or anything associated with stripping. The remedy for the former is this thing we call "trust." Is clothing what keeps your boyfriend faithful? The remedy for that is this thing we call "staying single." ..^i'. • .r',;' But', .as my husband reminded'me, same-sex hetero gatherings aren't known for their maturity, particularly after tee many martoonis. For your normally trustworthy but highly intoxicated sweetie who gets goaded by his highly intoxicated buddies into doing something he won't be proud of sober, we have your basic stripclub security: bouncers built like dishwashers. I defy revelers of either sex to paw a dancer. The stripper who makes house calls, on the other hand, rarely arrives with the same assurance. And so, predictably. the stories that come out of back-room parties, while rarely crossing over into infidelity, routinely cross over into gross. The moral, I suppose, for the affianced: Choose yoiir beloveds carefully, then celebrate your choice at a strip bar. Which brings us right to the issue of ick. Bachelors, bachelorettes and their buddies who fete them with skin — they're all doing the exploitation twostep, and no excuse or justification or rationalization can change that. But if they only dance it at bachelor parties, frankly^ I can live with it. As long as they don't eiy oy it, of course. ^ Dear Carolyn: I am an "out" lesbian who works with a married female co-worker who continuously came onto me sexually and cSlme out of the closet to me. After about a year of being very close to this woman, I told her I love her very much. Now, she denies coming on to me, liking women and is very cold and won't even speak to me. What should I do? How could this woman turn on me like this? Also, she just recently left her husband. -Help Leave her be — as far away from you as your workday life will permit. The past year of this woman' life has consisted of inner turmoil, professional risk and family chaos, capped off by self-loathing and. a very likely divorce. You "saw her through this parade of agony, and now you probably remind her of it. It's sad. It happens. Move on. Dear Caroljrn: I disagree with our theory that hints are the universal language of courtesy. I am a single male, and I can pick up on hints. But I am Very resentful when I am forced to take a hint rather than just be told that people are not interested. Anything but the direct approach tells me they donT think enough of me to be direct. Anything short of directness makes the opposite sex an opponent, and I am tired of plajring games. -Single and Tired Make that "Single and Beat All to Hell." Wow. You're a bit off the mark, too. My exact words were, "People believe hints are the universal language of courtesy." But still. Using hints instead of blunt truths has nothing to do with people's opinion of you, and everything to do with their mortal dread of an awkward moment. Is that good? No. You're right. But it's not as bad as you make it out to be, either. If the game's so painful for you, consider sometime on the bench. Write to Tell Me About It, Style Plus, 115015th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20071 or tellmewashpost.com, and Join Carolsrn's live discussion at noon today or at 8 p.m. Monday on The Post's Web site, www.wa8hpost.com. 1999, Washington Post Writers Group Tiie News covers your community PET OF THE WEEK Ben it a cute male tri-colored beagle. He has a very high energy level and needs a big yard. He Is also very friendly. Ben is looking for a good home. Photo courtesy oY National Charity League, Green Valley Chapter Call the Henderson Animal Shelter, 565-2033 UleVe Got Mi N S With 2,850 slot machines, high payouts, friendly employees -and^e fantastic slot club, it's no wonder locals voted us the Best Place to Play Slots In Las Vegas. ^" Results taken from orviine poll. IMI I KM SAM'S TOVTN

PAGE 27

ii p i p w^^wp^p wt i w' • • • ""' y-^v t*t"V ^n 'y-i*-"->* -i^ i^v'^ T^^ gt.'.^ ^y Pag2 Psnortma Thursday, May 20. 1999 ^OPV^V^F^^P .4-^. Goodwill of Southern Nevada names board of directors Phil Weisman, owner of PDT Associates, Inc., has been elected chairman of the 1999 board of directors for Goodwill of Southern Nevada, Inc. Weisman has served on the board since 1995, most recently as vice chairman. Serving with Weisman on the executive committee are: vice chairman Edd Kluth, owner of Advantage Parking Service; secretary Brian Me Evilly, president of McEvilly Benefits; and treasurer Ted Atencio, retired Citibank vice president. Other board members atlarge include: NickPandelis, Hugh Barnett;^ Darryl Cronfeld, Don Davidson, Dave Haag, Geno Hill, Mark Jones, Esq., Lillian McMorris, Brenda Meehan, Kay Sholine and Carroll Varner. These outstanding members of our community donate their time and expertise to help Goodwill help our neighbors with disabilities start new careers in our community," said Steve Chartrand, president/CEO of Goodwill. "For that, we are grateful." Phil Weisman Ih 1998, 105 people with disabilities and other special needs were served through Goodwill programs and 73 individuals started new careers. Goodwill is a not-for-profit organization whose mission is to provide training, employment and job placement services for people with disabilities and other special needs to maximize the quality of life of each individual served. For more information about Groodwill of Southern Nevada, Inc., visit the Web site at www.8ngoodwill.org, or call (702)597-1107. Nevada launc^s official millennium campaign Nevada tourism officials reThe site offers a searchable site or by calling the toll-free Gathering in Elko each JanuFinance is alternative for information technology executives, survey says If they had not opted for careers in technology, many information technology executives would be busy tracking their firms' budgets and capital expenditures, according to a recent survey of chief information officers (CIOs). When asked which field they would have entered if they had not pursued positions in information technolsgy, one in five respondents (21%) said accounting and finance. Teaching ranked second, receiving 15% of the response. The survey was developed by RHI Consulting, a leading specialized consulting firm that provides information technology professionals on a project basis. Conducted by an independent research firm, the survey includes responses from 1,400 CIOs ft"om a stratified random sample of U.S. companies with more than 100 employees. CIOs were asked, "If you had not chosen a career in technology, which field would you have been most likely to pursue?" Following are the results among the more than 1,200 CIOs who cited an .alternate career in response to the question: Accounting and finance, 21%; teaching, 15%; engineering, 11%; m edicine, 9% ; business administration, 8%; entertainment/recre^alUKlWbes, 5%; law, 5%; marketing,^;JcgRitfllc i!iM(>rch, "4%othr CipponBe8 under 3%), 17%. -- ,., "; cently announced details about the state's official "Making Millennium Magic" campaign to attract visitors and the business community to a 15-month celebration marking the coming of the once-in-1,000 years occurrence, The campaign of the Nevada Commission on Tourism (NCOT), "Nevada2000: Making Millennium Magic," involves statewide events and activities, a new Web site, souvenir gifts and commemorative merchandise, and a campaign kit for the business and tourism communities. The celebration and parade of millennium events will begin this year on Nevada Day weekend, Oct. 30, and conclude on Jan. 15, 2001, the birthday of slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King. "Nevada is the place to celebrate an extraordinary event in history that none of us will ever forget," said Lt. Gov. Lorraine Hunt, NCOT chair and a member of Gov. Kenny Guinn's Nevada Millennium Committee. "We will help make the millennium extra special by giving people 15 months of events and activities that offer something to suit every taste." Millennium activities and events from glittery and glamorous to ghost towns and getaways will occur daily in Nevada throughout the celebration. "Nevada's celebration will begin this fall as a drum roll for the big event on New Year's," NCOT Executive Director Tom Tait said. "The celebration will last throughout 2000 and into 2001, covering all seasons of the year. Celebrate in Nevada and you get a bonus because our 24hour life-style allows for'Making Millennium Magic' around the clock." database of statewide events listed in the 15-month Milleur nium Countdown Calendar, special millennium-related travel packages, a virtual Millennium Gift Shop with official Nevada2000 merchandise, a campaign kit for Nevada entities to adopt the official millennium logo, and a press room with information for news media and travel writers. Visitors to the Web site events section can e-mail a special millennium postcard invitation to celebrate in Nevada. Millennium gifts and merchandise The Millennium Gift Shop carries items emblazoned with NCOrs special logo, "NV2000Making Millennium Magic," including T-shirts, golf shirts, countdown clocks, seasonable fleece vests and sweatshirts, baseball caps, teddy bears, jewelry, golf balls, water bottles, coffee mugs and other trinkets. Gifts can be ordered on-line, or callers to the millennium hotline can receive a wholesale catalog with more than 300 gift selections for large quantity purchases. Millennium toll-firee hotline Nevada's official toll-free telephone hot line for callers to receive quick, convenient information about the millennium celebration, 1-877-2000-NEV, is usable throughout the United States and Canada. International inquiries should call (775) 687-4322, the regular telephone number for the Nevada Commission on Tourism. Callers can request a 15-month Millennium Countdown Calendar and other visitor information and order NV2000 merchandise. hotline or the NCOT ofhces. (775)687-4322. Millennium events "TDuring the celebration, Nevada's wide assortment of new and popular existing events will take on a millennium focus. Events will include the nation's longest off-road race, the Nevada 2000, running July 8-15, 2000, with a 2,000-mile loop around the state, beginning and ending in Las Vegas. Old favorites include The Cowboy Poetry ary, which in 2000 will be about "Cowboys and Ranching Culture at the Millennium." Millennium events throughout Nevada will be listed on the www.2000nevada.com web site, and in a special Millennium Countdown calendar of events section of Nevada Magazine, a division ofNCOT^Nevada Magazine is found on the web at www.nevadamagazine.com. The Events Calendar will lengthen as the months roll by and new events are added. 1 AJvti! lunch, water, camera. LEAVE: baggage. !iTl1f'. • • *?* fj^ Millennium Web site Nevada's new official Millennium Web site is found at www.2000nevada.com and also is accessible through NCOT's ^^^. : wfib wwwitravelnevada.com Rl mi^^m%* NV20001ogo Nevada's millennium campaign carries the abbreviated logo NV2000 on advertising, events, and merchandise. NCOT offers Nevada's tourism and business community an opporiuniUr to unite in an official fit2^ .$elem-efl8bJS^rHBog(J?campaign "'C'kit is available tJirough the Web VASQUE* DAY HIKING. Handcrafted boots made for getting away from it all. Try on a pair today • -— RDI PROFESSIONS FiniNG SERVICE 550 C Soutii Steplianie St. In Front of Home Base 458-8977 ;^ 6p€n 7 days : • • -^ • >^^mk"Iff ./ • .-. .\T-: • :'i-i-'.v.^' LEARN TO PLAY VIDEO POKER UKE AN EXPERT FREE CLASSES AT THE RESERVE WITH BOB DANCER S^Sm!^^ ^^ *<^ve, o ''^^ Learn the Secrets of Video Poker. Cla8e for beginiier are from 7:00 to 8:00 pjn. and adviUiced classes from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m. Winning video poker strategies are taiight by one of the world's foremost experts, Bob Dancer. The classes are free so you've got nothing • milUUg to lose-and possibly a whole lot to gain. Sound fair to you? We're at 1-515 and W. Lake Mean Drive in Hendersoa SiREURyE Play smarter." tt* dab RaMTf* • ifTi* th> i1(lit to nullify or i HoM C^ifeB ki owMrt Mm opaatail by • a Lake Las Vegas Resort announce die opening of their first waterfront goormet restai^rint* La Chandele, featuring European and Contincatal cuisine. Enjoy perfectly prepared dishes by international culinary expert Executive Chef Becker as you overlook the shhrnnehag waters of the private 320-acre lake from inside the elegant Reflection Bay Golf 6. Beach Qub. Taste wines from the finac^vinqfards tn the world. And savor a gourmet lakeside experience that U the ultimate reflection of good taste. For lunch, join oi daily from 1 lt30 *ja. to 3KX) pun. Evening dining Friday and Saturday 5:30 p.m. CaU (702) 568-7383 to reserve your candlelit tafale by the bay. ReservatioiM recaaunendad. 1^ Q ^Jf^cLAKE LAS VEOAS RESORT Hnknon, nit Lab MBMI Dnvc kpft (EM) 7 md 10 Lake LM V Lvtfrd irnidr RtrtrctVm B OvM S> Be4i HuK Thursday, May 20, 1999 Panorama Pag3 Who's doing the exploiting at bachelor parties? Carol3m: $ My boyfriend will be attending a string of bachelor pari;ies for his friends in the next couple df months, and I'm sure some will be pretty raunchy, with strip bars or strippers on the agenda. Besides the fact that I don't want him hanging around naked women, I think participation in this kind of thing is degrading to humans in the extreme. He dislikes the idea of strip bars, but he wants to be with his friends, so he is going to go. The feminist voice in me says "No way, it's wrong, I'm not going to compromise my beliefs," y^t I'm in love, so what's a girl to do? How and why do womeii put up with men engaging in crude behavior? I'm sure there are other feminists in love out there who are dealing with similar issues. -E.H. Please introduce me to the man who assures his girlfriend that he in fact loves the idea of strip joints. Actually, don't. But not because' the girly world breaks my feminist heart. For every boy who's been a boy, there's a girl in pasties making him pay for the privilege. Exploitative? Sure. But who's exploiting whom, exactly? It's like deciding who occupies moral high ground, Jerry Springer's guest or his studio audience> hard to Show to help Emergency Food Program Gary Marshal announced that St. Matthew's Episcopal Church will stage an admission-free benefit show for the Church's Emergency Food Outreach Program at 7 p.m. Friday, May 28, in the Concert Hall at the Whitney Library, 5175 East Tropicana Ave. The food program has an urgent need for a van to move donated food items. Marshal, volunteer/founder of the program at St. Matthew's will be master of ceremonies and perform at the benefit. He formerly appeared as leading man in "Hallalujah, Hollywood!" at the former MGM Grand, and in "Jubilee!" at Bally's when it opened in 1981. He later went on to star in the national tour of "42nd StreetThe Musical" and also was featured in "The Phantom of the Opera" during its four-year run at the Los Angeles Music Center. .---^ • He will be joined onstage by Michael Ray Tyler, the American Dance Co., Jaymi Marshal, and the Eldorado Jazz Singers, winners of three awards .including Outstanding Choir, at the 1999 All-American Choir Festival in Orlando. Also featured will be the Herbic Dell Trio. For more information contact Gary Marshal, 898-0321. Construction contracts, ^title Insurance are topics of Lied Institute program "Construction Contracts and Law" and "Title Insurance Underwriting and Issues" will be the next topics covered in the Certified Graduate Builder's series, sponsored by the Lied Institute for Real Estate Studies in conjunction with the Southern Nevada Homebuilder's Association. The course about construction contracts will be held from-8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, May 15 on the UNLV campus, Beam Hall (BEH>, Room 108. The instructor will be Shaima Brennan of SGG Management Co.. The course about title insurance will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. May 15 on the UNLV Campus, Beam Hall (BEH), Room 109. Instructors include Kasmer Bernath, Ron Ciaramella and Lori Bobrick, all from First American Title Co. of Nevada. For more information or to register, contact Donna Weiss of the Lied InStitute at 895-44b;!l| TELL ME ABOUT IT CAROLYN HAX see when you're face down in the dirt. If the feminist in you thinks this reasoning doesn't fly, please let me introduce you to another flightless bird...".. .yet I'm in love, so what's a girl to do?" The way I see it, the two real issues are one you cited — your boyfriend among nudies — and one you just touched on, the dingy film that seems to settle on anyone or anything associated with stripping. The remedy for the former is this thing we call "trust." Is clothing what keeps your boyfriend faithful? The remedy for that is this thing we call "staying single." ..^i'. • .r',;' But', .as my husband reminded'me, same-sex hetero gatherings aren't known for their maturity, particularly after tee many martoonis. For your normally trustworthy but highly intoxicated sweetie who gets goaded by his highly intoxicated buddies into doing something he won't be proud of sober, we have your basic stripclub security: bouncers built like dishwashers. I defy revelers of either sex to paw a dancer. The stripper who makes house calls, on the other hand, rarely arrives with the same assurance. And so, predictably. the stories that come out of back-room parties, while rarely crossing over into infidelity, routinely cross over into gross. The moral, I suppose, for the affianced: Choose yoiir beloveds carefully, then celebrate your choice at a strip bar. Which brings us right to the issue of ick. Bachelors, bachelorettes and their buddies who fete them with skin — they're all doing the exploitation twostep, and no excuse or justification or rationalization can change that. But if they only dance it at bachelor parties, frankly^ I can live with it. As long as they don't eiy oy it, of course. ^ Dear Carolyn: I am an "out" lesbian who works with a married female co-worker who continuously came onto me sexually and cSlme out of the closet to me. After about a year of being very close to this woman, I told her I love her very much. Now, she denies coming on to me, liking women and is very cold and won't even speak to me. What should I do? How could this woman turn on me like this? Also, she just recently left her husband. -Help Leave her be — as far away from you as your workday life will permit. The past year of this woman' life has consisted of inner turmoil, professional risk and family chaos, capped off by self-loathing and. a very likely divorce. You "saw her through this parade of agony, and now you probably remind her of it. It's sad. It happens. Move on. Dear Caroljrn: I disagree with our theory that hints are the universal language of courtesy. I am a single male, and I can pick up on hints. But I am Very resentful when I am forced to take a hint rather than just be told that people are not interested. Anything but the direct approach tells me they donT think enough of me to be direct. Anything short of directness makes the opposite sex an opponent, and I am tired of plajring games. -Single and Tired Make that "Single and Beat All to Hell." Wow. You're a bit off the mark, too. My exact words were, "People believe hints are the universal language of courtesy." But still. Using hints instead of blunt truths has nothing to do with people's opinion of you, and everything to do with their mortal dread of an awkward moment. Is that good? No. You're right. But it's not as bad as you make it out to be, either. If the game's so painful for you, consider sometime on the bench. Write to Tell Me About It, Style Plus, 115015th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20071 or tellmewashpost.com, and Join Carolsrn's live discussion at noon today or at 8 p.m. Monday on The Post's Web site, www.wa8hpost.com. 1999, Washington Post Writers Group Tiie News covers your community PET OF THE WEEK Ben it a cute male tri-colored beagle. He has a very high energy level and needs a big yard. He Is also very friendly. Ben is looking for a good home. Photo courtesy oY National Charity League, Green Valley Chapter Call the Henderson Animal Shelter, 565-2033 UleVe Got Mi N S With 2,850 slot machines, high payouts, friendly employees -and^e fantastic slot club, it's no wonder locals voted us the Best Place to Play Slots In Las Vegas. ^" Results taken from orviine poll. IMI I KM SAM'S TOVTN

PAGE 28

> • • • '—' • '^ !i\ • y.-j ivj < T-j .j j^>^v-rf-jrr-f-j.5TJ.f yy. !' ". > • • • f.f.y.y.p... -. }} 9m^^^^^^^^r^w^rwf^^'^^^^^^^ ^^mmmmmmmmmmmmm wmmm u It^o Psfl* 4 Panorama Thursday, May 20,1999 OUTDOORS Water safety festival this weelcend at iaice This weekend, the Desert Valley Water Safety Council will host the Water Safety Festival, geared for educating and sharinjir water safety tips with the geiJwal public. / Scheduled for lOo.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 22, and Sunday, May 23, the Water Safety Festival will be held at the special events beach at the Lake Mead National Recreation Area. According to the Desert Valley Water Safety Council, there will OUTDOORS WITH BARB BARB HENDERSON be fun activities for children and adults, which will include a scavenger hunt, lifejacket relay, rescue relay race, and a cardboard boat building contest and race. Along with those fim activities, the council is also planning several demonstrations on the following topics: visual distress signals, fire extinguisher use, dive flags, emergency equipment, marine band radio, air ambulances, safe fueling, life jackets, self rescue and boat equipment. There will be a special demonstration by the Las Vegas Search and Rescue Team. During this two-day event, there will be Coast Guard Boat Inspections at the Hemenway Ramp, for boaters who are getting ready for the start of the season. If you are among the many outdoor enthusiasts who ei\joy any of the water sports, like swimming, boating, SCUBA, paddle crafts, fishing, personal water crafts or skiing, just to name a few ... this two-day event should be of interest to you. "Until next week, eiyoy the great outdoors." Henderson is a host of outdoor TV and radio shows UNLV to offer homeowner pool maintenance course UNLVs Division of Continuing Education has scheduled a money-saving seminar for homeowners enjoying the benefits of pool ownership, but also facing the responsibilities of pool maintenance. Three two-hour sessions will be from 7 to 9 p..m. Thursdays, June 3-17, in Room ClU of the Classroom Building Complex on campus. Instructor Jeff Jarvis, a trained pool technician, will offer tips for pool servicing and repair. The fee for the course is $49 which includes a detailed maintenance pool manual. For more information, call 895-3394. New gadgets and accessories for your boat Most of us old-time skippers will be honest and confess that we always need to buy accessories for our boat. Even if we don't need an item, the urge to buy can't be overcome. That is why I always enjoy paging through the many boating catalogs I receive and going to visit a marine dealership. My list of things I need always gets longer after the mailman arrives. The solution for a versatile 12-volt light was displayed in a recent issue and might be worth checking out. Called the MegaLight, this small unit draws minimum amps and comes with a 15 foot cord and a cigarette lighter plug. (One of the first things I had installed on my rig was a.lighter receptacle.) This light turns on and off automatically with a photo cell and I would think it would be suitable for an anchor light as well as illuminating your helm area. There were two different prices for the same unit in two different catalogs so shop around for the best buy. There are 'a lot of anti-theft devices on the market, some to preyent thajwheels on yonr trailer from turning and others* to protect the trailer coupling. With many boats having auxiliary motors, some type of security chain or lock should be considered. Chains that are coated to prevent scratches and come with a heavy duty lock are fairly inexBOATING WITH RAY RAY EICHER. pensive. Anjrthing to deter a thief. One catalog devoted three pages to safety devices for a boat or trailer so there is a lot to choose from. A nifty item 1 discovered at a local dealership was an air horn that could be recharged by just pumping air into the can. This unit had the pump included. No environmental problem with this horn. Another ingenious accessory was a bucket that fills from the bottom. Drop it into the water and a flap opens up to allow water to enter. Once enough water is in the bucket and you lift it up, the flap closes, sealing without leaking. No more struggling to get water with a regular bucket. Wonder what genius thought of that? I can hardly wait until next month's publications to arrive so I can see what other stuff I might nfeed. One advantage of thi kind'Of fh^pping it that it does not cost anything which is a good thing. Our bank balance does not allow overspending. A reminder that this month is my annual column to have you check your fire extinguishers. If they need service, take them to a certified dealer. I have recom'X? mended that when you purchase a new extinguisher, buy a good one that can be recharged. It might cost more but it will be cheaper in the long run. Coming up this weekend is the inaugural Water Safety Festival to be held at Boulder Beach. This event will kick*ofr National Safe Boating Week and from the list of displays and demonstrations in their news release, this is something you should not miss. You can get your boat inspected at the Hemenway Ramp (Courtesy Marine Examination), get involved in boat races and build a cardboard boat which you must use in a relay race. That should be interesting. Along with that event will be a life jacket relay. Just to be safe, 1 imagine. The festival will go from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be food concessions and other entertainment so plan on coming out to support the Desert Valley Water Safety Council. The emcee will be Barb Henderson who seems to be everjrwhere whenever something is goin^ on in • pjigidoata.?-, r% .. "vw,-' ./ • A spedal congratuliaiion goes out to Dale Antonich, chief ranger at Lake Mead, who received the Harry Yount Award for Excellence for his work with the National Park Service. Vice President Al Gore made the presentation. • American Cancer Society accepts camp applications The American Cancer Society is accepting applications for two summer camps in July for children 8 to 15 years of age with cancer and their siblings. There is no fee for the camp and children are flown to their location courtesy of Angel Flights. Camp Sunrise and Sunrise 'Sidekicks are one-week summer camps located in Arizona. Camp Sunrise is specifically for children who have cancer, or have had cancer. In addition to canoeing, hiking, fishing, horseback riding, archery and swimming, campers can build birdhouses and participate in science experiments. Applications for both summer camps are available at the American Cancer Society, 1325 E. Harmon, through Friday, July 18. Only 20 campers will be selected based upon completion of their application. For more information, call Jeanette Rowland, camp coordinator at the American Cancer Society, 798-6877, ext. 228. The News You Need Is On Now! Oehorah levy lalinfurvis News ONE at 9 and News ONE at 10 weeknigtits on Las Vegas ONE Cliannels1&39 News ONE nt 9 & 10 on I as Vro.is ONF Ch.inncis 1 & ?. When you are marking your calendar, save June 12 to come out to Hamlin Bay for the Lake Mead Boat Owners Association's annual clean-up. Each year, this organization goes to this cove to pick up trash. Pack a lunch and come and enjoy the day. Meet at the bay at 9 a.m. I understand there will be divers so bringyour scuba gear as well. Until next time., keep your bilge dry. Eicher, a long-time valley resident, considers hinnself a parttime boater and fishernnan. His Email address is rayboating@aol.com. V\f MawMfiia piMMwna PIMMOm* iTWTWns Pitv7ni4 paii/ranis tM/reni* muvmn* raa^Tsnis IMPORT RADIAL SPECIALS I 1W0R1)__J13 1ISffOR14-M—IN I 1K/70R14 136 iosmmi m ITWTOmS FisK TIRES FISK EDITION PERFORMANCE RADIALS P195IR14 tM P21SC6R1S ttt ^P195ft15 MO P2SMR16 $49 )P2(M0R1S M R1SN0ZR17„410$ P1IMM14 FISK TIKES FISK CLASSIC P1Wn(n4.___t}1 P21V7SR1S IK P]K/nR14-__4l3 PlSffRIS tX novnftis—_t3s Pistrans $39 TRUCK, VAN 8. RV P1K/n)R14 $40 IP175WR14 $42 |P1IS5ft14 $43 pi7V7om3 WWXM PI0SmR14 $M PDSffORIS.—$S3 P21SffQR1S $64 CUSTOM WHEELS r40 wmm ...ysi 3I-IO6RISC....46O YWmi ...JS1 LT22y75mM) ..463 3M6tRiyC ..m LT24ynR16/E...JM lOPI ATFANTHinC PRICISI MICHELIN^ >FYOKOHAMA OOOD/YEAR BKAUSEiOMlXHISKIDIf.K.0NY0URnBtS: j ,UMrj(,N ll(HN(.|.H,y -^J ^1^ Z^i^i-^^J %mm. TK • MM nMunwnoN HiraB otr P16S/MR13 riTiflii-i) $41 PMMI>14 $44 nWMIM $47 nwn-is w IBIWIIWI IP P18BM0R-14 raiiiM4 IP Wiwm IP nHPR-iiZZZp 17V7Mniia4RAMPOnCE BFCoadrich 1 A K tz (S CJ N T H C> L JiT-kf/.d • r.'s.'-n//Tv.u PILOT/LTX mmuiLmimimrmm P21M0m4 fmm I KTHMI I nmmi i LT2M/78fnW STORE HOURS IION.-n.l.3M.-00 8AT.I:3M.-00 AHsniOA** LAHOBST INSB^BI 45 P178/7tM1l PWg ffOHII.. P22S/7PR1S. PiaSMRIS. PMMM1S. RtlMORII. psTymis. 463 • NT Tina TMMO DCaiQNt MAY VARY •OUUM Cnv / NBOCMON 360 N. BouUar Hoy $86-6874 OKOIVAUfY/QREBiVAUITRANCH 2PWliP'" ., '^'* • 4881 E. SunM 436-1533 SJ SJIieiJir i5t-3487 900N NiliiBW, 43B-10f| a640MnMIPlMry J864033 g*yj*^ ::L : 7MC66 aOUTW W JMP em jM/PeCQU 3640S.lltoytoidnMy 7M-433I 40 S. JanM 362-2106 6886 WM Stfm AM 873^ BOUUVANOMMX/IMLV nCITW/CMNATDVW NORTMSUMMBUN/PMNTEODCSOn' 3836 8liryWPtaiy 74^338 2886 8. Oiafcy. a5l.3487 4>1 N. RMto jMMtt www. Thursday, May 20, 1999 Panorama PagaS YOURHEALTH Biochemical marker targets brain injury leading to movement problems after stroke Researchers have used biochemical markers for the first time to locate the brain injury that is associated with loss of movement in individuals who have had a stroke. The study is reported in this month's Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association. The findings are considered significant because scientists are now able to pinpoint ah area of the brain associated with loss of movement resulting from a stroke. Identifying the location of brain cell damage provides scientists with a target site for designing treatments that could halt or slow the progression of such cell damage in stroke patients. To locate this brain region, the scientists measured levels of a biochemical substance found almost exclusively in adult brain cells. They used magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), a technique for quantitative measurements of the concentrations of biochemical substances, to measure levels of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) in various areas of the brain. The role of NAA in the brain is unclear, but studies suggest it may be associated with protein building and the transmission of signals between nerve cells. The researchers foand reduced concentratiohs of NAA in a particular brain region were linked with weakness in patients with stroke. This region, known as the internal capsule, has nerve pathways that transmit signals to and from the brain. "When combined with magnetic resonance imagingCMRI), a visualization method for detecting clots or blockages in the brain that trigger m^ strokes, MRS provides scientists with a panoramic, interactive view of both site and function within the nervous system," said leading researcher Sarah T. Pendlebury, MRCP, at the Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance of the Brain, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom. George Hademenos, Ph.D., staff scientist with the American Heart Association, noted that these findings suggest that the iryured brain cells within the internal capsule could be targeted by neuroprotective agents, thus minimizing the extent of permanent disabilities in stroke patients. If administered promptly, these agents could protect bsain cells from Older rockers help out Children's Miracle Network Some older folks just wanna rock! Seniors from Village Oaks-Las Vegas dusted off their rocking I chairs and geared up for a rockin' good time at their first Rock-A-Thon [ May 13 f(fr th^ Children's Miracle Network benefiting UMC Ho8pitAl. These Las Vegas seniors literally rocked the day away in rocking I chairsto raise money for sick kids through the Children's Miracle Network for UMC Hospital. They were joined and encouraged by children, various entertainers, fiiends and family throughout the day. BIRTHS ^^ May 6, 1999 Renda and Stephen Mirsky, girl. May 10,1999 Connie,Gerlits and Brett Costello, girl. May 11, 1999 Christine and Peter Van Alstyne, boy; Gail and Timothy Ward, boy; Lara and Brad Goldberg, girl; Kelley and Michael Werran, boy; Sherri and Ty Kehoe, boy; Nalleh and Thomas Shetayh, boy. May 12,1999 Tracy and David Prince, boy; Helena and Pedro Flores, girl; Alisha and Brian Clay, girl; Amy Tressler and Edward Folkman, Jr., boy. ,jt .._ • May 13,1999 Carrie and Russell Ketchum, boy; Betty and Isham Evans, boy; Courtney and Aaron Wenstrup, boy; Carmella Basils, boy; Grace and Eric Schellenberg, boy; Dalai and Paul Advent, girl. —.J May 14,1999 Maureen and Charles Setchell, Jr., boy; Carrie and Jeffrey Rowland, girl; Kelli Keplinger, boy; Cindi Willette and Michael Edwards, girl. May 15,1999 Nicole and Jeremy Richter, girl; Andra and Ted Dalgleish, girl; Beverly and Paul Young, boy. May 17,1999 Leann and Joseph Fink, boy; Jodi and Lance Mecham, boy; Laxira and Christiopher Laurent, girl; Victoria Gomez and Gary Smith, girl. •••**• • •••* ••••* •. •• • • -•* • • • : • '* _^.-:' • M." DAILY PRIME RIB ^4^^ SUNDAY THURSDAY S^95 / 20 OZ. T-BONE STEAK ^3 Also available Monday FRIED CHICKEN ^2 All dinners include all you can cat salad bar served from 4:00 10 00 pm (SubjccI to changp VM Thrfc s no piMf Itkf oi pM> '"> l>r. .l.fAsf tiin h .H tUnnvt irreversible iiyury caused by the loss of oxygen and other vital nutrients, thus halting further brain cell damage following the stroke, he adds. NAA levels were measured in the internal capsule of 12 men and six women who had suffered a sti'oke within one month to five years before entering the study. Both an MRS and MRI were performeSd, and NAA concentrations in the internal capsule were calculated for the 18 patients as well as 10 healthy individuals of similar average age who served as controls. The average internal capsule NAA level was 40 for the patient group comjJared with 51 for the control group, and the NAA loss was associated with loss of movement. "Since NAA loss is associated with brain cell injury, MRS allows us to predict post-stroke brain damage early, before the actual cell changes appear," Pendlebury said. Heretofore, scientists have relied upon MRI to visualize cell damage in the brain. Information from MRS of brain cell iryury could be used to predict the outcome for stroke patients. Future studies might determine whether the association care movemer\]t loss can be reversed," Pendlebury said. Other researchers include A.M. Blamire, Ph.D.; M.A. Lee, MRCP; P. Styles, Ph.D.; and P.M. Matthews, D. Phil. EYE INSTITUTE OF NEVADA SM .^sS^ OPTICAL CENTER \^ Gary W. Freedman Licensed Optician • Eyewear Prescriptions Filled • Eyewear Repairs • Affordable, Quality Eyewear • Medicare Provider ^irr," Personalized Service Davis Vision Plan Accepted 999 ADAMS BLVD. STE 100, BOULDER CITY • 108 E. LAKE MEAD DR. STE 303, HENDERSON PLEASE CALL FOR HOURS 294-4444 > 564-2539 NEVADA PIANO ORGAN CENTERS M Pre-Opening WAREHOUSE CLERANCE New Location...Too much merchandise for store...Must Move...No Gimmicl ust a Real Sale!! ;*t^4 RAND PIANOS rom ^6,995 IMANY QUAUTY RE-OWNED PIANOS 18 TUES. MAY 1 .„--^Thor Fri. May 21 10-6 llllMQry^re^Rd#K RENTAL PIANOSh-^ From $35 A Mo. Large SeliscHon lA "^ (Next to Marshmellow Factory) T 990-6 763 An Evolution in Cost Containment: Efficient Claims Management. ^Si^-f .^^^' .r-->WEMPLOYERS O F NEVADA 8URANCE COMPANY Experience that comes with the territory. Canon City • EIko • Las Vegas • Reno 1-888-977-3792, ext. 3426 or www.employer&insco.com Contact your Nevada Independent Ii Agent \!Py

PAGE 29

> • • • '—' • '^ !i\ • y.-j ivj < T-j .j j^>^v-rf-jrr-f-j.5TJ.f yy. !' ". > • • • f.f.y.y.p... -. }} 9m^^^^^^^^r^w^rwf^^'^^^^^^^ ^^mmmmmmmmmmmmm wmmm u It^o Psfl* 4 Panorama Thursday, May 20,1999 OUTDOORS Water safety festival this weelcend at iaice This weekend, the Desert Valley Water Safety Council will host the Water Safety Festival, geared for educating and sharinjir water safety tips with the geiJwal public. / Scheduled for lOo.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 22, and Sunday, May 23, the Water Safety Festival will be held at the special events beach at the Lake Mead National Recreation Area. According to the Desert Valley Water Safety Council, there will OUTDOORS WITH BARB BARB HENDERSON be fun activities for children and adults, which will include a scavenger hunt, lifejacket relay, rescue relay race, and a cardboard boat building contest and race. Along with those fim activities, the council is also planning several demonstrations on the following topics: visual distress signals, fire extinguisher use, dive flags, emergency equipment, marine band radio, air ambulances, safe fueling, life jackets, self rescue and boat equipment. There will be a special demonstration by the Las Vegas Search and Rescue Team. During this two-day event, there will be Coast Guard Boat Inspections at the Hemenway Ramp, for boaters who are getting ready for the start of the season. If you are among the many outdoor enthusiasts who ei\joy any of the water sports, like swimming, boating, SCUBA, paddle crafts, fishing, personal water crafts or skiing, just to name a few ... this two-day event should be of interest to you. "Until next week, eiyoy the great outdoors." Henderson is a host of outdoor TV and radio shows UNLV to offer homeowner pool maintenance course UNLVs Division of Continuing Education has scheduled a money-saving seminar for homeowners enjoying the benefits of pool ownership, but also facing the responsibilities of pool maintenance. Three two-hour sessions will be from 7 to 9 p..m. Thursdays, June 3-17, in Room ClU of the Classroom Building Complex on campus. Instructor Jeff Jarvis, a trained pool technician, will offer tips for pool servicing and repair. The fee for the course is $49 which includes a detailed maintenance pool manual. For more information, call 895-3394. New gadgets and accessories for your boat Most of us old-time skippers will be honest and confess that we always need to buy accessories for our boat. Even if we don't need an item, the urge to buy can't be overcome. That is why I always enjoy paging through the many boating catalogs I receive and going to visit a marine dealership. My list of things I need always gets longer after the mailman arrives. The solution for a versatile 12-volt light was displayed in a recent issue and might be worth checking out. Called the MegaLight, this small unit draws minimum amps and comes with a 15 foot cord and a cigarette lighter plug. (One of the first things I had installed on my rig was a.lighter receptacle.) This light turns on and off automatically with a photo cell and I would think it would be suitable for an anchor light as well as illuminating your helm area. There were two different prices for the same unit in two different catalogs so shop around for the best buy. There are 'a lot of anti-theft devices on the market, some to preyent thajwheels on yonr trailer from turning and others* to protect the trailer coupling. With many boats having auxiliary motors, some type of security chain or lock should be considered. Chains that are coated to prevent scratches and come with a heavy duty lock are fairly inexBOATING WITH RAY RAY EICHER. pensive. Anjrthing to deter a thief. One catalog devoted three pages to safety devices for a boat or trailer so there is a lot to choose from. A nifty item 1 discovered at a local dealership was an air horn that could be recharged by just pumping air into the can. This unit had the pump included. No environmental problem with this horn. Another ingenious accessory was a bucket that fills from the bottom. Drop it into the water and a flap opens up to allow water to enter. Once enough water is in the bucket and you lift it up, the flap closes, sealing without leaking. No more struggling to get water with a regular bucket. Wonder what genius thought of that? I can hardly wait until next month's publications to arrive so I can see what other stuff I might nfeed. One advantage of thi kind'Of fh^pping it that it does not cost anything which is a good thing. Our bank balance does not allow overspending. A reminder that this month is my annual column to have you check your fire extinguishers. If they need service, take them to a certified dealer. I have recom'X? mended that when you purchase a new extinguisher, buy a good one that can be recharged. It might cost more but it will be cheaper in the long run. Coming up this weekend is the inaugural Water Safety Festival to be held at Boulder Beach. This event will kick*ofr National Safe Boating Week and from the list of displays and demonstrations in their news release, this is something you should not miss. You can get your boat inspected at the Hemenway Ramp (Courtesy Marine Examination), get involved in boat races and build a cardboard boat which you must use in a relay race. That should be interesting. Along with that event will be a life jacket relay. Just to be safe, 1 imagine. The festival will go from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be food concessions and other entertainment so plan on coming out to support the Desert Valley Water Safety Council. The emcee will be Barb Henderson who seems to be everjrwhere whenever something is goin^ on in • pjigidoata.?-, r% .. "vw,-' ./ • A spedal congratuliaiion goes out to Dale Antonich, chief ranger at Lake Mead, who received the Harry Yount Award for Excellence for his work with the National Park Service. Vice President Al Gore made the presentation. • American Cancer Society accepts camp applications The American Cancer Society is accepting applications for two summer camps in July for children 8 to 15 years of age with cancer and their siblings. There is no fee for the camp and children are flown to their location courtesy of Angel Flights. Camp Sunrise and Sunrise 'Sidekicks are one-week summer camps located in Arizona. Camp Sunrise is specifically for children who have cancer, or have had cancer. In addition to canoeing, hiking, fishing, horseback riding, archery and swimming, campers can build birdhouses and participate in science experiments. Applications for both summer camps are available at the American Cancer Society, 1325 E. Harmon, through Friday, July 18. Only 20 campers will be selected based upon completion of their application. For more information, call Jeanette Rowland, camp coordinator at the American Cancer Society, 798-6877, ext. 228. The News You Need Is On Now! Oehorah levy lalinfurvis News ONE at 9 and News ONE at 10 weeknigtits on Las Vegas ONE Cliannels1&39 News ONE nt 9 & 10 on I as Vro.is ONF Ch.inncis 1 & ?. When you are marking your calendar, save June 12 to come out to Hamlin Bay for the Lake Mead Boat Owners Association's annual clean-up. Each year, this organization goes to this cove to pick up trash. Pack a lunch and come and enjoy the day. Meet at the bay at 9 a.m. I understand there will be divers so bringyour scuba gear as well. Until next time., keep your bilge dry. Eicher, a long-time valley resident, considers hinnself a parttime boater and fishernnan. His Email address is rayboating@aol.com. V\f MawMfiia piMMwna PIMMOm* iTWTWns Pitv7ni4 paii/ranis tM/reni* muvmn* raa^Tsnis IMPORT RADIAL SPECIALS I 1W0R1)__J13 1ISffOR14-M—IN I 1K/70R14 136 iosmmi m ITWTOmS FisK TIRES FISK EDITION PERFORMANCE RADIALS P195IR14 tM P21SC6R1S ttt ^P195ft15 MO P2SMR16 $49 )P2(M0R1S M R1SN0ZR17„410$ P1IMM14 FISK TIKES FISK CLASSIC P1Wn(n4.___t}1 P21V7SR1S IK P]K/nR14-__4l3 PlSffRIS tX novnftis—_t3s Pistrans $39 TRUCK, VAN 8. RV P1K/n)R14 $40 IP175WR14 $42 |P1IS5ft14 $43 pi7V7om3 WWXM PI0SmR14 $M PDSffORIS.—$S3 P21SffQR1S $64 CUSTOM WHEELS r40 wmm ...ysi 3I-IO6RISC....46O YWmi ...JS1 LT22y75mM) ..463 3M6tRiyC ..m LT24ynR16/E...JM lOPI ATFANTHinC PRICISI MICHELIN^ >FYOKOHAMA OOOD/YEAR BKAUSEiOMlXHISKIDIf.K.0NY0URnBtS: j ,UMrj(,N ll(HN(.|.H,y -^J ^1^ Z^i^i-^^J %mm. TK • MM nMunwnoN HiraB otr P16S/MR13 riTiflii-i) $41 PMMI>14 $44 nWMIM $47 nwn-is w IBIWIIWI IP P18BM0R-14 raiiiM4 IP Wiwm IP nHPR-iiZZZp 17V7Mniia4RAMPOnCE BFCoadrich 1 A K tz (S CJ N T H C> L JiT-kf/.d • r.'s.'-n//Tv.u PILOT/LTX mmuiLmimimrmm P21M0m4 fmm I KTHMI I nmmi i LT2M/78fnW STORE HOURS IION.-n.l.3M.-00 8AT.I:3M.-00 AHsniOA** LAHOBST INSB^BI 45 P178/7tM1l PWg ffOHII.. P22S/7PR1S. PiaSMRIS. PMMM1S. RtlMORII. psTymis. 463 • NT Tina TMMO DCaiQNt MAY VARY •OUUM Cnv / NBOCMON 360 N. BouUar Hoy $86-6874 OKOIVAUfY/QREBiVAUITRANCH 2PWliP'" ., '^'* • 4881 E. SunM 436-1533 SJ SJIieiJir i5t-3487 900N NiliiBW, 43B-10f| a640MnMIPlMry J864033 g*yj*^ ::L : 7MC66 aOUTW W JMP em jM/PeCQU 3640S.lltoytoidnMy 7M-433I 40 S. JanM 362-2106 6886 WM Stfm AM 873^ BOUUVANOMMX/IMLV nCITW/CMNATDVW NORTMSUMMBUN/PMNTEODCSOn' 3836 8liryWPtaiy 74^338 2886 8. Oiafcy. a5l.3487 4>1 N. RMto jMMtt www. Thursday, May 20, 1999 Panorama PagaS YOURHEALTH Biochemical marker targets brain injury leading to movement problems after stroke Researchers have used biochemical markers for the first time to locate the brain injury that is associated with loss of movement in individuals who have had a stroke. The study is reported in this month's Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association. The findings are considered significant because scientists are now able to pinpoint ah area of the brain associated with loss of movement resulting from a stroke. Identifying the location of brain cell damage provides scientists with a target site for designing treatments that could halt or slow the progression of such cell damage in stroke patients. To locate this brain region, the scientists measured levels of a biochemical substance found almost exclusively in adult brain cells. They used magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), a technique for quantitative measurements of the concentrations of biochemical substances, to measure levels of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) in various areas of the brain. The role of NAA in the brain is unclear, but studies suggest it may be associated with protein building and the transmission of signals between nerve cells. The researchers foand reduced concentratiohs of NAA in a particular brain region were linked with weakness in patients with stroke. This region, known as the internal capsule, has nerve pathways that transmit signals to and from the brain. "When combined with magnetic resonance imagingCMRI), a visualization method for detecting clots or blockages in the brain that trigger m^ strokes, MRS provides scientists with a panoramic, interactive view of both site and function within the nervous system," said leading researcher Sarah T. Pendlebury, MRCP, at the Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance of the Brain, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom. George Hademenos, Ph.D., staff scientist with the American Heart Association, noted that these findings suggest that the iryured brain cells within the internal capsule could be targeted by neuroprotective agents, thus minimizing the extent of permanent disabilities in stroke patients. If administered promptly, these agents could protect bsain cells from Older rockers help out Children's Miracle Network Some older folks just wanna rock! Seniors from Village Oaks-Las Vegas dusted off their rocking I chairs and geared up for a rockin' good time at their first Rock-A-Thon [ May 13 f(fr th^ Children's Miracle Network benefiting UMC Ho8pitAl. These Las Vegas seniors literally rocked the day away in rocking I chairsto raise money for sick kids through the Children's Miracle Network for UMC Hospital. They were joined and encouraged by children, various entertainers, fiiends and family throughout the day. BIRTHS ^^ May 6, 1999 Renda and Stephen Mirsky, girl. May 10,1999 Connie,Gerlits and Brett Costello, girl. May 11, 1999 Christine and Peter Van Alstyne, boy; Gail and Timothy Ward, boy; Lara and Brad Goldberg, girl; Kelley and Michael Werran, boy; Sherri and Ty Kehoe, boy; Nalleh and Thomas Shetayh, boy. May 12,1999 Tracy and David Prince, boy; Helena and Pedro Flores, girl; Alisha and Brian Clay, girl; Amy Tressler and Edward Folkman, Jr., boy. ,jt .._ • May 13,1999 Carrie and Russell Ketchum, boy; Betty and Isham Evans, boy; Courtney and Aaron Wenstrup, boy; Carmella Basils, boy; Grace and Eric Schellenberg, boy; Dalai and Paul Advent, girl. —.J May 14,1999 Maureen and Charles Setchell, Jr., boy; Carrie and Jeffrey Rowland, girl; Kelli Keplinger, boy; Cindi Willette and Michael Edwards, girl. May 15,1999 Nicole and Jeremy Richter, girl; Andra and Ted Dalgleish, girl; Beverly and Paul Young, boy. May 17,1999 Leann and Joseph Fink, boy; Jodi and Lance Mecham, boy; Laxira and Christiopher Laurent, girl; Victoria Gomez and Gary Smith, girl. •••**• • •••* ••••* •. •• • • -•* • • • : • '* _^.-:' • M." DAILY PRIME RIB ^4^^ SUNDAY THURSDAY S^95 / 20 OZ. T-BONE STEAK ^3 Also available Monday FRIED CHICKEN ^2 All dinners include all you can cat salad bar served from 4:00 10 00 pm (SubjccI to changp VM Thrfc s no piMf Itkf oi pM> '"> l>r. .l.fAsf tiin h .H tUnnvt irreversible iiyury caused by the loss of oxygen and other vital nutrients, thus halting further brain cell damage following the stroke, he adds. NAA levels were measured in the internal capsule of 12 men and six women who had suffered a sti'oke within one month to five years before entering the study. Both an MRS and MRI were performeSd, and NAA concentrations in the internal capsule were calculated for the 18 patients as well as 10 healthy individuals of similar average age who served as controls. The average internal capsule NAA level was 40 for the patient group comjJared with 51 for the control group, and the NAA loss was associated with loss of movement. "Since NAA loss is associated with brain cell injury, MRS allows us to predict post-stroke brain damage early, before the actual cell changes appear," Pendlebury said. Heretofore, scientists have relied upon MRI to visualize cell damage in the brain. Information from MRS of brain cell iryury could be used to predict the outcome for stroke patients. Future studies might determine whether the association care movemer\]t loss can be reversed," Pendlebury said. Other researchers include A.M. Blamire, Ph.D.; M.A. Lee, MRCP; P. Styles, Ph.D.; and P.M. Matthews, D. Phil. EYE INSTITUTE OF NEVADA SM .^sS^ OPTICAL CENTER \^ Gary W. Freedman Licensed Optician • Eyewear Prescriptions Filled • Eyewear Repairs • Affordable, Quality Eyewear • Medicare Provider ^irr," Personalized Service Davis Vision Plan Accepted 999 ADAMS BLVD. STE 100, BOULDER CITY • 108 E. LAKE MEAD DR. STE 303, HENDERSON PLEASE CALL FOR HOURS 294-4444 > 564-2539 NEVADA PIANO ORGAN CENTERS M Pre-Opening WAREHOUSE CLERANCE New Location...Too much merchandise for store...Must Move...No Gimmicl ust a Real Sale!! ;*t^4 RAND PIANOS rom ^6,995 IMANY QUAUTY RE-OWNED PIANOS 18 TUES. MAY 1 .„--^Thor Fri. May 21 10-6 llllMQry^re^Rd#K RENTAL PIANOSh-^ From $35 A Mo. Large SeliscHon lA "^ (Next to Marshmellow Factory) T 990-6 763 An Evolution in Cost Containment: Efficient Claims Management. ^Si^-f .^^^' .r-->WEMPLOYERS O F NEVADA 8URANCE COMPANY Experience that comes with the territory. Canon City • EIko • Las Vegas • Reno 1-888-977-3792, ext. 3426 or www.employer&insco.com Contact your Nevada Independent Ii Agent \!Py

PAGE 30

Pag* 6 Panorama Thursday, May 20, 1999 1 \ St Peter's ^ 'CathoUc Church 204 S. Boulder Hwy. OUR MASS SCHEDULE: Sat. Masses: 4 p.m. & ^:30 p.m. Sun. Masses: 8:00 a.m., 9:30 a.in 11:30 a.m. (BI-UNGUAL) &5p.m. Confessions: Sat. 2:30 to 3:30 565-8406 Uiiiiiiiaiii ojtnaiMon Chuitum Cnuvm Now meeting of CCSN 700 College Dr. Sunday School 9 omWorship lOom Pastor MoHf Boumgortntr for fnore info col 364-4880 Serving Boulder City, Henderson, Green Valley and West Valley Areas. To Advertise, Contact Goldie at 435-7700 Come Worship the Lord 1100A Nevada Highway Sunday Services: ^ould 9 AM Sunday School A.mbiy a 10 AM Spirit led Praise, Worship & Word • 'Chlldrens's Church and Child Care provided CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH 1401 5TH Street 293-4332 B.C. WORSHIP SERVICES • Saturday 5:00 pm Country / Western Worship • Sunday 9:00 am Traditional Worship "Come UntqM9" Contemporary Service 11:00 am T St. Matthews Episcopal Church The Working Church Saturday Evening Mass 5:30 pm Sunday Mass 10:00 am Church School During Sunday Mass Nursery Available 4709 S. NellisBlvd. 451-2483 -2 Blocks North of Trop(cn* on Nellis HRST BAPTIST CHURCH PASTOR DAN RALEY Clay and Meghan Overlien Musical Director SUNDAY WORSHIP 11:00 am & 6:00 pm Sunday School: 9:45 am Nursery Fcwililies Provided Wed. Bihie & Iniercessory Prayer Meeting 7:0() pm Wed. Polluck Dinner 5:45 pm (Contributions Welcome) 293-1394 850 Ave "B" Across from Boulder City Pool CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Sunday Church and Sunday School 10 a.m. (Care for small children provided) Wednesday Evening Service 7; 3P p.m FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 1419 Fifth Street, Boulder City Also vbH our RMdIng Room SM Nevada Higliwav, BouMcr City Mondqy-Friday 10-1 • 293-7740 FAITH CHRIS riAN CHURCH All Ar Wckomc tjcii Dcnommntion Adult Sunday School 9:00 a.m. I Children's Sunday School 9:00 a.m Worship 10:00 a.m. urace Valley Christian Reformed Church Pastor Steve Wunderink "With you from where you are to, where you will be." Call for times and location of Services and Bible Studies 454-9328 1100 Buchanan Boulder City • 293-2454 GRACE CHURCH • Informal Atmospiiere • Contemporary Woraiiip Meaningful Messages A Vision for die Family VISITORS EXPECTED (; • V Holjl. Ic'clrovv. PaslOf Neighborhood Church j^ Service times: SE^ t| Sunday •I0mn& 6pin 1 •^ We4nesdi^^ ypm : Sunday School-alt aijcs Youth Ministry • at! ages FOURSQUARE GQSPEL 207 W. Basic Rd First • '' • • :> Henderson < United Methodist! Ichurch Wonhippinga Newton Elemeniay School. 571 OreenwayRD, HD Sunday Service d 10:00 AM. Ninery aid Pmdiool care provided. BiUe SnKliet, CloldRn't, \ath. Men's and Women's minisniea weekly For more iafornatfoa call Paaior Dave Saitk at S64-S922 9 r S iMtMiy 9WMCflt MIDBAR KODESH A coraeiivA'nvE comREOATion ,J-^ rUTURCHOME ORECM VALLEY IW1CH ^ 33 Caiamnmim DMK Hm^mnom. htrntt mot* (702> 4A-4a48 609 E. Horizon Drive Henderson, Nevada 565-6049 Kcv. Htntn R. Gant, ftsror Sunday Worship: 8:00 Celebration and Praise 11:00 Traditional Worship 9:15 Sunday School forALLAies Chlldeort ProyiM Wtdnwday: DIsdpleship Swv ice 7:oo p.m St. Thomas Piore Catholic Community 130 M. Pecos Rd. Henderson, 361-3022 Saturday Confession: 3:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Saturday Vigil Mass: 4:30 p.m. Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m., 8f 12:00 p.m. Life Teen Mass: Gather at 5:30 Daily Mass: 8:30 a.m. {Monday through Friday) SUNRISE COMMUNITY CHURCH 10am Sunday 480 Greenway Dr. Masonic Temple "737-5219 N REV. JIM HAMILTON, PASTOR Come and let us help malce your life woric for you. VEGAS VALLEY CHRISTIAN CHURCH 5515 Mfn. VIsfo, Los Vcgos Phone 451-9211 UNDENOMINATIONAL BIBLE and CHRIST FOCUSED BIBLE SCHOOL 9:30 AM WORSHIP 10:30 AM S.O.W. (Study on Wednesday) 7 00 P.M. (Child Core Avoiloble) Serving Green Volley 0 l.os Vcgos Areos near Sunset 0 Russell Rood n pl.ico lo l)olon(j ,i pl.icc to become Licensed Child Care Conicr • Phone • IS 1-9665 SO St. Paul's Charismatic \l/ Episcopal Church Sacramentarin its Worship, Evangelical in Its Message/and ChahsmaUc in Its Expression SUNDAY WORSHIP 10AM ^^^V^l To God's Word and Spirit i. ^fHH*'^ David Hoir Rector 1661 Qallerla Dr. (White Middle School, Hendereon) CHRimAN CEKTER A FOURSQUARE CHURCH 571 Adams Blvd. Boulder City 293-7773 Sunday Worship 8:00 arl0:30 am Home of Christian Center School and Dav Care Center OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN CHURCH "Holding Forth the Word of Life..." Philippians2:16 Sunday School 9 am Adult Bible Class 9 am Sunday Worship 10:45 am PASTOR ED 8RUNING S9 Lynn Ln., Henderson 565-915.4 Growing together in the grace of our Lord Jesus SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH Welcomes YOU each Saturday Bible study 9:30 am Worship -11:00am Prayer Meeting Fri. 7 pm 591 Adams —^ Boulder City t Holy Family Church nOH" THE SALVATION ARMY fflRH COMMUNITY CENTER I );i?^p^ A Center For Worship and Service! jkb E! lake Mead Dr., Heiiderson. W "' (702) 565-9578 Sunday Worship Services: 11 am & 6pm Sunday School For All Ages: 9:30 am Bible Study Each Thursday: 6 pm ESTAND LATEST SUNDAY MASSE&IN VALLEY, AT HOLY FAMILY Holy Family Roman CathoSc Church, 4490 IMountain VisU, Us Vegas, Beginning on Sunday. November 29, will have the earliest and latest Sunday pansh Masses in the Las Vegas Valley, with an added Mass at 6:00 ajn. along with the present Sunday schejdule of Masses at 7:30 a.m., 9:30 a'.mT 11:30 a.m., and 7:00 p.m. There is a Vigil Mass on .Saturdays at 5:00 p.m. For funher information, plea.se call the parish office at 458-2211 ,-^ "iSf*^ — i^' COMMUNITY BAPTIST CHURCH 245 E. Foster Ave. • Henderson, NV 89009 Reverend Sam Roberson, Pastor/Teacher SUNDAY: Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Morning Service • 8:00 & I 1:00 a.m. Evening Sen/ice • 7:00 p.m. MONDAY: Evangelism Classes 7:00 p.m. TUESDAY: Theology Classes 7:00 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Prayer & Bible Study • 7:00 p.m. THURSDAY: Choir Rehearsal 7:00 p.m. Worship Services and Bible Study Times Sundays ; 8:30, 9:45 & 11:00 a.m. • i>" 6:00 p.m. Wednesdays 6:00 pjn. Oren Valley Baprist Church ^W 2.70 N. Voile Verde Dr., Henderson • 434.1906 Ejl (Corner of Silver Springs end Voile Verde) HENDERSON PRESBYTERIAN iri CinJR%,.i g^ oi nnNhUe* y-r •ctfibr r 565-9664 VUlV Worship Services 8:^ ft I0;30am nursery provided for 10:30 am service ROSS DOYEL, PASTOR LAKE MEAD, BWLE CHURQI Sunday Services and studies. 9am Sunday Schooi/lOam Worship Nursery Care.i§,avjiilable at all services. '' Call Pastor Daniel Sabaka for more information. Woriihipiping at Green Valley High School 565-8301 Worship In Spirit aad Truth. Miainrv...From God's Word to all. 7ind tuw Hope at. '*Ifu Cfiuch that LCn*E buiit." GIVING LIFE MIIMISTRIES 416 Peitae Wity. Hend. B€8^884 • BB5-4104 Pastor: Dave Delaria Sunday Morning ChrUtitn Ed'. JOun Sunday Morning • Worthip I lam ~ Sunday Evenint Bible Study 7pai Wednesday Evening • Royal Rangen • 7pai BLACK MOUNTAIN FELLOWSHIP Church of the Foursquare Gospel Sunday Worship 10:30AM ft B:30PM Wed. Family Night 7 pm ^ Hotm of ntek Mounts ^ 107 8. Oibeon, Hendereon 281-2758 Pastor Darrell Bowcn A Non-Denominational Church Services-Sunday 10:00 am & Wednesday 6:30 pm *0^rsery Care *Team Xids (ages 3-gradt 5) f Jjybutfi ^ittistries *Care Qroups througfumt weefi Now Meeting at Laln rCelebmtion!-k I A United Methodist Church I 2887 Sunlit Glade Ave., Henderson NV. • (702) 361-4102 of^*^Cende4sotv Pastor Rick Wilder Atlantic & Kansas 565-8577 Sunday School 9:30am Sunday Worship Sam, 1 lam, 6pm Wednesday Worship 7pm Wesleyan Lay Fellowship Sundays, Bible Study: 12 noon ,^ Worship 1 p.m. St. Christopher's Episcopal Church tor more information: v^ Mr. John Mondt, 293-1649 Mr. Brian Fox. 293-7620 Green Valley United Methodist Church 2200 Robindale Road, Hendei^dn 454-7989 8:30 a.m. & 11:00 a.m. Worstiip / Children's Church 9:45 a.in. • Christian Education (Adults & Children) Child Care Provided St Christopher's Episcopal Church Holy EucharistSun. 9am & Wed. 6pm ,';'.. Prayers For l-leoling ofter eoch Service •' Sunday School at 10:45 812 Arizona St. Boulder City • 293-4275 St. Christopher's Church, Boulder City is 0 God centered, inclusive, multi-generational, spiritually rejgted family welcominfl,all St. Timothy's Episcopal Church Pastor Rev. Dr. Lloyd Ru|)p WORSHIP 'Tues. Noonday Service •Fri. Noonday, Sun. SAM & 10AM Holy Eucharist 'lOAM Nursery & Sunday School Classes. -Pacific & Panama • 565-8033 In Downtown Henderson IM (Science of Mind) Mid Week Boost Build Self Esteem Overcome obstacles of Life. We Have Moved Every Wednesday Evening 7-8 p.m. Oasis Las Vegas • Windmill & Las Vegas Btvd So. 434-3912 Ftov Undt-Kiy Shave' Oasis Christian Fellowsliip • meets at Selma Bartlett Elementary School Ig Located at 1961 Wigwam Pkwy. ar*aufHkgu C'^*^^" ^alle Verde &. Green Valley Pkvy.) .^>:' *" Sunday Worship at 10 am ^^^ Nursery ^ Children's MlnlsiSy'" provided thru 5th Grade. le Harvest 1000 Nevada Hwy. Boulder City, NV 293-5878 "raise and Worskip iyer and Intertessjon Ik Children' Ciuirtli • Hirborn Voulk Mniury Christ The Servant Lutheran Church! 263-0802 Sunday Worship g 410:30 am Sunday School 9:1S am Sunday Evening Worship 7 pm Wedneiday 7pm Visitors Wtlcome • Nursery AvailaMt 2 South Pecos Rd. Henderson GREEN VALLEY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Saturday Service 5:30^p.m. Sunday Worship 8:30a.in. A 11 a.m. SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 a.m. Nursery All Services 1798 Wigwam Pkwy. (NE comu o< Wijn Pkwy 1 Vlit Vrt)* Dfl) iilllK Phone: 454-8484 ^110 CALVARYCHAPEL QREEN^^VALLEY >f--;s. Sunday ^JJJ^JJ/ Greenspun Jr. High ^ • ^140 North Valie Verde Drive Between Windmill and Wigwafn MId-Week Bible Study Tbesda y j7 Martinique Bay Clubhouse /^.TN 3000 High View Drive V^JJ^JJ^ Any Questions: Reas Call 896-8887 Paitor John Knapprft***—^cwwe>yc^^Oifc rs I COMMUNffY CHURCH OF HENDERSON United Church of Christ Congregational 360 E. Horizon Dr., • 565-8563 Worship Service 10:30 AM 'Building a Community to serve a Community' Church School 9:00AM, Nursery Available Sunday Evening 7:00 PM Bible Study 6 pm Currently Meeting Al: Join A.Dooiey 1940 ChKiuaw Headosoo, NV. 8901S sciBDUJiaraivicniauNDMrKaooLMiAM •MORNING WORSHIP lOrM AM EVENING WORSHIP 6.-00 PM YOUTH DISCOVERY iM PM PASTOR: JIM BENNETT -The Church CDn The Hiir 711 Vale Verde a. Hondemn. NV 454-2722 QwyAMoreMd Green Valley Christfain Center Sunday Schedule Morning Worship: 8:45 & 11:15 AM ChHdrer)'s Church: 9:00 & 11:15 AM Sunday School: 10:15 AM Evening Worship: 6:00 PM Wedneeday: Family Night 7:00 PM Tburaday: Youth Group (7-12). 6:45 PM Srturday. Evening Worship 6:30 PM (Baptist Cfmrcft Sunday Worship Service: 8 am, 10:30 & 6 p.m. Sunday School 9:15 a.m. Rev. Jeff McEarchern Jeff Dunham Youth Pastor 210 Wyoming, Boulder City Call 293-1912 for futher information Jaith Cdristian Jtdowshvp Pastor Bob Allen "Christ in you, the Hope of Glory'Col. 1:27 Services: Sunday Morning 10:00 am Sunday Evening 6:30 pm Wed. Evening 6:30 pm 421 S. Pacific Henderson, 565-7308 'ALLEY OUTDEACH !)YNAGQGUt Watecspring Boplifl Churdi Indtpandonl. Fundomanlol 1901 N. Orewi Voiey Hcwy. HMdwior NV 89014 lot CkiUnn'tWbrld) Sunder School A AA* Mbt* Shi^ 1li00a.Ni. Info dbout Sun. tWud. nigh, olher miniikitt. or jutl rtutd hip, call Pmttor DovMMlh (703) 4)M3M SERVICE First Friday Grace Community Church Methodist Presbyterian Congregational Founded: Feb 22,1933 1150 Wyomin. Boulder City, NV 283-2018 Sunday Worship 9:00 & 10:30 a.m. fnnwforav ivurwjr olsnvo SMla;Sckeal:9ajL I HteHaiSmkc: 7 H>-• 3rd Saeriqr ChapdWcddlvATaiaUe Rev. Dr. Ronald FTMI Patlor "ChrmCmm-WeCme' \Thursday, May 20. 1999 Panorama Paga7 The Rawhide Western: A railroad that never was THIS WAS NEVADA PHILLIP I. EARL Among the many Nevada railroad projects which never came to fruition during the early years of the 20th century mining boom wa9 the Rawhide Western, a line wbtich would have connected the camp of Rawhide to the Nevada' California Railroad at Schurz. The history of the Rawhide j Western goes back to the early 1 fall of 1907 when a rush to the : mines of Rawhide boosted the j camp's population to 3,bOO people. Some 30 auto stages were operat: ing from the railheads at Schurz, ] Fallen and Mina by Christmas time and some 10,000 miners, teamsters, would-be capitalists, saloon girls and other hangers-on were calling the camp home. Shortly after the first of the new year, 1908, rumors of proposed railroad projects began to circulate. Jim Sword, a Salt Lake capitalist, was said to be planning a 150-ton mill at Schurz and an electric railway connection to Rawhide. Nothing came of this project, however, nor was F.T. Topey of the Nevada Cable Traction Company successful in getting his plan for a line from Yerington off the ground. There were also persistent stories that officials of the Nevada Central Railroad were considering building west from Austin to Rawhide. The Southern Pacific Railroad was in the news as well in connection with a Rawhide spur, since the line south from Churchill Station had been standard gauged, but Rawhiders had to await the establishment of the Rawhide Western Company by promoter A.G. Renfro in late February 1908. Incorporated under the laws of West Virginia on Feb. 27, 1908, railroad officials named Fred Orutt, an early Rawhide locator, • president. Renfro assumed the position of general manager and .announJiied to the press that |$30,000|had Already been raised > toward construction costs and that he expected trains to be running within 90 days. The line was to stretch from the Southern Pacific railhead at Schurz — 28 miles to the west. He had assurances of sufficient shipping gradf ore to justly the construction of the line, Renfro said, and Southern Pacific officials were planning to make a site available on Walker Lake for a smelter. '.."^'' i Renfro and C.E. Loss, president of the California Contracting Company, signed a construction contract on March 3, and the initial surveys were completed two weeks later. The grading sub-con1 • • '-;r^*.'T> ^^^gt^ mmm ^-K i W9^ 'T* ^HB h 1 ^KttHHtm ^ • • aim* — • < • iBr V XSi\ m ^"^^^^'^^ ,...^• V i _..„ y 'V' "^ f^'' 1 M\ Read it in the News MONDAY IHRU FRIDAY ; ALL YOU CAN 1 KAi BUFFET > NEVADA HISTORICAL SOCIETY PHOTOGRAPH Grading work on the Rawhide Western Railroad, July, 1908. i^m. 1 1 am '.i pni tractor, Charles W. Reed of the Reed Teaming Co. of Oakland, however, was delayed by work on the Sacramento Southern Railroad. Grutt and Renfro had meanwhile arranged to purchase ties, rail and rolling stock from the Tonopah & Tidewater Railroad. The grading delay brought forth a proposal to build a competing railroad south from Fallon which would also serve the salt works near San Springs and the mining camp of Fairview, but nothing more was heard of such a plan when grading got imder way on April 28. With 50 men and 80 horses operating loaders, skips and scrapers, a mile and a half of grading had been completed by the first week in May. Renfro told reporters that the crew would be making a mile a day thereafter, although the average was less than half a mile. He also announced that drilling was under way on two wells to provide water for the men and horses. The first well struck water on May 26 and rumors began to circulate to the effect that Renfro was considering the platting of a new town on the site. Grading continued apace despite an effort by San Francisco stock brokers to depress the market in Rawhide mining stocks and continual turnovers in the labor force. Town boosters had hoped to celebrate Railroad Day on July 4, >;i Independence Day, but decided^ to shoot for Labor Day, Septi:'jQk!^^ when delays piled up. 'V.Z^A To speed the work, Renfro^ brought in 300 Greek laborers in mid-August. Rails and ties were piled, up )at Schurz by that" time: and there was talk of using a track-laying machine on the final phase. With less than three miles of grading to go, prospects for a fall opehing looked good, but a disastrous fire in Rawhide on Sept. 4 put the project on hold permanently. In the aftermath of the fire, a corporate reorganization took^'ii place and Charles W. Reed, the grading contractor, succeeded Fred Grutt as president of the railroad. .Reed attempted to purduade the directors of the Rawhide Queen Mine and the Rawhide Coalition into financing the completion of the line. In considering the proposal, officials of both companies decided to examine Rawhide's mining potential. An engineer, Morton Lindsay, arrived in town in early January 1909 to examine thfe mines. He concluded that only low-grade milling ore would be found at greater depths and recommended that his employers put their money in local mills rather than a railroad. Another mining engineer, Malcolm McDonald of Tonopah, did a more intensive survey threir-' months later, arriving at a simi-, lar conclusion, so the railroad i^|l. again put on the back burner. On Aug. 31,1909, Rawhide and the^SuiTDunoing areas were hit by torrential rains which did serious damage to the town and ,. washed out several sections of the ; Rawhide Western. Thereafter, mining officials gave up on any notions of a railroad. Several mills were operating by that time and there was insufficient shipping grade ore to even consider transporting it elsewhere. The old right-of-way sat abandoned until federal officials decided to seek its return in March 1931. The matter was considered in the federal District Covirt in Carson City over the next several months and an order returning the land was issued in July of that year. The remains of the graded roadbed are still visible east of Schurz 90 years later, mute reminders of an enterprise which never was. Earl is curator of the Nevada Historical Society in Reno : t 'lU'i' \;iii(l I 'iil\ \\ il li ( iiu|)i)ii I'.Mluilinii lli>liil.i>I W.i hnul ( Mlllinli .S'l. l.'i |-;:ull • M\l-I lie lit I Sllli|C(I 111 ch.lliuc U II hiPtit linl H'r • \,,i lix ~, r\. I' .i| ( uii|)nii. |)i i(ii' 111 ordcr-Mi': I \.iliil I .;n .") • :! M!i llh ri\ no i>hi( t li/yc aiir pliUtfar hiiiikliisl. Iiiiicli X (liiiiii r INO & PESTAURANT / />/('(7i Mllllll ilj • SinntI lid.. IIIIKIilMill ^(i^-')illi I i—. —— — -i —— _._i.._ — i-J House specialities: Ossobuco, Posta^ Fresh Seqfood COUPON Allow Italian Maater Chef Mario Aniflreoni to create your Special I ^5<>Sff Lunch I I I I L Lunch Mon.'l li II: iO Jpm Dinner Mon. Sat. S 1*.^ pm C lust J '^ulul,l\ I 2895 N. Green ^dleyParinmy • Formerly Piazza D'Angelo sSSE Explftes 7/31/99^ I • m-^'^y^'^. v>> > x.i • • at SuHBCtfcGVParltoafWMrtuc^^ • • • • BBMBHHaiBBaBiaaHBi 450-5339 Good only at our Green Valley Location 1 Terns CONSIGN & DESIGN FURNISHINGS "At Terries, it's five stores in one!" CONSIONMBIT SRVICE atoiimfalMwkhUSndc1lpUkKi^ VttikoiimtacikfUifmitdilibiyaii Cdl ovr CeatigiuRMit Llaei 247'7602 • V I i A. ..;>,' • • ^^y f^rChildren "^ Free Admission ^ Ice Cream Social ^ Family Entertainment ^Fun Stuff for Kids t Door Prizes • k'^.We Sell It For You...You Buy It Like New! Rainbow A Saharo SW Comer 247-7602 SECbrner 361-7747 • •• <. Saturday, May 22 > Noon to 4 p.m. ^^^ > .^;; Families are invited to attend the 3"* Annual Family Day: Stand for Children. ^ This event hosts a variety of civic booths that provide information on various community services. So, bring the family and enjoy an old-fashioned ice cream social with a sing-a-long, clap-a-long, and play-a-long. entertainment will once again be provided by Ncls, "^ Located at ^ MorrellPark 401 N. Major Avenue Adjacent to the L.J.K. Valley View Recreation Center located off of Boulder Highway and Basic Road. ^ D.J. from Kool Oldies 93.1 FM Learn more^ about what Henderson has to offer!^ j^ HACA FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER Sponsored by F.A.C.E. FamHy Advocates for Community Empowerment BEN£r .4IW.SA tgr • 1^

