Citation
1996-08-29 - Henderson Home News

Material Information

Title:
1996-08-29 - Henderson Home News
Creator:
Evans, Claude ( Columnist )
Jackson, Sharon ( Columnist )
Marciniak, D. B. ( Columnist )
Cohen, Richard ( Columnist )
Hanlon, Bill ( Columnist )
Dodge, Paul ( Columnist )
Theiss, Roy ( Columnist )
Bowman, Bill ( Columnist )
Goldstein, Philip ( Columnist )
Henderson, Barb ( Columnist )
Eicher, Ray ( Columnist )
Bernstein, Leroy ( Columnist )
Santor, Jim ( Columnist )
Santor, Kathleen Grace ( Columnist )
Wilbanks, George D. ( Columnist )
Earl, Phillip I. ( Columnist )
Bishop, Carolyn D. ( Columnist )
Wood, Kathleen ( Columnist )
Jones, Brian ( Photographer )
Weidenfeld, Rob ( Photographer )
Wood, Kathleen ( Photographer )
Publisher:
O'Callaghan, Mike
HBC Publications, Inc.
Creation Date:
1996-08-29
Language:
English
Materials:
Paper ( medium )

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Nevada
Henderson
East Las Vegas
City and town life -- Nevada -- Henderson
Community life -- Nevada -- Henderson
History -- Henderson (Nev.) -- 20th century
Genre:
Newspapers

Notes

Acknowledgments:
Greenspun Media sponsors this collection.
Collection Location:
Greenspun Media retains possession of the bound, original newspapers. Henderson District Public Libraries retains possession of the microfilm and the digital files.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Holding Location:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Rights Management:
The items in this collection are provided for non-commercial personal and academic use by Henderson Library patrons and may not be republished in any way. Contact Greenspun Media Group for additional information regarding rights to this material: http://www.greenspunmedia.com
Resource Identifier:
hhn4464 ( Digital Id )

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PAGE 1

Pag* 16 Henderson Horn* News Tuesday, August 27,1996 • GMC TRUCK rT.Trr. ri9 MO. service Required^ LET US Airl 5-Speed Transmission, FunI (Stk. #UP1447) 1994 GEO TRACKER Eddie Bauver, 4X4! (Stl(.61329B) ^ Sf> 1989 FORD Auto, Ali The Options! (Sti(. #UP1429) Oniy 1000 Miles, Loadedl (Stk.#UP1461) 1993 HONDA ACC0RD4DR 1996 MAZDA PROTEGE Sporty, Like New, Only 1300 Miles! (Stk.#UP1438) 1994MITSUBISHr ECLIPSE WZT 4WD, Loaded, 5 Speed Trans.! (Stk.#UP1427A) 1992 TOYOTA 4-RUNNER P ^irrr Silverado, All The Options! (Stk.#UP1430) 1994 CHEVY 1/t ION EXr-CAl Heavy Hauler, Like New! (Stk. #UP1422) 1995 CHEVY Sporty, 2 Door, Loaded! (Stk.#UP1435) | 3/4WiiiBir-(AB 1995 GMC -' • r^ 4Door, Low Miles! (Stk.#UP1421) JIMIiy4WD 1995 CHEVROLET vuaatnn SLE, Loaded, Air, 2WD! (Stk.#UP1475) 1992 GMC 4WD, SLE, All Power! (Stk.#UP1445) 1995 GMC yUKONSDIL WE ARE THE ONLY DEALERSHIP IN NEVADA VtflTH N.A.D.A. (NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE DEALERS ASSOCIATION) CERTIFIED SALESPERSONS! • BANKRUPTCIES • TAX UENS • REPOSSESSIONS • JUDBERIENT IRIE CAN HELRI 702-S58-a30tt. SKLIK (IN THE UALLEY AUTO iVIALU I I -s^>7PROOF BAY filCROFILM 1115 ARQUES AVE E. ALE, CA 94086'. M/04/99 MAIL 1 JLJ m Football section inside Thursday, August 29,1996 Henderson, Nevada 50* r ONE IVIAN'S VIEW BLACKIE EVANS The News asked Claude "Blackie" Evans, executive secretary treasurer of the Nevada State AFL-CIO, to write this week's One Man's View. The Reform Agenda of the 104th Congress: NO THANKS. As Labor Day 1996 approaches it is incumbent upon us to review the legislation that Congress passed or tried to pass in the 104th Congress. Environmental Enforcement: The Senate sought to slash the EPA's budget by more than 20% threatening environment efforts, and they also voted against safe drinking water. Against Working Families: Like their House counterparts, the Senate tried to force working families to pay more for Medicare and higher education in order to pay tax cuts for the wealthy. Against Minimum Wage: Before being overtaken by public opinion, the Congress opposed increasing the minimum wage which had not been increased in seven years. They were against worker safety. The Republicans' Regulatory Reform Bill sought to gut workplace safety and health, environment and public health safeguards. Against Food Safety: The same bill sought to weaken food safety inspection standards. Against Education: The Republican Senate also tried to gut funding for Head Start schools in low-income neighborhoods and student loans to keep tax loopholes for the rich. First, they tried to slash Medicaid by 170 billion, then repealed standards for nursing homes. Finally, they slashed federal retiree pensions and student loans, ^ifly-two Republicans in the Senate voted in favor of this legislation. The 104th Congress House of Representatives was even See One Man's View Page 2 IWEEH 'd IIERING .^i*fl WE 5 _8 _9 .11 17 Brian Jones/News Staff OFFICER IN ACTION — Henderson Police officer Larry Williams talks to dispatch over the radio while driving. In the line of duty Sharon Jackson News Staff Writer It is a career where no two days are the same. Police officers are faced with new situations every day and are called to scenes not knowing what lies ahead. Officers even have their own language, a series of codes for radio calls. The list of codes is about 20 inches long, consisting of more than 100 items. A day in the life of a police officer has some routine but each day there is a new problem to be solved, some new challenge to overcome. Henderson police officer Larry Williams considers himself a problem-solver. The two-year officer said problemsolving is one-of the things he eiuoys most about his work. Within a six-hour period, Wilhams answered five calls, going to the scene of each incident. Williams, 31, remembered when the power went out throughout the city on Aug 10. The power outage caused accidents in the intersections, multiple false alarms and traffic tie-ups. Williams said police officers had to write accident reports, direct traffic and answer every alarm call, most of which were false alarms. Officers had to deal with a lot of chaos in a little timespan. Toward the beginning of William's shift, he pulled over a vehicle for expired tags. A pullover is not just a routine thing in an officer's day. Each time an officer stops a vehicle, the officer never knows who or what situation he will confront. Williams remembers when the Fire Department assisted him in putting a drunk driver into custody. A driver was slumped over the steering wheel on the corner of Pecos and Windmill with his car stopped on the side of the road. Williams approached the vehicle, knocked on the window and identified himself as an officer. The officer then noticed the driver's foot was on the brake and his car was in drive. The driver was intoxicated to the point where he did not respond to Williams when he identified himself The officer reached in the car to shift into in park. At that time the driver regained consciousness and tried to flee the scene. ';-'-• S— Police Page 10 Brian Jones/News Staff ON THE JOB — Officer Mary Csssell responds to s 911 call at a Henderson residence. Reserve HotelCasino delayed D.B. Mareiniak v-^^^*-. News Staff Writer Despite slowed construction, work on The Reserve Hotel and Casino is rapidly progressing, said Gregg Schatzman, general manager for the project. Schatzman said construction has slowed to allow designers time to plan a second phase of work which was not anticipated at an earlier date. "Rather than finish ofTcertai n things and have to tear walls down to add the addition on, we are waiting so it can all be done at once," he said. The casino will open with phase one and likely begin S second phase, expanding thft project from previous expectations of the opening design. Making the expansion pos. sible is the pending merger of Ameristar Casinos Inc., designers and operators ofThe Reserve, with Gem Gaming Inc. The paperwork has been filed and the companies are waiting for a ruling by a joint legislative committee on the matter in October. Once the two merge, Schatzman said, the hotel-casino can use Gem Gaming's resources and expertise in designing to expand. Phase two of tiie pngect calls for an additional 30,000 square feet of casino space and 350 more rooms. With the second phase, the project would have approximately 60,000 square feet and 600 rooms. "It would actually open as a more complete casino than before," he said. Designers for the project are drafting plans to incorporate the second phase with phase one for the opening. A date for the opening has not been announded. To begin construction on the second phase of the casino, plans must be submitted to the city for a review. Once the process is complete and construction begins, he said, the opening of the casino could occur sometime in the spring. Reserve officials originally anticipated an opening between Thanksgiving and Christmas this year. The cost for the total project is estimated to be more than $100 million. woe nesoive Page 10 Locals star in 'Dear Emma' Sharon Jackson News Staff Writer Three Henderson residents starred in the encore presentation of "Dear Emma" Saturday at the Clark County Library theater. Roger Phillips played the part of Pres Hylton, and Moira Greenspun and Jamie Woodard shared the role of Mary Lou Hylton in the Civil War music drama based on original letters to Enuna Dillon, a Southern girl who marries a Yankee soldier immediately before the Civil War. The story is one of everyday situations transformed fi'om the ordinary into an extraordinary theatrical experience. Phillips, 37, who was a principal lead singer for 13 yean in 'Jubilee' at Sally's, said what he liked most about the story was the feeling of the era and the different way people communicated with one another as opposed to present-day communication. The way they wrote and spoke was very eloquent and you don't see that today," Phillips said. Greenspun, 12, who previously appeared in productions 'Annie" and "Music Man," said what she liked best about the production was working with the other cast members. Greenspun was optimistic and said she expected the production to run smoothly. Woodard could not be reached for comment Phillips said "Dear Emma" gives you insii^t into people's Uves. "You get a sense of who the people are and the way they fed." Bnan Jonea/News Staff DEAR EMMA — Pictured from left to right are Moria Greenspun. Roger PhWips and Jamie Woodartf downing around backstage l>efora the afternoon production of 'Deer Emnw." J E-^ -'^TF^ \,

PAGE 2

2 Htndarkon H6in ftewt Thursday, August 29,1996 ONE MAN'S VIEW: Fram PtQt 1 none. Hie KMth CongrMi took aim right at the walleti of Atterica'i Woridng FaaaiUei. Hei ii the Houie Record in brief. Repubbcani voted to slaih • oiiie$270 biltionfirom Medicare, they attempted to ilaih Medicare twice. Tlien they used $270 billion in Medicare cuti to give a $246 billion tax cut mostly to the very wealthy. Thby also cut $10 billicm in • tudait college loans. For a lengthy period of time they locked the wage hike for working families by refusing to increase the minimum wage. The House voted to cut OSHA's budget and oppose a new risk assessmmt procedure that put profits ahead of safety standards. They tried to gut job training. This same Congress voted to slash federal employment and job training programs by $700 million. The Team Act: The Team Act was passed by both houses whidi allows for company unions. This, thank goodness, it was vetoed by President Clinton. Republicans John Ensign and Vucanovidi both voted for this bad legislation. Sens. Reid and Sen. Bryan voted against it Safe Food: Republicans tried to stop the EPA from enforcing key provisions of the food and safety inspection laws. They attempted to repeal or weaken the Davis Bacon Act for construction workers. Tax breaks for the wealthy at our expense. Three times R^ublicans gave away the store to those who needed it the least • Eliminated minimum tax, allowing America's biggest companies to avoid paying any taxes. • Refused to close the loophole that permits wealthy Americans to avoid paying taxes by renouncing their citizenship. •Gave the wealthy a $189 billion tax cut package while making $189 billion in cuts aimed at services and programs that benefit middle and lower income families. The 104th Congress has been no friend to the working men and women of our state and nation. We in organized labor really don't care which party the representatives are from. It is how they vote on issues that affect our daily lives at home and on the job. We will continue to shine the light on the attempts of the Gingrich/Dole crowd to take away from the poor and give to the rich. 4 vie in Congressional primary Four Democrats will compete in Tuesday's primary for the right to face Republican John Ehsign for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives, District 1. Dan Banta Dan Santa's platform has emphasizes accountability, and the need to limit new bureaucratic programs.'^e need to take the existing program and make them work," Banta said, '^e need to give administrators of the programs responsibility and the laws to carry out that responsibility." Education, support of the Environmental Protection Agency and a balanced budget are other goals of Banta, 53, a resident of Las Vegas. He resigrned his job from the state Welfare Division to run for Congress. Bob Coffin CofRn,53, has served 14 years in the state Legislature, three terms as a senator representingo central Las Vegas and twoierms as an assemblyman. CofHn was one of only four legislators to vote against a 300% pension increase for legislators in 1989. He emphasizes that he has been a leader in the fair share issue to return more of the revenues generated in Southern Nevada back to the area. A resident of Las Vegas since 1951, CofHn turned a lifetime of book collecting into a business that specializes in books, maps and dociiments on Nevada and the old West Robert Gross Dr. Robert Gross, 64, a Las Vegas resident for four years, earned his medical degree from Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. From 1961 to 1982, he owned a private general practice with sports and aviation medicine interests, in El Cjoon, Calif. His campaign has stressed the need to stop "corporate welfare," V6teii upift j^^ (^|u|ificatioii D.B. Merdniak News Staff Writer Certain residents wishing to cast their ballot at a polling place rather than mail-in votes may haveto waituntil spring to return to their local precinct. Letters were issued by the Clark County Election Department Aug. 12 to 137 Henderson residents generally located in the Morrell Park area stating their polling station, at the Kesterson Valley View Recreation Center, will be closed due to low voter turnout. Residents say the move violates their voting rights. They said it is their right to have the option to vote on voting day rather than cast a ballot by mail before election day. The Election Department said it was one of 93 stations from around Clark County to change from walk-in to mail-in voting status — a move which will save the department $70,000 per election. "I just want to serve the voting community to the best of my ability without costing excess tax money," said Kathryn Ferguson, registrar of voters. Ferguson said due to the valley's rapid growth, more polling stations are needed for expanding areas. Changing the Henderson precinct to mail-in status was categorical, she said. All those stations not meeting the 200 voter minimum turnout were reclassified. To accommodate residents' concerns about traveling to downtown Las Vegas to cast tiieir votes, the Election Department will place locked mail ballot boxes at the City Clerk's office in Henderson City Hall, 240 Water St. Outcry from some voters in Henderson, however, may force the Election Department to change the classification. Most complaints from prer Rob WeidenfelcVNews Staff VEHICLE ROLLOVER — A vehicle shs on its roof after being struck on its right side, skidding 180 dgrM and striking the curb and the rotaining wall at the intersection of Warm Springs and Graan Valley Parkway Saturday. Ona parson was treated for injuries at St. Rose Dominican HospKal. Traffic was backed up while the wreckage was cleared. Advertising deadlines advanced Advertising deadlines for next week's editions have been advanced because of the Labor Day holiday. The classified advertising deadline for the Tuesday, Sept. 3, edition will be at noon Thursday. The display advertising deadline for Tuesday, Sept. 3, edition will be at 5 p.m. Thursday. The display deadline for the Panorama section on Sept. 5 will be at noon Friday. All news offices will be closed Monday,Sept 2, for Labor Day. ^^ cincts reclassified as mail-in areas came from Henderson. For areas like the older Henderson precinct which was affected, it would likely be changed back to a walk-in voting status, she said. "I don't want anyone playing with my ballot where it can be laying around for someone to see," said Ernie Tate, a resident who received a mail-in ballot. "At my age [70] and with my high blood pressure, I don't want to walk around the government center to cast my vote," he said. Losing a ballot by mail is not uncommon and he would like to pull a lever rather than punch holes in his mail-in card, he said. He also said there may be lastminute information leading up to the election which could sway his opinion toward another candidate. The move to change the status of the Henderson precinct comes after a 1986 law was passed by the state Legislature giving the registrar an option for low turnout areas. The law states that any polling area which receives less than a 200-voter turnout may be switched by the registrar to a mail-in precinct to save money. Saa Voting Page 12 and wasteful government spending. He wants to encourage small business by reducing regulations and protect Social Security and Medicare. David B. Mautner Henderson resident David B. Mautner, 79, a retired Lt. Colonel in the U.S. Air Force, served in World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War. He was pilot and captain for Golden West Airlines ofNewport Beach, Calif., and Flying Tiger Air Services of Los Angeles. His hobbies include hiking, water sports, building rock gardens and handicapping sports. He attends UNLV as a senior student. He received a bachelor of arts from Columbia University in 1938 and received military and civilian aviation training in California and Texas. Mautner is an advocate for veterans and senior citizens. HOME— NEWS An Indtp^ndtnt Nuwpaptr FoundtdJunt 1, 1951 Hndrson Home News (USPS 240000) Published every Tuesday and Thursday morning at 2 Commerce Center Drive, Henderson, Nevada, by NBC Publications, Inc. Second class postage paid at Henderson, Nevada. POSTMASTER: Sendaddresschanges to: HENDERSON HOME NEWS 2 Commerce Center Drive Handaraon, NV 89014 Phona (702) 564-1 SSI Cuctomer complaint calh will be aeeapttd from 7 to 10 am on Tuaadaya and Jhundaya. Miaaad papara will ba diatributad by noon. MIKE O'CALLAGHAN Publisher CAROLYN O'CALLAGHAN Co-Publisher TIM O'CALLAGHAN General Manager PAUL SZYDELKO Managing Editor MARY COLLEEN MIELE Circulation Manager HBC PUBLICATIONS, INC. Mike O'CaNaghan, President; Carolyn O'Callaghan, Vice President; Tim O'Callaghan, Treasurer/Vice President; Mary Colleen Miela, Vice President; Ruthe Deskin, Secretary. SUBSCRIPTION RATES Single 50 cents One Year $30 (Twelve Concecullva Months) No Refunds MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS West of Mississtppi$40peryear East of MississippiSSO per year "Additional Mailing Offkies" DOE COMMUNITY ADVISORY BOARD MEETING The Community Advisory Board for Nevada Test Site Programs will meet Wednesday, September 4,1996. Agenda Items are: ^ Radioactive Waste Acceptance Criteria for disposal at the NTS ^ Radioactive contamination on the surface of the NTS: How much is there? Time: 5:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Place: Community College of Southern Nevada Cheyenne Avenue Campus RighDesert Conference and Training Center, Room 1422 if you are unable to attend, have comments or questions, please contact: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management P.O. Box 98518 las Vegas, Nevada 89193-8518 702-295-0197 DOUBLE YOUR PAYCHECK • Drawings every Tuesday 8:00 p.m. Cash your paycheck for a chanca to WIN MILLIONS $$$ EVERY DAY OF THE WEEK Feast in the Grille House Restaurant 24-Hoursl i^ YOUR EVERY DAY GETAWAY! SKCIALSi ALYSIftAUSaVISI : DBCONimiK SnOALS U.S. OeparCment of Energy Nevada Operations Office ''. h's How \\i Do 11. Authorized UPS Shipping Outlet Private Mail Box Rental ^ COPIES W^ FAX PACKAGING RTj STAMPS MAIL SERVICE Bl OFFICE SUPPUES SHIPPINC W9 KEYS OVERNIGHT Hi PACKING SUPPUES S MONEY TRANSflR NOTARY PASSPORT PHOTOS MONEY ORDERS ETC, ETC., FTC WESTERN UNION • Personal Street Address •24 Hour Access • Mail Forwarding Ask about these too: Voice Mail • Business Cards • Rubber Stamps • Custom Packagini; And alot more! PECOS WINDMILL PLAZA 2657 Windmill Pkwy. HENDERSON 896-9898 GREEN VALLEY PLAZA 2756 Green Valley Pkwy. •HENDERSON 454.5220 HENDERSON SHOPPING VILLAGE 850 S. Boulder Hwy. 565-1235 FREE PERSONAL INJURY SEMINAR CltA^^ Kiddie Carnival • Food • Entertainment SATURDAY, SEPTtMBER 7,8AM • 8PM SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8,12AM • 5PM Henderson Presbyterian 601 N. Major (next to Morrell Park) For more information on bootti rental Call: 565-9684 or 564-1760. LOCATION: DATE: TIME: Saturn of Henderson Wednesday, September 4,1996 7pm 9pm OPEN TO THE PUBUC • This seminar will provide you with the information you need to protect your legal rights and obtain the maximum settlement that you are entitled to receive. • There will also be a discussion from a prominent Board Certified Medical Doctor and Chiropractic Physician concerning treatment of injuries. • Individuals questions will be answered and refreshments will be served. When you've been injured through no fault of your own, it's important to know ALL OF YOUR RIGHTS! Attorney Adam S. Kutner Practice limitad to Ptmnal liyury Law Former inturance Defenae Attorney Saitainnc Mtolw: NV Trial Laoym Aaodalion Member: SUU Bar of Nevada Member: American Bar Aaaodatioa Vov Rcserxations ov Vvvi' Consultation ( 382-0000 Mention this for a reduction in a!r(Mnev t'fP^ 'STi T ~ ^• -.,->'(-[ • -ton'?• • I Get How Many Square Feet For How Much Money? Every day people are amazed at just how much home they get for their money with our tovmhomes. Priced from the low $Wi and up to 1,728 sq. ft. In size, these tovmhomes are one ol the best values In Southern Nevodol Choose from two beautiful masterplanned cxxnmunltles In the Gkeen Vcdley area, wltti: • Mbnitored Security Systems • Swimming Pools & Parks • Workout Rooms • Garages with Direct Access • Front-Yard Mdintenanoe CHEYENNE Open J06 (702) 263-4752 RA^gff Open 10^ (702) 451-8787 TViE DEVELOPERS OF NEVADA 1st • aMMSMMMH m

PAGE 3

2 Htndarkon H6in ftewt Thursday, August 29,1996 ONE MAN'S VIEW: Fram PtQt 1 none. Hie KMth CongrMi took aim right at the walleti of Atterica'i Woridng FaaaiUei. Hei ii the Houie Record in brief. Repubbcani voted to slaih • oiiie$270 biltionfirom Medicare, they attempted to ilaih Medicare twice. Tlien they used $270 billion in Medicare cuti to give a $246 billion tax cut mostly to the very wealthy. Thby also cut $10 billicm in • tudait college loans. For a lengthy period of time they locked the wage hike for working families by refusing to increase the minimum wage. The House voted to cut OSHA's budget and oppose a new risk assessmmt procedure that put profits ahead of safety standards. They tried to gut job training. This same Congress voted to slash federal employment and job training programs by $700 million. The Team Act: The Team Act was passed by both houses whidi allows for company unions. This, thank goodness, it was vetoed by President Clinton. Republicans John Ensign and Vucanovidi both voted for this bad legislation. Sens. Reid and Sen. Bryan voted against it Safe Food: Republicans tried to stop the EPA from enforcing key provisions of the food and safety inspection laws. They attempted to repeal or weaken the Davis Bacon Act for construction workers. Tax breaks for the wealthy at our expense. Three times R^ublicans gave away the store to those who needed it the least • Eliminated minimum tax, allowing America's biggest companies to avoid paying any taxes. • Refused to close the loophole that permits wealthy Americans to avoid paying taxes by renouncing their citizenship. •Gave the wealthy a $189 billion tax cut package while making $189 billion in cuts aimed at services and programs that benefit middle and lower income families. The 104th Congress has been no friend to the working men and women of our state and nation. We in organized labor really don't care which party the representatives are from. It is how they vote on issues that affect our daily lives at home and on the job. We will continue to shine the light on the attempts of the Gingrich/Dole crowd to take away from the poor and give to the rich. 4 vie in Congressional primary Four Democrats will compete in Tuesday's primary for the right to face Republican John Ehsign for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives, District 1. Dan Banta Dan Santa's platform has emphasizes accountability, and the need to limit new bureaucratic programs.'^e need to take the existing program and make them work," Banta said, '^e need to give administrators of the programs responsibility and the laws to carry out that responsibility." Education, support of the Environmental Protection Agency and a balanced budget are other goals of Banta, 53, a resident of Las Vegas. He resigrned his job from the state Welfare Division to run for Congress. Bob Coffin CofRn,53, has served 14 years in the state Legislature, three terms as a senator representingo central Las Vegas and twoierms as an assemblyman. CofHn was one of only four legislators to vote against a 300% pension increase for legislators in 1989. He emphasizes that he has been a leader in the fair share issue to return more of the revenues generated in Southern Nevada back to the area. A resident of Las Vegas since 1951, CofHn turned a lifetime of book collecting into a business that specializes in books, maps and dociiments on Nevada and the old West Robert Gross Dr. Robert Gross, 64, a Las Vegas resident for four years, earned his medical degree from Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. From 1961 to 1982, he owned a private general practice with sports and aviation medicine interests, in El Cjoon, Calif. His campaign has stressed the need to stop "corporate welfare," V6teii upift j^^ (^|u|ificatioii D.B. Merdniak News Staff Writer Certain residents wishing to cast their ballot at a polling place rather than mail-in votes may haveto waituntil spring to return to their local precinct. Letters were issued by the Clark County Election Department Aug. 12 to 137 Henderson residents generally located in the Morrell Park area stating their polling station, at the Kesterson Valley View Recreation Center, will be closed due to low voter turnout. Residents say the move violates their voting rights. They said it is their right to have the option to vote on voting day rather than cast a ballot by mail before election day. The Election Department said it was one of 93 stations from around Clark County to change from walk-in to mail-in voting status — a move which will save the department $70,000 per election. "I just want to serve the voting community to the best of my ability without costing excess tax money," said Kathryn Ferguson, registrar of voters. Ferguson said due to the valley's rapid growth, more polling stations are needed for expanding areas. Changing the Henderson precinct to mail-in status was categorical, she said. All those stations not meeting the 200 voter minimum turnout were reclassified. To accommodate residents' concerns about traveling to downtown Las Vegas to cast tiieir votes, the Election Department will place locked mail ballot boxes at the City Clerk's office in Henderson City Hall, 240 Water St. Outcry from some voters in Henderson, however, may force the Election Department to change the classification. Most complaints from prer Rob WeidenfelcVNews Staff VEHICLE ROLLOVER — A vehicle shs on its roof after being struck on its right side, skidding 180 dgrM and striking the curb and the rotaining wall at the intersection of Warm Springs and Graan Valley Parkway Saturday. Ona parson was treated for injuries at St. Rose Dominican HospKal. Traffic was backed up while the wreckage was cleared. Advertising deadlines advanced Advertising deadlines for next week's editions have been advanced because of the Labor Day holiday. The classified advertising deadline for the Tuesday, Sept. 3, edition will be at noon Thursday. The display advertising deadline for Tuesday, Sept. 3, edition will be at 5 p.m. Thursday. The display deadline for the Panorama section on Sept. 5 will be at noon Friday. All news offices will be closed Monday,Sept 2, for Labor Day. ^^ cincts reclassified as mail-in areas came from Henderson. For areas like the older Henderson precinct which was affected, it would likely be changed back to a walk-in voting status, she said. "I don't want anyone playing with my ballot where it can be laying around for someone to see," said Ernie Tate, a resident who received a mail-in ballot. "At my age [70] and with my high blood pressure, I don't want to walk around the government center to cast my vote," he said. Losing a ballot by mail is not uncommon and he would like to pull a lever rather than punch holes in his mail-in card, he said. He also said there may be lastminute information leading up to the election which could sway his opinion toward another candidate. The move to change the status of the Henderson precinct comes after a 1986 law was passed by the state Legislature giving the registrar an option for low turnout areas. The law states that any polling area which receives less than a 200-voter turnout may be switched by the registrar to a mail-in precinct to save money. Saa Voting Page 12 and wasteful government spending. He wants to encourage small business by reducing regulations and protect Social Security and Medicare. David B. Mautner Henderson resident David B. Mautner, 79, a retired Lt. Colonel in the U.S. Air Force, served in World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War. He was pilot and captain for Golden West Airlines ofNewport Beach, Calif., and Flying Tiger Air Services of Los Angeles. His hobbies include hiking, water sports, building rock gardens and handicapping sports. He attends UNLV as a senior student. He received a bachelor of arts from Columbia University in 1938 and received military and civilian aviation training in California and Texas. Mautner is an advocate for veterans and senior citizens. HOME— NEWS An Indtp^ndtnt Nuwpaptr FoundtdJunt 1, 1951 Hndrson Home News (USPS 240000) Published every Tuesday and Thursday morning at 2 Commerce Center Drive, Henderson, Nevada, by NBC Publications, Inc. Second class postage paid at Henderson, Nevada. POSTMASTER: Sendaddresschanges to: HENDERSON HOME NEWS 2 Commerce Center Drive Handaraon, NV 89014 Phona (702) 564-1 SSI Cuctomer complaint calh will be aeeapttd from 7 to 10 am on Tuaadaya and Jhundaya. Miaaad papara will ba diatributad by noon. MIKE O'CALLAGHAN Publisher CAROLYN O'CALLAGHAN Co-Publisher TIM O'CALLAGHAN General Manager PAUL SZYDELKO Managing Editor MARY COLLEEN MIELE Circulation Manager HBC PUBLICATIONS, INC. Mike O'CaNaghan, President; Carolyn O'Callaghan, Vice President; Tim O'Callaghan, Treasurer/Vice President; Mary Colleen Miela, Vice President; Ruthe Deskin, Secretary. SUBSCRIPTION RATES Single 50 cents One Year $30 (Twelve Concecullva Months) No Refunds MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS West of Mississtppi$40peryear East of MississippiSSO per year "Additional Mailing Offkies" DOE COMMUNITY ADVISORY BOARD MEETING The Community Advisory Board for Nevada Test Site Programs will meet Wednesday, September 4,1996. Agenda Items are: ^ Radioactive Waste Acceptance Criteria for disposal at the NTS ^ Radioactive contamination on the surface of the NTS: How much is there? Time: 5:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Place: Community College of Southern Nevada Cheyenne Avenue Campus RighDesert Conference and Training Center, Room 1422 if you are unable to attend, have comments or questions, please contact: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management P.O. Box 98518 las Vegas, Nevada 89193-8518 702-295-0197 DOUBLE YOUR PAYCHECK • Drawings every Tuesday 8:00 p.m. Cash your paycheck for a chanca to WIN MILLIONS $$$ EVERY DAY OF THE WEEK Feast in the Grille House Restaurant 24-Hoursl i^ YOUR EVERY DAY GETAWAY! SKCIALSi ALYSIftAUSaVISI : DBCONimiK SnOALS U.S. OeparCment of Energy Nevada Operations Office ''. h's How \\i Do 11. Authorized UPS Shipping Outlet Private Mail Box Rental ^ COPIES W^ FAX PACKAGING RTj STAMPS MAIL SERVICE Bl OFFICE SUPPUES SHIPPINC W9 KEYS OVERNIGHT Hi PACKING SUPPUES S MONEY TRANSflR NOTARY PASSPORT PHOTOS MONEY ORDERS ETC, ETC., FTC WESTERN UNION • Personal Street Address •24 Hour Access • Mail Forwarding Ask about these too: Voice Mail • Business Cards • Rubber Stamps • Custom Packagini; And alot more! PECOS WINDMILL PLAZA 2657 Windmill Pkwy. HENDERSON 896-9898 GREEN VALLEY PLAZA 2756 Green Valley Pkwy. •HENDERSON 454.5220 HENDERSON SHOPPING VILLAGE 850 S. Boulder Hwy. 565-1235 FREE PERSONAL INJURY SEMINAR CltA^^ Kiddie Carnival • Food • Entertainment SATURDAY, SEPTtMBER 7,8AM • 8PM SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8,12AM • 5PM Henderson Presbyterian 601 N. Major (next to Morrell Park) For more information on bootti rental Call: 565-9684 or 564-1760. LOCATION: DATE: TIME: Saturn of Henderson Wednesday, September 4,1996 7pm 9pm OPEN TO THE PUBUC • This seminar will provide you with the information you need to protect your legal rights and obtain the maximum settlement that you are entitled to receive. • There will also be a discussion from a prominent Board Certified Medical Doctor and Chiropractic Physician concerning treatment of injuries. • Individuals questions will be answered and refreshments will be served. When you've been injured through no fault of your own, it's important to know ALL OF YOUR RIGHTS! Attorney Adam S. Kutner Practice limitad to Ptmnal liyury Law Former inturance Defenae Attorney Saitainnc Mtolw: NV Trial Laoym Aaodalion Member: SUU Bar of Nevada Member: American Bar Aaaodatioa Vov Rcserxations ov Vvvi' Consultation ( 382-0000 Mention this for a reduction in a!r(Mnev t'fP^ 'STi T ~ ^• -.,->'(-[ • -ton'?• • I Get How Many Square Feet For How Much Money? Every day people are amazed at just how much home they get for their money with our tovmhomes. Priced from the low $Wi and up to 1,728 sq. ft. In size, these tovmhomes are one ol the best values In Southern Nevodol Choose from two beautiful masterplanned cxxnmunltles In the Gkeen Vcdley area, wltti: • Mbnitored Security Systems • Swimming Pools & Parks • Workout Rooms • Garages with Direct Access • Front-Yard Mdintenanoe CHEYENNE Open J06 (702) 263-4752 RA^gff Open 10^ (702) 451-8787 TViE DEVELOPERS OF NEVADA 1st • aMMSMMMH m

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VIEWPOINT HCMNEWS PubiiaMr • CMOIM Co-Publli OXaMagliM PaulSiyMto Managing Editor Henderson Home News Thursday, August 29,1996 ii* lEWSVlEW A reminder to vote The News would like to remind all registered voters of the primary elections to be held next Tuesday, Sept. 3. Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Expect to be pelted this weekend with mailers, TV and radio commercials and even visits from those • -^ candidates who are going door to door. '^::{\':^"'''^--^----''-'-"^ Among the decisions to be made are: Justice of the Peace for Henderson, Family and District Court Judges, Assembly and Senate races. Of course, this is just a prelude to November's general election which will be topped off by the Presidential race. But it is important to display your interest — show you care about what happens in your community and in your state. ^^ ^^ <^ -^^ There are many ways to participate in a democracy: running for office, writing letters, gathering petitions, attending meetings, donating to a campaign and assisting in a campaign. Voting is the easiest and cheapest way to participate. Vote on Tuesday. needed now Sen. Jon Porter should be commended for initiating a resolution to study the feasibility of removing trucks carrying hazardous materials from crossing Hoover Dam. Porter's passion for the subject was highlighted with his lengthy speech filled with statistics from various governmental agencies during a meeting last week. But somehow the issue was twisted like a magician woridng with a balloon and a new animal was created. The three-hour meeting did not bring fdrth many details by the Nevada Department of Transportation or the Department of Energy concerning the possibility of removing hazardous materials shipments over the dam. NDOT officials briefly touched on the criteria used for the deletion of U.S. Highway 93 from the national network of highways. More discussion should have been provided in order for residents to base their comments on this new idea. ; • ;; -u;, Opposition from truck drivers may prove extensive due to the financial cost of traveling over a longer route. But economics need to be weighed against the possibility of an accident involving hazardous materials. Unfortunately, these ideas were not debated during the meeting. The idea of prohibiting hazardous material shipments from passing over the dam has been circulating for two decades. Longterm solutions such as an alternate route, (building a bridge or expanding U.S. Highway 95) have been studied to death. The feasibility study to remove truck traffic off of Hoover Dam was introduced at the last legislative session. What is needed immediately is a short-term solution. One of the criteria for deleting U.S. Highway 93 from the national network of highways is safety. It does not take an engineer to figure out trucks winding through hairpin turns near Hoover Dam are much more prone to an accident than crossing at Laughlin. The feasibility study is expected to be completed by the end of this year and will be submitted to the legislature during its next session. NDOT is accepting comments until Sept. 20. Residents should voice their opinion and let their state officials know they want something done now, not more studies for another 30 years. Comments should be directed to Dennis Baughman, Hearings Officer, Nevada Department of TVtmsportation, 1263 S. Stewart St., Carson City, Nv. 89712. SIGN YOUR LETTERS TO THE EDITOR RICHARD COHEN A virtuoso campaigner, a master politician CHICAGO — The White House was not happy. Time was preparing a cover story on Dick Morris, Bill Clinton's ethically challenged poUtical consultant, just as the Democratic National Convention was convening here. The White House wanted the focus on Clinton and, even more than that, on CUnton the statesman, not CUnton the raw politician. The White House was wrong about that. It is Clinton the poUtician that this convention clearly loves. Maybe not since Harry Truman has the party had a leader with such zest for campaigning. Maybe not since Ljmdon Johnson has the party had such an outsized nominee with a need to shake every hand and no apparent need to sleep. John Kennedy had his charm and Jimmy Carter his piety but Clinton stands on the verge of doipg what no Democrat has done since FDR—^win a second term. To appreciate what Clinton has done, it is necessary to go to the videotape. Let us roll some poll figures from just about two years ago. In the spring of 1994, Clinton had the lowest performance ratings at that point in his term of any president since the end of World War II. The only president who came close was the hapless Grerald Ford, who had just pardoned the felonious Richard Nixon. Even then, Clinton would have killed for Ford's numbers. Ford had a 42, CUnton a mere 36. At that time, there were probably no more than a dozen people in all the land who thought Clinton stood a chance of re-election — and three of them were on hallucinogens. The polls, in fact, foreshadowed a midierin election which returned a Republican Congress and triggered the so-caUed RepubUcan Revolution. Clinton himself had to assert that he — the very president of these United States — was still relevant. Newt Gingrich laughed. That Clinton is now choo-choosing his way toward this aUegedly windy dty is nothing less than apohtical miracle — but one he devised. It's true, of course, that he was lucky. Two military expeditions — Haiti and Bosnia — have produced not a sinj^e combat death and the economy has done relatively weU. The tragic bombing at Oklahoma City, an event no one could foresee, was masterfully handled by Clinton. He suddenly morphed fi:t)m poster boy of Boys Nation to national father figure. It was a remarklible transformation. Then, too, Gingrich and the GOP Congress helped. Newt turned out to have Saddam Hussein's touch for pubUc relations and his Congress was so zealous in the pursuit of a ri^twing agenda it seeilied that socmer or later it would seU ofr the national parks, drain the wetlands, enslave iUegal immigrants and snuff the family pet. It was a breathtaking display of political ineptitude. Now we come back to Morris. He is sometimes portrayed as a Machiavelhan character, both diaboUcal and, somehow, in control of Clinton's mind. I see him, however, as someone who has allowed Clinton to be Clinton. The president is not the conventional liberal his enemies make him out to be. Sure, he would have expanded government at one time — for that, folks, is the fim of being president, especially one who once worshiped John F. Kennedy. '• But there has always been another side of Clinton. To use the titie of a forthcoming book by joumaUst Martin Walker, he is "The President We Deserve." By that, Walker means that ^ Clinton perfectly represents his generation. He is a postwar, post-Cold War, post-New Deal figure. He sups from an ideologically varied buffet — a little economic liberalism, a little cultural conservatism and then, for dessert, some cviltural liberalism. In other words, this is a president who supports gay rights and conventional family values. Morris lets Clinton roam the neighborhood of ideas, taking what he wants when he wants it. Morris provides yet another function. From what Time says and what White House insiders tell me, he puts a floor under Clinton, suggesting positions so unprincipled, so totally devoid of ideological consistency, that Clinton is forced to reassert core beliefs. So it was that Clinton would not match Dole's tax cuts, as Morris wanted, or reverse himself on affirmative action. Here Clinton stuck to principles. In the end, the ultimate poUtical principal is to avoid defeat. This, at the moment, CUnton appears to be doing and for that his party is grateful. He and the party may differ on, say, welfare reform (without it, the demand to match Dole's tax cuts would be far greater) but first comes November and then, if that works, plenty of time to squabble. Meanwhile, we will see poUtics practiced by a virtuoso campaigner and a master politician. The miracle is not that he cpmes to Chicago in the liead'but, if yoti reniember 19d4, that he comes to Chicago at all. ?5 Cohen is a columnist for the Washington P^t Writers Group. mmmt BILL HANLON One for all, all for one All for one and one for all. We've heard the expression before, but do we truly understand that we are all in need of each other's support? Is your pension fund fiilly funded? Medicare, do we have em expectation that it will be there for us and our parents? How many times have we heard about social security going bankrupt? If you have planned all your life, paid into these funds, how would you feel if the yoimgel^generation decided that they didn't want to pay for those things that you truly beUeve belong to you? Do you feel the next generation has an obUgation to the older generation to pay for the continuation of these programs, even if they might not benefit them? How about the younger generation? Should they expect the older generation to help pay for rehabilitating older schools and paying for new ones? The simple fact is if we choose not to be edl for one and one for all, our nation wiU not be able to deUver on the promises made to us. We must work together for the betterment of us all. In September, the Washoe County School District wiU be the first in the state to ask voters to approve a school bond issue. Is it needed? Yes, there is no doubt in my mind that the additional seats are needed. In November, other local school districts will be asking their communities to support bond issues. Are they also needed? The Emswer to these questions can be veiy easily answered using basic mathmnatics. Count the number of seats available in your school district. Count the number of kids expected to enroll in that district. Using that information, what's your conclusion? That's basic math. I have every reason to beUeve the good people of Nevada will support these bond issues. However, I am troubled by the actions of small groups of people or smaU-minded people. I have actually heard people trying to negotiate on various issues with local schools districts using the bond question as a bargaining tool. Their feeling seems to be summed up by: if you don't cave in and give us what we want, we won't support bond issues. This is wrong. Little kids and big kids deserve a chance to go to a school that's not over-crowded. Teachers and principals should have the opportunity to know who those students are. Those kids should have opportunities to enroU and take part in clubs, organizations and sports. When schools are over capacity, teachers and principals have a hard time determining who a stranger to a school might be. Safety becomes a larger issue than it already is. Often, required alternative scheduling cuts into instructional time. That's terrible, to say the least And rather than having two footbaU teams, two Honor Societies, two student councils, etc., there is only one of each. That cuts down on participation. Student interest and curiosity are increased by those associations. And yes, there is research that cleariy suggests that smaller schools outpeifcnn veiy lafpe onee. Some might say that they have already paid their dues, their Idds have gone through school, why should they support a school bond issue? The answer is quite simple, we are all in this together. As funding is needed to pay for social security or Medicare, we would expect nothing less fi-om the next generation but to step up to the plate to make sure senior citizens' needs were being met. We cannot become a society that only looks after our own needs. If we are a community, then we have to look around our little boat to make sure everyone has a life preserver. We have an expectation that someone will come to our aid if we are in an accident, robbed or molested. We have those same expectations about retirement, medical care and schools. Like families, different segments of the community have differing needs. We cannot ne^ect the whole family to take care of just one need. They all have to be addressed. So, this faU, as you are being asked to support a school bond issue, ask yourself, *Do we need seats for the children?" If the answer is yes, forget about poUtics and support the school bond. One for all and all for one. Hanlon, a Las Vegas resident wtK> writes a column about education, sits on the State Board of Education, is the administrator for the Clark County School District's Mat^VScienoe iMtituta sod is s part-time instructor at UNLV. LETTERS 'Ths Nawt walcomM brief Isttart, signed with your nama, addr*M and phona for varWcation. Typad lattars racalva prafaranca and tlia NWB raaan/aa Iha right to adit for grammar, spalling or langth. Plaasa mall to: CdVtor, Horn* Nmn, 2 Commmem Ctnttr Drlv*, Htnehnon, NV 99014 )URWWS Thursday, August 29,1996 Henderson Home News Pagei LETTERS 6V casino is misplaced Editor Picture this with a casino at Green Valley Parkway and Lake Mead Drive: A young hothead gets into his pick-up truck after too much to drink and a serious gambling loss and goes roaring up Green Valley Parkway. He is very upset, for he blew the truck payment money on gambling. He faces the loss of his truck and he can't borrow the money because he is already deeply in debt The next day the papers announce the deaths of four Greenspun Junior High students plus a parent, and the driver of the truck is in critical condition at the hospital after a horrible traffic smash-up. For years there have been candidates for Gamblers Anonymous and Alcoholics Anonymous all over the place but fortunately Las Vegas survives and thrives. On the Strip, for example, a drunk or rash driver is held back by crowded traffic. He can't do much damage. And in more open areas such as Boulder Highway you have a divided highway with many lanes in both directions for easy driving and safety. Not true of Lake Mead Drive. I understand that roughly nine out of 10 Green Valley residents polled on the question of a local casino voted no. In spite of this, three out of five Henderson Cotmcilmen voted yes. I'm a friend of the gaming industry. 1 feel a sense of unease when 1 read of proposals by some in federal government to impose a surtax on Nevada gaming. Casinos help keep Nevada "green." But they don't belong in a prime residential area such as Green Valley or Summerlin. And a word to the developers. Are you sure your studies, charts and statistics are right? Are you sure that if you build it, they will come? A few blocks away from your site, a supermarket called Megafoods folded. Then Ernst failed at the same spot. Green Valley residents want a nice quiet and safe suburban place to live and are quite choosy about where to go for commercial and recreational needs. As for out-of-towners, they come here because of the magic name "Las Vegas." They aren't interested in an isolated casino way out in suberbia. ROBERT SPENCER Want polling place back Editor: The Registrar of Voters, Kathryn Ferguson has seen fit to close a 100 polling locations and demand that 16,420 voters send in their ballots early as absentee ballots. Her excuse is that she will save $70,000 per election. A couple of local politicians that I have contacted can not understand why they couldn't have doubled up on precincts. Why has no attempt been made to get volunteers to sit at the polls instead of hiring people? In her press release, she claims that those of us who wish tcrvote on election day at a polling place want to listen to the "latest gossip." Any voter or candidate running for office should resent such a flippant remark. I know what I do. Candidates are interviewed by the press up to election day and their remarks on TV and to the news media are certainly not gossip. A judge could make a ruling, the day before the election which could change a person's vote. Ferguson's remarks are inflammatory and not deserving of our public servants. The Commissioners who have supported her in this move should quickly re-examine this issue. About 16,420 people have lost their right to vote like the rest of the citizens of Clark County. She claims that she has only received 25 to 30 phone calls. If she were to send a card to the voters, I'm certain that the response would be that the electorate would prefer to vote at the polls. The fascists took away people's voting rights in the '30s and look what happened. Of the 30 to 40 people I have talked to, they all say that they do not trust absentee ballots. There are too many stories of lost or misplaced ballots throughout the country. I would also like to know how many people have complained about the cost of voting? 1 don't ever recall anyone mentioning it to me. In closing tell Ms. Ferguson, I want my polling place back for the general election. Can't fight City Hall PHIL PRENTICE Editor: Beware, Henderson residents: Don't bother to fight City Hall because you are only wasting your time. Two years ago the residents of Viewmont Drive and surrounding area banded together and fought for our view of the city and for a crossing over the railroad to Lake Mead Drive before any heavy equipment was brought in. We have dealt with the Eagle Crest construction for years on our street and are very tired of being woken at 5 a.m. with construction traffic. We woke up one morning recently to dust a mile high and heavy machinery mowing down the desert, brush, rabbits, quail, ground squirrels, lizards, and I'm sure, some turtles. How did they get a permit without the railroad crossing in? Someone didn't read the minutes of the last meeting! Or maybe they did. In trying to run this down, we found the minutes of the last meeting, which the residents attended and agreed on and was voted in by the City Council, had changed to what the planners and builders agreed would be best (for them). They didn't even have the courtesy to let the residents know they had changed the plans to suit the builder. Now when you try to find out who did the changes, it is a big game of passing the buck or "I'll call you back." Maybe. I just want to thank all the people on Viewmont and surrounding streets for attending meetings, writing letters (which must have gone in the round file) and supporting our neighborhood. Unfortunately, you can't fight City Hall and the men with the moneybuilders. P. THOMPSON Political signs useless, annoying Editor: Campaign posters! What are these annoying pieces of "artwork" that appear every election time on public property for? They seem to arrive earlier and eariier before each election giving a picture of the person but rarely identifying any qualifications of the ofHcial wishing to be elected. On public property there can be two to three campaign posters of the same person. These amount to grafTiti. Although the city is not responsible for removing the posters, the tax dollars that we have spent to beautify our community certainly go to waste during this prolonged period of poster exhibition. When the wind blows the signs are scattered, bent and torn. Nobody seems to come by to replace these posters after they have been damaged. I spoke with my City Councilman (Ward 2) and it appears that there is no regulation that controls placement of these posters except that they cannot be placed on government (local-state-federal) property. My Councilman even indicated that he uses these posters and is not sure of the worth of them in eatablishing chances for election. I suggest these posters be picked up as the housing development advertisement signs are. Evidently they are allowed to be placed from Friday night to Sunday ni^t and require removal by early Monday morning. If this is not an acceptable plan then, at least allow them to be placed only one week before election. If this does not work, then I suggest that we all not vote for candidates who continually litter our comnnunity with these useless posters. V.C. SMITH, M.O. Power outages becoming worrisome Northern Nevada was lucky that the second mtyor regional power outage in six weeks passed us by Saturday on its way to eight other Western states, plus parts of Canada and^Mexico. We didn't have to deal with the sap in electricity that silenced swamp coolers on a very hot day. We didn't have to deal with downed signals that tied up auto traffic. We did not have closed businesses on the busiest shopping day of the week. It was Hfe as usual in the Truckee Meadows. But we were not so fortunate during the first msgor outage on July 2. And chances are we may not be so lucky if it happens again. That is why we need to be concerned about the most recent outage and whether similar ones can be prevented in the future. The power outages may be a lot more serious than we think, and we need to look more in depth at what's behind them. The entire western third of the country is linked by a big electricity grid. The federal Department of Energy believes that the outages are linked to large amoimts of power that traverse these transmission lines. The higher transmission load, the department said, "raises new challenges" to the system's reliability. You bet it does. As the balance of population continues to shift to the West the electric system will be pressed into service even more. If you superimpose on this the coming utility deregulation, the concern over reliability becomes even greater. Some experts are predicting that power outages may become more frequent in the future. If we accept this then we are bowing to a standard that is much more commonplace in the Third World, where power outages are not only frequent but often the order of the day. The cost of inadequate service is too great to ignore. In Third World countries, electric shortages inflict enormous damage on industry, many of whom have learned to rely on their own generators at great personal expense; and electric outages wreak havoc on household appliances, shortening their useful life. One can only imagine the maneuvering among Airline security crackdown It was on July 25 that President Clinton warned against speculation on the cause of the explosion of TWA Flight 800 off Long Island. But, the President added, "Let us all agree that we must not wait to alleviate the concerns of the American people about air safety and air security." He spoke at a meeting with the families of the victims at Kennedy International Airport, where the flight had originated, a choice of place that added resonance to his remarks. The president called for strict new airline security covering both passengers and cargo on international and domestic flights. The imphed message: If lax security had anything to do with the fate of Flight 800, that will never again be the case. Clinton said he had asked Vice President Al Gore to head a commission to reviejv all aspects of aviation safety and that Gore had 45 days to report initial findings and propose a plan of action. At about the same time, the president asked Congress for quick action on legislation beefing up the nation's capacity to fight terrorism, and congressional leaders pledged their cooperation. It was a rousing call to action, spurred by the New York air disaster and the fatal explosion of a pipe bomb at Atlanta's Olympic Centennial Park. So, what progress has been made? Halfway through (Jore's 45 days, the first members of the commission on aviation safety have finally been named. A press secretary claimed that work had begun despite the fact that the commission has just been formed. Congress left for its recess without agreeing on any new anti-terrorism measures. The House of Representatives did vote on one bill but the result was to knock out one of the most promising of the proposed anti-terrorism tools; a requirement that markers or taggants be added to explosives to aid in tracking down their sources in criminal investigations. So far, federal investigators have been unable to determine whether sabotage or an accident (such as the explosion of a nearly empty fuel tank) caused the Flight 800 tragedy. That leaves doubt hanging over the quality of security at Kennedy Airport. Is it sufficiently tight even now? Investigative reports suggest quite the opposite, noting unguarded luggage conveyor belts, luggage rooms and luggage wagons. At the very least, a chasm exists between the intent of the presidential directives and actual practice at the nation's airports. Perhaps it's not such a bad idea that local government officials such as the Los Angeles County supervisors and some members of the City Council, are pressing for a review of. security measures at the airports within their jurisdictions. Los Angeles Times Students should not have to walk 1.9 miles Editor: Parents, grandparents,and concerned residents of Clark County, are you aware of the 1.9-mile limit which is only 1/lOth of a mile short of your children being able to take a bus to school? Drive it sometime. Where my grandson lives, the address is 1.9 miles, but the apartment he lives in is on the two-mile line. He has to walk because the school board says so. The children of Clark County have to walk this every morning and back— sometimes in areas we would not go. They are expected to also keep up good grades, and not ever be late, and be at school every day. So what if it is hot, raining, or some drug pusher or worse, harassed your children? They are to be happy and get good grades! The school board is again asking for more money. I know we need much more of everything with the rapid growth of Clark County. Parents should be told before they bought that new home and move here, "Your child may have to talk 1.9 miles to school twice a day just to get his/her education." Maybe they would think twice about what a wonderful place this is to raise their families. With the crime on our streets and more coming every day, it is not safe for our children to walk to the comer store much less 1.9 miles. I know we can't bus each child but we can sure change the bus pick-up closer so they are not walking sometimes an hour just to get to school. If they are walking one mile at least there will be more children and maybe the police would be more able to watch them. Look at the streets today compared to a short five years ago. Are they safe? Here is a challenge to Superintendent Brian Cram and the entire school board that controls your child's safety. "You walk the school year in rain, heat, and places you are forcing these kids to walk. Don't stay home because you will bet thrown out of work. Oh yes, do your best even though you had no food because you were late for work. Let the school board know at the voting booths we mean it when we say rules can be broken and school board members can be changed. My grandson is an A student plus an artist. How many more students try to get somewhere with their school studies, but have to face that long walk. Would you do it? Send letters to me and I'll carry them to the sdiool board. DORIS SIDES PO. 80x90656 HendwaoaNV 89009 utilities to keep the system going. In the Third Worid, power outages occur for the same reasons the Department of Energy gives for Saturday's outage: great demand for energy overloading a system that is under capacity. Many utilities here and elsewhere handle higher capacity needs by i building transmission lines because they are considerably less expensive than building power plants, which also are becoming more politically incorrect for environmental reasons. But the fact is, transmission lines lack the punch of the real thing. After awhile you cannot mask growing energy needs with more transmission lines. If the federal Department of Energy is correct, then we must either find new and better ways to boost the reliability of transmission lines or we may have to build more power plants. Because when the extension cord is overloaded, the thing to do is rewire the entire hotise, not plug in an additional load. Reno Gazette Journal Reform plan goes too far Some of Bob Dole's proposals to change tax administration are excellent. For example, he proposes to relieve 40 million individual taxpayers from the burden of filing annual tax returns, presumably by requiring that their withholding fully satisfy their income tax obligation. This would permit a sizable reduction iD.IRS staff and save many trees. ^ .4 r <^ "^ Dole also stresses taxpayer service. The IRS should do more of this and do it better. He wants a simpler and fairer law. Current law is very complicated and badly needs simplification and shortening. But tax laws, like traffic laws, won't work unless there is effective and responsible enforcement. Weinow collect about 83 cents of each tax dollar due. If we are serious about trying to balance the budget, we need to maintain and increase, not decrease, this 80% ratio. Of course, taxpayers' rights should be protected, and the Taxpayer Bill of Rights II, just enacted, will materially strengthen taxpayers' rights and protection against overzealous agents. But Dole's proposal to shift the burden of proof from the taxpayer to the IRS would seriously erode tax revenues. The taxpayer has the information, and the IRS does not Why is it wrong to require a taxpayer to support his own Form 1O40? Another proposal would grant a one-year amnesty so that individuals who owe taxes could pay without penalty or interest. But amnesties work only if they are followed by strong enforcement initiatives, missing here. Further, such an amnesty would be unfair to the taxpayers who meet their obligations in full and on time. Why should we reward those who deliberately underpay? Wouldn't thii encourage others to do the same? A further proposal would end BO called "lifestyle audits" imless there w clear evidence of criminal activity. While such audits should be carefiilly and infrequently used, imreported income is a more serious threat than overstated deductions. If someone reports an income of $40,000, lives in a 12-room house and owns three very expensive cars, I believe the IRS should have the right to ask whether that person is meeting his obligations to the country. Donald C. Alexander is a Washington attorney and a former Comrmsaoner of Internal Revenue. V8AT9dm These pages are the opmKjn pagas of the newspaper. Naws View tt vwittan bi tt^e editorial staff to bnr>Q attsntion to an issue of concern in ttie communty Our readers are enooursged to wnte about locai issues and submit tt>enn to the News.

PAGE 5

VIEWPOINT HCMNEWS PubiiaMr • CMOIM Co-Publli OXaMagliM PaulSiyMto Managing Editor Henderson Home News Thursday, August 29,1996 ii* lEWSVlEW A reminder to vote The News would like to remind all registered voters of the primary elections to be held next Tuesday, Sept. 3. Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Expect to be pelted this weekend with mailers, TV and radio commercials and even visits from those • -^ candidates who are going door to door. '^::{\':^"'''^--^----''-'-"^ Among the decisions to be made are: Justice of the Peace for Henderson, Family and District Court Judges, Assembly and Senate races. Of course, this is just a prelude to November's general election which will be topped off by the Presidential race. But it is important to display your interest — show you care about what happens in your community and in your state. ^^ ^^ <^ -^^ There are many ways to participate in a democracy: running for office, writing letters, gathering petitions, attending meetings, donating to a campaign and assisting in a campaign. Voting is the easiest and cheapest way to participate. Vote on Tuesday. needed now Sen. Jon Porter should be commended for initiating a resolution to study the feasibility of removing trucks carrying hazardous materials from crossing Hoover Dam. Porter's passion for the subject was highlighted with his lengthy speech filled with statistics from various governmental agencies during a meeting last week. But somehow the issue was twisted like a magician woridng with a balloon and a new animal was created. The three-hour meeting did not bring fdrth many details by the Nevada Department of Transportation or the Department of Energy concerning the possibility of removing hazardous materials shipments over the dam. NDOT officials briefly touched on the criteria used for the deletion of U.S. Highway 93 from the national network of highways. More discussion should have been provided in order for residents to base their comments on this new idea. ; • ;; -u;, Opposition from truck drivers may prove extensive due to the financial cost of traveling over a longer route. But economics need to be weighed against the possibility of an accident involving hazardous materials. Unfortunately, these ideas were not debated during the meeting. The idea of prohibiting hazardous material shipments from passing over the dam has been circulating for two decades. Longterm solutions such as an alternate route, (building a bridge or expanding U.S. Highway 95) have been studied to death. The feasibility study to remove truck traffic off of Hoover Dam was introduced at the last legislative session. What is needed immediately is a short-term solution. One of the criteria for deleting U.S. Highway 93 from the national network of highways is safety. It does not take an engineer to figure out trucks winding through hairpin turns near Hoover Dam are much more prone to an accident than crossing at Laughlin. The feasibility study is expected to be completed by the end of this year and will be submitted to the legislature during its next session. NDOT is accepting comments until Sept. 20. Residents should voice their opinion and let their state officials know they want something done now, not more studies for another 30 years. Comments should be directed to Dennis Baughman, Hearings Officer, Nevada Department of TVtmsportation, 1263 S. Stewart St., Carson City, Nv. 89712. SIGN YOUR LETTERS TO THE EDITOR RICHARD COHEN A virtuoso campaigner, a master politician CHICAGO — The White House was not happy. Time was preparing a cover story on Dick Morris, Bill Clinton's ethically challenged poUtical consultant, just as the Democratic National Convention was convening here. The White House wanted the focus on Clinton and, even more than that, on CUnton the statesman, not CUnton the raw politician. The White House was wrong about that. It is Clinton the poUtician that this convention clearly loves. Maybe not since Harry Truman has the party had a leader with such zest for campaigning. Maybe not since Ljmdon Johnson has the party had such an outsized nominee with a need to shake every hand and no apparent need to sleep. John Kennedy had his charm and Jimmy Carter his piety but Clinton stands on the verge of doipg what no Democrat has done since FDR—^win a second term. To appreciate what Clinton has done, it is necessary to go to the videotape. Let us roll some poll figures from just about two years ago. In the spring of 1994, Clinton had the lowest performance ratings at that point in his term of any president since the end of World War II. The only president who came close was the hapless Grerald Ford, who had just pardoned the felonious Richard Nixon. Even then, Clinton would have killed for Ford's numbers. Ford had a 42, CUnton a mere 36. At that time, there were probably no more than a dozen people in all the land who thought Clinton stood a chance of re-election — and three of them were on hallucinogens. The polls, in fact, foreshadowed a midierin election which returned a Republican Congress and triggered the so-caUed RepubUcan Revolution. Clinton himself had to assert that he — the very president of these United States — was still relevant. Newt Gingrich laughed. That Clinton is now choo-choosing his way toward this aUegedly windy dty is nothing less than apohtical miracle — but one he devised. It's true, of course, that he was lucky. Two military expeditions — Haiti and Bosnia — have produced not a sinj^e combat death and the economy has done relatively weU. The tragic bombing at Oklahoma City, an event no one could foresee, was masterfully handled by Clinton. He suddenly morphed fi:t)m poster boy of Boys Nation to national father figure. It was a remarklible transformation. Then, too, Gingrich and the GOP Congress helped. Newt turned out to have Saddam Hussein's touch for pubUc relations and his Congress was so zealous in the pursuit of a ri^twing agenda it seeilied that socmer or later it would seU ofr the national parks, drain the wetlands, enslave iUegal immigrants and snuff the family pet. It was a breathtaking display of political ineptitude. Now we come back to Morris. He is sometimes portrayed as a Machiavelhan character, both diaboUcal and, somehow, in control of Clinton's mind. I see him, however, as someone who has allowed Clinton to be Clinton. The president is not the conventional liberal his enemies make him out to be. Sure, he would have expanded government at one time — for that, folks, is the fim of being president, especially one who once worshiped John F. Kennedy. '• But there has always been another side of Clinton. To use the titie of a forthcoming book by joumaUst Martin Walker, he is "The President We Deserve." By that, Walker means that ^ Clinton perfectly represents his generation. He is a postwar, post-Cold War, post-New Deal figure. He sups from an ideologically varied buffet — a little economic liberalism, a little cultural conservatism and then, for dessert, some cviltural liberalism. In other words, this is a president who supports gay rights and conventional family values. Morris lets Clinton roam the neighborhood of ideas, taking what he wants when he wants it. Morris provides yet another function. From what Time says and what White House insiders tell me, he puts a floor under Clinton, suggesting positions so unprincipled, so totally devoid of ideological consistency, that Clinton is forced to reassert core beliefs. So it was that Clinton would not match Dole's tax cuts, as Morris wanted, or reverse himself on affirmative action. Here Clinton stuck to principles. In the end, the ultimate poUtical principal is to avoid defeat. This, at the moment, CUnton appears to be doing and for that his party is grateful. He and the party may differ on, say, welfare reform (without it, the demand to match Dole's tax cuts would be far greater) but first comes November and then, if that works, plenty of time to squabble. Meanwhile, we will see poUtics practiced by a virtuoso campaigner and a master politician. The miracle is not that he cpmes to Chicago in the liead'but, if yoti reniember 19d4, that he comes to Chicago at all. ?5 Cohen is a columnist for the Washington P^t Writers Group. mmmt BILL HANLON One for all, all for one All for one and one for all. We've heard the expression before, but do we truly understand that we are all in need of each other's support? Is your pension fund fiilly funded? Medicare, do we have em expectation that it will be there for us and our parents? How many times have we heard about social security going bankrupt? If you have planned all your life, paid into these funds, how would you feel if the yoimgel^generation decided that they didn't want to pay for those things that you truly beUeve belong to you? Do you feel the next generation has an obUgation to the older generation to pay for the continuation of these programs, even if they might not benefit them? How about the younger generation? Should they expect the older generation to help pay for rehabilitating older schools and paying for new ones? The simple fact is if we choose not to be edl for one and one for all, our nation wiU not be able to deUver on the promises made to us. We must work together for the betterment of us all. In September, the Washoe County School District wiU be the first in the state to ask voters to approve a school bond issue. Is it needed? Yes, there is no doubt in my mind that the additional seats are needed. In November, other local school districts will be asking their communities to support bond issues. Are they also needed? The Emswer to these questions can be veiy easily answered using basic mathmnatics. Count the number of seats available in your school district. Count the number of kids expected to enroll in that district. Using that information, what's your conclusion? That's basic math. I have every reason to beUeve the good people of Nevada will support these bond issues. However, I am troubled by the actions of small groups of people or smaU-minded people. I have actually heard people trying to negotiate on various issues with local schools districts using the bond question as a bargaining tool. Their feeling seems to be summed up by: if you don't cave in and give us what we want, we won't support bond issues. This is wrong. Little kids and big kids deserve a chance to go to a school that's not over-crowded. Teachers and principals should have the opportunity to know who those students are. Those kids should have opportunities to enroU and take part in clubs, organizations and sports. When schools are over capacity, teachers and principals have a hard time determining who a stranger to a school might be. Safety becomes a larger issue than it already is. Often, required alternative scheduling cuts into instructional time. That's terrible, to say the least And rather than having two footbaU teams, two Honor Societies, two student councils, etc., there is only one of each. That cuts down on participation. Student interest and curiosity are increased by those associations. And yes, there is research that cleariy suggests that smaller schools outpeifcnn veiy lafpe onee. Some might say that they have already paid their dues, their Idds have gone through school, why should they support a school bond issue? The answer is quite simple, we are all in this together. As funding is needed to pay for social security or Medicare, we would expect nothing less fi-om the next generation but to step up to the plate to make sure senior citizens' needs were being met. We cannot become a society that only looks after our own needs. If we are a community, then we have to look around our little boat to make sure everyone has a life preserver. We have an expectation that someone will come to our aid if we are in an accident, robbed or molested. We have those same expectations about retirement, medical care and schools. Like families, different segments of the community have differing needs. We cannot ne^ect the whole family to take care of just one need. They all have to be addressed. So, this faU, as you are being asked to support a school bond issue, ask yourself, *Do we need seats for the children?" If the answer is yes, forget about poUtics and support the school bond. One for all and all for one. Hanlon, a Las Vegas resident wtK> writes a column about education, sits on the State Board of Education, is the administrator for the Clark County School District's Mat^VScienoe iMtituta sod is s part-time instructor at UNLV. LETTERS 'Ths Nawt walcomM brief Isttart, signed with your nama, addr*M and phona for varWcation. Typad lattars racalva prafaranca and tlia NWB raaan/aa Iha right to adit for grammar, spalling or langth. Plaasa mall to: CdVtor, Horn* Nmn, 2 Commmem Ctnttr Drlv*, Htnehnon, NV 99014 )URWWS Thursday, August 29,1996 Henderson Home News Pagei LETTERS 6V casino is misplaced Editor Picture this with a casino at Green Valley Parkway and Lake Mead Drive: A young hothead gets into his pick-up truck after too much to drink and a serious gambling loss and goes roaring up Green Valley Parkway. He is very upset, for he blew the truck payment money on gambling. He faces the loss of his truck and he can't borrow the money because he is already deeply in debt The next day the papers announce the deaths of four Greenspun Junior High students plus a parent, and the driver of the truck is in critical condition at the hospital after a horrible traffic smash-up. For years there have been candidates for Gamblers Anonymous and Alcoholics Anonymous all over the place but fortunately Las Vegas survives and thrives. On the Strip, for example, a drunk or rash driver is held back by crowded traffic. He can't do much damage. And in more open areas such as Boulder Highway you have a divided highway with many lanes in both directions for easy driving and safety. Not true of Lake Mead Drive. I understand that roughly nine out of 10 Green Valley residents polled on the question of a local casino voted no. In spite of this, three out of five Henderson Cotmcilmen voted yes. I'm a friend of the gaming industry. 1 feel a sense of unease when 1 read of proposals by some in federal government to impose a surtax on Nevada gaming. Casinos help keep Nevada "green." But they don't belong in a prime residential area such as Green Valley or Summerlin. And a word to the developers. Are you sure your studies, charts and statistics are right? Are you sure that if you build it, they will come? A few blocks away from your site, a supermarket called Megafoods folded. Then Ernst failed at the same spot. Green Valley residents want a nice quiet and safe suburban place to live and are quite choosy about where to go for commercial and recreational needs. As for out-of-towners, they come here because of the magic name "Las Vegas." They aren't interested in an isolated casino way out in suberbia. ROBERT SPENCER Want polling place back Editor: The Registrar of Voters, Kathryn Ferguson has seen fit to close a 100 polling locations and demand that 16,420 voters send in their ballots early as absentee ballots. Her excuse is that she will save $70,000 per election. A couple of local politicians that I have contacted can not understand why they couldn't have doubled up on precincts. Why has no attempt been made to get volunteers to sit at the polls instead of hiring people? In her press release, she claims that those of us who wish tcrvote on election day at a polling place want to listen to the "latest gossip." Any voter or candidate running for office should resent such a flippant remark. I know what I do. Candidates are interviewed by the press up to election day and their remarks on TV and to the news media are certainly not gossip. A judge could make a ruling, the day before the election which could change a person's vote. Ferguson's remarks are inflammatory and not deserving of our public servants. The Commissioners who have supported her in this move should quickly re-examine this issue. About 16,420 people have lost their right to vote like the rest of the citizens of Clark County. She claims that she has only received 25 to 30 phone calls. If she were to send a card to the voters, I'm certain that the response would be that the electorate would prefer to vote at the polls. The fascists took away people's voting rights in the '30s and look what happened. Of the 30 to 40 people I have talked to, they all say that they do not trust absentee ballots. There are too many stories of lost or misplaced ballots throughout the country. I would also like to know how many people have complained about the cost of voting? 1 don't ever recall anyone mentioning it to me. In closing tell Ms. Ferguson, I want my polling place back for the general election. Can't fight City Hall PHIL PRENTICE Editor: Beware, Henderson residents: Don't bother to fight City Hall because you are only wasting your time. Two years ago the residents of Viewmont Drive and surrounding area banded together and fought for our view of the city and for a crossing over the railroad to Lake Mead Drive before any heavy equipment was brought in. We have dealt with the Eagle Crest construction for years on our street and are very tired of being woken at 5 a.m. with construction traffic. We woke up one morning recently to dust a mile high and heavy machinery mowing down the desert, brush, rabbits, quail, ground squirrels, lizards, and I'm sure, some turtles. How did they get a permit without the railroad crossing in? Someone didn't read the minutes of the last meeting! Or maybe they did. In trying to run this down, we found the minutes of the last meeting, which the residents attended and agreed on and was voted in by the City Council, had changed to what the planners and builders agreed would be best (for them). They didn't even have the courtesy to let the residents know they had changed the plans to suit the builder. Now when you try to find out who did the changes, it is a big game of passing the buck or "I'll call you back." Maybe. I just want to thank all the people on Viewmont and surrounding streets for attending meetings, writing letters (which must have gone in the round file) and supporting our neighborhood. Unfortunately, you can't fight City Hall and the men with the moneybuilders. P. THOMPSON Political signs useless, annoying Editor: Campaign posters! What are these annoying pieces of "artwork" that appear every election time on public property for? They seem to arrive earlier and eariier before each election giving a picture of the person but rarely identifying any qualifications of the ofHcial wishing to be elected. On public property there can be two to three campaign posters of the same person. These amount to grafTiti. Although the city is not responsible for removing the posters, the tax dollars that we have spent to beautify our community certainly go to waste during this prolonged period of poster exhibition. When the wind blows the signs are scattered, bent and torn. Nobody seems to come by to replace these posters after they have been damaged. I spoke with my City Councilman (Ward 2) and it appears that there is no regulation that controls placement of these posters except that they cannot be placed on government (local-state-federal) property. My Councilman even indicated that he uses these posters and is not sure of the worth of them in eatablishing chances for election. I suggest these posters be picked up as the housing development advertisement signs are. Evidently they are allowed to be placed from Friday night to Sunday ni^t and require removal by early Monday morning. If this is not an acceptable plan then, at least allow them to be placed only one week before election. If this does not work, then I suggest that we all not vote for candidates who continually litter our comnnunity with these useless posters. V.C. SMITH, M.O. Power outages becoming worrisome Northern Nevada was lucky that the second mtyor regional power outage in six weeks passed us by Saturday on its way to eight other Western states, plus parts of Canada and^Mexico. We didn't have to deal with the sap in electricity that silenced swamp coolers on a very hot day. We didn't have to deal with downed signals that tied up auto traffic. We did not have closed businesses on the busiest shopping day of the week. It was Hfe as usual in the Truckee Meadows. But we were not so fortunate during the first msgor outage on July 2. And chances are we may not be so lucky if it happens again. That is why we need to be concerned about the most recent outage and whether similar ones can be prevented in the future. The power outages may be a lot more serious than we think, and we need to look more in depth at what's behind them. The entire western third of the country is linked by a big electricity grid. The federal Department of Energy believes that the outages are linked to large amoimts of power that traverse these transmission lines. The higher transmission load, the department said, "raises new challenges" to the system's reliability. You bet it does. As the balance of population continues to shift to the West the electric system will be pressed into service even more. If you superimpose on this the coming utility deregulation, the concern over reliability becomes even greater. Some experts are predicting that power outages may become more frequent in the future. If we accept this then we are bowing to a standard that is much more commonplace in the Third World, where power outages are not only frequent but often the order of the day. The cost of inadequate service is too great to ignore. In Third World countries, electric shortages inflict enormous damage on industry, many of whom have learned to rely on their own generators at great personal expense; and electric outages wreak havoc on household appliances, shortening their useful life. One can only imagine the maneuvering among Airline security crackdown It was on July 25 that President Clinton warned against speculation on the cause of the explosion of TWA Flight 800 off Long Island. But, the President added, "Let us all agree that we must not wait to alleviate the concerns of the American people about air safety and air security." He spoke at a meeting with the families of the victims at Kennedy International Airport, where the flight had originated, a choice of place that added resonance to his remarks. The president called for strict new airline security covering both passengers and cargo on international and domestic flights. The imphed message: If lax security had anything to do with the fate of Flight 800, that will never again be the case. Clinton said he had asked Vice President Al Gore to head a commission to reviejv all aspects of aviation safety and that Gore had 45 days to report initial findings and propose a plan of action. At about the same time, the president asked Congress for quick action on legislation beefing up the nation's capacity to fight terrorism, and congressional leaders pledged their cooperation. It was a rousing call to action, spurred by the New York air disaster and the fatal explosion of a pipe bomb at Atlanta's Olympic Centennial Park. So, what progress has been made? Halfway through (Jore's 45 days, the first members of the commission on aviation safety have finally been named. A press secretary claimed that work had begun despite the fact that the commission has just been formed. Congress left for its recess without agreeing on any new anti-terrorism measures. The House of Representatives did vote on one bill but the result was to knock out one of the most promising of the proposed anti-terrorism tools; a requirement that markers or taggants be added to explosives to aid in tracking down their sources in criminal investigations. So far, federal investigators have been unable to determine whether sabotage or an accident (such as the explosion of a nearly empty fuel tank) caused the Flight 800 tragedy. That leaves doubt hanging over the quality of security at Kennedy Airport. Is it sufficiently tight even now? Investigative reports suggest quite the opposite, noting unguarded luggage conveyor belts, luggage rooms and luggage wagons. At the very least, a chasm exists between the intent of the presidential directives and actual practice at the nation's airports. Perhaps it's not such a bad idea that local government officials such as the Los Angeles County supervisors and some members of the City Council, are pressing for a review of. security measures at the airports within their jurisdictions. Los Angeles Times Students should not have to walk 1.9 miles Editor: Parents, grandparents,and concerned residents of Clark County, are you aware of the 1.9-mile limit which is only 1/lOth of a mile short of your children being able to take a bus to school? Drive it sometime. Where my grandson lives, the address is 1.9 miles, but the apartment he lives in is on the two-mile line. He has to walk because the school board says so. The children of Clark County have to walk this every morning and back— sometimes in areas we would not go. They are expected to also keep up good grades, and not ever be late, and be at school every day. So what if it is hot, raining, or some drug pusher or worse, harassed your children? They are to be happy and get good grades! The school board is again asking for more money. I know we need much more of everything with the rapid growth of Clark County. Parents should be told before they bought that new home and move here, "Your child may have to talk 1.9 miles to school twice a day just to get his/her education." Maybe they would think twice about what a wonderful place this is to raise their families. With the crime on our streets and more coming every day, it is not safe for our children to walk to the comer store much less 1.9 miles. I know we can't bus each child but we can sure change the bus pick-up closer so they are not walking sometimes an hour just to get to school. If they are walking one mile at least there will be more children and maybe the police would be more able to watch them. Look at the streets today compared to a short five years ago. Are they safe? Here is a challenge to Superintendent Brian Cram and the entire school board that controls your child's safety. "You walk the school year in rain, heat, and places you are forcing these kids to walk. Don't stay home because you will bet thrown out of work. Oh yes, do your best even though you had no food because you were late for work. Let the school board know at the voting booths we mean it when we say rules can be broken and school board members can be changed. My grandson is an A student plus an artist. How many more students try to get somewhere with their school studies, but have to face that long walk. Would you do it? Send letters to me and I'll carry them to the sdiool board. DORIS SIDES PO. 80x90656 HendwaoaNV 89009 utilities to keep the system going. In the Third Worid, power outages occur for the same reasons the Department of Energy gives for Saturday's outage: great demand for energy overloading a system that is under capacity. Many utilities here and elsewhere handle higher capacity needs by i building transmission lines because they are considerably less expensive than building power plants, which also are becoming more politically incorrect for environmental reasons. But the fact is, transmission lines lack the punch of the real thing. After awhile you cannot mask growing energy needs with more transmission lines. If the federal Department of Energy is correct, then we must either find new and better ways to boost the reliability of transmission lines or we may have to build more power plants. Because when the extension cord is overloaded, the thing to do is rewire the entire hotise, not plug in an additional load. Reno Gazette Journal Reform plan goes too far Some of Bob Dole's proposals to change tax administration are excellent. For example, he proposes to relieve 40 million individual taxpayers from the burden of filing annual tax returns, presumably by requiring that their withholding fully satisfy their income tax obligation. This would permit a sizable reduction iD.IRS staff and save many trees. ^ .4 r <^ "^ Dole also stresses taxpayer service. The IRS should do more of this and do it better. He wants a simpler and fairer law. Current law is very complicated and badly needs simplification and shortening. But tax laws, like traffic laws, won't work unless there is effective and responsible enforcement. Weinow collect about 83 cents of each tax dollar due. If we are serious about trying to balance the budget, we need to maintain and increase, not decrease, this 80% ratio. Of course, taxpayers' rights should be protected, and the Taxpayer Bill of Rights II, just enacted, will materially strengthen taxpayers' rights and protection against overzealous agents. But Dole's proposal to shift the burden of proof from the taxpayer to the IRS would seriously erode tax revenues. The taxpayer has the information, and the IRS does not Why is it wrong to require a taxpayer to support his own Form 1O40? Another proposal would grant a one-year amnesty so that individuals who owe taxes could pay without penalty or interest. But amnesties work only if they are followed by strong enforcement initiatives, missing here. Further, such an amnesty would be unfair to the taxpayers who meet their obligations in full and on time. Why should we reward those who deliberately underpay? Wouldn't thii encourage others to do the same? A further proposal would end BO called "lifestyle audits" imless there w clear evidence of criminal activity. While such audits should be carefiilly and infrequently used, imreported income is a more serious threat than overstated deductions. If someone reports an income of $40,000, lives in a 12-room house and owns three very expensive cars, I believe the IRS should have the right to ask whether that person is meeting his obligations to the country. Donald C. Alexander is a Washington attorney and a former Comrmsaoner of Internal Revenue. V8AT9dm These pages are the opmKjn pagas of the newspaper. Naws View tt vwittan bi tt^e editorial staff to bnr>Q attsntion to an issue of concern in ttie communty Our readers are enooursged to wnte about locai issues and submit tt>enn to the News.

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wm Ptg* 6> Hndifson Home Ntws Thursday, August 29,1996 Luau at The center is open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, from 6 to 10 p.m. Monday through Thursday evenings, and from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Hawaiian Luau Hawaiian native Leilani Leclerc volunteers her time and talent each Labor Day to cook an authentic Hawaiian Luau luncheon at the center. Her talents are legendary—from individually carved vegetables to deliciously seasoned ham and chicken and Hawaiian desserts. Along with her superb culinary skills, Leclercbrings ablend ofHawaiian culture of dance and music. A truly magnificent meal and delightful entertainment will make you believe you are dining on the beach. The Henderson Seniors Auxiliary will help provide the hohday luncheon for a suggested donation of $L25. Enjoy a culinary arid cultural visit to the spirit of the islands without an airplane ticket. Beach towels not required. Linny Scott, floral director of Silk Designs, will bring silk flowers and other arrangements to decorate the center on Sept. 2. Call 565-6990 for reservations. Great Birthday Party Jean Sadler's great coordinating efforts, and the cake decorating skills of Helen Hjonas and nutrition manager Sandy Quinnell produce the most beautiful and delicious birthday cakes. Band Director Minnie Fulford and her Young At Heart Band led the music, happy birthday wish and introduction to all seniors bom in August. We wish a special happy birthday to seniors 80+years young; Laura Altmann, Mary Bailey, Florence Davis, Vernon Edge, James Howell, Florence Jennings, Margaret Owens, Jane Purtill, Nora Speiser, Virginia Vercruy sse and Edwin Vigoren. Thank You, Bruce t MThirough the efforts of Clark !ounty Commissioner Bruce Woodbury, the Henderson Senior Center was selected as an early voting site. Voting was provided at the center Friday, Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 23-25, enabling seniors ad area residents easy voting access. Pot Luck The monthly Pot Luck will begin at 1 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 8, and will be hosted by Rep. Richard Perkins. The event features the best senior culinary delights in the valley and is a wonderful way to enjoy a delicious meal with good friends and meet new people. Bring a favorite family dish to share with others. SENIOR CENTER HlGHUGHTS 27 e. TEXAS ST. 565-6990 Free Card Lessons Want to learn to play pinochle or bridge? Want to start at the beginning and really learn how to enjoy these games? Are you an intermediate or expert player and want to fine tune your skills? If so, we have free lessons for you. Leonard Hagar offers free pinochle lessons at 10 a.m..every Wednesday. Helen Hymas will offer free bridge lessons at 9 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 19. Call 5656990 to sign up for free lessons. Bus Trips Travel coordinators Helen Hymas and Jean Sadler have great trips planned for the year and are looking for seniors to help plan more trips. Stop by to visit with Hymas and Sadler to discuss future travel ideas. Today at 10 a.m., we will go to the Mt. Charleston Lodge for a cool afternoon and luncheon in the mountains. The "shop til you drop" bus will leave the center at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 10, to the Boulevard Mall, and on Sept. 14, we will journey to cool Spring Mountain. Call the center, 5656990, for reservations and costs. Friday Movies Every Friday at 9 a.m. Doug Pyle and Ruth Shannon coordinate the Friday Movie Theater. Showing Aug. 30 is "Strategic Air Command," starring Jimmy Stewart and June Allyson. Stop by for a great movie and let Shannon and Pyle know about movies you would like to see. Learning The center has community college and UNLV catalogues available for seniors to check out upcoming classes. The center also provides a beautiful and quiet library for reading enjoyment. Our book/writing club meets at 1 p.m. Thursdays, beginning Sept. 5. Senior Volunteers A special thank you to Lois Bailey and her volunteers who helped put together a small mailing—10,000 pieces—for the Clark County School District. Thelma Tuvey is lining up volunteers to help with the grand opening of the mine at Gordon McCaw Elementary School, Sept. 11. Seniors are again planning to assist with the annual Juvenile Diabetes Foundation's Walk For The Cure, to be held Saturday, Sept. 28, at the MGM Theme Park. Call Edna Deardoflf, director of the Retired Senior Volunteer Program, to volunteer for these and other Henderson services. SAVING WATER WATER BETWEEN 2AM SAM SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER A. CAMCO PLUMBINqiCO. Water Heaters • Disposals • Drains Dcpindiblc • Bondei) • Ini • Uc OOMSI? Ful Emergency Repairs p 896-8815 I'^ve Valley Wide Services i B ARREL uHOHii BILLY T;^' desert )Data 503 Hotel Plaza Boulder City, NV 89005 (702) 294-6224 FAX: 2940141 VVoiii Processing.Neivsletlers .COLOR lASER COPIES .Transcriplion UPSlFcilEx .Resumes.Forms.laminating .Notary .Bindini) Courtesy Photo EARLY VOTING — Election Department officials conduct early voting at the Henderson Senior Center. sincerely appreciate your assistance. Activities The Henderson Senior Center Thank You, Selma ~ Henderson Seniors Auxiliary Chairwoman Othena Williams is organizing a "Happy Birthday Party" for Selma Bartlett, beginning at 6 p.m., Monday, Sept. 23, at the Henderson Golf and Country Club. All proceeds will benefit senior nutrition programs at the center. Bartlett is a long-time supporter of seniors programs. Call Williams, 565-8890,' for ticket information. Reminders •The Close Up Foundation has provided the center with applications for trips to Washington D.C. in September and October. Stop by for applications, or call (800)363-4762 for information. •The Clark County Assessor's office provides services from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, at the center. •The Department of Motor Vehicles provides drivers license and photo ID services for seniors once a month at the center on the second Thursday of the month. This month it will be held Sept. 12. •Confused about your medical bills, or what Medicare will pay? Stop by ft-om 9 a.m. to noon any Friday and work with Dorothy Swackhammer for assistance. •CAT tokens and passes are available for sale at the center every morning from 8 a.m. to noon. •55 ALIVE classes are offered three times a month at the center, an afternoon, evening and weekend class. Call for pre-registration and class time information. •We have more calls for wheelchairs and walkers with wheels than we can deliver. If you have a wheelchair or walker with wheels to donate to our medical loan program, we would ELECT JUDGE GREGORY BARLOW lU'caiise it'siihoiit jiislicc'...an(l \()iir siilVl\ Judge Barlow wants to be your District Court Judge because he has experience from all points of the law: • Municipal Court judge since 1989 • Deputy Attorney General 1987-89, Head of insurance fraud investigation unit • Clark County Deputy Public Defender 1977-81 • Instructor, mentor National Judicial College ;. • Distinguished Jurist Certificate, Nevada Supreme Court Judge Barlow is committed to you and our community Judge Barlow and Sharon, his wife of 26 years, have been active in our community for more than 20 years. Judge Barlow is conmiitted to ensuring criminals who take advantage of our seniors and children are prosecuted quickly and to the fullest extent of the law. ^^As a judge, my job is to protect the public against criminals—a jobyl jake very ] seriously." JUDGE GREGORY BARLOW DISTRICT COURT DEPT. 4 Judge Gregory Barlow Call 229-6060 to volunteer or for information See Seniors Page? Citiikrl' Kiddie Carnival • Food • Entertainment SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, SAM 8PM SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8,12AM • 5PM Henderson Presbyterian 601 N, Major (next to Morrell Park) For more Information on booth rental Call: 565-9684 or 564-1760 BLUE PLATE SPECIAL OF THE WEEK ^ ^ INCLUDES SOUP & SALAD & BREAD PUDDING )f MACORONI & CHEESE $2.95 ^ SOFT TACOS BEEF, PORK OR CHICKEN $1.75 SUPER ROCKER HAMBURGER with Basket of Fries $4.95 ^ MILKSHAKES ALL FLAVORS $2.00 OPENING TUESDAY, AUGUST 27 "ENTERPRISE" featuring the Sounds of "The Four Seasons" & the "Beach Boys' SUNDAY MATINEE • 2 TO 6 P.M. Traditional Blue Grass with the RED ROCK MOUNTAIN BOYS free appetizers WEDNESDAY NIGHT LADIES DRINK FREE FROM 8 P.M. TO MIDNIGHT BANQUET FACILITIES AVAILABLE '564-1150 ( .i-iiii'. I IIIIIIL:( A Piiii I liiii/lilrl I/M I .// ''luiuf BLUE PLATE SPECIAL OFFERS EXPIRE SEPTEMBER 5,1996 Paid by Kendal Bird Family Court Race Includes Henderson Native Kendal Sue Bird is a candidate for Family Court Judge in the newly created department "H". A graduate of Basic High School, Burkholder Jr. High, and Gordan McCaw Elementary, Kendal Sue Bird continued on to college and law school. You may remember Kendal as president of the Basic High school Desertaires or as the hind section of the dancing reindeer in many Henderson Christmas parades. As a child Kendal was often featured in the Henderson Home News as an ice skater and with local dance troups. Kendal says, "My days of dancing and skating pretty much ended when I went to college and focused on my studies." Kendal Sue Bird received a Bachelors degree in English and Philosophy and was Student Body President in her senior year at college. Since becoming an attorney, Kendal has been named the "Outstanding Domestic Relations Attorney" by the Clark County Pro Bono Project in 1991-1992. She is past president of the Southern Nevada Association of Women Attorneys and presently serves as an Arbitrator for the Eighth Judicial District Court, Mandatory Arbitration Program. That is in addition to her family law practice. Kendal and her husband, a local school teacher, actively participate in youth charity organizations in the community. "The families of Clark County are entitled to justice that is fair, prompt, and legally sound. Justice rests in truth and the law, not political connecttons or favors. To personally talk with Kendal Sue Bird about her views on Law, Family, or her Candidacy please call her office at 382-2560. PERSONAL INJURY FREE CONSULTATION NO RECOVERY FEE 565-0473 218 LEAD ST. (Across from the new Civic Center Plaza) LAW OFFICE OF JOHN F. MARCHIANO FORMER HENDERSON CITY ATTORNEY Thursday, August 29,1996 Henderson Home Newt Page 7 SENIORS: Activities listed From Ifage 6 has activities ranging from art to Scrabble, concerts to health semihars, recreation programs to sopial activities. Tie Center is open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Monday through Thursday evenings, the center is open from 6 to 10 p.m. and from 9 a.n. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Ihursday, Aug. 29: Center opel for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4p.m. and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.. Retired Sei^ior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 .m., billiards all hours center is open, bridge at 8 a.m.. Scrabble at 10 a.m. and bingo at 10 a.m., Senior Orchestra at 1 p.n., Duplicate bridge at 6 p.m. ani pinochle at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 30: Center open forall activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Retired Senior Volunteer Prjgram 8 to 11 a.m., billiards al tiours center is open, Medicare Information and Assistance and hdp with medical forms 9 a.m. to neon, free hearing tests by appdntment call 565-6990, bridge at 12:30 p.m., canasta and cribbsge at 1 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 31: Center will be open for all activities from 9a.m. to 2 p.m. Brunch will be served from 9 to 11:30 a.m. for $1.25. Monday, Sept. 2: Center open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is apen, bridge at 8 a.m., wood carving at 9 a.m., oil painting at •** WIN *** Dinner for yourself and four other couples at: Henderson, NV Mail To: Dinner Drawing P.O. Box 4974 Las Vegas, NV 89127-0974 Homeowners or Renters Adults ONLY No Obligation Card must be completely filled out Klame Address City Ptwoe Husband employed by. Wife employed by Age of ctilldren at fKxne. Sponsored by MASTERQUARD One Entry Per Household Courtesy Photo BIRTHDAY PARTY — Black Mountain Nutrition manager Sandy Quinnell, seated center, baked birthday cakes for the Center's monthly birthday party. From left are Laura Boggess, Georgia Johnson, Flo Davis, Quinnell, Mary Bailey, Margaret Owens, Vernon Edge, Laura Altman and band director Minnie Fulford. 12:30 p.m., pinochle at 1 p.m., mens chorus at 7 p.m. and double deck pinochle at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 3: Center open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.. Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, needlecraft at 9 a.m., T-shirt painting at 9 a.m., and blood pressure te=;ting at 10 a.m., pinochle at 1 p.m., line dancing at 2 p.m. and Celebrity City Chorus at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 4: Center open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, ceramics 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., free pinochle lessons at 10 a.m., Euchre at 1 p.m., dominoes at 1 p.m., pinochle at 6:30 p.m., and Scrabble at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 5: Center open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, bridge at 8 a.m.. Scrabble at 10 a.m. and bingo at 10a.m., SeniorOrchestra at 1:30 p.m., Duplicate bridge at 6 p.m. and pinochle at 6:30 p.m. Meal program Meals are provided at the center Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for a suggested donation of $1.25 by Catholic Charities of Southern Nevada through the Black Mountain Senior Nutrition Program. Catholic Charities also provides Meals on Wheels for Henderson seniors. For information on these services and the daily menu, call Catholic Charities of Southern Nevada, 385-5284. Thursday, Aug. 29: Baked Ham Friday, Aug. 30: Egg Salad Monday, Sept. 2: Hawaiian Luau Tuesday, Sept. 3: Baked Chicken Wednesday, Sept. 4; Chicken Parmigiana Thursday, Sept. 5: Pork Chops Dukes named to Senior Citizens Task Force The Board of County-Commissioners recently approved the appointment of Betty Dukes to theClark County SeniorCitizens Task Force. The short-term task force will evaluate services provided to seniors and develop a list of recommendations of how Clark County can improve senior services and programs. Dukes is a volunteer for the Henderson Senior Center and was named volunteer of the month in November 1994. She also delivers Meals on Wheels to 30 homebound residents, and is the official clown for the city of Henderson. County Commissioner Bruce Woodbury recommended the appointment of Dukes to the task force. "Dukes is an asset to the city of Henderson, and her participation in the task force will aid in improving the way local government does business throughout the county," Woodbury said. The Clark County Senior Citizens Task Force includes seven members who will serve one-yearterms expiring Aug. 20, 1997. Expo booths available "To Serve A lifetime of service to his country,, • 33 years of Military Service (includes active duty and reserve time) • Served with Navy SEAL Team 1, Mekong Delta, Vietnam *67 (32 Military Decorations including; The Cross of Gallantry and three Presidential Citations) • Major in the Nevada National Guard Reserve • 10 years in Law Enforcement (receiving the nation's highest police award; "The Law Enforcement Commendation Medal") Now, Jim wants to serve | and fight for you! If you have any questions or concerns please call Jim at 566-8008 Piid for by ihe Commiliee Th Bleci Jim Born Born Assembly ?^Only a few booth spaces are still available for Expo '96. For booth rental information contact the Henderson Chamber of Commerce, 590 S. Boulder Highway, or call 565-8951. An estimated 20,000 visitors attend Expo '95, making their way through exhibits at the Henderson Convention Center, and taking advantage of goods and services offered by business exhibitors. In conjunction with this year's show, an open art and craft show will be held adjacent to the exhibit hall, and a new car show will take place in the Civic Center Plaza adjacent to the exhibit hall. Non-stop entertainment will take place in the new amphitheatre, along with the Inland Empire Carnival atTimet Field. For more information, call Ann Snyder at the Henderson Chamber of Commerce office, 565-8951. THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY i'.'

PAGE 7

wm Ptg* 6> Hndifson Home Ntws Thursday, August 29,1996 Luau at The center is open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, from 6 to 10 p.m. Monday through Thursday evenings, and from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Hawaiian Luau Hawaiian native Leilani Leclerc volunteers her time and talent each Labor Day to cook an authentic Hawaiian Luau luncheon at the center. Her talents are legendary—from individually carved vegetables to deliciously seasoned ham and chicken and Hawaiian desserts. Along with her superb culinary skills, Leclercbrings ablend ofHawaiian culture of dance and music. A truly magnificent meal and delightful entertainment will make you believe you are dining on the beach. The Henderson Seniors Auxiliary will help provide the hohday luncheon for a suggested donation of $L25. Enjoy a culinary arid cultural visit to the spirit of the islands without an airplane ticket. Beach towels not required. Linny Scott, floral director of Silk Designs, will bring silk flowers and other arrangements to decorate the center on Sept. 2. Call 565-6990 for reservations. Great Birthday Party Jean Sadler's great coordinating efforts, and the cake decorating skills of Helen Hjonas and nutrition manager Sandy Quinnell produce the most beautiful and delicious birthday cakes. Band Director Minnie Fulford and her Young At Heart Band led the music, happy birthday wish and introduction to all seniors bom in August. We wish a special happy birthday to seniors 80+years young; Laura Altmann, Mary Bailey, Florence Davis, Vernon Edge, James Howell, Florence Jennings, Margaret Owens, Jane Purtill, Nora Speiser, Virginia Vercruy sse and Edwin Vigoren. Thank You, Bruce t MThirough the efforts of Clark !ounty Commissioner Bruce Woodbury, the Henderson Senior Center was selected as an early voting site. Voting was provided at the center Friday, Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 23-25, enabling seniors ad area residents easy voting access. Pot Luck The monthly Pot Luck will begin at 1 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 8, and will be hosted by Rep. Richard Perkins. The event features the best senior culinary delights in the valley and is a wonderful way to enjoy a delicious meal with good friends and meet new people. Bring a favorite family dish to share with others. SENIOR CENTER HlGHUGHTS 27 e. TEXAS ST. 565-6990 Free Card Lessons Want to learn to play pinochle or bridge? Want to start at the beginning and really learn how to enjoy these games? Are you an intermediate or expert player and want to fine tune your skills? If so, we have free lessons for you. Leonard Hagar offers free pinochle lessons at 10 a.m..every Wednesday. Helen Hymas will offer free bridge lessons at 9 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 19. Call 5656990 to sign up for free lessons. Bus Trips Travel coordinators Helen Hymas and Jean Sadler have great trips planned for the year and are looking for seniors to help plan more trips. Stop by to visit with Hymas and Sadler to discuss future travel ideas. Today at 10 a.m., we will go to the Mt. Charleston Lodge for a cool afternoon and luncheon in the mountains. The "shop til you drop" bus will leave the center at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 10, to the Boulevard Mall, and on Sept. 14, we will journey to cool Spring Mountain. Call the center, 5656990, for reservations and costs. Friday Movies Every Friday at 9 a.m. Doug Pyle and Ruth Shannon coordinate the Friday Movie Theater. Showing Aug. 30 is "Strategic Air Command," starring Jimmy Stewart and June Allyson. Stop by for a great movie and let Shannon and Pyle know about movies you would like to see. Learning The center has community college and UNLV catalogues available for seniors to check out upcoming classes. The center also provides a beautiful and quiet library for reading enjoyment. Our book/writing club meets at 1 p.m. Thursdays, beginning Sept. 5. Senior Volunteers A special thank you to Lois Bailey and her volunteers who helped put together a small mailing—10,000 pieces—for the Clark County School District. Thelma Tuvey is lining up volunteers to help with the grand opening of the mine at Gordon McCaw Elementary School, Sept. 11. Seniors are again planning to assist with the annual Juvenile Diabetes Foundation's Walk For The Cure, to be held Saturday, Sept. 28, at the MGM Theme Park. Call Edna Deardoflf, director of the Retired Senior Volunteer Program, to volunteer for these and other Henderson services. SAVING WATER WATER BETWEEN 2AM SAM SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER A. CAMCO PLUMBINqiCO. Water Heaters • Disposals • Drains Dcpindiblc • Bondei) • Ini • Uc OOMSI? Ful Emergency Repairs p 896-8815 I'^ve Valley Wide Services i B ARREL uHOHii BILLY T;^' desert )Data 503 Hotel Plaza Boulder City, NV 89005 (702) 294-6224 FAX: 2940141 VVoiii Processing.Neivsletlers .COLOR lASER COPIES .Transcriplion UPSlFcilEx .Resumes.Forms.laminating .Notary .Bindini) Courtesy Photo EARLY VOTING — Election Department officials conduct early voting at the Henderson Senior Center. sincerely appreciate your assistance. Activities The Henderson Senior Center Thank You, Selma ~ Henderson Seniors Auxiliary Chairwoman Othena Williams is organizing a "Happy Birthday Party" for Selma Bartlett, beginning at 6 p.m., Monday, Sept. 23, at the Henderson Golf and Country Club. All proceeds will benefit senior nutrition programs at the center. Bartlett is a long-time supporter of seniors programs. Call Williams, 565-8890,' for ticket information. Reminders •The Close Up Foundation has provided the center with applications for trips to Washington D.C. in September and October. Stop by for applications, or call (800)363-4762 for information. •The Clark County Assessor's office provides services from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, at the center. •The Department of Motor Vehicles provides drivers license and photo ID services for seniors once a month at the center on the second Thursday of the month. This month it will be held Sept. 12. •Confused about your medical bills, or what Medicare will pay? Stop by ft-om 9 a.m. to noon any Friday and work with Dorothy Swackhammer for assistance. •CAT tokens and passes are available for sale at the center every morning from 8 a.m. to noon. •55 ALIVE classes are offered three times a month at the center, an afternoon, evening and weekend class. Call for pre-registration and class time information. •We have more calls for wheelchairs and walkers with wheels than we can deliver. If you have a wheelchair or walker with wheels to donate to our medical loan program, we would ELECT JUDGE GREGORY BARLOW lU'caiise it'siihoiit jiislicc'...an(l \()iir siilVl\ Judge Barlow wants to be your District Court Judge because he has experience from all points of the law: • Municipal Court judge since 1989 • Deputy Attorney General 1987-89, Head of insurance fraud investigation unit • Clark County Deputy Public Defender 1977-81 • Instructor, mentor National Judicial College ;. • Distinguished Jurist Certificate, Nevada Supreme Court Judge Barlow is committed to you and our community Judge Barlow and Sharon, his wife of 26 years, have been active in our community for more than 20 years. Judge Barlow is conmiitted to ensuring criminals who take advantage of our seniors and children are prosecuted quickly and to the fullest extent of the law. ^^As a judge, my job is to protect the public against criminals—a jobyl jake very ] seriously." JUDGE GREGORY BARLOW DISTRICT COURT DEPT. 4 Judge Gregory Barlow Call 229-6060 to volunteer or for information See Seniors Page? Citiikrl' Kiddie Carnival • Food • Entertainment SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, SAM 8PM SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 8,12AM • 5PM Henderson Presbyterian 601 N, Major (next to Morrell Park) For more Information on booth rental Call: 565-9684 or 564-1760 BLUE PLATE SPECIAL OF THE WEEK ^ ^ INCLUDES SOUP & SALAD & BREAD PUDDING )f MACORONI & CHEESE $2.95 ^ SOFT TACOS BEEF, PORK OR CHICKEN $1.75 SUPER ROCKER HAMBURGER with Basket of Fries $4.95 ^ MILKSHAKES ALL FLAVORS $2.00 OPENING TUESDAY, AUGUST 27 "ENTERPRISE" featuring the Sounds of "The Four Seasons" & the "Beach Boys' SUNDAY MATINEE • 2 TO 6 P.M. Traditional Blue Grass with the RED ROCK MOUNTAIN BOYS free appetizers WEDNESDAY NIGHT LADIES DRINK FREE FROM 8 P.M. TO MIDNIGHT BANQUET FACILITIES AVAILABLE '564-1150 ( .i-iiii'. I IIIIIIL:( A Piiii I liiii/lilrl I/M I .// ''luiuf BLUE PLATE SPECIAL OFFERS EXPIRE SEPTEMBER 5,1996 Paid by Kendal Bird Family Court Race Includes Henderson Native Kendal Sue Bird is a candidate for Family Court Judge in the newly created department "H". A graduate of Basic High School, Burkholder Jr. High, and Gordan McCaw Elementary, Kendal Sue Bird continued on to college and law school. You may remember Kendal as president of the Basic High school Desertaires or as the hind section of the dancing reindeer in many Henderson Christmas parades. As a child Kendal was often featured in the Henderson Home News as an ice skater and with local dance troups. Kendal says, "My days of dancing and skating pretty much ended when I went to college and focused on my studies." Kendal Sue Bird received a Bachelors degree in English and Philosophy and was Student Body President in her senior year at college. Since becoming an attorney, Kendal has been named the "Outstanding Domestic Relations Attorney" by the Clark County Pro Bono Project in 1991-1992. She is past president of the Southern Nevada Association of Women Attorneys and presently serves as an Arbitrator for the Eighth Judicial District Court, Mandatory Arbitration Program. That is in addition to her family law practice. Kendal and her husband, a local school teacher, actively participate in youth charity organizations in the community. "The families of Clark County are entitled to justice that is fair, prompt, and legally sound. Justice rests in truth and the law, not political connecttons or favors. To personally talk with Kendal Sue Bird about her views on Law, Family, or her Candidacy please call her office at 382-2560. PERSONAL INJURY FREE CONSULTATION NO RECOVERY FEE 565-0473 218 LEAD ST. (Across from the new Civic Center Plaza) LAW OFFICE OF JOHN F. MARCHIANO FORMER HENDERSON CITY ATTORNEY Thursday, August 29,1996 Henderson Home Newt Page 7 SENIORS: Activities listed From Ifage 6 has activities ranging from art to Scrabble, concerts to health semihars, recreation programs to sopial activities. Tie Center is open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Monday through Thursday evenings, the center is open from 6 to 10 p.m. and from 9 a.n. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Ihursday, Aug. 29: Center opel for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4p.m. and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.. Retired Sei^ior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 .m., billiards all hours center is open, bridge at 8 a.m.. Scrabble at 10 a.m. and bingo at 10 a.m., Senior Orchestra at 1 p.n., Duplicate bridge at 6 p.m. ani pinochle at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 30: Center open forall activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Retired Senior Volunteer Prjgram 8 to 11 a.m., billiards al tiours center is open, Medicare Information and Assistance and hdp with medical forms 9 a.m. to neon, free hearing tests by appdntment call 565-6990, bridge at 12:30 p.m., canasta and cribbsge at 1 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 31: Center will be open for all activities from 9a.m. to 2 p.m. Brunch will be served from 9 to 11:30 a.m. for $1.25. Monday, Sept. 2: Center open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is apen, bridge at 8 a.m., wood carving at 9 a.m., oil painting at •** WIN *** Dinner for yourself and four other couples at: Henderson, NV Mail To: Dinner Drawing P.O. Box 4974 Las Vegas, NV 89127-0974 Homeowners or Renters Adults ONLY No Obligation Card must be completely filled out Klame Address City Ptwoe Husband employed by. Wife employed by Age of ctilldren at fKxne. Sponsored by MASTERQUARD One Entry Per Household Courtesy Photo BIRTHDAY PARTY — Black Mountain Nutrition manager Sandy Quinnell, seated center, baked birthday cakes for the Center's monthly birthday party. From left are Laura Boggess, Georgia Johnson, Flo Davis, Quinnell, Mary Bailey, Margaret Owens, Vernon Edge, Laura Altman and band director Minnie Fulford. 12:30 p.m., pinochle at 1 p.m., mens chorus at 7 p.m. and double deck pinochle at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 3: Center open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.. Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, needlecraft at 9 a.m., T-shirt painting at 9 a.m., and blood pressure te=;ting at 10 a.m., pinochle at 1 p.m., line dancing at 2 p.m. and Celebrity City Chorus at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 4: Center open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, ceramics 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., free pinochle lessons at 10 a.m., Euchre at 1 p.m., dominoes at 1 p.m., pinochle at 6:30 p.m., and Scrabble at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 5: Center open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, bridge at 8 a.m.. Scrabble at 10 a.m. and bingo at 10a.m., SeniorOrchestra at 1:30 p.m., Duplicate bridge at 6 p.m. and pinochle at 6:30 p.m. Meal program Meals are provided at the center Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for a suggested donation of $1.25 by Catholic Charities of Southern Nevada through the Black Mountain Senior Nutrition Program. Catholic Charities also provides Meals on Wheels for Henderson seniors. For information on these services and the daily menu, call Catholic Charities of Southern Nevada, 385-5284. Thursday, Aug. 29: Baked Ham Friday, Aug. 30: Egg Salad Monday, Sept. 2: Hawaiian Luau Tuesday, Sept. 3: Baked Chicken Wednesday, Sept. 4; Chicken Parmigiana Thursday, Sept. 5: Pork Chops Dukes named to Senior Citizens Task Force The Board of County-Commissioners recently approved the appointment of Betty Dukes to theClark County SeniorCitizens Task Force. The short-term task force will evaluate services provided to seniors and develop a list of recommendations of how Clark County can improve senior services and programs. Dukes is a volunteer for the Henderson Senior Center and was named volunteer of the month in November 1994. She also delivers Meals on Wheels to 30 homebound residents, and is the official clown for the city of Henderson. County Commissioner Bruce Woodbury recommended the appointment of Dukes to the task force. "Dukes is an asset to the city of Henderson, and her participation in the task force will aid in improving the way local government does business throughout the county," Woodbury said. The Clark County Senior Citizens Task Force includes seven members who will serve one-yearterms expiring Aug. 20, 1997. Expo booths available "To Serve A lifetime of service to his country,, • 33 years of Military Service (includes active duty and reserve time) • Served with Navy SEAL Team 1, Mekong Delta, Vietnam *67 (32 Military Decorations including; The Cross of Gallantry and three Presidential Citations) • Major in the Nevada National Guard Reserve • 10 years in Law Enforcement (receiving the nation's highest police award; "The Law Enforcement Commendation Medal") Now, Jim wants to serve | and fight for you! If you have any questions or concerns please call Jim at 566-8008 Piid for by ihe Commiliee Th Bleci Jim Born Born Assembly ?^Only a few booth spaces are still available for Expo '96. For booth rental information contact the Henderson Chamber of Commerce, 590 S. Boulder Highway, or call 565-8951. An estimated 20,000 visitors attend Expo '95, making their way through exhibits at the Henderson Convention Center, and taking advantage of goods and services offered by business exhibitors. In conjunction with this year's show, an open art and craft show will be held adjacent to the exhibit hall, and a new car show will take place in the Civic Center Plaza adjacent to the exhibit hall. Non-stop entertainment will take place in the new amphitheatre, along with the Inland Empire Carnival atTimet Field. For more information, call Ann Snyder at the Henderson Chamber of Commerce office, 565-8951. THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY i'.'

