Citation
1997-11-13 - Henderson Home News

Material Information

Title:
1997-11-13 - Henderson Home News
Creator:
Jackson, Sharon ( Columnist )
Marciniak, D. B. ( Columnist )
Ferguson, Kevin ( Columnist )
Cohen, Richard ( Columnist )
Hanlon, Bill ( Columnist )
Szydelko, Paul ( Columnist )
Berrigan, Lauren ( Columnist )
Kimble, Jennifer ( Columnist )
Anderson, Jill ( Columnist )
Sabo, Betty A. ( Columnist )
Ferguson, Ryann ( Columnist )
Bowman, Bill ( Columnist )
Brewer, Ray ( Columnist )
Rosenbaum, Ellen ( Columnist )
Henderson, Barb ( Columnist )
Eicher, Ray ( Columnist )
Santor, Jim ( Columnist )
Santor, Kathleen Grace ( Columnist )
Earl, Phillip I. ( Columnist )
Bishop, Carolyn D. ( Columnist )
Zaichick, Lee ( Photographer )
Weidenfeld, Rob ( Photographer )
Publisher:
O'Callaghan, Mike
HBC Publications, Inc.
Creation Date:
1997-11-13
Language:
English
Materials:
Paper ( medium )

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Nevada
Henderson
East Las Vegas
City and town life -- Nevada -- Henderson
Community life -- Nevada -- Henderson
History -- Henderson (Nev.) -- 20th century
Genre:
Newspapers

Notes

Acknowledgments:
Greenspun Media sponsors this collection.
Collection Location:
Greenspun Media retains possession of the bound, original newspapers. Henderson District Public Libraries retains possession of the microfilm and the digital files.

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Source Institution:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Holding Location:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Rights Management:
The items in this collection are provided for non-commercial personal and academic use by Henderson Library patrons and may not be republished in any way. Contact Greenspun Media Group for additional information regarding rights to this material: http://www.greenspunmedia.com
Resource Identifier:
hhn4590 ( Digital Id )

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PAGE 1

^."..s^ilC. • • '~1 • *•• • ( Page 16 Henderson Home News Tuesday, November 11, 1997 • BMC TRUCK i^WmB f J f I • i / An on • ,.^^^olc^.ith approved credit BRAND k^l '^J-^ IJI '97 CMC MiiMlM WAS: ^. NOW ONLY \ iii iy"'i*^"'• 454 VORTEC ENGINE • 4 SPEED AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION • HhBACK BUCKET SEATS • 6 WAY POWER SEATS • POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS • TILT STEERING WHEEL • DUAL REAR WHEELS • TRAILERING EQUIPMENT SLE TRIM • CUSTOM WHEELS & MUCH MORE! WE HAVE A HUGE SELEm ^NU W PRE-OWNEP VEHICLES! 1*93 CNEVYS-10X-CAB PICKUP 15 speed, Air, Only 36k Miles! #UP1950 I "gSMItTSWSNI ECLIPSE j 5 Spd., Air, AM/FM Cassette, Only 33k Miles! #UP1956A "94 FORD RAN8ER PICKUP Uke New. XLT. Only 24k Miles! #UP2057 "96 CHEVY CORSICA*! Low Miles, 2 To Choose! #UP1946,#UP1947 I "96 NISSAN 200 SX Auto, Air, Low Miles! #UP1941 "93 9IIIIC PICKUP [Convefsion, Ground Effects, Loaded! #UP1961A SOLO ^9247 '9297 (I ni,990 n3.990 Look For The ronucrRA ^ee your sales person for^ complete details "91 INRNm 948 V-8, Like New! #UP2084 "94 CHEVY CUSrOM CONVERSION Loaded, Stepside Pickup! #UP2015 CHEVY X-CAR PICKUP Iverado, Loaded, Very Sharp! #UP1984 CHEVY X-CAR ^714x4 Loaded, Must See! #UP2118 "OS JEEP ORANO CHEROKEE Only 3400 Miles, Loaded, Black Beauty! #UP1933A "95 CHEVY 1AH9ELT ir4Wheel Drive, Only 28kMiles!#UP1930. air^ ^v'ij, ^^ :^WP|^ mjk 14,790 ns,847 '16,990 '19,490 '19190 '29190 1991 JEEP Hard Top, AM/FM Cassette, Custom Wheels! IUP2010 4[)oor, Automatic, I Air Conditioning, AM/FM. Only 40k MHas! /mf^ 1711030 (SB. 11595 DOWN. 9.9% A.P.R. ON APPROVED CRED IT [WiiUMIWiONBfPi*UMHPWNEW>MWIIHMJLDJL in* •uri I MnOMOMUPWIHSAIIOaM I THURSDAY November 13,1997 0^ PROOF, BAY. MICROFILM 1115 ARQUES AVE E. SUNNYMALE., CA 94036 oa/04/99 MAIL. 1J1 MJ m Henderson, Nevada 50*A sobering lesson in life Drunk driving sinnulator visits Henderson school StMTonJMluefi News Staff Wnter Baric Hi^ School students last Thursday experienced the dangers of driving drunk firsthand, without taking a sip of alcohol. Desert Chiysler-Ptymouth sponsored the drunk driving simulator show which allowed a|>praxiniately 300 sober student drivers to operate a motor vdxicle that goes out of control under the pretense of the driver being drunk. Students under the driving age also experienced riding in the car as passengers. "Ihe biggest thing we are trying to show studoits is do not drink, but most of all do not drink and drive,* said Gerry Dolhancryk, program instructor for ChryslerPlymouth "Last year we lost 6,233 kids to alcohol-related crashes. Atthou^ there are no st^istics that show the program's success in reducing die number of akohol-related crashes, Dolhancryk said simulator veterans have told him it infhienoed later dedrions they made regarding gutting into a jahidajrith drunk firieods. "Whether they are 17 or 37, hopefully they will take this •q>erience and use it when they are of age," Dolhancryk added. Tutting them in a vehicle that is basically out of CMitrol (hopefully] they will retain the message." IIM simulator is a 1996 Dodf^Flymouth Hi Neon, modified with an on-board computer that can be proLee Zaichick/News Staff DRUNK DRIVER — Basie High student Aaron Swapp drives a Chry sto r Neon Dnink Drivsifl Simulator sponsored by Desert Chrysler to teach the affects of drunk difving as a computer sknulatM driving under the influenc* of akohol. grammed to delay components of the car. The vdiicles steering and braking response time are reprognuauned to emulate a drunk driver's slowed phyrical and mental response abihties. A trained instructor, who is in the car at all times, programs the student drivers' weight and a hypothetical number of drinlu. The computer processes this information and automatically sets the taming delay on the ctur's braking and steering. ^ith t iff* iT^pff tK ^ abilities, studenti attempt to negotiate aft-ebstade course without hitting the orange pylons or pedestrian figmree that pop-op on a safis, controlled course. The course covers a 150-fbot by 200-foot area. Under zero blood-alcohol level conditions the driver has ample time to stop without hitting the figures, but after entering any number of drinks, it becomes increasingly difficult to avoid the mockpedestrians. Gary Qmsman, represodt* ing Desert Chrysler-Plymouth, explained that students drive around the figure-eight track twice. They drive one practice lap with the car under normal conditions, thai a second lap under simulated drunk conditions. "Some students think that if they drive slow [they will be able to control the car], but the reaction is still slowed...if you're driving drank you've basittUly lost your edge,^ Ddlhvieryk said. Tve had kids freak out because the car doesnt react the way they expected." *I know I will never drive drunk cause it's just too hard to handle that car," Basic Hi|^ School senior Angela Smith said. SM Drunk Driving Page 2 Reserve GM eyes January opening DM.f*mMUk News Staff Writer Progress is showing on the Reserve Hotel Casino as the deyelopen plan to announce a firm opening date in thecoming month. "We're shooting for Januaiy," said Gregg Schatzman, general manager for the {iroject He said progress at the casino has stepped up during the past several months and workers are in the process oflaying the drywall and painting murals on the ceiling and outside. Finishing work OD expansions that were ^iproved several months ago are also coming to a doee. Schatzman encouraged reridents to visit the onplojrment center at the casino whidi is accepting applications for all positions. The center is pr oce ssin g aqn>nxhnately 600peopleper day. It's nice to see things happening out there," he said. "Whoi you think of ^t we've gone through this progress really means something." Stalled by litigation against former partners in the project and the merger with another casino devebper, the project has been • low to astabbah iUrif in Hkdersen. SAatiman acknowiedged the project's stalled history, but said the development is commencing so quickly nothing foreseeable can stop a January opening. 1 know Henderson is going to be proud of what we are doing," he said. The Reserve wiD follow an Afr Pages Henderson: From the beginning The birth of a city The first of a seven-part series Kevin FeiTQueon News Staff Writer In 1919, Prerident Woodrow Wilson and other world leaders signed the notorious Versailles Treaty, ending World War I. Ihe treaty, whidi was not approved by the U.S. Congress, strqiped Germany of more than just land gained during the war, fbsUqgAdolphtfitlerfbrarevenge attack nearly two decades later. Daring that time, lt.B. Jefferson sat on his nnA in Senator Henderson escapes assassination. See, Page 2 Jericho Heists, the only thing that existed between Las Vegas and Boulder City. Charles B. Henderson, former district attorney of Elko County had just completed his first year in the U.S. Senate. A decade later, President Cahrin Coolklge signed the Boulder Dam Bill, creating thousands of jobs for the Depression riddled Americans, leading to a steady fk>w of new resklenta to the Las Vegas Valley. Taking advantage of his location, Jefferson and his partner named Bearden subdivided a 40acre tract in Jeridu) Heiihts. Its most popular purpose was as a *speakeaay* where workers stopped after a hard day's work for more potent liquids. Ihis led to the settlement of Pittman, which was bordered by the streets of Sunset Road on the north, Moeer Drive to the east. Ward Drive to the west and Merlayne Drive to the south. Inside the numbers Page 2 00 GET 'EM WOLVES Bob Hondricks, Frank Smoke, George Undesnnith, HaroW Hanson, Beak High football playerx pose forthe 1944 0 iii6o, the school yearbook. Major events and statistics of the development of HenderBoa: •1928, Prerident CooUdge signed the Boulder Dam BiU. •Sept 3,1941, McNeil Construction Co. signed a contract to buiU a magrMisium plant •Get 2, 1942, Baric High Sdiool opened. •Jan 10, 1944, town was named Henderson after the late Senator Charles B. Henderson. •Peak of BMI employment during the war. 14.000. •April 1950, Henderson population: 5,717. •1962. BMI changed firom state-owned to privatization. •1953, Henderson is incorporated as a dtj. ^ '/r WWW.DESERTGMC.COM Or E-mail Us At C .MCHl JICKCc/Wf(^AS INf I NEl in Brief BanicWcfl opem Officers and ftaff of BankWest of Nevada celebrated the opening of ttwir new regional banking center, 2890 N. Green Valley Parkway, on Tuesday r>ight. Long-time local financial executive Sekna Baittett headi the center. Hay opens at CVHS The Green Valley High School Theatre Dapaitmsnl win present The Night Thoreau Spent in )ail'Nov. 1822. Curtain tinw is 7 p.m. Tickets are $6 for aduhs, $3 kx students and seniors. Call 7990950, Ext. 200, for infonrnation. mounccs cfurHy A Joint effort with I high schools will tienefH the Make-A-Wish Foundation. Hm 14. AitofBoncai cxptoied. See In Spotlight... Bob Unger and Barry Fieldnfian Synagogue leaders and leaders in their community — what many don't realize about these Henderson residents is they are creators of the Las Vegas Strip's most successful fcunily adventure. 8ePage4. I

