Citation
1996-10-10 - Henderson Home News

Material Information

Title:
1996-10-10 - Henderson Home News
Creator:
O'Callaghan, Mike ( Columnist )
Marciniak, D. B. ( Columnist )
Jackson, Sharon ( Columnist )
Cohen, Richard ( Columnist )
Hanlon, Bill ( Columnist )
Kerr, Carol ( Columnist )
Bowman, Bill ( Columnist )
Goldstein, Philip ( Columnist )
Henderson, Barb ( Columnist )
Eicher, Ray ( Columnist )
Frigoletto, Fredric D., Jr. ( Columnist )
Earl, Phillip I. ( Columnist )
Bishop, Carolyn D. ( Columnist )
Weidenfeld, Rob ( Photographer )
Jones, Brian ( Photographer )
Publisher:
O'Callaghan, Mike
HBC Publications, Inc.
Creation Date:
1996-10-10
Language:
English
Materials:
Paper ( medium )

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Nevada
Henderson
East Las Vegas
City and town life -- Nevada -- Henderson
Community life -- Nevada -- Henderson
History -- Henderson (Nev.) -- 20th century
Genre:
Newspapers

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Acknowledgments:
Greenspun Media sponsors this collection.
Collection Location:
Greenspun Media retains possession of the bound, original newspapers. Henderson District Public Libraries retains possession of the microfilm and the digital files.

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Source Institution:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Holding Location:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Rights Management:
The items in this collection are provided for non-commercial personal and academic use by Henderson Library patrons and may not be republished in any way. Contact Greenspun Media Group for additional information regarding rights to this material: http://www.greenspunmedia.com
Resource Identifier:
hhn4476 ( Digital Id )

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PAGE 1

' >% '^ > .. J.>. L '' '^^*^'^ip?' Pfle 18 Henderson Home News Tuesday, October 8, 1 996 GMC TRUCK ^A ^AfJ <-. wi ^ I TEBVEMR NEW OR USED VEHCLE AND GEl I mm KfiUUI iDfflRIB w..*no.o .M,---^ • AU LOADED! • LOW MILEAGE • W5 & '^'S AVAILABLEI BOrCE OUR LEASE ANSM/n AtAii ^'SJflWKEXKWENCEASD WOULD BE GLAD TO HELP. TJIT X Eddie Bauer, 6 Cyl., 5 Spd! (Stk.#UP1506) 1994 CHEVY Red Beauty, Like New!. (Stk.#UP1567) Economy & Quality! (Stk.#UP1569) It's That Time Of Year For Top Down Crusin'! (Stk.#UP1560) 1995 CHRYSLER Great Car For School! (Stk.#UP1565) suNPin y^ Loaded, White, Like New! (Stk. #UP1562) 1993 HONDA AceowtM Leather, Loaded, Family Comfort, 10K Miles (Stk.61466A) SLT, Leather, Loaded! (Stk.#UP1501) 1993 GMC Sport Model, Automatic, Loaded! (Stk.#UP1557) 1994 NISSAN MAXIMA 1996PONTIAC 1 Ton, Go Anywhere, Haul Anything! (Stk.#UP1510) 1994 CHEVY vnwmjLy ^K'taisli^J^J^fV-XJi^.'^^l^^^^^ "^ NEVADA WITH N.A.D.A. (NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE DEALERS ASSOCIATION) CERTIFIED SALESPtRSONS! 2iiil CHANGE nillliCHiB • BANKRUPTCIES • TAX UEMS • REPOSSESSIONS • JUDGEIMEmUlfE CAM HELP! WElDflllllBHt ri f. mOLim ASK FOR DAVIO TIMS (IN I HE VALLEY AUFU rVIALLI B rSfOTSgBB wsgsm SSSSSESnXS Basic, GV ^^^— get set foi Henderson Bowl Vl Thursday, October 10,1996 ONE MAN'S VIEW MIKE O'C ALLAGHA N The shared-campus plan for a new Clark County School District high school and the Community College of Southern Nevada Henderson campus demonstrates that somebody at both levels of education is thinking. It's this kind of thinking that will eventually result in grades 13 and 14 becoming natural extensions of our secondary educational system. This is exactly what is necessary if our people are to keep up with the rest of our modem and fast-moving world. Not only will the sharedcampus plan result in better education, it will save millions of taxpayer dollars during coming years. It's a system that has been used in some other leading nations for several decades. Grades 13 and 14 attract large numbers of students in those nations before they leave formal v;^. • schooling. If President Clinton's plan of tax relief for two years education beyond high school becomes a reality, this is exactly the kind of convenient system that's attractive to even more students who want to continue their education. "I believe the clear facts of this time make it imperative that our goal must be nothing less than to make the 13th and 14th years of education as universal to all Americans as the first 12 are t oday." Clinton remarked. If CCSN President Richard Moore and CCSD Superintendent Brian Cram continue to make their sharedcampus plan a reality at every CCSN campus, we will all benefit. Exactly why the Bond Oversight Committee became involved in holding up this plan on the CCSN Henderson campus is beyond me. To endanger the plans put forth by Moore and Cram shows a lack of foresight on the part of some of the people involved in making decisions affecting our schools. This slight hitch in plans See One Man's View Page 2 INSIDE Tiger begins tale in TPC at Summerlin .. Pjnoram>f cover Moll Flanders on PBS _TV News inside Editorials Education 4-5 Senior Center 8 Happenings 11 Sports 17 VWunw47,C2W£dUan H. B .C. PunteflUofw PO Bra (0430 HwwMvon, NV \ (7M)M-HM He \ 50 Rob Weidenfeld/News Staff POLY PRODUCERS'Amnand Manufacturing, Inc. President Rich de Heras explains some aspects of the company's production facility, located at 2399 Silver Wolf Dr. in Henderson. Molding into perfection D.B. Marciniak News Staff Writer Plastic makes perfect. At least that is what one Henderson businessman likes to think. Rich de Heras, president of Armand Manufacturing, recently relocated his California-based business to Henderson to continue its tradition which dates back to 1948. What makes plastic perfect, de Heras said, is that it is affordable to produce, can be made easily in mass quantities and is safe. Armand Manufacturing, a producer of plastic goods, has come a long way since those first days of operation, de Heras said. "I think people aren't aware of how extensively plastics are used in life," he said. The company originally began producing plastic for retail products such as tire covers and garment bags, then the company decided to expand to offer custommade poly and vinyl packaging and specialty prodii|t<. A wide array ef products aremade at the 29,000-square-foot plant located at 2399 Silver Wolf Dr., next to the water treatment plant. "It's kind of like the guy who built the manufactured home," de Heras said. "...I wanted to build a custom home." There is no end to the types of plastic that can be made at the factory, he said. One of the company's largest markets is the medical field. Plastic bags for blood and medication are some of the most frequently ordered products atthe factory. Altiiough the medical field supplies much of the business, de Heras said, other businesses approach the plant with work for di0jprent plastic goods. J^e're always making a vari^sL ety of things for a variety of markets," he said. Other goods such as plastic covers to store automobile documents in the glove compartments of a Volvo car, to a folder holding shingle samples for sales people are produced at the factory. Goods such as computer dust covers, covers for other mechanical equipment and bags to store computer programming boards are also produced regularly. Producing the goods is more than rolling vinyl off a spool and_ fastening snaps, though. The factory is dotted with machines which follow the basic principles of a Play Dough toymolding station. For some products, vinyl is roliedoffa apool and ruiu through apress. Unlike a Play Dough mold, the vinyl is fused by a surge of electricity. Other products are pimply stamped in a giantmachine which looks like an industrial-sized waffle iron. There are 45 employees at the factory. Of those, approximately 25% transferred from the California operation. de Heras said he has always wanted to relocate to the Las VeSee Plastics Page 2 19 landfill debate heats up D.B. Marciniak News Staff Writer Very few issues were put to rest at a pubHc hearing Monday about the proposed Eldorado Landfill in Boulder City. The landfill, which is undergoing initial planning, was lambasted by concerned parties after a representative of the County Health District annoimced an additional hearing will be scheduled because the applicant had changed provisions. "I may not be an expert, but you don't have to be a chicken to smell a rotten egg," said John Moran Jr., a Boulder City resident and attorney representing Silver State Disposal. Moran said the application for the landfill has changed like a chameleon and offers no reason for the residents to trust those involved in the process. The city revised its plans concerning ground water monitoring and leach aid detection on its proposal, causing the health district to schedule another public hearing to offer citizens enough time to review a new document. Those interested will have 30 days before another p\4))ic hearing to review the revised application once a final 9op> is completo. Gomityhm^ommAa predict a revised copy will be available toward the end of the month. According to the proposal, the landfill will contain municipal and dry construction waste. The construction waste will generally contain nails, dry-board and other materials. At the meeting, officials recognized that even though hazardous material cannot be See Landfill _j—Xj Page 2 J A New high school plans in the works Sharon Jackson News Staff Writer Another high school is in Henderson's future. The new high school site was approved in a 5-1 decision by the 'Clark County School District Board ofTrustees Tuesday night. Fred Smith, Assistant Superintendent of Facilities and Transportation Services Division, said, "The total turn-key cost for the high school, including the building, design, managing, furnishing and equipment, will cost $40 million." The new high school's site is located at College Drive and Heather Drive, adjacent to the Community College of Southern Nevada-Henderson Campus. School District officials are looking to build the new high school in conjunction with the Community College. Dusty Dickens, Director of Demographics, Zoning and Reality for the Clark County School District, said, "The college and the high school can share resources for construction and facilities which will represent high cost savings." Smith said the partnership arrangement between the two schools will represont a $10 million cost savings. The Bond Oversight Committee questioned if Clark County School District officials used the same criteri a in plotting the third high school site as they used for other high school sites. Dickens said CCSD officials will not be able to apply the same methodology they used for the otherhigh schools until they have the final enrollment figures, set to be available in November. "The next time we apply the methodology we uaed (on the last two schools), I think it will show the same as the first two did. ..."I think staff is confident that for the third time the methodology will show that a third school is needed in southeast," Dickens said. "The Bond Oversight Committee wanted to be sure the application of methodology was the same one used as the other two schools," Dickens said. The site approval is still contingent upon the November figures. If at the end of November, the figures say that this is the right place for the high school, we will move ahead with the planning," Dickens said. "If the SM School Page 2 Bnan Jones/News Staff CELEBRITY CITY CHORUS—From left are President Jeannie Kennedy, Mayor Bob Groesbeck. Lee Steffes and Claire Smith, celebrating Sweet Adelines Harmony Week. Sweet Adelines Week proclaimed 'Hie Celerity City chapter of Sweet Adelines International is delighted to share in the proclamation of Sweet Adelines Harmony Week, Oct 13-19, with Mayor Bob Groesbedt. The chapter is an international nonprofit organization for women dedicated to the education and performance of unaccompanied four-part harmony. A portion of the performances are donated to Temporary Assistance for Domestic Crisis. Director Linda Taylor hsM a SMAcMbtM Page?

PAGE 2

-• • ^•^W-^^VW^ wm mmmmmammmm^mimmm^ Pag* 2 HMidtrson Horn* Nws Thursday, October 10,1996 ONE MAN'S VIEW: From Page 1 was only temporary. The good thinkers and the taxpaying public insisted on these plans going forward. In the meantime all of us had better keep a close watch to make certain the naysayers don't kill other such plans that deserve to be implemented. School Board member Jeff Burr again must be credited for pushing the school district into the next century. He will be missed when leaving this position in December. c Green Valley High School graduate Jon Dentonis one of the finest young quarterbacks to play college football this year. He has been improving" with every game but the lack of good offensive line play last Saturday set the UNLV quarterback up for some heavy shots from Wolf Pack defenders. It was a long afternoon for Denton that ended with a 54-17 defeat. Things won't get much better this weekend when the Rebels travel to BYU. The La Veil Edwards-coached Cougars are ranked 21st in the most recent college poll. You can bet that Denton won't make any foolish promises like he did last week prior to the UNR game. Last week an enthusiastic Denton was quoted as saying he guaranteed a win over the Wolf Pack. This didn't please the team from Reno and their feelings were expressed in a story in Sunday's RenoGazette Journal. Writer Mark Anderson : recalled that Denton had twice said "I guarantee a win" prior to the game. The UNR players heard about Denton's remark on Saturday morning when reading the Thursday Las Vegas Review-Journal. Some wise Wolf Pack coach fed them a copy of the newspaper with their breakfast. Needless to say, it didn't go down too easy. Wolf Pack wide receiver D^^nd Wilkins said, "Yo\t should've seen everybody's face. I really don't like to talk about an opponent, but as a freshman, you can't make comments like that. Especially in college, nobody can guarantee a win." UNR quarterback John Dutton, who had a big day at the expense of the Rebels, after seeing Denton's comments remarked, "We took it to heart. You just can't do that, especially a redshirt freshman. He had a great game going against Wyoming, but that's one game." Denton shouldn't let this get him down because he still has the arm, wheels, heart and overall talent to become a great college quarterback. Maybe a little less public exuberance prior to a game would be wise. Somebody did a great job scouting the Rebels. Then the Wolf Pack executed almost perfectly Saturday afternoon. Let's hope UNLV can develop an offensive line like the Wolf Pack. Then watch Denton and the Rebels shine. The Sept. 9 letter sent to Boulder City Mayor Eric : Lundganrd from the BO ^'" Chamber of Commerce was most interesting. The 31 .. chamber members who responded to two questions showed a strong belief that the controlled growth management plan should remain as it is and that a new supermarket center should be developed at the corner of Buchanan ^nd Nevada Highway. Most interesting were the comments made by the members who voted not to change the management plan and those who supported a new supermarket center. They were gut-level comments that revealed strong feelings of the members questioned. For example: Question 1: Do we support the proposed change^ tp the Boulder City Controlled Grp^th Management Plan? YES: This community is continually becoming more attractive to out-of-state builders, developers, etc. We have done very well in standing our ground with regards to the current plan. However, we don't need to be naive to the fact that there are people who would want to take advantage of any loophole to their benefit, without regard to our trusting they will adhere to our rules. NO: The revisions to the plan will work against the community by lowering revenues coming into the city from many sources we now have. The outcome would be to raise taxes or do less improvements in the city. NO: It ain't broke so don't need a fix! NO: Doesn't go far enough. Question 2: Do we support thp development of a new supermarket center at the corner of Buchanan and Nevada Highway? YES: We're all tired of being forced to shop at Vons! Need to get rid of the unsightly trailer park at practically the entrance of "Clean Green BC!" Traffic problems can be addressed. YES: The plan to rehabilitate that corner is excellent and would improve the entrance into the community as well as bring in needed shopping for us and better the lifestyle we have in Boulder City, helping people in our own town to do their shopping. NO: Maybe some where else on Adams Blvd. or on Wyoming and Utah — Anywhere but Nevada Highway and Buchanan. YES: It would benefit the residents of BC to have an alternative choice for shopping. O'Callaghan, a former two-term I governor of Nevada, is publisher of the News. Fire causes $400,000 damage Sharon Jackson News Staff Writer A fire causing approximately $400,000 damage occurred Saturday. Around 4:30 a.m., fire and police units responded to a house fire at 326 W. Sherwood Ave., finding a two-story house fully enveloped in flames. Henderson PoKce Department Investigator Gary Smith said several area neighbors reported the fire. A total of 55 fire personnel responded on 21 units including aladdertruck. Two large groundlevel fire streams and several hand-held hoses controlled the fire. Mutual aid units from Clark County also helped. The fire was extinguished after approximately two hours. Fire officials considered the house a total loss. The Henderson Police Department provided traffic and crowd control. The cause of the fire is under investigation by the Henderson Fire Prevention Division and the Clark County Fire Department. Woman sentenced for fatal DUI Sharon Jackson News Staff Writer A Henderson woman was sentenced to prison Friday for causing a fatal traffic accident earlier this year. The accident occurred Feb. 20 when Diane Marr, 50, attempted to turn left off Green Valley Parkway onto Windmill Parkway, while driving under the influence of alcohol. The accident caused the death of Annette Grote, 87, a Texas resident living with her family in Henderson. She was hospitalized at University Medical Center and died of injuries on Feb. 24. Also in the vehicle was 2-yearold, Jasmine Jensen, who was also iAJured. District Attorney Tom Carrol said Jensen had lacerations on the side of her head through the ears. Carrol said doctors at UMC were able to correct the physical harm but Jensen suffered more from the trauma and her grandmother's death. Marr, sentenced by District Judge Don Chairez, will serve a maximum of 192 months in the Nevada Department of Prisons and a minimum of 30 months with possibility of parole after that time. City wins financial reporting awards impartial panel to meet the high } standards of the program, i >W-J'>.,* • "' -7^. The city of Henderson has been awarded the "Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting" by the Government Finance Officers Association of the U.S. and Canada for its comprehensive annual financial report. Henderson was told of its award by Stephen Gauthier of the GFOA, who said the award "is the highest form of recognition in the area of governmental accounting and financial reporting, and its attainment represents a significant accomplishment by a government and its management." An "Award of Financial Reporting Achievement" was also given to the city's director of Finance, Steve Hanson. Hanson joined the city in 1985 and is responsible for budgeting, risk management, purchasing and financial reporting. Henderson presently ei^oys an "A" bond ratingby both Moodys and Standard and Poors. The award was judged by an Gauthier said, "including demonstrating a constructive 'spirit of full disclosure' to clearly communicate its financial story and motivate potential users and user groups to read the report." The GFOA is a nonprofit professional association serving 12,625 government finance professionals with offices in Chicago, 111. and Washington, D.C. SCHOOL: CCSD approves From Page 1 numbers come back and say greater need is elsewhere, the Board will review it at that time." "Looking at residential data fi-om October 1995 to June 1996, we anticipate over 4,500 units (houses) constructed in the Silverado zone and another 1,400 in theBasie zone," Diokensaaid. ^^>_^^_Dickgna jwiij p fhirA high school in the southeast valley area would help enrollment at Green Valley, Basic, and Silverado High School. Dickens said, "Presently Green Valley High is at 128% capacity and enrollment capacity at Basic is at 116%." E n rollme nt Capacity at SilveradoTs'at 86% but that extra space will not last with the Green Valley Ranch housing construction, Dickens said. ,' • ,n "We want to be consistent in ,. how we site schools. We are confident the methodology will support the southeast siting," Dickens said. Ameristar takes over The Reserve S;5P^^'^'"^"^ D.B Mardniak News Staff Writer The acquisition of Gem Gaming, developer of Henderson's The Reserve Casino, by Ameristar Inc. will not affect the status of the project, a Reserve official said. s Recently, it was announced ^at Ameristar Inc., of Jackpot, Schatzman declined to comment on how much Gem was acquired for, and said earlier reports of $40 million were unsubstantiated. Financial terms of the agreement are still ongoing, he said, and a stock swap and other arrangements cannot be fully assessed at this time. Nev., will be the sole asset owner for The Reserve Hotel and Casino project being developed by Gem. The Reserve is the first mtyor hotel/casino to open in Henderson along Lake Mead Drive. Negotiations for a merger of the two companies turned into a proposal by Ameristar officials to acquire Gem, said Gregg Schatzman, general manager for The Reserve. "Rather than Gem becoming a subsidiary of Ameristar," he said. "They will be the sole owner of The Reserve project." Ameristar operates Cactus Pete's and the Horseshoe casinos in Jackpot and gaming establishments in Iowa and Vicksberg, Miss. Although The Reserve will operate under new ownership, Schatzman said those who visit the casino will not notice a physical difference from earlier plans. The $50 million project will open larger than originally anticipated, he said. The initial phase of the project included approximately 1,000 slot machines, 35 table games, a 225-room hotel, several dining rooms and retail stores. "Their plan [Ameristar Inc.] was accelerated. This plan will put more things on Jine sooner, better and more efficiently," he said. Now the development will open jath_ expansion already complete. Gem had originally proposed to open the casino this month. However, once the merger proceedings began, the possibility of pushing a deadline back to allow for a partial expansion was a reality. Following an African jungle safari theme, The Reserve will feature several bronze statues of monkeys, hippos, elephants, giraffes and other wildlife amid a canopy of trees towering 24 feet in the air. Since the acquisition of Gem has surfaced, he said, the facility can use more resources and open totally expanded. Having Ameristar as the op^ erator, Schatzman said, gives Gem enough resources to open The Reserve fully developed. "I think the city of Henderson is going to be pleased with what they're going to s ee from the company," he said. When The Reserve opens, the expanded project will have a total of 1,500 rooms, 2,000 slot machines, 75 table games, several restaurants, meeting and convention facilities and other recreational amenities. The acquisition is still pending state approval. Final plans for the expanded project are nearing completion and must be submitted for approval from the Henderson Planning Commission prior to construction. An opening date between March and April is expected, according to Schatzman. gas valley and Henderson offered him a prime location to build his factory. The 1972 University of Nevada, Las Vegas, graduate, said he and his wife always visited the area to watch Runnin' Rebel f games and had hoped to move, back. ^We^bit the bullet and got our SBA loan to buy the land and build the building," he said. "We just figured if we didn't do it now, we might never relocate." Basic HS dance Saturday The Basic High School Student Council will hold its annual Homecoming dance from 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19. All alumni are invited to attend. LANDFILL Public hearing From Page 1 accepted at the dump, there is always the possibility of contamination. The facility will be built in seven phases, with each phase consisting of one cell 50-feet deep. Hie landfill will have a 60-year life span. Residents, representatives for the city's landfill and various special interest groups met in the Boulder City High School auditorium to discuss the application for the facility and answer environmental questions. Tlie four and one-half hour meeting, wdiich was facilitated by Dr. Otto Ravenholt, chief health officer for the Clark County Health District, raised nearly as many questions as it answered, some residents felt 'All the reports are misleading. They're not true," laid Patrick OVrian, a Boulder City resident. "Something smells here and it's not coming all the way from Denmark," he said. Residents complained that creating a landfill in the valley will cause traffic safety hazards, create a stench and be an eyesore for the city. To me they aregamblinghere and let me make one thing clear. Boulder City is not a gambling community," Henderson City Councilman Amanda Cyphers said. Cyphers, who spoke as a representative of Henderson, said the city's residents will be affected by the landfill if it is not built correctly. She cited that the Henderson Sunset landfill has cost Henderson approximately $28 million to close properly because it was not built according to guidelines. According to Cyphers, who also spoke on behalf of the Clark County Health District Board, much of the same garbage will be in the proposed Eldorado landfill. If financial problems exist when Boulder City wants to close the its landfill, the cost will be passed on to county residents. "I've been unfairly accused of being involved as a representative of Silver State and Henderson," said Henderson Mayor Bob Groesbeck, a legal representative for Silver State. Groesbeck said he would defer all city matters dealing with the issue to Cyphers. He then continued to cite reasons why the landfill is bad for Henderson and the county. He noted the city of Henderson's responsibilities for cleaning up the Sunset dump as reasons why Boulder City should stay away from creating the Eldorado landfill. "Gentlemen, you will not see us again if you develop this correctly," he said to the legal representative for Boulder City concerning the landfill. Gregory Welch, an environmental attorney hired by the dty, addressed concerns about the site. The bottom line is that science tells us this is safe, but do we have to place all our eggs in one basket— absolutely not," he said. Welch said two additional soil samples will be taken from the site to analyze compounds. The additional samples, he said, will bring the soil sample to six for the 240-acre parcel located on 1,920-acres in the valley. Despite comments from concerned citizens and special groups, city representatives continued to support their original claim that the site does not need a special liner to help restrict waste from seeping into groundwater. They contended that the soil under the landfill is ideal for storage of the proposed waste and it would take an expected 800,000 years for contamination to seep to the water table. Another public hearing is expected to be scheduled in December. Information concerning the amended application can be obtained through contacting dty hall or the Health Department. CALL 435-7700 WITH NEWS TIPS Besides relocating to see more : Rebel games, he said tax benefits helped make the decision easier. In California, taxes on businesses are much higher than in Nevada. While some Henderson residents think the city has become .' too large, de Heras said he thinks the area has a home-town feel. "Even though there are a mil' lion people here, it's still like a small town for us," he said. HOME— NEWS An Independent Newspaper Founded June 1, 19S1 Henderson Home News (DSPS 240000) Published every Tuesday and Thursday moming at 2 Commerce Center Drive, Henderson, Nevada, by HBC Publications, Inc. Second class postage paid at Henderson, Nevada POSTMASTER: Sendaddresschanges to: HENDERSON HOME NEWS 2 Commerce Canter Drive Henderson, NV 89014 Phone (702) 564-1881 Cuetomer complaint calle will be accepted from 7 to 10 am on Tueedayt and Thuredaya. Miaaed paper* will be tMatributed by noon. MIKE O'CALLAGHAN Publisher CAROLYN O'CALLAGHAN Co-Publisher TIM O'CALLAGHAN General Manager PAUL SZYDELKO Managing Editor MARY COLLEEN MIELE Circulation Manager HBC PUBLICATIONS, INC. Mike O'Calleghan. President; Carolyn O'Callaghan, Vice President; Tim O'Callaghan, Treasurer/Vice President; Mary Colleen Miele, Vic* President; Ruthe Deskin, Secretary. SUBSCRIPTION RATES Sn(^ 50 cents One Year $30 (Tnwtvt ConeecuMve Monlta) No Refund* MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS West d Mississippi$40peryear East of Mississipi>450 per year •Addtoofi^ Maaing oftcee' i ^ Thursday. October 10, 1996 Henderson Home Nwt Page 3, Fire Prevention Week proclaimed THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COIVIIVIUNITY Sharon Jaduon News Staff Writer "Let's Hear it for Fire Safety: Test Your Detectors," is this year's Fire Prevention Week theme. Fire Prevention Week is a national event that began Oct. 7 and will actually run for two weeks. Public education specialist Rick Freed said it will nm for two weeks because of the increased number of school children participating in Fire Prevention education. The Henderson Fire Department is paying $3,900 to have children bused from local schools to the Civic Center Plaza the first week, Oct. 7-11, and the Black Mountain Recreation Center the second week, Oct. 1517. The sessions will be from 9 to 11 a.m. Afternoon sessions will be held from 1 to 3:45 p.m. Oct. 910 "Every school in the country will go to their local Fire Department and be educated on fire safety and fire prevention techniques," Freed said. ,^-^, Freed said the event is^^ry important to Henderson because it is the fastest-growing city in the U.S. City officials hope to decrease the number of fire fatalities through education. "Fire Prevention Week helps in making a safer environment for everyone," Freed said. Last year approximately 800 young children participated in the annual event. This year 1,750 kids are participating in Fire Prevention Week. Firefighters will staff learning stations: •Stop Drop and Roll. •Crawl Low Under Smoke. •Exit Drills in the Home. •Cool a Bum. •Matches and Lighter Safety. •Dial9-1-L Freed is making the fire prevention and safety lessons as close to real life as possible. He is using a dispatch simulator with a re{A dispatcher employee for the Dial 9-1-1 lesson as well as ..IMing real smoke detectors Inounted to wooden props for kids to learn how to check batteries in detectors. Freed will have a tent acting as a house and employ a smoke machine that sprays harmless smoke in the Crawl Low Under Smoke lesson. "We teach them (the kids) how to crawl out of bed, check the door with the back of their hand and we tell them never to hide in their rooms during a fire," Freed said. Freed is also featuring a grand finale. "I do a smoke bomb that makes it look like City Hall is on fire, I'll have one of the kids call 9-1-1, then the 100-foot ladder truck with its lights and siren will come on the scene, extinguish the fire and save City Hall," Freed said. "After that, two firefighters will repel off the 100-foot ladder truck while the ladder is exPerna chosen Miss Nevada USA Henderson resident Ninya Pema, 23, has been chosen Miss Nevada USA 1997. She is the daughter of Frank and Cassandra Pema. The black-haired, brown-eyed Pema is employed at the Monte Carlo Hotel as a front desk clerk. Her future plans include attending Bible college, working in the ministry and continuing her education in the field of Bible economics. She is a volunteer with the Nevada Chapter of Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, Operation Blessing and Nevada Child Seekers. Pema will represent Nevada in the Miss USA Pageant to be held in Shreveport, La. in February 1997. Finalists in the category were Shaynee Smith, Alicia Cames, Anita Narutowicz and Traci Fox. The Miss Nevada USA pageant is an official preliminary to the Miss USA Pageant. For more information on the Nevada preliminaries to Miss USA and Miss Teen USA write to: Pacific Glue Enterprises, P.O. Box 95434, Las Vegas, NV891935434, or call 898-3365. Ninya Pema Local man saves a in Reno tended," Freed said. Freddy the Fire Truck, Sparky the Fii-e D6g, Firefighter Frank, puppets and a clown will also participate in the event to make the lessons a little more memorable and fim.for the young children. A Sparky video dealing with the ABC's of fire safety will also be shown to school children. The history of National Fife Prevention week has its roots in the great Chicago Fire Oct. 9, 1871. The tragedy killed more than 300 people, left 100,000 homeless and destroyed more than 17,000 structures. The fire burned more than 2,000 acres in 27 hours. President Woodrow Wilson issued the first National Fire Prevention Day proclamation in 1920. Every year sincel925, the U.S. President pronoimces the Sunday-through Saturday period falling on Oct. 9 a national observance. Blood drive tliis weekend at Galleria A blood drive will be held at the Galleria at Sunset Mall beginning this weekend in the lower level in front of Mervyns of California. Those wishing to donate blood can participate in the event from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday and from 11 a.m. to7 p.m. Monday. The drive is open for those who are at least 17-years-old, 110 pounds and in good health. All donors must have picture •identification or a donor card to present to blood drive workers. ,H)t I l'(i I. lUi > bl 'it I ^ t lOl> CTTi i Sharon Jackson tiews Staff Writer A Henderson resident saved a man in his mid-70s from choking to death Sept. 16 in The Hickory Pit Restaurant, a steakhouse in the Circus Circus Hotel Casino in Reno. Butch Uher, 58, and Cyndi Uher, 44, were having dinner across from a gentlemen and his caretaker, when the caretaker jumped up and started pleading for help. "Lots of people gathered around but they didn't know what to do," said Butch's wife, Cyndi. "My husband fought his way through the crowd and asked the people standing in the front -if they knew what to do, arid tire" people said 'no.' That was when my husband stepped in and applied the Heimlich Maneuver." "It was odd that we picked that restaurant after all the others we walked past, it was so coincidental you're drawn to place for a certain reason," Cyndi said. Butch's sister, Stephanie Christian, agreed with Cyndi and said that it was lucky that Butch and Cyndi couldn't get seated at the three other restaurants they tried prior to Hickory Pit. — Christian said, "He's (Butch) a real take-charge kind of a person." NO STAKES 3HL Tournament $5,500.00 TOTAI PRIZE MONEY QUALIFY: October 1 November 10,1996 TOURNAMENT: November 14 November 16 NO ENTRY FEE! To qualify, play 50 hours of Keno ($1.00 ticket or 2, .50 cent tickets per game) between October 1 and November 10, 1996. Present your I.D. card to the Keno Supen/isor upon arrival for verification of your play time. REGISTRATION FORMS ARE AVAILABLE AT THE KENO DEPARTMENT Details Posted m the Keno Dpt MOVkirr SI. DowMomi Henderson Fine Boyd Oaming PropertyJ What's NEW of Health Connections? The Ultimote In Fociol Rfness... • Relieves Stress Tones Muscles & Skin Experience on Introductory Session for only S25. • NEW CLIENTS ONLY GIFT CERTIFICATES SARA AAAYS, MYOTONOLOGIST 1 A Commerce Center Henderson • ^ 454-4024 Pet Sitting Service In your home Loving Care of your Pet Companions When You Can't Be There • Playing • Exercising • Walkinij Core • Mail • Newspaper PickupJ PAMPERED PETS ^ 263-PETS (7387) FREE FIRST VISIT Licensed • Bonded • Insured :MBE MAIL BOXES, ETC. h'sNoi \Vii\i \Vi D(>. Ii'sHowWi Di^Ii. Authorized UPS Shipping Outiet Private Mail Box Rental SI COPIES PACKAGING MAIL SERVICE SHIPPING OVERNIGHT I STAMPS lomCESUPPUES I KEYS I PACKING SUPPLIES MONEY TRANSfEt! m PASSPORT PHOTOS MONEY ORDERS ETC., m.. ETC WESTERN UNION • Personal Street Address • 24 Hour Access • Mail Forwarding Ask about these too: Voice Mail • Business Cards • Rubber Stamps • Custom Packaging And alot more! PECOS WINDMILL PLAZA 2657 Windmill Pkwy. HENDERSON 896-9898 GREEN VALLEY PLAZA 2756 Green Valley Pkwy. •HENDERSON 454-5220 Cyndi said this is the Aird "p er sb n h ef'husband has^saved doing the Heimlich Maneuver. The police and paramedics said the man would have had serious problems if he wasn't helped right away, Cyndi said. Christian said, "The guy had fallen over in his seat and had already stopped breathing." Christian commented on how she was amazed that the gentleman went back to eating his dinner after almost choking to death. aid training. He just retired and sold the alarm company he owned for 35 years. HENDERSON SHOPPING VILLAGE 850 S. Boulder Hwy. 565-1235 • • it.— L:.. I Avisti to extend my special tHantsTo Othenal)(/^iinams, Henderson s Senior Citizens and to all o{ those who attended my 69th Birthday EventMany friends spoke so kindly of me with words, plaques and proclamations. My experiences as a banker in Henderson throughout the many years has been wonderful as the community of Henderson has been so supportive. Without all of you, I may not be where I am today Thank You AU, Selma Barlett ^mmi

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-• • ^•^W-^^VW^ wm mmmmmammmm^mimmm^ Pag* 2 HMidtrson Horn* Nws Thursday, October 10,1996 ONE MAN'S VIEW: From Page 1 was only temporary. The good thinkers and the taxpaying public insisted on these plans going forward. In the meantime all of us had better keep a close watch to make certain the naysayers don't kill other such plans that deserve to be implemented. School Board member Jeff Burr again must be credited for pushing the school district into the next century. He will be missed when leaving this position in December. c Green Valley High School graduate Jon Dentonis one of the finest young quarterbacks to play college football this year. He has been improving" with every game but the lack of good offensive line play last Saturday set the UNLV quarterback up for some heavy shots from Wolf Pack defenders. It was a long afternoon for Denton that ended with a 54-17 defeat. Things won't get much better this weekend when the Rebels travel to BYU. The La Veil Edwards-coached Cougars are ranked 21st in the most recent college poll. You can bet that Denton won't make any foolish promises like he did last week prior to the UNR game. Last week an enthusiastic Denton was quoted as saying he guaranteed a win over the Wolf Pack. This didn't please the team from Reno and their feelings were expressed in a story in Sunday's RenoGazette Journal. Writer Mark Anderson : recalled that Denton had twice said "I guarantee a win" prior to the game. The UNR players heard about Denton's remark on Saturday morning when reading the Thursday Las Vegas Review-Journal. Some wise Wolf Pack coach fed them a copy of the newspaper with their breakfast. Needless to say, it didn't go down too easy. Wolf Pack wide receiver D^^nd Wilkins said, "Yo\t should've seen everybody's face. I really don't like to talk about an opponent, but as a freshman, you can't make comments like that. Especially in college, nobody can guarantee a win." UNR quarterback John Dutton, who had a big day at the expense of the Rebels, after seeing Denton's comments remarked, "We took it to heart. You just can't do that, especially a redshirt freshman. He had a great game going against Wyoming, but that's one game." Denton shouldn't let this get him down because he still has the arm, wheels, heart and overall talent to become a great college quarterback. Maybe a little less public exuberance prior to a game would be wise. Somebody did a great job scouting the Rebels. Then the Wolf Pack executed almost perfectly Saturday afternoon. Let's hope UNLV can develop an offensive line like the Wolf Pack. Then watch Denton and the Rebels shine. The Sept. 9 letter sent to Boulder City Mayor Eric : Lundganrd from the BO ^'" Chamber of Commerce was most interesting. The 31 .. chamber members who responded to two questions showed a strong belief that the controlled growth management plan should remain as it is and that a new supermarket center should be developed at the corner of Buchanan ^nd Nevada Highway. Most interesting were the comments made by the members who voted not to change the management plan and those who supported a new supermarket center. They were gut-level comments that revealed strong feelings of the members questioned. For example: Question 1: Do we support the proposed change^ tp the Boulder City Controlled Grp^th Management Plan? YES: This community is continually becoming more attractive to out-of-state builders, developers, etc. We have done very well in standing our ground with regards to the current plan. However, we don't need to be naive to the fact that there are people who would want to take advantage of any loophole to their benefit, without regard to our trusting they will adhere to our rules. NO: The revisions to the plan will work against the community by lowering revenues coming into the city from many sources we now have. The outcome would be to raise taxes or do less improvements in the city. NO: It ain't broke so don't need a fix! NO: Doesn't go far enough. Question 2: Do we support thp development of a new supermarket center at the corner of Buchanan and Nevada Highway? YES: We're all tired of being forced to shop at Vons! Need to get rid of the unsightly trailer park at practically the entrance of "Clean Green BC!" Traffic problems can be addressed. YES: The plan to rehabilitate that corner is excellent and would improve the entrance into the community as well as bring in needed shopping for us and better the lifestyle we have in Boulder City, helping people in our own town to do their shopping. NO: Maybe some where else on Adams Blvd. or on Wyoming and Utah — Anywhere but Nevada Highway and Buchanan. YES: It would benefit the residents of BC to have an alternative choice for shopping. O'Callaghan, a former two-term I governor of Nevada, is publisher of the News. Fire causes $400,000 damage Sharon Jackson News Staff Writer A fire causing approximately $400,000 damage occurred Saturday. Around 4:30 a.m., fire and police units responded to a house fire at 326 W. Sherwood Ave., finding a two-story house fully enveloped in flames. Henderson PoKce Department Investigator Gary Smith said several area neighbors reported the fire. A total of 55 fire personnel responded on 21 units including aladdertruck. Two large groundlevel fire streams and several hand-held hoses controlled the fire. Mutual aid units from Clark County also helped. The fire was extinguished after approximately two hours. Fire officials considered the house a total loss. The Henderson Police Department provided traffic and crowd control. The cause of the fire is under investigation by the Henderson Fire Prevention Division and the Clark County Fire Department. Woman sentenced for fatal DUI Sharon Jackson News Staff Writer A Henderson woman was sentenced to prison Friday for causing a fatal traffic accident earlier this year. The accident occurred Feb. 20 when Diane Marr, 50, attempted to turn left off Green Valley Parkway onto Windmill Parkway, while driving under the influence of alcohol. The accident caused the death of Annette Grote, 87, a Texas resident living with her family in Henderson. She was hospitalized at University Medical Center and died of injuries on Feb. 24. Also in the vehicle was 2-yearold, Jasmine Jensen, who was also iAJured. District Attorney Tom Carrol said Jensen had lacerations on the side of her head through the ears. Carrol said doctors at UMC were able to correct the physical harm but Jensen suffered more from the trauma and her grandmother's death. Marr, sentenced by District Judge Don Chairez, will serve a maximum of 192 months in the Nevada Department of Prisons and a minimum of 30 months with possibility of parole after that time. City wins financial reporting awards impartial panel to meet the high } standards of the program, i >W-J'>.,* • "' -7^. The city of Henderson has been awarded the "Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting" by the Government Finance Officers Association of the U.S. and Canada for its comprehensive annual financial report. Henderson was told of its award by Stephen Gauthier of the GFOA, who said the award "is the highest form of recognition in the area of governmental accounting and financial reporting, and its attainment represents a significant accomplishment by a government and its management." An "Award of Financial Reporting Achievement" was also given to the city's director of Finance, Steve Hanson. Hanson joined the city in 1985 and is responsible for budgeting, risk management, purchasing and financial reporting. Henderson presently ei^oys an "A" bond ratingby both Moodys and Standard and Poors. The award was judged by an Gauthier said, "including demonstrating a constructive 'spirit of full disclosure' to clearly communicate its financial story and motivate potential users and user groups to read the report." The GFOA is a nonprofit professional association serving 12,625 government finance professionals with offices in Chicago, 111. and Washington, D.C. SCHOOL: CCSD approves From Page 1 numbers come back and say greater need is elsewhere, the Board will review it at that time." "Looking at residential data fi-om October 1995 to June 1996, we anticipate over 4,500 units (houses) constructed in the Silverado zone and another 1,400 in theBasie zone," Diokensaaid. ^^>_^^_Dickgna jwiij p fhirA high school in the southeast valley area would help enrollment at Green Valley, Basic, and Silverado High School. Dickens said, "Presently Green Valley High is at 128% capacity and enrollment capacity at Basic is at 116%." E n rollme nt Capacity at SilveradoTs'at 86% but that extra space will not last with the Green Valley Ranch housing construction, Dickens said. ,' • ,n "We want to be consistent in ,. how we site schools. We are confident the methodology will support the southeast siting," Dickens said. Ameristar takes over The Reserve S;5P^^'^'"^"^ D.B Mardniak News Staff Writer The acquisition of Gem Gaming, developer of Henderson's The Reserve Casino, by Ameristar Inc. will not affect the status of the project, a Reserve official said. s Recently, it was announced ^at Ameristar Inc., of Jackpot, Schatzman declined to comment on how much Gem was acquired for, and said earlier reports of $40 million were unsubstantiated. Financial terms of the agreement are still ongoing, he said, and a stock swap and other arrangements cannot be fully assessed at this time. Nev., will be the sole asset owner for The Reserve Hotel and Casino project being developed by Gem. The Reserve is the first mtyor hotel/casino to open in Henderson along Lake Mead Drive. Negotiations for a merger of the two companies turned into a proposal by Ameristar officials to acquire Gem, said Gregg Schatzman, general manager for The Reserve. "Rather than Gem becoming a subsidiary of Ameristar," he said. "They will be the sole owner of The Reserve project." Ameristar operates Cactus Pete's and the Horseshoe casinos in Jackpot and gaming establishments in Iowa and Vicksberg, Miss. Although The Reserve will operate under new ownership, Schatzman said those who visit the casino will not notice a physical difference from earlier plans. The $50 million project will open larger than originally anticipated, he said. The initial phase of the project included approximately 1,000 slot machines, 35 table games, a 225-room hotel, several dining rooms and retail stores. "Their plan [Ameristar Inc.] was accelerated. This plan will put more things on Jine sooner, better and more efficiently," he said. Now the development will open jath_ expansion already complete. Gem had originally proposed to open the casino this month. However, once the merger proceedings began, the possibility of pushing a deadline back to allow for a partial expansion was a reality. Following an African jungle safari theme, The Reserve will feature several bronze statues of monkeys, hippos, elephants, giraffes and other wildlife amid a canopy of trees towering 24 feet in the air. Since the acquisition of Gem has surfaced, he said, the facility can use more resources and open totally expanded. Having Ameristar as the op^ erator, Schatzman said, gives Gem enough resources to open The Reserve fully developed. "I think the city of Henderson is going to be pleased with what they're going to s ee from the company," he said. When The Reserve opens, the expanded project will have a total of 1,500 rooms, 2,000 slot machines, 75 table games, several restaurants, meeting and convention facilities and other recreational amenities. The acquisition is still pending state approval. Final plans for the expanded project are nearing completion and must be submitted for approval from the Henderson Planning Commission prior to construction. An opening date between March and April is expected, according to Schatzman. gas valley and Henderson offered him a prime location to build his factory. The 1972 University of Nevada, Las Vegas, graduate, said he and his wife always visited the area to watch Runnin' Rebel f games and had hoped to move, back. ^We^bit the bullet and got our SBA loan to buy the land and build the building," he said. "We just figured if we didn't do it now, we might never relocate." Basic HS dance Saturday The Basic High School Student Council will hold its annual Homecoming dance from 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19. All alumni are invited to attend. LANDFILL Public hearing From Page 1 accepted at the dump, there is always the possibility of contamination. The facility will be built in seven phases, with each phase consisting of one cell 50-feet deep. Hie landfill will have a 60-year life span. Residents, representatives for the city's landfill and various special interest groups met in the Boulder City High School auditorium to discuss the application for the facility and answer environmental questions. Tlie four and one-half hour meeting, wdiich was facilitated by Dr. Otto Ravenholt, chief health officer for the Clark County Health District, raised nearly as many questions as it answered, some residents felt 'All the reports are misleading. They're not true," laid Patrick OVrian, a Boulder City resident. "Something smells here and it's not coming all the way from Denmark," he said. Residents complained that creating a landfill in the valley will cause traffic safety hazards, create a stench and be an eyesore for the city. To me they aregamblinghere and let me make one thing clear. Boulder City is not a gambling community," Henderson City Councilman Amanda Cyphers said. Cyphers, who spoke as a representative of Henderson, said the city's residents will be affected by the landfill if it is not built correctly. She cited that the Henderson Sunset landfill has cost Henderson approximately $28 million to close properly because it was not built according to guidelines. According to Cyphers, who also spoke on behalf of the Clark County Health District Board, much of the same garbage will be in the proposed Eldorado landfill. If financial problems exist when Boulder City wants to close the its landfill, the cost will be passed on to county residents. "I've been unfairly accused of being involved as a representative of Silver State and Henderson," said Henderson Mayor Bob Groesbeck, a legal representative for Silver State. Groesbeck said he would defer all city matters dealing with the issue to Cyphers. He then continued to cite reasons why the landfill is bad for Henderson and the county. He noted the city of Henderson's responsibilities for cleaning up the Sunset dump as reasons why Boulder City should stay away from creating the Eldorado landfill. "Gentlemen, you will not see us again if you develop this correctly," he said to the legal representative for Boulder City concerning the landfill. Gregory Welch, an environmental attorney hired by the dty, addressed concerns about the site. The bottom line is that science tells us this is safe, but do we have to place all our eggs in one basket— absolutely not," he said. Welch said two additional soil samples will be taken from the site to analyze compounds. The additional samples, he said, will bring the soil sample to six for the 240-acre parcel located on 1,920-acres in the valley. Despite comments from concerned citizens and special groups, city representatives continued to support their original claim that the site does not need a special liner to help restrict waste from seeping into groundwater. They contended that the soil under the landfill is ideal for storage of the proposed waste and it would take an expected 800,000 years for contamination to seep to the water table. Another public hearing is expected to be scheduled in December. Information concerning the amended application can be obtained through contacting dty hall or the Health Department. CALL 435-7700 WITH NEWS TIPS Besides relocating to see more : Rebel games, he said tax benefits helped make the decision easier. In California, taxes on businesses are much higher than in Nevada. While some Henderson residents think the city has become .' too large, de Heras said he thinks the area has a home-town feel. "Even though there are a mil' lion people here, it's still like a small town for us," he said. HOME— NEWS An Independent Newspaper Founded June 1, 19S1 Henderson Home News (DSPS 240000) Published every Tuesday and Thursday moming at 2 Commerce Center Drive, Henderson, Nevada, by HBC Publications, Inc. Second class postage paid at Henderson, Nevada POSTMASTER: Sendaddresschanges to: HENDERSON HOME NEWS 2 Commerce Canter Drive Henderson, NV 89014 Phone (702) 564-1881 Cuetomer complaint calle will be accepted from 7 to 10 am on Tueedayt and Thuredaya. Miaaed paper* will be tMatributed by noon. MIKE O'CALLAGHAN Publisher CAROLYN O'CALLAGHAN Co-Publisher TIM O'CALLAGHAN General Manager PAUL SZYDELKO Managing Editor MARY COLLEEN MIELE Circulation Manager HBC PUBLICATIONS, INC. Mike O'Calleghan. President; Carolyn O'Callaghan, Vice President; Tim O'Callaghan, Treasurer/Vice President; Mary Colleen Miele, Vic* President; Ruthe Deskin, Secretary. SUBSCRIPTION RATES Sn(^ 50 cents One Year $30 (Tnwtvt ConeecuMve Monlta) No Refund* MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS West d Mississippi$40peryear East of Mississipi>450 per year •Addtoofi^ Maaing oftcee' i ^ Thursday. October 10, 1996 Henderson Home Nwt Page 3, Fire Prevention Week proclaimed THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COIVIIVIUNITY Sharon Jaduon News Staff Writer "Let's Hear it for Fire Safety: Test Your Detectors," is this year's Fire Prevention Week theme. Fire Prevention Week is a national event that began Oct. 7 and will actually run for two weeks. Public education specialist Rick Freed said it will nm for two weeks because of the increased number of school children participating in Fire Prevention education. The Henderson Fire Department is paying $3,900 to have children bused from local schools to the Civic Center Plaza the first week, Oct. 7-11, and the Black Mountain Recreation Center the second week, Oct. 1517. The sessions will be from 9 to 11 a.m. Afternoon sessions will be held from 1 to 3:45 p.m. Oct. 910 "Every school in the country will go to their local Fire Department and be educated on fire safety and fire prevention techniques," Freed said. ,^-^, Freed said the event is^^ry important to Henderson because it is the fastest-growing city in the U.S. City officials hope to decrease the number of fire fatalities through education. "Fire Prevention Week helps in making a safer environment for everyone," Freed said. Last year approximately 800 young children participated in the annual event. This year 1,750 kids are participating in Fire Prevention Week. Firefighters will staff learning stations: •Stop Drop and Roll. •Crawl Low Under Smoke. •Exit Drills in the Home. •Cool a Bum. •Matches and Lighter Safety. •Dial9-1-L Freed is making the fire prevention and safety lessons as close to real life as possible. He is using a dispatch simulator with a re{A dispatcher employee for the Dial 9-1-1 lesson as well as ..IMing real smoke detectors Inounted to wooden props for kids to learn how to check batteries in detectors. Freed will have a tent acting as a house and employ a smoke machine that sprays harmless smoke in the Crawl Low Under Smoke lesson. "We teach them (the kids) how to crawl out of bed, check the door with the back of their hand and we tell them never to hide in their rooms during a fire," Freed said. Freed is also featuring a grand finale. "I do a smoke bomb that makes it look like City Hall is on fire, I'll have one of the kids call 9-1-1, then the 100-foot ladder truck with its lights and siren will come on the scene, extinguish the fire and save City Hall," Freed said. "After that, two firefighters will repel off the 100-foot ladder truck while the ladder is exPerna chosen Miss Nevada USA Henderson resident Ninya Pema, 23, has been chosen Miss Nevada USA 1997. She is the daughter of Frank and Cassandra Pema. The black-haired, brown-eyed Pema is employed at the Monte Carlo Hotel as a front desk clerk. Her future plans include attending Bible college, working in the ministry and continuing her education in the field of Bible economics. She is a volunteer with the Nevada Chapter of Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, Operation Blessing and Nevada Child Seekers. Pema will represent Nevada in the Miss USA Pageant to be held in Shreveport, La. in February 1997. Finalists in the category were Shaynee Smith, Alicia Cames, Anita Narutowicz and Traci Fox. The Miss Nevada USA pageant is an official preliminary to the Miss USA Pageant. For more information on the Nevada preliminaries to Miss USA and Miss Teen USA write to: Pacific Glue Enterprises, P.O. Box 95434, Las Vegas, NV891935434, or call 898-3365. Ninya Pema Local man saves a in Reno tended," Freed said. Freddy the Fire Truck, Sparky the Fii-e D6g, Firefighter Frank, puppets and a clown will also participate in the event to make the lessons a little more memorable and fim.for the young children. A Sparky video dealing with the ABC's of fire safety will also be shown to school children. The history of National Fife Prevention week has its roots in the great Chicago Fire Oct. 9, 1871. The tragedy killed more than 300 people, left 100,000 homeless and destroyed more than 17,000 structures. The fire burned more than 2,000 acres in 27 hours. President Woodrow Wilson issued the first National Fire Prevention Day proclamation in 1920. Every year sincel925, the U.S. President pronoimces the Sunday-through Saturday period falling on Oct. 9 a national observance. Blood drive tliis weekend at Galleria A blood drive will be held at the Galleria at Sunset Mall beginning this weekend in the lower level in front of Mervyns of California. Those wishing to donate blood can participate in the event from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday and from 11 a.m. to7 p.m. Monday. The drive is open for those who are at least 17-years-old, 110 pounds and in good health. All donors must have picture •identification or a donor card to present to blood drive workers. ,H)t I l'(i I. lUi > bl 'it I ^ t lOl> CTTi i Sharon Jackson tiews Staff Writer A Henderson resident saved a man in his mid-70s from choking to death Sept. 16 in The Hickory Pit Restaurant, a steakhouse in the Circus Circus Hotel Casino in Reno. Butch Uher, 58, and Cyndi Uher, 44, were having dinner across from a gentlemen and his caretaker, when the caretaker jumped up and started pleading for help. "Lots of people gathered around but they didn't know what to do," said Butch's wife, Cyndi. "My husband fought his way through the crowd and asked the people standing in the front -if they knew what to do, arid tire" people said 'no.' That was when my husband stepped in and applied the Heimlich Maneuver." "It was odd that we picked that restaurant after all the others we walked past, it was so coincidental you're drawn to place for a certain reason," Cyndi said. Butch's sister, Stephanie Christian, agreed with Cyndi and said that it was lucky that Butch and Cyndi couldn't get seated at the three other restaurants they tried prior to Hickory Pit. — Christian said, "He's (Butch) a real take-charge kind of a person." NO STAKES 3HL Tournament $5,500.00 TOTAI PRIZE MONEY QUALIFY: October 1 November 10,1996 TOURNAMENT: November 14 November 16 NO ENTRY FEE! To qualify, play 50 hours of Keno ($1.00 ticket or 2, .50 cent tickets per game) between October 1 and November 10, 1996. Present your I.D. card to the Keno Supen/isor upon arrival for verification of your play time. REGISTRATION FORMS ARE AVAILABLE AT THE KENO DEPARTMENT Details Posted m the Keno Dpt MOVkirr SI. DowMomi Henderson Fine Boyd Oaming PropertyJ What's NEW of Health Connections? The Ultimote In Fociol Rfness... • Relieves Stress Tones Muscles & Skin Experience on Introductory Session for only S25. • NEW CLIENTS ONLY GIFT CERTIFICATES SARA AAAYS, MYOTONOLOGIST 1 A Commerce Center Henderson • ^ 454-4024 Pet Sitting Service In your home Loving Care of your Pet Companions When You Can't Be There • Playing • Exercising • Walkinij Core • Mail • Newspaper PickupJ PAMPERED PETS ^ 263-PETS (7387) FREE FIRST VISIT Licensed • Bonded • Insured :MBE MAIL BOXES, ETC. h'sNoi \Vii\i \Vi D(>. Ii'sHowWi Di^Ii. Authorized UPS Shipping Outiet Private Mail Box Rental SI COPIES PACKAGING MAIL SERVICE SHIPPING OVERNIGHT I STAMPS lomCESUPPUES I KEYS I PACKING SUPPLIES MONEY TRANSfEt! m PASSPORT PHOTOS MONEY ORDERS ETC., m.. ETC WESTERN UNION • Personal Street Address • 24 Hour Access • Mail Forwarding Ask about these too: Voice Mail • Business Cards • Rubber Stamps • Custom Packaging And alot more! PECOS WINDMILL PLAZA 2657 Windmill Pkwy. HENDERSON 896-9898 GREEN VALLEY PLAZA 2756 Green Valley Pkwy. •HENDERSON 454-5220 Cyndi said this is the Aird "p er sb n h ef'husband has^saved doing the Heimlich Maneuver. The police and paramedics said the man would have had serious problems if he wasn't helped right away, Cyndi said. Christian said, "The guy had fallen over in his seat and had already stopped breathing." Christian commented on how she was amazed that the gentleman went back to eating his dinner after almost choking to death. aid training. He just retired and sold the alarm company he owned for 35 years. HENDERSON SHOPPING VILLAGE 850 S. Boulder Hwy. 565-1235 • • it.— L:.. I Avisti to extend my special tHantsTo Othenal)(/^iinams, Henderson s Senior Citizens and to all o{ those who attended my 69th Birthday EventMany friends spoke so kindly of me with words, plaques and proclamations. My experiences as a banker in Henderson throughout the many years has been wonderful as the community of Henderson has been so supportive. Without all of you, I may not be where I am today Thank You AU, Selma Barlett ^mmi

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mfi mmmmmfmmm •if^'L T-:;.-^'';^ VIEWPOINT HCMNEWS 'MteO'Cdtoghan Publistier 'CwvlynO'CaRaahMi Co-Publisher 'PMISZVMW, Managing Editor Piae4 Henderson Home News Thursday, October 10,1996 o excuse abuse October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month. This month, battered women's advocates in Henderson and across the nation, are working to focus pubHc awareness on the epidemic of domestic violence and encouraging all Americans to become part of the solution. T^i Whether we want to acknowledge it or not, the reality is that domestic violence exists in our community, it exists in the neighborhoods where we live, the places vvhere we work, the houses of worship we attend, and in families that are the very foundation pf our community. i^^-It is a tragic epidemic that does not discriminate, it knows no racial, economic or social barriers. Domestic violence fills emergency rooms and morgues, it tears families apart, devastates children, and it kills women. Help is out there, and we are asking you to help us spread the message. By raising public awareness of domestic violence, by providing people with ideas for action, and letting women who are abused know that they are not alone and that help in available, we caiT work together to become part of the solution. There is no excuse for domestic violence, everyone must learn the facts and help stop domestic violence. Fire Prevention in October makes home a safer place year round National Fire Prevention Week is (Dctober 6-12, and there is no jbetter time to take the precautions ^ec^ssary to protect your home and. experts at HomeBase home improvement warehouse oflFer simple suggestions for fire safety: •Install smoke detectors on every level of your home, especially near sleeping areas. •Never install a smoke detector within six inches of where a wall and ceiling meet. This is dead air space with little circulation. Do not mount a detector in front of an air supply or return duct. •Check the batteries in your smoke detector every month and change them once a year. A working smoke detector doubles your chances of surviving a fire. •One fire extinguisher is not enough to protect a home. Instead, there should be a fire extinguisher near the kitchen, bedrooms, basement and garage. •Multi-purpose, dry chemical extinguishers are recommended for fighting household fires of all types. •Do not mount a fire extinguisher too close to the place where a fire is likely to occur. For instance, do not place an extinguisher next to the kitchen stove. •Fight only minor household fires yourself. In the case of a serious fire, leave the house immediately and notify the fire department. •Never leave your home with a fire burning in the fireplace, or with the stove or oven turned on. •Create and practice a home escape plan that includes an outside meeting spot for all family members. Practice feeling your way out of the house jn the dark and have ai^ ... emergency ladder available i(ff quick ^f ape from a two-story house. 'Watch for signs that your child is playing with fire: burnt matches, missing lighters or matches and burn holes in clothing or furniture. •Teach children that if their clothing catches on fire, that they should immediately drop to the ground and roll around to smother' the fire. •Plug space heaters directly into the wall, never into an extension cord. Unplug space heaters when not in use. •Make your fireplace safer with a screen or glass enclosure to prevent sparks from scattering. A grate will hold logs and keep them from rolling forward. •Cover your chimney with steel mesh to prevent sparks from spewing out onto the roof. •Establish a 30-foot zone around your home that is free of flammable vegetation to help prevent brush fires and reduce the chance of a fire spreading. HomeBase, one of the western region's leading chains of home improvement warehouses, is committed to promoting safety in the local community. HomeBase warehouses offer guaranteed, everyday low prices on a broad selection of tens-of-thousands of home improvement items and building supplies, including a wide variety of fire prevention aids. HomeBase currently operates 84 stores in 10 western states. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif, it was founded in 1983. Fueling cynicism Utah Gov. Mike Leavitt's invite of a powerful Republican lawmaker and chairman of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure to see first-hand the amount of road construction Utah needs before the 2002 Winter Olympics can be adequately hosted was appropriate and smart. Pennsylvania Congressman Bud Shuster said that any allocation of federal money made to Utah will be a good investment in the state and will be equally good for the rest of the country. But including fund-raising events as part of this fact-finding trip was inappropriate. The events to raise money for Shuster's re-election campaign— details of whtdi were unavailable—were added to the scheduling after the fact-finding trip was planned, said Kent Hansen, Utah Department of Transportation spokesman. But Hansen quickly pointed out in apparent justification that the more federal funds Congress allocates for this pre-Olympics project, the less Utah will need to spend its own money. As if on cue, Shuster said these necessary projects could be paid for with the federal government covering 80 to 90% of the cost Shuster's re-election campaign did pay for his travel to Utah, but this coraingling of travel sends a bad message and gives federal government critics ammunition for RICHARD COHEN Politics and drugs WASHINGTON Robert G. Deckel, the Democratic campaign analyst, recently took Bob Dole to the woodshed for charging that the increase in teenage drug use is President Clinton's fault. Writing in the Los Angeles Times, Beckel excoriated Dole for what he called a "new low, even by Dole's standards" and exhumed the late Joseph McCarthy and his ism just for good measure. It was a jim-dandy of a piece. But it was not quite right. The issue, like drug statistics themselves, is open to some interpretatiori. Dole is just plain wrong in laying the blame for the increased use of drugs on Bill Clinton since, among other things, the trend was under way before Clinton got to the White House. But he is right in criticizing the president for doing precious little about this trend until just recently when, as you may have noticed, the campaign got started. ^f~7^ In fact, until recently drug activists were complaining to the White House that the president was failing to use the bully pulpit in the war against drugs. After two Republican administrations — > Reagan and Bush — and exaggerated and sometimes overheated words about drugs, the issue seemed to run out of steam. Clinton seemed reluctant to say very much about it and pleas from drug activists that he do more were ignored. But the president wasn't alone. The media, too, turned away from the subject. The number of antidriig public service ahnouncemehts (remember the one where a fried egg was meant to show the damage drugs did to the brain?) was reduced. James Burke, chairman of the Partnership for a Drug-Free America, estimates that its public service announcements were down $100 million a year in air time from their petdc. These messages were instrumental in deglamorizing drug use. Now, though, kids are getting a different message — although it's hard to say precisely from where. Dole has singled out certain films, but having seen one of those he's mentioned "Pulp Fiction^" I beg to differ with him. A near-fatal overdose is no way to sell me on-the wonders of drugs. But there's little doubt that what one generation learned the hard way abut drugs another generation is disregarding. Recent surveys show that kids aren't as spooked by drugs as they used to be and, maybe worse, they increasingly think their idols — movie and rock stars — use drugs. In other words, drugs are regaining the cachet they used to have. So it was no surprise then that the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse — the one cited by Dole — this August found an increase in drug usage among teenagers. The increases for hard drugs are statistically insignificant, but not so for marijuana: Kids are smoking dope at an earlier and earlier age. It is 12to 17-year-olds who are accounting for most of the increased drug usage. And if we know anything at all about addiction, these are the bad years. Get a habit then and you've got a problem for life. ^ President Clinton, of course, famously Sfidriot i.rihale the one time he tried to smoke 4oper4'hfr4-emark is almost universally ridiculed (I happen to believe him) and supposedly accounts for his reluctance to make a big deal about drugs. I think though, that Joseph Califano Jr., president of the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse, put his finger on the real reason. „. In a Washington ^ Post op-ed piece, Califano cited a demographic fact: Baby boomers who once Vr smoked dope are now the parents of the kids in the latest drug survey. Since they themselves saw nothing wrong in using marijuana — since many of them, in fact, recoiled from overly dramatic anti-drug rhetoric — they are either proving to be permissive about their own children's drug usage or reluctant to issue Draconian edicts. Clinton is a member of that generation — the one that could see for itself that smoking marijuana did not necessarily lead to either harder drugs or addiction. But the situation has now changed. The smokers are younger, the dope is stronger and a new tactic is needed. It would not matter to me if, instead of marijuana, we were talking about booze. No matter what the drug, teenagers ought to not use it. Even without drugs the teenage years can be a hallucinogenic experience. Dole was on to something in his criticism of Clinton — and, by extension, all of us who were too cool to get awfully hot about a puff or two of marijuana. But the blame for the increase in drug usage is not the president's alone and what is, really, a public health problem ought not to be used for simplistic, political rhetoric. This, though, was not Dole's lowest moment. In his own bumbling way, he was saying something that needed to be said. Cohen is a columnist for the Washington Post Writers Group. _* • —;" • • """"^ ^ BILL HANLON S^ET j/^rT. n^^ -,^~^i^-^. Getting out what is put in If you were to write down all the things wrong with education today, and then write down all the positive things you know about education, which List do you think would be longer? There is no doubt in my mind that the positive side would be substantially longer. Being on the inside of education for more than 20 years, I have seen many positive things in our schools. I have also seen some really dumb stuff. Over the years, I have severely criticized policies, regulations, guidelines and practices that do not serve the needs of students. I found out long ago, decision makers often don't see the light. They have to feel the heat when the light is focused on them to make changes that best serve students and the community. My kids went to public schools and if I was starting over again, I would again choose public education. The reasons are simple: quality of teachers, curriculum, selection of coursework, opportimity for involvement in athletics, clubs and organizations. Also, opportimities to experience a wide variety of electives, from foreign language to nursing and welding electives; and programs for special needs students, honors or assistance. There will always be disagreements, and there will always be issues and differences to be resolved. The bottom line is that one gets out of public education about what is put into it. To restore confidence, a number of things can and should be done: •The state has to be honest in the reporting of accomplishments, while being just as honest in reporting shortcomings. Educators must say what they mean and mean what they say. •We need to help students learn by demanding a higher level of proficiency and publicize those proficiencies at each grade level in each subject, so parents and community know and understand what students are expected to learn. •Education must become more personalized. Teachers should be given sufficient time not only to know their students, but to contact each and every parent of students to discuss students' progress. •Teachers must have ready access to staff development programs that emphasize what we know "works" in the classrooms. •Knowing that increased educational standards will result in some students not reaching the mark on the first try, flexibility must be built in so some student populations are not discouraged from challenging themselves or reaching the higher standards and goals. • Honestly reporting the results of grade level benchmarks so parents and the community can measure the progress of schools in achieving and exceeding the standards. •Education must be stabilized. Too many parents say they can't help their own kids because they don't understand what is being taught in school. While that may be true, it should not be. The U.S. Dept of Education publishes research on education that works in the classroom.Unfortunately, itseans gwty decade sducatags have to grab hold of the latest fad and change things that might not ought to be changed. Learning today is no different from how we learned in first grade: Study, memorize by saying or writing, think and reflect and try to understand and apply new-found knowledge. __^Ji^ Adopting the most recent fad won't change that. In fact, technology won't change how to learn, it will only change how you may get and use information. It will enhance a person's capabilities to see things from different prospectives, a^d give students greater access for information and research. But the person on the other end still has to know how to read, write, compute, memorize important facts, study the information. They have to think, reflect, understand what to do with it and how to use it in their lives. •We must be willing to admit a mistake. We must admit when a policy has an unintended, negative result and make appropriate eorrections. And finally, we must all understand what works requires work and perseverance. Hanlon, a Las Vegas resident who writss a colunnn aboui education, sits on the State Board of Education, is the administrator for the Clark County School District's MsttV Science Institute and is a part-time instructor at UNLV. r* >*"; LETTERS 'The News welcomes brief letters, signed wllh your name, address and phone for verification. Typed letters receive preference and the News reserves the right to edit for grammar, spelling or length. Please mail to: Editor, Homm NewB, 2 Commtrc* CmtfrDrtv, Hnder$on, NV 99014 DUR VIEWS Thursday, October 10,1996 Henderson Home News Pages LETTERS Bridging tlie Generation Gap Thanks for lieip in Barflett's tribute Editon What a pleasure to have the opportunity to publicly thank the wonderful people who made a large contribution to Selma Bartlett's Tribute and Birthday party. •Ray Nolan, Ocean Spray Cranberry, Inc. •Sheri Smith, American Nevada Corp. •Lois Forester & Board of Directors, Black Mountain Country Club. •Don Snyder, The Boyd Group Eldorado and Jokers Wild. •Jim & Fred D. Gibson, American Pacific Corp. •Scott Higginson, Wells Fargo Bank. •Jack Willis, Bank West of Nevada. •John Kish, Skyline Casino. •Mr. and Mrs. Don Marker, Marker Plaza. •Ben and Billie Stepman, Hyundai dealer. ?^ v^^. •Rod Davis, St. Rose Dominican Hospital : V' •Carol Towbin, Towbin Infiniti. Without your kindness the event would not have been the great success it was. It really warms the heart to know you are in our community. It's great to know so many people bought tickets to pay tribute to Selma and have the money go to the Henderson Senior Center and Black Mountain Nutritional program. „ ,. My thanks to Cindy Hermon and Vicki Taylor for their printing of wonderfill. flyers and verbal help in promoting Selma's party. I want to thank the many people who bought tickets knowing they could not attend but wanted to donate them for the use of others. That kind of generosity is what Henderson is made of Manythanks. v;"r '.'j;^.' • • :• • T^y^::^.-':.-C-L'--r.--^:'0?'..-'iv OTHENAWILUAMS ". "*^ ,„:, : '^^''' I: ;,;..:^ President, Senior Center Auxiliary Dr. Carol KMT Seniors add a special dimension to the lives of children. This important resource is readily available for those who wish to enrich their lives as well as the lives of the future generation. Many public schools have already invited and welcomed adults who ei^joy listening to children read and also guide them in varied learning experiencesi. Teachers need helping hands with understanding seniors to offer concrete experiences such as arts, storytelling, poetry readings and one-to-one instruction. How many older citizens would benefit from several hours of EDITORIAL From Page 4 contributions to children who need role models? A teacher's job is never done. Lesson plans, grading papers, parent conferences, special preparations for projects, units and bulletin boards are just a few everyday items on a teacher's agenda. Countless hours could be given to children if some of the workload shifted to capable senior hands. Every child has special needs in a classroom. The energy of one or two adults in a team teaching situation can be greatly enhanced by providing active participants who enjoy being part of the classroom family. The opportimities are too numerous to state for all people involved in this learning environment. Touching lives across generations fills emotional and social gaps for everyone. We have an untapped resource in our community that benefits so many. The school can be a true agent of change bringing the young and old together in partnerships toward growth and health. Kenis a member of the Adjunct Faculty, Community College of Southern Nevada, and a guest teacher for the Claric County School District. • :.-i ;."' • their argument that government spending decisions are too often quid pro quo and sweetheart deals. And who could prove such a claim invalid? For what other reason than contribution for construction money would Utahns donate to a congressional campaign on the other side of the nation? This is not a Republican issue. Democi-ats have previously been equally guiltyof raising money at Testing on a level playing field The developers of the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test, in ordering a revision to eliminate bias against girl^, have cast new light on the larger problem of school admissions based narrowly on standardized testing, f Boys generally outscore girls on the standardized PSAT exam. It is taken in the junior year of high school and is regarded as preparatory for the Scholastic Achievement Test, which is given heavy weight by many colleges in the admissions process. The PSAT also determines semifinalists for the prestigious National Merit Scholarship Program. Boys win the majority of those college scholarships, although more girls than boys take the test. The score gap is a result of higher math scores achieved by boys. It is generally acknowledged that social, cultural and historical pressures have discouraged girls from excelling at math. The long-standing disparity resulted in charges of gender discrimination by the watchdog National Center for Fair and Open Testing, based in Cambridge, Mass. It also prompted the American Civil Liberties Union to apply pressure on the Educational Testing Service, which administers the test for the College Board. Without admitting gender bias, the testing service agreed to more measurements of writing skills. That is expected to narrow the gap because girls tend to do better than boys on test of verbal ability. The new PSAT exam, according to a statement from the College Board, "will help measure the varied talents of an increasingly diverse student population." Educators have long argued about the ability of standardized tests to predict success in college for women and minority students. The PSAT revision goes in the right direction. At the same time, the University of California is moving backward. A UC study shows that at least its premier campuses will see a marked decrease in black and Latino enrollment when racial and ethic preferences are banned as of 1998. Test scores and grades alone are not enough. Merit comes in many forms and should be measured by many methods. Lo$ Angelei Time$ Another new study takes swipe ":v;•. • ;;• • '\:; at teacliers :'-:-C''-''-'--^^^ The latest criticism of teachers has set teetix gnashing everywhere. Too many teachers are unqualified to teach in the areas they're assigned, according to a new report by the National Commission on Teaching and America's Future. Two-thirds of university schools of education are unaccredited. Teacher hiring is helter-skelter. New teachers get little mentoring. Teacher workloads are too high. And so it goes. Yes, there are many things wrong with our school system, but the factors mentioned in the study point in part to a shortage of teachers, in many parts of the country. That's why there is a growing issue of teaching standards and qualifications. The report states that the teaching force needs to expand by nearly 18% by 2002, just six years from now. That's because the student population is booming in Washoe County and aroimd the nation. Where are these teachers going to come from? The reality is that becoming a teacher doesn't have the prestige it once eiyoyed. Teachers must endure a fair amount of daily criticism. There are many other career options for college students, especially women, who have traditionally held the teaching fort. And frankly, the private sector pays better. So it's not wonder that math and science majors don't teach or that there aren't enough qualified English teachers to go Ground. They are gainfully employed elsewhere. But when the private sector experiences a labor shortage, it raises salaries. School districts cannot. Oftentimes, school districts make do with what they have for as long as they can. And it just may be that the teacher who fills a post may be the best qualified in. the school, although in Nevada there's a limit to how long a teacher with the wrong credentials can remain in a post. Nevertheless, we have to question and examine how much we demand of teachers and how much they get in return. A college education is not cheap, but all teachers must have a college degree and preferably a graduate degree, too. It makes fittle sense to become so indebted (five to six years of formal schooling) for so little pay—starting salaries in the mid$20,000. Others with comparable years of formal education earn more. In addition, teaching is not solely about teaching anymore. The amount of time that is devoted to solving home and social problems is significant In the private sector, job descriptions are tightly scripted. The next time a new study finds another wart among the teaching force, ask yourselves this question: How much are you willing to pay to remove it? Reno Gazette-Journal inappropriate times. But both appear oblivious to what looks bad to the average observer, and both wonder why voters become cynical about government and politics. While there may be few indiscretions like the one committed earlier this week in Utah, they form lasting impressions when they occur. Though campaign finance refornj is needed, no collection of laws would -A prevent such incidents. That would ^ O § < > • Surprise for term limiters These pages are the opinion pages of the newspaper News View is written b/ the editonal staff to bnng attention to an issue of concern in the community. Our regular columnists reflect on state and national politics, as well as education Editorials re-pnnted from other newspapers provide other opinions. Remember when term limits were touted as the only way to get new blood in Congress? It was a bad idea whose time is past; term limits are now exposed as not only undemocratic but also unnecessary. Congress, awash in new blood as a result of the past two elections, is sure to get another infusion of fresh faces in January. As the 104 th Congress heads home to campEiign, the casualty list is already long: •50 of the House's 435 members — 29 Democrats and 21 Republicans — are retiring or seeking other office. • 13 senators — eight Democrats and five Republicans — are retiring. •Two more House members and one senator lost primaries. •Five other House members already resigned and one died; two senators resigned. On top of that turnover, so many incumbents are in tough races that more than 100 seats could go either way in November. The weekly Congressional Quarterly identifies 50 House races as too close to call, 53 more as quite competitive and a further 69 as places to watch for upsets. That's nearly 40% of the House, a far cry from the '80s image of an institution in whidi most members stayed forever. In the Senate, at least 18 of the 34 require a commitment by political parties and their followers to avoid any action or activity that so much as appears improper. When politicians adhere to that standard—fact-finding trips, for instance, limited to finding facts—cynics will have less fuel for their campaign of heaping contempt on government. Salt Lake Tribune Us Your • •• U z z> O < X The News is interested in publishing your family's and your neighborhood's news. What awards, accornplishrnenis and interesting incidents and accidents do you want your neighbors to know? Please be brief and state what is News, what is Different, what is Interesting. Please limit yourself to one news brief per page. The news brief will be published as space permits. ., MAIL TO: Henderson Home News 2 Commerce Center ^ .>.,; • "''T;;:. Henderson, NV 89014 -!:-''^^;-v • .'i;/^Stt '1> • • • ;-fc OR FAX TO: 434-3527 Nome: Address: Phone: Dore: Please print or type neatly. Be sure your spelling of names is accurate. races are seen as quite competitive. And this is the third consecutive election to be marked by significant turnover. There were 86 freshmen in the House and 11 in the Senate after '94 and 110 freshmen in the House and 14 in the Senate aftr '92. So come January, over half the House and nearly half the Senate vrill have been there less than six years. The term-limits movements was pushed largely by critics of the longtime Democratic dominance of Congress. Having given up on the possibility of defeating incumbents, they tried the undemocratic ploy of telling voters whom they couldn't voU for. Fortunately, democracy addressed the problem. Some of the old warhorses quit in the face of stronger competition. Others, of both parties, were tossed out by a restive electorate in the past two elections. But the term-limit zealots haven't given up. Now they're pushing ballot initiatives in 15 states calling for a constitutional convention — the first since 1787 and a process that would risk free-form rewriting of the Constitution. That's like ordering a nuclear strike to destroy an iceberg that has substantially melted away. Voters are pumping fresh blood into Congress. Why get in their way? USA Today 1 ..........„...:.::... • : • ;:: • • ::>,.;" • • • -f • • • ;.v'-w-c U • • ;.: • • • / • • ; • ; • • ^^' • ':>' • ^. '"v-j • '. • • ." • "• ;. T^ > • < • u. 0 B < 0 1 • 1 n I O o > (Lrt • a O z O z • m Z > m Z m g z o • < —I O 5 73 m C 3P •< YOUR VIEWS: A FORUM FOR ISSUES THAT AFFECT OUR READERS