PAGE 8

mmmmm POC 8 Htndarson Horn* N%v Thursday, August 29,1996 Ur\j ir^ A Tirw T THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNIIT "V Thuisday. August 29,1996 Henelron Horn* Nw Pifltf LiJJUl^AllUiN Fearnley receives scholarship Henderson resident Michael Fearnley recently received anonresident scholarship to the University of Nebraska, Kearney. The scholarships, which are for approximately $1,590 a year, cover the difference in cost between resident and non-resident tuition. The value of the award varies based on the number of credithours taken each semester. Other recipients from Nevada were Andrew Darling and Rex Noble, both of Las Vegas. UNK Chancellor Gladys Styles Johnston announced the recipients for the 1996-1997 school year on Aug. 21. Johnston said that the purpose of the scholarship is to attract high-achievers from diverse backgrounds and regions to the campus. AOVGRTWEMENT Swedish Weight Losi Surprises Researchei Sweden-After many scientific studies, Banta was developed by Vita Source with the assistance of tiie U.S. Government. After extensive testing with amazing results, Banta is now available in this country. The unique ingredients of Banta are proven to burn fat, decrease appetite, and increase lean muscle tissue. Gary F. of Santa Barbara, California stated, "I lost II pounds within three weeks. I feel much better and definitely have more energy." Thomas S., a Pharmacist from San Diego wrote, "I started Banta weighing 215 pounds and lost 20 pounds|in 2 months. Incredibly I lost inchesiin all the right places." In an interview with the ViciePresident of Vita Source-'Letta's from consumers telling us about tMir wonderful results have been so poitive and overwhelming, we guarantte Banta to work. The only difficulty vie have is keeping our stores in stock" Banta is available at most Kman Pharmacies including: Henderson732 Racetrack Rd 565-744* .. .or ask your favorite Pharmacy! p ^ • ac Listen &< Dance To the WOOD BROTHERS "Country" Free Appetizers Weekly Monday Nights Only following Football Game shown on our Big Screen Television BANQUET FACIUTIES AVAILABLE '564-1150 I < {"Uiti. / t'///i'ji .i /hill/ /n'f//t/tf //I'I ,;/^//yyw/ 3BEwiK3B3E Rob Weidenfeld/News Staff MAKING MUSIC — Green Valley High sophomore Jed Hoyt plays the Sousaphone, or marching tuba, during a performance Friday. The performance, held for family and friends of band members, was the culmination of a two-week long camp. DINNER AT THE GREEN'S SUPPER CLUB Dinner served from 4:30-10:30p.m. Try Our Italian Specialty Dinners • Starting at $8.95 Enjoy a complementary Bottle of Wine on us.* Sunday thru Thursday only. Not Valid with any other offer. Offer valid v/Hh purchase of 2 entries. Lounge Open 24 hours "'Wbti'le^fVJine Your choice of CHIANTI (Francesco) or FRASCA'TI (Fontana Candida) Italy with purdmseofl Dinner Entrees ivilh coupon • expires 9/19/96 Supper Club BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER 2241 N. Green Valley Pkv^. at Warm Springs (Albertson's Shopping Center) 454-4211 INTEGRITY • ACCESSIBILITY • LEADERSHIP VOTE Mary Beth SCOW SCHOOL BOARD TRUSTEE DISTRICT A 'iask^McoyBethtorm for ^ School Bomi beceme offterexptrktnce cmdifmgrity* • Jeff Burr, IVtiitee, Dtet A • Deborah J. Behr • Randy & Lisa Coldhammer • Dan & Mary Stewart • Steve & Marsha Rose • Sheila Tomola • Tresa & Dallas Allen • Marian Walker • Melodee Wilcox • Jim & Mary Jo McEvoy • Max & Janet Tanner • Dr. Robert & Sheryl HIiistead • Creg & Julie Jensen • Gary & Sandy Croft • Jim & Hope Walton • Dennis & Sue Smusiciewicz • Rory & Cindy Reid • Dr. Russell & Julie Neibaur • Patty Hymanson • Cory & Kathryn Fish • Nance Stevens. Phil AJanet Zobrist • nfmtmtDiarkt ice 4tobert and Tr\xly Larten ^ Endorsed by your Neighbors Lori Musa • Dennis & Leslie Cobia • Cody & Chris Wili(ens • Hoy & Kathy Frakes • Kym & Wendy Cushing • Donald Peterson • Becky Evans • Ray & Mary jane Vogel • P.T. & Deanna Finke • Steve & Wendy Ashton • Donna & Doug Brady • Mike & Kim Talbot • Brad & Janet Stewart • Stephen & Almee Cella • Debra Durham • Scon & Joyce Seegmilier • Linda Lee • David & Patsi Saas • Monte & Madeline Morris • John Mowbray 'Joseph Belingheri • Maureen Parco • Doug & Mesia Nielsen • Kent &Jan Greene • Cralg & Darlene Palmer • Sam & Bev Kitterman • Buck i Betsy Ncal • Russ & Merry Sillitoc • ClintArnoidus -John4CathyDykema • Clark & Melissa Warren • Diane & Ron Gill • James A Suzan Armstrong • Greg Morris • Bruce & Leesa Hermansen • Sandy Campbell • Diane Paid for by fiinds of Mary Bth Scow, Cindy Zockoll. Ch. |f^ 'Way B&h has a long hisiory ofcommmity bwobMment-gfie has shcmm herself babe intelligent andsimxre.' -Uiroa Ketlcariott, fwmec Mayor, HtM<3roo ^ & Brent Evans • Tracey Spencer • Dr. Jon & Kristi Camp • Pam Katz • Stephen & Tammy Wood • Scott 4 Susan Evans • Stu & Cindy Reyburn • Cindy 4 Jerry Goddard • Gary 4 Lora Milne • Bob 4 Martha Swift • Russell 4 Sheri Rhodes • Janice Horton • Thomas 4 Fawn Stirling • Kevin 4 Sheila Roberts • Joey 4 Marilyn Peterson • Pru Palecek • Jim 4 Carl Perkins • Doug 4 Becky Dean • Barbara Wilde • Steven R. Scow • 9 Scow Children "" 'Asadhe^rwommct^ SexBdAdMaoryOotfmOUm^ Maty BeA has bem commuted md levetheaded' -MartiB Knwttt, Fbrmer Tntfiei.DlsCA Come see what we provide beyond Medicare. In less than an hour you'll breathe easier We're having a meeting within walking distance of your home. Learn all about our: • 10 high-tech medical facilities • 5 urgent care centers, open 24 hours a day, • 365 days a year • More than 30 pharmacies • Hundreds of physicians to care for you • 4 vision care centers We would like to introduce you to Senior Dimensions. It's a plan that will ease your mind and provide you with affordable, quality health care. You're not alone out there. Let Senior Dimensions show you why. We look forward to meeting you. Learn ail about Senior Dimensions at tlie meetings below: SENIOR CENTER 27 E. Texas Ave. Wdnday^ SptMnl>r 4, •iM a jm. to 10:30 • .m. Bring this coupon to any SENIOR DIMENSIONS group meeting for your FREE ^L RS.V.P. 1-800-274-6648 Bringafnendl Snor Omanaoni • I (tMBon d HMh r%< (^ Nl (HPN). • Mrnty qutfM HMO undtr cantna MVi MMtCM 10 pWMdt nMl CM t) WMCM bmiCL •KMmg fWM who n dMMa Stnoi Dnwwn SENIOR DIMENSIONS. ZS^^TT.'SifXrJSf 1 iiiiiniufllirtirirfliiili.lii (frinmamwtmimtn. Community •TRE88 MANAGEMENT TuMday and WadnMday, 8pt 9-4, SIraM ManagMMnt CMIK of Navada. On Sapt 3, a fraa introductory TaJ Chi Chih dass from 7 to S p.m. On SapL 4, a fraa intnoductory Hatha Yoga clan from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 4S8-08e to RSVP. CREDIT COUNSELING Wadnaaday, SapL 4,6:30 to 8:30 a.m., CCCSSNOfflca,3650S.Diatur,8ulta 3a Fraa. Loam tha staps you can tako to gat tha moit from avary hard aamad dollar. -a' TORTOISE CARE PuMe aafvica announcamant from tha Tortoiaa Group. This is hatohing saason. Bat)iaa must liva outdoors to ba haalthy.txjthaat kills. Learn how to buikJ an undarground txjrrowand what to faad l>abias. Pick up a fraa tortoisa cara pamphlat at any araa vatarinarian's offica. CHRISTIAN SINGLES A rwn-danominational organization for singlo Christians of all agas for natworking and maating naw friands. 393-4939. RECOVERY HOME CASLhouaa saaka Ihosa intarastad in livirig in a daan and sobar homa. Call 896-0054. VETERANS ART GALLERY Waakdaya, 1-5 p.m., waakands, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., 700 Naplaa Dr., Suita 103, Laa Vagaa. A SO-yaar collaction of art t>y disablad vatorans in VA hospitals. Exhit>itors and volunteers needed to showcaaa arts and crafts. Call 895-9737 for information. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS Mondaya-SuiKlaya. Gamblers Anonymous of Southern Nevada has day and evening meetings. Call for help and schedules, 24-hour hotline, 385-7732. DIVORCED AND SEPARATED Mondaya, 7:30 p.m., Community LuttMf an Church, 3720 E. Tropicana. Fraa support group for divorced and separated men and women of all ages. Cal 735-5544. KIWANIS Mondaya, 7:30 a.m., Graan'a Supper Ckib, 2241 N. Green Valley Parkway and Wadneadaya, 7 a.m., Omelet Houaa. 317 N. BouMar Highway. The Green Valley Kiwanis Club meets Moncjaya and the Hfodarion duti meats To announc* your group or organiialion't wmnta, pftam coma by ormi-inforrrmiion to: 2 Comnwf CtnttrDriv, Hmndr9ort, NVB9014. Women'a Cantar, CBC Room 227. Through Dae. 5, tha Poslpartum Support Group will meet 695-4475. BUSINESS Tuaadaya and Thuradaya, 7 am., IHOP Reataurant, 3260 E. Tropicana at Pacoa. Tha Morning Business Profasatonals and tha Eastside EartyBirds Chapters of the Business Network International meets. Terri Gimmick, 566-1348. Mark Kembarting, 451-7077. ROTARY Tuaadays, noon, Eldorado Casino and Thursdays, 7 a.m., Counby Inn, 1990 W. Sunaet Road. The Henderson Rotary Club meets Tuesday s and the Q raen Valley Club meets Thuradays. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Daily maatinga. Overeaters Anonymousisa 12-step program. Theraarano dues or fees. Daily meetings are heM throughout Las Vegas and sunounding arsas. Call 593-2945. LEAN Second Tuaaday of each month, 6 p.m. Continental Hotel. The Natk>nal Law Enforcement Assodatkm of Nevada will hod its regularmeeting. Retired and active police officers and law enforcement or related professionals are invited. 434-0442. BUSINESS NETWORK Wedneadaya, 7 to 8:30 a.m., Country Inn, Sunaatand Valla Varda. The Green Valley Chapterof Business Network Ind. meets. 454-3100. ALL PARENTS UNITED Wedneadaya, 7 p.m.. White Middto School. All Parents United, a collection of various parents' groups, meet to discuss educatfonal issues. VFW LADIES AUXIUARY Wedneadaya, first and third of each month, 7 p.m.. Post Home, 401 W. Baaic Road. Post 3848 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars meets the first Wednesday for meetings, and the third for "Work Night." Call 564-3624. CANCER SUPPORT GROUP Wedneadaya, aacond and fourth of each month, 6:30 to 8 p.m., Sunrise Hoepltal, PadUtric Physical Medicine Department Together We Cope,' a support group for cancer patients and families, will meet. Dorothy Howard, 731 8135 or Linda Sooudi, 731 -6274. SENIOR BAGEL BRUNCH TTiuradaya, firet and third of each monlti, 11:30 a.m., at Congregation Itplnasdays. 4 ^ ,^'^*^n BMI Post 40 will meet. All'veterans wek:ome. 454-6551. DRAMA WORKSHOP Mondaya, 8 p.m., Sam'a Town Bowling Cantar, Room A. Joe Behar's Community Drama workshop is free for anyone interested in learning acting and auditioning techniques for molton pk:tura and television wort(. Open to M\ ages. 457-0234. TOASTMASTERS Mondaya, second and fourth of each month, 6:30 p.m., at Norweet Bank, 2231 N. Green Valley Parkway. Regular meetings, open to ttw publk;, for TNT Toastmasters will be held. Kyle Tingle, 434-8452. Geoff Reeves, 263-2134. MOPS Altamata Mondaya and Tuaedaya. Mothers of Pro-schoolers (MOPS) is a program forall mothers of pre-schoolers, birth through 6 years. Enjoy breakfast, a speaker, friencMiip groups and a craft project w^ila tt>e chiMren are cared for in a atiuctuiad setting. For cost, kicattons and dates, 735-4004. SUCCESS WITHOUT STRESS Tuaedaya, flrat and third aJL^aach month, 7 p.m., Nonireet Bank, 2231 N. Green Valley Pkwy. Secrets to Success Without Stress is sponsoring an ongoing fraadass, "Conquer Negative Emotk)ns.' 293-7797. BIPOLAR SUPPORT GROUP Every Tueeday, 6:30 to 8 p.m., Nevada Aa a o c latton for the Handkapped, 6200 W. Oakay Bhrd. A group for BiPolar (Manic Depressive) indivMuels, family and friends will meet. 870-7050. POSTPARTUM SUPPORT GROUP Tueadaya. 7 to 1:80 p.m., UNLV VegaaL WiH conclude with entertain ment, Pan, Mah Jong and other games. Call 733-6292. EXECUTIVE LEADS CLUB Thuradaya, 7 a.m., Raa'a, Pecos and Wigwam. The Executive Leads Club East nrMots to exchange Ixjsiness leads. Karen Scherer, 736-7755. BARBERSHOP CHORUS Thuradaya, 7 p.m., Chriat Lutheran Church, Torrey Pinea Road and the axpreaaway. T>)e Las Vegas GambleAires Men's Barbershop Cfiorus meete every week. Men of all ages who enjoy singing are welcome. Gary Forsberg, 454-7620. MASTER MASONS Thuradaya, flrat and third of each month, Mt Moriah Temple, 480 Greenway Road. AN interested wtirsd or active masons are wekx>me to attend meetings. Dkik Steele, 458-5225. SINGLES TRAVEL CLUB Fridaya, firat and third, 6 to 7:30 p.m., Skinny Dugan'a Pub, 4127 W. Ctiarleaton Boutevard. Singles of all ages who are interested in trsvellng are invited. Shiriey Pepe, 458-1924. ELKS HELPING PEOPLE Fridaya, 6 to 9 p.m., 631E. Lake Meed Dr. A complete dinner will t>e hosted by the Elks club. Cost: $4 donatton. 5659959. DAUGHTERS OF AMERICAN REVOLUTK)N Norweet Bank, Community Room, In Bouklar aty. The Silver Steto Chapter of Daughtere ol tf)e American Revolution, senring the Henderson/BoukJer City area, meetsnrtonthly(September-May). 4583693 or 293-5863. SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE The Suidda Preventnn Center is tooking for volunteers to man the hotline. 731-2990, ask for Ewy. GVHS choirs visit Hawaii Green Valley High School choir students traveled to Honolulu from Junie 7-14 to participate in the national King Kameamehea Festival for choirs. All GVHS choirs received excellent ratings, now illustrated on plaques in the choir room. The trip also included various tours, atrip to Pearl Harbor, and time on the beach. All members of the group behaved well and represented the area with pride, a tour member said. Jewish Community Center to install officers, board TYM Jewiih Community Colter ofSouthem Nevada will install ita new officers and board of directors atSp.m. Saturday, Sept 7, at thaLuVegasCountiyClub, 3000 Joe W. Brown Dr. Shothana, an Israeli itertainer currentJy appearing in the Celebrity Cafe at the Debbie Reynolds Hotel, will perform. I^e cost is $10. Reservations with checks should be mailed to JCCSN, 3909 S. Maryland Parkway, Suite 400, Las Vegas, NV 89119. For more information, call 7940090. SunStriders off to • • I start Paul Dodge News Staff Contributor The SunStriders mall walking club is off to a running start after its kickoflf on Aug. 14. More than 150 people of all ages turned out for the club's opening, and membership has risen to 175 in the pasttwo weeks. The club is co-sponsored by Galleria at Sunset and. St. Rose Dominican Hospital. There is a $5 annual fee for club membership but the unexpectedly large turnout brought about some last-minute generosity, publicist Lori Nelson said. Fees were waived for everybody present at the kickoff. "I was just so excited by the number of people there that I wanted to give them a goodwill gift," Galleria marketing/advertising director Cindy Williams said. Galleria has also made its facilities more accessible to the walking club than any other mall in town, Nelson said. In addition to the mall's regular hours, members can walk the safe, climate-controlled 3/4 or 5/8 mile courses two hours before opening and one hour after closing. "That's-the freedom of the SunStriders," Williams said.. Members have the opportunity to walk whenever it is convenient for them." Members also enjoy other perks while at the mall, such as discounts in many stores, free health seminars, free blood pressure checks, and free SunStriders T-shirts. Now the club is focusing on selecting its officers, who will plan the seminars and future activities. Williams believes that if the enthusiasm tliey have been encountering continues, the club will be a great success. "I have received many letters and talked to many people expressing their gratitude. The reaction has been great and we should continue to grow," Williams said. Antk^ues Urtqua oms Old Town ^ANTIQUES & COLLEaABLES, Buy • Sen • Locate • Appraisals • Estate Sales 508 Nevada Hwy. In the Old Town Mall Boukjer City, NV. 89005 CAROL ANN KALA8TI> (702)293-3975 Fax:(702)293-)6(r 280 N. GIBSON RD. at the Valley Auto Mall' L/vrd Evetvthing We Do Is Driven Bv You 18 GREAT PRODUCTSl Tivo Great Sales Gonsultaiits Douglas Ray • joe Schaeffer Factory trained &. authorized • Sales. Plan ^ Leasing GREAT DEALS GREAT GIFT when you drive away happy with our GREAT new or used vehicle DOUGLAS RAY f^HT^ fOE SCHAOFFEk (voice mail) 558-8161 K:*:^;^^^^^ (voice mail) 558-8171 PHILLIPS FURNITURE Across from Timet 433 W. Lake Mead 565-6050 When You Choose A Mannington Floor For Your Homea.a People Will Notice. SiWE NOW DUIUNG OUR tOL DOVVN DAYS SALB IT MUST BE MANNINGTON. Only Mannington offers you so many elegant patterns, beautiful textures and vibrant colors. And with its unrivaled durability, a Mannington floor assures you of receiving admiring glances for years to come. If it looks this good and wears this well, it must be Mannington. BMBMINGION. ^s*^ • om>i 334 S. Water Street • Henderson 565-1441 1 W e're certainly going to try. Two and a half years ago, we found the ideal setting for our new steakhouse right here in Green Valley. It seemed to be a place with values very similar to our community as well. Which is why we've formed a partnership with the Nevada Symphony Orchestra to support those things that make this small town such an outstanding place to live. CAM OIME STEAKHOUSE REAILY MAKE GREERI VAEEEY ABEHER PEACE TO LIVE? • t^^t.-'f^-^ :-t* • own the sophistication of the city with the friendliness of a small community. And we thought it was about time Green Valley enjoyed a big-city steakhouse. Without the big-citj^b. Or the big-city drive. Now that we're open, we have a goal. Not only to serve you, but to serve the We're excited to be here and look forward to being a contributing member of Green Valley. So whether you're listening to Beethoven's Fifth or having our chef compose something of his own, we're doing everything we can to make our corner of the world even brighter. CARVERS STKAKS CHOPS We're on Sunset Road between Valle Verde and Sunset Way in Green Valley / 433-5801. yA-: iiti^

PAGE 9

mmmmm POC 8 Htndarson Horn* N%v Thursday, August 29,1996 Ur\j ir^ A Tirw T THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNIIT "V Thuisday. August 29,1996 Henelron Horn* Nw Pifltf LiJJUl^AllUiN Fearnley receives scholarship Henderson resident Michael Fearnley recently received anonresident scholarship to the University of Nebraska, Kearney. The scholarships, which are for approximately $1,590 a year, cover the difference in cost between resident and non-resident tuition. The value of the award varies based on the number of credithours taken each semester. Other recipients from Nevada were Andrew Darling and Rex Noble, both of Las Vegas. UNK Chancellor Gladys Styles Johnston announced the recipients for the 1996-1997 school year on Aug. 21. Johnston said that the purpose of the scholarship is to attract high-achievers from diverse backgrounds and regions to the campus. AOVGRTWEMENT Swedish Weight Losi Surprises Researchei Sweden-After many scientific studies, Banta was developed by Vita Source with the assistance of tiie U.S. Government. After extensive testing with amazing results, Banta is now available in this country. The unique ingredients of Banta are proven to burn fat, decrease appetite, and increase lean muscle tissue. Gary F. of Santa Barbara, California stated, "I lost II pounds within three weeks. I feel much better and definitely have more energy." Thomas S., a Pharmacist from San Diego wrote, "I started Banta weighing 215 pounds and lost 20 pounds|in 2 months. Incredibly I lost inchesiin all the right places." In an interview with the ViciePresident of Vita Source-'Letta's from consumers telling us about tMir wonderful results have been so poitive and overwhelming, we guarantte Banta to work. The only difficulty vie have is keeping our stores in stock" Banta is available at most Kman Pharmacies including: Henderson732 Racetrack Rd 565-744* .. .or ask your favorite Pharmacy! p ^ • ac Listen &< Dance To the WOOD BROTHERS "Country" Free Appetizers Weekly Monday Nights Only following Football Game shown on our Big Screen Television BANQUET FACIUTIES AVAILABLE '564-1150 I < {"Uiti. / t'///i'ji .i /hill/ /n'f//t/tf //I'I ,;/^//yyw/ 3BEwiK3B3E Rob Weidenfeld/News Staff MAKING MUSIC — Green Valley High sophomore Jed Hoyt plays the Sousaphone, or marching tuba, during a performance Friday. The performance, held for family and friends of band members, was the culmination of a two-week long camp. DINNER AT THE GREEN'S SUPPER CLUB Dinner served from 4:30-10:30p.m. Try Our Italian Specialty Dinners • Starting at $8.95 Enjoy a complementary Bottle of Wine on us.* Sunday thru Thursday only. Not Valid with any other offer. Offer valid v/Hh purchase of 2 entries. Lounge Open 24 hours "'Wbti'le^fVJine Your choice of CHIANTI (Francesco) or FRASCA'TI (Fontana Candida) Italy with purdmseofl Dinner Entrees ivilh coupon • expires 9/19/96 Supper Club BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER 2241 N. Green Valley Pkv^. at Warm Springs (Albertson's Shopping Center) 454-4211 INTEGRITY • ACCESSIBILITY • LEADERSHIP VOTE Mary Beth SCOW SCHOOL BOARD TRUSTEE DISTRICT A 'iask^McoyBethtorm for ^ School Bomi beceme offterexptrktnce cmdifmgrity* • Jeff Burr, IVtiitee, Dtet A • Deborah J. Behr • Randy & Lisa Coldhammer • Dan & Mary Stewart • Steve & Marsha Rose • Sheila Tomola • Tresa & Dallas Allen • Marian Walker • Melodee Wilcox • Jim & Mary Jo McEvoy • Max & Janet Tanner • Dr. Robert & Sheryl HIiistead • Creg & Julie Jensen • Gary & Sandy Croft • Jim & Hope Walton • Dennis & Sue Smusiciewicz • Rory & Cindy Reid • Dr. Russell & Julie Neibaur • Patty Hymanson • Cory & Kathryn Fish • Nance Stevens. Phil AJanet Zobrist • nfmtmtDiarkt ice 4tobert and Tr\xly Larten ^ Endorsed by your Neighbors Lori Musa • Dennis & Leslie Cobia • Cody & Chris Wili(ens • Hoy & Kathy Frakes • Kym & Wendy Cushing • Donald Peterson • Becky Evans • Ray & Mary jane Vogel • P.T. & Deanna Finke • Steve & Wendy Ashton • Donna & Doug Brady • Mike & Kim Talbot • Brad & Janet Stewart • Stephen & Almee Cella • Debra Durham • Scon & Joyce Seegmilier • Linda Lee • David & Patsi Saas • Monte & Madeline Morris • John Mowbray 'Joseph Belingheri • Maureen Parco • Doug & Mesia Nielsen • Kent &Jan Greene • Cralg & Darlene Palmer • Sam & Bev Kitterman • Buck i Betsy Ncal • Russ & Merry Sillitoc • ClintArnoidus -John4CathyDykema • Clark & Melissa Warren • Diane & Ron Gill • James A Suzan Armstrong • Greg Morris • Bruce & Leesa Hermansen • Sandy Campbell • Diane Paid for by fiinds of Mary Bth Scow, Cindy Zockoll. Ch. |f^ 'Way B&h has a long hisiory ofcommmity bwobMment-gfie has shcmm herself babe intelligent andsimxre.' -Uiroa Ketlcariott, fwmec Mayor, HtM<3roo ^ & Brent Evans • Tracey Spencer • Dr. Jon & Kristi Camp • Pam Katz • Stephen & Tammy Wood • Scott 4 Susan Evans • Stu & Cindy Reyburn • Cindy 4 Jerry Goddard • Gary 4 Lora Milne • Bob 4 Martha Swift • Russell 4 Sheri Rhodes • Janice Horton • Thomas 4 Fawn Stirling • Kevin 4 Sheila Roberts • Joey 4 Marilyn Peterson • Pru Palecek • Jim 4 Carl Perkins • Doug 4 Becky Dean • Barbara Wilde • Steven R. Scow • 9 Scow Children "" 'Asadhe^rwommct^ SexBdAdMaoryOotfmOUm^ Maty BeA has bem commuted md levetheaded' -MartiB Knwttt, Fbrmer Tntfiei.DlsCA Come see what we provide beyond Medicare. In less than an hour you'll breathe easier We're having a meeting within walking distance of your home. Learn all about our: • 10 high-tech medical facilities • 5 urgent care centers, open 24 hours a day, • 365 days a year • More than 30 pharmacies • Hundreds of physicians to care for you • 4 vision care centers We would like to introduce you to Senior Dimensions. It's a plan that will ease your mind and provide you with affordable, quality health care. You're not alone out there. Let Senior Dimensions show you why. We look forward to meeting you. Learn ail about Senior Dimensions at tlie meetings below: SENIOR CENTER 27 E. Texas Ave. Wdnday^ SptMnl>r 4, •iM a jm. to 10:30 • .m. Bring this coupon to any SENIOR DIMENSIONS group meeting for your FREE ^L RS.V.P. 1-800-274-6648 Bringafnendl Snor Omanaoni • I (tMBon d HMh r%< (^ Nl (HPN). • Mrnty qutfM HMO undtr cantna MVi MMtCM 10 pWMdt nMl CM t) WMCM bmiCL •KMmg fWM who n dMMa Stnoi Dnwwn SENIOR DIMENSIONS. ZS^^TT.'SifXrJSf 1 iiiiiniufllirtirirfliiili.lii (frinmamwtmimtn. Community •TRE88 MANAGEMENT TuMday and WadnMday, 8pt 9-4, SIraM ManagMMnt CMIK of Navada. On Sapt 3, a fraa introductory TaJ Chi Chih dass from 7 to S p.m. On SapL 4, a fraa intnoductory Hatha Yoga clan from 11 a.m. to noon. Call 4S8-08e to RSVP. CREDIT COUNSELING Wadnaaday, SapL 4,6:30 to 8:30 a.m., CCCSSNOfflca,3650S.Diatur,8ulta 3a Fraa. Loam tha staps you can tako to gat tha moit from avary hard aamad dollar. -a' TORTOISE CARE PuMe aafvica announcamant from tha Tortoiaa Group. This is hatohing saason. Bat)iaa must liva outdoors to ba haalthy.txjthaat kills. Learn how to buikJ an undarground txjrrowand what to faad l>abias. Pick up a fraa tortoisa cara pamphlat at any araa vatarinarian's offica. CHRISTIAN SINGLES A rwn-danominational organization for singlo Christians of all agas for natworking and maating naw friands. 393-4939. RECOVERY HOME CASLhouaa saaka Ihosa intarastad in livirig in a daan and sobar homa. Call 896-0054. VETERANS ART GALLERY Waakdaya, 1-5 p.m., waakands, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., 700 Naplaa Dr., Suita 103, Laa Vagaa. A SO-yaar collaction of art t>y disablad vatorans in VA hospitals. Exhit>itors and volunteers needed to showcaaa arts and crafts. Call 895-9737 for information. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS Mondaya-SuiKlaya. Gamblers Anonymous of Southern Nevada has day and evening meetings. Call for help and schedules, 24-hour hotline, 385-7732. DIVORCED AND SEPARATED Mondaya, 7:30 p.m., Community LuttMf an Church, 3720 E. Tropicana. Fraa support group for divorced and separated men and women of all ages. Cal 735-5544. KIWANIS Mondaya, 7:30 a.m., Graan'a Supper Ckib, 2241 N. Green Valley Parkway and Wadneadaya, 7 a.m., Omelet Houaa. 317 N. BouMar Highway. The Green Valley Kiwanis Club meets Moncjaya and the Hfodarion duti meats To announc* your group or organiialion't wmnta, pftam coma by ormi-inforrrmiion to: 2 Comnwf CtnttrDriv, Hmndr9ort, NVB9014. Women'a Cantar, CBC Room 227. Through Dae. 5, tha Poslpartum Support Group will meet 695-4475. BUSINESS Tuaadaya and Thuradaya, 7 am., IHOP Reataurant, 3260 E. Tropicana at Pacoa. Tha Morning Business Profasatonals and tha Eastside EartyBirds Chapters of the Business Network International meets. Terri Gimmick, 566-1348. Mark Kembarting, 451-7077. ROTARY Tuaadays, noon, Eldorado Casino and Thursdays, 7 a.m., Counby Inn, 1990 W. Sunaet Road. The Henderson Rotary Club meets Tuesday s and the Q raen Valley Club meets Thuradays. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Daily maatinga. Overeaters Anonymousisa 12-step program. Theraarano dues or fees. Daily meetings are heM throughout Las Vegas and sunounding arsas. Call 593-2945. LEAN Second Tuaaday of each month, 6 p.m. Continental Hotel. The Natk>nal Law Enforcement Assodatkm of Nevada will hod its regularmeeting. Retired and active police officers and law enforcement or related professionals are invited. 434-0442. BUSINESS NETWORK Wedneadaya, 7 to 8:30 a.m., Country Inn, Sunaatand Valla Varda. The Green Valley Chapterof Business Network Ind. meets. 454-3100. ALL PARENTS UNITED Wedneadaya, 7 p.m.. White Middto School. All Parents United, a collection of various parents' groups, meet to discuss educatfonal issues. VFW LADIES AUXIUARY Wedneadaya, first and third of each month, 7 p.m.. Post Home, 401 W. Baaic Road. Post 3848 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars meets the first Wednesday for meetings, and the third for "Work Night." Call 564-3624. CANCER SUPPORT GROUP Wedneadaya, aacond and fourth of each month, 6:30 to 8 p.m., Sunrise Hoepltal, PadUtric Physical Medicine Department Together We Cope,' a support group for cancer patients and families, will meet. Dorothy Howard, 731 8135 or Linda Sooudi, 731 -6274. SENIOR BAGEL BRUNCH TTiuradaya, firet and third of each monlti, 11:30 a.m., at Congregation Itplnasdays. 4 ^ ,^'^*^n BMI Post 40 will meet. All'veterans wek:ome. 454-6551. DRAMA WORKSHOP Mondaya, 8 p.m., Sam'a Town Bowling Cantar, Room A. Joe Behar's Community Drama workshop is free for anyone interested in learning acting and auditioning techniques for molton pk:tura and television wort(. Open to M\ ages. 457-0234. TOASTMASTERS Mondaya, second and fourth of each month, 6:30 p.m., at Norweet Bank, 2231 N. Green Valley Parkway. Regular meetings, open to ttw publk;, for TNT Toastmasters will be held. Kyle Tingle, 434-8452. Geoff Reeves, 263-2134. MOPS Altamata Mondaya and Tuaedaya. Mothers of Pro-schoolers (MOPS) is a program forall mothers of pre-schoolers, birth through 6 years. Enjoy breakfast, a speaker, friencMiip groups and a craft project w^ila tt>e chiMren are cared for in a atiuctuiad setting. For cost, kicattons and dates, 735-4004. SUCCESS WITHOUT STRESS Tuaedaya, flrat and third aJL^aach month, 7 p.m., Nonireet Bank, 2231 N. Green Valley Pkwy. Secrets to Success Without Stress is sponsoring an ongoing fraadass, "Conquer Negative Emotk)ns.' 293-7797. BIPOLAR SUPPORT GROUP Every Tueeday, 6:30 to 8 p.m., Nevada Aa a o c latton for the Handkapped, 6200 W. Oakay Bhrd. A group for BiPolar (Manic Depressive) indivMuels, family and friends will meet. 870-7050. POSTPARTUM SUPPORT GROUP Tueadaya. 7 to 1:80 p.m., UNLV VegaaL WiH conclude with entertain ment, Pan, Mah Jong and other games. Call 733-6292. EXECUTIVE LEADS CLUB Thuradaya, 7 a.m., Raa'a, Pecos and Wigwam. The Executive Leads Club East nrMots to exchange Ixjsiness leads. Karen Scherer, 736-7755. BARBERSHOP CHORUS Thuradaya, 7 p.m., Chriat Lutheran Church, Torrey Pinea Road and the axpreaaway. T>)e Las Vegas GambleAires Men's Barbershop Cfiorus meete every week. Men of all ages who enjoy singing are welcome. Gary Forsberg, 454-7620. MASTER MASONS Thuradaya, flrat and third of each month, Mt Moriah Temple, 480 Greenway Road. AN interested wtirsd or active masons are wekx>me to attend meetings. Dkik Steele, 458-5225. SINGLES TRAVEL CLUB Fridaya, firat and third, 6 to 7:30 p.m., Skinny Dugan'a Pub, 4127 W. Ctiarleaton Boutevard. Singles of all ages who are interested in trsvellng are invited. Shiriey Pepe, 458-1924. ELKS HELPING PEOPLE Fridaya, 6 to 9 p.m., 631E. Lake Meed Dr. A complete dinner will t>e hosted by the Elks club. Cost: $4 donatton. 5659959. DAUGHTERS OF AMERICAN REVOLUTK)N Norweet Bank, Community Room, In Bouklar aty. The Silver Steto Chapter of Daughtere ol tf)e American Revolution, senring the Henderson/BoukJer City area, meetsnrtonthly(September-May). 4583693 or 293-5863. SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE The Suidda Preventnn Center is tooking for volunteers to man the hotline. 731-2990, ask for Ewy. GVHS choirs visit Hawaii Green Valley High School choir students traveled to Honolulu from Junie 7-14 to participate in the national King Kameamehea Festival for choirs. All GVHS choirs received excellent ratings, now illustrated on plaques in the choir room. The trip also included various tours, atrip to Pearl Harbor, and time on the beach. All members of the group behaved well and represented the area with pride, a tour member said. Jewish Community Center to install officers, board TYM Jewiih Community Colter ofSouthem Nevada will install ita new officers and board of directors atSp.m. Saturday, Sept 7, at thaLuVegasCountiyClub, 3000 Joe W. Brown Dr. Shothana, an Israeli itertainer currentJy appearing in the Celebrity Cafe at the Debbie Reynolds Hotel, will perform. I^e cost is $10. Reservations with checks should be mailed to JCCSN, 3909 S. Maryland Parkway, Suite 400, Las Vegas, NV 89119. For more information, call 7940090. SunStriders off to • • I start Paul Dodge News Staff Contributor The SunStriders mall walking club is off to a running start after its kickoflf on Aug. 14. More than 150 people of all ages turned out for the club's opening, and membership has risen to 175 in the pasttwo weeks. The club is co-sponsored by Galleria at Sunset and. St. Rose Dominican Hospital. There is a $5 annual fee for club membership but the unexpectedly large turnout brought about some last-minute generosity, publicist Lori Nelson said. Fees were waived for everybody present at the kickoff. "I was just so excited by the number of people there that I wanted to give them a goodwill gift," Galleria marketing/advertising director Cindy Williams said. Galleria has also made its facilities more accessible to the walking club than any other mall in town, Nelson said. In addition to the mall's regular hours, members can walk the safe, climate-controlled 3/4 or 5/8 mile courses two hours before opening and one hour after closing. "That's-the freedom of the SunStriders," Williams said.. Members have the opportunity to walk whenever it is convenient for them." Members also enjoy other perks while at the mall, such as discounts in many stores, free health seminars, free blood pressure checks, and free SunStriders T-shirts. Now the club is focusing on selecting its officers, who will plan the seminars and future activities. Williams believes that if the enthusiasm tliey have been encountering continues, the club will be a great success. "I have received many letters and talked to many people expressing their gratitude. The reaction has been great and we should continue to grow," Williams said. Antk^ues Urtqua oms Old Town ^ANTIQUES & COLLEaABLES, Buy • Sen • Locate • Appraisals • Estate Sales 508 Nevada Hwy. In the Old Town Mall Boukjer City, NV. 89005 CAROL ANN KALA8TI> (702)293-3975 Fax:(702)293-)6(r 280 N. GIBSON RD. at the Valley Auto Mall' L/vrd Evetvthing We Do Is Driven Bv You 18 GREAT PRODUCTSl Tivo Great Sales Gonsultaiits Douglas Ray • joe Schaeffer Factory trained &. authorized • Sales. Plan ^ Leasing GREAT DEALS GREAT GIFT when you drive away happy with our GREAT new or used vehicle DOUGLAS RAY f^HT^ fOE SCHAOFFEk (voice mail) 558-8161 K:*:^;^^^^^ (voice mail) 558-8171 PHILLIPS FURNITURE Across from Timet 433 W. Lake Mead 565-6050 When You Choose A Mannington Floor For Your Homea.a People Will Notice. SiWE NOW DUIUNG OUR tOL DOVVN DAYS SALB IT MUST BE MANNINGTON. Only Mannington offers you so many elegant patterns, beautiful textures and vibrant colors. And with its unrivaled durability, a Mannington floor assures you of receiving admiring glances for years to come. If it looks this good and wears this well, it must be Mannington. BMBMINGION. ^s*^ • om>i 334 S. Water Street • Henderson 565-1441 1 W e're certainly going to try. Two and a half years ago, we found the ideal setting for our new steakhouse right here in Green Valley. It seemed to be a place with values very similar to our community as well. Which is why we've formed a partnership with the Nevada Symphony Orchestra to support those things that make this small town such an outstanding place to live. CAM OIME STEAKHOUSE REAILY MAKE GREERI VAEEEY ABEHER PEACE TO LIVE? • t^^t.-'f^-^ :-t* • own the sophistication of the city with the friendliness of a small community. And we thought it was about time Green Valley enjoyed a big-city steakhouse. Without the big-citj^b. Or the big-city drive. Now that we're open, we have a goal. Not only to serve you, but to serve the We're excited to be here and look forward to being a contributing member of Green Valley. So whether you're listening to Beethoven's Fifth or having our chef compose something of his own, we're doing everything we can to make our corner of the world even brighter. CARVERS STKAKS CHOPS We're on Sunset Road between Valle Verde and Sunset Way in Green Valley / 433-5801. yA-: iiti^

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Pagt 10 HcndMson Horn* Nw Thursday, August 29,1996 Thursday, August 29,1996 Hendarson Home Nwt Po> 11 POUCE: A day in life From Page 1 The person driving the car was going to drive away with me standing right there," WilUams said. "I grabbed the man's arm to try to pull him out of the car when he put a death grip on the steering wheel." "I kept saying, 'Police officer! Step out of the car!,' Williams said. At that time the man kept trying to shift the car to drive when two fire personnel assisted Williams in prying him out of the car and cuffing him. "The Henderson Police and Fire Departments work very well together," WilUams said. "Both departments go above and beyond to help each other." Police officers change shifts about every two years. Changing sleep schedules is another aspect of the job that requires flexibility. Officers can go from a day shift to a graveyard shift having to completely rearrange their life. Some things in an officer's job are constants. The required uniform they wear, including their gun, cuffs, baton and bulletproof vest, is worn every time they hit the streets. A debriefing session is held where officers are informed of what is happening in the city before every shift. Williams responded to about five false 911 during Friday's shift as well burglar alarm calls. "You could get 1,000 of these kinds of calls but you always have to watch out for that one call that's real." Everytime an officer visits a scene he or she always gets a back-up officer. Williams said there is a contact officer, one who makes contact with the people involved and a back-up officer to be on the scene in case the contact officer needs assistance. The procedure for alarm calls is, the contact officer will wait for back-up while dispatch calls the people's home. When the back-up patrol arrives, officers inspect the outside of the house for signs of forced entry, Williams said. "The real problem-solving comes into play when I am called to a domestic disturbance," Williams said. "I am then a problem-solver and a counselor because I have to help families work out their disputes." "I go into a situation where nothing criminal is happening but domestic disputes can lead be one step away from hurting a spouse," Williams said. About 10 p.m., Williams was called to transport a criminal from the Treasure Island Hotel-Casino to the Henderson ,Jail. The suspect was wanted for petty larceny. The suspect was also using two Social Security numbers and was playing what police call "the name game," in which the suspicious person makes it difficult for law enforcement officials to figure out who he or she is for fear of being arrested. One of the man's identities came up with a Henderson warrant. The suspect had a criminal record consisting of grand larceny, sexual assault and attempted homicide. After a thorough investigation including running fingerprints, Williams determined one of the two identifications was the suspect's true identity. Williams transported the suspect to Henderson where he was booked. Arts Council discusses Shakespeare The Arts Council of Henderson/Green Valley, presenters of the 10th anniversary of "Nevada Shakespeare in the Park," recently held acommunity meeting at Fox Ridge Park in the Green Valley area to answer questions about the upcoming event. To minimize the impact of the eveiit of the community, the mayor of Henderson had sought input from residents. "I wanted Fox Ridge residents to have the opportunity to share," said Mayor Robert Groesbeck. The event's board was also on hand to answer questions, said Judi Steele, president of the Arts Council. "The residents in attendance were very supportive," Steele said. "The board was very enRESERVE: Opening delayed From Page 1 Homebuying seminar Thursday The non-profit Inside Corporation is sponsoring a free lease-purchase home buying^nvestment seminar, at 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 29, in the conference room of the Clark County Library, 1401E. Flamingo. Steve Winham will conduct the seminar. Winham is the partner of John Ross, author of "LeasePurchase, America!"—the first non-technical book on the topic written for the consumer, according to a spokesman. Each participant will receive a copy of the book. Rosshas wonnumerous awards for his work including an achievement award from "Success" magazine and the United States Olympic Committee. The seminar's purpose is to help neoole understand lease-purSAVING WAIER IT'S A GRASS ROOTS EFFORT chase, an alternative method of financing a home. To reserve a seat or for more information, call 293-5781. The Reserve is the first major hotel/casino to open in Henderson along Lake Mead Drive. Following an African jungle safari theme, it will feature several bronze statues of monkeys, hippos, elephants, giraffes and other wildlife amid a canopy of trees towering 24 feet in the air. The project is being done in several phases. Once complete, the hotel/casino could feature as many as 1,500 hotel rooms, 2,000 slot machines, 75 table games, several restaurants, meeting and convention facilities and other recreational amenities. The Reserve will employ approximately 750-800 people, making it one of the largest employers in Henderson. SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER WATER BETWEEN 2AM SAM On August 6, 1996, at the MaOonal Might Out, hosted by the Henderson Police Department, the ultimate test of security prevailed. High security locks designed for Saturn vehicles by Qene's Locksmith were given the greatest test possible. On city property between 8:10 and 10:15 p.m., within 20 feet of the Saturn Display Van, In plain view, someone attempted to steal my Saturn. It was vandalized and defaced and the dealer license plate was stolen. Logos advertising these high security locks were partially removed, Although my product withstood the break-In attempt, the vandals at this community event soiled the meaning behind this event. If you have any information regarding the person or persons who committed this petty, vindictive act, please contact the Henderson Police Department. Qene's Locksmith is offering a reward for information leading to the arrest of the individual(s) responsible for the crime. The national Might Out is an excellent means of bringing communities together, however, we must find a way to weed out these types of unsavory characters. _...;,,..Qene Altobella, Sr. ^^ • Owner/Qene's Locksmltlr^ • ^ • Q&B Auto Sales Gene LICENSED • BONDED 566-4363 875 S. Boulder Hwy. Henderson couraged by the positive reaction." The mayor was encouraged as well. "Henderson has been a city for slightly more than 40 years, and this is the 10th anniversary of Shakespeare in the Park," said Groesbeck. "I think this speaks well about Henderson's sense of community and commitment to the arts." Nevada Shakespeare in the Park will return to Fox Ridge Park on Sept. 27-29 for its 10th anniversary. This year's play, "Macbeth," will be presented by Jester Productions, a Los Angeles-based professional acting troupe. For more information about the event or to volunteer, call 226-9101. DENNIS DAINACK Has rejoined our excellent Staff: Larry Drury, Jeff Ruth and Dion Martin TOWING WHEEL ALIGNMENT PROPANE EMISSION CONTROL I H PROPANE EMISSiON CONfROL ij I TRIANGLE SERVICE J I Open 8 AM to 5 PM in Green Valley | tl197E. Tmplcana Ave. Call Larry or Dennis sunset & Expressway • I (702)736-7371 for an appt. (702) 458-3037 J Sizzling Summer Sale Hot New Colors Highest Quality' Happy Prices Green Valley Store 436-7736 ^Ts I960 W. Sunset (at VaUe Verde) ELECT ART li^kM I DISTRICT COURT JUDGE FAMILY DIVISION • DEPARTMENT H COMPETENCE, DILIGENCE & FAIRNESS ir Henderson Resident since 1989 it Partner, Freeman & Ritchie ir Little League Coacii since 1987 ir University of Virginia -k George Mlason University SchooiofLaw -k Associate Attorney IMcDonald, Carano, Wiison, iMcCune, Bergin, Franlcovich & Hiclcs k Judiciai Law Cierk Honorable J. Ciiarles Thompson i( Endorsed by the Ciark County District Attorney Investigators Association Paid for by the Committee to Elect Art Ritchie 1850 E. Flamingo Rd.. Ste. 240. Las Vegas. NV 89119 • 791-5657 $i A e BREAKFAST BUFFETI WILD CARD BUFFET Monday, Sept. 2nd, 9am 11am (Regular lunch buffet to open at 11:30an}) $300 $500 $800 Saturday, Sunday & Monday three drawings each day! $)00 $300 $0 Paycheck Payback Friday, Aug. 30 MONDAV MIGHT FOOTBALL Dallas at Chicago $1000 weekly most wins! $100 Weekly parlay Card! Game on Big Screen TVs! ALL BEER 75^ Monday, Sept. 2 T-SHIRTSI On Q/Q/Q/Q* Monday CASINO Mixknun ootntplMytd, no wJUcsnto. wMkMd pnmoiion runt 8/3(Me tn 0/2/96. RulM postid. AMOTNEft PINE lOVD iAMIMO* PROPERTV • lOULDER HieHVAV, ICTWEEH LAKE MEAD DR. i SUNSET • 9A4-I100 >iiliwii"'"'"I'liDEATHS THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY Benavidez killed on mission Brandy Kay Benavidez, 22, of Henderson, was killed when she was hit by a car Aug. 23, 1996, while serving a mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in the Buenos Aries, South Argentina Mission. Benavidez was bom July 20, 1974,inVictorville,Calif.,toPaul Edward and Christy Ann Peterson Benavidez. Her family moved to Henderson in 1977 where Brandy attended school and graduated from Basic high School in 1992. While attending Basic High School Brandy lettered in varsity basketball and belonged to the Spanish Club. She was employed at Smith's Food in Henderson since 1990. She attended Southern Utah University in Cedar City, from 1992 until she departed for her mission. She had a migor in Spanish and was pursuing an education mtyor. She was an active member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. She received her Young Women's Recognition award, was assistant sports director, served on the activities committee and as a visiting teadier. She had been serving on her mission since Sept. 26,1996. She was a senior companion and was serving in Los Homos, La Plata, Argentina at the time of her death. She is survived, in addition to her parents in Henderson, by a brother, Aaron Paul CTara) Benavidez; a nephew, Brandon A. Benavidez; grandparents, Florence Benavidez of Henderson, Henry Benavidez of Las Vegas, and Richard and Rose Peterson of Avoca, Iowa. Aunts and uncles are Janet andJeffBurr, Susan Benavidez, and David and Cindy Benavidez, all of Henderson; Kathy Wilber, Alan and Pam Petersen, and Mike and Molly Petersen, all of Avoca, Iowa; Carol and Curt Elcock of Orem, Utah, Sherry Emd PetePoulsen of Stephenville, Texas; Aaron Ward of Cedar City; Terry and Melanie Beck, of Omaha and Debbie and Mark McKinley of Norfork, both in Nebraska. Funeral services are scheduled for 9 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 31, at the LDS Cholla Chapel. Henderson. Friends and relatives may attend the viewing from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 30, at Palm Mortuary-Henderson, and from 8 a.m. Saturday until services at 9 a.m. at the Cholla Chapel. Interment will be at Palm Memorial Park, Henderson. G. Clifford Taylor, Jr. Q. Clifford Taylor, Jr., 51, died Friday, Aug. 23,1996, in Arizona. Born June 19,1945, in Idaho Falls, Idaho, he had been a resident of the Las Vegas area since 1954. He was a gaming executive employed by the Showboat Inc. for 19 years. A member of Mt. Moriah Henderson Masonic Lodge #39 F&AM, he graduatedf romthe University of Idaho in 1973 with an accounting degree. He is survived by one son, Shane of Henderson; fiance, Leann Schneider of Las Vegas; mother, Lois of Henderson; three brothers, Phillip of Henderson, William of Sandy Hook, Conn., and Robert of San Antonio, Texas. The family suggests donations to Henderson Boys and Girls Club, 401 Drake St, Henderson, NV 89015, or Shriner's Crippled Children's Hospital, IntertTWuntain Unit, Fairfax Road at Virginia St., Salt Lalte City, UT 84103. Memorial services will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, Aug. 30 at Palm MorTursngements were handled by Palm Mortuary-Henderson. Alma Eleanor Alvet Alma Eleanor Alves, 89, died Friday, Aug. 23,1996. Born Jan. 4^ 1907, in Hayward, Calif., she had been a resident of Henderson for/l8 years. She was a retired after 45 years from Hunts canneiy. She was a charter nrwmber of the Teanrtsters Union. She is sun/ived by two daughters, Marilyn Fraga of Hayward, Calif., Dorothy Brown, eight grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Services were held. An'angements were handled by Nevada Funeral Sen^ice, NV Cremation or Burial Society of Las Vegas. John L McBroy John L McElroy, 48, died Sunday, Aug. 25,1996. Bom Nov. 30, 1947, in Birmingham, Ala., he had been a resident of Henderson for 23 years. He was a policeman, and a veteran of the U.S. Marines, having served in Vietnam. He is survived by his wife, Barbara, son, Shane, and daughter. Tammy Harrison, all of Henderson; two sisters, Jackie Han-is of Remlop, Ala., and Jean Smith of Birmingham, Ala.; three brothers, Jerry, James and Joseph, father Charles F., and nrwther Avis King, all of Birmingham; and two grandchildren. ServKes are private. Arrangements were handled by Palm Mortua^-Henderson. Ted J. Lattanzio Ted J. Lattanzio, 62, died Monday, Aug. 26,1996, in a local hospital. Bom Aug. 1,1934, in Chksago, III., he had been a resident of Henderson "loMhyeare, He was • retired, disabled veteran of the U.S. Amny, having served in Korea. He is survived by his wife, Victoria J. of Henderson; three sons, Ted of Henderson, Tom of Las Vegas and Eddie, also of Henderson; one sister, Mary Sapors of Phoenix, Ariz.; one brother, Phillip of Chcago, and three grandchildren. ServKes were held. An'angements were handled by Palm Mortuary-Henderson. SAVING WATER *s** IT'S A GRASS ROOTS EFFORT SHOP TALK with Tony MIQO CARBON BUILDUP AND PINGING Pinging due to abnomial combustion causes metalic-sounding noises to emanate from inside the engine. The octane rating posted on the gasoline pumpisameasureofthe fuel's ability to resist pinging. As a car gets older, however, it may happen that gasoline of a particular octane number is no longer sufficient lo keep pinging at bay, and gasoline of a higher octane number may be needed to stop pinging. An engine'sincreased octane appetite may be due to excessive carbon buildup in the combustion chambers. While driving the car at high speed for a few hours may help to bum off some of the carbon, good sense and recognition of the need to enforce speed limits may preclude this solution to the problem. Instead, the automobile technician may use a chemical for decarbonization, or as a last resort, mechanical carbon removal may be necessary. Your car will run more efficiently if you take preventative measures to eliminate carbon buildup. When your car needs service, bring it lo AUTO SPECIALIST, INC. We preform all general automotive service and repair including wheel alignment, tune-ups, engine overhauls and air conditioning. 24-hour towing is available and we are AAA certified. The shop is open M-F 8-6, Sat. 8-5 and most major credit cards are accepted. Call 2934776 to speak to an expert technician about any car problems. AUTO SPECIALISTS, INC 705 lunlpcr Way, Boulder City 293-4776 This column brought to you iii publK untc* and (mid lor by Auto Spacmlltts, IIK I J9 J3 J9 J3 J: J9 J3 J9 J9 J9 J9 J9 J3 i ^ JO J9 J9 JS i J9 JJ JO J3 JO J: J: JO JO J9 JO ^ x_^ J: J0J0J0J0J0J9^J0^J0CJ0^J0^J0J0J0J0J0J0J0J0.0J0<0JCO^Oi9iOJ7OCJ0^mi ^''ismim-'m Brandy Kay BenavidM: SAY IT WITH CCX)K1ES We Deliver "The Sweetest Bouquet In Town' ^ C(gkies by Design • Cookie Bouquets For All Occasions • We Will Write Your Personal Message On Any Bouquet • We Copy Company Logos For Corporate Gilts • Locai Delivery Available 2877 Green Valley Pkwy. (luckysCenter) Phone: 898-0440 • Fax: 898-0794 Pd. Pol.Adv: V Dear Fellow Henderson Voters: It has been my pleasure to serve as your Assemblyman. Together we have accomplished many great things for our community, including stiffer sentences for violent criminals, keeping Nevada's tax rates one of the lowest in the nation and receiving approval for a new Department of Motor Vehicles office in Henderson. I have no opposition in the primary, so my name will not appear on your primary ballot. I hope to meet and talk with you in person as 1 knock on doors throughout our neighborhood for the November 5 General Election. If you would like more information about me or my campaign, please call me at home at 565MONDf^y NIGHT WILD Cf^RD Lake Mead is Going Wild this Football Seasonf Come on in on Monday Nights and Win Cash & Squares on our Super Bowl Board. Here's how it works: Hit any 4 of a kind. Max Bet No Wilds starting on August 26 and get entered in our Monday Night Football Drawing. Monday Night Drawings: 1st Quarter: no • SUPER SQUARE 2nd Quarter: ^20 • SUPER SQUARE 3rd Quarter: ^30 • SUPER SQUARE 4tti Quarter: ^0 • SUPER SQUARE ^^^ SUPER BOWL BOARD Hit any of the following on Monday Nights During the Gome: JS ^200 NICKEL JACKPOT ^ W ^500 QUARTER JACKPOT IS ^800 DOLLAR JACKPOT And receive one of 32 Wild Card Spots on Our Super Bowl Board. DURING SUPER BOWL XXXI WE WILL GIUE AWAY I ST QUARTER: $100 3RD QUARTER: $100 2ND QUARTER: $100 4TH QUARTER: S500 ••• Must b PrMMit • Ask for DctcriU LAKE MEAD LounGE et CAsmo 846 E. Lake Mead Drive • 565-0297 1 mile East of Boulder Hwy. 'On the way to the Lake' ""335^: 1^ •:*'W

PAGE 11

Pagt 10 HcndMson Horn* Nw Thursday, August 29,1996 Thursday, August 29,1996 Hendarson Home Nwt Po> 11 POUCE: A day in life From Page 1 The person driving the car was going to drive away with me standing right there," WilUams said. "I grabbed the man's arm to try to pull him out of the car when he put a death grip on the steering wheel." "I kept saying, 'Police officer! Step out of the car!,' Williams said. At that time the man kept trying to shift the car to drive when two fire personnel assisted Williams in prying him out of the car and cuffing him. "The Henderson Police and Fire Departments work very well together," WilUams said. "Both departments go above and beyond to help each other." Police officers change shifts about every two years. Changing sleep schedules is another aspect of the job that requires flexibility. Officers can go from a day shift to a graveyard shift having to completely rearrange their life. Some things in an officer's job are constants. The required uniform they wear, including their gun, cuffs, baton and bulletproof vest, is worn every time they hit the streets. A debriefing session is held where officers are informed of what is happening in the city before every shift. Williams responded to about five false 911 during Friday's shift as well burglar alarm calls. "You could get 1,000 of these kinds of calls but you always have to watch out for that one call that's real." Everytime an officer visits a scene he or she always gets a back-up officer. Williams said there is a contact officer, one who makes contact with the people involved and a back-up officer to be on the scene in case the contact officer needs assistance. The procedure for alarm calls is, the contact officer will wait for back-up while dispatch calls the people's home. When the back-up patrol arrives, officers inspect the outside of the house for signs of forced entry, Williams said. "The real problem-solving comes into play when I am called to a domestic disturbance," Williams said. "I am then a problem-solver and a counselor because I have to help families work out their disputes." "I go into a situation where nothing criminal is happening but domestic disputes can lead be one step away from hurting a spouse," Williams said. About 10 p.m., Williams was called to transport a criminal from the Treasure Island Hotel-Casino to the Henderson ,Jail. The suspect was wanted for petty larceny. The suspect was also using two Social Security numbers and was playing what police call "the name game," in which the suspicious person makes it difficult for law enforcement officials to figure out who he or she is for fear of being arrested. One of the man's identities came up with a Henderson warrant. The suspect had a criminal record consisting of grand larceny, sexual assault and attempted homicide. After a thorough investigation including running fingerprints, Williams determined one of the two identifications was the suspect's true identity. Williams transported the suspect to Henderson where he was booked. Arts Council discusses Shakespeare The Arts Council of Henderson/Green Valley, presenters of the 10th anniversary of "Nevada Shakespeare in the Park," recently held acommunity meeting at Fox Ridge Park in the Green Valley area to answer questions about the upcoming event. To minimize the impact of the eveiit of the community, the mayor of Henderson had sought input from residents. "I wanted Fox Ridge residents to have the opportunity to share," said Mayor Robert Groesbeck. The event's board was also on hand to answer questions, said Judi Steele, president of the Arts Council. "The residents in attendance were very supportive," Steele said. "The board was very enRESERVE: Opening delayed From Page 1 Homebuying seminar Thursday The non-profit Inside Corporation is sponsoring a free lease-purchase home buying^nvestment seminar, at 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 29, in the conference room of the Clark County Library, 1401E. Flamingo. Steve Winham will conduct the seminar. Winham is the partner of John Ross, author of "LeasePurchase, America!"—the first non-technical book on the topic written for the consumer, according to a spokesman. Each participant will receive a copy of the book. Rosshas wonnumerous awards for his work including an achievement award from "Success" magazine and the United States Olympic Committee. The seminar's purpose is to help neoole understand lease-purSAVING WAIER IT'S A GRASS ROOTS EFFORT chase, an alternative method of financing a home. To reserve a seat or for more information, call 293-5781. The Reserve is the first major hotel/casino to open in Henderson along Lake Mead Drive. Following an African jungle safari theme, it will feature several bronze statues of monkeys, hippos, elephants, giraffes and other wildlife amid a canopy of trees towering 24 feet in the air. The project is being done in several phases. Once complete, the hotel/casino could feature as many as 1,500 hotel rooms, 2,000 slot machines, 75 table games, several restaurants, meeting and convention facilities and other recreational amenities. The Reserve will employ approximately 750-800 people, making it one of the largest employers in Henderson. SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER WATER BETWEEN 2AM SAM On August 6, 1996, at the MaOonal Might Out, hosted by the Henderson Police Department, the ultimate test of security prevailed. High security locks designed for Saturn vehicles by Qene's Locksmith were given the greatest test possible. On city property between 8:10 and 10:15 p.m., within 20 feet of the Saturn Display Van, In plain view, someone attempted to steal my Saturn. It was vandalized and defaced and the dealer license plate was stolen. Logos advertising these high security locks were partially removed, Although my product withstood the break-In attempt, the vandals at this community event soiled the meaning behind this event. If you have any information regarding the person or persons who committed this petty, vindictive act, please contact the Henderson Police Department. Qene's Locksmith is offering a reward for information leading to the arrest of the individual(s) responsible for the crime. The national Might Out is an excellent means of bringing communities together, however, we must find a way to weed out these types of unsavory characters. _...;,,..Qene Altobella, Sr. ^^ • Owner/Qene's Locksmltlr^ • ^ • Q&B Auto Sales Gene LICENSED • BONDED 566-4363 875 S. Boulder Hwy. Henderson couraged by the positive reaction." The mayor was encouraged as well. "Henderson has been a city for slightly more than 40 years, and this is the 10th anniversary of Shakespeare in the Park," said Groesbeck. "I think this speaks well about Henderson's sense of community and commitment to the arts." Nevada Shakespeare in the Park will return to Fox Ridge Park on Sept. 27-29 for its 10th anniversary. This year's play, "Macbeth," will be presented by Jester Productions, a Los Angeles-based professional acting troupe. For more information about the event or to volunteer, call 226-9101. DENNIS DAINACK Has rejoined our excellent Staff: Larry Drury, Jeff Ruth and Dion Martin TOWING WHEEL ALIGNMENT PROPANE EMISSION CONTROL I H PROPANE EMISSiON CONfROL ij I TRIANGLE SERVICE J I Open 8 AM to 5 PM in Green Valley | tl197E. Tmplcana Ave. Call Larry or Dennis sunset & Expressway • I (702)736-7371 for an appt. (702) 458-3037 J Sizzling Summer Sale Hot New Colors Highest Quality' Happy Prices Green Valley Store 436-7736 ^Ts I960 W. Sunset (at VaUe Verde) ELECT ART li^kM I DISTRICT COURT JUDGE FAMILY DIVISION • DEPARTMENT H COMPETENCE, DILIGENCE & FAIRNESS ir Henderson Resident since 1989 it Partner, Freeman & Ritchie ir Little League Coacii since 1987 ir University of Virginia -k George Mlason University SchooiofLaw -k Associate Attorney IMcDonald, Carano, Wiison, iMcCune, Bergin, Franlcovich & Hiclcs k Judiciai Law Cierk Honorable J. Ciiarles Thompson i( Endorsed by the Ciark County District Attorney Investigators Association Paid for by the Committee to Elect Art Ritchie 1850 E. Flamingo Rd.. Ste. 240. Las Vegas. NV 89119 • 791-5657 $i A e BREAKFAST BUFFETI WILD CARD BUFFET Monday, Sept. 2nd, 9am 11am (Regular lunch buffet to open at 11:30an}) $300 $500 $800 Saturday, Sunday & Monday three drawings each day! $)00 $300 $0 Paycheck Payback Friday, Aug. 30 MONDAV MIGHT FOOTBALL Dallas at Chicago $1000 weekly most wins! $100 Weekly parlay Card! Game on Big Screen TVs! ALL BEER 75^ Monday, Sept. 2 T-SHIRTSI On Q/Q/Q/Q* Monday CASINO Mixknun ootntplMytd, no wJUcsnto. wMkMd pnmoiion runt 8/3(Me tn 0/2/96. RulM postid. AMOTNEft PINE lOVD iAMIMO* PROPERTV • lOULDER HieHVAV, ICTWEEH LAKE MEAD DR. i SUNSET • 9A4-I100 >iiliwii"'"'"I'liDEATHS THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY Benavidez killed on mission Brandy Kay Benavidez, 22, of Henderson, was killed when she was hit by a car Aug. 23, 1996, while serving a mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in the Buenos Aries, South Argentina Mission. Benavidez was bom July 20, 1974,inVictorville,Calif.,toPaul Edward and Christy Ann Peterson Benavidez. Her family moved to Henderson in 1977 where Brandy attended school and graduated from Basic high School in 1992. While attending Basic High School Brandy lettered in varsity basketball and belonged to the Spanish Club. She was employed at Smith's Food in Henderson since 1990. She attended Southern Utah University in Cedar City, from 1992 until she departed for her mission. She had a migor in Spanish and was pursuing an education mtyor. She was an active member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. She received her Young Women's Recognition award, was assistant sports director, served on the activities committee and as a visiting teadier. She had been serving on her mission since Sept. 26,1996. She was a senior companion and was serving in Los Homos, La Plata, Argentina at the time of her death. She is survived, in addition to her parents in Henderson, by a brother, Aaron Paul CTara) Benavidez; a nephew, Brandon A. Benavidez; grandparents, Florence Benavidez of Henderson, Henry Benavidez of Las Vegas, and Richard and Rose Peterson of Avoca, Iowa. Aunts and uncles are Janet andJeffBurr, Susan Benavidez, and David and Cindy Benavidez, all of Henderson; Kathy Wilber, Alan and Pam Petersen, and Mike and Molly Petersen, all of Avoca, Iowa; Carol and Curt Elcock of Orem, Utah, Sherry Emd PetePoulsen of Stephenville, Texas; Aaron Ward of Cedar City; Terry and Melanie Beck, of Omaha and Debbie and Mark McKinley of Norfork, both in Nebraska. Funeral services are scheduled for 9 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 31, at the LDS Cholla Chapel. Henderson. Friends and relatives may attend the viewing from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 30, at Palm Mortuary-Henderson, and from 8 a.m. Saturday until services at 9 a.m. at the Cholla Chapel. Interment will be at Palm Memorial Park, Henderson. G. Clifford Taylor, Jr. Q. Clifford Taylor, Jr., 51, died Friday, Aug. 23,1996, in Arizona. Born June 19,1945, in Idaho Falls, Idaho, he had been a resident of the Las Vegas area since 1954. He was a gaming executive employed by the Showboat Inc. for 19 years. A member of Mt. Moriah Henderson Masonic Lodge #39 F&AM, he graduatedf romthe University of Idaho in 1973 with an accounting degree. He is survived by one son, Shane of Henderson; fiance, Leann Schneider of Las Vegas; mother, Lois of Henderson; three brothers, Phillip of Henderson, William of Sandy Hook, Conn., and Robert of San Antonio, Texas. The family suggests donations to Henderson Boys and Girls Club, 401 Drake St, Henderson, NV 89015, or Shriner's Crippled Children's Hospital, IntertTWuntain Unit, Fairfax Road at Virginia St., Salt Lalte City, UT 84103. Memorial services will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, Aug. 30 at Palm MorTursngements were handled by Palm Mortuary-Henderson. Alma Eleanor Alvet Alma Eleanor Alves, 89, died Friday, Aug. 23,1996. Born Jan. 4^ 1907, in Hayward, Calif., she had been a resident of Henderson for/l8 years. She was a retired after 45 years from Hunts canneiy. She was a charter nrwmber of the Teanrtsters Union. She is sun/ived by two daughters, Marilyn Fraga of Hayward, Calif., Dorothy Brown, eight grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Services were held. An'angements were handled by Nevada Funeral Sen^ice, NV Cremation or Burial Society of Las Vegas. John L McBroy John L McElroy, 48, died Sunday, Aug. 25,1996. Bom Nov. 30, 1947, in Birmingham, Ala., he had been a resident of Henderson for 23 years. He was a policeman, and a veteran of the U.S. Marines, having served in Vietnam. He is survived by his wife, Barbara, son, Shane, and daughter. Tammy Harrison, all of Henderson; two sisters, Jackie Han-is of Remlop, Ala., and Jean Smith of Birmingham, Ala.; three brothers, Jerry, James and Joseph, father Charles F., and nrwther Avis King, all of Birmingham; and two grandchildren. ServKes are private. Arrangements were handled by Palm Mortua^-Henderson. Ted J. Lattanzio Ted J. Lattanzio, 62, died Monday, Aug. 26,1996, in a local hospital. Bom Aug. 1,1934, in Chksago, III., he had been a resident of Henderson "loMhyeare, He was • retired, disabled veteran of the U.S. Amny, having served in Korea. He is survived by his wife, Victoria J. of Henderson; three sons, Ted of Henderson, Tom of Las Vegas and Eddie, also of Henderson; one sister, Mary Sapors of Phoenix, Ariz.; one brother, Phillip of Chcago, and three grandchildren. ServKes were held. An'angements were handled by Palm Mortuary-Henderson. SAVING WATER *s** IT'S A GRASS ROOTS EFFORT SHOP TALK with Tony MIQO CARBON BUILDUP AND PINGING Pinging due to abnomial combustion causes metalic-sounding noises to emanate from inside the engine. The octane rating posted on the gasoline pumpisameasureofthe fuel's ability to resist pinging. As a car gets older, however, it may happen that gasoline of a particular octane number is no longer sufficient lo keep pinging at bay, and gasoline of a higher octane number may be needed to stop pinging. An engine'sincreased octane appetite may be due to excessive carbon buildup in the combustion chambers. While driving the car at high speed for a few hours may help to bum off some of the carbon, good sense and recognition of the need to enforce speed limits may preclude this solution to the problem. Instead, the automobile technician may use a chemical for decarbonization, or as a last resort, mechanical carbon removal may be necessary. Your car will run more efficiently if you take preventative measures to eliminate carbon buildup. When your car needs service, bring it lo AUTO SPECIALIST, INC. We preform all general automotive service and repair including wheel alignment, tune-ups, engine overhauls and air conditioning. 24-hour towing is available and we are AAA certified. The shop is open M-F 8-6, Sat. 8-5 and most major credit cards are accepted. Call 2934776 to speak to an expert technician about any car problems. AUTO SPECIALISTS, INC 705 lunlpcr Way, Boulder City 293-4776 This column brought to you iii publK untc* and (mid lor by Auto Spacmlltts, IIK I J9 J3 J9 J3 J: J9 J3 J9 J9 J9 J9 J9 J3 i ^ JO J9 J9 JS i J9 JJ JO J3 JO J: J: JO JO J9 JO ^ x_^ J: J0J0J0J0J0J9^J0^J0CJ0^J0^J0J0J0J0J0J0J0J0.0J0<0JCO^Oi9iOJ7OCJ0^mi ^''ismim-'m Brandy Kay BenavidM: SAY IT WITH CCX)K1ES We Deliver "The Sweetest Bouquet In Town' ^ C(gkies by Design • Cookie Bouquets For All Occasions • We Will Write Your Personal Message On Any Bouquet • We Copy Company Logos For Corporate Gilts • Locai Delivery Available 2877 Green Valley Pkwy. (luckysCenter) Phone: 898-0440 • Fax: 898-0794 Pd. Pol.Adv: V Dear Fellow Henderson Voters: It has been my pleasure to serve as your Assemblyman. Together we have accomplished many great things for our community, including stiffer sentences for violent criminals, keeping Nevada's tax rates one of the lowest in the nation and receiving approval for a new Department of Motor Vehicles office in Henderson. I have no opposition in the primary, so my name will not appear on your primary ballot. I hope to meet and talk with you in person as 1 knock on doors throughout our neighborhood for the November 5 General Election. If you would like more information about me or my campaign, please call me at home at 565MONDf^y NIGHT WILD Cf^RD Lake Mead is Going Wild this Football Seasonf Come on in on Monday Nights and Win Cash & Squares on our Super Bowl Board. Here's how it works: Hit any 4 of a kind. Max Bet No Wilds starting on August 26 and get entered in our Monday Night Football Drawing. Monday Night Drawings: 1st Quarter: no • SUPER SQUARE 2nd Quarter: ^20 • SUPER SQUARE 3rd Quarter: ^30 • SUPER SQUARE 4tti Quarter: ^0 • SUPER SQUARE ^^^ SUPER BOWL BOARD Hit any of the following on Monday Nights During the Gome: JS ^200 NICKEL JACKPOT ^ W ^500 QUARTER JACKPOT IS ^800 DOLLAR JACKPOT And receive one of 32 Wild Card Spots on Our Super Bowl Board. DURING SUPER BOWL XXXI WE WILL GIUE AWAY I ST QUARTER: $100 3RD QUARTER: $100 2ND QUARTER: $100 4TH QUARTER: S500 ••• Must b PrMMit • Ask for DctcriU LAKE MEAD LounGE et CAsmo 846 E. Lake Mead Drive • 565-0297 1 mile East of Boulder Hwy. 'On the way to the Lake' ""335^: 1^ •:*'W

PAGE 12

mmmm^mmmmmmmmmm mimfimmmmm mmmmmm mmmrn Pag* 12 llandorson Home News Thursday, August 29,1996 Thursday, August 29,1996 Henderson Home News Page 13. VOTING: Mail precinct From Page 2 Ferguson said staffing a station is costly. Volunteers become more costly than those who regularly work the booths because they have to be trained to follow strict state laws for voting procedures. Voting district lines were redrawn this year, adding to the confusion, she said. New district lines need to be set by 2001 to meet a state law. Due to the rapid growth in the county, lines were reset according to population and voter registration. She said those areas where lines were not compatible for redistricting were turned into a mail-in precinct. The Henderson precinct, generally located around Morrell Park, fits that example, she said. Some people who were in the area were reclassified into a neighboring precinct. Once each of the neighboring precincts near the Kesterson Center station were at their capacity, however, those left in the old precinct became classified as mail-in voters, "Our civil rights are violated in the fact that we cannot hear all the information and are forced to vote early," said Phil Prentice, a resident who received a mailin ballot. He said not all people may know how to punch their mail-in card and if an error is made, the wrong person may receive their vote. "When I moved to Henderson, I realized that my vote counts. In such a small area, it makes it important to vote," said Marilyn A]tobel 1 a-Lebens, a resident who received a mail-in ballot. Some residents in her apartment complex are disabled or do not have transportation to get to a poll to vote. This may result in some residents not voting. "As far as the Sept. 3 primary, I'm not going to vote. I refuse to put it in the mail," she said."... If something is not done by the general election, I'm not going to vote then either." Ferguson said those reclassified still have the option of going to the City Clerk's office to cast their ballot or traveling to the government center to reach the polls. Residents cannot go to a neighboring precinct because many of them are already at their capacity, she said. "I do empathize with people's voting and I will meet with tiiem in the spring," she S£ud. Until then, the Election Department is busy preparing for upcoming elections. *It is important to vote on election day and if I can help them then I will try to," Ferguson said. For those who did not receive a mail-in ballot, contact the mailin ballot line, 455-2822. reston^s Class Act Dance & Gymnastic Center i WWi Thlf Ad Expires 10/31/96 OFFERING: Ballet Tap • Jazz Cheerleading Gymnastics Bars • Beams • Floor • Vault • Aerobatic Training AGES: 2-1/2 through Prolesiionai ALSO Preschool Combination Classes • Adult Classes 62501MtMntaln Vista • BIdg. D Free classes relieve stress Fine Men's Neckwear and Accessories „ 4l.aO ftox> • • wTy -youth HC/4C/i1fT€CliLCCt1!n **• psK*^<-wtv oHvupoli. OP roUtfloia* 'nr* -nrlll donakte I^IB for ora^ -n f im t lo -yon 738 South Boulder Highway. Henderson. Hevodo 89015 in the Lucky's Shopping Center 564-TIES (8431) The Stress Management Center of Nevada will offer free classes to the community the first week of September, to help increase community awareness of the value of Yoga, T'ai Chi and other stress reducing and health promoting classes. Ramona Morningstar will teach a free Tai Chi class from 7 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 3. This ancientexerciseformind and body focuses on developing greater flexibility, strength and calmness through the practice of flowing, standing movements. It is an excellent way to become mor energized and relaxed. Kathleen Grace Santor will teach a free Hatha Yoga class from 11 a.m. to noon Wednesday, Sept. 4. Storytime for children scheduled Henderson District Public Libraries will begin storytimes for children ages 3 to 5 in September. id \ Gibson Branch / ^^ 280 Water St. ^^ • • 565-8402 Storytimes are set at 10 a.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays, beginning Sept. 17 and 18. Malcolm Branch 80 N. Pecos 263-7522 Storytimes are set at 10 a.m. Wednesdays and at 10 a.m. and 11 a.m. Thursdays, beginning Sept. 18 and 19. Santor, director of the SMCN, has taught yoga for 26 years and specializes in introducing beginners to it in a way that is comfortable and results-oriented. The class will include Yoga exercises, breathing and relaxation techniques. Sensei Leonard Cardinale will present Aikido from 9 to 9:50 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 7. It requires no previous experience. Circular, gentle movements and the memipulation of joints and pressure allow energy to flow easily in the body. Michael Justice will teach Chi Grong from 10 to 10:50 a.m., also on Sept. 7. Classes will take place in the SMCN classroom, 601 Whitney Ranch, Building C, Suite 12. Reserve space by calling 4588088. MASKS • SNORKELS FINS • BOOTIES • GLOVES • OARLEXX • HOODS • BCDS • WETSUITS • 1/8" SHORTIES o^^ "CHILDREN'S" MASKS • SNORKELS • FINS ^ssoc 444 W. Sunset Rd. Hendfson TTTPT .CAi I N O 1/4 mile West Of BouWerHwy. 564-5551 BACK TO BASICS BREAKFAST" INTRODUCING • Lake Mead & Colorado ryTi River Dive Boat Charters l^'-'l ^-^ PANCAKE SPECIAL 2 fluffy pancakes made from our special recipe. Top it wttti Ions of wann syrup, butter and your choice of breakfast meats. Seived from 11 pin. to 11 BJD. every day. [•T^ :^fc5^*>> BREAKFAST fM 2 large AA eggs cooked any stylo with crispy potatoes, toast \ \. j* or biscuits & gravy and your ^ choice of double smoked bacon or plump & juicy sausage. Served everyday from 11p.m. to 11a.m. ^ ^^WLt COLORADO RIVER DIVERS ^S0^ % mf^^^^i^ 1321-A NEVADA HIGHWAY ^F^ |^ C W^ ^ 293-6648 ^sHeRWOOD ^ ^ ^^0' Storewide 25 to 50% off ||^ ^ 1g^ REGISTER NOW • COLORADO RIVER DIVERS ||^ The Police Protective Association anii Attorney Generai Franl(ie Sue Dei Papa Agree Nancy Saitta Will Make Our Community... A Better Community ''Quality & Experience Makes The Difference" NAUI and PADI INSTRUCTORS ON STAFF I EXPERT SERVICE and REPAIRS PRIVATE OR CROUP INSTRUCTION | ALL REGULATORS, TANKS & VALVES Beginning Scuba Class • 8 classrooms • S pool sessions 5 dives Lal(e Mead .^g Super Advanced Class 3 classrooms • 164dives Lal(e Mead & Colorado River ^^ '^ate REGISTER NOW • COLORADO RIVER DIVERS THEY'LL STEAL YOUR HEART... Two Shows Nightty 6pm & 8pm TWO MHK • momii I^S VEGAS • HOTELCASmO • RVRES08T i.k.Blut.Dluiloiid Eidt 33 (702) ^ ^^^J^mj^^^lj^ Hi ghly Qualified Board of Directors, Nevada Child Seekers •Chairperson, Southern Nevada Runaway Task Force Chairperson, Missing and Exploited Children Progem Member, Citizen's Committee for Victim's Rights • Member, Southern Nevada Domestic Violence Task Force • Ten years of practice in Michigan and Nevada •Graduated Magna Cum Laude from Wayne State University As Nevada's ChUdren's Advocate in the Attorney General's Office, Nancy Saitta lias dedicated her life to protecting our children, protecting our families, and protecting our community. Nancy SAITTA FOR FAMILY COURT • DEFT. G call Nancy Saitta at 393-2154 Wi^m^ • yUflj^iMSWt^ Brian Jones/News Staff HERE'S LOOKIN' AT YOU, KID—Jennifer Cox, 1, attended Saturday's concert at Discovery Park with her parents Rick and Joan Cox. Quality Upholstry i 568-1473 • 384-2554 All Work Guaranteed Specializing in Antique Furniture Call Katie for FREE Estimates. Internet used for recruitment Now, "working the Net" might be as important as networking when it comes to a job search, suggests a new nationwide survey of executives. While recruiting online is still afairly new approach (as indicated by the 57% of executives who say companies rarely use this method), a surprising 40% of respondents polled said that using the Internet for recruiting efforts is now commonplace. The survey was developed by Accountemps, the world's largest temporary staffing service for accounting, finance and bookkeeping. It was conducted by an independent research firm, which polled 150 executives from the nation's 1,000 largest companies. Executives were asked: How common is it for companies today to use the Internet for recruiting job candidates? Thefti'espoiises: veflry common, 10%; somewhat common, 30%; somewhat uncommon, 38%; very uncommon, 19%; don't know, 3%. "The fact that recruiting on the Internet has only in the last few years become a viable option for most companies makes the survey results even more significant and indicative of its growing acceptance as a hiring tool," said Max Messmer, chairman of Accountemps and author of the popular" Job Hunting For DumMinister ordained The Rev. James R. Gay will hold services at 6 p.m. Sundays at the New Hope Christian Center Church of God, 519 N. Pueblo, Henderson. Gay, a 20-year resident of Henderson, was recently ordained. For more information, call 5669838. mies" from IDG Books. "Online retruiting is still 'uncharted territory' for many businesses. However, a rapidly expanding contingent of employers is now posting jobs on home pages, using online job listing services or working with recruiters that actively use the Internet," Messmer said. "The message for job candidates is that searching for positions on the Internet will clearly give them an added advantage in landing a position," said Cecil Gregg, Accountemps area manager for Las Vegas. "However, other more traditional search techniques such as networking, classified ads and temporary work remain critical to the job search mix." Accountemps has more than 180 offices in the United States, Canada and Europe. Health Nuts 1635 NV Hwy. 293-1844 Tests show folic acid supplements raise status of body folic acid. Eating foods high in folic acid did not. Dr. Lininger, D.C. • ^ "ip* ^i^ ^p "i^ ^i^ li^ Happy 40th Anniversary Joe & Bertha Braschler ^^^ Love yoUf H||i yow ChMren & Grandchildren |^ ^ -A. -rfLjAa B^a mA^ 40 Years Later and you^fe still in Love At the Library. GREEN VALLEY LIBRARY 2797 N. Green Valley Parkway, Henderson — 435-1840 Thursday, Aug. 29 10 a.m., Desert Newcomers Coffee (Sunset Room) 6 p.m., Spanish Gardens Homeowners As.sociaiion General Meeting (Sunset Room) Friday, AUR. 30 9 a.m., Mommy and Me Crafts (Sunset Room) ^ ^ Saturday, AUR. 31 9 30 a.m.. Family Coun.seiing Services (Sunset Room) Monday, Sept. 2 THE LIBRARY IS CLOSED IN OBSERVATION OF LABOR DAY Tuesday, Sept. 3 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Early Voting (Sun.set Room) Wednesday, Sept. 4 7 p.m., Harvest Church (Sun.sei Room and Conference Room) THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY GEORGE E. MERINO M.D. FACS, FIGS, Board Certified Cardiovascular & Thore$150^ 558-3840 CLEARWATHt CANTON Coming Soon On Valle Verde at pMeo Veide next to Green N^Jley Raicfa 99v*lyDO Champion Homes • • • • ^>g -.^^ •

PAGE 13

mmmm^mmmmmmmmmm mimfimmmmm mmmmmm mmmrn Pag* 12 llandorson Home News Thursday, August 29,1996 Thursday, August 29,1996 Henderson Home News Page 13. VOTING: Mail precinct From Page 2 Ferguson said staffing a station is costly. Volunteers become more costly than those who regularly work the booths because they have to be trained to follow strict state laws for voting procedures. Voting district lines were redrawn this year, adding to the confusion, she said. New district lines need to be set by 2001 to meet a state law. Due to the rapid growth in the county, lines were reset according to population and voter registration. She said those areas where lines were not compatible for redistricting were turned into a mail-in precinct. The Henderson precinct, generally located around Morrell Park, fits that example, she said. Some people who were in the area were reclassified into a neighboring precinct. Once each of the neighboring precincts near the Kesterson Center station were at their capacity, however, those left in the old precinct became classified as mail-in voters, "Our civil rights are violated in the fact that we cannot hear all the information and are forced to vote early," said Phil Prentice, a resident who received a mailin ballot. He said not all people may know how to punch their mail-in card and if an error is made, the wrong person may receive their vote. "When I moved to Henderson, I realized that my vote counts. In such a small area, it makes it important to vote," said Marilyn A]tobel 1 a-Lebens, a resident who received a mail-in ballot. Some residents in her apartment complex are disabled or do not have transportation to get to a poll to vote. This may result in some residents not voting. "As far as the Sept. 3 primary, I'm not going to vote. I refuse to put it in the mail," she said."... If something is not done by the general election, I'm not going to vote then either." Ferguson said those reclassified still have the option of going to the City Clerk's office to cast their ballot or traveling to the government center to reach the polls. Residents cannot go to a neighboring precinct because many of them are already at their capacity, she said. "I do empathize with people's voting and I will meet with tiiem in the spring," she S£ud. Until then, the Election Department is busy preparing for upcoming elections. *It is important to vote on election day and if I can help them then I will try to," Ferguson said. For those who did not receive a mail-in ballot, contact the mailin ballot line, 455-2822. reston^s Class Act Dance & Gymnastic Center i WWi Thlf Ad Expires 10/31/96 OFFERING: Ballet Tap • Jazz Cheerleading Gymnastics Bars • Beams • Floor • Vault • Aerobatic Training AGES: 2-1/2 through Prolesiionai ALSO Preschool Combination Classes • Adult Classes 62501MtMntaln Vista • BIdg. D Free classes relieve stress Fine Men's Neckwear and Accessories „ 4l.aO ftox> • • wTy -youth HC/4C/i1fT€CliLCCt1!n **• psK*^<-wtv oHvupoli. OP roUtfloia* 'nr* -nrlll donakte I^IB for ora^ -n f im t lo -yon 738 South Boulder Highway. Henderson. Hevodo 89015 in the Lucky's Shopping Center 564-TIES (8431) The Stress Management Center of Nevada will offer free classes to the community the first week of September, to help increase community awareness of the value of Yoga, T'ai Chi and other stress reducing and health promoting classes. Ramona Morningstar will teach a free Tai Chi class from 7 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 3. This ancientexerciseformind and body focuses on developing greater flexibility, strength and calmness through the practice of flowing, standing movements. It is an excellent way to become mor energized and relaxed. Kathleen Grace Santor will teach a free Hatha Yoga class from 11 a.m. to noon Wednesday, Sept. 4. Storytime for children scheduled Henderson District Public Libraries will begin storytimes for children ages 3 to 5 in September. id \ Gibson Branch / ^^ 280 Water St. ^^ • • 565-8402 Storytimes are set at 10 a.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays, beginning Sept. 17 and 18. Malcolm Branch 80 N. Pecos 263-7522 Storytimes are set at 10 a.m. Wednesdays and at 10 a.m. and 11 a.m. Thursdays, beginning Sept. 18 and 19. Santor, director of the SMCN, has taught yoga for 26 years and specializes in introducing beginners to it in a way that is comfortable and results-oriented. The class will include Yoga exercises, breathing and relaxation techniques. Sensei Leonard Cardinale will present Aikido from 9 to 9:50 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 7. It requires no previous experience. Circular, gentle movements and the memipulation of joints and pressure allow energy to flow easily in the body. Michael Justice will teach Chi Grong from 10 to 10:50 a.m., also on Sept. 7. Classes will take place in the SMCN classroom, 601 Whitney Ranch, Building C, Suite 12. Reserve space by calling 4588088. MASKS • SNORKELS FINS • BOOTIES • GLOVES • OARLEXX • HOODS • BCDS • WETSUITS • 1/8" SHORTIES o^^ "CHILDREN'S" MASKS • SNORKELS • FINS ^ssoc 444 W. Sunset Rd. Hendfson TTTPT .CAi I N O 1/4 mile West Of BouWerHwy. 564-5551 BACK TO BASICS BREAKFAST" INTRODUCING • Lake Mead & Colorado ryTi River Dive Boat Charters l^'-'l ^-^ PANCAKE SPECIAL 2 fluffy pancakes made from our special recipe. Top it wttti Ions of wann syrup, butter and your choice of breakfast meats. Seived from 11 pin. to 11 BJD. every day. [•T^ :^fc5^*>> BREAKFAST fM 2 large AA eggs cooked any stylo with crispy potatoes, toast \ \. j* or biscuits & gravy and your ^ choice of double smoked bacon or plump & juicy sausage. Served everyday from 11p.m. to 11a.m. ^ ^^WLt COLORADO RIVER DIVERS ^S0^ % mf^^^^i^ 1321-A NEVADA HIGHWAY ^F^ |^ C W^ ^ 293-6648 ^sHeRWOOD ^ ^ ^^0' Storewide 25 to 50% off ||^ ^ 1g^ REGISTER NOW • COLORADO RIVER DIVERS ||^ The Police Protective Association anii Attorney Generai Franl(ie Sue Dei Papa Agree Nancy Saitta Will Make Our Community... A Better Community ''Quality & Experience Makes The Difference" NAUI and PADI INSTRUCTORS ON STAFF I EXPERT SERVICE and REPAIRS PRIVATE OR CROUP INSTRUCTION | ALL REGULATORS, TANKS & VALVES Beginning Scuba Class • 8 classrooms • S pool sessions 5 dives Lal(e Mead .^g Super Advanced Class 3 classrooms • 164dives Lal(e Mead & Colorado River ^^ '^ate REGISTER NOW • COLORADO RIVER DIVERS THEY'LL STEAL YOUR HEART... Two Shows Nightty 6pm & 8pm TWO MHK • momii I^S VEGAS • HOTELCASmO • RVRES08T i.k.Blut.Dluiloiid Eidt 33 (702) ^ ^^^J^mj^^^lj^ Hi ghly Qualified Board of Directors, Nevada Child Seekers •Chairperson, Southern Nevada Runaway Task Force Chairperson, Missing and Exploited Children Progem Member, Citizen's Committee for Victim's Rights • Member, Southern Nevada Domestic Violence Task Force • Ten years of practice in Michigan and Nevada •Graduated Magna Cum Laude from Wayne State University As Nevada's ChUdren's Advocate in the Attorney General's Office, Nancy Saitta lias dedicated her life to protecting our children, protecting our families, and protecting our community. Nancy SAITTA FOR FAMILY COURT • DEFT. G call Nancy Saitta at 393-2154 Wi^m^ • yUflj^iMSWt^ Brian Jones/News Staff HERE'S LOOKIN' AT YOU, KID—Jennifer Cox, 1, attended Saturday's concert at Discovery Park with her parents Rick and Joan Cox. Quality Upholstry i 568-1473 • 384-2554 All Work Guaranteed Specializing in Antique Furniture Call Katie for FREE Estimates. Internet used for recruitment Now, "working the Net" might be as important as networking when it comes to a job search, suggests a new nationwide survey of executives. While recruiting online is still afairly new approach (as indicated by the 57% of executives who say companies rarely use this method), a surprising 40% of respondents polled said that using the Internet for recruiting efforts is now commonplace. The survey was developed by Accountemps, the world's largest temporary staffing service for accounting, finance and bookkeeping. It was conducted by an independent research firm, which polled 150 executives from the nation's 1,000 largest companies. Executives were asked: How common is it for companies today to use the Internet for recruiting job candidates? Thefti'espoiises: veflry common, 10%; somewhat common, 30%; somewhat uncommon, 38%; very uncommon, 19%; don't know, 3%. "The fact that recruiting on the Internet has only in the last few years become a viable option for most companies makes the survey results even more significant and indicative of its growing acceptance as a hiring tool," said Max Messmer, chairman of Accountemps and author of the popular" Job Hunting For DumMinister ordained The Rev. James R. Gay will hold services at 6 p.m. Sundays at the New Hope Christian Center Church of God, 519 N. Pueblo, Henderson. Gay, a 20-year resident of Henderson, was recently ordained. For more information, call 5669838. mies" from IDG Books. "Online retruiting is still 'uncharted territory' for many businesses. However, a rapidly expanding contingent of employers is now posting jobs on home pages, using online job listing services or working with recruiters that actively use the Internet," Messmer said. "The message for job candidates is that searching for positions on the Internet will clearly give them an added advantage in landing a position," said Cecil Gregg, Accountemps area manager for Las Vegas. "However, other more traditional search techniques such as networking, classified ads and temporary work remain critical to the job search mix." Accountemps has more than 180 offices in the United States, Canada and Europe. Health Nuts 1635 NV Hwy. 293-1844 Tests show folic acid supplements raise status of body folic acid. Eating foods high in folic acid did not. Dr. Lininger, D.C. • ^ "ip* ^i^ ^p "i^ ^i^ li^ Happy 40th Anniversary Joe & Bertha Braschler ^^^ Love yoUf H||i yow ChMren & Grandchildren |^ ^ -A. -rfLjAa B^a mA^ 40 Years Later and you^fe still in Love At the Library. GREEN VALLEY LIBRARY 2797 N. Green Valley Parkway, Henderson — 435-1840 Thursday, Aug. 29 10 a.m., Desert Newcomers Coffee (Sunset Room) 6 p.m., Spanish Gardens Homeowners As.sociaiion General Meeting (Sunset Room) Friday, AUR. 30 9 a.m., Mommy and Me Crafts (Sunset Room) ^ ^ Saturday, AUR. 31 9 30 a.m.. Family Coun.seiing Services (Sunset Room) Monday, Sept. 2 THE LIBRARY IS CLOSED IN OBSERVATION OF LABOR DAY Tuesday, Sept. 3 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Early Voting (Sun.set Room) Wednesday, Sept. 4 7 p.m., Harvest Church (Sun.sei Room and Conference Room) THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY GEORGE E. MERINO M.D. FACS, FIGS, Board Certified Cardiovascular & Thore$150^ 558-3840 CLEARWATHt CANTON Coming Soon On Valle Verde at pMeo Veide next to Green N^Jley Raicfa 99v*lyDO Champion Homes • • • • ^>g -.^^ •

PAGE 14

pp HiV ^ • ^ wm^m Page 14 Hendarson Horn* News Thursday, August 29,1996 Thursday, August 29,1996 Henderson Home News Page 15 Hazardous material shipments discussed Roy Thaiss A three-hour meeting concerning truck traffic over Hoover Dam not only filled the Boulder City Council Chambers last week, but also lined the hallway to the stairs. The meeting, called by the Nevada Department of Transportation, was in response to Senate Concurrent Resolution 60 introduced by Sen. Jon Porter, R-Clark County, during the last legislative session. SCR 60 directs NDOT to conduct feasibility studies for diverting commercial trucks, especially hazardous materials, off of Hoover Dam and away from Boulder City. Much of the discussion was a rehash of opinions, statistics and facts from a number of previous meetings. Over the years, millions of dollars have been spent studying alternative routes over dam. Porter said. *• • For more than a half-hour, Porter bombarded the audience with statistics on the safety issue of trucks carrying hazardous materials over the dam. He quoted numerous studies from various governmental agencies concerning the risk and the cost to build an alternative route. In 1968, one study estimated a bridge over the Colorado River would cost $12 million. The alternative route now is estimated to cost more than $100 million. Currently, 825 hazardous material shipments travel over the dam per week, based on the Nevada Test Site Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), 1995 October draft Transportation Study, Porter said. Frank Di Sanza, director of "I hope your idea isn't that we can't give them a bridge or a new route, give them a meeting." Neal Siniakin, resident the Nevada Operations Office for the Department of Energy, argued the numbers with Porter. He said there was an error in the study and the 825 shipments are per year, not per week. Porter responded that the EIS was not the only document quoting the 825 shipments per week of hazardous materials to the Nevada Test Site. Di Sanza countered that those shipments are not coming from the DOE. Michael Lawson, Traffic Information Systems Manager for the NDOT, said the documents Porter were quoting were not reliable. He said the state has done recent hazardous materials studies and have shown 100 trucks a day carrying hazardous materials travel over the dam. Ninety-three of those hazardous material trucks are carryingfuel, he added. Porter said there is a credibility problem with government. "This is a prime example of a lack of trust. ..My point is who do you trust, where do we turn, who can we believe?" Resident Neal Siniakin expressed frustration with the studies taking on a life of their own. "I have come to a number of these meetings over the years and they all blend together. I had hoped there would be more facts presented tonight.... 'I hope your idea isn't that we can't give them a bridge or a new route, [so] give them a meeting. And maybe they will accept meeting after meeting after meeting, in place of a bridge or a new route." Tom Stephens, director for NDOT, said finding an alternative to Hoover Dam should be put in a national perspective. The water supply and the power supply for Nevada and California are at risk if a disaster occurs over the dam. Four proposals have been introduced: • Halt all commercial truck traffic over the dam. • Prohibit only trucks carrying hazardous materials. • Prohibit Class 3 flammable materials. • Status quo, do not prohibit any commercial truck traffic. Lawson said the state can make a recommendation to remove Highway 93 from the federal highway network. But he cautioned certain criteria have to be met to comply with federal regulations. The impact of removing Highway 93 from the federal highway network would have to be considered, Lawson explained. Safety and industry issues were only two issues that need to be considered, he added. After the meeting, Lawson said he thinks the chances of removing Highway 93 from the federal highway network are slim. But he said the preliminary analysis for removinghazardous materials off Hoover Dam has some potential. 'That's the most promising of all." Another meeting on the topic will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 4, at the Henderson Convention Center. ft BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA Notice of Application md Notice of Htaring Nevada Power Company ("Nevada Power" or the "Applicil") has filed m applicatinn, designated u Doclcet No. 968010, with the Public Service CommiMian of Nevada ("Commiuion"). Nevada Power is requeiting authority from the CommLssion (o do the following: (1) enter into agrremeniA with Coconino County, Arizona Pollution Control Corporation ("Coconino") for the issuance and sale of tax-exempt Pollution Control Revenue Sccnritict (Nevada Power Company General Project) (MPCRV) in • principle amount not to exceed $20,000,000, rt aadi time and upon such condition as Applicsnt determines to be favorable to finance certain expenditures for scrubbers and related pollution control facilities at the Navajo Generating Station aa required by the EPA; (2) issue and pledge, at its option, first mortgage bonds in a like amount as collateral for the PCRBs; (3) obtain, at iU option, credit enhancemenb for the PCRBs (including bond insurance and bank letters of credit); (4) have the option to issue the PCRBs aa tax advantaged preferred securities. Nevada Power states that this financing mechanism will provide significant savings to its customers since the lower Interest charge* applicable to tax-exempt revenue securities will be reflected in the its rates for electrical service. Nevada Power is requesting an expedited order authorizing the istnaiceofthiese securities within 60 days of August 2,1996. The Commission has legal authority and jurisdiction to hold • bearing in this matter pursuant to the proviiioiw of Nevada Revised Statutes ("NRS") 704. KM) and 704.110. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Commission has scheduled a PF^BINC in Docket No. 96-8010 as follows: MONDAY. SEPTEMBER 16.1996 Public Service Commission Sawyer Building S55 E. Washington Avenue, Hearing Room B Las VegM, Nevada 89101 10:00 a.m. at which time interested persons may appear and be heard. The hearing mav priceed from day to day and, if necessary, thismatter may be continued to alime to he determined at the hearing. Pursuant to the provisions of NRS 704.322 thniugh 704.328, inclusive, the Commission will consider evidence concerning Nevada Power's application. At the hearing, the Commission may also consider other issues related to the provisions of Chapter 703 and 704 of the Nevada Revised Statutes and Nevada Administrative Code, may discuss public comments, and may make decisions on procedural itnd substantive issues raised at the hearing. The Commission may vote to approve or deny any stipulation presented by the parties, llie Commissian also m ay vote to grant or deny the application in whole or in part. The application is filrd puriuant to Chapters 703 and 704 of the Nevada Revised Statutes and the Nevada Administrative Code, ipecincally NRS 704.322 through 704.328, inclusive. The filing is available for viewing by the public at the offices of the Commission, 727 Fairview Drive, Carson City, Nevada 89710 and 555 East Washington Avenue, Suite 46O0, Las Vegas. Nevada 89101. Persons with a direct and substantial interest in the filing may file Petitions for Leave to Intervene at either nf the Commission's offices. Such Petitiims must conform to the Commissiim's regulations and must be filed on or before Wednesday. September 11.1996. Interested persons may submit Protests for filing at either of the Commission's offices. Protests must ci>nfrm to the Commission's regulations. Other written comments may also he submitted for filing. By the Commission, /s/ Clayton L. HiiLvline CLAYTON L. HOLSTINE, Commission Secretary Dated: Carson City, Nevada Auguat 19,1996 (S^L) H—Aug. 29,1996. ^M^ Tom's Sunset Sports Book's *50,000 "NO POINT" FOOTBALL CONTEST 'NFL SHOWDOWN AT SUNSET** $25 Entry Fee • The Contest Prizes will be: l''-$15,000 • 2"^-$10,000 • 3"*-$5,0O0 • Last Place $3,000 (most losers) • A total sum of $50,000 in CASH Guaranteed! Entry is limited to a maximum of two entrees. An additional FREE BONUS ENTRY will be awarded to those entrants who do enter twice. 1 Bontu entry limit per person. Entry forms & rules at Sporto Book Counter. 1/4 mile West of Boulder Hwy. 564-5551 1 wit' 444 Sunset Rd. Herxjrson GREEN VALLEY LAW OFFICE Injured...Get the settlement You Deserve...NOW • Car/ Bike/ Boat Accidents • Serious Injuries/ Deaths • Injuries to Children > Dog Bites 4013 E. Sunset Rd: • 898-9557 AUG. 30th-SEPT 1st DANCE FLOORi SO TWO-STEP yOURSELP & YOUR PARTNER INTO ^^^, TRIPLE J CASINO Wwif FOR A WEEKEND ^^ OP PUN AND ff^i 725 Race Track Rd • (Behind K-Marl on Boulder Hwy) — 5555 GOOD TIMES! BINGO BONANZA FOR SOrS OR LESS $1,000.00 CONSOLATION $100 TO WINNERl DRAWING AT 11:00 PHUUST BE PRESENT TO WIN. i^ RATING KEY ^ p ra (Walked Out) Grcal C;ood Fair Boring • ^00 r MATILDA *. I'l ~i it-t III.' /*. ROBIN WILLIAMS JACK Francis ford Coppola diI reels Robin Williams in a schizoid comedy-cumdrama that turns bland and disappointing despite the heavy-duty talent Williams does not display his manic genius in the title role of a 10year-old boy trapped in the body ol a 40-ycar-old man Actually, most ol the humor comes from real child actors The fantasy, a little tired initially, becomes overly pensive and conveys a schmaltzy seize-the-day message With Bill Cosby and Fran Drcscher (PG-13) EMMA I Projecting a modest amount nf wit and sunny [ intelligence, Jane Austen's t9th century comedy of manners is skillfully adapted for the screen Gwyncth I'altrow gives a sparkling, confident performance as the young busybody who meddles in the romantic affairs of others while neglecting her own heart A first-rate supporting cast ties a ribbon on the entertaining story set in the English countryside This Austen novel also inspired the teen comedy "Clueless'" With Toni Collette. Jeremy Northam and Cireia Scacchi (P0> Laurence Fishburnc is set to star in United Artists' "Gingsltr," an action drama that tells of the war between gangsters "Dutch" Schult/ and "Bumpy" Johnson over the numbers racket in Harlem Krvin Kline wilt .ippcar in \o\ Scaithlighl I'lcluro "Ice Storm." I he comcd) takes place unc lung uinirv nighl in ( onncclicul in the l'>7()s Kubtrl Duwnry .Jr., Sean I'rnn and ( iihy Mnriarly arc in the casi ol "HuKO P(Mil," a romantic cumcdv In be distributed by first Look Pictures I he film concerns a Beverly Hills p role in the romanln, thriller •*( riminal ( imvfriaiiin." She will ponr.iy the wile III a district attorney who gelv laught up in a dangerous situation Michael Kciloa will star in Mandalay Fnlertainmcnt's "Drtpcrilr MraMim.** Thii action thriller involves I cop who has lo free a convicted murderer and keep him alive lu save his son's lilc :,.... II Ibis uneven dark comedy I features Danny DeVito and Rhea Perlman gleefully I portraying outrageous, vulgar parents who ostraci/.e their intelligent, sweet, six-year-old daughter (Mara Wilson) But the sarcastic film, based on Roald Dahl's story, goes off the deep end and loses mipacl by presenting overly-intense nasty and cru.el incidents involving children Of course, the spunky girl turns the tables on her crass adult tormcnters, but cheap gimmicks spoil the satisfaction Pam Ferris hams It up as a monstrous school principal (PG) WALKING AND TALKING The bond between two I young women (Catherine Keener and Anne Heche) is tested as one prepares for marriage and the other deals with remaining single Keenly-observed comedy takes chances by offering a naturalistic lake on modern relationships Writer-director Nicole llolofcener infuses her characters and situations with a mild attitude i;nd result pleasant but bland (R) KEANU REEVES CHAIN REACTION HHB Physicists in Chicago are P^JH developing a revolutionary \^ >iB new energy source when ^--^B their project is sabotaged and their leader murdered A junior team member, Kcanu Reeves at his grungiest, is framed for technological espionage and is pursued by mysterious government agents led by Morgan Freeman Director Andrew Davis ("The Fugitive") serves up an entertaining series of chases and taut action sequences Rachel Weisz costars as an attractive scientist (PG13) Labor Day \l\feekend > -0 COUNTRY) -^ pANCllllALL HUI CINEDOME12 HENDERSON LUKURY THEATRE COMPLEX ^12 Luxury kuilipriums •Dtlia$ Snack hr *Bolby Shr$9 Sttmd •C//ffiof Controlhd Coishrt 'hcking Chair Loga Saatlng ^ftaa Ughtad farkiig Juit mliiutts from 6rt$n Ml$y oni teuld$( City! CAll 457-3700 gaaxMMMMXMM (Jt4ff4fN MATiattS 'Y f vr syin wiiatn ufM I tifM uiiui 4 ion uioti ?-WM :^ • • • • • • • • • • VI STARTS FRIDAY CINEDOME 12 H I \ D I R S 0 N STARTS FRIDAY 3 l[M (PG13) 1255 350 7 15 1025 HUNCHBACK OF ND(G) 12 35 300 TINCUP(PG13) 1200 2 35 5 10 7 50 1025 TIME TO KILL (R) 1 10 10 720 1010 • SHE'S THE ONE (R) 7 30 =< 55 FIRST KID (PG) 1220 2 30 J 45 7 10 9 25 • ISLAND OF M0REAU(PG13) 12 30 2 35 4 40 7% ='20 11 15 • THE STUPIDO (PG) 1250 250 455 725 930 1125 JACK (PG13) 1215 235 515 7 40 9 55 • TRIGGER EFFECT (R) 100 305 500 9 35 11 35 • A VERY BRADY SEQUEL (PG13) 1245 2 45 4 50 700 905 1100 • THE CROW: CITY OF ANGLES (PG13) 12 05 2 00 3 55 5 45 7 40 945 1140 • SaO(PG13) 600 600 100Q • CARPOOL(PG) 1210 215 4 30 • NO PASSES COUPONS on DISCOUNTS • UkTE SHCMT FRI SAT. ONLV • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 11^ JJ CPR classes offered CPR classes will be sponsored by the Henderson Parks and Recreation Department during Save-a-Life Saturday, Sept. 7. A two and one-half hour class will begin every 30 minutes beginning at8 a.m. attheKesterson Valley View Recreation Center, 500 Harris St., near Morrell Park. The fee will be $3 for individuals and $5 for families. Space is limited and pre-registration is encouraged. Knowing the important steps of rescue breathing and cardiopulmonary resuscitation can be the difference between saving and losing a life. Safety-related activities, supervised playtime and carnival games will be available for children. For more information, call 565-2121. REGISTRATION FORM UMPpi an ounom tr dSBBBBta UtII FIWlllMW ^j^^2^^5H^^2E^^B£2f2£5B22^^2^^E222!2£JJ^25i IMtHIW JM410|n JUHMfn .2J0-m fChiMwi diito i mkief, I • MIM gi>^>> g" my Mnnulon lor hiiAw ptfkMa'i In llM *M idMiH aid lor ll iiMn M • iWMHiy iMtlol In^^ tigMin ol pinit or gurtlai TOSPtaM mail ragictration to: City of Henderson Parks and Recreation Departnnent Ann: Save-A-Life Saturday. 240 Water Street, Henderson, NV 89015. THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES COMMISSION OF NEVADA NOTICE OF PETITION Nevada Power Company ("NPC), Valley Electric Asiodatktii, Inc. ("VaUey Elcctrii^'), tlie Regulatory Operation Stiff ("Stafl") oT the Public Service Comminioli of Nevada ("Commifsion"), and Lincoln Coonty Power District No. 1 ("Lincoln Power") (collectivelv, "Joint Petitioner*") have ffled a Joint pctiUon, dcrignated ai Docket No. 96-70S3, with the Comminioii. The Joint petition ariict oat of a complaint filed with the Comminiati In September 1992, by Valley Electric against NPC. The complaint concerned provision by NPC of electric service to the United States Depariment of Energy ("DOE") roriisebytheNevadaTestSiU("TestSitc")in (he certificated service area of Valley Electric This complaint was designated Docket No. 92-9055. In May 19SM, the Commissian issued m Opinion and Order in Docket No. 9^90S5, which Valley Electric anpedcd to the District Couri for Clark County, Nevada ('4)istrict Couri"). The District Couri issued a decision in August 1995, which, inter alia, vacated the Commission's Opfaiion and Order of 1994 and ordered the Commission to require NPC to cease and desist from any activity that violates a territorial agreement executed by NPC and Valley Electric in 1963 bd approved by the Commission in 1964. The Commission moved for a stay of the District Court's Order pending completion of appellate proceedings, which was denied. In February 1996, Lincoln Power advised the DOE that the electricity used in that portion of the Test Site located in Lincoln Power's service area should be purchased from Lincoln Power. In April 1996, the DOE iitformed the parties to this Katlcr of its refusal to provide the mtttrti data nccess^tvfctimnine die ge ia ya piiic hicatian of dtetrical usage wttUn the Test Site. NPC, VaHcy Electric, lincoln Power, Staff, and DOE have not been able to arrive at a mutually acceptable resolution at this matter. Accordinglv, the Joint petitioners have executed a Stipiflation, SetUement Agreement and Release ("Agreement") regarding provision of electric service to thie Test Site. On July 30,1996, the parties filed this Joint Petition with the Commission, requesting Ihat the Commission approve the agreement attached (hereto. The agreement: (a) requires NPC and Valley Electric to provide service to the Test Site tat accordance with the terms of the agreement, pending resolution of appellate proceedings, (b) requires NPC, Valley Electric, and Lincoln Power, unless modified by the parties in accordance with Paragraphs 7 and 8 of the agreement, or unless otherwiM ordered by the t^mmissian, to agree and deem that for billing purposes, the Test SHe's total hour-by-hour power and energy requirements, including the requirements met by the Test Site's allocation of federal hydro power and energy from the Western Area Power Administration ("WAPA"), are prtivided 40 percent by NPC, 40 percent by Valley Electric, and 20 percent by Lincoln Power, (c) provides that NPC shall, at iU sole discretion, schedule, dispatch, and transmit (n l(s delivery points at the Test Site's Jackass Flats and Mercury substations, all of the Test Site's total hour-by-hour power and energy requirements. At the end of each billing period, NPC sh Jl: (i) calculate iti bill for service to the Test Site based on 40 percent of the total verified metered demand and energy consumption at those delivery points hated on hourly readings for the period, minu.s (he rrsuK achieved by multiplying 40 percent times the energy and capacity the Test Site received in the affected billing period from WAPA, and (ii) promptly provide, free of charge, (he (otal verified metercd data to Valley Electric and Lincoln Power for their billing purposes in accordance with the percentages set forth hereinabove, (d) provides that NPC's rates to Valley Electric and Lincoln Power for scheduling, transmitUng, and providing supplemental power and energy services to (hem for (he delivery of power and energy to (he Test Site shall be (he applicable ra(es and charges for such services on file with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The agreement also a ddr es ses the conditions under whidi Valley Electric • ay purchase supplemental power and energy resources froM sources other than NPC, (*) provides for release and discharge in connection with d iiagti based on the geographic scope of service provided to thcTcat Site and revenues therefrom prior to tke-effective dale f the ag r ee m ent and during its term, (f) provides that the effective date of the agreement shall be the date of issuance by the Commissiaa of an Order appravingit, (g) provides that the term of the agreement shall be three year*, commencing with the elTectivc date, (h) provides that the agreement is subject to reopening, rcmgptialion, or modificalian by Order of the Commissiaa, on tl^ Com^iiasiim's own motion or otherwise, amler certain dmrnstaneci, and (i) provides that NPC's pending complaint Msimt the City af Glend^ and (he DOE, DocfcH No. 95-12021, should The Joint Petitioners aaaert that the ^rteuMnt is an interim, temporary approach to providing service to llic Test SiU daring Ms thrcc-vear tervi, pendtag a dedaioa by the Sapnmc Court of Nevada on the appeal of the District Cmnl'i Order, pomiMe legislation alowing compctitiaa Mnaag — pp M iis gf electric service for rrtaB asatsmers hi NcvM% or saMc other material ckange, in au w ri n g during Ite term, and effcctualcs coavlianoe with the DMiict Court's Oi^cr of Auguat IS, 199S, m Modified, Iddag inU MMideralion the pbysicy reaUlies of providing • cnfae la the Test Site, pendit^ a dedsion by the Nevada SarrMMCaurt. n* Jatat PctiUau wii flkd punuaut to the pravWaM af I 703 Md 704 af NRS mid NAC Md b on He and • by the puMk al ihc •ffiec* af the 1,727 P*Ticw Drive, CarMU OtT, Ncrada tS?!* Md Ike Slute Office BuMiiv. 555 Eaat WasUi^lau Avenue, SuMa 4CM, Las VcgM, Nevada Inlerertcrf Md iffected perI MM flk riuMirti pu ialwlu g to this Jalnt uctillon at ertta CauMimien's nfllccs anorbefefi TTlfclllllT CLAYTON U HOLmNE, C iM Oy, Ne va da AMHt 12,1996 LEGAL NOTICE CODE) NOTC GOLDSMrra A GUYMON, P.C Dara J. (Goldsmith, Ei. Nevada Bar No. 4270 300 South Fourth Street, Suite 1404 Las Vegaa, Nevada 89101 (702)384-1650 Attorney! for the Estate of .. Edward J. DeBartolo FILED AUG. 2310:11 AM >96 /i/ Loretto Bowman CLERK DISTRICT COURT ) CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA ) In the Matter of the Eitote of ) EDWARD J.DeBARTOLO ) Deceased. ) Case No. P 37132 Department XII Probate NOTICE OF SALE Date! September 6th, 1996 Thnei 9:30 ajn. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Ihat the undersigned, as Executrix of the Estate of Edward J. DeBartolo, deccMcd, wUI sdl at private sWe to the highcat and best bidder (net to the estote) upon the terms and canditioas hercinaAer mentioned, and snhjcct to conflimation by the above-entitled court on the 6th day of September, (or within one year Ihcrealter) at the hour of 9:30 ajn. o'dock at 200 S. Thini Street, Laa Vegas, Nevada, all right, title, faitercat and estote of said Edward J. DeBartolo, deceased, at the thne of his/her death and all right, title and faitcrcst that said estote has acquired by operation of law, or otherwiM, alher than or in addition to that of said decedent at the time of hb/her death, fai and to the real and personal property located at City of North Laa Vegas, County of Clark, Slate of Nevada, more Mrticulariy dcacribed as foBows: The Southwest Quarter (SW1/4) of the Southwest Qnaite (SW 1/4) of Section 22, Towmhip 19 South, Rnge 61 East, M.D.B. M. Bids or offers arc bivHed for said property and mast be fat writing and wfll be recdvcd at the offioc of Dara J. Goldsmith, Esq., attorney for the Executrix for said estote, 300 South Fourth Street, Suite 1404, in the aty of Laa Vegas, Nevada, 89101, or may he filed with the Clerk of said District Court, or delivered personally to said Executrix, at any time after first publication of thb notice and before makh^ said sale. Said sale wiD be made on the folhiwing terms: Cash. The Executrix of this estate reserves the right to reject any and all bids. DATED (hb 10th day of Augwt, 1996. U M. Denise DeBartolo Yoric M. Denise DeBartolo Yorii Executrix of the Estote of Edward J. DeBartolo SubmiUed by: GOLDSMITH & GUYMON, P.C Byi Dara J. GoUtanith Dara J. Goldsmith, Esq. Nevada Bar. No. 4270 300 South Fourth Street, SuHe 1404 Las Vegaa, NV 89101 Attorneys for the Estote of Edward J. DeBartolo H—Aug. 27,29, Sept 3,1996. BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE CONMlSSKm OF NEVADA NOnCF. OF PBFHRABI NG CONFRRENCK Docket Na 96-5046 b an appHcalion filed with the Public Service Commbsion of Nevada ("Couunbrion'O by Sm Cab, Inc., daii businem aa Black Can Lhuiled ("qipiicMt"). The applicant reqaeste a certificate of public convenience and necessity to provide transportotion service by Mmiinihie, carrying jMuseogcrs and their baggage, between points and places in Clarii and Nye Counliea, Nevada, an an on-cal basb over irregular routes. The a i i p lli md propoac* to transport paaacngers in Uncoin TowDcan, larger laur-uoor nuMuauies, and stretched modd Ihnousincs. The appBcanl, as Sun Cab, Inc., doii bvineas M NdNs Cah CiMpaiif, ataici that M currently operulea aa a laoricah s miw in Clarii Caunly andcr the JariadictiM of the Nevada Taxicab Authority. Parsuant lo Nevada Admi^tralive Code ("NAC) 703.655, the Cammbaion wil convene a PRBIEARING CONFERENCE m foBows: FBIDAY. SEPTEMBFJ 13.1996 10:00 aju. Pabiic Service Commission of Nevada SSS Ewt Washington Avenue, 4th Ooor LasVcgM, Nevada 89101 Hearing Room B At the prehearing conference, the presiding officer designated by tiie C LEBARON VIN JHZMC24O9PK2032S0 JA3CU2(XXLU0e9049 JT2AL31GOV03C7S32 JTiW22T8L0098S06 JT4RNS0R7EO002999 JIIMSZ7429DC127S19 RN421974 11M3I199 WVWCAM6aDWZ}4SQS 1MEBP9830GG628644 lFABP4fB6KFlll irrCRltA7SUA2S7t2 1B3BD4118EG19S734 1C3SHS8EBGN134108 IGlCUTHlGaiTinS lG4AMra7DW4742M tO4AO19GT480 lFABniR6EK3i992S lC3BCS1^2,Sl9N> REG/LEGAL AMERICAN HCNSDA/SPALDING WILLLiMS/GMF LEASING PARRK HOG AN KOVACS^ASS CARSTORE/RYFF FLORES/AUTOSWAP WEL CH BRUNETTE UNKNOWN MBSTASfflRSTSECURrrYBANK HARTUNG/FORD CREDIT TITLING iSONZALEZ UNKNOWN SANCHEZ/CAPITOL CHEVY GAKIN ODONNELL HEARNE/DONKEY MOTXHtt/LANOUE JUAREZ/NORTH CENTRAL AUTO Green Valley's own Unique W ftatun Corporate Wine Baskets, Gift Baskets for all Occasions. Wine Racks and Wine Openers Special Order Wines, upon Request OoSotnethogNice fof Your Heart MaveaGlassof RED WINE WINE TASTING DAILY Come in and Enjoy our Tasting Selections from AROUND THE WORLD This Weeks Featured Selections are from: AUSTRALIA i The Wines of Pahrump Valley Vineyards, Nevada's Premier Winery are available for Tasting and Private Lat}eling Open: Mon • Fri 11AM • 6PM Saturday10AM 3PH ^_. We will be closed Monday, Sept 2, Labor Day 693 Valle Vercic, Ste. 8 ^ 436-3710 (Just behind Thristbusters, comer of Sunset Rd. t ViHe Vwde) G let your 7th Edition Football Fanatic T-Shirt with any *20. Professional Parlay Bet on Sunday & Monday. One T-Shirt per person per bet per daj. MO>Xhter St. Downtown Heftdefion Another Fine fiord Oantin^ Property -'M 1 .wv^ • ,T^^ h

