Citation
1998-02-12 - Henderson Home News

Material Information

Title:
1998-02-12 - Henderson Home News
Creator:
O'Callaghan, Mike ( Columnist )
Theiss, Roy ( Columnist )
Allen, D. J. ( Columnist )
Jackson, Sharon ( Columnist )
Ferguson, Kevin ( Columnist )
Marciniak, D. B. ( Columnist )
Cohen, Richard ( Columnist )
Hanlon, Bill ( Columnist )
Bowman, Bill ( Columnist )
Thiessen, Gary ( Columnist )
Henderson, Barb ( Columnist )
Eicher, Ray ( Columnist )
Croke, Robert ( Columnist )
Earl, Phillip I. ( Columnist )
Bishop, Carolyn D. ( Columnist )
Weidenfeld, Rob ( Photographer )
Zaichick, Lee ( Photographer )
Publisher:
O'Callaghan, Mike
HBC Publications, Inc.
Creation Date:
1998-02-12
Language:
English
Materials:
Paper ( medium )

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Subjects / Keywords:
Nevada
Henderson
East Las Vegas
City and town life -- Nevada -- Henderson
Community life -- Nevada -- Henderson
History -- Henderson (Nev.) -- 20th century
Genre:
Newspapers

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Acknowledgments:
Greenspun Media sponsors this collection.
Collection Location:
Greenspun Media retains possession of the bound, original newspapers. Henderson District Public Libraries retains possession of the microfilm and the digital files.

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Source Institution:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Holding Location:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Rights Management:
The items in this collection are provided for non-commercial personal and academic use by Henderson Library patrons and may not be republished in any way. Contact Greenspun Media Group for additional information regarding rights to this material: http://www.greenspunmedia.com
Resource Identifier:
hhn4616 ( Digital Id )

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mmmm Page 22 Henderson Home News Tuesday, February 10, 1998 FEBRUARY A Rich Heritage • A lirifilit Future 1998 McCaw School of Mines and BMI: Working Together to Educate Students Boeing and TIMET officials recently "inked" Boeing's ten-year contract with TIMET Pictured from left are Robert Ecker, director of procurement for Boeing: Landls Martfn, chairman and CEO, TIMET; Gerald Kearns. vice president and general manager of Boeing's materials division; and Andrew Dixie, president and COO. TIMET. TINIET Signs Long-tenn Contract Witii Boding In November, the world's largest manufacturer of titanium signed a 10-year contract with Boeing Co., supplying the commercial airline group and its suppliers with titanium products. The contract calls for TIMET to provide a minimum of 1{W( of Boeing's annual titanium needs, depending on Boeing's requirements each yeaf. Shipments have already begun, but are not expected to reach planned volume levels until 1999. "Timet has worked diligently to earn the trust and respect Boeing has given us," said John .Sanderson, Timet's plant manager. "This a great thing for TIMET, our employees, and the community-at-large. We are up to the challenge." Alter analyzing the world-wide titanium supply and the titanium market's ever-changing prices, Boeing sought a new way ol doing business. Over time, the long-term contract with TIMET should stabilize and reduce the cost of titanium and help Boeing to better manage its own costs and operations. According to .Sanderson, TIMET is receptive to the idea of long-term contracts with other coinpanies in the aerospace industry, as well. As the world's largest supplier of titanium metal products. TIMET is currently working on hundreds of aerospace, industrial and emerging applications. "We're confident TIMET can continue to deliver the superior product and service for which we have been known." Sanderson said. "The agreement we have with Boeing is hopelullyV just the tip of the iceberg."^ The McCaw School of Mines is a result of a huge collaborative effort between the community, corporations, and the students, parents, faculty, and administration of Gordon McCaw Elementary School. The BMI companies are very proud to be associated with this project whose goal is to educate students about Nevada's second largest industry mining. Celebrating its first successful year, the McCaw School of Mines recently invited Basic Management to prepare a display room to be included in Pha.se 11 of the school. The ro9m will feature BMI's mining and mineral related companies in Henderson. "We are pleased and honored to have received this invitation," said Dan Stewart, BMI president. "BMI will continue to be a great supporter of the school. We believe it is important to generate interest in mining and showcase opportunities available in the mining industry."" Since iLs beginning, BMI ha.s been a major benefactor of the McCaw School of-Mines. Chemical Lime Company, formerly Chemstar, was among the first companies to donate cash and lime for its construction. Kerr-McGee was also a contributor and donated mining equipment from its BristolMine and Castleton Mine near Pioche, Nevada. The company also provided a crane to move the equipment it donated, and unloaded and moved other equipment as needed. In addition, KerrMcGee has long been a supporter of From left, student Chad Ledbetter, Mark Van Steenhuyse of BMI, student Amanda Venticinque and State Senator Kathy Augustine celebrate the McCaw School of Mines' first anniversary. the Gordon McCaw PTA, funding various projects. When the school celebrates its fortieth birthday, TIMET will provide a titanium time capsule to house a variety of memorabilia from the schoofs archives. The company also arranged transportation of equipment to the school and provided a forklift for unloading and moving equipment throughout the mine yard. One of TIMETs most impressive contributions involved transporting 1.7 million marbles via rail. The marbles were sold to benefit the school. Employees of Pioneer Chlor Alkali assisted the McCaw fourth grade economics unit with the Kids Kard Kompany. They interviewed students who applied to be "plant managers" at the Christmas Card factories in each fourth grade classroom. This project received recognition from the Nevada State Social Studies Teachers Association. Both TIMET and Pioneer Chlor Alkali are currently providing displays at McCaw. "We are eager to have a display room at McCaw dedicated exclusively to highlighting mining companies in Henderson," said Janet Dobry, McCaw principal. ^ Henderson Alerting System Nearing Completion BIVII Plays Big Role in Launching Opportunity Village's New Henderson Campus Members of the Henderson Industrial Citizens Advisory Panel (HICAP) are continuing to facilitate progress of an alerting system designed to alert dispatchers of routine, non-routine and emergency incidences which occur within the BMI complex. The system indues a large display board which willenhance communications between the BMI plants and the City of Henderson's 911 dispatch office. According to Craig Wilkinson, TIMET plant safety manager, the board features a detailed map of 45 locations throughout the BMI plants each one indicated by a numbered light. Three different colors of lights will be used to identify routine and scheduled maintenance releases, non-scheduled but nonemergency relea.ses and releases which may pose a health and/or safety threat. "Dispatchers will now instantly be able to accurately identify the nature and location of an incident at the BMI complex." said Wilkinson. "This will not only expedite the arrival of emergency response vehicles and personnel, it will also help dispatchers to distinguish between real and non-emergencies, helping to allay public concern." Scheduled to be installed during March, the $70.(KK) alerting system is being funded by Pioneer Chlor Alakali, Co.. TIMET and KerrMcGee Chemical Corporation. A meteorological station which will provide emergency personnel with detailed weather information specific to the BMI complex is also part of the system. "The meteorological station will provide continuous infonnation on the exact wind speed and direction, humidity levels, temperature, and other weather factors present at the BMI complex," .said Wilkinson. "In the case of an emergency, this information can prove to be very valuable and significant in determining how to handle the situation."" ;^ ''iifTfliM t ;ir vir imjiiMn. 1^ tsmm^ Ip5 W'^ wm -fi The ground was ceremonially broken with an old-fashioned plow and a little help from Opportunity Village client Mark Nevin. More than five years ago. Basic Management. Inc. donated a 1.6acre' piece of property to Opportunity Village for a new Henderson campus. Just a few months ago, BMI again played a major role in helping to launch the facility by hosting a ceremonial groundbreaking for a 22,000-square-foot building to be named for the Bill Walters family. A highly regarded non-profit organization dedicated to providing work opportunities and life enrichment for the mentally disabled, Opportunity Village is eager to expand its reach with a second campus in the southeaslem valley. According to Opportunity Village executive director Ed Guthrie, the Walters Family Campus of Opportunity Village will help to meet the needs of a growing handicapped population. "'One of every ten Henderson families includes a person with mental retardation," said Guthrie. "At the same time, the needs of the Henderson business community are growing, as well. At Opportunity Village, we provide local busines.ses with affordable packaging, bulkmailing and task-oriented services while giving tho.se with mental retardation a purpose to their existence by providing work opportunities." Construction on the $3 million campus is expected to begin in March, with completion scheduled for early 1999. "Although we had already made a significant donation to Opportunity Village years earlier, it made a lot of sense for BMI, as Henderson's oldest neighbor, to welcome the city's newest neighbor," said Dan Stewart, BMI president. "We were extremely pleased to be able to increase the visibility of Opportunity Village and what the organization brings to our community especially in terms of improving the lives of the mentally disabled." ;^ Dan Stewart, BMI president, welcomes Opportunity Village to Henderson. 1997 SAFETY MILESTONES • Kerr-McGee recently achieved two maion man-hours without a lost-time indderrt from May 12,1994 to December 20,1997. Kerr-McGee received a commendation from the City of Henderson for this achievement. TIMET reached 989,710 man-hours without a lost-time incident from December 7,1996 through August 4,1997just short of the company's 1 million-hour goal. in Ju(y 1997, TIMET reconditioned an off-gas scnjbi3ir>g unit and purctvEMd and InstaNed a $160,000 back-up power generation syslem which wi help to prevent potential cNorine reteBMS during electrical powrar MufK. TIMET is currantly engineering a complex chemical monitoring ayalim which is pianrwd for inst^yiation aurrounding the plant. Upon Its aperatlon, the system wi provide factual and specific I in oaaa otf a cNorine or hydrochloric acid reieaaa. BASIC NUNAGBmr MC Basic Managemerrt Inc. is home to four nfiajor chemical and metal manufacturers, which employ more than 1,000 workers. Pioneer CMor MkaH is a major producer of chk>rine, used in a variety of products and processes including water treatnwnt, pharmaceuticals, plastics, cleaners, food processing, coemetics and paper. Kerr-McGse OianiGil LLC produces five ms^ chemicais: amrrxxiium percfiiorHls used as an oxidizer for space shuttle boosters; sodhxn perchlorate which is used to mali nmonium pen:hk)rate; manganese dkixide which is the energy source in dry osl alialna batteries; elemental boron which is uaed as ttw HMor In automobile air safety bagsi and boron triohioride used to msnufacnjre pharmapeuBcals and in the electronic industry. Tttnlum Mslali Corporation (TME1) is a major producer of titanium, a lightweight metal with a growing list of end uses, including airaafts and the aerospace industry, human body rsplacepfient parts such as hip and knee joints, automotive parts such as vah/es and spring rods, and sporting goods, such as golf dubs and tennis water system which pumps and transports water from Lake Mead. VldHy VMsy land Company, through its general partner, Baric Land Compiny, is involved in the development of more than 4,000 acres historically held by BML Baric ManagMNnt Inc. maintains and operalas the complex's power distributran system. I Ci. produces lime which is used extansivoly in the buNdhg industry for products such as stucco. Together, the BMI companies own Baric bsMkaarii^ IRC, a holdkig company, VKI tfw following three wholy-owned subsidiaries: overssss a soohiBticatad In additkxi to maintaining its status as Hendersorfi largest Industrial emptoysr, BMTi future pisns inckJde the redevekspment of the complax, itself, in an effort to twautify the araa and keep pace with the prosperous growth of Henderson. Detaiied plans fcx-this renovaHon are under acth/e development with the project scfieduisd to oommsnoe in 1906. THURSDAY February 12. 1998 Henderson, Nevada 50*f" fa' ,.ONE MAN'S VIEW MIKE O'CALLAGHAN News managing editor Paul Szydelko didn't write a Tuesday column because of his father's death. Richard Szydelko has been a resident of Henderson for the past several years and has had a close relationship with his son. No matter how old and/or mature you are, the loss of a parent brings sadness and a flood of memories. I'm sure that Paul has been thinking about those ball games he and his father had enjoyed together. Times in church and the highlights of his own life as an adult that they shared together are also in his thoughts. I was about Paul's age when friends called me in Henderson and said they had found my father's body. First there was shock and then a flood of emotions that only a son can recall when his father dies. Then there were tears as I ordered a ticket that would get me to Pasco, Wash., to arrange for his funeral. Sitting in the plane on the way to Pasco, I recalled those long hours working in the fields during the Great Depression. But then came the cool evenings as we caught trout and bathed in a nearby stream. There were also late evenings that we slapped mosquitos and built a bonfire as we fished for catfish in a cranberry marsh. Dad taught us all how to work, hunt and fish. He didn't have the opportunity to attend my high school and college football games and boxing matches because he was working. This didn't keep him from knowing exactly how good or how poorly I had competed. There was the look in his face when I came home on crutches from an Army hospital Memorial Day 1953. He knew I would have to seek different goals in life but he wasn't quite certain how 1 would do it. Neither did I. So, I know a few of the feelings Paul has been experiencing in recent days. Having known Paul for many years, I'm sure that he has provided his father with great joy over the years. His thoughts will be deep but they should be happy ones because young men like Paul are a source of great joy for their fathers. When was the last time you received a letter from a fraternal, social or lobbying group that asked you to send your assemblyman or member of Congress a thank you note? I get mail from See One Man's View Page 2 THE -RESERVE Rob Weidenfeld/News Staff BUTTERFLY WELCOME — Cynamon McCulloch of Farrington Productions helps greet guests at the opening of The Reserve Hotel and Casino on Tuesday night. Thousands flock to opening Roy Thaiss News Staff Writer A procession of conga players and well-sculptured people body-painted as animals snaked through several thousand people to kick off the VIP party for The Reserve Hotel Casino Tuesday. Dignitaries and executives from around the state were on hand for the "vine-cutting" to welcome Henderson's second resort hotel and casino, 777 Lake Mead Dr. On stage at a watering hole inside the African safari-themed casino, Craig Neilsen, president and CEO of Ameristar Casinos Inc., gave a brief history of his company which bought The Reserve property under development in September 1996. Ameristar Casinos has a strong background in the gaming and hospitality industry dating back to 1954, he explained. One of their properties. Cactus Pete's Resort Casino in Jackpot, Nev., is only one of a few Four Diamond casinos in the state of Nevada, he added. Neilsen praised designer Henry Con versa no for his exquisite detail. At every turn, vivid African scenery is highlighted — from pumas in trees to a hippopotamus soaking up the mist in front of Monsoon Mary's exotic bar. Conversano has also designed The Mirage Hotel Casino and the Lost City at Sun City Resort Hotel and Casino in Sun City, South Africa. Jeff Terp, vice president of business development, Ameristar Casinos, wasn't giving lip service when he spoke about being good community partners. Ameristar donated $50,000 to St. Jude's Ranch for Children and $50,000 to the Clark County Education Foundation. Mayor Jim Gibson pledged to continue the city's support and cooperation to The Reserve. Describing The Reserve as "the gateway to the city," Gibson said the casino will help revitalize Henderson's redevelopment area. Gibson thanked Ameristar for making Henderson a "place to call home." At 10 p.m., a spectacular fireworks show officially marked the grand opening to the public. Thousands poured in to experience the wildlife found onlv in Henderson. ^ArtFesf planned for wntown j^ II 'D.J. Allan Contributing Writer Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. And, if Henderson has its way, in May there will be about 30,000 beholders. The city of Henderson will be a title sponsor for the inaugural "ArtFest of Henderson" May 910" in "Old Town" Henderson — along Water Street and in the park area around City Hall and the Convention Center. The ArtFest will 6ffer fine art, music and food, as 175 artists from across the nation will display and sell one-of-a-kind pieces including paintings, sculptures, ceramics, wood art, fiber and jewelry. "It promises to be an eiyoyable and fun event for Henderson," said Assistant City Manager Terry Zerkle, who played a key role in bringing the event to Henderson. "One of the nice things about this kind of an event is it's really family-oriented. There will be things there for people of all ages. It's going to be nice for the entire community," Zerkle said. To make sure the event gets done right, Henderson turned to an expert. Frank Maguire, president of the Arizona-based The Events Group, Inc., will act as the festival director for "ArtFest of Henderson." Maguire has more than 25 years of experience of producing such shows and currently has annual festivals in La JoUa, Calif., Scottsdale, Tucson and Flagstaff, all in Arizona. He said Henderson — due to its rapid growth and conununity atmosphere — is a perfect fit for an annual arts show. "It's going to develop into a major cultural festival in the upcoming years," said Maguire about the event, which will be free to the public. "It's something different that the Las Vegas-area hasn't had. It brings a sense of community to the area." It also brings foot-traffic and a revamped image to downtown Henderson. "The [Henderson City] Council expressed a desire to see 'Old Town' Henderson take on an arts and cultural theme," Zerkle said. "They envision that as part of the ambiance for Water Street." Maguire said the city's desire should be fulfilled. "To make a major festival, you need an area with a certain amSaaART Page 2 Vesley memorial a silent reminder of child's, death Sharon Jackson News Staff Writer On Feb. 8, 1997, two people's lives were changed forever because of the negligence of another. Henderson residents Jerry and Patti Vesely lost their only child, Cody, to a drunk driver. She was only 11 years old. It was a Saturday at 4:30 p.m., a woman was traveling on Russell Road approaching Mountain Vista Street going 75 miles per hour in a 45 mph zone when she struck the car in which Cody was traveling, according to Jerry. Two children including Cody were ejected from the car and she died instantly. Jerry said witnesses reported the woman who caused the crash had been driving in a reckless manner miles prior to the incident. He added the driver's blood alcohol level was tested about an hour and a half after the wreck and read .08. Rob Weidenfeld/News Staff Flowers are placed on the light pole in memory of Cody Vesely on the one-year anniversary of her death. See MEMORIAL Page 2 INSIDE Editorials. Deaths Happenings. Senior News. Sports SPORTS THURSDAY • B.isic girls win to earn s|)(l in /one soccer P.ie T { • Area wrestling teams gear up for zone action Page 1 \ II Ml TODAY I iLirlrfly in Hpiulnson Honir Nrws to kfcp (.mimiiinitv residents ,IMI htismcs'. ownri'. inlriinwd .IIMHII .KIIVIIICS, issufs .im1 pl.ns ol tlw BMI (,(Mii|'.nrs lor rnofp inlortn.ilion, ((ml;i( t HMI .)t ')>'i (M' Volume 49,13th Edition HBC Publications PO Box 90430 Herxierson, NV 89009 (702) 435-7700 On Ht Wb: www.hn
PAGE 2

Page 2 Hdnderson Home News Thursday, February 12,'1998 ONE MAN'S VIEW: From Fage 1 dozens of different groups claiming to represent people of my age, religion, occupation and even past jobs like military service. Every time they ask me to write a letter to tell the office holder what I want him or her to do for me. They want me to sound like a little kid in the kitchen crying gimme, gimme, gimme. Now stop and think about it. What if you were the elected official who only received letters wanting something and never one saying thank you? We continually tell our young people to express gratitude and then get caught up on the one-way street encouraged by special interest groups. As an elected public ofTicial for eight years, I soon learned that some people couldn't be satisfied no matter what was done. After so much negativism from any individual or group, it's easy to arrive at the point of being unable to care less about their mail or phone calls. Despite this, oftentimes officials support th,e programs of critics because even they can't be wrong on every issue. Of ^ourse, neither can our elected public servants. When was the last time you sat down and wrote an elected official a note of thanks? How about giving some bureaucrat a pat on the back for a job well done. We have some outstanding public servants at all levels of government in Nevada. Try it, you may like it. I'm sure^they will. UNLV football coach Jeff Horton is the speaker Thursday evening at the awards banquet for the Henderson Boys & Girls Club. Jeff isn't a stranger in Henderson and has come to town several times for youth oriented activities. This hasn't always been the practice of some past UNLV coaches and athletic directors. In addition to giving his time and interest to schools and organizations in and around the valley, he has also shown interest by recruiting local athletes. The WAC is big league college sports and Horton has a tough assignment fielding a competitive t^am. With his enthusiasm and knowledge of the game, fans are looking"" ahead to the 1998 season. Irene Ballis, a VA volunteer and member of Henderson VFW Post 3848, believes people should have a laugh every now and then. The Perfect Guest Planning a vacation in Florida, the tourist didn't know what to do with his dog. In reply to his letter the hotel manager wrote back: "I've been in this business for 30 years. Never have I called on police to eject a disorderly dog. Never has a dog set fire to a bed with a cigarette. I have never found a hotel towel or blanket in a dog's suitcase. The dog is welcome, and if he will vouch for you, come along too." Ruff, ruff, ruff O'Callaghan is publisher of the News. Courtesy Photo COMING TO TOWN — In just its seventh year, the "Art Festival in the Village of La Jolla"—pictured above—drew 90.000 to the two-day event in California. Frank Maguire, producer of the upcoming "ArtFest of Henderson," sees the same potential with his new Water Street event. ART From Page 1 biance — which certain areas of downtown Henderson has," Maguire said. "I couldn't find a section of Las Vegas that had the same feeling Henderson did. Henderson is very much a community, it's very much community-oriented." Downtown Henderson also fits into Maguire's plan due to the possibilities of more parking and freeway access, which will become a concern as the attendance at the event grows annually. MEMORIAL From Page 1 \ Maguire's "Art Festival in the Village of La Jolla," in just its seventh year, drew 90,000 people in two days this past September. He already has his goals set for Henderson. "I think we'll get about 20,00030,000 people this year. That's a good goal for the first year," he said. While The Events Group Inc. and the city played the lead roles in bringing the art festival to Henderson, local artists got the ball rolling, approaching both Now the Veselys live every day trying to cope with the loss. "Sometimes it seems hopeless — Cody was our life. Everything we did revolved around her," Jerry said. "We do a lotjif staring at each other now. It's kind of lonely without a little 'Code-tode.'" That was Cody's nickname. She was a very bubbly child who was active in the school choir at White Middle School. Cody loved outdoor activities such as soccer. She also loved riding her horse and singing. "She sang constantly," Jerry said. The family's future was well-charted. "In a matter of seconds there was no chart, now we are out floundering in a vast ocean with no sail and we still haven't found that direction," Jerry said. "Because Cody was an only child, I will miss all the fii^ts, the first dance ... the first boyfriend," Jerry said. "I don't get to see Cody do anything because she only experienced 11 years of it [life]." The effect Cody's death has had on he and Patti has been shattering. In the past year they have done many things to try to cope. Tlity have moved out of the home in which they lived Cody Vesely with Cody. "We had to move out of the neighborhood, we saw the same kids on the same bikes — minus one, that didn't work well," Jerry said.Tou have to realize your life has changed and you make the decision to go forward or go backward," Jerry explained. About once a week, he and Patti place flowers and a cross on a light pole at the place where Cody was killed. Jerry says it helps keep their daughter's memory alive. It also serves as a community reminder to slow down and leave the beer at the bar. Sunday was the one-year anniversary of Cody's death. Patti distributed purple ribbons and angel pma to family and close friends to reflect and remember that Cody's was a most preventable death. Zerkle and Maguire. "A number of artists who live in Henderson and Las Vegas contacted me," Maguire said. "They told me it would be a perfect place [to have a festival.]" Zerkle said the city of Henderson is looking forward to seeing all of the planning for the event become a reality this spring. "Henderson is just a natural for this kind of activity. It should be a good time of the year to have an event like this," he said. HOME — NEWS An Independent Newspaper Founded June 1, 1951 Henderson Home New$ (USPS 240000) Publistied every Tuesday and Thursday morning at 2 Commerce Center Drive. Henderson, Nevada, by HBC Publications. Inc. Periodicals postage paid at Henderson, Nevada. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: HENDERSON HOME NEWS 2 Commerce Center Drive Henderson, NV 89014 Phone (702) 564-1881 Customer complaint calls will tie accepted from 7 to 10 am on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Missed papers will be distributed by noon. MIKE O'CALLAGHAN Publisher CAROLYN O CALLAGHAN Co-Publisher TIM O'CALLAGHAN General Manager PAUL SZYDELKO Managing Editor MARY COLLEEN MIELE Circulation Manager HBC PUBLICATIONS, INC. Mike O'Callaghan, President: Carolyn OCallaghan. Vice President; Tim O Callaghan, TreasurerA/ice President: Mary Colleen Miele, Vice President. Ruthe Deskln. Secretary SUBSCRIPTION RATES Single 50 cents One Year $30 (Twetve Consecutive Months) No Refunds MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS West of MissiSSippiSSO per year East of Mts8issippt$60 per year 'Artctitional Mailing Otfires" \ White cloud emerges from Tlmet maintenance Sharon Jackson News Staff Writer • A scheduled maintenance project at 2:30 p.m. Sunday at Timet resulted in a white cloud that lingered over the area for about 20 minutes. According to Timct human resources manager Brent Peterson, workers had to repair one of the process tanks. The tank was drained of titanium tetrachloridc and washed out so the repairs could be done. "We had to get all the material out of the tank. Of course, it had residual titanium tetrachloride left in the tank," Peterson said. He added that when water is mixed with the titanium tetrachloride it makes a white cloud, titanium dioxide, a non-hazardous, non-toxic material. Peterson said Timet informed the Clark County Fire Department and the Clark County Air Pollution Control Division of the maintenance effort in advance. "We called [them] early in the morning and said we would be doing a maintenance effort and it could result in a release of titanium dioxide, Peterson said. This wa? just a maintenance operation, 1 there were] no accidents. [It's! nothing unusual, it's just something that has to be done periodically," Michael Naylor, Clark County Air Pollution Control Division Director, confirmed his agency was notified of the release. Air pollution inspectors did not respond to the incident but Naylor said staff used instrumentation in Pittman and at Burkholder Junior High to test the air. He said the test results showed no signs of haze, visible Smog or visibility impairment. Lee Zaichick/News Staif JUST A LITTLE RESERVED — The Reserve Hotel and Casino held a company party for their employees Friday. Bob Sobcyzk, director of slots, and other department directors performed a skit wearing dresses andjijgs and poked fun at themselves. '# WINTER CLEARANCE NOPAYMENTS& NOlNTEREST MONTHS*! ^ UP TO 50% OFF STOREWIDE (On Stock Carpets Only) Top Quality DuPont STAINMASTER MASTERLIFE Carpet •^ STAINMASTER MasterLife You must see inis quabiv DuPoni STAlNMASTr (' MASTERLIFE carpel, rcgui.iriy '29' sq yd., now on wle dunticj me holidays lor ONLY 'IT sq yd installed with upgrnni-: pad Plus. NO PAYMENTS Ni i INTEREST 'TIL 1999' Thjl • Right, tiljanuary 1999 00 sq.yd. 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Boulder City 458-4727 taadqr Ihni Fndjy Sttm*tf9imto9fm 0 1 t <] i t>'k ilni^^n'l t- i4ut •!! l*t?<" "• • Di i>titio't ti! r*fpg* ^t^ I'lJV Thursday, February 12, 1998 Henderson Home News Page 3 HPD offers sex offender notification Sharon Jackson News Staff Writer Certain agencies, and in some cases private citizens, can now be notifiedif a person-wlio has been convicted of .aJsexual offense -moves into their neighborhood. The.1997 Legislature passed the Sex Offender Noti fidation Law in Nevada which requires that all sex offenders within the state or moving into the state, register with the Department of Parole a*id Probation. The Department then rates the threat level to the community. Examples of agencies eligible to be notified are Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, private educational institutions, camps, day care centers, womenonly health spas, or churches that organize events for children or women. "[Years ago] we couldn't go to the community and say a 'sex offender or pedophile has just moved across the street from the day care center.' Now the police department is not only allowed [to notify] but we are required to make notifications," Henderson Police Lt. Jutta Chambers said. The police department encourages any organization (or person involved in any organization) who cares for or provides services/programs for women or children and feels they meet the criteria is requested to call the Police investigate infant's death Sharon Jackson News Staff Writer A baby born to an 18-year old Henderson woman Monday night died shortly after the birth and Henderson Police are investigating the death as a crime. Henderson Police Capt. Richard Perkins said the woman sought medical help at a health care facility because she started hemorrhaging after giving birth. She was eventually taken to St. Rose. "All we know is a child was born on Monday and a child died Monday. We arc still trying to piece together how the cl*ld died and ifitwasthe result of a criminal or noncriminal act," Perkins said. She gave birth to the infant at home. He added that the information is unclear because the women is still under a doctors car&\tind police have had limited acce.s) her. He said Henderson investigators are working to determine if the baby's mother provided the infant with the needs to sustain life. ^ The baby was found in the woman's bedroom, Perkins said. The family later took the infant to the hospital. He did not know at News \ipad\\ne how the baby girl died but said the department is waiting on infonnation from the Clark County Coroner office. The girl's parents may not have known their daughter was pregnant. "We don't believe they did [know]," Perkins said. "It is a difficult thing to conceal, it appears they had no idea." The woman thought she had a miscarriage, Perkins said. Police served a search warrant an(| found a lot of blood and items as/>ociated with an unattended regnancy. Police Department, 565-2198, to register for notification. "This information we will be giving community members and organizations is only for their information, not for them to make contact with these people or to harass these offenders. [There is to be] no vigilantism," Chambers said, adding that the offender has already completed parole or probation and is not being sought for any offense. Chambers explained the tiers on which offenders are rated. If £m offender is rated at tier one, they are determined to be a low risk — the offender's risk of recidivism and threat to public safety is low. Tier two is moderate risk. If the offender's risk of recidivism and threat to public safety is determined to be moderate. Tier three is a high risk — if the offender's risk to public safety is determined to be high, that person is rated at a tier three. Determinations are made by a state of Nevada statute. Under the new statute, it is i)ow a felony if a sex offender changes addresses and does not register under the new program, according to Chambers. She added the offender must register under this rating system for a minimum of 10 years before they can request to be excused. This law applies to any sex offender who has been convicted of a qualifying sexual offense that happened on or after July 1,1956. "The more the offender is a threat to the community, the higher the rating and the more of a notification to the community is required," Chambers said. "Once the Henderson Police Depart-ment receives notice of an offender rating, we will notify the community." This notification includes law enforcement, then community groups or businesses that provide services to women or children, and occasionally can include iJSf1' ..^ JIAiSKil B Hflm^^^t^^^^BP^^^^*"^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^BEll^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^HK^^^^^& ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^1 II^~L^I^^^BI^9^H^^^!^^^I^BJ^^^^^I ^^ • H^H^^S^^^^B I^^^^HE^K^^M ^^^HPi^^^ilj^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^K Lee Zaichick/News Staff • ROLLOVER— A truck carrying sand and cement turned over at Lake Mead and U.S. 95 Monday afternoon. Traffic was hampered by the logistics of pulling the truck upright with the weight of the cargo and the fuel spilled on the road. ^ti ^ ^^U^ ^ Discover the Diff^l'ence \ ^^Prompt, Friendly Personal Service ^^> CLEANERS &UUNDRY (In Lucky Shopping Center) 456-1333 • Dry Cleaning On Premises • Fine Tailoring & Alterations • Shirts Laundered • Wedding Gowns Heirloomed Leather & Suedes Hours: M F -7:00 am 7pm Sat. 8:30 am 5 pm Town & Country $200 Off Any Incoming Dry Cleaning Order Of $ 12~ Or More Coupon Not Valid With Any Other Ofler • Must Present Coupon With Incoming Order Households k Leathers Encluded Silks, linens Pleats Extra .V.n/MS Town & Country S300 Off Any Incoming Dry Cleaning Order Of SI?"" Or More Coupon Not Valid With Any Other Offer • Must Present Coupon With Incoming Order Households h. Leathers Excluded Silks, Linens Pleats Extra V < I /MX mM Drop-Off Clothes At Our Store Hours • Days A Week Stop In Today For All The Oetdils Let Town & Coiintrv Put A I ittle ^1ore Convenience neighborhoods, depending on the rating the offender receives. Chambers explained that if a moderate risk offender moves to a given Henderson neighborhood, law enforcement and certain community organizations would be notified. She added if a high risk offender moves to an area, a neighborhood notification would be issued and law enforcement and organizations that serve women and children would be informed. To be eligible to receive notification of a sex offender who has moved into the area, qualifying organizations must register with the Henderson Police Department. Chambers said the registration process is easy but to be eligible organizations must communicate to the police department they wish to be notified. Simply call the previously noted telephone number and leave the organization's name and mailing address. The police department will send the caller a one-page application. The department will notify the organization if they meet the notification requirements. Once the organization is registered with HPD, it is placed on the department mailing list for notification. If a sex offender moves into an area where an eligible organization provides services or holds meetings, they will be informed. Notification eligibility does not expire but if an organization moves, it must change its address with the HPD. Chambers said if a person is unsure if their organization falls within the required guidelines, they should call 565-2198. State Farm policies are ^ • -^ven better than You may quality for a aiscount on your Stale Fami auto insurance when you buy another line of ^ insuraricc coverage from us. Don't miss 1I11S oppoiiuiiity! Sec sour iiooti ncmlibor aiii'iit lodin lor details: Marketplace ^ %j, See Me: Bob Piper 10(M)N. Green Valley Pkwy. Suite 230. Henderson 269-8452 STATE FARM INSURANCE Like o f^ood neighbor, StaW I'arni is thereSI. IkIMIIII MIIIIMI Auloinnliilc IIIMIMIKC (onip.iu^. Ilimi.Oll'iiiMlii(iiiiiiii.'i^^^ "[)E:KS KJOVER-MGHT KB PACKING SlPPLIt^ £9 '"^ ET( EU • Personal Street Addres.s • 24 Hour .'Kccess • Mail Forwarding Ask about these too: Voice Mail • Business Cards • Rubber Stamps • Custom Packajjinj; • And alot more! 1 s. YV^KAAAA A/l.^ ^ 1 ^^ OPEN ^^ -^ SATURDAY ^^ ^^ *SUNDAYS ^^PEBBLE MARKETPL.ACE 1000 .N. Green Vallev Pkwv '*440.. Henderson 270-8282 mm\ PECOS^WI.ND.MILL PL.^ZA 2657 Windmill Pkwy.. Henderson 896-9898 GREEN VALLEY PLAZA 2756 Green Vallev PkwY., Henderson • 454-5220 m\\\ \ HENDERSON SHOPPING VILUGE 850 S. Boulder Hwy., Henderson !. 565-1235 IKI TAR(iET SHOPPING CENTER G;U N. Stephanie St., Henderson -454-8811 m\\\ lllNINIERi llUJFIFIEhT MONDAY FEBRUARY I6TH 4 PM -10 PM HIGHWAY (702) 293-5000 We would like to Invite you to a FREE DINNER BUFFET as our way of saying Thank You for your continued support! Town & Country $5oOff Any Incoming Dry Cleaning Order Of $25" Or More C(xjpon Nol Valid VVilh Any Other Wei • Must Present Coupon With Incoming Ordeit' HousehoWs & Leathen txcludecf Silks, Ltnns Pleats Extri Town & Country PLAIN KING OR QULLN COMFORTERS $ 1 S"^ EACH (Reg. SZS**) Down Slighllv Higher Must Present Coupon with IrKoming Order I DINNER RUFFET MON., FEB. 16TH ONLY 4 PM -10 PM (Musi be 21 or over) ^r 1 I I I I I I I I I I I

PAGE 3

Page 2 Hdnderson Home News Thursday, February 12,'1998 ONE MAN'S VIEW: From Fage 1 dozens of different groups claiming to represent people of my age, religion, occupation and even past jobs like military service. Every time they ask me to write a letter to tell the office holder what I want him or her to do for me. They want me to sound like a little kid in the kitchen crying gimme, gimme, gimme. Now stop and think about it. What if you were the elected official who only received letters wanting something and never one saying thank you? We continually tell our young people to express gratitude and then get caught up on the one-way street encouraged by special interest groups. As an elected public ofTicial for eight years, I soon learned that some people couldn't be satisfied no matter what was done. After so much negativism from any individual or group, it's easy to arrive at the point of being unable to care less about their mail or phone calls. Despite this, oftentimes officials support th,e programs of critics because even they can't be wrong on every issue. Of ^ourse, neither can our elected public servants. When was the last time you sat down and wrote an elected official a note of thanks? How about giving some bureaucrat a pat on the back for a job well done. We have some outstanding public servants at all levels of government in Nevada. Try it, you may like it. I'm sure^they will. UNLV football coach Jeff Horton is the speaker Thursday evening at the awards banquet for the Henderson Boys & Girls Club. Jeff isn't a stranger in Henderson and has come to town several times for youth oriented activities. This hasn't always been the practice of some past UNLV coaches and athletic directors. In addition to giving his time and interest to schools and organizations in and around the valley, he has also shown interest by recruiting local athletes. The WAC is big league college sports and Horton has a tough assignment fielding a competitive t^am. With his enthusiasm and knowledge of the game, fans are looking"" ahead to the 1998 season. Irene Ballis, a VA volunteer and member of Henderson VFW Post 3848, believes people should have a laugh every now and then. The Perfect Guest Planning a vacation in Florida, the tourist didn't know what to do with his dog. In reply to his letter the hotel manager wrote back: "I've been in this business for 30 years. Never have I called on police to eject a disorderly dog. Never has a dog set fire to a bed with a cigarette. I have never found a hotel towel or blanket in a dog's suitcase. The dog is welcome, and if he will vouch for you, come along too." Ruff, ruff, ruff O'Callaghan is publisher of the News. Courtesy Photo COMING TO TOWN — In just its seventh year, the "Art Festival in the Village of La Jolla"—pictured above—drew 90.000 to the two-day event in California. Frank Maguire, producer of the upcoming "ArtFest of Henderson," sees the same potential with his new Water Street event. ART From Page 1 biance — which certain areas of downtown Henderson has," Maguire said. "I couldn't find a section of Las Vegas that had the same feeling Henderson did. Henderson is very much a community, it's very much community-oriented." Downtown Henderson also fits into Maguire's plan due to the possibilities of more parking and freeway access, which will become a concern as the attendance at the event grows annually. MEMORIAL From Page 1 \ Maguire's "Art Festival in the Village of La Jolla," in just its seventh year, drew 90,000 people in two days this past September. He already has his goals set for Henderson. "I think we'll get about 20,00030,000 people this year. That's a good goal for the first year," he said. While The Events Group Inc. and the city played the lead roles in bringing the art festival to Henderson, local artists got the ball rolling, approaching both Now the Veselys live every day trying to cope with the loss. "Sometimes it seems hopeless — Cody was our life. Everything we did revolved around her," Jerry said. "We do a lotjif staring at each other now. It's kind of lonely without a little 'Code-tode.'" That was Cody's nickname. She was a very bubbly child who was active in the school choir at White Middle School. Cody loved outdoor activities such as soccer. She also loved riding her horse and singing. "She sang constantly," Jerry said. The family's future was well-charted. "In a matter of seconds there was no chart, now we are out floundering in a vast ocean with no sail and we still haven't found that direction," Jerry said. "Because Cody was an only child, I will miss all the fii^ts, the first dance ... the first boyfriend," Jerry said. "I don't get to see Cody do anything because she only experienced 11 years of it [life]." The effect Cody's death has had on he and Patti has been shattering. In the past year they have done many things to try to cope. Tlity have moved out of the home in which they lived Cody Vesely with Cody. "We had to move out of the neighborhood, we saw the same kids on the same bikes — minus one, that didn't work well," Jerry said.Tou have to realize your life has changed and you make the decision to go forward or go backward," Jerry explained. About once a week, he and Patti place flowers and a cross on a light pole at the place where Cody was killed. Jerry says it helps keep their daughter's memory alive. It also serves as a community reminder to slow down and leave the beer at the bar. Sunday was the one-year anniversary of Cody's death. Patti distributed purple ribbons and angel pma to family and close friends to reflect and remember that Cody's was a most preventable death. Zerkle and Maguire. "A number of artists who live in Henderson and Las Vegas contacted me," Maguire said. "They told me it would be a perfect place [to have a festival.]" Zerkle said the city of Henderson is looking forward to seeing all of the planning for the event become a reality this spring. "Henderson is just a natural for this kind of activity. It should be a good time of the year to have an event like this," he said. HOME — NEWS An Independent Newspaper Founded June 1, 1951 Henderson Home New$ (USPS 240000) Publistied every Tuesday and Thursday morning at 2 Commerce Center Drive. Henderson, Nevada, by HBC Publications. Inc. Periodicals postage paid at Henderson, Nevada. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: HENDERSON HOME NEWS 2 Commerce Center Drive Henderson, NV 89014 Phone (702) 564-1881 Customer complaint calls will tie accepted from 7 to 10 am on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Missed papers will be distributed by noon. MIKE O'CALLAGHAN Publisher CAROLYN O CALLAGHAN Co-Publisher TIM O'CALLAGHAN General Manager PAUL SZYDELKO Managing Editor MARY COLLEEN MIELE Circulation Manager HBC PUBLICATIONS, INC. Mike O'Callaghan, President: Carolyn OCallaghan. Vice President; Tim O Callaghan, TreasurerA/ice President: Mary Colleen Miele, Vice President. Ruthe Deskln. Secretary SUBSCRIPTION RATES Single 50 cents One Year $30 (Twetve Consecutive Months) No Refunds MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS West of MissiSSippiSSO per year East of Mts8issippt$60 per year 'Artctitional Mailing Otfires" \ White cloud emerges from Tlmet maintenance Sharon Jackson News Staff Writer • A scheduled maintenance project at 2:30 p.m. Sunday at Timet resulted in a white cloud that lingered over the area for about 20 minutes. According to Timct human resources manager Brent Peterson, workers had to repair one of the process tanks. The tank was drained of titanium tetrachloridc and washed out so the repairs could be done. "We had to get all the material out of the tank. Of course, it had residual titanium tetrachloride left in the tank," Peterson said. He added that when water is mixed with the titanium tetrachloride it makes a white cloud, titanium dioxide, a non-hazardous, non-toxic material. Peterson said Timet informed the Clark County Fire Department and the Clark County Air Pollution Control Division of the maintenance effort in advance. "We called [them] early in the morning and said we would be doing a maintenance effort and it could result in a release of titanium dioxide, Peterson said. This wa? just a maintenance operation, 1 there were] no accidents. [It's! nothing unusual, it's just something that has to be done periodically," Michael Naylor, Clark County Air Pollution Control Division Director, confirmed his agency was notified of the release. Air pollution inspectors did not respond to the incident but Naylor said staff used instrumentation in Pittman and at Burkholder Junior High to test the air. He said the test results showed no signs of haze, visible Smog or visibility impairment. Lee Zaichick/News Staif JUST A LITTLE RESERVED — The Reserve Hotel and Casino held a company party for their employees Friday. Bob Sobcyzk, director of slots, and other department directors performed a skit wearing dresses andjijgs and poked fun at themselves. '# WINTER CLEARANCE NOPAYMENTS& NOlNTEREST MONTHS*! ^ UP TO 50% OFF STOREWIDE (On Stock Carpets Only) Top Quality DuPont STAINMASTER MASTERLIFE Carpet •^ STAINMASTER MasterLife You must see inis quabiv DuPoni STAlNMASTr (' MASTERLIFE carpel, rcgui.iriy '29' sq yd., now on wle dunticj me holidays lor ONLY 'IT sq yd installed with upgrnni-: pad Plus. NO PAYMENTS Ni i INTEREST 'TIL 1999' Thjl • Right, tiljanuary 1999 00 sq.yd. ALL COMPLETELY INSTALLED CARPET PRICES INCLUDE... • 6. • i ,160 Satslac! or Goa'ariee' • fcicbsive LWme HefiaceTienl GuaianW • Bev :/aie Measj^etienl G^a'antM' • Ouai^y anfl rtfar Gjaranleei • Wetr.e NOW ONLY Reg. 24 sq.yd, INSIAliEDWITH 'jPGRADf PAD HIGH PRESSURE LAMINATE FLOORS This durable and attiaclive tloof can be installed in virtually any room and oilers easy manintenance with a 16 YEAR GUARANTEE Available in wide color ranges 0MAmiNG1ON ItCL TAX MATERIAL ONL-r INSTALLATION AND FINANCING AVAILABLE MANNINGTON VINYL FLOORS Bi-ai/lily your liooi with quality Manninglon Vinyi r.unuinf. M-'inm..rKjt'." vmyl flooring HMATMNGION SALE 7 beauty ii value ; .illprns 99 'iC. TW 'M'ERIALONU 4221 W. Charleston Blvd. 870-0202 ii 1 c i j '•"JIU'T' 0 105 N. ^lellis Blvd. i/i l .'i.i-iui.ihn Coirunonsi 459-0202 3520 E. Tropicana Ave. looo Nevada Hwy.. Boulder City 458-4727 taadqr Ihni Fndjy Sttm*tf9imto9fm 0 1 t <] i t>'k ilni^^n'l t- i4ut •!! l*t?<" "• • Di i>titio't ti! r*fpg* ^t^ I'lJV Thursday, February 12, 1998 Henderson Home News Page 3 HPD offers sex offender notification Sharon Jackson News Staff Writer Certain agencies, and in some cases private citizens, can now be notifiedif a person-wlio has been convicted of .aJsexual offense -moves into their neighborhood. The.1997 Legislature passed the Sex Offender Noti fidation Law in Nevada which requires that all sex offenders within the state or moving into the state, register with the Department of Parole a*id Probation. The Department then rates the threat level to the community. Examples of agencies eligible to be notified are Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, private educational institutions, camps, day care centers, womenonly health spas, or churches that organize events for children or women. "[Years ago] we couldn't go to the community and say a 'sex offender or pedophile has just moved across the street from the day care center.' Now the police department is not only allowed [to notify] but we are required to make notifications," Henderson Police Lt. Jutta Chambers said. The police department encourages any organization (or person involved in any organization) who cares for or provides services/programs for women or children and feels they meet the criteria is requested to call the Police investigate infant's death Sharon Jackson News Staff Writer A baby born to an 18-year old Henderson woman Monday night died shortly after the birth and Henderson Police are investigating the death as a crime. Henderson Police Capt. Richard Perkins said the woman sought medical help at a health care facility because she started hemorrhaging after giving birth. She was eventually taken to St. Rose. "All we know is a child was born on Monday and a child died Monday. We arc still trying to piece together how the cl*ld died and ifitwasthe result of a criminal or noncriminal act," Perkins said. She gave birth to the infant at home. He added that the information is unclear because the women is still under a doctors car&\tind police have had limited acce.s) her. He said Henderson investigators are working to determine if the baby's mother provided the infant with the needs to sustain life. ^ The baby was found in the woman's bedroom, Perkins said. The family later took the infant to the hospital. He did not know at News \ipad\\ne how the baby girl died but said the department is waiting on infonnation from the Clark County Coroner office. The girl's parents may not have known their daughter was pregnant. "We don't believe they did [know]," Perkins said. "It is a difficult thing to conceal, it appears they had no idea." The woman thought she had a miscarriage, Perkins said. Police served a search warrant an(| found a lot of blood and items as/>ociated with an unattended regnancy. Police Department, 565-2198, to register for notification. "This information we will be giving community members and organizations is only for their information, not for them to make contact with these people or to harass these offenders. [There is to be] no vigilantism," Chambers said, adding that the offender has already completed parole or probation and is not being sought for any offense. Chambers explained the tiers on which offenders are rated. If £m offender is rated at tier one, they are determined to be a low risk — the offender's risk of recidivism and threat to public safety is low. Tier two is moderate risk. If the offender's risk of recidivism and threat to public safety is determined to be moderate. Tier three is a high risk — if the offender's risk to public safety is determined to be high, that person is rated at a tier three. Determinations are made by a state of Nevada statute. Under the new statute, it is i)ow a felony if a sex offender changes addresses and does not register under the new program, according to Chambers. She added the offender must register under this rating system for a minimum of 10 years before they can request to be excused. This law applies to any sex offender who has been convicted of a qualifying sexual offense that happened on or after July 1,1956. "The more the offender is a threat to the community, the higher the rating and the more of a notification to the community is required," Chambers said. "Once the Henderson Police Depart-ment receives notice of an offender rating, we will notify the community." This notification includes law enforcement, then community groups or businesses that provide services to women or children, and occasionally can include iJSf1' ..^ JIAiSKil B Hflm^^^t^^^^BP^^^^*"^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^BEll^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^HK^^^^^& ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^1 II^~L^I^^^BI^9^H^^^!^^^I^BJ^^^^^I ^^ • H^H^^S^^^^B I^^^^HE^K^^M ^^^HPi^^^ilj^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^K Lee Zaichick/News Staff • ROLLOVER— A truck carrying sand and cement turned over at Lake Mead and U.S. 95 Monday afternoon. Traffic was hampered by the logistics of pulling the truck upright with the weight of the cargo and the fuel spilled on the road. ^ti ^ ^^U^ ^ Discover the Diff^l'ence \ ^^Prompt, Friendly Personal Service ^^> CLEANERS &UUNDRY (In Lucky Shopping Center) 456-1333 • Dry Cleaning On Premises • Fine Tailoring & Alterations • Shirts Laundered • Wedding Gowns Heirloomed Leather & Suedes Hours: M F -7:00 am 7pm Sat. 8:30 am 5 pm Town & Country $200 Off Any Incoming Dry Cleaning Order Of $ 12~ Or More Coupon Not Valid With Any Other Ofler • Must Present Coupon With Incoming Order Households k Leathers Encluded Silks, linens Pleats Extra .V.n/MS Town & Country S300 Off Any Incoming Dry Cleaning Order Of SI?"" Or More Coupon Not Valid With Any Other Offer • Must Present Coupon With Incoming Order Households h. Leathers Excluded Silks, Linens Pleats Extra V < I /MX mM Drop-Off Clothes At Our Store Hours • Days A Week Stop In Today For All The Oetdils Let Town & Coiintrv Put A I ittle ^1ore Convenience neighborhoods, depending on the rating the offender receives. Chambers explained that if a moderate risk offender moves to a given Henderson neighborhood, law enforcement and certain community organizations would be notified. She added if a high risk offender moves to an area, a neighborhood notification would be issued and law enforcement and organizations that serve women and children would be informed. To be eligible to receive notification of a sex offender who has moved into the area, qualifying organizations must register with the Henderson Police Department. Chambers said the registration process is easy but to be eligible organizations must communicate to the police department they wish to be notified. Simply call the previously noted telephone number and leave the organization's name and mailing address. The police department will send the caller a one-page application. The department will notify the organization if they meet the notification requirements. Once the organization is registered with HPD, it is placed on the department mailing list for notification. If a sex offender moves into an area where an eligible organization provides services or holds meetings, they will be informed. Notification eligibility does not expire but if an organization moves, it must change its address with the HPD. Chambers said if a person is unsure if their organization falls within the required guidelines, they should call 565-2198. State Farm policies are ^ • -^ven better than You may quality for a aiscount on your Stale Fami auto insurance when you buy another line of ^ insuraricc coverage from us. Don't miss 1I11S oppoiiuiiity! Sec sour iiooti ncmlibor aiii'iit lodin lor details: Marketplace ^ %j, See Me: Bob Piper 10(M)N. Green Valley Pkwy. Suite 230. Henderson 269-8452 STATE FARM INSURANCE Like o f^ood neighbor, StaW I'arni is thereSI. IkIMIIII MIIIIMI Auloinnliilc IIIMIMIKC (onip.iu^. Ilimi.Oll'iiiMlii(iiiiiiii.'i^^^ "[)E:KS KJOVER-MGHT KB PACKING SlPPLIt^ £9 '"^ ET( EU • Personal Street Addres.s • 24 Hour .'Kccess • Mail Forwarding Ask about these too: Voice Mail • Business Cards • Rubber Stamps • Custom Packajjinj; • And alot more! 1 s. YV^KAAAA A/l.^ ^ 1 ^^ OPEN ^^ -^ SATURDAY ^^ ^^ *SUNDAYS ^^PEBBLE MARKETPL.ACE 1000 .N. Green Vallev Pkwv '*440.. Henderson 270-8282 mm\ PECOS^WI.ND.MILL PL.^ZA 2657 Windmill Pkwy.. Henderson 896-9898 GREEN VALLEY PLAZA 2756 Green Vallev PkwY., Henderson • 454-5220 m\\\ \ HENDERSON SHOPPING VILUGE 850 S. Boulder Hwy., Henderson !. 565-1235 IKI TAR(iET SHOPPING CENTER G;U N. Stephanie St., Henderson -454-8811 m\\\ lllNINIERi llUJFIFIEhT MONDAY FEBRUARY I6TH 4 PM -10 PM HIGHWAY (702) 293-5000 We would like to Invite you to a FREE DINNER BUFFET as our way of saying Thank You for your continued support! Town & Country $5oOff Any Incoming Dry Cleaning Order Of $25" Or More C(xjpon Nol Valid VVilh Any Other Wei • Must Present Coupon With Incoming Ordeit' HousehoWs & Leathen txcludecf Silks, Ltnns Pleats Extri Town & Country PLAIN KING OR QULLN COMFORTERS $ 1 S"^ EACH (Reg. SZS**) Down Slighllv Higher Must Present Coupon with IrKoming Order I DINNER RUFFET MON., FEB. 16TH ONLY 4 PM -10 PM (Musi be 21 or over) ^r 1 I I I I I I I I I I I

PAGE 4

Page 4 Henderson Home News Thursday, Eebruary 12, 1998 Reedom's compassion stems from nursing background SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL NEWSPAPER ADVERTISE IN THE NEWS 564-1881^ Kevin Ferguson News Staff Writer '" Caring for othafc^ is a quality that had been instilled in Dr. Carolyn Reedom since her childhood, which may be why the principal at Vanderburg Elementary School is so compassionate with her students. Dr. Reedom spent many of her teen years taking care of her grandmother who suffered from Alzheimer's Disease. As a result, the high school honors student was often told by her parents and friends that she would make a great nurse. The Louisiana native followed that path after graduating with honors, accepting a partial scholarship to Dillard University in New Orleans, one of the top nursing programs in the country. At the start, Reedom did well in her classes, and was well-liked among the teachers of the nursing department. But in her third year in college, Reedom said she failed the real test to see if she could stomach witnessing the daily pain, suffering and death that occurs in hospitals. "All the classes that year were in the hospital," Reedom said. "I realized then I couldn't handle seeing that every day. I used to cry with the patients. The doctors told me I wasn't supposed to cry in front of them." That experience taught her that there was quite a difference between dealing with patients who 1^ Lee Zaichick/News Staff Student Lucie Guzman greets Dr. Carolyn Reedom. don't know they're dying such as Alzheimer's patients and those who do know they have a terminal illness. When she told Dr. Ruth Miller, the chairman of Dillard's nursing department she wanted to change her major to anything other than nursing, Miller tried to persuade her to complete her nursing decree. "She spent hours trying to convince me to change my mind because of all the time I had spent in it [nursing]," Reedom said. "But I knew if I stayed in it, I would never use that degree." One of Miller's expressions she often said to her students was that nurses must be dedicated, Reedom said. To reiterate that statement back to Miller, Reedom said was her only way out. "She kept trying and trying to convince me to stay until finally I just said,'Dr. Miller. Iju.st wouldn't be dedicated as a nurse."! Those magical words unlocked the door, freeing Reedom to change her major with Miller's acceptance. "What department do you want to change to?" Reedom recalled Miller asking. Reedom didn't have an answer to that at tbe time, but that summier she volunteered to help at the early childhood program, HeadStart Following that summer internship in 1969, Reedom changed her major_ tp education and graduated on-time at the end of the school year. Afterward, she followed her parents out to Clark County and she landed a teaching job in the school district. Seven years later, at 27, Dr. Reedom became the youngest to be appointed principal of a Clark County School, when she assumed that position at Red Rock Elementary School. The school district's respect for Reedom continued to be evident as she was been appointed the first principal of McDoniel Elementary (1987) and Vanderburg Elementary (1996). When a new school opens, and the district expects it may lead to a issues of overcrowded classrooms and upset parents, Reedom is often the person district officials put near the top of the list because of her problem-solving record. ^Express Lube Boulder Hwy & Palo Verde, Henderson 565-0522 Changing your oil has never been easier. HI $5 off our regular $24.95 service. n9 95 Havolihe FORMULA *. f/ h ] (I H Oil I Star Service Oil & Filter Change, Lube. • Includes Two FREE Car Washes. With this ad Most cars Incfijdes 5 quarts of Havoline motor oil Expires 2-28-98 I NOT GOOD WITH ANY OTHER OFFER J FREE CONSULTATION CALL KEVIN UTTERBACK ATTORNEY AT LAW 433-5138 FOR ALL YOUR LEGAL NEEDS \ Learning a focus at Play Plus DIVORCE CONSTRUCTION ADOPTIONS PERSONAL INJURY 601 WHITNEY RANCH #C-14 HENDERSON, NEVADA GUARDIANSHIP CHILD SUPPORT GENERAL BUSINESS COLLECTIONS WILLS BANKRUPTCY I yt^ Play Plus, a young children's community museum, will open this month at 1000 N. Stephanie Place #3. Founders, Robin Bell and Maggie Cook have enhanced the hves of many young children in Las Vegas and Henderson as early childhood music and arts specialists. Through their work with local families, and as mothers themselves, they recognized a need for a special place where very young children and their parents can interact, having fiin while learning They also realize that with the growth the community is experiencing, there are many parents who are new to the area. Play Plus will he a place where they may meet other parents, esUnknown man approaches student A fourth-grade .student was approached by an unknown man at Sewell Elementary School Tuesday. Henderson Police are unsure what the man's intentions were. No children were harmed but Henderson Police Capt. Richard Perkins said police want to remind parents to make sure they know their children's location. "It always concerns us when an unauthorized person is on school grounds talking to children," Perkins said. He commented on the importance for parents to inform their children not totalk to strangers. The suspect is described as a black male with bleached hair. Sharon Jackson News Staff Writer tablishing new friends and support for the sometimesdifficult challenges ofparent ing in the'90s. The community museum will 1K' a wealth of rt'sources for parents whether they are new to the area or long time residents, a spokesman said. Through play, all the elements of gi'owth come together. Play is increasingly seen by early childh(HKi specialists as a huildingblock where a broad range of learning can thrive and flourish. Play Plus respects and encourages this natural activity necessary for healthy gi'owth and learning. The Discover},' Room at Play Plus, designed for infants through 8 years old, is a place "Wliere learning and play go hand in hand." It provides children and their parents with a safe environment to explore, create and learn while having fun together, enhancing tTie parent-child relation.ship. Children will experience the Puppet Theater, Dress-Up Stage, Recycled Art, Music and Science Areas, Baby Bungalow, Kids Size Kitchen and Grocery Store, The Library, Sand and Water Play, Bounce House, and many more surprises. The entrance fee is $4.95 for children 1 year old and up. Children under a year and adults are free. The entrance fee is the only cost for exploring. There are no arcades, vending machines or snackbars. Play Plus will also be available to private birthday parties. In addition. Play Plus offers the quality children's programs of Kindermusik, Musikgarten and Young at Art. The music programs are also offered at a satellite location in the Northwest. For more information, call 3430051. Complete Thinner ^^•SrSr + tax SERVED WITH SOUP OR SALAD VEGETABLES & YOUR CHOICE OF POTATO Served 4:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m ron dsKail \^aje • P.O* 2S00 S. Boulder Hwy. Henderson 294-5000 Where the Freeway ends and the fun be(;ins Best Selection of Wall Systems In Las Vegas! Wall Systi'iiis Starling At Only t<^>n 'i "The Newest And Largest Selection Of Wall Systems In Las Vegas Accommodating Big Screen TVs Up To 80"! niG SCREE]\ • LV FURNITURE S HOWCABEJ, ^ WEST SIDE 3067 N. Rainbow (Cheyenne & Relnbow) 656-1421 GREEN VALLEY 4500 E. Sunset (next to Barley's Casino) 451-8421 EAST SIDE 3335 E. Tropicana (next to Sav-On) 458-8421 U m DOWN PAYMEAIT NO PAYMENTS NO ACCROED INTEREST MONTHS! FRKE DESKiN SKR\ RI PERSONAL INJURY ONSULTATION NO RECOVERY FEE 565-0473 218 LEAD ST. (Across from the new Civic Center Plaza) LAW OFFICE OF JOHN F. MARCHIANO FORMER HENDERSON CITY ATTORNEY Thursday, February 12, 1998 Henderson Home News Page 5 Sunset Station expansion on the horizon D.B. Marciniak News Staff Writer As Henderson celebrated the opening of its second resort-style hotel and casino this week, the first, Sunset Station Hotel and Casino, announced it is preparing to expand. Only seven months after Sunset Station opened its doors to Henderson residents, casino executives are solidifying plans for a $30 million expansion project. "Sometimes you need to get bigger to get better," said Don Marrandino, Sunset Station's general manager. More movie theaters, additional parking, as well as more gaming and restaurants will be added to the eastern side of Sunset Station within the next year, he said. Ground breaking is expected for April for the expansion. Construction will take about eight to nine months with different aspects of the project completed in phases, Marrandino said. Citing an influx of resources from a $1.7 biUion merger with Crescent Real Estate Equities Co. late last month, he said it gave Station Casinos a comfort level to pursue its expansion plans. "I've been pleased vfith the results [of the property] thus far," he said. "We've been meeting our expectations both financially and with visitors." Revenues at the casino have been increasing marginally each month of operation since its June opening, Marrandino indicated. Eiesides the casino's favorable financial situation, he said, the number of people visiting the property has increased. Svmset Station's buffet recently celebrated its one millionth customer, „the hotel has remained aroimd a 95% occupancy rate and the ratio of people gaming at key times of the day has remained consistent or increased sUghtly since their opening. Marrandino said these are all indicators the property is succeeding and it's time to move ahead with expansion plans. "We are doing it because the movie theater has been overcrowded," he said. The cornerstone of the expanded property wilj^be 12 state-of-the-art stadium-style theaters. By designing the new theaters as stadium-style, it will give Sunset Station more seating capacity for movie-goers. Once open, the additional screens will give Sunset Station 24 theaters in all. Aside from the theaters, Sunset Station is planning to build a five-story parking garage off its Warm Springs Road exit. The garage will feature a valet drop area and 2,000 available spaces. "I wanted the garage all along," Marrandino said. "I think it is a key part of the property." The garage will offer patrons a convenient place to park and not have to walk far to get into Sunset Station, he said. Additional planned amenities for the addition include 20,000 square feet of gaming area, a few fast food restaurants and a possible steak house. "We're still putting together some details of the plans," Marrandino said, adding expansion plans should be completed soon. "We figured as long as expansion makes sense, we'd go ahead." In the meantime, he said, patr(ms will soon get a glimpse of improvements at the casino's amphitheater. He said additional trees, shrubs and other improve''We're sWI putting together some details of the plans. We figured as long as expansion makes ^ sense, we'd go ahead." Don Marrandino Sunset Station GM ments have been made during the past month to prepare the amphitheater for planned outdoor events. The amphitheater should be complete and open to the public in the coming week. Sunset Station oi>ened in June, 1997, on 100 acres. Casino executives planned expansion, but at the time of the opening were unsure when additional improvements would be pursued. At its opening, the property was assessed at about $ 198 million. Once expansion plans are complete, the property will exceed a value of $200 million. Caring hearts food drive Go For It Academy will sponsor the Caring Hearts Food Drive on behalf of the Salvation Army fi-om noon to 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 21. Children of all ages are welcome to participate in all of the activities at the world-class multi-sports facility., 1000 Stephanie Place #1. Participants will receive hands-on experience on the gymnastics equipment including: balance beams, imeven bars, floor exercise, vault, and trampolines. Other planned activities for the children are [cheerleading and creative dance. Admission for each child is two non-perishable food items. Families are encouraged to participate. Snacks and beverages will be available Commercial Rates Available IwJE One Price Service \ IIKE NE Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning We'll Make It Look Like New 7 Days 24 Hours Emergency Service Now have all the carpets in your home professionally cleaned for $99 00 up 10 1200 Sq.ft. $149"? to 240O Sq. ft. Prices include all rooms, family room dining room, Halls, Baths & one set of stairs • Pre Vacuuming • Pre Conditioning • Pre Spotting • Pre Scrubbing • Steam Cleaning • Dupont Teflon Carpet Protectant • Most Furniture Moved Sofa & Love Seat...^99^ Includes all cushions & Dupont Teflon Fabric Protector 270-6000 • % i NAME BRAND FRAGRANCES AT DISCOUNT PRICES Courtesy Pfioto 50TH ANNIVERSARY— Ira and Eula Cliff will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary Saturday in Hurricane, Utah. The long-time Henderson residents moved from the crty about 20 years ago, but have many friends in the city. The couple currently resides in Utah. CHOSEN to meet The Christian Homeschoolers of Southern Nevada, CHOSEN, a homeschooling support group and fellowship, will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 17, at the Green Valley Baptist Church, 270 Valle Verde Dr., between Warm Springs and Windmill. The program is a Cjoithia Tobias video on children's learning styles. Parents who are currently homeschooling and those who are thinking about it are welcome to attend. Children are welcome and supervised activities will be provided for them. For more information, call 391-8625. THE NEIVS Is YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER u PERFUME I^DEPOT WE MAKE IT EASY GIFT SHOPPING FOR VALENTINE'S DAY FOR HER... FOR HIM... Bal A Vcrsallles..3.0 oz. Boucheron 1.7 oz. Chantilly 3.4 Oz. Curve....: 3.4 oz. First i.Q oz. Jean Paul Gaultier. 1.7 oz. Liz Claiborne.... 1.7 oz. Opium 3.4 oz. Shalimar. 1.7 oz. White Diamonds..J.4 oz. Spr. M9"" Spr. M9"" Spr. Mr' Spr. 39'" Spr. • 3}f" Spr. M9'" Spr. *3fr" Spr. M9" Spr. Wl"' Spr. '48^ Baryshnikov. Boss HalstonZ-14 Issey Miyake.... Joop Kouros Lagerfeld Paul Sebastian.. Red ^ Royal Copenhagen, 3.4 oz, 4.2 oz. 4.2 Oz, 2.5 oz, .4.2 oz, .3.4 oz, 4.2 oz, 4.0 oz, 3.4 oz, 1.5 oz. Spr. • 29" Spr. 39'' Spr. • 26" Spr. • 39" Spr. '43" Spr. '39" Spr. 36 Spr. '33" Spr. 41 Spr. '19" Over 500 Choices "We Are The Oldest & largest Wholesole Retail Fragrante Dealer in Nevodo" New, Old & Hard To Find "With No Imitarions" Selection •Price •Service •Free Gift Wrapping | Phone Orders • Shipping Available/Mon. Fri. 10-7 • Sat 1 CMi • Sun 11-5 OPEN TO THE PUBLIC / DISCOUNTS UP TO 70% Vons Shopping Center, Pecos & Russell .Q, 1 s' Place $600 2"" Place $400 • 3^" Place $300 4"' Place $200 • 5'" Place $150 Play our slots &• win tickets for every 4 of a kind See details at the cage • Must be 21. SNORE'S TERRIBLE'S TOWN 200 FUN RUN FEB. 15 10 AM 6-34 MILE LAPS The course has changed SNORE FEB. 20SIGN UP & TECH Terribie's Town Casino FEB. 21 DRIVERS MEETING 9:00 am RACE STARTS 10:00 ann FEB. 22 AWARDS 11:00 am Terribie's Town Casino ENTRY FEES: 1,1-2-1600,5,10,HEAVYMETAL, MINI METAL $310 • CLASS 9,5-1600 $185 • CLASS 11, SPORTSMAN BUGGY & TRUCKS $75 BLM FEE $25 PUBLIC NOTICE Here Come the Women in Black • Mmm' 642 S. Boulder Hwv 564-7118 As of February II, 1998 it will be no Hgment of your imagination to see.., KelU Williams, Rachael Burr Emily Buckles, Summer Gubler Kristen Murray legally driving on your local streets. Drivere Beware!

PAGE 5

Page 4 Henderson Home News Thursday, Eebruary 12, 1998 Reedom's compassion stems from nursing background SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL NEWSPAPER ADVERTISE IN THE NEWS 564-1881^ Kevin Ferguson News Staff Writer '" Caring for othafc^ is a quality that had been instilled in Dr. Carolyn Reedom since her childhood, which may be why the principal at Vanderburg Elementary School is so compassionate with her students. Dr. Reedom spent many of her teen years taking care of her grandmother who suffered from Alzheimer's Disease. As a result, the high school honors student was often told by her parents and friends that she would make a great nurse. The Louisiana native followed that path after graduating with honors, accepting a partial scholarship to Dillard University in New Orleans, one of the top nursing programs in the country. At the start, Reedom did well in her classes, and was well-liked among the teachers of the nursing department. But in her third year in college, Reedom said she failed the real test to see if she could stomach witnessing the daily pain, suffering and death that occurs in hospitals. "All the classes that year were in the hospital," Reedom said. "I realized then I couldn't handle seeing that every day. I used to cry with the patients. The doctors told me I wasn't supposed to cry in front of them." That experience taught her that there was quite a difference between dealing with patients who 1^ Lee Zaichick/News Staff Student Lucie Guzman greets Dr. Carolyn Reedom. don't know they're dying such as Alzheimer's patients and those who do know they have a terminal illness. When she told Dr. Ruth Miller, the chairman of Dillard's nursing department she wanted to change her major to anything other than nursing, Miller tried to persuade her to complete her nursing decree. "She spent hours trying to convince me to change my mind because of all the time I had spent in it [nursing]," Reedom said. "But I knew if I stayed in it, I would never use that degree." One of Miller's expressions she often said to her students was that nurses must be dedicated, Reedom said. To reiterate that statement back to Miller, Reedom said was her only way out. "She kept trying and trying to convince me to stay until finally I just said,'Dr. Miller. Iju.st wouldn't be dedicated as a nurse."! Those magical words unlocked the door, freeing Reedom to change her major with Miller's acceptance. "What department do you want to change to?" Reedom recalled Miller asking. Reedom didn't have an answer to that at tbe time, but that summier she volunteered to help at the early childhood program, HeadStart Following that summer internship in 1969, Reedom changed her major_ tp education and graduated on-time at the end of the school year. Afterward, she followed her parents out to Clark County and she landed a teaching job in the school district. Seven years later, at 27, Dr. Reedom became the youngest to be appointed principal of a Clark County School, when she assumed that position at Red Rock Elementary School. The school district's respect for Reedom continued to be evident as she was been appointed the first principal of McDoniel Elementary (1987) and Vanderburg Elementary (1996). When a new school opens, and the district expects it may lead to a issues of overcrowded classrooms and upset parents, Reedom is often the person district officials put near the top of the list because of her problem-solving record. ^Express Lube Boulder Hwy & Palo Verde, Henderson 565-0522 Changing your oil has never been easier. HI $5 off our regular $24.95 service. n9 95 Havolihe FORMULA *. f/ h ] (I H Oil I Star Service Oil & Filter Change, Lube. • Includes Two FREE Car Washes. With this ad Most cars Incfijdes 5 quarts of Havoline motor oil Expires 2-28-98 I NOT GOOD WITH ANY OTHER OFFER J FREE CONSULTATION CALL KEVIN UTTERBACK ATTORNEY AT LAW 433-5138 FOR ALL YOUR LEGAL NEEDS \ Learning a focus at Play Plus DIVORCE CONSTRUCTION ADOPTIONS PERSONAL INJURY 601 WHITNEY RANCH #C-14 HENDERSON, NEVADA GUARDIANSHIP CHILD SUPPORT GENERAL BUSINESS COLLECTIONS WILLS BANKRUPTCY I yt^ Play Plus, a young children's community museum, will open this month at 1000 N. Stephanie Place #3. Founders, Robin Bell and Maggie Cook have enhanced the hves of many young children in Las Vegas and Henderson as early childhood music and arts specialists. Through their work with local families, and as mothers themselves, they recognized a need for a special place where very young children and their parents can interact, having fiin while learning They also realize that with the growth the community is experiencing, there are many parents who are new to the area. Play Plus will he a place where they may meet other parents, esUnknown man approaches student A fourth-grade .student was approached by an unknown man at Sewell Elementary School Tuesday. Henderson Police are unsure what the man's intentions were. No children were harmed but Henderson Police Capt. Richard Perkins said police want to remind parents to make sure they know their children's location. "It always concerns us when an unauthorized person is on school grounds talking to children," Perkins said. He commented on the importance for parents to inform their children not totalk to strangers. The suspect is described as a black male with bleached hair. Sharon Jackson News Staff Writer tablishing new friends and support for the sometimesdifficult challenges ofparent ing in the'90s. The community museum will 1K' a wealth of rt'sources for parents whether they are new to the area or long time residents, a spokesman said. Through play, all the elements of gi'owth come together. Play is increasingly seen by early childh(HKi specialists as a huildingblock where a broad range of learning can thrive and flourish. Play Plus respects and encourages this natural activity necessary for healthy gi'owth and learning. The Discover},' Room at Play Plus, designed for infants through 8 years old, is a place "Wliere learning and play go hand in hand." It provides children and their parents with a safe environment to explore, create and learn while having fun together, enhancing tTie parent-child relation.ship. Children will experience the Puppet Theater, Dress-Up Stage, Recycled Art, Music and Science Areas, Baby Bungalow, Kids Size Kitchen and Grocery Store, The Library, Sand and Water Play, Bounce House, and many more surprises. The entrance fee is $4.95 for children 1 year old and up. Children under a year and adults are free. The entrance fee is the only cost for exploring. There are no arcades, vending machines or snackbars. Play Plus will also be available to private birthday parties. In addition. Play Plus offers the quality children's programs of Kindermusik, Musikgarten and Young at Art. The music programs are also offered at a satellite location in the Northwest. For more information, call 3430051. Complete Thinner ^^•SrSr + tax SERVED WITH SOUP OR SALAD VEGETABLES & YOUR CHOICE OF POTATO Served 4:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m ron dsKail \^aje • P.O* 2S00 S. Boulder Hwy. Henderson 294-5000 Where the Freeway ends and the fun be(;ins Best Selection of Wall Systems In Las Vegas! Wall Systi'iiis Starling At Only t<^>n 'i "The Newest And Largest Selection Of Wall Systems In Las Vegas Accommodating Big Screen TVs Up To 80"! niG SCREE]\ • LV FURNITURE S HOWCABEJ, ^ WEST SIDE 3067 N. Rainbow (Cheyenne & Relnbow) 656-1421 GREEN VALLEY 4500 E. Sunset (next to Barley's Casino) 451-8421 EAST SIDE 3335 E. Tropicana (next to Sav-On) 458-8421 U m DOWN PAYMEAIT NO PAYMENTS NO ACCROED INTEREST MONTHS! FRKE DESKiN SKR\ RI PERSONAL INJURY ONSULTATION NO RECOVERY FEE 565-0473 218 LEAD ST. (Across from the new Civic Center Plaza) LAW OFFICE OF JOHN F. MARCHIANO FORMER HENDERSON CITY ATTORNEY Thursday, February 12, 1998 Henderson Home News Page 5 Sunset Station expansion on the horizon D.B. Marciniak News Staff Writer As Henderson celebrated the opening of its second resort-style hotel and casino this week, the first, Sunset Station Hotel and Casino, announced it is preparing to expand. Only seven months after Sunset Station opened its doors to Henderson residents, casino executives are solidifying plans for a $30 million expansion project. "Sometimes you need to get bigger to get better," said Don Marrandino, Sunset Station's general manager. More movie theaters, additional parking, as well as more gaming and restaurants will be added to the eastern side of Sunset Station within the next year, he said. Ground breaking is expected for April for the expansion. Construction will take about eight to nine months with different aspects of the project completed in phases, Marrandino said. Citing an influx of resources from a $1.7 biUion merger with Crescent Real Estate Equities Co. late last month, he said it gave Station Casinos a comfort level to pursue its expansion plans. "I've been pleased vfith the results [of the property] thus far," he said. "We've been meeting our expectations both financially and with visitors." Revenues at the casino have been increasing marginally each month of operation since its June opening, Marrandino indicated. Eiesides the casino's favorable financial situation, he said, the number of people visiting the property has increased. Svmset Station's buffet recently celebrated its one millionth customer, „the hotel has remained aroimd a 95% occupancy rate and the ratio of people gaming at key times of the day has remained consistent or increased sUghtly since their opening. Marrandino said these are all indicators the property is succeeding and it's time to move ahead with expansion plans. "We are doing it because the movie theater has been overcrowded," he said. The cornerstone of the expanded property wilj^be 12 state-of-the-art stadium-style theaters. By designing the new theaters as stadium-style, it will give Sunset Station more seating capacity for movie-goers. Once open, the additional screens will give Sunset Station 24 theaters in all. Aside from the theaters, Sunset Station is planning to build a five-story parking garage off its Warm Springs Road exit. The garage will feature a valet drop area and 2,000 available spaces. "I wanted the garage all along," Marrandino said. "I think it is a key part of the property." The garage will offer patrons a convenient place to park and not have to walk far to get into Sunset Station, he said. Additional planned amenities for the addition include 20,000 square feet of gaming area, a few fast food restaurants and a possible steak house. "We're still putting together some details of the plans," Marrandino said, adding expansion plans should be completed soon. "We figured as long as expansion makes sense, we'd go ahead." In the meantime, he said, patr(ms will soon get a glimpse of improvements at the casino's amphitheater. He said additional trees, shrubs and other improve''We're sWI putting together some details of the plans. We figured as long as expansion makes ^ sense, we'd go ahead." Don Marrandino Sunset Station GM ments have been made during the past month to prepare the amphitheater for planned outdoor events. The amphitheater should be complete and open to the public in the coming week. Sunset Station oi>ened in June, 1997, on 100 acres. Casino executives planned expansion, but at the time of the opening were unsure when additional improvements would be pursued. At its opening, the property was assessed at about $ 198 million. Once expansion plans are complete, the property will exceed a value of $200 million. Caring hearts food drive Go For It Academy will sponsor the Caring Hearts Food Drive on behalf of the Salvation Army fi-om noon to 2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 21. Children of all ages are welcome to participate in all of the activities at the world-class multi-sports facility., 1000 Stephanie Place #1. Participants will receive hands-on experience on the gymnastics equipment including: balance beams, imeven bars, floor exercise, vault, and trampolines. Other planned activities for the children are [cheerleading and creative dance. Admission for each child is two non-perishable food items. Families are encouraged to participate. Snacks and beverages will be available Commercial Rates Available IwJE One Price Service \ IIKE NE Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning We'll Make It Look Like New 7 Days 24 Hours Emergency Service Now have all the carpets in your home professionally cleaned for $99 00 up 10 1200 Sq.ft. $149"? to 240O Sq. ft. Prices include all rooms, family room dining room, Halls, Baths & one set of stairs • Pre Vacuuming • Pre Conditioning • Pre Spotting • Pre Scrubbing • Steam Cleaning • Dupont Teflon Carpet Protectant • Most Furniture Moved Sofa & Love Seat...^99^ Includes all cushions & Dupont Teflon Fabric Protector 270-6000 • % i NAME BRAND FRAGRANCES AT DISCOUNT PRICES Courtesy Pfioto 50TH ANNIVERSARY— Ira and Eula Cliff will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary Saturday in Hurricane, Utah. The long-time Henderson residents moved from the crty about 20 years ago, but have many friends in the city. The couple currently resides in Utah. CHOSEN to meet The Christian Homeschoolers of Southern Nevada, CHOSEN, a homeschooling support group and fellowship, will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 17, at the Green Valley Baptist Church, 270 Valle Verde Dr., between Warm Springs and Windmill. The program is a Cjoithia Tobias video on children's learning styles. Parents who are currently homeschooling and those who are thinking about it are welcome to attend. Children are welcome and supervised activities will be provided for them. For more information, call 391-8625. THE NEIVS Is YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER u PERFUME I^DEPOT WE MAKE IT EASY GIFT SHOPPING FOR VALENTINE'S DAY FOR HER... FOR HIM... Bal A Vcrsallles..3.0 oz. Boucheron 1.7 oz. Chantilly 3.4 Oz. Curve....: 3.4 oz. First i.Q oz. Jean Paul Gaultier. 1.7 oz. Liz Claiborne.... 1.7 oz. Opium 3.4 oz. Shalimar. 1.7 oz. White Diamonds..J.4 oz. Spr. M9"" Spr. M9"" Spr. Mr' Spr. 39'" Spr. • 3}f" Spr. M9'" Spr. *3fr" Spr. M9" Spr. Wl"' Spr. '48^ Baryshnikov. Boss HalstonZ-14 Issey Miyake.... Joop Kouros Lagerfeld Paul Sebastian.. Red ^ Royal Copenhagen, 3.4 oz, 4.2 oz. 4.2 Oz, 2.5 oz, .4.2 oz, .3.4 oz, 4.2 oz, 4.0 oz, 3.4 oz, 1.5 oz. Spr. • 29" Spr. 39'' Spr. • 26" Spr. • 39" Spr. '43" Spr. '39" Spr. 36 Spr. '33" Spr. 41 Spr. '19" Over 500 Choices "We Are The Oldest & largest Wholesole Retail Fragrante Dealer in Nevodo" New, Old & Hard To Find "With No Imitarions" Selection •Price •Service •Free Gift Wrapping | Phone Orders • Shipping Available/Mon. Fri. 10-7 • Sat 1 CMi • Sun 11-5 OPEN TO THE PUBLIC / DISCOUNTS UP TO 70% Vons Shopping Center, Pecos & Russell .Q, 1 s' Place $600 2"" Place $400 • 3^" Place $300 4"' Place $200 • 5'" Place $150 Play our slots &• win tickets for every 4 of a kind See details at the cage • Must be 21. SNORE'S TERRIBLE'S TOWN 200 FUN RUN FEB. 15 10 AM 6-34 MILE LAPS The course has changed SNORE FEB. 20SIGN UP & TECH Terribie's Town Casino FEB. 21 DRIVERS MEETING 9:00 am RACE STARTS 10:00 ann FEB. 22 AWARDS 11:00 am Terribie's Town Casino ENTRY FEES: 1,1-2-1600,5,10,HEAVYMETAL, MINI METAL $310 • CLASS 9,5-1600 $185 • CLASS 11, SPORTSMAN BUGGY & TRUCKS $75 BLM FEE $25 PUBLIC NOTICE Here Come the Women in Black • Mmm' 642 S. Boulder Hwv 564-7118 As of February II, 1998 it will be no Hgment of your imagination to see.., KelU Williams, Rachael Burr Emily Buckles, Summer Gubler Kristen Murray legally driving on your local streets. Drivere Beware!