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mfi mmmmmfmmm •if^'L T-:;.-^'';^ VIEWPOINT HCMNEWS 'MteO'Cdtoghan Publistier 'CwvlynO'CaRaahMi Co-Publisher 'PMISZVMW, Managing Editor Piae4 Henderson Home News Thursday, October 10,1996 o excuse abuse October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month. This month, battered women's advocates in Henderson and across the nation, are working to focus pubHc awareness on the epidemic of domestic violence and encouraging all Americans to become part of the solution. T^i Whether we want to acknowledge it or not, the reality is that domestic violence exists in our community, it exists in the neighborhoods where we live, the places vvhere we work, the houses of worship we attend, and in families that are the very foundation pf our community. i^^-It is a tragic epidemic that does not discriminate, it knows no racial, economic or social barriers. Domestic violence fills emergency rooms and morgues, it tears families apart, devastates children, and it kills women. Help is out there, and we are asking you to help us spread the message. By raising public awareness of domestic violence, by providing people with ideas for action, and letting women who are abused know that they are not alone and that help in available, we caiT work together to become part of the solution. There is no excuse for domestic violence, everyone must learn the facts and help stop domestic violence. Fire Prevention in October makes home a safer place year round National Fire Prevention Week is (Dctober 6-12, and there is no jbetter time to take the precautions ^ec^ssary to protect your home and. experts at HomeBase home improvement warehouse oflFer simple suggestions for fire safety: •Install smoke detectors on every level of your home, especially near sleeping areas. •Never install a smoke detector within six inches of where a wall and ceiling meet. This is dead air space with little circulation. Do not mount a detector in front of an air supply or return duct. •Check the batteries in your smoke detector every month and change them once a year. A working smoke detector doubles your chances of surviving a fire. •One fire extinguisher is not enough to protect a home. Instead, there should be a fire extinguisher near the kitchen, bedrooms, basement and garage. •Multi-purpose, dry chemical extinguishers are recommended for fighting household fires of all types. •Do not mount a fire extinguisher too close to the place where a fire is likely to occur. For instance, do not place an extinguisher next to the kitchen stove. •Fight only minor household fires yourself. In the case of a serious fire, leave the house immediately and notify the fire department. •Never leave your home with a fire burning in the fireplace, or with the stove or oven turned on. •Create and practice a home escape plan that includes an outside meeting spot for all family members. Practice feeling your way out of the house jn the dark and have ai^ ... emergency ladder available i(ff quick ^f ape from a two-story house. 'Watch for signs that your child is playing with fire: burnt matches, missing lighters or matches and burn holes in clothing or furniture. •Teach children that if their clothing catches on fire, that they should immediately drop to the ground and roll around to smother' the fire. •Plug space heaters directly into the wall, never into an extension cord. Unplug space heaters when not in use. •Make your fireplace safer with a screen or glass enclosure to prevent sparks from scattering. A grate will hold logs and keep them from rolling forward. •Cover your chimney with steel mesh to prevent sparks from spewing out onto the roof. •Establish a 30-foot zone around your home that is free of flammable vegetation to help prevent brush fires and reduce the chance of a fire spreading. HomeBase, one of the western region's leading chains of home improvement warehouses, is committed to promoting safety in the local community. HomeBase warehouses offer guaranteed, everyday low prices on a broad selection of tens-of-thousands of home improvement items and building supplies, including a wide variety of fire prevention aids. HomeBase currently operates 84 stores in 10 western states. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif, it was founded in 1983. Fueling cynicism Utah Gov. Mike Leavitt's invite of a powerful Republican lawmaker and chairman of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure to see first-hand the amount of road construction Utah needs before the 2002 Winter Olympics can be adequately hosted was appropriate and smart. Pennsylvania Congressman Bud Shuster said that any allocation of federal money made to Utah will be a good investment in the state and will be equally good for the rest of the country. But including fund-raising events as part of this fact-finding trip was inappropriate. The events to raise money for Shuster's re-election campaign— details of whtdi were unavailable—were added to the scheduling after the fact-finding trip was planned, said Kent Hansen, Utah Department of Transportation spokesman. But Hansen quickly pointed out in apparent justification that the more federal funds Congress allocates for this pre-Olympics project, the less Utah will need to spend its own money. As if on cue, Shuster said these necessary projects could be paid for with the federal government covering 80 to 90% of the cost Shuster's re-election campaign did pay for his travel to Utah, but this coraingling of travel sends a bad message and gives federal government critics ammunition for RICHARD COHEN Politics and drugs WASHINGTON Robert G. Deckel, the Democratic campaign analyst, recently took Bob Dole to the woodshed for charging that the increase in teenage drug use is President Clinton's fault. Writing in the Los Angeles Times, Beckel excoriated Dole for what he called a "new low, even by Dole's standards" and exhumed the late Joseph McCarthy and his ism just for good measure. It was a jim-dandy of a piece. But it was not quite right. The issue, like drug statistics themselves, is open to some interpretatiori. Dole is just plain wrong in laying the blame for the increased use of drugs on Bill Clinton since, among other things, the trend was under way before Clinton got to the White House. But he is right in criticizing the president for doing precious little about this trend until just recently when, as you may have noticed, the campaign got started. ^f~7^ In fact, until recently drug activists were complaining to the White House that the president was failing to use the bully pulpit in the war against drugs. After two Republican administrations — > Reagan and Bush — and exaggerated and sometimes overheated words about drugs, the issue seemed to run out of steam. Clinton seemed reluctant to say very much about it and pleas from drug activists that he do more were ignored. But the president wasn't alone. The media, too, turned away from the subject. The number of antidriig public service ahnouncemehts (remember the one where a fried egg was meant to show the damage drugs did to the brain?) was reduced. James Burke, chairman of the Partnership for a Drug-Free America, estimates that its public service announcements were down $100 million a year in air time from their petdc. These messages were instrumental in deglamorizing drug use. Now, though, kids are getting a different message — although it's hard to say precisely from where. Dole has singled out certain films, but having seen one of those he's mentioned "Pulp Fiction^" I beg to differ with him. A near-fatal overdose is no way to sell me on-the wonders of drugs. But there's little doubt that what one generation learned the hard way abut drugs another generation is disregarding. Recent surveys show that kids aren't as spooked by drugs as they used to be and, maybe worse, they increasingly think their idols — movie and rock stars — use drugs. In other words, drugs are regaining the cachet they used to have. So it was no surprise then that the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse — the one cited by Dole — this August found an increase in drug usage among teenagers. The increases for hard drugs are statistically insignificant, but not so for marijuana: Kids are smoking dope at an earlier and earlier age. It is 12to 17-year-olds who are accounting for most of the increased drug usage. And if we know anything at all about addiction, these are the bad years. Get a habit then and you've got a problem for life. ^ President Clinton, of course, famously Sfidriot i.rihale the one time he tried to smoke 4oper4'hfr4-emark is almost universally ridiculed (I happen to believe him) and supposedly accounts for his reluctance to make a big deal about drugs. I think though, that Joseph Califano Jr., president of the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse, put his finger on the real reason. „. In a Washington ^ Post op-ed piece, Califano cited a demographic fact: Baby boomers who once Vr smoked dope are now the parents of the kids in the latest drug survey. Since they themselves saw nothing wrong in using marijuana — since many of them, in fact, recoiled from overly dramatic anti-drug rhetoric — they are either proving to be permissive about their own children's drug usage or reluctant to issue Draconian edicts. Clinton is a member of that generation — the one that could see for itself that smoking marijuana did not necessarily lead to either harder drugs or addiction. But the situation has now changed. The smokers are younger, the dope is stronger and a new tactic is needed. It would not matter to me if, instead of marijuana, we were talking about booze. No matter what the drug, teenagers ought to not use it. Even without drugs the teenage years can be a hallucinogenic experience. Dole was on to something in his criticism of Clinton — and, by extension, all of us who were too cool to get awfully hot about a puff or two of marijuana. But the blame for the increase in drug usage is not the president's alone and what is, really, a public health problem ought not to be used for simplistic, political rhetoric. This, though, was not Dole's lowest moment. In his own bumbling way, he was saying something that needed to be said. Cohen is a columnist for the Washington Post Writers Group. _* • —;" • • """"^ ^ BILL HANLON S^ET j/^rT. n^^ -,^~^i^-^. Getting out what is put in If you were to write down all the things wrong with education today, and then write down all the positive things you know about education, which List do you think would be longer? There is no doubt in my mind that the positive side would be substantially longer. Being on the inside of education for more than 20 years, I have seen many positive things in our schools. I have also seen some really dumb stuff. Over the years, I have severely criticized policies, regulations, guidelines and practices that do not serve the needs of students. I found out long ago, decision makers often don't see the light. They have to feel the heat when the light is focused on them to make changes that best serve students and the community. My kids went to public schools and if I was starting over again, I would again choose public education. The reasons are simple: quality of teachers, curriculum, selection of coursework, opportimity for involvement in athletics, clubs and organizations. Also, opportimities to experience a wide variety of electives, from foreign language to nursing and welding electives; and programs for special needs students, honors or assistance. There will always be disagreements, and there will always be issues and differences to be resolved. The bottom line is that one gets out of public education about what is put into it. To restore confidence, a number of things can and should be done: •The state has to be honest in the reporting of accomplishments, while being just as honest in reporting shortcomings. Educators must say what they mean and mean what they say. •We need to help students learn by demanding a higher level of proficiency and publicize those proficiencies at each grade level in each subject, so parents and community know and understand what students are expected to learn. •Education must become more personalized. Teachers should be given sufficient time not only to know their students, but to contact each and every parent of students to discuss students' progress. •Teachers must have ready access to staff development programs that emphasize what we know "works" in the classrooms. •Knowing that increased educational standards will result in some students not reaching the mark on the first try, flexibility must be built in so some student populations are not discouraged from challenging themselves or reaching the higher standards and goals. • Honestly reporting the results of grade level benchmarks so parents and the community can measure the progress of schools in achieving and exceeding the standards. •Education must be stabilized. Too many parents say they can't help their own kids because they don't understand what is being taught in school. While that may be true, it should not be. The U.S. Dept of Education publishes research on education that works in the classroom.Unfortunately, itseans gwty decade sducatags have to grab hold of the latest fad and change things that might not ought to be changed. Learning today is no different from how we learned in first grade: Study, memorize by saying or writing, think and reflect and try to understand and apply new-found knowledge. __^Ji^ Adopting the most recent fad won't change that. In fact, technology won't change how to learn, it will only change how you may get and use information. It will enhance a person's capabilities to see things from different prospectives, a^d give students greater access for information and research. But the person on the other end still has to know how to read, write, compute, memorize important facts, study the information. They have to think, reflect, understand what to do with it and how to use it in their lives. •We must be willing to admit a mistake. We must admit when a policy has an unintended, negative result and make appropriate eorrections. And finally, we must all understand what works requires work and perseverance. Hanlon, a Las Vegas resident who writss a colunnn aboui education, sits on the State Board of Education, is the administrator for the Clark County School District's MsttV Science Institute and is a part-time instructor at UNLV. r* >*"; LETTERS 'The News welcomes brief letters, signed wllh your name, address and phone for verification. Typed letters receive preference and the News reserves the right to edit for grammar, spelling or length. Please mail to: Editor, Homm NewB, 2 Commtrc* CmtfrDrtv, Hnder$on, NV 99014 DUR VIEWS Thursday, October 10,1996 Henderson Home News Pages LETTERS Bridging tlie Generation Gap Thanks for lieip in Barflett's tribute Editon What a pleasure to have the opportunity to publicly thank the wonderful people who made a large contribution to Selma Bartlett's Tribute and Birthday party. •Ray Nolan, Ocean Spray Cranberry, Inc. •Sheri Smith, American Nevada Corp. •Lois Forester & Board of Directors, Black Mountain Country Club. •Don Snyder, The Boyd Group Eldorado and Jokers Wild. •Jim & Fred D. Gibson, American Pacific Corp. •Scott Higginson, Wells Fargo Bank. •Jack Willis, Bank West of Nevada. •John Kish, Skyline Casino. •Mr. and Mrs. Don Marker, Marker Plaza. •Ben and Billie Stepman, Hyundai dealer. ?^ v^^. •Rod Davis, St. Rose Dominican Hospital : V' •Carol Towbin, Towbin Infiniti. Without your kindness the event would not have been the great success it was. It really warms the heart to know you are in our community. It's great to know so many people bought tickets to pay tribute to Selma and have the money go to the Henderson Senior Center and Black Mountain Nutritional program. „ ,. My thanks to Cindy Hermon and Vicki Taylor for their printing of wonderfill. flyers and verbal help in promoting Selma's party. I want to thank the many people who bought tickets knowing they could not attend but wanted to donate them for the use of others. That kind of generosity is what Henderson is made of Manythanks. v;"r '.'j;^.' • • :• • T^y^::^.-':.-C-L'--r.--^:'0?'..-'iv OTHENAWILUAMS ". "*^ ,„:, : '^^''' I: ;,;..:^ President, Senior Center Auxiliary Dr. Carol KMT Seniors add a special dimension to the lives of children. This important resource is readily available for those who wish to enrich their lives as well as the lives of the future generation. Many public schools have already invited and welcomed adults who ei^joy listening to children read and also guide them in varied learning experiencesi. Teachers need helping hands with understanding seniors to offer concrete experiences such as arts, storytelling, poetry readings and one-to-one instruction. How many older citizens would benefit from several hours of EDITORIAL From Page 4 contributions to children who need role models? A teacher's job is never done. Lesson plans, grading papers, parent conferences, special preparations for projects, units and bulletin boards are just a few everyday items on a teacher's agenda. Countless hours could be given to children if some of the workload shifted to capable senior hands. Every child has special needs in a classroom. The energy of one or two adults in a team teaching situation can be greatly enhanced by providing active participants who enjoy being part of the classroom family. The opportimities are too numerous to state for all people involved in this learning environment. Touching lives across generations fills emotional and social gaps for everyone. We have an untapped resource in our community that benefits so many. The school can be a true agent of change bringing the young and old together in partnerships toward growth and health. Kenis a member of the Adjunct Faculty, Community College of Southern Nevada, and a guest teacher for the Claric County School District. • :.-i ;."' • their argument that government spending decisions are too often quid pro quo and sweetheart deals. And who could prove such a claim invalid? For what other reason than contribution for construction money would Utahns donate to a congressional campaign on the other side of the nation? This is not a Republican issue. Democi-ats have previously been equally guiltyof raising money at Testing on a level playing field The developers of the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test, in ordering a revision to eliminate bias against girl^, have cast new light on the larger problem of school admissions based narrowly on standardized testing, f Boys generally outscore girls on the standardized PSAT exam. It is taken in the junior year of high school and is regarded as preparatory for the Scholastic Achievement Test, which is given heavy weight by many colleges in the admissions process. The PSAT also determines semifinalists for the prestigious National Merit Scholarship Program. Boys win the majority of those college scholarships, although more girls than boys take the test. The score gap is a result of higher math scores achieved by boys. It is generally acknowledged that social, cultural and historical pressures have discouraged girls from excelling at math. The long-standing disparity resulted in charges of gender discrimination by the watchdog National Center for Fair and Open Testing, based in Cambridge, Mass. It also prompted the American Civil Liberties Union to apply pressure on the Educational Testing Service, which administers the test for the College Board. Without admitting gender bias, the testing service agreed to more measurements of writing skills. That is expected to narrow the gap because girls tend to do better than boys on test of verbal ability. The new PSAT exam, according to a statement from the College Board, "will help measure the varied talents of an increasingly diverse student population." Educators have long argued about the ability of standardized tests to predict success in college for women and minority students. The PSAT revision goes in the right direction. At the same time, the University of California is moving backward. A UC study shows that at least its premier campuses will see a marked decrease in black and Latino enrollment when racial and ethic preferences are banned as of 1998. Test scores and grades alone are not enough. Merit comes in many forms and should be measured by many methods. Lo$ Angelei Time$ Another new study takes swipe ":v;•. • ;;• • '\:; at teacliers :'-:-C''-''-'--^^^ The latest criticism of teachers has set teetix gnashing everywhere. Too many teachers are unqualified to teach in the areas they're assigned, according to a new report by the National Commission on Teaching and America's Future. Two-thirds of university schools of education are unaccredited. Teacher hiring is helter-skelter. New teachers get little mentoring. Teacher workloads are too high. And so it goes. Yes, there are many things wrong with our school system, but the factors mentioned in the study point in part to a shortage of teachers, in many parts of the country. That's why there is a growing issue of teaching standards and qualifications. The report states that the teaching force needs to expand by nearly 18% by 2002, just six years from now. That's because the student population is booming in Washoe County and aroimd the nation. Where are these teachers going to come from? The reality is that becoming a teacher doesn't have the prestige it once eiyoyed. Teachers must endure a fair amount of daily criticism. There are many other career options for college students, especially women, who have traditionally held the teaching fort. And frankly, the private sector pays better. So it's not wonder that math and science majors don't teach or that there aren't enough qualified English teachers to go Ground. They are gainfully employed elsewhere. But when the private sector experiences a labor shortage, it raises salaries. School districts cannot. Oftentimes, school districts make do with what they have for as long as they can. And it just may be that the teacher who fills a post may be the best qualified in. the school, although in Nevada there's a limit to how long a teacher with the wrong credentials can remain in a post. Nevertheless, we have to question and examine how much we demand of teachers and how much they get in return. A college education is not cheap, but all teachers must have a college degree and preferably a graduate degree, too. It makes fittle sense to become so indebted (five to six years of formal schooling) for so little pay—starting salaries in the mid$20,000. Others with comparable years of formal education earn more. In addition, teaching is not solely about teaching anymore. The amount of time that is devoted to solving home and social problems is significant In the private sector, job descriptions are tightly scripted. The next time a new study finds another wart among the teaching force, ask yourselves this question: How much are you willing to pay to remove it? Reno Gazette-Journal inappropriate times. But both appear oblivious to what looks bad to the average observer, and both wonder why voters become cynical about government and politics. While there may be few indiscretions like the one committed earlier this week in Utah, they form lasting impressions when they occur. Though campaign finance refornj is needed, no collection of laws would -A prevent such incidents. That would ^ O § < > • Surprise for term limiters These pages are the opinion pages of the newspaper News View is written b/ the editonal staff to bnng attention to an issue of concern in the community. Our regular columnists reflect on state and national politics, as well as education Editorials re-pnnted from other newspapers provide other opinions. Remember when term limits were touted as the only way to get new blood in Congress? It was a bad idea whose time is past; term limits are now exposed as not only undemocratic but also unnecessary. Congress, awash in new blood as a result of the past two elections, is sure to get another infusion of fresh faces in January. As the 104 th Congress heads home to campEiign, the casualty list is already long: •50 of the House's 435 members — 29 Democrats and 21 Republicans — are retiring or seeking other office. • 13 senators — eight Democrats and five Republicans — are retiring. •Two more House members and one senator lost primaries. •Five other House members already resigned and one died; two senators resigned. On top of that turnover, so many incumbents are in tough races that more than 100 seats could go either way in November. The weekly Congressional Quarterly identifies 50 House races as too close to call, 53 more as quite competitive and a further 69 as places to watch for upsets. That's nearly 40% of the House, a far cry from the '80s image of an institution in whidi most members stayed forever. In the Senate, at least 18 of the 34 require a commitment by political parties and their followers to avoid any action or activity that so much as appears improper. When politicians adhere to that standard—fact-finding trips, for instance, limited to finding facts—cynics will have less fuel for their campaign of heaping contempt on government. Salt Lake Tribune Us Your • •• U z z> O < X The News is interested in publishing your family's and your neighborhood's news. What awards, accornplishrnenis and interesting incidents and accidents do you want your neighbors to know? Please be brief and state what is News, what is Different, what is Interesting. Please limit yourself to one news brief per page. The news brief will be published as space permits. ., MAIL TO: Henderson Home News 2 Commerce Center ^ .>.,; • "''T;;:. Henderson, NV 89014 -!:-''^^;-v • .'i;/^Stt '1> • • • ;-fc OR FAX TO: 434-3527 Nome: Address: Phone: Dore: Please print or type neatly. Be sure your spelling of names is accurate. races are seen as quite competitive. And this is the third consecutive election to be marked by significant turnover. There were 86 freshmen in the House and 11 in the Senate after '94 and 110 freshmen in the House and 14 in the Senate aftr '92. So come January, over half the House and nearly half the Senate vrill have been there less than six years. The term-limits movements was pushed largely by critics of the longtime Democratic dominance of Congress. Having given up on the possibility of defeating incumbents, they tried the undemocratic ploy of telling voters whom they couldn't voU for. Fortunately, democracy addressed the problem. Some of the old warhorses quit in the face of stronger competition. Others, of both parties, were tossed out by a restive electorate in the past two elections. But the term-limit zealots haven't given up. Now they're pushing ballot initiatives in 15 states calling for a constitutional convention — the first since 1787 and a process that would risk free-form rewriting of the Constitution. That's like ordering a nuclear strike to destroy an iceberg that has substantially melted away. Voters are pumping fresh blood into Congress. Why get in their way? USA Today 1 ..........„...:.::... • : • ;:: • • ::>,.;" • • • -f • • • ;.v'-w-c U • • ;.: • • • / • • ; • ; • • ^^' • ':>' • ^. '"v-j • '. • • ." • "• ;. T^ > • < • u. 0 B < 0 1 • 1 n I O o > (Lrt • a O z O z • m Z > m Z m g z o • < —I O 5 73 m C 3P •< YOUR VIEWS: A FORUM FOR ISSUES THAT AFFECT OUR READERS

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Pages Henderson Home News Thursday, October 10,1996 Thursday, October 10.1996 Henderson How Newrt Page 7 EDUCATION Henderson Home News White MS sets town hall meeting White MS will hold its first town hall meeting at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 16, in the gymnasium to discuss double sessions to begin Jan. 6,1997. Beginning in January, White MS will house two schools on one campus. White MSwill be conducted during the morning session, while Woodbury MS will hold sessions in the afternoon. Topics to be addressed at the meeting include bell schedules, transportation, security, facilities, food, late bird classes, student activities and interscholastic basketball. For more information, call 799-0777. Dinner, choral concert at White MS A chicken/ham dinner and boys' chorus. choral concert will be held by Mr. Pagel and the White MS choral program at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 17. Dinner will be catered by Boston Market. Sixth grade performing groups will include the girls' chorus and Seventhand eighth-grade groups will include the harmonious choir, show choir, concert choir and madrigals. Tickets are $6 and are available at the chorus office, or call the school, 799-0777 ext. 208. Courtesy Photo PENTAGON VISIT—Students from BurkholderMlddleSchool visited Washington D.C. last summer. From left are Chris Begnoche, Ray Delillo, Ashley Valdivia, Kelli Marino and Amanda Bennington at the Pentagon. 'I want American history to come alive for our students," said teacher Jackie Welch-Doubek, who accompanied the students. 'This is an experience that the students will never forget.' >ARREL B ILLY DESERT DATA .. TO THE RESCUE HELP! Typing Linitnaiing /^sad£l2 I'M COMINQI lesert )Data 503 Hotel Plaza Bouldei City, NV 89005 {702)2Mbm FAX: 2910141 mil Piiir,:v.iiig r.'.:.vJi:lli:t:.. COtOR lAStH COPItS Trjn'.ciiiJliu UPSlft'iJEi Rc^uiiiivi Foiiiis • l,irniiij|iiii| IlluUry Binding Triple J. Casino Happy Hour in the Lounge 3p.m. to 7p.m. • IMon. thru Fri. SO^DrafiT^ ^7S g Domestii Ladies Night Wednesday Free Drinks to all Ladies 7p.m. to 9p.m. (Expires Oct. 3l.l996) 725 Racetrack Rd. Henderson to CASINO Rogas named SIVIU Scholar India Lee Rogas of Henderson is one of nearly 400 first-year students chosen to be University Scholars at Southern Methodist University this fall. Scholars are selected on the basis of several factors, including academic record and extracurricular activities in high school. Rogas will receive an award of up to $12,000 over four years. SMU is a private, comprehensive university located in Dallas. It has an enrollment of more than 9,000 students and a fulltime faculty of nearly 500. !. Undergraduate programs are offered in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Meadows School of the Arts, Edwin L. Cox School of Business, and the School of Engineering and Applied Science. -: ,^ Graduate and professional programs are offered in these schools and in Perkins School of Theology and the School of Law. Voufe :; lnv\ied to SUPPER CLCIB up 10 200 peoP>^ HONORED — Green Valley ; Hlglii School senior Chris'^t^pher-Wnlker. Student ~BtJdv President, recently received $15,000 as the national Silver award winner in the Science, Business & Technology Studies category of the 1996 Discover Card Tribute Award Program. Walkerand his family traveled to Washington, D.C, where he was honored at an awards gala. Jaycee State Fair opened Tuesday CCNGS to meet The Clark County Nevada Genealogical Society will meet at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 17, at the Katherine Center (Reformation Lutheran Church), 580 E. St. Louis, Las Vegas. The program will include a premeeting refresher, a business meeting, and the main topic, "Genealogy in the U.S.—Sharing Information Night" Meetings are open to members of the public interested in doing family history research. For more information, call 225-5838. This year's Jaycee State Fair, which opened Tuesday, offers many activities for people of all ages. Running through Sunday, Oct. 13, at Cashman Field, the F^r offers.^ days of live music, carnival rides, commercial exhibits, food and fun for the whole family. Entertainment includes children's theatre, strolling acts, jugglers and live animals. Admission is $6 adults; $4 for seniors; and $3 for children. It opened Tuesday with Kids Day through the Clark County School District hosted by Sunny 106.5, Video Tyme, Snapple and Saturn. Each Clark Comity Student was given a free fair ticket. Today the fair goes country for KWNR's Country Night, on the main stage. Entertainment will include Celia Rose, Country Star Dancers and line dancing. In conjunction with Country Night is Casino Night All casino employees are invited to bring casino identification .to Promotions Desk to receive $2 off adult admission. RockNightwillbeFridaywhen KOMP will feature "Quiet Riot" on the main outdoor stage at 7 p.m. Famous for heavy metal music, the band will play old favorites like "Cum on Feel the Noize" and "Bang Your Head." The group went on a lOO-dty U.S. and Canadian tour in February 1996. On Saturday, Oct. 12, KOOL 105.5 will sponsor "Seattle and Stone." The fair ends with Senior Day AASL Microcomputer Technology in the Media Center Award Winners Named Cynthia Montoya, library media specialist at Green Valley High School, is the winner of the 1996 American Association of School Librarians Microcomputer in the Media Center Award. The award, donated by Follett Software Company, includes $1,000 for the school library media speciahst and $500for the school library media center of her choice. The award is given to elementary and secondary divisions for the innovative use of computer technology in the school library media program. Montoya, the secondary division winner, said the library media center should "become a model for the educational community by demonstrating the opportunities and realities of a broad-based, technologically diversified campus." Applications for the 1997 award are available by calling (800)645-2433, ext 4384. E-mail: aasl@ala.org. and Latin day on Sunday, Oct 13. At the Inside-Out Exhibit Hall, seniors ages 55 and more can enjoy a free pancake breakfast served by the Boy Scouts, Tomahawk District ADixie Jazz Band will be sponsored by the (jold Coast. Seniors will pay no adipission fee from noon until 2 p.m. A free Senior Health Fair will feature free services such as blood pressure and cholesterol screening, cardiac testing, nutritional advice, chiropractic care and hearing and vision tests. Latin Day, hosted by Telemundo and Super Q Radio, will feature Mariachi Bands and Latin Bands. Throughout all six days of the Las Vegas Jaycees State Fair, fairgoers can participate in various in-door and out-door contests. SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER Entertainment Fri. & Sat. • 8 p.m. 'til? ^^PIPEUNE: LGMCH SPECIALS Mon. Fri. ^y^ gc : 11:00-2:00 m DINNER • 5:0010:30 7 DAYS EARLY BIRD SPECIALS 5:00-7:00 ; full course dinners Catering Service For Any Occasion 15 Lake Mead Dr. • 565-0122 Next Time You Go To The Galleria Mall Don't Forget -M-^r^ Your Jewels • • ^ ^ • -HHN Exp. 11-15-96 At Fast Fix... "While You Shop" Ring Sizing, Chain Repair, Stone Setting, Engraving. Watch Batteries, Watch Bands, Watch Repair We Can Do It Fast! Fast Fix Jewelry Repair Galleria Mall Lower Level. Below Food Court 547-6223 At 50% off, even the prices are beautifully crafted. Every Kanatan carpet is designed flawlessly And now even the prices are d perfection. From vebet saxonies to SisalWool'"', our entire collection is on sale. Stop by for a look. c^%Slft^f^(r omDi 334 S. Wthr Sine* • Heaknoi 565-1441 PERSONAL INJURY FREE CONSULTATION NO RECOVERY FEE 565-0473 218 LEAD ST. (Across from the new Civic Center Plaza) £n LAW OFFICE OF JOHN F. MARCHIANO FORMER HENDERSON CITY ATTORNEY • ismdtll Courtesy Photo CAREER EXPLORATION — During White Middle School's career exploration day, Dianna Menzel, the principal's secretary, demonstrates cake decorating to Joelle Hopfer and Steven Dimino. Guest speakers, including prof essionalgolfers and hot air balloonists, have been included in the curriculum. 'Arsenic and Old Lace'.[$lP opens CCSN season oiriiirGiu. Joseph Kesselring's comedy, "Arsenic and Old Lace" will open the Community College of Southern Nevada's theatre season, directed by Michael Lugering. Performances are at 8 p.m. Oct. 11-12 and 18-19, with matinees at 2 p.m., Oct. 13 and 20, in the Horn Theatre at the CCSN Performing Arts Center on the Cheyenne campus, 3200 E. Cheyenne Ave. Admission is $12.50 adults; $10 students and seniors. One of the most famous blackcomedy faces of all times, the play centers on two gentle but highly lethal sisters who populate their cellar with the corpses of older gentlemen. The show staple of theatre troupes across the country," said Lugering. "In the words of character Dr. Harper, it echoes a by-gone era—'the gentle virtues that went out with candlelight and good manners and low taxes." Lugering, an assistant professor at UNLV, teaches voice, acting and classical text. His local directing credits include, The Misanthrope" and "Romeo and Juliet," at the Bayley Theatre. Set design is by Chuck Rounds with lighting by Joe Aldridge. Season subscriptions are still available at a 20% savings over individual tickets. Upcoming productions include, "The Will Rogers Follies," "19408' Radio Hour," and "All in the Timing." For reservations, call 651LIVE (5483). A.CAMC0PU)MNN6Ca Residential & Commercial Complete Plumbing Service 11 General Repairs /\W^''k i: $io arniroia I I Kitchens & Baths
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Pages Henderson Home News Thursday, October 10,1996 Thursday, October 10.1996 Henderson How Newrt Page 7 EDUCATION Henderson Home News White MS sets town hall meeting White MS will hold its first town hall meeting at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 16, in the gymnasium to discuss double sessions to begin Jan. 6,1997. Beginning in January, White MS will house two schools on one campus. White MSwill be conducted during the morning session, while Woodbury MS will hold sessions in the afternoon. Topics to be addressed at the meeting include bell schedules, transportation, security, facilities, food, late bird classes, student activities and interscholastic basketball. For more information, call 799-0777. Dinner, choral concert at White MS A chicken/ham dinner and boys' chorus. choral concert will be held by Mr. Pagel and the White MS choral program at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 17. Dinner will be catered by Boston Market. Sixth grade performing groups will include the girls' chorus and Seventhand eighth-grade groups will include the harmonious choir, show choir, concert choir and madrigals. Tickets are $6 and are available at the chorus office, or call the school, 799-0777 ext. 208. Courtesy Photo PENTAGON VISIT—Students from BurkholderMlddleSchool visited Washington D.C. last summer. From left are Chris Begnoche, Ray Delillo, Ashley Valdivia, Kelli Marino and Amanda Bennington at the Pentagon. 'I want American history to come alive for our students," said teacher Jackie Welch-Doubek, who accompanied the students. 'This is an experience that the students will never forget.' >ARREL B ILLY DESERT DATA .. TO THE RESCUE HELP! Typing Linitnaiing /^sad£l2 I'M COMINQI lesert )Data 503 Hotel Plaza Bouldei City, NV 89005 {702)2Mbm FAX: 2910141 mil Piiir,:v.iiig r.'.:.vJi:lli:t:.. COtOR lAStH COPItS Trjn'.ciiiJliu UPSlft'iJEi Rc^uiiiivi Foiiiis • l,irniiij|iiii| IlluUry Binding Triple J. Casino Happy Hour in the Lounge 3p.m. to 7p.m. • IMon. thru Fri. SO^DrafiT^ ^7S g Domestii Ladies Night Wednesday Free Drinks to all Ladies 7p.m. to 9p.m. (Expires Oct. 3l.l996) 725 Racetrack Rd. Henderson to CASINO Rogas named SIVIU Scholar India Lee Rogas of Henderson is one of nearly 400 first-year students chosen to be University Scholars at Southern Methodist University this fall. Scholars are selected on the basis of several factors, including academic record and extracurricular activities in high school. Rogas will receive an award of up to $12,000 over four years. SMU is a private, comprehensive university located in Dallas. It has an enrollment of more than 9,000 students and a fulltime faculty of nearly 500. !. Undergraduate programs are offered in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Meadows School of the Arts, Edwin L. Cox School of Business, and the School of Engineering and Applied Science. -: ,^ Graduate and professional programs are offered in these schools and in Perkins School of Theology and the School of Law. Voufe :; lnv\ied to SUPPER CLCIB up 10 200 peoP>^ HONORED — Green Valley ; Hlglii School senior Chris'^t^pher-Wnlker. Student ~BtJdv President, recently received $15,000 as the national Silver award winner in the Science, Business & Technology Studies category of the 1996 Discover Card Tribute Award Program. Walkerand his family traveled to Washington, D.C, where he was honored at an awards gala. Jaycee State Fair opened Tuesday CCNGS to meet The Clark County Nevada Genealogical Society will meet at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 17, at the Katherine Center (Reformation Lutheran Church), 580 E. St. Louis, Las Vegas. The program will include a premeeting refresher, a business meeting, and the main topic, "Genealogy in the U.S.—Sharing Information Night" Meetings are open to members of the public interested in doing family history research. For more information, call 225-5838. This year's Jaycee State Fair, which opened Tuesday, offers many activities for people of all ages. Running through Sunday, Oct. 13, at Cashman Field, the F^r offers.^ days of live music, carnival rides, commercial exhibits, food and fun for the whole family. Entertainment includes children's theatre, strolling acts, jugglers and live animals. Admission is $6 adults; $4 for seniors; and $3 for children. It opened Tuesday with Kids Day through the Clark County School District hosted by Sunny 106.5, Video Tyme, Snapple and Saturn. Each Clark Comity Student was given a free fair ticket. Today the fair goes country for KWNR's Country Night, on the main stage. Entertainment will include Celia Rose, Country Star Dancers and line dancing. In conjunction with Country Night is Casino Night All casino employees are invited to bring casino identification .to Promotions Desk to receive $2 off adult admission. RockNightwillbeFridaywhen KOMP will feature "Quiet Riot" on the main outdoor stage at 7 p.m. Famous for heavy metal music, the band will play old favorites like "Cum on Feel the Noize" and "Bang Your Head." The group went on a lOO-dty U.S. and Canadian tour in February 1996. On Saturday, Oct. 12, KOOL 105.5 will sponsor "Seattle and Stone." The fair ends with Senior Day AASL Microcomputer Technology in the Media Center Award Winners Named Cynthia Montoya, library media specialist at Green Valley High School, is the winner of the 1996 American Association of School Librarians Microcomputer in the Media Center Award. The award, donated by Follett Software Company, includes $1,000 for the school library media speciahst and $500for the school library media center of her choice. The award is given to elementary and secondary divisions for the innovative use of computer technology in the school library media program. Montoya, the secondary division winner, said the library media center should "become a model for the educational community by demonstrating the opportunities and realities of a broad-based, technologically diversified campus." Applications for the 1997 award are available by calling (800)645-2433, ext 4384. E-mail: aasl@ala.org. and Latin day on Sunday, Oct 13. At the Inside-Out Exhibit Hall, seniors ages 55 and more can enjoy a free pancake breakfast served by the Boy Scouts, Tomahawk District ADixie Jazz Band will be sponsored by the (jold Coast. Seniors will pay no adipission fee from noon until 2 p.m. A free Senior Health Fair will feature free services such as blood pressure and cholesterol screening, cardiac testing, nutritional advice, chiropractic care and hearing and vision tests. Latin Day, hosted by Telemundo and Super Q Radio, will feature Mariachi Bands and Latin Bands. Throughout all six days of the Las Vegas Jaycees State Fair, fairgoers can participate in various in-door and out-door contests. SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER Entertainment Fri. & Sat. • 8 p.m. 'til? ^^PIPEUNE: LGMCH SPECIALS Mon. Fri. ^y^ gc : 11:00-2:00 m DINNER • 5:0010:30 7 DAYS EARLY BIRD SPECIALS 5:00-7:00 ; full course dinners Catering Service For Any Occasion 15 Lake Mead Dr. • 565-0122 Next Time You Go To The Galleria Mall Don't Forget -M-^r^ Your Jewels • • ^ ^ • -HHN Exp. 11-15-96 At Fast Fix... "While You Shop" Ring Sizing, Chain Repair, Stone Setting, Engraving. Watch Batteries, Watch Bands, Watch Repair We Can Do It Fast! Fast Fix Jewelry Repair Galleria Mall Lower Level. Below Food Court 547-6223 At 50% off, even the prices are beautifully crafted. Every Kanatan carpet is designed flawlessly And now even the prices are d perfection. From vebet saxonies to SisalWool'"', our entire collection is on sale. Stop by for a look. c^%Slft^f^(r omDi 334 S. Wthr Sine* • Heaknoi 565-1441 PERSONAL INJURY FREE CONSULTATION NO RECOVERY FEE 565-0473 218 LEAD ST. (Across from the new Civic Center Plaza) £n LAW OFFICE OF JOHN F. MARCHIANO FORMER HENDERSON CITY ATTORNEY • ismdtll Courtesy Photo CAREER EXPLORATION — During White Middle School's career exploration day, Dianna Menzel, the principal's secretary, demonstrates cake decorating to Joelle Hopfer and Steven Dimino. Guest speakers, including prof essionalgolfers and hot air balloonists, have been included in the curriculum. 'Arsenic and Old Lace'.[$lP opens CCSN season oiriiirGiu. Joseph Kesselring's comedy, "Arsenic and Old Lace" will open the Community College of Southern Nevada's theatre season, directed by Michael Lugering. Performances are at 8 p.m. Oct. 11-12 and 18-19, with matinees at 2 p.m., Oct. 13 and 20, in the Horn Theatre at the CCSN Performing Arts Center on the Cheyenne campus, 3200 E. Cheyenne Ave. Admission is $12.50 adults; $10 students and seniors. One of the most famous blackcomedy faces of all times, the play centers on two gentle but highly lethal sisters who populate their cellar with the corpses of older gentlemen. The show staple of theatre troupes across the country," said Lugering. "In the words of character Dr. Harper, it echoes a by-gone era—'the gentle virtues that went out with candlelight and good manners and low taxes." Lugering, an assistant professor at UNLV, teaches voice, acting and classical text. His local directing credits include, The Misanthrope" and "Romeo and Juliet," at the Bayley Theatre. Set design is by Chuck Rounds with lighting by Joe Aldridge. Season subscriptions are still available at a 20% savings over individual tickets. Upcoming productions include, "The Will Rogers Follies," "19408' Radio Hour," and "All in the Timing." For reservations, call 651LIVE (5483). A.CAMC0PU)MNN6Ca Residential & Commercial Complete Plumbing Service 11 General Repairs /\W^''k i: $io arniroia I I Kitchens & Baths
PAGE 8

mK^^fmmmmmmmmmmmmm^'mmmm''^ Pi08 Henderson Home News Thursday. October 10,1996 Center honors Mark Nadar The center is open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday; from 6 to 10 p.m. Monday through Thursday evenings; and from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. llie Henderson Senior Center named Mark Nadar "Volunteer of the Month' for October 1996. Nadar has been assisting veterans and their widows with benefit claims and services at the center since 1994, when he decided he still wanted to serve other seniors. Originally, he set up the volunteer position afler discussing his idea with several members of the center's staff and quickly became an invaluable asset to Henderson seniors and veterans. His knowledge of veterans benefitclaims spans an entire career, including his position as the financial manager of the Department of Veterans Affairs before he retired. Nadar is also accredited by the Department of Veteran's Affairs General Council and can represent veterans at local VA hearings. In addition, he is the assistant state service ofTicer for the Veterans of Foreign Wars, state of Nevada. Beyond his service at the center and other activities, Nadar volunteers his remaining time to the VA Outpatient Clinic on West Charleston. His dedicated service throughout his career and now as an enthusiastic volunteer is a testament to all individuals who go the extra mile for veterans and their families. The center gives Mark Nadar "a heart-felt thanks for all the things he does for seniorsI'The center staff also noted Nadar's good humor, good work, and his ability to "brighten our day and help remind us of why we appreciate this grand-^ land of ours." Fun, Food and Crafts I Henderson Seniors'Auxiliary ; chairwoman Othena Williams >and)MM' dedlcBted|^grou]^ of voluqj^i}ers are busy* malcing : preparations for the Fourth An, nual Oktoberfest at the center. I The event is scheduled from 10 • a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, : and will feature food, drink, crafls and live entertainment. The center has received food ; and raffle prize donations. Raffle : tickets ($1 each or six for $5) are now on sale by Auxiliary volun; teers, and will also be sold at the : event. In addition to paintings, afghans, dinners and more, the center will award three grand cash prizes of $100, $150 and $250. Entrants do not need to be present to win. The event will also offer a bake sale featuring homemade cakes, pies, cookies and candies. Among special treats will be Edna Deardoffs famous cinnamon rolls. Remember to arrive early to purchase bakesaleitems. Last year, all homemade bakery items were sold out in the first two hours. Tlieevent.forallages, includes the popular Dumkopf Band. The center also reminds seniors that this is a great time to get acquainted and find out why they SENIOR CENTER HIGHLIGHTS 27 E. TEXAS ST. S6S-6990 are so proud of the Henderson Senior Auxiliary volunteers which is noted for making the center the "friendliest place in town." All proceeds collected at the event will help support the ongoing meal program at the center and more volunteers are signing up to help make the barbecue a memorable and fun way to contribute to the senior meal programs. October Babies All seniors bom in the month of October will be feted at a birthday party beginning at 11 a.m. Wednesday, October 16. The celebration is held the third Wednesday of each month. Young at Heart's band director, Minnie Fulford, will lead the center's birthday party. Black Mountain Senior Nutrition contributes bakery goods and Jean Sadler's volunteer^-jvill decorate birthday cakes. The center also extends a special birthday wish to several seniors who are 80+ years young, including Sidney Catsiff, Charles Demars, Katherine Hopkins, 'Mary Ann Ludwig, Christine Morehead, Berl Neilsen, Fanny Perkel and Harvey Rasmussen. New Service Cardiology Associates of Lake Mead is offering a new free service at the center called the Leg Up Program. The program was established to increase community awareness and provide free screenings designed to educate seniors and other members of the community about early detection of circulatory conditions, which can eventually block the flow of blood to various parts of the body. • : ',' Free blood pressure tests are taken on upper arms and legs. If screening indicates a person bein^ tisted has inci^eased risk factors in developing a vascular disease, or that they have symptoms of peripheral vascular disease,^they will be advised to see a doctor. Cardiology Associates encourage seniors to call for an appointment if they or someone they know feels pain when they stand (but is relieved with elevation of the feet), skin discoloration, ulcers or skin sores on their legs, swelling or tenderness. Cardiology Associates will provide screening services at the center Oct. 17, Nov. 15 and Dec. 13, by appointment, call 5656990. • Pinochle Tournament The center is hosting its annual Pinochle Tournament at 9 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15. All entrants will enjoy special treats and top players will receive prizes. The event is being coordinated by voltmteer Chris Greening and her team. To participate in the free event, call 565-6990. Space is limited; sign up early. Vote! It's Your Right The Clark County Election 2,500 WEEKLY CAS SUNDAY PAYCHECK DRAWING M00^'BONUS 7iW p.m AL$0 TUES. fyompx WED. W ^-^^ 9:00 p.in. $15000 6:00 p.m. $2500 444 Sunset Rd. HeiMlenon NV. Department will provide early voting services at the center from 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 19-20. For questions about voter's registration, call the Election Department, 455-2780. Special Thanks The center offered a public thanks to Cafe Sensations and the Henderson Chamber of Commerce for the special treats they send to the center for seniors. Thanks also went to Beverly Wiggles worth for the ice cream she served on her birthday and to Judge Kent Dawson for providing fried chicken for the monthly pot luck. The Bank of America and Saturn of Henderson received thanks for inviting the seniors for lunch, bingo prizes and an all around great time. Reminders •The DMV will provide senior photo ID and driver license services from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 10. The service will continue the first Thursday of each month from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. beginning Thursday, Nov. 7. •The Clark County Assessor's Office has moved from the center to 872 Boulder Highway at the comer of Palo Verde in the Smith's shopping center. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 4553882 for information on senior tax and rent rebates. ':' •CAT bus tokens are on sale at the center from 8 to 11 a.m. Monday through Thursdays. •Medical equipment is now on loan for seniors through the center. Call 565-6990 for information and a listing of available equipment. •If Medicare, Medicaid, hospital or doctor's bills appear confusing, visit the center between 9 a.m. and noon on any Friday and ask for Dorothy Swackhammer. •The center is currently looking for donations of additional wheel chairs and walkers with wheels. Call 565-6990. Activities The Henderson Senior Center has activities ranging from art to Scrabble. It also hosts concerts, health seminars, recreation and social activities. The center is open for all activities, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, and from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. In the evenings, it is open from 6 p.m. to 10 ^CHRISTIAN CENTER IS CELEBRAflNC %:%, | M. 50 YEARS OF MINISTRY EVERY SUNDAY THIS YEAR! Come rejoice with us at 10:00 a.m. 5i: 571 Adams St. • 293-7773 :^i: Boulder City (cosaa/c/ot/ies OK/; • ^. SENIORS: Activities listed From Page 8 Thursday, October 10,1996 Henderson Home Newt Page 9 See Seniors Page 9 ABC CHECK CASHING We Cash Post-Dated Checks Payday Loans Approved in minutes: NO CREDIT CHECK! We cash Out of State • Personal • Payroll • Second party Government & Refund Checks Special Discounts for 1st time customers OPEN 7 DAYS Corner of Sandhill 8. Sunset 1^. 458-7675 GRAND OPENING p.m. Monday through Thursday. Thursday, Oct. 10: Center is open for all activities from 8 a.m. to4 p.m. and from 6 p.m. until 10 p.m. Assessor, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Retired Senior Volunteer Program, 8 a.m. to 11 a.-m.; Free Bridge lessons at 9 a.m.; Billiards, all hours center is open, Department of Motor Vehicles 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Scrabble at 10 a.m. and Bingo at 10 a.m.; Sr. Orchestra at 1 p.m.; Duplicate Bridge at 6 p.m., and Pinochle at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11: Center is open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and from 6 p.m. until 10 p.m. Retired SeniDr Volunteer Program, 8 a.m. to 11 a.m.; Billiards, all hours; Medicare Information and Assistance (including help with forms), 9 a.m. to noon; Movie of the week at 9 p.m.; Free hearing tests by appointment (call 565-6990); Bridge at 12:30 p.m.; Canasta and Cribbage at 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12: Center is open for all activities from 9 a.m. Scrabble at 10 a.m.; Bingo at 10 a.m.; Sr. Orchestra at 1:30 p.m.; Duplicate Bridge at 6 p.m.; Pinodile at 6:30 p.m. Meial Pro{pram Meals are provided at the center Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for a suggested donation of $1.25 by Catholic Charities of Southern Nevada through the Black Mountain Senior Nutrition Program. Catholic Charities also provides Meals on Wheels for Henderson seniors. For information on these services and the daily menu call Catholic Charities of Southern Nevada, 385-5284. to 2 p.m. Brunch will be served from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. for $1.25. Monday, Oct 14: Center is open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and from 6 p.m. until 10 p.m. Assessor, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Retired Senior Volunteer Program, 8 a.m. to 11 a.m.; Billiards, all hours; Bridge at 8 a.m.; Wood carving at 9 a.m.; Oil painting at 12:30 p.m.; Pinochle at 1 p.m.; Mens' Chorus at 7 p.m.; Double Deck Pinochle at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15: Center is open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and from 6 p.m. until 10 p.m. Assessor, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Retired Senior Volunteer Program, 8 a.m. to 11 a.m.; Billiards, all hours; Needle craft at 9 a.m.; T-shirt painting at 9 a.m.; Blood pressure testing at 10 a.m.; Pinochle at 1 p.m.; Experienced line dancing at 1 p.m.; Beginners' line dancing at 2:15 p.m.; Celebrity City Chorus at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 16: Center is open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and from 6 p.m. until 10 p.m. Assessor, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Retired Senior Volunteer Program, 8 a.m. to 11 a.m.; Billiards, all hours; Ceramics, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; free Pinochle lessons, at 10 a.m.; monthly birthday party at 11 a.m.; Euchre at 1 p.m.; Dominoes at 1 p.m.; Pinochle at 6:30 p.m.; Scrabble at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct 17: Center is open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and from 6 p.m. until 10 p.m. Assessor, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Retired Senior Volunteer Program, 8 a.m. to 11 a.m.; free bridge lessons at 9 a.m.; billiards, all hours; Bridge at 8 a.m. Congratulations Rob & Patty on Another Beautiftil Daughter "EvaJcM^phlue Weideufeld" Bom: October 6 Weight: 7 lbs. 14 oz. Length: 21 inches Atitlques Unique Gifts Collectables Home Decor ow Town ^ANTIQUES & COLLEaABLES^ Buy • Sell • Locate • Appraisals • Estate Sales • Consignments 1325 Arizona St. CAROL ANN KALASTRO Boulder City, NV. 89005 (702) 293-3975 Fax: (702) 293-6056" TERRIBLE S LUBE Only $ip95 We do Domestic & Foreign Cars and Motor Homes -Includes: • Change the oil •Check4 (ill the battery • Check & fill power steering • Check & fill transmission • Change the filter • Check & fill the brake fluid • Check & fill differential > Check & fill windshiekj washer • Complete chassis lube • Check & fill tires • Check & dean air filter • Wash windshiekls We are "The Professionals" WEreATUREPENNZOIL PRODUCTS pfj 11 p/N ki. :3i Heritage Museum offers Junior League exiiibit $3 OFF We feature Pennzoil air & oil filters SERVICE CHANGE K^ I INCLUDES FREE CAR WASH I T^ COUPON GOOD AT ALL STORES 2601 WIGWAM PARKWAY •361-1424 (Pecos and Wigwam) J*5fc In 1946, the war was over and people turned their attention to the future. Seven Clark County women got together and decided ^ • 40 form a volunteer service organization that would help meet the unmet needs" of their community. • '.. • • '-.:^'-4'^*^: Fifty years later, the organization they founded — Service League, now Junior League — continues as one of the oldest volunteer service organizations in the valley. Their service will be the focus of a week long exhibition at the Clark County Heritage Museum Oct. 12-19. The 50th anniversary Service League/Junior League exhibition includes historical photos and text, as well as three dimensional displays. Interviews can be arranged in advance with members who joined in the '40s and early '50s, as well with more recent members. Over the years, the League has developed more than 60 projects, ranging from counseling and providing financial aid to more than 1,000 welfare cases in the 1940s, to the Ronald Hshtng derby at Lake Mead Oct. 18-19 The Nevada Division of Wildlife, Boulder City Parks and Recreation and the National Park Service, will once again hold its annual free fishing derby and clinics at Hemenway fishing point. Lake Mead Friday and Saturday, Oct. 18-19. The derby starts at 6 p.m. Fri. Oct. 19 and will last all night, with final weigh-ins and prizes at 8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19. Also Friday evening, there will be a free fly-tying workshop from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Alan Bible Visitor's Center. Events for Saturday will start at 8:30 a.m. with an on-the-water fly-fishing class and fishing clinics for the entire family at 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. There will be casting contests for kids during each clinic. The clinics will cover such topics as filleting striped bass, fish identification and conservation, baits, tackle and rigging, and tips on how to locate where fish are biting. Rods and reels will be available, if needed. At 5 p.m. there will be dutchoven cooking demonstrations and a hot dog roast. For more information on the derby or clinics, call the NDOW, 486-5127. For camping information, call the NPS, 293-8990. FRIDs^", Sj^^URQAt AND SUNDAY td n ..is'"^ \S ALWAYS \>\ ^ -/rt* i\\\\^ ^y Y\ : 11 3 CASH DRAWINGS 6:30-8:30-10:30 P.M Ji $150 EACH, -i^" p\ "/ • \ J^Hiiiini A It's the opportunity you've been dreaming of. Affordable homes just 3 minutes aw<^ from Lake Mead. Toucan Trails by the Lake offers you a quiet secluded location and prime access to boating, fishing and skiing. And sirtce we're also just minutes firom fioulder City, you 'II have the best of both worlds! 1,552-2,226 Sq.fr. Starring at $134,990 by the Lake Phone 564-1706 Sales by Needham Realty BROKER COOP ^saiaiBi H O M I S BulUtnifarQamaatmtoQffm^ ^ --•>• v.. K. uPRE ooooooooooooo SPECIAL PAYOUTS IN OUR .'21*' PIT AND BINGO ROOM SATURDAY CHlLUBE FREE FOOD; SOFT DRINKS, & DRAFT BEER FOR SLOT CLUB MEMBERS (IT JUST TAKES MINUTES TO JOIN OUR SLOT CLUB AND irS FREE) >> / \ ^ SATURDAY 4 P.M. 9 P.M. '^ / 'v WHEH YOV SUOV^ YOVR PLAYERS CLUB CARD, OUT ON OUR PATIO AND DRIVEWAY PARTY AREA ENJOY ALL OF THIS VNDER THE STARS. :HILtrOUT TO YOUR FAVORITE SONGS WITH OUR LIVE BAND!!! DESERT WIND 120 MARKET ST ( OVER THE RAINBOW IN DOWNTOW HENDERSON ) ''^'-.nTSSJS' McDonald House in 1990. Lea|:ue members have maintained their volunteer commitment by donating thousands of hours of time and hundreds of thousands of dollars to the community. The museum has been the beneficiary of several projects, including the Beckley House relocation and restoration and a locomotive yard switcher engine first donated to Service League in 1959. The exhibition opens with a 50th anniversary preview party at 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12 ,at a cost of $25. To attend the party make reservations at the Junior League office, 732-3257. The Clark County Heritage Museum is open daily from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Admission is $1.50 adults; $1 for seniors and children under the age of 15. Do you want the ultimate luxury cruise experience? Affordable luxury cruising is a reality with *^ CRYSTALCRUISES you are invited to cai[Cruise !Ho[idays for a special ivitation to... 'S^nXnc/iantedCrystcd'Evening' imtfi Captain 1(eidu[f iMaakn of Crystal Cruises Thursday, October 24th • •' Exclusive benefits for Crystal Society Members. Bonus offer for all bookings made by Oct. 31st. Space is limited & must be recieved by Oct. IStfi. Cuisine by Affairs Cruise fashions by Attitude Music by Crystal pianist 898-6999 ''Did I tell you about my new home on the golf course?^' '^0:--HELEQACV iil^^i:Ei:.'i § • '/ • M \ \ '^'''' CMVCV ^^ 'I'm telling everyone about my new townhome at Muirfield at the Grand Legacy. It's loaded with custom features, offers a spectacular view of the fairway, plus it's inside a security-gated community. Now, I'll tell you the best part. It was a steal at $134,950! So, come out to Muirfield today, t)ecause there's no telling how long these choice homesites will be available." Large2k3Bedroom Townhomes from $134,950 iiS^CY SON^ wssr MUIRFIELD AT THE GRAND LEGACY ini,iu< t vLu van • aan vuur 898-3889

PAGE 9

mK^^fmmmmmmmmmmmmm^'mmmm''^ Pi08 Henderson Home News Thursday. October 10,1996 Center honors Mark Nadar The center is open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday; from 6 to 10 p.m. Monday through Thursday evenings; and from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. llie Henderson Senior Center named Mark Nadar "Volunteer of the Month' for October 1996. Nadar has been assisting veterans and their widows with benefit claims and services at the center since 1994, when he decided he still wanted to serve other seniors. Originally, he set up the volunteer position afler discussing his idea with several members of the center's staff and quickly became an invaluable asset to Henderson seniors and veterans. His knowledge of veterans benefitclaims spans an entire career, including his position as the financial manager of the Department of Veterans Affairs before he retired. Nadar is also accredited by the Department of Veteran's Affairs General Council and can represent veterans at local VA hearings. In addition, he is the assistant state service ofTicer for the Veterans of Foreign Wars, state of Nevada. Beyond his service at the center and other activities, Nadar volunteers his remaining time to the VA Outpatient Clinic on West Charleston. His dedicated service throughout his career and now as an enthusiastic volunteer is a testament to all individuals who go the extra mile for veterans and their families. The center gives Mark Nadar "a heart-felt thanks for all the things he does for seniorsI'The center staff also noted Nadar's good humor, good work, and his ability to "brighten our day and help remind us of why we appreciate this grand-^ land of ours." Fun, Food and Crafts I Henderson Seniors'Auxiliary ; chairwoman Othena Williams >and)MM' dedlcBted|^grou]^ of voluqj^i}ers are busy* malcing : preparations for the Fourth An, nual Oktoberfest at the center. I The event is scheduled from 10 • a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, : and will feature food, drink, crafls and live entertainment. The center has received food ; and raffle prize donations. Raffle : tickets ($1 each or six for $5) are now on sale by Auxiliary volun; teers, and will also be sold at the : event. In addition to paintings, afghans, dinners and more, the center will award three grand cash prizes of $100, $150 and $250. Entrants do not need to be present to win. The event will also offer a bake sale featuring homemade cakes, pies, cookies and candies. Among special treats will be Edna Deardoffs famous cinnamon rolls. Remember to arrive early to purchase bakesaleitems. Last year, all homemade bakery items were sold out in the first two hours. Tlieevent.forallages, includes the popular Dumkopf Band. The center also reminds seniors that this is a great time to get acquainted and find out why they SENIOR CENTER HIGHLIGHTS 27 E. TEXAS ST. S6S-6990 are so proud of the Henderson Senior Auxiliary volunteers which is noted for making the center the "friendliest place in town." All proceeds collected at the event will help support the ongoing meal program at the center and more volunteers are signing up to help make the barbecue a memorable and fun way to contribute to the senior meal programs. October Babies All seniors bom in the month of October will be feted at a birthday party beginning at 11 a.m. Wednesday, October 16. The celebration is held the third Wednesday of each month. Young at Heart's band director, Minnie Fulford, will lead the center's birthday party. Black Mountain Senior Nutrition contributes bakery goods and Jean Sadler's volunteer^-jvill decorate birthday cakes. The center also extends a special birthday wish to several seniors who are 80+ years young, including Sidney Catsiff, Charles Demars, Katherine Hopkins, 'Mary Ann Ludwig, Christine Morehead, Berl Neilsen, Fanny Perkel and Harvey Rasmussen. New Service Cardiology Associates of Lake Mead is offering a new free service at the center called the Leg Up Program. The program was established to increase community awareness and provide free screenings designed to educate seniors and other members of the community about early detection of circulatory conditions, which can eventually block the flow of blood to various parts of the body. • : ',' Free blood pressure tests are taken on upper arms and legs. If screening indicates a person bein^ tisted has inci^eased risk factors in developing a vascular disease, or that they have symptoms of peripheral vascular disease,^they will be advised to see a doctor. Cardiology Associates encourage seniors to call for an appointment if they or someone they know feels pain when they stand (but is relieved with elevation of the feet), skin discoloration, ulcers or skin sores on their legs, swelling or tenderness. Cardiology Associates will provide screening services at the center Oct. 17, Nov. 15 and Dec. 13, by appointment, call 5656990. • Pinochle Tournament The center is hosting its annual Pinochle Tournament at 9 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15. All entrants will enjoy special treats and top players will receive prizes. The event is being coordinated by voltmteer Chris Greening and her team. To participate in the free event, call 565-6990. Space is limited; sign up early. Vote! It's Your Right The Clark County Election 2,500 WEEKLY CAS SUNDAY PAYCHECK DRAWING M00^'BONUS 7iW p.m AL$0 TUES. fyompx WED. W ^-^^ 9:00 p.in. $15000 6:00 p.m. $2500 444 Sunset Rd. HeiMlenon NV. Department will provide early voting services at the center from 10 a.m. Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 19-20. For questions about voter's registration, call the Election Department, 455-2780. Special Thanks The center offered a public thanks to Cafe Sensations and the Henderson Chamber of Commerce for the special treats they send to the center for seniors. Thanks also went to Beverly Wiggles worth for the ice cream she served on her birthday and to Judge Kent Dawson for providing fried chicken for the monthly pot luck. The Bank of America and Saturn of Henderson received thanks for inviting the seniors for lunch, bingo prizes and an all around great time. Reminders •The DMV will provide senior photo ID and driver license services from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 10. The service will continue the first Thursday of each month from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. beginning Thursday, Nov. 7. •The Clark County Assessor's Office has moved from the center to 872 Boulder Highway at the comer of Palo Verde in the Smith's shopping center. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 4553882 for information on senior tax and rent rebates. ':' •CAT bus tokens are on sale at the center from 8 to 11 a.m. Monday through Thursdays. •Medical equipment is now on loan for seniors through the center. Call 565-6990 for information and a listing of available equipment. •If Medicare, Medicaid, hospital or doctor's bills appear confusing, visit the center between 9 a.m. and noon on any Friday and ask for Dorothy Swackhammer. •The center is currently looking for donations of additional wheel chairs and walkers with wheels. Call 565-6990. Activities The Henderson Senior Center has activities ranging from art to Scrabble. It also hosts concerts, health seminars, recreation and social activities. The center is open for all activities, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, and from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. In the evenings, it is open from 6 p.m. to 10 ^CHRISTIAN CENTER IS CELEBRAflNC %:%, | M. 50 YEARS OF MINISTRY EVERY SUNDAY THIS YEAR! Come rejoice with us at 10:00 a.m. 5i: 571 Adams St. • 293-7773 :^i: Boulder City (cosaa/c/ot/ies OK/; • ^. SENIORS: Activities listed From Page 8 Thursday, October 10,1996 Henderson Home Newt Page 9 See Seniors Page 9 ABC CHECK CASHING We Cash Post-Dated Checks Payday Loans Approved in minutes: NO CREDIT CHECK! We cash Out of State • Personal • Payroll • Second party Government & Refund Checks Special Discounts for 1st time customers OPEN 7 DAYS Corner of Sandhill 8. Sunset 1^. 458-7675 GRAND OPENING p.m. Monday through Thursday. Thursday, Oct. 10: Center is open for all activities from 8 a.m. to4 p.m. and from 6 p.m. until 10 p.m. Assessor, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Retired Senior Volunteer Program, 8 a.m. to 11 a.-m.; Free Bridge lessons at 9 a.m.; Billiards, all hours center is open, Department of Motor Vehicles 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Scrabble at 10 a.m. and Bingo at 10 a.m.; Sr. Orchestra at 1 p.m.; Duplicate Bridge at 6 p.m., and Pinochle at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11: Center is open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and from 6 p.m. until 10 p.m. Retired SeniDr Volunteer Program, 8 a.m. to 11 a.m.; Billiards, all hours; Medicare Information and Assistance (including help with forms), 9 a.m. to noon; Movie of the week at 9 p.m.; Free hearing tests by appointment (call 565-6990); Bridge at 12:30 p.m.; Canasta and Cribbage at 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12: Center is open for all activities from 9 a.m. Scrabble at 10 a.m.; Bingo at 10 a.m.; Sr. Orchestra at 1:30 p.m.; Duplicate Bridge at 6 p.m.; Pinodile at 6:30 p.m. Meial Pro{pram Meals are provided at the center Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for a suggested donation of $1.25 by Catholic Charities of Southern Nevada through the Black Mountain Senior Nutrition Program. Catholic Charities also provides Meals on Wheels for Henderson seniors. For information on these services and the daily menu call Catholic Charities of Southern Nevada, 385-5284. to 2 p.m. Brunch will be served from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. for $1.25. Monday, Oct 14: Center is open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and from 6 p.m. until 10 p.m. Assessor, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Retired Senior Volunteer Program, 8 a.m. to 11 a.m.; Billiards, all hours; Bridge at 8 a.m.; Wood carving at 9 a.m.; Oil painting at 12:30 p.m.; Pinochle at 1 p.m.; Mens' Chorus at 7 p.m.; Double Deck Pinochle at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15: Center is open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and from 6 p.m. until 10 p.m. Assessor, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Retired Senior Volunteer Program, 8 a.m. to 11 a.m.; Billiards, all hours; Needle craft at 9 a.m.; T-shirt painting at 9 a.m.; Blood pressure testing at 10 a.m.; Pinochle at 1 p.m.; Experienced line dancing at 1 p.m.; Beginners' line dancing at 2:15 p.m.; Celebrity City Chorus at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 16: Center is open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and from 6 p.m. until 10 p.m. Assessor, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Retired Senior Volunteer Program, 8 a.m. to 11 a.m.; Billiards, all hours; Ceramics, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; free Pinochle lessons, at 10 a.m.; monthly birthday party at 11 a.m.; Euchre at 1 p.m.; Dominoes at 1 p.m.; Pinochle at 6:30 p.m.; Scrabble at 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct 17: Center is open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and from 6 p.m. until 10 p.m. Assessor, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Retired Senior Volunteer Program, 8 a.m. to 11 a.m.; free bridge lessons at 9 a.m.; billiards, all hours; Bridge at 8 a.m. Congratulations Rob & Patty on Another Beautiftil Daughter "EvaJcM^phlue Weideufeld" Bom: October 6 Weight: 7 lbs. 14 oz. Length: 21 inches Atitlques Unique Gifts Collectables Home Decor ow Town ^ANTIQUES & COLLEaABLES^ Buy • Sell • Locate • Appraisals • Estate Sales • Consignments 1325 Arizona St. CAROL ANN KALASTRO Boulder City, NV. 89005 (702) 293-3975 Fax: (702) 293-6056" TERRIBLE S LUBE Only $ip95 We do Domestic & Foreign Cars and Motor Homes -Includes: • Change the oil •Check4 (ill the battery • Check & fill power steering • Check & fill transmission • Change the filter • Check & fill the brake fluid • Check & fill differential > Check & fill windshiekj washer • Complete chassis lube • Check & fill tires • Check & dean air filter • Wash windshiekls We are "The Professionals" WEreATUREPENNZOIL PRODUCTS pfj 11 p/N ki. :3i Heritage Museum offers Junior League exiiibit $3 OFF We feature Pennzoil air & oil filters SERVICE CHANGE K^ I INCLUDES FREE CAR WASH I T^ COUPON GOOD AT ALL STORES 2601 WIGWAM PARKWAY •361-1424 (Pecos and Wigwam) J*5fc In 1946, the war was over and people turned their attention to the future. Seven Clark County women got together and decided ^ • 40 form a volunteer service organization that would help meet the unmet needs" of their community. • '.. • • '-.:^'-4'^*^: Fifty years later, the organization they founded — Service League, now Junior League — continues as one of the oldest volunteer service organizations in the valley. Their service will be the focus of a week long exhibition at the Clark County Heritage Museum Oct. 12-19. The 50th anniversary Service League/Junior League exhibition includes historical photos and text, as well as three dimensional displays. Interviews can be arranged in advance with members who joined in the '40s and early '50s, as well with more recent members. Over the years, the League has developed more than 60 projects, ranging from counseling and providing financial aid to more than 1,000 welfare cases in the 1940s, to the Ronald Hshtng derby at Lake Mead Oct. 18-19 The Nevada Division of Wildlife, Boulder City Parks and Recreation and the National Park Service, will once again hold its annual free fishing derby and clinics at Hemenway fishing point. Lake Mead Friday and Saturday, Oct. 18-19. The derby starts at 6 p.m. Fri. Oct. 19 and will last all night, with final weigh-ins and prizes at 8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19. Also Friday evening, there will be a free fly-tying workshop from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Alan Bible Visitor's Center. Events for Saturday will start at 8:30 a.m. with an on-the-water fly-fishing class and fishing clinics for the entire family at 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. There will be casting contests for kids during each clinic. The clinics will cover such topics as filleting striped bass, fish identification and conservation, baits, tackle and rigging, and tips on how to locate where fish are biting. Rods and reels will be available, if needed. At 5 p.m. there will be dutchoven cooking demonstrations and a hot dog roast. For more information on the derby or clinics, call the NDOW, 486-5127. For camping information, call the NPS, 293-8990. FRIDs^", Sj^^URQAt AND SUNDAY td n ..is'"^ \S ALWAYS \>\ ^ -/rt* i\\\\^ ^y Y\ : 11 3 CASH DRAWINGS 6:30-8:30-10:30 P.M Ji $150 EACH, -i^" p\ "/ • \ J^Hiiiini A It's the opportunity you've been dreaming of. Affordable homes just 3 minutes aw<^ from Lake Mead. Toucan Trails by the Lake offers you a quiet secluded location and prime access to boating, fishing and skiing. And sirtce we're also just minutes firom fioulder City, you 'II have the best of both worlds! 1,552-2,226 Sq.fr. Starring at $134,990 by the Lake Phone 564-1706 Sales by Needham Realty BROKER COOP ^saiaiBi H O M I S BulUtnifarQamaatmtoQffm^ ^ --•>• v.. K. uPRE ooooooooooooo SPECIAL PAYOUTS IN OUR .'21*' PIT AND BINGO ROOM SATURDAY CHlLUBE FREE FOOD; SOFT DRINKS, & DRAFT BEER FOR SLOT CLUB MEMBERS (IT JUST TAKES MINUTES TO JOIN OUR SLOT CLUB AND irS FREE) >> / \ ^ SATURDAY 4 P.M. 9 P.M. '^ / 'v WHEH YOV SUOV^ YOVR PLAYERS CLUB CARD, OUT ON OUR PATIO AND DRIVEWAY PARTY AREA ENJOY ALL OF THIS VNDER THE STARS. :HILtrOUT TO YOUR FAVORITE SONGS WITH OUR LIVE BAND!!! DESERT WIND 120 MARKET ST ( OVER THE RAINBOW IN DOWNTOW HENDERSON ) ''^'-.nTSSJS' McDonald House in 1990. Lea|:ue members have maintained their volunteer commitment by donating thousands of hours of time and hundreds of thousands of dollars to the community. The museum has been the beneficiary of several projects, including the Beckley House relocation and restoration and a locomotive yard switcher engine first donated to Service League in 1959. The exhibition opens with a 50th anniversary preview party at 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12 ,at a cost of $25. To attend the party make reservations at the Junior League office, 732-3257. The Clark County Heritage Museum is open daily from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Admission is $1.50 adults; $1 for seniors and children under the age of 15. Do you want the ultimate luxury cruise experience? Affordable luxury cruising is a reality with *^ CRYSTALCRUISES you are invited to cai[Cruise !Ho[idays for a special ivitation to... 'S^nXnc/iantedCrystcd'Evening' imtfi Captain 1(eidu[f iMaakn of Crystal Cruises Thursday, October 24th • •' Exclusive benefits for Crystal Society Members. Bonus offer for all bookings made by Oct. 31st. Space is limited & must be recieved by Oct. IStfi. Cuisine by Affairs Cruise fashions by Attitude Music by Crystal pianist 898-6999 ''Did I tell you about my new home on the golf course?^' '^0:--HELEQACV iil^^i:Ei:.'i § • '/ • M \ \ '^'''' CMVCV ^^ 'I'm telling everyone about my new townhome at Muirfield at the Grand Legacy. It's loaded with custom features, offers a spectacular view of the fairway, plus it's inside a security-gated community. Now, I'll tell you the best part. It was a steal at $134,950! So, come out to Muirfield today, t)ecause there's no telling how long these choice homesites will be available." Large2k3Bedroom Townhomes from $134,950 iiS^CY SON^ wssr MUIRFIELD AT THE GRAND LEGACY ini,iu< t vLu van • aan vuur 898-3889

PAGE 10

I I I^^^^IH^ iOTPiiPin^WIHHPI Page 10 Henderson Home News Thursday. October 10.1996 Warning: Be alert for financial aid scams Collese students and potential college students sedking financial aid need to be on the lookout for financial aid scams that are occurring across the U.S., warns Judy Belanger, UNLV director of student financial services. "As college costs rise nationwide, more students are turning to financial tad to help pay for higher education," Belanger said. "Unfortunately, a number of unscrupulous companies are capitalizing on the situation by charging students to help them find scholarships and then not delivering what they have promised." Many of the unscrupulous companies advertise heavily to students and present misleading information about their services, she said. An important first step for anyone considering using a company that appears to offer scholarships is to determine whether the company actually has scholarship money to disseminate or if it merely is in the business of providing students with a list of scholarships for which they can apply, Belanger said. Most companies and organizations that actually give out scholarships do not charge an application fee, she said. As for the companies that only provide lists of available scholarships, students considering paying for such a service should know beforehand that information is available free of charge to the student willing to do a little homework, Belanger said. "University and college financial aid offices, high school counseling offices, and libraries all are excellent sources of that information," she said. "With just a little work, students can come up with the same information those companies want to charge them to provide. For students who choose to pay the companies to do the work for them, it is important to get the companies' promises in writing so Canine Companions for Independence to host car wash The Nevada Champions Volunteer Chapter of Canine Companions for Independence will host a "Wash for Wags" car wash fimd-raiser from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12, at Chief Auto Parts, 3480 S. Rainbow Blvd. near Spring Mountain. —: The cost of the car wash and protective seal is a $15 donation, or $10 for people with disabilities. Volunteers will staflFa CCI information booth at the event. Les and Helen Slaughter and other distributors of Dri Wash 'n Guard are sponsoring the event and providing the car washing service. The local CCI chapter participates in fund-raising for the national CCI organization and promotes activities providing support for people who use or train assistance dogs, as well as educating the public about asDISCOUKT TIRE CO. SALE sistance dogs. Locally, five families volunteer as ""puppy raisers," socializing specially bred puppies before they are trained to become assistance dogs for people with disabilities. Canine Companions for Independence is a national organization whose mission is to serve the needs of people with disabilities by providing trained service, hearing and socii^ dogs and by providing continuing support to ensure the success of the working team. For advance tickets or more information about CCI, contact chapter president Helen Coombs, 739-6569. that both parties are clear what is being provided, she said. Scams in the financial aid area have received a substantial amount of attention across the country in recent months, Belanger said. She pointed to the involvement of the Federal Trade Commission, which has obtained temporary restraining orders against five companies and has frozen their assets while seeking permanent injunctions against them. Those companies are: •Career Assistance Planning Inc. of Atlanta. •Christopher Ebere Nwaigwe of Towson, Md. •Student Assistance Services Ina of Ft Lauderdale, Fla. •College Assistance Services Inc. of Sunrise, Fla. •Student Aid Incorporated of New York City. For more information on the do's and don'ts of applying for financial aid, call Belanger, 8953424. ^ COURTESY CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING ("(irpcl C^lc'cmiiuj Spccicils 2 ROOMS &HAU Complete No Hidden Charges $44 3 ROOMS J^O &HALL 9Zf Complete No Hidden Charges 5 ROOMS fir HALL Complete No Hidden Chorges $99 7 ROOMS €<|^#\ fir HALL ^129 Complete No Hidden Charges MOVE INS • MOVE OUTS On Carpet Cleaning When Home Is Empty UPHOLSTERY CLEANING* Sofa Loveseat Easy Chair $44 $34 $24 $69 MOBILE HOMES* Single Wides Double Wides $99 WE ALSO CLEAN R.V.S & TRAVEL TRAILERS Truck Mounted Units PROMPT, COURTEOUS & PROFESSIONAL A Henderson based Company owned & opemted locally. CALL 547-1183 Minimum cleaning order of '44 • Free Estimates • Carpet Repairs • Re-Stretching • Stain Removal • Odor Removal ^Senior Discount • Licensed • Insured • SALE ENDS OCT. 31st, 1996 iND NEW STEELRAPIALS! 4 P15SA0R13 P16S0ni3 P17S/80fl13 P18Sm)R13 35,000 MILE WARRANTY (22.50 ea.) 4 P18Sff5B14 P195/75R14 P20S/75R14 35,000 MILE WARRANTY 110 (27.50 ea.) 4 35,000 MILE WARRANTY 180 (32.50 ea.) DISCOUNT TIRE CO. SALE When You re Ready To Get Serious BFGood rich T/A SALE! • aoM •• METRIC RADIALS ARIZONiAN LIMITED EDITION RADULS E SO MUCH s MXNO ONTow nwrl XW4 / XZ4 BIG ,. BIG '(^^ KICK OFF BIRTHDAT. Friday Oct. 4 :v FARTT1st nighfly drawing Sunday Oct. 13 Cake & Champagne Reception at 5:30 p.m. Get a lucky coin in Your Birthday Cake : • and Win CASH! i There wiU be 20 I coins worth $50 each GRAHTD • PRXKE : AT 10:15 EM. 0750, 01,000 & 01,500 1990 POOTIAC GRAXDAH at 8:15 p.m. Hors d'oeuvres served throughout the casino from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. ^AO FOOD r SSPECIALS in Both Restaurants October 4-13th PROGRmSlVl! CASH DRAfn]!l^GS mGWTLY at 8:15 p.m. October 4-12 andgat 4:15 p.m. on October 13 I.BIOO 2. 8250 I f 3.8400 4.8550 ALL RULES POSTED Thursday, October 10,1996 Henderson HomeNevyi Page 11 .SS" Community HAUNTED HOUSE Friday, Oct 11, 2975 E. Sahara at McLaod. A Haunted Housa wiH opsn its aacond year in the K-Mart partdng lot. Hours: Dusit midni^t. Children undar S not allowad, children under 12 not allowad in alone. Costs: $6.50 per person. GOSPEL MUSIC Friday, Oct 11, 8 p.ni.,951 W. Laka Mead Blvd. An encone presentation of This Ain't No Enteitainmenr will ba presented by the Las Vegas Black Gospel Theatre. For tickts call 594-2235. SONGS OFPOLITICS Friday and Saturday, OcLII A 12, 8 p.m., 1401 E. Ramingo Road. Campaign songs from George Washington to the present. Advanced ticlcets available at UNLV Perfcmiing Arts Box Office. 895-3601. GEM CLUB MEETING Monday, Oct 14,7:30 p.m., 821 Laa Vagaa Blvd. The Las Vegas Gem Club will hold a general meeting on the second floor of the Reed Whipple-Cenfer. 256-9032. ARTIST GULD MEETING Tuesday, OcL 1(, 7 p.m., 1401 E. Flamingo Road. The Vegas Artisfs Guild will hold a renting. Plans for art show Oct. 29 wil be discussed.4594812. AUDUBCN SOCIETY Wednesday, Oct 16,7:30 p.m., 330S. Valley View Blvd.Patrice Harvey of Wild Birds Unlimited wH present Talcing Bird Feeding to New Heights." GAMBLERI ANONYMOUS Mondays-Sundiys. Gamblers Anonymous of Southen Nevada has day and evening meetin(s. Call for help and schedules, 24-h)ur hotline, 365-7732. DIVORCED ND SEPARATED Mondays, 7:3) p.m.. Community Lutheran Churth, 3720 E. Tropicana. Free support goup for divorced and separated menand women of all ages. Call 735-5544. ; IIWANIS Mondays, 7:31 a.m., Green's Supper Club, 2241 N. Green Valley Parkway and Wedneaiays, 7 a.m., Omelet House, 317 f^ Boulder Highway. The Green Valley Kiwanis Club meets Mondays and the Henderson club meets Wednesdays AMS^ICAN LEGION (Monc^, J^at and third of each month, 7 p.m, Henderaon Jr. Jayceas buildthg, fabtween Water St. And Major Ave. American Legion BMI Post 40 will meet.AII veterans welcome. 4546551. MOPS Alternate Mondaya and Tuesdays. Mothers of Pre-schoolers (MOPS) is a program forallpiothers of pre-schoolers, birth through Syears. Enjoy breakfast, a speaker, friendship groups and a craft project while ^e children are cared for in a stmctured setting. For cost, locations and dalbs, 735-4004. • CODEPENDENTS AND ADULT CHILDREN Tuaadays, beginning Sept 24, 7-9 p.m. the Community Rooin of the Saturn of Henderson daatership, 310 N.Gibson Road. Twelve-step program to break the dysfunctional rulesofdon't talk, don't trust don't feel," and to develop closer relationship with God. UONS CLUB Tuaadays, fiiat and third of each month, 6:30 p.m. Call Karen Scherer, Club Treasur#r 736-7755 between 6 a.m.-S p.m. SUCCESS WITHOUT STRESS Tuaadays, iiret and third of each month, 7 p.m., NonwastBanlt, 2231N. Grean Vality Parlcway. Secrets to Success Wilhout Stress Is sponsoring an ongoing tree class, "Conquer Negative Emotiois." 293-7797. BIPOLAR SUPPORT GROUP Every Tuesday, 6:30 to 8 p.m., Nevada Association for the Handicapped, 6200 W. Oakey Blvd. A group for BiPolar (Mank; Depressive) indivkfuals, family and friends viill meet. 870-7050. POSTPARTUM SUPPORT GROUP Tueadays, 7 to S:30 p.m., UNLV Women's Qintar, CBC Room 227. Through De<. 5, the Poatpartum Support Group win meet. 695-4475. DISEASE AWARENESS Tueadays and Thursdeya, 105 N. Pecos, aula *114. A free vascular To announc0 your group or organization'i avtnta, plaaae coma by or mail information to: 2 Commarca Cantar Driva, Hartflaaon, NV890U. disease awareness and screening program for the community will be offered. Call Linda at 263-3366 for an appointment BUSINESS Tuesdays and Thuradaya, 7 a.m., IHOP Restaurant, 3260 E. Tropicana at Pecos. The Morning Business Professionals and the Eastside EartyBirds Chapters of the Business Network International meets. Tern Dimmidt, 5661348. Mark Kemberling, 451-7077. ROTARY Tuesdays, noon, Eldorado Casino and Thursdaya, 7 a.m.. Country inn, 1990 W. Sunset Road. The Henderson Rotary Club meets Tuesdays and the Green Valley Ctub meats Thursdays, OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Daily meatinga. Ovsreaters Anonymous is a 12-step program. There are noduesorfees. Daily meetings are hekl throughout Las Vegas and surrounding areas. Call 593-2945. LEAN Second Tuesday of each month, 8 p.m, Continental Hotel. The Natronal Law Enforcement Association of Nevada will hold its regular meeting, Retired and active police officers and law enforcement or related professk)naIs are invited. 434-0442. ATTENTION DISORDERS Fourth Tueaday of each month, 7 p.m. East Ramingo Ubrary,1401 E Ramingo Road. Ch.A.D.D. a non profit organization for chlklren and adults with attention deficit disorders will hold a monthly meeting. 390-3400. BUSINESS NETWORK Wednesdays, 7 to 8:30 am.. Country Inn, Sunsetand Valie Verde. The Green Valley Chapterof Business Network Intl. meets for its weekly meeting. 454-3100. ALL PARENTS UNITED Wednesdays, 7 p.m., White Middle School. Ail Parents United, a collection of various parents' groups, meet to discuss educational issues. HEALING SEMINAR Wednesdays, 7 p.m.. Green Valley Pain Relief and Weiinesa Center, 2S59 Wigwam Parkway. Free alternative healing seminars will be held. Seating is limited. For reservations call 896-2700. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY Wednesdays, first and third of each month, 7 p.m., Post Home, 401 W. Basic Road. Post 3848 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars meets the first Wednesday for meetiogs. and the third Ibr-Work NighL'^Jall 564-3624. CANCER SUPPORT GROUP Wadnesdaya, second and fourth of each month, 6:30 to 8 p.m., Sunrise Hospital, Pediatric Physical Medicine Department Together We Cope," a support group for cancer patients and families, will meet. Dorothy Howard, 731 8135 or Linda Sooudi, 731-8274. SENIOR BAGEL BRUNCH Thursdays, first and third of aach month, 11:30 a.m., at Congregation Ner Tamid, ?761 Emerson Ave, Las Vegas. Will conclude with entertainment. Pan, Mah Jong and other games. Call 733-6292. EXECUTIVE LEADS CLUB Thuradaya, 7 a.m., Rae'a, Pecos and Wigwam. The Executive Leads Club East meets to exchange bu siness leads. Karen Scherer, 736-7755. MASTER MASONS Thursdays, first and third of each month, Mt Morlah Temple, 480 Greenway Road. All interested retired or active masons are welcome to attend meetings. Dick Steele, 458-5225. ELKS HELPING PEOPLE Fridays, 6 to 9 p.m., 631E. Lake Mead Dr. A complete dinner will ba hosted by the Elks club. Cost: (4 donation. 5659959. JEWISH WAR VETERANS Rrst Sunday of each month, 1 p.m.. Green Valley Library. The Jewish War Veterans Post 65 will meet. New members are welcome call 4564386. DAUGHTERS OF AMERICAN REVOLUTION Norwest Bank, Community Room, in Boulder City. The Silver State Chapter of Daughters of the American Revolution, serving the Henderson/Boulder City area, meets monthly (September May). 458-3693 or 293-5863. SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE The Suickle Preventwn Center is tookIng for volunteers to man the hotline. 731-2990, ask for Ewy. Reid unveils plans for veterans home Drama showcase set Oct. 27 Joe Behar's Community Drama Workshop will spotlight the talents of 22 of its drama students in a Talent Showcase to be held at 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 27, at the Whitney Library Theater, 5175 E. Tropicana. Admission is free to all members of the ccmmunity, although the program is not recommended for children under 6 years. Actors and actresses appearing in the 90-minute program of scenes and monologues include Joy Brittan, Ana Licon, Carl Scott, Richard Gardner, Fred Cola, Susaa Marks, Albertine, Chase Kenaedy, Debbie Texter, Niki Prantisco, George Kerr, JoNell Boit, Phyl Verderosa, Carol Behar, Annie Flanzraich, Noel Julian, Eric Koch, Cindy Walters, Iva Montross, Gayle Comins, Dick Cornell, andRoger Wood. Gloria Hoffmann, a frequent actress in many community theater productions, will be the mistress of ceremonies. Community Drama Workshop now in its 23rd year, conducts free workshop sessions every Monday evening in Room A of the Bowling Center at Sam's Town. U.S. Sen. Harry Reid announced plans for a new veterans home recently during a rally in front of the VA's Outpatient Ambulatory Care Center, which is currently tmder construction. "As we tour this much needed new clinic for Nevada veterans, I thought it was an appropriate venue to announce my plans for a new veterans home here in Las Vegas," Reid said. "This is part of my three-pronged attack pi an for improving veterans services here in the valley. "Thanks to support from President Clinton and the Veterans Administration, we secured the funds to build this much needed new outpatient clinic. I also worked hard with Sen. Bryan to fund the new Mike O'Callaghan Federal Hospital at Nellis Air Force Base. Although I have some serious concerns as to whether the needs of veterans are being met at this facility, we need a hospital for our veterans and I am committed to making that happen one way or another. "The missing piece in the overall care picture is a skilled nursing home facility for our veterans. I have been working closely with the state of Nevada and the VA to establish an extended care facility up near Nellis for veterans. The federal government will pick up about two-thirds of the tab and the state will cover the rest. "When I return to Congress in Jeuiuary, I will be working to secure a "home grant" for Nevada as part of the recently passed VA budget. Based on the support we have received from the present Administration, lam hopeful that this third prong of my overall veterans improvement plan will be successful. "More than 7,000 new people arrive each month in the state of Nevada. Man of them are retirees and many are veterans. We need to ensure we can meet the medical needs of these brave men and women who have sacrificed for our country. When you factor in spouses and dependents, close to one-third of Nevada's population is dependent in some way on veterans services. We need to significantly increase and improve the services we offer to keep up with our booming growth. "The state of Nevada is graying. Our climate and friendly tax base is attracting seniors. These World War II veterans suffer from chronic long-term illnesses associated with aging. Their conditions are often worsened by war time injures. We need to keep our promise to these men and women and provide health care and support during their twilight years." Rieger named Little Britches Queen Karly Rieger, 16, was recently named the National Little Britches Rodeo Association Queen in Colorado Springs, Colo. A junior at Cheyenne High School, Rieger is the daughter of Kerry A. Rieger, who owns Gibralter Transmissions, 8390 S. Fourth St., in Henderson. To try out for the title, Rieger had to qualify for national finals. She qualified in goat tying, barrel racing and pole bending. The 10-day contest featured modeling, speech, impromptu questions Eind personal interviews. She was judged on appearance and horsemanship. Rieger competed in eight of nine performances in addition to the Queen events. Eleven young women ages 14-18 vied for the title. As Queen, she will travel throughout the U.S. in shows almost every weekend. She is treated as "visiting royalty" and will be featured in the Miss Rodeo American before the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas later this year..: •. • • • • • • • ,'•' • •. .^ • ^."' • '.":'.' She won a combination saddle, jacket, ahand-tooled sash, crown, belt buckle, chaps and several hundred dollars in gift certificates. A rider since the age of 4, Rieger is a member of the Women's Professional Rodeo Association and the Las Vegas High Schools Rodeo Club. The fourth-generation Las Vegan hopes to be a veterinarian. HENIIERSON & BOULDER CITY RESIDENTS M. SENIORS ^ SAVER RACK S470 2 Roundtrips Limited Time Offer Condliions apply • < DALLAS COWBOY FANS ^ JOIN THE FUN! Dec. 7-8 M79 Game Ticket (West side 10 ym\ line) • • Motoaoach to PhcK-nix • lioiel stay • C(K-kt.iils • Liiiich & hrcakfasi • Surprises Support the TEAM! [ EUROPE SALE'"> Amstcrdim $640 Frankfurt l.j $615 London $515 MoKow $795 Pirii $60() Rome „ $685 .Stockholm $675 Vienna $6K0 < ORIENT SALE* ItanRkok $791 Hong ki)ng $724 Jakarta $92. Kuala Lumpur $791 NtanilU $761 Singapore $791 TailKi : $674 ilmaa EmH.OnM WntofiM Utwtfe CARIBBEAN Fail Caribbean Cruises From *598 7 day aalllnga ^ SHOP TIL YOU DROP • Nov. 9-10 '85 {Grange County Swapmet and choice of LA. Garment District or South Coact Plaza OntN.hoM'BfMklMt Uotofooach* Escoflad PRESTIGE TRAVEL r-5 LOCAHONS W H&IDEA80N > tiM9(HJU} HWY. 56S-7797 r>toy.MWMli 45778 For more information, call Joe Behar. 457-0234. We Accept Major Crlit Cards Anwcicvi EipiiM Trwitarv CfiMlts •H,aMiRMnMMMuM 'BaitPammltmntitmmOai 16 Addition^ Locattom m LM VagM Mia. • 725 Racetrack Rd. Henderson LIGOURI'S CASINO BEST FOOD IN TOWN! SPECIAL SENIORS MENU fforl f POKER rrOURNAMENTf Chicken Fried SAT & SUN 1 PM High/Low Split 8 or Better for Low 2 pair or Better for High HOURLY CASH DRAWING SEVEN DAYS A WEEK Steak I DINNER $4.49 210 p.m. with coupon Sun. thru Wed. MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL 50* Draft Beer M" Domestic Beer FREE MUNCHIES ATHALFTIMEI 1133 BIdr. 565 Hwy. Hend. -1688 NOW!! OVER 100 MACHINES 50 & 250 DeucMWild DoubtoOMic** Bonus Pokar K>noaMoi FREEH! T'Shlrton Royal Flu$h (Max. Coin Bet) THE SMALLEST BUT FRIENDLIEST CASINO IN HENDERSON WITH THE LOOSEST SLOTS OUR ATM MACHINES TAKE ALL CARDS < r. Oct. 10-Oct. 16,1996 DINNER MENU 4:00pmthru10:00pm All Entrees Served with Soup or Salad ,_ ^ ..^ ^^ Quality THURSDAY ^Service 1/2 ROAST CHICKEN....... 4.95 ,^^~..^V-, BEEF ROULADEN 4.95 ^^~~^Low^^ FRIDAY 2_, Price* ^ PRIME RIB • S.SS ^^--^-^ BEER BAHERED COD 4.95 ^ 1. ^ 5^ New SATURDAY : : • : V < Price* POT ROAST..; 4.95 SEAFOOD FEHUCCINI • 4.95 SUNDAY <^ cl!!!Ti PORK ROAST *4.9S ^ 5Pe CHICKEN PARMESAN M.25 MONDAY 3^ Best LIVER AND ONIONS 2.95 ^ in Town BRATWURST PLAHER 4.9S TUESDAY STUFFED BELL PEPPERS ...:..........*3.95 RIGATONI W/ITALIAN SAUSAGE. • 2.95 WEDNESDAY CHICKEN FRIED STEAK (TWO FOR 0NE)...*4.9S MEATLOAF 3.95 f t * PORTERHOUSE \ STEAK • 1 lb. ^ $3.95 \ 7DP,iS,k\'l£EK 1:00 pm to 10:00 pm BOULDER CITY MOTORS "Quality Cars & Trucks" 22 yrs. Autonfiotive experience 82 CORVETTE #2257 JOK, TJPPS, SILVER BLUE 85 SURBURBAN #2253 J2K,J-0AD^DK BLUE/SILVER 87 JEEP LARADO #2250 4X4, 6 CYL., LOADED 86 BRONCO 4X4 #2248 ABSOLUTELY BEAUTIFUL 56 CHEVY DUALLY #2228 NEW GOOD WRENCH MOTOR 90 FORD F-150 #2234 62K. XLT, LO ADED, V-8 'REMEMBER US WHEN YOU NEED A QUALITY VEHICLE' 1495 NEVADA HWY. BOULDER CITY 293-2000 We Finance • Trades Welcome D#948 • 50 Vehicles To Choose From, Call!!!