PAGE 15

pp HiV ^ • ^ wm^m Page 14 Hendarson Horn* News Thursday, August 29,1996 Thursday, August 29,1996 Henderson Home News Page 15 Hazardous material shipments discussed Roy Thaiss A three-hour meeting concerning truck traffic over Hoover Dam not only filled the Boulder City Council Chambers last week, but also lined the hallway to the stairs. The meeting, called by the Nevada Department of Transportation, was in response to Senate Concurrent Resolution 60 introduced by Sen. Jon Porter, R-Clark County, during the last legislative session. SCR 60 directs NDOT to conduct feasibility studies for diverting commercial trucks, especially hazardous materials, off of Hoover Dam and away from Boulder City. Much of the discussion was a rehash of opinions, statistics and facts from a number of previous meetings. Over the years, millions of dollars have been spent studying alternative routes over dam. Porter said. *• • For more than a half-hour, Porter bombarded the audience with statistics on the safety issue of trucks carrying hazardous materials over the dam. He quoted numerous studies from various governmental agencies concerning the risk and the cost to build an alternative route. In 1968, one study estimated a bridge over the Colorado River would cost $12 million. The alternative route now is estimated to cost more than $100 million. Currently, 825 hazardous material shipments travel over the dam per week, based on the Nevada Test Site Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), 1995 October draft Transportation Study, Porter said. Frank Di Sanza, director of "I hope your idea isn't that we can't give them a bridge or a new route, give them a meeting." Neal Siniakin, resident the Nevada Operations Office for the Department of Energy, argued the numbers with Porter. He said there was an error in the study and the 825 shipments are per year, not per week. Porter responded that the EIS was not the only document quoting the 825 shipments per week of hazardous materials to the Nevada Test Site. Di Sanza countered that those shipments are not coming from the DOE. Michael Lawson, Traffic Information Systems Manager for the NDOT, said the documents Porter were quoting were not reliable. He said the state has done recent hazardous materials studies and have shown 100 trucks a day carrying hazardous materials travel over the dam. Ninety-three of those hazardous material trucks are carryingfuel, he added. Porter said there is a credibility problem with government. "This is a prime example of a lack of trust. ..My point is who do you trust, where do we turn, who can we believe?" Resident Neal Siniakin expressed frustration with the studies taking on a life of their own. "I have come to a number of these meetings over the years and they all blend together. I had hoped there would be more facts presented tonight.... 'I hope your idea isn't that we can't give them a bridge or a new route, [so] give them a meeting. And maybe they will accept meeting after meeting after meeting, in place of a bridge or a new route." Tom Stephens, director for NDOT, said finding an alternative to Hoover Dam should be put in a national perspective. The water supply and the power supply for Nevada and California are at risk if a disaster occurs over the dam. Four proposals have been introduced: • Halt all commercial truck traffic over the dam. • Prohibit only trucks carrying hazardous materials. • Prohibit Class 3 flammable materials. • Status quo, do not prohibit any commercial truck traffic. Lawson said the state can make a recommendation to remove Highway 93 from the federal highway network. But he cautioned certain criteria have to be met to comply with federal regulations. The impact of removing Highway 93 from the federal highway network would have to be considered, Lawson explained. Safety and industry issues were only two issues that need to be considered, he added. After the meeting, Lawson said he thinks the chances of removing Highway 93 from the federal highway network are slim. But he said the preliminary analysis for removinghazardous materials off Hoover Dam has some potential. 'That's the most promising of all." Another meeting on the topic will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 4, at the Henderson Convention Center. ft BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA Notice of Application md Notice of Htaring Nevada Power Company ("Nevada Power" or the "Applicil") has filed m applicatinn, designated u Doclcet No. 968010, with the Public Service CommiMian of Nevada ("Commiuion"). Nevada Power is requeiting authority from the CommLssion (o do the following: (1) enter into agrremeniA with Coconino County, Arizona Pollution Control Corporation ("Coconino") for the issuance and sale of tax-exempt Pollution Control Revenue Sccnritict (Nevada Power Company General Project) (MPCRV) in • principle amount not to exceed $20,000,000, rt aadi time and upon such condition as Applicsnt determines to be favorable to finance certain expenditures for scrubbers and related pollution control facilities at the Navajo Generating Station aa required by the EPA; (2) issue and pledge, at its option, first mortgage bonds in a like amount as collateral for the PCRBs; (3) obtain, at iU option, credit enhancemenb for the PCRBs (including bond insurance and bank letters of credit); (4) have the option to issue the PCRBs aa tax advantaged preferred securities. Nevada Power states that this financing mechanism will provide significant savings to its customers since the lower Interest charge* applicable to tax-exempt revenue securities will be reflected in the its rates for electrical service. Nevada Power is requesting an expedited order authorizing the istnaiceofthiese securities within 60 days of August 2,1996. The Commission has legal authority and jurisdiction to hold • bearing in this matter pursuant to the proviiioiw of Nevada Revised Statutes ("NRS") 704. KM) and 704.110. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Commission has scheduled a PF^BINC in Docket No. 96-8010 as follows: MONDAY. SEPTEMBER 16.1996 Public Service Commission Sawyer Building S55 E. Washington Avenue, Hearing Room B Las VegM, Nevada 89101 10:00 a.m. at which time interested persons may appear and be heard. The hearing mav priceed from day to day and, if necessary, thismatter may be continued to alime to he determined at the hearing. Pursuant to the provisions of NRS 704.322 thniugh 704.328, inclusive, the Commission will consider evidence concerning Nevada Power's application. At the hearing, the Commission may also consider other issues related to the provisions of Chapter 703 and 704 of the Nevada Revised Statutes and Nevada Administrative Code, may discuss public comments, and may make decisions on procedural itnd substantive issues raised at the hearing. The Commission may vote to approve or deny any stipulation presented by the parties, llie Commissian also m ay vote to grant or deny the application in whole or in part. The application is filrd puriuant to Chapters 703 and 704 of the Nevada Revised Statutes and the Nevada Administrative Code, ipecincally NRS 704.322 through 704.328, inclusive. The filing is available for viewing by the public at the offices of the Commission, 727 Fairview Drive, Carson City, Nevada 89710 and 555 East Washington Avenue, Suite 46O0, Las Vegas. Nevada 89101. Persons with a direct and substantial interest in the filing may file Petitions for Leave to Intervene at either nf the Commission's offices. Such Petitiims must conform to the Commissiim's regulations and must be filed on or before Wednesday. September 11.1996. Interested persons may submit Protests for filing at either of the Commission's offices. Protests must ci>nfrm to the Commission's regulations. Other written comments may also he submitted for filing. By the Commission, /s/ Clayton L. HiiLvline CLAYTON L. HOLSTINE, Commission Secretary Dated: Carson City, Nevada Auguat 19,1996 (S^L) H—Aug. 29,1996. ^M^ Tom's Sunset Sports Book's *50,000 "NO POINT" FOOTBALL CONTEST 'NFL SHOWDOWN AT SUNSET** $25 Entry Fee • The Contest Prizes will be: l''-$15,000 • 2"^-$10,000 • 3"*-$5,0O0 • Last Place $3,000 (most losers) • A total sum of $50,000 in CASH Guaranteed! Entry is limited to a maximum of two entrees. An additional FREE BONUS ENTRY will be awarded to those entrants who do enter twice. 1 Bontu entry limit per person. Entry forms & rules at Sporto Book Counter. 1/4 mile West of Boulder Hwy. 564-5551 1 wit' 444 Sunset Rd. Herxjrson GREEN VALLEY LAW OFFICE Injured...Get the settlement You Deserve...NOW • Car/ Bike/ Boat Accidents • Serious Injuries/ Deaths • Injuries to Children > Dog Bites 4013 E. Sunset Rd: • 898-9557 AUG. 30th-SEPT 1st DANCE FLOORi SO TWO-STEP yOURSELP & YOUR PARTNER INTO ^^^, TRIPLE J CASINO Wwif FOR A WEEKEND ^^ OP PUN AND ff^i 725 Race Track Rd • (Behind K-Marl on Boulder Hwy) — 5555 GOOD TIMES! BINGO BONANZA FOR SOrS OR LESS $1,000.00 CONSOLATION $100 TO WINNERl DRAWING AT 11:00 PHUUST BE PRESENT TO WIN. i^ RATING KEY ^ p ra (Walked Out) Grcal C;ood Fair Boring • ^00 r MATILDA *. I'l ~i it-t III.' /*. ROBIN WILLIAMS JACK Francis ford Coppola diI reels Robin Williams in a schizoid comedy-cumdrama that turns bland and disappointing despite the heavy-duty talent Williams does not display his manic genius in the title role of a 10year-old boy trapped in the body ol a 40-ycar-old man Actually, most ol the humor comes from real child actors The fantasy, a little tired initially, becomes overly pensive and conveys a schmaltzy seize-the-day message With Bill Cosby and Fran Drcscher (PG-13) EMMA I Projecting a modest amount nf wit and sunny [ intelligence, Jane Austen's t9th century comedy of manners is skillfully adapted for the screen Gwyncth I'altrow gives a sparkling, confident performance as the young busybody who meddles in the romantic affairs of others while neglecting her own heart A first-rate supporting cast ties a ribbon on the entertaining story set in the English countryside This Austen novel also inspired the teen comedy "Clueless'" With Toni Collette. Jeremy Northam and Cireia Scacchi (P0> Laurence Fishburnc is set to star in United Artists' "Gingsltr," an action drama that tells of the war between gangsters "Dutch" Schult/ and "Bumpy" Johnson over the numbers racket in Harlem Krvin Kline wilt .ippcar in \o\ Scaithlighl I'lcluro "Ice Storm." I he comcd) takes place unc lung uinirv nighl in ( onncclicul in the l'>7()s Kubtrl Duwnry .Jr., Sean I'rnn and ( iihy Mnriarly arc in the casi ol "HuKO P(Mil," a romantic cumcdv In be distributed by first Look Pictures I he film concerns a Beverly Hills p role in the romanln, thriller •*( riminal ( imvfriaiiin." She will ponr.iy the wile III a district attorney who gelv laught up in a dangerous situation Michael Kciloa will star in Mandalay Fnlertainmcnt's "Drtpcrilr MraMim.** Thii action thriller involves I cop who has lo free a convicted murderer and keep him alive lu save his son's lilc :,.... II Ibis uneven dark comedy I features Danny DeVito and Rhea Perlman gleefully I portraying outrageous, vulgar parents who ostraci/.e their intelligent, sweet, six-year-old daughter (Mara Wilson) But the sarcastic film, based on Roald Dahl's story, goes off the deep end and loses mipacl by presenting overly-intense nasty and cru.el incidents involving children Of course, the spunky girl turns the tables on her crass adult tormcnters, but cheap gimmicks spoil the satisfaction Pam Ferris hams It up as a monstrous school principal (PG) WALKING AND TALKING The bond between two I young women (Catherine Keener and Anne Heche) is tested as one prepares for marriage and the other deals with remaining single Keenly-observed comedy takes chances by offering a naturalistic lake on modern relationships Writer-director Nicole llolofcener infuses her characters and situations with a mild attitude i;nd result pleasant but bland (R) KEANU REEVES CHAIN REACTION HHB Physicists in Chicago are P^JH developing a revolutionary \^ >iB new energy source when ^--^B their project is sabotaged and their leader murdered A junior team member, Kcanu Reeves at his grungiest, is framed for technological espionage and is pursued by mysterious government agents led by Morgan Freeman Director Andrew Davis ("The Fugitive") serves up an entertaining series of chases and taut action sequences Rachel Weisz costars as an attractive scientist (PG13) Labor Day \l\feekend > -0 COUNTRY) -^ pANCllllALL HUI CINEDOME12 HENDERSON LUKURY THEATRE COMPLEX ^12 Luxury kuilipriums •Dtlia$ Snack hr *Bolby Shr$9 Sttmd •C//ffiof Controlhd Coishrt 'hcking Chair Loga Saatlng ^ftaa Ughtad farkiig Juit mliiutts from 6rt$n Ml$y oni teuld$( City! CAll 457-3700 gaaxMMMMXMM (Jt4ff4fN MATiattS 'Y f vr syin wiiatn ufM I tifM uiiui 4 ion uioti ?-WM :^ • • • • • • • • • • VI STARTS FRIDAY CINEDOME 12 H I \ D I R S 0 N STARTS FRIDAY 3 l[M (PG13) 1255 350 7 15 1025 HUNCHBACK OF ND(G) 12 35 300 TINCUP(PG13) 1200 2 35 5 10 7 50 1025 TIME TO KILL (R) 1 10 10 720 1010 • SHE'S THE ONE (R) 7 30 =< 55 FIRST KID (PG) 1220 2 30 J 45 7 10 9 25 • ISLAND OF M0REAU(PG13) 12 30 2 35 4 40 7% ='20 11 15 • THE STUPIDO (PG) 1250 250 455 725 930 1125 JACK (PG13) 1215 235 515 7 40 9 55 • TRIGGER EFFECT (R) 100 305 500 9 35 11 35 • A VERY BRADY SEQUEL (PG13) 1245 2 45 4 50 700 905 1100 • THE CROW: CITY OF ANGLES (PG13) 12 05 2 00 3 55 5 45 7 40 945 1140 • SaO(PG13) 600 600 100Q • CARPOOL(PG) 1210 215 4 30 • NO PASSES COUPONS on DISCOUNTS • UkTE SHCMT FRI SAT. ONLV • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 11^ JJ CPR classes offered CPR classes will be sponsored by the Henderson Parks and Recreation Department during Save-a-Life Saturday, Sept. 7. A two and one-half hour class will begin every 30 minutes beginning at8 a.m. attheKesterson Valley View Recreation Center, 500 Harris St., near Morrell Park. The fee will be $3 for individuals and $5 for families. Space is limited and pre-registration is encouraged. Knowing the important steps of rescue breathing and cardiopulmonary resuscitation can be the difference between saving and losing a life. Safety-related activities, supervised playtime and carnival games will be available for children. For more information, call 565-2121. REGISTRATION FORM UMPpi an ounom tr dSBBBBta UtII FIWlllMW ^j^^2^^5H^^2E^^B£2f2£5B22^^2^^E222!2£JJ^25i IMtHIW JM410|n JUHMfn .2J0-m fChiMwi diito i mkief, I • MIM gi>^>> g" my Mnnulon lor hiiAw ptfkMa'i In llM *M idMiH aid lor ll iiMn M • iWMHiy iMtlol In^^ tigMin ol pinit or gurtlai TOSPtaM mail ragictration to: City of Henderson Parks and Recreation Departnnent Ann: Save-A-Life Saturday. 240 Water Street, Henderson, NV 89015. THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES COMMISSION OF NEVADA NOTICE OF PETITION Nevada Power Company ("NPC), Valley Electric Asiodatktii, Inc. ("VaUey Elcctrii^'), tlie Regulatory Operation Stiff ("Stafl") oT the Public Service Comminioli of Nevada ("Commifsion"), and Lincoln Coonty Power District No. 1 ("Lincoln Power") (collectivelv, "Joint Petitioner*") have ffled a Joint pctiUon, dcrignated ai Docket No. 96-70S3, with the Comminioii. The Joint petition ariict oat of a complaint filed with the Comminiati In September 1992, by Valley Electric against NPC. The complaint concerned provision by NPC of electric service to the United States Depariment of Energy ("DOE") roriisebytheNevadaTestSiU("TestSitc")in (he certificated service area of Valley Electric This complaint was designated Docket No. 92-9055. In May 19SM, the Commissian issued m Opinion and Order in Docket No. 9^90S5, which Valley Electric anpedcd to the District Couri for Clark County, Nevada ('4)istrict Couri"). The District Couri issued a decision in August 1995, which, inter alia, vacated the Commission's Opfaiion and Order of 1994 and ordered the Commission to require NPC to cease and desist from any activity that violates a territorial agreement executed by NPC and Valley Electric in 1963 bd approved by the Commission in 1964. The Commission moved for a stay of the District Court's Order pending completion of appellate proceedings, which was denied. In February 1996, Lincoln Power advised the DOE that the electricity used in that portion of the Test Site located in Lincoln Power's service area should be purchased from Lincoln Power. In April 1996, the DOE iitformed the parties to this Katlcr of its refusal to provide the mtttrti data nccess^tvfctimnine die ge ia ya piiic hicatian of dtetrical usage wttUn the Test Site. NPC, VaHcy Electric, lincoln Power, Staff, and DOE have not been able to arrive at a mutually acceptable resolution at this matter. Accordinglv, the Joint petitioners have executed a Stipiflation, SetUement Agreement and Release ("Agreement") regarding provision of electric service to thie Test Site. On July 30,1996, the parties filed this Joint Petition with the Commission, requesting Ihat the Commission approve the agreement attached (hereto. The agreement: (a) requires NPC and Valley Electric to provide service to the Test Site tat accordance with the terms of the agreement, pending resolution of appellate proceedings, (b) requires NPC, Valley Electric, and Lincoln Power, unless modified by the parties in accordance with Paragraphs 7 and 8 of the agreement, or unless otherwiM ordered by the t^mmissian, to agree and deem that for billing purposes, the Test SHe's total hour-by-hour power and energy requirements, including the requirements met by the Test Site's allocation of federal hydro power and energy from the Western Area Power Administration ("WAPA"), are prtivided 40 percent by NPC, 40 percent by Valley Electric, and 20 percent by Lincoln Power, (c) provides that NPC shall, at iU sole discretion, schedule, dispatch, and transmit (n l(s delivery points at the Test Site's Jackass Flats and Mercury substations, all of the Test Site's total hour-by-hour power and energy requirements. At the end of each billing period, NPC sh Jl: (i) calculate iti bill for service to the Test Site based on 40 percent of the total verified metered demand and energy consumption at those delivery points hated on hourly readings for the period, minu.s (he rrsuK achieved by multiplying 40 percent times the energy and capacity the Test Site received in the affected billing period from WAPA, and (ii) promptly provide, free of charge, (he (otal verified metercd data to Valley Electric and Lincoln Power for their billing purposes in accordance with the percentages set forth hereinabove, (d) provides that NPC's rates to Valley Electric and Lincoln Power for scheduling, transmitUng, and providing supplemental power and energy services to (hem for (he delivery of power and energy to (he Test Site shall be (he applicable ra(es and charges for such services on file with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The agreement also a ddr es ses the conditions under whidi Valley Electric • ay purchase supplemental power and energy resources froM sources other than NPC, (*) provides for release and discharge in connection with d iiagti based on the geographic scope of service provided to thcTcat Site and revenues therefrom prior to tke-effective dale f the ag r ee m ent and during its term, (f) provides that the effective date of the agreement shall be the date of issuance by the Commissiaa of an Order appravingit, (g) provides that the term of the agreement shall be three year*, commencing with the elTectivc date, (h) provides that the agreement is subject to reopening, rcmgptialion, or modificalian by Order of the Commissiaa, on tl^ Com^iiasiim's own motion or otherwise, amler certain dmrnstaneci, and (i) provides that NPC's pending complaint Msimt the City af Glend^ and (he DOE, DocfcH No. 95-12021, should The Joint Petitioners aaaert that the ^rteuMnt is an interim, temporary approach to providing service to llic Test SiU daring Ms thrcc-vear tervi, pendtag a dedaioa by the Sapnmc Court of Nevada on the appeal of the District Cmnl'i Order, pomiMe legislation alowing compctitiaa Mnaag — pp M iis gf electric service for rrtaB asatsmers hi NcvM% or saMc other material ckange, in au w ri n g during Ite term, and effcctualcs coavlianoe with the DMiict Court's Oi^cr of Auguat IS, 199S, m Modified, Iddag inU MMideralion the pbysicy reaUlies of providing • cnfae la the Test Site, pendit^ a dedsion by the Nevada SarrMMCaurt. n* Jatat PctiUau wii flkd punuaut to the pravWaM af I 703 Md 704 af NRS mid NAC Md b on He and • by the puMk al ihc •ffiec* af the 1,727 P*Ticw Drive, CarMU OtT, Ncrada tS?!* Md Ike Slute Office BuMiiv. 555 Eaat WasUi^lau Avenue, SuMa 4CM, Las VcgM, Nevada Inlerertcrf Md iffected perI MM flk riuMirti pu ialwlu g to this Jalnt uctillon at ertta CauMimien's nfllccs anorbefefi TTlfclllllT CLAYTON U HOLmNE, C iM Oy, Ne va da AMHt 12,1996 LEGAL NOTICE CODE) NOTC GOLDSMrra A GUYMON, P.C Dara J. (Goldsmith, Ei. Nevada Bar No. 4270 300 South Fourth Street, Suite 1404 Las Vegaa, Nevada 89101 (702)384-1650 Attorney! for the Estate of .. Edward J. DeBartolo FILED AUG. 2310:11 AM >96 /i/ Loretto Bowman CLERK DISTRICT COURT ) CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA ) In the Matter of the Eitote of ) EDWARD J.DeBARTOLO ) Deceased. ) Case No. P 37132 Department XII Probate NOTICE OF SALE Date! September 6th, 1996 Thnei 9:30 ajn. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Ihat the undersigned, as Executrix of the Estate of Edward J. DeBartolo, deccMcd, wUI sdl at private sWe to the highcat and best bidder (net to the estote) upon the terms and canditioas hercinaAer mentioned, and snhjcct to conflimation by the above-entitled court on the 6th day of September, (or within one year Ihcrealter) at the hour of 9:30 ajn. o'dock at 200 S. Thini Street, Laa Vegas, Nevada, all right, title, faitercat and estote of said Edward J. DeBartolo, deceased, at the thne of his/her death and all right, title and faitcrcst that said estote has acquired by operation of law, or otherwiM, alher than or in addition to that of said decedent at the time of hb/her death, fai and to the real and personal property located at City of North Laa Vegas, County of Clark, Slate of Nevada, more Mrticulariy dcacribed as foBows: The Southwest Quarter (SW1/4) of the Southwest Qnaite (SW 1/4) of Section 22, Towmhip 19 South, Rnge 61 East, M.D.B. M. Bids or offers arc bivHed for said property and mast be fat writing and wfll be recdvcd at the offioc of Dara J. Goldsmith, Esq., attorney for the Executrix for said estote, 300 South Fourth Street, Suite 1404, in the aty of Laa Vegas, Nevada, 89101, or may he filed with the Clerk of said District Court, or delivered personally to said Executrix, at any time after first publication of thb notice and before makh^ said sale. Said sale wiD be made on the folhiwing terms: Cash. The Executrix of this estate reserves the right to reject any and all bids. DATED (hb 10th day of Augwt, 1996. U M. Denise DeBartolo Yoric M. Denise DeBartolo Yorii Executrix of the Estote of Edward J. DeBartolo SubmiUed by: GOLDSMITH & GUYMON, P.C Byi Dara J. GoUtanith Dara J. Goldsmith, Esq. Nevada Bar. No. 4270 300 South Fourth Street, SuHe 1404 Las Vegaa, NV 89101 Attorneys for the Estote of Edward J. DeBartolo H—Aug. 27,29, Sept 3,1996. BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE CONMlSSKm OF NEVADA NOnCF. OF PBFHRABI NG CONFRRENCK Docket Na 96-5046 b an appHcalion filed with the Public Service Commbsion of Nevada ("Couunbrion'O by Sm Cab, Inc., daii businem aa Black Can Lhuiled ("qipiicMt"). The applicant reqaeste a certificate of public convenience and necessity to provide transportotion service by Mmiinihie, carrying jMuseogcrs and their baggage, between points and places in Clarii and Nye Counliea, Nevada, an an on-cal basb over irregular routes. The a i i p lli md propoac* to transport paaacngers in Uncoin TowDcan, larger laur-uoor nuMuauies, and stretched modd Ihnousincs. The appBcanl, as Sun Cab, Inc., doii bvineas M NdNs Cah CiMpaiif, ataici that M currently operulea aa a laoricah s miw in Clarii Caunly andcr the JariadictiM of the Nevada Taxicab Authority. Parsuant lo Nevada Admi^tralive Code ("NAC) 703.655, the Cammbaion wil convene a PRBIEARING CONFERENCE m foBows: FBIDAY. SEPTEMBFJ 13.1996 10:00 aju. Pabiic Service Commission of Nevada SSS Ewt Washington Avenue, 4th Ooor LasVcgM, Nevada 89101 Hearing Room B At the prehearing conference, the presiding officer designated by tiie C LEBARON VIN JHZMC24O9PK2032S0 JA3CU2(XXLU0e9049 JT2AL31GOV03C7S32 JTiW22T8L0098S06 JT4RNS0R7EO002999 JIIMSZ7429DC127S19 RN421974 11M3I199 WVWCAM6aDWZ}4SQS 1MEBP9830GG628644 lFABP4fB6KFlll irrCRltA7SUA2S7t2 1B3BD4118EG19S734 1C3SHS8EBGN134108 IGlCUTHlGaiTinS lG4AMra7DW4742M tO4AO19GT480 lFABniR6EK3i992S lC3BCS1^2,Sl9N> REG/LEGAL AMERICAN HCNSDA/SPALDING WILLLiMS/GMF LEASING PARRK HOG AN KOVACS^ASS CARSTORE/RYFF FLORES/AUTOSWAP WEL CH BRUNETTE UNKNOWN MBSTASfflRSTSECURrrYBANK HARTUNG/FORD CREDIT TITLING iSONZALEZ UNKNOWN SANCHEZ/CAPITOL CHEVY GAKIN ODONNELL HEARNE/DONKEY MOTXHtt/LANOUE JUAREZ/NORTH CENTRAL AUTO Green Valley's own Unique W ftatun Corporate Wine Baskets, Gift Baskets for all Occasions. Wine Racks and Wine Openers Special Order Wines, upon Request OoSotnethogNice fof Your Heart MaveaGlassof RED WINE WINE TASTING DAILY Come in and Enjoy our Tasting Selections from AROUND THE WORLD This Weeks Featured Selections are from: AUSTRALIA i The Wines of Pahrump Valley Vineyards, Nevada's Premier Winery are available for Tasting and Private Lat}eling Open: Mon • Fri 11AM • 6PM Saturday10AM 3PH ^_. We will be closed Monday, Sept 2, Labor Day 693 Valle Vercic, Ste. 8 ^ 436-3710 (Just behind Thristbusters, comer of Sunset Rd. t ViHe Vwde) G let your 7th Edition Football Fanatic T-Shirt with any *20. Professional Parlay Bet on Sunday & Monday. One T-Shirt per person per bet per daj. MO>Xhter St. Downtown Heftdefion Another Fine fiord Oantin^ Property -'M 1 .wv^ • ,T^^ h

PAGE 16

mmmmmmtmt — "p^^r^iw^^^^pi^ • • -' ilW-iPl ^Pi^B^^^i^P^^^i^"^"^^^^^"^^^ ^^^^^^^^^•iW^i^^^^ ^^i^^^^^^^^^^^^^^F^^ Page 16 llandarson Home News Thursday, August 29,1996 Thursday, August 29,1996 Henderson Horn* Naws Panel? • I AM MbwiBf locatMNMi ai]pHal,MOWa PUBUSHi AMHI 19M HOMENEWS It Witoei to y, AasMt IS, 19N IIE^a>EltSON ITaterSlrtct r ScrricM FaditT, 223 Lid Stmt I Valcy Ubranr. 2797 GnM Vaaqr PM^WW ayi' aid GMi> CM, IMS MaMr Drive CMMMrit7CllcrofSMilkeniNTada,BiMiMA,700CalcMlMva AGENDA TacMby, Stptoiibcr 3, 199t AGENDA fTEMS BECHVro ABTfcBi.30 RM. ON AUGUST 11.19M WILL NOT BE SEEN ON THE ACRNDA AS WmUSHm. WIIT MAY APPEAt QN THE AGENPA AS ADDED ITEMS QB ADDENDA. COMMIITEE MEETING COUNCIL CHAMBER HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL 240 WATER STREET NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITJ^ M w fcrrt rfthe pMIc who are When a gronp of dtiiena h prtacnt to fpcak on an iton, a ipokeiper*on ihall be adccted by the troop to addrcei the CoancU. S. EachprnaUaabyMchniake*pcraonihdlbeifaaitcdtatcn(10)mhNtei. C Anyone tnm a gronp aiay be reoogniied if they have MMnelldng new or additional iirforaution to add to an itcni. 7. Sach additional presentation ikafl be Haiited to flve (5) adnatcs. S. Individnab malong presentations on ittnu not a part of a dtiitn'i groap ibal be Mmitod to five (S) Minutes, f. Al rcmailu ikril be addressed to the Coond as a whole and not to sny BMmber diereoT. 10. NoperMmotherthanmanbcnofthcConndlandthcpcrsanhavingthcfloorshallbe pcnnitted to enter into any discnssion, eitlwr directly or through a member of the CoancS, wltiMiot pennission of the Mayor (Presidhig Officer). II. No i|acstion may be aifced a Conndlmember or member of CHy staff without the peniission of the Mayor (Presidtaig Officer). 12. Once the qacsiion h called for or a pabUc bearing ii cloMd, no person in the audience ahai address the Conndl on the matter without flrst securing peraiiuion to do so by a maiority vole of the Coancfl. 13. EXHIBITSi Anyone wiiMng to rabmit ExhibiU for the record on any project or item on the Agenda ihall be required to provide lhcCityClcrkvrilhseven(7) copies of the \ EshibitorExliihi(s;aiicforthertcordandacopyroreachofthefoarCoiiiicibncmlMrs, the Mayor and the City Attorney. 14. STATEMENTS FOR THE RECORD) Anyone wishkit to mahe a statement for the record ihalinnt state their naMe and addresi and say! *fwish the record to show" and then proceed very dearly to nuke the statement into the microphotK. 15. STATEMENT TO BE READ INTO THE RECORDi Anyone wMihig to read a statement faito the record ihal provide the City Clerh witii a written copy of the statcmrnt for the recoH. The fatdividaal shall Uicn identify themselves by stating their name and addrcas hito the microphone and then proceed to read thdr statement IC THE CITY COUNCIL IS A LEGISLATIVE, GOVERNING AND POLICY MAKING BODY: Ihc aty Coancil is not a Judicial body. Ihcrefore, only hifonnation rdalhig to items before the Coancil for actions each SB approvals, denials, appeah to polde% proccdans or ordinance requirements should be presented. The Minutes •crvc M Council's record of actions. L CALL TO ORDER n. CONFIRMATION OF POSTING ULROLLCALL IV. ACCEPTANCE OF AGENDA V. ITEMS OF BUSINESS C-1 BILL NO. 1332 • GAMING ORDINANCE AMENDMENTS AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITV OF HENDERSON REPEALING HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE CHAPTER 4.32 'GAMBLING REGULATIONS AND LICENSES' IN ITS ENTIRETY AND ADOPTING A NEW CHAPTER 4J2TOTHE HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE ENTITLED 'GAMBLING REGULATIONS AND LICENSES,' AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. C-2 MLL Na 1333 Z-3746 PROPERTY HOLDINGS CORPORATION AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHINTHE CITY LIMITS OFTHE CITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE <3 EAST, M.D.B. A M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RS-2 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTLiL) DISTRICT TO CN-MP (NEIGHBORHOOD COMMERCIAL WITH MASTER PLAN DEVELOPMENT OVERLAY) DISTRICT, LOCATEDATTHENORTHSIDEOFAHORIZONDRIVEBETWEENBLACKRIDGE ROAD AND CANYON ROAD, IN THE BLACK MOUNTAIN PLANNING AREA, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO. C-3 NO. 1334 • EMPLOYEE REGISTRATION CARDS AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, TO AMEND ILM.C. CHAPTER 4.44 BY ELIMINATING PROVISIONS ALLOWING ISSUANCEOFATEMPORARYWORKCARD(EMPLOYEEREGISTRATIONCARD), DELETING THEREQUIREMENTSTHATMINORS UNDER THEAGEOFEIGHTEEN OBTAIN A LETTER FROM THE CLARK COUNTY JUVENILE DEPARTMENT, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. VL ADJOURNMENT Pasted) Wednesday, August 2S, 1996 altha Mfowhig kKStions) Hal. 240 Wa aty Hal,: l^ater Street EmcrgMcy Scrrkcs Facility, 223 Lead Street GnmiVdley ~ The Mayor r ts err es the right to hear a gen d a items out of order. PUBLISH) Augwt 29,1996 HENDERSON HOME NEWS ley Ubrary, 2797 Green VaUcy Parkway Hmdmm Bop' mi Girib' CUb, IMS Moscr Mn My CU of Sonthcn Nevada, BuiMing A, 700 Colcr Drive AGENDA Tacsday, September 3,19M 7.-O0pja. Ar.RwnA rrFJVLS HECEIVKD AFTER IIHW P.M. ON AljflUST 21 l>g6 V will. NOT BESEEN ON THE AGENDA AS PUBLLSHKD. BUT MAY AiPEAB ON THE AGFJWDA AS ADDFJ) ITEMS OR ADDENDA. REGULAR MEETING COUNCIL CHAMBER HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL < 240 WATER STREET NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES M im brti of the public vrho are d fa abl td or require ipedsl sssistsnce or accoBMUodatlons at the moetiiM mv leqaested ta notify the City Qerii by tdepbonhig (702) S65-20S7 at least aavsaty^wo boan b advMMO of the meeting. NOlXi ALL ITEMS ARE ACTION m^fS UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED. LCALLTOORDER n. CONFIRMATION OF POSTING m. ROLL CALL, INVOCATION, PLEDGE OF ALLEGUNCE IV. ACCEPTANCE or AGENDA PRPERSONNELEMPLOYEE DEDICATION AND SERVICE AWARD SEPTEMBER, 19N Prssiidatisn EaplMrcc Dcdkation and Service AwaH Montii of September, 1996, to Robert D. Writers, Flite Caolaln, fire Departmeirt. PRCOMMENDATION -TOM HARMON fiMiulatlan Is Twa HmmMi fsr Wi didiratiim mid str-IrT 1IhT T—' *-r' -~* Girts'Chib. VL CONSENT AGENDA UNLESS AN ITEM IS PULLED FOR DISCUSSION, COUNCIL WILL TAKE ACTION ON CONSENT AGENDA ITEM N06. ADD THROUGH ADD WFTH ONE MOIION, ACCEPTING THE RECOMMENDATIONS AS STATED ON THE AGENDA. TO PULL AN ITEM FOR DISCUSSION, PLEASE NOTIFY THE CITY CLERK BY PRESENTING A YELLOW SIGN-UP CARD BEFORE COUNOL TAKES ACTION ON THE CONSENT AGENDA. YEIXOW SIGN^JP CARDS ARE AVAILABLE AT THE BACK OF THE COUNCH. CHAMBERS AN D AT T HE PODIUM. CAMINUTES-COMMnTEE AND REGULAR MEETINGS OF AUGUST 20,1996 CA-SILVER CANYON PARTNERSHIP REIMBURSEMENT OF ACQUISITION COSTS Ln>T-10 PROJECT ADP W14a Approve payawnt to Silver Csmon Partnership for rdmbarsement of acquisition costo rdatin to Local Improvement District T-10, Project ADP W14a. CASILVER CANYON PARTNERSHIP REIMBURSEMENT OF ACQUISITION COSTS LID T-10 PROJECT ADP TRS-2 Approve payiMnt to Silver Canyon Partnership for rdmbarsement of acqaisUon cosU t^af^ to Local faaprovement District T-10, Project ADP TRS-2. CA-AWARD OF BID BID Na 102-96*97 ...,..,., MOTOROLA 16-CHANNELVHF ^v II :>';:^ • : PORTABLE RADIOS AwaH of BM No. 10^96•97 for MotoroU 16-Channel VHF PMtable Radios. CA-PAVEMENT CUT REQUEST SOUTHWEST GAS MARY CREST ROAD EAST OF GALLAGHER CREST ROAD Pavement cut at Mary Crest Road, east of Gaagher Crtat Road, for the purpose of hHtaUng a gm service. CA-PAVEMENT CUT REQUEST SOUTHWEST GAS GIBSON ROAD BETWEEN WARM SPRINGS AND AMERICAN PACIFIC DRIVE Pavement cut at Gibson Road betweesi Warm Sprinp and American Pacific Drive, for the purpose of installing a gm service. CAREVOCABLE PERMITRETAINING WAU, ST. THOMAS MORE CATHOLIC CHURCH Revocable permit for a rctsinfaig wal on CHy property (Pcoos-Legacy Park). CA-REVOCABLE PERMIT BLACK MOUNTAIN VISTAS L. BRUCE NYBO, INC Revocable permM to alow petitioner to construct landscape improvements in the medisn Uand and ahwg each ddc of Horiion Rhfee Parkway, along eadi ride of Paseo Verde Drive and withhi the cul-de-sac buBi hi Black Mountafai Drive. CAVARUNCE HENDERSON MUNICIPAL C(M)E TTFLE15. CHAPTER 15,18 PAGEANTRY COMPANIES Varimiceof tile Henderson Munidpd Code TItie 15, Chspter 15.18 for dM relocation of one ^B^INESS LICENSE BLUE MOON BAR ADDITIONAL TEMPORARY CLOSURE TRYLONE, INC Request for additional 120-day temporary closure of tavern for Bhw Moon Bar & Griu, Hendenon, Nevada. (Third Request for Temporary Ckisure). CABUSINESS LICENSE • ANGEL'S TOUCH KATHLEEN FEGAN BushMH License for Mass^e Therapist for Katiilecn Fegan, dbat Angel's Touch, 2563 Wigwaa Puiway, Hendenon, Nevada, 89014. CA-BUSINESS LICENSE • SAM-PAN RESTAURANT JMNRONGLU „ „ BusfaNM Liceme for ResUuranI Liquor License for Jian Rong La, SamPan Restaursnt, 1418 West Pacific Avenue, Hendenon, Nevada, 89015. CA-BUSINESS LICENSE CIRCLE K K-CAL VENTURES „ „. ^ „ Busfaiess License for Package Uquor Retail Outiet for K-Cal Ventures, dbst Cirde K, 100 S. BouMcr Highway, Henderson, Nevada, 89015. ^ PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDATIONS OF AUGUST 22,1996) CARIGHT.OF-WAYROW.42.96 APPLICANT) MERIDL^N HOMES Acceptance of a 10 foot drainage and public utlHty easement on Lot 34, Block 1, of Canyon Country Unit 3, in the nortiwast quarter of Section 29, Township 22 SouU^ Rsnge 63 East, hi tiie Highland HlHs planning area. CARIGHT-OF-WAYROW-43-96 APPUCANT) MERIDUN HOMES Acceptance of a 10 foot drsinage and public UtlHty easement on Lot 35, Block 1, of Canyon Coanti^ Unit 3, In tiie northeast quarter of Section 29, Township 22 South, Rsnge 63 East, hi tiie Highland HiUi Dlannfaig area. CARIGHT-OF-WAYROW-44-96 APPLICANT) ALBERT AND NANCY HARVICK Acceptance of a portion of Arabisn Drive, In the north hsif of tiie south west quarter of tiic northeast quarter of Uie noitiieaat qaartcr of Section 27, Township 22 Sou^^ Range 63 East, in the River Moantsin planning area. CARIGHT-OF-WAYROW.45-9i6 APPLICANT) MINNIE DOBBINS Acceptance of a portion of Atiiens Avenue, Orleans Street, and Berlin Avenue, taiduding spandrels, in tiie west hrif of the northeast quarter of the northeast quarter of tiM northeast quarter of Section 4, Towmhlp 22 South, Range 63 East, hi tiie FootiilBs plannfaig area. CARIGHT-OF-WAYROW-46.96 APPLICANT) THOMAS HOLDER Acceptance of a portion of Atiwns Avenue snd Magic Way, indadfaig spssidrds, hi the east hrif of the northemt quarter of UM northeast quarter of tiie northeast qaarter of Section 4, Townahip 22 Souti^ Range 63 East, in tiie FootiaUs plamfaig area. CARIGHT4)F-WAYROW.47-96 APPLICANT) MARK AND LISA BULLEN Acceptance of a portion of Tumble weed Drive, bi the north half of the soutiicast quarter of tiie southemt quarter of the soutiieast quarter of Section 27, Township 22 South, Range 63 East, in the River Mountain planning area. CAEXTENSION OF TIME ZONE CHANGE-Z-51-94 LUCKY STARS HOTEL AND CASINO APPLICANT: GILBERT AND ROSALINDA STRANGE Review of a ledasdHcation request fhan RS-6 (Sbigle FamUy Residential) district to CC (Commuidty Coaunerdal) district and approval of a Master Development Plan Overiay District on 13 J acres, hicaled at tiieaoutiMast comer of West Lake Mead Drive snd Eastera Avenue, hn the Green Valley South pianning area. CATENTATIVE MAPTM-41-96 SUNRIDGELOT21 APPUCANT) TS.G. DEVELOPMENT GROUP LLC Review of a residential subdivision comistliv of 82 fete on 17J acres, witii a dendty of 4.7 dwdUng anits per acre, generally located In tiie Mad)onald Ranch plannfaig area. CAEXTENSION OF TIME TENTATIVE MAP-TM.56-95 GALLEIUA COMMONS APPLICANT) OPUS SOUTHWEST CORP. Review of a commercial subdivision consisting of one lot on 347 acres, fecated at tiic northeast comer of Wann Spriis Road and Stephanie Street, hi the WMIney Ranch CA^m'nSSION OF TIME PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT AND TENTATIVE MAPPUDirrM-31-95 SUNRIDGE AT MACDONALD RANCH APPLICANT: SUNRIDGE DEVELOPMENT CO. Review of a nsidcntial sabdivision consisting of 225 kto on 16a6 acres, witii a density of 1.5 dwdHng unite per acre, gencraly located hi tiie Mad)onald Ranch planning area. CA-a. USE PER^fIT U-81-% CA4i. ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW AR-157-96 TONY ROMA'S SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT APPUCANT) ROMACORP, INCORPORATED Request for a proposed sapper dab rcstaarsnt hi the Stephanie Street shopphig cmter, generally located on tiM west side of Stephmie StrtH and north of Warm SpringsRoad, In tiie Whitney Randi plannfaig area. CA-VARIANCE V.35.96 APPLICANT: ROBERT AND DLiNE LEWIS Reqaest to redace adnfanum frontage to 96.5 feet where 100 feH is reqaired snd to reduce mfaifanusn lot rise fhau .34 acre to J6S acre, hicatcd at 1011 Havre A venue, fai the FooUiills CTHJIMSED UNIT DEVELOPMENT AND TENTATIVE MAPPUiyrM-62-96 PARCEL 21 AT LAKE LAS VEGAS APPUCANT) LAKE AT LAS VEGAS Review of 40 hits on 16 acres, witii a dendty of 2J dwdlng anMs per acre, hicatcd west of Gnmd Mcditerra Boale vard on die SoutiiShoK of Lake L Vegaa, in the Lake Las Vegm CA-PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT AND TENTATIVE MAP PUIVTM-63-96 GREEN VALLEY RANCH PARCEL 48A APPUCANT) GREEN VALLEY DEVELOPMENT LP Review of a residential aubdividon cowMng of 226 hite on 16J acres, witii a density of 134 dwdHng unite per acre, located at Uw aoatheast comer of Lahe Mead Drive snd Pasco Verde Parkway, hi tiw Green Valley Ranch piamdngarea. CAPLANNO) UNrr DEVELOPMENT AND TENTATIVE MAPPUDn'M.64-96 GREEN VALLEY RANCH PARCEL 48B APPUCANT) GREEN VALLEY DEVELOPMIWT LP Review of a residential sdbdiridon cainistii^ of 106 lots on 18.0 acres, witii a density of 5.9 dweOfa^ mdte per acre, located at fkt soutiiwest earner of Paseo Verde Pariiway and Carnegie Road, in tiw Green Valey Randi VILPUBr > Md Rclar Mcetti^ af Anast 20,199. CAAGREEMENTUSE OFRBCLAIMED WAlXR FOOTHILLS AT MACDONALD SANCH Agraament far UM sT Reddasd water • FaalhaB at MacDonaM Ranch CAAGREEMENTHOME IMPROVEMENT PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM (HOME) —Ml taaaeHmne I n viatm t P M t m isW p sPlegrmn (HOME) IbndabHwewi City State af Nevada. JCA-PERSONNEL Cmr CLERK RKVISB CLASS SPECIflCATION DIPVnr CITY CLERK I A p pravrisf fi iWiaefelMi g idiia H snlsr Deputy City OattL CA-PERSONNEL • FINANCE CLASS SPECinCATlON AND WAGE ASSIGNMENT • usmnB ucE^BE AUDTTOR Afpreval of dma MdBestiam Md wage aadMMal I CA* APPORTIONMENT REPORT Jk FINAL AMB8MENTROLL AMKWMENTNaa UDT-l •ftii IfMtFarUDT CA-AI ROLL AMBiNMKrrrNad UDT4a lNa.< K Lie HEARINGS PHPUBUC HEARING VACATION-VAC-21-96 APPUCANT) GIBSON RANCH LLC Request to vacate partlaw af right.W-way along Stephasde Street, American PadHc Drive, mJ^baoa RoaJTlB tk, Gftaan Springs ptanriag area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENIKDENUL) PH-PUBLIC HEARING VACATION-VAC.22-96 APPUCANT) PULTE HOMES Reqncal to vacate cmcMento for read and atiHty pwpeacs hi Grsan Valey Ranch, Pared 32, In ttK Green Vdfey R^di a lm m h i g area. (PLANNING COMMISSION ftSCOhMENDS APPROVAL) PHPUBUC HEARING VACATION-VAC-2M6 APPUCANT: AMERICAN NEVADA CORPORATION Reaaaat to vac^ amnawda for read ^d atiBty parpeess hi Grasa VaUev Ranch, Pared a^todM Greta Vdcy RMHI .1 i area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDS APPROVAL) PHPUBLIC HEARING COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENTCPA-2MS AWIJCAWT. DICK BUCK COMPA NY .>, ,,.,..^.... -~ -^. to aBaad Iht ind am Itaai Caanaaaly aad NslghhanMaa saappam M u^ P*, SB 2.4 acrsB, fSBsraiy laealad sail rf MaaetoiB VIda Stnjtani iyhm aaalh of Rma^AvsaaCtolkCMVafcy Nat* plaamh area (PLANN^ COMMBSION RECOMMENDS APPROVAL) PHRESOLUTION CPA-23-91 DICK BUCK COhlPANY A RESOLUtlONOFTHECrrY COUNCILOFTIiECmrOFHEI>a)ERSON,NEVADA, TO AMEND THE LAND USE POLICY PLAN' OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FOR THE PURPOSE OF CHANGING THE LAND USE DESIGNATION OF CERTAIN PROPERTY WTTHIN THE CITY LIMTTS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON DESCRIBED AS A PARCEL OF LAND CONTAINING 2.4 ACRES, MORE OR LESS, AND DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 21 SOUTH, RANGE 62 EAST, MJ).M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM COMMUNTTY AND NEIGHBORHOOD SHOPPING TO LIGHT INDUSTRY/ BUSINESS PARK, LOCATED EAST OF MOUNTAIN VISTA STREET AND LYING SOUTH OF RAMROD AVENUE, IN THE GREEN VALLEY NORTH PLANNING AREA. PH-ZONE CHANGE Z-46-96 APPLICANT: DICK BLICK COMPANY ...... Review of a redmdflcation request from CC (Commanity Commercial) district to IL (Limited Industry) district on 2.4 acres 1 in tiie Green VaDey North planning area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDS APPROVAL BY ORDINANCE) VIIL CmZEN'S CONCERNS IX. UNFINISHED BUSIN r'?^ UBAPPOINTMENT. HENj >( RSON PLANNING COMMISSION WARD IV One Mayond appofaitmeni m the Henderson Plannfaig Commbshm for Ward IV. (CONTINUED FRoSfAUGUST 20,1996) „„.„„^„c UBHENDERSON CONVENTION CENTER ADVISORY BOARD OF DIRECTORSTHREE VACANCIES Three mipointmente to the Convention Center Board of Dlrecton: Two appofaitments fkom Ward H, and one lypointmmt ft-om Ward IV, for tiie terms to expire July 31,1998. (CONTINUED FROM AUGUST 20,1996) UB-MAYORAL APPOINTMENT ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION „. • • Mayoral Appofaitment to tiie Economic Development Commission. (CONTINUED FROM AUGUST So, 1996) UBZONE CHANGE Z-47-96 USE PERMITU-76-96 UBDAY CARE CENTER, GASOLINE SALES, AND PACKAGED BEER AND WINE SALES UBARCHTTECTURAL REVIEW AR-150-96 HORIZON COMMERCUL CENTER APPLICANT: P.R.EVPHILLIPREGESKI,P.E. ...._, Review of a redasdlkation request tWan RS.2 (Single Family Residential) district to CN (Neighborhood Commercial) district; request for a day care center, convenience market witii gasoUnc sales, ssid pack^ed beer and wfaw sales and wdver of distance requirement for liquor sales adjacent to a day care center; and request for archltecturd review for a proposed conveidence market and a nroposed day care facllKy, generally located at the northeast comer of Horizon Ridge Paricway and Camrgle Street, bi tiie Green VaBey Ranch plnnkig area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDS APPROVAL OF ALL APPLICATIONS CONTINUED FROM THE AUGUST 20,1996, CITY COUNCIL MEETING) UBRESOLUTION ZONE CHANGE-Z-47-96 HORIZON COMMERCL\L CENTER A RESOLUTION OF THE CFFY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON COMMITTING THE CITY COUNCIL TO REZONE CERTAIN PROPERTY WITHIN THE CTTY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 62 EAST, M.D.B. & M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RS-2 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL) TO CN (NEIGHBORHOOD COMMERCUL) LOCATED AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF HORIZON RIDGE PARKWAY AND CARNEGIE STREET, INTHE GREEN VALLEY RANCH PLANNING AREA. (CONTINUED FROM THE AUGUST 20, 1996, CFTY COUNCIL MEETING) UB-a. USE PERMIT-U-69-96 "^ UB*. ARCHITECTURAL REVIEWAR-I3I-96 APPLICANT) CAMCO, INC, dba SUPERPAWN Request for use permit spproval for pawn shop and check crashing service; and review of a proposed pawn shop and check^ashlng service located at 1100 West Sunset Road, in the Whitney Ranch plannfaig area, (CONTINUED FROM JULY 2, 1996 FORWARDED WTTH NO PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDATION) UBBILL NO. 1332 GAMING ORDINANCE AMENDMENTS AN ORDINANCE OF THE CFTY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON REPEALING HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE CHAPTER 4J2 'GAMBLING • REGULATIONS AND LICENSES' IN ITS ENTIRETY AND ADOPTING A NEW CHAPTER4J2TOTHE HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE ENTITLED 'GAMBLING REGULATIONS AND LICENSES,' AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. (HNAL ACTION) UBBILL NO. 1333 Z-36.96 PROPERTY HOLDINGS CORPORATION AN ORDINANCE OF THE CFTY COUNCIL OF THE CFTY OF HENDERSON AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHIN THECTTY LIMITS OFTHECITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH,RANGE 63 EAST, M.D.B. & M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM R&2 (SINGLTTAMILY IESIDENTIAL) DISTRICTTO CN-MP (NEIGHmMHtKlD COMMERCIAL WFTH MASTER PLAN DEVELOPMENT OVERLAY) DISTRICT! LOCATEDATTHENORTHSIDEOFAHORIZONDRIVEBETWEENBLACKRIDGE ROAD AND CANYON ROAD, IN THE BLACK MOUNTAIN PLANNING AREA, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO. (ONAL ACTION) UB-BILL NO. 1334 EMPLOYEE REGISTRATION CARDS AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, TO AMEND H.M.C. CHAPTER 4.44 BY ELIMINATING PROVISIONS ALLOWING ISSUANCEOFATEMPORARY WORK CARD(EMPLOYEE REGISTRATION CARD), DELETING THEREQUIREMENTSTHATMINORS UNDER THEAGEOFEIGHTEEN OBTAIN A LETTER FROM THE CLARK COUNTY JUVENILE DEPARTMENT, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. (HNAL ACTION) X. NEW BUSINESS NB-BILL NO. 1335 ZONE CHANGE Z-46-96 DICK BLICK COMPANY AN ORDINANCE OF THE CFTY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OFTHE CITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 21 SOUTH, RANGE 62 EAST, MD.B. A M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM CC (COMMUNFFY COMMERCIAL) TO IL (LIMITED INDUSTRY), LOCATED IN THE GREEN VALLEY NORTH PLANNING AREA, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO. (REFER TO COMMITTEE MEETING OF SEPTEMBER 17,1996) NB-RESOLUTION ZONE CHANGE Z-51-94 LUCKY STARS HOTEL A CASINO A RESOLUTION OF THE CFTY COUNCIL OF THE CTTY OF HENDERSON COMMFTTING THE CFTY COUNCIL TO REZONE CERTAIN PROPERTY WITHIN THE CFTY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 61 EAST, M.D.B. A M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RS-6 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTLiL) DISTRICT TO CC (COMMUNmr COMMERCL^D DISTRICT. NBARCHTTECTURAL REVIEWAR-140-96 CASINO U-HAUL APPLICANT: U-HAUL Request for carelaken quarten; and review of a truck rental facility on 1.2 acres, located at 936 North BouMer Highway, fai Uie PHtman plannb area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDS DENIAL) XL SET MEETING XH. ADJOURNMENT ACENDA DEADLINE __ „ AO Hems for bKliulon on the Council Agenda for the Meeting of September 17, 1996, must be submitted, in writing, no later then Thursday, September 5,1996 at 5:30 pjn. to tiie CHy Clerk's office. Any items received sfter the above date will automatically be placed on the not CHy Coancil Agenda. H—Aug. 29.1996. LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA NOTICE OF APPLICATION El D filed ai application, drniKiulrd o.^ Docket No. 96-7006, with the F^Mic Service Conimi.WleedtheO>terilnte Fi l

PAGE 17

mmmmmmtmt — "p^^r^iw^^^^pi^ • • -' ilW-iPl ^Pi^B^^^i^P^^^i^"^"^^^^^"^^^ ^^^^^^^^^•iW^i^^^^ ^^i^^^^^^^^^^^^^^F^^ Page 16 llandarson Home News Thursday, August 29,1996 Thursday, August 29,1996 Henderson Horn* Naws Panel? • I AM MbwiBf locatMNMi ai]pHal,MOWa PUBUSHi AMHI 19M HOMENEWS It Witoei to y, AasMt IS, 19N IIE^a>EltSON ITaterSlrtct r ScrricM FaditT, 223 Lid Stmt I Valcy Ubranr. 2797 GnM Vaaqr PM^WW ayi' aid GMi> CM, IMS MaMr Drive CMMMrit7CllcrofSMilkeniNTada,BiMiMA,700CalcMlMva AGENDA TacMby, Stptoiibcr 3, 199t AGENDA fTEMS BECHVro ABTfcBi.30 RM. ON AUGUST 11.19M WILL NOT BE SEEN ON THE ACRNDA AS WmUSHm. WIIT MAY APPEAt QN THE AGENPA AS ADDED ITEMS QB ADDENDA. COMMIITEE MEETING COUNCIL CHAMBER HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL 240 WATER STREET NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITJ^ M w fcrrt rfthe pMIc who are When a gronp of dtiiena h prtacnt to fpcak on an iton, a ipokeiper*on ihall be adccted by the troop to addrcei the CoancU. S. EachprnaUaabyMchniake*pcraonihdlbeifaaitcdtatcn(10)mhNtei. C Anyone tnm a gronp aiay be reoogniied if they have MMnelldng new or additional iirforaution to add to an itcni. 7. Sach additional presentation ikafl be Haiited to flve (5) adnatcs. S. Individnab malong presentations on ittnu not a part of a dtiitn'i groap ibal be Mmitod to five (S) Minutes, f. Al rcmailu ikril be addressed to the Coond as a whole and not to sny BMmber diereoT. 10. NoperMmotherthanmanbcnofthcConndlandthcpcrsanhavingthcfloorshallbe pcnnitted to enter into any discnssion, eitlwr directly or through a member of the CoancS, wltiMiot pennission of the Mayor (Presidhig Officer). II. No i|acstion may be aifced a Conndlmember or member of CHy staff without the peniission of the Mayor (Presidtaig Officer). 12. Once the qacsiion h called for or a pabUc bearing ii cloMd, no person in the audience ahai address the Conndl on the matter without flrst securing peraiiuion to do so by a maiority vole of the Coancfl. 13. EXHIBITSi Anyone wiiMng to rabmit ExhibiU for the record on any project or item on the Agenda ihall be required to provide lhcCityClcrkvrilhseven(7) copies of the \ EshibitorExliihi(s;aiicforthertcordandacopyroreachofthefoarCoiiiicibncmlMrs, the Mayor and the City Attorney. 14. STATEMENTS FOR THE RECORD) Anyone wishkit to mahe a statement for the record ihalinnt state their naMe and addresi and say! *fwish the record to show" and then proceed very dearly to nuke the statement into the microphotK. 15. STATEMENT TO BE READ INTO THE RECORDi Anyone wMihig to read a statement faito the record ihal provide the City Clerh witii a written copy of the statcmrnt for the recoH. The fatdividaal shall Uicn identify themselves by stating their name and addrcas hito the microphone and then proceed to read thdr statement IC THE CITY COUNCIL IS A LEGISLATIVE, GOVERNING AND POLICY MAKING BODY: Ihc aty Coancil is not a Judicial body. Ihcrefore, only hifonnation rdalhig to items before the Coancil for actions each SB approvals, denials, appeah to polde% proccdans or ordinance requirements should be presented. The Minutes •crvc M Council's record of actions. L CALL TO ORDER n. CONFIRMATION OF POSTING ULROLLCALL IV. ACCEPTANCE OF AGENDA V. ITEMS OF BUSINESS C-1 BILL NO. 1332 • GAMING ORDINANCE AMENDMENTS AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITV OF HENDERSON REPEALING HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE CHAPTER 4.32 'GAMBLING REGULATIONS AND LICENSES' IN ITS ENTIRETY AND ADOPTING A NEW CHAPTER 4J2TOTHE HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE ENTITLED 'GAMBLING REGULATIONS AND LICENSES,' AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. C-2 MLL Na 1333 Z-3746 PROPERTY HOLDINGS CORPORATION AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHINTHE CITY LIMITS OFTHE CITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE <3 EAST, M.D.B. A M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RS-2 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTLiL) DISTRICT TO CN-MP (NEIGHBORHOOD COMMERCIAL WITH MASTER PLAN DEVELOPMENT OVERLAY) DISTRICT, LOCATEDATTHENORTHSIDEOFAHORIZONDRIVEBETWEENBLACKRIDGE ROAD AND CANYON ROAD, IN THE BLACK MOUNTAIN PLANNING AREA, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO. C-3 NO. 1334 • EMPLOYEE REGISTRATION CARDS AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, TO AMEND ILM.C. CHAPTER 4.44 BY ELIMINATING PROVISIONS ALLOWING ISSUANCEOFATEMPORARYWORKCARD(EMPLOYEEREGISTRATIONCARD), DELETING THEREQUIREMENTSTHATMINORS UNDER THEAGEOFEIGHTEEN OBTAIN A LETTER FROM THE CLARK COUNTY JUVENILE DEPARTMENT, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. VL ADJOURNMENT Pasted) Wednesday, August 2S, 1996 altha Mfowhig kKStions) Hal. 240 Wa aty Hal,: l^ater Street EmcrgMcy Scrrkcs Facility, 223 Lead Street GnmiVdley ~ The Mayor r ts err es the right to hear a gen d a items out of order. PUBLISH) Augwt 29,1996 HENDERSON HOME NEWS ley Ubrary, 2797 Green VaUcy Parkway Hmdmm Bop' mi Girib' CUb, IMS Moscr Mn My CU of Sonthcn Nevada, BuiMing A, 700 Colcr Drive AGENDA Tacsday, September 3,19M 7.-O0pja. Ar.RwnA rrFJVLS HECEIVKD AFTER IIHW P.M. ON AljflUST 21 l>g6 V will. NOT BESEEN ON THE AGENDA AS PUBLLSHKD. BUT MAY AiPEAB ON THE AGFJWDA AS ADDFJ) ITEMS OR ADDENDA. REGULAR MEETING COUNCIL CHAMBER HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL < 240 WATER STREET NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES M im brti of the public vrho are d fa abl td or require ipedsl sssistsnce or accoBMUodatlons at the moetiiM mv leqaested ta notify the City Qerii by tdepbonhig (702) S65-20S7 at least aavsaty^wo boan b advMMO of the meeting. NOlXi ALL ITEMS ARE ACTION m^fS UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED. LCALLTOORDER n. CONFIRMATION OF POSTING m. ROLL CALL, INVOCATION, PLEDGE OF ALLEGUNCE IV. ACCEPTANCE or AGENDA PRPERSONNELEMPLOYEE DEDICATION AND SERVICE AWARD SEPTEMBER, 19N Prssiidatisn EaplMrcc Dcdkation and Service AwaH Montii of September, 1996, to Robert D. Writers, Flite Caolaln, fire Departmeirt. PRCOMMENDATION -TOM HARMON fiMiulatlan Is Twa HmmMi fsr Wi didiratiim mid str-IrT 1IhT T—' *-r' -~* Girts'Chib. VL CONSENT AGENDA UNLESS AN ITEM IS PULLED FOR DISCUSSION, COUNCIL WILL TAKE ACTION ON CONSENT AGENDA ITEM N06. ADD THROUGH ADD WFTH ONE MOIION, ACCEPTING THE RECOMMENDATIONS AS STATED ON THE AGENDA. TO PULL AN ITEM FOR DISCUSSION, PLEASE NOTIFY THE CITY CLERK BY PRESENTING A YELLOW SIGN-UP CARD BEFORE COUNOL TAKES ACTION ON THE CONSENT AGENDA. YEIXOW SIGN^JP CARDS ARE AVAILABLE AT THE BACK OF THE COUNCH. CHAMBERS AN D AT T HE PODIUM. CAMINUTES-COMMnTEE AND REGULAR MEETINGS OF AUGUST 20,1996 CA-SILVER CANYON PARTNERSHIP REIMBURSEMENT OF ACQUISITION COSTS Ln>T-10 PROJECT ADP W14a Approve payawnt to Silver Csmon Partnership for rdmbarsement of acquisition costo rdatin to Local Improvement District T-10, Project ADP W14a. CASILVER CANYON PARTNERSHIP REIMBURSEMENT OF ACQUISITION COSTS LID T-10 PROJECT ADP TRS-2 Approve payiMnt to Silver Canyon Partnership for rdmbarsement of acqaisUon cosU t^af^ to Local faaprovement District T-10, Project ADP TRS-2. CA-AWARD OF BID BID Na 102-96*97 ...,..,., MOTOROLA 16-CHANNELVHF ^v II :>';:^ • : PORTABLE RADIOS AwaH of BM No. 10^96•97 for MotoroU 16-Channel VHF PMtable Radios. CA-PAVEMENT CUT REQUEST SOUTHWEST GAS MARY CREST ROAD EAST OF GALLAGHER CREST ROAD Pavement cut at Mary Crest Road, east of Gaagher Crtat Road, for the purpose of hHtaUng a gm service. CA-PAVEMENT CUT REQUEST SOUTHWEST GAS GIBSON ROAD BETWEEN WARM SPRINGS AND AMERICAN PACIFIC DRIVE Pavement cut at Gibson Road betweesi Warm Sprinp and American Pacific Drive, for the purpose of installing a gm service. CAREVOCABLE PERMITRETAINING WAU, ST. THOMAS MORE CATHOLIC CHURCH Revocable permit for a rctsinfaig wal on CHy property (Pcoos-Legacy Park). CA-REVOCABLE PERMIT BLACK MOUNTAIN VISTAS L. BRUCE NYBO, INC Revocable permM to alow petitioner to construct landscape improvements in the medisn Uand and ahwg each ddc of Horiion Rhfee Parkway, along eadi ride of Paseo Verde Drive and withhi the cul-de-sac buBi hi Black Mountafai Drive. CAVARUNCE HENDERSON MUNICIPAL C(M)E TTFLE15. CHAPTER 15,18 PAGEANTRY COMPANIES Varimiceof tile Henderson Munidpd Code TItie 15, Chspter 15.18 for dM relocation of one ^B^INESS LICENSE BLUE MOON BAR ADDITIONAL TEMPORARY CLOSURE TRYLONE, INC Request for additional 120-day temporary closure of tavern for Bhw Moon Bar & Griu, Hendenon, Nevada. (Third Request for Temporary Ckisure). CABUSINESS LICENSE • ANGEL'S TOUCH KATHLEEN FEGAN BushMH License for Mass^e Therapist for Katiilecn Fegan, dbat Angel's Touch, 2563 Wigwaa Puiway, Hendenon, Nevada, 89014. CA-BUSINESS LICENSE • SAM-PAN RESTAURANT JMNRONGLU „ „ BusfaNM Liceme for ResUuranI Liquor License for Jian Rong La, SamPan Restaursnt, 1418 West Pacific Avenue, Hendenon, Nevada, 89015. CA-BUSINESS LICENSE CIRCLE K K-CAL VENTURES „ „. ^ „ Busfaiess License for Package Uquor Retail Outiet for K-Cal Ventures, dbst Cirde K, 100 S. BouMcr Highway, Henderson, Nevada, 89015. ^ PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDATIONS OF AUGUST 22,1996) CARIGHT.OF-WAYROW.42.96 APPLICANT) MERIDL^N HOMES Acceptance of a 10 foot drainage and public utlHty easement on Lot 34, Block 1, of Canyon Country Unit 3, in the nortiwast quarter of Section 29, Township 22 SouU^ Rsnge 63 East, hi tiie Highland HlHs planning area. CARIGHT-OF-WAYROW-43-96 APPUCANT) MERIDUN HOMES Acceptance of a 10 foot drsinage and public UtlHty easement on Lot 35, Block 1, of Canyon Coanti^ Unit 3, In tiie northeast quarter of Section 29, Township 22 South, Rsnge 63 East, hi tiie Highland HiUi Dlannfaig area. CARIGHT-OF-WAYROW-44-96 APPLICANT) ALBERT AND NANCY HARVICK Acceptance of a portion of Arabisn Drive, In the north hsif of tiie south west quarter of tiic northeast quarter of Uie noitiieaat qaartcr of Section 27, Township 22 Sou^^ Range 63 East, in the River Moantsin planning area. CARIGHT-OF-WAYROW.45-9i6 APPLICANT) MINNIE DOBBINS Acceptance of a portion of Atiiens Avenue, Orleans Street, and Berlin Avenue, taiduding spandrels, in tiie west hrif of the northeast quarter of the northeast quarter of tiM northeast quarter of Section 4, Towmhlp 22 South, Range 63 East, hi tiie FootiilBs plannfaig area. CARIGHT-OF-WAYROW-46.96 APPLICANT) THOMAS HOLDER Acceptance of a portion of Atiwns Avenue snd Magic Way, indadfaig spssidrds, hi the east hrif of the northemt quarter of UM northeast quarter of tiie northeast qaarter of Section 4, Townahip 22 Souti^ Range 63 East, in tiie FootiaUs plamfaig area. CARIGHT4)F-WAYROW.47-96 APPLICANT) MARK AND LISA BULLEN Acceptance of a portion of Tumble weed Drive, bi the north half of the soutiicast quarter of tiie southemt quarter of the soutiieast quarter of Section 27, Township 22 South, Range 63 East, in the River Mountain planning area. CAEXTENSION OF TIME ZONE CHANGE-Z-51-94 LUCKY STARS HOTEL AND CASINO APPLICANT: GILBERT AND ROSALINDA STRANGE Review of a ledasdHcation request fhan RS-6 (Sbigle FamUy Residential) district to CC (Commuidty Coaunerdal) district and approval of a Master Development Plan Overiay District on 13 J acres, hicaled at tiieaoutiMast comer of West Lake Mead Drive snd Eastera Avenue, hn the Green Valley South pianning area. CATENTATIVE MAPTM-41-96 SUNRIDGELOT21 APPUCANT) TS.G. DEVELOPMENT GROUP LLC Review of a residential subdivision comistliv of 82 fete on 17J acres, witii a dendty of 4.7 dwdUng anits per acre, generally located In tiie Mad)onald Ranch plannfaig area. CAEXTENSION OF TIME TENTATIVE MAP-TM.56-95 GALLEIUA COMMONS APPLICANT) OPUS SOUTHWEST CORP. Review of a commercial subdivision consisting of one lot on 347 acres, fecated at tiic northeast comer of Wann Spriis Road and Stephanie Street, hi the WMIney Ranch CA^m'nSSION OF TIME PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT AND TENTATIVE MAPPUDirrM-31-95 SUNRIDGE AT MACDONALD RANCH APPLICANT: SUNRIDGE DEVELOPMENT CO. Review of a nsidcntial sabdivision consisting of 225 kto on 16a6 acres, witii a density of 1.5 dwdHng unite per acre, gencraly located hi tiie Mad)onald Ranch planning area. CA-a. USE PER^fIT U-81-% CA4i. ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW AR-157-96 TONY ROMA'S SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT APPUCANT) ROMACORP, INCORPORATED Request for a proposed sapper dab rcstaarsnt hi the Stephanie Street shopphig cmter, generally located on tiM west side of Stephmie StrtH and north of Warm SpringsRoad, In tiie Whitney Randi plannfaig area. CA-VARIANCE V.35.96 APPLICANT: ROBERT AND DLiNE LEWIS Reqaest to redace adnfanum frontage to 96.5 feet where 100 feH is reqaired snd to reduce mfaifanusn lot rise fhau .34 acre to J6S acre, hicatcd at 1011 Havre A venue, fai the FooUiills CTHJIMSED UNIT DEVELOPMENT AND TENTATIVE MAPPUiyrM-62-96 PARCEL 21 AT LAKE LAS VEGAS APPUCANT) LAKE AT LAS VEGAS Review of 40 hits on 16 acres, witii a dendty of 2J dwdlng anMs per acre, hicatcd west of Gnmd Mcditerra Boale vard on die SoutiiShoK of Lake L Vegaa, in the Lake Las Vegm CA-PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT AND TENTATIVE MAP PUIVTM-63-96 GREEN VALLEY RANCH PARCEL 48A APPUCANT) GREEN VALLEY DEVELOPMENT LP Review of a residential aubdividon cowMng of 226 hite on 16J acres, witii a density of 134 dwdHng unite per acre, located at Uw aoatheast comer of Lahe Mead Drive snd Pasco Verde Parkway, hi tiw Green Valley Ranch piamdngarea. CAPLANNO) UNrr DEVELOPMENT AND TENTATIVE MAPPUDn'M.64-96 GREEN VALLEY RANCH PARCEL 48B APPUCANT) GREEN VALLEY DEVELOPMIWT LP Review of a residential sdbdiridon cainistii^ of 106 lots on 18.0 acres, witii a density of 5.9 dweOfa^ mdte per acre, located at fkt soutiiwest earner of Paseo Verde Pariiway and Carnegie Road, in tiw Green Valey Randi VILPUBr > Md Rclar Mcetti^ af Anast 20,199. CAAGREEMENTUSE OFRBCLAIMED WAlXR FOOTHILLS AT MACDONALD SANCH Agraament far UM sT Reddasd water • FaalhaB at MacDonaM Ranch CAAGREEMENTHOME IMPROVEMENT PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM (HOME) —Ml taaaeHmne I n viatm t P M t m isW p sPlegrmn (HOME) IbndabHwewi City State af Nevada. JCA-PERSONNEL Cmr CLERK RKVISB CLASS SPECIflCATION DIPVnr CITY CLERK I A p pravrisf fi iWiaefelMi g idiia H snlsr Deputy City OattL CA-PERSONNEL • FINANCE CLASS SPECinCATlON AND WAGE ASSIGNMENT • usmnB ucE^BE AUDTTOR Afpreval of dma MdBestiam Md wage aadMMal I CA* APPORTIONMENT REPORT Jk FINAL AMB8MENTROLL AMKWMENTNaa UDT-l •ftii IfMtFarUDT CA-AI ROLL AMBiNMKrrrNad UDT4a lNa.< K Lie HEARINGS PHPUBUC HEARING VACATION-VAC-21-96 APPUCANT) GIBSON RANCH LLC Request to vacate partlaw af right.W-way along Stephasde Street, American PadHc Drive, mJ^baoa RoaJTlB tk, Gftaan Springs ptanriag area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENIKDENUL) PH-PUBLIC HEARING VACATION-VAC.22-96 APPUCANT) PULTE HOMES Reqncal to vacate cmcMento for read and atiHty pwpeacs hi Grsan Valey Ranch, Pared 32, In ttK Green Vdfey R^di a lm m h i g area. (PLANNING COMMISSION ftSCOhMENDS APPROVAL) PHPUBUC HEARING VACATION-VAC-2M6 APPUCANT: AMERICAN NEVADA CORPORATION Reaaaat to vac^ amnawda for read ^d atiBty parpeess hi Grasa VaUev Ranch, Pared a^todM Greta Vdcy RMHI .1 i area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDS APPROVAL) PHPUBLIC HEARING COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENTCPA-2MS AWIJCAWT. DICK BUCK COMPA NY .>, ,,.,..^.... -~ -^. to aBaad Iht ind am Itaai Caanaaaly aad NslghhanMaa saappam M u^ P*, SB 2.4 acrsB, fSBsraiy laealad sail rf MaaetoiB VIda Stnjtani iyhm aaalh of Rma^AvsaaCtolkCMVafcy Nat* plaamh area (PLANN^ COMMBSION RECOMMENDS APPROVAL) PHRESOLUTION CPA-23-91 DICK BUCK COhlPANY A RESOLUtlONOFTHECrrY COUNCILOFTIiECmrOFHEI>a)ERSON,NEVADA, TO AMEND THE LAND USE POLICY PLAN' OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FOR THE PURPOSE OF CHANGING THE LAND USE DESIGNATION OF CERTAIN PROPERTY WTTHIN THE CITY LIMTTS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON DESCRIBED AS A PARCEL OF LAND CONTAINING 2.4 ACRES, MORE OR LESS, AND DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 21 SOUTH, RANGE 62 EAST, MJ).M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM COMMUNTTY AND NEIGHBORHOOD SHOPPING TO LIGHT INDUSTRY/ BUSINESS PARK, LOCATED EAST OF MOUNTAIN VISTA STREET AND LYING SOUTH OF RAMROD AVENUE, IN THE GREEN VALLEY NORTH PLANNING AREA. PH-ZONE CHANGE Z-46-96 APPLICANT: DICK BLICK COMPANY ...... Review of a redmdflcation request from CC (Commanity Commercial) district to IL (Limited Industry) district on 2.4 acres 1 in tiie Green VaDey North planning area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDS APPROVAL BY ORDINANCE) VIIL CmZEN'S CONCERNS IX. UNFINISHED BUSIN r'?^ UBAPPOINTMENT. HENj >( RSON PLANNING COMMISSION WARD IV One Mayond appofaitmeni m the Henderson Plannfaig Commbshm for Ward IV. (CONTINUED FRoSfAUGUST 20,1996) „„.„„^„c UBHENDERSON CONVENTION CENTER ADVISORY BOARD OF DIRECTORSTHREE VACANCIES Three mipointmente to the Convention Center Board of Dlrecton: Two appofaitments fkom Ward H, and one lypointmmt ft-om Ward IV, for tiie terms to expire July 31,1998. (CONTINUED FROM AUGUST 20,1996) UB-MAYORAL APPOINTMENT ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION „. • • Mayoral Appofaitment to tiie Economic Development Commission. (CONTINUED FROM AUGUST So, 1996) UBZONE CHANGE Z-47-96 USE PERMITU-76-96 UBDAY CARE CENTER, GASOLINE SALES, AND PACKAGED BEER AND WINE SALES UBARCHTTECTURAL REVIEW AR-150-96 HORIZON COMMERCUL CENTER APPLICANT: P.R.EVPHILLIPREGESKI,P.E. ...._, Review of a redasdlkation request tWan RS.2 (Single Family Residential) district to CN (Neighborhood Commercial) district; request for a day care center, convenience market witii gasoUnc sales, ssid pack^ed beer and wfaw sales and wdver of distance requirement for liquor sales adjacent to a day care center; and request for archltecturd review for a proposed conveidence market and a nroposed day care facllKy, generally located at the northeast comer of Horizon Ridge Paricway and Camrgle Street, bi tiie Green VaBey Ranch plnnkig area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDS APPROVAL OF ALL APPLICATIONS CONTINUED FROM THE AUGUST 20,1996, CITY COUNCIL MEETING) UBRESOLUTION ZONE CHANGE-Z-47-96 HORIZON COMMERCL\L CENTER A RESOLUTION OF THE CFFY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON COMMITTING THE CITY COUNCIL TO REZONE CERTAIN PROPERTY WITHIN THE CTTY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 62 EAST, M.D.B. & M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RS-2 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL) TO CN (NEIGHBORHOOD COMMERCUL) LOCATED AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF HORIZON RIDGE PARKWAY AND CARNEGIE STREET, INTHE GREEN VALLEY RANCH PLANNING AREA. (CONTINUED FROM THE AUGUST 20, 1996, CFTY COUNCIL MEETING) UB-a. USE PERMIT-U-69-96 "^ UB*. ARCHITECTURAL REVIEWAR-I3I-96 APPLICANT) CAMCO, INC, dba SUPERPAWN Request for use permit spproval for pawn shop and check crashing service; and review of a proposed pawn shop and check^ashlng service located at 1100 West Sunset Road, in the Whitney Ranch plannfaig area, (CONTINUED FROM JULY 2, 1996 FORWARDED WTTH NO PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDATION) UBBILL NO. 1332 GAMING ORDINANCE AMENDMENTS AN ORDINANCE OF THE CFTY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON REPEALING HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE CHAPTER 4J2 'GAMBLING • REGULATIONS AND LICENSES' IN ITS ENTIRETY AND ADOPTING A NEW CHAPTER4J2TOTHE HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE ENTITLED 'GAMBLING REGULATIONS AND LICENSES,' AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. (HNAL ACTION) UBBILL NO. 1333 Z-36.96 PROPERTY HOLDINGS CORPORATION AN ORDINANCE OF THE CFTY COUNCIL OF THE CFTY OF HENDERSON AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHIN THECTTY LIMITS OFTHECITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH,RANGE 63 EAST, M.D.B. & M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM R&2 (SINGLTTAMILY IESIDENTIAL) DISTRICTTO CN-MP (NEIGHmMHtKlD COMMERCIAL WFTH MASTER PLAN DEVELOPMENT OVERLAY) DISTRICT! LOCATEDATTHENORTHSIDEOFAHORIZONDRIVEBETWEENBLACKRIDGE ROAD AND CANYON ROAD, IN THE BLACK MOUNTAIN PLANNING AREA, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO. (ONAL ACTION) UB-BILL NO. 1334 EMPLOYEE REGISTRATION CARDS AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, TO AMEND H.M.C. CHAPTER 4.44 BY ELIMINATING PROVISIONS ALLOWING ISSUANCEOFATEMPORARY WORK CARD(EMPLOYEE REGISTRATION CARD), DELETING THEREQUIREMENTSTHATMINORS UNDER THEAGEOFEIGHTEEN OBTAIN A LETTER FROM THE CLARK COUNTY JUVENILE DEPARTMENT, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. (HNAL ACTION) X. NEW BUSINESS NB-BILL NO. 1335 ZONE CHANGE Z-46-96 DICK BLICK COMPANY AN ORDINANCE OF THE CFTY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OFTHE CITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 21 SOUTH, RANGE 62 EAST, MD.B. A M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM CC (COMMUNFFY COMMERCIAL) TO IL (LIMITED INDUSTRY), LOCATED IN THE GREEN VALLEY NORTH PLANNING AREA, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO. (REFER TO COMMITTEE MEETING OF SEPTEMBER 17,1996) NB-RESOLUTION ZONE CHANGE Z-51-94 LUCKY STARS HOTEL A CASINO A RESOLUTION OF THE CFTY COUNCIL OF THE CTTY OF HENDERSON COMMFTTING THE CFTY COUNCIL TO REZONE CERTAIN PROPERTY WITHIN THE CFTY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 61 EAST, M.D.B. A M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RS-6 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTLiL) DISTRICT TO CC (COMMUNmr COMMERCL^D DISTRICT. NBARCHTTECTURAL REVIEWAR-140-96 CASINO U-HAUL APPLICANT: U-HAUL Request for carelaken quarten; and review of a truck rental facility on 1.2 acres, located at 936 North BouMer Highway, fai Uie PHtman plannb area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDS DENIAL) XL SET MEETING XH. ADJOURNMENT ACENDA DEADLINE __ „ AO Hems for bKliulon on the Council Agenda for the Meeting of September 17, 1996, must be submitted, in writing, no later then Thursday, September 5,1996 at 5:30 pjn. to tiie CHy Clerk's office. Any items received sfter the above date will automatically be placed on the not CHy Coancil Agenda. H—Aug. 29.1996. LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA NOTICE OF APPLICATION El D filed ai application, drniKiulrd o.^ Docket No. 96-7006, with the F^Mic Service Conimi.WleedtheO>terilnte Fi l

PAGE 18

Page 18 Handenon Homa News Thursday, August 29,1996 Silverado girls open with golf victory! By the Ifavm Staff Tlie Silveradogirla opened the fiill golf season with a 291-356 victory over Rancho on Tuesday at Wildhorae. "Having a match the second day of school was tough," Silverado coadi Joe Sawaia said. "Butthegirlspli^edpretty well." Tami Shibata led the Skyhawks with a 41. Other Silverado scores included: Corrina Latini with a 68, Kiley Lee with a 65 and 668 by Amy Hawkins and Liaa Lindaey. "Once we get three or four matches under our belts, the scores should drop," Sawaia aaid. Sawaia also praiaed the play of Shibata. Tami ia a good influence on the younger girla," the coach said. They see how hard she works and it's a good influence." Silverado is 1-0 on the season. BASIC FALLS TO GORBfAN — Tarah Badger carded a 62 for the Wolves at Highland Falls, but Gorman came away with a 287-299 victory in girls golf action. 1 think the girls played well," Basic coach Bill Tobler said. "Some of them have had better days, but for the most part they played well. It was a tough course and it was windy." Other Basic scores included: Jessica Atkid and Gen Ludwig with 69s, Amber Mortensen with a 64 and Sarah Anderson with a 66. 1 was proud of the scores, especially on that tough course and in those conditions," Tobler said. The girls did very well." Basic is 0-1 on the season. GATORS WIN BY FORFEIT — Green Valley is 1-0 on the season after a forfeit victory over Clark on Tuesday in girls golf action. The Gators had a practice round at Paiute and posted scores of: Annie Long, 40; Mira Lee, 40; Kimberly Kindig, 40; Mary Fernandez, 41 and Rhonda Gallion, 43 for a 204 total. "I expect a little better effort," coach Del Sagers said. The intensity wasn't there with some of them." ^ Express Lube FAST' REUABLE GUARANTEED Boulder Highway & Palo Verde Henderson Phone: 566-0522 ACROSS FROM THE MOVIE THEATER I $5.00 OFF our regular S24.95 14-Point service I Oil & Filter Change, OC Lube and 14-Polnt Checkup. Includes I 3 Free Car Washes \n9 WWi thK Id. Mott etrt. InchidM 5 OiMfti o< Havolln* Fonnult 3 motor olt. ExpirM C-30-9e PANORAMA:= RAILROAD PASS WINS READER'S POLL PAGE 2 Thursday, August 29,1996 Pagal -Sk:: Henderson fisherman lands huge catfish Henderson fishennan Kurt Nelson caught a lake-record catfish at the Las Vegas Wash at Lake Mead over the weekend. Nelson's fish, caught on anchovies, measured 19.96 pounds and was 25 inches long with a girth of 24 inches. Nelson said it took him 1015 minutes to land his fish on 12-pound test line. The old record was 18 pounds, nine ounces. Kurt Nelson Scoreboard Lizards tackle tough Mr. Charleston course The Henderson-based Lizards youth running club participated in the 13th Annual Forest Challenge on Aug. 24 at Mt. Charleston. Over a rough course, Lizard Yolonda Ghee, 11, earned overall female honors with a time of 1:28.07 and Erickson Chee, 12, took first in the division for male runners and ninth overall with a time of 1:16.17. hi the four-mile race, Julie Kyriacou, 16, topped the field of female runners, winning in a time of 32:39. Erika Hanson, 16, finished second overall for females with a time of 34:47. hi the 11-14 female diviision, Deann Bradshaw finished first in 36:36, followed by Michelle Chee in second. In the 10-andunder females it was the youngest Lizard, Jodi Chee, 7, winning with a time of 50:33. Tlie 10-and-under male division was dominated by division winner Joel Chee in 37:47, followed by Marvin Chee in 39:24, Chris Hoppie in 42:18, and Kurtis Hoppie in 45:12. The nationally ranked Lizards are in their seventh year and are currently preparing for the USATF Cross Country Nationals to be held in December in Nashville, Tenn. HENDERSON PARKS and RECREATION DEPT. Softball & Baseball Standings Tuesday 'C Summer II Longhorn Century Steel EAS Electric SWOC Gold Rush Barley's Brewers Co-Rcc 'D' Summer II W Mission Impauible 13 Barry Plastics 12 Fish A. Chips 7 St. Thomas More 7 Water Dogs 5 KWU-TV 5 5 Joker's Wild 4 MGM Lionsligersbeers 3 Friday Mens 'D' Summer II W Schibrowsicy Consult. 10 Senor Suertes 7 Fed-Ex 6 The Bandits S Neighborhood Giurdi 5 Frito-Lay 5 Austin Hardwoab 1 F.O.P. Henderson 1 Friday Co-Rec 'D' Summer II W GLVCC Upside Down 9 P.T.'s Slot Casino 8 L'Eggs 3 FSBC 0 Mimday 'D+' Summer II W Spoctco 12 Lewco Electric 9 BAB Bombers 7 Oakley's Bad Company 5 MGM Wizards 5 Vic 5 L 1 3 5 9 11 13 L 1 2 7 7 9 9 10 11 L 0 3 4 5 5 4 9 9 L 1 2 7 10 L 0 3 5 7 7 7 T 0 0 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 0 0 Marnell Corrao Soutliem NV Cabinets Tuesday iettSWCon.iult. American West Misfit Code Sevens Mens 'D' Summer II Mighty Mart Sigma Clii Fraternity Nevada Grapliix Spanish Flies L'Eggs Just Blinds CBV Lake Mead Bible 5 7 0 12 II Doug W L 13 1 11 3 10 4 4 4 T 0 3 0 4 0 10 0 10 0 0 14 0 W L T 10 2 0 9 3 0 3 9 0 2 10 0 W L T 11 1 0 3 6 6 6 7 7 0 12 0 SAVING WATER IT'S A GRASS ROOTS EFFORT For More Information On The Campaign Call 547-6089 Douq';: Internet Addre:;;;: htt|)//www.wbanct.com/bradford Clark County School Board Pi;;trict J p4\d tnr by Citi/nn;: tor Br-idtord Day f: r -. 1 Deanne Blackwell ssys goodbye to daughter Alexandria before she starts kindergarten at Taylor Elementary School. Gibson Elementary second-grade teacher Danielle Bongiovanni introduces herself to new student Darlena Kem, 6, and Kern's grandmother, Delores Hooker, before classes began on Monday. PHOTOS BY BRIAN JONES AND ROB WEIDENFELD Ftadi&rT//K $C999 P205/70R14 62 99 P225/70R15 71.99 P215y65R15 73 99 P2350R15 70.99 The bus finally picked up the White Middle School students up at 8:15 a.m., 40 minutes past due, and 15 minute* Lagretchen Lee and slttar Sherrel look for morning at Taylor Elemontary School. ^^ ,*

PAGE 19

Page 18 Handenon Homa News Thursday, August 29,1996 Silverado girls open with golf victory! By the Ifavm Staff Tlie Silveradogirla opened the fiill golf season with a 291-356 victory over Rancho on Tuesday at Wildhorae. "Having a match the second day of school was tough," Silverado coadi Joe Sawaia said. "Butthegirlspli^edpretty well." Tami Shibata led the Skyhawks with a 41. Other Silverado scores included: Corrina Latini with a 68, Kiley Lee with a 65 and 668 by Amy Hawkins and Liaa Lindaey. "Once we get three or four matches under our belts, the scores should drop," Sawaia aaid. Sawaia also praiaed the play of Shibata. Tami ia a good influence on the younger girla," the coach said. They see how hard she works and it's a good influence." Silverado is 1-0 on the season. BASIC FALLS TO GORBfAN — Tarah Badger carded a 62 for the Wolves at Highland Falls, but Gorman came away with a 287-299 victory in girls golf action. 1 think the girls played well," Basic coach Bill Tobler said. "Some of them have had better days, but for the most part they played well. It was a tough course and it was windy." Other Basic scores included: Jessica Atkid and Gen Ludwig with 69s, Amber Mortensen with a 64 and Sarah Anderson with a 66. 1 was proud of the scores, especially on that tough course and in those conditions," Tobler said. The girls did very well." Basic is 0-1 on the season. GATORS WIN BY FORFEIT — Green Valley is 1-0 on the season after a forfeit victory over Clark on Tuesday in girls golf action. The Gators had a practice round at Paiute and posted scores of: Annie Long, 40; Mira Lee, 40; Kimberly Kindig, 40; Mary Fernandez, 41 and Rhonda Gallion, 43 for a 204 total. "I expect a little better effort," coach Del Sagers said. The intensity wasn't there with some of them." ^ Express Lube FAST' REUABLE GUARANTEED Boulder Highway & Palo Verde Henderson Phone: 566-0522 ACROSS FROM THE MOVIE THEATER I $5.00 OFF our regular S24.95 14-Point service I Oil & Filter Change, OC Lube and 14-Polnt Checkup. Includes I 3 Free Car Washes \n9 WWi thK Id. Mott etrt. InchidM 5 OiMfti o< Havolln* Fonnult 3 motor olt. ExpirM C-30-9e PANORAMA:= RAILROAD PASS WINS READER'S POLL PAGE 2 Thursday, August 29,1996 Pagal -Sk:: Henderson fisherman lands huge catfish Henderson fishennan Kurt Nelson caught a lake-record catfish at the Las Vegas Wash at Lake Mead over the weekend. Nelson's fish, caught on anchovies, measured 19.96 pounds and was 25 inches long with a girth of 24 inches. Nelson said it took him 1015 minutes to land his fish on 12-pound test line. The old record was 18 pounds, nine ounces. Kurt Nelson Scoreboard Lizards tackle tough Mr. Charleston course The Henderson-based Lizards youth running club participated in the 13th Annual Forest Challenge on Aug. 24 at Mt. Charleston. Over a rough course, Lizard Yolonda Ghee, 11, earned overall female honors with a time of 1:28.07 and Erickson Chee, 12, took first in the division for male runners and ninth overall with a time of 1:16.17. hi the four-mile race, Julie Kyriacou, 16, topped the field of female runners, winning in a time of 32:39. Erika Hanson, 16, finished second overall for females with a time of 34:47. hi the 11-14 female diviision, Deann Bradshaw finished first in 36:36, followed by Michelle Chee in second. In the 10-andunder females it was the youngest Lizard, Jodi Chee, 7, winning with a time of 50:33. Tlie 10-and-under male division was dominated by division winner Joel Chee in 37:47, followed by Marvin Chee in 39:24, Chris Hoppie in 42:18, and Kurtis Hoppie in 45:12. The nationally ranked Lizards are in their seventh year and are currently preparing for the USATF Cross Country Nationals to be held in December in Nashville, Tenn. HENDERSON PARKS and RECREATION DEPT. Softball & Baseball Standings Tuesday 'C Summer II Longhorn Century Steel EAS Electric SWOC Gold Rush Barley's Brewers Co-Rcc 'D' Summer II W Mission Impauible 13 Barry Plastics 12 Fish A. Chips 7 St. Thomas More 7 Water Dogs 5 KWU-TV 5 5 Joker's Wild 4 MGM Lionsligersbeers 3 Friday Mens 'D' Summer II W Schibrowsicy Consult. 10 Senor Suertes 7 Fed-Ex 6 The Bandits S Neighborhood Giurdi 5 Frito-Lay 5 Austin Hardwoab 1 F.O.P. Henderson 1 Friday Co-Rec 'D' Summer II W GLVCC Upside Down 9 P.T.'s Slot Casino 8 L'Eggs 3 FSBC 0 Mimday 'D+' Summer II W Spoctco 12 Lewco Electric 9 BAB Bombers 7 Oakley's Bad Company 5 MGM Wizards 5 Vic 5 L 1 3 5 9 11 13 L 1 2 7 7 9 9 10 11 L 0 3 4 5 5 4 9 9 L 1 2 7 10 L 0 3 5 7 7 7 T 0 0 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 0 0 Marnell Corrao Soutliem NV Cabinets Tuesday iettSWCon.iult. American West Misfit Code Sevens Mens 'D' Summer II Mighty Mart Sigma Clii Fraternity Nevada Grapliix Spanish Flies L'Eggs Just Blinds CBV Lake Mead Bible 5 7 0 12 II Doug W L 13 1 11 3 10 4 4 4 T 0 3 0 4 0 10 0 10 0 0 14 0 W L T 10 2 0 9 3 0 3 9 0 2 10 0 W L T 11 1 0 3 6 6 6 7 7 0 12 0 SAVING WATER IT'S A GRASS ROOTS EFFORT For More Information On The Campaign Call 547-6089 Douq';: Internet Addre:;;;: htt|)//www.wbanct.com/bradford Clark County School Board Pi;;trict J p4\d tnr by Citi/nn;: tor Br-idtord Day f: r -. 1 Deanne Blackwell ssys goodbye to daughter Alexandria before she starts kindergarten at Taylor Elementary School. Gibson Elementary second-grade teacher Danielle Bongiovanni introduces herself to new student Darlena Kem, 6, and Kern's grandmother, Delores Hooker, before classes began on Monday. PHOTOS BY BRIAN JONES AND ROB WEIDENFELD Ftadi&rT//K $C999 P205/70R14 62 99 P225/70R15 71.99 P215y65R15 73 99 P2350R15 70.99 The bus finally picked up the White Middle School students up at 8:15 a.m., 40 minutes past due, and 15 minute* Lagretchen Lee and slttar Sherrel look for morning at Taylor Elemontary School. ^^ ,*

PAGE 20

LIFESTYLES Pag* 2 Panorama Thursday, August 29,1996 And the winner is... The Conductor's Room at Railroad Pass was the overwhelmingfavorite of our readers for the best prime rib in town. Almost 40% of all votes received by the Henderson Home News and Boulder City News were castfor Railroad Pass. And I must concur that they have some of the best, and most reasonably priced road prime rib of beef. Honorable mention goes to the Skyline Casino and Tom's Sunset Casino in a virtual tie for second place. Roland Fraga of Boulder City won the raffle for a dinner for four at Railroad Pass. Upon receiving news of the winner, I packed up the family for a return visit to Railroad Pass to verify the results. There are several prime ribs from which to choose. The stanLETS EAT OuTl PHILIP GOLDSTEIN dard prime rib is $6.95, and includes a small, but good, salad bar or soup, a choice of potato, with vegetable, and a fresh baked mini loaf of bread. Other cuts include the blackened prime rib, as well as the king-cut prime rib and a T-bone steak, priced from $6,95 to $8.95. We especially like to order the baked potato which is always very good. For those not in the mood for beef—such as my children— seafood, such as shrimp, orange roughy, halibut and trout are also available. They range from about$6.95 to $9.95, served with soup or salad, potato or rice, or a side of spaghetti. Other dinner entrees include a stir-fry vegetable dish, stirfry beef, barbecue ribs, baked orfried chicken, lasagna, ravioli and spaghetti with meatballs. My kids usually share a pasta dinner, and it usually works out. Excellent desserts, such as ice cream, sherbert, pie, cheesecake and layer cake round out the menu. It's easy to see why Railroad Pass is such a favorite at our house and with the general readership. We always have a good meal with good service. When the kids shout "Let's Eat Out," Railroad Pass is always a contender. in Goldstein, an attorney who lives Henderson, writes about his dining expenences with his wife Julie, and young children Marcie and Matthew. BC Officer to be honored Boulder City Police Officer Dale Wood has been selected by Silver State Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution to receive the DAR Excellence in Community Service Award. The presentation will take place at 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 7, in the community room of Norwest Bank, 1000 Nevada Hwy., Boulder City. Friends of Wood are invited to attend. The award is designed to recognize worthy, local people from a variety of walks of life for outstanding achievements in educatio1Rll,'T5umanitarian, patriotic, historical and environmental conservation, and citizenship endeavors. Wood started the Drug Resistance Educational program (DARE) in the junior high school in Boulder City in 1986 and in the five fifth grades in the elementary school in 1988. Certified to teach the program, he now conducts weekly classes. He is in the monitoring program which teaches other officers to conduct classes and expects to go to other countries in the near future in the same capacity. Wood deals with three common abuses—tobacco, alcohol and marijuana. He believes that if a child has learned how to deal with resistance to those drugs by the age of 20, the child will reniain drug free for the rest of its life regardless of the conditions to which it may be exposed. The Boulder City program has as its unofficial sponsors the Thunderbirds stationed at Nellis Air Force Base and the Las Vegas Thunder Hockey Team. The program includes classroom work with lectures and workbooks and essays due at the end of the course, as well as picnics and other rewards including local newspaper publicity. As Boulder City is a small town, OfficerWood interacts with students on a frequent, informal basis in addition to the classroom setting. The DARE program has proven to be effective in decreasing drug and alcohol use, gang activity and vandalism along with improving study habits and increasing student's respect for law enforcement officers. The award recipient must be approved by the National Society DAR, headquartered in Washington, D.C. Las Vegas women to be "Women in Laa Vegas Gaining and Entertainment, 1940s19708," a slide lecture featuring three speakers, is scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 12 and Saturday, Sept 14. The event is part of the Las Vegas Women in Gaming and Entertainment Oral History Project, directed by UNLV history professor Joanne Goodwin. The lectures will present the experiences of women involved in the city's casino, hotel and entertainment industries in years gone by. The first presentation will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Sept. 12, in the auditorium of the Barrick Museum of Natural History on the UNLV campus. It follows a reception beginning at 5 p.m. The second lecture will take place firom 4 to 6 p.m., Sept. 14, in Che lecture hall of the West Charleston Library, 6301 W. Charleston Blvd., and a reception will follow. =. Topics will include: •"From Fordyce to Fortune, From Tallulah to Tinsel Town: The Story of Black Women Migrants," by Claytee D. White. •"A Class Act: The Realities of Work, Family and Culture for the Las Vegas Showgirl 1950-1970," by Joyce Marshall. •"Promise and Prosperity: Korean Kim sisters' Courageous Journey to Success," by Myoungja Lee Kwon. Funding is provided by the Nevada Humanities Committee. For more information on the lectures orthe oral history project, call Goodwin, 895-1026. Church offers classes Highland Hills Baptist Church announces new fall classes and groups. The groups and classes are an effort at community outreach and are not just for Baptists or religious people. Classes will begin Wednesday, Sept. 4, and will take place six days a week. Most begin at 6:30 p.m. Call thechurch office, 566-0200, for specific times, costs and directions. 1^ schedule is as follows: Sundays: Morning, 12 Steps for Christians; evening, Exp^ri•ncuif God, Bible Basics, Explore tb* Bible, Youth and Children's Choin. (These are in addition to r^ular Sunday sdicduling.) Mondays: Anxiety Attack Support Group, AAfor Beginners, and GamAnon. Tuesdays: Youth Drama Team, Youth Group, Conquering Eating Disorders, and Defeating Anger Workbook Class. Wednesdays: Growing Kids God's Way (a parenting class), Serendipity Bible Study, AWANA, and Adult Choir. Thursdays: KidShare, What Do I Do Now? (divorce recovery for kids), Adult Divorce Recovery Group, Clod's Priceless Woman (women's Bible study), Bible Perspectives for Adults and Alcoholics Anonymous. Fridays: God's Priceless Woman (morning group), (Jramblert Anonymous, andGamAnoa INSIGHT TO EYESIGHT by Josq)h Shalev, M.D, WHAT'S THE RUB? Among the tiniest and most delicate muscles in the human body is the levator muscle, whose function is to raise the upper eyelid. It attaches to the upper lid with the help of a very thin band of tendinous tissue known as the levator aponeurosis. It is the age-related degeneration of this aponeurotic tissue that can lead to the drooping eyelids that so many older people experience. Traumatic injury to the eye may also damage the aponeurotic tissue, which may lead to surgical reattachment of the levator muscle in order factor in causing it to droop, the habit may aggravate the condition. Thus, i f you must mb your eye, try to avoid rubbing the eyelid itself. Instead, try to rub the eyebrow or the skin over the cheekbone just under the eye. Wheneva you need the service of an ophthalmologist, come see us at EYE INSTITUTE OF NEVADA. Unfortunately, many serious eye diseases produce little or no symptoms until they are well advanced. Everyone should have regular eye examinations, and any sudden changes to vision should be checked immediately, Please call 293-0551 to schedule an appointment. We're located at 999 Adams Blvd.. Suite 101. Boukier City. P.S. Tkote who are neanighud (myopic) and who have undergone cataract tyrgery who rub their eyes vigorously run the risk of retinaldetachmeruby virtueofthepmtive exerted an the eyeball. Tka coimm is hnrnghite yam atape Uk mdpaidtorbyimerk SMk*. lt.D. -.f • >• 'All bogs Go to Heaven 2' drab sequel Drab sequel to the 1989 animated adventure finds the hero dog Charlie (voice of Charlie Sheen) and sidekick Itchy (voice of Dom DeLuise) on"an earthbound mission to rescue Gabriel's horn. A few energetic scenes are eventually lost among the flat animated art work and the forgettable songs. The escapade concludes with a canine Armageddon than fails to offer significant dimension to the story. Sheena Easton and Ernest Borgnine also supply voices for key characters. (G) FAIR ANIMATED CHILDREN'S ADVENTURE DIRS-Paul Sabella and Larry Leker RT-84 mins. It's My Party Over-wrought drama about an AIDS-inflicted architect (Eric Roberts) who stages a farewell party where he intends to commit suicide. The strained script flaunts gallows humor that fails to register. Roberts handles the difficult material with some gusto, but this downer of a story is an ordeal for actors and the audience. Gregory Harrison, Marlee Matlin, Roddy McDowall and George Segal portray some of the invitees who endure this strange gathering. (R) BORING DRAMA DIRRandal Xleiser LEAD-Eric Roberts RT-109 mins. (Profanity) Mary Reilly A lyrical version of the "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" classic told from the perspective of Jekyll's housemaid, convincingly portrayed by Julia Roberts. The psychodynamics of good versus evil are emphasized in a poignant love story_with John VIDEO VIEW Malkovich bringing eerie Rumor to the dual role. Inspired melodrama evolves with dashes of gore kept taut and suggestive until the climax when an unnecessary special effect strikes the only fal se note. Lush music and unflinching production design create the ideal atmosphere. (R) GREAT DRAMA DIRStephen Frears LEAD-Julia Roberts RT-108 mins. Thing To Do In Denver When You're Dead From fledgling director Gary Fleder, a so-so caper comedy that closely follows the style of Quentin Tarantino ("Pulp Fiction"). Andy Garcia plays a colorful hood, gone straight, who reactivates his old gang for one more assignment. Garcia and many supporting players are quite good as salty characters, but the wobbly story and derivative dialogue do not project much entertainment appeal. Christopher Walken,Treat Williams and Gabrielle Anwar co-star. (R) FAIRCOMEDYDIR-Gary Fleder LEAD-Andy Garcia Top Video Rentals Broken Arrow Hong Kong director John Woo puts his special spin on this loud, courageous action saga that involves hijacked nuclear bombs. There's meager credibility in the wake of non-stop explosions, phony shoot-outs and trumpedup stimts. John Travolta stars as the heavy, a renegade U.S. Air Force pilot who masterminds a daring scheme to demand ransom for the return of the devastating weapons. Co-pilot Christian Slater, helped by spunky park ranger Samantha Mathis, tries to stop him. The cartoonish mayhem loses its punch despite all the fury. (R) FAIR ACTION DRAMA DIR-John Woo LEAD-John Travolta RT-110 mins. (Profanity). Executive Decision This deplorable political thriller, filled with a hodgepodge of convoluted plot segments from much better action films, falls shott in every area. It tells of terrorists who hijack a U.S.bound passenger plane and threaten mass destruction with deadly nerve gas. First-time director Stuart Baird fails to resuscitate the Hfeless, cliche-riddled screenplay thatfeaturesapreposterous midair docking of a stealth fighter with the jumbo jet. Kurt Russell stars in a flat role as an antiterrorist expert. Al so wi th Steven Seagal and Halle Berry. (R) FAIR ACTION DRAMA DIR-Stuart Baird LEAD-Kurt Russell RT-132 mins. (Profanity). THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY "^ (Our drand Opening) Vew Viq$ Lake Mead Cniises' Desert Princess has a new home! It's ail shipshape and ready to bring you even more Outrageously Great Times! Our brand new landing and ferry terminal offers plenty of room to relax, indoors and out, while waifing to board the Desert Princess. Ifew Dock Experience Hoover Dam a little differently. The Desert Princess now has its own private dock alongside the dam. All midday excursion cniises offer passengers an opportunity to disembark at Hoover Dam to enjoy the remarkable sights of this engineering marvel. X ^•w Pal X I I I I I I I I I I I I I b. LaVor Dar Vttktfkd 702-293-^180 RaoMve t free Mcoad fire wtiea toooapwyiai • fall ptjmf fan of ptmet or cqaal valne pcrid. OfrervaiidS/31-91^1996 LAe Mc*d CraiM* it u AAhorind O da* id for docooM. of dK Nilianl Pvt Service Thursday, August 29,1996 Patiorama Pag* 3 Nevada Wildlife Commission issues Auction Bid Tags The Nevada Wildlife Commission issued the 1997 Auction Bid Tags during its recent commission meeting in Ely. Tags are issued to outdoor sports organizations in cooperation with Nevada Division of Wildlife. Money raised from the tags are placed in a trust account to be used for wildlife and wildlife programs throughout the state. Organizations do not keep any of the funds raised. However, groups utilize the tags as a tool to promote their banquets which assist groups with wildlife and habitat conservation projects each year. The 1996 auction bid tags brought in $248,500, with auctions from annual banquets of various outdoor organizations. The Mule Deer Foundation raised $52,000 with one mule deer tag. Another mule deer tag OUTDOORS WITH BARB BARB HENDERSON raised $50,000. The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation auctioned an elk tag for $24,000. The Nevada Bighorns Unlimited-Reno, raised $7,500 for an antelope tag and $55,000 for a desert bighorn sheep tag. Wildlife Habitat Improvement of Nevada auctioned a desert bighorn sheep tag for $60,000. That is amazing when one considers these are individual hunters bidding these amovmts, just for an opportunity to hunt big game in Nevada. Most of us submit a few hundred dollars with our hunt application each year for achance to draw a tag, and in most cases. we get our money back with no tag. However, many Nevada Hunters will hunt deer, antelope, elk and desert bighorn for a lot less than these auction tags for simply by being lucky in the draw. If you have the money and are interested in bidding on one of next year's auction bid tags, according to Geoff Schneider at NDOW, here is a list of the outdoor conservation organizations that will have tags auctioned at their banquets: •Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, one Rocky Mountain elk tag. •Fraternity of the Desert Bighorn, one desert bighorn sheep tag. •Nevada Bighorns UnlimitedReno, one desert bighorn sheep tag and one antelope tag. •The Mule Deer Foundation, Vascular disease program to begin Starting Sept. 3, Cardiology Associates of Lake Mead, will offer a free vascular disease awareness program for the community. Called the "Leg Up Program," it is designed for education about, and early detection of, circulatory conditions that can block blood flow to various parts of the body. Symptoms can include swelling or pain in an arm or leg, loss of feeling in the fingers or toes, skin discoloration, and difficulty walking. Vascular disease is most common in men and women over the age of 50 and affects millions of Americans. These diseases start so quietly that many people may not recognize a problem. They may simply think they are feeling the natural effects of aging. Smokers, diabetics and those with high blood pressure or high cholesterol levels are especially at risk. During the program, participants will answer a brief questionnaire designed to identify risk factors for vascular disease. The medical staff will also measure the "Ankl e-Brachial Index," which compares blood pressure at the arm with blood pressure at the ankle. The degree THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY of difference between the two readings may signal a circulation problem. Participants with multiple risk factors, symptoms, and those with abnormal ABIs will be advised to visit their doctor. The Leg Up Program is not a complete medical exam. It is a screening program to h^lp identify people with risk factors of vascular disease and refer them to their own physicians to initiate appropriate evaluation and treatment, if required. The earlier vascular disease is identified and treated, the better the chance that it can be controlled with smoking cessation, diet improvement or exercise. The fr-ee screening program will be held Tuesday mornings and Thursday afternoons beginning Sept. 3, at Cardiology Associates of Lake Mead, 105 N. Pecos, suite #114, in Henderson. To schedule an appointment, call Linda, 263-3366. ONCE AGAIN! BIG O BRAND TIRES CAPTURE THE WARD OP CONSUMER XCELLENCE FOR REPLACEMENT TIRES PASSENGER VEHICLE J.e. Nmr M4 ANKMM im lm k—i — ul •! 14JM iMniaMf rM*MMt. 90 DAYS SAMl AS I BIG 0 BRAND CASH,.. IE INCIUDES: • K lititiMt Eviry 50OO Mills • FIEE UiiMm Fid Mrs • FUE LHttiM Air Priisir* Ciradi • FIEE MMIHI| • FIEE IMiriM imfiAw laloidifl • FIEE libbw Vaivi Sliw Aid A FIEE iMd ilaid lipiwNwit Wormty Mwt m'\ U ball mmQTiREs I I BRAKE iNSPECTiON! I I Noobligaliontobuy.Mostcars. j Not valid with any other olter. See slofe lot details. Coupon expires 9/1 M\ \ BIG il TIRES FOUR TIRE! ROTATION I Most cars. Not valid wi any other olter. I See store lor details. I Coupon expires 9/13^. j BJGQTmES BriCO TIRES I 4 WNEEl BAUNCING || S^QOO Qpf] flQ^^ 11 ANY ALIGNMENT I • Most cars No! valid with any other oHer See store lof details Light tru* I • Utosl cars Not valid with any other oiler. See store lor details. [ and mag wheels extra Coipn expires 9/l3fl6 • Coupon expire 9/13/96. J irirn "" HENDERSON/QREEN VALLIY om *o utMoia m m $j. um onm PECOS & WINDMILL 170 N.PaoM m> n9 |||#fA||V Eflilli/lll^l BOULOER HWY & MAJOR AVE. 82S S BouldCf Hwy. f t^f* iHjlilJII fllMJIVInVi EAST SIDE OAC BONAf^ZA & NELLIS 787 N NM Blvd 4M-31M ^^^^^^^^^P^ FLAMINGO & BOULDER HWY 4728 E. Flwnlngo Rd 41>aSM ^^^^^^^DA/ WEST SIDE ^^^^IWL LAKE MEAD ft OECATUR 1965 N DMMUT •47<01O ^^ff^^^^9^ RANCHO & CRAIQ 4520 N Rancho ••••74 ^vM^HvIa DESERT INN & JONES 3303 8. JoriM •7410 ^i V^ PAHRUMP RAHflUMP 1301 E. NV SUM Hwy: 372 TT. ,^/^aS£w^^M^* K .:ra— • two mule deer tags. So, hunters, start saving your money. The banquets are coming up quickly and NDOW will gladly accept bids, usually starting into the thousands. OUTDOOR RECREATION/ INFORMATION Youth hunts scheduled Youngsters 15 years of age and under will have opportunities to participate in several special dove and waterfowl hunts in coming weeks, according to NDOW. A youth dove hunt for youngsters 12 to 15 years of age will be held Saturday, Sept. 7, at Overton Wildlife Management Area. It is limited to 30 hunters who must be accompanied by a parent or adult. A drawing for reservations for the Overton hunt was held Monday, Aug. 26 at the NDOW offices. Young hunters may also participate in a pair of youth waterfowl hunts to be held one week before the scheduled opening of the regular duck season. Saturday, Oct. 5 will be the youth waterfowl hunting day in all counties except Clark and Lincoln which will have a hunt on Saturday, Oct. 26. Hunters must be accompanied by an adult when participating in the youth hunts. Adults will not be allowed to hunt in either the youth waterfowl hunt or the Overton youth dove hunt. For more information, call NDOW, 486-5127. Until next week, enjoy the great outdoors. Henderson, an outdoor enthusiast, IS a liost and producer of local TV and radio shows. : • of^" "PERFUME DEPOT JOM^ i^;r^ "^"s :• Now has a new location at the gateway ,. ,. —-to Green Valley and Henderson to make your shopping easier ^^ S3v Discounts ranging up to 70% on Nevada's largest selection of original name brand fragrances. NEW, OLD HARD TO FIND WITH NO IMITATIONS" EXPERIENCED SALES PEOPU All Mnio< Crxlii Cordi Accpld SEUCnON • PtKIS • KRVKE FtflOirTWtAPnNG 5725 S. PtCOS, sum D-3 • 454-5059 (VONS SHOPPING CENTER AI PKOS 1, RUSSEUj (BETWEEN BIOCKBUSTEH VIDEO S, SAliY'S BEAUTY SUPPIV) PHONE ORDEIS SHimNO AVANAUI m JIAUlJ Houn Monfrl I0 4pin Sot. \Q^pn Sun: ll-Spn Anxiety Group Anger Group Alcoholics Anonymous Gamblers Anonymous GamAnon Parenting Classes & Bible studies Conquering Eating Disorders Divorce Recovery (Kids & Adults) New Classes Start in September! Call 566-0200 for details If you're looking for a church home or a support group, there is a place for you at Highland Hills Baptist Church 61 5 College Drive (at Horizon) m^4 PAl L REGlSTRAll^^jVl Saturday, September 7th • 10:00 3O0p.in. ^ Only 8 minutes 3425 S. LAMB • 739-1446 ^Ma 0 MM eo ee On Monday, September 2,1996, all Sam's Town bingo players at all sessions (beginning with 7:30 am session) will receive a FREE Sam's Town bingo bag*! $l,000t guaranteed coverall and $1,000 second chance at 3 pm, 7 pm, and 11 pm •While supplies last.tAII monies are assresate. All aames, all sessions on September 2,1996", will be played on paper. Must use dauber. SAM'S TOVT^N Where Locals Bring Their Friends