PAGE 6

mmmmmfm • ^i*"*' VIEWPOINT HOME NEWS Mike O'CalUghMi Publisher Carolyn O'Callagha Co-PuWisher Paul Szydaiko Managing Editor I Page 6 Henderson "Home News Thursday, February 12, 1998 When tragedy strikes... When tragedy strikes, before friends and family can lend comfort, a helping hand, a thoughtful ear and a few well-chosen words are needed at the scene. Being there, however, is most important. With the bustle of paramedic and police and fire activity, sometimes a friendly face is all a victim needs to see. That's where the Trauma Intervention Team • '-Hit'" comes m. This group of volunteers is on call to assist in providing "emotional first-aid the first couple of hours of the trauma" TIP crisis team leader Marion Thomas said in a News report last week. The volunteers are screened and trained before they attempt to counsel family members of victims of traffic accidents, fires and other tragedies. It's tough work and certainly not for everyone, no question, but it's needed in communities of all sizes — when accidents can happen any time of the day or night. The 13-year-old national program is in its second year in Henderson, and the News encourages residents to consider helping. A new training session for TIP volunteers will begin Feb. 19 at the Henderson Training Center, Parkson and Warm Spring Road. Call 459-1055 for more information. • •z 0 I— < < > z UJ LLI U Z =) O z z < en Z I— X C3 U • 0 > • < u Lu O < o z MEMORABLE AaS OF KINDNESS • FUNDRAISERS Send Us Your News... The News is interested in publishing your family's and your neighborhood's news. What awards, accomplishments and interesting incidents and accidents do you want your neighbors to know^ Please be brief and state what is News, what is Different, what is Interesting. Pi-ease limit yourself to one news brief per page. The news brief will be published as space permits. MAIL TO: Henderson Home News 2 Commerce Center Henderson, NV89014 OR FAX TO: 434-3527 Nome: ~\ Address: Phone: Dare: Please print or type nedtly. Be sure your spelling of names is accurate. -'--•'* • n X O O r— > > • o z > z CO m > m 5: m Z —I 4/ • SNOIiOWOyd • SaOf /ft3N • SNOIlVNOa RICHARD COHEN Exterminate a rat At one of the closed Capitol Hill briefings given by the CHnton administration over the Iraq crisis, a member of Congress likened Saddam Hussein to the Energizer Bunny—the one that keeps on going. No, said the administration's briefer, the Iraqi dictator was more like the toy mole in the "Whack a Mole" game. It comes up one hole, you bop it on the head and it comes up another. ; Choose your analogy^bunny or mole-neither way the lesson is clear: Saddam is going to be around for the foreseeable future. I For the U.S. and it&^remaining Gulf War allies, the anticipated j military action against Iraq has a resigned, world-weary quality to it. I Not only is it anticipated that Saddam will survivfe, but he is I expected in due course to return to \ his old behavior. This mole never gives up. j The hope—it may, in fact, be closer to a dream—is that critical elements of Iraqi society will bUme Saddam for their misery. That's why the bombardment being contemplated may not turn out to be a brief affair, but one of prolonged duration—maybe a couple of weeks or so. The aim i,s to so hurt the Iraqi military, especially Saddam's cherished Republican Guard, that they will oitfior demand that he abide by the agreement he made with the United Nations or —dream on — dispatch him to an emeritus status, posthumously of course. The chances of that happening are, however, only slightly better than the chance of catching Saddam out in the open and parting his hair with a very smart bomb. But the administration figures it has no choice but to proceed anyway, knowing that victory (in the old sense of capitulation) is unattainable. It is even far from certain that, when the bombing ceases, the U.N. inspectors will once again be granted access to whatever area intrigues them. The scenario is simultaneously unsatisfying and inevitable. The only way to ensure Saddam's removal would be to send in ground troops. (About 100,000 would be needed.) But Saudi Arabia, the launching pad for the 1991 allied invasion of Kuwait and Iraq, is unavailable this time airbun.4 '^Q-tjipt .. only will there be no massive invasion, no American ground troops at all will be used. Yet another—if unspoken—option is to do nothing. That, though, would mean allowing Saddam to continue his weapons program and, in short order, intimidate much of the Middle East. Moreover, it would spell the end of the United Nations as an efTective international organization. Up to now, it really has accomplished much in Iraq, destroying more weaponry through inspections than the allies did from the air in the Gulf War. (The United Nations, in fact, has been so effective that Congress ought to consider paying the U.S. dues.) In one sense, Saddam represents a no-brainer. The man is ^o vile, so evil, so patently irrational that letting him get hrs way is Simply not an option. Still, military action is a perilous cour.se. It will produce what is called collateral damage—a fancy term for the accidental killing of civilians and, possibly, the unintentional destruction of a school or mosque. That, in turn, will provoke protests in parts of the Arab world --nJordan, probably, and Egypt as well. In both countries, the U.S. is already considered the protector of a recalcitrant Israeli government. As for Israel itself, it can expect that Iraq will send some missiles its way — maybe armed with chemical or biological agents. The United Nations has never been able to account for all the chemical or biological weapons Iraq was once thought to have — and, possibly, even more have been produced. The same i triie for their Scud missiles. Iraq has some, that's for sure, although the exact number is anyone's guess. If the U.S. laiinches air strikes against Iraq, there's a fair chance innocent IsraeHs will die as well — more collateral damage. This, after all, is not Israel's fight. None of the options available to the Clinton administration are any good. But the worst would be to allow a sociopath like Saddam to develop chemical or, in particular, biological weapons which, almost certainly, he would use. (He already has used poison gas against his own people). He is not, to return to metaphor, a mole but a rat. It would be best to exterminate him but, barring that, he needs to be whacked. Sometimes in statecraft, as in life itself, all you can do is what you can. Cohen is a columnist for the Washir^gton Post Writers Group. BILL HANLON Legislative reform needed g z • < 0 ^ • 50 m C u I • > The way bills wore handled during the last legislative session is the reason that Nevada needs legislative reform. A great number of bills concerning public education were poorly conceived, written, buried in committee, not brought up for public hearing, then passed into law. That's no way to run a legislature. While many of our representatives talk about education reform, they need also to concentrate on legislative reform. Those who are giving that lip service are merely talking about putting a limit on the number of days the session will last. While that's nice, it won't be their decision. Nevadans will vote to make sure our representatives get right to work rather than wasting the first few months of the session as they have in the past. While I favor having a shorter session, I believe the way the Nevada legislature does business is in need of reform. Too often bills are held up by one committee chairperson to be used as a bargaining chip at the end of the session. The power of committee chairs has to be addressed. If they can hold bills to the end of the session, without any kind of hearings, then why do 1 bother to vote for a representative? The only people with access to these chairs at the end of the session are the lobbyists writing some of these atrocities or special interest groups. I believe that bills assigned to committee should be heard within a time certain. Any bill that is not heard during that timeframe should be automatically passed out of committee for a vote by the people we send to Carson City. I would also suggest that no new bills be allowed during the last few weeks of the legislature. Having close to 50% of the state's legislation being voted on at the end of the session is a recipe for stupidity. There are only so many people that work at the Legislative Council Bureau who write these bills for Legislators. If they are working 18 to 22 hours per day at the end of the session trying to get these bills written, it does not give them enough time or sleep to determine if the bills they are drafting are addressing the true concerns of the originator of the bill. It does not give other legislators time to even read the bill that will be brought to a vote. Most people I have talked to agree much of the legislation passed last session was poorly written because of the abuses of the chairs. While I personally agreed in concept with many of those bills, the bills have m'any flaws because there was not public testimony on them. The charter bill was a waste of taxpayer money, the attendance/ truancy bill certainly needs much work as does the crown jewel of last session's legislature, Nevada's Educational Reform Act. Put yourself in this situation. You are a private school beginning with fourth grade. All students come from different schools in the community. The second month these kids are in your school, October, the state tests them on what was taught to them in first, second and third grades. When the results are reported later that year, your school—that had nothing to do with the students' first, second, or third grade education—is labeled as "inadequate" because of their test performance. Do you see anything wrong with that picture? How can a school that only had kids for little more than a month be responsible and labeled inadequate? Let's just call that a flaw. Adding to that, the K-3 schools that prepared the students won't be identified nor will they receive any funds set aside by the legislature to address remediation needs of their students. The effects of poorly written legislation snowball. By the way, the story line is not any different if you represent a public school starting with fourth grade. While mtmy committees in the legislature schedule meetings, take testimony, study the issues, and work hard, other committees do not. The state spends more than 50% of its budget on education. You'd think legislators would take the subject seriously. You know there is a problem when many of our elected legislators do their utmost to introduce education legislation in other committees to by-pass the Assembly Education Committee. Some legislators will tell you they are reforming the legislative process by ending the session earlier. That's not enough! Committee chairs have to have their power curtailed so the public is informed and can testify before legislation is enacted. Hanlon, a Las Vegas resident who writes a column about education, sits on the State Board of Education, is the administrator for the Clark County School District's fVlath/ Science Institute arxj is a part-time instructor at UNLV P^\Wll%W.1fili;'ti^;!iaKgiiB!P !i!BB I i iin i npi wwwiiiiwiw niii,.iipnu i i mjiii]ain \ iBMS^ S WSSw rjiiiiffgaiiww^ff sggg !S!!S2S!2!55523 • ^F^"'WlW'if!W.f LETTERS 'The News welcomes brief letters, signed with your name, address and phone for verifiaitlon. Typed letters receive preference and the News reser'es the right to edit for grammar, spelling or length. Please mail to: Editor, Home New*, 2 Commerce Center Drive, Henderson, NV 89014 PURVIEWS Thursday, February 12,1998 Henderson Home News Pag* 7 LETTERS CAT unresponsive Editor: „ My latest report on this CAT endeavor. Was I too presumptuous asking Santa Glaus to bring a bus shelter to that longsuffering bus stop? You know the one ... on Sunset just around the comer from Boulder Highway? Or, was he just too busy with all his normal duties, delivering goodies to all the boys and girls? And then again, CAT did promise a bus shelter by September 1997. How do we sort this out? CAT did not live up to its promises! How long do we have to wait? For your information, CAT, the art deco rocks are back.. .spread over the area! I saw a senior citizen sitting on one of those rocks last Friday How about it, CAT? A compromise? HoV about a bench? I wonder if the Leprechaims could help me or maybe the Easter Bimny? What say you, CAT? ___^_^^_-..^_ DOROTHY NORMAN COOKE Campaign donations: More reform needed ^ There is no problem with Circus Circus dumping nearly all of its $300,000 in contributions into Kenny Guinn's campaign one day before a new law would reduce the maximum to half of that. The old law was still ir effect, and the casino corporation had every right to act under it. All of us— businesses and individuals—rush to achieve advantages we would lose under expiring-I^ws, from gaining tax deductions to paying fees to doing a host of other things. It is the way we operate under a system based upon law. If it's legal, we can do it until it is not legal. So when Circus Circus's various corporate entities each donated $20,000 on Nov. 26 of last year, they were certainly within their rights— even though on Nov. 27 these donations would be limited to $10,000. And if Guinn other donors did the same, they were within their rights also. The problem here is not with how corporations and individuals actfed under the law; the problem is with the law itself The earlier law permitted corporations and other special interests to donate far too much to election campaigns. And while the 1997 reform law improved that by halving the maximum donation, it failed to do anything to prevent inter-linked corporations from funneling large amounts of money into specific campaigns. Thus Circus Circus or any other corporate structure can still donate up to $10,000 from a host of subcorporations and allied businesses which the law looks on as separate entities but which in reality are one and the,same. Divide $20,000 into the $300,000 that came from Circus Circus hotel-casinos, development and finance firms and a fuel company, and you find that the $300,000 came from up to 15 entities. Even under the $10,000 limit, this gives Circus Circus and other giant corporations the ability to give huge sums to candidates. And these candidates know as well as the voters do that all of these contributions represent the same interest and hope for the same legislation in their favor. So the special interests continue to hold grg^t power in elections. Reno Assemblyman Pete Ernaut, who is the campaign chief in Guinn's run for the governorship, argues that if these "bundled" donations are forbidden, the political process would be limited to the very rich. That is certainly a concern given the horrendous cost of campaigning these days. This state, and this nation, must find ways to limit campaign spending in all areas, and return some sense to the process. But even so, the Nevada Legislature would do citizens a great favor by limiting the amount of money that bundled corporations can donate. The very rich, at least, do not owe anybody anything except themselves; while the not-so-rich becone beholden to special interests on a vast monetary scalq that injures the political process. Quite probably, voters would be more than pleased to tackle this issue now, and deal with the billionaires later. Reno Gazette-Journal EXPRESSING YOURSELF Expressing Yourself is the place where readers can give their opinions on issues. The reader hotline number of the Henderson Home News, 585-9879, is available 24 hours a day If you wish, leave your name and the neighborhood in which you live on the voice mail The News will publish selected comments each Thursday. KNOW YOUR REPRESENTATIVES President Bill Clinton: White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington 0.0.20510,(202)456-1414. U.S. Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev. 528 Senate Hart Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20510, (202) 224-3542, Fax (202)224-7327; 300 Las Vegas Blvd. S #1610, Las Vegas, NV 89101, 474-0041. EMail: senator_reid@reid.senate.gov Home Page: http://wvvw.senate.gov/ -reid •-U.S. Sen. Richard Bryan, D-Nev. 269 Senate Russell Office' Building, Washington, D.C. 20510, (202) 224-6244; 300 S. Las Vegas Blvd. Suite 1110,'Las Vegas, NV 89101, 388-6605. E-Mail: http:// www.senate.gov/-bryanU.S. Rep. John Ensign, R-Nev. 414 Cannon House Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20515. (202) 225-5965; 1000 E. Sahara, Suite 101, Las Vegas, NV 89104, 731-1801. E-Mail: engsign@hr.house.gov U.S. Rep. Jim Gibbons, R-Nev.1116 Longworth House Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20515. (202) 225-6155; 850 Durango Dr., Suite 107, Las Vegas, NV 89128; 255-1651; fax 255-1927. Gov. Bob Miller: Capitol Connplex, Carson City, NV 89710, 687-5670; 555 E. Washington Ave. Suite 5100, Las Vegas, NV 89101. 486-2500. E-Mail: governor@govmail.state.nv.us State Sen. Ann O'Connell (R, District 5): Capitol Connplex, Carson City, NV 89710, 687-5702; 7225 Montecito Circle, Las Vegas, NV 89120-3118. Office phone: 43.4-4020. Home phone: 451-3444. State Sen. Bill O'Donnell (R-District 5): Capitol Complex, Carson City, NV 89710, 687-3650. 2995 S. Jones Blvd., Las Vegas, NV 89102-5309. Office phone: 873-2724. Home phone: 873-2724. State Sen. Jon Porter (R-District 1): Capitol Complex, Carson City, NV89710, Office: 294-1004. 601 Whitney Ranch Dr., Suite 16, Henderson, NV 890142643. Home: 294-1981. State Sen. Dina Titus (D-District 7): Capitol Complex, Carson City, NV 89710, 687-8123; Mailing Address: 1637 Travois Circle, Las Vegas, NV 89119-6283. Office phone: 826-5050. Home: 798-8348. State Sen. Kathy Augustine (R-District 7): (!^pitol Complex, Carson City, NV 89710, P.O. Box 61482, Las Vegas, NV 89160-1492. Home: 387-5922. State Assemblywoman Kathy Von Tobel (RDistrict 20): 401 S, Carson Street, Carson City, NV 89710. (702() 684-8839 StateAssemblywomanGeneSegerblom(D-District22):401 S CarsonStreet, Carson City, NV 89710, 687-3611. P.O. Box 61136, Boulder City, NV. 890061136. Home phone: 293-2626. "^ State Assemblywoman Sandra Tiffany (R-District 21 ): 401 S Carson Street, Carson City, NV 89710, 684-8839; 2289 Cassatt Dr., Henderson, NV 890145060. Home 451-7301. State Assemblyman Richard Perkins (D-District 23): 401 S. Carson Street, Carson City, NV 89710, 687-8110. 408 Glasgow St., Henderson, NV 890155630. Office phone: 565-8933. Home: 566-6542. Toll-Free Legislative Hotline: 1 -800-367-5057 Mayor Jim Gibson: Henderson City Hall, 240 Water St., Henderson, NV89015, 565-2085. Clark County Commissioner Bruce Woodbury (R-District A): Clark County GovernmentCenter, 500S. GrandCentral Parkway, Las Vegas, NV89155-1601. 455-3500. Clark County Commissioner Lorraine Hunt (R-District G): Clark County GovernmentCenter, 500S. GrandCentral Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89155-1601. 455-3500. Clark County School District Board Trustee Mary Beth Scow (District A): Education Center, 2832 E. Flamingo Road, Las Vegas, NV 799-1072. Clark County School District Board Trustee Judy Witt (District G): Education Center, 2832 W. Flamingo Road, Las Vegas, NV 799-1072. University-Community College Regent Mark Alden (District D): 3910 PecosMcLeod, Suite 100, Las Vegas, NV 89121; 454-4999; fax, 898-4845. Progress in Bosnia In a country as fractured as Bosnia, the word "break-through" is invoked at considerable peril. But there is no question that a httlenoticed development in the Serbian portion of Bosnia last month represents, at the least, a significant step forward in the difficult process of restoring peace and building a new nation out of the wreckage of the post-Yugoslavia war. The parliament of the Republika Srpska, as it is known, chose as prime minister Milorad Dodik, 38, who supports democratization, the Dayton accords and integration with the Croat and Muslim institutions of the tripartite state. His election, by the narrowest of margins, delivers a blow to the Serb nationalist forces controlled by Radovan Karadzic that have been the single biggest—though by no means only—obstacle to the peace process. The weakening of the nationalist Serb forces follows a conscious strategy by the U.S. and its NATO allies. Mr. Karadzic, an indicted war criminal, has been deprived of the media and police he used to maintain power and enrich himself. Now his forces stand to lose their last source of authority, the power to tax and impose customs duties. From their last redoubt in eastern Srpska, they have been reduced to decrying Mr. Dodik's election as "undemocratic" and warning—correctly, we hope— that the new government will work toward the reintegration of Republika Srpska into the Bosnian state. What's important now is for the West to capitalize on Mr. Dodik's election by supporting his new government, financially as well as politically. Some members of Congress don't want any aid funds going to any Serbs until they've turned over all their indicted war criminals, including Mr. Karadzic. But one reason Serb voters have turned toward peace and away from hard-liners is that they've seen the rest of Bosnia benefiting from international aid while they languish. Unemployment rates remain at 90% in Srpska, for example, while they've fallen to "only" 37% in the rest of the country. Now Mr. Dodik needs similarly to show voters that being pro-peace and pro-Dayton brings rewards— that the West isn't antiSerb. To the extent the ultranationalists maintain control of Pale and the eastern region, voters there need to see that Serbs in the west— the cooperating part—also enjoy some fruits of economic integration. That will further undermine Mr. Karadzic's position. And it's just as important for the West to keep applying pressure against nationalists in non-Serb communities, who also are a major bar to peace. All this comes in the context of President Clinton's decision to extend a U.S. military presence in Bosnia beyond his self-imposed deadline of next June. Given the slow but sure progress being made, and the unspeakable dangers of a sudden withdrawal, this is the right move. Washington Poet BRIEFS AARP to meet The Henderson chapter (#5025) of the American Association of Retired Persons will conduct its monthly meeting at noon Saturday, Feb. 14, at the Henderson Senior Center. The featured speaker will be cardiologist Dr. Alan Steljes who will discuss The Heart," an appropriate subject for the Valentine's Day program. Seniors and local members of national AARP are cordially invited to attend. Monthly meetings are at noon on the second Saturday of each month at the Senior Center. Local student honored Freshman Christopher Balke Scarberry of Henderson.was named to the Dean's List at Valparaiso University for achieving academic excellence during the fall semester. Valparaiso University is an independent comprehensive tmiversity affiliated with the Lutheran Church and enrolls 3,600 students on its campus 55 miles southeast of Chicago. It consistently is ranked among the Midwest's top regional universities by U.S. News & World Report magazine and also earns national recognition from pubUcations such a fl,:E!B<(PmRi5^i.te^tfSSP^^ petitivo Coliogi's and Bamm s More than 60 academic programs are offered through the colleges of arts and sciences, business administration, engineering and nursing. VU also has an honors college, a graduate division and a School of Law. Junior Girls sought Are you tired of sitting home amd doing nothing after school? Would you like to meet new people? Develop character, leadership and self-reliance? If the answer is yes to any of these questions, the VFW Ladies Auxiliary #3848 have the answers. Junior Girls assist the Ladies Auxiliary with many worthwhile programs. Activities include, but are not limited to: marching in parades, serving meals at special dinners, selling Buddy Poppies, volunteering in nursing homes, presenting American Flags to community groups, making tray favors or cards for veterans at VA Medical Centers, and raising funds for cancer aid and research. Who is eligible? Junior Girls are daufj^ters, foster daughters, stepdaughters, granddaughters, sisters, half-sisters, foster sisters or step-sisters of persons whose father, foster father, step-father, grandfather, brother, half-brother, foster brother or step-brother has served on foreign soil in war. All schools have received information regarding this program. There will be an organizational meeting at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 18, at the VFW Post Home, Basic and Lake Mead roads. All interested girls and parents are invited. For morp information, call Alice Wagner. 564-3624 VFW Auxiliary leader visits valley Connie Atkinson, National President of the Ladies Auxihary to the VFW, attended a conference in Las Vegas this week. Wednesday, Atkinson held a round-table question-and-answer session with VFVl Auxiliary 1753. She later attended a dinner show at Excahbur. Today, the national president was scheduled t^ attend a tour of the Thunderbird base, Mike O'Callaghan Hospital and ACC Medical Center. Atkinson, of Conway, Ark., was elected to head the Auxihary at its 84th National Convention in Salt Lake City in August. Her election makes her the first person to hold office from Arkansas bom after WW II and the first whose only Auxiliary ehgibility is the Vietnam conflict. She joined the Auxiliary on the ehgibility of her husband. Carroll, who served as a helicopter crew chief in Vietnam and is a past All-State Post Commander. Dalipe graduates Boston Universit/^ Henderson resident Rowena M. Dalipe. received a bachelor's of science degree in occupational therapy, cum laude, from Boston University. She was among 940 students awarded academic degrees this winter. Boston University is the third leu-gest independent university in the U.S., with an enrollment of nearly 30,000 students in its 15 schools and oollefpni. fii1|A;!iii:SS-!wW;8ll(..'itii.) • .'liai'ilUJfliilil.,iuiHii.l.'iJii l llBliW^

PAGE 7

mmmmmfm • ^i*"*' VIEWPOINT HOME NEWS Mike O'CalUghMi Publisher Carolyn O'Callagha Co-PuWisher Paul Szydaiko Managing Editor I Page 6 Henderson "Home News Thursday, February 12, 1998 When tragedy strikes... When tragedy strikes, before friends and family can lend comfort, a helping hand, a thoughtful ear and a few well-chosen words are needed at the scene. Being there, however, is most important. With the bustle of paramedic and police and fire activity, sometimes a friendly face is all a victim needs to see. That's where the Trauma Intervention Team • '-Hit'" comes m. This group of volunteers is on call to assist in providing "emotional first-aid the first couple of hours of the trauma" TIP crisis team leader Marion Thomas said in a News report last week. The volunteers are screened and trained before they attempt to counsel family members of victims of traffic accidents, fires and other tragedies. It's tough work and certainly not for everyone, no question, but it's needed in communities of all sizes — when accidents can happen any time of the day or night. The 13-year-old national program is in its second year in Henderson, and the News encourages residents to consider helping. A new training session for TIP volunteers will begin Feb. 19 at the Henderson Training Center, Parkson and Warm Spring Road. Call 459-1055 for more information. • •z 0 I— < < > z UJ LLI U Z =) O z z < en Z I— X C3 U • 0 > • < u Lu O < o z MEMORABLE AaS OF KINDNESS • FUNDRAISERS Send Us Your News... The News is interested in publishing your family's and your neighborhood's news. What awards, accomplishments and interesting incidents and accidents do you want your neighbors to know^ Please be brief and state what is News, what is Different, what is Interesting. Pi-ease limit yourself to one news brief per page. The news brief will be published as space permits. MAIL TO: Henderson Home News 2 Commerce Center Henderson, NV89014 OR FAX TO: 434-3527 Nome: ~\ Address: Phone: Dare: Please print or type nedtly. Be sure your spelling of names is accurate. -'--•'* • n X O O r— > > • o z > z CO m > m 5: m Z —I 4/ • SNOIiOWOyd • SaOf /ft3N • SNOIlVNOa RICHARD COHEN Exterminate a rat At one of the closed Capitol Hill briefings given by the CHnton administration over the Iraq crisis, a member of Congress likened Saddam Hussein to the Energizer Bunny—the one that keeps on going. No, said the administration's briefer, the Iraqi dictator was more like the toy mole in the "Whack a Mole" game. It comes up one hole, you bop it on the head and it comes up another. ; Choose your analogy^bunny or mole-neither way the lesson is clear: Saddam is going to be around for the foreseeable future. I For the U.S. and it&^remaining Gulf War allies, the anticipated j military action against Iraq has a resigned, world-weary quality to it. I Not only is it anticipated that Saddam will survivfe, but he is I expected in due course to return to \ his old behavior. This mole never gives up. j The hope—it may, in fact, be closer to a dream—is that critical elements of Iraqi society will bUme Saddam for their misery. That's why the bombardment being contemplated may not turn out to be a brief affair, but one of prolonged duration—maybe a couple of weeks or so. The aim i,s to so hurt the Iraqi military, especially Saddam's cherished Republican Guard, that they will oitfior demand that he abide by the agreement he made with the United Nations or —dream on — dispatch him to an emeritus status, posthumously of course. The chances of that happening are, however, only slightly better than the chance of catching Saddam out in the open and parting his hair with a very smart bomb. But the administration figures it has no choice but to proceed anyway, knowing that victory (in the old sense of capitulation) is unattainable. It is even far from certain that, when the bombing ceases, the U.N. inspectors will once again be granted access to whatever area intrigues them. The scenario is simultaneously unsatisfying and inevitable. The only way to ensure Saddam's removal would be to send in ground troops. (About 100,000 would be needed.) But Saudi Arabia, the launching pad for the 1991 allied invasion of Kuwait and Iraq, is unavailable this time airbun.4 '^Q-tjipt .. only will there be no massive invasion, no American ground troops at all will be used. Yet another—if unspoken—option is to do nothing. That, though, would mean allowing Saddam to continue his weapons program and, in short order, intimidate much of the Middle East. Moreover, it would spell the end of the United Nations as an efTective international organization. Up to now, it really has accomplished much in Iraq, destroying more weaponry through inspections than the allies did from the air in the Gulf War. (The United Nations, in fact, has been so effective that Congress ought to consider paying the U.S. dues.) In one sense, Saddam represents a no-brainer. The man is ^o vile, so evil, so patently irrational that letting him get hrs way is Simply not an option. Still, military action is a perilous cour.se. It will produce what is called collateral damage—a fancy term for the accidental killing of civilians and, possibly, the unintentional destruction of a school or mosque. That, in turn, will provoke protests in parts of the Arab world --nJordan, probably, and Egypt as well. In both countries, the U.S. is already considered the protector of a recalcitrant Israeli government. As for Israel itself, it can expect that Iraq will send some missiles its way — maybe armed with chemical or biological agents. The United Nations has never been able to account for all the chemical or biological weapons Iraq was once thought to have — and, possibly, even more have been produced. The same i triie for their Scud missiles. Iraq has some, that's for sure, although the exact number is anyone's guess. If the U.S. laiinches air strikes against Iraq, there's a fair chance innocent IsraeHs will die as well — more collateral damage. This, after all, is not Israel's fight. None of the options available to the Clinton administration are any good. But the worst would be to allow a sociopath like Saddam to develop chemical or, in particular, biological weapons which, almost certainly, he would use. (He already has used poison gas against his own people). He is not, to return to metaphor, a mole but a rat. It would be best to exterminate him but, barring that, he needs to be whacked. Sometimes in statecraft, as in life itself, all you can do is what you can. Cohen is a columnist for the Washir^gton Post Writers Group. BILL HANLON Legislative reform needed g z • < 0 ^ • 50 m C u I • > The way bills wore handled during the last legislative session is the reason that Nevada needs legislative reform. A great number of bills concerning public education were poorly conceived, written, buried in committee, not brought up for public hearing, then passed into law. That's no way to run a legislature. While many of our representatives talk about education reform, they need also to concentrate on legislative reform. Those who are giving that lip service are merely talking about putting a limit on the number of days the session will last. While that's nice, it won't be their decision. Nevadans will vote to make sure our representatives get right to work rather than wasting the first few months of the session as they have in the past. While I favor having a shorter session, I believe the way the Nevada legislature does business is in need of reform. Too often bills are held up by one committee chairperson to be used as a bargaining chip at the end of the session. The power of committee chairs has to be addressed. If they can hold bills to the end of the session, without any kind of hearings, then why do 1 bother to vote for a representative? The only people with access to these chairs at the end of the session are the lobbyists writing some of these atrocities or special interest groups. I believe that bills assigned to committee should be heard within a time certain. Any bill that is not heard during that timeframe should be automatically passed out of committee for a vote by the people we send to Carson City. I would also suggest that no new bills be allowed during the last few weeks of the legislature. Having close to 50% of the state's legislation being voted on at the end of the session is a recipe for stupidity. There are only so many people that work at the Legislative Council Bureau who write these bills for Legislators. If they are working 18 to 22 hours per day at the end of the session trying to get these bills written, it does not give them enough time or sleep to determine if the bills they are drafting are addressing the true concerns of the originator of the bill. It does not give other legislators time to even read the bill that will be brought to a vote. Most people I have talked to agree much of the legislation passed last session was poorly written because of the abuses of the chairs. While I personally agreed in concept with many of those bills, the bills have m'any flaws because there was not public testimony on them. The charter bill was a waste of taxpayer money, the attendance/ truancy bill certainly needs much work as does the crown jewel of last session's legislature, Nevada's Educational Reform Act. Put yourself in this situation. You are a private school beginning with fourth grade. All students come from different schools in the community. The second month these kids are in your school, October, the state tests them on what was taught to them in first, second and third grades. When the results are reported later that year, your school—that had nothing to do with the students' first, second, or third grade education—is labeled as "inadequate" because of their test performance. Do you see anything wrong with that picture? How can a school that only had kids for little more than a month be responsible and labeled inadequate? Let's just call that a flaw. Adding to that, the K-3 schools that prepared the students won't be identified nor will they receive any funds set aside by the legislature to address remediation needs of their students. The effects of poorly written legislation snowball. By the way, the story line is not any different if you represent a public school starting with fourth grade. While mtmy committees in the legislature schedule meetings, take testimony, study the issues, and work hard, other committees do not. The state spends more than 50% of its budget on education. You'd think legislators would take the subject seriously. You know there is a problem when many of our elected legislators do their utmost to introduce education legislation in other committees to by-pass the Assembly Education Committee. Some legislators will tell you they are reforming the legislative process by ending the session earlier. That's not enough! Committee chairs have to have their power curtailed so the public is informed and can testify before legislation is enacted. Hanlon, a Las Vegas resident who writes a column about education, sits on the State Board of Education, is the administrator for the Clark County School District's fVlath/ Science Institute arxj is a part-time instructor at UNLV P^\Wll%W.1fili;'ti^;!iaKgiiB!P !i!BB I i iin i npi wwwiiiiwiw niii,.iipnu i i mjiii]ain \ iBMS^ S WSSw rjiiiiffgaiiww^ff sggg !S!!S2S!2!55523 • ^F^"'WlW'if!W.f LETTERS 'The News welcomes brief letters, signed with your name, address and phone for verifiaitlon. Typed letters receive preference and the News reser'es the right to edit for grammar, spelling or length. Please mail to: Editor, Home New*, 2 Commerce Center Drive, Henderson, NV 89014 PURVIEWS Thursday, February 12,1998 Henderson Home News Pag* 7 LETTERS CAT unresponsive Editor: „ My latest report on this CAT endeavor. Was I too presumptuous asking Santa Glaus to bring a bus shelter to that longsuffering bus stop? You know the one ... on Sunset just around the comer from Boulder Highway? Or, was he just too busy with all his normal duties, delivering goodies to all the boys and girls? And then again, CAT did promise a bus shelter by September 1997. How do we sort this out? CAT did not live up to its promises! How long do we have to wait? For your information, CAT, the art deco rocks are back.. .spread over the area! I saw a senior citizen sitting on one of those rocks last Friday How about it, CAT? A compromise? HoV about a bench? I wonder if the Leprechaims could help me or maybe the Easter Bimny? What say you, CAT? ___^_^^_-..^_ DOROTHY NORMAN COOKE Campaign donations: More reform needed ^ There is no problem with Circus Circus dumping nearly all of its $300,000 in contributions into Kenny Guinn's campaign one day before a new law would reduce the maximum to half of that. The old law was still ir effect, and the casino corporation had every right to act under it. All of us— businesses and individuals—rush to achieve advantages we would lose under expiring-I^ws, from gaining tax deductions to paying fees to doing a host of other things. It is the way we operate under a system based upon law. If it's legal, we can do it until it is not legal. So when Circus Circus's various corporate entities each donated $20,000 on Nov. 26 of last year, they were certainly within their rights— even though on Nov. 27 these donations would be limited to $10,000. And if Guinn other donors did the same, they were within their rights also. The problem here is not with how corporations and individuals actfed under the law; the problem is with the law itself The earlier law permitted corporations and other special interests to donate far too much to election campaigns. And while the 1997 reform law improved that by halving the maximum donation, it failed to do anything to prevent inter-linked corporations from funneling large amounts of money into specific campaigns. Thus Circus Circus or any other corporate structure can still donate up to $10,000 from a host of subcorporations and allied businesses which the law looks on as separate entities but which in reality are one and the,same. Divide $20,000 into the $300,000 that came from Circus Circus hotel-casinos, development and finance firms and a fuel company, and you find that the $300,000 came from up to 15 entities. Even under the $10,000 limit, this gives Circus Circus and other giant corporations the ability to give huge sums to candidates. And these candidates know as well as the voters do that all of these contributions represent the same interest and hope for the same legislation in their favor. So the special interests continue to hold grg^t power in elections. Reno Assemblyman Pete Ernaut, who is the campaign chief in Guinn's run for the governorship, argues that if these "bundled" donations are forbidden, the political process would be limited to the very rich. That is certainly a concern given the horrendous cost of campaigning these days. This state, and this nation, must find ways to limit campaign spending in all areas, and return some sense to the process. But even so, the Nevada Legislature would do citizens a great favor by limiting the amount of money that bundled corporations can donate. The very rich, at least, do not owe anybody anything except themselves; while the not-so-rich becone beholden to special interests on a vast monetary scalq that injures the political process. Quite probably, voters would be more than pleased to tackle this issue now, and deal with the billionaires later. Reno Gazette-Journal EXPRESSING YOURSELF Expressing Yourself is the place where readers can give their opinions on issues. The reader hotline number of the Henderson Home News, 585-9879, is available 24 hours a day If you wish, leave your name and the neighborhood in which you live on the voice mail The News will publish selected comments each Thursday. KNOW YOUR REPRESENTATIVES President Bill Clinton: White House, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington 0.0.20510,(202)456-1414. U.S. Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev. 528 Senate Hart Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20510, (202) 224-3542, Fax (202)224-7327; 300 Las Vegas Blvd. S #1610, Las Vegas, NV 89101, 474-0041. EMail: senator_reid@reid.senate.gov Home Page: http://wvvw.senate.gov/ -reid •-U.S. Sen. Richard Bryan, D-Nev. 269 Senate Russell Office' Building, Washington, D.C. 20510, (202) 224-6244; 300 S. Las Vegas Blvd. Suite 1110,'Las Vegas, NV 89101, 388-6605. E-Mail: http:// www.senate.gov/-bryanU.S. Rep. John Ensign, R-Nev. 414 Cannon House Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20515. (202) 225-5965; 1000 E. Sahara, Suite 101, Las Vegas, NV 89104, 731-1801. E-Mail: engsign@hr.house.gov U.S. Rep. Jim Gibbons, R-Nev.1116 Longworth House Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20515. (202) 225-6155; 850 Durango Dr., Suite 107, Las Vegas, NV 89128; 255-1651; fax 255-1927. Gov. Bob Miller: Capitol Connplex, Carson City, NV 89710, 687-5670; 555 E. Washington Ave. Suite 5100, Las Vegas, NV 89101. 486-2500. E-Mail: governor@govmail.state.nv.us State Sen. Ann O'Connell (R, District 5): Capitol Connplex, Carson City, NV 89710, 687-5702; 7225 Montecito Circle, Las Vegas, NV 89120-3118. Office phone: 43.4-4020. Home phone: 451-3444. State Sen. Bill O'Donnell (R-District 5): Capitol Complex, Carson City, NV 89710, 687-3650. 2995 S. Jones Blvd., Las Vegas, NV 89102-5309. Office phone: 873-2724. Home phone: 873-2724. State Sen. Jon Porter (R-District 1): Capitol Complex, Carson City, NV89710, Office: 294-1004. 601 Whitney Ranch Dr., Suite 16, Henderson, NV 890142643. Home: 294-1981. State Sen. Dina Titus (D-District 7): Capitol Complex, Carson City, NV 89710, 687-8123; Mailing Address: 1637 Travois Circle, Las Vegas, NV 89119-6283. Office phone: 826-5050. Home: 798-8348. State Sen. Kathy Augustine (R-District 7): (!^pitol Complex, Carson City, NV 89710, P.O. Box 61482, Las Vegas, NV 89160-1492. Home: 387-5922. State Assemblywoman Kathy Von Tobel (RDistrict 20): 401 S, Carson Street, Carson City, NV 89710. (702() 684-8839 StateAssemblywomanGeneSegerblom(D-District22):401 S CarsonStreet, Carson City, NV 89710, 687-3611. P.O. Box 61136, Boulder City, NV. 890061136. Home phone: 293-2626. "^ State Assemblywoman Sandra Tiffany (R-District 21 ): 401 S Carson Street, Carson City, NV 89710, 684-8839; 2289 Cassatt Dr., Henderson, NV 890145060. Home 451-7301. State Assemblyman Richard Perkins (D-District 23): 401 S. Carson Street, Carson City, NV 89710, 687-8110. 408 Glasgow St., Henderson, NV 890155630. Office phone: 565-8933. Home: 566-6542. Toll-Free Legislative Hotline: 1 -800-367-5057 Mayor Jim Gibson: Henderson City Hall, 240 Water St., Henderson, NV89015, 565-2085. Clark County Commissioner Bruce Woodbury (R-District A): Clark County GovernmentCenter, 500S. GrandCentral Parkway, Las Vegas, NV89155-1601. 455-3500. Clark County Commissioner Lorraine Hunt (R-District G): Clark County GovernmentCenter, 500S. GrandCentral Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89155-1601. 455-3500. Clark County School District Board Trustee Mary Beth Scow (District A): Education Center, 2832 E. Flamingo Road, Las Vegas, NV 799-1072. Clark County School District Board Trustee Judy Witt (District G): Education Center, 2832 W. Flamingo Road, Las Vegas, NV 799-1072. University-Community College Regent Mark Alden (District D): 3910 PecosMcLeod, Suite 100, Las Vegas, NV 89121; 454-4999; fax, 898-4845. Progress in Bosnia In a country as fractured as Bosnia, the word "break-through" is invoked at considerable peril. But there is no question that a httlenoticed development in the Serbian portion of Bosnia last month represents, at the least, a significant step forward in the difficult process of restoring peace and building a new nation out of the wreckage of the post-Yugoslavia war. The parliament of the Republika Srpska, as it is known, chose as prime minister Milorad Dodik, 38, who supports democratization, the Dayton accords and integration with the Croat and Muslim institutions of the tripartite state. His election, by the narrowest of margins, delivers a blow to the Serb nationalist forces controlled by Radovan Karadzic that have been the single biggest—though by no means only—obstacle to the peace process. The weakening of the nationalist Serb forces follows a conscious strategy by the U.S. and its NATO allies. Mr. Karadzic, an indicted war criminal, has been deprived of the media and police he used to maintain power and enrich himself. Now his forces stand to lose their last source of authority, the power to tax and impose customs duties. From their last redoubt in eastern Srpska, they have been reduced to decrying Mr. Dodik's election as "undemocratic" and warning—correctly, we hope— that the new government will work toward the reintegration of Republika Srpska into the Bosnian state. What's important now is for the West to capitalize on Mr. Dodik's election by supporting his new government, financially as well as politically. Some members of Congress don't want any aid funds going to any Serbs until they've turned over all their indicted war criminals, including Mr. Karadzic. But one reason Serb voters have turned toward peace and away from hard-liners is that they've seen the rest of Bosnia benefiting from international aid while they languish. Unemployment rates remain at 90% in Srpska, for example, while they've fallen to "only" 37% in the rest of the country. Now Mr. Dodik needs similarly to show voters that being pro-peace and pro-Dayton brings rewards— that the West isn't antiSerb. To the extent the ultranationalists maintain control of Pale and the eastern region, voters there need to see that Serbs in the west— the cooperating part—also enjoy some fruits of economic integration. That will further undermine Mr. Karadzic's position. And it's just as important for the West to keep applying pressure against nationalists in non-Serb communities, who also are a major bar to peace. All this comes in the context of President Clinton's decision to extend a U.S. military presence in Bosnia beyond his self-imposed deadline of next June. Given the slow but sure progress being made, and the unspeakable dangers of a sudden withdrawal, this is the right move. Washington Poet BRIEFS AARP to meet The Henderson chapter (#5025) of the American Association of Retired Persons will conduct its monthly meeting at noon Saturday, Feb. 14, at the Henderson Senior Center. The featured speaker will be cardiologist Dr. Alan Steljes who will discuss The Heart," an appropriate subject for the Valentine's Day program. Seniors and local members of national AARP are cordially invited to attend. Monthly meetings are at noon on the second Saturday of each month at the Senior Center. Local student honored Freshman Christopher Balke Scarberry of Henderson.was named to the Dean's List at Valparaiso University for achieving academic excellence during the fall semester. Valparaiso University is an independent comprehensive tmiversity affiliated with the Lutheran Church and enrolls 3,600 students on its campus 55 miles southeast of Chicago. It consistently is ranked among the Midwest's top regional universities by U.S. News & World Report magazine and also earns national recognition from pubUcations such a fl,:E!B<(PmRi5^i.te^tfSSP^^ petitivo Coliogi's and Bamm s More than 60 academic programs are offered through the colleges of arts and sciences, business administration, engineering and nursing. VU also has an honors college, a graduate division and a School of Law. Junior Girls sought Are you tired of sitting home amd doing nothing after school? Would you like to meet new people? Develop character, leadership and self-reliance? If the answer is yes to any of these questions, the VFW Ladies Auxiliary #3848 have the answers. Junior Girls assist the Ladies Auxiliary with many worthwhile programs. Activities include, but are not limited to: marching in parades, serving meals at special dinners, selling Buddy Poppies, volunteering in nursing homes, presenting American Flags to community groups, making tray favors or cards for veterans at VA Medical Centers, and raising funds for cancer aid and research. Who is eligible? Junior Girls are daufj^ters, foster daughters, stepdaughters, granddaughters, sisters, half-sisters, foster sisters or step-sisters of persons whose father, foster father, step-father, grandfather, brother, half-brother, foster brother or step-brother has served on foreign soil in war. All schools have received information regarding this program. There will be an organizational meeting at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 18, at the VFW Post Home, Basic and Lake Mead roads. All interested girls and parents are invited. For morp information, call Alice Wagner. 564-3624 VFW Auxiliary leader visits valley Connie Atkinson, National President of the Ladies Auxihary to the VFW, attended a conference in Las Vegas this week. Wednesday, Atkinson held a round-table question-and-answer session with VFVl Auxiliary 1753. She later attended a dinner show at Excahbur. Today, the national president was scheduled t^ attend a tour of the Thunderbird base, Mike O'Callaghan Hospital and ACC Medical Center. Atkinson, of Conway, Ark., was elected to head the Auxihary at its 84th National Convention in Salt Lake City in August. Her election makes her the first person to hold office from Arkansas bom after WW II and the first whose only Auxiliary ehgibility is the Vietnam conflict. She joined the Auxiliary on the ehgibility of her husband. Carroll, who served as a helicopter crew chief in Vietnam and is a past All-State Post Commander. Dalipe graduates Boston Universit/^ Henderson resident Rowena M. Dalipe. received a bachelor's of science degree in occupational therapy, cum laude, from Boston University. She was among 940 students awarded academic degrees this winter. Boston University is the third leu-gest independent university in the U.S., with an enrollment of nearly 30,000 students in its 15 schools and oollefpni. fii1|A;!iii:SS-!wW;8ll(..'itii.) • .'liai'ilUJfliilil.,iuiHii.l.'iJii l llBliW^

PAGE 8

Ml 4 Page 8 Henderson Home News Thursday, February 12, 199B Community *N nei NURTURING YOUR SPIRmjAL SELF Feb. 14, 2 p.m. at the West Las Vegas Library Conference Room. The Professional Black Women's Alliance is sponsoring the tree workshop. HOW TO BUY A COMPUTER Friday, Feb. 13, 1 to 3 p.m., at the Sunrise Senior Friends Resource Center, 2809 N. Green Valley Parkway. Pat Salter from Computer U wilt present facts about computers and what the general consumer will need to know when buying one. 434-6500. BIKE CLUB TO HOLD POKER RUN Saturday, Feb. 14, 9:30 a.m. to noon, at Plumbers and Pipefitters Union Hall Union Hall, 760 N. Lamb Blvd. Pre-entry for LWBC memtiers for the 25-mile bike run is $14. Non-members, $17. 228-4076 ELIMINATING BAD CREDIT Tuesday, Feb. 17, 6 to 8 p.m., 3650 S. Decatur, #32. A class will be held on getting spending under control, reducing debt and building a better future. 364-0344 GOOD GRIEF SUPPORT GROUg, Tuesday, Feb. 17,3 to 4:30 p.m., at 4011A McLeod Dr. The Odyssey/Safe Harbor Hospice group will meet. 693-4904 MOPS Feb. 25,9:30 a.m. to noon, at the Las Vegas First Church of the Nazareth, 3825 Pecos/McLeod. Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS) is a program for all mothers of pre-schoolers, birth through 6 years. Enjoy breakfast, a speaker, friendship groups and a craft project while the children are cared for in a structured setting. 451-6000. INTERACTIVE DINNER THEATER Fridays & Saturdays, Italian American Club, 2333 E. Sahara Ave. Enjoy the fun food and tradition of an Italian wedding. Dance like a chicken and do the tarantualla. RSVP 1-800-733-5639 or 838-7455 for privates or fundraisers. 130TH BIRTHDAY OF THE ELKS 1 Stand 3rd Tuesdays, Henderson Green Valley Elks Lodge, #2802, 631 Lake Mead Drive. This month the Elks Club is celebrating its 130 birthday. Meetings are held twice a month. Dinners are held every Friday at 6:30 p.m. 565-9959. LIVING LARGE A singles group for large and lovely people and their friends. For schedule of events, call 585-2425. LEADS CLUB Every Tuesday, 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at the Country Inn, 1990 W. Sunset Road. The Henderson chapter will meet to promote business networking. 260-4055. CHRISTIAN MEN'S FELLOWSHIP 2nd and 4th Saturday of the month, 9:00 a.m. First Henderson United Methodist Church, 609 E. Horizon Dr. Discussions are held on topical, spiritual and personal needs. 565-6049. MOJAVE CACTUS CLUB 1 BurKhberry Ct., Henderson. Informal meetings about the plant reforestation project are held at the Mojave Cactus Club. Interested people may call 390-6859. SURVIVAL AFTER TREATMENT Survival After Treatment is a support group for recovering alcoholics interested in shared cooperative living. Call Paul Benton, 898-0054, for information. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED Reach Out, a non-profit pediatric AIDS organization needs volunteers for fund raising, special events, bulk mail and day wori^ers. 382-7337. NEVADA STATE TROUPERS The Nevada State Troupers is a senior citizen Tap Dance program, operating as a charitable non-profit organization. Classes are held four times a week and there are 23 performances a nnonth at nursing homes, hospitals, churches and other places. The Troupers are looking for people interested in tap dancing: call Mary Lou Ricci, 4592044. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS Mondays-Sundays. Gamblers Anonymous of Southern Nevada has day and evening meetings. Call for help and schedules, 24-hour hotline, 385-7732. DIVORCED AND SEPARATED ADJUSTMENT Mondays, 7:30 9 p.m., Community Lutheran Church, 3720 E. Troptcana Ave. Free support group for men and wOTTien of all ages. Call 735-5544. AMERICAN LEGION First and third Mondays, Henderson Senior Center, 27 Texas. All veterans wefcome. 565-5433. To announce your group or organization's events, please come by or mail information to: 2 Commerce Center Drive, Henderson, NV 89014. HENDERSON RAINBOW GIRLS #17 Mondays, first and third of each month, 7 p.m., Mt. Morlah Temple, 480 Qrsenway Road. Giris ages .,11-20 c^tact Patsy Smith, 565-0527/ TNTTOASTMASTERS A MondaySr second and fourth of Iftnh month. Auto Nation USA community room, 1000 Warm Springs Road. Toastmasters will be meeting at their new location. SWEET ADELINES INTERNATIONAL Tuesdays, 7 p.m., Henderson Senior Center, 27 E. Texas. Open to women 18 and over whp are interested in memlsership and to learn and perform "Barbershop" style hamiony. 223-7893. GV, HENDERSON KIWANIS Tuesdays, 7:30 a.m.. Green's Supper Club, 2241N. Green Valley Parkway and Wednesdays, 7 a.m., Roadhouse, 2100 N. Boulder Highway. The Green Valley Kiwanis Club meets Tuesdays and the Henderson Club meets Wednesdays. US VEGAS CELEBRITY CITY CHORUS Tuesdays, 7 to 10 p.m., Henderson Senior Center, 27 E. Texas. Open to women 18 and over who are interested in membership to learn and perform "Bartwrshop" style harmony. 223-7893. SUCCESS WITHOUT STRESS Tuesdays, first and third of each month, Tp.m., Norwest Bapk, 2231 N. Green Valley Parkway. Secrets to Success Without Stress is sponsoring an ongoing free class, "Conquer Negative Emotions." 293-7797. ORDER OF EASTERN STAR Tuesdays, second and fourth of each month, Mt. Moriah Temple, 480 Greenway Road. All interested O.E.S. members are welcome to attend. 5648515. SUNSET GARDEN CLUB Tuesdays, second of each month, 9:30 a.m., Green Valley Library. The Sunset Garden Club, a community service club, meets with guest speakers on gardening topics. 731-3801. ROTARY Tuesdays, 12:15 p.m., Kiefer's Downtown Henderson, 15 E. Lake Mead. The Henderson Rotary club holds a weekly meeting. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Dally meetings. Overeaters Anonymous is a 12-step program. There are no dues or fees. Daily meetings are held throughout Las Vegas and surrounding areas. Call 593-2945. BUSINESS NETWORK Wednesdays, 7 to 8:30 a.m., Country Inn, Sunset and Valle Verde. The Green Valley Chapter of Business Networi< Intl. meets for its weekly meeting. 454-3100. HEALING SEMINAR Wednesdays, 7 p.m.. Green Valley Pain Relief and Wellness Center, 2559 Wigwam Parkway. Free alternative healing seminars will be held. Seating is limited. For resen/ations, call 896-2700. OPTIMISTS Wednesdays, 7:30 a.m.. Country Inn, Sunset and Valle Verde. The Green Valley/Henderson Optimist club is a local service organization. Guests are invited call Iris Yost 896-4118. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY Wednesdays, first and third of each month, 7 p.m.. Post Home, 401 W. Lake Mead. Post #3848 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars meets the first Wednesday lor meetings, and the third for "Work Night." Call 564-3624. MASTER MASONS Thursdays, first and third of each month, Mt. Moriah Temple, 480 Greenway Road. All interested retired or active masons are welcome to attend meetings. Dick Steele, 458-5225. EXECUTIVE LEADS CLUB Thursdays, 7 a.m., Rae's, Pecos artd Wigwam. The Executive Leads Club East meets to exchange business leads. Karen Scherer, 736-7755. KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS Thursdays, second and fourth of each month, 7 p.m., 50 W. Pacific. Rosary Council 3741 meets. Grand Knight Craig Stockbridge, 564-6875. BOAT OWNERS ASSOCIATION Sundays, third of each month, 10 a.m., Lake Mead Marina restaurant. Lake Mead Boat Owners Associatk^n meets. Visitors are always welconrw. Call Diane Palmer at 457-2797 for information. SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE The Suickle Prevention Center Is kx>king for volunteers to man the hotline. 7312990, ask tor Ewy. CRE8V LISNZ PL8S Vanity license plates seen around the valley: •DADS 'MOMOFS •MRSPEP 'SHARYNS •NOBULL 'MOMMERS •SAMEDAY •GUMBI •DOLPHNS 'SPUNKEE Every week, the News publishes the top 10 personalized license plates seen around the community. We encourage reader participation. Ideas can be e-mailed to kjfergiedhotmail.cotti or mailed to: HBC Publications, Inc. (creative license plates) 2 Commerce Center Drive Henderson, NV 89014. VOICE MAIL • 585-9879 BRIEFS Miss Heritage Days appiications now available The Henderson Charhber of Commerce is gearing up for the 48th annual Heritage Days festivities, including the popular Miss Heritage Days Beauty Pageant. This year's Beauty Pageant vnA be held on Friday, April 17, at Burkholder Middle School. For the first time, scholarships will be awarded to the winners. The Henderson Home News has donated a $500 scholarship to the winner of the Miss Heritage Days title, and $250 to each of the two runners up and to Miss Congeniality. A $500 scholarship will also be awarded to the wanner of the essay contest, donated by Leonard and Sonya Smith of Henderson. Entrants must be aged 15 to 18 on or before April 1, and must be Henderson residents and/or students in a Henderson school. Applications are currently available at the Henderson Chamber of Commerce, 590 S. Boulder Highway, Henderson. The deadline for applications is 5 p.m. Friday, March 13. For more information, call the Henderson Chamber of Commerce, 565-8951. Free throw contest Feb. 14 Henderson's youngsters are invited to participate in the Knights of Columbus annujrf free throw contest Feb. 14, at the Henderson Boy's and Girl's Club. According to chairman Joaquin Aguerria, the event mau^ks the 25th anniversary of national sponsorship by the Knights, and the contest has been held locally during that period. There are divisions for both boys and girls in each of the ages from 10 to 14. Contestants' scores are determined by the nilmber of successful shots. All 10 winners receive awards at the local level Button Club to meet The Southern Nevada Button Society wiU hold its next meeting at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 16, at the Htenderson Senior Center, 27 E. Texas St. Membership is open to button collectors and to those wanting to start this hobby. For more information, call 451-7294 or 564-3349. and are eligible to compete in a district shoot, also scheduled for the Boys and Girls Club on Feb. 28. Both contests will begin at 2:30 p.m. District Deputy of the Knights Larry Ouellett reports the district contest will pit the winners of four other area contests against Henderson winners and each other. The scores from these shoots will be matched against other state winners to determine Nevada champions. The wirming scores will be matched against all other states to determine national champions. When you pre-plan, plan with us. iVlany of the families we serve know the wisdom of planning funeral arrangements before need. Through our own professional experience we can fully recommend this. Pre-planning lets you make decisions about the funeral service without the burden of emotional stress. You will also be able to eliminate unnecessary costs. Certainly, you'll save the cost of future inflated prices. Talk now, at" no obligation, with one of our preplanning counselors. FUNERAL HOMES PARADISE MEMORIAL GARDENS MAUSOLEUMS & CREMATORY 6200 S. Eastern Avenue • 736-6200 2127 W. Charleston Blvd. • 383-2900 Please contact me about preplanning a funeral service or cremation options NAfVIE ADDRESS, CITY STATE zip. BEST TIME TO CALL PHONE. K^ail this coupon to Davis Funeral Homes, 6200 S. Eastern Ave. Las Vegas. NV 89119 I I Champion Homes Exactly how much HOME are you willing to sacrifice? Buy a home without an LID Fee and you get two additional bedrooms for the same price as a home with an LID-without sacrificingathmg. Witt UD ^"y'" ^^^ "other" master-planned community and pay LID (Limited Improvement District) Fees that can reach up to $17,000*. On top of the purchase price of your home, each month you pay extra for streets, curbs, gutters, str.eet lights, utilities and parks within the community. WIttOUt UO ^uy J^st outside the same master-planned community and you can enjoy all the amenities that community offers at no cost to you. That way you can move into a home with 400 more square feet than your "LlD-neighbors" for the exact same amount of money. Do The MStt ^" LID fee of $94 per month paid over 15 years adds up to $17,000. fmtcuffXKim. k N 5 I I 3 CLEAR^X^AT ER N O N (kl THE ESTATES 269-8421 Figures based on Tht Mrym Report. August 19% ^ Thursday, February 12,1998 Henderson Home News Page 9 Gray spends Christmas in Costa Rica BE HEARD • 585-9879 There's no snow, no multi-col• ored light extravaganza, no Santa Claus at the mall—in fact, no mall. So how do you "do" Christmas in Costa Rica? It starts out with a bang, literally, when a crowing rooster is upstaged by a festive firecracker. AJPter that, Mass at the church in Santa Elena and then a walk through the Reserva Santa Elena, the famous cloud forest, where it seems even the wildlife observe the holiday with sabbath stillness. And for toppers, dinner overlooking the active Arenal volcano. W3Tiona Gray, an employee of the Lower Colorado Dam Facility and resident of Henderson, spent two weeks in December as a member ofa team of volunteers in Santa Elena, Costa Rica. The 10 volunteers and their Global Volunteers team leader were part of an on-going service program, coordinated by Global Volunteers, in this rural town. The volunteers joined people of the community on projects targeted by the community leaders harvesting coffee, painting a community building, enlarging a cooperatively-run grocery store and digging an irrigation cUtch. In the process, the volunteers learned about life in this beautiful, rugged country. "We noticed how affectionate GRAY IN COSTA RICA — Henderson's Wynona Gray spent two weeks In December in Costa Rica as part of the Global Volunteers. She helps harvest coffee, paint a building, enlarge a grocery store and dig an irrigation ditch. families are with each other and how respectful the children are," Gray said. Renowned for its cloud forest, rain forests, verdant mountains, active volcanoes and natural hot springs, Costa Rica is also respected for its long history of peaceful conflict resolution and lack of military, despite its precarious location in Central America. Travel is always an adventure, and pari;icularly so in Costa Rica, where winding, bumpy mounteun roads are sometimes blocked by obstacles more palpable than fog. "Three of us were on our way to work on the irrigation ditch when a bull blocked the path. Coco, the town dog, made the bull move so we could continue on our way," Gray said. Gray also shopped the local markets, ate delicious meals ("our breakfast was fhiits, scrambled eggs, black beans and rice, and coflFee"), hiked through the cloud forest on trails made by previous teams of Global Volunteers, visited the Mariposa Butterfly Farm, soaked in local hot springs and gingerly crossed swaying suspension bridges on a Sky Walk through the rain forest. Christmas tradition and a local art in Costa Rica is the making of tamales. Volunteers were invited to learn this art in the kitchens of pros—the local women. They ground com, dried banana leaves, cut vegetables and pulled strings ^om bags to tie the tamales. The vegetable/rice/com ensemble is wrapped in dried banana leaves, tied with string and cooked. An entry in the team's journal on Christmas Day reads: "For us, there was no Christmas tree nor exchange of gifts. For those of us who wanted to put some meaning into our lives at Christmas, we found the simplicity vrith which the villagers celebrated this day very refreshing. We felt gratitude for receiving renewed sensitivity to people of the world, the beauties of the earth and the blessings in our Uves." This service program was coordinated by Global Volunteers, a private, non-profit organization that coordinates more than .125 teams of volunteers at sites in 17 other countries year rovmd. For a current schedule and more information on each program, contact Global Volunteers, (800)487-1074, 375 E. Little Canada Rd., St. Paul, MN 55117. SpuM^Sfiecicd Aluma Wood Patio Cover |10'xl2' Solid Cover or Uttlce,| Two Posts Installed Complete S995.00 Estimates given on other sizes & home improvements. •Design assistance available • Contract NEVER signed| at first meeting. • When you're ready, we'll be there. J. McCay and Associates General Contractor LnncQ, jmcxay associates CompuServe com NV License 0043739 480-3456 Qoid Caster Jezvefry "'Henderson 's Oldest andMost Trusted Jewelers' 15th Anniversary Complete Jewelery Services Michael Holland Joel^ngel Jeweler/Owner Custom Designer Mention this ad for 60% OFF L _QQLD_CHAINS & BRACELETS_ J HOURS: MON F-RI 9-5 • SAT 9-3 Se Habia Espanol • Layaways available It 19 S. WATER ST. • HENDERSON • 565-7411 At the Library GREEN VALLEY LIBRARY 2797 N. Green Valley Parkway, Henderson, NV 89014 435-1840 ~ Thursday, Feb. 12 Noon-4 p.m.. Free Tax Preparation for seniors over 60 AARP. Call 435-1840 for an appointment. (Sunset Room) 6 p.m., VITA: Free tax preparation for low income individuals. Call 435-1840 for an appoinlment.(Conference Room) 7 p.m.. Charioteers Classic Car Club. (Sun.set Room) Friday, Feb. 13 9 a.m.-1p.m., Clark County Health Department's Free Immunizations for Children. (Sunset Room) 2 p.m.. Desert Newcomers Investment Club. (Sunset Room) Saturday, Feb. 14 10 a.m.. Green Valley Republican Women's Club. (Sunset Room) Noon, Hudson Family Genealogical Group. (Conference Room) 2 p.m., Rancho Nevada Homeowners' Association. (Sun.set Room) Sunday, Feb. 15 2 p.m., Farsi Cla.ss (Sunset Room) Monday, Feb. 16 THE LIBRARY WILL BE CLOSED IN OBSERVANCE OF PRESIDENTS' DAY Tuesday, Feb. 17 9:30 a.m.. La Leche League. (Sun.set Room) 6 p.m., Montecito Estates Homeowners'Association. (Sunset Room) 6:30 p.m., Green Valley Village Homeowners' Association. (Sunset Room) Wednesday, Feb. 18 9 a.m., Nate Mack School (Conference Room) Noon-4 p.m.. Free Tax Preparation for Seniors ages 60 or older by AARP. Call 435-1840 for an appointment (Sunset Room) 6 p.m.. Master Series at the Legacy Homeowners' Association. (.Sunset Room) 6 p.m.. Master Series at the Legacy Homeowners' Association. (Sunset Room) 7 p.m.. Green'Valley Neighborhood Homeowners' Association Board Meeting. (Conference Room) American Red Cross seeks volunteers SAY IT WITH COOKIES Creative Edible Centerpieces • Order Early For The Holidays The Clark Country chapter of the American Red Cross is an active partner with everyone in the community. The Red Cross provides a wide range of services and training; including emergency services for families devastated by fire, flood and other natural disasters, emergencies related to members of the U.S. armed forces, veterStop lawn watering As a result of recent rains caused by the El Nino weather system, the Southern Nevada Water Authority encourages all water users to turn off their sprinkler systems until at least Wednesday, Feb. 18. So far this month. Southern Nevada has received .93" of rainfall—four times greater than normal for this time of year. More showers are expected later this week. For more information and lawn watering guides, call the Water Conservation Hotline, 258-SAVE. ans, their families and civilians, i CPR, first aid, lifeguard training and swimming. It also provides HIV/AIDS education to help prevent the spread of the deadly disease in the community. In becoming a Red Cross volunteer, residents can give back to the community. For more information, call Sandra Fadil, 791-3311. es by Design|gfA%p(^ We Deliver "The Sweetest Bouquet in Town' • Cookie Bouquets For All Occasions • We Will Write Your Personal Message On Any Bouquet • We Copy Company Logos For Corporate Gilts Phone: 898-0440 • Fax: 898-0794 2877 Green Valley Pkwy. at Sunset in the Lucky s Shopping Center Mwrn • Henderson's Class Act • ^'^M'n Hendct^ Reserve Employ SPECIAL 40% more effective* ^^ than stairclimbing None of the impact of running. Introducing the Precor EFX 5.21s. The World's First Elliptical Fitness Crosstrainer. If you can Imagine sluing on air or hiking on clouds, you can imagine a typical workout on a Precor EFX. Fluid and supple, the EFX'S exclusive elliptical movement combines all the advantages ol traditional cardio equipment in one machine \Mif ther you want to lose weight or simply gel in shape, the EFX is the only impact-lree crosstrainer that lets you choose from virtually hundreds of workouts Simply adjust the exclusive electronic ramp to quickly settle In to your ideal lat^buwiing zone or cardio conditioning program. Either way, you'll never have to switch machines to gel the results you want And you'll never want to Come in and Irvan EFX today. Exercise Equipment of Nevada Nevada s Luge§t Ixadse Iqulpnatt Deakr MKtaMM U. tmnm tltmmm 1 HMMta M>iM i.laMi t. HIIIIBIII 4n W tilMH JW^ Mi >. a MMM raM Mippkit CMIK La • • > 547-9004 • 258-4484 'Up M 40\ mora 0USMI •onng M iMMd by tw UnnatMv 0* Otgon FOOD &. DRINKS with your work card Don not appty with ai>v food h I>inli SpKub Must bf 2\ yttn at tgt TRIPLE Slot Club Points Thru March Triple Cash paid back L^ I to you! JOtN HER& aocaoaoaoaaaoiini Thru March Double Action Special ,?"ti At OIK 24 Hour Coffee Shop or ^^B Exotic Island Grill | liiiv one (liiint>r ami ;{i't sccoiui dinniT of 'm.il or lessrr v.iliic I HI I ^t,,sI I.. -M I xpir. s / /( • BIIMGO T\AIO DOLLARS \V\Tf', I 20 MN

PAGE 9

Ml 4 Page 8 Henderson Home News Thursday, February 12, 199B Community *N nei NURTURING YOUR SPIRmjAL SELF Feb. 14, 2 p.m. at the West Las Vegas Library Conference Room. The Professional Black Women's Alliance is sponsoring the tree workshop. HOW TO BUY A COMPUTER Friday, Feb. 13, 1 to 3 p.m., at the Sunrise Senior Friends Resource Center, 2809 N. Green Valley Parkway. Pat Salter from Computer U wilt present facts about computers and what the general consumer will need to know when buying one. 434-6500. BIKE CLUB TO HOLD POKER RUN Saturday, Feb. 14, 9:30 a.m. to noon, at Plumbers and Pipefitters Union Hall Union Hall, 760 N. Lamb Blvd. Pre-entry for LWBC memtiers for the 25-mile bike run is $14. Non-members, $17. 228-4076 ELIMINATING BAD CREDIT Tuesday, Feb. 17, 6 to 8 p.m., 3650 S. Decatur, #32. A class will be held on getting spending under control, reducing debt and building a better future. 364-0344 GOOD GRIEF SUPPORT GROUg, Tuesday, Feb. 17,3 to 4:30 p.m., at 4011A McLeod Dr. The Odyssey/Safe Harbor Hospice group will meet. 693-4904 MOPS Feb. 25,9:30 a.m. to noon, at the Las Vegas First Church of the Nazareth, 3825 Pecos/McLeod. Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS) is a program for all mothers of pre-schoolers, birth through 6 years. Enjoy breakfast, a speaker, friendship groups and a craft project while the children are cared for in a structured setting. 451-6000. INTERACTIVE DINNER THEATER Fridays & Saturdays, Italian American Club, 2333 E. Sahara Ave. Enjoy the fun food and tradition of an Italian wedding. Dance like a chicken and do the tarantualla. RSVP 1-800-733-5639 or 838-7455 for privates or fundraisers. 130TH BIRTHDAY OF THE ELKS 1 Stand 3rd Tuesdays, Henderson Green Valley Elks Lodge, #2802, 631 Lake Mead Drive. This month the Elks Club is celebrating its 130 birthday. Meetings are held twice a month. Dinners are held every Friday at 6:30 p.m. 565-9959. LIVING LARGE A singles group for large and lovely people and their friends. For schedule of events, call 585-2425. LEADS CLUB Every Tuesday, 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at the Country Inn, 1990 W. Sunset Road. The Henderson chapter will meet to promote business networking. 260-4055. CHRISTIAN MEN'S FELLOWSHIP 2nd and 4th Saturday of the month, 9:00 a.m. First Henderson United Methodist Church, 609 E. Horizon Dr. Discussions are held on topical, spiritual and personal needs. 565-6049. MOJAVE CACTUS CLUB 1 BurKhberry Ct., Henderson. Informal meetings about the plant reforestation project are held at the Mojave Cactus Club. Interested people may call 390-6859. SURVIVAL AFTER TREATMENT Survival After Treatment is a support group for recovering alcoholics interested in shared cooperative living. Call Paul Benton, 898-0054, for information. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED Reach Out, a non-profit pediatric AIDS organization needs volunteers for fund raising, special events, bulk mail and day wori^ers. 382-7337. NEVADA STATE TROUPERS The Nevada State Troupers is a senior citizen Tap Dance program, operating as a charitable non-profit organization. Classes are held four times a week and there are 23 performances a nnonth at nursing homes, hospitals, churches and other places. The Troupers are looking for people interested in tap dancing: call Mary Lou Ricci, 4592044. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS Mondays-Sundays. Gamblers Anonymous of Southern Nevada has day and evening meetings. Call for help and schedules, 24-hour hotline, 385-7732. DIVORCED AND SEPARATED ADJUSTMENT Mondays, 7:30 9 p.m., Community Lutheran Church, 3720 E. Troptcana Ave. Free support group for men and wOTTien of all ages. Call 735-5544. AMERICAN LEGION First and third Mondays, Henderson Senior Center, 27 Texas. All veterans wefcome. 565-5433. To announce your group or organization's events, please come by or mail information to: 2 Commerce Center Drive, Henderson, NV 89014. HENDERSON RAINBOW GIRLS #17 Mondays, first and third of each month, 7 p.m., Mt. Morlah Temple, 480 Qrsenway Road. Giris ages .,11-20 c^tact Patsy Smith, 565-0527/ TNTTOASTMASTERS A MondaySr second and fourth of Iftnh month. Auto Nation USA community room, 1000 Warm Springs Road. Toastmasters will be meeting at their new location. SWEET ADELINES INTERNATIONAL Tuesdays, 7 p.m., Henderson Senior Center, 27 E. Texas. Open to women 18 and over whp are interested in memlsership and to learn and perform "Barbershop" style hamiony. 223-7893. GV, HENDERSON KIWANIS Tuesdays, 7:30 a.m.. Green's Supper Club, 2241N. Green Valley Parkway and Wednesdays, 7 a.m., Roadhouse, 2100 N. Boulder Highway. The Green Valley Kiwanis Club meets Tuesdays and the Henderson Club meets Wednesdays. US VEGAS CELEBRITY CITY CHORUS Tuesdays, 7 to 10 p.m., Henderson Senior Center, 27 E. Texas. Open to women 18 and over who are interested in membership to learn and perform "Bartwrshop" style harmony. 223-7893. SUCCESS WITHOUT STRESS Tuesdays, first and third of each month, Tp.m., Norwest Bapk, 2231 N. Green Valley Parkway. Secrets to Success Without Stress is sponsoring an ongoing free class, "Conquer Negative Emotions." 293-7797. ORDER OF EASTERN STAR Tuesdays, second and fourth of each month, Mt. Moriah Temple, 480 Greenway Road. All interested O.E.S. members are welcome to attend. 5648515. SUNSET GARDEN CLUB Tuesdays, second of each month, 9:30 a.m., Green Valley Library. The Sunset Garden Club, a community service club, meets with guest speakers on gardening topics. 731-3801. ROTARY Tuesdays, 12:15 p.m., Kiefer's Downtown Henderson, 15 E. Lake Mead. The Henderson Rotary club holds a weekly meeting. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Dally meetings. Overeaters Anonymous is a 12-step program. There are no dues or fees. Daily meetings are held throughout Las Vegas and surrounding areas. Call 593-2945. BUSINESS NETWORK Wednesdays, 7 to 8:30 a.m., Country Inn, Sunset and Valle Verde. The Green Valley Chapter of Business Networi< Intl. meets for its weekly meeting. 454-3100. HEALING SEMINAR Wednesdays, 7 p.m.. Green Valley Pain Relief and Wellness Center, 2559 Wigwam Parkway. Free alternative healing seminars will be held. Seating is limited. For resen/ations, call 896-2700. OPTIMISTS Wednesdays, 7:30 a.m.. Country Inn, Sunset and Valle Verde. The Green Valley/Henderson Optimist club is a local service organization. Guests are invited call Iris Yost 896-4118. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY Wednesdays, first and third of each month, 7 p.m.. Post Home, 401 W. Lake Mead. Post #3848 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars meets the first Wednesday lor meetings, and the third for "Work Night." Call 564-3624. MASTER MASONS Thursdays, first and third of each month, Mt. Moriah Temple, 480 Greenway Road. All interested retired or active masons are welcome to attend meetings. Dick Steele, 458-5225. EXECUTIVE LEADS CLUB Thursdays, 7 a.m., Rae's, Pecos artd Wigwam. The Executive Leads Club East meets to exchange business leads. Karen Scherer, 736-7755. KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS Thursdays, second and fourth of each month, 7 p.m., 50 W. Pacific. Rosary Council 3741 meets. Grand Knight Craig Stockbridge, 564-6875. BOAT OWNERS ASSOCIATION Sundays, third of each month, 10 a.m., Lake Mead Marina restaurant. Lake Mead Boat Owners Associatk^n meets. Visitors are always welconrw. Call Diane Palmer at 457-2797 for information. SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE The Suickle Prevention Center Is kx>king for volunteers to man the hotline. 7312990, ask tor Ewy. CRE8V LISNZ PL8S Vanity license plates seen around the valley: •DADS 'MOMOFS •MRSPEP 'SHARYNS •NOBULL 'MOMMERS •SAMEDAY •GUMBI •DOLPHNS 'SPUNKEE Every week, the News publishes the top 10 personalized license plates seen around the community. We encourage reader participation. Ideas can be e-mailed to kjfergiedhotmail.cotti or mailed to: HBC Publications, Inc. (creative license plates) 2 Commerce Center Drive Henderson, NV 89014. VOICE MAIL • 585-9879 BRIEFS Miss Heritage Days appiications now available The Henderson Charhber of Commerce is gearing up for the 48th annual Heritage Days festivities, including the popular Miss Heritage Days Beauty Pageant. This year's Beauty Pageant vnA be held on Friday, April 17, at Burkholder Middle School. For the first time, scholarships will be awarded to the winners. The Henderson Home News has donated a $500 scholarship to the winner of the Miss Heritage Days title, and $250 to each of the two runners up and to Miss Congeniality. A $500 scholarship will also be awarded to the wanner of the essay contest, donated by Leonard and Sonya Smith of Henderson. Entrants must be aged 15 to 18 on or before April 1, and must be Henderson residents and/or students in a Henderson school. Applications are currently available at the Henderson Chamber of Commerce, 590 S. Boulder Highway, Henderson. The deadline for applications is 5 p.m. Friday, March 13. For more information, call the Henderson Chamber of Commerce, 565-8951. Free throw contest Feb. 14 Henderson's youngsters are invited to participate in the Knights of Columbus annujrf free throw contest Feb. 14, at the Henderson Boy's and Girl's Club. According to chairman Joaquin Aguerria, the event mau^ks the 25th anniversary of national sponsorship by the Knights, and the contest has been held locally during that period. There are divisions for both boys and girls in each of the ages from 10 to 14. Contestants' scores are determined by the nilmber of successful shots. All 10 winners receive awards at the local level Button Club to meet The Southern Nevada Button Society wiU hold its next meeting at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 16, at the Htenderson Senior Center, 27 E. Texas St. Membership is open to button collectors and to those wanting to start this hobby. For more information, call 451-7294 or 564-3349. and are eligible to compete in a district shoot, also scheduled for the Boys and Girls Club on Feb. 28. Both contests will begin at 2:30 p.m. District Deputy of the Knights Larry Ouellett reports the district contest will pit the winners of four other area contests against Henderson winners and each other. The scores from these shoots will be matched against other state winners to determine Nevada champions. The wirming scores will be matched against all other states to determine national champions. When you pre-plan, plan with us. iVlany of the families we serve know the wisdom of planning funeral arrangements before need. Through our own professional experience we can fully recommend this. Pre-planning lets you make decisions about the funeral service without the burden of emotional stress. You will also be able to eliminate unnecessary costs. Certainly, you'll save the cost of future inflated prices. Talk now, at" no obligation, with one of our preplanning counselors. FUNERAL HOMES PARADISE MEMORIAL GARDENS MAUSOLEUMS & CREMATORY 6200 S. Eastern Avenue • 736-6200 2127 W. Charleston Blvd. • 383-2900 Please contact me about preplanning a funeral service or cremation options NAfVIE ADDRESS, CITY STATE zip. BEST TIME TO CALL PHONE. K^ail this coupon to Davis Funeral Homes, 6200 S. Eastern Ave. Las Vegas. NV 89119 I I Champion Homes Exactly how much HOME are you willing to sacrifice? Buy a home without an LID Fee and you get two additional bedrooms for the same price as a home with an LID-without sacrificingathmg. Witt UD ^"y'" ^^^ "other" master-planned community and pay LID (Limited Improvement District) Fees that can reach up to $17,000*. On top of the purchase price of your home, each month you pay extra for streets, curbs, gutters, str.eet lights, utilities and parks within the community. WIttOUt UO ^uy J^st outside the same master-planned community and you can enjoy all the amenities that community offers at no cost to you. That way you can move into a home with 400 more square feet than your "LlD-neighbors" for the exact same amount of money. Do The MStt ^" LID fee of $94 per month paid over 15 years adds up to $17,000. fmtcuffXKim. k N 5 I I 3 CLEAR^X^AT ER N O N (kl THE ESTATES 269-8421 Figures based on Tht Mrym Report. August 19% ^ Thursday, February 12,1998 Henderson Home News Page 9 Gray spends Christmas in Costa Rica BE HEARD • 585-9879 There's no snow, no multi-col• ored light extravaganza, no Santa Claus at the mall—in fact, no mall. So how do you "do" Christmas in Costa Rica? It starts out with a bang, literally, when a crowing rooster is upstaged by a festive firecracker. AJPter that, Mass at the church in Santa Elena and then a walk through the Reserva Santa Elena, the famous cloud forest, where it seems even the wildlife observe the holiday with sabbath stillness. And for toppers, dinner overlooking the active Arenal volcano. W3Tiona Gray, an employee of the Lower Colorado Dam Facility and resident of Henderson, spent two weeks in December as a member ofa team of volunteers in Santa Elena, Costa Rica. The 10 volunteers and their Global Volunteers team leader were part of an on-going service program, coordinated by Global Volunteers, in this rural town. The volunteers joined people of the community on projects targeted by the community leaders harvesting coffee, painting a community building, enlarging a cooperatively-run grocery store and digging an irrigation cUtch. In the process, the volunteers learned about life in this beautiful, rugged country. "We noticed how affectionate GRAY IN COSTA RICA — Henderson's Wynona Gray spent two weeks In December in Costa Rica as part of the Global Volunteers. She helps harvest coffee, paint a building, enlarge a grocery store and dig an irrigation ditch. families are with each other and how respectful the children are," Gray said. Renowned for its cloud forest, rain forests, verdant mountains, active volcanoes and natural hot springs, Costa Rica is also respected for its long history of peaceful conflict resolution and lack of military, despite its precarious location in Central America. Travel is always an adventure, and pari;icularly so in Costa Rica, where winding, bumpy mounteun roads are sometimes blocked by obstacles more palpable than fog. "Three of us were on our way to work on the irrigation ditch when a bull blocked the path. Coco, the town dog, made the bull move so we could continue on our way," Gray said. Gray also shopped the local markets, ate delicious meals ("our breakfast was fhiits, scrambled eggs, black beans and rice, and coflFee"), hiked through the cloud forest on trails made by previous teams of Global Volunteers, visited the Mariposa Butterfly Farm, soaked in local hot springs and gingerly crossed swaying suspension bridges on a Sky Walk through the rain forest. Christmas tradition and a local art in Costa Rica is the making of tamales. Volunteers were invited to learn this art in the kitchens of pros—the local women. They ground com, dried banana leaves, cut vegetables and pulled strings ^om bags to tie the tamales. The vegetable/rice/com ensemble is wrapped in dried banana leaves, tied with string and cooked. An entry in the team's journal on Christmas Day reads: "For us, there was no Christmas tree nor exchange of gifts. For those of us who wanted to put some meaning into our lives at Christmas, we found the simplicity vrith which the villagers celebrated this day very refreshing. We felt gratitude for receiving renewed sensitivity to people of the world, the beauties of the earth and the blessings in our Uves." This service program was coordinated by Global Volunteers, a private, non-profit organization that coordinates more than .125 teams of volunteers at sites in 17 other countries year rovmd. For a current schedule and more information on each program, contact Global Volunteers, (800)487-1074, 375 E. Little Canada Rd., St. Paul, MN 55117. SpuM^Sfiecicd Aluma Wood Patio Cover |10'xl2' Solid Cover or Uttlce,| Two Posts Installed Complete S995.00 Estimates given on other sizes & home improvements. •Design assistance available • Contract NEVER signed| at first meeting. • When you're ready, we'll be there. J. McCay and Associates General Contractor LnncQ, jmcxay associates CompuServe com NV License 0043739 480-3456 Qoid Caster Jezvefry "'Henderson 's Oldest andMost Trusted Jewelers' 15th Anniversary Complete Jewelery Services Michael Holland Joel^ngel Jeweler/Owner Custom Designer Mention this ad for 60% OFF L _QQLD_CHAINS & BRACELETS_ J HOURS: MON F-RI 9-5 • SAT 9-3 Se Habia Espanol • Layaways available It 19 S. WATER ST. • HENDERSON • 565-7411 At the Library GREEN VALLEY LIBRARY 2797 N. Green Valley Parkway, Henderson, NV 89014 435-1840 ~ Thursday, Feb. 12 Noon-4 p.m.. Free Tax Preparation for seniors over 60 AARP. Call 435-1840 for an appointment. (Sunset Room) 6 p.m., VITA: Free tax preparation for low income individuals. Call 435-1840 for an appoinlment.(Conference Room) 7 p.m.. Charioteers Classic Car Club. (Sun.set Room) Friday, Feb. 13 9 a.m.-1p.m., Clark County Health Department's Free Immunizations for Children. (Sunset Room) 2 p.m.. Desert Newcomers Investment Club. (Sunset Room) Saturday, Feb. 14 10 a.m.. Green Valley Republican Women's Club. (Sunset Room) Noon, Hudson Family Genealogical Group. (Conference Room) 2 p.m., Rancho Nevada Homeowners' Association. (Sun.set Room) Sunday, Feb. 15 2 p.m., Farsi Cla.ss (Sunset Room) Monday, Feb. 16 THE LIBRARY WILL BE CLOSED IN OBSERVANCE OF PRESIDENTS' DAY Tuesday, Feb. 17 9:30 a.m.. La Leche League. (Sun.set Room) 6 p.m., Montecito Estates Homeowners'Association. (Sunset Room) 6:30 p.m., Green Valley Village Homeowners' Association. (Sunset Room) Wednesday, Feb. 18 9 a.m., Nate Mack School (Conference Room) Noon-4 p.m.. Free Tax Preparation for Seniors ages 60 or older by AARP. Call 435-1840 for an appointment (Sunset Room) 6 p.m.. Master Series at the Legacy Homeowners' Association. (.Sunset Room) 6 p.m.. Master Series at the Legacy Homeowners' Association. (Sunset Room) 7 p.m.. Green'Valley Neighborhood Homeowners' Association Board Meeting. (Conference Room) American Red Cross seeks volunteers SAY IT WITH COOKIES Creative Edible Centerpieces • Order Early For The Holidays The Clark Country chapter of the American Red Cross is an active partner with everyone in the community. The Red Cross provides a wide range of services and training; including emergency services for families devastated by fire, flood and other natural disasters, emergencies related to members of the U.S. armed forces, veterStop lawn watering As a result of recent rains caused by the El Nino weather system, the Southern Nevada Water Authority encourages all water users to turn off their sprinkler systems until at least Wednesday, Feb. 18. So far this month. Southern Nevada has received .93" of rainfall—four times greater than normal for this time of year. More showers are expected later this week. For more information and lawn watering guides, call the Water Conservation Hotline, 258-SAVE. ans, their families and civilians, i CPR, first aid, lifeguard training and swimming. It also provides HIV/AIDS education to help prevent the spread of the deadly disease in the community. In becoming a Red Cross volunteer, residents can give back to the community. For more information, call Sandra Fadil, 791-3311. es by Design|gfA%p(^ We Deliver "The Sweetest Bouquet in Town' • Cookie Bouquets For All Occasions • We Will Write Your Personal Message On Any Bouquet • We Copy Company Logos For Corporate Gilts Phone: 898-0440 • Fax: 898-0794 2877 Green Valley Pkwy. at Sunset in the Lucky s Shopping Center Mwrn • Henderson's Class Act • ^'^M'n Hendct^ Reserve Employ SPECIAL 40% more effective* ^^ than stairclimbing None of the impact of running. Introducing the Precor EFX 5.21s. The World's First Elliptical Fitness Crosstrainer. If you can Imagine sluing on air or hiking on clouds, you can imagine a typical workout on a Precor EFX. Fluid and supple, the EFX'S exclusive elliptical movement combines all the advantages ol traditional cardio equipment in one machine \Mif ther you want to lose weight or simply gel in shape, the EFX is the only impact-lree crosstrainer that lets you choose from virtually hundreds of workouts Simply adjust the exclusive electronic ramp to quickly settle In to your ideal lat^buwiing zone or cardio conditioning program. Either way, you'll never have to switch machines to gel the results you want And you'll never want to Come in and Irvan EFX today. Exercise Equipment of Nevada Nevada s Luge§t Ixadse Iqulpnatt Deakr MKtaMM U. tmnm tltmmm 1 HMMta M>iM i.laMi t. HIIIIBIII 4n W tilMH JW^ Mi >. a MMM raM Mippkit CMIK La • • > 547-9004 • 258-4484 'Up M 40\ mora 0USMI •onng M iMMd by tw UnnatMv 0* Otgon FOOD &. DRINKS with your work card Don not appty with ai>v food h I>inli SpKub Must bf 2\ yttn at tgt TRIPLE Slot Club Points Thru March Triple Cash paid back L^ I to you! JOtN HER& aocaoaoaoaaaoiini Thru March Double Action Special ,?"ti At OIK 24 Hour Coffee Shop or ^^B Exotic Island Grill | liiiv one (liiint>r ami ;{i't sccoiui dinniT of 'm.il or lessrr v.iliic I HI I ^t,,sI I.. -M I xpir. s / /( • BIIMGO T\AIO DOLLARS \V\Tf', I 20 MN

PAGE 10

\ Page 10 Henderson Home News Thursday, February 12,1998 Thursday, February 12, 1998 Henderson Home News Page t1 I .^. • ,^."V Valentine's party Saturday at Center SENIOR CENTER HIGHLIGHTS 27 £. TEXAS ST. 565-6990 The center is open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to t.iuay, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays, from 6 to 10 p.m. Mc.iday to Thursday, from 11 a.m. '0 1 p.m Sundays for lunch. Valentine's Day Party Saturday I'lic Henderson Senior Center wi 11 host its annual St. Valentine's Dny party, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 14. Betty Dukes, Jean Sadler and Nona Ferryman will coordinate volunteers from the Henderson Parks and Recreation staff, Henderson Seniors' Auxiliary and Ki. ights of Columbus for a special holiday treat for home-bound seuiors and seniors at the center KofC volunteers will cook a made-to-order Saturday brunch for $1.25. The party will include lioor prizes and photos in the (Itxorated dining room. Richard Slu twell on sax and Jean Johnson at the keyboards will ent( rtain. The event is an opportunity for seniors who have never visited the center to drop in and learn about available programs and ev£ nts and to. meet the center's energetic volunteers. Speaking of hearts Anyone needing a Valentine's gift for a special person is entouraged to visit the center's gift shop. A variety of gifts are available, all handmade by the Friday Crafts Group. Proceeds benefit IIK,' RSVP volunteer program. Helen Hymas is starting a Hearts Club—competitive hearts. H\ '^as and RSVP volunteer Marie Hoshovsky are recruiting players and teachers to play Hearts from 9:30 to 11 a.m. Friday. Several levels of play will be otlered from recreational to cut ihroat. Those interested in If a ning or participating in the ;. mie are asked to drop in. Heartfelt thanks The Henderson Seniors'Auxiliary and Chairwoman Othena Williams never forget homebound seniors. Kathy Weese, Lucy Hutton, Susie Segura and Richard and Evelyn Conrad baked Valentine's Day cookies for the home-bound, which were packed with a holiday message of good cheer from the Auxiliary by Gwen Woods, Beverly Wigglesworth, Dorothy Vondenbrink, Betty Dukes and the Conrads. They were delivered to home-bound seniors by Cathohc Charities. The Senior Center thanks Catholic Charities and Henderson Seniors' Auxiliary volunteers for their generosity. Free skin screening Richard Diskin,DO,of Diskin Dermatology, will ofter free skin cancer screenings to seniors at the center by appointment from 9 a.m. to noon Friday, Feb 13. He will also provide information on how to protect skin from the sun. Call 565-6990 for an appointment. Birthday party On the third Wednesday of each month, the center hosts_a birthday party for all seniors born in that month. Betty Dukes has organized a special party to be held at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 18, for seniors born in February. Staff" and volunteers from the Concorde Retirement and Assisted Living Community will provide decorated cakes and ice cream. BettyGunthrieofHumana wall play sing-along songs. All seniors are invited to attend this festive event and wish February seniors a happy birthday. Silver Congress Jean Maher, one of four Nevada delegates to the National Silver Haired Congress, will be at the center at noon Wednesday, Feb 18, distributing survey questionnaires to obtain senior views. "The Nevada Delegation to the National Silver Haired Congress is a group of four appointees who will represent Nevada at the annual meetingheld in Washington, D.C. by presenting non-partisan, intergenerational solutions to the issues before Congress," said Maher. At the request of the Nevada Division of Aging, the SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL NEWSPAPER ADVERTISE l^< THE NEWS 564-1881 Let Our Family Take Care Of Your Family Family Owned &. Operated *^ Staff Has Over 25 Yrs. Experience In So. Nevada Burial & Cremation • Serving All Faiths HITES FUNERAL SERVICES ^^3B Donations to AFAN (Aids for Aids Nevada) 568-1747 • 438 W. Sunset Rd. "^/fiSiS {Available 24 HRS. • 7 Days Member of NMIomi Funeral Director Aisoc Worldwide Shipping | Courtesy Photo MUSICIANS — Entertaining seniors at the Michigan Days celebration were pianist Jean Johnston and saxophonist Richard Shotwell. WARREL BILLY (X^ I got a COLOR Valentine from DESERT DATA 503 Hotel Plaza Boulder City, NV 89005 --^ HAPPY VALENTINES DAY from DESERT DATA I Newer gel a Valentine!! (702)294-6224 FAX 294 0141 Word Processing.Newsletters .COLOR LASER COPIES .Transcription UPSIFedE .Resumes. Forms .Laminating.Notary. Binding Courtesy Photo PINOCHLE CLUB — Cooking brunch for the Michigan Day celebration were Pinochle Club members. In the first row, from left, are Francis Swing, Clara Holt, Lisa Houlihan, Patrick Houlihan and Mary Bevao. Back row: Jack Greening, Leonard Hagar and Chis Greening. delegates are working on a needs assessment survey throughout • Nevada to convey senior issues to the NSHC. i VERN'S TEXACO IS noui opcfi! Need a Smog /or Oil Change? Come on in. Mechanics on Duty. Free services U.S. Bank representatives will be at the center at 12:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 19, to explain free senior checking and banking services. Lori Sluzynski and Alison Borra will discuss banking services and answer questions. UNLV conference The gerontology program of the College of Extended Studies, UNLV, in cooperation with Carla Sloan, administrator for Nevada's Division for Aging Services, will present a conference on senior issues from 12:30 to 5:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 20, at UNLV. The conference, "Aging, Southwestern Style," will offer 10 sessions with issues ranging from the quality of nursing care to marketingtoolder adults. Professionals from 14 UNLV departments, inclvding anthropology, kinesiology\ j 7~