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I I I^^^^IH^ iOTPiiPin^WIHHPI Page 10 Henderson Home News Thursday. October 10.1996 Warning: Be alert for financial aid scams Collese students and potential college students sedking financial aid need to be on the lookout for financial aid scams that are occurring across the U.S., warns Judy Belanger, UNLV director of student financial services. "As college costs rise nationwide, more students are turning to financial tad to help pay for higher education," Belanger said. "Unfortunately, a number of unscrupulous companies are capitalizing on the situation by charging students to help them find scholarships and then not delivering what they have promised." Many of the unscrupulous companies advertise heavily to students and present misleading information about their services, she said. An important first step for anyone considering using a company that appears to offer scholarships is to determine whether the company actually has scholarship money to disseminate or if it merely is in the business of providing students with a list of scholarships for which they can apply, Belanger said. Most companies and organizations that actually give out scholarships do not charge an application fee, she said. As for the companies that only provide lists of available scholarships, students considering paying for such a service should know beforehand that information is available free of charge to the student willing to do a little homework, Belanger said. "University and college financial aid offices, high school counseling offices, and libraries all are excellent sources of that information," she said. "With just a little work, students can come up with the same information those companies want to charge them to provide. For students who choose to pay the companies to do the work for them, it is important to get the companies' promises in writing so Canine Companions for Independence to host car wash The Nevada Champions Volunteer Chapter of Canine Companions for Independence will host a "Wash for Wags" car wash fimd-raiser from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12, at Chief Auto Parts, 3480 S. Rainbow Blvd. near Spring Mountain. —: The cost of the car wash and protective seal is a $15 donation, or $10 for people with disabilities. Volunteers will staflFa CCI information booth at the event. Les and Helen Slaughter and other distributors of Dri Wash 'n Guard are sponsoring the event and providing the car washing service. The local CCI chapter participates in fund-raising for the national CCI organization and promotes activities providing support for people who use or train assistance dogs, as well as educating the public about asDISCOUKT TIRE CO. SALE sistance dogs. Locally, five families volunteer as ""puppy raisers," socializing specially bred puppies before they are trained to become assistance dogs for people with disabilities. Canine Companions for Independence is a national organization whose mission is to serve the needs of people with disabilities by providing trained service, hearing and socii^ dogs and by providing continuing support to ensure the success of the working team. For advance tickets or more information about CCI, contact chapter president Helen Coombs, 739-6569. that both parties are clear what is being provided, she said. Scams in the financial aid area have received a substantial amount of attention across the country in recent months, Belanger said. She pointed to the involvement of the Federal Trade Commission, which has obtained temporary restraining orders against five companies and has frozen their assets while seeking permanent injunctions against them. Those companies are: •Career Assistance Planning Inc. of Atlanta. •Christopher Ebere Nwaigwe of Towson, Md. •Student Assistance Services Ina of Ft Lauderdale, Fla. •College Assistance Services Inc. of Sunrise, Fla. •Student Aid Incorporated of New York City. For more information on the do's and don'ts of applying for financial aid, call Belanger, 8953424. ^ COURTESY CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING ("(irpcl C^lc'cmiiuj Spccicils 2 ROOMS &HAU Complete No Hidden Charges $44 3 ROOMS J^O &HALL 9Zf Complete No Hidden Charges 5 ROOMS fir HALL Complete No Hidden Chorges $99 7 ROOMS €<|^#\ fir HALL ^129 Complete No Hidden Charges MOVE INS • MOVE OUTS On Carpet Cleaning When Home Is Empty UPHOLSTERY CLEANING* Sofa Loveseat Easy Chair $44 $34 $24 $69 MOBILE HOMES* Single Wides Double Wides $99 WE ALSO CLEAN R.V.S & TRAVEL TRAILERS Truck Mounted Units PROMPT, COURTEOUS & PROFESSIONAL A Henderson based Company owned & opemted locally. CALL 547-1183 Minimum cleaning order of '44 • Free Estimates • Carpet Repairs • Re-Stretching • Stain Removal • Odor Removal ^Senior Discount • Licensed • Insured • SALE ENDS OCT. 31st, 1996 iND NEW STEELRAPIALS! 4 P15SA0R13 P16S0ni3 P17S/80fl13 P18Sm)R13 35,000 MILE WARRANTY (22.50 ea.) 4 P18Sff5B14 P195/75R14 P20S/75R14 35,000 MILE WARRANTY 110 (27.50 ea.) 4 35,000 MILE WARRANTY 180 (32.50 ea.) DISCOUNT TIRE CO. SALE When You re Ready To Get Serious BFGood rich T/A SALE! • aoM •• METRIC RADIALS ARIZONiAN LIMITED EDITION RADULS E SO MUCH s MXNO ONTow nwrl XW4 / XZ4 BIG ,. BIG '(^^ KICK OFF BIRTHDAT. Friday Oct. 4 :v FARTT1st nighfly drawing Sunday Oct. 13 Cake & Champagne Reception at 5:30 p.m. Get a lucky coin in Your Birthday Cake : • and Win CASH! i There wiU be 20 I coins worth $50 each GRAHTD • PRXKE : AT 10:15 EM. 0750, 01,000 & 01,500 1990 POOTIAC GRAXDAH at 8:15 p.m. Hors d'oeuvres served throughout the casino from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. ^AO FOOD r SSPECIALS in Both Restaurants October 4-13th PROGRmSlVl! CASH DRAfn]!l^GS mGWTLY at 8:15 p.m. October 4-12 andgat 4:15 p.m. on October 13 I.BIOO 2. 8250 I f 3.8400 4.8550 ALL RULES POSTED Thursday, October 10,1996 Henderson HomeNevyi Page 11 .SS" Community HAUNTED HOUSE Friday, Oct 11, 2975 E. Sahara at McLaod. A Haunted Housa wiH opsn its aacond year in the K-Mart partdng lot. Hours: Dusit midni^t. Children undar S not allowad, children under 12 not allowad in alone. Costs: $6.50 per person. GOSPEL MUSIC Friday, Oct 11, 8 p.ni.,951 W. Laka Mead Blvd. An encone presentation of This Ain't No Enteitainmenr will ba presented by the Las Vegas Black Gospel Theatre. For tickts call 594-2235. SONGS OFPOLITICS Friday and Saturday, OcLII A 12, 8 p.m., 1401 E. Ramingo Road. Campaign songs from George Washington to the present. Advanced ticlcets available at UNLV Perfcmiing Arts Box Office. 895-3601. GEM CLUB MEETING Monday, Oct 14,7:30 p.m., 821 Laa Vagaa Blvd. The Las Vegas Gem Club will hold a general meeting on the second floor of the Reed Whipple-Cenfer. 256-9032. ARTIST GULD MEETING Tuesday, OcL 1(, 7 p.m., 1401 E. Flamingo Road. The Vegas Artisfs Guild will hold a renting. Plans for art show Oct. 29 wil be discussed.4594812. AUDUBCN SOCIETY Wednesday, Oct 16,7:30 p.m., 330S. Valley View Blvd.Patrice Harvey of Wild Birds Unlimited wH present Talcing Bird Feeding to New Heights." GAMBLERI ANONYMOUS Mondays-Sundiys. Gamblers Anonymous of Southen Nevada has day and evening meetin(s. Call for help and schedules, 24-h)ur hotline, 365-7732. DIVORCED ND SEPARATED Mondays, 7:3) p.m.. Community Lutheran Churth, 3720 E. Tropicana. Free support goup for divorced and separated menand women of all ages. Call 735-5544. ; IIWANIS Mondays, 7:31 a.m., Green's Supper Club, 2241 N. Green Valley Parkway and Wedneaiays, 7 a.m., Omelet House, 317 f^ Boulder Highway. The Green Valley Kiwanis Club meets Mondays and the Henderson club meets Wednesdays AMS^ICAN LEGION (Monc^, J^at and third of each month, 7 p.m, Henderaon Jr. Jayceas buildthg, fabtween Water St. And Major Ave. American Legion BMI Post 40 will meet.AII veterans welcome. 4546551. MOPS Alternate Mondaya and Tuesdays. Mothers of Pre-schoolers (MOPS) is a program forallpiothers of pre-schoolers, birth through Syears. Enjoy breakfast, a speaker, friendship groups and a craft project while ^e children are cared for in a stmctured setting. For cost, locations and dalbs, 735-4004. • CODEPENDENTS AND ADULT CHILDREN Tuaadays, beginning Sept 24, 7-9 p.m. the Community Rooin of the Saturn of Henderson daatership, 310 N.Gibson Road. Twelve-step program to break the dysfunctional rulesofdon't talk, don't trust don't feel," and to develop closer relationship with God. UONS CLUB Tuaadays, fiiat and third of each month, 6:30 p.m. Call Karen Scherer, Club Treasur#r 736-7755 between 6 a.m.-S p.m. SUCCESS WITHOUT STRESS Tuaadays, iiret and third of each month, 7 p.m., NonwastBanlt, 2231N. Grean Vality Parlcway. Secrets to Success Wilhout Stress Is sponsoring an ongoing tree class, "Conquer Negative Emotiois." 293-7797. BIPOLAR SUPPORT GROUP Every Tuesday, 6:30 to 8 p.m., Nevada Association for the Handicapped, 6200 W. Oakey Blvd. A group for BiPolar (Mank; Depressive) indivkfuals, family and friends viill meet. 870-7050. POSTPARTUM SUPPORT GROUP Tueadays, 7 to S:30 p.m., UNLV Women's Qintar, CBC Room 227. Through De<. 5, the Poatpartum Support Group win meet. 695-4475. DISEASE AWARENESS Tueadays and Thursdeya, 105 N. Pecos, aula *114. A free vascular To announc0 your group or organization'i avtnta, plaaae coma by or mail information to: 2 Commarca Cantar Driva, Hartflaaon, NV890U. disease awareness and screening program for the community will be offered. Call Linda at 263-3366 for an appointment BUSINESS Tuesdays and Thuradaya, 7 a.m., IHOP Restaurant, 3260 E. Tropicana at Pecos. The Morning Business Professionals and the Eastside EartyBirds Chapters of the Business Network International meets. Tern Dimmidt, 5661348. Mark Kemberling, 451-7077. ROTARY Tuesdays, noon, Eldorado Casino and Thursdaya, 7 a.m.. Country inn, 1990 W. Sunset Road. The Henderson Rotary Club meets Tuesdays and the Green Valley Ctub meats Thursdays, OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Daily meatinga. Ovsreaters Anonymous is a 12-step program. There are noduesorfees. Daily meetings are hekl throughout Las Vegas and surrounding areas. Call 593-2945. LEAN Second Tuesday of each month, 8 p.m, Continental Hotel. The Natronal Law Enforcement Association of Nevada will hold its regular meeting, Retired and active police officers and law enforcement or related professk)naIs are invited. 434-0442. ATTENTION DISORDERS Fourth Tueaday of each month, 7 p.m. East Ramingo Ubrary,1401 E Ramingo Road. Ch.A.D.D. a non profit organization for chlklren and adults with attention deficit disorders will hold a monthly meeting. 390-3400. BUSINESS NETWORK Wednesdays, 7 to 8:30 am.. Country Inn, Sunsetand Valie Verde. The Green Valley Chapterof Business Network Intl. meets for its weekly meeting. 454-3100. ALL PARENTS UNITED Wednesdays, 7 p.m., White Middle School. Ail Parents United, a collection of various parents' groups, meet to discuss educational issues. HEALING SEMINAR Wednesdays, 7 p.m.. Green Valley Pain Relief and Weiinesa Center, 2S59 Wigwam Parkway. Free alternative healing seminars will be held. Seating is limited. For reservations call 896-2700. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY Wednesdays, first and third of each month, 7 p.m., Post Home, 401 W. Basic Road. Post 3848 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars meets the first Wednesday for meetiogs. and the third Ibr-Work NighL'^Jall 564-3624. CANCER SUPPORT GROUP Wadnesdaya, second and fourth of each month, 6:30 to 8 p.m., Sunrise Hospital, Pediatric Physical Medicine Department Together We Cope," a support group for cancer patients and families, will meet. Dorothy Howard, 731 8135 or Linda Sooudi, 731-8274. SENIOR BAGEL BRUNCH Thursdays, first and third of aach month, 11:30 a.m., at Congregation Ner Tamid, ?761 Emerson Ave, Las Vegas. Will conclude with entertainment. Pan, Mah Jong and other games. Call 733-6292. EXECUTIVE LEADS CLUB Thuradaya, 7 a.m., Rae'a, Pecos and Wigwam. The Executive Leads Club East meets to exchange bu siness leads. Karen Scherer, 736-7755. MASTER MASONS Thursdays, first and third of each month, Mt Morlah Temple, 480 Greenway Road. All interested retired or active masons are welcome to attend meetings. Dick Steele, 458-5225. ELKS HELPING PEOPLE Fridays, 6 to 9 p.m., 631E. Lake Mead Dr. A complete dinner will ba hosted by the Elks club. Cost: (4 donation. 5659959. JEWISH WAR VETERANS Rrst Sunday of each month, 1 p.m.. Green Valley Library. The Jewish War Veterans Post 65 will meet. New members are welcome call 4564386. DAUGHTERS OF AMERICAN REVOLUTION Norwest Bank, Community Room, in Boulder City. The Silver State Chapter of Daughters of the American Revolution, serving the Henderson/Boulder City area, meets monthly (September May). 458-3693 or 293-5863. SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE The Suickle Preventwn Center is tookIng for volunteers to man the hotline. 731-2990, ask for Ewy. Reid unveils plans for veterans home Drama showcase set Oct. 27 Joe Behar's Community Drama Workshop will spotlight the talents of 22 of its drama students in a Talent Showcase to be held at 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 27, at the Whitney Library Theater, 5175 E. Tropicana. Admission is free to all members of the ccmmunity, although the program is not recommended for children under 6 years. Actors and actresses appearing in the 90-minute program of scenes and monologues include Joy Brittan, Ana Licon, Carl Scott, Richard Gardner, Fred Cola, Susaa Marks, Albertine, Chase Kenaedy, Debbie Texter, Niki Prantisco, George Kerr, JoNell Boit, Phyl Verderosa, Carol Behar, Annie Flanzraich, Noel Julian, Eric Koch, Cindy Walters, Iva Montross, Gayle Comins, Dick Cornell, andRoger Wood. Gloria Hoffmann, a frequent actress in many community theater productions, will be the mistress of ceremonies. Community Drama Workshop now in its 23rd year, conducts free workshop sessions every Monday evening in Room A of the Bowling Center at Sam's Town. U.S. Sen. Harry Reid announced plans for a new veterans home recently during a rally in front of the VA's Outpatient Ambulatory Care Center, which is currently tmder construction. "As we tour this much needed new clinic for Nevada veterans, I thought it was an appropriate venue to announce my plans for a new veterans home here in Las Vegas," Reid said. "This is part of my three-pronged attack pi an for improving veterans services here in the valley. "Thanks to support from President Clinton and the Veterans Administration, we secured the funds to build this much needed new outpatient clinic. I also worked hard with Sen. Bryan to fund the new Mike O'Callaghan Federal Hospital at Nellis Air Force Base. Although I have some serious concerns as to whether the needs of veterans are being met at this facility, we need a hospital for our veterans and I am committed to making that happen one way or another. "The missing piece in the overall care picture is a skilled nursing home facility for our veterans. I have been working closely with the state of Nevada and the VA to establish an extended care facility up near Nellis for veterans. The federal government will pick up about two-thirds of the tab and the state will cover the rest. "When I return to Congress in Jeuiuary, I will be working to secure a "home grant" for Nevada as part of the recently passed VA budget. Based on the support we have received from the present Administration, lam hopeful that this third prong of my overall veterans improvement plan will be successful. "More than 7,000 new people arrive each month in the state of Nevada. Man of them are retirees and many are veterans. We need to ensure we can meet the medical needs of these brave men and women who have sacrificed for our country. When you factor in spouses and dependents, close to one-third of Nevada's population is dependent in some way on veterans services. We need to significantly increase and improve the services we offer to keep up with our booming growth. "The state of Nevada is graying. Our climate and friendly tax base is attracting seniors. These World War II veterans suffer from chronic long-term illnesses associated with aging. Their conditions are often worsened by war time injures. We need to keep our promise to these men and women and provide health care and support during their twilight years." Rieger named Little Britches Queen Karly Rieger, 16, was recently named the National Little Britches Rodeo Association Queen in Colorado Springs, Colo. A junior at Cheyenne High School, Rieger is the daughter of Kerry A. Rieger, who owns Gibralter Transmissions, 8390 S. Fourth St., in Henderson. To try out for the title, Rieger had to qualify for national finals. She qualified in goat tying, barrel racing and pole bending. The 10-day contest featured modeling, speech, impromptu questions Eind personal interviews. She was judged on appearance and horsemanship. Rieger competed in eight of nine performances in addition to the Queen events. Eleven young women ages 14-18 vied for the title. As Queen, she will travel throughout the U.S. in shows almost every weekend. She is treated as "visiting royalty" and will be featured in the Miss Rodeo American before the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas later this year..: •. • • • • • • • ,'•' • •. .^ • ^."' • '.":'.' She won a combination saddle, jacket, ahand-tooled sash, crown, belt buckle, chaps and several hundred dollars in gift certificates. A rider since the age of 4, Rieger is a member of the Women's Professional Rodeo Association and the Las Vegas High Schools Rodeo Club. The fourth-generation Las Vegan hopes to be a veterinarian. HENIIERSON & BOULDER CITY RESIDENTS M. SENIORS ^ SAVER RACK S470 2 Roundtrips Limited Time Offer Condliions apply • < DALLAS COWBOY FANS ^ JOIN THE FUN! Dec. 7-8 M79 Game Ticket (West side 10 ym\ line) • • Motoaoach to PhcK-nix • lioiel stay • C(K-kt.iils • Liiiich & hrcakfasi • Surprises Support the TEAM! [ EUROPE SALE'"> Amstcrdim $640 Frankfurt l.j $615 London $515 MoKow $795 Pirii $60() Rome „ $685 .Stockholm $675 Vienna $6K0 < ORIENT SALE* ItanRkok $791 Hong ki)ng $724 Jakarta $92. Kuala Lumpur $791 NtanilU $761 Singapore $791 TailKi : $674 ilmaa EmH.OnM WntofiM Utwtfe CARIBBEAN Fail Caribbean Cruises From *598 7 day aalllnga ^ SHOP TIL YOU DROP • Nov. 9-10 '85 {Grange County Swapmet and choice of LA. Garment District or South Coact Plaza OntN.hoM'BfMklMt Uotofooach* Escoflad PRESTIGE TRAVEL r-5 LOCAHONS W H&IDEA80N > tiM9(HJU} HWY. 56S-7797 r>toy.MWMli 45778 For more information, call Joe Behar. 457-0234. We Accept Major Crlit Cards Anwcicvi EipiiM Trwitarv CfiMlts •H,aMiRMnMMMuM 'BaitPammltmntitmmOai 16 Addition^ Locattom m LM VagM Mia. • 725 Racetrack Rd. Henderson LIGOURI'S CASINO BEST FOOD IN TOWN! SPECIAL SENIORS MENU fforl f POKER rrOURNAMENTf Chicken Fried SAT & SUN 1 PM High/Low Split 8 or Better for Low 2 pair or Better for High HOURLY CASH DRAWING SEVEN DAYS A WEEK Steak I DINNER $4.49 210 p.m. with coupon Sun. thru Wed. MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL 50* Draft Beer M" Domestic Beer FREE MUNCHIES ATHALFTIMEI 1133 BIdr. 565 Hwy. Hend. -1688 NOW!! OVER 100 MACHINES 50 & 250 DeucMWild DoubtoOMic** Bonus Pokar K>noaMoi FREEH! T'Shlrton Royal Flu$h (Max. Coin Bet) THE SMALLEST BUT FRIENDLIEST CASINO IN HENDERSON WITH THE LOOSEST SLOTS OUR ATM MACHINES TAKE ALL CARDS < r. Oct. 10-Oct. 16,1996 DINNER MENU 4:00pmthru10:00pm All Entrees Served with Soup or Salad ,_ ^ ..^ ^^ Quality THURSDAY ^Service 1/2 ROAST CHICKEN....... 4.95 ,^^~..^V-, BEEF ROULADEN 4.95 ^^~~^Low^^ FRIDAY 2_, Price* ^ PRIME RIB • S.SS ^^--^-^ BEER BAHERED COD 4.95 ^ 1. ^ 5^ New SATURDAY : : • : V < Price* POT ROAST..; 4.95 SEAFOOD FEHUCCINI • 4.95 SUNDAY <^ cl!!!Ti PORK ROAST *4.9S ^ 5Pe CHICKEN PARMESAN M.25 MONDAY 3^ Best LIVER AND ONIONS 2.95 ^ in Town BRATWURST PLAHER 4.9S TUESDAY STUFFED BELL PEPPERS ...:..........*3.95 RIGATONI W/ITALIAN SAUSAGE. • 2.95 WEDNESDAY CHICKEN FRIED STEAK (TWO FOR 0NE)...*4.9S MEATLOAF 3.95 f t * PORTERHOUSE \ STEAK • 1 lb. ^ $3.95 \ 7DP,iS,k\'l£EK 1:00 pm to 10:00 pm BOULDER CITY MOTORS "Quality Cars & Trucks" 22 yrs. Autonfiotive experience 82 CORVETTE #2257 JOK, TJPPS, SILVER BLUE 85 SURBURBAN #2253 J2K,J-0AD^DK BLUE/SILVER 87 JEEP LARADO #2250 4X4, 6 CYL., LOADED 86 BRONCO 4X4 #2248 ABSOLUTELY BEAUTIFUL 56 CHEVY DUALLY #2228 NEW GOOD WRENCH MOTOR 90 FORD F-150 #2234 62K. XLT, LO ADED, V-8 'REMEMBER US WHEN YOU NEED A QUALITY VEHICLE' 1495 NEVADA HWY. BOULDER CITY 293-2000 We Finance • Trades Welcome D#948 • 50 Vehicles To Choose From, Call!!!

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• ly-T-"7 ?' f ^ i; ^ f i ^ f f^ | i 1 .1 1 .11 I I m yy^^^ypppp P0 12 Henderson Hom News Thursday. October 10,1996 mummm Courtesy Photo GRANT—Opportunity Village staff and clients are all smiles as Bank of America executives present them with a $50,000 grant for the construction of their new Henderson facility. Shown are left to right, Linda Smith, director of Resource Development for OP; Tom Thomas, foundation board member of OP; Bof A President George Smith; OP clients Tracey Peterson and Mark Nivens; BofA Executive Vice President Gary Mullins, and Ed Guthrie, executive director of OP. Bank of America awards grant Bank of America Nevada today announced that it has awarded a $50,000 grant from the BankAmerica Foundation to Opportunity Village for the building of a new work-training facility in Henderson. The new 22,000-square-foot facility will cost approximately $3 million to build and $375,000 to operate on an annual basis. It will provide an estimated 200 adult Henderson residents with mental retardation a state-of-the-art work-training fadHty. The new facility will be located at the intersection of Burkholder and Lake Mead, and is scheduled to open in the winter of 1998. "Bank of America's generous involvement in this project will certainly help us launch what we expect will be a very successful fund-raising campaign," said Ed Guthrie, executive director of Opportunity Village. "Bank of America has stepped up to the plate once again as one of our first nugor contributors to the Henderson campus project.' Guthrie added that when Opportunity Village built its Las Vegas campus several years ago. Bank of America was also one of the first companies to provide much needed fimding to help turn that project into a reality. Opportunity Village was founded 42 years ago by a group of concerned parents who wanted more options for children with mental handicaps. While public acceptance of the mentally challenged working in the community has grown individuals with mental retardation still suffer from vmemployment rates of 60 to 75%. According to estimates by the Census Bureau, by the year 2000 more than 30,000 people with mental retardation will reside in Clark County. "We're very excited to take part in such a worthwhile and much needed project for the mentally challenged," said BofA Nevada President George Smith. "When you have the privilege to visit with these individuals in their work environment you quickly realize that they are very dedicated, hard working people who want to be productive and contributing members of our society.' Smith added that the bank's involvement with Opportunity Village goes beyond just the monetary support. Gary Mullins, executive vice president and senior credit officer of BofA Nevada, sits on the board of directors of 4)pportunity Village, he said. "An integral part of our community outreach also includes b^nk i^aiMelft and staff Volunteering their time and talents to community-based programs and projects that help people, organizations and commiuiity." The BankAmerica Foundation is the philanthropic arm of BankAmerica Corporation. The foundation funds private, nonprofit, tax-exempt organizations that engage in health and human services, education, conservation and the environment, and culture and the arts activities. Bolshoi in benefit The Bolshoi Ballet of Moscow will perform "Don Quixote" at 8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, at the Aladdin Theater for the Performing Arts, as a benefit for Nevada Dance TTieatre. TTieMoscow Bolshoi Balletfirst performed in Russia in January 1825. Since that time it has remained the benchmark of ballet excellence. The 1996 Bolshoi tour to the U.S. will feature performances only in Los Angeles and Las Vegas. In Las Vegas, it will present three ballets, "Swan Lake," "La Sylphide'and "DonQuixote''from Oct. 8-20. Benefit tickets can be purchased through Ticketmaster at (702) 474-4000 or in person at the Aladdin Theatre for the Performing Arts box office.* Stark granted money from State Council Robin Stark of Henderson was Jan 7 at the West Charleston among many artists granted Library Gallery, money recently by the Nevada State Council on the Arts. The NSCA was founded in Stark was granted $515 to 1967 to develop and promote arts fund a sculpture show Oct. 22in Nevada. Family history workshop at GV Library The Clark County Nevada Genealogical Society will hold a family history workshop for beginners at 7 p.m. Oct. 16 at the Green Valley Library. Experienced family researchers will discuss using federal censuses, requesting vital records such as marriage and birth records from county courthouses andhow to fill out pedigree charts and other forms to help participants document family trees. For more information, call 2255838. Shriiiers and Masons Zelzah is forming a Shrine Club in the Henderson Area. If you are a Noble or Mason interested in becoming a charter member, please contact Zelzah Temple at 382-5554. Illustrious Sir John Holler will be hosting a cocktail party at 4 p.m., Oct. 16,1996 at The Temple for anyone interested. Please RSVPThe Temple by October 12th. Bowlers hold yard sale The Henderson Women's Bowling Association will host the Nevada State Annual Bowling Tournament in May 1997. The group will raising necessary funds by holding a yard sale at 8 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, at 227 S. Texas Ave., Henderson. Donated items such as unwanted furniture, household items, clothes, books, etc., may be dropped off at that address or call chairman Carol Lassiter, 897-1901, or RochelleNeige, 5666455, to arrange for delivery to the site. The tournament theme is "A Little Bit of Heaven in 1997" and attendees may find a treasured bit of heaven in someone's donation. The public is invited to participate in the sale. SHOP TALK with Tony Meleo INTERNAL MATTERS A compression test reveals a great eHver 'The Sweetest Bouquet In Town" • Cookie Bouquets For All Occasions • We Will Write Your Personal Message On Any Bouquet • We Copy Company Logos For Corporate Gilts • lx)cal Delivery Available Phone: 898-0440 • Fax: 898-0794 2877 Green Valley Pkwy. at Sunset in the Lucky's Shopp ing Center Courtesy Photo 50th ANNIVERSARY — Howard and Dorothy Palmer will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary on Oct. 11, 1996. They were married In Geneva, N. Y., on Oct. 11,1946. An informal surprise dinner was held at a family reunion this summer in San Diego with seven of their eight children In attendance, along with 14 of their 17 grandchildren. A compression test can tell you if yourengine needs a majoroverhauI or even replacement, ^hen you need parts or fluids for,your car, come to THE PARTS HOUSE. We carry a wide selection of automobile parts and accessories including filter, hoses, fluids, alternators, and generators. If we don't carry it, we can special order hard-to-find parts. The shop is open M-F 8-6, Sat. 8-5. Call 293-2193 to talk with our knowledgable staff. "You'll find it at Car Quest." AUTO SPECIALISTS, Wt' 705 lunlper Way, Boulder City 293-4776 'This column is brought (o you as a public service andpaidiorbyAuloSpecialists. Inc' It's Happening at the Eoadhcuse Monday Ni^t Football Party Dnfi Beer ft H $1.00 King of KoDdtj Nl^ FootbiU Dnidiig NFl Binai Entertainment Schedule October 1 thru 13 The Ca ch October 15 thru 27 Flashback October 29 thru November 17 Enterprise V\fednesday Night Ladies Night Ladies Drink FREE Saturday Afternoon 2:00pm to 6:00pm The Pollta Club Banquet Facilities /:': • •
PAGE 13

• ly-T-"7 ?' f ^ i; ^ f i ^ f f^ | i 1 .1 1 .11 I I m yy^^^ypppp P0 12 Henderson Hom News Thursday. October 10,1996 mummm Courtesy Photo GRANT—Opportunity Village staff and clients are all smiles as Bank of America executives present them with a $50,000 grant for the construction of their new Henderson facility. Shown are left to right, Linda Smith, director of Resource Development for OP; Tom Thomas, foundation board member of OP; Bof A President George Smith; OP clients Tracey Peterson and Mark Nivens; BofA Executive Vice President Gary Mullins, and Ed Guthrie, executive director of OP. Bank of America awards grant Bank of America Nevada today announced that it has awarded a $50,000 grant from the BankAmerica Foundation to Opportunity Village for the building of a new work-training facility in Henderson. The new 22,000-square-foot facility will cost approximately $3 million to build and $375,000 to operate on an annual basis. It will provide an estimated 200 adult Henderson residents with mental retardation a state-of-the-art work-training fadHty. The new facility will be located at the intersection of Burkholder and Lake Mead, and is scheduled to open in the winter of 1998. "Bank of America's generous involvement in this project will certainly help us launch what we expect will be a very successful fund-raising campaign," said Ed Guthrie, executive director of Opportunity Village. "Bank of America has stepped up to the plate once again as one of our first nugor contributors to the Henderson campus project.' Guthrie added that when Opportunity Village built its Las Vegas campus several years ago. Bank of America was also one of the first companies to provide much needed fimding to help turn that project into a reality. Opportunity Village was founded 42 years ago by a group of concerned parents who wanted more options for children with mental handicaps. While public acceptance of the mentally challenged working in the community has grown individuals with mental retardation still suffer from vmemployment rates of 60 to 75%. According to estimates by the Census Bureau, by the year 2000 more than 30,000 people with mental retardation will reside in Clark County. "We're very excited to take part in such a worthwhile and much needed project for the mentally challenged," said BofA Nevada President George Smith. "When you have the privilege to visit with these individuals in their work environment you quickly realize that they are very dedicated, hard working people who want to be productive and contributing members of our society.' Smith added that the bank's involvement with Opportunity Village goes beyond just the monetary support. Gary Mullins, executive vice president and senior credit officer of BofA Nevada, sits on the board of directors of 4)pportunity Village, he said. "An integral part of our community outreach also includes b^nk i^aiMelft and staff Volunteering their time and talents to community-based programs and projects that help people, organizations and commiuiity." The BankAmerica Foundation is the philanthropic arm of BankAmerica Corporation. The foundation funds private, nonprofit, tax-exempt organizations that engage in health and human services, education, conservation and the environment, and culture and the arts activities. Bolshoi in benefit The Bolshoi Ballet of Moscow will perform "Don Quixote" at 8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, at the Aladdin Theater for the Performing Arts, as a benefit for Nevada Dance TTieatre. TTieMoscow Bolshoi Balletfirst performed in Russia in January 1825. Since that time it has remained the benchmark of ballet excellence. The 1996 Bolshoi tour to the U.S. will feature performances only in Los Angeles and Las Vegas. In Las Vegas, it will present three ballets, "Swan Lake," "La Sylphide'and "DonQuixote''from Oct. 8-20. Benefit tickets can be purchased through Ticketmaster at (702) 474-4000 or in person at the Aladdin Theatre for the Performing Arts box office.* Stark granted money from State Council Robin Stark of Henderson was Jan 7 at the West Charleston among many artists granted Library Gallery, money recently by the Nevada State Council on the Arts. The NSCA was founded in Stark was granted $515 to 1967 to develop and promote arts fund a sculpture show Oct. 22in Nevada. Family history workshop at GV Library The Clark County Nevada Genealogical Society will hold a family history workshop for beginners at 7 p.m. Oct. 16 at the Green Valley Library. Experienced family researchers will discuss using federal censuses, requesting vital records such as marriage and birth records from county courthouses andhow to fill out pedigree charts and other forms to help participants document family trees. For more information, call 2255838. Shriiiers and Masons Zelzah is forming a Shrine Club in the Henderson Area. If you are a Noble or Mason interested in becoming a charter member, please contact Zelzah Temple at 382-5554. Illustrious Sir John Holler will be hosting a cocktail party at 4 p.m., Oct. 16,1996 at The Temple for anyone interested. Please RSVPThe Temple by October 12th. Bowlers hold yard sale The Henderson Women's Bowling Association will host the Nevada State Annual Bowling Tournament in May 1997. The group will raising necessary funds by holding a yard sale at 8 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, at 227 S. Texas Ave., Henderson. Donated items such as unwanted furniture, household items, clothes, books, etc., may be dropped off at that address or call chairman Carol Lassiter, 897-1901, or RochelleNeige, 5666455, to arrange for delivery to the site. The tournament theme is "A Little Bit of Heaven in 1997" and attendees may find a treasured bit of heaven in someone's donation. The public is invited to participate in the sale. SHOP TALK with Tony Meleo INTERNAL MATTERS A compression test reveals a great eHver 'The Sweetest Bouquet In Town" • Cookie Bouquets For All Occasions • We Will Write Your Personal Message On Any Bouquet • We Copy Company Logos For Corporate Gilts • lx)cal Delivery Available Phone: 898-0440 • Fax: 898-0794 2877 Green Valley Pkwy. at Sunset in the Lucky's Shopp ing Center Courtesy Photo 50th ANNIVERSARY — Howard and Dorothy Palmer will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary on Oct. 11, 1996. They were married In Geneva, N. Y., on Oct. 11,1946. An informal surprise dinner was held at a family reunion this summer in San Diego with seven of their eight children In attendance, along with 14 of their 17 grandchildren. A compression test can tell you if yourengine needs a majoroverhauI or even replacement, ^hen you need parts or fluids for,your car, come to THE PARTS HOUSE. We carry a wide selection of automobile parts and accessories including filter, hoses, fluids, alternators, and generators. If we don't carry it, we can special order hard-to-find parts. The shop is open M-F 8-6, Sat. 8-5. Call 293-2193 to talk with our knowledgable staff. "You'll find it at Car Quest." AUTO SPECIALISTS, Wt' 705 lunlper Way, Boulder City 293-4776 'This column is brought (o you as a public service andpaidiorbyAuloSpecialists. Inc' It's Happening at the Eoadhcuse Monday Ni^t Football Party Dnfi Beer ft H $1.00 King of KoDdtj Nl^ FootbiU Dnidiig NFl Binai Entertainment Schedule October 1 thru 13 The Ca ch October 15 thru 27 Flashback October 29 thru November 17 Enterprise V\fednesday Night Ladies Night Ladies Drink FREE Saturday Afternoon 2:00pm to 6:00pm The Pollta Club Banquet Facilities /:': • •
PAGE 14

T r -w'^ yn^ i^^^pi^i^^^^ mmmmrf^H^^l^m'mmm J^l-^. Pfl14 Henderson Home News Thursday, October 10.1996 I I i \t the Library GREEN VALLEY LIBRARY 2797 N. Green Valley Parkway, Henderson — 435-1840 Thursday, Oct. 10 7 p.m., Charioteers Classic Car Club (Sunset Room) Friday, Oct. 11 9 a.m.-lp.in.. Qark County Health Department, Free immunization Qinic (Sunset Room) Sunday, Oct. 13 2 p.m., Os Too: Prostate Cancer Support Group (Sunset Room) Monday, Oct. 14 LIBRARY CLOSED IN OBSERVATION OF COLUMBUS DAY Tuesday, Oct. 15 10 a.m., Overeaters Anonymous (Sunset Room) 4:45 p.m.. Brownie Troop #68 (Sunset Room) 6 p.m.. Green Valley Stitchers (Sunset Room) 6:30 p.m., Rancho Nevada Estates Board Meeting (Conference Room) Wednesday, Oct. 16 10 a.m.. La Leche League (Sunset Room) 7 p.m., Qark County Genealogical Society: An informative free fvogram for the public on how to conduct a genealogic^oc^.. -: search (Sunset Room) 6:30 p.m.. Frontier Estates Homeowners' Association Executive Board meeting (Conference Room) Henderson y Boulder City VFW Posts consolidate Boulder City's Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3574 has requested -they be allowed to consolidate with F'ost 3848 in Henderson. They have complied with the national by-laws and procedures in following the steps necessary to consolidate lAW Section 209. VFW State Commander George Ruth reviewed letters firom both posts requesting consolidation and it was approved. In May 1996, both posts voted to retain the name Basic Post 3848 with the Charter date of Jan. 23, 1937. Basic Post 3848 officers for 1996-1997 are: Commander Dennis Cournoyer; Sr. Vice Commander Paul Gdrgis; Jr. Vice Commander Leonard Hagar; Quartermaster Gordon Gablin; Adjutant Herman Hagen; Chaplain Gilbert Medina; Post Advocate Laddie Ruzica; Surgeon Al Campa; One-Year Trustee Richard Bennett; Two-Year Trustee Don Dickinson, and Three-Year Trustee Gilbert Wagner. Homeschoolers to meet j> The Christian Homeschoolers of Southern Nevada, a homeschooling support group and fellowship, will meet from 7 to 8;30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15, at Green Valley Baptist Church, 270 Valle Verde Dr., between Warm Springs and Wigwam, in Henderson. -^ The meeting will feature aP' guest speaker, and the legal environment of homeschooling will be discussed as well as other topics of interest to the families. Parents who are currently homeschooling and those who are considering it are welcome to attend. Children are welcome, and supervised activities will be provided. For more information, call codirector Michael Bom, 269-8048, orCHOSENvoicemail, 391-8625 and leave message. SUPPORT YOUR COIVIMUNITY NEWSPAPER CLOCK REPAIR 294-1133 GEORGE E. MERINO M.D. FACS, FiCS, Board Certified Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery General Vascular Surgery Specializing in Surgery of the heart, lungs, arteries & veins. Non-invasive in-office evaluation of circulation disorders. VASCULAR U0O1UTORY Medicare AsiJgnmenf Accepted Provider to most PPOs and Insuronce plans. PARK FLAMINGO EAST 2110 E. FLAMINGO RD. SUITE 201 LAS VEGAS, NV 734-2121 Thursday, October 10, 1996 Henderson Home News Pefli 15 Equestrmn event brings horsemen The eighth annual Las Vegas Horse Trials/3-Day Event will take place Oct. 12-14 at Horseman's Park and Floyd Lamb State Park hosted by Las Vegas Equestrian Events, Inc. The sport of 3-Day Eventing began in the 1900s as a combined : training test for military men and their horses. The combined training horse trails, otherwise known as the 3-i)ay Event, was added to the^ Qlympic Games in 1912. / Three-Day Eventing tests the jumping abilities, courage, and trainability of horses as well as the capabilities of riders through dressage, show jumping and cross country. Dressage will be held at 8 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 12, at Horseman's Park. Cross Country takes place at 8 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 13, at Floyd Lamb State Park. Show Jumping will be held on Monday, Oct. 14. LVEE will again host the Western Regional Adult Team Championships accredited by the U.S. Combined Training Association at the trials which will bring in competitors from Colorado, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Utah, Montana, Arizona and others. The non-profit organization is dedicated to the Olympic sport of 3-Day Eventing and competition in Southern Nevada. The trials, which draw competitors from 11 Western states, enables the public to enjoy live equestrian sports. The organization relies solely on donations, grants and volunteer work from the public. The quality and integrity of the nonprofit organization has helped to bring equestrian sports to a new level in the Las Vegas valley and has been instrumental in extending national recognition to Las Vegas. It lends support to all equestrian groups in the area and is truly an asset to the commtmity. The number of competitors and spectators grow each year and this year's horse trials holds no exception. Fxmd-raising for the event is on-going. Financial and volunteer support is needed to continue to bring this event to the community and celebrate the wonderful world of horses. • "•'• • •;'•.: ."i \ • '... • "For more information on sponsoring the event or volunteering call Tammy Hanson, LVEE vice president, 655-6380. Disabilities workshop announced An Americans with Disabilities Act workshop will be offered from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 15, at Saturn of Henderson. [\r':;7^'x:'7\W^W^" Individuals who success^lly complete this workshop are eligible to become ADA compliance officers for businesses and to take the National Registration Examination to become a regi stered accessibility consultant. Such consultants are eligible for employment with the Accessibility Compliance Team throughout the U.S. or to start their own ADA consulting business. The workshop cost is $169, or$149 for registration before P,-The fee includes the workshop, the 300-page Accessibility Compliance text, the 150-page National Accessibilj^;^ Directory and lunch. -. :, •^'i. The ADA is a federal antidiscrimination statute designed to remove barriers which prevent qualified individuals with disabilities from enjoying the same opportunities that are available to persons who are not disabled. The ADA requires every business, most government entities and organizations in the U.S. to provide both equal access and reasonable accommodations to all qualified individuals with disabilities in the areas of equal employment opportunities, and equal access to state and local government services, to public accommodations, to transportation, and to telecommunications. Call Jackie Maugh, 678-0526, for more information or to request special accommodations for people with disabilities. This "monopoly-like" game displays forty Henderson businesses as featured prestigious real estate properties on the lx>ard game. THE "GAME OF HENDERSON" \s SPONSORED BY UIIS NauoN tu MIMARI P.T.A GAME OF HENDERSON ORDER lORif'l GAME OF HENDERSON boAtAs \silldiipl.i\ thv Hcndcison Se,\l And iw\s Motto with pride within the center of each game iwArd. I Order by SepumberSOih for DecmnherlHUutry I NAME PHONE # i I I I BUSINESS. ADDRESS. CITY .STATE. .ZIP. I The "GAME OF HENDERSON" is $20 including tax, I Quantity TrrfSqV.ATTr •/ • irn'/flMnurfi rr MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALI ftmis RANDOM HALF TIME GIVEAWAYS FOR A TOTAL OF $500 CASH, HOTEL DINNERS & PRIZES JOIN HARVEY HYDE FOR THE PRE-GAME SHOW AT 5PM FOOD & BEVERAGE SPECIALS: • 75< HOT DOG •SOK DRAFT BEER •50< NACHOS •50< PRETZELS SPORTS BOOK SPECIALS From Half Time Through The End Of The Game, Receive 5% Vig On The Following Week's Gomes And Move The Line Up Or Down 1 /2 Point On Your Wager. Free Sahara T-Shirt With A $ 10 Bet.' •\Miile Supplies Lojt POKER SPECIALS Monday Night Football A^dness Tournaments $15 Buy In With $10 Re-Buys. •7 Gjrd Stud •Texas Hold 'em Party Held In The Turf Club Deli Next To The Race & Sporh Book. SMMM HOTEL AND CASINO PUBLISH: October 10,1996 HENDERSON HOME NEWS RMtcd: TucMiay, October S, 1996 at the roHowing locatioiui aiy HaU, 240 Water Street Emergency Services Facility, 223 Lead Street Green Valley Library, 2797 Green Valley Parkway Hendenon Boyi' and Girb' Ouh, 1608 MiMier Drive Community College of Southern Nevada, Building A, 700 College Drive ACENDA Tuesday, October 15,1996 6:30 pjn. AGENDA ITEMS RECEIVED AFTER 11:00 A.M. ON OCTOBER 7,1996 WILL NOT BE SEEN ON THE AGENDA AS PUBLISHED, BUT MAY APPEAR ON THE AGENDA AS ADDED ITEMS OR ADDENDA. COMMITTEE MEETING COUNCIL CHAMBER HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL 240 WATER STREET NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DISABILniES Members of the public who are disabled or require special assistance or accommodatiom at the meeting are requested to notify the City Clerk by Ulephoning (702) 565-2057 at lewt acventy-two hours in advance of the meeting. NOTE: ALL ITEMS ARE ACTION ITEMS UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED. The Mayor reserves the right to hear agenda items out of order. I. CALL TO ORDER IL CONFIRMATION OF POSTING III. ROLL CALL IV. ACCEPTANCE OF AGENDA V. ITEMS OF BUSINESS C-1 BILL NO. 1339 • ZOA-10-96 AMEND TITLE 19 HEIGHT LIMITS FOR FREESTANDING SIGNS AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND TITLE 19 OF THE HENDERSON MUNICIPA L CODE BY ESTABLISHING HEIGHT LIMITS FOR FREESTANDING SIGNS APPROVED THROUGH MASTER SIGN PLAN, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. C-2 BILL NO. 1341 -AMEND TITLE 15 UNIFORM BUILDING CODEHREPUCES ANORDINANCEOFTUE CFFY COUNCIL OFTHE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA, TO AMEND TITLE 15, UNIFORM BUILDING CODE, BY CREATING A NEW SECTISENTITLED"nREPLACES"; PROVIDING OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELATING THERETO; AND REPEALING ALLORDINANCES, RESOLUTIONSOR PARTS THEREOF IN CONFLICT HEREWITH. C-3 BILL NO. 1342 H.M.C. 4.36.380LICENSED PREMISESENTERTAINMENT AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON TO CLARIFY THAT ANY ESTABLISHMENTS GRANDFATHERED IN WHEN ORDINANCE NO. 1541 WAS PASSED CONTINUE TO BE REGULATED BY THE SAME REGULATIONS THAT HAD BEEN IN PLACE PRIOR TO ADOPTION OF ORDINANCE NO. 1541. „ .... C-4 BILL NO. 1344 • ZOA-8-SNS • %--rv'v^ PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT INDICATORSZONING MAPS APPLICANT: CITY OF HENDERSON AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON TO AMEND TfTLE 19 OFTHE HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE BY REPEALING THE REQUIREMENT FOR A PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT INDICATOR ON THE ZONING MAP, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. C-5 BILL NO. 1345 Z-52.96 1s! BLACK MOUNTAIN GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHINTHE CITY LIMITS OFTHE CITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 33 SOUTH, RANGE 66 EAST, M.D.B. & M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM OS (OPEN SPACE) DISTRICT TO PS (PUBLIC AND SEMI-PUBLIC) DISTRICT, LOCATED SOUTHEAST OF GREENWAY ROAD AND THE UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD, IN THE BLACK HILLS PLANNING AREA, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO. V ,^^XaP*. s ; C-6 BILL NO. 1346-ZOA-3-96 ':^ i U"^ -^>.? HOSTELS >,^; APPLICANT: MIRAMAR CORPORATION -i* *' AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON TO AMEND TITLE 19 OF THE HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE BY DEFINING HOSTELS AND BY AMENDING REGULATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL ZONES BY ALLOWING CERTAIN HOSTELS, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. ,.VL ADJOURNMENT fcJiv. /, PUBLISH: October 10,1996 HENDERSON HOME NEWS Posted: Tuesday, October 8,1996} • • • at the following locations: City Hall, 240 Water Street Emergency Services Facility, 223 Lead Street Green Valley Library, 2797 Green Valley Parkway Hendereon Boys'and GIris'Club, 1608 Moser Drive ^ • '" .TJ' Community Ciillege of Southern Nevada, Building A, 700 CoilegeDriv* -' AGENDA Tuesday, October 15,1996 ,, -^..ft^ 7:00 pjn. •.,-, -^ AGENDA ITEMS RECEIVED AFTER 11:00 A.M. ON OCTOBER 7,1996 WILL NOT BE SEEN ON THE AGENDA AS PUBLISHED, BUT MAY APPFJVR ON THE AGENDA AS ADDED ITEMS OR ADDENDA. REGULAR MEETING ^ ;.,, _^COUNCIL CHAMBER HENDERSON CTTY COUNCIL ^^'-240 WATER STREET NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DISABILTTIES Members of (he public who are disabled or require special assistance oraccommodulions at the meetiiw are requested lo notify the City Clerk by telephoning (70^ 565-2057 ul least seventy4wu hours in advance of the meeting. NOTE: ALL ITEMS ARE ACTION ITEMS UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED. The Mayor reserves the right to hear agenda ilcin.s out of order. I. CALL TO ORDER II. CONnRMATIONOF POSTING III. ROLL CALL, INVOCATION, PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE IV. ACCEPTANCE OF AGENDA V. PRESENTATIONS PR-l PRESENTATION EXCELLENCE IN RNANCIAL REPORTING AND A WARD OF nNANCIAL REPORTING ACHIEVEMENT Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting to the City ofHendenon and Award of Financial Reporting Ai*ieveinent toSteve Hanson, Finance Director, by the Government Finance Officer's Assitcialioa PR-2 PRESENTATION BLUE RIBBON COMMISSION ON EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE AND YOUTH OPPORTUNITY Presentation of annual report from Blue Ribbon Commissiim on Educational Excellence and Youth Opportunity. PR-3 COMMi^NDATION VICTORY VALLEY LAND COMPANY Commendation by the Economic Development Commission's Business Recognilion Protram to Victory Valley Land Company. VL CONSENT AGENDA UNLESS AN ITEM IS PULLED FOR DISCUSSION, COUNCIL WILL TAKE ACTION ON CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS Ntt CA-4 THROUGH C:A-S5 WITH ONE MOTION, ACCEPTING THE RECOMMENDATIONS AS STATED ON THE AGENDA. TO PULL AN TTEM FOR DISCUSSION, PLEASE NOTIFY THE CTTY CLERK BY PRESENTING A YELLOW SIGN-UP CARD BEFORE COUNCIL TAKES ACTION ON THE CONSENT AGENDA. YELLOW SIGN-UP CARDS ARE AVAILABLE AT THE BACK OF THE COUNCIL CHAMBERS AND )(T THE PODIUM. CA-4 CASH REQUIREMENTS REGISTER Cash Requirements Register for the month of October, 1996w CA-5 MINUTES* COMMnTEE AND REGULAR MEETINGS OF OCTOBER 1,1996 Minutes Committee and Regular Meetii^ of October 1,199 APPLICANT: BRINKER NEVADA INC. • V^ \f Review of a proposed restaurant litcated at 573 North SteptTaidrStfeet; hi the Whitney Ranch planning area. CA-40 ARCHITECTURAL REVIEWAR-2fl7-96 P-20 POTABLE WATER PUMPING STATION APPLICANT: SEVEN HILLS DEVELOPMENT CO. Review of pumping station, generally liH-ated on Eastern Avenue south of Maryland Parkway, in an unincorpora(ed area of Clark Coun(y. CA-41 ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW AR-208-96 R-21 POTABLE WATER RESERVOIR APPLICANT: SEVEN HILLS DEVELOPMENT CO. Review of pot able water reservoir, generally located on Ea.strm A venuesouth of Maryland Parkway, in an unincorporated area of Clark County. EXTENSION OF TIME CA-42 ZONE CHANGE Z-57-95 FULWIDER OFFICE COMPLEX APPLICANT: SGOTT FULWIDER Request for extension of time for reclassifica(ion request from RS-2 (Single Family Residential) district to CN (Neighborhood Commercial) district on IS acres, located at the northeast comer of Horizon Ridge Parkway and Carmichael Way, in the Green Valley Ranch planning area. EXTENSIONS OF TIME CA-43a USE PERMITU-62-9S CA-43b PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT/TENTATIVE MAP PUIVTM-62-95 THE MONARCH AT GREEN VALLEY APPLICANT: FREY DEVELOPMENT Request for extension of time to allow an independent and assisted care living facility, and convalescent facility; and extension of time for tentative map and residential ptaiiiH'd unit development consisting of 160 units of independent and assisted care living, and 160-hrd convalescent facility and medical fifTice at 301 Prince Royal Drive, in the Green Valley North planning area. CA-44a USE PERMITU.99-96 Ca-44b ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW-AR-186-96 > WENDY'S APPLICANT: WENDY'S OF LAS VEGAS INC Request for restaurant with drive-thmugh service; and review of proposed restaurant at 500 North Green Valley Parkway, in the Green Valley South planning area. CA-45a USE PERMITU-107-96 CA-45b ARCHITECTURAL REVIEWAR-196.96 HORIZON RIDGE RESBRVOIR AND RATE-OF-FLOW CONTROL STATION CA-45c USE PERMITU-lOS-96 CA.45d ARCHITECTURAL REVIEWAR-I95-96 SOUTH VALLEY REGULATING TANK CA-45C USE PERMITU-106-96 CA-45f ARCHrTECTURAL REVIEW AR-197.96 PARKWAY RATE-OF-FLOW CONTROL STATION APPLICANT: SOUTHERN NEVADA WATER AUTHORTTY Review of a proposed 20-miDian-gallon water reservoir and rate-of-flow control station kicalcd •outhwcst of Annrt Street and Horizcated at 1753 West Horizon Ridge Pariiway, in the MacDonaM Ranch plwining area. CA-52a USE PERMIT U-114-96 CA-52b ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW AR-206-96 SCHLOTZSKY'S DELI APPLICANT: EMBREE CONSTRUCTION GROUP Request for drive-through window; and review of proposed restaurant located at 673 Mai Ring Circle, in the Whitney Ranch planning area. CA-53a USE PERMIT U-117-96 CA-53b ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW AR-213-96 BURKHOLDER REGULATING RESERVOIR AND RIVER MOUNTAINS PUMPING STATION APPLICANT: SOUTHERN NEVADA WATER AUTHORTTY Request for regulating reservoir and pumping station; and review at regulating reservoir and pumping station, generally located northeast of Equestrian Drive and Magk Way, in the Foothills and River Mountain planning areas. CA-54a USE PERMITU-118-96 CA-54b ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW-AR-214-96 ..>i,..i^. FOOTHILLS PUMPING STATION -rs^.''::'^-::-^:;::'':''-:^'APPLICANT: SOUTHERN NEVADA WATER AUTttORrfY Request for pumping station; and review of pniposed pumping station generally located southeast of East Lake Mead Drive and Golda Way, in the Foothills planning area. CA-55 nNAL MAPFM-131-96 PECOS LEGACY CENTER Final Map (FM-131-96) for Pecos Legacy Center • 1 lot-16.40 acres. VH. PUBLIC HEARINGS PH-56PUBLIC HEARING REUSE WATER INFRASTRUCTURE REFUNDING PROGRAM Public Hearing Reuse Water Infrastrudure Refunding Program. PH-57 PUBLIC HEARING VACATION VAC-17-96 sv AMEND CONDITIONS • FOOTHILL INVEST. CO. AND LEWIS HOMES Removal of condition No. 2 from Vacation (VAC-17-96), tvhich was approved by City Council on August 6,1S>96. PH-58 PUBLIC HEARING VACATION VAC-2S-96 FOOTHILL INVESTMENT CO. & LEWIS HOMES Request to vacate two public utility and drainage easements in the Foothills South No. 13 subdivision, in the River Mountain planqing area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDS APPROVAL) PH-59 PUBLIC HEARING VACATION VAC-26-96 LEWIS HOMES OF NEVADA Request to vacate portiims ofthe cul-de-suc bulb on Anchorgatc Court right-of-way in the MacDonald Ranch planning area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMEN'DS APPROVAL) PUBLIC HEARING "^ "' PH-60a CPA-33.96 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT PH-60b Z-S9.96 ZONE CHANGE FOOTHILL INVESTMENT CO. Request to amend the land use from Residenliul and Highway Commercial to Residential and Commercial (relocate boundary line); and reviewof a reclassiflcation request from RR (Rural Residential) district and CH-G (Highway Commerrial with Gaming Eiilrrprisc Overiuy)di.strict to RS-6(Single Family Rrsidtntiul) district andCH (High way Com me rdal) district on 28.6 acrest, located at AppulmMa Rood and Wagon Wheel Drive, in the River Mountain planning area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDS APPROVAL) PH-61 RF:SOLUTION CPA-33-96 FOOTHILL INVESTMENT COMPANY ,.i ARESOLUTIONOFTHECITYCOUNCILOFTHECITYOFHENDERSON, NEVADA, TO AMEND THE LAND USE POLICY PLAN OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FOR THE PURPOSE OF CHANGING THE LAND USE DF^SIGNATION OF CERTAIN PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON DESCRIBED AS A PARCEL OF LAND CONTAINING 28.6 ACRES, MORE OR LESS, AND DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 63 EA.ST, M.D.M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RESIDENTIAL AND HIGHWAY COMMERCIAL TO RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIA L, LOCATED ATA I'PA LOOSA ROAD AND WAJJON WHEELD^E, IN THE RIVER MOUNTAIN PLANNING AREA. -i.:_jfci/^ 1;£^~'^' PH-62 RESOLin ION Z-S9.96 J, : .^ FOOTHILL INVESTMENT COMPANY A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON COMMITTING THE CTTY COUNCIL TO REZONE CERTAIN PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDER.SON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTTION 27, TOWNSHIP 22 SOU! H, RANGE 63 EAST, M.D.B. & M., CURK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RR (RURAL RESIDENTIAL) DISTRICT AND CH-G (HIGHWAY COMMERCIAL WITH GAMING ENTERPRISE OVERLAY) DISTRICT TO RS-6 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDEN1IAL) DI.STRICT AND CH (HIGHWAY COMMERCIAL) DISTRICT, LOCATED AT AI'PALOOSA ROAD AND WAGON WHEEL DRIVE, IN THE RIVER MOUNTAIN PLANNING AREA. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDS APPROVAL) VIII. CITIZEN'S CONCERNS IX. UNHNISHED BUSINESS UB-63 ONE MAYORAL COMMISSION APPOINTMENT FROM WARD IV HENDERSON PLANNING COMMI.SSION One Mayoral appoinlmrnt from Ward IV to the Henderson Planning Commission. (CONTINUED FROM SEPTEMBER 17,1996) UB-64 APPEAL OF DENIAL BY DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS LAS VEGAS VALLEY WATER DISTRICT POTABLE WATER DEAN O'BANNON Appeal of Director of Public Works' denial of the use of Las Vegas Valley Water District potable water within the corp AMEND TITLE 19 OF THE HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE BY DEFINING HOSTELS AND BY AMENDING REGULATIONS FOR COMMEROAL ZONKS BY ALLOWING CERTAIN HOSTELS. AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERBItX (RNAL ACTION) CA-4S USE PERMTT • U-IU-M nmSKT VBTA BUSINESS PARK APPUCANTi SUNSET VISTA BUSINESS PARK Pag1 ^>.

PAGE 15

T r -w'^ yn^ i^^^pi^i^^^^ mmmmrf^H^^l^m'mmm J^l-^. Pfl14 Henderson Home News Thursday, October 10.1996 I I i \t the Library GREEN VALLEY LIBRARY 2797 N. Green Valley Parkway, Henderson — 435-1840 Thursday, Oct. 10 7 p.m., Charioteers Classic Car Club (Sunset Room) Friday, Oct. 11 9 a.m.-lp.in.. Qark County Health Department, Free immunization Qinic (Sunset Room) Sunday, Oct. 13 2 p.m., Os Too: Prostate Cancer Support Group (Sunset Room) Monday, Oct. 14 LIBRARY CLOSED IN OBSERVATION OF COLUMBUS DAY Tuesday, Oct. 15 10 a.m., Overeaters Anonymous (Sunset Room) 4:45 p.m.. Brownie Troop #68 (Sunset Room) 6 p.m.. Green Valley Stitchers (Sunset Room) 6:30 p.m., Rancho Nevada Estates Board Meeting (Conference Room) Wednesday, Oct. 16 10 a.m.. La Leche League (Sunset Room) 7 p.m., Qark County Genealogical Society: An informative free fvogram for the public on how to conduct a genealogic^oc^.. -: search (Sunset Room) 6:30 p.m.. Frontier Estates Homeowners' Association Executive Board meeting (Conference Room) Henderson y Boulder City VFW Posts consolidate Boulder City's Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3574 has requested -they be allowed to consolidate with F'ost 3848 in Henderson. They have complied with the national by-laws and procedures in following the steps necessary to consolidate lAW Section 209. VFW State Commander George Ruth reviewed letters firom both posts requesting consolidation and it was approved. In May 1996, both posts voted to retain the name Basic Post 3848 with the Charter date of Jan. 23, 1937. Basic Post 3848 officers for 1996-1997 are: Commander Dennis Cournoyer; Sr. Vice Commander Paul Gdrgis; Jr. Vice Commander Leonard Hagar; Quartermaster Gordon Gablin; Adjutant Herman Hagen; Chaplain Gilbert Medina; Post Advocate Laddie Ruzica; Surgeon Al Campa; One-Year Trustee Richard Bennett; Two-Year Trustee Don Dickinson, and Three-Year Trustee Gilbert Wagner. Homeschoolers to meet j> The Christian Homeschoolers of Southern Nevada, a homeschooling support group and fellowship, will meet from 7 to 8;30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15, at Green Valley Baptist Church, 270 Valle Verde Dr., between Warm Springs and Wigwam, in Henderson. -^ The meeting will feature aP' guest speaker, and the legal environment of homeschooling will be discussed as well as other topics of interest to the families. Parents who are currently homeschooling and those who are considering it are welcome to attend. Children are welcome, and supervised activities will be provided. For more information, call codirector Michael Bom, 269-8048, orCHOSENvoicemail, 391-8625 and leave message. SUPPORT YOUR COIVIMUNITY NEWSPAPER CLOCK REPAIR 294-1133 GEORGE E. MERINO M.D. FACS, FiCS, Board Certified Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery General Vascular Surgery Specializing in Surgery of the heart, lungs, arteries & veins. Non-invasive in-office evaluation of circulation disorders. VASCULAR U0O1UTORY Medicare AsiJgnmenf Accepted Provider to most PPOs and Insuronce plans. PARK FLAMINGO EAST 2110 E. FLAMINGO RD. SUITE 201 LAS VEGAS, NV 734-2121 Thursday, October 10, 1996 Henderson Home News Pefli 15 Equestrmn event brings horsemen The eighth annual Las Vegas Horse Trials/3-Day Event will take place Oct. 12-14 at Horseman's Park and Floyd Lamb State Park hosted by Las Vegas Equestrian Events, Inc. The sport of 3-Day Eventing began in the 1900s as a combined : training test for military men and their horses. The combined training horse trails, otherwise known as the 3-i)ay Event, was added to the^ Qlympic Games in 1912. / Three-Day Eventing tests the jumping abilities, courage, and trainability of horses as well as the capabilities of riders through dressage, show jumping and cross country. Dressage will be held at 8 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 12, at Horseman's Park. Cross Country takes place at 8 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 13, at Floyd Lamb State Park. Show Jumping will be held on Monday, Oct. 14. LVEE will again host the Western Regional Adult Team Championships accredited by the U.S. Combined Training Association at the trials which will bring in competitors from Colorado, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Utah, Montana, Arizona and others. The non-profit organization is dedicated to the Olympic sport of 3-Day Eventing and competition in Southern Nevada. The trials, which draw competitors from 11 Western states, enables the public to enjoy live equestrian sports. The organization relies solely on donations, grants and volunteer work from the public. The quality and integrity of the nonprofit organization has helped to bring equestrian sports to a new level in the Las Vegas valley and has been instrumental in extending national recognition to Las Vegas. It lends support to all equestrian groups in the area and is truly an asset to the commtmity. The number of competitors and spectators grow each year and this year's horse trials holds no exception. Fxmd-raising for the event is on-going. Financial and volunteer support is needed to continue to bring this event to the community and celebrate the wonderful world of horses. • "•'• • •;'•.: ."i \ • '... • "For more information on sponsoring the event or volunteering call Tammy Hanson, LVEE vice president, 655-6380. Disabilities workshop announced An Americans with Disabilities Act workshop will be offered from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 15, at Saturn of Henderson. [\r':;7^'x:'7\W^W^" Individuals who success^lly complete this workshop are eligible to become ADA compliance officers for businesses and to take the National Registration Examination to become a regi stered accessibility consultant. Such consultants are eligible for employment with the Accessibility Compliance Team throughout the U.S. or to start their own ADA consulting business. The workshop cost is $169, or$149 for registration before P,-The fee includes the workshop, the 300-page Accessibility Compliance text, the 150-page National Accessibilj^;^ Directory and lunch. -. :, •^'i. The ADA is a federal antidiscrimination statute designed to remove barriers which prevent qualified individuals with disabilities from enjoying the same opportunities that are available to persons who are not disabled. The ADA requires every business, most government entities and organizations in the U.S. to provide both equal access and reasonable accommodations to all qualified individuals with disabilities in the areas of equal employment opportunities, and equal access to state and local government services, to public accommodations, to transportation, and to telecommunications. Call Jackie Maugh, 678-0526, for more information or to request special accommodations for people with disabilities. This "monopoly-like" game displays forty Henderson businesses as featured prestigious real estate properties on the lx>ard game. THE "GAME OF HENDERSON" \s SPONSORED BY UIIS NauoN tu MIMARI P.T.A GAME OF HENDERSON ORDER lORif'l GAME OF HENDERSON boAtAs \silldiipl.i\ thv Hcndcison Se,\l And iw\s Motto with pride within the center of each game iwArd. I Order by SepumberSOih for DecmnherlHUutry I NAME PHONE # i I I I BUSINESS. ADDRESS. CITY .STATE. .ZIP. I The "GAME OF HENDERSON" is $20 including tax, I Quantity TrrfSqV.ATTr •/ • irn'/flMnurfi rr MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALI ftmis RANDOM HALF TIME GIVEAWAYS FOR A TOTAL OF $500 CASH, HOTEL DINNERS & PRIZES JOIN HARVEY HYDE FOR THE PRE-GAME SHOW AT 5PM FOOD & BEVERAGE SPECIALS: • 75< HOT DOG •SOK DRAFT BEER •50< NACHOS •50< PRETZELS SPORTS BOOK SPECIALS From Half Time Through The End Of The Game, Receive 5% Vig On The Following Week's Gomes And Move The Line Up Or Down 1 /2 Point On Your Wager. Free Sahara T-Shirt With A $ 10 Bet.' •\Miile Supplies Lojt POKER SPECIALS Monday Night Football A^dness Tournaments $15 Buy In With $10 Re-Buys. •7 Gjrd Stud •Texas Hold 'em Party Held In The Turf Club Deli Next To The Race & Sporh Book. SMMM HOTEL AND CASINO PUBLISH: October 10,1996 HENDERSON HOME NEWS RMtcd: TucMiay, October S, 1996 at the roHowing locatioiui aiy HaU, 240 Water Street Emergency Services Facility, 223 Lead Street Green Valley Library, 2797 Green Valley Parkway Hendenon Boyi' and Girb' Ouh, 1608 MiMier Drive Community College of Southern Nevada, Building A, 700 College Drive ACENDA Tuesday, October 15,1996 6:30 pjn. AGENDA ITEMS RECEIVED AFTER 11:00 A.M. ON OCTOBER 7,1996 WILL NOT BE SEEN ON THE AGENDA AS PUBLISHED, BUT MAY APPEAR ON THE AGENDA AS ADDED ITEMS OR ADDENDA. COMMITTEE MEETING COUNCIL CHAMBER HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL 240 WATER STREET NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DISABILniES Members of the public who are disabled or require special assistance or accommodatiom at the meeting are requested to notify the City Clerk by Ulephoning (702) 565-2057 at lewt acventy-two hours in advance of the meeting. NOTE: ALL ITEMS ARE ACTION ITEMS UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED. The Mayor reserves the right to hear agenda items out of order. I. CALL TO ORDER IL CONFIRMATION OF POSTING III. ROLL CALL IV. ACCEPTANCE OF AGENDA V. ITEMS OF BUSINESS C-1 BILL NO. 1339 • ZOA-10-96 AMEND TITLE 19 HEIGHT LIMITS FOR FREESTANDING SIGNS AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND TITLE 19 OF THE HENDERSON MUNICIPA L CODE BY ESTABLISHING HEIGHT LIMITS FOR FREESTANDING SIGNS APPROVED THROUGH MASTER SIGN PLAN, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. C-2 BILL NO. 1341 -AMEND TITLE 15 UNIFORM BUILDING CODEHREPUCES ANORDINANCEOFTUE CFFY COUNCIL OFTHE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA, TO AMEND TITLE 15, UNIFORM BUILDING CODE, BY CREATING A NEW SECTISENTITLED"nREPLACES"; PROVIDING OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELATING THERETO; AND REPEALING ALLORDINANCES, RESOLUTIONSOR PARTS THEREOF IN CONFLICT HEREWITH. C-3 BILL NO. 1342 H.M.C. 4.36.380LICENSED PREMISESENTERTAINMENT AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON TO CLARIFY THAT ANY ESTABLISHMENTS GRANDFATHERED IN WHEN ORDINANCE NO. 1541 WAS PASSED CONTINUE TO BE REGULATED BY THE SAME REGULATIONS THAT HAD BEEN IN PLACE PRIOR TO ADOPTION OF ORDINANCE NO. 1541. „ .... C-4 BILL NO. 1344 • ZOA-8-SNS • %--rv'v^ PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT INDICATORSZONING MAPS APPLICANT: CITY OF HENDERSON AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON TO AMEND TfTLE 19 OFTHE HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE BY REPEALING THE REQUIREMENT FOR A PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT INDICATOR ON THE ZONING MAP, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. C-5 BILL NO. 1345 Z-52.96 1s! BLACK MOUNTAIN GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHINTHE CITY LIMITS OFTHE CITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 33 SOUTH, RANGE 66 EAST, M.D.B. & M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM OS (OPEN SPACE) DISTRICT TO PS (PUBLIC AND SEMI-PUBLIC) DISTRICT, LOCATED SOUTHEAST OF GREENWAY ROAD AND THE UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD, IN THE BLACK HILLS PLANNING AREA, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO. V ,^^XaP*. s ; C-6 BILL NO. 1346-ZOA-3-96 ':^ i U"^ -^>.? HOSTELS >,^; APPLICANT: MIRAMAR CORPORATION -i* *' AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON TO AMEND TITLE 19 OF THE HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE BY DEFINING HOSTELS AND BY AMENDING REGULATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL ZONES BY ALLOWING CERTAIN HOSTELS, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. ,.VL ADJOURNMENT fcJiv. /, PUBLISH: October 10,1996 HENDERSON HOME NEWS Posted: Tuesday, October 8,1996} • • • at the following locations: City Hall, 240 Water Street Emergency Services Facility, 223 Lead Street Green Valley Library, 2797 Green Valley Parkway Hendereon Boys'and GIris'Club, 1608 Moser Drive ^ • '" .TJ' Community Ciillege of Southern Nevada, Building A, 700 CoilegeDriv* -' AGENDA Tuesday, October 15,1996 ,, -^..ft^ 7:00 pjn. •.,-, -^ AGENDA ITEMS RECEIVED AFTER 11:00 A.M. ON OCTOBER 7,1996 WILL NOT BE SEEN ON THE AGENDA AS PUBLISHED, BUT MAY APPFJVR ON THE AGENDA AS ADDED ITEMS OR ADDENDA. REGULAR MEETING ^ ;.,, _^COUNCIL CHAMBER HENDERSON CTTY COUNCIL ^^'-240 WATER STREET NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DISABILTTIES Members of (he public who are disabled or require special assistance oraccommodulions at the meetiiw are requested lo notify the City Clerk by telephoning (70^ 565-2057 ul least seventy4wu hours in advance of the meeting. NOTE: ALL ITEMS ARE ACTION ITEMS UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED. The Mayor reserves the right to hear agenda ilcin.s out of order. I. CALL TO ORDER II. CONnRMATIONOF POSTING III. ROLL CALL, INVOCATION, PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE IV. ACCEPTANCE OF AGENDA V. PRESENTATIONS PR-l PRESENTATION EXCELLENCE IN RNANCIAL REPORTING AND A WARD OF nNANCIAL REPORTING ACHIEVEMENT Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting to the City ofHendenon and Award of Financial Reporting Ai*ieveinent toSteve Hanson, Finance Director, by the Government Finance Officer's Assitcialioa PR-2 PRESENTATION BLUE RIBBON COMMISSION ON EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE AND YOUTH OPPORTUNITY Presentation of annual report from Blue Ribbon Commissiim on Educational Excellence and Youth Opportunity. PR-3 COMMi^NDATION VICTORY VALLEY LAND COMPANY Commendation by the Economic Development Commission's Business Recognilion Protram to Victory Valley Land Company. VL CONSENT AGENDA UNLESS AN ITEM IS PULLED FOR DISCUSSION, COUNCIL WILL TAKE ACTION ON CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS Ntt CA-4 THROUGH C:A-S5 WITH ONE MOTION, ACCEPTING THE RECOMMENDATIONS AS STATED ON THE AGENDA. TO PULL AN TTEM FOR DISCUSSION, PLEASE NOTIFY THE CTTY CLERK BY PRESENTING A YELLOW SIGN-UP CARD BEFORE COUNCIL TAKES ACTION ON THE CONSENT AGENDA. YELLOW SIGN-UP CARDS ARE AVAILABLE AT THE BACK OF THE COUNCIL CHAMBERS AND )(T THE PODIUM. CA-4 CASH REQUIREMENTS REGISTER Cash Requirements Register for the month of October, 1996w CA-5 MINUTES* COMMnTEE AND REGULAR MEETINGS OF OCTOBER 1,1996 Minutes Committee and Regular Meetii^ of October 1,199 APPLICANT: BRINKER NEVADA INC. • V^ \f Review of a proposed restaurant litcated at 573 North SteptTaidrStfeet; hi the Whitney Ranch planning area. CA-40 ARCHITECTURAL REVIEWAR-2fl7-96 P-20 POTABLE WATER PUMPING STATION APPLICANT: SEVEN HILLS DEVELOPMENT CO. Review of pumping station, generally liH-ated on Eastern Avenue south of Maryland Parkway, in an unincorpora(ed area of Clark Coun(y. CA-41 ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW AR-208-96 R-21 POTABLE WATER RESERVOIR APPLICANT: SEVEN HILLS DEVELOPMENT CO. Review of pot able water reservoir, generally located on Ea.strm A venuesouth of Maryland Parkway, in an unincorporated area of Clark County. EXTENSION OF TIME CA-42 ZONE CHANGE Z-57-95 FULWIDER OFFICE COMPLEX APPLICANT: SGOTT FULWIDER Request for extension of time for reclassifica(ion request from RS-2 (Single Family Residential) district to CN (Neighborhood Commercial) district on IS acres, located at the northeast comer of Horizon Ridge Parkway and Carmichael Way, in the Green Valley Ranch planning area. EXTENSIONS OF TIME CA-43a USE PERMITU-62-9S CA-43b PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT/TENTATIVE MAP PUIVTM-62-95 THE MONARCH AT GREEN VALLEY APPLICANT: FREY DEVELOPMENT Request for extension of time to allow an independent and assisted care living facility, and convalescent facility; and extension of time for tentative map and residential ptaiiiH'd unit development consisting of 160 units of independent and assisted care living, and 160-hrd convalescent facility and medical fifTice at 301 Prince Royal Drive, in the Green Valley North planning area. CA-44a USE PERMITU.99-96 Ca-44b ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW-AR-186-96 > WENDY'S APPLICANT: WENDY'S OF LAS VEGAS INC Request for restaurant with drive-thmugh service; and review of proposed restaurant at 500 North Green Valley Parkway, in the Green Valley South planning area. CA-45a USE PERMITU-107-96 CA-45b ARCHITECTURAL REVIEWAR-196.96 HORIZON RIDGE RESBRVOIR AND RATE-OF-FLOW CONTROL STATION CA-45c USE PERMITU-lOS-96 CA.45d ARCHITECTURAL REVIEWAR-I95-96 SOUTH VALLEY REGULATING TANK CA-45C USE PERMITU-106-96 CA-45f ARCHrTECTURAL REVIEW AR-197.96 PARKWAY RATE-OF-FLOW CONTROL STATION APPLICANT: SOUTHERN NEVADA WATER AUTHORTTY Review of a proposed 20-miDian-gallon water reservoir and rate-of-flow control station kicalcd •outhwcst of Annrt Street and Horizcated at 1753 West Horizon Ridge Pariiway, in the MacDonaM Ranch plwining area. CA-52a USE PERMIT U-114-96 CA-52b ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW AR-206-96 SCHLOTZSKY'S DELI APPLICANT: EMBREE CONSTRUCTION GROUP Request for drive-through window; and review of proposed restaurant located at 673 Mai Ring Circle, in the Whitney Ranch planning area. CA-53a USE PERMIT U-117-96 CA-53b ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW AR-213-96 BURKHOLDER REGULATING RESERVOIR AND RIVER MOUNTAINS PUMPING STATION APPLICANT: SOUTHERN NEVADA WATER AUTHORTTY Request for regulating reservoir and pumping station; and review at regulating reservoir and pumping station, generally located northeast of Equestrian Drive and Magk Way, in the Foothills and River Mountain planning areas. CA-54a USE PERMITU-118-96 CA-54b ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW-AR-214-96 ..>i,..i^. FOOTHILLS PUMPING STATION -rs^.''::'^-::-^:;::'':''-:^'APPLICANT: SOUTHERN NEVADA WATER AUTttORrfY Request for pumping station; and review of pniposed pumping station generally located southeast of East Lake Mead Drive and Golda Way, in the Foothills planning area. CA-55 nNAL MAPFM-131-96 PECOS LEGACY CENTER Final Map (FM-131-96) for Pecos Legacy Center • 1 lot-16.40 acres. VH. PUBLIC HEARINGS PH-56PUBLIC HEARING REUSE WATER INFRASTRUCTURE REFUNDING PROGRAM Public Hearing Reuse Water Infrastrudure Refunding Program. PH-57 PUBLIC HEARING VACATION VAC-17-96 sv AMEND CONDITIONS • FOOTHILL INVEST. CO. AND LEWIS HOMES Removal of condition No. 2 from Vacation (VAC-17-96), tvhich was approved by City Council on August 6,1S>96. PH-58 PUBLIC HEARING VACATION VAC-2S-96 FOOTHILL INVESTMENT CO. & LEWIS HOMES Request to vacate two public utility and drainage easements in the Foothills South No. 13 subdivision, in the River Mountain planqing area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDS APPROVAL) PH-59 PUBLIC HEARING VACATION VAC-26-96 LEWIS HOMES OF NEVADA Request to vacate portiims ofthe cul-de-suc bulb on Anchorgatc Court right-of-way in the MacDonald Ranch planning area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMEN'DS APPROVAL) PUBLIC HEARING "^ "' PH-60a CPA-33.96 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT PH-60b Z-S9.96 ZONE CHANGE FOOTHILL INVESTMENT CO. Request to amend the land use from Residenliul and Highway Commercial to Residential and Commercial (relocate boundary line); and reviewof a reclassiflcation request from RR (Rural Residential) district and CH-G (Highway Commerrial with Gaming Eiilrrprisc Overiuy)di.strict to RS-6(Single Family Rrsidtntiul) district andCH (High way Com me rdal) district on 28.6 acrest, located at AppulmMa Rood and Wagon Wheel Drive, in the River Mountain planning area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDS APPROVAL) PH-61 RF:SOLUTION CPA-33-96 FOOTHILL INVESTMENT COMPANY ,.i ARESOLUTIONOFTHECITYCOUNCILOFTHECITYOFHENDERSON, NEVADA, TO AMEND THE LAND USE POLICY PLAN OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FOR THE PURPOSE OF CHANGING THE LAND USE DF^SIGNATION OF CERTAIN PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON DESCRIBED AS A PARCEL OF LAND CONTAINING 28.6 ACRES, MORE OR LESS, AND DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 63 EA.ST, M.D.M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RESIDENTIAL AND HIGHWAY COMMERCIAL TO RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIA L, LOCATED ATA I'PA LOOSA ROAD AND WAJJON WHEELD^E, IN THE RIVER MOUNTAIN PLANNING AREA. -i.:_jfci/^ 1;£^~'^' PH-62 RESOLin ION Z-S9.96 J, : .^ FOOTHILL INVESTMENT COMPANY A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON COMMITTING THE CTTY COUNCIL TO REZONE CERTAIN PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDER.SON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTTION 27, TOWNSHIP 22 SOU! H, RANGE 63 EAST, M.D.B. & M., CURK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RR (RURAL RESIDENTIAL) DISTRICT AND CH-G (HIGHWAY COMMERCIAL WITH GAMING ENTERPRISE OVERLAY) DISTRICT TO RS-6 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDEN1IAL) DI.STRICT AND CH (HIGHWAY COMMERCIAL) DISTRICT, LOCATED AT AI'PALOOSA ROAD AND WAGON WHEEL DRIVE, IN THE RIVER MOUNTAIN PLANNING AREA. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDS APPROVAL) VIII. CITIZEN'S CONCERNS IX. UNHNISHED BUSINESS UB-63 ONE MAYORAL COMMISSION APPOINTMENT FROM WARD IV HENDERSON PLANNING COMMI.SSION One Mayoral appoinlmrnt from Ward IV to the Henderson Planning Commission. (CONTINUED FROM SEPTEMBER 17,1996) UB-64 APPEAL OF DENIAL BY DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS LAS VEGAS VALLEY WATER DISTRICT POTABLE WATER DEAN O'BANNON Appeal of Director of Public Works' denial of the use of Las Vegas Valley Water District potable water within the corp AMEND TITLE 19 OF THE HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE BY DEFINING HOSTELS AND BY AMENDING REGULATIONS FOR COMMEROAL ZONKS BY ALLOWING CERTAIN HOSTELS. AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERBItX (RNAL ACTION) CA-4S USE PERMTT • U-IU-M nmSKT VBTA BUSINESS PARK APPUCANTi SUNSET VISTA BUSINESS PARK Pag1 ^>.