PAGE 2

> Pag* 2 Henderson Home News Thursday, November 13, 1997 Sen. Henderson survives assassin's liuUet DRUNK DRIVING Kevin FwgiNon News Staff Writer U.S. Sen. Charles B. Henderson was the victim of an attempted assassination in his Senate chambers by a man motivated by a 20-year old grudge over a legal fee. While cleaning out his Washington office one night in 1920, the senator was confronted by Charles A. Crock, a client of the former district attorney of Elko Coimty in 1903, according to an> old issue of the Reno Evening Gazette. Grock was dissatisfied with Henderson's service to him, and failing to receive all the relief he felt he deserved from the suit, he blamed Henderson for years afterward. The Gazette reported Grock claimed Henderson did not properly handle the case. Grock several times threatened to kill him and wrote letters threatening Henderson. The senator was Later became city namesake in constant fear of Grock and was advised by friends to kill him on sig^t, the paper said. News accounts of specifics from the 1920 incident vary slightly. According to the New York American on the following day, Grock spent time in the Senator^s office discussing old legal fee problems In a friendly way, and (Henderson) tried to point out to (Grock) that he had no just cause for grievance. "Smiling, Grock arose to go and the Senator accompanied him to the door. As his hand fell on the knob Grock wheeled and whipped a revolver from his hip pocket, pressing it against the Senator's chest," according to the newspaper. Henderson struck the weapon with his right arm. The gun exploded simultaneously and the bullet tore through the lower part of the Senator's right arm, inflicting an ugly flesh wound." After firing, Grock reportedly ran out in to the outer office. Before he could get out of the building, Grock was surrounded by people. "Drop the gun!" ordered George V. Messer, secretary to Sen. Broussard of Louisiana, the newspaper reported. Grock did as he was told and "Messer then grabbed Grbck by the shoulder and led him to the street where he was turned over jto a traffic policeman," the American reported. Henderson made a complete recovery and continued his public life. The Stanford-educated Henderson was appointed by President Roosevelt as the director of the Recovery Finance Corporation (RFC) in 1934. Seven years later, he became its chairman, serving From Page 1 Sen. Charles Henderson in that post until 1947. An RFC project included the construction of the BMI plants during World War II. The man whose name graces the Home News and our city died in 1954 in San Francisco, where he had lived for the last seven years of his life. : Senior Valentino Diaz III agreed, "It was definitely a deterrent to drunk driving." Stop DUI treasurer Bill Parker said the simulator is important because it serves as an educational tool for people either driving or just watching it in operation. "Maybe it will influence their decisions later," Parker said. If I was a passenger I would have been sick if I wasn't already sick from the booze" said senior David Gleich. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, in 1996,17,126 people died in alcohol-related traffic crashes, an average of one every 30 minutes. Alcohol was involved in 40.9% of all fatal crashes. More than one third of the 17,126 people killed were under age 20. The Neon Drunk Driving simulator will visit more than 250 schools across the U.S. this year. The simulator, which comes to Henderson approximately three times a year, was built for Dodge in 1988. It has made more than 1,100 public appearances in more than 200 U.S. cities. No "One Man's View' PubUsher Mike O'Callaghan is in the Middle East His "One Man's View" column will resume when he returns. HISTX5RY: The birth of a city From Page 1 • • ^,"''-I • '''':'^'':'::-y'-r'r t-"'/^ • ''': • ',:'/'' • • But once the Boulder Dam :. Oater named Hoover Dam after the 30th president) was completed in 1935, Pittman's population began to decUne. Hitler's invasion of Poland four years later, started World War II. As Germany's tanks rolled across Europe, U.S. involvement grew unavoidable, leading to the desperate need of magnesium for planes and other war efforts. Early in 1940, English and American forces were united to create a magnesium plant in Midway City, named Basic Magnesium Incorporated. On Sept. 3, 1941, the McNeil Construction Co. of Las Vegas, signed a contract to build the plant, costing $63 million. It became the largest producer of metallic magnesium in the U.S. When the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor on Dec 7,1941, the magnesium plant was on its way to completion. Within another month, several thousand men and women were living within the 200 acres below Black Mountain. East of Boulder Highway were two neighborhoods, Victory Village and Carver Park. The Reid family was one of 500 families that moved into the new homes in Victory Village, currently called the Valley View planning area. In theTownsiteacross Boulder Highway, their four boys attended the newly built schools on Water Street. The educational facilities in the Basic Townsite complex consisted of three elementary schools and one high school, Basic High. The entire school district, all on land currently occupied by the Convention Center and Henderson City Hall, had 72 faculty members. The inaugural year of the high school had 235 students. Don Reid, the captain ofBasic's basketball team and student body presidentin 1945, joked about the size of the sports teams the school produced in the early years. "I was a forward and I was only 5 ft 8." Reid also played football for Basic under Estes McDoniel Sr., Basic's coach and physics teacher who eventually became the city's fourth mayor. Twenty-six students who attended Basic High'sfirsttwo years served in World War II. "My class missed it [the draft] because the war ended,* Reid said. The Martinez family lived next door to the Reids on Texas Street Reynaldo Martinez, currently diief of staff to his long-time neighbor, U.S. Senator Harry Reid, attended Henderson Elementary School. The school is titled after the town, named for the former Senator, which replaced Midway City in 1944. During the war, Henderson was the director and chairman of the Reconstruction Finance Corporation, appointed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt African-American families lived in Carver Park, next to Victory VUlage, but their children attended the same idiools as Victory Village kids. "Carver Park and Victory Village were federal projects, inchiding Ae Townsite. So they weren't supposed to be segreA LOOK BACK AT CITY'S HISTORY Editor's Note: This is the first of a series of reports about the history of Henderson Nov. 13; The Early Years Nov. 20:1953-1959 Nov. 27: 1960-1969 Dec. 4:1970-1979 Dec. 11:1980-1989 Dec. 18: 1990-1997 Dec. 25:1998 Projections gated ."Martinez said. "Butall the Africam-Americans were placed in Carver Park." '. PLANT EXPLOSIONS OCCURRED OFTEN Both fathers of Harry and Reynaldo worked at the BMI plant. Despite the housing segregation, Martinez recalled that there wasn't much segregation at the plant "Everybody (blacks and whites) worked together. It seemed that there was a homogeneous feeling at the plant," Martinez said. The work was very difficult... and very dangerous. They [BMI] had accidents all the time," Martinez said. "I believe there were many accidents that were never reported. I can remember an explosion in which a classmate of mine lost his father. Others there became disfigured because it was sulfuric acid going through these pipes that became ruptured." Martinez said that he felt very fortunate to have grown up in Henderson because it was so small. "Everybody knew each other," Martinez said. "We didn't have social outcasts because everybody worked at the plant and made the same amount of mc ney." The only exception were the residents of Pittman. They were considered misfits because that's where the collection of bars were. It was guilt by association. Some were very nice people, but we thought since we didn't have bars in Victory Village or theTownsite, Pittman people must be shady people." Pittman was also where the magnesium plants were located. "You really had to persevere living in Pittman because of the smell of the gas from the plants," Martinez said. The gas would permeate the entire Pittman area. It was horrible." Near the school complex on Water Street was the neighborhood hangout. "We all congregated at the drug store and the bowling alley after the football games," Don Reid said. In that shopping center, there were also a grocery store, telegraph station, laundramat, barber shop, shoe repair store, and a theater seating785. SCHOOL WAS I CENTER OF TOWN But the center of town, Martinez recalled, was the school. "Our role models in those days were our teachers. It's evident just by looking at how many teachers and administrators eventually had schools named after them," Martinez said. In the •40s, Lyal Burkholder was one of the principals of Basic High School, which became a middle school with his name when the high school moved across town in the '70s. Other former Henderson teachers and ifaculty with schools named after them include McDoniel, John Dooley, David Cox, Fay Galloway, Edna Hinman, Martha King, Gordon McCaw, Andrew Mitchell, Ulis Newton and Harriet Treem. Robert Taylor was the principal of the old Henderson Elementary school in 1948. He also served as the assistant football and basketball coach. Chester T. Sewell, 93, another FREE SEMINAR on Marketing Your Company or Service t>n the Internet Sponsortd by tite Hetuknon Home News Thursday, November 13 S:30p.ni. 7:30p.m. Hendenon Home Newj 2 Commerce Center Dr. (Behind Ethel Ms) Friday, November 14 SrOOa.m. • 11:00a.m. Hendenon Home News 2 Commerce Center Dr. (Behind Ethel M's) Plene Mtive early, seating may 6e limited. Attend One of These Seminars and You'll Leom... / How Prttne Cable u putting the Internet pnTV / How to enhance ycm print odvettiting by tkpotufing to indude the Internet • '*itOnUneiervic?" / How to ^ocoliK the iottmet to Southern Ncvodd tonsumen can eaifly ftoi yod / How to gain the upper h competition /If the bUemetU tight fc r\A r\r\ ^ Avtry infomativt seminar presented m layman s terns that was well worth attet)(bng. r^ Meg klerrHt Mcriter htarttettna I; had very little knowledge ol the Internet before the seminar and left with a very firm I grasp of where the Internet is headed Itceptionol seminar, I'm very pleased. • Karen Wallace • Americana Croup Realton Call 02) 435 elementary school namesake, moved from California to the Townsite in 1942 to work for BMI. The former school board member still lives in Henderson. "I worked in the storage department for BMI until 1953. Then, I joined the school board imtil health reasons made me quit in 1966," he said. In those early days, Sewell hved on Copper Street in a house that still stands. Many of the still existing old Townsite homes are located along Water Street between Ocean and M£uor. Unlike today, school classes were always small, according to Martinez. "We had a lot of transients —^people who were here for a short time then moved." In 1947, magnesium production was no longer necessary for defense, so many of BMI's 14,000 employees had moved away. Enrollment in the school system had been reduced by two-thirds compared to the war years, and well over half the Townsitehomes were vacant. Three years later, the city's populationrwas 5,717. In 195fi^BMI purchased the plants they had been managing for the past decade from the state. They and their successor companiesareChemstarLime,Inc.,Kerr > McGee Chemical Coinp., Pioneer Chlor Alkali Co., and theTitanium Metals Corporation (Timet). Martinez's father was one of the few BMI employees who were never affected by BMI's downsizing. He worked for the company until 1977. There was always the fear of losing your job [at the plant] after the war," Martinez said. "It was something we all talked about We [the Martinez family] were lucky." HOME— NEWS An Independent Newspaper Founded June 1, 1951 Henderson Home News (USPS 240000) Published every Tuesday and Thursday morning at 2 Commerce Center Drive, Henderson, Nevada, by HBC Publications, Inc. Periodicals postage paid at Henderson, Nevada. POSTMASTER: Sendaddresschanges to: HENDERSON HOME NEWS 2 Commerce Center Drhra Henderson, NV 89014 Phone (702) 564-188t Customer complaint calls will be accepted from 7 to 10 am on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Missed papers will be distributed by noon. MIKE O'CALLAGHAN Publisher CAROLYN O'CALLAGHAN Co-Publisher TIM O'CALLAGHAN ., General Manager ,. /PAULSZYDELKO Managing Editor MARY COLLEEN MIELE Circulation Manager HBC PUBUCATIONS, INC. Mike O'Callaghan, President; Carolyn O'Callaghan, Vice President; Tim O'Callaghan, TreasurerA/ice President; Mary Colleen Miele, Vice President; Ruths Deskin, Secretary. SUBSCRIPTION RATES Single 50 cents One Year $30 (Twelve Consecutive Monttis) No Refunds MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS West of MississippiSSOperyear East of Mlssisslppi$60 per year 'Additional KtaiNrig onces' Fri. Now. 14 9-9 S.it. Nov. 15 9-6 Sun. Nov. 16 12-5 Mead To lleilig-l^eyers For Low Prices On A Huge Selection Of Home Furnishings, Plus: •[)lf (M.lli\ I\( ( SSO! ic-. • ( 111 icl • |,f !M iMK S • \l)l)lile&4lo6Chaini>rJI\ama \ \ 11 v^nrj* tn:u L -vMFnOwSuv •ip.Ko.wii •Cmr. • V'MfiHW S.a, '".'^ -Cjnnawcontirad •vjFna.,iSili, i p .c • iteo pun^VM* I I > iy v tu*mi pto piiiTtiMn | • "n, dv w jpraKt lo pro, pwtf • Any 4-Pc. Bedroom Dresser, Mirror, Chest & Bed ^^ GRAND OPENING i1 Immr^iw^mmm^ ^^mmfiim^Hmmm^ 2DaysOrJy! I I. I I I I TUl GRAND OPENING E^ 2DaysOnly! I L I I I I V GRAND OPENIIUB ?<*i! 2 Days Only! I Any 5-Pc. Or 7-Pc. | | Any Sleep Sofa I I Fomnal Dining Room Or China Up To $899 I I Any Size Or Style... I I Tabk&4io6Chain,or>nc.auna | | Fobulous Selection Available! | | — --*o-~.u, L .Vi*(IFnd*,iSjfcJrt^ "(wwiwfcm-C*vwibowTv 'V^JFWirl Sifcwiyr '^ P**" -Clfwrt b> CBWteTd • VUrt F,idy 15^i% .ipyyu) .C^nxbu u it m m t at.o.,iPlump. riiii I I "• "V • *• i*BiBpm!• | • • —— • rr I I nil I ^B ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ aa ^ ^a BBi MiB KB BBi ^m ^ s^ t^ ^ HJ LM BK ^ ^m HB MB ^m ^ ^m ^1 Any Table Group <249 Or More Cocktail Tbble &2End Tables GRAND OPENING rAs^ ^fVfVitr' GRAND OPENING ^ 2DaifsOn^ WIINI! WIN! Any5-Pc. Or 7-Pc. Dinette •299 Or Mora Any Recli n er •199 Or Mora Ann Style.' Vjp Brand Names! WIN! Register Tod^! ^2,500 SHOPI'INC; SPREfc! YmrUJiistLovc Our Convenient In-Storefredil! Weelsaecaal mejiir credit cards. • hr romfhte drUili! Wm you ihop rtrfif-Meym. year account itwi rifM wtMrt ym gpfMi lyourh u tm ei—fc Thai mtaraifyouhliit^ about your accouar. Iht i Thursday, November 13, 1997 Hendonon Home Nw Pga3 Kyriacou pleads guilty in alleged murder Sliaron Jaduon News Staff Writer Henderson resident Christopher Kyriacou plead guilty to firstdegree murder Thursday, Oct 30, in District Judge Don Ghairez's courtroom. Kyriacou, along with Tiffany Robbins and the victim's stepsister, Traci Rutherford, aUegedly took part in the Feb. 28, 1996 murder at 348 Keating. The three allegedly strangled Michael CXRourke with a coaxial cable. All three are being tried as adults. On that day, CyRourke's mother found her 19-year old son's body lyingface down on the kitchen floor with a cord wrapped around his neck. Police believe the killing occurred sometime between 3:30 and 5:30p.m. and thatthemotiveforthemurder was robbery,according to Henderson police Sgt. Gary Smith. They waited on him at home to come over there [to the home where the murder occurred]," Smith added. PoUce believe their thou^ts were confirmed following the recovery of some of O'Rourke's property firom Kyriacou's home on Mardi2.1996. Rutherford and OTRourke had only lived together for the couple of weeks their parents had been married. Kyriacou is charged with conspiracy to felony counts to commit robbery and or murder and felony first^legree murder and felony robbery. Under a plea bargain agreement, I^acou plead guilty to all three counts and agreed to testify agtunst his co-defendants. According to a district court spokesperson, Kyriacou may withdraw his plea if he is sentenced to life without the possibility of parole or sentenced to more than 50 years. Also under the plea bargain agreement, the state dropped charges of burglary use of a deadly weapon. If those charges were DOtdropped, Kyriacoucouldhave received amuchharsher sentence. Kyriacou vtrill be sentenced at 9 a.m. Dec 18, in Chairez's Department 13 courtroom. Rutherford and Robbins' trial date is set for Dec. 8, also in Chairez's courtroom, where the two defendants will face similar charges. • M^at apozzolt s Serving Bob's ^Homemade Italian Cuisint in a beautifuksetting ^^^ Early Bird Special TFrTe A^eiueTSatHpler PW $3.00 off any entree! rvith entree purchase n iii'T'^-t^ / To Benefit \ "MahcaWish > ^i \'oundatum'\^ in coiigunction with the Student Leadership Councils from Basic, Green Valley and Silverado High Schools PROUDLY PRESENT THE INAUGURAL HENDERSON HIGH SCHOOLS' CHARITY BASKETBALL GAME 1 Comfort • Romance • Identity • Security • Privacy Vhen you own a home buih by The Robert Jones Company, >ou become part of a Mdition. Agnnring vaditioa thai has provided homes for more than 20,000 families since 1976. Visit today and see why so many hive chosen die ln)pical resort style livtag Ihal Ihe ftobert Jones Company has made a tradition. Own Your New Home Todmy! I Watch as Students from Henderson High Schools take on Media Personalities and Celebrities. pmHkefl5(n WnMcraaAMM (702)M5-S221 iMxmj Hcam 6 OM J uni i i m m Sfri^VSt-kOamnm (7W)J Ininu'ilitilc •/
PAGE 3