PAGE 11

\ Page 10 Henderson Home News Thursday, February 12,1998 Thursday, February 12, 1998 Henderson Home News Page t1 I .^. • ,^."V Valentine's party Saturday at Center SENIOR CENTER HIGHLIGHTS 27 £. TEXAS ST. 565-6990 The center is open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to t.iuay, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays, from 6 to 10 p.m. Mc.iday to Thursday, from 11 a.m. '0 1 p.m Sundays for lunch. Valentine's Day Party Saturday I'lic Henderson Senior Center wi 11 host its annual St. Valentine's Dny party, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 14. Betty Dukes, Jean Sadler and Nona Ferryman will coordinate volunteers from the Henderson Parks and Recreation staff, Henderson Seniors' Auxiliary and Ki. ights of Columbus for a special holiday treat for home-bound seuiors and seniors at the center KofC volunteers will cook a made-to-order Saturday brunch for $1.25. The party will include lioor prizes and photos in the (Itxorated dining room. Richard Slu twell on sax and Jean Johnson at the keyboards will ent( rtain. The event is an opportunity for seniors who have never visited the center to drop in and learn about available programs and ev£ nts and to. meet the center's energetic volunteers. Speaking of hearts Anyone needing a Valentine's gift for a special person is entouraged to visit the center's gift shop. A variety of gifts are available, all handmade by the Friday Crafts Group. Proceeds benefit IIK,' RSVP volunteer program. Helen Hymas is starting a Hearts Club—competitive hearts. H\ '^as and RSVP volunteer Marie Hoshovsky are recruiting players and teachers to play Hearts from 9:30 to 11 a.m. Friday. Several levels of play will be otlered from recreational to cut ihroat. Those interested in If a ning or participating in the ;. mie are asked to drop in. Heartfelt thanks The Henderson Seniors'Auxiliary and Chairwoman Othena Williams never forget homebound seniors. Kathy Weese, Lucy Hutton, Susie Segura and Richard and Evelyn Conrad baked Valentine's Day cookies for the home-bound, which were packed with a holiday message of good cheer from the Auxiliary by Gwen Woods, Beverly Wigglesworth, Dorothy Vondenbrink, Betty Dukes and the Conrads. They were delivered to home-bound seniors by Cathohc Charities. The Senior Center thanks Catholic Charities and Henderson Seniors' Auxiliary volunteers for their generosity. Free skin screening Richard Diskin,DO,of Diskin Dermatology, will ofter free skin cancer screenings to seniors at the center by appointment from 9 a.m. to noon Friday, Feb 13. He will also provide information on how to protect skin from the sun. Call 565-6990 for an appointment. Birthday party On the third Wednesday of each month, the center hosts_a birthday party for all seniors born in that month. Betty Dukes has organized a special party to be held at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 18, for seniors born in February. Staff" and volunteers from the Concorde Retirement and Assisted Living Community will provide decorated cakes and ice cream. BettyGunthrieofHumana wall play sing-along songs. All seniors are invited to attend this festive event and wish February seniors a happy birthday. Silver Congress Jean Maher, one of four Nevada delegates to the National Silver Haired Congress, will be at the center at noon Wednesday, Feb 18, distributing survey questionnaires to obtain senior views. "The Nevada Delegation to the National Silver Haired Congress is a group of four appointees who will represent Nevada at the annual meetingheld in Washington, D.C. by presenting non-partisan, intergenerational solutions to the issues before Congress," said Maher. At the request of the Nevada Division of Aging, the SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL NEWSPAPER ADVERTISE l^< THE NEWS 564-1881 Let Our Family Take Care Of Your Family Family Owned &. Operated *^ Staff Has Over 25 Yrs. Experience In So. Nevada Burial & Cremation • Serving All Faiths HITES FUNERAL SERVICES ^^3B Donations to AFAN (Aids for Aids Nevada) 568-1747 • 438 W. Sunset Rd. "^/fiSiS {Available 24 HRS. • 7 Days Member of NMIomi Funeral Director Aisoc Worldwide Shipping | Courtesy Photo MUSICIANS — Entertaining seniors at the Michigan Days celebration were pianist Jean Johnston and saxophonist Richard Shotwell. WARREL BILLY (X^ I got a COLOR Valentine from DESERT DATA 503 Hotel Plaza Boulder City, NV 89005 --^ HAPPY VALENTINES DAY from DESERT DATA I Newer gel a Valentine!! (702)294-6224 FAX 294 0141 Word Processing.Newsletters .COLOR LASER COPIES .Transcription UPSIFedE .Resumes. Forms .Laminating.Notary. Binding Courtesy Photo PINOCHLE CLUB — Cooking brunch for the Michigan Day celebration were Pinochle Club members. In the first row, from left, are Francis Swing, Clara Holt, Lisa Houlihan, Patrick Houlihan and Mary Bevao. Back row: Jack Greening, Leonard Hagar and Chis Greening. delegates are working on a needs assessment survey throughout • Nevada to convey senior issues to the NSHC. i VERN'S TEXACO IS noui opcfi! Need a Smog /or Oil Change? Come on in. Mechanics on Duty. Free services U.S. Bank representatives will be at the center at 12:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 19, to explain free senior checking and banking services. Lori Sluzynski and Alison Borra will discuss banking services and answer questions. UNLV conference The gerontology program of the College of Extended Studies, UNLV, in cooperation with Carla Sloan, administrator for Nevada's Division for Aging Services, will present a conference on senior issues from 12:30 to 5:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 20, at UNLV. The conference, "Aging, Southwestern Style," will offer 10 sessions with issues ranging from the quality of nursing care to marketingtoolder adults. Professionals from 14 UNLV departments, inclvding anthropology, kinesiology\ j 7~

PAGE 12

Page 12 Henderson Home News Thursday, February 12, mW^ .:.::£ifcj-c EDUCATION BRIEFS iO Bartlett ES information There will be no school at Bartlett Elementary School Monday in observance of Presidents'Day. The school will have a half-day staff development on Feb. 20, with the following schedule: Morning kindergarten, 9:05 to 10:15 a.m.; afternoon kindergarten, 11 a.m. to 12 12:15 p.m., grades 1-5, 9:05 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Breakfast will be served but there will be no lunch. SafeKey will be available before school and beginning at the 12:15 p. m. dismissal. The February skating party will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, at Crystal Palace Skating Center, 1110 E. Lake Mead Drive. The school receives $1 from each paid admission of $3.50 and this party will benefit the kindergarten classes. Bartlett parents and business owners can become yearbook sponsors. For only $25, they can purchase an ad in the 1997/98 yearbook. Turn in business cards and a check payable to Bartlett ES at the school office. Space is limited. Basic HS News Briefs Sophomore Jessica Magro will r(^resent Basic Highr School at the Hugh O'Brien Youth Leadership Institute this sum^er. Every year, one sophomore student from the school is selected to attend the prestigious youth leadership program. Magro, who recently completed the first semester with a 4.0 grade-point average, is involved in Student Council, Key Club, Spanish Club and Mu Alpha Theta. She also plays volleyball, soccer and Softball for the Lady Wolves. \-^^-C^ Brotlierhood Week celebrated Green Valley High School is winding down itsn of Brotherhood Week. A king and queen are crowned each day during lunch, followed by entertainment from a specific culture. Monday was Asian Pacific American Day. King Mark AejtfititJ' and Queen Joy Hay were crowned. Class Act, a Polynesian.dance and music group entertained. Tuesday was African American Day. King Jamar Glasper and Queen Brianna Coleman were crowned. CODAME-Hubbard Dancers entertained. Wednesday was Native American Day. King Brandon Leavitte and Queen Liz Scott were crowned. Jim Big John entertained. Today is Hispanic American Day. King Ryan Stone and Queens Linda Del Rosario and Page Smith will be crowned. Armando will entertain. Friday will be Europeem American Day. King Bryce Porter and Queen Danielle Bradfish will be crowned. The Green Valley High School Jazz Band will entertain. McCaw kids save the day Thursday, February 12, 1998 Henderson Home News Page 13 Sharon Jackson News Staff Writer Two fourth-grade boys were riding bicycles at McCaw Elementary School Saturday afternoon and ended up saving taxpayers thousands of dollars. The problein was noticed when Justin Dahl and Matt Mulhollem saw a puddle outside the multipurpose room. "They were resflly observant and noticed water coming from the inside of the door," McCaw principal Janet Dobry said. She just happened to be at school that day for a meeting. "They really insisted I just had to come and check this out, and sure enough, 1 opened the door and there was an inch of water all over the multi-purpose room and kitchen floor and you could hear water running," she said. "It was just coming out like water coming out of a faucet." A water heater in the attic sprung a leak and caused a flood. The ceiling.tile was falling and -ihfenlanager'sdesk in the kitchen, including the computer and telephone, was sitting in water. A custodian and school district emergency crew was called to turn off the water to the heater. "Basically by them alerting us to the problem they saved taxpayers thousands of dollars," Dobry said. "No one was expected to be in the area until Monday. If water would have been rurming for 36 hours longer, we would have had a muck deeper accumulation ^ ...it would have ruined everything on the bottom shelves [in the kitchen] and the electrical appliances would have been compromised ... and who knows what would have happened to the ceiling." Dahl and Mulhollem not only made Monday better by alerting' the proper authorities to the situation, but they also stayed to help clean up the mess. "We are just really proud of these kids, they did the right thing and the" fact they stayed to help with the clean up—that is pretty dam nice, too. It shows that kids can be and are responsible," Dobry said. Dr. Pat Herron, assistant superintendent of facilities and transportation congratulated the boys and presented each of them Arith a $25 gift certificate to Walmart. 'Booter* &Cafe • Psychic Readings • Gifts •Jewelry • Clothine 1N. Green Valley Plwy.| 450-7953 \ HENDERSON Now Taking Reservations Dinners Starting at... ^6^^ Champagne Special for Lovers ^9'^ IS E. Lake Mead D rive S6S-0122 '^'JZidi!!^^* i Ref lexology workshop offered Feb. 17 Dooley Gemstones Gemstones at Dooley Elementary School for January were: Kindergarten: Dylan Jones, Anthony Foote, Tyler Puetz. Grade 1: Jonathan Kennoy, Justin Burdno, Richard Velasquez, Courtney Floth and Kevin Kanowitz. Grade 3: Jennifer Delgado, MeHssa Rademaker, Thomas Hughes and Nicole Neilson. Grade 4: Michael Ames, David Wilson, Jessica Oliva and Leah Armstrong. Grade 5: Danielle Accardo, Eric Brown and Melinda Atteberry. Methodists to host fund-raiser The Henderson United Methodist Women will sponsor a chicken stew dinner Feb. 28, at the First Henderson United Methodist Church, 609 E. Horizon Dr. A fund-raiser for mission projects, dinner will be served from 5 to 7 p.m. ^ The cost, at the door, will be $3.50 for adults and $1.50 for children. There will be no advance ticket sales. For reservations, call 4512858 or 565-4195. The Nevada Institute of Reflexology will hold a free • workshop on Foot Reflexology from 7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 17. Topics' will include using Reflexology as a tool for stress reduction and the role of the feet in body jjosture. It will be held at the offices of the Stress Management Center of Nevada, 601 Whitney Ranch Dr. Bldg. C, Suite 12. Alexandra L. Ferguson, a certified Reflexologist of the American Reflexology Certification Board will be the instructor. Registration is required as seating is limited. To reserve a seat, call 458-8992. Reflexology is a scientific art based on the premise that within the feet, hands and ears are reflexes which directly correspond to all parts of the body. Using fingers and thumbs, specific pressure is applied to these areas, causinga reduction in stress which in turn may create physiological changes. Reflexology is gaining recognition as a complimentary therapy, a spokesman said. A complimentary therapy is one which works well with, in s^'{)port of and does not compete wjihltraditional form s of stress reduction and medical therapies. While reflexology is not a medical or healing treatment for specific ills of the body, its ability to reduce stress has long lfeerr~p seen as a benefit. There will be one hour of lecture and discussion followed by one hour of hands-on instruction tor self-help techniques. Gene's Automotive Service & Repair LADIES: tired of going in for an oil change and coming out with a complete overhaul? We won't take advantage of you, Quality Work ^ Fair Prices! 'fmaa • ELECTRICAL •FUEL INJECTION •AIR CONDITIONING •COOLING SYSTEM ALSO: Brakes Lube & Tune Front Wheel Drive. And Minor Engine Repair 105 Coogan Henderson 566-8886 Men. Sat. Sam 5pm %3 J w — u Dine Elegantly ^jQ for a Romantic Valentine's Day at... ^k(ficm Sufrfien C^ Choose from a Variety of entree's Starting at $16.95 Free Glass of Korbel Champagne with all dinners Reservations Suggested Lounge Open 24 hours .O, 2241 N. Green Valley Pkwy. at Warm Springs in Albcrtons Shopping Center 454-4211 Cs ^weet g^ ealsJ ^ • ^? I $16,000.00 MOKE Feb. 13th 28th Hit the daily specified Four -Of-A-Kind & receive a 1 DO COIN BONUS on all video poker machines at... Guaranteed Cash Giveaway C • A • S • I • N • O 140 Water Street • Downtown Henderson (702)564-1811 February 13th -16th $8,000 guaranteed Per casino Rii\es pos casinos BOYD GAMING HENDERSON Logo Wear! Mock Turtle Necks, Sweatshirts, & Silk Jackets! on specified video poker, slot & keno machine wini! Rules posted at \ CAS! NO Boulder Higtiway, Souttf of Sunset (702)654-8100 :i<'. Basic teams with Durango to make 'Horrors' D.B. Marcinlak News Staff Writer Producing a play becomes quite a production for many valley schools as directors seek the most cost-effective way to produce a memorable and educational experience for their students. This may be so, but when two valley high schools put their heads together, producing a play becomes a "Little Shop of Horrors." Basic and Durango High Schools have accomplished the unusual feat of building an authentic set to the play about a plant whose thirst for blood acts as a fertilizer for its growth. The play will appear at Durango HS Feb. 10-13. While schools have hel ped each other to build a set before, what's most interesting about this project is the complexity of the set. The set is unique because of the large, fully operational plants which were built. Since there are no useable sets on the West Coast, Basic's theatre teacher Helene Laatikainen decided to team with Durango's theatre teacher to bring a set to the area. Through sharing the set, the schools hope to rent the pieces toother schools in the state and on the West Coast to make a profit for their theatre programs. "Both of uscut ourselves two to three times each. We were bleeding all over it, then the students came along with their sewing needles and pricked themselves some more," Laatikainen said. "We said. This plant is already taking its victims.'" Laatikainen and her husband Wayne, who works as an engineer, designed and built the monstrous plants at Basic and transported them to Durango for the production. As the story goes, each timethe plant gets a taste of blood, it unexpectedly grows. To have an authentic set, the schools built several plants of various sizes. The plants are fully functional with operating pods which nip like a mouth. This is an essential part of the story because it reflects the personality of the plant, the collaborating teachers said. Building the frame to the smaller plants was not as difficult at the large one, which is nearly the size of a Volkeswagen Bug. The largest plant is designed to tit Lee Zaichick/News Staff HORROR SHOPPING—Durango High School student Katie Matthews, as Audrey, practices the moment the monster plant will devour her in "The Little Shop of Horrors." one person inside to operate its jowls as the plant searches for its next victim in the play. "When you get the score, you get plans to build the set. There are no measurements though. It's just a pretty picture and here it is," she said. There likely arenotmore "Little Shop of Horrors" sets because it requires a lot of time and expertise to build, she said. "It intimidates them [directors to build]," Laatikainen said. "Had I never done it, I would have been shaking in my boots, but I've done it before so I thought, 'Come on. You can do it,'" she said. With the help of drama students, she and her husband built the set using expertise fi-om past experiences with similar sets. "What happened is I've done the show two times myself and it finally ended up being an 'Act of Congress' to get a set for the show," Laatikainen said. Not only did Basic have to have a set shipped from across the country, but when it arrived both times, it almost had to be rebuilt, she said. Working since before Christmas, the Basic group of students helped sew, staple and glue foam and fabric to the plant monsters. Sometimes working 10 hours in a day, students labored to produce, the set on time. It cost the schools $1,100 to build the set from scratch, nearly half of what it would have if they were to rent it and have it shipped across the country. The pieces will be stored at Durango, but when Basic produces the play in the upcoming year, they will merfely ship it across town. Advertising on the Internet, the two schools plan to market Theatre in the Valley will present "Squabbles" by Marshall Karp, directed by Lee Feldman, at the Kesterson Valley View Recreation Center, at Harris and Basic, in Henderson. The comedy is about a young couple and their in-laws; Because of unforseen circumstances it is necessary for the in-laws to move in with their children. Needless to say, mom and dad are far from compatible, leaving the kids searching for solutions. Robert Abel plays the curmudgeon father-in-law, Diane Kremser the mother-in-law, Erin Auerbach and Henry Cutrona are the frustrated young couple. Ken Feldman is Dad's card playing buddy, Ed Clayton is handyman Hector Lopez, with a penchant for making himself right at home and Charlotte Walton is the no-nonsense governess who resembles the Bride of Frankenstein. Performances are at 8 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, Feb. 1328; and at 2 p.m. Sundays. Tickets are $9 general admission, $6 for students and seniors. For information and reservations call 458-PLAY. their work and spUt any profits from renting the pieces. "Theatre by nature is an ensemble experience. That is how we operate," Laatikainen said. "We have a relationship with these kids," she said. "That [building the sets together] was one of those bridges we built for a stronger relationship." To perform Little Shop of Horrors, the school would have had to pay fit)m $800 to $1,000 one way to have a set shipped in fi-om Illinois, the collaborating teachers said. "We should be cordial in sharing what we have and not vicious because we're rival high schools," said Durango theatre teacher Colleen Brown. She added the collaborative project is a perfect exam pie of how schools tan work together for one common goal — doing something which benefits the students involved. "I love big shows because it gets more kids involved," shesaid. "It saves some lives. It gets them off the streets after school." Brown said one student who is known as a trouble-maker discovered by becoming involved in the project, he had a fiin alternative to hanging out with his friends after school and causing harm to others. • II drive Saturday On Valentine's Day, Feb. 14, Saturn retail facilities nationwide are joining America's leading donor organizations to encourage millions of American's to give the gift of life. Locally, Satiim dealers will partner with United Blood Services to encourage Las Vegas and Henderson residents to give the blood this Valentine's Day. The public is invited to visit area Saturn dealerships from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday to participate in the Five Points of Life National Donor Day. To donate blood, donors must be 17 years old, and weigh 110 or more pounds. Call 564-1881 with news tips ^• THE MIRACLE SKYLIGHT S-OLATUBE, The original lublar skylight Light up a Bathroom/C'ioscl Brighten a Kitchen/f-amily Rni • It looks like recessed lighting $25.00 off Installation Mention this ad. OIILM expires March 15, IWK SUN CAT SKYLIGHTS 658-9847 ICBO APPROVAL #5057 Aulhon/ctI Dealer hir .Solaiutv liilcmalional. IIK AMERICAN FENCE CO. "FOR ALL OF YODR FENCING NEEDS" 12'x34' MARE MOTEL With Two... 12'xl2' CORRALS Track & Purlin May vary In size & gauge CHAIN LINK WROUGHT IRON HORSE CORRALS FARM FENCING GATES GATE OPERATORS • SHELTERS WOOD VINYL FENCE • DOG RUNS 4230 LOSEE RD. 399-2669 Craig Cheyenne u-i Cardiology Associates of Lake Mead Serving the Greater Henderson, Green Valley, and Boulder City Areas Invites all to Celebrate Valentine's Day At our /// Cardiac Rehabilitation Open House Meet the staff, learn about cardiovascular fitness, and enjoy some light refreshments with the people who are... Healing Hearts in the Heart of Our Community Thursday, February 12, from U:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. 1701 ffeen Valley Parkway Bldg. #8 Henderson, NV 89014 564-4441 T Everything You're In The Market For SHQPPinii Smith's Food and Drug Center Bank of America First Security Bank CHOICES Wendy's Old Fashfoned Hamburgers Anthony & Sylvan Pools Allstate Insurance liiiE Coldstone Creamery DIMartino's Your Neighborhood ttalian Eatery General Nutrition Center Mail Boxes, Etc. Ml) Manhattan Bagel Pick Up Stix Express Pizza Hut Prestige Travel sTonc's Radio Shack Rubk)'s Baja Grill Starbuck's Coffee Company State Farm insurance THBQU Subway Sandwiches The Water Place Vogue Cleaners Zuka juice IIURY Marketplace Developed and managed by American Nevada Corporation A Greenspun Corporation Northeast Corner of Green Valley Parkway and Lake Mead Drive ;s* ^

PAGE 13

Page 12 Henderson Home News Thursday, February 12, mW^ .:.::£ifcj-c EDUCATION BRIEFS iO Bartlett ES information There will be no school at Bartlett Elementary School Monday in observance of Presidents'Day. The school will have a half-day staff development on Feb. 20, with the following schedule: Morning kindergarten, 9:05 to 10:15 a.m.; afternoon kindergarten, 11 a.m. to 12 12:15 p.m., grades 1-5, 9:05 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Breakfast will be served but there will be no lunch. SafeKey will be available before school and beginning at the 12:15 p. m. dismissal. The February skating party will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, at Crystal Palace Skating Center, 1110 E. Lake Mead Drive. The school receives $1 from each paid admission of $3.50 and this party will benefit the kindergarten classes. Bartlett parents and business owners can become yearbook sponsors. For only $25, they can purchase an ad in the 1997/98 yearbook. Turn in business cards and a check payable to Bartlett ES at the school office. Space is limited. Basic HS News Briefs Sophomore Jessica Magro will r(^resent Basic Highr School at the Hugh O'Brien Youth Leadership Institute this sum^er. Every year, one sophomore student from the school is selected to attend the prestigious youth leadership program. Magro, who recently completed the first semester with a 4.0 grade-point average, is involved in Student Council, Key Club, Spanish Club and Mu Alpha Theta. She also plays volleyball, soccer and Softball for the Lady Wolves. \-^^-C^ Brotlierhood Week celebrated Green Valley High School is winding down itsn of Brotherhood Week. A king and queen are crowned each day during lunch, followed by entertainment from a specific culture. Monday was Asian Pacific American Day. King Mark AejtfititJ' and Queen Joy Hay were crowned. Class Act, a Polynesian.dance and music group entertained. Tuesday was African American Day. King Jamar Glasper and Queen Brianna Coleman were crowned. CODAME-Hubbard Dancers entertained. Wednesday was Native American Day. King Brandon Leavitte and Queen Liz Scott were crowned. Jim Big John entertained. Today is Hispanic American Day. King Ryan Stone and Queens Linda Del Rosario and Page Smith will be crowned. Armando will entertain. Friday will be Europeem American Day. King Bryce Porter and Queen Danielle Bradfish will be crowned. The Green Valley High School Jazz Band will entertain. McCaw kids save the day Thursday, February 12, 1998 Henderson Home News Page 13 Sharon Jackson News Staff Writer Two fourth-grade boys were riding bicycles at McCaw Elementary School Saturday afternoon and ended up saving taxpayers thousands of dollars. The problein was noticed when Justin Dahl and Matt Mulhollem saw a puddle outside the multipurpose room. "They were resflly observant and noticed water coming from the inside of the door," McCaw principal Janet Dobry said. She just happened to be at school that day for a meeting. "They really insisted I just had to come and check this out, and sure enough, 1 opened the door and there was an inch of water all over the multi-purpose room and kitchen floor and you could hear water running," she said. "It was just coming out like water coming out of a faucet." A water heater in the attic sprung a leak and caused a flood. The ceiling.tile was falling and -ihfenlanager'sdesk in the kitchen, including the computer and telephone, was sitting in water. A custodian and school district emergency crew was called to turn off the water to the heater. "Basically by them alerting us to the problem they saved taxpayers thousands of dollars," Dobry said. "No one was expected to be in the area until Monday. If water would have been rurming for 36 hours longer, we would have had a muck deeper accumulation ^ ...it would have ruined everything on the bottom shelves [in the kitchen] and the electrical appliances would have been compromised ... and who knows what would have happened to the ceiling." Dahl and Mulhollem not only made Monday better by alerting' the proper authorities to the situation, but they also stayed to help clean up the mess. "We are just really proud of these kids, they did the right thing and the" fact they stayed to help with the clean up—that is pretty dam nice, too. It shows that kids can be and are responsible," Dobry said. Dr. Pat Herron, assistant superintendent of facilities and transportation congratulated the boys and presented each of them Arith a $25 gift certificate to Walmart. 'Booter* &Cafe • Psychic Readings • Gifts •Jewelry • Clothine 1N. Green Valley Plwy.| 450-7953 \ HENDERSON Now Taking Reservations Dinners Starting at... ^6^^ Champagne Special for Lovers ^9'^ IS E. Lake Mead D rive S6S-0122 '^'JZidi!!^^* i Ref lexology workshop offered Feb. 17 Dooley Gemstones Gemstones at Dooley Elementary School for January were: Kindergarten: Dylan Jones, Anthony Foote, Tyler Puetz. Grade 1: Jonathan Kennoy, Justin Burdno, Richard Velasquez, Courtney Floth and Kevin Kanowitz. Grade 3: Jennifer Delgado, MeHssa Rademaker, Thomas Hughes and Nicole Neilson. Grade 4: Michael Ames, David Wilson, Jessica Oliva and Leah Armstrong. Grade 5: Danielle Accardo, Eric Brown and Melinda Atteberry. Methodists to host fund-raiser The Henderson United Methodist Women will sponsor a chicken stew dinner Feb. 28, at the First Henderson United Methodist Church, 609 E. Horizon Dr. A fund-raiser for mission projects, dinner will be served from 5 to 7 p.m. ^ The cost, at the door, will be $3.50 for adults and $1.50 for children. There will be no advance ticket sales. For reservations, call 4512858 or 565-4195. The Nevada Institute of Reflexology will hold a free • workshop on Foot Reflexology from 7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 17. Topics' will include using Reflexology as a tool for stress reduction and the role of the feet in body jjosture. It will be held at the offices of the Stress Management Center of Nevada, 601 Whitney Ranch Dr. Bldg. C, Suite 12. Alexandra L. Ferguson, a certified Reflexologist of the American Reflexology Certification Board will be the instructor. Registration is required as seating is limited. To reserve a seat, call 458-8992. Reflexology is a scientific art based on the premise that within the feet, hands and ears are reflexes which directly correspond to all parts of the body. Using fingers and thumbs, specific pressure is applied to these areas, causinga reduction in stress which in turn may create physiological changes. Reflexology is gaining recognition as a complimentary therapy, a spokesman said. A complimentary therapy is one which works well with, in s^'{)port of and does not compete wjihltraditional form s of stress reduction and medical therapies. While reflexology is not a medical or healing treatment for specific ills of the body, its ability to reduce stress has long lfeerr~p seen as a benefit. There will be one hour of lecture and discussion followed by one hour of hands-on instruction tor self-help techniques. Gene's Automotive Service & Repair LADIES: tired of going in for an oil change and coming out with a complete overhaul? We won't take advantage of you, Quality Work ^ Fair Prices! 'fmaa • ELECTRICAL •FUEL INJECTION •AIR CONDITIONING •COOLING SYSTEM ALSO: Brakes Lube & Tune Front Wheel Drive. And Minor Engine Repair 105 Coogan Henderson 566-8886 Men. Sat. Sam 5pm %3 J w — u Dine Elegantly ^jQ for a Romantic Valentine's Day at... ^k(ficm Sufrfien C^ Choose from a Variety of entree's Starting at $16.95 Free Glass of Korbel Champagne with all dinners Reservations Suggested Lounge Open 24 hours .O, 2241 N. Green Valley Pkwy. at Warm Springs in Albcrtons Shopping Center 454-4211 Cs ^weet g^ ealsJ ^ • ^? I $16,000.00 MOKE Feb. 13th 28th Hit the daily specified Four -Of-A-Kind & receive a 1 DO COIN BONUS on all video poker machines at... Guaranteed Cash Giveaway C • A • S • I • N • O 140 Water Street • Downtown Henderson (702)564-1811 February 13th -16th $8,000 guaranteed Per casino Rii\es pos casinos BOYD GAMING HENDERSON Logo Wear! Mock Turtle Necks, Sweatshirts, & Silk Jackets! on specified video poker, slot & keno machine wini! Rules posted at \ CAS! NO Boulder Higtiway, Souttf of Sunset (702)654-8100 :i<'. Basic teams with Durango to make 'Horrors' D.B. Marcinlak News Staff Writer Producing a play becomes quite a production for many valley schools as directors seek the most cost-effective way to produce a memorable and educational experience for their students. This may be so, but when two valley high schools put their heads together, producing a play becomes a "Little Shop of Horrors." Basic and Durango High Schools have accomplished the unusual feat of building an authentic set to the play about a plant whose thirst for blood acts as a fertilizer for its growth. The play will appear at Durango HS Feb. 10-13. While schools have hel ped each other to build a set before, what's most interesting about this project is the complexity of the set. The set is unique because of the large, fully operational plants which were built. Since there are no useable sets on the West Coast, Basic's theatre teacher Helene Laatikainen decided to team with Durango's theatre teacher to bring a set to the area. Through sharing the set, the schools hope to rent the pieces toother schools in the state and on the West Coast to make a profit for their theatre programs. "Both of uscut ourselves two to three times each. We were bleeding all over it, then the students came along with their sewing needles and pricked themselves some more," Laatikainen said. "We said. This plant is already taking its victims.'" Laatikainen and her husband Wayne, who works as an engineer, designed and built the monstrous plants at Basic and transported them to Durango for the production. As the story goes, each timethe plant gets a taste of blood, it unexpectedly grows. To have an authentic set, the schools built several plants of various sizes. The plants are fully functional with operating pods which nip like a mouth. This is an essential part of the story because it reflects the personality of the plant, the collaborating teachers said. Building the frame to the smaller plants was not as difficult at the large one, which is nearly the size of a Volkeswagen Bug. The largest plant is designed to tit Lee Zaichick/News Staff HORROR SHOPPING—Durango High School student Katie Matthews, as Audrey, practices the moment the monster plant will devour her in "The Little Shop of Horrors." one person inside to operate its jowls as the plant searches for its next victim in the play. "When you get the score, you get plans to build the set. There are no measurements though. It's just a pretty picture and here it is," she said. There likely arenotmore "Little Shop of Horrors" sets because it requires a lot of time and expertise to build, she said. "It intimidates them [directors to build]," Laatikainen said. "Had I never done it, I would have been shaking in my boots, but I've done it before so I thought, 'Come on. You can do it,'" she said. With the help of drama students, she and her husband built the set using expertise fi-om past experiences with similar sets. "What happened is I've done the show two times myself and it finally ended up being an 'Act of Congress' to get a set for the show," Laatikainen said. Not only did Basic have to have a set shipped from across the country, but when it arrived both times, it almost had to be rebuilt, she said. Working since before Christmas, the Basic group of students helped sew, staple and glue foam and fabric to the plant monsters. Sometimes working 10 hours in a day, students labored to produce, the set on time. It cost the schools $1,100 to build the set from scratch, nearly half of what it would have if they were to rent it and have it shipped across the country. The pieces will be stored at Durango, but when Basic produces the play in the upcoming year, they will merfely ship it across town. Advertising on the Internet, the two schools plan to market Theatre in the Valley will present "Squabbles" by Marshall Karp, directed by Lee Feldman, at the Kesterson Valley View Recreation Center, at Harris and Basic, in Henderson. The comedy is about a young couple and their in-laws; Because of unforseen circumstances it is necessary for the in-laws to move in with their children. Needless to say, mom and dad are far from compatible, leaving the kids searching for solutions. Robert Abel plays the curmudgeon father-in-law, Diane Kremser the mother-in-law, Erin Auerbach and Henry Cutrona are the frustrated young couple. Ken Feldman is Dad's card playing buddy, Ed Clayton is handyman Hector Lopez, with a penchant for making himself right at home and Charlotte Walton is the no-nonsense governess who resembles the Bride of Frankenstein. Performances are at 8 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, Feb. 1328; and at 2 p.m. Sundays. Tickets are $9 general admission, $6 for students and seniors. For information and reservations call 458-PLAY. their work and spUt any profits from renting the pieces. "Theatre by nature is an ensemble experience. That is how we operate," Laatikainen said. "We have a relationship with these kids," she said. "That [building the sets together] was one of those bridges we built for a stronger relationship." To perform Little Shop of Horrors, the school would have had to pay fit)m $800 to $1,000 one way to have a set shipped in fi-om Illinois, the collaborating teachers said. "We should be cordial in sharing what we have and not vicious because we're rival high schools," said Durango theatre teacher Colleen Brown. She added the collaborative project is a perfect exam pie of how schools tan work together for one common goal — doing something which benefits the students involved. "I love big shows because it gets more kids involved," shesaid. "It saves some lives. It gets them off the streets after school." Brown said one student who is known as a trouble-maker discovered by becoming involved in the project, he had a fiin alternative to hanging out with his friends after school and causing harm to others. • II drive Saturday On Valentine's Day, Feb. 14, Saturn retail facilities nationwide are joining America's leading donor organizations to encourage millions of American's to give the gift of life. Locally, Satiim dealers will partner with United Blood Services to encourage Las Vegas and Henderson residents to give the blood this Valentine's Day. The public is invited to visit area Saturn dealerships from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday to participate in the Five Points of Life National Donor Day. To donate blood, donors must be 17 years old, and weigh 110 or more pounds. Call 564-1881 with news tips ^• THE MIRACLE SKYLIGHT S-OLATUBE, The original lublar skylight Light up a Bathroom/C'ioscl Brighten a Kitchen/f-amily Rni • It looks like recessed lighting $25.00 off Installation Mention this ad. OIILM expires March 15, IWK SUN CAT SKYLIGHTS 658-9847 ICBO APPROVAL #5057 Aulhon/ctI Dealer hir .Solaiutv liilcmalional. IIK AMERICAN FENCE CO. "FOR ALL OF YODR FENCING NEEDS" 12'x34' MARE MOTEL With Two... 12'xl2' CORRALS Track & Purlin May vary In size & gauge CHAIN LINK WROUGHT IRON HORSE CORRALS FARM FENCING GATES GATE OPERATORS • SHELTERS WOOD VINYL FENCE • DOG RUNS 4230 LOSEE RD. 399-2669 Craig Cheyenne u-i Cardiology Associates of Lake Mead Serving the Greater Henderson, Green Valley, and Boulder City Areas Invites all to Celebrate Valentine's Day At our /// Cardiac Rehabilitation Open House Meet the staff, learn about cardiovascular fitness, and enjoy some light refreshments with the people who are... Healing Hearts in the Heart of Our Community Thursday, February 12, from U:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. 1701 ffeen Valley Parkway Bldg. #8 Henderson, NV 89014 564-4441 T Everything You're In The Market For SHQPPinii Smith's Food and Drug Center Bank of America First Security Bank CHOICES Wendy's Old Fashfoned Hamburgers Anthony & Sylvan Pools Allstate Insurance liiiE Coldstone Creamery DIMartino's Your Neighborhood ttalian Eatery General Nutrition Center Mail Boxes, Etc. Ml) Manhattan Bagel Pick Up Stix Express Pizza Hut Prestige Travel sTonc's Radio Shack Rubk)'s Baja Grill Starbuck's Coffee Company State Farm insurance THBQU Subway Sandwiches The Water Place Vogue Cleaners Zuka juice IIURY Marketplace Developed and managed by American Nevada Corporation A Greenspun Corporation Northeast Corner of Green Valley Parkway and Lake Mead Drive ;s* ^

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Page 14 Henderson Home News Thursday, February 12, 1998 Thursday, February 12, 1998 Henderson Home News Page 15 DEATHS Robert W. Georgeson Robert W. Georgeson, 83, died Monday, Feb 9. 1998 in Boulder City. He had been a resident of Boulder City •mce 1933. He was born March 25,1914 in St. Piuil, Minnesota and was a retired owner/operator of a retail men's clothing store. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army, having served in World War II. He seived on the Boulder City Advisory Council, was a member of the Charter t;onimission. chairman of the Boulder City Council, and former Mayor of iloulder City. He served for ten years on the Clark County Ple^ng Commission, was a member or the Boulder City Masonic Lodge #37. was a 32nd Degree Mason, merfiber of Desert Chapter #22 OES. member of Zelzah Shrine Temple, and member of the Boulder City Shrine Club. He is survived by his wife Lorraine L of Boulder City: step-son Purnell Westbrook Jr. of Crozet, Va.; two grandchildren: and five great-grandchildren. Services will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, Feb. 13 at BoulderCify Masonic Lodge. 901 Arizona St.. in Boulder City : The farriily requests donations be made to the American Heart Association in lieu of flowers. Arrangements were hatidled by Palm Mortuary of Henderson. Vernell Walker Vemeli Walker, 74, died Monday, Feb. 9. 1998, in a local hospice. Born Nov. 23, 1923, in Pomerene, Ariz., the homemaker was a 33-year resident of Henderson. She had also lived in Tucson, Ariz, and St. George, Utah. She is survived by five sons, Norman Walker of Las Vegas, Vaughn Evans and Earl Evans, both of Logandale, Eldon Evans of Sierra V
PAGE 15

Page 14 Henderson Home News Thursday, February 12, 1998 Thursday, February 12, 1998 Henderson Home News Page 15 DEATHS Robert W. Georgeson Robert W. Georgeson, 83, died Monday, Feb 9. 1998 in Boulder City. He had been a resident of Boulder City •mce 1933. He was born March 25,1914 in St. Piuil, Minnesota and was a retired owner/operator of a retail men's clothing store. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army, having served in World War II. He seived on the Boulder City Advisory Council, was a member of the Charter t;onimission. chairman of the Boulder City Council, and former Mayor of iloulder City. He served for ten years on the Clark County Ple^ng Commission, was a member or the Boulder City Masonic Lodge #37. was a 32nd Degree Mason, merfiber of Desert Chapter #22 OES. member of Zelzah Shrine Temple, and member of the Boulder City Shrine Club. He is survived by his wife Lorraine L of Boulder City: step-son Purnell Westbrook Jr. of Crozet, Va.; two grandchildren: and five great-grandchildren. Services will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, Feb. 13 at BoulderCify Masonic Lodge. 901 Arizona St.. in Boulder City : The farriily requests donations be made to the American Heart Association in lieu of flowers. Arrangements were hatidled by Palm Mortuary of Henderson. Vernell Walker Vemeli Walker, 74, died Monday, Feb. 9. 1998, in a local hospice. Born Nov. 23, 1923, in Pomerene, Ariz., the homemaker was a 33-year resident of Henderson. She had also lived in Tucson, Ariz, and St. George, Utah. She is survived by five sons, Norman Walker of Las Vegas, Vaughn Evans and Earl Evans, both of Logandale, Eldon Evans of Sierra V
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Page 16 Henderson Home News Thursday, February 12, 1998 Scoreboard Compiled by Clark County Schotil District .s 1998 Boys Basketball Sunrise Green Vallc\ Valley L* Vegas Eldorado Chaparral Raneho Silverado SNVTC Basic W 12 II 10 7 7 6 .S L 1 ,1 6 6 7 9 12 13 Sunset Cheyenne Gorman Cim-Meniorial Western Durango Bonanza Clark Girls Basketball Sunrise Silverado Green Vallev Chaparral Basic Las Vegas Eldorado SNVTC Raneho Vallev W L 7 ? Bulls Pistons Runhin' Rebels Cougars Jazz BM Silver East Bulls • Knicks Jazz Gators Hornets Dominators BM/W Silver Girls Magic Streaks Rockets Sharks BM/W Gold W L 1 Warnors Hornets Rockets Raptors Knicks Lakers Jazz Hawks Sunset Cheyenne Gorman Durango Bonanza Cim-Memorial Western Clark 3 5 S X 2 II I 12 I 13 W L '<) I BM/W GoldEast Girls Soccer Sunrise Runnin' Rebels Big Red Jazz Fighting Irish Lakers Magic BM/\A//SS Gold Girls Stars Jazz Raptors Comets Bulls Liberty Magic Hornets 4 4 2 1 0 w 5 4 2 2 2 0 W 5 4 1 0 W 4 4 3 3 2 1 1 0 w 4 3 2 2 1 0 1 0 1 0 3 0 4 0 5 0 L T 0 0 1 3 3 3 5 SS Silver East Lakers. Raptors Rebels ^ Magic Rockets Timberwolves Wizards Jazz W L T 5 0 0 1 0 1 0 3 0 3 0 SS Gold West 3 0 1 4 0 0 5 0 W L T L T 0 0 1 0 4 0 5 0 L T 0 0 0 0 Raptors Hoyas Hawks Mavericks Hornets Spurs Jazz Lakers Jazz Rebels Rockets Bulls Heat Sonics SS Diamond 4 1 0 3 2 0 3 2 0 3 2 0 2 3 0 2 3 0 2 3 0 1 4 0 W L T 5 0 0 4 1 0 3 2 0 2 3 0 1 4 0 0 5 0 SS Diamond East L T 0 0 Lightning Wolverines Green Wave Grizzlies Buckeyes Raptors W L T 5 0 0 3 2 0 3 2 0 <.2 3 0 1 4 0 SS Silver Girls W^ 5 4 4 2 2 2 1 0 L T; R ebelsMagic Hornets Stingrays BM/W Diamond 1 4 0 W L T 5 2 0 3 2 0 1 4 0 1 4 0 I W L T 4 1 0 4 1 0 4 1 4 1 Green Valley Chaparral Basic Silverado Raneho Valley Eldorado Las Vegas Boulder City Gorman Bonanza Cim-Memorial Durango Clark Cheyenne Weslem W L 14 0 Sunset Wrestling Sunrise I 10 I 14 W I. II 0 7 3. 6 2 \3 2 2 6 2 6 0 II W 7 6 4 4 4 2 I 0 6 3 3 4 2 3 4 0 T 0 I 3 f. 3 3 0 W Bulls 5 Lakers 4 Vikings 4 Pistons 3 Flying Eagles 2 Cavaliers 2 Spurs 0 Celtics 0 BM/W/SS Diam. Girls W Lakers 4 Raptors 4 Thunder 2 Celtics 0 L T 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 3 2 0 2 3 0 1 4 0 0 5 0 0 5 0 L T 1 0 1 0 3 0 5 0 Silver Springs Gold Sunset Silverado Green Valley L;LS Vegas Raneho Chaparral Basic Eldorado Vallev Cim-Memonal Durango Bonanza Cheyenne Clark Western Gorman HENDERSON PARKS and RECREATION DEPARTMENT BASKETBALL Black Mountain Silver W L T Sonics 4 1 0 w L 6 0 5 1 4 2 3 3 2 4 1 5 I) 6 Wolverines Rebels Cougars Lakers Nuggets Rockets Sonics Bulls Rebels Eagels Jazz Knicks Bulls Raptors Magic Mud Dogs SS Gold East SS Silver Jazz Lakers Crimson Tide Hornets Runnin' Rebels Bulls Suns Pistons W 5 4 3 3 2 2 1 0 w 5 4 3 3 2 2 1 0 w 5 4 4 2 2 1 1 1 L T 0 0 SS Silver West at BM Jazz Tarheels Knicks Bulls Slammin' Jammers Sonics Jayhawks Rockets Lakers Magic 16 & Over Adult BB W L T The Melting Pot 7 0 0 Lion Kings 6 10 Lakers 4 3 0 Bull 2 5 0 Levis 2 5 0 '^^pplebees 0 7 0 16 & Over Adult BBMW W L T Mud Dogs 6 2 0 Vanderwerken 6 2 0 AirQubnlll 3 5 0 Sara Lee 17 0 GREEN VALLEY ROLLERHOCKEY Standings as of 2/8/98 Gold Division L T 0 0 Ice Bergs Express Cougars Bears Mavericks Wolves Sharks W 6 5 4 2 2 1 0 T 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Leading Scorers Tiara Bowman, Cougars, 35 goals, 9 assls.. 44 pts; Hayden Hoffman, Ice Bergs, 31 goals, 13 assls. 44 pis.; Ben Hoist, Ice Bergs, 11 goals, 17 assts., 28 pts.; Roland Zagoni, Ice Bergs, I ."i goals. 12 assts., 27 pts.; Matthew Brown, Ice Bergs, 11 goals, 13 assls.. 24 pts.; Silver Division W L Ducks 8 0 Sharks SIv 4 2 Renegades SIv 4 3 IRA'S YOUR WAY. Make vour monev work the wav you want with a Pioneer Citizens 18-month IR.\. You can use it as a standard IR;\, a Roth \R\, or an Education IR.\. Any way you choose, you get the same great rate. Gall 731-2222 or visit any hranch today, including our new location at 8260 West Sahara, and get the IRiVs that work vour wav. •Annual Ptrixntafr' Yield acwirate v irf 1/1 .Wh Rates subject to chanite ith(Hii notlot: Suhjecl to penally for eariy ithdrawal Minimum investment ^lOO.fX). 18 month term Nevad a' s 3ank anisNs yy^ Member FDIC li=J Equal Housing Lender Raptors 2 3 I Rangers SIv 2 5 0 Fireblades 0 7 0 Leading Scorers Rocky Di Antonio. Ducks, 31 goals, 25 assLs,, 56 pts.; Eli Schwartzman, Ducks, 23 goals, 30 assls., 53 pts.; Nigel Walton, Sharks SIv. 33 goals, 5 assls., 38 pts.; Ryan Hedderly, Sharks SIv, 22 goals, 11 a.ssts., 33 pis.; Kyle Clay, Raptors, 23 goals, 6 a.s.sts., 29 pts. Bronze Division W 6 5 4 I 0 L 0 I 3 5 7 Thunder Brz Bulldogs Scorpions Blackhawks Wildcats Leading Scorers Ryan Logan, Thunder Brz, 33 goals, 3 a.ssts., 36 pts.; Marlon Mantle, Scorpions, 19 goals, 12 assls., 31 pLs.; Derek Combs, Scorpions, 20 goals, 6 a.ssts., 26 pts.; Brandon Stevens, Thunder Brz., 13 goals, 9assts., 22 pts; Stephen Manthei, Bulldogs, 12 goals, I Cassis., 22 pts. Platinum Division W High Rollers 6 Renegades 5 T.J. Cralg. Rattlers Jason Dramise, High Rollers Shaun Slerrett, Bullfrogs Paul Trovato, Renegades Jeremy Bucholz, Devils Daniel Terkel, Iguanas Diamond Division David Lawrence, Chiefs Patrick Homewood, Thunder Noah Harter. Rangers WRESTLING Fronn Page 15 15 3.00 13 3.25 23 5.11 32 6.40 55 7.86 61 8.71 GA AVR. 22 4.40 34 5.67 12 6.00 Silver Division (based on 2 full games) GA Avg. Ian Giovina/zo, Renegades SIv 1 0.50 Michael Balogh, Ducks 8 2.67 Sean Balogh, Ducks 4 2.67 Gino Campagna, Ducks 8 3.20 Nathan Fowler. Sharks SIv 9 4.50 Joey Bohan, Raptors 13 6.50 Joseph Renna. Rangers SIv 30 7.50 Andrew Hendrix, Fireblades 18 9.00 Rattlers Bullfrogs Iguanas Devils L 0 2 I 4 6 7 L T 1 0 2 0 4 0 2 0 3 0 3 0 Leading Scorers Cody Pelersen, High Rollers, 29 goals, 10 assts,, 39 pts.; Troy Beer, Bullfrogs, 28 goals, 9 assts., 37 pis.; Steven Trovato, Renegades, 16 goals, 11 as.sts., 27 pis.; Karim Guirguis, Renegades, 13 goals, 10 a^.sis., 23 pts.; Sean Fox, Rattlers, 18 goals, 4 assts., 22 pts. Adult Division :__ W Blades 4 Holiday Hockey 3 Post Net 3 Dark Warriors 2 Roadrunners 2 Boulder City Beavers 0 Leading Scorers TJKnudsen, BIades,20goals,6assls.,26pts.; Robert Vada.sy, Post Net, 12 goals, 10 as.sls., 22 pts.; Randy Huari.son, Blades, 7 goals, 10 assts., I7pLs.;TomChieIIo, Post Net, I2goaIs, 4 assts., 16 pts.; andy Amundson, Roadrunners, 11 goals, 5 assts., 16 pts. Diamond Division Chiefs Thunder Rangers Leading Scorers Andrew Amundson, Chiefs, l7goaIs, 11 as.sts., 28 pts.; Joey Dramise, Chiefs, 5 goals, 11 assts., 16 pis.; Casey Sparks, Thunder, 10 goals,Sassts., 15pts.;Matthew Prejean.Chiefs, 9 goals, 5 assls., 14 pis.; Tim Broo, Chiefs, 5 goals, 9 assls., 14 pts. Goalie Stats as of 2/8/98 Gold Division (based on 2 full games) GA Avg. Preston Day. Ice Bergs 14 4.67 Jeff Morgan, Cougars 13 6.50 Frank lovino. Wolves 13 6.50 Jim Bohan, Bears 27 6.75 Ryan Johnson, Ice Bergs 14 7.00 Matt Hands, Express 23 7.67 Ryan Kirsi, Sharks 16 8.00 Oscar Dhingra, Wolvs 23 11.50 Platinum Division (based on 2 full games) GA Avg. Chris Prejean, High Rollers 4 2.00 14 wrestlers to the dance, led by Yonas Woldu (125), Mario Paladino (140), Mike Bartholow (152) and Tom Cass (189) who were all 7-0 and will have No. 1 seeds in their weight class. "Each of these wrestlers have all had great seasons, but they will now have to take every match like it may be their last," Silverado coach Bob Clements SEiid, "No wrestler is going to lay down. This is the time for each kid to perform his best," In addition to the top seeds, the Skyhawks' other wrestlers will include: Lance Herndon, Bobby Asai, Kevin Riordan, Tom Rucci, Darryl McDonald, Brock Lafosto, Jason Canillo, Andy Socha, Jason Thompson and Joel Menendez. Diri^ M livln'OnThee CA-4 CASH REQUIREMENTS REGISTER FEBRUARY, 1998 Cash Requirements Register for the month of February, 1998. CA-5 PARTNERSHIP CITY OF HENDERSON PARKS & RECREATION AND HENDERSON BOYS' & GIRLS' CLUB SAFEKEYTYPE PROGRAM Partnership l)etween the City of Henderson Parks and Recreation Depariment and the Henderson Boys' and Girls' Club for a Safekey-type program. CA-6 FIRST AMENDMENT TO INTERLOCAL AGREEMENT INMATE HOUSING First amendment to the Interlocal Agreement for Inmate Housing. CA-7 AGREEMENT DECREASE CURRENT MONTHLY NETWORK Tl LINE CONNECTIONS SPRINT CENTRAL TELEPHONE COMPANY Agreement between the City of Henderson and Sprint Central Telephone Company to decrease current monthly network Tl line connections. CA-8 AGREEMENT COMMUNITY POLICING GRANT LANDSMAN GARDENS AND HAMPTON COURT Agreement between the City of Henderson and the Housing Authority of Clark County for a grant to be utilized for community policing at Landsman Gardens and Hampton Couri. CA-9 AGREEMENT FAIR HOUSING PLAN NEVADA FAIR HOUSING CENTER Agreement between the City of Henderson and the Nevada Fair Housing Center to facilitate implementation of the City's Fair Housing Plan. CA-10 AWARD CONTRACT UTILITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM CONTRACT SOLUTIONS FOR GOVERNMENT TECHNOLOGIES, INC. Award contract to Contract Solutions for Government Technologies, Inc., (SFG) for a Utility Management System. CA-11 AUTHORIZATION TO BID COMPUTER HARDWARE Authorization for Public Works Utility Division to go to bid for computer hardware for a Utihty Management System. CA-12 AUTHORIZATION TO ADVERTISE CONTRACT NO. 97.9831 TRAFTIC SIGNAL AT 1-515 & HORIZON DRIVE Authorization to advertise Contract No. 97-98*31, for a traffic signal at 1-515 and Horizon Drive. CA-13 AWARD CONTRACT NO. 96-9726 MARYLAND PKWY. 24-lNCH WATER TRANSMISSION MAIN RFTLACEMENT Award of Contract No. 96-97*26, for the Maryland Parkway 24-inch Water Transmission Main Replacement, to Telecor, Incorporated. CA-U AWARD CONTRACT NO. 96-97*21 THURMAN WHITE SITE IMPROVEMENTS Award Contract No. 96-97*21, for Thurman White She Improvements to the k>west rcspoasive and responsible bidder. CA-15 AWARD CONTRACT NO. 107-97*98 AERIAL LIFT TRUCK Award Contract No. 107-97*98, for an Aerial Lift Truck to the lowest responsive and responsible bidder. CA-16 AWARD CONTRACT NO 97-98*30 JUSTICE FACILITY DRAIN RETROFIT Award Contract No. 97-98*30, for the Justice Facility Drain Retrofit, to the k>west responsive and responsible bidder. CA-17 AWARD CONTRACT NO. 108-97*98 KVSES Award Contract No. 108-97*98, for Buses to Coach & Transit. CA-18 SPACE RENTAL RATE ADJUSTMENT HENDKRSON CONVENTION CENTER Adopt a new rale schedule for space rental and equipment charges for the Henderson Convention Center. CA-19 UPDATED FEE SCHEDULE POLICE SERVICESAVORKCARDS POLICE DEPARTMENT Adopt the updated Police Services Fee Schedule for work card fees. CA-20 AMENDMENT TO FISCAL IMPACT F(K)TH1LI.S DRIVE AT US-95 OVERPASS UTILITY ADJUSTMENT Amendment to fl.scal impact for Foothills Drive at US-95 overpass utility adjustment CA-21 BUDGET AUGMENTATION PARKS & RECREATION DEPARTMENT Aiigmeni (he Parks and Recreation Department 1997-98 budget to allow for the increased demands for expanded programs and facilities. CA-22 BUDtJET AWiMENTATlON INCREASE CONTRACT PRISONERS HENDERSON DETENTION CENTER Budget augmentation lo the Henderson Detention Center budget to support an increase in the numiwr of contract prisoners from Clark County up to 120 inmates. CA-23 RJNDING TO Pl!RCHASE ITEMS INCREASE CAPACITY HENDERSON DETENTION CENTER Funding lo purcha.se items for the Henderson Detention Center to increase its capability to accommodate up lo 260 inmates. CA-24 CLASS SPECIUCATION & WAGE ASSIGNMENT — K>LICE DEPARTMENT CORRECTIONS LIEUTENANTS Class Spedflcation for Corrections Lieutenants and the wage aMignment to Range 484 of the Police Wage Schedule. CA-25 AMEND STAFF COMPLEMENT POLICE DEPARTMENT CORRECTIONS LIEUTENANTS Amend the staff compicmcnt by adding two (2) Corrcctloiis Ueutenanti to Fund 01-21-04. CA-26 CLASS SPEOFICATION A WAGE ASSIGNMENT POIJCE DEPARTMENT a,ASSinCATION TECHNiaAN Claai SpedWtatlon for a iill c a H on Techntdan and wage a Mlgi i i eut to Range 430 of the CA-27 AMEND STAFF COMPLEMENT POUCB DBPARTMENT n.^SSmCATlON TEtTtNIOAN 4mmdlhr>l8rr>mplrmrnlbf • ddln>^(l)ClaMlf1cartonTertinMantcFuadOI-ll-e4. CA.28 AMEND STAFF COMPLEMENT POLICE DEPARTMENT BOOKING CLERK Amend the staff complement by adding one Booking Clerk to Fund 01-21-04. CA.29 AMEND STAFF COMPLEMENT I POLICE DEPARTMENT. Amend the staff complement by adding five (5) Corrections OfHcers I's to Fund 01-21-04. CA.30 AMEND STAFF COMPLEMENT POLICE DEPARTMENT POLICE SERGEANTS Amend the staff complement by adding three (3) Police Sergeants to, and deleting three (3) Police Officers from Fund 01-21-05. CA-31 AMEND STAFF COMPLEMENT POLICE DEPARTMENT POLICE RECORDS CLERK Amend the staff complement by adding one (1) Police Records Clerk to Fund 01-21-09. CA-32 PAVEMENT CUT REQUEST SUMMIT GROVE DRIVE Request for permission to cut Summit Grove Drive for the purpose of installing water and sewer laterals. CA-33 REMOVAL OF NO-PARKING ZONE GREENWAY ROAD ULIS NEWTON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Removal of the No-Parking Zone on the east side of Greenway Road adjacent to Ulis Newton Elementary School. CA-34 DEFERMENT OF OFFSITES PM-5-98 APPLICANT: NORBERT A. ALEMAN ALPHA ENGINEERING Request by Norbcrt A. Aleman/Alpha Engineering, for a deferment of offsites for Parcel Map (PM-5-98) on Warm Springs Road and Annabelle Lane. CA-35 PM-10 PAVING PROGRAM CHANGE ORDER NO. 19 STIRRUP DRIVE FROM ROAN TO THROUGHBRED; DERBY DRIVE FROM APPALOOSA TO PINTO; HFE STREET FROM ATHENS TO BERLIN; HFE STREET FROM BERLIN TO CADIZ; EMDEN STREET FROM ATHENS TO BERLIN; EMDEN STREET FROM BERLIN TO CADIZ AVENUE PM-10 Paving Program Stirrup Drive from Roan to Thoroughbred; Derby Drive from Appaloosa to Pinto; Fife Street from Athens to Berlin; Fife street from Berlin to Cadiz; Emden Street from Athens to Berlin, Emden Street from Beriin to Cadiz, and associated Change Order No. 19. CA-36 REVOCABLE PERMIT FLOODWALL APN: 179-33-511-001 APPLICANT: VTN ENGINEERS/CHAMPION HOMES Request from VTN Engineers/Champion Homes for a Revocable Permit to construct a (loodwall on City-owned property, APN: 179-33-511-001. CA-37 RIGHT-OF-WAY ROW-009-98 APPLICANT: SUN CITY MACDONALD RANCH COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION Acceptance of a muittcipal utility easement for sewer purposes in the golf course along Sun City MacDonaldllanch Unit 8 in the Southeast Quarter of Section 29, Township 22 South, Range 62 E&st^ the MacDonald-Ranch Planning Area. CA-38 RIGHT-OF-WAY ROW-010-98 APPLICANT: SUN CITY AT MACDONALD RANCH COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION Acceptance of a municipal utility easement for sewer purposes in the golf course along the future Sdn City MacDonald Ranch Unit 6 in the Southeast Quarter of Section 29, Township 22 South, Range 62 East, in the MacDonald Ranch Planning Area. CA-39 RIGHT-OF-WAY v ROW-011-98 APPLICANT: DEL WEBB COMMUNITIES, INC. Acceptance of a municipal utility easement for sewer purposes in the future Sun City MacDonald Ranch Unit 6 in the Southeast Quarter of Section 29, Township 22 South, Range 62 East, in the MacDonald Ranch Planning Area. CA.40 RIGHT-OF-WAY ROW-012-98 APPLICANT: JUDITH DEMPSEY Acceptance of portions of Roan Road, Bridle Drive, and the resulting IS-foot spandrel in the N2 SW4 NE4 NE4 of Section 27. Township 22 South, Range 63 East, in the River Mountain Planning Area. CA-41 RIGHT-OF-WAY ROW-0I3-98 APPLICANT: WHITNEY RANCH BUSINF.SS PARK. LLC Acceptance of a municipal utility easement for sewer purposes in the Whitney Ranch Business Park in the Northeast Quarter of Section 33, Township 21 South, Range 62 Fjisl, in the Whitney Ranch Planning Area. CA-42 BUSINF:SS LICENSE MYSTIC MIND BOOKS AND CAFE APPLICANT: PATRICIA LENTZ Application for Psychic Arts Business License for Patricia Lentz, dbat Mystic Mind Books and Cafe, 2841 North (irecn Valley Parkway. Henderson, Nevada. 89014. CA-43 BUSINESS LICENSE SUNSET MARKET. BAIT, AND TACKLE APPLICANT: JERRY HAMIKA Application for Package, Beer, Wine, and Spirit-Ba.sed Products Liquor License for Sunset Market, Bait, and Tackle, 1000 East Lake Mead Drive. Henderson. Nevada, 89015. CA-44 BUSINESS LICENSE SHEAR CLASS APPLICANT: LYNN BUDD Application for Massage Therapist Business License for Lynn Budd, dbat Shear Class, 1090 West Sunset Road, Henderson, Nevada, 89014. CA-45 BUSINFiS LICENSE EVAN'S OLD TOWN GRILLE APPLICANT: EVANGELOS LATHOURIS Application for Catering Liquor License for Evan's Old Town Grille, 1129 Arizona Street, Pouldcr City, Nevada, 89(05. CA-46 BUSINESS LICENSE RUBIO'S BAJA GRILL APPLICANT: RUBIO'S RESTAURANTS OF NEVADA. Application for Restaurant Beer, Wine, and Spirit-Based Liquor License for Rubio's Restaurants of Nevada, Inc., dba Rubio's Baja (irill. 1500 Norih (ireen Valley Parkway #210, Henderson, Nevada, 89014. PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDATIONS OF JANUARY 29, 1998 EXTENSION OF TIME CA-47a USE PERMIT U-155-96 CA-47b ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW AR-270-96 + PAWS 'N CLAWS ANIMAL LOD<,E APPLICANT: TERESA BOUNTY Review of extension of lime for a caretaker's quarters; and review of a proposed caretaker's quarters located at 640 Ea.slgate Road, in the Mid>fCy planning area. CA-48 TENTATIVE MAP TM-13-98 LAKE LAS VEGAS PARCEL 3N APPLICANT: LAKE LAS VEGAS JOINT VENTURE Review of a residential .sulKlivision coaslsling of 52 lots on 28.7 acres with a density of 2.8 dwelling units per acre generally located north of the intersection of Lake IJLS Vegas Boulevard and Montelago Boulevard on the North.Shore in the Lake Las Vegas planning CA-49 EXTENSION OF TIME PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT AND TENTATIVE MAP PUD/TM-82-96 SEVEN HILLS PARCEL U APPLICANT: AMERICAN NEVADA CORPORATION Request for an extension of time for a residential sul>division consisting of 123 lots on 35.4 acres with a density of 3.3 dwelling units per acre generally located south of Lake Mead Drive and east of the Henderson Executive Airport, in the Weslgale pUinning area. CA-50a USE PERMIT U-106-97 CASOb ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW AR-175-97 LEW IS HOMF-S 2630 ZONE WATER SYSTEM PROJECT APPLICANT: LEWIS HOMES OF NEVADA Request lo allow construction of Pump Station P-3A; and review of a pump station, generally located at (irtenway Road and Mission Drive, in the Higfabuid Hills planning area. CA-5la ZONE CHANGE Z-3-90 CA-5lb PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT AND TENTATIVE MAP PUDirrM-9-98 CA-5lc USE PERMIT Ut4-N SOUTHSHORE GOLF COUKSE CTUBHOUSE AND CONDOMINIUMS APPIJCANT: LAKE I AS VEGAS JOINT \TNTt'RE Review of • rrctaMlfkallon rrqunl from C( ICommunltvCommercial). RM-IO(Medium Density Residential), and PS (ftMlc and Scmipublic) districts with Gamfaig Enterprise Overiay and Master Plan Ovcriay to CT (Tourist Commercial) district wlth-Gaming Enterprise Overiay and Master Plan Overlay; review of a residential and commerdal planned unit dcvelopment/lenUtive map consisting of 20 condominium units, 8 motel rooms, and a golf course clubhouse; use permit to allow shared parking, a golf course chibhouse, health club, and massage studio on approximately 4,8 acres, generally located south of Grand Mediterra Boulevard on Parcel 35 of Lake Las Vegas SouthShore in the Lake Las Vegas planning area. CA-52 PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT AND TENTATIVE MAP PUD/rM-11.98 CHAMPION VILLAGE APARTMENTS APPLICANT: MANLEY DEVELOPMENT, INC. Review of a residential subdivision consisting of 296 apartment units on 18.7 acres with a density of 16 dwdling units per acre generally located south of Lake Mead Drive and east of Stephanie Street, in the McCullough Hills plannine area. CA-53a USEPERMFT U-12-98 CA-53b ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW AR-14-98 DEL WEBB ANTHEM WATER RESERVOIR APPLICANT: DEL WEBB COMMUNITIES Request to allow an underground water reservoir and architedural review of a pump sUtion building located in the Anthem planning area. CA-54a USE PERMIT U-13-98 CA-54b ARCHTTECTURAL REVIEW AR-13-98 PIONEER CITIZENS BANK WARM SPRINGS BRANCH APPLICANT: PIONEER OTIZENS BANK Request to allow a temporary bank trailer at 458 N. Stephanie Street and architectural review of proposed bank at 460 N. Stephanie Street on I acre, in the Whitney Ranch planning area..' CA-55 USE PERMIT U-I5-98 ACCESSORY LIVING QUARTERS APPLICANT: EUGENE AND ELIZABETH GILLARD Request to allow accessory living quarters at 1004 San Gabriel Avenue in the Mission Hills planning area. CA-56 VARIANCE APPLICANT: BRUCE AND JEANNINE HANSON Request to increase the side street perimeter wall bright from 6 feet to 8 feet along Arroyo Grande Bqulevard at 1671 Navarre Lane, in the Green Valley North plannine area. CA-57 VARIANCE V.4.98 APPLICANT: KELLY AND SARA GARDNER Request to allow a rear setback of 26 feet where 30 feet is required at 2836 Edgemont Drive, in the Westgate planning area. CA-58 FINAL MAP FM-IO-98 VENTANA CANYON UNIT lOA APPLICANT: GIBSON RANCH. LLC Final Map for Ventana Canyon Unit lOA 32 lots. 7.1 acres. CA-59 FINAL MAP FM-20-98 BLACK MOUNTAIN VISTA PARCEL C UNIT I APPLICANT: AMERICAN COMMUNITIES Final Map for Black Mountain Vista Parcel CUnit 1 90 lots. 33.1 acres. CA-60 REVERSIONARY MAP RM-5-98 APPLICANTAML PROPERTIES Reversionary Map to revert Lots 2 and 3 of File 76. Page 68 of Parcel Maps and Lot 7 in File 91^age 41 in Section 2. Township 22 South, Range 62 East VII. PUbLIC HEARINGS PH-61 PUBLIC HEARING APPEAL-AP-1-98 PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT AND TENTATIVE MAP PUD/TM-3-98 SEARS. ROEBUCK, AND COMPANY APPLICANT: SEARS, ROEBUCK. AND COMPANY Appeal of denial of a review of an amendment to a commercial subdivision to allow sales and installation of tires, balleries, and related items, consisting of 8.5 acres, generally located southeast of Sunsel Road and Whitney Ranch Drive, in the Whitney Ranch planning area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDS DENIAL) PH-62 PUBLIC HEARING COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CPA-4-98 LAKE LAS VEGAS SOUTHSHORE APPLICANT: LAKE LAS VEGAS JOINT VENTURE Request lo amend the Land Use Policy Plan from Residential. Commercial, and Public/ Semipublic land uses lo various Residential, Commercial, and Public/Semipublic on approximately 563 acres for the purpose of providing land uses which are consistent with a previously approved zone change, generally located on the SouthShore of Lake Las Vegas in the Lake Las Vegas planning area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDS APPROVAL) PH-63 RESOLUTION CPA-4-98 LAKE LAS VEGAS SOUTHSORE APPLICANT: LAKE LAS VEGAS JOINT VENTURE A RF^SOLUTIONOFTHECITY COUNCIL OFTHE CITY OFHENDER.SON,NEVADA, TO AMEND THE LAND USE I^OLICY PLAN OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FOR THE Pl'RPOSE OF CHANGlNtJ THE LAND USE DESIGNATION OF CERTAIN PROPERTY WITHIN THF: CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON DESCRIBED AS A PARCEL OF LAND CONTAINING 563 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. AND DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTIONS 14,22, AND 23. TOWNSHIP 21 SOUTH. RANGE 63 EAST, M.D.M.. CLARK COUNTY. NEVADA. FROM RESIDENTIAL. COMMERCIAL. AND PUBLIC/SEMIPUBLIC LAND USES TO VARIOUS RESIDENTIAL. COMMERCIAL. AND PUBLIC/ SEMIPUBLIC LOCATED ON THE SOUTHSHORE OF LAKE LAS VEGAS IN THE LAKE LAS VE(;AS PLANNING AREA. PUBLIC HEARING ^ PH-64a COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT CPA-5-98 PH-64b Z-4-98 SEVEN HILUS APPLICANT: SILVER CANYON PARTNERSHIP Request lo amend the Land Use Policy Plan from various Residential, Commercial, and Public and .Semipublic land use categories to various Residential, Commercial, and Public and Semipublic land use categories, and review of a reclassification request from various Residential, Commerdal, and Public and Semipublic zoning districts, all with Master Development Plan Overlay district to various Residential, Commercial, and Public and Semipublic zoning districts, all with Master Development Plan Overlay district for the purpose of correcting the configuration of several parcels within (he Seven HilLs Master Plan on approximately 1,293 acres, generally located south of .Seven HilLs Boulevard and Marvland Parkway iii Ihe Westgate planning area. (PLANNINti COMMISSION RECOMMENDS APPROVAL) PH-65 RESOLUTION CPA-5-98 SEVEN HILLS APPLICANT: SILVER CANYON PARTNERSHIP A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COl'NCI 1. OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA, TO AMEND THE LAND USE POLICY PLAN OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FOR THE PURPOSE OF CTIANtiING THE LAND USE DESIGNATION OF CERTAIN PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDER.SON DESCRIBED AS A PARCEL OF LAND CONTAINING U93 ACRF:S. MORE OR LFVSS, AND DF.SCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 23 SOl'TH, RANGE 61 EA.ST, M.D.M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM VARIOI'SRESIDENTIAECOMMERCIAL. AND PUBLIC ANDSEMIPUBLIC TO VARIOUS RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL. AND PUBLIC AND SEMIPUBLIC LAND I SE CATEGORIES. IXKATED SOITH OF SEVEN HILLS BOULEVARD AND MARVLAND PARKWAY IN THE WESTGATE PLANNING AREA. VIII. CITIZEN'S CONCERNS Items discussed cannot be acted upon at this meeting, but can be referred by Council to the next Regular Meeting for consideration. IX. UNRNLSHED BUSINESS UB-66 ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW AR-7-98 ROADHOUSE CASINO REMODELING APPLICANT: ROADHOUSE CASINO Review of Ihe remodeling of a casina/restaurant at 2100 North Boulder Highway, in the Ptttman planning area. (PLANNIN(; COMMISSION RECOMMENDS APPROV'AL CONTINUFJ) FROM FEBRUARY 3,1998) UB-67a PI^ANtVED UNFT DEVELOPMENT AND TENTATIVE MAP PUIVTM-5-9i PLANNING AREA NO. 5A UB-7b PI.ANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT AND TENTATIVE MAP PUlVTM-*.9 PLANNIM; AREA 4 UB-67c PLANNED IFNIT DEVELOPMENT AND $•• Agenda Page 18

PAGE 17

Page 16 Henderson Home News Thursday, February 12, 1998 Scoreboard Compiled by Clark County Schotil District .s 1998 Boys Basketball Sunrise Green Vallc\ Valley L* Vegas Eldorado Chaparral Raneho Silverado SNVTC Basic W 12 II 10 7 7 6 .S L 1 ,1 6 6 7 9 12 13 Sunset Cheyenne Gorman Cim-Meniorial Western Durango Bonanza Clark Girls Basketball Sunrise Silverado Green Vallev Chaparral Basic Las Vegas Eldorado SNVTC Raneho Vallev W L 7 ? Bulls Pistons Runhin' Rebels Cougars Jazz BM Silver East Bulls • Knicks Jazz Gators Hornets Dominators BM/W Silver Girls Magic Streaks Rockets Sharks BM/W Gold W L 1 Warnors Hornets Rockets Raptors Knicks Lakers Jazz Hawks Sunset Cheyenne Gorman Durango Bonanza Cim-Memorial Western Clark 3 5 S X 2 II I 12 I 13 W L '<) I BM/W GoldEast Girls Soccer Sunrise Runnin' Rebels Big Red Jazz Fighting Irish Lakers Magic BM/\A//SS Gold Girls Stars Jazz Raptors Comets Bulls Liberty Magic Hornets 4 4 2 1 0 w 5 4 2 2 2 0 W 5 4 1 0 W 4 4 3 3 2 1 1 0 w 4 3 2 2 1 0 1 0 1 0 3 0 4 0 5 0 L T 0 0 1 3 3 3 5 SS Silver East Lakers. Raptors Rebels ^ Magic Rockets Timberwolves Wizards Jazz W L T 5 0 0 1 0 1 0 3 0 3 0 SS Gold West 3 0 1 4 0 0 5 0 W L T L T 0 0 1 0 4 0 5 0 L T 0 0 0 0 Raptors Hoyas Hawks Mavericks Hornets Spurs Jazz Lakers Jazz Rebels Rockets Bulls Heat Sonics SS Diamond 4 1 0 3 2 0 3 2 0 3 2 0 2 3 0 2 3 0 2 3 0 1 4 0 W L T 5 0 0 4 1 0 3 2 0 2 3 0 1 4 0 0 5 0 SS Diamond East L T 0 0 Lightning Wolverines Green Wave Grizzlies Buckeyes Raptors W L T 5 0 0 3 2 0 3 2 0 <.2 3 0 1 4 0 SS Silver Girls W^ 5 4 4 2 2 2 1 0 L T; R ebelsMagic Hornets Stingrays BM/W Diamond 1 4 0 W L T 5 2 0 3 2 0 1 4 0 1 4 0 I W L T 4 1 0 4 1 0 4 1 4 1 Green Valley Chaparral Basic Silverado Raneho Valley Eldorado Las Vegas Boulder City Gorman Bonanza Cim-Memorial Durango Clark Cheyenne Weslem W L 14 0 Sunset Wrestling Sunrise I 10 I 14 W I. II 0 7 3. 6 2 \3 2 2 6 2 6 0 II W 7 6 4 4 4 2 I 0 6 3 3 4 2 3 4 0 T 0 I 3 f. 3 3 0 W Bulls 5 Lakers 4 Vikings 4 Pistons 3 Flying Eagles 2 Cavaliers 2 Spurs 0 Celtics 0 BM/W/SS Diam. Girls W Lakers 4 Raptors 4 Thunder 2 Celtics 0 L T 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 3 2 0 2 3 0 1 4 0 0 5 0 0 5 0 L T 1 0 1 0 3 0 5 0 Silver Springs Gold Sunset Silverado Green Valley L;LS Vegas Raneho Chaparral Basic Eldorado Vallev Cim-Memonal Durango Bonanza Cheyenne Clark Western Gorman HENDERSON PARKS and RECREATION DEPARTMENT BASKETBALL Black Mountain Silver W L T Sonics 4 1 0 w L 6 0 5 1 4 2 3 3 2 4 1 5 I) 6 Wolverines Rebels Cougars Lakers Nuggets Rockets Sonics Bulls Rebels Eagels Jazz Knicks Bulls Raptors Magic Mud Dogs SS Gold East SS Silver Jazz Lakers Crimson Tide Hornets Runnin' Rebels Bulls Suns Pistons W 5 4 3 3 2 2 1 0 w 5 4 3 3 2 2 1 0 w 5 4 4 2 2 1 1 1 L T 0 0 SS Silver West at BM Jazz Tarheels Knicks Bulls Slammin' Jammers Sonics Jayhawks Rockets Lakers Magic 16 & Over Adult BB W L T The Melting Pot 7 0 0 Lion Kings 6 10 Lakers 4 3 0 Bull 2 5 0 Levis 2 5 0 '^^pplebees 0 7 0 16 & Over Adult BBMW W L T Mud Dogs 6 2 0 Vanderwerken 6 2 0 AirQubnlll 3 5 0 Sara Lee 17 0 GREEN VALLEY ROLLERHOCKEY Standings as of 2/8/98 Gold Division L T 0 0 Ice Bergs Express Cougars Bears Mavericks Wolves Sharks W 6 5 4 2 2 1 0 T 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Leading Scorers Tiara Bowman, Cougars, 35 goals, 9 assls.. 44 pts; Hayden Hoffman, Ice Bergs, 31 goals, 13 assls. 44 pis.; Ben Hoist, Ice Bergs, 11 goals, 17 assts., 28 pts.; Roland Zagoni, Ice Bergs, I ."i goals. 12 assts., 27 pts.; Matthew Brown, Ice Bergs, 11 goals, 13 assls.. 24 pts.; Silver Division W L Ducks 8 0 Sharks SIv 4 2 Renegades SIv 4 3 IRA'S YOUR WAY. Make vour monev work the wav you want with a Pioneer Citizens 18-month IR.\. You can use it as a standard IR;\, a Roth \R\, or an Education IR.\. Any way you choose, you get the same great rate. Gall 731-2222 or visit any hranch today, including our new location at 8260 West Sahara, and get the IRiVs that work vour wav. •Annual Ptrixntafr' Yield acwirate v irf 1/1 .Wh Rates subject to chanite ith(Hii notlot: Suhjecl to penally for eariy ithdrawal Minimum investment ^lOO.fX). 18 month term Nevad a' s 3ank anisNs yy^ Member FDIC li=J Equal Housing Lender Raptors 2 3 I Rangers SIv 2 5 0 Fireblades 0 7 0 Leading Scorers Rocky Di Antonio. Ducks, 31 goals, 25 assLs,, 56 pts.; Eli Schwartzman, Ducks, 23 goals, 30 assls., 53 pts.; Nigel Walton, Sharks SIv. 33 goals, 5 assls., 38 pts.; Ryan Hedderly, Sharks SIv, 22 goals, 11 a.ssts., 33 pis.; Kyle Clay, Raptors, 23 goals, 6 a.s.sts., 29 pts. Bronze Division W 6 5 4 I 0 L 0 I 3 5 7 Thunder Brz Bulldogs Scorpions Blackhawks Wildcats Leading Scorers Ryan Logan, Thunder Brz, 33 goals, 3 a.ssts., 36 pts.; Marlon Mantle, Scorpions, 19 goals, 12 assls., 31 pLs.; Derek Combs, Scorpions, 20 goals, 6 a.ssts., 26 pts.; Brandon Stevens, Thunder Brz., 13 goals, 9assts., 22 pts; Stephen Manthei, Bulldogs, 12 goals, I Cassis., 22 pts. Platinum Division W High Rollers 6 Renegades 5 T.J. Cralg. Rattlers Jason Dramise, High Rollers Shaun Slerrett, Bullfrogs Paul Trovato, Renegades Jeremy Bucholz, Devils Daniel Terkel, Iguanas Diamond Division David Lawrence, Chiefs Patrick Homewood, Thunder Noah Harter. Rangers WRESTLING Fronn Page 15 15 3.00 13 3.25 23 5.11 32 6.40 55 7.86 61 8.71 GA AVR. 22 4.40 34 5.67 12 6.00 Silver Division (based on 2 full games) GA Avg. Ian Giovina/zo, Renegades SIv 1 0.50 Michael Balogh, Ducks 8 2.67 Sean Balogh, Ducks 4 2.67 Gino Campagna, Ducks 8 3.20 Nathan Fowler. Sharks SIv 9 4.50 Joey Bohan, Raptors 13 6.50 Joseph Renna. Rangers SIv 30 7.50 Andrew Hendrix, Fireblades 18 9.00 Rattlers Bullfrogs Iguanas Devils L 0 2 I 4 6 7 L T 1 0 2 0 4 0 2 0 3 0 3 0 Leading Scorers Cody Pelersen, High Rollers, 29 goals, 10 assts,, 39 pts.; Troy Beer, Bullfrogs, 28 goals, 9 assts., 37 pis.; Steven Trovato, Renegades, 16 goals, 11 as.sts., 27 pis.; Karim Guirguis, Renegades, 13 goals, 10 a^.sis., 23 pts.; Sean Fox, Rattlers, 18 goals, 4 assts., 22 pts. Adult Division :__ W Blades 4 Holiday Hockey 3 Post Net 3 Dark Warriors 2 Roadrunners 2 Boulder City Beavers 0 Leading Scorers TJKnudsen, BIades,20goals,6assls.,26pts.; Robert Vada.sy, Post Net, 12 goals, 10 as.sls., 22 pts.; Randy Huari.son, Blades, 7 goals, 10 assts., I7pLs.;TomChieIIo, Post Net, I2goaIs, 4 assts., 16 pts.; andy Amundson, Roadrunners, 11 goals, 5 assts., 16 pts. Diamond Division Chiefs Thunder Rangers Leading Scorers Andrew Amundson, Chiefs, l7goaIs, 11 as.sts., 28 pts.; Joey Dramise, Chiefs, 5 goals, 11 assts., 16 pis.; Casey Sparks, Thunder, 10 goals,Sassts., 15pts.;Matthew Prejean.Chiefs, 9 goals, 5 assls., 14 pis.; Tim Broo, Chiefs, 5 goals, 9 assls., 14 pts. Goalie Stats as of 2/8/98 Gold Division (based on 2 full games) GA Avg. Preston Day. Ice Bergs 14 4.67 Jeff Morgan, Cougars 13 6.50 Frank lovino. Wolves 13 6.50 Jim Bohan, Bears 27 6.75 Ryan Johnson, Ice Bergs 14 7.00 Matt Hands, Express 23 7.67 Ryan Kirsi, Sharks 16 8.00 Oscar Dhingra, Wolvs 23 11.50 Platinum Division (based on 2 full games) GA Avg. Chris Prejean, High Rollers 4 2.00 14 wrestlers to the dance, led by Yonas Woldu (125), Mario Paladino (140), Mike Bartholow (152) and Tom Cass (189) who were all 7-0 and will have No. 1 seeds in their weight class. "Each of these wrestlers have all had great seasons, but they will now have to take every match like it may be their last," Silverado coach Bob Clements SEiid, "No wrestler is going to lay down. This is the time for each kid to perform his best," In addition to the top seeds, the Skyhawks' other wrestlers will include: Lance Herndon, Bobby Asai, Kevin Riordan, Tom Rucci, Darryl McDonald, Brock Lafosto, Jason Canillo, Andy Socha, Jason Thompson and Joel Menendez. Diri^ M livln'OnThee CA-4 CASH REQUIREMENTS REGISTER FEBRUARY, 1998 Cash Requirements Register for the month of February, 1998. CA-5 PARTNERSHIP CITY OF HENDERSON PARKS & RECREATION AND HENDERSON BOYS' & GIRLS' CLUB SAFEKEYTYPE PROGRAM Partnership l)etween the City of Henderson Parks and Recreation Depariment and the Henderson Boys' and Girls' Club for a Safekey-type program. CA-6 FIRST AMENDMENT TO INTERLOCAL AGREEMENT INMATE HOUSING First amendment to the Interlocal Agreement for Inmate Housing. CA-7 AGREEMENT DECREASE CURRENT MONTHLY NETWORK Tl LINE CONNECTIONS SPRINT CENTRAL TELEPHONE COMPANY Agreement between the City of Henderson and Sprint Central Telephone Company to decrease current monthly network Tl line connections. CA-8 AGREEMENT COMMUNITY POLICING GRANT LANDSMAN GARDENS AND HAMPTON COURT Agreement between the City of Henderson and the Housing Authority of Clark County for a grant to be utilized for community policing at Landsman Gardens and Hampton Couri. CA-9 AGREEMENT FAIR HOUSING PLAN NEVADA FAIR HOUSING CENTER Agreement between the City of Henderson and the Nevada Fair Housing Center to facilitate implementation of the City's Fair Housing Plan. CA-10 AWARD CONTRACT UTILITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM CONTRACT SOLUTIONS FOR GOVERNMENT TECHNOLOGIES, INC. Award contract to Contract Solutions for Government Technologies, Inc., (SFG) for a Utility Management System. CA-11 AUTHORIZATION TO BID COMPUTER HARDWARE Authorization for Public Works Utility Division to go to bid for computer hardware for a Utihty Management System. CA-12 AUTHORIZATION TO ADVERTISE CONTRACT NO. 97.9831 TRAFTIC SIGNAL AT 1-515 & HORIZON DRIVE Authorization to advertise Contract No. 97-98*31, for a traffic signal at 1-515 and Horizon Drive. CA-13 AWARD CONTRACT NO. 96-9726 MARYLAND PKWY. 24-lNCH WATER TRANSMISSION MAIN RFTLACEMENT Award of Contract No. 96-97*26, for the Maryland Parkway 24-inch Water Transmission Main Replacement, to Telecor, Incorporated. CA-U AWARD CONTRACT NO. 96-97*21 THURMAN WHITE SITE IMPROVEMENTS Award Contract No. 96-97*21, for Thurman White She Improvements to the k>west rcspoasive and responsible bidder. CA-15 AWARD CONTRACT NO. 107-97*98 AERIAL LIFT TRUCK Award Contract No. 107-97*98, for an Aerial Lift Truck to the lowest responsive and responsible bidder. CA-16 AWARD CONTRACT NO 97-98*30 JUSTICE FACILITY DRAIN RETROFIT Award Contract No. 97-98*30, for the Justice Facility Drain Retrofit, to the k>west responsive and responsible bidder. CA-17 AWARD CONTRACT NO. 108-97*98 KVSES Award Contract No. 108-97*98, for Buses to Coach & Transit. CA-18 SPACE RENTAL RATE ADJUSTMENT HENDKRSON CONVENTION CENTER Adopt a new rale schedule for space rental and equipment charges for the Henderson Convention Center. CA-19 UPDATED FEE SCHEDULE POLICE SERVICESAVORKCARDS POLICE DEPARTMENT Adopt the updated Police Services Fee Schedule for work card fees. CA-20 AMENDMENT TO FISCAL IMPACT F(K)TH1LI.S DRIVE AT US-95 OVERPASS UTILITY ADJUSTMENT Amendment to fl.scal impact for Foothills Drive at US-95 overpass utility adjustment CA-21 BUDGET AUGMENTATION PARKS & RECREATION DEPARTMENT Aiigmeni (he Parks and Recreation Department 1997-98 budget to allow for the increased demands for expanded programs and facilities. CA-22 BUDtJET AWiMENTATlON INCREASE CONTRACT PRISONERS HENDERSON DETENTION CENTER Budget augmentation lo the Henderson Detention Center budget to support an increase in the numiwr of contract prisoners from Clark County up to 120 inmates. CA-23 RJNDING TO Pl!RCHASE ITEMS INCREASE CAPACITY HENDERSON DETENTION CENTER Funding lo purcha.se items for the Henderson Detention Center to increase its capability to accommodate up lo 260 inmates. CA-24 CLASS SPECIUCATION & WAGE ASSIGNMENT — K>LICE DEPARTMENT CORRECTIONS LIEUTENANTS Class Spedflcation for Corrections Lieutenants and the wage aMignment to Range 484 of the Police Wage Schedule. CA-25 AMEND STAFF COMPLEMENT POLICE DEPARTMENT CORRECTIONS LIEUTENANTS Amend the staff compicmcnt by adding two (2) Corrcctloiis Ueutenanti to Fund 01-21-04. CA-26 CLASS SPEOFICATION A WAGE ASSIGNMENT POIJCE DEPARTMENT a,ASSinCATION TECHNiaAN Claai SpedWtatlon for a iill c a H on Techntdan and wage a Mlgi i i eut to Range 430 of the CA-27 AMEND STAFF COMPLEMENT POUCB DBPARTMENT n.^SSmCATlON TEtTtNIOAN 4mmdlhr>l8rr>mplrmrnlbf • ddln>^(l)ClaMlf1cartonTertinMantcFuadOI-ll-e4. CA.28 AMEND STAFF COMPLEMENT POLICE DEPARTMENT BOOKING CLERK Amend the staff complement by adding one Booking Clerk to Fund 01-21-04. CA.29 AMEND STAFF COMPLEMENT I POLICE DEPARTMENT. Amend the staff complement by adding five (5) Corrections OfHcers I's to Fund 01-21-04. CA.30 AMEND STAFF COMPLEMENT POLICE DEPARTMENT POLICE SERGEANTS Amend the staff complement by adding three (3) Police Sergeants to, and deleting three (3) Police Officers from Fund 01-21-05. CA-31 AMEND STAFF COMPLEMENT POLICE DEPARTMENT POLICE RECORDS CLERK Amend the staff complement by adding one (1) Police Records Clerk to Fund 01-21-09. CA-32 PAVEMENT CUT REQUEST SUMMIT GROVE DRIVE Request for permission to cut Summit Grove Drive for the purpose of installing water and sewer laterals. CA-33 REMOVAL OF NO-PARKING ZONE GREENWAY ROAD ULIS NEWTON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Removal of the No-Parking Zone on the east side of Greenway Road adjacent to Ulis Newton Elementary School. CA-34 DEFERMENT OF OFFSITES PM-5-98 APPLICANT: NORBERT A. ALEMAN ALPHA ENGINEERING Request by Norbcrt A. Aleman/Alpha Engineering, for a deferment of offsites for Parcel Map (PM-5-98) on Warm Springs Road and Annabelle Lane. CA-35 PM-10 PAVING PROGRAM CHANGE ORDER NO. 19 STIRRUP DRIVE FROM ROAN TO THROUGHBRED; DERBY DRIVE FROM APPALOOSA TO PINTO; HFE STREET FROM ATHENS TO BERLIN; HFE STREET FROM BERLIN TO CADIZ; EMDEN STREET FROM ATHENS TO BERLIN; EMDEN STREET FROM BERLIN TO CADIZ AVENUE PM-10 Paving Program Stirrup Drive from Roan to Thoroughbred; Derby Drive from Appaloosa to Pinto; Fife Street from Athens to Berlin; Fife street from Berlin to Cadiz; Emden Street from Athens to Berlin, Emden Street from Beriin to Cadiz, and associated Change Order No. 19. CA-36 REVOCABLE PERMIT FLOODWALL APN: 179-33-511-001 APPLICANT: VTN ENGINEERS/CHAMPION HOMES Request from VTN Engineers/Champion Homes for a Revocable Permit to construct a (loodwall on City-owned property, APN: 179-33-511-001. CA-37 RIGHT-OF-WAY ROW-009-98 APPLICANT: SUN CITY MACDONALD RANCH COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION Acceptance of a muittcipal utility easement for sewer purposes in the golf course along Sun City MacDonaldllanch Unit 8 in the Southeast Quarter of Section 29, Township 22 South, Range 62 E&st^ the MacDonald-Ranch Planning Area. CA-38 RIGHT-OF-WAY ROW-010-98 APPLICANT: SUN CITY AT MACDONALD RANCH COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION Acceptance of a municipal utility easement for sewer purposes in the golf course along the future Sdn City MacDonald Ranch Unit 6 in the Southeast Quarter of Section 29, Township 22 South, Range 62 East, in the MacDonald Ranch Planning Area. CA-39 RIGHT-OF-WAY v ROW-011-98 APPLICANT: DEL WEBB COMMUNITIES, INC. Acceptance of a municipal utility easement for sewer purposes in the future Sun City MacDonald Ranch Unit 6 in the Southeast Quarter of Section 29, Township 22 South, Range 62 East, in the MacDonald Ranch Planning Area. CA.40 RIGHT-OF-WAY ROW-012-98 APPLICANT: JUDITH DEMPSEY Acceptance of portions of Roan Road, Bridle Drive, and the resulting IS-foot spandrel in the N2 SW4 NE4 NE4 of Section 27. Township 22 South, Range 63 East, in the River Mountain Planning Area. CA-41 RIGHT-OF-WAY ROW-0I3-98 APPLICANT: WHITNEY RANCH BUSINF.SS PARK. LLC Acceptance of a municipal utility easement for sewer purposes in the Whitney Ranch Business Park in the Northeast Quarter of Section 33, Township 21 South, Range 62 Fjisl, in the Whitney Ranch Planning Area. CA-42 BUSINF:SS LICENSE MYSTIC MIND BOOKS AND CAFE APPLICANT: PATRICIA LENTZ Application for Psychic Arts Business License for Patricia Lentz, dbat Mystic Mind Books and Cafe, 2841 North (irecn Valley Parkway. Henderson, Nevada. 89014. CA-43 BUSINESS LICENSE SUNSET MARKET. BAIT, AND TACKLE APPLICANT: JERRY HAMIKA Application for Package, Beer, Wine, and Spirit-Ba.sed Products Liquor License for Sunset Market, Bait, and Tackle, 1000 East Lake Mead Drive. Henderson. Nevada, 89015. CA-44 BUSINESS LICENSE SHEAR CLASS APPLICANT: LYNN BUDD Application for Massage Therapist Business License for Lynn Budd, dbat Shear Class, 1090 West Sunset Road, Henderson, Nevada, 89014. CA-45 BUSINFiS LICENSE EVAN'S OLD TOWN GRILLE APPLICANT: EVANGELOS LATHOURIS Application for Catering Liquor License for Evan's Old Town Grille, 1129 Arizona Street, Pouldcr City, Nevada, 89(05. CA-46 BUSINESS LICENSE RUBIO'S BAJA GRILL APPLICANT: RUBIO'S RESTAURANTS OF NEVADA. Application for Restaurant Beer, Wine, and Spirit-Based Liquor License for Rubio's Restaurants of Nevada, Inc., dba Rubio's Baja (irill. 1500 Norih (ireen Valley Parkway #210, Henderson, Nevada, 89014. PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDATIONS OF JANUARY 29, 1998 EXTENSION OF TIME CA-47a USE PERMIT U-155-96 CA-47b ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW AR-270-96 + PAWS 'N CLAWS ANIMAL LOD<,E APPLICANT: TERESA BOUNTY Review of extension of lime for a caretaker's quarters; and review of a proposed caretaker's quarters located at 640 Ea.slgate Road, in the Mid>fCy planning area. CA-48 TENTATIVE MAP TM-13-98 LAKE LAS VEGAS PARCEL 3N APPLICANT: LAKE LAS VEGAS JOINT VENTURE Review of a residential .sulKlivision coaslsling of 52 lots on 28.7 acres with a density of 2.8 dwelling units per acre generally located north of the intersection of Lake IJLS Vegas Boulevard and Montelago Boulevard on the North.Shore in the Lake Las Vegas planning CA-49 EXTENSION OF TIME PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT AND TENTATIVE MAP PUD/TM-82-96 SEVEN HILLS PARCEL U APPLICANT: AMERICAN NEVADA CORPORATION Request for an extension of time for a residential sul>division consisting of 123 lots on 35.4 acres with a density of 3.3 dwelling units per acre generally located south of Lake Mead Drive and east of the Henderson Executive Airport, in the Weslgale pUinning area. CA-50a USE PERMIT U-106-97 CASOb ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW AR-175-97 LEW IS HOMF-S 2630 ZONE WATER SYSTEM PROJECT APPLICANT: LEWIS HOMES OF NEVADA Request lo allow construction of Pump Station P-3A; and review of a pump station, generally located at (irtenway Road and Mission Drive, in the Higfabuid Hills planning area. CA-5la ZONE CHANGE Z-3-90 CA-5lb PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT AND TENTATIVE MAP PUDirrM-9-98 CA-5lc USE PERMIT Ut4-N SOUTHSHORE GOLF COUKSE CTUBHOUSE AND CONDOMINIUMS APPIJCANT: LAKE I AS VEGAS JOINT \TNTt'RE Review of • rrctaMlfkallon rrqunl from C( ICommunltvCommercial). RM-IO(Medium Density Residential), and PS (ftMlc and Scmipublic) districts with Gamfaig Enterprise Overiay and Master Plan Ovcriay to CT (Tourist Commercial) district wlth-Gaming Enterprise Overiay and Master Plan Overlay; review of a residential and commerdal planned unit dcvelopment/lenUtive map consisting of 20 condominium units, 8 motel rooms, and a golf course clubhouse; use permit to allow shared parking, a golf course chibhouse, health club, and massage studio on approximately 4,8 acres, generally located south of Grand Mediterra Boulevard on Parcel 35 of Lake Las Vegas SouthShore in the Lake Las Vegas planning area. CA-52 PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT AND TENTATIVE MAP PUD/rM-11.98 CHAMPION VILLAGE APARTMENTS APPLICANT: MANLEY DEVELOPMENT, INC. Review of a residential subdivision consisting of 296 apartment units on 18.7 acres with a density of 16 dwdling units per acre generally located south of Lake Mead Drive and east of Stephanie Street, in the McCullough Hills plannine area. CA-53a USEPERMFT U-12-98 CA-53b ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW AR-14-98 DEL WEBB ANTHEM WATER RESERVOIR APPLICANT: DEL WEBB COMMUNITIES Request to allow an underground water reservoir and architedural review of a pump sUtion building located in the Anthem planning area. CA-54a USE PERMIT U-13-98 CA-54b ARCHTTECTURAL REVIEW AR-13-98 PIONEER CITIZENS BANK WARM SPRINGS BRANCH APPLICANT: PIONEER OTIZENS BANK Request to allow a temporary bank trailer at 458 N. Stephanie Street and architectural review of proposed bank at 460 N. Stephanie Street on I acre, in the Whitney Ranch planning area..' CA-55 USE PERMIT U-I5-98 ACCESSORY LIVING QUARTERS APPLICANT: EUGENE AND ELIZABETH GILLARD Request to allow accessory living quarters at 1004 San Gabriel Avenue in the Mission Hills planning area. CA-56 VARIANCE APPLICANT: BRUCE AND JEANNINE HANSON Request to increase the side street perimeter wall bright from 6 feet to 8 feet along Arroyo Grande Bqulevard at 1671 Navarre Lane, in the Green Valley North plannine area. CA-57 VARIANCE V.4.98 APPLICANT: KELLY AND SARA GARDNER Request to allow a rear setback of 26 feet where 30 feet is required at 2836 Edgemont Drive, in the Westgate planning area. CA-58 FINAL MAP FM-IO-98 VENTANA CANYON UNIT lOA APPLICANT: GIBSON RANCH. LLC Final Map for Ventana Canyon Unit lOA 32 lots. 7.1 acres. CA-59 FINAL MAP FM-20-98 BLACK MOUNTAIN VISTA PARCEL C UNIT I APPLICANT: AMERICAN COMMUNITIES Final Map for Black Mountain Vista Parcel CUnit 1 90 lots. 33.1 acres. CA-60 REVERSIONARY MAP RM-5-98 APPLICANTAML PROPERTIES Reversionary Map to revert Lots 2 and 3 of File 76. Page 68 of Parcel Maps and Lot 7 in File 91^age 41 in Section 2. Township 22 South, Range 62 East VII. PUbLIC HEARINGS PH-61 PUBLIC HEARING APPEAL-AP-1-98 PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT AND TENTATIVE MAP PUD/TM-3-98 SEARS. ROEBUCK, AND COMPANY APPLICANT: SEARS, ROEBUCK. AND COMPANY Appeal of denial of a review of an amendment to a commercial subdivision to allow sales and installation of tires, balleries, and related items, consisting of 8.5 acres, generally located southeast of Sunsel Road and Whitney Ranch Drive, in the Whitney Ranch planning area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDS DENIAL) PH-62 PUBLIC HEARING COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CPA-4-98 LAKE LAS VEGAS SOUTHSHORE APPLICANT: LAKE LAS VEGAS JOINT VENTURE Request lo amend the Land Use Policy Plan from Residential. Commercial, and Public/ Semipublic land uses lo various Residential, Commercial, and Public/Semipublic on approximately 563 acres for the purpose of providing land uses which are consistent with a previously approved zone change, generally located on the SouthShore of Lake Las Vegas in the Lake Las Vegas planning area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDS APPROVAL) PH-63 RESOLUTION CPA-4-98 LAKE LAS VEGAS SOUTHSORE APPLICANT: LAKE LAS VEGAS JOINT VENTURE A RF^SOLUTIONOFTHECITY COUNCIL OFTHE CITY OFHENDER.SON,NEVADA, TO AMEND THE LAND USE I^OLICY PLAN OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FOR THE Pl'RPOSE OF CHANGlNtJ THE LAND USE DESIGNATION OF CERTAIN PROPERTY WITHIN THF: CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON DESCRIBED AS A PARCEL OF LAND CONTAINING 563 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. AND DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTIONS 14,22, AND 23. TOWNSHIP 21 SOUTH. RANGE 63 EAST, M.D.M.. CLARK COUNTY. NEVADA. FROM RESIDENTIAL. COMMERCIAL. AND PUBLIC/SEMIPUBLIC LAND USES TO VARIOUS RESIDENTIAL. COMMERCIAL. AND PUBLIC/ SEMIPUBLIC LOCATED ON THE SOUTHSHORE OF LAKE LAS VEGAS IN THE LAKE LAS VE(;AS PLANNING AREA. PUBLIC HEARING ^ PH-64a COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT CPA-5-98 PH-64b Z-4-98 SEVEN HILUS APPLICANT: SILVER CANYON PARTNERSHIP Request lo amend the Land Use Policy Plan from various Residential, Commercial, and Public and .Semipublic land use categories to various Residential, Commercial, and Public and Semipublic land use categories, and review of a reclassification request from various Residential, Commerdal, and Public and Semipublic zoning districts, all with Master Development Plan Overlay district to various Residential, Commercial, and Public and Semipublic zoning districts, all with Master Development Plan Overlay district for the purpose of correcting the configuration of several parcels within (he Seven HilLs Master Plan on approximately 1,293 acres, generally located south of .Seven HilLs Boulevard and Marvland Parkway iii Ihe Westgate planning area. (PLANNINti COMMISSION RECOMMENDS APPROVAL) PH-65 RESOLUTION CPA-5-98 SEVEN HILLS APPLICANT: SILVER CANYON PARTNERSHIP A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COl'NCI 1. OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA, TO AMEND THE LAND USE POLICY PLAN OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FOR THE PURPOSE OF CTIANtiING THE LAND USE DESIGNATION OF CERTAIN PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDER.SON DESCRIBED AS A PARCEL OF LAND CONTAINING U93 ACRF:S. MORE OR LFVSS, AND DF.SCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 23 SOl'TH, RANGE 61 EA.ST, M.D.M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM VARIOI'SRESIDENTIAECOMMERCIAL. AND PUBLIC ANDSEMIPUBLIC TO VARIOUS RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL. AND PUBLIC AND SEMIPUBLIC LAND I SE CATEGORIES. IXKATED SOITH OF SEVEN HILLS BOULEVARD AND MARVLAND PARKWAY IN THE WESTGATE PLANNING AREA. VIII. CITIZEN'S CONCERNS Items discussed cannot be acted upon at this meeting, but can be referred by Council to the next Regular Meeting for consideration. IX. UNRNLSHED BUSINESS UB-66 ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW AR-7-98 ROADHOUSE CASINO REMODELING APPLICANT: ROADHOUSE CASINO Review of Ihe remodeling of a casina/restaurant at 2100 North Boulder Highway, in the Ptttman planning area. (PLANNIN(; COMMISSION RECOMMENDS APPROV'AL CONTINUFJ) FROM FEBRUARY 3,1998) UB-67a PI^ANtVED UNFT DEVELOPMENT AND TENTATIVE MAP PUIVTM-5-9i PLANNING AREA NO. 5A UB-7b PI.ANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT AND TENTATIVE MAP PUlVTM-*.9 PLANNIM; AREA 4 UB-67c PLANNED IFNIT DEVELOPMENT AND $•• Agenda Page 18