PAGE 16

I m t tmmmm m> i.-^ii, v i .v. f J • 'P • ^ffVI^FV^PIV^lliiPiPPiiiPIHHMMHIi ^ P>fl16 Henderson Home Newt Thursday, October 10.1996 Boat theft a growing problem in Nevada Thursday, October 10,1996 Henderson Home News Page 17 llie two happiest days in a man's life, it has been said, are the day he buys his first boat and the day he finally rids himself of it While most boaters prefer to make that decision on their own, a growing number of thieves are reUeving unsuspecting boaters of that responsibility by making the choice for them. Nationwide, more than 1,000 boats are stolen every month at a cost of more than $40 million to boat owners and their insurance companiies, said Fred Messmann, Nevada Division of Wildlife boating law administrator. And Nevada has not been left unscathed by the onslaught. In 1995, 87 boats were reported stolen in Nevada. Though a seemingly small number, that figure accounts for more than 20% of the 427 stolen boats NDOW has recorded during the past 24 years. Although more than half of all stolen boats are in the 18to 23foot class, the most popular targets for boat thieves in recent years, have been the sporty little personal watercraft commonly referred to as "jet skis." According to an article in a recent edition of the Intema. tional Association of Marine Investigators newsletter, the number of stolen personal watercraft increased by 15% in 1995. Auto theft, meanwhile, dropped by 10%. This trend also holds true in Nevada, where personal watercraft accounted for nearly 55% of all boat thefts reported last year. Boat bandits not only target personal watercraft because they are popular, but also because they are an easy mark. They're easy to steal because they are small," said David Pfiflher, supervising boating officer for NDOW. "It doesn't take much for a couple of people to pick up a jet ski and throw it in the back of a pickup truck. Also, because no key is required to start them, unattended jet skis can be stolen right off the beach." Boats stored on trailers can also provide a tempting target for boat bandits, especially when they are easily accessible to vehicles capable of towing the boat away. Stolen boats may be sold outright, stripped for parts, or simply taken to another state where the thief may try to regi ster the vessel in his own name, Messmann said. He also said, however, that NDOWs recovery rate is about three times that of most other states, averaging between 27 and 35%. Division officers were able to recover 26% of boats reported stolen in 1995. "Our recovery rate is high because we send our officers through a specialized training program that prepares them to spot and identify stolen boats," Messmann said. People looking to purchase a used boat, especially a personal watercraft, should use caution when making the deal. "Remember," advised Pfifftier, "if the deal is too good, it's not a deal." Boat buyers should consider the following as red flags to potential ownership problems: The seller has only a bill of sale but no title; the vessel has no hull number or the number appears to have been tampered with; or the boat has been brought in from another state but never registered in Nevada. Although the ultimate prize 'for a boat bandit is generally the entire vessel along with all of its contents, some thieves are content to take whatever they can grab quickly and easily. Items of interest to these sticky-fingered members of society include such electronic devices as stereos, depth finders, CB or marine radios, and Global Positioning System units. But the list also includes everything from water skis to ski vests and even outboard motors. Boaters can prevent thefts of these smaller items by removing them from the yessel or by stowing them away in a locking cabinet or container. Anyone planning to be away from their boat for any length of time is encouraged to close and lock all hatches. Where applicable, draperies should also be closed. Large outboard motors can be made secure with, appropriately enough, an outboard motor lock. Messmann offers boaters the following suggestions for preventing boat theft: • If possible, store the boat and trailer in a locked garage or secured storage facility. •Store the boat in the back or side yard, out of sight if possible. • If the boat must be stored in an open driveway, carport or open side lot, place another vehicle or other large object in firont of the trailer. • Store the vessel so the trailer tongue is inaccessible to a wouldbe thief or purchase and use a quality hitch lock. •Remove one trailer wheel so the boat cannot be towed away. The spare should be locked to the trailer or stored elsewhere. • Boat and trailer to a pole or ^ee vWth a quality lock and chain. •If the boat must be stored along the shoreline for an extended time, remove the outboard motor or secure it with a transom lock. 'Godiilla iats Las Ve^lis' Oct^ 17 The world premiere of "Godzilla Eats Las Vegas" will take place at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 17, by the UNLV Wind Symphony. The light-hearted composition was written by Eric Whitacre, an UNLValumnus. At the age of 26, he has already madehis mark as a conductor, clinician and composer. He won the American Choral Directors Association's Composers of the Future competition and has received awards from th* A8CAP Gfaht fdr Young Composers Program and The Dale Warland Singers Commissioning Program. He was also a finalist in the ABA Ostwald Competition. Currently a g^raduate student in composition at JuUiard, his music describes Godzilla's journey in a satirical trip along the Las Vegas Strip. The gala performance begins the 20th year of the UNLVs Wind Symphony. Thomas G. Leslie, conductor of the University Wind Symphony, and directorof UNLV Bands, noted that "This will be an upbeat program of fast and exciting music." Under Leslie's direction, the UNLV Bands have toured and performed extensively throughout England, Scotland, and Japan. The Wind Sjrmphony is a regular feature of state and local music conventions as well as the College Band Directors' National Association conferences. Leslie's 3^member symphony is optimum size. The symphony is comprised of graduate and undergraduate music majors who major in jazz, classical performance or music education. Among the highlights of the program will be Takayoshi Suzuki, UNLV Artist-in-Residence, conducting a transcription of an early baroque organ piece, Tocatta," written by Girolamo Frescobaldi. Three hundred years after Frescobaldi, Ron Nelson composed "Rocky Point Holiday," 300 years after Frescobaldi. This exciting work combines elements of jazz and classical construction and has become one of the most popular band standards. The evening performance will also include worksbyAlfi^edReed and Jay Bocock. ":v~:~r^T7:^~^ Reed's "Rushmore" was first performed in 1980 in the amphitheater atMountRush-more. A brooding, mystic opening represents the four great faces carved in stoqe gazing over the plains of America. The melodic line following is meant to symbolize the inner strength and calm majesty represented by the four great Americans. The theme is developed ever higher, bringing the work to a close in all of the majestj;^and colors of which a modern concert band or wdnd ensemble is capable. "Fanfare and Hymn of Brotherhood" by Jay Bocock is a favorite throughout the nation. Admission is $3, with discoimts for seniors, military and students AGENDA From Page 15 X. ^fEW BUSINFSS NB-71 ONE WARD II COMMISSION AI'I'OINTMENT ^ • • .•; SENIOR CITIZEN'S ADVISORY COMMISSION One Ward II app<>intmrnt tu (he Senior Citiztmls Advisory Commissiiin (ii fill unrxpirrd term lo cjcpire SepJembcr, 1997. NB-72 TWO MAVORAL COMMISSION APWINTMENTS ^ "^ SENIOR CITIZEN'S ADVISORY COMMISSION Two Mayoral Commission Appoinlmrnts to llic Srnior Citizen's Advisory Commissiim fur the (rm to expire October, 1998. NB-73 ONE WARD II BOARD REAPPOINTMENT PARKS AND RECREATION BOARD Keappointmcnt ofBill Spelts from Ward II to the Parks and Recreation Board, for the term to expire April, 1997. NB-74 MAYORAL COMMISSION APPOINTMENT BLUE RIBBON COMMISSION ON EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE AND YOUTH OPPORTUNITY One Mayoral appointment to the Blue Ribbon Commission on Educational Excrllrncc and Youth Opportunity to fill an unexpired vacancy. NB-7STWO WARD I BOARD APPOINTMENTS CITIZENS' ADVISORY COMMITTEE Two Ward I board appointments to the Citizens' Advisory Committee. NB-76 THREE WARD II BOARD APPOINTMENTS CITIZENS' ADVISORY COMMITTEE Three Ward II board appointmcnLs to the Citizens' Advisory Committee. NB-77 0NE WARD III BOARDAPPOINTMENT CITIZENS' ADVISORY COMMITTEE One Ward III boani appointment to the CitJzem' Advisory Committee to fill an unexpired vacAncy. NB-78 THREE WARD IV BOARD APPOINTMENTS CITIZENS' ADVISORY COMMITTEE Three Ward IV board appointments to the Citizens' Advisory Committee. NB-790NE MAYORAL BOARD APPOINTMENT CITIZENS'ADVISORY COMMITTEE One Mayoral board appointment to the Citizens' Advisory Committee to fill an unexpired vacancy. NB-M MAYORAL CHAIRMAN APPOINTMENT CITIZENS' ADVISORY COMMITTEE ^ ,„ „„ j Mayoral appointment ofchairman to the Citizens' Advisory Committee to HO an unexpired vacancy. NB-1 CITY REQUIREMENT ^ FOOTHILLS AT MacDONALD RANCH ---j ~,, ^ .,„ Citv r)i>iiement for Foothilb at MacD-mald Ranch to cu i w l i i: t 1.5 million gallon redaimed water reaervoir. „ • „. ^„ NB-2 SELECTION OF CONSULTANT FOR TITLE 19 UPDATE (ZONING ORDINANCE) ^^, '. Sdertion of consultait to prepare an update to Title 19 (Zoning Ordinance) of the HcndeiMH Munidpal Code. .„..,.,i. NB^APPeiNTMENTOFTECHNICAL STEERING COMMnTEE TO ASSIST IN UPDATE OF TITLE 19 ^ j_^ .u _j.KTTI.U lo Appointment oTtechnkal ateerinc committee to assi*t and advise in the update trTUk 19 tlik* Henderson Munidpal Code. NB-M RATIFY RESOLUTION • VICTIM ADVOCATE PROGRAM A RESOLimON OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON SUTPORTING THE VALUABLE EFFORTS OF THE VICTIM ADVOCATE PROGRAM OF THE CITY ATTORNEY'S OFFICE. NB-5 BILL NO. 1347 ZOA-9-96 AMEND TITLE 19 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON TO AMEND TITLE 19 OF THE HENDERSON MUOTCIPALCODE BY CURimNGTHEDEFtNrnON.AMENDINGLO<^TIONALAATOHA JTI^NCT REQUIREMEWra, AND REMOVING A REQWREMENT TOR niBLICSERVICE MBSAGE FOR CLASS-I OFF-PREMISES SIGN, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. (REFER TO COMMITTEE MEETING OF NOVEMBER 5,19<6) NBM BIU NO. 134t • Z-
PAGE 17

I m t tmmmm m> i.-^ii, v i .v. f J • 'P • ^ffVI^FV^PIV^lliiPiPPiiiPIHHMMHIi ^ P>fl16 Henderson Home Newt Thursday, October 10.1996 Boat theft a growing problem in Nevada Thursday, October 10,1996 Henderson Home News Page 17 llie two happiest days in a man's life, it has been said, are the day he buys his first boat and the day he finally rids himself of it While most boaters prefer to make that decision on their own, a growing number of thieves are reUeving unsuspecting boaters of that responsibility by making the choice for them. Nationwide, more than 1,000 boats are stolen every month at a cost of more than $40 million to boat owners and their insurance companiies, said Fred Messmann, Nevada Division of Wildlife boating law administrator. And Nevada has not been left unscathed by the onslaught. In 1995, 87 boats were reported stolen in Nevada. Though a seemingly small number, that figure accounts for more than 20% of the 427 stolen boats NDOW has recorded during the past 24 years. Although more than half of all stolen boats are in the 18to 23foot class, the most popular targets for boat thieves in recent years, have been the sporty little personal watercraft commonly referred to as "jet skis." According to an article in a recent edition of the Intema. tional Association of Marine Investigators newsletter, the number of stolen personal watercraft increased by 15% in 1995. Auto theft, meanwhile, dropped by 10%. This trend also holds true in Nevada, where personal watercraft accounted for nearly 55% of all boat thefts reported last year. Boat bandits not only target personal watercraft because they are popular, but also because they are an easy mark. They're easy to steal because they are small," said David Pfiflher, supervising boating officer for NDOW. "It doesn't take much for a couple of people to pick up a jet ski and throw it in the back of a pickup truck. Also, because no key is required to start them, unattended jet skis can be stolen right off the beach." Boats stored on trailers can also provide a tempting target for boat bandits, especially when they are easily accessible to vehicles capable of towing the boat away. Stolen boats may be sold outright, stripped for parts, or simply taken to another state where the thief may try to regi ster the vessel in his own name, Messmann said. He also said, however, that NDOWs recovery rate is about three times that of most other states, averaging between 27 and 35%. Division officers were able to recover 26% of boats reported stolen in 1995. "Our recovery rate is high because we send our officers through a specialized training program that prepares them to spot and identify stolen boats," Messmann said. People looking to purchase a used boat, especially a personal watercraft, should use caution when making the deal. "Remember," advised Pfifftier, "if the deal is too good, it's not a deal." Boat buyers should consider the following as red flags to potential ownership problems: The seller has only a bill of sale but no title; the vessel has no hull number or the number appears to have been tampered with; or the boat has been brought in from another state but never registered in Nevada. Although the ultimate prize 'for a boat bandit is generally the entire vessel along with all of its contents, some thieves are content to take whatever they can grab quickly and easily. Items of interest to these sticky-fingered members of society include such electronic devices as stereos, depth finders, CB or marine radios, and Global Positioning System units. But the list also includes everything from water skis to ski vests and even outboard motors. Boaters can prevent thefts of these smaller items by removing them from the yessel or by stowing them away in a locking cabinet or container. Anyone planning to be away from their boat for any length of time is encouraged to close and lock all hatches. Where applicable, draperies should also be closed. Large outboard motors can be made secure with, appropriately enough, an outboard motor lock. Messmann offers boaters the following suggestions for preventing boat theft: • If possible, store the boat and trailer in a locked garage or secured storage facility. •Store the boat in the back or side yard, out of sight if possible. • If the boat must be stored in an open driveway, carport or open side lot, place another vehicle or other large object in firont of the trailer. • Store the vessel so the trailer tongue is inaccessible to a wouldbe thief or purchase and use a quality hitch lock. •Remove one trailer wheel so the boat cannot be towed away. The spare should be locked to the trailer or stored elsewhere. • Boat and trailer to a pole or ^ee vWth a quality lock and chain. •If the boat must be stored along the shoreline for an extended time, remove the outboard motor or secure it with a transom lock. 'Godiilla iats Las Ve^lis' Oct^ 17 The world premiere of "Godzilla Eats Las Vegas" will take place at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 17, by the UNLV Wind Symphony. The light-hearted composition was written by Eric Whitacre, an UNLValumnus. At the age of 26, he has already madehis mark as a conductor, clinician and composer. He won the American Choral Directors Association's Composers of the Future competition and has received awards from th* A8CAP Gfaht fdr Young Composers Program and The Dale Warland Singers Commissioning Program. He was also a finalist in the ABA Ostwald Competition. Currently a g^raduate student in composition at JuUiard, his music describes Godzilla's journey in a satirical trip along the Las Vegas Strip. The gala performance begins the 20th year of the UNLVs Wind Symphony. Thomas G. Leslie, conductor of the University Wind Symphony, and directorof UNLV Bands, noted that "This will be an upbeat program of fast and exciting music." Under Leslie's direction, the UNLV Bands have toured and performed extensively throughout England, Scotland, and Japan. The Wind Sjrmphony is a regular feature of state and local music conventions as well as the College Band Directors' National Association conferences. Leslie's 3^member symphony is optimum size. The symphony is comprised of graduate and undergraduate music majors who major in jazz, classical performance or music education. Among the highlights of the program will be Takayoshi Suzuki, UNLV Artist-in-Residence, conducting a transcription of an early baroque organ piece, Tocatta," written by Girolamo Frescobaldi. Three hundred years after Frescobaldi, Ron Nelson composed "Rocky Point Holiday," 300 years after Frescobaldi. This exciting work combines elements of jazz and classical construction and has become one of the most popular band standards. The evening performance will also include worksbyAlfi^edReed and Jay Bocock. ":v~:~r^T7:^~^ Reed's "Rushmore" was first performed in 1980 in the amphitheater atMountRush-more. A brooding, mystic opening represents the four great faces carved in stoqe gazing over the plains of America. The melodic line following is meant to symbolize the inner strength and calm majesty represented by the four great Americans. The theme is developed ever higher, bringing the work to a close in all of the majestj;^and colors of which a modern concert band or wdnd ensemble is capable. "Fanfare and Hymn of Brotherhood" by Jay Bocock is a favorite throughout the nation. Admission is $3, with discoimts for seniors, military and students AGENDA From Page 15 X. ^fEW BUSINFSS NB-71 ONE WARD II COMMISSION AI'I'OINTMENT ^ • • .•; SENIOR CITIZEN'S ADVISORY COMMISSION One Ward II app<>intmrnt tu (he Senior Citiztmls Advisory Commissiiin (ii fill unrxpirrd term lo cjcpire SepJembcr, 1997. NB-72 TWO MAVORAL COMMISSION APWINTMENTS ^ "^ SENIOR CITIZEN'S ADVISORY COMMISSION Two Mayoral Commission Appoinlmrnts to llic Srnior Citizen's Advisory Commissiim fur the (rm to expire October, 1998. NB-73 ONE WARD II BOARD REAPPOINTMENT PARKS AND RECREATION BOARD Keappointmcnt ofBill Spelts from Ward II to the Parks and Recreation Board, for the term to expire April, 1997. NB-74 MAYORAL COMMISSION APPOINTMENT BLUE RIBBON COMMISSION ON EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE AND YOUTH OPPORTUNITY One Mayoral appointment to the Blue Ribbon Commission on Educational Excrllrncc and Youth Opportunity to fill an unexpired vacancy. NB-7STWO WARD I BOARD APPOINTMENTS CITIZENS' ADVISORY COMMITTEE Two Ward I board appointments to the Citizens' Advisory Committee. NB-76 THREE WARD II BOARD APPOINTMENTS CITIZENS' ADVISORY COMMITTEE Three Ward II board appointmcnLs to the Citizens' Advisory Committee. NB-77 0NE WARD III BOARDAPPOINTMENT CITIZENS' ADVISORY COMMITTEE One Ward III boani appointment to the CitJzem' Advisory Committee to fill an unexpired vacAncy. NB-78 THREE WARD IV BOARD APPOINTMENTS CITIZENS' ADVISORY COMMITTEE Three Ward IV board appointments to the Citizens' Advisory Committee. NB-790NE MAYORAL BOARD APPOINTMENT CITIZENS'ADVISORY COMMITTEE One Mayoral board appointment to the Citizens' Advisory Committee to fill an unexpired vacancy. NB-M MAYORAL CHAIRMAN APPOINTMENT CITIZENS' ADVISORY COMMITTEE ^ ,„ „„ j Mayoral appointment ofchairman to the Citizens' Advisory Committee to HO an unexpired vacancy. NB-1 CITY REQUIREMENT ^ FOOTHILLS AT MacDONALD RANCH ---j ~,, ^ .,„ Citv r)i>iiement for Foothilb at MacD-mald Ranch to cu i w l i i: t 1.5 million gallon redaimed water reaervoir. „ • „. ^„ NB-2 SELECTION OF CONSULTANT FOR TITLE 19 UPDATE (ZONING ORDINANCE) ^^, '. Sdertion of consultait to prepare an update to Title 19 (Zoning Ordinance) of the HcndeiMH Munidpal Code. .„..,.,i. NB^APPeiNTMENTOFTECHNICAL STEERING COMMnTEE TO ASSIST IN UPDATE OF TITLE 19 ^ j_^ .u _j.KTTI.U lo Appointment oTtechnkal ateerinc committee to assi*t and advise in the update trTUk 19 tlik* Henderson Munidpal Code. NB-M RATIFY RESOLUTION • VICTIM ADVOCATE PROGRAM A RESOLimON OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON SUTPORTING THE VALUABLE EFFORTS OF THE VICTIM ADVOCATE PROGRAM OF THE CITY ATTORNEY'S OFFICE. NB-5 BILL NO. 1347 ZOA-9-96 AMEND TITLE 19 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON TO AMEND TITLE 19 OF THE HENDERSON MUOTCIPALCODE BY CURimNGTHEDEFtNrnON.AMENDINGLO<^TIONALAATOHA JTI^NCT REQUIREMEWra, AND REMOVING A REQWREMENT TOR niBLICSERVICE MBSAGE FOR CLASS-I OFF-PREMISES SIGN, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. (REFER TO COMMITTEE MEETING OF NOVEMBER 5,19<6) NBM BIU NO. 134t • Z-
PAGE 18

mm mmmmmm .Pagt 18 Henderson Home News Thursday, October 10.1996 Thursday, October 10,1996 Henderson Home New Pege 1 iGatorSy Wolves post volleyball wins By thsMmrs Staff The Green Valley girls volleyball team stayed unbeaten in ^Sunrise action with a 15-6,15-5, 45-11 victory over Chaparral on rTuesday. \ "We had a little lull in the Ithird game, but we definitely dictated the pace in the first two fames," Gators' assistant coach Dindi Davis said. Wendy Lewis had 12 kills for 5reen Valley. "Wendy had an Excellent game," Davis added. 'She was hot." Erin Denton had nine kills for he Gators while Krista Gronert lad 23 assists and four service ices. Green Valley moves to 21-5 )verall and 7-0 in conference. "You don't want to get too satisfied," Davis said. "Now these teams will be that much hungrier the second time around. We just have to keep taking it one match at a time." WOLVES WIN IN FIVE: Basic used 10 kills from Erica McElroy and Andi BefTa in beating Las Vegas in a five-set marathon 4-15,15-11,12-15,1512, 15-11. "The first game we stunk and then we had some real good games," Basic coach Barb Gillaspy said. "In the second game they led 11-4 and we came back and won and in the third game we had a 9-4 lead and they came back and won. I think we beat them conditioning-wise." Andrea Brandon had 23 assists for the Wolves while Michelle Tolboe had seven kills in the final two games. "[Tolboe] really came on strong the last two games," Gillaspy said. "She kind of sparked us." Gillaspy added the Wolves "needed the win. If we had lost that one, we would have been digging ourselves a grave." With the win, the Wolves are tied for third. "The last two matches, we didn't have any ups and downs," Gillaspy said. 'The girls stayed focused. If we can win those fivesetters, those are real positives. The Wolves are 4-3 in Sunrise and 6-6 overall. rolled to a 15-8,15-9,14-16,151 victory over the Skyhawks on Tuesday night. "Durango played well," Silverado coach Pam Sloan said. From Page 17 The Skyhawks were led by AddieAlban's 10 assists and four service points. "It was probably ClC^LF the best game she has had all ^JV^I— • year," Sloan said. The Skyhawks fall to 2-5 in Sunset and 4-8 overall. "It's teams like Cimarron, Clark and Bonanza that we need to beat to grab the fourth playoff spot," Sloan said. Sloan said she was "pleased -~even though we lost. The girls Girls sought for Softball tryouts Officials of the Genesis ASA Softball Club are looking for girls age 16-under for a traveling spflball team. —41*8 a fast-pitch softball team and officials said girls must have good experience. For more information, call 382-9821 or 433-7373. Officials say the season will start in January, but the^jvant^ to hold tryouts starting in October. "We definitely made it to zone and we're excited about going there," Tobler said. Basic now faces Green Valley on Thursday and the coach just wants the girls to go out and have a good time. "We'll try to stay focused for our last match," he said. "It's a big challenge. Green Valley is No. 1. We just have to go out, do our best and have fun. The girls just have to play their best. That's all they can do." -: got a little frustrated in the SKYHAWKS FALL TO fourth game, but they played DURANGO: The Trailblazers well." rBOYS From Page 17 player in Justin Robinson, in another rotation move that worked to perfection. The duo won all four sets in No. 2 doubles, 6-1.6k, 6-0.6-3. V?;-:-: "With any good plan, sometimes it works and sometimes doesn't," Mundt said. Santino DeWreede won two sets in No. 4 singles, 7-5,6-2 and Chris Johnson won two sets in No. 3 singles 6-1, 6-1. ; The Skyhawks improved their record to 9-2, with the last game on their schedule Wednesday at home against first-place Bonanza after News deadline. • • GREEN VALLEY 26, ELDORADO 0 At Green Valley, the Gators cruised to their eighth straight shutout as seniors Jeff Harbach and Matt Mullin played their final home matches on Monday. ,. :: "We played Jeff and Matt one set each for their last home match," Gator head coach Jeff Horn said. "We'll rest them in the last game against Rancho." Ben Regin won in No. 1 singles 6-0, 6-0 and Trent Lee was victorious in No. 2 singles 6-1, 6-0 to pace the Gators. Green Valley swept all doubles points in improving to 11-0 on M:he season. "Consistency comes with talent," Horn said. "We know what is coming up so we have to stay focused." MOAPA VALLEY 15, BASIC 11 — At Basic, the Wolves came up short in falling to conference opponent Moapa Valley on Monday. "We had a chance to win, but Jared Bradley broke his strings after one set and didn't want to borrow someone's racket," Dye said. Bradley dropped his first set 5-7 in No. 2 sirigles, then went on to forfeit the match after his racket problem. Z a c Ju s t ice, who will most likely represent Basic in zone, won 6-2, 6-2 in No. 1 singles. Galvin Walker and Shad Williams won three sets in No, 2 doubles, 6-2, 6-4, 6-2. "They've been up and down all year," Dye said of his doubles team. Clyde Williams, Joey Dedrich, and Mark Williams each won one of three sets in the singles round robin play. Gus Macker tourney this weekend The City of Henderson's 2nd Annual Gus Macker Three-onThree Basketball tournament will be held this Saturday and Sunday. The event, which will feature about 100 teams, will take place at the Galleria Mall. Games start at 8 a.m. each day and is free to the public. Gators win cross country meet Green Valley won last weekend's Angel Park Invitational Cross Country meet. The event took the three fastest boys and girls times and combined them for the team total. For the Gator boys, Mark Bemis was fourth while James Wamsdorfer was fifth and Bryce Leavitt was 14th. The GV girls picked up the top three spots as Katie Barto won, Kaelynn Nielsen was second and Suzi Grgurich was third. "It was about what we expected," Gators' coach Jeff Doyle said. 'The boys still have a long way to go, but it was good to see Katie Barto run the fastest time of the day." Red Rock Racers top junior high teams The Red Rock Racers, a running club for youths age 7-17, won thejuniorhighdivisionoflastweekend'sAngel Park Invitational Cross Country Meet. The Racers'Chaz LaHodny won the girls with a time of 11:03 leading the girls' team to seven of the top 10 finishes. Elycia Gauthier was second, KeHy Pardee was third and Dominique Palladino was fifth. Alec Chapman won the boys race with a time of 11:17 while Michael Boland was fifth. For more information on the Red Rock Racers, call 367-1766. DIVORCE ^' BANKRUPTCY CHAPTER? M CHAPTER 13 M60 Doni L. Stephens, Esq. 871-2949 Health Nuts 1635 NV Hwy. 293-1844 For Strains and Sprains give 500 mg of vitamin C in a combination form of bioflavonoids, hesperidin, and rutin. A poultice of arnica with added mint speeds the healing. Alice Duncan, D.C. Who Said You Couldn't Find All This In Green Valley ? Over $40 Million Sold! To buy or seii a home call THE SALES TEAM of the #1 REAL ESTATE COMPANY Half Acre & Circular Drive Custom home on over an acre. Private gated entrance on drcnlar drive, fabolona landscaping with great pool and separate pool honse. Interior features recently updated kitchen with granite counters and flooring, hardwood floors in formal living areaa, his ft her baths in master suite. This home boots 5 bedrooms, 7 baths and over 5700 sq. ft. Price at $649,000. Call The Sweeney's to see this Great Home! /imencana <}raup.nEM.TOR$ WiSl^S^ BOB &LOREN SWEENEY Pager: 389-2400 Cellular: 596-5265 HENDERSON •Iji :>V' •..,! From Page 17 GIRLS Fronn Page 17 Gators remained undefeated on the season with an easy win over Eldorado on Monday. •We wanted everyone to play, so we put the subs in the whole time," Green Valley coach Jackie Carducci said. Melissa Carducci won a set in No. 3 singles, 6-0, Carla Monrada won a set in No. 4 singles, 6-0, and Kristina Wood won 6-2 in her No. 5 singles set. Eldorado defaulted in No. 2 and No. 3 doubles. Carducci planned to rest her starters again in Green Valley's final regular season match Wednesday after News deadline. ing to be a big one. We have to eliminate costly mistakes. The kids came out last week and we had Some people up their level of hitting and that's a big plus. The thing is we have to get on track offensively." Overall, Thomas said the Gators "are just a breath away from being 5-1. We have to play with more consistency if we are going to be competitive." Frazier added the Wolves' emotions are high. "The kids realized last week they can play good football," Frazier said. "But we need to be emotionally ready to go because it will be tough playing [at Green Valley]." re*ha*bil*i*tate v :to restore to a condition of health or useful and constructive activity Rehabilitate is an important word at Delmar Gardens of Green Valley. Known for its outstanding skilled nursing care and warm, homelike atmosphere, Delmar Gardens of Green Valley also offers the finest rehabilitative services for those suffering from arthritis or recovering from a stroke, surgery, or fracture. Delmar Gardens of Green Valley fills the gap between hospital and home by providing highly qualified professional therapists, the finest therapeutic services, and beautiful surroundings. Licensed physical, speech, and occupational therapists are just part of the staff dedicated to restoring our residents to a healthy physical and psychological state. Stop by for a personal tour or call 361-6111 for more infonmation. mua^dlBff^ OF GREEN VALLEY NURSING AND REHABILITATION CENTER 100 DELMAR GARDENS DR HENDERSON, NV 89014 • 702/361-6111 Admissions 7 days a week TktmarOturltntofOrtinVaUeydouHotditerimiMamimhtrvigoraxycditrdmxmononthebatuofr^ r^ligioii, ^1,4iiabtlity and hattdiatf tuwrfi Iwi (iiteludiitgAlDB ami AIDS-nlaltd eondittont) m admuaont or occtu to. or trtatmtnt ef, tmphjment in U$ mrvia: program*, and t tiwrtw. s'; Ifsa •(.'-• • Halloween Thursday, October 31st, 1996 FREE SLOT TOURNAMENT Ten people will win 13 minutes of free play on any 25* machine of their choice...must have lucky coin located in goodie bags. BINGOQO'' Special Halloween Bingo Game at 6:30 p.m. $200 Bonus on Coverall Game. FREE GOODIE BAGS filled witti candy, free drinks & food coupons, (at 7:30 p.m.) FREE COSTUME CONTEST parade of costumes starting at 8 p.m. ...registration from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the promenade. 1st Place $250 2nd Place $150 3rd Place $100 FREE CUPCAKES AND DEVIL'S PUNCH starting at 7 p.m. in ttie Keno Lounge ^^ I • N • 0 DOWNTOWN • HENDERSON Ail rules posted Must be 21 or older to participate In these events HAVE A HAPPY HALLOWEEN Scoreboard Henderson Parlts and Rec. Soccer League Silver Spriiigx 3^ TEAM Quick.vilver S]lil(£I8 SIIMIM Killer Decs VVS-A Division W 1 I 0 Q TEAM Tlie .Sling Omrgers Slam rirehall. Twiwdd'.'s Tliuiiiiir Boliz SS 3-4 East Divisiim TEAM Rot'kel.i Paiilliers IIutTiL-aiie.s MagicScorpion SlrilcerN TFv\M WiMcal.v Falcon.v Dulliiog.v Torpi'dd'.v Jaguars' Eagle.'! .SS 3-4 Wfsl Divisiim S.S 5-6 Cold Division 0 0 0 I W I I 0 0 0 0 I w I 1 I 0 0 0 1 w I I .v;'^^***^ -i^i^jyes-i TEAM Sidekick.s [}u.sl Devil.i Sidcwindi-M^; Wolverine Liglilning Doll Blue Jels SSS-fi Cold Eusl Division W I I I U 0 0 .SS 7-X DiuniiHid I)i%'isiiHi TEAM W MudilogN .: jiir—i m., '• • Falcon.s ..-a,^ti'; -' 1 Tliumler i_ 0 Rash '' Jr/"':? 0 Cougars 0 Valley View 3-4 Di>ision TEAM W Purple People Ealer.i I Ilie.Sliirs g^ 1 llurricane.s •^ • ^ i Cardiiial.s 0 Tliiiiider 0 Oiargcrs 0 VV3-4 Silver Divisiim TEAM W llurrieane.s 1 Eagles I Du.s'liwackers I Dragoii.s 0 SOCCER 0 0 0 0 T0 0 1 I 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 TEAM Mutiny Punlliers Tlie Doiiilx-rs Red Devilx Cougar.iiws 8 ADULT DIVISION Oct. Z—RoatlruDDem 10 at Blaiten 2 Oct. 2—Boulder CHy 0 at Hiiliday Hockey I Oct. S—Roller Pigs al Stint i HENDERSON BOYS & GIRLS CLUB FLAG FOOTBALL SponMdvd hy Dcvrlopvni uf Nevada Slunding* AiiiirSepl.27,1996 3rd-5lh Grade CALL 435-7700 WITH NEWS TIPS FBBiALC COACH apericoce M ooUcge & oroooqidltlK pkf PLEASE CALL B6SM97 Outslden SOAIMII TCI ^f^i I9C TEAM Bronau .Seahawks Qiiefs Sleeler5 Qiargers Raiders TEAM Packers Cowhiys Colls 49ers 6tli-Xlli Grade W 3 3 2 2 2 0 W 3 2 I 1 L 0 ^^riple J. Casino Country Music-Live Bai Tuesday thru Saturday Ladies 1st Drink Free 7p.m. to 12iiiid.| With any purchase receive a chance to win a25"ColorT.V. 725 Racetrack Rd. Henderson Ducks s.: 5 Scorpions 4 Seals ,1 Tliunderhlades I Leading .Seoreni Stilli Michael, Scorpion.s, 37 goals, 3 a.sst T 0 I I 0 40 Basic alumni football game set Oct. 14 The third annual Basic High School Alumni Football game will be played on Oct. 14 at 7 p.m. at Basic High School. Last year a total of 74 players took part in the event The game, which features the 'Young' guys [ 1987-1996] against the 'Old' guys [1986 and prior]. The game raises money for the Basic football program. Officials are looking for a $25 donation from *Young' guys players and $40 from 'Old' guy players, but any donations will help the cause. Basic offici als are hoping for fan supportThereisa'$2 charge for admission. Children and students are free. Afew of the alumni expectedto be on hand include: Mayor Bob Groesbeck, Judge Steve Jones and last year's oldest alumni, Richard Lee Derrick, a 1961 graduate. ,. An added feature for businesses is the largest donation to'the fund will get one starting spot on the 'Old' guys team. For more information, call 898-2575. GET YOUR VEHICLE READY FOR FALL • Brake Service • Wheel Alignment • Emission Control • Towing • Propane DENNIS DAINACK IS BACK! I FLUSH & FILL I I I Fluth rutt a contaminanM fron) I radlalorScoolingsyatem.inspsct I belts, hoses and water pump. I Pressure test cooling system. I Refill up to 1 gallon coolant. I ^_^_^^,, Most cars & light truclu.Ei*Ml(y31/M We have a full service staff to serve you: RADIATOR SERVICE $2995 Larry Drury, Jeff Ruth, Dion Martin & Dermis Dainack. Itny Drury Green Valley s Only Full Service Station OanntoOafeMrii TRIANGLE 1197E. Tropicana Av0. (702) 736-7371 Open 8 AM to 5 PM Call Lany or Dennis foranappt. In Qreen VUtoy Sunset A Expntmtmy (702) 458-3037 From Page 17 because he didn't play, and we probably played bad because he didn't play," Hart said. Adam Canfield got Green Valley's first goal off a direct free kick outside the box. Bernardo Sounakhen, a sophomore, scored the second goal on a breakaway and Oscar Miomer scored the game-win~aer on another breakaway. BISHOP GORMAN 4, SILVERADO 0— At Silverado, Skyhawks' goalie Steve Ceron sparkled in goal, holding the Gaels to only four goals on Tuesday. "Steve played excellent," Skyhawks' coach Randy Minagil said. 'The other coach even came up to me after the game and said how good he played." Since Gorman has been crushing opponents, Minagil was happy with his team's effort. "Everyone put in a strong effort," he said. "We just have a hard time scoring." Silverado has been shut out four games in a row, but in all four of those games, the defense has improved. m Great RATING KEY '^^*-*'*^^^' l^-^.-'-^sja*^'"^ (Walked Out) Good Fair Boring Poor THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY w r30^^^^^^ -R TUESDAY NIGHT DRAWINGS FOR 5 FREE Drawing Tickets Hrfnl fouiHHi to Cunt Sefvuf* Good lor all Alyslra'(k:tol)er Festival ulCasli Drawings MUST l)€ Club Alystra Member, so JOIN TODAY at Guesi Services. (EXl10^31%) $1,000 (Oct. 8, 15. 22 & 29;( 6:00 p.m ^200 7:30 p.m ^300 9:00 p.m ^500 IFREE Slice of l>umpldD Pie w/ purthiK of any eotree In Grille Houc. PrnnM rojpon lo wrvcr In GKUr HouH MUST be Club Alystra Member. $0 WIN TODAY at Guest Services. (EXP IMIX) FREEn. Roll of Nickels Prew^i roupot) lo Casino Cage MUST be Club Alystra Member, so JOIN TODAY at Guest Services. (OP 103196) IFREE Hotdog & Soft Drink Pment coupon lo Main Casrno Bar Valid Tuesday Sunday Irom II:00a.m. llOOpm MUST be Club Alystra Member so JOIN TODAY at Guest Services (EXP 10-3196) SHOALS ARE NOT GOOD Wmi ANY OTHU OTFEIt ALYSTRA RESERVES THE RIGHT TO MODIFY OR DBCONTINIIE SKOALS \ii mi ALYSTRA CASINO • 4$tH !33W. Sl'NSETRD. HEVDERSON. \OURL\LR\ U\\ GEIAUAV HACKMAN AND GRANT EXTREME -^ MEASURES wmmam Engrossing thriller about a pr^H young New York City docy O^ tor (Hugh Grant) who \-'^fl stumbles upon a creepy medical conspiracy The physician digs too deep -and finds his career and life in jeopardy Crisp pace and a vivid atmosphere keep the film moving smartly. Grant is fine as the easygoing neurologist and Gene Hackman is predictable but efTiective as a venerated and villainous doctor on a mission Sarah Jessica Parker does well In a nurse role The fllm sustains a strong, healthy pulse. (R) Oscar-winner NIcolai Cage is expected to star opposite Meg Ryan in "City of Angels," the story of a guardian angel who falls for the woman he's protecting. Turner Pictures will release Leonardo DiCaprio will learn up with director Michael Mann for "The Inside Man," a true story set in the 1980s about a father and son caught up in crime and politics Daniel Benzall. the actor who left the starring role of TV's criticallyacclaimed "Murder One" after its first season, is set to star oppiosite Wesley Snipes in "Executive Privilege." The Warner Bros movie lakes place in the While House, where a detective played by Snipes investigates a murder. Don Johnson will take the lead in the buddy action movie "The Good Gnyi" about a con man forced to go on the run with an FBI agent after testifying against the mob. Brother and sister John and Joan Cusack are to appear in a black comedy along with Dan Akroyd, Alan Arkin and Minnie Driver. "Grossc Poinie Blank" concerns a hit man who questions his career choice while attending his lO-yev high school reunion. • • • Pierce Broanan will star in the bigbudget action film "Dante's Peak" as a scieniiit wtw tries to save a community from a volcano Universal Piciurcs will release SPADER AND THERON 2 DAYS IN THE ^i VALJ>EY I This sdPcejsful dark com|edy evolves with similar I stylish elements of Robert Altman's "Short Cuts" and Quentin Tarentino's "Pulp Fiction." In L.A.'s San Fernando Valley, two hit men (James Spader and Danny Aiello) commit murder that eventually connects the lives of various colorful characters. While hardly original, the lively well-directed vehicle neatly mixes violence, sex and comedy The excellent ensemble of top actors is a joy to watch..Also with Paul Mazursky, Eric Stoltz, Jeff Daniels and voluptuous South African model Charlize Theron. (R) ANNA PAQIIIN FLY AWAY HOME I Overly sentimental melodrama about a 13-year-old girl (Anna Paquin) who raises orphaned Canadian geese and teaches them to migrate by leading the llock in her ullra-iighl aircraft When the birds fly, the film also gains some altitude by displaying spectacular outdoor scenery But the story stumbles when it dwells on family problems and confrontations with government authorities. And a girl so young flying solo for hundreds of miles'' Hard to believe. Jeff Daniels co-stars as the girl's artist father (PG) ClNEDOMEl H EN D E R SO LUXURY X H E A T R E C O M P L E X ^12 luxury kw^Umi *D^mJnotk 9m •Otikf St§ri9 iMiif •Clim^§ Cuntr^M Ctmhii •itckiag Chair l9§9 S§athf •frti UfhtiJ hfki$f Just //•; from Sn$a elltY td iooldf Cityl 457-3700 tMMutum unma *yivarun miam NWR MM iiNi t ms mm JJM STARTS FRIDAY CINEDOME 12 H [ N D t R l(H (PG13) 12:55 3:50 715 10:25 MIGHn[)UCKS3(PG) 1205 2:20 4:35 7:05 9:20 11:20 STARTS FRIDAY FLY AWAY HOME (PG) 12:25 2:35 4 55 7:30 9 45 • LONG KISS GOODNIGHT (R) 100 3 15 5:35 7:50 10:10 BULLETPROOF (R) 330 7 50 • THE CHAMBER (R) 12 40 3 05 5 30 7:55 10:20 THATTHWGYOUDO(PG) 12 35 2:50 5 05 720 9:35 1130 • NO PASSES COUPONS OR IJtSCOUNTS SON RRST WIVES CLUB (PG) 12:00 2:15 4: 7:00 9:15 11:20 JACK (PG13) 12i0 5:15 10:15 GLIMMER MAN (R) 12.45 3:00 5:20 7 40 9:50 11:40 EXTREME MEASURES (R) 1:00 5:25 9:50 PHENOMENON (PG) 245 745 LAST MAN STANOMG(R) 12:30 240 5.O0 725 9:4S 1130 GHOST M DARKNESS (R) 1210 2 35 5 10 7:35 • I g LATE SHOW m. SAT ai.v • • • • • • f • • • • • • • • 1^

PAGE 19

mm mmmmmm .Pagt 18 Henderson Home News Thursday, October 10.1996 Thursday, October 10,1996 Henderson Home New Pege 1 iGatorSy Wolves post volleyball wins By thsMmrs Staff The Green Valley girls volleyball team stayed unbeaten in ^Sunrise action with a 15-6,15-5, 45-11 victory over Chaparral on rTuesday. \ "We had a little lull in the Ithird game, but we definitely dictated the pace in the first two fames," Gators' assistant coach Dindi Davis said. Wendy Lewis had 12 kills for 5reen Valley. "Wendy had an Excellent game," Davis added. 'She was hot." Erin Denton had nine kills for he Gators while Krista Gronert lad 23 assists and four service ices. Green Valley moves to 21-5 )verall and 7-0 in conference. "You don't want to get too satisfied," Davis said. "Now these teams will be that much hungrier the second time around. We just have to keep taking it one match at a time." WOLVES WIN IN FIVE: Basic used 10 kills from Erica McElroy and Andi BefTa in beating Las Vegas in a five-set marathon 4-15,15-11,12-15,1512, 15-11. "The first game we stunk and then we had some real good games," Basic coach Barb Gillaspy said. "In the second game they led 11-4 and we came back and won and in the third game we had a 9-4 lead and they came back and won. I think we beat them conditioning-wise." Andrea Brandon had 23 assists for the Wolves while Michelle Tolboe had seven kills in the final two games. "[Tolboe] really came on strong the last two games," Gillaspy said. "She kind of sparked us." Gillaspy added the Wolves "needed the win. If we had lost that one, we would have been digging ourselves a grave." With the win, the Wolves are tied for third. "The last two matches, we didn't have any ups and downs," Gillaspy said. 'The girls stayed focused. If we can win those fivesetters, those are real positives. The Wolves are 4-3 in Sunrise and 6-6 overall. rolled to a 15-8,15-9,14-16,151 victory over the Skyhawks on Tuesday night. "Durango played well," Silverado coach Pam Sloan said. From Page 17 The Skyhawks were led by AddieAlban's 10 assists and four service points. "It was probably ClC^LF the best game she has had all ^JV^I— • year," Sloan said. The Skyhawks fall to 2-5 in Sunset and 4-8 overall. "It's teams like Cimarron, Clark and Bonanza that we need to beat to grab the fourth playoff spot," Sloan said. Sloan said she was "pleased -~even though we lost. The girls Girls sought for Softball tryouts Officials of the Genesis ASA Softball Club are looking for girls age 16-under for a traveling spflball team. —41*8 a fast-pitch softball team and officials said girls must have good experience. For more information, call 382-9821 or 433-7373. Officials say the season will start in January, but the^jvant^ to hold tryouts starting in October. "We definitely made it to zone and we're excited about going there," Tobler said. Basic now faces Green Valley on Thursday and the coach just wants the girls to go out and have a good time. "We'll try to stay focused for our last match," he said. "It's a big challenge. Green Valley is No. 1. We just have to go out, do our best and have fun. The girls just have to play their best. That's all they can do." -: got a little frustrated in the SKYHAWKS FALL TO fourth game, but they played DURANGO: The Trailblazers well." rBOYS From Page 17 player in Justin Robinson, in another rotation move that worked to perfection. The duo won all four sets in No. 2 doubles, 6-1.6k, 6-0.6-3. V?;-:-: "With any good plan, sometimes it works and sometimes doesn't," Mundt said. Santino DeWreede won two sets in No. 4 singles, 7-5,6-2 and Chris Johnson won two sets in No. 3 singles 6-1, 6-1. ; The Skyhawks improved their record to 9-2, with the last game on their schedule Wednesday at home against first-place Bonanza after News deadline. • • GREEN VALLEY 26, ELDORADO 0 At Green Valley, the Gators cruised to their eighth straight shutout as seniors Jeff Harbach and Matt Mullin played their final home matches on Monday. ,. :: "We played Jeff and Matt one set each for their last home match," Gator head coach Jeff Horn said. "We'll rest them in the last game against Rancho." Ben Regin won in No. 1 singles 6-0, 6-0 and Trent Lee was victorious in No. 2 singles 6-1, 6-0 to pace the Gators. Green Valley swept all doubles points in improving to 11-0 on M:he season. "Consistency comes with talent," Horn said. "We know what is coming up so we have to stay focused." MOAPA VALLEY 15, BASIC 11 — At Basic, the Wolves came up short in falling to conference opponent Moapa Valley on Monday. "We had a chance to win, but Jared Bradley broke his strings after one set and didn't want to borrow someone's racket," Dye said. Bradley dropped his first set 5-7 in No. 2 sirigles, then went on to forfeit the match after his racket problem. Z a c Ju s t ice, who will most likely represent Basic in zone, won 6-2, 6-2 in No. 1 singles. Galvin Walker and Shad Williams won three sets in No, 2 doubles, 6-2, 6-4, 6-2. "They've been up and down all year," Dye said of his doubles team. Clyde Williams, Joey Dedrich, and Mark Williams each won one of three sets in the singles round robin play. Gus Macker tourney this weekend The City of Henderson's 2nd Annual Gus Macker Three-onThree Basketball tournament will be held this Saturday and Sunday. The event, which will feature about 100 teams, will take place at the Galleria Mall. Games start at 8 a.m. each day and is free to the public. Gators win cross country meet Green Valley won last weekend's Angel Park Invitational Cross Country meet. The event took the three fastest boys and girls times and combined them for the team total. For the Gator boys, Mark Bemis was fourth while James Wamsdorfer was fifth and Bryce Leavitt was 14th. The GV girls picked up the top three spots as Katie Barto won, Kaelynn Nielsen was second and Suzi Grgurich was third. "It was about what we expected," Gators' coach Jeff Doyle said. 'The boys still have a long way to go, but it was good to see Katie Barto run the fastest time of the day." Red Rock Racers top junior high teams The Red Rock Racers, a running club for youths age 7-17, won thejuniorhighdivisionoflastweekend'sAngel Park Invitational Cross Country Meet. The Racers'Chaz LaHodny won the girls with a time of 11:03 leading the girls' team to seven of the top 10 finishes. Elycia Gauthier was second, KeHy Pardee was third and Dominique Palladino was fifth. Alec Chapman won the boys race with a time of 11:17 while Michael Boland was fifth. For more information on the Red Rock Racers, call 367-1766. DIVORCE ^' BANKRUPTCY CHAPTER? M CHAPTER 13 M60 Doni L. Stephens, Esq. 871-2949 Health Nuts 1635 NV Hwy. 293-1844 For Strains and Sprains give 500 mg of vitamin C in a combination form of bioflavonoids, hesperidin, and rutin. A poultice of arnica with added mint speeds the healing. Alice Duncan, D.C. Who Said You Couldn't Find All This In Green Valley ? Over $40 Million Sold! To buy or seii a home call THE SALES TEAM of the #1 REAL ESTATE COMPANY Half Acre & Circular Drive Custom home on over an acre. Private gated entrance on drcnlar drive, fabolona landscaping with great pool and separate pool honse. Interior features recently updated kitchen with granite counters and flooring, hardwood floors in formal living areaa, his ft her baths in master suite. This home boots 5 bedrooms, 7 baths and over 5700 sq. ft. Price at $649,000. Call The Sweeney's to see this Great Home! /imencana <}raup.nEM.TOR$ WiSl^S^ BOB &LOREN SWEENEY Pager: 389-2400 Cellular: 596-5265 HENDERSON •Iji :>V' •..,! From Page 17 GIRLS Fronn Page 17 Gators remained undefeated on the season with an easy win over Eldorado on Monday. •We wanted everyone to play, so we put the subs in the whole time," Green Valley coach Jackie Carducci said. Melissa Carducci won a set in No. 3 singles, 6-0, Carla Monrada won a set in No. 4 singles, 6-0, and Kristina Wood won 6-2 in her No. 5 singles set. Eldorado defaulted in No. 2 and No. 3 doubles. Carducci planned to rest her starters again in Green Valley's final regular season match Wednesday after News deadline. ing to be a big one. We have to eliminate costly mistakes. The kids came out last week and we had Some people up their level of hitting and that's a big plus. The thing is we have to get on track offensively." Overall, Thomas said the Gators "are just a breath away from being 5-1. We have to play with more consistency if we are going to be competitive." Frazier added the Wolves' emotions are high. "The kids realized last week they can play good football," Frazier said. "But we need to be emotionally ready to go because it will be tough playing [at Green Valley]." re*ha*bil*i*tate v :to restore to a condition of health or useful and constructive activity Rehabilitate is an important word at Delmar Gardens of Green Valley. Known for its outstanding skilled nursing care and warm, homelike atmosphere, Delmar Gardens of Green Valley also offers the finest rehabilitative services for those suffering from arthritis or recovering from a stroke, surgery, or fracture. Delmar Gardens of Green Valley fills the gap between hospital and home by providing highly qualified professional therapists, the finest therapeutic services, and beautiful surroundings. Licensed physical, speech, and occupational therapists are just part of the staff dedicated to restoring our residents to a healthy physical and psychological state. Stop by for a personal tour or call 361-6111 for more infonmation. mua^dlBff^ OF GREEN VALLEY NURSING AND REHABILITATION CENTER 100 DELMAR GARDENS DR HENDERSON, NV 89014 • 702/361-6111 Admissions 7 days a week TktmarOturltntofOrtinVaUeydouHotditerimiMamimhtrvigoraxycditrdmxmononthebatuofr^ r^ligioii, ^1,4iiabtlity and hattdiatf tuwrfi Iwi (iiteludiitgAlDB ami AIDS-nlaltd eondittont) m admuaont or occtu to. or trtatmtnt ef, tmphjment in U$ mrvia: program*, and t tiwrtw. s'; Ifsa •(.'-• • Halloween Thursday, October 31st, 1996 FREE SLOT TOURNAMENT Ten people will win 13 minutes of free play on any 25* machine of their choice...must have lucky coin located in goodie bags. BINGOQO'' Special Halloween Bingo Game at 6:30 p.m. $200 Bonus on Coverall Game. FREE GOODIE BAGS filled witti candy, free drinks & food coupons, (at 7:30 p.m.) FREE COSTUME CONTEST parade of costumes starting at 8 p.m. ...registration from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the promenade. 1st Place $250 2nd Place $150 3rd Place $100 FREE CUPCAKES AND DEVIL'S PUNCH starting at 7 p.m. in ttie Keno Lounge ^^ I • N • 0 DOWNTOWN • HENDERSON Ail rules posted Must be 21 or older to participate In these events HAVE A HAPPY HALLOWEEN Scoreboard Henderson Parlts and Rec. Soccer League Silver Spriiigx 3^ TEAM Quick.vilver S]lil(£I8 SIIMIM Killer Decs VVS-A Division W 1 I 0 Q TEAM Tlie .Sling Omrgers Slam rirehall. Twiwdd'.'s Tliuiiiiir Boliz SS 3-4 East Divisiim TEAM Rot'kel.i Paiilliers IIutTiL-aiie.s MagicScorpion SlrilcerN TFv\M WiMcal.v Falcon.v Dulliiog.v Torpi'dd'.v Jaguars' Eagle.'! .SS 3-4 Wfsl Divisiim S.S 5-6 Cold Division 0 0 0 I W I I 0 0 0 0 I w I 1 I 0 0 0 1 w I I .v;'^^***^ -i^i^jyes-i TEAM Sidekick.s [}u.sl Devil.i Sidcwindi-M^; Wolverine Liglilning Doll Blue Jels SSS-fi Cold Eusl Division W I I I U 0 0 .SS 7-X DiuniiHid I)i%'isiiHi TEAM W MudilogN .: jiir—i m., '• • Falcon.s ..-a,^ti'; -' 1 Tliumler i_ 0 Rash '' Jr/"':? 0 Cougars 0 Valley View 3-4 Di>ision TEAM W Purple People Ealer.i I Ilie.Sliirs g^ 1 llurricane.s •^ • ^ i Cardiiial.s 0 Tliiiiider 0 Oiargcrs 0 VV3-4 Silver Divisiim TEAM W llurrieane.s 1 Eagles I Du.s'liwackers I Dragoii.s 0 SOCCER 0 0 0 0 T0 0 1 I 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 TEAM Mutiny Punlliers Tlie Doiiilx-rs Red Devilx Cougar.iiws 8 ADULT DIVISION Oct. Z—RoatlruDDem 10 at Blaiten 2 Oct. 2—Boulder CHy 0 at Hiiliday Hockey I Oct. S—Roller Pigs al Stint i HENDERSON BOYS & GIRLS CLUB FLAG FOOTBALL SponMdvd hy Dcvrlopvni uf Nevada Slunding* AiiiirSepl.27,1996 3rd-5lh Grade CALL 435-7700 WITH NEWS TIPS FBBiALC COACH apericoce M ooUcge & oroooqidltlK pkf PLEASE CALL B6SM97 Outslden SOAIMII TCI ^f^i I9C TEAM Bronau .Seahawks Qiiefs Sleeler5 Qiargers Raiders TEAM Packers Cowhiys Colls 49ers 6tli-Xlli Grade W 3 3 2 2 2 0 W 3 2 I 1 L 0 ^^riple J. Casino Country Music-Live Bai Tuesday thru Saturday Ladies 1st Drink Free 7p.m. to 12iiiid.| With any purchase receive a chance to win a25"ColorT.V. 725 Racetrack Rd. Henderson Ducks s.: 5 Scorpions 4 Seals ,1 Tliunderhlades I Leading .Seoreni Stilli Michael, Scorpion.s, 37 goals, 3 a.sst T 0 I I 0 40 Basic alumni football game set Oct. 14 The third annual Basic High School Alumni Football game will be played on Oct. 14 at 7 p.m. at Basic High School. Last year a total of 74 players took part in the event The game, which features the 'Young' guys [ 1987-1996] against the 'Old' guys [1986 and prior]. The game raises money for the Basic football program. Officials are looking for a $25 donation from *Young' guys players and $40 from 'Old' guy players, but any donations will help the cause. Basic offici als are hoping for fan supportThereisa'$2 charge for admission. Children and students are free. Afew of the alumni expectedto be on hand include: Mayor Bob Groesbeck, Judge Steve Jones and last year's oldest alumni, Richard Lee Derrick, a 1961 graduate. ,. An added feature for businesses is the largest donation to'the fund will get one starting spot on the 'Old' guys team. For more information, call 898-2575. GET YOUR VEHICLE READY FOR FALL • Brake Service • Wheel Alignment • Emission Control • Towing • Propane DENNIS DAINACK IS BACK! I FLUSH & FILL I I I Fluth rutt a contaminanM fron) I radlalorScoolingsyatem.inspsct I belts, hoses and water pump. I Pressure test cooling system. I Refill up to 1 gallon coolant. I ^_^_^^,, Most cars & light truclu.Ei*Ml(y31/M We have a full service staff to serve you: RADIATOR SERVICE $2995 Larry Drury, Jeff Ruth, Dion Martin & Dermis Dainack. Itny Drury Green Valley s Only Full Service Station OanntoOafeMrii TRIANGLE 1197E. Tropicana Av0. (702) 736-7371 Open 8 AM to 5 PM Call Lany or Dennis foranappt. In Qreen VUtoy Sunset A Expntmtmy (702) 458-3037 From Page 17 because he didn't play, and we probably played bad because he didn't play," Hart said. Adam Canfield got Green Valley's first goal off a direct free kick outside the box. Bernardo Sounakhen, a sophomore, scored the second goal on a breakaway and Oscar Miomer scored the game-win~aer on another breakaway. BISHOP GORMAN 4, SILVERADO 0— At Silverado, Skyhawks' goalie Steve Ceron sparkled in goal, holding the Gaels to only four goals on Tuesday. "Steve played excellent," Skyhawks' coach Randy Minagil said. 'The other coach even came up to me after the game and said how good he played." Since Gorman has been crushing opponents, Minagil was happy with his team's effort. "Everyone put in a strong effort," he said. "We just have a hard time scoring." Silverado has been shut out four games in a row, but in all four of those games, the defense has improved. m Great RATING KEY '^^*-*'*^^^' l^-^.-'-^sja*^'"^ (Walked Out) Good Fair Boring Poor THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY w r30^^^^^^ -R TUESDAY NIGHT DRAWINGS FOR 5 FREE Drawing Tickets Hrfnl fouiHHi to Cunt Sefvuf* Good lor all Alyslra'(k:tol)er Festival ulCasli Drawings MUST l)€ Club Alystra Member, so JOIN TODAY at Guesi Services. (EXl10^31%) $1,000 (Oct. 8, 15. 22 & 29;( 6:00 p.m ^200 7:30 p.m ^300 9:00 p.m ^500 IFREE Slice of l>umpldD Pie w/ purthiK of any eotree In Grille Houc. PrnnM rojpon lo wrvcr In GKUr HouH MUST be Club Alystra Member. $0 WIN TODAY at Guest Services. (EXP IMIX) FREEn. Roll of Nickels Prew^i roupot) lo Casino Cage MUST be Club Alystra Member, so JOIN TODAY at Guest Services. (OP 103196) IFREE Hotdog & Soft Drink Pment coupon lo Main Casrno Bar Valid Tuesday Sunday Irom II:00a.m. llOOpm MUST be Club Alystra Member so JOIN TODAY at Guest Services (EXP 10-3196) SHOALS ARE NOT GOOD Wmi ANY OTHU OTFEIt ALYSTRA RESERVES THE RIGHT TO MODIFY OR DBCONTINIIE SKOALS \ii mi ALYSTRA CASINO • 4$tH !33W. Sl'NSETRD. HEVDERSON. \OURL\LR\ U\\ GEIAUAV HACKMAN AND GRANT EXTREME -^ MEASURES wmmam Engrossing thriller about a pr^H young New York City docy O^ tor (Hugh Grant) who \-'^fl stumbles upon a creepy medical conspiracy The physician digs too deep -and finds his career and life in jeopardy Crisp pace and a vivid atmosphere keep the film moving smartly. Grant is fine as the easygoing neurologist and Gene Hackman is predictable but efTiective as a venerated and villainous doctor on a mission Sarah Jessica Parker does well In a nurse role The fllm sustains a strong, healthy pulse. (R) Oscar-winner NIcolai Cage is expected to star opposite Meg Ryan in "City of Angels," the story of a guardian angel who falls for the woman he's protecting. Turner Pictures will release Leonardo DiCaprio will learn up with director Michael Mann for "The Inside Man," a true story set in the 1980s about a father and son caught up in crime and politics Daniel Benzall. the actor who left the starring role of TV's criticallyacclaimed "Murder One" after its first season, is set to star oppiosite Wesley Snipes in "Executive Privilege." The Warner Bros movie lakes place in the While House, where a detective played by Snipes investigates a murder. Don Johnson will take the lead in the buddy action movie "The Good Gnyi" about a con man forced to go on the run with an FBI agent after testifying against the mob. Brother and sister John and Joan Cusack are to appear in a black comedy along with Dan Akroyd, Alan Arkin and Minnie Driver. "Grossc Poinie Blank" concerns a hit man who questions his career choice while attending his lO-yev high school reunion. • • • Pierce Broanan will star in the bigbudget action film "Dante's Peak" as a scieniiit wtw tries to save a community from a volcano Universal Piciurcs will release SPADER AND THERON 2 DAYS IN THE ^i VALJ>EY I This sdPcejsful dark com|edy evolves with similar I stylish elements of Robert Altman's "Short Cuts" and Quentin Tarentino's "Pulp Fiction." In L.A.'s San Fernando Valley, two hit men (James Spader and Danny Aiello) commit murder that eventually connects the lives of various colorful characters. While hardly original, the lively well-directed vehicle neatly mixes violence, sex and comedy The excellent ensemble of top actors is a joy to watch..Also with Paul Mazursky, Eric Stoltz, Jeff Daniels and voluptuous South African model Charlize Theron. (R) ANNA PAQIIIN FLY AWAY HOME I Overly sentimental melodrama about a 13-year-old girl (Anna Paquin) who raises orphaned Canadian geese and teaches them to migrate by leading the llock in her ullra-iighl aircraft When the birds fly, the film also gains some altitude by displaying spectacular outdoor scenery But the story stumbles when it dwells on family problems and confrontations with government authorities. And a girl so young flying solo for hundreds of miles'' Hard to believe. Jeff Daniels co-stars as the girl's artist father (PG) ClNEDOMEl H EN D E R SO LUXURY X H E A T R E C O M P L E X ^12 luxury kw^Umi *D^mJnotk 9m •Otikf St§ri9 iMiif •Clim^§ Cuntr^M Ctmhii •itckiag Chair l9§9 S§athf •frti UfhtiJ hfki$f Just //•; from Sn$a elltY td iooldf Cityl 457-3700 tMMutum unma *yivarun miam NWR MM iiNi t ms mm JJM STARTS FRIDAY CINEDOME 12 H [ N D t R l(H (PG13) 12:55 3:50 715 10:25 MIGHn[)UCKS3(PG) 1205 2:20 4:35 7:05 9:20 11:20 STARTS FRIDAY FLY AWAY HOME (PG) 12:25 2:35 4 55 7:30 9 45 • LONG KISS GOODNIGHT (R) 100 3 15 5:35 7:50 10:10 BULLETPROOF (R) 330 7 50 • THE CHAMBER (R) 12 40 3 05 5 30 7:55 10:20 THATTHWGYOUDO(PG) 12 35 2:50 5 05 720 9:35 1130 • NO PASSES COUPONS OR IJtSCOUNTS SON RRST WIVES CLUB (PG) 12:00 2:15 4: 7:00 9:15 11:20 JACK (PG13) 12i0 5:15 10:15 GLIMMER MAN (R) 12.45 3:00 5:20 7 40 9:50 11:40 EXTREME MEASURES (R) 1:00 5:25 9:50 PHENOMENON (PG) 245 745 LAST MAN STANOMG(R) 12:30 240 5.O0 725 9:4S 1130 GHOST M DARKNESS (R) 1210 2 35 5 10 7:35 • I g LATE SHOW m. SAT ai.v • • • • • • f • • • • • • • • 1^

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leis ^smmm r: P020 Henderson Home News Thursday. October 10.1996 LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE Thursday, October 10,1996 Henderson Home News Pfl21 NOTICE OF GENERA! ELtCTl6N CITY OF HENDERSON, STATE OF NEVADA TO BE HELD ON TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5,1996 NOTICE IS HEREB Y GIVEN that ihe General Elecuon will be held on Tuesday, November S, 1996, at which electioa there will be submitted lo (lie duly qualified electors, properly regiHered, of the Gty of Henderson, statewide Questions 1 -7,9aAb. 10-17 and Oork County School Diftrict Question No. 18 as follows: V\A. KKPI.AM ATION OF BALI OT QUESTIONS INCLUDING ARCIIMKNTS FOR AND AGAINST PA&SAGE NOTF-STOVOTKHS mtHsLl Ballot QuestioM 13,14, and IS relate to Nevada s.iales lax. hisimpoftanttliatyouunder.itand this lax and the process by which it may be changed. As noted below, only a portico of tliis lax may be changed by you, llie voter, pur.iuant to die attached ballot que.^tions. Nevada's statewide sales lax coa^i.iLs of Uiree .sepwale pans levied at different rales on the sale and use of tangible personal propert y in die state. Tlie current statewide combined rale is 6.S0 percent. In addition to these tliree parts, each county also may impose additional taxes up to a combined rate of 1 percent, subject to die approval of die voters or governing body in dial county. These additional taxes have, in seven cixinties, increaw(increa.eclexpen.nowin£. Funds comiiiilled for llie retirement of puWic employees niu.. Nevada is die fa.stesl growing slate in diis country. Tliis population growdi can cau.se an extraordinary increase in the number of people who vote. Tlial increa.se in voters unfairly cau.ses an increa.se in the number of signatures required on a petition to recall a public officer. Tlie proposed amendment would ensure dial die number of required signatures is based on die number of persons wlio voted in die election in wliidi die public officer was actually elected, not on die increa.sed number of voters who voted al a later electioa. Once die recall petition is submitted and a special recall election a ordered, a reali.tic amount of time is needed to: 1. Schedule die dole of die special election; 2. Allow die proper preparation of die .special ballots; and 3. Advi.se die voters of die relevant i.ssues and infoniuition.. Tlie current time of 20 days is not sufficient. Voters wishing lo exerci.se llieir constitutional right lo recall a public officer should n aapl are widiin die audiority given to diem by die Legislature; 2. Tlie courts will slill be interpreting regulations and may rule that a particular regulation is legally defecdve; and 3. Tlie Legislature will still pa.ss laws wliile keeping die right to ensure dial die people's voice is heard by die sute regulators. ARGUMENTS AGAINST PASSAGE The Nevada Constitution provides for a .separation of powers among die legi.slalive, executive and judicial branches of government. Once it pa.s.ses a law audiorizing a .stale agency to adopt regulations, die Legislature sliould nol have die audiority lo review or oveaide die regulations proposed by agencies of dieexecuti ve brandi of govemmeni. In addition, die Nevada Constitution grants lo die courts die audiority lo interpret regulaUons and to determine wlietlier diey exceed die agendes statutory audiority. FISCALNOTE Finandal Impact • No. Tlie propasal lo amend die Nevada Con.stilution would .specifically authorize die legislauve review of adminlstrauve regulations. Tlierevisions can be accomplished widi no adverse fiscal effect. FULL TEXT OF THE MEASURE : SENATE JOINT RESOLUTION Proposing to amend die Nevada constitution lo authorize specifically die legislative review of aihiiinistrative regulations. RESOLVED BY THE SENATE AND ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF NEVADA, JOINTLY, Tliat section 1 of article 3 of die consumuon of llie State of Nevada be amemled to read as follows: Section [.] 1.7. The powers of die Government of die State of Nevada sliall be diviiled into three separate departments,— tlie Legislative,—die Executive and die Judicial; and no persons charged widi dieexerdseof powers properly belonging loone of diese departments sliall exercise any functions, apperuining loeidierof die otliers, except in die ca.ses (herein] expressly directed or permitted (.] m this constilulitm. 2. If the legislature authorizes Ihe aeloplion i>f regulations by im executive agency which hind persons outside the agency the legulalure may provide by law for: (a) The review cf these regulations by a legislative agency before their effective date to determine initially whether each is within the statutory authority for its adoption: (b) The suspension by a legislative agency of tiny such regulation which appears to exceed that authority, until it is rex-iewed by a legLiltilive body compo.ted of members of the Senate and Assembly which is authorized lo act on behalf of both houses of the legislature: aiul (c) 'The nullification of any such regulation by a nuijority vote tiflhal legi.slalive body, whether or not Ihe regulation was su.spended QUESTI0NN0.6 ...'.'. Amendment to die Nevada Constitution Assembly Joint Rrsolutiim No. 26 of the 67th Session CONDENSATION (Ballot Question) Shall the Nevada Constitution be amended tu clarify that an exemption from the state's debt limitation also applies to money borrowed to n-tnifit state buildings to make more cflldent use of energy in those buildings? Vrs.„, No__ JD Page 21 EXPLANATION The Nevada ConstiluUon allows die state lo borrow money, but proliibils die sum of such debts from exceeding 2 percent of llie asses.sed value of all taxable property in die .stale. Tlie coosutution also provides dial debts incurred by die .stale for die preservation of ils property or natural resources are exempt from tliis debt limitation. Although energy resources are generally considered lo be natural resources, it is nol clear if projects to retrofit buildings in order to conserve energy are exempt from the deN limitation. Tlie proposed amendment would clarify that die existing exemption applies to debts incurred in mollifying state buildings to con.serve energy. ARGUMENTS FOR PASSAGE Tlie ooBservatioB of Nevada's energy re.sources dirough tlie retrofitting cf puNic buildings is ooasisteat with the preservation of tlie state's natural resources and, dierefore, should be exempt qwcifically from die debt linuiaiion. Tlie proposed amendment would provide more flexibiUty and additional options for financing projects lo retrofit state buildings lo make diem more energy effideat Through demonstration projects lo retrofit buildings funded by special graals, the Slate of Nevada lias shown dial it can obtain significant savings in die cost of energy within a period of a few years. Nevada could realize subslanUal . ARGUMENTS AGAINST PASSAGE • .. -.j. *, • • ri Tlie Sute should not use lax dollars for inve.slmeni in private companies, associations, or corporations. Any risk or gain a.s.sociated widi inve.sinients involving private busine.s.ses lia.s IradiUonally been left to private investors. • ^ • 'V' /.' • .;: • • •/ • • ••FISCALNOTE • '•• ,' Financial Impad • Cannot he detcnnim'd. Tlie prapo.sal does not require any inve.siiiient (0 be made. Die aniemliiiem would simply peniiil llie Legislature to consider proposals for investments subject to die terms and conditions in the amendment. Until .specific legi.slalion is enaded authorizing an invesliiienl, there would be no fi.scal impact. FULL TEXT OF THE MEA.SURE ASSEMBLY JOINT RESOLUTION Proposing loameml the Nevada constitution lo allow die investment of stale money lo .sUmulate economic development. WHEREAS, Emerging compeUlion in oilier states and federally regulated territories threaten die Slate of Nevada's long-term growdi in its vital gaming industry; and WHEREAS, Finance programs necessary lo assure business expansion and high quality job growth do not currendy provide Nevada's business sector with adequate access to diose types of money and capiul essenual to .support die growdi of a diversified economic base, and WHEREAS, Tlie Nevada constitution curtenlly conlaias re.stricUons, based on conditions existing in die I9di century, dial have prevented the Legislature from coasidering legislation similar to laws enacted in several other slates, wliicli would permit prudently managed investments in public-private partner.sliips and corporaUons designed to provide needed sources of capiul for high quality, job-creating businesses widiin Nevaila dial cannot feasibly oblain .such finandng from exisUng private financial markets in an easily acces.sible and efficient manner; and WHEREAS, The Sute of Nevada must remain competitive widi odier .sUles in providing die necessary finandal tools lo atlrad die types of bu.sinesses and indusUies dial would diversify Nevada's economic base and improve die stamlard of living for Nevada's dlizens; and WHEREAS, The benefits lo be derived from a sUong economic development effort throughout the stole may be jeopardized if ciuient restricUons i n die Nevada constitution ore not replaced widi more flexible and contemporary standards dial bodi protect public investments i n economic development projects and provide access to die lyjie of financing needed lo stimulate the growth of businesses and industries tlirougliout the .slate which will provide llie liigli quality jobs, increased property values, snd enhanced stamlard of living desired by Nevadans; now, dierefore, be il RESOLVED BY THE A.SSEMBLY AND SENATE OF THE STATE OF NEVADA, JOINTLY. That secUon 9 of article 8 of the ooaslilulion of llie Stale of Nevaila is hereby amended to read as follows: (Sec: 9. The) Sec. 9.1. Except as otherwise provided in subsections 2 ami 3. Ihe Sute shall nol (bnale or loan money (,] or its credit (,] to, or subscribe lo or be (,] interested in die Slock of any company, associatioo, or corporaUon. (, except] 2. The legislature may by law, approved by a vote nflwoIhirds of the members elected to each house, authorize Ihe investment of slate money in a company, association or corporation subject to the following conditions: (a) Before any investment Ls authorized, a delerminalirn mu.st be made, by a person or entity designated in the authorizing legislation, thtU: (1 ) The investment is for Ihe economic development of this stale or the creation of new employment opportunities in this slate: (2) The slate can reasonably expect to achieve a reasimable rate of return an Ihe investment, adjusted for Ihe relative degree of risk: tmd (b) Each mveMnenl by the stale must be maile through a cooperative venture with private mveslors of rtasonable sophistication who participate in the venture on terms that are the same at or less favorable than the terms on which the state is participating. Kevenue received from investments pursuant to this subsection may be reinvestetl subject lo Ihe same conditions. 3. The provisions of this section do not apply to corporations formed for educational or diarilaUe puipases. QUESTION NO. 8 An Mtiative Rrlating to Term Limits fur Federal Odken REMOVED FROM THE BALLOT Qacstion namber eiglit was rttnavtd trvm the ballat fitllowing tkc US. Sapmnc Court D irW ai^ VS. Term Limits, Ime. r. fhorlM, and Nevada Attomry Genrnd Opinion Na 9S17. QUESTION NO. 9 Aa Ulialivt Rcialii to Tenn UBRS for Slate and Locd PMMc Offlccn CONDEKSA'nON (Bafci QmftOtm} 9(a) Shril the Nevada ConstHalioa be amemled to otabHsii lem IIMMS far alalc aa4 lacai piiblic oHlccn in the cxccuUve and legislative branches of goverMMntT ITes a No a 9(b) SbaD the Nevada Constllulion be amended to establish term HMMS for Nevada Jn^ica and juices? Yea... Na.— JO EXPLANA-nON Odier dian ihe office of governor, die Nevada Coasutution currendy places no limils oa llie number of terms to whidi slate and local officers can be elected. This amendment would limit members of die sUte Assembly to serving twelve (12) years or six (6) terms in office. Members of diesute Senate would be limited lo serving twelve (12) years or diree (3) terms in office. The Secretary of Sute, Sute Treasurer, Slate Controller, and die Attorney General would be limited to eight (8) years or two (2) terms. Oilier state officials and local governing body members would be limited lo twelve (12) years. Appointment loan office for any amount of lime would be equal to one (I) term. Justices of die s^ireme court district court jutlges, justices of die peace, and all oilier judges would be limited lo two full terms, to one full term and a fraction of a term, or lo two fractions of one term. Limits to service by a judge would range from twelve years to less dian diree years. A limit of diree years or less would occur if a judge u appointed lofill a judidal vacancy and diea is reeiected to the final two yean of (he terni, u is required lo keep tlie position: tliix would constitute two temis under die language of tlie amendment. ARGUMENTS FOR PASSAGE Proponents argue dial pa.ssage will .stop career poliucians .since no one will be able lo hold one office for .several lemu: Passage may le.s.sen die power of lobbyists and .special i merest group* since state officials and local governing body members will only be in office for a limited amount of time. Stale officials and local governing body members would have the opportunity lo focus on the issues iastead of reelection. A greater number of Nevadans would be allowed to serve as sUle oflldals and as members of local governing bodies. s !. ARGUMENTS AGAINST PASSAGE Opponents argue dial il may be difficult to get qualified candidates to run for an office if die term of dial office is limited. Experienced slate office holders and members of local governing bodies will not be allowed to run for reelection; nor will diose who havedone a good job and been responsive lo Ihe voters. During die slate or local offidals' final term, the official will nol be accountable to the voters during lliat term, since dial official cannot be reeiected. Tliis amendment does not consider dial Nevada cunently has a citizen legislature which meets only once every two years; coasequently, die current turnover in tlie sUte legislature is quite high. Most people want a judge widi knowledge and experience, yet term limiu will give die judge insufficient lime to develop eidier. No sooner will a judge begin to attain these qualiUes dian lie or she will be forced to leave office by term hmits. Since most judges'terms end al the same time, wholesale replacement of experienced judges will occur. Tlie long term quality of Ihe judidary will also decUne because mast qualified lawyers will refuse to give up dieir practices or careers in exchange for only a limited period of Ume on die bench. nSCALNOTE "• • • • :' • '" • • • • • Fiscal Impad No. Tlie propasal lo amend die Nevada CoastimUon would limit Ihe terms of Slate and Local Officers. Tlie propo.sal would have no adver.se fi.scal impact. FULL TEXT OF THE MEASURE ^ ^ Initiative to Limit Terms of Stale and I.,ocal OITlcers : The People of Ihe Slate of Nevada ik) enact as follows: Section I. Section 3 of article 4 of llie coastiiulion of die Stale of Nevada is hereby amended lo read as follows: (Sec:) Sec. 3. 1. Tlie members of die AsseniHy sliall be cliosen (biennialy] biennially by llie qualified eledors of dieir respective districts, on die Tuesday next after die first Monday in November and llieir term of office slull be two years from die day next after tlieir election. 2. No person may be elected or appointed as a member of the Assembly who has Servetl in that office, or at the expiration of his current term if he is .so .serving will have .servetl, 12 years or more, from any district cflhix slate. Sec. 2 Section 4 of article 4 of die con.slilution of tlie Stale of Nevada is liereby amended lo read as follows: (Sec:]5ec. 4. /. Senators shall be clio.sen at tlie same time and places as members of die As.seiiibly by die qualified electors of dieir respective districts, and llieir term of Office shall be four Years from die day next after dieir election. 2. No person may be elected or appointed as a Seiuttor who has served in that office, oral the expiraliartvfhis current term if he is so serving will have served, 12 years or more, from any district cfthis slate. Sea 3. SecUon 19 of article 5 of die coasUlulion of die State of Nevada is hereby amended to read as follows: [Section) Sec. 19. 1. A secretary of .slate, a treasurer, a controller, and an attorney general, shall be elected al die same Ume ami places, and in llie same manner as die governor. Tlie term of office of each shall be the same as is prescrihetl for llie governor. 2. Any elector shall be eligible to (eitlier of said) any tf these offices).], but no person may be elected to any of them more than twice, or more than once if he has previously held the office by election or appointment. Sec. 4 SecUon 11 of article 6 of die con.sUtution of die Slate of Nevada is hereby amended lo read as follows: ^ Sec. 11.7. Tlie jusuoes of die supreme court and llie district judges sliall be ineligible to any office, odier dian a judidal office, during die tenn for wliich diey .shall have been elected cr appointed; and all elections or appointments of any such judges by die people, legislature, or odierwi.se, during said period, lo any office odier than judicial, .sliall be void. 2. No person may be electedajustice of the supreme court, judge of any other court, or justice of the peace more than twice for Ihe same court, or more than imce if he has previously served upon that court by election or appointment. Sec. 5. Section 3 of article 15 of tlie con.sUtution of die Stale of Nevada is hereby amended to read as follows: (SecUon) Sec. 3. 1. No person shall be eligible to any office who Is not a qualified elector under diis consuiuUon. 2. No person may be elected to any state office or local governing body who has served in that office, or at the expiration of his cu rrent term if he is so serving will have served, 12 years or more, unless Ihe permissible number if terms or duration of service is otherwise specified in this constitution. QUESTION NO. 10 An Initiative Relating to Establish Limits and Define Campaign CiNitrilHiliom CONDENSATION (Balhit Qurntiiin) Shall the Nevada Constitution be amended lo add a new section which establishes, limils and defines campaign contributions? Ves„ n No a EXPLANATION The Nevada Constitution cinrenlly lias no provlsioas winch define or regulate cannaign cootrifauuons. This amendment defines campaign contribuUons as including items such as paid polling and resulUng data, paid direti mail, paid .solicilaUon by telephone and paid caiinign paraphernalia primed or odierwise produce
PAGE 21

leis ^smmm r: P020 Henderson Home News Thursday. October 10.1996 LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE Thursday, October 10,1996 Henderson Home News Pfl21 NOTICE OF GENERA! ELtCTl6N CITY OF HENDERSON, STATE OF NEVADA TO BE HELD ON TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5,1996 NOTICE IS HEREB Y GIVEN that ihe General Elecuon will be held on Tuesday, November S, 1996, at which electioa there will be submitted lo (lie duly qualified electors, properly regiHered, of the Gty of Henderson, statewide Questions 1 -7,9aAb. 10-17 and Oork County School Diftrict Question No. 18 as follows: V\A. KKPI.AM ATION OF BALI OT QUESTIONS INCLUDING ARCIIMKNTS FOR AND AGAINST PA&SAGE NOTF-STOVOTKHS mtHsLl Ballot QuestioM 13,14, and IS relate to Nevada s.iales lax. hisimpoftanttliatyouunder.itand this lax and the process by which it may be changed. As noted below, only a portico of tliis lax may be changed by you, llie voter, pur.iuant to die attached ballot que.^tions. Nevada's statewide sales lax coa^i.iLs of Uiree .sepwale pans levied at different rales on the sale and use of tangible personal propert y in die state. Tlie current statewide combined rale is 6.S0 percent. In addition to these tliree parts, each county also may impose additional taxes up to a combined rate of 1 percent, subject to die approval of die voters or governing body in dial county. These additional taxes have, in seven cixinties, increaw(increa.eclexpen.nowin£. Funds comiiiilled for llie retirement of puWic employees niu.. Nevada is die fa.stesl growing slate in diis country. Tliis population growdi can cau.se an extraordinary increase in the number of people who vote. Tlial increa.se in voters unfairly cau.ses an increa.se in the number of signatures required on a petition to recall a public officer. Tlie proposed amendment would ensure dial die number of required signatures is based on die number of persons wlio voted in die election in wliidi die public officer was actually elected, not on die increa.sed number of voters who voted al a later electioa. Once die recall petition is submitted and a special recall election a ordered, a reali.tic amount of time is needed to: 1. Schedule die dole of die special election; 2. Allow die proper preparation of die .special ballots; and 3. Advi.se die voters of die relevant i.ssues and infoniuition.. Tlie current time of 20 days is not sufficient. Voters wishing lo exerci.se llieir constitutional right lo recall a public officer should n aapl are widiin die audiority given to diem by die Legislature; 2. Tlie courts will slill be interpreting regulations and may rule that a particular regulation is legally defecdve; and 3. Tlie Legislature will still pa.ss laws wliile keeping die right to ensure dial die people's voice is heard by die sute regulators. ARGUMENTS AGAINST PASSAGE The Nevada Constitution provides for a .separation of powers among die legi.slalive, executive and judicial branches of government. Once it pa.s.ses a law audiorizing a .stale agency to adopt regulations, die Legislature sliould nol have die audiority lo review or oveaide die regulations proposed by agencies of dieexecuti ve brandi of govemmeni. In addition, die Nevada Constitution grants lo die courts die audiority lo interpret regulaUons and to determine wlietlier diey exceed die agendes statutory audiority. FISCALNOTE Finandal Impact • No. Tlie propasal lo amend die Nevada Con.stilution would .specifically authorize die legislauve review of adminlstrauve regulations. Tlierevisions can be accomplished widi no adverse fiscal effect. FULL TEXT OF THE MEASURE : SENATE JOINT RESOLUTION Proposing to amend die Nevada constitution lo authorize specifically die legislative review of aihiiinistrative regulations. RESOLVED BY THE SENATE AND ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF NEVADA, JOINTLY, Tliat section 1 of article 3 of die consumuon of llie State of Nevada be amemled to read as follows: Section [.] 1.7. The powers of die Government of die State of Nevada sliall be diviiled into three separate departments,— tlie Legislative,—die Executive and die Judicial; and no persons charged widi dieexerdseof powers properly belonging loone of diese departments sliall exercise any functions, apperuining loeidierof die otliers, except in die ca.ses (herein] expressly directed or permitted (.] m this constilulitm. 2. If the legislature authorizes Ihe aeloplion i>f regulations by im executive agency which hind persons outside the agency the legulalure may provide by law for: (a) The review cf these regulations by a legislative agency before their effective date to determine initially whether each is within the statutory authority for its adoption: (b) The suspension by a legislative agency of tiny such regulation which appears to exceed that authority, until it is rex-iewed by a legLiltilive body compo.ted of members of the Senate and Assembly which is authorized lo act on behalf of both houses of the legislature: aiul (c) 'The nullification of any such regulation by a nuijority vote tiflhal legi.slalive body, whether or not Ihe regulation was su.spended QUESTI0NN0.6 ...'.'. Amendment to die Nevada Constitution Assembly Joint Rrsolutiim No. 26 of the 67th Session CONDENSATION (Ballot Question) Shall the Nevada Constitution be amended tu clarify that an exemption from the state's debt limitation also applies to money borrowed to n-tnifit state buildings to make more cflldent use of energy in those buildings? Vrs.„, No__ JD Page 21 EXPLANATION The Nevada ConstiluUon allows die state lo borrow money, but proliibils die sum of such debts from exceeding 2 percent of llie asses.sed value of all taxable property in die .stale. Tlie coosutution also provides dial debts incurred by die .stale for die preservation of ils property or natural resources are exempt from tliis debt limitation. Although energy resources are generally considered lo be natural resources, it is nol clear if projects to retrofit buildings in order to conserve energy are exempt from the deN limitation. Tlie proposed amendment would clarify that die existing exemption applies to debts incurred in mollifying state buildings to con.serve energy. ARGUMENTS FOR PASSAGE Tlie ooBservatioB of Nevada's energy re.sources dirough tlie retrofitting cf puNic buildings is ooasisteat with the preservation of tlie state's natural resources and, dierefore, should be exempt qwcifically from die debt linuiaiion. Tlie proposed amendment would provide more flexibiUty and additional options for financing projects lo retrofit state buildings lo make diem more energy effideat Through demonstration projects lo retrofit buildings funded by special graals, the Slate of Nevada lias shown dial it can obtain significant savings in die cost of energy within a period of a few years. Nevada could realize subslanUal .
ARGUMENTS AGAINST PASSAGE • .. -.j. *, • • ri Tlie Sute should not use lax dollars for inve.slmeni in private companies, associations, or corporations. Any risk or gain a.s.sociated widi inve.sinients involving private busine.s.ses lia.s IradiUonally been left to private investors. • ^ • 'V' /.' • .;: • • •/ • • ••FISCALNOTE • '•• ,' Financial Impad • Cannot he detcnnim'd. Tlie prapo.sal does not require any inve.siiiient (0 be made. Die aniemliiiem would simply peniiil llie Legislature to consider proposals for investments subject to die terms and conditions in the amendment. Until .specific legi.slalion is enaded authorizing an invesliiienl, there would be no fi.scal impact. FULL TEXT OF THE MEA.SURE ASSEMBLY JOINT RESOLUTION Proposing loameml the Nevada constitution lo allow die investment of stale money lo .sUmulate economic development. WHEREAS, Emerging compeUlion in oilier states and federally regulated territories threaten die Slate of Nevada's long-term growdi in its vital gaming industry; and WHEREAS, Finance programs necessary lo assure business expansion and high quality job growth do not currendy provide Nevada's business sector with adequate access to diose types of money and capiul essenual to .support die growdi of a diversified economic base, and WHEREAS, Tlie Nevada constitution curtenlly conlaias re.stricUons, based on conditions existing in die I9di century, dial have prevented the Legislature from coasidering legislation similar to laws enacted in several other slates, wliicli would permit prudently managed investments in public-private partner.sliips and corporaUons designed to provide needed sources of capiul for high quality, job-creating businesses widiin Nevaila dial cannot feasibly oblain .such finandng from exisUng private financial markets in an easily acces.sible and efficient manner; and WHEREAS, The Sute of Nevada must remain competitive widi odier .sUles in providing die necessary finandal tools lo atlrad die types of bu.sinesses and indusUies dial would diversify Nevada's economic base and improve die stamlard of living for Nevada's dlizens; and WHEREAS, The benefits lo be derived from a sUong economic development effort throughout the stole may be jeopardized if ciuient restricUons i n die Nevada constitution ore not replaced widi more flexible and contemporary standards dial bodi protect public investments i n economic development projects and provide access to die lyjie of financing needed lo stimulate the growth of businesses and industries tlirougliout the .slate which will provide llie liigli quality jobs, increased property values, snd enhanced stamlard of living desired by Nevadans; now, dierefore, be il RESOLVED BY THE A.SSEMBLY AND SENATE OF THE STATE OF NEVADA, JOINTLY. That secUon 9 of article 8 of the ooaslilulion of llie Stale of Nevaila is hereby amended to read as follows: (Sec: 9. The) Sec. 9.1. Except as otherwise provided in subsections 2 ami 3. Ihe Sute shall nol (bnale or loan money (,] or its credit (,] to, or subscribe lo or be (,] interested in die Slock of any company, associatioo, or corporaUon. (, except] 2. The legislature may by law, approved by a vote nflwoIhirds of the members elected to each house, authorize Ihe investment of slate money in a company, association or corporation subject to the following conditions: (a) Before any investment Ls authorized, a delerminalirn mu.st be made, by a person or entity designated in the authorizing legislation, thtU: (1 ) The investment is for Ihe economic development of this stale or the creation of new employment opportunities in this slate: (2) The slate can reasonably expect to achieve a reasimable rate of return an Ihe investment, adjusted for Ihe relative degree of risk: tmd (b) Each mveMnenl by the stale must be maile through a cooperative venture with private mveslors of rtasonable sophistication who participate in the venture on terms that are the same at or less favorable than the terms on which the state is participating. Kevenue received from investments pursuant to this subsection may be reinvestetl subject lo Ihe same conditions. 3. The provisions of this section do not apply to corporations formed for educational or diarilaUe puipases. QUESTION NO. 8 An Mtiative Rrlating to Term Limits fur Federal Odken REMOVED FROM THE BALLOT Qacstion namber eiglit was rttnavtd trvm the ballat fitllowing tkc US. Sapmnc Court D irW ai^ VS. Term Limits, Ime. r. fhorlM, and Nevada Attomry Genrnd Opinion Na 9S17. QUESTION NO. 9 Aa Ulialivt Rcialii to Tenn UBRS for Slate and Locd PMMc Offlccn CONDEKSA'nON (Bafci QmftOtm} 9(a) Shril the Nevada ConstHalioa be amemled to otabHsii lem IIMMS far alalc aa4 lacai piiblic oHlccn in the cxccuUve and legislative branches of goverMMntT ITes a No a 9(b) SbaD the Nevada Constllulion be amended to establish term HMMS for Nevada Jn^ica and juices? Yea... Na.— JO EXPLANA-nON Odier dian ihe office of governor, die Nevada Coasutution currendy places no limils oa llie number of terms to whidi slate and local officers can be elected. This amendment would limit members of die sUte Assembly to serving twelve (12) years or six (6) terms in office. Members of diesute Senate would be limited lo serving twelve (12) years or diree (3) terms in office. The Secretary of Sute, Sute Treasurer, Slate Controller, and die Attorney General would be limited to eight (8) years or two (2) terms. Oilier state officials and local governing body members would be limited lo twelve (12) years. Appointment loan office for any amount of lime would be equal to one (I) term. Justices of die s^ireme court district court jutlges, justices of die peace, and all oilier judges would be limited lo two full terms, to one full term and a fraction of a term, or lo two fractions of one term. Limits to service by a judge would range from twelve years to less dian diree years. A limit of diree years or less would occur if a judge u appointed lofill a judidal vacancy and diea is reeiected to the final two yean of (he terni, u is required lo keep tlie position: tliix would constitute two temis under die language of tlie amendment. ARGUMENTS FOR PASSAGE Proponents argue dial pa.ssage will .stop career poliucians .since no one will be able lo hold one office for .several lemu: Passage may le.s.sen die power of lobbyists and .special i merest group* since state officials and local governing body members will only be in office for a limited amount of time. Stale officials and local governing body members would have the opportunity lo focus on the issues iastead of reelection. A greater number of Nevadans would be allowed to serve as sUle oflldals and as members of local governing bodies. s !. ARGUMENTS AGAINST PASSAGE Opponents argue dial il may be difficult to get qualified candidates to run for an office if die term of dial office is limited. Experienced slate office holders and members of local governing bodies will not be allowed to run for reelection; nor will diose who havedone a good job and been responsive lo Ihe voters. During die slate or local offidals' final term, the official will nol be accountable to the voters during lliat term, since dial official cannot be reeiected. Tliis amendment does not consider dial Nevada cunently has a citizen legislature which meets only once every two years; coasequently, die current turnover in tlie sUte legislature is quite high. Most people want a judge widi knowledge and experience, yet term limiu will give die judge insufficient lime to develop eidier. No sooner will a judge begin to attain these qualiUes dian lie or she will be forced to leave office by term hmits. Since most judges'terms end al the same time, wholesale replacement of experienced judges will occur. Tlie long term quality of Ihe judidary will also decUne because mast qualified lawyers will refuse to give up dieir practices or careers in exchange for only a limited period of Ume on die bench. nSCALNOTE "• • • • :' • '" • • • • • Fiscal Impad No. Tlie propasal lo amend die Nevada CoastimUon would limit Ihe terms of Slate and Local Officers. Tlie propo.sal would have no adver.se fi.scal impact. FULL TEXT OF THE MEASURE ^ ^ Initiative to Limit Terms of Stale and I.,ocal OITlcers : The People of Ihe Slate of Nevada ik) enact as follows: Section I. Section 3 of article 4 of llie coastiiulion of die Stale of Nevada is hereby amended lo read as follows: (Sec:) Sec. 3. 1. Tlie members of die AsseniHy sliall be cliosen (biennialy] biennially by llie qualified eledors of dieir respective districts, on die Tuesday next after die first Monday in November and llieir term of office slull be two years from die day next after tlieir election. 2. No person may be elected or appointed as a member of the Assembly who has Servetl in that office, or at the expiration of his current term if he is .so .serving will have .servetl, 12 years or more, from any district cflhix slate. Sec. 2 Section 4 of article 4 of die con.slilution of tlie Stale of Nevada is liereby amended lo read as follows: (Sec:]5ec. 4. /. Senators shall be clio.sen at tlie same time and places as members of die As.seiiibly by die qualified electors of dieir respective districts, and llieir term of Office shall be four Years from die day next after dieir election. 2. No person may be elected or appointed as a Seiuttor who has served in that office, oral the expiraliartvfhis current term if he is so serving will have served, 12 years or more, from any district cfthis slate. Sea 3. SecUon 19 of article 5 of die coasUlulion of die State of Nevada is hereby amended to read as follows: [Section) Sec. 19. 1. A secretary of .slate, a treasurer, a controller, and an attorney general, shall be elected al die same Ume ami places, and in llie same manner as die governor. Tlie term of office of each shall be the same as is prescrihetl for llie governor. 2. Any elector shall be eligible to (eitlier of said) any tf these offices).], but no person may be elected to any of them more than twice, or more than once if he has previously held the office by election or appointment. Sec. 4 SecUon 11 of article 6 of die con.sUtution of die Slate of Nevada is hereby amended lo read as follows: ^ Sec. 11.7. Tlie jusuoes of die supreme court and llie district judges sliall be ineligible to any office, odier dian a judidal office, during die tenn for wliich diey .shall have been elected cr appointed; and all elections or appointments of any such judges by die people, legislature, or odierwi.se, during said period, lo any office odier than judicial, .sliall be void. 2. No person may be electedajustice of the supreme court, judge of any other court, or justice of the peace more than twice for Ihe same court, or more than imce if he has previously served upon that court by election or appointment. Sec. 5. Section 3 of article 15 of tlie con.sUtution of die Stale of Nevada is hereby amended to read as follows: (SecUon) Sec. 3. 1. No person shall be eligible to any office who Is not a qualified elector under diis consuiuUon. 2. No person may be elected to any state office or local governing body who has served in that office, or at the expiration of his cu rrent term if he is so serving will have served, 12 years or more, unless Ihe permissible number if terms or duration of service is otherwise specified in this constitution. QUESTION NO. 10 An Initiative Relating to Establish Limits and Define Campaign CiNitrilHiliom CONDENSATION (Balhit Qurntiiin) Shall the Nevada Constitution be amended lo add a new section which establishes, limils and defines campaign contributions? Ves„ n No a EXPLANATION The Nevada Constitution cinrenlly lias no provlsioas winch define or regulate cannaign cootrifauuons. This amendment defines campaign contribuUons as including items such as paid polling and resulUng data, paid direti mail, paid .solicilaUon by telephone and paid caiinign paraphernalia primed or odierwise produce
PAGE 22