> Pag* 2 Henderson Home News Thursday, November 13, 1997 Sen. Henderson survives assassin's liuUet DRUNK DRIVING Kevin FwgiNon News Staff Writer U.S. Sen. Charles B. Henderson was the victim of an attempted assassination in his Senate chambers by a man motivated by a 20-year old grudge over a legal fee. While cleaning out his Washington office one night in 1920, the senator was confronted by Charles A. Crock, a client of the former district attorney of Elko Coimty in 1903, according to an> old issue of the Reno Evening Gazette. Grock was dissatisfied with Henderson's service to him, and failing to receive all the relief he felt he deserved from the suit, he blamed Henderson for years afterward. The Gazette reported Grock claimed Henderson did not properly handle the case. Grock several times threatened to kill him and wrote letters threatening Henderson. The senator was Later became city namesake in constant fear of Grock and was advised by friends to kill him on sig^t, the paper said. News accounts of specifics from the 1920 incident vary slightly. According to the New York American on the following day, Grock spent time in the Senator^s office discussing old legal fee problems In a friendly way, and (Henderson) tried to point out to (Grock) that he had no just cause for grievance. "Smiling, Grock arose to go and the Senator accompanied him to the door. As his hand fell on the knob Grock wheeled and whipped a revolver from his hip pocket, pressing it against the Senator's chest," according to the newspaper. Henderson struck the weapon with his right arm. The gun exploded simultaneously and the bullet tore through the lower part of the Senator's right arm, inflicting an ugly flesh wound." After firing, Grock reportedly ran out in to the outer office. Before he could get out of the building, Grock was surrounded by people. "Drop the gun!" ordered George V. Messer, secretary to Sen. Broussard of Louisiana, the newspaper reported. Grock did as he was told and "Messer then grabbed Grbck by the shoulder and led him to the street where he was turned over jto a traffic policeman," the American reported. Henderson made a complete recovery and continued his public life. The Stanford-educated Henderson was appointed by President Roosevelt as the director of the Recovery Finance Corporation (RFC) in 1934. Seven years later, he became its chairman, serving From Page 1 Sen. Charles Henderson in that post until 1947. An RFC project included the construction of the BMI plants during World War II. The man whose name graces the Home News and our city died in 1954 in San Francisco, where he had lived for the last seven years of his life. : Senior Valentino Diaz III agreed, "It was definitely a deterrent to drunk driving." Stop DUI treasurer Bill Parker said the simulator is important because it serves as an educational tool for people either driving or just watching it in operation. "Maybe it will influence their decisions later," Parker said. If I was a passenger I would have been sick if I wasn't already sick from the booze" said senior David Gleich. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, in 1996,17,126 people died in alcohol-related traffic crashes, an average of one every 30 minutes. Alcohol was involved in 40.9% of all fatal crashes. More than one third of the 17,126 people killed were under age 20. The Neon Drunk Driving simulator will visit more than 250 schools across the U.S. this year. The simulator, which comes to Henderson approximately three times a year, was built for Dodge in 1988. It has made more than 1,100 public appearances in more than 200 U.S. cities. No "One Man's View' PubUsher Mike O'Callaghan is in the Middle East His "One Man's View" column will resume when he returns. HISTX5RY: The birth of a city From Page 1 • • ^,"''-I • '''':'^'':'::-y'-r'r t-"'/^ • ''': • ',:'/'' • • But once the Boulder Dam :. Oater named Hoover Dam after the 30th president) was completed in 1935, Pittman's population began to decUne. Hitler's invasion of Poland four years later, started World War II. As Germany's tanks rolled across Europe, U.S. involvement grew unavoidable, leading to the desperate need of magnesium for planes and other war efforts. Early in 1940, English and American forces were united to create a magnesium plant in Midway City, named Basic Magnesium Incorporated. On Sept. 3, 1941, the McNeil Construction Co. of Las Vegas, signed a contract to build the plant, costing $63 million. It became the largest producer of metallic magnesium in the U.S. When the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor on Dec 7,1941, the magnesium plant was on its way to completion. Within another month, several thousand men and women were living within the 200 acres below Black Mountain. East of Boulder Highway were two neighborhoods, Victory Village and Carver Park. The Reid family was one of 500 families that moved into the new homes in Victory Village, currently called the Valley View planning area. In theTownsiteacross Boulder Highway, their four boys attended the newly built schools on Water Street. The educational facilities in the Basic Townsite complex consisted of three elementary schools and one high school, Basic High. The entire school district, all on land currently occupied by the Convention Center and Henderson City Hall, had 72 faculty members. The inaugural year of the high school had 235 students. Don Reid, the captain ofBasic's basketball team and student body presidentin 1945, joked about the size of the sports teams the school produced in the early years. "I was a forward and I was only 5 ft 8." Reid also played football for Basic under Estes McDoniel Sr., Basic's coach and physics teacher who eventually became the city's fourth mayor. Twenty-six students who attended Basic High'sfirsttwo years served in World War II. "My class missed it [the draft] because the war ended,* Reid said. The Martinez family lived next door to the Reids on Texas Street Reynaldo Martinez, currently diief of staff to his long-time neighbor, U.S. Senator Harry Reid, attended Henderson Elementary School. The school is titled after the town, named for the former Senator, which replaced Midway City in 1944. During the war, Henderson was the director and chairman of the Reconstruction Finance Corporation, appointed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt African-American families lived in Carver Park, next to Victory VUlage, but their children attended the same idiools as Victory Village kids. "Carver Park and Victory Village were federal projects, inchiding Ae Townsite. So they weren't supposed to be segreA LOOK BACK AT CITY'S HISTORY Editor's Note: This is the first of a series of reports about the history of Henderson Nov. 13; The Early Years Nov. 20:1953-1959 Nov. 27: 1960-1969 Dec. 4:1970-1979 Dec. 11:1980-1989 Dec. 18: 1990-1997 Dec. 25:1998 Projections gated ."Martinez said. "Butall the Africam-Americans were placed in Carver Park." '. PLANT EXPLOSIONS OCCURRED OFTEN Both fathers of Harry and Reynaldo worked at the BMI plant. Despite the housing segregation, Martinez recalled that there wasn't much segregation at the plant "Everybody (blacks and whites) worked together. It seemed that there was a homogeneous feeling at the plant," Martinez said. The work was very difficult... and very dangerous. They [BMI] had accidents all the time," Martinez said. "I believe there were many accidents that were never reported. I can remember an explosion in which a classmate of mine lost his father. Others there became disfigured because it was sulfuric acid going through these pipes that became ruptured." Martinez said that he felt very fortunate to have grown up in Henderson because it was so small. "Everybody knew each other," Martinez said. "We didn't have social outcasts because everybody worked at the plant and made the same amount of mc ney." The only exception were the residents of Pittman. They were considered misfits because that's where the collection of bars were. It was guilt by association. Some were very nice people, but we thought since we didn't have bars in Victory Village or theTownsite, Pittman people must be shady people." Pittman was also where the magnesium plants were located. "You really had to persevere living in Pittman because of the smell of the gas from the plants," Martinez said. The gas would permeate the entire Pittman area. It was horrible." Near the school complex on Water Street was the neighborhood hangout. "We all congregated at the drug store and the bowling alley after the football games," Don Reid said. In that shopping center, there were also a grocery store, telegraph station, laundramat, barber shop, shoe repair store, and a theater seating785. SCHOOL WAS I CENTER OF TOWN But the center of town, Martinez recalled, was the school. "Our role models in those days were our teachers. It's evident just by looking at how many teachers and administrators eventually had schools named after them," Martinez said. In the •40s, Lyal Burkholder was one of the principals of Basic High School, which became a middle school with his name when the high school moved across town in the '70s. Other former Henderson teachers and ifaculty with schools named after them include McDoniel, John Dooley, David Cox, Fay Galloway, Edna Hinman, Martha King, Gordon McCaw, Andrew Mitchell, Ulis Newton and Harriet Treem. Robert Taylor was the principal of the old Henderson Elementary school in 1948. He also served as the assistant football and basketball coach. Chester T. Sewell, 93, another FREE SEMINAR on Marketing Your Company or Service t>n the Internet Sponsortd by tite Hetuknon Home News Thursday, November 13 S:30p.ni. 7:30p.m. Hendenon Home Newj 2 Commerce Center Dr. (Behind Ethel Ms) Friday, November 14 SrOOa.m. • 11:00a.m. Hendenon Home News 2 Commerce Center Dr. (Behind Ethel M's) Plene Mtive early, seating may 6e limited. Attend One of These Seminars and You'll Leom... / How Prttne Cable u putting the Internet pnTV / How to enhance ycm print odvettiting by tkpotufing to indude the Internet • '*itOnUneiervic?" / How to ^ocoliK the iottmet to Southern Ncvodd tonsumen can eaifly ftoi yod / How to gain the upper h competition /If the bUemetU tight fc r\A r\r\ ^ Avtry infomativt seminar presented m layman s terns that was well worth attet)(bng. r^ Meg klerrHt Mcriter htarttettna I; had very little knowledge ol the Internet before the seminar and left with a very firm I grasp of where the Internet is headed Itceptionol seminar, I'm very pleased. • Karen Wallace • Americana Croup Realton Call 02) 435 elementary school namesake, moved from California to the Townsite in 1942 to work for BMI. The former school board member still lives in Henderson. "I worked in the storage department for BMI until 1953. Then, I joined the school board imtil health reasons made me quit in 1966," he said. In those early days, Sewell hved on Copper Street in a house that still stands. Many of the still existing old Townsite homes are located along Water Street between Ocean and M£uor. Unlike today, school classes were always small, according to Martinez. "We had a lot of transients —^people who were here for a short time then moved." In 1947, magnesium production was no longer necessary for defense, so many of BMI's 14,000 employees had moved away. Enrollment in the school system had been reduced by two-thirds compared to the war years, and well over half the Townsitehomes were vacant. Three years later, the city's populationrwas 5,717. In 195fi^BMI purchased the plants they had been managing for the past decade from the state. They and their successor companiesareChemstarLime,Inc.,Kerr > McGee Chemical Coinp., Pioneer Chlor Alkali Co., and theTitanium Metals Corporation (Timet). Martinez's father was one of the few BMI employees who were never affected by BMI's downsizing. He worked for the company until 1977. There was always the fear of losing your job [at the plant] after the war," Martinez said. "It was something we all talked about We [the Martinez family] were lucky." HOME— NEWS An Independent Newspaper Founded June 1, 1951 Henderson Home News (USPS 240000) Published every Tuesday and Thursday morning at 2 Commerce Center Drive, Henderson, Nevada, by HBC Publications, Inc. Periodicals postage paid at Henderson, Nevada. POSTMASTER: Sendaddresschanges to: HENDERSON HOME NEWS 2 Commerce Center Drhra Henderson, NV 89014 Phone (702) 564-188t Customer complaint calls will be accepted from 7 to 10 am on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Missed papers will be distributed by noon. MIKE O'CALLAGHAN Publisher CAROLYN O'CALLAGHAN Co-Publisher TIM O'CALLAGHAN ., General Manager ,. /PAULSZYDELKO Managing Editor MARY COLLEEN MIELE Circulation Manager HBC PUBUCATIONS, INC. Mike O'Callaghan, President; Carolyn O'Callaghan, Vice President; Tim O'Callaghan, TreasurerA/ice President; Mary Colleen Miele, Vice President; Ruths Deskin, Secretary. SUBSCRIPTION RATES Single 50 cents One Year $30 (Twelve Consecutive Monttis) No Refunds MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS West of MississippiSSOperyear East of Mlssisslppi$60 per year 'Additional KtaiNrig onces' Fri. Now. 14 9-9 S.it. Nov. 15 9-6 Sun. Nov. 16 12-5 Mead To lleilig-l^eyers For Low Prices On A Huge Selection Of Home Furnishings, Plus: •[)lf (M.lli\ I\( ( SSO! ic-. • ( 111 icl • |,f !M iMK S • \l)l)lile&4lo6Chaini>rJI\ama \ \ 11 v^nrj* tn:u L -vMFnOwSuv •ip.Ko.wii •Cmr. • V'MfiHW S.a, '".'