PAGE 31

Pag* 6 Panorama Thursday, May 20, 1999 1 \ St Peter's ^ 'CathoUc Church 204 S. Boulder Hwy. OUR MASS SCHEDULE: Sat. Masses: 4 p.m. & ^:30 p.m. Sun. Masses: 8:00 a.m., 9:30 a.in 11:30 a.m. (BI-UNGUAL) &5p.m. Confessions: Sat. 2:30 to 3:30 565-8406 Uiiiiiiiaiii ojtnaiMon Chuitum Cnuvm Now meeting of CCSN 700 College Dr. Sunday School 9 omWorship lOom Pastor MoHf Boumgortntr for fnore info col 364-4880 Serving Boulder City, Henderson, Green Valley and West Valley Areas. To Advertise, Contact Goldie at 435-7700 Come Worship the Lord 1100A Nevada Highway Sunday Services: ^ould 9 AM Sunday School A.mbiy a 10 AM Spirit led Praise, Worship & Word • 'Chlldrens's Church and Child Care provided CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH 1401 5TH Street 293-4332 B.C. WORSHIP SERVICES • Saturday 5:00 pm Country / Western Worship • Sunday 9:00 am Traditional Worship "Come UntqM9" Contemporary Service 11:00 am T St. Matthews Episcopal Church The Working Church Saturday Evening Mass 5:30 pm Sunday Mass 10:00 am Church School During Sunday Mass Nursery Available 4709 S. NellisBlvd. 451-2483 -2 Blocks North of Trop(cn* on Nellis HRST BAPTIST CHURCH PASTOR DAN RALEY Clay and Meghan Overlien Musical Director SUNDAY WORSHIP 11:00 am & 6:00 pm Sunday School: 9:45 am Nursery Fcwililies Provided Wed. Bihie & Iniercessory Prayer Meeting 7:0() pm Wed. Polluck Dinner 5:45 pm (Contributions Welcome) 293-1394 850 Ave "B" Across from Boulder City Pool CHRISTIAN SCIENCE Sunday Church and Sunday School 10 a.m. (Care for small children provided) Wednesday Evening Service 7; 3P p.m FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 1419 Fifth Street, Boulder City Also vbH our RMdIng Room SM Nevada Higliwav, BouMcr City Mondqy-Friday 10-1 • 293-7740 FAITH CHRIS riAN CHURCH All Ar Wckomc tjcii Dcnommntion Adult Sunday School 9:00 a.m. I Children's Sunday School 9:00 a.m Worship 10:00 a.m. urace Valley Christian Reformed Church Pastor Steve Wunderink "With you from where you are to, where you will be." Call for times and location of Services and Bible Studies 454-9328 1100 Buchanan Boulder City • 293-2454 GRACE CHURCH • Informal Atmospiiere • Contemporary Woraiiip Meaningful Messages A Vision for die Family VISITORS EXPECTED (; • V Holjl. Ic'clrovv. PaslOf Neighborhood Church j^ Service times: SE^ t| Sunday •I0mn& 6pin 1 •^ We4nesdi^^ ypm : Sunday School-alt aijcs Youth Ministry • at! ages FOURSQUARE GQSPEL 207 W. Basic Rd First • '' • • :> Henderson < United Methodist! Ichurch Wonhippinga Newton Elemeniay School. 571 OreenwayRD, HD Sunday Service d 10:00 AM. Ninery aid Pmdiool care provided. BiUe SnKliet, CloldRn't, \ath. Men's and Women's minisniea weekly For more iafornatfoa call Paaior Dave Saitk at S64-S922 9 r S iMtMiy 9WMCflt MIDBAR KODESH A coraeiivA'nvE comREOATion ,J-^ rUTURCHOME ORECM VALLEY IW1CH ^ 33 Caiamnmim DMK Hm^mnom. htrntt mot* (702> 4A-4a48 609 E. Horizon Drive Henderson, Nevada 565-6049 Kcv. Htntn R. Gant, ftsror Sunday Worship: 8:00 Celebration and Praise 11:00 Traditional Worship 9:15 Sunday School forALLAies Chlldeort ProyiM Wtdnwday: DIsdpleship Swv ice 7:oo p.m St. Thomas Piore Catholic Community 130 M. Pecos Rd. Henderson, 361-3022 Saturday Confession: 3:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Saturday Vigil Mass: 4:30 p.m. Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m., 8f 12:00 p.m. Life Teen Mass: Gather at 5:30 Daily Mass: 8:30 a.m. {Monday through Friday) SUNRISE COMMUNITY CHURCH 10am Sunday 480 Greenway Dr. Masonic Temple "737-5219 N REV. JIM HAMILTON, PASTOR Come and let us help malce your life woric for you. VEGAS VALLEY CHRISTIAN CHURCH 5515 Mfn. VIsfo, Los Vcgos Phone 451-9211 UNDENOMINATIONAL BIBLE and CHRIST FOCUSED BIBLE SCHOOL 9:30 AM WORSHIP 10:30 AM S.O.W. (Study on Wednesday) 7 00 P.M. (Child Core Avoiloble) Serving Green Volley 0 l.os Vcgos Areos near Sunset 0 Russell Rood n pl.ico lo l)olon(j ,i pl.icc to become Licensed Child Care Conicr • Phone • IS 1-9665 SO St. Paul's Charismatic \l/ Episcopal Church Sacramentarin its Worship, Evangelical in Its Message/and ChahsmaUc in Its Expression SUNDAY WORSHIP 10AM ^^^V^l To God's Word and Spirit i. ^fHH*'^ David Hoir Rector 1661 Qallerla Dr. (White Middle School, Hendereon) CHRimAN CEKTER A FOURSQUARE CHURCH 571 Adams Blvd. Boulder City 293-7773 Sunday Worship 8:00 arl0:30 am Home of Christian Center School and Dav Care Center OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN CHURCH "Holding Forth the Word of Life..." Philippians2:16 Sunday School 9 am Adult Bible Class 9 am Sunday Worship 10:45 am PASTOR ED 8RUNING S9 Lynn Ln., Henderson 565-915.4 Growing together in the grace of our Lord Jesus SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH Welcomes YOU each Saturday Bible study 9:30 am Worship -11:00am Prayer Meeting Fri. 7 pm 591 Adams —^ Boulder City t Holy Family Church nOH" THE SALVATION ARMY fflRH COMMUNITY CENTER I );i?^p^ A Center For Worship and Service! jkb E! lake Mead Dr., Heiiderson. W "' (702) 565-9578 Sunday Worship Services: 11 am & 6pm Sunday School For All Ages: 9:30 am Bible Study Each Thursday: 6 pm ESTAND LATEST SUNDAY MASSE&IN VALLEY, AT HOLY FAMILY Holy Family Roman CathoSc Church, 4490 IMountain VisU, Us Vegas, Beginning on Sunday. November 29, will have the earliest and latest Sunday pansh Masses in the Las Vegas Valley, with an added Mass at 6:00 ajn. along with the present Sunday schejdule of Masses at 7:30 a.m., 9:30 a'.mT 11:30 a.m., and 7:00 p.m. There is a Vigil Mass on .Saturdays at 5:00 p.m. For funher information, plea.se call the parish office at 458-2211 ,-^ "iSf*^ — i^' COMMUNITY BAPTIST CHURCH 245 E. Foster Ave. • Henderson, NV 89009 Reverend Sam Roberson, Pastor/Teacher SUNDAY: Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Morning Service • 8:00 & I 1:00 a.m. Evening Sen/ice • 7:00 p.m. MONDAY: Evangelism Classes 7:00 p.m. TUESDAY: Theology Classes 7:00 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Prayer & Bible Study • 7:00 p.m. THURSDAY: Choir Rehearsal 7:00 p.m. Worship Services and Bible Study Times Sundays ; 8:30, 9:45 & 11:00 a.m. • i>" 6:00 p.m. Wednesdays 6:00 pjn. Oren Valley Baprist Church ^W 2.70 N. Voile Verde Dr., Henderson • 434.1906 Ejl (Corner of Silver Springs end Voile Verde) HENDERSON PRESBYTERIAN iri CinJR%,.i g^ oi nnNhUe* y-r •ctfibr r 565-9664 VUlV Worship Services 8:^ ft I0;30am nursery provided for 10:30 am service ROSS DOYEL, PASTOR LAKE MEAD, BWLE CHURQI Sunday Services and studies. 9am Sunday Schooi/lOam Worship Nursery Care.i§,avjiilable at all services. '' Call Pastor Daniel Sabaka for more information. Woriihipiping at Green Valley High School 565-8301 Worship In Spirit aad Truth. Miainrv...From God's Word to all. 7ind tuw Hope at. '*Ifu Cfiuch that LCn*E buiit." GIVING LIFE MIIMISTRIES 416 Peitae Wity. Hend. B€8^884 • BB5-4104 Pastor: Dave Delaria Sunday Morning ChrUtitn Ed'. JOun Sunday Morning • Worthip I lam ~ Sunday Evenint Bible Study 7pai Wednesday Evening • Royal Rangen • 7pai BLACK MOUNTAIN FELLOWSHIP Church of the Foursquare Gospel Sunday Worship 10:30AM ft B:30PM Wed. Family Night 7 pm ^ Hotm of ntek Mounts ^ 107 8. Oibeon, Hendereon 281-2758 Pastor Darrell Bowcn A Non-Denominational Church Services-Sunday 10:00 am & Wednesday 6:30 pm *0^rsery Care *Team Xids (ages 3-gradt 5) f Jjybutfi ^ittistries *Care Qroups througfumt weefi Now Meeting at Laln rCelebmtion!-k I A United Methodist Church I 2887 Sunlit Glade Ave., Henderson NV. • (702) 361-4102 of^*^Cende4sotv Pastor Rick Wilder Atlantic & Kansas 565-8577 Sunday School 9:30am Sunday Worship Sam, 1 lam, 6pm Wednesday Worship 7pm Wesleyan Lay Fellowship Sundays, Bible Study: 12 noon ,^ Worship 1 p.m. St. Christopher's Episcopal Church tor more information: v^ Mr. John Mondt, 293-1649 Mr. Brian Fox. 293-7620 Green Valley United Methodist Church 2200 Robindale Road, Hendei^dn 454-7989 8:30 a.m. & 11:00 a.m. Worstiip / Children's Church 9:45 a.in. • Christian Education (Adults & Children) Child Care Provided St Christopher's Episcopal Church Holy EucharistSun. 9am & Wed. 6pm ,';'.. Prayers For l-leoling ofter eoch Service •' Sunday School at 10:45 812 Arizona St. Boulder City • 293-4275 St. Christopher's Church, Boulder City is 0 God centered, inclusive, multi-generational, spiritually rejgted family welcominfl,all St. Timothy's Episcopal Church Pastor Rev. Dr. Lloyd Ru|)p WORSHIP 'Tues. Noonday Service •Fri. Noonday, Sun. SAM & 10AM Holy Eucharist 'lOAM Nursery & Sunday School Classes. -Pacific & Panama • 565-8033 In Downtown Henderson IM (Science of Mind) Mid Week Boost Build Self Esteem Overcome obstacles of Life. We Have Moved Every Wednesday Evening 7-8 p.m. Oasis Las Vegas • Windmill & Las Vegas Btvd So. 434-3912 Ftov Undt-Kiy Shave' Oasis Christian Fellowsliip • meets at Selma Bartlett Elementary School Ig Located at 1961 Wigwam Pkwy. ar*aufHkgu C'^*^^" ^alle Verde &. Green Valley Pkvy.) .^>:' *" Sunday Worship at 10 am ^^^ Nursery ^ Children's MlnlsiSy'" provided thru 5th Grade. le Harvest 1000 Nevada Hwy. Boulder City, NV 293-5878 "raise and Worskip iyer and Intertessjon Ik Children' Ciuirtli • Hirborn Voulk Mniury Christ The Servant Lutheran Church! 263-0802 Sunday Worship g 410:30 am Sunday School 9:1S am Sunday Evening Worship 7 pm Wedneiday 7pm Visitors Wtlcome • Nursery AvailaMt 2 South Pecos Rd. Henderson GREEN VALLEY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Saturday Service 5:30^p.m. Sunday Worship 8:30a.in. A 11 a.m. SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 a.m. Nursery All Services 1798 Wigwam Pkwy. (NE comu o< Wijn Pkwy 1 Vlit Vrt)* Dfl) iilllK Phone: 454-8484 ^110 CALVARYCHAPEL QREEN^^VALLEY >f--;s. Sunday ^JJJ^JJ/ Greenspun Jr. High ^ • ^140 North Valie Verde Drive Between Windmill and Wigwafn MId-Week Bible Study Tbesda y j7 Martinique Bay Clubhouse /^.TN 3000 High View Drive V^JJ^JJ^ Any Questions: Reas Call 896-8887 Paitor John Knapprft***—^cwwe>yc^^Oifc rs I COMMUNffY CHURCH OF HENDERSON United Church of Christ Congregational 360 E. Horizon Dr., • 565-8563 Worship Service 10:30 AM 'Building a Community to serve a Community' Church School 9:00AM, Nursery Available Sunday Evening 7:00 PM Bible Study 6 pm Currently Meeting Al: Join A.Dooiey 1940 ChKiuaw Headosoo, NV. 8901S sciBDUJiaraivicniauNDMrKaooLMiAM •MORNING WORSHIP lOrM AM EVENING WORSHIP 6.-00 PM YOUTH DISCOVERY iM PM PASTOR: JIM BENNETT -The Church CDn The Hiir 711 Vale Verde a. Hondemn. NV 454-2722 QwyAMoreMd Green Valley Christfain Center Sunday Schedule Morning Worship: 8:45 & 11:15 AM ChHdrer)'s Church: 9:00 & 11:15 AM Sunday School: 10:15 AM Evening Worship: 6:00 PM Wedneeday: Family Night 7:00 PM Tburaday: Youth Group (7-12). 6:45 PM Srturday. Evening Worship 6:30 PM (Baptist Cfmrcft Sunday Worship Service: 8 am, 10:30 & 6 p.m. Sunday School 9:15 a.m. Rev. Jeff McEarchern Jeff Dunham Youth Pastor 210 Wyoming, Boulder City Call 293-1912 for futher information Jaith Cdristian Jtdowshvp Pastor Bob Allen "Christ in you, the Hope of Glory'Col. 1:27 Services: Sunday Morning 10:00 am Sunday Evening 6:30 pm Wed. Evening 6:30 pm 421 S. Pacific Henderson, 565-7308 'ALLEY OUTDEACH !)YNAGQGUt Watecspring Boplifl Churdi Indtpandonl. Fundomanlol 1901 N. Orewi Voiey Hcwy. HMdwior NV 89014 lot CkiUnn'tWbrld) Sunder School A AA* Mbt* Shi^ 1li00a.Ni. Info dbout Sun. tWud. nigh, olher miniikitt. or jutl rtutd hip, call Pmttor DovMMlh (703) 4)M3M SERVICE First Friday Grace Community Church Methodist Presbyterian Congregational Founded: Feb 22,1933 1150 Wyomin. Boulder City, NV 283-2018 Sunday Worship 9:00 & 10:30 a.m. fnnwforav ivurwjr olsnvo SMla;Sckeal:9ajL I HteHaiSmkc: 7 H>-• 3rd Saeriqr ChapdWcddlvATaiaUe Rev. Dr. Ronald FTMI Patlor "ChrmCmm-WeCme' \Thursday, May 20. 1999 Panorama Paga7 The Rawhide Western: A railroad that never was THIS WAS NEVADA PHILLIP I. EARL Among the many Nevada railroad projects which never came to fruition during the early years of the 20th century mining boom wa9 the Rawhide Western, a line wbtich would have connected the camp of Rawhide to the Nevada' California Railroad at Schurz. The history of the Rawhide j Western goes back to the early 1 fall of 1907 when a rush to the : mines of Rawhide boosted the j camp's population to 3,bOO people. Some 30 auto stages were operat: ing from the railheads at Schurz, ] Fallen and Mina by Christmas time and some 10,000 miners, teamsters, would-be capitalists, saloon girls and other hangers-on were calling the camp home. Shortly after the first of the new year, 1908, rumors of proposed railroad projects began to circulate. Jim Sword, a Salt Lake capitalist, was said to be planning a 150-ton mill at Schurz and an electric railway connection to Rawhide. Nothing came of this project, however, nor was F.T. Topey of the Nevada Cable Traction Company successful in getting his plan for a line from Yerington off the ground. There were also persistent stories that officials of the Nevada Central Railroad were considering building west from Austin to Rawhide. The Southern Pacific Railroad was in the news as well in connection with a Rawhide spur, since the line south from Churchill Station had been standard gauged, but Rawhiders had to await the establishment of the Rawhide Western Company by promoter A.G. Renfro in late February 1908. Incorporated under the laws of West Virginia on Feb. 27, 1908, railroad officials named Fred Orutt, an early Rawhide locator, • president. Renfro assumed the position of general manager and .announJiied to the press that |$30,000|had Already been raised > toward construction costs and that he expected trains to be running within 90 days. The line was to stretch from the Southern Pacific railhead at Schurz — 28 miles to the west. He had assurances of sufficient shipping gradf ore to justly the construction of the line, Renfro said, and Southern Pacific officials were planning to make a site available on Walker Lake for a smelter. '.."^'' i Renfro and C.E. Loss, president of the California Contracting Company, signed a construction contract on March 3, and the initial surveys were completed two weeks later. The grading sub-con1 • • '-;r^*.'T> ^^^gt^ mmm ^-K i W9^ 'T* ^HB h 1 ^KttHHtm ^ • • aim* — • < • iBr V XSi\ m ^"^^^^'^^ ,...^• V i _..„ y 'V' "^ f^'' 1 M\ Read it in the News MONDAY IHRU FRIDAY ; ALL YOU CAN 1 KAi BUFFET > NEVADA HISTORICAL SOCIETY PHOTOGRAPH Grading work on the Rawhide Western Railroad, July, 1908. i^m. 1 1 am '.i pni tractor, Charles W. Reed of the Reed Teaming Co. of Oakland, however, was delayed by work on the Sacramento Southern Railroad. Grutt and Renfro had meanwhile arranged to purchase ties, rail and rolling stock from the Tonopah & Tidewater Railroad. The grading delay brought forth a proposal to build a competing railroad south from Fallon which would also serve the salt works near San Springs and the mining camp of Fairview, but nothing more was heard of such a plan when grading got imder way on April 28. With 50 men and 80 horses operating loaders, skips and scrapers, a mile and a half of grading had been completed by the first week in May. Renfro told reporters that the crew would be making a mile a day thereafter, although the average was less than half a mile. He also announced that drilling was under way on two wells to provide water for the men and horses. The first well struck water on May 26 and rumors began to circulate to the effect that Renfro was considering the platting of a new town on the site. Grading continued apace despite an effort by San Francisco stock brokers to depress the market in Rawhide mining stocks and continual turnovers in the labor force. Town boosters had hoped to celebrate Railroad Day on July 4, >;i Independence Day, but decided^ to shoot for Labor Day, Septi:'jQk!^^ when delays piled up. 'V.Z^A To speed the work, Renfro^ brought in 300 Greek laborers in mid-August. Rails and ties were piled, up )at Schurz by that" time: and there was talk of using a track-laying machine on the final phase. With less than three miles of grading to go, prospects for a fall opehing looked good, but a disastrous fire in Rawhide on Sept. 4 put the project on hold permanently. In the aftermath of the fire, a corporate reorganization took^'ii place and Charles W. Reed, the grading contractor, succeeded Fred Grutt as president of the railroad. .Reed attempted to purduade the directors of the Rawhide Queen Mine and the Rawhide Coalition into financing the completion of the line. In considering the proposal, officials of both companies decided to examine Rawhide's mining potential. An engineer, Morton Lindsay, arrived in town in early January 1909 to examine thfe mines. He concluded that only low-grade milling ore would be found at greater depths and recommended that his employers put their money in local mills rather than a railroad. Another mining engineer, Malcolm McDonald of Tonopah, did a more intensive survey threir-' months later, arriving at a simi-, lar conclusion, so the railroad i^|l. again put on the back burner. On Aug. 31,1909, Rawhide and the^SuiTDunoing areas were hit by torrential rains which did serious damage to the town and ,. washed out several sections of the ; Rawhide Western. Thereafter, mining officials gave up on any notions of a railroad. Several mills were operating by that time and there was insufficient shipping grade ore to even consider transporting it elsewhere. The old right-of-way sat abandoned until federal officials decided to seek its return in March 1931. The matter was considered in the federal District Covirt in Carson City over the next several months and an order returning the land was issued in July of that year. The remains of the graded roadbed are still visible east of Schurz 90 years later, mute reminders of an enterprise which never was. Earl is curator of the Nevada Historical Society in Reno : t 'lU'i' \;iii(l I 'iil\ \\ il li ( iiu|)i)ii I'.Mluilinii lli>liil.i>I W.i hnul ( Mlllinli .S'l. l.'i |-;:ull • M\l-I lie lit I Sllli|C(I 111 ch.lliuc U II hiPtit linl H'r • \,,i lix ~, r\. I' .i| ( uii|)nii. |)i i(ii' 111 ordcr-Mi': I \.iliil I .;n .") • :! M!i llh ri\ no i>hi( t li/yc aiir pliUtfar hiiiikliisl. Iiiiicli X (liiiiii r INO & PESTAURANT / />/('(7i Mllllll ilj • SinntI lid.. IIIIKIilMill ^(i^-')illi I i—. —— — -i —— _._i.._ — i-J House specialities: Ossobuco, Posta^ Fresh Seqfood COUPON Allow Italian Maater Chef Mario Aniflreoni to create your Special I ^5<>Sff Lunch I I I I L Lunch Mon.'l li II: iO Jpm Dinner Mon. Sat. S 1*.^ pm C lust J '^ulul,l\ I 2895 N. Green ^dleyParinmy • Formerly Piazza D'Angelo sSSE Explftes 7/31/99^ I • m-^'^y^'^. v>> > x.i • • at SuHBCtfcGVParltoafWMrtuc^^ • • • • BBMBHHaiBBaBiaaHBi 450-5339 Good only at our Green Valley Location 1 Terns CONSIGN & DESIGN FURNISHINGS "At Terries, it's five stores in one!" CONSIONMBIT SRVICE atoiimfalMwkhUSndc1lpUkKi^ VttikoiimtacikfUifmitdilibiyaii Cdl ovr CeatigiuRMit Llaei 247'7602 • V I i A. ..;>,' • • ^^y f^rChildren "^ Free Admission ^ Ice Cream Social ^ Family Entertainment ^Fun Stuff for Kids t Door Prizes • k'^.We Sell It For You...You Buy It Like New! Rainbow A Saharo SW Comer 247-7602 SECbrner 361-7747 • •• <. Saturday, May 22 > Noon to 4 p.m. ^^^ > .^;; Families are invited to attend the 3"* Annual Family Day: Stand for Children. ^ This event hosts a variety of civic booths that provide information on various community services. So, bring the family and enjoy an old-fashioned ice cream social with a sing-a-long, clap-a-long, and play-a-long. entertainment will once again be provided by Ncls, "^ Located at ^ MorrellPark 401 N. Major Avenue Adjacent to the L.J.K. Valley View Recreation Center located off of Boulder Highway and Basic Road. ^ D.J. from Kool Oldies 93.1 FM Learn more^ about what Henderson has to offer!^ j^ HACA FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER Sponsored by F.A.C.E. FamHy Advocates for Community Empowerment BEN£r .4IW.SA tgr • 1^

PAGE 32

^fppp"^ T^T ^^ fl^mi^Piii^i 7f^^">'5-^' r V r ''i'V • • r r -r r r'-'r';"^r'~>'r r PtgtS Panoriiina Thursday, May 20,1999 WHAT'S PLAYING Thursday, May 20,1999 Panorama Paga9 :'f Myron Heaton Chorale to perform The Myron Heaton Chorale will conclude its ninth concert season by presenting Great Choruses of Opera at 3 p.m. Sunday, May 23, at Reed Whipple cultural Center, 821 Las Vegas Blvd. N. The concert is based on the book "Opera for Dummies" as many of the selected pieces will be familiar as movie or television soundtracks or music used in a variety of commercials. Some of the compositions selected include The Toreador Song" fix)m Georges Bizet's "Carmen," "Libiamo" from "La Traviata," and Richard Wagner's "Entrance Chorus" from "Tannhauser." Featured soloists include Rossana Arager, soprano and Steve Robinson, tenor. Aranger has given recitals throughout the Southwestern United States and Mexico. She holds a bachelor of fine arts from the University of Arizona in Tucson and a master's degree from California State University-Northridge. She is a music specialist for the Clark County School District and is a workshop clinician for music teachers specializing in the Orff-Schulwerk. Robinson has performed with the Kansas City Lyric Opera, St. Louis Opera Theatre, and the Cincinnati Opera. He has been a featured soloist with the Kansas City Philharmonic and a premier arrangement of Leonard Bernstein's "Songfest" conducted by Bernstein as well as local productions with the Southern Nevada Musical Arts Society. Robinson holds a master of music degree from the University of Kansas and is a music therapist at the Southern Nevada Adult Mental Health Services. Tickets are $8 in advance or $10 at the door and $4 for children 5-13. For more information, call456-0735. • Hclcdics'""' yrccn f REE OUTDOOR CONCERT! Del Webb presents Softball game benefits Children's Miracle Network The 10th annual Doctors vs. Lawyers Charity Softball game to benefit UMC's Children's Miracle Network is scheduled for Saturday, May 22, at Cashman Field. The gates will open at 3: p.m. with the double-header game starting at 3:30 p.m. Presently, the score is 5-4 with the doctors taking the lead. Judge Nancy Oesterle and Dr. Carl Williams organize this annual event. Oesterle indicated that with the public's help, between the softball game and the volleyball game to be held in the fall, the doctors and lawyers intend to raise about $10,000 to benefit UMC's Children's Miracle Network. Only tickets purchased prior to the game will actually benefit Children's Miracle Network because the Las Vegas Stars will donate $2.50 on every ticket sold in advance to UMC's Children's Miracle Network. For more information, call Colleen Courtney, 383-2326, or Michelle Diegel, 650-6565. The ticket price is $5 and that also includes the regularly scheduled game between the Las Vegas Stars and the Memphis Redbirda Immediately after the Doctors vs. Lawyers Charity Softball game, there will be a tailgate party hosted by the Kiwanis Strip Club. All members of the public are invited to join the teams for this fun-filled party. Net proceeds of the tailgate party will also help to benefit UMC's Children's Miracle Network. Las Vegas Woodwind Quintet In concert on May 23 The Las Vegas Woodwind Quintet will perform at the Reed Whipple Cultural Center, 821 Las Vegas Blvd. N. at 2 p.m. Sunday, May 23. Admission is free, however, tickets are required to guarantee seating and may be picked Up at the center. No phone reservations will be taken for the free concerts. The program will include "The Flight of the Bumble Bee" by Rimsky-KbrsakofT, "Quintet for Winds" by Muczynski, "A Winter Suite" by Schudel and Eight Russian Folksongs by Liadov. The quintet members include Mary Walters on flute, Dave Hawley on clarinet, Sam Pisciotta on bassoon, Doug Beasley on horn and Gordon MacKinnon on oboe. This concert is presented by the Cultural and Community Affairs Division, City of Las Vegas Department of Leisure Services, and the music for this occasion is provided by a grant from the Music Performance Trust Funds. For more Information, call 229-6211. The Randy Anderson Band You'll be tapping your feet to the smooth 'n' easy countiy rhythms of this veisatile and talented singing group, tBoent winneis of the Country Music Association of America's prestigious "Band oftheYear." Thursday, May 20 6:00.pjn. Desert Willow Golf Course Amphitheater at Sun City MacDonald Ranch • • • 2 -' • • •: • • • • • • %>.-' • ,' ^QiinriK/IVl5 Sun City NacDonald Ranch* Retire from work. Not lifer Whitney Senior Center plans special events The Clark County Parks and Recreation Department's Whitney Senior Center, 5712 E. Missouri, near Boulder Highway and Tropicana Ave., has planned several spec^^ fvent^ for May in addition to daily activities and the senior nutrition lunch program. A celebration of spring is planned from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Tuesday, May 25. Featured entertainment will include the "Tom Williams Beat" and the Whitney Roadrunner Square Dance group. Following the entertainment, a barbecue will be heVd on th|9 patio. The Qcwtis $2. \ National Senior Health and Fitness Day will be celebrated from 8 to 11 a.m. on Wednesday, May 26. Co-sponsored by the National Association of Senior Friends, the event will include a Tai Chi demonstration, exercise and stretching routines, a walk in the park led by the UNLV Rebels mascot, a physical therapist from Sunrise Hospital, health exhibits and a continental breakfast. The event is free but interested persons should call in their phone reservations, 4557576, to be eUgible for the door prizes. Maya clothing on display starting Saturday "Huipils," an exhibit featuring traditional Guatemalan clothing, will be on display at the Marjorie Barrick Museum on the UNLV campus starting May 22. y ^ A public reception for the exhibit will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. Saturday, May 22. Huipils are woven garments which are produced and worn throughout Guatemala. These garments are produced in many colors and contain icons which identify the area from where they are produced. Huipils are an example of how the Maya see thenriselves and how they relate to their world. The Marjorie Barrick Museum is open 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. For information, call 8953381. Admission is free. Las Vegas High School Class of '54 to meet on July 10 The Las Vegas High School Class of 1954 will celebrate its 45th reunion on July 10 at the Orleans Hotel in Las Vegas, with the members of the LVHS Class of 1953 being invited to join in the event. Heading the Reunion Committee are 1954 class members Rollie Gibbs, Sharon Marshall Rather and Yorel Hutchison Barlow. Further information about the event may be obtained by calling the Reunion Committee, 4524278. The News covers your community Call 435-7700 to subscribe ^k ^J #^ Howard Hanson's MMT t W" ^ Symphony No. 2 it i^ ^^ ^^ g ^B one of the most llttCLlE ''''^"'* ^"'"" M w^rww^^ symphonies. It was commissioned by Serge Koussecitzlcy in 1931 for the Boston • Symphony's 50* anniversaty. The aim in this symphony his been to create work young in spirit, romantic in temperament, and simple and direct in expression. You will be swept away \sy the romantic swells, beautiful melodies and romantic movemenu of this wonderful work. This conft is • vtry appropriate ending to a season of outsunding music and musicians. f,May2SMSjmi Loma J. Kesterson VaUey View Recreation Center, 500 Hacris Street Free Admission ci $6$'ZS67 t%Omtttm All DIGITAL SOUND FORMATS I • Starcadc video game cntertainmcni rooms • Rocking chair logc seating with cupholdcr armrests Calc Cinema lor espresso drinks & gourmet desserts Century Orleans 12 Til 1456 c.r '2'il HLM ll/i IROPlCANA AVE 8, ARVllU IM IH[ OHltANS HOTEL ;USI WEST Of THE STRIP & I 15 IHX On A" *.--.% • A!'S1.-1J )4u Bargain Shows In () All shows startbia before 6pm CENTURY TlltATRES = No passes, coupons or discounts www.ccnturythcatrDS.com Late Shows Every Friday & Saturday Up to 5 day advance Tickets at all Century Walk-in Theatres Cincdome 12 Las Vegas ^>J\ STAR WAR; RUNS M HOURS tU. WEEKEND, THROUGH SUNDAY MGHTI 5EP1S0DEI • THEfHANTOMM£NAa. 1'^' On 5 ScfMM (80M 30-10 WH 00-11 30-1 00-200-2 30 -4 00) P M 15 0O-5 25| 700^00-8 30-11) 0O-1100-1130 P M 1 >-2 0O-2,3O-6 00-5 30-7 00 A M OCITAL THJT (92O1030-l?2O-130-32W30)6730Ptt .20-10 30-t2 20-130-3 < 30-6 20-7 30 A M DWrTALTTO THE LOVE. LETTER <'''5-'3> 112:00-2 IS-S 10) 7 40-tO 10DiaiT/U.TR7 Rancho Santa Fe 16 ,1 Mb-5'jl8 Of ?i2-FILM7M ^ NORTH IAS VEGAS • RANCHO ROAD ft NORTH RAINBOW BLVD (R) (II 2;W-506)735-1005OtCimfffir BmpMEf^' IPG-13) 145-4 25)7 10-9 55 MGIT/nTHy (1 05-4ll5) 7{I5-10:00 DKilTAlTHy MUMMY(V.3) On 3 Screens (1115-1215-115-215-315415-515)615-715 • 8:15-9:15-10.15-11;15 DKllTALTHJr THE LOVE. LETTER ("c-'^i On 2 Screens 1113IV12 35-135-2 35-3 3(M 40-5 40) 6 557 50 •B:00<1000 DtGITAI. AMIDSUMMER • ISllCHTSpREAM IPG-13) (11:45-2:20-4 55) 7:M-10fl5 OKMTAt. On2Scttenf (ItiS-l.15-245410-5:40)706-3S-10:X DKUTAL (R) (12:40-2 45-4:50) 7.<-905 DtOTAL election (12:20-2:40-5:00) 7:20-9:45 OtfllTAl (R) (PG-13) B^OMMEhfT On2Screni (1150-120-215-3454 40)620-705-145-925 OKITW. (R) 7:1$-10:)0 nCITM. Cookie's (PG-I3)^ Fortuna (11:45-2:2(M:SS) 7 40-lOAS OMTM. LIFE' (12:05-4 45)910 DtGITAL Plui FOOLISH2 25)70) XS£ EDtv (PG-13) 7:35-10:15 DtGIT/U. yftW^^tjoyi (G) V30-3:20-5:10) ONXT/U. $hatoeln[{vg (") (11:40-2:10-4:35) 7:10-935 DICIT/U. analj^ze „ (1215-2 40-5 00) 7 20-9 40 DIOITW. (105-3 15-5 20) 7 25-9 DOITM. (12:5O-3:0O-5:O5) DWTAi. Century Desert 16 641 9i00 v^' 27V HIM 11755 lA'iVFuA', • lAMBBlVOBtrWflNSAHARAiBOUlOtRhW/ THE LOVE. LETTER "^'^ (12 35-2 SS-5M) 7 tO-:30 OQITN. (12:2S-2:35-5:l5) 7 J5^ 20 DMirW. "75^222^ (R) On2Sciwni (11 S0>I22^}2I>4 304 30) 7 244$|tl0>72Mtt>l0a OnTN. Lfi'BiAima' BffllAPMM (J-'3 Oil (1t-lMMl4JHa|4l-7*tS -NMS IMTN. iRfiuin f(PO- l(1f4 4D^S0|740 OOTM. FOOLISH^ |(i2:io-M-srai7M0 aariL <0ijitait$ (PG-13) 7:35-9:50 THINGS I HATE ABOUTYOU (PG-13) OOTM. Shatepearelnli^f () 1145-2 50)6004.50 OKMTM. (P6-I3I II 40-2 154 55)7 35-10)0 OMTM. Cincdome 12 Las Vegas 365 2133 or 222-FILM 753 IAS VEGAS • DECATUR & WEST DESERT INN ROAD EXISTENZ'"' (12:30-3:15-5:20) 7,40-9:40 DICITAl UFE^ (1205-23i-4:55) 729--55 DtOITAl (12:20-2:50-5:05)715-9:35 OIGITAl (R) On 2 Screens (ia0-3l0-51O)7 0O-80O-94SIO30n£ Cookie s (PG.I3) Fortune (12:25-2:55-5:l5) 7:45-10:15 DIGITAl (12 50-305-5:35) 7 35-10:25 DWITAl V^G^m (G) 112:15-2:45-4:45) (R) (12 00-2 30-500) 7:25-10:00 DtGITAL 710-9:50 THINGS I HATE ABOUTYOU (PG-ll) OG^ LfrlAilTIRl' (PG-13) 12:35-3 30)7:30-10:05 DICITAL baby geniuses 112 10-2:40-4:50) (PG) (PG-13) EDIv (1240-5:30)10:10 DIGITAL-Plus(3:20) 7:55 DlGrTAt analyze m. this (1? 45-3O0-5251 7 5O-10-20 OtGITAL Cinedomc 12 Henderson (t 457 3700 or 222 FILM 7b5 ^^ HLNDLRSON GREEN VAlLEy • BOULDER HWV AT GREENWAY RO —EPISODEI* THEWANTOMMENAa. <'^' (10:30-l:M-4 30) 7 30-1030 DIGITAl. MUMMYrw'13) (1100-1 45-4 45) 7 45-10:35 BQITAl BmMEMT' (PG-13) (1045-1:05-3.25-5 45) 600-10:20 DCITAl. LIFE* (11^0-1:50-4 15)6:50-9:10 BCITAl (11:15-2.00-4:50)7:35-1015 OKMTAl 600-8:15-1025 DiOtTAI. (11 40-2.05-4.25) 7 00-9:20 DKjrTAL Rcdrock 11 Value Cincmds 870 1423or225fltM754 (11:10-120-335-5 40)755-1&10DIGITAl Academy Award Wmtt { 10:55-13S405) 6:45-905 DMITM. (10:40-12:30-2:204 10) (G) OGITAL analyze ,<,, tms "" (11:35-1:554:20)6:40-900 B^E (PG-13) (10 50-12 55-300-505)7 10-9 150IGITAI ^^Lts"^^ gem (1105-110-3:15-5:20) 0KTAL 720-9:30 OKUTAL THE MOO SOUAO (Ri 12 40510-9 IS as • PWTME RAPE: GARR'E J (R) ?•?' WWG COMMANDER (Pfi-13) 12:45-2:55-505-715-925 IBat PAYBACK (R)120-3255307409 45 gg CRUaiNTENTKMS(R) 12-05-23O4 55-7 10-9: OOSE THEKMGANOI {G|i:3KI45-7{l5ai -PluiTHE FACULTY (R) too PM IBM SHE'S ALL THAT(PG-13 1 1S320 5 2S-735-9.40 THE PWCE-Of EGTPT(P012 50^ SS-4 50 XSE-PlutSAyMGIWATE RYMi(R)720PJil SSB THE OTHER SISTER (P&-13) 1>!00-2JMa>-7 25-9:50 GOLD COAST TWIN,j.;j;i';;^ ELIZABETH'"' (12 20-3.00-545)115 lIMITAt. NATURE "^^ (PG) (1240-3 15-i:2^ WTO. 0(MRSKY< (1f-}0S-} 25)7 45-1015 OMRM. eledien c 10031O-5aO-7M00BITl TTW •OOAfOKOMIUIOf A MIDSUMMER • fgiGHT-SDREAM (PG-13 12JO'2:4$-SOO-7 15^9^0 OmTALTnT Las Vegas Drivc-lns fllM o?".! H 00 PM f m SAT 8 •• .-.., .',^5 Ct -Jffn L'id.t 12 IREE L,: I.-N^i. -SW CARfy AT RANCHO &SMOKE RANCH P(WfflW THE DB.TA (PG-13) • THEMUMMV(P&-I3) PU JOmCARWKTtirS VAMHRtSW UFEn PU oom THEMATNXIR) Pta ENTIUPMEMT(P6-i3) NEVEH KBI ianU(P&-t]) BLENMnm Times Vdlid for fnddy, Mdy 21, 1999 Only • ""y^^-'T DEAR DEBBIE HOROSCOPE DEBORAH WHITE \ Dear Debbie: My mother just died, and my father is from the generation when men did nothing for themselves. He and mom were retired and living down South. Now he wants to come and live with me. I am a single, career I woman who travels on the job. I live in a one-bedroom apartment. What do I do? No matter how much I impress on him that I don't cook and won't be there to keep him company, he still insists on moving back. i Do you have any other suggestions? I love my dad, but I feel • trapped. .,. : \ GUILT-TRIPPED DAUGHTER 5,*v Dear G.T. Daughter: Your dad belongs in a senior living community, a complex with apartments, condos, town houses or • small, single homes geared toward active adults over 65. There ; are restaurants and communal dining and services, such as laundry and pharmacy. There's also medical care on the premises. Find a few complexes near your home and take your dad to look around. Don't tell him in advance they're for seniors. He'll think you're trying to put him in a nursing home. Dear Debbie: About 15 years ago, I met a man who'6 a lot older than me. I was raised without a father, so he appealed to my need for security. We got married. He didn't change, but I did. I grew out of needing another daddy, so I left him. That was five years ago. We have stayed good friends, and although I've gone with other men, I haven't fallen in love again. My ex wants to move back in, and I'm considering it. My only concern is that it will be giving up. I'm still young enough to have kids. He can't have any. I don't want to hurt him again. What should I do? SECOND TIME AROUND Dear Second Time Around: If he moves in, you lose your freedom and your privacy. I give it six months before you kick him out. Why torture a man who really loves you? You don't want what he has to offer. Keep things the way they are, although that's really using him, too. ^ Send questions or comments to Dear Debbie, P.O. Box 4328, Chicagojll. 60680. Or send e-mail to tclark@tribune.com. 1999, Tribune Media Services LINDA BUCK Weekly Tip: The sun is in Gemini. Gemini is the sign of curiosity, so it's a sure bet interesting things will be going on. The competition is fierce. Aries (March 21-April 19). Move quickly and you may get to the prize before anyone catches you. Listen and learn from your partner and from your friends. Taurus (April 20-May 20). The sun in Gemini helps you focus on financial matters, as if you didn't do enough of that already. This time, instead of finding ways to save, you'll be finding ways to make more money. Gemini (May 21-June 21). The sun's in your sign, giving you an advantage, and that's going to get even more obvious as the week progresses. You're Jjjoking good, especially if you're working with a partner who has skills you lack. Cancer (June 22-July 22). Your mind is probably buzzing with the sun and Mercury both in CJemini. You're most likely worrying about work-related matters. Just wait a while, and things will calm down. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22). You're good with teams. Social activities should be taking up lots of your time, too. You'll have more invitations than you can possibly accept. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). You might tend to be nervous while the sun is in Gemini, but the upside is that it makes you even quicker, both mentally and physically. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). The sun's in (]remini, which is really lovely for you. It helps you travel and also learn advanced subjects. The biggest difficulty will be figuring out where to go, and which subjects to study. Scorpio (Oct. 24'Nov. 21). You cian make and lose a lot of money while the sun's going through Gemini, so take care. It looks like a lot of it is changing hands. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). The sun's in Gemini, presenting something of a challenge. A raging debate could prove quite entertaining. You're one of the main players, so stay alert. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). You generally stay pretty busy, but during the sun's transit of Gemini things can get downright hectic. It looks like you're working to meet a deadline. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You do very well when the sim is in Gemini, as it is now, so this whole week should be spectacular for you. Your friends will come up with some amazing new ideas, much to your delight. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20). The sun in Gemini could inspire you to make changes at home. That'll really stir things up and make you impatient with the status quo. If You're Having a Birthday This Week: Saving is your theme this year, and paying off old debts. Do that and youll propel yourself toward success. Anticipate changes and the3rll be much less disruptive. 1999, Tribune Media Services ; • ^ i>; ^ Synagogue members to golf The second annual Putting and Dinner duting of Ahavat Torah Synagogue will be held May 23 at the Angel Park putting course. The tee-off will be at 4 p.m. followed by the Angel Park Ail-American dinner. The cost will be $30 per person. The cost of the dinner only is $20. Reservations and advance payment are required. Contact the Temple office, 242-2111, or contact any board member. Thermostat jammed at freezing level Sprint. The point of contact" If you have trouble reading this column, I'll explain right now it's tough typi ng while wearing a pair of gloves. Why am I wearing gloves? I'll tdd you iwhy — because Tm married to a' man whose thermostat is jammed at the freezing level. That's right! Summer has struck and the polar bear I'm married to has turned on the air-conditioning full-blast. After spending the winter in a near comatose state (intense cold tends to make one feel sluggish), I can't tell you how much I always look forward to the spring thaw. My thaw didn't last long, hence the gloves. If all this isn't bad enough, as soon as I sneak out to the driveway where I can sit in the car and thaw for a while, Polar Bear arrives on the scene. "As long as you're in the car," Jie ^^9Utg> "let's go somewhere.*-; '*^-':; ONCE OVER LIGHTLY CAROLYN DRENNAN BISHOP You guessed it, before we are out of the driveway the air-conditioningis cranked up full-blast. What follows is not a pretty sight. As we cruise along, little icicles form on my eyelashes and soon my nose is frozen into an exclamation point. Worse is yet to come. Let me put it this way: It is distinctly off-putting to anyone we stop and visit along the way, when I end up defrosting all over their carpet. A dripping nose and sagging eyelashes tends to put a pall on any conversation. I've tried to interject a little humor into my plight. I mentioned merrily the other day that I have been eagerly following the discovery of the body of an explorer near the top of Mt. Everest. It seems the poor fellow has lain there frozen solid for 75 years. "Perhaps, J tog^WiU'be discovered years from now in a perfectly preserved condition sit;^ ting at my computer," I added and chuckled wildly. I was met with cold stare. Lately, something else has cold shivers running up and down my spine. I couldn't believe it when I learned yesterday that an innovative new gadget is going to be added to some of next year's cars — seats that turn instantly cold when the air-conditioning is switched on! Not only will my nose and eyelashes be alternately freezing and melting, something else is going to be dripping on someone's carpet. If you don't want to think about it, I don't blame you. LoU Emmert Vice /'resident and Gen^raJ Mwuiger Congregation Ner Tamid celebrates Shavuot May 22 At 10 a.m. on May 22, there will be a Yiskor observance followed by a special Shavuot -program. "This year's program will be entitled "The Principles of Reform Judaism." Much in the news over the past few months has been the discussion of a new platform of principles for Reform Judaism. Over this time, the platform has been revised many times. Participants can learn about this debate and how Reform Judaism has changed over the decades reflecting contemporary themes as well as ancient concerns. Rabbi Akselrad and rabbinic intern, Leah Malmon will lead discussions which will give participants the opportunity to learn more about the history and specifics of Reform Jewish belief Call the Temple office, 7336292, for reservations. Babysitting is available for Friday evening's service and Saturday morning's service and program. 0.1' Congregation Ner Tamid is located at 2671 Emerson Ave, just east of Eastern Avenue, between Desert Inn and Flamingo. As part of our 100th amii'". CELEBRATING 100 „ VV\ • ::• • • ^-v YEARS OF SERVICE MAY LOCAIfS' PAVOMTE' PEPPERMILL'S RUUCFAfT'' HOME of the PENNY GAMES! GIVEAWAY WIN A LUtOI KREIN fV! WIN CASH & PRIZES! na wnKLY PIAWINOSI MUMNM Mflr im, um, lunt A WIH, IMf I DRAWINO mUlMpm. SEE POSTED FUERS FOR DETAILS WHIM TNI LOCAU HlUr WIN CLUB CASINO 122 WATER ST. HENDERSON, NV. 565-9777 tTS HERE! DAILY SPiCIALS 9pjnvl)i3>m SUNCMT BBQBMYlMCKPORKiaBl.... .$4.9^ luesoAY PWMERB. .-^ ^95 WGONESDKf KANSAS CflVSTIA>C..v^.^ ...M^9S saAi.PorftOA9r...,. $3.99 T4K3NISIBMC. ... $6.96 SAPURDWr 9ECM(SNB7K>0
PAGE 33

^fppp"^ T^T ^^ fl^mi^Piii^i 7f^^">'5-^' r V r ''i'V • • r r -r r r'-'r';"^r'~>'r r PtgtS Panoriiina Thursday, May 20,1999 WHAT'S PLAYING Thursday, May 20,1999 Panorama Paga9 :'f Myron Heaton Chorale to perform The Myron Heaton Chorale will conclude its ninth concert season by presenting Great Choruses of Opera at 3 p.m. Sunday, May 23, at Reed Whipple cultural Center, 821 Las Vegas Blvd. N. The concert is based on the book "Opera for Dummies" as many of the selected pieces will be familiar as movie or television soundtracks or music used in a variety of commercials. Some of the compositions selected include The Toreador Song" fix)m Georges Bizet's "Carmen," "Libiamo" from "La Traviata," and Richard Wagner's "Entrance Chorus" from "Tannhauser." Featured soloists include Rossana Arager, soprano and Steve Robinson, tenor. Aranger has given recitals throughout the Southwestern United States and Mexico. She holds a bachelor of fine arts from the University of Arizona in Tucson and a master's degree from California State University-Northridge. She is a music specialist for the Clark County School District and is a workshop clinician for music teachers specializing in the Orff-Schulwerk. Robinson has performed with the Kansas City Lyric Opera, St. Louis Opera Theatre, and the Cincinnati Opera. He has been a featured soloist with the Kansas City Philharmonic and a premier arrangement of Leonard Bernstein's "Songfest" conducted by Bernstein as well as local productions with the Southern Nevada Musical Arts Society. Robinson holds a master of music degree from the University of Kansas and is a music therapist at the Southern Nevada Adult Mental Health Services. Tickets are $8 in advance or $10 at the door and $4 for children 5-13. For more information, call456-0735. • Hclcdics'""' yrccn f REE OUTDOOR CONCERT! Del Webb presents Softball game benefits Children's Miracle Network The 10th annual Doctors vs. Lawyers Charity Softball game to benefit UMC's Children's Miracle Network is scheduled for Saturday, May 22, at Cashman Field. The gates will open at 3: p.m. with the double-header game starting at 3:30 p.m. Presently, the score is 5-4 with the doctors taking the lead. Judge Nancy Oesterle and Dr. Carl Williams organize this annual event. Oesterle indicated that with the public's help, between the softball game and the volleyball game to be held in the fall, the doctors and lawyers intend to raise about $10,000 to benefit UMC's Children's Miracle Network. Only tickets purchased prior to the game will actually benefit Children's Miracle Network because the Las Vegas Stars will donate $2.50 on every ticket sold in advance to UMC's Children's Miracle Network. For more information, call Colleen Courtney, 383-2326, or Michelle Diegel, 650-6565. The ticket price is $5 and that also includes the regularly scheduled game between the Las Vegas Stars and the Memphis Redbirda Immediately after the Doctors vs. Lawyers Charity Softball game, there will be a tailgate party hosted by the Kiwanis Strip Club. All members of the public are invited to join the teams for this fun-filled party. Net proceeds of the tailgate party will also help to benefit UMC's Children's Miracle Network. Las Vegas Woodwind Quintet In concert on May 23 The Las Vegas Woodwind Quintet will perform at the Reed Whipple Cultural Center, 821 Las Vegas Blvd. N. at 2 p.m. Sunday, May 23. Admission is free, however, tickets are required to guarantee seating and may be picked Up at the center. No phone reservations will be taken for the free concerts. The program will include "The Flight of the Bumble Bee" by Rimsky-KbrsakofT, "Quintet for Winds" by Muczynski, "A Winter Suite" by Schudel and Eight Russian Folksongs by Liadov. The quintet members include Mary Walters on flute, Dave Hawley on clarinet, Sam Pisciotta on bassoon, Doug Beasley on horn and Gordon MacKinnon on oboe. This concert is presented by the Cultural and Community Affairs Division, City of Las Vegas Department of Leisure Services, and the music for this occasion is provided by a grant from the Music Performance Trust Funds. For more Information, call 229-6211. The Randy Anderson Band You'll be tapping your feet to the smooth 'n' easy countiy rhythms of this veisatile and talented singing group, tBoent winneis of the Country Music Association of America's prestigious "Band oftheYear." Thursday, May 20 6:00.pjn. Desert Willow Golf Course Amphitheater at Sun City MacDonald Ranch • • • 2 -' • • •: • • • • • • %>.-' • ,' ^QiinriK/IVl5 Sun City NacDonald Ranch* Retire from work. Not lifer Whitney Senior Center plans special events The Clark County Parks and Recreation Department's Whitney Senior Center, 5712 E. Missouri, near Boulder Highway and Tropicana Ave., has planned several spec^^ fvent^ for May in addition to daily activities and the senior nutrition lunch program. A celebration of spring is planned from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Tuesday, May 25. Featured entertainment will include the "Tom Williams Beat" and the Whitney Roadrunner Square Dance group. Following the entertainment, a barbecue will be heVd on th|9 patio. The Qcwtis $2. \ National Senior Health and Fitness Day will be celebrated from 8 to 11 a.m. on Wednesday, May 26. Co-sponsored by the National Association of Senior Friends, the event will include a Tai Chi demonstration, exercise and stretching routines, a walk in the park led by the UNLV Rebels mascot, a physical therapist from Sunrise Hospital, health exhibits and a continental breakfast. The event is free but interested persons should call in their phone reservations, 4557576, to be eUgible for the door prizes. Maya clothing on display starting Saturday "Huipils," an exhibit featuring traditional Guatemalan clothing, will be on display at the Marjorie Barrick Museum on the UNLV campus starting May 22. y ^ A public reception for the exhibit will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. Saturday, May 22. Huipils are woven garments which are produced and worn throughout Guatemala. These garments are produced in many colors and contain icons which identify the area from where they are produced. Huipils are an example of how the Maya see thenriselves and how they relate to their world. The Marjorie Barrick Museum is open 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. For information, call 8953381. Admission is free. Las Vegas High School Class of '54 to meet on July 10 The Las Vegas High School Class of 1954 will celebrate its 45th reunion on July 10 at the Orleans Hotel in Las Vegas, with the members of the LVHS Class of 1953 being invited to join in the event. Heading the Reunion Committee are 1954 class members Rollie Gibbs, Sharon Marshall Rather and Yorel Hutchison Barlow. Further information about the event may be obtained by calling the Reunion Committee, 4524278. The News covers your community Call 435-7700 to subscribe ^k ^J #^ Howard Hanson's MMT t W" ^ Symphony No. 2 it i^ ^^ ^^ g ^B one of the most llttCLlE ''''^"'* ^"'"" M w^rww^^ symphonies. It was commissioned by Serge Koussecitzlcy in 1931 for the Boston • Symphony's 50* anniversaty. The aim in this symphony his been to create work young in spirit, romantic in temperament, and simple and direct in expression. You will be swept away \sy the romantic swells, beautiful melodies and romantic movemenu of this wonderful work. This conft is • vtry appropriate ending to a season of outsunding music and musicians. f,May2SMSjmi Loma J. Kesterson VaUey View Recreation Center, 500 Hacris Street Free Admission ci $6$'ZS67 t%Omtttm All DIGITAL SOUND FORMATS I • Starcadc video game cntertainmcni rooms • Rocking chair logc seating with cupholdcr armrests Calc Cinema lor espresso drinks & gourmet desserts Century Orleans 12 Til 1456 c.r '2'il HLM ll/i IROPlCANA AVE 8, ARVllU IM IH[ OHltANS HOTEL ;USI WEST Of THE STRIP & I 15 IHX On A" *.--.% • A!'S1.-1J )4u Bargain Shows In () All shows startbia before 6pm CENTURY TlltATRES = No passes, coupons or discounts www.ccnturythcatrDS.com Late Shows Every Friday & Saturday Up to 5 day advance Tickets at all Century Walk-in Theatres Cincdome 12 Las Vegas ^>J\ STAR WAR; RUNS M HOURS tU. WEEKEND, THROUGH SUNDAY MGHTI 5EP1S0DEI • THEfHANTOMM£NAa. 1'^' On 5 ScfMM (80M 30-10 WH 00-11 30-1 00-200-2 30 -4 00) P M 15 0O-5 25| 700^00-8 30-11) 0O-1100-1130 P M 1 >-2 0O-2,3O-6 00-5 30-7 00 A M OCITAL THJT (92O1030-l?2O-130-32W30)6730Ptt .20-10 30-t2 20-130-3 < 30-6 20-7 30 A M DWrTALTTO THE LOVE. LETTER <'''5-'3> 112:00-2 IS-S 10) 7 40-tO 10DiaiT/U.TR7 Rancho Santa Fe 16 ,1 Mb-5'jl8 Of ?i2-FILM7M ^ NORTH IAS VEGAS • RANCHO ROAD ft NORTH RAINBOW BLVD (R) (II 2;W-506)735-1005OtCimfffir BmpMEf^' IPG-13) 145-4 25)7 10-9 55 MGIT/nTHy (1 05-4ll5) 7{I5-10:00 DKilTAlTHy MUMMY(V.3) On 3 Screens (1115-1215-115-215-315415-515)615-715 • 8:15-9:15-10.15-11;15 DKllTALTHJr THE LOVE. LETTER ("c-'^i On 2 Screens 1113IV12 35-135-2 35-3 3(M 40-5 40) 6 557 50 •B:00<1000 DtGITAI. AMIDSUMMER • ISllCHTSpREAM IPG-13) (11:45-2:20-4 55) 7:M-10fl5 OKMTAt. On2Scttenf (ItiS-l.15-245410-5:40)706-3S-10:X DKUTAL (R) (12:40-2 45-4:50) 7.<-905 DtOTAL election (12:20-2:40-5:00) 7:20-9:45 OtfllTAl (R) (PG-13) B^OMMEhfT On2Screni (1150-120-215-3454 40)620-705-145-925 OKITW. (R) 7:1$-10:)0 nCITM. Cookie's (PG-I3)^ Fortuna (11:45-2:2(M:SS) 7 40-lOAS OMTM. LIFE' (12:05-4 45)910 DtGITAL Plui FOOLISH2 25)70) XS£ EDtv (PG-13) 7:35-10:15 DtGIT/U. yftW^^tjoyi (G) V30-3:20-5:10) ONXT/U. $hatoeln[{vg (") (11:40-2:10-4:35) 7:10-935 DICIT/U. analj^ze „ (1215-2 40-5 00) 7 20-9 40 DIOITW. (105-3 15-5 20) 7 25-9 DOITM. (12:5O-3:0O-5:O5) DWTAi. Century Desert 16 641 9i00 v^' 27V HIM 11755 lA'iVFuA', • lAMBBlVOBtrWflNSAHARAiBOUlOtRhW/ THE LOVE. LETTER "^'^ (12 35-2 SS-5M) 7 tO-:30 OQITN. (12:2S-2:35-5:l5) 7 J5^ 20 DMirW. "75^222^ (R) On2Sciwni (11 S0>I22^}2I>4 304 30) 7 244$|tl0>72Mtt>l0a OnTN. Lfi'BiAima' BffllAPMM (J-'3 Oil (1t-lMMl4JHa|4l-7*tS -NMS IMTN. iRfiuin f(PO- l(1f4 4D^S0|740 OOTM. FOOLISH^ |(i2:io-M-srai7M0 aariL <0ijitait$ (PG-13) 7:35-9:50 THINGS I HATE ABOUTYOU (PG-13) OOTM. Shatepearelnli^f () 1145-2 50)6004.50 OKMTM. (P6-I3I II 40-2 154 55)7 35-10)0 OMTM. Cincdome 12 Las Vegas 365 2133 or 222-FILM 753 IAS VEGAS • DECATUR & WEST DESERT INN ROAD EXISTENZ'"' (12:30-3:15-5:20) 7,40-9:40 DICITAl UFE^ (1205-23i-4:55) 729--55 DtOITAl (12:20-2:50-5:05)715-9:35 OIGITAl (R) On 2 Screens (ia0-3l0-51O)7 0O-80O-94SIO30n£ Cookie s (PG.I3) Fortune (12:25-2:55-5:l5) 7:45-10:15 DIGITAl (12 50-305-5:35) 7 35-10:25 DWITAl V^G^m (G) 112:15-2:45-4:45) (R) (12 00-2 30-500) 7:25-10:00 DtGITAL 710-9:50 THINGS I HATE ABOUTYOU (PG-ll) OG^ LfrlAilTIRl' (PG-13) 12:35-3 30)7:30-10:05 DICITAL baby geniuses 112 10-2:40-4:50) (PG) (PG-13) EDIv (1240-5:30)10:10 DIGITAL-Plus(3:20) 7:55 DlGrTAt analyze m. this (1? 45-3O0-5251 7 5O-10-20 OtGITAL Cinedomc 12 Henderson (t 457 3700 or 222 FILM 7b5 ^^ HLNDLRSON GREEN VAlLEy • BOULDER HWV AT GREENWAY RO —EPISODEI* THEWANTOMMENAa. <'^' (10:30-l:M-4 30) 7 30-1030 DIGITAl. MUMMYrw'13) (1100-1 45-4 45) 7 45-10:35 BQITAl BmMEMT' (PG-13) (1045-1:05-3.25-5 45) 600-10:20 DCITAl. LIFE* (11^0-1:50-4 15)6:50-9:10 BCITAl (11:15-2.00-4:50)7:35-1015 OKMTAl 600-8:15-1025 DiOtTAI. (11 40-2.05-4.25) 7 00-9:20 DKjrTAL Rcdrock 11 Value Cincmds 870 1423or225fltM754 (11:10-120-335-5 40)755-1&10DIGITAl Academy Award Wmtt { 10:55-13S405) 6:45-905 DMITM. (10:40-12:30-2:204 10) (G) OGITAL analyze ,<,, tms "" (11:35-1:554:20)6:40-900 B^E (PG-13) (10 50-12 55-300-505)7 10-9 150IGITAI ^^Lts"^^ gem (1105-110-3:15-5:20) 0KTAL 720-9:30 OKUTAL THE MOO SOUAO (Ri 12 40510-9 IS as • PWTME RAPE: GARR'E J (R) ?•?' WWG COMMANDER (Pfi-13) 12:45-2:55-505-715-925 IBat PAYBACK (R)120-3255307409 45 gg CRUaiNTENTKMS(R) 12-05-23O4 55-7 10-9: OOSE THEKMGANOI {G|i:3KI45-7{l5ai -PluiTHE FACULTY (R) too PM IBM SHE'S ALL THAT(PG-13 1 1S320 5 2S-735-9.40 THE PWCE-Of EGTPT(P012 50^ SS-4 50 XSE-PlutSAyMGIWATE RYMi(R)720PJil SSB THE OTHER SISTER (P&-13) 1>!00-2JMa>-7 25-9:50 GOLD COAST TWIN,j.;j;i';;^ ELIZABETH'"' (12 20-3.00-545)115 lIMITAt. NATURE "^^ (PG) (1240-3 15-i:2^ WTO. 0(MRSKY< (1f-}0S-} 25)7 45-1015 OMRM. eledien c 10031O-5aO-7M00BITl TTW •OOAfOKOMIUIOf A MIDSUMMER • fgiGHT-SDREAM (PG-13 12JO'2:4$-SOO-7 15^9^0 OmTALTnT Las Vegas Drivc-lns fllM o?".! H 00 PM f m SAT 8 •• .-.., .',^5 Ct -Jffn L'id.t 12 IREE L,: I.-N^i. -SW CARfy AT RANCHO &SMOKE RANCH P(WfflW THE DB.TA (PG-13) • THEMUMMV(P&-I3) PU JOmCARWKTtirS VAMHRtSW UFEn PU oom THEMATNXIR) Pta ENTIUPMEMT(P6-i3) NEVEH KBI ianU(P&-t]) BLENMnm Times Vdlid for fnddy, Mdy 21, 1999 Only • ""y^^-'T DEAR DEBBIE HOROSCOPE DEBORAH WHITE \ Dear Debbie: My mother just died, and my father is from the generation when men did nothing for themselves. He and mom were retired and living down South. Now he wants to come and live with me. I am a single, career I woman who travels on the job. I live in a one-bedroom apartment. What do I do? No matter how much I impress on him that I don't cook and won't be there to keep him company, he still insists on moving back. i Do you have any other suggestions? I love my dad, but I feel • trapped. .,. : \ GUILT-TRIPPED DAUGHTER 5,*v Dear G.T. Daughter: Your dad belongs in a senior living community, a complex with apartments, condos, town houses or • small, single homes geared toward active adults over 65. There ; are restaurants and communal dining and services, such as laundry and pharmacy. There's also medical care on the premises. Find a few complexes near your home and take your dad to look around. Don't tell him in advance they're for seniors. He'll think you're trying to put him in a nursing home. Dear Debbie: About 15 years ago, I met a man who'6 a lot older than me. I was raised without a father, so he appealed to my need for security. We got married. He didn't change, but I did. I grew out of needing another daddy, so I left him. That was five years ago. We have stayed good friends, and although I've gone with other men, I haven't fallen in love again. My ex wants to move back in, and I'm considering it. My only concern is that it will be giving up. I'm still young enough to have kids. He can't have any. I don't want to hurt him again. What should I do? SECOND TIME AROUND Dear Second Time Around: If he moves in, you lose your freedom and your privacy. I give it six months before you kick him out. Why torture a man who really loves you? You don't want what he has to offer. Keep things the way they are, although that's really using him, too. ^ Send questions or comments to Dear Debbie, P.O. Box 4328, Chicagojll. 60680. Or send e-mail to tclark@tribune.com. 1999, Tribune Media Services LINDA BUCK Weekly Tip: The sun is in Gemini. Gemini is the sign of curiosity, so it's a sure bet interesting things will be going on. The competition is fierce. Aries (March 21-April 19). Move quickly and you may get to the prize before anyone catches you. Listen and learn from your partner and from your friends. Taurus (April 20-May 20). The sun in Gemini helps you focus on financial matters, as if you didn't do enough of that already. This time, instead of finding ways to save, you'll be finding ways to make more money. Gemini (May 21-June 21). The sun's in your sign, giving you an advantage, and that's going to get even more obvious as the week progresses. You're Jjjoking good, especially if you're working with a partner who has skills you lack. Cancer (June 22-July 22). Your mind is probably buzzing with the sun and Mercury both in CJemini. You're most likely worrying about work-related matters. Just wait a while, and things will calm down. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22). You're good with teams. Social activities should be taking up lots of your time, too. You'll have more invitations than you can possibly accept. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). You might tend to be nervous while the sun is in Gemini, but the upside is that it makes you even quicker, both mentally and physically. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). The sun's in (]remini, which is really lovely for you. It helps you travel and also learn advanced subjects. The biggest difficulty will be figuring out where to go, and which subjects to study. Scorpio (Oct. 24'Nov. 21). You cian make and lose a lot of money while the sun's going through Gemini, so take care. It looks like a lot of it is changing hands. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). The sun's in Gemini, presenting something of a challenge. A raging debate could prove quite entertaining. You're one of the main players, so stay alert. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). You generally stay pretty busy, but during the sun's transit of Gemini things can get downright hectic. It looks like you're working to meet a deadline. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You do very well when the sim is in Gemini, as it is now, so this whole week should be spectacular for you. Your friends will come up with some amazing new ideas, much to your delight. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20). The sun in Gemini could inspire you to make changes at home. That'll really stir things up and make you impatient with the status quo. If You're Having a Birthday This Week: Saving is your theme this year, and paying off old debts. Do that and youll propel yourself toward success. Anticipate changes and the3rll be much less disruptive. 1999, Tribune Media Services ; • ^ i>; ^ Synagogue members to golf The second annual Putting and Dinner duting of Ahavat Torah Synagogue will be held May 23 at the Angel Park putting course. The tee-off will be at 4 p.m. followed by the Angel Park Ail-American dinner. The cost will be $30 per person. The cost of the dinner only is $20. Reservations and advance payment are required. Contact the Temple office, 242-2111, or contact any board member. Thermostat jammed at freezing level Sprint. The point of contact" If you have trouble reading this column, I'll explain right now it's tough typi ng while wearing a pair of gloves. Why am I wearing gloves? I'll tdd you iwhy — because Tm married to a' man whose thermostat is jammed at the freezing level. That's right! Summer has struck and the polar bear I'm married to has turned on the air-conditioning full-blast. After spending the winter in a near comatose state (intense cold tends to make one feel sluggish), I can't tell you how much I always look forward to the spring thaw. My thaw didn't last long, hence the gloves. If all this isn't bad enough, as soon as I sneak out to the driveway where I can sit in the car and thaw for a while, Polar Bear arrives on the scene. "As long as you're in the car," Jie ^^9Utg> "let's go somewhere.*-; '*^-':; ONCE OVER LIGHTLY CAROLYN DRENNAN BISHOP You guessed it, before we are out of the driveway the air-conditioningis cranked up full-blast. What follows is not a pretty sight. As we cruise along, little icicles form on my eyelashes and soon my nose is frozen into an exclamation point. Worse is yet to come. Let me put it this way: It is distinctly off-putting to anyone we stop and visit along the way, when I end up defrosting all over their carpet. A dripping nose and sagging eyelashes tends to put a pall on any conversation. I've tried to interject a little humor into my plight. I mentioned merrily the other day that I have been eagerly following the discovery of the body of an explorer near the top of Mt. Everest. It seems the poor fellow has lain there frozen solid for 75 years. "Perhaps, J tog^WiU'be discovered years from now in a perfectly preserved condition sit;^ ting at my computer," I added and chuckled wildly. I was met with cold stare. Lately, something else has cold shivers running up and down my spine. I couldn't believe it when I learned yesterday that an innovative new gadget is going to be added to some of next year's cars — seats that turn instantly cold when the air-conditioning is switched on! Not only will my nose and eyelashes be alternately freezing and melting, something else is going to be dripping on someone's carpet. If you don't want to think about it, I don't blame you. LoU Emmert Vice /'resident and Gen^raJ Mwuiger Congregation Ner Tamid celebrates Shavuot May 22 At 10 a.m. on May 22, there will be a Yiskor observance followed by a special Shavuot -program. "This year's program will be entitled "The Principles of Reform Judaism." Much in the news over the past few months has been the discussion of a new platform of principles for Reform Judaism. Over this time, the platform has been revised many times. Participants can learn about this debate and how Reform Judaism has changed over the decades reflecting contemporary themes as well as ancient concerns. Rabbi Akselrad and rabbinic intern, Leah Malmon will lead discussions which will give participants the opportunity to learn more about the history and specifics of Reform Jewish belief Call the Temple office, 7336292, for reservations. Babysitting is available for Friday evening's service and Saturday morning's service and program. 0.1' Congregation Ner Tamid is located at 2671 Emerson Ave, just east of Eastern Avenue, between Desert Inn and Flamingo. As part of our 100th amii'". CELEBRATING 100 „ VV\ • ::• • • ^-v YEARS OF SERVICE MAY LOCAIfS' PAVOMTE' PEPPERMILL'S RUUCFAfT'' HOME of the PENNY GAMES! GIVEAWAY WIN A LUtOI KREIN fV! WIN CASH & PRIZES! na wnKLY PIAWINOSI MUMNM Mflr im, um, lunt A WIH, IMf I DRAWINO mUlMpm. SEE POSTED FUERS FOR DETAILS WHIM TNI LOCAU HlUr WIN CLUB CASINO 122 WATER ST. HENDERSON, NV. 565-9777 tTS HERE! DAILY SPiCIALS 9pjnvl)i3>m SUNCMT BBQBMYlMCKPORKiaBl.... .$4.9^ luesoAY PWMERB. .-^ ^95 WGONESDKf KANSAS CflVSTIA>C..v^.^ ...M^9S saAi.PorftOA9r...,. $3.99 T4K3NISIBMC. ... $6.96 SAPURDWr 9ECM(SNB7K>0
PAGE 34