f ^ • '^r-iijm-v;' :.'m"i'TW a. P022 Ht ndfson Horn* Ntwt Thursday. October 10.1996 Thursday. October 10,1996 Hndtron Hom Ntw Pag23 rUEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL From Page 21 FISCAL NOTE *yl lMct No. The propoaal to amend ilie Nevada Coiutitutioii would limit certain campaign coanibutiou. The proposal would have no adverse fMcal impact to tlie State. FULL TEXT OF THE MEASURE Initiative to DrfiiM and Limit Campaign Contributiom The People of the State of Nevada do enact a.1 follow.i: Section 1. Article 2 of the constitution of die Sute of Nevada is hereby amended by adding thereto a new aection to read a.i follows: Sec. 10. 1. As used in this section, "contribution" includes the value of services provided in kind for which money would otherwise be paitl, such as paid polling and resulting data, paid direct mail paid solicitation by telephone, any paid campaign paraphernalia printed or otherwise produced, and the use of paid personnel to assist in a campaign. 2. The legislature shall provide by law for the limitaliim of the total contribution by any ttatural or artificial person to the campaign of any person for election to any office, except a federal office, lo$S,000for the primary! and $5,0(X)forthegenemleleclioii, aulto theupprimil or rejection of any question by the registered voters to $5, (MX), whether t'he office sought or the question submitted is local or for the stale as a whole. The legislature shall further provide for the punishtnent of the contributor, the candidate, and any other knowing party to a violation of Ihe limit, as a felony. Sec. 2. If article 2 of tlie coaslitulion of llie State of Nevada is al.o amended by llie addition of anodier section at (lie same general election al which Uiis initiative is finally approved, die secretary of state shall redesignate Uie .section added by lliis initiative as • Sec. U." QUESTION NO. 11 An Initiative Relating to Tax Restraint ;. CONDENSATION (Ballot Question); ^ t -A r : • ; Shall Ihe Nevada Constil ulion l>e amrndrd torstablish a rtqui rement that at least a t woIhirds vote of both houses of the legi.slulurc he necessary to pass a measure which grtirrates or increases a tax, fee, assessment, rale ation bonds in an amount oTmit more than $20,000,000 to carry out projects for the conlnti of erosion and the restoration of natural walercoorses in the Lake Tahoe Basin? — a Yes No EXPLANATION If this proposal is approved, die Stale of Neva:;.•; AN ACT relating lo cooperative agreemenU; audiorizing certain pubUc employers to enter into cooperative agreements concerning workmen's condensation, employer's liability or healdi insurance which obligate die employers iopleENSA'nON (Ballot Quotion) and approved a biR may be hnpaa ts er k i c rta ses a tax or nss r is wi ti t b c ewald irid by each boMse of the Nevada LegMal w befort EXPLANA-nON The proposed amendment to stole low would require each house of die Nevada Legislature toconsider and approve twice any bill dial imposes or increases a lax or assessment. Additionally, die measure would require a period of 10 calendar days lo elapse between tlie first and second votes in each house on any such bill. Al.so, Ihe final vole on such a bill would be void unless il is Uken al least 10 days before die adjournmenl of a regular legislative session. The proposed amendment, if approved, will become effective on January 1,1997. only if a majority of die voters reject (^estion No. 11. Tliat proposal would require a t wo-iliirds majority vole of bodi iKMises of die Nevada Legislature toposs o bill or joinlresoluUon that increases public revenue. ARGUMENTS FOR PASSAGE The proposed amendment provides a belter melliod of approving new or increased taxes or assessments dian (^estion No. 11. Tliis proposal is based on die democratic principle of "majority lule." (Question No. 11, on die odier liond, allows a minority of stale legislators lo control suie policy over die wishes of a majority of iliase elected. In addition. Question No. 16 provides safeguards against hasly dedsions concerning taxation and oould Umil increases in Uxes and assessmenU. ARGUMENTS AGAINST PASSAGE The prop)}sed amendment would liimler die Nevada Legislature's ability to provide necessary revenue for die operation of schools and slate governnieni by placing additional requiremenu on die manner in which legi.slation is approved. Fiiitlier, dus special provision is not required for other important laws approved by die Legislature and is an unnecessary departure from Ihe requirements contained in die Nevada Constitution. The current provisions have served Nevada well for over 130 years and should not be amemled. nSCALNOTE 1 Financial Impact • No. Tlie proposal would require any hi II which impases or increases taxes or assessments lo be approved twice in each House of die Nevada Legislature before il may lie enacted. Tlie proposal would have no adverse fiscal effect. >; FULL TEXT OF THE MEASURE r ; '• AN ACT relating loleglslalion; providing for die submission tollie voters of Uie jue.stion whellier a bill dial iiifioses or increases a lax or as.sessnient must be considered and approved twice for final pas.sage by eadi house of the legislature before it may be enacted; and providing odier matters properly relating dierelo. THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEVADA, REPRESENTED IN SENATE AND A.SSEMBLY, DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Oiapler 218 of NRS is hereby amended by adiling thereto a new .section lo read as follows: /. A bill that impo.ies orincreavs a lax orassessmrnt must be consideredtmdapprovedt\fice for final passage in each house. A period of at Ira.xt 10 calendar days must elapse ItelH-een the date f^ the first vote on final pas.sage ami the dale itfthe additional rending and secoiul vole on final passage required by ihLi subsection. The.jecoiul vote nrifimd passage of such a bill is void unless it is taken at least 10 caleiitlar ilays Infore the adjournment sine die of a regular ses.tim of the legislature. 2. Except as otherwise provided in this subsection, nosuhtUmtiveamenelments nuiy lie made to a bill that imposes or increases a lax or a.isessn\ent f>etweeii fhe first vole and .lecoiul vote on firialpassage.Suchabill miiy beameiuledbetweenihefirsivoteand secoiidvole >m final iMi.'i.'iage if legislation which conflicts with any provi.dtn of the hill is enrolled during Ihe periint between the first vote and second vole on final paistige of that hill. Sec. 2. NRS 218.300 is liereby amended 10 rea.1 as follows: 2I8.3(X) 1. Tlie superinlendenl of the slate printing and niiaograpliics division of the department of adniini.stration.sliall, iniineihalely after receipl of the copy of any bill or re.solution, print, in addition lo die regular audiorized number, one copy thereof upon lieavy buff paper, wlijch copy must be delivered to llie .secrela(y,q( \\\ft gep^ yr.jo die chief clerk of ihe itt.seiiibly. (Before) £>crpfa.ror/ienv(.(eprr/v>Vi!i'(/i>i.cM/Mn7(Vi 2./'( • /''rellietliirilreading aiiil final passage of die bill or resolution, the legislative counsel shall carefully coiiipaie die printed or reprinteil copy of the bill or resolution with die duplicate copy thereof ami tlie original aiiienilnienls as adopted by die house, and, if tlie printeil or reprinted copy is found lo be in all respects cocrecl, Ihe legislative counsel sliall dien certify lo llie correctness of the hound copy and shall deliver die [same] bourulcopyto\iie secretary oftliesenaleor the chief clerk of die assembly as the case may be, whereupon die bound copy prinlnl upon buff paper, .so coinpareil and certified, is ready for durd reading and final pas.sage. 2. The legislative counsel shall compare, certify and deliver the bound copy if a hill Ihtit imposes or increases a tax ortLisessmrnlin accordance with iheprovLvota iif.xul>section 1 before the additional reading and second vole on final pas.iage required by section I of this act. Sec 3. NRS 218.340 Is liereby amended to read as follows:. 218.340 When any bill or resolution is pas.sel, is not approvetl by Ihe voters when rcsubniilled on tlie ballot for die general election on November 5, 1996. QUESTION NO. 17 An IniUalivc Relating tu Term Limits CONDENSATION (Ballot Question) Shall the Nevada Constitution be amended lo instruct Nevada's Congressioial delegation and members of the State Legislature to provide for term limiU for members of the VS. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate thniugh action iif the Congress or through a Constitutional Convention, and shall the Nevada Constitution be further amended lo faifonn voters how their rkcted representatives have acted in regard to this Usue? Yrs„ No-, ..a EXPLANATION Neidier die y}.S. Constitution nor die Nevada Constitution hmiu die number of terms 10 whidi a person may be elected lo die \}.S. House of Representatives or die U.S. Senate. Tliis amendment proposes to Umil a Representalive lo 00 more dian diree (3) terms in office or six (6) years and tolimit a Senator to no mere dian two (2) terms inofficeortwelve (12) years. If aperson holds one of Oiese offices al die time of ratification ofdiis amendment, dial term will count as one (I) of those allowed by die o(nen
PAGE 23

f ^ • '^r-iijm-v;' :.'m"i'TW a. P022 Ht ndfson Horn* Ntwt Thursday. October 10.1996 Thursday. October 10,1996 Hndtron Hom Ntw Pag23 rUEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL From Page 21 FISCAL NOTE *yl lMct No. The propoaal to amend ilie Nevada Coiutitutioii would limit certain campaign coanibutiou. The proposal would have no adverse fMcal impact to tlie State. FULL TEXT OF THE MEASURE Initiative to DrfiiM and Limit Campaign Contributiom The People of the State of Nevada do enact a.1 follow.i: Section 1. Article 2 of the constitution of die Sute of Nevada is hereby amended by adding thereto a new aection to read a.i follows: Sec. 10. 1. As used in this section, "contribution" includes the value of services provided in kind for which money would otherwise be paitl, such as paid polling and resulting data, paid direct mail paid solicitation by telephone, any paid campaign paraphernalia printed or otherwise produced, and the use of paid personnel to assist in a campaign. 2. The legislature shall provide by law for the limitaliim of the total contribution by any ttatural or artificial person to the campaign of any person for election to any office, except a federal office, lo$S,000for the primary! and $5,0(X)forthegenemleleclioii, aulto theupprimil or rejection of any question by the registered voters to $5, (MX), whether t'he office sought or the question submitted is local or for the stale as a whole. The legislature shall further provide for the punishtnent of the contributor, the candidate, and any other knowing party to a violation of Ihe limit, as a felony. Sec. 2. If article 2 of tlie coaslitulion of llie State of Nevada is al.o amended by llie addition of anodier section at (lie same general election al which Uiis initiative is finally approved, die secretary of state shall redesignate Uie .section added by lliis initiative as • Sec. U." QUESTION NO. 11 An Initiative Relating to Tax Restraint ;. CONDENSATION (Ballot Question); ^ t -A r : • ; Shall Ihe Nevada Constil ulion l>e amrndrd torstablish a rtqui rement that at least a t woIhirds vote of both houses of the legi.slulurc he necessary to pass a measure which grtirrates or increases a tax, fee, assessment, rale ation bonds in an amount oTmit more than $20,000,000 to carry out projects for the conlnti of erosion and the restoration of natural walercoorses in the Lake Tahoe Basin? — a Yes No EXPLANATION If this proposal is approved, die Stale of Neva:;.•; AN ACT relating lo cooperative agreemenU; audiorizing certain pubUc employers to enter into cooperative agreements concerning workmen's condensation, employer's liability or healdi insurance which obligate die employers iopleENSA'nON (Ballot Quotion) and approved a biR may be hnpaa ts er k i c rta ses a tax or nss r is wi ti t b c ewald irid by each boMse of the Nevada LegMal w befort EXPLANA-nON The proposed amendment to stole low would require each house of die Nevada Legislature toconsider and approve twice any bill dial imposes or increases a lax or assessment. Additionally, die measure would require a period of 10 calendar days lo elapse between tlie first and second votes in each house on any such bill. Al.so, Ihe final vole on such a bill would be void unless il is Uken al least 10 days before die adjournmenl of a regular legislative session. The proposed amendment, if approved, will become effective on January 1,1997. only if a majority of die voters reject (^estion No. 11. Tliat proposal would require a t wo-iliirds majority vole of bodi iKMises of die Nevada Legislature toposs o bill or joinlresoluUon that increases public revenue. ARGUMENTS FOR PASSAGE The proposed amendment provides a belter melliod of approving new or increased taxes or assessments dian (^estion No. 11. Tliis proposal is based on die democratic principle of "majority lule." (Question No. 11, on die odier liond, allows a minority of stale legislators lo control suie policy over die wishes of a majority of iliase elected. In addition. Question No. 16 provides safeguards against hasly dedsions concerning taxation and oould Umil increases in Uxes and assessmenU. ARGUMENTS AGAINST PASSAGE The prop)}sed amendment would liimler die Nevada Legislature's ability to provide necessary revenue for die operation of schools and slate governnieni by placing additional requiremenu on die manner in which legi.slation is approved. Fiiitlier, dus special provision is not required for other important laws approved by die Legislature and is an unnecessary departure from Ihe requirements contained in die Nevada Constitution. The current provisions have served Nevada well for over 130 years and should not be amemled. nSCALNOTE 1 Financial Impact • No. Tlie proposal would require any hi II which impases or increases taxes or assessments lo be approved twice in each House of die Nevada Legislature before il may lie enacted. Tlie proposal would have no adverse fiscal effect. >; FULL TEXT OF THE MEASURE r ; '• AN ACT relating loleglslalion; providing for die submission tollie voters of Uie jue.stion whellier a bill dial iiifioses or increases a lax or as.sessnient must be considered and approved twice for final pas.sage by eadi house of the legislature before it may be enacted; and providing odier matters properly relating dierelo. THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEVADA, REPRESENTED IN SENATE AND A.SSEMBLY, DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS: Section 1. Oiapler 218 of NRS is hereby amended by adiling thereto a new .section lo read as follows: /. A bill that impo.ies orincreavs a lax orassessmrnt must be consideredtmdapprovedt\fice for final passage in each house. A period of at Ira.xt 10 calendar days must elapse ItelH-een the date f^ the first vote on final pas.sage ami the dale itfthe additional rending and secoiul vole on final passage required by ihLi subsection. The.jecoiul vote nrifimd passage of such a bill is void unless it is taken at least 10 caleiitlar ilays Infore the adjournment sine die of a regular ses.tim of the legislature. 2. Except as otherwise provided in this subsection, nosuhtUmtiveamenelments nuiy lie made to a bill that imposes or increases a lax or a.isessn\ent f>etweeii fhe first vole and .lecoiul vote on firialpassage.Suchabill miiy beameiuledbetweenihefirsivoteand secoiidvole >m final iMi.'i.'iage if legislation which conflicts with any provi.dtn of the hill is enrolled during Ihe periint between the first vote and second vole on final paistige of that hill. Sec. 2. NRS 218.300 is liereby amended 10 rea.1 as follows: 2I8.3(X) 1. Tlie superinlendenl of the slate printing and niiaograpliics division of the department of adniini.stration.sliall, iniineihalely after receipl of the copy of any bill or re.solution, print, in addition lo die regular audiorized number, one copy thereof upon lieavy buff paper, wlijch copy must be delivered to llie .secrela(y,q( \\\ft gep^ yr.jo die chief clerk of ihe itt.seiiibly. (Before) £>crpfa.ror/ienv(.(eprr/v>Vi!i'(/i>i.cM/Mn7(Vi 2./'( • /''rellietliirilreading aiiil final passage of die bill or resolution, the legislative counsel shall carefully coiiipaie die printed or reprinteil copy of the bill or resolution with die duplicate copy thereof ami tlie original aiiienilnienls as adopted by die house, and, if tlie printeil or reprinted copy is found lo be in all respects cocrecl, Ihe legislative counsel sliall dien certify lo llie correctness of the hound copy and shall deliver die [same] bourulcopyto\iie secretary oftliesenaleor the chief clerk of die assembly as the case may be, whereupon die bound copy prinlnl upon buff paper, .so coinpareil and certified, is ready for durd reading and final pas.sage. 2. The legislative counsel shall compare, certify and deliver the bound copy if a hill Ihtit imposes or increases a tax ortLisessmrnlin accordance with iheprovLvota iif.xul>section 1 before the additional reading and second vole on final pas.iage required by section I of this act. Sec 3. NRS 218.340 Is liereby amended to read as follows:. 218.340 When any bill or resolution is pas.sel, is not approvetl by Ihe voters when rcsubniilled on tlie ballot for die general election on November 5, 1996. QUESTION NO. 17 An IniUalivc Relating tu Term Limits CONDENSATION (Ballot Question) Shall the Nevada Constitution be amended lo instruct Nevada's Congressioial delegation and members of the State Legislature to provide for term limiU for members of the VS. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate thniugh action iif the Congress or through a Constitutional Convention, and shall the Nevada Constitution be further amended lo faifonn voters how their rkcted representatives have acted in regard to this Usue? Yrs„ No-, ..a EXPLANATION Neidier die y}.S. Constitution nor die Nevada Constitution hmiu die number of terms 10 whidi a person may be elected lo die \}.S. House of Representatives or die U.S. Senate. Tliis amendment proposes to Umil a Representalive lo 00 more dian diree (3) terms in office or six (6) years and tolimit a Senator to no mere dian two (2) terms inofficeortwelve (12) years. If aperson holds one of Oiese offices al die time of ratification ofdiis amendment, dial term will count as one (I) of those allowed by die o(nen
PAGE 24

>*q 24 Henderson Home New Thursday. October 10.1996 LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL From Page 23 ?P^ ^^ • INS TRUaiON ON TC R M IJM I T PIJ.DT.R FOR NON-INrilM1. Noo-incumbeM candidateii for United Stales Senator and Representative, and tlie Neva.b Ugirfature shall be given an ofiportunity to lake a 'Term Limits" pledge regarding Term Limits each time he or slie fdes to run fat such office. Any such camlidate WIK) declines to lake the "Term Limits" pledge slull liave tlie information "DECLINED TO PLEDGE TO SUPPORT TERM LIMITS" printed adjacent to liis or her name on every primary and general election ballot 2. The "Term Limits" pledge sliall be chered to non-incunibeni candidates for United Slatw Senator and Representative, and tlie Nevada Legislature until a Constitutional Anien.lment which limits the number of terms of United States Senators to no niore tlian t wo and United Stales Represenuiives lo no more than lliree shall have become part of our United Stales Constitution. 3. The "Term Limits" pledge tliat each non-incumbent auuUdate, e( fortli above, shall be offered is as follows: I support term limiu and pledge to use all my legislative powers lo enact the proposed Constitutional Amendment .set fortli in the Term Limits Act of 1996. If elected, I pledge lo vole in such a way tliat die designation "DISREGARDED VOTER INSTRUCTION ON TERM LIMITS" will not appear adjacent lo niy'ijine,. ^^, Junior League fiosts class y>-o Signature of Candidate SEOION F„ VOTER INSTRUCTION ON TERM LIMITS FOR STATE LEGISLATORS 1. We, tlie Voter.s of Nevada, iiereby in.itruct eadi member of tlie Nevada Le{;i.so pflf^ioses or brings lo a vole of the full legislative body the application set forUi above or; e. fails to vote agaiast any attetnpl lo delay, tab]e or odierwise prevent a vole by die full legislative body of the application .set fordi above or; {. fails in any way lo easure thai all votes on Uie application set fortli almve are recorded and made available to the public or; g. fails to vote again.sj any diange, addition or modification to die application set forth above or; h. fails lo vole in favor of llie aniendinent .set forth above if it is sent lo Uie .states for ratification or; i. fails lo vole again.si any term limits amendment, widi longer leniu if such an aiiiendmeni is sent to die .states for ratification. 4. TTie informaiion "DISREGARDED VOTERS' INSTRUCTION ON TERM LIMITS" • shall not appear adjacent lo die names of candidates for tlie Nevada Legi.slature as re FUi mm—nd Compfti iMUanq AdfliWw ol PuliWhT E MiM Ct rif Tfrrr-r rr -rrf r\ i rrTir-ffnrg"T T -t-r i-ff • mr-m n' ni rn rnfi*nr m a i^ tiwi ) f r T ni n i r fi| ri -^ • "-* — j-^ mOMHo/iWca IIrv*-nam§naaanttmmtHmoiei MMM fmiiijmi • imrii niiniii Mikp nTillaahan • P.O.BOX 90<30 Menderson, Nevaia 890C5 mrnlyn n'Callaahan P.O.BOX 90430 HenJerson, Neva a 8900) •m uFr.<; SUN INC. ?.O.BOX 4375 •"• LaaVeqaa, avaia 891? 11 Known BonffKMtrt Mort^AgMt >nd Ottw 6cuniv HokMif Owiwig o> H0kng 1 Pvrcam c Mof* o< Total Amouni ol Bonn Mongagas a Otw ScunMi II norm Ottck boa zitt" 12 latSmMlfvceiripmanbrnoniimi-iaiganua^ormauttentaaiomt^m T>i pwfpoM. imwn and nonpniM lutuf ot •• •fgenunon and Via nampt O MM Ma Chan9Dunn9Piclfli ?**• • Q Has Changad Dimg PtacMms \ i t*ot*>% (Pijtmthm tnAl i**nm Maiui to Maiai mconw lai (MpoaM awVnainn o/cfMng* i #* • iiMmant^ PS Fom 3536.1iapian*a. iH iSm Mfd-ucMom m %iwj 19 WWOwTO HENDCRSON HONE NEWS 14 mmOmlOiOmtmviDatmMom 9/2i/9(. eaM antf IMim ^ CkraMlMi AM..t.N0 CoMMCKhlMM AMMfN* Ctwl%m^mu a total NtfftAatulCoffM/Mat fwvuntnj 15,000 -16,700 n PaMandftv "Hi (au^OaafanaCaif's ttraal and Counta' Satat (Hoi TWMM MntfBit 12,368 l),24l 2(0 .')•; ^ 12.610 (St^aliSMf)mttitttTH 13,480 0 0 2,000 2,000 > 2,000 2,000 f lBOMMnnfSwM0f iJcantflSO k 14,610 15,4(0 tnoncaUaa. Ldtadn. Ipeiad 350 no (MMMM Ol MMuma lM NMM Afv 540 870 toM flwM Of iSf iMf U and iMtflJ > 15,500 1.71) 81 nc/tif>im <>7 ...-:s... Oct. 10. nt ,.^. r-'-H/A. tmmmmm^mm*m9 InatnicUufW to PwRwnvra I C lll U ili*iW' —IO—lln I IMptawfs" nHmttM.tmmmmmni PANORAMA; i • YOUR HEALTH • WHAT'S PLAYING • lAST WORDS RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL THIS SATURDAY Thursday, October 10,1996 f A Tiger with a tale Woods' first pro victory lighlights impressive week at Las Vegas Invitationa By tha News Staff Last week's Las Vegas Invitational golf tournament had everything from 'A* to 'Z* that golf fans could want. Whether it was Paul Azinger, Fuzzy Zoeller or anyone in between, the fans who ventured out to the Tournament Players Club at Summerlin, the Desert Inn or the Las Vegas Hilton saw topnotch golf. In the end, it was a Tiger's tale that will go down in history. Tiger Woods, a 20year-old competing in just his fifth event as a pro, won the LVI with a five-day total of 332. But it would take more than the five rounds making up the tournament for Woods to win as he was forced into a playoflF and beat Davis Love III in the playoff for the crown. It was a tournament to remember and one Woods will never forget. Whether it was a crowd of 400 fans singing happy birthday to Fred Couples at the Las Vegas Hilton on Thursday or the crowd^ of 20,000-plus fans during the final round at the TPC at Summerlin, it was a tournament that won't soon be forgotten. It starts early in the week with the pro-am where the pros tee it up with amateur golfers. It's three days with the amateurs out to have a little fun while the pros try their beSt to concentrate on their round while still being hospitable to the amateurs. Sometimes it's not easy to do. There was more than one time when fans were ducking for their lives as errant shots — mostly from the amateurs — found their way into the crowds. For the most part, it was an array of amazing shots, booming drives, clutch putts, nerve-racking chips and high-fives. It was the Las Vegas Invitational. Pagt Tiger Woods picked up his first victory as a professional golfer at last week's Las Vegas Invitational. ; • • • • > • • : • • Crowds were huge at this year's Las Vegas Invitational golf tournament which took place at three courses, The parfcihg lot at the Las Vegas Hnton Country Glub is full wfien Tiger Woods pbys there. Jerry Hocking gets an up-ctose view of action at the Las Vegas InvltationaL • \ Staff photos by Brian Jones

PAGE 25

>*q 24 Henderson Home New Thursday. October 10.1996 LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL From Page 23 ?P^ ^^ • INS TRUaiON ON TC R M IJM I T PIJ.DT.R FOR NON-INrilM1. Noo-incumbeM candidateii for United Stales Senator and Representative, and tlie Neva.b Ugirfature shall be given an ofiportunity to lake a 'Term Limits" pledge regarding Term Limits each time he or slie fdes to run fat such office. Any such camlidate WIK) declines to lake the "Term Limits" pledge slull liave tlie information "DECLINED TO PLEDGE TO SUPPORT TERM LIMITS" printed adjacent to liis or her name on every primary and general election ballot 2. The "Term Limits" pledge sliall be chered to non-incunibeni candidates for United Slatw Senator and Representative, and tlie Nevada Legislature until a Constitutional Anien.lment which limits the number of terms of United States Senators to no niore tlian t wo and United Stales Represenuiives lo no more than lliree shall have become part of our United Stales Constitution. 3. The "Term Limits" pledge tliat each non-incumbent auuUdate, e( fortli above, shall be offered is as follows: I support term limiu and pledge to use all my legislative powers lo enact the proposed Constitutional Amendment .set fortli in the Term Limits Act of 1996. If elected, I pledge lo vole in such a way tliat die designation "DISREGARDED VOTER INSTRUCTION ON TERM LIMITS" will not appear adjacent lo niy'ijine,. ^^, Junior League fiosts class y>-o Signature of Candidate SEOION F„ VOTER INSTRUCTION ON TERM LIMITS FOR STATE LEGISLATORS 1. We, tlie Voter.s of Nevada, iiereby in.itruct eadi member of tlie Nevada Le{;i.so pflf^ioses or brings lo a vole of the full legislative body the application set forUi above or; e. fails to vote agaiast any attetnpl lo delay, tab]e or odierwise prevent a vole by die full legislative body of the application .set fordi above or; {. fails in any way lo easure thai all votes on Uie application set fortli almve are recorded and made available to the public or; g. fails to vote again.sj any diange, addition or modification to die application set forth above or; h. fails lo vole in favor of llie aniendinent .set forth above if it is sent lo Uie .states for ratification or; i. fails lo vole again.si any term limits amendment, widi longer leniu if such an aiiiendmeni is sent to die .states for ratification. 4. TTie informaiion "DISREGARDED VOTERS' INSTRUCTION ON TERM LIMITS" • shall not appear adjacent lo die names of candidates for tlie Nevada Legi.slature as re FUi mm—nd Compfti iMUanq AdfliWw ol PuliWhT E MiM Ct rif Tfrrr-r rr -rrf r\ i rrTir-ffnrg"T T -t-r i-ff • mr-m n' ni rn rnfi*nr m a i^ tiwi ) f r T ni n i r fi| ri -^ • "-* — j-^ mOMHo/iWca IIrv*-nam§naaanttmmtHmoiei MMM fmiiijmi • imrii niiniii Mikp nTillaahan • P.O.BOX 90<30 Menderson, Nevaia 890C5 mrnlyn n'Callaahan P.O.BOX 90430 HenJerson, Neva a 8900) •m uFr.<; SUN INC. ?.O.BOX 4375 •"• LaaVeqaa, avaia 891? 11 Known BonffKMtrt Mort^AgMt >nd Ottw 6cuniv HokMif Owiwig o> H0kng 1 Pvrcam c Mof* o< Total Amouni ol Bonn Mongagas a Otw ScunMi II norm Ottck boa zitt" 12 latSmMlfvceiripmanbrnoniimi-iaiganua^ormauttentaaiomt^m T>i pwfpoM. imwn and nonpniM lutuf ot •• •fgenunon and Via nampt O MM Ma Chan9Dunn9Piclfli ?**• • Q Has Changad Dimg PtacMms \ i t*ot*>% (Pijtmthm tnAl i**nm Maiui to Maiai mconw lai (MpoaM awVnainn o/cfMng* i #* • iiMmant^ PS Fom 3536.1iapian*a. iH iSm Mfd-ucMom m %iwj 19 WWOwTO HENDCRSON HONE NEWS 14 mmOmlOiOmtmviDatmMom 9/2i/9(. eaM antf IMim ^ CkraMlMi AM..t.N0 CoMMCKhlMM AMMfN* Ctwl%m^mu a total NtfftAatulCoffM/Mat fwvuntnj 15,000 -16,700 n PaMandftv "Hi (au^OaafanaCaif's ttraal and Counta' Satat (Hoi TWMM MntfBit 12,368 l),24l 2(0 .')•; ^ 12.610 (St^aliSMf)mttitttTH 13,480 0 0 2,000 2,000 > 2,000 2,000 f lBOMMnnfSwM0f iJcantflSO k 14,610 15,4(0 tnoncaUaa. Ldtadn. Ipeiad 350 no (MMMM Ol MMuma lM NMM Afv 540 870 toM flwM Of iSf iMf U and iMtflJ > 15,500 1.71) 81 nc/tif>im <>7 ...-:s... Oct. 10. nt ,.^. r-'-H/A. tmmmmm^mm*m9 InatnicUufW to PwRwnvra I C lll U ili*iW' —IO—lln I IMptawfs" nHmttM.tmmmmmni PANORAMA; i • YOUR HEALTH • WHAT'S PLAYING • lAST WORDS RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL THIS SATURDAY Thursday, October 10,1996 f A Tiger with a tale Woods' first pro victory lighlights impressive week at Las Vegas Invitationa By tha News Staff Last week's Las Vegas Invitational golf tournament had everything from 'A* to 'Z* that golf fans could want. Whether it was Paul Azinger, Fuzzy Zoeller or anyone in between, the fans who ventured out to the Tournament Players Club at Summerlin, the Desert Inn or the Las Vegas Hilton saw topnotch golf. In the end, it was a Tiger's tale that will go down in history. Tiger Woods, a 20year-old competing in just his fifth event as a pro, won the LVI with a five-day total of 332. But it would take more than the five rounds making up the tournament for Woods to win as he was forced into a playoflF and beat Davis Love III in the playoff for the crown. It was a tournament to remember and one Woods will never forget. Whether it was a crowd of 400 fans singing happy birthday to Fred Couples at the Las Vegas Hilton on Thursday or the crowd^ of 20,000-plus fans during the final round at the TPC at Summerlin, it was a tournament that won't soon be forgotten. It starts early in the week with the pro-am where the pros tee it up with amateur golfers. It's three days with the amateurs out to have a little fun while the pros try their beSt to concentrate on their round while still being hospitable to the amateurs. Sometimes it's not easy to do. There was more than one time when fans were ducking for their lives as errant shots — mostly from the amateurs — found their way into the crowds. For the most part, it was an array of amazing shots, booming drives, clutch putts, nerve-racking chips and high-fives. It was the Las Vegas Invitational. Pagt Tiger Woods picked up his first victory as a professional golfer at last week's Las Vegas Invitational. ; • • • • > • • : • • Crowds were huge at this year's Las Vegas Invitational golf tournament which took place at three courses, The parfcihg lot at the Las Vegas Hnton Country Glub is full wfien Tiger Woods pbys there. Jerry Hocking gets an up-ctose view of action at the Las Vegas InvltationaL • \ Staff photos by Brian Jones

PAGE 26

^^-^HiWW-W •• • nil mnw<^^m^tmmmmmmi^^^mmm^9mm9 J Ifag* 2 Panorama Thursday, October 10,1996 Pot O' Gold opens in downtown Henderson ; The Pot 0" Gold casino recently opened on Market Street, off Water and Pacific Streets, and sports a coffee shop and a grill. I On recommendation, we tried out its new Island Grill and Deli. With the indoor area of the grill a bit too smoky for the kids, we slat in the outdoor patio eating area. The grill menu features different shish kabobs. The beef, chicken, pork, shrimp, veggie and 'Carried Away' new in video stores VIDEO VIEW Mini-reviews of major movies on videocassette available now or coming soon to video stores. • ;-^ NEW RELEASES '% •=''''*^'' Carried Away Dennis Hopper portrays a middle-aged teacher who behaves as the title suggests when confronted by a seductive student (Amy Locane). Despite the steamy sexual encounters—in ahayloft no less— the story creeps along in a confined, overbearing, manner. An unglamorous Amy Irving is on board as the teacher's long-time girlfriend. Full frontal nudity by the lead characters does not add much excitement to the drama. (R) FAIR DIR-Bruno Barreto. LEAD-Dennis Hopper RT-104 mins. (Profanity, nudity). The Great White Hype Professional boxing is satirized with spunky energy in this loose-jointed comedy. Samuel L. Jackson struts about in regal outfits in an obvious poke at boxing fHlBmoter Don King.* H tt^stagea a prize fight betwelK'a smug black champton (Damon Wayans) and a doubtful white contender (Peter Berg) as a ploy to earn increased revenue. .^.i:^.. See Video Page 3 INSIGHT TO EYESIGHT by Joseph Shalev, M.D. CATARACT SURGERY THROUGH THE AGES Cataract development has been recognized as a vision-impairing condition since the daysof the ancient Romans, when a primitive procedure was undertaken to circumvent the problem of a clouded lens. Using a form of surgery known as "couching," performed until the 18th century, Roman surgeons inserted a needle into the eye in an attempt to dislocate the lens. The goal was simply to push the lens out of thecentral axis so that it would no longer interfere with vision. By the middle of the 18th century, surgeons had moved beyond lens-dislocation and were attempting to remove the opaque lens (cataract extraction). Due tea lack of anesthesia and a high infection rate, the procedure was risky at first; however, development of anesthesia and antiseptics led to much improved outcomes. During this century, new procedures have made cataract surgery one of the safest and most effective of all surgical procedures. Although (he cause of cataracts is unknown, they are most common in people over 65 and people with diabetes or with a history of steroid use. For answers to your questions about cataracts, or any other eye health care issue, call EYE INSTITUTE OF NEVADA Regular eye examinations should be part of your overall good health maintenance We're located at 108 E. Lake Mead Dr.. Suite 303. (564-2539). where we are currently accepting new patienu PS Today, the success rate of cataract surgery is weU over 95 percent ~nucobmmaknmglioimfpMKien/ict mulpadfcrlnJotephShaiey. MD ~ LETS EAT OUT! PHILIP GOLDSTEII^ shark varieties, served with rice, are priced from 69 cents to $1.49 for the smaller single servings, to $1.59 to $2.89 for the larger double shish kabob meals. bur son Matthew ordered the double shrimp kabobs for $1.99 and had a nice-sized meal. It was interesting watching our son try to maneuver through the different vegetables on the sticks, trying to get to the shrimps first. Our less-adventurous daughter Marcie ordered a grilled corned beef sandwich, served with potato salad. Other sandwiches, priced at $ 2.95, were ham, turkey, roast beef and pastrami. Burgers were $3.95, but for 75 cents extra, could be replaced with chicken breast. Toppings included spicy jack cheese, American cheese or provolone, chili, onions, mushrooms, or even ham and pineapple. As for the full dinners from the grill, the eight-ounce filet steak, at $6.95, is served with rice and stir-fried vegetables. The New York-cut is $7.50, and the 16-ounce porterhouse is $7.95, both served with rice and vegetables. My wife Julie went with one of the mushroom burgers and could barely finish it. I had the big porterhouse and foimd it to be a quality cut of steak. To top off our meals, we treated ourselves to bowls of ice cream. No complaints here! Goldstein, an attorney who lives in Henderson, writes about his dining expenences with his wife Julie, and young children Marcie and Matthew. 1??5£i SUN Cny MACDONALD RANCH • 2ii: :? The ultimate in carefree living. ; % At Sun City MacDonald Ranch, you'll find an easygoing, carefree and friendly community of active adults age 55 and better. With a par 60 executive-golf course and nearly completed recreation center offering literally dozens of clubs, events, activities, you can do as much..,or aslittle..^a£you like. /,:: : • ^ : • •; ^^; ^^ ; ;; ''. ^ The Sun City lifestyle is surprisingly affordable, ^ i^^ Our eight exceptional single-family homes start from under $100,000750 there's sure to be a model that suits both your tastes and your budget. And each home is backed by Del Webb, the folks who pioneered master-planned communities for active adults more than 36 years ago. See for yourself why life is better here. Why not see for yourself why more and more active adults are choosing Sun City MacDonald Ranch as their new hometown. Our Model Home Center is open daily from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Or call (702) 269-4300 for more information. You can also visit us at: http://www.delwebb.com/scmr.htm on the Internet. Life is better here. ^^^ Sun City MacDonald Ranch A Del Webb CommimltY From Lake Mead Drive take Green Valley Parkway south one and a half miles and follow the signs. TM IHI O'^OHTWillff Del Wtbb Communities, Inc 2000 W Honzon Ridge Parkway. Henderson, NV 89012 Occupancy testncted to at least one person 55 years of agt or older and additional restrictions apply PTKCS subjea to change without notice and select homesites require payment of lot premium and are subjea to aviilability Community Ajsociatioci fee and additional fees (or golf are requited Details available upon request Copyright C 1996, Del Webb Cocpoeation 6. 1-;V • -V-'Thursday, October 10. 1996 Panorama Pag* 3 Notes on a very special fishing tournament /TT-^V Anglers with fishing tackle gathered for an extraordinary fishing tournament. Earlier in the year, I received a telephone call from Robert Gaudet, requesting my appearance as emcee at this year's fishing tournament, and I quickly responded. Driving out to Las Vegas Bay Marina, I was excited to be part of the tournament. There was no doubt I would leave with a better appreciation of the outdoors, the sport of fishing and those who enjoy it. The anglers were all members of the Las Vegas Blind OUTDOORS WITH BARB BARB HENDERSON Center. The "Fishing For The Blind Fishing Tournament" was sponsored by Sprint. It was heartwarming to watch the anglers, many with seeing-eye dogs at their sides, hook onto a fish and reel it in. It didn't matter what species of fish were being caught, the only objective was the thrill of competition and to have fun. Tournament director Gaudet is extremely dedicated to this event. Since 1989, his only goal throughout the tournament is for those who participate to have a great experience with the sport of fishing. Every volunteer became very involved and this year's tournament was successful. There were trophies for the largest fish caught and first, second and third place anglers for total weigh in. According to Gaudet, the results were as follows: Virginia Frederick, for the largest fish caught and weighed in at 12-3/4 lbs.; Wynette Quarles who came in first with a total weigh-in of fish at 27-^4 lbs.. VIDEO: Reviews From Page 2 Various stereotypes are spoofed with an even hand: blacks, whites, Jews and sports figures. Jamie Foxx does a neat comic turn as a competing fight manager. (R) GOOD COMEDY DIRReginald Hudlin LEAD-Samuel L. Jackson RT-90 mins. (ProIfanity). I Flipper Unremarkable update based on the various boy-and-dolphin episodes from the movies and TV series of the'60s. Elijah Wood takes over as the moody adolescent who befriends the aquatic mammal. Together, they tangle with some bad guys who menace dolphins and pollute the ocean. There's nothing new or exciting in this predictable family adventure. Paul ("Crocodile Dundee") Hogan co-stars as the boy's beach bum uncle. (PG) FAIR CHILDREN'S ADVENTURE DIR-Alan Shapiro LEAD-Elijah Wood RT-96 mins. I Shot Andy Warhol Lali Taylor turns in a magnificent, fiery performance as the half-brilliant, half-mad and ever provocative Valerie Solanas, the feminist revolutionary who seriously woimded the celebrated pop artist. Writer-director Mary Harron colorfully recreates Warhol's Bohemian environment. And Taylor expertly gets to the core of Solanas' radical attitude that led her to violence when rejected by the artist's associates. Jared Harris plays Warhol with striking credibility. Stephen Dorff is excellent as the transvestite Candy Darling. (R) GREAT BIOGRAPHY DIR-Mary Harron LEAD-Lily Taylor RT-106 mins. (Profanity, nudity). TOP VIDEO RENTALS The Birdcage Robin Williams and Nathan Lane are engagingly fiinny as the stressed-out gay couple in this energetic, '90s take on the popular French farce "La C^ge Aux Folles," now situated in Miami's South Beach. Their unconventional lives are turned upside down when the son of Williams' character suddenly introduces his intended in-laws, an ultra-conservative senator and his straightlaced wife (Gene Hackman and Dianne Wiest). Director Mike Nichols and screenwriter Elaine May deliver effective comic setups and punchy dialogue. Silvia Dade placed second with 26-3/4 lbs., and third place winner Jean Limck with 20-1/2 lbs. All tournament participants received a goody bagfull of prizes. As the anglers reeled in their fish, I appreciated the sport of fishing even more. The smiles and laughter along with screams of joy gave me a better appreciation for a sport I have eiy oyed all my life. As I was leaving, Robert asked if I would help out again next year. With a lump in my throat, I quickly answered, "I wouldn't miss it for the world." OUTDOOR RECREATION INFORMATION Nevada Division of Wildlife NDOW is seeking the public's help in apprehending a poacher who shot a cow elk in early September near Willow Creek in the Spring Mountain Range. Game wardens say the mature elk was shot with an arrow and left in the field to waste on or about Sept. 4, and was found and reported by a deer himter on September 15. Anyone having information about the incident is asked to call Operation Game Thief at (800)992-3030. Calls are anonymous and a reward will be paid upon conviction. Safari Club International The next general membership meeting will be at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 24, at Spring Mountain Gardens. The buffet dinner is $15. Until next week, enjoy the gp-eat outdoors. Henderson, an outdoor enthusiast, is a host and producer of local TV and radio shows. Ready "2" Invest IN BRIAN HEAD? Then NOW is the time "2" Buy at For a limited time only, all Buyers receive Z liaduh season passes (ski & bike) for full years! (96/97 & 97/98 Seasons) Consider this premier subdivision for your Mountain Dream Home t Large lots, underground utilities ski in & out access as low as S49,900 Owner financing available! Call High Country Realty din-800^338-3886 Don't pass up this opportunity to own in Brian Head! l^eSDAY NIGlfr FOOTBALI FREE HOT DOGS I FREE Fixins at the end of the 1st Quarter ; DRAFT BEER SPECIALS "^ /^ 32 oz. Bud on tap $1.00 16 oz. Miller Lite $.50 > BUD BUD LIGHT SPECIAL ', Choice of Five 16 oz. bottles on ICE $5.00 FREE DRAWINGS Lots of Prizes Hats, shirts &. coin banl
PAGE 27

^^-^HiWW-W •• • nil mnw<^^m^tmmmmmmi^^^mmm^9mm9 J Ifag* 2 Panorama Thursday, October 10,1996 Pot O' Gold opens in downtown Henderson ; The Pot 0" Gold casino recently opened on Market Street, off Water and Pacific Streets, and sports a coffee shop and a grill. I On recommendation, we tried out its new Island Grill and Deli. With the indoor area of the grill a bit too smoky for the kids, we slat in the outdoor patio eating area. The grill menu features different shish kabobs. The beef, chicken, pork, shrimp, veggie and 'Carried Away' new in video stores VIDEO VIEW Mini-reviews of major movies on videocassette available now or coming soon to video stores. • ;-^ NEW RELEASES '% •=''''*^'' Carried Away Dennis Hopper portrays a middle-aged teacher who behaves as the title suggests when confronted by a seductive student (Amy Locane). Despite the steamy sexual encounters—in ahayloft no less— the story creeps along in a confined, overbearing, manner. An unglamorous Amy Irving is on board as the teacher's long-time girlfriend. Full frontal nudity by the lead characters does not add much excitement to the drama. (R) FAIR DIR-Bruno Barreto. LEAD-Dennis Hopper RT-104 mins. (Profanity, nudity). The Great White Hype Professional boxing is satirized with spunky energy in this loose-jointed comedy. Samuel L. Jackson struts about in regal outfits in an obvious poke at boxing fHlBmoter Don King.* H tt^stagea a prize fight betwelK'a smug black champton (Damon Wayans) and a doubtful white contender (Peter Berg) as a ploy to earn increased revenue. .^.i:^.. See Video Page 3 INSIGHT TO EYESIGHT by Joseph Shalev, M.D. CATARACT SURGERY THROUGH THE AGES Cataract development has been recognized as a vision-impairing condition since the daysof the ancient Romans, when a primitive procedure was undertaken to circumvent the problem of a clouded lens. Using a form of surgery known as "couching," performed until the 18th century, Roman surgeons inserted a needle into the eye in an attempt to dislocate the lens. The goal was simply to push the lens out of thecentral axis so that it would no longer interfere with vision. By the middle of the 18th century, surgeons had moved beyond lens-dislocation and were attempting to remove the opaque lens (cataract extraction). Due tea lack of anesthesia and a high infection rate, the procedure was risky at first; however, development of anesthesia and antiseptics led to much improved outcomes. During this century, new procedures have made cataract surgery one of the safest and most effective of all surgical procedures. Although (he cause of cataracts is unknown, they are most common in people over 65 and people with diabetes or with a history of steroid use. For answers to your questions about cataracts, or any other eye health care issue, call EYE INSTITUTE OF NEVADA Regular eye examinations should be part of your overall good health maintenance We're located at 108 E. Lake Mead Dr.. Suite 303. (564-2539). where we are currently accepting new patienu PS Today, the success rate of cataract surgery is weU over 95 percent ~nucobmmaknmglioimfpMKien/ict mulpadfcrlnJotephShaiey. MD ~ LETS EAT OUT! PHILIP GOLDSTEII^ shark varieties, served with rice, are priced from 69 cents to $1.49 for the smaller single servings, to $1.59 to $2.89 for the larger double shish kabob meals. bur son Matthew ordered the double shrimp kabobs for $1.99 and had a nice-sized meal. It was interesting watching our son try to maneuver through the different vegetables on the sticks, trying to get to the shrimps first. Our less-adventurous daughter Marcie ordered a grilled corned beef sandwich, served with potato salad. Other sandwiches, priced at $ 2.95, were ham, turkey, roast beef and pastrami. Burgers were $3.95, but for 75 cents extra, could be replaced with chicken breast. Toppings included spicy jack cheese, American cheese or provolone, chili, onions, mushrooms, or even ham and pineapple. As for the full dinners from the grill, the eight-ounce filet steak, at $6.95, is served with rice and stir-fried vegetables. The New York-cut is $7.50, and the 16-ounce porterhouse is $7.95, both served with rice and vegetables. My wife Julie went with one of the mushroom burgers and could barely finish it. I had the big porterhouse and foimd it to be a quality cut of steak. To top off our meals, we treated ourselves to bowls of ice cream. No complaints here! Goldstein, an attorney who lives in Henderson, writes about his dining expenences with his wife Julie, and young children Marcie and Matthew. 1??5£i SUN Cny MACDONALD RANCH • 2ii: :? The ultimate in carefree living. ; % At Sun City MacDonald Ranch, you'll find an easygoing, carefree and friendly community of active adults age 55 and better. With a par 60 executive-golf course and nearly completed recreation center offering literally dozens of clubs, events, activities, you can do as much..,or aslittle..^a£you like. /,:: : • ^ : • •; ^^; ^^ ; ;; ''. ^ The Sun City lifestyle is surprisingly affordable, ^ i^^ Our eight exceptional single-family homes start from under $100,000750 there's sure to be a model that suits both your tastes and your budget. And each home is backed by Del Webb, the folks who pioneered master-planned communities for active adults more than 36 years ago. See for yourself why life is better here. Why not see for yourself why more and more active adults are choosing Sun City MacDonald Ranch as their new hometown. Our Model Home Center is open daily from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Or call (702) 269-4300 for more information. You can also visit us at: http://www.delwebb.com/scmr.htm on the Internet. Life is better here. ^^^ Sun City MacDonald Ranch A Del Webb CommimltY From Lake Mead Drive take Green Valley Parkway south one and a half miles and follow the signs. TM IHI O'^OHTWillff Del Wtbb Communities, Inc 2000 W Honzon Ridge Parkway. Henderson, NV 89012 Occupancy testncted to at least one person 55 years of agt or older and additional restrictions apply PTKCS subjea to change without notice and select homesites require payment of lot premium and are subjea to aviilability Community Ajsociatioci fee and additional fees (or golf are requited Details available upon request Copyright C 1996, Del Webb Cocpoeation 6. 1-;V • -V-'Thursday, October 10. 1996 Panorama Pag* 3 Notes on a very special fishing tournament /TT-^V Anglers with fishing tackle gathered for an extraordinary fishing tournament. Earlier in the year, I received a telephone call from Robert Gaudet, requesting my appearance as emcee at this year's fishing tournament, and I quickly responded. Driving out to Las Vegas Bay Marina, I was excited to be part of the tournament. There was no doubt I would leave with a better appreciation of the outdoors, the sport of fishing and those who enjoy it. The anglers were all members of the Las Vegas Blind OUTDOORS WITH BARB BARB HENDERSON Center. The "Fishing For The Blind Fishing Tournament" was sponsored by Sprint. It was heartwarming to watch the anglers, many with seeing-eye dogs at their sides, hook onto a fish and reel it in. It didn't matter what species of fish were being caught, the only objective was the thrill of competition and to have fun. Tournament director Gaudet is extremely dedicated to this event. Since 1989, his only goal throughout the tournament is for those who participate to have a great experience with the sport of fishing. Every volunteer became very involved and this year's tournament was successful. There were trophies for the largest fish caught and first, second and third place anglers for total weigh in. According to Gaudet, the results were as follows: Virginia Frederick, for the largest fish caught and weighed in at 12-3/4 lbs.; Wynette Quarles who came in first with a total weigh-in of fish at 27-^4 lbs.. VIDEO: Reviews From Page 2 Various stereotypes are spoofed with an even hand: blacks, whites, Jews and sports figures. Jamie Foxx does a neat comic turn as a competing fight manager. (R) GOOD COMEDY DIRReginald Hudlin LEAD-Samuel L. Jackson RT-90 mins. (ProIfanity). I Flipper Unremarkable update based on the various boy-and-dolphin episodes from the movies and TV series of the'60s. Elijah Wood takes over as the moody adolescent who befriends the aquatic mammal. Together, they tangle with some bad guys who menace dolphins and pollute the ocean. There's nothing new or exciting in this predictable family adventure. Paul ("Crocodile Dundee") Hogan co-stars as the boy's beach bum uncle. (PG) FAIR CHILDREN'S ADVENTURE DIR-Alan Shapiro LEAD-Elijah Wood RT-96 mins. I Shot Andy Warhol Lali Taylor turns in a magnificent, fiery performance as the half-brilliant, half-mad and ever provocative Valerie Solanas, the feminist revolutionary who seriously woimded the celebrated pop artist. Writer-director Mary Harron colorfully recreates Warhol's Bohemian environment. And Taylor expertly gets to the core of Solanas' radical attitude that led her to violence when rejected by the artist's associates. Jared Harris plays Warhol with striking credibility. Stephen Dorff is excellent as the transvestite Candy Darling. (R) GREAT BIOGRAPHY DIR-Mary Harron LEAD-Lily Taylor RT-106 mins. (Profanity, nudity). TOP VIDEO RENTALS The Birdcage Robin Williams and Nathan Lane are engagingly fiinny as the stressed-out gay couple in this energetic, '90s take on the popular French farce "La C^ge Aux Folles," now situated in Miami's South Beach. Their unconventional lives are turned upside down when the son of Williams' character suddenly introduces his intended in-laws, an ultra-conservative senator and his straightlaced wife (Gene Hackman and Dianne Wiest). Director Mike Nichols and screenwriter Elaine May deliver effective comic setups and punchy dialogue. Silvia Dade placed second with 26-3/4 lbs., and third place winner Jean Limck with 20-1/2 lbs. All tournament participants received a goody bagfull of prizes. As the anglers reeled in their fish, I appreciated the sport of fishing even more. The smiles and laughter along with screams of joy gave me a better appreciation for a sport I have eiy oyed all my life. As I was leaving, Robert asked if I would help out again next year. With a lump in my throat, I quickly answered, "I wouldn't miss it for the world." OUTDOOR RECREATION INFORMATION Nevada Division of Wildlife NDOW is seeking the public's help in apprehending a poacher who shot a cow elk in early September near Willow Creek in the Spring Mountain Range. Game wardens say the mature elk was shot with an arrow and left in the field to waste on or about Sept. 4, and was found and reported by a deer himter on September 15. Anyone having information about the incident is asked to call Operation Game Thief at (800)992-3030. Calls are anonymous and a reward will be paid upon conviction. Safari Club International The next general membership meeting will be at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 24, at Spring Mountain Gardens. The buffet dinner is $15. Until next week, enjoy the gp-eat outdoors. Henderson, an outdoor enthusiast, is a host and producer of local TV and radio shows. Ready "2" Invest IN BRIAN HEAD? Then NOW is the time "2" Buy at For a limited time only, all Buyers receive Z liaduh season passes (ski & bike) for full years! (96/97 & 97/98 Seasons) Consider this premier subdivision for your Mountain Dream Home t Large lots, underground utilities ski in & out access as low as S49,900 Owner financing available! Call High Country Realty din-800^338-3886 Don't pass up this opportunity to own in Brian Head! l^eSDAY NIGlfr FOOTBALI FREE HOT DOGS I FREE Fixins at the end of the 1st Quarter ; DRAFT BEER SPECIALS "^ /^ 32 oz. Bud on tap $1.00 16 oz. Miller Lite $.50 > BUD BUD LIGHT SPECIAL ', Choice of Five 16 oz. bottles on ICE $5.00 FREE DRAWINGS Lots of Prizes Hats, shirts &. coin banl
PAGE 28

.....pip.p .wpiip, I wmmmwwwmmmmmmmmmmmmm IIU III III IIIJI PiWWg— • • • • N04 Panorama Thursday, October 10.1996 i I Safety checkpoints help save lives RavEkhMAreportfrom theNational Park Service revealed that on one Simday in August of this year, 210 watercraft were checked. Some of the results were disappointing as far as boat safety, responsible operation and ownership were concerned. Fm all for random inspections every so often throughouttheyear. If I was in charge, I certainly would not advertise the date and location of the checkpoints. It did not seem to matter to some boaters as there were five owners arrested for operating a vessel under the influence of alcohol. That is ridiculous. If they are not mature enough to operate a boat in a safe manner and drink in a sensible quantity, then I say throw the book at them if caught in violation of boating regulations. Impound their boat and charge them for storage. Something has to be done to impress upon all skippers that BOATING WITH RAY RAY EICHER drinking and driving a boat will not be tolerated on Lake Mead. It may be a lost cause to continually harp on the subject of boat operators drinking too much. All my efforts may fall on deaf ears, but maybe, just maybe some boater will read and heed my warnings. You can help out by reporting violators to \he Park Service Rangers and keepingyour drinking and that of your fellow skippers in moderation. Please do this for yourself, to help make the lake accident free. There is only so much the rangers can do on their own, due to their limited numbers. Another statistic listed was that 13 boaters had no flotation device on board. That means no PFDs. None! You have got to be kidding me, I thought, but that was the total in the report. Another unbelievable nimaber on that Sunday were six boaters— or should I say so-called boaters— who did not have fire extinguishers on board. Do these figures represent a true percentage of boaters on the lake? I hope not Maybe I should write a daily column instead of only once a week. But then these goofs probably can't read anyway. I know I may be asking too mudi to have a perfect lake, but we can all try. Do me a favor the next time you go out. Ask your skipper or your fellow boater if they have all the proper safety equipmenton board. If we all talk safety and proper operation we just might start having an effect on future checkpoint inspection numbers. You can help your lake in another way by volunteering for a few hours a week to assist the Safety Seminar set for Oct. 16 Park Service in a variety of activities. You do not have to have a lot of experience with the 1 ake or even with boating. Just have a friendly attitude and an ei^joyment of working with others. You can make a difference by calling Nancy Bernard, 293-8714, or Keith Eland, 293-8958. Training for various positions will be provided by the National Park Service. Check your schedule to see if you can help out, even if only for a day. Remember, the cove cleaning project at Hamblin Bay this Saturday at 10 a.m. If you can't make it this week, then have your own lake dean-up every time you go tdult Bring your trash back, every bit of it Until next time...keep your bilge dry. Eicher, a long-time valley resident, considers himself a part-time boater and fisherman. SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER (6I0C1 z*\ A safety seminar will be hosted on Get 16, by Silver State Schools Federal Credit Union and We Can, Inc., in ooi|junction with International'Credit Union Week. Through their cooperative philosophy, credit unions are helping people prosper both at home and abroad. An important partis to make sure they are safe in their community. SSSFCU wants to help children and parents learn how to protect themselves. "By sponsoring a program such as this to our members, our Credit Union can feel as though we are giving something back to the community for all it has given us," said Alan Pughes, SSSFCU president. We Can, Inc., a local non-profit children's issues organization, will present "Child Safety.'This program is available only to SSSFCU members and participation is limited to 75 adults, who must register by Oct 11. by Ceramic show Tuesday Maijon Ceramics, Inc. announces a free ceramic mold and decal show from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15, and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 16, at 6230 Kimberly, Suite D. Several mold companies will display finished samples of molds including the newest releases. A free min^^glass will be offered, along with a large display of ceramic decals. There is no admission fee. The public is welcome to attend and take advantage of the many special prices offered on molds, decals, colors, brushes and tools. For more information and to reserve a seat in the class, call 433 -3411. calling 733-8820, ext. 8299. Founded in 1951, Silver State Schools Federal Credit Union is the third largest credit imion in Nevada, with $236 million in assets. Its 33,000-person membership is drawn primarily from employees of the Clark County School District, UNLV and Community College of Southern Nevada, as well as members of the Westwide LDS stakes, members' relatives and other select employee groups. SAVING WA1ER rrs A GRASSROOTS EFFORT Ib4 4 WATER BETWEEN 2AM SAM TRADITIONAL, OLD TIME 7 TO 9 P.M. OCT. 11 & 25 BLACK MODNTAIN BECREAnOH CENTER HORIZON DR. &GREENWAYRD. HENDERSON, NV 565-2880 ALLDANCES TAUGHT $2 PER PERSON WEAR SOFT SOLED SHOES Sponsored by HENDERSON PARKS & RECREATION DEPT Anyiai^e Onc-Mpins^Hzza AndAGnmler ForOdy \>>fi;!f, s^, >,*/ Buy 10 Laijc Pizzas AndiierilieilfliHHEE! Hours: 11am-11pm • Sunday-Thursday llam-2am • Fridays Saturday Ask RirVour Punch Card ft CM Vour llfli Pizzas Growler RcflUmEE! Must bring Gtmte bottle bode to refil hW voBd wim am other specials. Nooasnvalue.Manageiiientieservetheiiglittoiiiodifyoroaixd without prior notificatioa Must be 21 years of age or oldet Taplntojarle/s! BARLEY'S [jBKBWNSCOIIBUffl i fx: Tliplnto'Ilie Excitement! ;; ^ 45&?EW 45(X)BQStSunsetRoQd,HendasQn,NV .'"•'• Located in the Green \Mey Tbvvii Colter • East of Green \toIleyR)ricway wiVM.OMOt C1996Bai1ey^aisn)&Bi7win4CivonyHendalon,NVQSU]danCaiinia)fi^)any • "DfTlP^l^"" HAUNTED HOUSE THE FEAR STAATS HE^E' October 88-31 • Thomas & Mack Center I Z FREE Haunted House Tickets ^^^^ with Purchase of ^^^* Lube,Oil, and Filter ^ OR Rotation and Balance Sec Store For Details. While Supplies Last. Valuable Savings During OCTOBER CAR CARE Tin '•d llrw Mlftpd Tiinr.l^tioi A rum hn'M--,y .ffi ji^-jdriMiii aai?' *Tterci*^}ie fiffefijftu've been wailing for..;. > 'i>i^ OTJ I 4\ SOLVES VIBRATION PROBLEM GUARANTEED TRADE-IN HMSC ReMm*lftiaouimMMwiiia(tB iaMtkiM>lkbifGm\Kj BRAKE SERVICE SPECIALS | PROLONG TIRE LIFE & IMPROVE HANDLING 4 TIRE ROTATION 4 WHEEL REiAUNCE SAVE OVER 50% may apply. Nol wlid wiHi ay olW o8t^ • t Thursday. October 10,1996 Panorama Pago 5 f^^m^s^-^^Tz '"'* M/oMEN's HEALTH awareness at UNLV DR. FREDRIC D. FRIQOLETTO, JR. A week of sexual assault awareness activities will be presented by UNLVs Jean Nidetch ^"Ifcmsn'M Center beginning Oct All events will take jjiTaci on campus and are free and open to the public. Reservations are requested for some activities. The events are scheduled as follows: •Oct 21, noon to 2 p.m., Street Smarts & Crisis Mindset, noon to 2p.m. in theMoyer Student Union, Room 203. This seminar will include information on criminal methods of attack, deflecting crime and controlling violent encounters, color code of street awareness, mental conditioning for crime survival, and self-defense items and methods. •Oct 21,6 p.m., Take Bade the Night March and Vigil, at Valerie Pida Plaza, located immediately north of the Moyer Student Union. A coalition of student and community organizations will present activities to promote awareness of sexual assault and domestic violence. There will be a walk around campus and a candlelight vigil to remember the victims of sexual assault. ,-,.„. •€k*. 24,:30 a.m., Surwvors of Violence Support Group, at the Jean Nidetch Women's Center in the Student Services Complex, Room 225. This weekly support group is for individuals who are experiencing or have experienced violence in their lives. •Oct 24, 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. a second offering of Street Smarts & Crisis Mind-set, in the Moyer Student Union, Room 203. See Oct. 21 listing for details. •Oct 26,10 a.m. to 1p.m., Selfdefense and PhysicalTechniques, at McDermott Physical EducationComplex,Room506. Physical escape and defense techniques will be presented. For additional infdrmation and to reserve seats for the events, call Conee Spano, director of the Nidetch Women's Center, 8954475. Renaissance Festival opens Saturday at Sunset Park Sunset Park will be transported back in time when Clark County Parks & Recreation presents the "Age of Chivalry" Renaissance Festival from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12, and irom 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 13. Historically accurate festivities highlight the weekend and include performances of period plays; dancers, jugglers, fireeaters and musicians; battle reenactments, crafts and handcrafted items; English food, beers and beverages for sale, and jousting tournaments. A Renaissance Village will be recreated, with encampments of German, Italian, Greek, Ottomans, French, Celtic and British Military units. These campsites will portray all aspects of the daily life of a military unit in the field as well as family life and everyday tasks, and foregoing and displaying weapons. The village will also feature women crafi^ing and cooking, feasts, men honing military skills, and general carousing, with an occasional brawl to add excitement. Historical reenactment groups from all over the U.S. and Canada will recreate battles. Olde English Shoppes featuring artisans and craftsmen from the U.S. and Canada, selling handcrafted leather goods, costumes, jewelry, swords and armor, gold and silver items, wood works, toys, hand-mixed perfumes and treasures of all types will wind through the festival grounds. The Royal Stuarts Acting Company will present an original historical play aboutMary Queen of Scotts. So highly respected, they are the only group invited by the Scottish government to perform at the world's largest renaissance festival in Glasgow, Scotland. Zoppe'sWildWonderfiilWorld of Horses will also perform daily. with demonstrations of Roman riding and jousting. The first full jousting tournament in America will be held during the festival. They have appeared in both movies and television, and have performed with Ringling Brothers Circus, the Moscow Circus, and Circus of the Stars. A jousting battle will be performed by the New Riders of the Golden Age from Sarasota, Fla., who have also been featured in many movies. Festival-goers can join in games of skill including archery, spear throw, dunk the wench and battle axe throw. Pony rides will be available for the children. The Royal Parade will begin each day, and children and the public are welcome to participate. Small charges may apply. Vendors will sell authentic period foods from turkey legs and shepherd's pie to a full English feast. English beers and ales will also be available. Feast, drink and make merry, while watching military units do battle, combat joust, street entertainers dance, sing and perform magic or eixjoy an excellent play. Admission is $6 adults; $5 seniors; $3 children 12 years of age; and free for those under 6. Advance tickets can be purchased at any of the Clark County Parks and Recreation Community Centers. Those buying advance tickets on or before Oct. 11 will receive a dollar off each ticket All proceeds raised will go to scholarship children for Clark County Parks and Recreation programs. The event is co-sponsored by Satum of West Sahara, Saturn of Henderson, Findlay Oldsmobile-Subaru and KWU Fox 5. For more information, call Clark County Parks and Recreation, 455-8200. Aviation' on weekend The fifth annual 'Discover Aviation "96* will be held at the North Las Vegas Air Terminal on Saturday and Sunday. Oct 12-13. The event is free and open to the public Sponsored by Discover Aviation and the Las Vegas Valley 998, the two-day event will feature static displays of vintage, aircraft undergoing complete restoration, experimental, training, helicopters, military and new aircraft Acrobatic demonstrations by the Las Vegas Chapter of the International Aerobatic Club, •777, will be held on both days. Also featured will be hands-on fun for the young and not-soyoung, paper airplane contest displays by aviation organizations, dvic groups, and much more. Rides in a fiilly restored DC-3 will be available. Regiatration for the "Young Eaglei" program will take place firom 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days. Breast-feeding: benefits for you and your baby Breast milk is called the "perfect" food because it is easily digested and offers complete nutrition for the first six months of life. It provides antibodies that protect your baby from infection and illness, and can also help prevent allergies. Breast-feeding benefits a new mother as well. The baby's sucking releases hormones that contract the uterus, helping it to return to normal size more quickly. The close contact during breast-feeding for mother and newborn often helps in the bonding of a new relationship. Before giving birth, find out whether your hospital offers instruction in breastfeeding. After birth, ask a nurse or a lactation expert on staff there to observe whether your infant is sucking properly and is well positioned. Can they also show you how to use a breast pump? Is there a "help line' to call after hours? Breast-feeding is a learned skill, and you may be discharged before you have mastered it. If so,' you may want to have a lactation consultant (someone with special training in breast feeding) visit your home. The charge (up to $50 an hour) may be worth the peace of mind. Some insurers cover home care visits. Ask your doctor fbr a referral. ^ At first newboms may have to be awakened to nurse, but soon they should "demand" to be fed every two to four hours. Make sure your infant is wetting or soiling at least six to eight diapers per day. These are signs of adequate nourishment. With poor nourishment, a baby becomes dehydrated. Left untreated, this -•' can cause, convulsions, permanent brain damage and possibly d^th vvithin days. One warning sign is if your infant's "soft spot" becomes noticeably depressed or sunken looking. If you have any doubts, seek help right away.-:^^^-^''^3r::----*^;^^ ;' Yourpartner can help with^ breast-feeding by handling diaper changes, bringing the baby to you in bed and giving occasional bottle-feedings; Your decision about how long to breast-feed will be based upon a number of factors, including whether you work outside the home. Find out if your work environment is hospitable to pumping and storing milk. Breast-feeding is not a form of birth control, so talk to your doctor about the proper contraceptive to use during this time. Sometimes, for whatever reason, breast-feeding just doesn't work out or is inappropriate for you. There is no reason to feel guilty. Infants can get the nourishment they need through bottle feeding with formula. Frigoletto is president of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Early Childliood ParenlConference Oct. 18 The Clark County Parent Advisory Council will host the third annual Special Education Early Childhood Parent Conference Friday, Oct. 18 at the Southern Nevada Vocational Technical Center. Registration will be from 4 to 6 p.m. Friday, with a dinner at 6 p.m. The cost for dinner is $10 per person, $15 per couple. The conference will begin at 7 p.m. and is free of charge. It will continue at 8:30 p.m. Saturday. The purpose of the conference is to educate parents about how to meet the special needs of their children and at the same time meet their ovm needs. There will be exhibits and local agencies available with literature. Friday's dinner will be filled with valuable information, dinner and laughter, a spokesman said. Saturday, parents will learn effective ways to deal with children's misbehavior and how to teach children through songs. Guest speakers will be Dr. John Platt, Jim Gill and comedian Tim Gard. Platt teaches classes in family counseling. Gill works with autistic children through song and music play. Gard will present "Laughter Becomes You." "The topics covered in this conference are extremely important to all parents," the spolcesman said. "You can learn new techniques in dealing with problems and concerns related to your family as well as how to put laughter back into your life at times when you would least expect to." For more information or to register, call Linda, 799-7479. JiJ-M-Power Wdlk Against Breask Cancer Oct. 16 The American Cancer Society invites women from all walks of life to participate in the Women's Power Walk Against Breast Cancer from noon to 1 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 16, in Lot L, the former Landmark parking lot. Teams of four women from similar industries will compete against each other. Participants wrill remove heels, stash them in briefcases, put on fitness shoes, and Power Walk through the parking lot. Using a rolled-up magazine as a baton, women will Power Walk to victory! The team entry fee of $100 entitles participants to an event T-shirt, catered lunch, and a team photo with Legends in Concert performer, Garth Brooks. To register or for more information, call 798-6877. Courtesy Photo POWER WALK—Practicing forthe big event are, from left. Weight Watchers representatives Andres Werner, DeAnne Haynes and Suzy Jones; and Norwest Banks representatives, Rena Nicholson, Sue Belargee, Kathleen Cox and Donnette Kelso.

PAGE 29

.....pip.p .wpiip, I wmmmwwwmmmmmmmmmmmmm IIU III III IIIJI PiWWg— • • • • N04 Panorama Thursday, October 10.1996 i I Safety checkpoints help save lives RavEkhMAreportfrom theNational Park Service revealed that on one Simday in August of this year, 210 watercraft were checked. Some of the results were disappointing as far as boat safety, responsible operation and ownership were concerned. Fm all for random inspections every so often throughouttheyear. If I was in charge, I certainly would not advertise the date and location of the checkpoints. It did not seem to matter to some boaters as there were five owners arrested for operating a vessel under the influence of alcohol. That is ridiculous. If they are not mature enough to operate a boat in a safe manner and drink in a sensible quantity, then I say throw the book at them if caught in violation of boating regulations. Impound their boat and charge them for storage. Something has to be done to impress upon all skippers that BOATING WITH RAY RAY EICHER drinking and driving a boat will not be tolerated on Lake Mead. It may be a lost cause to continually harp on the subject of boat operators drinking too much. All my efforts may fall on deaf ears, but maybe, just maybe some boater will read and heed my warnings. You can help out by reporting violators to \he Park Service Rangers and keepingyour drinking and that of your fellow skippers in moderation. Please do this for yourself, to help make the lake accident free. There is only so much the rangers can do on their own, due to their limited numbers. Another statistic listed was that 13 boaters had no flotation device on board. That means no PFDs. None! You have got to be kidding me, I thought, but that was the total in the report. Another unbelievable nimaber on that Sunday were six boaters— or should I say so-called boaters— who did not have fire extinguishers on board. Do these figures represent a true percentage of boaters on the lake? I hope not Maybe I should write a daily column instead of only once a week. But then these goofs probably can't read anyway. I know I may be asking too mudi to have a perfect lake, but we can all try. Do me a favor the next time you go out. Ask your skipper or your fellow boater if they have all the proper safety equipmenton board. If we all talk safety and proper operation we just might start having an effect on future checkpoint inspection numbers. You can help your lake in another way by volunteering for a few hours a week to assist the Safety Seminar set for Oct. 16 Park Service in a variety of activities. You do not have to have a lot of experience with the 1 ake or even with boating. Just have a friendly attitude and an ei^joyment of working with others. You can make a difference by calling Nancy Bernard, 293-8714, or Keith Eland, 293-8958. Training for various positions will be provided by the National Park Service. Check your schedule to see if you can help out, even if only for a day. Remember, the cove cleaning project at Hamblin Bay this Saturday at 10 a.m. If you can't make it this week, then have your own lake dean-up every time you go tdult Bring your trash back, every bit of it Until next time...keep your bilge dry. Eicher, a long-time valley resident, considers himself a part-time boater and fisherman. SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER (6I0C1 z*\ A safety seminar will be hosted on Get 16, by Silver State Schools Federal Credit Union and We Can, Inc., in ooi|junction with International'Credit Union Week. Through their cooperative philosophy, credit unions are helping people prosper both at home and abroad. An important partis to make sure they are safe in their community. SSSFCU wants to help children and parents learn how to protect themselves. "By sponsoring a program such as this to our members, our Credit Union can feel as though we are giving something back to the community for all it has given us," said Alan Pughes, SSSFCU president. We Can, Inc., a local non-profit children's issues organization, will present "Child Safety.'This program is available only to SSSFCU members and participation is limited to 75 adults, who must register by Oct 11. by Ceramic show Tuesday Maijon Ceramics, Inc. announces a free ceramic mold and decal show from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15, and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 16, at 6230 Kimberly, Suite D. Several mold companies will display finished samples of molds including the newest releases. A free min^^glass will be offered, along with a large display of ceramic decals. There is no admission fee. The public is welcome to attend and take advantage of the many special prices offered on molds, decals, colors, brushes and tools. For more information and to reserve a seat in the class, call 433 -3411. calling 733-8820, ext. 8299. Founded in 1951, Silver State Schools Federal Credit Union is the third largest credit imion in Nevada, with $236 million in assets. Its 33,000-person membership is drawn primarily from employees of the Clark County School District, UNLV and Community College of Southern Nevada, as well as members of the Westwide LDS stakes, members' relatives and other select employee groups. SAVING WA1ER rrs A GRASSROOTS EFFORT Ib4 4 WATER BETWEEN 2AM SAM TRADITIONAL, OLD TIME 7 TO 9 P.M. OCT. 11 & 25 BLACK MODNTAIN BECREAnOH CENTER HORIZON DR. &GREENWAYRD. HENDERSON, NV 565-2880 ALLDANCES TAUGHT $2 PER PERSON WEAR SOFT SOLED SHOES Sponsored by HENDERSON PARKS & RECREATION DEPT Anyiai^e Onc-Mpins^Hzza AndAGnmler ForOdy \>>fi;!f, s^, >,*/ Buy 10 Laijc Pizzas AndiierilieilfliHHEE! Hours: 11am-11pm • Sunday-Thursday llam-2am • Fridays Saturday Ask RirVour Punch Card ft CM Vour llfli Pizzas Growler RcflUmEE! Must bring Gtmte bottle bode to refil hW voBd wim am other specials. Nooasnvalue.Manageiiientieservetheiiglittoiiiodifyoroaixd without prior notificatioa Must be 21 years of age or oldet Taplntojarle/s! BARLEY'S [jBKBWNSCOIIBUffl i fx: Tliplnto'Ilie Excitement! ;; ^ 45&?EW 45(X)BQStSunsetRoQd,HendasQn,NV .'"•'• Located in the Green \Mey Tbvvii Colter • East of Green \toIleyR)ricway wiVM.OMOt C1996Bai1ey^aisn)&Bi7win4CivonyHendalon,NVQSU]danCaiinia)fi^)any • "DfTlP^l^"" HAUNTED HOUSE THE FEAR STAATS HE^E' October 88-31 • Thomas & Mack Center I Z FREE Haunted House Tickets ^^^^ with Purchase of ^^^* Lube,Oil, and Filter ^ OR Rotation and Balance Sec Store For Details. While Supplies Last. Valuable Savings During OCTOBER CAR CARE Tin '•d llrw Mlftpd Tiinr.l^tioi A rum hn'M--,y .ffi ji^-jdriMiii aai?' *Tterci*^}ie fiffefijftu've been wailing for..;. > 'i>i^ OTJ I 4\ SOLVES VIBRATION PROBLEM GUARANTEED TRADE-IN HMSC ReMm*lftiaouimMMwiiia(tB iaMtkiM>lkbifGm\Kj BRAKE SERVICE SPECIALS | PROLONG TIRE LIFE & IMPROVE HANDLING 4 TIRE ROTATION 4 WHEEL REiAUNCE SAVE OVER 50% may apply. Nol wlid wiHi ay olW o8t^ • t Thursday. October 10,1996 Panorama Pago 5 f^^m^s^-^^Tz '"'* M/oMEN's HEALTH awareness at UNLV DR. FREDRIC D. FRIQOLETTO, JR. A week of sexual assault awareness activities will be presented by UNLVs Jean Nidetch ^"Ifcmsn'M Center beginning Oct All events will take jjiTaci on campus and are free and open to the public. Reservations are requested for some activities. The events are scheduled as follows: •Oct 21, noon to 2 p.m., Street Smarts & Crisis Mindset, noon to 2p.m. in theMoyer Student Union, Room 203. This seminar will include information on criminal methods of attack, deflecting crime and controlling violent encounters, color code of street awareness, mental conditioning for crime survival, and self-defense items and methods. •Oct 21,6 p.m., Take Bade the Night March and Vigil, at Valerie Pida Plaza, located immediately north of the Moyer Student Union. A coalition of student and community organizations will present activities to promote awareness of sexual assault and domestic violence. There will be a walk around campus and a candlelight vigil to remember the victims of sexual assault. ,-,.„. •€k*. 24,:30 a.m., Surwvors of Violence Support Group, at the Jean Nidetch Women's Center in the Student Services Complex, Room 225. This weekly support group is for individuals who are experiencing or have experienced violence in their lives. •Oct 24, 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. a second offering of Street Smarts & Crisis Mind-set, in the Moyer Student Union, Room 203. See Oct. 21 listing for details. •Oct 26,10 a.m. to 1p.m., Selfdefense and PhysicalTechniques, at McDermott Physical EducationComplex,Room506. Physical escape and defense techniques will be presented. For additional infdrmation and to reserve seats for the events, call Conee Spano, director of the Nidetch Women's Center, 8954475. Renaissance Festival opens Saturday at Sunset Park Sunset Park will be transported back in time when Clark County Parks & Recreation presents the "Age of Chivalry" Renaissance Festival from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12, and irom 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 13. Historically accurate festivities highlight the weekend and include performances of period plays; dancers, jugglers, fireeaters and musicians; battle reenactments, crafts and handcrafted items; English food, beers and beverages for sale, and jousting tournaments. A Renaissance Village will be recreated, with encampments of German, Italian, Greek, Ottomans, French, Celtic and British Military units. These campsites will portray all aspects of the daily life of a military unit in the field as well as family life and everyday tasks, and foregoing and displaying weapons. The village will also feature women crafi^ing and cooking, feasts, men honing military skills, and general carousing, with an occasional brawl to add excitement. Historical reenactment groups from all over the U.S. and Canada will recreate battles. Olde English Shoppes featuring artisans and craftsmen from the U.S. and Canada, selling handcrafted leather goods, costumes, jewelry, swords and armor, gold and silver items, wood works, toys, hand-mixed perfumes and treasures of all types will wind through the festival grounds. The Royal Stuarts Acting Company will present an original historical play aboutMary Queen of Scotts. So highly respected, they are the only group invited by the Scottish government to perform at the world's largest renaissance festival in Glasgow, Scotland. Zoppe'sWildWonderfiilWorld of Horses will also perform daily. with demonstrations of Roman riding and jousting. The first full jousting tournament in America will be held during the festival. They have appeared in both movies and television, and have performed with Ringling Brothers Circus, the Moscow Circus, and Circus of the Stars. A jousting battle will be performed by the New Riders of the Golden Age from Sarasota, Fla., who have also been featured in many movies. Festival-goers can join in games of skill including archery, spear throw, dunk the wench and battle axe throw. Pony rides will be available for the children. The Royal Parade will begin each day, and children and the public are welcome to participate. Small charges may apply. Vendors will sell authentic period foods from turkey legs and shepherd's pie to a full English feast. English beers and ales will also be available. Feast, drink and make merry, while watching military units do battle, combat joust, street entertainers dance, sing and perform magic or eixjoy an excellent play. Admission is $6 adults; $5 seniors; $3 children 12 years of age; and free for those under 6. Advance tickets can be purchased at any of the Clark County Parks and Recreation Community Centers. Those buying advance tickets on or before Oct. 11 will receive a dollar off each ticket All proceeds raised will go to scholarship children for Clark County Parks and Recreation programs. The event is co-sponsored by Satum of West Sahara, Saturn of Henderson, Findlay Oldsmobile-Subaru and KWU Fox 5. For more information, call Clark County Parks and Recreation, 455-8200. Aviation' on weekend The fifth annual 'Discover Aviation "96* will be held at the North Las Vegas Air Terminal on Saturday and Sunday. Oct 12-13. The event is free and open to the public Sponsored by Discover Aviation and the Las Vegas Valley 998, the two-day event will feature static displays of vintage, aircraft undergoing complete restoration, experimental, training, helicopters, military and new aircraft Acrobatic demonstrations by the Las Vegas Chapter of the International Aerobatic Club, •777, will be held on both days. Also featured will be hands-on fun for the young and not-soyoung, paper airplane contest displays by aviation organizations, dvic groups, and much more. Rides in a fiilly restored DC-3 will be available. Regiatration for the "Young Eaglei" program will take place firom 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days. Breast-feeding: benefits for you and your baby Breast milk is called the "perfect" food because it is easily digested and offers complete nutrition for the first six months of life. It provides antibodies that protect your baby from infection and illness, and can also help prevent allergies. Breast-feeding benefits a new mother as well. The baby's sucking releases hormones that contract the uterus, helping it to return to normal size more quickly. The close contact during breast-feeding for mother and newborn often helps in the bonding of a new relationship. Before giving birth, find out whether your hospital offers instruction in breastfeeding. After birth, ask a nurse or a lactation expert on staff there to observe whether your infant is sucking properly and is well positioned. Can they also show you how to use a breast pump? Is there a "help line' to call after hours? Breast-feeding is a learned skill, and you may be discharged before you have mastered it. If so,' you may want to have a lactation consultant (someone with special training in breast feeding) visit your home. The charge (up to $50 an hour) may be worth the peace of mind. Some insurers cover home care visits. Ask your doctor fbr a referral. ^ At first newboms may have to be awakened to nurse, but soon they should "demand" to be fed every two to four hours. Make sure your infant is wetting or soiling at least six to eight diapers per day. These are signs of adequate nourishment. With poor nourishment, a baby becomes dehydrated. Left untreated, this -•' can cause, convulsions, permanent brain damage and possibly d^th vvithin days. One warning sign is if your infant's "soft spot" becomes noticeably depressed or sunken looking. If you have any doubts, seek help right away.-:^^^-^''^3r::----*^;^^ ;' Yourpartner can help with^ breast-feeding by handling diaper changes, bringing the baby to you in bed and giving occasional bottle-feedings; Your decision about how long to breast-feed will be based upon a number of factors, including whether you work outside the home. Find out if your work environment is hospitable to pumping and storing milk. Breast-feeding is not a form of birth control, so talk to your doctor about the proper contraceptive to use during this time. Sometimes, for whatever reason, breast-feeding just doesn't work out or is inappropriate for you. There is no reason to feel guilty. Infants can get the nourishment they need through bottle feeding with formula. Frigoletto is president of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Early Childliood ParenlConference Oct. 18 The Clark County Parent Advisory Council will host the third annual Special Education Early Childhood Parent Conference Friday, Oct. 18 at the Southern Nevada Vocational Technical Center. Registration will be from 4 to 6 p.m. Friday, with a dinner at 6 p.m. The cost for dinner is $10 per person, $15 per couple. The conference will begin at 7 p.m. and is free of charge. It will continue at 8:30 p.m. Saturday. The purpose of the conference is to educate parents about how to meet the special needs of their children and at the same time meet their ovm needs. There will be exhibits and local agencies available with literature. Friday's dinner will be filled with valuable information, dinner and laughter, a spokesman said. Saturday, parents will learn effective ways to deal with children's misbehavior and how to teach children through songs. Guest speakers will be Dr. John Platt, Jim Gill and comedian Tim Gard. Platt teaches classes in family counseling. Gill works with autistic children through song and music play. Gard will present "Laughter Becomes You." "The topics covered in this conference are extremely important to all parents," the spolcesman said. "You can learn new techniques in dealing with problems and concerns related to your family as well as how to put laughter back into your life at times when you would least expect to." For more information or to register, call Linda, 799-7479. JiJ-M-Power Wdlk Against Breask Cancer Oct. 16 The American Cancer Society invites women from all walks of life to participate in the Women's Power Walk Against Breast Cancer from noon to 1 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 16, in Lot L, the former Landmark parking lot. Teams of four women from similar industries will compete against each other. Participants wrill remove heels, stash them in briefcases, put on fitness shoes, and Power Walk through the parking lot. Using a rolled-up magazine as a baton, women will Power Walk to victory! The team entry fee of $100 entitles participants to an event T-shirt, catered lunch, and a team photo with Legends in Concert performer, Garth Brooks. To register or for more information, call 798-6877. Courtesy Photo POWER WALK—Practicing forthe big event are, from left. Weight Watchers representatives Andres Werner, DeAnne Haynes and Suzy Jones; and Norwest Banks representatives, Rena Nicholson, Sue Belargee, Kathleen Cox and Donnette Kelso.