PAGE 18

Page 18 Henderson Home News Thursday, February 12, 1998 AGENDA From Page 17 TENTATIVE MAP PUD/TM-7-98 PLANNING AREA 6 AT THE FOOTHILLS AT MACDONALD RANCH APPLICANT: FOOTHILLS PARTNERS Review of a proposed residential subdivlsfon consisting of 45 lots on 21.5 acres, with a density of .5 dweiling units per acre; review of a proposed residential sul>divi$ion consisting of 59 lots on 26 acres, with a density of 2 J dwelling units per acre; and review of a proposed residential subdivision consisting of? lots on 12 acres, with a density of .6 dwelling units per acre, generally located at Horizon Ridge Parkway and Valley Verde Drive, in the MacDonald Ranch planning area. (PLANNING CONOMISSION RECOMMENDS APPROVAL CONTINUED FROM FEBRUARY 3,1998) X. NEW BUSINESS NB-68 MAYORAL APPOINTMENT CITIZEN'S ADVISORY COMMITTEE One (1) Mayoral appointment to the Citizen's Advisory Committee. NB-69 WAIVER OF PARCEL MAP REQUIREMENTS 'PARCEL MAP (PM-16-97) APPLICANT: G. WIRTHLIN/M. DEL TORO Waiver of the offsite improvements and drainage study requirements of Parcel Map (PM16-97) at 481 Rexford. (STAFF RECOMMENDS DENIAL) NB-70 BILL NO. 1448 Z.3-98 APPLICANT: LAKE LAS VEGAS JOINT VENTURE AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP 21 SOUTH, RANGE 63 EAST. M.D.B. & M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM CC (COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL), RM-10 (MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTIAL), AND PS (PUBLIC AND SEMIPUBLIC) DISTRICTS WITH GAMING ENTERPRISE OVERLAY AND MASTER PLAN OVERLAY TO CT (TOURIST COMMERCIAL) DISTRICT WITH GAMING ENTERPRISE OVERLAY AND MASTER PLAN OVERLAY,LOCATEDSOUTHOFGRANDMEDITERRABOULEVARDONPARCEL 35 OF LAKE LAS VEGAS SOUTHSHORE IN THE LAKE LAS VEGAS PLANNING AREA. AND OTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO. (REFER TO COMMITTEE MEETING OF MARCH 3,1998) NB 71 BILL NO 1449 Z-4-98 APPLICANT: SILVER CANYON PA RTNERSHIP AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON. DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 2. TOWNSHIP 23 SOUTH, RANGE61 EAST.M.D.B. & M.,CLARKCOUPOY,NEVADA, FROM VARIOUS RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, AND PUBLIC AND SEMIPUBLIC ZONING DISTRICTS, ALL WITH MASTER DEVELOPMENT PLAN OVERLAY, TO VARIOUS RESIDENTIAL. COMMERCIAL. AND PUBLIC AND SEMIPUBLIC ZONING DISTRICTS, ALL WITH MASTER DEVELOPMENT PLANOVERLAY LOCATEDSOUTO OFSEVEN HILLS BOULEVARD AND MARYLAND PARKWAY IN THE WESTGATE PLANNING AREA., AND OTHER MATTERS RELATIN(; THERETO. (REFER TO COMMITTEE MEETING OF MARCH 3,1998) XI. SET MEETING XII. ADJOURNMENT AGENDA DEADLINE All items for inclusion on the City Council Agenda for the meeting of March 3,1998, must be submitted, in writing, no later than Thursday, February 19, 1998, at 5:30 p.m. to the City Clerk's office. Any items received after the above date will automatically be placed on the Next City Council Agenda. H—Feb. 12,1998. LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICE Public Auction Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Nevada Revised Statutes 108.473108.4783, the contents of the following storage units will be sold on February 26th, at 9:00 AM at AAA Mini Warehouses, 1601 Athol • Ave., Henderson, NV to satisfy delinquent rent and fees. #64 Peter Donnanimmo #69 Radeane Blacliwell #77 Richard Harris #110 Gloria Rios #111 Isabel Sandoval #112 Maria Russell #122BobGunn #158 Norman Malinity #178 Allison Murray #190/191 George Rogan #192/193 JeanaRoebke #218/219 Thomas Miller Register at ofTice by 8:30 AM. payments to be made in cash on date of sale. Units to be vacated by 8:00 PM. H—Feb. 12,19,1998 CITY OF HENDERSON QUARTERLY REPORT SECOND QUARTER 1997/98 UNAUDITED GENERAIFVfID REVENUES Taxes Licen'ses & Permits InicTgovemmcnu.l _Revenucf Ourges for Services Fines & Forfeits Miscellaneous Transfers In Gain on Sale of Fixed Assets Beginning Fund Balance TOTAI, AVAILABLE RESOITRCES EXPENDITURES General Government Public Safety Judicial Public Works Culture and Recreation Transfers Out ToUl Eipeadllarts and Other UKS Ending Fund Balance Unreserved TOTAL GENERAL FUND REQUIREMENTS GAS TAX SPECIAL REVXNUI: FUND Beginning Fund Balance Inlergovcmmcntal Revenues Miscellaneous Transfers In TOTAL Enpendirures Transfers Oui Ending Fund Balance TOTAL LID REVOLVING SfEClAL REVENUI FWP Beginning Fund BaltrKe Miscellaneous TOTAl. Transfers Out Ending Fund Balance TOTAL HNANCLAL STABILIZATION SPEOAL REVENUE FUND Begmnmi Fund Balance Revenuea TOTAL Eapenditiffci Ending Fund Balance TOTAL pCPPfDABLI TRUST FUND Bcfmnuif Find Balance Tranafcfiln TOTAL Eading Fwid Balance TOTAL • /""*'PCAITTALni o"CTSFUWD I Fund i ORIGINAL ANNUAL BUDGET IO,785.M7 15.035.782 47.103,290 6.I32.S04 1.357,229 ll.(23 90,000 500 7.682.710 n,M9.MS 19,501,193 37.134 JOl 2,062,941 4.742,731 10.526,227 9,529.071 M.197,l*4 4.52,2I W,>49.95 0 1,152.000 95,000 0_ IJ47,tt l.l97;00a 50,000 0_ IJ47,I0 1,500,000 10,000 to.ooo 1,500,000 2.431.374 120,000 aj5M74 0 _WSU74_ 1J51JT4 ACTUAL YEAR TO PATE 5,035.249 7.018,322 15.884.606 2.506.132 717.796 909.758 0 0 9,826.431 41,198,994 8,658.597 18.685,395 962,579 2.047.653 5.396,849 0_ 35,751,073 41J98,9*4 1,111,607 424.918 70.380 41.992 401,727 0 1,247.170 i,4My7 1,535.528 K431 1J*9,9S9 23.526 1.544.433 1,S9,9S9 2.495.9I6 37.159 um45 0 2,533.145 tJlJ.US 123,150 nu5i 118.581 0 |JMM fMJDl 1.045.150 919432 t^M ]*JM 0 3IJ0 I.T1I.11* 1,172.910 TOTAL )IJ ).*4M TraM(*nO Fiidii Fund Balancr TOTAl 31Je UJ3I 0 i.wm5 JIJM BEFORE THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION OF NEVADA In Re Fllins by Nevada Power Com-) panyoTTarifrRevisioiisAddlngaNew) DocketNo. Service Identified as Green Power Op-) 97-10004 tion (GPO) [Advice Letter No. 197] ) NOTICE OF HEARING Nevada Power Company ("NPC") has filed a Tariff Revision with the Public Utilities Commission of Nevada ("Commission"), designated as Docliet No. 97-10004. Nevada Power Company proposes a new service, the "Green Power Option." NPC stales that this filing is intended to meet customers' interest in a program designed to increase the use of, and encourage the development of, renewable resources such as solar and wind for the production of electric energy. The tariff revision was filed pursuant to the provisions of Nevada Revised SUtutes ("N.R.S.") and Nevada Administrative Code ("N.A.C.") Chapters 703 and 704. These provisions give the Commission authority to hold a hearing and to grant or deny the application in whole or in part The Commission has legal authority and juri.sdiction to hold a hearing on these filings pursuant to the provisions of NRS 704.110 and 704.120. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Commission has scheduled a hearing as follows: THUR.SDAY. F EBRUARY 26.1998 1:00 p.m. Public Utilities Commission 555 E. Washington Avenue, Room 4500 Las Vegas, Nevada 89101 at which time interested persons may appear and be heard. The hearing may continue from day to day as needed. Pursuant to the provisions of NRS 704.120, the Commission will consider evidence pertaining to whether the proposed revisions to the tariffs should be found unjust, unreasonable or unjustly discriminatory, preferential, or otherwise in violation of any of the provisions of Chapter 704 of Chapter 704 of NRS. PREPARED TESTIMONY shall be filed with the Commission and received by all parties of record in accordance with NAC 703.710. Nevada Power Company shall file and serve testimony no later than Thursday, February 5,1998. All other parties shall file and serve testimony no later than Friday, February 13,1998. At the hearing, the Commission may also consider other issues related to the provisions of Chapters 703 and 704 of NRS and NAC, may discuss public comments, and may make decisions on the procedural and substantive issues raised at the hearing. The Commission may vote at the hearing to approve or reject, in whole or in part, the tariffs filed by Nevada Power Company, or to take such other action as it deems appropriate under the circumstances. The docket is available for viewing by the public at the offices of the Commission, 727 Fairview Drive, Carson City, Nevada 8'9710 and the Grant Sawyer Building, 555 E. Washington Avenue, Room 4500, Las Vegas, Nevada 89101. This notice has been posted at the county courthouses in Carson City, Reno, and Las Vegas. By the Commission, /s/ Jeanne Reynolds JEANNE REYNOLDS, Commission SecreUry Dated: Carson City, Nevada 1/29/98 (SEAL) _;. H—Feb: 12,1998 -J^^gnoniJi • •^. NOnCR OP HEARING Nevada Power Compuy {"NKT) hai filed • rcrlston to its Large General Service tariff, dcdgnatcd ai Docket No. 9711007, with the Public UUIitica Commlisloa of Nevada ("Coitimission"). NPC itatet that the purpoae oTthii rcvUon is to clarify the admlnistnition of certain sclicduica. Large General Service Extra Large and Large General Service Extra Large Water Pumping. The clviflcaUoris Involve (a) NPC's intent to file for modincattoM to a cuitomer'i facilities charge under certain circumstances, (b) ib hitent to bill a customer a proposed fadlilics charge before it has been approved by the Cosmnisskm, with revisions to be made upon approval, (c) indiislon of a customer-specific effective date for radUUcs diargcs, and (d) modlflcatioa of the applicability clauses for these schedules to reflect that the schedules apply to customers whose total load, not incremental load. Is estimated to achieve 22 megawatts or 20 megawatts for water pumping. NPC has also filed a revision to its Large General Service tariff, designated as Docket No.97-11006, with the Commission. NPC proposes to increase the customer-spedflc facilities charge for one of its customers, the Excalibur/Luxor/ Hacienda Hotels, from $95^00 to $106,000 per month. BEFORE THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION OF NEVADA In Re Filing by NEVADA POWER COM-) PANY of a revision to its Schedule LGS-X,> Docket No. Large General Service Extra Large, toj 97-11006 modify the customer specific facilities charge J for Excalibur/Luxor/Hacienda. Advice Let> terNo. 199. In Re Filing by NEVADA POWER COM-) PANY of a revision to its Schedule LGS-X,) Large General Service Extra Large, and) Schedule l,(;S-X-WP, Large General Service) Extra Large Water Pumping, to clarify the) administration of .Schedules LGS-X and LGS-) i-WP. Advice Letter No. 198. ) Jn Re Filing by NEVADA POWER COM-) PANY of a revision to its Schedule LGS-X,) Large General Service Extra Large, to move) an existing customer, Caesars Palace, to the) LGS-X Schedule. Advice Letter No. 200. ) ) In Re Filing by NEVADA POWER COM-) PANY of a revision to its .Schedule LGS-X,) Large General Service Extra Large, to add) a new customer, Bellagio/Monte Carlo, to the) LGS-X Schedule. Advice Letter No. 201. ) Docket No. 97-11007 Docket No. 97-11008 Docket No. 97-11039 .) NPC has filed another revishm to its Large General Service tariff, designated as Docket No. 97-11008, with the Commission. The purpose of this revision Is to move an existing customer, Caesar's Palace, from the Large General Service to the Large General Service Extra Large schedule. NPC has Installed new transmission facilities to serve this customer's 50 MVA customer-owned substation. NPC proposes to charge this customer a monthly facilities charge of $65,100. NPC has also filed a proposed revision to Schedule LGSX, designated as Docket No. 97-11039, to add a new customer, the Bellagio and Monte Carlo Hotels, to the schedule. NPC proposes a monthly facilities charge for this customer of $117,500. NPC intends to bill these customers the proposed amounts until the Commission renders a decision on these filings, with revisions to be made to reflect any difference between the charges proposed by NPC and those which may be approved. The proposed tariffs were filed pursuant to the provisions of Chapters 703 and 704 of NRS and NAC and are on file and available for viewing by the public at the offices of the Commission,727 Fairview Drive, Carson City, Nevada 89710 and the Sawyer Offke Buildbig, 555 East Washington Avenue, Suite 4500, Las Vegas, Nevada 89101. The Commisshin has legal authority and jurisdktion to hold a hearing on these filings pursuant to the provisions of NRS 704.110 and 704.120. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a hearing has been scheduled as follows: TIlF-SnAV-MARCH 17. 1998 10:00 a.m. Office of the Public Utilities Commission Sawyer Office Building 555 East Washington Avenue, Suite 4500 Las Vegas, Nevada 89101 at which time interested persons may appear and be heard. The hearing may continue from day to day as needed. At this time, the Commission has reserved March 17 and 18,1998 for the hearing. Pursuant to the provisions of NRS 704.120,the Commission will considerevidence pertaining to whether the proposed revisions to the tariffs should be foundiii^ust, unreasonable or unjustly discriminatory,: gteftsf^aW oirif: otherwise In violafion ofiiiy of the provisions of Chajptfci^O* of NRS. LEGAL NOTICE S.N.A.P. TOW, INC. 1239 N. Boulder Highway Suite 900 -^ Henderson, Nevada 89015 (702)564-1180 The vehicles listed herein will be sold at Dealer/Wrecker Auction on MARCH 6,1998 at 8:00 ajn., at 1239 N. Boulder Hwy., Henderson, Nevada. Vehicles are sold as is, no warranty or guarantee of any kind is given or implied. Snap Tow reserves the right to set minimum bids also bid on the following vehicles. Vehicles are available for viewing the day before the auction. PREPARED TESTIMONY shaU be filed with the Comniasioii and received by all parties oT recordin accordance with NAC 703.710. NPC shaH (Uc and serve testimony no Uter than Tiaciday, March 3,1998. AU other parties shaU fUe and serve tcstimoay no later tiian Thursday, March 12,199S. At the hearing, the Coanmlssion may also consider other Issues tcbted to the provistons of Chapters 703 and 704 of NRS and NAC, may discuss puUk comments, and may make dcdshms on the procedural and substantive Issues raised at heartaig. The Commission may vote at the hearing toapprove or reject, in whole or In part, the teriffs filed by NPC, or to Uke such other action as it deems appropriate under the circmBsiances. This notice has been posted at the county courthouses In Carson City, Reno, and Las Vegas. By the Commission, Is/ Jeaime Reynolds JEANNE REYNOLDS, Commisston Secretery Dated: Carson City, Nevada 1/28/98 (SEAL) H—Feb. 12,1998. ^W r TRUST DATED S/44. Uf4Cftliisr'8 chsck drfwn on s f Maraf.cradit un^or a by M duhr (ppoinlsd kusoonvsysd to and now hsM mmon designaSon of rul prapsity: ^89P15APN: 179^)0W)06 wdim am lialiilihr for any InoonadnMS o( the .v.,,.oaninn(ISMnalion,l(any,il)oiMiaboM. nnoiM r common dasignalion ttthown, diradiont to ms beaten d,^ y M ctiainai m sanding a written request to vie benefciary [Its jMsoMirat publtcaKn ol this Ntjbca o( Sale f^STK,SERyiCES.INC. ERNANCi&MISSlON 6LTO ,091345 H—Feb. 12,19,26,19 YR 86 88 81 89 88 85 85 86 83 72 83 87 78 H—Feb, MAKE HONDA VW TOYOTA MITSUBISHI GMC FORD FORD DODGE CHRYSLER CHEVY CHEVY BUICK TRICKE 12,19,26,1998 MODEL CIVIC FOX CELICA ECLIPSE PU PU MUSTANG VAN LEBARON PU CAPRICE SOMMERSET THREEWHL VIN JHMAH7329GS0I33121 9BWGA0309JP09390i, JT2MA47L0B0005569 4A3CS44R6LE041390 1GTDC14K0JZ560284 1FTIIF25L4FPA24186 1FABP28A3FF161662 2B5WB31T3GK538871 1C3BT46C1DC292I76 CCE242Z149425 2G1AN35H8D1177582 1G4NJ14U5HM057798 V2146 REG/LEGAL MAJZER STEIN/FIRESIDE THRIFT/KEMPER BRANDIN/TAO FALLOOUTHTRUST BANK ATLANTIC MUTUAL NELSON/MERCURY FINANCE MOHLHENRICK/NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION SCHAEFER/FIESTA AUTOSALES GROOM DUFFNEY CORDER/FROST UNKNOWN STATE FARM BONNEVILLE -HSPECIAL RECREATION CAPITAL PROJECTS niND Beginning Fund Balance Revenues TOTAL Expendimres Transfer? Out Ending Fund Balance TOTAL HUD PROCEEDS CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND Beginning Fund Balance Revenues TOTAl. EKpenditures Ending Fund Balance TOTAL SPECUL ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS CAPITAL PROJECTS FLTVP Beginning Fund Balance Revenues Transfers In TOTAL ORIGINAL ANNliAL auEfru 239005 1,1 • • • .000 1J8.005 l,389.0OS 0 0_ IJ89,S 0 181,320 IIMIO 181,320 0 ACTUAL YEAR TO DATE 85<,870 336,333 1,1*1,103 58,M6 0 732.657 l.l>l,I03 (8.083) 129.686 121.603 375,865 (254,262) IS1J20 121,603 0 0 72,338 TUia Expenditures Transfers Out Ending Fund Balance TOTAL MUNICIPAL FACrLITTES ACOUISITION AND CONSTRUCTION CAPTTAL PROJECTS FUND Beginning Fund Balance Revenues Bond Proceeds Transfers In ^ TOTAL Expenditures Transfers Out Ending Fund Balance TOTAL SPECIAL AD VALOREM TRANSPORTATION CAfITAL PROJECTS FUND Beginning Fund Balance Revenues TOTAL Expenditures Ending Fund BalarKe TOTAL DEBT SERVICT FUND IAD VALOREM) GENERAL OBUGATION DEBT Beginning Fund Balance Revenues BOIMI Procceda Trvufenln TOTAL Expendinra TnnafenOut Ending Fund Balance TOTAL DMT StBVlC t fl IWD fOWKATPKn srrriiM ftSMMTiiPTTPifFni"^ 26,482 0 45,856 7IJU ORJGINAL ANNUAL 0 200,000 0 6,529,071 2,000,000 3J76,I00 1.452.961 *.n*Mi 38,616,861 1,600,963 148.310 4J6t,H4 6.269,929 444,386 33,651.819 40Jt6,l34 ACTUAL YEAR TO PATE. 11.784.960 647.244 18.500.000 0_ 3,S1J4 2.SI9.8I0 92.500 28.339.894 0 400,000 400,000 0 **ut 73,774 84,608 ISSJtl 158.382 0 ISSJIl Expenditures Trnsfers Oul Ending Fund Balance TOTAL WATER ENTERPRISE FUND Toul Operating Revenue Toul Operating Expense Toul Nonopenling Revenue Toul Nonoperating Expense Transfers In Net Iicome (Lou) SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND Toul Operating Revenue Toul Operating Expense Toul Nonoperating Revenue Toul Nonoperanng Expense Transfers In Net Iicone (Loss) CONVENTION CENTER ENTERPRISE FUND Toul Operating Revenue Toul Operating Expense Toul Nonoperating Revenue Total Nonoperating Expense Nc< locomc (Loss) ENGINEERING INTERNAL SERVICE FUND Toul Opcraling ReveniiC Toul Opciaiing Fxpense Toul Nonoperjimg Revenue Toul Nonoperating Expense Transfers In Net Iieonie (Lou) CITY SHOP INTERNAL SERVICE FUND Toul Operating Revenue Toul Operating Expense Toul Nonoperating Revenue Toul Nonoperating Expense TransfCT In Net lacone (Lou) SELF-INSURANCE INTERNAL SERVICE FUND Toul Operating Revenue Toul Operating Expense Toul Nonoperating Revenue Trfiafen In Transfers Out 16,623,364 72,338 25,274,566 41,970,26* 26,343,500 26.690,576 1,600,000 3,335,476 0_ (1.082,552) 11,797,500 12,636,001 1,700,000 2,200,741 0_ 680,000 <9,9S 14.000 ^ 0 .^^ 14,035 ORIGINAL ANNUAL BUBfiEI 2,008,000 5.648,463 80,000 U05 3,000,000 (Ml,7ti) 4,517,433 3,674,090 50,000 24J49 0 a**,*4 l,l*2JOI *SW3 o,ooo 80.000 0 NH (Lou) Jj7j9e 6J97JJ0 9.437,090 0 }jlt.llO t.N74*l 4J74JJ* 0 0 i9jss,4as 1IJ41JM •JIS.299 40,000 I1.1W.HI 3,0*,749 0 1,455,779 lJSS,4M OMCINAL ANiniAL iiMUa* ACTUAL ysAaTo TOTAl J4.7,0T t MJ7l,tS4 IIJW.IM HEALTH INSURANCE INTERNAL SERVICE FUNP Toul Operating Revenue Toul Operaung ExpenK Toul Naooperatini Revenue Not iKOBie (Lou) UUJSS a.i
PAGE 19

Page 18 Henderson Home News Thursday, February 12, 1998 AGENDA From Page 17 TENTATIVE MAP PUD/TM-7-98 PLANNING AREA 6 AT THE FOOTHILLS AT MACDONALD RANCH APPLICANT: FOOTHILLS PARTNERS Review of a proposed residential subdivlsfon consisting of 45 lots on 21.5 acres, with a density of .5 dweiling units per acre; review of a proposed residential sul>divi$ion consisting of 59 lots on 26 acres, with a density of 2 J dwelling units per acre; and review of a proposed residential subdivision consisting of? lots on 12 acres, with a density of .6 dwelling units per acre, generally located at Horizon Ridge Parkway and Valley Verde Drive, in the MacDonald Ranch planning area. (PLANNING CONOMISSION RECOMMENDS APPROVAL CONTINUED FROM FEBRUARY 3,1998) X. NEW BUSINESS NB-68 MAYORAL APPOINTMENT CITIZEN'S ADVISORY COMMITTEE One (1) Mayoral appointment to the Citizen's Advisory Committee. NB-69 WAIVER OF PARCEL MAP REQUIREMENTS 'PARCEL MAP (PM-16-97) APPLICANT: G. WIRTHLIN/M. DEL TORO Waiver of the offsite improvements and drainage study requirements of Parcel Map (PM16-97) at 481 Rexford. (STAFF RECOMMENDS DENIAL) NB-70 BILL NO. 1448 Z.3-98 APPLICANT: LAKE LAS VEGAS JOINT VENTURE AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP 21 SOUTH, RANGE 63 EAST. M.D.B. & M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM CC (COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL), RM-10 (MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTIAL), AND PS (PUBLIC AND SEMIPUBLIC) DISTRICTS WITH GAMING ENTERPRISE OVERLAY AND MASTER PLAN OVERLAY TO CT (TOURIST COMMERCIAL) DISTRICT WITH GAMING ENTERPRISE OVERLAY AND MASTER PLAN OVERLAY,LOCATEDSOUTHOFGRANDMEDITERRABOULEVARDONPARCEL 35 OF LAKE LAS VEGAS SOUTHSHORE IN THE LAKE LAS VEGAS PLANNING AREA. AND OTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO. (REFER TO COMMITTEE MEETING OF MARCH 3,1998) NB 71 BILL NO 1449 Z-4-98 APPLICANT: SILVER CANYON PA RTNERSHIP AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON. DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 2. TOWNSHIP 23 SOUTH, RANGE61 EAST.M.D.B. & M.,CLARKCOUPOY,NEVADA, FROM VARIOUS RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, AND PUBLIC AND SEMIPUBLIC ZONING DISTRICTS, ALL WITH MASTER DEVELOPMENT PLAN OVERLAY, TO VARIOUS RESIDENTIAL. COMMERCIAL. AND PUBLIC AND SEMIPUBLIC ZONING DISTRICTS, ALL WITH MASTER DEVELOPMENT PLANOVERLAY LOCATEDSOUTO OFSEVEN HILLS BOULEVARD AND MARYLAND PARKWAY IN THE WESTGATE PLANNING AREA., AND OTHER MATTERS RELATIN(; THERETO. (REFER TO COMMITTEE MEETING OF MARCH 3,1998) XI. SET MEETING XII. ADJOURNMENT AGENDA DEADLINE All items for inclusion on the City Council Agenda for the meeting of March 3,1998, must be submitted, in writing, no later than Thursday, February 19, 1998, at 5:30 p.m. to the City Clerk's office. Any items received after the above date will automatically be placed on the Next City Council Agenda. H—Feb. 12,1998. LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICE Public Auction Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Nevada Revised Statutes 108.473108.4783, the contents of the following storage units will be sold on February 26th, at 9:00 AM at AAA Mini Warehouses, 1601 Athol • Ave., Henderson, NV to satisfy delinquent rent and fees. #64 Peter Donnanimmo #69 Radeane Blacliwell #77 Richard Harris #110 Gloria Rios #111 Isabel Sandoval #112 Maria Russell #122BobGunn #158 Norman Malinity #178 Allison Murray #190/191 George Rogan #192/193 JeanaRoebke #218/219 Thomas Miller Register at ofTice by 8:30 AM. payments to be made in cash on date of sale. Units to be vacated by 8:00 PM. H—Feb. 12,19,1998 CITY OF HENDERSON QUARTERLY REPORT SECOND QUARTER 1997/98 UNAUDITED GENERAIFVfID REVENUES Taxes Licen'ses & Permits InicTgovemmcnu.l _Revenucf Ourges for Services Fines & Forfeits Miscellaneous Transfers In Gain on Sale of Fixed Assets Beginning Fund Balance TOTAI, AVAILABLE RESOITRCES EXPENDITURES General Government Public Safety Judicial Public Works Culture and Recreation Transfers Out ToUl Eipeadllarts and Other UKS Ending Fund Balance Unreserved TOTAL GENERAL FUND REQUIREMENTS GAS TAX SPECIAL REVXNUI: FUND Beginning Fund Balance Inlergovcmmcntal Revenues Miscellaneous Transfers In TOTAL Enpendirures Transfers Oui Ending Fund Balance TOTAL LID REVOLVING SfEClAL REVENUI FWP Beginning Fund BaltrKe Miscellaneous TOTAl. Transfers Out Ending Fund Balance TOTAL HNANCLAL STABILIZATION SPEOAL REVENUE FUND Begmnmi Fund Balance Revenuea TOTAL Eapenditiffci Ending Fund Balance TOTAL pCPPfDABLI TRUST FUND Bcfmnuif Find Balance Tranafcfiln TOTAL Eading Fwid Balance TOTAL • /""*'PCAITTALni o"CTSFUWD I Fund i ORIGINAL ANNUAL BUDGET IO,785.M7 15.035.782 47.103,290 6.I32.S04 1.357,229 ll.(23 90,000 500 7.682.710 n,M9.MS 19,501,193 37.134 JOl 2,062,941 4.742,731 10.526,227 9,529.071 M.197,l*4 4.52,2I W,>49.95 0 1,152.000 95,000 0_ IJ47,tt l.l97;00a 50,000 0_ IJ47,I0 1,500,000 10,000 to.ooo 1,500,000 2.431.374 120,000 aj5M74 0 _WSU74_ 1J51JT4 ACTUAL YEAR TO PATE 5,035.249 7.018,322 15.884.606 2.506.132 717.796 909.758 0 0 9,826.431 41,198,994 8,658.597 18.685,395 962,579 2.047.653 5.396,849 0_ 35,751,073 41J98,9*4 1,111,607 424.918 70.380 41.992 401,727 0 1,247.170 i,4My7 1,535.528 K431 1J*9,9S9 23.526 1.544.433 1,S9,9S9 2.495.9I6 37.159 um45 0 2,533.145 tJlJ.US 123,150 nu5i 118.581 0 |JMM fMJDl 1.045.150 919432 t^M ]*JM 0 3IJ0 I.T1I.11* 1,172.910 TOTAL )IJ ).*4M TraM(*nO Fiidii Fund Balancr TOTAl 31Je UJ3I 0 i.wm5 JIJM BEFORE THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION OF NEVADA In Re Fllins by Nevada Power Com-) panyoTTarifrRevisioiisAddlngaNew) DocketNo. Service Identified as Green Power Op-) 97-10004 tion (GPO) [Advice Letter No. 197] ) NOTICE OF HEARING Nevada Power Company ("NPC") has filed a Tariff Revision with the Public Utilities Commission of Nevada ("Commission"), designated as Docliet No. 97-10004. Nevada Power Company proposes a new service, the "Green Power Option." NPC stales that this filing is intended to meet customers' interest in a program designed to increase the use of, and encourage the development of, renewable resources such as solar and wind for the production of electric energy. The tariff revision was filed pursuant to the provisions of Nevada Revised SUtutes ("N.R.S.") and Nevada Administrative Code ("N.A.C.") Chapters 703 and 704. These provisions give the Commission authority to hold a hearing and to grant or deny the application in whole or in part The Commission has legal authority and juri.sdiction to hold a hearing on these filings pursuant to the provisions of NRS 704.110 and 704.120. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Commission has scheduled a hearing as follows: THUR.SDAY. F EBRUARY 26.1998 1:00 p.m. Public Utilities Commission 555 E. Washington Avenue, Room 4500 Las Vegas, Nevada 89101 at which time interested persons may appear and be heard. The hearing may continue from day to day as needed. Pursuant to the provisions of NRS 704.120, the Commission will consider evidence pertaining to whether the proposed revisions to the tariffs should be found unjust, unreasonable or unjustly discriminatory, preferential, or otherwise in violation of any of the provisions of Chapter 704 of Chapter 704 of NRS. PREPARED TESTIMONY shall be filed with the Commission and received by all parties of record in accordance with NAC 703.710. Nevada Power Company shall file and serve testimony no later than Thursday, February 5,1998. All other parties shall file and serve testimony no later than Friday, February 13,1998. At the hearing, the Commission may also consider other issues related to the provisions of Chapters 703 and 704 of NRS and NAC, may discuss public comments, and may make decisions on the procedural and substantive issues raised at the hearing. The Commission may vote at the hearing to approve or reject, in whole or in part, the tariffs filed by Nevada Power Company, or to take such other action as it deems appropriate under the circumstances. The docket is available for viewing by the public at the offices of the Commission, 727 Fairview Drive, Carson City, Nevada 8'9710 and the Grant Sawyer Building, 555 E. Washington Avenue, Room 4500, Las Vegas, Nevada 89101. This notice has been posted at the county courthouses in Carson City, Reno, and Las Vegas. By the Commission, /s/ Jeanne Reynolds JEANNE REYNOLDS, Commission SecreUry Dated: Carson City, Nevada 1/29/98 (SEAL) _;. H—Feb: 12,1998 -J^^gnoniJi • •^. NOnCR OP HEARING Nevada Power Compuy {"NKT) hai filed • rcrlston to its Large General Service tariff, dcdgnatcd ai Docket No. 9711007, with the Public UUIitica Commlisloa of Nevada ("Coitimission"). NPC itatet that the purpoae oTthii rcvUon is to clarify the admlnistnition of certain sclicduica. Large General Service Extra Large and Large General Service Extra Large Water Pumping. The clviflcaUoris Involve (a) NPC's intent to file for modincattoM to a cuitomer'i facilities charge under certain circumstances, (b) ib hitent to bill a customer a proposed fadlilics charge before it has been approved by the Cosmnisskm, with revisions to be made upon approval, (c) indiislon of a customer-specific effective date for radUUcs diargcs, and (d) modlflcatioa of the applicability clauses for these schedules to reflect that the schedules apply to customers whose total load, not incremental load. Is estimated to achieve 22 megawatts or 20 megawatts for water pumping. NPC has also filed a revision to its Large General Service tariff, designated as Docket No.97-11006, with the Commission. NPC proposes to increase the customer-spedflc facilities charge for one of its customers, the Excalibur/Luxor/ Hacienda Hotels, from $95^00 to $106,000 per month. BEFORE THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION OF NEVADA In Re Filing by NEVADA POWER COM-) PANY of a revision to its Schedule LGS-X,> Docket No. Large General Service Extra Large, toj 97-11006 modify the customer specific facilities charge J for Excalibur/Luxor/Hacienda. Advice Let> terNo. 199. In Re Filing by NEVADA POWER COM-) PANY of a revision to its Schedule LGS-X,) Large General Service Extra Large, and) Schedule l,(;S-X-WP, Large General Service) Extra Large Water Pumping, to clarify the) administration of .Schedules LGS-X and LGS-) i-WP. Advice Letter No. 198. ) Jn Re Filing by NEVADA POWER COM-) PANY of a revision to its Schedule LGS-X,) Large General Service Extra Large, to move) an existing customer, Caesars Palace, to the) LGS-X Schedule. Advice Letter No. 200. ) ) In Re Filing by NEVADA POWER COM-) PANY of a revision to its .Schedule LGS-X,) Large General Service Extra Large, to add) a new customer, Bellagio/Monte Carlo, to the) LGS-X Schedule. Advice Letter No. 201. ) Docket No. 97-11007 Docket No. 97-11008 Docket No. 97-11039 .) NPC has filed another revishm to its Large General Service tariff, designated as Docket No. 97-11008, with the Commission. The purpose of this revision Is to move an existing customer, Caesar's Palace, from the Large General Service to the Large General Service Extra Large schedule. NPC has Installed new transmission facilities to serve this customer's 50 MVA customer-owned substation. NPC proposes to charge this customer a monthly facilities charge of $65,100. NPC has also filed a proposed revision to Schedule LGSX, designated as Docket No. 97-11039, to add a new customer, the Bellagio and Monte Carlo Hotels, to the schedule. NPC proposes a monthly facilities charge for this customer of $117,500. NPC intends to bill these customers the proposed amounts until the Commission renders a decision on these filings, with revisions to be made to reflect any difference between the charges proposed by NPC and those which may be approved. The proposed tariffs were filed pursuant to the provisions of Chapters 703 and 704 of NRS and NAC and are on file and available for viewing by the public at the offices of the Commission,727 Fairview Drive, Carson City, Nevada 89710 and the Sawyer Offke Buildbig, 555 East Washington Avenue, Suite 4500, Las Vegas, Nevada 89101. The Commisshin has legal authority and jurisdktion to hold a hearing on these filings pursuant to the provisions of NRS 704.110 and 704.120. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a hearing has been scheduled as follows: TIlF-SnAV-MARCH 17. 1998 10:00 a.m. Office of the Public Utilities Commission Sawyer Office Building 555 East Washington Avenue, Suite 4500 Las Vegas, Nevada 89101 at which time interested persons may appear and be heard. The hearing may continue from day to day as needed. At this time, the Commission has reserved March 17 and 18,1998 for the hearing. Pursuant to the provisions of NRS 704.120,the Commission will considerevidence pertaining to whether the proposed revisions to the tariffs should be foundiii^ust, unreasonable or unjustly discriminatory,: gteftsf^aW oirif: otherwise In violafion ofiiiy of the provisions of Chajptfci^O* of NRS. LEGAL NOTICE S.N.A.P. TOW, INC. 1239 N. Boulder Highway Suite 900 -^ Henderson, Nevada 89015 (702)564-1180 The vehicles listed herein will be sold at Dealer/Wrecker Auction on MARCH 6,1998 at 8:00 ajn., at 1239 N. Boulder Hwy., Henderson, Nevada. Vehicles are sold as is, no warranty or guarantee of any kind is given or implied. Snap Tow reserves the right to set minimum bids also bid on the following vehicles. Vehicles are available for viewing the day before the auction. PREPARED TESTIMONY shaU be filed with the Comniasioii and received by all parties oT recordin accordance with NAC 703.710. NPC shaH (Uc and serve testimony no Uter than Tiaciday, March 3,1998. AU other parties shaU fUe and serve tcstimoay no later tiian Thursday, March 12,199S. At the hearing, the Coanmlssion may also consider other Issues tcbted to the provistons of Chapters 703 and 704 of NRS and NAC, may discuss puUk comments, and may make dcdshms on the procedural and substantive Issues raised at heartaig. The Commission may vote at the hearing toapprove or reject, in whole or In part, the teriffs filed by NPC, or to Uke such other action as it deems appropriate under the circmBsiances. This notice has been posted at the county courthouses In Carson City, Reno, and Las Vegas. By the Commission, Is/ Jeaime Reynolds JEANNE REYNOLDS, Commisston Secretery Dated: Carson City, Nevada 1/28/98 (SEAL) H—Feb. 12,1998. ^W r TRUST DATED S/44. Uf4Cftliisr'8 chsck drfwn on s f Maraf.cradit un^or a by M duhr (ppoinlsd kusoonvsysd to and now hsM mmon designaSon of rul prapsity: ^89P15APN: 179^)0W)06 wdim am lialiilihr for any InoonadnMS o( the .v.,,.oaninn(ISMnalion,l(any,il)oiMiaboM. nnoiM r common dasignalion ttthown, diradiont to ms beaten d,^ y M ctiainai m sanding a written request to vie benefciary [Its jMsoMirat publtcaKn ol this Ntjbca o( Sale f^STK,SERyiCES.INC. ERNANCi&MISSlON 6LTO ,091345 H—Feb. 12,19,26,19 YR 86 88 81 89 88 85 85 86 83 72 83 87 78 H—Feb, MAKE HONDA VW TOYOTA MITSUBISHI GMC FORD FORD DODGE CHRYSLER CHEVY CHEVY BUICK TRICKE 12,19,26,1998 MODEL CIVIC FOX CELICA ECLIPSE PU PU MUSTANG VAN LEBARON PU CAPRICE SOMMERSET THREEWHL VIN JHMAH7329GS0I33121 9BWGA0309JP09390i, JT2MA47L0B0005569 4A3CS44R6LE041390 1GTDC14K0JZ560284 1FTIIF25L4FPA24186 1FABP28A3FF161662 2B5WB31T3GK538871 1C3BT46C1DC292I76 CCE242Z149425 2G1AN35H8D1177582 1G4NJ14U5HM057798 V2146 REG/LEGAL MAJZER STEIN/FIRESIDE THRIFT/KEMPER BRANDIN/TAO FALLOOUTHTRUST BANK ATLANTIC MUTUAL NELSON/MERCURY FINANCE MOHLHENRICK/NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION SCHAEFER/FIESTA AUTOSALES GROOM DUFFNEY CORDER/FROST UNKNOWN STATE FARM BONNEVILLE -HSPECIAL RECREATION CAPITAL PROJECTS niND Beginning Fund Balance Revenues TOTAL Expendimres Transfer? Out Ending Fund Balance TOTAL HUD PROCEEDS CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND Beginning Fund Balance Revenues TOTAl. EKpenditures Ending Fund Balance TOTAL SPECUL ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS CAPITAL PROJECTS FLTVP Beginning Fund Balance Revenues Transfers In TOTAL ORIGINAL ANNliAL auEfru 239005 1,1 • • • .000 1J8.005 l,389.0OS 0 0_ IJ89,S 0 181,320 IIMIO 181,320 0 ACTUAL YEAR TO DATE 85<,870 336,333 1,1*1,103 58,M6 0 732.657 l.l>l,I03 (8.083) 129.686 121.603 375,865 (254,262) IS1J20 121,603 0 0 72,338 TUia Expenditures Transfers Out Ending Fund Balance TOTAL MUNICIPAL FACrLITTES ACOUISITION AND CONSTRUCTION CAPTTAL PROJECTS FUND Beginning Fund Balance Revenues Bond Proceeds Transfers In ^ TOTAL Expenditures Transfers Out Ending Fund Balance TOTAL SPECIAL AD VALOREM TRANSPORTATION CAfITAL PROJECTS FUND Beginning Fund Balance Revenues TOTAL Expenditures Ending Fund BalarKe TOTAL DEBT SERVICT FUND IAD VALOREM) GENERAL OBUGATION DEBT Beginning Fund Balance Revenues BOIMI Procceda Trvufenln TOTAL Expendinra TnnafenOut Ending Fund Balance TOTAL DMT StBVlC t fl IWD fOWKATPKn srrriiM ftSMMTiiPTTPifFni"^ 26,482 0 45,856 7IJU ORJGINAL ANNUAL 0 200,000 0 6,529,071 2,000,000 3J76,I00 1.452.961 *.n*Mi 38,616,861 1,600,963 148.310 4J6t,H4 6.269,929 444,386 33,651.819 40Jt6,l34 ACTUAL YEAR TO PATE. 11.784.960 647.244 18.500.000 0_ 3,S1J4 2.SI9.8I0 92.500 28.339.894 0 400,000 400,000 0 **ut 73,774 84,608 ISSJtl 158.382 0 ISSJIl Expenditures Trnsfers Oul Ending Fund Balance TOTAL WATER ENTERPRISE FUND Toul Operating Revenue Toul Operating Expense Toul Nonopenling Revenue Toul Nonoperating Expense Transfers In Net Iicome (Lou) SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND Toul Operating Revenue Toul Operating Expense Toul Nonoperating Revenue Toul Nonoperanng Expense Transfers In Net Iicone (Loss) CONVENTION CENTER ENTERPRISE FUND Toul Operating Revenue Toul Operating Expense Toul Nonoperating Revenue Total Nonoperating Expense Nc< locomc (Loss) ENGINEERING INTERNAL SERVICE FUND Toul Opcraling ReveniiC Toul Opciaiing Fxpense Toul Nonoperjimg Revenue Toul Nonoperating Expense Transfers In Net Iieonie (Lou) CITY SHOP INTERNAL SERVICE FUND Toul Operating Revenue Toul Operating Expense Toul Nonoperating Revenue Toul Nonoperating Expense TransfCT In Net lacone (Lou) SELF-INSURANCE INTERNAL SERVICE FUND Toul Operating Revenue Toul Operating Expense Toul Nonoperating Revenue Trfiafen In Transfers Out 16,623,364 72,338 25,274,566 41,970,26* 26,343,500 26.690,576 1,600,000 3,335,476 0_ (1.082,552) 11,797,500 12,636,001 1,700,000 2,200,741 0_ 680,000 <9,9S 14.000 ^ 0 .^^ 14,035 ORIGINAL ANNUAL BUBfiEI 2,008,000 5.648,463 80,000 U05 3,000,000 (Ml,7ti) 4,517,433 3,674,090 50,000 24J49 0 a**,*4 l,l*2JOI *SW3 o,ooo 80.000 0 NH (Lou) Jj7j9e 6J97JJ0 9.437,090 0 }jlt.llO t.N74*l 4J74JJ* 0 0 i9jss,4as 1IJ41JM •JIS.299 40,000 I1.1W.HI 3,0*,749 0 1,455,779 lJSS,4M OMCINAL ANiniAL iiMUa* ACTUAL ysAaTo TOTAl J4.7,0T t MJ7l,tS4 IIJW.IM HEALTH INSURANCE INTERNAL SERVICE FUNP Toul Operating Revenue Toul Operaung ExpenK Toul Naooperatini Revenue Not iKOBie (Lou) UUJSS a.i
PAGE 20

LIFESTYLES Page 2 Panorama February 12-13, 1998 ON THE SIDELINES D. J. ALLEN Negative 'journalism' usually has its roots It was refreshing to see mega-sports agent I Leigh Steinberg discuss the Dallas Cowboys I and Jerry Jones last week instead of listening to another biased, so-called, sports broadcast I journalist talk about the franchise. Steinberg, who represents the Hkes of such National Football League stars as Steve Young and Troy Aikman, relayed on Fox Sports' "Last Word" last Thursday night a message that you will rarely ever find in today's media — the Cowboys are in good hands with Jones, who bought the struggling franchise prior to the 1989 season and returned it to elite status. The Cowboys, one of the most storied franchises in all of American sports, cannot and will not escape the headlines — no matter the situation. However, one thing needs to be remembered when the Cowboys are discussed — success brings jealousy. Just look,at the Chicago Bulls or New York Yankees. For every One fan that lovgs the team with a passion, there is five fans that hate it. Think about how many times you have heard people say they hate the Arizona Cardinals or Los Angeles Clipp^ haven't. Why? They don't win. This past weekend, I heard a national radio talk show host boast to all of his listeners he was a "Yankee hater." He then continued to explain how bad of a decision it was for New York to acquire second baseman Chuck Knoblauch from the Minnesota Twins for four minor league prospects and cash. It was an obvious opinion he stated as fact. But, he justified it being a bad trade for the sole reason he "hates" the Yankees. That is what the media does with the Cowboys on a daily basis. Example No-. 1. Much is made season after season about Jones going down on the field at the end of the Dallas games. How do you know he is there? Because the networks always show him. Did you know it is a tradition for Denver Broncos owner Pat Bowlen to head to his team's sideline with five minutes left in every game? Is there something M^ong with the owner going to his sidelines at the end of a game to watch his team. No. But, in Jones' case there seems to be. Example No. 2. In the past 12 months, how many Dallas Cowboy players have been in trouble with the law or have been issued a suspension. Zero. Michael Irvin's past is brought up on a daily basis. Is it just me or did his now infamous motel room act occur during the same off-season that Brett Favrfi^pent time in a drug rehabilitation clinic? Forgot above Favre, didn't you? Or, at least the media let you forget about him. And, example No. 3**""^ In a day and age when sports stars are considered to be self-centered and don't worry about their respective teams, Aikman has been just the opposite. Last off-season, Aikman traveled across the country to personally workout with the top five tight ends eligible for the draft. Who better would you want to scout and work with a possible offensive draft pick than the team's starting quarterback — a threetime Super Bowl winner at that. However, once again the critics came out on the Cowboys. People asked, "Who's running the team?" and "Why does Aikman have so much power?" For a winning team such asithe Dallas Cowboys, it isn't and will never, be a win-win situation. ^ There are millions of fans across the country that "hate" the Dallas Cowboys — and that doesn't exclude members of the media. So the next time you hear a message regarding the Cowboys or any sports player or team for that matter, remember who the messenger is. "^ Looking at where they come from is usually morelnformative than what they have to say. D.J. Allen is Public Relations Director for Henderson Home News. wm Valentine stories and poems for children "I gave a hundred valentines. A hundred, did I say? I gave a thousand valentines one cold and wintry day ..." The poem is titled "Valentines," and the book, "Valentine's Day: Stories and Poems," edited by Caroline F. Bauer (1993, ages 4 and up), containsmany other poems, short stories, a recipe for chocolate candy, a bibliography of additional reading, and ways to say "I love you" in 12 different languages. It is a silly, amusing, sweet, and engaging book which is sure to be a young poetry lover's delight. In "Pete's Puddles," by Hannah Roche (1996, ages 3 to 6), it is raining outside so little Pete must play inside. But, all is well because Sandra, his friend from down the street, comes over to paint with him. Then Pete's mom decides to take them both shopping. On their way home, the rain stops and they decide it would be fun to visit a^ park to swing, play, and, of course, jump in every puddle they can find. Back home, the day comes to a delicious conclusion with a big cup of yummy hot chocolate. This little book, easy for small hands to hold, has a brief text with bright illustrations done in primary colors that will really appeal to little children eager to share books and experiences. Just make sure you have some hot chocolate ready when you share this story. In "Winnie the Pooh's Valentine," by Bruce Talkington (1995, ages 3 to 7), Pooh Bear is busy decorating his home for a Valentine celebration when his friend, Roo, conies a-calling. Roo is really worried. He wants to surprise his mom with a special valentine, but he doesn't know how to go about making one. So, they put their heads together and decide they need more heads. Enter Piglet, Tigger, Rabbit, Gopher, and Eyeore to the rescue. When the dust settles, a beautiful, but huge, boulder chiseled into the shape of a heart by Gopher, painted by Tigger, and inscribed by Roo is unveiled. But this towering valentine does present a really large problem. Never fear, Pooh and his SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14 > M^^i -h UL6iM..QI / |>.in K H 10 p 11:00 a.m.11:00 p.m. Chicken Angelo $/S9 6 3:00 p.m.11:00 p.m. Reservations Suggested ^5lt-H031 Lobster M edaUions ,2499 N.Y Steak & Cajiui GrUled Shrimp Where Locals Brins Their Friends S— V a ltn U i w I A M I N C. 0 AND lU Page 13 \ \i(\i. I < 1 February 12-13, 1998 Panorama Page 3 Boulder City Sailor visits Hong Kong ii| Oriental beauty, exotic sights, massive crowds, towering buildings, great night-life and excellent shopping opportunities mean one thing — Hong Kong. These are some of the things that will come to mind when Boulder City's Randy W. Martin, 32, tells his family and friends about his visit to the Pearl of the Orient. Navy Chief Petty Officer Martin, the son of Marguerite Martin ofBoulder City, and his shipmates stationed aboard the guided missile cruiser USS Lake Champlain, recently made a port visit to Hong Kong diuing a six-month tour. For more than a century, Hong Kong has been a favorite stop for sailors on tours to the Western Pacific, Indian Ocean and Persian Gulf. "During my visit I did a lot of shopping. Besides shopping, I indulged in many cultural activities Randy W. Martin like touring and eating various types of food. This was my sixth visit to Hong Kong and every time I've experienced something new," said Martin, a 1983 graduate of Boulder City High School. He is a radar and navigation specialist on the Lake Champlain where he uses radar in the tracking and identification of ships and aircraft. For nearly 100 years. Hong Kong had been a British Crown Colony and U.S. warships made more than 60 port calls there annually. On July 1, the British handed over the South Pacific city to its new landlord. Communist China. Although Hong Kong is 40W under Communistnile, Martin was happy to find that the city's unique atmosphere, at least on the surface, was no different. "In many ways, the people of Hong Kong are the same as us. Almost everywhere we went, we saw people with cellular telephones, dressed in suits and big on sports. Unlike the western cities, Hong Kong is built on small areas ofland, this gives the city its own unique beauty," Martin said. Based in San Diego, Martin and the Lake Champlain are currently enforcingU.N. sanctions against Iraq as part of Operation Southern Watch in the Arabian Gulf He feels it's important for the Navy to deploy ships Uke the Lake Champlain to the Middle East, especially when tensions with Iraq are high. "As the wofld's strongest country, it's important to make our presence known to everyone. Deployments are a great opportimity to interact with different people A mtiMnAtMuryttcki^^ thatLeoeet WiirWu • i-Ci\JLSay "Goodbye" to your unwanted hair and tattoos ^^ FOREVER with the new FDA approved Ruby-Laser Hair Removal system. Ruby-Laser treatment can offer that M perfect biicini line, free from hair, smooth silky aims/ ^ legs, backs, and even removal of unwanted tattoos and age spots. 0 u \lMser Hair Removal I Tanoo Removal Introductory Offer (with coupon) 25% 0 1'o^ ^W^ik^L TVA\Jf .,., j ^., I 11CE. Lake Mead, Suite 201, Hend. •564-9444 military is an ambassador of the ^ ^i ^_^^LM...L..I_..^.._ U.S. and it's our duty to present ourselves to the world as the best of the best," said Martin, a 12year Navy veteran. Although Martin and the Lake Champlain will continue to help mainteiin a tenuous peace in the Gulf for the next four months, their visit to beautiftil Hong Kong will be the topic of sea stories long after the deployment is over. BRIEFS 'Freedoms' celebrated "Remembering the Freedoms," a two-day celebration of African American culture through song, drama, dance and oral history will be presented Saturday £ind Sunday, Feb. 14-15, at the West Charleston Library Theater. The free event is open to the public and offers the best of national touring and local artists from 12:30 to 4 p.m. both days. Special guest vocalist is Johnny Ray Watson from his role of Joe in "Showboat," and his rendition of "01' Man River" is a Showstopper, a spokesman said. The show depicts several Black leaders including Buffalo Soldier Sgt. Stance, Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington and-'W.E.B. Dubois, Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X. The Las Vegas chapter of the Tuskegee Airmen, Inc. will present an oral history of their struggles and make a presentation to several schools and libraries of the GI Joe Tuskegee Fighter Pilot dolls, a gift of Hasbro Toy Co. This event will also showcase Dharvi Morgenstem's tribute to African queens, Kim Russell's "Sojoumer Truth," comedy by Jay Bernard, and an interpretative dance by Rhonda Simmons. National touring artist Lewis Tucker's one-man show."Can I' Sing for you Brother," will round out the program with San Francisco soprano Denise Mitchell offering gospel standards. Bryans to be honored The Frontier Girl Scout Council will hopor Sen. Richard and Bonnie Bryan on Feb. 18, with its Awsmi of DiBtinction,the highest "^ coirpnunity servict award given by the organization. • TTie Bryans were chosen for their ongoing support of the organization, especially help with the six drop>-in centers, which bring the Girl Scout experience to girls from all income levels and cultural backgrounds. The event, "For the Love of Giri Scouts," will be held at the Palace Station Hotel and Casino in the Roundhouse BaHfawar.^ Cocktails will be at 6 p.m., followed by dinner at 7 p.m. For reservations or more information, call 385-3677. County spring classes offered The Clark County Parks and Recreation Department offers more than 300 classes in adventure recreation, arts and crafts, child development, exercise and fitness, languages, martial arts, music, sports, emd special interest. Classes are offered at one or more of 11 community center locations. Mail-in registration will be held Feb. 13-19. Walk-in registration begins Feb. 23. The six-week class sessions will be held from March 2 to April 11. Offerings include: Backpacking Skills, Fossil Hunting, Children's Gun Safety, Pilot Ground School, Creative Video Expression, Photography, Painting, Retirement Planning, Trout Fishing, Ballet and Tap, Foreign Languages for Children, Active Learning, Line Dancing, Sports Skills, Hispanic folk Dance, Antique Collecting, Italian Cooking, Creative Thinking, Tai Chi, Yoga, Juggling, Spanish, Poetry, Master Acting, Piano, Improvisational Comedy, AdultSportsLeagues,Tennis,BabysittingCertification, Parenting Skills and more. Class locations include Guinn Center, 6480 Fairbanks, (near Torrey Pines and Flamingo), 455-8393; Lowden Center, 3333' Cambridge, 455-7169; Orr Center, 1520 Katie (behind the Boule: vard Mall), 455-7196; Paradise Center, 4770 South Harrison, 455-7513; Parkdale Center, 3200 Femdale, 455-7517; Sunrise Center, 2240 Linn Lane, 455-7600; Von Tobel Center, 3610 E. Carey Ave. (Pecos and Carey), 455-7699; Walnut Cecile Center, 3880 Cecile, 455-8402; Whitney Center, 5700 Missouri, 455-7573; and Winchester Center, 3130 S. McLeod, 455-7340. For a copy of the latest brochure or for more information, ca^t 455-8200. Choreographers' Showcase set The ninth annual Choreographers' Showcase will be on stage Satiu-day and Sunday, Feb. 21-22, the Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush, Las Vegas. Advance tickets are $10 for adults, and $8 for students, seniors and disabled. Call 229-6383. Tickets at the door are $12 and $10. The Showcase serves as an outlet for local dancers to experiment and display choreographic talent in an artistic setting. To be in the showcase, choreographers audition and are selected by a panel of judges. Featured will be a piece by award-winning choreographer Kathryn Posin, performed by UNLV Dance Department students. Posin recently received a Choreography Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. For more information, call 229-6383. Ensign hosts AGC dinner The Associated General Contractors of Las Vegas, a non-profit organization, will hold a membership dinner from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 18, at the Riviera Hotel/Casino, Top^)f-the-Riv." Rep. John Ensign, R-Nev., will be the guest speaker. Tickets are $40. and can be obtained by calling the AGC office, 796-9986, or at the door the day c^the dinner. PET OF THE WEEK 'Mickay D' Domestic Short Hair Black/Gray Tiger Male — 1 year old Very cute and loving A Call the Henderson Animal Shelter. 565-2033 / THE NEWS IS YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER Ramada Express Hotel & Casino • Laughliii, NV nOL Laughlin's $19 "Super Room" Now includes a Social Hour Free parking, quick check-in, non-smoking floors, free fun hook, Social Hour and 1940's tribute with collectibles, films, flags & big bands • Enjoy a complimentary beverage and make new friends at our Social Hour m>eting daily. • Park free in our covered highrise garage. • Give us 3-5 hours notice and we'll arrange an Express Check-in with your credit card. • A non-smoker? You'U have your own floor. • Free pull on a Slot that guarantees you a win. Top prize is a whopping $5,000! • Shop at Horizon Outlet Center, just a block away (free shuttle service). • Free coflfee and donuts in our "Back to the 1940's" Canteen. • Ask about our adults only East Tower with in-room coffee pots and continental breakfast delivered to your door, for a nominal fee. .^ • • Bringing a guest? The $19 price is for for 2 (Sunday through Thursday) until February 26,1998Cail Toll Free for Information & Reservations: 1-888-TRAIN05 (872-4605) k Room rales based on aiwUihUit) Skitukrd rooms only Holidays, umkertds andspeaal nvntpemds higher .Whan in Las Vagas visK our sitter property The Tropicana Resort! V F IN TOTAL HOLIDAY WEEKEND (jii mliMUi} "l^il^ Catk" For e>ery KH) points earned at the slots >ou will recei\t' iMo extra "Wild Cards." Table name players (with Town Club Card displayedi can also earn additional Wild Cards. Just because you're not working this holiday weekend doesn't mean you can't get paid! $10,000.00 A DAY FOR 3 DAYS If you're not a Town Club Member, sign up for your FREE membership now. The Big Cash Drawings: Saturday, February 14th thru Monday. Febmary 16th. Daily Cash Drawings: $3,000.00 at 12:30p.m.. $3,000.00 at 4:30p.m. and $3,000.00 at 8:30p.m. An additional SI.000.00 in total cash will be given awa\ each day during random cash drawings. Listen to announcements dunng each regularlv scheduled drawing tor the times the extra ca.sh will he given away Must bt 21. Rules posted in the casino. BAITS TOWH SAM'S TOWN Kl 1 ( )( \l S |',KiN( I I \\1l\'( ,( ) \Ni> \\i )( Nl >^

PAGE 21

LIFESTYLES Page 2 Panorama February 12-13, 1998 ON THE SIDELINES D. J. ALLEN Negative 'journalism' usually has its roots It was refreshing to see mega-sports agent I Leigh Steinberg discuss the Dallas Cowboys I and Jerry Jones last week instead of listening to another biased, so-called, sports broadcast I journalist talk about the franchise. Steinberg, who represents the Hkes of such National Football League stars as Steve Young and Troy Aikman, relayed on Fox Sports' "Last Word" last Thursday night a message that you will rarely ever find in today's media — the Cowboys are in good hands with Jones, who bought the struggling franchise prior to the 1989 season and returned it to elite status. The Cowboys, one of the most storied franchises in all of American sports, cannot and will not escape the headlines — no matter the situation. However, one thing needs to be remembered when the Cowboys are discussed — success brings jealousy. Just look,at the Chicago Bulls or New York Yankees. For every One fan that lovgs the team with a passion, there is five fans that hate it. Think about how many times you have heard people say they hate the Arizona Cardinals or Los Angeles Clipp^ haven't. Why? They don't win. This past weekend, I heard a national radio talk show host boast to all of his listeners he was a "Yankee hater." He then continued to explain how bad of a decision it was for New York to acquire second baseman Chuck Knoblauch from the Minnesota Twins for four minor league prospects and cash. It was an obvious opinion he stated as fact. But, he justified it being a bad trade for the sole reason he "hates" the Yankees. That is what the media does with the Cowboys on a daily basis. Example No-. 1. Much is made season after season about Jones going down on the field at the end of the Dallas games. How do you know he is there? Because the networks always show him. Did you know it is a tradition for Denver Broncos owner Pat Bowlen to head to his team's sideline with five minutes left in every game? Is there something M^ong with the owner going to his sidelines at the end of a game to watch his team. No. But, in Jones' case there seems to be. Example No. 2. In the past 12 months, how many Dallas Cowboy players have been in trouble with the law or have been issued a suspension. Zero. Michael Irvin's past is brought up on a daily basis. Is it just me or did his now infamous motel room act occur during the same off-season that Brett Favrfi^pent time in a drug rehabilitation clinic? Forgot above Favre, didn't you? Or, at least the media let you forget about him. And, example No. 3**""^ In a day and age when sports stars are considered to be self-centered and don't worry about their respective teams, Aikman has been just the opposite. Last off-season, Aikman traveled across the country to personally workout with the top five tight ends eligible for the draft. Who better would you want to scout and work with a possible offensive draft pick than the team's starting quarterback — a threetime Super Bowl winner at that. However, once again the critics came out on the Cowboys. People asked, "Who's running the team?" and "Why does Aikman have so much power?" For a winning team such asithe Dallas Cowboys, it isn't and will never, be a win-win situation. ^ There are millions of fans across the country that "hate" the Dallas Cowboys — and that doesn't exclude members of the media. So the next time you hear a message regarding the Cowboys or any sports player or team for that matter, remember who the messenger is. "^ Looking at where they come from is usually morelnformative than what they have to say. D.J. Allen is Public Relations Director for Henderson Home News. wm Valentine stories and poems for children "I gave a hundred valentines. A hundred, did I say? I gave a thousand valentines one cold and wintry day ..." The poem is titled "Valentines," and the book, "Valentine's Day: Stories and Poems," edited by Caroline F. Bauer (1993, ages 4 and up), containsmany other poems, short stories, a recipe for chocolate candy, a bibliography of additional reading, and ways to say "I love you" in 12 different languages. It is a silly, amusing, sweet, and engaging book which is sure to be a young poetry lover's delight. In "Pete's Puddles," by Hannah Roche (1996, ages 3 to 6), it is raining outside so little Pete must play inside. But, all is well because Sandra, his friend from down the street, comes over to paint with him. Then Pete's mom decides to take them both shopping. On their way home, the rain stops and they decide it would be fun to visit a^ park to swing, play, and, of course, jump in every puddle they can find. Back home, the day comes to a delicious conclusion with a big cup of yummy hot chocolate. This little book, easy for small hands to hold, has a brief text with bright illustrations done in primary colors that will really appeal to little children eager to share books and experiences. Just make sure you have some hot chocolate ready when you share this story. In "Winnie the Pooh's Valentine," by Bruce Talkington (1995, ages 3 to 7), Pooh Bear is busy decorating his home for a Valentine celebration when his friend, Roo, conies a-calling. Roo is really worried. He wants to surprise his mom with a special valentine, but he doesn't know how to go about making one. So, they put their heads together and decide they need more heads. Enter Piglet, Tigger, Rabbit, Gopher, and Eyeore to the rescue. When the dust settles, a beautiful, but huge, boulder chiseled into the shape of a heart by Gopher, painted by Tigger, and inscribed by Roo is unveiled. But this towering valentine does present a really large problem. Never fear, Pooh and his SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14 > M^^i -h UL6iM..QI / |>.in K H 10 p 11:00 a.m.11:00 p.m. Chicken Angelo $/S9 6 3:00 p.m.11:00 p.m. Reservations Suggested ^5lt-H031 Lobster M edaUions ,2499 N.Y Steak & Cajiui GrUled Shrimp Where Locals Brins Their Friends S— V a ltn U i w I A M I N C. 0 AND lU Page 13 \ \i(\i. I < 1 February 12-13, 1998 Panorama Page 3 Boulder City Sailor visits Hong Kong ii| Oriental beauty, exotic sights, massive crowds, towering buildings, great night-life and excellent shopping opportunities mean one thing — Hong Kong. These are some of the things that will come to mind when Boulder City's Randy W. Martin, 32, tells his family and friends about his visit to the Pearl of the Orient. Navy Chief Petty Officer Martin, the son of Marguerite Martin ofBoulder City, and his shipmates stationed aboard the guided missile cruiser USS Lake Champlain, recently made a port visit to Hong Kong diuing a six-month tour. For more than a century, Hong Kong has been a favorite stop for sailors on tours to the Western Pacific, Indian Ocean and Persian Gulf. "During my visit I did a lot of shopping. Besides shopping, I indulged in many cultural activities Randy W. Martin like touring and eating various types of food. This was my sixth visit to Hong Kong and every time I've experienced something new," said Martin, a 1983 graduate of Boulder City High School. He is a radar and navigation specialist on the Lake Champlain where he uses radar in the tracking and identification of ships and aircraft. For nearly 100 years. Hong Kong had been a British Crown Colony and U.S. warships made more than 60 port calls there annually. On July 1, the British handed over the South Pacific city to its new landlord. Communist China. Although Hong Kong is 40W under Communistnile, Martin was happy to find that the city's unique atmosphere, at least on the surface, was no different. "In many ways, the people of Hong Kong are the same as us. Almost everywhere we went, we saw people with cellular telephones, dressed in suits and big on sports. Unlike the western cities, Hong Kong is built on small areas ofland, this gives the city its own unique beauty," Martin said. Based in San Diego, Martin and the Lake Champlain are currently enforcingU.N. sanctions against Iraq as part of Operation Southern Watch in the Arabian Gulf He feels it's important for the Navy to deploy ships Uke the Lake Champlain to the Middle East, especially when tensions with Iraq are high. "As the wofld's strongest country, it's important to make our presence known to everyone. Deployments are a great opportimity to interact with different people A mtiMnAtMuryttcki^^ thatLeoeet WiirWu • i-Ci\JLSay "Goodbye" to your unwanted hair and tattoos ^^ FOREVER with the new FDA approved Ruby-Laser Hair Removal system. Ruby-Laser treatment can offer that M perfect biicini line, free from hair, smooth silky aims/ ^ legs, backs, and even removal of unwanted tattoos and age spots. 0 u \lMser Hair Removal I Tanoo Removal Introductory Offer (with coupon) 25% 0 1'o^ ^W^ik^L TVA\Jf .,., j ^., I 11CE. Lake Mead, Suite 201, Hend. •564-9444 military is an ambassador of the ^ ^i ^_^^LM...L..I_..^.._ U.S. and it's our duty to present ourselves to the world as the best of the best," said Martin, a 12year Navy veteran. Although Martin and the Lake Champlain will continue to help mainteiin a tenuous peace in the Gulf for the next four months, their visit to beautiftil Hong Kong will be the topic of sea stories long after the deployment is over. BRIEFS 'Freedoms' celebrated "Remembering the Freedoms," a two-day celebration of African American culture through song, drama, dance and oral history will be presented Saturday £ind Sunday, Feb. 14-15, at the West Charleston Library Theater. The free event is open to the public and offers the best of national touring and local artists from 12:30 to 4 p.m. both days. Special guest vocalist is Johnny Ray Watson from his role of Joe in "Showboat," and his rendition of "01' Man River" is a Showstopper, a spokesman said. The show depicts several Black leaders including Buffalo Soldier Sgt. Stance, Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington and-'W.E.B. Dubois, Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X. The Las Vegas chapter of the Tuskegee Airmen, Inc. will present an oral history of their struggles and make a presentation to several schools and libraries of the GI Joe Tuskegee Fighter Pilot dolls, a gift of Hasbro Toy Co. This event will also showcase Dharvi Morgenstem's tribute to African queens, Kim Russell's "Sojoumer Truth," comedy by Jay Bernard, and an interpretative dance by Rhonda Simmons. National touring artist Lewis Tucker's one-man show."Can I' Sing for you Brother," will round out the program with San Francisco soprano Denise Mitchell offering gospel standards. Bryans to be honored The Frontier Girl Scout Council will hopor Sen. Richard and Bonnie Bryan on Feb. 18, with its Awsmi of DiBtinction,the highest "^ coirpnunity servict award given by the organization. • TTie Bryans were chosen for their ongoing support of the organization, especially help with the six drop>-in centers, which bring the Girl Scout experience to girls from all income levels and cultural backgrounds. The event, "For the Love of Giri Scouts," will be held at the Palace Station Hotel and Casino in the Roundhouse BaHfawar.^ Cocktails will be at 6 p.m., followed by dinner at 7 p.m. For reservations or more information, call 385-3677. County spring classes offered The Clark County Parks and Recreation Department offers more than 300 classes in adventure recreation, arts and crafts, child development, exercise and fitness, languages, martial arts, music, sports, emd special interest. Classes are offered at one or more of 11 community center locations. Mail-in registration will be held Feb. 13-19. Walk-in registration begins Feb. 23. The six-week class sessions will be held from March 2 to April 11. Offerings include: Backpacking Skills, Fossil Hunting, Children's Gun Safety, Pilot Ground School, Creative Video Expression, Photography, Painting, Retirement Planning, Trout Fishing, Ballet and Tap, Foreign Languages for Children, Active Learning, Line Dancing, Sports Skills, Hispanic folk Dance, Antique Collecting, Italian Cooking, Creative Thinking, Tai Chi, Yoga, Juggling, Spanish, Poetry, Master Acting, Piano, Improvisational Comedy, AdultSportsLeagues,Tennis,BabysittingCertification, Parenting Skills and more. Class locations include Guinn Center, 6480 Fairbanks, (near Torrey Pines and Flamingo), 455-8393; Lowden Center, 3333' Cambridge, 455-7169; Orr Center, 1520 Katie (behind the Boule: vard Mall), 455-7196; Paradise Center, 4770 South Harrison, 455-7513; Parkdale Center, 3200 Femdale, 455-7517; Sunrise Center, 2240 Linn Lane, 455-7600; Von Tobel Center, 3610 E. Carey Ave. (Pecos and Carey), 455-7699; Walnut Cecile Center, 3880 Cecile, 455-8402; Whitney Center, 5700 Missouri, 455-7573; and Winchester Center, 3130 S. McLeod, 455-7340. For a copy of the latest brochure or for more information, ca^t 455-8200. Choreographers' Showcase set The ninth annual Choreographers' Showcase will be on stage Satiu-day and Sunday, Feb. 21-22, the Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. Brush, Las Vegas. Advance tickets are $10 for adults, and $8 for students, seniors and disabled. Call 229-6383. Tickets at the door are $12 and $10. The Showcase serves as an outlet for local dancers to experiment and display choreographic talent in an artistic setting. To be in the showcase, choreographers audition and are selected by a panel of judges. Featured will be a piece by award-winning choreographer Kathryn Posin, performed by UNLV Dance Department students. Posin recently received a Choreography Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. For more information, call 229-6383. Ensign hosts AGC dinner The Associated General Contractors of Las Vegas, a non-profit organization, will hold a membership dinner from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 18, at the Riviera Hotel/Casino, Top^)f-the-Riv." Rep. John Ensign, R-Nev., will be the guest speaker. Tickets are $40. and can be obtained by calling the AGC office, 796-9986, or at the door the day c^the dinner. PET OF THE WEEK 'Mickay D' Domestic Short Hair Black/Gray Tiger Male — 1 year old Very cute and loving A Call the Henderson Animal Shelter. 565-2033 / THE NEWS IS YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER Ramada Express Hotel & Casino • Laughliii, NV nOL Laughlin's $19 "Super Room" Now includes a Social Hour Free parking, quick check-in, non-smoking floors, free fun hook, Social Hour and 1940's tribute with collectibles, films, flags & big bands • Enjoy a complimentary beverage and make new friends at our Social Hour m>eting daily. • Park free in our covered highrise garage. • Give us 3-5 hours notice and we'll arrange an Express Check-in with your credit card. • A non-smoker? You'U have your own floor. • Free pull on a Slot that guarantees you a win. Top prize is a whopping $5,000! • Shop at Horizon Outlet Center, just a block away (free shuttle service). • Free coflfee and donuts in our "Back to the 1940's" Canteen. • Ask about our adults only East Tower with in-room coffee pots and continental breakfast delivered to your door, for a nominal fee. .^ • • Bringing a guest? The $19 price is for for 2 (Sunday through Thursday) until February 26,1998Cail Toll Free for Information & Reservations: 1-888-TRAIN05 (872-4605) k Room rales based on aiwUihUit) Skitukrd rooms only Holidays, umkertds andspeaal nvntpemds higher .Whan in Las Vagas visK our sitter property The Tropicana Resort! V F IN TOTAL HOLIDAY WEEKEND (jii mliMUi} "l^il^ Catk" For e>ery KH) points earned at the slots >ou will recei\t' iMo extra "Wild Cards." Table name players (with Town Club Card displayedi can also earn additional Wild Cards. Just because you're not working this holiday weekend doesn't mean you can't get paid! $10,000.00 A DAY FOR 3 DAYS If you're not a Town Club Member, sign up for your FREE membership now. The Big Cash Drawings: Saturday, February 14th thru Monday. Febmary 16th. Daily Cash Drawings: $3,000.00 at 12:30p.m.. $3,000.00 at 4:30p.m. and $3,000.00 at 8:30p.m. An additional SI.000.00 in total cash will be given awa\ each day during random cash drawings. Listen to announcements dunng each regularlv scheduled drawing tor the times the extra ca.sh will he given away Must bt 21. Rules posted in the casino. BAITS TOWH SAM'S TOWN Kl 1 ( )( \l S |',KiN( I I \\1l\'( ,( ) \Ni> \\i )( Nl >^