PAGE 21

LIFESTYLES Pag* 2 Panorama Thursday, August 29,1996 And the winner is... The Conductor's Room at Railroad Pass was the overwhelmingfavorite of our readers for the best prime rib in town. Almost 40% of all votes received by the Henderson Home News and Boulder City News were castfor Railroad Pass. And I must concur that they have some of the best, and most reasonably priced road prime rib of beef. Honorable mention goes to the Skyline Casino and Tom's Sunset Casino in a virtual tie for second place. Roland Fraga of Boulder City won the raffle for a dinner for four at Railroad Pass. Upon receiving news of the winner, I packed up the family for a return visit to Railroad Pass to verify the results. There are several prime ribs from which to choose. The stanLETS EAT OuTl PHILIP GOLDSTEIN dard prime rib is $6.95, and includes a small, but good, salad bar or soup, a choice of potato, with vegetable, and a fresh baked mini loaf of bread. Other cuts include the blackened prime rib, as well as the king-cut prime rib and a T-bone steak, priced from $6,95 to $8.95. We especially like to order the baked potato which is always very good. For those not in the mood for beef—such as my children— seafood, such as shrimp, orange roughy, halibut and trout are also available. They range from about$6.95 to $9.95, served with soup or salad, potato or rice, or a side of spaghetti. Other dinner entrees include a stir-fry vegetable dish, stirfry beef, barbecue ribs, baked orfried chicken, lasagna, ravioli and spaghetti with meatballs. My kids usually share a pasta dinner, and it usually works out. Excellent desserts, such as ice cream, sherbert, pie, cheesecake and layer cake round out the menu. It's easy to see why Railroad Pass is such a favorite at our house and with the general readership. We always have a good meal with good service. When the kids shout "Let's Eat Out," Railroad Pass is always a contender. in Goldstein, an attorney who lives Henderson, writes about his dining expenences with his wife Julie, and young children Marcie and Matthew. BC Officer to be honored Boulder City Police Officer Dale Wood has been selected by Silver State Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution to receive the DAR Excellence in Community Service Award. The presentation will take place at 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 7, in the community room of Norwest Bank, 1000 Nevada Hwy., Boulder City. Friends of Wood are invited to attend. The award is designed to recognize worthy, local people from a variety of walks of life for outstanding achievements in educatio1Rll,'T5umanitarian, patriotic, historical and environmental conservation, and citizenship endeavors. Wood started the Drug Resistance Educational program (DARE) in the junior high school in Boulder City in 1986 and in the five fifth grades in the elementary school in 1988. Certified to teach the program, he now conducts weekly classes. He is in the monitoring program which teaches other officers to conduct classes and expects to go to other countries in the near future in the same capacity. Wood deals with three common abuses—tobacco, alcohol and marijuana. He believes that if a child has learned how to deal with resistance to those drugs by the age of 20, the child will reniain drug free for the rest of its life regardless of the conditions to which it may be exposed. The Boulder City program has as its unofficial sponsors the Thunderbirds stationed at Nellis Air Force Base and the Las Vegas Thunder Hockey Team. The program includes classroom work with lectures and workbooks and essays due at the end of the course, as well as picnics and other rewards including local newspaper publicity. As Boulder City is a small town, OfficerWood interacts with students on a frequent, informal basis in addition to the classroom setting. The DARE program has proven to be effective in decreasing drug and alcohol use, gang activity and vandalism along with improving study habits and increasing student's respect for law enforcement officers. The award recipient must be approved by the National Society DAR, headquartered in Washington, D.C. Las Vegas women to be "Women in Laa Vegas Gaining and Entertainment, 1940s19708," a slide lecture featuring three speakers, is scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 12 and Saturday, Sept 14. The event is part of the Las Vegas Women in Gaming and Entertainment Oral History Project, directed by UNLV history professor Joanne Goodwin. The lectures will present the experiences of women involved in the city's casino, hotel and entertainment industries in years gone by. The first presentation will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Sept. 12, in the auditorium of the Barrick Museum of Natural History on the UNLV campus. It follows a reception beginning at 5 p.m. The second lecture will take place firom 4 to 6 p.m., Sept. 14, in Che lecture hall of the West Charleston Library, 6301 W. Charleston Blvd., and a reception will follow. =. Topics will include: •"From Fordyce to Fortune, From Tallulah to Tinsel Town: The Story of Black Women Migrants," by Claytee D. White. •"A Class Act: The Realities of Work, Family and Culture for the Las Vegas Showgirl 1950-1970," by Joyce Marshall. •"Promise and Prosperity: Korean Kim sisters' Courageous Journey to Success," by Myoungja Lee Kwon. Funding is provided by the Nevada Humanities Committee. For more information on the lectures orthe oral history project, call Goodwin, 895-1026. Church offers classes Highland Hills Baptist Church announces new fall classes and groups. The groups and classes are an effort at community outreach and are not just for Baptists or religious people. Classes will begin Wednesday, Sept. 4, and will take place six days a week. Most begin at 6:30 p.m. Call thechurch office, 566-0200, for specific times, costs and directions. 1^ schedule is as follows: Sundays: Morning, 12 Steps for Christians; evening, Exp^ri•ncuif God, Bible Basics, Explore tb* Bible, Youth and Children's Choin. (These are in addition to r^ular Sunday sdicduling.) Mondays: Anxiety Attack Support Group, AAfor Beginners, and GamAnon. Tuesdays: Youth Drama Team, Youth Group, Conquering Eating Disorders, and Defeating Anger Workbook Class. Wednesdays: Growing Kids God's Way (a parenting class), Serendipity Bible Study, AWANA, and Adult Choir. Thursdays: KidShare, What Do I Do Now? (divorce recovery for kids), Adult Divorce Recovery Group, Clod's Priceless Woman (women's Bible study), Bible Perspectives for Adults and Alcoholics Anonymous. Fridays: God's Priceless Woman (morning group), (Jramblert Anonymous, andGamAnoa INSIGHT TO EYESIGHT by Josq)h Shalev, M.D, WHAT'S THE RUB? Among the tiniest and most delicate muscles in the human body is the levator muscle, whose function is to raise the upper eyelid. It attaches to the upper lid with the help of a very thin band of tendinous tissue known as the levator aponeurosis. It is the age-related degeneration of this aponeurotic tissue that can lead to the drooping eyelids that so many older people experience. Traumatic injury to the eye may also damage the aponeurotic tissue, which may lead to surgical reattachment of the levator muscle in order factor in causing it to droop, the habit may aggravate the condition. Thus, i f you must mb your eye, try to avoid rubbing the eyelid itself. Instead, try to rub the eyebrow or the skin over the cheekbone just under the eye. Wheneva you need the service of an ophthalmologist, come see us at EYE INSTITUTE OF NEVADA. Unfortunately, many serious eye diseases produce little or no symptoms until they are well advanced. Everyone should have regular eye examinations, and any sudden changes to vision should be checked immediately, Please call 293-0551 to schedule an appointment. We're located at 999 Adams Blvd.. Suite 101. Boukier City. P.S. Tkote who are neanighud (myopic) and who have undergone cataract tyrgery who rub their eyes vigorously run the risk of retinaldetachmeruby virtueofthepmtive exerted an the eyeball. Tka coimm is hnrnghite yam atape Uk mdpaidtorbyimerk SMk*. lt.D. -.f • >• 'All bogs Go to Heaven 2' drab sequel Drab sequel to the 1989 animated adventure finds the hero dog Charlie (voice of Charlie Sheen) and sidekick Itchy (voice of Dom DeLuise) on"an earthbound mission to rescue Gabriel's horn. A few energetic scenes are eventually lost among the flat animated art work and the forgettable songs. The escapade concludes with a canine Armageddon than fails to offer significant dimension to the story. Sheena Easton and Ernest Borgnine also supply voices for key characters. (G) FAIR ANIMATED CHILDREN'S ADVENTURE DIRS-Paul Sabella and Larry Leker RT-84 mins. It's My Party Over-wrought drama about an AIDS-inflicted architect (Eric Roberts) who stages a farewell party where he intends to commit suicide. The strained script flaunts gallows humor that fails to register. Roberts handles the difficult material with some gusto, but this downer of a story is an ordeal for actors and the audience. Gregory Harrison, Marlee Matlin, Roddy McDowall and George Segal portray some of the invitees who endure this strange gathering. (R) BORING DRAMA DIRRandal Xleiser LEAD-Eric Roberts RT-109 mins. (Profanity) Mary Reilly A lyrical version of the "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" classic told from the perspective of Jekyll's housemaid, convincingly portrayed by Julia Roberts. The psychodynamics of good versus evil are emphasized in a poignant love story_with John VIDEO VIEW Malkovich bringing eerie Rumor to the dual role. Inspired melodrama evolves with dashes of gore kept taut and suggestive until the climax when an unnecessary special effect strikes the only fal se note. Lush music and unflinching production design create the ideal atmosphere. (R) GREAT DRAMA DIRStephen Frears LEAD-Julia Roberts RT-108 mins. Thing To Do In Denver When You're Dead From fledgling director Gary Fleder, a so-so caper comedy that closely follows the style of Quentin Tarantino ("Pulp Fiction"). Andy Garcia plays a colorful hood, gone straight, who reactivates his old gang for one more assignment. Garcia and many supporting players are quite good as salty characters, but the wobbly story and derivative dialogue do not project much entertainment appeal. Christopher Walken,Treat Williams and Gabrielle Anwar co-star. (R) FAIRCOMEDYDIR-Gary Fleder LEAD-Andy Garcia Top Video Rentals Broken Arrow Hong Kong director John Woo puts his special spin on this loud, courageous action saga that involves hijacked nuclear bombs. There's meager credibility in the wake of non-stop explosions, phony shoot-outs and trumpedup stimts. John Travolta stars as the heavy, a renegade U.S. Air Force pilot who masterminds a daring scheme to demand ransom for the return of the devastating weapons. Co-pilot Christian Slater, helped by spunky park ranger Samantha Mathis, tries to stop him. The cartoonish mayhem loses its punch despite all the fury. (R) FAIR ACTION DRAMA DIR-John Woo LEAD-John Travolta RT-110 mins. (Profanity). Executive Decision This deplorable political thriller, filled with a hodgepodge of convoluted plot segments from much better action films, falls shott in every area. It tells of terrorists who hijack a U.S.bound passenger plane and threaten mass destruction with deadly nerve gas. First-time director Stuart Baird fails to resuscitate the Hfeless, cliche-riddled screenplay thatfeaturesapreposterous midair docking of a stealth fighter with the jumbo jet. Kurt Russell stars in a flat role as an antiterrorist expert. Al so wi th Steven Seagal and Halle Berry. (R) FAIR ACTION DRAMA DIR-Stuart Baird LEAD-Kurt Russell RT-132 mins. (Profanity). THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY "^ (Our drand Opening) Vew Viq$ Lake Mead Cniises' Desert Princess has a new home! It's ail shipshape and ready to bring you even more Outrageously Great Times! Our brand new landing and ferry terminal offers plenty of room to relax, indoors and out, while waifing to board the Desert Princess. Ifew Dock Experience Hoover Dam a little differently. The Desert Princess now has its own private dock alongside the dam. All midday excursion cniises offer passengers an opportunity to disembark at Hoover Dam to enjoy the remarkable sights of this engineering marvel. X ^•w Pal X I I I I I I I I I I I I I b. LaVor Dar Vttktfkd 702-293-^180 RaoMve t free Mcoad fire wtiea toooapwyiai • fall ptjmf fan of ptmet or cqaal valne pcrid. OfrervaiidS/31-91^1996 LAe Mc*d CraiM* it u AAhorind O da* id for docooM. of dK Nilianl Pvt Service Thursday, August 29,1996 Patiorama Pag* 3 Nevada Wildlife Commission issues Auction Bid Tags The Nevada Wildlife Commission issued the 1997 Auction Bid Tags during its recent commission meeting in Ely. Tags are issued to outdoor sports organizations in cooperation with Nevada Division of Wildlife. Money raised from the tags are placed in a trust account to be used for wildlife and wildlife programs throughout the state. Organizations do not keep any of the funds raised. However, groups utilize the tags as a tool to promote their banquets which assist groups with wildlife and habitat conservation projects each year. The 1996 auction bid tags brought in $248,500, with auctions from annual banquets of various outdoor organizations. The Mule Deer Foundation raised $52,000 with one mule deer tag. Another mule deer tag OUTDOORS WITH BARB BARB HENDERSON raised $50,000. The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation auctioned an elk tag for $24,000. The Nevada Bighorns Unlimited-Reno, raised $7,500 for an antelope tag and $55,000 for a desert bighorn sheep tag. Wildlife Habitat Improvement of Nevada auctioned a desert bighorn sheep tag for $60,000. That is amazing when one considers these are individual hunters bidding these amovmts, just for an opportunity to hunt big game in Nevada. Most of us submit a few hundred dollars with our hunt application each year for achance to draw a tag, and in most cases. we get our money back with no tag. However, many Nevada Hunters will hunt deer, antelope, elk and desert bighorn for a lot less than these auction tags for simply by being lucky in the draw. If you have the money and are interested in bidding on one of next year's auction bid tags, according to Geoff Schneider at NDOW, here is a list of the outdoor conservation organizations that will have tags auctioned at their banquets: •Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, one Rocky Mountain elk tag. •Fraternity of the Desert Bighorn, one desert bighorn sheep tag. •Nevada Bighorns UnlimitedReno, one desert bighorn sheep tag and one antelope tag. •The Mule Deer Foundation, Vascular disease program to begin Starting Sept. 3, Cardiology Associates of Lake Mead, will offer a free vascular disease awareness program for the community. Called the "Leg Up Program," it is designed for education about, and early detection of, circulatory conditions that can block blood flow to various parts of the body. Symptoms can include swelling or pain in an arm or leg, loss of feeling in the fingers or toes, skin discoloration, and difficulty walking. Vascular disease is most common in men and women over the age of 50 and affects millions of Americans. These diseases start so quietly that many people may not recognize a problem. They may simply think they are feeling the natural effects of aging. Smokers, diabetics and those with high blood pressure or high cholesterol levels are especially at risk. During the program, participants will answer a brief questionnaire designed to identify risk factors for vascular disease. The medical staff will also measure the "Ankl e-Brachial Index," which compares blood pressure at the arm with blood pressure at the ankle. The degree THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY of difference between the two readings may signal a circulation problem. Participants with multiple risk factors, symptoms, and those with abnormal ABIs will be advised to visit their doctor. The Leg Up Program is not a complete medical exam. It is a screening program to h^lp identify people with risk factors of vascular disease and refer them to their own physicians to initiate appropriate evaluation and treatment, if required. The earlier vascular disease is identified and treated, the better the chance that it can be controlled with smoking cessation, diet improvement or exercise. The fr-ee screening program will be held Tuesday mornings and Thursday afternoons beginning Sept. 3, at Cardiology Associates of Lake Mead, 105 N. Pecos, suite #114, in Henderson. To schedule an appointment, call Linda, 263-3366. ONCE AGAIN! BIG O BRAND TIRES CAPTURE THE WARD OP CONSUMER XCELLENCE FOR REPLACEMENT TIRES PASSENGER VEHICLE J.e. Nmr M4 ANKMM im lm k—i — ul •! 14JM iMniaMf rM*MMt. 90 DAYS SAMl AS I BIG 0 BRAND CASH,.. IE INCIUDES: • K lititiMt Eviry 50OO Mills • FIEE UiiMm Fid Mrs • FUE LHttiM Air Priisir* Ciradi • FIEE MMIHI| • FIEE IMiriM imfiAw laloidifl • FIEE libbw Vaivi Sliw Aid A FIEE iMd ilaid lipiwNwit Wormty Mwt m'\ U ball mmQTiREs I I BRAKE iNSPECTiON! I I Noobligaliontobuy.Mostcars. j Not valid with any other olter. See slofe lot details. Coupon expires 9/1 M\ \ BIG il TIRES FOUR TIRE! ROTATION I Most cars. Not valid wi any other olter. I See store lor details. I Coupon expires 9/13^. j BJGQTmES BriCO TIRES I 4 WNEEl BAUNCING || S^QOO Qpf] flQ^^ 11 ANY ALIGNMENT I • Most cars No! valid with any other oHer See store lof details Light tru* I • Utosl cars Not valid with any other oiler. See store lor details. [ and mag wheels extra Coipn expires 9/l3fl6 • Coupon expire 9/13/96. J irirn "" HENDERSON/QREEN VALLIY om *o utMoia m m $j. um onm PECOS & WINDMILL 170 N.PaoM m> n9 |||#fA||V Eflilli/lll^l BOULOER HWY & MAJOR AVE. 82S S BouldCf Hwy. f t^f* iHjlilJII fllMJIVInVi EAST SIDE OAC BONAf^ZA & NELLIS 787 N NM Blvd 4M-31M ^^^^^^^^^P^ FLAMINGO & BOULDER HWY 4728 E. Flwnlngo Rd 41>aSM ^^^^^^^DA/ WEST SIDE ^^^^IWL LAKE MEAD ft OECATUR 1965 N DMMUT •47<01O ^^ff^^^^9^ RANCHO & CRAIQ 4520 N Rancho ••••74 ^vM^HvIa DESERT INN & JONES 3303 8. JoriM •7410 ^i V^ PAHRUMP RAHflUMP 1301 E. NV SUM Hwy: 372 TT. ,^/^aS£w^^M^* K .:ra— • two mule deer tags. So, hunters, start saving your money. The banquets are coming up quickly and NDOW will gladly accept bids, usually starting into the thousands. OUTDOOR RECREATION/ INFORMATION Youth hunts scheduled Youngsters 15 years of age and under will have opportunities to participate in several special dove and waterfowl hunts in coming weeks, according to NDOW. A youth dove hunt for youngsters 12 to 15 years of age will be held Saturday, Sept. 7, at Overton Wildlife Management Area. It is limited to 30 hunters who must be accompanied by a parent or adult. A drawing for reservations for the Overton hunt was held Monday, Aug. 26 at the NDOW offices. Young hunters may also participate in a pair of youth waterfowl hunts to be held one week before the scheduled opening of the regular duck season. Saturday, Oct. 5 will be the youth waterfowl hunting day in all counties except Clark and Lincoln which will have a hunt on Saturday, Oct. 26. Hunters must be accompanied by an adult when participating in the youth hunts. Adults will not be allowed to hunt in either the youth waterfowl hunt or the Overton youth dove hunt. For more information, call NDOW, 486-5127. Until next week, enjoy the great outdoors. Henderson, an outdoor enthusiast, IS a liost and producer of local TV and radio shows. : • of^" "PERFUME DEPOT JOM^ i^;r^ "^"s :• Now has a new location at the gateway ,. ,. —-to Green Valley and Henderson to make your shopping easier ^^ S3v Discounts ranging up to 70% on Nevada's largest selection of original name brand fragrances. NEW, OLD HARD TO FIND WITH NO IMITATIONS" EXPERIENCED SALES PEOPU All Mnio< Crxlii Cordi Accpld SEUCnON • PtKIS • KRVKE FtflOirTWtAPnNG 5725 S. PtCOS, sum D-3 • 454-5059 (VONS SHOPPING CENTER AI PKOS 1, RUSSEUj (BETWEEN BIOCKBUSTEH VIDEO S, SAliY'S BEAUTY SUPPIV) PHONE ORDEIS SHimNO AVANAUI m JIAUlJ Houn Monfrl I0 4pin Sot. \Q^pn Sun: ll-Spn Anxiety Group Anger Group Alcoholics Anonymous Gamblers Anonymous GamAnon Parenting Classes & Bible studies Conquering Eating Disorders Divorce Recovery (Kids & Adults) New Classes Start in September! Call 566-0200 for details If you're looking for a church home or a support group, there is a place for you at Highland Hills Baptist Church 61 5 College Drive (at Horizon) m^4 PAl L REGlSTRAll^^jVl Saturday, September 7th • 10:00 3O0p.in. ^ Only 8 minutes 3425 S. LAMB • 739-1446 ^Ma 0 MM eo ee On Monday, September 2,1996, all Sam's Town bingo players at all sessions (beginning with 7:30 am session) will receive a FREE Sam's Town bingo bag*! $l,000t guaranteed coverall and $1,000 second chance at 3 pm, 7 pm, and 11 pm •While supplies last.tAII monies are assresate. All aames, all sessions on September 2,1996", will be played on paper. Must use dauber. SAM'S TOVT^N Where Locals Bring Their Friends

PAGE 22

Page 4 Panorama Thursday, August 29,1996 Night boating fun, but dangerous Boating on Lake Mead, or on any body of water, after dark can be very relaxing especially now that temperatures are cooler in the evenings. My first night ride was many years ago when I went out with my neighbor. In the beginning everything was great Fresh air, no other boats on the water, a sky fiill of stars and a shver ofa moon. Soft lights coming from the marina area and the slip walkways reflecting off the smooth surface of the i^ater. Boy, that is the way to boat. A I didAOt own a boat then, havingjustsoldmy 12-foot aluminum, so I began dreaming of once again going to a boat dealership and BOATING NEWS RAYEICHER joining the Lake Mead boating group again. If I remember correctly, the boat was about 25 feet with an inboard/outboard power plant and after clearing the posteid haibor speed limits, my neighbor hit the throttle and we swiftly left the quiet marina harbor and headed into the blackness. Not so much fun now, I began to think, as I cotild not see anything in front of us. I was not too reassured of our safety when he said to be on the lookout for Sentinel Island. Heck, I was not sure where Boulder City was, let alone an invisible island nanied Sentinel. Our boat had no spotlight and, with our running lights on, I could barely see the bow of the boat. Needless to say, I was relieved when he finally eased back on the speed and we began to cruise at a reasonable RPM. No, I did not mention my concern then, but if that were to occur now, you can bet I would express my doubts as to the unsafe operation of any skipper. Operate in a safe manner or put me back on shore! I do not think my friend intended to throw a scare into me by roaring off like he did. Maybe he just wanted to show oflFfor a little while, or maybe he just did not Lakes survey shows shad doing well Anglers should be pleased by recent Nevada Division of Wildlife findings that the primary food fish for striped bass on Lake Mead and Lake Mohave appears to be doing well. NDOW biologists say the spawn for threadfin shad on Lake Mead appears to be above average, while Lake Mohave's spawn has produced the most fish seen since 1990. The small forage fish are the single most important food source for stripers at the two Colorado River impoundments. Jon Sjoberg, NDOW supervisingfisheries biologist, saTd surveys are conducted each year from late April through mid-September. They are designed to give biologists an indication aboutthefuture of the sport fishery, particularly striped bass. '^e are especially interested in seeing what cycles may be occurring and any trends that are emerging. We have seen years that have had high production and others when very few shad were produced," he said. Mike Burrell, NDOW Lake Mohave biologist, said he is finding 06 larval shad per cubic meter of water surveyed. This is more than double the .025 fish found in last year's surveys. Burrell also reports he is seeing more adult shad this year in his gill nets while doing surveys for game and endemic fish. Shad surveys on Lake Mohave are conducted from Eldorado Canyon to Cottonwood Cove. The highest concentration of larval shad was found at Aztec Wash, followed by the mile 30 area and Davis Basin. Cottonwood Cove and Eldorado Canyon produced the lowest shad numbers. Lake Mead is also seeing a good year for shad production, according to biologist John Hutchings. He said fish that were spawned in recent weeks are being seen throughout the lake. NDOW to enhance Lake IVIead fishing, boating facilities The Nevada Division of Wildlife has anno\iiiced it i^providing $150,000 to enhance pdsUc boating, fishing and restroom facilities atLakeMeadNational Recreation Area. '^cause of its mild climate and close proximity to Las Vegas, the recreation area receives extremely high use from anglers and recreational boaters. Recognizing this, we wanted to improve existing facilities and enhance public accessibility, safety and usage," said NDOW Administrator Willie Molini. Included in the project will be the refurbishing of fi^ cleaning stations at both Hemen way Wash and Las Vegas Bay, at an estimated cost for the two stations of $64,000. Restrooms will be refurbished at Boulder Beach, Las Vegas Bay and Cottonwood Cove at a projected costof$69,000.Thecourtesy w 8bck fit Echo Bay will undergo a $12,000 renovation. Also included is $5,000 for development of information exhibits at Government Wash, designed to provide general public information and help protect the area's natural and recreational resources. Barring unforeseen problems, all work should be completed by June 30,1997. All of the money for the project is being provided to the National Park Service which will handle design and construction. NPS will maintain the facihties once they come on line. Most funding for the project comes from the Federal Aid in Sport Fish Restoration Act. Matching funds are being provided from the state's motorboat fuel tax. Surveys are conducted at night when the larval fish are near the water's surface. Biologists collect the shad by trawling with fine mesh nets. From spring through the summer months shad spawn in water that generally ranges from two to 10 inches deep. When hatched, their progeny are microscopic in size, but these young fish grow quickly if they are able to find an adequate diet of plankton. Threadfin shad spawn through the summer months and typically have two successful spawns each year. Attempts at a third spawn takes place in fall along the shoreline, but there is usually little production from that spawn. Interestingly, shad spawned in the spring can mature quickly enough so that they can spawn in the fall. Shad more than seven inches long have been found in the lakes, but adults rarely exceed four inches. Shad were stocked into Lake Mead in 1954 and 1955, and were released into Lake Mohave in 1955. By 1956 they were found throughout the two lakes. *li/f *• • *, • • ; • • • mi.;. THE NEWS is YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER The "Hello" business has been our specialty iliice 1928. We can bring new customers to you with our unique form of Mendly, effective, petwxiallzcd advertising. If you want to know more about out proven S-Way Advertiiing System, which offers measurabU results, call today. 702/474-1313 Employment Opportunities Available WELCOME WAGON" IXTilNATIONAL.INC. 'MU^'^ Anniversaries • Birthdays Christmas Parties ^ Imaginative Menus for 10 or more steak • Veal • Pasta • Chicken • Seafood specialties STARHNC AT^9V 2 for 1 Chinese SiOO to 6;30 p.m CHAMPAGNE SUNDAY BRUNCH... ONLY^S.'^ Fnsh5(aads* Hot Entrees •Omelet Station'Waffle Station Carving Station •Roast Beef'11001 •Turkey'Dessert Table] 4451 E Sunset Mik VMi A OraM Viltoir PkwyJ 435-4000 use common sense and felt his actions were under control. I do have a little experience in boating at night sol can tell you it can be fun but obviously more care has to be taken during this time. Don't cruise in unfamiliar areas. I have been in many Christmas Parades of Light and I still have some difficulty locating familiar landmarks along the parade route. Don't take chances. Try short trips at night to gain experience. Leave before dusk and return before all light is gone. Stay in sight of the marina lights so they can guide you on your return trip. Build confidence in your boating skills on these short trips. If you don't have a spotlight mounted on the bow, get to a dealership and buy a good handheld unit. Don't skimp on the candlepower either. When I bought my present boat, I had a cigarette lighter receptacle installed in the dash just to use for my spothght. Eixjoy the lake, but do it safely day or night. Until next time, keep your bilge dry. Eicher, a long-time valley resident, considers himself a part-time boater and fisherman. Whether remodeling or biiyinii a new home, you must .uponl SUinnMKlcr MaxlcrLlfc cflrpct.s l)y Mohawk Umnd Eutllencet All avnilable In the most beautlhil selection of styles and colors Top Quality Duponi Stninniasler MnsicrUfc Carpels Rtg. '2S.(H) NOW ONLY NO PAYMENTS NO INTEREST'0, NOW ONLY •* .^•••.^ ^^ ^^^^^ • Exclusive Salislaction Assurancel installed w/Supremc Carpet Cushion STMNMASTI'.R MiisterLife / Exclusive Salislaction Assurancel / BesI Price Guaranteel ,*'ii'i '. / Exclusive Quality & Wear Guarantee! / FREE Moving 01 Furniturel .' • • • -•.. / FREE Renrwval & Disposal 01 Old Carpet! / FREE Vacuuming Upon Completion! / Full Service Design Center. With Window Treatments, Wall Coverings, & Re-Uptiolsteiy Products & Service! / Exclusive Lite Tinra Installation Guaranteet / Exclusive Accurate Measurement Guarantee! All Carpets, Vinyls, Hardwood, Ceramic Tile, Rugs And Window Treatments On Salel il 11 1 1 UJ 11. 1 1—*4221 W. Charleston Blvd. rj^^u 870-0202 €^Ji>2r 3520 E. Tropicana Avenue 458-4727 1000 Nevada Hwy., Boulder Clty/^??,294-2680 ^ rtpMic v.'ll b'ing ai'f ifleihonof carprf', vn ^I'CVK t.le & hr.rd^ood .„ you' hon:v Ojt ir'vno n FREI! W(870-I57I YOU WILL GET SMARTER We Guarantee It! Laser Dynamics Computers Inc. Offers Classes On All Popular Computer Applications If you're not 100% satisfied with our courses we'll either give you a free repeat class or refund your money. Your choice 1 No questions asked and no hard feelings Henderson Call 739 1989 2()7S I I'MiiiLk "S I .IS VcLMs. \\ K'>l :() 20",. Off Wii This All • • • • I wmmmm f.*s^l First Game Is ^ • 1996 DQIIQS Cowboys vs. The Chicago Dears EBH HOT DOGS!!! W nElEl & FIXINGS!!! 'AT THE END OF THE FIRST QUARTER ^\ \^ FREE DRAWINGS HATS, SHIRTS, & COIN BANKS JUST TO NAME A FEW (winners must be present to win) \ QiJ?^i mm Bud & Bud Ught on special Five 16oz. bottles, on Ice FOR ONLY 00 5. CASINO RESTAURANT N. DOULDER HWY. SOUTH OF SUNSET • 565-9116 • HENDERSON NV. Yom HEALTH EvGrv child ^UNSELING CORNER ^^^ ^i^ ^ ^^m • • • ^^ JIM* KATHLEEN GRACE needs a Thursday, August 29, 1996 Panorama Page 5 -up Leroy Bernstein, MD Pediatrics Most people do take their family automobile in for a periodic tune-up and to check various parts of the car. However, the fact that a child needs a periodic "tune-up" is often overlooked but is obviously at least as important as having your car checked. All too often parents have the attitude that "when my child is sick, I seek medical care, otherwise I don't have to see a doctor." Just like checking the steering mechanism or the brake linings of your car, checking your well child periodically is probably more important than seeing a physician for a minor illness. Problems found in a complete head-to-toe routine check-up can have profound consequences for a child's future. When a child is taken to a physician with a specific complaint, the doctor will evaluate the possible sources of that complaint. For example, if a child has a fever, the doctor will check for ear infection, possibly pneumonia, possibly urinary tract infection, or other causes, but in all likelihood will not routinely check other parts of the child's body such as arms and legs, heart, vision, etc. HiiBse are organ systems that "ftrreratnined at the time of what we consider a routine complete check-up. A child may appear perfectly healthy, but may have a defective heart with a murmur, a dislocated joint, visual problems, neurological problems or other possible maladies not readily apparent, but which can be detected by a trained pediatrician. Fortunately, it has happened to me only twice in my 14 years of practice in Las Vegas. On two occasions, during routine checkups, I found abdominal tumors in two small boys. The abnormalities were detected early, and prompt intervention prevented possible tragic consequences. On other occasions I have foundheartmurmurs, dislocated hips, and other abnormalities. Finding such defects requires someone with special training to discover these problems. Schools throughout Clark County are open again. And what better time for a routine check-up than a back-toschool physical exam. Our school system requires that children have completed a proper immunization series, but this is all. There is much more to your child than "shots." Generally, the pediatrician, following completion of the exam will simply say "your child is perfectly normal and perfectly healthy." What sweeter words could you possibly hope to hear? On the other hand should a problem be discovered it can and should be dealt with promptly, and perhaps avoid more serious consequences in later years. ST. ROSE BIRTHS July 30, 1996 Beverly J. Chmiel, girl; Patricia and Robert Lemke, boy; Karen and Michael Dixon, boy; Terri and Steven Szpyrka, girl. July 31, 1996 Barbara and Timothy Romero, boy; Camla and Michael Schultz, boy; Jodi Tyson and Aaron Low, girl; Arlene and Donald Volnoff, boy. August 1,1996 Paula and Scott Angelmaier, boy; Amy and Jack Miller, boy; Heather and Frederick Marall, boy; Mary and John Gallagher, boy; Sonia Williams, boy. August 2, 1996 Stacy and Nicholas Till, boy; Kimberly and Philip Floth, boy; Anita and Carlos Bassler, girl; Loriann and Gary Harker, girl. August 3, 1996 Catherine and Todd Osmundson, boy; Catherine and Brent GiflFord, boy. August 4, 1996 Jan and Guy Torres, boy; Kimberly Carbajal, girl; Tina and Oscar Castanon, boy. August 6,1996 Dominique and Pedro Gonzalez, boy. Lianne and Richard Conti, girl; Judith and Miguel Serrano, boy; Sandee and Thomas Yagle, boy. August 8,1996 Rose and Patrick Carrigan, ;boy; Evette Gonzalez, girl; Erin and Johnny Gutierrez II, boy; Bethany Knight, girl; Kern and LeRoi Stone, boy; Alcira and Paul Romtvedt, girl; Kendra Glasper, boy; Nicole CoUey and Eric Beurrier, girl. August 10,1996 Lorrie and Robert Mainord, girl; Laurie and Tyler Goodman, boy; Julie Dahl and Glen Havard, girl; Karen and Gregory Jones, boy. August 11,1996 Susan and Ronald Ruliffson, girl; Erica and Peter Mcllroy, girl; Anna and David Rivero, boy; Kelly and John Ross, boy; Jacqueline Gerard and Jose Lucero, girl; Laura and Kenneth Neher, girl; Cynthia and Frederick Simonds, boy. August 13,1996 Shirley and Edward Koch, girl; Christina and Miguel Nantas, boy; Nicole and Jeffrey Martin, girl; Brandy and Brian Brown, boy; Diane and Lennon Jordan III, girl; Traci and Kenneth Fiscus, girl; Jeanie Navarre and Alvin Caldwell, boy. / August 14,1996 Sara and David Gardner, girl; Carla and Roger Whitmire, girl; Stacey and Jeremy Wood, boy; Kristin and Raymundo Cabrera, girl; Virginia and Peter Jauch, girl. August 15,1996 Vera and James Jordan, boy; Mildred Baze and Brian Pattiani, boy; Terra and Keith Koenig, girl. August 16,1996 Judith and Dale Ficklin, girl; Linnae and Michael Merritt,boy; Karen and Scott Majewski, girl. August 18,1996 Ronda and Ryna Torbic, girl; Shirin and Todd Coleman, boy; Michelle and Robin Mellor, girl. August 19,1996 Tami Campa and Michael Close, girl; Valerie Hughes, girl. August 20,1996 Kristen and Michael Lee, boy; Bonnie and John Hawley, boy; Julie and John Garcia, boy. SAVING WATER nS A GRASS ROOTS EFFORT DON T WATER IN THE RAIN Intimacy and sharing Why is talking about your personal life with a stranger sometimes easier than talking to someone close such as a spouse or family member? Probably the most significant factor is that talking to someone who doesn't know you well is a low risk ii\teraction, whereas sharing with someone significant could be a higher risk in terms of getting emotionally hurt. Sharing intimately about yourself, your life and your feelings is healthy and vital to your personal relationships. The main ingredients that make intimate sharing likely to happen between two people are knowing it is safe to share and using good listening skills. Making a relationship a safe place to be open, to share who you are, is a deliberate effort, a conscipus decision each of us can make. Couples need to talk about how they can make it safe for each other to discuss problems, concerns and hurt feelings. Having things shared in confidence used against you destroys the feeling it is safe to share. Not sharing creates distance between two people and a wall is gradually built of hurt, resentment and loneliness. Agree to have "safe time" or "sharing time" each week. Couples who use this and honor what is shared in those talks find their good feelings, trust and desire for one another increasing. It feels wonderful to know your partner cares enough to make time to let you share freely and openly without the fear of being judged or criticized. As counselors, we often teach families how to set up weekly family meetings. The results are inevitably positive, and children generally are all for the family meetings. They begin to experience less anger and tension, behavior improves and cooperative feelings increase. Knowing there is a time when they will be able to speak, be heard and get help with concerns gives children a sense that they count and that they have some control. Safe time together, whether for a couple or a family, works when good communication skills are used, especially easyto-leam good listening skills. Good listening means primarily listening to understand the other person 's point of view and showing interest and respect even if you don't see it the same way. The absence of criticism or negative, derogatory remarks is crucial. Usually we listen defensively. We focus on what is wrong with the other person's position or even remark on how they communicate rather than on what they are saying. We argue, defend our own position and find fault. The result is inevitably hurt feelings, distancing, frustration and eventually discouragement and giving up. This can gradually erode the good in the relationship and destroy loving caring feelings. A wise person once said that growth conies not by fighting with what is wrong, but by loving what is right. We believe our poor, judgmental communication styles are primarily a reactive, automatic style — simply an inherited aspect of our culture. As couples move away from traditional roles and assume a more conscious desire for quality and meaningfulness, tiie interest in interpersonal skills is increasing. This is a Renaissance age in the realm of relationships. Those willing to strive and do the work it takes to change old, improductive styles will find the rewards of deeper, more intimate relationships that grow and become better with time. Children learn what they live with. What a marvelous opportunity for couples to improve their own relationships and, at the same time, teach children a new and better way of creating trusting, intimate relationships. Jim and Kathleen Grace Santor are licensed marriage and family therapists practicing at Professional Counseling E.T.C., at 601 Whitney Ranch BIdg. C, Suite 12, 458-5686. 1 ^i{)iviEN^s HEA LTH DR. GEORGE D. WILBANKS, JR. Getting your mammogram Oct. 19 is National Mammography Day. A mammogram is an X-ray of the breast used to detect breast cancer early, at its more curable stage. New technology in mammography screening allows detection of small tumors up to two years before they can be felt by you or your physician. Early diagnosis and treatment gives up to a 90% chance of surviving breast cancer. If you are age 50 or older, you should have a mammogram each year. If you are between 40 and 49, there is some debate over how frequently you should be screened. The National Cancer Institute withdrew recommendations for routine mammogram screening for women in this age group, based on certain studies. However, The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, The American Cancer Society, and other medical groups believe the studies are inconclusive and continue to recommend having a mammogram every one to two years during your 40s. Talk to your doctor about what is right for you. Your doctor can order a mammogrram test for you at a nearby hospital, cHnic, or special facility. Mammography facilities are now regulated and are required to be certified. Many insurers now include coverage of mammogn'aphy as part ofa woman's routine screening once she reaches a certain age. During the procedure, the doctor or technician will have you remove your clothes from the waist up and will position you in front of the Xray machine. Two smooth plates will be placed around one of your breasts to flatten it so the greatest amount of tissue can be examined. Both breasts are examined this way. The pressure from the plates may cause brief discomfort. If you menstruate, you may want to schedule your mammogram for the week right after your period, when the breasts are usually less tender. Mammography equipment today is quite safe, exposing you to a very low dose of radiation. A woman can even undergo a mammogram while she is breastfeeding, if, for example, she experiences a risk such as a breast lump during this time. However, because the tissue ofa lactating breast is usually more dense, there may be difficulty in reading the mammogram. It is generally better to wait until a mother has stopped nursing for several months before doing a routine screening mammogram. Since mammography is not 100% accurate, you should also perform a monthly breast self-exam and get an annual clinical breast exam from your physician. Wil banks is past president of the Annencan College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Backed by full-service hospital. Extensive experience in diagnosing and treating depression, anxiety, chemical dependency emotional stress and codependency. Inpatient partial hospitalization & Outpatient treatment available. 564-4736 AU Calls Confidential i

PAGE 23

Page 4 Panorama Thursday, August 29,1996 Night boating fun, but dangerous Boating on Lake Mead, or on any body of water, after dark can be very relaxing especially now that temperatures are cooler in the evenings. My first night ride was many years ago when I went out with my neighbor. In the beginning everything was great Fresh air, no other boats on the water, a sky fiill of stars and a shver ofa moon. Soft lights coming from the marina area and the slip walkways reflecting off the smooth surface of the i^ater. Boy, that is the way to boat. A I didAOt own a boat then, havingjustsoldmy 12-foot aluminum, so I began dreaming of once again going to a boat dealership and BOATING NEWS RAYEICHER joining the Lake Mead boating group again. If I remember correctly, the boat was about 25 feet with an inboard/outboard power plant and after clearing the posteid haibor speed limits, my neighbor hit the throttle and we swiftly left the quiet marina harbor and headed into the blackness. Not so much fun now, I began to think, as I cotild not see anything in front of us. I was not too reassured of our safety when he said to be on the lookout for Sentinel Island. Heck, I was not sure where Boulder City was, let alone an invisible island nanied Sentinel. Our boat had no spotlight and, with our running lights on, I could barely see the bow of the boat. Needless to say, I was relieved when he finally eased back on the speed and we began to cruise at a reasonable RPM. No, I did not mention my concern then, but if that were to occur now, you can bet I would express my doubts as to the unsafe operation of any skipper. Operate in a safe manner or put me back on shore! I do not think my friend intended to throw a scare into me by roaring off like he did. Maybe he just wanted to show oflFfor a little while, or maybe he just did not Lakes survey shows shad doing well Anglers should be pleased by recent Nevada Division of Wildlife findings that the primary food fish for striped bass on Lake Mead and Lake Mohave appears to be doing well. NDOW biologists say the spawn for threadfin shad on Lake Mead appears to be above average, while Lake Mohave's spawn has produced the most fish seen since 1990. The small forage fish are the single most important food source for stripers at the two Colorado River impoundments. Jon Sjoberg, NDOW supervisingfisheries biologist, saTd surveys are conducted each year from late April through mid-September. They are designed to give biologists an indication aboutthefuture of the sport fishery, particularly striped bass. '^e are especially interested in seeing what cycles may be occurring and any trends that are emerging. We have seen years that have had high production and others when very few shad were produced," he said. Mike Burrell, NDOW Lake Mohave biologist, said he is finding 06 larval shad per cubic meter of water surveyed. This is more than double the .025 fish found in last year's surveys. Burrell also reports he is seeing more adult shad this year in his gill nets while doing surveys for game and endemic fish. Shad surveys on Lake Mohave are conducted from Eldorado Canyon to Cottonwood Cove. The highest concentration of larval shad was found at Aztec Wash, followed by the mile 30 area and Davis Basin. Cottonwood Cove and Eldorado Canyon produced the lowest shad numbers. Lake Mead is also seeing a good year for shad production, according to biologist John Hutchings. He said fish that were spawned in recent weeks are being seen throughout the lake. NDOW to enhance Lake IVIead fishing, boating facilities The Nevada Division of Wildlife has anno\iiiced it i^providing $150,000 to enhance pdsUc boating, fishing and restroom facilities atLakeMeadNational Recreation Area. '^cause of its mild climate and close proximity to Las Vegas, the recreation area receives extremely high use from anglers and recreational boaters. Recognizing this, we wanted to improve existing facilities and enhance public accessibility, safety and usage," said NDOW Administrator Willie Molini. Included in the project will be the refurbishing of fi^ cleaning stations at both Hemen way Wash and Las Vegas Bay, at an estimated cost for the two stations of $64,000. Restrooms will be refurbished at Boulder Beach, Las Vegas Bay and Cottonwood Cove at a projected costof$69,000.Thecourtesy w 8bck fit Echo Bay will undergo a $12,000 renovation. Also included is $5,000 for development of information exhibits at Government Wash, designed to provide general public information and help protect the area's natural and recreational resources. Barring unforeseen problems, all work should be completed by June 30,1997. All of the money for the project is being provided to the National Park Service which will handle design and construction. NPS will maintain the facihties once they come on line. Most funding for the project comes from the Federal Aid in Sport Fish Restoration Act. Matching funds are being provided from the state's motorboat fuel tax. Surveys are conducted at night when the larval fish are near the water's surface. Biologists collect the shad by trawling with fine mesh nets. From spring through the summer months shad spawn in water that generally ranges from two to 10 inches deep. When hatched, their progeny are microscopic in size, but these young fish grow quickly if they are able to find an adequate diet of plankton. Threadfin shad spawn through the summer months and typically have two successful spawns each year. Attempts at a third spawn takes place in fall along the shoreline, but there is usually little production from that spawn. Interestingly, shad spawned in the spring can mature quickly enough so that they can spawn in the fall. Shad more than seven inches long have been found in the lakes, but adults rarely exceed four inches. Shad were stocked into Lake Mead in 1954 and 1955, and were released into Lake Mohave in 1955. By 1956 they were found throughout the two lakes. *li/f *• • *, • • ; • • • mi.;. THE NEWS is YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER The "Hello" business has been our specialty iliice 1928. We can bring new customers to you with our unique form of Mendly, effective, petwxiallzcd advertising. If you want to know more about out proven S-Way Advertiiing System, which offers measurabU results, call today. 702/474-1313 Employment Opportunities Available WELCOME WAGON" IXTilNATIONAL.INC. 'MU^'^ Anniversaries • Birthdays Christmas Parties ^ Imaginative Menus for 10 or more steak • Veal • Pasta • Chicken • Seafood specialties STARHNC AT^9V 2 for 1 Chinese SiOO to 6;30 p.m CHAMPAGNE SUNDAY BRUNCH... ONLY^S.'^ Fnsh5(aads* Hot Entrees •Omelet Station'Waffle Station Carving Station •Roast Beef'11001 •Turkey'Dessert Table] 4451 E Sunset Mik VMi A OraM Viltoir PkwyJ 435-4000 use common sense and felt his actions were under control. I do have a little experience in boating at night sol can tell you it can be fun but obviously more care has to be taken during this time. Don't cruise in unfamiliar areas. I have been in many Christmas Parades of Light and I still have some difficulty locating familiar landmarks along the parade route. Don't take chances. Try short trips at night to gain experience. Leave before dusk and return before all light is gone. Stay in sight of the marina lights so they can guide you on your return trip. Build confidence in your boating skills on these short trips. If you don't have a spotlight mounted on the bow, get to a dealership and buy a good handheld unit. Don't skimp on the candlepower either. When I bought my present boat, I had a cigarette lighter receptacle installed in the dash just to use for my spothght. Eixjoy the lake, but do it safely day or night. Until next time, keep your bilge dry. Eicher, a long-time valley resident, considers himself a part-time boater and fisherman. Whether remodeling or biiyinii a new home, you must .uponl SUinnMKlcr MaxlcrLlfc cflrpct.s l)y Mohawk Umnd Eutllencet All avnilable In the most beautlhil selection of styles and colors Top Quality Duponi Stninniasler MnsicrUfc Carpels Rtg. 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Laser Dynamics Computers Inc. Offers Classes On All Popular Computer Applications If you're not 100% satisfied with our courses we'll either give you a free repeat class or refund your money. Your choice 1 No questions asked and no hard feelings Henderson Call 739 1989 2()7S I I'MiiiLk "S I .IS VcLMs. \\ K'>l :() 20",. Off Wii This All • • • • I wmmmm f.*s^l First Game Is ^ • 1996 DQIIQS Cowboys vs. The Chicago Dears EBH HOT DOGS!!! W nElEl & FIXINGS!!! 'AT THE END OF THE FIRST QUARTER ^\ \^ FREE DRAWINGS HATS, SHIRTS, & COIN BANKS JUST TO NAME A FEW (winners must be present to win) \ QiJ?^i mm Bud & Bud Ught on special Five 16oz. bottles, on Ice FOR ONLY 00 5. CASINO RESTAURANT N. DOULDER HWY. SOUTH OF SUNSET • 565-9116 • HENDERSON NV. Yom HEALTH EvGrv child ^UNSELING CORNER ^^^ ^i^ ^ ^^m • • • ^^ JIM* KATHLEEN GRACE needs a Thursday, August 29, 1996 Panorama Page 5 -up Leroy Bernstein, MD Pediatrics Most people do take their family automobile in for a periodic tune-up and to check various parts of the car. However, the fact that a child needs a periodic "tune-up" is often overlooked but is obviously at least as important as having your car checked. All too often parents have the attitude that "when my child is sick, I seek medical care, otherwise I don't have to see a doctor." Just like checking the steering mechanism or the brake linings of your car, checking your well child periodically is probably more important than seeing a physician for a minor illness. Problems found in a complete head-to-toe routine check-up can have profound consequences for a child's future. When a child is taken to a physician with a specific complaint, the doctor will evaluate the possible sources of that complaint. For example, if a child has a fever, the doctor will check for ear infection, possibly pneumonia, possibly urinary tract infection, or other causes, but in all likelihood will not routinely check other parts of the child's body such as arms and legs, heart, vision, etc. HiiBse are organ systems that "ftrreratnined at the time of what we consider a routine complete check-up. A child may appear perfectly healthy, but may have a defective heart with a murmur, a dislocated joint, visual problems, neurological problems or other possible maladies not readily apparent, but which can be detected by a trained pediatrician. Fortunately, it has happened to me only twice in my 14 years of practice in Las Vegas. On two occasions, during routine checkups, I found abdominal tumors in two small boys. The abnormalities were detected early, and prompt intervention prevented possible tragic consequences. On other occasions I have foundheartmurmurs, dislocated hips, and other abnormalities. Finding such defects requires someone with special training to discover these problems. Schools throughout Clark County are open again. And what better time for a routine check-up than a back-toschool physical exam. Our school system requires that children have completed a proper immunization series, but this is all. There is much more to your child than "shots." Generally, the pediatrician, following completion of the exam will simply say "your child is perfectly normal and perfectly healthy." What sweeter words could you possibly hope to hear? On the other hand should a problem be discovered it can and should be dealt with promptly, and perhaps avoid more serious consequences in later years. ST. ROSE BIRTHS July 30, 1996 Beverly J. Chmiel, girl; Patricia and Robert Lemke, boy; Karen and Michael Dixon, boy; Terri and Steven Szpyrka, girl. July 31, 1996 Barbara and Timothy Romero, boy; Camla and Michael Schultz, boy; Jodi Tyson and Aaron Low, girl; Arlene and Donald Volnoff, boy. August 1,1996 Paula and Scott Angelmaier, boy; Amy and Jack Miller, boy; Heather and Frederick Marall, boy; Mary and John Gallagher, boy; Sonia Williams, boy. August 2, 1996 Stacy and Nicholas Till, boy; Kimberly and Philip Floth, boy; Anita and Carlos Bassler, girl; Loriann and Gary Harker, girl. August 3, 1996 Catherine and Todd Osmundson, boy; Catherine and Brent GiflFord, boy. August 4, 1996 Jan and Guy Torres, boy; Kimberly Carbajal, girl; Tina and Oscar Castanon, boy. August 6,1996 Dominique and Pedro Gonzalez, boy. Lianne and Richard Conti, girl; Judith and Miguel Serrano, boy; Sandee and Thomas Yagle, boy. August 8,1996 Rose and Patrick Carrigan, ;boy; Evette Gonzalez, girl; Erin and Johnny Gutierrez II, boy; Bethany Knight, girl; Kern and LeRoi Stone, boy; Alcira and Paul Romtvedt, girl; Kendra Glasper, boy; Nicole CoUey and Eric Beurrier, girl. August 10,1996 Lorrie and Robert Mainord, girl; Laurie and Tyler Goodman, boy; Julie Dahl and Glen Havard, girl; Karen and Gregory Jones, boy. August 11,1996 Susan and Ronald Ruliffson, girl; Erica and Peter Mcllroy, girl; Anna and David Rivero, boy; Kelly and John Ross, boy; Jacqueline Gerard and Jose Lucero, girl; Laura and Kenneth Neher, girl; Cynthia and Frederick Simonds, boy. August 13,1996 Shirley and Edward Koch, girl; Christina and Miguel Nantas, boy; Nicole and Jeffrey Martin, girl; Brandy and Brian Brown, boy; Diane and Lennon Jordan III, girl; Traci and Kenneth Fiscus, girl; Jeanie Navarre and Alvin Caldwell, boy. / August 14,1996 Sara and David Gardner, girl; Carla and Roger Whitmire, girl; Stacey and Jeremy Wood, boy; Kristin and Raymundo Cabrera, girl; Virginia and Peter Jauch, girl. August 15,1996 Vera and James Jordan, boy; Mildred Baze and Brian Pattiani, boy; Terra and Keith Koenig, girl. August 16,1996 Judith and Dale Ficklin, girl; Linnae and Michael Merritt,boy; Karen and Scott Majewski, girl. August 18,1996 Ronda and Ryna Torbic, girl; Shirin and Todd Coleman, boy; Michelle and Robin Mellor, girl. August 19,1996 Tami Campa and Michael Close, girl; Valerie Hughes, girl. August 20,1996 Kristen and Michael Lee, boy; Bonnie and John Hawley, boy; Julie and John Garcia, boy. SAVING WATER nS A GRASS ROOTS EFFORT DON T WATER IN THE RAIN Intimacy and sharing Why is talking about your personal life with a stranger sometimes easier than talking to someone close such as a spouse or family member? Probably the most significant factor is that talking to someone who doesn't know you well is a low risk ii\teraction, whereas sharing with someone significant could be a higher risk in terms of getting emotionally hurt. Sharing intimately about yourself, your life and your feelings is healthy and vital to your personal relationships. The main ingredients that make intimate sharing likely to happen between two people are knowing it is safe to share and using good listening skills. Making a relationship a safe place to be open, to share who you are, is a deliberate effort, a conscipus decision each of us can make. Couples need to talk about how they can make it safe for each other to discuss problems, concerns and hurt feelings. Having things shared in confidence used against you destroys the feeling it is safe to share. Not sharing creates distance between two people and a wall is gradually built of hurt, resentment and loneliness. Agree to have "safe time" or "sharing time" each week. Couples who use this and honor what is shared in those talks find their good feelings, trust and desire for one another increasing. It feels wonderful to know your partner cares enough to make time to let you share freely and openly without the fear of being judged or criticized. As counselors, we often teach families how to set up weekly family meetings. The results are inevitably positive, and children generally are all for the family meetings. They begin to experience less anger and tension, behavior improves and cooperative feelings increase. Knowing there is a time when they will be able to speak, be heard and get help with concerns gives children a sense that they count and that they have some control. Safe time together, whether for a couple or a family, works when good communication skills are used, especially easyto-leam good listening skills. Good listening means primarily listening to understand the other person 's point of view and showing interest and respect even if you don't see it the same way. The absence of criticism or negative, derogatory remarks is crucial. Usually we listen defensively. We focus on what is wrong with the other person's position or even remark on how they communicate rather than on what they are saying. We argue, defend our own position and find fault. The result is inevitably hurt feelings, distancing, frustration and eventually discouragement and giving up. This can gradually erode the good in the relationship and destroy loving caring feelings. A wise person once said that growth conies not by fighting with what is wrong, but by loving what is right. We believe our poor, judgmental communication styles are primarily a reactive, automatic style — simply an inherited aspect of our culture. As couples move away from traditional roles and assume a more conscious desire for quality and meaningfulness, tiie interest in interpersonal skills is increasing. This is a Renaissance age in the realm of relationships. Those willing to strive and do the work it takes to change old, improductive styles will find the rewards of deeper, more intimate relationships that grow and become better with time. Children learn what they live with. What a marvelous opportunity for couples to improve their own relationships and, at the same time, teach children a new and better way of creating trusting, intimate relationships. Jim and Kathleen Grace Santor are licensed marriage and family therapists practicing at Professional Counseling E.T.C., at 601 Whitney Ranch BIdg. C, Suite 12, 458-5686. 1 ^i{)iviEN^s HEA LTH DR. GEORGE D. WILBANKS, JR. Getting your mammogram Oct. 19 is National Mammography Day. A mammogram is an X-ray of the breast used to detect breast cancer early, at its more curable stage. New technology in mammography screening allows detection of small tumors up to two years before they can be felt by you or your physician. Early diagnosis and treatment gives up to a 90% chance of surviving breast cancer. If you are age 50 or older, you should have a mammogram each year. If you are between 40 and 49, there is some debate over how frequently you should be screened. The National Cancer Institute withdrew recommendations for routine mammogram screening for women in this age group, based on certain studies. However, The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, The American Cancer Society, and other medical groups believe the studies are inconclusive and continue to recommend having a mammogram every one to two years during your 40s. Talk to your doctor about what is right for you. Your doctor can order a mammogrram test for you at a nearby hospital, cHnic, or special facility. Mammography facilities are now regulated and are required to be certified. Many insurers now include coverage of mammogn'aphy as part ofa woman's routine screening once she reaches a certain age. During the procedure, the doctor or technician will have you remove your clothes from the waist up and will position you in front of the Xray machine. Two smooth plates will be placed around one of your breasts to flatten it so the greatest amount of tissue can be examined. Both breasts are examined this way. The pressure from the plates may cause brief discomfort. If you menstruate, you may want to schedule your mammogram for the week right after your period, when the breasts are usually less tender. Mammography equipment today is quite safe, exposing you to a very low dose of radiation. A woman can even undergo a mammogram while she is breastfeeding, if, for example, she experiences a risk such as a breast lump during this time. However, because the tissue ofa lactating breast is usually more dense, there may be difficulty in reading the mammogram. It is generally better to wait until a mother has stopped nursing for several months before doing a routine screening mammogram. Since mammography is not 100% accurate, you should also perform a monthly breast self-exam and get an annual clinical breast exam from your physician. Wil banks is past president of the Annencan College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Backed by full-service hospital. Extensive experience in diagnosing and treating depression, anxiety, chemical dependency emotional stress and codependency. Inpatient partial hospitalization & Outpatient treatment available. 564-4736 AU Calls Confidential i

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r hig* 6 Panorama Thursday, August 29,1996 ii?!f!i!!!!pPi!^^ h < w^j' ii ';:^^ ^•MdMUiakuildii • ; • • -.:.:.:.• :•;.':':.' •. • •.: • • .•.. • ..• • : • • • • .•.•.•.• • • • .' • • '.A • •.' • • • .•-v. •.;..'. ^.:. ..•,'. • .'j. • ;.•. • • • \.v. • •. • • ^.y. .-. • • • • • '. • • : • •:.' • :-.•...' • • f-:-.". • .^ • y • V. • • • .V^ • ^.•. • .^.^.• • •^ • •^' • •.^. • ,^,^." • • .>>; • ^ • • CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH 1401 RFTH STREET BOULDER CITY, NV 293-4332 Saturday Country Western Worship 5:00 p.m. Sunday Traditional Worship 9:00 a.m. Sunday School and Adult Bible Study 10:15 a.m. St. Matthews Episcopal Church JheWoitdngCttuKh Saturday Evening Mass 5:30 pm Sunday Mass 9:45 am Church School During Sunday Mass Nursery Available 4709 S. Netlis Blvd. 451-2483 2llodBNoitho>Tro|)lcwonNtlb t SL Peter's Catholic Church 204 S. Boulder Hwy. MASS SCHEDULE: Sat: S p.m. Sun: 8 am & 10 am 11:30 am 5 pm Confessions: Sat. 4 to 4:30 j^^ NEW BEGINNINGS ^^ COMMUNITY CHURCH ^^^^ (A new church in Green VSilley) ^^ (Relaxed, casual atmosphere) Meeting Sundays of Dovkl Cox Elementoiy School 280 Oarti Ditv* on Roblndale t>etween Pecos and Eastern WORSHIP CELEBRATION, 10:00 A.M. PtK>r>e: 263-3024 Pastor, Richoid Hubocek "^ Nuiseiy/Chlld Core Boulder City AMembly of God Church "The church of new l)egirmings' 7th and Utah (The Boulder City Women's Club Building Sunday Moming Worship 9:30 A.M. Sunday Evening Services 6:00 P.M. Wednesday Services 7:00 P.M. YOU ABE ALWAYS WELCOME/ Ouorn Jordan, Puator none (70^ 293-0620 IM IH ( HUISTIAN CHURC H TJOI Aclrims Blvd. NHVV loc/vnoN ii; SUNDAY SERVICES: Multi-Denominational Worship 10 AM Child Carp Avnilahlo BABES PUPPET PROGRAM June 29Aug, 10 Telephone: 293-245-1 • Hev fiol)l Tcdtoiv, P,ilAR KODESH The Church On The Hir 711 Valle Verde Ct., IHenderson, NV 454-2722 Qary A. Morefieid Senior Pastor Green Valley Christian Center Sunday Schedule Moming Worship: 8:45-11:15 AM & 6:00 PM Children's Church: 8:45-11:15 AM Sunday School: 10:15 AM Evening Worship: 6:00 PM Wednesday: Family Night 7:00 PM Thursday: Youth Group (7-12), 6:45 PM 'astois Bill .*; Nora Toller ii, K 7:110 ;).iii. • I 260-4777 BUILDING THE rUIURE TOGE111BR CniLDREM'S SUMMER PROGRAM YOUTH QROUPS REUQIOUS SCHOOL 0 BAR/BAT MITZVAH PROGRAM SERVICES ARE HELD: 2nd & 4th Friday evenings, 7:30 p.m. Every Shabl>at morning, 9 a.m. United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism affiliate 6000 S. Eastern Ave., #3B. Cail 798-4510 • '.':i ^HlGHLAJmllLLS 618 College Drive • Henderson • 866-0200 Sunday Worship Services: 8:30am, 11:00am, 6:00pm Come Join lu Sunday! We Care About You curd Your Family! Celebrate Jesus at Dynamic Drama, Music and Message! Currently meeting at Community College of Southern Nevada 700 College Drive, Henderson Sundays 10AM Call 2634661 for more information MPLE BETH SHOLOM EttabUihed 1947 /• The largest Congregation in Nevoda AffliliotAi with United Synagogue of Conservative Judoiim & Solomon Schechter Day Schools OUH MENMIERSHIP if COME GROW WITH U$UI V m 1600lalOakySlvd. • Lot Vegat, Nevada • 384-5070 THE SALVATION ARMY COMMUNITY CENTER A Center For Worship and Service! 830 E. Lal(e Mead Dr., Henderson, NV (702) 565-9578 Sunday Worship Services: 11 am & 6pm Sunday School For All Ages: 9:30 am Bible Study Each Thursday: 6 pm St. Thomas More Catholic Cdmmuiiity 130 n. Pecos Rd. Henderson, 361-3022 MASSES Sat: 4 pm Ar 5:30 pm Sun: 8 am, 9:30 am, 11 am & 12:30 pm Men FrI. 8:30 am Father Dui noian, C.S.V. St. Paul's Charismatic Episcopal Church 1661 QalierlaDr. (Wliite Middle School, Henderson) SUNDAY WORSHIP 10AM Father George Gerard • 564-1152 i^ther David Holf Father Charlea Coleman To list your congregation call Goldie at 435-7700. I fem:4 \ii1 SUNRISE COMMUNITY CHURCH Meeting in Henderson Convention Center 200 S. Water St. (please use liackparking lot) REV. JIM HAMILTON, PASTOR 737-5219 Sunday Worship lOam Come and let us help molte your life woric for you. VV i^ SOUTHERN BAPTIST CHURCH 240 S. ChoRa St. • Henderson, W 89015 (702) 565)72 You're Invited! Sunday Worship Services: ,^|8:30 a.m. 9:45 a.m. ISPS.^ 11:00 d.m. 6:00 pm Paator Ran* JoHph Houle COMMUNITY BAPTIST CHURCH 245 E. Foster Ave. • Henderson, NV 89009 Reverend Sam Roberson, PastorAeacher X SUNDAY: Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Morning Service • 11:00 a.m. Evening Service 7:00 p.m. MONDAY: Evagelism Classes 7:00 p.m. TUESDAY: Theology Classes 7:00 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Prayer & Bible Study • 7:00 p.m. THURSDAY: Choir Rehearsal • 7:00 p.m. FRIDAY: Teachers Meeting • 6:45 p.m. Worship Services and Bible Study Times Sundoys 8:30, 9:45 & 11:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m. Wednesdays 6:00 p.m. ~Qifmmii Valley Baptist Church 270 N. Voile Verde Dr., Henderson • 434-1906 (Comer of Silver Springs and Voile Verde) GREEN VALLEY CHURCH OF CHRIST 28 Commerce Center Drive (On Sunset In Commerce Center betiind Ethel M CtKxx>late8) 456-2040 OR 29^J7J7 BMe Centered Undenominational Always A Welcome DIAbA-BIBI^ MESSAGE PhoNE 4$6'2040 (A taped weekly inspirational message) ,^ Call atxHJt our FREE Bible correspondence course. The Doho'i Foith Expior* t*ochings on Worid Unity, Bimlnotlon of Projudico, Equollty off Mon ond Womon ond find onswors to tho most porploxing quostions of our timos. Coii 293^663 for froo llforoturo of information. THE CENTER for SUCCESSFUL UVING (A Melaphyalcal Learning Experience) Join us EVERY Wed. evening 7-8pm HAVEAQREATLIFEI Joy, Happiness & Abundance Henderson Convention Center 200 Water Street • 434-3912 i, ^-^ VEGAS VALLEY CHRISTIAN CHURCH 5515 Mm VisfQ, Los Vegos Phone 451-9211 UNDENOMINATIONAL BIBLE and CHRIST FOCUSEO • • BIBLE SCHOOL 9:30 AM WORSHIP 1030 AM S.O.W. (Study on Wednesday) 7:00 P.M. (Child Core Avoilobic) Serving Grocn Volley & Los Vogos Areos neor Sunsci 0 Ruisill Rood .1 ()lnco lo l)i>long w place lo become I \ccnsvii Child Cnrc Center Phono -ISI-OMiC^ St Christopher's Episcopal Church Holy Eucharist Sunday 9 A.M. 812 Arizona St. • Boulder City • 293-4275 St. Christopher's Church, Boulder City is a God centered, inclusive, multi-generational, spiritually related family welcoming all. ^iUfllAN mKIER A FOURSQUARE CHURCH 571 Adams Bhftl. Bouldar City 293-7773 Sunday Woralilp lOKM) am Home of Christian Center School and Day Care Cemer OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN CHURCH "Holding Forth the Word of Life..." Philippians2:16 Sunday School 9 am Adult Bible Class 9 am Sunday Worship 8 fc 10:45 am Pastor Bruning 59 Lynn Ln., Henderson 565-9154 Growing togettier in the grace of our Lord Jesus RELIGIOUS SCIENCE CHURCH of LAS VEGAS 4820 Alpine PI., Ste. ElOl Us Vegas, NV 89107 258-5683 Wednesday 7:00 PM Sunday 9AM & 10:30AM Rev. Sheila Weldon ST. PAUL THE APOSTLE ORTHODOX CHURCH Divine Liturgy: 9KM) KM., Simday 898-4800 5400 ANNIE OAKLEY DR. (South of Hacienda) LAS VEGAS, NEVADA 89120 ICALVARY n ^UjiLttJiJ\/yLjdid CLcJt 609 East Horiion Drive Henderson. NV 89015* r702) 565-0049 GALLEY t^f OUTDEACHV^ (SYNAGOGUE srRVICE i III I riday t)t Lach Montli Worship Servtcea 8:30 at 10:30am Sunday School 10:30am nurseiy provided for 10:30am service REV. MARVIN R. QANT. PASTOR ^ Worship services 8:30 0r 10:OOBm (Mo Sundsy School) nursery provided for lOam service ROSS DOYEL. PAATOII •;<;, Thursday, August29,1996 Panorama Pegs? Nevada's first official L On March 2,1903, Assemblyman John Kitson of Storey County introduced a bill in the Nevada Assembly v^rhidi setforth the days of the year whidi would thereafter be considered court holidays. Four days later, his colleagues A! passed the measure by a vote of |31-5. On March 10, the Nevada :' Senate went along by a vote of 11t4. Two days later, Gov. John £ Sparks signed the act into law. •, Among the designated days was the first Monday in September, Labor Day. First proclaimed a national hohday by act of Congress in 1894, Labor Day was not ofGcially observed in Nevada until Sept. 7,1903. Officials of theTonopah Miners' Union had celebrated the holiday with parades, drilling contests, dances and literary exercises on Sept. 2, 1901 and Sept 1, 1902, but the 1903 observance was the first formal recognition. Nevada was entering a boom phase in 1903 and oiTicials of the state's labor unions were once again asserting their political power, the same legislature which recognized Labor Day also establishing an eifi^t-hour day on all public works and for men employed in smelters, ore reduction works and mines. The lawmakers also enacted industrial safety legislation that session, outlawed the infamous "Yellow Dog Contract," prohibited employers fiixim requiring that theirmen trade atcompany stores and took the first steps toward the enactment of a constitutional mandate providing for the initiative and referendum. RenohadreplacedVirginiaCity as both the state's largest community and the leading stronghold of organized labor, some 500 residents out of a popvdation of 4,500 being members of tinions. In recognition of the town's new status, union ofiicials planning for the formal observance agreed that Reno should be the host. Plaiming got underway in July It and officials of the Reno carpen^ ters' local t^ok the lead in making arrangements for the parade, athletic contests, banquet, dance and literary program which were to be features of the observance. Rep. Kitson accepted the post of Grand Marshal of the parade, assisted by L.B. Self and J.H. Lynch. P.R Burton, a state representative of the American Federation of Labor, and W.A Bums, a Virginia Miners' Union official, also served on the planning committee, THIS WAS NEVADA PHILLIP I. EARL as did spokesmen for the Gold Hill Miners' Union, the Wedekind Miners' Union, the American Railway Union, the Carson City Mechanics Union, the Reno Laundry Workers' Union. The local plumbers' union and the lathers and shinglers' union. On Aug. 31, Sparks issued an executive proclamation declaring Sept. 7 to be Labor Day. By that time, the line of march for the parade had been established and arrangements made for athletic events, including a tug-of-war. music programs, a dance at Wheelmen's Hall and a community banquet on the grounds of the Hotel Nevada. The carpenters knocked together enough tables to seat 600 people at a serving and the women of the community were preparing enough food to serve 2,000 locals ajad visitors. Reno school officials put off the opening of classes until Sept. 8 and several members of the clergy devoted Sunday sermons to the cause of labor. Rev. Mathias Burkett of the Congregational Church chose as his title, "The Relationship of Christianity to Labor Day." Members of the Virginia City and Gold Hill Miners Union plaimed to come to Reno as a body on the V&T and all businesses in Virginia City, Gold Hill and Carson City, saloons included, were to be closed for the day. Sparks and his staff led the parade on horseback and 1,100 men representing 26 unions followed. The ladies of the Wedekind District rode a float sponsored by the governor, the owner of the mines in that section. The members of the engineering department of the Southern Pacific Railroad also entered afloat, the men marching while their womenfolk rode. Both the Eagles' Band and the Reno Wheelmen's Band marched, as did Reno Mayor Robert C. Turritin and the members of the Reno City Council. In the afternoon, tug-of-war and races were held. Yoimg boys climbed a greased pole for a $2 prize and engaged in a pie-eating contest. The women competed in a nail-driving contest, raced each other and otherwise took a full part in the celebration, although Nevada Historical Society photograph > Reno's 1903 Labor Day parade, Virginia Street, looking north Shown in the foreground is Governor John Sparks and his staff. there were no female members of labor organizations represented. The Wedekind miners and the Reno U&I team played a baseball game on the Chism field on Third Street and literary exercises were held at the city park. William A. Bums of the American Labor Union spoke on the evolution of labor legislation and P.R. Burton of the Reno Building Trades Council followed with a speech on current labor confrontations in other sections of the country. Attorney General James G. Sweeney concluded the literSee History Pages ... Q^^vecX OUJs^e^ C/apdiolcxiu Associat ssociaies (^.AaUUTHMd Serving the Greater Henderson, Green Valley and Boulder City Areas HCART maoiD "Studies indicate that half of all heart attack victims wait more than two hours before getting help. About 300,000 people a year die of heart attacks before they reach a hospital." Don't Risk a Heart Attack Call US today to schedule a FREE Coronary Risk Profile This health fact brought to you by: Alan Steljes, M.D. James C. Buell, M.D. Robert P. Croke, M.D. Specialists in Cardiovascular Disease Appointment Line 564-4441 108 E. Lal
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r hig* 6 Panorama Thursday, August 29,1996 ii?!f!i!!!!pPi!^^ h < w^j' ii ';:^^ ^•MdMUiakuildii • ; • • -.:.:.:.• :•;.':':.' •. • •.: • • .•.. • ..• • : • • • • .•.•.•.• • • • .' • • '.A • •.' • • • .•-v. •.;..'. ^.:. ..•,'. • .'j. • ;.•. • • • \.v. • •. • • ^.y. .-. • • • • • '. • • : • •:.' • :-.•...' • • f-:-.". • .^ • y • V. • • • .V^ • ^.•. • .^.^.• • •^ • •^' • •.^. • ,^,^." • • .>>; • ^ • • CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH 1401 RFTH STREET BOULDER CITY, NV 293-4332 Saturday Country Western Worship 5:00 p.m. Sunday Traditional Worship 9:00 a.m. Sunday School and Adult Bible Study 10:15 a.m. St. Matthews Episcopal Church JheWoitdngCttuKh Saturday Evening Mass 5:30 pm Sunday Mass 9:45 am Church School During Sunday Mass Nursery Available 4709 S. Netlis Blvd. 451-2483 2llodBNoitho>Tro|)lcwonNtlb t SL Peter's Catholic Church 204 S. Boulder Hwy. MASS SCHEDULE: Sat: S p.m. Sun: 8 am & 10 am 11:30 am 5 pm Confessions: Sat. 4 to 4:30 j^^ NEW BEGINNINGS ^^ COMMUNITY CHURCH ^^^^ (A new church in Green VSilley) ^^ (Relaxed, casual atmosphere) Meeting Sundays of Dovkl Cox Elementoiy School 280 Oarti Ditv* on Roblndale t>etween Pecos and Eastern WORSHIP CELEBRATION, 10:00 A.M. PtK>r>e: 263-3024 Pastor, Richoid Hubocek "^ Nuiseiy/Chlld Core Boulder City AMembly of God Church "The church of new l)egirmings' 7th and Utah (The Boulder City Women's Club Building Sunday Moming Worship 9:30 A.M. Sunday Evening Services 6:00 P.M. Wednesday Services 7:00 P.M. YOU ABE ALWAYS WELCOME/ Ouorn Jordan, Puator none (70^ 293-0620 IM IH ( HUISTIAN CHURC H TJOI Aclrims Blvd. NHVV loc/vnoN ii; SUNDAY SERVICES: Multi-Denominational Worship 10 AM Child Carp Avnilahlo BABES PUPPET PROGRAM June 29Aug, 10 Telephone: 293-245-1 • Hev fiol)l Tcdtoiv, P,ilAR KODESH The Church On The Hir 711 Valle Verde Ct., IHenderson, NV 454-2722 Qary A. Morefieid Senior Pastor Green Valley Christian Center Sunday Schedule Moming Worship: 8:45-11:15 AM & 6:00 PM Children's Church: 8:45-11:15 AM Sunday School: 10:15 AM Evening Worship: 6:00 PM Wednesday: Family Night 7:00 PM Thursday: Youth Group (7-12), 6:45 PM 'astois Bill .*; Nora Toller ii, K 7:110 ;).iii. • I 260-4777 BUILDING THE rUIURE TOGE111BR CniLDREM'S SUMMER PROGRAM YOUTH QROUPS REUQIOUS SCHOOL 0 BAR/BAT MITZVAH PROGRAM SERVICES ARE HELD: 2nd & 4th Friday evenings, 7:30 p.m. Every Shabl>at morning, 9 a.m. United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism affiliate 6000 S. Eastern Ave., #3B. Cail 798-4510 • '.':i ^HlGHLAJmllLLS 618 College Drive • Henderson • 866-0200 Sunday Worship Services: 8:30am, 11:00am, 6:00pm Come Join lu Sunday! We Care About You curd Your Family! Celebrate Jesus at Dynamic Drama, Music and Message! Currently meeting at Community College of Southern Nevada 700 College Drive, Henderson Sundays 10AM Call 2634661 for more information MPLE BETH SHOLOM EttabUihed 1947 /• The largest Congregation in Nevoda AffliliotAi with United Synagogue of Conservative Judoiim & Solomon Schechter Day Schools OUH MENMIERSHIP if COME GROW WITH U$UI V m 1600lalOakySlvd. • Lot Vegat, Nevada • 384-5070 THE SALVATION ARMY COMMUNITY CENTER A Center For Worship and Service! 830 E. Lal(e Mead Dr., Henderson, NV (702) 565-9578 Sunday Worship Services: 11 am & 6pm Sunday School For All Ages: 9:30 am Bible Study Each Thursday: 6 pm St. Thomas More Catholic Cdmmuiiity 130 n. Pecos Rd. Henderson, 361-3022 MASSES Sat: 4 pm Ar 5:30 pm Sun: 8 am, 9:30 am, 11 am & 12:30 pm Men FrI. 8:30 am Father Dui noian, C.S.V. St. Paul's Charismatic Episcopal Church 1661 QalierlaDr. (Wliite Middle School, Henderson) SUNDAY WORSHIP 10AM Father George Gerard • 564-1152 i^ther David Holf Father Charlea Coleman To list your congregation call Goldie at 435-7700. I fem:4 \ii1 SUNRISE COMMUNITY CHURCH Meeting in Henderson Convention Center 200 S. Water St. (please use liackparking lot) REV. JIM HAMILTON, PASTOR 737-5219 Sunday Worship lOam Come and let us help molte your life woric for you. VV i^ SOUTHERN BAPTIST CHURCH 240 S. ChoRa St. • Henderson, W 89015 (702) 565)72 You're Invited! Sunday Worship Services: ,^|8:30 a.m. 9:45 a.m. ISPS.^ 11:00 d.m. 6:00 pm Paator Ran* JoHph Houle COMMUNITY BAPTIST CHURCH 245 E. Foster Ave. • Henderson, NV 89009 Reverend Sam Roberson, PastorAeacher X SUNDAY: Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Morning Service • 11:00 a.m. Evening Service 7:00 p.m. MONDAY: Evagelism Classes 7:00 p.m. TUESDAY: Theology Classes 7:00 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Prayer & Bible Study • 7:00 p.m. THURSDAY: Choir Rehearsal • 7:00 p.m. FRIDAY: Teachers Meeting • 6:45 p.m. Worship Services and Bible Study Times Sundoys 8:30, 9:45 & 11:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m. Wednesdays 6:00 p.m. ~Qifmmii Valley Baptist Church 270 N. Voile Verde Dr., Henderson • 434-1906 (Comer of Silver Springs and Voile Verde) GREEN VALLEY CHURCH OF CHRIST 28 Commerce Center Drive (On Sunset In Commerce Center betiind Ethel M CtKxx>late8) 456-2040 OR 29^J7J7 BMe Centered Undenominational Always A Welcome DIAbA-BIBI^ MESSAGE PhoNE 4$6'2040 (A taped weekly inspirational message) ,^ Call atxHJt our FREE Bible correspondence course. The Doho'i Foith Expior* t*ochings on Worid Unity, Bimlnotlon of Projudico, Equollty off Mon ond Womon ond find onswors to tho most porploxing quostions of our timos. Coii 293^663 for froo llforoturo of information. THE CENTER for SUCCESSFUL UVING (A Melaphyalcal Learning Experience) Join us EVERY Wed. evening 7-8pm HAVEAQREATLIFEI Joy, Happiness & Abundance Henderson Convention Center 200 Water Street • 434-3912 i, ^-^ VEGAS VALLEY CHRISTIAN CHURCH 5515 Mm VisfQ, Los Vegos Phone 451-9211 UNDENOMINATIONAL BIBLE and CHRIST FOCUSEO • • BIBLE SCHOOL 9:30 AM WORSHIP 1030 AM S.O.W. (Study on Wednesday) 7:00 P.M. (Child Core Avoilobic) Serving Grocn Volley & Los Vogos Areos neor Sunsci 0 Ruisill Rood .1 ()lnco lo l)i>long w place lo become I \ccnsvii Child Cnrc Center Phono -ISI-OMiC^ St Christopher's Episcopal Church Holy Eucharist Sunday 9 A.M. 812 Arizona St. • Boulder City • 293-4275 St. Christopher's Church, Boulder City is a God centered, inclusive, multi-generational, spiritually related family welcoming all. ^iUfllAN mKIER A FOURSQUARE CHURCH 571 Adams Bhftl. Bouldar City 293-7773 Sunday Woralilp lOKM) am Home of Christian Center School and Day Care Cemer OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN CHURCH "Holding Forth the Word of Life..." Philippians2:16 Sunday School 9 am Adult Bible Class 9 am Sunday Worship 8 fc 10:45 am Pastor Bruning 59 Lynn Ln., Henderson 565-9154 Growing togettier in the grace of our Lord Jesus RELIGIOUS SCIENCE CHURCH of LAS VEGAS 4820 Alpine PI., Ste. ElOl Us Vegas, NV 89107 258-5683 Wednesday 7:00 PM Sunday 9AM & 10:30AM Rev. Sheila Weldon ST. PAUL THE APOSTLE ORTHODOX CHURCH Divine Liturgy: 9KM) KM., Simday 898-4800 5400 ANNIE OAKLEY DR. (South of Hacienda) LAS VEGAS, NEVADA 89120 ICALVARY n ^UjiLttJiJ\/yLjdid CLcJt 609 East Horiion Drive Henderson. NV 89015* r702) 565-0049 GALLEY t^f OUTDEACHV^ (SYNAGOGUE srRVICE i III I riday t)t Lach Montli Worship Servtcea 8:30 at 10:30am Sunday School 10:30am nurseiy provided for 10:30am service REV. MARVIN R. QANT. PASTOR ^ Worship services 8:30 0r 10:OOBm (Mo Sundsy School) nursery provided for lOam service ROSS DOYEL. PAATOII •;<;, Thursday, August29,1996 Panorama Pegs? Nevada's first official L On March 2,1903, Assemblyman John Kitson of Storey County introduced a bill in the Nevada Assembly v^rhidi setforth the days of the year whidi would thereafter be considered court holidays. Four days later, his colleagues A! passed the measure by a vote of |31-5. On March 10, the Nevada :' Senate went along by a vote of 11t4. Two days later, Gov. John £ Sparks signed the act into law. •, Among the designated days was the first Monday in September, Labor Day. First proclaimed a national hohday by act of Congress in 1894, Labor Day was not ofGcially observed in Nevada until Sept. 7,1903. Officials of theTonopah Miners' Union had celebrated the holiday with parades, drilling contests, dances and literary exercises on Sept. 2, 1901 and Sept 1, 1902, but the 1903 observance was the first formal recognition. Nevada was entering a boom phase in 1903 and oiTicials of the state's labor unions were once again asserting their political power, the same legislature which recognized Labor Day also establishing an eifi^t-hour day on all public works and for men employed in smelters, ore reduction works and mines. The lawmakers also enacted industrial safety legislation that session, outlawed the infamous "Yellow Dog Contract," prohibited employers fiixim requiring that theirmen trade atcompany stores and took the first steps toward the enactment of a constitutional mandate providing for the initiative and referendum. RenohadreplacedVirginiaCity as both the state's largest community and the leading stronghold of organized labor, some 500 residents out of a popvdation of 4,500 being members of tinions. In recognition of the town's new status, union ofiicials planning for the formal observance agreed that Reno should be the host. Plaiming got underway in July It and officials of the Reno carpen^ ters' local t^ok the lead in making arrangements for the parade, athletic contests, banquet, dance and literary program which were to be features of the observance. Rep. Kitson accepted the post of Grand Marshal of the parade, assisted by L.B. Self and J.H. Lynch. P.R Burton, a state representative of the American Federation of Labor, and W.A Bums, a Virginia Miners' Union official, also served on the planning committee, THIS WAS NEVADA PHILLIP I. EARL as did spokesmen for the Gold Hill Miners' Union, the Wedekind Miners' Union, the American Railway Union, the Carson City Mechanics Union, the Reno Laundry Workers' Union. The local plumbers' union and the lathers and shinglers' union. On Aug. 31, Sparks issued an executive proclamation declaring Sept. 7 to be Labor Day. By that time, the line of march for the parade had been established and arrangements made for athletic events, including a tug-of-war. music programs, a dance at Wheelmen's Hall and a community banquet on the grounds of the Hotel Nevada. The carpenters knocked together enough tables to seat 600 people at a serving and the women of the community were preparing enough food to serve 2,000 locals ajad visitors. Reno school officials put off the opening of classes until Sept. 8 and several members of the clergy devoted Sunday sermons to the cause of labor. Rev. Mathias Burkett of the Congregational Church chose as his title, "The Relationship of Christianity to Labor Day." Members of the Virginia City and Gold Hill Miners Union plaimed to come to Reno as a body on the V&T and all businesses in Virginia City, Gold Hill and Carson City, saloons included, were to be closed for the day. Sparks and his staff led the parade on horseback and 1,100 men representing 26 unions followed. The ladies of the Wedekind District rode a float sponsored by the governor, the owner of the mines in that section. The members of the engineering department of the Southern Pacific Railroad also entered afloat, the men marching while their womenfolk rode. Both the Eagles' Band and the Reno Wheelmen's Band marched, as did Reno Mayor Robert C. Turritin and the members of the Reno City Council. In the afternoon, tug-of-war and races were held. Yoimg boys climbed a greased pole for a $2 prize and engaged in a pie-eating contest. The women competed in a nail-driving contest, raced each other and otherwise took a full part in the celebration, although Nevada Historical Society photograph > Reno's 1903 Labor Day parade, Virginia Street, looking north Shown in the foreground is Governor John Sparks and his staff. there were no female members of labor organizations represented. The Wedekind miners and the Reno U&I team played a baseball game on the Chism field on Third Street and literary exercises were held at the city park. William A. Bums of the American Labor Union spoke on the evolution of labor legislation and P.R. Burton of the Reno Building Trades Council followed with a speech on current labor confrontations in other sections of the country. Attorney General James G. Sweeney concluded the literSee History Pages ... Q^^vecX OUJs^e^ C/apdiolcxiu Associat ssociaies (^.AaUUTHMd Serving the Greater Henderson, Green Valley and Boulder City Areas HCART maoiD "Studies indicate that half of all heart attack victims wait more than two hours before getting help. About 300,000 people a year die of heart attacks before they reach a hospital." Don't Risk a Heart Attack Call US today to schedule a FREE Coronary Risk Profile This health fact brought to you by: Alan Steljes, M.D. James C. Buell, M.D. Robert P. Croke, M.D. Specialists in Cardiovascular Disease Appointment Line 564-4441 108 E. Lal
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wmmm mrm WHAT'S PLAYING Pag* 8 Panorama Thursday, August 29,1996 Janis Ian in debut Saturday Concert at 8 p.m. Saturday at Clark County Governnnent Center Folk singer-songwriter Janis Ian will make her Clark County Government Center Amphitheater debut at 8 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 31, as part of the Autumn Performing Arts Series. Tickets are $8 in advance; $10 at the gate. They are now on sale and are available at all Ticketrmaster outlets, the Parks and Recreation office at Simset Park, or in the fifth floor office at the Government Center, 500 8. Grand Central Parkway. The daughter of a music teacher, Janis Eddy Fink was bom in 1951 in New York and raised in New Jersey. Her career spans more than three decades as a singer-songwriter. She began composing songs on piano and guitar at 12, and in 1967, at 16, she recorded her first single, "Societjr's Child." The song about interracial love created a firestorm, and was banned by some radio stations. Itbecame ahit, reaching the top 20, when conductor-composer Leonard Bernstein featured it on a CBS television special. Her album, "Janis Ian," was nominated for a Grammy —the first of nine nominations. In 1973, after moving to Los Angeles, she released "Stars," the same year that her song, "Jesse," recorded by Roberta Flack, reached the top 10. Her biggest hit was the 1975 album, "Between the Lines," v^ch rose to number one on the diarts and won two Grammys. She collaborated with Chick Corea, Giorgio Moroder, Mel Tonne, Leonard Cohen and James Brown. Her song-writing was discovered by Bette Midler, Amy Grant, John Cougar Mellencamp and Hugo Masekela. With her career on the rise, she walked away from it all. Ian studied theater with Stella Adler, ballet with Dora Kranning of the Paris Opera Company, directing with Jose Quintero, and acting and interpretation with William Chow of the Peking Opera Company and with Nina Foch. In 1993, after 12 years, she returned to recording, with "Breaking Silence," when she also came out pubUcly as a lesbian. Ian also became a columnist writing plain speaking commentary focusing on social issues for the gay and lesbian magazine. The Advocate. The concert series continues with Kevin McCarthy's one-man play, "Give 'Em Hell, Harry!" on Sept. 14. It is co-sponsored by KNPR 89.5 FM, with other support provided by Saturn ofWest Sahara and Henderson, the Aladdin Hotel Casino, Fertitta Elnterprises, Fiesta Hotel, Sands Hotel Casino, Polo Towers, Mirage Resorts and Lionel, Sawyer and Collins. The Clark County Government Center Amphitheater is just north of Charleston and west of Main, with access of Bonneville or Grand Central Parkway. Lawn seating and ample f^e parking are available. Concert-goers are invited to bring picnic baskets, or may purchasefood or beverages firom vendors. No dogs, glass containers, cigars or pipes will' be allowed. For more information, call 455-8200. LV Pops sets grand finale performances The Las Vegas Pops will put on a Hollywood-style grand finale with back-to-back Picnic Pops performances on Aug. 31 and Sept 6, in Summerlin's Hills Park, Hillpointe Avenue at Rampart BWd. Each concert begins at 8 p.m., and gates will open at 5 p.m. Guestconductor Bill Broughton will lead the two concerts featuring big and little screen favorites. On Aug. 31, Broughton will present "Musical Magic from the Movies," featuring soundtracks from Hollywood blockbusters "Mission Impossible" and "Legends of the Fall" as well as beloved classics. On Sept. 6, he will present "Tune for Toons, featuring music ft'om favorite cartoons and animated feature films. "Thisyear's Pops concert finale is the most exciting in its history," said Bruce Aguilera, president of the Nevada Symphony OrchesHopi photos on display '^uHISTORY: Labor Day From Page 7 ary portion of the exercises with an address on recent labor laws and the relations between capital and labor in the state. That evening, the Labor Day Ball washeld at Wheelmen's Hall. With 500 couples attending, the dancing to the music of the Wheelmen's Band continued on into the early morning hours. In later years, the laboring men ofReno, Virginia City, Sparks and Carson City would host the annual Labor Day festivities on a rotating basis and only Nevada's Independence Day celebration would surpass the first Monday in September. Earl IS curator of the Nevada Historical Society in Carson City. "Photographs of Hopi Life, 1904-1939," will open Sunday, Sept 1, at the Lost City Museum in Overton. The exhibit will run through Sept 30. The exhibition includes images of Hopi culture seen through the eyes and cameras of early 20th century photographers, and was developed by the Museum of Northern Arizona. It is on tour with the Arizona Commission on the Arts. As early as the 1850s, Hopi people posed for photographers firom the U.S. government survey parties, for anthropologists, traders and missionaries. With the 'Blithe Spirit' to open Sept. 7 The Actors Repertory Theatre wnll perform "BHthe Spirit," Sept 7-15, at the Summerlin Library Theatre. A bright comedy by Noel Coward which features the ghosts of two wives who turn up to complicate their husband's life. The spoof has been one of the most popular plays in the English language since its first milestone success in 1941. The cast features Ray Favero, Claire Jaget, Coryn Caspar, Stormi Lloyd-Drake and John Wenstrom. Backlund-Talley designed the set The comedy is directed by Georgia Neu. Tickets are $15 adults; and $12.50 seniors and children. Performances will take place at 8 p.m. Sept 7, 12-14. On Sept. 8 and 15, performances will begin at 2 p.m. SAVING WATER IT'S A GRASS ROOTS EFFORT DON'T WATER IN THE RAIN r ^.> High Country Realty pfev^ For Mountain Resort Property in Brian Head, Utah. Only a Short 3 Hour Drive Away! ^ ^ AFFORDABLE CONDOS MOUNTAJN HOMES WOODED AND VIEW LOTS ^""^ "^-^' Call 800-3383886 for FREE FLYER! DOHl PASS UP THE OPPORTUNITY TO OWN IN BRIAN HEAD BRIAN HEAD, UTAH L '^^^ S'lcep in Uje fTOnuntainB tl|i0 MiiBixmmtt Ntglit! T^cntalfi by tijc Migb* of VecMy Cboke of CorHlo6 or Log Home Only 55 Mii>ote6 to Si^aKcfipesrean festival Mt. Bihing. Hor&ebacK t^iding. HiKipg, SijioiDer Cvents experience out 70* Alpine Cliioate BRIAN HEAD CONDO RESERVATIONS 800-72 2-4 74 2 (Mention ^ Ad for fo% PiMounf) completion of the Santa Fe Railway into Arizona in the 1880s, settlers and tourists came to the Southwest in large numbers. By 1900, visitors by the thousands were arriving to witness ceremonies such as the Snake Dance. Photographs taken by professional and amateur photographers provide a treasury of visual information about the people who lived on the Hopi mesas, and the early part of the 20th century The museum is open daily, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Admission is $2foradults. For more information, call (702) 397-2193. tra. "Two weekends in a row we will be charmed by the musical talent of such a famous conductor." Broughton was the music director for opening and closing ceremonies of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. The job included writing original musical composition and overseeing musical productions. The Paralympic Games began Aug. 15 in Atlanta, with Christopher Reeves as master of ceremony. Broughton began his career as a studio musician in 1968 and played lead trombone for television and motion picture studios in Hollywood, including TV shows and movies such as "Bonanza," "Gunsmoke," "Little House on the Prairie," "Kojak," "Hawaii 5-0," "Jaws IF and "Godfather H." He also composed for the television shows "Quincy, M.E.," "Hawaii 50,""TheTonight Show" and "Buck Rogers." Broughton began producing and launched SGM Productions. He has arranged and compiled complete scores and orchestrations for full orchestra. He has written and performed on jazz albums which received rave reviews by industry professionals including Billboard Magazine. Concert-goers are invited to bringpicnicbaskets and blankets, watch the sunset and enjoy the the 65-piece orchestra. Tickets for each concert are $12 adults; $6 for children; and $30 families. Tickets can be purchased at the gate or in advance at the following Prestige Travel/American Express: 2253 N. Rampart, 3504-AS. Maryland Pkwy, and at 3884 W. Sahara. For more information, call 792-4337. The Picnic Pops series is an extension of the Nevada Symphony Orchestra and its commitment to provide Southern Nevada with the thrill, excitement and passion of live music. The NSO offers a vfide selection of programs and year-round performances catering to various musical tastes, for an audience ranging from children to seniors. CARPET SALE Guaranteed Lowest Prices • Carpet Vinyl Ceramic Wood Floors 100o Guaranteed Installation One of Las Vecjas' Oldest Carpet Dealers Carpets Galore 1601 S. Main Street 2 BIks. No. of Stratosphere Toucr 385-5252 We Beat 'Em All !! Special Discounts witli this Ad When you need relief ivom Stress 1 AQT f^fc any class with this ad lU/OUll (new students) Daytime, Evening & Weekend Classes 458-8088 Classes beein Sept. 7th. Classes to help you get control of daily stress. Experienced, certified instructors who care about your wellbeing. Classes now being offered: V HathaYoga V T'aiChi V Chi Gong V Aikido L V Solutions for Stress V Relaxation ^''''*f V Meditation V SleepClass Gentef* ^^S^oai/a 601 Whitney Ranch, C-12 PEPPERMILfS GIV*' DAILY DRAWINGS SEPT. 3RD-30TH, 1996 PRAWINO TIMI it0 PM. PMI DAILY RIOifTMTION WITN U. CARD. $1.00 Off VALUABLE COUPON I I 1/3 LB. ANGUS BEEF PATTY I oouKNgoowie4MRMna.autrHii. m*x\wm%ia mrim. $1.00 Off $1.00 off < RAINBOW CLUB'S SPECIAL "ROYAL BURGER" REG. $4.50 W/ COUPON ONLY .50 Include* Icttuca, tomato, picid*. onion, 4 MM. ChMM oxtra. Strvod 24 hours. tXP. MM $1.00 Off. 12? WATER ST, HEND. NV. 565-9777 LAST WORDS HOROSCOPE LINDA BLACK DEAR a: : Ma Weekly Tip: The sun's in Virgo, good for memorization. Use it to remember where you saw the best deals. The moon's in Taurus, excellent for shopping. Aries (March 21-April 19). Make a practical decision—it'll cost you more if you wait longer. Your brain should be just about up to speed. You'll breeze through your assignments. Taurus (April 20-May 20). You're sharp. Take a trip back to a favorite spot with the one you love and make big pi ans. Study finances. Something you read could make you wealthy. Gemini (May 21-June 21). Family obligations fill up your time. You'll get to do more of what you want soon, when the moon's in your sign. Don't start new projects, they won't turn out well. Cancer (June 22-July 22). Friends help you achieve your goal. Complications arise concerning written material. It has errors— hopefully not ones you've put there. Don't bel ieve everything you read, either. Your luck improves. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22). You may have to make concessions, if you're trying to get money out of an older person. Your team's hot—go for the gold. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Your bos,s will be very talkative. He or she will want reports on every little thing, too. Attend a party—you could find Mr. or Ms. Perfect. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Send in your tuition fees. A problem concerning your housing will start toclear up. Study foreign languages or an attractive foreigner. Doe what an older woman, possibly your mother, wants. Scorpio (Oct. 24-NOV.21). Heed a friend's unwelcome advice. Sell somethingfor needed cash. Call in nioneyyou've loaned to others. Also be careful with paperwork—it'll bo easy to make a mistake. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Find enough money to treat your fiiend to a special treat. Get a smart friend to help you with your work. Glet out for a long bike ride with your favorite fellovv peddler. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Do something fun—you've earned it. You get even luckier, a condition which holds for months. There could be a mistake in paperwork you're given. Verify the facts before you take action. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18).Stay home. Cuddle and do the chores your sweetheart wants done. Your brain will be back in gear soon, and you'll cruise at high speed. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20). It's easy to study, even though you may not have to. Read ahead, so you'll be even better prepared. All sorts ofchanges disrupt your home life. Don't worry, just keep putting in the corrections. If You're Having a Birthday This Week: You're lucky traveling with an old friend this year. Take that cruise you've been dreaming about. Manage the changes going on in your life, so that you wind up on top. & 1996, Tribune Media Services DEBORAH WHITE ; : v-a^ Dear Debbie: I'm a grown woman whose parents run my life. Tm married with two kids, but my parents still haven't let go. My mother's on the phone with me constantly telling me what to do. I can't seem to stand up to them. Every time I think I have the guts to do it, I back down. Then I feel disgusted with myself. My husband says to just ignore them, to agree with them and do what I want. I have tried that, but it doesn't work for me. I don't know where to turn. I fell like I'll never be able to live my own life. : ; TIED TO THEIR APRON STRINGS Dear Tied: You never outgrow needing your parents' approval on a basic child-like level and you're terrified of being abandoned. It's probably compounded by parents who guilt-trip you every time you step out of line. That double bind has you trapped. I wish I could wave a wand and release you from their grip, but no advice will free you from such deep-seated fears. The only chance you have to change your relationship with your Thursday, August 29,1996 Panorama Page 9 parents is to see a good therapist and work out these gut-level issues. It's not stuff you can do on your own. Dear Debbie: I waitressed this summer at the beach and met a great guy. Luckily we met in June, and we've been seeing each other all summer. The problem is, we live in different places and I'm dreading the end of the season. I'm afraid it's just a summer romance to him and we'll both go back to our own lives. This guy isn't my first love. I've been there before, and I'm sure Fm serious about him. Is there anything I can do to keep this going? SUMMER LOVE Dear Summer Love: Not unless he feels the same way. If you've "been there before" you know you can't drag someone kicking and screaming through a relationship. And why would you want to? See what he says. If he doesn't want to keep in touch, do not, I repeat, do not contact him. Give him a chance to see what it feels like without you. i* If you don't hear from him within a month the feelings aren't there. Write to Dear Debbie, P.O. Box 4328, Chicago, 111. 60680. £> 1996, Tribune Media Senrices Going from bad to worse The other evening our grown sons arrived home for a festive dinner with Mom and Dad. What fun we'd have. I was set to bask in fond remembrances of the days when they were all living athome. Perhaps there would be a sweet memory of all those lovely meals I cooked, or the many nights I sat up with a sick baby. Sure enough, as the eldest cut intohis steak, he remarked, "What I always remember about family meals is all those casseroles Mom used to serve. Yuck!" "Right on!" shouted his brothers. From then on, things went from bad to worse. The stories that brought out the most laughter were cute little accounts detailing how they fooled Mom. Following is what one of the boys had to say: UNLV offers counseling services UNLVs Client Services Center has immediate openings for adults, children and couples who could benefit from counseling. The center provides a variety of counseling services, including support for persons facing marital difficulties, family communication problems, individual crises, parenting problems, career decisions, and other important life issues. Counseling is provided by graduate students in the counseling program under the supervision of faculty members. Appointments are available afternoons and evenings. All counseling services are shortterm—notmore than 14 sessions. For more information or to make an appointment, call 8953106. Magazine writers workshop Sept. 6-7 Free-lance writers from around the country will hear what magazine editors need to fill their pages, what they're paying and how to get published and get paid. Reader's Digest magazine is sponsoring a writers workshop Friday and Saturday, Sept. 6-7 at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. "Many people wonder how to format a story, send a query letter or what their rights are in terms of copyrighting material sent by e-mail or disc." Maggie Nichols, editor of Field and Strcar7',has the answers and will share with workshop participants. Featured speaker, Phil Osborne, editor of Reader's Digest, will be availablefor personal consultations, along with Gene Perret, Emmy-Award winning author-producer, 17 books in print and a long standing association as Bob Hope's principal writer. The cost is $125. Checks should be made payable to Nevada Board of Regents/RD Workshop, and mailed to Prof Mary Hausch, Greenspun School of Communication, UNLV, P.O. Box 455007, Las Vegas, NV 89154-5007. Affordable custom livingl Spectacular homesites from only $50,000! • Brand new releasefirst time offered! • View bts available • Fully developed lots • All urxjerground utilities • Six miles from Lake Mead • Established area ^^^ CUSTOM HOMESITES Next to Lak LM VsgM Tak9 Lak* MMKJ Drlv 3 mtas •ast d Bouldar Hwy. Coi 564-9181 OMc Opn 9AM 6M ONCE OVER LIGHTLY CAROLYN DRENNAN BISHOP One spring break, I was longing for home so I decided to fly home and surprise Mom. I flew to Las Vegas, passed the Nuke protestors in the airport, jumped into my brother's Blazer and we raced home. He dropped me off at two in the morning. Dad was up and let me in. I brought him a bunch of clams I'd dug from the beach. He put them in the frig. 1 tossed my clothes in the hamper, mywalletonthebathroomcounter and went to bed. The next morning Mom arose, peered into the frig and inquired into the source of the clams. Dad explained that I'd sent them Express Mail from Seattle and they hadn't arrived until late the night before. What a wonderful son, he told her, to send his dad such a nice unexpected gift. Mom believed every word. Of course, it was only a matter of time before she discovered my wallet. Dad said it was his. He'd changed his clothes in my bathroom so he wouldn't wake her up. She bought that one too. Being the fastidious mother she is, she couldn't help spotting my jeans in the hamper. Perplexed, she once again asked my father, the oracle, why dirty clothes were in the hamper. His reply was, "Those pants must have been sitting there since Christmas vacation." Guilt-ridden, mom skulked off and tossed them in the washer. Soon, however, things were to change. My sister-in-law called and asked how I was. "Cameron isn't coming home until summer vacation," Mom answered. "Perhaps you'd better be on the safe side and check his room," sister-in-law advised. Mom's luck was changing. One eyebrow notched up a few inches, she peeked into my room. There I was, sleeping the sleep of the innocent. Mom's never lived that one down. CALL 435-7700 WITH NEWS TIPS OdbB iioo (Hppk Aram iBGfwnWh-(70i)w-*o)