PAGE 30

• • • I • I III ^^^^WWPi^liPiP^ wvppivpn i^n^vvvwai Pag* 6 Panorama Thursday, October 10,1996 Thursday, October 10,1996 Panorama Paga? t I I House of Worship Directory CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURC 1401 FIFTH STREET BOULDER CITY, NV 293-4332 Saturday Country Western Worship 5:00 p.m. Sunday Traditioruil Worship 9:00 a.m. Sunday School and Adult Bible Study 10:15 a.m. ^ St. Matthews Episcopal Church The Working Church Saturday Evening Mass 5:30 pm Sunday Mass 9:45 am Church School During Sunday Mass Nursery Available 4709 S. Neiiis^ivd. 451-2483 _2Blocks North of TropicM on NcMs t St. Peter's Catholic Churcl) 204 S. Boulder H>yy. MASS SCHEDULE: Sat: 5 p.m. Sun: 8 am & 10 am 11:30 am 5 pm Confessions: Sat. 4 to 4:30 NEW BEGINNINGS COMMUNITY CHURCH (A new church in Green Valley) (Relaxed, casual atmosphere) Meeting Sundays at David Cox Elemntaiy School 260 aoih Drive on Roblndole between Pecos ond Eastern WORSHIP CELEDRATION, 10:00 A.M. Phone: 260-3024 Pastor, Wchord Hubocek Nursery/Child Core Boulder City Assembly of God Church| cA .Sfiti* fillMi Mieiwchif of jr,v Jga^iiwiaga 1 Sunday School: 9:00 AM JM worship .._ „ 10:00 AM n^mlH^ Night of Mlracles(2nd & 4th Sundays) 6:00 PM if J**^ Share the Vision (1 st 4 3rd Sundays) 6:00 PM • *^ Wednesday: Family Night 7:00 PM DeMiMJaraM,PaMBr TOaHgjkSMMXO BMSaMt BMMerGII]f,fWaiiM FAITH CHRISTL\N CHURCH • Sur.d.n Sc 591 Adams Blvd. m. • Thurs. alRec Cir. Telephone: 293-2 154 C • • nov Robt. Tpdrnw P.ivi The Church On The Hill" 711 Valle Verde Ct.. Henderson, NV 454-2722 Gary A. Morefield Senio r Pastor Green Valley Christian Center Sunday Schedule Morning Worship: 8:45-11:15 AM & 6:00 PM Children's Church: 8:45 -11:15 AM Sunday School: 10:15AM Evening Worship: 6:00 PM Wednesday: Family Night 7:00 PM Thursday: Youth Group (7-12). 6:45 PM -NEW I.OCATION Pastors Bill & Nora Toller W-.m fi.m. AI' o siidrc in God s LOVP & Power U<'(/nfS((fU' 7.00 /).in. 370 E. Windmill Lam; 260-4777 MIDBAR KODESH BUILDINQ THE FUTURE TOGETHER 0 CHILDREM'S SUMMER PROQRAM YOin-H GROUPS REUQIOUS SCHOOL 0 BAR/BAT MUZVAH PROQRAM SERVICES ARE HELD: 2nd at 4th Friday evenings, 7:30 p.m. Every Shabbat morning, 9 a.m. United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism affiliate 6000 S. Eastern Ave., #3B. Call 798-4510 [HlGHLANb^ILLS IB W JMW 615 College Drive • Henderson • 566-0200 ; i Sunday Worship Services: 8:30 am. 11:00 am, 6:00 pm Come Join us Sunday! We Care About You and Your FamUy! Celebrate Jesus at ; Dynamic Drama, Music and Message! Currently meeting at Community College of Southern Nevada 700 College Drive, Henderson Sundays 10AM Call 2634661 for more information TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM Established 1947 ; Ttie largest Congregation in l^levada Affliliated witli United Synagpgue of Conservative Judoism OUR MEMBERSHIP IS OPEN, r— COME GROW WITH USH! 1600Ea*tOakyBkd. • Los Vagas, Nevada • 384-5070 THE SALVATION ARMY COMMUNITY CENTER ACenteiFpr Worship and Servicei 830 E. Uke Mead Dr.. Handerson, NV (702) 565-9578 Sunday Worship Services: 11 am & 6pm Sunday School For All Ages: 9:30 am Bible Study Each Thursday: 6 pm To list your congregation call; Goldie •^ at -i-' 435-77QI St. Thomas More Catholic Commimity 130 M. Pecos Rd. Henderson. 361-3022 Announces Our New Mass Schedule Celebrated In Our NEW PERMANENT CHURCHI Saturday Confession: 3:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Saturday Vigil !*1ass: 4:30 p.m. Sunday l^asses: 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m., & 12:00 p.m. Dally Mass: 8:50 a.m. (Monday through Friday) in A FOURSQUARE CHURCH 571 Adams Blvd. Boulder City 293-7773 Sunday Worship 10:00 am Home of Christian Center School and Day Care Center OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN CHURCH "Holding Forth ttie Word of Life..." Philippians2:16 Sunday School 9 am Adult Bible Class 9 am Sunday Worship 8 & 10:45 am Pastor Bruning 59 Lynn Ln., Henderson 565-9154 Growing together in tlie grace of our Lord Jesus St. Paul's Charismatic Episcopal Church ~^^^^^ 1661 Qalleria Dn • (White Middle School, Henderson) SUNDAY WORSHIP 10AM Fatiier George Qerard • 564-1152 Fattier David Hoff • Father Charies Coleman SUNRISE COMMUNITY CHURCH Meeting in Henderson Cofivention Center 200 S. Water St. (please use back parking lot) REV. JIM HAMILTON, PASTOR 737-5219 Sunday Worship 10am Come and let us help molie your life work for you. V %SOUTHERN BAPTIST CHURCH 240 S. Cholla St. • Henderson, NV 89015 (702) 565-6072 You're Invited! Sunday Worship Services: **i!.4.*SL*v,.i8:30 a.m. 9:45 a.m. 11:00 a.m. 6:00 pm — /4 PUec 7-fct/ ^out our FREE Bible correspondence course. To List Your Congregation Call Goldie at 435-7700 THE CENTER for SUCCESSFUL LIVING (Science of Mind Principle) Join us EVERY Wed. evening 7-8pm Make Every Day A Great Day! Henderson Convention Center 200 Water Street • 434-3912 VEGAS VALLEY CHRISTIAN CHURCH 5515 Mrn. Visra. Los Vegas Phone 451 -921 1 UNDENOMINATIONAL BIBLE and CHRIST FOCUSED • •BIBLE SCHOOL 9:30 AM WORSHIP 10:30 AM S.O.W. (Study on Wednesday) 7;00 P.M. (Child Core Avoilobie) Serving Green Volley 0 los Vegos Areas neor Sunset & Russell Rood a place to belonq n place to become Licensed Child Care Center Phone 451-9665 St Christopher's Episcopal Church Holy Eucharist Sun(day 9 A.M. Sunday School 10:45 A.M. 812 Arizona St. • Boulder City • 293-4275 St. Christopher's Church, Boulder City is a God centered, inclusive, multi-generational, spiritually related family welcoming all. .t^RELIGIOUS SCIENCE CHURCH of LAS VEGAS 4820 Alpine Pi., Ste. ElOl Las Vegas, NV 89107 258-5683 Wednesday 7:00 PM Sunday 9AM & 10:30AM Rev. Sheila Weldon Discover your own answers lo questions about your past, present, and future ttirough the ancient wisdom of ECKANKAR. Experience il for yourself. Sunday Worship 10 A.M. Saturday Video Intro 1 P.M. 3160 E. Desert Inn Rd., #14 369-0101 ST. PAUL THE APOSTLE ORTHODOX CHURCH Divine Liturgy: 9:00 A.M., Sunday 898-4800 5400 ANNIE OAKLEY DR. (Soutli of Hacienda) LAS VEGAS, NEVADA 89120 CALVARY cP^ CHAPEL of HENDERSON 600 Sunset Rd. (Sunset Plaza) Sunday 10AM Wednesday Night 7PM Call for other Service times 456-3619 Pastor Chuck Trett • Bring the Family!.' "Thy word have I treasured in my heart that I might not sin against thee." Cmi unto m, all ^ ^ II 11 ir^i i"' ^ GREEN VALLEY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 454-7989 2200 Robindale Road 8:15 Worship Services 9:30 am & 11 am Worship & Sunday School CtilW Care for Infants and Toddlers SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH Welcomes YOU each Saturday Bible Study 9:30 am Worship-11:00am Prayer Meeting • Wed. 7 pm 591 Adams Boulder City ^ RIKI< Church of the H;irvAst 000 Ne 293-5878 7AM Rev. Bob Bums MO|
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• • • I • I III ^^^^WWPi^liPiP^ wvppivpn i^n^vvvwai Pag* 6 Panorama Thursday, October 10,1996 Thursday, October 10,1996 Panorama Paga? t I I House of Worship Directory CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURC 1401 FIFTH STREET BOULDER CITY, NV 293-4332 Saturday Country Western Worship 5:00 p.m. Sunday Traditioruil Worship 9:00 a.m. Sunday School and Adult Bible Study 10:15 a.m. ^ St. Matthews Episcopal Church The Working Church Saturday Evening Mass 5:30 pm Sunday Mass 9:45 am Church School During Sunday Mass Nursery Available 4709 S. Neiiis^ivd. 451-2483 _2Blocks North of TropicM on NcMs t St. Peter's Catholic Churcl) 204 S. Boulder H>yy. MASS SCHEDULE: Sat: 5 p.m. Sun: 8 am & 10 am 11:30 am 5 pm Confessions: Sat. 4 to 4:30 NEW BEGINNINGS COMMUNITY CHURCH (A new church in Green Valley) (Relaxed, casual atmosphere) Meeting Sundays at David Cox Elemntaiy School 260 aoih Drive on Roblndole between Pecos ond Eastern WORSHIP CELEDRATION, 10:00 A.M. Phone: 260-3024 Pastor, Wchord Hubocek Nursery/Child Core Boulder City Assembly of God Church| cA .Sfiti* fillMi Mieiwchif of jr,v Jga^iiwiaga 1 Sunday School: 9:00 AM JM worship .._ „ 10:00 AM n^mlH^ Night of Mlracles(2nd & 4th Sundays) 6:00 PM if J**^ Share the Vision (1 st 4 3rd Sundays) 6:00 PM • *^ Wednesday: Family Night 7:00 PM DeMiMJaraM,PaMBr TOaHgjkSMMXO BMSaMt BMMerGII]f,fWaiiM FAITH CHRISTL\N CHURCH • Sur.d.n Sc 591 Adams Blvd. m. • Thurs. alRec Cir. Telephone: 293-2 154 C • • nov Robt. Tpdrnw P.ivi The Church On The Hill" 711 Valle Verde Ct.. Henderson, NV 454-2722 Gary A. Morefield Senio r Pastor Green Valley Christian Center Sunday Schedule Morning Worship: 8:45-11:15 AM & 6:00 PM Children's Church: 8:45 -11:15 AM Sunday School: 10:15AM Evening Worship: 6:00 PM Wednesday: Family Night 7:00 PM Thursday: Youth Group (7-12). 6:45 PM -NEW I.OCATION Pastors Bill & Nora Toller W-.m fi.m. AI' o siidrc in God s LOVP & Power U<'(/nfS((fU' 7.00 /).in. 370 E. Windmill Lam; 260-4777 MIDBAR KODESH BUILDINQ THE FUTURE TOGETHER 0 CHILDREM'S SUMMER PROQRAM YOin-H GROUPS REUQIOUS SCHOOL 0 BAR/BAT MUZVAH PROQRAM SERVICES ARE HELD: 2nd at 4th Friday evenings, 7:30 p.m. Every Shabbat morning, 9 a.m. United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism affiliate 6000 S. Eastern Ave., #3B. Call 798-4510 [HlGHLANb^ILLS IB W JMW 615 College Drive • Henderson • 566-0200 ; i Sunday Worship Services: 8:30 am. 11:00 am, 6:00 pm Come Join us Sunday! We Care About You and Your FamUy! Celebrate Jesus at ; Dynamic Drama, Music and Message! Currently meeting at Community College of Southern Nevada 700 College Drive, Henderson Sundays 10AM Call 2634661 for more information TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM Established 1947 ; Ttie largest Congregation in l^levada Affliliated witli United Synagpgue of Conservative Judoism OUR MEMBERSHIP IS OPEN, r— COME GROW WITH USH! 1600Ea*tOakyBkd. • Los Vagas, Nevada • 384-5070 THE SALVATION ARMY COMMUNITY CENTER ACenteiFpr Worship and Servicei 830 E. Uke Mead Dr.. Handerson, NV (702) 565-9578 Sunday Worship Services: 11 am & 6pm Sunday School For All Ages: 9:30 am Bible Study Each Thursday: 6 pm To list your congregation call; Goldie •^ at -i-' 435-77QI St. Thomas More Catholic Commimity 130 M. Pecos Rd. Henderson. 361-3022 Announces Our New Mass Schedule Celebrated In Our NEW PERMANENT CHURCHI Saturday Confession: 3:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Saturday Vigil !*1ass: 4:30 p.m. Sunday l^asses: 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m., & 12:00 p.m. Dally Mass: 8:50 a.m. (Monday through Friday) in A FOURSQUARE CHURCH 571 Adams Blvd. Boulder City 293-7773 Sunday Worship 10:00 am Home of Christian Center School and Day Care Center OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN CHURCH "Holding Forth ttie Word of Life..." Philippians2:16 Sunday School 9 am Adult Bible Class 9 am Sunday Worship 8 & 10:45 am Pastor Bruning 59 Lynn Ln., Henderson 565-9154 Growing together in tlie grace of our Lord Jesus St. Paul's Charismatic Episcopal Church ~^^^^^ 1661 Qalleria Dn • (White Middle School, Henderson) SUNDAY WORSHIP 10AM Fatiier George Qerard • 564-1152 Fattier David Hoff • Father Charies Coleman SUNRISE COMMUNITY CHURCH Meeting in Henderson Cofivention Center 200 S. Water St. (please use back parking lot) REV. JIM HAMILTON, PASTOR 737-5219 Sunday Worship 10am Come and let us help molie your life work for you. V %SOUTHERN BAPTIST CHURCH 240 S. Cholla St. • Henderson, NV 89015 (702) 565-6072 You're Invited! Sunday Worship Services: **i!.4.*SL*v,.i8:30 a.m. 9:45 a.m. 11:00 a.m. 6:00 pm — /4 PUec 7-fct/ ^out our FREE Bible correspondence course. To List Your Congregation Call Goldie at 435-7700 THE CENTER for SUCCESSFUL LIVING (Science of Mind Principle) Join us EVERY Wed. evening 7-8pm Make Every Day A Great Day! Henderson Convention Center 200 Water Street • 434-3912 VEGAS VALLEY CHRISTIAN CHURCH 5515 Mrn. Visra. Los Vegas Phone 451 -921 1 UNDENOMINATIONAL BIBLE and CHRIST FOCUSED • •BIBLE SCHOOL 9:30 AM WORSHIP 10:30 AM S.O.W. (Study on Wednesday) 7;00 P.M. (Child Core Avoilobie) Serving Green Volley 0 los Vegos Areas neor Sunset & Russell Rood a place to belonq n place to become Licensed Child Care Center Phone 451-9665 St Christopher's Episcopal Church Holy Eucharist Sun(day 9 A.M. Sunday School 10:45 A.M. 812 Arizona St. • Boulder City • 293-4275 St. Christopher's Church, Boulder City is a God centered, inclusive, multi-generational, spiritually related family welcoming all. .t^RELIGIOUS SCIENCE CHURCH of LAS VEGAS 4820 Alpine Pi., Ste. ElOl Las Vegas, NV 89107 258-5683 Wednesday 7:00 PM Sunday 9AM & 10:30AM Rev. Sheila Weldon Discover your own answers lo questions about your past, present, and future ttirough the ancient wisdom of ECKANKAR. Experience il for yourself. Sunday Worship 10 A.M. Saturday Video Intro 1 P.M. 3160 E. Desert Inn Rd., #14 369-0101 ST. PAUL THE APOSTLE ORTHODOX CHURCH Divine Liturgy: 9:00 A.M., Sunday 898-4800 5400 ANNIE OAKLEY DR. (Soutli of Hacienda) LAS VEGAS, NEVADA 89120 CALVARY cP^ CHAPEL of HENDERSON 600 Sunset Rd. (Sunset Plaza) Sunday 10AM Wednesday Night 7PM Call for other Service times 456-3619 Pastor Chuck Trett • Bring the Family!.' "Thy word have I treasured in my heart that I might not sin against thee." Cmi unto m, all ^ ^ II 11 ir^i i"' ^ GREEN VALLEY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 454-7989 2200 Robindale Road 8:15 Worship Services 9:30 am & 11 am Worship & Sunday School CtilW Care for Infants and Toddlers SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH Welcomes YOU each Saturday Bible Study 9:30 am Worship-11:00am Prayer Meeting • Wed. 7 pm 591 Adams Boulder City ^ RIKI< Church of the H;irvAst 000 Ne 293-5878 7AM Rev. Bob Bums MO|
PAGE 32

• an mmmmm^mmmmmmmmmmmm mmmmmm ( I Ho* • Pnorm* Thursday. October 10.1996 College of Urban Affairs named for Greenspuns Joel and Kitty Rivers Veteran minister, wife to lead tour of Holy Land Paator Joel and Kitty Rivers will host a 10-day trip to Israel and an eight-day extension to Cairo, Egypt, to see the Pyranuds and the Valley of Kings and Queens next year. llie tour's cost will begin at $1398, from Las Vegas. The departure date will be Feb. 17,1997. Among the tour highlights: Sea of Galilee; Mount of Beatitudes; the Jordan River; Cana in Galilee; Qumran, site of the Dead Sea Scroll discovery; the Garden of Gethsemane, the Old City of Jerusalem, the Via Dolorosa, the Way of the Cross; Bethlehem, the Garden Tomb and the Upper Room. • UNLV asked the Board of Regents to approve naming the university's new College ofUrban Affairs for the Greenspun family in recognition of their gifts, said President Carol C. Harter at a recent press conference. The family recently gave $1.7 million and their earlier gifts, pledges and in-kind donations, bring the family's total support of university programs to $5 million. The College of Urban Affairs was created during the university's recent academic reorganization. It contains the Hank Greenspun School of Communication, named for the late founder and publisher of the Las Vegas Sun, and the departments of counseling, criminal justice, environmental studies and leisure studies. Upon approval of the Regents, it will be named the Greenspun College of Urban Affairs. "We are very grateful to the Greenspun family for their ongoing support of our programs," said Harter. "When the new Greenspun College of Urban Affairs was formed during the reorganization of our academic units last summer, we grouped together programs that would contribute to our goal of becoming a premier urban university by addressing the needs of the urban area in which we are located. "By supporting this new college, the Greenspuns are helping UNLV fulfill its mission of meeting the educational, work force and research needs of Southern Nevada and beyond.", Harter said. Initial proceeds will be use to fund student scholarships and to hire Greenspun assistant professors in the college. Dr. BobRossman, professor of kinesiology^ chair of the department of leisure studies, and a member of the UNLV faculty since 1992, will serve as interim dean of the new college while a national search is conducted for a permanent dean. "Hank Greenspun committed his life to the betterment of a growing Las Vegas community. That is why my family created the Hank Greenspun School of Communication, to continue his dream," said Barbara Greenspun, publisher of the Sun and wife of the late Hank Greenspun. "Today, we are fortunate to be able to further his goal of a welleducated community by creating the Greenspun College of Urban Affairs." "Together with the Hank Greenspun School of CommuniParticipants will travel on El Al Airlines with tour host Joel Rivers, who has served 25 years in Las Vegas. This will be his fifth trip to the Holy Land. An information meeting will be held at 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 13. For reservations, call 4582731. Communication students receive scholarships Ner Tamid offers Jewish music store on Sunday Tara West's "Music Mobile' will be set up in the parking lot of Congregation Ner Tamid from 9 a.m to 5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 13. "Die Religious School of Ner Tamid will also hold a large ird^mage sale from 8 a.m. to 1 PnPllie mobile music store offers a special opportunity to look, listn and buy from an outstanding collection of Jewish music casiet^s, CDs, videos and music books, and is is the first of its kind in the Las Vegas area. Tara West, a retirement project of Elaine and Roy Golub, travels by motor home troughout the country presenting Judaism's vast musical heritage to communities where these resources may not be readily available. There is a thriving new market of Jewish music that many people in the Las Vegas area may not be aware of" said Bella Feldman, music director of the synagogue. "After attending many Cantors' conferences over the past few years, I have had the pleasure of dealing vWth; Elaine and Roy who have exposed me to wonderful Jewish music that I never knew was available. They have anything and everything you ever wanted on recording, including children's music, Klezmer, classical and contemporary." More than 6O0 individual titles on cassettes, compact discs, music books and video tapes will be on display. The Golubs are distributors for Tara Publications, Cedarhurst, N.Y., one of the largest publishers and distributors of Jewish music, and can readily obtain pieces not carried in stock. Scholarships totaling $47,000 forthe 1996-1997 academicyear were recently awarded by the UNLV Greenspun School of Communication. •Robert M. MacNamara Scholarships, sponsored by Maureen Barrett of Barrett and Associates: Jennifer Evans, Paula Gottula Miles, Farrah Newbold, April Partridge, Melissa Reichley and Jacqueline Roderick. •Las Vegas Women in Communications Scholar.. ships: Paul^ Gol%ta, Kareen Hale, and Amy Jones. !).r .Griigp,in JournaHsm Scholarships, sponsored by Barbara Greenspun of the Las Vegas Sun: Stephanie Rushia and Nora Griffith. •Greenspan Communication Scholarships, sponsored by the Milken Family Foun-, dation: Jaymes Aimetti, Kristen' Basi, Leonil Brandel, Stacey Devald, Sally Gilbertson, E.J. Gladding, Kendra Hodapp, Richard Kimbrough, Joel Lauer, Michelle Low, Monique Madara, Sergio Marquez, Susan McNabb, Terry Morrow, William Muchow, Sarah Norton-Kelly, Kapka Pchelarova, William Price, Stephen Robertson, Michael Saunders, Africa Tellez-Rios, Deborah Tingets, and Pauline Villapando. •Las Vegas Ad Club Scholarships: Charles Briggs, Cheryl Congdon, Gerri Dereszynski, Jamie Hapip, Cassandra Kegley, Allen Klevens, Sean Ross, Kathryn Mary Schiele, Carrie Schmidt, Shawn Takaguchi, Jennifer Tucker, and Eric Whitaker. •The Maury Stevens Memorial Scholarship, sponsored by Robin Greenspun: Joanna Schneider. •Public Relations Society of America Scholarships, sponsored by the Desert Sands chapter: Paula Golata and Mark Heftman. EVENT f Whether remodeling or buying a new home, you muit >ee our extenilve (election o( Inp quality Truatmark Stalaaaalcr carpels by Tnuunwii and Df SAT 8AM • 6PM • SUN 9AM I2N00N SERVING GREEN VALLEY & LAS VEGAS CORNER OF SUNSET & EASTERN 6521 South Eastern Avenue Great Food! Great Fun! Great Place! I Monday Broasted Chicken iictdhic, potato (ind lldliaii Bread ^ 1\icsday • Choice Top Sirloin & ^^g ivlth potato and Thursday l'"!'"" ^^^cad Wediie.sday Roast Pork & Dressing // • //// iinislwil potatoes & girny All Dinners Include Our World Famous "All You Can Eat" Salad Bar. Offer available 5-10pm only. CASINO 8. RESTAURANT Boulder Hay., 1 Block South of Sunset Rd., Henderson 56')-!lll6 STEAK SPECIAL SPM'llPM MONDAythruTHURSDAV 16 oz. Porterhouse Includes Potato^ Vegetable, Soup Or Salad, Rd b Butter Ihp Into Excitenient Ihp Into Bailey's 458-BRE(V 4500EwtSuiMtRoMl,HidraDn, NV Li)catMHnthtGrMn\MvT(wnCnlw fmOtOmnyMKfPmkm/ •— l^tt C aiwt i m r i M< l^^i m UW fTlil P I Thursday, October 10,1996 Panorama Papa 9 state Symphony of Russia in concert The internationally acclaimed State Symphony of Russia— formerly the USSR State Symphony—^will perform an allGershwin program at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 16, in UNLVs Ham Concert Hall. The performance opens the 21st season of the Charles Vanda Master Series. Led by Yevgeny Svetlanov and comprised of Russia's top symphonic instrumentalists, the orchestra has made an invaluable contribution to the art of symphonic music in Russia, since it began performing in 1936. The orchestra has performed in the world's most prestigious venues, including the Musikverein in Vienna, Albert Hall in London, Salle Pleyel in Paris, Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., Lincoln Center and Carnegie Hall in New York. Russian music is normally an integral part of the orchestra's repertoire, but this performance is a salute to America with' some of Gershwin's popular music including "An American In Paris," "Rhapsody In Blue," "Cuban Overture" and "Porgy and Bess, Symphonic Suite." "Porgy and Bess," George Gershwin's last mjgor work, was also one of his most popular musicals. It is about life on CatYevgeny Svetlanov fish Row, a dilapidated area in a fallen quarter of Charleston inhabited by poor black people. The symphony presents more than 100 concerts a year. Most of the season is spent on foreign tours. It began performing abroad in 1957 and made appearances in North America in 1960 and 1991. Tickets, from $20 to $50, are on sale at the Performing Arts Center Box Office on the UNLV campus between 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday qr 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday. beJ Want Higher Returns on Your ^ Investments? Since 1977 Consolidated Mortgage has helped investors realize maximum COnSOLIDiiTED mORTGi\GE Jerilyn Cla.vl • Its 33,000-person membership is drawn primarily from employees of the Clark County School District, UNLV and Community College of Southern Nevada, as well as members of the Westside LDS stakes and other select employee groups. GREAT FOOD FUN & FRIENDS 990 Breakfast 7 Selections to Choose From! ^^B Daily from 11pm 11am ] I I ^rh 1^1 ITTT 'n<'"'in9 All Vou ^ _I^VI LIIILI Can Eat Salad Bar GIANT SHRIMP COCKTAIL FILLERS, PIECES OR CELERY filled to the brim with 6oz. of shrimp & sauce $495 Prime Rib liidudes ALLYOU-CA\'-EA T Salad Bar! Ihuly I roni 5 p.m. 10 p.m. Boulder liny., I Bloek South of Sunset lid., Henderson 5ti>'JI 10 Dignity Las Vegas, a reconciling faith community of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered Catholics, our families 'and'iriends, has a new home starting Oct 19, at The Interfaith Center at UNLV, 4765 Brussells Road. Catholic Mass/Communion Service is held at 5:30 p.m. Saturdays, and is alv/ays followed by a social hour, potluck dinner, fun siad fellowship. Dignity Las Vegas began in August 1994, when 18 gay and lesbian Catholics joined in prayer, led by a gay. Catholic priest. Now in its third year, its various ministries have reached more 2,000 gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered Catholics, families and friends. In addition to weekly services, Dignity Las Vegas celebrates all major Catholic holidays in a participatory/modern liturgy. It invites those interested to its fa^th cominunity4< 'Whei^ 1 everyone''is cherished >a6 a gift fromGod— taijtlyhas'they are. Everyone is always welcome. For more information about Dignity Las Vegas, write to: Dignity Las Vegas, P.O. Box 70424, Las Vegas, NV 89170; call 5935395; fax 257-1031; or e-mail: DignityNV@aol.com. 3i ..tTiMrS tno'^lE?. nssmr New directory catalogs Nevada exports Export sales in Nevada racked up $744 million last year, a 32% jump over 1993-95 sales. Did you know Switzerland was Nevada's biggest export market, before Canada bumped it out of first place last year. Mining has been Nevada's number one export for quite awhile. This is just some of the information in Uie more than 100 -page "1996 Nevada International Trade and Investment Directory." Put together by the International Trade OfRce of the state Commission on Economic Development, it covers exporting from accounting firms to world trade centers. The News covers your community Peter Cunningham, director of CED's international office, said the new directory combines updates of both the Nevada Export Directory and the Nevada International Trade Resource Directory. The combination lists business resources for exporting, plus comprehensive Nevada statistics, and the export directory, all in one convenient volume. Cunningham said the directory has been distributed to all commercial libraries of U.S. embassies worldwide, and is also on the internet (http^www.tpusa.com/ nevada). Directories can be purchased for $35,by calling Menyone Page at CED in Las Vegas, 4862700. Cunningham said other activities to help current or potential Nevada exporters through the CED office include: •Foreign trade missions. •Export seminars. •Export counseling. •An international trade database for strategic planning. •Expediting finance applications for Nevada businesses. •Match-ups of foreign buyers with Nevada suppliers at m^or industry trade shows. J Anniversaries • Birthdays Christmas Parties Imaginative Menus for 10 or more • Pasta • Chicken • Seafood specialties STARTING AV9.^' 2 for 1 Chinese 5:00 to 6:30 p.m. CHAMPAGNE SUNDAY BRUNCH... ONLY ^IS.^^ Fresti Salads • Hot Entrees • Omelet Station Waffle Station Carving Station • Roast Beef •Ham • Turkey • Dessert Table 4451 E Sunset (Between Mtn. Vista & Green Valley Pkwy.) 435-4000 Tired of fishing around^ Call 1-800437-5814 Perfect Pate Jyoice personals

PAGE 33

• an mmmmm^mmmmmmmmmmmm mmmmmm ( I Ho* • Pnorm* Thursday. October 10.1996 College of Urban Affairs named for Greenspuns Joel and Kitty Rivers Veteran minister, wife to lead tour of Holy Land Paator Joel and Kitty Rivers will host a 10-day trip to Israel and an eight-day extension to Cairo, Egypt, to see the Pyranuds and the Valley of Kings and Queens next year. llie tour's cost will begin at $1398, from Las Vegas. The departure date will be Feb. 17,1997. Among the tour highlights: Sea of Galilee; Mount of Beatitudes; the Jordan River; Cana in Galilee; Qumran, site of the Dead Sea Scroll discovery; the Garden of Gethsemane, the Old City of Jerusalem, the Via Dolorosa, the Way of the Cross; Bethlehem, the Garden Tomb and the Upper Room. • UNLV asked the Board of Regents to approve naming the university's new College ofUrban Affairs for the Greenspun family in recognition of their gifts, said President Carol C. Harter at a recent press conference. The family recently gave $1.7 million and their earlier gifts, pledges and in-kind donations, bring the family's total support of university programs to $5 million. The College of Urban Affairs was created during the university's recent academic reorganization. It contains the Hank Greenspun School of Communication, named for the late founder and publisher of the Las Vegas Sun, and the departments of counseling, criminal justice, environmental studies and leisure studies. Upon approval of the Regents, it will be named the Greenspun College of Urban Affairs. "We are very grateful to the Greenspun family for their ongoing support of our programs," said Harter. "When the new Greenspun College of Urban Affairs was formed during the reorganization of our academic units last summer, we grouped together programs that would contribute to our goal of becoming a premier urban university by addressing the needs of the urban area in which we are located. "By supporting this new college, the Greenspuns are helping UNLV fulfill its mission of meeting the educational, work force and research needs of Southern Nevada and beyond.", Harter said. Initial proceeds will be use to fund student scholarships and to hire Greenspun assistant professors in the college. Dr. BobRossman, professor of kinesiology^ chair of the department of leisure studies, and a member of the UNLV faculty since 1992, will serve as interim dean of the new college while a national search is conducted for a permanent dean. "Hank Greenspun committed his life to the betterment of a growing Las Vegas community. That is why my family created the Hank Greenspun School of Communication, to continue his dream," said Barbara Greenspun, publisher of the Sun and wife of the late Hank Greenspun. "Today, we are fortunate to be able to further his goal of a welleducated community by creating the Greenspun College of Urban Affairs." "Together with the Hank Greenspun School of CommuniParticipants will travel on El Al Airlines with tour host Joel Rivers, who has served 25 years in Las Vegas. This will be his fifth trip to the Holy Land. An information meeting will be held at 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 13. For reservations, call 4582731. Communication students receive scholarships Ner Tamid offers Jewish music store on Sunday Tara West's "Music Mobile' will be set up in the parking lot of Congregation Ner Tamid from 9 a.m to 5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 13. "Die Religious School of Ner Tamid will also hold a large ird^mage sale from 8 a.m. to 1 PnPllie mobile music store offers a special opportunity to look, listn and buy from an outstanding collection of Jewish music casiet^s, CDs, videos and music books, and is is the first of its kind in the Las Vegas area. Tara West, a retirement project of Elaine and Roy Golub, travels by motor home troughout the country presenting Judaism's vast musical heritage to communities where these resources may not be readily available. There is a thriving new market of Jewish music that many people in the Las Vegas area may not be aware of" said Bella Feldman, music director of the synagogue. "After attending many Cantors' conferences over the past few years, I have had the pleasure of dealing vWth; Elaine and Roy who have exposed me to wonderful Jewish music that I never knew was available. They have anything and everything you ever wanted on recording, including children's music, Klezmer, classical and contemporary." More than 6O0 individual titles on cassettes, compact discs, music books and video tapes will be on display. The Golubs are distributors for Tara Publications, Cedarhurst, N.Y., one of the largest publishers and distributors of Jewish music, and can readily obtain pieces not carried in stock. Scholarships totaling $47,000 forthe 1996-1997 academicyear were recently awarded by the UNLV Greenspun School of Communication. •Robert M. MacNamara Scholarships, sponsored by Maureen Barrett of Barrett and Associates: Jennifer Evans, Paula Gottula Miles, Farrah Newbold, April Partridge, Melissa Reichley and Jacqueline Roderick. •Las Vegas Women in Communications Scholar.. ships: Paul^ Gol%ta, Kareen Hale, and Amy Jones. !).r .Griigp,in JournaHsm Scholarships, sponsored by Barbara Greenspun of the Las Vegas Sun: Stephanie Rushia and Nora Griffith. •Greenspan Communication Scholarships, sponsored by the Milken Family Foun-, dation: Jaymes Aimetti, Kristen' Basi, Leonil Brandel, Stacey Devald, Sally Gilbertson, E.J. Gladding, Kendra Hodapp, Richard Kimbrough, Joel Lauer, Michelle Low, Monique Madara, Sergio Marquez, Susan McNabb, Terry Morrow, William Muchow, Sarah Norton-Kelly, Kapka Pchelarova, William Price, Stephen Robertson, Michael Saunders, Africa Tellez-Rios, Deborah Tingets, and Pauline Villapando. •Las Vegas Ad Club Scholarships: Charles Briggs, Cheryl Congdon, Gerri Dereszynski, Jamie Hapip, Cassandra Kegley, Allen Klevens, Sean Ross, Kathryn Mary Schiele, Carrie Schmidt, Shawn Takaguchi, Jennifer Tucker, and Eric Whitaker. •The Maury Stevens Memorial Scholarship, sponsored by Robin Greenspun: Joanna Schneider. •Public Relations Society of America Scholarships, sponsored by the Desert Sands chapter: Paula Golata and Mark Heftman. EVENT f Whether remodeling or buying a new home, you muit >ee our extenilve (election o( Inp quality Truatmark Stalaaaalcr carpels by Tnuunwii and Df SAT 8AM • 6PM • SUN 9AM I2N00N SERVING GREEN VALLEY & LAS VEGAS CORNER OF SUNSET & EASTERN 6521 South Eastern Avenue Great Food! Great Fun! Great Place! I Monday Broasted Chicken iictdhic, potato (ind lldliaii Bread ^ 1\icsday • Choice Top Sirloin & ^^g ivlth potato and Thursday l'"!'"" ^^^cad Wediie.sday Roast Pork & Dressing // • //// iinislwil potatoes & girny All Dinners Include Our World Famous "All You Can Eat" Salad Bar. Offer available 5-10pm only. CASINO 8. RESTAURANT Boulder Hay., 1 Block South of Sunset Rd., Henderson 56')-!lll6 STEAK SPECIAL SPM'llPM MONDAythruTHURSDAV 16 oz. Porterhouse Includes Potato^ Vegetable, Soup Or Salad, Rd b Butter Ihp Into Excitenient Ihp Into Bailey's 458-BRE(V 4500EwtSuiMtRoMl,HidraDn, NV Li)catMHnthtGrMn\MvT(wnCnlw fmOtOmnyMKfPmkm/ •— l^tt C aiwt i m r i M< l^^i m UW fTlil P I Thursday, October 10,1996 Panorama Papa 9 state Symphony of Russia in concert The internationally acclaimed State Symphony of Russia— formerly the USSR State Symphony—^will perform an allGershwin program at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 16, in UNLVs Ham Concert Hall. The performance opens the 21st season of the Charles Vanda Master Series. Led by Yevgeny Svetlanov and comprised of Russia's top symphonic instrumentalists, the orchestra has made an invaluable contribution to the art of symphonic music in Russia, since it began performing in 1936. The orchestra has performed in the world's most prestigious venues, including the Musikverein in Vienna, Albert Hall in London, Salle Pleyel in Paris, Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., Lincoln Center and Carnegie Hall in New York. Russian music is normally an integral part of the orchestra's repertoire, but this performance is a salute to America with' some of Gershwin's popular music including "An American In Paris," "Rhapsody In Blue," "Cuban Overture" and "Porgy and Bess, Symphonic Suite." "Porgy and Bess," George Gershwin's last mjgor work, was also one of his most popular musicals. It is about life on CatYevgeny Svetlanov fish Row, a dilapidated area in a fallen quarter of Charleston inhabited by poor black people. The symphony presents more than 100 concerts a year. Most of the season is spent on foreign tours. It began performing abroad in 1957 and made appearances in North America in 1960 and 1991. Tickets, from $20 to $50, are on sale at the Performing Arts Center Box Office on the UNLV campus between 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday qr 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday. beJ Want Higher Returns on Your ^ Investments? Since 1977 Consolidated Mortgage has helped investors realize maximum COnSOLIDiiTED mORTGi\GE Jerilyn Cla.vl • Its 33,000-person membership is drawn primarily from employees of the Clark County School District, UNLV and Community College of Southern Nevada, as well as members of the Westside LDS stakes and other select employee groups. GREAT FOOD FUN & FRIENDS 990 Breakfast 7 Selections to Choose From! ^^B Daily from 11pm 11am ] I I ^rh 1^1 ITTT 'n<'"'in9 All Vou ^ _I^VI LIIILI Can Eat Salad Bar GIANT SHRIMP COCKTAIL FILLERS, PIECES OR CELERY filled to the brim with 6oz. of shrimp & sauce $495 Prime Rib liidudes ALLYOU-CA\'-EA T Salad Bar! Ihuly I roni 5 p.m. 10 p.m. Boulder liny., I Bloek South of Sunset lid., Henderson 5ti>'JI 10 Dignity Las Vegas, a reconciling faith community of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered Catholics, our families 'and'iriends, has a new home starting Oct 19, at The Interfaith Center at UNLV, 4765 Brussells Road. Catholic Mass/Communion Service is held at 5:30 p.m. Saturdays, and is alv/ays followed by a social hour, potluck dinner, fun siad fellowship. Dignity Las Vegas began in August 1994, when 18 gay and lesbian Catholics joined in prayer, led by a gay. Catholic priest. Now in its third year, its various ministries have reached more 2,000 gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered Catholics, families and friends. In addition to weekly services, Dignity Las Vegas celebrates all major Catholic holidays in a participatory/modern liturgy. It invites those interested to its fa^th cominunity4< 'Whei^ 1 everyone''is cherished >a6 a gift fromGod— taijtlyhas'they are. Everyone is always welcome. For more information about Dignity Las Vegas, write to: Dignity Las Vegas, P.O. Box 70424, Las Vegas, NV 89170; call 5935395; fax 257-1031; or e-mail: DignityNV@aol.com. 3i ..tTiMrS tno'^lE?. nssmr New directory catalogs Nevada exports Export sales in Nevada racked up $744 million last year, a 32% jump over 1993-95 sales. Did you know Switzerland was Nevada's biggest export market, before Canada bumped it out of first place last year. Mining has been Nevada's number one export for quite awhile. This is just some of the information in Uie more than 100 -page "1996 Nevada International Trade and Investment Directory." Put together by the International Trade OfRce of the state Commission on Economic Development, it covers exporting from accounting firms to world trade centers. The News covers your community Peter Cunningham, director of CED's international office, said the new directory combines updates of both the Nevada Export Directory and the Nevada International Trade Resource Directory. The combination lists business resources for exporting, plus comprehensive Nevada statistics, and the export directory, all in one convenient volume. Cunningham said the directory has been distributed to all commercial libraries of U.S. embassies worldwide, and is also on the internet (http^www.tpusa.com/ nevada). Directories can be purchased for $35,by calling Menyone Page at CED in Las Vegas, 4862700. Cunningham said other activities to help current or potential Nevada exporters through the CED office include: •Foreign trade missions. •Export seminars. •Export counseling. •An international trade database for strategic planning. •Expediting finance applications for Nevada businesses. •Match-ups of foreign buyers with Nevada suppliers at m^or industry trade shows. J Anniversaries • Birthdays Christmas Parties Imaginative Menus for 10 or more • Pasta • Chicken • Seafood specialties STARTING AV9.^' 2 for 1 Chinese 5:00 to 6:30 p.m. CHAMPAGNE SUNDAY BRUNCH... ONLY ^IS.^^ Fresti Salads • Hot Entrees • Omelet Station Waffle Station Carving Station • Roast Beef •Ham • Turkey • Dessert Table 4451 E Sunset (Between Mtn. Vista & Green Valley Pkwy.) 435-4000 Tired of fishing around^ Call 1-800437-5814 Perfect Pate Jyoice personals

PAGE 34

w^mnm^wwwrm^n w^fmr^^^^ mmwm^mmmm I WHAT'S PLAYING -\ Pg 10 Panorama Thursday, October 10,1996 Bluestone, Soule open Chamber Music Southwest series Chamber Music Southwest will open its ninth season at 8 p.m. Get 18, with Robert Bluestone and Rick Soule in concert atUNLVsHamHall. Classical guitarist Bluestone will perform solo works by VillaLobos, Carlevaro, Duarte, Torroba, Albeniz, Gomez-Crespo, Ibert, Giuliani, and Paganini. Soule Itnd Bluestone, performing together for the first time, will play Jacque Ibert's "Ente'acte," Niccollo Paganini's 'Y^antabile for Flute and Guitar" and Mauro Guiliani's "Sonata, opus 85, for Flute and Guitar." Bluestone has been the most requested solo artist on the prestigious Western States Arts performing arts tour roster since 1991. He recently received the Mayor of Santa Fe's Outstanding Achievement in the Arts Award for his leading role in the culture of his home and city. He tours regularly throughout the U.S., Mexico, Canada, and Central America. His critically acclaimed recordings "Recital" and "Alchemy" are available on the Linares label. Soule is the principal flutist of the Nevada Symphony Orchestra, a founding member of the Sierra Winds and a professor of flute at UNLV. As a member of the Sierra Winds, Soule has traveled extensively throughout the U.S. and abroad, has released three CD albums for Cambria Records Vets to hold Oktoberfest AMVETS Post #f of Searchlight will host its annual Oktoberfest Oct. 12, at the Searchlight Community Center, 200 Michael Wendell Way. It will begin at 4 p.m. with a no-host oasis and a bratwurst dinner starting at 5 p.m. Dinner tickets are $4 each. The annual fund-raiser supports the Post's charitable works. AMVETS is a non-profit organization and lionations' may be tax-deductibl^. Through its, fund-raising efforts, the organization has been able to procure, a 15-passenger van, through the Disabled American Vetersbis, to transport veterans of Laughlin, Bullhead City, Cal-Nev-Ari and Searchlight to the V.A. Clinic in Las Vegas. Robert Bluestone and received the i9^3Govemor's Arts Award for Excellence in the Arts from the State of Nevada. In May, Soule and harpsichordist John Metz toured southern France, performing at the national conservatories of Nice and Aix-en-Provence. Richard L Soule Chamber Music Southwest was established in 1987 by the Department of Music at UNLV to bring internationally and nationally acclaimed ensembles and soloists to Las Vegas and to provide a venue for outstanding musicians from Southern Nevada. Musical Arts Society opens seasoi GOTVOc/ Call Home Maid Cleaning X Licensed Bonded References Weekly, Monthly, One-Time Peggy LeRoy 223-1990 Tlie Southern Nevada Musical Arts Society will open its 34th season with a concert, "Songs of Our Politics"by the Musical Arts Singers at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday.Oct 11-12, at the Clark County Library Theatre,1401 E. Flamingo Road. The program will bring to life over 200 years of political campaign music beginning with George Washington to the present day. Campaign songs will include "Welcome Mighty Chief and "Yankee Doodle" (Washington); "Lincoln and Liberty" (Lincoln); "His Grandfather's Hat" (Cleveland); "Happy Days are Here Again" (Roosevelt); "Don't Let Them Take It Away" (Truman); "I yke Ike" (Eisenhower); "High Hopes" (Kennedy); "Click with Dick" (Nixon); "Why Not the Bestr (Carter), and "God Bless the U.S.A" (Reagan). The 24-voice Musical Arts Singers are under the direction of Dr. Douglas R. Peterson, in his 29th year as the Society's music director. They will be accompanied by Nancy Porter and an instrumental ensemble including piccolo, banjo and guitar. John Hanks will provide the historical narrative including 'Jelly Roir musical at Lorenzi Park The Las Vegas Cultural and Community Affairs Division will present the award-winning offBroadway musical "Jelly Roll!" at the Sammy Davis Jr. Festival Pla2a in Lorenzi Park, from 7:30 Mn., Saturday, Oct. 12. Advance tidtets are $10adults; SSfitudaiitf, seniors anddisabled. Tickets at the door are $12 and $10. Gates will open at 6:30 p.m. The show won the 1995 Obie Award, Outer Critics Circle Award and the Lucille Lortel Award for Best Off-Broadway Musical, and has received rave reviews. It is a 90-minute tribute to the now legendary Jelly Rbll'Moftdn (1890-1941), theNew Orleans jazz pianist, composer, arranger and bandleader as well as the selfstyled creator of jazz. Tickets are available at the Charleston Heights Arts Center and Reed Whipple Cultural Center box offices or TicketMaster. BLAST IL% IB first to win in the Barley's "BLACKJACK BLAST 1" We're giving away cash and prizes totaling 33, Drawings to be held October 9th, 16th, 23nl& 30th, 1996, at 6:00pm &8K)(h)m. Miist be present to win. Any Bladdack, with a minimum bet of $5 quBuifies you for the drawing. October 2,1996, at lOm uid jgh OHober 30,1996,6;3qpin. MiMt to 21 yMia of i^ or obr. This promotion an be CMICJIKI at •ngr tmw at maiMfmanf• dkcTBlion. Tap Into The Esatementl 468-BKEW 4500EMt8uiM>tRo^Hm(faron,NV ^ ._ Located in the GianVUlerl>)niCmtw'EMt of Gn>Ul^yIWniv Covered Parking w^ Available eia NV iS interesting anecdotes and hi: torical facts about America' political parties and the cane dates from George Washingt( to Bill Clinton. In keeping with the theme the concert, candidates or thei representatives for the Presi dential race, Nevada's t' Congressional seats, and tl open County Commissioner seat have been invited to set up infor• ttiational displays and meet the audience in the lobby before the concert and during intermission. Admission is $10 adults; $7 seniors and students. Tickets are available at the UNLV Performing Center Box Office, 895-3801, or at the door. The program sponsored in partby agrantfn the Nevada State Council on Arts. I NATION WIDE SAFETY \Jk>^*3iS & I I ALIGNMENT CENTER [ [ IVe do things the old fashion way. j We listen to and satisfy you, THE CUSTOMER. [ I Specializing in: brakes, alignments, struts, shocl<;s, I A/C &. heating, electrical 8v general repair. I We service American, Foreign and light trucks, j 30 Years in business. ] We also specialize in '50 '60 & 70's Come in & meet us. Bring ^this ad for free brake inspectioo, tire rotation & balancing. • Member of the Better Business Burf^u.. I r 540 N. Boulder Hwy., Henderson j I (702) 565-4887 I I 1 DEAR DEBBIE DEBORAH WHITE Dear Debbie: My baby's father and I were togetherforfive years. He gave me everything, and all he wanted was a son. He supported me and my other son, who is now 5. /^ Ju!l^i^:^"^ We were forced to move away from each dtherHbicaiise our apartment got flooded. He started going with my best friend, but we were still seeing each other. £-'" I broke it off because it was hurting me. But every time he comes to my house to get his son and stepson he tries to make moves on me. He says he wants his family back and his girlfriend doesn't satisfy him. How do I get over the hurt and get him to leave me alone? I can't give my new spouse 100% of me until I'm over my baby's father. HURT FROM LOVE Dear Hurt: It sounds like you want this man back. If you're willing to forgive his betrayal and give him another chance, here's thedeal: Youhaveto start fresh. No seeingother people. Take things slowly, see hin;t and build back your trust before you move back in together. j^/"'"' If you really want to get over him, limit your contact with him. Drop off the kids at his mother's house or a neutral place. Don't discuss anything except the kids when he calls and keep your conversations short. Dear Debbie: Tm having a custody problem. My boyfriend and I broke up, and we both want the cat. We adopted it together and we're both very attached to "Smokey." We tried joint custody, but he moved far enough away to make that impractical. I took care of the cat and spent the most time with him. So I think he should be mine. But my ex is just being stubborn and wants him, too. Right now the cat's with me, but my ex keeps calling me about him. What would you do'? SMOKERS MOM Dear Smokey's Mom: Your ex is using the cat to try to control you. Buy him a cute kitten with the same coloring, and present it to him. Don't buy into this game, and cuthim off when he calls. Eventually hell refocus his obsessive behavior. If he doesn't, and steps up his contact or threatens you, file a formal criminal complaint and consider taking out a restraining order. Write to Dear Debbie, P.O. Box 4328, Chicago, 111. 60680. 1996, Tribune Media Services ,A cold really is no big deal • :rrEditor's Note: Because of a production error, paragrapphs in Bishop's column last week were printed out of order. The News today reprints the column in its correct form. Take my word, it was no big deal when a cave man or woman came down with a nasty cold. For one thing, they didn't have to sit around watching some poor wretch with a runny nose pop up on their TV screen every few minutes clutching her head and shouting about her stuffy, sniffling, achy feeling head cold. Since it took several centuries for the evolution of man to reach the peak of ingenuity necessary for the design of those cutesy offkilter arrows on medicine bottle tops, it stands to reason no cave person spent tortuous hours atting .to.open a bottle of ^ng, sniffling, sneezing. ONCE OVER LIGHTLY CAROLYN DRENNAN BISHOP coughing, stuffy-headed, achyfeeling medicine. If you're interested in a little more hi storical background, I can tell you that not long after the off-kilter arrow person mastered his craft, a new species of man arose to torment the cold sufferer. His plan was ingenious. >--t In no time, he perfected the art of sealing cold capsules into plastic, foil wrapped packets wrapped so snugly 1il!ife"llStC' quires the combined efforts of a Houdini and Jj||g strength of an elephant to open them. Also, I'm sure if a cave woman looked like.I do when I have a cold, it didn't bother her a bit. After all, mirrors hadn't been invented yet. There was no way she could know she looked like she'd been flying for days with her head hanging outside an airplane window. Another plus for cave people: There was no irritating doctor sitting around in a plush office saying things like, "There's a lot of that going around. Not much you can do for a virus." I guess you've gathered by now^^ I have a cold. Not only do I look ^Hii. like a wilted turnip, I just spent half the night locked in the bathroom with a set of tools trying to open a packet of the latest sure-cure for the common cold. I was not a pretty sight when my husband stumbled over me this morning. It didn't matter. He strolled by my inert form and remarked casually, "Have a good day." ;,.;^:S^/ Like I said, having a cold is no '^'g deal. Dog show sffli Friday ST. ROSE BIRTHS The Silver Circuit AKC All Breed and Obedience Dog Show will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 11-13, at the Silver Bowl Sports Complex, on Russell Road. Group and Best in Show com petition will begin at 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Obedience will be from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Expected are 1,800 to 2,000dogs. There will be 25 vendors selling miscellaneous dog grrooming and training products, books and collectibles, and food and beverages. Admission and parking is free. Thursday, October 10,1996 Panorama Page 11 HOROSCOPE LINDA BUCK Weekly Tip: The sun goes from Libra into Scorpio this week. It'll be harder to express yourself verbally, but easier to concentrate. Aries (March 21-April 19). You need a good team and a good partner to win the match. The pressure's growing and tees demand your full attention. Youll be energized, so you'll be able to get what you need. Taurus (April 20-May 20). You'll have more time to meet with your friends soon. A deadline looms, so finish old work now. You're strongest on your own turf. Gemini (May 21-June 21). Start all the intellectual endeavors you've been considering—don't wait! You'll get a new assignment that gets in the way of your own pursuits. You'll be practically overwhelmed. Cancer (June 22-July 22). You may find more money, if you do the research. Hold ofFon a decision—it's more likely to go your way later. A short-tempered supervisor could blow up, so watch out. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22). Get help from a technical expert to solve the problem. Study your financial situation and you may find a workable solution. Take out a small loan to get something you need for your personal environment. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Give yourself extra time for a difficult assignment. You may be attracted to a sensitive person. Follow through on that thought—^you may make a friend for life. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). If you're smart, which you are, you'll start your big writing project. Do the research. Accept an opportunity to make more money. Get a friend to help and you'll both prosper. Scorpio (Oct 24-Nov. 21). Stall on everything important. You are magniflcent. Do everything you've ever wanted to do—or at least begin it. Work hard and watch out for sharp instruments. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Offer your skills and push your team to victory. Your friends may try to help, but you'll be stuck with the main responsibility. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Ask your boss for a raise. You can figure out what a flaky person wants, if you concentrate. The odds are good youll meet Mr. or Ms. Right. y Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). Begin your big project; you can't afford to wait any longer. Put a down payment on your dream vacation. An older person's whim costs you money. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20). Private information can help you get the money you need. You're getting stronger, so ask for what you want. If You're Having a Birthday This Week: Love leads to amazing new possibilities. Be willing to try something outrageous. Work hard and you'll make more money. It's worth the effort. 61996, Tribune Medim ServicM Dam offers volunteer program Sept 21,1996 Connie and Michael Thompson, boy. Sept 23,1996 Regina and Matthew Roybal, boy; K'Lynne and David Patterson, boy; Laurel and Mark DuBois, boy; Teresa and Curtis Hagerty, boy; Precilla and Jan Greener, boy. Sept 24,1996 Jermifer and John Klapper, birl; Kyle and Martin Crawford, girl; Jennifer and Michael McCarthy, girl. Sept 25,1996 Evamarie and Michael Woods, boy; Debra and Christopher Culligan, boy; Bridgitte Gardner and Edward Hill, girl; Beverly and Robert Dow, boy; Jacqueline and Anthony Balser, girl. Sept 26,1996 Jennifer and Timothy Jones, boy; Sunshine Charlson, boy; Esther and Fernando Argonza Jr., girl; Dawn and Richard Hoilingsworth, boy; Dana and Michael Shepherd, girl; Kristin and Frank Samprone Jr., girl. ^ Sept 28,1996 Karen and Ron Lutz, girl; Melanie and Thomas Dunn, girl; Cathryn and John Dalrymple.boy; Valerie Worth, girl; Jennifer and Trase Watson, boy; Dorien and Stephen Oliver, girl. Sept 29,1996 Kristi and Todd Byington, girl; Teri Connelly and Jay Hamilton, boy. Sept 30,1996 Victoria and Craig Howell, boy; Jennifer and Michael Maloney, girl; Heather Rankin and Edwin Bell III, boy; Susette and Kirk Vitto, boy; Helen and David (jottlob, boy. • • • '.• • • • / -> Oct 1,1996 Carol and Scott Black, girl. New exhibits and a three-way revolving theater will open at the Hoover Dam Visitor Center on Jan. 1,1997. • ^ For the first time in its history. Hoover Dam is initiating a Visitor Center Volunteer Program. For more information, individuals or groups should call 294-3523, or visitthe Hoover Dam Home Page (www.hoover dam.com). '•. ^' >\^>:i % Save 30 on evety pair of Men's and Ladies Abilene and Sage Boots! 6 FREE DAILY DRAWINGS STARTS: OCT. 3ND OCT. SIST. DKAWIHO TIME liOOPM. in MtHD nms M* DRMU. na BMLT MOisnHieN WITH J. CMO. *)•• I^^Pi'i jursjursimm TIM Wcstcni Emporittffl / Flamingo at Boulder / 454-8017 / Open Dallr Special 30% savings good through October 31. 1996. on AbOene and Sage Boots only. No special orders, layaways or adjustments on prior purchases. ma c^^^ Mtiia •***^ V IGluu PLAY OUR NEW MACHINES NEW KENO PLUS NEW TRIPLE BONUS POKER NEW GAME MAKERS NEW REELS: 5 X PAY NEW WINNERS CHOICE 'WHERE IT PAYS TO EAT & PLAY' >MIN # VALUABLE COUPON RAINBOWj WIN SUcHINltl WATCN POK out OCi: SILK JACKIT OIVIAWAY li^GIVEAWAYllr VALUABLE COUPON PRIME RIB OR NEW YORK STEAK Coupon Worth Up To $4*00 or SI .00 Off Each Dinnor e^iPwionaM A succutonl Blct of Prima Mb of Btl, or a Luscious New York StM*. Ofhrtd wtOi Au Jus, crs sro sd horssradWi saucs and a o rv d wIMt soup or salad and chotca of potato, roM and buttar. Good For Up To 4 Parsons. Cot^wn not waU wMi any otttar ollkr. rWmmM rIvSafll SAW^^^mn fman ^MQSnnQ. 3PM • 11PM. MlMl Ba 21 Or OMar. 122 WATER ST., HENDERSON, NV, (702) 565-9777

PAGE 35

w^mnm^wwwrm^n w^fmr^^^^ mmwm^mmmm I WHAT'S PLAYING -\ Pg 10 Panorama Thursday, October 10,1996 Bluestone, Soule open Chamber Music Southwest series Chamber Music Southwest will open its ninth season at 8 p.m. Get 18, with Robert Bluestone and Rick Soule in concert atUNLVsHamHall. Classical guitarist Bluestone will perform solo works by VillaLobos, Carlevaro, Duarte, Torroba, Albeniz, Gomez-Crespo, Ibert, Giuliani, and Paganini. Soule Itnd Bluestone, performing together for the first time, will play Jacque Ibert's "Ente'acte," Niccollo Paganini's 'Y^antabile for Flute and Guitar" and Mauro Guiliani's "Sonata, opus 85, for Flute and Guitar." Bluestone has been the most requested solo artist on the prestigious Western States Arts performing arts tour roster since 1991. He recently received the Mayor of Santa Fe's Outstanding Achievement in the Arts Award for his leading role in the culture of his home and city. He tours regularly throughout the U.S., Mexico, Canada, and Central America. His critically acclaimed recordings "Recital" and "Alchemy" are available on the Linares label. Soule is the principal flutist of the Nevada Symphony Orchestra, a founding member of the Sierra Winds and a professor of flute at UNLV. As a member of the Sierra Winds, Soule has traveled extensively throughout the U.S. and abroad, has released three CD albums for Cambria Records Vets to hold Oktoberfest AMVETS Post #f of Searchlight will host its annual Oktoberfest Oct. 12, at the Searchlight Community Center, 200 Michael Wendell Way. It will begin at 4 p.m. with a no-host oasis and a bratwurst dinner starting at 5 p.m. Dinner tickets are $4 each. The annual fund-raiser supports the Post's charitable works. AMVETS is a non-profit organization and lionations' may be tax-deductibl^. Through its, fund-raising efforts, the organization has been able to procure, a 15-passenger van, through the Disabled American Vetersbis, to transport veterans of Laughlin, Bullhead City, Cal-Nev-Ari and Searchlight to the V.A. Clinic in Las Vegas. Robert Bluestone and received the i9^3Govemor's Arts Award for Excellence in the Arts from the State of Nevada. In May, Soule and harpsichordist John Metz toured southern France, performing at the national conservatories of Nice and Aix-en-Provence. Richard L Soule Chamber Music Southwest was established in 1987 by the Department of Music at UNLV to bring internationally and nationally acclaimed ensembles and soloists to Las Vegas and to provide a venue for outstanding musicians from Southern Nevada. Musical Arts Society opens seasoi GOTVOc/ Call Home Maid Cleaning X Licensed Bonded References Weekly, Monthly, One-Time Peggy LeRoy 223-1990 Tlie Southern Nevada Musical Arts Society will open its 34th season with a concert, "Songs of Our Politics"by the Musical Arts Singers at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday.Oct 11-12, at the Clark County Library Theatre,1401 E. Flamingo Road. The program will bring to life over 200 years of political campaign music beginning with George Washington to the present day. Campaign songs will include "Welcome Mighty Chief and "Yankee Doodle" (Washington); "Lincoln and Liberty" (Lincoln); "His Grandfather's Hat" (Cleveland); "Happy Days are Here Again" (Roosevelt); "Don't Let Them Take It Away" (Truman); "I yke Ike" (Eisenhower); "High Hopes" (Kennedy); "Click with Dick" (Nixon); "Why Not the Bestr (Carter), and "God Bless the U.S.A" (Reagan). The 24-voice Musical Arts Singers are under the direction of Dr. Douglas R. Peterson, in his 29th year as the Society's music director. They will be accompanied by Nancy Porter and an instrumental ensemble including piccolo, banjo and guitar. John Hanks will provide the historical narrative including 'Jelly Roir musical at Lorenzi Park The Las Vegas Cultural and Community Affairs Division will present the award-winning offBroadway musical "Jelly Roll!" at the Sammy Davis Jr. Festival Pla2a in Lorenzi Park, from 7:30 Mn., Saturday, Oct. 12. Advance tidtets are $10adults; SSfitudaiitf, seniors anddisabled. Tickets at the door are $12 and $10. Gates will open at 6:30 p.m. The show won the 1995 Obie Award, Outer Critics Circle Award and the Lucille Lortel Award for Best Off-Broadway Musical, and has received rave reviews. It is a 90-minute tribute to the now legendary Jelly Rbll'Moftdn (1890-1941), theNew Orleans jazz pianist, composer, arranger and bandleader as well as the selfstyled creator of jazz. Tickets are available at the Charleston Heights Arts Center and Reed Whipple Cultural Center box offices or TicketMaster. BLAST IL% IB first to win in the Barley's "BLACKJACK BLAST 1" We're giving away cash and prizes totaling 33, Drawings to be held October 9th, 16th, 23nl& 30th, 1996, at 6:00pm &8K)(h)m. Miist be present to win. Any Bladdack, with a minimum bet of $5 quBuifies you for the drawing. October 2,1996, at lOm uid jgh OHober 30,1996,6;3qpin. MiMt to 21 yMia of i^ or obr. This promotion an be CMICJIKI at •ngr tmw at maiMfmanf• dkcTBlion. Tap Into The Esatementl 468-BKEW 4500EMt8uiM>tRo^Hm(faron,NV ^ ._ Located in the GianVUlerl>)niCmtw'EMt of Gn>Ul^yIWniv Covered Parking w^ Available eia NV iS interesting anecdotes and hi: torical facts about America' political parties and the cane dates from George Washingt( to Bill Clinton. In keeping with the theme the concert, candidates or thei representatives for the Presi dential race, Nevada's t' Congressional seats, and tl open County Commissioner seat have been invited to set up infor• ttiational displays and meet the audience in the lobby before the concert and during intermission. Admission is $10 adults; $7 seniors and students. Tickets are available at the UNLV Performing Center Box Office, 895-3801, or at the door. The program sponsored in partby agrantfn the Nevada State Council on Arts. I NATION WIDE SAFETY \Jk>^*3iS & I I ALIGNMENT CENTER [ [ IVe do things the old fashion way. j We listen to and satisfy you, THE CUSTOMER. [ I Specializing in: brakes, alignments, struts, shocl<;s, I A/C &. heating, electrical 8v general repair. I We service American, Foreign and light trucks, j 30 Years in business. ] We also specialize in '50 '60 & 70's Come in & meet us. Bring ^this ad for free brake inspectioo, tire rotation & balancing. • Member of the Better Business Burf^u.. I r 540 N. Boulder Hwy., Henderson j I (702) 565-4887 I I 1 DEAR DEBBIE DEBORAH WHITE Dear Debbie: My baby's father and I were togetherforfive years. He gave me everything, and all he wanted was a son. He supported me and my other son, who is now 5. /^ Ju!l^i^:^"^ We were forced to move away from each dtherHbicaiise our apartment got flooded. He started going with my best friend, but we were still seeing each other. £-'" I broke it off because it was hurting me. But every time he comes to my house to get his son and stepson he tries to make moves on me. He says he wants his family back and his girlfriend doesn't satisfy him. How do I get over the hurt and get him to leave me alone? I can't give my new spouse 100% of me until I'm over my baby's father. HURT FROM LOVE Dear Hurt: It sounds like you want this man back. If you're willing to forgive his betrayal and give him another chance, here's thedeal: Youhaveto start fresh. No seeingother people. Take things slowly, see hin;t and build back your trust before you move back in together. j^/"'"' If you really want to get over him, limit your contact with him. Drop off the kids at his mother's house or a neutral place. Don't discuss anything except the kids when he calls and keep your conversations short. Dear Debbie: Tm having a custody problem. My boyfriend and I broke up, and we both want the cat. We adopted it together and we're both very attached to "Smokey." We tried joint custody, but he moved far enough away to make that impractical. I took care of the cat and spent the most time with him. So I think he should be mine. But my ex is just being stubborn and wants him, too. Right now the cat's with me, but my ex keeps calling me about him. What would you do'? SMOKERS MOM Dear Smokey's Mom: Your ex is using the cat to try to control you. Buy him a cute kitten with the same coloring, and present it to him. Don't buy into this game, and cuthim off when he calls. Eventually hell refocus his obsessive behavior. If he doesn't, and steps up his contact or threatens you, file a formal criminal complaint and consider taking out a restraining order. Write to Dear Debbie, P.O. Box 4328, Chicago, 111. 60680. 1996, Tribune Media Services ,A cold really is no big deal • :rrEditor's Note: Because of a production error, paragrapphs in Bishop's column last week were printed out of order. The News today reprints the column in its correct form. Take my word, it was no big deal when a cave man or woman came down with a nasty cold. For one thing, they didn't have to sit around watching some poor wretch with a runny nose pop up on their TV screen every few minutes clutching her head and shouting about her stuffy, sniffling, achy feeling head cold. Since it took several centuries for the evolution of man to reach the peak of ingenuity necessary for the design of those cutesy offkilter arrows on medicine bottle tops, it stands to reason no cave person spent tortuous hours atting .to.open a bottle of ^ng, sniffling, sneezing. ONCE OVER LIGHTLY CAROLYN DRENNAN BISHOP coughing, stuffy-headed, achyfeeling medicine. If you're interested in a little more hi storical background, I can tell you that not long after the off-kilter arrow person mastered his craft, a new species of man arose to torment the cold sufferer. His plan was ingenious. >--t In no time, he perfected the art of sealing cold capsules into plastic, foil wrapped packets wrapped so snugly 1il!ife"llStC' quires the combined efforts of a Houdini and Jj||g strength of an elephant to open them. Also, I'm sure if a cave woman looked like.I do when I have a cold, it didn't bother her a bit. After all, mirrors hadn't been invented yet. There was no way she could know she looked like she'd been flying for days with her head hanging outside an airplane window. Another plus for cave people: There was no irritating doctor sitting around in a plush office saying things like, "There's a lot of that going around. Not much you can do for a virus." I guess you've gathered by now^^ I have a cold. Not only do I look ^Hii. like a wilted turnip, I just spent half the night locked in the bathroom with a set of tools trying to open a packet of the latest sure-cure for the common cold. I was not a pretty sight when my husband stumbled over me this morning. It didn't matter. He strolled by my inert form and remarked casually, "Have a good day." ;,.;^:S^/ Like I said, having a cold is no '^'g deal. Dog show sffli Friday ST. ROSE BIRTHS The Silver Circuit AKC All Breed and Obedience Dog Show will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 11-13, at the Silver Bowl Sports Complex, on Russell Road. Group and Best in Show com petition will begin at 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Obedience will be from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Expected are 1,800 to 2,000dogs. There will be 25 vendors selling miscellaneous dog grrooming and training products, books and collectibles, and food and beverages. Admission and parking is free. Thursday, October 10,1996 Panorama Page 11 HOROSCOPE LINDA BUCK Weekly Tip: The sun goes from Libra into Scorpio this week. It'll be harder to express yourself verbally, but easier to concentrate. Aries (March 21-April 19). You need a good team and a good partner to win the match. The pressure's growing and tees demand your full attention. Youll be energized, so you'll be able to get what you need. Taurus (April 20-May 20). You'll have more time to meet with your friends soon. A deadline looms, so finish old work now. You're strongest on your own turf. Gemini (May 21-June 21). Start all the intellectual endeavors you've been considering—don't wait! You'll get a new assignment that gets in the way of your own pursuits. You'll be practically overwhelmed. Cancer (June 22-July 22). You may find more money, if you do the research. Hold ofFon a decision—it's more likely to go your way later. A short-tempered supervisor could blow up, so watch out. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22). Get help from a technical expert to solve the problem. Study your financial situation and you may find a workable solution. Take out a small loan to get something you need for your personal environment. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Give yourself extra time for a difficult assignment. You may be attracted to a sensitive person. Follow through on that thought—^you may make a friend for life. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). If you're smart, which you are, you'll start your big writing project. Do the research. Accept an opportunity to make more money. Get a friend to help and you'll both prosper. Scorpio (Oct 24-Nov. 21). Stall on everything important. You are magniflcent. Do everything you've ever wanted to do—or at least begin it. Work hard and watch out for sharp instruments. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Offer your skills and push your team to victory. Your friends may try to help, but you'll be stuck with the main responsibility. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Ask your boss for a raise. You can figure out what a flaky person wants, if you concentrate. The odds are good youll meet Mr. or Ms. Right. y Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). Begin your big project; you can't afford to wait any longer. Put a down payment on your dream vacation. An older person's whim costs you money. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20). Private information can help you get the money you need. You're getting stronger, so ask for what you want. If You're Having a Birthday This Week: Love leads to amazing new possibilities. Be willing to try something outrageous. Work hard and you'll make more money. It's worth the effort. 61996, Tribune Medim ServicM Dam offers volunteer program Sept 21,1996 Connie and Michael Thompson, boy. Sept 23,1996 Regina and Matthew Roybal, boy; K'Lynne and David Patterson, boy; Laurel and Mark DuBois, boy; Teresa and Curtis Hagerty, boy; Precilla and Jan Greener, boy. Sept 24,1996 Jermifer and John Klapper, birl; Kyle and Martin Crawford, girl; Jennifer and Michael McCarthy, girl. Sept 25,1996 Evamarie and Michael Woods, boy; Debra and Christopher Culligan, boy; Bridgitte Gardner and Edward Hill, girl; Beverly and Robert Dow, boy; Jacqueline and Anthony Balser, girl. Sept 26,1996 Jennifer and Timothy Jones, boy; Sunshine Charlson, boy; Esther and Fernando Argonza Jr., girl; Dawn and Richard Hoilingsworth, boy; Dana and Michael Shepherd, girl; Kristin and Frank Samprone Jr., girl. ^ Sept 28,1996 Karen and Ron Lutz, girl; Melanie and Thomas Dunn, girl; Cathryn and John Dalrymple.boy; Valerie Worth, girl; Jennifer and Trase Watson, boy; Dorien and Stephen Oliver, girl. Sept 29,1996 Kristi and Todd Byington, girl; Teri Connelly and Jay Hamilton, boy. Sept 30,1996 Victoria and Craig Howell, boy; Jennifer and Michael Maloney, girl; Heather Rankin and Edwin Bell III, boy; Susette and Kirk Vitto, boy; Helen and David (jottlob, boy. • • • '.• • • • / -> Oct 1,1996 Carol and Scott Black, girl. New exhibits and a three-way revolving theater will open at the Hoover Dam Visitor Center on Jan. 1,1997. • ^ For the first time in its history. Hoover Dam is initiating a Visitor Center Volunteer Program. For more information, individuals or groups should call 294-3523, or visitthe Hoover Dam Home Page (www.hoover dam.com). '•. ^' >\^>:i % Save 30 on evety pair of Men's and Ladies Abilene and Sage Boots! 6 FREE DAILY DRAWINGS STARTS: OCT. 3ND OCT. SIST. DKAWIHO TIME liOOPM. in MtHD nms M* DRMU. na BMLT MOisnHieN WITH J. CMO. *)•• I^^Pi'i jursjursimm TIM Wcstcni Emporittffl / Flamingo at Boulder / 454-8017 / Open Dallr Special 30% savings good through October 31. 1996. on AbOene and Sage Boots only. No special orders, layaways or adjustments on prior purchases. ma c^^^ Mtiia •***^ V IGluu PLAY OUR NEW MACHINES NEW KENO PLUS NEW TRIPLE BONUS POKER NEW GAME MAKERS NEW REELS: 5 X PAY NEW WINNERS CHOICE 'WHERE IT PAYS TO EAT & PLAY' >MIN # VALUABLE COUPON RAINBOWj WIN SUcHINltl WATCN POK out OCi: SILK JACKIT OIVIAWAY li^GIVEAWAYllr VALUABLE COUPON PRIME RIB OR NEW YORK STEAK Coupon Worth Up To $4*00 or SI .00 Off Each Dinnor e^iPwionaM A succutonl Blct of Prima Mb of Btl, or a Luscious New York StM*. Ofhrtd wtOi Au Jus, crs sro sd horssradWi saucs and a o rv d wIMt soup or salad and chotca of potato, roM and buttar. Good For Up To 4 Parsons. Cot^wn not waU wMi any otttar ollkr. rWmmM rIvSafll SAW^^^mn fman ^MQSnnQ. 3PM • 11PM. MlMl Ba 21 Or OMar. 122 WATER ST., HENDERSON, NV, (702) 565-9777

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?r i^rTyr. r jJA U i '"y ^ yffy\ ^ .f. ^'^* ^'^yyyyi^wi>pff^ w^m^mm^ wmm^m Pg12 Ptnorama Thursday, October 10,1996 Thursday, October 10, 1996 Panorama Pag* 13 by D.B.Donovan tncnunbit thcM four wordi, one letter to Mch iquart, to fonn four otdtnar; wordi. CROSSWORD Pl^ZLE cr OXEN TS n POYNAC • A U Distrust is a self-fulfilling prophecy; if you look hard enough, eventually you will fitid someone who will betray you. WHW THB CONVICT W!(k5 IN THBMIPPLEOF. Death is the great equalizer. Now arrange the drdcd letter* to rorm the surpriae anwcr, as suggeatad by the above ortDon. Answers: AdONVD NOLXHS 3S0O0 aiVflV ^^^**'^ 33NaLN3SV—p3lPPP3'P"!S8*vi3iAU03 3qiJBqM r SLAPSTIX === The best thing about the future is that it comes one day at a time. 19%. Tribune Mnlii .Services Those who like to find fault are displeased by perfection. • • • Generosity is a good measure of mental health. • • • One person's failure is another person's success. OfFINEWUL MUGICWORD HOW TO PLAY: Read the list of word*. Look at the puzzle. You'll find these word* in all directions—horizontally, vertically, diagonally, backwards. Draw a circle around each letter of a word found in the puzzle, then strike it off the list. Circling it will show a latter has been used but will leave it visible should it also form part of another word. Find the big words fir*t. When letters of all listed words are circled, you'll have the given number of letters left over. They'll spell out your MAGTCWORO. FORREST GUMP (sol.: 8 letters) A-Army; B-Boat, Brave, Bubba, Bus stop; Cv. Care for, Chocolates, College, Couragfi; Curious; D-Dr. Pepper; E-Elvis; F-Family,' Fast, Football, Funny; H-Hero, Honest, Humble; I-Ignorant, Ironic; K-Kenriedy, Kind; L-Lieutenant Dan; J-Jenny; M-Medal, Modest, Mother; N-Naive, Nixon; 0-Offer; P-Ping pong. President, Pure; S-Shrimp, Simple; T-Trust; VVietnam; W-Wealthy This Week's Answer: XNaOONNI O 19M. Tribune Media Service* NYHONESTMANTEIV AHMODESTDN I KRL Y DTABBUBEVI ANUAN TLT I.ROFERACNPDN NANTSELBMUHNOEE A E AY FL LABTOOFMJ NWRLMNBI CACXUOR ERG I PAURUOO I NFE TENMLRSORBLNNFH UPGAEMSN I RALYET EPIFTYTIOATHERO lEGARUOCUVECNGM LPFASTPESESIVLE P RE S I DENT PMI RHS YDENNEKGNOPGN IP fvftysopy Sits OUT TO po soMiTiK&. m SOMITIN&. BUT WAT m SITS OUT TO VO. 1 2 3 4 1 5 6 7 8 9 1 10 11 12 r-ia 14 IS 16 17 18 19 20 21 mr 23 |HHHI|24 ^ • 25 • P P 26 27 28 • 3U 31 33 • 34 • 3!> 36 wP r 39 • 40 M" 42 43 • HBi 45 • '' I • 1 47 48 mr 51 v/ u 54 1 55 56 i 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 SOLUTION: 3 X y oHs X/ X 1 a oH3 s V 1 1 oHu y u y 3 Mulo 0 K 3 HMK 0 y -1 3 U vlu 3 A 0 1 0 HIB S 1 M • sfxii nay OEiniD Booa X 3 3 b Xlspi 3 3 N 1 SMM U n 0 illN 3 ~ D y upn 1 11 3 S djy T 1 0 • • • -1 0 0 xj A S M 0 u aJT HUB dip y n n N nHv a 1 i y o|n y B 3 1 dl3|3 X S 1 N V • U 1 d 1 sllx y 3 N n dHs N 1 A 3 SIIA N y X 0 a IT s 0 HMIII 3 1 S 1 d S 3 a A |B3 X N y H 1 l|'< 1 0 0 1 u oil M 3 y ACROSS 38 Playing card 2 Solid figure 1 Yearn 39 G.P.s 3 Successes 5 Best part 40 More 4 Massive 10 Restaurant rational animal 14 Wind 41 Subsequently 5 Elegant 15 Ronsfadt of 42 Features of 6 Bolt for an 1T] song churches • -v r beam 16 E pluribus — 44 Road 7 Oklahoma 17 Poker stake 45 Tells city 18 Of birds untruths 8 Nabokov title 19 Salon ^='^ "46 "^Old pronoun 9 Stringed treatment. 47 Grown ones instrument for short 50 Shoes 10 Dome 20 Scorned 54 Like a sage 11 Freshly 22 Not wide55 Tooth 12 Ermine and awake 57 — podrida other 24 l^ultitude 58 In excess 13Enter1ainment 25 Cat's paw 59 Came to be award 26 A science 60 Newspaper 21 Charged 29 Cave in item particles 33 Smooths 61 Lord's wife 23 Croissant 34 Learner 62 Efts 25 Drunkard 35 Cloth for 63 Sticky fruit 26 Makes dipting crooked 36 Shipshape DOWN • • • 27 Manifest 37 Femme 1 School: 28 Tantalize fatale abbr. 29 Makes healthy again ^ 30 Lying flat 31 Worcestershire for one 32 Heron 34 Longs 37 Stpre worker 38 Certain fuel 40 Rod for roasting 41 Printing term 43 —Queen 44 Coasts 46 Browned • bread 47 Missing soldier 48 Prima donna 49 Secondhand 50 Current 51 Isle of exile 52 Dismounted 53 Appraise 56 Mineral ~ earth -. Garfield by Jim Davis PEANUTS byCharfes'^. Schuiz MR. ARBiJCKL£,THIS 15 THE •HAPPV PAV'-PATIWCr SERVICE TME 0ASE0AU. SEASON ISOVER.ANPYOULOST E\/ERV6AME..WHAT ARE V0U6OIN6T0DON0U;? IM60IN6T0UE MEREINTMI5BEANBA6 UNTIL NEKT 5PRIN6.. THEN I'LL BURST FORTH LIKE A BIRD FROM AN 666, ANP FACE THE NEUIUIORLP! AFTER THEV COME TO TAKE YOU AU/AV, I'M 60IN6T0M0VEMS'THIN65 INTO YOUR ROOM.. ROBV.THe PATING SERVICE 5AIP WE 6H0ULP GET TO KNOW EACH OTHER /saeXACTLV WHV WEREVOO ^ IN PRI60N? IHIPE THE POTATO PEELER) L^ f \ Cotycnl ^^ L j^yL^i nli^^ E^ sJSe OK, RUBV, I'LL MEET SOO ATJ ^ SEVEN ^ \ ^a s I BUT HOW WILL I KNOW VOU? I SEE, THE TATTOO ON ^ObR FOREHEAP REAPS •vaufl OR\" y MEY.MARCIE..I PIP fWOSE SIX PROBLEMS ON PA6e SEVEN.. YOU OJERE SUPPOSED To DO THE SEVEN PROBLEMS ON PA6E SIX HOW ABOUT YE5TERRAY?! PIP ALL FOUR PROBLEMS ON PA6E FIVE.. YESTERWkV U/E PIP ALL FIVE PROBLEMS ON PA6E FOUR.. I HAVET0HAN6, UPNOU),MARCIEj'M 60IN6 OUTSIDE, ANP STAND IN THE RAIN.. LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.8. N0.Q235748 Unit CodeQ Loan No.3070932/ HOWERTON AP# 178-19-110-047 T.D. SERVICE COMPANY as duly appointed Trustee under the following desalbed Deed of Trust WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (In the forms wfiicli are lawful tender in the United States) and/or tlie cashier's, certified or other checks spedtied in the Civil Code (payable in full at the time of sale to T.D. Servk^ Company) all right, title and interest conveyea to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust In the property hereinafter desalbed: TRUSTOR: URRY WADE HOWERTON ANNA M. HOWERTON BENEFICIARY: COMUNITY LENDING, INC. RecordedFebruary 28, 1995 as Instr, No. 02241 In Boole 950228 page of Official Records In the office of the Recorder of Clarl(County: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 2/28/95.UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLO AT A PUBLIC SALE.IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. 17 RUE DE PARC, HENDERSON, NV89014 (If a Street address or common designation of property is shown above, no warrant is given as to its completeness or correctness). The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust, by reason of a breach or default In the obligations secured thereby, heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and written notice of default and of election to cause the undersigned to sell said property to satisfy said obligations, and thereafter the undersigned caused said notice of default and of election to be RecordedJune 10, 1996 as Instr. No 00454ln Book 960610 Page of Ofllciai Records In the office of the recorder of ClarkCounly; Said Sale of property will be made in as is condition without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the notefs) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest as in said note provided, advances, if any, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of TrustAs of the date hereof the following amount' is REASONABLY ESTIMATED to be the amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation together with Interest, costs of foreclosure, and advances:$135.769.40.THIS AMOUNT IS ONLY AN ESTIMATE AND NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY IS MADE. EXPRESS OR IMPLIED. AS TO THE ACCURACY THEREOF. Said sale will be held on: Oclober17.1996. at 10:30 a.m.at the front enhance of the County Courthouse. 200 South Third ,8t.. Las Vegas, Nevada It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. Date:9/17/96 T.D. SERVICE COMPANY as said Trustee, Debra Brundage, Assistant Secretary 737 Arnold Drive, Sle C. Martinez. CA 94553-6526 (510) 2299015 We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. IF AVAILABLE. THE EXPECTED OPENING BID MAY BE OBTAINED BY CALLING THE FOLLOWING TELEPHONE NUMBER ON THE DAY BEFORE THE SALE: (510) 313-9581 TAG: 433208M H—Sfpt M, Oct 3,10,1996. LEGAL NOTICE Effective July 16,1996, Nov. 14, 1996 All Silver Dollar cliipt MMI tokcni will be redeemed at the Silver .Saddle Saloon, 2501 E. Charieston, formerly Silver Dollar Saloon. H—July 16, 18, 23, 25, 30, Auj. 1,6,8,13,15,20,22,27, 29, Sept 3,5,10,12,17,19, 24,26, Oct 1,3,8,10,15,17, 22,24,29,31, Nov. 5,7,12,14, 1996. LEGAL ADVERllSEKfENT NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN TO THE LAST REGISTERED AND LEGAL OWNER OFi 73 LIN VIN 3482A859108 STEVEN J. SULLIVAN, LAS VEGAS, NV. 81 OLD VIN 1G3AR47AXBM484920, NANCY DREW, COOS BAY, OR. 84 PLY VIN H7EZ500523 RETHEMA M. MARTINEZ, BULLHEAD CITY, AZ. 73 IHC VIN 3H1C0CHB89335 JOSE VARGAS, LAS VEGAS, NV. THE VEHICLES DESCRIBED ABOVE WILL BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER It) SATISFY THE LIEN INCURRED BY BIG JOHNS TOWING THE SALE WILL BE HELD AT 9t00 AM OCTOBER 22ND 1996 AT 1573 FOOTHILL DRIVE BOULDER CITY, NEVADA 89005. BC—Sept. 26, Oct 3, 10, 1996. PUBUC NOTICE Public notice b hereby given that a copy oT B4Nilder City' • Integrated Rcaourcc Plan i now on flic for pablic in• pection in the Ofllce of the City CIcrlt. 401 California Avenue, Bouldrf City, Nevada. The Integrated Reiource Plan will be fcheduled for adoption at a regular city council meeting to be held at 7:00 p.m. on October 22, 1996. Any written abjecti4ii to adoption of the (propmied) Integrated Reiource Plan muit be nied in the Otllcc of the City Clerk on or before October 21, 1996. The City Council win provide opportunity for the public to comment on the (proposed) Integrated ReiourccPlanprior to taking action at iti October 22,1996, regular city council meeting. BC—Oct 10,1996. LEGAL NOTICE THE FOLLOWING VEHICLES ARE UP FOR PUBUC AUCTION. AUCTION WILL BE HELD TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 19IMLT9i00AMATAUTO SPECIAUSTS, INC, 1S69 FOOTHILL DRIVE. BOULDER CITY. NV. 8900S. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO Vm ANIMOR SET MINIMUM BIDS. VEHICLES WILL BE SOLD ASIStNOWARRAKTYOR GUARANTEE OF ANY KIND IS GIVEN OR IMPLIED. VEHICLES ARE AVAILABLE FOR VIEWING THE DAY BEFORE THE AUCTION. YEARi 1983. MAKEi LINCOLN. VINJ f 1MRBP98F0DY641721R/0 A L/O: SOTO, LAZARO P., LAS VEGAS, NVS910L YEAR: 1988. MAKEi MERCURY. VINi 3MABM1254JR614899. R/ O: MOTEN, JANICE KATE, N. LAS VEGAS. NV 89030. L/O: NEVADA HRST BANK, LAS VEGAS, NV 89116. YEAR: 1979. MAKE: BUICK. VIN f 4P37X9X111859. R/O ft 1/ Oi BRISEBOIS, MARSHA, PAGE, AZ 86040. LEGAL NOTICE S.N.A.P.TOW.INC 1239 N. Boulder Highway Suite 900 Hendenon, Nevada 89015 (702)564-1180 The vehicles listed herein will be sold at Dealrr/Wrrckrr Auction on OCTFOBER 18,1996 at 8:00 a.m., at 1239 N. Boulder H wy., Hrndrnnn, Nrvada. Vrhicirs arc sold as is, mi warranty or guarantee of any kind is given or implied. Snap Tow rrsrrvcs the right to si-t minimum bids and also bid on the following vehicles. Vehidea are available for viewing the day before (he auction. VIN JN1HZ06SOBX188744 1P3BP36C6FC219060 0K91B1S29 your iww comptrtarT W on halpl Wa coma to you. TroufetaahooOng. ModHlcAkint addbig dtlvai, •yatam boarda, ate Vaqr cas Carolyn at 558-4335 COVER RITE CARPORT ALL STEEL 107[21'X8' ^ 293-2179 BOULDER CITY CARPET CARE Carpet Cleaning specialists, upholstery, auto, boat, R V interiors, 24 hr. service, Carpet & fabric protection. Soft water for cleaner, softer carpets. 293-4148 19422 MikFlKit HANDYMAN Call Roy COMPLETE HOME MAINTENANCE, REPAIRS A IMPROVEMENTS 294-6214 Discounts ID Seniors COATES Dave Coatee PAINTING Owner COMPANY Since NV LICENSE MOOSe 1977 COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL nNISHING/RERNISHING Free Ettimatee Senior Discounts 293-5525 264-4018 Pager J&M Janitorial Commercial cleaning Licensed, Bonded, Insured Free Estimates 293-4716 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES We move.res. & comm. Free estimates, we load/ unload rental trucks anywhere in town. 565-9675 or Beep 599-0652. PSI95575 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Small businesses? Need help with your books? I can help you. Do bookkeeping, P/R, A/R, A/P, sales, bank rec, financial statements. Call Sandi 565-4640. PSI 8966 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES PROFESSiONAL SERVICES YOUR GREEN VALLEY ROOFING & PATIO CO. B.C. BUILDING & ROOFING LIC.# 27043 2g3-7373 \trtxi Electrical work done by SOUTH VALLEY ELECTRIC LIconsad Bondad Wt do tan llghli, 220 tiookups, spa hookups NO JOB TOO SMALL FFM Esllmstat wittiln HIVQV area — 692-6033 BOULDER CONCRETE WANTS TO MEET YOUR CONCRETE NEEDS FOR FREE ESTIMATES AND QUALITY WORKMANSHIP CALL MiCK CASEY Boulder City 293-1571 Lie oi689e 19664 //y//y//^////yYfx/^?^//??//////////?/ Harry's Quality Painting 15 Years in Boulder City Interior/Exterior Residential/Commcrciai Acoustical Ceiling Repair Text Orywall Taping Texturing Wallpapering 293-1523 FrB9 Estimats Senior Discounts Uc Bonded' Insured mmm^wmm^^^miii^ Stl: YARDVARK'S LAWN AND MAINTENANCE Professional Tree Trimming Serving BC, Green Valley S Henderson 294-1114 Pager 222-69261942(1 19421 I BLACK MOUr every day Low nkes Priattag fteeds Letteitieed • Business Cards • Envelopes • note PMs • I • Ad Design Sr Layout • nCR rorms • CouF>ons and Morel See next page for.more professional services...

