Citation
1996-02-29 - Henderson Home News

Material Information

Title:
1996-02-29 - Henderson Home News
Creator:
O'Callaghan, Mike ( Columnist )
Streeter, Kathy ( Columnist )
Marciniak, D. B. ( Columnist )
Theiss, Roy ( Columnist )
Lacy, Thomas ( Columnist )
Cohen, Richard ( Columnist )
Shipler, Guy ( Columnist )
Hanlon, Bill ( Columnist )
Dibb, Kiersten ( Columnist )
Banks, Kimberley ( Columnist )
Thomas, Susan ( Columnist )
Sanders, Meredith ( Columnist )
Dodge, Paul ( Columnist )
Allen, D. J. ( Columnist )
Bowman, Bill ( Columnist )
Soehlke, Ruth ( Columnist )
Goldstein, Philip ( Columnist )
Spotti, Alexandra ( Columnist )
Henderson, Barb ( Columnist )
Eicher, Ray ( Columnist )
Earl, Phillip I. ( Columnist )
Marshall, Kent ( Columnist )
Wilbanks, George D. ( Columnist )
Bishop, Carolyn D. ( Columnist )
Judge, John ( Photographer )
Weidenfeld, Rob ( Photographer )
Marciniak, D. B. ( Photographer )
Publisher:
O'Callaghan, Mike
HBC Publications, Inc.
Creation Date:
1996-02-29
Language:
English
Materials:
Paper ( medium )

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Nevada
Henderson
East Las Vegas
City and town life -- Nevada -- Henderson
Community life -- Nevada -- Henderson
History -- Henderson (Nev.) -- 20th century
Genre:
Newspapers

Notes

Acknowledgments:
Greenspun Media sponsors this collection.
Collection Location:
Greenspun Media retains possession of the bound, original newspapers. Henderson District Public Libraries retains possession of the microfilm and the digital files.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Holding Location:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Rights Management:
The items in this collection are provided for non-commercial personal and academic use by Henderson Library patrons and may not be republished in any way. Contact Greenspun Media Group for additional information regarding rights to this material: http://www.greenspunmedia.com
Resource Identifier:
hhn4412 ( Digital Id )

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PAGE 1

tvt:, MMJi,.J|J|4^|i.,.LJ^MJMU..MM......M....UJIJIIN!|{{^ rt-^w'^^v^-. m.HlUliWJII.WWA.i-' • • MIHMIHMI Pag* 22 Hendarson Home News Tuesday, February 27, 1996 JUMP INTO mERTmLEYSMC LEAP YEAR mAYAemi 0 N 66 A PRnriF BAY MICROFILK u"m AROUES •AVE E SUNNYVALE, CA SAOab 64/04/99 MAIL ws Previews of the prep baseball, golf teams Page 17 HOP OH OVER TO THB mLBY! Thursday, February 29, 19% Henderson, Nevada 50* y**"-"""^: "^mi-fri^f^^z^. iai^m^mim'i-mm'^^^^^f^^^' Low Miles, Factory Warranty, Many Extras! (#61076A) *19.990 1994 CMC Red, Sportside.#UPl242 ASK FOR DAVID OR TOM • II 990 ONE MAN'S VIEW m9Bm • acaL..-'' Exai Only SSOO MIlM, Must SM! UP1269A 11.990 7990 1f95 BUICK Rt,A|-nMQoodi^ •UP1277 f1995 CHEVY C :^ LOWMIM,FI iWwmtty.LouOf •CtMV OfExfassI 9990 ..**^**^ '45''^' IV^yy CORVETTE Only 44,500 Original Miles. Red/Silver, Get Ready For Spring! #61163A gr•^ ^ IV^o EXPLORER 4 Dr.. 4x4. V-6. All The Extras. Won't Last! #61047A 14,990 BANKRUPTCIES TAX LEINS • REPOSSESSIONS JUDGEMENT WE (AN HELP! ASK FOR TOM K IViinr SUBURBAN Power Windows-Locks, Leather & Much More! #UP1240 2S990 Great For Camping, Must Drive This One! #UP1219A Vjmg|ffi^ [CHKVIWOLltl' f jajD4^%44 imoiEvy s&mm B!!k.CMtonia(> Induing RumnoBoiRMTMtartw Tediyl(IUPl2K) i994ISUZU /.4Mt4, 4 Dr., Only 23.000^ Mpas,WontLMt,6fTM • Todayt fSITeOA "mj^ii 1995 JEEP I J'i'jLMMl.4X4,Low,LMIr' LMMMT.U (lypizMf) 1993 NMH^ lAVE MIKE O'CALLAGHAN "Come downstairs, the governor wants to see you," his secretary told me over the phone. My office was upstairs in the state capitol building and I was standing in front of Gov. Grant Sawyer in a matter of minutes. Just a few months earlier Sawyer had named me as the first director of the newly created department which included overseeing health, welfare and institutional functions. He handed me a letter he had received from Henderson Mayor Bill Byrne which demanded I be fired. Byrne, a former three-term member of the Nevada Assembly, was unhappy because I hadn't ruled in favor of his proclaimed power to run all public health matters as he had determined. Because I came from Henderson, he had earlier believed my rulings would be in his favor rather than according to Nevada Revised Statutes. He was wrong. -^ "Well, what do you think?" 'Sawyer asked me. I told him, using some of my favorite expressions learned as a Marine sergeant and in the streets. He laughed and threw the letter aside and we talked about some other department issues. Never again did I hear about that letter from ^ Henderson. Grant Sawyer, elected in 1958 as the youngest man to enter the office of governor, came to Carson City from Elko. Nevada voters had never elected a Clark County person as governor and that year was no exception. What was different this time was Sawyer's willingness to appoint Southern Nevadans to key positions in state government. L, Two of the key men in his campaign for governor, both now living in Boulder City, were Ralph Denton and Bob Faiss. Another key campaigner and later staff member was Boulder City grocery store owner Dick Ham. Faiss and See One Man's View Page 2 INSIDE Skiing at Lee is great escape Panor.im;i cover WE ARE THE ONLY DEALERSHIP IN TOWN VIHTH NJLDJL CERHRED SALESPERSONS! ^ R^^^V^^^^^^|(| ^^B i| ^^M^MM 2 S! 1 S] *' 1 ^31 r Vk^^ FRTiiniH :Wi]i^m ^^ ^^ u J^ I ^ fIN THE VALLEY AUTO IVIALL] 1 All vehicles subircl lo prior s.ilc plus la and dor Sro dr.iirr (or dot.iil-; S.ile or.di ( "b 27 1.)% It's pledge month at PBS Editorials TV News inside 4-5 Senior News 10 Happenings Deaths 12 12 Movies 14 City Council Agenda _15 VUUrw47. imemon H.B.C. PiMcMlona POBM 90410 (704144-1001 John Judge/News Staff BIRTHDAY — Edna Deardoff celebrates her 21st birthday today, a leap day. Deardoff celebrate^ 21 st today Kathy StreotW News Staff Writer Edna Deardoff, celebrating her 21stbirthday today, is used to blowing out candles on a day other than Feb. 29. However, her first birthday party mis sed the d ate by several months. ^ Not long after Deardoff started school in 1918, a classmate had a birthday party. Deardoff had so much fun she decided to announce her own birthday party —jil a week. Sh e neglected to tell her mo ther of the plan, and when the day came classmates arrived giflsin-hand. Her mother sent the children home and told them to come back in February. Deardoff, bom Feb. 29,1912, only gets to celebrate her "real birthday" once every four years. This will beher 21st, and that's enough, she said. "I'm not counting anymore," Deardoff said. "I'm going to be 21 forever." She plans to celebrate in gnrand style. Her only request was for Sam's Band to play at her party, and Mayor Bob Groesbeck arranged for that to happen. *Tm not counting anymore. Vm going to lie 21 forever J* Edna Deardoff "They play all the tunes that we always knew," Deardoff said. "People can come and visit and dance." Ice cream sundaes will also be served during Deardoffs party today at the Henderson Senior Center. DeardoflFwork sBt the center coordinating all volunteer efforts. She is the director of the Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) office. A resident of Henderson since 1974, she has worked at the Senior Center almost as long. When she started, the center was located at St. Peter's Catholic Church. Deardoff worked as director of nutrition until she turned 80. "I decided I didn't need to deal with the government anymore," she said. She retired for three days, then agreed to fill a vacancy in the RSVP office. 'This gives me a purpose in life," she said. "I have to get up and get dressed every morning. ... The doctor said there's nothing wrong with my brain, but there will be if I don't use it." Deardoff works in the RSVP office from 8 to 11 a.m. Monday through Friday, long enough to organize the center's volunteers and earn a little "fun money." In 1995 her RSVP volunteers clocked 42,802 hours of service. Deardoff was born the oldest of six children in a small Nebraska town. She met her husband, Joe, on a double date after his brother (whom Edna wafS dating) fell for her cousin. Joe and Edna had a son, William, and Edna is now a great-grandmother. Joe died in 1971, two years before Deardoff came to visit her sister in Henderson and decided to stay. "I just fell in love with it," she said. "I knew I wanted to make a change. I was tired of the cold winters." Several of Deardoff s family members will help her celebrate today. All are invited to stop by, have a sundae, and wish Edna a "Happy 21st." The open house will be held fi*om 2 to 4 p.m. today at the Henderson Senior Center, 27 E. Texas St. Mail brings traffic woes D.B. Marciniak News Staff Writer With convenient mall-shopping comes parking and traffic frustration for drivers. Actions taken before the opening of the Galleria at Sunset Mall may alleviate problem all drivers fear. Within 10 minutes of the mall there is access to approximately 300,000 people. For those traveling to the mall, there are 6,000 parking spots. Valet parking is available. Thelargescale of the mall and possible attraction for thousands of people creates a tremendous traffic burden on the area, said John Bartels, traffic engineer for the Public Works Department. "Anytime you have a project of this size operating, there is going to be an increase in traffic," Bartels said. Traffic flow to the mall is mainly served by Sunset Road. When construction to accommodate more traffic was done, studies considered that most traffic will be coming from Interstate 95, east of the mall,. rather than from the west. The mall is expected to increase traffic flow in the area by See Traffic Page 13 Peck to be named D.B. Marciniak News Staff Writer The future challenges of planningfor Henderson will deal with large-scale projects and developments which set the city apart on a regional level, said Mary Kay Peck, planning administrator. Peck is expected to be named the city's planning director by the City Council Tuesday. She has served as the interim planning director and zoning administrator. "The biggest challenge, as far as planning is concerned, is you have to look at balancing the regional attractions which are coming to Henderson with the neighborhoods," Peck said. Attractions such as the GalleiiCat Sunset Mall, The Reserve Hotel and Casino and the Sunset Station Hotel Casino pose a challenge to the city. The projects are helping Henderson lose its identity as a suburb of Las Vegas by visitors and gain an identity of being a separate city, she said. "When you're dealing with a city that is the fastest-growing city in the U.S., then it is difficult to keep up with the expansion," she said. Peck said the most important part of being a planning director is to use all the information presented to make decisions on projects. "Planning comes from the bottom up, not the top down, and that's the way it's supposed to be," she said. As far as planning the future of Henderson is concerned, it is up to the citizens and not her to make the decisions. She said she is there to put the views of citizens into action, analyze information presented by them and use that to help forge the future of Henderson. "What I have to do is listen to the people say. This is what the city's going to be like,"' Peck said. Working with people and hearing opinions is a responsibility she enjoys as a planner. Making good decisions based on information is also an area in which she excels, she said. As planning director she is responsible for managing the department, representing the department at various meetings and making presentations on projects to the City Council. BC studies landfill location 1 Roy Theiss A site for a new landfill which will be used by out-of-town trucks hauling construction debris was unanimously approved Tuesday during the Boulder City City Council. The site, approximately one mile west of U.S. Highway 95 and north of the Dry Lake Bed in the Eldorado Valley, was chosen because of several existing advantages. Mayor Eric Lundgaard presented the pros and cons of the two sites. The site near the highway has a paved road to it, a 100-square acre fence and the area was previously used by the Nevada Department of Transportation as a gravel pit. "The other one (near Dutchman Pass] would require extensive development includihg procurement of the right-of-way of Bureau of Land Management land and we would need a permit for that road," he said. llie logistics of sending trucks four miles deeper into the McCullough Mountain Range to the other site was only one factor for Limdgaard. "I really have a difficult time SDump Pagell • '"'i-'*'*-^"^-. :i— John Judge/News Staff SNOW DAY — Snowfall provided an opportunity for Stephen Helliday to give his grandchildren Daniel De Angelis and Sara Hetyonk an innertube ride on the Wild Horse GoH Course Monday.