^'^^^m mm^^m^^mmmm ^F^PW^ ^^^^PPP^^^^PPPPPPW 10 Panorama Thursday, May 20,1999 Thursday, May 20,1999 Panorama Pagall Jumble UnM:ramH( ihae row wonb, one letter to cKfa iqurt, to rona four ordbiliry wordb NORDE BITHA DWEAMO I NAANAB WHAT THE cxrrWords of Wisdom CROSSWORD PUZZLE N '1.'. Benevolent Chickens.'.." Jumbles: VNVNVa MOQVaW UeVH HNOaa Answer •. ONvaaaNNva — siuessq dnojS :|30J snosSeJino sq] rmif/^: 'SLAPSTIX Dogs come when they're called; cats take a message ^and get back to you. C \1')9. TritiurxMedia Scrvicej Empty pockets never held anyone back. Only empty heads and empty hearts can do that. • • • For a good life: Work like a dog. Eat like a horse. Think like a fox. And play like a rabbit • • • Dreams are ... illustrations from the book your soul is writing about you. i •;,' • • Style ain't nothing but keeping the same idea from beginning to end. Everybody got it. AfiFINEWRU. O 1999. TVibune Media Sa\ka M^GICWORD HOW TO PLAY: Rand the Hat of words. Look at the puzzla. You'll fliKl IhMa wonts In all diractlona—horlzonUlly, vartlcaHy, diagonally, backwarda. Draw a clrda around aach lattar of a wordfound In ttta puzzla, than atrlka it off ttia Hat. Circling It will ahow a lattar haa baan uaad but will laava H vlaibia should H alao form part of anothar word. Find the big words first. Whan lattars of all ilstad words are circled, you'll have tha oivan number of lattars left over. They'll spell out your MAQICWORO. BUYING A HOME (sol.: 8 letters) A-Acres, Asset; B-Bank, Broker, Building, Buyei^ C-Cellar, City, Closing, Cost; D-Dates, Deed; E-Equity, Escrow, Executive; F-Parm, File, Finance; H-House; I-Inspect, Interest, Invest; L-Land, Lawyer, Listing, Loan, Look; M-Money, Move; 0-Oflfer, Option; P-Payment, Price; R-Realtor; S-Sell, Sign, Site, &)ld; TTaxes, Terms, Time, Title, Town, Tract, Trade, Trend; U-Unit This Week's Answer: 01999. Tribune Madia Sorvlcea aOVOXHOlM TTGGN I DL PI I YT lUQ TRTMAC SE NRI LE LTR GOECEOLF I TTNE S I F SLTCD I SN EACOENTS XEASEG IN ARRTDTNK TATNERGH ELARE FFO SLAWYERU SE SCROWS ACRESMRE IUBKNAB EBUYERP TADLOS A ADEKFEY I LET IXM ARMONEE AOLWACN ELLNNUT VESTCTS OOL I E I E UOTVGVR NYOMEEE I MONEY T TOPT I ON TCEPSNI iMandbesnot live kj zvords albnej despite die fact tfiat sometimes fk lias to ea^ tfiem. i 2 3 4 1 5 6 7 8 9 1 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 16 19 5o~ • 21 |H 22 ^H 23 24 I 25 ^ ^^H 27 2a • 29 30 31 32 33 • 34 • 35 36 i 37 I 38 39 • 40 • 41 42 43 • 44 JHHI 45 • iT ^H 47 4 49 ^H 50 • 51 52 53 64" 55 56 57 M 1 59 60 61 62 63 N 1 3 xHs a H 1 sHa N 0 N 0 H 3 aHa a o u alu 01 1 a 3 V J|a n d -lUilo H H 1 HJV D N 1 • ilHiN 1 V 1 a QQEiciEi nnnn a a d d olsB s -1 0 0 diaa H 1 1 MBTN a N HHA N I 1 V O\Z\H a A s A V olajs 0 N 1 V X vIBa 1 V V 1 •H' d V J. d sHl N V U 1 OHIIN V M a 1 • nan nnnna nnmm aaoa ciani a N V ilsjM a n 0 a VHN O a n oHa a i A 1o om^ V H 0 a H 1 sfli 1 V N viv r V H ACROSS • 1 Indbnpiihce 5 Name in violins 10 Wraiorhen 14 Type Of exam 15 Punctuation nri1( 16 .benAdhem 17 CofTuption 18 Brisbane's state 20 Moose 21 Melody 22 Poundand Stone 23 Shun 25 Gumbo 27 Occupant 29 Ulster 33 Native of Qum 34 Thorny 35 One:Fr. 36 Record 37 Tilt 38 Recipe vMord 39 Devoured 40 ".ofTwo Cities' 41 Natatoflums 42 Bouquets 44 Java 45 Willie of baseball 46 Inexpensive 47 Spot 50 Jog 51 Once'around the track 54 Legendary sovereign 57 Medieval war dub 58 Take leave it 59 Eat away 60 U.S. satellite 61 Not any 62 Begets 63 Adolescent DOWN 10 1 Winder at random Seed covering Upstart 4 Stout ^ 5 Absolve 6 HiMock 7 ftouticalwDid 8 Digit 9 TnavBtef's stopover French noveiist 11 Constructkxi piece 12 Cokjmnist Barrett 13 Lemons 19 Crowd togetfier Singer Termille 24 Weathercock 25 Sheeplike 26 Artist Rockwell 27 Industrial giant 28 Muse of poetry 29 Certain gems 30 Inappropriate 31 Like an oW 21 woman 32 Succinct 34 Ovenwhelms. as with laughter 37 Remain 38 Divan 40 Capltalof Guam 41 Bard 43 Onewho flees his country 44 Tasks 46 Coarse 47 Hide 48 JosipBroz 49 Shortly 50 God of thunder 52 Vbam 53 Unskilled latwrer 55 Thing, in law 56 Numerical prefix Came upon 57 sNoumos PEANUTS by Charles M. Schuiz Garfidd by JJm Davis HAVE '<0\) HEARD ANY ANNOUNCEMENTS? I ALWAYS LIKE THE ANNOUNCEMENTS. nHE ROLE OF 50 ANP 50 OOILLBEPLAYEPTOPAY0Y 50AND5O...THEU5EOF RECORDtKe CAMeRA5l5 RATES BOXED ADS $8.00 pw.cetiamilnelipwiMM UP TO 3 LINES (apptox. 23 charactef J per trn) 4S EA. ADOmONAL UNE. lOnc UoK pict-ap rm b i).00 up lo J lines Md 15c ptr iddilioiiil lint.) (Green Valley Plus Pia up Rales Boied ads = J3 00 p c I pel issue Ijnea<)st3 00peflineupio3 tows • per i&sue Cwh ailM Rite RiK 3llni $6.90 16.85 •IliM $6.>5 '$7 JO 5lin J7. '11.n 6n.$7.85 -$8.20 'linaa $8J0 tS.SS 'li"" $8.75 'IHO 9 line* $9J0 19.55 'Olinaa SS.65 110.00 KousHttfumxufaiaiLr CLASSIFIED Published Tuesdays, Thursdays iww ACCEPTING PUASE READ VOUR AD FOR ERTORS the first day It appeare H B C Publicalmre, Inc assumes TO lesponsibifcty AFTER THE FIRST 1^^^^ na lor arron not allecling DM valu* ol the ad All daims (w jaWamenl adjuslmenls must be made wiltim 12 days alter axpiratior ol ad. Henderson Home News Boulder City News 564-1881 • 435-7700 293-2302 Hours:Mood ayltiruFiidayB-4 Hrxirs: Monday thru FrxJay 8 • 4 DEADLINES Henderson Home News Tuesday's Issue 4:00 P.M. FRIDAY Henderson Home News • Boulder City News Thursday's Issue 12:00 NOON TUESDAY PREPAYMENTS: Yard. Garage, and Moving Sales requin cash in advance (Exception subscribers) Otjtol-iown and oul-ol-stale also require prepayment NOTICE TO READERS By law, companies that contract to locally move your liousehold goods must hold a certificate from the Nevada Public Service Commission. This requirement ensures that the company carries proper insurance, complies with government safety standards and charges only approved rates. Nevada lawalso requires these "full service" movers to printtheirPSC number on their trucks in their advertising. For more Information, the PSC can be reached at 486-2600. Chapter 624 of Nevada Revised Statutes makes it unlawf ullor any person to engage in the business or act in the capacity of a contractor within this State without having a State Contractor's License. All advertising by a licensed contractor shall include the license numt>er. Should a question arise regarding licensed contractors, contact the Nevada State Board Of Contractors, 486-1100. Affordable legal services. PersonalinjuryA divorce. 564-0800/497-0797. 24 hrs. Serving Henderson, Green Valley & Boulder City. PS47975 Don't despair, We repair '^'"' Bill's Furniture & Upholstery Repair 25 years of Experience 565-4752 RAINBOW CONSTRUCTIOfJ INC. NOW DOES STUCCO ikxij wHh New Conslruction, Reodeling, PaBoa; AH of your Building NMdi Call 558-7949. nm\i ^CONSULTING> IrMewnan will halp In all erMs •I marhellng/talsa any magnltud* ktcMMng your bolton. Iln for any produci or •frvlca. Ova, IT yaare aiprlnM tiKliidlna MLM. dialrlbullon Cood a*nlc. nnufaclurlng. lm|>onlrr a>porlll,. hoca bMailkualnaaMeM lrcm. I<>tnan M ou./wMn/(ita, I'll develop It for you a a turn-key (with tpeed) CAN ALSO HELP; ADVERTISING, DIRECT MAIL. MAH OROEH INTERNET/FAX BLAST SELLING, RETAIL AND WSURANCE. L CALL KIR APPT122 J X^FIm Co rn. FliM ianti^y LTD Builders Home tmprovement Specialists Room Additions Remodeling Patio Covers Landscaping Lie. No. 33260 222-1778 PS43569 Plumbing Electrical HANDYMAN, UNLIMITED Serving Henderson and Boulder City privately for 16 years has now gone public. All work Is guaranteed and senior citizens get a 10% discount! For a free estimate call: \ 204-4488 Painting Cleaning MICHAELS PRO LANDSCAPE Rocks/Sod Old/New Sprinklers Too 453-8252 PS47882 Electric Power Deregulated! How would you like to save 20% on your power bill? For tnore information call J-800-573-3236. No. 1430 ************ THE HANDYMAN WHO CAN OMMiaMnusr. vHr WOBCOWfT/UcMWd Ron 564-7442y37S-7107 PSdTWl CMLO CARE w Hofna away ffwn home ^ '* aimoaphare. OV aiae. ^isvs atrntUt card, tiaaWi eaM. CPn cart. Fun thinffs to o. 614-OMC PROFESSIONAL 111 00 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES II SERVICES B.H. SMITH PS43M2 HOME REFAim MAINTENANCE IBRVICE ONE CALL DOES fT ALL Shelving, assembly, move-In Specials Make a list.. 20 yrs. exp. Call Brad 564-4073 THE CLOCK IS TICKING IS YOUR COMPUTER READY? '•Check your PC while there Is still time. •We locate and fix the Y2K bug in both, your hardware and software. •All work performed in your home or off ice. $49.95 analysis CALL FIX Y2K NOW at (702) 349-5228 MATINATA LANDSCAPE Design-installation Irrigation maintenance Lie. & established 20 yrs. Call us now for a quote FREE-FOR ANY JOB OVER $500 REC. 1-15 QAL. TREE. SIGN 6 MOS. MAINTENANCE SERVICE & RECEIVE 1 FLAT OF FLOWERS FREE. CALL 270-6269/592-7006 PS47267 ^ THE CAVANAUGH'S J^XS PAINTING CONTRACTORS y*/ INTERIOR & EXTERIOR ^pt SENIOR DISC. 294-1422/293-7341 FREEESV M ATES 5 Residential Lie. 31642 Commercial R&G Landscaping Design & Installation • Lawn Maintenance • Renovation • Sprinklers Systems m Rocky-Greg (702) 558-7346 YARDVARK'S LAWN AND MAINTENANCE Professional Tree Trimming Serving BC. Green Valley & Henderson 294-1114 Pager 221-2936 PS43573 ID BLACK MOUNTAIN PLUMBING j6^ ^FASTSERVIck HENDERSON BOUTDER CfTY 565-6749 uc foonM. 294-7713 Kitclien & Bath Remodels. Lie. & Insured. ^^• 0876. PS48113 •. Carpentry, Remodeling/ Additions, Jeff Mayer, 294-1728. PS40628 GENE'S CARPET CLEANING and WINDOW CLEANING Res. & Comm. 564-8055 pgitml SAVE MONEY ON LONG DISTANCE CALLING 10c a minute 24 hrs./day 7 days a wk. Best quality, lowest phce, Call Mitch 878-6896 ps — rsm — CONCRETE, INC Uc. 4S120 Patto* Drtvawaya • SidawaMw Etparianca maana qualHyt FREE Eatlmain • 566-7867 PS477 YOU NAME FT-Well DOIT •nasldantlal •Commarclal •Remodel Call 294-1039 or Cell #496-1990 Conlractort Uc. No. 00144S3 HANDYMAN PLUS For all your honM repairs. Plus Ule carpet repairs. Lie. 31390 450-5474__ SERENITY CLEANING Care Free. Worry Free. Reliable Call KIml 293-4730 '^" Affordable Happy Housedeaners "BKS SpecW** Sl3Ar.", our luppMii. FrMadbrartM. Uc. A Cdi LICENSED HANDY MAN Completo home repiirt Rick It 564-7488 or Ml 379-2197 Doggie Yard Weekly Clean Up Services Thorough, Reliable, Affordable. Call Bob 391-0922 HANDYMAN PLUS Does your home need a little face-lift or maybe a few small repairs? Call 450-5474 Sr. Discount TINA'S CARPET CLEANING UpMaMry a Orapaa Commareial a RaaMamial SRV't St. Dtacounia, Fiaa E rt iMtM j^mJ 568-1222 Q&M CONCRETE, INC. Uc. •45120 PatkM • Ortvewcys SkJewalks Exparlenca mean* qualHyl FREE EallmatM 566-7M7__, MARK HARMON PEST CONTROL t18/Mo. No Contracts 30 Day Guarantee Ue.*4aT 5654168 or Pager #660-2199 THE RANCH CLEANING SERVICC 20 Yrs. of reliable service H^)h standards a quality youcantnjst. CdlMiiy 897.1163 Complete Pool Semce Repair & Remodel Acid Wash, Tile & Equip. Repair Decking Repair or Replacement 25 Yrs. Experience 698-1521 PS4(XM 100 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES HENDERSON MASONRY 564-1487 Block & Brick Lie. No. 0012631. p.^.. Drywall Repairs, Free estimates. 293-4730/ 218-8199 (fWlobile). PS48193 Reliable college student to clean your home, all prices determined on job. Ask lor Laura, Day 6442244/night 558-7360. PS48123 NEWLY OPENED Assisted Living Facility (Private) in Henderson. Call Rina, 363-5693. PS42028 4 LINES ^6' 100 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Golf Lessons By touring professional Tim Rose 435-9681 p^, Last minute movers! we move resid. & comm. ANYWHERE. Load/Unload your rental truck. 565-9675/BEEP 5990652. PS47289 Lifetime reminder service. Never miss another important occasion. A post card will be sent to you within 7-10 days, prior to any special occasion, for the rest of your life. Send $29.95+$4 S/, H to High Hopes, P.O. Box 91388, HD, NV:. 89009. PS44493 100 PROFESSIONAL I 100 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES H SERVICES ^ .tdano& Son Plumbinc Service/Repair/ Remodeling Reasonable 558-7887 PIANO LESSONS ALL AGES 33 YEARS EXPERIENCE SHEILA-293-1614 psiiiim Sprinkler Systems License # 4490-0 Lawn Care HaroM & Sharon Critcher Telephone 294-6200 Senrtng BouMer City for 11 years COMMERCIAL RENOVATION Remodeling, Tenants Improvements • s Over 20 yrs. exp. 233-4562 (iic. NO. 43073) S teve Bailey Constniction __PS47971 Since1959 • U31MM Lie. #214.0-19400 GENE'S TREE SERVICE Topping, Trimming, Complete Removals, FREE ESTIMATES Stump Grinding 564-2551 ASSEMBLY REQUIRED BY CARL Entertainment Centers BBQ's Computer desltract or Initial Charga* 8tata Licwiaa 4903 Cell 568-5534 Tecfinics organ GN9 Series 5-6yrs. old, excel, cond. $7500, 739-8070/ 794-9321, Barbara. MI40668 Wanted-Antiques, old costume jewelry, paintings, glass, sterling, 1 piece/collections, 4506841.MI45e38 Washers. Dryers $125 each 293-6101. BC. MI47970 23ft. Ranger Day Cruiser Boat. 455 Jet inboard 80 hrs. Biminy Top, CD play, Roadrunner Trailer, xint. cond. $5800 OBO, new Baft.. Life Jackets, skis incl. 293-0438 anytime. MI45448 2-Weatherauard side mount Tool Boxes, white, for 8' bed. $125 each. 361-2845. MI48069 For sale 1997while cargo trailer 5x10 enclosed, 4 mos. oW, tires 15x6, excel, cond. asking $2200, pis. call Cheryl at 5973435. MI34321 HD-GV 1/2 price furn. sale. Couch, bdrm. set, TV unit, WW wan unit, 5 gar. cabinets. 436-4538. MI48096 300 MISCELLANEOUS >^ Boulder City 293-7296 4Line?gS cosh rota Huge Rummage Sale, Sat., May22nd,8-2.1100 Buchanan Blvd. BC. GS48063 Full size W/elec. ID, white deluxe. Whirlpool, 2 yrs. old only used 1 yr. Asking $475 for pair. 5661519 MI47667 WOLFF TANNING BEDS. Tan at home. Buy direct and save! Commercial/Home units from $199 Low Monthly Payments. Free Color Catalog. Call Today 1-800842-1310. MI48014 Roving out of the country, need to sell furniture: couch, bakers rack, coffee table, and congos. Also Pet Boa Constrictor. Call Hunter or TR at 734-8176. Saddle-Circle Y 15 1/2 $500. English Saddle $90, stove 2 s/s refrig. $135, Washer. 294-2642 or 524-8603. Mt48168 BC-Sat.,5/22.8am,517 Ave. I, saddles, refrigerators, washer, stova. clothes, misc. Mi48170 Motorized Treadmill, VHF Boat radio, electric hedge trimmer, inversion skyhook oscillator, electric rotisserie broiler, motion pk:ture cameras, orojectors S supplies also jeveral radios. 293-3191. \^l4ei39 3100 |3100 STORAGE UNITS | STORAGE UNITS STORE YOUR STUFF Controllad Acoaaa UghtMl UiWta—Auto-eoat-RV-24 Hour Seoura Storaga—Concrala Bhiek Construction 488 W. Victory Rd^ Henderson 564-8040 PROFESSIONAL SFRVICfS 100 ppofrssu Hi8-Her'3 Hendy Servioe No Job too emeli. Gen do K eN, 24 hr. mmmrg. no edded efi 293-5848 564-1 ^W Trash Hauling Yard Cleanup, Handyman. Call Ray, 293-0745. PS48097 400 PERSONALS WANTED! Acne sufferers to try an all natural treatment. FREE 30 DAY SUPPLY for a clinical study. 294-0390, Ext. 4. PE41293 Free denture Cleaner!! Call 1-800-664-8780. www.sparkledenture.conT MI47475 Advertise in the NEWS fordable & thorough House Cleaning. 5047488/678-4788 pager #. PS47286 Am FORCE. Grr career opportunities available or high school grads, ages 17-27. Plus up to $9,000 enlistment bonus if you qualify! For an inf omnaiton packet call 1-800-423-USAF or visit www.airforce.cofn. PE48004 mm'im' ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS MMt7dayawk.atSPM, Rtc. Annax bahind BouMarDam CrwMUnlon. 49 PEOPLE WANTED Lose 10-15 Pounds 10-30 inches per month Call Julie 800-217-4402 HOUOAY BLUES?] Whmi nothing elee wor1(s. Nevada Learning Programa 898-712Sor t 2 94-0277 1-6774wniM www.1877hatmiH.eoni 9976181 (R#f8f#no# ) ThaUntanataBualfMas Opportunity of the Nwir MMIaiiiuniL PUMMI St. Jude's Novena...May the Sacred Heart of| Jesus be adored, glorified, loved and preserved throughout the world now and forever. Sacred Heart of Jesus have mercy on us. St. Jude worker of miracles, pray for us. Say this" prayer 9 times a day for 9 days. By the 8tii day your prayer will be answered. It has never been known to fail. Publication must be p romised. Thank yo u St. Jude. AA 200 GARAGE SALES UKE MEAD VIEW ESTATES • ConwrTtmplaRocktQyptum St. 8 i.in.-2 p.m. Antiqua rociwra. tllktiaa, Wroughtlron Bwtlwi ciMirt, lampt. diahat, llnana, clotha*. 1989 Biu doN •hoai A Iwou, K. 8, much .jaam. YNT PUBLIC AUC MUN Bank owned residential real estate Reno, Nevada. 1-finished house, 6-partially finished houses, 5-building lots. Sale Date: Wednesday, May 26th, 5:30 p.m. ON SITE 445 Snowmass Court. Reno, Nf^a. Free brochure. With terms and openhouse info. Conducted by Realty Executives of Northern Nevada, Ruth WardEmmil, Carolyn Miller, 775-824-3666. GS48007 Estate Sale, Fri. & SaL, May21&22,8A-?247S. Texas, Hd. GS47979 825 Verbena, New Hosp. scrubs, misc. clothing, desk & file cabinets, much, muct> more. All funds go back to the Community, sponsored by the Greater HD Kiwanis. Fri. &Sat.,21& 22. GS47987 200 GARAGE SALES Yard Sale, Boulder Oakes RV Resort SAT. 4-10 only. 7 AM-3 PM. 1010 Industrial Rd. BC. GS46744 4 family sale, furn., microwave, golf clubs, toys, new & used clothes, lots of misc., EZ lift H/D hitch towbar, jeep towrtjar attachment. Harley misc. 71 Kencraft 35 ft. pai1< model w/front T/0, all furnished. EVERYTHING PRICED TO GO. Fri.&Sat.,8-5,912Essex Ave.GS47215 Sun.. HiKy 22 & 23, S-?. 207 Nickel St. G548071 HD Muhi family garage sale, Sat., May 22nd, 82. 1041 Heatherwood. Cross sts. Racetrack & Blue Latern. GS48093 HD Moving Sale, Sat. & Sun., 22nd & 23rd, 9-5. 545 Truffles, off Horizon. GS48104 HD Huge Garage Sale, Sat., May 22nd, 7a-12. 633 Robin Lane off Pacific & Fairway across from Golf Course. GS47918 Huge Yard Sale, Fri. & Sat. 5/21-22. 8-3, 154 Magnesium, something for everyone. GS48126 HD Garage sale great stuff, Fri., Sat., May 21 & 22, 8A-2P. 1620Nlavajo Pt. PI. Arroyo Grande & Wigwam. GS48116 Moving Sale, Sat., fe/22 7-10 AM. Clothes, mower, misc., 517 Ave. K., BC. GS48110 Car bike rack. 2 pr. roller blades, truck tires, windows, bk;ycle, riothes, toys and 3 sets worlds great classic cooks, and microwave, etc. 270 'E. Desert Rose Dr. (between Pacific and Greenway) 5/21-22, 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. GS48106 4 Lines'6^^ 1 BC homemade spring/ summer clothes sale. Nothing over $15. Fri., 21,Sat.,22,8a.m.-lp.m. 402 Lakeview Dr. GS48082 Garage Sale goes country! Sat., 5/22, 6-11 a.m. 1430 San Felipe Dr. Lots of country decorating Hems. Linens, and attractive previously appreciated treasures. Y'all cornel GS480e3 Giant Garage Sale, 7noon. Sat, May 22nd, at St. Christophers, 812 Arizona St. BC. If you have derations. Call Sbina at 294-0954 oi Craig at 293-6304. GS48059 BC Fri.-Sat.. 8-3. 781 Christina Dr. Collectoi Plates, music boxes, a lot of crafts, Fum. No Early Birds. GS48064 Huge Rummage Sale, Sat, May 22nd. 8-2.1100 Buchanan Blvd. BC. GS48063 BC Moving in Sale, May 21 & 22, 8 a-1 p. 1623 Indian Walls Dr. off Buchanan. QS48030 BC FIRST GARAGE SALE IN TWENTY YEARS! FOREIGN COLLECTIBLES. May 22, 7-11. 1540 Sandra Dr. ONE HOUSE OFF FAIRWAY. GS48098 BC 553 Elm, Fri., Sat., Sun., 7A-?. Household, old books. Too much to mention. GS48088 HD Yd. Sale, LR fum.. comp. desk, lights, 3 pc. babyf urn. & accessories, toys men, women & kids clothes & shoes, wheelchair, & lots more. Not unk. Sat. only 8-6, 318 Water St. GS48087 Garage Sale, Fri. & Sat. Everything Cheap. 231 Puite Lane. HD. GS48090 BC-Moving Sale. 6 pc. pine bed set queen w/ armoire$1600,4pc. oak bedfull $500, leather sofa w/2 built in recliners $600, 1 7' sectional tan sofa w/ queen sleeper/recliner $1600,2computer desks w/chairs $200 ea.. student desk w/chair $125, Sunday 9-1,630 Arizona St. 294-1161.GS48166 YARD SALE: AMERICAN BUSINESS WOMEN'S ASSOCDESERTDAWNCHAfiTER proceeds to Scholarship fund. Sat., May 22nd. 7 am-12pm. 542 Fairway, Henderson. GS48161 Sun.. 9-2 NO EARLY BIRDS. 1444 Rawhide, BC. Bar Stools, Cabinets. BBQ. lots of housahoM items. GS48157 BC-Annual Yard Safe. Sat, May 22, 709 5th St. Lots of everytNng! Tools, collectibles, some art supplies, housewarea. G$A8456 s^i^plie BC^ BC-Multl family sale. Arn^ada PI., §^1., S/22. 812 Please no early btrda. GS481S2 BC-LarMsaio.Sat.onV. Lots of lads toys, draftinig table & more. 659 Otono. GS481S0 BCl6 0up Bridge Bdt.. cards score sheets, bks S35. framed paintinol, housahoUilems. 7a-2p Fri.-Sal.804SanRamo. GS48172

PAGE 35

^'^^^m mm^^m^^mmmm ^F^PW^ ^^^^PPP^^^^PPPPPPW 10 Panorama Thursday, May 20,1999 Thursday, May 20,1999 Panorama Pagall Jumble UnM:ramH( ihae row wonb, one letter to cKfa iqurt, to rona four ordbiliry wordb NORDE BITHA DWEAMO I NAANAB WHAT THE cxrrWords of Wisdom CROSSWORD PUZZLE N '1.'. Benevolent Chickens.'.." Jumbles: VNVNVa MOQVaW UeVH HNOaa Answer •. ONvaaaNNva — siuessq dnojS :|30J snosSeJino sq] rmif/^: 'SLAPSTIX Dogs come when they're called; cats take a message ^and get back to you. C \1')9. TritiurxMedia Scrvicej Empty pockets never held anyone back. Only empty heads and empty hearts can do that. • • • For a good life: Work like a dog. Eat like a horse. Think like a fox. And play like a rabbit • • • Dreams are ... illustrations from the book your soul is writing about you. i •;,' • • Style ain't nothing but keeping the same idea from beginning to end. Everybody got it. AfiFINEWRU. O 1999. TVibune Media Sa\ka M^GICWORD HOW TO PLAY: Rand the Hat of words. Look at the puzzla. You'll fliKl IhMa wonts In all diractlona—horlzonUlly, vartlcaHy, diagonally, backwarda. Draw a clrda around aach lattar of a wordfound In ttta puzzla, than atrlka it off ttia Hat. Circling It will ahow a lattar haa baan uaad but will laava H vlaibia should H alao form part of anothar word. Find the big words first. Whan lattars of all ilstad words are circled, you'll have tha oivan number of lattars left over. They'll spell out your MAQICWORO. BUYING A HOME (sol.: 8 letters) A-Acres, Asset; B-Bank, Broker, Building, Buyei^ C-Cellar, City, Closing, Cost; D-Dates, Deed; E-Equity, Escrow, Executive; F-Parm, File, Finance; H-House; I-Inspect, Interest, Invest; L-Land, Lawyer, Listing, Loan, Look; M-Money, Move; 0-Oflfer, Option; P-Payment, Price; R-Realtor; S-Sell, Sign, Site, &)ld; TTaxes, Terms, Time, Title, Town, Tract, Trade, Trend; U-Unit This Week's Answer: 01999. Tribune Madia Sorvlcea aOVOXHOlM TTGGN I DL PI I YT lUQ TRTMAC SE NRI LE LTR GOECEOLF I TTNE S I F SLTCD I SN EACOENTS XEASEG IN ARRTDTNK TATNERGH ELARE FFO SLAWYERU SE SCROWS ACRESMRE IUBKNAB EBUYERP TADLOS A ADEKFEY I LET IXM ARMONEE AOLWACN ELLNNUT VESTCTS OOL I E I E UOTVGVR NYOMEEE I MONEY T TOPT I ON TCEPSNI iMandbesnot live kj zvords albnej despite die fact tfiat sometimes fk lias to ea^ tfiem. i 2 3 4 1 5 6 7 8 9 1 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 16 19 5o~ • 21 |H 22 ^H 23 24 I 25 ^ ^^H 27 2a • 29 30 31 32 33 • 34 • 35 36 i 37 I 38 39 • 40 • 41 42 43 • 44 JHHI 45 • iT ^H 47 4 49 ^H 50 • 51 52 53 64" 55 56 57 M 1 59 60 61 62 63 N 1 3 xHs a H 1 sHa N 0 N 0 H 3 aHa a o u alu 01 1 a 3 V J|a n d -lUilo H H 1 HJV D N 1 • ilHiN 1 V 1 a QQEiciEi nnnn a a d d olsB s -1 0 0 diaa H 1 1 MBTN a N HHA N I 1 V O\Z\H a A s A V olajs 0 N 1 V X vIBa 1 V V 1 •H' d V J. d sHl N V U 1 OHIIN V M a 1 • nan nnnna nnmm aaoa ciani a N V ilsjM a n 0 a VHN O a n oHa a i A 1o om^ V H 0 a H 1 sfli 1 V N viv r V H ACROSS • 1 Indbnpiihce 5 Name in violins 10 Wraiorhen 14 Type Of exam 15 Punctuation nri1( 16 .benAdhem 17 CofTuption 18 Brisbane's state 20 Moose 21 Melody 22 Poundand Stone 23 Shun 25 Gumbo 27 Occupant 29 Ulster 33 Native of Qum 34 Thorny 35 One:Fr. 36 Record 37 Tilt 38 Recipe vMord 39 Devoured 40 ".ofTwo Cities' 41 Natatoflums 42 Bouquets 44 Java 45 Willie of baseball 46 Inexpensive 47 Spot 50 Jog 51 Once'around the track 54 Legendary sovereign 57 Medieval war dub 58 Take leave it 59 Eat away 60 U.S. satellite 61 Not any 62 Begets 63 Adolescent DOWN 10 1 Winder at random Seed covering Upstart 4 Stout ^ 5 Absolve 6 HiMock 7 ftouticalwDid 8 Digit 9 TnavBtef's stopover French noveiist 11 Constructkxi piece 12 Cokjmnist Barrett 13 Lemons 19 Crowd togetfier Singer Termille 24 Weathercock 25 Sheeplike 26 Artist Rockwell 27 Industrial giant 28 Muse of poetry 29 Certain gems 30 Inappropriate 31 Like an oW 21 woman 32 Succinct 34 Ovenwhelms. as with laughter 37 Remain 38 Divan 40 Capltalof Guam 41 Bard 43 Onewho flees his country 44 Tasks 46 Coarse 47 Hide 48 JosipBroz 49 Shortly 50 God of thunder 52 Vbam 53 Unskilled latwrer 55 Thing, in law 56 Numerical prefix Came upon 57 sNoumos PEANUTS by Charles M. Schuiz Garfidd by JJm Davis HAVE '<0\) HEARD ANY ANNOUNCEMENTS? I ALWAYS LIKE THE ANNOUNCEMENTS. nHE ROLE OF 50 ANP 50 OOILLBEPLAYEPTOPAY0Y 50AND5O...THEU5EOF RECORDtKe CAMeRA5l5 RATES BOXED ADS $8.00 pw.cetiamilnelipwiMM UP TO 3 LINES (apptox. 23 charactef J per trn) 4S EA. ADOmONAL UNE. lOnc UoK pict-ap rm b i).00 up lo J lines Md 15c ptr iddilioiiil lint.) (Green Valley Plus Pia up Rales Boied ads = J3 00 p c I pel issue Ijnea<)st3 00peflineupio3 tows • per i&sue Cwh ailM Rite RiK 3llni $6.90 16.85 •IliM $6.>5 '$7 JO 5lin J7. '11.n 6n.$7.85 -$8.20 'linaa $8J0 tS.SS 'li"" $8.75 'IHO 9 line* $9J0 19.55 'Olinaa SS.65 110.00 KousHttfumxufaiaiLr CLASSIFIED Published Tuesdays, Thursdays iww ACCEPTING PUASE READ VOUR AD FOR ERTORS the first day It appeare H B C Publicalmre, Inc assumes TO lesponsibifcty AFTER THE FIRST 1^^^^ na lor arron not allecling DM valu* ol the ad All daims (w jaWamenl adjuslmenls must be made wiltim 12 days alter axpiratior ol ad. Henderson Home News Boulder City News 564-1881 • 435-7700 293-2302 Hours:Mood ayltiruFiidayB-4 Hrxirs: Monday thru FrxJay 8 • 4 DEADLINES Henderson Home News Tuesday's Issue 4:00 P.M. FRIDAY Henderson Home News • Boulder City News Thursday's Issue 12:00 NOON TUESDAY PREPAYMENTS: Yard. Garage, and Moving Sales requin cash in advance (Exception subscribers) Otjtol-iown and oul-ol-stale also require prepayment NOTICE TO READERS By law, companies that contract to locally move your liousehold goods must hold a certificate from the Nevada Public Service Commission. This requirement ensures that the company carries proper insurance, complies with government safety standards and charges only approved rates. Nevada lawalso requires these "full service" movers to printtheirPSC number on their trucks in their advertising. For more Information, the PSC can be reached at 486-2600. Chapter 624 of Nevada Revised Statutes makes it unlawf ullor any person to engage in the business or act in the capacity of a contractor within this State without having a State Contractor's License. All advertising by a licensed contractor shall include the license numt>er. Should a question arise regarding licensed contractors, contact the Nevada State Board Of Contractors, 486-1100. Affordable legal services. PersonalinjuryA divorce. 564-0800/497-0797. 24 hrs. Serving Henderson, Green Valley & Boulder City. PS47975 Don't despair, We repair '^'"' Bill's Furniture & Upholstery Repair 25 years of Experience 565-4752 RAINBOW CONSTRUCTIOfJ INC. NOW DOES STUCCO ikxij wHh New Conslruction, Reodeling, PaBoa; AH of your Building NMdi Call 558-7949. nm\i ^CONSULTING> IrMewnan will halp In all erMs •I marhellng/talsa any magnltud* ktcMMng your bolton. Iln for any produci or •frvlca. Ova, IT yaare aiprlnM tiKliidlna MLM. dialrlbullon Cood a*nlc. nnufaclurlng. lm|>onlrr a>porlll,. hoca bMailkualnaaMeM lrcm. I<>tnan M ou./wMn/(ita, I'll develop It for you a a turn-key (with tpeed) CAN ALSO HELP; ADVERTISING, DIRECT MAIL. MAH OROEH INTERNET/FAX BLAST SELLING, RETAIL AND WSURANCE. L CALL KIR APPT122 J X^FIm Co rn. FliM ianti^y LTD Builders Home tmprovement Specialists Room Additions Remodeling Patio Covers Landscaping Lie. No. 33260 222-1778 PS43569 Plumbing Electrical HANDYMAN, UNLIMITED Serving Henderson and Boulder City privately for 16 years has now gone public. All work Is guaranteed and senior citizens get a 10% discount! For a free estimate call: \ 204-4488 Painting Cleaning MICHAELS PRO LANDSCAPE Rocks/Sod Old/New Sprinklers Too 453-8252 PS47882 Electric Power Deregulated! How would you like to save 20% on your power bill? For tnore information call J-800-573-3236. No. 1430 ************ THE HANDYMAN WHO CAN OMMiaMnusr. vHr WOBCOWfT/UcMWd Ron 564-7442y37S-7107 PSdTWl CMLO CARE w Hofna away ffwn home ^ '* aimoaphare. OV aiae. ^isvs atrntUt card, tiaaWi eaM. CPn cart. Fun thinffs to o. 614-OMC PROFESSIONAL 111 00 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES II SERVICES B.H. SMITH PS43M2 HOME REFAim MAINTENANCE IBRVICE ONE CALL DOES fT ALL Shelving, assembly, move-In Specials Make a list.. 20 yrs. exp. Call Brad 564-4073 THE CLOCK IS TICKING IS YOUR COMPUTER READY? '•Check your PC while there Is still time. •We locate and fix the Y2K bug in both, your hardware and software. •All work performed in your home or off ice. $49.95 analysis CALL FIX Y2K NOW at (702) 349-5228 MATINATA LANDSCAPE Design-installation Irrigation maintenance Lie. & established 20 yrs. Call us now for a quote FREE-FOR ANY JOB OVER $500 REC. 1-15 QAL. TREE. SIGN 6 MOS. MAINTENANCE SERVICE & RECEIVE 1 FLAT OF FLOWERS FREE. CALL 270-6269/592-7006 PS47267 ^ THE CAVANAUGH'S J^XS PAINTING CONTRACTORS y*/ INTERIOR & EXTERIOR ^pt SENIOR DISC. 294-1422/293-7341 FREEESV M ATES 5 Residential Lie. 31642 Commercial R&G Landscaping Design & Installation • Lawn Maintenance • Renovation • Sprinklers Systems m Rocky-Greg (702) 558-7346 YARDVARK'S LAWN AND MAINTENANCE Professional Tree Trimming Serving BC. Green Valley & Henderson 294-1114 Pager 221-2936 PS43573 ID BLACK MOUNTAIN PLUMBING j6^ ^FASTSERVIck HENDERSON BOUTDER CfTY 565-6749 uc foonM. 294-7713 Kitclien & Bath Remodels. Lie. & Insured. ^^• 0876. PS48113 •. Carpentry, Remodeling/ Additions, Jeff Mayer, 294-1728. PS40628 GENE'S CARPET CLEANING and WINDOW CLEANING Res. & Comm. 564-8055 pgitml SAVE MONEY ON LONG DISTANCE CALLING 10c a minute 24 hrs./day 7 days a wk. Best quality, lowest phce, Call Mitch 878-6896 ps — rsm — CONCRETE, INC Uc. 4S120 Patto* Drtvawaya • SidawaMw Etparianca maana qualHyt FREE Eatlmain • 566-7867 PS477 YOU NAME FT-Well DOIT •nasldantlal •Commarclal •Remodel Call 294-1039 or Cell #496-1990 Conlractort Uc. No. 00144S3 HANDYMAN PLUS For all your honM repairs. Plus Ule carpet repairs. Lie. 31390 450-5474__ SERENITY CLEANING Care Free. Worry Free. Reliable Call KIml 293-4730 '^" Affordable Happy Housedeaners "BKS SpecW** Sl3Ar.", our luppMii. FrMadbrartM. Uc. A Cdi LICENSED HANDY MAN Completo home repiirt Rick It 564-7488 or Ml 379-2197 Doggie Yard Weekly Clean Up Services Thorough, Reliable, Affordable. Call Bob 391-0922 HANDYMAN PLUS Does your home need a little face-lift or maybe a few small repairs? Call 450-5474 Sr. Discount TINA'S CARPET CLEANING UpMaMry a Orapaa Commareial a RaaMamial SRV't St. Dtacounia, Fiaa E rt iMtM j^mJ 568-1222 Q&M CONCRETE, INC. Uc. •45120 PatkM • Ortvewcys SkJewalks Exparlenca mean* qualHyl FREE EallmatM 566-7M7__, MARK HARMON PEST CONTROL t18/Mo. No Contracts 30 Day Guarantee Ue.*4aT 5654168 or Pager #660-2199 THE RANCH CLEANING SERVICC 20 Yrs. of reliable service H^)h standards a quality youcantnjst. CdlMiiy 897.1163 Complete Pool Semce Repair & Remodel Acid Wash, Tile & Equip. Repair Decking Repair or Replacement 25 Yrs. Experience 698-1521 PS4(XM 100 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES HENDERSON MASONRY 564-1487 Block & Brick Lie. No. 0012631. p.^.. Drywall Repairs, Free estimates. 293-4730/ 218-8199 (fWlobile). PS48193 Reliable college student to clean your home, all prices determined on job. Ask lor Laura, Day 6442244/night 558-7360. PS48123 NEWLY OPENED Assisted Living Facility (Private) in Henderson. Call Rina, 363-5693. PS42028 4 LINES ^6' 100 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Golf Lessons By touring professional Tim Rose 435-9681 p^, Last minute movers! we move resid. & comm. ANYWHERE. Load/Unload your rental truck. 565-9675/BEEP 5990652. PS47289 Lifetime reminder service. Never miss another important occasion. A post card will be sent to you within 7-10 days, prior to any special occasion, for the rest of your life. Send $29.95+$4 S/, H to High Hopes, P.O. Box 91388, HD, NV:. 89009. PS44493 100 PROFESSIONAL I 100 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES H SERVICES ^ .tdano& Son Plumbinc Service/Repair/ Remodeling Reasonable 558-7887 PIANO LESSONS ALL AGES 33 YEARS EXPERIENCE SHEILA-293-1614 psiiiim Sprinkler Systems License # 4490-0 Lawn Care HaroM & Sharon Critcher Telephone 294-6200 Senrtng BouMer City for 11 years COMMERCIAL RENOVATION Remodeling, Tenants Improvements • s Over 20 yrs. exp. 233-4562 (iic. NO. 43073) S teve Bailey Constniction __PS47971 Since1959 • U31MM Lie. #214.0-19400 GENE'S TREE SERVICE Topping, Trimming, Complete Removals, FREE ESTIMATES Stump Grinding 564-2551 ASSEMBLY REQUIRED BY CARL Entertainment Centers BBQ's Computer desltract or Initial Charga* 8tata Licwiaa 4903 Cell 568-5534 Tecfinics organ GN9 Series 5-6yrs. old, excel, cond. $7500, 739-8070/ 794-9321, Barbara. MI40668 Wanted-Antiques, old costume jewelry, paintings, glass, sterling, 1 piece/collections, 4506841.MI45e38 Washers. Dryers $125 each 293-6101. BC. MI47970 23ft. Ranger Day Cruiser Boat. 455 Jet inboard 80 hrs. Biminy Top, CD play, Roadrunner Trailer, xint. cond. $5800 OBO, new Baft.. Life Jackets, skis incl. 293-0438 anytime. MI45448 2-Weatherauard side mount Tool Boxes, white, for 8' bed. $125 each. 361-2845. MI48069 For sale 1997while cargo trailer 5x10 enclosed, 4 mos. oW, tires 15x6, excel, cond. asking $2200, pis. call Cheryl at 5973435. MI34321 HD-GV 1/2 price furn. sale. Couch, bdrm. set, TV unit, WW wan unit, 5 gar. cabinets. 436-4538. MI48096 300 MISCELLANEOUS >^ Boulder City 293-7296 4Line?gS cosh rota Huge Rummage Sale, Sat., May22nd,8-2.1100 Buchanan Blvd. BC. GS48063 Full size W/elec. ID, white deluxe. Whirlpool, 2 yrs. old only used 1 yr. Asking $475 for pair. 5661519 MI47667 WOLFF TANNING BEDS. Tan at home. Buy direct and save! Commercial/Home units from $199 Low Monthly Payments. Free Color Catalog. Call Today 1-800842-1310. MI48014 Roving out of the country, need to sell furniture: couch, bakers rack, coffee table, and congos. Also Pet Boa Constrictor. Call Hunter or TR at 734-8176. Saddle-Circle Y 15 1/2 $500. English Saddle $90, stove 2 s/s refrig. $135, Washer. 294-2642 or 524-8603. Mt48168 BC-Sat.,5/22.8am,517 Ave. I, saddles, refrigerators, washer, stova. clothes, misc. Mi48170 Motorized Treadmill, VHF Boat radio, electric hedge trimmer, inversion skyhook oscillator, electric rotisserie broiler, motion pk:ture cameras, orojectors S supplies also jeveral radios. 293-3191. \^l4ei39 3100 |3100 STORAGE UNITS | STORAGE UNITS STORE YOUR STUFF Controllad Acoaaa UghtMl UiWta—Auto-eoat-RV-24 Hour Seoura Storaga—Concrala Bhiek Construction 488 W. Victory Rd^ Henderson 564-8040 PROFESSIONAL SFRVICfS 100 ppofrssu Hi8-Her'3 Hendy Servioe No Job too emeli. Gen do K eN, 24 hr. mmmrg. no edded efi 293-5848 564-1 ^W Trash Hauling Yard Cleanup, Handyman. Call Ray, 293-0745. PS48097 400 PERSONALS WANTED! Acne sufferers to try an all natural treatment. FREE 30 DAY SUPPLY for a clinical study. 294-0390, Ext. 4. PE41293 Free denture Cleaner!! Call 1-800-664-8780. www.sparkledenture.conT MI47475 Advertise in the NEWS fordable & thorough House Cleaning. 5047488/678-4788 pager #. PS47286 Am FORCE. Grr career opportunities available or high school grads, ages 17-27. Plus up to $9,000 enlistment bonus if you qualify! For an inf omnaiton packet call 1-800-423-USAF or visit www.airforce.cofn. PE48004 mm'im' ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS MMt7dayawk.atSPM, Rtc. Annax bahind BouMarDam CrwMUnlon. 49 PEOPLE WANTED Lose 10-15 Pounds 10-30 inches per month Call Julie 800-217-4402 HOUOAY BLUES?] Whmi nothing elee wor1(s. Nevada Learning Programa 898-712Sor t 2 94-0277 1-6774wniM www.1877hatmiH.eoni 9976181 (R#f8f#no# ) ThaUntanataBualfMas Opportunity of the Nwir MMIaiiiuniL PUMMI St. Jude's Novena...May the Sacred Heart of| Jesus be adored, glorified, loved and preserved throughout the world now and forever. Sacred Heart of Jesus have mercy on us. St. Jude worker of miracles, pray for us. Say this" prayer 9 times a day for 9 days. By the 8tii day your prayer will be answered. It has never been known to fail. Publication must be p romised. Thank yo u St. Jude. AA 200 GARAGE SALES UKE MEAD VIEW ESTATES • ConwrTtmplaRocktQyptum St. 8 i.in.-2 p.m. Antiqua rociwra. tllktiaa, Wroughtlron Bwtlwi ciMirt, lampt. diahat, llnana, clotha*. 1989 Biu doN •hoai A Iwou, K. 8, much .jaam. YNT PUBLIC AUC MUN Bank owned residential real estate Reno, Nevada. 1-finished house, 6-partially finished houses, 5-building lots. Sale Date: Wednesday, May 26th, 5:30 p.m. ON SITE 445 Snowmass Court. Reno, Nf^a. Free brochure. With terms and openhouse info. Conducted by Realty Executives of Northern Nevada, Ruth WardEmmil, Carolyn Miller, 775-824-3666. GS48007 Estate Sale, Fri. & SaL, May21&22,8A-?247S. Texas, Hd. GS47979 825 Verbena, New Hosp. scrubs, misc. clothing, desk & file cabinets, much, muct> more. All funds go back to the Community, sponsored by the Greater HD Kiwanis. Fri. &Sat.,21& 22. GS47987 200 GARAGE SALES Yard Sale, Boulder Oakes RV Resort SAT. 4-10 only. 7 AM-3 PM. 1010 Industrial Rd. BC. GS46744 4 family sale, furn., microwave, golf clubs, toys, new & used clothes, lots of misc., EZ lift H/D hitch towbar, jeep towrtjar attachment. Harley misc. 71 Kencraft 35 ft. pai1< model w/front T/0, all furnished. EVERYTHING PRICED TO GO. Fri.&Sat.,8-5,912Essex Ave.GS47215 Sun.. HiKy 22 & 23, S-?. 207 Nickel St. G548071 HD Muhi family garage sale, Sat., May 22nd, 82. 1041 Heatherwood. Cross sts. Racetrack & Blue Latern. GS48093 HD Moving Sale, Sat. & Sun., 22nd & 23rd, 9-5. 545 Truffles, off Horizon. GS48104 HD Huge Garage Sale, Sat., May 22nd, 7a-12. 633 Robin Lane off Pacific & Fairway across from Golf Course. GS47918 Huge Yard Sale, Fri. & Sat. 5/21-22. 8-3, 154 Magnesium, something for everyone. GS48126 HD Garage sale great stuff, Fri., Sat., May 21 & 22, 8A-2P. 1620Nlavajo Pt. PI. Arroyo Grande & Wigwam. GS48116 Moving Sale, Sat., fe/22 7-10 AM. Clothes, mower, misc., 517 Ave. K., BC. GS48110 Car bike rack. 2 pr. roller blades, truck tires, windows, bk;ycle, riothes, toys and 3 sets worlds great classic cooks, and microwave, etc. 270 'E. Desert Rose Dr. (between Pacific and Greenway) 5/21-22, 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. GS48106 4 Lines'6^^ 1 BC homemade spring/ summer clothes sale. Nothing over $15. Fri., 21,Sat.,22,8a.m.-lp.m. 402 Lakeview Dr. GS48082 Garage Sale goes country! Sat., 5/22, 6-11 a.m. 1430 San Felipe Dr. Lots of country decorating Hems. Linens, and attractive previously appreciated treasures. Y'all cornel GS480e3 Giant Garage Sale, 7noon. Sat, May 22nd, at St. Christophers, 812 Arizona St. BC. If you have derations. Call Sbina at 294-0954 oi Craig at 293-6304. GS48059 BC Fri.-Sat.. 8-3. 781 Christina Dr. Collectoi Plates, music boxes, a lot of crafts, Fum. No Early Birds. GS48064 Huge Rummage Sale, Sat, May 22nd. 8-2.1100 Buchanan Blvd. BC. GS48063 BC Moving in Sale, May 21 & 22, 8 a-1 p. 1623 Indian Walls Dr. off Buchanan. QS48030 BC FIRST GARAGE SALE IN TWENTY YEARS! FOREIGN COLLECTIBLES. May 22, 7-11. 1540 Sandra Dr. ONE HOUSE OFF FAIRWAY. GS48098 BC 553 Elm, Fri., Sat., Sun., 7A-?. Household, old books. Too much to mention. GS48088 HD Yd. Sale, LR fum.. comp. desk, lights, 3 pc. babyf urn. & accessories, toys men, women & kids clothes & shoes, wheelchair, & lots more. Not unk. Sat. only 8-6, 318 Water St. GS48087 Garage Sale, Fri. & Sat. Everything Cheap. 231 Puite Lane. HD. GS48090 BC-Moving Sale. 6 pc. pine bed set queen w/ armoire$1600,4pc. oak bedfull $500, leather sofa w/2 built in recliners $600, 1 7' sectional tan sofa w/ queen sleeper/recliner $1600,2computer desks w/chairs $200 ea.. student desk w/chair $125, Sunday 9-1,630 Arizona St. 294-1161.GS48166 YARD SALE: AMERICAN BUSINESS WOMEN'S ASSOCDESERTDAWNCHAfiTER proceeds to Scholarship fund. Sat., May 22nd. 7 am-12pm. 542 Fairway, Henderson. GS48161 Sun.. 9-2 NO EARLY BIRDS. 1444 Rawhide, BC. Bar Stools, Cabinets. BBQ. lots of housahoM items. GS48157 BC-Annual Yard Safe. Sat, May 22, 709 5th St. Lots of everytNng! Tools, collectibles, some art supplies, housewarea. G$A8456 s^i^plie BC^ BC-Multl family sale. Arn^ada PI., §^1., S/22. 812 Please no early btrda. GS481S2 BC-LarMsaio.Sat.onV. Lots of lads toys, draftinig table & more. 659 Otono. GS481S0 BCl6 0up Bridge Bdt.. cards score sheets, bks S35. framed paintinol, housahoUilems. 7a-2p Fri.-Sal.804SanRamo. GS48172

PAGE 36

T' — -T ^ <^^^ ^^^ • • ^^ ^l LMca a Mountwn vwwa Irani iTMooaaoOtOoo CaaeCAdobator **•• *iMMit 293-1707 LAKE MEAD VIEW ESTATES CUSTOM HOMi aim BOULDER CITY IIOOOMUI tmwnn 2^4-0475. J 60 ACRES WYOMING Lifnitsd supply at prices soon disappearing. Antelope, wikjnorsae, great speculation' Si 95 do./ $2318 mo. ($23,800/9%/ 15 1/2 years). Call toll free 1-800-945-3040. L047991 I 500 LOST& FOUND LOST: Gold ladies watch lost in rear parking lot of the Reserve. Sentimental value. Please call 5955582. LF48042 LOST Grey & White Cat, just shaved w/puffy tail. Has mustache like Sylvester. Answers to name of Snoopy. Liberal Reward. Call 898-3770. -F47980 1300 FINANCIAL OVER YOUR HEAD in debt??? Do you need more breathing room??? Debt consolidation, no qualifying!!! 'Free consultation (800) 556-1548. www.anewhorizon org. Licensed, bonded, nonprofit/national CO. FS48006 600 PETS/ANIMALS Very pretty blue' front Amazon Parrot. Talker, cage. First $850, Sunrise Mtn. area. 437-0635. PA47994 Dogs, cats, birds, iguanas, ready for adoption. Call 361-2484. Open 7 days a week, daylight 'til dark. PA43050 4Unes'6Lj^ co in roie ^Boulder City ^" P 293-7296 1 300 FINANCIAL SOVERDUE BILLS!!'! Credit problems? Consolidate debts! Same day approval. Cut monthly payments up to 50%. Become debt free. No applkation fees!! 1-800863-9006. Ext. 881. www.help-pay-bills.com. FS48020 600 PETS /ANIMALS DESPtMATLLY NEEDED HI MYIIOHN ANIMAI ADOPIinNS Hnthe /yvertlse Uk the Nm$ GREAT SAVINGS ON mortgage loans, debt consolidation, bankruptcy, good-bad credit OK. Reasonable monthly payments. Low interest rates. Calltollfree. 1-888856-2458. FS47992 r=a YOURLOCAL Payroll Services & General Ledger •I.ocliRu> •IlKlk RnnKlUlMluna NnruAwtivrnw: •)MVTJBION SKf-lT •EMPUJYHH ADDmO.NS •EMPI^n-EH (IlOi(iF,S •iM^X I'AVROLL (IIKKS •I'AI'WHXPKKII' H.\(iNITir TAPE MEDU •l iARTESLY TAX REPORTS SIIS REFORf __ L733-0378J I INIVAIM rvuNOAL cmxnt I LOANS WE WANT TO MAKE YOU A LOAN CALL US TODAY In Boulder City 294-4478 In Henderson 568-1544 $75 $750 LICENSED BY THE STATE OF NV 1200 BUSINESS |1200 BUSINESS ||l 200 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES II r-iDDnftiiMiTitc II OPPDRTIINIT OPPORTUNITIES NOTICE TO READERS: The HBC Publications does not vouch for the legitimacy of items, jobs, or money-making opportunities advertised in this classification. We suggest you carefully evaluate such offers and not send money to these advertisers unless you are cerlainyou know with whom you are dealing and you know all terms and conditions of the otfer. EARN EXTRA INCOME $200-$500 weekly mailing gift certificates. For more Information send a seH-addressed stamped envelope to: Just For Kids, P.O. Box 0610, Miami, FL. 33168. B045668 h^ail Box Shipping Center with checK cashing business. Established 1986. Excel, income. Tremendous potential. $199,000, terms avail., 438-0134. B042417 Starting a Buainaaa? See Ad Business Servtees under Consulting, call 221-8822. SAYNOtODAYCARE MOMMIES WANTED Who want to stay home with their children but Need a P/T or F/T Income. Call for "FREE" Info. Tese 392-1397 B047755 EARN 16K > RESIDUAL. Information business. ONLY $t3 investment. Call now 3928876. BO39330 AGENT: Avon needs representatives. Earn up to 50%. No door to door. Start your own business in 98'. Must be 18. Independent Rep. Call 1 -800727-2866. BO40680 OWN YOUR OWN APPAREL, shoe, westernwear, lingerie, bridal, gift or $1.00 store. Inclucws fixtures, buying trip, training. Minimum in-, vestment $18,900.00. Call Liberty Opportunities O 1-501-327-8031.' BO45099 OPPORTUNITIES FREEDOM GREETING C/^RDS! 100K ahnual potential. No selling PT/ FT accounts furnished. Enjoy restocking displays on your schedule! Req. $9,800 up, investment! 1 -800-231 -2832. B047995 $1.00 STORES! $1-$10 Stores! 10,000 products. Financing available. Be open for Christmas!! Complete from $44,900. Call: 1-800-829-2915. BO48012 Turn Key Bar & Food Sen/ice in B.C. Building, Business, Fixtures, and upstairs Apt: $230K. Anchor Realty, Wayne, 4997223. BO48120 AAA$IPARTTNIE Earn up ro t40K. NO SEUJNat EMy Wofk, Your Schadul*. Sarvfc* QrMtln Card Dtoplayal taeOO. Cash ftoqulrwl. 1-800-231-2832 mami FREEOOMI QREETINa CAROai PT/FT, tlOOK ANNUAL NO SCLLMQI Accounti (umMhad Entoy rModilng Oltplayi or your Khadultl nq. ie.800 up. invMtmind 1-800-231-28 & 700 FURNITURE If you have furniture to sell. consign at Terrrs...it's tt)e eoslest, most convenient way to do It. All it takes is one earphone call: (70^314-2233 KAdvrtts It. l/Dltplay It. ofid*.. ^fll If fy ypul SiMeltTt TtRRHsCONSJGN^rDESIGN mdoth^worK HBDSDBDHH. you g^t th9 monmyl Consignmitt lltf: (702) 314-2233 SAHARA WARMSPRINGS tMf Oonw tilwf A (701) 247-7Mt (702) M1.7747 FURNITURE 1300 FINANCIAL $$$ CASH LOANS. Auto loans, debt consolidation with same-day approval. Bad credit (JK. 1-800247-5125, ext, 434 FS48013 For Sale: Ethan Allen Antique pine dining suite with 72 inch trestle table & 4 chairs. Very good cond. $350. 293-4405. 1^048173 ^_ King size bed oak, mirrored dresser & head board custom made, spread, $275.294-3932. MI48ni Couch, Dbl. recliner, oak trim, Brn./Bge/Tan Plaid, 2 yrs. old, mint condition, Paid $750, Sell for $200. 454-5509. 1^148057 Sofa & Love Seat, good cond. $400. 293-2604 after 8 A.M. MI48065 Solid Mahogany office des w/right wing, $200. Popasan chair w/cushion, $50. 294-1935 after 4 p.m. MC46120 4 captains chairs, 1 gas lawn mower, 1 elec. edger, 1 elec. trimmer, 1 12 colorTV, cable ready, 1 roll top desk has to be seen to be appreciated. Callafter5pm, 564-8483. MC46673 2 antique fireside uph. chairs, very Ig. & comfy. Exc. cond. $580 for set. 564-5371. MC47179 Sofa/Loveseat, It. blue pinstripe, very goodcond. $400 QBO. 896-1049. MC47225 1 100 EMPIOYMFNT OPPOPrUNIIItS Print Shop looking for experienced PRESSMAN who is custonDer 8ervk:e oriented, familiar wrth multi 1650'8. Must be a team player. Benefits package. Hours 85, Monday-Friday. Apply in person at: 3D Sunset Way, Henderson, 4357761. E047966 1 100 EMPLOYMENT FOOD SERVER 30-35 hr/wk., min. plus tips, apply in person THE PIT STOP, 802 Buchanan, BC. E047983 CAREGIVER Sm. group home, HD area. Minutes from BC. Transp. nee. Bonus program. 5658144. E047954 Print Shop looking for experienced CUSTOMER SALES CLERK. Benefits package. Hour* 8-5, Monday-Friday. Apply in person at: 3D Sunset Way, Henderson, 435-7761. E047965 Admin. Assist, GVUnited Methodist Church, IBM compatible PC. Windoyvs 98; MS word, familiar with MS publisher is a • • Call Elaine, 454-7989. EO48056 Mature lady for housekeeping and to assist elderly woman, wk. MOP., Wed. & Fh., 8 AM-12. $12/hr. Call Joann for appt., 293-4364, EO48044 Receptionist: St. Jude's Ranch for Children is looking for a full-time receptionist wKh a smile & positive attitude. Must have multi-line phone experience and good customer servk:e skills. Apply in person: 100 St. Jude sSt., B.C. EO48041 TRUCK DRIVERS WANTED off most weekends, home every other day. Ins., 401 (k), Class A, CDL, & 2 yrs. exp. req. Call B & C Transportation, 888-2860190. EO48036 Front deskopeningatthe Super 8 Motel. FT/PT w benefits. Apply in person 294-8888. E047968 "SAY NO TO DAYCARE" Mommies wanted. Whowant to stay home with their children but Need a P/T or F/T Income. Call for "FREE'Info. Tete, 3921397.E045342 Crew member neededfor VERY BUSY 7-11. Must be 21 yrs. APPLY IN PERSON ONLY to Date or Larry, 850 E. Horizon Dr., corner of Boulder Hwy. E043231 CARRIERS WANTED Apply at H.B.C. Publeations, 2 Conrwnerco Center Drive. HD. 435-7700. E047758 Wanted: 43 People to lose 20 lbs. by July 4th. All Natural! Results Guaranteed! Call Susan, 970-870-7939. E047277 Sales lady. Mature P/T for gift shop at McCarran airport. Parking paid for. 798-5852. EO47820 AM cooks & waltrNsas. Apply at Frosty Freeze. EO48062 CAoOMir^G Experiencad gantia dog groomet. F/PT. Susie, 294-0001. E0481 82 CASHt^A P.T. Evas, ft Wkends a must. Apply in person Coast-To-Coast Hardware, 520 E Lake MaadDr..HD.EO48ie0 Now hiring! Labor/Roofer must be willing to laam the trade & have own transportation. Some tools required. No experience naadad! Contact Steve at Perfactaau Roofing at 293-7662. E048189 A FEW (ieOICATED FLATBED OPENINGS. HOME WEEKENDS! Kingman. AZ and Back. $1,000 Sign-On. Haul Rebar. 6 Mo's Experience: Roadrunner Trucking, Inc. 800-945BIRO www.roadrunner trucking.com. E043974 ^'ow hiring CPS, Inc Unarnncd Security Officers. Full/Part time & Live in. Must have phone. Interviewing, Mon.-Fri. Noon to 4:30 pm. Full Benefit s/BonusPay. 201 E. Colorado Ave. (702) 380-3146. EO47604 Wanted Exp. Counter person for Auto Parts Store. Apply in person at Pickarts Auto Parts, 31 E.BasicRd.,HD,M-F,95. E04758e Help wanted: Growing daycare needs reliable, dependable person to manage 3 yrs. old rm. FT, must have refs. Call 564-2201 for appt., ask for Angle or Lana. E047564 Applcations now being accepted for afternoon shift at Christian Center Preschool, hrs. 2:305:30, must be 18, alert, creative & love children. Phone 293-7773 ask for Dianne. E047524 DRIVERS-OTR, TEAM, owner/operators, students. COLL, Hazmat, DBL, Endorsements, Clean MVR-Great pay package. Home weekly, tOE Andrus Transportation 31-800-888-5838 or 1-888-200-7887. EO47087 Clerk/Cashier to work in GV Salon, 4days, Tues., Thurs.. Fri. & Sat. 3-8:30 pm. Call Judy for appt. at 896-0097. E046611 CASHIER/CLERICAL working in a gift shop, FT 40hrs.Ak., 1 mile marker at Hoover Dam. Call 5640104. Ask for Gene. EO43230 Physician to serve as Medical Director for Substance Abuse Clinic inHD, 1-2hrs./wk.,4744104. EO40265 1 100 (MfHOYMtNT OPPORTUNITIES Amateur Famala Modela needed. Have fun & nnake qufck cash. Photographer needs models of all ages to model aveningwesr to swinnwear. Formore info send photo 4 letter describing vourself to New Image. P.O. Box 94231, LV. NV. 89193-4231. EO48033 Entry level office positions receptionist good w/ people & numbers. computer exp. a -f. Call 564-5050. E047993 FT/PT reservations clerk for Boulder Oaks RV Resort in Boulder City. Fax # 702-294-4426. 294-4426, Attn. Elaine. EO48022 Construction helper needed, 293-5650. E047984 Medi9al Receptionist ,. .~^.^~ ^— NaMorial irfiaging comDJ'S fcayca're Center BabysitterneededinGV, our house for 3 yr. old. Ideal for student. A couple of afternoons & one night. Should be responsible & fun & must have refs. Phone btwn. 9 AM-8 PM. 564-3556. E047934 Glazier exp. req.. Green Valley Glass Co.. Robert. 368-4628. E047937 Christian Center School is nowtaking applications for JR. High Math teacher. Part time hours. Call 293-7773. E047941 Apt. management person/couple to manage & maintain 15 apts. in exchange for rent. Prefer retired. 293-7430. EO47908 DENTAL COORDINATOR. F/T BC. Dental, conputar, bookkeeping ins. & exp. Vac., hollaays, incentive ins. Contact Wanda. 293-0373. E047919 Bob's All Family Restaurant now hiring FT A.M. WAITRESS, exp. req. Apply in person, 761 Nevada Hwy. BC. EO48077 Bob's All Family Restaurant now hiring PT prep, cook/dishwasner. Apply in person 761 Nevada Hwy. BC. E048154 Homeworkers Needed $635 weekly processing mail. Easy! No expenence needed. Call 800426-3203 Ext. 5000 24 hrs. E047824 Housekeepers $8-$10/ hr. Individuals needed to clean area homes, FT/ PT, M-F. Car & phone req. 436-0076. EO48092 pany is seeking a Receptionist/Scheduler for a new imaging center in HD. Min. of 2 yrs. medical office exp. Gr. pay w/ benefits. Send or fax resunne to ATTN. D. K., 15438 N. Florida Ave.. Suite 200. Tampa, FL. 33613. Fax 813-2699402 DFWP. EO40264 Mexican Cook/delivery driver, full/part-time, call 558-4500, ask for Gene. EO40442 FOOD SERVICE ASSISTANT Village Oaks Assisted Living by Marriott. Friendly, attractive, non-nursing community providing servk:es to elderly. Duties IrKlude setting dining room, washing dishes, and helpinc) cook. Apply at 3025 E. Russell Rd., Las Vegas. 451-7896 for more information. £0481 pi MEDICATION ASSISTANT Village Oaks Assisted Living by Marriott. Friendly, attractive, nonnursing community providing sen/k:es to elderly. Requires attention for detail. Perfect for Nurses Aide looking for upward nrx)ve. Willing to train. All shifts available. AppW at 3025 E. Russell Rd., Las Vegas, 451-7896 for more information. EO48102 COOK Village Oaks Assisted Living by Marriott, friendly, attractive, non-nursing facility providing sen^lces to seniors. All shifts, weekends and holidays. Experience in institutk>nal cooking required. Duties also include cleaning, dishwashing and serving. Apply in person: 3025 E. Russell Road or phone 451-7896. E048103 PERSORAT^WTAT: TENDANT ViHage Oaks Assisted Living by Marriott. Friendly, attracliva, non-nursing comnxinity providing services to Seniors. Raquirea kind heart artd love of the eldarty. WiMng to train rsK•bla person with good references. All srilfta available. Apply In person: 3025 E. Russel Rd. or phone 451-7896. £048105 XD7EHTi§iR?n?EPRe SENTATIVE: Graat opportunity, earnings potential at Truckee-North Tahos weekly papers. Resume: Sierra Sun. c/o Peter Kostea. P.O. Box 2973. Truckea. CA 9 6 18 0, koates O swiftnews.cora EO4S000 IS in need of a responsible caregiver for the infants nn. w/exp. FT w/benefits. Accepting applications. 360 Horizon, HD. (cross street Greenway) 5664070. E047748 LUBETECHFT,avaiLat a very busy auto repair facility in BC. Room for advancement to dedicated parson. Apply in Serson at 705 Juniper /ay, BC. E047678 Opening for Class 1. Class 2 Smog tech. Vem's Texaco, Water & Lake Mead. 565-0220. E04B128 Gen. & folding laborers needed. Immed. opening for reliable team players in our fast paced environment. Apply at UniFirst Corp. 568 Parkson Rd.. Hd. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. £048124 Part-time delivery person needed for gift basket business. Must be dependable, friendly, flexible and own a reliable, air-conditioned insured vehicle. Hours vary, approx. 10-20 weekly. Perfect for retirees/ moms. Call 361-8885. E048112 Live in wanted to care for ekierly gentlenrwin. Sonne medical background helpful, incl. It. housework, prep, of nneals, must have own transportation. Must provide refs. Call 293-2236 for details. E048122 MANAGER Fast paced energetic people needed a* shHt supervlaora. Become pert of a hard working team, 2-3 yrs. FAB exp. helpfuL Enthuaiaem Mandaloiy FT w/Benef its A 401K. Apply In person 480 Lake &iofM.BC. No phone calle pleaae. EOE. £048052 N6WHlAlNdSMILIN(^ FACES. THE HOOVER DAM STORE. A people oriented corrpanytotaNy commJnad to the Disney phloaophy of aaccellanca in gueet service & cast meni>er training has job opportunlies avalable. One full time clerk; 3 Summer help part-time/ fun time. Staffing wage based on experience. 1 Full-time position AprlOctober. Requires heavy lifting. S8.50 per hour. Mual have reliable iranaportatkxi for al poaitk>ns.Visudlyinpaired and physically challenged walcoms to apply. Phone 586-1082. E648047 1 1 00 EMPLOYMLNI OPPORTUNITIES Manicurist wanted tor growing salon. Great clientle building pofSStTal. Partial clientle needed. Horizon 95, HD. 5651156. E047956 FISHERMAN WANTED F/T CLERK W/FISHING & NAVIGATION KNOWLEDGE OF LAKE MEAD. PAY DOE $6-8/ HR W/VAC. EXTREME MINI MART. 564-3058 ASK FOR DON OR MIKE. E045874 SALES REP-A dynamic national leader in the gift industry has an outstandingcareer opportunity in outside sales. We are seeking an energetic self-starter with the desire to succeed, in Henderson/Las Vegas/Pahrump area. We offer: An expanding product line, $400/wK. salary & expenses -f commission, annual volume bonus, training, along with benefits, supportive organization & advancement opportunities. This is an excellent opportunity to build a long term career ...don't pass it up! Send/ fax resume to Recruitment Manager — NVl, Papel Giftware, 30 EngelhardDr.Cranbury, NJ 08512. Fax: (609) 860-1938. EOE. RN's, LPN's. Hospital near Reno/Tahoe. Acute/ LTC; PT/FT; benefits. (775)463-2301.6X1.217; South Lyon Medical Center, POB 940, Yerington, NV 89447. E0E.EO45537 Now accept, applications, all positions. Apply between 2-4. Evan's OTG. 1129 Arizona. E045712 &' BUILDING PLANS EXAf^lNER II. SALARY: $24.06-27.43/hour. REQUIREMENTS: Graduation from high school, ortheequivalent.andtwo (2) years of full-time expenence as a Plans Examiner, or four (4) years of experience as a Building Inspector, or registration as a professional engineer or architect, OR an equivalent combination of closely related training and experience. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: Must possess appropriate Nevada^ Driver's License at the^ time of appointment and maintain a satisfactory driving record. Must be certified by ICBO as a Plans Examiner at the time of application. All required licenses and certificates must be obtained and maintained at the incumbent's exense. CANDIDATES UST PRESENT PROOF OF CURRENT ICBO CERTIFICATION AS A PLANS EXAMINER AT TIME OF APPLICATION. WHERE TOAPPLY: City application form must be submitted to, and received by, the Human Resources Department, Room200, City Hall. 240 Water Street, Henderson, NV 89015, no later than Wednesday, June 2, J999, by 5:00 p.m., to be consideredforthis recruitment. NO APPLICATIONS WILL BE GIVEN OUT AFTER 4:00 P.M. ON THE CLOSING DATE OF THIS RECRUITMENT. Employment packet MUST be obtained from the Human Resources Department, resumes only WILL NOT be accepted in lieu of employment application. HOURS OF OPERATIONS: MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY, 7:30A.M. TO 5:30 P.M. SMOKE-FREE WORK ENVIRONMENT. AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER. E047988 1 100 EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Motel maid, PT, Apply in persprjJSevada Inn Motel, 1009 NV Hwy., BC. EO43047 FALLON, NEVADA EQUIPMENT DEALER needs experienced FarnVField mechanics, baler repair desired. Need own tools. Salary, benefits D.O.E. Renner Equipment, (775) 8674556, 9 AM-5 PM. E047998 DRIVER BUD MEYER truck lines refrigerated hauling *$1,000 sign-on bonus for exp. co. drivers* Solo drivers start up. to 33c. Solo drivers & contractors call toll free 877-283-6393. Graduate students 1-800-3386428. EO48016 INSURANCE-4 day work week. Advances, $1000/week, statewide opportunity, 5 people maximum. Call ASAP 1800-252-2581 E047997 HEALTHCARE SALES. Attn: healthcare providers, marketers & reps. Utilize your healthcare connections-$100Kplus commission based income. Part-time or full time. National Healthcare Company. No investment. Free seminar at Sahara Hotel & Casino. Tuesday, 6/1/ 99 in Las Vegas. 7 pm-9 pm. Refreshments served. Look "THCC Seminar'at hotel. Call to confirm your seat. (305) 652-2029. EO48002 AVON PRODUCTSSTART your own business. Work flexible hours. Enjoy unlimited earnings. Call toll free (888) 9424053. EO48015 AD SALESPERSON FOR twice-weekly newspaper in northern Nevada, base plus commission, mileage, great potential: letter, resume: Buqie Sales Position, P.O. Box 250, Battle Mountain, NV 89820. EO48011 ^__ DRIVERS-OTR, TEAM, owner/operators, students. CDL, Hazmat, DBL, Endorsements, Clean MVR-Great pay package. Home weekly. EOE Andrus Transportation @ 1 -800-888-5838 or 1-888-200-7887. EO48005 $300-$850 WEEKLY mailing coupons for companies, to apply, send S.A.S.E. to: Multi Coupons, 6A45 W. i ChandlerBlvd.,#L6-242, ^ Chandler, AZ., 85226. (602) 222-8662. EO480O3 PT Mon.-Fri. Maid, nonsmoker preferred. Apply in person El Rancho Boulder Motel, 725 NV Hwy. EO47650 Thursday, May 20, 1999 Panorama PagalS MANAGER Fast Paced energetic people needed as shift supervisors. Become part of a hard working team, 23 yrs. FAB exp. helpful. Enthusiasm Mandatory FT w/Benef its & 401K. Apply in person 480 Lake Shore Rd.,BC. No phone calls please. EOE. EO48052 DALY a WEEKLY PAY SItorVLong Tarm AMign. New taking applications for: CLERICAL WAREHOUSES CONSTRUCTION Apply In parton, I am4 pm, Mon.-f rl. #91 wmUf WLt Hanflafaofi NOW HIRING SMILING FACES. THE HOOVER DAM STORE. A people oriented company totally committed to the Disney philosophy of excellence in guest service & cast member training has job opportunities available. One full time clerk; 3 Summer help part-time/ full time. Starting wage based on experience. 1 Full-time position /VprilOctober. Requires heavy lifting. $8.50 per hour. Must have reliable transportation for all positions. Visually impaired and physically challenged weteome to apply. Phone 596-1082. EO48047 DAM WEAR Dam Wear ia looking for an enargetic FT asai manager. Must have previous retail axparienca and bs familiar with windows. Contact Donna Draney at 294-4399. mam] Your Futura Bagins Hare Dal Wabb Corporation CALL REPRESErfTATIVE Nevada's #1 horns builder of retirement oommunNlea Is currently looking for IndivWuaie ftw are Totally Committed to Succeeel Fu itl m a and part-time poeKione avaHabie for IndMduaiswtwtMveabeettgroundlntaieplKMie m artw inw aalaa. aiwvye or reee r v at io na PC/ Compular dais entry expertenoersquirad. Strong eommunicatton. language and grammar sidils Great worldng envlronntent and bensntsi Apply or send resume to: Dal Wabb Corporation Human Raaourcaa-SCA 11800 8. Eaalam AvaiMia Handaraon, NV 80012 fOe/DruQ-Fraa Wortcplaoa 1 100 EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES 1100 tiMPLOVMlNr OPPOTUNITIES DraWeOr company Need A Dam Job!? WilUi cl ;lll iiu i;:i lii V^^l. \l;iil,imr ;i| Diiiii \\V;ir .ilK .iiiil;il Lake Mead Resorts HAVE A LIFEI (at the lake) Now hiring lor Sklliad malnttnanca, custodial, boat rantaifront daak, diahwashars, Una cooka, houMkaapert, cathlara, waldan. Apply at: 322 Lakeshore Rd. BC. 8-4 PM Pra amploymant drug taat raq. E.E.O.C. A.C.O.T.N.P.S. Eo, TEACHER NEEDED Subbtiiute Teacher Ctiild Development Teacher Elem. Educ. Teacher Secondary Educ. Teacher College Student in Educ. NAME OWN HOURS Oaklane Academy, 1308 VVyoiiiinq Si. BC 293-5188 COMPUTER MIS Coordinator II EOBot Clark County I* Making • uaar-suppoit tpMialltt. Dutiea ivill includa, but not limitad to, trouMastKoting FantoM local uaar probteffls; hardwire Installatkm and maintenance, Softwara configuntkMi, ind other dutiea ai asiignad. ShouMbefamillarwitt) popular Microsoft •oftwara, Windowa '95, Office 97, Word ind Excel. Knowrtedge of NT or LANi is I plui but not required. Qualified applicant must have strong communlcatkxi, organizational and Interpersonal skills. Reliable transportatkKi and driver licsnse are requirefl. Recent college graduatee are Invited to apply. Starting Salary $29,767 Annually D.O.Q. Full benefits. Including retirement and Cafeteria plan. Resumes will be accepted until 4 p.m., Wednesday, Mey 26,1999 at EOB Human Rtsourcec Department, 2228 Comstock Drive, Las Vegas, NV 89030 or Email to gcfmngaMxbiinxxIsmcQni An Equal Employment Opportunity Employer. E048117 4 LINES ^6' Sale* CONNECT WITH THE FUTURE Tired of commission salet, Joba In high tumovsr, and no recognition companies? Coma join OONCE. A Maraliall InduatrJM Company, with nearly $2 l>lilion In annual sale*. We are loolclng lor taiasalee/lelemarfceting talent to learn our systems, build e career and )oin our team. COME SHARE IN OUR SUCCESS W* currently have the following excellent career opportunttiet avallat>le: Inside Sales, Customer Support Specialist and 24/7Technical eupport. Position qualifications include, previous salee and/or customer servlcWeupport iMMkground. FULL-TIME. PART-TIME OR FLEMMiE We ere open 24 hours eli aMfte and hours avslial>le. We offer a dynamic, llexibie, low^mover work environment with great benefits that Include; Competitive salary, 401 (k), Medical, Dental, Vacations and Sick Uma. Fax your resume to: (JS) st (702) 436-1880, or stop by and 8e our beeutlful ofHoee, localed in Qrean Vslley, at 4 Sunael WSy, BulMIng C, Henderaon, NV and complete an application. eo4ao74 CASHIERS Immediate openinga for PT cashiera at the Hoovar Dam Parking Garage. Prior cashiering & customer service preferred. Joba required to stand for long periods of time in all weather conditions. We offer excellent wages. Apply in person at the second floor parking office at Hoover Dam Parking Garage. Previous applicants need not reapply. EOR E04fl148 Hair Stylist & ly/lanicurist station Available For Busy Salon Call 294-8477 or 524-8916 Leave Name & Number ^'i^ASTRJDGtTem psL $6.00-$7.73/hr. Warahouae/V^anufacturlng Full Time and Temporary poaitiona available Muat be reliable and have transportation c 566-9662 NEVER A FEE for appt 320 S. Boulder Hwy., Suite 102. HO NEVER A FEE ^MAINTENANCE MECHANIC* FMp*c*dOlraclMnn(M*optnnglortniainHnnn mKtwifc Nsae wpwlanc* In prail mat) ml liMify •qupmsnl MMI candUali aS pewM* tMng tlKlncal and mtctwUI nuH* enoarg ikai. AIn p n < w mt tt ki t. Vaitman. nd wchnn Hwp *m. ComptS S i n bwWk pertufl* PiMMlu Of n rMunt h uly iwiuNiMnB 10 VaM>ak CMS, 1(40 Ana>a.tWmy beak. tsao Aanlat Way. (al Crs Rd aUiaI.N laaVa^.NrdalS0S0.(7O:i3Se-3llO Your Future Bagins Hera Del Webb Corporation CUSTODIAL WORKERS Full-time position avallabia for a meUculoua IndivMual wtto posaeeaee good Interpersonal akilla to perform general custodial wfortc. Woftdng knowleclge of cleaning agents and soWonts necessary. Must be able to woric with mininrtal supenrttion. We offer en excellent banefH package and have a great wortdr>g environment Apply In person or send reeume to: Del Webb Corporation Human Resourcee-SCA 11500 S. Eastern AventM NV 89012 ""H EOE^Dnig-FraeWortiplaea "y 7^!p^^ff^iBp^f"WTrrr 1 100 EMPLOYMENT OPPOKTUNITIES •••••*•• AT HOME WEEKLY AND..."~ You won't have to run the northeast! This is dedicated flatbed regional opportunity. $1,000 Sign-On. Plenty of miles. 6 mo's. flatbed experience. Limited availabilities so CALL TODAY! 800-945-BIRD(2473) www.roadrunnartrucklng.eoin ••••••*• QENERAL LABORERS WAREHOUSE CONSTRUCTION CLEAN4JP Dally Pay • Ftwns & Troni aplua LABOR EXPRESS 3SE. UkaMaadDr. BOX 11) ADS 8 DOYOULOVEKIOS? If so, THE BOYS & GIRLS CLUB OF HENDERSON IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR CHILD CARE AIDE. IF Interested please call 566-6566 ask lor Kim. ••••••e* I dHwBMwnBCT* HOTEX A CASINO Climb aboard and start your career in the following positiona: No Experience Necessary. We wiU train aU positions At the Railroad Past we believe in promoting from within! Competitive wages and benefits. Equal opportunity e employer. e e Pre^mployment drug e • testing required. 2800 8. Boulder Highway 1 1 00 fMPLOYMfNT OPPORTUNITIES A VON •" • **~'"" Maxine Hottel MEDICAL BILUNQ Seek* FULL/PART Time. Home PC raq. UPTo$45KYR.WIII train. 1-80O0O-1844. 1 1 00 EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES CARRIERSWANTED Apply at H.B.C. Publications, 2 Commerce Center Drive. HD. • >435-7700 Houaekeepera exp., c nee. l.oteof work $8-$Mir. to stsrt. Call Happy House Cleaners 564-4438. E043SS7 Now hiring friendly faces. Full & Part time hours to fit your schedule. Please call Patty, 2^4-0642. KINDERGARTEN TEACHERS r It'll). .*>(.!i()(l TLaclu'is \\ here arc NOU? \\C lucd vou! C:.II-()AKI.\M;AC.M)I;.MV • 293-5188 • 293-5188 • _L ^%^ SUNSET SIATION Sunset Station is currently recruiting: Lifeguards: Must be certified Guest Room Attendants: Will train mithusiastic individuals Sunset Station offers an excellent benefit plan, great career opportunities and'a FUN place to work. CALL, 231-6789 EOE/ADA OUTSIDE DISPLAY ADVERTISING SALES REP needed. A real people person. Background in newspaper advertising helpful. Will train. Salary DOE. Own transportation & Insured. Full time position. Great benefits. Fast nrrovlng fun place to wor1<. Sond Resumes to: ^t:i;'p: HBC Publications. "''^^ 2 Commerce Center Dr., HEND. 89014 E0477SS ^ Hendereon, NV 8901S e*e*eeee vat Come In TODAY, work TOMORROW! Pick/Pack Assembly Warehouse Solderers (Small parts) Wire/Cable Class C Drivers Interim Personnel -w 736-1585 EO44S01 BOULDER CITY PEDAL TOURS is seeking outgoing, animated personalities for F/T and P/T positions. Good pay plus tips as a pedicab driver in Boulder City. Applicants must be in good physical condition as well as possess excellent verbal skills. 294-2278 EOfrtit Immediate Openings in the Las Vegas, NV Area: MEDICAL ASSISTArfT • Duties: Performing general & In-depth admin. & clerical medical support functions. Quals: HS Grad; 1 yr. experience In medical or health related environment; good organization skills; computer literate. NURSE EDUCATOR Duties: Perfomiing primary prevention/inventions functions for disease detecjion screening for obstetrics/gynecology patients with specific emphasis on breast cancer prevention & detection. Quals: BS In nursing (master degree preferred); clinical nursing experience; good case mgmt.; statistic skills; good communication skills. Returnee: PTSI, 18 Koger Ctr., Ste. 203, Norfolk, Va. 23502 or Fax 757 466-8721. ATTN: C. McCoy. 757 461-6447. E038e2^ [TTj WANTED SPORTS REPORTER Applicants should have knowledge of all sports and the Henderson area. Journalism experience preferred but not required. RequlrementK Sports knowledge, hard working and excellent work ethics ^ Full Time CaU 435-7700 lor appointment. HDMENEWS 2 Commerce Center, Henderson, NV ilJl CT71 WANTED GRAPHIC ARTIST Must be fast and efficient in Macintosh Pagemaker, Illustrator and Photoshop. Reqalrements: Excellent work ethics able to meet deadlines. Part time Monday through Wednesday Call 435-7700 for appointment. HOWENEWS 2 Commerce Center, Henderson, NV iJJl 1 100 EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIf 1 '00 EMPLOYMENT OPPORTLiNITIES IMMEDIATE OPENINGS FOR Delivery Drivers Competitive wages average $10/hr., flex hrs. & flex days. Apply at: Vaile Verde & Sunset Lake Mead & Boulder Hwy. IMMEDIATE OPENINGS IN YOUR AREA BECOME A REPRESENTATIVE FOR FRIENDLY TOYS & diFTS. THE NUMBER ONE COMPANY IN PARTY PLAN. TOYS, GIFTS, CHRISTMAS, HOME DECOR. FREE CATALOG AND INFORMATION. CALL SUSAN 1-800-488-4875._ E04555Q Lake Mead Cruises is currently hiring Reservation/Ticketing Staff, Bar/Cocktail, Deckhand, Weight Staff, Night Maintenance/Security & Prep Cook. Mid-day/Mld-wk/Flex. Shifts avail. Please Apply in person at 480 Lakeshore Rd. between 9 AM-4 PM. NO PHONE CALLS PLS. EOE 6W RENTALS Warehouse/Apartment T200 Sq. Ft. w gas heat anJ Swamp cooler slop sink lots of electric sep. offk:e upstairs, 1 bd. apt. $1200/nno., 293-3480/ 595-3183. C047634 Office/Retail space avail., month-fo-month, 660 SF, $660/mo., 402 NV Hwy. BC. 294-4399. C043362 Lease now, new building, offrce space downtown BC, historical district. 1400 or 500 sq. ft. avail, now. 1400 Wyoming St., 293-7509. C047963 Commercial Warehouse for Rent or Lease. 1000 SFw/150 sf. office, $500/ mo. or 2000S w/150 sf office for $1,000. 1.000 sf, no office for $500.703 Wells Rd. BC 294-3030. C047279 Office space for rent in Boulder City. One office • from $150/mo. utilities included, to 4,000 sq. ft. Startingat SBcents/gross sq. ft./mo. Larry 2937007. C037675 •EXECUTIVE OFFICES* Small to medium suites of high quality in mediterranean style. Save $$ 1st month!! Soundproofed, wet bars, special lighting. Russell & Pecos area, call 4341997. CO40333 Industrial ^-PGO Sf SI T!>()/iiin 1130 SF. S750/H1O 1000 SF. S/OO/mo Now t.}uilclinc|s Call 480-5888 VONS CENTER 760 SF AvallabI* Naxt to Vidao Tym* NMI Siniakin, Broker 294-1444 C04SI14 TiVl* RENTALS CM Zone 672 Wells Ro^2000+ sq. ft. w/ W4P7 yard. Red Mountain Plaza-1400+ sq. ft. street level/12— H lower level-will split CM Zone Executive Offices @ 705 Yucca St-1100 sq. ft. CALL 294-1080 9-2 WEEKDAYS. C04398 CMBuilding2600tt.,900 ft.. Plush office with 1700 Shop. $1280/mo. or $139K.OWClO%down. 293-2030. C047B42 CM Building 600' w/600 ft. yard, 220 Power/Cool. $325/mo.Buy$29K.2932030. C047841 Office, perfect for training. UtJIs. pd. Sunset & Eastern. $450/mo. 8910201. C047737 NEW, small office, util. pd.. Sunset & Eastern. $350/mo. 891-0201. C047737 Marshall Plaza, office space, 1500 SF avail., 293-2760. C048184 For lease 1500 sf com. at .45 per Bf. New building BC. 293-1897. C048186 1200 sq. ft. warehouse w/sep. office. $600/mo. 293-3480/595-3183. CO47606 3500 sq. ft. Commercial building 150 sq.ft. office, 3 baths, 3 phase. Private gate, Rent/Lease $1800. 294-3030. C046834 *•* • • • • ** • • BOULDER CITY • • Offices for LMM -k it $1S0/$175ino. ir ^ wlvttfr a elec. Included.^ Above Boulder Theatre ^ 293-1283 ^ •*•*•*•• *'VT* Office 1130SF. S800/rno ryiust see. 550 SF. S700 Now Ijuildings Call 480-5888 HOUSE RENTALS I HOUSE RENTALS FOR RENT: Avail. 5-21, 3 bd72 ba., 2 car, River Mt. area. $925/mo. + dep. Call Elaine 592-2046. HR47730 2bd./1ba.Houseforrent. Available approx. June 10th. 640 Ave. K. $675. 293-1917. HR48023 4 bd., 2 ba., cul-de-sac, near Basic H.S. $950/mo. + dep. Call Jack 45401 60/4341475. HR48066 BC 3 bd./2 ba., 2 car gar., $950 First. Last, Dep. Fenced yard. 5283000. HR48121 Great 3 bd/2 ba., Del Prado, Ig. fam. rm., auto sprinklers front & roar. 2 car gar. Avail. aboutJune 7th. $950/mo. +dep. Call 293-5311. HR48118 Immaculate 3 bd72 ba., 2 car, Horizon & College area, w/d, frig., immed. move-In. No pets or •mokera. $950/mo. • dep. Call 294-1515. HR48n5 ^ SUN CITY 55+ 2 bd-2 ba. New $950 per month, Sunshine Realty-8978409. HR48143 BC-3 bd., 2 ba., 2 car gar., RV park., fenced yd., $995 + depa., 2934357. HR48288 Custom 3 bdrm. Boulder City home rent/lease option. IMMEDIATE MOVE-IN homey, clean, goK course area newly painted & pool/spa. $500.00 dep. $1150.00 per mo. 616-0347or 3750620. HR48142 SUN CITY 55+ 2 Bd. 2 Ba. New $950 per month Sunshine Realty 8978409. HR48127 3bd./1-1/2ba. off street parking, big kitchen. $950/nx>. + deps. 2935726,10A-2P, Eve.. 2948428. HR48159 4 bd/2 ba., 2 car gar., fenced bk. yd., Palo Verde Dr.. $975/nfX). + dep. No pets. Call Al at Jensen's Realty, 5643333. HR47999 New 2-Story View Home, 3br./2.5ba./2cargaryAII New Appl. Blinds/Close to SchTShop $ 1.25d per column inch per issue Very nice mobile home for sale in Villa Hermosa. $19,950. Please call 565-7348|j^ 1700 MOBILE HOMES Big House, Small House, and those in between; We have many homes to be seen. Mike 1 -888-2246510. MH48039 Land-Home for sale. 3 BR/2 BA. A real dream. Gary 1-888-224-6510. MH48037 Affordable, Comfortable, Living. 3 BR, 2 BA, Less than $30,000. Call Dee at 1-888-224-6510. MH48035 Beautiful New Triple Wide Home, just an'ived. Many options, visit us at Oakwobd Homes in Pahrump. Please ask for Jerry 1-888-224-6510. MH47779 Big House, Small House, and those in between. We have many homes to be seen. Mike 1 -888-2246510. MH47777 Big Family? Big House, 1920Sq. Ft..4br.,2Full baths. Fireplace, 2x6 Walls. A must see. Ask for Vince only. 1-702727-8304. H^H47775 Land/Home for sale. 1996 Champion, 3 BR, 2 BA., A real dream at only $73,000. Gary 1-888224-6510. MH47773 Affordable, Comfortable, Living. 3 BR, 2 BA, Less than $30,000. CaU Dae al .^1..S8S-224^510. MH47771 GINGERWOOD-55+, nice corner lot, 2 bd.,1 3/ 4 baths, 20x52. 1977 Washington in mint conditin. ONE OWNER! $32,400. ANCHOR REALTY, ask for Katie, 2935757. MH48078 Rent to Own or Lease w/ option. 2 bd, Mobile Home, BC only on lot. If necessary we will just rent. Recently opened a franchise in BC. Please callMayra at 294-1689. MH47925 1972 Leisure 14x56, 2 bdVI ba. in BC. $15,000 OBO. Call Bret 294-8888. MH47563 Nice & Affordable in popular Coronado Estates. 2 bd./2 ba., workshop, 3 sheds/2 car carports, 60x100. $99,900. CENTURY 21 Boulder Dam Realty, Jennifer 293-4663. f/H46068 HERlSERgCH == BEST FAMILY PARK 4 bed. double wide, $65(Vmo. 3 bed. double wide, $625/rno. 2 bed. (Ingle wide, tSOO/mo. Incl. space, vacant, ready to move in now! For Sale OAC Co-Op. 525-2494, Dale OAKRIDGE TOWNHOMES 2 Bedroom, 11.'2 Bath, over 1000 sq. ft., sep. laundry room w washer/dryer hookup, private patio! $600 month. $499 moves you in!! 565-1499. CR47406 Pecos & Wigwam, excel, retail/office location. Occup. June, 99. Call Chuck at MDL Group, 388-1800. C047917 HD 1 bd. condo. End Unit, few blocks from Jokers Wild, $500/mo. • dep. 775-727-8869. CR47659 1*1*. WCl. BC 3 bd./2 ba. condo, all appls. + micro, W/D, frplc, window treatments, 2-car gar. pool/ spa, RV parking avail., NO PETS, 1 yr. lease, NO Smokers, tdOO/mo.. 1st, last+dep, 294-4420. CR47839 BC condo, avail, now, near schools, 2 Ig. bd., 1 1/2 ba., Indryrm., kitchen appls., Ivrm. w/frpl., dning area, central air & heat, no destructive pets, refs. req., $795/nx). $795 dep., 293-5054. CF(48094 Avail. June 15, 2 bdrm. • • Den, 2-1/2 baths, cov'd. pkg., akylites, excel, cond. $900/mo. -f deps. & ref. Linette, 294-3100. Lake Mead Area Realty, cmaoeo Spotless Condo for rent. 2 b6J2 ba., gated community, washer & dryer, frig., fireplace, swimming pool & work out rm. $795/mo. 1200 8q.ft. Sm. pets OK. Racetrack Rd. HD. 558-0801/564-7772. -y