PAGE 27

wmmm mrm WHAT'S PLAYING Pag* 8 Panorama Thursday, August 29,1996 Janis Ian in debut Saturday Concert at 8 p.m. Saturday at Clark County Governnnent Center Folk singer-songwriter Janis Ian will make her Clark County Government Center Amphitheater debut at 8 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 31, as part of the Autumn Performing Arts Series. Tickets are $8 in advance; $10 at the gate. They are now on sale and are available at all Ticketrmaster outlets, the Parks and Recreation office at Simset Park, or in the fifth floor office at the Government Center, 500 8. Grand Central Parkway. The daughter of a music teacher, Janis Eddy Fink was bom in 1951 in New York and raised in New Jersey. Her career spans more than three decades as a singer-songwriter. She began composing songs on piano and guitar at 12, and in 1967, at 16, she recorded her first single, "Societjr's Child." The song about interracial love created a firestorm, and was banned by some radio stations. Itbecame ahit, reaching the top 20, when conductor-composer Leonard Bernstein featured it on a CBS television special. Her album, "Janis Ian," was nominated for a Grammy —the first of nine nominations. In 1973, after moving to Los Angeles, she released "Stars," the same year that her song, "Jesse," recorded by Roberta Flack, reached the top 10. Her biggest hit was the 1975 album, "Between the Lines," v^ch rose to number one on the diarts and won two Grammys. She collaborated with Chick Corea, Giorgio Moroder, Mel Tonne, Leonard Cohen and James Brown. Her song-writing was discovered by Bette Midler, Amy Grant, John Cougar Mellencamp and Hugo Masekela. With her career on the rise, she walked away from it all. Ian studied theater with Stella Adler, ballet with Dora Kranning of the Paris Opera Company, directing with Jose Quintero, and acting and interpretation with William Chow of the Peking Opera Company and with Nina Foch. In 1993, after 12 years, she returned to recording, with "Breaking Silence," when she also came out pubUcly as a lesbian. Ian also became a columnist writing plain speaking commentary focusing on social issues for the gay and lesbian magazine. The Advocate. The concert series continues with Kevin McCarthy's one-man play, "Give 'Em Hell, Harry!" on Sept. 14. It is co-sponsored by KNPR 89.5 FM, with other support provided by Saturn ofWest Sahara and Henderson, the Aladdin Hotel Casino, Fertitta Elnterprises, Fiesta Hotel, Sands Hotel Casino, Polo Towers, Mirage Resorts and Lionel, Sawyer and Collins. The Clark County Government Center Amphitheater is just north of Charleston and west of Main, with access of Bonneville or Grand Central Parkway. Lawn seating and ample f^e parking are available. Concert-goers are invited to bring picnic baskets, or may purchasefood or beverages firom vendors. No dogs, glass containers, cigars or pipes will' be allowed. For more information, call 455-8200. LV Pops sets grand finale performances The Las Vegas Pops will put on a Hollywood-style grand finale with back-to-back Picnic Pops performances on Aug. 31 and Sept 6, in Summerlin's Hills Park, Hillpointe Avenue at Rampart BWd. Each concert begins at 8 p.m., and gates will open at 5 p.m. Guestconductor Bill Broughton will lead the two concerts featuring big and little screen favorites. On Aug. 31, Broughton will present "Musical Magic from the Movies," featuring soundtracks from Hollywood blockbusters "Mission Impossible" and "Legends of the Fall" as well as beloved classics. On Sept. 6, he will present "Tune for Toons, featuring music ft'om favorite cartoons and animated feature films. "Thisyear's Pops concert finale is the most exciting in its history," said Bruce Aguilera, president of the Nevada Symphony OrchesHopi photos on display '^uHISTORY: Labor Day From Page 7 ary portion of the exercises with an address on recent labor laws and the relations between capital and labor in the state. That evening, the Labor Day Ball washeld at Wheelmen's Hall. With 500 couples attending, the dancing to the music of the Wheelmen's Band continued on into the early morning hours. In later years, the laboring men ofReno, Virginia City, Sparks and Carson City would host the annual Labor Day festivities on a rotating basis and only Nevada's Independence Day celebration would surpass the first Monday in September. Earl IS curator of the Nevada Historical Society in Carson City. "Photographs of Hopi Life, 1904-1939," will open Sunday, Sept 1, at the Lost City Museum in Overton. The exhibit will run through Sept 30. The exhibition includes images of Hopi culture seen through the eyes and cameras of early 20th century photographers, and was developed by the Museum of Northern Arizona. It is on tour with the Arizona Commission on the Arts. As early as the 1850s, Hopi people posed for photographers firom the U.S. government survey parties, for anthropologists, traders and missionaries. With the 'Blithe Spirit' to open Sept. 7 The Actors Repertory Theatre wnll perform "BHthe Spirit," Sept 7-15, at the Summerlin Library Theatre. A bright comedy by Noel Coward which features the ghosts of two wives who turn up to complicate their husband's life. The spoof has been one of the most popular plays in the English language since its first milestone success in 1941. The cast features Ray Favero, Claire Jaget, Coryn Caspar, Stormi Lloyd-Drake and John Wenstrom. Backlund-Talley designed the set The comedy is directed by Georgia Neu. Tickets are $15 adults; and $12.50 seniors and children. Performances will take place at 8 p.m. Sept 7, 12-14. On Sept. 8 and 15, performances will begin at 2 p.m. SAVING WATER IT'S A GRASS ROOTS EFFORT DON'T WATER IN THE RAIN r ^.> High Country Realty pfev^ For Mountain Resort Property in Brian Head, Utah. Only a Short 3 Hour Drive Away! ^ ^ AFFORDABLE CONDOS MOUNTAJN HOMES WOODED AND VIEW LOTS ^""^ "^-^' Call 800-3383886 for FREE FLYER! DOHl PASS UP THE OPPORTUNITY TO OWN IN BRIAN HEAD BRIAN HEAD, UTAH L '^^^ S'lcep in Uje fTOnuntainB tl|i0 MiiBixmmtt Ntglit! T^cntalfi by tijc Migb* of VecMy Cboke of CorHlo6 or Log Home Only 55 Mii>ote6 to Si^aKcfipesrean festival Mt. Bihing. Hor&ebacK t^iding. HiKipg, SijioiDer Cvents experience out 70* Alpine Cliioate BRIAN HEAD CONDO RESERVATIONS 800-72 2-4 74 2 (Mention ^ Ad for fo% PiMounf) completion of the Santa Fe Railway into Arizona in the 1880s, settlers and tourists came to the Southwest in large numbers. By 1900, visitors by the thousands were arriving to witness ceremonies such as the Snake Dance. Photographs taken by professional and amateur photographers provide a treasury of visual information about the people who lived on the Hopi mesas, and the early part of the 20th century The museum is open daily, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Admission is $2foradults. For more information, call (702) 397-2193. tra. "Two weekends in a row we will be charmed by the musical talent of such a famous conductor." Broughton was the music director for opening and closing ceremonies of the 1996 Atlanta Paralympic Games. The job included writing original musical composition and overseeing musical productions. The Paralympic Games began Aug. 15 in Atlanta, with Christopher Reeves as master of ceremony. Broughton began his career as a studio musician in 1968 and played lead trombone for television and motion picture studios in Hollywood, including TV shows and movies such as "Bonanza," "Gunsmoke," "Little House on the Prairie," "Kojak," "Hawaii 5-0," "Jaws IF and "Godfather H." He also composed for the television shows "Quincy, M.E.," "Hawaii 50,""TheTonight Show" and "Buck Rogers." Broughton began producing and launched SGM Productions. He has arranged and compiled complete scores and orchestrations for full orchestra. He has written and performed on jazz albums which received rave reviews by industry professionals including Billboard Magazine. Concert-goers are invited to bringpicnicbaskets and blankets, watch the sunset and enjoy the the 65-piece orchestra. Tickets for each concert are $12 adults; $6 for children; and $30 families. Tickets can be purchased at the gate or in advance at the following Prestige Travel/American Express: 2253 N. Rampart, 3504-AS. Maryland Pkwy, and at 3884 W. Sahara. For more information, call 792-4337. The Picnic Pops series is an extension of the Nevada Symphony Orchestra and its commitment to provide Southern Nevada with the thrill, excitement and passion of live music. The NSO offers a vfide selection of programs and year-round performances catering to various musical tastes, for an audience ranging from children to seniors. CARPET SALE Guaranteed Lowest Prices • Carpet Vinyl Ceramic Wood Floors 100o Guaranteed Installation One of Las Vecjas' Oldest Carpet Dealers Carpets Galore 1601 S. Main Street 2 BIks. No. of Stratosphere Toucr 385-5252 We Beat 'Em All !! Special Discounts witli this Ad When you need relief ivom Stress 1 AQT f^fc any class with this ad lU/OUll (new students) Daytime, Evening & Weekend Classes 458-8088 Classes beein Sept. 7th. Classes to help you get control of daily stress. Experienced, certified instructors who care about your wellbeing. Classes now being offered: V HathaYoga V T'aiChi V Chi Gong V Aikido L V Solutions for Stress V Relaxation ^''''*f V Meditation V SleepClass Gentef* ^^S^oai/a 601 Whitney Ranch, C-12 PEPPERMILfS GIV*' DAILY DRAWINGS SEPT. 3RD-30TH, 1996 PRAWINO TIMI it0 PM. PMI DAILY RIOifTMTION WITN U. CARD. $1.00 Off VALUABLE COUPON I I 1/3 LB. ANGUS BEEF PATTY I oouKNgoowie4MRMna.autrHii. m*x\wm%ia mrim. $1.00 Off $1.00 off < RAINBOW CLUB'S SPECIAL "ROYAL BURGER" REG. $4.50 W/ COUPON ONLY .50 Include* Icttuca, tomato, picid*. onion, 4 MM. ChMM oxtra. Strvod 24 hours. tXP. MM $1.00 Off. 12? WATER ST, HEND. NV. 565-9777 LAST WORDS HOROSCOPE LINDA BLACK DEAR a: : Ma Weekly Tip: The sun's in Virgo, good for memorization. Use it to remember where you saw the best deals. The moon's in Taurus, excellent for shopping. Aries (March 21-April 19). Make a practical decision—it'll cost you more if you wait longer. Your brain should be just about up to speed. You'll breeze through your assignments. Taurus (April 20-May 20). You're sharp. Take a trip back to a favorite spot with the one you love and make big pi ans. Study finances. Something you read could make you wealthy. Gemini (May 21-June 21). Family obligations fill up your time. You'll get to do more of what you want soon, when the moon's in your sign. Don't start new projects, they won't turn out well. Cancer (June 22-July 22). Friends help you achieve your goal. Complications arise concerning written material. It has errors— hopefully not ones you've put there. Don't bel ieve everything you read, either. Your luck improves. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22). You may have to make concessions, if you're trying to get money out of an older person. Your team's hot—go for the gold. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Your bos,s will be very talkative. He or she will want reports on every little thing, too. Attend a party—you could find Mr. or Ms. Perfect. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Send in your tuition fees. A problem concerning your housing will start toclear up. Study foreign languages or an attractive foreigner. Doe what an older woman, possibly your mother, wants. Scorpio (Oct. 24-NOV.21). Heed a friend's unwelcome advice. Sell somethingfor needed cash. Call in nioneyyou've loaned to others. Also be careful with paperwork—it'll bo easy to make a mistake. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Find enough money to treat your fiiend to a special treat. Get a smart friend to help you with your work. Glet out for a long bike ride with your favorite fellovv peddler. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Do something fun—you've earned it. You get even luckier, a condition which holds for months. There could be a mistake in paperwork you're given. Verify the facts before you take action. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18).Stay home. Cuddle and do the chores your sweetheart wants done. Your brain will be back in gear soon, and you'll cruise at high speed. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20). It's easy to study, even though you may not have to. Read ahead, so you'll be even better prepared. All sorts ofchanges disrupt your home life. Don't worry, just keep putting in the corrections. If You're Having a Birthday This Week: You're lucky traveling with an old friend this year. Take that cruise you've been dreaming about. Manage the changes going on in your life, so that you wind up on top. & 1996, Tribune Media Services DEBORAH WHITE ; : v-a^ Dear Debbie: I'm a grown woman whose parents run my life. Tm married with two kids, but my parents still haven't let go. My mother's on the phone with me constantly telling me what to do. I can't seem to stand up to them. Every time I think I have the guts to do it, I back down. Then I feel disgusted with myself. My husband says to just ignore them, to agree with them and do what I want. I have tried that, but it doesn't work for me. I don't know where to turn. I fell like I'll never be able to live my own life. : ; TIED TO THEIR APRON STRINGS Dear Tied: You never outgrow needing your parents' approval on a basic child-like level and you're terrified of being abandoned. It's probably compounded by parents who guilt-trip you every time you step out of line. That double bind has you trapped. I wish I could wave a wand and release you from their grip, but no advice will free you from such deep-seated fears. The only chance you have to change your relationship with your Thursday, August 29,1996 Panorama Page 9 parents is to see a good therapist and work out these gut-level issues. It's not stuff you can do on your own. Dear Debbie: I waitressed this summer at the beach and met a great guy. Luckily we met in June, and we've been seeing each other all summer. The problem is, we live in different places and I'm dreading the end of the season. I'm afraid it's just a summer romance to him and we'll both go back to our own lives. This guy isn't my first love. I've been there before, and I'm sure Fm serious about him. Is there anything I can do to keep this going? SUMMER LOVE Dear Summer Love: Not unless he feels the same way. If you've "been there before" you know you can't drag someone kicking and screaming through a relationship. And why would you want to? See what he says. If he doesn't want to keep in touch, do not, I repeat, do not contact him. Give him a chance to see what it feels like without you. i* If you don't hear from him within a month the feelings aren't there. Write to Dear Debbie, P.O. Box 4328, Chicago, 111. 60680. £> 1996, Tribune Media Senrices Going from bad to worse The other evening our grown sons arrived home for a festive dinner with Mom and Dad. What fun we'd have. I was set to bask in fond remembrances of the days when they were all living athome. Perhaps there would be a sweet memory of all those lovely meals I cooked, or the many nights I sat up with a sick baby. Sure enough, as the eldest cut intohis steak, he remarked, "What I always remember about family meals is all those casseroles Mom used to serve. Yuck!" "Right on!" shouted his brothers. From then on, things went from bad to worse. The stories that brought out the most laughter were cute little accounts detailing how they fooled Mom. Following is what one of the boys had to say: UNLV offers counseling services UNLVs Client Services Center has immediate openings for adults, children and couples who could benefit from counseling. The center provides a variety of counseling services, including support for persons facing marital difficulties, family communication problems, individual crises, parenting problems, career decisions, and other important life issues. Counseling is provided by graduate students in the counseling program under the supervision of faculty members. Appointments are available afternoons and evenings. All counseling services are shortterm—notmore than 14 sessions. For more information or to make an appointment, call 8953106. Magazine writers workshop Sept. 6-7 Free-lance writers from around the country will hear what magazine editors need to fill their pages, what they're paying and how to get published and get paid. Reader's Digest magazine is sponsoring a writers workshop Friday and Saturday, Sept. 6-7 at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. "Many people wonder how to format a story, send a query letter or what their rights are in terms of copyrighting material sent by e-mail or disc." Maggie Nichols, editor of Field and Strcar7',has the answers and will share with workshop participants. Featured speaker, Phil Osborne, editor of Reader's Digest, will be availablefor personal consultations, along with Gene Perret, Emmy-Award winning author-producer, 17 books in print and a long standing association as Bob Hope's principal writer. The cost is $125. Checks should be made payable to Nevada Board of Regents/RD Workshop, and mailed to Prof Mary Hausch, Greenspun School of Communication, UNLV, P.O. Box 455007, Las Vegas, NV 89154-5007. Affordable custom livingl Spectacular homesites from only $50,000! • Brand new releasefirst time offered! • View bts available • Fully developed lots • All urxjerground utilities • Six miles from Lake Mead • Established area ^^^ CUSTOM HOMESITES Next to Lak LM VsgM Tak9 Lak* MMKJ Drlv 3 mtas •ast d Bouldar Hwy. Coi 564-9181 OMc Opn 9AM 6M ONCE OVER LIGHTLY CAROLYN DRENNAN BISHOP One spring break, I was longing for home so I decided to fly home and surprise Mom. I flew to Las Vegas, passed the Nuke protestors in the airport, jumped into my brother's Blazer and we raced home. He dropped me off at two in the morning. Dad was up and let me in. I brought him a bunch of clams I'd dug from the beach. He put them in the frig. 1 tossed my clothes in the hamper, mywalletonthebathroomcounter and went to bed. The next morning Mom arose, peered into the frig and inquired into the source of the clams. Dad explained that I'd sent them Express Mail from Seattle and they hadn't arrived until late the night before. What a wonderful son, he told her, to send his dad such a nice unexpected gift. Mom believed every word. Of course, it was only a matter of time before she discovered my wallet. Dad said it was his. He'd changed his clothes in my bathroom so he wouldn't wake her up. She bought that one too. Being the fastidious mother she is, she couldn't help spotting my jeans in the hamper. Perplexed, she once again asked my father, the oracle, why dirty clothes were in the hamper. His reply was, "Those pants must have been sitting there since Christmas vacation." Guilt-ridden, mom skulked off and tossed them in the washer. Soon, however, things were to change. My sister-in-law called and asked how I was. "Cameron isn't coming home until summer vacation," Mom answered. "Perhaps you'd better be on the safe side and check his room," sister-in-law advised. Mom's luck was changing. One eyebrow notched up a few inches, she peeked into my room. There I was, sleeping the sleep of the innocent. Mom's never lived that one down. CALL 435-7700 WITH NEWS TIPS OdbB iioo (Hppk Aram iBGfwnWh-(70i)w-*o)

PAGE 28

mm. Pag* 10 Panorama Thursday, August 29,1996 by D.B.Donovan llMRnaiU* UMM llDiir wordi, OM bttcr to twh iqaMC, to Aim ftmr Words of Wisdom CROSSWORD PUZZLE IREMAPE nil 1 1 Now • mote Ibc drckd Mtcn lo fonn die n>TrlH aiiiwar, MiOBalMl by the •bovtcMtoim. Ar.HE"cnxnxn''CD Ostentation is a sign of being obsessed by the little things in life. t • • Despair is no match for perseverance. • • • If you seek praise, you will not find it. • • • Be careful of making jests that bite; they may turn on you someday. Answers: 3H3nw HDnaay Aism cravno" Answer U ..aaanSVHJM.. gH — 8UIMOJ8 jda^i sssuisnq s,Joirei aqj k\\t\ f SLAPSTIX ========— When a man is wrapped up in himself, he makes a pretty small package. 0 19%. Tribune MolU Scrvicn Be frugal and productiver dollars are the offspring of pennies. tffFTHEWRU. NflQICWORD HOW TO PIJkY: Read the lilt of words. Look at the puzzle. You'll find the** word* In all directions—horizontally, vertically, diagonally, backwards. Draw a circle around each letter of a word found in the puzzle, than strike It off ttw list. Circling H will show a latter has lieen used but will leave it visibte should it also form part of another word. Find the big words first. When letters of all listed words are circled, you'll have Itie given number of latters left over. They'll spell out your MAQICWORD. THE WORLD SERIES (sol: 12 letters) A-Amaze; B-Baseball, Bix)adcast, Bullpen; CChallenge, Cheer, Classic, Coach, Comeback; D-Defeat, Defense, Diamond, Double; F-Field; G-Games, Glory, Ground rules; H-Home run; L-League, Lineup; M-Media, Memories; PPitching, Play; R-Rookie; S-Save, Slide, Slugger, Stadium, Strike, Success; T-Teams, Tied; Toss, Triple, Trophy; V-Victory; WWinner This Week's Answer: e ISSe, Trtbun* Mdla Strvtcts dIHSNOIdNVHD TBD TRE SOO S AS EDE C CG CAN USE STL TP L RUA I EH KNC E I S VL A NOMA GGUL DLE I PNUR SHE I HYYD DRWE EOC I FLC Y EGRG AOAM TMED EDNL I EVA SELU I DE SEU FBU EMO KOO E I T LBU S S A NCY HNM AZE I LS LAB SE I RDN FENSE GAELR LLPEN H I EC I RHGOP CCNMP OD I EO LCHB S A I CAT AHTC A S L I KD RMPS I ES ABU ROMEM UORGT MlVt? TO TALK A^UT ONlSllT IS A mi Of y?oc?isy. l1 2 3 4 1 S 6 7 8 9 1 10 11 12 13 1 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 ^ • 22 23 • • • H24 • 1 25 ^H • 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 1 37 38 • 1 39 • 40 41 42 43 ^^H44 45 46 ^ • 47 48 49 ^^^^HSO 51 ^^H 52 S3 54 II 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 1 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 SOLUTION: AIS vlil s y|3 {i|8Bo|v iTs] V p IN!MI* 1 \lM N N 1 N{ up apl 3 A 1 MNI II TV ON lllsio d|l|o • ih XIN v|u ^ • slal.H lil.loh^H M 1 UI O^^Vl Id iii-iMriiri IIUIXIN as • uOEinC] Q d IlloB HIIIK JiHo N a u hlsU IIMI iorilTali w|o ^Hdl.lilal • NIIII^^H N V HIIIMJIIIC JNl 1lU MIV d t l' M iH 1^11 'hi" p 0 dj 'lit V ll 3 i C Misl sliTi H al d V IOIHI sTT ok ACROSS 43 Formal act feature 29 Ridicule 1 "—Well That 44 Kirk of films 3 Refrain 31 Russian Ends..." 45 Satisfied syllables leader, once 5 Choir 47 Furniture 4 Wore 32 Rental singers' org. 50 Be bested proudly document 10 Trade 51 Newspaper 5 Repair a 33 Asparagus 14 —opera notices coat, in a unit 15 Overact 52 Get under way 36 Had a 16 Biblical weed one's skin 6 Portent session 17 Marco — 55 Removing 7 Tennis ace 39 Gifts 18 Dormouse from office 8 WWII theatre 42 flaking a 19 Great Lake 60 Et — 9 Pioneers speech 20 Practicing (or 61 Ingenuous 10 Brewed tea 44 Nimble a bout 63 Scent 11 Friendly 46 The sun 22 "Stan—" 64 Neighbor of 12 Opera solo 48 Candles 24 Bo Derek Wis. 13 Hammer 49 Hubbub number 65 Track official head 52 L.A. team 25 Applaud 66 Prefix for 21 Clergyman's 53 Landed 26 Distressed phone or ton title: abbr. 54 vessel of 30 Hashes over 67 Deer 23 Fedora, for 1492 34 Break 68 Suffix after one 55 Coin 35 Asian bigwig mob and tip 25 Difficult 56 At any time 37 Profound 69 Lenient times 5/ Brainstorm 38 Gl address 26 Hold firmly 58 Alcoholic 39 Iron DOWN 27 Drive away drinks 40 Scottish 1 Snakes 28 — ear and 59 Drab negative 2 Chicago out... 62 Islet Garfidd by Jim Davis PEANUTS by Charles M. Schul: Thursday. August 29,1996 Panorama Pagall RATES Boxed Ads $8.00 ecs. Up to 3 llnM (spprox. 23 chsracters per line). 45 EACH ADDITIONAL LINE. (Green Valley Phu nckmp Rates: Boxed ads > $3.00 p.cJ. per issue. Line ads s $3.00 per line up lo 3 lines per Issue. CashRatMi BUM Rats CaahRMMi BIIMFtata 3 "'"•8-50 16.85 8 Unas $8.76 •$9.10 ^I'n^I8-95 -$7^0 9 Unas $9.20 IftSS SI'*** 17.40 %t.n 10 Unas $9.65 IIO.OO • ""•• $7 J5 '$8.20 • Pnlag* each lime bthd 274M amu. EE4M00RE CLEARLY WINDOW CLEANING Reasonable Rates n6S6 Jff KIncald • 294-1114 or 222-6926 Saiving HMMltno^ GraM Vihr I BoutdwCly HOWARD HELDERLEIN CONSTRUCTION Conncrdal • Rctldcntiai • Rcmodcb and AdditioiM Licenic #021013 HZM 565-0874 ,_ FnEE ESTIMATES JiFFY TRIM LAWN CARE I IFFY •yfe Work WhUe You Play' Licensed Insured HENDERSON QWEEN VALLEY ,^^ CALL 565-1593 ENTERTAINMENT GARAGE SALES I MISCELLANEOUS HAVING SALE FrI. 23. Sat. 24. 7 AM-Noon. 1334 Pinto Rd. BC GSiaug Garage Sale 29th & 30th 8-5 at 608 Fernbrook Dr. Gas grill. Yamaha electronic keyboard, craftsnnan 6-1/8'jointer-planer, ladies clothes & much misc., 565-1979. Sat. &Sun., 7 AM. Bikes, Frig., electronics. MUST SELL ALL. 1306 AppaloosaBC GS18379 MOVING in 3 weeks sale. Sat., Aug. 31.7-12.1026 Keys Dr.. BC. 294-0767 Yard Sale, 375 Apache. HD. Fri., 8/30 & Sat. 8/ 31. 7 AM 3 PM. GS18398 Yard sale, Sat.. 8/31.901 Plains. 7 AM. New baby clothes. Peter Rabbit layette set. ski clothes & equipment, adult & children, Hawks drinking fountain, goH clubs, skeet thrower & stick vacuum. College to Mission & Mission to Plains. GS18412 YARD SALE Sat., 7 AM?, 657 Avenue M, BC. Washer & dryer, fum., TV &misc. GS16500 MOVING SALE! Furniture and misc. items • Sat., Aug. 31-793 FairwayDr. GS18334 769 Sandra Dr., Aug. 31 St, 7-12 bedroomsuite, den lurn., dishes, misc. Garage & Moving Sale, Thurs., 29th. Fri. 30th only, 417 Blackridge, Hend8-5. GS18338 Garage Sale, Fri. & Sat, 8 AM-2 PM, 776 Christina Dr., BC, fridge, slide projector, misc. items, clothes. GS18359 5 Family—clothes, toys 6 much more. 717 Fifth, 7 AM-Noon, Sat. 8/31. GS18355 Yard Sale, 1537 Chestnut St., HD, organ, boat, van & misc. items. Sat. & Sun., 8 AM-5 PM. PERSONALS "Powerful Novena of Childlike Confidence" (This Novena is to be said at the same time every hour for Nine consecutive hours -just one day). FREE GAS exchanged for ride from BC to Warm Springs/Eastern (GV area) weekday afternoons, Susie 294-0001/ 361-6778. PE18161 GERMAN STUDENT and other Scandinavian, European. South American, Asian, Russian exchange students aniving August. Become a host family/AISE. Call 1-800SIBLING. PE18267 AT&T GLOBAL NETWORK. Offer AT&T wholesale rates. Tremendous compensation, weekly checks. Car bonus, heatlth insurance. Free Web Site. Call toll free 888-599-9965 for recorded message. SINGLES: MEET single people throughout rural Amerk:a. Confidential, reputable, established plan. Free details. Country Connections Newsletter. PO Box 406. Superior. NE 68978, BC wanted roommate fern, that works swing begin 10-15, 565-1389. FREE SAMPLE. SlaaMloaivS MaMalfNdlyaara NOOCTMQ Eal anylhlna you want ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS 7eiyak.alSPM, Rae. AiMMx bahlnd •oiMarOaM CradH Unton. jgBL MISCELLANEOUS BdmiJ.Mkk DISCOUNT AVON For ewapmeel price* Call 293-AVON (2866) Ind^ Singer sewing machine in cabinet, Toast Master oven, Hoover cleaner, Bissell sweeper, metal step ladder, iron & ironing board, call 564-1386 before 6 PM. MM 8400 COMPUTER SOPTWARE Over 25 CDRoms, including games, children's and educational disks. No shareware or demos. Most $3 to S5. Please call 434-6149 for list. MM 7569 WOLFFTANNINGBEDS. TAN AT HOME. Buy DIRECT and SAVE! Commercial/Home units from $199 Low Monthly Payments. FREE Color Catalog. Call TODAY 1800-842-1305. MI18285 Dogloo dog house, extra Ig., never used, pad & see-thru door, pd. $225, sell for $125 OBO, 5651167 Mil8387 WhiripoolW/D$150ea., $275pr;HotpointDW. 1 yr. old, $125; wood hutch, 2 pcs., $ 150; fax machine $75; after 6 PM, 4337725. Mil8385 ARTHRITIS Suffers, live pain free. Had it for 20 years now I am pain free. Cost is as low as $15 per mo., not medicine, natural food & energy supplements. Guaranteed. 564-1648. MI254 New Matco tool box w/ hand/pwr. tools, all name brands MUST SELL, $7,200 OBO: also acetylene tanks; Eagle Commercial Smoker/ BBO, NEW COND. cost $1500 sell $760; 5681304. MI1019^ CANON EOS tCNS. 2880 mm, 13.5-5.6, Ultrasonic. Works with any EOS System camera, including Elan, Rebel, etc. Complete with caps, filter and hood. $100 o.b.o., 434-6149. CD-ROM'eforealeOver 20 titles, including games, children's and educational disks. NONE OVER $10. Please call 434-6149 for list. MM 7569 2 brown rocker recliners $50 ea.; pine roll top desk $150; oM chest of drawers $25; octagon end table $20; larppll 5; new Chrysler mini-van bsnch seat, make offer. Call 565-9311 evenings. MI18017 Clarinet for $200, like new. 564-3996. MI18248 WASHER / Dryers $125.00 Each. 2936101. BC MI1B235 GV GLASS & MIRROR CO. Surplus shower doors, mirrors, glass, minor doors. 368-4628. CaH anytkrw. MI16718 BAHAMA CRUISEI 5 days/4 nights. Underbooked! MUST SELL! $299/couple. Limited tk:kets. 1-800414-4151 Ext. 5149 Mon.-SaL.9AM-10PM. MI15677 Large, General Electric mk:rowav* oven $30; Unusually Beautiful Wedding Dress, size 5 with fuH slip $200: Custom d*signj Weddng Veil $40: MaclntoahQucktel 14,400 fax/hwdemby Logicod*. Mime limited warranty, $60; Cal 564-3508. MI18000 BAHAMA CRUISE! 5 days/4 nights. Undarbookedl MUST SELL! $299/coupl*. Limitad tk^ets. 1-to0-03-9O99 Ext 5148. Mil8019 NewtactorytowbartOO; new 15" tire 4 wheel off 1/2 T Ford $40; fold up bed(ioodahiip$2o,i6^ TV $30: invalid walker $20; potty lift $10; 4 legged cane $8; high chair $5; cycle exer. machlna $8; private carrpground wCCC SOO carrpaltaa $1000 060 on all 565-1367. Mil 1116 Usad madieal aquiprTwnt 1 oofnmoda. 1 elac. hoepHal bad. 3 wdhM*. make ollar. 24-01t4. Mil 8241

PAGE 29

mm. Pag* 10 Panorama Thursday, August 29,1996 by D.B.Donovan llMRnaiU* UMM llDiir wordi, OM bttcr to twh iqaMC, to Aim ftmr Words of Wisdom CROSSWORD PUZZLE IREMAPE nil 1 1 Now • mote Ibc drckd Mtcn lo fonn die n>TrlH aiiiwar, MiOBalMl by the •bovtcMtoim. Ar.HE"cnxnxn''CD Ostentation is a sign of being obsessed by the little things in life. t • • Despair is no match for perseverance. • • • If you seek praise, you will not find it. • • • Be careful of making jests that bite; they may turn on you someday. Answers: 3H3nw HDnaay Aism cravno" Answer U ..aaanSVHJM.. gH — 8UIMOJ8 jda^i sssuisnq s,Joirei aqj k\\t\ f SLAPSTIX ========— When a man is wrapped up in himself, he makes a pretty small package. 0 19%. Tribune MolU Scrvicn Be frugal and productiver dollars are the offspring of pennies. tffFTHEWRU. NflQICWORD HOW TO PIJkY: Read the lilt of words. Look at the puzzle. You'll find the** word* In all directions—horizontally, vertically, diagonally, backwards. Draw a circle around each letter of a word found in the puzzle, than strike It off ttw list. Circling H will show a latter has lieen used but will leave it visibte should it also form part of another word. Find the big words first. When letters of all listed words are circled, you'll have Itie given number of latters left over. They'll spell out your MAQICWORD. THE WORLD SERIES (sol: 12 letters) A-Amaze; B-Baseball, Bix)adcast, Bullpen; CChallenge, Cheer, Classic, Coach, Comeback; D-Defeat, Defense, Diamond, Double; F-Field; G-Games, Glory, Ground rules; H-Home run; L-League, Lineup; M-Media, Memories; PPitching, Play; R-Rookie; S-Save, Slide, Slugger, Stadium, Strike, Success; T-Teams, Tied; Toss, Triple, Trophy; V-Victory; WWinner This Week's Answer: e ISSe, Trtbun* Mdla Strvtcts dIHSNOIdNVHD TBD TRE SOO S AS EDE C CG CAN USE STL TP L RUA I EH KNC E I S VL A NOMA GGUL DLE I PNUR SHE I HYYD DRWE EOC I FLC Y EGRG AOAM TMED EDNL I EVA SELU I DE SEU FBU EMO KOO E I T LBU S S A NCY HNM AZE I LS LAB SE I RDN FENSE GAELR LLPEN H I EC I RHGOP CCNMP OD I EO LCHB S A I CAT AHTC A S L I KD RMPS I ES ABU ROMEM UORGT MlVt? TO TALK A^UT ONlSllT IS A mi Of y?oc?isy. l1 2 3 4 1 S 6 7 8 9 1 10 11 12 13 1 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 ^ • 22 23 • • • H24 • 1 25 ^H • 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 1 37 38 • 1 39 • 40 41 42 43 ^^H44 45 46 ^ • 47 48 49 ^^^^HSO 51 ^^H 52 S3 54 II 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 1 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 SOLUTION: AIS vlil s y|3 {i|8Bo|v iTs] V p IN!MI* 1 \lM N N 1 N{ up apl 3 A 1 MNI II TV ON lllsio d|l|o • ih XIN v|u ^ • slal.H lil.loh^H M 1 UI O^^Vl Id iii-iMriiri IIUIXIN as • uOEinC] Q d IlloB HIIIK JiHo N a u hlsU IIMI iorilTali w|o ^Hdl.lilal • NIIII^^H N V HIIIMJIIIC JNl 1lU MIV d t l' M iH 1^11 'hi" p 0 dj 'lit V ll 3 i C Misl sliTi H al d V IOIHI sTT ok ACROSS 43 Formal act feature 29 Ridicule 1 "—Well That 44 Kirk of films 3 Refrain 31 Russian Ends..." 45 Satisfied syllables leader, once 5 Choir 47 Furniture 4 Wore 32 Rental singers' org. 50 Be bested proudly document 10 Trade 51 Newspaper 5 Repair a 33 Asparagus 14 —opera notices coat, in a unit 15 Overact 52 Get under way 36 Had a 16 Biblical weed one's skin 6 Portent session 17 Marco — 55 Removing 7 Tennis ace 39 Gifts 18 Dormouse from office 8 WWII theatre 42 flaking a 19 Great Lake 60 Et — 9 Pioneers speech 20 Practicing (or 61 Ingenuous 10 Brewed tea 44 Nimble a bout 63 Scent 11 Friendly 46 The sun 22 "Stan—" 64 Neighbor of 12 Opera solo 48 Candles 24 Bo Derek Wis. 13 Hammer 49 Hubbub number 65 Track official head 52 L.A. team 25 Applaud 66 Prefix for 21 Clergyman's 53 Landed 26 Distressed phone or ton title: abbr. 54 vessel of 30 Hashes over 67 Deer 23 Fedora, for 1492 34 Break 68 Suffix after one 55 Coin 35 Asian bigwig mob and tip 25 Difficult 56 At any time 37 Profound 69 Lenient times 5/ Brainstorm 38 Gl address 26 Hold firmly 58 Alcoholic 39 Iron DOWN 27 Drive away drinks 40 Scottish 1 Snakes 28 — ear and 59 Drab negative 2 Chicago out... 62 Islet Garfidd by Jim Davis PEANUTS by Charles M. Schul: Thursday. August 29,1996 Panorama Pagall RATES Boxed Ads $8.00 ecs. Up to 3 llnM (spprox. 23 chsracters per line). 45 EACH ADDITIONAL LINE. (Green Valley Phu nckmp Rates: Boxed ads > $3.00 p.cJ. per issue. Line ads s $3.00 per line up lo 3 lines per Issue. CashRatMi BUM Rats CaahRMMi BIIMFtata 3 "'"•8-50 16.85 8 Unas $8.76 •$9.10 ^I'n^I8-95 -$7^0 9 Unas $9.20 IftSS SI'*** 17.40 %t.n 10 Unas $9.65 IIO.OO • ""•• $7 J5 '$8.20 • Pnlag* each lime bthd
274M amu. EE4M00RE CLEARLY WINDOW CLEANING Reasonable Rates n6S6 Jff KIncald • 294-1114 or 222-6926 Saiving HMMltno^ GraM Vihr I BoutdwCly HOWARD HELDERLEIN CONSTRUCTION Conncrdal • Rctldcntiai • Rcmodcb and AdditioiM Licenic #021013 HZM 565-0874 ,_ FnEE ESTIMATES JiFFY TRIM LAWN CARE I IFFY •yfe Work WhUe You Play' Licensed Insured HENDERSON QWEEN VALLEY ,^^ CALL 565-1593 ENTERTAINMENT GARAGE SALES I MISCELLANEOUS HAVING SALE FrI. 23. Sat. 24. 7 AM-Noon. 1334 Pinto Rd. BC GSiaug Garage Sale 29th & 30th 8-5 at 608 Fernbrook Dr. Gas grill. Yamaha electronic keyboard, craftsnnan 6-1/8'jointer-planer, ladies clothes & much misc., 565-1979. Sat. &Sun., 7 AM. Bikes, Frig., electronics. MUST SELL ALL. 1306 AppaloosaBC GS18379 MOVING in 3 weeks sale. Sat., Aug. 31.7-12.1026 Keys Dr.. BC. 294-0767 Yard Sale, 375 Apache. HD. Fri., 8/30 & Sat. 8/ 31. 7 AM 3 PM. GS18398 Yard sale, Sat.. 8/31.901 Plains. 7 AM. New baby clothes. Peter Rabbit layette set. ski clothes & equipment, adult & children, Hawks drinking fountain, goH clubs, skeet thrower & stick vacuum. College to Mission & Mission to Plains. GS18412 YARD SALE Sat., 7 AM?, 657 Avenue M, BC. Washer & dryer, fum., TV &misc. GS16500 MOVING SALE! Furniture and misc. items • Sat., Aug. 31-793 FairwayDr. GS18334 769 Sandra Dr., Aug. 31 St, 7-12 bedroomsuite, den lurn., dishes, misc. Garage & Moving Sale, Thurs., 29th. Fri. 30th only, 417 Blackridge, Hend8-5. GS18338 Garage Sale, Fri. & Sat, 8 AM-2 PM, 776 Christina Dr., BC, fridge, slide projector, misc. items, clothes. GS18359 5 Family—clothes, toys 6 much more. 717 Fifth, 7 AM-Noon, Sat. 8/31. GS18355 Yard Sale, 1537 Chestnut St., HD, organ, boat, van & misc. items. Sat. & Sun., 8 AM-5 PM. PERSONALS "Powerful Novena of Childlike Confidence" (This Novena is to be said at the same time every hour for Nine consecutive hours -just one day). FREE GAS exchanged for ride from BC to Warm Springs/Eastern (GV area) weekday afternoons, Susie 294-0001/ 361-6778. PE18161 GERMAN STUDENT and other Scandinavian, European. South American, Asian, Russian exchange students aniving August. Become a host family/AISE. Call 1-800SIBLING. PE18267 AT&T GLOBAL NETWORK. Offer AT&T wholesale rates. Tremendous compensation, weekly checks. Car bonus, heatlth insurance. Free Web Site. Call toll free 888-599-9965 for recorded message. SINGLES: MEET single people throughout rural Amerk:a. Confidential, reputable, established plan. Free details. Country Connections Newsletter. PO Box 406. Superior. NE 68978, BC wanted roommate fern, that works swing begin 10-15, 565-1389. FREE SAMPLE. SlaaMloaivS MaMalfNdlyaara NOOCTMQ Eal anylhlna you want ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS 7eiyak.alSPM, Rae. AiMMx bahlnd •oiMarOaM CradH Unton. jgBL MISCELLANEOUS BdmiJ.Mkk DISCOUNT AVON For ewapmeel price* Call 293-AVON (2866) Ind^ Singer sewing machine in cabinet, Toast Master oven, Hoover cleaner, Bissell sweeper, metal step ladder, iron & ironing board, call 564-1386 before 6 PM. MM 8400 COMPUTER SOPTWARE Over 25 CDRoms, including games, children's and educational disks. No shareware or demos. Most $3 to S5. Please call 434-6149 for list. MM 7569 WOLFFTANNINGBEDS. TAN AT HOME. Buy DIRECT and SAVE! Commercial/Home units from $199 Low Monthly Payments. FREE Color Catalog. Call TODAY 1800-842-1305. MI18285 Dogloo dog house, extra Ig., never used, pad & see-thru door, pd. $225, sell for $125 OBO, 5651167 Mil8387 WhiripoolW/D$150ea., $275pr;HotpointDW. 1 yr. old, $125; wood hutch, 2 pcs., $ 150; fax machine $75; after 6 PM, 4337725. Mil8385 ARTHRITIS Suffers, live pain free. Had it for 20 years now I am pain free. Cost is as low as $15 per mo., not medicine, natural food & energy supplements. Guaranteed. 564-1648. MI254 New Matco tool box w/ hand/pwr. tools, all name brands MUST SELL, $7,200 OBO: also acetylene tanks; Eagle Commercial Smoker/ BBO, NEW COND. cost $1500 sell $760; 5681304. MI1019^ CANON EOS tCNS. 2880 mm, 13.5-5.6, Ultrasonic. Works with any EOS System camera, including Elan, Rebel, etc. Complete with caps, filter and hood. $100 o.b.o., 434-6149. CD-ROM'eforealeOver 20 titles, including games, children's and educational disks. NONE OVER $10. Please call 434-6149 for list. MM 7569 2 brown rocker recliners $50 ea.; pine roll top desk $150; oM chest of drawers $25; octagon end table $20; larppll 5; new Chrysler mini-van bsnch seat, make offer. Call 565-9311 evenings. MI18017 Clarinet for $200, like new. 564-3996. MI18248 WASHER / Dryers $125.00 Each. 2936101. BC MI1B235 GV GLASS & MIRROR CO. Surplus shower doors, mirrors, glass, minor doors. 368-4628. CaH anytkrw. MI16718 BAHAMA CRUISEI 5 days/4 nights. Underbooked! MUST SELL! $299/couple. Limited tk:kets. 1-800414-4151 Ext. 5149 Mon.-SaL.9AM-10PM. MI15677 Large, General Electric mk:rowav* oven $30; Unusually Beautiful Wedding Dress, size 5 with fuH slip $200: Custom d*signj Weddng Veil $40: MaclntoahQucktel 14,400 fax/hwdemby Logicod*. Mime limited warranty, $60; Cal 564-3508. MI18000 BAHAMA CRUISE! 5 days/4 nights. Undarbookedl MUST SELL! $299/coupl*. Limitad tk^ets. 1-to0-03-9O99 Ext 5148. Mil8019 NewtactorytowbartOO; new 15" tire 4 wheel off 1/2 T Ford $40; fold up bed(ioodahiip$2o,i6^ TV $30: invalid walker $20; potty lift $10; 4 legged cane $8; high chair $5; cycle exer. machlna $8; private carrpground wCCC SOO carrpaltaa $1000 060 on all 565-1367. Mil 1116 Usad madieal aquiprTwnt 1 oofnmoda. 1 elac. hoepHal bad. 3 wdhM*. make ollar. 24-01t4. Mil 8241

PAGE 30

wmmm Pg12 Panomma Thursday, August 29,1^96 Thursday, August 29,1996 Panorama Pag* 13 MISCELLANEOUS | MISCELLANEOUS Thomas playmate color glow orgar), like new, never been used, has all the amenities, orig. $3500. sell for $1500 OBO, 454-2859. MI18251 DP Gympac 1000 fitness system, $225; dog kennel. 7'x12'x5' high, 2 gates, $275; iron secunty doors, $50 ea; iron lights, $ 10 ea.; Craftsman twin motor, Ig. capacity home shop vac. w/ attachs. $50; gold aluminum tub shower door $25; call 564-82B8 MI18414 LAility trailer 8-1/2X4 1/2X2'light weight $300, 293-4895. MM 8424 For sale: Refrig. $200, dinette set w/credenza $175, mKrowave & table $60, Singer sewing machine $100, king size bed $75, grandfather clock $200, endtat>les & lamps, call 565-3569 Iv. msg. MI17896 Roomy, General Electric mwrowave oven $30; Unusually beautiful Wedding Dress, size 5 with full slip $200; Designer Wedding Veil $40; Maclntosh-Quicktel 14,400 fax/modem by Logicode, lifetime limited warranty, $30; Sun dried lumber, good for firewood, FREE! Call 5643598. MM 8090 Bedroom set, dresser, nite stand, headboard, full, $100, 564-1794; Jane Fonda treadmill, only used 1 mo., $75 firm, 565-3398. iWin 8279 Washer/Dryer $125/pr.; almond gas dryer $125, 565-5850 after 4 PM. MI18303 Kennnore gas dryer, light yellow, $100 OBO. 4364138. Ml 18309 File cabinet, tools, bookcase, 294-2375. MI18343 AM-FM stereo cassette record player, component unit & console, $50 OBO; oak vanity w/mirror $20 OBO; French style telephone $15; antique bubble gum machine complete $40 OBO; oxygen emergency life pack $75 OBO; antique brass desk lamp $40 OBO; antique dk. wood shadow box $20 OBO; dk. solid oak credenza $60 OBO; 4 drawer metalfile cabinet, $20 OBO; console AMFM phonograph stereo $25 OBO; 2 glass top end tables $40 OBO; temporary plastic construction fence, 50', $20; 36 bags of oil & gas absorbent $1/bag; 5654125. Mil8353 Overeaters Anonymous meets at St. Christophers Church, 812 Arizona St., 7 PM. Thurs., 593-2945. PERSONALS Sleaplast In Lai Vegas Ate you tooking lor a wonnan who will treat you like a King. Maybe I'm your Queen or maybe a good Irlend Let's talk. Voice Mailbox No 11993 20 gal. aquarium w/ stand, fish, f ihers, heater, extras $40. 293-1693. MI18417 Glass dinette, 4 chairs. $200; youth bed, complete. $50; vibrating recliner, $100; misc., all in excel, cond., 564-5522. PETS/ANIMALS THE ANIMAL FOUNDATION will help you financially spay or neuteryour cat or dog. Very inexpensive in Las Vegas. 384-3333 BC PA ADOPT CATS & Dogs from your shelters. Save a Life. BC PA LAS VEGAS VALLEY HUMANE SOCIETY. Beautiful, healthy, kittens, cats, puppies, dogs. Spayed/neutered, tested, shots. PetsMart, Trop-Eastern store onlyWed., Thurs., Fri.. Sat., Sun., 11-4. PA17B57 FREE FAMILY FUN SAFARI IN THE DESERT. Visitors welcome for guided tours daily to see lions, bears, tigers, cougars, various parrots and hundreds of others. 361 2484. PA17768 Congo African gray beautiful big healthy baby, 645-3786. PA17261 Betty Hohn's non profit Animal Adoption Ltd. is accepting unlimited nunnber of unwanted pets byappointmentonly.You are welcome to view adoptable pets 7 days a week. Callfirst 361-2484. THERE IS NO GUIDED TOURS OF THE PREMISES AT THIS TIME, OF NATIVE, NON-NATIVE, OR WILD AND EXOTIC ANIMALS. PA14684 ATTENTION CAT LOVERS. My name is Coco & I need a loving family to adopt nne. I'm a sweet, playful, affectionate black & white male who needs a warm cozy home. I'm FREE. To meet me call 565-9197. PA18298 MEDICAL SUPPLIES Proventil? Respiratory problems? Do you use Albuterol Sulfate, Alupent, Metaproternol, Mucomist, or other nebulizer medication? Still paying for supplies? Why? Call Express-Med at 1-800-678-5733. MCI 8281 DIABETIC? Are you still & aying for supplies? /hy? For information on how you can receive supplies at little or no cost call 1-800-678-5733. MCI 8287 PERSONALS LICENSED CHILDCARE 'S Can Home MB 4mo.-4yra.oM iM FT/PT, ^n 6AM-6PM-M-F Eaayl-S16,USB3t8SAi IndoorASuldoor ActMIlM 565-5400 LOST & FOUND LOST in Horizon & Greenway area, 1 yr. old male Dachshund, black wAan nrarkings, answers to Tommy Boy, 5648276. REWARD. LF17852 DESPERATELY SEEKING OWNER FOUND Sat., 8/24, sm. dachshund vicinity of Vbtory & Washington Way. HD. Pis. call 564-0134. LF18384 MISSING all white declawed, neut. 15yr. old male cat w/yellow eyes, black/multi-color fish collar. Lost on Wyoming/ Calif., 8/19, 293-4177. BUILDING SUPPLIES Must sell 36 X 40 straiahtwall steel bidg. for bal. due. Serious buyer can save thousands NOW! Call NED 800-527-4044. MCI 4902 GV Glass & Mirror Co. surplus shower doors mirrors glass mirror doors 368-4628 call anytime. MCI 6000 All steel building, never erected, will deliver. Ask for Charlie, 1-800-3202340. MCI 6812 8'x16' MDREX/COMM mobile office, AC, wired for phones, on wheels, OSHA approved, steel steps, $1800. Call 7987776 for 275-4042. MCI 8282 Steel Buildings. Quality Buildings at an Affordable Price. 1-800-9733366. MCI 8330 STEEL BLDG. Fac. inventoiy reduction. Act now. Save thousands. Limited size avail. Call Howell & Bros. Const. 702-438-5582. MCI 7464 FURNITURE MUST SELL solid maple dining rm. furniture, 6 ft. drop leaf harvest table, 2 captain chairs, 4 mates, $475, call 564-3589. MCI 8413 FURNITURE Comfortable cushion sofa, good cond., $75, 565-3091. MCI 6450 Oak dinette set w/6 chairs, $575; corner sectional couch w/queen size hide-a-bed, blue, $125. 564-5922. MCI 8278 Exec, desk, new, orig. $850, selling for $335, 294-0686/286-2833. MCI 8300 5 pc. bd. set, solid oak ent. ctr. w/TV & VCR, other furn. 565-6928. MCI 8314 Rocking love seat & matching platform rocker $500r Lazy Boy rocking recliner $200; 294-2241. MCI 8301 HEALTH & FITNESS ARTHRITIS PAIN RELIEF. 100% NATURAL EMU OIL The application of EMU Oil aids in the relief of pain by reducing inflammation & swelling associated with Arthritis, muscle strain & sore joints. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 2 oz. bottle $19.95 (includes S&H) M/C, VISA. TOLL FREE 1-888-4525292. MCI 5126 20/20 WITHOUT GLASSES! Safe, rapid, non-surgk:al, permanent restoration in 6-8 weeks. Airline pilot developed. Doctor approved, hree information by mail. (800) 422-7320, ext. 222. (406) 961-5570, Fax (406) 9615577. http://www.vision freedom.com SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. MCI 8270 ZAP THE FAT!! Lose up to 40 lbs., 30 day money back guaranteed!! 100% Natural! Doctor recommended! Experience More Energy! Ask about "Freebies." Toll Free 1888-MELTFATMC18295 Exerciser: Schwin airdyne model AD2-$200; 893-0393. MCI 8354 2 end tables 'f 1 coffee Old English Shoppe Oak Plus sofa sleeper section Must se-Will sac. $700 294-2680 na PERSONALS SUCCESS THE AMS WAY •Hirbal Supplaincnia •Nitural Antibiotic •Silt Natural Wclghl ItaiMgwntnl •f rM Sampitt with contultatlon •full or Part Tlirw OMrlbulora • Can Larry or VIvIa (703) 4S4.SMO •Advanlag* Markttlng Syattma, Inc. •ThtM art •oma of our producta •AM-lOO.SharkCartllasa, ColloMal Plut •Supar Antloxidant ColMdal SKvaf Preform Cross Walk Excel, cond. $200 566-0490 ,. PERSONALS Wfjy Walk Alone? A S, I rii • Of I'lijii r l),itf Christinn Christian Presentable SWC Irog. 60. Bible study, books, square dancing. ISO slender, NS. NO, younger SWC lady Irog to hop witli. No Uds, no exes. Voice Mailbox No. 119B9 Spirlt-Fllled Single Mom Young 47. loves the Lord, studying the Bible and going to church. Looking lor commlted, sptrlt-lllled man who loves the same. Voice Mailbox No. 11996 SWM.S'4", 55 Yean Young Never married, enjoy walks with my dogs. Christian and classical music, intelligent conversation and good sense ol humor Seeks beautilul Christian /nate. Vofce Mailbox N0.1199S First Time Ad Athletic, open-minded SWF. 18. who tikes spons, ISO SW/BM 1824, who's athletic, sincere and a Christian, tor Irlendship or possible long-term relationship. Voice Mailbox No. 11995 Singles Petite, Green-Eyed Country Woman 50. NS and NO. wants to meet tall, dark, handsome, physk:ally 111 country guy. En|oys camping rodeos, dancing. Any race. LTR. Voice Mailbox No. 11990 DWF,45,5'7MZ0lbS. Model, blonde hair, beautllul. ISO handsome, tall, dark-haired SWM who can dance al night with energy M over. Voce Malbox No. 11994 SM.18 Tall, dark hair, enjoys the outdoors, all types ol musk:, seeking someone to share all the good things In ille Voice Mailbox No. 11997 ISO Angel From Heaven DWM. 38. 56". 145 lbs. ISO attractive SWF. 25-40. NS. who's honest, sincere, very romantic, warmhearted, and down to earth. Enjoys movies, romantic dinners, hand-inhand moonlit waUts. cuddling. It you want love and respect, let's talk. Voice Mailbox No. 11988 SWF, 36 ISO SWM, NO, 35-45, who likes country musk: and watching movies Friendship first, possible relationship. Vok Mailbox No 11991 SWM, 22 Financially secure, open-minded, athletic, loves water sports, dance, and conversation. ISO WF. 18-25. lor triendship llrst. possible relationship Voice Mailbox No. 11992 Wanted: Someone Special DWF, SOs, ISO honest, romantic, NS, S/DWM, no dependents. I love C&W musK. Las Vegas, traveling, movies, swimming, laughter, massages, quiet evenings. Vox:e Mailbox No. 11986 CLUB SCENE NOT YOUR STYLE? There IS an aliernaiive Call today to place your free ad! DWM, 60s, Financially Secure Retired and alone, seeks lady who would like to Stan over. Must be easygoing and love animals. Vok;e Mailbox No. 11987 TIME RUNNING OUT? Call I-IUM37 j||4 mday in icncw yuw al-flin ihc time al or pUx a new inc! ABBREVIATIONS S-SINGLE D-OIVORCED M-MALE F-FEMALE L-LATIN B-BUCKA-ASIANW-WHITE H-HISPANIC CA-CATHOLIC C-CHRISTIAN J-JEWISH LOS-LATTER-DAY SAINT NS-NONSMOKER ND-NONDRINKER NR-NONRELIGIOUS ISOIN SEARCH OF Don't be lata for your Perfect Date! Call 1-800-437-5814 today to place your free 25-word print ad! To place an ad: To respond: • Col l-aO(M37-5ai4 Mondojrivou^ rvoof, 6ain. to7pm. Saudci)rcndSundoy, 7ain.to3pjn. nxnc femi. andntm •yMdt MKlDdaNnonali 6l9WColegeAv StatoCokge, PA 16801 I^FoK 1-800-8566588 UHaunaDa/l W wl mol tw iniormcion )iou nead b ralrwiv your rwponMi A(^rfmidbt25adiorlaa hdude vour nan, oddran and phone nwTv Mr. For your ad to ba prooHMd, dl infonnation ffluil bt indudad Infer fftfior t tt *li^Wy iJuiiiJwifc CT Wt? proviflf n FRf I print ;id. FREEwke '• ..., ,,,^£c.illstoretJieve ckl That means there s no cost I I43<7I] nMdi mmaim.ljmmtm mmmtmmmmt^namwiikt,yanmfmmaiimiamfmiKtaktataOlKAM*aMifalBpiipMtfiag*aiMi(llM4(Uf1 ID (K airfM. ffc aria • aiMMte • > I foni'i • MMaAMy Kfar iaJtadnt BteoAfc Wc letnc mmf^mmmafmtmu^fmii.mmmt€mtc WCIOT IB utwnimmttMlmiai/l/atmJiK.faiitwtictwmmci I [htyaurOtafZai ^ UmaloudHomphoim. • Col 1-aOO-205-538S • FVt'raidUU4eaiy jnrtudiani • YouwIbecKigadJI?? pw mnM to your Viwror Morivoar^ m \m \tfMt SMI )aur wriltan rttponM, w ploca in an nlopt, and wrik tn toia I moibaK numbtr on iht oubidi. Abo wrili immtcHht pop* tv od opptond in. Put iht MOU riipanM or iniibM in a loigv aitjapt along wi^ iht $7 brvnqrano im. You moy •UOM m moiy n ycnw i 01 you wiih, along wilt $7 far EAQH rMpom*. Owcx or rnoney ordv on^, piM, pay>hlc/rtcnalil< •LockBoi 'Ccmio BUUi^a •BMtk KrcowUlUUoa* •CMIOH SoftwMV iMorHAitr.RPnB: coNVEliiinN!cr.iTr •EMPLOYBE JkDDrnoNS •EMFLOrBB CBANTiBS •USa PAYIOLL CBEnS •PAYioLL PK:K IT? •MAGNEnr TAPE UEDIA •OnABTEKLY TAX KEPOnS •sns lEPnrr C UB Pick lt>i Deiiver-, • 733-0378-J NEVAM FDUKIAl. COHCIPTS I L_M 1. lUanlM., fM<. Ul__4 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES NOTICE TO READERS: The NBC Publications does not vouch for the legitimacy of items, jobs, or nrx>ney-making opportunities ad\/ertised in this classification. Wesuggestyou carefully evaluate such offers and not send money to these advertisers unless you are certain you know with whom you are dealing and you know all terms and conditions of the offer. Housecleaning Sen/Ke, Est'd Syrs., $75K-f gross annual inc., $10K w/ terms. 294-1236. Honest & dependable woman will clean your houseforyou. Call at 5650890. DH 18262 Have 2 openings in my GV home, ages 6 mo.-4 B rs.,Mon.-Fri.,451-9815. IH18336 Babysitting BIk. Mtn. area M-F til 6 PM, sm. group CPR/clean/safe 5644922. PHI 8351 Exper. thorough reliable housecleaning. Good local refs. if required, 5660456 anytime. PHI 8377 Little Bears Babysitting, 2 mothers will care for your little bears, any age, will take to & pick up from school, M-F, askfor Terri or Stacey 558-4105. DH18407 ROUTE, SALES SERVICE DEUVERY WOWWCMA>tmt Have childcare openings all shifts, M-F full time only, 293-4195. DH 18420 HELP WANTED Veterinary assistant part tjme position open. Duties included receptionist technical and Kennel work must be 18 years, for more information call 294-0001. HW18174 CLERK: Mighty Mart Convenience Store. All shifts. Must be 21 yrs. Cashier/stockroomcomp. wages. Located at Pecos/Windmill in Green Valley, 263-4242. HW15748 Now hiring responsible, intelligent people. See any manager, 1237 Nevada Hwy., BC HW18394 NATIONAL PARKS HIRING —Posit ions are now available at National Parks, Forests & Wildlife Preserves. Benefits -tbonuses! For employment directory, call (206) 971-3622 ext, N89779. HW18269 J Area residents have found opportunity Ulce none other worlcing as a team to create residual income. Ail pian toeani|7(MM0 first year Cal 564-6875 Strong design^roduction parson needed for digital depl. MAC oriented. Must know Photoshop, Illustrator & Quark, IBM knowledge a-f. Experienced orily. Salary DOE. Strong color portfolio required. Call Milo, 7321878. HW14378 CARRIERS needed, professional only need apply with reliable transportatnn. Acply in person at: Hendsrson Home News, 2 Commerce Canter, Henderson. HW17780 ALASKA EMPLOYMENT Fishing Induetiy. Earn up to $3,000$e,000-f per month. Room & Board! Tranepoftalion! No experience naceesaryl Male/Female. Age 18-70. For mort Information caH: S M) 971-3512 ext. 977P. HW18041 HELP WANTED Exparianead lawn eara peraon 294-6274. HW18411 CRUISE SHIPS HIRING — Earn up to $2,000-t-/ mo. working on Cruise Ships or Land-Tour companies. World Travel. No exp. necessary. For directory, call: 1-206-971-3552 ext. C89777. HW18268 ALASKA EMPLOYMENT — Fishing Indus\ry. Earn up to $3,000$6,000+ per month. Room & Board! Transportation! No experience necessary! Male/Female. Age 18-70. For more information call: (206) 971-3512 ext. Aa9779. HW18266 PARKS AND FACILITIES MAINTENANCE II SALARY: $30,185.73$34,411.02/year. REQUIREMENT^: Two (2) years of general maintenance experience in the areas of building maintenance and landscape maintenance, or any equivalent combination of closely related traininci and experience. SP? CIAL REQUIREMENTS: Possession of, or the ability to obtain, an appropriate Nevada Driver's License, and maintenance of a satisfactory driving record. WHERETOAPPLY:City applcation form must be submitted to and received by the Personnel Department, Room 200, City Hall, 240 Water Street, Henderson, NV 89015, no later than Thursday, September 12,1996, by 5:00 p.m., to be considered for this recruitment. NO APPLICATIONS WILL BE GIVEN OUT AFTER4:00 P.M. ON THE CLOSING DATE OF THIS RECRUITMENT. Employment packet MUST be obtained from the Personnel Department; resumes only WILL NOT be accepted in lieu of employment application. HOUF^S OF OPERATION: MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY, 7:30 A.M, TO 5:30 P,M, SMOKE-FREE WORK ENVIRONMENT. AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER. HW18335 Italian restaurant now hirinqforallpositbns. Pis. apply in person at Trilussa Restaurant, 1300 Sunset Way, Suite 2545, HD. HW18014 PROFESSIONAL carriers to throw full size routes. Must be experienced. Apply in person at: HBC Publications, 2 Commerce Center, Hd, We are now accepting applications in the following areas: classified & typesetting. Both positions must have computer experience. Apply in person at: Henderson Home News, 2 Commerce Center, Henderson. HW18078 Cleaning sen/ice needs person forflexible PThrs, to do residential & some commercial accts., 5654750 HW18242 PT maid, M-F, Nonsmoker preferred, apply in person. El Rancho Boulder Motel, 725 Nev. Hwy. BC HW18409 NSTIL ft CASINO (g) Both proptrtlM art Accaptirig Application* For Accounting MgryAccountint Min.5yrs.Exp. PicvkMiiCitlno Eip. Desired Apply In paison QoM Strika Holal, Jaan, NV. Paraonnal Dapl. M^, 7-5 PM Exc*!. tenaMa S oppoftunHy 401K Program Iton nelting areum Oreu* Proptrtha Norei m CASWM (6 Both propartlaa an Aocaptkig AppltcatlofM For Change Person Exp. Line Coolc Dealers Apply bipMMn JawvNV. EaBBi b iiiiWl a cypotluney 401K Ctreua CIntM Pnparttt* HELP WANTED $1000s POSSIBLE READING BOOKS. Part Time. At Home. Toll Free 1-800-898-9778, Ext. R3804 for Listings. HW16671 Help Wanted: Secretary/ Bookkeeper for small electrical contractor. Must know accounts payable and receivable, payroll and taxes. Send resume and salary requirements to: Design Systems, 892 Dianne Dr., Boulder City, NV 89005 or call 294-4208 after 4:00 PM. HW18217 Experienced mig welder/ fabricator must be drug free, apply inperson, 668 Wells Rd.,BdHWl 8224 R.E. SALESFREE SEMINAR Com* join ttw *1 Cantunr 21 offte* In the SW t Lu Vagaa. Wa ara aaaklng quallflad candidataa lo bagin a nw caraar. For tha baat on-on-ona training and support, East and Wast offlcaa, call Joa, 43S-S300, Cantury 21 Monay World. HAIR STYLIST & MANICURIST NEEDED^ Exp. preferred. Full service salon. Call 294-8477. HW141B8 $$CASINO JOBS$$ Now hiring 17,00050,000/yr. casinos & riverboats. No exp. necessary. For immediate hiring info 407-338-6100 ext.NVl01$,6AM-6PM, 7 days. HW14465 VOLUNTEERS OF AMERICA has the following position available: RESIDENTIALTECHNICIAN. Shifts vary. Assist House Parents with daily operations of a group home. MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Individuals over the age of 21 with a high school diploma and related experience in the human social sen/ices field. /Applications will be accepted at: 801 Adams Blvd., Boulder City, NV 89005. For information contact Volunteers of America at 293-3301, HW17401 *•*••*•**•*** • GOLD STRIKE INN • & CASINO NOWHIRING: WaMraaiM SMWtty Quvd* Hostati/Cadilan KafW Runnaca BuaParaona Caakio Capa CaaMira • k Mouaalwapara, Nna coofca • -k i, dIaliwaalMra ie ^ Hfl-4nM gM altop parson. ^ Apply In pan on at CaaMara Caga US HWY as* NaarHoovarOm **•*•••* • •*•* COIN ROOM ATTENCLERK All shifts. Must be 21 yrs. Cashier/Stockroom. Mighty Mart Convenience Store located in Green Valley. 433-4343. HW14723 CLINICAL DIRECTOR. Southern Nevada Children's Home seeks licensed therapist to fill the position of Clinical Director. The qualified candidate must have at least a master's degree in social work, psychology or related field and have either an MFT, LCSW or comparable license. The Clinrcal Director must be a highly skilled individual with experience in residential and/or group home settings. Salaty will be DOE. Send your resume to: Director, 801 So. Adams Blvd., Boulder City, NV 89005 or FAX it to: 2934251. HW17410 Advertising Salesperson for award-winninq weekly in Lake Tahoe. Send resume to Bill Kunerth, Tahoe World, PO Box 138, Tahoe City, CA 96145. Or Fax to (916) 583-7109. HW18286 FRIENDLY TOYS & GIFTS has openings for dealers and managers. No cash investment! Fantastic toys, home decor, Christmas items. Call for catalog and information. 1-800-4884875. HW18277 RECEPTION 1ST-Heavy phones, sonne light typing, good people skills & a team player. M-F, 8-5. Pis. apply in person at: Henderson Home News, 2 Commerce Center, Henderson. No phone calls pis. HW18245 HF1.P WANTED Waltresa at Expraaaor Cafe, PT. Apply In peraon. Super 8 Motel, 704 Nevada Hwy., BC HW17511 POSTAL JOBS, BOULDERCITYAREA$13.27 hr. to start plus benefits. Caaler, sorters, clerks, computer trainees. For application & exam information, call 1-800270-8015, Ext. 5201. 6 am-6 pm. 7 days. HW17745 Ambitious minded people! $500 wktypotential. Many positions available. Start now, no experience necessary. Call 7 days 407-8752022 Ext. 6049 H33 HW18020 LANDSCAPE GARDENER, 40 hrs./wk., valid drivers lk:ense, JM Landscape, 565-6859. MANICURIST NEEDED Exp. preferred. Full sen/Ke salon. Call 2948477 HW14376 Retail clerk 4-8 evenings in pro shop. Call 2932875/385-2324 lor appt. HW17840 MAIDS exper. Apply in person between 7 AM-3 PM, Best Western Lake Mead, 85 W. Lake Mead Dr., HD. HW17954 MOTEL CLERK exper. 3-11 PM,& PT. Apply in person between 7 AM-3 PM, Best Western Lake Mead, 85 W. Lake Mead' Dr., HD. HW17953 Position available for prep cook, no exp. necessary. Apply at Two Gals Restaurant, 1632 NVHwy.BC HW18133 HOME HEALTH SERVICES of Nevada immediate openings: full-time, part-time, per-diem RN's throughout Nevada, especially Carson, Yerington and Hawthorne. 1-800-7337178,POBox1359,Elko, NV 89803. HW18272 TRAVEL PEOPLE GOING PLACES That's what CSAA Is all • bout So if you'ra looking to move, now la the time, and CSAA is the place! Travel Agents HENDERSON We currently Jiave a lu|( time poeition available for • n individual with at least 2 years of current Maura travel agency experience, and Apollo or other air retervationt syetema experience. At AAA, you'll enjoy an excellent aalary and benefits package, along with the •tability we've earned by providing travel-related aervlcea to our members since 1907. To apply call Sue Musto at: 702/456-5994x241, or FAX your resume to her at: 702/458-3711. We strive to equally employ populations as diverse as the cuttomart we serve. CSAA DRIVERS AND LABORERS 50 Needed Daily/Weekly Pay Apply LABOR EXPRESS 39 E. Basic Rd. WENDY'S Now hiring Day/Night Cashieni Pramium Pay! 1131 W. Sunset (Across from the Gallaria) SHIFT MANAGERS withltyrs. mgmt. exp. also needed. EOE SECURITY GUARD PT Security Guard Must have experience. Pla. call 433-7706 DISHWASHER/DIETARY AID Will be responsible for washing dishes & learn proper food handling techniques & special diets of our residents. Previous experience always a plus, if interested please apply ia person at: Boulder City Care Center 601 Adanfw Blvd., Boulder City TELLERS—$8Air an Hourly Taaer al Bank of Amartoa. braneh. Hr*. are lleaMa, up to 1* hm>au ealary IIHI s NHi Miiifly • cneMfiflnp. irifNMUM ov9 monttw oseh In panon al aank el MMMlaa • C>e < weawtaw-W •mkH/^mmfeaiim m avaMatala M our BouMw efaNyoH-lvalaiae 1 ELP WANTED SALESPERSON—MARINE naadad for Marina aceasaorias, including, wakeboarda, water skia, ate. Stait $8/hr. + commisakMi. Marina Products Pro Shop, 702-466-0122 (Las Vegas). HW17379 llOOO'a POSSIBLE TYPING. Part Time. At Home. Toll Fraa 1-800898-9778. Ext T-3804for Lletlnga. HW17498 Halntylista wanted for. QV salon, rental, call Audrey 458-0063. HW17787 slight manager, honest, riandly, mature. Apply at Frosty Freeze, BC HW18151 PT housakaapar for Ig. horn* In Hd. Dutias will incl: claaning, laundry & Ironing. Expar. prafarrad $7/hr. 565-9757 •••••*••• .TOW DRIVERS Full Time Avail. 7^ "^ Exp. prefen-ed but ir not necessary, ir •^ Must be clean cut, -^ .JL, have valid Nevada ^ .driver's license with curent DMV "* • ^ printout. ir UutUvtlnBC. -k .^ Apply in person at -^ 705 Juniper Way, BC •••••*••• RESUMES PfotM9t€ntmy Don9 KrSMWNESS SERVICES opwiMiyitoi 14a0 Ctlaraae (M A*) B.C 293-5361 CAFE SENSATIONS G.V. Cafe eeeking full time axpe. pantry cook. Kitchen supervleor position available bring ref arerwaa. Applications accepted In person M W F, 8 am to 11 am, 2-4 pm, 4350 E. Sunaet 110 at AtNnaan. Mendereon. HW2SS TEACHER NEEDED ^ Kindergarten ^ Elementary Educ. • ChikI Development OiMM Prasdiofll AcsdMny llNWyofnIns -61H Yw Ilium mt Vw llnM*l AVON (r02)2M417( Call Today! AYOn HMAnMBlorYOUl ToauyorSM CMI nocN WNVM^WI 293-0110 DAILY a WEEKLY PAY Shoit/Long Term Aaalgn. Now laUng appitcatlont tor. CLERICAL WAREHOUSE S CONSTRUCTION Apply in peraon, S am-S pm, Moti.-Frl. 331 Watar SI., HMKlerMXi HELP WANTED Counter person, night shift. Apply at Frosty Fraaze.BC HW18152 SIOOO'B POSSIBLE READING BOOKS. Part Time. At Home. Toll Free 1-800-898-9778, Ext. R3804 for Listings. HW18332 SlOOO's POSSIBLE TYPING. Part Time. At Home. Toll Free 1-800898-9778, ext. T-3804 for listings. HW18331 HELP WANTED Apart. Managers, a mature couple, exper., must have own tools, 42 unit complex, husband can, have outskla job, 4314442. HW18250 Now hiring, McDonald's Restaurant new k)cation at College & Horizon. Work near home. Applications & interviews at the Community College of So. NV at Hd, M-F, 9 AM-12 PM or call 8961347 for information. SECURITY OFFICERS-UNARMED $5.75 HR. to start HENDERSON av. areas. Full A Part-Time. Weekdays & Weekends. MUST HAVE WORKING PHONE t TRANSPORTATK)N. Please apply in person MON.-THURS., 10a-3p, EOE CURTIS SECURrrV, 3305 Spring Mtn. Rd,8te. 83. HWIIOU .SJDC Seeking articulats, personable, and mature minded hidlvkfcials, to conduct foltow up phone calls, with graduates and associates of distinguished instituttons. Integrity and a commitment a must Afternoon and weekend ahifts available. A professional, and friendly environmenL $7 hourly wage, part time positions only. 565-S038 leave a npwieSRe" Temporary/Full-Tim* Employment Sarvicet IMMEDIATE OPENINGS! NEVER A FEE Receptionist, Word Processing, Data Entry Oper. & More. 898-1956 3510 E. Tropicana, #K at Paces •••••••••••••••••••••••• SECURITY OFFICERS I • k Needed for greater Henderson, GV area,* FULL TIME and PART TIME, flexible hours.* Must have dependable transportation &* phone. Call ALUED SECURPTY, 795-3317,^ Monday-Friday, 8:30-4:30 pm, 1515 E.* Tropicana Ave., Suite 395. EOE/M-F/H-V. 17764* •••••••••••••••••••••••• iEASTRiPGETem ps' Ik Packers, $S.50-$C.OO Urgi HMidOTMn oompany Mak* nllalito IndMdiial* (or varfcHM aMtlt. Mutt hava fraraportaUon. NO FEE Caff No>y 566-9662 NO FEE lacraaVon tadllty at Sun City MacOonald Ranch In Hand I* appNcaVont raauma* for tha following poaMoni. Tha I ba opanlng In M> Oct/Mrly Nov. Ceoka Dtahwaihara Hoa^aftonACasHar Bava r aga Cart Atlandanla (goH courta) (FT) ContpMi aniHcaeon at or aand raaunM to: Dal Wabb Corporation Human Raaourca* Al 9SSS CM Wabb Blvd. La* Vagaa.NV 89134 Or 20SS Watt Horizon RIdga Handaraon, NV 89012 tun city MacDenald Riiwli ki H*nd. It Meapttng appNcitlont t rMumta lof tiM Idlowlng petMona. Looking for nul> t fanoU ippllcanli lor ill opanlngi. AH ihm Marls at approi. 4:>0 AM. FaelUly will bopanlng ki lit* OeUttitr Nov. Makitonanea Claili MtkitMianea Workara Caalodhna (daya t awkig) Laad CMIodaraon,NV 89012 laan Sun City IMacDonald Rancti in Hand, ia accapting applications S raaumas for tha following poaltiorts. Tha racraatlonat facility will ba opaning In iata Octiaarly Nov. FHnaaa Inatructor MonHora (PT) Actlvltiaa Clark Mambarahip Clark CompMa application at or aand raeuma to: Dal Wabb Corporation Human Raaourcaa At 9SSS Dal Wabb Blvd. LaaVagaa,NV89134 Or 2065 Waat Horizon Ridga Handaraon, NV 89012 1B3t2 YOUR NEXT JOB COULD BE A CRUISE... LAKE MEAD CRUISES. HAS IMMEDIATE OPENINGS FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS: ^ Coclctall Staff g local carpenters for Boulder City locations. Also Henderson & Las Vegas Carpenters $7-$17 DOE Foremen $19-$24 DOE Family Health Insurance 401K plan Company truck & tools supplied Call KBI 798-2737 for project locations ixxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx HELP WANTED Ornamental Iron painter needed to paint lences & gates prior to installation, shop in BC, proof of exper. required, call 293-5535. HW18397 HOUSE RENTALS 3 bd., 2 ba., 2 c. garageBC Golf Course Area $975, 293-6383. HR18430 BC 3 bd., 2 ba., 2 car $900, 293-6383 HR18428 2 BD., 1 BATH APT. Newly remodeled, $495/ mo., 293-6248. HR15447 HD 2 bd., 1 ba. quiet cul de sac $675, 566-3655 after 5 PM. HR17663 4bd.,2ba.,$B75 + utiL& deposits, NO PETS 5658296. HR18258 2bd.,1ba.,$675-^utiL& deposits, NO PETS 5658296. HR18257 Hend. Duplex, 2 bd., 1 ba., 700 SF, incl. util. & appl., $700/mo., vacant, 565-1120. HR18261 2 bd., 1 ba., in middle of town for rent, 1st, last & cleaning dep., 565-9579. HR18284 BC golf course home, 3 bd., 2-1/2 ba., $1400, 596-4956. HR18329 3 bd., 2 ba. chain linl< fence front & back $600 per nrK). $600 sec. dep., call 293-2341. HR18344 2 bd., 1 ba.. Central AC, recently remodeled, 525 Hopi, $695/mo., 2936501. HR18358 Lg. 5 bd., 3 ba., close to schools, many extras, reasonable to good tenants, 293-5728/2936036. HR18389 1 bd., 1 ba., $475 incl. water + dep., NO PETS, 565-8296. HR18404 LEASE OPTION 3 bd., 1-3/4 ba., fam. rm., w/ frpl., new Icitchen, roof, stucco, ba. Avail. Nov. 1, $1000/mo. Call 293-3144 for appt. HR18406 HELP WANTED RUNNER must havacar, good driving record, wage -f mileage, GVHS or UNLV student, M-F, aftemoona, 15-20 hnJ wk., 795-8335 afterSPM. HW17718 HOUSE RENTALS 3 bd., 1 ba., 635 Ava. B, $750 per mo., first, last, $350 cleaning dep., 2935722, leave message. HR18421 2bd., downtown, outside storage, NO PETS, $600/ mo., 564-3140. HR18328 3 bd., 1 -3/4 ba., fam. rm., fenced yd., close to schools & easy access. Avail. 10/1, $800 • • sec, 564-5648 after 6 PM. HR18022 2 bd., 2 ba. $710/mo. $600 sec. dep., laundry facility inside, 547-1270. HR18012 3 bd. + den. Key Largo w/ pool, $1600/mo. Century 21 Boulder Dam Realty, 293-4663. HR18178 3 bd. Waters Edge $1600/mo. Century 21 Boulder Dam Realty, 293-4663. HR18177 BC 3 bd., 1 ba., gar. w/ automatic opener, RV parking, automatic sprinklers, range, drapes, $875, 1st, last & $450 sec. dep. Avail. 9/1,8965828. HR18165 Duplex for rent in Hend. $575/mo.,$500dep.,30 E. Atlantte, Unit A, 2 bd. Call Jim Jensen at 5643333. HR18252 2 bd. duplex, good for adults, $600 -f dep. 5658210. HR18308 3 bd., 1 ba., 42 Ocean, HD, water & garbage incl., $700/mo., $700 dep., 564-6742. HENDERSONSINGLE FAMILY Spadoua 2 bd., 2 b., MMy Mcaaa to Inmtmi. PocalH. IMM. op W on, MMM pM only, 1 yr. IMM MM ma Fred or Ellie:::Kni|ip Realty 566-8185 FOR RENT Regatta Pointe 2 bd., 2 ba., 2 car gar., priv. yd., $1,150 • $1,150 sec. 2 bd., 1 ba. homo, $67S -f deposiU Boulder Square 2 bd, 1 ba., $625 deposits Call B.C. Adobe Realty, 293-1707 APT. RENTALS Teddy's Kitchenettes, Just bring your toothbrush. Everything furnished. PH. 293-1716. BC NEW KITCHENETTES, phone, satellite, maid service. STARVIEW MOTEL 293-1658. BC AR14278 2 bd., 1-1/2 ba. townhouse, gr. location, close to ail, W/D hookups, easy move in $575 + $150 dep., 565-1499. ART7563 3 bd. house for rent, must see. No pets, near school & shopping $850 mo. Call 293-4517. AR18371 2 rooms, house priv. $250 for small rm. $300 for large rm., 293-0172. APARTMENTS AS LOW AS $275 a Month furnished 564-6952 ,„ NEW KITCHENETTES STARVIEW, 293-1658 APT. RENTALS Studio apt., BC, $350 per mo, $500 dep. Avail. NOW prefer No Pets, 293-4384. AR18418 FOR RENT: Kitchenettes, $65/wk. Utilities pd. SHADY REST MOTEL, 565-7688. AR9597 Ridge /Vpts., 2 bdrm. No pets. Lease for 12 mo., 293-0420. AR18003 Beautiful apartment for rent, Ibd., $465/mo. incl. util., W/D avail. Sr. citizen & NON-SMOKER, call 293-4523. AR16543 Studio apart., util. pd., preferred Srs., $300,5658165. AR18175 Kitchenettes, fully furnished with cable, in Boulder City. 293-6269 Cell. 682-7914 CORNER COURT APIS. 2 bdrm., 1 ba. Near Basic High iSOO/mo. 'f sec. dap. SM:. 8 OK-NO PETS 434-9B27 MERLAYNE VILLA APTS. — Units lass than 2 yrs. old— 2 bd., 2 ba., microwave & dishwasher, $625/mo. 409 & 417 Merlayns • Near Park & Grade School 565-9582 CASA DE ALICIA AND M&M II APT We're not giving away the kitchen sink. WE DONT HAVE TO. Let our features & professk>nal staff speak for themseh/es. 1,2&3bdnn. from$550. Pools, pk;nk: areas. Walk in ck>sets. 293-1615 ARIUM '"""•"='*' • ATLANTIC CITY APARTMENTS Clean, Quality 1-2-3 Bdroom ApartmMits In HMtderson • Central Air h. Heat • Appliancaa • Blinds • Carpets • Water PskJ • Washsr/Dryer AvailsMs Apartments are $420 ft up per month, newly remodeled, spacious rtssr schools, park A shopping. 565-7028 17564 COMMERCIAL RENTALS 3500 aq. ft. Warehouse space for rent, 710 W. Sunset, 564-4100. C018315 Storage Plus Office warehouse suite 1 GOOsq. ft., 1557 Foothill Dr. Frontape view BC $650 mo. with $650 Security Dep., 293-3115. C018233 BC approx. 1000 SF warehouse w/bath in new plaza. Temw negotiable. 293-1844 weekdays to see. C013992 BC approx. 1/2 acre blacl( top & block walled w/ 40'X90'shop,4bay8,14' doors & 3 orfKSs. Zoned CM. WouM like to share part of bIdg. & lot. Call 293-7003. C016616 GREAT LOCATION Professional Office space. 1600 Sq. Ft. Excellent sign exposure— 1001 Nevada Hwy.— Next to State Farm Office. Phone 293-4151. CO18370 Professional office space available in BC. Approx. 800 sq. ft. for as low as $450. Ph. 293-3119. C018368 Lease commercial manufacturing 600 or 1200 SF, industrial condo, 707 Canyon Rd., BC, Unit #6, 293-0434. C018367 BRIAN HEAD GR "A-Frame" cabin in beautiful Brian IHead ski area, yr. round access, a gr. place to relax. Call Larry at 801-572-8900. MCI 8155 UTAH LAND Live your dream, fish in your backyard stream, 5 acres just N. of Zion, close to Brian Head too. $40,000, 564-6875. MCI 8089 MOBILE HOMES Villa Hermosa huge 3 bd., 2 ba., w/den, all appl., $1000 down OAC under $600/mo., CO-OP, 5953279. MM 17655 Boulder Hwy. & Russell Rd. huge 3 bd., 2 ba. w/ den, all appl. & fenced. Low as $ 1000 down OAC under $700/mo. CO-OP, 595-3279. MH17654 2bd., 1 ba. set up in local park mature lawn enclosed patio, washer and dryer heat AC swamp after 5 PM, 293-0401. Shown by appt., BC MH16634 1976, 14x70 Kit Mobile Home, 2bd., 1-1/2 ba., $18,000, 293-3956. MH 17578 2 bd. home in beautiful Gingenwood Senior Park, many extras, $21,500. Enjoy swimming pool, therapy pool, recreation programs, etc. Call for details, 293-1908. QINGERWOOD SEN. PK. dM. wid* ilmost 2bd.,dn, 1-1/2ba.,fum, carport, thMl, 1100 SF, Immad. occup. BC $34,950 FIRM 566-5403 CONDO RENTALS Henderson CondoCountry Hills, 2 bd., 2 ba., upstairs gated w/pool & exercise rm., 2936383. CR18429 BC, 2 bd., 2 ba. condo, adults, no pets, $650/ nrx)., 1st & dep., call 2937476. CR18079 Near Jokers Wild, nee end unit condo., 2bd., 1 1/2 ba., all appl., cov. park., NO PETS, $585/ mo -f dep., 566-6260. CR18280 Nk;e 1 bd. upstairs unit in quiet Boulder Square. Complex has pool & laundry facilities, close to town, gr. for Seniors, NO PETS, $545 + dep. 2940323 or 293-2511. CR18373 2 bd. priv. patk> behind golf course $550/mo. 566-1269. CR1B383 2 bd. BouMar Square $625 mo. dapositt' BC Adobe Realty 293-1707 1310 Nev. Hwy. CHOICE MOBILE home/ building lots in Sandy Valley. 2 Wacres ea. Power at the site, underground phone, paved and/or gravel roads. Seller offering good terms. Phone Grace, at Americor Realty, 3651953. L0253 LAKE MEAD VIEW ESTATES, custom honr>e lots overlooking Lake Mead. 702-294-0475. L0l75e8 Spectacular lake view approved plane, 312 Baicaiona Q.. BC. Draaliealyreduoad, $160,000 o*vner ?93-0§10 COMMERCIAL RENTALS CM Zoning BCI600 SF of shop area w/600 SF of caretakers quarters. Waeher & dryer incl. Lease $1200/mo. 2932202 BEFORE 6 PM. 0017650 OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT. Prinrw BC k>cation. Available 9/1/96. 294-0225. C017541 OFFICE SPACE • 2nd floor, separate entrance, ba., AC & heating. Util. fum.,tots of parking. 1225 SF, avail, but can section off as desired at .65 cents per SF. Call Katie 2935757. C017957 PRIME RETAIL OR OFFICE Qrsat locatk)n 1402 Nevada Hwy., BC 600 sq. ft, 750 sq. ft. & 1175 sq.ft. Ideal for Beauty shop, RE, Ins. or Sales. Call Owner 293-2898 — mm^ — 12,000-157,000 SF .36 pet • .42 psf Hettdaraa Avail 9/96 Doug/Lorl CB Commercial 369-4800 VONS SHOPPING CENTER Retail Space Available Neal Siniakin, Broker 294-1444 LOTS FOR SALE ARE YOU GETTING ail the credit you deserve? 100% construction financing plus permanent financing if qualified, even without 20% down-payment. Miles Homes 1800-343-2884 Ext. L. MCI 8289 VACATION RENTALS Brian Head Condo rental, sleeps 8, cool summer fun, mtn. biking, fishing, hiking, festivals, summer rates, $65/niglit weekdays, $90/night weekends, 702-294-2320. MCI 7776 ROOMS FOR RENT Bdrm., house priv., cable, pool/spa, GV, $300 mo., call Ron 434-2005 after 5:30 PM. RR17972 2 bdrm., townsite home, $575 mo., 1st, last mo. + $250cleaning dep., 1916 Margarita, call Ron 8711721 B or 434-2005 after 5:30. RR17973 Hend. Furn. studio, priv. ba., kit., N-S, $400 incl. util. -Idep., 293-6799. RR18263 Beautiful home in BC, priv. bd. & ba., prefer straight professional male, NON SMOKER background ck required, 293-0957. RR18253 Room with bath, private entry, house privileges, $350, 566-6466. RR18244 2 roommates to share 3 bd. home in BC. $300$350/nno, util. incl., avail. 9/1.293-1270. RR18326 Bd. w/ba., possible rent reduct., exch. repairs pref. Sr., 564-4206. RR18346 5 bd., 3 ba., pool & spa, Christian morals & nonsmoker, house priv., exercise equip, area, fum./ non-furn. $350, 2935728/293-6036. RR18401 CONDO SALES BC2bd., 2-1/2 ba. Lake View Condo. Hend. Neat, 3 bd., 1-3/4 ba. house R riced to sell $85,990. einz Prudential S.W. Realty, 293-0545. CS By owner BC Lake view, 2 br., 2 ba., den, 2 car gar., 1892 SF upgraded Regatta Pointe, pool, spa, principals only, 2934146. CS18347 CONOO/rOWNHOUSE Check out Ihie fuNy done ovar unit New paint In S out new root. CIteaper ttian rent FiedorElK=KM|VlMly sa>n complelae in Oct. $168,500, owner 256-5510 or 254-6458 Eves. RE18029 BARGAINS OhI ddVERNMENT FORECLOSED HOMES. Save up to 50% or more. Minimum or no down payment. Repossessed E roperties sold daily, isttngs available now! 1 800-338-0020 ext. 3399. PVH Real Estate, Inc. has 1 of the largest selections of comntercial & residential lots, nrwbile homes, Ig. acreage, home & income property in Pahrump, 1-702-7270445. REI8323 BY0WNER.4bd., 2-1/2 ba. + office. 2400 sq. ft. Lewis Home. New window coverings. Huge patio cover w/misters. Completely shaded, k>w main, front & rear yds. Excel, cond. Loads of RV pkg. $176,500. 2932408, Iv. meg. REI 5263 Whitney Ranch by owner, nnove in today! 6 bd., 3 ba., 3500 SF, rent $1700 mo., buy $218.9K or lease option w/only $6K down. 800-593-3898. By owner, a Lewis Home in HD, 4 bd. + retreat, 21/2 ba., corner tot, cov. patio, fenced yd., security screen doors & solar screens, ceiling fans & vertical blinds. 3 car gar., $150,000. Call after 5 PM, 558-3220. REI 7870 HENDERSON'S BEST KEPT SECRETII The City of Henderson DownPayment Assistance Program!! Why rent, when you can buy for as iittle as $750 TOT ALII Certain restrkrtions apply. Call for information and seminar schedule. 4364393 $100 DOWN HUD/ GOVT. REPOS' Hud Homes, all areas from $100 to 3% down. DESERT VALLEY PROPERTIES 436-4393 or 558-3175 REI 8076 Fixer-up in Boukler City 3 bd. 1 ba. -f detached unfinished 1 bd. 1 ba. & kitchen over 750 SF gar. w/alley access. Located on the avenues & priced at an unbelievable $104.9501 Call RpSS GILMORE 24 hre. 4741569 for nrare details. Knapp Realty. REI 8432 $97,500 is all it takes for this 2 story 3 bd. 2 ba. beauty conriplete w/aHthe amenities incl. cozy F/P. AHappL+W/Dstay.FHA, VAfcLOW INT. STATE LOAN HN. AVAIL Call RUSSGILMORE24hra. 474-1569. Knapp Realty. PALM CANYON 1 yr oM, 4 bd., 3 ba., over 2000 8F home is a drsam to walk bito. Extras galorel FiBdorElis:=Kai|ipRsall|r 56641 as. ThousaiKis below appraised value. Seller will pay 2 point toward cbaing coet COMPLETELY REMODELED 3 bd., 2 ba.^ pool w/epa $179,500 firm 2S11£S Steal Thie Onall Nearly 2200 Sq. FL spack>us Spaniah style, with \oX of tile. A honte buiK for entertaining. $225,000. Phone 293-0421 or 293-0890 evaninga. CHARMING HOME 2BR/IBALocated ia the heart of B.C. Many features. Call April. $126,500 X'LENT LOCATION Lot Bcstlcd bctweea Marihall Plata Fanaers fat. on Hifiiway. CaH Brad fiN-iafs. S32S,0M • •• BOULDER CITY •• • rSonSoT Tiezns aae AIM a. a • •. 2 aa4jari.sBea.a isao Dereanr, Pooi, laaa lAAare 1S7 — mu ea Ovnee, OoN ULTIMATE Lahe Visw Moeee. TeMllAJLIU.IU •i,aaa •1 eq.n.1 BRETRUNION 29M42 • • • Dsft Sun RIty • • • k

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wmmm Pg12 Panomma Thursday, August 29,1^96 Thursday, August 29,1996 Panorama Pag* 13 MISCELLANEOUS | MISCELLANEOUS Thomas playmate color glow orgar), like new, never been used, has all the amenities, orig. $3500. sell for $1500 OBO, 454-2859. MI18251 DP Gympac 1000 fitness system, $225; dog kennel. 7'x12'x5' high, 2 gates, $275; iron secunty doors, $50 ea; iron lights, $ 10 ea.; Craftsman twin motor, Ig. capacity home shop vac. w/ attachs. $50; gold aluminum tub shower door $25; call 564-82B8 MI18414 LAility trailer 8-1/2X4 1/2X2'light weight $300, 293-4895. MM 8424 For sale: Refrig. $200, dinette set w/credenza $175, mKrowave & table $60, Singer sewing machine $100, king size bed $75, grandfather clock $200, endtat>les & lamps, call 565-3569 Iv. msg. MI17896 Roomy, General Electric mwrowave oven $30; Unusually beautiful Wedding Dress, size 5 with full slip $200; Designer Wedding Veil $40; Maclntosh-Quicktel 14,400 fax/modem by Logicode, lifetime limited warranty, $30; Sun dried lumber, good for firewood, FREE! Call 5643598. MM 8090 Bedroom set, dresser, nite stand, headboard, full, $100, 564-1794; Jane Fonda treadmill, only used 1 mo., $75 firm, 565-3398. iWin 8279 Washer/Dryer $125/pr.; almond gas dryer $125, 565-5850 after 4 PM. MI18303 Kennnore gas dryer, light yellow, $100 OBO. 4364138. Ml 18309 File cabinet, tools, bookcase, 294-2375. MI18343 AM-FM stereo cassette record player, component unit & console, $50 OBO; oak vanity w/mirror $20 OBO; French style telephone $15; antique bubble gum machine complete $40 OBO; oxygen emergency life pack $75 OBO; antique brass desk lamp $40 OBO; antique dk. wood shadow box $20 OBO; dk. solid oak credenza $60 OBO; 4 drawer metalfile cabinet, $20 OBO; console AMFM phonograph stereo $25 OBO; 2 glass top end tables $40 OBO; temporary plastic construction fence, 50', $20; 36 bags of oil & gas absorbent $1/bag; 5654125. Mil8353 Overeaters Anonymous meets at St. Christophers Church, 812 Arizona St., 7 PM. Thurs., 593-2945. PERSONALS Sleaplast In Lai Vegas Ate you tooking lor a wonnan who will treat you like a King. Maybe I'm your Queen or maybe a good Irlend Let's talk. Voice Mailbox No 11993 20 gal. aquarium w/ stand, fish, f ihers, heater, extras $40. 293-1693. MI18417 Glass dinette, 4 chairs. $200; youth bed, complete. $50; vibrating recliner, $100; misc., all in excel, cond., 564-5522. PETS/ANIMALS THE ANIMAL FOUNDATION will help you financially spay or neuteryour cat or dog. Very inexpensive in Las Vegas. 384-3333 BC PA ADOPT CATS & Dogs from your shelters. Save a Life. BC PA LAS VEGAS VALLEY HUMANE SOCIETY. Beautiful, healthy, kittens, cats, puppies, dogs. Spayed/neutered, tested, shots. PetsMart, Trop-Eastern store onlyWed., Thurs., Fri.. Sat., Sun., 11-4. PA17B57 FREE FAMILY FUN SAFARI IN THE DESERT. Visitors welcome for guided tours daily to see lions, bears, tigers, cougars, various parrots and hundreds of others. 361 2484. PA17768 Congo African gray beautiful big healthy baby, 645-3786. PA17261 Betty Hohn's non profit Animal Adoption Ltd. is accepting unlimited nunnber of unwanted pets byappointmentonly.You are welcome to view adoptable pets 7 days a week. Callfirst 361-2484. THERE IS NO GUIDED TOURS OF THE PREMISES AT THIS TIME, OF NATIVE, NON-NATIVE, OR WILD AND EXOTIC ANIMALS. PA14684 ATTENTION CAT LOVERS. My name is Coco & I need a loving family to adopt nne. I'm a sweet, playful, affectionate black & white male who needs a warm cozy home. I'm FREE. To meet me call 565-9197. PA18298 MEDICAL SUPPLIES Proventil? Respiratory problems? Do you use Albuterol Sulfate, Alupent, Metaproternol, Mucomist, or other nebulizer medication? Still paying for supplies? Why? Call Express-Med at 1-800-678-5733. MCI 8281 DIABETIC? Are you still & aying for supplies? /hy? For information on how you can receive supplies at little or no cost call 1-800-678-5733. MCI 8287 PERSONALS LICENSED CHILDCARE 'S Can Home MB 4mo.-4yra.oM iM FT/PT, ^n 6AM-6PM-M-F Eaayl-S16,USB3t8SAi IndoorASuldoor ActMIlM 565-5400 LOST & FOUND LOST in Horizon & Greenway area, 1 yr. old male Dachshund, black wAan nrarkings, answers to Tommy Boy, 5648276. REWARD. LF17852 DESPERATELY SEEKING OWNER FOUND Sat., 8/24, sm. dachshund vicinity of Vbtory & Washington Way. HD. Pis. call 564-0134. LF18384 MISSING all white declawed, neut. 15yr. old male cat w/yellow eyes, black/multi-color fish collar. Lost on Wyoming/ Calif., 8/19, 293-4177. BUILDING SUPPLIES Must sell 36 X 40 straiahtwall steel bidg. for bal. due. Serious buyer can save thousands NOW! Call NED 800-527-4044. MCI 4902 GV Glass & Mirror Co. surplus shower doors mirrors glass mirror doors 368-4628 call anytime. MCI 6000 All steel building, never erected, will deliver. Ask for Charlie, 1-800-3202340. MCI 6812 8'x16' MDREX/COMM mobile office, AC, wired for phones, on wheels, OSHA approved, steel steps, $1800. Call 7987776 for 275-4042. MCI 8282 Steel Buildings. Quality Buildings at an Affordable Price. 1-800-9733366. MCI 8330 STEEL BLDG. Fac. inventoiy reduction. Act now. Save thousands. Limited size avail. Call Howell & Bros. Const. 702-438-5582. MCI 7464 FURNITURE MUST SELL solid maple dining rm. furniture, 6 ft. drop leaf harvest table, 2 captain chairs, 4 mates, $475, call 564-3589. MCI 8413 FURNITURE Comfortable cushion sofa, good cond., $75, 565-3091. MCI 6450 Oak dinette set w/6 chairs, $575; corner sectional couch w/queen size hide-a-bed, blue, $125. 564-5922. MCI 8278 Exec, desk, new, orig. $850, selling for $335, 294-0686/286-2833. MCI 8300 5 pc. bd. set, solid oak ent. ctr. w/TV & VCR, other furn. 565-6928. MCI 8314 Rocking love seat & matching platform rocker $500r Lazy Boy rocking recliner $200; 294-2241. MCI 8301 HEALTH & FITNESS ARTHRITIS PAIN RELIEF. 100% NATURAL EMU OIL The application of EMU Oil aids in the relief of pain by reducing inflammation & swelling associated with Arthritis, muscle strain & sore joints. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 2 oz. bottle $19.95 (includes S&H) M/C, VISA. TOLL FREE 1-888-4525292. MCI 5126 20/20 WITHOUT GLASSES! Safe, rapid, non-surgk:al, permanent restoration in 6-8 weeks. Airline pilot developed. Doctor approved, hree information by mail. (800) 422-7320, ext. 222. (406) 961-5570, Fax (406) 9615577. http://www.vision freedom.com SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. MCI 8270 ZAP THE FAT!! Lose up to 40 lbs., 30 day money back guaranteed!! 100% Natural! Doctor recommended! Experience More Energy! Ask about "Freebies." Toll Free 1888-MELTFATMC18295 Exerciser: Schwin airdyne model AD2-$200; 893-0393. MCI 8354 2 end tables 'f 1 coffee Old English Shoppe Oak Plus sofa sleeper section Must se-Will sac. $700 294-2680 na PERSONALS SUCCESS THE AMS WAY •Hirbal Supplaincnia •Nitural Antibiotic •Silt Natural Wclghl ItaiMgwntnl •f rM Sampitt with contultatlon •full or Part Tlirw OMrlbulora • Can Larry or VIvIa (703) 4S4.SMO •Advanlag* Markttlng Syattma, Inc. •ThtM art •oma of our producta •AM-lOO.SharkCartllasa, ColloMal Plut •Supar Antloxidant ColMdal SKvaf Preform Cross Walk Excel, cond. $200 566-0490 ,. PERSONALS Wfjy Walk Alone? A S, I rii • Of I'lijii r l),itf Christinn Christian Presentable SWC Irog. 60. Bible study, books, square dancing. ISO slender, NS. NO, younger SWC lady Irog to hop witli. No Uds, no exes. Voice Mailbox No. 119B9 Spirlt-Fllled Single Mom Young 47. loves the Lord, studying the Bible and going to church. Looking lor commlted, sptrlt-lllled man who loves the same. Voice Mailbox No. 11996 SWM.S'4", 55 Yean Young Never married, enjoy walks with my dogs. Christian and classical music, intelligent conversation and good sense ol humor Seeks beautilul Christian /nate. Vofce Mailbox N0.1199S First Time Ad Athletic, open-minded SWF. 18. who tikes spons, ISO SW/BM 1824, who's athletic, sincere and a Christian, tor Irlendship or possible long-term relationship. Voice Mailbox No. 11995 Singles Petite, Green-Eyed Country Woman 50. NS and NO. wants to meet tall, dark, handsome, physk:ally 111 country guy. En|oys camping rodeos, dancing. Any race. LTR. Voice Mailbox No. 11990 DWF,45,5'7MZ0lbS. Model, blonde hair, beautllul. ISO handsome, tall, dark-haired SWM who can dance al night with energy M over. Voce Malbox No. 11994 SM.18 Tall, dark hair, enjoys the outdoors, all types ol musk:, seeking someone to share all the good things In ille Voice Mailbox No. 11997 ISO Angel From Heaven DWM. 38. 56". 145 lbs. ISO attractive SWF. 25-40. NS. who's honest, sincere, very romantic, warmhearted, and down to earth. Enjoys movies, romantic dinners, hand-inhand moonlit waUts. cuddling. It you want love and respect, let's talk. Voice Mailbox No. 11988 SWF, 36 ISO SWM, NO, 35-45, who likes country musk: and watching movies Friendship first, possible relationship. Vok Mailbox No 11991 SWM, 22 Financially secure, open-minded, athletic, loves water sports, dance, and conversation. ISO WF. 18-25. lor triendship llrst. possible relationship Voice Mailbox No. 11992 Wanted: Someone Special DWF, SOs, ISO honest, romantic, NS, S/DWM, no dependents. I love C&W musK. Las Vegas, traveling, movies, swimming, laughter, massages, quiet evenings. Vox:e Mailbox No. 11986 CLUB SCENE NOT YOUR STYLE? There IS an aliernaiive Call today to place your free ad! DWM, 60s, Financially Secure Retired and alone, seeks lady who would like to Stan over. Must be easygoing and love animals. Vok;e Mailbox No. 11987 TIME RUNNING OUT? Call I-IUM37 j||4 mday in icncw yuw al-flin ihc time al or pUx a new inc! ABBREVIATIONS S-SINGLE D-OIVORCED M-MALE F-FEMALE L-LATIN B-BUCKA-ASIANW-WHITE H-HISPANIC CA-CATHOLIC C-CHRISTIAN J-JEWISH LOS-LATTER-DAY SAINT NS-NONSMOKER ND-NONDRINKER NR-NONRELIGIOUS ISOIN SEARCH OF Don't be lata for your Perfect Date! Call 1-800-437-5814 today to place your free 25-word print ad! To place an ad: To respond: • Col l-aO(M37-5ai4 Mondojrivou^ rvoof, 6ain. to7pm. Saudci)rcndSundoy, 7ain.to3pjn. nxnc femi. andntm •yMdt MKlDdaNnonali 6l9WColegeAv StatoCokge, PA 16801 I^FoK 1-800-8566588 UHaunaDa/l W wl mol tw iniormcion )iou nead b ralrwiv your rwponMi A(^rfmidbt25adiorlaa hdude vour nan, oddran and phone nwTv Mr. For your ad to ba prooHMd, dl infonnation ffluil bt indudad Infer fftfior t tt *li^Wy iJuiiiJwifc CT Wt? proviflf n FRf I print ;id. FREEwke '• ..., ,,,^£c.illstoretJieve ckl That means there s no cost I I43<7I] nMdi mmaim.ljmmtm mmmtmmmmt^namwiikt,yanmfmmaiimiamfmiKtaktataOlKAM*aMifalBpiipMtfiag*aiMi(llM4(Uf1 ID (K airfM. ffc aria • aiMMte • > I foni'i • MMaAMy Kfar iaJtadnt BteoAfc Wc letnc mmf^mmmafmtmu^fmii.mmmt€mtc WCIOT IB utwnimmttMlmiai/l/atmJiK.faiitwtictwmmci I [htyaurOtafZai ^ UmaloudHomphoim. • Col 1-aOO-205-538S • FVt'raidUU4eaiy jnrtudiani • YouwIbecKigadJI?? pw mnM to your Viwror Morivoar^ m \m \tfMt SMI )aur wriltan rttponM, w ploca in an nlopt, and wrik tn toia I moibaK numbtr on iht oubidi. Abo wrili immtcHht pop* tv od opptond in. Put iht MOU riipanM or iniibM in a loigv aitjapt along wi^ iht $7 brvnqrano im. You moy •UOM m moiy n ycnw i 01 you wiih, along wilt $7 far EAQH rMpom*. Owcx or rnoney ordv on^, piM, pay>hlc/rtcnalil< •LockBoi 'Ccmio BUUi^a •BMtk KrcowUlUUoa* •CMIOH SoftwMV iMorHAitr.RPnB: coNVEliiinN!cr.iTr •EMPLOYBE JkDDrnoNS •EMFLOrBB CBANTiBS •USa PAYIOLL CBEnS •PAYioLL PK:K IT? •MAGNEnr TAPE UEDIA •OnABTEKLY TAX KEPOnS •sns lEPnrr C UB Pick lt>i Deiiver-, • 733-0378-J NEVAM FDUKIAl. COHCIPTS I L_M 1. lUanlM., fM<. Ul__4 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES NOTICE TO READERS: The NBC Publications does not vouch for the legitimacy of items, jobs, or nrx>ney-making opportunities ad\/ertised in this classification. Wesuggestyou carefully evaluate such offers and not send money to these advertisers unless you are certain you know with whom you are dealing and you know all terms and conditions of the offer. Housecleaning Sen/Ke, Est'd Syrs., $75K-f gross annual inc., $10K w/ terms. 294-1236. Honest & dependable woman will clean your houseforyou. Call at 5650890. DH 18262 Have 2 openings in my GV home, ages 6 mo.-4 B rs.,Mon.-Fri.,451-9815. IH18336 Babysitting BIk. Mtn. area M-F til 6 PM, sm. group CPR/clean/safe 5644922. PHI 8351 Exper. thorough reliable housecleaning. Good local refs. if required, 5660456 anytime. PHI 8377 Little Bears Babysitting, 2 mothers will care for your little bears, any age, will take to & pick up from school, M-F, askfor Terri or Stacey 558-4105. DH18407 ROUTE, SALES SERVICE DEUVERY WOWWCMA>tmt Have childcare openings all shifts, M-F full time only, 293-4195. DH 18420 HELP WANTED Veterinary assistant part tjme position open. Duties included receptionist technical and Kennel work must be 18 years, for more information call 294-0001. HW18174 CLERK: Mighty Mart Convenience Store. All shifts. Must be 21 yrs. Cashier/stockroomcomp. wages. Located at Pecos/Windmill in Green Valley, 263-4242. HW15748 Now hiring responsible, intelligent people. See any manager, 1237 Nevada Hwy., BC HW18394 NATIONAL PARKS HIRING —Posit ions are now available at National Parks, Forests & Wildlife Preserves. Benefits -tbonuses! For employment directory, call (206) 971-3622 ext, N89779. HW18269 J Area residents have found opportunity Ulce none other worlcing as a team to create residual income. Ail pian toeani|7(MM0 first year Cal 564-6875 Strong design^roduction parson needed for digital depl. MAC oriented. Must know Photoshop, Illustrator & Quark, IBM knowledge a-f. Experienced orily. Salary DOE. Strong color portfolio required. Call Milo, 7321878. HW14378 CARRIERS needed, professional only need apply with reliable transportatnn. Acply in person at: Hendsrson Home News, 2 Commerce Canter, Henderson. HW17780 ALASKA EMPLOYMENT Fishing Induetiy. Earn up to $3,000$e,000-f per month. Room & Board! Tranepoftalion! No experience naceesaryl Male/Female. Age 18-70. For mort Information caH: S M) 971-3512 ext. 977P. HW18041 HELP WANTED Exparianead lawn eara peraon 294-6274. HW18411 CRUISE SHIPS HIRING — Earn up to $2,000-t-/ mo. working on Cruise Ships or Land-Tour companies. World Travel. No exp. necessary. For directory, call: 1-206-971-3552 ext. C89777. HW18268 ALASKA EMPLOYMENT — Fishing Indus\ry. Earn up to $3,000$6,000+ per month. Room & Board! Transportation! No experience necessary! Male/Female. Age 18-70. For more information call: (206) 971-3512 ext. Aa9779. HW18266 PARKS AND FACILITIES MAINTENANCE II SALARY: $30,185.73$34,411.02/year. REQUIREMENT^: Two (2) years of general maintenance experience in the areas of building maintenance and landscape maintenance, or any equivalent combination of closely related traininci and experience. SP? CIAL REQUIREMENTS: Possession of, or the ability to obtain, an appropriate Nevada Driver's License, and maintenance of a satisfactory driving record. WHERETOAPPLY:City applcation form must be submitted to and received by the Personnel Department, Room 200, City Hall, 240 Water Street, Henderson, NV 89015, no later than Thursday, September 12,1996, by 5:00 p.m., to be considered for this recruitment. NO APPLICATIONS WILL BE GIVEN OUT AFTER4:00 P.M. ON THE CLOSING DATE OF THIS RECRUITMENT. Employment packet MUST be obtained from the Personnel Department; resumes only WILL NOT be accepted in lieu of employment application. HOUF^S OF OPERATION: MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY, 7:30 A.M, TO 5:30 P,M, SMOKE-FREE WORK ENVIRONMENT. AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER. HW18335 Italian restaurant now hirinqforallpositbns. Pis. apply in person at Trilussa Restaurant, 1300 Sunset Way, Suite 2545, HD. HW18014 PROFESSIONAL carriers to throw full size routes. Must be experienced. Apply in person at: HBC Publications, 2 Commerce Center, Hd, We are now accepting applications in the following areas: classified & typesetting. Both positions must have computer experience. Apply in person at: Henderson Home News, 2 Commerce Center, Henderson. HW18078 Cleaning sen/ice needs person forflexible PThrs, to do residential & some commercial accts., 5654750 HW18242 PT maid, M-F, Nonsmoker preferred, apply in person. El Rancho Boulder Motel, 725 Nev. Hwy. BC HW18409 NSTIL ft CASINO (g) Both proptrtlM art Accaptirig Application* For Accounting MgryAccountint Min.5yrs.Exp. PicvkMiiCitlno Eip. Desired Apply In paison QoM Strika Holal, Jaan, NV. Paraonnal Dapl. M^, 7-5 PM Exc*!. tenaMa S oppoftunHy 401K Program Iton nelting areum Oreu* Proptrtha Norei m CASWM (6 Both propartlaa an Aocaptkig AppltcatlofM For Change Person Exp. Line Coolc Dealers Apply bipMMn JawvNV. EaBBi b iiiiWl a cypotluney 401K Ctreua CIntM Pnparttt* HELP WANTED $1000s POSSIBLE READING BOOKS. Part Time. At Home. Toll Free 1-800-898-9778, Ext. R3804 for Listings. HW16671 Help Wanted: Secretary/ Bookkeeper for small electrical contractor. Must know accounts payable and receivable, payroll and taxes. Send resume and salary requirements to: Design Systems, 892 Dianne Dr., Boulder City, NV 89005 or call 294-4208 after 4:00 PM. HW18217 Experienced mig welder/ fabricator must be drug free, apply inperson, 668 Wells Rd.,BdHWl 8224 R.E. SALESFREE SEMINAR Com* join ttw *1 Cantunr 21 offte* In the SW t Lu Vagaa. Wa ara aaaklng quallflad candidataa lo bagin a nw caraar. For tha baat on-on-ona training and support, East and Wast offlcaa, call Joa, 43S-S300, Cantury 21 Monay World. HAIR STYLIST & MANICURIST NEEDED^ Exp. preferred. Full service salon. Call 294-8477. HW141B8 $$CASINO JOBS$$ Now hiring 17,00050,000/yr. casinos & riverboats. No exp. necessary. For immediate hiring info 407-338-6100 ext.NVl01$,6AM-6PM, 7 days. HW14465 VOLUNTEERS OF AMERICA has the following position available: RESIDENTIALTECHNICIAN. Shifts vary. Assist House Parents with daily operations of a group home. MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Individuals over the age of 21 with a high school diploma and related experience in the human social sen/ices field. /Applications will be accepted at: 801 Adams Blvd., Boulder City, NV 89005. For information contact Volunteers of America at 293-3301, HW17401 *•*••*•**•*** • GOLD STRIKE INN • & CASINO NOWHIRING: WaMraaiM SMWtty Quvd* Hostati/Cadilan KafW Runnaca BuaParaona Caakio Capa CaaMira • k Mouaalwapara, Nna coofca • -k i, dIaliwaalMra ie ^ Hfl-4nM gM altop parson. ^ Apply In pan on at CaaMara Caga US HWY as* NaarHoovarOm **•*•••* • •*•* COIN ROOM ATTENCLERK All shifts. Must be 21 yrs. Cashier/Stockroom. Mighty Mart Convenience Store located in Green Valley. 433-4343. HW14723 CLINICAL DIRECTOR. Southern Nevada Children's Home seeks licensed therapist to fill the position of Clinical Director. The qualified candidate must have at least a master's degree in social work, psychology or related field and have either an MFT, LCSW or comparable license. The Clinrcal Director must be a highly skilled individual with experience in residential and/or group home settings. Salaty will be DOE. Send your resume to: Director, 801 So. Adams Blvd., Boulder City, NV 89005 or FAX it to: 2934251. HW17410 Advertising Salesperson for award-winninq weekly in Lake Tahoe. Send resume to Bill Kunerth, Tahoe World, PO Box 138, Tahoe City, CA 96145. Or Fax to (916) 583-7109. HW18286 FRIENDLY TOYS & GIFTS has openings for dealers and managers. No cash investment! Fantastic toys, home decor, Christmas items. Call for catalog and information. 1-800-4884875. HW18277 RECEPTION 1ST-Heavy phones, sonne light typing, good people skills & a team player. M-F, 8-5. Pis. apply in person at: Henderson Home News, 2 Commerce Center, Henderson. No phone calls pis. HW18245 HF1.P WANTED Waltresa at Expraaaor Cafe, PT. Apply In peraon. Super 8 Motel, 704 Nevada Hwy., BC HW17511 POSTAL JOBS, BOULDERCITYAREA$13.27 hr. to start plus benefits. Caaler, sorters, clerks, computer trainees. For application & exam information, call 1-800270-8015, Ext. 5201. 6 am-6 pm. 7 days. HW17745 Ambitious minded people! $500 wktypotential. Many positions available. Start now, no experience necessary. Call 7 days 407-8752022 Ext. 6049 H33 HW18020 LANDSCAPE GARDENER, 40 hrs./wk., valid drivers lk:ense, JM Landscape, 565-6859. MANICURIST NEEDED Exp. preferred. Full sen/Ke salon. Call 2948477 HW14376 Retail clerk 4-8 evenings in pro shop. Call 2932875/385-2324 lor appt. HW17840 MAIDS exper. Apply in person between 7 AM-3 PM, Best Western Lake Mead, 85 W. Lake Mead Dr., HD. HW17954 MOTEL CLERK exper. 3-11 PM,& PT. Apply in person between 7 AM-3 PM, Best Western Lake Mead, 85 W. Lake Mead' Dr., HD. HW17953 Position available for prep cook, no exp. necessary. Apply at Two Gals Restaurant, 1632 NVHwy.BC HW18133 HOME HEALTH SERVICES of Nevada immediate openings: full-time, part-time, per-diem RN's throughout Nevada, especially Carson, Yerington and Hawthorne. 1-800-7337178,POBox1359,Elko, NV 89803. HW18272 TRAVEL PEOPLE GOING PLACES That's what CSAA Is all • bout So if you'ra looking to move, now la the time, and CSAA is the place! Travel Agents HENDERSON We currently Jiave a lu|( time poeition available for • n individual with at least 2 years of current Maura travel agency experience, and Apollo or other air retervationt syetema experience. At AAA, you'll enjoy an excellent aalary and benefits package, along with the •tability we've earned by providing travel-related aervlcea to our members since 1907. To apply call Sue Musto at: 702/456-5994x241, or FAX your resume to her at: 702/458-3711. We strive to equally employ populations as diverse as the cuttomart we serve. CSAA DRIVERS AND LABORERS 50 Needed Daily/Weekly Pay Apply LABOR EXPRESS 39 E. Basic Rd. WENDY'S Now hiring Day/Night Cashieni Pramium Pay! 1131 W. Sunset (Across from the Gallaria) SHIFT MANAGERS withltyrs. mgmt. exp. also needed. EOE SECURITY GUARD PT Security Guard Must have experience. Pla. call 433-7706 DISHWASHER/DIETARY AID Will be responsible for washing dishes & learn proper food handling techniques & special diets of our residents. Previous experience always a plus, if interested please apply ia person at: Boulder City Care Center 601 Adanfw Blvd., Boulder City TELLERS—$8Air an Hourly Taaer al Bank of Amartoa. braneh. Hr*. are lleaMa, up to 1* hm>au ealary IIHI s NHi Miiifly • cneMfiflnp. irifNMUM ov9 monttw oseh In panon al aank el MMMlaa • C>e < weawtaw-W •mkH/^mmfeaiim m avaMatala M our BouMw efaNyoH-lvalaiae 1 ELP WANTED SALESPERSON—MARINE naadad for Marina aceasaorias, including, wakeboarda, water skia, ate. Stait $8/hr. + commisakMi. Marina Products Pro Shop, 702-466-0122 (Las Vegas). HW17379 llOOO'a POSSIBLE TYPING. Part Time. At Home. Toll Fraa 1-800898-9778. Ext T-3804for Lletlnga. HW17498 Halntylista wanted for. QV salon, rental, call Audrey 458-0063. HW17787 slight manager, honest, riandly, mature. Apply at Frosty Freeze, BC HW18151 PT housakaapar for Ig. horn* In Hd. Dutias will incl: claaning, laundry & Ironing. Expar. prafarrad $7/hr. 565-9757 •••••*••• .TOW DRIVERS Full Time Avail. 7^ "^ Exp. prefen-ed but ir not necessary, ir •^ Must be clean cut, -^ .JL, have valid Nevada ^ .driver's license with curent DMV "* • ^ printout. ir UutUvtlnBC. -k .^ Apply in person at -^ 705 Juniper Way, BC •••••*••• RESUMES PfotM9t€ntmy Don9 KrSMWNESS SERVICES opwiMiyitoi 14a0 Ctlaraae (M A*) B.C 293-5361 CAFE SENSATIONS G.V. Cafe eeeking full time axpe. pantry cook. Kitchen supervleor position available bring ref arerwaa. Applications accepted In person M W F, 8 am to 11 am, 2-4 pm, 4350 E. Sunaet 110 at AtNnaan. Mendereon. HW2SS TEACHER NEEDED ^ Kindergarten ^ Elementary Educ. • ChikI Development OiMM Prasdiofll AcsdMny llNWyofnIns -61H Yw Ilium mt Vw llnM*l AVON (r02)2M417( Call Today! AYOn HMAnMBlorYOUl ToauyorSM CMI nocN WNVM^WI 293-0110 DAILY a WEEKLY PAY Shoit/Long Term Aaalgn. Now laUng appitcatlont tor. CLERICAL WAREHOUSE S CONSTRUCTION Apply in peraon, S am-S pm, Moti.-Frl. 331 Watar SI., HMKlerMXi HELP WANTED Counter person, night shift. Apply at Frosty Fraaze.BC HW18152 SIOOO'B POSSIBLE READING BOOKS. Part Time. At Home. Toll Free 1-800-898-9778, Ext. R3804 for Listings. HW18332 SlOOO's POSSIBLE TYPING. Part Time. At Home. Toll Free 1-800898-9778, ext. T-3804 for listings. HW18331 HELP WANTED Apart. Managers, a mature couple, exper., must have own tools, 42 unit complex, husband can, have outskla job, 4314442. HW18250 Now hiring, McDonald's Restaurant new k)cation at College & Horizon. Work near home. Applications & interviews at the Community College of So. NV at Hd, M-F, 9 AM-12 PM or call 8961347 for information. SECURITY OFFICERS-UNARMED $5.75 HR. to start HENDERSON av. areas. Full A Part-Time. Weekdays & Weekends. MUST HAVE WORKING PHONE t TRANSPORTATK)N. Please apply in person MON.-THURS., 10a-3p, EOE CURTIS SECURrrV, 3305 Spring Mtn. Rd,8te. 83. HWIIOU .SJDC Seeking articulats, personable, and mature minded hidlvkfcials, to conduct foltow up phone calls, with graduates and associates of distinguished instituttons. Integrity and a commitment a must Afternoon and weekend ahifts available. A professional, and friendly environmenL $7 hourly wage, part time positions only. 565-S038 leave a npwieSRe" Temporary/Full-Tim* Employment Sarvicet IMMEDIATE OPENINGS! NEVER A FEE Receptionist, Word Processing, Data Entry Oper. & More. 898-1956 3510 E. Tropicana, #K at Paces •••••••••••••••••••••••• SECURITY OFFICERS I • k Needed for greater Henderson, GV area,* FULL TIME and PART TIME, flexible hours.* Must have dependable transportation &* phone. Call ALUED SECURPTY, 795-3317,^ Monday-Friday, 8:30-4:30 pm, 1515 E.* Tropicana Ave., Suite 395. EOE/M-F/H-V. 17764* •••••••••••••••••••••••• iEASTRiPGETem ps' Ik Packers, $S.50-$C.OO Urgi HMidOTMn oompany Mak* nllalito IndMdiial* (or varfcHM aMtlt. Mutt hava fraraportaUon. NO FEE Caff No>y 566-9662 NO FEE lacraaVon tadllty at Sun City MacOonald Ranch In Hand I* appNcaVont raauma* for tha following poaMoni. Tha I ba opanlng In M> Oct/Mrly Nov. Ceoka Dtahwaihara Hoa^aftonACasHar Bava r aga Cart Atlandanla (goH courta) (FT) ContpMi aniHcaeon at or aand raaunM to: Dal Wabb Corporation Human Raaourca* Al 9SSS CM Wabb Blvd. La* Vagaa.NV 89134 Or 20SS Watt Horizon RIdga Handaraon, NV 89012 tun city MacDenald Riiwli ki H*nd. It Meapttng appNcitlont t rMumta lof tiM Idlowlng petMona. Looking for nul> t fanoU ippllcanli lor ill opanlngi. AH ihm Marls at approi. 4:>0 AM. FaelUly will bopanlng ki lit* OeUttitr Nov. Makitonanea Claili MtkitMianea Workara Caalodhna (daya t awkig) Laad CMIodaraon,NV 89012 laan Sun City IMacDonald Rancti in Hand, ia accapting applications S raaumas for tha following poaltiorts. Tha racraatlonat facility will ba opaning In iata Octiaarly Nov. FHnaaa Inatructor MonHora (PT) Actlvltiaa Clark Mambarahip Clark CompMa application at or aand raeuma to: Dal Wabb Corporation Human Raaourcaa At 9SSS Dal Wabb Blvd. LaaVagaa,NV89134 Or 2065 Waat Horizon Ridga Handaraon, NV 89012 1B3t2 YOUR NEXT JOB COULD BE A CRUISE... LAKE MEAD CRUISES. HAS IMMEDIATE OPENINGS FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS: ^ Coclctall Staff g local carpenters for Boulder City locations. Also Henderson & Las Vegas Carpenters $7-$17 DOE Foremen $19-$24 DOE Family Health Insurance 401K plan Company truck & tools supplied Call KBI 798-2737 for project locations ixxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx HELP WANTED Ornamental Iron painter needed to paint lences & gates prior to installation, shop in BC, proof of exper. required, call 293-5535. HW18397 HOUSE RENTALS 3 bd., 2 ba., 2 c. garageBC Golf Course Area $975, 293-6383. HR18430 BC 3 bd., 2 ba., 2 car $900, 293-6383 HR18428 2 BD., 1 BATH APT. Newly remodeled, $495/ mo., 293-6248. HR15447 HD 2 bd., 1 ba. quiet cul de sac $675, 566-3655 after 5 PM. HR17663 4bd.,2ba.,$B75 + utiL& deposits, NO PETS 5658296. HR18258 2bd.,1ba.,$675-^utiL& deposits, NO PETS 5658296. HR18257 Hend. Duplex, 2 bd., 1 ba., 700 SF, incl. util. & appl., $700/mo., vacant, 565-1120. HR18261 2 bd., 1 ba., in middle of town for rent, 1st, last & cleaning dep., 565-9579. HR18284 BC golf course home, 3 bd., 2-1/2 ba., $1400, 596-4956. HR18329 3 bd., 2 ba. chain linl< fence front & back $600 per nrK). $600 sec. dep., call 293-2341. HR18344 2 bd., 1 ba.. Central AC, recently remodeled, 525 Hopi, $695/mo., 2936501. HR18358 Lg. 5 bd., 3 ba., close to schools, many extras, reasonable to good tenants, 293-5728/2936036. HR18389 1 bd., 1 ba., $475 incl. water + dep., NO PETS, 565-8296. HR18404 LEASE OPTION 3 bd., 1-3/4 ba., fam. rm., w/ frpl., new Icitchen, roof, stucco, ba. Avail. Nov. 1, $1000/mo. Call 293-3144 for appt. HR18406 HELP WANTED RUNNER must havacar, good driving record, wage -f mileage, GVHS or UNLV student, M-F, aftemoona, 15-20 hnJ wk., 795-8335 afterSPM. HW17718 HOUSE RENTALS 3 bd., 1 ba., 635 Ava. B, $750 per mo., first, last, $350 cleaning dep., 2935722, leave message. HR18421 2bd., downtown, outside storage, NO PETS, $600/ mo., 564-3140. HR18328 3 bd., 1 -3/4 ba., fam. rm., fenced yd., close to schools & easy access. Avail. 10/1, $800 • • sec, 564-5648 after 6 PM. HR18022 2 bd., 2 ba. $710/mo. $600 sec. dep., laundry facility inside, 547-1270. HR18012 3 bd. + den. Key Largo w/ pool, $1600/mo. Century 21 Boulder Dam Realty, 293-4663. HR18178 3 bd. Waters Edge $1600/mo. Century 21 Boulder Dam Realty, 293-4663. HR18177 BC 3 bd., 1 ba., gar. w/ automatic opener, RV parking, automatic sprinklers, range, drapes, $875, 1st, last & $450 sec. dep. Avail. 9/1,8965828. HR18165 Duplex for rent in Hend. $575/mo.,$500dep.,30 E. Atlantte, Unit A, 2 bd. Call Jim Jensen at 5643333. HR18252 2 bd. duplex, good for adults, $600 -f dep. 5658210. HR18308 3 bd., 1 ba., 42 Ocean, HD, water & garbage incl., $700/mo., $700 dep., 564-6742. HENDERSONSINGLE FAMILY Spadoua 2 bd., 2 b., MMy Mcaaa to Inmtmi. PocalH. IMM. op W on, MMM pM only, 1 yr. IMM MM ma Fred or Ellie:::Kni|ip Realty 566-8185 FOR RENT Regatta Pointe 2 bd., 2 ba., 2 car gar., priv. yd., $1,150 • $1,150 sec. 2 bd., 1 ba. homo, $67S -f deposiU Boulder Square 2 bd, 1 ba., $625 deposits Call B.C. Adobe Realty, 293-1707 APT. RENTALS Teddy's Kitchenettes, Just bring your toothbrush. Everything furnished. PH. 293-1716. BC NEW KITCHENETTES, phone, satellite, maid service. STARVIEW MOTEL 293-1658. BC AR14278 2 bd., 1-1/2 ba. townhouse, gr. location, close to ail, W/D hookups, easy move in $575 + $150 dep., 565-1499. ART7563 3 bd. house for rent, must see. No pets, near school & shopping $850 mo. Call 293-4517. AR18371 2 rooms, house priv. $250 for small rm. $300 for large rm., 293-0172. APARTMENTS AS LOW AS $275 a Month furnished 564-6952 ,„ NEW KITCHENETTES STARVIEW, 293-1658 APT. RENTALS Studio apt., BC, $350 per mo, $500 dep. Avail. NOW prefer No Pets, 293-4384. AR18418 FOR RENT: Kitchenettes, $65/wk. Utilities pd. SHADY REST MOTEL, 565-7688. AR9597 Ridge /Vpts., 2 bdrm. No pets. Lease for 12 mo., 293-0420. AR18003 Beautiful apartment for rent, Ibd., $465/mo. incl. util., W/D avail. Sr. citizen & NON-SMOKER, call 293-4523. AR16543 Studio apart., util. pd., preferred Srs., $300,5658165. AR18175 Kitchenettes, fully furnished with cable, in Boulder City. 293-6269 Cell. 682-7914 CORNER COURT APIS. 2 bdrm., 1 ba. Near Basic High iSOO/mo. 'f sec. dap. SM:. 8 OK-NO PETS 434-9B27 MERLAYNE VILLA APTS. — Units lass than 2 yrs. old— 2 bd., 2 ba., microwave & dishwasher, $625/mo. 409 & 417 Merlayns • Near Park & Grade School 565-9582 CASA DE ALICIA AND M&M II APT We're not giving away the kitchen sink. WE DONT HAVE TO. Let our features & professk>nal staff speak for themseh/es. 1,2&3bdnn. from$550. Pools, pk;nk: areas. Walk in ck>sets. 293-1615 ARIUM '"""•"='*' • ATLANTIC CITY APARTMENTS Clean, Quality 1-2-3 Bdroom ApartmMits In HMtderson • Central Air h. Heat • Appliancaa • Blinds • Carpets • Water PskJ • Washsr/Dryer AvailsMs Apartments are $420 ft up per month, newly remodeled, spacious rtssr schools, park A shopping. 565-7028 17564 COMMERCIAL RENTALS 3500 aq. ft. Warehouse space for rent, 710 W. Sunset, 564-4100. C018315 Storage Plus Office warehouse suite 1 GOOsq. ft., 1557 Foothill Dr. Frontape view BC $650 mo. with $650 Security Dep., 293-3115. C018233 BC approx. 1000 SF warehouse w/bath in new plaza. Temw negotiable. 293-1844 weekdays to see. C013992 BC approx. 1/2 acre blacl( top & block walled w/ 40'X90'shop,4bay8,14' doors & 3 orfKSs. Zoned CM. WouM like to share part of bIdg. & lot. Call 293-7003. C016616 GREAT LOCATION Professional Office space. 1600 Sq. Ft. Excellent sign exposure— 1001 Nevada Hwy.— Next to State Farm Office. Phone 293-4151. CO18370 Professional office space available in BC. Approx. 800 sq. ft. for as low as $450. Ph. 293-3119. C018368 Lease commercial manufacturing 600 or 1200 SF, industrial condo, 707 Canyon Rd., BC, Unit #6, 293-0434. C018367 BRIAN HEAD GR "A-Frame" cabin in beautiful Brian IHead ski area, yr. round access, a gr. place to relax. Call Larry at 801-572-8900. MCI 8155 UTAH LAND Live your dream, fish in your backyard stream, 5 acres just N. of Zion, close to Brian Head too. $40,000, 564-6875. MCI 8089 MOBILE HOMES Villa Hermosa huge 3 bd., 2 ba., w/den, all appl., $1000 down OAC under $600/mo., CO-OP, 5953279. MM 17655 Boulder Hwy. & Russell Rd. huge 3 bd., 2 ba. w/ den, all appl. & fenced. Low as $ 1000 down OAC under $700/mo. CO-OP, 595-3279. MH17654 2bd., 1 ba. set up in local park mature lawn enclosed patio, washer and dryer heat AC swamp after 5 PM, 293-0401. Shown by appt., BC MH16634 1976, 14x70 Kit Mobile Home, 2bd., 1-1/2 ba., $18,000, 293-3956. MH 17578 2 bd. home in beautiful Gingenwood Senior Park, many extras, $21,500. Enjoy swimming pool, therapy pool, recreation programs, etc. Call for details, 293-1908. QINGERWOOD SEN. PK. dM. wid* ilmost 2bd.,dn, 1-1/2ba.,fum, carport, thMl, 1100 SF, Immad. occup. BC $34,950 FIRM 566-5403 CONDO RENTALS Henderson CondoCountry Hills, 2 bd., 2 ba., upstairs gated w/pool & exercise rm., 2936383. CR18429 BC, 2 bd., 2 ba. condo, adults, no pets, $650/ nrx)., 1st & dep., call 2937476. CR18079 Near Jokers Wild, nee end unit condo., 2bd., 1 1/2 ba., all appl., cov. park., NO PETS, $585/ mo -f dep., 566-6260. CR18280 Nk;e 1 bd. upstairs unit in quiet Boulder Square. Complex has pool & laundry facilities, close to town, gr. for Seniors, NO PETS, $545 + dep. 2940323 or 293-2511. CR18373 2 bd. priv. patk> behind golf course $550/mo. 566-1269. CR1B383 2 bd. BouMar Square $625 mo. dapositt' BC Adobe Realty 293-1707 1310 Nev. Hwy. CHOICE MOBILE home/ building lots in Sandy Valley. 2 Wacres ea. Power at the site, underground phone, paved and/or gravel roads. Seller offering good terms. Phone Grace, at Americor Realty, 3651953. L0253 LAKE MEAD VIEW ESTATES, custom honr>e lots overlooking Lake Mead. 702-294-0475. L0l75e8 Spectacular lake view approved plane, 312 Baicaiona Q.. BC. Draaliealyreduoad, $160,000 o*vner ?93-0§10 COMMERCIAL RENTALS CM Zoning BCI600 SF of shop area w/600 SF of caretakers quarters. Waeher & dryer incl. Lease $1200/mo. 2932202 BEFORE 6 PM. 0017650 OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT. Prinrw BC k>cation. Available 9/1/96. 294-0225. C017541 OFFICE SPACE • 2nd floor, separate entrance, ba., AC & heating. Util. fum.,tots of parking. 1225 SF, avail, but can section off as desired at .65 cents per SF. Call Katie 2935757. C017957 PRIME RETAIL OR OFFICE Qrsat locatk)n 1402 Nevada Hwy., BC 600 sq. ft, 750 sq. ft. & 1175 sq.ft. Ideal for Beauty shop, RE, Ins. or Sales. Call Owner 293-2898 — mm^ — 12,000-157,000 SF .36 pet • .42 psf Hettdaraa Avail 9/96 Doug/Lorl CB Commercial 369-4800 VONS SHOPPING CENTER Retail Space Available Neal Siniakin, Broker 294-1444 LOTS FOR SALE ARE YOU GETTING ail the credit you deserve? 100% construction financing plus permanent financing if qualified, even without 20% down-payment. Miles Homes 1800-343-2884 Ext. L. MCI 8289 VACATION RENTALS Brian Head Condo rental, sleeps 8, cool summer fun, mtn. biking, fishing, hiking, festivals, summer rates, $65/niglit weekdays, $90/night weekends, 702-294-2320. MCI 7776 ROOMS FOR RENT Bdrm., house priv., cable, pool/spa, GV, $300 mo., call Ron 434-2005 after 5:30 PM. RR17972 2 bdrm., townsite home, $575 mo., 1st, last mo. + $250cleaning dep., 1916 Margarita, call Ron 8711721 B or 434-2005 after 5:30. RR17973 Hend. Furn. studio, priv. ba., kit., N-S, $400 incl. util. -Idep., 293-6799. RR18263 Beautiful home in BC, priv. bd. & ba., prefer straight professional male, NON SMOKER background ck required, 293-0957. RR18253 Room with bath, private entry, house privileges, $350, 566-6466. RR18244 2 roommates to share 3 bd. home in BC. $300$350/nno, util. incl., avail. 9/1.293-1270. RR18326 Bd. w/ba., possible rent reduct., exch. repairs pref. Sr., 564-4206. RR18346 5 bd., 3 ba., pool & spa, Christian morals & nonsmoker, house priv., exercise equip, area, fum./ non-furn. $350, 2935728/293-6036. RR18401 CONDO SALES BC2bd., 2-1/2 ba. Lake View Condo. Hend. Neat, 3 bd., 1-3/4 ba. house R riced to sell $85,990. einz Prudential S.W. Realty, 293-0545. CS By owner BC Lake view, 2 br., 2 ba., den, 2 car gar., 1892 SF upgraded Regatta Pointe, pool, spa, principals only, 2934146. CS18347 CONOO/rOWNHOUSE Check out Ihie fuNy done ovar unit New paint In S out new root. CIteaper ttian rent FiedorElK=KM|VlMly sa>n complelae in Oct. $168,500, owner 256-5510 or 254-6458 Eves. RE18029 BARGAINS OhI ddVERNMENT FORECLOSED HOMES. Save up to 50% or more. Minimum or no down payment. Repossessed E roperties sold daily, isttngs available now! 1 800-338-0020 ext. 3399. PVH Real Estate, Inc. has 1 of the largest selections of comntercial & residential lots, nrwbile homes, Ig. acreage, home & income property in Pahrump, 1-702-7270445. REI8323 BY0WNER.4bd., 2-1/2 ba. + office. 2400 sq. ft. Lewis Home. New window coverings. Huge patio cover w/misters. Completely shaded, k>w main, front & rear yds. Excel, cond. Loads of RV pkg. $176,500. 2932408, Iv. meg. REI 5263 Whitney Ranch by owner, nnove in today! 6 bd., 3 ba., 3500 SF, rent $1700 mo., buy $218.9K or lease option w/only $6K down. 800-593-3898. By owner, a Lewis Home in HD, 4 bd. + retreat, 21/2 ba., corner tot, cov. patio, fenced yd., security screen doors & solar screens, ceiling fans & vertical blinds. 3 car gar., $150,000. Call after 5 PM, 558-3220. REI 7870 HENDERSON'S BEST KEPT SECRETII The City of Henderson DownPayment Assistance Program!! Why rent, when you can buy for as iittle as $750 TOT ALII Certain restrkrtions apply. Call for information and seminar schedule. 4364393 $100 DOWN HUD/ GOVT. REPOS' Hud Homes, all areas from $100 to 3% down. DESERT VALLEY PROPERTIES 436-4393 or 558-3175 REI 8076 Fixer-up in Boukler City 3 bd. 1 ba. -f detached unfinished 1 bd. 1 ba. & kitchen over 750 SF gar. w/alley access. Located on the avenues & priced at an unbelievable $104.9501 Call RpSS GILMORE 24 hre. 4741569 for nrare details. Knapp Realty. REI 8432 $97,500 is all it takes for this 2 story 3 bd. 2 ba. beauty conriplete w/aHthe amenities incl. cozy F/P. AHappL+W/Dstay.FHA, VAfcLOW INT. STATE LOAN HN. AVAIL Call RUSSGILMORE24hra. 474-1569. Knapp Realty. PALM CANYON 1 yr oM, 4 bd., 3 ba., over 2000 8F home is a drsam to walk bito. Extras galorel FiBdorElis:=Kai|ipRsall|r 56641 as. ThousaiKis below appraised value. Seller will pay 2 point toward cbaing coet COMPLETELY REMODELED 3 bd., 2 ba.^ pool w/epa $179,500 firm 2S11£S Steal Thie Onall Nearly 2200 Sq. FL spack>us Spaniah style, with \oX of tile. A honte buiK for entertaining. $225,000. Phone 293-0421 or 293-0890 evaninga. CHARMING HOME 2BR/IBALocated ia the heart of B.C. Many features. Call April. $126,500 X'LENT LOCATION Lot Bcstlcd bctweea Marihall Plata Fanaers fat. on Hifiiway. CaH Brad fiN-iafs. S32S,0M • •• BOULDER CITY •• • rSonSoT Tiezns aae AIM a. a • •. 2 aa4jari.sBea.a isao Dereanr, Pooi, laaa lAAare 1S7 — mu ea Ovnee, OoN ULTIMATE Lahe Visw Moeee. TeMllAJLIU.IU •i,aaa •1 eq.n.1 BRETRUNION 29M42 • • • Dsft Sun RIty • • • k