PAGE 2

Page 2 Henderson Home News Thursday, February 29,1996 ONE MAN'S VIEW: From Page 1 Denton both gave moving tributes to their friend Grant during his funeral last Saturday. In Sawyer's oral recollection of history contained in the book "Hang Tough" he remembered Denton and Ham as his primary people in the south. Sawyer recalled, "Ralph Denton was willing to stick his neck out and try to organize our campaign in the south. Ralph and I had both been quite active in the party, and were always in the same conspiracies when it came to Democratic conventions. He was liberal and he was gutsy, and we were pretty much soul mates on political issues, but though he helped me a lot during that and later campaigns, he wasn't a Sawyer man — he's his own man. We remain ;: extremely close, and as a matter of fact Ral ph's daughter gave the name Grant to the son born to her in 1991. That pleased me very much. I have considered Ralph probably my closest friend all these years." When talking about Faiss, he praised him for the outstanding work he performed when serving with the newly created Nevada Gaming Commission. Then he said, "Eventually Bob moved over to the governor's office as my executive assistant, in which role he took care of making sure that my speeches indicated that I knew what I was talking about, (laughter) If I was asked to speak about subject x, for example. Bob would go to the proper division of state government and say, The governor has to give a speech on x on such-and-such a date. Would you please send me something suitable on that subject' The agency would draft a speech on the subject and send it in, and Bob would rewrite the ones that were not particularly competent. That went on all the time, because I was giving a speech a day. In fact, one year we figured I gave more speeches than there were days! (laughter) So I had to have a constant flow of material on an array of subjects. Eventually, Bob was handling the whole thing. He became very familiar with my style, and most of what I wrote or said for the last several years of my governorship came out of Bob Faiss, who would • rewrite it and was the final arbiter on all of those things." Faiss later went on to become a key staff member in Lyndon Johnson's White House and today is recognized as the most capable and skilled gaming attorney in the country. Sawyer also reached into Henderson to appoint George Ullom to the Tax Commission and the Public Service Commission. This may not sound significant today but all during Sawyer's time in office, Clark County had only one state senator as did each of the other 16 counties. Despite this, he tapped southerner after southerner to become members of his administration in Carson City. He was the first governor to treat Southern Nevada as an equal to the counties in the north. Looking back, I realize that Sawyer took an extra risk when bringing a brash young man like me into his administration. He offered me the challenge to take seven state departments and make them functiqn as one. He told me what he wanted done and then gave me the authority to do the job. Working with people like Faiss, Ham and Chris Schaller was a pleasure. Schaller, also a southern Nevadan, was married to Harriet Jones of Boulder City. Both Schaller and Faiss had been editors at the Las Vegas Sun. In "Hanging Tough" Sawyer, the man who gave me an opportunity to succeed, noted that I.had run the Department of Human Resources "very well." Like many other Southern Nevadans, I considered myself most fortunate to have had the opportunity to work for and with one of our nation's giants during my initial years in public office. Grant Sawyer brought Southern Nevada into the halls of state government like no previous governor. The man from Elko was truly the governor for all of the Silver State. O'Callaghan, a former two-term governor of Nevada, is publisher of the News. Pedestrian injured on Boulder Hwy. Staff New* Raports A Henderson senior citizen was critically injured Tuesday after he was hit by a vehicle while attempting to cross Boulder Highway. According to Henderson police, Marshall Steerling, 77, was trying to cross the south-bound lanes of Boulder Highway near Texas Avenue when he was struck by a pick-up truck driven by John Fields of Henderson. Police said pedestrian error was likely the cause of the 11:50 a.m. accident and that Fields was not cited. Steerling was transported to University Medical Centerin Las Vegas. A hospital spokesperson said Wednesday that Steerling remained in critical condition. HOME— NEWS An Ind0p0nd0nt Nwtpmp^ Founded June 1, 19S1 Henderson Home News (USPS 240000) Published every Tuesday and Thursday morning at2 Commerce Center Drive, Henderson, Nevada, by HBC Publications, Inc. Second class postage paid at Henderson, Nevada. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: HENDERSON HOME NEWS 2 Commerce Cantor Drive Hi(toraon,NVaM14 PhoiM (702) 564-1881 Cuatomar complaint ealla will ba aeeaptad from 7 to 10 am on Tuaadaya and fhuradmyt. Uiaaad papara win ba tMatributad by noon. MIKE O'CALLAGHAN Publisher CAROLYN O'CALLAGHAN Co-Publisher TIM O'CALLAGHAN General Manager PAUL SZYDELKO Managing Editor MARY COLLEEN MIELE Circulation Manager HBC PUBUCATK>NS, INC. Mike O'Callaghan, President; Carolyn O'Callaghan, Vice President; Tim O'Calaghan, Treasurer/Vice President Mary CoOeen Miela, Vica President; Ruthe Deskin, Secretary. SUBSCRIPTION RATES Sinc^ 50 canto OnaYaw S30 (TWMM ConeeciMM Monhs) NoRatoHk MAN. SUBSCRIPTIONS WaH cH Mlaaaippi$40peryear Eat! of laaiMipPi$SOM*yyi •Adiflkmal Maiina Officaa' Rob Weidenfeld/News Staff LANGUAGE BOOKS—Axithor C l lffDavisandbet tyChapman, president of EPLS Language Training Corp., will be at B. Dalton in the Galleria at Sunset Mall March 1. Davis will sign copies of his Easy to Pronounce foreign language phrase books from 4 to 7 p.m. Language book author to sign books Friday Kathy Streeter News Staff Writer Anyone who has ever stumbled through a phrase book trying to communicate in a foreign language will appreciate Cliff Davis. Davis developed a series of easy to pronounce language books. The books are based on a system which allows the reader to correctly pronounce all vowel sounds. Symbols are used for each vowel and the symbols are always pronounced the same way. Davis' books are the first language books of their kind, he said. "It is difficult to pronounce [a foreign language] when you've never seen that combination of letters before," Davis said. This system has visual vowels. I isolated the vowels and gave them a symbol. It is the first and only system based on sound." The Henderson resident's "Easy to Pronounce Language Series" includes phrase books in Spanish, French, German, Italian and Japanese. He is working on a book in Chinese and just completed a Spanish to English book. Davis' unique system evolved from his love of travel. He used symbols to remind himself of the sounds each vowel made in various languages. When his sister, Betty Chapman, saw his notes, she knew immediately that the system would be marketable. The EPSL method was tested extensively by Davis and other independent researchers, including college professors. All research indiS— Language Page 13 John Judge/News Staff CARTOON — Stacia Martin of the Disney Store demonstrates the techniques involved in drawing Disney cartoon characters for Julia Marchese during the pre-opening party held at the Galleria at Sunset Tuesday evening. Thursday, February 29 1996 Henderson Home News Page 3 Kidnappers plead guilty Thomas Lacy News Staff Writer Two brothers who allegedly kidnapped a Henderson youth to recoup money from a drug deal pleaded guilty to charges which will net them three to five-year prison sentences. Juan Manuel Reyes-Elias, 28, and Luis Reyes, 23, will be sentenced June 28. The elder brother faces a maximum of five years in prison as a result of pleading guilty to a charge of using a gpn in a kidnapping. HPRD offers classes for spring time Henderson Parks and Recre,ation will offer a-Y-ariety-oflartsand crafts classes at the Kesterson Valley View Recreation Center. Scheduled in six week sessions, classes are open to those 16 years and older. •Bonsai: Thursdays, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.; class fee $35, begins Feb. 29. •Quilting: Saturdays, 9 to 11 a.m.; class fee $30; begins March 2. •Oil Painting: Saturdays, 1 to2:30 p.m.; class fee $35; begins March 2. •Stained Glass: Mondays, 6 to8:30 p.m.; class fee $35; begins March 4. •Tole Painting: Tuesdays, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.; class fee $38; begins March 5. Luis Reyes faces a pri son term of three years stemming from his guiltl^ plea t^the charge of failing to report a kidnapping to authorities. *^ *!. Both men were accused in the kidnapping of Richard Deroboam, 17, of Henderson. According to published reports, the brothers kidnapped Deroboam in an attempt to recoup $ 10,000 from an earlier sale of marijuana that had not yet been collected. -:^ ; •;-; However, prosecutor Tom O'Connell said Deroboam was not involved in the sale of the drugs, but was simply in the wrong nl^ce at the wrong time. The Henderson teenager was kidnapped at gunpoint Aug. 2 at his apartment. It was reported that the brothers hoped the youth's father would convince another man to give them the money. ., Deroboam was later released unharmed. THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY -:MBE MAIL BOXES, ETCIT'S NOT WHAT \VL DO. IT'S HOW VVn Do IT. Authorized UPS Shipping Outlet Private Mail Box Rental SJ COPIES PACKAGING MAIL SERVICE SHIPPING OVERNIGHT FAX STAMPS OFFICE SUPPUES KEYS PACKING SUPPUL^ [3 MONEY TRANSFER NOTARV PASSPORT PHOTOS MONEY ORDERS ETC.ETCCTC WESTERN UNION • Personal Street Address • 24 Hour Access • Mail Forwarding Ask about these too: Voice Mail • Business Cards • Rubber Stamps Custom Packaging • And alot more! PECOS WINDMILL PLAZA 2657 Windmill Pkwy. HENDERSON 896-9898 GREEN VALLEY PLAZA 2756 Green Valley Pkwy. •HENDERSON 454-5220 HENDERSON SHOPPING VILLAGE 850 S, Boulder Hwy. 565-1235 ^^^, r. TOM'S SUNSET CASINO 7^. e^^ MONDAY NIGHT MYSTERY SPECIALS Z /^' 1 S^ti^<^'i<(<.Haiif T^i 'c*i*iC7J STARTING MARCH I8lh 5 to 10 P.M 444 W. SUNSET ROAD 1/4 Mile West of Boulder Hwy. ''Rock Arouriil the Mouse'' ^ Catch Mickey, Minnie, Donald, Daisy, Pluto and Goofy in a V nfiusical stage show outside the food court, upper level. Wed-Sot 10:30am, l2:30Dm, 3:00pm, 5:00pm and 7:00pm. Sun 11:30am, 1:30pm, 3:00pm^ 4:00pm, and 5:00pm. Disney Skefch Ariist Watch magic in the making with a Disney sketch artist near Mervyn's California, lower level. Wed-Sat 12:30pm, 2:30pm, 4:00pm, 5:30pm, and 7:00Dm. Sun 11:30am, 1:00pm, 2:30pm, 4:00pm, and 5:30pm. "Sword in the Sfone'' Get into the act with Merlin's "Sword in the Stone" at the fountain, lower level. Wed-Sat 11:00am, 12:00pm, 1:00pm, 2:00pm, 3:30pm, 5:00pm, and 6:00pm. Sun 11:15am, 12:00pm, 1:00pm, 2:00pm, 3:30pm, 4:30pm, 5:30pm. i Character Meet & Greet Meet and greet Disney characters, ipecial^rprise appeorancesthroughout the day. Near Dillard's, upper level and across from 9 & Company, lower level. (Characters alternate every 30 minutes.) Wed-Sat 11:00am7:30pm Sun. ll:00am-5:30pm. Cartoons! Disney cartoons and playtime for kids. Near Dillard's, lower levef Wed-Sat 10:00am-9:00pm Sun 11:00am^:00pm Just for you. Galleria at Sunset at your service. 600 seat food court, valet parking, gift certificates, strollers, wheelchairs. Just ask us. Any way we can make your shopping experience more enjoyable, just let us know. After all, we're your place in the sun. WEDNESDAY, 9:30AM! IHE SUN AND THE STARS COME OUTJUSr FOR YOU. Just for you! Galleria at Sunset will grand open with a "Spectacular Sunrise," on exclusive, once-in-a-lifetime show, produced by Disney Be there for the excitement as we cut our ribbon and greet you with open arms. Bring your kids. Bring your camera. The fun runs Wednesday through Sunday. You'll want to catch every magical moment. Show stoppers, music and live Disney entertainment everywhere you turn. Four department stores, over 100 specialty shops, restaurants and natural attractions. Brand new. Just for you. Your place in the sun. Galleria at Sunset. (Don't tell the tourists.) Galleria At Sunset 1300 W. Sunset Road Henderson, NV Mon-SatlOAM-9PMSunllA/^PM

PAGE 3