PAGE 37

T' — -T ^ <^^^ ^^^ • • ^^ ^l LMca a Mountwn vwwa Irani iTMooaaoOtOoo CaaeCAdobator **•• *iMMit 293-1707 LAKE MEAD VIEW ESTATES CUSTOM HOMi aim BOULDER CITY IIOOOMUI tmwnn 2^4-0475. J 60 ACRES WYOMING Lifnitsd supply at prices soon disappearing. Antelope, wikjnorsae, great speculation' Si 95 do./ $2318 mo. ($23,800/9%/ 15 1/2 years). Call toll free 1-800-945-3040. L047991 I 500 LOST& FOUND LOST: Gold ladies watch lost in rear parking lot of the Reserve. Sentimental value. Please call 5955582. LF48042 LOST Grey & White Cat, just shaved w/puffy tail. Has mustache like Sylvester. Answers to name of Snoopy. Liberal Reward. Call 898-3770. -F47980 1300 FINANCIAL OVER YOUR HEAD in debt??? Do you need more breathing room??? Debt consolidation, no qualifying!!! 'Free consultation (800) 556-1548. www.anewhorizon org. Licensed, bonded, nonprofit/national CO. FS48006 600 PETS/ANIMALS Very pretty blue' front Amazon Parrot. Talker, cage. First $850, Sunrise Mtn. area. 437-0635. PA47994 Dogs, cats, birds, iguanas, ready for adoption. Call 361-2484. Open 7 days a week, daylight 'til dark. PA43050 4Unes'6Lj^ co in roie ^Boulder City ^" P 293-7296 1 300 FINANCIAL SOVERDUE BILLS!!'! Credit problems? Consolidate debts! Same day approval. Cut monthly payments up to 50%. Become debt free. No applkation fees!! 1-800863-9006. Ext. 881. www.help-pay-bills.com. FS48020 600 PETS /ANIMALS DESPtMATLLY NEEDED HI MYIIOHN ANIMAI ADOPIinNS Hnthe /yvertlse Uk the Nm$ GREAT SAVINGS ON mortgage loans, debt consolidation, bankruptcy, good-bad credit OK. Reasonable monthly payments. Low interest rates. Calltollfree. 1-888856-2458. FS47992 r=a YOURLOCAL Payroll Services & General Ledger •I.ocliRu> •IlKlk RnnKlUlMluna NnruAwtivrnw: •)MVTJBION SKf-lT •EMPUJYHH ADDmO.NS •EMPI^n-EH (IlOi(iF,S •iM^X I'AVROLL (IIKKS •I'AI'WHXPKKII' H.\(iNITir TAPE MEDU •l iARTESLY TAX REPORTS SIIS REFORf __ L733-0378J I INIVAIM rvuNOAL cmxnt I LOANS WE WANT TO MAKE YOU A LOAN CALL US TODAY In Boulder City 294-4478 In Henderson 568-1544 $75 $750 LICENSED BY THE STATE OF NV 1200 BUSINESS |1200 BUSINESS ||l 200 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES II r-iDDnftiiMiTitc II OPPDRTIINIT OPPORTUNITIES NOTICE TO READERS: The HBC Publications does not vouch for the legitimacy of items, jobs, or money-making opportunities advertised in this classification. We suggest you carefully evaluate such offers and not send money to these advertisers unless you are cerlainyou know with whom you are dealing and you know all terms and conditions of the otfer. EARN EXTRA INCOME $200-$500 weekly mailing gift certificates. For more Information send a seH-addressed stamped envelope to: Just For Kids, P.O. Box 0610, Miami, FL. 33168. B045668 h^ail Box Shipping Center with checK cashing business. Established 1986. Excel, income. Tremendous potential. $199,000, terms avail., 438-0134. B042417 Starting a Buainaaa? See Ad Business Servtees under Consulting, call 221-8822. SAYNOtODAYCARE MOMMIES WANTED Who want to stay home with their children but Need a P/T or F/T Income. Call for "FREE" Info. Tese 392-1397 B047755 EARN 16K > RESIDUAL. Information business. ONLY $t3 investment. Call now 3928876. BO39330 AGENT: Avon needs representatives. Earn up to 50%. No door to door. Start your own business in 98'. Must be 18. Independent Rep. Call 1 -800727-2866. BO40680 OWN YOUR OWN APPAREL, shoe, westernwear, lingerie, bridal, gift or $1.00 store. Inclucws fixtures, buying trip, training. Minimum in-, vestment $18,900.00. Call Liberty Opportunities O 1-501-327-8031.' BO45099 OPPORTUNITIES FREEDOM GREETING C/^RDS! 100K ahnual potential. No selling PT/ FT accounts furnished. Enjoy restocking displays on your schedule! Req. $9,800 up, investment! 1 -800-231 -2832. B047995 $1.00 STORES! $1-$10 Stores! 10,000 products. Financing available. Be open for Christmas!! Complete from $44,900. Call: 1-800-829-2915. BO48012 Turn Key Bar & Food Sen/ice in B.C. Building, Business, Fixtures, and upstairs Apt: $230K. Anchor Realty, Wayne, 4997223. BO48120 AAA$IPARTTNIE Earn up ro t40K. NO SEUJNat EMy Wofk, Your Schadul*. Sarvfc* QrMtln Card Dtoplayal taeOO. Cash ftoqulrwl. 1-800-231-2832 mami FREEOOMI QREETINa CAROai PT/FT, tlOOK ANNUAL NO SCLLMQI Accounti (umMhad Entoy rModilng Oltplayi or your Khadultl nq. ie.800 up. invMtmind 1-800-231-28 & 700 FURNITURE If you have furniture to sell. consign at Terrrs...it's tt)e eoslest, most convenient way to do It. All it takes is one earphone call: (70^314-2233 KAdvrtts It. l/Dltplay It. ofid*.. ^fll If fy ypul SiMeltTt TtRRHsCONSJGN^rDESIGN mdoth^worK HBDSDBDHH. you g^t th9 monmyl Consignmitt lltf: (702) 314-2233 SAHARA WARMSPRINGS tMf Oonw tilwf A (701) 247-7Mt (702) M1.7747 FURNITURE 1300 FINANCIAL $$$ CASH LOANS. Auto loans, debt consolidation with same-day approval. Bad credit (JK. 1-800247-5125, ext, 434 FS48013 For Sale: Ethan Allen Antique pine dining suite with 72 inch trestle table & 4 chairs. Very good cond. $350. 293-4405. 1^048173 ^_ King size bed oak, mirrored dresser & head board custom made, spread, $275.294-3932. MI48ni Couch, Dbl. recliner, oak trim, Brn./Bge/Tan Plaid, 2 yrs. old, mint condition, Paid $750, Sell for $200. 454-5509. 1^148057 Sofa & Love Seat, good cond. $400. 293-2604 after 8 A.M. MI48065 Solid Mahogany office des w/right wing, $200. Popasan chair w/cushion, $50. 294-1935 after 4 p.m. MC46120 4 captains chairs, 1 gas lawn mower, 1 elec. edger, 1 elec. trimmer, 1 12 colorTV, cable ready, 1 roll top desk has to be seen to be appreciated. Callafter5pm, 564-8483. MC46673 2 antique fireside uph. chairs, very Ig. & comfy. Exc. cond. $580 for set. 564-5371. MC47179 Sofa/Loveseat, It. blue pinstripe, very goodcond. $400 QBO. 896-1049. MC47225 1 100 EMPIOYMFNT OPPOPrUNIIItS Print Shop looking for experienced PRESSMAN who is custonDer 8ervk:e oriented, familiar wrth multi 1650'8. Must be a team player. Benefits package. Hours 85, Monday-Friday. Apply in person at: 3D Sunset Way, Henderson, 4357761. E047966 1 100 EMPLOYMENT FOOD SERVER 30-35 hr/wk., min. plus tips, apply in person THE PIT STOP, 802 Buchanan, BC. E047983 CAREGIVER Sm. group home, HD area. Minutes from BC. Transp. nee. Bonus program. 5658144. E047954 Print Shop looking for experienced CUSTOMER SALES CLERK. Benefits package. Hour* 8-5, Monday-Friday. Apply in person at: 3D Sunset Way, Henderson, 435-7761. E047965 Admin. Assist, GVUnited Methodist Church, IBM compatible PC. Windoyvs 98; MS word, familiar with MS publisher is a • • Call Elaine, 454-7989. EO48056 Mature lady for housekeeping and to assist elderly woman, wk. MOP., Wed. & Fh., 8 AM-12. $12/hr. Call Joann for appt., 293-4364, EO48044 Receptionist: St. Jude's Ranch for Children is looking for a full-time receptionist wKh a smile & positive attitude. Must have multi-line phone experience and good customer servk:e skills. Apply in person: 100 St. Jude sSt., B.C. EO48041 TRUCK DRIVERS WANTED off most weekends, home every other day. Ins., 401 (k), Class A, CDL, & 2 yrs. exp. req. Call B & C Transportation, 888-2860190. EO48036 Front deskopeningatthe Super 8 Motel. FT/PT w benefits. Apply in person 294-8888. E047968 "SAY NO TO DAYCARE" Mommies wanted. Whowant to stay home with their children but Need a P/T or F/T Income. Call for "FREE'Info. Tete, 3921397.E045342 Crew member neededfor VERY BUSY 7-11. Must be 21 yrs. APPLY IN PERSON ONLY to Date or Larry, 850 E. Horizon Dr., corner of Boulder Hwy. E043231 CARRIERS WANTED Apply at H.B.C. Publeations, 2 Conrwnerco Center Drive. HD. 435-7700. E047758 Wanted: 43 People to lose 20 lbs. by July 4th. All Natural! Results Guaranteed! Call Susan, 970-870-7939. E047277 Sales lady. Mature P/T for gift shop at McCarran airport. Parking paid for. 798-5852. EO47820 AM cooks & waltrNsas. Apply at Frosty Freeze. EO48062 CAoOMir^G Experiencad gantia dog groomet. F/PT. Susie, 294-0001. E0481 82 CASHt^A P.T. Evas, ft Wkends a must. Apply in person Coast-To-Coast Hardware, 520 E Lake MaadDr..HD.EO48ie0 Now hiring! Labor/Roofer must be willing to laam the trade & have own transportation. Some tools required. No experience naadad! Contact Steve at Perfactaau Roofing at 293-7662. E048189 A FEW (ieOICATED FLATBED OPENINGS. HOME WEEKENDS! Kingman. AZ and Back. $1,000 Sign-On. Haul Rebar. 6 Mo's Experience: Roadrunner Trucking, Inc. 800-945BIRO www.roadrunner trucking.com. E043974 ^'ow hiring CPS, Inc Unarnncd Security Officers. Full/Part time & Live in. Must have phone. Interviewing, Mon.-Fri. Noon to 4:30 pm. Full Benefit s/BonusPay. 201 E. Colorado Ave. (702) 380-3146. EO47604 Wanted Exp. Counter person for Auto Parts Store. Apply in person at Pickarts Auto Parts, 31 E.BasicRd.,HD,M-F,95. E04758e Help wanted: Growing daycare needs reliable, dependable person to manage 3 yrs. old rm. FT, must have refs. Call 564-2201 for appt., ask for Angle or Lana. E047564 Applcations now being accepted for afternoon shift at Christian Center Preschool, hrs. 2:305:30, must be 18, alert, creative & love children. Phone 293-7773 ask for Dianne. E047524 DRIVERS-OTR, TEAM, owner/operators, students. COLL, Hazmat, DBL, Endorsements, Clean MVR-Great pay package. Home weekly, tOE Andrus Transportation 31-800-888-5838 or 1-888-200-7887. EO47087 Clerk/Cashier to work in GV Salon, 4days, Tues., Thurs.. Fri. & Sat. 3-8:30 pm. Call Judy for appt. at 896-0097. E046611 CASHIER/CLERICAL working in a gift shop, FT 40hrs.Ak., 1 mile marker at Hoover Dam. Call 5640104. Ask for Gene. EO43230 Physician to serve as Medical Director for Substance Abuse Clinic inHD, 1-2hrs./wk.,4744104. EO40265 1 100 (MfHOYMtNT OPPORTUNITIES Amateur Famala Modela needed. Have fun & nnake qufck cash. Photographer needs models of all ages to model aveningwesr to swinnwear. Formore info send photo 4 letter describing vourself to New Image. P.O. Box 94231, LV. NV. 89193-4231. EO48033 Entry level office positions receptionist good w/ people & numbers. computer exp. a -f. Call 564-5050. E047993 FT/PT reservations clerk for Boulder Oaks RV Resort in Boulder City. Fax # 702-294-4426. 294-4426, Attn. Elaine. EO48022 Construction helper needed, 293-5650. E047984 Medi9al Receptionist ,. .~^.^~ ^— NaMorial irfiaging comDJ'S fcayca're Center BabysitterneededinGV, our house for 3 yr. old. Ideal for student. A couple of afternoons & one night. Should be responsible & fun & must have refs. Phone btwn. 9 AM-8 PM. 564-3556. E047934 Glazier exp. req.. Green Valley Glass Co.. Robert. 368-4628. E047937 Christian Center School is nowtaking applications for JR. High Math teacher. Part time hours. Call 293-7773. E047941 Apt. management person/couple to manage & maintain 15 apts. in exchange for rent. Prefer retired. 293-7430. EO47908 DENTAL COORDINATOR. F/T BC. Dental, conputar, bookkeeping ins. & exp. Vac., hollaays, incentive ins. Contact Wanda. 293-0373. E047919 Bob's All Family Restaurant now hiring FT A.M. WAITRESS, exp. req. Apply in person, 761 Nevada Hwy. BC. EO48077 Bob's All Family Restaurant now hiring PT prep, cook/dishwasner. Apply in person 761 Nevada Hwy. BC. E048154 Homeworkers Needed $635 weekly processing mail. Easy! No expenence needed. Call 800426-3203 Ext. 5000 24 hrs. E047824 Housekeepers $8-$10/ hr. Individuals needed to clean area homes, FT/ PT, M-F. Car & phone req. 436-0076. EO48092 pany is seeking a Receptionist/Scheduler for a new imaging center in HD. Min. of 2 yrs. medical office exp. Gr. pay w/ benefits. Send or fax resunne to ATTN. D. K., 15438 N. Florida Ave.. Suite 200. Tampa, FL. 33613. Fax 813-2699402 DFWP. EO40264 Mexican Cook/delivery driver, full/part-time, call 558-4500, ask for Gene. EO40442 FOOD SERVICE ASSISTANT Village Oaks Assisted Living by Marriott. Friendly, attractive, non-nursing community providing servk:es to elderly. Duties IrKlude setting dining room, washing dishes, and helpinc) cook. Apply at 3025 E. Russell Rd., Las Vegas. 451-7896 for more information. £0481 pi MEDICATION ASSISTANT Village Oaks Assisted Living by Marriott. Friendly, attractive, nonnursing community providing sen/k:es to elderly. Requires attention for detail. Perfect for Nurses Aide looking for upward nrx)ve. Willing to train. All shifts available. AppW at 3025 E. Russell Rd., Las Vegas, 451-7896 for more information. EO48102 COOK Village Oaks Assisted Living by Marriott, friendly, attractive, non-nursing facility providing sen^lces to seniors. All shifts, weekends and holidays. Experience in institutk>nal cooking required. Duties also include cleaning, dishwashing and serving. Apply in person: 3025 E. Russell Road or phone 451-7896. E048103 PERSORAT^WTAT: TENDANT ViHage Oaks Assisted Living by Marriott. Friendly, attracliva, non-nursing comnxinity providing services to Seniors. Raquirea kind heart artd love of the eldarty. WiMng to train rsK•bla person with good references. All srilfta available. Apply In person: 3025 E. Russel Rd. or phone 451-7896. £048105 XD7EHTi§iR?n?EPRe SENTATIVE: Graat opportunity, earnings potential at Truckee-North Tahos weekly papers. Resume: Sierra Sun. c/o Peter Kostea. P.O. Box 2973. Truckea. CA 9 6 18 0, koates O swiftnews.cora EO4S000 IS in need of a responsible caregiver for the infants nn. w/exp. FT w/benefits. Accepting applications. 360 Horizon, HD. (cross street Greenway) 5664070. E047748 LUBETECHFT,avaiLat a very busy auto repair facility in BC. Room for advancement to dedicated parson. Apply in Serson at 705 Juniper /ay, BC. E047678 Opening for Class 1. Class 2 Smog tech. Vem's Texaco, Water & Lake Mead. 565-0220. E04B128 Gen. & folding laborers needed. Immed. opening for reliable team players in our fast paced environment. Apply at UniFirst Corp. 568 Parkson Rd.. Hd. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. £048124 Part-time delivery person needed for gift basket business. Must be dependable, friendly, flexible and own a reliable, air-conditioned insured vehicle. Hours vary, approx. 10-20 weekly. Perfect for retirees/ moms. Call 361-8885. E048112 Live in wanted to care for ekierly gentlenrwin. Sonne medical background helpful, incl. It. housework, prep, of nneals, must have own transportation. Must provide refs. Call 293-2236 for details. E048122 MANAGER Fast paced energetic people needed a* shHt supervlaora. Become pert of a hard working team, 2-3 yrs. FAB exp. helpfuL Enthuaiaem Mandaloiy FT w/Benef its A 401K. Apply In person 480 Lake &iofM.BC. No phone calle pleaae. EOE. £048052 N6WHlAlNdSMILIN(^ FACES. THE HOOVER DAM STORE. A people oriented corrpanytotaNy commJnad to the Disney phloaophy of aaccellanca in gueet service & cast meni>er training has job opportunlies avalable. One full time clerk; 3 Summer help part-time/ fun time. Staffing wage based on experience. 1 Full-time position AprlOctober. Requires heavy lifting. S8.50 per hour. Mual have reliable iranaportatkxi for al poaitk>ns.Visudlyinpaired and physically challenged walcoms to apply. Phone 586-1082. E648047 1 1 00 EMPLOYMLNI OPPORTUNITIES Manicurist wanted tor growing salon. Great clientle building pofSStTal. Partial clientle needed. Horizon 95, HD. 5651156. E047956 FISHERMAN WANTED F/T CLERK W/FISHING & NAVIGATION KNOWLEDGE OF LAKE MEAD. PAY DOE $6-8/ HR W/VAC. EXTREME MINI MART. 564-3058 ASK FOR DON OR MIKE. E045874 SALES REP-A dynamic national leader in the gift industry has an outstandingcareer opportunity in outside sales. We are seeking an energetic self-starter with the desire to succeed, in Henderson/Las Vegas/Pahrump area. We offer: An expanding product line, $400/wK. salary & expenses -f commission, annual volume bonus, training, along with benefits, supportive organization & advancement opportunities. This is an excellent opportunity to build a long term career ...don't pass it up! Send/ fax resume to Recruitment Manager — NVl, Papel Giftware, 30 EngelhardDr.Cranbury, NJ 08512. Fax: (609) 860-1938. EOE. RN's, LPN's. Hospital near Reno/Tahoe. Acute/ LTC; PT/FT; benefits. (775)463-2301.6X1.217; South Lyon Medical Center, POB 940, Yerington, NV 89447. E0E.EO45537 Now accept, applications, all positions. Apply between 2-4. Evan's OTG. 1129 Arizona. E045712 &' BUILDING PLANS EXAf^lNER II. SALARY: $24.06-27.43/hour. REQUIREMENTS: Graduation from high school, ortheequivalent.andtwo (2) years of full-time expenence as a Plans Examiner, or four (4) years of experience as a Building Inspector, or registration as a professional engineer or architect, OR an equivalent combination of closely related training and experience. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: Must possess appropriate Nevada^ Driver's License at the^ time of appointment and maintain a satisfactory driving record. Must be certified by ICBO as a Plans Examiner at the time of application. All required licenses and certificates must be obtained and maintained at the incumbent's exense. CANDIDATES UST PRESENT PROOF OF CURRENT ICBO CERTIFICATION AS A PLANS EXAMINER AT TIME OF APPLICATION. WHERE TOAPPLY: City application form must be submitted to, and received by, the Human Resources Department, Room200, City Hall. 240 Water Street, Henderson, NV 89015, no later than Wednesday, June 2, J999, by 5:00 p.m., to be consideredforthis recruitment. NO APPLICATIONS WILL BE GIVEN OUT AFTER 4:00 P.M. ON THE CLOSING DATE OF THIS RECRUITMENT. Employment packet MUST be obtained from the Human Resources Department, resumes only WILL NOT be accepted in lieu of employment application. HOURS OF OPERATIONS: MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY, 7:30A.M. TO 5:30 P.M. SMOKE-FREE WORK ENVIRONMENT. AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER. E047988 1 100 EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Motel maid, PT, Apply in persprjJSevada Inn Motel, 1009 NV Hwy., BC. EO43047 FALLON, NEVADA EQUIPMENT DEALER needs experienced FarnVField mechanics, baler repair desired. Need own tools. Salary, benefits D.O.E. Renner Equipment, (775) 8674556, 9 AM-5 PM. E047998 DRIVER BUD MEYER truck lines refrigerated hauling *$1,000 sign-on bonus for exp. co. drivers* Solo drivers start up. to 33c. Solo drivers & contractors call toll free 877-283-6393. Graduate students 1-800-3386428. EO48016 INSURANCE-4 day work week. Advances, $1000/week, statewide opportunity, 5 people maximum. Call ASAP 1800-252-2581 E047997 HEALTHCARE SALES. Attn: healthcare providers, marketers & reps. Utilize your healthcare connections-$100Kplus commission based income. Part-time or full time. National Healthcare Company. No investment. Free seminar at Sahara Hotel & Casino. Tuesday, 6/1/ 99 in Las Vegas. 7 pm-9 pm. Refreshments served. Look "THCC Seminar'at hotel. Call to confirm your seat. (305) 652-2029. EO48002 AVON PRODUCTSSTART your own business. Work flexible hours. Enjoy unlimited earnings. Call toll free (888) 9424053. EO48015 AD SALESPERSON FOR twice-weekly newspaper in northern Nevada, base plus commission, mileage, great potential: letter, resume: Buqie Sales Position, P.O. Box 250, Battle Mountain, NV 89820. EO48011 ^__ DRIVERS-OTR, TEAM, owner/operators, students. CDL, Hazmat, DBL, Endorsements, Clean MVR-Great pay package. Home weekly. EOE Andrus Transportation @ 1 -800-888-5838 or 1-888-200-7887. EO48005 $300-$850 WEEKLY mailing coupons for companies, to apply, send S.A.S.E. to: Multi Coupons, 6A45 W. i ChandlerBlvd.,#L6-242, ^ Chandler, AZ., 85226. (602) 222-8662. EO480O3 PT Mon.-Fri. Maid, nonsmoker preferred. Apply in person El Rancho Boulder Motel, 725 NV Hwy. EO47650 Thursday, May 20, 1999 Panorama PagalS MANAGER Fast Paced energetic people needed as shift supervisors. Become part of a hard working team, 23 yrs. FAB exp. helpful. Enthusiasm Mandatory FT w/Benef its & 401K. Apply in person 480 Lake Shore Rd.,BC. No phone calls please. EOE. EO48052 DALY a WEEKLY PAY SItorVLong Tarm AMign. New taking applications for: CLERICAL WAREHOUSES CONSTRUCTION Apply In parton, I am4 pm, Mon.-f rl. #91 wmUf WLt Hanflafaofi NOW HIRING SMILING FACES. THE HOOVER DAM STORE. A people oriented company totally committed to the Disney philosophy of excellence in guest service & cast member training has job opportunities available. One full time clerk; 3 Summer help part-time/ full time. Starting wage based on experience. 1 Full-time position /VprilOctober. Requires heavy lifting. $8.50 per hour. Must have reliable transportation for all positions. Visually impaired and physically challenged weteome to apply. Phone 596-1082. EO48047 DAM WEAR Dam Wear ia looking for an enargetic FT asai manager. Must have previous retail axparienca and bs familiar with windows. Contact Donna Draney at 294-4399. mam] Your Futura Bagins Hare Dal Wabb Corporation CALL REPRESErfTATIVE Nevada's #1 horns builder of retirement oommunNlea Is currently looking for IndivWuaie ftw are Totally Committed to Succeeel Fu itl m a and part-time poeKione avaHabie for IndMduaiswtwtMveabeettgroundlntaieplKMie m artw inw aalaa. aiwvye or reee r v at io na PC/ Compular dais entry expertenoersquirad. Strong eommunicatton. language and grammar sidils Great worldng envlronntent and bensntsi Apply or send resume to: Dal Wabb Corporation Human Raaourcaa-SCA 11800 8. Eaalam AvaiMia Handaraon, NV 80012 fOe/DruQ-Fraa Wortcplaoa 1 100 EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES 1100 tiMPLOVMlNr OPPOTUNITIES DraWeOr company Need A Dam Job!? WilUi cl ;lll iiu i;:i lii V^^l. \l;iil,imr ;i| Diiiii \\V;ir .ilK .iiiil;il Lake Mead Resorts HAVE A LIFEI (at the lake) Now hiring lor Sklliad malnttnanca, custodial, boat rantaifront daak, diahwashars, Una cooka, houMkaapert, cathlara, waldan. Apply at: 322 Lakeshore Rd. BC. 8-4 PM Pra amploymant drug taat raq. E.E.O.C. A.C.O.T.N.P.S. Eo, TEACHER NEEDED Subbtiiute Teacher Ctiild Development Teacher Elem. Educ. Teacher Secondary Educ. Teacher College Student in Educ. NAME OWN HOURS Oaklane Academy, 1308 VVyoiiiinq Si. BC 293-5188 COMPUTER MIS Coordinator II EOBot Clark County I* Making • uaar-suppoit tpMialltt. Dutiea ivill includa, but not limitad to, trouMastKoting FantoM local uaar probteffls; hardwire Installatkm and maintenance, Softwara configuntkMi, ind other dutiea ai asiignad. ShouMbefamillarwitt) popular Microsoft •oftwara, Windowa '95, Office 97, Word ind Excel. Knowrtedge of NT or LANi is I plui but not required. Qualified applicant must have strong communlcatkxi, organizational and Interpersonal skills. Reliable transportatkKi and driver licsnse are requirefl. Recent college graduatee are Invited to apply. Starting Salary $29,767 Annually D.O.Q. Full benefits. Including retirement and Cafeteria plan. Resumes will be accepted until 4 p.m., Wednesday, Mey 26,1999 at EOB Human Rtsourcec Department, 2228 Comstock Drive, Las Vegas, NV 89030 or Email to gcfmngaMxbiinxxIsmcQni An Equal Employment Opportunity Employer. E048117 4 LINES ^6' Sale* CONNECT WITH THE FUTURE Tired of commission salet, Joba In high tumovsr, and no recognition companies? Coma join OONCE. A Maraliall InduatrJM Company, with nearly $2 l>lilion In annual sale*. We are loolclng lor taiasalee/lelemarfceting talent to learn our systems, build e career and )oin our team. COME SHARE IN OUR SUCCESS W* currently have the following excellent career opportunttiet avallat>le: Inside Sales, Customer Support Specialist and 24/7Technical eupport. Position qualifications include, previous salee and/or customer servlcWeupport iMMkground. FULL-TIME. PART-TIME OR FLEMMiE We ere open 24 hours eli aMfte and hours avslial>le. We offer a dynamic, llexibie, low^mover work environment with great benefits that Include; Competitive salary, 401 (k), Medical, Dental, Vacations and Sick Uma. Fax your resume to: (JS) st (702) 436-1880, or stop by and 8e our beeutlful ofHoee, localed in Qrean Vslley, at 4 Sunael WSy, BulMIng C, Henderaon, NV and complete an application. eo4ao74 CASHIERS Immediate openinga for PT cashiera at the Hoovar Dam Parking Garage. Prior cashiering & customer service preferred. Joba required to stand for long periods of time in all weather conditions. We offer excellent wages. Apply in person at the second floor parking office at Hoover Dam Parking Garage. Previous applicants need not reapply. EOR E04fl148 Hair Stylist & ly/lanicurist station Available For Busy Salon Call 294-8477 or 524-8916 Leave Name & Number ^'i^ASTRJDGtTem psL $6.00-$7.73/hr. Warahouae/V^anufacturlng Full Time and Temporary poaitiona available Muat be reliable and have transportation c 566-9662 NEVER A FEE for appt 320 S. Boulder Hwy., Suite 102. HO NEVER A FEE ^MAINTENANCE MECHANIC* FMp*c*dOlraclMnn(M*optnnglortniainHnnn mKtwifc Nsae wpwlanc* In prail mat) ml liMify •qupmsnl MMI candUali aS pewM* tMng tlKlncal and mtctwUI nuH* enoarg ikai. AIn p n < w mt tt ki t. Vaitman. nd wchnn Hwp *m. ComptS S i n bwWk pertufl* PiMMlu Of n rMunt h uly iwiuNiMnB 10 VaM>ak CMS, 1(40 Ana>a.tWmy beak. tsao Aanlat Way. (al Crs Rd aUiaI.N laaVa^.NrdalS0S0.(7O:i3Se-3llO Your Future Bagins Hera Del Webb Corporation CUSTODIAL WORKERS Full-time position avallabia for a meUculoua IndivMual wtto posaeeaee good Interpersonal akilla to perform general custodial wfortc. Woftdng knowleclge of cleaning agents and soWonts necessary. Must be able to woric with mininrtal supenrttion. We offer en excellent banefH package and have a great wortdr>g environment Apply In person or send reeume to: Del Webb Corporation Human Resourcee-SCA 11500 S. Eastern AventM NV 89012 ""H EOE^Dnig-FraeWortiplaea "y 7^!p^^ff^iBp^f"WTrrr 1 100 EMPLOYMENT OPPOKTUNITIES •••••*•• AT HOME WEEKLY AND..."~ You won't have to run the northeast! This is dedicated flatbed regional opportunity. $1,000 Sign-On. Plenty of miles. 6 mo's. flatbed experience. Limited availabilities so CALL TODAY! 800-945-BIRD(2473) www.roadrunnartrucklng.eoin ••••••*• QENERAL LABORERS WAREHOUSE CONSTRUCTION CLEAN4JP Dally Pay • Ftwns & Troni aplua LABOR EXPRESS 3SE. UkaMaadDr. BOX 11) ADS 8 DOYOULOVEKIOS? If so, THE BOYS & GIRLS CLUB OF HENDERSON IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR CHILD CARE AIDE. IF Interested please call 566-6566 ask lor Kim. ••••••e* I dHwBMwnBCT* HOTEX A CASINO Climb aboard and start your career in the following positiona: No Experience Necessary. We wiU train aU positions At the Railroad Past we believe in promoting from within! Competitive wages and benefits. Equal opportunity e employer. e e Pre^mployment drug e • testing required. 2800 8. Boulder Highway 1 1 00 fMPLOYMfNT OPPORTUNITIES A VON •" • **~'"" Maxine Hottel MEDICAL BILUNQ Seek* FULL/PART Time. Home PC raq. UPTo$45KYR.WIII train. 1-80O0O-1844. 1 1 00 EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES CARRIERSWANTED Apply at H.B.C. Publications, 2 Commerce Center Drive. HD. • >435-7700 Houaekeepera exp., c nee. l.oteof work $8-$Mir. to stsrt. Call Happy House Cleaners 564-4438. E043SS7 Now hiring friendly faces. Full & Part time hours to fit your schedule. Please call Patty, 2^4-0642. KINDERGARTEN TEACHERS r It'll). .*>(.!i()(l TLaclu'is \\ here arc NOU? \\C lucd vou! C:.II-()AKI.\M;AC.M)I;.MV • 293-5188 • 293-5188 • _L ^%^ SUNSET SIATION Sunset Station is currently recruiting: Lifeguards: Must be certified Guest Room Attendants: Will train mithusiastic individuals Sunset Station offers an excellent benefit plan, great career opportunities and'a FUN place to work. CALL, 231-6789 EOE/ADA OUTSIDE DISPLAY ADVERTISING SALES REP needed. A real people person. Background in newspaper advertising helpful. Will train. Salary DOE. Own transportation & Insured. Full time position. Great benefits. Fast nrrovlng fun place to wor1<. Sond Resumes to: ^t:i;'p: HBC Publications. "''^^ 2 Commerce Center Dr., HEND. 89014 E0477SS ^ Hendereon, NV 8901S e*e*eeee vat Come In TODAY, work TOMORROW! Pick/Pack Assembly Warehouse Solderers (Small parts) Wire/Cable Class C Drivers Interim Personnel -w 736-1585 EO44S01 BOULDER CITY PEDAL TOURS is seeking outgoing, animated personalities for F/T and P/T positions. Good pay plus tips as a pedicab driver in Boulder City. Applicants must be in good physical condition as well as possess excellent verbal skills. 294-2278 EOfrtit Immediate Openings in the Las Vegas, NV Area: MEDICAL ASSISTArfT • Duties: Performing general & In-depth admin. & clerical medical support functions. Quals: HS Grad; 1 yr. experience In medical or health related environment; good organization skills; computer literate. NURSE EDUCATOR Duties: Perfomiing primary prevention/inventions functions for disease detecjion screening for obstetrics/gynecology patients with specific emphasis on breast cancer prevention & detection. Quals: BS In nursing (master degree preferred); clinical nursing experience; good case mgmt.; statistic skills; good communication skills. Returnee: PTSI, 18 Koger Ctr., Ste. 203, Norfolk, Va. 23502 or Fax 757 466-8721. ATTN: C. McCoy. 757 461-6447. E038e2^ [TTj WANTED SPORTS REPORTER Applicants should have knowledge of all sports and the Henderson area. Journalism experience preferred but not required. RequlrementK Sports knowledge, hard working and excellent work ethics ^ Full Time CaU 435-7700 lor appointment. HDMENEWS 2 Commerce Center, Henderson, NV ilJl CT71 WANTED GRAPHIC ARTIST Must be fast and efficient in Macintosh Pagemaker, Illustrator and Photoshop. Reqalrements: Excellent work ethics able to meet deadlines. Part time Monday through Wednesday Call 435-7700 for appointment. HOWENEWS 2 Commerce Center, Henderson, NV iJJl 1 100 EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIf 1 '00 EMPLOYMENT OPPORTLiNITIES IMMEDIATE OPENINGS FOR Delivery Drivers Competitive wages average $10/hr., flex hrs. & flex days. Apply at: Vaile Verde & Sunset Lake Mead & Boulder Hwy. IMMEDIATE OPENINGS IN YOUR AREA BECOME A REPRESENTATIVE FOR FRIENDLY TOYS & diFTS. THE NUMBER ONE COMPANY IN PARTY PLAN. TOYS, GIFTS, CHRISTMAS, HOME DECOR. FREE CATALOG AND INFORMATION. CALL SUSAN 1-800-488-4875._ E04555Q Lake Mead Cruises is currently hiring Reservation/Ticketing Staff, Bar/Cocktail, Deckhand, Weight Staff, Night Maintenance/Security & Prep Cook. Mid-day/Mld-wk/Flex. Shifts avail. Please Apply in person at 480 Lakeshore Rd. between 9 AM-4 PM. NO PHONE CALLS PLS. EOE 6W RENTALS Warehouse/Apartment T200 Sq. Ft. w gas heat anJ Swamp cooler slop sink lots of electric sep. offk:e upstairs, 1 bd. apt. $1200/nno., 293-3480/ 595-3183. C047634 Office/Retail space avail., month-fo-month, 660 SF, $660/mo., 402 NV Hwy. BC. 294-4399. C043362 Lease now, new building, offrce space downtown BC, historical district. 1400 or 500 sq. ft. avail, now. 1400 Wyoming St., 293-7509. C047963 Commercial Warehouse for Rent or Lease. 1000 SFw/150 sf. office, $500/ mo. or 2000S w/150 sf office for $1,000. 1.000 sf, no office for $500.703 Wells Rd. BC 294-3030. C047279 Office space for rent in Boulder City. One office • from $150/mo. utilities included, to 4,000 sq. ft. Startingat SBcents/gross sq. ft./mo. Larry 2937007. C037675 •EXECUTIVE OFFICES* Small to medium suites of high quality in mediterranean style. Save $$ 1st month!! Soundproofed, wet bars, special lighting. Russell & Pecos area, call 4341997. CO40333 Industrial ^-PGO Sf SI T!>()/iiin 1130 SF. S750/H1O 1000 SF. S/OO/mo Now t.}uilclinc|s Call 480-5888 VONS CENTER 760 SF AvallabI* Naxt to Vidao Tym* NMI Siniakin, Broker 294-1444 C04SI14 TiVl* RENTALS CM Zone 672 Wells Ro^2000+ sq. ft. w/ W4P7 yard. Red Mountain Plaza-1400+ sq. ft. street level/12— H lower level-will split CM Zone Executive Offices @ 705 Yucca St-1100 sq. ft. CALL 294-1080 9-2 WEEKDAYS. C04398 CMBuilding2600tt.,900 ft.. Plush office with 1700 Shop. $1280/mo. or $139K.OWClO%down. 293-2030. C047B42 CM Building 600' w/600 ft. yard, 220 Power/Cool. $325/mo.Buy$29K.2932030. C047841 Office, perfect for training. UtJIs. pd. Sunset & Eastern. $450/mo. 8910201. C047737 NEW, small office, util. pd.. Sunset & Eastern. $350/mo. 891-0201. C047737 Marshall Plaza, office space, 1500 SF avail., 293-2760. C048184 For lease 1500 sf com. at .45 per Bf. New building BC. 293-1897. C048186 1200 sq. ft. warehouse w/sep. office. $600/mo. 293-3480/595-3183. CO47606 3500 sq. ft. Commercial building 150 sq.ft. office, 3 baths, 3 phase. Private gate, Rent/Lease $1800. 294-3030. C046834 *•* • • • • ** • • BOULDER CITY • • Offices for LMM -k it $1S0/$175ino. ir ^ wlvttfr a elec. Included.^ Above Boulder Theatre ^ 293-1283 ^ •*•*•*•• *'VT* Office 1130SF. S800/rno ryiust see. 550 SF. S700 Now Ijuildings Call 480-5888 HOUSE RENTALS I HOUSE RENTALS FOR RENT: Avail. 5-21, 3 bd72 ba., 2 car, River Mt. area. $925/mo. + dep. Call Elaine 592-2046. HR47730 2bd./1ba.Houseforrent. Available approx. June 10th. 640 Ave. K. $675. 293-1917. HR48023 4 bd., 2 ba., cul-de-sac, near Basic H.S. $950/mo. + dep. Call Jack 45401 60/4341475. HR48066 BC 3 bd./2 ba., 2 car gar., $950 First. Last, Dep. Fenced yard. 5283000. HR48121 Great 3 bd/2 ba., Del Prado, Ig. fam. rm., auto sprinklers front & roar. 2 car gar. Avail. aboutJune 7th. $950/mo. +dep. Call 293-5311. HR48118 Immaculate 3 bd72 ba., 2 car, Horizon & College area, w/d, frig., immed. move-In. No pets or •mokera. $950/mo. • dep. Call 294-1515. HR48n5 ^ SUN CITY 55+ 2 bd-2 ba. New $950 per month, Sunshine Realty-8978409. HR48143 BC-3 bd., 2 ba., 2 car gar., RV park., fenced yd., $995 + depa., 2934357. HR48288 Custom 3 bdrm. Boulder City home rent/lease option. IMMEDIATE MOVE-IN homey, clean, goK course area newly painted & pool/spa. $500.00 dep. $1150.00 per mo. 616-0347or 3750620. HR48142 SUN CITY 55+ 2 Bd. 2 Ba. New $950 per month Sunshine Realty 8978409. HR48127 3bd./1-1/2ba. off street parking, big kitchen. $950/nx>. + deps. 2935726,10A-2P, Eve.. 2948428. HR48159 4 bd/2 ba., 2 car gar., fenced bk. yd., Palo Verde Dr.. $975/nfX). + dep. No pets. Call Al at Jensen's Realty, 5643333. HR47999 New 2-Story View Home, 3br./2.5ba./2cargaryAII New Appl. Blinds/Close to SchTShop $ 1.25d per column inch per issue Very nice mobile home for sale in Villa Hermosa. $19,950. Please call 565-7348|j^ 1700 MOBILE HOMES Big House, Small House, and those in between; We have many homes to be seen. Mike 1 -888-2246510. MH48039 Land-Home for sale. 3 BR/2 BA. A real dream. Gary 1-888-224-6510. MH48037 Affordable, Comfortable, Living. 3 BR, 2 BA, Less than $30,000. Call Dee at 1-888-224-6510. MH48035 Beautiful New Triple Wide Home, just an'ived. Many options, visit us at Oakwobd Homes in Pahrump. Please ask for Jerry 1-888-224-6510. MH47779 Big House, Small House, and those in between. We have many homes to be seen. Mike 1 -888-2246510. MH47777 Big Family? Big House, 1920Sq. Ft..4br.,2Full baths. Fireplace, 2x6 Walls. A must see. Ask for Vince only. 1-702727-8304. H^H47775 Land/Home for sale. 1996 Champion, 3 BR, 2 BA., A real dream at only $73,000. Gary 1-888224-6510. MH47773 Affordable, Comfortable, Living. 3 BR, 2 BA, Less than $30,000. CaU Dae al .^1..S8S-224^510. MH47771 GINGERWOOD-55+, nice corner lot, 2 bd.,1 3/ 4 baths, 20x52. 1977 Washington in mint conditin. ONE OWNER! $32,400. ANCHOR REALTY, ask for Katie, 2935757. MH48078 Rent to Own or Lease w/ option. 2 bd, Mobile Home, BC only on lot. If necessary we will just rent. Recently opened a franchise in BC. Please callMayra at 294-1689. MH47925 1972 Leisure 14x56, 2 bdVI ba. in BC. $15,000 OBO. Call Bret 294-8888. MH47563 Nice & Affordable in popular Coronado Estates. 2 bd./2 ba., workshop, 3 sheds/2 car carports, 60x100. $99,900. CENTURY 21 Boulder Dam Realty, Jennifer 293-4663. f/H46068 HERlSERgCH == BEST FAMILY PARK 4 bed. double wide, $65(Vmo. 3 bed. double wide, $625/rno. 2 bed. (Ingle wide, tSOO/mo. Incl. space, vacant, ready to move in now! For Sale OAC Co-Op. 525-2494, Dale OAKRIDGE TOWNHOMES 2 Bedroom, 11.'2 Bath, over 1000 sq. ft., sep. laundry room w washer/dryer hookup, private patio! $600 month. $499 moves you in!! 565-1499. CR47406 Pecos & Wigwam, excel, retail/office location. Occup. June, 99. Call Chuck at MDL Group, 388-1800. C047917 HD 1 bd. condo. End Unit, few blocks from Jokers Wild, $500/mo. • dep. 775-727-8869. CR47659 1*1*. WCl. BC 3 bd./2 ba. condo, all appls. + micro, W/D, frplc, window treatments, 2-car gar. pool/ spa, RV parking avail., NO PETS, 1 yr. lease, NO Smokers, tdOO/mo.. 1st, last+dep, 294-4420. CR47839 BC condo, avail, now, near schools, 2 Ig. bd., 1 1/2 ba., Indryrm., kitchen appls., Ivrm. w/frpl., dning area, central air & heat, no destructive pets, refs. req., $795/nx). $795 dep., 293-5054. CF(48094 Avail. June 15, 2 bdrm. • • Den, 2-1/2 baths, cov'd. pkg., akylites, excel, cond. $900/mo. -f deps. & ref. Linette, 294-3100. Lake Mead Area Realty, cmaoeo Spotless Condo for rent. 2 b6J2 ba., gated community, washer & dryer, frig., fireplace, swimming pool & work out rm. $795/mo. 1200 8q.ft. Sm. pets OK. Racetrack Rd. HD. 558-0801/564-7772. -y