^ -Cjnnawcontirad •vjFna.,iSili, i p .c • iteo pun^VM* I I > iy v tu*mi pto piiiTtiMn | • "n, dv w jpraKt lo pro, pwtf • Any 4-Pc. Bedroom Dresser, Mirror, Chest & Bed ^^ GRAND OPENING i1 Immr^iw^mmm^ ^^mmfiim^Hmmm^ 2DaysOrJy! I I. I I I I TUl GRAND OPENING E^ 2DaysOnly! I L I I I I V GRAND OPENIIUB ?<*i! 2 Days Only! I Any 5-Pc. 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Iht i Thursday, November 13, 1997 Hendonon Home Nw Pga3 Kyriacou pleads guilty in alleged murder Sliaron Jaduon News Staff Writer Henderson resident Christopher Kyriacou plead guilty to firstdegree murder Thursday, Oct 30, in District Judge Don Ghairez's courtroom. Kyriacou, along with Tiffany Robbins and the victim's stepsister, Traci Rutherford, aUegedly took part in the Feb. 28, 1996 murder at 348 Keating. The three allegedly strangled Michael CXRourke with a coaxial cable. All three are being tried as adults. On that day, CyRourke's mother found her 19-year old son's body lyingface down on the kitchen floor with a cord wrapped around his neck. Police believe the killing occurred sometime between 3:30 and 5:30p.m. and thatthemotiveforthemurder was robbery,according to Henderson police Sgt. Gary Smith. They waited on him at home to come over there [to the home where the murder occurred]," Smith added. PoUce believe their thou^ts were confirmed following the recovery of some of O'Rourke's property firom Kyriacou's home on Mardi2.1996. Rutherford and OTRourke had only lived together for the couple of weeks their parents had been married. Kyriacou is charged with conspiracy to felony counts to commit robbery and or murder and felony first^legree murder and felony robbery. Under a plea bargain agreement, I^acou plead guilty to all three counts and agreed to testify agtunst his co-defendants. According to a district court spokesperson, Kyriacou may withdraw his plea if he is sentenced to life without the possibility of parole or sentenced to more than 50 years. Also under the plea bargain agreement, the state dropped charges of burglary use of a deadly weapon. If those charges were DOtdropped, Kyriacoucouldhave received amuchharsher sentence. Kyriacou vtrill be sentenced at 9 a.m. Dec 18, in Chairez's Department 13 courtroom. Rutherford and Robbins' trial date is set for Dec. 8, also in Chairez's courtroom, where the two defendants will face similar charges. • M^at apozzolt s Serving Bob's ^Homemade Italian Cuisint in a beautifuksetting ^^^ Early Bird Special TFrTe A^eiueTSatHpler PW $3.00 off any entree! rvith entree purchase n iii'T'^-t^ / To Benefit \ "MahcaWish > ^i \'oundatum'\^ in coiigunction with the Student Leadership Councils from Basic, Green Valley and Silverado High Schools PROUDLY PRESENT THE INAUGURAL HENDERSON HIGH SCHOOLS' CHARITY BASKETBALL GAME 1 Comfort • Romance • Identity • Security • Privacy Vhen you own a home buih by The Robert Jones Company, >ou become part of a Mdition. Agnnring vaditioa thai has provided homes for more than 20,000 families since 1976. Visit today and see why so many hive chosen die ln)pical resort style livtag Ihal Ihe ftobert Jones Company has made a tradition. Own Your New Home Todmy! I Watch as Students from Henderson High Schools take on Media Personalities and Celebrities. pmHkefl5(n WnMcraaAMM (702)M5-S221 iMxmj Hcam 6 OM J uni i i m m Sfri^VSt-kOamnm (7W)J Ininu'ilitilc •/
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Page 4 Henderson Home News Thursday, November 13, 1997 Residents work to make Henderson better D.B. Mardniak News Staff Writer Synagogue leaders and leaders in their community— what many don't realize about these Henderson residents is they are creators of the Las Vegas Strip's most successful family adventure. Bob Unger and Barry Fieldman developed the Showcase Mall with borrowed money and lofty dreams. However, their success on the strip is a testament to their lives in Henderson, they said. Fueled with a belief in influencing both the spiritual and material aspects of their community, the developers took an idea and a strong friendship to make their dreams become a reality. "It's an incredible story for two guys who have just taken off our Huggies," said Fieldman, president of Midbar Kodesh Temple and member of Henderson's Redevelopment Advisory Commission. "No. One guy who has shed his Huggies and one who is getting ready to put them back on," joked Unger, presidentof Congregation Ner Tamid and a Henderson Planning Commissioner. The two friends teamed to form Makena Development about four years ago in an effort to spearhead their dream of developing a 2 1/2 -acre parcel of land on the strip into a non-gaming oasis. "We are looking to be a showcase for m{u&r companies," Unger said. And the south strip mall is a showcase. With the help of Forest City Development, the two have made their dream a reality. The two are even in the process of planning world-wide expansion with six more Showcase Mall fadUties. •> Offering visitors a glimpse of the worlds of Coke and M&M and Bthel M. Chocolates, the Showcase Mall also entertains through its game room for children and adults. The 200,000-square-foot facility is also home to the All Star Cafe where visitors 9^n eat while admiring a variety of sports memorabilia. "We took a 50-pound bag of potatoes and put it into a baggie," Fieldman said of the relatively Patios & Pools I Home & Business Landscaping Adverts ng Bart>ecues Barker Creek Covered Wagon Company'" H^md Mado constrjclion of Cedar and other (me .vood products !or durability. Eye catching, soulhvjcsl decor, ideal (or many uses incldding,. advertising, landscaping, backyard pool & barhocuo areas Party Centerpiece Grand Openings Special Sales Theme Promotion Unlimited Uses! "3IW:0//:. ^ • • t • '•jgiltai*^* large project being located on such a small parcel. Though the mall is their dream, many seldom realize it because of the friends' intense involvement in their community. "We have more temple meetings here [in Makena Development's meeting room] than board meetings," Unger said with a smile. As president of Congregation Ner Tamid, Unger helps guide the faith of approximately 620 families throughout the valley. The synagogue has been in the valley for 24 years, and he has been president for the past three years. Fieldman is the second president of Midbar Kodesh Temple, which was established 31/2 years ago. His is one of six founding familiesofthecongregation, which now includes 160 families. From synagogue meetings to their children's Boy Scout meetings, thet^o are always an active part of their community. Some day s they will have to cut a meeting short because they need to attend a baseball game or help Showcase Mall in a synagogue affair, the two acknowledged. Though they are constantly busy, they don't mind. "Instead of playing golf a couple times a week now maybe I play once a week if that," Unger joked. On a material level, the two help make a difference in Henderson through their involvement with city planning and redevelopment. As a planner, Unger said he enjoys playing a pivotal role in shaping how development in Henderson will appear. Prior to has work as a planner, he sat on the Henderson Citizens Advisory Committee, While Unger enjoys concentrating development efforts on what's new, Fieldman enjoys helping efforts on what's old. "We need to look at a lot, but I feel we are really g^^ing somewhere," Fieldman s4id of efforts to redevelop the city s downtown area. The agency has moved from the guidance of the Henderson Economic Development. DepartBurkholder MS honors students October's students of the month honored at Burkholder Middle Sdioors"BreakfastofChampions" on Oct. 29 included: Bethany Anderson, Ashlea Armstrong, Vanna Berry, Karen Brigman, Lyle Celler, Ryan Chase, Joshua Cochran, Jamie Craig, John Crowley, Chris Crunk, Jenna Curry, Sanaz Dehghan-Mansha, Miles Dickson, Arturo Dimante, Antonio Duque, Ryan Eakin, Matthew Epperson, Rocio Estrella, Rebecca Evans and Andrew Flewelleh. Amanda Gentry, Shawn Gore, Summer Gorski, Matthew Hagan, Brandon Hanna, Ciara Hartman, Andrew Hefner, Bryson Holland, Brandy Houston, Erica Knell, Kimberly Knudsen, Summer Kurtz, Whitney Manning, Anthony Manriquez, Aubrianna McGhie, Gabrielle McGhie, Robby Messner, Michelle Miller, Travis Moe, Karen Mogren and Matthew Nielsen. Claudia Ocampo, Jesus Ocampo, Kyle Parkson, Shannon Ramey, Miahcel Regano, Ashley Reimer, Rachael Rinn, Kaori Scott, Russell Sheldon, Sarah Simmons, Christina Sinanian, Charlene Steele, Courtney Tackett, Jamie Taylor, Amber Thomas, Marc Wagner, Jennifer Weaver, Kristen Wilhams, Shelly WilUams and Sara York. BRING A FRIEND STEAK DINNER SPECIAL... MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL... ... I DRAR BREAKFAST 1 1p.m.1 1a.m. 79 < STEAK SANDWICH SERVED 24HRS. UflMff I p9f ClfSVOflMT. NOT fOOO tNnttl OoffiOMrf OMWS Of onwi' coupons. 79 < St Fillet Mi9non...joup or soiod, choice of pokjto.; ^5" Land/ Sea & Air.. .chicken Breast, Shrimp 4 New York Steok wup or salad, choice of potato .,. ^7** fillet MJgnon & Scampi soup or salad, choice of potato ^7^ Chicken or Shrimp Fettuccini..3ouporsaiad M'' Lots of Other Specials ^)fV f/J/)i Private^ooms Available For =V^ 294-1627 PERSONAL INJURY FREE CONSULTATION NO RECOVERY FEE 565-0473 218 LEAD ST. (Across from the new Civic Center Plaza) LAW OFFICE OF JOHN F. MARCHIANO I FORMER HENDERSON CITY ATTORNEY Thursday, Novennber 13, 1997 Henderson Home News Page 5 CALL KEVIN UTTERBACK ATTORNEY AT LAW 433-5138 FOR ALL YOUR LEGAL NEEDS OTHER FIELDS OF PRACTICE: GUARDIANSHIP CONSTRUCTION CHILD SUPPORT ADOPTIONS GENERAL BUSINESS PERSONAL INJURY COLLECTIONS WILLS BANKRUPTCY 601 WHITNEY RANCH #C-14 HENDERSON, NEVADA iiir WiiirtMMillijUi'liii" "ill '>ij_i||iit"'iiiii iiiiiliiiiiiiini i Lee Zaichick/News Staff ALMOST READY— The Reserve Hotel Casino is nearing completion. Offidab for the project are anticipating a January opening. RESERVE: Nearing completion From Page 1 rican safari theme throughout the project. A mural which will surround the building of different exotic animals is nearly complete. Besides the mural, the theme is evident on the inside oftheprojed Several bronze statues of hippos, monkeys and other wildlife along with several trees common to Africa are placed throughout the building. A Monsoon Bar is the center piece of the casino area. Complete with a tin roof firom which rain drops trickle off into a pond, the bar will serve as a main gathering place for visitors. In addition to 216 rooms and eight suites, the $120 million project will include 43,000 square feet of gaming area, 1,400 slot machines, 26 tablegames, poker, bingo and keno rooms and a sports book. • • :'}'<':''\ ;-\'-';V.7^-.; "I think itf s going to change the face of local gaming," said Gary Smith, director of casino operations. Smith said although Henderson residents have had to wait, they willsoon find outTheReserve will offer different amenities than other casinos in the area. Tm afiraid in the first week we open, people will come in and they will not gamble because they are looking around so much," he said. From lions to a crashed plane in the jungle, The Reserve expects to offer visitors a different experience. The facility will also include a buffet, coffee shop, steak house and other restaurants. The way this town is growing, I believe you have to be bullish in this market," Smith said of the bold safari theme. He added that soon Henderson will find out what The Reserve is all about Tiffany fa> head water State Rep. Sandra Tiffany, RHenderson, says she will lead a petition drive for a referendum if the County Commission imposes a sales tax increase without a vote of the people. :: "Let our people vote," she demanded at a Wednesday news conference, joined by officials and community leaders, including Rep. Harry Mortenson, D-Las Vegas; Ken Mahal, president of the Nevada Seniors CoaUtion; Hiil Stout, president of the Nevada Association of Independent Businesses; and Milton Schwartz, diairman of the Clark County Republican Central Committee. '^t is a matter of the highest principle that we have a vote of the people on this issue," Tiffany said. "We should have the ri^t to vote on how and if we're going to be taxed, whether the tax is for water or widgets." Pointing out that Nevada is an initiative and referendum state, she said "We hope that the Commission will honor that tradition and place the proposed sales tax increase on the ballot in 1998 for a vote of the people." She urged citizens to attend and speak outat the Conomission hearing at 10 a. m. Tuesday, Nov. 18, when the matter will be decided. The commissioners are under tremendous pressure from major campaign contributors to impose the sales tax increase without a vote of the people," she said. "However, if the Commission buckles under to the big contributors and imposes this tax without a vote of the people, we will exercise our right to circulate petitions to place the issue on the 1998 ballot." Tiffany indicated that just over 26,500 signatures will be required to secure a referendum. "We expect to get many more than that ff we are forced to go the referendum route," she said, "because a recent poll sponsored by the Review-Journal and TV-8 showed that 95% of the people wanted an opportunity to vote on the question." At the last session of the legislature. Tiffany attempted to tack an amendment to the sales tax increase authorization to mandate a vote of the people. Her amendment was voted down. SAVING WATER IT'S ALWAYS IN SEASON CHECK TOIinS AND FAUCETS f OR LEAKS Your Comofete Automotive Service Center J FINANCING AVAILABLEI90 DAYS, SAME AS CASH (U.A.C.) HENDERSON 4337 E. Sunset Rd. 454-2130 • "ns < SUNSET wo Owvron LUBE, OIL & FILTER '9.98 MOST VEHICLES Rc9.S2t.M MOST VEHICLES • OK change up to 5t|t. 30wt. oil • Multi-grades t other brands higher • Install new oil niter • Lube chassis (if appl.) • Ptus $2 hazardous waste disposal fee Not valid vlth other offers. Good Thru 12/31/97 HBC11R sooNOuuKirnmrcMAIIf IIT "BR AKE"SPECTAL ASLOWA%$^A QO • Written estimate wrtth no otiHgallon • free 2* point brake Inspection • Install preniium pads / Hnlngs • Resurface rotors / drums • Repack front wfict< bearings • FWD ft seml-fnetallk Nghcr • Phn $2 hazardous waste disposal fee tot valid with aih offtn. Good Thni 12/31/97 HOC 11R FREE LUBE, OIL & FILTER WTTHA IteaUUUt-PHKED WME UP $9A AO 4CYLM0-MOSTVEHtCU$ l9770 •CnMO$44M-tCnMMII$4t.M • oil change up to Sgt. Mwt ON • MuHHirades ft other brands higher • Instal rww et fKter • Lube chassis (V appl) • Engine >nal|rsls • Inital new ipari plugs' Adjust carburetor (If appl) • Ad|usl llmlr kmMhv elemtnl • PCV Mhre • Onm r(M enure cookng system • TiMMntlMlen ivlc • OlHwwttil iwvice • Bralw kNpacMan • FtMl ir^Kttd rnodih t autotnMIc transnri^ • Pha S2 huwAxa waste dtapotal tae Not wHd wNh olhar oftan. Good nwu 12/31/7 HK11M NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY • MONDAY SATURDAY 8 6 OoadMpMMpMlngiaaMamai^. MLTS • S*ti iiBR*?', Tm not giving up," she said. The people have a right to vote on m{gor tax decisions that aifect their pocketbooks. Either the commissioners voluntarily place the tax increase on the ballot or we the people will exercise our right of petition to put it on the ballot ourselves." I couldn't count the times you'vi done some special tiling for me\ Y