PAGE 22

OUTDOORS Page 4 Panorama February 12-13, 1998 LV Flappers dedicated to waterfowl KiJMSlJtlfeiliyi Women are once again making pi an s to flock together on behalf of waterfowl. The women's chapter of Ducks Unlimited, known as the Las Vegas Flappers chapter, is gearing up for its annual banquet, to be held Friday, Feb. 20, at the Gold Coast Hotel and Casino. Monies raised will go toward the continuation of waterfowl and habitat conservation programs. The committee has be^ working hard on planning the event, obtaining wonderful auction items and door prizes to the details of the evening's program^. The LV Flappers chapter of Ducks Unlimited BaBquet should be all its "quacked-up\o be. Attending the banquet is a wonderful way for sportsmen and women to support the local women's chapter and to join one of the finest OUTDOORS WITH BARB BARB HENDERSON conservationist organizations dedicated to wise conservation of waterfowl and their habitat. To purchase tickets or for more information about the chapter call Pamela Goodwill, 896-1588. •Frontier Girl Scout Council will hold its annual Girl Scout Cookie Sale from Feb. 27 to March 14. Each box is $3. Call 385-3677. •Congratulations to the Boy Scouts of America. February marks the 88th anniversary of the Boy Scouts. Call 736-4366.^ •National Parks Service v/ill hold Friday evening programs through February at Lake Mead National Recreation Area. Call 293-8990. •Foundatidn of North American Wild Sheep will hold its outdoor hunting and sportsman show Feb. 18-21, at the Reno Hilton. Call the FNAWS office in Cody, Wy., (307)527-62^1. • Las Vegas Ski and Social Club has a hotline telephone number for information on activities and meetings. Call 458-0469. •Lake Mead Boatowners' Association will meet at 10 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 15, atthe Lake Mead Marina. Call Diane Palmer, 4572797. •The Southern Nevada March of Dimes is gearing up for its annual Walkam erica. To join^ team, call 732-9255. ( •Las Vegas Power Squadron is holding registration for^ public boatingcoursein March. Call Clint Moore, 255-3590. •Nevada Division of Wildlife reminds state anglers and hunters that annual licenses n[d attached stamps are valid through Feb. 28. Thenewlicenseyearruns from March 1 to the end of February (not the calendar year as in some states). Fishing and hunting licenses for 1998-99 will be available by mid-February, at most sporting goods dealers, bait/tackle shops and marinas. Call NDOW, 486-5127. •The National Wild Turkey Federation Las Vegas chapter will hold its annual banquet Saturday, March 7, at the Showboat Hotel. Call Greg Clark, 432-6033. "Until next week, enjoy the great outdoors." a Henderson is the Outdoors Editor for the News Ranger programs set at Lake Mohave Join Park Ranger programs on Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays through April 12 at Lakoj Mohave in Lake Mead National Recreation Area. All times are for Arizona, which is on Mountain Standard Time,— one hour later than Nevada, wh ich is on Pacific Standard Time. Talks will be. held at the Katherine amphitheater each Wednesday and Saturday evening beginningat 7 p.m. (MST). Walks originate atthe Katherine Ranger Station eacK^aturday and Sunday at 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. A 2 p.m. talk will be held at the Katherine Picnic Area. The programs are free and the public is invited. Travel the World on Wednesday evenings with Park Volunteer Virginia Forbes. The program willfeature a new travel adventure each week. Join Forbes for an armchair trip around the Southwest. Saturday evening programs will alternate weekly and include: Photographing the Mojave Desert. Offered on the first and third Saturdays of'the month, explore the world of the Mojave Desert and Lake Mead NRA through the medium of nature photography. Park Ranger Dave Gafney will teach techniqueg of wilderness and desert photography. Early Passages. Offered on the second and fourth Saturdays of the month, Gafney will present the sequence of events that brought "Gentleman Trapper" Jedidiah Strong Smith to lead the first group of Euro-Americans through the Katherine Landing area in 1826. Learn more about this incredible adventure that cost of the lives of many of Smith's men. Desert Ecology Walk. Walks begin at 2 p.m. Saturday afternoons. Join Park Ranger Robin White for an easy, one hour Desert Ecology Walk, and learn about amazing adaptations plants and animals have made to survive the harsh conditions of life in the Mojave Desert. Bird Walk. Join Park Ranger Laura Seager for an easy, onehour Bird Walk at9a.m. Sundays, to view seasohal feathered visitors to Katherine Landing. For best viewing, participants are asked to bring binoculars and a bird guide. Creatures of the Desert. At 2 p.m. on Sundays, Meet at the Katherine Picnic Area at 2 p.m. Sundays, for a talk about Creepy, Crawly Creatures of the Desert by Park Ranger Dave Gafney. Learn about tarantulas, scorpions and other invertebrates of the' Mojave Desert and the remarkable ways they have developed to survive in a land of extremes. For more information about these activities or Lake Mead National Recreation Area, stop by the Katherine Ranger Station daily from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. (MST) or call (520) 754-3272. Callville boat ramp closed Lake Mead boaters are advised the courtesy dock at the Callville Bay puljlic launch ramp will be out of the water for repairs until March 1, according to Lake Mead National Recreation Area Superintendent Alan O'Neill. "We regret the inconvenience to boaters in having to pull the dock for repairs," said O'Neill. "However, this dock was in need of major rehabilitation work, and we wanted to get that done before the main boating season." Work on the dock will include rewelding on the frame as well as redecking. O'Neill indicated that the dock will be returned to the water as quickly as possible. Outdoor sports boots go the distance Wolverine Boots and Shoes has been keeping outdoors sportsmen's feet warm, dry and comfortable since 1883. As technology improves and more people participate in outdoors activities, Wolverine keeps in step with new products, new classifications and new performance materials. Using Gore-Tex waterproof laminates and Thinsulate insulations for its top-of-the line winter boots, Wolverine adds new Mossy Oak mini camo pattern in both men's and women's 8-inch models and an 11-inch version. Proven performance features include the proprietary DuraShock Comfort System designed to compress, as weight is distributed first on the heel and then on the'ball of the foot, absorbing impact. To prove its claim that boots utilizing this system are the most comfortable in the world, the company has been offering a 30day guarantee. Another important feature o£^ the Outdoor Sport boots are the Vibram rubber outsoles which offer superior traction, and a polyurethane mid-sole gives additional comfort. Some of Wolverine's boot styles. The News covers your community Great Food! Great Fun! Great Place! Monday Fried Chicken w/vcgctahle, potato and rolls Tuesday Choice Top Sirloin : with potato and Thursday "'//*> • ^ Wednesday Turkey iiilh dri'ssin^, inaslu'd potatoes, iiraiy. etc. All Dinners Include Our World F'amous "All You Can Eat" Salad Bar. Offer available 4-10pm only. "Outdoors with Barb" CJASINO a. RESTAUBANT noiildii llu v.. / BImh S„utli of Sunset Rd, Hvndvrsnn .'tfnUJUi Barb Henderson Saturday mornings at 9:30 a.m. KNEWS AM 970 A half hour radio program highlighting the great outdoors. ..__J February 12-13,1998 Panorama Pag5 Skippers attend safe boating class ^ Diamond Plate Aluminum Tool Boxes • Aluminum Running Boards • Side Rails Aluminum & Stainless • Bed Liners & Bed Mats • Bug Shields and Many Other Pick-Up Truck Accessories • FREE GIFT WITH THIS AD • OPEN MONDAY FRIDAY 8 AM • 5 PM 1051 Mary Crest Rd. Suite M (Off Gibson Rd.). CALL 564-5090 FOR DIRECTIONS Sail on Disnei; Magic! "^fsfOf^CDUiSE LINE ,^DiMJ)vi:u liNciiAicn;!) MACK; •k REFRESHMENTS • EJooR PRIZES SPECIAL PRICING DATES iSuiSflk. OfLas Vegas INFORMATIONAL SEMINAR • Meet DSM Janet Sederquist and Learn about the new "Disney Magic" FEBRUARY 12 • 7:00 P.M. ENTERPRISE LIBRARY LAS VEGAS BLVD. -1 BLOCK SOUTH OF WINDMILL RSVP Cruise Holidays EAST: 898-6999 ^ WEST: 871-7447 Ray Eichar The Las Vegas Power Squadron safe boating class held last month in Henderson had 16 students. I made a short visit to one of the classes and stayed long enough for the first s^:ment of the course called "Boat Smart." Six certified instructors and monitors from the Power Squadron were on hand. That's a pretty fair teacher-to-8tudent ratio. And these instructors are just regular boaters like you and me, from an organization with a goal to teach boat safety and have fun doing it. The segment I attended covered anchoring, theft protection, launching boats from a trailer and docking. The use of new colored overhead training slides made understanding very clear and easy to follow, I was especially interested in procedures shown when docking in a heavy wind. For veterans of BOATING WITH RAY RAY EiCHER the lake, I think you will agree the wind does blow occasionally at Lake Mead—especially when you are trying to pull into a dock or slip. The instructors gave several suggestions that I needed to be reminded about when docking. Such as pr^iaring the boat before docking. I always seem to forget to put out my fenders. I launch my rig from the trailer and head for the dock. Just before I get there, I start to look for them. The last time I was already at the dock and had tied a line when I noticed the boat was banging into the dock. And I had written a column on fenders. Hope nobody notices. Ill Every suggestion given made me all the more convinced that safe boating classes should be taken by the rookie skipper as well as those who have been on the lake for many years. I support mandatory completion of a safe boating class for all Nevada skippers before ^oing out on the water. Classes are only four weeks long. I am certain you will learn something or, as in my case, remember something to help you become a safety-conscious boater. The next meeting of the Lake Mead Boatowners' Association should be interesting. Although January attendance was still low, the discussion was Hvely. Problems and concerns of slip renters was a main topic. Representatives of the Nevada yacht Club and LMBOA will meet in February to see if some solutions can be worked out. Onoe two orgranizations get going, much can be accomplished as there are many experienced boaters in each group who can Gome up with workable solution. The meeting will be at 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 15, in the Lake Mead Marine restaurant You don't have to be a member to attend.. A sport show will come to Cashman Field Center on Feb. 19. Winter is a gteat time to look over the latest available safety equipment. It is a good time to dieck present gear to see if any needs to be replaced. Stop by the Power Squadron booth while you are there. Until next time, keep your Wlge dry. Eichef, a long-time valley resident, considers himself a part-time txMter and fisherman. Rocky Shoes, Ducks Unlimited in partnership ^PUY SHOWBOAT VUEHTIHC'SDAYBIHGO WITHiURiiaRTSJl^ Rocky Shoes & Boots, Inc., the leading outdoor footwear manufacturer in the world, is proud to announce a partnership with Ducks Unlimited, the world's largest private waterfowl and wetlands conservation organization. According to director of marfirs and wetlands" throug'nom :^>fe^iSil:&ji>i5gi(^( 41 1^ it uli^ ?ivihf auiai| a free heart-i|iped lacqj/er trinket box toanplafimataliieHioni.* 9 (eitiont Daili| 9 a.m. • II a.m. • i p.m. • 3 p.m. S p.in. • 7 p.(n. -9 p.m. • 11 p.m. • 1 a.m. (.oAjDinimum Bui| in UWGC thtBoukkri • 89104 wwwjnO'woow-fVi sumers and DU members and Girl Scouts to sell cookies Frontier Girl Scout Council is gearing up for the annual Girl Scout Cookie Sale, Feb. 27-March 14. Each box will cost $3. Check the main entrance of major grocery stores for a Girl Scout cookie booth. Cookies can also be preordered from Jan. 17Feb. 1, by calling the Girl Scout service center. All eight varieties will be available this year includinglce Ginger Daisies, 5 World Cinnamons, Peanut Butter Patties, Peanut Butter Cookies, Lemon Pastry Creams, Shortbreads, Thin Mints and Caramel Delights. The sale helps girls develop leadership skills and practice resourcefulness and self-reliance, and it generates revenue for troops, Girl gcout councils and Girl Scouts of the U.S.A. to fund the Girl Scout program in the U.S. "However it is the girls themselves that are the primary beneficiaries of the cookie sale through what they learn and experience by taking part in the sale and through the programs and services made possible by the revenue the sale generates," said public relations director Juergen Barbusca. Girl Scouts have sold more than 1 billion boxes of cookies since they began organized sales in 1936. Iflaid end to end they would circle the globe over five times, or build a Cheops pyramid or a Great Wall. To preorder cookies and for more information on the cookie sale or about Girl Scouting, contact the Girl Scout service center, 385-3677. Anglers supporters share the same love for outdoors and the well-being of the envirormient." Rocky and DU were both founded more than 60 years ago. DU's 673,000 members have raised more than $1 biUion for conservation projects, restored or acresof North America, and currently maintain morethan 11,000 North American conservation projects. DU has also aided in the race to save numerous endangered species including the Whooping Crane, Peregrine Falcon, Louisiana Black Bear, American Bald Eagle and more. A significant porijipn of proceeds generated fV^om sales of the DU styles will help to suptoort the organization's goal to support waterfowl, endangered species and wetlands conservation"prbjectfi. Rocky Shoes & Boots, Inc. has been designing and manufacturing quality outdoor and work footwear for the past 65 years. Products are available in more than 3,000 retail and catalog outlets throughout North America and Europe. AAAA4iAAAAAAAAA
PAGE 23

OUTDOORS Page 4 Panorama February 12-13, 1998 LV Flappers dedicated to waterfowl KiJMSlJtlfeiliyi Women are once again making pi an s to flock together on behalf of waterfowl. The women's chapter of Ducks Unlimited, known as the Las Vegas Flappers chapter, is gearing up for its annual banquet, to be held Friday, Feb. 20, at the Gold Coast Hotel and Casino. Monies raised will go toward the continuation of waterfowl and habitat conservation programs. The committee has be^ working hard on planning the event, obtaining wonderful auction items and door prizes to the details of the evening's program^. The LV Flappers chapter of Ducks Unlimited BaBquet should be all its "quacked-up\o be. Attending the banquet is a wonderful way for sportsmen and women to support the local women's chapter and to join one of the finest OUTDOORS WITH BARB BARB HENDERSON conservationist organizations dedicated to wise conservation of waterfowl and their habitat. To purchase tickets or for more information about the chapter call Pamela Goodwill, 896-1588. •Frontier Girl Scout Council will hold its annual Girl Scout Cookie Sale from Feb. 27 to March 14. Each box is $3. Call 385-3677. •Congratulations to the Boy Scouts of America. February marks the 88th anniversary of the Boy Scouts. Call 736-4366.^ •National Parks Service v/ill hold Friday evening programs through February at Lake Mead National Recreation Area. Call 293-8990. •Foundatidn of North American Wild Sheep will hold its outdoor hunting and sportsman show Feb. 18-21, at the Reno Hilton. Call the FNAWS office in Cody, Wy., (307)527-62^1. • Las Vegas Ski and Social Club has a hotline telephone number for information on activities and meetings. Call 458-0469. •Lake Mead Boatowners' Association will meet at 10 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 15, atthe Lake Mead Marina. Call Diane Palmer, 4572797. •The Southern Nevada March of Dimes is gearing up for its annual Walkam erica. To join^ team, call 732-9255. ( •Las Vegas Power Squadron is holding registration for^ public boatingcoursein March. Call Clint Moore, 255-3590. •Nevada Division of Wildlife reminds state anglers and hunters that annual licenses n[d attached stamps are valid through Feb. 28. Thenewlicenseyearruns from March 1 to the end of February (not the calendar year as in some states). Fishing and hunting licenses for 1998-99 will be available by mid-February, at most sporting goods dealers, bait/tackle shops and marinas. Call NDOW, 486-5127. •The National Wild Turkey Federation Las Vegas chapter will hold its annual banquet Saturday, March 7, at the Showboat Hotel. Call Greg Clark, 432-6033. "Until next week, enjoy the great outdoors." a Henderson is the Outdoors Editor for the News Ranger programs set at Lake Mohave Join Park Ranger programs on Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays through April 12 at Lakoj Mohave in Lake Mead National Recreation Area. All times are for Arizona, which is on Mountain Standard Time,— one hour later than Nevada, wh ich is on Pacific Standard Time. Talks will be. held at the Katherine amphitheater each Wednesday and Saturday evening beginningat 7 p.m. (MST). Walks originate atthe Katherine Ranger Station eacK^aturday and Sunday at 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. A 2 p.m. talk will be held at the Katherine Picnic Area. The programs are free and the public is invited. Travel the World on Wednesday evenings with Park Volunteer Virginia Forbes. The program willfeature a new travel adventure each week. Join Forbes for an armchair trip around the Southwest. Saturday evening programs will alternate weekly and include: Photographing the Mojave Desert. Offered on the first and third Saturdays of'the month, explore the world of the Mojave Desert and Lake Mead NRA through the medium of nature photography. Park Ranger Dave Gafney will teach techniqueg of wilderness and desert photography. Early Passages. Offered on the second and fourth Saturdays of the month, Gafney will present the sequence of events that brought "Gentleman Trapper" Jedidiah Strong Smith to lead the first group of Euro-Americans through the Katherine Landing area in 1826. Learn more about this incredible adventure that cost of the lives of many of Smith's men. Desert Ecology Walk. Walks begin at 2 p.m. Saturday afternoons. Join Park Ranger Robin White for an easy, one hour Desert Ecology Walk, and learn about amazing adaptations plants and animals have made to survive the harsh conditions of life in the Mojave Desert. Bird Walk. Join Park Ranger Laura Seager for an easy, onehour Bird Walk at9a.m. Sundays, to view seasohal feathered visitors to Katherine Landing. For best viewing, participants are asked to bring binoculars and a bird guide. Creatures of the Desert. At 2 p.m. on Sundays, Meet at the Katherine Picnic Area at 2 p.m. Sundays, for a talk about Creepy, Crawly Creatures of the Desert by Park Ranger Dave Gafney. Learn about tarantulas, scorpions and other invertebrates of the' Mojave Desert and the remarkable ways they have developed to survive in a land of extremes. For more information about these activities or Lake Mead National Recreation Area, stop by the Katherine Ranger Station daily from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. (MST) or call (520) 754-3272. Callville boat ramp closed Lake Mead boaters are advised the courtesy dock at the Callville Bay puljlic launch ramp will be out of the water for repairs until March 1, according to Lake Mead National Recreation Area Superintendent Alan O'Neill. "We regret the inconvenience to boaters in having to pull the dock for repairs," said O'Neill. "However, this dock was in need of major rehabilitation work, and we wanted to get that done before the main boating season." Work on the dock will include rewelding on the frame as well as redecking. O'Neill indicated that the dock will be returned to the water as quickly as possible. Outdoor sports boots go the distance Wolverine Boots and Shoes has been keeping outdoors sportsmen's feet warm, dry and comfortable since 1883. As technology improves and more people participate in outdoors activities, Wolverine keeps in step with new products, new classifications and new performance materials. Using Gore-Tex waterproof laminates and Thinsulate insulations for its top-of-the line winter boots, Wolverine adds new Mossy Oak mini camo pattern in both men's and women's 8-inch models and an 11-inch version. Proven performance features include the proprietary DuraShock Comfort System designed to compress, as weight is distributed first on the heel and then on the'ball of the foot, absorbing impact. To prove its claim that boots utilizing this system are the most comfortable in the world, the company has been offering a 30day guarantee. Another important feature o£^ the Outdoor Sport boots are the Vibram rubber outsoles which offer superior traction, and a polyurethane mid-sole gives additional comfort. Some of Wolverine's boot styles. The News covers your community Great Food! Great Fun! Great Place! Monday Fried Chicken w/vcgctahle, potato and rolls Tuesday Choice Top Sirloin : with potato and Thursday "'//*> • ^ Wednesday Turkey iiilh dri'ssin^, inaslu'd potatoes, iiraiy. etc. All Dinners Include Our World F'amous "All You Can Eat" Salad Bar. Offer available 4-10pm only. "Outdoors with Barb" CJASINO a. RESTAUBANT noiildii llu v.. / BImh S„utli of Sunset Rd, Hvndvrsnn .'tfnUJUi Barb Henderson Saturday mornings at 9:30 a.m. KNEWS AM 970 A half hour radio program highlighting the great outdoors. ..__J February 12-13,1998 Panorama Pag5 Skippers attend safe boating class ^ Diamond Plate Aluminum Tool Boxes • Aluminum Running Boards • Side Rails Aluminum & Stainless • Bed Liners & Bed Mats • Bug Shields and Many Other Pick-Up Truck Accessories • FREE GIFT WITH THIS AD • OPEN MONDAY FRIDAY 8 AM • 5 PM 1051 Mary Crest Rd. Suite M (Off Gibson Rd.). CALL 564-5090 FOR DIRECTIONS Sail on Disnei; Magic! "^fsfOf^CDUiSE LINE ,^DiMJ)vi:u liNciiAicn;!) MACK; •k REFRESHMENTS • EJooR PRIZES SPECIAL PRICING DATES iSuiSflk. OfLas Vegas INFORMATIONAL SEMINAR • Meet DSM Janet Sederquist and Learn about the new "Disney Magic" FEBRUARY 12 • 7:00 P.M. ENTERPRISE LIBRARY LAS VEGAS BLVD. -1 BLOCK SOUTH OF WINDMILL RSVP Cruise Holidays EAST: 898-6999 ^ WEST: 871-7447 Ray Eichar The Las Vegas Power Squadron safe boating class held last month in Henderson had 16 students. I made a short visit to one of the classes and stayed long enough for the first s^:ment of the course called "Boat Smart." Six certified instructors and monitors from the Power Squadron were on hand. That's a pretty fair teacher-to-8tudent ratio. And these instructors are just regular boaters like you and me, from an organization with a goal to teach boat safety and have fun doing it. The segment I attended covered anchoring, theft protection, launching boats from a trailer and docking. The use of new colored overhead training slides made understanding very clear and easy to follow, I was especially interested in procedures shown when docking in a heavy wind. For veterans of BOATING WITH RAY RAY EiCHER the lake, I think you will agree the wind does blow occasionally at Lake Mead—especially when you are trying to pull into a dock or slip. The instructors gave several suggestions that I needed to be reminded about when docking. Such as pr^iaring the boat before docking. I always seem to forget to put out my fenders. I launch my rig from the trailer and head for the dock. Just before I get there, I start to look for them. The last time I was already at the dock and had tied a line when I noticed the boat was banging into the dock. And I had written a column on fenders. Hope nobody notices. Ill Every suggestion given made me all the more convinced that safe boating classes should be taken by the rookie skipper as well as those who have been on the lake for many years. I support mandatory completion of a safe boating class for all Nevada skippers before ^oing out on the water. Classes are only four weeks long. I am certain you will learn something or, as in my case, remember something to help you become a safety-conscious boater. The next meeting of the Lake Mead Boatowners' Association should be interesting. Although January attendance was still low, the discussion was Hvely. Problems and concerns of slip renters was a main topic. Representatives of the Nevada yacht Club and LMBOA will meet in February to see if some solutions can be worked out. Onoe two orgranizations get going, much can be accomplished as there are many experienced boaters in each group who can Gome up with workable solution. The meeting will be at 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 15, in the Lake Mead Marine restaurant You don't have to be a member to attend.. A sport show will come to Cashman Field Center on Feb. 19. Winter is a gteat time to look over the latest available safety equipment. It is a good time to dieck present gear to see if any needs to be replaced. Stop by the Power Squadron booth while you are there. Until next time, keep your Wlge dry. Eichef, a long-time valley resident, considers himself a part-time txMter and fisherman. Rocky Shoes, Ducks Unlimited in partnership ^PUY SHOWBOAT VUEHTIHC'SDAYBIHGO WITHiURiiaRTSJl^ Rocky Shoes & Boots, Inc., the leading outdoor footwear manufacturer in the world, is proud to announce a partnership with Ducks Unlimited, the world's largest private waterfowl and wetlands conservation organization. According to director of marfirs and wetlands" throug'nom :^>fe^iSil:&ji>i5gi(^( 41 1^ it uli^ ?ivihf auiai| a free heart-i|iped lacqj/er trinket box toanplafimataliieHioni.* 9 (eitiont Daili| 9 a.m. • II a.m. • i p.m. • 3 p.m. S p.in. • 7 p.(n. -9 p.m. • 11 p.m. • 1 a.m. (.oAjDinimum Bui| in UWGC thtBoukkri • 89104 wwwjnO'woow-fVi sumers and DU members and Girl Scouts to sell cookies Frontier Girl Scout Council is gearing up for the annual Girl Scout Cookie Sale, Feb. 27-March 14. Each box will cost $3. Check the main entrance of major grocery stores for a Girl Scout cookie booth. Cookies can also be preordered from Jan. 17Feb. 1, by calling the Girl Scout service center. All eight varieties will be available this year includinglce Ginger Daisies, 5 World Cinnamons, Peanut Butter Patties, Peanut Butter Cookies, Lemon Pastry Creams, Shortbreads, Thin Mints and Caramel Delights. The sale helps girls develop leadership skills and practice resourcefulness and self-reliance, and it generates revenue for troops, Girl gcout councils and Girl Scouts of the U.S.A. to fund the Girl Scout program in the U.S. "However it is the girls themselves that are the primary beneficiaries of the cookie sale through what they learn and experience by taking part in the sale and through the programs and services made possible by the revenue the sale generates," said public relations director Juergen Barbusca. Girl Scouts have sold more than 1 billion boxes of cookies since they began organized sales in 1936. Iflaid end to end they would circle the globe over five times, or build a Cheops pyramid or a Great Wall. To preorder cookies and for more information on the cookie sale or about Girl Scouting, contact the Girl Scout service center, 385-3677. Anglers supporters share the same love for outdoors and the well-being of the envirormient." Rocky and DU were both founded more than 60 years ago. DU's 673,000 members have raised more than $1 biUion for conservation projects, restored or acresof North America, and currently maintain morethan 11,000 North American conservation projects. DU has also aided in the race to save numerous endangered species including the Whooping Crane, Peregrine Falcon, Louisiana Black Bear, American Bald Eagle and more. A significant porijipn of proceeds generated fV^om sales of the DU styles will help to suptoort the organization's goal to support waterfowl, endangered species and wetlands conservation"prbjectfi. Rocky Shoes & Boots, Inc. has been designing and manufacturing quality outdoor and work footwear for the past 65 years. Products are available in more than 3,000 retail and catalog outlets throughout North America and Europe. AAAA4iAAAAAAAAA
PAGE 24

YOUR HEALTH Page 6 Panorama February 12-13, 1998 Diet, vigilance may protect against prostate cancer JJu. RT FACTS DR. ROBERT CROKE^FACC The verdict isn't in, but many cases of prostate cancer might be prevented by taking some steps that are probably good for you anyway, says a Stanford University urologist who specializes in this disease, the most common form of cancer to strike men. "We need more studies, but preliminary evidence suggests that up to 75"/? of prostate cancer pases could be prevented by changes in life-style — particularly diet. Cutting out the fat may be the best way to prevent prostate cancer," said Dr. James Brooks, an assistant professor of urology who practices with UCSF Stanford Health Care. "We've also seen studies indicating that natural substances in vegetables — including lycopene, the red pigment found in tomatoes, and selenium, an element found in garlic, grains and other plant foods — may help reduce prostate cancer," said Brooks. For example, one study suggested that a dietary supplement of selenium (200 micrograms daily) can lower the risk of prostate cancer by 667f and may be effective against colon and lung cancer as well. Selenium encourages the body to produce antioxidant enzymes that protect against cancer. Antioxidants appear to ward off cancer by neutralizing unstable molecules that can damage the DNA of healthy cells. Beta Carotene, the substance that makes can'ots orange, is a direct source of antioxidants, and its role in preventing prostate cancer is also being explored. Brooks said. Brooks himself is researching how the production of one antioxidant enzyme normally found in the prostate gets turned off in people with prostate cancer. "If we can figure out how to turn it back on or compensate for its disappearance, we may be able to find new ways to prevent or slow prostate cancer," Brooks said. While healthy eating habits may reduce the risk of prostate cancer, regular screening is a proven way to keep prostate cancer from going undetected. Brooks recommends that all men over the age of 50 have a digital rectal exam by their doctors every year, along with a bipod test known as the PSA (prostate-specific antigen) test. Men with a family history of prostate cancer should start having both yearly exams starting at age 40, he said. So shouldAfrican Americans, who' are twice as likely to develop prostate cancer as whites or Asians he notes. In most men, prostate cancer produces nos3Tnptoms in its early, most curable stages. In others, symptoms may include painful, difficult or frequent urination, blood in the urine,^ or persistent pain in the lower back, pelvis or upper thighs. "These symptoms may also be a sign of a noncancerous urinary infection or other condition, but it's important to rule out prostate cancer if the symptoms persist," Brooks explains. More than 80% of all prostate cancers are detected in men over the age of 60. In 1997, some 209,000 U.S. men were diagnosed with prostate cancer. The malady killedabout42,000 American men last year. "When founded early and treated aggressively, prostate cancer can usually be cured — which means that regular checkups can save lives," Brooks said. Cardiac rehabilitation makes strides In the 1950s, when President Eisenhower had a heart attack, the standard treatment was rest, rest and more rest. He was kept in bed, not even allowed to turn over by himself, for a weiek and allowed outside on the sun deck of the hospital only after several more weeks of wheelchair existence. His confinement would probably have been longer if his cardiologist had been other than Paul Dudley White, a pioneer in recognizing people could recover from heart problems and that their recovery would be helped by carefully chosen activity. Since then, we've seen amazing strides in the recognition and treatment of heart attacks, resulting in much improved survival and much improved return to full activity. We now have new drugs to restore blood flow to the heart and save muscle tissue, and other drugs to ease the burden of work on the heart and preserve muscle tissue. We also have surgical and angioplasty techniques to provide new blood flow to the entire heart and provide stability for years into the future. While exercise programs are not quite as dramatic as some of these other treatments, they have contributed importantly to the improved outlook for patients with heart disease. Research scientists have shown that properly constructed programs increase numbers of people returning to fully active lives compared to the old ways of caring for patients. Modern rehabilitation programs are holistic, including exercise at increasing grades of effort, education in risk factors and medications, and coaching in stress management, beginning in the coronary care unit or post operative recovery unit soon after the patient arrives. Exercise starts with light calisthenics in bed and getting up on the day after arrival for patients who are doing well. On release, walking outdoors is encouraged. After several weeks, the patient is invited to participate in group exercise at the cardiac center. Sessions are usually one hour, three days per week, for 12 weeks. The group includes four to eight people taking turns on treadmills, stationary bicycles, rowing machines and weights. Each spends eight or 10 minutes at a station; then changes places with a classmate at another station. Patients are supervised onsite by nurses experienced in, coronary care and trained in ^ rehabilitation, who judge workloads for individual patients according to diagnosis and disability; monitor progress and adjust work as patients become conditioned and more capable. Some programs have an exercise physiologist on staff. Managed by a physician, it requires a physician certified in advanced life support to be in the building while patients are exercising. If exercising within three months or so of a heart attack or operation, patients wear radio transmitters sending EKG signals to a central monitoring station, allowing heart rate and rhythm to be read and enabling patients to stop immediately at trouble, allowing patients to push harder and seek faster progress than could be allowed unsupervised. Also difficult to measure but as mportant as exercise, is education, which comes from the staff, concerning exercise, diet, medications and recognition of warning signals. Stress is closely tied to hearts and blood vessels—programs can be effective in learning to handle stress more creatively and less destructively. Education also takes place between patients. Newcomers enter classes with "old hands" in class for a few weeks or approaching graduation, who help newcomers learn about getting along with heart disease from experience, something professionals usually cannot do. Peer relations are invaluable and sometimes take an unusual twist. In one class, a member was smoking. They put pressure on him in a way that nurses and doctors could not, and he finally quit. Cardiac rehabilitation programs are available at hospitals and some cardiology offices. Entry requires a doctor's referral. Most doctors are well aware of their value and are glad to make the referral. mk Arthritis Foundation offers children's summer camp BRIEFS 'Domestic Violence' lecture at UMC University Medical Center aimounces a special two-hour lecture, "Domestic Violence: Breaking the Cycle," will be offered from 10 a.m. to noon Thursday, Feb. 26, at the Clark County Chambers, first floor, Government Center, 500 S. Grand iHentral Parkway. Speakers will feature Hedda Nussbaum, national speaker on Domestic Violence-Survivor; Dr. Annabel Barber, UMC surgeon; and Kathleen Brooks of SafeNest. Discussion will focus primarily on the cycle of domestic violence, who is involved in domestic violence, and what experts consider physical and psychological abuse. Handouts on available services for those in domestic crisis willalso be provided. The program is fi"ee and open to the public. Seating is limited. Call Neva Brown, 383-2090, to reserve. Multiple Sclerosis information fair The National Multiple Sclerosis Society Desert Southwest chapter will hold its aimual information from 9 a.m. to noon Feb. 21, at the Rehabilitation Hospital of Nevada-Las Vegas, 1250 S. Valley View Blvd. The event is free of charge and the public is welcome to attend. ^ i. Many exhibitors will provide information and answer questions for people who live with multiple sclerosis, their families and those who would like to learn more. Dr. Dennis Bourdette, director of the Oregon Health Sciences MS Center, will speak and answer questions on MS research. Refi-eshments will be provided. MS isachronic disease affectingthe central nervous system. Its symptoms run the gamut fi-om slightly blurred vision to complete paralysis. It is not contagious, and it is rarely fatal, but it is unpredictable. An estimated third of a miUion Americans have multiple sclerosis, with nearly 200 new cases diagnosed every week. Cholesterol screening offered University Medical Center will offer a fi-ee cholesterol screening for peojJe agied 50 and older Feb. 18, at the UMC Nellis Quick Care, 61 N. NeUis Blvd. Participants may eat a light breakfast and take medication. To register, caU Charmaine Endres, 383-2095, at UMC's Silver Advantage. T" The Las Vegas branch of the Arthritis Foundation is currently recruiting campors and counselors for Camp Esperanza, a summer camp for children with arthritis and related diseases in the San Bernardino Mountains, near Big Bear, Calif The camp is a two-session, five day/four night sleepover camp for children ages 8 tol7 with any form of juvenile arthritis or rheumatic disease. Sessions run from Aug. 15-i9 (for ages 8 to 12), and from Aug. 19-23 (for ageslS to 17). The camp provides wellplanned, safe activities that are fun, challenging and exciting. Programs are designed to help campers make new friends, improve self-esteem, and discover new skills and interests. Activities include horseback riding, swimming, arts and crafts, nature cabin, archery, ropes/ challenge courses, campfires, and theme meals. The staff consists of a blend of volunteers and professionals, over the age of 18, carefully selected because of their interest and experience in working with Clinic seeks participants for study of elderly depression Pharmacology Research Clinic is seeking participants for a study on elderly depression. Individuals over age 64 may participate in the study if they meet criteria for major depression. Symptoms of major depression include; fatigue or loss of energy, weight loss or gain, depressed mood, feelings of worthlessness, loss of interest or pleasure, diminished ability to think or concentrate, insomnia, or recurrent thoughts of death. Five or more of the above symptomsmustbe presentduring the same two-week period and represent a change from previous functioning to be considered a case of depression, For those interested in participating. the study includes screenings, evaluations, and investigational medication for depression at no cost. For more information or questions about the study, call the Pharmacology Research Clinic, 257-2600, individuals who have arthritis and For more information on beCamp Esperanza, contact the related diseases. coming a camper or counselor for Arthritis Foundation, 367-1626. WEGETIDTHE MATTER OF THE HEART Ai Si. Rose Dominican Hospital, we pn)vi(k' the very best in Cardiology and Rehabilitation services. Our team of healthcare professionals structure a personalized exercise and diet program, enabling our patients to lead healthier lifestyles. .\t St. Rose Dominican Hospital, our commitment to improving the health of our community begins with... You! St. Rose + Dominican Hospital Technology Mends, Compassion Heals. GENERAL INFORMATION: (702) 564-2622 • 102 E. LAKE MEAD DRIVE • HENDERSON. NEVADA 89015 hUp://www.srdh.com February 12-13,1998 Panorama Page? Stewart Indian School lecture Phillip I. Earl On Thursday, Feb. 19, the Nevada Historical Society will host the fourth lecture in its series, "Nevada's Native Americans: A Living History and Culture," at the Reno Museum, 1650 N. Virginia St., Reno. Funded by the Nevada Humanities Committee, the statebased affyiate of the National Endowm^t for the Humanities; Eugene Hattori, staff archaeologist with the Nevada State OflBce of Historic Preservation, will speak. He will speak on "The Stewart Indian School: Archaeological Perspectives." Also speaking will be former students who will share memories and experiences. The program will begin at 7 p.m. and is free to the public. For more information, call 688-1191. In 1977, archaeologists from the Nevada State Museum discovered a cache of refuse located near the school just south of Carson City. Initially, they believed that this find represented the remains of a Native American camp established in 1890-91 by parents concerned over the fate of their children, some of whom had been abducted by school authorities to live and go to school at Stewart. A subsequent investigation revealed, however, that the trash piles originated with students and staff. Hattori and anthropologist Mary Rusco conducted the archaeological work and Edward Johnson and Warren D'Azevedo looked into the school's history and ethnography. Functioningfrom 1890to 1980, the school operated as a government boarding facility for Native American children. When it opened, fewer than 8% of native^' children were enrolled in formal educational institutions. In 1890, the U.S. government embarked upon a policy of assimilation, inducing native peoples to turn away from their own traditions andfmd a place in EYE INSTITUTE OF NEVADA SM OPTICAL CENTER ^^ Gary W. Freedman Licensed Optician • Eyewear Prescriptions Filled • Eyewear Repairs • Affordable, Quality Eyewear • Medicare Provider • Personalized Service Davis Vision Plan Accepted 999 ADAMS BLVD. STE 100, BOULDER CITY • 294-4444 108 E. LAKE MEAD DR. STE 303, HENDERSON • 564-2539 PLEASE CALL FOR HOURS Nevada Historical Society Photograph Students at Stewart Indian School, 1910. Note the uniforms. Euro-American society. The students, many of them as young as 5 or 6, stayed until they were 18, living at the school and allowed to go home only during the summers. Under school poUcies, they were required to speak English and were punished if caught using native languages. In these early years, Stewart operated on a semimilitary basis, the students wearing blue uniforms, answeringreveille at6a.m. andmarching military-style to and from classes. Attendance at Christian church services three times a week was also mandatory. Many students did not take to the restricted lifestyles and would get together in private to speak Paiute, Washoe and Shoshone. Others ran away ori were taken out of the school by their parents. Punishments ranged from scrubbing walls and cleaning showers to being forced to carry heavy railroad ties around the grounds. Girls were sometimes locked in the attic of their dormitory and both boys and girls were subject to corporad punishment with a strap. THIS WAS NEVADA PHILLIP I. EARL Those who persisted in running aWay sometimes wound up with a ball and chain attached to the ankle. As the years passed, new Bureau of Indian Affairs guidelines reduced the military orientation of the school, and academics were emphasized over vocational instruction. The curriculum also changed to include instruction in the students' own native heritage. Students who did well entered college and moved into the professions. Many former students believe that they benefited from the vocational and academic training they received and feel very positive about the years spent at Stewart. Others, especially those from the earlier years, recall mainly the punishments and hardships they had to endure, as well as the difficult separation from their families and culture. Hattori's lecture will focus upon the early history and lifeways of students and staff at Stewart, as reflected in archaeological remains. The former students will relate their experiences and the impact the school made on their lives. Stewart has many alumni in Northern Nevada and we can look forward to an informative discussion on the history and cultural significance of the school. The fifth and final lecture in the series celebrating Nevada's Native American heritage will be given by Brian WaUace, chaurman of the Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California, at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 19, at the Reno Museum. He will speak on "The Washoe People and Their Relationship to the Land." GREAT FOOD^ FUN & FRIENDS 990 Breakfast 7 Selections to Choose From! Daily from 1 Ipni 1 lain I I KiA M I I I I u(lin
PAGE 25

YOUR HEALTH Page 6 Panorama February 12-13, 1998 Diet, vigilance may protect against prostate cancer JJu. RT FACTS DR. ROBERT CROKE^FACC The verdict isn't in, but many cases of prostate cancer might be prevented by taking some steps that are probably good for you anyway, says a Stanford University urologist who specializes in this disease, the most common form of cancer to strike men. "We need more studies, but preliminary evidence suggests that up to 75"/? of prostate cancer pases could be prevented by changes in life-style — particularly diet. Cutting out the fat may be the best way to prevent prostate cancer," said Dr. James Brooks, an assistant professor of urology who practices with UCSF Stanford Health Care. "We've also seen studies indicating that natural substances in vegetables — including lycopene, the red pigment found in tomatoes, and selenium, an element found in garlic, grains and other plant foods — may help reduce prostate cancer," said Brooks. For example, one study suggested that a dietary supplement of selenium (200 micrograms daily) can lower the risk of prostate cancer by 667f and may be effective against colon and lung cancer as well. Selenium encourages the body to produce antioxidant enzymes that protect against cancer. Antioxidants appear to ward off cancer by neutralizing unstable molecules that can damage the DNA of healthy cells. Beta Carotene, the substance that makes can'ots orange, is a direct source of antioxidants, and its role in preventing prostate cancer is also being explored. Brooks said. Brooks himself is researching how the production of one antioxidant enzyme normally found in the prostate gets turned off in people with prostate cancer. "If we can figure out how to turn it back on or compensate for its disappearance, we may be able to find new ways to prevent or slow prostate cancer," Brooks said. While healthy eating habits may reduce the risk of prostate cancer, regular screening is a proven way to keep prostate cancer from going undetected. Brooks recommends that all men over the age of 50 have a digital rectal exam by their doctors every year, along with a bipod test known as the PSA (prostate-specific antigen) test. Men with a family history of prostate cancer should start having both yearly exams starting at age 40, he said. So shouldAfrican Americans, who' are twice as likely to develop prostate cancer as whites or Asians he notes. In most men, prostate cancer produces nos3Tnptoms in its early, most curable stages. In others, symptoms may include painful, difficult or frequent urination, blood in the urine,^ or persistent pain in the lower back, pelvis or upper thighs. "These symptoms may also be a sign of a noncancerous urinary infection or other condition, but it's important to rule out prostate cancer if the symptoms persist," Brooks explains. More than 80% of all prostate cancers are detected in men over the age of 60. In 1997, some 209,000 U.S. men were diagnosed with prostate cancer. The malady killedabout42,000 American men last year. "When founded early and treated aggressively, prostate cancer can usually be cured — which means that regular checkups can save lives," Brooks said. Cardiac rehabilitation makes strides In the 1950s, when President Eisenhower had a heart attack, the standard treatment was rest, rest and more rest. He was kept in bed, not even allowed to turn over by himself, for a weiek and allowed outside on the sun deck of the hospital only after several more weeks of wheelchair existence. His confinement would probably have been longer if his cardiologist had been other than Paul Dudley White, a pioneer in recognizing people could recover from heart problems and that their recovery would be helped by carefully chosen activity. Since then, we've seen amazing strides in the recognition and treatment of heart attacks, resulting in much improved survival and much improved return to full activity. We now have new drugs to restore blood flow to the heart and save muscle tissue, and other drugs to ease the burden of work on the heart and preserve muscle tissue. We also have surgical and angioplasty techniques to provide new blood flow to the entire heart and provide stability for years into the future. While exercise programs are not quite as dramatic as some of these other treatments, they have contributed importantly to the improved outlook for patients with heart disease. Research scientists have shown that properly constructed programs increase numbers of people returning to fully active lives compared to the old ways of caring for patients. Modern rehabilitation programs are holistic, including exercise at increasing grades of effort, education in risk factors and medications, and coaching in stress management, beginning in the coronary care unit or post operative recovery unit soon after the patient arrives. Exercise starts with light calisthenics in bed and getting up on the day after arrival for patients who are doing well. On release, walking outdoors is encouraged. After several weeks, the patient is invited to participate in group exercise at the cardiac center. Sessions are usually one hour, three days per week, for 12 weeks. The group includes four to eight people taking turns on treadmills, stationary bicycles, rowing machines and weights. Each spends eight or 10 minutes at a station; then changes places with a classmate at another station. Patients are supervised onsite by nurses experienced in, coronary care and trained in ^ rehabilitation, who judge workloads for individual patients according to diagnosis and disability; monitor progress and adjust work as patients become conditioned and more capable. Some programs have an exercise physiologist on staff. Managed by a physician, it requires a physician certified in advanced life support to be in the building while patients are exercising. If exercising within three months or so of a heart attack or operation, patients wear radio transmitters sending EKG signals to a central monitoring station, allowing heart rate and rhythm to be read and enabling patients to stop immediately at trouble, allowing patients to push harder and seek faster progress than could be allowed unsupervised. Also difficult to measure but as mportant as exercise, is education, which comes from the staff, concerning exercise, diet, medications and recognition of warning signals. Stress is closely tied to hearts and blood vessels—programs can be effective in learning to handle stress more creatively and less destructively. Education also takes place between patients. Newcomers enter classes with "old hands" in class for a few weeks or approaching graduation, who help newcomers learn about getting along with heart disease from experience, something professionals usually cannot do. Peer relations are invaluable and sometimes take an unusual twist. In one class, a member was smoking. They put pressure on him in a way that nurses and doctors could not, and he finally quit. Cardiac rehabilitation programs are available at hospitals and some cardiology offices. Entry requires a doctor's referral. Most doctors are well aware of their value and are glad to make the referral. mk Arthritis Foundation offers children's summer camp BRIEFS 'Domestic Violence' lecture at UMC University Medical Center aimounces a special two-hour lecture, "Domestic Violence: Breaking the Cycle," will be offered from 10 a.m. to noon Thursday, Feb. 26, at the Clark County Chambers, first floor, Government Center, 500 S. Grand iHentral Parkway. Speakers will feature Hedda Nussbaum, national speaker on Domestic Violence-Survivor; Dr. Annabel Barber, UMC surgeon; and Kathleen Brooks of SafeNest. Discussion will focus primarily on the cycle of domestic violence, who is involved in domestic violence, and what experts consider physical and psychological abuse. Handouts on available services for those in domestic crisis willalso be provided. The program is fi"ee and open to the public. Seating is limited. Call Neva Brown, 383-2090, to reserve. Multiple Sclerosis information fair The National Multiple Sclerosis Society Desert Southwest chapter will hold its aimual information from 9 a.m. to noon Feb. 21, at the Rehabilitation Hospital of Nevada-Las Vegas, 1250 S. Valley View Blvd. The event is free of charge and the public is welcome to attend. ^ i. Many exhibitors will provide information and answer questions for people who live with multiple sclerosis, their families and those who would like to learn more. Dr. Dennis Bourdette, director of the Oregon Health Sciences MS Center, will speak and answer questions on MS research. Refi-eshments will be provided. MS isachronic disease affectingthe central nervous system. Its symptoms run the gamut fi-om slightly blurred vision to complete paralysis. It is not contagious, and it is rarely fatal, but it is unpredictable. An estimated third of a miUion Americans have multiple sclerosis, with nearly 200 new cases diagnosed every week. Cholesterol screening offered University Medical Center will offer a fi-ee cholesterol screening for peojJe agied 50 and older Feb. 18, at the UMC Nellis Quick Care, 61 N. NeUis Blvd. Participants may eat a light breakfast and take medication. To register, caU Charmaine Endres, 383-2095, at UMC's Silver Advantage. T" The Las Vegas branch of the Arthritis Foundation is currently recruiting campors and counselors for Camp Esperanza, a summer camp for children with arthritis and related diseases in the San Bernardino Mountains, near Big Bear, Calif The camp is a two-session, five day/four night sleepover camp for children ages 8 tol7 with any form of juvenile arthritis or rheumatic disease. Sessions run from Aug. 15-i9 (for ages 8 to 12), and from Aug. 19-23 (for ageslS to 17). The camp provides wellplanned, safe activities that are fun, challenging and exciting. Programs are designed to help campers make new friends, improve self-esteem, and discover new skills and interests. Activities include horseback riding, swimming, arts and crafts, nature cabin, archery, ropes/ challenge courses, campfires, and theme meals. The staff consists of a blend of volunteers and professionals, over the age of 18, carefully selected because of their interest and experience in working with Clinic seeks participants for study of elderly depression Pharmacology Research Clinic is seeking participants for a study on elderly depression. Individuals over age 64 may participate in the study if they meet criteria for major depression. Symptoms of major depression include; fatigue or loss of energy, weight loss or gain, depressed mood, feelings of worthlessness, loss of interest or pleasure, diminished ability to think or concentrate, insomnia, or recurrent thoughts of death. Five or more of the above symptomsmustbe presentduring the same two-week period and represent a change from previous functioning to be considered a case of depression, For those interested in participating. the study includes screenings, evaluations, and investigational medication for depression at no cost. For more information or questions about the study, call the Pharmacology Research Clinic, 257-2600, individuals who have arthritis and For more information on beCamp Esperanza, contact the related diseases. coming a camper or counselor for Arthritis Foundation, 367-1626. WEGETIDTHE MATTER OF THE HEART Ai Si. Rose Dominican Hospital, we pn)vi(k' the very best in Cardiology and Rehabilitation services. Our team of healthcare professionals structure a personalized exercise and diet program, enabling our patients to lead healthier lifestyles. .\t St. Rose Dominican Hospital, our commitment to improving the health of our community begins with... You! St. Rose + Dominican Hospital Technology Mends, Compassion Heals. GENERAL INFORMATION: (702) 564-2622 • 102 E. LAKE MEAD DRIVE • HENDERSON. NEVADA 89015 hUp://www.srdh.com February 12-13,1998 Panorama Page? Stewart Indian School lecture Phillip I. Earl On Thursday, Feb. 19, the Nevada Historical Society will host the fourth lecture in its series, "Nevada's Native Americans: A Living History and Culture," at the Reno Museum, 1650 N. Virginia St., Reno. Funded by the Nevada Humanities Committee, the statebased affyiate of the National Endowm^t for the Humanities; Eugene Hattori, staff archaeologist with the Nevada State OflBce of Historic Preservation, will speak. He will speak on "The Stewart Indian School: Archaeological Perspectives." Also speaking will be former students who will share memories and experiences. The program will begin at 7 p.m. and is free to the public. For more information, call 688-1191. In 1977, archaeologists from the Nevada State Museum discovered a cache of refuse located near the school just south of Carson City. Initially, they believed that this find represented the remains of a Native American camp established in 1890-91 by parents concerned over the fate of their children, some of whom had been abducted by school authorities to live and go to school at Stewart. A subsequent investigation revealed, however, that the trash piles originated with students and staff. Hattori and anthropologist Mary Rusco conducted the archaeological work and Edward Johnson and Warren D'Azevedo looked into the school's history and ethnography. Functioningfrom 1890to 1980, the school operated as a government boarding facility for Native American children. When it opened, fewer than 8% of native^' children were enrolled in formal educational institutions. In 1890, the U.S. government embarked upon a policy of assimilation, inducing native peoples to turn away from their own traditions andfmd a place in EYE INSTITUTE OF NEVADA SM OPTICAL CENTER ^^ Gary W. Freedman Licensed Optician • Eyewear Prescriptions Filled • Eyewear Repairs • Affordable, Quality Eyewear • Medicare Provider • Personalized Service Davis Vision Plan Accepted 999 ADAMS BLVD. STE 100, BOULDER CITY • 294-4444 108 E. LAKE MEAD DR. STE 303, HENDERSON • 564-2539 PLEASE CALL FOR HOURS Nevada Historical Society Photograph Students at Stewart Indian School, 1910. Note the uniforms. Euro-American society. The students, many of them as young as 5 or 6, stayed until they were 18, living at the school and allowed to go home only during the summers. Under school poUcies, they were required to speak English and were punished if caught using native languages. In these early years, Stewart operated on a semimilitary basis, the students wearing blue uniforms, answeringreveille at6a.m. andmarching military-style to and from classes. Attendance at Christian church services three times a week was also mandatory. Many students did not take to the restricted lifestyles and would get together in private to speak Paiute, Washoe and Shoshone. Others ran away ori were taken out of the school by their parents. Punishments ranged from scrubbing walls and cleaning showers to being forced to carry heavy railroad ties around the grounds. Girls were sometimes locked in the attic of their dormitory and both boys and girls were subject to corporad punishment with a strap. THIS WAS NEVADA PHILLIP I. EARL Those who persisted in running aWay sometimes wound up with a ball and chain attached to the ankle. As the years passed, new Bureau of Indian Affairs guidelines reduced the military orientation of the school, and academics were emphasized over vocational instruction. The curriculum also changed to include instruction in the students' own native heritage. Students who did well entered college and moved into the professions. Many former students believe that they benefited from the vocational and academic training they received and feel very positive about the years spent at Stewart. Others, especially those from the earlier years, recall mainly the punishments and hardships they had to endure, as well as the difficult separation from their families and culture. Hattori's lecture will focus upon the early history and lifeways of students and staff at Stewart, as reflected in archaeological remains. The former students will relate their experiences and the impact the school made on their lives. Stewart has many alumni in Northern Nevada and we can look forward to an informative discussion on the history and cultural significance of the school. The fifth and final lecture in the series celebrating Nevada's Native American heritage will be given by Brian WaUace, chaurman of the Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California, at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 19, at the Reno Museum. He will speak on "The Washoe People and Their Relationship to the Land." GREAT FOOD^ FUN & FRIENDS 990 Breakfast 7 Selections to Choose From! Daily from 1 Ipni 1 lain I I KiA M I I I I u(lin
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Pages Panorama February 12-13, 1998 Serving Boulder City, Henderson, Green Valley and West Valley Areas. CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH 1401 5TH Street 293-4332 B.C. WORSHIP SERVICES • Saturday 5:00 pm Country / Western Worship • Sunday 9:00 am Traditional Worship 'Come Unto Me" St. Matthews Episcopal Church The Working Church Saturday Evening Mass 5:30 pm Sunday Mass 9:45 am Church School During Sunday Mass Nursery Available nTc St. Peter's Catholic Church ^ 204 S. Boulder Hwy. OLR NEW MASS SCHEDULE: Sat. Masses:4 p.m. & 5:30 p.m. Sun. Masses: 8:00 a.m., 9:30 a.m 11:30 a.m. (BI-LINGUAL) & 5p.m. '^'^Hl>\ ^^^H^?}""^''^^:^„'*^^ iConfessions: Sat. 2:30 to 3:30 2 Blocks North of Tropicin.i on Nellis CALVARY c:^ CHAPEL of HENDERSON 600 Sunset Rd. (Sunset Plaza) Sunday-10AM-6PM Call for other Service times 565-7122 Pastor Chuck Trett • Bring the Family!! "Thy word have I treasured in my heart thai I might not sin against thee." ^HRIfnAN > J\ A FOURSQUARE CHURCH ^ ^^ 571 Adams Blyd. Boulder City 293-7773 Sunday Worship 8 ft 10:50 am Home of Christian Center School and Dav Care Center you are always welcome at Boulder City Assembly of God Church FAITH CHRISTIAN CHURCH ''JUST SAY YES TO JESUS" MINISTRIES". MiNDAV WORSHIP srHI mil r Sunday S(;hool of the Bible..9:00 AM Woiship Service... 10:00 AM WLUNCSDAVSrHFnillF Praise and Prayer...7:00 PM Meeting at: 7th 82, Utah (next to 711) 293 2400 or 293 0620 Diuuir Jordcm. I'tisun Alirui/s Bihlc centered inearltiiuj (niri worslnj) NEW LOCATION Pastors Bill & Nona Toller extend a personal invitation to share in God's Love & Power SuMflav I i.OO A.m. & 7.00 p.m. • IVednesday 7.00 p.m. "70 E. Windmill Lane icomer of rairiicid i miie w. /1-2151 260-4777 \ MlJ^-., fHiGHUND HILLS 615 College Drive • Henderson • 566-0200 Saturday Night Worsliip Celebration • 6:00 pm Sunday Worship Services: -H4if^4i.^iJit,AS-: '-^' i^^^ 8::i0 am, .9:45 am. 11:00 am. 6;00 pm Come join us We Care Ahoui Y6u and Your Family! Adult Sunday School • 8:45 a.m. Children's Sunday School 9:00 a.m. (4yrs. • 8th grade) Worship10:00 a.m. Youth Group • 6:30 p.m. God 'N Me • Thurs.. 3:15 p.m. (Grades 1-5) VISITORS EXPECTED 1100 Buchanan Rev. Robt. Tedrow, Pastor Boulder City • 293-2454 Neighborhood C)%urch Service times: Sunday 10am & 6pm Wednesday 7pm Sunday School all ages Youth Ministry all ages FOUR SQUARE GOSPEL 207 W. Basic Rd 565-9672 Celebrate Jesus at... Dynamic Drama, Music and Message! Currently meeting at: Community College of Southern Nevada 700 College Drive, Henderson Sundays 10AM Call 263-4661 for more Information Shabbat ar holl4ay &vl+%* Mcmtenon tVvsda 09014 (702) 4.54-4848 1/^ Ministry Reaching The World! Salvation!! Prayer For The Sick!! Families Restored! Financial Miracles In Action! RADIO MINISTRY KKW 10:60 AM 6:30 AM & 8 PM FRIDAY SATURDAYS 6:00 P.M. Saturn of Henderson • 310 N. Gibson (Community Center Upstairs) Everyone Welcome! All Seats Free! PASTOR JIM BRTTT OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN CHURCH "Holding Forth the Word of Life..." Philippians 2:16 Sunday School 9 am Adult Bible Class 9 am Sunday Worship 8 & 10:45 am Pastor Bruning 59 Lynn Ln., Henderson 565-9154 Growing together in the grace of our Lord Jesus St. Thomas More Catholic Commuiiity 130 I^. Pecos Rd. Henderson, 361-3022 Saturday Confession: 3:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. • Saturday Vigil Mass: 4:30 p.m. Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m., & 12:00 p.m. Daily Mass: 8:30 a.m. (Monday through Friday) St. FauFs Charismatic Episcopal Church 1661 Qallerija Dr. r 260-0126 (White Middle School/ Henderson) ^-U^DAY WORSHIP 10AM Faitmuh^'^ci'$J^ojdaridSpirit ^ Father David Hoff • ry&i^^harles Coleman TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM Established 1947 The LargesI Congregotion in Nevada Affliliated with United Synagogue ol Conservative Judaism 'OUR MEMBERSHIP IS OPEN, COME GROW WITH US!!! 1600 East Oakey Blvd. • Las Vegas, Nevada • 384-5070 Oasis Christian Fellowship meets at Selma Bartlett Elementary School i^ Located at 1961 Wigwam Pkwy. (between Vallo Verde ?.. Green Valley Pkwy.) Sunday Worship at 10 am Nursery &^ Children's Ministry provided thru 5th Grade. For more information call 270-7777 COMMUNITY BAPTIST CHURCH 245 E. Foster Ave. Henderson, NV 89009 Reverend Sam Roberson, Pastor/Teacher ^M^ SUNDAY: Sunday School 9:30 a.m. ^^^^^ Morning Service I 1:00 a.m. ^^^^B Evening Service 7:00 p.m. ^^^H MONDAY: fvagelism Classes • 7:00 p.m. ^^^^K TUESDAY: Theology Classes • 7:00 p.m. • I^H^L WEDNESDAY: Prayer & Bible Study 7:00 p.m. ^ • ^H^^ THURSDAY: Choir Rehearsal • 7:00 p.m. ^UJ^ JKmk. FRIDAY: Teachers Meeting 6:45 p.m. Worship Services and Bible Study Times Sundays i yir l^flc' 8:30, 9:45 & 11:00 a.m. -^ I I J J 6:00p.m Wednesdays 6:00 p.m. Green Valley Baptist Church 270 N. Valle Verde Dr., Henderson • 434-1906 (Corner of Silver Springs and Voile Verde) HENDERSOIN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH JL (lOI n. Major 565-9684 Worshi|) !3i'rvi(.C.S H 31) H ll):.30.im PturMTV' pri)\i(le(l lor 10 30aitt siTvifc ROSS DOYEL, PASTOR VEGAS VALLEY CHRISTIAN CHURCH 5515 Mtn. Visto, Los Vegas Phone 451-9211 UNDENOMINATIONAL BIBLE and CHRIST FOCUSED '-BIBLE SCHOOL 9:30 AM WORSHIP 10:30 AM S.O.W. (Sfody on Wednesdoy) 7:00 P.M. (Child Core Avoiloble) Serving Green Valley 0 Los Vegos Areas neor Sunset & Russell Rood a place to belong a place to become Licensed Child Care Center Phone 451-9665 St Christopher's Episcopal Church Holy Eucharist Sun. 9 A.M. & Wed. 6 P.M. Proyers for Healing offer each Service Sunday School 10:45 A.M. J812 Arizona St. • Boulder City • 293-4275 St Gtiristophers Church. Boulder City is a God centered, inclusive, multi-generational. spiritually related family welcoming all. SUNRISE COMMUNITY CHURCH 10am Sunday 480 Greenvy^ay Dr. Masonic Temple 737-5219 REV. JIM HAMILTON, PASTOR • Come end let us help make your life work for you. jAC FIRST SOUTHERN BAPTIST ^%'3?' 240 S. Cholla St. • Henderson ^^V 565-6072 You're Invited! Sunday Worship Services8:30 a.m. 11:00 a.m. 6:00p.m. Bible studySunday 8:30 a.m! 9:45 a.m. Wedne.sday 7:00 p.m. for all ages — /f Piau 74ai ^Wt Waterspring Baptist Church Independont, Fundomental 1901 N. Green Valley Pkwy. Henderson, NV 89014 |al Children's WorW| Sunday School A Aduh Bible Stvdf 10:00 o.m. Morning Wonhip 11:00 a.m. (nfo about Sun & Wed n/ghr, other miniitries, or juil need help, coll Pastor David Smith (702) 435-622S 't i^f'l of*^}{end&ts^ \''j Pastor Rick Wilder \^ Atlantic & Kansas i"-), 565-8577 Sunday School 9:30am Sunday Worship Sam, 1 lam, 6pm Wednesday Worship 7pm ST. PAUL THE APOSTLE ORTHODOX CHURCH Divine Liturgy: 9:00 A.M., Sunday 898-4800 5400 ANNIE OAKLEY DR. (South of Hacienda) LAS VEGAS, NEVADA 89120 w^^mi • pwpip ipep ^P^^ lb list vfiur c'ont^iT^ation call (ioldit'at 4:{.')-77rs Rev. Boh Hiirns Christ The Servant IK Lutheran Church *^ 26.3-0802 Sunday Worship • 8 &IO.V)ani Sunday School 9 15 am Sunday Evening Worship 7 pm Wednesday 7pm Visiliirs Welnimr • Nurser\ Avutlahli2 South Pecos Rd. Henderson VICTORY Christian Center Anngirifi themesapolLow Arceplaiheandf'drfiiieneisitiniiifliJem (Vimi Schedule of Services: Sunday 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. Spanish 1:30 p.m. Wednesday 6:30 p.m. Youth 6:30 p.m. Saturday Prayer 6 p.m. Pastors Bob & Martha Perry Nursery and/or Kids' Churrli providrd all servlcM 6126 S. Sandllili (SandhUl & Patrick) 456-4480^ I'aciric Si Panama • 565-8033 I In Downtown Hciidcrson V. L!';' Church of the Harvest 1000 Nevada Hwy. Boulder City. NV 293-5878 PtnM Ml PatiU Nwdstrom SuH^y j0:30am Praise and Worship WMI. 7:15pm Wisdom in the Word Dyaamic GUIdrans' Churcli • Hcirbom Youtii (Ministry • Promise Keepers Women of Harvest COMMUNITY CHURCH OF HENDERSON United Church of Christ Congregational 360 E. Horizon Dr., • 565-8563 Worship Service 10:30 AM "Building a Community to serve a Community" Chufch School 9:00AM, Nursery Available Sunday Evening 7:00PM "The Church On The Hill" 711 Valle Verde Ct. Henderson, NV 454-2722 Gary A Morefield Senior Pastor Green Valley Christian Center Sunday Schedule Morning Worship: 8:45 & 11:15 AM Children's Church: 9:004 11 15 AM Sunday School: 10 15 AM Evening Worship 6:00 PM Wednesday: Family Night 700 PM Thursday: Youth Group (7-12), 6:45 PM Saturd ay: Evening Worship 6:30 PM GREEN VALLEY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH New Saturday Service 5:30 p.m. Sunday Worship 8:30a.m.All a.m. SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 a.m. Nursery All Sen/ices 1798 Wigwam Pl(wy. (NE cornw ol Wijwam Pkwy 8 V>ll Van)* On I i^HIk Phone: 454-8484 ^U*'' nv Linda -Kally* Shaw BIBLE CHURCH Sunday Services and Studies 9am Sunday School/lOam Worship Nursery Care is available at all services. Call Pastor Daniel Sabaka for more information. Worship la Spirit and Tmtk. Ministry From Cod's Word to all. Worshipping at Fay Galloway Elm. Sch. 701 Skyline RD, HD 5658301 THE SALVATION ARMY COMMUNITY CENTER A Center For Worship and Service'. 830 E. Uke Mead Dr., Henderson, NV (702) 565 9578 Sunday Worship Services: 11 am & 6pm Sunday School For All Ages: 9:30 am Rihip '^iiriv Farh Thursday: 6 pm Ctinstian Weddings Invited Bethany baptist Church Sunday Worship Service: 8 am, 10:30 & 6 p.m. Sunday School 9: \ 5 a.m. Dr. George A. Huber Senior Pastor Rev. Jeffery McEorchern 2 1 0 Wyoming, Boulder City Call 293-1912 for futher information BLACK MOUNTAIN FELLOWSHIP Church of the Foursquare Gospel Sunday Worship 10:30AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Wad. Family Night 7 pm Thurs. Psranting Class** 7 pm SIS S. Water St., Henderson Homaol 564-2435 Black Mountain Chrblian Da Cara GIVING LIFE MINISTRIES 4lfiPerlilcWay. Mend 585-4984 • 585-4104 Pastor: Dave Delaria Sunday Chrmian Lduialion 10 jm Sunday Worship Services 11 am & 7 pm Nurtery Provided F ot 11 am Service Wed. Bible Study 7 pm Rev Marvin R Ganl. Pastor ^, 'ALLEY 3A7 OUTDEACH V^ (SYNAGOGUE SERVICE First Friday of Each Month FIRST HENDERSON UNUEn METHODIST CHURCH tm* E. Hortam Drhv. HmdariM Nevada SSaiS Ta mi taw Sonday Worship: IMUK CclebraMMMdPrMe • 9:31 FMAA Am • l):N Trafalional SndaySdnei for ALL ages *:IJSJB. lay ETC.: lMf.m. DiKipleship Worship ChMrmipmiMmSm^ rjov. meeting at ttiiLutheran Church. 2 T ,t>^*^' 4 February 12-13, 1998 Panorama Page 9 BRHEFS Jewish Genealogy groups to meet The Jewish Genealogy Society of Southern Nevada meets each month on tj^e east and west sides of the valley to enable the partidpatiop of more people. The wesf side group will meet from 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 15, at the Wes Sahara Library, on West Sahara and Fort Apache, in Las Vegai. The program will be "A Grenealogical Tour of the Library," ibllowed by problem-solving sessions for beginners and advancedresearchers. For mjre information, call the West-side coordinators Carole Montell,871-9773, or Mary Barkan, 362-8625. The edst-side group will meet from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 18, at Midbar Kodesh Temple, 33 Cactus Garden Dr., in Hender^n. The program will be "Jewish Genealogy on the Internet," foUowe^ by a problem-solving session and hands-on use of resources. For pnore information, call president/East^side coordinator SchelljDardashti, 896-1899. Menbership is open to all those interested in Jewish family histor)' research, learning and utilizing methods and resources. The groups oflfer problem-solving and. support of experienced resea-chers. Beginners and advanced researchers are always welcome. Jewish singles meet at The Hop Ihe 39 Again group for Jewish singles aged 50-60 will meet for an ivening of socializing and dancing at 7:30 p. m. Wednesday, Feb. 18,at The Hop, 1350 E. Tropicana Ave. Sponsored by the Jewish Community Center of Southern Nevada, the group plans activities for Jewish singles in the valley. All interested individuals are encouraged to attend the next program planning meeting at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 17, at the JCC offices, 3909 S. Maryland Parkway, fourth floor. For more information, call the JCC, 794-0090. ATTC to host open house The Area Techniial Trade Center, a school where CCSD high school students areable to study various vocational programs will host an open house from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Wednesday, Feb. 11, during National ^'ocational Education Week. ATTC is located at 444 W. Brooks Ave., southwest of Cheyenne Avenue and Commerce Street, between Mfirtin Luther King Boulevard and i^l5. From Cheyenne, head south on Commerce, then west on Brooks. Refreshments will be prepared and served by the cuUnary arts students, while school tours will be conducted by students in the hotel operations program. ATTC students attend classes for part of the day at their home campus, and attend cleisses in the vocational program of their choice for the remainder of the day at ATTC. Graduates of ATTC can be found in a variety of jobs around the communitj" welding metal structures, finishing cabinets, designing and maintaining local landscapes, reserving hotel accommodations, preparing gourmet meals, repairing electronic equipment and computers, designing find printing professional documents, managing front-office operations, practicing entry-level nursing skills and more. / f. ^ Variety Club names new director The Variety Club of Southern Nevada Board of Directors recently announced the appointment of Nancy M. Kosik as executive director. Kosik has extensive experience in the nonprofit field. She was marketing/campaign director at United Wa)i in Texas, development director at a pubUc broadcasting station in New Mexico and state director for Easter Seals in Nevada. Her earned a graduate degree fix)m New Mexico State University in educational management and development and mass conununications. The Variety Club of Southern Nevada is a dedicated, caring, involved nonprofit organization committed to the well-being of disabled, disadvantaged and deserving children. Fimds raised in Nevada stay in Nevada to be allocated to local organizations in need. Habitat for Humanity gets boost Habitat for Humanity recently received a $40,000 donation from Del Webb Corp., a Phoenix-based developer of new homes with operations throughout the Southwest. Habitat for Htunanity Las Vegas will receive a 20% share of the developer's donation, valued at $8,600. Del Webb also made donations to chapters in Arizona, California, South Carolina and Texas. Habitat for Hxunanity is a national non-profit organization with the mission of providing home ownership opportunities to lowincome famihes. It operates through corporate funding, donations of construction materials and services and volunteer labor. By the end of February, Habitat for Humanity Las Vegas will have completed 15 homes in the valley. The organization expects to complete six more homes by December 1998. Donations may be sent to Habitat for Humanity Las Vegas, 1573 N. Decatur Blvd., Las Vegas, NV 89108, or call 638-6477. Catholic charities seeks volunteers Catholic Charities of Southern Nevada is seeking volunteers to help with such sponsored programs as social services, migration and refugee services and the CathoUc Charities Child Care Center. "Because the needs of this community have grown tremendously, our need for volimteers has also grown," said Michael Husted, executive director of Catholic Charities. "We are looking for volunteers who can help us on a regular basis and other volunteers or civic groups who are interested in helping out with specific projects or programs." CathoUc Charities offers diverse volimteer opportunities with programs such as the Lied Dining Facility (formerly known as the St. Vincent's Dining Room), Meals on Wheels, adoption services and five thrift store locations. CathoUc Charities was founded in 1941 and is dedicated to serving the needy in Southern Nevada, regardless of race, religion or creed. Those interested in volunteering should call 385-2662. JCC volunteers needed The Adult Committee of the Jewish Commimity Center is looking for volunteers to serve on its program planning committee to help plan and implement adult programs. The JCC receives numerous requests for adult programs. Volunteers should expect to attend six to seven meetings a year and hkve an interest in developing programs for the Jewish community. To become involved, call the JCC, 794-0090. ^opi^iijHP a^miL, STOP! • FREE MOBILE SERVICE • LOWEST CASH PRICES ^N TOWN Service on Autos • Trucks Motor Homes Save up to $250.00 on your insurance deductible some restrictions apply All Insurance Companys accepted Commercial • Re.sidential • Mirrors Glass Emporium Rd. 702-880-9199 4881 E. Flamingo (Flamingo & Boulder) 4; St Rose Dominican Hospital CH Vr ^ Member of Catholic Healthcare West \ 102 E. Lake Mead Drive • Henderson, Nevada 89015 is please to announce the opening of Boulder Medical Clinic ^ Michael R. Falvo, D.O. and Mai1( Gibson, PA-C 129 W. Lake Mead Drive Salte I Hendersen. NV 19115 712-561-7411 by Mike Pacini f^ Starting at 5:00 p.m.. Chef Peter will be serving : ^) 4^ Ift^mitt^i, (^McAe(i VUi^t^ ) Reservations are Suggested l^tf, 293-3484 f^j^My^ Authoiized LAKE MEAD LAKE VIEW OHL -i-tax per night everyday of the week until April 1, 1998 Come check us^out 1/2 mile South of Lake Mead Marina (all lor Rcscnalioiis & Infonnation • •'• • • LAKE MEAD LODGE 290-2074 Authorized Concessionaire of the National Park Service ORIGINAL DEFf' N.VlSsi

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Pages Panorama February 12-13, 1998 Serving Boulder City, Henderson, Green Valley and West Valley Areas. CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH 1401 5TH Street 293-4332 B.C. WORSHIP SERVICES • Saturday 5:00 pm Country / Western Worship • Sunday 9:00 am Traditional Worship 'Come Unto Me" St. Matthews Episcopal Church The Working Church Saturday Evening Mass 5:30 pm Sunday Mass 9:45 am Church School During Sunday Mass Nursery Available nTc St. Peter's Catholic Church ^ 204 S. Boulder Hwy. OLR NEW MASS SCHEDULE: Sat. Masses:4 p.m. & 5:30 p.m. Sun. Masses: 8:00 a.m., 9:30 a.m 11:30 a.m. (BI-LINGUAL) & 5p.m. '^'^Hl>\ ^^^H^?}""^''^^:^„'*^^ iConfessions: Sat. 2:30 to 3:30 2 Blocks North of Tropicin.i on Nellis CALVARY c:^ CHAPEL of HENDERSON 600 Sunset Rd. (Sunset Plaza) Sunday-10AM-6PM Call for other Service times 565-7122 Pastor Chuck Trett • Bring the Family!! "Thy word have I treasured in my heart thai I might not sin against thee." ^HRIfnAN > J\ A FOURSQUARE CHURCH ^ ^^ 571 Adams Blyd. Boulder City 293-7773 Sunday Worship 8 ft 10:50 am Home of Christian Center School and Dav Care Center you are always welcome at Boulder City Assembly of God Church FAITH CHRISTIAN CHURCH ''JUST SAY YES TO JESUS" MINISTRIES". MiNDAV WORSHIP srHI mil r Sunday S(;hool of the Bible..9:00 AM Woiship Service... 10:00 AM WLUNCSDAVSrHFnillF Praise and Prayer...7:00 PM Meeting at: 7th 82, Utah (next to 711) 293 2400 or 293 0620 Diuuir Jordcm. I'tisun Alirui/s Bihlc centered inearltiiuj (niri worslnj) NEW LOCATION Pastors Bill & Nona Toller extend a personal invitation to share in God's Love & Power SuMflav I i.OO A.m. & 7.00 p.m. • IVednesday 7.00 p.m. "70 E. Windmill Lane icomer of rairiicid i miie w. /1-2151 260-4777 \ MlJ^-., fHiGHUND HILLS 615 College Drive • Henderson • 566-0200 Saturday Night Worsliip Celebration • 6:00 pm Sunday Worship Services: -H4if^4i.^iJit,AS-: '-^' i^^^ 8::i0 am, .9:45 am. 11:00 am. 6;00 pm Come join us We Care Ahoui Y6u and Your Family! Adult Sunday School • 8:45 a.m. Children's Sunday School 9:00 a.m. (4yrs. • 8th grade) Worship10:00 a.m. Youth Group • 6:30 p.m. God 'N Me • Thurs.. 3:15 p.m. (Grades 1-5) VISITORS EXPECTED 1100 Buchanan Rev. Robt. Tedrow, Pastor Boulder City • 293-2454 Neighborhood C)%urch Service times: Sunday 10am & 6pm Wednesday 7pm Sunday School all ages Youth Ministry all ages FOUR SQUARE GOSPEL 207 W. Basic Rd 565-9672 Celebrate Jesus at... Dynamic Drama, Music and Message! Currently meeting at: Community College of Southern Nevada 700 College Drive, Henderson Sundays 10AM Call 263-4661 for more Information Shabbat ar holl4ay &vl+%* Mcmtenon tVvsda 09014 (702) 4.54-4848 1/^ Ministry Reaching The World! Salvation!! Prayer For The Sick!! Families Restored! Financial Miracles In Action! RADIO MINISTRY KKW 10:60 AM 6:30 AM & 8 PM FRIDAY SATURDAYS 6:00 P.M. Saturn of Henderson • 310 N. Gibson (Community Center Upstairs) Everyone Welcome! All Seats Free! PASTOR JIM BRTTT OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN CHURCH "Holding Forth the Word of Life..." Philippians 2:16 Sunday School 9 am Adult Bible Class 9 am Sunday Worship 8 & 10:45 am Pastor Bruning 59 Lynn Ln., Henderson 565-9154 Growing together in the grace of our Lord Jesus St. Thomas More Catholic Commuiiity 130 I^. Pecos Rd. Henderson, 361-3022 Saturday Confession: 3:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. • Saturday Vigil Mass: 4:30 p.m. Sunday Masses: 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m., & 12:00 p.m. Daily Mass: 8:30 a.m. (Monday through Friday) St. FauFs Charismatic Episcopal Church 1661 Qallerija Dr. r 260-0126 (White Middle School/ Henderson) ^-U^DAY WORSHIP 10AM Faitmuh^'^ci'$J^ojdaridSpirit ^ Father David Hoff • ry&i^^harles Coleman TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM Established 1947 The LargesI Congregotion in Nevada Affliliated with United Synagogue ol Conservative Judaism 'OUR MEMBERSHIP IS OPEN, COME GROW WITH US!!! 1600 East Oakey Blvd. • Las Vegas, Nevada • 384-5070 Oasis Christian Fellowship meets at Selma Bartlett Elementary School i^ Located at 1961 Wigwam Pkwy. (between Vallo Verde ?.. Green Valley Pkwy.) Sunday Worship at 10 am Nursery &^ Children's Ministry provided thru 5th Grade. For more information call 270-7777 COMMUNITY BAPTIST CHURCH 245 E. Foster Ave. Henderson, NV 89009 Reverend Sam Roberson, Pastor/Teacher ^M^ SUNDAY: Sunday School 9:30 a.m. ^^^^^ Morning Service I 1:00 a.m. ^^^^B Evening Service 7:00 p.m. ^^^H MONDAY: fvagelism Classes • 7:00 p.m. ^^^^K TUESDAY: Theology Classes • 7:00 p.m. • I^H^L WEDNESDAY: Prayer & Bible Study 7:00 p.m. ^ • ^H^^ THURSDAY: Choir Rehearsal • 7:00 p.m. ^UJ^ JKmk. FRIDAY: Teachers Meeting 6:45 p.m. Worship Services and Bible Study Times Sundays i yir l^flc' 8:30, 9:45 & 11:00 a.m. -^ I I J J 6:00p.m Wednesdays 6:00 p.m. Green Valley Baptist Church 270 N. Valle Verde Dr., Henderson • 434-1906 (Corner of Silver Springs and Voile Verde) HENDERSOIN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH JL (lOI n. Major 565-9684 Worshi|) !3i'rvi(.C.S H 31) H ll):.30.im PturMTV' pri)\i(le(l lor 10 30aitt siTvifc ROSS DOYEL, PASTOR VEGAS VALLEY CHRISTIAN CHURCH 5515 Mtn. Visto, Los Vegas Phone 451-9211 UNDENOMINATIONAL BIBLE and CHRIST FOCUSED '-BIBLE SCHOOL 9:30 AM WORSHIP 10:30 AM S.O.W. (Sfody on Wednesdoy) 7:00 P.M. (Child Core Avoiloble) Serving Green Valley 0 Los Vegos Areas neor Sunset & Russell Rood a place to belong a place to become Licensed Child Care Center Phone 451-9665 St Christopher's Episcopal Church Holy Eucharist Sun. 9 A.M. & Wed. 6 P.M. Proyers for Healing offer each Service Sunday School 10:45 A.M. J812 Arizona St. • Boulder City • 293-4275 St Gtiristophers Church. Boulder City is a God centered, inclusive, multi-generational. spiritually related family welcoming all. SUNRISE COMMUNITY CHURCH 10am Sunday 480 Greenvy^ay Dr. Masonic Temple 737-5219 REV. JIM HAMILTON, PASTOR • Come end let us help make your life work for you. jAC FIRST SOUTHERN BAPTIST ^%'3?' 240 S. Cholla St. • Henderson ^^V 565-6072 You're Invited! Sunday Worship Services8:30 a.m. 11:00 a.m. 6:00p.m. Bible studySunday 8:30 a.m! 9:45 a.m. Wedne.sday 7:00 p.m. for all ages — /f Piau 74ai ^Wt Waterspring Baptist Church Independont, Fundomental 1901 N. Green Valley Pkwy. Henderson, NV 89014 |al Children's WorW| Sunday School A Aduh Bible Stvdf 10:00 o.m. Morning Wonhip 11:00 a.m. (nfo about Sun & Wed n/ghr, other miniitries, or juil need help, coll Pastor David Smith (702) 435-622S 't i^f'l of*^}{end&ts^ \''j Pastor Rick Wilder \^ Atlantic & Kansas i"-), 565-8577 Sunday School 9:30am Sunday Worship Sam, 1 lam, 6pm Wednesday Worship 7pm ST. PAUL THE APOSTLE ORTHODOX CHURCH Divine Liturgy: 9:00 A.M., Sunday 898-4800 5400 ANNIE OAKLEY DR. (South of Hacienda) LAS VEGAS, NEVADA 89120 w^^mi • pwpip ipep ^P^^ lb list vfiur c'ont^iT^ation call (ioldit'at 4:{.')-77rs Rev. Boh Hiirns Christ The Servant IK Lutheran Church *^ 26.3-0802 Sunday Worship • 8 &IO.V)ani Sunday School 9 15 am Sunday Evening Worship 7 pm Wednesday 7pm Visiliirs Welnimr • Nurser\ Avutlahli2 South Pecos Rd. Henderson VICTORY Christian Center Anngirifi themesapolLow Arceplaiheandf'drfiiieneisitiniiifliJem (Vimi Schedule of Services: Sunday 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. Spanish 1:30 p.m. Wednesday 6:30 p.m. Youth 6:30 p.m. Saturday Prayer 6 p.m. Pastors Bob & Martha Perry Nursery and/or Kids' Churrli providrd all servlcM 6126 S. Sandllili (SandhUl & Patrick) 456-4480^ I'aciric Si Panama • 565-8033 I In Downtown Hciidcrson V. L!';' Church of the Harvest 1000 Nevada Hwy. Boulder City. NV 293-5878 PtnM Ml PatiU Nwdstrom SuH^y j0:30am Praise and Worship WMI. 7:15pm Wisdom in the Word Dyaamic GUIdrans' Churcli • Hcirbom Youtii (Ministry • Promise Keepers Women of Harvest COMMUNITY CHURCH OF HENDERSON United Church of Christ Congregational 360 E. Horizon Dr., • 565-8563 Worship Service 10:30 AM "Building a Community to serve a Community" Chufch School 9:00AM, Nursery Available Sunday Evening 7:00PM "The Church On The Hill" 711 Valle Verde Ct. Henderson, NV 454-2722 Gary A Morefield Senior Pastor Green Valley Christian Center Sunday Schedule Morning Worship: 8:45 & 11:15 AM Children's Church: 9:004 11 15 AM Sunday School: 10 15 AM Evening Worship 6:00 PM Wednesday: Family Night 700 PM Thursday: Youth Group (7-12), 6:45 PM Saturd ay: Evening Worship 6:30 PM GREEN VALLEY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH New Saturday Service 5:30 p.m. Sunday Worship 8:30a.m.All a.m. SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 a.m. Nursery All Sen/ices 1798 Wigwam Pl(wy. (NE cornw ol Wijwam Pkwy 8 V>ll Van)* On I i^HIk Phone: 454-8484 ^U*'' nv Linda -Kally* Shaw BIBLE CHURCH Sunday Services and Studies 9am Sunday School/lOam Worship Nursery Care is available at all services. Call Pastor Daniel Sabaka for more information. Worship la Spirit and Tmtk. Ministry From Cod's Word to all. Worshipping at Fay Galloway Elm. Sch. 701 Skyline RD, HD 5658301 THE SALVATION ARMY COMMUNITY CENTER A Center For Worship and Service'. 830 E. Uke Mead Dr., Henderson, NV (702) 565 9578 Sunday Worship Services: 11 am & 6pm Sunday School For All Ages: 9:30 am Rihip '^iiriv Farh Thursday: 6 pm Ctinstian Weddings Invited Bethany baptist Church Sunday Worship Service: 8 am, 10:30 & 6 p.m. Sunday School 9: \ 5 a.m. Dr. George A. Huber Senior Pastor Rev. Jeffery McEorchern 2 1 0 Wyoming, Boulder City Call 293-1912 for futher information BLACK MOUNTAIN FELLOWSHIP Church of the Foursquare Gospel Sunday Worship 10:30AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Wad. Family Night 7 pm Thurs. Psranting Class** 7 pm SIS S. Water St., Henderson Homaol 564-2435 Black Mountain Chrblian Da Cara GIVING LIFE MINISTRIES 4lfiPerlilcWay. Mend 585-4984 • 585-4104 Pastor: Dave Delaria Sunday Chrmian Lduialion 10 jm Sunday Worship Services 11 am & 7 pm Nurtery Provided F ot 11 am Service Wed. Bible Study 7 pm Rev Marvin R Ganl. Pastor ^, 'ALLEY 3A7 OUTDEACH V^ (SYNAGOGUE SERVICE First Friday of Each Month FIRST HENDERSON UNUEn METHODIST CHURCH tm* E. Hortam Drhv. HmdariM Nevada SSaiS Ta mi taw Sonday Worship: IMUK CclebraMMMdPrMe • 9:31 FMAA Am • l):N Trafalional SndaySdnei for ALL ages *:IJSJB. lay ETC.: lMf.m. DiKipleship Worship ChMrmipmiMmSm^ rjov. meeting at ttiiLutheran Church. 2 T ,t>^*^' 4 February 12-13, 1998 Panorama Page 9 BRHEFS Jewish Genealogy groups to meet The Jewish Genealogy Society of Southern Nevada meets each month on tj^e east and west sides of the valley to enable the partidpatiop of more people. The wesf side group will meet from 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 15, at the Wes Sahara Library, on West Sahara and Fort Apache, in Las Vegai. The program will be "A Grenealogical Tour of the Library," ibllowed by problem-solving sessions for beginners and advancedresearchers. For mjre information, call the West-side coordinators Carole Montell,871-9773, or Mary Barkan, 362-8625. The edst-side group will meet from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 18, at Midbar Kodesh Temple, 33 Cactus Garden Dr., in Hender^n. The program will be "Jewish Genealogy on the Internet," foUowe^ by a problem-solving session and hands-on use of resources. For pnore information, call president/East^side coordinator SchelljDardashti, 896-1899. Menbership is open to all those interested in Jewish family histor)' research, learning and utilizing methods and resources. The groups oflfer problem-solving and. support of experienced resea-chers. Beginners and advanced researchers are always welcome. Jewish singles meet at The Hop Ihe 39 Again group for Jewish singles aged 50-60 will meet for an ivening of socializing and dancing at 7:30 p. m. Wednesday, Feb. 18,at The Hop, 1350 E. Tropicana Ave. Sponsored by the Jewish Community Center of Southern Nevada, the group plans activities for Jewish singles in the valley. All interested individuals are encouraged to attend the next program planning meeting at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 17, at the JCC offices, 3909 S. Maryland Parkway, fourth floor. For more information, call the JCC, 794-0090. ATTC to host open house The Area Techniial Trade Center, a school where CCSD high school students areable to study various vocational programs will host an open house from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Wednesday, Feb. 11, during National ^'ocational Education Week. ATTC is located at 444 W. Brooks Ave., southwest of Cheyenne Avenue and Commerce Street, between Mfirtin Luther King Boulevard and i^l5. From Cheyenne, head south on Commerce, then west on Brooks. Refreshments will be prepared and served by the cuUnary arts students, while school tours will be conducted by students in the hotel operations program. ATTC students attend classes for part of the day at their home campus, and attend cleisses in the vocational program of their choice for the remainder of the day at ATTC. Graduates of ATTC can be found in a variety of jobs around the communitj" welding metal structures, finishing cabinets, designing and maintaining local landscapes, reserving hotel accommodations, preparing gourmet meals, repairing electronic equipment and computers, designing find printing professional documents, managing front-office operations, practicing entry-level nursing skills and more. / f. ^ Variety Club names new director The Variety Club of Southern Nevada Board of Directors recently announced the appointment of Nancy M. Kosik as executive director. Kosik has extensive experience in the nonprofit field. She was marketing/campaign director at United Wa)i in Texas, development director at a pubUc broadcasting station in New Mexico and state director for Easter Seals in Nevada. Her earned a graduate degree fix)m New Mexico State University in educational management and development and mass conununications. The Variety Club of Southern Nevada is a dedicated, caring, involved nonprofit organization committed to the well-being of disabled, disadvantaged and deserving children. Fimds raised in Nevada stay in Nevada to be allocated to local organizations in need. Habitat for Humanity gets boost Habitat for Humanity recently received a $40,000 donation from Del Webb Corp., a Phoenix-based developer of new homes with operations throughout the Southwest. Habitat for Htunanity Las Vegas will receive a 20% share of the developer's donation, valued at $8,600. Del Webb also made donations to chapters in Arizona, California, South Carolina and Texas. Habitat for Hxunanity is a national non-profit organization with the mission of providing home ownership opportunities to lowincome famihes. It operates through corporate funding, donations of construction materials and services and volunteer labor. By the end of February, Habitat for Humanity Las Vegas will have completed 15 homes in the valley. The organization expects to complete six more homes by December 1998. Donations may be sent to Habitat for Humanity Las Vegas, 1573 N. Decatur Blvd., Las Vegas, NV 89108, or call 638-6477. Catholic charities seeks volunteers Catholic Charities of Southern Nevada is seeking volunteers to help with such sponsored programs as social services, migration and refugee services and the CathoUc Charities Child Care Center. "Because the needs of this community have grown tremendously, our need for volimteers has also grown," said Michael Husted, executive director of Catholic Charities. "We are looking for volunteers who can help us on a regular basis and other volunteers or civic groups who are interested in helping out with specific projects or programs." CathoUc Charities offers diverse volimteer opportunities with programs such as the Lied Dining Facility (formerly known as the St. Vincent's Dining Room), Meals on Wheels, adoption services and five thrift store locations. CathoUc Charities was founded in 1941 and is dedicated to serving the needy in Southern Nevada, regardless of race, religion or creed. Those interested in volunteering should call 385-2662. JCC volunteers needed The Adult Committee of the Jewish Commimity Center is looking for volunteers to serve on its program planning committee to help plan and implement adult programs. The JCC receives numerous requests for adult programs. Volunteers should expect to attend six to seven meetings a year and hkve an interest in developing programs for the Jewish community. To become involved, call the JCC, 794-0090. ^opi^iijHP a^miL, STOP! • FREE MOBILE SERVICE • LOWEST CASH PRICES ^N TOWN Service on Autos • Trucks Motor Homes Save up to $250.00 on your insurance deductible some restrictions apply All Insurance Companys accepted Commercial • Re.sidential • Mirrors Glass Emporium Rd. 702-880-9199 4881 E. Flamingo (Flamingo & Boulder) 4; St Rose Dominican Hospital CH Vr ^ Member of Catholic Healthcare West \ 102 E. Lake Mead Drive • Henderson, Nevada 89015 is please to announce the opening of Boulder Medical Clinic ^ Michael R. Falvo, D.O. and Mai1( Gibson, PA-C 129 W. Lake Mead Drive Salte I Hendersen. NV 19115 712-561-7411 by Mike Pacini f^ Starting at 5:00 p.m.. Chef Peter will be serving : ^) 4^ Ift^mitt^i, (^McAe(i VUi^t^ ) Reservations are Suggested l^tf, 293-3484 f^j^My^ Authoiized LAKE MEAD LAKE VIEW OHL -i-tax per night everyday of the week until April 1, 1998 Come check us^out 1/2 mile South of Lake Mead Marina (all lor Rcscnalioiis & Infonnation • •'• • • LAKE MEAD LODGE 290-2074 Authorized Concessionaire of the National Park Service ORIGINAL DEFf' N.VlSsi