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?r i^rTyr. r jJA U i '"y ^ yffy\ ^ .f. ^'^* ^'^yyyyi^wi>pff^ w^m^mm^ wmm^m Pg12 Ptnorama Thursday, October 10,1996 Thursday, October 10, 1996 Panorama Pag* 13 by D.B.Donovan tncnunbit thcM four wordi, one letter to Mch iquart, to fonn four otdtnar; wordi. CROSSWORD Pl^ZLE cr OXEN TS n POYNAC • A U Distrust is a self-fulfilling prophecy; if you look hard enough, eventually you will fitid someone who will betray you. WHW THB CONVICT W!(k5 IN THBMIPPLEOF. Death is the great equalizer. Now arrange the drdcd letter* to rorm the surpriae anwcr, as suggeatad by the above ortDon. Answers: AdONVD NOLXHS 3S0O0 aiVflV ^^^**'^ 33NaLN3SV—p3lPPP3'P"!S8*vi3iAU03 3qiJBqM r SLAPSTIX === The best thing about the future is that it comes one day at a time. 19%. Tribune Mnlii .Services Those who like to find fault are displeased by perfection. • • • Generosity is a good measure of mental health. • • • One person's failure is another person's success. OfFINEWUL MUGICWORD HOW TO PLAY: Read the list of word*. Look at the puzzle. You'll find these word* in all directions—horizontally, vertically, diagonally, backwards. Draw a circle around each letter of a word found in the puzzle, then strike it off the list. Circling it will show a latter has been used but will leave it visible should it also form part of another word. Find the big words fir*t. When letters of all listed words are circled, you'll have the given number of letters left over. They'll spell out your MAGTCWORO. FORREST GUMP (sol.: 8 letters) A-Army; B-Boat, Brave, Bubba, Bus stop; Cv. Care for, Chocolates, College, Couragfi; Curious; D-Dr. Pepper; E-Elvis; F-Family,' Fast, Football, Funny; H-Hero, Honest, Humble; I-Ignorant, Ironic; K-Kenriedy, Kind; L-Lieutenant Dan; J-Jenny; M-Medal, Modest, Mother; N-Naive, Nixon; 0-Offer; P-Ping pong. President, Pure; S-Shrimp, Simple; T-Trust; VVietnam; W-Wealthy This Week's Answer: XNaOONNI O 19M. Tribune Media Service* NYHONESTMANTEIV AHMODESTDN I KRL Y DTABBUBEVI ANUAN TLT I.ROFERACNPDN NANTSELBMUHNOEE A E AY FL LABTOOFMJ NWRLMNBI CACXUOR ERG I PAURUOO I NFE TENMLRSORBLNNFH UPGAEMSN I RALYET EPIFTYTIOATHERO lEGARUOCUVECNGM LPFASTPESESIVLE P RE S I DENT PMI RHS YDENNEKGNOPGN IP fvftysopy Sits OUT TO po soMiTiK&. m SOMITIN&. 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Garfield by Jim Davis PEANUTS byCharfes'^. Schuiz MR. ARBiJCKL£,THIS 15 THE •HAPPV PAV'-PATIWCr SERVICE TME 0ASE0AU. SEASON ISOVER.ANPYOULOST E\/ERV6AME..WHAT ARE V0U6OIN6T0DON0U;? IM60IN6T0UE MEREINTMI5BEANBA6 UNTIL NEKT 5PRIN6.. THEN I'LL BURST FORTH LIKE A BIRD FROM AN 666, ANP FACE THE NEUIUIORLP! AFTER THEV COME TO TAKE YOU AU/AV, I'M 60IN6T0M0VEMS'THIN65 INTO YOUR ROOM.. ROBV.THe PATING SERVICE 5AIP WE 6H0ULP GET TO KNOW EACH OTHER /saeXACTLV WHV WEREVOO ^ IN PRI60N? IHIPE THE POTATO PEELER) L^ f \ Cotycnl ^^ L j^yL^i nli^^ E^ sJSe OK, RUBV, I'LL MEET SOO ATJ ^ SEVEN ^ \ ^a s I BUT HOW WILL I KNOW VOU? I SEE, THE TATTOO ON ^ObR FOREHEAP REAPS •vaufl OR\" y MEY.MARCIE..I PIP fWOSE SIX PROBLEMS ON PA6e SEVEN.. YOU OJERE SUPPOSED To DO THE SEVEN PROBLEMS ON PA6E SIX HOW ABOUT YE5TERRAY?! PIP ALL FOUR PROBLEMS ON PA6E FIVE.. YESTERWkV U/E PIP ALL FIVE PROBLEMS ON PA6E FOUR.. I HAVET0HAN6, UPNOU),MARCIEj'M 60IN6 OUTSIDE, ANP STAND IN THE RAIN.. LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.8. N0.Q235748 Unit CodeQ Loan No.3070932/ HOWERTON AP# 178-19-110-047 T.D. SERVICE COMPANY as duly appointed Trustee under the following desalbed Deed of Trust WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (In the forms wfiicli are lawful tender in the United States) and/or tlie cashier's, certified or other checks spedtied in the Civil Code (payable in full at the time of sale to T.D. Servk^ Company) all right, title and interest conveyea to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust In the property hereinafter desalbed: TRUSTOR: URRY WADE HOWERTON ANNA M. HOWERTON BENEFICIARY: COMUNITY LENDING, INC. RecordedFebruary 28, 1995 as Instr, No. 02241 In Boole 950228 page of Official Records In the office of the Recorder of Clarl(County: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 2/28/95.UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLO AT A PUBLIC SALE.IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. 17 RUE DE PARC, HENDERSON, NV89014 (If a Street address or common designation of property is shown above, no warrant is given as to its completeness or correctness). The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust, by reason of a breach or default In the obligations secured thereby, heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and written notice of default and of election to cause the undersigned to sell said property to satisfy said obligations, and thereafter the undersigned caused said notice of default and of election to be RecordedJune 10, 1996 as Instr. No 00454ln Book 960610 Page of Ofllciai Records In the office of the recorder of ClarkCounly; Said Sale of property will be made in as is condition without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the notefs) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest as in said note provided, advances, if any, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of TrustAs of the date hereof the following amount' is REASONABLY ESTIMATED to be the amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation together with Interest, costs of foreclosure, and advances:$135.769.40.THIS AMOUNT IS ONLY AN ESTIMATE AND NO REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY IS MADE. EXPRESS OR IMPLIED. AS TO THE ACCURACY THEREOF. Said sale will be held on: Oclober17.1996. at 10:30 a.m.at the front enhance of the County Courthouse. 200 South Third ,8t.. Las Vegas, Nevada It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. Date:9/17/96 T.D. SERVICE COMPANY as said Trustee, Debra Brundage, Assistant Secretary 737 Arnold Drive, Sle C. Martinez. CA 94553-6526 (510) 2299015 We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. IF AVAILABLE. THE EXPECTED OPENING BID MAY BE OBTAINED BY CALLING THE FOLLOWING TELEPHONE NUMBER ON THE DAY BEFORE THE SALE: (510) 313-9581 TAG: 433208M H—Sfpt M, Oct 3,10,1996. LEGAL NOTICE Effective July 16,1996, Nov. 14, 1996 All Silver Dollar cliipt MMI tokcni will be redeemed at the Silver .Saddle Saloon, 2501 E. Charieston, formerly Silver Dollar Saloon. H—July 16, 18, 23, 25, 30, Auj. 1,6,8,13,15,20,22,27, 29, Sept 3,5,10,12,17,19, 24,26, Oct 1,3,8,10,15,17, 22,24,29,31, Nov. 5,7,12,14, 1996. LEGAL ADVERllSEKfENT NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN TO THE LAST REGISTERED AND LEGAL OWNER OFi 73 LIN VIN 3482A859108 STEVEN J. SULLIVAN, LAS VEGAS, NV. 81 OLD VIN 1G3AR47AXBM484920, NANCY DREW, COOS BAY, OR. 84 PLY VIN H7EZ500523 RETHEMA M. MARTINEZ, BULLHEAD CITY, AZ. 73 IHC VIN 3H1C0CHB89335 JOSE VARGAS, LAS VEGAS, NV. THE VEHICLES DESCRIBED ABOVE WILL BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER It) SATISFY THE LIEN INCURRED BY BIG JOHNS TOWING THE SALE WILL BE HELD AT 9t00 AM OCTOBER 22ND 1996 AT 1573 FOOTHILL DRIVE BOULDER CITY, NEVADA 89005. BC—Sept. 26, Oct 3, 10, 1996. PUBUC NOTICE Public notice b hereby given that a copy oT B4Nilder City' • Integrated Rcaourcc Plan i now on flic for pablic in• pection in the Ofllce of the City CIcrlt. 401 California Avenue, Bouldrf City, Nevada. The Integrated Reiource Plan will be fcheduled for adoption at a regular city council meeting to be held at 7:00 p.m. on October 22, 1996. Any written abjecti4ii to adoption of the (propmied) Integrated Reiource Plan muit be nied in the Otllcc of the City Clerk on or before October 21, 1996. The City Council win provide opportunity for the public to comment on the (proposed) Integrated ReiourccPlanprior to taking action at iti October 22,1996, regular city council meeting. BC—Oct 10,1996. LEGAL NOTICE THE FOLLOWING VEHICLES ARE UP FOR PUBUC AUCTION. AUCTION WILL BE HELD TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 19IMLT9i00AMATAUTO SPECIAUSTS, INC, 1S69 FOOTHILL DRIVE. BOULDER CITY. NV. 8900S. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO Vm ANIMOR SET MINIMUM BIDS. VEHICLES WILL BE SOLD ASIStNOWARRAKTYOR GUARANTEE OF ANY KIND IS GIVEN OR IMPLIED. VEHICLES ARE AVAILABLE FOR VIEWING THE DAY BEFORE THE AUCTION. YEARi 1983. MAKEi LINCOLN. VINJ f 1MRBP98F0DY641721R/0 A L/O: SOTO, LAZARO P., LAS VEGAS, NVS910L YEAR: 1988. MAKEi MERCURY. VINi 3MABM1254JR614899. R/ O: MOTEN, JANICE KATE, N. LAS VEGAS. NV 89030. L/O: NEVADA HRST BANK, LAS VEGAS, NV 89116. YEAR: 1979. MAKE: BUICK. VIN f 4P37X9X111859. R/O ft 1/ Oi BRISEBOIS, MARSHA, PAGE, AZ 86040. LEGAL NOTICE S.N.A.P.TOW.INC 1239 N. Boulder Highway Suite 900 Hendenon, Nevada 89015 (702)564-1180 The vehicles listed herein will be sold at Dealrr/Wrrckrr Auction on OCTFOBER 18,1996 at 8:00 a.m., at 1239 N. Boulder H wy., Hrndrnnn, Nrvada. Vrhicirs arc sold as is, mi warranty or guarantee of any kind is given or implied. Snap Tow rrsrrvcs the right to si-t minimum bids and also bid on the following vehicles. Vehidea are available for viewing the day before (he auction. VIN JN1HZ06SOBX188744 1P3BP36C6FC219060 0K91B1S29 your iww comptrtarT W on halpl Wa coma to you. TroufetaahooOng. ModHlcAkint addbig dtlvai, •yatam boarda, ate Vaqr cas Carolyn at 558-4335 COVER RITE CARPORT ALL STEEL 107[21'X8' ^ 293-2179 BOULDER CITY CARPET CARE Carpet Cleaning specialists, upholstery, auto, boat, R V interiors, 24 hr. service, Carpet & fabric protection. Soft water for cleaner, softer carpets. 293-4148 19422 MikFlKit HANDYMAN Call Roy COMPLETE HOME MAINTENANCE, REPAIRS A IMPROVEMENTS 294-6214 Discounts ID Seniors COATES Dave Coatee PAINTING Owner COMPANY Since NV LICENSE MOOSe 1977 COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL nNISHING/RERNISHING Free Ettimatee Senior Discounts 293-5525 264-4018 Pager J&M Janitorial Commercial cleaning Licensed, Bonded, Insured Free Estimates 293-4716 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES We move.res. & comm. Free estimates, we load/ unload rental trucks anywhere in town. 565-9675 or Beep 599-0652. PSI95575 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Small businesses? Need help with your books? I can help you. Do bookkeeping, P/R, A/R, A/P, sales, bank rec, financial statements. Call Sandi 565-4640. PSI 8966 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES PROFESSiONAL SERVICES YOUR GREEN VALLEY ROOFING & PATIO CO. B.C. BUILDING & ROOFING LIC.# 27043 2g3-7373 \trtxi Electrical work done by SOUTH VALLEY ELECTRIC LIconsad Bondad Wt do tan llghli, 220 tiookups, spa hookups NO JOB TOO SMALL FFM Esllmstat wittiln HIVQV area — 692-6033 BOULDER CONCRETE WANTS TO MEET YOUR CONCRETE NEEDS FOR FREE ESTIMATES AND QUALITY WORKMANSHIP CALL MiCK CASEY Boulder City 293-1571 Lie oi689e 19664 //y//y//^////yYfx/^?^//??//////////?/ Harry's Quality Painting 15 Years in Boulder City Interior/Exterior Residential/Commcrciai Acoustical Ceiling Repair Text Orywall Taping Texturing Wallpapering 293-1523 FrB9 Estimats Senior Discounts Uc Bonded' Insured mmm^wmm^^^miii^ Stl: YARDVARK'S LAWN AND MAINTENANCE Professional Tree Trimming Serving BC, Green Valley S Henderson 294-1114 Pager 222-69261942(1 19421 I BLACK MOUr every day Low nkes Priattag fteeds Letteitieed • Business Cards • Envelopes • note PMs • I • Ad Design Sr Layout • nCR rorms • CouF>ons and Morel See next page for.more professional services...

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• • • • • —^i^^w^nWiP—pipi^^ p j t ^fnww w ffj m* v J iiiW^iPfi^PW^P^^ m^rmr Pag* 14 Panorama Thursday, October 10,1996 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Home repair & landscaping caU Shan* Phillips p.9 584-2177 Action Ac* CTh* AppUanc* place) Sal**, parts A aervica at raasonabi* rates. Opan M-Sat. 9-S, Sun. 1-5 43S-9038 BATH TUB REPAIR Tubs and Sinks regiazed, chips rapairad. Fiberglass and more 564-2276 VALLEY VIEW LANDSCAPING Complete lawn maintenance Ucans* No. 41763 566-0680 AM Your Lawn Care Needs! Ind. new lawns, sprinklers, rwwvillon, cleanup and pnjrWng. MICHAEL'S LAWN CARE 453-8252 Rivera Cabinets 35th Anniversary Grand Opening LV Showroom 4S35 W. Russell Rd., 5 248-4015 or 281-2073 Thomas L. Baker, Inc. General Contractor remodeling, room addHions, commercial, residential custom homes ft patio covers. No job too small License No. 0036671 263-7561 CARPET REPAIR & RESTRETCH 293-2122 Bill YOU NAME IT WE DO IT "4 'Residential 'Commercial 'Remodel Ca 294-1039 or Ce//496-1990 CntKMii Lk. Na nlun COUNTRY TIME HOME SHOWS (The Country Store that come* to your home) Call Zee today to ichedule a party In your home. 896-1872 HOME REPAIRS bv CC. Mio Iirtwlor/Eiltrtar painting 23 yrs. Experience Call 564-4292 For Free Estimate Prompt, Dependable Service ,,557^ Home & oflice cleaning, help avail., exper., good refs., reasonable, 5669116. PS19591 MISCELLANEOUS WASHER / Dryers $125.00 Each. 2936101. BC Mil 9569 GV GLASS & MIRROR CO. Surplus shower doors, mirrors, glass, mirror doors. 368-4628. Call anytime. MM 6718 BAHAMA CRUISE! 5 days/4 nights. Underboolced! MTJST SELL! $299ycouple. Limited ticltets. 1-800414-4151 Ext. 5149 Mon.-Sat., 9AM-10PM. Complete set Tinie Life libraiy of Photography, $45; Volvo H.D. trailer hitch. $100; 293-3992. Full mattress set $75, childs desk $15, 2childrens bllces $15 ea., exercise bilte $50, 5669705. Mil 9675 Hideaway couch std. size brown w/white colors like new $200 294-2402. RUGER M77 rifle w/ scope .300 Winchester mag $550 also MOSSBERG 500A 12g pump $175 both ex. cond. Call Paul at 2930621. Ml 19710 Ovareaters Anonymous meets at St. Christopher's Chui:ch, 812 Arizona St., 7 PM Thurs. 593-2945. Nice almond 22 cu. ft. Magic Chef S/S door water/ice $625 or trade, wicker, gun, big screen! 294-1445. Mil9758 4 Mercedes 14' wheels mint condition. 293-4860. HUGE 22 CU. FT. upright freezer in excel, cond. $200; Rhino Guard. Bug Guard and Running BodsforF-150:8r-86^ al for $100; Older style exercis* bike $15; call 294-1236 days or eves. til 0 PM. Mill MISCELLANEOUS One year old spa, $2200. Four Station Weight Set, $800, 293-0828, Mn9252 For Sale, 2 lots, BC cemetery, if interested call 909-679-7397. Ml 19279 EGYPTIAN TREASURES, Quality JewelrySilver, Gold, CostumePyramids, Statues, Plates, Papyrus, etc. All made in Egypt for full mystic and psychic powers. Free catalog 1-800747-4317. Mil9622 Dryer gas runs gr. $125. 293-6101. Mil9769 Whirlpool 20cu. ft. refrig./ freezer, almond, good cond., $250; 50 gal. gas hot water heater, new, still in box, $150; 2947710. Mil9761 Pecan wardrobe by Drexel brass wire & shear curtains indoor, can be siielved for pantry or display, 6'6" by 42" by 24 $125; wet bar matches wardrobe w/frig. glass shelves mirror back 4 drawers $175; matciiing lighted mirror w/shelves 48''x 24" $40; 48" marble top vanities, solid brass, fixture antique styled gold leaf base $40; ping pong tbi. & accessories $20; will consider trades on any 294-7776. Ml 19773 2 door refrigerator $225; Hide a bed couch $50; View at 616 Ave. F. COMPUTER SOFTVy^ME Over 25 CDRoms, including games, children's and educational disks. No shareware or demos. Most $3 to $5. Please call 434-6149 for list. For Sale: Dinette set w/ credenza $175; microwave $60; Singer sewing machine $100; 2 end tables $10ea,& 2 lamps $10ea.,call 565-3569 Iv. msg. MM8668 WOLFFTANNINGBEDS. TAN AT HOME. Buy DIRECT and SAVE! Commercial/Home units fronh $199. Low Monthly Payments. FREE Color Catalog. Call TODAY, 1-800-842-1305. MI19609 ARTHRITIS Suffers, live pain free. Had if for 20 years now I am pain free. Cost is as low as $15 per mo., not medicine, natural food & energy supplements. Guaranteed. 564-1648. MI254 CD-ROIVI'sforsaleOver 20 titles, including games, children's and educational disks. NONE OVER $10. Please call 434-6149 for list. Ml 17569 2 brown rodker recliners $50 ea.; pine roll top desk $150; old chest of drawers $25; octagon end table $20; lamp $15; new Chrysler mini-van bench seat, make offer. Call 565-9311 evenings. MI18017 Fifth wheel for 3/4 ton P/U $200. Tool box for 3/4tonP/U. Canbeseen atA-1 Truck School, 2931681 or 293-7335. Ml 19656 WOMEN'S HANDGUN SAFETY & INSTRUCTION CLASS. 10/26 Classroom 8 AM-4 PM DO NOT BRING FIREARMS 10/27 Range 8 AM-NOON Location: Garrett High, 1200 Ave. B,BC,NV.Cost$35,Preregister by mail w/Boulder Rifle & Pistol Club, P.O. Box 60534 BC, NV 89006. 293-1885. Ml 19153 • • For sale crib w/bedding, 4 drawer chest w/ changing table, honey oak, like new. White X-lg. wood cradle w/nite light & bedding, like new + misc. baby items. 2934335, MM 9696 Glider rocker green like new$150,connputerH.P. Pavillion desk model 5010,100 MHZ 486 DX4 PC 635 MG hard dr. 13" Packard Bell monitor $800. 293-3395, MM 9707 •Private Art ClassesFor beginning/intermediate and advanced levels in watercolor acrylic charcoal or pastels. Ail ages • 294-1284. Ml 19742 Welding equipment, acetylene & oxygen tanks, call 294-1790. MM 9757 Din. Rm. Table, 6 chairs, hutch $695; pair gold rockers $70; Sears refrig. $125; Fr. Prov. chest of drawers $30; gun cab. $35; 293-5087 or 2936500. Mil9741 PMISI'MY PIOTEaTOUlSELF •Ac*!"** I(*kbra, MtiCra Ms4 lUyla** 5Q.9S EiwmdJ. Rich 5261 Jaitfred CL i33 Lot Vtgat, NV99103 GARAGE SALES ANTIQUE AND COLLECTIBLES FAIR 100 Dealers Extravaganza, Sat., Oct. 19, 9 am to 5 pm, Sunday, Oct. 20th 10 am to 4:30 pm, Cashman Field, Las Vegas. Admission $3.00 with ad. Pccadilly, 6557469. QS-\f?2S Yard Sale-microwave, pool, baby items, coffee table & lots more. 76 Mallory, Henderson, 2 blocks behind hospital. Sat. & Sun. 8 AM-5 PM. Sat.-Sun.-9-3-multi-famiiy, computer microwave, sports designer clothes, ceramic mold, household, etc. Calico Cove E. Lake Mead Dr. E of Calico Ridge Dr. to 1031 Golda Way. GS19740 4 Family Yard Sale Oct. 12. 7 AM til ?, 613 Avenue K, BC. Baby clothes & bedding, adult clothes & shoes, furn. & houseware, toys & misc. GS19744 MOTHERS OF TWINS Yard Sale, baby items, toys, furn., clothing & LOTS of non-baby related items. Sat., Oct. 12, 8AM-2PM, 3141 Regal OakPr., HD. GS19713 Yard Sale, 112 Linden St. HD, Fri. & Sat. GS19680 BIG ANNUAL YARD SALE, 591 Adams, 10/ 11, 8-Noon. Tools, kids items, treasures, NO EARLY BIRDS PIS. GS 19650 Garage Sale, 1306 Stacey, Oct. 11/12. Hshld. items, stereo, jewelry, golf clubs, clothes, misc. GS19654 3 Family Collection. Clothes, basketball cards, refrigerator, stove, treadmill, computer, & wt. bench plus lots of misc. 420Sunburst, Fri. &Sat. GS19635 3 family sale, furniture, toys, clothes & misc. Priced to sell. 11th& 12, 8-5, 912 Essex Ave. HD GS 19672 BIG SALE loads of computer items, auto parts, oaby items & much, much more. 190Fullerton, HD, 565-6415. GS19683 1528 Palm St., Sat. & Sun., Oct. 12th & 13th, from 8 AM to 6 PM. Exercise equipment, doll house w/furniture, skis & boots & much more. GS19685 GARAGE SALES Moving Sale, IBM 386, color monitor, new printer & all software, 85 Chevy Cavalier, truck parts, tons kids clothes, toys, bikes, TV's, ceramk: tile, misc. furn.. much more, call 564-1982. GS18918 BIG RUMMAGE SALE 67E. Pacifk5Ave..Hend., Oct. 10. 11 & 12, 9 AMdark. Lots of sm. appliances. Hoover vacuum cleaner, Panasonk: stereo radio & 8 track tape player, excel, cond., dishes, silverware, coats, sweaters & lots of good clothing, al! sizes & much much more. GSl 9646 Neigh. Yd. Sales. Fri. & Sat. 11 & 12.8 AM-5 PM, 506 Feliz Contado Ct. at Boulder & Racetrack-see signs. Furn., din. set, baby & gr. womens clothes, portacrib & much more. GSl 9651 Early Morning Madness Sale, Sat., Oct. 12,7 am10 am, 515 8th St. Clothing wms.-inf.-tod., crib w/mat., playpens, dsk., high ch., toys, vacs, household items. A must come see. Early Birds Welcome. GSl 9655 Fri. & Sat., 9-3. Books, clothes, toys, bike, VCR, kid's videos, luagage, much misc., 210 h. Foster, HD. GSl 9668 Sat., Oct. 12th. 8 AM-2 PM, 9078 Aviance Ct. (Pebble Canyon near Pebble & Pecos). 16 in. boys bike, crib, pet crates. Little Tyke toys, clothing, misc. GSl 9676 Family Yard Sale, Sun., Oct. 13, 8 AM, 180 Horizonview Dr. off Racetrack & Burkholder. Furn., home interiors, toys, size 5 clothes, something for everyone. GSl 9771 Yard Sale, Sat., 8-1. misc. housefiold goods, couch, loveseat, kids stuff, 517 Ave. K, BC. GSl 9760 Huge Sale at Storage Plus. Everything priced to sell. 1553 Foothill Dr., BC, Oct. 3, 4 & 5, 7 AM6 PM. GSl 9764 2 Family 604 Ave. U., Fn. 9/27, 9 A-1 P, Sat. 9/28, 8 A-3 P. Glass top dining set, clothes, toys, etc. GSl9293 GIANT SALE Oct. 5, 8 A-2 P corner Fifth and Ave. G. GSl9477 Rummage Sale Oct. 12th & 13th 9 AM-4 PM 171 Van Wagenen Building 8 HD Senior Citizens of Espinoza Terrace mri-til Yard Sale, Sat., 10/12, 9-12, 414 Horizon Dr., HD. GSl 6026 MOVING Yard Sale Oct. 12 & 13, 1317 Pinto, 7 AM-4 PM. Furn., misc. items. GSl 9715 YARD SALE Oct. 11-13, 7 am to ? A little bit of everything. Baby items, clothes, some maternity, misc. household, tires/ rims, jet skis, boat gas tanks, sport boats, too much to list! Lake Mead Dr. East to Shoshone. 234 Shoshone, HD. GSl 9682 Giant garage sale. Boulder City Trailer Park, 1501 Nevada Hwy., opposite Sp. 74, Sat. & Sun., 6-7, beds, AC'S, washers, dryers, refrig., freezer, lamps, 10019" TVs, even cars. H7K Multi-Family Garage Sale East of Pebble & S. Pecos, 29 Rue De Pare, Pebble Creek Development, 8 AM-3 PM, Sat, Oct. 12. Household goods, mens & ladies clothing, furniture, TV, golf club, luggage, vacuum cleaner, books & misc. SWAP MEET SWAP MEET "SELL OR SEEK" ORGANIZATIONS OR INDIVIDUALS Rent a Space at COMMUNITY SWAP MEET & CRAFT SALE: October 19,1996-Foothill Dr.-B.C. 7AM-1PM 15x15 space for $15.00 Send check & SASE to Faith Christian Church Attn: Bill Welcome PC Box 62326 Boulder City, NV 89005 435-6774 NAME: ADDRESS: l!IC.'t7 STORAGE RENTALS STORAGE RENTALS Mini Storage For Rent, 7x10 Off Bouider Hwy. & Atliol $35 monthiy • 24 hr. access. 431-4442 ENTERTAiNMENT VOICE PIANO DRAMA LESSONS O^Mikiet waltiMi HMMMmafertMl S65-8469 TiYjr/#illiU\VlL\^^A\\t^> • S WimtM OVAUTY VOCAL PIANO *'**'*^ OR KEYBOARD!!! Fjiirrtainmml. AvaOiMrrpr jrMtrorianiialienerate lifetime income stream. Motivation & high integrity a must Call 564-6875 1M13 FURNITURE Brass Bed, w/premium queen Ortho nr^t. set & frame, under warranty, all new, retail $839 sacrifice $275. Call 269-8979. Dining room table + 4 chairs, 2 leaves, excellent condition $150.2940740. MCI9705 FINANCIAL SERVICES $$CASH$$ Immediate $$ for structured settlements and deferred insurance claims. J.G. Wentworth. 1-800-3863582. FS19618 1st Trust Deed for Sale. $75,000, 15% $937.50 mo., 58% LTV capital, 59 mo. 800-966-1000. FS19652 Private party will loan money on your house-er lot. No red tape. Call LeRoy, 294-1238. FS1954<^ MERCHANTS OF AMERICA. Visa/Mastercard (unsecured). Re' quirements. Household income of $ 18,000-1-, valid checking or savings account, phone service in home, no open backruptcy. 1-800-2725814. FS19616 BEENTURNEDDOWN? Your search for a Real Estate Loan stops here. Heath Financial Services, Inc. 1-800-9971955. FS19628 A BAJILLION DOLLARS. CASH AVAILABLE NOW for Notes, Contracts & Annuities. Free Quotes, Free Information, Great Prices. Meghan Foss (800) 2756197. FS19623 Financial Freedom! Consolidate for lower monthly payments. Money loans $3,000$25,000 (O.A.C.). Call us now! Toil free 1-888-6246444. E-mail: Financial. Freedom Sympatco.ca FS19626 ALL CASH! Receiving payments on a mortgage? Why wait? Best prices paid nationwide, plus we pay transfer costs. Sell all/part. Purchase Equity Investors 1 800-999-9892. FS 19620 Jn, rOUR LOCAL IZ IWlrUllHlJoiiM •ClMtoiU SoOwMTT wnriTAitHRi^k •riI\T;KSHISl!TlT • EMn.dMas AimmoNs •EMl'UHTOJrUANl'.ES • LASEli rAIKnlx llIEltS • rAlKllLLrirKI'P •MAl-.Henr TAI* MEtlU • Ul lAirrEKLV TAX KEIM i Delivsr -. •733-0378-1 MEVADA FINMICIAL CONCEPTS ^^I7H6E. SahM^Aw., &tfU tan-H^ HEALTH 8. FITNESS ARTHRITIS PAIN RELIEF. 100% NATURAL EMU OIL. The application of EMU Oil aids in the relief of pain by reducing inflammation & swelling associated with Arthritis, muscle strain & sore joints. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 2 oz. bottle $19.95 (includes S&HJ M/C, VISA. TOLL FREE 1-888-4525292. MCI 5126 In Home Personal Training, for Women only Toning & Sculpting. C.P.T.-Ace Call Debbie 558-1950. MCI 8936 ACNE? COLD & FLU? STREP? Infections? Colloidal Silver known to be effective against 650 diseases. Free information: 1-800-735-5171 ext. T?'45jaei-9608 Thursday, October 10,1996 Panorama Pag* IS SUCCESS THE AMSWAY •Hf rbal Supplcinentt •Nilural Antltiollc 'S>ff Natural Waigtil Management •Free Samples wllti consultation •Full or Part Time Dlstrltiutors •Call Larry or VIvIa (702) 4S4-S98 •Advantage Marketing Systems, Inc. •These are some of our products •AM-JOO, Stiark Cartilage, Colloidal Plus •Super AntloikJant, Colloktal Silver Advertise in the NEWS PERSONALS "Powerful Novena of Childlike Confidence" (This Novena is to be said at the same time every hour for Nine consecutive hours -just one day). 20/20 WITHOUT GLASSES! Safe, rapid, non-surgical, permanent restoration in 6-8 weeks. Airline pilot developed. Doctor approved. Free information by mail. (800) 422-7320, ext. 222, (406) 961-5570, Fax(406)9615577. http://www.vision freedom.com SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. PE19627 ADOPTION. Large extendedfamily (& adopted cousins) can't wait to hug the baby we adopted. We're stable NW couple wishing to share our love of the outdoors & all the good things in life with our baby. On going confact OK. Call Sandy 206780-9783/206-842-6658 collect. PE19667 FREE SAMPLE. Raglsterad nurse SIzs 20 to size 6 Malntalnad 2 years NO DIETING Eat anything you want Guaranteed 896-5896 PERSONALS PERSONALS ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Mala7dayaawk.atSPM, Rac. Annex behind Boulder Dam Credit Union. ALANONALATEEW Z9.I15 Why Walk Alone? A Scrrue ()/ I'crfnt D.ite Christian Christian Presentable SWC Irog, 60 Bible study, books, square dancing. ISO slender, NS, NO, younger SWC lady Irog to tiop with No kids, no exes. Voice Mailbox No. 119S9 DWM,42 Interests Include: daiKing, musk;, plays. No one night stands. ISO SWCF. 35-45, with similar interests, and open lor discussion. Children wekiome. Vok;e Mailbox No.11985 SWM, 5*4", 55 Years Young Never noarried, enjoy walks with my dogs. Christian and classical music. Intelligent conversation and good sense ol humor. Seeks beautiful Christian mate. Voice Mailbox No.11996 Singles ISO Angel From Heaven DWM, 38. 56-, 145 lbs, ISO attractive SWF, 25-40. NS, who's honest, sincere, very romantk;, warmhearted, and down to earth. Enjoys movies, romantk; dinners, hand-inhand moonlit waits, cuddlln';. II you want love and respect, let's talk. Voce Mailbox No. 11988 Lady Seeks Gentleman Any race^, sincere, no games, lor Irlendshlp, maybe more. SWF. S0, 5', 120 bs.. NS, lit. anractlve; toves country, animals, laugtner and moie. Voice Mailbox No 11990 SWF, 36 ISO SWM. NO, 35-45, who likes country, music and watching movies. Friendship lirst, possible relationship. Voice Mailbox No, 11991 Wanted: Someone Special OWF. 50s, ISO honest, romantic, NS, S/OWM, no dependents. I tove C&W musK, Las Vegas, traveling, movies, swimming, laughter, massages, quiet evenings. Vok;e Mailbox No. 11986 Wanted: Special Woman DWCM, 5'10'. 160 lbs, attractive, romantic. ISO SWCF, 44-54. NS, nice ligure, attractive, romantic, enjoys cuddling, dancing, movies, camping, hiking, snow skiing. Harl^, and being together. Voice Mailbox No. 11984 Seniors DWM, 60s, Financially Secure Retired and alone, seeks lady who would like to start over Must be easygoing and love animals. Vok;e Mailbox No. 11987 TIME RUNNING OUT? Call 1-800-437-5814 today to renew your ad—nin the same ad or place a new one! LookineFor Love? T Try Perfect Datc.V ABBREVIATIONS S-SINGLEO-DIVORCEO M-MALEF-FEMALE L-LAT)N I-8LACKA-ASIANW-WHITE H-HISPANIC CA-CATHOLIC C-CHRISTIAN J-JEWISH IDS-LATTER-DAY SAINT LTIH0NG-1ERM RaATIONSHIPS NS-NONSMOKER ND-NONORINKER ISO-IN SEARCH OF Don't be late for your Perfect Date! CalM-800-437-5814 ''' today'tirplace your free'25-word;print adi To place an ad: To respond: • Cdl 1-)(M37-58I4 Open 24 hours 7 days a week e tiifllfftopfactanad twoonyouf ^9tKr^ ate nmwn ntponu hmapartmkl PyMcK fanaovvafanotua 619WCole9eAve Stale Colege, PA 16801 ByFa)cl-800-856-&588 24HainaDaf{ We wJ mol ^ inlormdion you need ID lalieve yov iwpenMi A(t ^nid be 25 v-205-53a5 • rVt'l'(nJlal(vlaaiy raftrudmi • YouwIbediagadSl 99 pv minuti to )ur Viia*cr B We provide a fflff 25-word print ad, ^ff voice greeting, and two fflff calls to retrieve responses per wi;ek! That means t^ere • s no cost to you, the advertiser! TcKMae(int a^Bl hte Bnc bK Ai (Mm l0.347IS nedi loai pi*c b kac (II jme OKlHoac (ioB kfac Bkoiil cMiirai f) M iai necoK IB in Boadod I tnx yoK jni cat ai icqxni • Ian h MHOMitan^*aBaoMa*. Ptofa DK<>'. tr • a Bis ad wlaiAn # AetiMeriKriac. Kr niK Mornani al I OMT'-SM laBBalkMMfenilciaMif aot Ml • •1(1 III ri^ Ode IfMoft Sid your wriiian reiparaa, or pipca in on •ndape, and wnit ihe toiee moifeoK rwTiber on iha ouliidt. At wrili iha doh a ^ pi^ iha od appaarad if\. r\ji ha MMd nafona or wwpe MI O Jor^v Wwpe obng wif ifa S7 ferwurA m lea. You moy waam oa many mfxnm at you wi^, along witft )7 tor EAOf rvpomi. Oiedi or money ordar a4. pl. poyw* X) MKt D(*'"\^ Pwiondi. No cadt Alnx poilo^iVw tnoi loc NAd (Ml Nnonob 01^44 619WColigaA Sk*Gligi,M 16801 NOTICES AREA CONTACT PERSON needed for higlily reputed international high school student exchange program. Call Diane at 1 800-733-2773 for information. I\^C19615 VACATION RENTALS Brian IHead Condo rental, sleeps 8, cool summer fun, mtn. biking, fishing, hiking, festivals, summer rates, $65/night weekdays, $90/night weekr ends, 702-294-2320. MCI 9580 CRAFTS Tole Painters let us cut for you. Reasonable prices, fast sen/ice, 5650971. MCI 9595 PETS/ANIMALS Betty Hofin'Sffion pmfit: Anirhal Adoption LtcHis accepting unlimited numberof unwantedpets by appointment only. You are welcome to view adoptable pets 7 days a week. Call first 361-2484. THERE IS NO GUIDED TOURS OF THE PREMISES AT THIS TIME, OF NATIVE, NON-NATIVE, OR WILD AND EXOTIC ANIMALS. PA14684 FREE KITTENS 5659973. PA19648 y FREE to good home, adorable kitten, 41/2 mo., orange tabby, MUST BE IN DOOR CAT, WILL BE SCREENED, 731-0542. PA19687 FREE gray kittens, box -. trained, 293-3775. PA19750 THE ANIMAL FOUNDATION will help you financially spay or neuter your cat or dog. Very inexpensive in Las Vegas. 384-3333 BC PA ADOPT CATS & Dogs from your shelters. Save a Life. BC PA LAS VEGAS VALLEY HUMANE SOCIETY. Beautiful, healthy, kittens, cats, puppies, dogs. Spayed/neutered, tested, shots. PetsMart, Trop-Eastern store only. Wed., Thurs., Fri., Sat., Sun., 11-4. PA19660 FREE FAMILY FUN SAFARI IN THE DESERT. Visitors welcome for guided tours daily to see lions, bears, tigers, cougars, various parrots and hundreds of others. 3^12484. PA19570 Congo African gray beautiful big healthy baby, 645-3786. PA17261 2HORSECORRALSBC $15,000 ea., move right in, 293-5673. PA19677 LOST & FOUND LOST small black miniature Dachshund, missing 10/3rd, PM, vicinity Boulder Hwy. & Pacific, 565-6348. LF19653 LOST sm. black female poodle. Pacific & Mulberry, 565-8158. LF19679 LICENSED CHILDCARE Licensed daycare, 1 opening, 2-4 yr. old, M/F, 6 AM-6PM, learning activities & TLC, 564-6007, MCI 8917 DOMESTIC HELP Responsible Loving Mom w/exc. refs. Avto Babysit in your home eves. Wknds. Kery, 558-0008. PHI 8895 House cleaning for a European touch, call 5587428. DH18859 Qualitychildcareinmy home. Loving Christian Environment. Ex. Ref., Michelle, 293-1780. PHI 8824 Stay Home Mother of three, is willing to watch your Children, in my New HD Home. Close to Pooley Elem. School, Lots of fun & TLC Guaranteed. Call 558-6248. PHI 9338 Will babysit in my home, grandmother type, reasonable rates, all meals incl.. Horizon & 95 Freeway, 565-9440. PHI9344 Doing alterations & slip covers for couches, 2604172. PHI9440 Mother of 1 yr. old would like to trade childcare services, half days/full days, 568-1934. DH19225 Professional ironing & sewing alterations & clothing repair, 2934200. DH19721 HELP WANTED CRUISE SHIPS HiRINGEam upto$2,000+/nno. workina 6n Cmise Ships or Lano-Tour companies. WorkJ Travel. No exp. necessary. Fordirectoiy call: 1-206-971-3552 ML C89778 HW19613 f HELP WANTED Construction Help Wanted Boulder City Area, 294-7000, Leave Msg. HW18856 '97 model search, looking for new faces for an exciting career. We'll be interviewing in Las Vegas. Sat., Oct. 12. Call 1800-3 15-2485. HW19409 CLERK—All shifts. Must be 21 yrs. cashier/ stockroom. Mighty Mart Convenience Store located in Green Valley. 263-4222. HW19641 $1000s POSSIBLE READING BOOKS. Part Time. At Home. Toll Free 1-800-898-9778, Ext. R3804 for Listings. HOUSEKEEPER NEEDED Part time. Please apply: Nevada Inn Motel, BC HW18892 PT during day, FT hrs. in evening, apply 'at store location, 1311 Nevada Hwy., BC, 29 4-4496. •ATTN: HENDERSON* Postal Positions. Permanent FT for clerk/sorters. Full benefits. E'er exam, app. & salary info, call 708-906-2350 Ext. 6398, 8 AM-8 PM. HW19429 ENGRS./INSPECTORS, Las Vegas, 10 Electrical, 10 Mechanical, 10 Civil/ Structural. Degreed or equiv. for Utility inspection. Call Johnson Service Group 1-800-5448099 or Fax to: 314-2052824. EOE. HW19587 Help Wanted, all shifts, cook, counter and asst. manager. Apply at Frosty Freeze, BC HW19552 Strong design/production person neededfordiqital dept. MAC oriented. Must know Photoshop, Illustrator & Ouark. IBM knowledge a+. Experienced only. Salary (JOE. Strong color portfolio required. Call Milo, 7321878. HW14378 CARRIERS needed, professional only need apply with reliable transportation. Apply in person at: Henderson Home News, 2 Commerce Center, Henderson. HW17780 ALASKA EMPLOYMENT Fishing Industry. Earn up to $3,000$6,000-tper month. Room & Board! Transportation! No experience necessary! Male/Female. Age 18-70. For more information call: (206)-971-3512 ext. A89771. .HW19611 CONVENTION SERVICES ATTENDANT (PART-TIME ONLY) SALARY: $7.25/hour. Pay to increase to $9.00/ hour subject to City Council approval on 10/ 15/96. REQUIREMENTS: Equivalent of high school diploma and work experience requiring heavy lifting and strenuous physical exertion, including use of hand and power tools. Experience with tact is hefpfuL SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: Possession of, or the ability to obtain, appropriate Nevada Driver's License, and maintenance of a satisfactory driving record. WHERE TO APPLY: City application form must be submitted to and received by the Personnel Department, Room 200, City Hall, 240 Water Street, Henderson, Nevada 89015, no later than Wednesday, October 23,1996, by 5:00 p.m., to be considered for this recruitment. NO APPLICATIONS WILL BE GIVEN OUT AFTER 4:00 P.M. ON THE CLOSING DATE OF THIS RECRUITMENT. Employment packet MUST be obtained from the Personnel Department; resumes only WILL NOT be accepted in lieu of employment application. HOURS OF OPERATION: MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY, 7:30 AM. TO 5:30 P.M. SMOKE-FREE WORK ENVIRONMENT. AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER. HW19737 SALESPERSON—MARINE needed for Marine accessories, including wakeboards, water skis, etc. Start $8/hr. + commission. Marine Products Pro Shop, 702-456-0122 (Las Vegas). HW17379 Experienced mig welder/ fabricator, must be drug free, apply in person, 668 Wells Rd.,BC.HW18224 Carpenter/Installer Quality finish person to aid install of Exhibitry at Hoover Dam Visitor Center. Prevailing wage/ benefits. 8-12 weeks work. Phone Manny at 294-3580. HW19134 Wanted Grocery Cashier* Stocker. Experience required. Must be 21. 293-4213. HW19729 HAIR STYLIST & MANICURIST STATION AVAIL. Pl8. Call 2934322. HW19720 HELP WANTED Sm. but fast moving print shop in need of press person. Exper. on multilith 1250 press. Also needs expertise in all phases of camera, bindery, layout & pasteup. PT position, $16.50/hr. Apply in person, 2827 N. Green Valley Pkwy., M-F, 9-4. NOPHONECALLSPLS. HW19545 PRODUCTION WORK: Work Clothes Rental is now accepting applications for full or part time positions. Flexible hours, no weekends. Apply at 568 Parkson Rd, Hd., Mon.-Fri. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. HW18665 Work Clothes Rental is now acceptina applrcations for PT afternoons, M-F, 1-6:30. Good after school opportunity! Apply in person at 568 Parkson Rd., Hend. NO PHONE CALLS PLS. HW19640 Crew member needed for VERY BUSY 7-11. Must be 21 yrs. APPLY IN PERSON ONLY to Dale or Larry, 850 E. Horizon Pr., corner of Boulder Hwy. HW19637 HAIR STYLIST* MANICURIST NEEDED-Exp. preferred. Full service salon. Call 294-8477. HW14188 $$CASINO JOBS$$ Now hiring 17,00050,000/yr. casinos & riverboafs. No exp. necessary. For immediate hiring info 407-338-6100 ext.NVl01$,6AM-6PM, 7 days. HWl 4465 DEXTER SHOE FACTORY OUTLET Now hiringforMGR. & ASST. MGfi. forourstore @ the Factory Stores of America on Las Vegas Blvd. F/T career minded individuals who are selfmotivated & enthusiastic. Benefit pkg. incl: Pd. Sick Days/Holidays/Vacation pay w/Health Insurance & more. Call Mike @ 896-0713. HWl 9506 LAUNDRY PERSON Exper. Apply in person between 7 AM-3 PM, Best Western Lake Mead, 85 W. Lake Mead Dr., HD. HWl 9563 Homemakers do you like housecleaning? Come work with me. It's fun. Must have own transportation. Call 2322284. HWl 8571 CLINICAL DIRECTOR. Southern Nevada Children's Home seeks licensed therapist to fill the position of Clinical Director. The qualified candidate must have at least a master's degree in social work, psychology or related field and have either an MFT, LCSW or comparable license. The Clinical Director must be a highly skilled individual with experience in residential and/or group home settings. Salary will be DOE. Send your resume to: Director, 801 So. Adams Blvd., Boulder City, NV 89005 or FAX it to: 2934251, HW1J410 Manicurist to take over following, 293-0129 or 564-1943. HWl 9411 SIOOO's POSSIBLE TYPING. Part Time. At Home. Toll Free 1-800898-9778, Ext. T-3804 for Listings. HWl 7498 Hairstylists wanted for GV salon, rental, call Audrey 458-0063. HWl 7787 $1000's POSSIBLE TYPING. Part Time. At Home. Toll Free 1-800898-9778, ext. T-3804 for listings. HWl 9255 SIOOO's POSSIBLE READING BOOKS. Part Time. At Home. Toll Free 1-800-898-9778, Ext. R3804 for Listings. HWl 9254 ATTN: Moms and Grandmas counter help wanted, day shift, M-f^. Apply Frosty Freeze, BC HW19555 MANICURIST NEEDED Exp. preferred. Full service salon. Call 2948477. HWl 4376 MAIDS exper. Apply in person between 7 AM-3 PM, Best Western Lake Mead, 85 W. Lake Mead Dr., HD. HWl 8882 WILDLIFE/CONSERVATION JOBS. Game wardens, security, maintenance, etc. No exp. necessary. Now Hiring. For Info. Call (219) 7940010 ext. 9007. 6AM8PM/7 days. HWl 8476 MOTHER'S DREAM. Stay home, lose weight, make money. Part-time/ Fuli-tinne. Full training. Pail vacations. Call now 702-598-2958. HWl 9631 Need exper. block layer ASAP, 565-1217. HWl 9774 FRONT DESK CLERK immed. opening. Super 8 Motel, 704 m Hwy., BC. Pis. apply in person. No exper necessary. No phone calls pis. HELP WANTED Chiltjcare needed for 3 & 6 yr. old, downtown HD area, hrs. vary, reliable, 558-3212. HWl 9590 LICENSED LIFE & HEALTH-AGENT NEEDED. Quality products, high commissions with advance before issue, lead system, and benefits. (Must qualify for advances* benefits) Call 1-800-252-2581. HW19614 DIRECTOR BREWERY ARTS CENTER Carson City, NV. ($25,000$30,000 DOE) BA degree/equivalent work. Call: (702) 883-1976, Fax (702) 883-1922 or E-Mail: lujano@ix.netcome.com. for job description. EVALUATION TECHNICIAN (Part-Time) SALARY: $654.84-795.60/81Weekly (Based on 18 hours per week) Actual rate to be negotiated with candidate selected. REQUIREMENTS: Bachelor's Degree in psychology, social work, or closely related field, and two (2) years of experience conducting evaluations or providing substance abuse counseling OR an equivalent combination of closely related training and experience. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: Must possess BADA Certification as an Evaluation Technician or Drug and Afcohol Abuse Counselor at time of application. Ability to speak Spanish is an asset in this oositlon. WHERETOAPPLY:City application form must be submitted to and received by the Personnel Department, Room 200, City Hall, 240 Water Street, Henderson, Nevada 89015, no laterthan Tuesday, November 12 1996, by 5:00 p.m., to be considered for this recruitment. NO APPLICATIONS WILL BE GIVEN OUT AFTER 4:00 P.M. ON THE CLOSING DATE OF THIS RECRUITMENT. Employment packet MUST be obtained from the Personnel Department; resumes only WILL NOT be accepted in lieu of employment application. HOUfIs OF OPERATION: MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY, 7:30A.M. TO 5:30 P.M. SMOKE-FREE WORK ENVIRONMENT. AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER. HWl 9791 Secretarial position-Active Real Estate Officetelephone skills, typing & general office skills-must know Windows 3 & 95 & Microsoft word. Submit resume to: Century 21 JR Realty, 101 E. Horizon Dr., Hend. 89015. HWl 9684 HELP WANTED GV area, sitter PT days, $3/hr., 435-4822. HWl 9518 NATIONAL PARKS HIRING-Positions are now available at National parks. Forests & Wildlife Preserves. Benefits + Bonuses! For employment directory, call (206) 971-3622 ext. N89771. HW19612 aaaaaaaaam j^r^-. 1 Prr, 1 F/T Hard • • ** • '* Count Position, • Hotel Maida, • Security Guards, Keno Runners, • Dish Waahers t • Air Conditioning • Tachnlclan, must be carllfied. Apply Hotel Front Desk Railroad Past Hotel t Casino, 2S0OS. Boulder Hwy., HD. No Phone Calls Please. Pr^el1lployment drug testing • regulretj. (^ • aammamamaaa SECURITY GUARD PT Security Guard Must have experience. Pis. call 433-7706 **P0STAL JOBS ** $12.68/hr. to start, plus benefits. Carriers, sorters, computer trainees, maintenance. Call today for application & information. 6am-6pm. 7 days. 1-800-267-5715, Ext. P81 TOW DRIVERS t:^x Full Time Avail. DAILY 4 WEEKLY PAY Short/Long Term Assign. Now taking applications for: CLERICAL WAREHOUSE CONSTRUCTION Apply in person, 5 am-3 pm, Mon.-Fri. 331 Water St., Henderson Exp. preferred but not necessary. Must be clean cut, have valid Nevada driver's license with current DMV printout. Must live in BC Apply in person at 705 Juniper Way, BC CAFE SENSATIONS G.V. Cafe seeking full time expe. pantry cook. Kitchen supervisor position available bring references. Applications accepted In person M • W F, 19amto11 am, 2-4pm, 4350 E. Sunset #110 at Athlnean. Henderson. HW255 WENDY'S Now hiring Day/Night Cashiers Premium Payl 1131 W. Sunset (Across from the Galleria) SHIFT MANAGERS with 1+yrs. mgmt. exp. also needed. EOE DRIVERS AND LABORERS 50 Needed Daily/Weekly Pay Apply LABOR EXPRESS 39 E. Basic Rd. RESUMES ProHttlanatly Don* Rmtorfbly Priced BCrS BUSINESS SERVICES OpMi tWly a lo ( 1400 Colorado (a Ash) B.C. .. 293-5361 VM III mill wrf Tw MMW *t AVON MaikwHolM (702)2tl-170 Call Today! Avon HaaAnacatarVOUl ToluyorMI CaM Roele MaanMn 293-0110 kta. LaeeiwMp Itop^ iiua HELP WANTED •••••• Reataurant Hostess/ Cashier line cooks & prep cooks. Apply at Restaurant Cashier Riilroad Pass Hotel & Casino, 2800 S.Boukler Hwy., HND.EOE Pre^mployment drug testing required. taaaaaam a"ii' Airline Jobs! Now hiring, $10-$2S/lir. All poaitlona skilled & un-skilled. Excel, pay/benarits. Call1-S04-429-9229, Ext. 4626 A39, 24 hrs. m icn Now hiring, McDonald's College & Horizon, Managers, all shifts, must have previous experience, contact 565-1465 for information & application. R.E. SALES FREE SEMINAR Come Join the *1 Century 21 office In the SW ft Lea Vegas. Wa are seeking qualified candidataa to begin a new career. For the best one-on-ona training andsupport.EastandWest offices, call Joe, 435-8300, Century 21 Money World. "a ngvMpM, HDTSL II CASINO (R) Both proptrties art accapting applications for: Exp. Gift Shop Cashiers (Must be 21) P/T Slot Club Clerk Exp. Line Cook Snack Bar Attendant Guest Room Attendant Internal Maintenance Supenrisor Apply In Parton Qold SWIw HoM, Jam, NV. Parsonnd Dept M-F, 7-5 PM Excel. Benellt* S O^ortOtill/ 40tK Program Hilr Analysli Drug TttI Rtqulred. Mor* exciting CIrcut CIrcut Propertlet ZlDC Seeking articulate, personable, and mature minded individuals, to conduct follow up phone calls, with graduates and associates of distinguished institutions. Integrity and a commitment a must. Afternoon and weekend shifts available. A professional, and friendly environment. $7 hourly wage, part time positions only. 565-9038 leave a message. nppi.ediie Temporary/Full-Time EmploymenI Services IMMEDIATE OPENINGS! NEVER A FEE Receptionist, Word Processing, Data Entry Oper. & More. 898-1956 3510 E. Troplcana, #K at Pecos liEASi RiDGE^Temps' Is Recruiting for the following positions: CLERICAL GENERAL •Receptionist •Construction Cleanup •Data Entry 'Warehouse Jobs •Accounting Clerk •Production •General Secretarial 'Light Indualrial Up to $9.00 per hour Up to $7.00 per hour caH 566-9662 for an appointment todayl NEVER A FEE 320 S. Boulder Hwy., Ste. 102, fl*n'^f'?niNYi NEVER A FEE •******•*•*•*** • ***•*•** SECURITY OFFICERS Needed for greater Henderson, GV area,* FULL TIME and PART TIME, flexible hours.* Must have dependable transportation &* phone. Call ALLIED SECURITY, 795-3317,* Monday-Friday, 8:30-4:30 pm, 1515 E.^ Tropicana Ave., Suite 395. EOE/M-F/H-V. 17764* litASTRiDGt Tem ps' 320 S. Boulder Hwy. Suite 102 'Stockers-Taggers SS.IO/hr. Huge tent salel We're looklngforclean cut, reliable Individuals who Will commit to a 30-60 day assignment. Fun JobI 2 shifts available May be drug tested Call: HendeiYon 566-9662 Las Vegas 732-0160 1*423 NO FEE NO FEE IMMEDIATE OPENINGS FOR ManaKrs, Assistant ManaKsrs Crsw Apply: 118 E. Lake Maad 690 N. Van* Vsrds A Sunsst or S06 Buchanan, BC (Von'e Shoppins Cnter) HELP WANTED Cruise Ship Jobs! Earn $300/$900 wkly. Year round positions. Hiring both men/women. Free room and board. Will train. Call 7 days (407) 875-2022 Ext. 6049 C39. Casa Flores Mexican Restaurant now taking applications for PT waiter/waitresses, experience preferred. Apply in person at 930 NV Hwy.. BC, after 4 PM. HWl 9454 Handyman needed for Boulder City rental. Approx. 20 hrs. per wk., $7/hr. Call 293-5000,122 pm, ask for Tony. HWl 9520 HELP WANTED *••**•**• ••*** i, GOLD STRIKE INN • & CASINO NOWHIRING: WaKrassM -* Sacutlly Quardi Englnoers .^ HostMi/Caahhn i, KMM Rufwtart ^ Porters But Pareone Catino Cage Caehlert HoUMkovptrt, Una cootn it dittwailwre 4r ^ Pait-lina gm Shop parson. .^ Apply m personal CaslMrtCage US HWY t3* New Hoover Dam •*•***•***••* Help Wanted, all shifts, cook, counter and asst. manager. Apply at Frosty Freeze. BC iHWl9553 REAL ESTATE AGENTSNEW OR EXPERIENCED Grow along with me. The best is yet to be! Established Broker moving to a NEW OFFICE In a PRIME HENDERSON LOCATION, for a confidential interview, call Ellie at Knapp Realty, 566-8185. HOUSE RENTALS 2 BD., 1 BATH APT. Newly remodeled, $495/ mo., 293-6248. HR15447 4 bd., 2 ba., 10 Wyoming, HD, $725/mo. + dep., 564-6742. Hl4l8396 Forrent, 3bd., 1-1/2ba. home, walking distance to schools, avail. Nov. 1 st, $750/mo., 294-1805. HR19507 BC4bd.,2ba.,fam.&liv. rm., frpL, formal din., 2 car gar., big yd., $1000/ mo., 1st, last-I-dep., NO PETS, taking applications, 293-2697. Avail. Nov. 1st. HR19585 $$$$STOP DREAMING Learn how I make $5000/ wk. at home. Sounds too good to be true? You can do it. I have first class team support. We train. No selling. No MLM. Get paid directly w/Cashiers Checks. Order our FREE powerful audio tape, 4541978. HR18893 Forrent4bd.,2bth. Lewis Home, 1500 SF $850/ mo. Call 293-2939 ask for Roger Realtor, Anctior Realty. HR19748 HOUSE RENTALS BC golf course home, 3 bd., 2-1/2 ba. $1400,5964956. HR18846 1 bd., 1 ba., $450 incl. water + dep., NO PETS, 565-8296. HR19356 OldHD3bd„2ba., 1800 SF, Ig. fenced yd. $825/ mo. + deps., avail, now, 433-4555. HR19600 Sunset McDonald Ranch 55-(-, brand new, upgraded, 2bd., 2ba., 2 car, 796-6061. HR19603 Vacant, 2 bd. near St. Rose Hospital, all floors tile & kit. counter, lots of rm., in gr. location. Fenced back yd. for pet, $700/mo., $600 dep., $100/pet dep. Easy move in, call 564-3969. 2 bd., 1 ba, house for rent, $850. 293-5115. HRi9772 3 bd., 3 ba., $900 mo.-I$900 dep. avail. 1 Nov., 2 car gar., BC. 293-0986. For Sale, or Lease Gorgeous 4 bd,, 2 ba.. Key Largo Home. Top Terrace, Superb Lake View, 229,900 or 1350 per mo. 294-0323 or 293-2511. 2bd., 1ba.,quietBC historic st. Fenced yd., central A/C, 1 yr. lease, owner/broker, $725/mo., Sr. Disc. 294-1444. ,,,7,j "FOR RENT" TOWNSITES:" 1 bd., 1 ba. Apt. $475 Rent/$400 Sec. 2 bd., 1 ba. Home $575 Rent/$500 Sec. CITY VIEW TERRACE 2 bd., 1 ba. Home $750 Rent/$750 Sec. HIGHLAND HILLS-Homes 3 bd., 1 3/4 ba. $850 Rent/$825 Sec. 3 bd., 1 3/4 ba. $895 Rent/$900 Sec. 4 bd., 2 baVPOOL $1075 Rent/$1000 Sec. SUN CrrV/MCDONALD RANCH (Age 55 & Older) 2 bd., 1 3/4 ba. Home $950 Rent/$900 Sec. Call Century 21 JR Realty— 564-5142 For More Details CONDO SALES BC 2 bd., 2-1/2 ba. Lake View Condo. Hend, Neat, 3 bd., 1-3/4 ba. house priced to sell $85,990. Heinz Prudential S.W. Realty, 293-0545. CS 1 bd. condo, new cabinets, carpet, paint, fixtures, stove. fJicest one on the block. Call 5664108. CS19437 CONDO SALES LUXURY CONDO for sale by owner, 2 bd., 2 ba., vaulted living rm. ceiling, 1 level, 565-3808. CS19436 Boulder Hills 2 bd., 1 1/2 ba., all appl., new paint/ carpet $67,000, by owner. 294-0726. CS19728 BRAND NEW!! Villa Florence Townhomes @ Lake Mtn. Dr. & Florence Models open Mon., Thurs., Fri. & Sat. 1700 Sf $230,000 to 2800 Sf $270,000 Broker co-op: Multacc access if closed MOBILE HOMES 1978 Flamingo, BC Moores Trailer Park. 12x44.1 bd.. carport + 2 sheds, furn., excel cond. $18,000, OBO. 8988376. MH19586 1976 Fleetwood 12x60. w/8x8 & 14x16 expando rms., excel, cond, Sr. Prk., Gingerwood, call Luke, 379-2000 Valley Mobile Home. MH19597 2 bd., 1 ba. set up in local park mature lawn encbsedpatk), washer and dryer heat AC swamp after 5 PM. 293-0401. Shown bv .ippt BC MH 16634 MOBILE HOMES ik****************i| GINGERWOOD SEN. PK. dt>l. wida almoat 2 bd., den, 11/3 ba. fum., carport, shed ItOO SF. imoled. occup. BC S34/S0 FIRM SM-S403 iMse TRAILERS RENT OR SALE Park Models good for 1 or 2 people Rents start $375/up Sales start S1500/up Ask for Donna/Marm 294-8888 MOBILE HOMES 2 bd. home in beautiful Gingenwood Senior Park, many extras. $21,500. Enjoy swimming pool, therapy pool, recreation programs, etc. Call for details. 293-1908. Cornado Estates, 60x24 Fleetwood w/land, furn., 2bd.,2ba.,allappl., Ig. liv. rm. w/wet bar, cent, air, new vinyl alum, siding, awnings, porches, cov'd. carport & patio shed 12x17. fenced cor-, ner lot, no fees $90's, by owner. 294-2982. COMMERCIAL RENTALS OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT. Prinne BC location. Available 9/1/96. 294-0225. C019343 BC off. and wse. w/attach. liv. qtrs. +/-9,000 sq. ft. Less than .60/ft! Matt, EBC Comm. 2935781. C019589 Storage Plus Office warehouse suite 1000 sq. ft., 1557 Foothill Dr. Frontage view BC $650 mo. With $550 Security Dep., 293-3115. C019562 BC approx. 100O SF warehouse w/bath in new plaza. Terms negotiable. 293-1844 weekdays to see. C013992 • Lease commercial manufacturing 600 or 1200 SF, industrial condo., 707 Canyon Rd, BC, Unit #6, 293-0434. C019726 Office-Warehouse BC, 1200 SF 10 ft. roll up door, 709-F Yucca St., $680/mo. incl. utilities, 293-4757. C019730 APT. RENTALS 2 bd. unfurn duplex apart. Clean & roomy. Call 5642524 after 5 PM. AR19692 2 bd., 1 ba. $500 $200 dep. no cat, dog... studio $320 $200 dep. util. pd. 307E. Minister, HD. 5645712. AR19718 Quiet 1 bd. apt., no pets, non-smoker W/D/F avail. $500 -f dep. 293-0932. AR19753 1-3bd., 2ba. apart., no pets. 2-2 bd., 2 ba. apart., no pets, 293-7775. AR19768 FOR RENT: Kitcfienettes, $65/wk. Utilities pd. SHADY REST f^OTEL, 565-7688. AR9597 Beautiful apartment for rent, 1 bd., $465/mo. incl. util., W/D avail. Sr. citizen & NON-SMOKER, call 293-4523. ARl 6543 Cherry Lynn Apts. 1 bdrm. No pets. Sr. preferred. Lease for 12 mo. 293-0420. ARl9526 Clean, green. Boulder City's finest, very modern, most affordable apart. w/2bd., 1 ba., unfurnished, all elec., dw, Ig. closets, balcony, sep. storaqe rm., coin laundry rm., on street parking, NO POOL. NO PETS, UPSTAIRS. Perfect for 1 or 2 quiet, mature ADULTS ONLY. Local owner operated, $525/mo. -i$400 dep. Min. 6 mo. lease. Call293-3324. AR19285 HEND., 2 bd., 1 ba., central air, stove, refrig., blinds, carpeted, fenced yd. w/patio, owner occupied. $500/mo. -I$300 sec. dep. 565-5462. ARl 3798 Teddy's Kitchenettes, Just bring your toothbrush. Everything furnished PH. 293-1716. BC MOBILE HOMi BC mobile for rent: 2 bd./ 1 ba„ in nkre well caredi for area, nice addition, loj yd., will accept pets, $72S + deposit. Call Kay, C21' B. Dam, 293-4663 or 477-^ 4818. MH19546 ~ i Boulder City Beauty -• 1991 Silvercrest. Im-J maculate, interior de-J signer owned. 1651 sq.t ft, on 90x110 lot, 3 bd., 2; ba., fireplace. Lake Mt.i Views. Trade?, $130K) OBO, 294-4416.* MH19510 COMMERCIAL RENTALS PRIME RETAIL OR OFFICE Great location 1402 Nevada Hwy., BC 600 sq. ft., 750 sq. ft. & 1175 sq.ft. Ideal for Beauty shop, RE, Ins. or Sales. Call Owner 293-2898 Of(/Whse 12,000-157,000 SF .36psf-.42psf Hend area Avail. 9/96 Doug/Lor! CB Commercial 369-4800 BC Historic Distiict Lease 800 SF.Beautiliil Suite Office Pinf'essional Retail Great Security in Eiicinsed Mall 294-8455 VONS SHOPPING CENTER Retail Space Available Neal Siniakin, Broker APT. RENTALS 1 bedroom apt. $350 + dep. NO CHILDREN OR PETS. 293-2309. NEW KITCHENETTES, phone, satellite, maid service. STARVIEW fylOTEL 293-1658. BC ARl4278 2 bdrm. apt. $500/mo. 897-9421. ARl 9599 Lg. unfurn. studio, nonsmoker, gar., priv. entry, W/D, all util., cable, $550/ mo., 564-3637. APARTMENTS AS LOW AS $275 a Month furnlstwd • • 564-g§fei ,0,, I II ill IT' In HO by Basic HS, 2nd fl. Like new, 2 bd., SSOO/mo. -f deps. cat OK, W/D on premises. Mgr. lives on property. Avail, immediately Pis. call 566-8996 Iv. msg. NEW KITCHENETTES STARVIEW, 293-1658 Gated Duplex -1 bd., ftilly carpeted. Central air, w/stove & frig. Big backyard $430 • Sec. 433-6069 Tom's Boulder Inn 1 Lg. apart., fully furnished with cable 293-4445 Cell 682-7914 MERLAYNE VILLA APTS. —Units less than 2 yrs. old— 2 bd., 2 ba., microwave & dishwasher, $625/mo. 409 & 417 Mei\ayne • Near Paik & Grade School 565-9582 CASA DE ALICIA AND M&M II APT We're not giving away the kitchen sink. WE DON'T HAVE TO. Let our features & professional staff speak for themselves. 1,2 & 3 bdrm. from $550. Pools, picnic areas. Walk in closets. 293-1615 *"'" Boulder Citv. ATLANTIC CITY APARTMENTS Clean, Quality 1-2-3 Bedroom Apartments In Henderson • Central Air & Heat • Appliances • Blinds • Carpets • Water Paid • Washer/Dryer Available Apartments are $420 & up per nwnth. newly remodeled, spacious near schools, park & shopping. 565-7028 1041