PAGE 38

• I • • wn ni ^^ ..Liiv-q-^ I f ^ s ^ i^' f^^i i r^ \ \% ^ *^\'^^^\\%V%^ ^ ^ ^^^^WfWWWWW^^^^^^^^ ^^^ l^5^ Pg 14 Panorama Thursday, May 20, 1999 Thursday, May 20,1999 Panorama Page 15 I \\ t^ t*^^BS!!T^ 1900 CONDO RENTALS BC2BD.,2BA. upstafrs condo nearschools $750 first, last, dep. Clean. 294-1663. CR48177 HD Townhouse, 2 bd., 2 1/2ba.,allappl.,W/D,no pets, $675 + dep. Call 263-4691. CR48054 BC-2bd/2ba.. w/d, pool, $700 + sec. 293-1359. CR47939 1185sq. ft. office, excel location, Sunset & Valle Verde. .90 net. Ca Chuck at MDL Group, 388-1800. C047916 1800 CONDO SALES By owner Boulder Hills, 900 sq. ft., 2 level condo, totally redone, 90 yds. carpet & new kitchen tile, new dw. & ac unit, parklike grounds w/pool, next to schools. Asking $64,000. 293-3547. CS48151 GV 2 Bd-2 Ba. Co/ido Super Buy! $84(900. Susan Sunshine Realty -897-8409. CS48131 Immaculate upgraded townhouse, 1500 + S.F. 2 yrs. old, gated community. Garage w/cabinets, fenced yd., Italian stone tile flooring. Laundry rm., fireplace, Ig. nook. Priced Thousands under Market. $106,900. 451-2605, Bobbie Lenzie. CS48085 Boulder City, 2 bd., 2 1/2 ba., balcony with storage rm., fresh paint, new vinyl, carpeting, verticles t/ 0. Brkfst. bar, ceiling fan, community pool. LAKE VIEW! $122,000. Ownerlicensee, Call Katie, Anchor Realty, 293-5757. CS48079 Boulder City Spanish Steps, new 1148SF 2 bd./2 ba., 1 cov'd. pkg., 1 uncov'd. pkg., 1 RV pkg. Assoc. pool a spa $89(Vmo. Option to buy, call 497-2345. MARINA COVE TOWNHOUSE-2 levels, 3 bed., 3 1/2 ba., 2 car garage, lake view forever, 2 way fireplace, brkfst. bar & more! Seller would consider lease or lease/option. Asking $204,906. Call Katie, AncKor Realty, 2935757. CS48080 'Boulder Square* quiet 2 bd., pool, newly painted. By owner, 2940184 eves/434-1997 days. 0838388 3 Bdrim., 2 Bth* Al Modwn Townhouse Only $79,9S0 It's carpeted, has a patio, 4 the refrigerator, washer & diyer included. Jerry, 558^)877 CENTURY 21 JR REALTY jum Boulder City Spanish Steps, rww 1148 SF 2 bdJ2 ba., 1 cov'd. pkg., 1 uncov'd. pkg., .1 RV pkg. Assoc. pool & spa $950/mo. Option to buy, call 497-2345. Boulder City Spanish Steps, new 2328 SF 3 bd./3.5 ba., attached garage & RV pkg. HOA pool & spa, $165,000. Call Qeorge O 497-2345 ,.,.,,, 2000 ROOM RENTALS Furn. Master bd. & ba. Gate security, pool, sauna & weight rm. All util. incl. $450/mo. & no dep. 558-9469f rom 8 am2 pm. RR48046 HD-Pvt. Studio, $400, N/ S. BC-Pvt. studio, $375, N/S. incl. utilities plus dep. 293-6799. RR48029 Rm. & Ba., pvt. entry, utily. incl. $400. 5580038, RR47985 Priv. rm., $85/wk., 1st & last rent, $30 cleanino & damage dep., askfor Bill, 566-6777. RR47889 Room for Rent, $350/ MO, Utilities & Cable incl. Pool, Jacuzzi 4 Work out rm. 432-3961 RR46747 Non-smoker, working gentleman, 565-1600 work. 564-6477 hon9. RR47884 HD-ROOM FOR RENT, furn. orunfurn, $425/mo. •f dp. • 1/3 utils. N/S only. Must like cats. 5854199 ext. 2. RR43060 I Want to rent a room in a honw wfth tuH use ot facilities. Call Wil at 6472450, don't Iv. msg.. keep trying if not there RR38959 NEVADA INN, "A Friendly Place To Stay" Budget cottages to cfe luxe suites, beautiful pool A whirlpool, parking for boats and RVi Call 702293-2044 for rates and rvMrvations. Our suites are three room apartment •ize. with Kitchen. RR43061 Room Mate wanted to share monthly exp. New 3 bd. w/3 car gar. in HD. Ptaase call 55is-8232 or 477-4793 2100 APARTMENT RENTALS GEORGIA AVENUE APARTMENTS rents start at $650. 293-7775. AR48183 Ridge Apts. in BC, 2 bdrm. No pets. Lease for 12 mo. 293-0420. AR48185 2 bdyi ba., central air, all appls., $710. 293-6221. AR47955 Ridge Apts. in BC, 2 bdrm. No pets. Lease for 12 mo. 293-0420. AR47655 HD-1bd.,1ba.,allappls., Indryrm. on premises, parking. Sec. 8 OK, $490/ mo. + sec, 489 East Merlayne, pg. 563-0715 ask for Katie. AR48001 Apt. management person/couple to manage & maintain 15 apts. in exchange for rent. Prefer retired. 293-7430. EO47908 LG. DUPLEX FOR RENT extra Ig. 1 1/2 bd.. Old Town Boulder, walking distance to all facilities, nice quiet neighborhood, 518 Ash St. Call 293-6081. $600/ mo. AR47909 2100 APARTMENT RENTALS • For rent 1 bd. cottage^ furn. or unfurnished, clean & quiet for semiretired or steady working person. Non-smoking oi drinking. All utilities exp elec. No pets. $400/mo. + dep.. Call 565-6310 after 10a.m. AR48149 1 bd. apt., $365/mo. 4 3 bd. house, $650/mo. Mature adults. No pets, all util. incl. exp. elec. 5645779/565-9848. AR47768 Loft for Rent. Priv. 4 furn. Call Teddy to see at 663 Ave. D. 293-1716. AR47693 1 bd. apt. for rent. $550/ nrto. incl. util. Call 2933480/595-31 83. AR47605 2 bd. apt. near downtown park & schools. Laundry on premises. All appl. $520. AR48067 293-6885. 4 Unes'&^ ROB'S MOTEL Weekly rentals KITCHENETTES Cable Clean & Safe Spacloua Rms. 563-0715 2 bd. near downtown schools 4 park. $525, 293-6885. AR46037 2 Bd., 1 Ba. near Worrell Park. $525/mo. 5644243. AR48068 BC 2 bd./1 ba. duplex, 548 Date St. $600/mo. 294-0648. AR48119 APARTMENTS AS LOW AS $275 a Month furnished 564-6952 .. KITCHENETTES STARVIEW MOTEL Boulder City 293-1658 Advertise in the NEWS Monte Cario Apts. Very nice 2 bd. Apt. for Rent All elec. & eecurlty Srs. welcome uum< $490 mo. Pla. call 558-2099 ARCTIC DESERT PROPERTIES Residential lot for sale, $80,000. 294-1213 $300 off l8t Months Rent Quiet Gated Community Free basic cable, basltetbail, btx| area 2 pools, spa & more. Under new management Lakewood Cove 1100 N Center, HD AIUTTM ARCTIC DESERT PROPERTIES 2 bd/2 ba. adult apt in quiet BC, no pets. $650/ mo. + dep. Senior disc. Avail 4-20. Residential lot for sale, $80,000. Lewis Home 2800 sq. ft., 4 bd./3-1/2 ba., 3 car gar., gorgeous back yd. w/spa. /Asking $315,000. 294-1213 AR47278 APARTMENTS IN HENDERSON Clean, Quality 1-2-3 Bedroom Apartments in Henderson •Central Air & Heat • Appliances •Blinds • Carpets • Water paid •Washer/Dryer Available Apartments are $420 & up per month, newly remodeled, spacious nesr schools, parit & shopping. 565-7028 AR47575 WELCOME HOME TD COMFORTABLE LIVING CASA DE ALICIA M&IVI II APTS. (gj Call Today ^ 293-1615 2300 RENTALS 2300 RENTALS RENTALS Spanish Steps Condo. 1 at Or., 2 bdrm., 2 tatt), appL ITSSAno. • deps. LsOotee VHa Condo. 2 b*in., 11/2 bstti, t7S(Mno. I3 bdrm., 2 balh. IQ. 1st fir.. fourplsK apt, tasofmo. 4 bdrm., 2 bedi, 2 esr gsr. home tM^tonosd yard, t12Safimo. • dsps. 3bdrm..2beth.2cfgBf.homsiiriv s ls yard, sew mo. • dsps. DICK BLAIR REALTY 293-2171 McM ^KfLASSIFIED p.m. fridajr 12 wks. aval. Bcsi ftroni at Sol Mei [Holsl. Sspt/Oct.' 293-5558 2400 REAL ESTATE FSBO in BC "Wonderful tri level near golf course' 4 BDy3 BTK "Pool qtr. ac^e, $215,000, 2936871.RE47930 NO BULL! 3 bedroom, 2 bath fiome for $24,995!! Receive a complete wholesale fiome price list witfi brochures and floor plans before you shop. 1 -8e8-720-0d60. RE47996 FORECLOSED HOMES. Low or $0 down! Gov't. & bank repos being sold now! Fantastic savings! Financing available (800) 501-1777, ext. 3399. RE48019 Needabigfiouse? 1920 sq. ft., 4 br., 2 full baths, fireplace, 2x6 walls. A must see. Ask for Vince 1-702-727-8304. RE48038 FSBO in BC. "Wonderful tri level near golf course" 4 BD/3 BTH. "Pool qtr. acre, $215,000. 2936871.RE47929 GREAT FAMILY HOME Golf Course W/Lake View, 3 BD, pool. Reduced $10,000-^ $5,000 Carpet allowance. $348,000. Call 293-3051, Rhonda or Scott 7338805. RE47795 For Sale By Owner Zoned for Horses, 1/2 Acre +. 3 bd/2 ba.. Corner Lot in Enterprise Township. Asking Price $140,000. 361-6836. RE47698 .CLASSIFIED 4 p.m. Friday for Tuesday issue, Noon Tuesday for Panofama^ BYOWNERGreatSBD./ 2 BA. 1200 SF. Lots of upgrades pricedforquKk sale at only $117,500. 293—0038 or 496-1575.. RE47479 'Boulder Square Condo* quiet 2 bd., pool, newly painted. $72,000. By owner 294-0184 eves/ 434-1997 days. R^47^ ^E47 >VHf PVH Real Estate, Inc. fias 1 of the largest selections of commercial & residential lots, mobile homes, Ig. acreage, home & income property in Pahrump, 1-70 2-7270445. RE43409 GOVT REPO HOMES. All areas svailabls. For information, call Chris Biles, 496-3283. RE44591 HD 3 bd. home, fenced Ig. yd. RV parking, freeway access. $75,900. New loan, call MCS properties. 564-6742. RE46451 B.C. DUPLEX Nice Condition with lame detached Garage, Fenced Yard, Great Location. Call Bret 293-0000, Desert Sun Realty. RE47642 SSBO in BC. "Wonderful tri level near golf course" 4 BD/3 BTH "Pool qtr. acre, $215,000, 2936871. RE45948 BY OWNER. Great 2 bdrm., 1-1/2 ba. townhouse, veiy close to schools, shopping. Immed. Occupancy. $95,000 (about $700/ mo.) call Ed 702-2946569. RE42218 BC Custom 2 story, 4 bd/3 ba., great lake & mountain view. Wrap around upper deck. Rv drive, mature landscape. $274,000. 293-0450. RE47214 Home for sale by owner, 4b/2 ba., 3 car gar., covered patio. Across from O'Callaghan Park in HD. 437-2493. RE47341 HORSE PROPERTY in Hend, Newer Honne with Lots of Charm. Very Good Cond. • Great Price $164,900 Bret 293-0000 Desert Sun Realty. RE47460 2400 REAL ESTATE FSBO. 667 Ave. H. Charming 2 bd./l ba., Historc home. Lg. fenced bkyd. with lawn. Shade trees, shed, alley access & pkng. $109,900. 2937977. RE48099 "FORECLOSED GOVT. HOMES" Save up to 50% or more! Minimum or no down payment! For listings call now 7 days a week. (800) 429-3660, ext. H-5521.RE48017 IDAHO MNT. PROPERTY 5 AC $29,900. 1 hour Boise. New, premiere ranch acreage w/ private lake access. Set amidst 10OO's of acres of Boise Nat'l. forest. Surveyed, perc, waranty deed. Excellent access, fully buildable. Great financing. Call now 800488-5506. RE48021 Advertise in the NEWS 2400 REAL ESTATE 2400 REAL ESTATE FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS... Call Henderson's f 1 Real Estate Team BRENDA BIRD-FAIRLESS QRI, CRS Ufatim* Handwton ffatidant 564-1127 WENDY WILLIAMS 37S-1689 Over $160 Million in Sales 33 years combined Real Estate experience! • •e ooueu cnrruiiON TEAM Re797i -HCNDCRSON•1994 HIGH MESA DR.: Del Wtbb Sun City! Built in 98 uid pKkcd wilh upgrades! A real betuty! I33 sq. ft. 2 bdmt., 2 bith, 2 car girage. $189,900. .909 HARVEST SEASON CT: 2 itor> biUis, eorncT -"'" — • SOLD bdr.,3 prige. M. iirai.m, iMt ire* It more! Better than New! $1374M0. -NOilTHWE.*T•7li RUBBER TREE AVE: Better itian new! 4 bdmi., M/2 K^earfSgofc^ lyttcnL Built In'W.openiitcben, tmtnoorplin $124,900. BOULOCR CITY HOMCSBOULDER CUV GOLF COURSE AREA •156 INVERNESS CT. 2085 sq. 11,4 bed., 2 bith, 3 car garage, huge 111x192 comer, cul-de-nc lot! Room to roam! I8x3 heated sports poo Vipa w/ralsed sun deck, covered patio w/mlst system. Basketball ct. RV parking. Island kitchen. Great floor plan & more! $290,000. A Must icc! •1S37 MANCHA: Best Buy! Cutton built home! IS90 sq. ft, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 2 car garage, MIy landscaped with • child safe healed pool and spa. Roof, pool/ spa & home are in great condithm! New appliances, tile kitchen floon. light carpet and more, a see $159/100. •217 RED ROCK RD: Best Buy In Lake Mewl View Est! Great rtews, custom, triievel home, 2750 sq. ft., perfect kitchen, open floor 0m m, 2 maHer i|ta. e rwnB,2i leaping, loaded w/apgradet OerUnd 2 car garage for a 20' boiL $389,000. •1433 PUEBLO: 5 bdrm, 4 baths, 4H0 sq. fL BisemenI has 2 nlended Uving/ramily rm. quarten with thelrown icparale entrance. 9*i335 k)t upgraded lush paiilikc landscaping. Stunning mt & chy views. $399,000. >30 ARIZONA: 3 bdrm. or 2 and den custom adobe houie! A true work of art! Step in to Old Mesico a real stunning home with Ions of charm! A must see! Com. plelely detailed out In Southwest style Imported Mexicui tile thniML$25SJ)00. -BOULDER CITY CONDOS'701 CAPRI IIIA: No stain! ComcrjiLjult_anaBd level! Upfiad SOLDIK aacts stay! Act IM! 1044 sq. ft. $99,500. 110TOFSAIL-BayviewcDndo,llu • ew. 2 bd, 2 ba-f doi, flipl, 2 car gar, icar poaL Lake view, 1348 SF. $149,90a Very Modvaled!! IMake AnOflW!Rdicid! •434RANGERCr.,dumiiilake ml vtewi!! 2 large rm, 2 ftiii baths, new vinyl floors, lush carpel, fteiiUy pahited, formal dhiing rm. w/inolMd gtaai, large great rm, 2 car gange. atrium, k>ts more! Redaccd!$lt9/NWLOW. VACANT UND1030 ACRES. Great location! UdllUes acroa street ned I/^2 • aster plan Light IndustrialCMUwrclal! Reduced $375,000. 151 Pelkan Wy. M. Boalder OabR/VtatncarLKMead.Tons *f aoeaHi*! MMIvaled! Approi. 32x70 iM.$32,M. Sandra Deubler Hwe • lop prodDcer li ymir comer! ft Double Centurion Ageal 271-3277 TollFrtcl48-227-042 E-mail mdniKidaaLctMii GOLF COURSE-$325,000 1703 ST. ANDREWS COURT 2 STORY, 3,400 SQ.FT. FORMER MODEL HOME MANY EXTRAS SHOWN BY APPOINTMENT 450-1000 OR 293-6168dofteon O goMccofn nB474i? Prudential 'C.J'/ **^ Jensen's Realty Tliinking of Buying or Stiling? The Rock is tho answerl TIM PrMtanttel JMMAM'S ilMlty S^aciaHsM In Ktlii mi aK o wii w rctol and Proparty ti Henderson 564-3333 ffl^ FREE HOME WARRANTY SELLER'S COVERAGE When you list your home for sale with me. LARRY SHAFFER Century 21 Moneyworld *" 565-4100 • "Just call JUDY" 497-1553 1-800-852-1726 UhcnliMMOaolxom JUDY HENKEN8 ABR, QRI REALTOR • Propwty Mgr. For honest i nllable npnatntathn wHhallyournalutattnMib^ Condominiums OVAL' 2 BO • 2 BM all appliancos New $94,795 OVAL 2 BO' 2 BH' all appliances $76,500 HD' 2 80 2 BH All appliances Gated $76,500 Boulder CHy Lake Mtn. Eatatet FonnerModel' 1536SF"2 BD*2BH*3CarGar*3 Caiport RV Park Extras Loaded $182,752 One Story Penoramic VIewsl 1720 SF • 3 BD 2 BH 3 Car Calico Terrace & Priced right at $179,251. 4 BD • 2 BH 2 Car • $124,900 VA Contr/Sale Land Build your dream home on this .340 acre of land in Henderson. Utilities at curb' negotiable at $60,000 KNAPP REALTY {Jsm^ I 21 Century 21 MoneyWorld *m^^ Wfei#r8trcr—"^' Henderson, Nv 89015 564-2515 Two Great Cnpa Cabana Townhouses — First... 2 bdrm., 1.5 baths, 1304 sq. ft., priced at $83,500. Next .n 2 bdrms., 2.5 baths, 1412 sq. ft., priced at $83,500. Both have attached 2 car garages, RV parking, pool, tentiis, association, etc.... Call and ask for David Bower or Marty Mitchell at 564-2515. MLS #100456 & 101571 Picture Perfect — This 4 bdrm. Henderson home features an open & flowing rioorplan, country kitchen w/island & breakfast bar, gr^at room, Berber carpet. Big inground pool on an extra lg. comer lot. Priced to sell at $166,900. Call now & ask for Gloria or Janet at 592-6411 ofy, 564-2515. MLS #1034100 Northwest Custom Home-Rustic & Wooiisy — Located on a large half acre lot this beautiful custom home features vaulted ceilings/knotty pine custom tile, great kitchen with pantry, upgraded carpet and many other extras. Priced to sell at $247,000. Call now to preview & ask for Dcbi at 493-6043 or 564-2515. MLS #107016LM "New On The Market" Just in time for summer, park-like back yard with pool. 3 bdrms., 2 baths. This one story makes life easy. Must see to appreciate. Priced at $ 169.000. Call and ask for Saundra at 283-0552 or 564-2515. MLS #1055198 ONE .STOP .SHOPPrNfl ONE LOCATION • TWO GREAT SERVICES CENTURY 21 MONEYWORLD AND IRWIN MORTGAGE I OWORTJITY Irwin Mortgage EACHOmCEIS WOEPBOENTLY OWNED ANDOf>SWTE0. 2400 REAL ESTATE 2400 REAI ESTATE ^ QUAUTYSERVKE 1997 Boulder Dam Realty, Inc. 1664 Nevada Hwy. Boulder City, Nevada 8900S YOUR Li2CAL BOULDER CITY OFFICE 293-4663^ ^ 1.800-228-8358 C21BCNVMl4)0in Advertise in the Nem OPEN HOUSE 1701 RED MOUNTAIN DR. SUN-MAY 23—12-4. RE481SS • •••••••••• ••••••• • -k BIRCH ST. BC HISTORIC HOME • • 3 bd., 1 ba., garage, storage, • •k workshop, central air, teak flooring • ir Neal SIniakIn, Owner/Broker • • 294-1444 ^„*^ ••••••••••••••••••• 5 BDRM., 2-3/4 BATH MOBILE, OVERSIZED CARPORT, 2 SHEDS, CORNER LOT, A GREAT FAMILY HOME ONLY $110,000. LAKE MTN. ESTS. 2 BDRM., 1-3/4 BATH, BONUS RM., DRY WALL T/0 XTRA DEEP LOT. REDUCED TO $125,000. 4 BDRM., 2-1/2 BATH, LEWIS HOME, CLOSE TO OASIS PK., CERAMIC TILE, RV-PKY., & MORE. EASY TO VIEW. TWO CONTIGUOUS LOTS ON 'B' HILL, OVERLOOKING CORALS, SOLD SEPARATELY OR AS ONE $89,000 EACH. VIEWS VIEWS VIEWS LAKE MTN. ESTS. 2 BDRM., 1-3/4 BATH, LOTS OF BUILTINS. LG. ISLAND KIT. W/ WALKIN PANTRY, ALL APPLIANCES. ONLY $169,900. LAKE MEAD AREA REALTY LINETTE 294-3100 • •*••••*•**-A* BOULDER crrv W Briu Stoiw 2-8ty, approx. 2208 sq. It., 4 1x173-1/2 ba., finished "K basement, new construction $199,000. "IT Brter Stone -Single sloiy, 2 bd./2-1/2 ba., approx. 1620 sq. It., finished X basemeni, new constiuction $167,000. yf B-HIII-Customhomew/approx.4,077sq.ft.,4bd73ba.,3caratlached'X' gardbe, plus 28x36 garage, lovely wateriall lagoon pool $685,000. • if nm • 2tloiycuMomhome, approx. 3511 sq.lt,5bd73-1/Sbe.,2 '^ ~ lamify rmk. w^replace."master bd w/balc6ny,'?ca'r'MbfiM'gar, if wonderful city and mountain views, zoned lor horses $470,000. i( Spanish Steps Condo AJI appliancesll 2 bdV2 ba. ceramic tile, very if nice unit. $95,000. if Manufactuted Home 2 bd72 ba., 1 car gar., carport, well cared for if home, all appliances Included $99,900 H ENDERSO N if Ml Tnifflei-3 bdS ba., 2 (SOLDI* '386 Q S122.900. Condo-2 bd^ ba., 2 car gar., A|)pr6x. 1106 sq ft $94,900. JL COMMERCIAiyLIGHT INDUSTRIAL Red Mountain PIsza 40 x 60 Pad with Nevada Hwy. Exposure, JL Includes City approved BIdg. plans, $175,000. For Sale 3 phase power, approx. 4,500 sq. ft. warehouse w/addltional JL. office approx. 750 sq. It. plus apartment approx 750 sq. ft., 2 14 It. '^ ovtitMad doors $380,000. ^ FOR LEASE 12 It. overhead, approx. 900 sq. It., $700 nwTlnciudes * For JL, uWltias. A ^ 709 Yucca-offices warehouse, approx. 1,030 sq.ft. $750 mo. Tenant^ ^ pays utilities. A ^ 70SFooltilH-3phass. approx. 2.000sq. II. offices warehouse, 14ft. ^ 1 overhead door. $1,200 mo. ^^ i ^ CALL APRIL faf "^ • JL RED MOUNTAIN REALTY mTZL if 294-1500 OR 888-733-6881 '~ • %E4.IO7 • *••*••••••••• • ••*•*•'*•••••• • ""•'" BOULDER CITY • t Lain MMd Vlw EtUrtti Custom home In prestigious i ^ area, 2X6 construction. Spacious rooms, Island kitchen. 3 ^ <^bd72-1/2t., 3 car gar. $299,000. ^ JL. Qotf CoufM Home 4 bd72-3/4 ba., 2552 sq. ft. lower JL level bed & bath, family ro^, country kitchen, lagoon •^ pod, RV Pkg., 4 car gar, $327,500. if if Room For Evefyone r er>i"r>T '"''"*• • ^^'^^ if ba., separate family rcLsOfcEUroom, r"' • A-$179,900. pool, 3 car gar. • ^Ownr8aytSell-4bd72-1/2ba.,nicefk>orplan,separate if famHy room, pool ft spa, over 3/4 acre lot, 3 car gar. X $289,500. .^ if Omt lake View • Be autlfullv uDo radad Lakfltrae ennhn, if 3bd/l-3/4ba.,vtewsff ^ SOL D I w & covered patio $136,000. if Quality Home, Quail ter&guest bedroom bd., 3-1/2 ba, 2790 "llt^ter^^y custom laatures. 4 if sq ? rfKr ..ul home Inskle and out! • "^ GoK course views $369,000. "^ Lake Mead View Eatalaa k}ts from $89,900. CALL BETH AT {^ RED MOUNTAIN REALTY *^-* '*' 294-1500 OR 888-733-6861 *•*••••••••* if if One of a kind work of art in Boulder City. Sellers moving out of state. $225,000, make offer. Agent Sandra Deubler 271-3277 y 2400 REALESTATF ?400 REAL ESTATE HouMtarMabfOnMr. (rCa#anN>kA(. MMAba,amas|Ma*, '^"^^^" Iw. ISiMM^VRL cm as tee M, gardm ataa, Maa.g>spaB.tilea*tt • dioal, pK rse. esMar, golf, (rMMiraeeaM.tl4IK. Caa864-098 What art point*? HowdothifyafiMt tlwIoMigM? CirtlSlMrylat 369-1655 for FREE InfoniuUon fmit FRIENDLY. PROFESSIONAL f^^ REAL ESTATE SERVICE Jr^Sfc-r 3PECIALIZINQ IN HgMPgRSnl^iT BOULDER CITY! Our Uttlngt am MHing quIcUy— Please call u* If you are considering telling your home or landl **Call office for additionai information & other propartiee for sale!** Knapp Realty—566-8185 Ellie Knapp, Broker/Owner GRI, CRS E-mail: knappre0juno.com 827 So. Boulder Hwy., Henderson, NV 89015 4niwOut of town? Call toll-free: 1-877-566-8696 tSHMfcrn rjEm POTENTIAU POTENTIAL! Fixer-upper w/ many pluses. Dow n town Henderson location, hugs lot, central AC/heet, almost new roof. Home has 3 bedrooms, 1 iMrth ft priced at only $74,900 DOWMTOWN HENDERSON! 2 bedroom home In need of work, large fenced lot w/ multi-famHy zoning, convsnient to shops, cesinos, stc. All at a "fix-me-up" price of Just $79,900 3t3 BRING YOUR TOOTHBRUSH MOVE RIGHT IN! Immaculate ineide A out! Custom home hes 3 bedrooms, 2.75 baths, 2470 SF, 2 car garage -f 28 x 26 detached finished garage w/ beth. Hugs country kitchen w/ftustom cal)lnets A upgraded appliances. RV gates A sewer dump, too. $249,950 HAVE YOUR MORNING COFFEE....on the patio of this 3 bedroom, 2 bath home overlooking ttM mountaina. You'll love tite open, airy floor plan, master suit* sitting room, window seat in Wtctien A great iMckyardI A great prtoe at $16t,000 ROOM FOR EVERYONE A EVERYTHINQI Beautifully designed custom horns, 3600 8F, 3 hill beths, 3 bed r oom s or more, 4 pattos, 2 firsplaoes, tiled beicony, 3 cer gerags, full RV hookups, vehlds A equipment yard. $279,000 Ws helped over 400 buyers ceN Henderson "HOME" \n 199$. Tfikikktg of selling? Cell the oompeny thet gels results, Century 21JRR*elty. 564-6546 101 E. Horizon Dr. (president 'sjiwanf EACH OrnCt MDCKNOmUT OMMCO MD OKMAS 2400 REAL ESTATE 2400 REAL ESTATE 2400 REAL ESTATE QV • 4 bdJ2 ba., over 1 qtr. acre lot, pool, ponds, covered patio, sap. work shop. Hardwood floon, backyd., paradiee A room to roam. CallValerle White to eeetoday.$174,999. 281-5541, Ownet/Ucenaee. Boxed Ad8 *B^ per column Inch pef leaue 4Unes*6'*iue CQihrots 2400 REAL ESTATE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS 535 Cherry Street CtMCk oel iMa llH new honw tn ttM heart of Bouktor CHy's HMertc OWriel Over ISOO sq. ft Hh 3 bd, 14/4 ba. and M/2 car ^riga. TMa l a loely home wWi euatofli upgradss throughout Offsrad by ONMr tlM^SOO. Can Susan at 293-1SS4 or 290447. 4 lines *6*Ji^ B 0 dobcW) Boxed Ad8 >8< per column Inch per leeue BC Rdobe Realty t£} BC ADOBE REALTY (702) 293-1707 ^1 Out of Town 1-800-553-8081 Email — Cristinale aol.com For more information and td view these properties, call: ANNA, DIANNE, DOTTIE, JOAN, KIM, RHONDA, SHERRY OR SUE 1416 Pueblo Drive 1593 Bermuda Dunes 1566 Brentwood Drive 1121 Cumminge Drive 521 Date Street 505 Dee Circle 883 Fairway Drive 1408 Fifth Street 1404 Garnet Place 1815 Hilton Head Drive 1029 Key* Drive 620 Kings Place 100 Laguna Lane 4 HOMES $389,000 533 Shoshone Wy. $315,000 1568 Brentwood Dr. $242,000 100 Sea Breeze L^ne, $181,900 572 Seventh Street $ 98,500 1538 Sherri Lane $447,500 1568 Torrey Pine* Drive $333,000 640 Ave M $165,000 790LoTavie $364,900 634 Valencia $292,900 Henderson $980,000 2127 Eagle Watch $145,000 526 Amethyst Avenue $315,000 873 Bergamont CONDO/TOWNHOMES $142,000 $319,500 $279,900 $119,900 $299,000 $279,000 $106,900 $185,000 $399,000 $335,000 $120,000 $125,000 870 Avenue B units 703,303, 904, 906...From $59,900 1303 Darlene Way • units 103B, 103C, 202B, 402C, 403A...From $63,900 700 Capri Drive, Unit 30B $102,000 101 Lantern Bay Drive $135,900 698 Freedom Lane $210,000 50OTara Court $115,900 647 Florence Drive $229,000 540 Tare Court $179,900 596 Lk. Michigan m4-^ MANUFACTURED HOMES $139,900 1709 Red Mountain Drive $104,900 LAND FOURTEEN LOTS from which to chooee, ranging In price from $39,000 to $350,000 BUSINESS/COMMERCIAL ^ Call for information on: For sale or lease Warehouae/Offices/Sales Room i Uet your property with the LARGEST small town real estate office ^' with LOCAL knowledge of market values. Fully licensed Property Management Service available. 2400 REAL ESTATE Want to Buy a Home? Go to www.compugar.com. Free qualifying completely confidential. Download App. and fax to (775) 727-3773 Aftn: Gary. RE47500 RE47BeC Total Don Payment No Cloelng Coets BattarttwiModel2BR. Huge, Huge Qaraga Many Upgrades Ruse QNmora B964<8S Ijikit Meed Aiee Realty EZ LOANS CALL FC MORTGAQE (702) 294-2855 RE4i26e REAL ESTATE AaENTS NEEDED Fof buty Hindifton ofAcf Cel S HOME LOANS PuraffiBM Of ndlniMc QoodorBadCndH 100% FinsnoinQ AVWMM CMI WwTsn M Pwmlngton Mortgagt 897-5450_ 2 Bad., 1 S8i Dupin Tlf t ns 2ba*s.,tbi 7SITeO S bs*. Dan, 1 katti, 2 ear gamss. Laka VIssr iaae 1200 3 VSVSi., 2 BMn OOflOO Me 4 Nl Call B.C. Adobe Realty ivo rvmuMw*9tQ reee> Know the whole story! CaliSliarylat 369-1955 for FREE Intonnation • 2700 VEHICLES 2700 VEHICLES How to Ngotiato Iha Price of • Naw Built Contractor. dNSharytat 389-1965 for _^^ FREE Information. 'ISSmSlSStTm' jtkUB. Howtobuya CirilShaiylat 389-1966 for FREE Monnalton c L A S S i F I E D S W O a K 4 0 5 • 7 7 0 0 2700 VEHICLES 2400 REAL ESTATE •••••••••*•* BOUIDER CfTY • dn tlie QoH Couree i, Rancli style lioine JL w/pod, ovar 3000 aq. ft WIB.OOO Call BCAdotM Realty 203-1707 2700 • •*••••• WIP* Advertise Free on the Intamei to millions of home buyers. Homas4Aart 294-2428 RE REAL ESTATE APPRAISAL Ra^./Comm'l, Handeraon G. Rigdon Eva, 5654143 •••••••*•••• .^ CulDtSaeNsarOoHCoursa.^ BaauUfun Stacy Ranch atyla^ "^ homst1578 P rite l iCt4* ir b(l73 bs., 1 car garJRV # ^ partdns. Hugs back yard w ^ pool a much moral CalCaryn ^ omord at Rad Mountain it Raalty,2M-1S00or27S4745. ir • • ^PT* •••*•••• VEHICLES 1994 Line. tAmrk Vlil Loaded, 53,000 mi. Credit Union bi(. $17,215. Sell $13,800, 293-0693. VE45642 1988 FULL SIZE CHEVY 4X4 PICKUP, $5000 OBO. 293-7508. VE47977 89 Chevy Berrata & 90 Aerostar. $8000OBOfor both, 564-5642. VE4S884 1996 Dodge Ram 1500, 6 cyL, 5 Soeed air, 34,000 miles. $10,500. 2940213. VE43807 1988 Toyota i^R2, 5 speed Manual, T-Top, AC, Power windows & locks, Stereo. $3,000. 294-0347. VE47670 2600 MOTORCYCLES ATV Kawasaki 220.4yrs. old, like new. A loader-2 XL Adult helmets. $T,900 OBO. Serious calls only, 566-5629. MC47986 2700 VEHICLES 1990 Taurus GL. 4 dr., loaded under 68,000 mi., 2 yr. old transPiission. New radiator & water pump. $4,000. Call 5641325. VE48031 93 Isuzu Trooper, w/all options. Excel, cond. $11,500. 564-7823, Janet. VE47822 19820ldsnrK)bilefirenza, $600. 564-1409. VE47735 97 Ford F150, Ext-Cab, Lariat 4x4. Tan/Exterior, Tan Leather interior, 38,900mi. Mint Cond. Price $25,358. Good to 5-22-99 (lease end). 2940533/3762578. VE47413 CARS$100-$500&UP. Police impounds, Hondas, Chevys, Jeeps, and Sport Utility! Good Condition! Must sell! 1800-772-7470, Ext. 7007. VE48008 1992 Buick Rega' Gran Sport-loaded, 1 owner, exc. cond. $7200 OBO. 293-0058. VE48169 1992 Chevy Lumina Euro. Power Pkg., exc. cond.,$5700OBO.2931087. VE48171 "2700 VEHICLES VICTORY DEMO DAYS MAY 14-22 Teat ride tha new 1999 Victory V92C Motorcycle ... and gat a FREE t-ahlrt! Named "Cruiaar of the Year" by Cycle World Magazine, MSRP starting at $12,995. _„ MC47Se9 STAZ'S NEVADA INDIAN HENDERSON, NV (702) 565-9595 2500 BOATS & RVs 2500 BOATS & RVs 92 Hyline 35' travel trir. premier model-many extras w/d new microwave, battery, awnings, too many extras to mentton. $10,000080.293-1607. BR48158 1997 Challenger 1800 Sea Doo Jet Boat with trailer, 18 FT. Twin engine, low hrs., excel, cond. $13,000. Call 2935285. BR48132 91 Cuddy Cabin, 22 FT, Seaswirl & Galv trailer 350 10 170 Hrs. Radios & Nav instr. & full canvas. $12,500. 294-1816. BR48114 1991 Bayliner2855Cera Sunbridge, low hrs., excel, cond. Call for info. 661-724-1904. BR48028 1998 Executive Dream 5THWHEEL.28lideout8, 2 AC, 40 FT, 2 BD, W/D, Double door frig. Perfect for Lot, Lake, or Travel. N/S. Much more. Will consider Trailer in trade. Will deliver, 383-5490. BR47786 -Cr— 23 FT. Ranger Day Cruiser Boat, 455 Jet inboard 80 hrs., Biminey Top, CD play., Roadrunner trailer, xint. cond. $5800 OBO, new Batt.. Life Jackets, skis incl., 293-0438 anytime. BR45448 ONLY 10 HOURS on this like-new 20 ft. SeaRay bowrider. Mercruiser260 V8 power. Includes tandem trailer, radios, skis, Bimini+full cover & many extras. Always stored in garage at home. Reduced to $17,500 or ?. Call owner 293-1530 to see. BR48164 TRAILERS RENT OR SALE Park Models good for 1 or 2 people Ranta start $375Ajp Sales 8tart$1500/up Aslcfor Donna/Mark) 294-8888 an BOAT, RV& SELF STORAGE 704 Canyon Rd. Boulder City, NV 294-5025 Fully enclosed/each unit has an alarrp BR43228 wpioio '^f0X& ^UNf^ MJTO M4U FORD TRUCK STAMPED R KIT i HI"' COUNIRY US BEEN REWnilEtfi.r^ tWITHlUIEXIIUtaiUCimONOFNEW % \ FORD suPEi ours € ^ SAVE'4000 ) C 2 *9% APRflNANCINC Wm g \^ FOJUPTO mf % .,„. 36MOS. STOCli I ^ g^^^ s-xo 48MOS.) (<^ SSOOCSS^ST^K) {srsMKsyMsa) ^B^^N^ I W Pav Ton Dollar I nrkork r^rkimrrav iSL X ...JK
PAGE 39

• I • • wn ni ^^ ..Liiv-q-^ I f ^ s ^ i^' f^^i i r^ \ \% ^ *^\'^^^\\%V%^ ^ ^ ^^^^WfWWWWW^^^^^^^^ ^^^ l^5^ Pg 14 Panorama Thursday, May 20, 1999 Thursday, May 20,1999 Panorama Page 15 I \\ t^ t*^^BS!!T^ 1900 CONDO RENTALS BC2BD.,2BA. upstafrs condo nearschools $750 first, last, dep. Clean. 294-1663. CR48177 HD Townhouse, 2 bd., 2 1/2ba.,allappl.,W/D,no pets, $675 + dep. Call 263-4691. CR48054 BC-2bd/2ba.. w/d, pool, $700 + sec. 293-1359. CR47939 1185sq. ft. office, excel location, Sunset & Valle Verde. .90 net. Ca Chuck at MDL Group, 388-1800. C047916 1800 CONDO SALES By owner Boulder Hills, 900 sq. ft., 2 level condo, totally redone, 90 yds. carpet & new kitchen tile, new dw. & ac unit, parklike grounds w/pool, next to schools. Asking $64,000. 293-3547. CS48151 GV 2 Bd-2 Ba. Co/ido Super Buy! $84(900. Susan Sunshine Realty -897-8409. CS48131 Immaculate upgraded townhouse, 1500 + S.F. 2 yrs. old, gated community. Garage w/cabinets, fenced yd., Italian stone tile flooring. Laundry rm., fireplace, Ig. nook. Priced Thousands under Market. $106,900. 451-2605, Bobbie Lenzie. CS48085 Boulder City, 2 bd., 2 1/2 ba., balcony with storage rm., fresh paint, new vinyl, carpeting, verticles t/ 0. Brkfst. bar, ceiling fan, community pool. LAKE VIEW! $122,000. Ownerlicensee, Call Katie, Anchor Realty, 293-5757. CS48079 Boulder City Spanish Steps, new 1148SF 2 bd./2 ba., 1 cov'd. pkg., 1 uncov'd. pkg., 1 RV pkg. Assoc. pool a spa $89(Vmo. Option to buy, call 497-2345. MARINA COVE TOWNHOUSE-2 levels, 3 bed., 3 1/2 ba., 2 car garage, lake view forever, 2 way fireplace, brkfst. bar & more! Seller would consider lease or lease/option. Asking $204,906. Call Katie, AncKor Realty, 2935757. CS48080 'Boulder Square* quiet 2 bd., pool, newly painted. By owner, 2940184 eves/434-1997 days. 0838388 3 Bdrim., 2 Bth* Al Modwn Townhouse Only $79,9S0 It's carpeted, has a patio, 4 the refrigerator, washer & diyer included. Jerry, 558^)877 CENTURY 21 JR REALTY jum Boulder City Spanish Steps, rww 1148 SF 2 bdJ2 ba., 1 cov'd. pkg., 1 uncov'd. pkg., .1 RV pkg. Assoc. pool & spa $950/mo. Option to buy, call 497-2345. Boulder City Spanish Steps, new 2328 SF 3 bd./3.5 ba., attached garage & RV pkg. HOA pool & spa, $165,000. Call Qeorge O 497-2345 ,.,.,,, 2000 ROOM RENTALS Furn. Master bd. & ba. Gate security, pool, sauna & weight rm. All util. incl. $450/mo. & no dep. 558-9469f rom 8 am2 pm. RR48046 HD-Pvt. Studio, $400, N/ S. BC-Pvt. studio, $375, N/S. incl. utilities plus dep. 293-6799. RR48029 Rm. & Ba., pvt. entry, utily. incl. $400. 5580038, RR47985 Priv. rm., $85/wk., 1st & last rent, $30 cleanino & damage dep., askfor Bill, 566-6777. RR47889 Room for Rent, $350/ MO, Utilities & Cable incl. Pool, Jacuzzi 4 Work out rm. 432-3961 RR46747 Non-smoker, working gentleman, 565-1600 work. 564-6477 hon9. RR47884 HD-ROOM FOR RENT, furn. orunfurn, $425/mo. •f dp. • 1/3 utils. N/S only. Must like cats. 5854199 ext. 2. RR43060 I Want to rent a room in a honw wfth tuH use ot facilities. Call Wil at 6472450, don't Iv. msg.. keep trying if not there RR38959 NEVADA INN, "A Friendly Place To Stay" Budget cottages to cfe luxe suites, beautiful pool A whirlpool, parking for boats and RVi Call 702293-2044 for rates and rvMrvations. Our suites are three room apartment •ize. with Kitchen. RR43061 Room Mate wanted to share monthly exp. New 3 bd. w/3 car gar. in HD. Ptaase call 55is-8232 or 477-4793 2100 APARTMENT RENTALS GEORGIA AVENUE APARTMENTS rents start at $650. 293-7775. AR48183 Ridge Apts. in BC, 2 bdrm. No pets. Lease for 12 mo. 293-0420. AR48185 2 bdyi ba., central air, all appls., $710. 293-6221. AR47955 Ridge Apts. in BC, 2 bdrm. No pets. Lease for 12 mo. 293-0420. AR47655 HD-1bd.,1ba.,allappls., Indryrm. on premises, parking. Sec. 8 OK, $490/ mo. + sec, 489 East Merlayne, pg. 563-0715 ask for Katie. AR48001 Apt. management person/couple to manage & maintain 15 apts. in exchange for rent. Prefer retired. 293-7430. EO47908 LG. DUPLEX FOR RENT extra Ig. 1 1/2 bd.. Old Town Boulder, walking distance to all facilities, nice quiet neighborhood, 518 Ash St. Call 293-6081. $600/ mo. AR47909 2100 APARTMENT RENTALS • For rent 1 bd. cottage^ furn. or unfurnished, clean & quiet for semiretired or steady working person. Non-smoking oi drinking. All utilities exp elec. No pets. $400/mo. + dep.. Call 565-6310 after 10a.m. AR48149 1 bd. apt., $365/mo. 4 3 bd. house, $650/mo. Mature adults. No pets, all util. incl. exp. elec. 5645779/565-9848. AR47768 Loft for Rent. Priv. 4 furn. Call Teddy to see at 663 Ave. D. 293-1716. AR47693 1 bd. apt. for rent. $550/ nrto. incl. util. Call 2933480/595-31 83. AR47605 2 bd. apt. near downtown park & schools. Laundry on premises. All appl. $520. AR48067 293-6885. 4 Unes'&^ ROB'S MOTEL Weekly rentals KITCHENETTES Cable Clean & Safe Spacloua Rms. 563-0715 2 bd. near downtown schools 4 park. $525, 293-6885. AR46037 2 Bd., 1 Ba. near Worrell Park. $525/mo. 5644243. AR48068 BC 2 bd./1 ba. duplex, 548 Date St. $600/mo. 294-0648. AR48119 APARTMENTS AS LOW AS $275 a Month furnished 564-6952 .. KITCHENETTES STARVIEW MOTEL Boulder City 293-1658 Advertise in the NEWS Monte Cario Apts. Very nice 2 bd. Apt. for Rent All elec. & eecurlty Srs. welcome uum< $490 mo. Pla. call 558-2099 ARCTIC DESERT PROPERTIES Residential lot for sale, $80,000. 294-1213 $300 off l8t Months Rent Quiet Gated Community Free basic cable, basltetbail, btx| area 2 pools, spa & more. Under new management Lakewood Cove 1100 N Center, HD AIUTTM ARCTIC DESERT PROPERTIES 2 bd/2 ba. adult apt in quiet BC, no pets. $650/ mo. + dep. Senior disc. Avail 4-20. Residential lot for sale, $80,000. Lewis Home 2800 sq. ft., 4 bd./3-1/2 ba., 3 car gar., gorgeous back yd. w/spa. /Asking $315,000. 294-1213 AR47278 APARTMENTS IN HENDERSON Clean, Quality 1-2-3 Bedroom Apartments in Henderson •Central Air & Heat • Appliances •Blinds • Carpets • Water paid •Washer/Dryer Available Apartments are $420 & up per month, newly remodeled, spacious nesr schools, parit & shopping. 565-7028 AR47575 WELCOME HOME TD COMFORTABLE LIVING CASA DE ALICIA M&IVI II APTS. (gj Call Today ^ 293-1615 2300 RENTALS 2300 RENTALS RENTALS Spanish Steps Condo. 1 at Or., 2 bdrm., 2 tatt), appL ITSSAno. • deps. LsOotee VHa Condo. 2 b*in., 11/2 bstti, t7S(Mno. I3 bdrm., 2 balh. IQ. 1st fir.. fourplsK apt, tasofmo. 4 bdrm., 2 bedi, 2 esr gsr. home tM^tonosd yard, t12Safimo. • dsps. 3bdrm..2beth.2cfgBf.homsiiriv s ls yard, sew mo. • dsps. DICK BLAIR REALTY 293-2171 McM ^KfLASSIFIED p.m. fridajr 12 wks. aval. Bcsi ftroni at Sol Mei [Holsl. Sspt/Oct.' 293-5558 2400 REAL ESTATE FSBO in BC "Wonderful tri level near golf course' 4 BDy3 BTK "Pool qtr. ac^e, $215,000, 2936871.RE47930 NO BULL! 3 bedroom, 2 bath fiome for $24,995!! Receive a complete wholesale fiome price list witfi brochures and floor plans before you shop. 1 -8e8-720-0d60. RE47996 FORECLOSED HOMES. Low or $0 down! Gov't. & bank repos being sold now! Fantastic savings! Financing available (800) 501-1777, ext. 3399. RE48019 Needabigfiouse? 1920 sq. ft., 4 br., 2 full baths, fireplace, 2x6 walls. A must see. Ask for Vince 1-702-727-8304. RE48038 FSBO in BC. "Wonderful tri level near golf course" 4 BD/3 BTH. "Pool qtr. acre, $215,000. 2936871.RE47929 GREAT FAMILY HOME Golf Course W/Lake View, 3 BD, pool. Reduced $10,000-^ $5,000 Carpet allowance. $348,000. Call 293-3051, Rhonda or Scott 7338805. RE47795 For Sale By Owner Zoned for Horses, 1/2 Acre +. 3 bd/2 ba.. Corner Lot in Enterprise Township. Asking Price $140,000. 361-6836. RE47698 .CLASSIFIED 4 p.m. Friday for Tuesday issue, Noon Tuesday for Panofama^ BYOWNERGreatSBD./ 2 BA. 1200 SF. Lots of upgrades pricedforquKk sale at only $117,500. 293—0038 or 496-1575.. RE47479 'Boulder Square Condo* quiet 2 bd., pool, newly painted. $72,000. By owner 294-0184 eves/ 434-1997 days. R^47^ ^E47 >VHf PVH Real Estate, Inc. fias 1 of the largest selections of commercial & residential lots, mobile homes, Ig. acreage, home & income property in Pahrump, 1-70 2-7270445. RE43409 GOVT REPO HOMES. All areas svailabls. For information, call Chris Biles, 496-3283. RE44591 HD 3 bd. home, fenced Ig. yd. RV parking, freeway access. $75,900. New loan, call MCS properties. 564-6742. RE46451 B.C. DUPLEX Nice Condition with lame detached Garage, Fenced Yard, Great Location. Call Bret 293-0000, Desert Sun Realty. RE47642 SSBO in BC. "Wonderful tri level near golf course" 4 BD/3 BTH "Pool qtr. acre, $215,000, 2936871. RE45948 BY OWNER. Great 2 bdrm., 1-1/2 ba. townhouse, veiy close to schools, shopping. Immed. Occupancy. $95,000 (about $700/ mo.) call Ed 702-2946569. RE42218 BC Custom 2 story, 4 bd/3 ba., great lake & mountain view. Wrap around upper deck. Rv drive, mature landscape. $274,000. 293-0450. RE47214 Home for sale by owner, 4b/2 ba., 3 car gar., covered patio. Across from O'Callaghan Park in HD. 437-2493. RE47341 HORSE PROPERTY in Hend, Newer Honne with Lots of Charm. Very Good Cond. • Great Price $164,900 Bret 293-0000 Desert Sun Realty. RE47460 2400 REAL ESTATE FSBO. 667 Ave. H. Charming 2 bd./l ba., Historc home. Lg. fenced bkyd. with lawn. Shade trees, shed, alley access & pkng. $109,900. 2937977. RE48099 "FORECLOSED GOVT. HOMES" Save up to 50% or more! Minimum or no down payment! For listings call now 7 days a week. (800) 429-3660, ext. H-5521.RE48017 IDAHO MNT. PROPERTY 5 AC $29,900. 1 hour Boise. New, premiere ranch acreage w/ private lake access. Set amidst 10OO's of acres of Boise Nat'l. forest. Surveyed, perc, waranty deed. Excellent access, fully buildable. Great financing. Call now 800488-5506. RE48021 Advertise in the NEWS 2400 REAL ESTATE 2400 REAL ESTATE FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS... Call Henderson's f 1 Real Estate Team BRENDA BIRD-FAIRLESS QRI, CRS Ufatim* Handwton ffatidant 564-1127 WENDY WILLIAMS 37S-1689 Over $160 Million in Sales 33 years combined Real Estate experience! • •e ooueu cnrruiiON TEAM Re797i -HCNDCRSON•1994 HIGH MESA DR.: Del Wtbb Sun City! Built in 98 uid pKkcd wilh upgrades! A real betuty! I33 sq. ft. 2 bdmt., 2 bith, 2 car girage. $189,900. .909 HARVEST SEASON CT: 2 itor> biUis, eorncT -"'" — • SOLD bdr.,3 prige. M. iirai.m, iMt ire* It more! Better than New! $1374M0. -NOilTHWE.*T•7li RUBBER TREE AVE: Better itian new! 4 bdmi., M/2 K^earfSgofc^ lyttcnL Built In'W.openiitcben, tmtnoorplin $124,900. BOULOCR CITY HOMCSBOULDER CUV GOLF COURSE AREA •156 INVERNESS CT. 2085 sq. 11,4 bed., 2 bith, 3 car garage, huge 111x192 comer, cul-de-nc lot! Room to roam! I8x3 heated sports poo Vipa w/ralsed sun deck, covered patio w/mlst system. Basketball ct. RV parking. Island kitchen. Great floor plan & more! $290,000. A Must icc! •1S37 MANCHA: Best Buy! Cutton built home! IS90 sq. ft, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 2 car garage, MIy landscaped with • child safe healed pool and spa. Roof, pool/ spa & home are in great condithm! New appliances, tile kitchen floon. light carpet and more, a see $159/100. •217 RED ROCK RD: Best Buy In Lake Mewl View Est! Great rtews, custom, triievel home, 2750 sq. ft., perfect kitchen, open floor 0m m, 2 maHer i|ta. e rwnB,2i leaping, loaded w/apgradet OerUnd 2 car garage for a 20' boiL $389,000. •1433 PUEBLO: 5 bdrm, 4 baths, 4H0 sq. fL BisemenI has 2 nlended Uving/ramily rm. quarten with thelrown icparale entrance. 9*i335 k)t upgraded lush paiilikc landscaping. Stunning mt & chy views. $399,000. >30 ARIZONA: 3 bdrm. or 2 and den custom adobe houie! A true work of art! Step in to Old Mesico a real stunning home with Ions of charm! A must see! Com. plelely detailed out In Southwest style Imported Mexicui tile thniML$25SJ)00. -BOULDER CITY CONDOS'701 CAPRI IIIA: No stain! ComcrjiLjult_anaBd level! Upfiad SOLDIK aacts stay! Act IM! 1044 sq. ft. $99,500. 110TOFSAIL-BayviewcDndo,llu • ew. 2 bd, 2 ba-f doi, flipl, 2 car gar, icar poaL Lake view, 1348 SF. $149,90a Very Modvaled!! IMake AnOflW!Rdicid! •434RANGERCr.,dumiiilake ml vtewi!! 2 large rm, 2 ftiii baths, new vinyl floors, lush carpel, fteiiUy pahited, formal dhiing rm. w/inolMd gtaai, large great rm, 2 car gange. atrium, k>ts more! Redaccd!$lt9/NWLOW. VACANT UND1030 ACRES. Great location! UdllUes acroa street ned I/^2 • aster plan Light IndustrialCMUwrclal! Reduced $375,000. 151 Pelkan Wy. M. Boalder OabR/VtatncarLKMead.Tons *f aoeaHi*! MMIvaled! Approi. 32x70 iM.$32,M. Sandra Deubler Hwe • lop prodDcer li ymir comer! ft Double Centurion Ageal 271-3277 TollFrtcl48-227-042 E-mail mdniKidaaLctMii GOLF COURSE-$325,000 1703 ST. ANDREWS COURT 2 STORY, 3,400 SQ.FT. FORMER MODEL HOME MANY EXTRAS SHOWN BY APPOINTMENT 450-1000 OR 293-6168dofteon O goMccofn nB474i? Prudential 'C.J'/ **^ Jensen's Realty Tliinking of Buying or Stiling? The Rock is tho answerl TIM PrMtanttel JMMAM'S ilMlty S^aciaHsM In Ktlii mi aK o wii w rctol and Proparty ti Henderson 564-3333 ffl^ FREE HOME WARRANTY SELLER'S COVERAGE When you list your home for sale with me. LARRY SHAFFER Century 21 Moneyworld *" 565-4100 • "Just call JUDY" 497-1553 1-800-852-1726 UhcnliMMOaolxom JUDY HENKEN8 ABR, QRI REALTOR • Propwty Mgr. For honest i nllable npnatntathn wHhallyournalutattnMib^ Condominiums OVAL' 2 BO • 2 BM all appliancos New $94,795 OVAL 2 BO' 2 BH' all appliances $76,500 HD' 2 80 2 BH All appliances Gated $76,500 Boulder CHy Lake Mtn. Eatatet FonnerModel' 1536SF"2 BD*2BH*3CarGar*3 Caiport RV Park Extras Loaded $182,752 One Story Penoramic VIewsl 1720 SF • 3 BD 2 BH 3 Car Calico Terrace & Priced right at $179,251. 4 BD • 2 BH 2 Car • $124,900 VA Contr/Sale Land Build your dream home on this .340 acre of land in Henderson. Utilities at curb' negotiable at $60,000 KNAPP REALTY {Jsm^ I 21 Century 21 MoneyWorld *m^^ Wfei#r8trcr—"^' Henderson, Nv 89015 564-2515 Two Great Cnpa Cabana Townhouses — First... 2 bdrm., 1.5 baths, 1304 sq. ft., priced at $83,500. Next .n 2 bdrms., 2.5 baths, 1412 sq. ft., priced at $83,500. Both have attached 2 car garages, RV parking, pool, tentiis, association, etc.... Call and ask for David Bower or Marty Mitchell at 564-2515. MLS #100456 & 101571 Picture Perfect — This 4 bdrm. Henderson home features an open & flowing rioorplan, country kitchen w/island & breakfast bar, gr^at room, Berber carpet. Big inground pool on an extra lg. comer lot. Priced to sell at $166,900. Call now & ask for Gloria or Janet at 592-6411 ofy, 564-2515. MLS #1034100 Northwest Custom Home-Rustic & Wooiisy — Located on a large half acre lot this beautiful custom home features vaulted ceilings/knotty pine custom tile, great kitchen with pantry, upgraded carpet and many other extras. Priced to sell at $247,000. Call now to preview & ask for Dcbi at 493-6043 or 564-2515. MLS #107016LM "New On The Market" Just in time for summer, park-like back yard with pool. 3 bdrms., 2 baths. This one story makes life easy. Must see to appreciate. Priced at $ 169.000. Call and ask for Saundra at 283-0552 or 564-2515. MLS #1055198 ONE .STOP .SHOPPrNfl ONE LOCATION • TWO GREAT SERVICES CENTURY 21 MONEYWORLD AND IRWIN MORTGAGE I OWORTJITY Irwin Mortgage EACHOmCEIS WOEPBOENTLY OWNED ANDOf>SWTE0. 2400 REAL ESTATE 2400 REAI ESTATE ^ QUAUTYSERVKE 1997 Boulder Dam Realty, Inc. 1664 Nevada Hwy. Boulder City, Nevada 8900S YOUR Li2CAL BOULDER CITY OFFICE 293-4663^ ^ 1.800-228-8358 C21BCNVMl4)0in Advertise in the Nem OPEN HOUSE 1701 RED MOUNTAIN DR. SUN-MAY 23—12-4. RE481SS • •••••••••• ••••••• • -k BIRCH ST. BC HISTORIC HOME • • 3 bd., 1 ba., garage, storage, • •k workshop, central air, teak flooring • ir Neal SIniakIn, Owner/Broker • • 294-1444 ^„*^ ••••••••••••••••••• 5 BDRM., 2-3/4 BATH MOBILE, OVERSIZED CARPORT, 2 SHEDS, CORNER LOT, A GREAT FAMILY HOME ONLY $110,000. LAKE MTN. ESTS. 2 BDRM., 1-3/4 BATH, BONUS RM., DRY WALL T/0 XTRA DEEP LOT. REDUCED TO $125,000. 4 BDRM., 2-1/2 BATH, LEWIS HOME, CLOSE TO OASIS PK., CERAMIC TILE, RV-PKY., & MORE. EASY TO VIEW. TWO CONTIGUOUS LOTS ON 'B' HILL, OVERLOOKING CORALS, SOLD SEPARATELY OR AS ONE $89,000 EACH. VIEWS VIEWS VIEWS LAKE MTN. ESTS. 2 BDRM., 1-3/4 BATH, LOTS OF BUILTINS. LG. ISLAND KIT. W/ WALKIN PANTRY, ALL APPLIANCES. ONLY $169,900. LAKE MEAD AREA REALTY LINETTE 294-3100 • •*••••*•**-A* BOULDER crrv W Briu Stoiw 2-8ty, approx. 2208 sq. It., 4 1x173-1/2 ba., finished "K basement, new construction $199,000. "IT Brter Stone -Single sloiy, 2 bd./2-1/2 ba., approx. 1620 sq. It., finished X basemeni, new constiuction $167,000. yf B-HIII-Customhomew/approx.4,077sq.ft.,4bd73ba.,3caratlached'X' gardbe, plus 28x36 garage, lovely wateriall lagoon pool $685,000. • if nm • 2tloiycuMomhome, approx. 3511 sq.lt,5bd73-1/Sbe.,2 '^ ~ lamify rmk. w^replace."master bd w/balc6ny,'?ca'r'MbfiM'gar, if wonderful city and mountain views, zoned lor horses $470,000. i( Spanish Steps Condo AJI appliancesll 2 bdV2 ba. ceramic tile, very if nice unit. $95,000. if Manufactuted Home 2 bd72 ba., 1 car gar., carport, well cared for if home, all appliances Included $99,900 H ENDERSO N if Ml Tnifflei-3 bdS ba., 2 (SOLDI* '386 Q S122.900. Condo-2 bd^ ba., 2 car gar., A|)pr6x. 1106 sq ft $94,900. JL COMMERCIAiyLIGHT INDUSTRIAL Red Mountain PIsza 40 x 60 Pad with Nevada Hwy. Exposure, JL Includes City approved BIdg. plans, $175,000. For Sale 3 phase power, approx. 4,500 sq. ft. warehouse w/addltional JL. office approx. 750 sq. It. plus apartment approx 750 sq. ft., 2 14 It. '^ ovtitMad doors $380,000. ^ FOR LEASE 12 It. overhead, approx. 900 sq. It., $700 nwTlnciudes * For JL, uWltias. A ^ 709 Yucca-offices warehouse, approx. 1,030 sq.ft. $750 mo. Tenant^ ^ pays utilities. A ^ 70SFooltilH-3phass. approx. 2.000sq. II. offices warehouse, 14ft. ^ 1 overhead door. $1,200 mo. ^^ i ^ CALL APRIL faf "^ • JL RED MOUNTAIN REALTY mTZL if 294-1500 OR 888-733-6881 '~ • %E4.IO7 • *••*••••••••• • ••*•*•'*•••••• • ""•'" BOULDER CITY • t Lain MMd Vlw EtUrtti Custom home In prestigious i ^ area, 2X6 construction. Spacious rooms, Island kitchen. 3 ^ <^bd72-1/2t., 3 car gar. $299,000. ^ JL. Qotf CoufM Home 4 bd72-3/4 ba., 2552 sq. ft. lower JL level bed & bath, family ro^, country kitchen, lagoon •^ pod, RV Pkg., 4 car gar, $327,500. if if Room For Evefyone r er>i"r>T '"''"*• • ^^'^^ if ba., separate family rcLsOfcEUroom, r"' • A-$179,900. pool, 3 car gar. • ^Ownr8aytSell-4bd72-1/2ba.,nicefk>orplan,separate if famHy room, pool ft spa, over 3/4 acre lot, 3 car gar. X $289,500. .^ if Omt lake View • Be autlfullv uDo radad Lakfltrae ennhn, if 3bd/l-3/4ba.,vtewsff ^ SOL D I w & covered patio $136,000. if Quality Home, Quail ter&guest bedroom bd., 3-1/2 ba, 2790 "llt^ter^^y custom laatures. 4 if sq ? rfKr ..ul home Inskle and out! • "^ GoK course views $369,000. "^ Lake Mead View Eatalaa k}ts from $89,900. CALL BETH AT {^ RED MOUNTAIN REALTY *^-* '*' 294-1500 OR 888-733-6861 *•*••••••••* if if One of a kind work of art in Boulder City. Sellers moving out of state. $225,000, make offer. Agent Sandra Deubler 271-3277 y 2400 REALESTATF ?400 REAL ESTATE HouMtarMabfOnMr. (rCa#anN>kA(. MMAba,amas|Ma*, '^"^^^" Iw. ISiMM^VRL cm as tee M, gardm ataa, Maa.g>spaB.tilea*tt • dioal, pK rse. esMar, golf, (rMMiraeeaM.tl4IK. Caa864-098 What art point*? HowdothifyafiMt tlwIoMigM? CirtlSlMrylat 369-1655 for FREE InfoniuUon fmit FRIENDLY. PROFESSIONAL f^^ REAL ESTATE SERVICE Jr^Sfc-r 3PECIALIZINQ IN HgMPgRSnl^iT BOULDER CITY! Our Uttlngt am MHing quIcUy— Please call u* If you are considering telling your home or landl **Call office for additionai information & other propartiee for sale!** Knapp Realty—566-8185 Ellie Knapp, Broker/Owner GRI, CRS E-mail: knappre0juno.com 827 So. Boulder Hwy., Henderson, NV 89015 4niwOut of town? Call toll-free: 1-877-566-8696 tSHMfcrn rjEm POTENTIAU POTENTIAL! Fixer-upper w/ many pluses. Dow n town Henderson location, hugs lot, central AC/heet, almost new roof. Home has 3 bedrooms, 1 iMrth ft priced at only $74,900 DOWMTOWN HENDERSON! 2 bedroom home In need of work, large fenced lot w/ multi-famHy zoning, convsnient to shops, cesinos, stc. All at a "fix-me-up" price of Just $79,900 3t3 BRING YOUR TOOTHBRUSH MOVE RIGHT IN! Immaculate ineide A out! Custom home hes 3 bedrooms, 2.75 baths, 2470 SF, 2 car garage -f 28 x 26 detached finished garage w/ beth. Hugs country kitchen w/ftustom cal)lnets A upgraded appliances. RV gates A sewer dump, too. $249,950 HAVE YOUR MORNING COFFEE....on the patio of this 3 bedroom, 2 bath home overlooking ttM mountaina. You'll love tite open, airy floor plan, master suit* sitting room, window seat in Wtctien A great iMckyardI A great prtoe at $16t,000 ROOM FOR EVERYONE A EVERYTHINQI Beautifully designed custom horns, 3600 8F, 3 hill beths, 3 bed r oom s or more, 4 pattos, 2 firsplaoes, tiled beicony, 3 cer gerags, full RV hookups, vehlds A equipment yard. $279,000 Ws helped over 400 buyers ceN Henderson "HOME" \n 199$. Tfikikktg of selling? Cell the oompeny thet gels results, Century 21JRR*elty. 564-6546 101 E. Horizon Dr. (president 'sjiwanf EACH OrnCt MDCKNOmUT OMMCO MD OKMAS 2400 REAL ESTATE 2400 REAL ESTATE 2400 REAL ESTATE QV • 4 bdJ2 ba., over 1 qtr. acre lot, pool, ponds, covered patio, sap. work shop. Hardwood floon, backyd., paradiee A room to roam. CallValerle White to eeetoday.$174,999. 281-5541, Ownet/Ucenaee. Boxed Ad8 *B^ per column Inch pef leaue 4Unes*6'*iue CQihrots 2400 REAL ESTATE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS 535 Cherry Street CtMCk oel iMa llH new honw tn ttM heart of Bouktor CHy's HMertc OWriel Over ISOO sq. ft Hh 3 bd, 14/4 ba. and M/2 car ^riga. TMa l a loely home wWi euatofli upgradss throughout Offsrad by ONMr tlM^SOO. Can Susan at 293-1SS4 or 290447. 4 lines *6*Ji^ B 0 dobcW) Boxed Ad8 >8< per column Inch per leeue BC Rdobe Realty t£} BC ADOBE REALTY (702) 293-1707 ^1 Out of Town 1-800-553-8081 Email — Cristinale aol.com For more information and td view these properties, call: ANNA, DIANNE, DOTTIE, JOAN, KIM, RHONDA, SHERRY OR SUE 1416 Pueblo Drive 1593 Bermuda Dunes 1566 Brentwood Drive 1121 Cumminge Drive 521 Date Street 505 Dee Circle 883 Fairway Drive 1408 Fifth Street 1404 Garnet Place 1815 Hilton Head Drive 1029 Key* Drive 620 Kings Place 100 Laguna Lane 4 HOMES $389,000 533 Shoshone Wy. $315,000 1568 Brentwood Dr. $242,000 100 Sea Breeze L^ne, $181,900 572 Seventh Street $ 98,500 1538 Sherri Lane $447,500 1568 Torrey Pine* Drive $333,000 640 Ave M $165,000 790LoTavie $364,900 634 Valencia $292,900 Henderson $980,000 2127 Eagle Watch $145,000 526 Amethyst Avenue $315,000 873 Bergamont CONDO/TOWNHOMES $142,000 $319,500 $279,900 $119,900 $299,000 $279,000 $106,900 $185,000 $399,000 $335,000 $120,000 $125,000 870 Avenue B units 703,303, 904, 906...From $59,900 1303 Darlene Way • units 103B, 103C, 202B, 402C, 403A...From $63,900 700 Capri Drive, Unit 30B $102,000 101 Lantern Bay Drive $135,900 698 Freedom Lane $210,000 50OTara Court $115,900 647 Florence Drive $229,000 540 Tare Court $179,900 596 Lk. Michigan m4-^ MANUFACTURED HOMES $139,900 1709 Red Mountain Drive $104,900 LAND FOURTEEN LOTS from which to chooee, ranging In price from $39,000 to $350,000 BUSINESS/COMMERCIAL ^ Call for information on: For sale or lease Warehouae/Offices/Sales Room i Uet your property with the LARGEST small town real estate office ^' with LOCAL knowledge of market values. Fully licensed Property Management Service available. 2400 REAL ESTATE Want to Buy a Home? Go to www.compugar.com. Free qualifying completely confidential. Download App. and fax to (775) 727-3773 Aftn: Gary. RE47500 RE47BeC Total Don Payment No Cloelng Coets BattarttwiModel2BR. Huge, Huge Qaraga Many Upgrades Ruse QNmora B964<8S Ijikit Meed Aiee Realty EZ LOANS CALL FC MORTGAQE (702) 294-2855 RE4i26e REAL ESTATE AaENTS NEEDED Fof buty Hindifton ofAcf Cel S HOME LOANS PuraffiBM Of ndlniMc QoodorBadCndH 100% FinsnoinQ AVWMM CMI WwTsn M Pwmlngton Mortgagt 897-5450_ 2 Bad., 1 S8i Dupin Tlf t ns 2ba*s.,tbi 7SITeO S bs*. Dan, 1 katti, 2 ear gamss. Laka VIssr iaae 1200 3 VSVSi., 2 BMn OOflOO Me 4 Nl Call B.C. Adobe Realty ivo rvmuMw*9tQ reee> Know the whole story! CaliSliarylat 369-1955 for FREE Intonnation • 2700 VEHICLES 2700 VEHICLES How to Ngotiato Iha Price of • Naw Built Contractor. dNSharytat 389-1965 for _^^ FREE Information. 'ISSmSlSStTm' jtkUB. Howtobuya CirilShaiylat 389-1966 for FREE Monnalton c L A S S i F I E D S W O a K 4 0 5 • 7 7 0 0 2700 VEHICLES 2400 REAL ESTATE •••••••••*•* BOUIDER CfTY • dn tlie QoH Couree i, Rancli style lioine JL w/pod, ovar 3000 aq. ft WIB.OOO Call BCAdotM Realty 203-1707 2700 • •*••••• WIP* Advertise Free on the Intamei to millions of home buyers. Homas4Aart 294-2428 RE REAL ESTATE APPRAISAL Ra^./Comm'l, Handeraon G. Rigdon Eva, 5654143 •••••••*•••• .^ CulDtSaeNsarOoHCoursa.^ BaauUfun Stacy Ranch atyla^ "^ homst1578 P rite l iCt4* ir b(l73 bs., 1 car garJRV # ^ partdns. Hugs back yard w ^ pool a much moral CalCaryn ^ omord at Rad Mountain it Raalty,2M-1S00or27S4745. ir • • ^PT* •••*•••• VEHICLES 1994 Line. tAmrk Vlil Loaded, 53,000 mi. Credit Union bi(. $17,215. Sell $13,800, 293-0693. VE45642 1988 FULL SIZE CHEVY 4X4 PICKUP, $5000 OBO. 293-7508. VE47977 89 Chevy Berrata & 90 Aerostar. $8000OBOfor both, 564-5642. VE4S884 1996 Dodge Ram 1500, 6 cyL, 5 Soeed air, 34,000 miles. $10,500. 2940213. VE43807 1988 Toyota i^R2, 5 speed Manual, T-Top, AC, Power windows & locks, Stereo. $3,000. 294-0347. VE47670 2600 MOTORCYCLES ATV Kawasaki 220.4yrs. old, like new. A loader-2 XL Adult helmets. $T,900 OBO. Serious calls only, 566-5629. MC47986 2700 VEHICLES 1990 Taurus GL. 4 dr., loaded under 68,000 mi., 2 yr. old transPiission. New radiator & water pump. $4,000. Call 5641325. VE48031 93 Isuzu Trooper, w/all options. Excel, cond. $11,500. 564-7823, Janet. VE47822 19820ldsnrK)bilefirenza, $600. 564-1409. VE47735 97 Ford F150, Ext-Cab, Lariat 4x4. Tan/Exterior, Tan Leather interior, 38,900mi. Mint Cond. Price $25,358. Good to 5-22-99 (lease end). 2940533/3762578. VE47413 CARS$100-$500&UP. Police impounds, Hondas, Chevys, Jeeps, and Sport Utility! Good Condition! Must sell! 1800-772-7470, Ext. 7007. VE48008 1992 Buick Rega' Gran Sport-loaded, 1 owner, exc. cond. $7200 OBO. 293-0058. VE48169 1992 Chevy Lumina Euro. Power Pkg., exc. cond.,$5700OBO.2931087. VE48171 "2700 VEHICLES VICTORY DEMO DAYS MAY 14-22 Teat ride tha new 1999 Victory V92C Motorcycle ... and gat a FREE t-ahlrt! Named "Cruiaar of the Year" by Cycle World Magazine, MSRP starting at $12,995. _„ MC47Se9 STAZ'S NEVADA INDIAN HENDERSON, NV (702) 565-9595 2500 BOATS & RVs 2500 BOATS & RVs 92 Hyline 35' travel trir. premier model-many extras w/d new microwave, battery, awnings, too many extras to mentton. $10,000080.293-1607. BR48158 1997 Challenger 1800 Sea Doo Jet Boat with trailer, 18 FT. Twin engine, low hrs., excel, cond. $13,000. Call 2935285. BR48132 91 Cuddy Cabin, 22 FT, Seaswirl & Galv trailer 350 10 170 Hrs. Radios & Nav instr. & full canvas. $12,500. 294-1816. BR48114 1991 Bayliner2855Cera Sunbridge, low hrs., excel, cond. Call for info. 661-724-1904. BR48028 1998 Executive Dream 5THWHEEL.28lideout8, 2 AC, 40 FT, 2 BD, W/D, Double door frig. Perfect for Lot, Lake, or Travel. N/S. Much more. Will consider Trailer in trade. Will deliver, 383-5490. BR47786 -Cr— 23 FT. Ranger Day Cruiser Boat, 455 Jet inboard 80 hrs., Biminey Top, CD play., Roadrunner trailer, xint. cond. $5800 OBO, new Batt.. Life Jackets, skis incl., 293-0438 anytime. BR45448 ONLY 10 HOURS on this like-new 20 ft. SeaRay bowrider. Mercruiser260 V8 power. Includes tandem trailer, radios, skis, Bimini+full cover & many extras. Always stored in garage at home. Reduced to $17,500 or ?. Call owner 293-1530 to see. BR48164 TRAILERS RENT OR SALE Park Models good for 1 or 2 people Ranta start $375Ajp Sales 8tart$1500/up Aslcfor Donna/Mark) 294-8888 an BOAT, RV& SELF STORAGE 704 Canyon Rd. Boulder City, NV 294-5025 Fully enclosed/each unit has an alarrp BR43228 wpioio '^f0X& ^UNf^ MJTO M4U FORD TRUCK STAMPED R KIT i HI"' COUNIRY US BEEN REWnilEtfi.r^ tWITHlUIEXIIUtaiUCimONOFNEW % \ FORD suPEi ours € ^ SAVE'4000 ) C 2 *9% APRflNANCINC Wm g \^ FOJUPTO mf % .,„. 36MOS. STOCli I ^ g^^^ s-xo 48MOS.) (<^ SSOOCSS^ST^K) {srsMKsyMsa) ^B^^N^ I W Pav Ton Dollar I nrkork r^rkimrrav iSL X ...JK
PAGE 40

• ^^^•^^-r"f^%-,^ #-rf ^T-y-y^^ r f f-f 4>^ y Ji^^y"! 1 s H'^HWW r V T ^UBLic MEETINGXPUBLIC MEETING people in their homeland, but also to the unprecedented economic, technological, and scientific progress that Israel has achieved in the Middle East." The Jewish Community Center of Southern Nevada (JCCSN) is a non-profit organization dedicated to fostering the continuity of Jewish life by providing a variety of programs which bring people of the community together. The JCCSN provides educational, social, athletic and cultural programs designed to meet the needs of the Jewish community. Call JCCSN at 794-0090 for more information. The Jewish Federation of Las Vegas represents the voice of the organized Jewish community, fiound together by shared history, traditions and common values, it seeks to assure Jewish (:ontinuity in Las Vegas, in Israel and around the world, by preserving, strengthening and enhancing Jewish life, and transmitting these values to succeeding generations. For additional information about the. Jewish Federation of Las Vegas and its local agencies and services, call 732-0556. ing 17 floor plan designs. Priced from the upper $200,000 to more than $1.5 million, the oneand two-story designs range from 2,156 square feet to homes that can be expanded to more than 7,000 square feet. Homes with up to six bedrooms and a fourcar garage are available. Conlon said the reaction among visitors to the newly opened model homes promises to accelerate the already impressive rate of sales at Red Rock Country Club. "Our pre-grand-opening home sales were absolutely outstanding." said Conlon, noting that more than 200 sales contracts were accepted during the 11-month period leading up to the grand opening. Conlon further noted that about 25 home owners were comfortably moved into their homes before the models were completed. "Our initial buyers were impressed enough by our community plans and home designs to purchase early, during the pre-construction phase," Conlon said. "Now that prospective homebuyers can actually walk through the models and experience the incredible degree of elegance these homes offer, we anticipate an even greater rate of sales through 1999." The 15 model homes opened to the public represent four of the five collections of home styles that are available. The Acacia Collection features four, one and two-story executive floor plan designs ranging from 2,155 to 3,451 square feet with up to four bedrooms and 4 1/2 baths. Prices start at $263,000. The Mesquite Collection offers a choice of four two-story models ranging from 3,188 to 4,295 square feet and priced from $360,000. Homes with up to six bedrooms and six baths are available. The Ocotillo Collection encompasses four single-story designs ranging from 2,864 to 4,175 square feet with up to six bedrooms and 4 1/2 baths. Pricing starts at $345,000. The Palo Verde Collection offers a choice of three oneand two-story floor plan designs ranging from 3,765 to 5,300 square feet and priced from $507,000. Homes with up to five bedrooms and 5 1/2 baths are available. Later this year, Sunrise Colony Company will unveil two additional model homes in The Palm Collection. Priced from approximately $900,000 to more than $1.5 million, including lot premiums. The Palm Collection homes will be built on home sites in The Estates at Red Rock Country Club, a private, separately gated neighborhood of 87 high-end, semi-custom homes in Red Rock Country Club. The homes will be expandable to more than 7,000 square feet and feature a long list of included and customizing features. ConUm pointed out that along with providing wide-ranging home designs and exterior architectural styles. Sunrise Colony Company will intermingle home styles throughout the various neighborhoods. "By blending home designs, architectural styles, color schemes and roof tile variations, we will be creating more varied street scenes, resembling those found in more established, custom neighborhoods," he said. "The result will be an overall sense of integrity and continuity that is rarely found in a planned community of this scale." PLEASE JOIN US... for a Public Meeting on the Proposed South Strip Transit Transfer Terminal (South Las Vegas Blvd.) The Regional Transportation Commission of Clark County, Nevada (RTC) imltes you to view project information, review site locations and maxe comments on a proposed intemiodal transit transfer terminal. Project team members will be available to discuss concerns and answer questions. A draft of the Environmental Assessment (EA) document is being prepared and will be ready for public review and comment on May 27, 1999.. Members of the public may view the document after this date at the RTC, 301 E. Clark Avenue, Suite 300, at the public meeting, or call the RTC at 455-4481. The transit transfer terminal rtMsy" | m| McCarran ^ along the South Resort Corridor will provide .a convenient location for the transfer of bus v.' passengers. Two potential locations .* identified for the transfer terminal are depicted in the vicinity map. WHEN and WHERE..... Thursday, June 3,1999 • 4.00 p.m. 7:00 p.m. Enterprise Library 25 E. Shelboume Avenue • Las Vegas, NV 89123 A stenographer will be available to take your written comments for inclusion in the final Environmental Assessment (EA) document. The meetings are free and accessible by CAT bus via route #303 or call CAT-RIDE, 228-7433, for more information. In addition, Spanish and sign language interpreters can be made available if requested more than 48 hours in advance by calling 455-4481 or TDD 455-5997. For additional Information contact: Ingrld Yocum, Public Information Coordinator Regional Transportation Commlcsion 301 East Claric Avanua, Suite #300 Las Vsgas, NV 89101 Phone: (702)455-4481 Fax: (702) 45S-S959 SUNSET STATW IS A NICE PUCE TO VISIT BUT YOU WOULDN'T WANT m HAY THERE. PUY SMARTER r + Reserve 100% We mean no disresi)ect to oiir friends at Simset, but good looks will only get you so far. More than anything else, video poker players want to win—and no other casino does more to help you win than The Reserve. We*re the only casino in town where every video poker machine is set to the very highest payouts available. Which means they all pay more for winning combinations, compared to the "tighter" machines you can find at other local casinos. S^SL'Sl!l£2^if JS^'ill Sure, some of Simset's machines also give — Vt TIW KeWCTT net to tlW • • tl 1. j. ^ xi. j A. rery hij^hest payouts, but only hlgn payOUtS—^DUt mOSt 01 them dOH t. about one-fourth of Sunsets ^t The Reserve, vou'll always be playing are. So. where will you play? ^ hig^eSt-payOUt iuachine, bCCaUSC that's /j the only kind we have. (Isn't that the only kind you want?) VUB AB#B A%#B So come play at the casino the Review-Joiunal voted MSKB^BR 5 B "Best Video Poker" in Las Vegas, and play smarter. ww w. i^ MIUI DT. m Hendannn '^ •nrl MThs offwn the 1 TUESDAY May 25, 1999 66 4 PROOF BMI IMAGING 1115 ARQUES AVE E. SUNNYVALE, CA 94086 04/04/00 MAIL J. IXJ ,\^S Henderson, Nevada 50*BMI companies outline catastrophic scenarios D.B. Marciniak News Staff Writer While a part of their message seemed apocalyptic, officials indicated all is safe at Black Mountain Industrial IBMI] plants nestled in the heart of Henderson. Wednesday night at the Henderson Convention Center, state, city and county officials teamed with local plant managers of Titanium Metals Inc. [Timet], Kerr McGee Chemical LLC and Pioneer Chlor-Alkali, Co. Inc. to present worst-case scenarios for chemical disasters. About 300 people attended. • : ; -^ • :; :. s The meeting was held as part of the federally mandated Risk Management Plan [RMP] which requires companies to list hazardous chemicals and detail disaster scenarios. The major thing this is going to do is enable the facilities to determine if they [plants] need a very stringent accident prevention program," said Mark Zusy, supervisor of the Nevada Chemical Accident Prevention Program [CAPP]. Zusy, who will monitor and enforce the RMP through the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, said although the program is mandated, the local industries have taken an active approach to implement the plans. The plants have gone beyond what the law requires and are among the first in Nevada to follow through on the plans. About 66,000 facilities nationwide tire participating in the RMP. While the program began to foster better communication between industries and residents, Henderson is far beyond what lawmakers envisioned the legislation to encourage. Programs such as the Henderson Industrial Citizen Advisory Panel already act to bring plaot managers and residents together to discuss issues, but the RMP takes that cooperation a step further, Mayor Jim Gibson said. ^ The RMP has opened the lines of communication between the operators and our emergency response teams," he said. One of the improvements from preparing the plan was creating better safety measures such as an emergency board which pinpoints where emergencies may occur at each plant. The light board gives an indication of the level of emergency or lets local emergency responders know if the situation is under control. See BMI Page 4 ftob Weidenfeld/News Staff SIMON SAYS — Above: Local children play "Simon Says" along with singer/songwriter Nels Lund at Saturday's Family Day and Stand for Children. Sponsored by the city of Henderson, Family Advocates for Community Empowerment, HACA Family Resourca Center and SAFEHouse, the event featured entertainment by children's performer Nels, free Ben & Jerry's ice cream, games and informational booths. FAMILY DAY — Right: Three-yearold Adam Carter enjoys the activities at the third annual Family Day and Stand for Children event at Morrell Paric. \ Redevelopment ma^inclucle hotels convention area Kevin Ferguson News Staff Writer Thrf Phyllis E. Thompson Companies has released revised plans of their $100 million redevelopment district project which includes bringing a 200-300 room hotel and a 50,000 square-foot convention facility to the downtown area. The mixed-use project proposed for the northeast comer of Water and Basic streets would also include retail, eateries, offices constructed in three phases, according to Victor Vincent, director of construction for the Thompson Companies. The city's Redevelopment Agency owns the land and is currently in negotiations with-— the Thompson Companies about ^ the sale of the land. Ernie Rubi, chief of housing and redevelopment, said negotiations are still in the preliminary stages, but they like the concept. "We're still trying to negotiate an agreement and try to get the numbers down in terms of funding," Rubi said. "Once we do that, then we'll take a critical eye to see what's good and what needs to be tweaked a bit." Vincent said they want "to set the tone" of Water Street's redevelopment district because the area has sentimental value to Phyllis Thompson. She has lived in Henderson for nearly 50 years, graduated from Basic High School and used to frequent the diners on Water Street in her school days. "It's the core of our city nd ;^, the heartj)f our city and we want, j^^ to briag it back," Vincent said, ti* "We want to bring a Qrst-class *'lt'8 the core of our chy and the heart of our city and we want to bring it bacli. We want to bring a first'Claas project wUh Class A office buildings like in Green Valley and Summeriin to the ^ downtown area." Victor Vincafvt Director of Construction, Thonipson Companies project with Class A office buildings like in Green Valley and Summeriin to the downtown area." Thompson already owns 17 properties in the redevelopment area, four of which are contiguous to the proposed lot. Vincent said in an interview in January the location was also chosen because of its proximity to City Hall, the Convention Center and the Civic Plaza, which have potential for attracting additional traffic. The second annual ArtFest drew more than 40,000 people to the area over a weekend earlier this month and the Farmer's Market also in the Civic Plaza continues to draw large crowds !% REDEVELOPMENT Page 4 Lee Zaichick/News Staff RRE DAMAGE — Henderson firemen water down the structures destroyed in a fire at the Montesol development near Gibson Road and Lake Mead Drive on Friday afternoon. A plumber's torch set off the blaze, fire officials said. INSIDE Overvtew_ 2 Education 6 Death* J 5 Spodi 9 Welder's torch sparks construction fire News Staff Reports A plumbing welder's torch sparked a devastating blaze Friday which ripped through four new homes off Lake Mead Drive and Gibson Road. Four homes burned to the ground at the Montesol development about 11:30 a.m. after solder from a torch ignited a blaze in a home under cdnstruction. Flames quickly spread, catching nearby structures on fire, demolishing three homes which were finished. Nobody had lived in the homes yet. When firefighters arrived, the structures were fully engulfed in flames as smoke and fire could be seen rising from the area by passers-bye on Lake Mead Drive. A total of nine fire trucks responded to the scene with 25 firefighters battling the blaze. Engines responded to the scene within five minutes of the first call and were able to contain the flames to keep them from spreading to nearby homes. It took about 15 minutes to control thc^ blaze, fire chief Brad Kreutzer said. Homes behind the structures received minor smoke and water damage. No ii^uries resulted fi'om the incident. SPORTS TUESDAY T SiK('i.i(lo soitJMJl tc.iin IIIIISIH-S S(>( OIUI .II st.iliIn Brief aae Your neighbor... Betsy Gillis ClaMHied. 12 Volume 50, 41ft EdMoii HBC Publications PO Box 90430 Henderson, NV 89009 (702) 435-7700 Mooxcr sUIIHs l(> sl.ll record lor Skvh.iuks r.ij;!' I I OiithcWl>:www.l Fax: (702) 434-3527 Express Yourself; (702) 585-9879 E-Mail: HonoeNewsNVOaol.com Office Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. M-F Clfy' Menidrbl Day The city of Henderson will honor its veterans with a Memorial Day celebration at 10 a.m. Saturday in the Civic Piazi Amphitheater. Sen. Richard Bryan, 0Nev., is scheduled to speak. TtM>rpe Spirit Awar^ The )im Thorpe Spirit Award will be presented Thursday to Carol Ann Ewing, who was declared legally Wind in 1991 and who contmues to work with students. The presentation is part of Thorpe Spirit week at the Henderson elementary school that bears the athlete's name. Panaro, Cino trial condudet A federal jury found Robert Panaro and Stephen Cino not guilty of any wrong-doing m connection with the murder of mobster Herbie Blitztein, but guiKy of other durges. See Pas* S. Betsy Gillie has (bund her true niche in liie. A former reporter and photographer in Kingman, Ariz., Gillis got her master's degree in education fi^m UNLV and is now a special education teacher at White Middle School. Gillis recently received the Teacher of the Year" award • from Alexis Park Resort and Spa. The district-wide award is chosen from student essays about their favorite teachers. "It was a huge surprise to get the award because the winners weren't notified before the presentation," she said. "Every teacher wants to make an impact on their students and it's very touching to be recognized by them.* Gillis, ei^th-grader John Fields, the student who wrote the eaaay, and the ichool eachpreceived $500.