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Page 4 Henderson Home News Thursday, November 13, 1997 Residents work to make Henderson better D.B. Mardniak News Staff Writer Synagogue leaders and leaders in their community— what many don't realize about these Henderson residents is they are creators of the Las Vegas Strip's most successful family adventure. Bob Unger and Barry Fieldman developed the Showcase Mall with borrowed money and lofty dreams. However, their success on the strip is a testament to their lives in Henderson, they said. Fueled with a belief in influencing both the spiritual and material aspects of their community, the developers took an idea and a strong friendship to make their dreams become a reality. "It's an incredible story for two guys who have just taken off our Huggies," said Fieldman, president of Midbar Kodesh Temple and member of Henderson's Redevelopment Advisory Commission. "No. One guy who has shed his Huggies and one who is getting ready to put them back on," joked Unger, presidentof Congregation Ner Tamid and a Henderson Planning Commissioner. The two friends teamed to form Makena Development about four years ago in an effort to spearhead their dream of developing a 2 1/2 -acre parcel of land on the strip into a non-gaming oasis. "We are looking to be a showcase for m{u&r companies," Unger said. And the south strip mall is a showcase. With the help of Forest City Development, the two have made their dream a reality. The two are even in the process of planning world-wide expansion with six more Showcase Mall fadUties. •> Offering visitors a glimpse of the worlds of Coke and M&M and Bthel M. Chocolates, the Showcase Mall also entertains through its game room for children and adults. The 200,000-square-foot facility is also home to the All Star Cafe where visitors 9^n eat while admiring a variety of sports memorabilia. "We took a 50-pound bag of potatoes and put it into a baggie," Fieldman said of the relatively Patios & Pools I Home & Business Landscaping Adverts ng Bart>ecues Barker Creek Covered Wagon Company'" H^md Mado constrjclion of Cedar and other (me .vood products !or durability. Eye catching, soulhvjcsl decor, ideal (or many uses incldding,. advertising, landscaping, backyard pool & barhocuo areas Party Centerpiece Grand Openings Special Sales Theme Promotion Unlimited Uses! "3IW:0//:. ^ • • t • '•jgiltai*^* large project being located on such a small parcel. Though the mall is their dream, many seldom realize it because of the friends' intense involvement in their community. "We have more temple meetings here [in Makena Development's meeting room] than board meetings," Unger said with a smile. As president of Congregation Ner Tamid, Unger helps guide the faith of approximately 620 families throughout the valley. The synagogue has been in the valley for 24 years, and he has been president for the past three years. Fieldman is the second president of Midbar Kodesh Temple, which was established 31/2 years ago. His is one of six founding familiesofthecongregation, which now includes 160 families. From synagogue meetings to their children's Boy Scout meetings, thet^o are always an active part of their community. Some day s they will have to cut a meeting short because they need to attend a baseball game or help Showcase Mall in a synagogue affair, the two acknowledged. Though they are constantly busy, they don't mind. "Instead of playing golf a couple times a week now maybe I play once a week if that," Unger joked. On a material level, the two help make a difference in Henderson through their involvement with city planning and redevelopment. As a planner, Unger said he enjoys playing a pivotal role in shaping how development in Henderson will appear. Prior to has work as a planner, he sat on the Henderson Citizens Advisory Committee, While Unger enjoys concentrating development efforts on what's new, Fieldman enjoys helping efforts on what's old. "We need to look at a lot, but I feel we are really g^^ing somewhere," Fieldman s4id of efforts to redevelop the city s downtown area. The agency has moved from the guidance of the Henderson Economic Development. DepartBurkholder MS honors students October's students of the month honored at Burkholder Middle Sdioors"BreakfastofChampions" on Oct. 29 included: Bethany Anderson, Ashlea Armstrong, Vanna Berry, Karen Brigman, Lyle Celler, Ryan Chase, Joshua Cochran, Jamie Craig, John Crowley, Chris Crunk, Jenna Curry, Sanaz Dehghan-Mansha, Miles Dickson, Arturo Dimante, Antonio Duque, Ryan Eakin, Matthew Epperson, Rocio Estrella, Rebecca Evans and Andrew Flewelleh. Amanda Gentry, Shawn Gore, Summer Gorski, Matthew Hagan, Brandon Hanna, Ciara Hartman, Andrew Hefner, Bryson Holland, Brandy Houston, Erica Knell, Kimberly Knudsen, Summer Kurtz, Whitney Manning, Anthony Manriquez, Aubrianna McGhie, Gabrielle McGhie, Robby Messner, Michelle Miller, Travis Moe, Karen Mogren and Matthew Nielsen. Claudia Ocampo, Jesus Ocampo, Kyle Parkson, Shannon Ramey, Miahcel Regano, Ashley Reimer, Rachael Rinn, Kaori Scott, Russell Sheldon, Sarah Simmons, Christina Sinanian, Charlene Steele, Courtney Tackett, Jamie Taylor, Amber Thomas, Marc Wagner, Jennifer Weaver, Kristen Wilhams, Shelly WilUams and Sara York. BRING A FRIEND STEAK DINNER SPECIAL... MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL... ... I DRAR BREAKFAST 1 1p.m.1 1a.m. 79 < STEAK SANDWICH SERVED 24HRS. UflMff I p9f ClfSVOflMT. NOT fOOO tNnttl OoffiOMrf OMWS Of onwi' coupons. 79 < St Fillet Mi9non...joup or soiod, choice of pokjto.; ^5" Land/ Sea & Air.. .chicken Breast, Shrimp 4 New York Steok wup or salad, choice of potato .,. ^7** fillet MJgnon & Scampi soup or salad, choice of potato ^7^ Chicken or Shrimp Fettuccini..3ouporsaiad M'' Lots of Other Specials ^)fV f/J/)i Private^ooms Available For =V^ 294-1627 PERSONAL INJURY FREE CONSULTATION NO RECOVERY FEE 565-0473 218 LEAD ST. (Across from the new Civic Center Plaza) LAW OFFICE OF JOHN F. MARCHIANO I FORMER HENDERSON CITY ATTORNEY Thursday, Novennber 13, 1997 Henderson Home News Page 5 CALL KEVIN UTTERBACK ATTORNEY AT LAW 433-5138 FOR ALL YOUR LEGAL NEEDS OTHER FIELDS OF PRACTICE: GUARDIANSHIP CONSTRUCTION CHILD SUPPORT ADOPTIONS GENERAL BUSINESS PERSONAL INJURY COLLECTIONS WILLS BANKRUPTCY 601 WHITNEY RANCH #C-14 HENDERSON, NEVADA iiir WiiirtMMillijUi'liii" "ill '>ij_i||iit"'iiiii iiiiiliiiiiiiini i Lee Zaichick/News Staff ALMOST READY— The Reserve Hotel Casino is nearing completion. Offidab for the project are anticipating a January opening. RESERVE: Nearing completion From Page 1 rican safari theme throughout the project. A mural which will surround the building of different exotic animals is nearly complete. Besides the mural, the theme is evident on the inside oftheprojed Several bronze statues of hippos, monkeys and other wildlife along with several trees common to Africa are placed throughout the building. A Monsoon Bar is the center piece of the casino area. Complete with a tin roof firom which rain drops trickle off into a pond, the bar will serve as a main gathering place for visitors. In addition to 216 rooms and eight suites, the $120 million project will include 43,000 square feet of gaming area, 1,400 slot machines, 26 tablegames, poker, bingo and keno rooms and a sports book. • • :'}'<':''\ ;-\'-';V.7^-.; "I think itf s going to change the face of local gaming," said Gary Smith, director of casino operations. Smith said although Henderson residents have had to wait, they willsoon find outTheReserve will offer different amenities than other casinos in the area. Tm afiraid in the first week we open, people will come in and they will not gamble because they are looking around so much," he said. From lions to a crashed plane in the jungle, The Reserve expects to offer visitors a different experience. The facility will also include a buffet, coffee shop, steak house and other restaurants. The way this town is growing, I believe you have to be bullish in this market," Smith said of the bold safari theme. He added that soon Henderson will find out what The Reserve is all about Tiffany fa> head water State Rep. Sandra Tiffany, RHenderson, says she will lead a petition drive for a referendum if the County Commission imposes a sales tax increase without a vote of the people. :: "Let our people vote," she demanded at a Wednesday news conference, joined by officials and community leaders, including Rep. Harry Mortenson, D-Las Vegas; Ken Mahal, president of the Nevada Seniors CoaUtion; Hiil Stout, president of the Nevada Association of Independent Businesses; and Milton Schwartz, diairman of the Clark County Republican Central Committee. '^t is a matter of the highest principle that we have a vote of the people on this issue," Tiffany said. "We should have the ri^t to vote on how and if we're going to be taxed, whether the tax is for water or widgets." Pointing out that Nevada is an initiative and referendum state, she said "We hope that the Commission will honor that tradition and place the proposed sales tax increase on the ballot in 1998 for a vote of the people." She urged citizens to attend and speak outat the Conomission hearing at 10 a. m. Tuesday, Nov. 18, when the matter will be decided. The commissioners are under tremendous pressure from major campaign contributors to impose the sales tax increase without a vote of the people," she said. "However, if the Commission buckles under to the big contributors and imposes this tax without a vote of the people, we will exercise our right to circulate petitions to place the issue on the 1998 ballot." Tiffany indicated that just over 26,500 signatures will be required to secure a referendum. "We expect to get many more than that ff we are forced to go the referendum route," she said, "because a recent poll sponsored by the Review-Journal and TV-8 showed that 95% of the people wanted an opportunity to vote on the question." At the last session of the legislature. Tiffany attempted to tack an amendment to the sales tax increase authorization to mandate a vote of the people. Her amendment was voted down. SAVING WATER IT'S ALWAYS IN SEASON CHECK TOIinS AND FAUCETS f OR LEAKS Your Comofete Automotive Service Center J FINANCING AVAILABLEI90 DAYS, SAME AS CASH (U.A.C.) HENDERSON 4337 E. Sunset Rd. 454-2130 • "ns < SUNSET wo Owvron LUBE, OIL & FILTER '9.98 MOST VEHICLES Rc9.S2t.M MOST VEHICLES • OK change up to 5t|t. 30wt. oil • Multi-grades t other brands higher • Install new oil niter • Lube chassis (if appl.) • Ptus $2 hazardous waste disposal fee Not valid vlth other offers. Good Thru 12/31/97 HBC11R sooNOuuKirnmrcMAIIf IIT "BR AKE"SPECTAL ASLOWA%$^A QO • Written estimate wrtth no otiHgallon • free 2* point brake Inspection • Install preniium pads / Hnlngs • Resurface rotors / drums • Repack front wfict< bearings • FWD ft seml-fnetallk Nghcr • Phn $2 hazardous waste disposal fee tot valid with aih offtn. Good Thni 12/31/97 HOC 11R FREE LUBE, OIL & FILTER WTTHA IteaUUUt-PHKED WME UP $9A AO 4CYLM0-MOSTVEHtCU$ l9770 •CnMO$44M-tCnMMII$4t.M • oil change up to Sgt. Mwt ON • MuHHirades ft other brands higher • Instal rww et fKter • Lube chassis (V appl) • Engine >nal|rsls • Inital new ipari plugs' Adjust carburetor (If appl) • Ad|usl llmlr kmMhv elemtnl • PCV Mhre • Onm r(M enure cookng system • TiMMntlMlen ivlc • OlHwwttil iwvice • Bralw kNpacMan • FtMl ir^Kttd rnodih t autotnMIc transnri^ • Pha S2 huwAxa waste dtapotal tae Not wHd wNh olhar oftan. Good nwu 12/31/7 HK11M NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY • MONDAY SATURDAY 8 6 OoadMpMMpMlngiaaMamai^. MLTS • S*ti iiBR*?', Tm not giving up," she said. The people have a right to vote on m{gor tax decisions that aifect their pocketbooks. Either the commissioners voluntarily place the tax increase on the ballot or we the people will exercise our right of petition to put it on the ballot ourselves." I couldn't count the times you'vi done some special tiling for me\ Y
PAGE 6