PAGE 39

• • • • • —^i^^w^nWiP—pipi^^ p j t ^fnww w ffj m* v J iiiW^iPfi^PW^P^^ m^rmr Pag* 14 Panorama Thursday, October 10,1996 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Home repair & landscaping caU Shan* Phillips p.9 584-2177 Action Ac* CTh* AppUanc* place) Sal**, parts A aervica at raasonabi* rates. Opan M-Sat. 9-S, Sun. 1-5 43S-9038 BATH TUB REPAIR Tubs and Sinks regiazed, chips rapairad. Fiberglass and more 564-2276 VALLEY VIEW LANDSCAPING Complete lawn maintenance Ucans* No. 41763 566-0680 AM Your Lawn Care Needs! Ind. new lawns, sprinklers, rwwvillon, cleanup and pnjrWng. MICHAEL'S LAWN CARE 453-8252 Rivera Cabinets 35th Anniversary Grand Opening LV Showroom 4S35 W. Russell Rd., 5 248-4015 or 281-2073 Thomas L. Baker, Inc. General Contractor remodeling, room addHions, commercial, residential custom homes ft patio covers. No job too small License No. 0036671 263-7561 CARPET REPAIR & RESTRETCH 293-2122 Bill YOU NAME IT WE DO IT "4 'Residential 'Commercial 'Remodel Ca 294-1039 or Ce//496-1990 CntKMii Lk. Na nlun COUNTRY TIME HOME SHOWS (The Country Store that come* to your home) Call Zee today to ichedule a party In your home. 896-1872 HOME REPAIRS bv CC. Mio Iirtwlor/Eiltrtar painting 23 yrs. Experience Call 564-4292 For Free Estimate Prompt, Dependable Service ,,557^ Home & oflice cleaning, help avail., exper., good refs., reasonable, 5669116. PS19591 MISCELLANEOUS WASHER / Dryers $125.00 Each. 2936101. BC Mil 9569 GV GLASS & MIRROR CO. Surplus shower doors, mirrors, glass, mirror doors. 368-4628. Call anytime. MM 6718 BAHAMA CRUISE! 5 days/4 nights. Underboolced! MTJST SELL! $299ycouple. Limited ticltets. 1-800414-4151 Ext. 5149 Mon.-Sat., 9AM-10PM. Complete set Tinie Life libraiy of Photography, $45; Volvo H.D. trailer hitch. $100; 293-3992. Full mattress set $75, childs desk $15, 2childrens bllces $15 ea., exercise bilte $50, 5669705. Mil 9675 Hideaway couch std. size brown w/white colors like new $200 294-2402. RUGER M77 rifle w/ scope .300 Winchester mag $550 also MOSSBERG 500A 12g pump $175 both ex. cond. Call Paul at 2930621. Ml 19710 Ovareaters Anonymous meets at St. Christopher's Chui:ch, 812 Arizona St., 7 PM Thurs. 593-2945. Nice almond 22 cu. ft. Magic Chef S/S door water/ice $625 or trade, wicker, gun, big screen! 294-1445. Mil9758 4 Mercedes 14' wheels mint condition. 293-4860. HUGE 22 CU. FT. upright freezer in excel, cond. $200; Rhino Guard. Bug Guard and Running BodsforF-150:8r-86^ al for $100; Older style exercis* bike $15; call 294-1236 days or eves. til 0 PM. Mill MISCELLANEOUS One year old spa, $2200. Four Station Weight Set, $800, 293-0828, Mn9252 For Sale, 2 lots, BC cemetery, if interested call 909-679-7397. Ml 19279 EGYPTIAN TREASURES, Quality JewelrySilver, Gold, CostumePyramids, Statues, Plates, Papyrus, etc. All made in Egypt for full mystic and psychic powers. Free catalog 1-800747-4317. Mil9622 Dryer gas runs gr. $125. 293-6101. Mil9769 Whirlpool 20cu. ft. refrig./ freezer, almond, good cond., $250; 50 gal. gas hot water heater, new, still in box, $150; 2947710. Mil9761 Pecan wardrobe by Drexel brass wire & shear curtains indoor, can be siielved for pantry or display, 6'6" by 42" by 24 $125; wet bar matches wardrobe w/frig. glass shelves mirror back 4 drawers $175; matciiing lighted mirror w/shelves 48''x 24" $40; 48" marble top vanities, solid brass, fixture antique styled gold leaf base $40; ping pong tbi. & accessories $20; will consider trades on any 294-7776. Ml 19773 2 door refrigerator $225; Hide a bed couch $50; View at 616 Ave. F. COMPUTER SOFTVy^ME Over 25 CDRoms, including games, children's and educational disks. No shareware or demos. Most $3 to $5. Please call 434-6149 for list. For Sale: Dinette set w/ credenza $175; microwave $60; Singer sewing machine $100; 2 end tables $10ea,& 2 lamps $10ea.,call 565-3569 Iv. msg. MM8668 WOLFFTANNINGBEDS. TAN AT HOME. Buy DIRECT and SAVE! Commercial/Home units fronh $199. Low Monthly Payments. FREE Color Catalog. Call TODAY, 1-800-842-1305. MI19609 ARTHRITIS Suffers, live pain free. Had if for 20 years now I am pain free. Cost is as low as $15 per mo., not medicine, natural food & energy supplements. Guaranteed. 564-1648. MI254 CD-ROIVI'sforsaleOver 20 titles, including games, children's and educational disks. NONE OVER $10. Please call 434-6149 for list. Ml 17569 2 brown rodker recliners $50 ea.; pine roll top desk $150; old chest of drawers $25; octagon end table $20; lamp $15; new Chrysler mini-van bench seat, make offer. Call 565-9311 evenings. MI18017 Fifth wheel for 3/4 ton P/U $200. Tool box for 3/4tonP/U. Canbeseen atA-1 Truck School, 2931681 or 293-7335. Ml 19656 WOMEN'S HANDGUN SAFETY & INSTRUCTION CLASS. 10/26 Classroom 8 AM-4 PM DO NOT BRING FIREARMS 10/27 Range 8 AM-NOON Location: Garrett High, 1200 Ave. B,BC,NV.Cost$35,Preregister by mail w/Boulder Rifle & Pistol Club, P.O. Box 60534 BC, NV 89006. 293-1885. Ml 19153 • • For sale crib w/bedding, 4 drawer chest w/ changing table, honey oak, like new. White X-lg. wood cradle w/nite light & bedding, like new + misc. baby items. 2934335, MM 9696 Glider rocker green like new$150,connputerH.P. Pavillion desk model 5010,100 MHZ 486 DX4 PC 635 MG hard dr. 13" Packard Bell monitor $800. 293-3395, MM 9707 •Private Art ClassesFor beginning/intermediate and advanced levels in watercolor acrylic charcoal or pastels. Ail ages • 294-1284. Ml 19742 Welding equipment, acetylene & oxygen tanks, call 294-1790. MM 9757 Din. Rm. Table, 6 chairs, hutch $695; pair gold rockers $70; Sears refrig. $125; Fr. Prov. chest of drawers $30; gun cab. $35; 293-5087 or 2936500. Mil9741 PMISI'MY PIOTEaTOUlSELF •Ac*!"** I(*kbra, MtiCra Ms4 lUyla** 5Q.9S EiwmdJ. Rich 5261 Jaitfred CL i33 Lot Vtgat, NV99103 GARAGE SALES ANTIQUE AND COLLECTIBLES FAIR 100 Dealers Extravaganza, Sat., Oct. 19, 9 am to 5 pm, Sunday, Oct. 20th 10 am to 4:30 pm, Cashman Field, Las Vegas. Admission $3.00 with ad. Pccadilly, 6557469. QS-\f?2S Yard Sale-microwave, pool, baby items, coffee table & lots more. 76 Mallory, Henderson, 2 blocks behind hospital. Sat. & Sun. 8 AM-5 PM. Sat.-Sun.-9-3-multi-famiiy, computer microwave, sports designer clothes, ceramic mold, household, etc. Calico Cove E. Lake Mead Dr. E of Calico Ridge Dr. to 1031 Golda Way. GS19740 4 Family Yard Sale Oct. 12. 7 AM til ?, 613 Avenue K, BC. Baby clothes & bedding, adult clothes & shoes, furn. & houseware, toys & misc. GS19744 MOTHERS OF TWINS Yard Sale, baby items, toys, furn., clothing & LOTS of non-baby related items. Sat., Oct. 12, 8AM-2PM, 3141 Regal OakPr., HD. GS19713 Yard Sale, 112 Linden St. HD, Fri. & Sat. GS19680 BIG ANNUAL YARD SALE, 591 Adams, 10/ 11, 8-Noon. Tools, kids items, treasures, NO EARLY BIRDS PIS. GS 19650 Garage Sale, 1306 Stacey, Oct. 11/12. Hshld. items, stereo, jewelry, golf clubs, clothes, misc. GS19654 3 Family Collection. Clothes, basketball cards, refrigerator, stove, treadmill, computer, & wt. bench plus lots of misc. 420Sunburst, Fri. &Sat. GS19635 3 family sale, furniture, toys, clothes & misc. Priced to sell. 11th& 12, 8-5, 912 Essex Ave. HD GS 19672 BIG SALE loads of computer items, auto parts, oaby items & much, much more. 190Fullerton, HD, 565-6415. GS19683 1528 Palm St., Sat. & Sun., Oct. 12th & 13th, from 8 AM to 6 PM. Exercise equipment, doll house w/furniture, skis & boots & much more. GS19685 GARAGE SALES Moving Sale, IBM 386, color monitor, new printer & all software, 85 Chevy Cavalier, truck parts, tons kids clothes, toys, bikes, TV's, ceramk: tile, misc. furn.. much more, call 564-1982. GS18918 BIG RUMMAGE SALE 67E. Pacifk5Ave..Hend., Oct. 10. 11 & 12, 9 AMdark. Lots of sm. appliances. Hoover vacuum cleaner, Panasonk: stereo radio & 8 track tape player, excel, cond., dishes, silverware, coats, sweaters & lots of good clothing, al! sizes & much much more. GSl 9646 Neigh. Yd. Sales. Fri. & Sat. 11 & 12.8 AM-5 PM, 506 Feliz Contado Ct. at Boulder & Racetrack-see signs. Furn., din. set, baby & gr. womens clothes, portacrib & much more. GSl 9651 Early Morning Madness Sale, Sat., Oct. 12,7 am10 am, 515 8th St. Clothing wms.-inf.-tod., crib w/mat., playpens, dsk., high ch., toys, vacs, household items. A must come see. Early Birds Welcome. GSl 9655 Fri. & Sat., 9-3. Books, clothes, toys, bike, VCR, kid's videos, luagage, much misc., 210 h. Foster, HD. GSl 9668 Sat., Oct. 12th. 8 AM-2 PM, 9078 Aviance Ct. (Pebble Canyon near Pebble & Pecos). 16 in. boys bike, crib, pet crates. Little Tyke toys, clothing, misc. GSl 9676 Family Yard Sale, Sun., Oct. 13, 8 AM, 180 Horizonview Dr. off Racetrack & Burkholder. Furn., home interiors, toys, size 5 clothes, something for everyone. GSl 9771 Yard Sale, Sat., 8-1. misc. housefiold goods, couch, loveseat, kids stuff, 517 Ave. K, BC. GSl 9760 Huge Sale at Storage Plus. Everything priced to sell. 1553 Foothill Dr., BC, Oct. 3, 4 & 5, 7 AM6 PM. GSl 9764 2 Family 604 Ave. U., Fn. 9/27, 9 A-1 P, Sat. 9/28, 8 A-3 P. Glass top dining set, clothes, toys, etc. GSl9293 GIANT SALE Oct. 5, 8 A-2 P corner Fifth and Ave. G. GSl9477 Rummage Sale Oct. 12th & 13th 9 AM-4 PM 171 Van Wagenen Building 8 HD Senior Citizens of Espinoza Terrace mri-til Yard Sale, Sat., 10/12, 9-12, 414 Horizon Dr., HD. GSl 6026 MOVING Yard Sale Oct. 12 & 13, 1317 Pinto, 7 AM-4 PM. Furn., misc. items. GSl 9715 YARD SALE Oct. 11-13, 7 am to ? A little bit of everything. Baby items, clothes, some maternity, misc. household, tires/ rims, jet skis, boat gas tanks, sport boats, too much to list! Lake Mead Dr. East to Shoshone. 234 Shoshone, HD. GSl 9682 Giant garage sale. Boulder City Trailer Park, 1501 Nevada Hwy., opposite Sp. 74, Sat. & Sun., 6-7, beds, AC'S, washers, dryers, refrig., freezer, lamps, 10019" TVs, even cars. H7K Multi-Family Garage Sale East of Pebble & S. Pecos, 29 Rue De Pare, Pebble Creek Development, 8 AM-3 PM, Sat, Oct. 12. Household goods, mens & ladies clothing, furniture, TV, golf club, luggage, vacuum cleaner, books & misc. SWAP MEET SWAP MEET "SELL OR SEEK" ORGANIZATIONS OR INDIVIDUALS Rent a Space at COMMUNITY SWAP MEET & CRAFT SALE: October 19,1996-Foothill Dr.-B.C. 7AM-1PM 15x15 space for $15.00 Send check & SASE to Faith Christian Church Attn: Bill Welcome PC Box 62326 Boulder City, NV 89005 435-6774 NAME: ADDRESS: l!IC.'t7 STORAGE RENTALS STORAGE RENTALS Mini Storage For Rent, 7x10 Off Bouider Hwy. & Atliol $35 monthiy • 24 hr. access. 431-4442 ENTERTAiNMENT VOICE PIANO DRAMA LESSONS O^Mikiet waltiMi HMMMmafertMl S65-8469 TiYjr/#illiU\VlL\^^A\\t^> • S WimtM OVAUTY VOCAL PIANO *'**'*^ OR KEYBOARD!!! Fjiirrtainmml. AvaOiMrrpr jrMtrorianiialienerate lifetime income stream. Motivation & high integrity a must Call 564-6875 1M13 FURNITURE Brass Bed, w/premium queen Ortho nr^t. set & frame, under warranty, all new, retail $839 sacrifice $275. Call 269-8979. Dining room table + 4 chairs, 2 leaves, excellent condition $150.2940740. MCI9705 FINANCIAL SERVICES $$CASH$$ Immediate $$ for structured settlements and deferred insurance claims. J.G. Wentworth. 1-800-3863582. FS19618 1st Trust Deed for Sale. $75,000, 15% $937.50 mo., 58% LTV capital, 59 mo. 800-966-1000. FS19652 Private party will loan money on your house-er lot. No red tape. Call LeRoy, 294-1238. FS1954<^ MERCHANTS OF AMERICA. Visa/Mastercard (unsecured). Re' quirements. Household income of $ 18,000-1-, valid checking or savings account, phone service in home, no open backruptcy. 1-800-2725814. FS19616 BEENTURNEDDOWN? Your search for a Real Estate Loan stops here. Heath Financial Services, Inc. 1-800-9971955. FS19628 A BAJILLION DOLLARS. CASH AVAILABLE NOW for Notes, Contracts & Annuities. Free Quotes, Free Information, Great Prices. Meghan Foss (800) 2756197. FS19623 Financial Freedom! Consolidate for lower monthly payments. Money loans $3,000$25,000 (O.A.C.). Call us now! Toil free 1-888-6246444. E-mail: Financial. Freedom Sympatco.ca FS19626 ALL CASH! Receiving payments on a mortgage? Why wait? Best prices paid nationwide, plus we pay transfer costs. Sell all/part. Purchase Equity Investors 1 800-999-9892. FS 19620 Jn, rOUR LOCAL IZ IWlrUllHlJoiiM •ClMtoiU SoOwMTT wnriTAitHRi^k •riI\T;KSHISl!TlT • EMn.dMas AimmoNs •EMl'UHTOJrUANl'.ES • LASEli rAIKnlx llIEltS • rAlKllLLrirKI'P •MAl-.Henr TAI* MEtlU • Ul lAirrEKLV TAX KEIM i Delivsr -. •733-0378-1 MEVADA FINMICIAL CONCEPTS ^^I7H6E. SahM^Aw., &tfU tan-H^ HEALTH 8. FITNESS ARTHRITIS PAIN RELIEF. 100% NATURAL EMU OIL. The application of EMU Oil aids in the relief of pain by reducing inflammation & swelling associated with Arthritis, muscle strain & sore joints. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 2 oz. bottle $19.95 (includes S&HJ M/C, VISA. TOLL FREE 1-888-4525292. MCI 5126 In Home Personal Training, for Women only Toning & Sculpting. C.P.T.-Ace Call Debbie 558-1950. MCI 8936 ACNE? COLD & FLU? STREP? Infections? Colloidal Silver known to be effective against 650 diseases. Free information: 1-800-735-5171 ext. T?'45jaei-9608 Thursday, October 10,1996 Panorama Pag* IS SUCCESS THE AMSWAY •Hf rbal Supplcinentt •Nilural Antltiollc 'S>ff Natural Waigtil Management •Free Samples wllti consultation •Full or Part Time Dlstrltiutors •Call Larry or VIvIa (702) 4S4-S98 •Advantage Marketing Systems, Inc. •These are some of our products •AM-JOO, Stiark Cartilage, Colloidal Plus •Super AntloikJant, Colloktal Silver Advertise in the NEWS PERSONALS "Powerful Novena of Childlike Confidence" (This Novena is to be said at the same time every hour for Nine consecutive hours -just one day). 20/20 WITHOUT GLASSES! Safe, rapid, non-surgical, permanent restoration in 6-8 weeks. Airline pilot developed. Doctor approved. Free information by mail. (800) 422-7320, ext. 222, (406) 961-5570, Fax(406)9615577. http://www.vision freedom.com SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. PE19627 ADOPTION. Large extendedfamily (& adopted cousins) can't wait to hug the baby we adopted. We're stable NW couple wishing to share our love of the outdoors & all the good things in life with our baby. On going confact OK. Call Sandy 206780-9783/206-842-6658 collect. PE19667 FREE SAMPLE. Raglsterad nurse SIzs 20 to size 6 Malntalnad 2 years NO DIETING Eat anything you want Guaranteed 896-5896 PERSONALS PERSONALS ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Mala7dayaawk.atSPM, Rac. Annex behind Boulder Dam Credit Union. ALANONALATEEW Z9.I15 Why Walk Alone? A Scrrue ()/ I'crfnt D.ite Christian Christian Presentable SWC Irog, 60 Bible study, books, square dancing. ISO slender, NS, NO, younger SWC lady Irog to tiop with No kids, no exes. Voice Mailbox No. 119S9 DWM,42 Interests Include: daiKing, musk;, plays. No one night stands. ISO SWCF. 35-45, with similar interests, and open lor discussion. Children wekiome. Vok;e Mailbox No.11985 SWM, 5*4", 55 Years Young Never noarried, enjoy walks with my dogs. Christian and classical music. Intelligent conversation and good sense ol humor. Seeks beautiful Christian mate. Voice Mailbox No.11996 Singles ISO Angel From Heaven DWM, 38. 56-, 145 lbs, ISO attractive SWF, 25-40. NS, who's honest, sincere, very romantk;, warmhearted, and down to earth. Enjoys movies, romantk; dinners, hand-inhand moonlit waits, cuddlln';. II you want love and respect, let's talk. Voce Mailbox No. 11988 Lady Seeks Gentleman Any race^, sincere, no games, lor Irlendshlp, maybe more. SWF. S0, 5', 120 bs.. NS, lit. anractlve; toves country, animals, laugtner and moie. Voice Mailbox No 11990 SWF, 36 ISO SWM. NO, 35-45, who likes country, music and watching movies. Friendship lirst, possible relationship. Voice Mailbox No, 11991 Wanted: Someone Special OWF. 50s, ISO honest, romantic, NS, S/OWM, no dependents. I tove C&W musK, Las Vegas, traveling, movies, swimming, laughter, massages, quiet evenings. Vok;e Mailbox No. 11986 Wanted: Special Woman DWCM, 5'10'. 160 lbs, attractive, romantic. ISO SWCF, 44-54. NS, nice ligure, attractive, romantic, enjoys cuddling, dancing, movies, camping, hiking, snow skiing. Harl^, and being together. Voice Mailbox No. 11984 Seniors DWM, 60s, Financially Secure Retired and alone, seeks lady who would like to start over Must be easygoing and love animals. Vok;e Mailbox No. 11987 TIME RUNNING OUT? Call 1-800-437-5814 today to renew your ad—nin the same ad or place a new one! LookineFor Love? T Try Perfect Datc.V ABBREVIATIONS S-SINGLEO-DIVORCEO M-MALEF-FEMALE L-LAT)N I-8LACKA-ASIANW-WHITE H-HISPANIC CA-CATHOLIC C-CHRISTIAN J-JEWISH IDS-LATTER-DAY SAINT LTIH0NG-1ERM RaATIONSHIPS NS-NONSMOKER ND-NONORINKER ISO-IN SEARCH OF Don't be late for your Perfect Date! CalM-800-437-5814 ''' today'tirplace your free'25-word;print adi To place an ad: To respond: • Cdl 1-)(M37-58I4 Open 24 hours 7 days a week e tiifllfftopfactanad twoonyouf ^9tKr^ ate nmwn ntponu hmapartmkl PyMcK fanaovvafanotua 619WCole9eAve Stale Colege, PA 16801 ByFa)cl-800-856-&588 24HainaDaf{ We wJ mol ^ inlormdion you need ID lalieve yov iwpenMi A(t ^nid be 25 v-205-53a5 • rVt'l'(nJlal(vlaaiy raftrudmi • YouwIbediagadSl 99 pv minuti to )ur Viia*cr B We provide a fflff 25-word print ad, ^ff voice greeting, and two fflff calls to retrieve responses per wi;ek! That means t^ere • s no cost to you, the advertiser! TcKMae(int a^Bl hte Bnc bK Ai (Mm l0.347IS nedi loai pi*c b kac (II jme OKlHoac (ioB kfac Bkoiil cMiirai f) M iai necoK IB in Boadod I tnx yoK jni cat ai icqxni • Ian h MHOMitan^*aBaoMa*. Ptofa DK<>'. tr • a Bis ad wlaiAn # AetiMeriKriac. Kr niK Mornani al I OMT'-SM laBBalkMMfenilciaMif aot Ml • •1(1 III ri^ Ode IfMoft Sid your wriiian reiparaa, or pipca in on •ndape, and wnit ihe toiee moifeoK rwTiber on iha ouliidt. At wrili iha doh a ^ pi^ iha od appaarad if\. r\ji ha MMd nafona or wwpe MI O Jor^v Wwpe obng wif ifa S7 ferwurA m lea. You moy waam oa many mfxnm at you wi^, along witft )7 tor EAOf rvpomi. Oiedi or money ordar a4. pl. poyw* X) MKt D(*'"\^ Pwiondi. No cadt Alnx poilo^iVw tnoi loc NAd (Ml Nnonob 01^44 619WColigaA Sk*Gligi,M 16801 NOTICES AREA CONTACT PERSON needed for higlily reputed international high school student exchange program. Call Diane at 1 800-733-2773 for information. I\^C19615 VACATION RENTALS Brian IHead Condo rental, sleeps 8, cool summer fun, mtn. biking, fishing, hiking, festivals, summer rates, $65/night weekdays, $90/night weekr ends, 702-294-2320. MCI 9580 CRAFTS Tole Painters let us cut for you. Reasonable prices, fast sen/ice, 5650971. MCI 9595 PETS/ANIMALS Betty Hofin'Sffion pmfit: Anirhal Adoption LtcHis accepting unlimited numberof unwantedpets by appointment only. You are welcome to view adoptable pets 7 days a week. Call first 361-2484. THERE IS NO GUIDED TOURS OF THE PREMISES AT THIS TIME, OF NATIVE, NON-NATIVE, OR WILD AND EXOTIC ANIMALS. PA14684 FREE KITTENS 5659973. PA19648 y FREE to good home, adorable kitten, 41/2 mo., orange tabby, MUST BE IN DOOR CAT, WILL BE SCREENED, 731-0542. PA19687 FREE gray kittens, box -. trained, 293-3775. PA19750 THE ANIMAL FOUNDATION will help you financially spay or neuter your cat or dog. Very inexpensive in Las Vegas. 384-3333 BC PA ADOPT CATS & Dogs from your shelters. Save a Life. BC PA LAS VEGAS VALLEY HUMANE SOCIETY. Beautiful, healthy, kittens, cats, puppies, dogs. Spayed/neutered, tested, shots. PetsMart, Trop-Eastern store only. Wed., Thurs., Fri., Sat., Sun., 11-4. PA19660 FREE FAMILY FUN SAFARI IN THE DESERT. Visitors welcome for guided tours daily to see lions, bears, tigers, cougars, various parrots and hundreds of others. 3^12484. PA19570 Congo African gray beautiful big healthy baby, 645-3786. PA17261 2HORSECORRALSBC $15,000 ea., move right in, 293-5673. PA19677 LOST & FOUND LOST small black miniature Dachshund, missing 10/3rd, PM, vicinity Boulder Hwy. & Pacific, 565-6348. LF19653 LOST sm. black female poodle. Pacific & Mulberry, 565-8158. LF19679 LICENSED CHILDCARE Licensed daycare, 1 opening, 2-4 yr. old, M/F, 6 AM-6PM, learning activities & TLC, 564-6007, MCI 8917 DOMESTIC HELP Responsible Loving Mom w/exc. refs. Avto Babysit in your home eves. Wknds. Kery, 558-0008. PHI 8895 House cleaning for a European touch, call 5587428. DH18859 Qualitychildcareinmy home. Loving Christian Environment. Ex. Ref., Michelle, 293-1780. PHI 8824 Stay Home Mother of three, is willing to watch your Children, in my New HD Home. Close to Pooley Elem. School, Lots of fun & TLC Guaranteed. Call 558-6248. PHI 9338 Will babysit in my home, grandmother type, reasonable rates, all meals incl.. Horizon & 95 Freeway, 565-9440. PHI9344 Doing alterations & slip covers for couches, 2604172. PHI9440 Mother of 1 yr. old would like to trade childcare services, half days/full days, 568-1934. DH19225 Professional ironing & sewing alterations & clothing repair, 2934200. DH19721 HELP WANTED CRUISE SHIPS HiRINGEam upto$2,000+/nno. workina 6n Cmise Ships or Lano-Tour companies. WorkJ Travel. No exp. necessary. Fordirectoiy call: 1-206-971-3552 ML C89778 HW19613 f HELP WANTED Construction Help Wanted Boulder City Area, 294-7000, Leave Msg. HW18856 '97 model search, looking for new faces for an exciting career. We'll be interviewing in Las Vegas. Sat., Oct. 12. Call 1800-3 15-2485. HW19409 CLERK—All shifts. Must be 21 yrs. cashier/ stockroom. Mighty Mart Convenience Store located in Green Valley. 263-4222. HW19641 $1000s POSSIBLE READING BOOKS. Part Time. At Home. Toll Free 1-800-898-9778, Ext. R3804 for Listings. HOUSEKEEPER NEEDED Part time. Please apply: Nevada Inn Motel, BC HW18892 PT during day, FT hrs. in evening, apply 'at store location, 1311 Nevada Hwy., BC, 29 4-4496. •ATTN: HENDERSON* Postal Positions. Permanent FT for clerk/sorters. Full benefits. E'er exam, app. & salary info, call 708-906-2350 Ext. 6398, 8 AM-8 PM. HW19429 ENGRS./INSPECTORS, Las Vegas, 10 Electrical, 10 Mechanical, 10 Civil/ Structural. Degreed or equiv. for Utility inspection. Call Johnson Service Group 1-800-5448099 or Fax to: 314-2052824. EOE. HW19587 Help Wanted, all shifts, cook, counter and asst. manager. Apply at Frosty Freeze, BC HW19552 Strong design/production person neededfordiqital dept. MAC oriented. Must know Photoshop, Illustrator & Ouark. IBM knowledge a+. Experienced only. Salary (JOE. Strong color portfolio required. Call Milo, 7321878. HW14378 CARRIERS needed, professional only need apply with reliable transportation. Apply in person at: Henderson Home News, 2 Commerce Center, Henderson. HW17780 ALASKA EMPLOYMENT Fishing Industry. Earn up to $3,000$6,000-tper month. Room & Board! Transportation! No experience necessary! Male/Female. Age 18-70. For more information call: (206)-971-3512 ext. A89771. .HW19611 CONVENTION SERVICES ATTENDANT (PART-TIME ONLY) SALARY: $7.25/hour. Pay to increase to $9.00/ hour subject to City Council approval on 10/ 15/96. REQUIREMENTS: Equivalent of high school diploma and work experience requiring heavy lifting and strenuous physical exertion, including use of hand and power tools. Experience with tact is hefpfuL SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: Possession of, or the ability to obtain, appropriate Nevada Driver's License, and maintenance of a satisfactory driving record. WHERE TO APPLY: City application form must be submitted to and received by the Personnel Department, Room 200, City Hall, 240 Water Street, Henderson, Nevada 89015, no later than Wednesday, October 23,1996, by 5:00 p.m., to be considered for this recruitment. NO APPLICATIONS WILL BE GIVEN OUT AFTER 4:00 P.M. ON THE CLOSING DATE OF THIS RECRUITMENT. Employment packet MUST be obtained from the Personnel Department; resumes only WILL NOT be accepted in lieu of employment application. HOURS OF OPERATION: MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY, 7:30 AM. TO 5:30 P.M. SMOKE-FREE WORK ENVIRONMENT. AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER. HW19737 SALESPERSON—MARINE needed for Marine accessories, including wakeboards, water skis, etc. Start $8/hr. + commission. Marine Products Pro Shop, 702-456-0122 (Las Vegas). HW17379 Experienced mig welder/ fabricator, must be drug free, apply in person, 668 Wells Rd.,BC.HW18224 Carpenter/Installer Quality finish person to aid install of Exhibitry at Hoover Dam Visitor Center. Prevailing wage/ benefits. 8-12 weeks work. Phone Manny at 294-3580. HW19134 Wanted Grocery Cashier* Stocker. Experience required. Must be 21. 293-4213. HW19729 HAIR STYLIST & MANICURIST STATION AVAIL. Pl8. Call 2934322. HW19720 HELP WANTED Sm. but fast moving print shop in need of press person. Exper. on multilith 1250 press. Also needs expertise in all phases of camera, bindery, layout & pasteup. PT position, $16.50/hr. Apply in person, 2827 N. Green Valley Pkwy., M-F, 9-4. NOPHONECALLSPLS. HW19545 PRODUCTION WORK: Work Clothes Rental is now accepting applications for full or part time positions. Flexible hours, no weekends. Apply at 568 Parkson Rd, Hd., Mon.-Fri. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. HW18665 Work Clothes Rental is now acceptina applrcations for PT afternoons, M-F, 1-6:30. Good after school opportunity! Apply in person at 568 Parkson Rd., Hend. NO PHONE CALLS PLS. HW19640 Crew member needed for VERY BUSY 7-11. Must be 21 yrs. APPLY IN PERSON ONLY to Dale or Larry, 850 E. Horizon Pr., corner of Boulder Hwy. HW19637 HAIR STYLIST* MANICURIST NEEDED-Exp. preferred. Full service salon. Call 294-8477. HW14188 $$CASINO JOBS$$ Now hiring 17,00050,000/yr. casinos & riverboafs. No exp. necessary. For immediate hiring info 407-338-6100 ext.NVl01$,6AM-6PM, 7 days. HWl 4465 DEXTER SHOE FACTORY OUTLET Now hiringforMGR. & ASST. MGfi. forourstore @ the Factory Stores of America on Las Vegas Blvd. F/T career minded individuals who are selfmotivated & enthusiastic. Benefit pkg. incl: Pd. Sick Days/Holidays/Vacation pay w/Health Insurance & more. Call Mike @ 896-0713. HWl 9506 LAUNDRY PERSON Exper. Apply in person between 7 AM-3 PM, Best Western Lake Mead, 85 W. Lake Mead Dr., HD. HWl 9563 Homemakers do you like housecleaning? Come work with me. It's fun. Must have own transportation. Call 2322284. HWl 8571 CLINICAL DIRECTOR. Southern Nevada Children's Home seeks licensed therapist to fill the position of Clinical Director. The qualified candidate must have at least a master's degree in social work, psychology or related field and have either an MFT, LCSW or comparable license. The Clinical Director must be a highly skilled individual with experience in residential and/or group home settings. Salary will be DOE. Send your resume to: Director, 801 So. Adams Blvd., Boulder City, NV 89005 or FAX it to: 2934251, HW1J410 Manicurist to take over following, 293-0129 or 564-1943. HWl 9411 SIOOO's POSSIBLE TYPING. Part Time. At Home. Toll Free 1-800898-9778, Ext. T-3804 for Listings. HWl 7498 Hairstylists wanted for GV salon, rental, call Audrey 458-0063. HWl 7787 $1000's POSSIBLE TYPING. Part Time. At Home. Toll Free 1-800898-9778, ext. T-3804 for listings. HWl 9255 SIOOO's POSSIBLE READING BOOKS. Part Time. At Home. Toll Free 1-800-898-9778, Ext. R3804 for Listings. HWl 9254 ATTN: Moms and Grandmas counter help wanted, day shift, M-f^. Apply Frosty Freeze, BC HW19555 MANICURIST NEEDED Exp. preferred. Full service salon. Call 2948477. HWl 4376 MAIDS exper. Apply in person between 7 AM-3 PM, Best Western Lake Mead, 85 W. Lake Mead Dr., HD. HWl 8882 WILDLIFE/CONSERVATION JOBS. Game wardens, security, maintenance, etc. No exp. necessary. Now Hiring. For Info. Call (219) 7940010 ext. 9007. 6AM8PM/7 days. HWl 8476 MOTHER'S DREAM. Stay home, lose weight, make money. Part-time/ Fuli-tinne. Full training. Pail vacations. Call now 702-598-2958. HWl 9631 Need exper. block layer ASAP, 565-1217. HWl 9774 FRONT DESK CLERK immed. opening. Super 8 Motel, 704 m Hwy., BC. Pis. apply in person. No exper necessary. No phone calls pis. HELP WANTED Chiltjcare needed for 3 & 6 yr. old, downtown HD area, hrs. vary, reliable, 558-3212. HWl 9590 LICENSED LIFE & HEALTH-AGENT NEEDED. Quality products, high commissions with advance before issue, lead system, and benefits. (Must qualify for advances* benefits) Call 1-800-252-2581. HW19614 DIRECTOR BREWERY ARTS CENTER Carson City, NV. ($25,000$30,000 DOE) BA degree/equivalent work. Call: (702) 883-1976, Fax (702) 883-1922 or E-Mail: lujano@ix.netcome.com. for job description. EVALUATION TECHNICIAN (Part-Time) SALARY: $654.84-795.60/81Weekly (Based on 18 hours per week) Actual rate to be negotiated with candidate selected. REQUIREMENTS: Bachelor's Degree in psychology, social work, or closely related field, and two (2) years of experience conducting evaluations or providing substance abuse counseling OR an equivalent combination of closely related training and experience. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: Must possess BADA Certification as an Evaluation Technician or Drug and Afcohol Abuse Counselor at time of application. Ability to speak Spanish is an asset in this oositlon. WHERETOAPPLY:City application form must be submitted to and received by the Personnel Department, Room 200, City Hall, 240 Water Street, Henderson, Nevada 89015, no laterthan Tuesday, November 12 1996, by 5:00 p.m., to be considered for this recruitment. NO APPLICATIONS WILL BE GIVEN OUT AFTER 4:00 P.M. ON THE CLOSING DATE OF THIS RECRUITMENT. Employment packet MUST be obtained from the Personnel Department; resumes only WILL NOT be accepted in lieu of employment application. HOUfIs OF OPERATION: MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY, 7:30A.M. TO 5:30 P.M. SMOKE-FREE WORK ENVIRONMENT. AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER. HWl 9791 Secretarial position-Active Real Estate Officetelephone skills, typing & general office skills-must know Windows 3 & 95 & Microsoft word. Submit resume to: Century 21 JR Realty, 101 E. Horizon Dr., Hend. 89015. HWl 9684 HELP WANTED GV area, sitter PT days, $3/hr., 435-4822. HWl 9518 NATIONAL PARKS HIRING-Positions are now available at National parks. Forests & Wildlife Preserves. Benefits + Bonuses! For employment directory, call (206) 971-3622 ext. N89771. HW19612 aaaaaaaaam j^r^-. 1 Prr, 1 F/T Hard • • ** • '* Count Position, • Hotel Maida, • Security Guards, Keno Runners, • Dish Waahers t • Air Conditioning • Tachnlclan, must be carllfied. Apply Hotel Front Desk Railroad Past Hotel t Casino, 2S0OS. Boulder Hwy., HD. No Phone Calls Please. Pr^el1lployment drug testing • regulretj. (^ • aammamamaaa SECURITY GUARD PT Security Guard Must have experience. Pis. call 433-7706 **P0STAL JOBS ** $12.68/hr. to start, plus benefits. Carriers, sorters, computer trainees, maintenance. Call today for application & information. 6am-6pm. 7 days. 1-800-267-5715, Ext. P81 TOW DRIVERS t:^x Full Time Avail. DAILY 4 WEEKLY PAY Short/Long Term Assign. Now taking applications for: CLERICAL WAREHOUSE CONSTRUCTION Apply in person, 5 am-3 pm, Mon.-Fri. 331 Water St., Henderson Exp. preferred but not necessary. Must be clean cut, have valid Nevada driver's license with current DMV printout. Must live in BC Apply in person at 705 Juniper Way, BC CAFE SENSATIONS G.V. Cafe seeking full time expe. pantry cook. Kitchen supervisor position available bring references. Applications accepted In person M • W F, 19amto11 am, 2-4pm, 4350 E. Sunset #110 at Athlnean. Henderson. HW255 WENDY'S Now hiring Day/Night Cashiers Premium Payl 1131 W. Sunset (Across from the Galleria) SHIFT MANAGERS with 1+yrs. mgmt. exp. also needed. EOE DRIVERS AND LABORERS 50 Needed Daily/Weekly Pay Apply LABOR EXPRESS 39 E. Basic Rd. RESUMES ProHttlanatly Don* Rmtorfbly Priced BCrS BUSINESS SERVICES OpMi tWly a lo ( 1400 Colorado (a Ash) B.C. .. 293-5361 VM III mill wrf Tw MMW *t AVON MaikwHolM (702)2tl-170 Call Today! Avon HaaAnacatarVOUl ToluyorMI CaM Roele MaanMn 293-0110 kta. LaeeiwMp Itop^ iiua HELP WANTED •••••• Reataurant Hostess/ Cashier line cooks & prep cooks. Apply at Restaurant Cashier Riilroad Pass Hotel & Casino, 2800 S.Boukler Hwy., HND.EOE Pre^mployment drug testing required. taaaaaam a"ii' Airline Jobs! Now hiring, $10-$2S/lir. All poaitlona skilled & un-skilled. Excel, pay/benarits. Call1-S04-429-9229, Ext. 4626 A39, 24 hrs. m icn Now hiring, McDonald's College & Horizon, Managers, all shifts, must have previous experience, contact 565-1465 for information & application. R.E. SALES FREE SEMINAR Come Join the *1 Century 21 office In the SW ft Lea Vegas. Wa are seeking qualified candidataa to begin a new career. For the best one-on-ona training andsupport.EastandWest offices, call Joe, 435-8300, Century 21 Money World. "a ngvMpM, HDTSL II CASINO (R) Both proptrties art accapting applications for: Exp. Gift Shop Cashiers (Must be 21) P/T Slot Club Clerk Exp. Line Cook Snack Bar Attendant Guest Room Attendant Internal Maintenance Supenrisor Apply In Parton Qold SWIw HoM, Jam, NV. Parsonnd Dept M-F, 7-5 PM Excel. Benellt* S O^ortOtill/ 40tK Program Hilr Analysli Drug TttI Rtqulred. Mor* exciting CIrcut CIrcut Propertlet ZlDC Seeking articulate, personable, and mature minded individuals, to conduct follow up phone calls, with graduates and associates of distinguished institutions. Integrity and a commitment a must. Afternoon and weekend shifts available. A professional, and friendly environment. $7 hourly wage, part time positions only. 565-9038 leave a message. nppi.ediie Temporary/Full-Time EmploymenI Services IMMEDIATE OPENINGS! NEVER A FEE Receptionist, Word Processing, Data Entry Oper. & More. 898-1956 3510 E. Troplcana, #K at Pecos liEASi RiDGE^Temps' Is Recruiting for the following positions: CLERICAL GENERAL •Receptionist •Construction Cleanup •Data Entry 'Warehouse Jobs •Accounting Clerk •Production •General Secretarial 'Light Indualrial Up to $9.00 per hour Up to $7.00 per hour caH 566-9662 for an appointment todayl NEVER A FEE 320 S. Boulder Hwy., Ste. 102, fl*n'^f'?niNYi NEVER A FEE •******•*•*•*** • ***•*•** SECURITY OFFICERS Needed for greater Henderson, GV area,* FULL TIME and PART TIME, flexible hours.* Must have dependable transportation &* phone. Call ALLIED SECURITY, 795-3317,* Monday-Friday, 8:30-4:30 pm, 1515 E.^ Tropicana Ave., Suite 395. EOE/M-F/H-V. 17764* litASTRiDGt Tem ps' 320 S. Boulder Hwy. Suite 102 'Stockers-Taggers SS.IO/hr. Huge tent salel We're looklngforclean cut, reliable Individuals who Will commit to a 30-60 day assignment. Fun JobI 2 shifts available May be drug tested Call: HendeiYon 566-9662 Las Vegas 732-0160 1*423 NO FEE NO FEE IMMEDIATE OPENINGS FOR ManaKrs, Assistant ManaKsrs Crsw Apply: 118 E. Lake Maad 690 N. Van* Vsrds A Sunsst or S06 Buchanan, BC (Von'e Shoppins Cnter) HELP WANTED Cruise Ship Jobs! Earn $300/$900 wkly. Year round positions. Hiring both men/women. Free room and board. Will train. Call 7 days (407) 875-2022 Ext. 6049 C39. Casa Flores Mexican Restaurant now taking applications for PT waiter/waitresses, experience preferred. Apply in person at 930 NV Hwy.. BC, after 4 PM. HWl 9454 Handyman needed for Boulder City rental. Approx. 20 hrs. per wk., $7/hr. Call 293-5000,122 pm, ask for Tony. HWl 9520 HELP WANTED *••**•**• ••*** i, GOLD STRIKE INN • & CASINO NOWHIRING: WaKrassM -* Sacutlly Quardi Englnoers .^ HostMi/Caahhn i, KMM Rufwtart ^ Porters But Pareone Catino Cage Caehlert HoUMkovptrt, Una cootn it dittwailwre 4r ^ Pait-lina gm Shop parson. .^ Apply m personal CaslMrtCage US HWY t3* New Hoover Dam •*•***•***••* Help Wanted, all shifts, cook, counter and asst. manager. Apply at Frosty Freeze. BC iHWl9553 REAL ESTATE AGENTSNEW OR EXPERIENCED Grow along with me. The best is yet to be! Established Broker moving to a NEW OFFICE In a PRIME HENDERSON LOCATION, for a confidential interview, call Ellie at Knapp Realty, 566-8185. HOUSE RENTALS 2 BD., 1 BATH APT. Newly remodeled, $495/ mo., 293-6248. HR15447 4 bd., 2 ba., 10 Wyoming, HD, $725/mo. + dep., 564-6742. Hl4l8396 Forrent, 3bd., 1-1/2ba. home, walking distance to schools, avail. Nov. 1 st, $750/mo., 294-1805. HR19507 BC4bd.,2ba.,fam.&liv. rm., frpL, formal din., 2 car gar., big yd., $1000/ mo., 1st, last-I-dep., NO PETS, taking applications, 293-2697. Avail. Nov. 1st. HR19585 $$$$STOP DREAMING Learn how I make $5000/ wk. at home. Sounds too good to be true? You can do it. I have first class team support. We train. No selling. No MLM. Get paid directly w/Cashiers Checks. Order our FREE powerful audio tape, 4541978. HR18893 Forrent4bd.,2bth. Lewis Home, 1500 SF $850/ mo. Call 293-2939 ask for Roger Realtor, Anctior Realty. HR19748 HOUSE RENTALS BC golf course home, 3 bd., 2-1/2 ba. $1400,5964956. HR18846 1 bd., 1 ba., $450 incl. water + dep., NO PETS, 565-8296. HR19356 OldHD3bd„2ba., 1800 SF, Ig. fenced yd. $825/ mo. + deps., avail, now, 433-4555. HR19600 Sunset McDonald Ranch 55-(-, brand new, upgraded, 2bd., 2ba., 2 car, 796-6061. HR19603 Vacant, 2 bd. near St. Rose Hospital, all floors tile & kit. counter, lots of rm., in gr. location. Fenced back yd. for pet, $700/mo., $600 dep., $100/pet dep. Easy move in, call 564-3969. 2 bd., 1 ba, house for rent, $850. 293-5115. HRi9772 3 bd., 3 ba., $900 mo.-I$900 dep. avail. 1 Nov., 2 car gar., BC. 293-0986. For Sale, or Lease Gorgeous 4 bd,, 2 ba.. Key Largo Home. Top Terrace, Superb Lake View, 229,900 or 1350 per mo. 294-0323 or 293-2511. 2bd., 1ba.,quietBC historic st. Fenced yd., central A/C, 1 yr. lease, owner/broker, $725/mo., Sr. Disc. 294-1444. ,,,7,j "FOR RENT" TOWNSITES:" 1 bd., 1 ba. Apt. $475 Rent/$400 Sec. 2 bd., 1 ba. Home $575 Rent/$500 Sec. CITY VIEW TERRACE 2 bd., 1 ba. Home $750 Rent/$750 Sec. HIGHLAND HILLS-Homes 3 bd., 1 3/4 ba. $850 Rent/$825 Sec. 3 bd., 1 3/4 ba. $895 Rent/$900 Sec. 4 bd., 2 baVPOOL $1075 Rent/$1000 Sec. SUN CrrV/MCDONALD RANCH (Age 55 & Older) 2 bd., 1 3/4 ba. Home $950 Rent/$900 Sec. Call Century 21 JR Realty— 564-5142 For More Details CONDO SALES BC 2 bd., 2-1/2 ba. Lake View Condo. Hend, Neat, 3 bd., 1-3/4 ba. house priced to sell $85,990. Heinz Prudential S.W. Realty, 293-0545. CS 1 bd. condo, new cabinets, carpet, paint, fixtures, stove. fJicest one on the block. Call 5664108. CS19437 CONDO SALES LUXURY CONDO for sale by owner, 2 bd., 2 ba., vaulted living rm. ceiling, 1 level, 565-3808. CS19436 Boulder Hills 2 bd., 1 1/2 ba., all appl., new paint/ carpet $67,000, by owner. 294-0726. CS19728 BRAND NEW!! Villa Florence Townhomes @ Lake Mtn. Dr. & Florence Models open Mon., Thurs., Fri. & Sat. 1700 Sf $230,000 to 2800 Sf $270,000 Broker co-op: Multacc access if closed MOBILE HOMES 1978 Flamingo, BC Moores Trailer Park. 12x44.1 bd.. carport + 2 sheds, furn., excel cond. $18,000, OBO. 8988376. MH19586 1976 Fleetwood 12x60. w/8x8 & 14x16 expando rms., excel, cond, Sr. Prk., Gingerwood, call Luke, 379-2000 Valley Mobile Home. MH19597 2 bd., 1 ba. set up in local park mature lawn encbsedpatk), washer and dryer heat AC swamp after 5 PM. 293-0401. Shown bv .ippt BC MH 16634 MOBILE HOMES ik****************i| GINGERWOOD SEN. PK. dt>l. wida almoat 2 bd., den, 11/3 ba. fum., carport, shed ItOO SF. imoled. occup. BC S34/S0 FIRM SM-S403 iMse TRAILERS RENT OR SALE Park Models good for 1 or 2 people Rents start $375/up Sales start S1500/up Ask for Donna/Marm 294-8888 MOBILE HOMES 2 bd. home in beautiful Gingenwood Senior Park, many extras. $21,500. Enjoy swimming pool, therapy pool, recreation programs, etc. Call for details. 293-1908. Cornado Estates, 60x24 Fleetwood w/land, furn., 2bd.,2ba.,allappl., Ig. liv. rm. w/wet bar, cent, air, new vinyl alum, siding, awnings, porches, cov'd. carport & patio shed 12x17. fenced cor-, ner lot, no fees $90's, by owner. 294-2982. COMMERCIAL RENTALS OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT. Prinne BC location. Available 9/1/96. 294-0225. C019343 BC off. and wse. w/attach. liv. qtrs. +/-9,000 sq. ft. Less than .60/ft! Matt, EBC Comm. 2935781. C019589 Storage Plus Office warehouse suite 1000 sq. ft., 1557 Foothill Dr. Frontage view BC $650 mo. With $550 Security Dep., 293-3115. C019562 BC approx. 100O SF warehouse w/bath in new plaza. Terms negotiable. 293-1844 weekdays to see. C013992 • Lease commercial manufacturing 600 or 1200 SF, industrial condo., 707 Canyon Rd, BC, Unit #6, 293-0434. C019726 Office-Warehouse BC, 1200 SF 10 ft. roll up door, 709-F Yucca St., $680/mo. incl. utilities, 293-4757. C019730 APT. RENTALS 2 bd. unfurn duplex apart. Clean & roomy. Call 5642524 after 5 PM. AR19692 2 bd., 1 ba. $500 $200 dep. no cat, dog... studio $320 $200 dep. util. pd. 307E. Minister, HD. 5645712. AR19718 Quiet 1 bd. apt., no pets, non-smoker W/D/F avail. $500 -f dep. 293-0932. AR19753 1-3bd., 2ba. apart., no pets. 2-2 bd., 2 ba. apart., no pets, 293-7775. AR19768 FOR RENT: Kitcfienettes, $65/wk. Utilities pd. SHADY REST f^OTEL, 565-7688. AR9597 Beautiful apartment for rent, 1 bd., $465/mo. incl. util., W/D avail. Sr. citizen & NON-SMOKER, call 293-4523. ARl 6543 Cherry Lynn Apts. 1 bdrm. No pets. Sr. preferred. Lease for 12 mo. 293-0420. ARl9526 Clean, green. Boulder City's finest, very modern, most affordable apart. w/2bd., 1 ba., unfurnished, all elec., dw, Ig. closets, balcony, sep. storaqe rm., coin laundry rm., on street parking, NO POOL. NO PETS, UPSTAIRS. Perfect for 1 or 2 quiet, mature ADULTS ONLY. Local owner operated, $525/mo. -i$400 dep. Min. 6 mo. lease. Call293-3324. AR19285 HEND., 2 bd., 1 ba., central air, stove, refrig., blinds, carpeted, fenced yd. w/patio, owner occupied. $500/mo. -I$300 sec. dep. 565-5462. ARl 3798 Teddy's Kitchenettes, Just bring your toothbrush. Everything furnished PH. 293-1716. BC MOBILE HOMi BC mobile for rent: 2 bd./ 1 ba„ in nkre well caredi for area, nice addition, loj yd., will accept pets, $72S + deposit. Call Kay, C21' B. Dam, 293-4663 or 477-^ 4818. MH19546 ~ i Boulder City Beauty -• 1991 Silvercrest. Im-J maculate, interior de-J signer owned. 1651 sq.t ft, on 90x110 lot, 3 bd., 2; ba., fireplace. Lake Mt.i Views. Trade?, $130K) OBO, 294-4416.* MH19510 COMMERCIAL RENTALS PRIME RETAIL OR OFFICE Great location 1402 Nevada Hwy., BC 600 sq. ft., 750 sq. ft. & 1175 sq.ft. Ideal for Beauty shop, RE, Ins. or Sales. Call Owner 293-2898 Of(/Whse 12,000-157,000 SF .36psf-.42psf Hend area Avail. 9/96 Doug/Lor! CB Commercial 369-4800 BC Historic Distiict Lease 800 SF.Beautiliil Suite Office Pinf'essional Retail Great Security in Eiicinsed Mall 294-8455 VONS SHOPPING CENTER Retail Space Available Neal Siniakin, Broker APT. RENTALS 1 bedroom apt. $350 + dep. NO CHILDREN OR PETS. 293-2309. NEW KITCHENETTES, phone, satellite, maid service. STARVIEW fylOTEL 293-1658. BC ARl4278 2 bdrm. apt. $500/mo. 897-9421. ARl 9599 Lg. unfurn. studio, nonsmoker, gar., priv. entry, W/D, all util., cable, $550/ mo., 564-3637. APARTMENTS AS LOW AS $275 a Month furnlstwd • • 564-g§fei ,0,, I II ill IT' In HO by Basic HS, 2nd fl. Like new, 2 bd., SSOO/mo. -f deps. cat OK, W/D on premises. Mgr. lives on property. Avail, immediately Pis. call 566-8996 Iv. msg. NEW KITCHENETTES STARVIEW, 293-1658 Gated Duplex -1 bd., ftilly carpeted. Central air, w/stove & frig. Big backyard $430 • Sec. 433-6069 Tom's Boulder Inn 1 Lg. apart., fully furnished with cable 293-4445 Cell 682-7914 MERLAYNE VILLA APTS. —Units less than 2 yrs. old— 2 bd., 2 ba., microwave & dishwasher, $625/mo. 409 & 417 Mei\ayne • Near Paik & Grade School 565-9582 CASA DE ALICIA AND M&M II APT We're not giving away the kitchen sink. WE DON'T HAVE TO. Let our features & professional staff speak for themselves. 1,2 & 3 bdrm. from $550. Pools, picnic areas. Walk in closets. 293-1615 *"'" Boulder Citv. ATLANTIC CITY APARTMENTS Clean, Quality 1-2-3 Bedroom Apartments In Henderson • Central Air & Heat • Appliances • Blinds • Carpets • Water Paid • Washer/Dryer Available Apartments are $420 & up per nwnth. newly remodeled, spacious near schools, park & shopping. 565-7028 1041

PAGE 40

• 11 • • P^ P ^.WJ i a i Mj >g ^*5.q.^^VV '' J '' '' ? ?^ ^ i ^iV P 'L i ^ 'W > lg^^'P^iPW^^^*W'W^g^^^^^^ i^KjiT^j I Ptgt 16 Panorama Thursday. October 10.1996 Thursday, October 10, 1996 Panorama Pagal? ,11 i< I'. I'. More Trees Are Needed Where We live More Trees Are Needed for Wildlife Trees help mal• \f 'f f. if -fe % Metric Tons 1 / X^^Ozone 1 __.: / .-^ __ / \. _^Particulates •. / ^NOj \ \ A.^CO '^^^\\ // ~— ^^-A 1 J F MAMJJASONDI Month 1 Air Pollution Removed in One Urt)an Region (Chicago) By Trees Trees produce oxygen that we breathe. In addition, trees remove air pollution by lowering air temperature, through respiration, and by retaining particulates. More Trees Are Needed to Increase Property Values ji^ sttifh^ a ^^mf 'flfAeryk maty. ff^ bttie^ cm bum.. ftodi-lfitK You Can Join The Arbor Day Foundation And Get 10 Free Trees • Nonprofit Foundation sponsors IVees for America^ campaign The National Arbor Day Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to tree planting and environmental stewardship, is sponsoring a TVees for America campaign to plant millions of trees. You can participate. NVhen you join the Arbor Day Foundation, you wiU receive ten free Colorado Blue Spruces, or other conifers selected to grow in your area. Colorado Blue Spruces have silver bluegreen color and compact conical shape. They are guaranteed to grow, or the Foundation will replace them free of charge. Your six to twelve inch trees will come postpaid with easy planting instructions. TVees are shipped at the right time for planting in your area, February through May in the spring or October through mid December in the fall. You will also receive a membership card, a subscription to the Foundation's colorful bimonthly publication, "Arbor Day," a free National Arbor Day Foundation wall calendar, and The IVee Book with information about tree planting and care. America needs more trees The United States has lost a third of its forest cover in the last 200 years. Our towns ai|d cities should have twice as many street trees £is we have today. We need more trees around our homes and throughout our communities. We need more trees to protect our farm fields and OUT rivers and streams, lb provide wood for our homes and a thousand products we use every day. Trees help conserve energy IVees cool our homes and entire cities in the sununer, and slow cold winter winds. Shade trees and windbreaks can cut home utility bUls 15-35%. rruj Colorado Blue Spruces can be planted as an energy-saving windbreak or screen, as individual ornamentals, or as living Christmas Trees. Trees clear the air we breathe. They provide life-giving oxygen while they remove particulates from the air and reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide. IVees along rivers and streams help keep the water clean. IVees reduce the risk of flooding. Planted as field windbreaks, they fight topsoil erosion. IVees provide food, shelter, and nesting sites for songbirds. IVees increase property values, and make our homes and nei^borhoods more livable. You can help by planting trees. Join today, and plant your "Dnees for America! The National Afbor Pay Foundation • • • 7-; 2-to-6 inch spruce cones are great for holiday displays 'M Q YesI Pleaae tend my 10 tree Colorado Blue Spruces. My $10 membership contribution is enclosed. Nam:. Address:. City:. State:. .Zip:. Mail to: The National Arbor Day Foundation 100 Arbor Avenue, Nebraska City, NE 68410 Trees Make a World of Difference. Trees can truly transform the environment and quality of life in both rural and urban areas. World Without Trees Sod PlTOCK Uwn CUn GoOkd FftmlBno Scredi Slopct Panntend ROOMS FOR RENT REAL ESTATE Mature male/fennale only, no snfwking, pool, spa, priv.rm.&ba., fully turn. $400/mo., 897-0842. RR19598 Room & board in HD, female preferred, $300/ mo., 566-3457. RR18991 Priv. ba., gated comm., pool/spa, kit. priv., $300/ mo. 558-7763. RRl 9738 Room 4 rent in our home for steady working person, no drugs. $300,5657397. RR19670 2 bdrm., townsite home, $575 mo., 1st, last mo. + $250cleaningdep.,1916 Margarita, call Ron 8711721 B or 434-2005 after 5:30. RRl 7973 Room for rent in HD, male/female, refs. required, $500/mo. + 1/2 elec. & water • • $300 sec. dep., Iv. msg., 695-2231. CONDO RENTALS BC, 2 bd, 2 ba. condo, adults, no pets, $650/ mo., 1st & dep., call 2937476. CR18970 3 bd, 1 1/2 ba., NO PETS. $650/mo. 5659081.CR19610 HD 2 bd, 2 ba. near shoppings freeway, very clean, $725/mo. Call Marie or Donna. Century 21 JR Realty, 564-5142 CR19643 BC lovely, clean, quiet, 2 bd., 2 ba., 2 car garage, all appliances, avail, now in Lake Tree, Adults only, $875, 293-0328. CR19644 LIKE NEW 2 Ig. bd. w/2 full ba., very nice, upstairs, NO PETS PLEASE, $675/mo., 2948482. CR19700 2 bd Boulder Square $625 mo. deposits BC Adobe Realty 293-1707 1310Nev.Hwy. CHOICE MOBILE home/ building lots in Sandy Valley. 2 +/acres ea. Power at the site, underground phone, paved and/or gravel roads. Seller offering good terms. Phone Grace, at Americor Realty, 3651953. L0253 LAKE MEAD VIEW ESTATES, custom home lots overlooking Lake Mead. 702-294-0475. L01934S"v..^^ COLORADO BARGAIN 83 /^res—$42,900. High meadows w/spectacu(ar views of surrounding mtns. Loaded w/wildlife. Yr. round access, power & phone, Exc. financing. Call now 719-742-5207, Majors Ranch. LOl 9617 IDAHO LAND BARGAIN 30 ACRES—$29,900 Hell's Canyon Area. Spectacular sunset vie ws on this open & wooded parcel, located between the two most powerful rivers in Idaho, the Snake & Salmon Rivers. Gentle terrain, county rd., power & tele. Surveyed, warranty deed. EZ financing. Don't miss out. Own property in one of the best recreational areas in the state. Call ownertoday— 208-839-2501. LOl 9619 180 unobstructed lake view hilllot. 2 lots totaling 0.8 acres 301 Ridge Rd $126,000, 294-3024 Owner/Licensee. LOl 9717 HUGE PRICE REDUCTION-BEAUT. CUSTOM HOME LOT located in very popular Section 19. 150 ft. -f frontage, all laterals in & paid. Perfect for split or tri-level with view of strip. Just reduced to an unbelievable $53,950!! Better Hurry! CallRUSSGILMORE24 HRS 474-1569 KNAPP REALTY. LOl9789 REAL ESTATE 2 bd., 1 ba. mobile w/ family rm. All fenced-will take pet. Gr. cond. $795 BDamC21. Call 2936383 Kay. RE19779 Byowner3bd., 11/2ba., 2 car garage, 1765 sq. ft. A-1 condition, 1517 Darlene. SEE TO APPRECIATE, 294-0812. RE19691 MUST SEE! BC by owner. 6 bd.. 4 ba. on Ig. corner lot w/alley access, call 293-1223/702-7278274 asking $189,000 OBO. RE 17039 TIMESHARES/CAMPGROUND MEMBERSHIPS/RESALES. Buying, selling, renting. America's most successful resort resale cleaninghouse. Accepting all resorts. Call Reson Properly Resale International. Toll Free Hotline 1-800-423-5967. RE 19607 40 acres/Wyoming. No cash needed, just as•ume mo. pymls. of $139 on $15.480 oalance. Best price and terms USA. Ryan (714) 252-5306. 7.21% 30 YR FIXED RATE financing now being offered on all state subsidized loans. Low down FH A, VA and Conv. Loans avail. To see how you may qualify call Russ Gllmore, 24 hrs., 4741569 Knapp Realty. These incredible rates won't last long socall right away!! RE19326 GOVERNMENT FORECLOSED HOMES penr\ies on the $1. Repo's, VA, HUD, Sheriff sales. No money down government loans available now. Local listings/directory. Toll free 1-800-6692292 Ext. H-4000. Calico Ridge, HD custom home, gr. view of LV, close to Lake Mead. 4 bd., 2-1/2 ba., separate dining, pantry & washrooms, walk in closets, marble & hardwood flooring are some of the many extras. Quiet neighborhood. $234,500. call 565-6929. RE17679 HENDERSON'S BEST KEPT SECRETII The City of Henderson DownPayment Assistance Program!! Why rent, when you can buy for as little as $750 TOTAL!! Certain restrictions apply. Call for information and seminar schedule. 4364393 $100 DOWN HUD/ GOVT. REPOS" Hud Homes, all areas, from $100 to 3% down. DESERT VALLEY PROPERTIES 436-4393 or 558-3.175. RE18799 BC Custom by Owner. Great Family Home, close to schools, parks. Built. 1985, one owner, 1690 sq. ft. Lot 70x120. Brick Wall Enclosed. Spacious Formal Living Room, Step Saver Kitchen with Custom Cabinets Galore! Family Room with Magnificent Fireplace. Large f^^aster Bedroom with private full bath. Generous 2nd and 3rd Bedrooms. Second Full Bath. Lots of Storage. Oversized 2-car garage, Boat/RV Parking. Full Landscape with Automatic system and large Private Back Yard. Lowest Priced Custom in BC. $10,000-h below appraisal. Reduced to $149,500 (Firm). Can be seen at 631 Northridge. Call for appt. 293-5520. NO BANK QUALIFYING, 4 bd., 3 ba.. Pool Home, $25,000 down! 293-1582 BC RE19549 C0MM7RES. LOT Lot located 1 block S. of Nevada Highway. .420 acres. Call Brad $135,000 294-1500 RlDMOl MAIN REALTY PRICED TO SELL 4BR/3BA 2car gar. Neutral decor., ceramic tile, closet organizers. S189.900 294-1500 Ul DMOl MAIN REALTY GREAT N.W.L.V. LOCATION. 3BR/3BA 2 car garage, close to schools, shopping & freeway! 1108.900 294-1500 LAKEFRONT REDUCED LV. Gated Com niunity, 3BR, upgraded, quiet & serene, GVHS S225,000 294-1500 REAL ESTATE GREAT STARTER HOME house for sale by owner. 3 bd, 1-1/2 ba., 1,330SF,lg. carport, inside laundry, lots of storag, auto sprinklers, planters, covered patio, ceiling fans. PRINCIPLES ONLY. $87,000 Iv. msg. at 564-8386. RE15455 BC Lake Mead View Home nestled on a Hilltop on approx. 3/4 acre, over 6,000 sq. ft. Pool & spa with Lake Mead backdrop setting. 4 or 5 bedrooms. Game room with wetbar & lake vistas, 4 fireplaces. BEST BUY IN TOWN. VACANT. $995,000. Call 367-6773. Las Vegas Int'l. Realty. Inc. RE16369 On Black Mtn. Golf Course by owner. 4 bd.. 1 3/4 ba., new carpet, AC, upgrades, RV park, low maint. yd., $137,500 OBO 565-0347. RE19581 Priced to sell. $284,500, Lake View Custom Home,2400SF,3bd.,21/2 ba., must see! 2941586. RE19681 By owner, custom golf course area, 2714 SF. 4+ bd!, 3 ba., Ig. corner, pool/spa, $255,000,2933992. RE19582 Lake Mead Executive home, fabulous views, $750,000, may consider ternns, OWC. Desert Sun Realty, 293-2151. RE19465 BC Golf course luxury, $260,000. Desert Sun Realty, 293-2151. RE19463 BC full Lake Mead panorama, one full acre, may be subdivided, $350,000. Desert Sun Realty, 2932151. RE19461 BC best value La Dolce Vita, private yard, new heat pump, owner-broker, consider lease-option or $94,500 cash. 294-2627. RE19458 BC 4 bdrm., 1-3/4 ba. on cul-de-sac. 796 Amy Ct. $164,000. 294-0632. KKDMOl N1 AIN RFAl TY Spring Valley L.V. location. 4BR/ 2BA Lovely garden irei, lots of flowers. S142,000 294-1500 & NailSalon For Sale! 14 stations. Call Cary for more information. $75.000 ,02) 294-1500 UIDMOl NJVIN REALTY X'LENT LOCATION Lot nestled between Marshall Plaza <& Farmers Ins. on Highway. Call Brad for info. S325,000 (702) 294-1500 Thousands below appraised value. Seller will pay 2 point toward closing cost. COMPLETELY REMODELED 3 bd., 2 ba., pool w/spa $179,500 firm 294-4150 xxxxxxxxxx X For Sale by Owner X $224,500; 2,540 sq. ^ ft. Tills house is a X dream come true. It V is clean, in excellent repair & in a quiet X neighborhood. X Close to schools & y the golf course. Realtors welcome; X check MLS. 294X2426 XXXXXXXXXX LCENSEO. BONDED a NSURED CARPEriUPHOtSTBYClEIUilG 564-3077 House for Sale by Owner in BC 4 bd., 1 3/4 ba. Lewis Home Lg. fr. new kit., Ig. lot. Prof, landscaped fronL New roof-Water System • Rm. for RV-Boat $152,000 Call for appt.—293-3074 19695 Barbara Storey Pager 390-3280 Is Always Selling Henderson JflPleaRy 101 E. Horizon Dr., Suit* A HMiderson, Navada IMIS (702)664-5142 1 .^^^m REAL ESTATE NEED NEW or EXPERIENCED R.E. agents for expanding office in BC. 100% commission desks available & $100/mo., $150 per transaction + E&O. NO franchise fees, also liberal split arrangements. Non-MLS available. For more info, and confidential interview, call Katie, C.B. Ancfior Realty, 293-5757 or at 1497 Nevada Hwy. (first dome on right). 180 unobstructed lake view hill lot. 2 lotstotaling 8 acres 301 Ridge Rd $150,000, 294-3024 Owner/Licen see. REAL ESTATE GV Whitnev Ranch by owner101iv2bd., Iba., 2 car, desert landscape, principles only. 4568735. RE14193 NO MONEY DOWN. Take over payments ol $249/mo. on 80 acres. S.E. of Kingman, Arizona. Good access with view. Call 602-951-6781. RE14476 Own Your Own Home Now! No down payment on Miles materials. Innovative construction financing. Call Miles Homes, today, 1-800343-2884, ext. L. Knapp Realty -We Male* Houj Call? Resideiitial*New and Resales"Property Management ••Commercial << Land Sales** •WMSPECIALIZING IN""* HENDERSON AREA PKOPERTIBS WATCH FOR OUR NEW BOULDER HWY. LOCATION "WE'RE CROWING ALONG Wmi HENDERSON" LlnlMrd REALTORS Sincf 17I PH. 566-8185 FRED & ELUE KNAPP Outside of Nevada: 1-800-209-2678 16 w. Pacific Ave., sta. 11, Handarscn, NV 89015 FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS... Call Henderson's #1 Real Estate Team BRENDABIRDGRI, CRS Lifetime Henderson Resident 564-1127 WENDY WILLIAMS 378-1689 Over $ 100,000,000 in Sales 27 years combined Real Estate experience! "The DYNAMIC DUO Sells Homes!" ^nericana 1JI2^iie group, iimifxi?-. I I — ri^u itlt^" • • • BOULDER CITY • • • Boulder Hills. 2 Bed Condo, TERMS $69,900 656 Sixth. 4 Bedrooms, Large Yard $129K REDUCED. 3 Bed./2 Bath, Great Cond! $131K 1401 Bronco. Corner Lot. Nice Home $146,900 MUST SELL. 1520 Dorothy, Pool, $179,900 1/2 Acre Lakeview Lot, Owner Finance $198K 1504 Marita. 2300 Ft., Pool, Oasis Park $215K 404 Sunset. Great Lake View for Only $229K 975 Fairway. Beautiful, GOLF Course $260K REDUCED. B-Hill, 5 Bed., Huge Lot $269,500 1579 Bermuda DuneSr Golf Course $338,500 ULTIMATE Lake View Home. TERMS $750K BRET RUN ION • 2948482 • • • Desert Sun Realty • • • mtKU • Cori 3lount FREE VACATIONI Buy, list or sell a tiome with me and I'll send you on a VacationI FREE! Considering buying or selling a home? Do you know friends and family that are? Refer them to me and you could be vacationing soon! Call for details. Call Cori for destinations for free. Call Cori Blount today and I'll fill you in. RE-MAX Eagle's View—109 Water Street., Henderson 1=) 702-566-6700 or [QUAL HOUtINC OFfORTUNITV 565-8870 OVERSIZED LOT Plenty of roomforthechildren to play. 3 bedrooms, 1-3/4 baths. Older Home on tree lined afreet. Large living roont Galley •tyte kitchen w/pantry. $84,000. PRIDE OF OWNERSHIP! Parklike back yard and RV gate. Remodeled Inside. You will say WOW! 3 bedroom that can work as a 4th bedroom. 2 baths. PRiCEDTOSELL AT $84,999. ROOM FOR EVERYTHING In this lovely 3 BR home. Marvelous kitchen, family room, 1-3/4 baths, 3-car finished garage, walled yard, storage shed, fully landscaped, sprinklers, ceramic tile counters and vanity tops, laundry area, covered patio. UNIQUELY DESIGNED CUSTOM HOME well established area zoned for horses. This beauty haa it all plus beautif u I viewof valiey/nrwu ntalns. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, laundry room, 3 way fireplace, In approximately 2176 SFof spacious, open f k>or plan. PUT A SPARKLE IN HER EYE! Be a sporti Buy her this pretty 4 BR home! Nearly 1600 Sq. R. sunny country kitchen, big LR w/flreplace, Lg. yard, tile roof, beautifully decorated & a 2 car garage. l5^ 564-6546 fc 101 E. Horizon Dr. CENTURION Office EACH OFfXX IS MOEKNOCNTIT OWNED AND OPEIUTH) REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE Want REAL ESTATE FACTS Call LARRY SHAFFER at RE/MAX Eagle's View 566-6700 HENDERSON HOMES Batttr llwn mw 3 Iwd, 135S SF. fp II tt.SM Good atarlH honw, 3 bd., 1000 SF, rv. prkg. t74,MM ComplaWly ramodclcd 4 ted., tSM SF S112,00 SEARCHLIGHT Looking for Miy rMionatil* on*r on Ihli 3 btd., 1440 SF honw on • 7S>120lo. Mlao REAL ESTATE REAl EST; When you'rs thinking ol buying or selling a home, you'H want Iha transaction lo procaad swIRly and ellicienlly. Thai's why you ahouM look lor a raal Mlals profaaakinal with tpaclal expsrtlaa In listing, sailing, Investmant and taxas. Somaone with a provan record of experience. Someone you can trust. Thai someone Is a Certified ReskJential Spacialisi (CRS), your beat chok:* In real estate. When You Want TMs ^' z Call Dave Berard E/MAX Eagle's View Broker/G.R.L CRS (702) 566-6700 ••*••*••*••*• a ^ F BC Adobe Rcolty t^ (702) 293-1707 HOMES HOMES 1 NEW ON THE MARKET...3 bdrm., 2 bath, open GOLF COURSE L0CATI0N...4 bdrm., 3-1/2 floor plan, surrounded by lush lawn and shrubs, baths, separata family room, large lot w/park well malntalnad...$133,000. like grounda, pool & spa, 3 car gar...$339,000. NEW ON THE MARKET...great family home on private street, 3 t>drm., 2 bath, spacious family room w/rireplace, RV pkg...$154,900. LOTS OF EXTRAS...3 bdrm., 2 bath, den, beautiful great room, 2 covered patios, RV pkg., low malntenance...$189,900. UNOBSTRUCTED VIEW...4 bdrm., 2 bath CUEtorn with family room, plus lot below, owner will consider to carry...$345,000. CHARMING STARTER...2 bdrm., 1 bath, plus bonus room, beautifully maintained Inside and out, 1 car gar. atorage...$110,900. CLOSE TO SCHOOLS & PARKS...3 bdrm., 13/4 bath, family room w/dlning area, extra gar. & work8hop...$179,999. IT ALL ADDS UP...4bdrm., 1-3/4 bath, sparoom & studio, large covered patio, fruit trees, mature landscaplng...$164,900. GREAT AREA, GREAT H0ME,..3 bdrm., 1-3/4 bath, many energy efficient features, pool, lake and mountain vlew...$285,0O0. ON 16TH TEE...4 bdrm., 3 bath, formal living and dining, hardwood floors, custom window coverings, fabulous view, 3 car gar...$335,OO0. SPACIOUS B-HILL HOME...4 bdrm., 4-1/2 bath, great kltchen/famlly room area, office, 1/2 acre corner lot, room for all...$299,50O. LAKE AND MOUNTAIN VIEWS...spM:loua 4 bdrm., 3-1/2 baths, open floor plan, h>war leva! game room, adjacent lot for sala...$399,500. OWNERS READY TO BUILD...In Bella Vista. 3 or 4 bdrm., 2 bath, 2x6 construction, custom features choose your optlona...$221,p00. SHOW UKE A MODEL..totally rafurfolshad two story Lewis home, 4 bdrm., 2-1/2 bath, many upgrades, pool, ready to move ln...$182,500. POOL & LANAI...3 bdrm., 2 bath with many extras, mature landscaping, totally upgraded, cul-de-sac locatlon...$179,900. MANUFACTURED HOMES DECORATOR'S HOME...3bdnn.,2bath,opanfloor plan In Lake Mountain Estates, high rear tot has lake & mtn. vlew...$131,900. UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY...In Nelson, NV... Fleetwood with 2 bdrm., 1 bath, partially furnlshed...$34,500. LAKE MOUNTAIN ESTATES...2 bdrm., 1-3/4 bath with mountain & lake views, covered parking, desert landscaplng...$117,900. K : LAND LAKE A MOUNTAIN VIEW LOTS... MANY TO CHOOSE FROM $95,000 TO $275,000. CALL FOR DETAILS ll i WELL ESTABLISHED BEAUTY SHOP FOR SALE, $36,500. CALL FOR DETAILS ***CALL FOR A LIST OF ALL AVAILABLE PROPERTIES*** MULTIPLE LISTING SERVICE 1310 NEVADA HWY BOULDER CITY FAX 702-293.7477 Joan Curran-293-1457 Dorothy Molln-293-5087 Claudia Raecka 293-9949 Olanna Vanaaea 293-4284 ^^^^ Beth Aldworth 293-7074 Crfatina LaBralon Farnald, Broker 293-2212 ^^^ lg |s=a=^ TOLL FREE #1800-553 8081 ^eaast y DICK BLAIR REALTY 833 NEVADA HWY., BOULDER CITY (702) 293-2171 t=^ IMJ8 293-249 294-2919 293-3292 J93-49I5 P.lly GulTfy-.S|Krr 293-675 *" • ** """" • "' •^*'''' Bi.b Blair, Broker. Andre. Anderson 293-3228 Cindy Bandy Khondu Sledge 293-7975 Nancy Murphy... Rich Moynihan 293-IR02 Richard Guy Kalhyjenen. 98-4364 Serving Boulder City Since 1968 HOMES LUSH YARD W/POOL, GROTTO & FRUIT TREES highlights 4 bdrm., 2-1/2 bath, 2086sq. ft home w/ fam. rm., 2 car gar. and more. Priced at just $173,000. IS WHERE YOU LIVE IMPORTANT? Not only do you get a view of the lake and mts., but you also get best value for the area. Lushly landscaped. 1722 sq. fL, 3 bedrm., 2 bath, 2car garage. Price $239,000. Beautiful large-1900sq. ft. PRESIDENTIAL MODEL mobile home in LAKE MTN. EST. 2 bedrms., 1 3/4 ba., 1 car gar. w/workshp. Great view Lake Mead. Super location. Asking $235,000. MOBILE HOMES-IN PARKS PRICE REDUCTION IN GINGERWOOD 24' x 48' 2 bdrm., 2 bath with 7-1/2' x 36' encL prchVwork shop plus additional stg. shed. Now $41,500. FOR THE FUSSY BUYER Beautiful, upgraded BQULDER CITY TRAILER PARK 2 bedrm., 1 bath. Lewis Home, 4 bdrms., 3 bath, 3 car gar., cov. patio, <-. ,cn' IQTI r>..i..^ eir cnn POOL, RV Pilrkg. cor. lot SEE IT TODAY! $353.500: ^2 60, 1971 Century $17,500. MOORE'S MOBILE HOME PARK. Cute 1 bedroom, CUSTOM HOME In Golf Course area, 3 bedrm., 2 bath. Well cared for. Great for single person, bath, 2 car gar. POOL. Call for details. $196,500. (9,soo.00. GREAT CURB APPEALI Single story 1,860 sq. ft 4 bedrooms., 2 baths, 2 car gar. Nicely landscaped. $169,500. BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM ESTATE S bedrms.. 4 baths, 8 car gar., prox. 6,136 sq. ft on 2 acres. View Mtns.. golf course-MUCH MORE $949,999. SEE IT TODAYII NEWLY REDECORATED VILLA DEL PRADO! 3 bedrms., 2 bath, Nev. room w/wet bar. 1,374 sq. ft NEW ROOF YOURS FOR ONLY $149,500. SECLUDED NEIGHBORHOOD 1,735 sq ft, 3 bedrms., 2-1/2 baths, 2 car gar. $159,600. Charming home in quiet neighborhood just waiting for the perfect owner. MIGHT THAT BE YOU? 2 bedrm., 1 bath, 1 car garage, 820 Sq. Ft Price $126,000. CONDOMINIUMS & TOWNHOMES 1,660 sq. ft, 2 bedrms., 2 1/2 baths. PLUS BONUS ROOM. Lake area. Pool A Spa. $129,900. IN HENDERSON—Cozy 1 bedrm., 1-1/2 bath, nearly new carpet with balcony from sec. story bedrm. ALL APPLIANCES, F.P. walk-in closets, ceiling fan. solar screens, Private Patio $49,000. PANORAMIC VIEW-LAKE MEAD A MTNS. UpgradMl REGATTA POINTE TNHSE. 1,892 sq. ft END UNIT—lote of privacy. FOR THOSE LOOKING FOR THE VERY BEST. $249,500. \tM MODULAR HOMES WITH If AND VIEW OF LAKE MEAD 1440 sq. ft, 2 bedroom, 2 bath home in Lk. Mtn. Estates. Nicely Indscpd. yard, 12x24 wrfcshp., fam. rm., sun rm. A more. $142,000. BOULDER CITY MHP—14x64,2 bedroom, 2 bathstorage—mature trees & shrubs. $21,750. Boulder City Trailer Parks 12'x61' Champion 1972, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $15,000. REDUCED FOR SALE. 1969 Marlett-12x60' 2 bedrm., 1 bath, central air/heat, all appliances stay. Completely fenced. THIS WILL SELL ITSELF. $19,500. LAND CUSTOM HOMESITE IN PRESTIGIOUS LAKEVIEW ESTATESI .4 acras, Cul de sac, EXCELLENT VIEWI ONLY $125,000. Corner building lot in Lake Terrace. Ready for your dream home. $124,900. Marina Highlands price reductioni Great bulMing lot with possibility of lake view deper>ding on designhome. $85,000. RENTALS LAKE TERRACE TWNHSE., FURNISHED. 2 bdrm., 2 bath, fam. rm., wetbar. Jacuzzi in MB. 2cargaraga, NON SMOKERS. $97S.00/mo. ALL NEW BAYVIEW CONDOMINIUM! 2 bedrms., 2 baths, 2 car gar. all appl. Community pool, also has den and is close to Lake Mead. AVAIL. NOW $1,00a NON-SMOKERS. SPANISH STEPS CONDO 1st fir., 2 bvdrnL, 2 bath. All appl. Community Pool. Avail. 10/1/96 $77S.oa COMMERCIAL PROPERTY MOTEL • 26 Units with living quarters. In excaflnt condibon. Great Investmant! COMMERaAL RENTALS 2,500 sq. ft office space AVAIL NOW t1.2S. par mo. Stop by and pick up your FREE CURRENT LIST OF PROPERTIES AVAILABLE FOR SALE TOLL FREE! 1-800-525-8910 Ext. E41 SINCERITY AMD INTEGRITY 18 OUR SPECIALTY

PAGE 41

• 11 • • P^ P ^.WJ i a i Mj >g ^*5.q.^^VV '' J '' '' ? ?^ ^ i ^iV P 'L i ^ 'W > lg^^'P^iPW^^^*W'W^g^^^^^^ i^KjiT^j I Ptgt 16 Panorama Thursday. October 10.1996 Thursday, October 10, 1996 Panorama Pagal? ,11 i< I'. I'. More Trees Are Needed Where We live More Trees Are Needed for Wildlife Trees help mal• \f 'f f. if -fe % Metric Tons 1 / X^^Ozone 1 __.: / .-^ __ / \. _^Particulates •. / ^NOj \ \ A.^CO '^^^\\ // ~— ^^-A 1 J F MAMJJASONDI Month 1 Air Pollution Removed in One Urt)an Region (Chicago) By Trees Trees produce oxygen that we breathe. In addition, trees remove air pollution by lowering air temperature, through respiration, and by retaining particulates. More Trees Are Needed to Increase Property Values ji^ sttifh^ a ^^mf 'flfAeryk maty. ff^ bttie^ cm bum.. ftodi-lfitK You Can Join The Arbor Day Foundation And Get 10 Free Trees • Nonprofit Foundation sponsors IVees for America^ campaign The National Arbor Day Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to tree planting and environmental stewardship, is sponsoring a TVees for America campaign to plant millions of trees. You can participate. NVhen you join the Arbor Day Foundation, you wiU receive ten free Colorado Blue Spruces, or other conifers selected to grow in your area. Colorado Blue Spruces have silver bluegreen color and compact conical shape. They are guaranteed to grow, or the Foundation will replace them free of charge. Your six to twelve inch trees will come postpaid with easy planting instructions. TVees are shipped at the right time for planting in your area, February through May in the spring or October through mid December in the fall. You will also receive a membership card, a subscription to the Foundation's colorful bimonthly publication, "Arbor Day," a free National Arbor Day Foundation wall calendar, and The IVee Book with information about tree planting and care. America needs more trees The United States has lost a third of its forest cover in the last 200 years. Our towns ai|d cities should have twice as many street trees £is we have today. We need more trees around our homes and throughout our communities. We need more trees to protect our farm fields and OUT rivers and streams, lb provide wood for our homes and a thousand products we use every day. Trees help conserve energy IVees cool our homes and entire cities in the sununer, and slow cold winter winds. Shade trees and windbreaks can cut home utility bUls 15-35%. rruj Colorado Blue Spruces can be planted as an energy-saving windbreak or screen, as individual ornamentals, or as living Christmas Trees. Trees clear the air we breathe. They provide life-giving oxygen while they remove particulates from the air and reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide. IVees along rivers and streams help keep the water clean. IVees reduce the risk of flooding. Planted as field windbreaks, they fight topsoil erosion. IVees provide food, shelter, and nesting sites for songbirds. IVees increase property values, and make our homes and nei^borhoods more livable. You can help by planting trees. Join today, and plant your "Dnees for America! The National Afbor Pay Foundation • • • 7-; 2-to-6 inch spruce cones are great for holiday displays 'M Q YesI Pleaae tend my 10 tree Colorado Blue Spruces. My $10 membership contribution is enclosed. Nam:. Address:. City:. State:. .Zip:. Mail to: The National Arbor Day Foundation 100 Arbor Avenue, Nebraska City, NE 68410 Trees Make a World of Difference. Trees can truly transform the environment and quality of life in both rural and urban areas. World Without Trees Sod PlTOCK Uwn CUn GoOkd FftmlBno Scredi Slopct Panntend ROOMS FOR RENT REAL ESTATE Mature male/fennale only, no snfwking, pool, spa, priv.rm.&ba., fully turn. $400/mo., 897-0842. RR19598 Room & board in HD, female preferred, $300/ mo., 566-3457. RR18991 Priv. ba., gated comm., pool/spa, kit. priv., $300/ mo. 558-7763. RRl 9738 Room 4 rent in our home for steady working person, no drugs. $300,5657397. RR19670 2 bdrm., townsite home, $575 mo., 1st, last mo. + $250cleaningdep.,1916 Margarita, call Ron 8711721 B or 434-2005 after 5:30. RRl 7973 Room for rent in HD, male/female, refs. required, $500/mo. + 1/2 elec. & water • • $300 sec. dep., Iv. msg., 695-2231. CONDO RENTALS BC, 2 bd, 2 ba. condo, adults, no pets, $650/ mo., 1st & dep., call 2937476. CR18970 3 bd, 1 1/2 ba., NO PETS. $650/mo. 5659081.CR19610 HD 2 bd, 2 ba. near shoppings freeway, very clean, $725/mo. Call Marie or Donna. Century 21 JR Realty, 564-5142 CR19643 BC lovely, clean, quiet, 2 bd., 2 ba., 2 car garage, all appliances, avail, now in Lake Tree, Adults only, $875, 293-0328. CR19644 LIKE NEW 2 Ig. bd. w/2 full ba., very nice, upstairs, NO PETS PLEASE, $675/mo., 2948482. CR19700 2 bd Boulder Square $625 mo. deposits BC Adobe Realty 293-1707 1310Nev.Hwy. CHOICE MOBILE home/ building lots in Sandy Valley. 2 +/acres ea. Power at the site, underground phone, paved and/or gravel roads. Seller offering good terms. Phone Grace, at Americor Realty, 3651953. L0253 LAKE MEAD VIEW ESTATES, custom home lots overlooking Lake Mead. 702-294-0475. L01934S"v..^^ COLORADO BARGAIN 83 /^res—$42,900. High meadows w/spectacu(ar views of surrounding mtns. Loaded w/wildlife. Yr. round access, power & phone, Exc. financing. Call now 719-742-5207, Majors Ranch. LOl 9617 IDAHO LAND BARGAIN 30 ACRES—$29,900 Hell's Canyon Area. Spectacular sunset vie ws on this open & wooded parcel, located between the two most powerful rivers in Idaho, the Snake & Salmon Rivers. Gentle terrain, county rd., power & tele. Surveyed, warranty deed. EZ financing. Don't miss out. Own property in one of the best recreational areas in the state. Call ownertoday— 208-839-2501. LOl 9619 180 unobstructed lake view hilllot. 2 lots totaling 0.8 acres 301 Ridge Rd $126,000, 294-3024 Owner/Licensee. LOl 9717 HUGE PRICE REDUCTION-BEAUT. CUSTOM HOME LOT located in very popular Section 19. 150 ft. -f frontage, all laterals in & paid. Perfect for split or tri-level with view of strip. Just reduced to an unbelievable $53,950!! Better Hurry! CallRUSSGILMORE24 HRS 474-1569 KNAPP REALTY. LOl9789 REAL ESTATE 2 bd., 1 ba. mobile w/ family rm. All fenced-will take pet. Gr. cond. $795 BDamC21. Call 2936383 Kay. RE19779 Byowner3bd., 11/2ba., 2 car garage, 1765 sq. ft. A-1 condition, 1517 Darlene. SEE TO APPRECIATE, 294-0812. RE19691 MUST SEE! BC by owner. 6 bd.. 4 ba. on Ig. corner lot w/alley access, call 293-1223/702-7278274 asking $189,000 OBO. RE 17039 TIMESHARES/CAMPGROUND MEMBERSHIPS/RESALES. Buying, selling, renting. America's most successful resort resale cleaninghouse. Accepting all resorts. Call Reson Properly Resale International. Toll Free Hotline 1-800-423-5967. RE 19607 40 acres/Wyoming. No cash needed, just as•ume mo. pymls. of $139 on $15.480 oalance. Best price and terms USA. Ryan (714) 252-5306. 7.21% 30 YR FIXED RATE financing now being offered on all state subsidized loans. Low down FH A, VA and Conv. Loans avail. To see how you may qualify call Russ Gllmore, 24 hrs., 4741569 Knapp Realty. These incredible rates won't last long socall right away!! RE19326 GOVERNMENT FORECLOSED HOMES penr\ies on the $1. Repo's, VA, HUD, Sheriff sales. No money down government loans available now. Local listings/directory. Toll free 1-800-6692292 Ext. H-4000. Calico Ridge, HD custom home, gr. view of LV, close to Lake Mead. 4 bd., 2-1/2 ba., separate dining, pantry & washrooms, walk in closets, marble & hardwood flooring are some of the many extras. Quiet neighborhood. $234,500. call 565-6929. RE17679 HENDERSON'S BEST KEPT SECRETII The City of Henderson DownPayment Assistance Program!! Why rent, when you can buy for as little as $750 TOTAL!! Certain restrictions apply. Call for information and seminar schedule. 4364393 $100 DOWN HUD/ GOVT. REPOS" Hud Homes, all areas, from $100 to 3% down. DESERT VALLEY PROPERTIES 436-4393 or 558-3.175. RE18799 BC Custom by Owner. Great Family Home, close to schools, parks. Built. 1985, one owner, 1690 sq. ft. Lot 70x120. Brick Wall Enclosed. Spacious Formal Living Room, Step Saver Kitchen with Custom Cabinets Galore! Family Room with Magnificent Fireplace. Large f^^aster Bedroom with private full bath. Generous 2nd and 3rd Bedrooms. Second Full Bath. Lots of Storage. Oversized 2-car garage, Boat/RV Parking. Full Landscape with Automatic system and large Private Back Yard. Lowest Priced Custom in BC. $10,000-h below appraisal. Reduced to $149,500 (Firm). Can be seen at 631 Northridge. Call for appt. 293-5520. NO BANK QUALIFYING, 4 bd., 3 ba.. Pool Home, $25,000 down! 293-1582 BC RE19549 C0MM7RES. LOT Lot located 1 block S. of Nevada Highway. .420 acres. Call Brad $135,000 294-1500 RlDMOl MAIN REALTY PRICED TO SELL 4BR/3BA 2car gar. Neutral decor., ceramic tile, closet organizers. S189.900 294-1500 Ul DMOl MAIN REALTY GREAT N.W.L.V. LOCATION. 3BR/3BA 2 car garage, close to schools, shopping & freeway! 1108.900 294-1500 LAKEFRONT REDUCED LV. Gated Com niunity, 3BR, upgraded, quiet & serene, GVHS S225,000 294-1500 REAL ESTATE GREAT STARTER HOME house for sale by owner. 3 bd, 1-1/2 ba., 1,330SF,lg. carport, inside laundry, lots of storag, auto sprinklers, planters, covered patio, ceiling fans. PRINCIPLES ONLY. $87,000 Iv. msg. at 564-8386. RE15455 BC Lake Mead View Home nestled on a Hilltop on approx. 3/4 acre, over 6,000 sq. ft. Pool & spa with Lake Mead backdrop setting. 4 or 5 bedrooms. Game room with wetbar & lake vistas, 4 fireplaces. BEST BUY IN TOWN. VACANT. $995,000. Call 367-6773. Las Vegas Int'l. Realty. Inc. RE16369 On Black Mtn. Golf Course by owner. 4 bd.. 1 3/4 ba., new carpet, AC, upgrades, RV park, low maint. yd., $137,500 OBO 565-0347. RE19581 Priced to sell. $284,500, Lake View Custom Home,2400SF,3bd.,21/2 ba., must see! 2941586. RE19681 By owner, custom golf course area, 2714 SF. 4+ bd!, 3 ba., Ig. corner, pool/spa, $255,000,2933992. RE19582 Lake Mead Executive home, fabulous views, $750,000, may consider ternns, OWC. Desert Sun Realty, 293-2151. RE19465 BC Golf course luxury, $260,000. Desert Sun Realty, 293-2151. RE19463 BC full Lake Mead panorama, one full acre, may be subdivided, $350,000. Desert Sun Realty, 2932151. RE19461 BC best value La Dolce Vita, private yard, new heat pump, owner-broker, consider lease-option or $94,500 cash. 294-2627. RE19458 BC 4 bdrm., 1-3/4 ba. on cul-de-sac. 796 Amy Ct. $164,000. 294-0632. KKDMOl N1 AIN RFAl TY Spring Valley L.V. location. 4BR/ 2BA Lovely garden irei, lots of flowers. S142,000 294-1500 & NailSalon For Sale! 14 stations. Call Cary for more information. $75.000 ,02) 294-1500 UIDMOl NJVIN REALTY X'LENT LOCATION Lot nestled between Marshall Plaza <& Farmers Ins. on Highway. Call Brad for info. S325,000 (702) 294-1500 Thousands below appraised value. Seller will pay 2 point toward closing cost. COMPLETELY REMODELED 3 bd., 2 ba., pool w/spa $179,500 firm 294-4150 xxxxxxxxxx X For Sale by Owner X $224,500; 2,540 sq. ^ ft. Tills house is a X dream come true. It V is clean, in excellent repair & in a quiet X neighborhood. X Close to schools & y the golf course. Realtors welcome; X check MLS. 294X2426 XXXXXXXXXX LCENSEO. BONDED a NSURED CARPEriUPHOtSTBYClEIUilG 564-3077 House for Sale by Owner in BC 4 bd., 1 3/4 ba. Lewis Home Lg. fr. new kit., Ig. lot. Prof, landscaped fronL New roof-Water System • Rm. for RV-Boat $152,000 Call for appt.—293-3074 19695 Barbara Storey Pager 390-3280 Is Always Selling Henderson JflPleaRy 101 E. Horizon Dr., Suit* A HMiderson, Navada IMIS (702)664-5142 1 .^^^m REAL ESTATE NEED NEW or EXPERIENCED R.E. agents for expanding office in BC. 100% commission desks available & $100/mo., $150 per transaction + E&O. NO franchise fees, also liberal split arrangements. Non-MLS available. For more info, and confidential interview, call Katie, C.B. Ancfior Realty, 293-5757 or at 1497 Nevada Hwy. (first dome on right). 180 unobstructed lake view hill lot. 2 lotstotaling 8 acres 301 Ridge Rd $150,000, 294-3024 Owner/Licen see. REAL ESTATE GV Whitnev Ranch by owner101iv2bd., Iba., 2 car, desert landscape, principles only. 4568735. RE14193 NO MONEY DOWN. Take over payments ol $249/mo. on 80 acres. S.E. of Kingman, Arizona. Good access with view. Call 602-951-6781. RE14476 Own Your Own Home Now! No down payment on Miles materials. Innovative construction financing. Call Miles Homes, today, 1-800343-2884, ext. L. Knapp Realty -We Male* Houj Call? Resideiitial*New and Resales"Property Management ••Commercial << Land Sales** •WMSPECIALIZING IN""* HENDERSON AREA PKOPERTIBS WATCH FOR OUR NEW BOULDER HWY. LOCATION "WE'RE CROWING ALONG Wmi HENDERSON" LlnlMrd REALTORS Sincf 17I PH. 566-8185 FRED & ELUE KNAPP Outside of Nevada: 1-800-209-2678 16 w. Pacific Ave., sta. 11, Handarscn, NV 89015 FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS... Call Henderson's #1 Real Estate Team BRENDABIRDGRI, CRS Lifetime Henderson Resident 564-1127 WENDY WILLIAMS 378-1689 Over $ 100,000,000 in Sales 27 years combined Real Estate experience! "The DYNAMIC DUO Sells Homes!" ^nericana 1JI2^iie group, iimifxi?-. I I — ri^u itlt^" • • • BOULDER CITY • • • Boulder Hills. 2 Bed Condo, TERMS $69,900 656 Sixth. 4 Bedrooms, Large Yard $129K REDUCED. 3 Bed./2 Bath, Great Cond! $131K 1401 Bronco. Corner Lot. Nice Home $146,900 MUST SELL. 1520 Dorothy, Pool, $179,900 1/2 Acre Lakeview Lot, Owner Finance $198K 1504 Marita. 2300 Ft., Pool, Oasis Park $215K 404 Sunset. Great Lake View for Only $229K 975 Fairway. Beautiful, GOLF Course $260K REDUCED. B-Hill, 5 Bed., Huge Lot $269,500 1579 Bermuda DuneSr Golf Course $338,500 ULTIMATE Lake View Home. TERMS $750K BRET RUN ION • 2948482 • • • Desert Sun Realty • • • mtKU • Cori 3lount FREE VACATIONI Buy, list or sell a tiome with me and I'll send you on a VacationI FREE! Considering buying or selling a home? Do you know friends and family that are? Refer them to me and you could be vacationing soon! Call for details. Call Cori for destinations for free. Call Cori Blount today and I'll fill you in. RE-MAX Eagle's View—109 Water Street., Henderson 1=) 702-566-6700 or [QUAL HOUtINC OFfORTUNITV 565-8870 OVERSIZED LOT Plenty of roomforthechildren to play. 3 bedrooms, 1-3/4 baths. Older Home on tree lined afreet. Large living roont Galley •tyte kitchen w/pantry. $84,000. PRIDE OF OWNERSHIP! Parklike back yard and RV gate. Remodeled Inside. You will say WOW! 3 bedroom that can work as a 4th bedroom. 2 baths. PRiCEDTOSELL AT $84,999. ROOM FOR EVERYTHING In this lovely 3 BR home. Marvelous kitchen, family room, 1-3/4 baths, 3-car finished garage, walled yard, storage shed, fully landscaped, sprinklers, ceramic tile counters and vanity tops, laundry area, covered patio. UNIQUELY DESIGNED CUSTOM HOME well established area zoned for horses. This beauty haa it all plus beautif u I viewof valiey/nrwu ntalns. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, laundry room, 3 way fireplace, In approximately 2176 SFof spacious, open f k>or plan. PUT A SPARKLE IN HER EYE! Be a sporti Buy her this pretty 4 BR home! Nearly 1600 Sq. R. sunny country kitchen, big LR w/flreplace, Lg. yard, tile roof, beautifully decorated & a 2 car garage. l5^ 564-6546 fc 101 E. Horizon Dr. CENTURION Office EACH OFfXX IS MOEKNOCNTIT OWNED AND OPEIUTH) REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE Want REAL ESTATE FACTS Call LARRY SHAFFER at RE/MAX Eagle's View 566-6700 HENDERSON HOMES Batttr llwn mw 3 Iwd, 135S SF. fp II tt.SM Good atarlH honw, 3 bd., 1000 SF, rv. prkg. t74,MM ComplaWly ramodclcd 4 ted., tSM SF S112,00 SEARCHLIGHT Looking for Miy rMionatil* on*r on Ihli 3 btd., 1440 SF honw on • 7S>120lo. Mlao REAL ESTATE REAl EST; When you'rs thinking ol buying or selling a home, you'H want Iha transaction lo procaad swIRly and ellicienlly. Thai's why you ahouM look lor a raal Mlals profaaakinal with tpaclal expsrtlaa In listing, sailing, Investmant and taxas. Somaone with a provan record of experience. Someone you can trust. Thai someone Is a Certified ReskJential Spacialisi (CRS), your beat chok:* In real estate. When You Want TMs ^' z Call Dave Berard E/MAX Eagle's View Broker/G.R.L CRS (702) 566-6700 ••*••*••*••*• a ^ F BC Adobe Rcolty t^ (702) 293-1707 HOMES HOMES 1 NEW ON THE MARKET...3 bdrm., 2 bath, open GOLF COURSE L0CATI0N...4 bdrm., 3-1/2 floor plan, surrounded by lush lawn and shrubs, baths, separata family room, large lot w/park well malntalnad...$133,000. like grounda, pool & spa, 3 car gar...$339,000. NEW ON THE MARKET...great family home on private street, 3 t>drm., 2 bath, spacious family room w/rireplace, RV pkg...$154,900. LOTS OF EXTRAS...3 bdrm., 2 bath, den, beautiful great room, 2 covered patios, RV pkg., low malntenance...$189,900. UNOBSTRUCTED VIEW...4 bdrm., 2 bath CUEtorn with family room, plus lot below, owner will consider to carry...$345,000. CHARMING STARTER...2 bdrm., 1 bath, plus bonus room, beautifully maintained Inside and out, 1 car gar. atorage...$110,900. CLOSE TO SCHOOLS & PARKS...3 bdrm., 13/4 bath, family room w/dlning area, extra gar. & work8hop...$179,999. IT ALL ADDS UP...4bdrm., 1-3/4 bath, sparoom & studio, large covered patio, fruit trees, mature landscaplng...$164,900. GREAT AREA, GREAT H0ME,..3 bdrm., 1-3/4 bath, many energy efficient features, pool, lake and mountain vlew...$285,0O0. ON 16TH TEE...4 bdrm., 3 bath, formal living and dining, hardwood floors, custom window coverings, fabulous view, 3 car gar...$335,OO0. SPACIOUS B-HILL HOME...4 bdrm., 4-1/2 bath, great kltchen/famlly room area, office, 1/2 acre corner lot, room for all...$299,50O. LAKE AND MOUNTAIN VIEWS...spM:loua 4 bdrm., 3-1/2 baths, open floor plan, h>war leva! game room, adjacent lot for sala...$399,500. OWNERS READY TO BUILD...In Bella Vista. 3 or 4 bdrm., 2 bath, 2x6 construction, custom features choose your optlona...$221,p00. SHOW UKE A MODEL..totally rafurfolshad two story Lewis home, 4 bdrm., 2-1/2 bath, many upgrades, pool, ready to move ln...$182,500. POOL & LANAI...3 bdrm., 2 bath with many extras, mature landscaping, totally upgraded, cul-de-sac locatlon...$179,900. MANUFACTURED HOMES DECORATOR'S HOME...3bdnn.,2bath,opanfloor plan In Lake Mountain Estates, high rear tot has lake & mtn. vlew...$131,900. UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY...In Nelson, NV... Fleetwood with 2 bdrm., 1 bath, partially furnlshed...$34,500. LAKE MOUNTAIN ESTATES...2 bdrm., 1-3/4 bath with mountain & lake views, covered parking, desert landscaplng...$117,900. K : LAND LAKE A MOUNTAIN VIEW LOTS... MANY TO CHOOSE FROM $95,000 TO $275,000. CALL FOR DETAILS ll i WELL ESTABLISHED BEAUTY SHOP FOR SALE, $36,500. CALL FOR DETAILS ***CALL FOR A LIST OF ALL AVAILABLE PROPERTIES*** MULTIPLE LISTING SERVICE 1310 NEVADA HWY BOULDER CITY FAX 702-293.7477 Joan Curran-293-1457 Dorothy Molln-293-5087 Claudia Raecka 293-9949 Olanna Vanaaea 293-4284 ^^^^ Beth Aldworth 293-7074 Crfatina LaBralon Farnald, Broker 293-2212 ^^^ lg |s=a=^ TOLL FREE #1800-553 8081 ^eaast y DICK BLAIR REALTY 833 NEVADA HWY., BOULDER CITY (702) 293-2171 t=^ IMJ8 293-249 294-2919 293-3292 J93-49I5 P.lly GulTfy-.S|Krr 293-675 *" • ** """" • "' •^*'''' Bi.b Blair, Broker. Andre. Anderson 293-3228 Cindy Bandy Khondu Sledge 293-7975 Nancy Murphy... Rich Moynihan 293-IR02 Richard Guy Kalhyjenen. 98-4364 Serving Boulder City Since 1968 HOMES LUSH YARD W/POOL, GROTTO & FRUIT TREES highlights 4 bdrm., 2-1/2 bath, 2086sq. ft home w/ fam. rm., 2 car gar. and more. Priced at just $173,000. IS WHERE YOU LIVE IMPORTANT? Not only do you get a view of the lake and mts., but you also get best value for the area. Lushly landscaped. 1722 sq. fL, 3 bedrm., 2 bath, 2car garage. Price $239,000. Beautiful large-1900sq. ft. PRESIDENTIAL MODEL mobile home in LAKE MTN. EST. 2 bedrms., 1 3/4 ba., 1 car gar. w/workshp. Great view Lake Mead. Super location. Asking $235,000. MOBILE HOMES-IN PARKS PRICE REDUCTION IN GINGERWOOD 24' x 48' 2 bdrm., 2 bath with 7-1/2' x 36' encL prchVwork shop plus additional stg. shed. Now $41,500. FOR THE FUSSY BUYER Beautiful, upgraded BQULDER CITY TRAILER PARK 2 bedrm., 1 bath. Lewis Home, 4 bdrms., 3 bath, 3 car gar., cov. patio, <-. ,cn' IQTI r>..i..^ eir cnn POOL, RV Pilrkg. cor. lot SEE IT TODAY! $353.500: ^2 60, 1971 Century $17,500. MOORE'S MOBILE HOME PARK. Cute 1 bedroom, CUSTOM HOME In Golf Course area, 3 bedrm., 2 bath. Well cared for. Great for single person, bath, 2 car gar. POOL. Call for details. $196,500. (9,soo.00. GREAT CURB APPEALI Single story 1,860 sq. ft 4 bedrooms., 2 baths, 2 car gar. Nicely landscaped. $169,500. BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM ESTATE S bedrms.. 4 baths, 8 car gar., prox. 6,136 sq. ft on 2 acres. View Mtns.. golf course-MUCH MORE $949,999. SEE IT TODAYII NEWLY REDECORATED VILLA DEL PRADO! 3 bedrms., 2 bath, Nev. room w/wet bar. 1,374 sq. ft NEW ROOF YOURS FOR ONLY $149,500. SECLUDED NEIGHBORHOOD 1,735 sq ft, 3 bedrms., 2-1/2 baths, 2 car gar. $159,600. Charming home in quiet neighborhood just waiting for the perfect owner. MIGHT THAT BE YOU? 2 bedrm., 1 bath, 1 car garage, 820 Sq. Ft Price $126,000. CONDOMINIUMS & TOWNHOMES 1,660 sq. ft, 2 bedrms., 2 1/2 baths. PLUS BONUS ROOM. Lake area. Pool A Spa. $129,900. IN HENDERSON—Cozy 1 bedrm., 1-1/2 bath, nearly new carpet with balcony from sec. story bedrm. ALL APPLIANCES, F.P. walk-in closets, ceiling fan. solar screens, Private Patio $49,000. PANORAMIC VIEW-LAKE MEAD A MTNS. UpgradMl REGATTA POINTE TNHSE. 1,892 sq. ft END UNIT—lote of privacy. FOR THOSE LOOKING FOR THE VERY BEST. $249,500. \tM MODULAR HOMES WITH If AND VIEW OF LAKE MEAD 1440 sq. ft, 2 bedroom, 2 bath home in Lk. Mtn. Estates. Nicely Indscpd. yard, 12x24 wrfcshp., fam. rm., sun rm. A more. $142,000. BOULDER CITY MHP—14x64,2 bedroom, 2 bathstorage—mature trees & shrubs. $21,750. Boulder City Trailer Parks 12'x61' Champion 1972, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $15,000. REDUCED FOR SALE. 1969 Marlett-12x60' 2 bedrm., 1 bath, central air/heat, all appliances stay. Completely fenced. THIS WILL SELL ITSELF. $19,500. LAND CUSTOM HOMESITE IN PRESTIGIOUS LAKEVIEW ESTATESI .4 acras, Cul de sac, EXCELLENT VIEWI ONLY $125,000. Corner building lot in Lake Terrace. Ready for your dream home. $124,900. Marina Highlands price reductioni Great bulMing lot with possibility of lake view deper>ding on designhome. $85,000. RENTALS LAKE TERRACE TWNHSE., FURNISHED. 2 bdrm., 2 bath, fam. rm., wetbar. Jacuzzi in MB. 2cargaraga, NON SMOKERS. $97S.00/mo. ALL NEW BAYVIEW CONDOMINIUM! 2 bedrms., 2 baths, 2 car gar. all appl. Community pool, also has den and is close to Lake Mead. AVAIL. NOW $1,00a NON-SMOKERS. SPANISH STEPS CONDO 1st fir., 2 bvdrnL, 2 bath. All appl. Community Pool. Avail. 10/1/96 $77S.oa COMMERCIAL PROPERTY MOTEL • 26 Units with living quarters. In excaflnt condibon. Great Investmant! COMMERaAL RENTALS 2,500 sq. ft office space AVAIL NOW t1.2S. par mo. Stop by and pick up your FREE CURRENT LIST OF PROPERTIES AVAILABLE FOR SALE TOLL FREE! 1-800-525-8910 Ext. E41 SINCERITY AMD INTEGRITY 18 OUR SPECIALTY

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,i^.v.vL'iiiJ,i.iii,viiui,Jii,.piijiUiuimjUJii5ipp5ip9PPP ^w99999999p Pg 18 Panorama Thursday, October 10.1996 f