Page 2 Henderson Home News Thursday, February 29,1996 ONE MAN'S VIEW: From Page 1 Denton both gave moving tributes to their friend Grant during his funeral last Saturday. In Sawyer's oral recollection of history contained in the book "Hang Tough" he remembered Denton and Ham as his primary people in the south. Sawyer recalled, "Ralph Denton was willing to stick his neck out and try to organize our campaign in the south. Ralph and I had both been quite active in the party, and were always in the same conspiracies when it came to Democratic conventions. He was liberal and he was gutsy, and we were pretty much soul mates on political issues, but though he helped me a lot during that and later campaigns, he wasn't a Sawyer man — he's his own man. We remain ;: extremely close, and as a matter of fact Ral ph's daughter gave the name Grant to the son born to her in 1991. That pleased me very much. I have considered Ralph probably my closest friend all these years." When talking about Faiss, he praised him for the outstanding work he performed when serving with the newly created Nevada Gaming Commission. Then he said, "Eventually Bob moved over to the governor's office as my executive assistant, in which role he took care of making sure that my speeches indicated that I knew what I was talking about, (laughter) If I was asked to speak about subject x, for example. Bob would go to the proper division of state government and say, The governor has to give a speech on x on such-and-such a date. Would you please send me something suitable on that subject' The agency would draft a speech on the subject and send it in, and Bob would rewrite the ones that were not particularly competent. That went on all the time, because I was giving a speech a day. In fact, one year we figured I gave more speeches than there were days! (laughter) So I had to have a constant flow of material on an array of subjects. Eventually, Bob was handling the whole thing. He became very familiar with my style, and most of what I wrote or said for the last several years of my governorship came out of Bob Faiss, who would • rewrite it and was the final arbiter on all of those things." Faiss later went on to become a key staff member in Lyndon Johnson's White House and today is recognized as the most capable and skilled gaming attorney in the country. Sawyer also reached into Henderson to appoint George Ullom to the Tax Commission and the Public Service Commission. This may not sound significant today but all during Sawyer's time in office, Clark County had only one state senator as did each of the other 16 counties. Despite this, he tapped southerner after southerner to become members of his administration in Carson City. He was the first governor to treat Southern Nevada as an equal to the counties in the north. Looking back, I realize that Sawyer took an extra risk when bringing a brash young man like me into his administration. He offered me the challenge to take seven state departments and make them functiqn as one. He told me what he wanted done and then gave me the authority to do the job. Working with people like Faiss, Ham and Chris Schaller was a pleasure. Schaller, also a southern Nevadan, was married to Harriet Jones of Boulder City. Both Schaller and Faiss had been editors at the Las Vegas Sun. In "Hanging Tough" Sawyer, the man who gave me an opportunity to succeed, noted that I.had run the Department of Human Resources "very well." Like many other Southern Nevadans, I considered myself most fortunate to have had the opportunity to work for and with one of our nation's giants during my initial years in public office. Grant Sawyer brought Southern Nevada into the halls of state government like no previous governor. The man from Elko was truly the governor for all of the Silver State. O'Callaghan, a former two-term governor of Nevada, is publisher of the News. Pedestrian injured on Boulder Hwy. Staff New* Raports A Henderson senior citizen was critically injured Tuesday after he was hit by a vehicle while attempting to cross Boulder Highway. According to Henderson police, Marshall Steerling, 77, was trying to cross the south-bound lanes of Boulder Highway near Texas Avenue when he was struck by a pick-up truck driven by John Fields of Henderson. Police said pedestrian error was likely the cause of the 11:50 a.m. accident and that Fields was not cited. Steerling was transported to University Medical Centerin Las Vegas. A hospital spokesperson said Wednesday that Steerling remained in critical condition. HOME— NEWS An Ind0p0nd0nt Nwtpmp^ Founded June 1, 19S1 Henderson Home News (USPS 240000) Published every Tuesday and Thursday morning at2 Commerce Center Drive, Henderson, Nevada, by HBC Publications, Inc. Second class postage paid at Henderson, Nevada. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: HENDERSON HOME NEWS 2 Commerce Cantor Drive Hi(toraon,NVaM14 PhoiM (702) 564-1881 Cuatomar complaint ealla will ba aeeaptad from 7 to 10 am on Tuaadaya and fhuradmyt. Uiaaad papara win ba tMatributad by noon. MIKE O'CALLAGHAN Publisher CAROLYN O'CALLAGHAN Co-Publisher TIM O'CALLAGHAN General Manager PAUL SZYDELKO Managing Editor MARY COLLEEN MIELE Circulation Manager HBC PUBUCATK>NS, INC. Mike O'Callaghan, President; Carolyn O'Callaghan, Vice President; Tim O'Calaghan, Treasurer/Vice President Mary CoOeen Miela, Vica President; Ruthe Deskin, Secretary. SUBSCRIPTION RATES Sinc^ 50 canto OnaYaw S30 (TWMM ConeeciMM Monhs) NoRatoHk MAN. SUBSCRIPTIONS WaH cH Mlaaaippi$40peryear Eat! of laaiMipPi$SOM*yyi •Adiflkmal Maiina Officaa' Rob Weidenfeld/News Staff LANGUAGE BOOKS—Axithor C l lffDavisandbet tyChapman, president of EPLS Language Training Corp., will be at B. Dalton in the Galleria at Sunset Mall March 1. Davis will sign copies of his Easy to Pronounce foreign language phrase books from 4 to 7 p.m. Language book author to sign books Friday Kathy Streeter News Staff Writer Anyone who has ever stumbled through a phrase book trying to communicate in a foreign language will appreciate Cliff Davis. Davis developed a series of easy to pronounce language books. The books are based on a system which allows the reader to correctly pronounce all vowel sounds. Symbols are used for each vowel and the symbols are always pronounced the same way. Davis' books are the first language books of their kind, he said. "It is difficult to pronounce [a foreign language] when you've never seen that combination of letters before," Davis said. This system has visual vowels. I isolated the vowels and gave them a symbol. It is the first and only system based on sound." The Henderson resident's "Easy to Pronounce Language Series" includes phrase books in Spanish, French, German, Italian and Japanese. He is working on a book in Chinese and just completed a Spanish to English book. Davis' unique system evolved from his love of travel. He used symbols to remind himself of the sounds each vowel made in various languages. When his sister, Betty Chapman, saw his notes, she knew immediately that the system would be marketable. The EPSL method was tested extensively by Davis and other independent researchers, including college professors. All research indiS— Language Page 13 John Judge/News Staff CARTOON — Stacia Martin of the Disney Store demonstrates the techniques involved in drawing Disney cartoon characters for Julia Marchese during the pre-opening party held at the Galleria at Sunset Tuesday evening. Thursday, February 29 1996 Henderson Home News Page 3 Kidnappers plead guilty Thomas Lacy News Staff Writer Two brothers who allegedly kidnapped a Henderson youth to recoup money from a drug deal pleaded guilty to charges which will net them three to five-year prison sentences. Juan Manuel Reyes-Elias, 28, and Luis Reyes, 23, will be sentenced June 28. The elder brother faces a maximum of five years in prison as a result of pleading guilty to a charge of using a gpn in a kidnapping. HPRD offers classes for spring time Henderson Parks and Recre,ation will offer a-Y-ariety-oflartsand crafts classes at the Kesterson Valley View Recreation Center. Scheduled in six week sessions, classes are open to those 16 years and older. •Bonsai: Thursdays, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.; class fee $35, begins Feb. 29. •Quilting: Saturdays, 9 to 11 a.m.; class fee $30; begins March 2. •Oil Painting: Saturdays, 1 to2:30 p.m.; class fee $35; begins March 2. •Stained Glass: Mondays, 6 to8:30 p.m.; class fee $35; begins March 4. •Tole Painting: Tuesdays, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.; class fee $38; begins March 5. Luis Reyes faces a pri son term of three years stemming from his guiltl^ plea t^the charge of failing to report a kidnapping to authorities. *^ *!. Both men were accused in the kidnapping of Richard Deroboam, 17, of Henderson. According to published reports, the brothers kidnapped Deroboam in an attempt to recoup $ 10,000 from an earlier sale of marijuana that had not yet been collected. -:^ ; •;-; However, prosecutor Tom O'Connell said Deroboam was not involved in the sale of the drugs, but was simply in the wrong nl^ce at the wrong time. The Henderson teenager was kidnapped at gunpoint Aug. 2 at his apartment. It was reported that the brothers hoped the youth's father would convince another man to give them the money. ., Deroboam was later released unharmed. THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY -:MBE MAIL BOXES, ETCIT'S NOT WHAT \VL DO. IT'S HOW VVn Do IT. Authorized UPS Shipping Outlet Private Mail Box Rental SJ COPIES PACKAGING MAIL SERVICE SHIPPING OVERNIGHT FAX STAMPS OFFICE SUPPUES KEYS PACKING SUPPUL^ [3 MONEY TRANSFER NOTARV PASSPORT PHOTOS MONEY ORDERS ETC.ETCCTC WESTERN UNION • Personal Street Address • 24 Hour Access • Mail Forwarding Ask about these too: Voice Mail • Business Cards • Rubber Stamps Custom Packaging • And alot more! PECOS WINDMILL PLAZA 2657 Windmill Pkwy. HENDERSON 896-9898 GREEN VALLEY PLAZA 2756 Green Valley Pkwy. •HENDERSON 454-5220 HENDERSON SHOPPING VILLAGE 850 S, Boulder Hwy. 565-1235 ^^^, r. TOM'S SUNSET CASINO 7^. e^^ MONDAY NIGHT MYSTERY SPECIALS Z /^' 1 S^ti^<^'i<(<.Haiif T^i 'c*i*iC7J STARTING MARCH I8lh 5 to 10 P.M 444 W. SUNSET ROAD 1/4 Mile West of Boulder Hwy. ''Rock Arouriil the Mouse'' ^ Catch Mickey, Minnie, Donald, Daisy, Pluto and Goofy in a V nfiusical stage show outside the food court, upper level. Wed-Sot 10:30am, l2:30Dm, 3:00pm, 5:00pm and 7:00pm. Sun 11:30am, 1:30pm, 3:00pm^ 4:00pm, and 5:00pm. Disney Skefch Ariist Watch magic in the making with a Disney sketch artist near Mervyn's California, lower level. Wed-Sat 12:30pm, 2:30pm, 4:00pm, 5:30pm, and 7:00Dm. Sun 11:30am, 1:00pm, 2:30pm, 4:00pm, and 5:30pm. "Sword in the Sfone'' Get into the act with Merlin's "Sword in the Stone" at the fountain, lower level. Wed-Sat 11:00am, 12:00pm, 1:00pm, 2:00pm, 3:30pm, 5:00pm, and 6:00pm. Sun 11:15am, 12:00pm, 1:00pm, 2:00pm, 3:30pm, 4:30pm, 5:30pm. i Character Meet & Greet Meet and greet Disney characters, ipecial^rprise appeorancesthroughout the day. Near Dillard's, upper level and across from 9 & Company, lower level. (Characters alternate every 30 minutes.) Wed-Sat 11:00am7:30pm Sun. ll:00am-5:30pm. Cartoons! Disney cartoons and playtime for kids. Near Dillard's, lower levef Wed-Sat 10:00am-9:00pm Sun 11:00am^:00pm Just for you. Galleria at Sunset at your service. 600 seat food court, valet parking, gift certificates, strollers, wheelchairs. Just ask us. Any way we can make your shopping experience more enjoyable, just let us know. After all, we're your place in the sun. WEDNESDAY, 9:30AM! IHE SUN AND THE STARS COME OUTJUSr FOR YOU. Just for you! Galleria at Sunset will grand open with a "Spectacular Sunrise," on exclusive, once-in-a-lifetime show, produced by Disney Be there for the excitement as we cut our ribbon and greet you with open arms. Bring your kids. Bring your camera. The fun runs Wednesday through Sunday. You'll want to catch every magical moment. Show stoppers, music and live Disney entertainment everywhere you turn. Four department stores, over 100 specialty shops, restaurants and natural attractions. Brand new. Just for you. Your place in the sun. Galleria at Sunset. (Don't tell the tourists.) Galleria At Sunset 1300 W. Sunset Road Henderson, NV Mon-SatlOAM-9PMSunllA/^PM