PAGE 28

p^^^^^^^ -"-?^^"^^^^ Page 10 Panorama February 12-13, 1998 AfricanAmerican history marked "Freedom Through Economic Independence" is the theme for this year's celebration of African American History Month. The event, coordinated by the U.S. Small Business Administration, will be held from 10:30 am. to noon Thursday, Feb. 19, at the Las Vegas Library Theatre, 951 W. Lake Mead Blvd. Speakers include Clark County Commission Chairwoman Yvonne Atkinson Gates, Las Vegas City Councilman, Gary Reese, and Ernest Fountain, president ofNew Ventures Capital Development Corporation, fiach has helped the African-American community find economic opportunities in Las Vegas. "There have b^n some tremendous accomplishments, but there is much more that can and should be done," said Foimtain, whose organization is hosting the event Also on the program will be a dramatic interpretation of the Langston Hughes poem, "Th^ Negro Mother," performed by Janice Pinder and supported by a male chorus, and a song will be performed by Ricca Grace and Janae Riberio. This is the third year the SBA has joined with Las Vegas, Clark County and Nevada to honor and recognize Nevada's AfricanAmericans. "By helping to observe National African-American history Month, the SBA hopes to increase awareness of opportunities for AfricanAmericans," said program coordinator Lisa Hendley. In 1997, the Las Vegas District Office of the SBA guaranteed 14 loans for AfricanAmerican business owners and entrepreneurs totaling $1.7 milUon. District Director John Scott saii, "We believe economic empowerment is the key to individual freedom, family strength and community development." The SBA is dedicated to helping African-Americans participate in the American dream of small-business ownership," he said. The event is open to the public at no charge. The theater holds 290 people, but reservations are encouraged to assure a seat. Anyone interested in attending may call Hendley, 388-6611, for reservations. For news tips call 564-1881 MHITARY February 12-13, 1998 Panorama Pag* 11 James Jenista Navy Lt. Comdr. James M. Jenista is on a temporary duty assignment as part of Joint Task Force-Southwest Asia, headquartered in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The force coordinates Operation Southern Watch which plans joint mihtary op)erations for coalition forces comprised of U.S. Air Force, Army, Navy and Marine Corps servicemembers, along with British and French forces. The watch conducts numerous coalition flying missions to ensiu-e compliance with the United Nations Security Council resolutions which prohibit Iraqi military flights gmd ground troop movements in the southern half of Iraq. The flight officer is the son of Sally Jenista of Boulder City. His grandmother is Josephine Jenista of Brooklield, 111., and his wife, Karen, is the daughter of Wilham J. and Anna Warren of Tampa, Fla. Benjamin M. Holness Army National Guard Pvt. Benjamin M. Holness has graduated from basic military training at Fort Leonard Wood, Waynesville, Mo. "During training, students received instruction in drill and ceremonies, weapons, map reading, tactics, military courtesy, mihtary justice, first aid, and Army history and traditions. Holness is the son of Eliane and step-son of Dermis Kist of Boulder City. David Lugo Greg Morrison Air Force Tech. Sgt. J. Greg Morrison is on a temporary duty assignment as part of the Joint Task Force-Southwest Asia, headquartered in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The JTF-SWA coordinates the Operation Southern Watch which plans joint mihtary operations for coalition forces comprised of U.S. Air Force, Army, Navy and Marine Corps servicemembers, along \yith British and French forces. The operation conducts numerous coalition flying missions to ensure compUance with the United Nations Security Council resolutions which prohibit Iraqi military flights and ground troop movements in the southern half of Iraq. Morrison is a computer systems supervisor normally assigned to the 505th Test Support Squadron at Hurlburt Field, Fort Walton Beach, Fla. He is the son of Annette Kidd of Boulder City, and Sherrill D. Morrison of Opehka, Ala., and a 1978 graduate of Opelika High School. Erin Murpliy Erin J. Murphy has been selected to receive an Army ROTC scholarship, and will attend Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, Wash., for four years to pursue a degree in nursing. The cadets are selected for the merit-based scholarship program on the basis of academic records, including comprehensive test results, school officials' evaluations, scholastic achievement and accomplishments in extra-curricular, leadership and athletic activities. The scholarship covers a predetermined amount of tuition and comprehensive fees, as well as a flat rate of $450 annually fot books, supplies and equipment, and $1,500 in tax-free spending money. Upon graduation from college and completion of the ROTC program, the cadet will be commissioned as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army, National Guard or Reserve. She is the daughter of James T. and Pamalee Murphy of Boulder City, and a 1997 graduate of Boulder City High School. Michael Brown Marine Pfc. Michael J. Brown; son of Helena H. Broadbent of Boulder City, recently completed basic training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego. He successfully completed 12 weeks of training designed to challenge new Marine recruits both physically and mentally. Recruits began training at 5 a.m. by running three miles and performing calisthenics. In addition to the physical conditioning program, Brown spent numerous hours in classroom and field assignments which included learning first aid, uniform regulations, combat water survival, marksmanship, hand-to-hand combat and assorted weapons training. They performed close order drill and operated as a small infantry unit during field training. Brown and other recruits also received instruction on the Marine Corps core values —honor, courage, commitment— and what the words mean in guiding personal and professional conduct. Brown and fellow recruits ended the training phase with "The Crucible," a 54-hour team effort, problem solving event which culminated with the presentation to recruits of the Marine Corps emblem, amd who were addressed as "Marines for the first time since boot camp began. Brown joins 41,000 men and women who will enter the Marine Corps this year from all over the country. Army Pfc. David A. Lugo has graduated from basic mihtary training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C. During the training, students received instruction in drill and ceremonies, weapons, map reading, tactics, mihtary courtesy, mihtary justice, first aid, and Army history and traditions. Lugo is the son of Gil Lugo of Sacramento, Calif, and Faye Mour of Henderson. Todd Aiirich Marine PFC. Todd S. Aurich, son of Christine Workman of Henderson, recently completed basic training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego and was promoted to his present rank. Aurich successfully completed 12 weeks of training designed to challenge new Marine recruits both physically and mentally. Aurich and fellow recruits began their training at 5 a.m., by running three miles and performing calUsthenics. In addition to the physical conditioning program, Aurich spent numerous hours in classroom and field assignments which included learning first aid, uniform regulations, combat water survival, marksmanship, hand-to-hand combat and assorted weapons training. They performed close" order drill and operated as a small infantry unit during field trauning. Aurich and other recruits also received instruction on the Marine Corps' core values—honor, courage and commitment, and what the words mean in guiding personal and professional conduct. Aurich and ;fellow recruits ended the training phase with the Crucible, a 54-hour team effort, problem solving evolution which culminated with an emotional ceremony in which the recruits were presented the Marine Corps Emblem, and were addressed as "Marines" for the first time since boot camp began. Aurich joins 41,000 men and women who will enter the Marine Corps this year from all over the country. He is a 1997 graduate of Green Valley High School. St. Rose Dominican Hospital CH^t^ y4 Member of Catholic Healthcare West 102 E. Lake Mead Drive • Henderson, Nevada 89015 weicimes Wm. Reid Litchf ield. M.D. EaMtcrtitliw Ir. UtelfliM rtctitly ctHpltui lit Eiiurtafltn Mttflelit Ftiitwsiili at liivarilltilcilScbttl Mi IrtilaHaWMu'sltspital • • • itrsM. siittm m .j i ".ective for human use. The ingredient! has been formulated into a product calUd ARTHRx" and comes in a strength designed for humans. Researchers am excited and say the formula can reliele arthritis pain for millions. Developed by the Phillips (julf Corporation, ARTH-Rx is a brealthrough in the treatment of painful disorders ranging from minor aches andipains to more serious conditions such as arthritis, bursitis, rheumatism, tendonitis, backache and more. Although the mechanism b) which ARTH-Rx works to relieve pain is not totally clear, scientists suggest that pain is relieved because ARTH-Rx intercepts the messenger substanct that sends pain signals to the brain. ARTH-Rx is available in a cinvenient roll-on applicator without a prescription. According to a spok^person for the company, due to the pverwhelming demand for ARTH-Rx,supplies are sometimes limited. ARTHRx can also be ordered by calling 1800-729-8446.1W7PGC ARTH-Rx Is available locally at: NEVADA PRESCRIPTION DRUGS 1220 ArizonaSt. • 293-4911 • Boulder Cty Or at your local PEPPERMILLS • CASINO 122 WATER ST. HENDERSON, NV. 565-9777 ^^ EXCITING § '11' TRIBLE '( BDKER FEBRUARY GIVEAWAYS 4 SAN DIEGO VACATIONS, 4 COLOR TVS, & CASH. S£t POSIEO FUERS FOR OetAILS YOU CAN lAflN WINSTON CUP NASCAR TICKETS AT THE RAINBOW CLUB CASINO Sf E POSTED FUERS FOR DETAILS VALENTINE'S DAY f tf SPECIALS V FEB. 14TH, 1998, 3PM 11PM NEW YORK STEAK & SHRIMP ^2 for $9.9Sl^ < A y^ > VALENTINE'SDAY 4 OF A KIND CANDY GIVEAWAY KK)fia>RmniiDcwL> VALUABLE COUPON NEW YORK STEAK W/ COUPON ONLY $4.99 lOoz. REG. $6.45 009D FOR 4NtS0NS INCUIDU SOUP OB tALAO, ROLL A BUITIR, CNWCi or POTATO. MUST BE 21. SUBJEa TO CANCELLATION OR CHANGE BY M>*JAG£MENT AT ANY TIME EMPLOYEES AND IMMECMTE FAMILY NOT ELEGILBLE. NOT V)^UD WITH ANY OTHER Of FER ONE COUPON PER VISIT, EXPIRES 2/28/98 PRESENT WHEN OIXRING. SERVED 3PM • nPM. I58UEO 2/1/98 You Con Do It!... Trigonometry byDillHonlon bhanlon@accessnv.com Many distances can be found directly by measuring with a ruler or tape measure. However, some distances can not be found directly. For instance, it's not practical to determine the height of a mountain by dropping a tape measure from the highest peak. So what do we do? You've got it, find in indirectly. How? We could try to use those special right triangles we found last time. Remember we said there was a relationship in their sides. Trigonometry means "triangle measurement' in Greek. That's why trig is Greek to so many people. Confinirig our discussion of trigonometiy to special relationships that exist in right triangles, consider the right triangles shown in the diagram below. c A ^-'"'^ 1 F ^ C E G 1 Since each of the triangles contain zA and a right angle, the triangles are all similar to one another by the Angle Angle Postulate. That means the sides are in proportion. That means RH D£ = Eli = til AC AE AG Al This is called the tangent ratio. The tangent (tan) of an acute angle of a right triangle is the ratio of the length of the lea opposite the acute angle to the length ofthe leg adjacent to the acute angle. Let's visualize that definition, B -c Using that picture and definition, we would write the tan A = opposite side ^ a_ adjacent side b The easiest way I know to remember the trig ratios is by memorizing SOHCAHTOA. The S stands for sine, O for opposite side, H for hypotenuse, C for cosine, A for adjacent side, and T for tangent. I know this interests you, if you were to write all the possible ratios for the sides of a triangle, you would find there would be six. How many trig ratios do you think there are? That's right, there are six. So trigonoriietry is nothing more than the study of the ratios of right triangles. We just happen to give those ratios names; sine .cosine, tangent, cosecant, secant, and cotangent. We'll only study sine (sin), cosine (cos), and tangent (tan) today. Using SOHCAHTOA, the and the sin A = cos A = tan A = opposite hypotenuse adjacent hypotenuse opposite adjacent a_ c b c a_ b By using right triangles,"we can now determine the sine, cosine, and tangent of angles. That, in tum, will allow us to find the sides of different triangles if we know an angle. By knowing SOHCAHTOA, you will be able to remember the Sine is equal to Opposite over the Hypotenuse, the Cosine is equal to the Adjacent over the Hypotenuse, etc. Tape 15 www. h/cybermalLconVmathsystems 1997 Mathematical Systems S*// Hanfon /$ ttie Math/Science Institute Coordinator for tlie Clark County School District and a I part-time math imtmctor at UNLV. ; 997 HBC Publications. United Way of Southern Nevada celebrates goal with volunteers United Way of Southern Nevada recently held a volunteer appreciation party celebrating its 1997-98 successes. Campaign chairman and president ofthe Las Vegas Chamber of Commerce Pat Shalmy announced that UWSN raised more than $5,620,000,70% ofthe $8 million goal. More than 75 volunteers joined in festivities marking the half-way point in the 1997-98 campaign. Entertainment was provided by Color Coded Brown. Local companies contributed to the event, including Copeland Sports Superstore, Port of Subs, CocaCola, Ethel M, Frito Lay, Ballys, Circus Circus, Fitzgerald Casino and Mediterranean Cafe. "It's amazing how supportive local merchants are," said communications manager Sharon Mann. "Copeland Sports Superstore hosted the event and Port of Subs donated more than enough sandwiches for everyone—that's commimity involvement." Port of Subs has been part of the Southern Nevada community for 11 years. Headquartered in Reno, it currently has more than 85 stores in Nevada^ California, Washington and Arizona, and is developing franchises in other Western states. "Port of Subs is pleased to recognize UWSN's dedication to the community, and happy to support their efforts," said Brian Ford, coop president and store operator. UWSN is an independent organization governed by a local board. Women's Aglow to meet Women's Aglow of Boulder City/Henderson will host ZulUe Franco at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 9, at 507 Utah St., in Boulder City. Franco will share testimony of overcoming obstacles of language, culture and poverty through Jesus Christ. Michele and Greg Richardson will lead music and worship. RSVP is requested. Call Elaine, 293-3224, or Maxine, 293-5345. mm • m nm j^ Poker Room open daily at 10am Z $17 Hold'em Shoot Out Everyday 10:30am Dinner ;4.49 Includes DuHet tHuifeoi. KvSx'kh**^''''^ Free Monthly Bliickjack Tournmcnt $2000"" j WHATADEA^I^; Cash Your Paycheck SS WIN A MILLION! SS Broiled NY Steok Sandwich SPECIALS m^ 458-8810 5255 Boulder Hwy. •m 10a.m. to noon Saturday, Feb. 14. Children will be able to make their own Valentines as well as those for children in the pediatric ward at Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center. Mall mascot, Boulevard Bailey, will also make an appearance at the event and deliver Valentines to the hospital. Membership in the Big Paw Club for Kids is free and children may enroll at the Boulevard Customer Service Center during mall hours. Members receive a club newsletter, a membership card and information on upcoming events. The March Big Paw Club event will be a workshop on "Learning the Value of Saving" on Saturday, March 14. The Boulevard, Nevada's largest mall, is located at 3528 S. Maryland Parkway, at Desert Inn DMV offices expand phone services Southern Nevada drivers who need answers to driver's license or registration questions c£ui now call from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, and from 8 to 4 p.m. Saturday. The Southern Nevada DMV information line is 486-4-DMV, or 486-4368. Hours of operation for the DMV info line now coincide with the office hours of the Southern Nevada DMV offices. The information line's menu system provides the option of addressing questions to DMV technicians or they may access the automated system for general information about registration or driver's hcenses. Another source for information is the Department of-Motor Vehicles and Pubhc Safety'slntemet web site, www.state.nv.us/ dmv_ps/. Easily accessible links to the driver's license and registration pages provide detailed customer information on each division. For more information about the expanded phone information services orthe website, call Kimberly Evwis, 687-1300. Road. The Big Paw Club for Kids is sponsored by Las Vegas Kidz Magazine, Stephen Wade Auto in St. George, Utah and the Boulevard Mall. For more information, call 7328949, or visit the Big Paw Club at the Boulevard's Website, www.blvdmall.com. $ Free Estimates $ Closet Organizers $ Pull-Out Shelves Storate Cabinets ly Closet Designs 644-0109 4530 Andrews St., Sutie H Lie s004308a • BOUNDED • INSURED M ft FREE LOW FAT COOKING CI.A.SS! Heart Health for Life February is 'Healthy Heart" month at Spartan—with a special cooWng class designed to lower the cholesterol, fat and sodium in your dietl Taught by Spartan's Certified Nutritionist Carol Drummey, the class will also offer FREE recipes and samples of these nutritionally-packed dishes. We're sure you'll love itl For more information, corttact Carol Drummey at 361-0406. Tuesday, February 17 @ 6:30 pm Spartan Health Foods 7380 S. Eastern Ave. ttlSW.SohOKl. 253-7672 7310 SEutanAvt. 361-0406 SPARTAN A Health poods Store for Evoyone. M-F Sam-TpiD; Sa 8ain-6fifn: Su 1 lom-Spm M-F 9aill4pm; So 9aill-7piu Su 1 lom-ipitl O MOVING! 24 Hour Pack And Load Service 10% SENIOR DISCOUNT Just Ask! 3 hour special $149.00 wirh coupon LET MOVERS REFERRAL SERVICE HELP YOU MAKE THE RIGHT MOVE! CALL TODAY 382-8683 MOVE TODAY Discounts cannot be combined H-2 n^Tv^NEw, Green Valley Plus 6 W. Pacific Ave., Henderson 568-5980 (FAX • 564-3580) Mon.-Pri. 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Classifieds • Announcements • Engagements • Births Weddings • Obituaries • News Releases • Subscriptions COUPON WORKS LIKE LIQUID BALL BEARINGS* ;i3~ OFF I FULL SERVICE OIL CHANGE WE FEATURE PENNZOIL AIR AND OIL FILTERS WORKS LIKE LIQUID BALL BEARINGS* 13 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS 3450 South Decatur 871-3253 4310 West Flamingo 876-0360 Sunset & Annie Oakley 456-7915 2718 East Tropicana 456-0988 • 107 South Rainbow 878-1765 West Sahara & Jones 873-7507 Lake Mead & Rampart 363-6906 Wigwam & Pecos 361-1424 Boulder Hwy. S^ast Lake Mead 564-7521 West Sahara & Buffalo 256-7574 Bullhead City. AZ 520-756-3590 11 N. Nellis 459-7724 Cheyenne & Buffalo 395-0273 WORKS LIKE LIQUID BALL BEARINGS* PE^OIL SERVICE INCLUDES! • CHANGE THE OIL CHANGE THE PILTER • COMPLETE CHASSIS LUBE • CHECK AND FILL BRAKE FLUID • CHECK AND FILL POWER STEERING • CHECK AND RLL DIFFERENTIAL • CHECK AND FILL TRANSMISSK5N • CHECK AND FILL ALL TIRES • CHECK AND FILL WINDSHIELD WASHER • CHECK AND CLEAN AIR FILTER • WASH WINDSHIELDS WE FEATURE PENNZOIL AIR 10 MINUTE LUBE AND OIL FILTERS WITH EVERY FULL SERVICE OIL & LUBE YOU GET A FREE CAR WASH. • ORIGINAL DESI^ msfi

PAGE 29

p^^^^^^^ -"-?^^"^^^^ Page 10 Panorama February 12-13, 1998 AfricanAmerican history marked "Freedom Through Economic Independence" is the theme for this year's celebration of African American History Month. The event, coordinated by the U.S. Small Business Administration, will be held from 10:30 am. to noon Thursday, Feb. 19, at the Las Vegas Library Theatre, 951 W. Lake Mead Blvd. Speakers include Clark County Commission Chairwoman Yvonne Atkinson Gates, Las Vegas City Councilman, Gary Reese, and Ernest Fountain, president ofNew Ventures Capital Development Corporation, fiach has helped the African-American community find economic opportunities in Las Vegas. "There have b^n some tremendous accomplishments, but there is much more that can and should be done," said Foimtain, whose organization is hosting the event Also on the program will be a dramatic interpretation of the Langston Hughes poem, "Th^ Negro Mother," performed by Janice Pinder and supported by a male chorus, and a song will be performed by Ricca Grace and Janae Riberio. This is the third year the SBA has joined with Las Vegas, Clark County and Nevada to honor and recognize Nevada's AfricanAmericans. "By helping to observe National African-American history Month, the SBA hopes to increase awareness of opportunities for AfricanAmericans," said program coordinator Lisa Hendley. In 1997, the Las Vegas District Office of the SBA guaranteed 14 loans for AfricanAmerican business owners and entrepreneurs totaling $1.7 milUon. District Director John Scott saii, "We believe economic empowerment is the key to individual freedom, family strength and community development." The SBA is dedicated to helping African-Americans participate in the American dream of small-business ownership," he said. The event is open to the public at no charge. The theater holds 290 people, but reservations are encouraged to assure a seat. Anyone interested in attending may call Hendley, 388-6611, for reservations. For news tips call 564-1881 MHITARY February 12-13, 1998 Panorama Pag* 11 James Jenista Navy Lt. Comdr. James M. Jenista is on a temporary duty assignment as part of Joint Task Force-Southwest Asia, headquartered in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The force coordinates Operation Southern Watch which plans joint mihtary op)erations for coalition forces comprised of U.S. Air Force, Army, Navy and Marine Corps servicemembers, along with British and French forces. The watch conducts numerous coalition flying missions to ensiu-e compliance with the United Nations Security Council resolutions which prohibit Iraqi military flights gmd ground troop movements in the southern half of Iraq. The flight officer is the son of Sally Jenista of Boulder City. His grandmother is Josephine Jenista of Brooklield, 111., and his wife, Karen, is the daughter of Wilham J. and Anna Warren of Tampa, Fla. Benjamin M. Holness Army National Guard Pvt. Benjamin M. Holness has graduated from basic military training at Fort Leonard Wood, Waynesville, Mo. "During training, students received instruction in drill and ceremonies, weapons, map reading, tactics, military courtesy, mihtary justice, first aid, and Army history and traditions. Holness is the son of Eliane and step-son of Dermis Kist of Boulder City. David Lugo Greg Morrison Air Force Tech. Sgt. J. Greg Morrison is on a temporary duty assignment as part of the Joint Task Force-Southwest Asia, headquartered in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The JTF-SWA coordinates the Operation Southern Watch which plans joint mihtary operations for coalition forces comprised of U.S. Air Force, Army, Navy and Marine Corps servicemembers, along \yith British and French forces. The operation conducts numerous coalition flying missions to ensure compUance with the United Nations Security Council resolutions which prohibit Iraqi military flights and ground troop movements in the southern half of Iraq. Morrison is a computer systems supervisor normally assigned to the 505th Test Support Squadron at Hurlburt Field, Fort Walton Beach, Fla. He is the son of Annette Kidd of Boulder City, and Sherrill D. Morrison of Opehka, Ala., and a 1978 graduate of Opelika High School. Erin Murpliy Erin J. Murphy has been selected to receive an Army ROTC scholarship, and will attend Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, Wash., for four years to pursue a degree in nursing. The cadets are selected for the merit-based scholarship program on the basis of academic records, including comprehensive test results, school officials' evaluations, scholastic achievement and accomplishments in extra-curricular, leadership and athletic activities. The scholarship covers a predetermined amount of tuition and comprehensive fees, as well as a flat rate of $450 annually fot books, supplies and equipment, and $1,500 in tax-free spending money. Upon graduation from college and completion of the ROTC program, the cadet will be commissioned as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army, National Guard or Reserve. She is the daughter of James T. and Pamalee Murphy of Boulder City, and a 1997 graduate of Boulder City High School. Michael Brown Marine Pfc. Michael J. Brown; son of Helena H. Broadbent of Boulder City, recently completed basic training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego. He successfully completed 12 weeks of training designed to challenge new Marine recruits both physically and mentally. Recruits began training at 5 a.m. by running three miles and performing calisthenics. In addition to the physical conditioning program, Brown spent numerous hours in classroom and field assignments which included learning first aid, uniform regulations, combat water survival, marksmanship, hand-to-hand combat and assorted weapons training. They performed close order drill and operated as a small infantry unit during field training. Brown and other recruits also received instruction on the Marine Corps core values —honor, courage, commitment— and what the words mean in guiding personal and professional conduct. Brown and fellow recruits ended the training phase with "The Crucible," a 54-hour team effort, problem solving event which culminated with the presentation to recruits of the Marine Corps emblem, amd who were addressed as "Marines for the first time since boot camp began. Brown joins 41,000 men and women who will enter the Marine Corps this year from all over the country. Army Pfc. David A. Lugo has graduated from basic mihtary training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C. During the training, students received instruction in drill and ceremonies, weapons, map reading, tactics, mihtary courtesy, mihtary justice, first aid, and Army history and traditions. Lugo is the son of Gil Lugo of Sacramento, Calif, and Faye Mour of Henderson. Todd Aiirich Marine PFC. Todd S. Aurich, son of Christine Workman of Henderson, recently completed basic training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego and was promoted to his present rank. Aurich successfully completed 12 weeks of training designed to challenge new Marine recruits both physically and mentally. Aurich and fellow recruits began their training at 5 a.m., by running three miles and performing calUsthenics. In addition to the physical conditioning program, Aurich spent numerous hours in classroom and field assignments which included learning first aid, uniform regulations, combat water survival, marksmanship, hand-to-hand combat and assorted weapons training. They performed close" order drill and operated as a small infantry unit during field trauning. Aurich and other recruits also received instruction on the Marine Corps' core values—honor, courage and commitment, and what the words mean in guiding personal and professional conduct. Aurich and ;fellow recruits ended the training phase with the Crucible, a 54-hour team effort, problem solving evolution which culminated with an emotional ceremony in which the recruits were presented the Marine Corps Emblem, and were addressed as "Marines" for the first time since boot camp began. Aurich joins 41,000 men and women who will enter the Marine Corps this year from all over the country. He is a 1997 graduate of Green Valley High School. St. Rose Dominican Hospital CH^t^ y4 Member of Catholic Healthcare West 102 E. Lake Mead Drive • Henderson, Nevada 89015 weicimes Wm. Reid Litchf ield. M.D. EaMtcrtitliw Ir. UtelfliM rtctitly ctHpltui lit Eiiurtafltn Mttflelit Ftiitwsiili at liivarilltilcilScbttl Mi IrtilaHaWMu'sltspital • • • itrsM. siittm m .j i ".ective for human use. The ingredient! has been formulated into a product calUd ARTHRx" and comes in a strength designed for humans. Researchers am excited and say the formula can reliele arthritis pain for millions. Developed by the Phillips (julf Corporation, ARTH-Rx is a brealthrough in the treatment of painful disorders ranging from minor aches andipains to more serious conditions such as arthritis, bursitis, rheumatism, tendonitis, backache and more. Although the mechanism b) which ARTH-Rx works to relieve pain is not totally clear, scientists suggest that pain is relieved because ARTH-Rx intercepts the messenger substanct that sends pain signals to the brain. ARTH-Rx is available in a cinvenient roll-on applicator without a prescription. According to a spok^person for the company, due to the pverwhelming demand for ARTH-Rx,supplies are sometimes limited. ARTHRx can also be ordered by calling 1800-729-8446.1W7PGC ARTH-Rx Is available locally at: NEVADA PRESCRIPTION DRUGS 1220 ArizonaSt. • 293-4911 • Boulder Cty Or at your local PEPPERMILLS • CASINO 122 WATER ST. HENDERSON, NV. 565-9777 ^^ EXCITING § '11' TRIBLE '( BDKER FEBRUARY GIVEAWAYS 4 SAN DIEGO VACATIONS, 4 COLOR TVS, & CASH. S£t POSIEO FUERS FOR OetAILS YOU CAN lAflN WINSTON CUP NASCAR TICKETS AT THE RAINBOW CLUB CASINO Sf E POSTED FUERS FOR DETAILS VALENTINE'S DAY f tf SPECIALS V FEB. 14TH, 1998, 3PM 11PM NEW YORK STEAK & SHRIMP ^2 for $9.9Sl^ < A y^ > VALENTINE'SDAY 4 OF A KIND CANDY GIVEAWAY KK)fia>RmniiDcwL> VALUABLE COUPON NEW YORK STEAK W/ COUPON ONLY $4.99 lOoz. REG. $6.45 009D FOR 4NtS0NS INCUIDU SOUP OB tALAO, ROLL A BUITIR, CNWCi or POTATO. MUST BE 21. SUBJEa TO CANCELLATION OR CHANGE BY M>*JAG£MENT AT ANY TIME EMPLOYEES AND IMMECMTE FAMILY NOT ELEGILBLE. NOT V)^UD WITH ANY OTHER Of FER ONE COUPON PER VISIT, EXPIRES 2/28/98 PRESENT WHEN OIXRING. SERVED 3PM • nPM. I58UEO 2/1/98 You Con Do It!... Trigonometry byDillHonlon bhanlon@accessnv.com Many distances can be found directly by measuring with a ruler or tape measure. However, some distances can not be found directly. For instance, it's not practical to determine the height of a mountain by dropping a tape measure from the highest peak. So what do we do? You've got it, find in indirectly. How? We could try to use those special right triangles we found last time. Remember we said there was a relationship in their sides. Trigonometry means "triangle measurement' in Greek. That's why trig is Greek to so many people. Confinirig our discussion of trigonometiy to special relationships that exist in right triangles, consider the right triangles shown in the diagram below. c A ^-'"'^ 1 F ^ C E G 1 Since each of the triangles contain zA and a right angle, the triangles are all similar to one another by the Angle Angle Postulate. That means the sides are in proportion. That means RH D£ = Eli = til AC AE AG Al This is called the tangent ratio. The tangent (tan) of an acute angle of a right triangle is the ratio of the length of the lea opposite the acute angle to the length ofthe leg adjacent to the acute angle. Let's visualize that definition, B -c Using that picture and definition, we would write the tan A = opposite side ^ a_ adjacent side b The easiest way I know to remember the trig ratios is by memorizing SOHCAHTOA. The S stands for sine, O for opposite side, H for hypotenuse, C for cosine, A for adjacent side, and T for tangent. I know this interests you, if you were to write all the possible ratios for the sides of a triangle, you would find there would be six. How many trig ratios do you think there are? That's right, there are six. So trigonoriietry is nothing more than the study of the ratios of right triangles. We just happen to give those ratios names; sine .cosine, tangent, cosecant, secant, and cotangent. We'll only study sine (sin), cosine (cos), and tangent (tan) today. Using SOHCAHTOA, the and the sin A = cos A = tan A = opposite hypotenuse adjacent hypotenuse opposite adjacent a_ c b c a_ b By using right triangles,"we can now determine the sine, cosine, and tangent of angles. That, in tum, will allow us to find the sides of different triangles if we know an angle. By knowing SOHCAHTOA, you will be able to remember the Sine is equal to Opposite over the Hypotenuse, the Cosine is equal to the Adjacent over the Hypotenuse, etc. Tape 15 www. h/cybermalLconVmathsystems 1997 Mathematical Systems S*// Hanfon /$ ttie Math/Science Institute Coordinator for tlie Clark County School District and a I part-time math imtmctor at UNLV. ; 997 HBC Publications. United Way of Southern Nevada celebrates goal with volunteers United Way of Southern Nevada recently held a volunteer appreciation party celebrating its 1997-98 successes. Campaign chairman and president ofthe Las Vegas Chamber of Commerce Pat Shalmy announced that UWSN raised more than $5,620,000,70% ofthe $8 million goal. More than 75 volunteers joined in festivities marking the half-way point in the 1997-98 campaign. Entertainment was provided by Color Coded Brown. Local companies contributed to the event, including Copeland Sports Superstore, Port of Subs, CocaCola, Ethel M, Frito Lay, Ballys, Circus Circus, Fitzgerald Casino and Mediterranean Cafe. "It's amazing how supportive local merchants are," said communications manager Sharon Mann. "Copeland Sports Superstore hosted the event and Port of Subs donated more than enough sandwiches for everyone—that's commimity involvement." Port of Subs has been part of the Southern Nevada community for 11 years. Headquartered in Reno, it currently has more than 85 stores in Nevada^ California, Washington and Arizona, and is developing franchises in other Western states. "Port of Subs is pleased to recognize UWSN's dedication to the community, and happy to support their efforts," said Brian Ford, coop president and store operator. UWSN is an independent organization governed by a local board. Women's Aglow to meet Women's Aglow of Boulder City/Henderson will host ZulUe Franco at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 9, at 507 Utah St., in Boulder City. Franco will share testimony of overcoming obstacles of language, culture and poverty through Jesus Christ. Michele and Greg Richardson will lead music and worship. RSVP is requested. Call Elaine, 293-3224, or Maxine, 293-5345. mm • m nm j^ Poker Room open daily at 10am Z $17 Hold'em Shoot Out Everyday 10:30am Dinner ;4.49 Includes DuHet tHuifeoi. KvSx'kh**^''''^ Free Monthly Bliickjack Tournmcnt $2000"" j WHATADEA^I^; Cash Your Paycheck SS WIN A MILLION! SS Broiled NY Steok Sandwich SPECIALS m^ 458-8810 5255 Boulder Hwy. •m 10a.m. to noon Saturday, Feb. 14. Children will be able to make their own Valentines as well as those for children in the pediatric ward at Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center. Mall mascot, Boulevard Bailey, will also make an appearance at the event and deliver Valentines to the hospital. Membership in the Big Paw Club for Kids is free and children may enroll at the Boulevard Customer Service Center during mall hours. Members receive a club newsletter, a membership card and information on upcoming events. The March Big Paw Club event will be a workshop on "Learning the Value of Saving" on Saturday, March 14. The Boulevard, Nevada's largest mall, is located at 3528 S. Maryland Parkway, at Desert Inn DMV offices expand phone services Southern Nevada drivers who need answers to driver's license or registration questions c£ui now call from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, and from 8 to 4 p.m. Saturday. The Southern Nevada DMV information line is 486-4-DMV, or 486-4368. Hours of operation for the DMV info line now coincide with the office hours of the Southern Nevada DMV offices. The information line's menu system provides the option of addressing questions to DMV technicians or they may access the automated system for general information about registration or driver's hcenses. Another source for information is the Department of-Motor Vehicles and Pubhc Safety'slntemet web site, www.state.nv.us/ dmv_ps/. Easily accessible links to the driver's license and registration pages provide detailed customer information on each division. For more information about the expanded phone information services orthe website, call Kimberly Evwis, 687-1300. Road. The Big Paw Club for Kids is sponsored by Las Vegas Kidz Magazine, Stephen Wade Auto in St. George, Utah and the Boulevard Mall. For more information, call 7328949, or visit the Big Paw Club at the Boulevard's Website, www.blvdmall.com. $ Free Estimates $ Closet Organizers $ Pull-Out Shelves Storate Cabinets ly Closet Designs 644-0109 4530 Andrews St., Sutie H Lie s004308a • BOUNDED • INSURED M ft FREE LOW FAT COOKING CI.A.SS! Heart Health for Life February is 'Healthy Heart" month at Spartan—with a special cooWng class designed to lower the cholesterol, fat and sodium in your dietl Taught by Spartan's Certified Nutritionist Carol Drummey, the class will also offer FREE recipes and samples of these nutritionally-packed dishes. We're sure you'll love itl For more information, corttact Carol Drummey at 361-0406. Tuesday, February 17 @ 6:30 pm Spartan Health Foods 7380 S. Eastern Ave. ttlSW.SohOKl. 253-7672 7310 SEutanAvt. 361-0406 SPARTAN A Health poods Store for Evoyone. M-F Sam-TpiD; Sa 8ain-6fifn: Su 1 lom-Spm M-F 9aill4pm; So 9aill-7piu Su 1 lom-ipitl O MOVING! 24 Hour Pack And Load Service 10% SENIOR DISCOUNT Just Ask! 3 hour special $149.00 wirh coupon LET MOVERS REFERRAL SERVICE HELP YOU MAKE THE RIGHT MOVE! CALL TODAY 382-8683 MOVE TODAY Discounts cannot be combined H-2 n^Tv^NEw, Green Valley Plus 6 W. Pacific Ave., Henderson 568-5980 (FAX • 564-3580) Mon.-Pri. 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Classifieds • Announcements • Engagements • Births Weddings • Obituaries • News Releases • Subscriptions COUPON WORKS LIKE LIQUID BALL BEARINGS* ;i3~ OFF I FULL SERVICE OIL CHANGE WE FEATURE PENNZOIL AIR AND OIL FILTERS WORKS LIKE LIQUID BALL BEARINGS* 13 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS 3450 South Decatur 871-3253 4310 West Flamingo 876-0360 Sunset & Annie Oakley 456-7915 2718 East Tropicana 456-0988 • 107 South Rainbow 878-1765 West Sahara & Jones 873-7507 Lake Mead & Rampart 363-6906 Wigwam & Pecos 361-1424 Boulder Hwy. S^ast Lake Mead 564-7521 West Sahara & Buffalo 256-7574 Bullhead City. AZ 520-756-3590 11 N. Nellis 459-7724 Cheyenne & Buffalo 395-0273 WORKS LIKE LIQUID BALL BEARINGS* PE^OIL SERVICE INCLUDES! • CHANGE THE OIL CHANGE THE PILTER • COMPLETE CHASSIS LUBE • CHECK AND FILL BRAKE FLUID • CHECK AND FILL POWER STEERING • CHECK AND RLL DIFFERENTIAL • CHECK AND FILL TRANSMISSK5N • CHECK AND FILL ALL TIRES • CHECK AND FILL WINDSHIELD WASHER • CHECK AND CLEAN AIR FILTER • WASH WINDSHIELDS WE FEATURE PENNZOIL AIR 10 MINUTE LUBE AND OIL FILTERS WITH EVERY FULL SERVICE OIL & LUBE YOU GET A FREE CAR WASH. • ORIGINAL DESI^ msfi

PAGE 30

Page 12 Panorama February 12-13, 1998 Nevada timeshare industry reports sales of $117 million Nevada timeshare sales1eae> • • •Graphic Design •NCR Forms •Stamps •Envelopes For All Your Printing & Copy Needs, We now offer VPS Services for your convenience. Henderson S(ore only 6 W. Pacific Avc. MOTOROLA PAGERS your pager package includes: •PAGER 'FREE ACTIVATION •2 MONTHS OF BASIC SERVICE Store Details 2 LOCATIONS TO SERUE YOU IN GKUN VALUY 2827 GREEN VALLEY PKWY. 435-7761 (fax)435-7828 IN HENDERSON 6 W. PACIFIC AVE. 568-5980 (fax)564-3580 Nevada owners include the following: a median household income of $69,000, or nearly twice the national average; a median age of household head of 53 years; bachelor degrees or higher attained by 54% ofhousehold heads; and married couples accounting for 86%. Consumers had purchased a total (rf499,800 weeks of Neva Ji timeshare as oT Jan. 1, 1997. Of these, 51% are in Las Vegas, 327o in the Lake Tahoe area, and 17% in Reno and elsewhere in the state. The study reports a total of 79,900 Nevada timeshare owners, indicating that many owners purchase multiple intervals. Las Vegas has the largest concentration of weeks sold, at 60,800, or approximately 51% of the state total. Lake Tahoe resorts report 38,300 intervals sold, or 32% of the state total. Reno and other areas of the'state represent 20,800 weeks, or 17% of the total, with most in the Reno area. The study is based on a national survey of 26 Nevada timeshare resorts and 1,143 households that own timeshares located in Nevada. It was conducted by Steven Miner Research & Appraisal, and the University of Southern California, with extensive data supplied by Interval International and Resort Condominiums International. As the professional association of the recreational real estate, resort and vacation ownership industry, ARDA serves nearly 1,000 member companies representing more than 4,000 resorts, and is based in Washington D.C. WANTED GRAPHIC ARTIST Must be fast and efficient in Macintosh PaiJeniaicer, Illustrator, Freehand, Quari( and Photoshop. Requirements: Kxcellent work ethics able to meet (leadlines. Full time • Salary with benefits --, Call 435-7700 for appointment. 2 Commerce Center, Henderson, NV village OaksL 2nd Year Voted 11 |M o r t g a g e 1 1„ CystOllief SeTVlCe i "We make Loans... Not Promises^^^^^^^^^ REFINANCING... YES! 100% FINANCING... YES! HOME LOANS. YES! CREDIT PROBLEMS. .YES! PREQUALIFICATIONS ..^ YES! YES! YES! Serving Arizona & Nevada with four offices 1(800) 819-3029 MBA #7848 UH^UEifM^ An EQLUII Hoi>Biro Opocxtuoftv LnntMi tSj D ESIDENT'S DAY VALUES! eUAMNTEED $ Good Quality at a Low Price! IQ 195B13.... fO 15/10113.. iss/nns. ISS/IOITM. icrai mntmu. iriivlyTii liliUllhlUHflifTilhlkl SwV' W^ wtnh W!^^^' $^09o P1IS/6INra. • #^ P1t5/9015. in/VMM nt5/MRi5. iMnnotaMiiti/MQi nos/Boms. .23MI .2IJt .njt .MJ8 j .33Jl| I I I I I Trade-in! Light Trucl( Special 49J8 41J8 59.9S S{J| >0nasetor4Preminni| Big 0 Brand Tires I MMmtMcMPMtmratZ/n/H I kOQ nis/nwis SBJ8 |90 2n8.50B14 ^flQaO 2n8.50B14 SIM • •O 3IM8.S0815 7188 pmmiiis 3ttie50Bi5....iiJ8 I itoMl • • • uni IT28S/ISB18....7IJ8 EVERY i BIG 0 BRAND TIRE INCLUDES: • FtEE Rolilioni Every 5000 MiUi • flEE Ufttim* Flat Rtpairt • FKEE lilttim* Air Pri 3*r; ei I Wheel Service I TTFT HENDERSON/GREEN VALLEY PECOS & WINDMILL 170 N.Pecos BOULDER HWY & MAJOR AVE. 828 S. Boulder Hwy. EAST SIDE BONANZA & NELLIS 787 N.Nellis Blvd FUMINGO & BOULDER HWY.4728 E. Ramingo Rd WEST SIDE UKE MEAD & DECATUR 1965 N. Decatur RANCHO ft CRAIG 4520 N Rancho DESERT INN ft JONES 3303 S Jones PAHRUMP PAHRUMP1301 E. NV. State Hwy. 372 /tf^B/C!uZaSi;?fjttf^/^0/f ovu 400 loamns m m u.s. AM UMUM I 263-9333 "' mTAHifmHcm! 438-3282 4S1-2208 647-6020 6S6-7499 873-6410 727-8400 .AM.iJff ^.r^-' WHAfs PLAYING February 12-13, 1998 Panorama Pag* 13 Chamber Orchestra to perform Nevada Chamber Symphony wUl present the Amadeus Chamber Orchestra in concert at 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 15, in the Main Theatre of the Clark County Library, 1401 E .FlMnii^ Road. Admission is free. ., This is the third community concert to be presented by the Nevada Chamber Symphony featuring the junior ensemble of the professional orchestra, founded in 1993. Amadeus members benefit from the educationaLoutreach services offered by the Nevada Chamber Symphony. Conductor Rodolfo Fernandez donates his services as conductor and music director of the student ensemble, and tutorial assistance is provided by the principals of the Chamber Symphony: Concertmistress DeAnn Burger, violistMaiy Trimble, and cellist Barbara Gurley. Students attend weekly rehearsals and workshops throughout the year to develop musical talents and experience Membership in the Amadeus is free and open to all interested students at regular auditions. Funding is provided by the Nevada Chamber Symphony with the assistance and support of the VioUn Outlet. For more information, call 433-9280. Ballerina to be honored Renowned American ballerina Cynthia Gregory will be honored at a charity dinner for the American Dance company Feb. 21, at the Alexis Park Resort. The dinner will cost $100 per person or $750 for a table of eight, with all proceeds going to a newly formed Las Vegas-based dance company. The American Dance company, founded by Linda de Becker Shoemaker, was created to offer professional experience and exposure to male and female dancers ages 15 and up. The company, to be comprised of approximately 15 dancers, will perform locally and through California. In addition to Gregory, other honorees will be VassiU Sulich, the founder and former artistic director of the Nevada Dance Theatre and AssembljTTian Harry Mortenson and his wife Helen who have actively supported the arts in the community for 35 years. Shoemaker most recently held the position of director for the Academy of Nevada Dance Theatre, where she was responsible for coordinating and choreographing numerous concerts and pubUc appearances for student dancers. Her career has included performing and choreographing throughout Europe £md the U.S. and training ballet students. Co-artistic director and choreographer of The American Dance Company is Maria Pogee, a native of Buenos Aires and a graduate of the Theater Cervantes and Theater Colon. For more information, call Shoemaker, (888) 298-2998. French ballet to perform The Ballet du Capitole de Toulouse will perform at 8 p.m. Feb. 15, at Ham Concert Hall on the UNLV campus. The progreun will include "Scotch Sjmiphony" and "Rubies," choreographed by George Balanchine, and "Troy Game," choreographed by Robert North. According to the ballet's director of dance,Nanette Glushak, "Troy Game" was created for the dance company. The Theatre du Capitole in Toulouse, France, holds an audience of 1,150 and employs 286 people, including a ballet company of 50 dancers and a permanent choir of 45. Glushak, bom in New York City, trained at the School of American Ballet. She was invited by George Balanchine to join the New York City Ballet in 1968. In 1970, she joined the American Ballet Theatre and two years later was promoted to soloist. A French resident, Glushak has staged Balanchine and classical repertoire for the Dutch National Ballet, English National Ballet, Royal Ballet of Flanders, the Berlin Opera Ballet, the Norwegiem National Ballet, the Rome Opera Ballet, and La Scala Opera Ballet. KLVX TV-10 is the television sponsor of the UNLV Performing Arts Center 1997-1998 Production Series. Tickets—from $13.75 to $33.75—are available at the UNLV Performing Arts Center Box Office, 895-3801, or at Dillard's, 6549545, with discounts for students, seniors, mihtary and disabled. Max Carl & Big Dance to play Sunset Station Max Carl Max Carl & Big Dance, with special guest Glenn Frey, take the Club Madrid stage at 10 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 14, and 8 p.m., Sunday, Feb. 15. Tickets—$22.50 and $50— are available at all Ticketmaster and Allstate locations. Fr. Guido Sai-ducci will appear at 8 pm., Saturday, Feb. 14, in a separate performance. Tickets are $15 and $20, also at Ticketmaster and Allstate, or at the hotel's VIP Experience Center. Carl earned recognition as founder, singer and writer for the, Los Angeles-based Mack and the' Heart Attack, a '708 and "808 soul act. He has performed with Elton John, Bonnie Raitt and Rod Stewart, and with The Eagles' star Frey. The 11-piece Big Dance band includes some of Nashville's finest studio players. Frey is a foimding member of The Eagles, which combined the souinds of contemporary country and rock 'n' roll. "Big Dance is workin progress," Carl said. "We combirieR&B withSouthern folk traditions." The Shakespearean Festival adds pcftermances Extra performances of the popular "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat" have been added this season at the Utah Shakespearean Festival. A late show on Saturdays from July 18 through Sept. 5 is now available. On those Saturday evenings, the musical will show at both 7:30 and 10 p.m.. Tickets for the 10 p.m. performance are being sold at a $3 discount. "This is a great opportunity to see the original version of this wonderful musical," said Fred C. Adams, who will direct the show. "It will be suitable for all ages and will leave you singing all the way home." According to Donna Law, Festival marketing and public relations director, good tickets for any performance are still available, but activity at the Box Office has been brisk. Prices range fi^m $19 to $38, and tickets can be ordered by calling 800-PLAYTIX; by mail at Box Office, Ut€ih Shakespearean Festival, 351W. Center St., Cedar City, UT 84720; or on the Internet, www.bard.org. fainS has beecTjmned on-stage recently by Sheryl Crow, Don Henley and Bruce Springsteen. VAtENTINE Frorr, Page 2^._ buddies figure out a really satisfying solution. The characters in the Himdred Acre Woods are as endearing as ever in this precious story. Another cozy story for the very young is "IfYou Were My Bunny," by Kate McMullan (1996, ages 3 to 6). In this beautifully crafted book, a mother is putting her young son to bed as she gently explains how she would love and care for him just the same if he was a bunny, a kitten, a bear, a duck, or a puppy. This is a book to hold close to your heart. Happy Reading! Spotti, a long-time Henderson resident who is a librarian at Sewell Elementary School, makes reconnmenaations orr children's literature, ^ ,,','"'"'"'':'J''*flS£,'' ." All DIGITAL SOUNiy FORMATS • Slarcade video game entertainment rooms V,^^ • I \1 | ^J 1V X • Rocking chair loge seating witticuptioider armrests -j^, r ATDCC • Cafe Cinema for espresso drinks & gourmet desserts i H L A I K L J $4 Bargain Shows In () AH sttows startlns before 6pfn For showtimes call 222 FILM Press fl -jnd Code located next to ttieatre below http://wAv.centurytheatres com Century Orleans 12 227 3456 or 222FILM #769 TROPICANA AVE & ARVILIE IN THE ORLEANS HOTEL JUST WES T OF T HE STRIP & 1-15 JH\ On All Screens All Stadium Seatinq tJJ (PG-13) SPHERE On 2 Scieens AJI Shorn In THX ADrCITAL Sound Ffi Sun .(11 45-1 \bHi-* 1S-545CTTnf Fn iSal. 7:15*45-1015H:45 Sunday 7 15-8:4S-10 15 Mills • Fn-Sui 11220-2 40-505) 72S945DIGrTAL TR7 (PG-13) TITINIC On 3 Screens All Shorn In THX / DIGITAL Sound Fn -Sun. (1250-2 10-340-500) Fn -Sun 6 20-7 45-9 10-10 30 As GOOD ,pG,3) AS IT GETS' Fn Sun (110-405)700-955DTALTRY Cinedome 12 Las Vesas 362-2133 or 222-flLM753 LAS VEGAS • DECATUR S WEST DESERT INN ROAD "KPUCimHT • Mjuas On 7 Screens AH Show* In THX OIOITAL Sound fn &SaI ( 12 10 2^5-4,3517 10-9 20-11 30 On 7 Scrn AU snow* tn THX / CXOITAL Seuntf Sunday ( 12 10 2 25-4 35) 7 10-9 20 fn Sun 1 OOP M 'P^ITATIONS <"' Fn Sun I 11 J6? 154SO)7 JO-IOOSOOim DEEP RISING'"' fn Sun I 1?X? WS 10) 7 X>-9 WD KtfTM ^ IMK ZERO EFFECT" fn Sui MPOO-JJS-5 10) ? 50-10 JSOMIIU. WIGIDOG' fn • Sun 112 15-2 < 55) J 20-9 SOOKMTM. Rancho Santa Fe 16 ^ 1645-5518 or 222-FILM764 *• NORTH LAS VEGAS • RANCHO ROAD & NORTH RAINBOW BiVD On 2 Screens All Shom In DIGITAL Sound Fn-Sun (12051 05-205-3O5-405-5O5) Fn • Sun 6;05-7fl5-8<-9:05-10O5 Fn -Sun (120-420)720-10 lODWrTAL (R) HUNTING On 2 Screens All Shows In DIGITAL Sound Fn.-Sun (11 55-100-2 35-3 40-510) Fn -Sun 6.20-7 50-9OO-10 30 AS GOOD jGoor ITGEI lPG-13) AS IT GETS On 2 Screens All Shoot In OIGrrAL Sound Fn -Sun (1200-1 35-2 50-435-545) Fn Sun 7,15-8.35-10 05 (R) Mma Fn • Sun (12 10-2 00-3 50-5 40) 7 30-9 25 OIGrrAL (R) On 2 Screens Al Slum In DICnAL Sound Fn-Sun (1225-1 25-240-335-455-550) Fn • Sun 705-805-9 25-10:20 (R) FALLEN Fn -Sun ( I 30)7 15 OlCrtAL• Plus • Fn -Sun (4 05)9 50 DIGITAL (IT. 1.1) jKiddingSinger On 3 Screens All Show In CMOITAi. Sound Fn-Sun ( 11 SO. 12 40-1 00-2 UO) Fn Sun (2 40-3 10-4 ( • < 40-6 10-6 00) Fn Sui 640-7 1^800-6408 I0-10OO 1030 (PG-ni Fn Sji 1 I ?l>3 30.'j<^)aUO10 10OIOnl. cxx)i)Wiii.,p, HUNTING On 2 Screens AD SItowa In OlOITAi Sound Fn Sun ( 11 30 12 2!>2 15-3 15-5 05) Fn t Sal 6 05-7 40 9 00 10 15-11 IS Sundey 6 05-7 40.9 00-10 15 (R) FniSal (11 45-2 10-4-25)715-925-11 25 DIGITAL Sunday (11 45210-4 25) 7 t5925t)l0rTAL SPICE (PG) FnSun |1 l532O-535)75O-10O50iaTAl MMti m Fn-Sui 11230-255-520)74510 lOOGITAL Fn-Sun (12152 30-4 45)700-9 ISOIOTAL ivi^Alft>o Fn -Sun (12 50-2 45) (PG) DIGITAL ]r\L\y^ciL\y\ (PG 13) Fn Sun (4 45)7 30-1015 DIGITAL AMISTADFn-Sun (1230-400)7 10-10 ISOtOTTAL NIGHTS Fn -Sun (1256-400)700-lOOOOIQfTAL Century Desert 16 ^.i 641-2500 Of 222 FILM K752 ^-^ -^ IAS VEGAS • LAMB Bl VD BETWEEN SAHARA & BOULDER HWY FnJSsI (12 55-310-555) 7 35 9 30-11M DIGITAL Sindav (12 55-310-5 25) 7 35-9 30DionAL Surprise your sweetie with a tin juU of tasty treats! VALENTINE'S SWEETS IN A TIN? V ..ON ALL HAND PAYS EXCEEDING HOO OR MORE* (PQt3) I On 2 Screens I Shorn H OKUT/U. Sound I Fn Sun (11 45-1 06 2 35-4 05-5 ?0I Fn • Sun 6 45-7 56-9 40-10 30 Cinedome 12 Henderson A. 1457 3700 or 222-FILM (>755 ^^ IHENDFRSON & GREEN VAllEV • BOULDER HWV AT GREENWAV RD Fn-Sui III55-220-4(5)705-935I>G(TAL jPHEriE*'^" =1 Fn SJI I 12 15 2 45 5 20) 55 10 300101*1 (PCI Fn bun (1220-2 30 4 351 7 30-9 45 OtOiWl ^^ddingSinger;.. Fn Sun ( 120^2 4 401 7 1S9 J50MTi (PG n. On 2 Screens AH Sfteies w OIOITAL Sound Fn Son ( 11 60-1 00 3 40-S 10) Fn Sun 7 50 9 20 L,CXM')\^'IIL,M, HUNTIN(, Fn Sun [ I 36 4 ;wi 7 10 IQ OOOtolTAt BE MY VALENTINE TIN WITH 12 OZ, OF GUMMY HEARTS While supplies last. w^^v>% 1741 aBouMcrnwy. (SouUiorSuiiet)llendcraon.l1V890l5 AS GOOD ,pt, ,„ AS n GETS fn Sw'I 1 lS-4 ISI ^ 20 10 ISOIOITAI. Redrock 11 670 1423 Of 222 FILM ;54 (AS VEGAS • 5201 W(ST CHARIESTON (PO 13) fn Sun t 11 <&-??5-S05l MS-10'QQKliTK Fn Sun r W),7 4|>IO20a () f..-S^. M 06 3.M) 7 0S.:5O IK3HTS FIL ai I 12.30-3:301 7 QS-IOlOa iFrt. km (1?1V23^445)7001S1 Fr Sun ( t? 55) / 10 FALLEN Fr Sur( t? 55) / H' 3U *niu AMISTAD Sur^ I 1 QC 4 00. .-UP 10 00 (BOW C^l fn Sun I im.is-aooi icem Fr S.^ 7li-i> 'n ^^ i0 3JO-sjm wo Fn atn r n-iO:Oo TITINIC On3ScrMns AH Sheas In 0KTAL Sound Fn -Sun (12:30-2 35-4 201 Fn -Sun 6 20-810-1010 Fn-Sun (1 30-525)9 10 TTO On 2 Screens All Shoos In DIGITAL Sound Fn-Sun (1210-120-2 30-335-445-555) Fn iSal 700-8 10-9 M-lO 10-1130 Sunday 7 00-8 10-9 30-10 10 (PG.13) On 2 Screens An Shorn In DIGITAL Sound Fn -Sun (1215-135-2 50-4 05-5 20) Fn iSal 6.35-7 50-9 05-10 20-11 40 Sunday 6 35-7 50-905-10 20 DEEP RISING (R) Fn Sir (1215250.520|'75O1020tGnAL (PG) Fn-Sui (1225-300-SX)eO&10XaaTAL Fn Stfi ( 1215-2 50-5 20) DWITAL (G) Fn -Sun ( 1 15-4 10I700-9.S50ITAJ. R) TammmHtmBIm (PGH) W( Fn -Sun 7 50-10 20 OKSITAL GOLD COAST TWIN^,,^^^^'*;' <,/t OOBAer.AiNMA'.NKMvis.aA' ZZZ-riLIVl W#OU All jMows euom : fLAMINGOAT VALlfy Vi AM SHOWSyc PRISENTCOINTRX ETD ffli^ O,;,;^*';:^:^ Fn Sun 100-3 30-5 55-8 30IHTTnt the sweet ,„, hereafter" Fr. Sx 10O-} 10-5^7 3M40DBnAlTR? Las Vcsds Drive-Ins or ':Q'2 FILM (17^1 fr : :, PMm SUN-6 3C • • or 646 3565 Chudttn Ur-Oi-r 12 fRFt L.; r. •• LAS VEGAS .W CARfV AT RANCHO A SMOKE RANCH • SPHERE(PGi3l PVrtFAUEN(R) THE WEOOM SMBCRlKi-iS-Pta SWCE WORU)|PQ) 4 TME Nmjicar Kuatra-taM AICMCAN VCIKWXf M NM|(R) BLUES BROTHERS MtlPG-13VI HAlf BAKED (R) DESPERATE MEASURES |R1 DEEPHWMO(R) T1TAMC(P6-t3) Plui M0UT(P6-13) hows Lvery Iridiiy A bdturday dnd up to b ddy valid For Friday, 2 13 Thru Sunday, 215 Only • = N

PAGE 31

Page 12 Panorama February 12-13, 1998 Nevada timeshare industry reports sales of $117 million Nevada timeshare sales1eae> • • •Graphic Design •NCR Forms •Stamps •Envelopes For All Your Printing & Copy Needs, We now offer VPS Services for your convenience. Henderson S(ore only 6 W. Pacific Avc. MOTOROLA PAGERS your pager package includes: •PAGER 'FREE ACTIVATION •2 MONTHS OF BASIC SERVICE Store Details 2 LOCATIONS TO SERUE YOU IN GKUN VALUY 2827 GREEN VALLEY PKWY. 435-7761 (fax)435-7828 IN HENDERSON 6 W. PACIFIC AVE. 568-5980 (fax)564-3580 Nevada owners include the following: a median household income of $69,000, or nearly twice the national average; a median age of household head of 53 years; bachelor degrees or higher attained by 54% ofhousehold heads; and married couples accounting for 86%. Consumers had purchased a total (rf499,800 weeks of Neva Ji timeshare as oT Jan. 1, 1997. Of these, 51% are in Las Vegas, 327o in the Lake Tahoe area, and 17% in Reno and elsewhere in the state. The study reports a total of 79,900 Nevada timeshare owners, indicating that many owners purchase multiple intervals. Las Vegas has the largest concentration of weeks sold, at 60,800, or approximately 51% of the state total. Lake Tahoe resorts report 38,300 intervals sold, or 32% of the state total. Reno and other areas of the'state represent 20,800 weeks, or 17% of the total, with most in the Reno area. The study is based on a national survey of 26 Nevada timeshare resorts and 1,143 households that own timeshares located in Nevada. It was conducted by Steven Miner Research & Appraisal, and the University of Southern California, with extensive data supplied by Interval International and Resort Condominiums International. As the professional association of the recreational real estate, resort and vacation ownership industry, ARDA serves nearly 1,000 member companies representing more than 4,000 resorts, and is based in Washington D.C. WANTED GRAPHIC ARTIST Must be fast and efficient in Macintosh PaiJeniaicer, Illustrator, Freehand, Quari( and Photoshop. Requirements: Kxcellent work ethics able to meet (leadlines. Full time • Salary with benefits --, Call 435-7700 for appointment. 2 Commerce Center, Henderson, NV village OaksL 2nd Year Voted 11 |M o r t g a g e 1 1„ CystOllief SeTVlCe i "We make Loans... Not Promises^^^^^^^^^ REFINANCING... YES! 100% FINANCING... YES! HOME LOANS. YES! CREDIT PROBLEMS. .YES! PREQUALIFICATIONS ..^ YES! YES! YES! Serving Arizona & Nevada with four offices 1(800) 819-3029 MBA #7848 UH^UEifM^ An EQLUII Hoi>Biro Opocxtuoftv LnntMi tSj D ESIDENT'S DAY VALUES! eUAMNTEED $ Good Quality at a Low Price! IQ 195B13.... fO 15/10113.. iss/nns. ISS/IOITM. icrai mntmu. iriivlyTii liliUllhlUHflifTilhlkl SwV' W^ wtnh W!^^^' $^09o P1IS/6INra. • #^ P1t5/9015. in/VMM nt5/MRi5. iMnnotaMiiti/MQi nos/Boms. .23MI .2IJt .njt .MJ8 j .33Jl| I I I I I Trade-in! Light Trucl( Special 49J8 41J8 59.9S S{J| >0nasetor4Preminni| Big 0 Brand Tires I MMmtMcMPMtmratZ/n/H I kOQ nis/nwis SBJ8 |90 2n8.50B14 ^flQaO 2n8.50B14 SIM • •O 3IM8.S0815 7188 pmmiiis 3ttie50Bi5....iiJ8 I itoMl • • • uni IT28S/ISB18....7IJ8 EVERY i BIG 0 BRAND TIRE INCLUDES: • FtEE Rolilioni Every 5000 MiUi • flEE Ufttim* Flat Rtpairt • FKEE lilttim* Air Pri 3*r; ei I Wheel Service I TTFT HENDERSON/GREEN VALLEY PECOS & WINDMILL 170 N.Pecos BOULDER HWY & MAJOR AVE. 828 S. Boulder Hwy. EAST SIDE BONANZA & NELLIS 787 N.Nellis Blvd FUMINGO & BOULDER HWY.4728 E. Ramingo Rd WEST SIDE UKE MEAD & DECATUR 1965 N. Decatur RANCHO ft CRAIG 4520 N Rancho DESERT INN ft JONES 3303 S Jones PAHRUMP PAHRUMP1301 E. NV. State Hwy. 372 /tf^B/C!uZaSi;?fjttf^/^0/f ovu 400 loamns m m u.s. AM UMUM I 263-9333 "' mTAHifmHcm! 438-3282 4S1-2208 647-6020 6S6-7499 873-6410 727-8400 .AM.iJff ^.r^-' WHAfs PLAYING February 12-13, 1998 Panorama Pag* 13 Chamber Orchestra to perform Nevada Chamber Symphony wUl present the Amadeus Chamber Orchestra in concert at 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 15, in the Main Theatre of the Clark County Library, 1401 E .FlMnii^ Road. Admission is free. ., This is the third community concert to be presented by the Nevada Chamber Symphony featuring the junior ensemble of the professional orchestra, founded in 1993. Amadeus members benefit from the educationaLoutreach services offered by the Nevada Chamber Symphony. Conductor Rodolfo Fernandez donates his services as conductor and music director of the student ensemble, and tutorial assistance is provided by the principals of the Chamber Symphony: Concertmistress DeAnn Burger, violistMaiy Trimble, and cellist Barbara Gurley. Students attend weekly rehearsals and workshops throughout the year to develop musical talents and experience Membership in the Amadeus is free and open to all interested students at regular auditions. Funding is provided by the Nevada Chamber Symphony with the assistance and support of the VioUn Outlet. For more information, call 433-9280. Ballerina to be honored Renowned American ballerina Cynthia Gregory will be honored at a charity dinner for the American Dance company Feb. 21, at the Alexis Park Resort. The dinner will cost $100 per person or $750 for a table of eight, with all proceeds going to a newly formed Las Vegas-based dance company. The American Dance company, founded by Linda de Becker Shoemaker, was created to offer professional experience and exposure to male and female dancers ages 15 and up. The company, to be comprised of approximately 15 dancers, will perform locally and through California. In addition to Gregory, other honorees will be VassiU Sulich, the founder and former artistic director of the Nevada Dance Theatre and AssembljTTian Harry Mortenson and his wife Helen who have actively supported the arts in the community for 35 years. Shoemaker most recently held the position of director for the Academy of Nevada Dance Theatre, where she was responsible for coordinating and choreographing numerous concerts and pubUc appearances for student dancers. Her career has included performing and choreographing throughout Europe £md the U.S. and training ballet students. Co-artistic director and choreographer of The American Dance Company is Maria Pogee, a native of Buenos Aires and a graduate of the Theater Cervantes and Theater Colon. For more information, call Shoemaker, (888) 298-2998. French ballet to perform The Ballet du Capitole de Toulouse will perform at 8 p.m. Feb. 15, at Ham Concert Hall on the UNLV campus. The progreun will include "Scotch Sjmiphony" and "Rubies," choreographed by George Balanchine, and "Troy Game," choreographed by Robert North. According to the ballet's director of dance,Nanette Glushak, "Troy Game" was created for the dance company. The Theatre du Capitole in Toulouse, France, holds an audience of 1,150 and employs 286 people, including a ballet company of 50 dancers and a permanent choir of 45. Glushak, bom in New York City, trained at the School of American Ballet. She was invited by George Balanchine to join the New York City Ballet in 1968. In 1970, she joined the American Ballet Theatre and two years later was promoted to soloist. A French resident, Glushak has staged Balanchine and classical repertoire for the Dutch National Ballet, English National Ballet, Royal Ballet of Flanders, the Berlin Opera Ballet, the Norwegiem National Ballet, the Rome Opera Ballet, and La Scala Opera Ballet. KLVX TV-10 is the television sponsor of the UNLV Performing Arts Center 1997-1998 Production Series. Tickets—from $13.75 to $33.75—are available at the UNLV Performing Arts Center Box Office, 895-3801, or at Dillard's, 6549545, with discounts for students, seniors, mihtary and disabled. Max Carl & Big Dance to play Sunset Station Max Carl Max Carl & Big Dance, with special guest Glenn Frey, take the Club Madrid stage at 10 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 14, and 8 p.m., Sunday, Feb. 15. Tickets—$22.50 and $50— are available at all Ticketmaster and Allstate locations. Fr. Guido Sai-ducci will appear at 8 pm., Saturday, Feb. 14, in a separate performance. Tickets are $15 and $20, also at Ticketmaster and Allstate, or at the hotel's VIP Experience Center. Carl earned recognition as founder, singer and writer for the, Los Angeles-based Mack and the' Heart Attack, a '708 and "808 soul act. He has performed with Elton John, Bonnie Raitt and Rod Stewart, and with The Eagles' star Frey. The 11-piece Big Dance band includes some of Nashville's finest studio players. Frey is a foimding member of The Eagles, which combined the souinds of contemporary country and rock 'n' roll. "Big Dance is workin progress," Carl said. "We combirieR&B withSouthern folk traditions." The Shakespearean Festival adds pcftermances Extra performances of the popular "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat" have been added this season at the Utah Shakespearean Festival. A late show on Saturdays from July 18 through Sept. 5 is now available. On those Saturday evenings, the musical will show at both 7:30 and 10 p.m.. Tickets for the 10 p.m. performance are being sold at a $3 discount. "This is a great opportunity to see the original version of this wonderful musical," said Fred C. Adams, who will direct the show. "It will be suitable for all ages and will leave you singing all the way home." According to Donna Law, Festival marketing and public relations director, good tickets for any performance are still available, but activity at the Box Office has been brisk. Prices range fi^m $19 to $38, and tickets can be ordered by calling 800-PLAYTIX; by mail at Box Office, Ut€ih Shakespearean Festival, 351W. Center St., Cedar City, UT 84720; or on the Internet, www.bard.org. fainS has beecTjmned on-stage recently by Sheryl Crow, Don Henley and Bruce Springsteen. VAtENTINE Frorr, Page 2^._ buddies figure out a really satisfying solution. The characters in the Himdred Acre Woods are as endearing as ever in this precious story. Another cozy story for the very young is "IfYou Were My Bunny," by Kate McMullan (1996, ages 3 to 6). In this beautifully crafted book, a mother is putting her young son to bed as she gently explains how she would love and care for him just the same if he was a bunny, a kitten, a bear, a duck, or a puppy. This is a book to hold close to your heart. Happy Reading! Spotti, a long-time Henderson resident who is a librarian at Sewell Elementary School, makes reconnmenaations orr children's literature, ^ ,,','"'"'"'':'J''*flS£,'' ." All DIGITAL SOUNiy FORMATS • Slarcade video game entertainment rooms V,^^ • I \1 | ^J 1V X • Rocking chair loge seating witticuptioider armrests -j^, r ATDCC • Cafe Cinema for espresso drinks & gourmet desserts i H L A I K L J $4 Bargain Shows In () AH sttows startlns before 6pfn For showtimes call 222 FILM Press fl -jnd Code located next to ttieatre below http://wAv.centurytheatres com Century Orleans 12 227 3456 or 222FILM #769 TROPICANA AVE & ARVILIE IN THE ORLEANS HOTEL JUST WES T OF T HE STRIP & 1-15 JH\ On All Screens All Stadium Seatinq tJJ (PG-13) SPHERE On 2 Scieens AJI Shorn In THX ADrCITAL Sound Ffi Sun .(11 45-1 \bHi-* 1S-545CTTnf Fn iSal. 7:15*45-1015H:45 Sunday 7 15-8:4S-10 15 Mills • Fn-Sui 11220-2 40-505) 72S945DIGrTAL TR7 (PG-13) TITINIC On 3 Screens All Shorn In THX / DIGITAL Sound Fn -Sun. (1250-2 10-340-500) Fn -Sun 6 20-7 45-9 10-10 30 As GOOD ,pG,3) AS IT GETS' Fn Sun (110-405)700-955DTALTRY Cinedome 12 Las Vesas 362-2133 or 222-flLM753 LAS VEGAS • DECATUR S WEST DESERT INN ROAD "KPUCimHT • Mjuas On 7 Screens AH Show* In THX OIOITAL Sound fn &SaI ( 12 10 2^5-4,3517 10-9 20-11 30 On 7 Scrn AU snow* tn THX / CXOITAL Seuntf Sunday ( 12 10 2 25-4 35) 7 10-9 20 fn Sun 1 OOP M 'P^ITATIONS <"' Fn Sun I 11 J6? 154SO)7 JO-IOOSOOim DEEP RISING'"' fn Sun I 1?X? WS 10) 7 X>-9 WD KtfTM ^ IMK ZERO EFFECT" fn Sui MPOO-JJS-5 10) ? 50-10 JSOMIIU. WIGIDOG' fn • Sun 112 15-2 < 55) J 20-9 SOOKMTM. Rancho Santa Fe 16 ^ 1645-5518 or 222-FILM764 *• NORTH LAS VEGAS • RANCHO ROAD & NORTH RAINBOW BiVD On 2 Screens All Shom In DIGITAL Sound Fn-Sun (12051 05-205-3O5-405-5O5) Fn • Sun 6;05-7fl5-8<-9:05-10O5 Fn -Sun (120-420)720-10 lODWrTAL (R) HUNTING On 2 Screens All Shows In DIGITAL Sound Fn.-Sun (11 55-100-2 35-3 40-510) Fn -Sun 6.20-7 50-9OO-10 30 AS GOOD jGoor ITGEI lPG-13) AS IT GETS On 2 Screens All Shoot In OIGrrAL Sound Fn -Sun (1200-1 35-2 50-435-545) Fn Sun 7,15-8.35-10 05 (R) Mma Fn • Sun (12 10-2 00-3 50-5 40) 7 30-9 25 OIGrrAL (R) On 2 Screens Al Slum In DICnAL Sound Fn-Sun (1225-1 25-240-335-455-550) Fn • Sun 705-805-9 25-10:20 (R) FALLEN Fn -Sun ( I 30)7 15 OlCrtAL• Plus • Fn -Sun (4 05)9 50 DIGITAL (IT. 1.1) jKiddingSinger On 3 Screens All Show In CMOITAi. Sound Fn-Sun ( 11 SO. 12 40-1 00-2 UO) Fn Sun (2 40-3 10-4 ( • < 40-6 10-6 00) Fn Sui 640-7 1^800-6408 I0-10OO 1030 (PG-ni Fn Sji 1 I ?l>3 30.'j<^)aUO10 10OIOnl. cxx)i)Wiii.,p, HUNTING On 2 Screens AD SItowa In OlOITAi Sound Fn Sun ( 11 30 12 2!>2 15-3 15-5 05) Fn t Sal 6 05-7 40 9 00 10 15-11 IS Sundey 6 05-7 40.9 00-10 15 (R) FniSal (11 45-2 10-4-25)715-925-11 25 DIGITAL Sunday (11 45210-4 25) 7 t5925t)l0rTAL SPICE (PG) FnSun |1 l532O-535)75O-10O50iaTAl MMti m Fn-Sui 11230-255-520)74510 lOOGITAL Fn-Sun (12152 30-4 45)700-9 ISOIOTAL ivi^Alft>o Fn -Sun (12 50-2 45) (PG) DIGITAL ]r\L\y^ciL\y\ (PG 13) Fn Sun (4 45)7 30-1015 DIGITAL AMISTADFn-Sun (1230-400)7 10-10 ISOtOTTAL NIGHTS Fn -Sun (1256-400)700-lOOOOIQfTAL Century Desert 16 ^.i 641-2500 Of 222 FILM K752 ^-^ -^ IAS VEGAS • LAMB Bl VD BETWEEN SAHARA & BOULDER HWY FnJSsI (12 55-310-555) 7 35 9 30-11M DIGITAL Sindav (12 55-310-5 25) 7 35-9 30DionAL Surprise your sweetie with a tin juU of tasty treats! VALENTINE'S SWEETS IN A TIN? V ..ON ALL HAND PAYS EXCEEDING HOO OR MORE* (PQt3) I On 2 Screens I Shorn H OKUT/U. Sound I Fn Sun (11 45-1 06 2 35-4 05-5 ?0I Fn • Sun 6 45-7 56-9 40-10 30 Cinedome 12 Henderson A. 1457 3700 or 222-FILM (>755 ^^ IHENDFRSON & GREEN VAllEV • BOULDER HWV AT GREENWAV RD Fn-Sui III55-220-4(5)705-935I>G(TAL jPHEriE*'^" =1 Fn SJI I 12 15 2 45 5 20) 55 10 300101*1 (PCI Fn bun (1220-2 30 4 351 7 30-9 45 OtOiWl ^^ddingSinger;.. Fn Sun ( 120^2 4 401 7 1S9 J50MTi (PG n. On 2 Screens AH Sfteies w OIOITAL Sound Fn Son ( 11 60-1 00 3 40-S 10) Fn Sun 7 50 9 20 L,CXM')\^'IIL,M, HUNTIN(, Fn Sun [ I 36 4 ;wi 7 10 IQ OOOtolTAt BE MY VALENTINE TIN WITH 12 OZ, OF GUMMY HEARTS While supplies last. w^^v>% 1741 aBouMcrnwy. (SouUiorSuiiet)llendcraon.l1V890l5 AS GOOD ,pt, ,„ AS n GETS fn Sw'I 1 lS-4 ISI ^ 20 10 ISOIOITAI. Redrock 11 670 1423 Of 222 FILM ;54 (AS VEGAS • 5201 W(ST CHARIESTON (PO 13) fn Sun t 11 <&-??5-S05l MS-10'QQKliTK Fn Sun r W),7 4|>IO20a () f..-S^. M 06 3.M) 7 0S.:5O IK3HTS FIL ai I 12.30-3:301 7 QS-IOlOa iFrt. km (1?1V23^445)7001S1 Fr Sun ( t? 55) / 10 FALLEN Fr Sur( t? 55) / H' 3U *niu AMISTAD Sur^ I 1 QC 4 00. .-UP 10 00 (BOW C^l fn Sun I im.is-aooi icem Fr S.^ 7li-i> 'n ^^ i0 3JO-sjm wo Fn atn r n-iO:Oo TITINIC On3ScrMns AH Sheas In 0KTAL Sound Fn -Sun (12:30-2 35-4 201 Fn -Sun 6 20-810-1010 Fn-Sun (1 30-525)9 10 TTO On 2 Screens All Shoos In DIGITAL Sound Fn-Sun (1210-120-2 30-335-445-555) Fn iSal 700-8 10-9 M-lO 10-1130 Sunday 7 00-8 10-9 30-10 10 (PG.13) On 2 Screens An Shorn In DIGITAL Sound Fn -Sun (1215-135-2 50-4 05-5 20) Fn iSal 6.35-7 50-9 05-10 20-11 40 Sunday 6 35-7 50-905-10 20 DEEP RISING (R) Fn Sir (1215250.520|'75O1020tGnAL (PG) Fn-Sui (1225-300-SX)eO&10XaaTAL Fn Stfi ( 1215-2 50-5 20) DWITAL (G) Fn -Sun ( 1 15-4 10I700-9.S50ITAJ. R) TammmHtmBIm (PGH) W( Fn -Sun 7 50-10 20 OKSITAL GOLD COAST TWIN^,,^^^^'*;' <,/t OOBAer.AiNMA'.NKMvis.aA' ZZZ-riLIVl W#OU All jMows euom : fLAMINGOAT VALlfy Vi AM SHOWSyc PRISENTCOINTRX ETD ffli^ O,;,;^*';:^:^ Fn Sun 100-3 30-5 55-8 30IHTTnt the sweet ,„, hereafter" Fr. Sx 10O-} 10-5^7 3M40DBnAlTR? Las Vcsds Drive-Ins or ':Q'2 FILM (17^1 fr : :, PMm SUN-6 3C • • or 646 3565 Chudttn Ur-Oi-r 12 fRFt L.; r. •• LAS VEGAS .W CARfV AT RANCHO A SMOKE RANCH • SPHERE(PGi3l PVrtFAUEN(R) THE WEOOM SMBCRlKi-iS-Pta SWCE WORU)|PQ) 4 TME Nmjicar Kuatra-taM AICMCAN VCIKWXf M NM|(R) BLUES BROTHERS MtlPG-13VI HAlf BAKED (R) DESPERATE MEASURES |R1 DEEPHWMO(R) T1TAMC(P6-t3) Plui M0UT(P6-13) hows Lvery Iridiiy A bdturday dnd up to b ddy valid For Friday, 2 13 Thru Sunday, 215 Only • = N

PAGE 32

February 12-13,1998 Panorama Page 15 Page 14 Panorama February 12-13, 1998 DEAR DEBBIE HOROSCOPE DEBORAH WHITE Dear Debbie: My husband is bored with his job, hates aging and I'm afraid he's ripe for an affair. Sound familiar? Yep, he's going through his midlife crisis. People seem to thinlt it's funny, but I'm scared to death. I've seen so many families and marriages destroyed by this, and I'm afraid I'm next. ""^^^ What can I do to help ease him through this difficult phase of life and not lose him in the process? WORRIED WIFE Dear W.W.: Your husband needs something new to engage him. That can be anything from taking up a new sport to running for political office. Help him sort out his wish list of things he always wanted to do but never got around to. Then help him lay out a game plan. But be prepared that whatever "it" is will mean he's exposed to a whole new circle of people. I advise you to bathere. w Dear Debbie: My parents we^iiever marriedndTOyifather took off before I was born. Now I'm in my 20s and I want to look for him, but my mother is against it. She's afraid he's a bum, and I'll turn out like that. She says he may even want nioney or for me to support him. I think he was a scared kid, and he may have straightened out. I tliink it's worth it, and I'm planning on trying to find him through the Internet. But I don't want to hurt my mom. What should I do? SEARCHING SON Dear S.S.: I'm with your mom on the risks, but I certainly understand your longing to locate your father. You can try to protect yourself Ifyou find him, make the contact in stages. Speak to him at length several times, gathering more information each time. Write everything down. Then discuss what he told you about his life with your mother, and decide ifyou want to leave it at that or meet him. He could be a total liar, of course, but that's the chance you take. Write to Dear Debbie, P.O. Box 4328, Chicago, 111. 60680. 1998, Tribune Media Services Dear Debbie: My parents we^iiever married -andmyifather took Write to Dear Debbie, P.O. Box 4328, Chicago, '. offbefore I was born. Now I'm in my 20s and I want to look for him, but • 1998, Tribune Me Trying to escape the festive flu season ri„„ n,-.,„,„ Bi^i, I'd no sooner settled in my seat direction and honke '"CkTwo* M sure as ONCE OVER (Wch I'd ^b^ with a special ,„^. ath and ;„„= vn„ anrf I „r. I .^.^^ antiBcpt.c hanky) when I realized Just in case any Carolyn Drennan Bishop Mark my words: As sure as death and taxes, you and I are going to be exposed to the flu. I'm not a doctor, but I can tell you that all the medical experts agree with me that an important key to staying healthyjs washing your hands. Another sound piece of advice: Don't go jaunting off on any vacations. Forget aboilt your plane crashing into a an extra-tall tree, that's not what I'm talking about. First, trjang to squeeze into a shoe-box-sized restroom to give your hapiis*-that-extra'scrtjb is imp6ssible."All the other passengers are in there washing their hands and gargling with extrastrength Lysol. In the meantime, you are captive to the re-cycled germs wafling ONCE OVER LIGHTLY CAROLYN DRENNAN BISHOP through the cabin's ventilating .system. Not only that, all those dumb folks who don't know you shouldn't travel are on board and they are exhaling voluminous gusts of lOC^ approved Type A, B, C and D flu bugs. I know whereof I speak becauseJ recently made the mistake of trying to get away from it all and hopjDcd on a plane bound for San Diego. You guessed it. I soon discovered I'd arrived just in time to attend the festive California flu season. I'd no sooner settled in my seat (which I'd scrubbed with a special antiseptic hanky) when I realized Typhoid Mary was seated directly behind me. Mary coughed, sneezed, snorted and snuffled. Her seat-mate leaned over and introduced himself: "Hi! I'm Herb from Plains, New York. Try some of my medicine." It turned out Herb's medicine was a liquid manufactured from the oil of a recently deceased halibut. Silence ensued while I assume Mary and Herb engaged in a few snorts of liquid fish. In the meantime, it turned out Mary's twi n sister was seated next to me. Her symptoms were a little different. Her nose dripped and her face was the color of sea weed. Occasionally, she turned in my Courtney honored Colleen Courtney, director of The Foundation at University Medical Center, has been named the Humanitarian of the Year by the Independent Order of Foresters for her work with the Children's Miracle Network. The Children's Miracle Network is an international non-profit organization dedicated to raising funds for children's hospitals. The CMN prides itself on the fact that money raised in Nevada stays in Nevada. Courtney has been the director of the UMC Foundation for 13 years. St. Rose births announced Jan. 28,1998 Sara Rodriguez and Thomas Windsor, boy; Alicia Roy, boy. Jan. 29,1998 Michelle Mitchell and Joseph Engle, boy; Jean and Francis Rivera, boy; Mary and Sheldon Herbert, boy; Laura and Anthony Chanice, boy; Lori Collette, boy; Betty Carden and Brian Chappell, girl. Jan. 30,1998 Cynthia and George Shandrow, boy; Gina and Jozeff Hagler, boy; Margaret and Nevada Pettes, girl; Heather and Theodore Martell Jr., girl. Jan. 31,1998 Cindy Kikugawa, boy. Feb. 1,1998 Ronni and Ryan Nelson, boy. Feb. 2, 1998 Stacey Perry, girl; Rebecca and Gary Tobin, boy; Cammie-Lyn and Robert Voges, boy; Eileen and Terrell Bigelow, boy; Melanie and Michael Payne, twins (girl, boy); Jennifer and Hassan Faress, boy. Feb. 3,1998 Janet and John Gambatese, boy; Carrie and Christopher Lybarger, girl; Lisa and Edward Clark, girl. Feb. 4,1998 Vanessa and Jack Dittmer, girl; Deana and John Arendt, boy. Renata's Supper Club 4451 E. Sunset j^£ leUzers Maine Lobster Bisque serx'ed with CaesarSalad $8.00 Crab Cake on Mesclun Lettuce Grilled Gulf Prawns with l ^mon and Cocktail Sauce $12.0 0 Escargol infilo cup with garlic butter $10.75 Grilled Ostrich Medallion Black currant sauce Mesclun Lettuce $10.75 Baked Pepper) Salmon Cabernet Butter Sauce $20.50 : Balsamic vinaigrette $12.50 *£fltTCCS Filet of Beef Wellington Truffle sauce $29.75 Roast Rack of Lamb Diablo, Rosemary Demi Glace 22.50 Veal Medallion with Mixed Mushrooms Cardonnay Demigla< $22.50 Stuffed Chicken Breast with i ^Spinach and Fontina cheese. Marsala Sauce ; 16.75 .. • iM' I' 1.., All Entrees served withTomaloFloreniine, grilled zuccini and roasted potato. /?e. •^P/v< Hie NJ'""""1 SdH*^* 3^ direction and honked like a dying goose. Just in case any germs happened to pass me by, I don't want you to forget the circulating^ystem was in fiiU action making certain they came back around for another try. That evening, we went out to dinner at our favorite restaurant and that's when I made my next mistake. "So", I said to our waiters, "Did you all have a wontierful Christmas hohday?" It turned out everyone, includingthe cook, had been laid-low by the flu bug. (I think one of them was still in a weakened condition because I couldn't help notice his finger was slumped in the side of my soup bowl). It was a relief to come home. I guess I don't need to tell you that we arrived just in time for the onset of the Las Vegas flu season. LINDA BLACK Weekly Tip: We've got a shift from super intellectual to compassionate and emotional. If you're in the arts, you're going to do better after the sun goes into Pisces. Aries (March 21-April 19). Be watching for a financial opportunity. You could find a way to turn your money into lots more through the use of somebody else's. Taurus (April 20-May 20). Ifyou need a loan or scholarship, make your appUcations now. You'll be making all kinds of new friends soon. One of them, at least, could seem like a soul mate. Gemini (May 21-June 21). You will perform briUiantly. The lesson you're learning has more to do with intuition than obedience. Not only to do you need to do what's required; you have to figure out what that is. Cancer (June 22-July 22). It looks like you'd rather stay home in bed. Your enthusiasm starts to pick up, however. It's back to the old grind but you're lucky with just about everything. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22). It looks like education goes easily, so get a report written. You'll be able to find the information you need. That may not be the case soon, so don't procrastinate. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). These are good days for taking care of financial matters, including gathering up money somebody else owes you. Study. Your concentration will be at its best. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Make a commitment to a loved one. Your workload increases. Youll also notice your chances for making money are improving. Focus on that theme. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Youll be in power, except for a few minor irritations coming from your home environment. You're strong but still frustrated, soon you'll start getting your own way. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). A team effort should pay off pretty well. Study the manual to fix something at home. You'll want to spend more time at home. You might be feeling hassled. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). This week starts out kind of rough, with orders barked from an older person. Things get better as the week goes along, as friends show upi to play. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). Make a connection with a distant friend. You need the information and support. You should start noticing that it's possible for you to make a lot more money. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20). Your luck is definitely starting to improve. You'll notice that things get better. You start out stressed about money, but wind up more interested in where you're going to go. If You're Having a Birthday This Week: The first part of this year looks good for travel, but after that you're goi ng to have to get back down to business. Youll feel stuck at times, but persevere. 1998, Tribune Media services HUGE CLEARANCE 538 S. Bouldar Hwy. 921 S. Main St., L.V. (In Henderson Plaza between Basic & Major) (Juat North of Charleston on Main) 50% OFF Gigantic inventory of clothing for men, women and children. For more information call 564-7128 (Henderson) 383-1082 (Las Vegas) ft Opportunity Village Value Centers are operated by Opportunity Village Association tor Retarded Citizens, a local non-profit organization. 97c of every dollar raised goes directly to programs for adults with mental retardation. For pickup of donations call 383-5911. Uaacnmblc Ibcsr foor words, ODC Icitar to cadi fquare, to ronn foor by D.B.Donovan UTAP 'UU 1 1 1 NOICT n 1 LIKALA 1 n 1 n 1ENCAME 1:1:1 1 1 Vy/HM-THE t4EW w;
PAGE 33