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wm^^ Pagt 14 Panorama Thursday, August 29,1996 Rf:Al tSTAlfc NO MONEY DOWN. Tak over payments of $24a^mo. on 80 acres. S.E. of Kingman, Arizona. Good access with view. Can 602-961 -6781. Own Your Own REAi ESTATE; REAL ESTAIf Home Nowl No down payment on Miles materials. Innovative construction financing. Call Miles Homes, today, 1-800343-2884, ext. L Calico Ridge, HD custom home. gr. view of LV, close to Lake Mead. 4 bd., 2-1/2 ba., separate dining, pantry & washrooms, walk in ckMets, marble & hardwood flooring are some of the many extras. Quist neighborhood. $234,500. cair565-6929. RE17679 MmSStfpt for iWiL MaM HviiMi MB^ OutaldA h^ ADA. Mi^Mihidfe attv patio. Landaeap* la pfalaaalonajly daaa S baauWully OfilyaiMngSiaMSOIIOMeNHOUSEMiSUNOAYS AIM. 11 a IS, tram 1-4 PM. Hum, a waallaill Caa PATTI QPnnllew,TS-18S1. BOULDER cmr Spectacular Lake Mead panoramic views; we have (2) unique homee, termc poeeble; (1) Is on nearly 2 acree, prhf. rd., $650,000; (2) hae pool, putting green A more, $750,000. Lewie 2story, 4 bd, 2-1/2 be., clean It green, extrae, $104,500. Townhome wHh lakeview, no stairs, garage, $128,460. Townhouee, prhr. yd^ clean, extrae, $94,500. DESERT SUN REALTY, 293-2151. RE1B422 REAL LbTATE AWESOME Lake View Home w/Massive Garage, TERMS $750K BITET 294-8482 Desert Sun Rity^REl 8374 REAL ESTATE BC REDUCED 3 bd., 2 ba., Lewie' w/pool, $179,900. BRET, 2948482 Desert Sun RIty. VHt Make Houac Orila* RoUenUal'Ttew and Reaales"Property Management "Commercial at Uuid Sales" "" • n oAuawG IN HiNDUsoN ARIA nioramis*n FRED & ELLIE KNAPP MuRt-MHIion Dollar Producara LIcanaed REALTORS Since 1978 PH. 566-8185 Outside of rievada: l-800-209-2fi78 10 W. Pacific Ave., ate. 11, Henderson, nv 89019 BC !L Adobe "i Reolty Is} I' (702) 293-1707 HOMES CHECK IT OUT...3,300 eq. ft, 4 bdrm., 4-1/2 bstti, country Idtchen, family room w/fIreplece, 3 car gar., 1/2 acre & more...$299,S00. PRICE RE0UCED...3 bdrm., 1-3/4 bath, family room, many upgrades, studio, lueh landscaping ft more...$l 64,900. LAKE MEAD VIEW ESTATES...spectacular great room wtthflreplace, many quality features, 2 bdrm., 2-1/2 batli, pool...$387,500. GOLF COURSE SPECIAL..4 bdrm. rumpus room, 3 bath, family room w/riraplace, great views, custom upgradee, 3 car gar...$33S,000. LOWEST PRICE...Inprestlglouslalce view area, 3 tKlrm., 1-3/4 tMth, energy efficient custom with beautiful view...$285,000. TWO FOR THE PRICE OF ONE...unobstructed lake view home, 4 t>drm., 2 tMth, plus vacant lot...$345,000. SUPER STARTER HOME...well maintained 2 bdrm., 1 bath, central eir ft heat, dual pane windows, garage 4storege...$114,500. READY FOR SCHOOI cuetom home close to echools and parks, spacious rooms, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, reedy for new ownere...$157,500. GREAT VIEWS...slngle level golf course home, 4 bdrm., 3-1/2 beth, femlly room, pool ft spa, lush grounds, 3 car gar...$349,900. SPACIOUS LAKE VIEW CUSTOM...3,8004^ sq. ft., 4 t)drm., 3-1/2 bath, fatiuloue living area, also available lot next door...$390,500. HOMES OWNER ANXIOUS...Ukeview Sites, 3 bdrm., 2-1/2 beth, many unique extras, waterf ells, pond ell In mountain 8attlng...$294,500. CHOOSE YOUR OPTIONS...owners will build to suit 3 or 4 bdrm., 2x6 construction, extras, call for floor plan...$221,000. SEEING IS BEUEVING...4 bdrm., 2-1/2 beth, all new carpet, peint, fixtures, appllancee and more, piue pool...$182,500. BEAUTIFULLY UPGRADED...4 bdrm., 2 bath, great room w/Tlreplace, large kitchen, mature larKiscsplng...$109,500. MANUFACTURED HOMES LAKE VIEW...well maintained 2 bdrm., 2 bath, views from living room ft back deck, covered perklng...$146,S00. UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY Fleetwood with 2 bdnn., nlshed...$34,500. In Nelson, NV ... bath, partially turDESIRABLE AREA...2 bdrm., 1 -3/4 bath, very nicely upgredsd, cerport, workshop ft more...$127,900. PRICE RED garage, you .som: th home with 1 car nd...$4,750. LAND LAKE A MOUNTAIN VIEW LOTS... MANY TO CHOOSE FROM $95,000 TO $275,000. CALL FOR DETAILS WELL ESTABLISHED BEAUTY SHOP FOR SALE. $36,500. CALL FOR DETAILS. ***CALL FOR A LIST OF ALL AVAILABLE PROPERTIES'*' MULTIPLE LISTING SERVICE 1310 NEVADA HWY BOULDER CITY FAX 702-293-7477 293-14S7 Dorothy Mdln 293-S087 OaudU Rsacka 23-eM9 OlaniM Vanaaaa 293-4284 Batli AMwortl) 293-7074 Criallna LsBrslon FarnaM, Brokar • 293-2212 TOLL FREE #1-800-553-8081 Joan Curran ll m IMMACULATE SUNRISE MOBILE ESTATES % 2 bd., 2 ba., 1989 CHAMPK)N Mobile on 60x100 lot Cov. park ft porch 8x12 Tuff Shed. NEW3.5tonAC4oeiling fanelDONTMISSOUTI 173,000. S66-8700, /Uk for Corby/Denyae RE/MAX Eegle'e View. KNOO REAL ESTATE MUST SELL Beautiful 3 bd. Lewla, POOL, 1861 SF, $179,000 BRET2046482 Desert Sun RIty. RIAL fSTATt REAL ESTATT REAL ESTATE Ro qualifying. Hd., 3 bdr, 4 ba., over 1/3 acre, acroes from BLM land. Call Joe 502-6025. CALLCOLDWELLBANKER ^^^^^^J^. COLDWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY 1487 Nevada Hvwy., Boulder City 83 to B.C. only dome on the rigfit 293-5757 FREE! LIST OF ALL HOMES FOR SALE IN B.C. HOMES THREElBbftM. home uewl ae two unite. Good rwnte'l hietory. $120,900. SIX BDRM. on 1.02 acre, city, min. S valley viewe! Baeement w/3 bdrms. S fern. rm. $340,000. UPGRADED LEWIS HOME • Of:y|3/f>.. carport wHii etorege bidg.. pooi/epa, tile roof, deeert leMM(i^Hl 44.900. RELOCATED OWNER • neede offer on multi-ievei home with ielce view from pool. Reduced to $229,900. CUSTOM 3 BDRM., 2 ba., pool/spa, overeized garage. $165,000. GOLF COURSE 2 etory, pool, epa, tiled fire. $387,500. THREE BDRM. 2 levele, 1700 e.f. remodeled kitchen, f/b in living rm.. off etreet paridng. Reducedl $124,900. LAKE VIEWI3 bd.. 2.6 ba., 2 c. garage, fam. rm., 2 1/p, covered patios, all appllancee, pool, epa. $346,000. LOCATED IN CUL-DE-SAC 2 etory, 4 bd., large lot w/pooi. cuetom patio cover A more. Roducedl $209,900. CUSTOM HOME A BLDa LOTiaka view from ail the home. 3 bd., 3 be.. fam. rm. and too much to liet. Home A lot together $435,000. LAKE AREA cuetom 3 bd. 2.5 ba.. Intercom, cent, vac, RV/boat paridng, bacica up to mtne. for privecyl $109,500. TRiLEVEL HOME Uke view. 4 bd.. 3 be., large 70x146 lot, RV paridng. formal d/r. living rm. w/rock i/p, overeizeid garage. NOW $265,000. WATERS EDGE • 2 bd.. 2 be.. 2 c. garage, upgraded and profeeelonaily iandacaped, eoma lake view. $162,500. UPGRADED TWO LEVEL condo. 2 or 3 bd., 3.5 ba., Ingmd. epa. ceiling fane t/o, lake viaw ft more. $270,500. LAKEVIEW CONDO-2 bvely, 2 bdnn.. completely furnished. Covered parking and lake view tool $134,500. CUL-DE-SAC k>t, room for RVAioaL Two bd.. 2 ba.. lake view from kMehen, fam. rm. and porch. $152,500. NEW ON MKT.I 2 bd., dan, 2 c. carport, etorege rm., covered porch, nnalura piante. $129,500. LUCE A MODEL • 2 bd., 2 ba., 2 c. garage, lanced patki/dog run. deeert OWNER MUST SELU 3 bd. 2 ba., pool, carport^V. $244,500. MOBILES IN PARKS CORNER LOT-3 bd. 2 ba.. central air/htg. $24,000. MOORE'S PARK — 10x56,2 bd, atoraga. aereaned patto w/waaher ft $15,000 COTL BLOa • 9000 ai. uaad for aalaa ol daeoralor itema ft aucttons. now iDolftate.S7S0.000.PropaftyBvaiable next door 00x156 with emeli Mdg. $276,000. B.C. GAS STATION eomar lot. hwy. frontage, bMg. ft buelneee. Mechanic en duty. $$66,000. JfertS) *£.rxK Advertise in the NEWS COUNTRY HOME 4BR/3BA 7 ear garage, Beautiful custom home w/formal dining. Guest house, corral. S387,000 294-1500 WAREHOUSEAVAIL 1000sq.ft. warehouse In new Red Mntn. Plaza. Office area, restroom, cvap. cool. S625.00 per month 294-1500 •NEAR LAKE MEAD!* Fabulous custom built home (large comer lot with approx 2990 sq. ft.) i bedrooms, large family room with built-in oak .shelves. R.V. parking/fully landscaped, beautiful Tireplaccs in living room and ma.'iter suite. Open floor plan, tons of potential, fabulous views from balcony, 2 car garage, (motivated). 259,900K BC. •GREEN VALLEY BEAUTY* 5 bdrms., pool & spa, trilevel, R.V. parking, mint condition! 220k •NORTHWEST NEW lar^^Aejl, u|gr|led. R.VTPowerss^l'Snooltups, much more, a perfect floor plan. I69,900K. •NORTHWEST/HORSE PROPERTY^ 470 acres, 4 bdnn., 2 bath, model perfect custom home, 3 car, R.V./ workshop. So much more. A real beauty! 2I9,900K. •FABULOUS AIRY FLOOR PLAN^ Close your eyes, sit back and relax in this single story 4 bdrm.. lush landscaped home w/pool in a private culdesac near the school. Has it all! REDUCED • (25K B.C. •GOLF COURSE BEAUTY!^ Thisisiheperfecl2stoty. A true beauty, lush and open natural and tranquil. 4 bdrm., 4 baths, plus bonus room, 3 car gar., large lot, RV parking, so much more, 369,900K B.C. •VACATION IN STYLE!* This condo is as big as a house! 1522 approx. sq. ft., 2 bdrm., 2 bonus rooms, tons of upgrades plus a beautiful view. Priced to sell at I29,900KB.C. •GOLFER'S PARADISE* Relax in your cool pebble deck pool with fountain. A true paradise, single story, 4 bdrm., large lot, beautiful view, great pool and lush landscaping, hardwood floon, great floor plan. So much more. Bring offers 349,950K. B.C. Sandra Deubler 271-3277 FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS., Call Handarson'a #1 Real EtMa Team BRENDA BIRD QRI, ORB Ufetltne Henderson Resident 564-1127 WENDY WILLIAMS 378-1689 Over $100,000,000 in Sales 27 years combined Real EsUte experiencel TTM DYNAMIC DUO 811$ Homml" /ftnOflCOnO rllBetber BtOUP. i] IOIi. *^W^l^^Bfi^^ EAGLE CREST "CREAM PUFr 0MM $30,000 In upgradMl 1370SF,3M.,2lM.,t6x100 M, gaiod RV/boal parUng. Pool a Spa w/Koot dMk. 210 SF oov. patio Wcaillng (an. Cuetom daaignad Intarior. Unototniotad view of cHyl 1138,000.6S64700, Aak for Cortiy/Danyaa RE/MAX Eagla'aVlMir. X8S& *•* ThePrudential Jensen's Realty Thinking of Buying or Selling? The Rock is the answer! The Prudential Jensen's Realty Specielixee In Residential-Cemmctxiel and Property Management iSi We're here to serve you Henderson 564-3333 fib ovroaTVNfrv ***************** i, HOME BUYERS LOOK HERE ^ 1 DQLLtiQUSE-.Upgraded2badroom,1-etoiytowni)ome...inciuding ^ ^ floor eovaringa, central afe, patio cover, etorege eiied, comm. pool, if nice location, beet price in the complex ...$44,500. if TQOHOTTQLAST. ..biQ 4 Ixlrm., 2 bth., 2-car garage, over 1800 e/f, '^ eep. faia rm. w/firepiace, vauHed ceiiinge. game rm., e rere find in ^ •^ thie euperiocation...ioweet per eq.ft...$114,900. if ALMOST NEW. ..Great priced 4 bdr., epiit floor plan, vaulted living ^ area. Indoor laundry, 2 car garage, firepiece, biinde thru-out, quiet ^ ^ cuideeec, area of newer homee...$109,900. ^ For more information.,, pieeee ceil and "aeic for" BmckyPantuso. REALTOR CENTURY 21JR REALTY • 371-0868 OR 391-9686 DICK BLAIR REALTY 833 NEVADA HWY., BOULDER CITY (702) 293-2171 (E1 frntyGuBtj-SfttT m-iVri AiTia HOURS CALL Bob Blair, Broker 293-2*49 AndrtaAiidcnoB. JM-ilU andrSandy 294-2919 RbomU Sledg*. 2J8-T97S ^ NrntyMorphy 293-3292 RldtMoTalhu -293-IS2 RkhwdGay J93-49I5 KtkfSnmn. <9S-434 Serving Boulder City Since 1968 HOMES lyiOBILE HOMES-IN PARKS FOR THE FUSSY BUYER — BMiutihil, upgraded 1969Marlette-12'x60' Sbedrms., 1 bath. t21,500 Lewis Home, 4 bdrms., 3 bath, 3 car gar., cov. patio, POOL. RV Parlcg. cor. lot SEE IT TOOAYI $353,500. CUSTOM HOME in Golf Course area, 3 bedrm., 2 bath, 2 car gar. POOL Call for detaila. (196,500. GREAT CURB APPEAL! Single story 1,860 sq. ft. 4 bedrooma., 2 batha, 2 car gar. Nicely landscaped. $169,500. GINGERWOOD PARK-Upgraded 2 bedrms., 2 bath, 24x48 Malibu. New carpet & PalnL $38,000. IN GINGERWOOD—24' x 48' 2 bedrm., 2 bath with 7-1/2' X 36' ertcl. porch/work shop Plua additional atg. shed. $47,500. MOORE'S M.H.P. 2^ x 40' SPARTA 2 bmlrms., 1 bath, Tuff Shod w/ W/D, covered patio, $26,000. BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM ESTATE 5 bedrms., 4 baths. Boulder City M.KP. 1981MANTEE 12'x52'.2t^nna. 8cargar.,prox.6,136sq.fLon2acrea,VlmvMtn8., GREAT DEALI $15,500. goH courae-MUCH MORE $949,999. SEE IT TOEU)ORADOM.H.P.-24'X48'GOLDEN WEST 1991 model, 2 badrma., 2 baths, fenced yard & atg. shed. NEWLY REDECORATED VILLA DEL PRADOI 3 ^9,900. bedrma., 2 bath, Nev. room w/wet bar. 1,374 sq. ft GINGERWOOD Corner lot. 2 bedrms., 1-3/4 bath, NEW ROOF YOURS FOR ONLY $149,500. add-on rm. W/Air/con. Wheel chair liH. FULLY FURNISHED 24' x 48' $39,500. SECLUDED NEIGHBORHOOD 1,735 aq. ft, 3 .^1*.,-^, m ^m. bedrms., 2-1/2 baths, 2 car gar. $159,600. MOORE'S M04]X|lOM| P JTl|Cute 1 bedroom, 1 bath. Wall carH<3MMllla4Jble person. $9,500. CONDOMINIUMS & TOWNHOMES 1,660 aq. ft, 2 bedrma., 2 1/2 baths, PLUS BONUS B0ULD6R CITY MHP—14x64,2 bedroom, 2 bath— ROOM. Lake area. Pool A Spa. $129,900. atorage—mature treee A ahruba. $21,750. IN HENDERSON-Coiyl bedrm., 1-1/2 bath, nearly ^„^„„.,„„,„^,^^ND ^. ^, ^ „ new carpet, with balcony from aec. atory bedrm. G"EAT BUILDING LOTI! In Manna Highland PoaALL APPLIANCES, F.P. walk-in cloaeta, celling fan, •""• ^*^ View, depending on design of home, aolar screens. Private Patio $49,000. $90,000. PANORAMIC VIEW-LAKE MEAD A MTNS. Upii;*IOt"0*^S'l.''?"'^S^!?^.^.^'S^.S graded REGATTA POINTE TNHSE. 1,892 aq. ft ESTATESI .4 acree, Guide sac, EXCELLENT VIEWI END UNIT-iota of prh/ecy. FOR THOSE LOOKING ^'*''^ *^ 25,000. FOR THE VERY BEST. $249,500. 4..,.. c, rr,.rr. w., • c j.. ^ IS AC in ELDORADO VALLEY-cleared & fenced. MODULAR HOMES WITH LAND part uUi. ZONED UGHT MFG. $600,000. VIEW OF LAKE MEAD -1440 sq. ft, 2 bedroom, 2 bath home in Lk. Mtn. EaUtee. Nicely Indscpd. RENTALS yard, 12x24 wrkshp., fem. rm., sun rm. more. ALL NEW BAYVIEW CONDOMINIUM! 2 bedrms., 2 $142,000. batha, 2 car gar. all appl. Community pool, alao has den and is close to Lake Mead. AVAIL NOW $1,100. LAKEMTN.ESTATES-1,6SOsq.ft60'x125'lot,Tile NON-SMOKERS, fl. in kit, FP in LR., Lerge laundry rm. Seperate Master Suite Panoramic view. Lake from reer of 1/2 DUPL£X-3 bedrm., 2 ba., close to achool*. property. $136,900. Owner paya water A landskpg. Avail. Sept 15 prox. $725. Beautiful large-1900 aq. ft PRESIDENTIAL MODEL mobile home in LAKE MTN. EST 2 bedrma., 1 3/4 COMIMERCIAL RENTALS be., 1 car gar. w/worfcahp. Greet view Lake Mead. 2,500 sq. ft office space AVAIL NOW $1,625. per Super locstion. AsUng $235,000. mo. FREEUSTSI OF AU AVAILABLE PROPERTIES PICK UP-MAIL-FAX FREE FULL COLOR BROCHURE OF BOULDER CITY HOMES 77ie Boulder City Specialists! Sewing Ail Southern Nevada 293-4663 1-800-228-8358 Fax (702) 293-4645 1664 Nevada Hwy. Boulder City, NV 89005 OppieMi^Sa COUNTRY Hia CONDO: 2 bdm., 2 be., Geled Community $82,500. OVERLAND TERRACE "REDUCED ~ 2 bd., 2 be., quiet setting $72,000. FOUR ADJACENT CUSTOM HOME LOTS OVER LAKE MEAD. $12SK es. EXCEPTIONAL VIEW EXCEPTiON-AL COfOmON Spygless TH $127,500. MAQNIFTCENT "Key Largo" ISSO ef, 3 bd, 2 cer oarage, VIEW $223,S0a COOL OFF IN THE POOLI4 bdm.. 2 be. "Del Predo". RV pidng. $167,500. CUSTOM SPANISH CONTEMPORARY, 4 bd., POOL Sep. Metr. w/spa $415,000. Offer Presantsd, Csll for STATUS. Ssnior Community of LAKE MOUNTAIN: 2 bd. 2 bs. workshop, 1682 sf $159,900. BEST PRI HIGHLANI iiifldfdldJt wn MARINA 19,900. HENDI ^*.b^* new, 2 bd. i,770. OVER 2000 sf CHALET MODEL In Laks Mountain, 2 csr gsrege, spa $210,000. ATTENTK>N INVESTORSI Leessd 2 bdrm., 2-1/2 be., 8PYGUSS $133,500. UNBEUEVABLE REMODEL in LAKE TREE. 3 bdrm., 2 em gsrege $134,500. For SALE or LEASE 1800 el* SPYGUSS. Very Upgreded $129,900. UNOBSTRUCTABLE Leke View, 3 bdrm., UL Mia Al Nke new $138,000. COMFORTABLE A AFFORDABLE Key Largo, 3 bdnn. Eesyt $165,000. CLEAN A READY FOR MOVE-IN. 2 bdrm., 19H bs. only $98,00a HAVE A SAFE LABOR DAY WEEKEND!! OPEN MorvFri 9 am to 5 pm Sat 10 am-4 pm Sun.&vM tiy appolntmL After iwure cell: Pat Dentetein Mery Board UnetteDavIe i64-f7W 2B9-72S4 293-1097 24-31t6 KayKbnberNn (peger) 477-41t ttuLowe 299->41 SueenMeMon 293-0226 EMsn Lemb Sirombers, Broker 293-i0t Eadi office is independently owned and operated mmmtmmmmmmm Thursday, August 29,1996 Panorama Page 15 REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNER 3bcl., 1-3/4ba.w/llvingrm.&lg. fam. rm., mature landscaped fenced rearyard & maintenance free front. 2 car gar. on quiet culde-sac in est'd subdivision, $159,000. 294-0158 Iv. msg. 1224 Cheyenne By Appt. Only Y D E 293-6014 & ASSOCIATES •PRIDE OF OWNERSHIP SHOWS IN THIS IMMACUUTE 3 BED., 1 1/2 BTH., FULLY LANDSCAPED, GARAGE, CARPORT A IN-GROUND SPA. $142,000. •THIS IS ITI CUTE STARTER HOME, ALMOST 1200 SQ. FT. 2 BED., 1 3/4 BTH. INCLUDES ALL APPUANCES. $120,000. •CUSTOM HOME WITH LAKE VIEWI 3 BED., 1 3/4 BTH.,2 CAR GARAGE ON CORNER LOT. $212,000. •COMMERCIAL BUILDING W/UVING QUARTERS IN OLD TOWN B.C. $120,000. •HUGE REDUCTION! PLANS INCLUDED VIEW AT OFRCE LAKE VIEW LOT, GREAT LOCATION REDUCED!!! TO $114,500. •HENDERSON 3 BED., CENTRAL AIR $795.00. •BOULDER CITY CUSTOM, 3 CAR GAR. $1600 MO. Ul DMOIM AIN REALTY B.C. GOLF COLRSE 4BR/2.SBAViews across 4 fairways. 2 story home, lite & bright. Upgraded. $339,900 294-1500 UIDMOIM AIN REALTY "GREAT N.W.L.V. LOCATION. 3BR/3BA 2 car garage, close to schools, shopping & freeway! S108.900 1702) 294-1500 KIDMOIMAIN REALTY Spring Valley Grat L.V. location 4BR/2BA Lively garden area, flowers. S144,900 294-1500 RIDMOIMAIN REALTY LAKEFRONT REDUCED L.V. Gated Community, 3BR, upgraded, quiet & serene, GVHS $225,000 (702) 294-1500 UIDMOIM AIN REALTY COIVIM./RES. LOT Lot located I block S. of Nevada Highway. .420 acres. Call Brad $135,000 (702, 294-1500 Ul I) MOl N IAIN REALTY FORRENT. 1 BR/IBA Apartment. 3rd story unit avail. Opens up lo roof-lop. $500.00 No Pets! Rtf & Deposit Required, tiililies included. DOLL HOUSE...Upgreded 2 bedroom, 1 story townliouse...incl(jding floor coveringe, centrel eir, petio cover, etorege ehed, coirim. pool, nice iocetion, beet price in tiie conf)plex...$44,500. Cell todeyl BOULDER CITY Excellent location. 2 bedroom, 1 batli w/upgredeegeioreiCioeeto pool, laundry & periling. Call now, won't leet long! UVE CLOSE TO BLACK MOUNTAIN GOLF COURSE in Country Club Viliege Estates. 3 bedroom, 2 betii menufactured iiome. Over 1,400 e/f of living specel Large fenced reer yard, covered cerport, no essociation feel FORMAL UVING/DINING 4 bedroom, 2 story w/3 cer finisiied garege. Lewis built—Green Veiley location. Upgreded cerpet & liardwood floore. Sitting eree in mester euHe. Unique iandeceping w/pond & waterf ell. Covered petio. $205,000. GUEST QUARTERS ARE INCLUDED in tills custom one story, 4 bedroom iiouee. l.oceted on corner lieH cere lot, 2,760 e/f plus e epe room. Pool. 3 cer gerege. $207,000. SINGLE STORY NEIGHBORHOOD IN HENDERSON! Huge cui-de-eec lot wHii room for RV parking and pool. Very open 1,800 e/f floorpian wHIi leiand Idtchen. $139,900. Ceil todeyl ^ 564-6546 fc iOI E. Horizon Dr. CENTURION* Office REAL ESTAIF REAL ESTATE Coldwell Banker Premier BC CofSsnMrary SW Ealalol HMlap vlawa. pilvaia aaWng, appmc. 7000 SF & guaal houaa, aoaiing oainga, Paislan nwitta & granSa tlvougtioul, gourmal Mtchan, amrctaa im., obaarvatlon dock, pool & tp, $1,867.000. CaN lor appl. CBBCNQROUP SSS^Ig IMW BOAT*. & RV< 35' Steel, 4 axle trailer, see behind 1000 Buchanan, 80, 2930600. BR18194 8' overhead camper, stove/ice box, sleeps 4, good shape, $600 OBO, 293-0077/453-4150. BOATS & RVs BOATS & RVs I MOTORCYCLES BOAT, RV& SELF STORAGE 704 Canyon Rd. Boulder City, NV 294-5025 Fully enclosed/each unit has an alarni 16' GLASSPAR W/ TRAILER 90 hp Johnson Outboard w/eiectric' tilt, runs great, great buy at $1700. Call 641-8817. BR131S8 Wanttobuycampershell to fit a Chevy S10 PAJ short wheel base & camping equip? Call 5664016 Iv. msg. BR16541 91 Class A motorhome, 28' Overland, $24,000, top of line has all the goodies, 566-0471/5656943. BR18391 VEHICLES 12' aluminum boat w/ trailer, 2 motors, trolling nwtor, 2 depth finders, battery & case, $800, 566-8492. BR18247 TRAILERS RENT OR SALE Park Models good for 1 or 2 people. Rents start $375/up. Sales start $1500/up. Ask for Jaannette/Mario 294-8888 VEHICLES CUSTOM HARLEY SPORTSTER new motor, paint & chrome, $12,000 invested, sellfor $6,000 080.568-1304. MCI 8318 Older Yamaha 100, good shape, $300, 565-5339. MCI 8342 92 Dodge Ram 250 Continental conversion touring van, fully loaded, $18,500, 293-6010. VE18380 1980 Toyota P/U, new transmission, AC, runs good, $1500 080, 5661544. VE18378 1994 Dodge Grand Caravan, loaded, white, excel, cond., $19,400 hi book. $17,750080,5665934. VE 18382 89 Mitsubishi Galant, runs & looks good, $5900, 080 565-5369. 86 Dodge 3/4 ton w/utility SVC body, AC, PS/PB, auto trans., stereo, $3500, 566-0471/5656943. VE 18392 79 Ford 3/4 ton w/utility SVC body, Auto Trans., P8/PS, $1900. 5660471 /565-6943 BOATS & RV^ 1977 Dodge Fireball nrx>torhome, 22' w/generator, microwave, awning, new tires & Bilstein shocks, 440 motor, $5,500. Call Dave or Sandy 565-2958. BRie249 VEHICLES Used auto parts foreign & domestk: Big John and Sons, 1631 R)othill Dr.. 293-PART. VE 17575 1989 Toyota Tercel, auto & air, pwr. steering, $3500,080,564-2132. VE18176 1982 Ford Custom Van newly rebuilt motor, captain chairs, running boards, $3500 OBO, 294-4201. VE18345 83 Toyota Celica GT, 5 speed, pwr. windows & dr. locks, AC, cruise control, tilt wheel. AMFM cassette, cellular phone, 144K mi, looks & runs good, $2000 OBO 293-2913. VE18360 1988 Nissan Pulsar NX SE, twin cam, 16 valve, AC, T-top, AM-FM stereo cass'stte. superb cond., 36,000 orig. mi., $7,000 OBO, call Beverly, 293-0769. 87 2 dr. Honda Prelude, automatic, sunroof, low mileage, ex. cond. $5000, 293-4384. VE18419 VEHICLES '90 Izuzu Trooper unbelievably good condition $8450 call 293-2803. VE18327 CARS UNDER $150. All nriodels. Seizedand auctioned by DEA, FBI, IRS, trucks, boats, computers, furniture and more. Available your area. Call Now! 1-800-451-0050 XC3398. VE18288 GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS from $125. Trucks, boats. 4wheelers. motorhomes, furniture, electronics, computers by FBI, IRS, DEA. Your area now! 1800-558-8672 ext. A5301. VE17368 Cadillac Coupe DeVille 1965. Excel, cond., 118 mi., 294-0686/286-2833. VE18299 1983 Mercedes 300 Diesel turbo excel, cond., $4850. 294-6209. VE18306 See Radiator Master Located inside Emission Express, 1400 NV Hwy, 293-RADI. VE17576 1987 Chevy Spectrum, mint cond., low mileage. $4500. 566-8942. VE14881 1974 Mercury 2 dr. Hardtop, good shape, $750 OBO, 565-1367. VE18246 85 S-10 Blazer, red & silver. 73000 mi. Enki wheels. V-6. 4x4. excel, cond.. $5750. 1506 San Felipe Dr., BC.VE18302 VEHICIES VEHICLE-^ (JoTKi •uNT^ LABOIMY SUB JPEaACIIUI CASH BACK On Selected '96 Vehicles Limited Time Offer Ends MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 1**^ Don't Miss OutI FORD COUNTRY Istry^in^ \Ne Do Is Driven By You Eat At Mustang Sally's Diner 280 N Gibson Rd., • Valley Auto Mall • Henderson 566-FORD WE'RE #3 IN THE NATION THAT'S RIGHT in June we became the 3rd largest Hyundai dealer in the nation! We didn't get there because of our "Good Looks" it's because we do what we advertise OUR PRODUCT IS GOOD AND OUR PRICES ARE AFFORDABLE. $495 -* > ^/>i.^t* Tfy*i'iHj! ij.r> • • firt .Tf' \ t • n -.* •WN BUYS ANY NEW CAR WE HAVE! WE HAVE THE LARGEST NEW HYUNDAI INVENTORY IN THE WESTERN REGION WE ARE THE ONLY HYUNDAI DEALER IN THE NATION THAT GIVES YOU "ABSOLUTLY FREE" A 2 YEAR/24,000 MILE "FREE" MAINTENANCE POLICY YOU ONLY BUY THE GAS! 49JWN Why pay "thru the nose" for a high mileage, driven by everybody, rental car? We can seli you a new Hyundai for less. BEN STEPMAN HYUNDAI 460 No. BOULDER HIGHWAY • 565-1500 IN HENDERSON OF COURSE!

PAGE 33

wm^^ Pagt 14 Panorama Thursday, August 29,1996 Rf:Al tSTAlfc NO MONEY DOWN. Tak over payments of $24a^mo. on 80 acres. S.E. of Kingman, Arizona. Good access with view. Can 602-961 -6781. Own Your Own REAi ESTATE; REAL ESTAIf Home Nowl No down payment on Miles materials. Innovative construction financing. Call Miles Homes, today, 1-800343-2884, ext. L Calico Ridge, HD custom home. gr. view of LV, close to Lake Mead. 4 bd., 2-1/2 ba., separate dining, pantry & washrooms, walk in ckMets, marble & hardwood flooring are some of the many extras. Quist neighborhood. $234,500. cair565-6929. RE17679 MmSStfpt for iWiL MaM HviiMi MB^ OutaldA h^ ADA. Mi^Mihidfe attv patio. Landaeap* la pfalaaalonajly daaa S baauWully OfilyaiMngSiaMSOIIOMeNHOUSEMiSUNOAYS AIM. 11 a IS, tram 1-4 PM. Hum, a waallaill Caa PATTI QPnnllew,TS-18S1. BOULDER cmr Spectacular Lake Mead panoramic views; we have (2) unique homee, termc poeeble; (1) Is on nearly 2 acree, prhf. rd., $650,000; (2) hae pool, putting green A more, $750,000. Lewie 2story, 4 bd, 2-1/2 be., clean It green, extrae, $104,500. Townhome wHh lakeview, no stairs, garage, $128,460. Townhouee, prhr. yd^ clean, extrae, $94,500. DESERT SUN REALTY, 293-2151. RE1B422 REAL LbTATE AWESOME Lake View Home w/Massive Garage, TERMS $750K BITET 294-8482 Desert Sun Rity^REl 8374 REAL ESTATE BC REDUCED 3 bd., 2 ba., Lewie' w/pool, $179,900. BRET, 2948482 Desert Sun RIty. VHt Make Houac Orila* RoUenUal'Ttew and Reaales"Property Management "Commercial at Uuid Sales" "" • n oAuawG IN HiNDUsoN ARIA nioramis*n FRED & ELLIE KNAPP MuRt-MHIion Dollar Producara LIcanaed REALTORS Since 1978 PH. 566-8185 Outside of rievada: l-800-209-2fi78 10 W. Pacific Ave., ate. 11, Henderson, nv 89019 BC !L Adobe "i Reolty Is} I' (702) 293-1707 HOMES CHECK IT OUT...3,300 eq. ft, 4 bdrm., 4-1/2 bstti, country Idtchen, family room w/fIreplece, 3 car gar., 1/2 acre & more...$299,S00. PRICE RE0UCED...3 bdrm., 1-3/4 bath, family room, many upgrades, studio, lueh landscaping ft more...$l 64,900. LAKE MEAD VIEW ESTATES...spectacular great room wtthflreplace, many quality features, 2 bdrm., 2-1/2 batli, pool...$387,500. GOLF COURSE SPECIAL..4 bdrm. rumpus room, 3 bath, family room w/riraplace, great views, custom upgradee, 3 car gar...$33S,000. LOWEST PRICE...Inprestlglouslalce view area, 3 tKlrm., 1-3/4 tMth, energy efficient custom with beautiful view...$285,000. TWO FOR THE PRICE OF ONE...unobstructed lake view home, 4 t>drm., 2 tMth, plus vacant lot...$345,000. SUPER STARTER HOME...well maintained 2 bdrm., 1 bath, central eir ft heat, dual pane windows, garage 4storege...$114,500. READY FOR SCHOOI cuetom home close to echools and parks, spacious rooms, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, reedy for new ownere...$157,500. GREAT VIEWS...slngle level golf course home, 4 bdrm., 3-1/2 beth, femlly room, pool ft spa, lush grounds, 3 car gar...$349,900. SPACIOUS LAKE VIEW CUSTOM...3,8004^ sq. ft., 4 t)drm., 3-1/2 bath, fatiuloue living area, also available lot next door...$390,500. HOMES OWNER ANXIOUS...Ukeview Sites, 3 bdrm., 2-1/2 beth, many unique extras, waterf ells, pond ell In mountain 8attlng...$294,500. CHOOSE YOUR OPTIONS...owners will build to suit 3 or 4 bdrm., 2x6 construction, extras, call for floor plan...$221,000. SEEING IS BEUEVING...4 bdrm., 2-1/2 beth, all new carpet, peint, fixtures, appllancee and more, piue pool...$182,500. BEAUTIFULLY UPGRADED...4 bdrm., 2 bath, great room w/Tlreplace, large kitchen, mature larKiscsplng...$109,500. MANUFACTURED HOMES LAKE VIEW...well maintained 2 bdrm., 2 bath, views from living room ft back deck, covered perklng...$146,S00. UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY Fleetwood with 2 bdnn., nlshed...$34,500. In Nelson, NV ... bath, partially turDESIRABLE AREA...2 bdrm., 1 -3/4 bath, very nicely upgredsd, cerport, workshop ft more...$127,900. PRICE RED garage, you .som: th home with 1 car nd...$4,750. LAND LAKE A MOUNTAIN VIEW LOTS... MANY TO CHOOSE FROM $95,000 TO $275,000. CALL FOR DETAILS WELL ESTABLISHED BEAUTY SHOP FOR SALE. $36,500. CALL FOR DETAILS. ***CALL FOR A LIST OF ALL AVAILABLE PROPERTIES'*' MULTIPLE LISTING SERVICE 1310 NEVADA HWY BOULDER CITY FAX 702-293-7477 293-14S7 Dorothy Mdln 293-S087 OaudU Rsacka 23-eM9 OlaniM Vanaaaa 293-4284 Batli AMwortl) 293-7074 Criallna LsBrslon FarnaM, Brokar • 293-2212 TOLL FREE #1-800-553-8081 Joan Curran ll m IMMACULATE SUNRISE MOBILE ESTATES % 2 bd., 2 ba., 1989 CHAMPK)N Mobile on 60x100 lot Cov. park ft porch 8x12 Tuff Shed. NEW3.5tonAC4oeiling fanelDONTMISSOUTI 173,000. S66-8700, /Uk for Corby/Denyae RE/MAX Eegle'e View. KNOO REAL ESTATE MUST SELL Beautiful 3 bd. Lewla, POOL, 1861 SF, $179,000 BRET2046482 Desert Sun RIty. RIAL fSTATt REAL ESTATT REAL ESTATE Ro qualifying. Hd., 3 bdr, 4 ba., over 1/3 acre, acroes from BLM land. Call Joe 502-6025. CALLCOLDWELLBANKER ^^^^^^J^. COLDWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY 1487 Nevada Hvwy., Boulder City 83 to B.C. only dome on the rigfit 293-5757 FREE! LIST OF ALL HOMES FOR SALE IN B.C. HOMES THREElBbftM. home uewl ae two unite. Good rwnte'l hietory. $120,900. SIX BDRM. on 1.02 acre, city, min. S valley viewe! Baeement w/3 bdrms. S fern. rm. $340,000. UPGRADED LEWIS HOME • Of:y|3/f>.. carport wHii etorege bidg.. pooi/epa, tile roof, deeert leMM(i^Hl 44.900. RELOCATED OWNER • neede offer on multi-ievei home with ielce view from pool. Reduced to $229,900. CUSTOM 3 BDRM., 2 ba., pool/spa, overeized garage. $165,000. GOLF COURSE 2 etory, pool, epa, tiled fire. $387,500. THREE BDRM. 2 levele, 1700 e.f. remodeled kitchen, f/b in living rm.. off etreet paridng. Reducedl $124,900. LAKE VIEWI3 bd.. 2.6 ba., 2 c. garage, fam. rm., 2 1/p, covered patios, all appllancee, pool, epa. $346,000. LOCATED IN CUL-DE-SAC 2 etory, 4 bd., large lot w/pooi. cuetom patio cover A more. Roducedl $209,900. CUSTOM HOME A BLDa LOTiaka view from ail the home. 3 bd., 3 be.. fam. rm. and too much to liet. Home A lot together $435,000. LAKE AREA cuetom 3 bd. 2.5 ba.. Intercom, cent, vac, RV/boat paridng, bacica up to mtne. for privecyl $109,500. TRiLEVEL HOME Uke view. 4 bd.. 3 be., large 70x146 lot, RV paridng. formal d/r. living rm. w/rock i/p, overeizeid garage. NOW $265,000. WATERS EDGE • 2 bd.. 2 be.. 2 c. garage, upgraded and profeeelonaily iandacaped, eoma lake view. $162,500. UPGRADED TWO LEVEL condo. 2 or 3 bd., 3.5 ba., Ingmd. epa. ceiling fane t/o, lake viaw ft more. $270,500. LAKEVIEW CONDO-2 bvely, 2 bdnn.. completely furnished. Covered parking and lake view tool $134,500. CUL-DE-SAC k>t, room for RVAioaL Two bd.. 2 ba.. lake view from kMehen, fam. rm. and porch. $152,500. NEW ON MKT.I 2 bd., dan, 2 c. carport, etorege rm., covered porch, nnalura piante. $129,500. LUCE A MODEL • 2 bd., 2 ba., 2 c. garage, lanced patki/dog run. deeert OWNER MUST SELU 3 bd. 2 ba., pool, carport^V. $244,500. MOBILES IN PARKS CORNER LOT-3 bd. 2 ba.. central air/htg. $24,000. MOORE'S PARK — 10x56,2 bd, atoraga. aereaned patto w/waaher ft $15,000 COTL BLOa • 9000 ai. uaad for aalaa ol daeoralor itema ft aucttons. now iDolftate.S7S0.000.PropaftyBvaiable next door 00x156 with emeli Mdg. $276,000. B.C. GAS STATION eomar lot. hwy. frontage, bMg. ft buelneee. Mechanic en duty. $$66,000. JfertS) *£.rxK Advertise in the NEWS COUNTRY HOME 4BR/3BA 7 ear garage, Beautiful custom home w/formal dining. Guest house, corral. S387,000 294-1500 WAREHOUSEAVAIL 1000sq.ft. warehouse In new Red Mntn. Plaza. Office area, restroom, cvap. cool. S625.00 per month 294-1500 •NEAR LAKE MEAD!* Fabulous custom built home (large comer lot with approx 2990 sq. ft.) i bedrooms, large family room with built-in oak .shelves. R.V. parking/fully landscaped, beautiful Tireplaccs in living room and ma.'iter suite. Open floor plan, tons of potential, fabulous views from balcony, 2 car garage, (motivated). 259,900K BC. •GREEN VALLEY BEAUTY* 5 bdrms., pool & spa, trilevel, R.V. parking, mint condition! 220k •NORTHWEST NEW lar^^Aejl, u|gr|led. R.VTPowerss^l'Snooltups, much more, a perfect floor plan. I69,900K. •NORTHWEST/HORSE PROPERTY^ 470 acres, 4 bdnn., 2 bath, model perfect custom home, 3 car, R.V./ workshop. So much more. A real beauty! 2I9,900K. •FABULOUS AIRY FLOOR PLAN^ Close your eyes, sit back and relax in this single story 4 bdrm.. lush landscaped home w/pool in a private culdesac near the school. Has it all! REDUCED • (25K B.C. •GOLF COURSE BEAUTY!^ Thisisiheperfecl2stoty. A true beauty, lush and open natural and tranquil. 4 bdrm., 4 baths, plus bonus room, 3 car gar., large lot, RV parking, so much more, 369,900K B.C. •VACATION IN STYLE!* This condo is as big as a house! 1522 approx. sq. ft., 2 bdrm., 2 bonus rooms, tons of upgrades plus a beautiful view. Priced to sell at I29,900KB.C. •GOLFER'S PARADISE* Relax in your cool pebble deck pool with fountain. A true paradise, single story, 4 bdrm., large lot, beautiful view, great pool and lush landscaping, hardwood floon, great floor plan. So much more. Bring offers 349,950K. B.C. Sandra Deubler 271-3277 FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS., Call Handarson'a #1 Real EtMa Team BRENDA BIRD QRI, ORB Ufetltne Henderson Resident 564-1127 WENDY WILLIAMS 378-1689 Over $100,000,000 in Sales 27 years combined Real EsUte experiencel TTM DYNAMIC DUO 811$ Homml" /ftnOflCOnO rllBetber BtOUP. i] IOIi. *^W^l^^Bfi^^ EAGLE CREST "CREAM PUFr 0MM $30,000 In upgradMl 1370SF,3M.,2lM.,t6x100 M, gaiod RV/boal parUng. Pool a Spa w/Koot dMk. 210 SF oov. patio Wcaillng (an. Cuetom daaignad Intarior. Unototniotad view of cHyl 1138,000.6S64700, Aak for Cortiy/Danyaa RE/MAX Eagla'aVlMir. X8S& *•* ThePrudential Jensen's Realty Thinking of Buying or Selling? The Rock is the answer! The Prudential Jensen's Realty Specielixee In Residential-Cemmctxiel and Property Management iSi We're here to serve you Henderson 564-3333 fib ovroaTVNfrv ***************** i, HOME BUYERS LOOK HERE ^ 1 DQLLtiQUSE-.Upgraded2badroom,1-etoiytowni)ome...inciuding ^ ^ floor eovaringa, central afe, patio cover, etorege eiied, comm. pool, if nice location, beet price in the complex ...$44,500. if TQOHOTTQLAST. ..biQ 4 Ixlrm., 2 bth., 2-car garage, over 1800 e/f, '^ eep. faia rm. w/firepiace, vauHed ceiiinge. game rm., e rere find in ^ •^ thie euperiocation...ioweet per eq.ft...$114,900. if ALMOST NEW. ..Great priced 4 bdr., epiit floor plan, vaulted living ^ area. Indoor laundry, 2 car garage, firepiece, biinde thru-out, quiet ^ ^ cuideeec, area of newer homee...$109,900. ^ For more information.,, pieeee ceil and "aeic for" BmckyPantuso. REALTOR CENTURY 21JR REALTY • 371-0868 OR 391-9686 DICK BLAIR REALTY 833 NEVADA HWY., BOULDER CITY (702) 293-2171 (E1 frntyGuBtj-SfttT m-iVri AiTia HOURS CALL Bob Blair, Broker 293-2*49 AndrtaAiidcnoB. JM-ilU andrSandy 294-2919 RbomU Sledg*. 2J8-T97S ^ NrntyMorphy 293-3292 RldtMoTalhu -293-IS2 RkhwdGay J93-49I5 KtkfSnmn. <9S-434 Serving Boulder City Since 1968 HOMES lyiOBILE HOMES-IN PARKS FOR THE FUSSY BUYER — BMiutihil, upgraded 1969Marlette-12'x60' Sbedrms., 1 bath. t21,500 Lewis Home, 4 bdrms., 3 bath, 3 car gar., cov. patio, POOL. RV Parlcg. cor. lot SEE IT TOOAYI $353,500. CUSTOM HOME in Golf Course area, 3 bedrm., 2 bath, 2 car gar. POOL Call for detaila. (196,500. GREAT CURB APPEAL! Single story 1,860 sq. ft. 4 bedrooma., 2 batha, 2 car gar. Nicely landscaped. $169,500. GINGERWOOD PARK-Upgraded 2 bedrms., 2 bath, 24x48 Malibu. New carpet & PalnL $38,000. IN GINGERWOOD—24' x 48' 2 bedrm., 2 bath with 7-1/2' X 36' ertcl. porch/work shop Plua additional atg. shed. $47,500. MOORE'S M.H.P. 2^ x 40' SPARTA 2 bmlrms., 1 bath, Tuff Shod w/ W/D, covered patio, $26,000. BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM ESTATE 5 bedrms., 4 baths. Boulder City M.KP. 1981MANTEE 12'x52'.2t^nna. 8cargar.,prox.6,136sq.fLon2acrea,VlmvMtn8., GREAT DEALI $15,500. goH courae-MUCH MORE $949,999. SEE IT TOEU)ORADOM.H.P.-24'X48'GOLDEN WEST 1991 model, 2 badrma., 2 baths, fenced yard & atg. shed. NEWLY REDECORATED VILLA DEL PRADOI 3 ^9,900. bedrma., 2 bath, Nev. room w/wet bar. 1,374 sq. ft GINGERWOOD Corner lot. 2 bedrms., 1-3/4 bath, NEW ROOF YOURS FOR ONLY $149,500. add-on rm. W/Air/con. Wheel chair liH. FULLY FURNISHED 24' x 48' $39,500. SECLUDED NEIGHBORHOOD 1,735 aq. ft, 3 .^1*.,-^, m ^m. bedrms., 2-1/2 baths, 2 car gar. $159,600. MOORE'S M04]X|lOM| P JTl|Cute 1 bedroom, 1 bath. Wall carH<3MMllla4Jble person. $9,500. CONDOMINIUMS & TOWNHOMES 1,660 aq. ft, 2 bedrma., 2 1/2 baths, PLUS BONUS B0ULD6R CITY MHP—14x64,2 bedroom, 2 bath— ROOM. Lake area. Pool A Spa. $129,900. atorage—mature treee A ahruba. $21,750. IN HENDERSON-Coiyl bedrm., 1-1/2 bath, nearly ^„^„„.,„„,„^,^^ND ^. ^, ^ „ new carpet, with balcony from aec. atory bedrm. G"EAT BUILDING LOTI! In Manna Highland PoaALL APPLIANCES, F.P. walk-in cloaeta, celling fan, •""• ^*^ View, depending on design of home, aolar screens. Private Patio $49,000. $90,000. PANORAMIC VIEW-LAKE MEAD A MTNS. Upii;*IOt"0*^S'l.''?"'^S^!?^.^.^'S^.S graded REGATTA POINTE TNHSE. 1,892 aq. ft ESTATESI .4 acree, Guide sac, EXCELLENT VIEWI END UNIT-iota of prh/ecy. FOR THOSE LOOKING ^'*''^ *^ 25,000. FOR THE VERY BEST. $249,500. 4..,.. c, rr,.rr. w., • c j.. ^ IS AC in ELDORADO VALLEY-cleared & fenced. MODULAR HOMES WITH LAND part uUi. ZONED UGHT MFG. $600,000. VIEW OF LAKE MEAD -1440 sq. ft, 2 bedroom, 2 bath home in Lk. Mtn. EaUtee. Nicely Indscpd. RENTALS yard, 12x24 wrkshp., fem. rm., sun rm. more. ALL NEW BAYVIEW CONDOMINIUM! 2 bedrms., 2 $142,000. batha, 2 car gar. all appl. Community pool, alao has den and is close to Lake Mead. AVAIL NOW $1,100. LAKEMTN.ESTATES-1,6SOsq.ft60'x125'lot,Tile NON-SMOKERS, fl. in kit, FP in LR., Lerge laundry rm. Seperate Master Suite Panoramic view. Lake from reer of 1/2 DUPL£X-3 bedrm., 2 ba., close to achool*. property. $136,900. Owner paya water A landskpg. Avail. Sept 15 prox. $725. Beautiful large-1900 aq. ft PRESIDENTIAL MODEL mobile home in LAKE MTN. EST 2 bedrma., 1 3/4 COMIMERCIAL RENTALS be., 1 car gar. w/worfcahp. Greet view Lake Mead. 2,500 sq. ft office space AVAIL NOW $1,625. per Super locstion. AsUng $235,000. mo. FREEUSTSI OF AU AVAILABLE PROPERTIES PICK UP-MAIL-FAX FREE FULL COLOR BROCHURE OF BOULDER CITY HOMES 77ie Boulder City Specialists! Sewing Ail Southern Nevada 293-4663 1-800-228-8358 Fax (702) 293-4645 1664 Nevada Hwy. Boulder City, NV 89005 OppieMi^Sa COUNTRY Hia CONDO: 2 bdm., 2 be., Geled Community $82,500. OVERLAND TERRACE "REDUCED ~ 2 bd., 2 be., quiet setting $72,000. FOUR ADJACENT CUSTOM HOME LOTS OVER LAKE MEAD. $12SK es. EXCEPTIONAL VIEW EXCEPTiON-AL COfOmON Spygless TH $127,500. MAQNIFTCENT "Key Largo" ISSO ef, 3 bd, 2 cer oarage, VIEW $223,S0a COOL OFF IN THE POOLI4 bdm.. 2 be. "Del Predo". RV pidng. $167,500. CUSTOM SPANISH CONTEMPORARY, 4 bd., POOL Sep. Metr. w/spa $415,000. Offer Presantsd, Csll for STATUS. Ssnior Community of LAKE MOUNTAIN: 2 bd. 2 bs. workshop, 1682 sf $159,900. BEST PRI HIGHLANI iiifldfdldJt wn MARINA 19,900. HENDI ^*.b^* new, 2 bd. i,770. OVER 2000 sf CHALET MODEL In Laks Mountain, 2 csr gsrege, spa $210,000. ATTENTK>N INVESTORSI Leessd 2 bdrm., 2-1/2 be., 8PYGUSS $133,500. UNBEUEVABLE REMODEL in LAKE TREE. 3 bdrm., 2 em gsrege $134,500. For SALE or LEASE 1800 el* SPYGUSS. Very Upgreded $129,900. UNOBSTRUCTABLE Leke View, 3 bdrm., UL Mia Al Nke new $138,000. COMFORTABLE A AFFORDABLE Key Largo, 3 bdnn. Eesyt $165,000. CLEAN A READY FOR MOVE-IN. 2 bdrm., 19H bs. only $98,00a HAVE A SAFE LABOR DAY WEEKEND!! OPEN MorvFri 9 am to 5 pm Sat 10 am-4 pm Sun.&vM tiy appolntmL After iwure cell: Pat Dentetein Mery Board UnetteDavIe i64-f7W 2B9-72S4 293-1097 24-31t6 KayKbnberNn (peger) 477-41t ttuLowe 299->41 SueenMeMon 293-0226 EMsn Lemb Sirombers, Broker 293-i0t Eadi office is independently owned and operated mmmtmmmmmmm Thursday, August 29,1996 Panorama Page 15 REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNER 3bcl., 1-3/4ba.w/llvingrm.&lg. fam. rm., mature landscaped fenced rearyard & maintenance free front. 2 car gar. on quiet culde-sac in est'd subdivision, $159,000. 294-0158 Iv. msg. 1224 Cheyenne By Appt. Only Y D E 293-6014 & ASSOCIATES •PRIDE OF OWNERSHIP SHOWS IN THIS IMMACUUTE 3 BED., 1 1/2 BTH., FULLY LANDSCAPED, GARAGE, CARPORT A IN-GROUND SPA. $142,000. •THIS IS ITI CUTE STARTER HOME, ALMOST 1200 SQ. FT. 2 BED., 1 3/4 BTH. INCLUDES ALL APPUANCES. $120,000. •CUSTOM HOME WITH LAKE VIEWI 3 BED., 1 3/4 BTH.,2 CAR GARAGE ON CORNER LOT. $212,000. •COMMERCIAL BUILDING W/UVING QUARTERS IN OLD TOWN B.C. $120,000. •HUGE REDUCTION! PLANS INCLUDED VIEW AT OFRCE LAKE VIEW LOT, GREAT LOCATION REDUCED!!! TO $114,500. •HENDERSON 3 BED., CENTRAL AIR $795.00. •BOULDER CITY CUSTOM, 3 CAR GAR. $1600 MO. Ul DMOIM AIN REALTY B.C. GOLF COLRSE 4BR/2.SBAViews across 4 fairways. 2 story home, lite & bright. Upgraded. $339,900 294-1500 UIDMOIM AIN REALTY "GREAT N.W.L.V. LOCATION. 3BR/3BA 2 car garage, close to schools, shopping & freeway! S108.900 1702) 294-1500 KIDMOIMAIN REALTY Spring Valley Grat L.V. location 4BR/2BA Lively garden area, flowers. S144,900 294-1500 RIDMOIMAIN REALTY LAKEFRONT REDUCED L.V. Gated Community, 3BR, upgraded, quiet & serene, GVHS $225,000 (702) 294-1500 UIDMOIM AIN REALTY COIVIM./RES. LOT Lot located I block S. of Nevada Highway. .420 acres. Call Brad $135,000 (702, 294-1500 Ul I) MOl N IAIN REALTY FORRENT. 1 BR/IBA Apartment. 3rd story unit avail. Opens up lo roof-lop. $500.00 No Pets! Rtf & Deposit Required, tiililies included. DOLL HOUSE...Upgreded 2 bedroom, 1 story townliouse...incl(jding floor coveringe, centrel eir, petio cover, etorege ehed, coirim. pool, nice iocetion, beet price in tiie conf)plex...$44,500. Cell todeyl BOULDER CITY Excellent location. 2 bedroom, 1 batli w/upgredeegeioreiCioeeto pool, laundry & periling. Call now, won't leet long! UVE CLOSE TO BLACK MOUNTAIN GOLF COURSE in Country Club Viliege Estates. 3 bedroom, 2 betii menufactured iiome. Over 1,400 e/f of living specel Large fenced reer yard, covered cerport, no essociation feel FORMAL UVING/DINING 4 bedroom, 2 story w/3 cer finisiied garege. Lewis built—Green Veiley location. Upgreded cerpet & liardwood floore. Sitting eree in mester euHe. Unique iandeceping w/pond & waterf ell. Covered petio. $205,000. GUEST QUARTERS ARE INCLUDED in tills custom one story, 4 bedroom iiouee. l.oceted on corner lieH cere lot, 2,760 e/f plus e epe room. Pool. 3 cer gerege. $207,000. SINGLE STORY NEIGHBORHOOD IN HENDERSON! Huge cui-de-eec lot wHii room for RV parking and pool. Very open 1,800 e/f floorpian wHIi leiand Idtchen. $139,900. Ceil todeyl ^ 564-6546 fc iOI E. Horizon Dr. CENTURION* Office REAL ESTAIF REAL ESTATE Coldwell Banker Premier BC CofSsnMrary SW Ealalol HMlap vlawa. pilvaia aaWng, appmc. 7000 SF & guaal houaa, aoaiing oainga, Paislan nwitta & granSa tlvougtioul, gourmal Mtchan, amrctaa im., obaarvatlon dock, pool & tp, $1,867.000. CaN lor appl. CBBCNQROUP SSS^Ig IMW BOAT*. & RV< 35' Steel, 4 axle trailer, see behind 1000 Buchanan, 80, 2930600. BR18194 8' overhead camper, stove/ice box, sleeps 4, good shape, $600 OBO, 293-0077/453-4150. BOATS & RVs BOATS & RVs I MOTORCYCLES BOAT, RV& SELF STORAGE 704 Canyon Rd. Boulder City, NV 294-5025 Fully enclosed/each unit has an alarni 16' GLASSPAR W/ TRAILER 90 hp Johnson Outboard w/eiectric' tilt, runs great, great buy at $1700. Call 641-8817. BR131S8 Wanttobuycampershell to fit a Chevy S10 PAJ short wheel base & camping equip? Call 5664016 Iv. msg. BR16541 91 Class A motorhome, 28' Overland, $24,000, top of line has all the goodies, 566-0471/5656943. BR18391 VEHICLES 12' aluminum boat w/ trailer, 2 motors, trolling nwtor, 2 depth finders, battery & case, $800, 566-8492. BR18247 TRAILERS RENT OR SALE Park Models good for 1 or 2 people. Rents start $375/up. Sales start $1500/up. Ask for Jaannette/Mario 294-8888 VEHICLES CUSTOM HARLEY SPORTSTER new motor, paint & chrome, $12,000 invested, sellfor $6,000 080.568-1304. MCI 8318 Older Yamaha 100, good shape, $300, 565-5339. MCI 8342 92 Dodge Ram 250 Continental conversion touring van, fully loaded, $18,500, 293-6010. VE18380 1980 Toyota P/U, new transmission, AC, runs good, $1500 080, 5661544. VE18378 1994 Dodge Grand Caravan, loaded, white, excel, cond., $19,400 hi book. $17,750080,5665934. VE 18382 89 Mitsubishi Galant, runs & looks good, $5900, 080 565-5369. 86 Dodge 3/4 ton w/utility SVC body, AC, PS/PB, auto trans., stereo, $3500, 566-0471/5656943. VE 18392 79 Ford 3/4 ton w/utility SVC body, Auto Trans., P8/PS, $1900. 5660471 /565-6943 BOATS & RV^ 1977 Dodge Fireball nrx>torhome, 22' w/generator, microwave, awning, new tires & Bilstein shocks, 440 motor, $5,500. Call Dave or Sandy 565-2958. BRie249 VEHICLES Used auto parts foreign & domestk: Big John and Sons, 1631 R)othill Dr.. 293-PART. VE 17575 1989 Toyota Tercel, auto & air, pwr. steering, $3500,080,564-2132. VE18176 1982 Ford Custom Van newly rebuilt motor, captain chairs, running boards, $3500 OBO, 294-4201. VE18345 83 Toyota Celica GT, 5 speed, pwr. windows & dr. locks, AC, cruise control, tilt wheel. AMFM cassette, cellular phone, 144K mi, looks & runs good, $2000 OBO 293-2913. VE18360 1988 Nissan Pulsar NX SE, twin cam, 16 valve, AC, T-top, AM-FM stereo cass'stte. superb cond., 36,000 orig. mi., $7,000 OBO, call Beverly, 293-0769. 87 2 dr. Honda Prelude, automatic, sunroof, low mileage, ex. cond. $5000, 293-4384. VE18419 VEHICLES '90 Izuzu Trooper unbelievably good condition $8450 call 293-2803. VE18327 CARS UNDER $150. All nriodels. Seizedand auctioned by DEA, FBI, IRS, trucks, boats, computers, furniture and more. Available your area. Call Now! 1-800-451-0050 XC3398. VE18288 GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS from $125. Trucks, boats. 4wheelers. motorhomes, furniture, electronics, computers by FBI, IRS, DEA. Your area now! 1800-558-8672 ext. A5301. VE17368 Cadillac Coupe DeVille 1965. Excel, cond., 118 mi., 294-0686/286-2833. VE18299 1983 Mercedes 300 Diesel turbo excel, cond., $4850. 294-6209. VE18306 See Radiator Master Located inside Emission Express, 1400 NV Hwy, 293-RADI. VE17576 1987 Chevy Spectrum, mint cond., low mileage. $4500. 566-8942. VE14881 1974 Mercury 2 dr. Hardtop, good shape, $750 OBO, 565-1367. VE18246 85 S-10 Blazer, red & silver. 73000 mi. Enki wheels. V-6. 4x4. excel, cond.. $5750. 1506 San Felipe Dr., BC.VE18302 VEHICIES VEHICLE-^ (JoTKi •uNT^ LABOIMY SUB JPEaACIIUI CASH BACK On Selected '96 Vehicles Limited Time Offer Ends MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 1**^ Don't Miss OutI FORD COUNTRY Istry^in^ \Ne Do Is Driven By You Eat At Mustang Sally's Diner 280 N Gibson Rd., • Valley Auto Mall • Henderson 566-FORD WE'RE #3 IN THE NATION THAT'S RIGHT in June we became the 3rd largest Hyundai dealer in the nation! We didn't get there because of our "Good Looks" it's because we do what we advertise OUR PRODUCT IS GOOD AND OUR PRICES ARE AFFORDABLE. $495 -* > ^/>i.^t* Tfy*i'iHj! ij.r> • • firt .Tf' \ t • n -.* •WN BUYS ANY NEW CAR WE HAVE! WE HAVE THE LARGEST NEW HYUNDAI INVENTORY IN THE WESTERN REGION WE ARE THE ONLY HYUNDAI DEALER IN THE NATION THAT GIVES YOU "ABSOLUTLY FREE" A 2 YEAR/24,000 MILE "FREE" MAINTENANCE POLICY YOU ONLY BUY THE GAS! 49JWN Why pay "thru the nose" for a high mileage, driven by everybody, rental car? We can seli you a new Hyundai for less. BEN STEPMAN HYUNDAI 460 No. BOULDER HIGHWAY • 565-1500 IN HENDERSON OF COURSE!

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H^^VW^^^nVM "^^^^mm^ Ptga 10 Panoraim Thursday. August 29,1996 • GMC TRUCK !| f k/i/ <|^Ci4w w mm m m fw LBTfS —TT—.^rioMoService Required Air! 5-Speed Transmission, Fun! (Stl(.#UP1447) 1994 GEO TRACKER Eddie Bauver, 4X4! (Sti(.#61329B) 1989 FORD i^^ Auto, Aii Tile Options! (Stl(.#UP1429) 1993 HONDA ACCORD 4 DR Oniy 1000 IMiies, Loaded! ? (Sti(.#UP1461) 1996 MAZDA Sporty, Lll(e New, Only 1300 Miles! (Stl(.#UP1438) 1994 MITSUBISHI ECUPSE 4WD, Loaded, 5 Speed Trans.! (Stl(.#UP1427A) Silverado, All The Options! (Stk.#UP1430) 1/2 WH EXT-CAB Heavy Hauler, Uke Newl (Stk.#UP1422) 3/4 ION EXT-CAB Sporty, 2 Door, Loaded! (Stl(.#UP1435) JIMIiy4WD 4Door, Low Miies! (Stl(.#UP1421) 1995 CHEVROLET SLE, Loaded, Air, 2WDI (Stl(. #UP1475) 4WD, SLE, Aii Power! (Stl(. #UP1445) 1995 GMC YUKON S DR WE ARE THE ONLY DEALERSHIP IN NEVADA WITH N.A.D.A. (NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE DEALERS ASSOCIATION) CERTIFIED SALESPERSONS! 2nd CHANCE HHANCING • BANKRUPTCIES • TAX UENS 7112-588-3300. WLltt (IN THF VAllFY AUTO IVIAIU I I nevada An H.B.C. Publications. Inc. Special Section Fain 996 roR^ % • H

PAGE 35

H^^VW^^^nVM "^^^^mm^ Ptga 10 Panoraim Thursday. August 29,1996 • GMC TRUCK !| f k/i/ <|^Ci4w w mm m m fw LBTfS —TT—.^rioMoService Required Air! 5-Speed Transmission, Fun! (Stl(.#UP1447) 1994 GEO TRACKER Eddie Bauver, 4X4! (Sti(.#61329B) 1989 FORD i^^ Auto, Aii Tile Options! (Stl(.#UP1429) 1993 HONDA ACCORD 4 DR Oniy 1000 IMiies, Loaded! ? (Sti(.#UP1461) 1996 MAZDA Sporty, Lll(e New, Only 1300 Miles! (Stl(.#UP1438) 1994 MITSUBISHI ECUPSE 4WD, Loaded, 5 Speed Trans.! (Stl(.#UP1427A) Silverado, All The Options! (Stk.#UP1430) 1/2 WH EXT-CAB Heavy Hauler, Uke Newl (Stk.#UP1422) 3/4 ION EXT-CAB Sporty, 2 Door, Loaded! (Stl(.#UP1435) JIMIiy4WD 4Door, Low Miies! (Stl(.#UP1421) 1995 CHEVROLET SLE, Loaded, Air, 2WDI (Stl(. #UP1475) 4WD, SLE, Aii Power! (Stl(. #UP1445) 1995 GMC YUKON S DR WE ARE THE ONLY DEALERSHIP IN NEVADA WITH N.A.D.A. (NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE DEALERS ASSOCIATION) CERTIFIED SALESPERSONS! 2nd CHANCE HHANCING • BANKRUPTCIES • TAX UENS 7112-588-3300. WLltt (IN THF VAllFY AUTO IVIAIU I I nevada An H.B.C. Publications. Inc. Special Section Fain 996 roR^ % • H

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SUNDAY Top Sirloin Steak $2.95 Baby Back Pork Ribs $5.25 MONDAY T-Bone Steak $5.95 Broasted Chicken $2.45 TUESDAY Chicken Fried Steak $2.95 Liver & Onions $2.95 Top Sirloin Steak $2.95 WEDNESDAY Tournedos of Beef $7.95 Roast Pork & Dressing $2.95 THURSDAY Pork Chops $3.95 Cornish Came Hen $3.95 Top Sirloin Steak $2.95 FRIDAY New York Steak or T-Bone $5.95 Filet Mignon $8.45 Trout Almondine $4.95 SATURDAY New York Steak or T-Bone $5.95 Filet Mignon $8.45 Catfish $4.95 All Dinners Include Our "Famous" All-You-Can-Eat Salad Bar 5 PM -10 PM ALSO B4IOY THESE HNE SPECIALS Steak & Eggs Midnight to 11 am $2.95 Luncheon Buffet 11 am 3 pm $3.25 Breakfast Special 99< 7 TO choose Frooi All-You-Can-Eat Salad Bar $2.95 There's no place like our place for breakfast, lunch or dinner. CASINO 6 RESTAURANT .,.. • • GREAT FOOD, GREAT FUN, GREAT PLACB Rob Weidenfeld/News Staff Basic's Chad Maestas has been battling for the starting quarterback spot. -= Basic High School BM BowmanNe^SportsEditor Big plays are crucial to a team's success. But for Cliff Frazier, Basic head football coach, stopping those plays is also a necessity. "We gave up too many longgainers last year,* Frazier said of the Wolves' 1-8 season. "One of the big things we're working on is stopping the big play." Frazier said the Wolves are working on that by "coming up with better overall defensive line play. We've really worked hard on team pursuit and shutting them down with our linri)ackers.'' One of the big keys for the Wolves will be Luke Haggarty. ., Haggarty, at 6-4,280-pounds, lb a two-year letterman who will ianchor both lines. "He played pretty good ball last year,* Frazier said. "It's his third year on varsity and hopefully this will be the year he steps throuj^ He showed up in good shape and is working NlclEiuiiiie: Wolves Sclifldl colon: BlueAgjQiver/ White' Head coach: Cliff Rraaer School enrollmaciti 2^258 harder." Another key player for the Wolves will be Jared Lamoreaux. "He played both ways for us last year," Frazier said of the 6-2, 230-pounder. "One of the things we're doing is moving him from linebacker to defensive end. We feel that will help us out defensively." On the offensive side of the ball, Basic has a battle for the starting quarterback spot Chad Maestas, a 5-9, 176pound senior and Eric Wise, a 6-1,170-pound senior, are waging a war for the starting spot They are two pretty solid kids," Frazier said. "It will be pretty competitive." In the bNSckfield, the Wolves win turn to Ricardo Ramos. "Last year he was a solid nmner for us," Frazier said. "He ran into some problems near the end of the season, but this year he showed up in good shape and is working hard. That's a big plus for us." But, as with most teams, Frazier said his club has to hang onto the ball. "In our last three tumoyters buried us," games, Frazier said. To be successful, we need to establish our run game. We have to control the ball and keep *'the ball out of the other team's hands.* Frazier said the Wolves "have pretty good numbers. Fm hoping by the time we get into pads and kick off the first game, we'll have 40 kids who are ready to go." Frazier said the team is fired "From the first kid to the last kid, they are all exdted," Frazier said. "TTiey are ready to get going." TEAM INDEX Basic 3 Boulder City, 4 Green Valley' 5 Silverado 6 Eldorado : 7 Chaparral 7 Las Vegas :.'. 7 Bishop Gorman 8 Valley 8 Rancho 8 Bonanza • 8 Clark 10 Cheyenne 10 Durango 10 Western v 10 Wooster 11 EIko 11 Cimarron-Memorial 11 Galena 11 McQueen 12 Sparka^ 12 Reed 12 Carson City 13 Churchill County 13 South Tahoe 13 Douglas 13 Reno 15 Lowry 16 Hug 15 Battle Mountain 16 Fernley 16 Rite of Passage 16 Spring Creek Dasrton Incline North Tahoe Bishop Manogue Pershing County Mineral County Whittell White Pine • Virgin Valley Moapa Valley Yerington Carlin -. Wells v^ •; Beatty Independence Laughlin The Meadows Tonopah Lincoln County West Wendover Needles Jackpot Smith Valley Pahranagat Valley McDermitt Spring Mountain Round Mountain Indian Springs Eureka Faith Lutheran Owyhee 16 17 17 17 17 18 18 18 19 19 19 19 20 20 20 20 21 21 21 21 22 22 23 23 23 23 24 24 24 25 25 25 Cover photograph by Rob Weidenfeld Thanks to Basic, Boulder City, Green Valley and Silverado for the use of football equipment to make the photo possible. Notes ... We'd hke to take a minute to thank everyone advertisers, coaches, the NIAA and our staff — for their help in making Nevada Football possible. 'We tried to track down every prep football coach from around the state, but we were unable to get information from the coaches from Coleville, Pahrump and Tahoe-Truckee. Good luck to everyone during the 1996 prep football season. HBC Publications MHw O'CaNaghwi Publishw Carolyn CCallaghMi Co-PublMMr Twn O'Callaghan QwMral Managf/Vloe Pr*idni CoUcen MMI Cireutartion MMwgw/Vloa Pr*idnt Paul Szydalln Manasing Editor Roy Thaisa AouMar CMy Alawa Editor Editorial: Bill Bowman (Sports EcMor), Ray Brawar, Paul Oodga, Sharen Jackaon, Brian Jonaa, Kara KIndatrom, O.B. Marciniak, Pat McOonnali, Rob Waidanlald and Kathlaan Wood. Advartiaing: Qoldia Baglay, Vina Cuitia, Anna Picking and Lynda RawKna. Art Dapartmant: Oonna O'Callaghan, marMigar, Donna Bkibal and Alicia Hulaay. Claaaiflad: Rita ParrauH Typaaattins: SNrtay Long, manager, June Andraws, Virginia Conta and Vakiy HaU. Produotion: Staphania Fucila and Dwayna Draw. Proolraading: SchaWy Daidaahti. Doo ktoaping: FaHh Halaai and Nallla WiKiamt. Raoaptioniat: Laura Muallar and Suaan Qibb. HBC PubMeaMona, 2 Commtnt CmitmrDr^ H&ndtnen, MV. 4S6-7no PagC2 NEVADA FOOTBALL AUGUST 29, 1996 f* ^' %^^>fLi -^ *_•. • is.. JS-,AUGUST 29, 1996 NEVADA FOOTIALL raffC3

PAGE 37

SUNDAY Top Sirloin Steak $2.95 Baby Back Pork Ribs $5.25 MONDAY T-Bone Steak $5.95 Broasted Chicken $2.45 TUESDAY Chicken Fried Steak $2.95 Liver & Onions $2.95 Top Sirloin Steak $2.95 WEDNESDAY Tournedos of Beef $7.95 Roast Pork & Dressing $2.95 THURSDAY Pork Chops $3.95 Cornish Came Hen $3.95 Top Sirloin Steak $2.95 FRIDAY New York Steak or T-Bone $5.95 Filet Mignon $8.45 Trout Almondine $4.95 SATURDAY New York Steak or T-Bone $5.95 Filet Mignon $8.45 Catfish $4.95 All Dinners Include Our "Famous" All-You-Can-Eat Salad Bar 5 PM -10 PM ALSO B4IOY THESE HNE SPECIALS Steak & Eggs Midnight to 11 am $2.95 Luncheon Buffet 11 am 3 pm $3.25 Breakfast Special 99< 7 TO choose Frooi All-You-Can-Eat Salad Bar $2.95 There's no place like our place for breakfast, lunch or dinner. CASINO 6 RESTAURANT .,.. • • GREAT FOOD, GREAT FUN, GREAT PLACB Rob Weidenfeld/News Staff Basic's Chad Maestas has been battling for the starting quarterback spot. -= Basic High School BM BowmanNe^SportsEditor Big plays are crucial to a team's success. But for Cliff Frazier, Basic head football coach, stopping those plays is also a necessity. "We gave up too many longgainers last year,* Frazier said of the Wolves' 1-8 season. "One of the big things we're working on is stopping the big play." Frazier said the Wolves are working on that by "coming up with better overall defensive line play. We've really worked hard on team pursuit and shutting them down with our linri)ackers.'' One of the big keys for the Wolves will be Luke Haggarty. ., Haggarty, at 6-4,280-pounds, lb a two-year letterman who will ianchor both lines. "He played pretty good ball last year,* Frazier said. "It's his third year on varsity and hopefully this will be the year he steps throuj^ He showed up in good shape and is working NlclEiuiiiie: Wolves Sclifldl colon: BlueAgjQiver/ White' Head coach: Cliff Rraaer School enrollmaciti 2^258 harder." Another key player for the Wolves will be Jared Lamoreaux. "He played both ways for us last year," Frazier said of the 6-2, 230-pounder. "One of the things we're doing is moving him from linebacker to defensive end. We feel that will help us out defensively." On the offensive side of the ball, Basic has a battle for the starting quarterback spot Chad Maestas, a 5-9, 176pound senior and Eric Wise, a 6-1,170-pound senior, are waging a war for the starting spot They are two pretty solid kids," Frazier said. "It will be pretty competitive." In the bNSckfield, the Wolves win turn to Ricardo Ramos. "Last year he was a solid nmner for us," Frazier said. "He ran into some problems near the end of the season, but this year he showed up in good shape and is working hard. That's a big plus for us." But, as with most teams, Frazier said his club has to hang onto the ball. "In our last three tumoyters buried us," games, Frazier said. To be successful, we need to establish our run game. We have to control the ball and keep *'the ball out of the other team's hands.* Frazier said the Wolves "have pretty good numbers. Fm hoping by the time we get into pads and kick off the first game, we'll have 40 kids who are ready to go." Frazier said the team is fired "From the first kid to the last kid, they are all exdted," Frazier said. "TTiey are ready to get going." TEAM INDEX Basic 3 Boulder City, 4 Green Valley' 5 Silverado 6 Eldorado : 7 Chaparral 7 Las Vegas :.'. 7 Bishop Gorman 8 Valley 8 Rancho 8 Bonanza • 8 Clark 10 Cheyenne 10 Durango 10 Western v 10 Wooster 11 EIko 11 Cimarron-Memorial 11 Galena 11 McQueen 12 Sparka^ 12 Reed 12 Carson City 13 Churchill County 13 South Tahoe 13 Douglas 13 Reno 15 Lowry 16 Hug 15 Battle Mountain 16 Fernley 16 Rite of Passage 16 Spring Creek Dasrton Incline North Tahoe Bishop Manogue Pershing County Mineral County Whittell White Pine • Virgin Valley Moapa Valley Yerington Carlin -. Wells v^ •; Beatty Independence Laughlin The Meadows Tonopah Lincoln County West Wendover Needles Jackpot Smith Valley Pahranagat Valley McDermitt Spring Mountain Round Mountain Indian Springs Eureka Faith Lutheran Owyhee 16 17 17 17 17 18 18 18 19 19 19 19 20 20 20 20 21 21 21 21 22 22 23 23 23 23 24 24 24 25 25 25 Cover photograph by Rob Weidenfeld Thanks to Basic, Boulder City, Green Valley and Silverado for the use of football equipment to make the photo possible. Notes ... We'd hke to take a minute to thank everyone advertisers, coaches, the NIAA and our staff — for their help in making Nevada Football possible. 'We tried to track down every prep football coach from around the state, but we were unable to get information from the coaches from Coleville, Pahrump and Tahoe-Truckee. Good luck to everyone during the 1996 prep football season. HBC Publications MHw O'CaNaghwi Publishw Carolyn CCallaghMi Co-PublMMr Twn O'Callaghan QwMral Managf/Vloe Pr*idni CoUcen MMI Cireutartion MMwgw/Vloa Pr*idnt Paul Szydalln Manasing Editor Roy Thaisa AouMar CMy Alawa Editor Editorial: Bill Bowman (Sports EcMor), Ray Brawar, Paul Oodga, Sharen Jackaon, Brian Jonaa, Kara KIndatrom, O.B. Marciniak, Pat McOonnali, Rob Waidanlald and Kathlaan Wood. Advartiaing: Qoldia Baglay, Vina Cuitia, Anna Picking and Lynda RawKna. Art Dapartmant: Oonna O'Callaghan, marMigar, Donna Bkibal and Alicia Hulaay. Claaaiflad: Rita ParrauH Typaaattins: SNrtay Long, manager, June Andraws, Virginia Conta and Vakiy HaU. Produotion: Staphania Fucila and Dwayna Draw. Proolraading: SchaWy Daidaahti. Doo ktoaping: FaHh Halaai and Nallla WiKiamt. Raoaptioniat: Laura Muallar and Suaan Qibb. HBC PubMeaMona, 2 Commtnt CmitmrDr^ H&ndtnen, MV. 4S6-7no PagC2 NEVADA FOOTBALL AUGUST 29, 1996 f* ^' %^^>fLi -^ *_•. • is.. JS-,AUGUST 29, 1996 NEVADA FOOTIALL raffC3

PAGE 38

= Boulder City High School, luthlMn Wood Boulder Qty Sports Editor After three years of dismal results in the win column, Boulder City looks to be back. "Our guys put in lots of work last winter and ov^r the summer," said Second-year coach Dan Cahill. "It has made a complete change in the personality of the team. The kids really bought into the work ethic and I think it is going to pay off." The Eagles finished with one of their worst records, 1-8, but don't expect the same from a team that should be solid. "The senior leadership has been outstanding," added Cahill. "We had it in the weight room, during the passing league season this summer, and now at pra tice." Doug Stuart will lead the Eagles at quarterback and on defense where he is a hard-hitting safety. Stuart, a 5-11, 180-pound senior, was a first team All-Division selection at the safety position and led the team with 86 tackles and four interceptions. He will be a three-year starter at the position. Last year was his first at the quarterback position, but he still managed to connect on 54 of 117 Kathleen WootWews Staff Doug Stuart will lead the Eagles this season from the quartertiaclc and safety positioni. ball to the running backs, there should be lots ofholes for them to to rim through as the Eagles return five seniors on the offensive line. In the middle will be Jay Frasure, a senior at 6-3 and 223pounds. The guards will be Jason Willoby, a 5-8,180-pounder and Chris Norton, 5-11,175-pounds. Tackles Kyle Green, 5-9, 230pounds and Mike Ward, 6-1, 190-pounds fill out the line. "All our linemen are not big, but have great foot speed," said Cahill. Receivers include tight end Chris Wallace, a 6-0,185-pound senior and a corp of six surehanded, speedy wide outs. "We are six deep at wide receiver.'said Cahill. "All six could start, so we will use an passes for a 46 % completion rate and 774 yards. He is also the returning punter writh a 38.6 average per punt "Doug will be one of the state's best at both positions, quarterbadk and safety," said Cahill. Stuart will get plenty of time to pass and, after handing off the See Bouldr City Page 26 .;• • )• • • .' • • • • '^ ''*r*^'?^*isi>~' • ,4^'i*^%'f;-7' •
PAGE 39

= Boulder City High School, luthlMn Wood Boulder Qty Sports Editor After three years of dismal results in the win column, Boulder City looks to be back. "Our guys put in lots of work last winter and ov^r the summer," said Second-year coach Dan Cahill. "It has made a complete change in the personality of the team. The kids really bought into the work ethic and I think it is going to pay off." The Eagles finished with one of their worst records, 1-8, but don't expect the same from a team that should be solid. "The senior leadership has been outstanding," added Cahill. "We had it in the weight room, during the passing league season this summer, and now at pra tice." Doug Stuart will lead the Eagles at quarterback and on defense where he is a hard-hitting safety. Stuart, a 5-11, 180-pound senior, was a first team All-Division selection at the safety position and led the team with 86 tackles and four interceptions. He will be a three-year starter at the position. Last year was his first at the quarterback position, but he still managed to connect on 54 of 117 Kathleen WootWews Staff Doug Stuart will lead the Eagles this season from the quartertiaclc and safety positioni. ball to the running backs, there should be lots ofholes for them to to rim through as the Eagles return five seniors on the offensive line. In the middle will be Jay Frasure, a senior at 6-3 and 223pounds. The guards will be Jason Willoby, a 5-8,180-pounder and Chris Norton, 5-11,175-pounds. Tackles Kyle Green, 5-9, 230pounds and Mike Ward, 6-1, 190-pounds fill out the line. "All our linemen are not big, but have great foot speed," said Cahill. Receivers include tight end Chris Wallace, a 6-0,185-pound senior and a corp of six surehanded, speedy wide outs. "We are six deep at wide receiver.'said Cahill. "All six could start, so we will use an passes for a 46 % completion rate and 774 yards. He is also the returning punter writh a 38.6 average per punt "Doug will be one of the state's best at both positions, quarterbadk and safety," said Cahill. Stuart will get plenty of time to pass and, after handing off the See Bouldr City Page 26 .;• • )• • • .' • • • • '^ ''*r*^'?^*isi>~' • ,4^'i*^%'f;-7' •
PAGE 40

=Silverado High School. HI BOIMIMfl Naws Sports Editor Silvegcado foofiball coadi John DeNardin lajrs it's aimple: In order for us to be competitive, we have to play better defense." Despite the fact the Skyhawks are coming off a 1-8 season, DeNardin is optamistic. "We've got a good turnout,* DeNardin said. "And that's agood sign." SchooltSilveradpMighSdiool Niokmune: Skyhavrlu School color*: Teal/Purple Head coach: John DeNardin School eDroQmeat: 1,783 DeNardin said the Skyhawks have a few returnees who will be keys for the team. The first is running back Rodrick Gibson, a 5-8, 170pound junior. Gibson rushed for 467 yards in four games before separating his shoulder and missing the rest of the season. Paul Manteufel, a 6-2, 220pound offensive guard is also going to be a strong point for the Hawks. "We are real young in the offensive line and that will be a big key for us if they come throui^,'' DeNardin said. Another key player back on offense is Adam Kearney, a 5-7, 160-pound Z-badi. Jung Yi, a 5-10, 175-pound -= Eldorado See Silverado Page 26 Brian JoneVNews Staff Sihrerado's Jung Yi is expected to help anchor the Skyhawks' i g^:^-' Marker Plaza Boat and Mini Storage ^ 807 Cadiz, Henderson Wishes the Woh^eSf Skyhawks, Gatois & Eagles a Winning Football SeasonI Phone 564-3397 Don & Ruth, owners HAVE A GREAT SEASON Have Fun Play Fair and Be Kind to Your Parents 3 Miles West of HOOVM' Dam on U.S. Hwy. 93 (702) 293-5000 By the Nwm Staff After not reaching the playoffs for the first time in five years last season, Eldorado football looks to a veteran offensive attack to carry the team to success in the 1996 campaign. This offense is fueled by senior running back John Bullock, who in 1995 was a 1st team all-conference selection. Joining Bullock on offense is center Brian Famsworth, an AllSunrise honorable mention in 1995, and big tight end Adam Passman. First-year head coach Ken Trvgillo is optimistic that with thi s stable nucleus the Sun Pevils will improve on their 5-4 record of last season. I believrir..., t^^^ „, j^„ ^MOTk harder through discipmt, ^ change our attitudes, then we See Eldorado Page 27 Bead eoaelu KenTftgHi!!,^ i School enroflment; 2,241 '^ --Chaparral By the Nmvs staff The 1996 Chaparral Cowboys football team will have a different head coach at the helm for the first time in over 10 years. Former head coach Bobby Johnson stepped down in the offseason, ending his tenure at the school where his career record was 71-41. Replacing Johnson is nw head coach Jordan Phee, an assistant in the program, who is -= Las Vegas School: Chaparral High iMwol raekmune: Cowboys School colon: Black/Orange dead coach: Jordan niee Mbnoait: 2,608 set to let loose a young and open attack. Phee describes his club as: The offense will be young and untested; the defense will be By the Nw> Staff Las Vegas coach Kris Cinkovich, starting his second season as the Wildcats' head coach, has numbers on his side. Las Vegas has 27 returning lettermen including 12 starters — seven on offense and five on defense — returning. "We hope we can continue to improve on the foundation that last year's team established," Cinkovich said of last year's 7-4 squad. "We believe that our players have a better understanding of our system and what is expected of them." Leading the list of returnees are receiver Cory Conner, a senior with 30 catches for 422yards and three touchdowns, and fullback Darrien Feazell, a senior with 87 carries for 401 yards apd eight touchdowns. Cinkovich said the team "is SchooItLasVegasHii^School Nickname: Wildcats School coloxi: Red/Blaok Head ^oach: Km Cinlcovi^ Sclioot enrollment: 2,791 lacking experience at the quarterback and defensive line positions. The key to the success of the Wildcat offense this season will be senior Charles Bush at quarterback. He had an impressive spring and summer." Other returnees expected to make an impact aire junior running back Jermaine Lewis who rushed for 171 yards and three touchdowns along with receiver Montrell Hooker, a senior, who had nine catches for 158 yards. "Our strengths should be our See Las Vegas Page 27 MnMBAfOOIIAU Go for the GOAL Good Luck Teams! li Assemblywoman Gene Segerblom Paid for by the Committee to re-elect Gene Segerblom. Box 61136 • Boulder City. Nev. 89006 • 293^2626 AUCUST 29, 1996 experienced, quick, and aggressive." The Cowboys will return 14 letter winners from a 1995 team that had a poor offensive performance in the first roimd of the playoffs. Senior Ryan Jackson will be called upon to lead a developing offense, while seniors Brady Dobbs, E.J. Henderson, Brian Miller, and Alvie Casius will carry ihe load on defense. STAY IN SHAPE EAGLES... BEST OF LUCK in TV VllUjS2S HotH PUzt BOUMM at)r. Ntvada (900S 293*5001 NEVADA FOOTBAU PaC7