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VIEWPOINT HO^NEWS ^MhaO'CalfaiahM fHjblishw *ColviiO'Caaghm Co^uWishef *PaulSzvdako Managing Editor P*4 Henderson Home News Thursday, February 29, 1996 R Ews VIEW RICHARD COHEN Mall developers deserve kudos More than 100 stores of the Galleria at Sunset Mall are now open and the developers of the mall deserve a pat on the back for a job well-done. The mall looks elegant and stately, yet fun and comfortable. Lots of Southern Nevada sunlight will -' filter through its ceiling, the topiaries in the food court are special and ^e access from all parts of the valley unmatched. ,,,.,,; ^^ .-..'• Leslie Dunn of Ranch Property Development, his partner Dr. Stephen Kollins, and co-developer Forest City Development have done a superb job. It was Dunn's vision more than 10 years ago to place a regional shopping mall at the intersection of Sunset Road and Stephanie Street. Persistent planning, negotiating, promoting and constructing were required to make such an elaborate dream come true. When the city's population hit 100,000 people and the funding for the mall secured, all systems were "go." Dunn said Monday the mall's evolution surpasses his highest hopes. Residents will have to visit the mall to appreciate it. Not only is the mall Henderson's first, it might be the valley's best. The city of Henderson and its residents should be proud of this new, dynamic commercial area. Teen pregnancy not teen matter Looking at Buchanan just The numbers on teen pregnancy in Nevada are abysmal. For three years straight, Nevada has ranked second in the nation for teen pregnancy for girls aged 15 to 19. No matter how you look at the numbers, they are just plain bad for teens and b^ for the future of Nevada. .; ''' • /' • • But an image persists that teen pregnancy is somehow a badge of courage for young girls who still do not know who they are or, more important, who they can become. Their life experience is so limited that it's impossible for teens to know or appreciate the full import of early parenthood. That's why the state's new four-year campaign to prevent teen pregnancy is more important than ever. It comes at a time when the federal government also is focusing on the problem, as well it s hould, for t ee n pregnancy 4a co s tly to taxpayers. But as we go about educating youngsters, forming committees and developing public service campaigns, it is crucial that proper attention be paid to a disturbing undercurrent of teen pregnancy. Research is turning up evidence that teen pregnancy is also an adult male problem. That is, "a majority of the fathers of babies born to teen mothers are not teens themselves," states the teen pregnancy report co-authored by the Nevada Attorney General's Office and the Nevada State Health Division. This is also true on a national level. In more blunt terms, adult men are entering into sexual liaisons with underage girls, and this makes the problem bigger than teen pregnancy for it is also a crime to engage in sex with a minor. Therefore it is no longer enough to talk to teens about the risks of sexual activity and teen pregnancy. It is no longer enough to brand young girls with a scarlet T, for teen mom. It is time to have a serious talk with the young men who for too long have not been brought into this equation, who for too long have benefited from this double standard. Young men must realize that this is considered predatory sexual behavior and that there will be a price to pay—as in a date in court and possibly jail time. The folks behind the Nevada teen pregnancy project understand this well. The health division and the attorney general plan to focus on this problem in July. They are calling upon the Nevada Domestic and Family Violence Prevention Coimcil to establish ways to educate the public, judges and law enforcement on Nevada laws related to sexual relations with minors, among other things. And this wake-up call doesn't come a moment too soon. Reduci ng theincidence^a< WASHINGTON—As Robert Frost said about walls, something there is abut Pat Buchanan you've got to like. It cannot be his social views, which are always reactionary and often mean. It cannot be his economic program, which is protectionist and head-in-thesandish. But it can be his obvious concern for the average guy. On a good day, this conservative Republican is the only Democrat in the race.• • ^:. • ?•:.; • ;; A good Democrat certainly was not what Buchanan's New Hampshire voters were seeking on Tuesday. Some of them are gun nuts and some are bigots and some are hard-core isolationists and many of them are social conservatives for whom abortion is the central issue. But of the voters who went for Buchanan, the largest percentage of them, 32%, said they cast their vote for reasons having to do with the economy or jobs. Abortion, with 21%, came in second. It's somewhat of an exaggeration to suggest that politics is always about money, but more often than not that's the case. The odd thing is that, on paper, the New Hampshire economy is doing just fine. But in a media age, there is no such thing anymore as a strictly local economy. A guy with a job can see on television that another guy with a good job has just been laid off". The standard Republican response has been to tell these people they're watching to much television. How about an "E" chip to block bad economic news? Conventional Republicans apparently are among the auditory challenged. They cannot hear the sounds of economic anxiety or, if they do, they dismiss it. A latter-day Hooverism infects the OOP's inner ear. Mister Herbert Hoover said that now's the time to buy, sang a song of the Depression years, and contemporary Republicans are singing a variation of the same tune: You never had it so good and, even if you don't, you cannot thwart progress. It is capitalism with a commie soul: the individual doesn't matter — not for the moment, anyway. • ,'::' • Of course, Buchanan is exactly what his critics (me included) say he is. He's a dangerous social reactionary, a bigot in his younger days (if not still) and a bit juvenile. For him, loyalty is the ultimate attribute, never mind loyalty to what. Thus, he stayed glued to his former campaign co-chair, Larry Pratt, who has ties to militia and whitesupremacist groups — the man being more important than the principle. Buchanan has it backwards. But in the one area he had made his own, Buchanan is right. Working class people are getting the shaft, corporations are making out like bandits and the Republican Party has been more than silent, it has been complicitous. It's downright funny, then, to listen to GOP leaders denounce Buchanan and Buchananism without even conceding that his appeal is partly based on the perception that the proverbial little man is getting pounded. Yet, something has to stand between the little guy and the onrushing train of robust capitalism. SuperPat — a "P" for protectionism on this chest — is saying he'll do just that. Spare me, please, all the arguments about how he is wrong. Buchanan is wrong in so many ways about so many things that his trade policy is the least of it. But at least he is speaking to the anxieties of Americans who want someone — anyone, it seems — to notice what is happening to them. Instead, the RepubUcan eye-shade gang in Washington made a contract with itself, confused an audit with a political program — and showed their adoration of business by favoring it over the environment. Buchanan has made those guys look up from their ledgers. In his State of the Union speech. President Clinton made a passing reference to the anomaly of economic insecurity in prosperous times. But this most politically plastic of presidents is almost sure to enlarge on that theme. After all the government he promised to be smaller does not have to be inefTectual. It can intervene. It can jawbone — and maybe punish — CEOs who forget they have an obligation to their employees as well as their stockholders. Buchanan will fade — and a good thing, too. But if I were a New Hampshire Republican (If pigs had wings...) with no moral objection to a good part of what can be called Buchananism, I would have voted for him. With his championing of ordinary workers, Buchanan seems to be the only one in the race who understands that capitalism, like a shark, is £unoral. Someoneh'aB to look out for'tlVe fOttf* swimmers. „ Cohen is a columnist for the Washington Post Writers Group. GU)CSHIPLER ....^^:;:C::V:^ ^ p of Nevada history YOUR VIEWS: A FORUM FOR ISSUES THAT AFFECT OUR READERS He had come to Carson City to pay a courtesy call on the man he had unexpectedly defeated a couple of • weeks before. He was irlyToF appointment with Gov. Charles Russell, so Grant Sawyer was relaxing over a cup of coffee at the small casino across the street from the Capitol Building. He hadn't expected to be there at all. The 38-year-old Elko County District Attorney's run for governor, he said much later, had been "a pure lark, with no conceivable chance of winning.' But he had been urged to do so, and he figured that campaigning would be a good way to get a close look at Nevada. He liked politics and knowing the state better might help him if he decided to try to get elected to something above district attorney. But campaigning turned out to be a lot morfe than that. Unlike most candidates. Grant Sawyer found it so fascinating that h4 knocked on every door he could find and talked to whoever would listen. It was fun to Reno Gaxette-Joumal him, not drudgery, so he didn't concentrate o the political impact he might be making. Besides, he was a liberal Democrat running against a Republican governor who was highly respected and loved. Even though the registration at the time was almost three to one Democratic, Nevada was a politically conservative state, which had already elected Republican Charles Russell to two terms. When Sawyer thought about being elected males engaging in sex with minor girls is just as important as tracking dowrn parents (mostly male, statistics show) who do not pay child support. In both cases there is an inappropriate attempt to escape responsibilities and that can no longer be tolerated. This escapism places a huge obligation on females who, in turn, must put the burden on taxpayers. For too long females have borne a disproportionate share of the parenting obligation and its financial burden, while fathers have gotten ofif scot free —an important reality for teen girls to weigh. It's no accident that females also will carry a disproportionate share of welfare reform, too—another critical argument to make to teen girls, for the odds are high that teen moms will collect welfare. But all efforts to modify teen girls' sexual behavior will fall flat and will be unfair if the adult male component isn't also dragged into this ugly picture. himself, a third term for Russell seemed almost a given. Instead, he had defeated the distinguished incumbent by 16,839 votes, and now was waiting to meet with him as the first step in the transition, although Grant Sawyer had never been easily intimidated, on this day he was nervous, feeling like an awkward kid, in awe of the man he could hardly believe he was about to succeed in office. Sawyer wanted most of all to do the meeting right, and had carefully dressed for the occasion. But he had failed to notice one flaw—the cuffs of his white shirt were frayed and it was too late to do anything about it. "How could I have done that?" he asked in dismay. "I have to meet with the governor with frayed cuffs!" That was the only time I ever saw Gov. Grant Sawyer even slightly uneasy. He was as naturcd in slipping into the role of governor as he had been in campaigning for the job; the whole scene from there on in seemed to be instinctive, as though he had been preparing for it at the same time he wasn't expecting to get the job. Automatically, from the start of his first term, he exuded a sense of relaxed authority, a calm selfconfidence, a sense of control which seldom required harsh measures. He always gave the impression that he had courage to spare. The state was fortunate to get a governor just then who had such qualities. Sawyer came on board at a time' when the transition reached far beyond the sipiple takeover of the r; governor's job. The young Democrat became the instrument of the deep change in Nevada from a rural to an urban economy, from a rogue state in —the eyes of its fellow commonweaWisto a substantial entity finally accepted by them. It didn't come easily, and Sawyer knew it wouldn't, that tough days lay ahead. But he didn't flinch in the face of opposition, even shrugging off death threats (they go with the territory) and plowing ahead on explosive issues such as challenging mob influence in gEuning and insisting on civil rights. None of this boosted his popularity at home, but his success is the reason that Gov. Bob Miller last week so aptly said that, "The passing of Grant Sawyer means a giant of Nevada history has passed from the scene." Sawyer was recognized most of the time as a much larger figure, often as a giant, outside the state than in Nevada while he was governor. At the time I was the correspondent here for Time and Life magazines, both of which assigned me regular updates on Sawyer's political activities. In once case, they told me they wanted him as a guest at the exclusive Wednesday lunch Henry Luce periodically gave in the RCA Building for the magazine editors to meet with government and business executives. When I came up with a date, they replied that they had invited the Secretary of State for that day, but would meet for lunch on the next day, Thursday, with Sawyer. They kept him there until 3:30. Shipler writes a column on state politics from Carson City. LETTERS ^Tba N*w