February 12-13,1998 Panorama Page 15 Page 14 Panorama February 12-13, 1998 DEAR DEBBIE HOROSCOPE DEBORAH WHITE Dear Debbie: My husband is bored with his job, hates aging and I'm afraid he's ripe for an affair. Sound familiar? Yep, he's going through his midlife crisis. People seem to thinlt it's funny, but I'm scared to death. I've seen so many families and marriages destroyed by this, and I'm afraid I'm next. ""^^^ What can I do to help ease him through this difficult phase of life and not lose him in the process? WORRIED WIFE Dear W.W.: Your husband needs something new to engage him. That can be anything from taking up a new sport to running for political office. Help him sort out his wish list of things he always wanted to do but never got around to. Then help him lay out a game plan. But be prepared that whatever "it" is will mean he's exposed to a whole new circle of people. I advise you to bathere. w Dear Debbie: My parents we^iiever marriedndTOyifather took off before I was born. Now I'm in my 20s and I want to look for him, but my mother is against it. She's afraid he's a bum, and I'll turn out like that. She says he may even want nioney or for me to support him. I think he was a scared kid, and he may have straightened out. I tliink it's worth it, and I'm planning on trying to find him through the Internet. But I don't want to hurt my mom. What should I do? SEARCHING SON Dear S.S.: I'm with your mom on the risks, but I certainly understand your longing to locate your father. You can try to protect yourself Ifyou find him, make the contact in stages. Speak to him at length several times, gathering more information each time. Write everything down. Then discuss what he told you about his life with your mother, and decide ifyou want to leave it at that or meet him. He could be a total liar, of course, but that's the chance you take. Write to Dear Debbie, P.O. Box 4328, Chicago, 111. 60680. 1998, Tribune Media Services Dear Debbie: My parents we^iiever married -andmyifather took Write to Dear Debbie, P.O. Box 4328, Chicago, '. offbefore I was born. Now I'm in my 20s and I want to look for him, but • 1998, Tribune Me Trying to escape the festive flu season ri„„ n,-.,„,„ Bi^i, I'd no sooner settled in my seat direction and honke '"CkTwo* M sure as ONCE OVER (Wch I'd ^b^ with a special ,„^. ath and ;„„= vn„ anrf I „r. I .^.^^ antiBcpt.c hanky) when I realized Just in case any Carolyn Drennan Bishop Mark my words: As sure as death and taxes, you and I are going to be exposed to the flu. I'm not a doctor, but I can tell you that all the medical experts agree with me that an important key to staying healthyjs washing your hands. Another sound piece of advice: Don't go jaunting off on any vacations. Forget aboilt your plane crashing into a an extra-tall tree, that's not what I'm talking about. First, trjang to squeeze into a shoe-box-sized restroom to give your hapiis*-that-extra'scrtjb is imp6ssible."All the other passengers are in there washing their hands and gargling with extrastrength Lysol. In the meantime, you are captive to the re-cycled germs wafling ONCE OVER LIGHTLY CAROLYN DRENNAN BISHOP through the cabin's ventilating .system. Not only that, all those dumb folks who don't know you shouldn't travel are on board and they are exhaling voluminous gusts of lOC^ approved Type A, B, C and D flu bugs. I know whereof I speak becauseJ recently made the mistake of trying to get away from it all and hopjDcd on a plane bound for San Diego. You guessed it. I soon discovered I'd arrived just in time to attend the festive California flu season. I'd no sooner settled in my seat (which I'd scrubbed with a special antiseptic hanky) when I realized Typhoid Mary was seated directly behind me. Mary coughed, sneezed, snorted and snuffled. Her seat-mate leaned over and introduced himself: "Hi! I'm Herb from Plains, New York. Try some of my medicine." It turned out Herb's medicine was a liquid manufactured from the oil of a recently deceased halibut. Silence ensued while I assume Mary and Herb engaged in a few snorts of liquid fish. In the meantime, it turned out Mary's twi n sister was seated next to me. Her symptoms were a little different. Her nose dripped and her face was the color of sea weed. Occasionally, she turned in my Courtney honored Colleen Courtney, director of The Foundation at University Medical Center, has been named the Humanitarian of the Year by the Independent Order of Foresters for her work with the Children's Miracle Network. The Children's Miracle Network is an international non-profit organization dedicated to raising funds for children's hospitals. The CMN prides itself on the fact that money raised in Nevada stays in Nevada. Courtney has been the director of the UMC Foundation for 13 years. St. Rose births announced Jan. 28,1998 Sara Rodriguez and Thomas Windsor, boy; Alicia Roy, boy. Jan. 29,1998 Michelle Mitchell and Joseph Engle, boy; Jean and Francis Rivera, boy; Mary and Sheldon Herbert, boy; Laura and Anthony Chanice, boy; Lori Collette, boy; Betty Carden and Brian Chappell, girl. Jan. 30,1998 Cynthia and George Shandrow, boy; Gina and Jozeff Hagler, boy; Margaret and Nevada Pettes, girl; Heather and Theodore Martell Jr., girl. Jan. 31,1998 Cindy Kikugawa, boy. Feb. 1,1998 Ronni and Ryan Nelson, boy. Feb. 2, 1998 Stacey Perry, girl; Rebecca and Gary Tobin, boy; Cammie-Lyn and Robert Voges, boy; Eileen and Terrell Bigelow, boy; Melanie and Michael Payne, twins (girl, boy); Jennifer and Hassan Faress, boy. Feb. 3,1998 Janet and John Gambatese, boy; Carrie and Christopher Lybarger, girl; Lisa and Edward Clark, girl. Feb. 4,1998 Vanessa and Jack Dittmer, girl; Deana and John Arendt, boy. Renata's Supper Club 4451 E. Sunset j^£ leUzers Maine Lobster Bisque serx'ed with CaesarSalad $8.00 Crab Cake on Mesclun Lettuce Grilled Gulf Prawns with l ^mon and Cocktail Sauce $12.0 0 Escargol infilo cup with garlic butter $10.75 Grilled Ostrich Medallion Black currant sauce Mesclun Lettuce $10.75 Baked Pepper) Salmon Cabernet Butter Sauce $20.50 : Balsamic vinaigrette $12.50 *£fltTCCS Filet of Beef Wellington Truffle sauce $29.75 Roast Rack of Lamb Diablo, Rosemary Demi Glace 22.50 Veal Medallion with Mixed Mushrooms Cardonnay Demigla< $22.50 Stuffed Chicken Breast with i ^Spinach and Fontina cheese. Marsala Sauce ; 16.75 .. • iM' I' 1.., All Entrees served withTomaloFloreniine, grilled zuccini and roasted potato. /?e. •^P/v< Hie NJ'""""1 SdH*^* 3^ direction and honked like a dying goose. Just in case any germs happened to pass me by, I don't want you to forget the circulating^ystem was in fiiU action making certain they came back around for another try. That evening, we went out to dinner at our favorite restaurant and that's when I made my next mistake. "So", I said to our waiters, "Did you all have a wontierful Christmas hohday?" It turned out everyone, includingthe cook, had been laid-low by the flu bug. (I think one of them was still in a weakened condition because I couldn't help notice his finger was slumped in the side of my soup bowl). It was a relief to come home. I guess I don't need to tell you that we arrived just in time for the onset of the Las Vegas flu season. LINDA BLACK Weekly Tip: We've got a shift from super intellectual to compassionate and emotional. If you're in the arts, you're going to do better after the sun goes into Pisces. Aries (March 21-April 19). Be watching for a financial opportunity. You could find a way to turn your money into lots more through the use of somebody else's. Taurus (April 20-May 20). Ifyou need a loan or scholarship, make your appUcations now. You'll be making all kinds of new friends soon. One of them, at least, could seem like a soul mate. Gemini (May 21-June 21). You will perform briUiantly. The lesson you're learning has more to do with intuition than obedience. Not only to do you need to do what's required; you have to figure out what that is. Cancer (June 22-July 22). It looks like you'd rather stay home in bed. Your enthusiasm starts to pick up, however. It's back to the old grind but you're lucky with just about everything. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22). It looks like education goes easily, so get a report written. You'll be able to find the information you need. That may not be the case soon, so don't procrastinate. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). These are good days for taking care of financial matters, including gathering up money somebody else owes you. Study. Your concentration will be at its best. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Make a commitment to a loved one. Your workload increases. Youll also notice your chances for making money are improving. Focus on that theme. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Youll be in power, except for a few minor irritations coming from your home environment. You're strong but still frustrated, soon you'll start getting your own way. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). A team effort should pay off pretty well. Study the manual to fix something at home. You'll want to spend more time at home. You might be feeling hassled. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). This week starts out kind of rough, with orders barked from an older person. Things get better as the week goes along, as friends show upi to play. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). Make a connection with a distant friend. You need the information and support. You should start noticing that it's possible for you to make a lot more money. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20). Your luck is definitely starting to improve. You'll notice that things get better. You start out stressed about money, but wind up more interested in where you're going to go. If You're Having a Birthday This Week: The first part of this year looks good for travel, but after that you're goi ng to have to get back down to business. Youll feel stuck at times, but persevere. 1998, Tribune Media services HUGE CLEARANCE 538 S. Bouldar Hwy. 921 S. Main St., L.V. (In Henderson Plaza between Basic & Major) (Juat North of Charleston on Main) 50% OFF Gigantic inventory of clothing for men, women and children. For more information call 564-7128 (Henderson) 383-1082 (Las Vegas) ft Opportunity Village Value Centers are operated by Opportunity Village Association tor Retarded Citizens, a local non-profit organization. 97c of every dollar raised goes directly to programs for adults with mental retardation. For pickup of donations call 383-5911. Uaacnmblc Ibcsr foor words, ODC Icitar to cadi fquare, to ronn foor by D.B.Donovan UTAP 'UU 1 1 1 NOICT n 1 LIKALA 1 n 1 n 1ENCAME 1:1:1 1 1 Vy/HM-THE t4EW w;
PAGE 34

Page 16 Panorama February 12-13, 1998 February 12-13,1998 Panorama Pag* 17 LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICE OSH FRANKIE SUE DEL PAPA Altomey General By: David C. Creckman Deputy Attorney General „ Nevada Bar No. 4580 lOftN. Carson St. CaJiion City. NV. 89701-4717 (702)687-7318 Attorneys for Ntvada State Engineer FILED Jan. 6, 2:27 PM '98 Loretta Bowman CLERK DISTRICT COURT CLARK COUNTY. NEVADA IN THE MATTER OF THE DETERMINATION OF ThE RELATIVE RIGHTS IN AND TO WATERS OF LAS VEGAS ARTESIAN BASIN (212) IN CLARK COUNTY. NEVADA. CASE NO. A382950 DEPT. NO. XV DOCKET NO. "L" ORDER SETTING TIME FOR HEARING WHEREAS, a certified copy of the Order of Determination, to|;cther with the original evidence in the above-entitled matter, has been filed with the Clerk of this Court pursuant to the provisions of NRS 5.V.165. NOW,THEREFORE,iiponapplicationof R.MICHAEL TURNIPSEED, State Engineer, and good cause appearing therefor. It is hereby ORDERED THAT THE HEARING IN THE ABOVE-ENTITLED MATTER TAKE PLACE commencing Friday the 3 day of April, 1998, at 8 AM of said day in Department XV of the courtroom of the Courthouse at Las Vegas, Clark County, Nevada. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that any and all parties in interest who are aggrieved or dissatisfied with the Order of Determination of the State Engineer, so filed, shall file with the Clerk of this ('ourt notice of exceptions to such Order of Determination by March 20,19987a date which is at least five (5) days prior to the date set for such hearing, as provided under the provisions of NRS 533.170. DATED and cntercjlhis — day of JAN. 6, 1998, A.D., 1998. SALLY LOEHRER DLSTRICT JUDGE Submitted by: FRANKIE SUE DEL PAPA Attorney General By: David C. Creekman David C. Creekman Deputy Attorney General Nevada Bar No. 4580 100 N. Carson St. Carson City, NV 89701-4717 Telephone: (702) 687-7318 CERTIFIED COPY DOCUMENT ATTACHED IS A TRUE AND CORRECT COPY OF THE ORKJINAL ON HLE 1998JAN-6P2:.32 As/ Loretta Bowman CLERK H —Jdfc. 15, 22, 29. Feb. 5,12.1998 • • ^S^:LEGAL NOTICE BOULDER CITY, NEVADA A Municipal Corporation 401 California Avenue Boulder City, Nevada 89005 REVISED NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Wednesday, February 18,1998 at the hour or7:00p.m., in the Council Chamber, City Hall, Boulder City, Nevada, the Boulder City Planning Commission will consider the following opplicalioni: 1. G.C. WALLACE FOR THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF SOUTHERN NEVADA-7(K) WYOMING STREETLOTS 14, IS, 16 AND 18, BLOCK 22, BC TOWN: Requests within (he R3, Multiple-Family Residential Zone for the following: a. RESOLUTION NO. 785-CU-98-I56: A public hearing on an application for a conditional use permit for an elevator shaft at a height of 29'5", whereas SecUon n-2(-7.B of the City Code requires a conditional use permit for elevator structure heighLs over 25'. b. PCSA-98-302: A Planning Commissitm Sign Applicatim to permit a sign height of 25'5", a total of 3 advertising itructarcs (ex&Ung), and • total sign area ol y4 square feet; whereas Section 11-24-4.A of the City Code limits sign height to no more than 20', and Section 11 -24-5.A.3 nf the City Code permits a maximum of 1 advertising structure and limiLs sign area to no more than 32 square feet. 2.V-98-393-JIMSPARKSFORCRAIGTILLOTSON-10pear before the Plaiming Commission in person or by counsel and object to or express approval of the propST: /s/ Vicki G. Mayes Vicki G. Mayes, City Clerk BC—Feb. 12,1998 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Trustees of Boulder City Library District will consider, at it's Regular Meeting of Feb. 18, 1998, at 7:00 pm in the Nevada Room of Boulder City Library, a Resolution to Augment it's Final Budget, for thefiscalyearending June 30, 1998 by the sum of $47,471.08 (Forty Seven Thousand, F'our Hundred Seventy One, and 08/100 Dollars), such money appropriated by the I>egLslaturc of the State of Nevada in it's 1997 Session and distributed by the Nevada Department of Maseums, Libraries and Arts, in accordance with NRS 378.087. /s/ Duncan R. McCoy Duncan R. McCov, Director Feb. 9,1998 BC—Feb. 12, 1998 LEtJAL NOTICE BOULDER CITY, NEVADA A Municipal Corporation 401 California Avenue Boulder City, Nevada 89005 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY i;iVEN that on Tuesday, February 24,1998 at the hour of 7:0n p.m., in the Council Chamber, City Hall, Boulder City, Nevada, the Boulder City CouiK'il will consider the fiilloHing applications: I. CAP-98-01 of PC.SA-97.Mtl-RETIREMENT FINANCIAL CENTERS OF AMKKICA-KHMt NEVADA HKJHWAY-LOTl,BLOCK 49, BC TOWN: An appeal of the I'lanning Cominissiim's denial of a Planning Commission Signj\pplicatil>uildingsign to remain. whereas the approval of PCSA.94-277 required the removal of certain building signs. ^ Copies of the foregoing applications (including maps) are on file and available for public inspection in the ofll^ of the Community Development Department, City Hall, (702) 293-9282. ANY AND ALL PERSONS may appear before the'City Council in person or by counsel and object to or express approval of the proposed applications or may, prior to this hearing, file with the City Clerk written objection thereto or approval thereof. Notice to penons with disabilities: Members of the public who are disabled and require special assistance or accommodations at (he meeting are requested to notify the City Clerk by telephoning (702) 293-9208 at least seventy-two hours in advance if the meeting. DATED this 10th day of February, 1998. /s/ Vicki G. Mayes Vicki G. Mayes, City Clerk BC—Feb. 12,1998 I,I:(;AL NOTICE To he sold at Lien Sale 10 a.m. Feb. 25,1998 by Shasta Sales Co. at 3200 Sandy Ln., Las Vegas, NV 89115. 1. 93 Hyundai vin KMHVD12J9PU256108 Rcg.-Legal-Stntc Farm. 2. 77 Dat. PU vin KHL620180720 Reg. Richard P. Mclchrorrc. I.cgal-Sun Auto Sales. 3. 85 Hyundai vin. KHMLD31J9JU214274 Ugal Chistian A. Durel. LegalVirst Interstate Bank. 4. 87 Ford vin. 1TEX14H6HKA.16444 Leg Reg. Berry A. Abram. H.—Jan. 29. Feb. 5. 12. 19. 1998 _^__ LFT.AL NOTICE BEFORE THE PUBLIC IITH.ITIF-S COMMISSION OF NEVADA Nf)TICE OF TARIFF FILINt; A tariff filing, designated as Docket No. 98-1025, has been filed with the Public Utilities Commission of Nevada, ("Commission") by .Nevada Power Company ("Nevada Power") for approval of its Fourth Revised P.S.C.N. Sheet No. 80 in its Tariff No. 1-Bto increase the gross-up rates fordepreciable property used in the taxability of line exteasion calculations under Rule No. 9. Specifically, Nevada Power proposes to increase the gross-up rate from ..30730 to ..10770. According to Nevada Power, non-cash contributions provided by an applicant under Rule No. 9 are subject to income tax under the 1986 Federal Tax Reform Act and are subject to a tax gross-up in accordance with the Nevada Administrative Code ("NAC"). Nevada Power states that a revised tariff Is necessary due to a change in the customer deposit interest rate which is an input to the gross-up rate calculation. The tariff filing is submitted pursuant to Chapters 703 and 704 of the Nevada Revised Statutes ("NRS") and Nac and, in particular, NAC 704.6532. The revLsed tariff is on file and available for public viewing at the offices of the Commission: 727 Fairview Drive. Carson City, Nevada 89710 ahd the Sawyer Buildlng,555 East Washington Avenue, Suite 4500, Las Vegas, Nevada 89101. Interested and affected persons may comment in writing and file appropriate Protests and/or Petitions for Leave to Intervene at either of the Commission's offices on or before Wednesday, February 25.1998. By the Commission. /s/ Jeanne Reynolds JEANNE REYNOLDS, CommLssion Secretary Dated: Carson City, Nevada 2/3/98 (SEAL) H—Feb. 12,1998 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN TO THE LAST REGISTERED AND LEGAL OWNER OF: 77 DODG VIN NL41G7G125185 RO/LO JEANETTE M. AND EARLE T. MARTIN. SAN BERNARDINO, CA. 91 FORD VIN 1FTCR10AONPA85082 RO/ LO DAMON JOHN MOUR. MARIPOSA, CA. CONTINENT BT TRLR VIN 8400 RO/LO SALLY I. NYBERG, LAS VEGAS. NV. THE VEHICLES DESCRIBED ABOVE WILL BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC AUCTOIN TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER TO SATISFY THE LIEN INCURRED BY BIG JOHNS TowiNt;. THF: SALE WILl^BE HELD AT 9:00AM MARCH 9TH, 1998 AT 1573 FOOTHILL DRIVE, BOULDER CITY, NEVADA 89005. BC—Feb. 12, 19,26,1998 LEtJAL NOTICE NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY OF ANNUAL RF;TURN Pursuant to .Section 6104(d) of the Internal Revenue Code, notice is hereby given that the annual return for the year lending December 31,1997 of the Baer Charitable Trust, a nonexempt charitable trust treated as a private foundation, is available for public inspection by any interested citizen who requests it by writing to Baer Charitable Trust, 6641 W. Tropicana Avenue, #202, Las Vegas, NV 89103, beginning on the date of this publication and for 180 days thereafter. The principal managers of the charitable trust are K. Dale Baer and Corinne Baer. /s/ Corinne Baer Corinne Baer Trustee H—Feb. 12,1998 LEGAL NOTICE A LIEN HAS BEEN PLACED ON THE GOODS STORED IN MINI STORAGE UNITS OF STORE LEGAL NOTICE Susan Kay Werly FILED 205 Rainier Coi(rt JAN 14,1:49 PM '98 Boulder City, NV 89005 /s/ LorelU Bowman 702-293-7526 CLERK DISTRICT COURT CLARK COUNTY. NEVADA In the Matter of the Application of) D222727 YOUR STUFF, 488 W. VICTORY RD.. HENDERSON, NV. 89015. TO RECOVER P/VST DUE RENT. ALL UNITS WILL BE SOLD BY SEALED BID ON FEBRUARY 24, 1998 AT 11:00 AM. ALL OWNERS OF UNITS UP FOR SALE MUST PAY CHARGES OWED IN FULL ON OR BEFORE FEBRUARY 19, 1998 BEFORE 5 P.M. PERSONAL PROPERTY AND HOUSEHOLD ITEMS TOBESOLD ARE STORED BY AND FOR THE FOLLOWING PARTIES: UNrr#185 TRAVIS RFVIER STORE YOUR STUFF RESERVES THE RIGHT TO BID ON ANY UNIT FOR THE TOTAL AMOUNT OWING. H—Feb. 12,17,1998 ) B ) NOTICE OF ) PETITION ) FOR CHANGE Of .) NAME that SUSAN KAY SUSAN KAY WERI.Y, Petitioner, For Change of Name BOBBIE KAY WERI.Y NOtfcE IS HEREBY GIVEN WERI,Y has on the 14th day of January, 1998, filed a Petition jddressed to the above-entitled Court praying that sail Court enter its Order changing Petitioner's legal name fron sUSAN KAY WERLY to BOBBIE KAY WERLY. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that any person having ibjeclion to the changing of Petitioner's name as aforesaid hall file written objection with the above-entitled Court within ten days after the date of the last publication of thi Notice, to wit, the 12th day of Feb., 1998 DATED: 1-4-98 's/ Susan Kay Werly usan Kay Werly 205 Rainier Court Boulder City, NV 89005 702-293-7526 BC—Jan. 29, Feb. 5, 12,1998. LEGAL NOTk::E BOULDER CITY LIBRARY FINANCIAL REPORT FOR 2nd QUARTER FY 1997-98 12/31/97 REVENUES: BUDGET ACTUAL ITEM 1997/98 12/31/97 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN TO THE LAST REGISTERED AND LEGAL OWNER OF: 80 HMD BT TRLR VIN DMV09301NV RO/LO BREAK-EM EXCAVATION, LAS VEGAS, NV. 75 FORD VIN FIODK648940 RO/LO ROGELIO OLIVAS, LAS CRUCES, NM. 87 DODG VIN IB3BD36DIHF127648 RO/ LO ROMERO CECELIA AND VIRGIL J, BERNARDO. ALBUQUER. QUE, NM. 86 MAZD VIN JM2UF2110GOS57483 RO/ LO RICHARD R. WEIKUM, ALBUQUERQUE, NM. 86 CHEV VIN IGIAJ08CODY255571 RO JOHNS. AND MARGARF;T R. PAYNE, BOULDER CITY, NV hO BOULDER DAM FED CREDIT UNION, BOULDER CITY, NV. 87 HYUN VIN KMHLF.32J9HU 167184 RO/ LO PATSY A. BRAl'ER, SEBRINt;, FL. 84 OLDS VIN IG3AP35Y9EX323171 RO/ LO GF:ORG1A MARtJO C O R C O V E L O S SCAPPOOSE, OR. 78 FORD VIN F8P62HI62489 RO/LO HERSHEL U. COtJER, WICHITA FALLS, TX. THE VEHICLES DESCRIBED ABOVE WILL BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HI(;HEST BIDDER TO SATISFY THE LIEN INCURRED BY BK; JOHNS TOWINt;. THE SALE WILL BE HELD AT 9:00 AM MARCH 2ND,1998 AT 1573 FOOTHILL DRIVE, BOULDER CITY. NEVADA 89005. BC—Feb.S, 12,19,1998 $$ +/ • % REALIZED AD VALOREM 211,185.62 MVPT 34.929J2 SCCRT 258353.64 OTHER 28^00.00 106.916.78 10,994.85 77,928.17 12,711.75 (104.268.84) (13,9.34.47) (l(i0,425.47) (15.488.25) EXPENDITURES: ITEM 532,668.58 BUD<;ET 1997/98 208,551.55 ACTUAL 12/31/97 50.63 31.48 .30.16 45.08 39.15 (.124,117.03) $$ +/0} REALIZED SALARIF.S BENEFITS SERVICES CAPITAL 263,214.64 76,0.34.87 84,863.78 108,555.28 118,707.53 33382J4 25,825.66 24,015.85 (144,507.11) (42,652.53) (.59,038.66) (8441.39.43) 532,688J7 /s/Duncan R. McCoy Duncan R. McCoy, Director Feb. 9, 1998 BC—Feb. 12,1998 201,930.84 (.330,737.73) 45.10 43.90 .V).43 22.12 .17.91 RATES BOXED ADS $8.00 par column Inch per luua UP TO 3 LINES (approx. 23 characters per line). 45( EA. ADDITIONAL LINE. (One time pick-up rate is $3.00 up to .1 lines and 25c per additional line.) (Green Valley Plus Picl(-up Rales: Boxed ads : S3 00 p c I per issue Une ads = S3 00 per line • up to 3 lines per rssue Cash Billed Rate Rate 3 lines S6.50 '$6.85 4 lines $6.95 '$7.30 5 lines $7.40 •$7.75 6 lines $7.85 '$8.20 7 lines $8.30 '$8.65 8 lines $8.75 '$9.10 9 lines $9.20 '$9.55 10 lines $9.65 *$10.OO 'PTus Postage eacfi l/ne txHed aftet n/riaf tJilltng NO CASHREFUNDS-CnEDtT ONLY $5 00 CanoatalKin f M ikx Non-Pttlislied tOs) CLASSIFIED Published Tuesdays, Thursdays NOW ACCEPTING PLEASE READ YOUR AD FOR ERRORS the first day it appears H B C Publications, Inc assumes no responsibility ARER THE FIRST INSERTION, nor for errors not affecting the value of the ad. M claims for settlement adjustments must be made within 12 days after expiration of ad. Henderson Home News 564-1881 •435-7700 Hours: Monday thru Friday 8 4 Boulder City News 293-2302 Hours; Monday t)iru Friday 8 4 DEADLINES Henderson Home News Tuesday's Issue 4:00 P.M. FRIDAY Henderson Home News • Boulder City News Thursday's Issue 12:00 NOON TUESDAY PREPA YMENTS: Yard. Garage, and Movi/igJSales require cash in advance. (Exception subscribers) Out-of-town and out-of-state also require prepayment PROFESSIONAL SERVICES NOTICE TO READERS By law, companies that contract to locally move your household goods must hold a certificate from the Nevada Public Service Commission. This requirement ensures that the company asrries proper insurance, complies with government safety standards and charges only approved rates. Nevada law also requires these "full service" movers to print their PSC numt>er on their trucks in their advertising. For more information, the PSC can be reached at 436-2600. Chapter 624 of Nevada Revised Statutes makes It unlawful for any person to engage in the business or act in the capacity of a contractor wKhIn this State without having a State Contractor's License. All advertising by a licensed contractor shall include the license number. Should a question arise regarding licensed contractors, contact the Nevada State Board Of Contractors, 486-1100. PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Dressmaker, Seamstress, alterations, replace a zipper, do a hem, mending of all sorts. Fast service, reasonable rates. 294-0389, 9 am-9 pm. PS33826 Last minute movers! We move resid. & comm. ANYWHERE. Load/Unload your rental truck. 565-9675/BEEP 5990652. PS33573 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES POOL SERVICE Lie. & Ins., 524-7448 or 2942975. PS33874 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES PROFESSIONAL SERVICES MASTER CRAFTSMAN Anything in WOOD Countertops Computer Centers 565-5466 peger 661-6250 Giordano & Son Pluinbinq Rensonable Lie lii."i 558-7887 MURRAY MAINTENANCE For all home repairs 293-5110 FIX-IT GUY Secunly ( Scottly 284-5214 We clean your garage & dispose of unwanted clutter. Call Dave for FREE ESTIMATES, 565-5668. PS32840 Electrician will do ceiling fans, 220 lines, spas, additions, patio covers. Reasonable, call 2227072/451-6655.. PS33795 $80 CCW Class 2/21-22 registration 8:30 a.m., class at 9 a.m. at Multi Purpose BIdg., Central Park, Boulder City." By Boulder Rifle & Pistol. PS33900 No Time for your Lawn? Specializing in all phases ol Landscape malm.. Irrigation 1 renovation rocK/sod, old/new Michaels 453-8252 CONCRETE & MASONRY 564-1487 MASONRY, INC. GENES CARPET CLEANING and WINDOW CLEANING Res. & Comm. 564-8055 BiaBonry-Coiiunercial ft Residential All Types — Brick. Block. Stone ft natwork Custom Work ft Glass Block Is Our Specialty Nerada Ucenae #24144 Serving Our Valley Since 1986 Sam Blakeley Masoniy 564-7764 9 Lie. #214.0-19400 GENE'S TREE SERVICE Topping, Trimming, Complete Removals, Stump Grinding FREE ESTIMATES 564-2551 HONfY DO S CllVl.'.r.K'" "" WE REPAIR ALMOST ANYTHING 294-3071 Royalty Mortgage Reflnaace Now — Beat Rate* CoaatnctloB a Home Impror e meot Loena Debt CooaotMatleB No Bqnlt7 aallBance Loan* 222-7072 33^ p Computer Lessons and Sctnp A^ Fnutnted with your computer? We can belpl ^sTJpN. Instruction, Modifications, Troubleshooting. ^JKM (Internet, Word Processing, Operating Systems, • ^ii^t^L etc.) Reasonable rates. Digital by Design Call Ed at: 55M33S 4Mb MCS GARDENING •TREE TRIMMING •RESIDENTIAL A COMMERCIAL •FREE ESTIMATES •SPRINKLER SYSTEMS A REPAIR •CLEAN-UPS a HAUL OFFS '"SENIOR DISCOUNTS*** We now accept MsalerCard and Visa LICENSED LAWN MAINTENANCE SINCE 19M PROFESSIONAL SERVICES FREE INTERNET information for your business. Web Sites, Home Pages and Classified. Inthebest Mall. Call or Email (909) 276-7787 or WWW.73240 655 CompuServe.com. PS21226 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES $40 basic rifle Class 3/ 21-22 pre registration by 3/7, with Boulder Rifle & Pistol, P.O. Box 60534, BCNV 89006. PS33901 NEED A NANNY? iVIy fiome or yours, infants. Toddlers welcome. Ref. avail. Fran 896-0257. ///////////^//^/^/^//?//?^^??^^?/^/M / Harry's Quality Painting 15 Years In Boulder City Interior/Exterior Residential/Commercial Acoustical Ceiling Repair' Text Drywall Taping Texturing Wallpapering 293-1523 Free Estimates Senior Discounts Lie Bonded Insured 'V??????^??^)???}??}??????????}77771'A PROFESSIONAL SERVICES CPA, 20+ yrs. exper. w/ personal, corporate taxes & yearly work, 436-6074. PS33596 VONDELL BROTHERS Painting Preaaure Washing FREE Eatlmatas Sr. DIacounta 694-0483 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Trash Hauling Yard Cleanup, Handyman. Call Ray, 293-0745. PS33887 COMMERCIAL RENOVATION Remodeling, Tenants Improvements Over 20 yrs. exp. 233-4562 (LIC. NO. 43073) Steve Bailey Construction FLOORING CERAMIC TILE and HARDWOOD Quality salaa, Installation, Sarvica Call Wood And Tile Rooiing, Inc. 525-1846 for quotation (Lte. 45868.43512 ATHE CAVANAUGH'S y) PAINTING ^sJ Interior/Exterior Free£sf/mafe OQ^_H^22 Licensed EEMOOUE CLEARLY WINDOW CLEANING Reasonable Rates 264ft Jeff Kincaid • 294-1114 or 222-6926 StfvinQ Htndirton, Gntn Vnty It BouMv City HOWARD HELDERLEIN CONSTRUCTION Commercial Residential Remodels and Additionji License #0:101-^ 565-0874' YARDVARK'S LAWN AND MAINTENANCE Profsaslonal Trsa Trimming Serying BC. Graon Valley A Henderson 294-1114 Pager 222-6926 33060 33303 IBI.AC K MCRiNTAI, PI.LMBIM; SERVICE :^ MAIN FAST SERVICE HENDERSON BOULDER CITY 565-749 uCKKn$n 294-7713 R&G Landscaping Lawn Maintenance Sprinlders & Renovation Rocky & Greg 558-7346 SAVE MONEY ON LONG DISTANCE CALLING 10c a minute 24 hrs./day 7 days a wk Best quality, lowest price. Call Mitch 878-6896 GUITAR LESSONS By Exp. Teacher $10/hr. Call 564-7718 LICENSED HANDY MAN Complete home repairs Rick at 564-7488 or pager 667-7652 PERSONAL TOUCH HOUSECLEANING Tired of housework! Then let me do your cleaning for you. Call Nancy, 564-9581 MikflKiit HANDYMAN COMPLETE HOMF. MAINTENANCE, REPAIRS a IMPROVEMENTS 294-6214 fj-r. COATES PAINTING CO, • COMMERCIAI.'RESIOENTIAL • PAI^mNG • DECK COATINGS • STUCCO AND DRYWALL REPAIR • ELASTOMERIC COATINGS 10% SENIOR DISCOUNT • FREi ESTIMATES • 20 YRS REUABLE PROFESSIONAL SERVICE • NV UC 40M CALL DAVE COATES 293-5525-264-4018 p.^ Rio Marble & Tile, Inc. 3685 S. Dej^ftir Blvd. (on 42^5-9896 IM gin A IVrslu imported Marble (I2I2)' Imported Granite | $399 Full Miectlon ofVleor Tile, tUiiit. Granite, Slate. Couf>tw-Top Tiles, Bathfoom 4 Patto Tile PROFESSIONAL SERVICES • • *.**:*-* • Electric Power Deregulated! How would you like to save 20% on your power bill? For more Information call 1-800-573-3236, No. 1430 •**•*****•*** PIER'S END CREATIONS Affordable Web Design Services •Creative Graphic Designs •Marketing AResearch •Digital Photography •Scanning Surfaces ^58-7785 '''''SERVICES'''' I F.NTERTAINMENT NELSON'S HOME REPAIR Painting, Texturing, Ceramic Tile, Carpenby Low prices FREE estimates 565-3418*491-3705 A.CAMCO PLUMBING CO. Bonded hint. •Lie* 0034S17 >' COMPLETE PLUMBING ) SERVICE RESIDCNTUL COMMEKUL • WiKr Htitm, Cii or ElMtrk Sinki Luki Dripi DlipOMll FMKCtl' Hiliim Stwtr t Drain Ctcanlng ^"fttst tmtrgtncY Repairs S 896-8815 VAUEY WIDE SERVICE III. 1976 1 H Sprinkler Systems ^& License # 4490-0 1 jRk^ S Lawn Care c^^2 Harold & Sharon Critcher 1 Telephone 294-6200 j Serving Boulder City for 11 years | STOP! • FREE MOBILE SERVICE • LOWEST CASH PRICES IN TOWN Service on Autos • Trucks • Motor Homes Save up to S250.00 on your insurance deductible / some restrictions apply All Insurance Companys accepted .Commercial • Residential • Mirrors Glass Emporium 702-880-9199 4881 E. Flamingo (Flamingo & Boulder) Happy Valentine's Day from (The Shutterbugs Candy Store) Give Your Sweetheart Memories. APS or 35mm Cameras Camera Kits Available from $39'* Frames, Albums (acid free) ^-\^tf^^ '2655 WindmHI Parkway'* 2697699 We Speak "Service" Fluently y WE CAN GET RID OF UNWANTED COLOR LOSS SPOTS ON YOUR CARPET, FASTI I Our exclusive Prism'" carpet spot colof repair system restores and matches the original dye cotor perfectly-makes your carpet look like new • The Prism'" System B the irwsl advanced mellni) ol dye ifiplKalion on irwrrurket • Dye cokKS are permanent Uce you carpel's ongnal cotor • No waiting Wak on carpels immediately attei cotor lepaii CM fDdkr es • Note Pads • • Ad tX'Siqn f layout • MCR Torms • Coufxjns and Morel CLASSIFIED AD iSM 4 p.m. Friday for Tuesday issue Noon Tuesday for POSITION WANTED Serv. Mgr./Director-experienced, mature, stable, hands on mgr. wants to relocate to HD/ LV area. Ford, Merc, Irriporl & motor home exp. ADP systems, sm/lg, dealer. Call Jerry, 209545-4776/fax 209-5458428 for interview/resume. MC33831 ENTERTAINMENT VOICE PIANO DRAMA LESSONS **,*. 7— 0-i. "*-*-"-**• ,„-• cor* C. *-l *i •"*> pMM now lor a^tH 569-040V J ////fill ii%v\\\>^^\\?enefits. Fast moving fun place to work. Appiy in person: HBC Publications, [ 2 Comnfierce Center Dr., HEND. FLIGHT ATTENDANTS SkyWest Airiines will be accepting applications and interviewing qualified applwants for the position of Flight Attendant. Please join us at the San Remo Hotel, 115 E. Tropcana Ave Las Vegas, NV. on Tuesday, Febmary 17th Q 6:00 p.m to 10:00 p.m. Also on Wednesday, Febmary 18th 9 8:00 a'.m to 12:00 p.m We will be starting promptly at 6:00 pm & 8:00 am: no late arrivals will be admitted. Please be prepared to fill out a 10 yr. wori< history on the application. There will be a $15.00 processing tee that must be collected at the tinrw of the interview. Please bring money orders or cash The following qualifications are required: "Minimum of 21 years of age "Height: 5*0" to 5'8" "2 years college or 2 years customer service experience preferred "Must be willing to relocate to any of our cun^ent domiciles Salt Lake City. UT., Palm Springs, CA, Santa Bartjara. CA, San Dtego. CA, San Luis Obispo, CA, Monterey. CA, and Yuma, AZ. The interview process will fill our training courses to b>e held in Mar. & Apr. Celebrating 25 years of outstanding customer service. EOE HELP WANTED | HELP WANTED I HELP WANTED DRIVERS — FLATBED 48 STATE OTR, Assigned New Conventionals, Competitive Pay, Benefits. $1000. Sign on Bonus, Rider Program, Flexible Time Off. Call Roadrunner Trucking. 1-800-8767784. HW33811 Applications being accepted for Church childrens worker. Sun., 8 AM-Noon, $6/hr., phone 293-7773. HW33746 Help Wanted PfT cook, weekend & pit clean-up afternoons. Apply in person @ 100 Ville Dr./ Rt. 93. HW33824 Crew member needed for VERY BUSY 7-11. Must be 21 yrs. APPLY IN PERSON ONLY to Dale or Larry, 850 E. Horizon Dr., corner of Boulder Hwv. HW33645 Help waited, Mature Woman pref. Exc. phone skills, flex, hrs., will train. Call Stuart for interview, 293-0041, Eve's, 2936132. HW33910 PT Nanny needed, flex h>s., some mornings needed, $6/hr., 5666297. HW33765 7-11 Store, Full/Part Time, must be 21 yrs., apply in person, 710 Center St. HW33763*j| SALES AND MARKETING: Health promoter, must enjoy working with people. Leadership and public speaking skills a plus. PfT 25K7yr., F/T 75K/Yr. Benefits available. 1-800-511-5986. HW33790 PT, Therapy aid/massage therapist needed for BC doctors office, 2933683. HW33868 Part time Admin. Asst./ Office Mgr. for small BC company. PC/typing skills w/knidg. of Word & Quick Book Pro. Good phone & people skills a must. Non-smoker. Starting at 7-9/hr. DOE. Pis. send resume to P.O. Box 61302, BC, NV. 89006. HW33869 Am DEFENSE (M advanoad technical training a* you makilaln mlsalle guidance aqulpniwit. $10,600 first year. 111,900 aaeond year ndnknum aalary, plus •xeellani benefits package. Call56M766 AIWY. BE AU. YOU CAN BE' PT, exp., flexible waitress. Apply at 1129 Arizona, BC, Evan's OTG. HW33561 CLERKyCASHIER to wori< in GV Salon, Mon., Tues. & Fri., 2-8:30 PM. Adult who likes to woric w/people & keep busy, 896-0097. HW33776 HAIRSTYLISTS with some clientele, rental, to work with best salon in GV. Call for appt., 8960097. HW33777 GOVERNMENT JOBS. Now hiring. $16,000$68,000. Call 1-800-8830819 ext. J-400 for current federal, county, city & state lists. HW33793 Admin. Assistant for a lg. business in the HD area. Must have proven typing & computer skills. Must be efficient in various computer programs: Microsoft XL, WordPerfect, Lotus, etc. Audit various forms for accuracy, log daily sales & cost figures, contact customer & vendors. Salary range $811 /hr. depending on exp. No benefits. Hrs. 8-4:30 M-F. Feix resume to 2635750, attn. HR Dept. HW33832 Lake Mead Cruises is cun-ently recruiting for the following positions: Bartenders, Cocktail Staff, Deckhands, Galley Staff (Prep Cook/Dishwashers), Reservations/Ticketing Staff, Snack Bar Staff & Waitstaff. Employment for these positions to start in April 1998. Pis. apply in person: 480 Lakeshore Rd., BC. 7 days a wk., beNveen 9 AM-5 PM. NO PHONE CALLS PLS. EOE. HW33922 HD Garage Sale, 1408 PalmSt., Sat. 2/14, 8 a?. Clothes, furn., etc. HW33916 INDUSTRIOUS? ABLE TO LIFT HEAVY fTEMS? RELIABLE AND HEALTHY? WILLING TO WORK A DISHWASHER? If So. We Need You for five hours a Day, Five Days a Week. SUrt at 9:30 am • $6.00 An Hour Call the Senior Center In Poulder Chy 293-5510 OnluiKHenderson 21 RGSI^Y) Inc. -== • "The Property People" 18 Water Street 564-2515 Excellent Career Opportunities avail, for both New & Exper. Agents. Come join the exciting team at Century 21 Moneyworld in Henderson. Call Mike, Branch Manager for details at 564-2515. ?'!' • >* ssL\e? t^S INNIS8R00K WRAPS, one of Arorica's leading fund-raising companies, is looliing tor a salesoriented, independent representative in this area to sell our top quality fund-raising programs. The position requires a self-starter who will call on schools, principals, and organizations. Willingness to regularty set appointnwnts, visit schools, make presentations to individuals and groups Is essential. EnttHBiasm, sell-discipline and sales experience correlate highly with success. School volunteef experience IS a plus. Innisbrook Wraps Is an aggressive, fun. and fast moving company ExcellenI opportunity for an individual who may be re-entefing the worii force It interested, please send a comprehensive cover letter and resunoe to Janet Gould, Dspt HNN, P.O. Box 16247, Greensboro, MC 27411 Fax P36) 5744201. No phone inquiries please. EOE INNISBROOK WRAPS iiEA:iiRiDGETem ps!_ 50-fPeople Needed 6.00/tir.—Various Shifts Eastridge Temps is recruiting seasonal worlcers for GOOD HUMOR/BREYERS CMII 566-9662 33472 NEVER A FEE for an appointment I 320 So. BouMer Hwy.. Ste. #102, Hendereon, NV NEVER A FEE WANTED GRAPHIC ARTIST I4uit Ix lad tnd cflklent in lilKintoth Pafenuiier. niuttralw. Frcefund. CMrt and ftiotothop [ tttMrn* work thlct ablr In nwM tftadUno Full lime • Salary with benefits Call 435-7700 tor appointment. HCMNEWS 2 Coounerce Center. Henii a )iiii i Mw ii i>iiii*ii tt 293-6170 Jt HELP WANTFD Motel maid, PT, Apply M person, Nevada Inn Motel, 1009 NV. Hwy., BC. HW33876 PRODUCTION WORK: Work Clothes Rental Is now accepting appUca* tions for full or part time posittons. Flexible hours, no weekends. Apply m 568 Parkson Rd., HD., Mon.-Fri. No phone calto pis. HW33894 BOOKKEEPER PTIn our offk. Call Tom at 5658927. HW33904 ALASKA EMPLOYMENT Fk>atlng prooeesors/canneries. Hundreds of employers! Excellent worker eaminga & benefits potential (up to $2,850/mo. + room/ board). For empk)ymenl inf onmatton caH: 517-3243008 ext. A89771. HW32754 WASTEWATERFACIUTIES OPERATION I; SALARY: $17.05$19.43/hour. REQUIREMENTS: Graduatlort from high school, or the equivalent, and one (1) year of experience In maintaining pumps, valves, pipes, or motors, or performing minor building or facility mairv tenance work on heating, ventilatk>n, aircondMorv ing, or plumbing systems;' OR an equivalent conv binatk>n ofck)sely relaled training and experience. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: Must possess valkt Class A Commercial Nevada Driver's license at time of appointment or a CDL Instruction Perniit and obtain ttie Class A License within the first six (6) months of employment as a concHtion of continued employment. Must maintain a satisfactory driving record. All required iP censes and certifktes, as mandated by State and Federal laws or as required herein, must t)e obtained and maintained at the incumbenfs expense. WHERE TO APPLY: City application form must be submitted to, and received by, tiM Human Resources Department, Room 200, CRy Hall, 240 Water Street, Henderson, Nevada 89015, no later than Monday, February 23* 1998, by 5:00 p.m., to be considered for this recruitment. NO APPLICATIONS WILL BE GIVEN OUT AFTCT4:Ci# P.M.ONTHECLOSINd DATE OF THIS REt CRUITMENT. Employ^ ment packet MUST be obtained from the Humart Resources Department; resumes only WILL NOT be accepted in lieu of employment applicatkm, HOURS*^OF OPERATION: MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY, 7:30 A.M. TO 5:30 P.M. SMOKE-FREE WORK ENVIRONMENT. HW33815 DRIVERS OTR LCL Bulk Transport, a leader In food grade liquM bulk, has openinga for quality OTR drivars. BENEFTTS: •Aaelgned • Ir.rld* conventtonal tractors •Sam* mlleag* pay loa<>*d or ernply •Paid loading t unloading •PaM vacations mm 1 yaer •a paM hoWdays > pereonel days •Safely a isrvlos benueee •401k tavlngs program S profit sliarlng •Company pak) unMorms For more Info, and applicationa, call racruiting at 1800^77-5475 or 1-800-984-9623. SECURITY OFRCES UNARKAED S5.7S HR. to start. HENDERSON Q.V. areas. Full S Part-Time. Weekdays S Waakanda MtJST HAVE WORKING PHONE ^ TRANSPORTATKM 10 a 3p EOE CURTIS SECURITY 330S spring Mtn. Rd. Ste. n DO YOU WANT OUT OF THE CASINOS? 00 YOU WANT A REAL SOCIAL UFE? DO YOU WANT TO SPEND MORE TIME WrfH YOUR FAMILY? LOOK NO FURTHER TRUGREENoCHEMLAWN THE WORLDS LARGEST LAWN AND TREE/SHRUB CARE COMPANY HAS IMMEDIATE OPENINGS FOR THE FOLLOWING POSmONS: 'ROtTTE DRIVERS (FUU TIME) 'SALES REPRESENTATIVES (FUU TIME) WE OFFER: 'COMPETmVE SALARY 'EXCELLENT BENEFTTS INCLUDING MEDICAL/ DENTAL, STOCK OPTIONS AND 401 K 'PAID 2 WEEK TRAINING 'ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNITIES YOU OFFER: 'GOOD DRIVING RECORD 'RELIABLE TRANSPORTATION 'ENTHUSIASM AND DESIRE TO BE THE BEST JOIN OUR FORTUNE 500 SUBSIDIARY TOOAYII THE FUTURE IS IN YOUR HANDSIII CALL OR SEND YOUR RESUME TO: DARIN BRASCH-ROUTE DRIVER OR JASON BAKER -SALES REPRESENTATIVE. FAX 1-702-S97-20S3 PHONE 1-702-597-1000 EQUAL OPPORTUNrrY EMPLOYER (IVF/V/D) CLERICAL $7/hr., M-F, S-6 Benefits, 401K. Compular exp. a muat phon—. typing, good psopla eUHs. Worto wsN wtth otttars, dapandeWe, punetuel, sHMng lo laem naw tsato. Apply In pr*on/Fai raima to 434-3827/ Man rsaunw lo: 2 Commaroa Cantar Dr., HD.

PAGE 35

Page 16 Panorama February 12-13, 1998 February 12-13,1998 Panorama Pag* 17 LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICE OSH FRANKIE SUE DEL PAPA Altomey General By: David C. Creckman Deputy Attorney General „ Nevada Bar No. 4580 lOftN. Carson St. CaJiion City. NV. 89701-4717 (702)687-7318 Attorneys for Ntvada State Engineer FILED Jan. 6, 2:27 PM '98 Loretta Bowman CLERK DISTRICT COURT CLARK COUNTY. NEVADA IN THE MATTER OF THE DETERMINATION OF ThE RELATIVE RIGHTS IN AND TO WATERS OF LAS VEGAS ARTESIAN BASIN (212) IN CLARK COUNTY. NEVADA. CASE NO. A382950 DEPT. NO. XV DOCKET NO. "L" ORDER SETTING TIME FOR HEARING WHEREAS, a certified copy of the Order of Determination, to|;cther with the original evidence in the above-entitled matter, has been filed with the Clerk of this Court pursuant to the provisions of NRS 5.V.165. NOW,THEREFORE,iiponapplicationof R.MICHAEL TURNIPSEED, State Engineer, and good cause appearing therefor. It is hereby ORDERED THAT THE HEARING IN THE ABOVE-ENTITLED MATTER TAKE PLACE commencing Friday the 3 day of April, 1998, at 8 AM of said day in Department XV of the courtroom of the Courthouse at Las Vegas, Clark County, Nevada. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that any and all parties in interest who are aggrieved or dissatisfied with the Order of Determination of the State Engineer, so filed, shall file with the Clerk of this ('ourt notice of exceptions to such Order of Determination by March 20,19987a date which is at least five (5) days prior to the date set for such hearing, as provided under the provisions of NRS 533.170. DATED and cntercjlhis — day of JAN. 6, 1998, A.D., 1998. SALLY LOEHRER DLSTRICT JUDGE Submitted by: FRANKIE SUE DEL PAPA Attorney General By: David C. Creekman David C. Creekman Deputy Attorney General Nevada Bar No. 4580 100 N. Carson St. Carson City, NV 89701-4717 Telephone: (702) 687-7318 CERTIFIED COPY DOCUMENT ATTACHED IS A TRUE AND CORRECT COPY OF THE ORKJINAL ON HLE 1998JAN-6P2:.32 As/ Loretta Bowman CLERK H —Jdfc. 15, 22, 29. Feb. 5,12.1998 • • ^S^:LEGAL NOTICE BOULDER CITY, NEVADA A Municipal Corporation 401 California Avenue Boulder City, Nevada 89005 REVISED NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Wednesday, February 18,1998 at the hour or7:00p.m., in the Council Chamber, City Hall, Boulder City, Nevada, the Boulder City Planning Commission will consider the following opplicalioni: 1. G.C. WALLACE FOR THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF SOUTHERN NEVADA-7(K) WYOMING STREETLOTS 14, IS, 16 AND 18, BLOCK 22, BC TOWN: Requests within (he R3, Multiple-Family Residential Zone for the following: a. RESOLUTION NO. 785-CU-98-I56: A public hearing on an application for a conditional use permit for an elevator shaft at a height of 29'5", whereas SecUon n-2(-7.B of the City Code requires a conditional use permit for elevator structure heighLs over 25'. b. PCSA-98-302: A Planning Commissitm Sign Applicatim to permit a sign height of 25'5", a total of 3 advertising itructarcs (ex&Ung), and • total sign area ol y4 square feet; whereas Section 11-24-4.A of the City Code limits sign height to no more than 20', and Section 11 -24-5.A.3 nf the City Code permits a maximum of 1 advertising structure and limiLs sign area to no more than 32 square feet. 2.V-98-393-JIMSPARKSFORCRAIGTILLOTSON-10pear before the Plaiming Commission in person or by counsel and object to or express approval of the propST: /s/ Vicki G. Mayes Vicki G. Mayes, City Clerk BC—Feb. 12,1998 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Trustees of Boulder City Library District will consider, at it's Regular Meeting of Feb. 18, 1998, at 7:00 pm in the Nevada Room of Boulder City Library, a Resolution to Augment it's Final Budget, for thefiscalyearending June 30, 1998 by the sum of $47,471.08 (Forty Seven Thousand, F'our Hundred Seventy One, and 08/100 Dollars), such money appropriated by the I>egLslaturc of the State of Nevada in it's 1997 Session and distributed by the Nevada Department of Maseums, Libraries and Arts, in accordance with NRS 378.087. /s/ Duncan R. McCoy Duncan R. McCov, Director Feb. 9,1998 BC—Feb. 12, 1998 LEtJAL NOTICE BOULDER CITY, NEVADA A Municipal Corporation 401 California Avenue Boulder City, Nevada 89005 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY i;iVEN that on Tuesday, February 24,1998 at the hour of 7:0n p.m., in the Council Chamber, City Hall, Boulder City, Nevada, the Boulder City CouiK'il will consider the fiilloHing applications: I. CAP-98-01 of PC.SA-97.Mtl-RETIREMENT FINANCIAL CENTERS OF AMKKICA-KHMt NEVADA HKJHWAY-LOTl,BLOCK 49, BC TOWN: An appeal of the I'lanning Cominissiim's denial of a Planning Commission Signj\pplicatil>uildingsign to remain. whereas the approval of PCSA.94-277 required the removal of certain building signs. ^ Copies of the foregoing applications (including maps) are on file and available for public inspection in the ofll^ of the Community Development Department, City Hall, (702) 293-9282. ANY AND ALL PERSONS may appear before the'City Council in person or by counsel and object to or express approval of the proposed applications or may, prior to this hearing, file with the City Clerk written objection thereto or approval thereof. Notice to penons with disabilities: Members of the public who are disabled and require special assistance or accommodations at (he meeting are requested to notify the City Clerk by telephoning (702) 293-9208 at least seventy-two hours in advance if the meeting. DATED this 10th day of February, 1998. /s/ Vicki G. Mayes Vicki G. Mayes, City Clerk BC—Feb. 12,1998 I,I:(;AL NOTICE To he sold at Lien Sale 10 a.m. Feb. 25,1998 by Shasta Sales Co. at 3200 Sandy Ln., Las Vegas, NV 89115. 1. 93 Hyundai vin KMHVD12J9PU256108 Rcg.-Legal-Stntc Farm. 2. 77 Dat. PU vin KHL620180720 Reg. Richard P. Mclchrorrc. I.cgal-Sun Auto Sales. 3. 85 Hyundai vin. KHMLD31J9JU214274 Ugal Chistian A. Durel. LegalVirst Interstate Bank. 4. 87 Ford vin. 1TEX14H6HKA.16444 Leg Reg. Berry A. Abram. H.—Jan. 29. Feb. 5. 12. 19. 1998 _^__ LFT.AL NOTICE BEFORE THE PUBLIC IITH.ITIF-S COMMISSION OF NEVADA Nf)TICE OF TARIFF FILINt; A tariff filing, designated as Docket No. 98-1025, has been filed with the Public Utilities Commission of Nevada, ("Commission") by .Nevada Power Company ("Nevada Power") for approval of its Fourth Revised P.S.C.N. Sheet No. 80 in its Tariff No. 1-Bto increase the gross-up rates fordepreciable property used in the taxability of line exteasion calculations under Rule No. 9. Specifically, Nevada Power proposes to increase the gross-up rate from ..30730 to ..10770. According to Nevada Power, non-cash contributions provided by an applicant under Rule No. 9 are subject to income tax under the 1986 Federal Tax Reform Act and are subject to a tax gross-up in accordance with the Nevada Administrative Code ("NAC"). Nevada Power states that a revised tariff Is necessary due to a change in the customer deposit interest rate which is an input to the gross-up rate calculation. The tariff filing is submitted pursuant to Chapters 703 and 704 of the Nevada Revised Statutes ("NRS") and Nac and, in particular, NAC 704.6532. The revLsed tariff is on file and available for public viewing at the offices of the Commission: 727 Fairview Drive. Carson City, Nevada 89710 ahd the Sawyer Buildlng,555 East Washington Avenue, Suite 4500, Las Vegas, Nevada 89101. Interested and affected persons may comment in writing and file appropriate Protests and/or Petitions for Leave to Intervene at either of the Commission's offices on or before Wednesday, February 25.1998. By the Commission. /s/ Jeanne Reynolds JEANNE REYNOLDS, CommLssion Secretary Dated: Carson City, Nevada 2/3/98 (SEAL) H—Feb. 12,1998 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN TO THE LAST REGISTERED AND LEGAL OWNER OF: 77 DODG VIN NL41G7G125185 RO/LO JEANETTE M. AND EARLE T. MARTIN. SAN BERNARDINO, CA. 91 FORD VIN 1FTCR10AONPA85082 RO/ LO DAMON JOHN MOUR. MARIPOSA, CA. CONTINENT BT TRLR VIN 8400 RO/LO SALLY I. NYBERG, LAS VEGAS. NV. THE VEHICLES DESCRIBED ABOVE WILL BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC AUCTOIN TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER TO SATISFY THE LIEN INCURRED BY BIG JOHNS TowiNt;. THF: SALE WILl^BE HELD AT 9:00AM MARCH 9TH, 1998 AT 1573 FOOTHILL DRIVE, BOULDER CITY, NEVADA 89005. BC—Feb. 12, 19,26,1998 LEtJAL NOTICE NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY OF ANNUAL RF;TURN Pursuant to .Section 6104(d) of the Internal Revenue Code, notice is hereby given that the annual return for the year lending December 31,1997 of the Baer Charitable Trust, a nonexempt charitable trust treated as a private foundation, is available for public inspection by any interested citizen who requests it by writing to Baer Charitable Trust, 6641 W. Tropicana Avenue, #202, Las Vegas, NV 89103, beginning on the date of this publication and for 180 days thereafter. The principal managers of the charitable trust are K. Dale Baer and Corinne Baer. /s/ Corinne Baer Corinne Baer Trustee H—Feb. 12,1998 LEGAL NOTICE A LIEN HAS BEEN PLACED ON THE GOODS STORED IN MINI STORAGE UNITS OF STORE LEGAL NOTICE Susan Kay Werly FILED 205 Rainier Coi(rt JAN 14,1:49 PM '98 Boulder City, NV 89005 /s/ LorelU Bowman 702-293-7526 CLERK DISTRICT COURT CLARK COUNTY. NEVADA In the Matter of the Application of) D222727 YOUR STUFF, 488 W. VICTORY RD.. HENDERSON, NV. 89015. TO RECOVER P/VST DUE RENT. ALL UNITS WILL BE SOLD BY SEALED BID ON FEBRUARY 24, 1998 AT 11:00 AM. ALL OWNERS OF UNITS UP FOR SALE MUST PAY CHARGES OWED IN FULL ON OR BEFORE FEBRUARY 19, 1998 BEFORE 5 P.M. PERSONAL PROPERTY AND HOUSEHOLD ITEMS TOBESOLD ARE STORED BY AND FOR THE FOLLOWING PARTIES: UNrr#185 TRAVIS RFVIER STORE YOUR STUFF RESERVES THE RIGHT TO BID ON ANY UNIT FOR THE TOTAL AMOUNT OWING. H—Feb. 12,17,1998 ) B ) NOTICE OF ) PETITION ) FOR CHANGE Of .) NAME that SUSAN KAY SUSAN KAY WERI.Y, Petitioner, For Change of Name BOBBIE KAY WERI.Y NOtfcE IS HEREBY GIVEN WERI,Y has on the 14th day of January, 1998, filed a Petition jddressed to the above-entitled Court praying that sail Court enter its Order changing Petitioner's legal name fron sUSAN KAY WERLY to BOBBIE KAY WERLY. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that any person having ibjeclion to the changing of Petitioner's name as aforesaid hall file written objection with the above-entitled Court within ten days after the date of the last publication of thi Notice, to wit, the 12th day of Feb., 1998 DATED: 1-4-98 's/ Susan Kay Werly usan Kay Werly 205 Rainier Court Boulder City, NV 89005 702-293-7526 BC—Jan. 29, Feb. 5, 12,1998. LEGAL NOTk::E BOULDER CITY LIBRARY FINANCIAL REPORT FOR 2nd QUARTER FY 1997-98 12/31/97 REVENUES: BUDGET ACTUAL ITEM 1997/98 12/31/97 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN TO THE LAST REGISTERED AND LEGAL OWNER OF: 80 HMD BT TRLR VIN DMV09301NV RO/LO BREAK-EM EXCAVATION, LAS VEGAS, NV. 75 FORD VIN FIODK648940 RO/LO ROGELIO OLIVAS, LAS CRUCES, NM. 87 DODG VIN IB3BD36DIHF127648 RO/ LO ROMERO CECELIA AND VIRGIL J, BERNARDO. ALBUQUER. QUE, NM. 86 MAZD VIN JM2UF2110GOS57483 RO/ LO RICHARD R. WEIKUM, ALBUQUERQUE, NM. 86 CHEV VIN IGIAJ08CODY255571 RO JOHNS. AND MARGARF;T R. PAYNE, BOULDER CITY, NV hO BOULDER DAM FED CREDIT UNION, BOULDER CITY, NV. 87 HYUN VIN KMHLF.32J9HU 167184 RO/ LO PATSY A. BRAl'ER, SEBRINt;, FL. 84 OLDS VIN IG3AP35Y9EX323171 RO/ LO GF:ORG1A MARtJO C O R C O V E L O S SCAPPOOSE, OR. 78 FORD VIN F8P62HI62489 RO/LO HERSHEL U. COtJER, WICHITA FALLS, TX. THE VEHICLES DESCRIBED ABOVE WILL BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HI(;HEST BIDDER TO SATISFY THE LIEN INCURRED BY BK; JOHNS TOWINt;. THE SALE WILL BE HELD AT 9:00 AM MARCH 2ND,1998 AT 1573 FOOTHILL DRIVE, BOULDER CITY. NEVADA 89005. BC—Feb.S, 12,19,1998 $$ +/ • % REALIZED AD VALOREM 211,185.62 MVPT 34.929J2 SCCRT 258353.64 OTHER 28^00.00 106.916.78 10,994.85 77,928.17 12,711.75 (104.268.84) (13,9.34.47) (l(i0,425.47) (15.488.25) EXPENDITURES: ITEM 532,668.58 BUD<;ET 1997/98 208,551.55 ACTUAL 12/31/97 50.63 31.48 .30.16 45.08 39.15 (.124,117.03) $$ +/0} REALIZED SALARIF.S BENEFITS SERVICES CAPITAL 263,214.64 76,0.34.87 84,863.78 108,555.28 118,707.53 33382J4 25,825.66 24,015.85 (144,507.11) (42,652.53) (.59,038.66) (8441.39.43) 532,688J7 /s/Duncan R. McCoy Duncan R. McCoy, Director Feb. 9, 1998 BC—Feb. 12,1998 201,930.84 (.330,737.73) 45.10 43.90 .V).43 22.12 .17.91 RATES BOXED ADS $8.00 par column Inch per luua UP TO 3 LINES (approx. 23 characters per line). 45( EA. ADDITIONAL LINE. (One time pick-up rate is $3.00 up to .1 lines and 25c per additional line.) (Green Valley Plus Picl(-up Rales: Boxed ads : S3 00 p c I per issue Une ads = S3 00 per line • up to 3 lines per rssue Cash Billed Rate Rate 3 lines S6.50 '$6.85 4 lines $6.95 '$7.30 5 lines $7.40 •$7.75 6 lines $7.85 '$8.20 7 lines $8.30 '$8.65 8 lines $8.75 '$9.10 9 lines $9.20 '$9.55 10 lines $9.65 *$10.OO 'PTus Postage eacfi l/ne txHed aftet n/riaf tJilltng NO CASHREFUNDS-CnEDtT ONLY $5 00 CanoatalKin f M ikx Non-Pttlislied tOs) CLASSIFIED Published Tuesdays, Thursdays NOW ACCEPTING PLEASE READ YOUR AD FOR ERRORS the first day it appears H B C Publications, Inc assumes no responsibility ARER THE FIRST INSERTION, nor for errors not affecting the value of the ad. M claims for settlement adjustments must be made within 12 days after expiration of ad. Henderson Home News 564-1881 •435-7700 Hours: Monday thru Friday 8 4 Boulder City News 293-2302 Hours; Monday t)iru Friday 8 4 DEADLINES Henderson Home News Tuesday's Issue 4:00 P.M. FRIDAY Henderson Home News • Boulder City News Thursday's Issue 12:00 NOON TUESDAY PREPA YMENTS: Yard. Garage, and Movi/igJSales require cash in advance. (Exception subscribers) Out-of-town and out-of-state also require prepayment PROFESSIONAL SERVICES NOTICE TO READERS By law, companies that contract to locally move your household goods must hold a certificate from the Nevada Public Service Commission. This requirement ensures that the company asrries proper insurance, complies with government safety standards and charges only approved rates. Nevada law also requires these "full service" movers to print their PSC numt>er on their trucks in their advertising. For more information, the PSC can be reached at 436-2600. Chapter 624 of Nevada Revised Statutes makes It unlawful for any person to engage in the business or act in the capacity of a contractor wKhIn this State without having a State Contractor's License. All advertising by a licensed contractor shall include the license number. Should a question arise regarding licensed contractors, contact the Nevada State Board Of Contractors, 486-1100. PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Dressmaker, Seamstress, alterations, replace a zipper, do a hem, mending of all sorts. Fast service, reasonable rates. 294-0389, 9 am-9 pm. PS33826 Last minute movers! We move resid. & comm. ANYWHERE. Load/Unload your rental truck. 565-9675/BEEP 5990652. PS33573 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES POOL SERVICE Lie. & Ins., 524-7448 or 2942975. PS33874 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES PROFESSIONAL SERVICES MASTER CRAFTSMAN Anything in WOOD Countertops Computer Centers 565-5466 peger 661-6250 Giordano & Son Pluinbinq Rensonable Lie lii."i 558-7887 MURRAY MAINTENANCE For all home repairs 293-5110 FIX-IT GUY Secunly ( Scottly 284-5214 We clean your garage & dispose of unwanted clutter. Call Dave for FREE ESTIMATES, 565-5668. PS32840 Electrician will do ceiling fans, 220 lines, spas, additions, patio covers. Reasonable, call 2227072/451-6655.. PS33795 $80 CCW Class 2/21-22 registration 8:30 a.m., class at 9 a.m. at Multi Purpose BIdg., Central Park, Boulder City." By Boulder Rifle & Pistol. PS33900 No Time for your Lawn? Specializing in all phases ol Landscape malm.. Irrigation 1 renovation rocK/sod, old/new Michaels 453-8252 CONCRETE & MASONRY 564-1487 MASONRY, INC. GENES CARPET CLEANING and WINDOW CLEANING Res. & Comm. 564-8055 BiaBonry-Coiiunercial ft Residential All Types — Brick. Block. Stone ft natwork Custom Work ft Glass Block Is Our Specialty Nerada Ucenae #24144 Serving Our Valley Since 1986 Sam Blakeley Masoniy 564-7764 9 Lie. #214.0-19400 GENE'S TREE SERVICE Topping, Trimming, Complete Removals, Stump Grinding FREE ESTIMATES 564-2551 HONfY DO S CllVl.'.r.K'" "" WE REPAIR ALMOST ANYTHING 294-3071 Royalty Mortgage Reflnaace Now — Beat Rate* CoaatnctloB a Home Impror e meot Loena Debt CooaotMatleB No Bqnlt7 aallBance Loan* 222-7072 33^ p Computer Lessons and Sctnp A^ Fnutnted with your computer? We can belpl ^sTJpN. Instruction, Modifications, Troubleshooting. ^JKM (Internet, Word Processing, Operating Systems, • ^ii^t^L etc.) Reasonable rates. Digital by Design Call Ed at: 55M33S 4Mb MCS GARDENING •TREE TRIMMING •RESIDENTIAL A COMMERCIAL •FREE ESTIMATES •SPRINKLER SYSTEMS A REPAIR •CLEAN-UPS a HAUL OFFS '"SENIOR DISCOUNTS*** We now accept MsalerCard and Visa LICENSED LAWN MAINTENANCE SINCE 19M PROFESSIONAL SERVICES FREE INTERNET information for your business. Web Sites, Home Pages and Classified. Inthebest Mall. Call or Email (909) 276-7787 or WWW.73240 655 CompuServe.com. PS21226 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES $40 basic rifle Class 3/ 21-22 pre registration by 3/7, with Boulder Rifle & Pistol, P.O. Box 60534, BCNV 89006. PS33901 NEED A NANNY? iVIy fiome or yours, infants. Toddlers welcome. Ref. avail. Fran 896-0257. ///////////^//^/^/^//?//?^^??^^?/^/M / Harry's Quality Painting 15 Years In Boulder City Interior/Exterior Residential/Commercial Acoustical Ceiling Repair' Text Drywall Taping Texturing Wallpapering 293-1523 Free Estimates Senior Discounts Lie Bonded Insured 'V??????^??^)???}??}??????????}77771'A PROFESSIONAL SERVICES CPA, 20+ yrs. exper. w/ personal, corporate taxes & yearly work, 436-6074. PS33596 VONDELL BROTHERS Painting Preaaure Washing FREE Eatlmatas Sr. DIacounta 694-0483 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Trash Hauling Yard Cleanup, Handyman. Call Ray, 293-0745. PS33887 COMMERCIAL RENOVATION Remodeling, Tenants Improvements Over 20 yrs. exp. 233-4562 (LIC. NO. 43073) Steve Bailey Construction FLOORING CERAMIC TILE and HARDWOOD Quality salaa, Installation, Sarvica Call Wood And Tile Rooiing, Inc. 525-1846 for quotation (Lte. 45868.43512 ATHE CAVANAUGH'S y) PAINTING ^sJ Interior/Exterior Free£sf/mafe OQ^_H^22 Licensed EEMOOUE CLEARLY WINDOW CLEANING Reasonable Rates 264ft Jeff Kincaid • 294-1114 or 222-6926 StfvinQ Htndirton, Gntn Vnty It BouMv City HOWARD HELDERLEIN CONSTRUCTION Commercial Residential Remodels and Additionji License #0:101-^ 565-0874' YARDVARK'S LAWN AND MAINTENANCE Profsaslonal Trsa Trimming Serying BC. Graon Valley A Henderson 294-1114 Pager 222-6926 33060 33303 IBI.AC K MCRiNTAI, PI.LMBIM; SERVICE :^ MAIN FAST SERVICE HENDERSON BOULDER CITY 565-749 uCKKn$n 294-7713 R&G Landscaping Lawn Maintenance Sprinlders & Renovation Rocky & Greg 558-7346 SAVE MONEY ON LONG DISTANCE CALLING 10c a minute 24 hrs./day 7 days a wk Best quality, lowest price. Call Mitch 878-6896 GUITAR LESSONS By Exp. Teacher $10/hr. Call 564-7718 LICENSED HANDY MAN Complete home repairs Rick at 564-7488 or pager 667-7652 PERSONAL TOUCH HOUSECLEANING Tired of housework! Then let me do your cleaning for you. Call Nancy, 564-9581 MikflKiit HANDYMAN COMPLETE HOMF. MAINTENANCE, REPAIRS a IMPROVEMENTS 294-6214 fj-r. COATES PAINTING CO, • COMMERCIAI.'RESIOENTIAL • PAI^mNG • DECK COATINGS • STUCCO AND DRYWALL REPAIR • ELASTOMERIC COATINGS 10% SENIOR DISCOUNT • FREi ESTIMATES • 20 YRS REUABLE PROFESSIONAL SERVICE • NV UC 40M CALL DAVE COATES 293-5525-264-4018 p.^ Rio Marble & Tile, Inc. 3685 S. Dej^ftir Blvd. (on 42^5-9896 IM gin A IVrslu imported Marble (I2I2)' Imported Granite | $399 Full Miectlon ofVleor Tile, tUiiit. Granite, Slate. Couf>tw-Top Tiles, Bathfoom 4 Patto Tile PROFESSIONAL SERVICES • • *.**:*-* • Electric Power Deregulated! How would you like to save 20% on your power bill? For more Information call 1-800-573-3236, No. 1430 •**•*****•*** PIER'S END CREATIONS Affordable Web Design Services •Creative Graphic Designs •Marketing AResearch •Digital Photography •Scanning Surfaces ^58-7785 '''''SERVICES'''' I F.NTERTAINMENT NELSON'S HOME REPAIR Painting, Texturing, Ceramic Tile, Carpenby Low prices FREE estimates 565-3418*491-3705 A.CAMCO PLUMBING CO. Bonded hint. •Lie* 0034S17 >' COMPLETE PLUMBING ) SERVICE RESIDCNTUL COMMEKUL • WiKr Htitm, Cii or ElMtrk Sinki Luki Dripi DlipOMll FMKCtl' Hiliim Stwtr t Drain Ctcanlng ^"fttst tmtrgtncY Repairs S 896-8815 VAUEY WIDE SERVICE III. 1976 1 H Sprinkler Systems ^& License # 4490-0 1 jRk^ S Lawn Care c^^2 Harold & Sharon Critcher 1 Telephone 294-6200 j Serving Boulder City for 11 years | STOP! • FREE MOBILE SERVICE • LOWEST CASH PRICES IN TOWN Service on Autos • Trucks • Motor Homes Save up to S250.00 on your insurance deductible / some restrictions apply All Insurance Companys accepted .Commercial • Residential • Mirrors Glass Emporium 702-880-9199 4881 E. Flamingo (Flamingo & Boulder) Happy Valentine's Day from (The Shutterbugs Candy Store) Give Your Sweetheart Memories. APS or 35mm Cameras Camera Kits Available from $39'* Frames, Albums (acid free) ^-\^tf^^ '2655 WindmHI Parkway'* 2697699 We Speak "Service" Fluently y WE CAN GET RID OF UNWANTED COLOR LOSS SPOTS ON YOUR CARPET, FASTI I Our exclusive Prism'" carpet spot colof repair system restores and matches the original dye cotor perfectly-makes your carpet look like new • The Prism'" System B the irwsl advanced mellni) ol dye ifiplKalion on irwrrurket • Dye cokKS are permanent Uce you carpel's ongnal cotor • No waiting Wak on carpels immediately attei cotor lepaii CM fDdkr es • Note Pads • • Ad tX'Siqn f layout • MCR Torms • Coufxjns and Morel CLASSIFIED AD iSM 4 p.m. Friday for Tuesday issue Noon Tuesday for POSITION WANTED Serv. Mgr./Director-experienced, mature, stable, hands on mgr. wants to relocate to HD/ LV area. Ford, Merc, Irriporl & motor home exp. ADP systems, sm/lg, dealer. Call Jerry, 209545-4776/fax 209-5458428 for interview/resume. MC33831 ENTERTAINMENT VOICE PIANO DRAMA LESSONS **,*. 7— 0-i. "*-*-"-**• ,„-• cor* C. *-l *i •"*> pMM now lor a^tH 569-040V J ////fill ii%v\\\>^^\\?enefits. Fast moving fun place to work. Appiy in person: HBC Publications, [ 2 Comnfierce Center Dr., HEND. FLIGHT ATTENDANTS SkyWest Airiines will be accepting applications and interviewing qualified applwants for the position of Flight Attendant. Please join us at the San Remo Hotel, 115 E. Tropcana Ave Las Vegas, NV. on Tuesday, Febmary 17th Q 6:00 p.m to 10:00 p.m. Also on Wednesday, Febmary 18th 9 8:00 a'.m to 12:00 p.m We will be starting promptly at 6:00 pm & 8:00 am: no late arrivals will be admitted. Please be prepared to fill out a 10 yr. wori< history on the application. There will be a $15.00 processing tee that must be collected at the tinrw of the interview. Please bring money orders or cash The following qualifications are required: "Minimum of 21 years of age "Height: 5*0" to 5'8" "2 years college or 2 years customer service experience preferred "Must be willing to relocate to any of our cun^ent domiciles Salt Lake City. UT., Palm Springs, CA, Santa Bartjara. CA, San Dtego. CA, San Luis Obispo, CA, Monterey. CA, and Yuma, AZ. The interview process will fill our training courses to b>e held in Mar. & Apr. Celebrating 25 years of outstanding customer service. EOE HELP WANTED | HELP WANTED I HELP WANTED DRIVERS — FLATBED 48 STATE OTR, Assigned New Conventionals, Competitive Pay, Benefits. $1000. Sign on Bonus, Rider Program, Flexible Time Off. Call Roadrunner Trucking. 1-800-8767784. HW33811 Applications being accepted for Church childrens worker. Sun., 8 AM-Noon, $6/hr., phone 293-7773. HW33746 Help Wanted PfT cook, weekend & pit clean-up afternoons. Apply in person @ 100 Ville Dr./ Rt. 93. HW33824 Crew member needed for VERY BUSY 7-11. Must be 21 yrs. APPLY IN PERSON ONLY to Dale or Larry, 850 E. Horizon Dr., corner of Boulder Hwv. HW33645 Help waited, Mature Woman pref. Exc. phone skills, flex, hrs., will train. Call Stuart for interview, 293-0041, Eve's, 2936132. HW33910 PT Nanny needed, flex h>s., some mornings needed, $6/hr., 5666297. HW33765 7-11 Store, Full/Part Time, must be 21 yrs., apply in person, 710 Center St. HW33763*j| SALES AND MARKETING: Health promoter, must enjoy working with people. Leadership and public speaking skills a plus. PfT 25K7yr., F/T 75K/Yr. Benefits available. 1-800-511-5986. HW33790 PT, Therapy aid/massage therapist needed for BC doctors office, 2933683. HW33868 Part time Admin. Asst./ Office Mgr. for small BC company. PC/typing skills w/knidg. of Word & Quick Book Pro. Good phone & people skills a must. Non-smoker. Starting at 7-9/hr. DOE. Pis. send resume to P.O. Box 61302, BC, NV. 89006. HW33869 Am DEFENSE (M advanoad technical training a* you makilaln mlsalle guidance aqulpniwit. $10,600 first year. 111,900 aaeond year ndnknum aalary, plus •xeellani benefits package. Call56M766 AIWY. BE AU. YOU CAN BE' PT, exp., flexible waitress. Apply at 1129 Arizona, BC, Evan's OTG. HW33561 CLERKyCASHIER to wori< in GV Salon, Mon., Tues. & Fri., 2-8:30 PM. Adult who likes to woric w/people & keep busy, 896-0097. HW33776 HAIRSTYLISTS with some clientele, rental, to work with best salon in GV. Call for appt., 8960097. HW33777 GOVERNMENT JOBS. Now hiring. $16,000$68,000. Call 1-800-8830819 ext. J-400 for current federal, county, city & state lists. HW33793 Admin. Assistant for a lg. business in the HD area. Must have proven typing & computer skills. Must be efficient in various computer programs: Microsoft XL, WordPerfect, Lotus, etc. Audit various forms for accuracy, log daily sales & cost figures, contact customer & vendors. Salary range $811 /hr. depending on exp. No benefits. Hrs. 8-4:30 M-F. Feix resume to 2635750, attn. HR Dept. HW33832 Lake Mead Cruises is cun-ently recruiting for the following positions: Bartenders, Cocktail Staff, Deckhands, Galley Staff (Prep Cook/Dishwashers), Reservations/Ticketing Staff, Snack Bar Staff & Waitstaff. Employment for these positions to start in April 1998. Pis. apply in person: 480 Lakeshore Rd., BC. 7 days a wk., beNveen 9 AM-5 PM. NO PHONE CALLS PLS. EOE. HW33922 HD Garage Sale, 1408 PalmSt., Sat. 2/14, 8 a?. Clothes, furn., etc. HW33916 INDUSTRIOUS? ABLE TO LIFT HEAVY fTEMS? RELIABLE AND HEALTHY? WILLING TO WORK A DISHWASHER? If So. We Need You for five hours a Day, Five Days a Week. SUrt at 9:30 am • $6.00 An Hour Call the Senior Center In Poulder Chy 293-5510 OnluiKHenderson 21 RGSI^Y) Inc. -== • "The Property People" 18 Water Street 564-2515 Excellent Career Opportunities avail, for both New & Exper. Agents. Come join the exciting team at Century 21 Moneyworld in Henderson. Call Mike, Branch Manager for details at 564-2515. ?'!' • >* ssL\e? t^S INNIS8R00K WRAPS, one of Arorica's leading fund-raising companies, is looliing tor a salesoriented, independent representative in this area to sell our top quality fund-raising programs. The position requires a self-starter who will call on schools, principals, and organizations. Willingness to regularty set appointnwnts, visit schools, make presentations to individuals and groups Is essential. EnttHBiasm, sell-discipline and sales experience correlate highly with success. School volunteef experience IS a plus. Innisbrook Wraps Is an aggressive, fun. and fast moving company ExcellenI opportunity for an individual who may be re-entefing the worii force It interested, please send a comprehensive cover letter and resunoe to Janet Gould, Dspt HNN, P.O. Box 16247, Greensboro, MC 27411 Fax P36) 5744201. No phone inquiries please. EOE INNISBROOK WRAPS iiEA:iiRiDGETem ps!_ 50-fPeople Needed 6.00/tir.—Various Shifts Eastridge Temps is recruiting seasonal worlcers for GOOD HUMOR/BREYERS CMII 566-9662 33472 NEVER A FEE for an appointment I 320 So. BouMer Hwy.. Ste. #102, Hendereon, NV NEVER A FEE WANTED GRAPHIC ARTIST I4uit Ix lad tnd cflklent in lilKintoth Pafenuiier. niuttralw. Frcefund. CMrt and ftiotothop [ tttMrn* work thlct ablr In nwM tftadUno Full lime • Salary with benefits Call 435-7700 tor appointment. HCMNEWS 2 Coounerce Center. Henii a )iiii i Mw ii i>iiii*ii tt 293-6170 Jt HELP WANTFD Motel maid, PT, Apply M person, Nevada Inn Motel, 1009 NV. Hwy., BC. HW33876 PRODUCTION WORK: Work Clothes Rental Is now accepting appUca* tions for full or part time posittons. Flexible hours, no weekends. Apply m 568 Parkson Rd., HD., Mon.-Fri. No phone calto pis. HW33894 BOOKKEEPER PTIn our offk. Call Tom at 5658927. HW33904 ALASKA EMPLOYMENT Fk>atlng prooeesors/canneries. Hundreds of employers! Excellent worker eaminga & benefits potential (up to $2,850/mo. + room/ board). For empk)ymenl inf onmatton caH: 517-3243008 ext. A89771. HW32754 WASTEWATERFACIUTIES OPERATION I; SALARY: $17.05$19.43/hour. REQUIREMENTS: Graduatlort from high school, or the equivalent, and one (1) year of experience In maintaining pumps, valves, pipes, or motors, or performing minor building or facility mairv tenance work on heating, ventilatk>n, aircondMorv ing, or plumbing systems;' OR an equivalent conv binatk>n ofck)sely relaled training and experience. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: Must possess valkt Class A Commercial Nevada Driver's license at time of appointment or a CDL Instruction Perniit and obtain ttie Class A License within the first six (6) months of employment as a concHtion of continued employment. Must maintain a satisfactory driving record. All required iP censes and certifktes, as mandated by State and Federal laws or as required herein, must t)e obtained and maintained at the incumbenfs expense. WHERE TO APPLY: City application form must be submitted to, and received by, tiM Human Resources Department, Room 200, CRy Hall, 240 Water Street, Henderson, Nevada 89015, no later than Monday, February 23* 1998, by 5:00 p.m., to be considered for this recruitment. NO APPLICATIONS WILL BE GIVEN OUT AFTCT4:Ci# P.M.ONTHECLOSINd DATE OF THIS REt CRUITMENT. Employ^ ment packet MUST be obtained from the Humart Resources Department; resumes only WILL NOT be accepted in lieu of employment applicatkm, HOURS*^OF OPERATION: MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY, 7:30 A.M. TO 5:30 P.M. SMOKE-FREE WORK ENVIRONMENT. HW33815 DRIVERS OTR LCL Bulk Transport, a leader In food grade liquM bulk, has openinga for quality OTR drivars. BENEFTTS: •Aaelgned • Ir.rld* conventtonal tractors •Sam* mlleag* pay loa<>*d or ernply •Paid loading t unloading •PaM vacations mm 1 yaer •a paM hoWdays > pereonel days •Safely a isrvlos benueee •401k tavlngs program S profit sliarlng •Company pak) unMorms For more Info, and applicationa, call racruiting at 1800^77-5475 or 1-800-984-9623. SECURITY OFRCES UNARKAED S5.7S HR. to start. HENDERSON Q.V. areas. Full S Part-Time. Weekdays S Waakanda MtJST HAVE WORKING PHONE ^ TRANSPORTATKM 10 a 3p EOE CURTIS SECURITY 330S spring Mtn. Rd. Ste. n DO YOU WANT OUT OF THE CASINOS? 00 YOU WANT A REAL SOCIAL UFE? DO YOU WANT TO SPEND MORE TIME WrfH YOUR FAMILY? LOOK NO FURTHER TRUGREENoCHEMLAWN THE WORLDS LARGEST LAWN AND TREE/SHRUB CARE COMPANY HAS IMMEDIATE OPENINGS FOR THE FOLLOWING POSmONS: 'ROtTTE DRIVERS (FUU TIME) 'SALES REPRESENTATIVES (FUU TIME) WE OFFER: 'COMPETmVE SALARY 'EXCELLENT BENEFTTS INCLUDING MEDICAL/ DENTAL, STOCK OPTIONS AND 401 K 'PAID 2 WEEK TRAINING 'ADVANCEMENT OPPORTUNITIES YOU OFFER: 'GOOD DRIVING RECORD 'RELIABLE TRANSPORTATION 'ENTHUSIASM AND DESIRE TO BE THE BEST JOIN OUR FORTUNE 500 SUBSIDIARY TOOAYII THE FUTURE IS IN YOUR HANDSIII CALL OR SEND YOUR RESUME TO: DARIN BRASCH-ROUTE DRIVER OR JASON BAKER -SALES REPRESENTATIVE. FAX 1-702-S97-20S3 PHONE 1-702-597-1000 EQUAL OPPORTUNrrY EMPLOYER (IVF/V/D) CLERICAL $7/hr., M-F, S-6 Benefits, 401K. Compular exp. a muat phon—. typing, good psopla eUHs. Worto wsN wtth otttars, dapandeWe, punetuel, sHMng lo laem naw tsato. Apply In pr*on/Fai raima to 434-3827/ Man rsaunw lo: 2 Commaroa Cantar Dr., HD.