Citation
1999-05-20 - Henderson Home News

Material Information

Title:
1999-05-20 - Henderson Home News
Creator:
Marciniak, D. B. ( Columnist )
Ferguson, Kevin ( Columnist )
Cohen, Richard ( Columnist )
Hanlon, Bill ( Columnist )
Tischler, Eric ( Columnist )
Brewer, Ray ( Columnist )
Tittrington, Brad ( Columnist )
Allen, D. J. ( Columnist )
Thiessen, Gary ( Columnist )
Miele, Rose Ann Rabiola ( Columnist )
Baker, Chuck N. ( Columnist )
Henderson, Barb ( Columnist )
Eicher, Ray ( Columnist )
Earl, Phillip I. ( Columnist )
Bishop, Carolyn D. ( Columnist )
Zaichick, Lee ( Photographer )
Weidenfeld, Rob ( Photographer )
Tischler, Eric ( Photographer )
Miele, Rose Ann Rabiola ( Photographer )
McGlone, Jack ( Photographer )
Publisher:
O'Callaghan, Mike
HBC Publications, Inc.
Creation Date:
1999-05-20
Language:
English
Materials:
Paper ( medium )

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Nevada
Henderson
East Las Vegas
City and town life -- Nevada -- Henderson
Community life -- Nevada -- Henderson
History -- Henderson (Nev.) -- 20th century
Genre:
Newspapers

Notes

Acknowledgments:
Greenspun Media sponsors this collection.
Collection Location:
Greenspun Media retains possession of the bound, original newspapers. Henderson District Public Libraries retains possession of the microfilm and the digital files.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Holding Location:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Rights Management:
The items in this collection are provided for non-commercial personal and academic use by Henderson Library patrons and may not be republished in any way. Contact Greenspun Media Group for additional information regarding rights to this material: http://www.greenspunmedia.com
Resource Identifier:
hhn4748 ( Digital Id )

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

Page 20 Henderson Home New* Tuesday, May 18,1999 Kitchell Contractors tops out St. Rose project Kitchell Contractors has completed the steel structure for the St. Rose Dominican Hospital Siena Campus project in Henderson for Catholic Healthcare West. This is the second St. Rose Dominican Hospital campus in the city of Henderson. Kitchell is serving as construction manager/ general contractor for the project, which totals $47 million in construction costs, and $185 million in overall costs. The architect for the 257,000square-foot, 139-bed acute care hospital is HAS Inc., based in Dallas. Construction is scheduled to complete in January 2000. Founded in 1950 in Phoenix, Kitchell specializes in healthcare, retail, advanced technology/ industrial and office construction throughout the western United States and Mexico. The. company is currently ranked the nation's 13th largest healthcare construction manager by Modern Healthcare. Kitchell's recent healthcare projects include the Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix, an ongoing remodel/expansion of Northern Arizona Healthcare's Flagstaff Medical Center in Flagstaff and Coltimbia's Sunrise MountainView Hospital and Medical Center in northwest Las Vegas. Read it in the News .* • • • .* -k • • • • .** • • • • .* *' • • • .* piliiili DAILY Lee & Sakaiiara announces construction completion Lee & Sakahara Architects AIA, Inc. has announced construction is nearing completion on Phase One of the Palms at Green Valley at Sunset Way and Valle Verde Dr. in Henderson. Lee & Sakahara provided all design and coordinated all engineering services for the project. The opening is scheduled for this month. Phase One of the project consists of four tilt-up concrete buildings and more than 46,000 square feet of flex (office/warehouse) space. Construction costs for Phase One is valued at more than $2 million. < Groundbreaking for Phase II of the project, also designed by Lee & Sakahara, is scheduled for mid-summer. Newport Beach, Calif.-based Green Valley Capital LLC is the developer. Las Vegas-based Burnett Haase Construction is the contractor. Established in 179, Lee & Sakahara is an award-winning, 40-person architecture firm licensed in 35 states with offices in Las Vegas for the past three years and Irvine, Calif, the past 20 years. ,::,;•' Lee & Sakahara has* completed numerous commercial. retail, restaurant, hotel, industrial, high-tech and government projects throughout the country. Some of its various clients include ProLogis Trust, The Howard ,Hughes Corp., Transwestern Properties, Clark County School District, El Torito Restaurants, Trammel Crow Development, and various governmental agencies. PRIME RIB "4' SUNDAY THURSDAY b^l W^bb Corp. announces several promotions Del Webb Corp., developer of Sun City communities in Summerlin, MacDonald Ranch and Anthem, recently announced several Las Vegas promotions. In Sun City construction operations, Paul Torblaa is now director o/construction operations and Craig Fritsinger is now construction division manager. In Sun City sales and marketing. Valerie Kruse is now marketing support manager, Debi Greer is now manager of sales administration at Sun City Anthem and Marcelle Lahademe is now contracts supervisor at Sun City MacDonald Ranch. "These promotions exemplify our commitment to promoting our employees from within the (fSlTHi^ny,'' said Frank Pankratz, senior vice president and general manger of Sun Cities Las Vegas. "The company has grown tremendously in the past year, which gives extensive opportunities to both DEATHS Michael James Callaiian Michael James Callahan, 94, died Thursday, May 13, in Henderson. Born May 26,1904, in Pennsylvania, he hacf been a resident of Henderson for two years. He was a grocery meat cutter. He was a veterancf the U.S. Army. He IS survived by one sister, Marie Imelda of New York. There are no local services. Interment will be in Pennsylvania. Arrangements were handled by 4Hites Funeral Home, in Henderson. Donald Lee Ctiandier Donald Lee Chandler, 69. died Tuesday, May 11. 1999. in Milton Freewater, Ore., where he lived for the past three years. He lived in Henderson and Las Vegas tor 51 years before moving to Oregon, He attended Henderson Elementary and Basic High School. He worked for the Nevada Test Site for about 20 years. He was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force, having served in the Korean War. He was discharged in 1953. He is survived by his wife, Nikki of Oregon and daughter Janlee of Utah; brothers. Randy, Ray and Larry Chandler; sisters LasVernne Dapprich, Rheba Brooks and Frances Sicklemier. Private servk:es are in Oregon. Herbert Ferguson Herbert Ferguson, 91, died May 10.1999. He was bom May 11,1907 in Wayne County, W.V., and fiad been a retired c(vil service employee of the United States Navy. He is survived by hts wife, Anne of Henderson; daughters, Barbara McDaniel of Henderson, and Sally Adams of Canoga Park, Calif; son. Steve Ferguson of Henderson; sister, Ethel Beck of Columbus, Ohio; seven grandchildren; 14 great grandchildren; and eight great-great grandctiildren. Arrangements were handled by Palm Mortuary-Eastern. Dave Parlcer Dave Parker. 53. died Sunday. May 9. 1999, in Las Vegas. Bom Aug. 2. 1945, in Tennessee he had beon a long-time resident of Las Vegas. He was a water purlfk:atkxi talMman, and was a veteran. He IS survived by his wife, Oebonrfi Parker of Las Vegas; sMert, Patrick Boon* and Carol Bowden both of ArtcaoMs; tam, O.J. Bartholomew lito of ArkanMS. thor* are no local —o/km. Interment wW ba in Taxaa. current and potential employees.' Torblaa joined Del Webb in 1987 as a quality assurance representative at Sun City Tucson and was promoted to positions including manager of product control, customer service manager and general construction superintendent before his current position. Fritsinger was previously a senior purchasing agent, senior contracts administrator and special projects manager before his current position. Fritsinger led the effort to construct Del Webb's new 45,000-square-foot administrative building in Anthem. In the sales and marketing department, Kruse was previously a front desk clerk in Sun City's Vacation Getaway program and sales administration manager before her current position. Kruse is now responsible for all of Sun Cities Las Vegas customer communication and Vacation Getaway operations. Arrangements were handled by Hites Funeral Home, in Henderson. Robert N. King Robert N. King, 60, died Thursday, May 13, 1999, in Las Vegas. Born Jan. 30,1939, in MIddleton. Tenn., he had been a resident of Henderson for two years. He was a retired dry cleaner and presser. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He is survived by his wife. Toni L. of Henderson; daughters, Kelly of Arcadia, Calif; Sharon of Henderson; Michelle of Los Angeles, Calif.; sons, Danny of Chicago, III.; Robert of Detroit, Mich.; Joseph of Grand Rapids. Mich.; Thomas of Ba'dwin Park. Calif. ; and Anthony of Los Angeles .Calif.; his mother, Christine King of Ripley, Tenn.; sister, Mae Frances Hunter of Sacramento, Calif.; brothers, Jimmy King, Billy King and John Raymong King, all of Chicago an(t13 grandchildren. Visitation will be from 3 to 7 p.m. today at Palm Mortuary-Henderson. Servtees will be held at 2 p.m. Wednesday at Palm MortuaryHenderson. Intemient will be m the Palm Memorial Park-Henderson. Arrangements were handled by Palm Mortuary-Henderson. John Touielo John Touielo, 82, died Thursday. May 13,1999, in Las Vegas. Bom June 18, 1916, in Newark, N.H.. he had been a resident of Henderson for one year. He was a retired business machine company technical representative. He was a 27-year resident of Port Monmouth. N.J.; a member of the American Legion; a volunteer fireman/policeman for 22 years in Port Monmouth. and was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force, having served in World War II. He is survived by his wife, Nanette of Henderson; daughters, Judi (John) Palumbo, also of Henderson; Celeste (George) Blake of Laurence Hartx)r, N.J.; Nanette (John) Warner of Haziet. N.J.; son, Qane D'Amico of Queens, N.Y.; brother, James Turello of Levittown, N.Y.; eight grandsons, five granddaughters and one great-granddaughter. The family suggests donatkxia to 0)9 Danny Thomas St. Jude Hoapital tef Cancar Raaa a rch. Visitation wW ba frotn9:30 to 10:30 a.m. today at Pahn Mortuary-Eastern. Sm^Km fM ba held at 11 a.m. today at 8t. Tllomas Mora CathoHc Church. Arrangamama were handled by Pakn Mortaiafy-Eastem. Greer was previously in the contracts department and supervisor for sales administration for Sun City MacDonald Ranch before her current position. Lahademe was previously aij.8enior data coordinator before her current position. / Del Webb is the developer of Anthem, a nearly 5,000-acre master-planned community in Henderson. : • 20 OZ. T-BON£ STEAK ^3'^ Also available Monday ;• ^ FRIED CHICKEN ^2^^ ^' All dinners include all you can eat salad bar *^ served from 4:00 10:00 pm (Subicct to change without notice) Subscribe to the News 435-7700 CASINO RESTAURANT There s no place like our place for breakfast, luncli or dinner Brand New Hyundais Several to Choose from Limited Cars at this Price Don't delay Why Buy Used When You Can Buy Brand New for Less? #3 IN THE NATION BEN STEPMAN () HYunoni 460 NO. BOULDER HIGHWAY 565-1500 IN HENDERSON OF COURSE! THURSDAY May 20, 1999 HO n i: r\ %T 66 4 PROOF BMI IMAGING 1115 ARQUES AVE E. SUNNYVALE, CA 94086 04/04/00_ MAI] 1 Henderson, Nevada 50Casino fire sparks rooftop rescue O.B. Marciniatc News Staff Writer Smoldering debris sparked by a welder's torch touched off a rescue of two workers from the TDof of The Reserve Hotel Casino Tuesday morning. I^lf^8 of smoke slowly rose from behind two construction workers around 10:15 a.m. as they nervously waited for Henderson firefight^ to raise a ladder to rescue them from the northwest tower on the roof of the casino. Although fire officials indicated the fire was small and no lives were in danger, the incident marks the first threat at a high-rise hotel to which Henderson fire crews responded. "They didn't know they were not in danger," Henderson Pire Chief Joe Hill said. "They just looked down find saw the smoke and climbed onto the roof." Hill indicated the two men, who were not identified by Reserve or fire officials, had been welding when a spark fell into a pile of cardboard boxes below the main casino tower, sparking a small fire. Upon arrival, firefighters noted small flames and smoke on the tower. Officials called additional support, but the situation was controlled within five minutes of arrival. "We ran down to try to stop it, but couldn't," one of the men told the News before being advised by his employer not to talk to the news media and taken away. The trapped workers suffered no ii\juries, and remained in good spirits as they came off the roof with the assistance from firefighters. "Thanks for the ride, guys," one of the two said aloud to an engine crew as they helped the two down the fire ladder after being plucked from the tower. Two fire engines, an ambulance and afire rescue responded to the scene. It is believed the sparks came from a 300 amp DC welder supplied by SNE Equipment Services which the two had been operating. "Our guests were never in danger and are safe," said Angle Baker, The Reserve's general manager. Baker said the casino has been under SM FIRE Page 4 Lee Zaichick/News Staff HELP — Cornered by the smoke and fire started by a welder's torch, workers yell to co-workrs from the northwest tower of The Reserve Hotel and Casino Tuesday morning as Henderson firefighters rescue the men. Redevelopment Agency hopes to see projects 'go verticar next year Kevin Ferguson News Staff Writer Henderson Redevelopment Agency officials say they are close to reaching a tviming point in rejuvenating the downtown area. For the past year or two, they have been in the "land acquisition mode," but Finance Director Steve Hanson said it's now time to get "reputable developers to partner with the city." Ernie Rubi, chief of housing and redevelopment, said the next phase is "seeing projects go vertical and businesses opening on Wator Street and the Thompson project becoming reality." Phyllis E. Thompson Companies' proposal is to develop a mixed-use project on the northeast corner of Water and Basic streets that would include retail, eateries, offices and potentially guest rooms or permanent upscale residential units. The company and city officials have been in negotiations about the sale of that land since January. Rubi said he doesn't expect it to be completed before July. Hanson said the agency, an independent entity, has maximized its borrowing limit during the "land acquisition mode." In the past two years, the agency has borrowed $10 million from the city to purchase run-^own propertiee^ in the Townsite area with plans to prepare the land for resale to developers. In total, that includes 37 parcels of land within the redevelopment district. Four of those parcels are on Water Street across from City Hall. Others include six parcels on the comer of Victory Road and Water Street and eight parcels along Basic Road. As that land sits in the agency's hands, no property tax dollars are generated. Rubi said once they get developers to buy the land, a steady stream of tax dollars will start coming in. Tuesday, the agency approved its expenditure budget of $1.14 million for the fiscal year 2000 (July 1,1999 ending June 30, 2000). The agency anticipates to generate $1.2 million in revenue. Almost half of that is generated from the redevelopment district's assessed valuation for the year. The agency still has another $4.4 million available to acquire additonal land or negotiate with developers. Community Development Director Mary Kay Peck said the long-term vision of Water Street is to "make it an exciting pedestrian-downtown with small, friendly two-to-three story type buildings with shops and offices." For the fiscal year 2000, Rubi said the game plan is to establish design guidelines for Water Street after conducting a market analysis identifying what types of businesses would want to relocate to a refurbished area. "Hypothetically, could the downtown support a Nordstrom's? Probably not, but most likely coffee shops, bookstores, sewing shops, bike shops and arts and crafts," Rubi said. Rubi said the agency is not in "hard negotiations" with any megor developers, yet, l^sides See REDEVELOPMENT Page 2 City files for re-Hearing on Thirstbusters; tavern also files complaint against city Kevin Ferguson News Staff Writer A difference of opinion and a dispute of the facts have led both the city and Thirstbusters to file for a re-hearing to the Nevada Supreme Court regarding whether or not the Green Valley tavern may expand ito gaming. Henderson officials filed their appeal Friday disputing that there was ever a motion by the Henderson City Council to limit gaming "in Henderson," according to Norman Kirshman, the attorney representing the city. ?We believe the court overlooked the site-sensitivit^of this [tavern]," Kirshman said, adding that other gaming establishments in Henderson may have expanded but didn't have the same variables involved, such as proximity to residential neighbors. Thirstbuster co-owner Ron Coury disputes that, saying they are "better isolated" from residents than Barley's and Renata's. "Zoning guidelines indicate we have an excellent buffer to residential neighborhoods," Coury said. Thirstbusters, which has 40 slot machines, has been seeking to expand ito gaming within its biiilding f^r nearly eight years. But a condition on their gaming license restricts them to no more than 40. The owners agreed to that condition in 1992, but have been saying competition among other gaming establishments in the area warrant the removal of that condition. The Nevada Supreme Court ruled last month that the limitation on Thirstbusters may be an "inequitable and oppressive" restriction, ordering the City Council to reconsider the tavern's gaming expansion at a future meeting. Kirshman contends the city's reasoning for preventing more gaming machines at Thirstbusters is not based on minimizing growth of gaming in Henderson nor ite Green Valley neighborhood. "The Council's decision in 1992 was that a 55,000-square-foot building in that size shopping center is not appropriate for 199 slot machines and nine table games," Kirshman said, in reference to the amount of gaming that would be allowed if the condition was removed from Thirstbusters' gaming license. Coury said the limitation has limited the business from generating the revenue that would have made it possible to expand its building before other See THiRTSBUSTERS Page 2 Rob Weidenfeld/News Staff SWEARIIMG IN—City Clerk Monice Simmons swears in new Councilman Steve Kirk at a special ceremony before Tuesday night's meeting. Kirk, along with Councilmembers Amanda Cyphers and Andy Haf an, as well as IMunicipei Court Judge John Provost, were elected last month and begen four-year terms. INSIDE Deaths Happeninft_ Senior Neifin_ Sporti .14 SPORTS THURSDAY • Basi( looks to dclend its /one VOIU'VIKII! litlo Minor I oamir iipd.ito: L.iRos.i m'ts.inothcr (li.jiH (' p.imV) VdMnc S0/40lh EdHion HBC Pubhcations PO Box 90430 Henderson, NV 89009 (702) 435-7700 On Mw Wcfc: wwmM*niti tor^homtnt^txont Fax: (702) 434-3527 Expresi Yourwjf: (702) 565-9879 E-Mail: Homef^ewsNVVaol.com Office Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. M-F In Brief. City ranlted third best to retire in new list The HendersonBoulder City area is ranked third in the fifth edition of "Retirement Places Rated' See (tory. Page 2, and editorial Page 6. City marica opening ef new utilitict office City officials on Wednesday marked the openinfi o^ a new office in the Pebble Marketplace Seepages. Principal retires JLof>g-time school^ administrator Diana Chalfant is retiring. Sec Page 8. Auto competition Basic High students competed in a statewide auto repair competition. See Page 9. Boulder City fo\k Fest For a look at last weekend's Folk Fest in Boulder City, see today'* Panorama Cover. In the Spotlight... Silverado softbaii After finishing fourth in the 1996 state Softball tournament, Silverado coach Chuck Pope first realized his team had the potential to do something special. The '96 squad received solid contributions from four sophomores — April Arata, Laura Connors, TifTani Finateri and Julia Yurek — in giving Pope a glimpse of what he perceived as a bright future. Some two years, later the same core of players along with senior Stormy Hanson (who transferred from Rancho for the 1997 season) and a cast of other role players are back in the state spotlight. Page 19 The Skyhawks celebrate

PAGE 2

Pag* 2 Hmderton Horn* Nws Thursday, May 20. 1999 !K*vln Farguson ;News Staff Writer) City rated third best place to retire ENVELOPMENT 7 — Mild winterVclimates, a low cost of living and minimal taxes are among the things drawing seniors to relocate to Henderson, •according to a recently published •edition of "Retirement Places •Rated." The book published^ by Macmillan and due out in stores soon ranks Henderson and Boulder City the third most desirable out of 187 American communities to retire. "Clark County has been in the book through its lifespan (16 years), but this year I decided to look at its suburbs because the county is over a million peopler*^ said David Savageau, the book's author. "Henderson and Boulder City have shown tremendous growth because they are remote of big city problems." Savageau said the latest trend has been for seniors to move tp Rocky Mountain and desert southwest sireas in contrast to their parents who retired in California and Florida. The popular place to retire used to be Palm Beach, Fla., and now it's Clark County," he said. The two communities that beat out Henderson-Boulder City were Fort Collins-Loveland, Colo, and Charleston-Sea. Islands, S.C. This is the fifth edition of "Retired Places Rated, the first was published in 1983. Savageau said they began profiling retired communities because people in their 50s are weighing options in later life, one of them is re-location. "Each year, a half a million Studio cancels site tour; agrees to conform to conditiorfs News Staff Reports A special Henderson Planning Commission meeting scheduled for tonight to tour the site proposed for a movie studio has been canceled. Studio officials faxed a letter to the city late Monday night (after the News went to press for Tuesday's edition), withdrawing their use permit application which requested permission for a building heights exceeding Wagon Wheel Industrial Park's neighborhood guidelines. The letter states, "Since the sole reason for the Planning Commission's site visit... is to review neighborhood concerns related to the line of site (in relation to their homes and the studio], the site tour is now unnecessary. ..." Since studio officials are no longer seeking a use permit for two 55-foot sound stage buildings, all buildings on that site are expected to be no higher than 45 feet tall. The planners are scheduled to rule on a planned-unit development for the movie studio proposed on 20 acres near Dawson Avenue and the railroad tracks May 27. THIRSTBUSTERSu From Page 1 offices and restaurants were developed west of their property. Thirstbusters is on the corner of Valle Verde and Sunset Road. Shortly after the city filed its appeal to the Supreme Court last Friday, Thirstbusters filed its own appeal on grounds of "changed circumstances." Also, tavern owners filed a motion claiming discrimination against Coury. "They are discriminating against me because the condition says the company can't expand as long as Ron Coury owns the tavern," Coury said. Both appeals were still pending when the News went to press Wednesday morning. Through April, the city has spent $89,328 in legal fees on this case, beginning in 1996 when the city sought outride counsel for their defense. From 1992 to 1996, the city attorney's office handled the defense. Police brutality lawsuit is appealed D.B. Marciniak News Staff Writer It may take another year and $5,000-$10,000 of taxpayer money to resolve Lisa Gager's lawsuit against the Henderson Police Department for alleged brutality. Prosecutors backed by the ACLU have appealed a decision by U.S. District Court Judge David Hagen to dismiss the case because the claim was filed long after the two-year statute of limitations had passed. Gager's lawsuit stems from a Feb. 13,1996, incident which occurred in the Henderson Detention Center. She alleges she was unnecessarily peppersprayed, beaten and improperly strip-searched while being detained by police. She was in jail on a child abuse charge. Police said they were forced to take such measures because Gager refused to change into a jail uniform. Details of the incident were never discussed in court as the case was dismissed under the statute of limitations law. The lawsuit came after the highly publicized incident was picked up by news media. A tape was released to a television station by a former jail employee. "The plaintiff has the right to appeal," said Walter Cannon, the lead attorney retained by the city. "Statutes of limitations are pretty well-defined. It usually is pretty clear=cut." Caiinon said the case will likely take a year and a half to determine the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals outcome. "The moments of the case have never been explored in court," Cannon said. "It never got a decision or became in issue since it was not filed in a timely fashion." Prosecutors for the case did not return repeated phone calls t^ clarify under what grounds the appeal was filed. Cannon said he does not know of any new evidence prosecutors will present to further support their case. Meanwhile, a new court date has been set for Gager to appear in Henderson Justice Court in connection to an unrelated incident. Gager will appear in Justice Court Department 2 on June 7 on charges of DUI liquor, following too closely and possession of drug paraphernalia. Charges stem from an Aug. 14 incident where Gager was involved in an auto collision at Warm Springs Road and Valle Verde Drive. A truck driven by Gager collided with another vehicle and the two hooked bumpers. Gager tried pulling her truck away, but was unsuccessful. A bystander and driver of the second vehicle reached into her car and took her keys after suspecting alcohol may have been involved. Fantastic Dining...fanta5tic Prices Enjoy Great Food In a Casual Atmosphen TOP SIRLOIN • HEARTY T-BONE BIG PORTERHOUSE • JUICY PRIME RIB Starting at Only ^8.95 ^ No Reservations Required Daily Lunch Specials Starting at Selection of great appetizers, salad, hot and cold sandwiches, burgers and dinner entrees , FAAP, FACC Therm M. Staauto, FAAP EatkkeiR.lU|i>ot,llD,FAAP litri^T,,Klp,.p,F^^, ,^ ,,.,,, ,,: LOCATED AT THE OFFICES OF PHYSICIAN'S MEDICAL CENTER CHIROPRACTI 55 South Valle Verde, Suite #450 Henderson, NV 89012 (702) 614-9500 '^• • i,: • ::-<^^-:''.}''::;,X. :- M'I'dlMMI \|S V\ \ll UtII (I IIWK^ Ml l)l( \RI ,^. \ll)s| ()I|||k |\M K\\i\ xCCKPrKI) 110 E. take Mead, Ste. 201 Heodmon' 544-9444 4845 S. Rainbow Blvd.. Ste. 403 LM Veeac • 873-9972 Please cnl/ for ajypinnlmmi sv nursing cafe ^Sprcxalizeisocid tSOO 'Wef/ ^i^atm Spwt^^ yoad • 9(MdMson %*, 890t4 T-.'l' PV .•Vv.>irll'-(TOUCAN TRAILS MOVE INTO A SINGLE SIORY HOME JOR UNDER $1600. INCLUDING DOWNRMfMENT WHO SAyS DREAMS CANT COME TRUE? r Signature Homes, the dream builder, welcomes you to Toucan Trails. A collection of singlestory detached homes with up to 2,155 square feet starting at only $129,990. At Toucan Trails there are No Special District Fees. Visit our sales office or call us at 568-7459. We're open daily at 10AM. >^^^^^ Btec Visit us online at www.signaturehomes.OHn Total imvrinoMlbMd on a sale* phtfol $129,990 MonlhK pa)rinni(a<$K1 praicipdi Sales office open 10 AM daily. 568-7459 PMor aad IHW Mb|Kl todMMF. Aflt 7.M5. -— ^ M

PAGE 3

Pag* 2 Hmderton Horn* Nws Thursday, May 20. 1999 !K*vln Farguson ;News Staff Writer) City rated third best place to retire ENVELOPMENT 7 — Mild winterVclimates, a low cost of living and minimal taxes are among the things drawing seniors to relocate to Henderson, •according to a recently published •edition of "Retirement Places •Rated." The book published^ by Macmillan and due out in stores soon ranks Henderson and Boulder City the third most desirable out of 187 American communities to retire. "Clark County has been in the book through its lifespan (16 years), but this year I decided to look at its suburbs because the county is over a million peopler*^ said David Savageau, the book's author. "Henderson and Boulder City have shown tremendous growth because they are remote of big city problems." Savageau said the latest trend has been for seniors to move tp Rocky Mountain and desert southwest sireas in contrast to their parents who retired in California and Florida. The popular place to retire used to be Palm Beach, Fla., and now it's Clark County," he said. The two communities that beat out Henderson-Boulder City were Fort Collins-Loveland, Colo, and Charleston-Sea. Islands, S.C. This is the fifth edition of "Retired Places Rated, the first was published in 1983. Savageau said they began profiling retired communities because people in their 50s are weighing options in later life, one of them is re-location. "Each year, a half a million Studio cancels site tour; agrees to conform to conditiorfs News Staff Reports A special Henderson Planning Commission meeting scheduled for tonight to tour the site proposed for a movie studio has been canceled. Studio officials faxed a letter to the city late Monday night (after the News went to press for Tuesday's edition), withdrawing their use permit application which requested permission for a building heights exceeding Wagon Wheel Industrial Park's neighborhood guidelines. The letter states, "Since the sole reason for the Planning Commission's site visit... is to review neighborhood concerns related to the line of site (in relation to their homes and the studio], the site tour is now unnecessary. ..." Since studio officials are no longer seeking a use permit for two 55-foot sound stage buildings, all buildings on that site are expected to be no higher than 45 feet tall. The planners are scheduled to rule on a planned-unit development for the movie studio proposed on 20 acres near Dawson Avenue and the railroad tracks May 27. THIRSTBUSTERSu From Page 1 offices and restaurants were developed west of their property. Thirstbusters is on the corner of Valle Verde and Sunset Road. Shortly after the city filed its appeal to the Supreme Court last Friday, Thirstbusters filed its own appeal on grounds of "changed circumstances." Also, tavern owners filed a motion claiming discrimination against Coury. "They are discriminating against me because the condition says the company can't expand as long as Ron Coury owns the tavern," Coury said. Both appeals were still pending when the News went to press Wednesday morning. Through April, the city has spent $89,328 in legal fees on this case, beginning in 1996 when the city sought outride counsel for their defense. From 1992 to 1996, the city attorney's office handled the defense. Police brutality lawsuit is appealed D.B. Marciniak News Staff Writer It may take another year and $5,000-$10,000 of taxpayer money to resolve Lisa Gager's lawsuit against the Henderson Police Department for alleged brutality. Prosecutors backed by the ACLU have appealed a decision by U.S. District Court Judge David Hagen to dismiss the case because the claim was filed long after the two-year statute of limitations had passed. Gager's lawsuit stems from a Feb. 13,1996, incident which occurred in the Henderson Detention Center. She alleges she was unnecessarily peppersprayed, beaten and improperly strip-searched while being detained by police. She was in jail on a child abuse charge. Police said they were forced to take such measures because Gager refused to change into a jail uniform. Details of the incident were never discussed in court as the case was dismissed under the statute of limitations law. The lawsuit came after the highly publicized incident was picked up by news media. A tape was released to a television station by a former jail employee. "The plaintiff has the right to appeal," said Walter Cannon, the lead attorney retained by the city. "Statutes of limitations are pretty well-defined. It usually is pretty clear=cut." Caiinon said the case will likely take a year and a half to determine the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals outcome. "The moments of the case have never been explored in court," Cannon said. "It never got a decision or became in issue since it was not filed in a timely fashion." Prosecutors for the case did not return repeated phone calls t^ clarify under what grounds the appeal was filed. Cannon said he does not know of any new evidence prosecutors will present to further support their case. Meanwhile, a new court date has been set for Gager to appear in Henderson Justice Court in connection to an unrelated incident. Gager will appear in Justice Court Department 2 on June 7 on charges of DUI liquor, following too closely and possession of drug paraphernalia. Charges stem from an Aug. 14 incident where Gager was involved in an auto collision at Warm Springs Road and Valle Verde Drive. A truck driven by Gager collided with another vehicle and the two hooked bumpers. Gager tried pulling her truck away, but was unsuccessful. A bystander and driver of the second vehicle reached into her car and took her keys after suspecting alcohol may have been involved. Fantastic Dining...fanta5tic Prices Enjoy Great Food In a Casual Atmosphen TOP SIRLOIN • HEARTY T-BONE BIG PORTERHOUSE • JUICY PRIME RIB Starting at Only ^8.95 ^ No Reservations Required Daily Lunch Specials Starting at Selection of great appetizers, salad, hot and cold sandwiches, burgers and dinner entrees , FAAP, FACC Therm M. Staauto, FAAP EatkkeiR.lU|i>ot,llD,FAAP litri^T,,Klp,.p,F^^, ,^ ,,.,,, ,,: LOCATED AT THE OFFICES OF PHYSICIAN'S MEDICAL CENTER CHIROPRACTI 55 South Valle Verde, Suite #450 Henderson, NV 89012 (702) 614-9500 '^• • i,: • ::-<^^-:''.}''::;,X. :- M'I'dlMMI \|S V\ \ll UtII (I IIWK^ Ml l)l( \RI ,^. \ll)s| ()I|||k |\M K\\i\ xCCKPrKI) 110 E. take Mead, Ste. 201 Heodmon' 544-9444 4845 S. Rainbow Blvd.. Ste. 403 LM Veeac • 873-9972 Please cnl/ for ajypinnlmmi sv nursing cafe ^Sprcxalizeisocid tSOO 'Wef/ ^i^atm Spwt^^ yoad • 9(MdMson %*, 890t4 T-.'l' PV .•Vv.>irll'-(TOUCAN TRAILS MOVE INTO A SINGLE SIORY HOME JOR UNDER $1600. INCLUDING DOWNRMfMENT WHO SAyS DREAMS CANT COME TRUE? r Signature Homes, the dream builder, welcomes you to Toucan Trails. A collection of singlestory detached homes with up to 2,155 square feet starting at only $129,990. At Toucan Trails there are No Special District Fees. Visit our sales office or call us at 568-7459. We're open daily at 10AM. >^^^^^ Btec Visit us online at www.signaturehomes.OHn Total imvrinoMlbMd on a sale* phtfol $129,990 MonlhK pa)rinni(a<$K1 praicipdi Sales office open 10 AM daily. 568-7459 PMor aad IHW Mb|Kl todMMF. Aflt 7.M5. -— ^ M

PAGE 4

rww^^^ • ••P mmmnr^m^ Paga 4 Hwidarson Horn* Nws Thursday, May 20, .1999 RESERVE From Page 1 remodeling and expansion. She indicated she was unsure if the incident was sparked from renovation work or routine' maintenance in the tower area. Hill said there was no smoke damage to the casino or hotel areas, and the structures remained unharmed from fire. There was no evacuation of the casino area, Although the stranded welders were unharmed, one firefighter who entered the smoldering area was taken to St. Rose Dominican Hospital for smoke inhalation. A small crew of firefighters entered the tower to assure the threat of fire was extingmshed. "They had all the personnel that we needed," Hill said, adding the Henderson Fire Department is adequately prepared for the threat of high rise fires. As more multi-story hotels are built in the city, there is more of a threat posed for firefighters. Two times a year, firefighters undergo high-rise training at the Ruth Fire Training Center in Henderson. Lee Zaichick/News Staff SAFETY — A welder leaps Into the safety of the basket after baing rescued from the smoke-filled northwest tower of The Reserve Hotel and Casino Tuesday. Officials have taken further action to help mitigate the threat of fire emergencies at high-rise structures by requiring a new fire station near Henderson's next hotel, the Hyatt Regency Lake Las Vegas Resort. "These [hotels}have.the most advanced fire prevention systems available," Hill said. He added in many instances, firefighters' jobs are made easier since hotels sprinklers are triggered to control fires before firefighters arrive. He said in this instance there was no report of the sprinkler system being triggered. • ''' • ^"' • ':': • • '' '"[-... FURNITURE Nurturing eciiicatibh offered for Registration is currently under way for the Nurturing Program family education clas&es for parents and children ages new-born to five-years old. The class meets from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursdays at the SAFEHouse Family Strengthening Center, 18 Sunrise Dr., Suite G-70, behind Ethel M Chocolates. The Nurturing Programs are family education classes that focus on such topics as communication, developmental stages OfflBaMM? \MiKII] Burglaries were reported on the following streets in Henderson during May 3 May 16 Police indicate the best way to deter neighborhood crime is through a watch program. To reach HPD's Neighborhood Watch Program call 565-1623. 0-100 Block of E OCEAN AV 5/07 0-100 Block of SEA HOLLY WY 5/14 100 Block of DANJA 5/10 100 Block of HICKORY ST 5/16 100 Block of JOSHUA ST 5/05 100 Block ofWSUNSETRD 5/15 1 700 Block of CLEAR RIVER FALLS LA 5/03 1 700 Block of CRYSTAL STREAM AV 5/03 1 700 Block of LA CRUZ DR 5/05 1 700 Block of TALON AV 5/09 i 900 Block of RAMROD AV .;. 5/1 1 200 Block of VICTORIA TE 5/14 2000 Block of OLYMPIC AV 5/13 2000 Block of RAINBOW VIEW ST 5/04 2000 Block of S MACIC WY 5/12 2 100 Block of CIMARRON HILL DR 5/04 2400 Block of PING DR 5/15 2400 Block of TOTTINCHAM RD 5/07 2500 Block of WIGWAM PK 5/05 -2500 Block of W IGWA M P K ,,,. V5— 2500 Block of WIGWAM PK 5/05 2700 Block of N GREEN VALLEY Pfc r^.^i 5/05 300 Block,of ATHENS AV :..^J..:.^.Z 5/16 300 Block of N STEPHANIE ST 5/1 5 300 Block of S BOULDER HW 5/09 300 Block of S MAJOR AV 5/11 300 Block of SANTALI CT 5/12 400 Block of BEARDSLEY Cl 5/12 400 Block of E MERLAYNE DR. ._. 5/10 400 Block of S WATER'ST ..':::!:. 5/11 4600 Block of E SUNSET RD 5/12 500 Block of CLOSE AV 5/07 500 Block of PREAKNESS STAKES ST 5/06 600 Block of HITCHEN POST DR 5/16 600 Block of PROFESSIONAL AV 5/07 6700 Block of PROFESSIONAL AV 5/07 600 Block of RED BARK LA *5/16 600 Block of S BOULDER HW 5/07 800 Block of ANCHOR DR 5/10 800 Block of BERCAMONT DR '. 5/10 800 Block of SECO VERDE AV 5/10 900 Block of LAS PALMAS ENTRADA AV 5/07 Information provided by Hendersort Police Deft. Don't Miss The Opening of our Grand StQliS^ WHEM ON EAkfH? Saturday, May 29*11^ 523 Nevada Hwy. in Boulder City 293-3447 Fax: 293-3491 Historic Old Town Uw0lry and Oddities from all conHnents and ^ros • Comeos Horplrvs Czech Brooches • Porchwork Scarves, Jackets • Decorored Formalwear --—— — • Precious & Semi-Precious Deeded Necklaces ^ • Sfoined Gloss Jewelry Designs • Fossils Shork Teerh and other Dead Stuff Glenn G Heidi hove rroveled 6 yeors doing om ond crofr shows coosf-rocooy Their wcxk is one-of-a-kind pece$ using new ond vinroge jewelry pom from nnony countries ond cultures. And WHERE ON EARTH did fhey finolly decide ro serrle ond open o srofe? Nor on eosy choice for seosooed rroveleo • bur DOULDER CITY rr is • o cozy. ofTi-friendly comnnunify wfth greof weofher ond greor porenrkal Looking forword ro meeting ybu oil here or rhef newe venrure. IMWCIff ON lAMtHI COUj rHREE-EYED WALm j pf children and effective behavior management techniques. Children who attend with their parents are introduced, in a child's group, to the same topics along with fun activities. Infants will be cared for in the New Baby Center, while older children will be engaged in nurturing' activities. Classes are led by trained facilitators and are sponsored by the Family Strengthening Services of SAFEHouse. To register or for more information, call 451-4203. Sunset Garden Club lists winners The Sunset Garden Club hosted its seventh annual Flower • Show May 15 at the Green Valley Library. Show chai rman Janet Benson and club members hosted an afternoon of horticulture and design exhibits. Horticulture exhibits were presented in several categories. Bea Babbitt received the Award of Horticultural Excellence for her Lipstick Plant. "Movie Mania" was the design theme. Jean Englemann received the Design Choice Award for her interpretation of "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" The Pot-Et-Fleurs Design Award was given to Jean Nelson fro her "Sound of Music" design. In the Youth Design category, the Design Choice Award was —given to Kate Bhmke Ibr hef interpretation of "The Little Mermaid." Master gardener Sheri Cole constructed an educational display entitled "Anything that Grows in your Garden goes into a Flower Arrangement." WATCH FOR IN M/^18-19 %"L^1S CHILD SEEKERS CARD GROCERY A A A A A A 3IGGE$T DISCOUNT. :EVER OFFERED: • TTTTVVV • MUST BRING THE CARD FOR DISCOUNT • THE CARD ONLY COMES OUT ONCE PHILLIPS FURNITURE C^C 433 W. LAKE MEAD DR. -'"•'' HENDERSON 6050 Read it in the News (foitex S)avieU <£ S)olo>ut Xcuvn Sien, £uAe, 3i%ittanif • For Directions or Church information Call 702-435-7337 visit our W9b$lt at www.croaaroads-henderson.org 540 E. Laiie Mead Drive • Three Blocks East of Boulder Highway Between Buritholder and Ivy Street • ;>-'-*.^ lVtAtf(* Finding the right home is hard. finding the right homeowners insurance IS easy • ^*7^ —_• See State Farm Agent: Bob Piper, Agent (702)269-8452 1000 N. QraMi VaMey Pkwy., Suite 230 HMdMWM, NV 89014 (Pebble MarkalptaM, GrMn Valay Pkwy. A UriM MMd Dr.) like a good neighbor, State Farm is there^ STATE fMM FKC AND CASUAtlY COMfANY • HOME OfftCE BlOOMINWOH, IIUNCIS Thursday, May 20, 1999 Henderson Home News Page 5 Monument to unborn presented to SI. Peter's ."Henderson's Knights of Co^ lumbus receiitly presented tq St. Peter the Ai^rtle Church a memorial to the lives lost to abortions. The granite monument, in the shape of a heart, stands in a quiet, grassy area just south of the church. According to Joseph Savone, chairman of the project, it is designed to provide passers-by an opp6rtunity to pause, pray and ponder the value of Goo-given life. V V :y The memorial was blessed and dedicated by St. Peter's pastor, the Rev. Mark Roberts, in ceremonies conducted before parishioners on May 16. An honor guard of Fourth Degree Knights in regalia, all members of the sponsoring local Rosary Council 3741, assisted in the ceremonies. Savone, who headed the monument fundraising drive with his wife, Phyllis, as co-chair, reported the contributions exceeded the costs by $961 and he City's Pe CDDC7 Wood-Handcrafted Henderson. Personalized with first name or nickname & school colors. (4 3/4 X 41/2 inches) Place your order now! 564-2373 Pick-up at Farmer's Market on May 13th or 20th Courtesy Photo MEMORIAL — Henderson's Knights of Columbus recently presented to St. Peter the Apostle Church a memorial to the jives lost to abortions. and Council drand Knight Roland LeClerc presented a check in that amoimt to the parish for use by its Right to Life committee. A special touch was added to the ceremonies when Lorraine Erling, president of the Knights' Auxiliary, presented a check for $500 to the youth group of. the parish tow&rd its effort to make a trip to Rome in the year 2000. .,.> • • • • •I. • .-.„'*.; • .-; Marketplace neighborhood office opens The city of Hendersob's neighborhood services office is celebrating more than 11 years of service by moving to a larger, • more conveniently located office. On Wednesday, May 19, Henderson Mayor Jim Gibson officially opened the office with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. "Our customers wanted a central location with better access, so we decided to relocate our neighborhood office to meet their needs," Kurt Segler, Henderson's utility services manager said. The new office is located at Green Valley Parkway between Lake Mead and Pebble Road. "A larger customer area and a confidential customer resolution area at the new office allows us to provide a higher level of service to our customers," Segler said. "That means less waiting in line and faster service." The Pebble Marketplace Neighborhood Office opened for business on Monday, May 3. The office is located at 1000 N. Green Valley Parkway, Suite 720. The phone number is 260-8444. Office hours are from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Residents can pay water and sewer bills on their way to work or on the way home in the evening. The City Hall Utility Services office is also open five days a week to assist customers. Additional city services provided at this office include dog licensing and trash service signup. Clark County forms board of rabbis Dinner served at the Green's is more than you could ever imagine! Supper Club The Las Vegas Valley witnessed a very special moment in the life of the Jewish community with the formation of the Clark CP„„*,. Board of Rabbis. Rabbi Sanford Akselrad, spiritual leader of Congregation Ner Tamid, and a resident of Henderson, was elected as the founding president of the organization. Rabbi Felipe Goodman of Temple Beth Sholom was elected as treasurer and secretary. ish people in Southern Nevada and throughout the world. It will serve as the voice of the Jewish religious community in Southern Nevada.' Buy two dinner entrees and receive a FREE Bottle ^ of Wine 9 Present coupon when ordering. Served in house only. • Expires 5/31/99 Valid Sunday Thursday Only. < OPEN 7 DAYS 454-4211 Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner 2241 N. Green Valley Pkvvy. (corner of Green Valley; Pkwy. & WJarm Sprinijs in the Albertson's Shoppintj Center) ThegTdqp serves sefVeral pOf!jfi^f''Tt^ vfhiJtSi) ^^ura^e poses including promoting (he and promote Rabbinic growth and interests ofJudaism and the Jewdevelopment. ii : :I; I i c u c Sf.Rose ^ality Care. Right Now : • f • ,• "• • • • • •' • "• • • r';;'-^ '**'.-. V^:.-'V. • • -.' • .'•-.* • • ^• • '" • • • • • Were do you turn when you've got a raging fever, a .sick child or an injury that needs immediate attention? St. Rose VrgentC;Axe. We re here to provide the high quality, compassionate care people have come to know from .> St. Rose Dominican Hospital— ri^ht now. : • :• .. • : • • •'-;' • For your convenience, St Rose £/>;gi/Care offers... v • Qualified physicians • Extended hours, .seven days a week "-'.:/"\ --• Convenient location • Acceptance of most insurance plans" • Walk-in appointments • Additional medical services on-site Your continued good health is important... Let us help find the right doctor for you. Call St. Rose's Physician Referral Service at (702) 564-4508 Hartwell Medical Center NowOpent W. Warm Springs Road and Spencer/Shadow Crest -40 am—7 pm Monday-Friday 10 am-5 pm Saturday-Sunday I*arlcway Medical Plaza Sow open! 100 N. Green Valley Pkwy. {at Lake Mead) Monday-Friday 9 am<-8 pm Saturday-Sunday 10 am-5 pm (702) 914-7100 4^ St Rose Dominican Hospital CHW ,a. iu 8;> Aji^ 5*5oia ,oo^ Cloud Carpets _jiowJias— fashionable Karastans at unheard of prices. Right now, our entire collection of SisalWooF^ carpets and rugs is being offered at some : well-fitted prices. During the National Karastan Promotion these and all -. our other fine carpets are on sale. So come to our sale, because there's never been a better time to dress up your home. ^' viw^w^^yp^^^'^ "Try, Sa|aH| iiliHiMll^UU Builders/Buyers Excluded am) ^^^ serving South mnSta/O CaRPBTS bORapem Serving Southern Nevada Since 1962 N. Rainbow 4699 Industrial Rd. 334 S. Water Street 312 Mesquite Blvd NORTHWEST LAS VEGAS HENDERSON MESQUrPE 631-2850 798-0798 565-1441 ^'346-3050 X

PAGE 5

rww^^^ • ••P mmmnr^m^ Paga 4 Hwidarson Horn* Nws Thursday, May 20, .1999 RESERVE From Page 1 remodeling and expansion. She indicated she was unsure if the incident was sparked from renovation work or routine' maintenance in the tower area. Hill said there was no smoke damage to the casino or hotel areas, and the structures remained unharmed from fire. There was no evacuation of the casino area, Although the stranded welders were unharmed, one firefighter who entered the smoldering area was taken to St. Rose Dominican Hospital for smoke inhalation. A small crew of firefighters entered the tower to assure the threat of fire was extingmshed. "They had all the personnel that we needed," Hill said, adding the Henderson Fire Department is adequately prepared for the threat of high rise fires. As more multi-story hotels are built in the city, there is more of a threat posed for firefighters. Two times a year, firefighters undergo high-rise training at the Ruth Fire Training Center in Henderson. Lee Zaichick/News Staff SAFETY — A welder leaps Into the safety of the basket after baing rescued from the smoke-filled northwest tower of The Reserve Hotel and Casino Tuesday. Officials have taken further action to help mitigate the threat of fire emergencies at high-rise structures by requiring a new fire station near Henderson's next hotel, the Hyatt Regency Lake Las Vegas Resort. "These [hotels}have.the most advanced fire prevention systems available," Hill said. He added in many instances, firefighters' jobs are made easier since hotels sprinklers are triggered to control fires before firefighters arrive. He said in this instance there was no report of the sprinkler system being triggered. • ''' • ^"' • ':': • • '' '"[-... FURNITURE Nurturing eciiicatibh offered for Registration is currently under way for the Nurturing Program family education clas&es for parents and children ages new-born to five-years old. The class meets from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursdays at the SAFEHouse Family Strengthening Center, 18 Sunrise Dr., Suite G-70, behind Ethel M Chocolates. The Nurturing Programs are family education classes that focus on such topics as communication, developmental stages OfflBaMM? \MiKII] Burglaries were reported on the following streets in Henderson during May 3 May 16 Police indicate the best way to deter neighborhood crime is through a watch program. To reach HPD's Neighborhood Watch Program call 565-1623. 0-100 Block of E OCEAN AV 5/07 0-100 Block of SEA HOLLY WY 5/14 100 Block of DANJA 5/10 100 Block of HICKORY ST 5/16 100 Block of JOSHUA ST 5/05 100 Block ofWSUNSETRD 5/15 1 700 Block of CLEAR RIVER FALLS LA 5/03 1 700 Block of CRYSTAL STREAM AV 5/03 1 700 Block of LA CRUZ DR 5/05 1 700 Block of TALON AV 5/09 i 900 Block of RAMROD AV .;. 5/1 1 200 Block of VICTORIA TE 5/14 2000 Block of OLYMPIC AV 5/13 2000 Block of RAINBOW VIEW ST 5/04 2000 Block of S MACIC WY 5/12 2 100 Block of CIMARRON HILL DR 5/04 2400 Block of PING DR 5/15 2400 Block of TOTTINCHAM RD 5/07 2500 Block of WIGWAM PK 5/05 -2500 Block of W IGWA M P K ,,,. V5— 2500 Block of WIGWAM PK 5/05 2700 Block of N GREEN VALLEY Pfc r^.^i 5/05 300 Block,of ATHENS AV :..^J..:.^.Z 5/16 300 Block of N STEPHANIE ST 5/1 5 300 Block of S BOULDER HW 5/09 300 Block of S MAJOR AV 5/11 300 Block of SANTALI CT 5/12 400 Block of BEARDSLEY Cl 5/12 400 Block of E MERLAYNE DR. ._. 5/10 400 Block of S WATER'ST ..':::!:. 5/11 4600 Block of E SUNSET RD 5/12 500 Block of CLOSE AV 5/07 500 Block of PREAKNESS STAKES ST 5/06 600 Block of HITCHEN POST DR 5/16 600 Block of PROFESSIONAL AV 5/07 6700 Block of PROFESSIONAL AV 5/07 600 Block of RED BARK LA *5/16 600 Block of S BOULDER HW 5/07 800 Block of ANCHOR DR 5/10 800 Block of BERCAMONT DR '. 5/10 800 Block of SECO VERDE AV 5/10 900 Block of LAS PALMAS ENTRADA AV 5/07 Information provided by Hendersort Police Deft. Don't Miss The Opening of our Grand StQliS^ WHEM ON EAkfH? Saturday, May 29*11^ 523 Nevada Hwy. in Boulder City 293-3447 Fax: 293-3491 Historic Old Town Uw0lry and Oddities from all conHnents and ^ros • Comeos Horplrvs Czech Brooches • Porchwork Scarves, Jackets • Decorored Formalwear --—— — • Precious & Semi-Precious Deeded Necklaces ^ • Sfoined Gloss Jewelry Designs • Fossils Shork Teerh and other Dead Stuff Glenn G Heidi hove rroveled 6 yeors doing om ond crofr shows coosf-rocooy Their wcxk is one-of-a-kind pece$ using new ond vinroge jewelry pom from nnony countries ond cultures. And WHERE ON EARTH did fhey finolly decide ro serrle ond open o srofe? Nor on eosy choice for seosooed rroveleo • bur DOULDER CITY rr is • o cozy. ofTi-friendly comnnunify wfth greof weofher ond greor porenrkal Looking forword ro meeting ybu oil here or rhef newe venrure. IMWCIff ON lAMtHI COUj rHREE-EYED WALm j pf children and effective behavior management techniques. Children who attend with their parents are introduced, in a child's group, to the same topics along with fun activities. Infants will be cared for in the New Baby Center, while older children will be engaged in nurturing' activities. Classes are led by trained facilitators and are sponsored by the Family Strengthening Services of SAFEHouse. To register or for more information, call 451-4203. Sunset Garden Club lists winners The Sunset Garden Club hosted its seventh annual Flower • Show May 15 at the Green Valley Library. Show chai rman Janet Benson and club members hosted an afternoon of horticulture and design exhibits. Horticulture exhibits were presented in several categories. Bea Babbitt received the Award of Horticultural Excellence for her Lipstick Plant. "Movie Mania" was the design theme. Jean Englemann received the Design Choice Award for her interpretation of "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" The Pot-Et-Fleurs Design Award was given to Jean Nelson fro her "Sound of Music" design. In the Youth Design category, the Design Choice Award was —given to Kate Bhmke Ibr hef interpretation of "The Little Mermaid." Master gardener Sheri Cole constructed an educational display entitled "Anything that Grows in your Garden goes into a Flower Arrangement." WATCH FOR IN M/^18-19 %"L^1S CHILD SEEKERS CARD GROCERY A A A A A A 3IGGE$T DISCOUNT. :EVER OFFERED: • TTTTVVV • MUST BRING THE CARD FOR DISCOUNT • THE CARD ONLY COMES OUT ONCE PHILLIPS FURNITURE C^C 433 W. LAKE MEAD DR. -'"•'' HENDERSON 6050 Read it in the News (foitex S)avieU <£ S)olo>ut Xcuvn Sien, £uAe, 3i%ittanif • For Directions or Church information Call 702-435-7337 visit our W9b$lt at www.croaaroads-henderson.org 540 E. Laiie Mead Drive • Three Blocks East of Boulder Highway Between Buritholder and Ivy Street • ;>-'-*.^ lVtAtf(* Finding the right home is hard. finding the right homeowners insurance IS easy • ^*7^ —_• See State Farm Agent: Bob Piper, Agent (702)269-8452 1000 N. QraMi VaMey Pkwy., Suite 230 HMdMWM, NV 89014 (Pebble MarkalptaM, GrMn Valay Pkwy. A UriM MMd Dr.) like a good neighbor, State Farm is there^ STATE fMM FKC AND CASUAtlY COMfANY • HOME OfftCE BlOOMINWOH, IIUNCIS Thursday, May 20, 1999 Henderson Home News Page 5 Monument to unborn presented to SI. Peter's ."Henderson's Knights of Co^ lumbus receiitly presented tq St. Peter the Ai^rtle Church a memorial to the lives lost to abortions. The granite monument, in the shape of a heart, stands in a quiet, grassy area just south of the church. According to Joseph Savone, chairman of the project, it is designed to provide passers-by an opp6rtunity to pause, pray and ponder the value of Goo-given life. V V :y The memorial was blessed and dedicated by St. Peter's pastor, the Rev. Mark Roberts, in ceremonies conducted before parishioners on May 16. An honor guard of Fourth Degree Knights in regalia, all members of the sponsoring local Rosary Council 3741, assisted in the ceremonies. Savone, who headed the monument fundraising drive with his wife, Phyllis, as co-chair, reported the contributions exceeded the costs by $961 and he City's Pe CDDC7 Wood-Handcrafted Henderson. Personalized with first name or nickname & school colors. (4 3/4 X 41/2 inches) Place your order now! 564-2373 Pick-up at Farmer's Market on May 13th or 20th Courtesy Photo MEMORIAL — Henderson's Knights of Columbus recently presented to St. Peter the Apostle Church a memorial to the jives lost to abortions. and Council drand Knight Roland LeClerc presented a check in that amoimt to the parish for use by its Right to Life committee. A special touch was added to the ceremonies when Lorraine Erling, president of the Knights' Auxiliary, presented a check for $500 to the youth group of. the parish tow&rd its effort to make a trip to Rome in the year 2000. .,.> • • • • •I. • .-.„'*.; • .-; Marketplace neighborhood office opens The city of Hendersob's neighborhood services office is celebrating more than 11 years of service by moving to a larger, • more conveniently located office. On Wednesday, May 19, Henderson Mayor Jim Gibson officially opened the office with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. "Our customers wanted a central location with better access, so we decided to relocate our neighborhood office to meet their needs," Kurt Segler, Henderson's utility services manager said. The new office is located at Green Valley Parkway between Lake Mead and Pebble Road. "A larger customer area and a confidential customer resolution area at the new office allows us to provide a higher level of service to our customers," Segler said. "That means less waiting in line and faster service." The Pebble Marketplace Neighborhood Office opened for business on Monday, May 3. The office is located at 1000 N. Green Valley Parkway, Suite 720. The phone number is 260-8444. Office hours are from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Residents can pay water and sewer bills on their way to work or on the way home in the evening. The City Hall Utility Services office is also open five days a week to assist customers. Additional city services provided at this office include dog licensing and trash service signup. Clark County forms board of rabbis Dinner served at the Green's is more than you could ever imagine! Supper Club The Las Vegas Valley witnessed a very special moment in the life of the Jewish community with the formation of the Clark CP„„*,. Board of Rabbis. Rabbi Sanford Akselrad, spiritual leader of Congregation Ner Tamid, and a resident of Henderson, was elected as the founding president of the organization. Rabbi Felipe Goodman of Temple Beth Sholom was elected as treasurer and secretary. ish people in Southern Nevada and throughout the world. It will serve as the voice of the Jewish religious community in Southern Nevada.' Buy two dinner entrees and receive a FREE Bottle ^ of Wine 9 Present coupon when ordering. Served in house only. • Expires 5/31/99 Valid Sunday Thursday Only. < OPEN 7 DAYS 454-4211 Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner 2241 N. Green Valley Pkvvy. (corner of Green Valley; Pkwy. & WJarm Sprinijs in the Albertson's Shoppintj Center) ThegTdqp serves sefVeral pOf!jfi^f''Tt^ vfhiJtSi) ^^ura^e poses including promoting (he and promote Rabbinic growth and interests ofJudaism and the Jewdevelopment. ii : :I; I i c u c Sf.Rose ^ality Care. Right Now : • f • ,• "• • • • • •' • "• • • r';;'-^ '**'.-. V^:.-'V. • • -.' • .'•-.* • • ^• • '" • • • • • Were do you turn when you've got a raging fever, a .sick child or an injury that needs immediate attention? St. Rose VrgentC;Axe. We re here to provide the high quality, compassionate care people have come to know from .> St. Rose Dominican Hospital— ri^ht now. : • :• .. • : • • •'-;' • For your convenience, St Rose £/>;gi/Care offers... v • Qualified physicians • Extended hours, .seven days a week "-'.:/"\ --• Convenient location • Acceptance of most insurance plans" • Walk-in appointments • Additional medical services on-site Your continued good health is important... Let us help find the right doctor for you. Call St. Rose's Physician Referral Service at (702) 564-4508 Hartwell Medical Center NowOpent W. Warm Springs Road and Spencer/Shadow Crest -40 am—7 pm Monday-Friday 10 am-5 pm Saturday-Sunday I*arlcway Medical Plaza Sow open! 100 N. Green Valley Pkwy. {at Lake Mead) Monday-Friday 9 am<-8 pm Saturday-Sunday 10 am-5 pm (702) 914-7100 4^ St Rose Dominican Hospital CHW ,a. iu 8;> Aji^ 5*5oia ,oo^ Cloud Carpets _jiowJias— fashionable Karastans at unheard of prices. Right now, our entire collection of SisalWooF^ carpets and rugs is being offered at some : well-fitted prices. During the National Karastan Promotion these and all -. our other fine carpets are on sale. So come to our sale, because there's never been a better time to dress up your home. ^' viw^w^^yp^^^'^ "Try, Sa|aH| iiliHiMll^UU Builders/Buyers Excluded am) ^^^ serving South mnSta/O CaRPBTS bORapem Serving Southern Nevada Since 1962 N. Rainbow 4699 Industrial Rd. 334 S. Water Street 312 Mesquite Blvd NORTHWEST LAS VEGAS HENDERSON MESQUrPE 631-2850 798-0798 565-1441 ^'346-3050 X

PAGE 6

. .t ,;. ; ..:. M L.| ,^ ,^ .^ j^, ,, ,, .^ i „^ ., , j | i^ .p B H ^p. p;|^^P^^^PPH^|^|^P|^i^^ imm^mmmmmm VIEWPOINT HCMNEWS MHM O'CaNaghan Publisher *CMlyiiOXritoghan Co-Putjlisher 'PaulSzyiMko Managing Editor Pag* 6 Henderson Home News Thursday, May 20,1999 NEWS VIEW Another feather in the cap ? We should be getting used to all the positive regional and national attention our city has attracted through the past decade, but another feather in the cap is always appreciated. The Henderson-Boulder City area was named the third best place to retire in the country, according to the fifth edition of "Retirement Places Rates," by David Savageau. (See story. Page 2). Our area was beat out only by Fort CoUinsLoveland, Colo., and Charleston Sea Islands, S.C; Savageau surveyed retirees to identify factoijp most important to them. They included public golf courses, historical neighborhoods, mild climate and low crime rate. Henderson-Boulder City's economic and other recreational opportunities and proximity to a larger city also had to play a role in the ranking. The city has received alot of attention for its sustained residential growth in the 1990s, and the number of our new residents is related to the overall quality of life. That quality of life is good, very good, the envy of many throughout the nation. Those who have lived here any length of time know we have our fair share of problems coping with the growth, but we also are very fortunate to live here. Southern Nevada, and specifically Henderson is a superb place to earn a living, raise a family and retire. RICHARD COHEN A 'tr.ii'', i-li)l.''-., ]. .|l Medical privacy Americans might be surprised to learn that there are no comprehensive federal laws protecting the privacy of health records. Video store owners are barred from disclosing our rental histories and cable companies cannot divulge our channel choices, but nothing prevents medical record keepers from selling our most intimate medical information, without our consent. It's estimated that HMOs, drug companies and hospitals spend up to $15 billion a— year on technology to acquire and exchange medical information about, say, our blood pressun^ and • psychiatric medications. That's why it's so important that -Congress fulfill its promise to pass the nation's first medical privacy bill in this session. The key to making good on that pledge lies in finding the common ground that eluded legislators last year, when eight medical privacy bills were debated but scrapped due to irreconcilable differences. This week House and Senate : staffers will be working to reach agreement on several recently introduced medical privacy bills. Everyone agrees that Americans should have the right to inspect and amend their medical records and that medical record keepers should obtain patients' authorization before releasing their medical information. Controversy, however, still swirls around two questions: •How should medical releases be ~ worded and when should they be required? Congress should avoid the coercive language in a bill by Sen. Robert F. Bennett (R-Utah) that would allow medical providers to deny treatment to patients who refuse to waive their privacy rights. Legislators should also reject the language proposed by Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (DVt.) that would require doctors' offices to seek authorization even for routine transactions like tallying bills and consulting specialists. Instead, legislators in both houses should embrace compromise language hy Reps. Henry A. Waxman (D-Los Angeles) and Gary A. Condit CDCeres) that would allow such uses but prevent abuse by requiring that patients' names be concealed, along with other curbs. 7::/:-':-: • —1~ •Should a new federal privacy law supersede state laws that provide even stronger protections? Sen. Bennett argues that a single, uniform national law is the only way to prevent health providers doing business across state lines from being confused by conflicting laws. But the same technology that has created the medical privacy crisis — computers — also allows health providers to properly manage complex information. A recent survey by the California Healthcare Foundation found that one in seven adults, in an effort to prevent violations of the legitimate zone of privacy, had lied to a doctor or withheld information concerning his or her medical history. Survey respondents worried, for instance, that employers or insurance companies would find out about a debilitating condition and then deny them insurance or a job. Such evidence that Americans are withholding information that doctors need to treat them should serve as a wake-up call to congressional leaders. It's becoming clear that prompt action to protect the privacy of medical records is not only a moral prioriify but a medical necessity. Lot Angelea Time* SEND YOUR LEIIERS TO THE EDITOR Dole speaks lip NEW YORK — This is a black town — and I'm not talking African American. I'm talking women's clothing — dresses, pants, suits and other things for which I do not know the right terms. This is not, definitely, a turquoise town, which is the color Elizabeth Dole wore last week when she addressed a mostly female audi^ce here. I thought she did about everything wrong. I came away impressed anyway. First, of course, was that silk suit — the color of Marriott, of Disney, of all of America west of the Hudson. This, though, was the Waldorf and the town was Gotham. Second, came the voice — soft, honeyed, words connected to one another by Spanish moss. It took Dole forever to make her point. New York minutes came and went — and so did my attention. Next, we come to the presentation. Dole did not do well — not on this day, anyway. She stepped on her laugh lines. Her timing was not sharp — or, maybe, it's just that her jokes were not funny. Frequently, she had to supply the laughter herself More often than not, her audience did not reciprocate and when she related how her mother "had lost her dinner" on the night Elizabeth announced she would postpone homemaking or whatever for law school, you wanted to remind Dole that this was a luncheon and people were eating. What's worse — at least I thought so until corrected — was that Dole spent much of her speech recounting how she has become the very'fi^i^ woman with a real shot at the White House. She talked about her smalltown upbringing and how, inexplicably, she wanted something more of life than hubby, kids and a house in the burbs. So she went to Harvard Law which, as we all now know, is The Night Mummy Lost It. After law school, she encountered the sort of sexism that men nowadays do not dare even to think of practicing. ; :, Wrong, I thought — all wrong. This was an audience assembled by the Ladies' Home Journal — urbane women, dressed in black, sporting Nokias. They don't want to hear about the past, I thought, they want to hear about the future. Give 'em a bridge to the 21st century, Liddy. Something like that. After the speech was over, I explained this to the two women sitting to my left. Wrong, they said. Dole was talking about their lives, too. Were these women typical? I have no idea. But they said they, too, were under pressure to forsake careers and have families — or, if they already have jobs, to be mor^ of a mother and less of a careerist. They called Dole a feminist — a true, honest-to-God feminist. They were, of course, right. And if she is that, she is also one of the few GOP presidential candidates to articulate a clear and, to my mind, bold position on Kosovo: Send in the troop.s, if need be. "Moving our troops into the theater so that they're ready is, I think, important," she said. "But most important, success can only be defined as driving tho?e forcje^ out pf^^^ strongly that this is a war we must win, and win absolutely." Just, a few days earlier. Dole had said something equally sensible in New Hampshire — this time on the subject of guns. She would ban copkiller bullets. She would keep the ban on some kinds of assault weapons. She called for safety locks on guns to protect children. Her audience of Republicem activists went into cardiac arrest. Gun control? What the blazes! What was wrong with this woman? We all know that Dole is driving for the center of the Republican Party. We know fUrtherthat she is appealing for women's votes — maybe the very GOP women who have been driven out of the party by 'the pro-life, pro-guns, pro-barefootand-pregnant crowd that would, if it could, take Clinton's bridge, turn it around, and point it toward the 19th century. We know, in short, that she is not necessarily putting principle ahead of politics, a la Sen. John McCain. She's no fighter pilot. But she is saying some things that need to be said — no matter what the reason. She has shown George W. Bush, the pretender to the nomination, how to take a position. She has talked reasonably about gun control and she strongly suggests to women that she — sorry, Bill — feels their pain. These positions may be poll-driven, but they are so refreshing to hear that I, for one, walked away from Dole's speech more impressed than I had expected. The hell with her clothes, ^ I ^^he actually had something to say. Ivjrrt --^H fvfiA nii'? H ynr • •, !n(iii nnovtih Cohen is a columnist for the Washington Post Writers Group. BILL HANLON Rubber is hitting the road in Legislature The rubber is beginning to hit the road in the Legislature with respect to hi|h school proficiency examinations. The failure rate on these exams should not come as a surprise to anyone. The Nevada state Board of Education predicted two years ago when the Legislature mandated implementing the new tests that the state could expect 10% of the student population not to be able to pass the exam and therefore not graduate fix)m high school. The sceneuno played out last week in the Nevada Legislature is being repeated nationwide. As states rushed to implement new, more rigorous standards, some states forgot to allow lead time to ensure that Students had ample opportunity to learn what was on the new tests. More reasonable people are now beginning to ask what is appropriate for all students to know and be able to do upon graduation. Last month I read an article in a Wisconsin newspaper about their new math standards being too high. Their legislature w^as reconsidering the algebra standai'ds they put in place because of the increased failure rates. In last week's New York Times, there was an article titled "Albany legislators seek to dilute tou^ new regents exams required for graduation." According to the story, an unusual coalition of state lawmakers, whose constituents range from inner-city residents to affluent suburbanites, is pushing to scale back new more stringent graduation requirements for all public school students. The New York lawmakers contend the new graduation standards are being phased in too quickly, do not accurately measure the overall studeat perfDrmanca of students and could result in increased failure and dropout rates across the state. Nevada's new standards to be implemented next year in math include polynomial factoring, solving systems of equations and inequalities, quadratics, and trigonometry. With over 50% of the state's juniors faihng the current test that don't include those, I have to conclude a lot more kids will fail future tests when the new standards are tested. While the state board predicted a 10% failure rate on the current test, the Council to Establish Academic standards has been reluctant to identify the percentage of students they believe will not graduate based on the new, more rigorous standards they created. My guess is that 20-25% of the students will not graduate high school based on the new academic standards in math. I say that because about 35% of the students who choose to take algebra nationwide fail the class, the incidence of failure should increase if we expect all students tti enroll in algebra. As Nevada's new, more rigorous academic standards created by the Council to Establish Academic Standards are implemented next year, this year's outcry will not even register a bleep on the radar screen. Prior to the standards movement that is currently sweeping across the countiy. the TIMSS study described America's curriculum "as a mile wide and an inch deep.' The recntly pubUshed McREL report suggests the new standards adopted by the states will take an additional nine years of schooling to cover. It would appear from these two reports that it would be prudent for the state to review the recently adopted state standards created by the council in math, English/Language Arts, and science to determine if they are reasonably attainable. m^m^^ Adding to the difficulty in implementing the more rigorous standards, Nevada adready has a shortage of math and science teachers, two of the areas being tested. It appears that the state's commitment to increased academic standards is not being matched by a commitment to providing world class teachers. Of the 2,500 teachers hired each year in the state, about 500 come from in-state teacher training programs. Knowing Nevada's salaries are low, teachers are not going to get a raise for another three years and the state does not offer incentives to attract teachers to the state, how do we expect to compete with other states for the other 2,000 teachers needed? The reluctance of the state Legislature to pass a bill*" that would allow retired teachers, in areas of shortage, to come back into the system speaks volumes about a lack of real commitment to public education and increased academic standards. Hanlon. a Las Vegas resident wtw writes a column about educatKx>. sits on the State Board of Education, is the admMMrstor.forthe Clark County School Districfs Matty Science Institute and is a parMinw insinjotof at UNLV. U LETTERS 'The News welcomes brief letters, signed with your name, address and phone for verification. Typed letters receive preference and the News resen^es the right to edit for grammar, spelling or length. Please mail to: Editor, Home News, 2 Commerce Center Drive. Henderson, NV 89014 Thursday, May 20, 1999 Henderson Home News Pag* 7 lEws VIEW Driver training and experience Editor: ; • :.* K.^-'v You should sit back and take another look at your editorial from the May 13,1999 edition. It appears unduly biased against teens. Along with other comments you say that, "Most teens are reckless in their driving..." and '':mo8t teens caught driving during this period are likely causing trouble any how." You also quote statistics which show that 16-year-old drivers have many more accidents than 17-year-old drivers. V I wonder about your information. Could it be that the teens we hear and read about are the ones who have gotten in trouble because of their actions; and that there is a larger number who have behaved responsibly and safely and therefore have not made the news? As to the information presenting 17, year-old drivers to be significantly safer than 16-year-olds. Could that be because the 17-year-old has now had a year of driving experience? Perhaps, with the change, the safety record of those would decrease due to this lack of experience. If we are going to pass laws to make our roads safer, how about supporting stiffer driver training requirements? I believe education and knowledge of driving situations might save more lives than waiting a year or two and then putting the same untrained and uniformed driver on the road. The experience and learning curve would just start from an older age. Why not a requirement for higher speed obstacle courses in driver's training programs? Let people, of whatever age, get a feel for some limits under various driving conditions. Of course, these programs would cost more, but we are talking about people's lives. If it is important enough for a na^w driver to be on the road at 16 (or 66 for that matter), he/she should be willing to pay for sufficient training to make themselves and others safe while on the roadways. Lest anyone think that I am championing teen drivers because I am one, I happened to have had my 70th birthday last month. I have been driving since I ,was 13 years old. Sure enough, I spent a lot of time being "unsafe" on the road. I don't recall being over that phase until I was well into my 208. The only things that made me a better driver were training classes and experience. STEWART W. EARL On guns and crime Editor: In your April 29 issue, regarding an article by Richard Cohen (Too Many Guns); If it were not tragic I would laugh my head off. Cohen is and always will be a total idiot. He and the rest of the reporters in the Washington Post have only one agenda, take the guns away from the honest gun owner. I wrote to the Washington Post some years ago and asked them why they were so against honest gun owners having firearms. Their comment was there is no such thing as an honest gtin owner. In Washington D.C., Mayor Marion Berry passed gun laws that prohibit anyone from owning a gun. And he tried to make it legal fbr the police to invade your home if they thought you might own a firearm, Washington D.C. has the highest crime rate of any city in the country. So much for no guns allowed. To top the no guns allowed. Berry got himself arrested for smoking dope, spent time in jail, and then was re-elected as mayor. It appears to me that the criminal element doesn't want the honest homeowner to have a gun to protect themselves. And the Washington Post is backing the criminal element in keeping guns out of the hands of honest gun owners. Never has any gun owner advocated that children be allowed to carry a firearm. We do advocate that everyone 14 and older be taught to respect the rights of others, safe gun handling and give training to teach young people that a firearm is not a toy and that life is a very precious thing. When the parents of our children start taking the responsibility of training the children that a life is not something you can waste just because you don't like something another person has done, then we can stop this horrible bloodshed. Taking firearms away fit)m honest gun owners is not going to stop the bloodshed. Japan has had laws prohibiting the ownership of firearms since the end of the war. Their crime rate is escalating at an unbehevable rate. The Philippine Island has the highest crime rate of any country and the weapons of choice? Machetes. England hfus made the ownership of firearms illegal and the crime rate has stayed the smie. Australia also has collected all the firearms and their crime rate has not diminished. So why does Mr. Cohen think that taking firearms away from honest gun owners is going to stop crime? If he would just take a minute and read the papers, he would find that the firearms used in Colorado massacre were illegally obtained. As long as people think they are justified in killing another person just because they feel like it we will have killing. And just what will be accompUshed by taking away all the firearms when the Colorado killers were using homemade bombs. Killers will find a way to kill if there are no guns. So what do you suggest? Making all knives illegal? Takiflg cars off the road? Let's start educating people that murder is not an acceptable excuse when you have a beef with someone. KENBURMAGE WHAT YOUR NEIGHBORS THINK "What do you think about President Elections are over! Editor: No more phone calls, literature in the mail, knocking at the door, no more candidate debates. Congratulations are in order for incumbent elected Coimcil seats. Andy Hafen and Amanda Cyphers, and newly elected Steve Kirk. Now that there is no more campaigning and politicking, the Council can concentrate on taking care of business on behalf of the residents of Henderson. With the recent lay-offs at Timet, Kidd Marshmallow, Breyer's Ice Cream and Kerr-McGee, we have families in Henderson faced with unemployment, no medical, drastic cuts in wages and struggling to support their families. Which brings me to my point! There has been a lot of controversy over the Black Mountain Studios. This industry is aWin-Win situation for the city of Henderson. No air emissions, no fear in contaminating the water or land. This type of industry the city of Henderson should be trying to attract and support to help diversify the economy. With the possibility of 1,000 jobs, well-paying jobs, medical benefits, and, most important, a secure job, not only would residents who are out of work, but businesses in the city, would prosper from Black Mountain Studios. To the Planning Commission, the Mayor, and all the Council, I personally plead to all of you on bfehalf of Doris Keating, the residents of Henderson and their children, to dolfne right thing and approve Black Mountain Studios, so all of Henderson c^/iave a brighter fiiture. ''=?^^T'?^''^'-^~ ~^'^^ BILLYHAND President, United Steelworkers of America, Local 4856 II disputes #^My n't belong Support film studio Editor: Now thatihe elections are over 1 would like to congratulate the incumbents Amanda Cyphers and Andy Hafen, and welcome Steve Kirk in his new role as Councilman. I would like us aU to move on to the future and get back to what really matters. Issues that face Henderson today like Black Mountain Studios. This project is too important to us in Henderson. I would like people to know that $5 billion leaves Califomia each year to film movies. Right now there are 47 shows filming in Canada not the USA You can not get on a sound stage in Califomia until after the year 2002. Why would we want our movies being made in other countries and not here? I realize that the movie studio is somewhat controversial for some. But this will bring good high-paying jobs to Henderson. It will bring a safe, clean environmentally friendly industry that is desperately needed in our town without polluting our water or our soil like some of the factories. We are not talking about Pepcon here. I humbly plea to Mayor Gibson and the Planning Commission and the City Council to move forward with this project without delay. We need Black Motmtain Studios and industries like it. If we let this opportunity go, we will be hurting our children. TONYA and BOB HUNT The last exception The purpose of uw? letfpir, JS m f^^fy pomts recently reported by j£pur ^ newspaper concerning commercial development oi| {forizon Ridge P^kway. (Medical Center Receives City Council Approval). At the Henderson City Council Meeting held May 11,1 spoke on behalf of some 40 plus residents in support of the proposed medicaJ/corporate office building planned at 2601 W. Horizon Ridge Parkway. The support of this project was gained through several meetings with developer Don Ross in which Ross made numerous adjustments to the project to satisfy nearby residents. However, the main reason the residents in the area were able to come to some agreement with the developer is that this piece of property has major power lines running through its boundaries and we realize that this particular piece of land would never be developed for single family residential use. Since the land was unacceptable for residential developmerit, residents felt that Ross's proposal was the best we could do for our neighborhood. The office complex is set back on the rear of the property, has many upgrades to the landscaping, the roof line of the building was redesigned in such a way as to protect the view, signage will be of monument type, parking lot lighting will be dimmed after a certain hour, and a bicycle path will run adjacent to the west side of the property line. We are adamantly opposed to further commercial development along Horizon Ridge Parkway because of concerns of increased traffic and congestion which prompts safety issues for adults and children in our neighborhood. The newspaper article gave the impression that because we agreed to this proposal, we might agree to other commercial development in our area. While we are not completel);.closed to accepting those parcels that have already been rezoned for commercial use, we must insist that Horizon Ridge Parkway not become a "Commercial Corridor" with businesses for neighbors ihstead of families. At the City (i^undl Meeting on May 11, Mayor Gibson and the Council echoed our concerns about where the commerdal development would end if they made this exception. Gibson ftjrther stated his hope that this would be the last exception. We hope this will indeed be the case. KAREN SEXTON It is unfortunate that a dispute between some parents and a Washoe County principal was aired in public at a March meeting of the School -, Board. Making the parents' grievances public was unfair to the principal, who had no opportunity to respond; it also was unfair to the parents (though it was their decision to go public with their complaints) and their children. It is particularly disttirbing that the parents thought, rightly or wrongly, that they had no alternative to using public comment time on the board agenda to get their complaints heard. The Washoe County School District has adopted a complaint procedure that allovvs parents to have their complaints heard first at the local level, then by a district administrator, then the superintendent and finally the School Board. The procedures are supposed to be published in each school's student handbook^ and complaint forms are supposed to be readily available at every school. To a large degree, the system works — 60 complaints have been filed this year; two have reached the superintendent. But apparently not all parents are getting the word, either through their own fault or that of their children's schools. Some n^ver see the handbooks; others don't read them when they come home; and some may be too angry to take the time to learn the correct procedure. Forms may be available, but if no one knows where they are, they're useless. The ultimate responsibility lies with the schools, however, to ensure that parents are informed of the policies and that forms are easily obtained. Going public with a personnel complaint should be the last option for a parent, an option that should never be needed. Reno Gazette-Journal ABOUT THESE PAGES These pages are the opinion pages of the newspaper News View is written by the editorial staff to bring attention to an issue of concern jn tfie community Our regular columnists reflect on state and national politics, as well as education Editorials re-printed from other newspapers provide other opinions Our readers are encouraged to write about local issues and submit them to the News Clinton's recent visit to Southern Nevada while the country is at war in Kosovo?" Cn w^ Hnl by ErkTIschlw/ HOD wwm09twW9a "I thought It was really neat that he came to visit our town." Victoria Short 'His time could **l know that it's "I was pretty probably have been important to take time enthusiastk about it better spe nt" out, but my inHial and it was pretty neat reacthn is he's to see Air Force One." goofing off." BothBagon Jim Golden J*nnif*r Pomaroy 'Wiile our country is in turmoil, our presklent deckles to take a vacathn. Weird." Marie Cavaliari A mmmmmm