PAGE 41

=Silverado High School. HI BOIMIMfl Naws Sports Editor Silvegcado foofiball coadi John DeNardin lajrs it's aimple: In order for us to be competitive, we have to play better defense." Despite the fact the Skyhawks are coming off a 1-8 season, DeNardin is optamistic. "We've got a good turnout,* DeNardin said. "And that's agood sign." SchooltSilveradpMighSdiool Niokmune: Skyhavrlu School color*: Teal/Purple Head coach: John DeNardin School eDroQmeat: 1,783 DeNardin said the Skyhawks have a few returnees who will be keys for the team. The first is running back Rodrick Gibson, a 5-8, 170pound junior. Gibson rushed for 467 yards in four games before separating his shoulder and missing the rest of the season. Paul Manteufel, a 6-2, 220pound offensive guard is also going to be a strong point for the Hawks. "We are real young in the offensive line and that will be a big key for us if they come throui^,'' DeNardin said. Another key player back on offense is Adam Kearney, a 5-7, 160-pound Z-badi. Jung Yi, a 5-10, 175-pound -= Eldorado See Silverado Page 26 Brian JoneVNews Staff Sihrerado's Jung Yi is expected to help anchor the Skyhawks' i g^:^-' Marker Plaza Boat and Mini Storage ^ 807 Cadiz, Henderson Wishes the Woh^eSf Skyhawks, Gatois & Eagles a Winning Football SeasonI Phone 564-3397 Don & Ruth, owners HAVE A GREAT SEASON Have Fun Play Fair and Be Kind to Your Parents 3 Miles West of HOOVM' Dam on U.S. Hwy. 93 (702) 293-5000 By the Nwm Staff After not reaching the playoffs for the first time in five years last season, Eldorado football looks to a veteran offensive attack to carry the team to success in the 1996 campaign. This offense is fueled by senior running back John Bullock, who in 1995 was a 1st team all-conference selection. Joining Bullock on offense is center Brian Famsworth, an AllSunrise honorable mention in 1995, and big tight end Adam Passman. First-year head coach Ken Trvgillo is optimistic that with thi s stable nucleus the Sun Pevils will improve on their 5-4 record of last season. I believrir..., t^^^ „, j^„ ^MOTk harder through discipmt, ^ change our attitudes, then we See Eldorado Page 27 Bead eoaelu KenTftgHi!!,^ i School enroflment; 2,241 '^ --Chaparral By the Nmvs staff The 1996 Chaparral Cowboys football team will have a different head coach at the helm for the first time in over 10 years. Former head coach Bobby Johnson stepped down in the offseason, ending his tenure at the school where his career record was 71-41. Replacing Johnson is nw head coach Jordan Phee, an assistant in the program, who is -= Las Vegas School: Chaparral High iMwol raekmune: Cowboys School colon: Black/Orange dead coach: Jordan niee Mbnoait: 2,608 set to let loose a young and open attack. Phee describes his club as: The offense will be young and untested; the defense will be By the Nw> Staff Las Vegas coach Kris Cinkovich, starting his second season as the Wildcats' head coach, has numbers on his side. Las Vegas has 27 returning lettermen including 12 starters — seven on offense and five on defense — returning. "We hope we can continue to improve on the foundation that last year's team established," Cinkovich said of last year's 7-4 squad. "We believe that our players have a better understanding of our system and what is expected of them." Leading the list of returnees are receiver Cory Conner, a senior with 30 catches for 422yards and three touchdowns, and fullback Darrien Feazell, a senior with 87 carries for 401 yards apd eight touchdowns. Cinkovich said the team "is SchooItLasVegasHii^School Nickname: Wildcats School coloxi: Red/Blaok Head ^oach: Km Cinlcovi^ Sclioot enrollment: 2,791 lacking experience at the quarterback and defensive line positions. The key to the success of the Wildcat offense this season will be senior Charles Bush at quarterback. He had an impressive spring and summer." Other returnees expected to make an impact aire junior running back Jermaine Lewis who rushed for 171 yards and three touchdowns along with receiver Montrell Hooker, a senior, who had nine catches for 158 yards. "Our strengths should be our See Las Vegas Page 27 MnMBAfOOIIAU Go for the GOAL Good Luck Teams! li Assemblywoman Gene Segerblom Paid for by the Committee to re-elect Gene Segerblom. Box 61136 • Boulder City. Nev. 89006 • 293^2626 AUCUST 29, 1996 experienced, quick, and aggressive." The Cowboys will return 14 letter winners from a 1995 team that had a poor offensive performance in the first roimd of the playoffs. Senior Ryan Jackson will be called upon to lead a developing offense, while seniors Brady Dobbs, E.J. Henderson, Brian Miller, and Alvie Casius will carry ihe load on defense. STAY IN SHAPE EAGLES... BEST OF LUCK in TV VllUjS2S HotH PUzt BOUMM at)r. Ntvada (900S 293*5001 NEVADA FOOTBAU PaC7

PAGE 42

= Bishop Grorman By llw rwwe Stan Bishon P'*''U>n returns nine ,_ sera and 22 lettermen for the 1996 season, and most key positions are filled. The team looks toward returning plajrers for leadership. Iliose returning in key positions include quarterback Steve Paravia, receiver Tim Walker, fullback John Juadines, receiver Joe (yConnel, offensive ahd defensive linemen Robert Momary and linebacker Steve Burford. shop Gorman High School Mokname: Gaels School colori: Blue/(^nuage Head coach: Mike Brasda School enroUment: 944 "Hxe team is stronger, bigger and faster as a whole," coach Mike Brascia said. S Bishop Gorman Page 26 • y His ravwssnn Valley Hi^ School will return 23 players for coach QregMurphy who is entering his third season as the head coach. The attitude of the kids is real good," Murphy said. "But we don't have a lot ofdepth so we're going to have to play with great effort to give us a chance to win." Some of the key players to watch include: •Quarterback Mike Cirkosz, a 6-0,185-pound senior. Cirkosz was an honorable mention selection for all-league last season. Murphy said Cirkosz '^s ready to go. He took a pounding last year iiilHMd: Valley Hi^ School 'radcttame: ViUngB School colon: Red/White/ Blue Bead coach: Gr^ Moridqr Sdiool enroUment: %B95 SARREL BILLY ^ GOOD LUCK EAGLES!! r)():i Hotel Pla/.a Boiiuipi niv \r snnnr) (70:i)291b2:i4 FAX: 2') 10111 IMRlAStRCOPIfS. wmmmmimKBmmtmBm WHO MADE THIS SECTION POSSl n^ ^ir:-vrv^;* A Proven Wimeri Season after season Loloe Mead Cruises has come out on top when it comes to outrageously great times. See for yourself what makes this winning team float. > Only Minutes from las Vsgas > Spectacular Views > One-way and Round-trip Sightseeing & Meal Cruises Incredible Food & Fufl Service Bar Special Evening Dinner/Dance Cruises 293-6180 ^^^'^ • ylil • M pqriai bn tf iMMr toMl mmmmnmtfL OAraatmlOOIM. SitfittHtmidr^lmrict. MHdCniMliM in his first year of playing quarterback, but he's a real good leader and competitor." •Paul Robinson, a 6-0, 205pound linebacker and running back also returns and was second-team all-league last season. •Darren Thomas, a 6-0,176pound senior receiver and defensive back. It will be the third varsity season for Thomas. •John Brazelle, a running back/defensive back who is a 6-0, 170-pound senior. Murphy said Brazelle had *a strong spring camp.' •Joe Aznarez, a 6-2, 215pound senior tight end/defensive end yrho led the team in catches last season. •Charles Rhoden, a 6-2,220pound senior offensive and defensive lineman who has been '^e most consistent lineman" according to Murphy. The team was 0-8 last season and Murphy said this year's squad "has to stay as healthy as we can." =!=Rancho By the Ntwa Staff Rancho will be looking for leadership as the Rams head into the prep football season. Randio has just 10 returning players "and that^s not a lot of experience," first-year coach Dtiane Johnson said. Johnson said the team "had a tough year, but they finished strong and that will be a plus." The team wound up 3-5 after losing its first four games. Johnson, who coached the -r junior varsity last season, will .. have some key people to rely on. v" One of those is Mike Thomas, a 5-7, 165-pound nuuiing bade. "He's very soUd," Johnson said. "He was with the junior varsity last year." ^ The quarterback spot is up for grabs with three juniors and a \ senior battling fior the job. Ray Lukes, 6-2, 160 pounds, I Al Tate, 6-1, 150 pounds and 1^ Todd Blaise, 6-1,175 pounds will .' go vLp against senior Arthur IreJSchooh Rancho K^ SdKtd ildliMipMrRadas Boho^t boitortt Green/White Head coach: Rich Whitehead jBchool cnroBmenfc 2,760 land, 6-2, 185 pounds for the starting job. Tate, while taking reps at quarterback, is expected to see a lot of time at free safety. "He's a very versatile athletes," Johnson said. ^ On the defensive side of the ball, the Rams will look for T.J. Otis, a 5-11, 170-pound senior, to lead the way at linebacker along with Dwayne Rogers, a 62, 195-pound junior who will also see time at tight end. Overall, Johnson said the Rams "have more talent and speed than last year. If we get in the right situations and play well, we could be successful. We have a tough schedule. We have to come out and play hard every game." ,r -^ > = Bonanza; By the Nmm staff Bonanza coach Nick Butera said the team's defensive front will be the key to the upcoming prep football season. The Bengals' front line "is awfully big," Butera said. The whole defensive line should be over 250 pounds with the heaviest about 280. They're all good athletes with good experience." The frontline includes Turner Graham, a 6-5,270-pound senior, Tommie Townsend, a 6-5, 260pound senior, Kiik Spencer, a 6-3,246-pound senior and Claude Smith, a 6-2,280-pound suaior. If they can gata safety, maybe we can win 2-0," Butera quipped. Butera said tiiedetfiBosivefrwit 'it important There are a lot of running teams over here and we've concentrated on stopping the run and upgrading our running game. No one will believe dcSopI: Bonanza lligh School Nlclriiame; Bengals Stdioliii&oliim: Brown/Gold Head cbaoh: Nick Butera School enrotbnent: 2,127 J me, but I think we need to do both of those things better." On the ofFoisive side of the ball, there is a battle at quarterback between two juniors and a sophomore. Steve Grammas, a 5-10,190pound junior; Jason Krebs,a6-1, 190-pound junior and Wes Brown, a 5-8,160-pound sophomore'^are worhinghard," Butera said. "We're going to give an three of them a chance to earn the job." The team was 3-6 last season, but Butera is kwking for better results this season. "If we can cut down our turnovers and if we stop the run, we could get interesting," he said. NtCI NEVADA POOTIALL AUGUST 2t. 1996 ''V*^"!'"',:''?C'^"f^ Your ktvoril* deparlment stores, Nevada's hoflesl shops, reskjuranis and natural attractions Ailing Back-To^hool just for you. The only shopping center around open 'til nine Saturday nights just for you. Oalhria at Sunsef wiihM our honw town toamg good luekl AnH MyVBf • • vONOH DOOkMMT lonk Of Aawico MM Ml i lody Wbrli lolh EUganK IMU tilo-i BM Bridg* JcwtUr Btyond Ihi ttoch Tht ftody Shop CocM Cociqut Corhofi Cordi Chompi Sporh Chorlon* RuiM Cloirfl'i Boutiqut Compogni* Intvrnotionot EXPRESS Crticant i*wlri Oillord'l Th Diiny Slor* Eddi* BoMr El Portol Lug90g Exprily Porlrotti Fast^ix jtwclry Rtpoir 57-9 Flopdoodbt Foot locltr Fritky P(l Ctnloi TlwGonw Ttw-Gop Gap KkJs/Bobv Gop Gordon Bo*anika GNC Gordon'i iowoWft GyinbofM Harris & Frank Hot Topic Intrigu* Jowtlry J. tiggingi J. Slophoni Flofihoim K Ponnty Kltidio Kondidt T)w KUclwn Sink KItt Comorot 1 Hour Ptwto tody Foot lockor Lorta Bryont Uchlir'i FtouMwort* iMdi lamor Now York TiMUmilod Tin Unilod Too MJ. ChrittonMfl Morvyn'i ColikKnio Mitof Slockmon \M
PAGE 43

= Bishop Grorman By llw rwwe Stan Bishon P'*''U>n returns nine ,_ sera and 22 lettermen for the 1996 season, and most key positions are filled. The team looks toward returning plajrers for leadership. Iliose returning in key positions include quarterback Steve Paravia, receiver Tim Walker, fullback John Juadines, receiver Joe (yConnel, offensive ahd defensive linemen Robert Momary and linebacker Steve Burford. shop Gorman High School Mokname: Gaels School colori: Blue/(^nuage Head coach: Mike Brasda School enroUment: 944 "Hxe team is stronger, bigger and faster as a whole," coach Mike Brascia said. S Bishop Gorman Page 26 • y His ravwssnn Valley Hi^ School will return 23 players for coach QregMurphy who is entering his third season as the head coach. The attitude of the kids is real good," Murphy said. "But we don't have a lot ofdepth so we're going to have to play with great effort to give us a chance to win." Some of the key players to watch include: •Quarterback Mike Cirkosz, a 6-0,185-pound senior. Cirkosz was an honorable mention selection for all-league last season. Murphy said Cirkosz '^s ready to go. He took a pounding last year iiilHMd: Valley Hi^ School 'radcttame: ViUngB School colon: Red/White/ Blue Bead coach: Gr^ Moridqr Sdiool enroUment: %B95 SARREL BILLY ^ GOOD LUCK EAGLES!! r)():i Hotel Pla/.a Boiiuipi niv \r snnnr) (70:i)291b2:i4 FAX: 2') 10111 IMRlAStRCOPIfS. wmmmmimKBmmtmBm WHO MADE THIS SECTION POSSl n^ ^ir:-vrv^;* A Proven Wimeri Season after season Loloe Mead Cruises has come out on top when it comes to outrageously great times. See for yourself what makes this winning team float. > Only Minutes from las Vsgas > Spectacular Views > One-way and Round-trip Sightseeing & Meal Cruises Incredible Food & Fufl Service Bar Special Evening Dinner/Dance Cruises 293-6180 ^^^'^ • ylil • M pqriai bn tf iMMr toMl mmmmnmtfL OAraatmlOOIM. SitfittHtmidr^lmrict. MHdCniMliM in his first year of playing quarterback, but he's a real good leader and competitor." •Paul Robinson, a 6-0, 205pound linebacker and running back also returns and was second-team all-league last season. •Darren Thomas, a 6-0,176pound senior receiver and defensive back. It will be the third varsity season for Thomas. •John Brazelle, a running back/defensive back who is a 6-0, 170-pound senior. Murphy said Brazelle had *a strong spring camp.' •Joe Aznarez, a 6-2, 215pound senior tight end/defensive end yrho led the team in catches last season. •Charles Rhoden, a 6-2,220pound senior offensive and defensive lineman who has been '^e most consistent lineman" according to Murphy. The team was 0-8 last season and Murphy said this year's squad "has to stay as healthy as we can." =!=Rancho By the Ntwa Staff Rancho will be looking for leadership as the Rams head into the prep football season. Randio has just 10 returning players "and that^s not a lot of experience," first-year coach Dtiane Johnson said. Johnson said the team "had a tough year, but they finished strong and that will be a plus." The team wound up 3-5 after losing its first four games. Johnson, who coached the -r junior varsity last season, will .. have some key people to rely on. v" One of those is Mike Thomas, a 5-7, 165-pound nuuiing bade. "He's very soUd," Johnson said. "He was with the junior varsity last year." ^ The quarterback spot is up for grabs with three juniors and a \ senior battling fior the job. Ray Lukes, 6-2, 160 pounds, I Al Tate, 6-1, 150 pounds and 1^ Todd Blaise, 6-1,175 pounds will .' go vLp against senior Arthur IreJSchooh Rancho K^ SdKtd ildliMipMrRadas Boho^t boitortt Green/White Head coach: Rich Whitehead jBchool cnroBmenfc 2,760 land, 6-2, 185 pounds for the starting job. Tate, while taking reps at quarterback, is expected to see a lot of time at free safety. "He's a very versatile athletes," Johnson said. ^ On the defensive side of the ball, the Rams will look for T.J. Otis, a 5-11, 170-pound senior, to lead the way at linebacker along with Dwayne Rogers, a 62, 195-pound junior who will also see time at tight end. Overall, Johnson said the Rams "have more talent and speed than last year. If we get in the right situations and play well, we could be successful. We have a tough schedule. We have to come out and play hard every game." ,r -^ > = Bonanza; By the Nmm staff Bonanza coach Nick Butera said the team's defensive front will be the key to the upcoming prep football season. The Bengals' front line "is awfully big," Butera said. The whole defensive line should be over 250 pounds with the heaviest about 280. They're all good athletes with good experience." The frontline includes Turner Graham, a 6-5,270-pound senior, Tommie Townsend, a 6-5, 260pound senior, Kiik Spencer, a 6-3,246-pound senior and Claude Smith, a 6-2,280-pound suaior. If they can gata safety, maybe we can win 2-0," Butera quipped. Butera said tiiedetfiBosivefrwit 'it important There are a lot of running teams over here and we've concentrated on stopping the run and upgrading our running game. No one will believe dcSopI: Bonanza lligh School Nlclriiame; Bengals Stdioliii&oliim: Brown/Gold Head cbaoh: Nick Butera School enrotbnent: 2,127 J me, but I think we need to do both of those things better." On the ofFoisive side of the ball, there is a battle at quarterback between two juniors and a sophomore. Steve Grammas, a 5-10,190pound junior; Jason Krebs,a6-1, 190-pound junior and Wes Brown, a 5-8,160-pound sophomore'^are worhinghard," Butera said. "We're going to give an three of them a chance to earn the job." The team was 3-6 last season, but Butera is kwking for better results this season. "If we can cut down our turnovers and if we stop the run, we could get interesting," he said. NtCI NEVADA POOTIALL AUGUST 2t. 1996 ''V*^"!'"',:''?C'^"f^ Your ktvoril* deparlment stores, Nevada's hoflesl shops, reskjuranis and natural attractions Ailing Back-To^hool just for you. The only shopping center around open 'til nine Saturday nights just for you. Oalhria at Sunsef wiihM our honw town toamg good luekl AnH MyVBf • • vONOH DOOkMMT lonk Of Aawico MM Ml i lody Wbrli lolh EUganK IMU tilo-i BM Bridg* JcwtUr Btyond Ihi ttoch Tht ftody Shop CocM Cociqut Corhofi Cordi Chompi Sporh Chorlon* RuiM Cloirfl'i Boutiqut Compogni* Intvrnotionot EXPRESS Crticant i*wlri Oillord'l Th Diiny Slor* Eddi* BoMr El Portol Lug90g Exprily Porlrotti Fast^ix jtwclry Rtpoir 57-9 Flopdoodbt Foot locltr Fritky P(l Ctnloi TlwGonw Ttw-Gop Gap KkJs/Bobv Gop Gordon Bo*anika GNC Gordon'i iowoWft GyinbofM Harris & Frank Hot Topic Intrigu* Jowtlry J. tiggingi J. Slophoni Flofihoim K Ponnty Kltidio Kondidt T)w KUclwn Sink KItt Comorot 1 Hour Ptwto tody Foot lockor Lorta Bryont Uchlir'i FtouMwort* iMdi lamor Now York TiMUmilod Tin Unilod Too MJ. ChrittonMfl Morvyn'i ColikKnio Mitof Slockmon \M
PAGE 44

le^ iiirgK waB.j!!!i,... m ..i u\" 'Mi. J : .. MBtvada Footj^ Oats AAAA = Clark By the NMVS stair If you're going to try and stop the Clark offisnae, better learn how to stop the run. Td say we're probably going to run 70% of the time," coach Todd Cutler said. With running backs Shay Mickell, a 5-7,145-pounder and Will Reves, a 6-1, 180-pounder returning, the Chargers will be solid on the ground. 1 look for good things from them," Cutler said ofhis running backs. He also added the offensive line "should be decent." Quarterback Perryn Hale will lead the attack. The 6-1, 175pound senior "will be the team leader," Cutler said. "He started a few games for us last year and is working very hard." On the defensive side of the ball. Cutler has size on his side. See Clark Page 27 School: Clark Hi{^ School Ntckname; Chaifflrs SdMxdi colvm BlackAjold Heltd coaoht Todd Cutler School enrollment: 2,010 Basic Wolves Green Valley Gators Silverado Skyhawks Here's hoping one of you bring the State Title home to Henderson. We have faith in your ability. Good Luck! OFFICE SUPPLY 62 E. Basic Road Henderson • 564-1155 = Cheyenne= SriOtf TEAM SPIRIT Support yoar Fooiball Team GOOD LUCK! ^mkm IRIS DLITSCH Candidate for Assembly 22 P^loctiyFrienimEIcllrtBe^ • '-• Cheyenne hopes to 'Veload and repeat" this season, according to coach Greorge Perry. The team boasted an 11-1 record last season, and their second straight Sunset Division Championship. They also took the zone championships against Green Valley. They fell short of a state title in a 14-0 loss to Wooster. The varsity squad returns 15 players, but needs to fill wide receiver, inside linebackers, and StehooUCheyenneHighSdUidi Nieimame: Deaert Shields School colorwNavy Blue/Old Gold Head coadh: Gead(er. Ian Lacomb (6-3,181), defensive tackle Luis Rnano (6-9,240) and defensive back Maurice Smith -''.•ik-i • =Elko ffl-:: • m By ha Maws Staff For the first time in three years, the Elko Indians didnot qualify for the playoiffs in 1995. Head Coach Bob Milligan, in his fifth year with Elko, thinks the Indians have enough talent on the interior line and overall team speed to compete for a postseason berth. Elko returns nine varsity lettermen, having to replace its quarterback, top rusher, a few linemen and a primary receiver. Still, Milligan does notpredictam^or overhaul in the Indians' future. "I don't see us rebuilding," he said. "We have some young players, but we'll be able to compete." Nidnuuine: Indians StchvoieblorssMarooq/Wfaite HMkl coach: Bob Milhgan School enrollments 1,243 Elko, 5-4 overall and 3-2 in the competitive Division I, lost two-year starter Shaelan McDonough at quarterback. Junior Shane Gilligan (5-9, 155 pounds), who handles the ball well, is the projected starter. Sophomore Jared Mosier (6-1, 150) is the backup. Senior Kirk Nylander (5-11, 170), who rushed for almost 500 yards and scored nine touchdowns last fall, will line up at — Cimarron-MemoriaL By tha Maws GUM Cimarron-Memorial's Vemon Fox is back and that's bad news for opposing defenses. Fox gained over 1,200 yards rushing last season and "should be one of the top recniits in town," coach Greg Spencer said of the 511,185-pound running back. Spencer added the team, which was 6-3 last season, "is returning a lotof defensive people and we have good kids coming up from the junior varsity program." But, there are also weaknesses. "We have to replace three down linemen and linebackers," Spencer said. The offensive battle right now is at quarterback with three players fi^tingfor the job. Monte Gutowski, a 6-0, 175-pounder "started every game last year," Spencer said. Gutowski will be battling Toby Smeltzer and Jeff Sarpyforthejob. "I think, from the passing School: Ciinarron-Memorial High School radouune: Spartans School coltnrstMaroon/SUver HcNBdcoachtGr^ Spencer Sdioolenrollmoiit) 3,350 drills, there's a little bit of a battle," Spencer said. They are all pretty good athletes and throw the ball well." Other key returnees include Ryan Miller, a 5-11, 195-pound outside Undbacker and offensive guard, Frank Paudr, a 5-9, 175pound defensive back and Mike Foster, a6-l,205-pound fullback. Cim-Memorial was 6-3 last season and fell in the first round of the playoffs last season. "Obviously, to make the playoffs and win a state championship is our goal," Spencer said. "But, Vm sure everyone in town has those goals." are back from a unit that allowed less than 10 points per game. "We've got good speed in the secondary," Sellers said, noting receiver Chris Leonard will turn around and play on defense, as will transfer tailback Duane Johnson and receiver/kicker Joe UccelU. Sellers, in his^lst year as head coach, expects a young Wooster offense to move the ball well out of its multiple set. Lacomb is the likely starter at quarterback, although Sellers By tha Nws Staff Brett Melcher thinks the Galena Grizzlies might get the chance to roar more in 1996. Galena has steadily improved its record from 0-9 during its first varsity season (1993), to 18 in 1994, and 2-7 last fall. With its largest turnout of players ever this month, Melcher believes the Grizzlies will pose some challenges for the Northern AAAA. 'The kids have a very good work ethic," he said. "They're starting to understand what we're doing. We're a full-fledged 8cho
PAGE 45

le^ iiirgK waB.j!!!i,... m ..i u\" 'Mi. J : .. MBtvada Footj^ Oats AAAA = Clark By the NMVS stair If you're going to try and stop the Clark offisnae, better learn how to stop the run. Td say we're probably going to run 70% of the time," coach Todd Cutler said. With running backs Shay Mickell, a 5-7,145-pounder and Will Reves, a 6-1, 180-pounder returning, the Chargers will be solid on the ground. 1 look for good things from them," Cutler said ofhis running backs. He also added the offensive line "should be decent." Quarterback Perryn Hale will lead the attack. The 6-1, 175pound senior "will be the team leader," Cutler said. "He started a few games for us last year and is working very hard." On the defensive side of the ball. Cutler has size on his side. See Clark Page 27 School: Clark Hi{^ School Ntckname; Chaifflrs SdMxdi colvm BlackAjold Heltd coaoht Todd Cutler School enrollment: 2,010 Basic Wolves Green Valley Gators Silverado Skyhawks Here's hoping one of you bring the State Title home to Henderson. We have faith in your ability. Good Luck! OFFICE SUPPLY 62 E. Basic Road Henderson • 564-1155 = Cheyenne= SriOtf TEAM SPIRIT Support yoar Fooiball Team GOOD LUCK! ^mkm IRIS DLITSCH Candidate for Assembly 22 P^loctiyFrienimEIcllrtBe^ • '-• Cheyenne hopes to 'Veload and repeat" this season, according to coach Greorge Perry. The team boasted an 11-1 record last season, and their second straight Sunset Division Championship. They also took the zone championships against Green Valley. They fell short of a state title in a 14-0 loss to Wooster. The varsity squad returns 15 players, but needs to fill wide receiver, inside linebackers, and StehooUCheyenneHighSdUidi Nieimame: Deaert Shields School colorwNavy Blue/Old Gold Head coadh: Gead(er. Ian Lacomb (6-3,181), defensive tackle Luis Rnano (6-9,240) and defensive back Maurice Smith -''.•ik-i • =Elko ffl-:: • m By ha Maws Staff For the first time in three years, the Elko Indians didnot qualify for the playoiffs in 1995. Head Coach Bob Milligan, in his fifth year with Elko, thinks the Indians have enough talent on the interior line and overall team speed to compete for a postseason berth. Elko returns nine varsity lettermen, having to replace its quarterback, top rusher, a few linemen and a primary receiver. Still, Milligan does notpredictam^or overhaul in the Indians' future. "I don't see us rebuilding," he said. "We have some young players, but we'll be able to compete." Nidnuuine: Indians StchvoieblorssMarooq/Wfaite HMkl coach: Bob Milhgan School enrollments 1,243 Elko, 5-4 overall and 3-2 in the competitive Division I, lost two-year starter Shaelan McDonough at quarterback. Junior Shane Gilligan (5-9, 155 pounds), who handles the ball well, is the projected starter. Sophomore Jared Mosier (6-1, 150) is the backup. Senior Kirk Nylander (5-11, 170), who rushed for almost 500 yards and scored nine touchdowns last fall, will line up at — Cimarron-MemoriaL By tha Maws GUM Cimarron-Memorial's Vemon Fox is back and that's bad news for opposing defenses. Fox gained over 1,200 yards rushing last season and "should be one of the top recniits in town," coach Greg Spencer said of the 511,185-pound running back. Spencer added the team, which was 6-3 last season, "is returning a lotof defensive people and we have good kids coming up from the junior varsity program." But, there are also weaknesses. "We have to replace three down linemen and linebackers," Spencer said. The offensive battle right now is at quarterback with three players fi^tingfor the job. Monte Gutowski, a 6-0, 175-pounder "started every game last year," Spencer said. Gutowski will be battling Toby Smeltzer and Jeff Sarpyforthejob. "I think, from the passing School: Ciinarron-Memorial High School radouune: Spartans School coltnrstMaroon/SUver HcNBdcoachtGr^ Spencer Sdioolenrollmoiit) 3,350 drills, there's a little bit of a battle," Spencer said. They are all pretty good athletes and throw the ball well." Other key returnees include Ryan Miller, a 5-11, 195-pound outside Undbacker and offensive guard, Frank Paudr, a 5-9, 175pound defensive back and Mike Foster, a6-l,205-pound fullback. Cim-Memorial was 6-3 last season and fell in the first round of the playoffs last season. "Obviously, to make the playoffs and win a state championship is our goal," Spencer said. "But, Vm sure everyone in town has those goals." are back from a unit that allowed less than 10 points per game. "We've got good speed in the secondary," Sellers said, noting receiver Chris Leonard will turn around and play on defense, as will transfer tailback Duane Johnson and receiver/kicker Joe UccelU. Sellers, in his^lst year as head coach, expects a young Wooster offense to move the ball well out of its multiple set. Lacomb is the likely starter at quarterback, although Sellers By tha Nws Staff Brett Melcher thinks the Galena Grizzlies might get the chance to roar more in 1996. Galena has steadily improved its record from 0-9 during its first varsity season (1993), to 18 in 1994, and 2-7 last fall. With its largest turnout of players ever this month, Melcher believes the Grizzlies will pose some challenges for the Northern AAAA. 'The kids have a very good work ethic," he said. "They're starting to understand what we're doing. We're a full-fledged 8cho
PAGE 46

c Nevida Footliail: = McQueen By the Nmn Staff Football teams often separate themselves from the pack t^ playing exceptional defense. Keeping opposing offenses bottled up is not just a philosophy, but an obsession for coach Ken Dalton and the McQueen Lancers, and that's meant tremendous success for the northwest Reno school. Lastyear, McQueen, the 1990 and '92 AAA state champion, did not allow an offensive toudidown until the fifth week of the season. The Lancers wound up 7-2, qualified for the playoffs as the Division I runnerup, and ended their season with a 3-0 loss to Wooster in the zone semifinals. Linebacker Moa Peaua (6-1, 231 pounds), defieoaiyJlineman/ mifl'^^rwsmmm I .iiii>iiii I'll 13dbo6l rotibuUBA: Lancers School colont Blue/Oray HMid eoadaa Ken Dalton School enrtriEbnent: 1,561 fullback BinCbfer (6-0,21&>and defensive end ^n Mathews (60, 211) return to lead the McQueen deirense. Each an A11PaaaC12 NEVADA FOOTIAIX Metro or All-Division selection, the trio combined for 291 tackles in '95. Peaua and Gofer are juniors. Guard Moa Topou (6-2,225) is the sole returning starter on offense. The senior also garnered postseason honors. "From this group of four, we'll see some fine leader8hip,''Dalton said. "We have two classes that really get along very well and they're used to winning." "The Lancers should be strong up front in their "50" defense. Senior defensive end Nolan Turner (5-10, 185) and classmates Brandon Noonkester (6-1, See McQueen Page 28 = Sparks. By the NMVt staff The Sparks Railroaders are ready to improve their defense and benefit from more size in 1996. A 3-6 team last season, the Railroaders allowed opponents 21 points per game in 1995, 12 points less per game than they did in '94. Now Sparks' goal is to give up no more than 100 points this year "Any team that allows more than that in the regular season is not gonna get it done,' secondyear head coadi Billy McHenry said. • f'^'r^'V'-.r-^-' Senior linebacker/offensive tackle Ross Capurro (6-3, 225 pounds) and classmate Paul Moss, a 6-2, 210-pound linebacker/fullback, can disrupt many AAAA offenses in the Railroaders' eight-man front. The/11 be supported by junior defensive tackle Tyler Rippee (61,250), senior defensive end Ian CriUenden (6-3, 205), defensive backs Will Franklin and Matt McHenry, linebacker T. Eriksen 1: Sparks High e: Railroaddrts ool colors: Manxm/Qdld^' coach: Bill McHeni:^ ool enroBmenfc: 1,590 and free safety Shawn Marlow. "We're bigger this year," Coach McHenry said. "We've had the weight program in place for a year now." Two prospects compete for the quarterback position. Monte Johnson (6-1, 165), who called signals at Sparks for a sevenwin JV team in '94, leads the pack. Franklin can also play quarterback. Coach McHenry expects the Railroaders to nm a multiple offense, using some option plays and some misdirection. Moss and Eriksen are efficient rushers. Senior split end Billy Duggins and senior flanker See Sparks Pager28 =Reed By th* Nwm Staff The frustration finally ended for the Reed Raiders last season. After failing to make the Northern AAA playoffs in 1993 and '94, the Raiders broke through by winning the Division I championship. Reed was 8-2 overall, ending its season with a 25-14 loss to Wooster in the zone finals. Coach Courtney Bossert, in his eighth year at the school, said the Raiders still have to work to catch Wooster and McQueen, the North's most consistent teams. "We're still chasing them," he said. "We've won 70% of our games (since 1989), but they've won 80-to-90% of their games." A veteran line with good size can help Reed keep winning this fall. All-Division and All-Metro defensive end Nick Reed (6-3, : Reed High School iKRaiden iehool oolow BltU/GoU iBLead coach: Courtney School enroUment: 2,080 227 pounds), who also plays guard, and fellow seniors Kevii) Moffatt, a 6-3,282-pound guard/ defensive tackle (a Division I college prospect), and Pat Knight, a6-l, 180-pound center/defensive end, have plenty of experience. Senior Nick Crooks (6-1, 220) is another returning starter at defensive tackle. "We're counting on Nick to step up,* Bossert said. "We want him and Kevin to play in the See Reed Page 29 AUGUST 29, 1996 = Carson City. By Hie Nnwa Stan Agood aiqiply of running backs and an experienced line have the (Darson Senators confidoitabout their chances to return to the playofft this season. An 8-2 team last fall, Carson won its first six games and finished sedond in Division II. The Senators made the playoffs for the first time in eight years, falling to Reed in the zone semifinals. lieading rusher Bart Dover (60, 180 pounds) and senior classmates Mike Raabe (6-10, 175),RyanGreen(5-10,165) and Brian Murdock will share ballcarrying duties in Carson's Wing-T misdirection offense. = South Tahoe w By the NMW staff A new offense is set at South Tahoe, where the Vikings will try to secure their first winning record since 1992. Head Coach Tim Jaureguito, in his second year back on the sidelines, has dropped last year's Wing-T offense for a spread-set, pass-dominated attack. After last season's 2-6 record, Jaureguito said it is time for a change. "It fits our personnel better," the coach said of the new singleback formation. "The Wing-T is not as deceptive as it used to be. Everybody's running it" Junior quarterback Brett Uppendahl(6-2,175pounds)and == Douglas By the News Staff Head Coach Mike Rippee hopes one of the best all-aroimd talents in the Northern AAAA can lead the Douglas Tigers into the playoffs. Junior Chris Griffith (6-0,165 povmds) is an elusive quarterback who is not afraid to throw the ball. Last fall, he backed up J.P. Sfdiiool: Dou^ Hifi^ School Nicknaine: Tigers Sdiool colors: BlackA>range/ White Head coach: Mike Rippee School Br(dIiiiat: 1,766 Albert at quarterback and saved his best work for defense, where he had four interceptions as a free safety. Griffith also kicks the ball welL "He is • fine athlete," Rippee Se Douglas Page 28 NhsioiiiniB Senators emad colon: Royid Blue/ White Heed coach: Bdb Bateman Sdi0l coirolhiMmt: 2,228 i Dover had more than l,000yards rushing in 1995 and again, this year, hell get plenty of help from his backfield teammates. "He's really focused and he's gotten quite strong,*" Northern AAA Coach of the Year Bob Bateman said of Dover, a firstteam All-League linebadier who led the team in tackles. "Hell be on the field all the time.* The Senators return senior center/defensive tackle Clint Treadway-(6-3,226) and tackle Anthony Carlquist (5-11, 215), as well as part-time starter Jason Price (6-3,185) at tii^t end/ linebacker. On both sides of the ball, jimiors Tim Baker, Jason Nicholson (6-5, 228) and Nick Redwine wHl hdp add d^th up front, along with Garret and Ryan Beikidi, and Ken Aldredge. Quarteibadi Matthew Jones (6-4,180), a starter the last two years, is a leader for the Carson offense. See Carson City Page 28 ^<:<-!-^'^ '2%;^ South Tahoe ffigll Nictbiame: Vikings School colors: Blue/Gold Head coachs lim Jaureguito junior runningback/kicker Brian Bough (5-10, 175) provide skill in the backfield. A core of senior receivers—Jeff Seitz (6-1,165), ElUott Hubler (5-9, 145) and Dominic Rohner (6-0,180)—are back to complement the offense. "We spent a lot of time in passing tournaments," Jaureguito said. "With that experience, it makes it easier for us (to pass frequently)." ••••**•••**••*••*** Mike understands and knows our community. He wants to protect TOU and your right to a good life. He Believes: Growth should not mean an increase in crime. There should be zero tolerance for gang activity and crimes against the elderly. H Henderson JUSTICE OFTHE PEACE CARE ABOUT HENDERSON ir?r VOTE IE Mike Eshragh YOUR Justice of the Peace CaU 89-MIKEJP (896-4535) Paid ftr by The ComotttM to deet Mike Ef hnfh 127 Pbiott Wi7, Heodmon, NV 89014 We must protect our citizens, their property rights and their contract rights. -= Churchill County By the News Staff Many coaches would be apprehensive about starting a season with just five returning starters. Greenwave Head Coach Kevin McGill likes it just fme. The attitude is so improved," the coach said when asked about a team as green as its home jerseys. "Lastyear, the enthusiasm Sehool: Churchill HifihSdiool Nicdouune: Greenwave Sdiool cohnrK Green/White Head eowshi Kevin IfeGill Sdhool euroltaseiitt l,16d See Churchill County Page 29 South Tahoe has a mix of juniors and seniors on t&e line. Senior Chris Bama (6-2, 215) moves from cente^' to tight end. Classmates Dan Bartelson (6-2, 220) and Darren KUne (6-0,165), both guards, join junior tackles Seth Martin (5-9,300) and Brad (3imino (6-10,22(^.> ^:% On defense, Jaureguito said the Vikings plan to be more active in an effort to confuse the league's offenses. 4 -?* -: ; "Ourseniorshaveneverhada winning season, and that includes Pop Warner,'^ the coach said. "We want to get those seniors a winning season." ei^EENE ecNCALcey 'Jtii^ 62124.30uUm Ofy,.^ 89006-2124 (702) 29A.34S1 tmaiL 102007J244%umfiumm.nm Unique Gin Idea Organize your data Free Brochure t3€€d Luck Ceulder 9 Eaales!! ^ •——^—% AUGUST 29, 1996 NEVADA FOOTIALL PafeC13

PAGE 47

c Nevida Footliail: = McQueen By the Nmn Staff Football teams often separate themselves from the pack t^ playing exceptional defense. Keeping opposing offenses bottled up is not just a philosophy, but an obsession for coach Ken Dalton and the McQueen Lancers, and that's meant tremendous success for the northwest Reno school. Lastyear, McQueen, the 1990 and '92 AAA state champion, did not allow an offensive toudidown until the fifth week of the season. The Lancers wound up 7-2, qualified for the playoffs as the Division I runnerup, and ended their season with a 3-0 loss to Wooster in the zone semifinals. Linebacker Moa Peaua (6-1, 231 pounds), defieoaiyJlineman/ mifl'^^rwsmmm I .iiii>iiii I'll 13dbo6l rotibuUBA: Lancers School colont Blue/Oray HMid eoadaa Ken Dalton School enrtriEbnent: 1,561 fullback BinCbfer (6-0,21&>and defensive end ^n Mathews (60, 211) return to lead the McQueen deirense. Each an A11PaaaC12 NEVADA FOOTIAIX Metro or All-Division selection, the trio combined for 291 tackles in '95. Peaua and Gofer are juniors. Guard Moa Topou (6-2,225) is the sole returning starter on offense. The senior also garnered postseason honors. "From this group of four, we'll see some fine leader8hip,''Dalton said. "We have two classes that really get along very well and they're used to winning." "The Lancers should be strong up front in their "50" defense. Senior defensive end Nolan Turner (5-10, 185) and classmates Brandon Noonkester (6-1, See McQueen Page 28 = Sparks. By the NMVt staff The Sparks Railroaders are ready to improve their defense and benefit from more size in 1996. A 3-6 team last season, the Railroaders allowed opponents 21 points per game in 1995, 12 points less per game than they did in '94. Now Sparks' goal is to give up no more than 100 points this year "Any team that allows more than that in the regular season is not gonna get it done,' secondyear head coadi Billy McHenry said. • f'^'r^'V'-.r-^-' Senior linebacker/offensive tackle Ross Capurro (6-3, 225 pounds) and classmate Paul Moss, a 6-2, 210-pound linebacker/fullback, can disrupt many AAAA offenses in the Railroaders' eight-man front. The/11 be supported by junior defensive tackle Tyler Rippee (61,250), senior defensive end Ian CriUenden (6-3, 205), defensive backs Will Franklin and Matt McHenry, linebacker T. Eriksen 1: Sparks High e: Railroaddrts ool colors: Manxm/Qdld^' coach: Bill McHeni:^ ool enroBmenfc: 1,590 and free safety Shawn Marlow. "We're bigger this year," Coach McHenry said. "We've had the weight program in place for a year now." Two prospects compete for the quarterback position. Monte Johnson (6-1, 165), who called signals at Sparks for a sevenwin JV team in '94, leads the pack. Franklin can also play quarterback. Coach McHenry expects the Railroaders to nm a multiple offense, using some option plays and some misdirection. Moss and Eriksen are efficient rushers. Senior split end Billy Duggins and senior flanker See Sparks Pager28 =Reed By th* Nwm Staff The frustration finally ended for the Reed Raiders last season. After failing to make the Northern AAA playoffs in 1993 and '94, the Raiders broke through by winning the Division I championship. Reed was 8-2 overall, ending its season with a 25-14 loss to Wooster in the zone finals. Coach Courtney Bossert, in his eighth year at the school, said the Raiders still have to work to catch Wooster and McQueen, the North's most consistent teams. "We're still chasing them," he said. "We've won 70% of our games (since 1989), but they've won 80-to-90% of their games." A veteran line with good size can help Reed keep winning this fall. All-Division and All-Metro defensive end Nick Reed (6-3, : Reed High School iKRaiden iehool oolow BltU/GoU iBLead coach: Courtney School enroUment: 2,080 227 pounds), who also plays guard, and fellow seniors Kevii) Moffatt, a 6-3,282-pound guard/ defensive tackle (a Division I college prospect), and Pat Knight, a6-l, 180-pound center/defensive end, have plenty of experience. Senior Nick Crooks (6-1, 220) is another returning starter at defensive tackle. "We're counting on Nick to step up,* Bossert said. "We want him and Kevin to play in the See Reed Page 29 AUGUST 29, 1996 = Carson City. By Hie Nnwa Stan Agood aiqiply of running backs and an experienced line have the (Darson Senators confidoitabout their chances to return to the playofft this season. An 8-2 team last fall, Carson won its first six games and finished sedond in Division II. The Senators made the playoffs for the first time in eight years, falling to Reed in the zone semifinals. lieading rusher Bart Dover (60, 180 pounds) and senior classmates Mike Raabe (6-10, 175),RyanGreen(5-10,165) and Brian Murdock will share ballcarrying duties in Carson's Wing-T misdirection offense. = South Tahoe w By the NMW staff A new offense is set at South Tahoe, where the Vikings will try to secure their first winning record since 1992. Head Coach Tim Jaureguito, in his second year back on the sidelines, has dropped last year's Wing-T offense for a spread-set, pass-dominated attack. After last season's 2-6 record, Jaureguito said it is time for a change. "It fits our personnel better," the coach said of the new singleback formation. "The Wing-T is not as deceptive as it used to be. Everybody's running it" Junior quarterback Brett Uppendahl(6-2,175pounds)and == Douglas By the News Staff Head Coach Mike Rippee hopes one of the best all-aroimd talents in the Northern AAAA can lead the Douglas Tigers into the playoffs. Junior Chris Griffith (6-0,165 povmds) is an elusive quarterback who is not afraid to throw the ball. Last fall, he backed up J.P. Sfdiiool: Dou^ Hifi^ School Nicknaine: Tigers Sdiool colors: BlackA>range/ White Head coach: Mike Rippee School Br(dIiiiat: 1,766 Albert at quarterback and saved his best work for defense, where he had four interceptions as a free safety. Griffith also kicks the ball welL "He is • fine athlete," Rippee Se Douglas Page 28 NhsioiiiniB Senators emad colon: Royid Blue/ White Heed coach: Bdb Bateman Sdi0l coirolhiMmt: 2,228 i Dover had more than l,000yards rushing in 1995 and again, this year, hell get plenty of help from his backfield teammates. "He's really focused and he's gotten quite strong,*" Northern AAA Coach of the Year Bob Bateman said of Dover, a firstteam All-League linebadier who led the team in tackles. "Hell be on the field all the time.* The Senators return senior center/defensive tackle Clint Treadway-(6-3,226) and tackle Anthony Carlquist (5-11, 215), as well as part-time starter Jason Price (6-3,185) at tii^t end/ linebacker. On both sides of the ball, jimiors Tim Baker, Jason Nicholson (6-5, 228) and Nick Redwine wHl hdp add d^th up front, along with Garret and Ryan Beikidi, and Ken Aldredge. Quarteibadi Matthew Jones (6-4,180), a starter the last two years, is a leader for the Carson offense. See Carson City Page 28 ^<:<-!-^'^ '2%;^ South Tahoe ffigll Nictbiame: Vikings School colors: Blue/Gold Head coachs lim Jaureguito junior runningback/kicker Brian Bough (5-10, 175) provide skill in the backfield. A core of senior receivers—Jeff Seitz (6-1,165), ElUott Hubler (5-9, 145) and Dominic Rohner (6-0,180)—are back to complement the offense. "We spent a lot of time in passing tournaments," Jaureguito said. "With that experience, it makes it easier for us (to pass frequently)." ••••**•••**••*••*** Mike understands and knows our community. He wants to protect TOU and your right to a good life. He Believes: Growth should not mean an increase in crime. There should be zero tolerance for gang activity and crimes against the elderly. H Henderson JUSTICE OFTHE PEACE CARE ABOUT HENDERSON ir?r VOTE IE Mike Eshragh YOUR Justice of the Peace CaU 89-MIKEJP (896-4535) Paid ftr by The ComotttM to deet Mike Ef hnfh 127 Pbiott Wi7, Heodmon, NV 89014 We must protect our citizens, their property rights and their contract rights. -= Churchill County By the News Staff Many coaches would be apprehensive about starting a season with just five returning starters. Greenwave Head Coach Kevin McGill likes it just fme. The attitude is so improved," the coach said when asked about a team as green as its home jerseys. "Lastyear, the enthusiasm Sehool: Churchill HifihSdiool Nicdouune: Greenwave Sdiool cohnrK Green/White Head eowshi Kevin IfeGill Sdhool euroltaseiitt l,16d See Churchill County Page 29 South Tahoe has a mix of juniors and seniors on t&e line. Senior Chris Bama (6-2, 215) moves from cente^' to tight end. Classmates Dan Bartelson (6-2, 220) and Darren KUne (6-0,165), both guards, join junior tackles Seth Martin (5-9,300) and Brad (3imino (6-10,22(^.> ^:% On defense, Jaureguito said the Vikings plan to be more active in an effort to confuse the league's offenses. 4 -?* -: ; "Ourseniorshaveneverhada winning season, and that includes Pop Warner,'^ the coach said. "We want to get those seniors a winning season." ei^EENE ecNCALcey 'Jtii^ 62124.30uUm Ofy,.^ 89006-2124 (702) 29A.34S1 tmaiL 102007J244%umfiumm.nm Unique Gin Idea Organize your data Free Brochure t3€€d Luck Ceulder 9 Eaales!! ^ •——^—% AUGUST 29, 1996 NEVADA FOOTIALL PafeC13

PAGE 48

• h,;. ".-1-• • .' .•,; • -; • ':|t;;0:-;^: • 1->.A -,<: -.-.'^ ^X; • • ;!'; • • ;. •n^? ;'i • jf • *^ ;.* • i*'', •:^-...'""'•'''"':. 'i ^' • • • • • • • ,? ;•< • ":, .f,'. • a. • • • • • • •n.'>.-'-]c' • • • • '." *?'''V,j5': • !^-].f.i .. ,• CHAMPION INTHE'MAKING. t •: rf^-'i." • .yM^ V, ..f • • \ • • • • • • • • .: i* „ • "<.. .*: • ._^, • • '. • • • • '^. '•'"'i.^t -* • • -, ; • CHAMPION HOME. 'AYou'll find a Champion Homes community to be the perfect neighborhood to raise your champions'in-training. Come visit one today. • • ^N. ,,..':§*'•" .l^?*.,^;.-. v • • CHAMPIONS Stewart eastofNellis From die $90'( 453-3066 WINDMILL CROSSING Windmill Parkway at Arroyo GrarKic From the $120's 898-7514 SARATOGA BLACK MOUNTAIN RANCH HUNTtR'S RiDOE CLEARWATER CANYON Rustell wett of Minion Drive Coming Soon Coming Soon Rainbow at San Jacinto 896-1988 896-1988 FrDmrfe$l20'8 From the $130's 368-1101 566-5706 nHEp~ 1^. • 1 1 Champion Homes raOC14 NEVADA FOOTIAU AUGUST 29, 1996 1.. • • i^..\^'. = RenO' By tiM NMnSlOT Head Coach Pat Rippee hopes more hard work can turn last year'sdisappointmentintoasolid season for tiie Reno Huskies. Reno dropped from a Northern zone finalist in 1994 to a struggling 3-6 last fall. It was not the kind of campaign Rippee had envisioned for his return to prep ^Ibotball. Agood interior line could spur the Huskies to more wins this season. Senior tackle Jed Bodger (6-4, 250-pound8), the biggest player on the roster, opens holes for Reno rushers. Senior defen< sive tackle Jason Phillips (6-5, 205) may also use his strength on the offensive side of the ball this year. Defensive tackle/deSchool: Renct High School Nickname: Httskies SdtoOl colon: Red/Blue Head coadu Pat Rippee iMiool enroDment: 1,632 fensive end Marshall Cowan (6-2, 2(X)) adds depth up front, along with senior guard Nick Jordan and junior center Alex MacLeod. "A lot of kids will have to {day both ways," Rippee said. John Anthony (5-10.175) will play quarterbadi in the Huskies' Wing-T offense. Rippee said he See Reno Page 29 =Hug. • '•>i:H<*.i4'-'ir" By the ftowB Staff If the Hug Hawks can find a replacement for All-State quarterback Bart Hendricks, they might be a sleeper in the Northem AAAA this season. Hendricks, who received a scholarship to play for Boise State University, was an experienced leader for Hug. He led the team to a winning season in 1994 and provided some thrills in a subpar 3-6 campaign last fall. Head Coach Rollins Stallworth hopes junior Troy Lemich (5-10, 170 pounds) is ready to step into the quarter^^ back position. Lemich fulfilled that role the last two seasons for Hawk junior varsity and freshSchool: Hug ffighSchix)! Nkkname: Hawks School colorm Green/White Head coach: Rollins Stallworth School caavollnifiiit: L768 man teams. That's gonna be a tough position to fill," Stallworth said. "Hell be above average among jimiors." Hug expects to be stronger at running back, relying on two transfers to carry the load. See Hug Page 29 ;sViit:>., = Lowry By thsNmws Staff For the Lowry High football team, change is inevitable. Twenty-nine-year-old Ray Parks is the Buckaroos' third coach in four seasons. Lowry hired Parks in March after twoyear head coach Brian Rothe 1^ to pursue a master's degree. "We needed some stability," Parks said, explaining why tibe Buckaroos will see their 1995 offensive coordinator become the head man. "It's not a whole lot of change.* Lowry would like to repeat many of last season's events this &I1. The Buckaroos, who return seven starters frm a surprising 4-5 team, broke a 17-game losing streak in the opener and logged their fint league triuIl^>h in AAA play by topping Reno in the seaioD finale. Bfany players from a strong School: Lowry Hi^ School Nickname: Buckaroos School colors: Blue/Gold Head coach: Ray Parks School enrollinent: 961 senior class are gone, but Lowry returns one of the state's best receivers and three starters on the interior line. All-League seniorT.W.Cunningham(5-10,175 pounds) cau^t 32 passes in "95 for more than 500 yards. Parks said Cunningham, who can also play slotback, quarterback and safety, will be "a marked man" this fall. "He's our best athlete," the coadi said. "He's siq)er committed and he catches the ball." See Lowry Psge29 AUGUST 29. 199C NEVADA FOOTBAU

PAGE 49

• h,;. ".-1-• • .' .•,; • -; • ':|t;;0:-;^: • 1->.A -,<: -.-.'^ ^X; • • ;!'; • • ;. •n^? ;'i • jf • *^ ;.* • i*'', •:^-...'""'•'''"':. 'i ^' • • • • • • • ,? ;•< • ":, .f,'. • a. • • • • • • •n.'>.-'-]c' • • • • '." *?'''V,j5': • !^-].f.i .. ,• CHAMPION INTHE'MAKING. t •: rf^-'i." • .yM^ V, ..f • • \ • • • • • • • • .: i* „ • "<.. .*: • ._^, • • '. • • • • '^. '•'"'i.^t -* • • -, ; • CHAMPION HOME. 'AYou'll find a Champion Homes community to be the perfect neighborhood to raise your champions'in-training. Come visit one today. • • ^N. ,,..':§*'•" .l^?*.,^;.-. v • • CHAMPIONS Stewart eastofNellis From die $90'( 453-3066 WINDMILL CROSSING Windmill Parkway at Arroyo GrarKic From the $120's 898-7514 SARATOGA BLACK MOUNTAIN RANCH HUNTtR'S RiDOE CLEARWATER CANYON Rustell wett of Minion Drive Coming Soon Coming Soon Rainbow at San Jacinto 896-1988 896-1988 FrDmrfe$l20'8 From the $130's 368-1101 566-5706 nHEp~ 1^. • 1 1 Champion Homes raOC14 NEVADA FOOTIAU AUGUST 29, 1996 1.. • • i^..\^'. = RenO' By tiM NMnSlOT Head Coach Pat Rippee hopes more hard work can turn last year'sdisappointmentintoasolid season for tiie Reno Huskies. Reno dropped from a Northern zone finalist in 1994 to a struggling 3-6 last fall. It was not the kind of campaign Rippee had envisioned for his return to prep ^Ibotball. Agood interior line could spur the Huskies to more wins this season. Senior tackle Jed Bodger (6-4, 250-pound8), the biggest player on the roster, opens holes for Reno rushers. Senior defen< sive tackle Jason Phillips (6-5, 205) may also use his strength on the offensive side of the ball this year. Defensive tackle/deSchool: Renct High School Nickname: Httskies SdtoOl colon: Red/Blue Head coadu Pat Rippee iMiool enroDment: 1,632 fensive end Marshall Cowan (6-2, 2(X)) adds depth up front, along with senior guard Nick Jordan and junior center Alex MacLeod. "A lot of kids will have to {day both ways," Rippee said. John Anthony (5-10.175) will play quarterbadi in the Huskies' Wing-T offense. Rippee said he See Reno Page 29 =Hug. • '•>i:H<*.i4'-'ir" By the ftowB Staff If the Hug Hawks can find a replacement for All-State quarterback Bart Hendricks, they might be a sleeper in the Northem AAAA this season. Hendricks, who received a scholarship to play for Boise State University, was an experienced leader for Hug. He led the team to a winning season in 1994 and provided some thrills in a subpar 3-6 campaign last fall. Head Coach Rollins Stallworth hopes junior Troy Lemich (5-10, 170 pounds) is ready to step into the quarter^^ back position. Lemich fulfilled that role the last two seasons for Hawk junior varsity and freshSchool: Hug ffighSchix)! Nkkname: Hawks School colorm Green/White Head coach: Rollins Stallworth School caavollnifiiit: L768 man teams. That's gonna be a tough position to fill," Stallworth said. "Hell be above average among jimiors." Hug expects to be stronger at running back, relying on two transfers to carry the load. See Hug Page 29 ;sViit:>., = Lowry By thsNmws Staff For the Lowry High football team, change is inevitable. Twenty-nine-year-old Ray Parks is the Buckaroos' third coach in four seasons. Lowry hired Parks in March after twoyear head coach Brian Rothe 1^ to pursue a master's degree. "We needed some stability," Parks said, explaining why tibe Buckaroos will see their 1995 offensive coordinator become the head man. "It's not a whole lot of change.* Lowry would like to repeat many of last season's events this &I1. The Buckaroos, who return seven starters frm a surprising 4-5 team, broke a 17-game losing streak in the opener and logged their fint league triuIl^>h in AAA play by topping Reno in the seaioD finale. Bfany players from a strong School: Lowry Hi^ School Nickname: Buckaroos School colors: Blue/Gold Head coach: Ray Parks School enrollinent: 961 senior class are gone, but Lowry returns one of the state's best receivers and three starters on the interior line. All-League seniorT.W.Cunningham(5-10,175 pounds) cau^t 32 passes in "95 for more than 500 yards. Parks said Cunningham, who can also play slotback, quarterback and safety, will be "a marked man" this fall. "He's our best athlete," the coadi said. "He's siq)er committed and he catches the ball." See Lowry Psge29 AUGUST 29. 199C NEVADA FOOTBAU

PAGE 50

=Battle Mountain By thcNaw* Stiff Battle Mountain could have one of the toughest schedules after the realignment of the leagues. '^e new league will be tough for us since we are easily the smallest school in our division (380 students),' said coach Jay School: Battle Mountain Hi^ SduMl Niokname: Longhoms School colors: Gredn/White Boad coaelu Jay Huckaby • School aurollment: 402, Huckaby. "Seven of last year's eight playoff teams are on our schedule, with only Virgin Valley missing." The Longhorr)8 hope that a strong offensive line, made up mostly of seniors, will give Quarterback Jacob Edgar,' a junior, plenty of time to throw and open up the big holes for junior running badis Cody Jonei Femley; By the MMW Staff After wrapping up the 1995 season with a9-5 (5-0) record the Femley High School football team is geared up to have a repeat School: Femley Hi^ School idkiianf: Vaqueros lool i^lors: Orange/Black Head coach: Dave Hart School enrollment: 668 (,Ri;i:\\;\ii.iYATHii:n(:(ii)B NATIONAUY 4 INTEKNATlONAllY CERTf lED JUDO • TAE KWONDO • KARATE • JIU-JITSU BOB SALAY • Regisltrd in U.S A., Europe and Japon • Fofmer Coodi U.S. Air Force Acodemy ondUS. Olynipic TroiningCenter • Member ol Nofl Governing Bod/ o( JUDO • Execvliv* Board Member ol U.S. Karate Attoc. • Former U.S. Reg. For Jiftlibu titi M Fed. • ForKid*|4yn.jrUp|andAdulh • low Rates • No Testing Fees • Unlimited Use ol Glosses FOtMOUmrOCAUBOB 433-1639 iinlWmt mt rta
PAGE 51

=Battle Mountain By thcNaw* Stiff Battle Mountain could have one of the toughest schedules after the realignment of the leagues. '^e new league will be tough for us since we are easily the smallest school in our division (380 students),' said coach Jay School: Battle Mountain Hi^ SduMl Niokname: Longhoms School colors: Gredn/White Boad coaelu Jay Huckaby • School aurollment: 402, Huckaby. "Seven of last year's eight playoff teams are on our schedule, with only Virgin Valley missing." The Longhorr)8 hope that a strong offensive line, made up mostly of seniors, will give Quarterback Jacob Edgar,' a junior, plenty of time to throw and open up the big holes for junior running badis Cody Jonei Femley; By the MMW Staff After wrapping up the 1995 season with a9-5 (5-0) record the Femley High School football team is geared up to have a repeat School: Femley Hi^ School idkiianf: Vaqueros lool i^lors: Orange/Black Head coach: Dave Hart School enrollment: 668 (,Ri;i:\\;\ii.iYATHii:n(:(ii)B NATIONAUY 4 INTEKNATlONAllY CERTf lED JUDO • TAE KWONDO • KARATE • JIU-JITSU BOB SALAY • Regisltrd in U.S A., Europe and Japon • Fofmer Coodi U.S. Air Force Acodemy ondUS. Olynipic TroiningCenter • Member ol Nofl Governing Bod/ o( JUDO • Execvliv* Board Member ol U.S. Karate Attoc. • Former U.S. Reg. For Jiftlibu titi M Fed. • ForKid*|4yn.jrUp|andAdulh • low Rates • No Testing Fees • Unlimited Use ol Glosses FOtMOUmrOCAUBOB 433-1639 iinlWmt mt rta
PAGE 52

Nevada Football: Class AAA Nevada Football: Class AAA = Mineral County; By the News Staff Mineral County will rely on the strength of players from an undefeated JV squad to fill their varsity program this year. Mineral returns just eight of 22 starters. Players from the undefeated JV team will hopefully step up to fill in. "We expect a large turnout and improvement in the offensive line," coach Scott Dean said. 'Team depth is questionable but School: Mineral County High School Nickname: Serpents School colors: Black/Gold Head coach: Scott Dean School enrollment: 348 off-season and preseason drills will answer many (of the) questions in front of us." Mineral County posted a 5-4 season record and 3-2 conference record last season. Three backfield positions are key in the areas to be filled. Last year's team was one game out of a playoff spot. Their goal this year is to improve with each practice. A strength this season will be the multiple offense, a version of the West Coast offense. Returning players include 210-pound fullback and linebacker Charles Tolliver, 175-pound tight end John Wachsmuth, 155-pound offensive linebacker Harley Rosemore and 160-pound offensive linebacker Travis Tommila. Chris Mann, a 190-pound offensive guard, returns, as does Todd Wright, a 185-pound safety. Dean has taken three schools to playoffs. He moved to Hawthorne to take over Mineral County from Westem-McEver High School in Oregon. ''Good Luck with all Your Goals!'' 4401 E. Sunset Sun-Thurs 10-10 Fri-Sat9-ll <.,ii,(^ 451-4146 (Across from the Olive Garden) = Whittell 4850 W. Flamingo Flamingo & Decatur Open 8am-Midnight Mon-Sat 873-6000 Good Luck Teams Have a Great Season! 87 East Lake Mead Drive across from St Rose Dommican Hospita 565-6511 • Fax 565-0580 By the News Staff Whittell will have a tough job replacing more than a dozen starters from last years 7-2 team that just missed the playoffs. Only five players return from that squad. This team will have to mature in a hurry to repeat last years success," said coach Butch Cattanach. "We will be very young and inexperienced since we graduated so many players. Our goal is a winning record and to make the playoffs." The five returning starters include Stephan Hambsch, a junior center/linebacker at 6-3, 200-pounds; John Topete, a senior running back/linebacker at 5-10, 190-pounds; Devin Apocotos, a junior offensive and from ONE SPORT TO ANOTHER Gators, Wolves, Skvhawks & Eagles SUM ^ 4565 E. Sunset Rd. 736-2695 y^ We have leagues for everyone School: Whittell High School Nickname: Warriors School colors: Red/Gold Head coach: Butch Cattanach School enrollment: 247 defensive lineman at 6-1, 225pounds; wide receiver Ryan McMillan, a 5-8,190-pound junior; and Matt Raab, a junior runningback/defensive back listed at 5-9, 150-pounds. Whittell will be strong at the "offensive line, receivers, and tailback," notes Cattanach. "Our weakness is our mostly young backfield and quick side of the line. Defensively, we are strong in the secondary and at linebacker, but weak on the line." Doug Pershing Cnty = White Pine By the News Staff Pershing County is another playoff team that lost a large group of seniors and will have to work hard to make it to post season play again this year. "Overall, I think our team will be weaker than last year," said coach Joe Yanni. "We lost a good group of seniors." The Mustangs return eight lettermen and six starters from last years team that went 6-4. The junior varsity team went 45. School: Pershing County High School Nickname: Mustangs School colort: Red/Black Head coach: Joe Yanni School enrollment: 221 "Our strength on offense is the skill players," Yanni said. "Our weakness is the line. On defense we should be solid, but we are weak at defensive end." Leading the Mustangs will be quarterback Casey Kiel, a 150pound senior and running back Nathan Martinez, who is also listed at 150-pounds. Nathan Swindlehurst will anchor the defense at the nose guard position. The senior weighs in at only 155-pounds, but will be joined by senior Travis Dirate, a 215-pound tackle. Senior Loren Cooney, a 170pound linebacker and Steven Fecht, a 155-pound defensive back will also help hold back any Division II opponents. For More Information On The Campaign Call 547-6089 Pouq':; Internet Address: http://wwwwbanct.com/bradford Clark County School 6oard District ,i P^id (or by Citi/nn:. tor Br^idlord By the News Staff The White Pine football team began its rebuilding cycle last season, and the growing pains were evident. They started the season losing their first four games, then bounced back to go 4-1 in conference play, and make the playoffs. "We should be better and have a much more experienced team," head coach Jeff Knutson said. Aaron Crow, White Pine's leading rusher last season and starting outside linebacker, has moved and will be unable to carry the team. Of the five sophomores the young squad started last season, four will be returning (Crow be= Moapa Valley. By the Newt Staff For Moapa Valley football, the 1995 season was full of many -accomplishments, including a victory in the AA and Division III state championship game. The prospects of winning the state title looked slim when the Pirates found themselves down 20-0 to Tahoe Truckee last Nov. 17 in the second half of the championship game. However, in one of the most storied comebacks in Nevada state high school playoff football history, Moapa erased the 20 point deficit and went on to win the championship, 21-20. "We hope to repeat and defend the Division and state championship," Moapa head coach Nick Bowler said. Bowler, who has a 45-17 lifetime record at Moapa, hopes a more balanced attack on offense can take Moapa back to the playoffs as well as improve on their 10-2 record of last season. School: White Pine High School Nickname: Bobcats School dolors: Blue/White Head coach: Jeff Knutson School Enrollment: 510 ing the other), and they include 175-pound inside linebacker Matt Braman, 180-pound guard Joe Sedlacek, 6-0 tight end Eric Jackson, and fullback Leevi Ahlvers. The quarterbaick position will be filled by Bohe Gleaue who was promoted from the junior varsity ranks. John Nakashira and Ryan Fullerton are also up from the junior varsity squad, and they will be playing wide receiver. School: Moapa Valley High School Nickname: Pirates School colors: Royal Blue/ Gold Head coach: Nick Bowler School enrollment: 567 The offense will have to be more balanced for the Pirates, since they lost their key halfback, Shane Hickman, to graduation. Replacing Hickman will be Brannon Batchelor, who had 252 yards rushing last season, and a 31 yard punt return average on special teams. "We will have a more balanced offense attack after losing a great runner (Hickman)," Bowler said. The Pirates will not lose anything from last season on defense as they return both talented inside linebackers in Doug Totten and Cody Hymas, who were first and second last season leading the team in tackles. = Yerington By the News Staff Yerington, fresh off its first homecoming victory in four years, looks to improve on its 27 record of last season. With a strong core of 16 returning lettermen, 13 of which are starters, the Lions chances of improvement are plenty. "Last year I had five sophomores starting for me," third year head coach Eric Bobrick said. "This year those five sophomores will be expected to step-up their game." Of those juniors, 180-pound running back MattMatheson will lead the offense, hoping to continue wherehe ended lastseason. School: Yeriogton High School Nickname: Lions School colors: PurpleAVhite Head coach: Eric Bobrick School enrollment: 386 leading the Lions in touchdowns. Junior Kasey Smith, who will play both quarterback and corner back this season, led the team in interceptions the previous year. Smith's main target will be tight end Luke Bonton, See Yerington Page 22 = Virgin Valley; By the News Staff Coming off an 8-2 season last year, the Virgin Valley football team is out to avenge its 22-19 loss to Moapa in the first round off the playoffs. Since the team only returns five starters, coach Kirk Hafen will rely heavily upon last season's junior varsity squad to make an immediate impact on the next level. "Our JV team was undefeated in league play, so we are counting on a lot of younger players to step up and fill in," Hafen said. "I am looking forward to the aggressive sty le of play our younger players demonstrated on junior varsity last season." One problem that needs to be addressed is who will replace last year's quarterback Mark Cheney. The two candidates fighting School: Virgin Valley High School Nickname: Bulldogs School colors: Kelly Green/ White Head coach: Kirk Hafen School enrollment: 399 for the starting job are Roby Hurley and Corby Frehner. "Our offense might struggle in the beginning, but once we find out who will fill in the quarterback position, we should improve each week," Hafen said. Hafen, who will try to improve on his five year, 42-11 record, will need a big season from senior receiver David Brotherson. Last season, Brotherson had 59 catches for 320 yards and four touchdowns. 'Let's Watch our Eagles Soar" GOOD LUCK Phyllis, Kon and the Staff 'll'ith a touch of (ove' 502 Mevada tliqfiway F^oukkT (ity, Fievada 293-1641 Legal Experience and a Common Sense Approach • 24 Year Henderson Resident • 25 Years of Legal Experience • Private Practice Attorney • Former City Attorney • Community Involved In the 1996 RJ Judicial Review, Dawson received top scores for pre-court preparation, as well as individual categories. (Dawson) "Knows the law and applies it correctly' Las Vegas Review Journal Judging The Judges, 1996 JUNE KENT JUSTICE OF THE PEACE Please feel free to call me at 384-0111. Paid for by the committee to retain Judge Dawson. PagC18 NEVADA FOOTBALL AUGUST 29, 1996 AUGUST 29. 1996 NEVADA FOOTBALL PaaC19

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Nevada Football: Class AAA Nevada Football: Class AAA = Mineral County; By the News Staff Mineral County will rely on the strength of players from an undefeated JV squad to fill their varsity program this year. Mineral returns just eight of 22 starters. Players from the undefeated JV team will hopefully step up to fill in. "We expect a large turnout and improvement in the offensive line," coach Scott Dean said. 'Team depth is questionable but School: Mineral County High School Nickname: Serpents School colors: Black/Gold Head coach: Scott Dean School enrollment: 348 off-season and preseason drills will answer many (of the) questions in front of us." Mineral County posted a 5-4 season record and 3-2 conference record last season. Three backfield positions are key in the areas to be filled. Last year's team was one game out of a playoff spot. Their goal this year is to improve with each practice. A strength this season will be the multiple offense, a version of the West Coast offense. Returning players include 210-pound fullback and linebacker Charles Tolliver, 175-pound tight end John Wachsmuth, 155-pound offensive linebacker Harley Rosemore and 160-pound offensive linebacker Travis Tommila. Chris Mann, a 190-pound offensive guard, returns, as does Todd Wright, a 185-pound safety. Dean has taken three schools to playoffs. He moved to Hawthorne to take over Mineral County from Westem-McEver High School in Oregon. ''Good Luck with all Your Goals!'' 4401 E. Sunset Sun-Thurs 10-10 Fri-Sat9-ll <.,ii,(^ 451-4146 (Across from the Olive Garden) = Whittell 4850 W. Flamingo Flamingo & Decatur Open 8am-Midnight Mon-Sat 873-6000 Good Luck Teams Have a Great Season! 87 East Lake Mead Drive across from St Rose Dommican Hospita 565-6511 • Fax 565-0580 By the News Staff Whittell will have a tough job replacing more than a dozen starters from last years 7-2 team that just missed the playoffs. Only five players return from that squad. This team will have to mature in a hurry to repeat last years success," said coach Butch Cattanach. "We will be very young and inexperienced since we graduated so many players. Our goal is a winning record and to make the playoffs." The five returning starters include Stephan Hambsch, a junior center/linebacker at 6-3, 200-pounds; John Topete, a senior running back/linebacker at 5-10, 190-pounds; Devin Apocotos, a junior offensive and from ONE SPORT TO ANOTHER Gators, Wolves, Skvhawks & Eagles SUM ^ 4565 E. Sunset Rd. 736-2695 y^ We have leagues for everyone School: Whittell High School Nickname: Warriors School colors: Red/Gold Head coach: Butch Cattanach School enrollment: 247 defensive lineman at 6-1, 225pounds; wide receiver Ryan McMillan, a 5-8,190-pound junior; and Matt Raab, a junior runningback/defensive back listed at 5-9, 150-pounds. Whittell will be strong at the "offensive line, receivers, and tailback," notes Cattanach. "Our weakness is our mostly young backfield and quick side of the line. Defensively, we are strong in the secondary and at linebacker, but weak on the line." Doug Pershing Cnty = White Pine By the News Staff Pershing County is another playoff team that lost a large group of seniors and will have to work hard to make it to post season play again this year. "Overall, I think our team will be weaker than last year," said coach Joe Yanni. "We lost a good group of seniors." The Mustangs return eight lettermen and six starters from last years team that went 6-4. The junior varsity team went 45. School: Pershing County High School Nickname: Mustangs School colort: Red/Black Head coach: Joe Yanni School enrollment: 221 "Our strength on offense is the skill players," Yanni said. "Our weakness is the line. On defense we should be solid, but we are weak at defensive end." Leading the Mustangs will be quarterback Casey Kiel, a 150pound senior and running back Nathan Martinez, who is also listed at 150-pounds. Nathan Swindlehurst will anchor the defense at the nose guard position. The senior weighs in at only 155-pounds, but will be joined by senior Travis Dirate, a 215-pound tackle. Senior Loren Cooney, a 170pound linebacker and Steven Fecht, a 155-pound defensive back will also help hold back any Division II opponents. For More Information On The Campaign Call 547-6089 Pouq':; Internet Address: http://wwwwbanct.com/bradford Clark County School 6oard District ,i P^id (or by Citi/nn:. tor Br^idlord By the News Staff The White Pine football team began its rebuilding cycle last season, and the growing pains were evident. They started the season losing their first four games, then bounced back to go 4-1 in conference play, and make the playoffs. "We should be better and have a much more experienced team," head coach Jeff Knutson said. Aaron Crow, White Pine's leading rusher last season and starting outside linebacker, has moved and will be unable to carry the team. Of the five sophomores the young squad started last season, four will be returning (Crow be= Moapa Valley. By the Newt Staff For Moapa Valley football, the 1995 season was full of many -accomplishments, including a victory in the AA and Division III state championship game. The prospects of winning the state title looked slim when the Pirates found themselves down 20-0 to Tahoe Truckee last Nov. 17 in the second half of the championship game. However, in one of the most storied comebacks in Nevada state high school playoff football history, Moapa erased the 20 point deficit and went on to win the championship, 21-20. "We hope to repeat and defend the Division and state championship," Moapa head coach Nick Bowler said. Bowler, who has a 45-17 lifetime record at Moapa, hopes a more balanced attack on offense can take Moapa back to the playoffs as well as improve on their 10-2 record of last season. School: White Pine High School Nickname: Bobcats School dolors: Blue/White Head coach: Jeff Knutson School Enrollment: 510 ing the other), and they include 175-pound inside linebacker Matt Braman, 180-pound guard Joe Sedlacek, 6-0 tight end Eric Jackson, and fullback Leevi Ahlvers. The quarterbaick position will be filled by Bohe Gleaue who was promoted from the junior varsity ranks. John Nakashira and Ryan Fullerton are also up from the junior varsity squad, and they will be playing wide receiver. School: Moapa Valley High School Nickname: Pirates School colors: Royal Blue/ Gold Head coach: Nick Bowler School enrollment: 567 The offense will have to be more balanced for the Pirates, since they lost their key halfback, Shane Hickman, to graduation. Replacing Hickman will be Brannon Batchelor, who had 252 yards rushing last season, and a 31 yard punt return average on special teams. "We will have a more balanced offense attack after losing a great runner (Hickman)," Bowler said. The Pirates will not lose anything from last season on defense as they return both talented inside linebackers in Doug Totten and Cody Hymas, who were first and second last season leading the team in tackles. = Yerington By the News Staff Yerington, fresh off its first homecoming victory in four years, looks to improve on its 27 record of last season. With a strong core of 16 returning lettermen, 13 of which are starters, the Lions chances of improvement are plenty. "Last year I had five sophomores starting for me," third year head coach Eric Bobrick said. "This year those five sophomores will be expected to step-up their game." Of those juniors, 180-pound running back MattMatheson will lead the offense, hoping to continue wherehe ended lastseason. School: Yeriogton High School Nickname: Lions School colors: PurpleAVhite Head coach: Eric Bobrick School enrollment: 386 leading the Lions in touchdowns. Junior Kasey Smith, who will play both quarterback and corner back this season, led the team in interceptions the previous year. Smith's main target will be tight end Luke Bonton, See Yerington Page 22 = Virgin Valley; By the News Staff Coming off an 8-2 season last year, the Virgin Valley football team is out to avenge its 22-19 loss to Moapa in the first round off the playoffs. Since the team only returns five starters, coach Kirk Hafen will rely heavily upon last season's junior varsity squad to make an immediate impact on the next level. "Our JV team was undefeated in league play, so we are counting on a lot of younger players to step up and fill in," Hafen said. "I am looking forward to the aggressive sty le of play our younger players demonstrated on junior varsity last season." One problem that needs to be addressed is who will replace last year's quarterback Mark Cheney. The two candidates fighting School: Virgin Valley High School Nickname: Bulldogs School colors: Kelly Green/ White Head coach: Kirk Hafen School enrollment: 399 for the starting job are Roby Hurley and Corby Frehner. "Our offense might struggle in the beginning, but once we find out who will fill in the quarterback position, we should improve each week," Hafen said. Hafen, who will try to improve on his five year, 42-11 record, will need a big season from senior receiver David Brotherson. Last season, Brotherson had 59 catches for 320 yards and four touchdowns. 'Let's Watch our Eagles Soar" GOOD LUCK Phyllis, Kon and the Staff 'll'ith a touch of (ove' 502 Mevada tliqfiway F^oukkT (ity, Fievada 293-1641 Legal Experience and a Common Sense Approach • 24 Year Henderson Resident • 25 Years of Legal Experience • Private Practice Attorney • Former City Attorney • Community Involved In the 1996 RJ Judicial Review, Dawson received top scores for pre-court preparation, as well as individual categories. (Dawson) "Knows the law and applies it correctly' Las Vegas Review Journal Judging The Judges, 1996 JUNE KENT JUSTICE OF THE PEACE Please feel free to call me at 384-0111. Paid for by the committee to retain Judge Dawson. PagC18 NEVADA FOOTBALL AUGUST 29, 1996 AUGUST 29. 1996 NEVADA FOOTBALL PaaC19

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• ^::vt.:-k!.m^^.,.,£: Nevada Football: Class AA 3 •= Carlin By th* Nw> Staff Out with the old and in with the new. That is the motto for the Carlin Railroaders, who went 0-9 last season. Last season between junior varsity and varsity, the program finished the year out with only 15 players. This season they have a new head coach, Dan Chappuis, who played college football at Western Montana College. School: Carlin High School Nickname: Railroaders School colors: ScarletAVhite Head coach: Dan Chappuis School enrollment: 169 "It was a tough year last year for the team," Chappuis said. "We are basically starting over from scratch." The team returns only four players and with a whole new coaching staff, anything positive will be a plus. 'There are a lot of new faces," Chappuis said. The team has had a turnout of 31 players for optional running and weight lifting in thesummer. Of those players, the two Chappuis is counting on to produce the most are Nick Madsen, a senior at 6-3, 200 pounds and quarterback Jaime Dennis at 62, 170 pounds. "To start off, we are going to need to execute, do a few things and do them well," Chappius said. Chappius remains positive and looks to future years to see the program shine. "Of the 31 players, we have four sophomores and 13 freshmen," Chappius said. = Independence By th News Staff The Independence Colts have a new head coach and a new game plan for this season. Clark Davidson, the new coach, has a new motto for the team: KISS — Keep it so simple. He hopes the team can capitalize on this theory. "Last year's squad tried to do too many things in the game of football," Davidson said. "My I GOOD LUCK EAGLES Bert's Electronic Service "*^ BERT BRECHLER 1312 Nevada Hwy., Suite B, Boulder City, NV 89005 TV & VCR REPAIR .SK\:i, (702) 293-0561 = Wells School: Independence High School Nickname: Colts School colors: Royal/White Head coach: Clark Davidson School enrollment: 152 Good Luck f jS_rVJH ^\JKr\ /-t'7"ciTv=Cj=rj=^"7^ to all Teams from BILL ANDREWS Allorney ^il l-^iw 508 Nevada Hwy., Ste. 4 • Boulder City • 294-1112 i,.iiii--' By th News Staff Wells, coming off a 5-4 record, returns just four lettermen for the 1996 prep football season. "We had a good season," coach Martin Linford said of last year's squad which won its last four games. "The highlight was beating Jackpot 62-14." But, there were downfalls. "The disappointment was losing to Owyhee and Eureka," Linford added. There will be plenty of holes to fill as Wells will be looking for a whole new offensive backfield as well as both ends. Linford expects Rett Reber, at tailback, and Cody Murphy, at fullback, to be key players and looks for the offensive and defensive lines to be strengths. This season, Linford said "we School: Wells High School Nickname: Leopards School colors: Orange/Black Head coach: Marty Linford School emrollment: 166 will be moving up a league to 11 man football, so we will see how we will do." Reber was all-conference last season as a sophomore and Brock Uhlig was all-conference last year as a junior offensive and defensive lineman. Other returning starters include: Jim Dahl, a 200-pound defensive lineman, Travis Bowlen, a 190-pound offensive and defensive lineman and Joe Hartsell, a 180-pound offensive and defensive lineman. own coaching philosophy is KISS. I believe that this will enable us to be competitive in the AA league. Structure and discipline, will be my main area of concentration in building this football program." Independence returns no players this year and has to fill every position for this fall. 'Thatnature of Independence High School (Nevada Youth Training Center) is for no players to return to this institution," Davidson said. Davidson said the strength for this year's squad should be team speed. With no returning players, the weakness is a lack of experience. The Colts posted a 3-6 record last year, with wins over Tonopah, Lovelock and Rite of Passage. STRONG VOICE FOR NEVADA = Beatty •••••••John Ensign U.S. CONGRESS By th News Staff Beatty High School finished one game out of the playoffs last season. Head coach Todd Klopp means to make that old news. Unfortunately for the Hornets, Fred Ibarra, who was voted best defensive player in the conference for two years, has graduated and heads to the military. Ibarra has two brothers in his footsteps. Twin brothers Diego and Pancho will step into running back and defensive tackle positions, respectively. Diego has what Klopp calls a "power running game"' and Pancho has been all-conference for two years. The Hornets,will look for quarterback Rick Jackson to power them. Klopp says he wants this season to be a year of passes. "He (Jackson) was the backup quarterback last year, so he's inexperienced," Klopp said. "He's School: Beatty High School Nickname: Hornets School colors: Green/Gold/ White Head coach: Todd Klopp School enrollment: 176 got good size and a good arm. He's a big kid." Klopp expects this year's squad to be bigger and stronger, but perhaps not as quick. The Hornets move this season to Division AA from Division A, which means 3 spots on each side of the ball are open. Klopp still looks to fill these positions. "We want to make sure to finish in the top of our league," Klopp said. Three of the teams have already been playing 11-man football, and Klopp feels the defending state champions from The Meadows are the team to beat. Pag* C20 NEVADA FOOTBALL AUGUST 29, 1996 Nevada Football: Class AA I'JJ! j(!j • :"m^_^.fjf'i,jnji' =Laughlin V =-Lincoln County By thNvra Staff With 13 varsity team members returning for the 1996 season, Laughlin hopes to capitalize on this and improve on last year's 27 record. "Our goal is to improve our defense and have a winning season," coach Mike Wolford said. Wolford noted that last year's offensive squad was consistent, setting records for pass offense. His concern this season is an inexperienced and small line, offensively and defensively. "I think we will be better," Wolford said. "We have more returning people and skill than in the past." Wolford anticipates improved defensive secondary, linebackers and offensive skill. Laughlin returns 180-pound quarterback Shane Boom this School: Laughlin Hi{^ School Nickname; Cougars School colors: Royal BIu^ Cobalt Blue/Silver Head coach: Mike Wolfonl School ennrilmeiit: 262 yeap Boom has passed for 2,600 yards in the last two seasons. Slotback Justin Burtsell, at 140 pounds, caught 46 passes last year and also returns. Both are seniors and three year lettermen. Junior Geronimo Schubert, a 190-pound tailback and defensive back, returns. Schubert rushed and received for a combined total of 670 yards last season. Defensively, Laughlin returns leading tackier Steve Warren, a 180-pound Unebacker. Warren will be a senior. By thNmv> Staff Despite a series of freak accidents in the 1995 season, the Lincoln County football teapi managed to end up at .500. First, the team's leading receiver broke his jaw when he passed out after getting a blood test at the hospital. Then, tailback Preston Wadsworth, who had a 9.5 yards per rush average, hit a deer on his motorcycle. Last, but not least, quarterback Colin Bleak broke his shoulder against Spring Creek. Bleak and Wadsworth are back this season, but the accidents continue to occur. Over the summer, starting center Marcos Escobodo fell out of a truck, requiring 19 stitches and giving him a gash that will keep him sideMned a month. Even with all the misfortunes, Lincoln County should still be strong. Schofri: Lincoln County High School : NidmameiLynx Sdiool colors: Red/White Head coach: Brad King Sdiool enrollment: 200 "We play well, considering we are one of the smallest schools in the league," head coach Brad King said. T^e team will run a traditional option offense led by two quarterbacks, Albert Frehner and Kent Christeiuien. Bleak, who has grown too big to run the option, topping the charts at 6-4, has movMl to flanker. Senior fullback Chris Matthews and his seven yards per carry return to ignite the option attadi. The defense will be strong with a m^ority of the players returning, including the anchor of the defense, 6-3,285-pound lineman Mark Young. Young is described by King as the team's "defensive strength." =The Meadows By thsNmvs staff First-year head coach Frank DeSantis has one goal for this upcoming season: for his Mustangs to repeat as state champions. This high expectation will be tough despite the fact The Meadows went 11-1 last season, its junior varsity was a perfect 90, and they only lost four seniors to graduation. But, the team will be forced to School: The Meadows School Niokniune: Mustaiigs SdnidcKdorr. Blue/Silver Head Goadit Frank Desantis School enrollment: 185 move up a division, fr-om Division I where they dominated to Division II, where their lack of depth could be the team's only problem. "Depth will be a problem going to 11-man footbsJI," DeSantis said in moving up from eightman football. The team will be lead by quarterback Andy Carron on the offensive side of the ball, and 215-pound tackle Tim Northington on defense. "We'll be more mature than last year," DeSantis said. Other returnees include: linebacker TJ Fechser, running bad(/linebacker Victor Wright, linebacker Chris Shucert, and running back Matt Pyneh. PUT THE SQUEEZE ON 'EM EAGLES! GEORGE ROSENBAUM, D.D.S. GENERAL DENTISTRY 899 Adams Boulevard Boulder City, Nevada 89005-2235 Office 293-0373 • Home293>5309 --S Tonopah By thaNawa staff Tonopah is "in the hunt"^for a conference title, according to coach Mike Domagala. The Muckers boasted their first winning season in 10 years last season with a 5-3 record. This year they join the AA conference and will face schools more their size. •. .-^^s-.v, Tonopah returns eight starters or lettermen from last year. They need to fill the offensive Une, backfield, linebackers and comers. "We are smaller than last year," Domagala said. "We have a lot of holes to fill because of graduation, but we have a good core of kids to build around." Among those returning are 165-pound senior David Bombard, who rushed for 350 yards last season. Barren Graunkel, at 220-pound8, led the team in sacks and tackles for losses, also returns, as does All-Conference defensive tackle Eduardo Miramontes, a 210-pound senior. Other retumersinclude Keahi DlUot, Sam Jeffrey and Ryan Perchetti. "We will have an entirely new backfield with only one player with experience," Domagala said. The Muckers won their first four games of the season last year, including victories over Lincoln County (27-0), North Tahoe (21-0) and Yerington (420). TERRIBLE'S LUBE 2601 Wigwam Parkway (Peoos & Wigwam) 306 N. Boulder Highway 6484 Annie Oakley (Sunset & Annie Oakley) 2718E.Tropfcana (Conner E. Trop. & Hanrison) J AUGUST 29, 1996 NEVADA FOOTBALL PaaC21

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• ^::vt.:-k!.m^^.,.,£: Nevada Football: Class AA 3 •= Carlin By th* Nw> Staff Out with the old and in with the new. That is the motto for the Carlin Railroaders, who went 0-9 last season. Last season between junior varsity and varsity, the program finished the year out with only 15 players. This season they have a new head coach, Dan Chappuis, who played college football at Western Montana College. School: Carlin High School Nickname: Railroaders School colors: ScarletAVhite Head coach: Dan Chappuis School enrollment: 169 "It was a tough year last year for the team," Chappuis said. "We are basically starting over from scratch." The team returns only four players and with a whole new coaching staff, anything positive will be a plus. 'There are a lot of new faces," Chappuis said. The team has had a turnout of 31 players for optional running and weight lifting in thesummer. Of those players, the two Chappuis is counting on to produce the most are Nick Madsen, a senior at 6-3, 200 pounds and quarterback Jaime Dennis at 62, 170 pounds. "To start off, we are going to need to execute, do a few things and do them well," Chappius said. Chappius remains positive and looks to future years to see the program shine. "Of the 31 players, we have four sophomores and 13 freshmen," Chappius said. = Independence By th News Staff The Independence Colts have a new head coach and a new game plan for this season. Clark Davidson, the new coach, has a new motto for the team: KISS — Keep it so simple. He hopes the team can capitalize on this theory. "Last year's squad tried to do too many things in the game of football," Davidson said. "My I GOOD LUCK EAGLES Bert's Electronic Service "*^ BERT BRECHLER 1312 Nevada Hwy., Suite B, Boulder City, NV 89005 TV & VCR REPAIR .SK\:i, (702) 293-0561 = Wells School: Independence High School Nickname: Colts School colors: Royal/White Head coach: Clark Davidson School enrollment: 152 Good Luck f jS_rVJH ^\JKr\ /-t'7"ciTv=Cj=rj=^"7^ to all Teams from BILL ANDREWS Allorney ^il l-^iw 508 Nevada Hwy., Ste. 4 • Boulder City • 294-1112 i,.iiii--' By th News Staff Wells, coming off a 5-4 record, returns just four lettermen for the 1996 prep football season. "We had a good season," coach Martin Linford said of last year's squad which won its last four games. "The highlight was beating Jackpot 62-14." But, there were downfalls. "The disappointment was losing to Owyhee and Eureka," Linford added. There will be plenty of holes to fill as Wells will be looking for a whole new offensive backfield as well as both ends. Linford expects Rett Reber, at tailback, and Cody Murphy, at fullback, to be key players and looks for the offensive and defensive lines to be strengths. This season, Linford said "we School: Wells High School Nickname: Leopards School colors: Orange/Black Head coach: Marty Linford School emrollment: 166 will be moving up a league to 11 man football, so we will see how we will do." Reber was all-conference last season as a sophomore and Brock Uhlig was all-conference last year as a junior offensive and defensive lineman. Other returning starters include: Jim Dahl, a 200-pound defensive lineman, Travis Bowlen, a 190-pound offensive and defensive lineman and Joe Hartsell, a 180-pound offensive and defensive lineman. own coaching philosophy is KISS. I believe that this will enable us to be competitive in the AA league. Structure and discipline, will be my main area of concentration in building this football program." Independence returns no players this year and has to fill every position for this fall. 'Thatnature of Independence High School (Nevada Youth Training Center) is for no players to return to this institution," Davidson said. Davidson said the strength for this year's squad should be team speed. With no returning players, the weakness is a lack of experience. The Colts posted a 3-6 record last year, with wins over Tonopah, Lovelock and Rite of Passage. STRONG VOICE FOR NEVADA = Beatty •••••••John Ensign U.S. CONGRESS By th News Staff Beatty High School finished one game out of the playoffs last season. Head coach Todd Klopp means to make that old news. Unfortunately for the Hornets, Fred Ibarra, who was voted best defensive player in the conference for two years, has graduated and heads to the military. Ibarra has two brothers in his footsteps. Twin brothers Diego and Pancho will step into running back and defensive tackle positions, respectively. Diego has what Klopp calls a "power running game"' and Pancho has been all-conference for two years. The Hornets,will look for quarterback Rick Jackson to power them. Klopp says he wants this season to be a year of passes. "He (Jackson) was the backup quarterback last year, so he's inexperienced," Klopp said. "He's School: Beatty High School Nickname: Hornets School colors: Green/Gold/ White Head coach: Todd Klopp School enrollment: 176 got good size and a good arm. He's a big kid." Klopp expects this year's squad to be bigger and stronger, but perhaps not as quick. The Hornets move this season to Division AA from Division A, which means 3 spots on each side of the ball are open. Klopp still looks to fill these positions. "We want to make sure to finish in the top of our league," Klopp said. Three of the teams have already been playing 11-man football, and Klopp feels the defending state champions from The Meadows are the team to beat. Pag* C20 NEVADA FOOTBALL AUGUST 29, 1996 Nevada Football: Class AA I'JJ! j(!j • :"m^_^.fjf'i,jnji' =Laughlin V =-Lincoln County By thNvra Staff With 13 varsity team members returning for the 1996 season, Laughlin hopes to capitalize on this and improve on last year's 27 record. "Our goal is to improve our defense and have a winning season," coach Mike Wolford said. Wolford noted that last year's offensive squad was consistent, setting records for pass offense. His concern this season is an inexperienced and small line, offensively and defensively. "I think we will be better," Wolford said. "We have more returning people and skill than in the past." Wolford anticipates improved defensive secondary, linebackers and offensive skill. Laughlin returns 180-pound quarterback Shane Boom this School: Laughlin Hi{^ School Nickname; Cougars School colors: Royal BIu^ Cobalt Blue/Silver Head coach: Mike Wolfonl School ennrilmeiit: 262 yeap Boom has passed for 2,600 yards in the last two seasons. Slotback Justin Burtsell, at 140 pounds, caught 46 passes last year and also returns. Both are seniors and three year lettermen. Junior Geronimo Schubert, a 190-pound tailback and defensive back, returns. Schubert rushed and received for a combined total of 670 yards last season. Defensively, Laughlin returns leading tackier Steve Warren, a 180-pound Unebacker. Warren will be a senior. By thNmv> Staff Despite a series of freak accidents in the 1995 season, the Lincoln County football teapi managed to end up at .500. First, the team's leading receiver broke his jaw when he passed out after getting a blood test at the hospital. Then, tailback Preston Wadsworth, who had a 9.5 yards per rush average, hit a deer on his motorcycle. Last, but not least, quarterback Colin Bleak broke his shoulder against Spring Creek. Bleak and Wadsworth are back this season, but the accidents continue to occur. Over the summer, starting center Marcos Escobodo fell out of a truck, requiring 19 stitches and giving him a gash that will keep him sideMned a month. Even with all the misfortunes, Lincoln County should still be strong. Schofri: Lincoln County High School : NidmameiLynx Sdiool colors: Red/White Head coach: Brad King Sdiool enrollment: 200 "We play well, considering we are one of the smallest schools in the league," head coach Brad King said. T^e team will run a traditional option offense led by two quarterbacks, Albert Frehner and Kent Christeiuien. Bleak, who has grown too big to run the option, topping the charts at 6-4, has movMl to flanker. Senior fullback Chris Matthews and his seven yards per carry return to ignite the option attadi. The defense will be strong with a m^ority of the players returning, including the anchor of the defense, 6-3,285-pound lineman Mark Young. Young is described by King as the team's "defensive strength." =The Meadows By thsNmvs staff First-year head coach Frank DeSantis has one goal for this upcoming season: for his Mustangs to repeat as state champions. This high expectation will be tough despite the fact The Meadows went 11-1 last season, its junior varsity was a perfect 90, and they only lost four seniors to graduation. But, the team will be forced to School: The Meadows School Niokniune: Mustaiigs SdnidcKdorr. Blue/Silver Head Goadit Frank Desantis School enrollment: 185 move up a division, fr-om Division I where they dominated to Division II, where their lack of depth could be the team's only problem. "Depth will be a problem going to 11-man footbsJI," DeSantis said in moving up from eightman football. The team will be lead by quarterback Andy Carron on the offensive side of the ball, and 215-pound tackle Tim Northington on defense. "We'll be more mature than last year," DeSantis said. Other returnees include: linebacker TJ Fechser, running bad(/linebacker Victor Wright, linebacker Chris Shucert, and running back Matt Pyneh. PUT THE SQUEEZE ON 'EM EAGLES! GEORGE ROSENBAUM, D.D.S. GENERAL DENTISTRY 899 Adams Boulevard Boulder City, Nevada 89005-2235 Office 293-0373 • Home293>5309 --S Tonopah By thaNawa staff Tonopah is "in the hunt"^for a conference title, according to coach Mike Domagala. The Muckers boasted their first winning season in 10 years last season with a 5-3 record. This year they join the AA conference and will face schools more their size. •. .-^^s-.v, Tonopah returns eight starters or lettermen from last year. They need to fill the offensive Une, backfield, linebackers and comers. "We are smaller than last year," Domagala said. "We have a lot of holes to fill because of graduation, but we have a good core of kids to build around." Among those returning are 165-pound senior David Bombard, who rushed for 350 yards last season. Barren Graunkel, at 220-pound8, led the team in sacks and tackles for losses, also returns, as does All-Conference defensive tackle Eduardo Miramontes, a 210-pound senior. Other retumersinclude Keahi DlUot, Sam Jeffrey and Ryan Perchetti. "We will have an entirely new backfield with only one player with experience," Domagala said. The Muckers won their first four games of the season last year, including victories over Lincoln County (27-0), North Tahoe (21-0) and Yerington (420). TERRIBLE'S LUBE 2601 Wigwam Parkway (Peoos & Wigwam) 306 N. Boulder Highway 6484 Annie Oakley (Sunset & Annie Oakley) 2718E.Tropfcana (Conner E. Trop. & Hanrison) J AUGUST 29, 1996 NEVADA FOOTBALL PaaC21

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Nevada FooflMi: Class = Needles. WestWendover By viv Nsws Staff ,. Needles began last season with disappointing losses. In their first three games, the Mustangs fell by just three points. Ihey finished their season 36. Had coach Ed Campbell hopes to change that this year. "It was a difDcult start," Campbell said. "We could have turned the Whole thing around. We had the opportunity to make a difference." Like many teams, Needles was affected by die revamping of the division lines in AA. No longer will the team endure 12-hour' bus rides to get to a game. "With the reorganization, we want to be able to compete in every game," Campbell said, '^eil have to wait and see what happens after that" Campbell will play the same guys on the offensive and defensive lines. Defensively, he hopes pBchool: Needles Hi^ School Nickname: Mustangs School coloTst Royal Bhie/ White Head coach: Ed Campbell Sdhool enrollment: 30^ to reduce the number ofbig plays that other teams come up with. "We're going to change things around to what we do better," Campbell said. Offensively, he hopes to reduce the number of penalties called against his team. The Mustangs return senior center Toby Brace, who also plays noseguard. Quarterback David Kellar will only be a junior this year, but he has the experience of starting most of last season. Running back Tom Belt.went for 400 yards last year. Wide receiver Larry Bemall also returns. ByttwNMvaSMff WestWendover, anew school, has lofty goals as it kicks off a football program this season. "Our goal is to be competitive and improve with each game," head coach Craig Kyllonen said. Kyllonen comes to West Wendover from Carlin High School. This season, with a fresh group of athletes, Kyllonen plans to rely on a running game. "A lot of our offense will be run orientated," Kyllonen said. The ground attack will be led by 6-2, 280-pound senior tackle B.J. Boyce, who is expected to be a big asset to his team. 'He (Boyce) is a kid who has learned the game of football, 1 look for big things from him," Kyllonen said. William Yazzi, a 5-10, 175pound senior, will be the halfback responsible for pounding the ball out on the ground. MclmaaeiWdhnatiDeB 8dbmlcaloBiiigiaK|y;Sted( Bead coaGteOaigK^anen "William reads the holes really well, and is a good power YERINGTON From Page 19 runner," Kyllonen added. Defensively, the squad will rel]( on the same athletes in their 4-4 aUgnment. Kyllonen looks for big plays from his comerback, senior Yarum Allen, who is 5-6, 130 pounds. Bobrick explains how his team's obstacles include a low turnout for the varsity and junior varsity program, and the team playing inconsistently. "I feel that we will play with more consistency on the offensive and defensive sides of the ball," Bobrick said. The defense is anchored by 1995 All-State selection, senior Vic Sam, who will hne up at defensive and offensive tackle for the Lions. Returning at linebacker is Robert Meachum. He returned an interception for a touchdown last season. • ^^^"SJ^V • ." • THANKS TO AH THE CQACHESU ^MbMta The PfeclPlacjTo Plj ondHomsportJ," ^osspalsm**—caiiW i-^' ^i^i ?ioo Oltjmpif Avenue in Green Valleij (702) /,5/,-6ooo ^^5#€W^ PaeC22 NEVADA FOOTIAU AUGUST 29, 1996 5Jackpot = Smith Valley By the Nm Staff Mike Strom can look for most of his team to return to play for Jackpot this year. He lost only a quarterback and a center to graduation. After finishing last season 44, this season's prospects for the Jaguars look good. "We're in good shape," Strom said. "We've got more size today than we've had in awhile." te: JagufTs il colors: Blue/SilVeir Headi eoaeh: Mike Sfarom BytheNwMtStaff Second-year head coach Shawn Frankhn and his Smith Valley football team enters the 1996 season with five returning starters and eight returning lettermen. Of the returnees, quarterback Justin Moore and running back Andy Hruby will be called upon to again carry an offense Uiat scored 284 points in eight games last season, helping Smith Valley to a 7-2 record (Smith Valley defeated Gabbs for their seventh win by forfeit). School: Smith Valley High Niolmaine: Bulldogs School colon: Roytd taiae/ White HM[vA(Boaeh:Shawn Franklio Sdiool enrollment: 102 Smith Valley had several blowout victories, includinga 7424 win over Jackpot, and a 52-6 win over McDermitt. "The highlight of our season was the squads' all-around offense," Franklin said. For the team to reach its peak, it will need to fill some holes on defense, most importantly at linebacker and all alimg the defensive line. Franklin notes his team's weakness will be the young Kne, resulting from the msjority of his linemen graduating. "We are weakler in our line positions," Franklin said. Other returning players fiom last year include: Ryan Smith at defensive back, Terry Fleck at defensive end, and Mark Nuti on defense. Strom says the team has been improving. Playing the eight-man line, Strom says, means that teams need players who are able to play different positions. The Jaguars have a few of those utility players, including Ryan Walker and William Tucker, who both return this year. The Jaguars also return receiver Adrian Guzman. Returning linemen Alex Torrero and Tony Holgate also will be back for Jackpot this season. Strom and the Jaguars will look to these players for experience and leadership this season. Strom's goal this year is simple: To make the playoffs." The team will look to last year's JV quarterback Max Bear to help get them there. Strom is confident in the ability of his team to make it to the playoffs. "I really think they can," he said. '^-?V; :;•: • • .' • ; • • • ^ = Pahranagat Valley By the News staff Pahranagat Valley football is looking to put a 2-6 1995 campaign behind them and move forward into this season. Last season they were hindered by injuries and illnesses that prevented the team from reaching its full potential. "With a good core of seniors we should hang in there," head coach Mike Strong said. The team will be anchored by two seniors: runningback Joey Morley(6-l, 175 pounds) and defensive end Travis Rudder (6-1, 170). Morley will be making the transition firom quarterback to runningback this season. Also, he was an all-conference selection on defense for the Panthers last season. The coach feels the success for Pahranagat Valley will be the play of the line. School: Pahranagat Vall^ Hig^School Niofcname; Panthers Sdbiool cfdonB Bcgral iffliuCaid Head coach: Mike Strong School enrollment: 110 "Our line has come around and will do a good job for us," Strong said. The goal for this year's team is to have a record above the .500 mark and to qualify for the playoffs. "The league has changed and so have our chances without Beatty and The Meadows being in our division," Strong concluded. ^ If You Want Change and Community Involvement... ELECT YOLANDA TONNIE" STIBOR School Board Trustee District A Endorsed By: • Southern NV Central Labor Council (AR^O) • Clark County School District Police Officers Assoc. • North Las Vegas Police Officers Assoc. I* Henderson Police Officers Assoc. ,? Nevada-Cops (Statewkie Police Assoc.] Las Vegas Police Protective Assoc., Metro, Inc. • Education Support Employees Assoc. • Clark County Classroom Teachers Assoc,' • International Brotherhood Electrical Workers 357. Paid for by the Committee to Elect, Ch. Marie Gervasi = McDermitt By the Nmra Staff McDermittheadfootball coach Greg Scott enters his first season with the school, inheriting a team that went 0-9 last season. This will be a rebuilding year since we haven't won in a few years," Scott said. Hie Bulldogs will construct their rebuilding process behind three sophomores: Cody Young, Monte Modderll, and Derek Hink6y. ITiis trio combined with junior quarterback Daniel Simmerman will be counted on to nm a balanced attack. They plan on mixing up a running and passing attack to keep a balance on the offensive side of the ball. On defense, Scott will use a l^chool: McDermitt High i:Blu6/White ch:Midiael Scott iirottment: 68 four-man line that should let his defenders utib ze their aggressive style of play. "^e are impressive on defense and have kids who like to hit," Scott said. Despite recent poor seasons, the Bulldogs still havehigh hopes of making the playoffs. "Since there are only four teams in our league, we have to have a good shot at the playoffs," Scott concluded. For Family Court Judge m.m GARY REDMON Experience, Credibility M Understanding • Gary brings over 23 years of Family, Civil and Criminal Law to the court-.with emphasis on Family Law • Gary is a former Deputy District Attorney and Special Prosecutor • An 82nd Airborne Veteran and a Las Vegas family man for twenty-seven years • Gary is active in civic and community orgammtions • Gary Redmon: the right person for the right job! Gary Redmoiu Endorsed by those who know the Law: Las Vegas Police Protective Association (Metro) North Las Vegas Police Association, Inc. Nevada Conference of Police and Sheriffs Henderson Police Officers Association Southern Nevada Central Labor Council VOTE GARY REDMON FAMILY COURT JUDGE DEPT. H PAD roil BY THE COMMrrm TO EiXCT GARY REDMON. Ch. J.T McClany AUGUST 29. 1996 NEVADA FOOTtALL PaC23

PAGE 57

Nevada FooflMi: Class = Needles. WestWendover By viv Nsws Staff ,. Needles began last season with disappointing losses. In their first three games, the Mustangs fell by just three points. Ihey finished their season 36. Had coach Ed Campbell hopes to change that this year. "It was a difDcult start," Campbell said. "We could have turned the Whole thing around. We had the opportunity to make a difference." Like many teams, Needles was affected by die revamping of the division lines in AA. No longer will the team endure 12-hour' bus rides to get to a game. "With the reorganization, we want to be able to compete in every game," Campbell said, '^eil have to wait and see what happens after that" Campbell will play the same guys on the offensive and defensive lines. Defensively, he hopes pBchool: Needles Hi^ School Nickname: Mustangs School coloTst Royal Bhie/ White Head coach: Ed Campbell Sdhool enrollment: 30^ to reduce the number ofbig plays that other teams come up with. "We're going to change things around to what we do better," Campbell said. Offensively, he hopes to reduce the number of penalties called against his team. The Mustangs return senior center Toby Brace, who also plays noseguard. Quarterback David Kellar will only be a junior this year, but he has the experience of starting most of last season. Running back Tom Belt.went for 400 yards last year. Wide receiver Larry Bemall also returns. ByttwNMvaSMff WestWendover, anew school, has lofty goals as it kicks off a football program this season. "Our goal is to be competitive and improve with each game," head coach Craig Kyllonen said. Kyllonen comes to West Wendover from Carlin High School. This season, with a fresh group of athletes, Kyllonen plans to rely on a running game. "A lot of our offense will be run orientated," Kyllonen said. The ground attack will be led by 6-2, 280-pound senior tackle B.J. Boyce, who is expected to be a big asset to his team. 'He (Boyce) is a kid who has learned the game of football, 1 look for big things from him," Kyllonen said. William Yazzi, a 5-10, 175pound senior, will be the halfback responsible for pounding the ball out on the ground. MclmaaeiWdhnatiDeB 8dbmlcaloBiiigiaK|y;Sted( Bead coaGteOaigK^anen "William reads the holes really well, and is a good power YERINGTON From Page 19 runner," Kyllonen added. Defensively, the squad will rel]( on the same athletes in their 4-4 aUgnment. Kyllonen looks for big plays from his comerback, senior Yarum Allen, who is 5-6, 130 pounds. Bobrick explains how his team's obstacles include a low turnout for the varsity and junior varsity program, and the team playing inconsistently. "I feel that we will play with more consistency on the offensive and defensive sides of the ball," Bobrick said. The defense is anchored by 1995 All-State selection, senior Vic Sam, who will hne up at defensive and offensive tackle for the Lions. Returning at linebacker is Robert Meachum. He returned an interception for a touchdown last season. • ^^^"SJ^V • ." • THANKS TO AH THE CQACHESU ^MbMta The PfeclPlacjTo Plj ondHomsportJ," ^osspalsm**—caiiW i-^' ^i^i ?ioo Oltjmpif Avenue in Green Valleij (702) /,5/,-6ooo ^^5#€W^ PaeC22 NEVADA FOOTIAU AUGUST 29, 1996 5Jackpot = Smith Valley By the Nm Staff Mike Strom can look for most of his team to return to play for Jackpot this year. He lost only a quarterback and a center to graduation. After finishing last season 44, this season's prospects for the Jaguars look good. "We're in good shape," Strom said. "We've got more size today than we've had in awhile." te: JagufTs il colors: Blue/SilVeir Headi eoaeh: Mike Sfarom BytheNwMtStaff Second-year head coach Shawn Frankhn and his Smith Valley football team enters the 1996 season with five returning starters and eight returning lettermen. Of the returnees, quarterback Justin Moore and running back Andy Hruby will be called upon to again carry an offense Uiat scored 284 points in eight games last season, helping Smith Valley to a 7-2 record (Smith Valley defeated Gabbs for their seventh win by forfeit). School: Smith Valley High Niolmaine: Bulldogs School colon: Roytd taiae/ White HM[vA(Boaeh:Shawn Franklio Sdiool enrollment: 102 Smith Valley had several blowout victories, includinga 7424 win over Jackpot, and a 52-6 win over McDermitt. "The highlight of our season was the squads' all-around offense," Franklin said. For the team to reach its peak, it will need to fill some holes on defense, most importantly at linebacker and all alimg the defensive line. Franklin notes his team's weakness will be the young Kne, resulting from the msjority of his linemen graduating. "We are weakler in our line positions," Franklin said. Other returning players fiom last year include: Ryan Smith at defensive back, Terry Fleck at defensive end, and Mark Nuti on defense. Strom says the team has been improving. Playing the eight-man line, Strom says, means that teams need players who are able to play different positions. The Jaguars have a few of those utility players, including Ryan Walker and William Tucker, who both return this year. The Jaguars also return receiver Adrian Guzman. Returning linemen Alex Torrero and Tony Holgate also will be back for Jackpot this season. Strom and the Jaguars will look to these players for experience and leadership this season. Strom's goal this year is simple: To make the playoffs." The team will look to last year's JV quarterback Max Bear to help get them there. Strom is confident in the ability of his team to make it to the playoffs. "I really think they can," he said. '^-?V; :;•: • • .' • ; • • • ^ = Pahranagat Valley By the News staff Pahranagat Valley football is looking to put a 2-6 1995 campaign behind them and move forward into this season. Last season they were hindered by injuries and illnesses that prevented the team from reaching its full potential. "With a good core of seniors we should hang in there," head coach Mike Strong said. The team will be anchored by two seniors: runningback Joey Morley(6-l, 175 pounds) and defensive end Travis Rudder (6-1, 170). Morley will be making the transition firom quarterback to runningback this season. Also, he was an all-conference selection on defense for the Panthers last season. The coach feels the success for Pahranagat Valley will be the play of the line. School: Pahranagat Vall^ Hig^School Niofcname; Panthers Sdbiool cfdonB Bcgral iffliuCaid Head coach: Mike Strong School enrollment: 110 "Our line has come around and will do a good job for us," Strong said. The goal for this year's team is to have a record above the .500 mark and to qualify for the playoffs. "The league has changed and so have our chances without Beatty and The Meadows being in our division," Strong concluded. ^ If You Want Change and Community Involvement... ELECT YOLANDA TONNIE" STIBOR School Board Trustee District A Endorsed By: • Southern NV Central Labor Council (AR^O) • Clark County School District Police Officers Assoc. • North Las Vegas Police Officers Assoc. I* Henderson Police Officers Assoc. ,? Nevada-Cops (Statewkie Police Assoc.] Las Vegas Police Protective Assoc., Metro, Inc. • Education Support Employees Assoc. • Clark County Classroom Teachers Assoc,' • International Brotherhood Electrical Workers 357. Paid for by the Committee to Elect, Ch. Marie Gervasi = McDermitt By the Nmra Staff McDermittheadfootball coach Greg Scott enters his first season with the school, inheriting a team that went 0-9 last season. This will be a rebuilding year since we haven't won in a few years," Scott said. Hie Bulldogs will construct their rebuilding process behind three sophomores: Cody Young, Monte Modderll, and Derek Hink6y. ITiis trio combined with junior quarterback Daniel Simmerman will be counted on to nm a balanced attack. They plan on mixing up a running and passing attack to keep a balance on the offensive side of the ball. On defense, Scott will use a l^chool: McDermitt High i:Blu6/White ch:Midiael Scott iirottment: 68 four-man line that should let his defenders utib ze their aggressive style of play. "^e are impressive on defense and have kids who like to hit," Scott said. Despite recent poor seasons, the Bulldogs still havehigh hopes of making the playoffs. "Since there are only four teams in our league, we have to have a good shot at the playoffs," Scott concluded. For Family Court Judge m.m GARY REDMON Experience, Credibility M Understanding • Gary brings over 23 years of Family, Civil and Criminal Law to the court-.with emphasis on Family Law • Gary is a former Deputy District Attorney and Special Prosecutor • An 82nd Airborne Veteran and a Las Vegas family man for twenty-seven years • Gary is active in civic and community orgammtions • Gary Redmon: the right person for the right job! Gary Redmoiu Endorsed by those who know the Law: Las Vegas Police Protective Association (Metro) North Las Vegas Police Association, Inc. Nevada Conference of Police and Sheriffs Henderson Police Officers Association Southern Nevada Central Labor Council VOTE GARY REDMON FAMILY COURT JUDGE DEPT. H PAD roil BY THE COMMrrm TO EiXCT GARY REDMON. Ch. J.T McClany AUGUST 29. 1996 NEVADA FOOTtALL PaC23