\^EWPOINT HCMNEVVS *MllwO'CtHaatin Publisher CMolyn O'Callashan y6tmjbtisher -^PMilSzyiMko Managing Editor LETTERS Page 6 Henderson Home News Thursday, November 13,1997 RICHARD COHEN peserves funding When it rains it pours. Being fiscally responsible has been determined to be a detriment when applying for state funding for the flood damage sustained in the Aug. 10 deluge. The Board of Examiners, in its infinite wisdom, condemned Boulder City and Henderson for being prudent when it comes to managing its money. ;; Since we can manage our money better than some Podunk in Northern Nevada, we are being penalized. The Board of Examiners, which is made up of the Grovernor, the Secretary of State and the Attorney General, has recommended not giving any relief funding to either Boulder City or Henderson. \ Reason — because both cities' budgets are in the black. ^ • • • -•^-/ • ^:'^V. ::. • •: A • ": • • •" • • • ... • -,./: • • ,' • • .•/ ^• • • • • The state readily concedes each town has suffered tremendous damage. But instead of addressing th^e need, the Board of Examiners has convoluted the process and is trying to assist Northe^ towns which were financially strapped before they suffered flood damage. AB 208 passed during the last legislative session to help during disasters. Legislators allocated $4 million for relief funding. That relief funding is to help Nevada's residents in times of emergency. The Governor declared a state of emergency for Boulder City and Henderson after the Aug. 10 flooding but now it appears his declaration was hollow. It is ironic because some of the infrastructure around BC is still hollowed out from the flash flooding. Bean counters, especially the Budget Director, can twist the numbers all they want to justify allocating funding or in Boulder City and Henderson's cases, denying it. • ;.\^--;^,.;._. • \y::\-\-'-'-\.-i::'-:'.-. The $3.4 million in flood damage Boulder City sustained is more than one-third of its overall budget. Compounding the situation. Boulder City stands to receive a smaller slice of the sales tax pie due to redistribution. City officials were aware of the predicament and started a process to bolster the town's general fund to offset the future diminished sales tax revenue.^""r;.';' • ''::^^.: "distinguishing characteristic,* but we know his enemy's. It's shameless political opportunism. Cohen is a columnist for the Washington Post Writers Group. BILL HANLON m. The wonderful world of math What did the acorn say when it grew up? Geometry. That's a math joke. For those of you who haven't thrown any math parties lately, the translation is "Gee, I'm a tree." My guess is you want to try another one. What's an occupied bathroom called on an airplane? Hypotenuse. A high pot in use. I hoped you looked in the back of this newspaper last Thursday, and saw the geometry column that HBC Publications will print each week. It will follow concepts taught in a typical high school geometry class. The column could be used as a reminder of carefree high school days or a review for students taking the class. As the parent of a student enrolled in a geometry class, you might want to clip the columns. I'm sure they will make interesting dinner conversation. There is a real need to describe what we are studying. High school math is no different. We establish our vocabulary, knowing it is very important to success. My opinion is that lack of vocabulary is the reason some kids have trouble in math. Often, students will ask if they will ever use the math they learn. The answer is yes. In math, we are formal about how concepts are defined and presented. The reason for that is the same math is used and applied in many walks of life. In geometry, we ask students to construct perpendicular lines. Homebuilders might describe that as making sure the walls are 'square'. You might decide to wedlpaper your room. In math, we call that finding the lateral area of the prism. Have you ever • bought dirt or wanted to lay a foundation ? In geometry, we would find the volume of a rectangular prism. You can feel the excitement about the opportunity to learn hiore about life. • Remember the joy you found in finding the circumference of a circle? It also describes the distance a tire travels in one revolution, suggesting different size tires on a car would make speedometer and odometer wrong. If the tires are smaller than the manufacturer recommends, the car will move slower than the speedometer indicates and the car will register more miles than actually driven. Neat, huh? Have you noticed most houses have pitched roofs ? In algebra, we describe pitch as slope. In geometry, we find lengths of the roof boards using the Pythagorean theorem. With a few substitutions, we see the "distance" formula is nothing more than a variation of the Pytheigorean theorem. As you discuss how all doors or windows should be the same size, geometry students would discuss congruence. Today's column, and last week's, introduces vocabulary students need to know to have a chance at success. Next week, using the vocabulary, we'll start proofs. Parents, if you have someone in the family taking geometry, use the column to ask questions. I caimot emphasize enough how important it is students memorize definitions and can recall postulates, theorems, and corollaries. For students • ^^^^Hi^ f^ ^ successful, they have to have a body of information to draw from, to analyze or think critically. Most geometry books Ust definitions in the back of the book and the postulates and theorems in the order presented. Your children should not only know those, hut be able to visualize and draw on what's contained in the theorems. Checking that knowledge comes under the heading of parenting. If you choose not to demonstrate a commitment to education, it shouldn't come as a shock if your kids don't do well. The O'Callaghan famUy has once again demonstrated their commitment to the community and to education by providing space for the geometry column. Take advantage of it, check today's Panorama section to play in the wonderful world we ciedl math. Hanlon, a Las Vegas resident who writes a column about education, sits on the State Board of Education, Is the administrator for the Clark County School Distnct's MstfV Science institute and is a part-time instructor at UNLV t,> 'The News welcomes brief letters, signed with your name, address and phone for verification. Typed letters receive preference and the News reserves the right to edit (or grammar, spelling or length. Please mail to: Editor, HomB News, 2 Commerce Center Drive, Henderson, NV 89014 iTUR VIEWS Thursday, Novennber 13,1997 lEWS VIEW Henderson Home News Pa7 A really bad idea on court reform Talk radio generates some really bad ideas from time to time, and Las Vegas talk-show host Jack Perm's court reform initiative surely is one of them. One's mind would have to be in neutral not to understand the huge problems that his three-point plan would create, not just for the courts, but for the people who rely on them for justice. The most inane proposal is to gauge the truth of witnesses through voice-stress analyzers. It need hardly be said that almost every witness would send the analyzer into a flurry of activity, because most people do not testify in a state of calm. Even the most honest can be stressed out by the courtroom, the attorneys, the questions, the onlookers. Talk about stage fright; here it is. And if someone knew how to separate the nervousness of a truth-teller from that of a calculating liar why then we wouldn't need judges and juries at all. Besides, the person to really be suspicious of is the one who shows no nervousness at all—because that person could well be a habitual and pathological liar. Almost as bad is Ferm's suggestion to give paralegals the authority to advise people on legal matters and file papers in courts (he's a paralegal himself). Whatever one might think of lawyers (and most people have a dim view), they are educated thoroughly in their profession and paralegals are not. If you need to place your wealth and your future in the hands of someone, you will certainly want the most experienced help you can get. Of course, Ferm's plan is based on getting legal advice for le^s money; but this would indeed be penny-wise and pound-foolish. There is also foolishness in the proposal to remove judges who have more than 5% of their rulings overturned by a higher court. As anyone knows who has tried, to judge jurists in election campaigns, there are all sorts of reversals, many of them partial and small, and it is not possible to use this as a reliable ^ barometer. V If you see this petition, do not sign. Reno Gazette Journal < • z w u z O z < CD z ca Ul U MEMORABLE AOS OF KINDNESS • FUNDRAISERS Send Us Your News..• The News is interested in publishingyour family's and your neighborhood's news. What awards, accomplishmentsand^ interesting incidents and accidents do you want your neighbors to know? Please be brief and state what is Ne^s, what is Different, what is Interesting. Please limit yourself to one news brief per page. The news brief will be published as space permits. MAIL TO: Henderson Home News ':V'4~. ;i "}r 2 Commerce Center ; • ;;>>:: • '-^^^-'--.Henderson, NV 89014 • • • ;-^ ^• • • • OR FAX TO: 434-3527 Nome: Address: Phone: Dare: n X O O > O Please print or type neatly. Be sure your spelling of names is accurate. t/t • m > Z • SNOiidwovjd • sapr AV3N • SNoiivNoa remain^ the norm A team of university-affiliated medical researchers has reached a conclusion about Los Angeles gang violence that bears a striking similarity to a White House aide's view of a national problem 32 years ago. That aide was Daniel Patrick Moynihan, now the senior senator from New York. The Democrat's seminal 1965 report. The Negro Family: A Case for National Action," declared that the high percentage of out-of-wedlock births would probably be unchecked unless government and the nation took action to create more job opportunities. Moynihan also noted the importance of role models in calling for male teachers to seek to serve as good examples for boys. It's now clear that Moynihan's warning applies to no particular -' • racial group but to all Americans stuck at the bottom. The new research points to the job factor as a prime cause of the growth of criminal gangs in Los Angeles. High unemployment rates and low per capita income, the report said, are the greatest contributors to gang violence. Achieving the obvious solution, getting affected kids into jobs, is compHcated. Persuading businesses to relocate in troubled neighborhoods or to expand there is always difficult, and finding work for former or potential gang members will be even harder now that employment must be found for many thousands of former welfare recipients. Moreover, jobs are not the only issue; two other factors also must be addressed. One that is particularly intractable is the sense among analarming number of youths that they have no future. They have seen too many deaths and have come to accept lethal violence as something they always must face. They have become convinced that their lives will be brief and probably will be ended by murder. That's why a disillusioned youngster might reject a job paying slightly above minimum wage, turning instead to the immediate gratification of gang-related drug crime. Finally, youths are driven to gangs when gang leaders are the only authority figures who offer them responsibility, trust and a sense of power and involvement. That kind of warped and anti-social mentoring has to be replaced; honest, successful adults will have to come forward to provide role models. The gang members need to be able to see that low-paying, entry-level jobs are not the end of the line. Lo$ Angeles Timee .M AGREE TO DISAGREE Do palm trees belong in the desert? editors note: this weeks arguement centers around excessive use of palm trees in the area. Managing Editor Paul Pszydelkno and reporter Kevin Ferguson gwe opposing views. Kavin F*rguson News Staff Reporter As a former reporter in the city of palm trees. Palm Springs, Calif, I have to respectfully but completely disagree with the boss. The people who think palm trees are ugly are in the minority. That is evident because if they didn't add to the aesthetic beauty of an area, resort towns and country clubs would not try to clone the Palm Springs/Palm Desert area. Another obvious exanrpleis ~ when scenes in a movie or TV show take place in Beverly Hills, they always show the palm tree-lined houses, adding to t^ "glamour" of the town. >^^-.^^ Sure, the photographers are focusing on the million dollar homes, but if the palm trees subtracted from the property value, would they have been planted there? You're probably saying, "Duh, Kevin." Do I need to go on? For the sake of the minority, I will, just a little. I don't think replacing palm trees with bushes at country clubs would be too popular with t^ : .^ people who pay thousandsof • dollars to play golf there. Even good golfers lose their share of balls in the lakes, and no matter how attractive a particular bush may be on the course, they would frustrate regulars even more. Palm trees maj be ugly when they're dying, but then again, what isn't? Some may say palm trees don't provide enough shade. Well, there aren't too many types of trees that do provide adequate shade and can withstand 120 degree summers. Area developers, landscape architects, keep up the good work. Some people just need something about which to complain. Fewer palm trees? ...whatever. Paul Szydsiko Managing Editor AGREE IIDISAGREE Enough already. If I see one more new : • • development spring up with palm trees posing as landscape, I'll scream. I'll have to slap someone (maybe the writer across the way) with the palm of my hand. They're everywhere — they're planted overnight in shopping *' center parking lots, apartment and condominium complexes, subdivision entrances and various street beautification projects. They don't belong. v'^VV Yes, they're hardy. Yes, they seem to do well in our climate. But enough is enough. The stark, plain, disproportionately tall trees are not exactly pretty when they're healthy; they're uglier when they're dying; they're downright scary when the wind blows them over or hacks off their tops. They offer precious little reward for the effort of craning your neck to look at what passes for leaves. The only thing positive about tlrem is that they are not likely to .blame for allergies many of us svd&^. at certain ti^es pf the year. ., The valley's transplanted trees are so plentiful, they're become trite. They are no longer a thoughtful landscape choice, if they ever were. The metal apparitions of the tjaes at McCarran International Airport are some kind of sick in-jokes. You can't escape them when leaving the city or greeting out-of-towners. If a new development does not have palm trees, it appears unfinished. But in fact, the designer used some creativity and chose another species to make the project look attractive. Area developers, landscape architects, I implore you: No/*fibre x palm trees. ..^^ Choosing anything else would improve the aesthetics of the area and be more healthy for residents. EXPRESSING YOURSELF Express Yourself is the place wfiere readers can give their opinions on issues. The reader hotline number of the Henderson Home News, 585^9879, is available 24 hours a day. If you wish, leave your name and the neighborhood in which you live on the voice mail. The News will putjiish selected comments each Thursday In reading your development for Water Street, I have a suggestion—get rid of those palm trees. I will not go do wn on Water Street to do any business and I know there are plenty of my friends that feel the same way because of the intricate parking there where you have to park between palm trees. If you want to leave palm trees at the beginning and end of the block, that's fine, but restore the parking places to the city of Henderson. It's too hard to park and I will not patronize any store if 1 have to park that way. Track Two WHAT YOUR NEIGHBORS THINK "Are uniforms a good idea for students in public schools?" MudmtaJ Thuyemt TktrvVteliM AnMstf Mirf flptfPM^ jt Asf ID oufMs 990 how M torn. Tim If ImKomtml §h ouU te to ami kia emil tiford wtrnt KsMn rw(MMn/ CoMa fifl Aoyd HUm Lara Connor