PAGE 7

. .t ,;. ; ..:. M L.| ,^ ,^ .^ j^, ,, ,, .^ i „^ ., , j | i^ .p B H ^p. p;|^^P^^^PPH^|^|^P|^i^^ imm^mmmmmm VIEWPOINT HCMNEWS MHM O'CaNaghan Publisher *CMlyiiOXritoghan Co-Putjlisher 'PaulSzyiMko Managing Editor Pag* 6 Henderson Home News Thursday, May 20,1999 NEWS VIEW Another feather in the cap ? We should be getting used to all the positive regional and national attention our city has attracted through the past decade, but another feather in the cap is always appreciated. The Henderson-Boulder City area was named the third best place to retire in the country, according to the fifth edition of "Retirement Places Rates," by David Savageau. (See story. Page 2). Our area was beat out only by Fort CoUinsLoveland, Colo., and Charleston Sea Islands, S.C; Savageau surveyed retirees to identify factoijp most important to them. They included public golf courses, historical neighborhoods, mild climate and low crime rate. Henderson-Boulder City's economic and other recreational opportunities and proximity to a larger city also had to play a role in the ranking. The city has received alot of attention for its sustained residential growth in the 1990s, and the number of our new residents is related to the overall quality of life. That quality of life is good, very good, the envy of many throughout the nation. Those who have lived here any length of time know we have our fair share of problems coping with the growth, but we also are very fortunate to live here. Southern Nevada, and specifically Henderson is a superb place to earn a living, raise a family and retire. RICHARD COHEN A 'tr.ii'', i-li)l.''-., ]. .|l Medical privacy Americans might be surprised to learn that there are no comprehensive federal laws protecting the privacy of health records. Video store owners are barred from disclosing our rental histories and cable companies cannot divulge our channel choices, but nothing prevents medical record keepers from selling our most intimate medical information, without our consent. It's estimated that HMOs, drug companies and hospitals spend up to $15 billion a— year on technology to acquire and exchange medical information about, say, our blood pressun^ and • psychiatric medications. That's why it's so important that -Congress fulfill its promise to pass the nation's first medical privacy bill in this session. The key to making good on that pledge lies in finding the common ground that eluded legislators last year, when eight medical privacy bills were debated but scrapped due to irreconcilable differences. This week House and Senate : staffers will be working to reach agreement on several recently introduced medical privacy bills. Everyone agrees that Americans should have the right to inspect and amend their medical records and that medical record keepers should obtain patients' authorization before releasing their medical information. Controversy, however, still swirls around two questions: •How should medical releases be ~ worded and when should they be required? Congress should avoid the coercive language in a bill by Sen. Robert F. Bennett (R-Utah) that would allow medical providers to deny treatment to patients who refuse to waive their privacy rights. Legislators should also reject the language proposed by Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (DVt.) that would require doctors' offices to seek authorization even for routine transactions like tallying bills and consulting specialists. Instead, legislators in both houses should embrace compromise language hy Reps. Henry A. Waxman (D-Los Angeles) and Gary A. Condit CDCeres) that would allow such uses but prevent abuse by requiring that patients' names be concealed, along with other curbs. 7::/:-':-: • —1~ •Should a new federal privacy law supersede state laws that provide even stronger protections? Sen. Bennett argues that a single, uniform national law is the only way to prevent health providers doing business across state lines from being confused by conflicting laws. But the same technology that has created the medical privacy crisis — computers — also allows health providers to properly manage complex information. A recent survey by the California Healthcare Foundation found that one in seven adults, in an effort to prevent violations of the legitimate zone of privacy, had lied to a doctor or withheld information concerning his or her medical history. Survey respondents worried, for instance, that employers or insurance companies would find out about a debilitating condition and then deny them insurance or a job. Such evidence that Americans are withholding information that doctors need to treat them should serve as a wake-up call to congressional leaders. It's becoming clear that prompt action to protect the privacy of medical records is not only a moral prioriify but a medical necessity. Lot Angelea Time* SEND YOUR LEIIERS TO THE EDITOR Dole speaks lip NEW YORK — This is a black town — and I'm not talking African American. I'm talking women's clothing — dresses, pants, suits and other things for which I do not know the right terms. This is not, definitely, a turquoise town, which is the color Elizabeth Dole wore last week when she addressed a mostly female audi^ce here. I thought she did about everything wrong. I came away impressed anyway. First, of course, was that silk suit — the color of Marriott, of Disney, of all of America west of the Hudson. This, though, was the Waldorf and the town was Gotham. Second, came the voice — soft, honeyed, words connected to one another by Spanish moss. It took Dole forever to make her point. New York minutes came and went — and so did my attention. Next, we come to the presentation. Dole did not do well — not on this day, anyway. She stepped on her laugh lines. Her timing was not sharp — or, maybe, it's just that her jokes were not funny. Frequently, she had to supply the laughter herself More often than not, her audience did not reciprocate and when she related how her mother "had lost her dinner" on the night Elizabeth announced she would postpone homemaking or whatever for law school, you wanted to remind Dole that this was a luncheon and people were eating. What's worse — at least I thought so until corrected — was that Dole spent much of her speech recounting how she has become the very'fi^i^ woman with a real shot at the White House. She talked about her smalltown upbringing and how, inexplicably, she wanted something more of life than hubby, kids and a house in the burbs. So she went to Harvard Law which, as we all now know, is The Night Mummy Lost It. After law school, she encountered the sort of sexism that men nowadays do not dare even to think of practicing. ; :, Wrong, I thought — all wrong. This was an audience assembled by the Ladies' Home Journal — urbane women, dressed in black, sporting Nokias. They don't want to hear about the past, I thought, they want to hear about the future. Give 'em a bridge to the 21st century, Liddy. Something like that. After the speech was over, I explained this to the two women sitting to my left. Wrong, they said. Dole was talking about their lives, too. Were these women typical? I have no idea. But they said they, too, were under pressure to forsake careers and have families — or, if they already have jobs, to be mor^ of a mother and less of a careerist. They called Dole a feminist — a true, honest-to-God feminist. They were, of course, right. And if she is that, she is also one of the few GOP presidential candidates to articulate a clear and, to my mind, bold position on Kosovo: Send in the troop.s, if need be. "Moving our troops into the theater so that they're ready is, I think, important," she said. "But most important, success can only be defined as driving tho?e forcje^ out pf^^^ strongly that this is a war we must win, and win absolutely." Just, a few days earlier. Dole had said something equally sensible in New Hampshire — this time on the subject of guns. She would ban copkiller bullets. She would keep the ban on some kinds of assault weapons. She called for safety locks on guns to protect children. Her audience of Republicem activists went into cardiac arrest. Gun control? What the blazes! What was wrong with this woman? We all know that Dole is driving for the center of the Republican Party. We know fUrtherthat she is appealing for women's votes — maybe the very GOP women who have been driven out of the party by 'the pro-life, pro-guns, pro-barefootand-pregnant crowd that would, if it could, take Clinton's bridge, turn it around, and point it toward the 19th century. We know, in short, that she is not necessarily putting principle ahead of politics, a la Sen. John McCain. She's no fighter pilot. But she is saying some things that need to be said — no matter what the reason. She has shown George W. Bush, the pretender to the nomination, how to take a position. She has talked reasonably about gun control and she strongly suggests to women that she — sorry, Bill — feels their pain. These positions may be poll-driven, but they are so refreshing to hear that I, for one, walked away from Dole's speech more impressed than I had expected. The hell with her clothes, ^ I ^^he actually had something to say. Ivjrrt --^H fvfiA nii'? H ynr • •, !n(iii nnovtih Cohen is a columnist for the Washington Post Writers Group. BILL HANLON Rubber is hitting the road in Legislature The rubber is beginning to hit the road in the Legislature with respect to hi|h school proficiency examinations. The failure rate on these exams should not come as a surprise to anyone. The Nevada state Board of Education predicted two years ago when the Legislature mandated implementing the new tests that the state could expect 10% of the student population not to be able to pass the exam and therefore not graduate fix)m high school. The sceneuno played out last week in the Nevada Legislature is being repeated nationwide. As states rushed to implement new, more rigorous standards, some states forgot to allow lead time to ensure that Students had ample opportunity to learn what was on the new tests. More reasonable people are now beginning to ask what is appropriate for all students to know and be able to do upon graduation. Last month I read an article in a Wisconsin newspaper about their new math standards being too high. Their legislature w^as reconsidering the algebra standai'ds they put in place because of the increased failure rates. In last week's New York Times, there was an article titled "Albany legislators seek to dilute tou^ new regents exams required for graduation." According to the story, an unusual coalition of state lawmakers, whose constituents range from inner-city residents to affluent suburbanites, is pushing to scale back new more stringent graduation requirements for all public school students. The New York lawmakers contend the new graduation standards are being phased in too quickly, do not accurately measure the overall studeat perfDrmanca of students and could result in increased failure and dropout rates across the state. Nevada's new standards to be implemented next year in math include polynomial factoring, solving systems of equations and inequalities, quadratics, and trigonometry. With over 50% of the state's juniors faihng the current test that don't include those, I have to conclude a lot more kids will fail future tests when the new standards are tested. While the state board predicted a 10% failure rate on the current test, the Council to Establish Academic standards has been reluctant to identify the percentage of students they believe will not graduate based on the new, more rigorous standards they created. My guess is that 20-25% of the students will not graduate high school based on the new academic standards in math. I say that because about 35% of the students who choose to take algebra nationwide fail the class, the incidence of failure should increase if we expect all students tti enroll in algebra. As Nevada's new, more rigorous academic standards created by the Council to Establish Academic Standards are implemented next year, this year's outcry will not even register a bleep on the radar screen. Prior to the standards movement that is currently sweeping across the countiy. the TIMSS study described America's curriculum "as a mile wide and an inch deep.' The recntly pubUshed McREL report suggests the new standards adopted by the states will take an additional nine years of schooling to cover. It would appear from these two reports that it would be prudent for the state to review the recently adopted state standards created by the council in math, English/Language Arts, and science to determine if they are reasonably attainable. m^m^^ Adding to the difficulty in implementing the more rigorous standards, Nevada adready has a shortage of math and science teachers, two of the areas being tested. It appears that the state's commitment to increased academic standards is not being matched by a commitment to providing world class teachers. Of the 2,500 teachers hired each year in the state, about 500 come from in-state teacher training programs. Knowing Nevada's salaries are low, teachers are not going to get a raise for another three years and the state does not offer incentives to attract teachers to the state, how do we expect to compete with other states for the other 2,000 teachers needed? The reluctance of the state Legislature to pass a bill*" that would allow retired teachers, in areas of shortage, to come back into the system speaks volumes about a lack of real commitment to public education and increased academic standards. Hanlon. a Las Vegas resident wtw writes a column about educatKx>. sits on the State Board of Education, is the admMMrstor.forthe Clark County School Districfs Matty Science Institute and is a parMinw insinjotof at UNLV. U LETTERS 'The News welcomes brief letters, signed with your name, address and phone for verification. Typed letters receive preference and the News resen^es the right to edit for grammar, spelling or length. Please mail to: Editor, Home News, 2 Commerce Center Drive. Henderson, NV 89014 Thursday, May 20, 1999 Henderson Home News Pag* 7 lEws VIEW Driver training and experience Editor: ; • :.* K.^-'v You should sit back and take another look at your editorial from the May 13,1999 edition. It appears unduly biased against teens. Along with other comments you say that, "Most teens are reckless in their driving..." and '':mo8t teens caught driving during this period are likely causing trouble any how." You also quote statistics which show that 16-year-old drivers have many more accidents than 17-year-old drivers. V I wonder about your information. Could it be that the teens we hear and read about are the ones who have gotten in trouble because of their actions; and that there is a larger number who have behaved responsibly and safely and therefore have not made the news? As to the information presenting 17, year-old drivers to be significantly safer than 16-year-olds. Could that be because the 17-year-old has now had a year of driving experience? Perhaps, with the change, the safety record of those would decrease due to this lack of experience. If we are going to pass laws to make our roads safer, how about supporting stiffer driver training requirements? I believe education and knowledge of driving situations might save more lives than waiting a year or two and then putting the same untrained and uniformed driver on the road. The experience and learning curve would just start from an older age. Why not a requirement for higher speed obstacle courses in driver's training programs? Let people, of whatever age, get a feel for some limits under various driving conditions. Of course, these programs would cost more, but we are talking about people's lives. If it is important enough for a na^w driver to be on the road at 16 (or 66 for that matter), he/she should be willing to pay for sufficient training to make themselves and others safe while on the roadways. Lest anyone think that I am championing teen drivers because I am one, I happened to have had my 70th birthday last month. I have been driving since I ,was 13 years old. Sure enough, I spent a lot of time being "unsafe" on the road. I don't recall being over that phase until I was well into my 208. The only things that made me a better driver were training classes and experience. STEWART W. EARL On guns and crime Editor: In your April 29 issue, regarding an article by Richard Cohen (Too Many Guns); If it were not tragic I would laugh my head off. Cohen is and always will be a total idiot. He and the rest of the reporters in the Washington Post have only one agenda, take the guns away from the honest gun owner. I wrote to the Washington Post some years ago and asked them why they were so against honest gun owners having firearms. Their comment was there is no such thing as an honest gtin owner. In Washington D.C., Mayor Marion Berry passed gun laws that prohibit anyone from owning a gun. And he tried to make it legal fbr the police to invade your home if they thought you might own a firearm, Washington D.C. has the highest crime rate of any city in the country. So much for no guns allowed. To top the no guns allowed. Berry got himself arrested for smoking dope, spent time in jail, and then was re-elected as mayor. It appears to me that the criminal element doesn't want the honest homeowner to have a gun to protect themselves. And the Washington Post is backing the criminal element in keeping guns out of the hands of honest gun owners. Never has any gun owner advocated that children be allowed to carry a firearm. We do advocate that everyone 14 and older be taught to respect the rights of others, safe gun handling and give training to teach young people that a firearm is not a toy and that life is a very precious thing. When the parents of our children start taking the responsibility of training the children that a life is not something you can waste just because you don't like something another person has done, then we can stop this horrible bloodshed. Taking firearms away fit)m honest gun owners is not going to stop the bloodshed. Japan has had laws prohibiting the ownership of firearms since the end of the war. Their crime rate is escalating at an unbehevable rate. The Philippine Island has the highest crime rate of any country and the weapons of choice? Machetes. England hfus made the ownership of firearms illegal and the crime rate has stayed the smie. Australia also has collected all the firearms and their crime rate has not diminished. So why does Mr. Cohen think that taking firearms away from honest gun owners is going to stop crime? If he would just take a minute and read the papers, he would find that the firearms used in Colorado massacre were illegally obtained. As long as people think they are justified in killing another person just because they feel like it we will have killing. And just what will be accompUshed by taking away all the firearms when the Colorado killers were using homemade bombs. Killers will find a way to kill if there are no guns. So what do you suggest? Making all knives illegal? Takiflg cars off the road? Let's start educating people that murder is not an acceptable excuse when you have a beef with someone. KENBURMAGE WHAT YOUR NEIGHBORS THINK "What do you think about President Elections are over! Editor: No more phone calls, literature in the mail, knocking at the door, no more candidate debates. Congratulations are in order for incumbent elected Coimcil seats. Andy Hafen and Amanda Cyphers, and newly elected Steve Kirk. Now that there is no more campaigning and politicking, the Council can concentrate on taking care of business on behalf of the residents of Henderson. With the recent lay-offs at Timet, Kidd Marshmallow, Breyer's Ice Cream and Kerr-McGee, we have families in Henderson faced with unemployment, no medical, drastic cuts in wages and struggling to support their families. Which brings me to my point! There has been a lot of controversy over the Black Mountain Studios. This industry is aWin-Win situation for the city of Henderson. No air emissions, no fear in contaminating the water or land. This type of industry the city of Henderson should be trying to attract and support to help diversify the economy. With the possibility of 1,000 jobs, well-paying jobs, medical benefits, and, most important, a secure job, not only would residents who are out of work, but businesses in the city, would prosper from Black Mountain Studios. To the Planning Commission, the Mayor, and all the Council, I personally plead to all of you on bfehalf of Doris Keating, the residents of Henderson and their children, to dolfne right thing and approve Black Mountain Studios, so all of Henderson c^/iave a brighter fiiture. ''=?^^T'?^''^'-^~ ~^'^^ BILLYHAND President, United Steelworkers of America, Local 4856 II disputes #^My n't belong Support film studio Editor: Now thatihe elections are over 1 would like to congratulate the incumbents Amanda Cyphers and Andy Hafen, and welcome Steve Kirk in his new role as Councilman. I would like us aU to move on to the future and get back to what really matters. Issues that face Henderson today like Black Mountain Studios. This project is too important to us in Henderson. I would like people to know that $5 billion leaves Califomia each year to film movies. Right now there are 47 shows filming in Canada not the USA You can not get on a sound stage in Califomia until after the year 2002. Why would we want our movies being made in other countries and not here? I realize that the movie studio is somewhat controversial for some. But this will bring good high-paying jobs to Henderson. It will bring a safe, clean environmentally friendly industry that is desperately needed in our town without polluting our water or our soil like some of the factories. We are not talking about Pepcon here. I humbly plea to Mayor Gibson and the Planning Commission and the City Council to move forward with this project without delay. We need Black Motmtain Studios and industries like it. If we let this opportunity go, we will be hurting our children. TONYA and BOB HUNT The last exception The purpose of uw? letfpir, JS m f^^fy pomts recently reported by j£pur ^ newspaper concerning commercial development oi| {forizon Ridge P^kway. (Medical Center Receives City Council Approval). At the Henderson City Council Meeting held May 11,1 spoke on behalf of some 40 plus residents in support of the proposed medicaJ/corporate office building planned at 2601 W. Horizon Ridge Parkway. The support of this project was gained through several meetings with developer Don Ross in which Ross made numerous adjustments to the project to satisfy nearby residents. However, the main reason the residents in the area were able to come to some agreement with the developer is that this piece of property has major power lines running through its boundaries and we realize that this particular piece of land would never be developed for single family residential use. Since the land was unacceptable for residential developmerit, residents felt that Ross's proposal was the best we could do for our neighborhood. The office complex is set back on the rear of the property, has many upgrades to the landscaping, the roof line of the building was redesigned in such a way as to protect the view, signage will be of monument type, parking lot lighting will be dimmed after a certain hour, and a bicycle path will run adjacent to the west side of the property line. We are adamantly opposed to further commercial development along Horizon Ridge Parkway because of concerns of increased traffic and congestion which prompts safety issues for adults and children in our neighborhood. The newspaper article gave the impression that because we agreed to this proposal, we might agree to other commercial development in our area. While we are not completel);.closed to accepting those parcels that have already been rezoned for commercial use, we must insist that Horizon Ridge Parkway not become a "Commercial Corridor" with businesses for neighbors ihstead of families. At the City (i^undl Meeting on May 11, Mayor Gibson and the Council echoed our concerns about where the commerdal development would end if they made this exception. Gibson ftjrther stated his hope that this would be the last exception. We hope this will indeed be the case. KAREN SEXTON It is unfortunate that a dispute between some parents and a Washoe County principal was aired in public at a March meeting of the School -, Board. Making the parents' grievances public was unfair to the principal, who had no opportunity to respond; it also was unfair to the parents (though it was their decision to go public with their complaints) and their children. It is particularly disttirbing that the parents thought, rightly or wrongly, that they had no alternative to using public comment time on the board agenda to get their complaints heard. The Washoe County School District has adopted a complaint procedure that allovvs parents to have their complaints heard first at the local level, then by a district administrator, then the superintendent and finally the School Board. The procedures are supposed to be published in each school's student handbook^ and complaint forms are supposed to be readily available at every school. To a large degree, the system works — 60 complaints have been filed this year; two have reached the superintendent. But apparently not all parents are getting the word, either through their own fault or that of their children's schools. Some n^ver see the handbooks; others don't read them when they come home; and some may be too angry to take the time to learn the correct procedure. Forms may be available, but if no one knows where they are, they're useless. The ultimate responsibility lies with the schools, however, to ensure that parents are informed of the policies and that forms are easily obtained. Going public with a personnel complaint should be the last option for a parent, an option that should never be needed. Reno Gazette-Journal ABOUT THESE PAGES These pages are the opinion pages of the newspaper News View is written by the editorial staff to bring attention to an issue of concern jn tfie community Our regular columnists reflect on state and national politics, as well as education Editorials re-printed from other newspapers provide other opinions Our readers are encouraged to write about local issues and submit them to the News Clinton's recent visit to Southern Nevada while the country is at war in Kosovo?" Cn w^ Hnl by ErkTIschlw/ HOD wwm09twW9a "I thought It was really neat that he came to visit our town." Victoria Short 'His time could **l know that it's "I was pretty probably have been important to take time enthusiastk about it better spe nt" out, but my inHial and it was pretty neat reacthn is he's to see Air Force One." goofing off." BothBagon Jim Golden J*nnif*r Pomaroy 'Wiile our country is in turmoil, our presklent deckles to take a vacathn. Weird." Marie Cavaliari A mmmmmm

PAGE 8

T^^^^^^tT^^r^^^T^^ mm^mi ^mm^ ^^ \^ Page 8 HMideraon Horn* Nevtfs Thui'sday, May 20, 1999 Thursday, May 20, 1999 Henderson Homa New* Page .9 EDUCAHON Salon • Cafe • Boutique ^nMH^aUuf, • 433-7765 wnww.shaarclaas.com Burkholder principal reflects on retirement Eric Tlschlw News Staff Writer This should be a time of quiet reflection for Burkholder Middle School principal Diana Chalfant, but she's really just too busy to slow down. After holding the top administrative position at the school for more than four years and three decades as an educator, Chalfant will retire from the school district at the end of June. "1 wish I could take the time and stroll the school's hall tafeel nostalgic, but I'm way too busy planning for next year," Chalfant said. Most of her time for the next six weeks will be spent to make an easier transition for the new principal Monte Bay, current assistant principal at Silverado High School. Chalfant came to Southern Nevada by way of Oklahoma when she visited with her husband Scott. She immediately fell in love with the area and began teaching choir at Basic High School. After eight years at Basic, she helped open Bonanza High School in Las Vegas. While teaching, she also pursued a master's degree in curriculum and instruction with additional hours in education administration. "At the beginning of my career, I always wanted to remain in the classroom and never intended to go into administration. But looking back, I couldn't be more happier with my decision," she said. Her many years with the Clark County education system, however, have caught up with officiate the rededication and renovations of the school in February. "Burkholder has been undergoing renovations since I began here and more is on the way," she said. Additional renovations will include more office space and upgraded outdoor sports facilities. Chalfant has no intentions to slow dowp after retirement. Currently, she's anxiously awaiting the completion of her new home and is looking forward to do some interior decorating. The Chalfants also want to do some cross country traveling in their camper. "I'm really going to eiyoy retirement and spending time with my husband. We have such a good time together," she said. Corbett Insurance Agency FARMERS \s proud to announce that we ate now offering: • Education Loans • Real Estate & Mortgage Assistances • Auto Buying • Auto Loans and Leasing • Mechanical Breakdown Insurance AUTO • HOIME • LIFE Comereial Bonds • Ranters Condominiums • Boats Motoraydas Discounte For: • Ovar SO MuHipla PoHcias • Good StudantCkwd Driver Non-$moiiar;. :;;, • •:_;•.>•..: • • .;.. • • 458-7440 : Opan Saturdays • Fast Piione Quotai 1012 WNtnay Rancli Rd. ; • 'vy^ • !:. f."] Diana Chalfant Chalfant. While attending school functions, she has met many of her former students from Basic High who have their own children attending Burkholder. "Since kids think their parents are already 100 years old and they find out I was their teacher, the kids are amazed at how old I am," she said smiling. "1 guess that's why Henderson is such a nice place to live. Nobody moves away and they get to watch their own kids grow up in the same town and attend the same schools." Like any successful school administrator, Chalfant has a deep appreciation for her staff, students and their parents. Without their tireless dedication to teaching, her job would be much more difficult, she said. Chalfant has always expressed her philosophy of learning to her teachers. Learning, she explained, means taking risks for both the teachers and students. Students, especially should also be encouraged to take the risk, raise their hand and say, 'I don't understand the lesson. Please explain it to me.' As one final hurrah for Chalfaht's career, Burkholder students increased their math computation test scores more than 209c and 60% of the school's eighth graders passed the high school math equivalency test. Originally, Chalfant planned to fetire at the beginning of the year, but postponed her retirement several months to help 1 Camp Marco Polo opens June 14 Camp Marco Polo, a unique summer program that provides children an upbeat educational adventure, will open June 14, according to director Carol Kurr Wardle. The camp, open only to children ages 6 to 11, will combine learning with adventure as children follow the path of the great explorer, Marco Polo. Only six children will be invited to attend each weekly session, where their journey will begin in Venice, Italy, and continue on to China, India and Persia. "I feel learning should be as thrilling as entertainment," Wardle said. "The world is an exciting place and learning about it is a fascinating experience." Each camper, according to Wardle, will plan journeys into the unknown, make monster masks, paper mosaics and block prints. In addition, they will present a puppet show, participate in chopstick relays, and active games from other countries. Campers will discover that the first documented Cinderella story was from China and that Cherrapuiyi, in northeastern India, in one of the wettest places on earth with an annual rainfall of 1,041.78 inches. They will learn that Darius, the Persian monarch 2,500 years ago, posted men on towers to shout important messages around the country. Camp Marco Polo is a weeklong camp held from 9 a.m. to noon Monday through Friday. Campers may attend any week beginning June 14 through July 30. Tuition for the week, including supplies and snacks, is $75. Siblings receive 5'/( discount. For more information, call 434-9509. Soup and Salad Bar when purchasing any entree item N • 0 : 140 Water Street Downtown Henderson • (702) 564-1811 • • • in Henderson! UNLV IS now offering classes in your neighborhood. • Upper division and graduate courses in business, education, hotel administration, criminal justice, public administration and liberal arts ;^;.:. •-;-• • ;-i:^-. 'AwM^Slttil^|Btt • vl Classes held on CCSN campus in Henderson or the adjacent Foothill High School • ^ • >: Easy freeway access and convenient paridng Gciinhlers Bonus Monthly Gamblers Bonus wOlPK^ • Gnnfyard Spedal 12 oz mbvy Steak Dbmer ••$•* 12:00Mn • 4KH>am • Happy Hour 4:00pm • 7:00pm • DodUt OamMara BoniM Point* During H^ipyHour •HHa4ofaKindwHhTlMcanloftlM dty and ncahn 10,000 bonus pointe| • Aak about our olhor prtmiollons • Broakfatt Sandwich SpocW 1640 W. Warm Springs Rd. At lh> lorniT o* VV.'rm Springs & Airuyo Grjnili' In front o( Cirt'ot V.lllcv MtKti SUMMER SESSION II (JUNE 7 JULY 9) June 4th final date to register without a late fee June 8th -final date to register with a late fee BUS 395-2 Current Issues in Business MW 6:00 8:45 pm A113 ECO 465-1 Labor and the Economy MTWThF 8:00 9:30 am A105 ESP 444-4 Special Education Techniques in Regular Settings MTWThF 9:40 11:10 arn A105 ICE 450-3 Strategies for Effective Elementary Classroom Teaching MTWThF 8:00 9:30 am A113 ICG 701-4 Multicultural f ducation (M. Ed. students only) MTW 4:00 6:30 pm A105 MIS 301-2 Applied Information Technology SUMMER SESSION III (JULY 12 TTh AUGUST 13) 6:00 9:45 pm A113 July 9th final date to raster without a late fee Jufy 13th final day to register with a late fee BUS 495-4 Strategy Formulation and Implementation TTh 6:00 9:45 pm A113 CW 427-2 Criminal Justice Policy: Sex, Violence. Drugs and MTWThF -^1' 20affl-12: SOom A105 — EPY 702-6 winjv III niii^iiw Research Methods ^ MTW 7:00 9:30 pm A105 MGT 352-3 Operations Managentent ^ MTWThF 8:00 9:30 am A105 MGT 352-4 Operations Management MTWThF 9:40 11:10 am A113 0 folk 1999: August 30th classes begin September 3rd final day to register with a late fee ^— ^^m I Registration begins April 28th for summer and faU. For the Summer Schedule of Classes, contact Summer Sessions at 895-3711. For the FaU Schedule of Classes, call the Registrar's Office at 895-3371. Or, consult the UNLV web page. 436-2520 unlv.edi; Basic HS students compete under the • II Eric Tischler News Staff Writer Ever tweak an engine? Blow out the carbs? Drain a radiator? Replace the plugs? ,,, ..How about analyzing a car's |engine by plugging in a scan tool t and seeing the results through [an advanced diagnostic com^.puter? jj Sounds overwhelming, but : two local students competed at [ the annual Ford/AAA Student ,, Auto Skills Contest last week ip and used the technology experi|. enced mechanics employ today. I Basic High School seniors ji'Craig Bushman, 18, and Mike I Archer, 17, competed against I teams from around the state and I placed ninth at the Reno compej.tition. Basic High's faculty ; • advisor and automotive teacher 'V tion Asay accompanied the stu• dents. I: Each team had an hour and a half to complete the test. Officials from Ford deliberately • ^ "bugged" a 1999 Ford Escort and the students had to analyze and repair the problem by using an advanced diagnostic computer. Errc Tischler/News Staff • .;;.' ; AUTOMOTIVE SKILLS—Basic students Craig Bushman and Mike Archer work on an engine at the school's autoshop class with theassistance of automotive teacher Don Asay. The students competed in a statewide competition for automotive skills in Reno last week and placed ninth. "They basically pointed and said there's something wrong with this car... fix it," Bushman said. • • -.': • The cars had an array of problems including fuses, fuel McCaw ES dedicates amphitheater r^McCaw Elementary School dedicated its new amphitheater last week at the annual Dance Fest and Museum de McCaw Art Show. Dr. Kay Carl, Clark County School District assistant superintendent for elementary education, joined McCaw students, parents and staff in honoring Elton Dale Scheideman, director of planning and engineering for the CCSD. Scheideman was honored for his commitment to provide the best possible learning environment for students and willingness to "go that extra mile" to make McCaw a great place for kids, a spokesman said. Also honored were: • Ysidro Barron, A.I.A., the I architect who designed the amphitheaier.the new classroom addition, tsftd' paYtfeipit^d in 'the renovation of the school in Courtesy Photo McCAW DEDICATION — Gordon McCaw Elementary students play steel drunts at the school's 12th annual Fine Arts and Dance Festival. The event featured students' art work, folk dances and choreography and dedicated the school's new amphitheater. 1992-93. vy J-m^^^-^imiamager from PreefeOnt • Brent Evans, the construeConstruction. M -t • • • • t^Our sped Whether a mother, wife, friend or confidant, you are a woman with special physical and emotional needs. The WomensCare Center was developed by women...with you in mind. Our nurse educators and certified in.structors are here to provide quality health education with tht? .Qompassion women have come to • : know from St. Rose Dominican Hospital.' v "f'> -' And because gcxxl health means more-than not bein^ sick, WomensCare offers wonderful life skills education and events on topics such as stress management, 4 osteoporosis prevention, positive parenting, herbal therapy, and -maximizing the Mind/Body/ Spirit relationship. --. At this hallmark center of healthcare excellence, you'll become a partner in your gcxxl health. • • • healthcare needs. rkBARBARA GREENSPUN Wonioisi.cirv Center of Excellence SL Rose Dominican Hospital I^CHW 100 N Green Valley Pkwy. Henderson, NV 89014 702-914-7060 distribution and electrical problems. In hindsight, the team figured they could have placed fourth or fifth if they weren't so anxious to start the repairs ai^d first analyzed the diagnostic computer. The team members will graduate in a few weeks and 'Bu's)in>an plans to continue studyih^automotive technology with Firestorm's automotive apprentice program. Archer will also continue studying mechanics, however, of a much different genre. For the next two year, Archer will learn how to service nuclear reactors for the Navy. Today, computers control more than 85% of the functions on a new vehicle. In many cases, the first tool a mechanic reaches for is the diagnostic computer, rather than a wrench or screwdriver./':3• • ,:;-; K : • ;,. ,:a^-^^. This is the sixth year forlwr Ford Motor Co. to co-sponsor the event. AAA bias been involved with the contest since 1984. i Cooling and Heating Referral Senrice Who can you trust? How do you find qufUfied, trustworthy A/C technicians? SNARSCA is a non-profit trade association. All member contractors are licensed, insured and bonded. Make one call to find the company that's right for yoMr project • Honesty •Qualify • DependabilityJ (Referrals arc Free) MMtkNI Ihteadand iclvS% oHservic**. Call 648-9200 tJ vi-;ijijr>.. •;, *RacKo,lamp. AM/FM radio with a minimum purchase of $200. Huny! Quantity limited. Auto Mill Monday-Saturday 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m.-7 p.m. 1075 American Pacific Road, Ste D \m\\n\ W II ABSOLUTELY THE LOWEST PRICES IN LAS VEGAS-GUARANTEED. 564-888G. f ^ V, .-.-. Local business leaders ratablish BankWest of Nevada. 1994 Wells Faigo Bank acquires First Interstate BanJc Norwest Bank acquires PriMerit Bank. First Interstate and PriMerit bank branches dose BankWest of Nevada grows to open ^^^^H First Security Bank acquires our Henderson/Green Valley ^^^^| American Bank of Commerce Regional Banking Office. ^^^^| Nevada State Bank acquires Sun State Bank. ^^^^^^^^^^1 Branches dose. BankWest of Nevada expands to open our Northwest Regional Banking Office. Norwest Bank and Wells Fargo merge 'A*^^' Colonial Bank acquires Commerdai Bank. .1 BankWest of Nevada celebrates our 5th Aimiversaiy. 1999 Bank of America acquires Nations Bank. Norwest Bank branches begin to dose. % • • • '^^ r;>-v^' '.'. • 'V:-' 'y Where will your bank (be in five yearsi 7 Stop guessing and give us a call. kWest t£^ In Las Vegas 2700 W. Sahara Ave 702-248-4200 in Henderson 2890 N. Green Valley Pkwy. 702451-0624 Your Business Partner in the Nordmcst 7251 W. Lake Mead Blvd. 702-240-1734 FDIC Courier service available for business dienu. Some restrictions may apply. Check Guarantee Cuds. mmmmmamaammammmmimaimmmmmmammamamaamimmmmmmmmm '"' • '>HWKi

PAGE 9

T^^^^^^tT^^r^^^T^^ mm^mi ^mm^ ^^ \^ Page 8 HMideraon Horn* Nevtfs Thui'sday, May 20, 1999 Thursday, May 20, 1999 Henderson Homa New* Page .9 EDUCAHON Salon • Cafe • Boutique ^nMH^aUuf, • 433-7765 wnww.shaarclaas.com Burkholder principal reflects on retirement Eric Tlschlw News Staff Writer This should be a time of quiet reflection for Burkholder Middle School principal Diana Chalfant, but she's really just too busy to slow down. After holding the top administrative position at the school for more than four years and three decades as an educator, Chalfant will retire from the school district at the end of June. "1 wish I could take the time and stroll the school's hall tafeel nostalgic, but I'm way too busy planning for next year," Chalfant said. Most of her time for the next six weeks will be spent to make an easier transition for the new principal Monte Bay, current assistant principal at Silverado High School. Chalfant came to Southern Nevada by way of Oklahoma when she visited with her husband Scott. She immediately fell in love with the area and began teaching choir at Basic High School. After eight years at Basic, she helped open Bonanza High School in Las Vegas. While teaching, she also pursued a master's degree in curriculum and instruction with additional hours in education administration. "At the beginning of my career, I always wanted to remain in the classroom and never intended to go into administration. But looking back, I couldn't be more happier with my decision," she said. Her many years with the Clark County education system, however, have caught up with officiate the rededication and renovations of the school in February. "Burkholder has been undergoing renovations since I began here and more is on the way," she said. Additional renovations will include more office space and upgraded outdoor sports facilities. Chalfant has no intentions to slow dowp after retirement. Currently, she's anxiously awaiting the completion of her new home and is looking forward to do some interior decorating. The Chalfants also want to do some cross country traveling in their camper. "I'm really going to eiyoy retirement and spending time with my husband. We have such a good time together," she said. Corbett Insurance Agency FARMERS \s proud to announce that we ate now offering: • Education Loans • Real Estate & Mortgage Assistances • Auto Buying • Auto Loans and Leasing • Mechanical Breakdown Insurance AUTO • HOIME • LIFE Comereial Bonds • Ranters Condominiums • Boats Motoraydas Discounte For: • Ovar SO MuHipla PoHcias • Good StudantCkwd Driver Non-$moiiar;. :;;, • •:_;•.>•..: • • .;.. • • 458-7440 : Opan Saturdays • Fast Piione Quotai 1012 WNtnay Rancli Rd. ; • 'vy^ • !:. f."] Diana Chalfant Chalfant. While attending school functions, she has met many of her former students from Basic High who have their own children attending Burkholder. "Since kids think their parents are already 100 years old and they find out I was their teacher, the kids are amazed at how old I am," she said smiling. "1 guess that's why Henderson is such a nice place to live. Nobody moves away and they get to watch their own kids grow up in the same town and attend the same schools." Like any successful school administrator, Chalfant has a deep appreciation for her staff, students and their parents. Without their tireless dedication to teaching, her job would be much more difficult, she said. Chalfant has always expressed her philosophy of learning to her teachers. Learning, she explained, means taking risks for both the teachers and students. Students, especially should also be encouraged to take the risk, raise their hand and say, 'I don't understand the lesson. Please explain it to me.' As one final hurrah for Chalfaht's career, Burkholder students increased their math computation test scores more than 209c and 60% of the school's eighth graders passed the high school math equivalency test. Originally, Chalfant planned to fetire at the beginning of the year, but postponed her retirement several months to help 1 Camp Marco Polo opens June 14 Camp Marco Polo, a unique summer program that provides children an upbeat educational adventure, will open June 14, according to director Carol Kurr Wardle. The camp, open only to children ages 6 to 11, will combine learning with adventure as children follow the path of the great explorer, Marco Polo. Only six children will be invited to attend each weekly session, where their journey will begin in Venice, Italy, and continue on to China, India and Persia. "I feel learning should be as thrilling as entertainment," Wardle said. "The world is an exciting place and learning about it is a fascinating experience." Each camper, according to Wardle, will plan journeys into the unknown, make monster masks, paper mosaics and block prints. In addition, they will present a puppet show, participate in chopstick relays, and active games from other countries. Campers will discover that the first documented Cinderella story was from China and that Cherrapuiyi, in northeastern India, in one of the wettest places on earth with an annual rainfall of 1,041.78 inches. They will learn that Darius, the Persian monarch 2,500 years ago, posted men on towers to shout important messages around the country. Camp Marco Polo is a weeklong camp held from 9 a.m. to noon Monday through Friday. Campers may attend any week beginning June 14 through July 30. Tuition for the week, including supplies and snacks, is $75. Siblings receive 5'/( discount. For more information, call 434-9509. Soup and Salad Bar when purchasing any entree item N • 0 : 140 Water Street Downtown Henderson • (702) 564-1811 • • • in Henderson! UNLV IS now offering classes in your neighborhood. • Upper division and graduate courses in business, education, hotel administration, criminal justice, public administration and liberal arts ;^;.:. •-;-• • ;-i:^-. 'AwM^Slttil^|Btt • vl Classes held on CCSN campus in Henderson or the adjacent Foothill High School • ^ • >: Easy freeway access and convenient paridng Gciinhlers Bonus Monthly Gamblers Bonus wOlPK^ • Gnnfyard Spedal 12 oz mbvy Steak Dbmer ••$•* 12:00Mn • 4KH>am • Happy Hour 4:00pm • 7:00pm • DodUt OamMara BoniM Point* During H^ipyHour •HHa4ofaKindwHhTlMcanloftlM dty and ncahn 10,000 bonus pointe| • Aak about our olhor prtmiollons • Broakfatt Sandwich SpocW 1640 W. Warm Springs Rd. At lh> lorniT o* VV.'rm Springs & Airuyo Grjnili' In front o( Cirt'ot V.lllcv MtKti SUMMER SESSION II (JUNE 7 JULY 9) June 4th final date to register without a late fee June 8th -final date to register with a late fee BUS 395-2 Current Issues in Business MW 6:00 8:45 pm A113 ECO 465-1 Labor and the Economy MTWThF 8:00 9:30 am A105 ESP 444-4 Special Education Techniques in Regular Settings MTWThF 9:40 11:10 arn A105 ICE 450-3 Strategies for Effective Elementary Classroom Teaching MTWThF 8:00 9:30 am A113 ICG 701-4 Multicultural f ducation (M. Ed. students only) MTW 4:00 6:30 pm A105 MIS 301-2 Applied Information Technology SUMMER SESSION III (JULY 12 TTh AUGUST 13) 6:00 9:45 pm A113 July 9th final date to raster without a late fee Jufy 13th final day to register with a late fee BUS 495-4 Strategy Formulation and Implementation TTh 6:00 9:45 pm A113 CW 427-2 Criminal Justice Policy: Sex, Violence. Drugs and MTWThF -^1' 20affl-12: SOom A105 — EPY 702-6 winjv III niii^iiw Research Methods ^ MTW 7:00 9:30 pm A105 MGT 352-3 Operations Managentent ^ MTWThF 8:00 9:30 am A105 MGT 352-4 Operations Management MTWThF 9:40 11:10 am A113 0 folk 1999: August 30th classes begin September 3rd final day to register with a late fee ^— ^^m I Registration begins April 28th for summer and faU. For the Summer Schedule of Classes, contact Summer Sessions at 895-3711. For the FaU Schedule of Classes, call the Registrar's Office at 895-3371. Or, consult the UNLV web page. 436-2520 unlv.edi; Basic HS students compete under the • II Eric Tischler News Staff Writer Ever tweak an engine? Blow out the carbs? Drain a radiator? Replace the plugs? ,,, ..How about analyzing a car's |engine by plugging in a scan tool t and seeing the results through [an advanced diagnostic com^.puter? jj Sounds overwhelming, but : two local students competed at [ the annual Ford/AAA Student ,, Auto Skills Contest last week ip and used the technology experi|. enced mechanics employ today. I Basic High School seniors ji'Craig Bushman, 18, and Mike I Archer, 17, competed against I teams from around the state and I placed ninth at the Reno compej.tition. Basic High's faculty ; • advisor and automotive teacher 'V tion Asay accompanied the stu• dents. I: Each team had an hour and a half to complete the test. Officials from Ford deliberately • ^ "bugged" a 1999 Ford Escort and the students had to analyze and repair the problem by using an advanced diagnostic computer. Errc Tischler/News Staff • .;;.' ; AUTOMOTIVE SKILLS—Basic students Craig Bushman and Mike Archer work on an engine at the school's autoshop class with theassistance of automotive teacher Don Asay. The students competed in a statewide competition for automotive skills in Reno last week and placed ninth. "They basically pointed and said there's something wrong with this car... fix it," Bushman said. • • -.': • The cars had an array of problems including fuses, fuel McCaw ES dedicates amphitheater r^McCaw Elementary School dedicated its new amphitheater last week at the annual Dance Fest and Museum de McCaw Art Show. Dr. Kay Carl, Clark County School District assistant superintendent for elementary education, joined McCaw students, parents and staff in honoring Elton Dale Scheideman, director of planning and engineering for the CCSD. Scheideman was honored for his commitment to provide the best possible learning environment for students and willingness to "go that extra mile" to make McCaw a great place for kids, a spokesman said. Also honored were: • Ysidro Barron, A.I.A., the I architect who designed the amphitheaier.the new classroom addition, tsftd' paYtfeipit^d in 'the renovation of the school in Courtesy Photo McCAW DEDICATION — Gordon McCaw Elementary students play steel drunts at the school's 12th annual Fine Arts and Dance Festival. The event featured students' art work, folk dances and choreography and dedicated the school's new amphitheater. 1992-93. vy J-m^^^-^imiamager from PreefeOnt • Brent Evans, the construeConstruction. M -t • • • • t^Our sped Whether a mother, wife, friend or confidant, you are a woman with special physical and emotional needs. The WomensCare Center was developed by women...with you in mind. Our nurse educators and certified in.structors are here to provide quality health education with tht? .Qompassion women have come to • : know from St. Rose Dominican Hospital.' v "f'> -' And because gcxxl health means more-than not bein^ sick, WomensCare offers wonderful life skills education and events on topics such as stress management, 4 osteoporosis prevention, positive parenting, herbal therapy, and -maximizing the Mind/Body/ Spirit relationship. --. At this hallmark center of healthcare excellence, you'll become a partner in your gcxxl health. • • • healthcare needs. rkBARBARA GREENSPUN Wonioisi.cirv Center of Excellence SL Rose Dominican Hospital I^CHW 100 N Green Valley Pkwy. Henderson, NV 89014 702-914-7060 distribution and electrical problems. In hindsight, the team figured they could have placed fourth or fifth if they weren't so anxious to start the repairs ai^d first analyzed the diagnostic computer. The team members will graduate in a few weeks and 'Bu's)in>an plans to continue studyih^automotive technology with Firestorm's automotive apprentice program. Archer will also continue studying mechanics, however, of a much different genre. For the next two year, Archer will learn how to service nuclear reactors for the Navy. Today, computers control more than 85% of the functions on a new vehicle. In many cases, the first tool a mechanic reaches for is the diagnostic computer, rather than a wrench or screwdriver./':3• • ,:;-; K : • ;,. ,:a^-^^. This is the sixth year forlwr Ford Motor Co. to co-sponsor the event. AAA bias been involved with the contest since 1984. i Cooling and Heating Referral Senrice Who can you trust? How do you find qufUfied, trustworthy A/C technicians? SNARSCA is a non-profit trade association. All member contractors are licensed, insured and bonded. Make one call to find the company that's right for yoMr project • Honesty •Qualify • DependabilityJ (Referrals arc Free) MMtkNI Ihteadand iclvS% oHservic**. Call 648-9200 tJ vi-;ijijr>.. •;, *RacKo,lamp. AM/FM radio with a minimum purchase of $200. Huny! Quantity limited. Auto Mill Monday-Saturday 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m.-7 p.m. 1075 American Pacific Road, Ste D \m\\n\ W II ABSOLUTELY THE LOWEST PRICES IN LAS VEGAS-GUARANTEED. 564-888G. f ^ V, .-.-. Local business leaders ratablish BankWest of Nevada. 1994 Wells Faigo Bank acquires First Interstate BanJc Norwest Bank acquires PriMerit Bank. First Interstate and PriMerit bank branches dose BankWest of Nevada grows to open ^^^^H First Security Bank acquires our Henderson/Green Valley ^^^^| American Bank of Commerce Regional Banking Office. ^^^^| Nevada State Bank acquires Sun State Bank. ^^^^^^^^^^1 Branches dose. BankWest of Nevada expands to open our Northwest Regional Banking Office. Norwest Bank and Wells Fargo merge 'A*^^' Colonial Bank acquires Commerdai Bank. .1 BankWest of Nevada celebrates our 5th Aimiversaiy. 1999 Bank of America acquires Nations Bank. Norwest Bank branches begin to dose. % • • • '^^ r;>-v^' '.'. • 'V:-' 'y Where will your bank (be in five yearsi 7 Stop guessing and give us a call. kWest t£^ In Las Vegas 2700 W. Sahara Ave 702-248-4200 in Henderson 2890 N. Green Valley Pkwy. 702451-0624 Your Business Partner in the Nordmcst 7251 W. Lake Mead Blvd. 702-240-1734 FDIC Courier service available for business dienu. Some restrictions may apply. Check Guarantee Cuds. mmmmmamaammammmmimaimmmmmmammamamaamimmmmmmmmm '"' • '>HWKi

PAGE 10

pp Page 10 Hendanon Home New* Thursday, May 20, 1999 BUSINESS Thursday, May 20, 1999 Henderson Home New* Peg* 11 '••Mi,*t Take a step back in time at Country Bears and Hares ^*^ Eric Tischler News Staff Writer Eric Tischler/News Staff ANTIQUE COLLECTIBLES—Sonia Mortensen, owner of Country Bears and Haras, has tailored her store's inventory of rustic, antique collectibles including her church birdhouses made from turn-of-the century materials. Grace period iiff of airea code 702 outside Clarlc County Effective Sunday, May 16, 1999, calls placed to areas of Nevada, outside Clark County, must use the new 775 area code. Area code 702 will continue to serve all areas of Clark County. A second area code was needed to meet the rapidly growing demand for additional phone numbers throughout Nevada. The introduction ofthe 775 area code will not affect the price of telephone calls. Callers were given a five-month grace period, which ended Saturday, May 15, to adjust to the new 775 area code. During this period, callers were able to dial either 702 or 775 to reach people outside Clark County. As of May 16, callers who do not use the new 775 area code will hear a recorded message reminding them that the area code has changed, and they will be required to re-dial the proper area code to complete the call. The recording will remain in place as long as technically feasible or through the end of the year 2000. Stuffed rabbits and collectible teddy bears are just the tip ofthe iceberg ofthe items available at Country Bears and Hares — Henderson's newest country gifts and collectibles store. As soon as you walk through the door, be prepared to enter a simpler time of rustic home furnishings and collectibles. Among the store's many items, most are hand-made and purchased from home crafters. "A lot of my inventory has been made by people who work out of their homes and have a love for coutitry crafts," owner Sonia Mortensen said. Country Bears and Hares has been Mortensien's dream for years. Before opening the store, she worked with her husband, Ralph, for 14 years at their auto repair center in Boulder City, but she always felt the need to try something else. With her husband's encouragement, she decided to give the store a try and has never regretted it. Country Bears and Hares, 1000 N. Green Valley Parkway in the Pebble Marketplace, opened its doors last month. The store features antique birdhouses, quilts, scented candles, spice racks, country furniture, primitives, dried flower arrangements, Americana collectibles and, of course, stuffed animals. "I've always been amazed by the number of people who collect teddy bears, many of whom have marveled at my store's collection," Mortensen said. Some of Mortensen's merchandise does more than appear to be antique. Each of her unique church birdhouses comes with a certificate of authenticity that state the birdhouses U^ive been built with materials that date back to the 19th century. "Antiques and rustic furnishings are becoming a nice trend in home decorating," she said. "Each spring and summer, many homeowners redecorate and it's out with the old stuff and in with the new stuff which appears old." THE HENDERSON CORRIDOR CONNECTION, INC. CHKAPt^.ST AIRPORT PARKING TN Cl.ARK COTTNTY AIRPORT DOOR TO DOOR RHSIUENTIAL & COMMERCIAL SHUTTLE SERVICE Is NOW AVAILABLE FOR HENDERSON-GREEN VALLEY V Prior Day Reservations are Required ,^1^1^ Call for details, rates, and neservations • 565-7087 or 1-888-822-6971 (Ibil Free) (Secured On Line Address; http://www.henderson-nevada.com) •• • ;'i::;:fSUNDAY THRU THURSDAY \ IROM YOUR CAREFREE PACKAGE INCLUDES: • 3 d'ays/2 nights acconimodacions • 2 One full-pound Hrime Rib Dinners • 2 Breakfast Buffets • 2 Shrimp Cocktails STARTING AT U^J: -k_ Hom/cmino/LDUGHun ;l;; • • ->A1/4 acre eustom is yours for ---^/ • y -^ N 1 1 1 A ^ /^ JL .y^^ mSSf ^5B*ii J^ "ywOTSd^fesT ^^•^>^-:i:V Call (702) 263-5302. \ at Green Ihlln/Ranch Brokers Welcome Coral Cove Concert Sunday Students of Flo Raymond, director of the Goral Cover Musical Arts Studio, will be presented in a Spring Concert at 12:30 p.m. Sunday at the Green Valley Library. Flo Raymond will kick off the concert with a few songs and a short talk on "Music, the Motivator." Many of her students have captured awards and trophies in piano and voice competitions. Janae Jeffrey not only won the Miss Heritage Days Beauty Contest, but also placed first in the vocal division for high schools in the Heritage Days Talent Contest. Student Noah Parker received first-place honors for piano or instrumental in the same contest. Scheduled to sing are: Jeffrey, Brenna O'Callaghan, Carly Avello, Jacklyn Bondurant and Dennis Dizon. Piano students are: Sara Parker, Noah Parker, Dizon, Marina Gastelum, Susan Eisenberg, Natasha Groitzsch, Canie McCollum, SeairQ^allaghan and Melaney Scarberry. --— Sean, Brenna antf-Megh^fn O'Callaghan will sing "I'm Late" from "Alice in Wonderland." Dizon and Avello will sing a vocal duet, "Endless Love. Sarah Parker will appear as a guest dancer with "true to your Heart." Jeffrey will sing "Chicago Blues," with words and music by Flo Raymond. • A buffet reception will follow. /;'..""' Margaret Jeffrey serves a hostess chair and Maria Rodriguez as co-hostess chair. Run for the Blind Sunday The Las Vegas Confederation of Motorcycle Clubs will present the first Run for the Blind on Sunday, May 23 The run will benefit the Hobble Creek Blind Camp. Sign-ups will begin at 7 a.m. at the Las Vegas Blind Center, 1001N. Bruce St., in Las Vegas. The donation is $15 per person. A free pancake breakfast will be offered with early registration from 7 to 8:30 a.m. Live music, door prizes and drawings will be featured. For more information, call 264-5106, or e-mail hcblindcamp@yahoo.com. Cellos in concert oh Sunday N The Nevada Chamber Symphony will join with the Ain^d^s School of Music to present "The Sounds of Cellos" in the Jewel Box Theater of the Clark County Library at 3 p.m. Sunday. Admission is free. A reception will follow ^he performance. For more information, call 433-9280. \ Elks set open House The Henderson/Green Valley Elks 2802 will host an open house from noon to 4 p.m. May 23 at the lodge, 631 E. Lake Mead Dr. All residents interested in the Elks are invited to iattend. The Elks is largest private organization that contributes to scholarships nationwide. The local Elks group also feeds the homeless on the first and third Thursday of every month, provides food for needy families, sponsors Cub Scouts, sponsors hoop shoot contests for youngsters and assists veterans. The Elks also have dinners every Friday night and breakfast fs served every first and third Sunday ofthe month. Call 565-9959 for more information. Methodists host evangelist On Pentecost Sunday, May 23, evangelist Leo Wood will speak at the 8 and 11 a.m. services at First Henderson United Methodist Church. Wood has pastored churches in Fallen, Nev.; Take Tahoe, Calif.; Spokane, Wash.; Wenatchee, Wash.; and Corvallis, ore. Wood served in the U.S. Naval Air Corps during the Korean Conflict. Wood now serves as funeral service manager for Palm Mortuaries and Memorial Parks. In addition to Wood speaking at the services of worship, the Rev. Marvin Gant will present The "God And Life" Scouting Awards to John McAvoy, Patrick McAvoy and Stephanie McAvoy. At 5 p.m. the church will host a Church/Community Barbecue to honor the first anniversary of the burning of the church's mortgage and dedication to God for all of the church campus and facilities. All residents are invited to Robert Maloney Maloney, Jr. named hdtel manager at Sam's Town Robert J. Maloney, Jr. was recently named hotel manager for Sam's Town.Hotel, Gambling Hall and Bowling Center. Maloney previously served as director of sales for the hotel. A graduate of UNLV, he is a former vice president of the Boulder Strip Association and has served as chairman ofthe Turkey Trot for the last two years. He is also an active member of the Las Vegas Track Club. Maloney resides i n Henderson with his wife and children. Food festival in LV The 24th annual International Food Festival will be held from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday, May 23, at the Cashman Field Exhibit Hall. Admission is $1, while children under 12 are admitted free. Authentic foods and drinks from more than 20 ethnic organizations will be for sale. ^ F^T .* • KAYAKING • HIKING • BACKCOUNTRY SKIING • BACKPACKING • CLIMBING • CAMPING k (702) 4544997 2925 N. Green Valley Pkwy #A Henderson, Nv 89014 The Temperature is Rising Summer Tune-Up Special • Fast, Courteous Service • Expert, Repair and Installation • Trained, Cooling and Heating System Specialist • Residential and Commercial • Repairs of All Makes and Models AIR SERVICE Get ready for summer. Have your home's Air Condidoning System tuned-up by nefessienai Technicians. Call 565-9800 today! LIC# 35354 • BOUNDED • INSURED 'TtptfthtUiu *J* ^iL. Water Place We mmke It pemctfy dmarF 1000 W. Qree n Valley Pkwy. Suite 240 • 263-2600 Softeners • Fleck Meter Head • Dow Kesin • lifetime Guosrontee • 32 K Groins Both installed W/Loop $999 Revene 15G.P.Day osmoiii $279 $579 "Full House Water Treatment Systems" NV. Contractors #48377 Insured Lie. & Bonded STEAK DINNER BBQ RIB DINNER W/RoMBud PoMonorBBQBMM,^ GirileBraid, MuporSiM Leo Wood these special services and to the all-church/community barbecue. First Henderson United Methodist Church is located at 609 E. Horizon Dr. For more information, call the church, 5656049. a^^^ \ 8oz STEAK SANDWICH wKh Fries Beverage Purchase Required on All Suecials • Must be 21 P 0 ft D tl 0 U H CASINO, DINEI^ G LOUNGE Daily Blue Plate Specials Lunch....$1.99 Dinner...$2.99 A SO's Dirter with SO's Prizes W \ Boulder HWIIL M Sunset Btf. • 584-1158 COME EiqOT GREAT FRESH PRODUCE GKEIIIEIIIEIIUNMDITtfGREIIimiJlEI this Thursday night from 4p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Market! FREE PARKING wiU be avaUable for the market at the empty, fenced'in lot on the corner of Water Street and Basic Road, across from the Market. This week will feature hot house tomatoes, fresh navel oranges, strawberries, raisins, pistachios, soy nuts, yellow squash, Maui and Vidalia onions, pickled garlic, specialty olives and MORE! Mid'May will bring cherries, apricots, peaches and other stone fruits. Downtown Henderscxi ^ARMER\V RAILROADPASS IIOTFI & CASINO START YOUR WEEK OFF WITH FREE CASH Beginning Monday at 6am until Wednesday at 12pm you can have a chance to win up to $500 CASH ^ ;:_::: • :-:.. r •'-IF YOU HIT ANY-'"^^^ ^ FOUR OF A KIND* On Video Poker or a Jackpot of $25 or More On Any Other Slot I^lachine. You Will Receive a Drawing Ticket For Cash and Prizes. Grand Prize Winner will receive $350 CASIII A Second Prize of $ 150 CASH, Third Prize will be Dinner for two tb^ the Conductor's Room, plus many more prizes. Drawings will be held every Wednesday at 7:00 pm** • Maximum coins bet, no wild cards, must be at least 21 years of age. ^j^ (f/, — Must be present to win, management nfiay (i^j cancel or change this promotion at anytime.Receive a FREE GIFT for signing up at Player's Junction. Henderson's most liberal player's club 2800 South Boulder Highway Henderson, Nevada 89015 (702) 294-5000 '-^^JSr^

PAGE 11

pp Page 10 Hendanon Home New* Thursday, May 20, 1999 BUSINESS Thursday, May 20, 1999 Henderson Home New* Peg* 11 '••Mi,*t Take a step back in time at Country Bears and Hares ^*^ Eric Tischler News Staff Writer Eric Tischler/News Staff ANTIQUE COLLECTIBLES—Sonia Mortensen, owner of Country Bears and Haras, has tailored her store's inventory of rustic, antique collectibles including her church birdhouses made from turn-of-the century materials. Grace period iiff of airea code 702 outside Clarlc County Effective Sunday, May 16, 1999, calls placed to areas of Nevada, outside Clark County, must use the new 775 area code. Area code 702 will continue to serve all areas of Clark County. A second area code was needed to meet the rapidly growing demand for additional phone numbers throughout Nevada. The introduction ofthe 775 area code will not affect the price of telephone calls. Callers were given a five-month grace period, which ended Saturday, May 15, to adjust to the new 775 area code. During this period, callers were able to dial either 702 or 775 to reach people outside Clark County. As of May 16, callers who do not use the new 775 area code will hear a recorded message reminding them that the area code has changed, and they will be required to re-dial the proper area code to complete the call. The recording will remain in place as long as technically feasible or through the end of the year 2000. Stuffed rabbits and collectible teddy bears are just the tip ofthe iceberg ofthe items available at Country Bears and Hares — Henderson's newest country gifts and collectibles store. As soon as you walk through the door, be prepared to enter a simpler time of rustic home furnishings and collectibles. Among the store's many items, most are hand-made and purchased from home crafters. "A lot of my inventory has been made by people who work out of their homes and have a love for coutitry crafts," owner Sonia Mortensen said. Country Bears and Hares has been Mortensien's dream for years. Before opening the store, she worked with her husband, Ralph, for 14 years at their auto repair center in Boulder City, but she always felt the need to try something else. With her husband's encouragement, she decided to give the store a try and has never regretted it. Country Bears and Hares, 1000 N. Green Valley Parkway in the Pebble Marketplace, opened its doors last month. The store features antique birdhouses, quilts, scented candles, spice racks, country furniture, primitives, dried flower arrangements, Americana collectibles and, of course, stuffed animals. "I've always been amazed by the number of people who collect teddy bears, many of whom have marveled at my store's collection," Mortensen said. Some of Mortensen's merchandise does more than appear to be antique. Each of her unique church birdhouses comes with a certificate of authenticity that state the birdhouses U^ive been built with materials that date back to the 19th century. "Antiques and rustic furnishings are becoming a nice trend in home decorating," she said. "Each spring and summer, many homeowners redecorate and it's out with the old stuff and in with the new stuff which appears old." THE HENDERSON CORRIDOR CONNECTION, INC. CHKAPt^.ST AIRPORT PARKING TN Cl.ARK COTTNTY AIRPORT DOOR TO DOOR RHSIUENTIAL & COMMERCIAL SHUTTLE SERVICE Is NOW AVAILABLE FOR HENDERSON-GREEN VALLEY V Prior Day Reservations are Required ,^1^1^ Call for details, rates, and neservations • 565-7087 or 1-888-822-6971 (Ibil Free) (Secured On Line Address; http://www.henderson-nevada.com) •• • ;'i::;:fSUNDAY THRU THURSDAY \ IROM YOUR CAREFREE PACKAGE INCLUDES: • 3 d'ays/2 nights acconimodacions • 2 One full-pound Hrime Rib Dinners • 2 Breakfast Buffets • 2 Shrimp Cocktails STARTING AT U^J: -k_ Hom/cmino/LDUGHun ;l;; • • ->A1/4 acre eustom is yours for ---^/ • y -^ N 1 1 1 A ^ /^ JL .y^^ mSSf ^5B*ii J^ "ywOTSd^fesT ^^•^>^-:i:V Call (702) 263-5302. \ at Green Ihlln/Ranch Brokers Welcome Coral Cove Concert Sunday Students of Flo Raymond, director of the Goral Cover Musical Arts Studio, will be presented in a Spring Concert at 12:30 p.m. Sunday at the Green Valley Library. Flo Raymond will kick off the concert with a few songs and a short talk on "Music, the Motivator." Many of her students have captured awards and trophies in piano and voice competitions. Janae Jeffrey not only won the Miss Heritage Days Beauty Contest, but also placed first in the vocal division for high schools in the Heritage Days Talent Contest. Student Noah Parker received first-place honors for piano or instrumental in the same contest. Scheduled to sing are: Jeffrey, Brenna O'Callaghan, Carly Avello, Jacklyn Bondurant and Dennis Dizon. Piano students are: Sara Parker, Noah Parker, Dizon, Marina Gastelum, Susan Eisenberg, Natasha Groitzsch, Canie McCollum, SeairQ^allaghan and Melaney Scarberry. --— Sean, Brenna antf-Megh^fn O'Callaghan will sing "I'm Late" from "Alice in Wonderland." Dizon and Avello will sing a vocal duet, "Endless Love. Sarah Parker will appear as a guest dancer with "true to your Heart." Jeffrey will sing "Chicago Blues," with words and music by Flo Raymond. • A buffet reception will follow. /;'..""' Margaret Jeffrey serves a hostess chair and Maria Rodriguez as co-hostess chair. Run for the Blind Sunday The Las Vegas Confederation of Motorcycle Clubs will present the first Run for the Blind on Sunday, May 23 The run will benefit the Hobble Creek Blind Camp. Sign-ups will begin at 7 a.m. at the Las Vegas Blind Center, 1001N. Bruce St., in Las Vegas. The donation is $15 per person. A free pancake breakfast will be offered with early registration from 7 to 8:30 a.m. Live music, door prizes and drawings will be featured. For more information, call 264-5106, or e-mail hcblindcamp@yahoo.com. Cellos in concert oh Sunday N The Nevada Chamber Symphony will join with the Ain^d^s School of Music to present "The Sounds of Cellos" in the Jewel Box Theater of the Clark County Library at 3 p.m. Sunday. Admission is free. A reception will follow ^he performance. For more information, call 433-9280. \ Elks set open House The Henderson/Green Valley Elks 2802 will host an open house from noon to 4 p.m. May 23 at the lodge, 631 E. Lake Mead Dr. All residents interested in the Elks are invited to iattend. The Elks is largest private organization that contributes to scholarships nationwide. The local Elks group also feeds the homeless on the first and third Thursday of every month, provides food for needy families, sponsors Cub Scouts, sponsors hoop shoot contests for youngsters and assists veterans. The Elks also have dinners every Friday night and breakfast fs served every first and third Sunday ofthe month. Call 565-9959 for more information. Methodists host evangelist On Pentecost Sunday, May 23, evangelist Leo Wood will speak at the 8 and 11 a.m. services at First Henderson United Methodist Church. Wood has pastored churches in Fallen, Nev.; Take Tahoe, Calif.; Spokane, Wash.; Wenatchee, Wash.; and Corvallis, ore. Wood served in the U.S. Naval Air Corps during the Korean Conflict. Wood now serves as funeral service manager for Palm Mortuaries and Memorial Parks. In addition to Wood speaking at the services of worship, the Rev. Marvin Gant will present The "God And Life" Scouting Awards to John McAvoy, Patrick McAvoy and Stephanie McAvoy. At 5 p.m. the church will host a Church/Community Barbecue to honor the first anniversary of the burning of the church's mortgage and dedication to God for all of the church campus and facilities. All residents are invited to Robert Maloney Maloney, Jr. named hdtel manager at Sam's Town Robert J. Maloney, Jr. was recently named hotel manager for Sam's Town.Hotel, Gambling Hall and Bowling Center. Maloney previously served as director of sales for the hotel. A graduate of UNLV, he is a former vice president of the Boulder Strip Association and has served as chairman ofthe Turkey Trot for the last two years. He is also an active member of the Las Vegas Track Club. Maloney resides i n Henderson with his wife and children. Food festival in LV The 24th annual International Food Festival will be held from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday, May 23, at the Cashman Field Exhibit Hall. Admission is $1, while children under 12 are admitted free. Authentic foods and drinks from more than 20 ethnic organizations will be for sale. ^ F^T .* • KAYAKING • HIKING • BACKCOUNTRY SKIING • BACKPACKING • CLIMBING • CAMPING k (702) 4544997 2925 N. Green Valley Pkwy #A Henderson, Nv 89014 The Temperature is Rising Summer Tune-Up Special • Fast, Courteous Service • Expert, Repair and Installation • Trained, Cooling and Heating System Specialist • Residential and Commercial • Repairs of All Makes and Models AIR SERVICE Get ready for summer. Have your home's Air Condidoning System tuned-up by nefessienai Technicians. Call 565-9800 today! LIC# 35354 • BOUNDED • INSURED 'TtptfthtUiu *J* ^iL. Water Place We mmke It pemctfy dmarF 1000 W. Qree n Valley Pkwy. Suite 240 • 263-2600 Softeners • Fleck Meter Head • Dow Kesin • lifetime Guosrontee • 32 K Groins Both installed W/Loop $999 Revene 15G.P.Day osmoiii $279 $579 "Full House Water Treatment Systems" NV. Contractors #48377 Insured Lie. & Bonded STEAK DINNER BBQ RIB DINNER W/RoMBud PoMonorBBQBMM,^ GirileBraid, MuporSiM Leo Wood these special services and to the all-church/community barbecue. First Henderson United Methodist Church is located at 609 E. Horizon Dr. For more information, call the church, 5656049. a^^^ \ 8oz STEAK SANDWICH wKh Fries Beverage Purchase Required on All Suecials • Must be 21 P 0 ft D tl 0 U H CASINO, DINEI^ G LOUNGE Daily Blue Plate Specials Lunch....$1.99 Dinner...$2.99 A SO's Dirter with SO's Prizes W \ Boulder HWIIL M Sunset Btf. • 584-1158 COME EiqOT GREAT FRESH PRODUCE GKEIIIEIIIEIIUNMDITtfGREIIimiJlEI this Thursday night from 4p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Market! FREE PARKING wiU be avaUable for the market at the empty, fenced'in lot on the corner of Water Street and Basic Road, across from the Market. This week will feature hot house tomatoes, fresh navel oranges, strawberries, raisins, pistachios, soy nuts, yellow squash, Maui and Vidalia onions, pickled garlic, specialty olives and MORE! Mid'May will bring cherries, apricots, peaches and other stone fruits. Downtown Henderscxi ^ARMER\V RAILROADPASS IIOTFI & CASINO START YOUR WEEK OFF WITH FREE CASH Beginning Monday at 6am until Wednesday at 12pm you can have a chance to win up to $500 CASH ^ ;:_::: • :-:.. r •'-IF YOU HIT ANY-'"^^^ ^ FOUR OF A KIND* On Video Poker or a Jackpot of $25 or More On Any Other Slot I^lachine. You Will Receive a Drawing Ticket For Cash and Prizes. Grand Prize Winner will receive $350 CASIII A Second Prize of $ 150 CASH, Third Prize will be Dinner for two tb^ the Conductor's Room, plus many more prizes. Drawings will be held every Wednesday at 7:00 pm** • Maximum coins bet, no wild cards, must be at least 21 years of age. ^j^ (f/, — Must be present to win, management nfiay (i^j cancel or change this promotion at anytime.Receive a FREE GIFT for signing up at Player's Junction. Henderson's most liberal player's club 2800 South Boulder Highway Henderson, Nevada 89015 (702) 294-5000 '-^^JSr^