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PW" ^^mm mm ^fi^^OliSH^ s Spring Mountain! BythaNMwStafff Spring Mountain coach Rich Logan has a quick team, but an inexperienced squad as the prep football season gets under way. Td say about 90% of this team has never played any form of football,"Logan said. "We're very inexperienced." But, Logan is quick to add the team *has good enthusiasm and the kids are working hard." The squad was 2-6 last season, but Logan said the team ."was pretty strong, but we lost a couple of close ones." The Tigers will rely on on quarterback Corey Primm, a 510,160-pound quarterback. "He's got good leadership and he's a good athlete," Logan said. Others expected to be key MONDAY FRIDAY 7:30 ^S3{ players include Johnson Porter, a 5-11,185-pound running back. Matt Davis, a 5-10, 220-pound offensive lineman, Cody Merrill, a 6-1, 180-pound tight end/defensive end and Travis Shaw, a 5-10,170-pound linebacker. Logan said the team will use a lot of shotgun and run-and-shoot on offense with Primm leading the way. "Hell be doing a lot of throwing and running," Logan said. "We're not that big, but the kids have good attitudes," Logan said. :-^VfS/^-^M -= Indian Springs; For Indian Springs, experience mii^ttranilate into success. After starting the 1995 season off with a 5-0 record, then finishing off by going 1-3, the lliimdeilrirds look to cash in on the experience of the offense. Leading the attack is sophomore Andrew Faga, who passed for 1,400 yards and rushed for 600 yards as a freshman. Faga, an all-conference selectaon,has earned praisefromhead coadi Ben Johnson. "Heisavery talented athlete," Johnson said. "We might lose him to a AAAA school because of his talents." Andrew is not the only Faga in the family expected to help the lliundeibirds. Joe Faga, a 6-0, 260-pound senior and cousin of Andrew, is the fullback. Joehas also caught the eye of some college recruiters. Also returning to the squad is Joey Gibson, an all-conference selection who gained over 1,200 yards last season. • V':'' '. ^ V-OCATEO,^^ SERVING 89015 Defensively, Indian Springs is led by defeniive end John Cochran (6^, 190 pounds) v^o was another all>conference selection last year. Joe Faga and aggretsive linri>acker Aaron Fisher also will be keys. Tliey will be using the 4-4 formation on defense, and have a 60-50 balanced attadi on offenae between the run and the pass. As for the goals of the team, the team is aiming high. "For the first time in school history, we want to win the league title and play in the championshipgame," according to Johnson. = Round 4^ Mountain = ^SATURDAf" by APPOINTMENT ..;-:i3*sM:"';i'''7'-;J • ;^';^ v.,;^;r And Easy Access for Boulder City 89005 Green Valley 89014 ^w.^ H^9f\ Specializing In The Treatment Of: 0 Personal Injuries gl Whiplash/Neck Injuries £1 Pain Management £1 Sprain/Strain Injuries £) Shoulder/Knee Injuries £) Bursitls/Neuritls/Artiiritis William RandaU MS.. P.T. Rick Tdbee M.S.. P.T. Ask your doctor to write your physicai therapy prescription to HENDERSON PHYSIQIL THERAPY 564-6712 129 W. Lake Mead Dr., Suite 2 ^1^ Henderson Physical Therapy is proud to support the community through the Henderson Chamber of Commerce •if tiwNmn Staff The 1996 Round Mountain football team is beginning a rough rebuilding process tha^ started when 11 seniors gradu-: ated last year. In 1995, they were undefeated until the championship game, where they lost to The Meadows. This season is a rebuilding year, but we still look to be competitive," fifth-year head coach John Jacobs said. "Our goal is to make the playoffs." lool 1 Niokuame: Kni£^ School colors: Bladk^flver Head coach: Joa Jacobs School enrollment: 125 The game plan on offense i^ simple. "Do not beat ourselvesi and to be conservative," Jacobs said. This strategy is orchestrated by junior quarterback Jason Cooley and junior halfback Craig Bums. On defense the team's motto is "bend but do not break." With so many new kids entering the program with hopes of replacing the players of past, Jacobs is not sure who will be the key. Two leaders on defense are expected to be juniors Sean Hanson, at 6-0, ITO-pounds, and Nathan Demchuck at 6-0, 210pounds. "We lost a ton of playeri,* Jacobs said. H^finOa roelMI: Class A = Eureka By IhaNmvB staff The Eureka Vandals finished last season with their second consecutive trip to the state semifinals. Despite losing in both appearances. Eureka played well. "We were really successful up north," assistant coach Rod Garcia said. This year, the squad will be shifted from the northern division to the southern division to compete in football. The Vandals will rely on the leadership of quarterback Giovanni Tognoni, who was a first-team all-league selection last season and the offensive player of the year. =Faith Lutheran Pa8aC24 NEVADA FOOTIAU AUGUST 29, 1996 BythaNmnStaff ^ '. First-year coach Paul Stark and his Faith Lutheran football squad have one goal for the 1996 campaign: "to improve arid take the program in the right dii^ection." 'r According to Stark, that will be the primary focus for a team that was blanked lastseason with an 0-9 record. Without star running back Devon Washington who graduated in 1995, the Crasaders will rely on fullback/linebacker John Tolentio to carry the load on both sides of the ball. On offense, Tolentio will get help from two returning wide receivers, junior Nate Youmans and senior Guy Sutton. Combined, the duo accounted for 400 yards receiving. Defensively, Faith Lutheran will run a 3-2 monster with Sdiool: Faith Lutiteran^Hii^ School Nidaunne: (^asadera Sdiool colon: Bftutxi/G<^ Headcoach: Paul Stark SdboolmiHiieiit: 125 Tolentio starting at middle linebacker. "We hope to improve every game and get the most out of our ability," Stark said. "We will do what we have the ability to do." The Crusaders will capitalize on a strong non-conference schedule, featuring a road trip to Palm Springs, Calif., to face West Shores to toughen them up. "A pretty tough non-conference schedule will prepare us for conference play," Stark concluded. — Owyh^e By thaNwvs Staff Owyhee Hifh School finished last season with a trip to the state semifinals. Ihey are looking to do the same this year. With an 8-1 regular season, the Braves fell to Round Mountain in the state semifinals, winding up with an 8-2 overall record. Head coach Scott Guthrie's goals for this season are to win the division and head to state. The Braves need to fill two running back positions, the quarterback spot and a wide receiver, but Guthrie says they have kids who can step up to do the job. Guthrie is looking at a team similar to last year's. The Braves do have their share of returnees. Defensive and offensive end Lee Dodson returns along with offensive and defensive lineman Timmy Jones. Gene Curtis, a linebacker and fallback, also retumr to the squad, as does outside linebacker and end Dirk mmmmmmmm Nicknanie: Braves Soh^l color*: RedAVhite/ Blue, Biead coach: J. Scott Guthrie School enrollment: 97 Kelly. Safety and running back Melvin Hanchor and defensive and running back William Whiterock also return. The Braves will look to new quarterback Dominique Bondley Uiis year for leaderahip. Bondley didn't play for the Brave%last season, but Guthrie says that Bondley is strong, with the ability to do the job. Guthrie expects the team's strength this year to be the offensive and defensive lines. "Our lines last year were pretty inexperienced," Guthrie said. This year, well have more experience." Areas that need to be worked on according to Guthrie are skill positions, such as quarterback, running back and receivers. Sdhool: Eureka High School Nldaiame: Vandals Sdbioolcdm: Green/Gold Head eoach: Dennia Wells Sdtool enroUineat: 63 Tognoni will guide an offense that is planning on controlling the line of scrimmage and running the ball at opponents. "We are a ball-control team," Garcia said. "We will try to control the clock, line of scrimmage, and run the ball down their throats." The Vandals will look to Josh Boren, the team's only returning line player, to help control the line. On offense. Eureka will rdy^ on the speed of senior wide out Luke Haplin. On defense, the squad looks to attack the opponent. "We will beat them up and down, and let the linebackers do their jobs," Garcia said. COLLECE FOOTBALL PAY-PER-VIEW ANY CLOSER TO THE ACTION AND YOU'LL NEED A HELMET! ._^]|VE PUT YOU ON THE 50 YARD LINE EVERY SATURDAY. "^ "• LIVE ABC SPORTS COLLEQE ACTION FROM ESPN. EXCLUSIVE PAY-PER-VIEW COVERAOE OF THE OAMES NOT AVAILABLE ON LOCAL BROADCAST TV. CFA, THE BI6 TEN, PAC 10, BIO S. SEC, SWC, ACC, WAC AND BIO EAST CONFERENCES. WATCH ESPN'S C0LLE6E FOOTBALL WEEKEND KICK-OFF SNOW EVERY THURSDAY AT 7:30 PM (ET) AND C0LLE6E FOOTBALL 6AMEDAV,. EVERY SATURDAY AT 11:30 AM (ET| FOR MORE DETAILS. pniM^e Must have a cable box, some restrictton apply Serving the Community To Ontor Call: 1-800485 E8PM For IndhAdual Sat. Games 1-8008SPACK For Season TickatB AUGUST 29, 1996 NEVADA FOOTBALL PaeC2S

PAGE 59

PW" ^^mm mm ^fi^^OliSH^ s Spring Mountain! BythaNMwStafff Spring Mountain coach Rich Logan has a quick team, but an inexperienced squad as the prep football season gets under way. Td say about 90% of this team has never played any form of football,"Logan said. "We're very inexperienced." But, Logan is quick to add the team *has good enthusiasm and the kids are working hard." The squad was 2-6 last season, but Logan said the team ."was pretty strong, but we lost a couple of close ones." The Tigers will rely on on quarterback Corey Primm, a 510,160-pound quarterback. "He's got good leadership and he's a good athlete," Logan said. Others expected to be key MONDAY FRIDAY 7:30 ^S3{ players include Johnson Porter, a 5-11,185-pound running back. Matt Davis, a 5-10, 220-pound offensive lineman, Cody Merrill, a 6-1, 180-pound tight end/defensive end and Travis Shaw, a 5-10,170-pound linebacker. Logan said the team will use a lot of shotgun and run-and-shoot on offense with Primm leading the way. "Hell be doing a lot of throwing and running," Logan said. "We're not that big, but the kids have good attitudes," Logan said. :-^VfS/^-^M -= Indian Springs; For Indian Springs, experience mii^ttranilate into success. After starting the 1995 season off with a 5-0 record, then finishing off by going 1-3, the lliimdeilrirds look to cash in on the experience of the offense. Leading the attack is sophomore Andrew Faga, who passed for 1,400 yards and rushed for 600 yards as a freshman. Faga, an all-conference selectaon,has earned praisefromhead coadi Ben Johnson. "Heisavery talented athlete," Johnson said. "We might lose him to a AAAA school because of his talents." Andrew is not the only Faga in the family expected to help the lliundeibirds. Joe Faga, a 6-0, 260-pound senior and cousin of Andrew, is the fullback. Joehas also caught the eye of some college recruiters. Also returning to the squad is Joey Gibson, an all-conference selection who gained over 1,200 yards last season. • V':'' '. ^ V-OCATEO,^^ SERVING 89015 Defensively, Indian Springs is led by defeniive end John Cochran (6^, 190 pounds) v^o was another all>conference selection last year. Joe Faga and aggretsive linri>acker Aaron Fisher also will be keys. Tliey will be using the 4-4 formation on defense, and have a 60-50 balanced attadi on offenae between the run and the pass. As for the goals of the team, the team is aiming high. "For the first time in school history, we want to win the league title and play in the championshipgame," according to Johnson. = Round 4^ Mountain = ^SATURDAf" by APPOINTMENT ..;-:i3*sM:"';i'''7'-;J • ;^';^ v.,;^;r And Easy Access for Boulder City 89005 Green Valley 89014 ^w.^ H^9f\ Specializing In The Treatment Of: 0 Personal Injuries gl Whiplash/Neck Injuries £1 Pain Management £1 Sprain/Strain Injuries £) Shoulder/Knee Injuries £) Bursitls/Neuritls/Artiiritis William RandaU MS.. P.T. Rick Tdbee M.S.. P.T. Ask your doctor to write your physicai therapy prescription to HENDERSON PHYSIQIL THERAPY 564-6712 129 W. Lake Mead Dr., Suite 2 ^1^ Henderson Physical Therapy is proud to support the community through the Henderson Chamber of Commerce •if tiwNmn Staff The 1996 Round Mountain football team is beginning a rough rebuilding process tha^ started when 11 seniors gradu-: ated last year. In 1995, they were undefeated until the championship game, where they lost to The Meadows. This season is a rebuilding year, but we still look to be competitive," fifth-year head coach John Jacobs said. "Our goal is to make the playoffs." lool 1 Niokuame: Kni£^ School colors: Bladk^flver Head coach: Joa Jacobs School enrollment: 125 The game plan on offense i^ simple. "Do not beat ourselvesi and to be conservative," Jacobs said. This strategy is orchestrated by junior quarterback Jason Cooley and junior halfback Craig Bums. On defense the team's motto is "bend but do not break." With so many new kids entering the program with hopes of replacing the players of past, Jacobs is not sure who will be the key. Two leaders on defense are expected to be juniors Sean Hanson, at 6-0, ITO-pounds, and Nathan Demchuck at 6-0, 210pounds. "We lost a ton of playeri,* Jacobs said. H^finOa roelMI: Class A = Eureka By IhaNmvB staff The Eureka Vandals finished last season with their second consecutive trip to the state semifinals. Despite losing in both appearances. Eureka played well. "We were really successful up north," assistant coach Rod Garcia said. This year, the squad will be shifted from the northern division to the southern division to compete in football. The Vandals will rely on the leadership of quarterback Giovanni Tognoni, who was a first-team all-league selection last season and the offensive player of the year. =Faith Lutheran Pa8aC24 NEVADA FOOTIAU AUGUST 29, 1996 BythaNmnStaff ^ '. First-year coach Paul Stark and his Faith Lutheran football squad have one goal for the 1996 campaign: "to improve arid take the program in the right dii^ection." 'r According to Stark, that will be the primary focus for a team that was blanked lastseason with an 0-9 record. Without star running back Devon Washington who graduated in 1995, the Crasaders will rely on fullback/linebacker John Tolentio to carry the load on both sides of the ball. On offense, Tolentio will get help from two returning wide receivers, junior Nate Youmans and senior Guy Sutton. Combined, the duo accounted for 400 yards receiving. Defensively, Faith Lutheran will run a 3-2 monster with Sdiool: Faith Lutiteran^Hii^ School Nidaunne: (^asadera Sdiool colon: Bftutxi/G<^ Headcoach: Paul Stark SdboolmiHiieiit: 125 Tolentio starting at middle linebacker. "We hope to improve every game and get the most out of our ability," Stark said. "We will do what we have the ability to do." The Crusaders will capitalize on a strong non-conference schedule, featuring a road trip to Palm Springs, Calif., to face West Shores to toughen them up. "A pretty tough non-conference schedule will prepare us for conference play," Stark concluded. — Owyh^e By thaNwvs Staff Owyhee Hifh School finished last season with a trip to the state semifinals. Ihey are looking to do the same this year. With an 8-1 regular season, the Braves fell to Round Mountain in the state semifinals, winding up with an 8-2 overall record. Head coach Scott Guthrie's goals for this season are to win the division and head to state. The Braves need to fill two running back positions, the quarterback spot and a wide receiver, but Guthrie says they have kids who can step up to do the job. Guthrie is looking at a team similar to last year's. The Braves do have their share of returnees. Defensive and offensive end Lee Dodson returns along with offensive and defensive lineman Timmy Jones. Gene Curtis, a linebacker and fallback, also retumr to the squad, as does outside linebacker and end Dirk mmmmmmmm Nicknanie: Braves Soh^l color*: RedAVhite/ Blue, Biead coach: J. Scott Guthrie School enrollment: 97 Kelly. Safety and running back Melvin Hanchor and defensive and running back William Whiterock also return. The Braves will look to new quarterback Dominique Bondley Uiis year for leaderahip. Bondley didn't play for the Brave%last season, but Guthrie says that Bondley is strong, with the ability to do the job. Guthrie expects the team's strength this year to be the offensive and defensive lines. "Our lines last year were pretty inexperienced," Guthrie said. This year, well have more experience." Areas that need to be worked on according to Guthrie are skill positions, such as quarterback, running back and receivers. Sdhool: Eureka High School Nldaiame: Vandals Sdbioolcdm: Green/Gold Head eoach: Dennia Wells Sdtool enroUineat: 63 Tognoni will guide an offense that is planning on controlling the line of scrimmage and running the ball at opponents. "We are a ball-control team," Garcia said. "We will try to control the clock, line of scrimmage, and run the ball down their throats." The Vandals will look to Josh Boren, the team's only returning line player, to help control the line. On offense. Eureka will rdy^ on the speed of senior wide out Luke Haplin. On defense, the squad looks to attack the opponent. "We will beat them up and down, and let the linebackers do their jobs," Garcia said. COLLECE FOOTBALL PAY-PER-VIEW ANY CLOSER TO THE ACTION AND YOU'LL NEED A HELMET! ._^]|VE PUT YOU ON THE 50 YARD LINE EVERY SATURDAY. "^ "• LIVE ABC SPORTS COLLEQE ACTION FROM ESPN. EXCLUSIVE PAY-PER-VIEW COVERAOE OF THE OAMES NOT AVAILABLE ON LOCAL BROADCAST TV. CFA, THE BI6 TEN, PAC 10, BIO S. SEC, SWC, ACC, WAC AND BIO EAST CONFERENCES. WATCH ESPN'S C0LLE6E FOOTBALL WEEKEND KICK-OFF SNOW EVERY THURSDAY AT 7:30 PM (ET) AND C0LLE6E FOOTBALL 6AMEDAV,. EVERY SATURDAY AT 11:30 AM (ET| FOR MORE DETAILS. pniM^e Must have a cable box, some restrictton apply Serving the Community To Ontor Call: 1-800485 E8PM For IndhAdual Sat. Games 1-8008SPACK For Season TickatB AUGUST 29, 1996 NEVADA FOOTBALL PaeC2S

PAGE 60

GREEN VALLEY From Page 5 senior, is expected to be back at quarterback. "lan's been playing baseball all summer and he's a little behind,"Thomas said. "But that could be a positive factor for U8 to work on our running game." l^at running attack will feature 6-10, 180-pound senior Brian Reed. "He's got excellent speed and great strength, too," liiomas said. Tm hoping he steps it up and can be our main carrier of the mail." Reed should get some help behind what Thomas calls "one of the best offensive lines we have had since I've been here." When Jones goes to the air, one of his targets will be 6-2,195pound senior EricNicksicK."He's going to be one of our leaders emotionally," Thomas said. "He doesn't have a lot of experience, but people will be surprised by his ability." Thomas said the team "has great expectations. Like every team, we're going to do whatever it takes to get back to the playoffs." He said this year's team has the talent to get back. "I think as a coaching staff, we believe we have good enough athletes to be competitive and be in the hunt," Thomas said. "If we can shuffle the players around and get them in die right places, we should be a good team." The growth of the inexperiSILVERADO From Page 6 enced players is one of the main concerns for Thomas. "For us, how we develop the inexperienced players will be the key," he said. "If they develop into competitors, we'll be OK." ^1^ Henderson ^^PpF'Chamber of Commerce GOOD LUCK Basic Wolves Green Valley Gators fihierado Skyhawks, senior safety leads the way on defense. Otihers back include outside linebadier Eric Ziegler, a 6-9, 176-pound senior, inside linebacker Cameron Baker, a 510, 185-pound senior, outside linebacker Paul Bingham, a 6-2, 210-pound senior, defensive tackle Brandon Splinter, a 6-2, 226-pounder, Josh Pardo, a 5-7, 150-pound defensive back and Jason Rowland, a 6-0,185-pound defensive end. "We have a lot of kids coming back on defense," DeNardin said. 'And that's been our focus, to beef up our defense." There's also one more focus for the 'Hawks: "We can't turn the ball over," DeNardin said. "We have to control the ball' • DeNardin added there is a good battle at quarteifoack and fullback. "It's nice to have the competition," DeNardin said. The quarterback battle is between Jay Stubbs, a 5-9, 165-pound junior, Charles Ohiaeri, a 6-10,170-pound j\mior and Robert Johnson, a 6-2, 165-pound junior. "It's been a good battle," DeNardin said. With the new format of four teams from each division going to the playoffs, that's the team's first step. "That's the main focus," DeNardin said of the season. "We're looking at the playoffs." And the kids are ready for the battle. "The kids have been very positive," DeNardin said. "The attitude has been great and everything's going well at practice." GOOD LUCK TO ALL TEAMS! Don't Worry. If you quit thinking about your Health It'll Eventually Go Away Physician RefeiTal-564-4508 Rehabilitation Seryices-564-4577 Home Health Seryices-564-4663 St. Rose Dominican Hospital 102 E Lake Mead Drtve • Henderson NV 89015 BOULDER CITY From Page 4 automatic rotation with all of them." The receivers include returning starter Trent Coyner, Sean McConnell, Augustine Acosta and Anthony Flores, all seniors, and juniors Derek Houser and Jared Davis. Mikey Cocks, a6-9,165-pound junior, returns from a sophomore season where he chalked up 256 yards on 64 carries. Nate Letro, a 5-9, 190-pound junior will play fullback and sophomore Justin Trone, 5-10, 175-pound8, will play both positions. Defensively, the Eagles will feature one of the best safety's in the state with Stuart and two of the most active 9nd intimidating hitters in Letro and Willoby at inside linebacker. Willoby was second on the team with 65 tackles and was an All-Division Second Team selection at linebacker. Playing on the outside will be Wallace and Cocks, with all six wide outs rotating in as defensive backs. The 4-4 defense will feature Greene and Justin Powell at tackle and Frasure and Norton as defensive ends. Cahill pointed out the importance of senior Matt Millett, a valuable utility player "who does everything for us. He can play in a lot of places and is the captain of all of our special teams. He is going to make some plays." Seeing plenty of action on both sides of the ball will be Colin Dick, Mark Medina, Ryan Tejada, Carl Hamby, Damian Rosario, Ken Legary, Mark St. Arnault, and Rubin Roelle. Kickoff duties will go to a strong legged Greene, Stuart will punt with Hamby helping out and Acosta will be called upon to kick extra points and field goals. BISHOP GORMAKt From Page 8 The team has spent a full offseason on weights and agility drillB to condition themselvea for this year. Lastyeai'i team posted a win in the opener against Valley Hi^ Sdiool. Big wins included a victory over Bonanza and a comeback victory over Silverado. Other returning players include defensive tackle and offenaive lineman Ciut Selser, defensive end and ofFeniive lineman Brett Whitman, defensive end and right back Matt Bice, and linebacker and fullback Steve Noahr. ,-^ ELDORADO From Page 7 -V will have the possibility to surprise a lot of schools," Trigillo said. On defense, Eldorado is weaker due to the fact that all three starting linebackers from last year's team graduated. 'The loss of three linebackers will need to be filled, and at this point we are weaker on defense," Tn^jillo said. The Sun Devils do return two all-conference selections on defense in safety Frank Blalark (Ist team) and guard Jason WESTERN From Page 10 outside or inside linebacker." Some of the other returnees include Eric Fields, a 6-3, 200pound outside linebacker/tight end; Jack Edwards, a 6-0, 215pound lineman; Jermail Smith, a 6-0,190-pound safety and Eddie Smith, a5-10,190-pound middle linebacker. Stevens said size — or lack of it — will be a problem. "We're going to spread things out and have people chase us," he said. "We can't bang with people. If ELKO From Page 11 NEVADA FOOTIAU AUGUST 29, 1996 Santina and Chance Madigan. The Indians welcome back senior All-State and All-League lineman Eddie Gonzalez (6-0, 210), who moves from guard to tackle. He'll be joined on the line by classmates Leon Jacobs, a 511, 250-pound tackle; 6-0, 240-pound Jason Skollingsberg; and center Matt Hazelton, who is 6-2, 210 pounds, Tight end/ linebacker Troy Good (6-0, 190) is a versatile leader on the front LAS VEGAS From Page 7 running game on offense and our secondary and linebackers on defense," Cinkovich said. The coach said the team's highlights were "having the first winning season in 11 years and the first playoff appearance in 15 years." A disappointment was "losing to Green Valley in the zone semifinals," Cinkovich said. "We're looking to build upon and improve on the successes of 1995." line. "We're a little bigger (more than 210 pounds) than we have beenthelasttwoyears,"Milligan said of the line. At receiver and in the secondary, Elkocounts on three-year starter Johnny Link (5-7, 150) and Chad Bowers (6-0, 170). Aaron Briggs, a senior cornerback/wideout, is also available. THANKS To ALL ADVERTISERS WHO MADE THIS SECTION POSSIBlf SUPPORT THESE BUSINESSES! CLARK From Page 10 DURANGO From Page 10 Travers (2nd team). Also on defense, Eldorado will look to Gil Verdugo (1995 honorable mention), nose guard Rick Ferria, and linebacker Lobario Mays to stop opponents from scoring. "Our outlook for the season is promising," Trujillo said. "We have a good nucleus of ball players this season. We feel that we have good team speed and our big people on the line both defensively and offensively will be bigger and stronger." "We've got a couple of big guys," he said. Calvin Anderson, a 6-3,270-pound defenisve tackle and Jamal Cherry, a 6-3, 235pound defensive end and outside linebacker will anchor the defense. In the middle will be Hector Larios, a 6-1,210-pounder while the defensive backfield will include the twin towers: Evin Contreres and Larry Conway, both in the 6-3,185-pound range. The Chargers were 4-5 last season. Cutler is looking for more this year. "We aren't a Green Valley or a Cheyenne, but we're getting better," he said. "If they beUeve in working hard together, we can be tough." The Blazers plan to run multiple sets on offense and a 52 defense. "Our key to success will be based upon how our jimior varsity players respond to the varsity level and how quick they learn," Mausbach said. "Our goal is to improve from last year and continue to make steps forward." they are going to play us, they better bring their track shoes." Stevens added the team, which was 9-3 last season, "is looking to make the playoffs." The coach said the players "have been running the same offense since they were freshmen so they know the offense. We might be ahead of some other people in that aspect." Perry has an overall record of 26-21. TOUGH ON CRIME ^ FOR SAFER STREETS \) As Judge, I would have very little sympathy for repeat offenders. O Career criminals need to go to prison. Violent offenders in particular need to go away, but I have no (^ J I favor strJQt sentencing. 5^^P%V:)<=:it/^/>%4^0#t->(^^<4Jr^<=30^>%^ t ^synipathy for burglars, having myself been burglarized twice ^^ Every'criminal defendant will receive due process, but for the guilty, ^ vor strict sentencino. > I I '^DISTRICT JUDGE SIPAN FOR \ RICHARD c/ SIPAN FOR DEPT.8 \) o I % ^ FOR FAIR DECISIONS ^ Civil cases need careful attention. Civil law is my specialty. STRONG ON THE LAW i g I? Experience: 3 Judicial Clerkships in Clark County ^ 11 Year as an Attorney, 9 years in Nevada 4 Law Licenses (Nevada, California, Oregon, Washington) • Every person will get a fair hearing in • ^ my courtroom when I'm elected Judge. \ Paid for by Richard C. Sipan AUCUST29, 1996 NEVADA FOOTIALL Pa9C27

PAGE 61

GREEN VALLEY From Page 5 senior, is expected to be back at quarterback. "lan's been playing baseball all summer and he's a little behind,"Thomas said. "But that could be a positive factor for U8 to work on our running game." l^at running attack will feature 6-10, 180-pound senior Brian Reed. "He's got excellent speed and great strength, too," liiomas said. Tm hoping he steps it up and can be our main carrier of the mail." Reed should get some help behind what Thomas calls "one of the best offensive lines we have had since I've been here." When Jones goes to the air, one of his targets will be 6-2,195pound senior EricNicksicK."He's going to be one of our leaders emotionally," Thomas said. "He doesn't have a lot of experience, but people will be surprised by his ability." Thomas said the team "has great expectations. Like every team, we're going to do whatever it takes to get back to the playoffs." He said this year's team has the talent to get back. "I think as a coaching staff, we believe we have good enough athletes to be competitive and be in the hunt," Thomas said. "If we can shuffle the players around and get them in die right places, we should be a good team." The growth of the inexperiSILVERADO From Page 6 enced players is one of the main concerns for Thomas. "For us, how we develop the inexperienced players will be the key," he said. "If they develop into competitors, we'll be OK." ^1^ Henderson ^^PpF'Chamber of Commerce GOOD LUCK Basic Wolves Green Valley Gators fihierado Skyhawks, senior safety leads the way on defense. Otihers back include outside linebadier Eric Ziegler, a 6-9, 176-pound senior, inside linebacker Cameron Baker, a 510, 185-pound senior, outside linebacker Paul Bingham, a 6-2, 210-pound senior, defensive tackle Brandon Splinter, a 6-2, 226-pounder, Josh Pardo, a 5-7, 150-pound defensive back and Jason Rowland, a 6-0,185-pound defensive end. "We have a lot of kids coming back on defense," DeNardin said. 'And that's been our focus, to beef up our defense." There's also one more focus for the 'Hawks: "We can't turn the ball over," DeNardin said. "We have to control the ball' • DeNardin added there is a good battle at quarteifoack and fullback. "It's nice to have the competition," DeNardin said. The quarterback battle is between Jay Stubbs, a 5-9, 165-pound junior, Charles Ohiaeri, a 6-10,170-pound j\mior and Robert Johnson, a 6-2, 165-pound junior. "It's been a good battle," DeNardin said. With the new format of four teams from each division going to the playoffs, that's the team's first step. "That's the main focus," DeNardin said of the season. "We're looking at the playoffs." And the kids are ready for the battle. "The kids have been very positive," DeNardin said. "The attitude has been great and everything's going well at practice." GOOD LUCK TO ALL TEAMS! Don't Worry. If you quit thinking about your Health It'll Eventually Go Away Physician RefeiTal-564-4508 Rehabilitation Seryices-564-4577 Home Health Seryices-564-4663 St. Rose Dominican Hospital 102 E Lake Mead Drtve • Henderson NV 89015 BOULDER CITY From Page 4 automatic rotation with all of them." The receivers include returning starter Trent Coyner, Sean McConnell, Augustine Acosta and Anthony Flores, all seniors, and juniors Derek Houser and Jared Davis. Mikey Cocks, a6-9,165-pound junior, returns from a sophomore season where he chalked up 256 yards on 64 carries. Nate Letro, a 5-9, 190-pound junior will play fullback and sophomore Justin Trone, 5-10, 175-pound8, will play both positions. Defensively, the Eagles will feature one of the best safety's in the state with Stuart and two of the most active 9nd intimidating hitters in Letro and Willoby at inside linebacker. Willoby was second on the team with 65 tackles and was an All-Division Second Team selection at linebacker. Playing on the outside will be Wallace and Cocks, with all six wide outs rotating in as defensive backs. The 4-4 defense will feature Greene and Justin Powell at tackle and Frasure and Norton as defensive ends. Cahill pointed out the importance of senior Matt Millett, a valuable utility player "who does everything for us. He can play in a lot of places and is the captain of all of our special teams. He is going to make some plays." Seeing plenty of action on both sides of the ball will be Colin Dick, Mark Medina, Ryan Tejada, Carl Hamby, Damian Rosario, Ken Legary, Mark St. Arnault, and Rubin Roelle. Kickoff duties will go to a strong legged Greene, Stuart will punt with Hamby helping out and Acosta will be called upon to kick extra points and field goals. BISHOP GORMAKt From Page 8 The team has spent a full offseason on weights and agility drillB to condition themselvea for this year. Lastyeai'i team posted a win in the opener against Valley Hi^ Sdiool. Big wins included a victory over Bonanza and a comeback victory over Silverado. Other returning players include defensive tackle and offenaive lineman Ciut Selser, defensive end and ofFeniive lineman Brett Whitman, defensive end and right back Matt Bice, and linebacker and fullback Steve Noahr. ,-^ ELDORADO From Page 7 -V will have the possibility to surprise a lot of schools," Trigillo said. On defense, Eldorado is weaker due to the fact that all three starting linebackers from last year's team graduated. 'The loss of three linebackers will need to be filled, and at this point we are weaker on defense," Tn^jillo said. The Sun Devils do return two all-conference selections on defense in safety Frank Blalark (Ist team) and guard Jason WESTERN From Page 10 outside or inside linebacker." Some of the other returnees include Eric Fields, a 6-3, 200pound outside linebacker/tight end; Jack Edwards, a 6-0, 215pound lineman; Jermail Smith, a 6-0,190-pound safety and Eddie Smith, a5-10,190-pound middle linebacker. Stevens said size — or lack of it — will be a problem. "We're going to spread things out and have people chase us," he said. "We can't bang with people. If ELKO From Page 11 NEVADA FOOTIAU AUGUST 29, 1996 Santina and Chance Madigan. The Indians welcome back senior All-State and All-League lineman Eddie Gonzalez (6-0, 210), who moves from guard to tackle. He'll be joined on the line by classmates Leon Jacobs, a 511, 250-pound tackle; 6-0, 240-pound Jason Skollingsberg; and center Matt Hazelton, who is 6-2, 210 pounds, Tight end/ linebacker Troy Good (6-0, 190) is a versatile leader on the front LAS VEGAS From Page 7 running game on offense and our secondary and linebackers on defense," Cinkovich said. The coach said the team's highlights were "having the first winning season in 11 years and the first playoff appearance in 15 years." A disappointment was "losing to Green Valley in the zone semifinals," Cinkovich said. "We're looking to build upon and improve on the successes of 1995." line. "We're a little bigger (more than 210 pounds) than we have beenthelasttwoyears,"Milligan said of the line. At receiver and in the secondary, Elkocounts on three-year starter Johnny Link (5-7, 150) and Chad Bowers (6-0, 170). Aaron Briggs, a senior cornerback/wideout, is also available. THANKS To ALL ADVERTISERS WHO MADE THIS SECTION POSSIBlf SUPPORT THESE BUSINESSES! CLARK From Page 10 DURANGO From Page 10 Travers (2nd team). Also on defense, Eldorado will look to Gil Verdugo (1995 honorable mention), nose guard Rick Ferria, and linebacker Lobario Mays to stop opponents from scoring. "Our outlook for the season is promising," Trujillo said. "We have a good nucleus of ball players this season. We feel that we have good team speed and our big people on the line both defensively and offensively will be bigger and stronger." "We've got a couple of big guys," he said. Calvin Anderson, a 6-3,270-pound defenisve tackle and Jamal Cherry, a 6-3, 235pound defensive end and outside linebacker will anchor the defense. In the middle will be Hector Larios, a 6-1,210-pounder while the defensive backfield will include the twin towers: Evin Contreres and Larry Conway, both in the 6-3,185-pound range. The Chargers were 4-5 last season. Cutler is looking for more this year. "We aren't a Green Valley or a Cheyenne, but we're getting better," he said. "If they beUeve in working hard together, we can be tough." The Blazers plan to run multiple sets on offense and a 52 defense. "Our key to success will be based upon how our jimior varsity players respond to the varsity level and how quick they learn," Mausbach said. "Our goal is to improve from last year and continue to make steps forward." they are going to play us, they better bring their track shoes." Stevens added the team, which was 9-3 last season, "is looking to make the playoffs." The coach said the players "have been running the same offense since they were freshmen so they know the offense. We might be ahead of some other people in that aspect." Perry has an overall record of 26-21. TOUGH ON CRIME ^ FOR SAFER STREETS \) As Judge, I would have very little sympathy for repeat offenders. O Career criminals need to go to prison. Violent offenders in particular need to go away, but I have no (^ J I favor strJQt sentencing. 5^^P%V:)<=:it/^/>%4^0#t->(^^<4Jr^<=30^>%^ t ^synipathy for burglars, having myself been burglarized twice ^^ Every'criminal defendant will receive due process, but for the guilty, ^ vor strict sentencino. > I I '^DISTRICT JUDGE SIPAN FOR \ RICHARD c/ SIPAN FOR DEPT.8 \) o I % ^ FOR FAIR DECISIONS ^ Civil cases need careful attention. Civil law is my specialty. STRONG ON THE LAW i g I? Experience: 3 Judicial Clerkships in Clark County ^ 11 Year as an Attorney, 9 years in Nevada 4 Law Licenses (Nevada, California, Oregon, Washington) • Every person will get a fair hearing in • ^ my courtroom when I'm elected Judge. \ Paid for by Richard C. Sipan AUCUST29, 1996 NEVADA FOOTIALL Pa9C27

PAGE 62

DOUGLAS From Page 13 MCQUEEN From Page 12 said. "He has agility, speed and a good throwing arm." Tlie Tigers, 5-4 for the second strai^t season in 1995, use senior Justin Maes (6-8,165) and junior Brady Ovard (5-8,155) in the sweepback position. In Douglas' fly motion offense, the sweepback is an important rusher and receiver. Senior Ricardo Duarte (5-8, 150) is an exceptionally strong tailback. "He's extremely quick and tough," Rippee said, noting Duarte bench presses 320 pounds. The Tigers are looking at several potential wideouts. Junior Chris Larsen is a leading candidate to start. Senior guard/defensive tackle Tony Streeter (5-11, 250) and junior tight end Beau Kruger (61, 210) have experience on the line. The coach said senior Adam Shoda plays a key role up front with seniors Jason Sheraer and Scott Hendricksen, as well as juniors Matt Stangle and Adam Bacon. Linebacker Zach Weber, a potential backup to GriiTith at quarterback, is one of the strengths of Douglas' 4-4 defense. "I would hope he would be one of the better ones (linebackers) in the league," Rippee said. In addition to Griffith, the Tigers line up Maes, Ovard and Mary Beth I'll like In Iniir Jniin \ou 450-S7S'J School Board Trustee District A Experience & Involvement: Clark GHjnty Schools • dwirvwmm, Sw Education AdmoryComnHtM 1990-prH)l Mmbw 1988-prMtn • MmUr, Sdwol Naming CommillM, 1995-96 • Mnb, YtorRound Skid/ CommHlM, 1990-92 • Miibr oi Mvwol parant talk foRM on zoning P.TA • Unit PmidMit at Gibion EkntMitary, 1991-92 • Prwidtnt, SunMtArM Council, 1995-96 • NMKJO Skill Board of Managm, 1995-96 • MtmlMr line* 1979 Boy Scouts of America • Dtn Ltodtr, 6 ytan • Dm Ltodir Cooch • CommiKM Ckoiowomon • Day Camp Diracky, 1964 Mary Beth wiU: • Deal wiih growffi • Establish accouitiabWty • Stand up for basks • Expect Excettence* Mobilize cmmnity involvement !••••••• Pd. lor by AM CommHlM to QKt, Gndjr Zoddl, di. I he Voice of I^xperieiiee I admire your dedication and determination. Your physical and mental training on the field and in the gym will prepare you for a successful future. The team work you develop will shape your character. And years from now, you will remember this experience as so much more than games. Good Luck to all of you. STATE SENATE 1 ^PORTER junior Kevin Lehr in the secondary. Douglas has posted a winning record in four of the last five seasons, narrowly missing the playoffs in 1991 and 1992. "Our goal is to win a championship," Rippee said. "But first you have to make the playoffs." WOOSTER From Page 11' said junior Greg Rocke will get some snaps. Akneeiiuury to Peterson will keep him sidelined until October, but junior tailback Mitch Jones (6-10,171) had 60 carries in '95. Newcomers Matt Nightingale and Johnson, as well as Quinnell Jones, will also help carry the ball. The coach's son, junior guard/ defensive end Bo Sellers (6-1, 215), is an All-State lineman. Senior guard Shane Doherty (61, 210) will help Sellers on the line, along with junior tackles Shawn Stocking and Dan Spring. Uccelli is a quaUty kicker. He booted a pair of game-winning field goals as a junior. The Colts have advanced to the Northern zone final in each of the last 12 seasons. SPARKS From Page 12 Marcelino Molina are the primary receiver.s. Junior offensive guard Matt Tarver (6-3,240) is a strength on the offensive line. Senior Clint Larson is a versatile player who can help the offense and defense. Before preseason drillsbegan, McHenry said Sparks needed to improve in the secondary and have more consistent line play. 225)and JonSteinbach(6-l, 197), both defensive tackles, will bolster McQueen's depth. Dalton, in his 15th year with the Lancers, said McQueen is "very inexperienced" in the secondary, but he said the team has enough athletes to keep foes from putting points on the board. On offense, senior quarterback Matt Dalton (6-2,177), the coach's son, will lead the pro-set offense. Senior halfback/punter Bubba Henderson, whom Coach Dalton rated as "one of the top athletes in 4-A," replaces Clay Belding, last year's Offensive Player of the Year in Division I. Senior receivers Brad Noble, Casey McCann and RonnieCanslergive McQueen more talent at the skill positions. A bigger offensive line than last fall's unit (215 pounds on average) features Topou, guard Dan Cruz (6-2, 234) and centei" Luke Paschall. The Lancers open on the road against two-time defending state champion Wooster. CARSON CITY From Page 13 "We expect a lot of big things from him," Bateman said. "He's throwing the ball really well." Returning senior Raymond Sanchez and junior Matt Staub are the primary receivers. Dover and Murdock can catch passes and will help out in the secondary. "We have 14 starters returning and we have some good juniors coming up," Bateman said. "Our goal is consistency. We want to be a good team that people have to reckon with." I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I • • • • • coupon MaBMaBMB Gators, Wolves, Eagles & Skyhawks BUY 1 GET 1 FREE SUPER BIG GULP At these Four Locations Sunset & Valle Verde Eastem & Reno B^ offer expires Sept 30, 1996 Windmill & Bermuda Eastern & Warm Springs PaC2 NEVADA FOOTIALL AUGUST 29. 1996 GALENA From Page 11 three years of experience in the program, Marshall will be a key performer. "There are a lot of people in the valley who know what kind of player he is," Melcher said. Senior fullback/linebacker/ punter Peter Ricdardi, classmate Bobby Kim and junior Kenny Walker, who can play a variety of positions, will a]^be a big part of the offense. Senior tackle Cam Wagner (6RENO £1 From Page 15 ~ 0, 225), junior guard Jason Estum (6-2, 190) and junior center Mitch Wi]liams(5-10,180) anchor the offensive line. On defense, the Grizzlies appear to be solid at linebacker. Estum and senior Gary Wilcox hold down inside positions. Conor Harris and Ricciardi man the outside. — Dave Cortez, who can fill in on the offensive line, is a strength is happy with Anthony's leadership skills and work e^ic, buthe wants the senior to gain confidence throwing the ball. Jimior WillTaylor, a prospective starter at strong safety, will back up Anthony. Reno has to rebuild its rushing unit, losing first-team All-Division fullback Johnno Lazetich and halfback Shane Dolan to graduation, aa well as two seniors who either transferred or did not rejoin the team. Junior Bernard Hargrove is a REED From Page 12 speedy receiver. Hell be joined by Shawn McDonough (6-2,150) and senior Garrett Gordon, who will likely punt and may get some snaps at tight end. Ryan Nevin and Tim Reilly are juniors who help out in the secondary and may get a shot at running bade. Rippee said he would like to see more athletes get involved in the program. The numbers aren't what I want them to be," he said. "There needs to be more enthusiasm." opponents' backfield." A gold mine of skill players graduated from Reed, leaving both the offensive and defensive badifield open for new talent. A quartet of prospects will make a run for quarterback, including returning seniors Mike Lee (6-2, 170) and Matt Field, as well as juniors Ryan Puliz and Tony Straw. Senior Tony Talancon and juniors Alan Clark and Kaleb Bartelheim will be running backs. Ty Burton and Darrell Baldwin will compete at fullback. LOWRY From Page 15 Senior tight end/linebacker Derek Sage (6-2, 200), whom Bossert called "one of the best tight ends to play at Reed," figures to be an important part of the offense. Norm Brady (6-3,170) is a top newcomer at receiver. Linebacker J.T. Thomas (6-4, 183) is the premier returning linebacker. He ranked third statistically among Raider defenders in '95. Kicker/punter Mike Biselli, a senior, is the top returning kicker in the Northern AAAA. CHURCHILL COUNTY From Page 13 Seniors Jaaon Deputy, a 5-11, 170-pound center/dd'ensive end; Luke Nesser, a 5-10,190-pound guard; and Dan Clark, a 6-2, 185pound tackle, return on the line. After losing top fullbadi Pete Herold to graduation, Lo wry will have to throw the ball more. Junior quarterback Mike Schrempp, the starter on junior varaity last year, gets the diance to lead the offense. Senior fullback/outside linebacker Chris Larsen (6-2,190) and junior running back/cornerback Eric Angelopoulos can help out on both sides of the ball. On defense, senior inside linebacker Nick Belingheri (511,175) provides toughness and leadership. Punter Fabian Zapeda, a junior who also plaoekicka, is an asset for the special teams. on the defensive front with noseguard Danny Atkinson (510, 280). Marshall, Walker and junior Dustin Lee have the athleticism to excel in the secondary. "We've finally got some depth," Melcher said. "This year, we have 14 players at quarterback, running back and receiver. Three years ago, we had 15 players on the whole team." HUG ^ From Page 15 Stallworth said senior Wesley Bennett (5-9, 160), who moves from Wooster, is a tailback with 4.6 speed. Atlanta transfer Terrell Campbell is another speedster who can rush, return kicks and catch passes. Seniors Mark Hobbs, a starting free safety on defense, and Shaun Severin (6-0, 170), who returns at wide receiver/defensive back, can also contribute offensively. Senior Jason Jones (5-10,185) moves from fullback to wide receiver. A pair of returning starters anchor the line. Senior Richard Tietjen (6-2,280) is a tackle and jimior Ben Gaddis (5-10, 200) moves from center to guard. The Hawks also count on junior tackle David Rauscher (6-1, 195), senior guard Douglas Murdoch (5-11, 194), senior center Kyle Archuleta (6-0, 220) and senior tight end Archie Ervin, who can fill in for Lemich at quarterback and play outside linebacker. The linebackers are a strength on defense for Hug. Ervin, Reno High transfer Nick Weber, senior Tim Robertson and classmate Kalum Fortune are the projected starters. This year, we might have skill people as good as anybody in the league," Stallworth said. dropped as the season went on." Fallen, 2-7 overall in McGill's first year as coach, has a pair of experienced players to provide leadership. McGill said senior halfback/linebacker Justin Snow (5-10,195 pounds), an agile rodeo cowboy, and classmate Jeremy Lewis (5-11, 180), a fullback/ linebacker, are tough, hardworking players. "Snow should be one of the better football players in the state," the cosieh said. "He benches 315 pounds." Junior fullback/linebacker Pete Olsen (5-11, 210) can be a bruising rusher, but McGill also sees him as a top defender. Olsen led the junior varsity in tackles last fall. Junior Mike Elizondo plays halfback and in the secondary. Senior tackle Josh Glass (511, 215) solidifies the interior line on both sides of the ball. He'll be surrounded by juniors with little or no varsity experience. Two players are competingfor the start at quarterback. Scrambler Kyle Ferguson (5-10, 170), also a defensive back, had the edge as drills began. Cole Thurston (6-2, 205), who may also play tight end, has a good arm. Senior Spencer Corbitt and junior Tony Nunes are fiery defensive players. The Greenwave should be physically stronger this season, McGill said. "We have five kids (on varsity) benching over 300 pounds," he said. "Last year, there were five kids in the whole program who could bench press 200 pounds." ACNE, WARTS. MOLES, COSMETIC • LASER Satving Hendenton, Boukler CHy & Green Valley l! SKIN CANCER & SKIN GROWTH DISEASES OF THE HAIR, SKIN & NAILS 564-9444 .11 DR. RICHARD DISKIN, D.O. Board Certified Dermatologist SAMEDAY A^INTMENT CUUNAlilY MEDIpARE & MOST OTHER JNSUR/tflCE^ACGEPTED no E. LAKE MEAD DR. STE. 201 HENDERSON. NV. 89015 AUCUST2|,1996 NEVADA FOOTIALL

PAGE 63

DOUGLAS From Page 13 MCQUEEN From Page 12 said. "He has agility, speed and a good throwing arm." Tlie Tigers, 5-4 for the second strai^t season in 1995, use senior Justin Maes (6-8,165) and junior Brady Ovard (5-8,155) in the sweepback position. In Douglas' fly motion offense, the sweepback is an important rusher and receiver. Senior Ricardo Duarte (5-8, 150) is an exceptionally strong tailback. "He's extremely quick and tough," Rippee said, noting Duarte bench presses 320 pounds. The Tigers are looking at several potential wideouts. Junior Chris Larsen is a leading candidate to start. Senior guard/defensive tackle Tony Streeter (5-11, 250) and junior tight end Beau Kruger (61, 210) have experience on the line. The coach said senior Adam Shoda plays a key role up front with seniors Jason Sheraer and Scott Hendricksen, as well as juniors Matt Stangle and Adam Bacon. Linebacker Zach Weber, a potential backup to GriiTith at quarterback, is one of the strengths of Douglas' 4-4 defense. "I would hope he would be one of the better ones (linebackers) in the league," Rippee said. In addition to Griffith, the Tigers line up Maes, Ovard and Mary Beth I'll like In Iniir Jniin \ou 450-S7S'J School Board Trustee District A Experience & Involvement: Clark GHjnty Schools • dwirvwmm, Sw Education AdmoryComnHtM 1990-prH)l Mmbw 1988-prMtn • MmUr, Sdwol Naming CommillM, 1995-96 • Mnb, YtorRound Skid/ CommHlM, 1990-92 • Miibr oi Mvwol parant talk foRM on zoning P.TA • Unit PmidMit at Gibion EkntMitary, 1991-92 • Prwidtnt, SunMtArM Council, 1995-96 • NMKJO Skill Board of Managm, 1995-96 • MtmlMr line* 1979 Boy Scouts of America • Dtn Ltodtr, 6 ytan • Dm Ltodir Cooch • CommiKM Ckoiowomon • Day Camp Diracky, 1964 Mary Beth wiU: • Deal wiih growffi • Establish accouitiabWty • Stand up for basks • Expect Excettence* Mobilize cmmnity involvement !••••••• Pd. lor by AM CommHlM to QKt, Gndjr Zoddl, di. I he Voice of I^xperieiiee I admire your dedication and determination. Your physical and mental training on the field and in the gym will prepare you for a successful future. The team work you develop will shape your character. And years from now, you will remember this experience as so much more than games. Good Luck to all of you. STATE SENATE 1 ^PORTER junior Kevin Lehr in the secondary. Douglas has posted a winning record in four of the last five seasons, narrowly missing the playoffs in 1991 and 1992. "Our goal is to win a championship," Rippee said. "But first you have to make the playoffs." WOOSTER From Page 11' said junior Greg Rocke will get some snaps. Akneeiiuury to Peterson will keep him sidelined until October, but junior tailback Mitch Jones (6-10,171) had 60 carries in '95. Newcomers Matt Nightingale and Johnson, as well as Quinnell Jones, will also help carry the ball. The coach's son, junior guard/ defensive end Bo Sellers (6-1, 215), is an All-State lineman. Senior guard Shane Doherty (61, 210) will help Sellers on the line, along with junior tackles Shawn Stocking and Dan Spring. Uccelli is a quaUty kicker. He booted a pair of game-winning field goals as a junior. The Colts have advanced to the Northern zone final in each of the last 12 seasons. SPARKS From Page 12 Marcelino Molina are the primary receiver.s. Junior offensive guard Matt Tarver (6-3,240) is a strength on the offensive line. Senior Clint Larson is a versatile player who can help the offense and defense. Before preseason drillsbegan, McHenry said Sparks needed to improve in the secondary and have more consistent line play. 225)and JonSteinbach(6-l, 197), both defensive tackles, will bolster McQueen's depth. Dalton, in his 15th year with the Lancers, said McQueen is "very inexperienced" in the secondary, but he said the team has enough athletes to keep foes from putting points on the board. On offense, senior quarterback Matt Dalton (6-2,177), the coach's son, will lead the pro-set offense. Senior halfback/punter Bubba Henderson, whom Coach Dalton rated as "one of the top athletes in 4-A," replaces Clay Belding, last year's Offensive Player of the Year in Division I. Senior receivers Brad Noble, Casey McCann and RonnieCanslergive McQueen more talent at the skill positions. A bigger offensive line than last fall's unit (215 pounds on average) features Topou, guard Dan Cruz (6-2, 234) and centei" Luke Paschall. The Lancers open on the road against two-time defending state champion Wooster. CARSON CITY From Page 13 "We expect a lot of big things from him," Bateman said. "He's throwing the ball really well." Returning senior Raymond Sanchez and junior Matt Staub are the primary receivers. Dover and Murdock can catch passes and will help out in the secondary. "We have 14 starters returning and we have some good juniors coming up," Bateman said. "Our goal is consistency. We want to be a good team that people have to reckon with." I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I • • • • • coupon MaBMaBMB Gators, Wolves, Eagles & Skyhawks BUY 1 GET 1 FREE SUPER BIG GULP At these Four Locations Sunset & Valle Verde Eastem & Reno B^ offer expires Sept 30, 1996 Windmill & Bermuda Eastern & Warm Springs PaC2 NEVADA FOOTIALL AUGUST 29. 1996 GALENA From Page 11 three years of experience in the program, Marshall will be a key performer. "There are a lot of people in the valley who know what kind of player he is," Melcher said. Senior fullback/linebacker/ punter Peter Ricdardi, classmate Bobby Kim and junior Kenny Walker, who can play a variety of positions, will a]^be a big part of the offense. Senior tackle Cam Wagner (6RENO £1 From Page 15 ~ 0, 225), junior guard Jason Estum (6-2, 190) and junior center Mitch Wi]liams(5-10,180) anchor the offensive line. On defense, the Grizzlies appear to be solid at linebacker. Estum and senior Gary Wilcox hold down inside positions. Conor Harris and Ricciardi man the outside. — Dave Cortez, who can fill in on the offensive line, is a strength is happy with Anthony's leadership skills and work e^ic, buthe wants the senior to gain confidence throwing the ball. Jimior WillTaylor, a prospective starter at strong safety, will back up Anthony. Reno has to rebuild its rushing unit, losing first-team All-Division fullback Johnno Lazetich and halfback Shane Dolan to graduation, aa well as two seniors who either transferred or did not rejoin the team. Junior Bernard Hargrove is a REED From Page 12 speedy receiver. Hell be joined by Shawn McDonough (6-2,150) and senior Garrett Gordon, who will likely punt and may get some snaps at tight end. Ryan Nevin and Tim Reilly are juniors who help out in the secondary and may get a shot at running bade. Rippee said he would like to see more athletes get involved in the program. The numbers aren't what I want them to be," he said. "There needs to be more enthusiasm." opponents' backfield." A gold mine of skill players graduated from Reed, leaving both the offensive and defensive badifield open for new talent. A quartet of prospects will make a run for quarterback, including returning seniors Mike Lee (6-2, 170) and Matt Field, as well as juniors Ryan Puliz and Tony Straw. Senior Tony Talancon and juniors Alan Clark and Kaleb Bartelheim will be running backs. Ty Burton and Darrell Baldwin will compete at fullback. LOWRY From Page 15 Senior tight end/linebacker Derek Sage (6-2, 200), whom Bossert called "one of the best tight ends to play at Reed," figures to be an important part of the offense. Norm Brady (6-3,170) is a top newcomer at receiver. Linebacker J.T. Thomas (6-4, 183) is the premier returning linebacker. He ranked third statistically among Raider defenders in '95. Kicker/punter Mike Biselli, a senior, is the top returning kicker in the Northern AAAA. CHURCHILL COUNTY From Page 13 Seniors Jaaon Deputy, a 5-11, 170-pound center/dd'ensive end; Luke Nesser, a 5-10,190-pound guard; and Dan Clark, a 6-2, 185pound tackle, return on the line. After losing top fullbadi Pete Herold to graduation, Lo wry will have to throw the ball more. Junior quarterback Mike Schrempp, the starter on junior varaity last year, gets the diance to lead the offense. Senior fullback/outside linebacker Chris Larsen (6-2,190) and junior running back/cornerback Eric Angelopoulos can help out on both sides of the ball. On defense, senior inside linebacker Nick Belingheri (511,175) provides toughness and leadership. Punter Fabian Zapeda, a junior who also plaoekicka, is an asset for the special teams. on the defensive front with noseguard Danny Atkinson (510, 280). Marshall, Walker and junior Dustin Lee have the athleticism to excel in the secondary. "We've finally got some depth," Melcher said. "This year, we have 14 players at quarterback, running back and receiver. Three years ago, we had 15 players on the whole team." HUG ^ From Page 15 Stallworth said senior Wesley Bennett (5-9, 160), who moves from Wooster, is a tailback with 4.6 speed. Atlanta transfer Terrell Campbell is another speedster who can rush, return kicks and catch passes. Seniors Mark Hobbs, a starting free safety on defense, and Shaun Severin (6-0, 170), who returns at wide receiver/defensive back, can also contribute offensively. Senior Jason Jones (5-10,185) moves from fullback to wide receiver. A pair of returning starters anchor the line. Senior Richard Tietjen (6-2,280) is a tackle and jimior Ben Gaddis (5-10, 200) moves from center to guard. The Hawks also count on junior tackle David Rauscher (6-1, 195), senior guard Douglas Murdoch (5-11, 194), senior center Kyle Archuleta (6-0, 220) and senior tight end Archie Ervin, who can fill in for Lemich at quarterback and play outside linebacker. The linebackers are a strength on defense for Hug. Ervin, Reno High transfer Nick Weber, senior Tim Robertson and classmate Kalum Fortune are the projected starters. This year, we might have skill people as good as anybody in the league," Stallworth said. dropped as the season went on." Fallen, 2-7 overall in McGill's first year as coach, has a pair of experienced players to provide leadership. McGill said senior halfback/linebacker Justin Snow (5-10,195 pounds), an agile rodeo cowboy, and classmate Jeremy Lewis (5-11, 180), a fullback/ linebacker, are tough, hardworking players. "Snow should be one of the better football players in the state," the cosieh said. "He benches 315 pounds." Junior fullback/linebacker Pete Olsen (5-11, 210) can be a bruising rusher, but McGill also sees him as a top defender. Olsen led the junior varsity in tackles last fall. Junior Mike Elizondo plays halfback and in the secondary. Senior tackle Josh Glass (511, 215) solidifies the interior line on both sides of the ball. He'll be surrounded by juniors with little or no varsity experience. Two players are competingfor the start at quarterback. Scrambler Kyle Ferguson (5-10, 170), also a defensive back, had the edge as drills began. Cole Thurston (6-2, 205), who may also play tight end, has a good arm. Senior Spencer Corbitt and junior Tony Nunes are fiery defensive players. The Greenwave should be physically stronger this season, McGill said. "We have five kids (on varsity) benching over 300 pounds," he said. "Last year, there were five kids in the whole program who could bench press 200 pounds." ACNE, WARTS. MOLES, COSMETIC • LASER Satving Hendenton, Boukler CHy & Green Valley l! SKIN CANCER & SKIN GROWTH DISEASES OF THE HAIR, SKIN & NAILS 564-9444 .11 DR. RICHARD DISKIN, D.O. Board Certified Dermatologist SAMEDAY A^INTMENT CUUNAlilY MEDIpARE & MOST OTHER JNSUR/tflCE^ACGEPTED no E. LAKE MEAD DR. STE. 201 HENDERSON. NV. 89015 AUCUST2|,1996 NEVADA FOOTIALL

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1996-97 League Alignment A LEAGUE (0-165) — 19 schools Division I Division II Austin, 25 Faith Lutheran, 126 Col6vine.99 Indian Springs, 148 Gabbs, 37 lake Mead, 66 Gerlach,41 Lund, 50 Jackpot, 88 Pahranagat Valley 110 McDermott,63 Round Mountain, 125 Owyhee, 97 Spring Mountain, 136 Smith Valley, 102 Trinity Christian, 94 Virpnia City, 144 Eureka, 63 Pyramid Lake (Independent), 27 •>-;;• AA LEAGUE (166-375) 10 schools Division I Division II Carlin, 169 Beatty, 176 Independence, 304 Laughlin, 262 Tonopah, 224 lincoUi County, 200 Wells, 166 The Meadows, 185 We8tWendover,N/A Needles, 308 Work & Ploy To Reach Your goals! • ;,^ui. -j'isyfiiii-s GOOD LUCK EAGLES! Connie & Kathleen TRAVEL CENTRE 4(X) Nev. Hwy. 293-5202 AAA LEAGUE (376-900) ~ 18 schools Division I Battle Mountain, 402. Femley, 568 North Tahoe, 444 Rite Of Passage, 476 Spring Creek, 644 Tahoe-Trudiee, 667 -^ '': '\ • -'.''.'' iMvision II Bishop Manogue, 398 • : Dayton, 400 ;• Incline, 400 Mineral County, 348 Pershing County, 221 • Whittell,-247 Yerington, 386 • Division III Boulder City, 703 Moapa Valley, 567 Pahrump, 725 Virgin Valley, 399 White Pine, 510 Out with the old...In with DENUE If you oiir system needs to get back to the basics... ELEa GREGORY W SCHOOL BOARD TRUSTEE DISTRICT A Paid for by cWzMM for DwMw. ch. Daryl NIonii taOOOLUCKTO ALL TEAMS! AAAA LEAGUE (901-above) 29 schools Division I Elko, 1,243 Galena, 1,443 McQueen, 1,561 Reed, 2,120 South Tahoe, 1,363 Sparks, 1,590 Division II Carson, 2,228 Churchill County, 1,188 Douglas, 1,766 Hug, 1,758 Lowry, 961 v Reno, 1,532 Wooster, 1,234 Division III Basic, 2,258' Chaparral, 2,608 Eldorado, 2,241 Green Valley, 3,122 Las Vegas, 2,791 Rancho; 2,780 Valley, 2,595 Vo-Tech, 1,575 Mojave, N/A • Division FV Bishop Gorman, 944 Bonanza, 2,127 Cheyenne, 3,010 Cimarron-Memorial, 3,350 Clark, 2,010 Durango, 3,092 Silverado, 1,733 Western, 2,058 Palo Vefde, N/A nm m mm..: Basic Wolves Green Valley Gators Boulder Eagles Silverado Skyhawks 9 mmmi mmi I for all your Business Printing needs & Every day lx)w Prices iO'CALLAGHAIH PRIINT & COPY SHOPPE 2827 Green Valley Parkway 435-7761 AAAA LEAGUE AUGUST 30 Bonanza at Chaparral, 7:00 p.m. Green Valley at Clark, 7:00 p.m. Eldorado at Cimarron Memorial, 7:00 p.m. Cheyenne at Rancho, 7:00 p.m. Bishop Gorman at Valley, 7:00 p.m. •^. Silverado at Basic, 7:00 p.m. Western at Lais Vegas, 7:00 p.m. Durango at Snow Canyon, 7:00 p.m. SEPTEMBER 6 Hug at Bishop, 7:30 p.m. Sparks at Lowry, 7:30 p.m. Carson at Elko, 7:30 p.m. Reed at Reno, 7:30 p.m. Rancho at Western, 7:00 p.m. Chaparral at Clark, 7:00 p.m.. Basic atDurango, 7:00 p.m. Eldorado at B. Gorman, 7:00 p.m. Las Vegas at Bonanza, 7:00 p.m. Long Beach Poly at Green Valley, 7:00 p.m. Cheyenne at Mountain View, 7:00 p.m. Madson at Cimarron-Memorial, 7:00 p.m. Uttle Rock at Valley, 7:00 p.m. • • ;:, • : • • • Highland at Silverado, 7:00 p.m. Nevada iF^ioiiiall: Sdwdute Radio/Television v'-JWiJ:) 1996 Prep Football Game of the Week Live radio broadcasts will be on KLAV 1230 (AM) with game times scheduled for 7 p.m. : • > TV replays will be on on Prime Cable, Channels 1&48 on the date listed starting at 7 p.m. 'ill c* Friday, Aug. 30Friday, Sept. 6 Thursday, Sept. Friday, Sept. 20 Friday, Sept. 27 Friday, Oct. 4 — Friday, Oct. 11Friday, Oct. 18Friday, Oct. 25Friday, Nov. 1 — Saturday, Nov. 2 Friday, Nov. 8 — Satiu-day, Nov. 9 Friday, Nov. 15* Friday, Nov. 22 — Silverado at Basic. (TV replay on Sept. 4) — Eldorado at Gorman. (TV replay on Sept. 11) 12 — Western at Durango. (TV replay on Sept. 18) — Valley at Chaparral. (TV replay on Sept. 25) — Cimarron-Memorial at Durango. (TV replay on Oct. 2) Bonanza at Cheyenne. (TV replay on Oct. 9) — Rancho at Las Vegas. (TV replay on Oct. 16) — Clark at Cimarron-Memorial. (TV replay on Oct. 23) — Green Valley at Chaparral. (TV replay on (Dct. 30) Zone Quarterfinal, Game A. (TV replay on Nov. 6) — Zone Quarterfinals, Game B. (TV replay on Nov. 7) Zone Semifinal, Game A. (TV replay on Nov. 13) — Zone Semifinal, Game B. (TV replay on Nov. 14) Zone Championship. (TV replay on Nov. 20) — State Championship. (TV replay on Nov. 27) Game to be played at Sam Boyd Stadium. Schedule subject to change. SEPTEMBER,? Douglas at Galena, 1:30 p.m. McQueen at Wooster, 1:30 p.m. Chiu-chill County at South Tahoe, 1:30 p.m. SEPTEMBER 12 Galena at Churchill County, 7:30 p.m. Western at Durango, 7:00 p.m. Clark at Bonanza, 7:00 p.m. Silverado at Cheyenne, 7:00 p.m. Cimarron at B. Gorman, 7:00 p.m. Green Valley at Rancho 7:00 p.m. Chaparral at Rancho, 7:00 p.m. Basic at Valley 7:00 p.m. SEPTEMBER 13 Sparks at Hug, 7:30 p.m. Washington at Carson, 7:00 p.m. Reed at Douglas, 7:30 p.m. Reno at McQueen, 7:30 p.m. SouthTahoeatLowry,7:30 p.m. SEPTEMBER 20 Galena at McQueen, 7:30 p.m. Churchill County at Carson, 7:30 p.m. Reno at Douglas, 7:30 p.m. Wooster at Reed, 7:30 p.m. Lowry at Hug, 7:30 p.m. Elko at Spring Creek, 7:30 p.m. Bonanza at Western, 7:00 p.m. Dlirango at Silvera&o, 7:00 pm. B. Gorman at Clark, 7:00 p.m. Cheyenne at Cimarron, 7:00 p.m. Rancho at Green Valley, 7:00 p.m. Eldorado at Basic, 7:00 p.m. Valley at Chaparral, 7:00 p.m. "^ Gardinia at Las Vegas, 7:00 p.m. SEPTEMBER 21 South Tahoe at.Sparks, 7:30 p.m. SEPTEMBER 26 Hug at Reno, 7:30 p.m. SEPTEMBER 27 Sparks at Reed, 7:30 pm. Carson at Lowry, 7:30 p.m. Douglas at Bishop, 7:30 p.m. Elko at McQueen, 7:30 p.m. Silverado at Western, 7:00 p.m. Cimarron at Durango, 7:00 p.m. B. Gorman at Bonanza, 7:00 p.m. Cheyenne at Clark, 7:0 p.m. Las Vegas at Basic, 7:00 p.m. Valley at Rancho, 7:00 p.m. Chaparral at Eldorado, 7:00 p.m. Green Valley at Oceanside, 7:00 p.m. SEPTEMBER 28 Galena at South Tahoe, 1:30 p.m. (H) Churchill County 'at Wooster, 1:30 p.m. OCTOBER 4 Sparks at Lassen, 8:00 p.m. Hug at Carson, 7:30 p.m. Douglas at Churchill County, 7:30 p.m. (H) Reno at Elko, 7:30 p.m. (H) Wooster at Lowry, 7:30 p.m. Western at B. Gorman, 7:00 pmSMSdMdul* Page 32 PagaCSO NEVADA FOOTBALL AUGUST 29, 1996 Basic Wolves • Green Valley Gators Boulder City Eagles • Silverado Skyhawks flf The Eldorado Casino %

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1996-97 League Alignment A LEAGUE (0-165) — 19 schools Division I Division II Austin, 25 Faith Lutheran, 126 Col6vine.99 Indian Springs, 148 Gabbs, 37 lake Mead, 66 Gerlach,41 Lund, 50 Jackpot, 88 Pahranagat Valley 110 McDermott,63 Round Mountain, 125 Owyhee, 97 Spring Mountain, 136 Smith Valley, 102 Trinity Christian, 94 Virpnia City, 144 Eureka, 63 Pyramid Lake (Independent), 27 •>-;;• AA LEAGUE (166-375) 10 schools Division I Division II Carlin, 169 Beatty, 176 Independence, 304 Laughlin, 262 Tonopah, 224 lincoUi County, 200 Wells, 166 The Meadows, 185 We8tWendover,N/A Needles, 308 Work & Ploy To Reach Your goals! • ;,^ui. -j'isyfiiii-s GOOD LUCK EAGLES! Connie & Kathleen TRAVEL CENTRE 4(X) Nev. Hwy. 293-5202 AAA LEAGUE (376-900) ~ 18 schools Division I Battle Mountain, 402. Femley, 568 North Tahoe, 444 Rite Of Passage, 476 Spring Creek, 644 Tahoe-Trudiee, 667 -^ '': '\ • -'.''.'' iMvision II Bishop Manogue, 398 • : Dayton, 400 ;• Incline, 400 Mineral County, 348 Pershing County, 221 • Whittell,-247 Yerington, 386 • Division III Boulder City, 703 Moapa Valley, 567 Pahrump, 725 Virgin Valley, 399 White Pine, 510 Out with the old...In with DENUE If you oiir system needs to get back to the basics... ELEa GREGORY W SCHOOL BOARD TRUSTEE DISTRICT A Paid for by cWzMM for DwMw. ch. Daryl NIonii taOOOLUCKTO ALL TEAMS! AAAA LEAGUE (901-above) 29 schools Division I Elko, 1,243 Galena, 1,443 McQueen, 1,561 Reed, 2,120 South Tahoe, 1,363 Sparks, 1,590 Division II Carson, 2,228 Churchill County, 1,188 Douglas, 1,766 Hug, 1,758 Lowry, 961 v Reno, 1,532 Wooster, 1,234 Division III Basic, 2,258' Chaparral, 2,608 Eldorado, 2,241 Green Valley, 3,122 Las Vegas, 2,791 Rancho; 2,780 Valley, 2,595 Vo-Tech, 1,575 Mojave, N/A • Division FV Bishop Gorman, 944 Bonanza, 2,127 Cheyenne, 3,010 Cimarron-Memorial, 3,350 Clark, 2,010 Durango, 3,092 Silverado, 1,733 Western, 2,058 Palo Vefde, N/A nm m mm..: Basic Wolves Green Valley Gators Boulder Eagles Silverado Skyhawks 9 mmmi mmi I for all your Business Printing needs & Every day lx)w Prices iO'CALLAGHAIH PRIINT & COPY SHOPPE 2827 Green Valley Parkway 435-7761 AAAA LEAGUE AUGUST 30 Bonanza at Chaparral, 7:00 p.m. Green Valley at Clark, 7:00 p.m. Eldorado at Cimarron Memorial, 7:00 p.m. Cheyenne at Rancho, 7:00 p.m. Bishop Gorman at Valley, 7:00 p.m. •^. Silverado at Basic, 7:00 p.m. Western at Lais Vegas, 7:00 p.m. Durango at Snow Canyon, 7:00 p.m. SEPTEMBER 6 Hug at Bishop, 7:30 p.m. Sparks at Lowry, 7:30 p.m. Carson at Elko, 7:30 p.m. Reed at Reno, 7:30 p.m. Rancho at Western, 7:00 p.m. Chaparral at Clark, 7:00 p.m.. Basic atDurango, 7:00 p.m. Eldorado at B. Gorman, 7:00 p.m. Las Vegas at Bonanza, 7:00 p.m. Long Beach Poly at Green Valley, 7:00 p.m. Cheyenne at Mountain View, 7:00 p.m. Madson at Cimarron-Memorial, 7:00 p.m. Uttle Rock at Valley, 7:00 p.m. • • ;:, • : • • • Highland at Silverado, 7:00 p.m. Nevada iF^ioiiiall: Sdwdute Radio/Television v'-JWiJ:) 1996 Prep Football Game of the Week Live radio broadcasts will be on KLAV 1230 (AM) with game times scheduled for 7 p.m. : • > TV replays will be on on Prime Cable, Channels 1&48 on the date listed starting at 7 p.m. 'ill c* Friday, Aug. 30Friday, Sept. 6 Thursday, Sept. Friday, Sept. 20 Friday, Sept. 27 Friday, Oct. 4 — Friday, Oct. 11Friday, Oct. 18Friday, Oct. 25Friday, Nov. 1 — Saturday, Nov. 2 Friday, Nov. 8 — Satiu-day, Nov. 9 Friday, Nov. 15* Friday, Nov. 22 — Silverado at Basic. (TV replay on Sept. 4) — Eldorado at Gorman. (TV replay on Sept. 11) 12 — Western at Durango. (TV replay on Sept. 18) — Valley at Chaparral. (TV replay on Sept. 25) — Cimarron-Memorial at Durango. (TV replay on Oct. 2) Bonanza at Cheyenne. (TV replay on Oct. 9) — Rancho at Las Vegas. (TV replay on Oct. 16) — Clark at Cimarron-Memorial. (TV replay on Oct. 23) — Green Valley at Chaparral. (TV replay on (Dct. 30) Zone Quarterfinal, Game A. (TV replay on Nov. 6) — Zone Quarterfinals, Game B. (TV replay on Nov. 7) Zone Semifinal, Game A. (TV replay on Nov. 13) — Zone Semifinal, Game B. (TV replay on Nov. 14) Zone Championship. (TV replay on Nov. 20) — State Championship. (TV replay on Nov. 27) Game to be played at Sam Boyd Stadium. Schedule subject to change. SEPTEMBER,? Douglas at Galena, 1:30 p.m. McQueen at Wooster, 1:30 p.m. Chiu-chill County at South Tahoe, 1:30 p.m. SEPTEMBER 12 Galena at Churchill County, 7:30 p.m. Western at Durango, 7:00 p.m. Clark at Bonanza, 7:00 p.m. Silverado at Cheyenne, 7:00 p.m. Cimarron at B. Gorman, 7:00 p.m. Green Valley at Rancho 7:00 p.m. Chaparral at Rancho, 7:00 p.m. Basic at Valley 7:00 p.m. SEPTEMBER 13 Sparks at Hug, 7:30 p.m. Washington at Carson, 7:00 p.m. Reed at Douglas, 7:30 p.m. Reno at McQueen, 7:30 p.m. SouthTahoeatLowry,7:30 p.m. SEPTEMBER 20 Galena at McQueen, 7:30 p.m. Churchill County at Carson, 7:30 p.m. Reno at Douglas, 7:30 p.m. Wooster at Reed, 7:30 p.m. Lowry at Hug, 7:30 p.m. Elko at Spring Creek, 7:30 p.m. Bonanza at Western, 7:00 p.m. Dlirango at Silvera&o, 7:00 pm. B. Gorman at Clark, 7:00 p.m. Cheyenne at Cimarron, 7:00 p.m. Rancho at Green Valley, 7:00 p.m. Eldorado at Basic, 7:00 p.m. Valley at Chaparral, 7:00 p.m. "^ Gardinia at Las Vegas, 7:00 p.m. SEPTEMBER 21 South Tahoe at.Sparks, 7:30 p.m. SEPTEMBER 26 Hug at Reno, 7:30 p.m. SEPTEMBER 27 Sparks at Reed, 7:30 pm. Carson at Lowry, 7:30 p.m. Douglas at Bishop, 7:30 p.m. Elko at McQueen, 7:30 p.m. Silverado at Western, 7:00 p.m. Cimarron at Durango, 7:00 p.m. B. Gorman at Bonanza, 7:00 p.m. Cheyenne at Clark, 7:0 p.m. Las Vegas at Basic, 7:00 p.m. Valley at Rancho, 7:00 p.m. Chaparral at Eldorado, 7:00 p.m. Green Valley at Oceanside, 7:00 p.m. SEPTEMBER 28 Galena at South Tahoe, 1:30 p.m. (H) Churchill County 'at Wooster, 1:30 p.m. OCTOBER 4 Sparks at Lassen, 8:00 p.m. Hug at Carson, 7:30 p.m. Douglas at Churchill County, 7:30 p.m. (H) Reno at Elko, 7:30 p.m. (H) Wooster at Lowry, 7:30 p.m. Western at B. Gorman, 7:00 pmSMSdMdul* Page 32 PagaCSO NEVADA FOOTBALL AUGUST 29, 1996 Basic Wolves • Green Valley Gators Boulder City Eagles • Silverado Skyhawks flf The Eldorado Casino %

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SCHEDULE From Page 31 DurangoatClark, 7:00p.m. Bonanza at Cheyenne, 7:00 p.m. Cimanron at Silverado, 7:00 p.m. Green Valley at Valley, 7:00 p.m. Las Vegas at Chaparral, 7:00 p.m. Rancho at Eldorado, 7:00 p.m. .;• • •:>^:^.v/• • ,... ; • ,:; • • • • .:... • Basic atPontana, 7:30 p.m. OCTOBERS Reed at Galena, 1:30 p.m. McQueen at South Tahoe, 1:30 p.m.. OCTOBER 11 Galena at Lower Lake, 7:30 p.m. :':y,:./-r Churchill County at Sparks, 7:30 p.m. Carson at Reno, 7:30 p.m. McQueen atReed, 7:30 p.m. Hug at Wooster, 2:30 p.m. (H) Western at Cimarron, 7:00 p.m. Durango at Bonanza, 7:00 p.m. g'-:^.y^:[/-: "^:• • ''^' • ^'^ ..Clark at Silverado, 7:00 p.m. B. Gorman at Cheyenne, 7:00p.m. ;'*: Basic at Green Valley, 7:00 p.m. Rancho at Las Vegas, 7:00 p.m. Eldorado at Valley, 7:00 p.m. : • :\'('}• • :'" • ''\:^ >4V';"'; Cedar City at Chaparral, 6:00 p.m. OCTOBER 12 Elko at Sparks, 7:30 p.m. Douglas at Hug, 7:30 p.m. McQueen at Del Oro, 7:30 p.m. Reno at Churchill Covmty, 7:30 p.m. South Tahoe at Reed, 7:30 p.m. Cheyenne at Western 7:00 p.m. B. Gorman at Durango, 7:00 p.m. Bonanza at Silverado, 7:00 p.m. Clark at Cimarron, 7:00 p.m. Eldorado at Green Valley, 7:00 p.m. Valley at Las Vegas, 7:00 p.m. Chaparral at Basic, 7:00 p.m. • OCTOBER 19 Lowry at Galena, 1:30 p.m. Carson at Wooster, 1:30 p.m. OCTOBER 25 Douglas at Carson, 7:30 p.m. • • :'';•/-.;, • • .".^ • •-. Hug atMcQueen, 7:30 p.m. Wooster at Reno, 7:30 p.m. Lowry at Churchill Coimty, 7:30 p.m. Reed at Elko, 7:30 p.m.^ South Tahoe at Concord, 7:30 p.m. Western at Clark, 7:00 p.m. Durango at Cheyenne, 7:00 p.m. A • "' • • • '' Cimarron at Bonanza, 7:00 p.m. Silverado at B. Gorman, 7:00 p.m. Green Valley at Chaparral, 7:00 p.m. Las Vegas at Eldorado, 7:00 p.m. Basic at Rancho, 7:00 p.m. Kofa at Valley, 7:00 p.m. OCTOBER26 Sparks at Galena, 1:30 p.m. NOVEMBER 1 Galena at Elko, 7:30 p.m. McQueen at Sparks, 7:30 p.m. Wooster at Douglas, 7:30 p.m. Reno at Lowry, 7:30 p.m. Churchill County at Hug, 7:30 p.m. NOVEMBER 2 Carson at South Tahoe, 1:30 p.m. NOVEMBER 8-9 Zone Playoffs, TBA j NOVEMBER 15-16 Zone Championships, TBA NOVEMBER 23 State Championship, 8:00 p.m. •,'.' • AMA LEAGUE AUGUST 30 Virgin Valley at Kanab, 6:00 p.m. Yerington at Mineral County, 12:00 p.m. (Jamboree) :• ^ Manogue at Femley, 7:30 p.m. Hurricane at Boulder City, 7:00 p.m. AUGUST 31 Spring Creek at American Falls, TBA SEPTEMBER 6 Hurricane at Virgin Valley, 7:00p.m. i: %r C ROPat Yerington, 7:30p.m. Truckee at Mineral Coimty, 7:30 p.m. Snow Canyon at Moapa Valley, 7:00 p.m. ^ Incline at Quincy, 7:00p.m. White Pine at Battle Moimtain, 7:30 p.m. Femley at Dayton, 7:30 p.m. Whittell at Boulder City, 7:00 p.m. Emmett at Spring Creek, 7:30 p.m. Mouat (British Col.) at Pahrump, 7:00 p.m. SEPTEMBER 7 North Tahoe at Manogue, 1:00 p.m. Fernley at Dayton, 1:30 p.m. SEPTEMBER 13 Mammoth at Mineral County, 7:30 p.m. Moapa Valley at Hurricane, 6:30 p.m. Yerington at Femley, 7:30 p.m. Truckee at Incline, 7:30 p.m. • -/ • > • Battle Mountain at Pershing Coimty, 7:30 p.m. North Tahoe at Dayton, 7:30 p.m. SpringCreek at White Pine, 7:00 p.m. SEPTEMBER 14 ROP at Whittell, 1:30 p.m. North Tahoe at Dayton, 1:30 p.m. SEPTEMBER 20 Virgin Valley at Page, 7:00 p.HQ. :— Pershing County at Mineral County, 7:30 p.m. Moapa Valley at Mohave, 7:00 p.m. ^~ Manogueat Yerington, 7:30 p.m. Elko at Spring Creek, 7:30 p.m. SEPTEMBER 21 Boiilder City at ROP, 1:30 p.m. InclineatNorth Tahoe, 1:30 p.m. Pahrump at Battle Mountain, 1:30 p.m. (H) Dayton at Whittell, 1:30 p.m. White Pine at Truckee, 1:30 p.m. SEPTEMBER 27 Virgin Valley at Spring Creek, 7:30 p.m. Dayton at Mineral County, 7:30 p.m. Battle Mountain at Moapa Valley, 7:00 p.m. Incline at Yerington, 7:30 p.m.(H) Boulder City at Mohave, 7:00 p.m. ROP at Pahrump, 7:00 p.m. / Buy Uied Cum ^^X Proffitt Enterprises ^P I Guns N Goodies, Sales • Service • Repairs I W r Oil Additives • Novelties • Jewelry Do You Like Four WHEELINC Then Double Your Fun GO 8 WHEaiNC! (iO AN^WIIKKi:! 26 B Water St., Henderson • 565-7402 ,m.. I '" • SCHEDUL£ From Page 32 SEPTEMBER 28 ROP at Pahrump, 1:30 p.m. Whittell at Manogue, 12:00 p.m. Pershing Coimty at North Tahoe, 1:30 p.m. Mammoth at Truckee, 1:30 p.m. Femley at White Pine, 1:30 p.m. Boulder City at Pahrump, 7:00 p.m. Truckfee at Femley, 7:30 p.m. OCTOBER4 Pahrump at Virgin Valley, 7:00 p.m. Mineral County at Moapa Valley, 7:00 p.m. (H) Whittell at Incline, 7:30 p.m. Battle Mountain at Spring Creek, 7:30 p.m. (H) Manogue at Da3rton, 7:30 p.m. (H) White PineatBoulderCity, 7:00 p.m. North Tahoe at Femley, 7:30p.m. \-^}K:--rW-:-h• ,-• • Yerington at Pershing County, 7:30 p.m. ^ OCTOBERS • fmckee at ROP, 1:30 p.m. Manogue at Dayton, 1:00 1^30 p.m. OCTOBER 12 Incline at Manogue, 12:00 p.m. Pershing County at Whittell, 1:00 p.m. OCTOBERiF Virgin Valley at Boulder City, 7:00 p.m. Whittell at Mineral County, 7:30 p.m. Moapa Valley at Pahrump, 7:00 p.m. White Pine at Yerington, 7:30 p.m. ;••:: • T?tC':^^'^'V< Da3rton at Incline, 7:30 p.m. Battle Mountain at North Tahoe, TBA Manogue at Pershing County, 7:30 p.m. OCTOBERS Femley at ROP, 1:30 p.m. Battle Mountain at North Tahoe, 1:30 p.m. ^ W^ Spring Creek at Tmckee, p,m. _h r.;-.. ..'j:. OCTOBER 11 Dayton at Virgin Valley, 7:00 p.m. ^ .; North Tahoe at Spring Creek, 7:30 p.m. ROP at Battle Mountain, 7:30 p.m. Mineral County at Yerington, 7?00 p.m. White Pine at Moapa Valley, 7:00 p.m. OCTOBER 24 Yerington at Dayton, 7:30 OCTOBER25 Virgin Valley at White Pine, 7:00 p.m. M-;Mineral County at Manogue, 12:00 p.m. Boulder City at Moapa Valley, 7:00 p.m. Incline at Pershing County, 7:30 p.m. Truckee at Battle Mountain, 7:30 p.m. Yerington at Dayton, 7:30 p.m. Spring Creek at Femley, 7:30 p.m. OCTOB'I:R26 ROP at North Tahoe, 1:30 p.m. y; Mineral County at Manogue, 12:00 p.m. Pahrump at Whittell, 1:30^ ~p.m.-• • .,,.,: • .=• • NOVEMBER 1 i Moapa Valley at Virgin Valley, 7:00 p.m. Mineral County at Incline, 7:30 p.m. r ^ M Fernley at Battle Mountain, 7:30 p.m. Manogue at Boulder City, 7:30 p.m. Pershing Coimty at Dayton, 7:30p.m. NOVEMBER 2 Spring Creek at ROP, 1:30 p.m. "':^;^;< ,• Yerington at Whittell, 1:30 p.m. North Tahoe at Truckee, 1:30 p.m. J Pahrump at White Pine, 1:30 p.m. ., NOVEMBER 15,16 Division PlayofTs NOVEMBER 23 State Championships Sam Boyd Stadium, 5:00 p.m. AA LEAGUE SEPTEMBERS Needles at Williams, 7:00 p:m. Beatty at Laughlin, 7:00* p.m. West Wendover at Tonopah, 7:00 p.m. Carlin at Independence, 1:30 p.m. ^Lincoln County at Meadows, 7:00 p.m. Jackpot at Wells, 3:30 p.m. SEPTEMBER 13 Needles at Beatty, 7:00p.m. Lincoln County at Laughlin, 7:00 p.m. Wells at Independence, 1:30 p.m. Riebett at Meadows, TBA iSEPTEMBERH Tonopah at Carhn, 1:30 p.m. SEPTEMBER 20 Laughlin at Needles, 7:00 p.m. Meadows at Beatty, 7:00 p.m. Tonopah at Lincoln County, 7:00 p.m. p.m. Beatty at Lincoln Coutffy, 7:00 p.m. Murtaugh at Independence, 1:30 p.m. SEPTEMBER 28 Tonopah at Wells, 1:30 p.m. West Wendover at Carlin, 1:00 p.m. OCTOBER4 Needles at Lincoln County, 7:00 p.m. Meadows at Laughlin, 7:00 p.m. Las Vegas Christian at Beatty, TBA Independence at Tonopah, 7:00 p.m. OCTOBERS Wells at West Wendovr, 1:30 p.m. OCTC^ERll Laughlin at Beatty, 7:00 p.m. (H) Meadows at Lincoln County, 7:00 p.m. OCTOBER 12 Tonopah at West Wendover, 1:30 p.m. Independence tX Caiiin, 1:30 p.m. SEPTEMBER 21 Carhn at Wells, 1:30 p.m. Independence at West Wendover, 1:30 p.m. SEPTEMBER 27 Needles at Meadows, 7:00 OCTOBER 18 • Beatty atNeedles, 7:00 pjn. Laughlin at Lincoln County, 7:00 p.m. SMSCHMIUI* Page 34 Tom s Sunset Casino Sports Book s loin's Sunset Sports Book's ^50,000 *NO POINT" FOOTBALL CONTEST **NII. SHOWDOWN AT niNSKT* $25 Entiy Fee • The Contest Prizes will be: 1*415,000 •2^U>,O0O*l''45.O0O • LM Phea $3,000 (wMt loMn) • A Mrf • if MyON ta CMH OMM ttrfktmlmtmwmtmmnlmmmmmm.tiM rUtMNUIB(nTflkaMM*i Tom's Sunset Casino 444 Sunset Rol Boulder Hwy. • Henderson Paradise Road at Convention Center Dr. • Las Vegas Pahrump Tom's Sunset Casino 18 OZ.PORTCRHOUSC STEAK COMPLETE DINNER 24 HOURS A DAY (\(| / I 111 I < (M $3.85 Try Our 900 Breakfast NEVADA FOOriAU AUGUST 29,199C AUGUST 29, 1996 NEVADA FOOTIAU ftiflC

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SCHEDULE From Page 31 DurangoatClark, 7:00p.m. Bonanza at Cheyenne, 7:00 p.m. Cimanron at Silverado, 7:00 p.m. Green Valley at Valley, 7:00 p.m. Las Vegas at Chaparral, 7:00 p.m. Rancho at Eldorado, 7:00 p.m. .;• • •:>^:^.v/• • ,... ; • ,:; • • • • .:... • Basic atPontana, 7:30 p.m. OCTOBERS Reed at Galena, 1:30 p.m. McQueen at South Tahoe, 1:30 p.m.. OCTOBER 11 Galena at Lower Lake, 7:30 p.m. :':y,:./-r Churchill County at Sparks, 7:30 p.m. Carson at Reno, 7:30 p.m. McQueen atReed, 7:30 p.m. Hug at Wooster, 2:30 p.m. (H) Western at Cimarron, 7:00 p.m. Durango at Bonanza, 7:00 p.m. g'-:^.y^:[/-: "^:• • ''^' • ^'^ ..Clark at Silverado, 7:00 p.m. B. Gorman at Cheyenne, 7:00p.m. ;'*: Basic at Green Valley, 7:00 p.m. Rancho at Las Vegas, 7:00 p.m. Eldorado at Valley, 7:00 p.m. : • :\'('}• • :'" • ''\:^ >4V';"'; Cedar City at Chaparral, 6:00 p.m. OCTOBER 12 Elko at Sparks, 7:30 p.m. Douglas at Hug, 7:30 p.m. McQueen at Del Oro, 7:30 p.m. Reno at Churchill Covmty, 7:30 p.m. South Tahoe at Reed, 7:30 p.m. Cheyenne at Western 7:00 p.m. B. Gorman at Durango, 7:00 p.m. Bonanza at Silverado, 7:00 p.m. Clark at Cimarron, 7:00 p.m. Eldorado at Green Valley, 7:00 p.m. Valley at Las Vegas, 7:00 p.m. Chaparral at Basic, 7:00 p.m. • OCTOBER 19 Lowry at Galena, 1:30 p.m. Carson at Wooster, 1:30 p.m. OCTOBER 25 Douglas at Carson, 7:30 p.m. • • :'';•/-.;, • • .".^ • •-. Hug atMcQueen, 7:30 p.m. Wooster at Reno, 7:30 p.m. Lowry at Churchill Coimty, 7:30 p.m. Reed at Elko, 7:30 p.m.^ South Tahoe at Concord, 7:30 p.m. Western at Clark, 7:00 p.m. Durango at Cheyenne, 7:00 p.m. A • "' • • • '' Cimarron at Bonanza, 7:00 p.m. Silverado at B. Gorman, 7:00 p.m. Green Valley at Chaparral, 7:00 p.m. Las Vegas at Eldorado, 7:00 p.m. Basic at Rancho, 7:00 p.m. Kofa at Valley, 7:00 p.m. OCTOBER26 Sparks at Galena, 1:30 p.m. NOVEMBER 1 Galena at Elko, 7:30 p.m. McQueen at Sparks, 7:30 p.m. Wooster at Douglas, 7:30 p.m. Reno at Lowry, 7:30 p.m. Churchill County at Hug, 7:30 p.m. NOVEMBER 2 Carson at South Tahoe, 1:30 p.m. NOVEMBER 8-9 Zone Playoffs, TBA j NOVEMBER 15-16 Zone Championships, TBA NOVEMBER 23 State Championship, 8:00 p.m. •,'.' • AMA LEAGUE AUGUST 30 Virgin Valley at Kanab, 6:00 p.m. Yerington at Mineral County, 12:00 p.m. (Jamboree) :• ^ Manogue at Femley, 7:30 p.m. Hurricane at Boulder City, 7:00 p.m. AUGUST 31 Spring Creek at American Falls, TBA SEPTEMBER 6 Hurricane at Virgin Valley, 7:00p.m. i: %r C ROPat Yerington, 7:30p.m. Truckee at Mineral Coimty, 7:30 p.m. Snow Canyon at Moapa Valley, 7:00 p.m. ^ Incline at Quincy, 7:00p.m. White Pine at Battle Moimtain, 7:30 p.m. Femley at Dayton, 7:30 p.m. Whittell at Boulder City, 7:00 p.m. Emmett at Spring Creek, 7:30 p.m. Mouat (British Col.) at Pahrump, 7:00 p.m. SEPTEMBER 7 North Tahoe at Manogue, 1:00 p.m. Fernley at Dayton, 1:30 p.m. SEPTEMBER 13 Mammoth at Mineral County, 7:30 p.m. Moapa Valley at Hurricane, 6:30 p.m. Yerington at Femley, 7:30 p.m. Truckee at Incline, 7:30 p.m. • -/ • > • Battle Mountain at Pershing Coimty, 7:30 p.m. North Tahoe at Dayton, 7:30 p.m. SpringCreek at White Pine, 7:00 p.m. SEPTEMBER 14 ROP at Whittell, 1:30 p.m. North Tahoe at Dayton, 1:30 p.m. SEPTEMBER 20 Virgin Valley at Page, 7:00 p.HQ. :— Pershing County at Mineral County, 7:30 p.m. Moapa Valley at Mohave, 7:00 p.m. ^~ Manogueat Yerington, 7:30 p.m. Elko at Spring Creek, 7:30 p.m. SEPTEMBER 21 Boiilder City at ROP, 1:30 p.m. InclineatNorth Tahoe, 1:30 p.m. Pahrump at Battle Mountain, 1:30 p.m. (H) Dayton at Whittell, 1:30 p.m. White Pine at Truckee, 1:30 p.m. SEPTEMBER 27 Virgin Valley at Spring Creek, 7:30 p.m. Dayton at Mineral County, 7:30 p.m. Battle Mountain at Moapa Valley, 7:00 p.m. Incline at Yerington, 7:30 p.m.(H) Boulder City at Mohave, 7:00 p.m. ROP at Pahrump, 7:00 p.m. / Buy Uied Cum ^^X Proffitt Enterprises ^P I Guns N Goodies, Sales • Service • Repairs I W r Oil Additives • Novelties • Jewelry Do You Like Four WHEELINC Then Double Your Fun GO 8 WHEaiNC! 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I '" • SCHEDUL£ From Page 32 SEPTEMBER 28 ROP at Pahrump, 1:30 p.m. Whittell at Manogue, 12:00 p.m. Pershing Coimty at North Tahoe, 1:30 p.m. Mammoth at Truckee, 1:30 p.m. Femley at White Pine, 1:30 p.m. Boulder City at Pahrump, 7:00 p.m. Truckfee at Femley, 7:30 p.m. OCTOBER4 Pahrump at Virgin Valley, 7:00 p.m. Mineral County at Moapa Valley, 7:00 p.m. (H) Whittell at Incline, 7:30 p.m. Battle Mountain at Spring Creek, 7:30 p.m. (H) Manogue at Da3rton, 7:30 p.m. (H) White PineatBoulderCity, 7:00 p.m. North Tahoe at Femley, 7:30p.m. \-^}K:--rW-:-h• ,-• • Yerington at Pershing County, 7:30 p.m. ^ OCTOBERS • fmckee at ROP, 1:30 p.m. Manogue at Dayton, 1:00 1^30 p.m. OCTOBER 12 Incline at Manogue, 12:00 p.m. Pershing County at Whittell, 1:00 p.m. OCTOBERiF Virgin Valley at Boulder City, 7:00 p.m. Whittell at Mineral County, 7:30 p.m. Moapa Valley at Pahrump, 7:00 p.m. White Pine at Yerington, 7:30 p.m. ;••:: • T?tC':^^'^'V< Da3rton at Incline, 7:30 p.m. Battle Mountain at North Tahoe, TBA Manogue at Pershing County, 7:30 p.m. OCTOBERS Femley at ROP, 1:30 p.m. Battle Mountain at North Tahoe, 1:30 p.m. ^ W^ Spring Creek at Tmckee, p,m. _h r.;-.. ..'j:. OCTOBER 11 Dayton at Virgin Valley, 7:00 p.m. ^ .; North Tahoe at Spring Creek, 7:30 p.m. ROP at Battle Mountain, 7:30 p.m. Mineral County at Yerington, 7?00 p.m. White Pine at Moapa Valley, 7:00 p.m. OCTOBER 24 Yerington at Dayton, 7:30 OCTOBER25 Virgin Valley at White Pine, 7:00 p.m. M-;Mineral County at Manogue, 12:00 p.m. Boulder City at Moapa Valley, 7:00 p.m. Incline at Pershing County, 7:30 p.m. Truckee at Battle Mountain, 7:30 p.m. Yerington at Dayton, 7:30 p.m. Spring Creek at Femley, 7:30 p.m. OCTOB'I:R26 ROP at North Tahoe, 1:30 p.m. y; Mineral County at Manogue, 12:00 p.m. Pahrump at Whittell, 1:30^ ~p.m.-• • .,,.,: • .=• • NOVEMBER 1 i Moapa Valley at Virgin Valley, 7:00 p.m. Mineral County at Incline, 7:30 p.m. r ^ M Fernley at Battle Mountain, 7:30 p.m. Manogue at Boulder City, 7:30 p.m. Pershing Coimty at Dayton, 7:30p.m. NOVEMBER 2 Spring Creek at ROP, 1:30 p.m. "':^;^;< ,• Yerington at Whittell, 1:30 p.m. North Tahoe at Truckee, 1:30 p.m. J Pahrump at White Pine, 1:30 p.m. ., NOVEMBER 15,16 Division PlayofTs NOVEMBER 23 State Championships Sam Boyd Stadium, 5:00 p.m. AA LEAGUE SEPTEMBERS Needles at Williams, 7:00 p:m. Beatty at Laughlin, 7:00* p.m. West Wendover at Tonopah, 7:00 p.m. Carlin at Independence, 1:30 p.m. ^Lincoln County at Meadows, 7:00 p.m. Jackpot at Wells, 3:30 p.m. SEPTEMBER 13 Needles at Beatty, 7:00p.m. Lincoln County at Laughlin, 7:00 p.m. Wells at Independence, 1:30 p.m. Riebett at Meadows, TBA iSEPTEMBERH Tonopah at Carhn, 1:30 p.m. SEPTEMBER 20 Laughlin at Needles, 7:00 p.m. Meadows at Beatty, 7:00 p.m. Tonopah at Lincoln County, 7:00 p.m. p.m. Beatty at Lincoln Coutffy, 7:00 p.m. Murtaugh at Independence, 1:30 p.m. SEPTEMBER 28 Tonopah at Wells, 1:30 p.m. West Wendover at Carlin, 1:00 p.m. OCTOBER4 Needles at Lincoln County, 7:00 p.m. Meadows at Laughlin, 7:00 p.m. Las Vegas Christian at Beatty, TBA Independence at Tonopah, 7:00 p.m. OCTOBERS Wells at West Wendovr, 1:30 p.m. OCTC^ERll Laughlin at Beatty, 7:00 p.m. (H) Meadows at Lincoln County, 7:00 p.m. OCTOBER 12 Tonopah at West Wendover, 1:30 p.m. Independence tX Caiiin, 1:30 p.m. SEPTEMBER 21 Carhn at Wells, 1:30 p.m. Independence at West Wendover, 1:30 p.m. SEPTEMBER 27 Needles at Meadows, 7:00 OCTOBER 18 • Beatty atNeedles, 7:00 pjn. Laughlin at Lincoln County, 7:00 p.m. SMSCHMIUI* Page 34 Tom s Sunset Casino Sports Book s loin's Sunset Sports Book's ^50,000 *NO POINT" FOOTBALL CONTEST **NII. SHOWDOWN AT niNSKT* $25 Entiy Fee • The Contest Prizes will be: 1*415,000 •2^U>,O0O*l''45.O0O • LM Phea $3,000 (wMt loMn) • A Mrf • if MyON ta CMH OMM ttrfktmlmtmwmtmmnlmmmmmm.tiM rUtMNUIB(nTflkaMM*i Tom's Sunset Casino 444 Sunset Rol Boulder Hwy. • Henderson Paradise Road at Convention Center Dr. • Las Vegas Pahrump Tom's Sunset Casino 18 OZ.PORTCRHOUSC STEAK COMPLETE DINNER 24 HOURS A DAY (\(| / I 111 I < (M $3.85 Try Our 900 Breakfast NEVADA FOOriAU AUGUST 29,199C AUGUST 29, 1996 NEVADA FOOTIAU ftiflC

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i^mrnm^ y^mnM : >ry j'-j^•v_ii\--S'-^.-fT'X''' uimF^rumn SCHEDULE From Page 33 Carlin at Tonopah, 7:00 p.m. (H) OCTOBER 19 Independence at Wells, 1:30 pm. OCTOBER 25 Needles at Laughlin, 7:00 p.m. Beatty at Meadows, 7:00 p.m. West Wendover at Independence, 1:30 p.m. "'"^ OCTOBER 26 Wells at Carlin, 1:30 p.m. NOVEMBER 1 Meadows at Needles, 7:00 p.m. -• • ;•',... • • ; • ,• • • • • • • • • • ': Lincoln County at Beatty, TEA -:>, Wells atTonopali, 7:00 p.m. NOVEMBER 2 CarUn at West Wendover, 1:30 p.m. .: NOVEMBERS Lincoln County at Needles, 7:00 p.m. v ;: Laughlin atMeadows, 7:00 p.m. Tonopah at Independence, 1:30 p.m. NOVEMBERS West Wendover at Wells, 1:30 p.m. NOVEMBER 15,16 Division Playoffs NOVEMBER 23 State Championship at Sam Boyd Stadium, 2:00 p.m. A LEAGUE SEPTEMBER 6 Jackpot at Wells, 4:30 p.m. .Faith Baptist at Faith Lutheran, 7:00 p.m. Spring Mountain at Mountain View, TBA SEPTEMBER? Indian Springs at Fredoniaj 12:00 p.m. Smith Valley at Coleville, 1:00 p.m. Round Mountain at Owyhee, 1:00 p.m. Eureka at McDermitt, 1:00 p.m. SEPTEMBER 12 Jackpot at Oakley, TBA SEPTEMBER 13 Spring Mountain at Owyhee, 1:00 p.m. Faith Lutheran at West Shores, 3:00 p.m. SEPTEMBER 14 Coleville at Round Mountain, 1:00 p.m. Smith Valley at Eureka, 1:00 p.m. Pahranagat Valley at Fredonia, 1:00 p.m. Indian Springs ,at Camptfefl; 1:00 p.m. Gabbs at McDermitt, 1:00 p.m. siESPTEMBER 20 Coleville at Faith Lutheran, 7:00 p.m. SEPTEMBER 21 Jackpot at Eureka, 1:00 p.m. Pahranagat Valley at Owyhee, 1:00 p.m. Round Mountain at Smith Valley, 1:00 p.m. Spring Mountain vs Gabbs at Indian Springs, 1:00 p.m. SEPTEMBER 27 Spring Mountain at Faith Lutheran, 7:00 p.m. 7:30 p.m. OCTOBER 12 Coleville at Smith Valley, 1:00 p.m. McDermitt at Jackpot, 1:00 p.m. Gabbs at Owyhee, TBA Round Mountain at Pahranagat Valley, 1:00 • I • • • -.,-, • OCTOBER 18 Indian Springs at Faith Lutheran, 7:00 p.m. (H) SEPTEMBER 28 Smith Valley at Pahranagat Valley, 12:00 p.m. Eureka at Coleville, 1:00 p.m. Gabbs at Round Mountain, 1:00 p.m. Owyhee at Indian Springs, TBA OCTOBER4 Spring Mountain at Indian Springs, TBA OCTOBERS Gabbs at Coleville, 1:00 p.m. Owyl^ee at Jackpot, 1:00 p.m. ::vv'-, ; • :;_ • >.: ;...; McDermitt at Smith Valley, 1:00 p.m. Faith Lutheran at Round Mountain, 1:00 p.m. (H) Pahranagat Vallev at Eureka, 1:00 p.m. OCTOBER 11 Spring Mountadn at Faith y Lutheran, 7:00 p.m. Eureka at Indian'Springs, OCTOBER 19 Coleville at McDermitt, 1:00 p.ra. Jackpot at Gabbs, 2:00 p.m. Smith Valley at Owyhee, 1:00 p.m. Spring Mountain at Pahranagat Valley, 1:00 p.m. Eureka at Round Moimtain, 1:00 p.m. OCTOBER 25 Pahranagat V at Indian Springs, 7:30 p.m. Spring Moimtain at Round Mountain, 1:00 p.m. OCTOBER 26 Owyhee at Coleville, 1:00 p.m. Jackpot at Smith Valley, 1:00 p.m. •; A-'CxA Faith Lutheran at Eureka, 1:00 p.m. McDermitt at Gabbs, 1:00 p.m. • • .^:"'-^r-r-r;-• OCTOBER 31 Pahranagat Valley at Faith Lutheran, 5:00 p.m. NOVEMBER 1 Rotmd Mountain at Indian Springs, 7:30 p.m. NOVEMBER 2 Coleville at Jackpot, 1:00 p.m. Owyhee atMcDermitt, 1:00 p.m. Smith Valley at Gabbs, 1:00 p.m. -:.vf.^:^\.:^:SpringMountain vs Eureka at Indian Springs, 1:00 p.m. NOVEMBER 15-16 Divisional PlayoflGs, TBA NOVEMBER 22-23 State Championship Sam Boyd Stadium, 11:00 a.m. TiHE STAFF OF NEVADA F00TBAU.'96 WISHES TO THANK ALL THE COACHES AND THE NIAA FOR ITS HELP IN PROVIDING INFORMATION FOR THIS SECTION We wish to thank the advertisers who made FOOTBALL '96 POSSIBLE H OMENEWS "^XNEWS With Call Waiting Options You>e In Compfete Control S Hif Ci4 NEVADA FOOTIAU AUGUST 29, 19M Sprint 'print proudly introduces Call Waiting Options. This new screenphone feature gives customers greater control over Call Waiting calls through the use of soft keys. When customers are on the phone and another call comes in, Call Waiting Options displays the name and number of the new caller. In addition, each soft key on the screenphone represents a different option for handling the new call with the customer making their choice at the touch of a button. leaturcs Talk 2nd ir Places the current caller on hold while the new call is answered. •k The screen displays new soft keys for switching back and forth between callers, initiating a three-way call, or ending the call. Drop 1st •k Ends the current call and answers the new call. Hold Msg •k Sends the new caller a pre-recorded message saying that their call will be answered in a moment. •k The new call is then put on hold until it can be answered. Add 2nd • Places both the current caller and the new caller on the line in a three-way conference call. Take Msg •k Forwards the new caller to voice mail or answering service. Otdeyby Nov*:3<>, i^V'k mm AUGUST 29, 1996 NEVADA FOOTBALL PaffC35

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i^mrnm^ y^mnM : >ry j'-j^•v_ii\--S'-^.-fT'X''' uimF^rumn SCHEDULE From Page 33 Carlin at Tonopah, 7:00 p.m. (H) OCTOBER 19 Independence at Wells, 1:30 pm. OCTOBER 25 Needles at Laughlin, 7:00 p.m. Beatty at Meadows, 7:00 p.m. West Wendover at Independence, 1:30 p.m. "'"^ OCTOBER 26 Wells at Carlin, 1:30 p.m. NOVEMBER 1 Meadows at Needles, 7:00 p.m. -• • ;•',... • • ; • ,• • • • • • • • • • ': Lincoln County at Beatty, TEA -:>, Wells atTonopali, 7:00 p.m. NOVEMBER 2 CarUn at West Wendover, 1:30 p.m. .: NOVEMBERS Lincoln County at Needles, 7:00 p.m. v ;: Laughlin atMeadows, 7:00 p.m. Tonopah at Independence, 1:30 p.m. NOVEMBERS West Wendover at Wells, 1:30 p.m. NOVEMBER 15,16 Division Playoffs NOVEMBER 23 State Championship at Sam Boyd Stadium, 2:00 p.m. A LEAGUE SEPTEMBER 6 Jackpot at Wells, 4:30 p.m. .Faith Baptist at Faith Lutheran, 7:00 p.m. Spring Mountain at Mountain View, TBA SEPTEMBER? Indian Springs at Fredoniaj 12:00 p.m. Smith Valley at Coleville, 1:00 p.m. Round Mountain at Owyhee, 1:00 p.m. Eureka at McDermitt, 1:00 p.m. SEPTEMBER 12 Jackpot at Oakley, TBA SEPTEMBER 13 Spring Mountain at Owyhee, 1:00 p.m. Faith Lutheran at West Shores, 3:00 p.m. SEPTEMBER 14 Coleville at Round Mountain, 1:00 p.m. Smith Valley at Eureka, 1:00 p.m. Pahranagat Valley at Fredonia, 1:00 p.m. Indian Springs ,at Camptfefl; 1:00 p.m. Gabbs at McDermitt, 1:00 p.m. siESPTEMBER 20 Coleville at Faith Lutheran, 7:00 p.m. SEPTEMBER 21 Jackpot at Eureka, 1:00 p.m. Pahranagat Valley at Owyhee, 1:00 p.m. Round Mountain at Smith Valley, 1:00 p.m. Spring Mountain vs Gabbs at Indian Springs, 1:00 p.m. SEPTEMBER 27 Spring Mountain at Faith Lutheran, 7:00 p.m. 7:30 p.m. OCTOBER 12 Coleville at Smith Valley, 1:00 p.m. McDermitt at Jackpot, 1:00 p.m. Gabbs at Owyhee, TBA Round Mountain at Pahranagat Valley, 1:00 • I • • • -.,-, • OCTOBER 18 Indian Springs at Faith Lutheran, 7:00 p.m. (H) SEPTEMBER 28 Smith Valley at Pahranagat Valley, 12:00 p.m. Eureka at Coleville, 1:00 p.m. Gabbs at Round Mountain, 1:00 p.m. Owyhee at Indian Springs, TBA OCTOBER4 Spring Mountain at Indian Springs, TBA OCTOBERS Gabbs at Coleville, 1:00 p.m. Owyl^ee at Jackpot, 1:00 p.m. ::vv'-, ; • :;_ • >.: ;...; McDermitt at Smith Valley, 1:00 p.m. Faith Lutheran at Round Mountain, 1:00 p.m. (H) Pahranagat Vallev at Eureka, 1:00 p.m. OCTOBER 11 Spring Mountadn at Faith y Lutheran, 7:00 p.m. Eureka at Indian'Springs, OCTOBER 19 Coleville at McDermitt, 1:00 p.ra. Jackpot at Gabbs, 2:00 p.m. Smith Valley at Owyhee, 1:00 p.m. Spring Mountain at Pahranagat Valley, 1:00 p.m. Eureka at Round Moimtain, 1:00 p.m. OCTOBER 25 Pahranagat V at Indian Springs, 7:30 p.m. Spring Moimtain at Round Mountain, 1:00 p.m. OCTOBER 26 Owyhee at Coleville, 1:00 p.m. Jackpot at Smith Valley, 1:00 p.m. •; A-'CxA Faith Lutheran at Eureka, 1:00 p.m. McDermitt at Gabbs, 1:00 p.m. • • .^:"'-^r-r-r;-• OCTOBER 31 Pahranagat Valley at Faith Lutheran, 5:00 p.m. NOVEMBER 1 Rotmd Mountain at Indian Springs, 7:30 p.m. NOVEMBER 2 Coleville at Jackpot, 1:00 p.m. Owyhee atMcDermitt, 1:00 p.m. Smith Valley at Gabbs, 1:00 p.m. -:.vf.^:^\.:^:SpringMountain vs Eureka at Indian Springs, 1:00 p.m. NOVEMBER 15-16 Divisional PlayoflGs, TBA NOVEMBER 22-23 State Championship Sam Boyd Stadium, 11:00 a.m. TiHE STAFF OF NEVADA F00TBAU.'96 WISHES TO THANK ALL THE COACHES AND THE NIAA FOR ITS HELP IN PROVIDING INFORMATION FOR THIS SECTION We wish to thank the advertisers who made FOOTBALL '96 POSSIBLE H OMENEWS "^XNEWS With Call Waiting Options You>e In Compfete Control S Hif Ci4 NEVADA FOOTIAU AUGUST 29, 19M Sprint 'print proudly introduces Call Waiting Options. This new screenphone feature gives customers greater control over Call Waiting calls through the use of soft keys. When customers are on the phone and another call comes in, Call Waiting Options displays the name and number of the new caller. In addition, each soft key on the screenphone represents a different option for handling the new call with the customer making their choice at the touch of a button. leaturcs Talk 2nd ir Places the current caller on hold while the new call is answered. •k The screen displays new soft keys for switching back and forth between callers, initiating a three-way call, or ending the call. Drop 1st •k Ends the current call and answers the new call. Hold Msg •k Sends the new caller a pre-recorded message saying that their call will be answered in a moment. •k The new call is then put on hold until it can be answered. Add 2nd • Places both the current caller and the new caller on the line in a three-way conference call. Take Msg •k Forwards the new caller to voice mail or answering service. Otdeyby Nov*:3<>, i^V'k mm AUGUST 29, 1996 NEVADA FOOTBALL PaffC35

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