PAGE 7

\^EWPOINT HCMNEVVS *MllwO'CtHaatin Publisher CMolyn O'Callashan y6tmjbtisher -^PMilSzyiMko Managing Editor LETTERS Page 6 Henderson Home News Thursday, November 13,1997 RICHARD COHEN peserves funding When it rains it pours. Being fiscally responsible has been determined to be a detriment when applying for state funding for the flood damage sustained in the Aug. 10 deluge. The Board of Examiners, in its infinite wisdom, condemned Boulder City and Henderson for being prudent when it comes to managing its money. ;; Since we can manage our money better than some Podunk in Northern Nevada, we are being penalized. The Board of Examiners, which is made up of the Grovernor, the Secretary of State and the Attorney General, has recommended not giving any relief funding to either Boulder City or Henderson. \ Reason — because both cities' budgets are in the black. ^ • • • -•^-/ • ^:'^V. ::. • •: A • ": • • •" • • • ... • -,./: • • ,' • • .•/ ^• • • • • The state readily concedes each town has suffered tremendous damage. But instead of addressing th^e need, the Board of Examiners has convoluted the process and is trying to assist Northe^ towns which were financially strapped before they suffered flood damage. AB 208 passed during the last legislative session to help during disasters. Legislators allocated $4 million for relief funding. That relief funding is to help Nevada's residents in times of emergency. The Governor declared a state of emergency for Boulder City and Henderson after the Aug. 10 flooding but now it appears his declaration was hollow. It is ironic because some of the infrastructure around BC is still hollowed out from the flash flooding. Bean counters, especially the Budget Director, can twist the numbers all they want to justify allocating funding or in Boulder City and Henderson's cases, denying it. • ;.\^--;^,.;._. • \y::\-\-'-'-\.-i::'-:'.-. The $3.4 million in flood damage Boulder City sustained is more than one-third of its overall budget. Compounding the situation. Boulder City stands to receive a smaller slice of the sales tax pie due to redistribution. City officials were aware of the predicament and started a process to bolster the town's general fund to offset the future diminished sales tax revenue.^""r;.';' • ''::^^.: "distinguishing characteristic,* but we know his enemy's. It's shameless political opportunism. Cohen is a columnist for the Washington Post Writers Group. BILL HANLON m. The wonderful world of math What did the acorn say when it grew up? Geometry. That's a math joke. For those of you who haven't thrown any math parties lately, the translation is "Gee, I'm a tree." My guess is you want to try another one. What's an occupied bathroom called on an airplane? Hypotenuse. A high pot in use. I hoped you looked in the back of this newspaper last Thursday, and saw the geometry column that HBC Publications will print each week. It will follow concepts taught in a typical high school geometry class. The column could be used as a reminder of carefree high school days or a review for students taking the class. As the parent of a student enrolled in a geometry class, you might want to clip the columns. I'm sure they will make interesting dinner conversation. There is a real need to describe what we are studying. High school math is no different. We establish our vocabulary, knowing it is very important to success. My opinion is that lack of vocabulary is the reason some kids have trouble in math. Often, students will ask if they will ever use the math they learn. The answer is yes. In math, we are formal about how concepts are defined and presented. The reason for that is the same math is used and applied in many walks of life. In geometry, we ask students to construct perpendicular lines. Homebuilders might describe that as making sure the walls are 'square'. You might decide to wedlpaper your room. In math, we call that finding the lateral area of the prism. Have you ever • bought dirt or wanted to lay a foundation ? In geometry, we would find the volume of a rectangular prism. You can feel the excitement about the opportunity to learn hiore about life. • Remember the joy you found in finding the circumference of a circle? It also describes the distance a tire travels in one revolution, suggesting different size tires on a car would make speedometer and odometer wrong. If the tires are smaller than the manufacturer recommends, the car will move slower than the speedometer indicates and the car will register more miles than actually driven. Neat, huh? Have you noticed most houses have pitched roofs ? In algebra, we describe pitch as slope. In geometry, we find lengths of the roof boards using the Pythagorean theorem. With a few substitutions, we see the "distance" formula is nothing more than a variation of the Pytheigorean theorem. As you discuss how all doors or windows should be the same size, geometry students would discuss congruence. Today's column, and last week's, introduces vocabulary students need to know to have a chance at success. Next week, using the vocabulary, we'll start proofs. Parents, if you have someone in the family taking geometry, use the column to ask questions. I caimot emphasize enough how important it is students memorize definitions and can recall postulates, theorems, and corollaries. For students • ^^^^Hi^ f^ ^ successful, they have to have a body of information to draw from, to analyze or think critically. Most geometry books Ust definitions in the back of the book and the postulates and theorems in the order presented. Your children should not only know those, hut be able to visualize and draw on what's contained in the theorems. Checking that knowledge comes under the heading of parenting. If you choose not to demonstrate a commitment to education, it shouldn't come as a shock if your kids don't do well. The O'Callaghan famUy has once again demonstrated their commitment to the community and to education by providing space for the geometry column. Take advantage of it, check today's Panorama section to play in the wonderful world we ciedl math. Hanlon, a Las Vegas resident who writes a column about education, sits on the State Board of Education, Is the administrator for the Clark County School Distnct's MstfV Science institute and is a part-time instructor at UNLV t,> 'The News welcomes brief letters, signed with your name, address and phone for verification. Typed letters receive preference and the News reserves the right to edit (or grammar, spelling or length. Please mail to: Editor, HomB News, 2 Commerce Center Drive, Henderson, NV 89014 iTUR VIEWS Thursday, Novennber 13,1997 lEWS VIEW Henderson Home News Pa7 A really bad idea on court reform Talk radio generates some really bad ideas from time to time, and Las Vegas talk-show host Jack Perm's court reform initiative surely is one of them. One's mind would have to be in neutral not to understand the huge problems that his three-point plan would create, not just for the courts, but for the people who rely on them for justice. The most inane proposal is to gauge the truth of witnesses through voice-stress analyzers. It need hardly be said that almost every witness would send the analyzer into a flurry of activity, because most people do not testify in a state of calm. Even the most honest can be stressed out by the courtroom, the attorneys, the questions, the onlookers. Talk about stage fright; here it is. And if someone knew how to separate the nervousness of a truth-teller from that of a calculating liar why then we wouldn't need judges and juries at all. Besides, the person to really be suspicious of is the one who shows no nervousness at all—because that person could well be a habitual and pathological liar. Almost as bad is Ferm's suggestion to give paralegals the authority to advise people on legal matters and file papers in courts (he's a paralegal himself). Whatever one might think of lawyers (and most people have a dim view), they are educated thoroughly in their profession and paralegals are not. If you need to place your wealth and your future in the hands of someone, you will certainly want the most experienced help you can get. Of course, Ferm's plan is based on getting legal advice for le^s money; but this would indeed be penny-wise and pound-foolish. There is also foolishness in the proposal to remove judges who have more than 5% of their rulings overturned by a higher court. As anyone knows who has tried, to judge jurists in election campaigns, there are all sorts of reversals, many of them partial and small, and it is not possible to use this as a reliable ^ barometer. V If you see this petition, do not sign. Reno Gazette Journal < • z w u z O z < CD z ca Ul U MEMORABLE AOS OF KINDNESS • FUNDRAISERS Send Us Your News..• The News is interested in publishingyour family's and your neighborhood's news. What awards, accomplishmentsand^ interesting incidents and accidents do you want your neighbors to know? Please be brief and state what is Ne^s, what is Different, what is Interesting. Please limit yourself to one news brief per page. The news brief will be published as space permits. MAIL TO: Henderson Home News ':V'4~. ;i "}r 2 Commerce Center ; • ;;>>:: • '-^^^-'--.Henderson, NV 89014 • • • ;-^ ^• • • • OR FAX TO: 434-3527 Nome: Address: Phone: Dare: n X O O > O Please print or type neatly. Be sure your spelling of names is accurate. t/t • m > Z • SNOiidwovjd • sapr AV3N • SNoiivNoa remain^ the norm A team of university-affiliated medical researchers has reached a conclusion about Los Angeles gang violence that bears a striking similarity to a White House aide's view of a national problem 32 years ago. That aide was Daniel Patrick Moynihan, now the senior senator from New York. The Democrat's seminal 1965 report. The Negro Family: A Case for National Action," declared that the high percentage of out-of-wedlock births would probably be unchecked unless government and the nation took action to create more job opportunities. Moynihan also noted the importance of role models in calling for male teachers to seek to serve as good examples for boys. It's now clear that Moynihan's warning applies to no particular -' • racial group but to all Americans stuck at the bottom. The new research points to the job factor as a prime cause of the growth of criminal gangs in Los Angeles. High unemployment rates and low per capita income, the report said, are the greatest contributors to gang violence. Achieving the obvious solution, getting affected kids into jobs, is compHcated. Persuading businesses to relocate in troubled neighborhoods or to expand there is always difficult, and finding work for former or potential gang members will be even harder now that employment must be found for many thousands of former welfare recipients. Moreover, jobs are not the only issue; two other factors also must be addressed. One that is particularly intractable is the sense among analarming number of youths that they have no future. They have seen too many deaths and have come to accept lethal violence as something they always must face. They have become convinced that their lives will be brief and probably will be ended by murder. That's why a disillusioned youngster might reject a job paying slightly above minimum wage, turning instead to the immediate gratification of gang-related drug crime. Finally, youths are driven to gangs when gang leaders are the only authority figures who offer them responsibility, trust and a sense of power and involvement. That kind of warped and anti-social mentoring has to be replaced; honest, successful adults will have to come forward to provide role models. The gang members need to be able to see that low-paying, entry-level jobs are not the end of the line. Lo$ Angeles Timee .M AGREE TO DISAGREE Do palm trees belong in the desert? editors note: this weeks arguement centers around excessive use of palm trees in the area. Managing Editor Paul Pszydelkno and reporter Kevin Ferguson gwe opposing views. Kavin F*rguson News Staff Reporter As a former reporter in the city of palm trees. Palm Springs, Calif, I have to respectfully but completely disagree with the boss. The people who think palm trees are ugly are in the minority. That is evident because if they didn't add to the aesthetic beauty of an area, resort towns and country clubs would not try to clone the Palm Springs/Palm Desert area. Another obvious exanrpleis ~ when scenes in a movie or TV show take place in Beverly Hills, they always show the palm tree-lined houses, adding to t^ "glamour" of the town. >^^-.^^ Sure, the photographers are focusing on the million dollar homes, but if the palm trees subtracted from the property value, would they have been planted there? You're probably saying, "Duh, Kevin." Do I need to go on? For the sake of the minority, I will, just a little. I don't think replacing palm trees with bushes at country clubs would be too popular with t^ : .^ people who pay thousandsof • dollars to play golf there. Even good golfers lose their share of balls in the lakes, and no matter how attractive a particular bush may be on the course, they would frustrate regulars even more. Palm trees maj be ugly when they're dying, but then again, what isn't? Some may say palm trees don't provide enough shade. Well, there aren't too many types of trees that do provide adequate shade and can withstand 120 degree summers. Area developers, landscape architects, keep up the good work. Some people just need something about which to complain. Fewer palm trees? ...whatever. Paul Szydsiko Managing Editor AGREE IIDISAGREE Enough already. If I see one more new : • • development spring up with palm trees posing as landscape, I'll scream. I'll have to slap someone (maybe the writer across the way) with the palm of my hand. They're everywhere — they're planted overnight in shopping *' center parking lots, apartment and condominium complexes, subdivision entrances and various street beautification projects. They don't belong. v'^VV Yes, they're hardy. Yes, they seem to do well in our climate. But enough is enough. The stark, plain, disproportionately tall trees are not exactly pretty when they're healthy; they're uglier when they're dying; they're downright scary when the wind blows them over or hacks off their tops. They offer precious little reward for the effort of craning your neck to look at what passes for leaves. The only thing positive about tlrem is that they are not likely to .blame for allergies many of us svd&^. at certain ti^es pf the year. ., The valley's transplanted trees are so plentiful, they're become trite. They are no longer a thoughtful landscape choice, if they ever were. The metal apparitions of the tjaes at McCarran International Airport are some kind of sick in-jokes. You can't escape them when leaving the city or greeting out-of-towners. If a new development does not have palm trees, it appears unfinished. But in fact, the designer used some creativity and chose another species to make the project look attractive. Area developers, landscape architects, I implore you: No/*fibre x palm trees. ..^^ Choosing anything else would improve the aesthetics of the area and be more healthy for residents. EXPRESSING YOURSELF Express Yourself is the place wfiere readers can give their opinions on issues. The reader hotline number of the Henderson Home News, 585^9879, is available 24 hours a day. If you wish, leave your name and the neighborhood in which you live on the voice mail. The News will putjiish selected comments each Thursday In reading your development for Water Street, I have a suggestion—get rid of those palm trees. I will not go do wn on Water Street to do any business and I know there are plenty of my friends that feel the same way because of the intricate parking there where you have to park between palm trees. If you want to leave palm trees at the beginning and end of the block, that's fine, but restore the parking places to the city of Henderson. It's too hard to park and I will not patronize any store if 1 have to park that way. Track Two WHAT YOUR NEIGHBORS THINK "Are uniforms a good idea for students in public schools?" MudmtaJ Thuyemt TktrvVteliM AnMstf Mirf flptfPM^ jt Asf ID oufMs 990 how M torn. Tim If ImKomtml §h ouU te to ami kia emil tiford wtrnt KsMn rw(MMn/ CoMa fifl Aoyd HUm Lara Connor