walcomM brief lattare, signed with your nama, address and phone for verification. Typed letters receive preference and the News reserves the right to edit for grammar, spelling or length. Please mail to: Bdltor, Horn* N&wt, 2 Commmc* Cantr Drtw, Hmidtrmm, NV $9014 YOUR VIEWS Thursday, February 29, 1996 Henderson Home News CECIL AND DIPSTIK P*g5 RAY COLLINS LETTERS Why pay membership? EditOR I have been an employee at the. Clark Cotmty School District for almost 20 years. I am a hard-working person and work a full eight-hour day. Recently I have been put in aposition by the director of ray department to fight for my job. The job duties as described on my job description are slowly being farmed out to other employees. I contacted the ESEA, our association, for which I pay $23.62 a month to be a member. I was told the director can assign my job duties any way he washes which he is. But, to giveme peace of mind and reassurance on my job, the following conversation took place: "How much do you make an hour?" asked the association representative. "$21.,''IrepUed. "You will still make $21 an hour even if yur duties are all taken away and you do nothing," said the representative. Now I am also a taxpayer in Clark County. Isn't this a strange way for an association representative to respond? I will be paid the same thing whether I work or just show up. The district will soon be asking for a new bond issue to build more schools which will probably raise our taxes. Think! I, for one, am resigning from the association the first week of July, as I £un really tired of pajring $23.62 a month and having the association represent my administrator. What does our $23.62 a month get for the paying member? You know they contacted my director before ever returning my phone call. What does that tell us? ; }-^ KAREN ERICKSON Henderson turning into Los Angeles EditoiT^' My wife, who is disabled, and I, who am an over-60-worker trashed by aerospace, moved here over a year ago into a house we had owned since 1983. Since moving here, in that short period of time, we have seen the emergence of smog, and a repetition of another Los Angeles. On our block alone, the population quadrupled, but the number of houses remained the same. It's easy to tell the difference when you flush your toilet, and see the decrease in water pressure. You now have rotten drivers on the streets here. In L.A. my wife was rammed off the road by a hit-and-run woman in a hurry and left unconscious in a ditch. I was rammed three times while waiting at a red light. I thought it would be different here. Twice in Henderson, people have attempted to ram me in the same way. You will be driving, or at a light, and they will come from over a mile away, suddenly speed up and aim for you, People who have spent a hfetime here are now selling out and leaving. My neighbor, after 40 years, sold off an unusually beautiful house because of everything I have said in this letter. He preferred to risk, at his age, the ice and now of a small peacefiil community back east. This area is heading in the same direction as L.A as long as people can make money in uncontrolled growth. Twenty years from now, you will be saying how much nicer it was back in "96. I have done volunteer work with the elderly for years, but not anymore. I have come out of retirement and am working to be able to move in five years to someplace where a crippled person can walk across the street to mail a letter without getting run over. I truly feel sorry for the nice people in Henderson. JAMES G. LINN ^; T^ pride in neighborhoods Editon / • • • ::; • :V--^-7.-,—>;-:--^;V;AV. '•-;..,•': I have lived on North Cholla Street in Henderson for almost two decades. Although it is an older neighborhood it does not mean that we cannot take pride inourhouseSv/v^^\v-;':-':'T/V • •'.^ • ; • • ^^'• • /. v^.:^;-. • • • ':' ;• ::• • • • • We few who really care about how our houses look have become disheartened and literally disgusted by our neighbors. There are broken windows, one house painted tourqoise, trash in yards and broken down cars in driveways used as storage. • :•' • • •: • r:.: :.v\: • x-:V. • I am embarrassed to live here. It doesn't cost to clean a yard. Just a little hard work—I am sure the children yould take pride in helping ouL_ Let's all take pride in our neighborhoods and remember that just one trashy house can affect what your neighborhood looks like. ONE OF THE FEW WHO CARE Education above all else Editon My tradition has a wonderful saying, "Education above all else." Apparently our Clark County School Board does not believe this. I find it incredulous that the board, comprised of what I assume to be educated people, can have their heads in the sand like an ostrich. For them, to not allow our student body, with parental permission, to visit an outstanding AIDS exhibit, (where abstinence is mentioned constantly in the preventive section) at the Lied Museum is the height of not fadng reality and harming our children, to a point of possible death, because of the ignorance of a few. The time has come for the parents and educated people of our commimity to take a stand. Statistics have proven that good sex education does not increase, but indeed decreases promiscuity, teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. The fact that the members of the board did not even have the courtesy to see the exhibit, approved all over this country by educators, shows their. disregard for any educational process and that they do not have our children's interests and health in mind. Our School Board's giving in to a few members of a special interest group, who have a very narrow agenda (the Nevada Concerned Citizens) does not benefit our students, but indeed harms them. Let me give the Board some facts: Informative sex education not only does not increase promiscuity, but indeed, study after study has been proven to decrease it, causing less teen pregnancy, (Nevada is number two in die nation), less promiscuity and less sexually transmitted diseases. I^e World Health Organization estimates that two women are infected with HIV every minute. WHO has proclaimed that AIDS is the world's fastest growing epidemic. At the beginning of 1995,1.5 million children have been infected with HIV. In the next five years, more than five million children will be infected. By the year 2000, the cumulative total of HIV infections in men, women and diildren is estimated at 3040 million world wide. Let's hope that our school board's decision is not responsible for some of the victims. —^—_^___^^_^__ RABBI RICHARD SCHACHET Valtey Outreach Synagogue BILL HANLON We need to prioritize our spending Companies that do not retool, that do not modernize, just like properties that don't keep up with the times, become run down, lose the capacity to compete, lose clientele, falter and eventually go out of business. Few argue tlie cost of education has gone up. What concerns many is the quality of product. In many instances, costs have increased, if not for good reasons, at least for understandable ones. In other instances, additional funds have been channeled into education to take care of someone's pet project or program. While many might actually be needed or worthwhile, we still need to prioritize pending. If we spend dollars in areas that are not priority, we are, in effect, defeating the very goals we set. When we took algebra, all that was required was a book, pencil, notebook and chalk. In today's algebra class, we still need for the book, pencil, notebook and chalk. But, today we also need to purchase computers, graphing calculators, and appropriate software—not to mention schools need to bp wired to m,ake use of the technology. Using a calculator, how much will it cost to buy a classroom set of graphing calculators if each costs $85 and there are 35 students in a class. Add to that the cost of a computer and printer.. How much should be allocated for software ? How about being connected on the Internet, the phone line, the monthly service charge. Multiply those costs by the number of classrooms where algebra, precalculus or calculus are being taught. Yes, it gets much more expensive than it ever was for us to take the same class. Before I go on, one -might askt "Is this t e ch nol ogy worth it?" The answer is yes. Do 1 believe this technology • • '. should replace the need for students to learn basic facts or algorithms ? Absolutely not. I still want students to be able to solve equations, to graph by plotting points, to recognize different equations. But, the advantage ofthe technology is after we have learned those things, we don't have to go through the drudgery of number crunching to see what happens when we make simple numerical changes. Students can see patterns develop, can better predict what might happen by having the calculator or computer do those sorts of things. Their knowledge and understanding will surpass ours because they can see what is happening. Too often, you and I were too busy plugging in numbers and we forgot, or never realized, we were looking for a pattern, looking for a ^way to solve a problem. The technology is not cheap, and is continually being upgraded. Most importantly, we need to have people trained in the technology so they can share the power of technology with students. Are we ready to make the dollar cpnynitmejit ? As taxpayers, as parents, as educators, we have seen wave after wave of reform movements the last few decades. Most would characterize the reforms as more hot air. Remember the governor's summit back in 1989? World class standards, national education goals, first in the world in math and science by the year 2000. Makes you want a baloney sandwich. :'"'"' • Currently, many students in Nevada don't have a seat to sit in without some type of alternative scheduling caused by overcrowded classrooms reducing instructional time. • •:.'• • • ; • • • :• • • • • • • If we are serious about education,we must insure that students have a place to sit as we experience growth, we must make sure older schools are kept up to speed with the ability to access the technology. We must talk to outsiders—non ^^^^^-i educators. Using their input, we must address their needs. We must establish high academic standards that are measurable, We must commit ourselves to updating hardware and software so students can take advantage ofthe age they live in. And yes, we have to train our teachers on appropriate use of computer technology to reach the standards. While computer technology does not replace the need for learning, it is a very powerful tool to enhance that learning As Nevada enters the 21st century, the need to be able to use the technology is all around us. We must address it and fully fund it. While it's unfortunate that to date we haven't done a very good job of addressing the issue, it's an embarrassment to know that we have not even taken the time to address the need for new school construction or rehabilitating older schools. Knowi ng that, what's the ; :> probability the governor or legislature will open their pocketbooks to buy computers and the technological accessories so our kids are competitive in the 21st century ? It's time to put up or shut upHanlon, a Las Vegas resident who wntes a column about education, sits on the State Board of Education, is the administrator for the Clark County Schcjol District's Math/ Science Institute and is a part-time instructor at UNLV. Thanks for iielp Editor: I wish to thank all my family and friends, St. Rose Dominican Hospital staff, Palm Mortuary, the paramedics, Miles Transfer, Mark Anthony, The Tropicana, and all the people who donated food, flowers and money. I love you all for being there during the loss of my husband, Frank Lucero. My children wish to thank everyone [who helped during] the loss of their father, and also Officer Richardson for all his help. ERNESTINA LUCERO and FAMILY Normai laws and rules don't apply? Editon Imagine that your hate-filled neighbor decides to sue you. Your well-paid lawyer informs you the lawsuit is based totally on your neighbor's personal opinions, has no evidence or facts, and is groundless. In court, the judge says the lawsuit is based solely on your neighbor's opinions and is not a strong case. However, just before the trial begins, the judge declares he is prepared to rule in favor of your neighbor right now, on the presumption that your neighbor's spoken opinions will prove his case. Your attorney doesn't object Your neighbor wins the case, based solely on his opinions. Sound impossible? Replace the word "nawsuit" with "motion" and replace the word "neighbor" with "ex-wife." In Las Vegas Family Court, Judge Gaston based his decision on the opinions of my ex-wife, who hates me. I have heard that he is a liberal feminist moms-judge, and that he does this sort of judicial malpractice all the time. I have been told that people in Nevada's Family Courts have no Constitutional Rights and that the normal laws and rules don't apply. Is this really true, Nevada? NEALCAPEHART ABOUT THESE PAGES These pages are the opinion pages of the newspaper. News View IS written by the editorial staff to bring attention to an issue of concern in the community. Our readers are encouraged to write about local issues and subrhlt them to the News. SIGN YOUR LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