PAGE 12

: ^^f-i'fi^^^r^^^^J'^J^^^^T^^^i ii Pag* 12 HMMfarson Horn* News Thursday, May 20,1999 Thursday, May 20,1999 Hndrson Hoim Hmm Pig* 13 ,r Coffee and bingo event is offered to seniors The Black Mountain Recreation Center, 599 Greenway Road, will host coffee and Bingo front) 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. May 28. The free event is sponsored by the Henderson Parks and Recreation Department for seniors (50 years of age or more). The three-hour event will feature popular Bingo games and prizes. Coffee and doughnuts will be served to all participants. "Seniors comprise almost 16% of our community and are among the fastest-growing segments of our population," said Jayne Mazurkiewicz, CLP, recreation coordinator. To ensure all oiir residents benefit from parks and recreation, our department is making an effort to expand upon some of our most successful senior programs and develop more for the future." Mazurkiewicz said that most parks and recreation department programs are created with the help of residents, but sometimes programs are also based on studies from organizations like the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP). For example, when AARP researchers established links between attitude and physical health, the department expanded programming to include social activities in addition to traditional senior fitness classes. For registration or additional information, call 565-2880. Advance registration is requested as space will be limited. To learn about additional activities and volunteer opportunities available to seniors, call the Henderson Senior Center, 565-6990. Family Music Centers to display hand-crafted pianos CdltGr tO hoSt MfiXICail FlfifttA Henderson-based Familv Mu. Familv Music Centers'$1 milof 10 U.S. cities. It is said to be niano lines inrlndintr Ynnncr ^F^ ^^ •^FB %# Bl^^^^^ I W I^I^^^I^^^MI • • l^^'^^ wVi DEATHS Edward H. Bellman Edward H. Bellman, 78, died Friday, May 14,1999, in Henderson. Bom May 31,1920, in Cincinnati, he had been a resident of Henderson for 21 years. He was a retired hotel/casino slot mechanic. He was a member of St. Peter's Catholic Church: and was a veteran of the U.S. Army, having sen/ed in World War II. He is survived by his daughter, Judy Shockey of Loveland, Ohio; sons, Edward and Steven of Henderson; sisters, Dolores Berling of Cincinnati; Rose Lange of Dallas, Texas; Sister Mildred Marie of Cincinnati; brothers, Bobby, Joseph and Albert all of Cincinnati; five grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. The family suggests donations to a charity of your choice. Services were held. Interment is in Palm Valley View Cemetery, Las Vegas. Arrangements were handled by Palm Mortuary-Henderson. George MItchem Crocker III George MItchem Crocker III, 49, died Saturday. I||f(^ gO, 1999, in Oontrose, Colo. Bom May 27, 1949, in Hampton, Va., he was a former resident of Las Vegas. He was a carpenter foreman, and had made his home in Montrose since 1993. He was employed for Ludwig Associates in Telluride, Cok>. He also helped bulk) the Montrose High School Gymnasium, the Montrose Airport Fire Station, the Montrose Judicial Building and the.new Super Wal-Mart. In 1995, in Las Vegas, he married Lisa L. Gage/Armstrong of Montrose, Colo., who currently lives in the family home. He is survived by his wife, Lisa; four sons: Paul, Sid, and Andy Crocker of West Virginia; Thomas Annstrong, of Montrose; and two daughters, Christa Armstrong-Hoover and husband Marvin; and Shannone Cryer and husband. Jon, also of Montrose; one brother, Eugene and wife Dottle of Forest Hills, Md.; four sisters, Alice and husband Churchill Nolan, of Beaver Dam, Va.; Judy and husband Stephen Fell of Berlin, Md.; Janet and husband Robert Mclntosh of Homestead, Fla.; and Susan and Larry Hanneman of Loveland; and five granddaughters, Jessica, Cheyanne, Shayla, Mandy and Brooke. Dave Parker Dave Parker, 53, died Sunday. May 9. 1999, in Las Vegas. Bom Aug. 2,1945, he had been a long time resident of Las Vegas. He was a water purification salesman; and was a veteran. He is survived by his wife. Deborah Parker of Las Vegas; sisters. Patricia Boons and Carol Bowden of Arkansas; father, D.H. Bartholomew of Arkansas. There are no local services. Interment will be in Texas. Arrangements were handled by Hites Funeral Home of Henderson. James L. Quick Jr. James L. Quick. Jr., 42, died Friday, May 14, 1999. In Des Moines. Iowa. Bom April 10.1957. in Des Moines. lowra, h wu a former resident of Henderson for 34 years. He is survived by his son. Shane Lavem Quk:k of Henderson; mother. Maxine C. Whiteaker, also of Hendereon; father, James L. Ouk:k. Sr. of Indianoia. Iowa; sister, Cheryl A. Fry of Spokane. Wash.; brother Mwfc L. Whiteaker. of Henderson; f|^>-father, Arnold M. Whiteaker of LM Vegae; and one grandchikt Vititaflon wW be held from 2 to 7 p.m. today at Palm MortuaryHenderson. Sarvloet wfR be hetd at 10 a.m. Ffktay at Palm Mortuary. Iniermefli wM be in Pahn Memorial Park-Henderaon. Arrangements were handled by Palm Mortuary-Henderson. Henderson-based Family Music Centers announced it will display the most exquisite collection of pianos in the history of Nevada as part of a two-day world-cjass piano sale event. The, event is part ofa national tour of Bosendorfer pianos — considered by many to be the most prestigious pianos in the world. The event, to be held from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and from 12 to 5 p.m. Sunday, will be held at Family Music Centers, 2714 N. Green Valley Parkway in Henderson. "This event will be a once in a lifetime opportunity to select for purchase an authentic Bosendorfer piano," said director of western sales for Bosendorfer Piano, John W. McDermott. "You would have to go to Vienna, Austria, to see this many Bosendorfers in one place," Family Music Centers President Scott Groseclose said. "Even in large cities hke New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles, it is extremely rare to walk ihto--a music store and find two or even three of these pianos...We're going to display at least eight." Family Music Centers' $1 mil lion display of hand-crafted Bosendorfers will feature the Franz Liszt Bosendorfer, a 158year-old piano believed to have been played by Liszt, one of the immortal greats of classical piano music whose talents have been compared with the likes of Beethoven, Bach and Mozart. The Liszt piano is on loan from the Bosendorfer Museum in Vienna, Austria, in order to participate in the Bosendorfer tour of 10 U.S. cities. It is said to be one of the world's most valuable pianos. More than 30 world-class pianos will be available for purchase with special pricing during this two-day event, including the rare Bosendorfers. "We're expecting the who's who of the Las Vegas music and entertainment industries to view these instruments," Groseclose said. Family Music Centers opened in 1995 and carries prominent piano lines including Young Chang, PianoDisc, Bosendorfer, Kawai, Seller, Charles Walter and Roland. The company has been awarded exclusive franchises from the industry's top manufacturers, and offers the lowest prices guaranteed. Family Music Centers stocks the largest inventory of pianos, organs, keyboards, band instru-. ments, and sheet music selections; in Nevada, and offers music les-*. sons seven days a week. Which of These Costly Homeseller Mistakes Will You Make When You Sell Your Home Henderson A new report has just been released which reveals 7 costly mistakes that most homeowners make when selling their home, and a 9 Step System that can help you sell your home fast and for the most amount of money. This industry report shows clearly how the traditional ways of selling homes have become increasingly less and less effective in today's market. Tfie fact of the matter is that fully three quarters of homeowners don't get what they want for their home and become disillusioned and worse fmancially disadvantaged when they put their home on the market. As this report uncovers, most homesellers make 7 deadly mistakes that cost them literally thousands of dollars. The good news is that each and every one of these mistakes are entirely preventable. In answer to this issue, industry insiders have prepared a free special report entitled "The 9 Step System to Get Your Home Sold Fast and for Top Dollar". To hear a brief recorded message about how to order your free copy of this report, call 1-800-61 .'5-5203 and enter ID#9000. You can call anytime, 24 hours a day 7 days a week. Call NOW to find out how you can get the most for your home. • ,. ,, This rrport is iiiunesy of CATHY BITTINGER TEAM. Not inlfiuteil lo solicit pniprrties cumiMly listed for sale. Copyright 1999. Low Interest Rates • Limited Supply Find the greatest value in Green Valley at ^\ 0![_^Bl^!^,^Qja Clearwater Canyon. Bordering Greeij Valley Ranch just to the south, this popular community is free of the unpopular L.l.D. fee. Plus, because of low interest rates, the monthly mortgage -^ 1998 on an average Clearwater Canyon home is more than ^176 lower per hionth today than it was just last year. Do the math and you'll see it equates to a savings of more than $63,000 on a fixed 30-year loan'. So get moving, you can't afford not to. Hon^e r ft^a toorP^an Great community. Great location. CLEARWATER CANYON Tfet PramlMi CoiltctiM From the $150$ J,810-2,i 14 square feet. All single-story neighborhood. 897-7380 TMlf y^pifCl tfff rirHSitiMmmdliiiia^ltKlfifSmmiaim. trntimaUmifna^ 1170.000. SENIOR CENTER HIGHLIGHTS 27 E. TEXAS ST. 565-6990 The Center is open for all activities fromSa.m. to 10p.m., Monday through Thursday and from 8 a.nn. to 4 p.m. on Friday. It is open from 8 a.nn. to 2 p.m. on Saturday and from 9 a.nn. to 2 p.m. on Sunday. Ole! A Mexican Fiesta will be held at the Center at 10 a.m. on Sunday May 23. Entertainment will start at 10:30 a.m. and includes traditional music and folk dancing. Lunch will be served-afril:30 a.m. The meal, prepared by Chef Harris Okashige of the Fiesta Hotel and Casino, includes Mexican specialties such as chicken enchiladas, steak fajitas, beans and rice, and chips and salsa. Flan will be served for dessert. Center staff member' Nona Ferryman and volunteers Lucy Hutton, Jim Hutton and Suzie Segura are organizing the event. Advanced reservations are requested. Participation is $1.50 per senior, payable at registration. For additional information, call 565-6990. ., Clowning Around The reorganized Clown Club hosts its regular meetings at 1 p.m. on the first Monday of each month in the Center's library. The club's elected officers are: Dody Smith, president; Dorothy Livesay, vice president; and June Goodyear, secretary. The Clown Club visits nursing homes and participants in special events hosted by the city of Henderson Parks and Recreation Department. Seniors interested in taking part in club activities should call Dody Smith, 566-4561, or leave a message at the center. Volunteer Opportunities The Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) helps seniors discover volunteer opportunities in Henderson. RSVP matches seniors with service progffyn^ t;hat n^afth their personal intertsts, taletits and skills. For details, contact Myra Drake at the Center's RSVP office from 9 a.m. to noon. Thank You Seniors at the Center thank the Knights of Columbus for coming to the rescue last Saturday when volunteers were needed to assist with brunch. A call to Head Knight Roland Leclerc resulted _in help from Paul Dumont, Joe Savonne, Frank ZottoUi and Steve Casmus. Thanks also go to volunteers ^ndy Hansen, Clara Hansen, George Hansen, George Devisser, Joe Franco; and staff members Michelle F*ynim, Matt Herron and Betty Dukes. Thank you to Sunset Station's Chef Edward Castaneda for Sunday's chicken lunch. Summer Sessions——— 7 "Starting June 22, an afternoon line dance class will take place from 3:30 to 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the dining room. Volunteer instructor Rita Barton says this class is geared Up Front Display Ads Boulder City and/or Henderson I>1 ADI INI ~ I richiv Spin Call^^-293-2302 Fax: 2940977 feri::Cawal6onnct :•"•( • Cajun Cookin' • Come learn what the South knows about good cookin'... loin us Wed. May 26th or Thur • May 27th at 6 PM Class is $ 10 (a couple of spots left) 410 Nevada Hwv fifiO • Boulder City • 294-V;i.^ HHHpr-iHE^ ^Vi .^ ^'1^-^^ Courtesy Photo VOLUNTEERS — Voluntaert host a lunch, Saturday at tht Henderson Senior Center. They are John Franco, George and Clara Hanson, Chef Edward Castenada of the Boulder Station Hotel-Casino, Katie Bair, Michelle Pymm and Dorothy Uveeay. Courtesy Photo KNIGHTS TO THE RESCUE — Volunteers at the Senior Center include Knights of Columbus members. Betty Dukes' call to head Knight, Roland LaClerc brought volunteers Andrew Hansen, Joe Savone, Paul Dumont in the first row. Back row: George DeVisser, Steve Casmus and Frank Zottolli. for fun and exercise. •A healthy exercise and nutrition class called "Preparation H (Health)" will meet on Wednesdays from June 2-30. Each class includes a light salad and healthy recipes. Participation is $10 pier person for all five sessions. •A beginning computer workshop entitled "CPU, Bytes and Mouse, What's That?" will be held at 4 p.m. on June 21. The workshop is designed to give seniors with no computer experience an overview of the computer and how it can assist them. •The Henderson Seniors'Auxiliary Craft Group will meet from June 28 to Aug. 30. Participants will prepare crafts for the Auxiliary's Oktoberfest sale. Ongoing Classes •The line dancing class meets from 9 to 11 a.m. on Thursdays. New students are welcome. •Canasta classes are held from 1 to 4 p.m. on Fridays. Seniors are welcome to drop in or call Selma Goldstein at 434-3151 with questions. •Watercolor classes are held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the dining room. Phyllis Squire is the instructor. Reminders •Free Blood pressure testing for seniors is offered from 9 to 11 a.m^ayery Tuesday at the center. This service is provided by RSVP volunteer Maria Davis, RN. • Dorothy Swackhammer helps seniors every Friday with questions about medical bills and Medicare/Medicaid benefits. •Manicures are available from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. on Fridays for a suggested donation of $1. No appointments are necessary. •From 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Monday through Thursday, CAT tokens and passes are available to seniors with CAT photo IDs. Paragon Asset Management Company A Re^stered Investment Advisory Company SpecUilzfaig 111 Conscivatlve Fixed income InvcatiBents Call Today lb Schedule a Free Coiuulacion 2920 N. Green Valley Pkwy., Suite 421, Ffenderson, Nevada $15 buys $20 worth of tokens. Monthly passes cost $10 and are valid for unlimited rides. For handicapped paratransit services, call 228-4800. Additional Information To receive the Henderson Senior Center Newsletter by mail. send several stamped, self-addressed business-sized envelopes to 27 E. Texas, Henderson, NV 89015. Newsletters are mailed each month. For more senior activities, call the Kesterson Valley View Recreation Center, 565-2121, the Silver Springs Recreation Center, 43^ 3814, the Black Mountain Recreation Center and Aquatic Complex, 565-2880, or the Lorin L. Williams Indoor Pool, 565.2123. Weekday Meals The city of Henderson provides a full-service kitchen so Catholic Charities of Southern Nevada can provide weekday meals at the Center. A donation of $1.75 is suggested. Catholic Charities also provides Meals On Wheels for home bound seniors. For more information call 565-4626. /AvNg WAter Mnt weiir ie Hit nfn. It't A Crati Roots Iffort a58-SAVE Three Bars Saddlery from San Antonio, Texas TACK and SADDLE AUCTION Sunday May 23rd 6 PM Doors Open a FIVE PM 86 Brand New Saddles Silvered Show, Pleasure, Roping, Youth, Cordura, and Pack Horse SADDLES (Manufacturers wriiten warranty on all saddles) LOTS OF BRAND NEW, BRAND NAME TACK Silvered Show Dridles. C.inv;i\ Wuictprool OlanlietN. O^lcr Clippers. Rein.s. Saddle Pads .inj Ulankcts. Haliers. U-ad Ro|X.-^. Crooming liemi!! I09'S OF ITE.MS NOT MENTIONED Henderson Convention Center 2(X) Water Street. Henderson, Nevada TI-RMS: C\SH — CREDIT CARDS — ATM CARDS Auctioneers S. C. Rogers, Telephone 800.554.0322 UNLV professor honored The French government presented UNLV professor Marie-France Hilgar with the Academic Palms award during a ceremony May 14 at UNLV. Hilgar, a distinguished professor of French who joined the UNLV faculty in 1971, was honored for the work she has done to promote French culture, education, language, and literature in the United States. "This is a wonderful recognition of Marie-France's many achievements, and we at UNLV are delighted for her," UNLV President Carol C. Barter said. "This award confirms the international stature she has held in her field for nearly 30 years." The Triumph. A victory for photo 60S-3 '(fibiui&tsi. Ji^ U,399^^ Camera Body Only Full-featured professional SLR with exclusive Canon EOS technology. Improved AIM System with 45-point Area AF, 21-zone Evaluative Metering & Eye Controlled Focus. Ultra-high-speed predictive AF up to 7 fps with optional Pov\*r Drive Booster PB-E2 Sophisticated E-TTL'flash exposure system and wireless control with optional Speedlites. 18 Custom Functions for expanded flexibility. Includes Canon U.S.A., Inc. 1-year Umited Warranty/Registration Card. —-CAJSEY*S CAMERAS— • "The Source for Everything Photographic" '?v Professional Film • Kodak • Fuji • Darkroom Supplies • Digital Cameras Open Monday thru Friday 9 to 6 • Saturdays 9 to 5 Liberacc Plaxa 1775 E. Tropicana Suite 21 736-0890 Under New Management; TRIANCLE AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR In Green Valley •458-3037 rhe Texaco at Sunset & Gibson next to the Express W ay^ ihiii;'.iJhJi.HTit'iNfiiHJiH LUBI. Oil a FIITER SPECIAL Oil change up to 5 qts. mult! grade oil Install new oil filter • Lube chassis (if appl.) • Check fluid levels r Most Cars I ^qffer^x£ire$jS^0^9_ — — Radiator^i Engine Drain & Refill Plus Coolant Plus visual inspection of. cooling system. ^Of|er^xgires 6/30/99 Most Cars I MR CONDmONIMG RECHARGE i I ^_^_ J • Check hoses & belts 1 • Includes visual inspection of cooling system for leaks Oj^Jffgr^^^^ *Freon| Extra 1^ AYS MORE May 14th -30th Hit the daily specified Four Of A Kind & receive a \, 100 COIN BONUS ^ on all video pol(er machines^" Memorial Weekend Mayhem May 28th 30th Guaranteed Cash Giveaway ^ 10,SOO guaranteed j>e£ casino^ Lake Mad & Water Street (702)564-1811 BOYD GAMING CORPORATIONe C A S I NO Boulder Hwy., South of Suneet (702) 564-8100

PAGE 13

: ^^f-i'fi^^^r^^^^J'^J^^^^T^^^i ii Pag* 12 HMMfarson Horn* News Thursday, May 20,1999 Thursday, May 20,1999 Hndrson Hoim Hmm Pig* 13 ,r Coffee and bingo event is offered to seniors The Black Mountain Recreation Center, 599 Greenway Road, will host coffee and Bingo front) 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. May 28. The free event is sponsored by the Henderson Parks and Recreation Department for seniors (50 years of age or more). The three-hour event will feature popular Bingo games and prizes. Coffee and doughnuts will be served to all participants. "Seniors comprise almost 16% of our community and are among the fastest-growing segments of our population," said Jayne Mazurkiewicz, CLP, recreation coordinator. To ensure all oiir residents benefit from parks and recreation, our department is making an effort to expand upon some of our most successful senior programs and develop more for the future." Mazurkiewicz said that most parks and recreation department programs are created with the help of residents, but sometimes programs are also based on studies from organizations like the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP). For example, when AARP researchers established links between attitude and physical health, the department expanded programming to include social activities in addition to traditional senior fitness classes. For registration or additional information, call 565-2880. Advance registration is requested as space will be limited. To learn about additional activities and volunteer opportunities available to seniors, call the Henderson Senior Center, 565-6990. Family Music Centers to display hand-crafted pianos CdltGr tO hoSt MfiXICail FlfifttA Henderson-based Familv Mu. Familv Music Centers'$1 milof 10 U.S. cities. It is said to be niano lines inrlndintr Ynnncr ^F^ ^^ •^FB %# Bl^^^^^ I W I^I^^^I^^^MI • • l^^'^^ wVi DEATHS Edward H. Bellman Edward H. Bellman, 78, died Friday, May 14,1999, in Henderson. Bom May 31,1920, in Cincinnati, he had been a resident of Henderson for 21 years. He was a retired hotel/casino slot mechanic. He was a member of St. Peter's Catholic Church: and was a veteran of the U.S. Army, having sen/ed in World War II. He is survived by his daughter, Judy Shockey of Loveland, Ohio; sons, Edward and Steven of Henderson; sisters, Dolores Berling of Cincinnati; Rose Lange of Dallas, Texas; Sister Mildred Marie of Cincinnati; brothers, Bobby, Joseph and Albert all of Cincinnati; five grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. The family suggests donations to a charity of your choice. Services were held. Interment is in Palm Valley View Cemetery, Las Vegas. Arrangements were handled by Palm Mortuary-Henderson. George MItchem Crocker III George MItchem Crocker III, 49, died Saturday. I||f(^ gO, 1999, in Oontrose, Colo. Bom May 27, 1949, in Hampton, Va., he was a former resident of Las Vegas. He was a carpenter foreman, and had made his home in Montrose since 1993. He was employed for Ludwig Associates in Telluride, Cok>. He also helped bulk) the Montrose High School Gymnasium, the Montrose Airport Fire Station, the Montrose Judicial Building and the.new Super Wal-Mart. In 1995, in Las Vegas, he married Lisa L. Gage/Armstrong of Montrose, Colo., who currently lives in the family home. He is survived by his wife, Lisa; four sons: Paul, Sid, and Andy Crocker of West Virginia; Thomas Annstrong, of Montrose; and two daughters, Christa Armstrong-Hoover and husband Marvin; and Shannone Cryer and husband. Jon, also of Montrose; one brother, Eugene and wife Dottle of Forest Hills, Md.; four sisters, Alice and husband Churchill Nolan, of Beaver Dam, Va.; Judy and husband Stephen Fell of Berlin, Md.; Janet and husband Robert Mclntosh of Homestead, Fla.; and Susan and Larry Hanneman of Loveland; and five granddaughters, Jessica, Cheyanne, Shayla, Mandy and Brooke. Dave Parker Dave Parker, 53, died Sunday. May 9. 1999, in Las Vegas. Bom Aug. 2,1945, he had been a long time resident of Las Vegas. He was a water purification salesman; and was a veteran. He is survived by his wife. Deborah Parker of Las Vegas; sisters. Patricia Boons and Carol Bowden of Arkansas; father, D.H. Bartholomew of Arkansas. There are no local services. Interment will be in Texas. Arrangements were handled by Hites Funeral Home of Henderson. James L. Quick Jr. James L. Quick. Jr., 42, died Friday, May 14, 1999. In Des Moines. Iowa. Bom April 10.1957. in Des Moines. lowra, h wu a former resident of Henderson for 34 years. He is survived by his son. Shane Lavem Quk:k of Henderson; mother. Maxine C. Whiteaker, also of Hendereon; father, James L. Ouk:k. Sr. of Indianoia. Iowa; sister, Cheryl A. Fry of Spokane. Wash.; brother Mwfc L. Whiteaker. of Henderson; f|^>-father, Arnold M. Whiteaker of LM Vegae; and one grandchikt Vititaflon wW be held from 2 to 7 p.m. today at Palm MortuaryHenderson. Sarvloet wfR be hetd at 10 a.m. Ffktay at Palm Mortuary. Iniermefli wM be in Pahn Memorial Park-Henderaon. Arrangements were handled by Palm Mortuary-Henderson. Henderson-based Family Music Centers announced it will display the most exquisite collection of pianos in the history of Nevada as part of a two-day world-cjass piano sale event. The, event is part ofa national tour of Bosendorfer pianos — considered by many to be the most prestigious pianos in the world. The event, to be held from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and from 12 to 5 p.m. Sunday, will be held at Family Music Centers, 2714 N. Green Valley Parkway in Henderson. "This event will be a once in a lifetime opportunity to select for purchase an authentic Bosendorfer piano," said director of western sales for Bosendorfer Piano, John W. McDermott. "You would have to go to Vienna, Austria, to see this many Bosendorfers in one place," Family Music Centers President Scott Groseclose said. "Even in large cities hke New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles, it is extremely rare to walk ihto--a music store and find two or even three of these pianos...We're going to display at least eight." Family Music Centers' $1 mil lion display of hand-crafted Bosendorfers will feature the Franz Liszt Bosendorfer, a 158year-old piano believed to have been played by Liszt, one of the immortal greats of classical piano music whose talents have been compared with the likes of Beethoven, Bach and Mozart. The Liszt piano is on loan from the Bosendorfer Museum in Vienna, Austria, in order to participate in the Bosendorfer tour of 10 U.S. cities. It is said to be one of the world's most valuable pianos. More than 30 world-class pianos will be available for purchase with special pricing during this two-day event, including the rare Bosendorfers. "We're expecting the who's who of the Las Vegas music and entertainment industries to view these instruments," Groseclose said. Family Music Centers opened in 1995 and carries prominent piano lines including Young Chang, PianoDisc, Bosendorfer, Kawai, Seller, Charles Walter and Roland. The company has been awarded exclusive franchises from the industry's top manufacturers, and offers the lowest prices guaranteed. Family Music Centers stocks the largest inventory of pianos, organs, keyboards, band instru-. ments, and sheet music selections; in Nevada, and offers music les-*. sons seven days a week. Which of These Costly Homeseller Mistakes Will You Make When You Sell Your Home Henderson A new report has just been released which reveals 7 costly mistakes that most homeowners make when selling their home, and a 9 Step System that can help you sell your home fast and for the most amount of money. This industry report shows clearly how the traditional ways of selling homes have become increasingly less and less effective in today's market. Tfie fact of the matter is that fully three quarters of homeowners don't get what they want for their home and become disillusioned and worse fmancially disadvantaged when they put their home on the market. As this report uncovers, most homesellers make 7 deadly mistakes that cost them literally thousands of dollars. The good news is that each and every one of these mistakes are entirely preventable. In answer to this issue, industry insiders have prepared a free special report entitled "The 9 Step System to Get Your Home Sold Fast and for Top Dollar". To hear a brief recorded message about how to order your free copy of this report, call 1-800-61 .'5-5203 and enter ID#9000. You can call anytime, 24 hours a day 7 days a week. Call NOW to find out how you can get the most for your home. • ,. ,, This rrport is iiiunesy of CATHY BITTINGER TEAM. Not inlfiuteil lo solicit pniprrties cumiMly listed for sale. Copyright 1999. Low Interest Rates • Limited Supply Find the greatest value in Green Valley at ^\ 0![_^Bl^!^,^Qja Clearwater Canyon. Bordering Greeij Valley Ranch just to the south, this popular community is free of the unpopular L.l.D. fee. Plus, because of low interest rates, the monthly mortgage -^ 1998 on an average Clearwater Canyon home is more than ^176 lower per hionth today than it was just last year. Do the math and you'll see it equates to a savings of more than $63,000 on a fixed 30-year loan'. So get moving, you can't afford not to. Hon^e r ft^a toorP^an Great community. Great location. CLEARWATER CANYON Tfet PramlMi CoiltctiM From the $150$ J,810-2,i 14 square feet. All single-story neighborhood. 897-7380 TMlf y^pifCl tfff rirHSitiMmmdliiiia^ltKlfifSmmiaim. trntimaUmifna^ 1170.000. SENIOR CENTER HIGHLIGHTS 27 E. TEXAS ST. 565-6990 The Center is open for all activities fromSa.m. to 10p.m., Monday through Thursday and from 8 a.nn. to 4 p.m. on Friday. It is open from 8 a.nn. to 2 p.m. on Saturday and from 9 a.nn. to 2 p.m. on Sunday. Ole! A Mexican Fiesta will be held at the Center at 10 a.m. on Sunday May 23. Entertainment will start at 10:30 a.m. and includes traditional music and folk dancing. Lunch will be served-afril:30 a.m. The meal, prepared by Chef Harris Okashige of the Fiesta Hotel and Casino, includes Mexican specialties such as chicken enchiladas, steak fajitas, beans and rice, and chips and salsa. Flan will be served for dessert. Center staff member' Nona Ferryman and volunteers Lucy Hutton, Jim Hutton and Suzie Segura are organizing the event. Advanced reservations are requested. Participation is $1.50 per senior, payable at registration. For additional information, call 565-6990. ., Clowning Around The reorganized Clown Club hosts its regular meetings at 1 p.m. on the first Monday of each month in the Center's library. The club's elected officers are: Dody Smith, president; Dorothy Livesay, vice president; and June Goodyear, secretary. The Clown Club visits nursing homes and participants in special events hosted by the city of Henderson Parks and Recreation Department. Seniors interested in taking part in club activities should call Dody Smith, 566-4561, or leave a message at the center. Volunteer Opportunities The Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) helps seniors discover volunteer opportunities in Henderson. RSVP matches seniors with service progffyn^ t;hat n^afth their personal intertsts, taletits and skills. For details, contact Myra Drake at the Center's RSVP office from 9 a.m. to noon. Thank You Seniors at the Center thank the Knights of Columbus for coming to the rescue last Saturday when volunteers were needed to assist with brunch. A call to Head Knight Roland Leclerc resulted _in help from Paul Dumont, Joe Savonne, Frank ZottoUi and Steve Casmus. Thanks also go to volunteers ^ndy Hansen, Clara Hansen, George Hansen, George Devisser, Joe Franco; and staff members Michelle F*ynim, Matt Herron and Betty Dukes. Thank you to Sunset Station's Chef Edward Castaneda for Sunday's chicken lunch. Summer Sessions——— 7 "Starting June 22, an afternoon line dance class will take place from 3:30 to 5 p.m. on Tuesdays in the dining room. Volunteer instructor Rita Barton says this class is geared Up Front Display Ads Boulder City and/or Henderson I>1 ADI INI ~ I richiv Spin Call^^-293-2302 Fax: 2940977 feri::Cawal6onnct :•"•( • Cajun Cookin' • Come learn what the South knows about good cookin'... loin us Wed. May 26th or Thur • May 27th at 6 PM Class is $ 10 (a couple of spots left) 410 Nevada Hwv fifiO • Boulder City • 294-V;i.^ HHHpr-iHE^ ^Vi .^ ^'1^-^^ Courtesy Photo VOLUNTEERS — Voluntaert host a lunch, Saturday at tht Henderson Senior Center. They are John Franco, George and Clara Hanson, Chef Edward Castenada of the Boulder Station Hotel-Casino, Katie Bair, Michelle Pymm and Dorothy Uveeay. Courtesy Photo KNIGHTS TO THE RESCUE — Volunteers at the Senior Center include Knights of Columbus members. Betty Dukes' call to head Knight, Roland LaClerc brought volunteers Andrew Hansen, Joe Savone, Paul Dumont in the first row. Back row: George DeVisser, Steve Casmus and Frank Zottolli. for fun and exercise. •A healthy exercise and nutrition class called "Preparation H (Health)" will meet on Wednesdays from June 2-30. Each class includes a light salad and healthy recipes. Participation is $10 pier person for all five sessions. •A beginning computer workshop entitled "CPU, Bytes and Mouse, What's That?" will be held at 4 p.m. on June 21. The workshop is designed to give seniors with no computer experience an overview of the computer and how it can assist them. •The Henderson Seniors'Auxiliary Craft Group will meet from June 28 to Aug. 30. Participants will prepare crafts for the Auxiliary's Oktoberfest sale. Ongoing Classes •The line dancing class meets from 9 to 11 a.m. on Thursdays. New students are welcome. •Canasta classes are held from 1 to 4 p.m. on Fridays. Seniors are welcome to drop in or call Selma Goldstein at 434-3151 with questions. •Watercolor classes are held at 1 p.m. on Fridays in the dining room. Phyllis Squire is the instructor. Reminders •Free Blood pressure testing for seniors is offered from 9 to 11 a.m^ayery Tuesday at the center. This service is provided by RSVP volunteer Maria Davis, RN. • Dorothy Swackhammer helps seniors every Friday with questions about medical bills and Medicare/Medicaid benefits. •Manicures are available from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. on Fridays for a suggested donation of $1. No appointments are necessary. •From 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Monday through Thursday, CAT tokens and passes are available to seniors with CAT photo IDs. Paragon Asset Management Company A Re^stered Investment Advisory Company SpecUilzfaig 111 Conscivatlve Fixed income InvcatiBents Call Today lb Schedule a Free Coiuulacion 2920 N. Green Valley Pkwy., Suite 421, Ffenderson, Nevada $15 buys $20 worth of tokens. Monthly passes cost $10 and are valid for unlimited rides. For handicapped paratransit services, call 228-4800. Additional Information To receive the Henderson Senior Center Newsletter by mail. send several stamped, self-addressed business-sized envelopes to 27 E. Texas, Henderson, NV 89015. Newsletters are mailed each month. For more senior activities, call the Kesterson Valley View Recreation Center, 565-2121, the Silver Springs Recreation Center, 43^ 3814, the Black Mountain Recreation Center and Aquatic Complex, 565-2880, or the Lorin L. Williams Indoor Pool, 565.2123. Weekday Meals The city of Henderson provides a full-service kitchen so Catholic Charities of Southern Nevada can provide weekday meals at the Center. A donation of $1.75 is suggested. Catholic Charities also provides Meals On Wheels for home bound seniors. For more information call 565-4626. /AvNg WAter Mnt weiir ie Hit nfn. It't A Crati Roots Iffort a58-SAVE Three Bars Saddlery from San Antonio, Texas TACK and SADDLE AUCTION Sunday May 23rd 6 PM Doors Open a FIVE PM 86 Brand New Saddles Silvered Show, Pleasure, Roping, Youth, Cordura, and Pack Horse SADDLES (Manufacturers wriiten warranty on all saddles) LOTS OF BRAND NEW, BRAND NAME TACK Silvered Show Dridles. C.inv;i\ Wuictprool OlanlietN. O^lcr Clippers. Rein.s. Saddle Pads .inj Ulankcts. Haliers. U-ad Ro|X.-^. Crooming liemi!! I09'S OF ITE.MS NOT MENTIONED Henderson Convention Center 2(X) Water Street. Henderson, Nevada TI-RMS: C\SH — CREDIT CARDS — ATM CARDS Auctioneers S. C. Rogers, Telephone 800.554.0322 UNLV professor honored The French government presented UNLV professor Marie-France Hilgar with the Academic Palms award during a ceremony May 14 at UNLV. Hilgar, a distinguished professor of French who joined the UNLV faculty in 1971, was honored for the work she has done to promote French culture, education, language, and literature in the United States. "This is a wonderful recognition of Marie-France's many achievements, and we at UNLV are delighted for her," UNLV President Carol C. Barter said. "This award confirms the international stature she has held in her field for nearly 30 years." The Triumph. A victory for photo 60S-3 '(fibiui&tsi. Ji^ U,399^^ Camera Body Only Full-featured professional SLR with exclusive Canon EOS technology. Improved AIM System with 45-point Area AF, 21-zone Evaluative Metering & Eye Controlled Focus. Ultra-high-speed predictive AF up to 7 fps with optional Pov\*r Drive Booster PB-E2 Sophisticated E-TTL'flash exposure system and wireless control with optional Speedlites. 18 Custom Functions for expanded flexibility. Includes Canon U.S.A., Inc. 1-year Umited Warranty/Registration Card. —-CAJSEY*S CAMERAS— • "The Source for Everything Photographic" '?v Professional Film • Kodak • Fuji • Darkroom Supplies • Digital Cameras Open Monday thru Friday 9 to 6 • Saturdays 9 to 5 Liberacc Plaxa 1775 E. Tropicana Suite 21 736-0890 Under New Management; TRIANCLE AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR In Green Valley •458-3037 rhe Texaco at Sunset & Gibson next to the Express W ay^ ihiii;'.iJhJi.HTit'iNfiiHJiH LUBI. Oil a FIITER SPECIAL Oil change up to 5 qts. mult! grade oil Install new oil filter • Lube chassis (if appl.) • Check fluid levels r Most Cars I ^qffer^x£ire$jS^0^9_ — — Radiator^i Engine Drain & Refill Plus Coolant Plus visual inspection of. cooling system. ^Of|er^xgires 6/30/99 Most Cars I MR CONDmONIMG RECHARGE i I ^_^_ J • Check hoses & belts 1 • Includes visual inspection of cooling system for leaks Oj^Jffgr^^^^ *Freon| Extra 1^ AYS MORE May 14th -30th Hit the daily specified Four Of A Kind & receive a \, 100 COIN BONUS ^ on all video pol(er machines^" Memorial Weekend Mayhem May 28th 30th Guaranteed Cash Giveaway ^ 10,SOO guaranteed j>e£ casino^ Lake Mad & Water Street (702)564-1811 BOYD GAMING CORPORATIONe C A S I NO Boulder Hwy., South of Suneet (702) 564-8100

PAGE 14

J'l.i ..* ^, ^ • j?w.v'^'.>s.'.f.y!'.'".''i" • ''"^ •PflW ,:•<. • .<;; Pag* 14 HMidarson Horn* New* Thursday, May 20, 1999 Community LV NEUROPATHY SUPPORT GROUP Friday, May 21,3 p.m. Sunrisa Prof. Bid, 3131 LaCanada, Suita 107.361-3902. WATER SAFETY FESTIVAL Saturday-Sunday, May 22-23,1eing held illustrating how to use movies as therapeutic healing tools. 27034^. DIVORCED & SEPARATED ADJUSTMENT Mondays. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Community Lutftaran Church, 3720 E. Troplcana. Free support group lor men and women. 735-5544. AMERICAN LEGION 1 at and 3rd Mondays, 425 Van Wagsnsn. All veterans welcome. 565-5433. NEVADA YACHT CLUB Tuesdays, Sailor talk 6:30 p.m. Genaral maatlng 7:30 p.m.. Coachman's Inn, 3240 Eastam. Anyone interested In sailing and racing is invited. 438-4020 NATIONAL AUIANCE FOR THE MENTALLY ILL Tuaadaya, 6:30-7:30 p.m., St. Rosa Dominican Hoapltal, Suit* 306 Support group for families of people with mental illness. 486-6700 or 434-1200 CfTYCARE BUSINESS NETWORKING Tuasdaya, 7:15-6:30 a.m., Gr**n* Suppar Club. 2241 N. Graan Vallay Pkwy Breakfast meeting for txjsiness and webbaaad networking through relationships with non-proflts. 875-4242 PENTECOSTAL BIBLE STUDIES Tuaadaya, 7 p.m 565-9490 To announce your group or organization's events, please come by or mail information to: 2 Commerce Center Drive, Henderson, NV 89014. ORDER OF EASTERN STAR Tuaadaya, aacond and fourth of each month. Ml. Morlah Temple, 480 Greenway Road. All interested O.E.S. members are weteome to attend. 5648515. ROTARY Tuaadaya, 12:15 p.m., Klefer's Downtown Henderaon, 15 E. Lake Mead. The Henderson Rotary club holds a weekly meeting. MASTER MASONS 3rd Tuaaday, 7:30 p.m., at Mt. Morlafi Temple, 480 Greenway Dr. A potluck will precede the meeting. 435-3667 ELKS MEETING NIGHT 1st and 3rd Tuaadaya, Henderaon/ Green Velley Elks Lodge, #2802,631E. Lake Mead Dr. Meetings are hekj twice a month except July and August when meetings are on the first Tuesday only. Meetings begin at 7:30 p.m. Dinners every Friday at 6:45 p.m. Reservations 5659959. GREEN VALLEY CHAPTER CCBN Wednesdays, 11:45-1 p.m.. The Olive Garden, 4400 E. Sunaat. Lunch meeting. 260-4595. WEIGHT-LOSS SUPPORT PROGRAM Wednesdays, 5:30 p.m. "The Take Off Pounds Sensibly," meeting Is a support group open to anyone trying to lose weight. For location or other information, call 5473538. ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE 3rd Wednesday, 6:30 p.m., at the Wellness Institute of Nevada, 2559 Wigwam Pkwy. The club focuses on valkl alternatives to traditional medicine. 8962700 GREATER HENDERSON KIWANIS 1st and 3rd Wednesdays, 6:15p.m., 15 E. Lake Mead Dr. The Greater Henderson Kiwanis Club meets. OPTIMISTS Wednesday a, 7:30 a.m.. Country Inn, Sunaet and Valla Verde. The Green Valley/Henderson Optimist club is a local sen/ice organization. Guests are invited. Calllris Yost, 896-4118. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY 1st and 3rd Wednesdays, 7 p.m., Post Home, 401 W. Lake Mead. Post #3848 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars meets the first Wednesday for meetings, and the third for "Work Night." Call 564-3624. VETERANS OF FOREIGN WARS 4th Wedneadaya of each month, 7 p.m., Poet Home, 401 W. Lake Mead. Basic Post #3848. Call 564-5822. EXECUTIVE LEADS CLUB Thuradaya, 7 a.m., Raa'a, Pecoa and Wigwam. The Executive Leads Club East meets loexchangebuslnessleeds. Karen Scherer, 736-7755. ,, "SEABEE ISLAND-X-1 1 at Thursday, 7 p.m., American Legion Hall, Veteran Memorial Hwy. Anyone current or fomier Seabees are weteome. 656-2691 or 871-7346. MARINE CORPS LEAGUE 4th Thursday, 7:30 p.m., at the VFW Basic Post, 401 W. Lake Mead. Any active duty marine or former Marine is wekx>me to attend the Black Mountain Det. Marine Corps. League meetings. 6980709 CHRISTIAN MEN'S FELLOWSHIP 2nd and 4th Saturday of the month, 9 a.m. First Hendereon United Methodlet Church, 609 E. Horizon Dr. Discussions are held on topical, spiritual and personal needs. 565-6049. BOAT OWNERS ASSOCIATION 3rd Sunday a of each month, 10 a.m.. Lake Meed Marina restaurant. Lake Mead Boat Owners Association meets. Visitors are always welcome. Call Diane Palmer at 457-2797 lor inforrTuitk>n. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Dally meetings. Overeaters Anonynwus Is a 12-step program. There are no dues or fees. Daily meetings are hekJ throughout Las Vegas and surrounding areas. Call 593-2945. PROBLEM GAMBLERS HELPLINE Nevada's only statewide education and referral agency addressing the impact of problem gambling on citizens of Nevada. Non-profit organizatk>n. 1-60O-522-470O. NARCOTKS ANONYMOUS The public infomnaUon subcommittee of Las Vegas aids those who need help recovering from dnig addtetton. 369-3362 MOJAVE CACTUS CLUB 331 Bunchberry Ct., Henderson. Informal meetings about the plant reforestatk>n project are held at the Mojave Cactus Club, interested people may call 3906859. SURVIVAL AFTER TREATMENT Survival Alter Treatment is a support group for recovering akx>holK8 interested in shared cooperative living. Call Paul Benton, 896-0054, lor informatkjn. VOLUNTEERS NEEDCO Reach Out, a non-proflt pediatric AIDS organization needs volunteers for fund raising, special events, txiik mail ar>d day workers. 382-7337. SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE The Sutode Prevention Center i* iooMn^ for vokjnteers to nun tfie hoMne. 7312990, ask tor Ewy BETA SIGMA PHI Local chapters of this social, cultural and service organizatkxi invHe women new to the community. 458-4685. • • THE NEWS IS YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER Nevada Landscape Association meets The first Las Vegas Nevada Landscape Association Trade Show/Conference will be held at the Tropicana Resort & Casino on May 25. The conference is sponsored by the Nevada Landscape Association in conjunction with Landscape Contractors Insurance Services. Concurrent sessions will begin at 9 a.m. and end at 4 p.m. The main conference tracks are entitled Business, Safety & Loss Control and Landscape Management, Installation anS Irrigation. The charge for the conference will be $40 for NLA members and $60 for non-members. The Trade Show will featuremore than 100 companies featuring all that is new in the Green Industry. ",..;' The keynote speaker will be Russ Thompson from Clark County Parks and Recreation Department. A silent auction will be held throughout the day, featuring a variety of items to bid on. All proceeds will go to the NLA scholarship fund. The Nevada Landscape Association was founded in 1990 in northern Nevada, an association of professionals making their living in some area of the Green Industry. Canine Companions to meet Thursday The Las Vega^ Champions Volunteer group for Canine Companions for Independence (CCI) will meet at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 27, at the West Charleston Library Conference Room, 6301 W. Charleston Blvd. Paul and Mary Jackson of K9 Therapists of Las Vegas will speak about pet therapy in southern Nevada. The NLA is working to raise industry standards and improve customer satisfaction through educational programs and the exchange of knowledge, ideas and experiences. They also work to beautify the communities of Nevada, guide environmental legislation and build a stronger image for the Green Industry. The NLA became a state association in 1997 and the Las Vegas chapter was established in early 1998. For information on the Las Vegas Trade Show & Conference call Debra Rae Drew, executive director, (775) 673-0404. PERSONAL INJURY FREE CONSULTATION NO RECOVERY FEE 565-0473 '.:-:^: 218 LEAD ST. /'.(Across from /the new ,/•; ;, Civjc^Center Plazan*K LAW OFFICE OF JOHN F. MARCHIANO FORMER HENDERSON CITY ATTORNEY \e:GamUeR' Your Favorite Games ^tli Bonus Action! fflIS Every Bonus Screen On Williains Games Wins A RoU Of Ck)W JABIES Every Suited Blaclgack Gets Match Play Coupons! STOJCfSlMIOIirEvery Bet Of $100 Gets You A DiWig Ticket! $1^00 In \\Mly Gash Drawiii^..6UARANIEED! 3-$500 Gash Wimieis On May 27 At 6:00PM! Plus i'Vh Extra Cash i% FREE Enby Tkicete For Daily (^ MONDAY THRU THURSDAY, MAY 3 27, FROM 2FM lb 6FM. Iliippy Hour Was Never Like This • Win Tiiousand!) In Cash! BARLEYS X'^^i^is. &BREWIIW COMPANY H IMMU Knows >nm (ijinii' J~v|i|{|\\ ilU l.tNi Siin<4'i I{II.MI. Ill IKII rMiii. W iiii 11! \.i;ii li.Mi ( I till r' Opportunity Village holds street party On Saturday and Sunday, May 22-23, Opportunity Village Thrift Stores will host a street party. The event, designed to thank Thrift Store supporters and to increase awareness of the Opportunity Village mission, will be held on 1st St. behind the Opportunity Village Thrift Store at 921 S. Main. Founded in Las Vegas in 1954, Opportunity Village provides job training, employment and advocacy services to people with mental retardation. The organization's Thrift Stores in Las Vegas and Henderson employ people with disabilities, and are an important part of the non-profit agency's operation. "We're really excited about doing this," said Jasoq Smith, sales and marketing manager for Opportunity Village Thrift Stores. "This event will give us a chance to say "thank you" to the people who shop at our Thrift Stores, and to tell people who don't know about us that we have an important organization for people ynth disabilities." As part of the event, the Thrift Stores will offer discounts on clothing and furniture. The price of admission to the event each day will be $1 per person, and the admission price includes a free hot dog and entertainment, Live bands, magicians, clowns and comedians will perform, and there also will be a fashion show and automobile auctions. A number of food vendors will be onsite. Children under 15 will be admitted free. In addition, hourly drawings will be held for free movie tickets to the new "Star Wars" movie. The Opportunity Village Thrifty Store at 538 S. Boulder Highway in Henderson will not have entertainment or food, but will be offering the same sale discounts. "This may be the most unique thing we've done at Opportunity Village," Smith said. The event runs each day from 11 a.m. until 6 p.m. For more information, call 383-1082 or 2593741. Thursday, May 20,1999 Hendarton Horn* Nvwrt Pig* 16 BUDGET POOL SUPPLY & SERVICE CO. ,^ool Se. 2301 E-Smser Road, #11 Las Vegas, NV 89119 (702) 361-SWIM;. mm COUNTRY TREASURES Free Stars ballgame for Goodwill donation Want to bring your best buddy to a Las Vegas Stars baseball game for free? Just bring a bag or box of donations for Goodwill to Cashman Field on Sunday, May 23, and receive a free general admission ticket for that game with one paid admission. v/; Game time for Sunday's game is 1:05 p.m. The ticket office opens one hour earlier. The Goodwill truck will be ready for donation drop-offs at noon. "Dedicating a free admission for this game has many benefits for baseball fans," said jjohn Sacceriti, marketing tnShager for the Las Vegas Stars Baseball Club. "First, by donating items, we're helping our neighbors with disabilities get good jobs in the community; second, we're making it convenient and easy for people to clean out their closets; and third, the weather in May is great to watch a baseball game with a friend." "We're thankful to the Las Vegas Stars for supporting Goodwill and helping us fulfill our mission," said Steve Chartrand, president and CEO of Goodwill. "We're looking for gently used clothing and other household items—books, shoes, small appliances, etc." Goodwill is a not-for-profit organization whose mission is to provide training, emplojrment and job placement services for people with disabilities and other sp'ecial needs. For more information about this special Las Vegas Stars' baseball game, call 597-1107, ext. 12 We will be-carrying Also stop by to see NEW FUl Wisconsin Mon. Thurs., 10-5 • Fri. 10-6 • Sat. 10-5 • CloMd Sun. 1404 A-B Nevada Hwy^ 294-8019 NOW! EVERYDAY SPECIAL 4-9PM STEAK DINNER BBQRIB DINNER W/RoMBud ilOMorBMte GiiicBrMd, MwporSM JCC's 'Swing Into Action' fund-raiser this weelcend rc^J ^K< tJ 8oz STEAK SANDWICH with Frie Beuerage Purchase Required on All Specials • Must be 21 This weekend promises to be an exciting time for those interested in the success of Jewish Community Center. The JCC will host the Swing into Action for the JCC fund-raiser. A swing dance show and instruction will begin at 6 p.m. j,* Sunday at the Venetian. T^; Professional costumed dancers will perform a swing dance show and will provide instruction to event goers who would like to learn a few of the latest moves. z^' A pre-dinner auction will feature a wide variety of items including Judaica, jewelry, vacation homes, show tickets, original artwork, sports memorabilia, Beanie Babies, hotel rooms, a variety of gift certificates and moreThe Tournament Players KNPR to broadcast local poetry reading May 23 In keeping with the growing popularity of poetry in Las Vegas, KNPR and the Allied Arts Council of Southern Nevada will host a live broadcast from noon until 1 p.m. Sunday, May 23, featuring local poets Claudia Keelan, Donald Revell, Susan Andrews Grace, Reno Espinoza and Patty Morelli. The work of the five poets is a reflection on contemporary life and finding connections to self and others through poetry, a spokesman Live music will bridge the spoken word portions of the program, which will conclude with a roundtable interview of the poets conducted by Constance DeVereaux, executive director of the Allied Arts Council. The broadcast is coordinated by the Allied Arts Council of Southern Nevada through the Poetry Center, a program of the Council, which serves poets in the greater Las Vegas area through a resource center and poetry readings every Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. Pastel Society to meet on May 26 — The Nevada Pastel Society will hold its final spring meeting on Wednesday, May 26, at the West Charleston Library Conference Room, 6301 W. Charleston Blvd. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m., and will feature a guest presentation by Dale Cox, artist and framing specialist. Artists interested in promoting pastel as an artistic medium are invited to attend the meeting. For more informatibn, call Barbara Ann Slade, president of the group, 254-1938. : • Local pianists get awards • / Several local pianists, students of Jean Guaftciytecently earned trophies and certificates from the Las Vegas Music Teachers Association. The students took written exams in February and the technique and repertoire exams in March at UNLV. Level 1 students who earned awards were: Ambree Klemm, Alexandra Melia, Jake Melia, Lauren Miller and Vinny Spotleson. Level 2: Holly Andersen, Daniel Becker, Courtney Eynck and Taylor Klemm. FREE Doctor Siipeivlsed WdgM Loss Pnogram to QpiaHfled People y \ $ **, Know Mow LMW If you think you have a gambling pnsblefn, call 1-800-522-4700 and l-888-BETSOFF in Missouri for more information call 386-5367 Club at Summerlin will host a golf tourney on Monday. This highly acclaimed course is the only course in the United States that hosts two elite professional tournaments, the Las Vegas Senior Classic and the Las Vegas Invitational. Golfers will be treated to a continental breakfast and use of the TPC driving range and practice green before the shotgun start at 10 a.m. A fourperson scramble will conclude with a 19th Hole reception and awards for players. For more information, call the JCC, 794-0090. P 0 (1 D II 0 U H CASINO, DINER G LOUNGE Daily Blue Plate Specials Luncll....$1.99 Dinner...$2.99 m. A 50's Diner with SO'a Prizes Boulder Hwy. At Sunset RiL*564-115l ^ Read it In the News CjJEDIT T/V)UNSELING |2^NTERS of Southern Nevada FREE FINANCIAL COUNSELING We know how to help Henderson peopli '* solve their bill-paying problems, avoid bankruptcy and restore their self esteem. 309 W. Lake Mead Drive Henderson, NV 89015 WE ARE A NONPROFIT UNITED WAY AGENCY (702) 564-2080 'Hi s II ) t \ LOOK!!! We're on TV 'T^^NEW; Because issues in Boulder City and Henderson are often important to the entire valley, reports about both areas are now highlighted on Thursday nights at 9 pm on all-news channel Las Vegas 1, cable Channels 1 and 39. Watch as reporter/editor Chuck N. Baker joins anchors ==" ^ Deborah Levy and John Purvis each Thursday night to report on important stories concerning Boulder City and Henderson. • • < • .•' rfThursday Nights, 9 p.m. Channels 1 and 39 / Las Vegas 1 all-news. Watch for It! BUY ANY 5 PIECE SET AND RECEIVE 50% OFF RETAIL ON YOUR CHOICE OF ANY LIDER, DOUBLE GLIDER, CHAISE OR UMBRELLA LIMIT-ONE OF EACH ITEM Eichidcs Terra fUrnitiire We ffx Umbrellas We install new Slings We re-strap furniture We cut new Acrilic table tops We can order custom Cushions We are a first class P4TI0 sbop All work is done on our premises West Charleston Store 878-6162 SoBday 10-5 6220 W. Charleston (W of Jones) McfW and Mrs.9otio A Funily Businesi in Las Vegas since 1972 Green VaUey Store 436-7736 SS.i'lts I960 W. Sunset (at VaDc Verde) mmmmmm -"^RiiPffMPPii iBiiP^ • :y^ ..^.-^ytftf**,.

PAGE 15

J'l.i ..* ^, ^ • j?w.v'^'.>s.'.f.y!'.'".''i" • ''"^ •PflW ,:•<. • .<;; Pag* 14 HMidarson Horn* New* Thursday, May 20, 1999 Community LV NEUROPATHY SUPPORT GROUP Friday, May 21,3 p.m. Sunrisa Prof. Bid, 3131 LaCanada, Suita 107.361-3902. WATER SAFETY FESTIVAL Saturday-Sunday, May 22-23,1eing held illustrating how to use movies as therapeutic healing tools. 27034^. DIVORCED & SEPARATED ADJUSTMENT Mondays. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Community Lutftaran Church, 3720 E. Troplcana. Free support group lor men and women. 735-5544. AMERICAN LEGION 1 at and 3rd Mondays, 425 Van Wagsnsn. All veterans welcome. 565-5433. NEVADA YACHT CLUB Tuesdays, Sailor talk 6:30 p.m. Genaral maatlng 7:30 p.m.. Coachman's Inn, 3240 Eastam. Anyone interested In sailing and racing is invited. 438-4020 NATIONAL AUIANCE FOR THE MENTALLY ILL Tuaadaya, 6:30-7:30 p.m., St. Rosa Dominican Hoapltal, Suit* 306 Support group for families of people with mental illness. 486-6700 or 434-1200 CfTYCARE BUSINESS NETWORKING Tuasdaya, 7:15-6:30 a.m., Gr**n* Suppar Club. 2241 N. Graan Vallay Pkwy Breakfast meeting for txjsiness and webbaaad networking through relationships with non-proflts. 875-4242 PENTECOSTAL BIBLE STUDIES Tuaadaya, 7 p.m 565-9490 To announce your group or organization's events, please come by or mail information to: 2 Commerce Center Drive, Henderson, NV 89014. ORDER OF EASTERN STAR Tuaadaya, aacond and fourth of each month. Ml. Morlah Temple, 480 Greenway Road. All interested O.E.S. members are weteome to attend. 5648515. ROTARY Tuaadaya, 12:15 p.m., Klefer's Downtown Henderaon, 15 E. Lake Mead. The Henderson Rotary club holds a weekly meeting. MASTER MASONS 3rd Tuaaday, 7:30 p.m., at Mt. Morlafi Temple, 480 Greenway Dr. A potluck will precede the meeting. 435-3667 ELKS MEETING NIGHT 1st and 3rd Tuaadaya, Henderaon/ Green Velley Elks Lodge, #2802,631E. Lake Mead Dr. Meetings are hekj twice a month except July and August when meetings are on the first Tuesday only. Meetings begin at 7:30 p.m. Dinners every Friday at 6:45 p.m. Reservations 5659959. GREEN VALLEY CHAPTER CCBN Wednesdays, 11:45-1 p.m.. The Olive Garden, 4400 E. Sunaat. Lunch meeting. 260-4595. WEIGHT-LOSS SUPPORT PROGRAM Wednesdays, 5:30 p.m. "The Take Off Pounds Sensibly," meeting Is a support group open to anyone trying to lose weight. For location or other information, call 5473538. ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE 3rd Wednesday, 6:30 p.m., at the Wellness Institute of Nevada, 2559 Wigwam Pkwy. The club focuses on valkl alternatives to traditional medicine. 8962700 GREATER HENDERSON KIWANIS 1st and 3rd Wednesdays, 6:15p.m., 15 E. Lake Mead Dr. The Greater Henderson Kiwanis Club meets. OPTIMISTS Wednesday a, 7:30 a.m.. Country Inn, Sunaet and Valla Verde. The Green Valley/Henderson Optimist club is a local sen/ice organization. Guests are invited. Calllris Yost, 896-4118. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY 1st and 3rd Wednesdays, 7 p.m., Post Home, 401 W. Lake Mead. Post #3848 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars meets the first Wednesday for meetings, and the third for "Work Night." Call 564-3624. VETERANS OF FOREIGN WARS 4th Wedneadaya of each month, 7 p.m., Poet Home, 401 W. Lake Mead. Basic Post #3848. Call 564-5822. EXECUTIVE LEADS CLUB Thuradaya, 7 a.m., Raa'a, Pecoa and Wigwam. The Executive Leads Club East meets loexchangebuslnessleeds. Karen Scherer, 736-7755. ,, "SEABEE ISLAND-X-1 1 at Thursday, 7 p.m., American Legion Hall, Veteran Memorial Hwy. Anyone current or fomier Seabees are weteome. 656-2691 or 871-7346. MARINE CORPS LEAGUE 4th Thursday, 7:30 p.m., at the VFW Basic Post, 401 W. Lake Mead. Any active duty marine or former Marine is wekx>me to attend the Black Mountain Det. Marine Corps. League meetings. 6980709 CHRISTIAN MEN'S FELLOWSHIP 2nd and 4th Saturday of the month, 9 a.m. First Hendereon United Methodlet Church, 609 E. Horizon Dr. Discussions are held on topical, spiritual and personal needs. 565-6049. BOAT OWNERS ASSOCIATION 3rd Sunday a of each month, 10 a.m.. Lake Meed Marina restaurant. Lake Mead Boat Owners Association meets. Visitors are always welcome. Call Diane Palmer at 457-2797 lor inforrTuitk>n. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Dally meetings. Overeaters Anonynwus Is a 12-step program. There are no dues or fees. Daily meetings are hekJ throughout Las Vegas and surrounding areas. Call 593-2945. PROBLEM GAMBLERS HELPLINE Nevada's only statewide education and referral agency addressing the impact of problem gambling on citizens of Nevada. Non-profit organizatk>n. 1-60O-522-470O. NARCOTKS ANONYMOUS The public infomnaUon subcommittee of Las Vegas aids those who need help recovering from dnig addtetton. 369-3362 MOJAVE CACTUS CLUB 331 Bunchberry Ct., Henderson. Informal meetings about the plant reforestatk>n project are held at the Mojave Cactus Club, interested people may call 3906859. SURVIVAL AFTER TREATMENT Survival Alter Treatment is a support group for recovering akx>holK8 interested in shared cooperative living. Call Paul Benton, 896-0054, lor informatkjn. VOLUNTEERS NEEDCO Reach Out, a non-proflt pediatric AIDS organization needs volunteers for fund raising, special events, txiik mail ar>d day workers. 382-7337. SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE The Sutode Prevention Center i* iooMn^ for vokjnteers to nun tfie hoMne. 7312990, ask tor Ewy BETA SIGMA PHI Local chapters of this social, cultural and service organizatkxi invHe women new to the community. 458-4685. • • THE NEWS IS YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER Nevada Landscape Association meets The first Las Vegas Nevada Landscape Association Trade Show/Conference will be held at the Tropicana Resort & Casino on May 25. The conference is sponsored by the Nevada Landscape Association in conjunction with Landscape Contractors Insurance Services. Concurrent sessions will begin at 9 a.m. and end at 4 p.m. The main conference tracks are entitled Business, Safety & Loss Control and Landscape Management, Installation anS Irrigation. The charge for the conference will be $40 for NLA members and $60 for non-members. The Trade Show will featuremore than 100 companies featuring all that is new in the Green Industry. ",..;' The keynote speaker will be Russ Thompson from Clark County Parks and Recreation Department. A silent auction will be held throughout the day, featuring a variety of items to bid on. All proceeds will go to the NLA scholarship fund. The Nevada Landscape Association was founded in 1990 in northern Nevada, an association of professionals making their living in some area of the Green Industry. Canine Companions to meet Thursday The Las Vega^ Champions Volunteer group for Canine Companions for Independence (CCI) will meet at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 27, at the West Charleston Library Conference Room, 6301 W. Charleston Blvd. Paul and Mary Jackson of K9 Therapists of Las Vegas will speak about pet therapy in southern Nevada. The NLA is working to raise industry standards and improve customer satisfaction through educational programs and the exchange of knowledge, ideas and experiences. They also work to beautify the communities of Nevada, guide environmental legislation and build a stronger image for the Green Industry. The NLA became a state association in 1997 and the Las Vegas chapter was established in early 1998. For information on the Las Vegas Trade Show & Conference call Debra Rae Drew, executive director, (775) 673-0404. PERSONAL INJURY FREE CONSULTATION NO RECOVERY FEE 565-0473 '.:-:^: 218 LEAD ST. /'.(Across from /the new ,/•; ;, Civjc^Center Plazan*K LAW OFFICE OF JOHN F. MARCHIANO FORMER HENDERSON CITY ATTORNEY \e:GamUeR' Your Favorite Games ^tli Bonus Action! fflIS Every Bonus Screen On Williains Games Wins A RoU Of Ck)W JABIES Every Suited Blaclgack Gets Match Play Coupons! STOJCfSlMIOIirEvery Bet Of $100 Gets You A DiWig Ticket! $1^00 In \\Mly Gash Drawiii^..6UARANIEED! 3-$500 Gash Wimieis On May 27 At 6:00PM! Plus i'Vh Extra Cash i% FREE Enby Tkicete For Daily (^ MONDAY THRU THURSDAY, MAY 3 27, FROM 2FM lb 6FM. Iliippy Hour Was Never Like This • Win Tiiousand!) In Cash! BARLEYS X'^^i^is. &BREWIIW COMPANY H IMMU Knows >nm (ijinii' J~v|i|{|\\ ilU l.tNi Siin<4'i I{II.MI. Ill IKII rMiii. W iiii 11! \.i;ii li.Mi ( I till r' Opportunity Village holds street party On Saturday and Sunday, May 22-23, Opportunity Village Thrift Stores will host a street party. The event, designed to thank Thrift Store supporters and to increase awareness of the Opportunity Village mission, will be held on 1st St. behind the Opportunity Village Thrift Store at 921 S. Main. Founded in Las Vegas in 1954, Opportunity Village provides job training, employment and advocacy services to people with mental retardation. The organization's Thrift Stores in Las Vegas and Henderson employ people with disabilities, and are an important part of the non-profit agency's operation. "We're really excited about doing this," said Jasoq Smith, sales and marketing manager for Opportunity Village Thrift Stores. "This event will give us a chance to say "thank you" to the people who shop at our Thrift Stores, and to tell people who don't know about us that we have an important organization for people ynth disabilities." As part of the event, the Thrift Stores will offer discounts on clothing and furniture. The price of admission to the event each day will be $1 per person, and the admission price includes a free hot dog and entertainment, Live bands, magicians, clowns and comedians will perform, and there also will be a fashion show and automobile auctions. A number of food vendors will be onsite. Children under 15 will be admitted free. In addition, hourly drawings will be held for free movie tickets to the new "Star Wars" movie. The Opportunity Village Thrifty Store at 538 S. Boulder Highway in Henderson will not have entertainment or food, but will be offering the same sale discounts. "This may be the most unique thing we've done at Opportunity Village," Smith said. The event runs each day from 11 a.m. until 6 p.m. For more information, call 383-1082 or 2593741. Thursday, May 20,1999 Hendarton Horn* Nvwrt Pig* 16 BUDGET POOL SUPPLY & SERVICE CO. ,^ool Se. 2301 E-Smser Road, #11 Las Vegas, NV 89119 (702) 361-SWIM;. mm COUNTRY TREASURES Free Stars ballgame for Goodwill donation Want to bring your best buddy to a Las Vegas Stars baseball game for free? Just bring a bag or box of donations for Goodwill to Cashman Field on Sunday, May 23, and receive a free general admission ticket for that game with one paid admission. v/; Game time for Sunday's game is 1:05 p.m. The ticket office opens one hour earlier. The Goodwill truck will be ready for donation drop-offs at noon. "Dedicating a free admission for this game has many benefits for baseball fans," said jjohn Sacceriti, marketing tnShager for the Las Vegas Stars Baseball Club. "First, by donating items, we're helping our neighbors with disabilities get good jobs in the community; second, we're making it convenient and easy for people to clean out their closets; and third, the weather in May is great to watch a baseball game with a friend." "We're thankful to the Las Vegas Stars for supporting Goodwill and helping us fulfill our mission," said Steve Chartrand, president and CEO of Goodwill. "We're looking for gently used clothing and other household items—books, shoes, small appliances, etc." Goodwill is a not-for-profit organization whose mission is to provide training, emplojrment and job placement services for people with disabilities and other sp'ecial needs. For more information about this special Las Vegas Stars' baseball game, call 597-1107, ext. 12 We will be-carrying Also stop by to see NEW FUl Wisconsin Mon. Thurs., 10-5 • Fri. 10-6 • Sat. 10-5 • CloMd Sun. 1404 A-B Nevada Hwy^ 294-8019 NOW! EVERYDAY SPECIAL 4-9PM STEAK DINNER BBQRIB DINNER W/RoMBud ilOMorBMte GiiicBrMd, MwporSM JCC's 'Swing Into Action' fund-raiser this weelcend rc^J ^K< tJ 8oz STEAK SANDWICH with Frie Beuerage Purchase Required on All Specials • Must be 21 This weekend promises to be an exciting time for those interested in the success of Jewish Community Center. The JCC will host the Swing into Action for the JCC fund-raiser. A swing dance show and instruction will begin at 6 p.m. j,* Sunday at the Venetian. T^; Professional costumed dancers will perform a swing dance show and will provide instruction to event goers who would like to learn a few of the latest moves. z^' A pre-dinner auction will feature a wide variety of items including Judaica, jewelry, vacation homes, show tickets, original artwork, sports memorabilia, Beanie Babies, hotel rooms, a variety of gift certificates and moreThe Tournament Players KNPR to broadcast local poetry reading May 23 In keeping with the growing popularity of poetry in Las Vegas, KNPR and the Allied Arts Council of Southern Nevada will host a live broadcast from noon until 1 p.m. Sunday, May 23, featuring local poets Claudia Keelan, Donald Revell, Susan Andrews Grace, Reno Espinoza and Patty Morelli. The work of the five poets is a reflection on contemporary life and finding connections to self and others through poetry, a spokesman Live music will bridge the spoken word portions of the program, which will conclude with a roundtable interview of the poets conducted by Constance DeVereaux, executive director of the Allied Arts Council. The broadcast is coordinated by the Allied Arts Council of Southern Nevada through the Poetry Center, a program of the Council, which serves poets in the greater Las Vegas area through a resource center and poetry readings every Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. Pastel Society to meet on May 26 — The Nevada Pastel Society will hold its final spring meeting on Wednesday, May 26, at the West Charleston Library Conference Room, 6301 W. Charleston Blvd. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m., and will feature a guest presentation by Dale Cox, artist and framing specialist. Artists interested in promoting pastel as an artistic medium are invited to attend the meeting. For more informatibn, call Barbara Ann Slade, president of the group, 254-1938. : • Local pianists get awards • / Several local pianists, students of Jean Guaftciytecently earned trophies and certificates from the Las Vegas Music Teachers Association. The students took written exams in February and the technique and repertoire exams in March at UNLV. Level 1 students who earned awards were: Ambree Klemm, Alexandra Melia, Jake Melia, Lauren Miller and Vinny Spotleson. Level 2: Holly Andersen, Daniel Becker, Courtney Eynck and Taylor Klemm. FREE Doctor Siipeivlsed WdgM Loss Pnogram to QpiaHfled People y \ $ **, Know Mow LMW If you think you have a gambling pnsblefn, call 1-800-522-4700 and l-888-BETSOFF in Missouri for more information call 386-5367 Club at Summerlin will host a golf tourney on Monday. This highly acclaimed course is the only course in the United States that hosts two elite professional tournaments, the Las Vegas Senior Classic and the Las Vegas Invitational. Golfers will be treated to a continental breakfast and use of the TPC driving range and practice green before the shotgun start at 10 a.m. A fourperson scramble will conclude with a 19th Hole reception and awards for players. For more information, call the JCC, 794-0090. P 0 (1 D II 0 U H CASINO, DINER G LOUNGE Daily Blue Plate Specials Luncll....$1.99 Dinner...$2.99 m. A 50's Diner with SO'a Prizes Boulder Hwy. At Sunset RiL*564-115l ^ Read it In the News CjJEDIT T/V)UNSELING |2^NTERS of Southern Nevada FREE FINANCIAL COUNSELING We know how to help Henderson peopli '* solve their bill-paying problems, avoid bankruptcy and restore their self esteem. 309 W. Lake Mead Drive Henderson, NV 89015 WE ARE A NONPROFIT UNITED WAY AGENCY (702) 564-2080 'Hi s II ) t \ LOOK!!! We're on TV 'T^^NEW; Because issues in Boulder City and Henderson are often important to the entire valley, reports about both areas are now highlighted on Thursday nights at 9 pm on all-news channel Las Vegas 1, cable Channels 1 and 39. Watch as reporter/editor Chuck N. Baker joins anchors ==" ^ Deborah Levy and John Purvis each Thursday night to report on important stories concerning Boulder City and Henderson. • • < • .•' rfThursday Nights, 9 p.m. Channels 1 and 39 / Las Vegas 1 all-news. Watch for It! BUY ANY 5 PIECE SET AND RECEIVE 50% OFF RETAIL ON YOUR CHOICE OF ANY LIDER, DOUBLE GLIDER, CHAISE OR UMBRELLA LIMIT-ONE OF EACH ITEM Eichidcs Terra fUrnitiire We ffx Umbrellas We install new Slings We re-strap furniture We cut new Acrilic table tops We can order custom Cushions We are a first class P4TI0 sbop All work is done on our premises West Charleston Store 878-6162 SoBday 10-5 6220 W. Charleston (W of Jones) McfW and Mrs.9otio A Funily Businesi in Las Vegas since 1972 Green VaUey Store 436-7736 SS.i'lts I960 W. Sunset (at VaDc Verde) mmmmmm -"^RiiPffMPPii iBiiP^ • :y^ ..^.-^ytftf**,.

PAGE 16

• V" Pagii 16 HMiderMn Home News Thursday, May 20,1999 LEGAL LEGAL LEGAL LEGAL X THIRD QUARTER 19'nm UNAUDITED REVENUES Tua LicenKs 4 PemilU InlergovnnnmlaJ Revoiun C>Hr(c< for Scrvica Finn Foffeiu MiicellaiKoui ~ Proceeds ftom CapHal Uuc Tnnffenin Oain on Sak of Fixed Aueu Betinning Fund Balwce 4 TOTAl. AVAILABIX RXSOURCIS EXFINDITURES iGcncnl Cknwmmcnl '. • '.;., • • Public Safety judKwi ^;;./.:;.-':;;;. Public Woriti Culnire and Recrtalion TfantftnOut Taul Eapndtnrai aid CNktr Uaaa Endinf Fund Balance Unreaerved TOTAL GENERAL FUND REQUIREMENTS ffi^ff TAX SPECIAL REVENUE fUND OMGINAL AJMUAL yjPGfT 12^3.413 I,I9IJI0 l,<72,JJ5 l,4}3,74l 1,179,144 0 500 I0.0t}39* • 45,I4J,I5S -^.. W.OI 4.9O0,5O I4,10,777 ,777,590 MJtHOM 5,40t,9Tt IM^SIJM' Beginning Fund Balance Inlogovenunenul Revenue! Miicellaneoul Tmufenln TtJTAL > Epnditurca Tranafen Out Ending Fund Balance TOTAL 10,000 0 1.5S9,7]3 1,509,733 30,000 0 l,SS9,733 ACTUAL YEAR TO I0,t7l.li3 11,71,702 31,199,611 5,561.234 1.107.119 2.135.754 I67J22 0 0 23.4>5.54 i3JI3>M IMU,932 33.910.434 I.5M.033 4,3M.I33 9J71,00 0_ 17,610,307 ti,ai3>si 1,06IJ46 631,440 77,156 0_ 1,714,442 7,613 0 1,776,759 1,714.442 l>^INiriPAl. COURT ADMINISTRATIVE FEE ORIGINAI. ANNUAL tamsti ACTUAL YF.AR TO iJAIt fimiAliMVBWtlWP Deginning Fund Balance Revcnuca TOTAL Eipendinmi Ending Fund Balance TOTAL FORFEITED AS SETS SPECIAL REVENUE FyND 0 50,000 to.ooo 50,000 0 Beginning Fund Balance Rfvenucs TOTAL Eipendlhirei Ending Fund Balance TOTAL FINANClAL STA en .I7^T10N 0 lOO.OOO I0<,0M 100,000 0 IO<,OM SPEriAI. REV ENUE rUND Beginning Fund Balance Revenue! TOTAL Ejipeuditures Tnnifen Out Ending Fund Balance TOTAL 2,645.95 100,000 2,74S,9t9 0 100,000 2,64S,9S5 2.745,9S gtft m.)^ggga!^Rg^ ^ „;1 • • • llltXIOIOI Beginning Fund Balance Revenuei TOTAL Etpendilurci Ending Fund Balance TOTAL 1,263 0 Ui3 0 U63 FXTRABR D INARY RtPAlKS • CAflTAL PROJECTS.ORIGIN Al ANNUAL ByecEi ACTUAl. VEARTO JtAIK SUOAL Beginning Fund Balance Revenues Tranafentn TOTAL Expcndilurei Ending Fund Balance 76,7l 4,000 0 •0,7SI 0 •0.711 -.-,,-^• Ali. BirwiNnAaiJ TRUST HIND ,Bcginn0ig Fund Bklaooe RcvMuea Tranafen In •. '• .. TOTAL Ending Fund BalanM '.',' • '< TOTAL S ijLHD sAi js CAriTAL rROJEcrs FUND 151,000 70W> 221,0 22I.00* Beginning Fund Balance Revenue* LandSalea TOTAL .-A • • ; • '. • ; • • ;• Eapendiuns '. TnosftnOnl • Gndng Fund Bakno* TOTAL ^ • '" SPETIAl. RECREATION CAPITAL l,57,53l 100.000 1,400.000 jMjjai 47,400 0 3.040.131 3,ar,53i PROJECTS ruND Beginning Fund Balance Revenue* TOTAL EjqiandituRa TmsfenOul Endmi Fund Balance TOTAL 202,597 l,MW I472J7 30,000 0 I,4jf7 • ONDPaoCEEDS CAflTAL ORIGINAL ANNUAL ACTUAL YEAR TO Beginninf Fiaid Balance Revenuaa BoMll TOTAL 0 USMM TimdanOu) Twikat Fir-* -' 233,40S 165,050 29.769 368,616 33,110 72,513 27,057 79.406 2,499,062 103,633 2,M2>IS 0 0 2,602,615 4 l.93,123 ii .m m TOTAL USMll U^MM* s^ If^f. FAcnjnEs Aromsmprn ,tf^p iSrnon CAHTAL PROJErTii nff*P PlMtd DttMnN IM.U4 0 0 4J7J37 11,171.990 1,016.39* 0 0 TOTAL MMti i,ijll OM t 4.>i,dM 21IJ 4Jl.fll TOTAL iM*jn\ n,inj* t • 0 TOTAL ^*>*fj^ ai,w Mijn TOTAL 3TSJM MIJW Toul Operatilig Revenue ToUl Openiling Expcnw Toul Nonoperalmg Revenue ToUl Nonopenting Eipcnae Tianiren CKiI Net iKtnM (LMS) SEWER ENTF-RPRISE FUND CONVENTION CF^NTER ENTERPRISE FUND WATER y