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>^. Pag^S Henderson Home News Thursday, November 13, 1997 Thursday, November 13, 1997 Henderson Home News Page 9 THE GATORS This is the second ot a series of pages submitted by local high schools. Next week: Silverado. GVHS senior lives army life Lauran Barrigan When most teenagers think of basic training for the army, they imagine an arrogant, forceful drill sergeant and epdless hours of drills and exercise. So does senior Casey Hendrickson. Not because he watched a movie about the army or read a pamphlet from a recruiter, but because he lived it. For 10 weeks this summer in Fort Sill, Okla., he completed the initial course of the career he has always wanted to pursue. Learning extensive first aid, combat maneuvers, and how to operate more than 50 weapons, Hendrickson secured his much Casey Hendrickson desired enroltmeht into the U.S. Armed Forces while still a high school student "It was fun in a twisted sort of way. It was the adult version of playing war games with buddies and camping out And this time we learned how to blow a lot of things up," said Hendrickson. His new comrades were the 70 men in his barracks with whom he spent all his time — eating, sleeping, living, and working together to develop a team. This team lived a primitive life-style with no running water during the day, no opportunities to clean up before eating, and harsh physical activities and drills. > "We call the first two weeks of drill camp hell weeks. There's a lot of exercise. They make you hurt, they make you feel very small, and they confuse you," recalled Hendrickson. The physical and mental demands ofthe training caused some of the recruits to suffer nervous breakdowns, some tajquit, and others to doubt their cnoice to join the program. Prior research about Basic Training and his physical preparation had readied Hendrickson for the weeks, and his endurance SeeAimy Pages Green Valley band set for trip to Paris JannHer Kimbla The GVHS Marching Band, under the guidance of band director Diane Koutsulis, will travel to Paris during the holiday break between Dec. 27 to Jan. 3 to participate in two parades and celebrate their vacation European style. Eighty musical teens will be accompanied by 20 chaperones which include administrators from GVHS, Silverado and Cimarron Memorial High Schools. Aside from playing in the New Year's Montmarte and New Year's Eve Chantily parades— which the band has spent endless hours of preparation—students will travel • throughout Paris. They plan to visit the Eiffel Tower, Versailles Palace, The Louvre and various chateaus as well as sampling French cuisine. The incentive of the trip caused some band students to work during the summer to help raise payment for travel expenses and provide spending money for their much awaited shopping in Paris. REPORT CARD Courtesy Photo;r. _;•.; • ; • • ",/•:.:; • • • -.;,-.. • .. : ; \• • • ; ^^ ,' • i.,*•-• • :' • • • • OFF TO PARIS —Green Valley High's marching band, pictured here at a recent football game, will bring in 1998 while vacationing in Paris. GVs commitment showing through Batty A. Sabo PrincipaL Green Valley High School "Commitment to Excellence." These three words impressively guard the entryway of Green Valley High School in six-foot letters, visible to every person who passes the school and reminding everyone who enters the campus of our mission. The words proudly appear on every document carrying our name as a clear statement of purpose. They are spoken at every occasion where people gather with the common purpose of discussing some aspect ofthe school. They are the verbalization of our efforts, our triumphs, our struggles, and our achievements. They are our school motto. Commitment to excellence begins with the people who envision objectives, develop programs, and implement 'strategies. GVHS boasts faculty, support staff, and administrators who dare to dream and who diligently work to translate dreams into realities. The school is a bustling center of activity from morning until night It continues with students whom the school is charged with educating. Student participation in the management of school business is encouraged, clearly defined expectations are prepared and disseminated, consistent school policies and procedures are enforced, communication networks are implemented, and a safe, orderly, clean school climate is maintained. Commitment to excellence thrives through involvement of parents. It is ludicrous to think that a school can instill the admiration of such qualities as "commitment" and "excellence" without foundations being laid by parents and family. GVHS soars because parents are the "wind beneath our wings." Their students enter GVHS ready to learn and eager to wear the emblem of the Gator. Commitment to, and from, the community is essential. A school operating in isolation from the community at large is blind to the role it plays in society at best and is headed for certain disaister at worst To bind the community and school, community-based programs are instituted, linking common purposes and creating avenues for discussion. The constant motion of minds humming and opinions brewing enlivens the GVHS environment All points of view are on the table and every person is asked to be involved. Our commitment demands the status quo never be elevated so high that new ideas and risky ventures are not endorsed. GVHS people embrace the truth that an educational institution is like a living organism. It is ever-changing and ever-adapting; it breathes with the life of every person who touches it; it experiences joy and sadness. Our commitment recognizes the challenge of being dynamic. We seek to turn obstacles into opportunities. GVHS has been thelargesthigh school in the state for the last three years. Since the school was originally built for a maximum of 2,500 students, adjustmentshave had to be made every year. We average a turn-around of several hundred students every semester. The new students hail from everywhere across the county, the country and the globe. Commitment again provides salve to soothe aches caused by a rapidlygrowing and constantly-changing student population. Our common mission and goals are the top priorities. Regardless of which students are present, strivingfor excellence is never to be denied. Open and SMRtport Page 9 BRIEFS Gator students call White House Lauran Barrigan Teachers often receive messages from parents, friends, acquaintances, but not a congratulatory call from the White House from oflBdals pleased with students' work on racial issues in the nation. However, this was the case with English teacher Timothy Fladm. Only a half-hour after he had mdrched with his class out to (he GVHS courtyard and called Washington, D.C., on a pay I^Mine, he was surprised with a reply. Ben Johnson, Deputy Assistant to the President and Director of the Offioe of Liaison, returned the call to express his interest in the students' di scussions cmioeming equality and prejudice and also to notify the cla he wouM pcnonally inform tite President of the students' involvement The Engli sh II Honors dasses hope to make the President aware of their concerns on issues of racial relations and they are writing essays encouraging him to continue with the new-coming importance of equality in the nation. Issued in May, the PrMident's policy, or "national dialogue," centered oo trying to aid categorization between people. Students were inspired to help this cause after they read TiDie Olsen's short story, ^ Yea," about problems two girls faced and their separation throu^ high sdtool because one of the teens is white and the other black. Woridng in groups while foIk>wingthe story enabled thestudents to take notice of difficultiee encountered by the two girls as they were socially divided by race in a rapidly changing society. "Hke students also wrote eisays describing their first experiences ofthe •eoaration of ethnidtiea in America. Homeless girl lives life on the streets Jll Andaraon No home. No food. No money. No clean dothes. No security. Jennifer attended GVHS for two years, and appeared to be like any other student She went to all her classes, stayed out of trouble, pulled decent grades, and even attended an occasional football game. Buried deep under this facade, Jennifer lived with a dark secret. Jennifer was homeless. She survived on the streets alone for over a year and a half, after leaving home at the tender age of 15. Homeless. The mere mention evokes images of itinerant adults pushing grocery carts and holding cardboard signs desperately pleading for handouts, for help. Children are rarely part of the typical homeless portrait, even though the average age of a homeless person is nine. Children and families are the fastest growing segment of America's homeless population. A tear fell on her cheek, leaving behind a glimpse of clean skin under the dirt. She took a long drag from her cigarette, wiped her eyes, and recalled her first days on her own. 1 thought I had it so bad, but I had no idea how horrible life can be. My first night on the street I slept under a freeway pass with a blanket I had found and my backpack as my pillow. I woke up a few hours later and they were both gone. I was shocked, scared. I couldn't believe people could be so terrible. Since then, I bet Fve taken 10 backpacks from people sleeping." Homelessness does not just hit a certain and select group of people. It is not some specific combination of events that takes away one's home and throws them out on the street. The biggest misconception about homelessness is that it can't happen to you. No one misses utility payments or spends more money with plastic than they can afford thinking. This might lead to me living on the streets.' The scary thing is those simple things can be all it takes for you to lose your comfortable lifestyle and be forced onto the streets," explained Stephen Burger, the executive director ofthe International Union of Gospel Missions. Like most everyone else, Jeimifer was certainly not someone :itoli < i | i ^ ri bl | T?st9f|ierljb[e scroun^forfoo^., or begging stranfUB feraaoaey. It seems like a lifetime ago, but I used to have a house, a faniily, food, money. I fought with my mom about making my bed, took out the trash every week, made dinner when she worked double shifts. I lived a normal life, had normal friends. We weren't rich, or nothing, but I always had enough to see a movie or buy a Slurpee. Last month, this guy I know was knifed for $5. Five dollars." Jennifer left home over a year ago after her mother found drugs in her jacket pocket She Uved with various friends, hiding in their rooms to avoid parents, and leaving when someone became suspicious. Jennifer's parents reported her as a runaway. Two weeks after she left home, the police questioned someone she had stayed with. Word of this reached Jennifer and she hit the streets. 1 thought I was tough. I lasted four months alone, then I ran crying home — only they were gone. I knocked on my door and a stranger answered. I asked for my parents, but he had never heard of them. I didn't know what to do. I had spent my entire life running from them and now I couldn't find them. I sat on the stairs in my apartment complex and cried," Jennifer explained, choking on her words as she relived the fear and loneliness. She left home just as her sophomore year at GVHS was ending and lived on her own the following summer. She discovered her parents had moved less than a week before school started. Her world turned upside down and life hanging in the balance, Jermifer's next move was one that even surprised her. She went bade to school. 'With everything taken from me, I didn't know what else to do. I needed structure, and maybe a little sanity. Besides, everything is at school: food, money, and connections. I got drugs real cheap, bummed food every chance I got, and met some people who let me stay with them for a few days at a time. I survived because of school." Jennifer then continued to live a life unimaginable to many her age. She worried everyday if she would have a place to comfortably rest her head, or food to revive her exhausted body. "Everyday it seemed I had to sink to new lows to get by. I'd take stufffrom the people who let me stay with them, you know, clothes, food. But you run out of friends when all you are is a mooch and a thief. So rd sleep in the wash by the school or the one under Valle Verde if I couldn't find anyone to stay with. I slept in this guya car for a while, but he stole from me, so I left I started sneaking into that health club by Mountasia to shower. My clothes were never dean, but neither were the kids with homes who I hung out with at school. I looked like everyone else. Not many people knew I was homeless. Kids sometimes talk to adults, and adults always talk to cops, so I kept it quiet," Jennifer said. According to the Nati