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VIEWPOINT HO^NEWS ^MhaO'CalfaiahM fHjblishw *ColviiO'Caaghm Co^uWishef *PaulSzvdako Managing Editor P*4 Henderson Home News Thursday, February 29, 1996 R Ews VIEW RICHARD COHEN Mall developers deserve kudos More than 100 stores of the Galleria at Sunset Mall are now open and the developers of the mall deserve a pat on the back for a job well-done. The mall looks elegant and stately, yet fun and comfortable. Lots of Southern Nevada sunlight will -' filter through its ceiling, the topiaries in the food court are special and ^e access from all parts of the valley unmatched. ,,,.,,; ^^ .-..'• Leslie Dunn of Ranch Property Development, his partner Dr. Stephen Kollins, and co-developer Forest City Development have done a superb job. It was Dunn's vision more than 10 years ago to place a regional shopping mall at the intersection of Sunset Road and Stephanie Street. Persistent planning, negotiating, promoting and constructing were required to make such an elaborate dream come true. When the city's population hit 100,000 people and the funding for the mall secured, all systems were "go." Dunn said Monday the mall's evolution surpasses his highest hopes. Residents will have to visit the mall to appreciate it. Not only is the mall Henderson's first, it might be the valley's best. The city of Henderson and its residents should be proud of this new, dynamic commercial area. Teen pregnancy not teen matter Looking at Buchanan just The numbers on teen pregnancy in Nevada are abysmal. For three years straight, Nevada has ranked second in the nation for teen pregnancy for girls aged 15 to 19. No matter how you look at the numbers, they are just plain bad for teens and b^ for the future of Nevada. .; ''' • /' • • But an image persists that teen pregnancy is somehow a badge of courage for young girls who still do not know who they are or, more important, who they can become. Their life experience is so limited that it's impossible for teens to know or appreciate the full import of early parenthood. That's why the state's new four-year campaign to prevent teen pregnancy is more important than ever. It comes at a time when the federal government also is focusing on the problem, as well it s hould, for t ee n pregnancy 4a co s tly to taxpayers. But as we go about educating youngsters, forming committees and developing public service campaigns, it is crucial that proper attention be paid to a disturbing undercurrent of teen pregnancy. Research is turning up evidence that teen pregnancy is also an adult male problem. That is, "a majority of the fathers of babies born to teen mothers are not teens themselves," states the teen pregnancy report co-authored by the Nevada Attorney General's Office and the Nevada State Health Division. This is also true on a national level. In more blunt terms, adult men are entering into sexual liaisons with underage girls, and this makes the problem bigger than teen pregnancy for it is also a crime to engage in sex with a minor. Therefore it is no longer enough to talk to teens about the risks of sexual activity and teen pregnancy. It is no longer enough to brand young girls with a scarlet T, for teen mom. It is time to have a serious talk with the young men who for too long have not been brought into this equation, who for too long have benefited from this double standard. Young men must realize that this is considered predatory sexual behavior and that there will be a price to pay—as in a date in court and possibly jail time. The folks behind the Nevada teen pregnancy project understand this well. The health division and the attorney general plan to focus on this problem in July. They are calling upon the Nevada Domestic and Family Violence Prevention Coimcil to establish ways to educate the public, judges and law enforcement on Nevada laws related to sexual relations with minors, among other things. And this wake-up call doesn't come a moment too soon. Reduci ng theincidence^a< WASHINGTON—As Robert Frost said about walls, something there is abut Pat Buchanan you've got to like. It cannot be his social views, which are always reactionary and often mean. It cannot be his economic program, which is protectionist and head-in-thesandish. But it can be his obvious concern for the average guy. On a good day, this conservative Republican is the only Democrat in the race.• • ^:. • ?•:.; • ;; A good Democrat certainly was not what Buchanan's New Hampshire voters were seeking on Tuesday. Some of them are gun nuts and some are bigots and some are hard-core isolationists and many of them are social conservatives for whom abortion is the central issue. But of the voters who went for Buchanan, the largest percentage of them, 32%, said they cast their vote for reasons having to do with the economy or jobs. Abortion, with 21%, came in second. It's somewhat of an exaggeration to suggest that politics is always about money, but more often than not that's the case. The odd thing is that, on paper, the New Hampshire economy is doing just fine. But in a media age, there is no such thing anymore as a strictly local economy. A guy with a job can see on television that another guy with a good job has just been laid off". The standard Republican response has been to tell these people they're watching to much television. How about an "E" chip to block bad economic news? Conventional Republicans apparently are among the auditory challenged. They cannot hear the sounds of economic anxiety or, if they do, they dismiss it. A latter-day Hooverism infects the OOP's inner ear. Mister Herbert Hoover said that now's the time to buy, sang a song of the Depression years, and contemporary Republicans are singing a variation of the same tune: You never had it so good and, even if you don't, you cannot thwart progress. It is capitalism with a commie soul: the individual doesn't matter — not for the moment, anyway. • ,'::' • Of course, Buchanan is exactly what his critics (me included) say he is. He's a dangerous social reactionary, a bigot in his younger days (if not still) and a bit juvenile. For him, loyalty is the ultimate attribute, never mind loyalty to what. Thus, he stayed glued to his former campaign co-chair, Larry Pratt, who has ties to militia and whitesupremacist groups — the man being more important than the principle. Buchanan has it backwards. But in the one area he had made his own, Buchanan is right. Working class people are getting the shaft, corporations are making out like bandits and the Republican Party has been more than silent, it has been complicitous. It's downright funny, then, to listen to GOP leaders denounce Buchanan and Buchananism without even conceding that his appeal is partly based on the perception that the proverbial little man is getting pounded. Yet, something has to stand between the little guy and the onrushing train of robust capitalism. SuperPat — a "P" for protectionism on this chest — is saying he'll do just that. Spare me, please, all the arguments about how he is wrong. Buchanan is wrong in so many ways about so many things that his trade policy is the least of it. But at least he is speaking to the anxieties of Americans who want someone — anyone, it seems — to notice what is happening to them. Instead, the RepubUcan eye-shade gang in Washington made a contract with itself, confused an audit with a political program — and showed their adoration of business by favoring it over the environment. Buchanan has made those guys look up from their ledgers. In his State of the Union speech. President Clinton made a passing reference to the anomaly of economic insecurity in prosperous times. But this most politically plastic of presidents is almost sure to enlarge on that theme. After all the government he promised to be smaller does not have to be inefTectual. It can intervene. It can jawbone — and maybe punish — CEOs who forget they have an obligation to their employees as well as their stockholders. Buchanan will fade — and a good thing, too. But if I were a New Hampshire Republican (If pigs had wings...) with no moral objection to a good part of what can be called Buchananism, I would have voted for him. With his championing of ordinary workers, Buchanan seems to be the only one in the race who understands that capitalism, like a shark, is £unoral. Someoneh'aB to look out for'tlVe fOttf* swimmers. „ Cohen is a columnist for the Washington Post Writers Group. GU)CSHIPLER ....^^:;:C::V:^ ^ p of Nevada history YOUR VIEWS: A FORUM FOR ISSUES THAT AFFECT OUR READERS He had come to Carson City to pay a courtesy call on the man he had unexpectedly defeated a couple of • weeks before. He was irlyToF appointment with Gov. Charles Russell, so Grant Sawyer was relaxing over a cup of coffee at the small casino across the street from the Capitol Building. He hadn't expected to be there at all. The 38-year-old Elko County District Attorney's run for governor, he said much later, had been "a pure lark, with no conceivable chance of winning.' But he had been urged to do so, and he figured that campaigning would be a good way to get a close look at Nevada. He liked politics and knowing the state better might help him if he decided to try to get elected to something above district attorney. But campaigning turned out to be a lot morfe than that. Unlike most candidates. Grant Sawyer found it so fascinating that h4 knocked on every door he could find and talked to whoever would listen. It was fun to Reno Gaxette-Joumal him, not drudgery, so he didn't concentrate o the political impact he might be making. Besides, he was a liberal Democrat running against a Republican governor who was highly respected and loved. Even though the registration at the time was almost three to one Democratic, Nevada was a politically conservative state, which had already elected Republican Charles Russell to two terms. When Sawyer thought about being elected males engaging in sex with minor girls is just as important as tracking dowrn parents (mostly male, statistics show) who do not pay child support. In both cases there is an inappropriate attempt to escape responsibilities and that can no longer be tolerated. This escapism places a huge obligation on females who, in turn, must put the burden on taxpayers. For too long females have borne a disproportionate share of the parenting obligation and its financial burden, while fathers have gotten ofif scot free —an important reality for teen girls to weigh. It's no accident that females also will carry a disproportionate share of welfare reform, too—another critical argument to make to teen girls, for the odds are high that teen moms will collect welfare. But all efforts to modify teen girls' sexual behavior will fall flat and will be unfair if the adult male component isn't also dragged into this ugly picture. himself, a third term for Russell seemed almost a given. Instead, he had defeated the distinguished incumbent by 16,839 votes, and now was waiting to meet with him as the first step in the transition, although Grant Sawyer had never been easily intimidated, on this day he was nervous, feeling like an awkward kid, in awe of the man he could hardly believe he was about to succeed in office. Sawyer wanted most of all to do the meeting right, and had carefully dressed for the occasion. But he had failed to notice one flaw—the cuffs of his white shirt were frayed and it was too late to do anything about it. "How could I have done that?" he asked in dismay. "I have to meet with the governor with frayed cuffs!" That was the only time I ever saw Gov. Grant Sawyer even slightly uneasy. He was as naturcd in slipping into the role of governor as he had been in campaigning for the job; the whole scene from there on in seemed to be instinctive, as though he had been preparing for it at the same time he wasn't expecting to get the job. Automatically, from the start of his first term, he exuded a sense of relaxed authority, a calm selfconfidence, a sense of control which seldom required harsh measures. He always gave the impression that he had courage to spare. The state was fortunate to get a governor just then who had such qualities. Sawyer came on board at a time' when the transition reached far