PAGE 36

Page 18 Panorama February 12-13, 1998 HELP WANTED I DOMESTIC HELP AVON NO DOOR to door necessary. Earn to 50%. Have fun and make money too. MLM available. Great moneymaKing opportunity. FT/OT. Independent Representative. 1-800527-2866. HW33801 ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOYMENT — Fishing industry. Excellent worker earnings & benefits potential (up to $2,850-i-/mo. -troom/ board). All major employers. For employment information: 517-3243056 ext. A89772. HW33807 ._ I NEED HELP! Overwhelmed! Will help you get started! Earn $5000 to $10,000 per month. Parttime. Fantastic Support! No selling. Not MLM. Two-minute message. 1800-995-0796, Ext. 6096. HW33809 POLICE OFFICER. SALARY; $18.81-24.00/ hour. REQUIREMENTS; Graduation from high school or the equivalent. College level coursework in Criminal Justice, Police Science, or a closely related field and worl< experience involving public contact is desirable. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: Must possess an appropriate Nevada Driver's License at the time of appointment and maintain a satisfactory driving record. Must be a U.S. citizen and be at least 21 years of age at the time of the written examination for Police Officer. Any applicant who has been convicted of any chme for which registration is required under NRS 207.090 and 207.152, or who has been convicted of two or more crimes of which fraud or intent to defraud is an element, or has been convicted of two or more offenses of larceny, stiall be disqualified. Visual acuity must be correctable to 20/20. Hearing threshold must be 30 decibels or less for each ear, without the use of a hearing aid or other corrective hearing device. All employees in this class must successfully complete the Academy Basic Course, Category I, within the time frame as required by tfie Henderson Police Department. WHERE TO APPLY; City application fomi must be submitted to, and received by, the Human Resources Department, Room 200, City Hall, 240 Water Street, Henderson, Nevada 89015, no later than Tuesday, March 10, 1998, by5;00p.m.,tobe considered for this recruitment. NO APPLICATIONS WILL BE GIVEN OUT AFTER 4:00 P.M. ON THE CLOSING DATE OF THIS RECRUITMENT. Employment packet MUST be obtained from thie Human Resources Department; resumes only WILL NOT be accepted in lieu of employment application. HOURS OF OPERATION: MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY. 7:30 A.M. TO 5:30 P.M. SMOKE-FREE WORK ENVIRONMENT. HW33817 PART-TIME SEASONAL. The City of Henderson is currently accepting applications for the following part-time, seasonal positions in our aquatics and summer youth programs. BUS DRIVER, $9.50. RECREATION ASST. I, $5.50. REC. ASST. IPOOL CASHIER, $5.50. RECREATIONASST.il, $5.55-$Q.00. RECREATION ASST. Ill, $6.25$7.25. RECREATION ASST. IV, $7.25-$10.00. LIFEGUARD (NO WSI), $6.50. LIFEGUARD (WITH WSI) $7.50. SENIOR LIFEGUARD, $9.00. POOL MANAGER, $10.50. WHERE TO APPLY; A City application must t€completed and submitted to the Human Resources Department, City Hall, 240 Water Street, Henderson, NV 89015. HOURS OF OPERATION: Monday through Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. NOTE: ALL POSITIONS WILL CLOSE APRIL 30, 1998 AT 5:00 P.M AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/ EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER HW33821 ** • • • • • • • • GOLD STRIKE INN & CASINO NOW HIRING: WWWBB laeufMy Guard* EnglnMr* ^ lluiUlirilWirt ^ Kuno Munnart ^ wontn .^ V_, m f ili m CB C —Wi n HeuMkaaptrs. In* eooM • ParMkna 0n atiap pwaon. MHwrw* utMr Noar Dam CHILD CARE near Boulder Hwy./Sunset. 7 daysawk., day and night, great ret. Call 566-6000. DH33216 Exp. quality affordable' day care, FT/PT, meals & snacks incl., refs. & health card. 558-0185. DH33267 Child care, my home, Mon.-Sat., 15 yrs. exp., refs. avail., 565-8659. DH33332 Childcare, Christian new home, FT opening. M-F only, days, 2 yrs. & older, refs. avail., Michelle, 5584399. DH33819 TAMMY'S CLEANING SERVICE. Konest, reliable, licensed pis., Iv. msg., 293-4341. Childcare in Hend. home, hot meals, nice back yd., infants welcome, 5666823. DH33585 Childcare, PT & FT, meals incl., 566-6229, Joanne. DH33762 Home away from home. Daycare by retired nurse. 24 hr. daycare. VanDeBurg ES distnct. Ages 0-12 yrs., drop ins welcome. Low rates. GV Ranch, 269-8662. D H33871 TAMMY'S CLEANING SERVICE Honest, reliable, licensed. Pis. Iv. msg., 293-4341. DH33872 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES NOTICE TO READERS; The HBC Publications does not vouch for the legitimacy of items, jobs, or money-making opportunities advertised in this classification. We suggest you carefully epvaluate such offers and not send money to these advertisers unless you are certain you know with whom you are dealing and you know all terms and conditions of the offer. Steel bidg. dealership avail. Jn select open areas. Big profit potential in booming industry. Call Mr. Clay (303) 759-3200. B033514 TURN YOUR MAILBOX INTO A CASH COW! FREE Tape Tells All. 1800-730-4314,24 hr.rec. msg. BO33710 HELP WANTED MOTHERS & OTHERS. Work PT or FT $499$7,999. Call 503-9452779. B033912 SSSS MONEY MAKER IN HENDERSON SSSS Established LubeATune Shop for sale. Asking $200,000. Ownerflnancing w/507o down. Profitable shopping center location. Long term lease. Century 21 JR Realty, Jackson Meeker, 702378-2745. B033654 OWN YOUR OWN apparel, shoe, lingerie, bridal, gift or $1.00 store. Includes inventory, fixtures, buying trip, training. Minimum investment $18,900. Call Dan at Liberty Opportunities (501) 327-8031. BO33805 Mi\KE MORE MONEY ttfen you can spend! Call the World's most valuable special recorded message: 1-888-2410189 ID number 013. Tollfree call and free information pack. B033813 FINANCIAL SERVICES $$CASH$$ REFINANCE YOUR home. Credit problems-Bankruptcy OK!! No income verification required. Many programs available. Call today (888) 971-8370 toll free. Village Oaks Mortgage. FS33800 Sen/. Mgr./Director-experienced, mature, stable, hands on mgr. wants to relocate to HD/ LV area. Ford. Merc, Import & motor home exp. ADP systems, sm/lg. dealer. Call Jerry. 209545-4776/fax 209-5458428 for interview/resume. MC33831 Loans From$100-$500 Security Finance 39 E. Basic, #C 558-5442 NEVADA FINANCIAL Provides Real Estate Loans for All Types of Credit Call Tom 9 369-1955 CASH ADVANCES up to S300 on your next paycheck No credit check Fast phone approval. Call Alpha Financial Services at 878--8065 FINANCIAL SERVICES $CASH NOW$ for your future lottery installments, structured settlements, annuities, class action awards and inheritances. 1-800-4579922, Bach Investments Co. FS33814 HOME LOANS! PURCHASING or refinancing? Perfect credit ,or problem credit! JHeath Financial Services can help you. Offices in Nevada and California to serve vou. 1-800-6550331. FS33798 "CASH" IMMEDIATE $$ for structured settlements and deferred insurance claims. J.G. Wentworth. 1-888-2315375. FS33786 ALL CASH! Receiving payments on a mortgage? Why wait? Best prices paid locally and nationwide, plus we pay transfer costs. Sell all/ part. PEI 1-800-9999892. FS33787 CALL US LAST FOR fast' cash! Receiving payments? Turn your annuity, mortgage, trust deed, lottery into immediate cash. Best Prices Nationwide! 1-800-6592274 Ext. 32. FS33788 100% OF VALUE HOME Equity Loans. Stated income is not checked. No up-front fees. Minimal paperwork. 60 minute approval by phone. 800997-1955. A-2-Z Mortgage Solutions. FS33791 $$GETCASHNOW$$lf you're currently receiving payments from workers comp, lottery or an insurance settlement. Best prices. Call PPI 1800-435-3248 ext 184. P.ROI.I. COMPANY Payroll Services & General ledger •Ul!/l(lfl^J MiuOKlk M.'illu • \nlN-l'iiMiIiI/rmhlilili* •I ,k llo\ • ( IHIlt'l ftlllliiu*. •Iliiilk Ki'i'uiKlllllilloils •( imtoiM S.,(rwiir\Ml( H\K(.i:l()H: •i(i\\rksi(i\ sp"i 11' •l.MrlllM I \IH>MI(i\s •I'Ml'Idll I ( IIWI.IS •I.VSI KPWKDI I ( Jill K.S •I'WKOI I I'll K I I' •\i.\i.\rrii lAi'i MiDiA •orvifn HIV lA.v ki I'oifiN ••ClIS Kl IIIKI -We Pick Up & Deliver. P w r run up at ueu ver-f L733-0378-I NEVADA FIWNCIAL CONCEPTS l7HfS h 'a)>an \vt SuHr IMp^a HOUSE RENTALS GV, $2p00/mo., 8968811. HR33295 BC LA DOLCE VITA, 2 bd .12 ba. w/lg. grassy yd., no pets pis, $775. BRET, 294-8482. HR33212 2 bd., downtown, $600/ mo. -tdep., no pets, 5643140. HR33781 BC 2 bd., 1 ba.. very close to schools, Ig. yd., 1st, last & sec. dep., $835/mo., 293-6345 or 274-2597. HR33770 3 bd., 2 ba. + den. 2 car gar., Ig. fenced yd, $1150 mo.1st +sec, 294-1963 or 293-0414. HR33873 NewGVRanch,2bd.,2 ba., 2 car gar., frpl., gated comm., comm. pool & spa, avail, now, $995/mo., pet OK, call 566-5875. HR33903 525HopiSt.,BC,near711 off Utah St., 2 bd., 1 ba., central air, pets OK, fenced backyd., $695, regs. 1st, last & $250 cleaning dep. Call 2937335/293-0410. HR33667 Like new Verde Viejo G V, overlooks pool/spa/play area, all appl, $850 rent, $825 Sec. Call Donna, Century 21 JR, 5645142. HR33723 3bd., 1 ba., 1 car gar, N. Major Ave., $725/mo. + dep., no pets, call Al at Jensen's Realty, 5643333. HR33367 3bd., 1-3/4 ba, full cov. patio, wood burning frpl., wood parquet floors In Ivrm., kitchen & dining area, central heating & AC,$800/mo., 293-3168/ 521-8393. HR33891 BC 3 bd., 1 ba., central air. Nice shape. $775 mo. + $500 dep., 564-0555. HR33919 INDIAN RIDGE 1 •tory, 3 br., 2 bth., 2 car gar., 1800 af, RV parking. Immed. move-in. No amoking, nopata. SI 200 mo. GV TOWNHOUSE 2 br.. 2 bth.. priv. Avail. 3/1/98, S875 mo. Call Fred/Sandy at Knapp Realty, 566-8185 2 bd.. Ig. Ivngrm., carpeted, modern kitn., appl. Incl. Lg. Lockable yd. w/cov. carport $690 mo. Dap. 564-4292 HOUSE RENTALS I CONDO RENTALS I CONDO RENTALS 2 bd., 1 ba., 2 car gar., Engel Ave., $700/mo. -idep., no pets, call Al at Jensen's Realty, 5643333. HR33855, 3 bd., 3 ba. home w/loft, good location, comm. pool, 435-9123. HR33407 GV Crystal Springs, spacious 2 bd. + den/office, 1700 SF, low main, yd., covered patio, $1150 RenL $1125 Sec. Call Donna, Century 21 JR, 564-5142. HR33727 3 bd., 2"ba. -tden, 2 car gar.,lq.fencedyd.,$1150 mo. First -tsec, 2941963 or 293-0414. HR33873 3 bd., 2 ba. + den, 2 car gar., Ig. fenced yd., $ 1150 mo. First'+ sec, 2941963 or 293-0414. HR33873 3 bd., 2 ba. mobile, neat & clean ayailable now. Call Kay/Desert Sun Realty, ^93-2151 or Pager #477-4818. $775. HR33911 Buy for zero down, $650/ mo., 2 bd,, 2 ba. condo, walking distance to downtown BC, no pets, 293-2433. HR33927 COMMERCIAL RENTALS Warehouse for sale or lease. 600 sq. ft. 20x30 zoned CM, $39,500 or $300 month plus assoc. fees. 707 Canyon Rd., M-3, call 294-0225. C033567 HENDERSON, 1&2bd. townhomes, close to schools and shopping. Move in for as low as $610. American Family Realty, 564-2878. CR33449 1 Lg.bd., 2 ba., very clean, close to school. BC, 2940605. CR33861 GRAND LEGACY Gated community Semi custom, 3300-tSF, pool/spa, culde-sac lot, 260-1048. CR33923 BC 2 Ig. bds, 2 ba., downstairs, very nice $675. Desert Sun Realty, 293-2151. CR33920 Pecos/Russell over 55 "Sun City" like complex. 2 bd./2 ba., ground floor. Never lived in. American Family Realty, 564-2878. CR33452 HD condo, 2 bd., 1 ba., convenient to downtown, some utils., $495 + dep. 564-1509/452-4884. 2 bd., 2 ba. W/D, $595 mo., 840 SF, No Pets, 293-0533. CR33942^ Nice & Clean one bedroom condo with pool $450 per month. 2930405. CR 33932 RENTALS BRAND NEW BAYVIEW CONDO! 2 bd, 2ba, 2 car gar, $1000 KEY LARGO CONDO-Gr. View of Lake, 2bd, 2ba, 2cargar, $1200 KEY LARGO CONDO-3 bd, 2 ba, 2 car gar, $1200 LAKE TERRACE CONDO-Gr. View of Lake, 3 bd, 2 ba, 2 car gar, $1100 DICK BLAIR REALTY 293-2171 33853 Downtown BC, 501 NV Hwfy., approx. 800 SF, office, avail, after 2/16. Call 293-2002 ask for Rod. C033186 1500 SF Commercial/ Retail Space, glass /rootagg on aauldec 294-8888. CO33205 Office space fo^ rent in BC. One office from $150/ mo, utils. incl., to 4,000 Sq.Ft. at 58 cents/gross Sq. Ft./mo. Larry, 2937007. C033836 Newer CM 1200'/600 loft. Live in ok! Nice area. $89K owe @ 8%, 2932030. MC32091 EQUIPMENT STORAGE LOTS FOR LEASE 24 hr. access near BC/ HEND, 7000 SF w/sec lighting, renewable yrs. lease at$700/mo.. Century 21 JR Realty, Jackson Meeker, 702-3782745. C033635 Industry zoned shop, 1.800 SF & fenced pad 5,000 SF for lease. Parkson Rd., HD, $880/ mo, 456-6520 evenings. C033782 Industrial building, 3000 sq. ft. shop with two A.C. offices, ONLY $1200. 688 B-Wells Rd., 2932202. C033882 VONS SHOPPING CENTER 760 & 1248 SF Available Neal Siniakin, Broker 294-1444 CONDO SALES 2 bd., 1-1/2 ba,. Sellers PI. Condo, $625 per mo. + dep., no pets. Call Al, at Jensens Realty, 5643333. CR33656 2 bd., 2-1/2 ba., 1300 Sq. Ft. + Hemenway Valley in BC, $117,000. Ph. 293-0869. CS33709 For Sale by Owner: Like new 2 bd., 2 ba., BC condo. This second floor location faces east & has 1140-^ SF. Ceiling fans, cable TV & phone jacks in every rm., frpl., track lighting, balcony/patio, cathedral ceilings, plant shelves w/covered & open assigned parking w/own RV spot. Incl.. 2 spas & a pool, plus lots of quiet. Must see to really appreciate. Can be sold either furn./unfurn. $99,500. Shown by appt., 293-0546. CS33895 Henderson-2 bd.-l 1/2 ba.-W/D hookup-1000 Sq.Ft.-445 Seller PI. 65K. 293-3625 Neil or Sue. CS33825 Buy for zero down, $650/ mo., 2 bd. 2 ba. condo, walking distance to downtown BC, no pets, 293-2433. CS33929 CONDO RENTALS 3 bd., 2 ba., dbl gar. w/ Lake view w/appi + W/D avail. 3/1, $915, 2947778. CR33466 BC-La Dolce Vita, 2 bd., 2ba,priv yd,frpl,$775, 293-1847. CR33857 Cozy 2 bd., 2 ba. condo w/frpl., W/D & dishwasher, $600 mo. • • dep., 293-4937 CR33859 BC • 2 M.J2 ba., ^ all appl*., convaniant ^ location W28MIO. • dapa. APT. RENTALS Teddy's Kitchenettes, Just bring your toottibrush. Everything furnished. PH. 293-1716. BC HND 2 bd., 1 ba., $525 mo., $250 dep.,1 time cleaning fee $125, no pets, 564-5712. AR33745 2 bd. apt., near downtown Hendersori, $500 + dep., 564-1628. AR33764 LG. DUPLEX FOR hENT extra Ig. 1-1/2 bd.. Old Town Boulder f ^KMs^.(K6taqfi to all facilities, nice qailt neighborhood. 508 Ash St. Call 293-6081, $600/mo. AR33866 Cozy 1 bd. duplex. 619 Ave. K. Fully f urn., includ. W/D. Green Landscaping, off St. parking, fenced yd No pets-$525 +dep. 434-1997 Days, 2941208 Eves. AR33808 Buy for zero down, $650/ mo., 2 bd., 2 ba. condo, walking distance to downtown BC, no pets, 293-2433. AR33928 CORNER COURT APTS. 2 bdrm., 1 ba.. Near Basic High $525/mo. + sec. dep. No Pets 458-6868 KITCHENETTES STARVIEW MOTEL Boulder City 293-1658 APT. RENTALS Ridge Apts. in BC,. 2 bdrm. No pets. Lease for 12 mo. 293-0420. AR33642 NEW KITCHENETTES, phone, satellite, maid service. STARVIEW MOTEL 293-1658. BC AR14278 FOR RENT: Kitcfienettes, $65/wk. Utilities pd. SHADY REST MOTEL, 565-7688. AR9597 Furn. studio apt. for rent, all utils. pd., 565-9318. AR33415 BC2bd.,2ba.,verynice, 5-plex, Ig. storage room w/ea. unit, downstairs, $650/mo., 293-0008. AR33902 Georgia Ave. Aparts. 1330 Georgia Ave. 2 & 3 bd. apts., some pets accepted, 293-7775. AR33742 ^ HENDERSON, 2 bd. apts. Close to schools and shopping. Move in for as low as $540. American Family Realty, 564-2878. AR33451 APARTMENTS AS LOW AS $275 a Month furnished 564-6952 „,, • •* • ••••• •• ^ GATED DUPLEX^ ^ 1&2bd., fully ^ carpeted, w/stove & refrig. priv. parking, 1 • sm. child OK, no pets. "^ • 433-6069 • •••••••••• HENDERSON PLAZA Lg. 2 bd., 1 ba.. Free hot water & cable. Pool, laundry facilities. Parklike setting. Police substation on site. Library, garden areas, monthly activities. Starting at $530/mo. Call 565-7512. FOR RENT Oceanside Apartments 2 bd., 1 ba. Corner of Ocean Ave. & Tin St. 566-9123 Welcome home to comfortable living. CASA DE ALICIA AND M&M II APT Offers 1,2&3Bedroom Apt. tiomes from $570 Pool, Laundry, small pets welcome tsj 293-1615 f^ Mon.-Fri., 8 am-5 pm. '.1^7! DO WE HAVE A SWEETHEART OF A DEAL FOR YOU! Call for details on fantastic move in special. You'll LOVE living at MORRELL PARK APARTMENTS 565-8080 'For a llmltd tlnrw only isi locatton W28MIO. RMI Mountain RMlly, 394-1100 ************ APARTMENTS IN HENDERSON Clean, Quality 1-2-3 Bedroom Apartments in Henderson • Central Air & Heat • Appliances • Blinds • Carpets • Water Paid • Washer/Dryer Available Apartments are $420 & up per month, newly remodeled, spacious near schools, park & shopping. 565-7028 32837 APT. RENTALS 2bd.,1ba. Duplex, $650, pets OK. 293-6221. AR33899 •••••••••••••e ROOM RENTALS NEVADA INN, "A Friendly Place To Stay". Budget cottages to aeluxe suites, beautiful pool & whirlpool, parking for boats and R Vs. Call 702293-2044 for rates and reservations. Our suites are three room apartment size, witti kitchen. RR32844 HD-4bd.,3ba.,2story', w/pool & Jacuzzi, W/D,' house privs., $400 + utils., Mike 564-2709. RR33592 Pref. retired femate, $300/mo., all utils. incl., new house, 454-7914. RR33773 Good loc, emp. man, all priv., no drugs, $300, cableTV, refs. exch. 2931022. RR33917 HD, Furn. studio, priv. ba., kit., N-S, $400 incl. util. + dep., 293-6799/ 565-6806. RR33292 Non-smoker, workin gentleman, 565-160 work, 564-6477 home RR33542 MOBILE HOMES 1997 dbl. wide 3 bd., 2 ba., like model home, must see to appreciate, Villa Hermosa Ct., low pk. rent, 564-7781. MH33780 Rent to own park model travel trailer, ideal for 1/2 persons, starting at $440/ mo. Call Bret, 294-8888. MH33647 HOUSE TO SELL OR TRADE LV-Lg 4 bd house 1/2 acre horse prop. N/W Jones/Gowan Ig. fam. rm., 2 car detached gar. will trade down for home or condo in BC/HC. $195,000 OBO. 2932230* 33896 LAND FOR SALE LAND SALE! SO Ac$49,900 winter liquidation. Owner selling Idaho ranch land between Snake & Salmon Rivers, near Hells Canyon Rec. Area &'millions of acres of nat'l. forest. Rolling terrain, spectacular views! Power, phone, excellentfinancing, Rare opp'ty. don't miss out! Call now 208-839-2501. f^/lC33802 COMMERCIAL SALES Rare CM Zoning in BC, new 4700 SF masonry bIdg., $300,000, 2932202. MC33370 Newer CM 12007600 loft. Live in OK! Nice area. $89K owe @ 8%, 2932030. MC33841 STORAGE UNITS For rent, 10x20 & 20x20 storage unit, 293-1135. MC33591 STEEL BUILDINGS and BUILDING MATERIALS STEEL BUILDINGS CLEARANCE SALE. Best Price in West! 1800-973-3366. MC33803 STEEL BUILDINGS SALE: 30x40x10, $4,594; 40x60x14, $8,155; 50x75x14, $11,195; 50x100x16, $14,953; 60x100x16, $17,603. Mini-storage buildings, 30x160, 32 units, $13,944. Free brochures. Sentinel Buildings, 800-327-0790, Extension 79. MC33804 Steel bIdg. dealership avail, in select open areas. Big profit potential in booming industry. Call Mr. Caly (303) 759-3200. MC33549 ALL STEEL BUILDINGS Factory Blowout! 1-800-973-3366 REAL ESTATE STEEL BUILDINGS and BUILDING MATERIALS STEEL BLDGS. Save 1,0O0's with fac. specials on Indus, shops & storage units If ordered by 2/ 28, call Al, 702-646-4170. MC33498 REAL ESTATE 5 yr. old home located at Waters Edge. 2 bd., 2 ba., nicely landscaped, super clean $180,000. 109 Sea Breeze Ln.BC, 293-4703. RE33426 PVH Real Estate, Inc. has 1 of the largest selections of commercial & residential lots, mobile homes, Ig. acreage, home & income property inPahrump, 1-70 2-7270445. RE26849 PAHRUMP hXER ON 2.5 ACRES $45,000. Gr. value. Single wide on 2.5 AC. Gr. area, loads of privacy. Well, septic & power already on lot. Financing avail. OAC. $45,000. NEW NV. REALTY 727-8522. BC 3 bd., 2 ba., home, on 100x100 lot, across from BC Golf Course. Features fp, 3 car gar., pool/spa, $187,500. Call 768-601 1/248-6199 owner Lie. Broker/Sales in NV. RE33631 A NATIONAL MOBILE HOME finance company has 2, 3 & 4 BR single and multi-section Bank Repos. Great Rates, easy qualify and transfer of payments. Terms negotiable or make cash offer. Free call 1-800651-4625, Ext. 911. February 12-13,1998 Panorama Page 19 VACATION RENTALS Ski Brian Head, UT, Ig. condo, 3 bds., 2 master, frpl., Jacuzzi, sleeps 8, $95 week nights, $135 weekends, $175 Holidays, 294-2320. REAL ESTATE INCOME PROPERTY, 2 homes: 2 bd., 1 ba. & 1 bd., 1 ba., indiv. fenced yd., quiet area, close to all shopping & schools, owner will carry first, $1100/mo. Income, 2941422. NO REALTORS, $135,000. RE33694 LAKE MOUNTAIN ESTATES 1993 Silvercrest, 2 bd., 2 ba., storage shed. Quiet cul-de-sac. $125,000. GINGERWOOD PARK 1977 Gibraltor, 2 bd., 1 ba. Backs up to desert. $24,500. Call Nancy at DICK BLAIR REALTY 293-2171. RE33526 GOVERNMENT FORECLOSED HOMES, pennies on the $1. Repo's, VA, HUD, Sheriff sales. No money down government loans available now. Local listings. Tolj free 1-800-669-2292 Ext. H-4000. RE33792 Vintage 2 br. house at 520 Fifth St. New carpet and paint, gas central heat, evaporative cooler, plaster walls, aluminum siding over stucco, alley access with double gate, 4 blocks from high scnooli One of few BC home§ under $100,000. 2932010 or 293-1912 for appm't. RE33862 RENTALS Spanish Steps, 2 bdrm., 2 hath.ofTice & den, 2nd fir., pool, $850. Lake Terrace Condo, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 2 car gar., lake view $1100. Home w/3 bdrm., 2 bath, 2 car gar., fenced yard, $1250. Home w/3 bdrm., 1 bath, 1 car gar., $850. DICK BLAIR REALTY 293-2171 OstUi% I 21. Henderson Realty, inc. "The Property People" 18 Water Street 564-2515 Call now for new home information! DOLLHOUSE IN HENDERSON 3 bdrm. townsitc home only blocks to downtown. Clean!! Great yard w/RV parking. Central Air. $82,90(). 84313m BEAUTIFUL MANUFACTURED HOME! REAL PROPERTY! 1996 Model-Double Wide. 3-4 bdrms., 2 full baths. Extra large lot, fully fenced. RV parking. Only $ 112.900! 75381 n HIGHLAND HILLS AREA Cul de-sac lot 90 X 1 11, 3 bdmi., 1-3/4 baths, 2 car garage, RV parking. Block wall fenced, formal living & dining, family room, ceramic lilc & hardwood floors, french door, covered palio, fireplace. Nearby freeway access. J:47171. Call Sharon .378-1692. MIS SI ON H ILL?> 1 A CRE Loi zoned for horses. 4 bdrm.. 2 bath, full blcKk wall fenced. 2 car attached garage plus 4 car detached garage workshop. Tile r(K)f, fireplace. 16x 18. Guest quarters with basement. SE:46142. Call Sharon 378-1692. RIV K RLANPI NC 2ST0RY Many upgrades, 3 bdrm., 2-3/4 baths, 2 car garage plus workshop. Huge country kitchen, Jenn-air, microwave, garden window, breakfast bar. pantry. 1 bed. & bath down plus 2 bed. & 1-.V4 baths upstairs, loft, pot shelf, gorgeous landscaping front & back, sdlar screens, central heat & air plus evaporative coolers. S;68120. Call Sharon 378-1692. NEAR DOOLEY ELEM. SCHOOL 3 bd., 1 -3/4 ba., 2 car garage, huge master. RV parking both sides of lot. C:74776 Call Sharon 378-1692. ts} EQUAL EACH OFFICE IS HOUSING INDEPENDENTLY OWNED OPPOHTUtllTV AND OPERATED M^ BRAND NEW! JUST BUILT FOR YOU! 835 Lime Roek KV & Boat Owners: This w(is huilt for you! Incredible RV/Iioai garage .store all your toys! OjK'n floor plan w/light colors & view of Ixike Mead from H hedrtHtms & kitchen. Berber carpet throughout, kitchen has marble floor &. quality cabinets! H Jet Jacuzzi tub in extra large master suite. Fountain and accent yard lighting makes this home spectacular! Calf today to see! 694-1881 or 293 0008 $359,900 Oumer/^ent REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE ThePrudential Jensen's Realty Thinking of Buying or Selling? The Rock is the answer! The Prudential Jensen's Realty Specializes In Residential-Commercial and Property Management t2r EQUAL MOUSING OfKlllTUNITY We're here to serve you Henderson 564-3333 tslaul More POWER to you JR Realty Are You Budget Wise? Don't pass up this 3 bedroom in Green Valley. Tile roof, 2 car garage, centrally located, $128,900. Act now call Century 21 JR Realty. What A Doll House! Single story, 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, .140 acre loti Easy care Desert Landscaping front & back. Open great room, breakfast bar, laundry room. $104,999. Wow! What curb Appeal! And that's a good Indication of what you'll find Inside! 3 bedroom, 2 bath, has lots of nift|t improvements you'll appreciate, including family room, custom kitchen cabinets. Only $93,500. Must See Location ... attractive 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage, new roof, big separate family room, brick fireplace, country kitchen, walk to park/grade school... $127,500. 4 Bedroom Beauty ... bonus 3-car garage, tile roof, separate family room, island kltcheiV^ 1 nook, pool, built in 1995, fantastic view lot, a4must see location ... $169,250. A Gourmet Kitchen and More! Jenn Aircooktop, large family room & kitchen, skylight, 3 large bdrooms, 2 bath, 3 car garage, RV parking, large rooms. Brand new custom, large lot, 2407 sq/ft. $189,900 LET US HELP YOU CALL HENDERSON HOME Oppoiiunltv 564-65461 m 101 E. Horizon Dr. Locally Owned EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED REAL ESTATE Calico Cove, HU, by owner (relocating), $141,900. 3 bd., 2 ba., many upgrades, 1 yr. old, 5 min. to Lake Mead, 5641202. RE33856 REAL ESTATE ^or sale by owner, 3 bd., 2 ba., 2 car ^r, nice neighborhood in HD, Ig. corner lot, like new, $110,000, call for appt. 568-1075/455-7932. RESioerrnAL COMMERCIAL LAND PROPERTY MANAOEMEm' 'We Make House Calls' NEW HOME INFORMATION and BUYER'S REPRESENTATION (Including Lain U Vtgm) ProptrtyofUnwetk ^ Spanish-style 2 story, 3 Bedrooms, 2-1/2 Baths, Room for RV or expansioii. Full covered patki w/arches & latticed enclosure. Washer & Dryer included. Lots of extra*. Only $129,900! Knapp Realty-566-8185 827 So. Boulder Hwy., Handcrson, NV 89015 (|nn=~j=i (Acroas from Smith'a Shopplnfl Cantar) \\^im^\ outsWeof rievada: IX>209-267e FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS... Call Henderson's #1 Real Estate Team BRENDAB1RDGR1,CRS Lifetime IHenderson Resident 564-1127 WENDY WILLIAMS 378-1689 Over $125 Million in Sales 30 years combined ^^H Real Estate experience! SJL "The DYNAMIC DUO JR Realty Sells Homes!" ^M Ox*m^ JUDY MENKENS, GRI Knapp Realty 'Just call JUDY" 497-1553 1-800-852-1726 Honest & Reliable representation for Buyers & Sellers Special of the Weekl Conveniently located 3 bedrm. 2 Bath 2 car Huge bedrooms with walit In closets Single Story City Lights & Mountain Views Seller Motivatedllllll $139,900 JOi-sale by owner, twostory Lewis home, 4 bdnri., 2.5 ba., too much to list, reduced to $183,000, 293-1973. RE33867 LAKE MOUMTAIN ESTATES 1993 Silvercrest, 2bd., 2ba., storage shed. Quiet cul-de-sac. $125,000. Call Nancy at DICK BLAIR REALTY 293-2171. RE33784 FORECLOSESI All areas of the LV Valley incl. Hend. & BC. Tract Homes, Custom Homes & FIx-ups. Call Russ Gilmore, Broker/Assoc. 24 hrs. 474-1569 for more details. Knapp Realty. RE33870 FOR SALE • TERMS AVAIUVDLE COMMERCIAL BUILDING & WAREHOUSE PLUS MINI STORAGE UNITS In Boulder City 6 Units in front plus mini storage units in bock plus warehouse Commercial Light Industrial Manufacturing Warehouse • Units 5&6 • Two Story OHice/Wurehouse w/Shop Area and Sloroge Icit • 2200 (T/ ,' Sq Ft Total • Units 8&10 1200 I+/I Sq Ft 3 Bedroom, 2 Both Aporlment Goroge • Units 7&9 700 (+/ | Sq Ft 1 Bedroom, 2 Batli Aporlment, w/500 (+/ ) Sq Fl Goroge • Unit 11 2520 (+/ • ) Sq Ft Total Area • 1 Bedroom, 2 Bath Aporlment • Rsc Room • Handball Courl • Unit) 2 1900(t/)Sq. Ft Mlm Sioroge Units & Worehouse Common areos included paved parking, stairways, woiks, o.,phn't ap-ons, drivewa/s and londscaping Duildings ore 6 years old total square footage is approximately 12,000 (W-) sellers will consider terms, priced below appraisal ^^tnUI)^ Call Danny Gennette ^ r2l (702) 873 2443^ MoneyWorld [(JUAI POUMNC OPPOBTUNIT* VEHICLES REAL ESTATE BC -3t)d., 2ba., spa, oak cab. in kitn., like new thruout, comer lot, block wall, 2 car gar., very delightful home. Asking $167,500. call 294-6294. RE33587 REAL ESTATE Own Your Own Home Nowl No down payment on Miles materials. Innovative construction financing. Call Miles Homes, today, 1-800343-2884. ext. L. Coldwell Banker Premier BC Contemporary SW Estatel Hilltop views, private setting, • approx. 70(X) SF & guest tKXJse, soaring ceilings, Persian tnarble & granite througtiout, gourmet kitchen, exercise rm., observation deck, pool & spa, $1,987,000. Call for appt. O'BRIEN QROUP 886-431 ^ u*a Sunday tour of homes. Tour up to 6 homes! No hassle, no pressure, call 458-1585 & enter ID No. 1189 to hear recorded information for this Sunday's tour. Talk to no agent, tour changes every week. Cathy BIttlnger, Century 21 MoneyWorid DON'T 2ND GUESS The next time you have to make a decision regarding Sfilllng or Purchaaing Real Estatel Put 35 years of real estate experience to worit for you. C8//Dtiane G. Laubach ORB, CRS, GRI Realtor-Broker I568^REAL)7325 iHtndtnon IMIy Inc. d 37(^6352 ia wif 8tft •*••**•*•***** ^ BOULDER CRT ^ Nw Listing • Spck>u ft bright Regatta Point*, 2 bd., -^ (l*n.chft'kitchan.cutomfaatijrMthru-out-$210.000.-^ i^ Villa Dal Prado graat room w/flraplace, 3 bdVI -3/4 ba., K Ula roof, covered RV pkg., lush landscaping, 2 car gar., W $165,000. i Ch*ckit0ut-4bd/l-3/4ba.,llvlng/dlnlngarM,*aparata ^ JL. lamlly room, over 1600 at.. 2 car gar. & pool. $167,500. JL. Ragatta Polnte • 2 bd./2 ba., country kitchan, aaparata • ^ maatar aulta, private yard, luth landscaping, $159.900. X Valley View Estates -1993 Cavco, 2 b6J2 ba., aaparata "w mastsrbdrm.,maturelandscaplng,comerlot,$OS,000. "^ JL Great Lake viewl 2 bd72 ba. townhome. Impeccably ^ maintained, open living area, many upgrades. 2 car J^ gar. $189,900. CALL BETH RED MOUNTAJ^gALTY ^ 294-1500 OR 888-733-6881 ••••*•***••*•* EQUAL HOMMO OPKMTUPfTV VEHICLES VEHICLES REAL ESTATE 4 bd. w/cov. RV park & over 1800 SF, 2 car gar., Gr. flag pole lined street. BeautJTul neighborthood. Tile roof. Gr. rm.. Ivrm. w/ huge kitchen & all bdrms. are huge. Asking $185,000. MLS #49202.. Call 733-7653. RE33307 REAI ESTATE REAL ESTATE BARGAIN HOMES. Thousands of Government foreclosed and repossessed properties being liquidated this monthl Call for local listIngsl 1-800-501-1777 ext. 3399. RE33789 Thinking of Selling or Purchasing Real Estate in the Valley? Ccill 568 555 Henderson Valley Realty Inc. 109 S. Water St., Henderson (odjocent to Dank of Amerkn Building) Ek>b -LukeLukowsld ^^ Drof^er/Solesmon DARWIN'S 1524 NEVADA HWY. BOULDER CITY, NV. 293-3996 Custom home overlooking lake—4 Bedrooms, 3 baths, lots of extras. Reduced to $229,000. Owner will help finance. Darwin Bible Boulder Square Condo—best view in area. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Reduced to $74,500. Lake Mountain Estates at its finest. Like new 2 bedroom, 2 bath w/den. 782 SF garage. Panoramic view of lake from deck. Reduced to $152,000 and owner will help finance. Older Boulder City location near schools. Completely restored. 1835 SF., Spacious rooms, huge lot w/alley access. Lots of room for big family. Detached garage. $159,000. Owner will help finance. Complete estate liquidations!!! Real estate and personal property. We also do personal property estate appraisals. 20th year in business. n VEHICLES VEHICLES VEHICLES Iiv Celebration of this month's "WINSTON CUP" Race, we're out to save you money • BE A VIP •• AT THE LAS VEGAS •400" K RACE Buy any new Taurus at... Get 2 reserved seats and '^'SUNT^ VIP treatment including meals in the Ford Hospitality Area. Buy any NEW or USED vehicle and receive a S100 ClfT CERTIFICATE Good toward automotive apparel & accessory items from the Ford Country Parts Pro Shop Register no^v at Ford Country to WIN A VALVOLINE GO-KART and Las Vegas "400" Race Tickets* CONGRATULATIONS "FORD TAURUS" WINS INAUGURAL RACE Boulder City Minutes from Las Vegas Worlds apart in life style The Choice is Yours FREE Real Estate Guide in this paper or Call for one from any of your local brokers 4," ANCHOR REALTY 1497 NKVADA HWV BC ADOBE REALTY 1310 NEVADA HWV CENTURY 21 Bclder D,m R. alty 293-5757 80n-842-QS2ll 293-1707 800 5S3-808I 293-4663 1664 NEVADA HWY 800 228 835.H DESERT SUN REALTY 293-2151 1000 NEVADA HWV DICK BLAIR REALTY 833 NEVADA HWY HYDE REALTY 132? ARJZQNA STREET RED MTN. REALTY 293-2171 800 525 89in 293-6014 800-92-3548 294-1500 Cash Down • Air Conditioning • Power Windows • V-6 Power • Power Loclbati Totaldui$820 ncKidn \* mo pml MC imp ten Total pn>ilO.On IFV}9050l2l>milnpwywr $1250 coh badi on al can acipi Tc*mn Sno • OvM) Viilufu

PAGE 37

Page 18 Panorama February 12-13, 1998 HELP WANTED I DOMESTIC HELP AVON NO DOOR to door necessary. Earn to 50%. Have fun and make money too. MLM available. Great moneymaKing opportunity. FT/OT. Independent Representative. 1-800527-2866. HW33801 ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOYMENT — Fishing industry. Excellent worker earnings & benefits potential (up to $2,850-i-/mo. -troom/ board). All major employers. For employment information: 517-3243056 ext. A89772. HW33807 ._ I NEED HELP! Overwhelmed! Will help you get started! Earn $5000 to $10,000 per month. Parttime. Fantastic Support! No selling. Not MLM. Two-minute message. 1800-995-0796, Ext. 6096. HW33809 POLICE OFFICER. SALARY; $18.81-24.00/ hour. REQUIREMENTS; Graduation from high school or the equivalent. College level coursework in Criminal Justice, Police Science, or a closely related field and worl< experience involving public contact is desirable. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: Must possess an appropriate Nevada Driver's License at the time of appointment and maintain a satisfactory driving record. Must be a U.S. citizen and be at least 21 years of age at the time of the written examination for Police Officer. Any applicant who has been convicted of any chme for which registration is required under NRS 207.090 and 207.152, or who has been convicted of two or more crimes of which fraud or intent to defraud is an element, or has been convicted of two or more offenses of larceny, stiall be disqualified. Visual acuity must be correctable to 20/20. Hearing threshold must be 30 decibels or less for each ear, without the use of a hearing aid or other corrective hearing device. All employees in this class must successfully complete the Academy Basic Course, Category I, within the time frame as required by tfie Henderson Police Department. WHERE TO APPLY; City application fomi must be submitted to, and received by, the Human Resources Department, Room 200, City Hall, 240 Water Street, Henderson, Nevada 89015, no later than Tuesday, March 10, 1998, by5;00p.m.,tobe considered for this recruitment. NO APPLICATIONS WILL BE GIVEN OUT AFTER 4:00 P.M. ON THE CLOSING DATE OF THIS RECRUITMENT. Employment packet MUST be obtained from thie Human Resources Department; resumes only WILL NOT be accepted in lieu of employment application. HOURS OF OPERATION: MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY. 7:30 A.M. TO 5:30 P.M. SMOKE-FREE WORK ENVIRONMENT. HW33817 PART-TIME SEASONAL. The City of Henderson is currently accepting applications for the following part-time, seasonal positions in our aquatics and summer youth programs. BUS DRIVER, $9.50. RECREATION ASST. I, $5.50. REC. ASST. IPOOL CASHIER, $5.50. RECREATIONASST.il, $5.55-$Q.00. RECREATION ASST. Ill, $6.25$7.25. RECREATION ASST. IV, $7.25-$10.00. LIFEGUARD (NO WSI), $6.50. LIFEGUARD (WITH WSI) $7.50. SENIOR LIFEGUARD, $9.00. POOL MANAGER, $10.50. WHERE TO APPLY; A City application must t€completed and submitted to the Human Resources Department, City Hall, 240 Water Street, Henderson, NV 89015. HOURS OF OPERATION: Monday through Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. NOTE: ALL POSITIONS WILL CLOSE APRIL 30, 1998 AT 5:00 P.M AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/ EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER HW33821 ** • • • • • • • • GOLD STRIKE INN & CASINO NOW HIRING: WWWBB laeufMy Guard* EnglnMr* ^ lluiUlirilWirt ^ Kuno Munnart ^ wontn .^ V_, m f ili m CB C —Wi n HeuMkaaptrs. In* eooM • ParMkna 0n atiap pwaon. MHwrw* utMr Noar Dam CHILD CARE near Boulder Hwy./Sunset. 7 daysawk., day and night, great ret. Call 566-6000. DH33216 Exp. quality affordable' day care, FT/PT, meals & snacks incl., refs. & health card. 558-0185. DH33267 Child care, my home, Mon.-Sat., 15 yrs. exp., refs. avail., 565-8659. DH33332 Childcare, Christian new home, FT opening. M-F only, days, 2 yrs. & older, refs. avail., Michelle, 5584399. DH33819 TAMMY'S CLEANING SERVICE. Konest, reliable, licensed pis., Iv. msg., 293-4341. Childcare in Hend. home, hot meals, nice back yd., infants welcome, 5666823. DH33585 Childcare, PT & FT, meals incl., 566-6229, Joanne. DH33762 Home away from home. Daycare by retired nurse. 24 hr. daycare. VanDeBurg ES distnct. Ages 0-12 yrs., drop ins welcome. Low rates. GV Ranch, 269-8662. D H33871 TAMMY'S CLEANING SERVICE Honest, reliable, licensed. Pis. Iv. msg., 293-4341. DH33872 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES NOTICE TO READERS; The HBC Publications does not vouch for the legitimacy of items, jobs, or money-making opportunities advertised in this classification. We suggest you carefully epvaluate such offers and not send money to these advertisers unless you are certain you know with whom you are dealing and you know all terms and conditions of the offer. Steel bidg. dealership avail. Jn select open areas. Big profit potential in booming industry. Call Mr. Clay (303) 759-3200. B033514 TURN YOUR MAILBOX INTO A CASH COW! FREE Tape Tells All. 1800-730-4314,24 hr.rec. msg. BO33710 HELP WANTED MOTHERS & OTHERS. Work PT or FT $499$7,999. Call 503-9452779. B033912 SSSS MONEY MAKER IN HENDERSON SSSS Established LubeATune Shop for sale. Asking $200,000. Ownerflnancing w/507o down. Profitable shopping center location. Long term lease. Century 21 JR Realty, Jackson Meeker, 702378-2745. B033654 OWN YOUR OWN apparel, shoe, lingerie, bridal, gift or $1.00 store. Includes inventory, fixtures, buying trip, training. Minimum investment $18,900. Call Dan at Liberty Opportunities (501) 327-8031. BO33805 Mi\KE MORE MONEY ttfen you can spend! Call the World's most valuable special recorded message: 1-888-2410189 ID number 013. Tollfree call and free information pack. B033813 FINANCIAL SERVICES $$CASH$$ REFINANCE YOUR home. Credit problems-Bankruptcy OK!! No income verification required. Many programs available. Call today (888) 971-8370 toll free. Village Oaks Mortgage. FS33800 Sen/. Mgr./Director-experienced, mature, stable, hands on mgr. wants to relocate to HD/ LV area. Ford. Merc, Import & motor home exp. ADP systems, sm/lg. dealer. Call Jerry. 209545-4776/fax 209-5458428 for interview/resume. MC33831 Loans From$100-$500 Security Finance 39 E. Basic, #C 558-5442 NEVADA FINANCIAL Provides Real Estate Loans for All Types of Credit Call Tom 9 369-1955 CASH ADVANCES up to S300 on your next paycheck No credit check Fast phone approval. Call Alpha Financial Services at 878--8065 FINANCIAL SERVICES $CASH NOW$ for your future lottery installments, structured settlements, annuities, class action awards and inheritances. 1-800-4579922, Bach Investments Co. FS33814 HOME LOANS! PURCHASING or refinancing? Perfect credit ,or problem credit! JHeath Financial Services can help you. Offices in Nevada and California to serve vou. 1-800-6550331. FS33798 "CASH" IMMEDIATE $$ for structured settlements and deferred insurance claims. J.G. Wentworth. 1-888-2315375. FS33786 ALL CASH! Receiving payments on a mortgage? Why wait? Best prices paid locally and nationwide, plus we pay transfer costs. Sell all/ part. PEI 1-800-9999892. FS33787 CALL US LAST FOR fast' cash! Receiving payments? Turn your annuity, mortgage, trust deed, lottery into immediate cash. Best Prices Nationwide! 1-800-6592274 Ext. 32. FS33788 100% OF VALUE HOME Equity Loans. Stated income is not checked. No up-front fees. Minimal paperwork. 60 minute approval by phone. 800997-1955. A-2-Z Mortgage Solutions. FS33791 $$GETCASHNOW$$lf you're currently receiving payments from workers comp, lottery or an insurance settlement. Best prices. Call PPI 1800-435-3248 ext 184. P.ROI.I. COMPANY Payroll Services & General ledger •Ul!/l(lfl^J MiuOKlk M.'illu • \nlN-l'iiMiIiI/rmhlilili* •I ,k llo\ • ( IHIlt'l ftlllliiu*. •Iliiilk Ki'i'uiKlllllilloils •( imtoiM S.,(rwiir\Ml( H\K(.i:l()H: •i(i\\rksi(i\ sp"i 11' •l.MrlllM I \IH>MI(i\s •I'Ml'Idll I ( IIWI.IS •I.VSI KPWKDI I ( Jill K.S •I'WKOI I I'll K I I' •\i.\i.\rrii lAi'i MiDiA •orvifn HIV lA.v ki I'oifiN ••ClIS Kl IIIKI -We Pick Up & Deliver. P w r run up at ueu ver-f L733-0378-I NEVADA FIWNCIAL CONCEPTS l7HfS h 'a)>an \vt SuHr IMp^a HOUSE RENTALS GV, $2p00/mo., 8968811. HR33295 BC LA DOLCE VITA, 2 bd .12 ba. w/lg. grassy yd., no pets pis, $775. BRET, 294-8482. HR33212 2 bd., downtown, $600/ mo. -tdep., no pets, 5643140. HR33781 BC 2 bd., 1 ba.. very close to schools, Ig. yd., 1st, last & sec. dep., $835/mo., 293-6345 or 274-2597. HR33770 3 bd., 2 ba. + den. 2 car gar., Ig. fenced yd, $1150 mo.1st +sec, 294-1963 or 293-0414. HR33873 NewGVRanch,2bd.,2 ba., 2 car gar., frpl., gated comm., comm. pool & spa, avail, now, $995/mo., pet OK, call 566-5875. HR33903 525HopiSt.,BC,near711 off Utah St., 2 bd., 1 ba., central air, pets OK, fenced backyd., $695, regs. 1st, last & $250 cleaning dep. Call 2937335/293-0410. HR33667 Like new Verde Viejo G V, overlooks pool/spa/play area, all appl, $850 rent, $825 Sec. Call Donna, Century 21 JR, 5645142. HR33723 3bd., 1 ba., 1 car gar, N. Major Ave., $725/mo. + dep., no pets, call Al at Jensen's Realty, 5643333. HR33367 3bd., 1-3/4 ba, full cov. patio, wood burning frpl., wood parquet floors In Ivrm., kitchen & dining area, central heating & AC,$800/mo., 293-3168/ 521-8393. HR33891 BC 3 bd., 1 ba., central air. Nice shape. $775 mo. + $500 dep., 564-0555. HR33919 INDIAN RIDGE 1 •tory, 3 br., 2 bth., 2 car gar., 1800 af, RV parking. Immed. move-in. No amoking, nopata. SI 200 mo. GV TOWNHOUSE 2 br.. 2 bth.. priv. Avail. 3/1/98, S875 mo. Call Fred/Sandy at Knapp Realty, 566-8185 2 bd.. Ig. Ivngrm., carpeted, modern kitn., appl. Incl. Lg. Lockable yd. w/cov. carport $690 mo. Dap. 564-4292 HOUSE RENTALS I CONDO RENTALS I CONDO RENTALS 2 bd., 1 ba., 2 car gar., Engel Ave., $700/mo. -idep., no pets, call Al at Jensen's Realty, 5643333. HR33855, 3 bd., 3 ba. home w/loft, good location, comm. pool, 435-9123. HR33407 GV Crystal Springs, spacious 2 bd. + den/office, 1700 SF, low main, yd., covered patio, $1150 RenL $1125 Sec. Call Donna, Century 21 JR, 564-5142. HR33727 3 bd., 2"ba. -tden, 2 car gar.,lq.fencedyd.,$1150 mo. First -tsec, 2941963 or 293-0414. HR33873 3 bd., 2 ba. + den, 2 car gar., Ig. fenced yd., $ 1150 mo. First'+ sec, 2941963 or 293-0414. HR33873 3 bd., 2 ba. mobile, neat & clean ayailable now. Call Kay/Desert Sun Realty, ^93-2151 or Pager #477-4818. $775. HR33911 Buy for zero down, $650/ mo., 2 bd,, 2 ba. condo, walking distance to downtown BC, no pets, 293-2433. HR33927 COMMERCIAL RENTALS Warehouse for sale or lease. 600 sq. ft. 20x30 zoned CM, $39,500 or $300 month plus assoc. fees. 707 Canyon Rd., M-3, call 294-0225. C033567 HENDERSON, 1&2bd. townhomes, close to schools and shopping. Move in for as low as $610. American Family Realty, 564-2878. CR33449 1 Lg.bd., 2 ba., very clean, close to school. BC, 2940605. CR33861 GRAND LEGACY Gated community Semi custom, 3300-tSF, pool/spa, culde-sac lot, 260-1048. CR33923 BC 2 Ig. bds, 2 ba., downstairs, very nice $675. Desert Sun Realty, 293-2151. CR33920 Pecos/Russell over 55 "Sun City" like complex. 2 bd./2 ba., ground floor. Never lived in. American Family Realty, 564-2878. CR33452 HD condo, 2 bd., 1 ba., convenient to downtown, some utils., $495 + dep. 564-1509/452-4884. 2 bd., 2 ba. W/D, $595 mo., 840 SF, No Pets, 293-0533. CR33942^ Nice & Clean one bedroom condo with pool $450 per month. 2930405. CR 33932 RENTALS BRAND NEW BAYVIEW CONDO! 2 bd, 2ba, 2 car gar, $1000 KEY LARGO CONDO-Gr. View of Lake, 2bd, 2ba, 2cargar, $1200 KEY LARGO CONDO-3 bd, 2 ba, 2 car gar, $1200 LAKE TERRACE CONDO-Gr. View of Lake, 3 bd, 2 ba, 2 car gar, $1100 DICK BLAIR REALTY 293-2171 33853 Downtown BC, 501 NV Hwfy., approx. 800 SF, office, avail, after 2/16. Call 293-2002 ask for Rod. C033186 1500 SF Commercial/ Retail Space, glass /rootagg on aauldec 294-8888. CO33205 Office space fo^ rent in BC. One office from $150/ mo, utils. incl., to 4,000 Sq.Ft. at 58 cents/gross Sq. Ft./mo. Larry, 2937007. C033836 Newer CM 1200'/600 loft. Live in ok! Nice area. $89K owe @ 8%, 2932030. MC32091 EQUIPMENT STORAGE LOTS FOR LEASE 24 hr. access near BC/ HEND, 7000 SF w/sec lighting, renewable yrs. lease at$700/mo.. Century 21 JR Realty, Jackson Meeker, 702-3782745. C033635 Industry zoned shop, 1.800 SF & fenced pad 5,000 SF for lease. Parkson Rd., HD, $880/ mo, 456-6520 evenings. C033782 Industrial building, 3000 sq. ft. shop with two A.C. offices, ONLY $1200. 688 B-Wells Rd., 2932202. C033882 VONS SHOPPING CENTER 760 & 1248 SF Available Neal Siniakin, Broker 294-1444 CONDO SALES 2 bd., 1-1/2 ba,. Sellers PI. Condo, $625 per mo. + dep., no pets. Call Al, at Jensens Realty, 5643333. CR33656 2 bd., 2-1/2 ba., 1300 Sq. Ft. + Hemenway Valley in BC, $117,000. Ph. 293-0869. CS33709 For Sale by Owner: Like new 2 bd., 2 ba., BC condo. This second floor location faces east & has 1140-^ SF. Ceiling fans, cable TV & phone jacks in every rm., frpl., track lighting, balcony/patio, cathedral ceilings, plant shelves w/covered & open assigned parking w/own RV spot. Incl.. 2 spas & a pool, plus lots of quiet. Must see to really appreciate. Can be sold either furn./unfurn. $99,500. Shown by appt., 293-0546. CS33895 Henderson-2 bd.-l 1/2 ba.-W/D hookup-1000 Sq.Ft.-445 Seller PI. 65K. 293-3625 Neil or Sue. CS33825 Buy for zero down, $650/ mo., 2 bd. 2 ba. condo, walking distance to downtown BC, no pets, 293-2433. CS33929 CONDO RENTALS 3 bd., 2 ba., dbl gar. w/ Lake view w/appi + W/D avail. 3/1, $915, 2947778. CR33466 BC-La Dolce Vita, 2 bd., 2ba,priv yd,frpl,$775, 293-1847. CR33857 Cozy 2 bd., 2 ba. condo w/frpl., W/D & dishwasher, $600 mo. • • dep., 293-4937 CR33859 BC • 2 M.J2 ba., ^ all appl*., convaniant ^ location W28MIO. • dapa. APT. RENTALS Teddy's Kitchenettes, Just bring your toottibrush. Everything furnished. PH. 293-1716. BC HND 2 bd., 1 ba., $525 mo., $250 dep.,1 time cleaning fee $125, no pets, 564-5712. AR33745 2 bd. apt., near downtown Hendersori, $500 + dep., 564-1628. AR33764 LG. DUPLEX FOR hENT extra Ig. 1-1/2 bd.. Old Town Boulder f ^KMs^.(K6taqfi to all facilities, nice qailt neighborhood. 508 Ash St. Call 293-6081, $600/mo. AR33866 Cozy 1 bd. duplex. 619 Ave. K. Fully f urn., includ. W/D. Green Landscaping, off St. parking, fenced yd No pets-$525 +dep. 434-1997 Days, 2941208 Eves. AR33808 Buy for zero down, $650/ mo., 2 bd., 2 ba. condo, walking distance to downtown BC, no pets, 293-2433. AR33928 CORNER COURT APTS. 2 bdrm., 1 ba.. Near Basic High $525/mo. + sec. dep. No Pets 458-6868 KITCHENETTES STARVIEW MOTEL Boulder City 293-1658 APT. RENTALS Ridge Apts. in BC,. 2 bdrm. No pets. Lease for 12 mo. 293-0420. AR33642 NEW KITCHENETTES, phone, satellite, maid service. STARVIEW MOTEL 293-1658. BC AR14278 FOR RENT: Kitcfienettes, $65/wk. Utilities pd. SHADY REST MOTEL, 565-7688. AR9597 Furn. studio apt. for rent, all utils. pd., 565-9318. AR33415 BC2bd.,2ba.,verynice, 5-plex, Ig. storage room w/ea. unit, downstairs, $650/mo., 293-0008. AR33902 Georgia Ave. Aparts. 1330 Georgia Ave. 2 & 3 bd. apts., some pets accepted, 293-7775. AR33742 ^ HENDERSON, 2 bd. apts. Close to schools and shopping. Move in for as low as $540. American Family Realty, 564-2878. AR33451 APARTMENTS AS LOW AS $275 a Month furnished 564-6952 „,, • •* • ••••• •• ^ GATED DUPLEX^ ^ 1&2bd., fully ^ carpeted, w/stove & refrig. priv. parking, 1 • sm. child OK, no pets. "^ • 433-6069 • •••••••••• HENDERSON PLAZA Lg. 2 bd., 1 ba.. Free hot water & cable. Pool, laundry facilities. Parklike setting. Police substation on site. Library, garden areas, monthly activities. Starting at $530/mo. Call 565-7512. FOR RENT Oceanside Apartments 2 bd., 1 ba. Corner of Ocean Ave. & Tin St. 566-9123 Welcome home to comfortable living. CASA DE ALICIA AND M&M II APT Offers 1,2&3Bedroom Apt. tiomes from $570 Pool, Laundry, small pets welcome tsj 293-1615 f^ Mon.-Fri., 8 am-5 pm. '.1^7! DO WE HAVE A SWEETHEART OF A DEAL FOR YOU! Call for details on fantastic move in special. You'll LOVE living at MORRELL PARK APARTMENTS 565-8080 'For a llmltd tlnrw only isi locatton W28MIO. RMI Mountain RMlly, 394-1100 ************ APARTMENTS IN HENDERSON Clean, Quality 1-2-3 Bedroom Apartments in Henderson • Central Air & Heat • Appliances • Blinds • Carpets • Water Paid • Washer/Dryer Available Apartments are $420 & up per month, newly remodeled, spacious near schools, park & shopping. 565-7028 32837 APT. RENTALS 2bd.,1ba. Duplex, $650, pets OK. 293-6221. AR33899 •••••••••••••e ROOM RENTALS NEVADA INN, "A Friendly Place To Stay". Budget cottages to aeluxe suites, beautiful pool & whirlpool, parking for boats and R Vs. Call 702293-2044 for rates and reservations. Our suites are three room apartment size, witti kitchen. RR32844 HD-4bd.,3ba.,2story', w/pool & Jacuzzi, W/D,' house privs., $400 + utils., Mike 564-2709. RR33592 Pref. retired femate, $300/mo., all utils. incl., new house, 454-7914. RR33773 Good loc, emp. man, all priv., no drugs, $300, cableTV, refs. exch. 2931022. RR33917 HD, Furn. studio, priv. ba., kit., N-S, $400 incl. util. + dep., 293-6799/ 565-6806. RR33292 Non-smoker, workin gentleman, 565-160 work, 564-6477 home RR33542 MOBILE HOMES 1997 dbl. wide 3 bd., 2 ba., like model home, must see to appreciate, Villa Hermosa Ct., low pk. rent, 564-7781. MH33780 Rent to own park model travel trailer, ideal for 1/2 persons, starting at $440/ mo. Call Bret, 294-8888. MH33647 HOUSE TO SELL OR TRADE LV-Lg 4 bd house 1/2 acre horse prop. N/W Jones/Gowan Ig. fam. rm., 2 car detached gar. will trade down for home or condo in BC/HC. $195,000 OBO. 2932230* 33896 LAND FOR SALE LAND SALE! SO Ac$49,900 winter liquidation. Owner selling Idaho ranch land between Snake & Salmon Rivers, near Hells Canyon Rec. Area &'millions of acres of nat'l. forest. Rolling terrain, spectacular views! Power, phone, excellentfinancing, Rare opp'ty. don't miss out! Call now 208-839-2501. f^/lC33802 COMMERCIAL SALES Rare CM Zoning in BC, new 4700 SF masonry bIdg., $300,000, 2932202. MC33370 Newer CM 12007600 loft. Live in OK! Nice area. $89K owe @ 8%, 2932030. MC33841 STORAGE UNITS For rent, 10x20 & 20x20 storage unit, 293-1135. MC33591 STEEL BUILDINGS and BUILDING MATERIALS STEEL BUILDINGS CLEARANCE SALE. Best Price in West! 1800-973-3366. MC33803 STEEL BUILDINGS SALE: 30x40x10, $4,594; 40x60x14, $8,155; 50x75x14, $11,195; 50x100x16, $14,953; 60x100x16, $17,603. Mini-storage buildings, 30x160, 32 units, $13,944. Free brochures. Sentinel Buildings, 800-327-0790, Extension 79. MC33804 Steel bIdg. dealership avail, in select open areas. Big profit potential in booming industry. Call Mr. Caly (303) 759-3200. MC33549 ALL STEEL BUILDINGS Factory Blowout! 1-800-973-3366 REAL ESTATE STEEL BUILDINGS and BUILDING MATERIALS STEEL BLDGS. Save 1,0O0's with fac. specials on Indus, shops & storage units If ordered by 2/ 28, call Al, 702-646-4170. MC33498 REAL ESTATE 5 yr. old home located at Waters Edge. 2 bd., 2 ba., nicely landscaped, super clean $180,000. 109 Sea Breeze Ln.BC, 293-4703. RE33426 PVH Real Estate, Inc. has 1 of the largest selections of commercial & residential lots, mobile homes, Ig. acreage, home & income property inPahrump, 1-70 2-7270445. RE26849 PAHRUMP hXER ON 2.5 ACRES $45,000. Gr. value. Single wide on 2.5 AC. Gr. area, loads of privacy. Well, septic & power already on lot. Financing avail. OAC. $45,000. NEW NV. REALTY 727-8522. BC 3 bd., 2 ba., home, on 100x100 lot, across from BC Golf Course. Features fp, 3 car gar., pool/spa, $187,500. Call 768-601 1/248-6199 owner Lie. Broker/Sales in NV. RE33631 A NATIONAL MOBILE HOME finance company has 2, 3 & 4 BR single and multi-section Bank Repos. Great Rates, easy qualify and transfer of payments. Terms negotiable or make cash offer. Free call 1-800651-4625, Ext. 911. February 12-13,1998 Panorama Page 19 VACATION RENTALS Ski Brian Head, UT, Ig. condo, 3 bds., 2 master, frpl., Jacuzzi, sleeps 8, $95 week nights, $135 weekends, $175 Holidays, 294-2320. REAL ESTATE INCOME PROPERTY, 2 homes: 2 bd., 1 ba. & 1 bd., 1 ba., indiv. fenced yd., quiet area, close to all shopping & schools, owner will carry first, $1100/mo. Income, 2941422. NO REALTORS, $135,000. RE33694 LAKE MOUNTAIN ESTATES 1993 Silvercrest, 2 bd., 2 ba., storage shed. Quiet cul-de-sac. $125,000. GINGERWOOD PARK 1977 Gibraltor, 2 bd., 1 ba. Backs up to desert. $24,500. Call Nancy at DICK BLAIR REALTY 293-2171. RE33526 GOVERNMENT FORECLOSED HOMES, pennies on the $1. Repo's, VA, HUD, Sheriff sales. No money down government loans available now. Local listings. Tolj free 1-800-669-2292 Ext. H-4000. RE33792 Vintage 2 br. house at 520 Fifth St. New carpet and paint, gas central heat, evaporative cooler, plaster walls, aluminum siding over stucco, alley access with double gate, 4 blocks from high scnooli One of few BC home§ under $100,000. 2932010 or 293-1912 for appm't. RE33862 RENTALS Spanish Steps, 2 bdrm., 2 hath.ofTice & den, 2nd fir., pool, $850. Lake Terrace Condo, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 2 car gar., lake view $1100. Home w/3 bdrm., 2 bath, 2 car gar., fenced yard, $1250. Home w/3 bdrm., 1 bath, 1 car gar., $850. DICK BLAIR REALTY 293-2171 OstUi% I 21. Henderson Realty, inc. "The Property People" 18 Water Street 564-2515 Call now for new home information! DOLLHOUSE IN HENDERSON 3 bdrm. townsitc home only blocks to downtown. Clean!! Great yard w/RV parking. Central Air. $82,90(). 84313m BEAUTIFUL MANUFACTURED HOME! REAL PROPERTY! 1996 Model-Double Wide. 3-4 bdrms., 2 full baths. Extra large lot, fully fenced. RV parking. Only $ 112.900! 75381 n HIGHLAND HILLS AREA Cul de-sac lot 90 X 1 11, 3 bdmi., 1-3/4 baths, 2 car garage, RV parking. Block wall fenced, formal living & dining, family room, ceramic lilc & hardwood floors, french door, covered palio, fireplace. Nearby freeway access. J:47171. Call Sharon .378-1692. MIS SI ON H ILL?> 1 A CRE Loi zoned for horses. 4 bdrm.. 2 bath, full blcKk wall fenced. 2 car attached garage plus 4 car detached garage workshop. Tile r(K)f, fireplace. 16x 18. Guest quarters with basement. SE:46142. Call Sharon 378-1692. RIV K RLANPI NC 2ST0RY Many upgrades, 3 bdrm., 2-3/4 baths, 2 car garage plus workshop. Huge country kitchen, Jenn-air, microwave, garden window, breakfast bar. pantry. 1 bed. & bath down plus 2 bed. & 1-.V4 baths upstairs, loft, pot shelf, gorgeous landscaping front & back, sdlar screens, central heat & air plus evaporative coolers. S;68120. Call Sharon 378-1692. NEAR DOOLEY ELEM. SCHOOL 3 bd., 1 -3/4 ba., 2 car garage, huge master. RV parking both sides of lot. C:74776 Call Sharon 378-1692. ts} EQUAL EACH OFFICE IS HOUSING INDEPENDENTLY OWNED OPPOHTUtllTV AND OPERATED M^ BRAND NEW! JUST BUILT FOR YOU! 835 Lime Roek KV & Boat Owners: This w(is huilt for you! Incredible RV/Iioai garage .store all your toys! OjK'n floor plan w/light colors & view of Ixike Mead from H hedrtHtms & kitchen. Berber carpet throughout, kitchen has marble floor &. quality cabinets! H Jet Jacuzzi tub in extra large master suite. Fountain and accent yard lighting makes this home spectacular! Calf today to see! 694-1881 or 293 0008 $359,900 Oumer/^ent REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE ThePrudential Jensen's Realty Thinking of Buying or Selling? The Rock is the answer! The Prudential Jensen's Realty Specializes In Residential-Commercial and Property Management t2r EQUAL MOUSING OfKlllTUNITY We're here to serve you Henderson 564-3333 tslaul More POWER to you JR Realty Are You Budget Wise? Don't pass up this 3 bedroom in Green Valley. Tile roof, 2 car garage, centrally located, $128,900. Act now call Century 21 JR Realty. What A Doll House! Single story, 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, .140 acre loti Easy care Desert Landscaping front & back. Open great room, breakfast bar, laundry room. $104,999. Wow! What curb Appeal! And that's a good Indication of what you'll find Inside! 3 bedroom, 2 bath, has lots of nift|t improvements you'll appreciate, including family room, custom kitchen cabinets. Only $93,500. Must See Location ... attractive 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage, new roof, big separate family room, brick fireplace, country kitchen, walk to park/grade school... $127,500. 4 Bedroom Beauty ... bonus 3-car garage, tile roof, separate family room, island kltcheiV^ 1 nook, pool, built in 1995, fantastic view lot, a4must see location ... $169,250. A Gourmet Kitchen and More! Jenn Aircooktop, large family room & kitchen, skylight, 3 large bdrooms, 2 bath, 3 car garage, RV parking, large rooms. Brand new custom, large lot, 2407 sq/ft. $189,900 LET US HELP YOU CALL HENDERSON HOME Oppoiiunltv 564-65461 m 101 E. Horizon Dr. Locally Owned EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED REAL ESTATE Calico Cove, HU, by owner (relocating), $141,900. 3 bd., 2 ba., many upgrades, 1 yr. old, 5 min. to Lake Mead, 5641202. RE33856 REAL ESTATE ^or sale by owner, 3 bd., 2 ba., 2 car ^r, nice neighborhood in HD, Ig. corner lot, like new, $110,000, call for appt. 568-1075/455-7932. RESioerrnAL COMMERCIAL LAND PROPERTY MANAOEMEm' 'We Make House Calls' NEW HOME INFORMATION and BUYER'S REPRESENTATION (Including Lain U Vtgm) ProptrtyofUnwetk ^ Spanish-style 2 story, 3 Bedrooms, 2-1/2 Baths, Room for RV or expansioii. Full covered patki w/arches & latticed enclosure. Washer & Dryer included. Lots of extra*. Only $129,900! Knapp Realty-566-8185 827 So. Boulder Hwy., Handcrson, NV 89015 (|nn=~j=i (Acroas from Smith'a Shopplnfl Cantar) \\^im^\ outsWeof rievada: IX>209-267e FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS... Call Henderson's #1 Real Estate Team BRENDAB1RDGR1,CRS Lifetime IHenderson Resident 564-1127 WENDY WILLIAMS 378-1689 Over $125 Million in Sales 30 years combined ^^H Real Estate experience! SJL "The DYNAMIC DUO JR Realty Sells Homes!" ^M Ox*m^ JUDY MENKENS, GRI Knapp Realty 'Just call JUDY" 497-1553 1-800-852-1726 Honest & Reliable representation for Buyers & Sellers Special of the Weekl Conveniently located 3 bedrm. 2 Bath 2 car Huge bedrooms with walit In closets Single Story City Lights & Mountain Views Seller Motivatedllllll $139,900 JOi-sale by owner, twostory Lewis home, 4 bdnri., 2.5 ba., too much to list, reduced to $183,000, 293-1973. RE33867 LAKE MOUMTAIN ESTATES 1993 Silvercrest, 2bd., 2ba., storage shed. Quiet cul-de-sac. $125,000. Call Nancy at DICK BLAIR REALTY 293-2171. RE33784 FORECLOSESI All areas of the LV Valley incl. Hend. & BC. Tract Homes, Custom Homes & FIx-ups. Call Russ Gilmore, Broker/Assoc. 24 hrs. 474-1569 for more details. Knapp Realty. RE33870 FOR SALE • TERMS AVAIUVDLE COMMERCIAL BUILDING & WAREHOUSE PLUS MINI STORAGE UNITS In Boulder City 6 Units in front plus mini storage units in bock plus warehouse Commercial Light Industrial Manufacturing Warehouse • Units 5&6 • Two Story OHice/Wurehouse w/Shop Area and Sloroge Icit • 2200 (T/ ,' Sq Ft Total • Units 8&10 1200 I+/I Sq Ft 3 Bedroom, 2 Both Aporlment Goroge • Units 7&9 700 (+/ | Sq Ft 1 Bedroom, 2 Batli Aporlment, w/500 (+/ ) Sq Fl Goroge • Unit 11 2520 (+/ • ) Sq Ft Total Area • 1 Bedroom, 2 Bath Aporlment • Rsc Room • Handball Courl • Unit) 2 1900(t/)Sq. Ft Mlm Sioroge Units & Worehouse Common areos included paved parking, stairways, woiks, o.,phn't ap-ons, drivewa/s and londscaping Duildings ore 6 years old total square footage is approximately 12,000 (W-) sellers will consider terms, priced below appraisal ^^tnUI)^ Call Danny Gennette ^ r2l (702) 873 2443^ MoneyWorld [(JUAI POUMNC OPPOBTUNIT* VEHICLES REAL ESTATE BC -3t)d., 2ba., spa, oak cab. in kitn., like new thruout, comer lot, block wall, 2 car gar., very delightful home. Asking $167,500. call 294-6294. RE33587 REAL ESTATE Own Your Own Home Nowl No down payment on Miles materials. Innovative construction financing. Call Miles Homes, today, 1-800343-2884. ext. L. Coldwell Banker Premier BC Contemporary SW Estatel Hilltop views, private setting, • approx. 70(X) SF & guest tKXJse, soaring ceilings, Persian tnarble & granite througtiout, gourmet kitchen, exercise rm., observation deck, pool & spa, $1,987,000. Call for appt. O'BRIEN QROUP 886-431 ^ u*a Sunday tour of homes. Tour up to 6 homes! No hassle, no pressure, call 458-1585 & enter ID No. 1189 to hear recorded information for this Sunday's tour. Talk to no agent, tour changes every week. Cathy BIttlnger, Century 21 MoneyWorid DON'T 2ND GUESS The next time you have to make a decision regarding Sfilllng or Purchaaing Real Estatel Put 35 years of real estate experience to worit for you. C8//Dtiane G. Laubach ORB, CRS, GRI Realtor-Broker I568^REAL)7325 iHtndtnon IMIy Inc. d 37(^6352 ia wif 8tft •*••**•*•***** ^ BOULDER CRT ^ Nw Listing • Spck>u ft bright Regatta Point*, 2 bd., -^ (l*n.chft'kitchan.cutomfaatijrMthru-out-$210.000.-^ i^ Villa Dal Prado graat room w/flraplace, 3 bdVI -3/4 ba., K Ula roof, covered RV pkg., lush landscaping, 2 car gar., W $165,000. i Ch*ckit0ut-4bd/l-3/4ba.,llvlng/dlnlngarM,*aparata ^ JL. lamlly room, over 1600 at.. 2 car gar. & pool. $167,500. JL. Ragatta Polnte • 2 bd./2 ba., country kitchan, aaparata • ^ maatar aulta, private yard, luth landscaping, $159.900. X Valley View Estates -1993 Cavco, 2 b6J2 ba., aaparata "w mastsrbdrm.,maturelandscaplng,comerlot,$OS,000. "^ JL Great Lake viewl 2 bd72 ba. townhome. Impeccably ^ maintained, open living area, many upgrades. 2 car J^ gar. $189,900. CALL BETH RED MOUNTAJ^gALTY ^ 294-1500 OR 888-733-6881 ••••*•***••*•* EQUAL HOMMO OPKMTUPfTV VEHICLES VEHICLES REAL ESTATE 4 bd. w/cov. RV park & over 1800 SF, 2 car gar., Gr. flag pole lined street. BeautJTul neighborthood. Tile roof. Gr. rm.. Ivrm. w/ huge kitchen & all bdrms. are huge. Asking $185,000. MLS #49202.. Call 733-7653. RE33307 REAI ESTATE REAL ESTATE BARGAIN HOMES. Thousands of Government foreclosed and repossessed properties being liquidated this monthl Call for local listIngsl 1-800-501-1777 ext. 3399. RE33789 Thinking of Selling or Purchasing Real Estate in the Valley? Ccill 568 555 Henderson Valley Realty Inc. 109 S. Water St., Henderson (odjocent to Dank of Amerkn Building) Ek>b -LukeLukowsld ^^ Drof^er/Solesmon DARWIN'S 1524 NEVADA HWY. BOULDER CITY, NV. 293-3996 Custom home overlooking lake—4 Bedrooms, 3 baths, lots of extras. Reduced to $229,000. Owner will help finance. Darwin Bible Boulder Square Condo—best view in area. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Reduced to $74,500. Lake Mountain Estates at its finest. Like new 2 bedroom, 2 bath w/den. 782 SF garage. Panoramic view of lake from deck. Reduced to $152,000 and owner will help finance. Older Boulder City location near schools. Completely restored. 1835 SF., Spacious rooms, huge lot w/alley access. Lots of room for big family. Detached garage. $159,000. Owner will help finance. Complete estate liquidations!!! Real estate and personal property. We also do personal property estate appraisals. 20th year in business. n VEHICLES VEHICLES VEHICLES Iiv Celebration of this month's "WINSTON CUP" Race, we're out to save you money • BE A VIP •• AT THE LAS VEGAS •400" K RACE Buy any new Taurus at... Get 2 reserved seats and '^'SUNT^ VIP treatment including meals in the Ford Hospitality Area. Buy any NEW or USED vehicle and receive a S100 ClfT CERTIFICATE Good toward automotive apparel & accessory items from the Ford Country Parts Pro Shop Register no^v at Ford Country to WIN A VALVOLINE GO-KART and Las Vegas "400" Race Tickets* CONGRATULATIONS "FORD TAURUS" WINS INAUGURAL RACE Boulder City Minutes from Las Vegas Worlds apart in life style The Choice is Yours FREE Real Estate Guide in this paper or Call for one from any of your local brokers 4," ANCHOR REALTY 1497 NKVADA HWV BC ADOBE REALTY 1310 NEVADA HWV CENTURY 21 Bclder D,m R. alty 293-5757 80n-842-QS2ll 293-1707 800 5S3-808I 293-4663 1664 NEVADA HWY 800 228 835.H DESERT SUN REALTY 293-2151 1000 NEVADA HWV DICK BLAIR REALTY 833 NEVADA HWY HYDE REALTY 132? ARJZQNA STREET RED MTN. REALTY 293-2171 800 525 89in 293-6014 800-92-3548 294-1500 Cash Down • Air Conditioning • Power Windows • V-6 Power • Power Loclbati Totaldui$820 ncKidn \* mo pml MC imp ten Total pn>ilO.On IFV}9050l2l>milnpwywr $1250 coh badi on al can acipi Tc*mn Sno • OvM) Viilufu

PAGE 38

Page 20 Panorama February 12-13, 1998 REAL ESTATE Highland Hills in HD for sale by owner, 3 bd., 2 ba., w/office, 1840 SF, $125,000, beautiful house &vd. w/pool. 5668965. RE31118 MissTon Hills, 1 AC, 2020 SF,3bd.,2ba.-t-720SF gar., 2 carports, many extras, by owner, $185,000, 646-9405/ 645-7728. RE33410 Advertise Free on the Internet to millions of home buyers. Homes-Mart 294-2428 • • • • • • • Regatta Pointe Corner lot Beautiful lake view 1892 SF. 2 bd.. 2 ba. i den. BertMr carpet, tile floors i appls. all almost new ,293-3340 $219,000 • ••••• # • HD Townsite You name it, its been done. Mas. bd. w/retreat -i2bds., 1-1/2ba.. 59'x137'lot. S92,900, Jan Liebert, Knapp Realty 566-8185/222-5933 Thousands below appraised value. Seller will pay 2 point toward closing cost. COMPLETELY REMODELED 3 bd., 2 ba., pool w/spa $179,500 firm 294-4150 REAL ESTATE APPRAISAL ResJComm'l, Henderson G. Rigdon Eve, 565-6143 -GREEN VALLEY— THK PKRFKCT H()MK-22A7 SF,.' M. tia. .' car gar, upgraded, lush mature landscapinc, pol/spa. Prrgo ricMir. Kirt>ol/spa, 3461 SF, 4 bd, 3 ia. 2 car par, ral-drsaclol. masliTM/relrrat. .Some cilv niBs! VFRV MOTI\ ATtDI S.M(l,OO0. —SUNRISE MT.— •l87nBAI.ZAC2n.<7,Sh.JI)d, 2ha,75>l.1 Ini. K\ park, 2 car gar, gated cumin., piHd,I rfail. & ohs<'r\uti(indt'ck tocnjo) all of I.V crl\ lichls! $245,(HK). — BOULDER CITY HOMES— 46 AKRON ^V^ Marina C'ovf ( (Hidii. Appro*. 1674 sq. ft.. .^ hdrm...' baths. .Model perfect, lots (if upgrades Berber Carpel Dry Sauna Full Lake Mead Mcv'. I'ri>ate 2nd bdrm. M/sep. entrance. 2 car garage, one side is RA', buat. Commercial si/.el A great find! $229,9KI neg. 841 ROBINSON I.N-Lake sicH min estate H/income yielding prnperlvl Custom kitchen. 4126 SF inci sep I bd gursi house thai is detached & self-contained. 4 bd in main house st/a gr master suite, } car gar, pnnl/spa. tni4V upgrades. V44,(HHINF(,. l4.t.V in FBI.O DR-Appron am .Sf custom huill estate! In a parti-like selling. Hreathtakng .t6ll" KC >alley tieHs. Circular dr. Home is under cfinslruction. 2 family rm. in basement H/separatecnlrances. Lots of i|ualil\ Mk: A MIST TOt R: $4'.IHm. •77n( llRIsnMA-4bd, 2ba. l548SF.2cargar.huKe72xll4 lot. I.ush carpet. Must sell. Pending Foreclosure! Act fast! •IIOT()I^AII-Ba\vieHcondo. likene.2 hd, 2 ha -)'den, frpl. 2 car gar, near pl, gr mm & lake views. Berber carpet, er> open, 1724 .SF, 3 car gar. $17.1,000 RFDl CF.D! •5001.K. HAVASt -C omerlot. l5l2SF.2hd,2ha,huge|eaaal.nMi I REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE Cm COUNTRY LIVING $155,000 Newly cemodeled home on 116x135 lot. 7 1/2 Tons of ground mounted heat & air 2 yrs. new. Tile & parquet flooring. 3 bd., 2 ba. Custom cabinets. 2 wood'burning frpls. & spa under cov. patio. Very Ig. laundry rm. Gar. separately cooled. Ask for Dave/Larry at RE/MAX Sunset 736-1333 Want REAL ESTATE FACTS? Call LARRY SHAFFER at RE/MAX Sunset Realty 736-1333 Home 565-4100 Cozy 1148 sf 3 bedroom condo $84,900 Superb Ranch home + 2159 sf $155,000 Upgraded Golf course 5 bedroom $279,900 Rancho/Torrey Pines 1/2 acre lot $145,000 Lowest Priced Condo in "The Colony" $82,900 jsm $100,000,000 in Sales t1 RE/MAX Sailing Agent In Henderaon When you're thinking ol buying or selling a home, you'll want the transaction to proceed swiftly and efficienlly Thai's why you should look for a real estate professional with special expertise in listing, selling, investment and taxes Some. one vrth a proven record ol experience Someone you can trust That someone IS a Certified Residential Specialist (CRS), your best choice in real estate ^^1^ Call Dave Berard, Broker/Associate ^"JJ^Jl^ RE/MAX SUNSET REALTY ^^m/UmM Broker/G.R.IO. CRS \&f (702) 566-6700 REAL ESTATE By owner, 2 yrs. old, 3 bd., 1-3/4 ba., 2 car gar., solar screens, desert landscaping, appl's. incl. $168,500. Call 293-5298 BC. RE33706 Lake Mtn. Est. Lake view, 2 bd., 2 ba. laundry rm., gqr. & carport, covered patio $118,000. 2933719. RE33721 HD-Blk. Mtn.-I time deal. View of LV/ Mtns. 4bd., 2ba., 1800SF, .37 AC, frpl. Built in equity $10,000+, $151,900. Open House Sun. 11-3 PM Horizon to Pacific S. to • Desert Rose. 598-0851 REAL ESTATE House for sale by owner, 2bd., 1 ba., new kitchen, hardwood floors, detached gar., 612 California St., BC, $117,500 OBO, 293-0789. RE33775 BC-3bdrm.,1000SF + basement, fenced yd., appraised at $110,000, asking $97,000 OBO, possible no money down. 293-7359/2689544 pager. RE33947 BOATS & RVs BOATS & RVs TRAILERS RENT OR SALE Park Models good for 1 or 2 people Rents start $375/up Sales start $1500/up Ask for Donna/Mario 294-8888 BOAT, RV & SELF STORAGE 704 Canyon Rd. Boulder City, NV 294-5025 Fully enclosed/each unit has an alarm VEHICLES VEHICLES VEHICLES VEHICLES BOATS & RVs 86 Toyota Dolphin RV, 21' long, like new, only 36,000 mi., fully self contained. Asking $10,500, call 294-6294. BR33588 1996 Four Winds, Class C motor home, 13,000 mi., never cooked/ smoked in, like new, lots of extras, 293-2002/3672912. BR33188 1987 Teton Traveler 81/2' cab over camper. Fully self-contained. Queen size bed. Bath. XInt. cond. Must see. $3650 OBO, 294-1583. BR33907 Boxed Ads 8~ per column Inch per Issua VEHICLES ATTENTION!!! Good cond., 87 HONDA ACCORD DX. needs minor wk., only $1000. MUST SELL! Call Todd at 5656481. VE30286 1995 Dodge PU, 1/2 ton longbed w/bdiiner., white w/tinted windows, good cond., asking $12,000 OBO. Call evenings, 5686280. VE33758 Classics 2 1966 Mustangs xInt. interior, both have new paint, one V8/ auto $4500, one 6/std. $3000; also 46 Packard Clipper, rest. $5500.2933547. VE33943 1993 Nissan Altima, all power, good cond., $6500, 293-3384. VE33945 VEHICLES HELP TOO MANY! 98 Infinity 130,97 Ltd., 87 4' Runners, 89 F150. Make offer, 341-5341. VE33816 1990 Toyota 4x4 V6 with camper shell. Low miles, excel, condition $10,000 OBO, 293-4703. VE33423 SEIZED CARS from $175. Porsches, Cadillacs, Chevys, BMW's, Corvettes. Also Jeeps, 4 WD's. Your Area. Toll Free 1-800218-9000 Ext. A-8891 for current listings. VE33346 1985 Chrysler LaBaron, runs & drives gr., looks good, ice cold air. First $1650 takes it. Call 3205828. VE33890 1984 Ford Escort, 99,000 mi., gr. transportation car, clean, $1400 FIRM, 2944167. VE33897 1996 Chevy StepsideP/ U, fully equipped, towing pkg., snug top, $5000 of extras. 293-2002/3672912. VE33187 72 JEEP WAGONEER 4x4, enjoy off road fun $1600. '79 FORD VAN, good transportation vehicle, $1200. Auto Specialist Inc. 293-4776. ID No. 542. VE33579 1991 Plymouth Aclaim in ex. cond. $4500 Pis. call 565-7348 VEHICLES Classic Merc SL's 1983 380SL w/51tr both/tops $10,500. Also 1974 450SL int. is perfect $8900. Also 46 Packard Clipper restored $5500, 293-3547, Iv. msg. VE33944 92 Pontiac Grand Am, 4 dr. loaded, asking $6495 OBO, 435-5879 Iv. msg; VE33854 '89 Olds Cutlass Supreme, 1 owner, silver 2door, xInt. condition, 127K mi., OBO, 5660831. VE33883 77 Chevy step van, 350 engine, automatic trans., $2500 OBO Robert, 5665976. VE33893 1987 Toyota 4x4 pickup $3200 OBO, 294-2336. VE33906 '92 EXPLORER. 4 dr. Eddie Bauer. AAA w/higher mileage 4x4. $10,995 Mike. 837-6664 94 Plymouth Duster 5 speed 46,000 miles $6850 558-7141 BRAND NEW 1998 HYUNDAI HATCHBACK HERE IS THE BUY OF A LIFETIME (NOT A LEASE) FULLY EQUIPPED: AIR CONDITIONEt) AM/FM CASSETTE DUAL AIR BAGS CARPETED FLOOR MATS DUAL REMOTE OUTSIDE MIRRORS POWER BRAKES BODY SIDE MOLDING INTERMITTENT WIPERS/ WASHER REAR WINDOW DEFROSTER W/ TIMER FULL FOLDING REAR SEAT CARGO AREA COVER CENTER CONSOLE W/ CUP HOLDERS FRONT PASSENGER VANITY MIRROR HALOGEN HEADLAMPS STEEL BELTED RADIAL TIRES. PLUS MUCH MORE. DOWN WE ARE THE 3"^ LARGEST HYUNDAI DEALER IN THE NATION REMEMBER THIS IS NOT A LEASE IT IS A PURCHASE YOU OWN THE CAR NOT A GIMMICK IT'S YOURS! (50) AVAILABLE AT THIS PRICE M95 DOWN ^198 PER MONTH ^ W BEN STEPMAN HYUNDAI 460 No. BOULDER HIGHWAY 565-1500 IN HENDERSON OF COURSE! VEHICLES rOUT THESE DEALS SPECIAL PURCHASE '98 FORD WINDSTAR CL Still under factory warranty. Save over J8,500. Automatic, 3.0L V-6 engine, PA/V, P/L, tilt, cruise, AM/FM cassette, front & rear air. #xtsi2 -?v&" \s