beyond the sipiple takeover of the r; governor's job. The young Democrat became the instrument of the deep change in Nevada from a rural to an urban economy, from a rogue state in —the eyes of its fellow commonweaWisto a substantial entity finally accepted by them. It didn't come easily, and Sawyer knew it wouldn't, that tough days lay ahead. But he didn't flinch in the face of opposition, even shrugging off death threats (they go with the territory) and plowing ahead on explosive issues such as challenging mob influence in gEuning and insisting on civil rights. None of this boosted his popularity at home, but his success is the reason that Gov. Bob Miller last week so aptly said that, "The passing of Grant Sawyer means a giant of Nevada history has passed from the scene." Sawyer was recognized most of the time as a much larger figure, often as a giant, outside the state than in Nevada while he was governor. At the time I was the correspondent here for Time and Life magazines, both of which assigned me regular updates on Sawyer's political activities. In once case, they told me they wanted him as a guest at the exclusive Wednesday lunch Henry Luce periodically gave in the RCA Building for the magazine editors to meet with government and business executives. When I came up with a date, they replied that they had invited the Secretary of State for that day, but would meet for lunch on the next day, Thursday, with Sawyer. They kept him there until 3:30. Shipler writes a column on state politics from Carson City. LETTERS ^Tba N*w walcomM brief lattare, signed with your nama, address and phone for verification. Typed letters receive preference and the News reserves the right to edit for grammar, spelling or length. Please mail to: Bdltor, Horn* N&wt, 2 Commmc* Cantr Drtw, Hmidtrmm, NV $9014 YOUR VIEWS Thursday, February 29, 1996 Henderson Home News CECIL AND DIPSTIK P*g5 RAY COLLINS LETTERS Why pay membership? EditOR I have been an employee at the. Clark Cotmty School District for almost 20 years. I am a hard-working person and work a full eight-hour day. Recently I have been put in aposition by the director of ray department to fight for my job. The job duties as described on my job description are slowly being farmed out to other employees. I contacted the ESEA, our association, for which I pay $23.62 a month to be a member. I was told the director can assign my job duties any way he washes which he is. But, to giveme peace of mind and reassurance on my job, the following conversation took place: "How much do you make an hour?" asked the association representative. "$21.,''IrepUed. "You will still make $21 an hour even if yur duties are all taken away and you do nothing," said the representative. Now I am also a taxpayer in Clark County. Isn't this a strange way for an association representative to respond? I will be paid the same thing whether I work or just show up. The district will soon be asking for a new bond issue to build more schools which will probably raise our taxes. Think! I, for one, am resigning from the association the first week of July, as I £un really tired of pajring $23.62 a month and having the association represent my administrator. What does our $23.62 a month get for the paying member? You know they contacted my director before ever returning my phone call. What does that tell us? ; }-^ KAREN ERICKSON Henderson turning into Los Angeles EditoiT^' My wife, who is disabled, and I, who am an over-60-worker trashed by aerospace, moved here over a year ago into a house we had owned since 1983. Since moving here, in that short period of time, we have seen the emergence of smog, and a repetition of another Los Angeles. On our block alone, the population quadrupled, but the number of houses remained the same. It's easy to tell the difference when you flush your toilet, and see the decrease in water pressure. You now have rotten drivers on the streets here. In L.A. my wife was rammed off the road by a hit-and-run woman in a hurry and left unconscious in a ditch. I was rammed three times while waiting at a red light. I thought it would be different here. Twice in Henderson, people have attempted to ram me in the same way. You will be driving, or at a light, and they will come from over a mile away, suddenly speed up and aim for you, People who have spent a hfetime here are now selling out and leaving. My neighbor, after 40 years, sold off an unusually beautiful house because of everything I have said in this letter. He preferred to risk, at his age, the ice and now of a small peacefiil community back east. This area is heading in the same direction as L.A as long as people can make money in uncontrolled growth. Twenty years from now, you will be saying how much nicer it was back in "96. I have done volunteer work with the elderly for years, but not anymore. I have come out of retirement and am working to be able to move in five years to someplace where a crippled person can walk across the street to mail a letter without getting run over. I truly feel sorry for the nice people in Henderson. JAMES G. LINN ^; T^ pride in neighborhoods Editon / • • • ::; • :V--^-7.-,—>;-:--^;V;AV. '•-;..,•': I have lived on North Cholla Street in Henderson for almost two decades. Although it is an older neighborhood it does not mean that we cannot take pride inourhouseSv/v^^\v-;':-':'T/V • •'.^ • ; • • ^^'• • /. v^.:^;-. • • • ':' ;• ::• • • • • We few who really care about how our houses look have become disheartened and literally disgusted by our neighbors. There are broken windows, one house painted tourqoise, trash in yards and broken down cars in driveways used as storage. • :•' • • •: • r:.: :.v\: • x-:V. • I am embarrassed to live here. It doesn't cost to clean a yard. Just a little hard work—I am sure the children yould take pride in helping ouL_ Let's all take pride in our neighborhoods and remember that just one trashy house can affect what your neighborhood looks like. ONE OF THE FEW WHO CARE Education above all else Editon My tradition has a wonderful saying, "Education above all else." Apparently our Clark County School Board does not believe this. I find it incredulous that the board, comprised of what I assume to be educated people, can have their heads in the sand like an ostrich. For them, to not allow our student body, with parental permission, to visit an outstanding AIDS exhibit, (where abstinence is mentioned constantly in the preventive section) at the Lied Museum is the height of not fadng reality and harming our children, to a point of possible death, because of the ignorance of a few. The time has come for the parents and educated people of our commimity to take a stand. Statistics have proven that good sex education does not increase, but indeed decreases promiscuity, teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. The fact that the members of the board did not even have the courtesy to see the exhibit, approved all over this country by educators, shows their. disregard for any educational process and that they do not have our children's interests and health in mind. Our School Board's giving in to a few members of a special interest group, who have a very narrow agenda (the Nevada Concerned Citizens) does not benefit our students, but indeed harms them. Let me give the Board some facts: Informative sex education not only does not increase promiscuity, but indeed, study after study has been proven to decrease it, causing less teen pregnancy, (Nevada is number two in die nation), less promiscuity and less sexually transmitted diseases. I^e World Health Organization estimates that two women are infected with HIV every minute. WHO has proclaimed that AIDS is the world's fastest growing epidemic. At the beginning of 1995,1.5 million children have been infected with HIV. In the next five years, more than five million children will be infected. By the year 2000, the cumulative total of HIV infections in men, women and diildren is estimated at 3040 million world wide. Let's hope that our school board's decision is not responsible for some of the victims. —^—_^___^^_^__ RABBI RICHARD SCHACHET Valtey Outreach Synagogue BILL HANLON We need to prioritize our spending Companies that do not retool, that do not modernize, just like properties that don't keep up with the times, become run down, lose the capacity to compete, lose clientele, falter and eventually go out of business. Few argue tlie cost of education has gone up. What concerns many is the quality of product. In many instances, costs have increased, if not for good reasons, at least for understandable ones. In other instances, additional funds have been channeled into education to take care of someone's pet project or program. While many might actually be needed or worthwhile, we still need to prioritize pending. If we spend dollars in areas that are not priority, we are, in effect, defeating the very goals we set. When we took algebra, all that was required was a book, pencil, notebook and chalk. In today's algebra class, we still need for the book, pencil, notebook and chalk. But, today we also need to purchase computers, graphing calculators, and appropriate software—not to mention schools need to bp wired to m,ake use of the technology. Using a calculator, how much will it cost to buy a classroom set of graphing calculators if each costs $85 and there are 35 students in a class. Add to that the cost of a computer and printer.. How much should be allocated for software ? How about being connected on the Internet, the phone line, the monthly service charge. Multiply those costs by the number of classrooms where algebra, precalculus or calculus are being taught. Yes, it gets much more expensive than it ever was for us to take the same class. Before I go on, one -might askt "Is this t e ch nol ogy worth it?" The answer is yes. Do 1 believe this technology • • '. should replace the need for students to learn basic facts or algorithms ? Absolutely not. I still want students to be able to solve equations, to graph by plotting points, to recognize different equations. But, the advantage ofthe technology is after we have learned those things, we don't have to go through the drudgery of number crunching to see what happens when we make simple numerical changes. Students can see patterns develop, can better predict what might happen by having the calculator or computer do those sorts of things. Their knowledge and understanding will surpass ours because they can see what is happening. Too often, you and I were too busy plugging in numbers and we forgot, or never realized, we were looking for a pattern, looking for a ^way to solve a problem. The technology is not cheap, and is continually being upgraded. Most importantly, we need to have people trained in the technology so they can share the power of technology with students. Are we ready to make the dollar cpnynitmejit ? As taxpayers, as parents, as educators, we have seen wave after wave of reform movements the last few decades. Most would characterize the reforms as more hot air. Remember the governor's summit back in 1989? World class standards, national education goals, first in the world in math and science by the year 2000. Makes you want a baloney sandwich. :'"'"' • Currently, many students in Nevada don't have a seat to sit in without some type of alternative scheduling caused by overcrowded classrooms reducing instructional time. • •:.'• • • ; • • • :• • • • • • • If we are serious about education,we must insure that students have a place to sit as we experience growth, we must make sure older schools are kept up to speed with the ability to access the technology. We must talk to outsiders—non ^^^^^-i educators. Using their input, we must address their needs. We must establish high academic standards that are measurable, We must commit ourselves to updating hardware and software so students can take advantage ofthe age they live in. And yes, we have to train our teachers on appropriate use of computer technology to reach the standards. While computer technology does not replace the need for learning, it is a very powerful tool to enhance that learning As Nevada enters the 21st century, the need to be able to use the technology is all around us. We must address it and fully fund it. While it's unfortunate that to date we haven't done a very good job of addressing the issue, it's an embarrassment to know that we have not even taken the time to address the need for new school construction or rehabilitating older schools. Knowi ng that, what's the ; :> probability the governor or legislature will open their pocketbooks to buy computers and the technological accessories so our kids are competitive in the 21st century ? It's time to put up or shut upHanlon, a Las Vegas resident who wntes a column about education, sits on the State Board of Education, is the administrator for the Clark County Schcjol District's Math/ Science Institute and is a part-time instructor at UNLV. Thanks for iielp Editor: I wish to thank all my family and friends, St. Rose Dominican Hospital staff, Palm Mortuary, the paramedics, Miles Transfer, Mark Anthony, The Tropicana, and all the people who donated food, flowers and money. I love you all for being there during the loss of my husband, Frank Lucero. My children wish to thank everyone [who helped during] the loss of their father, and also Officer Richardson for all his help. ERNESTINA LUCERO and FAMILY Normai laws and rules don't apply? Editon Imagine that your hate-filled neighbor decides to sue you. Your well-paid lawyer informs you the lawsuit is based totally on your neighbor's personal opinions, has no evidence or facts, and is groundless. In court, the judge says the lawsuit is based solely on your neighbor's opinions and is not a strong case. However, just before the trial begins, the judge declares he is prepared to rule in favor of your neighbor right now, on the presumption that your neighbor's spoken opinions will prove his case. Your attorney doesn't object Your neighbor wins the case, based solely on his opinions. Sound impossible? Replace the word "nawsuit" with "motion" and replace the word "neighbor" with "ex-wife." In Las Vegas Family Court, Judge Gaston based his decision on the opinions of my ex-wife, who hates me. I have heard that he is a liberal feminist moms-judge, and that he does this sort of judicial malpractice all the time. I have been told that people in Nevada's Family Courts have no Constitutional Rights and that the normal laws and rules don't apply. Is this really true, Nevada? NEALCAPEHART ABOUT THESE PAGES These pages are the opinion pages of the newspaper. News View IS written by the editorial staff to bring attention to an issue of concern in the community. Our readers are encouraged to write about local issues and subrhlt them to the News. SIGN YOUR LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

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^PWWfPFWf^ ^^^^^^'^^^^^mvmmmmmmmmmmfmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmrm Page 6 Henderson Home News Thursday, February 29. 1996 Thursday, February 29,1996 Henderson Home Newt Page? Boss for a Day Students share experiences at work Editor's Note: The following four high school students spent their "Boss for a Day" as reporters for the Henderson Home NeWs. IGarsten Dibb Basic High School One hundred forty-seven anxious students gathered Thursday morning at Green Valley High School for the 32nd annual "Boss for a Day" program sponsored by the Henderson Chamber of Commerce. The 72 students from Green Valley High School and 75 students from Basic High School KHnbriy Banks" "': Green Valley High School • .:; Students from Green Valley and Basic High Schools joined last week with community business leaders for a one-day glimpse of the real world. "Boss for a Day," a program put together by the Henderson Chamber of Commerce, allows students to follow the "boss" around for the day and to see how their respective businesses work. "The program gives the students the opportunity to look at the workplace andhow it is run," said James Hogan, Correction Center administrator of the Jail Administration of Henderson. George Bahr, a Henderson Chevrolet Geo sales consultant, took his group on a tour of the facility, explained about its new showroom, how its repair shop was safer and how, instead of ordering the'parts, it had its own shop inside (he store. The program shows people that we are a consumer-friendly store," Bahr said. -, A member of Bahr's group, Jennifer Torres, said she chose this because she thought it would be fun and didn't know anything about cars to start with. "New experiences are good changes," said Torres, a senior at Green Valley High. '\: The 'Boss for a Day' program was an opportunity for the staff to meet people that they wouldn't normally meet and it also gives the kids a chance to see what they normally don't," said Ron Cady, employee relations manager at Kerr-McGee Chemical Corp. At the chemical plant, employees were able to sit down with the kids and speak to them individually about their positions there. Basic High senior Erika Johnson did not want to be at Kerr-McGee, but because the medical field was full, she was placed in a science-related job. "I didn't want to come but it's not so bad, in fact it turned out pretty interesting" she said. Tim Smith, supervisor for the water reclamation plant of the city of Henderson Utility Department, said, "As bosses, we gain knowledge by seeing what the upcoming job market will be like." As the bosses and students joined to gain knowledge about the jobs of today, they caught a rare glimpse into both the future of the company and the future of their lives. spent the day gathering new experiences and ideas. For Miriam Martinez, a junior at Green Valley, the day was worthwhile. "I have a different point of view and have a lot of new choices,"said Martinez, who spent the day at the Kerr-McGee Chemical Corp. plant. "'Boss for a Day' gives us a chance to meet people we wouldn't normally meet and the students a chance to see things they wouldn't normally see," said Ron Cady, Kerr-McGee's employee relations manager, who was Martinez's supervisor. Erica Bidwell, a senior at Basic, went to the city of Henderson's facilities department where she was guided by Tim Smith, the supervisor for the water reclamation plant. "I don't think Henderson water is gross any more," Bidwell said. The Henderson Police Departmentalso participated in the program. "I learned that I do want to do this as a career," said Heather Larson, a senior at Green Valley, who spent the day at the department. Larson's supervisor was Cindy Kim, the records administrator for the Police Department. "It is nice to have interaction with high school students and to share perspectives," Kim said. The assistant chief of the Henderson Police Department, Kip Botkin, supervised Ray Scott, a senior at Green Valley. Scott felt he learned a lot from Botkin. "I learned how much responsibility he has and how long it takes to get up there," Scott said. The program gives the students an idea of what to look forward to in their futures and also gives the supervisors an opportunity to interact with students who someday could be a part of their business. CRAM SPEAKS — Clark County School District Superintendent of Schools Brian Cram addresses a group of businesspersons and high school students from Basic and Green Valley at the 32nd annual Boss for a Day activities Thursday. TAKING NOTES — Fledgling reporters, from left, Meredith both from Basic High, take notes during an interview. Sanders, of Green Valley High, Kiersten Dibb, and Susan Thomas, Photos by Rob Weidenfeld Susan ThontM Basic High School Students were given the opportunity last week to join the working class emd to experience what life in the workforce is all about. On Thursday, 147 students from Basic and Green Valley High Schools participated in the 32nd annual "Boss For A Day" program sponsored by the Henderson Chamber of Commerce. "I feel that this program is very beneficial for students," said Brad Kreutzer, a battalion chief for the Henderson Fire Department. A student Kreutzer had six years ago in the program is currently working for the Las Vegas Fire Department. "I think the 'Boss for a Day* program gives me the opportunity to experience what this job is all about," said Todd Cecil, a senior at Basic High, who also plans to become a fireman when he graduates. "I have learned that working in the real world takes a lot of commitment and that it is very essential to get your key education," said Ben Robertson, who visited the Kerr-McGee Chemical Corp. plant for the day. "The 'Boss for a Day' is a good opportunity and it helps students decide for their future plans." Ron Cady, a civil engineer who has been working for KerrMcGee for 14 years, believes this program gives the students an opportunity to understand what the workforce is all about. "This program gives us an opportunity to meet people that we usually don't have a chance to meet," Cady said. "It also gives the kids an opportunity to see that in a business the employees work from the time they arrive, until the time they leave and the wide range of activity that goes on." ,Tim Smith from the city of Henderson Utility Department agreed with Cady. "Thfs program provides knowledge for young individuals to see the upcoming job market and what it holds for the future," Smith said. This program gives students a chance to see a variety of jobs and what they're all about. It also provides the students with respect for the employer. "It gives the students a different view of how policemen are and how the Police Department works," said Mike Mayberry, the Uniform Division commander for the Henderson Police Department. "I think this program is excellent in exposing students to come into the working world for a day and hopefully have a positive experience," said Kip Botkin, assistant chief of the Henderson Police Department. City employees played a major part in the program touring students around their facilities and showing them how each department works together to form our community. This program gives the students an opportunity to see how the real world works," said Vicki Cameron, the animal control administrator, a 23-year city employee. After the students experienced "Boss For A Day," they left; with a new view about how our community works. At the same time, employers had an opportunity to meet the students and teach them about the upcoming job market and what tiheir companies are all about. MTERVIEWS — Basic High senior Susan Thomas interviews Todd CecU, also a Basic senior. Thomas chose the Htndanon Honw Ntwsto do her 'niini-4ntemship,' and Cecil was interested in the Hefiderson Fire Depertment. LEARNIIMG THE JOB — Diana Payne, seated, a designer wrth Tate & Snyder Architects, describes aspects of the business to a group of students while designer Kevin Kcmner, second from right looks on. Meredith Sanders Green Valley High School On Thursday, high school students had a chance to approach their future from a new prospective. It was a day for Green Valley and Basic High School students to step into the shoes of the bosses of different occupations to give them the feel for the job. This program, "Boss for a Day," was provided by the Henderson Chamber of Commerce. Groups of students worked alongside people from their chosen fields. Matt Frehner, a senior from Basic High School, spent his day with Brad Kreutzer, a battalion chief of the Henderson Fire Department. "I hope to learn exactly what firefighters do and what their day consists of," Frehner said. Frehner and many others were eager to leam and experience a day in the life of what may be their future professions. Ron Cady, the employee relations manager for 14 years at Kerr-McGee Chemical Corp., was happy to help his group of students to view the plant. This program gives the people here an opportunity to meet the students and for the students themselves to see how our business is run on a normal, but busy day," Cady said. It also gave kids the opportunity to learn general business skills the students will use in any profession. "I learned how to get prepared for engineering and chemical jobs," said Jairo Abrego, a junior at Green Valley High, who spent the day with Cady at KerrMcGee. "I also learned about human relations, which is a necessity in most fields that deal with the public." Nearly 50 entities participated in the program, including First Interstate Bank, the Henderson Police Department, a representative of U.S. Sen. Richard Bryan and St. Rose Dominican Hospital. Because there was such a range ofbusinesses, the students were able to choose a profession for the day that would be relevant to their future. "It is really neat to see what other people do during the day," said Nick Smith, a junior at Green Valley. "It lets you get ahead of yourself and see what things may be like." Tate and Snyder Architects, a Henderson-based architectural firm, took part in the "Boss for a Day" program. Kevin Kemner, a designer at Tate and Snyder, said he likes to be involved in the community. "Architecture isn't always understood throughout the community. Iliis is a chance to introduce it to the community, so they can see how it all works," Kemner said. Shannon Pratt, a senior from Basic High, learned some real values from her day with Kemner. This taught me what the real world is all about — hard work and respcmsibility. I learned how buildings are designed and put on computers," Pratt said. After living a day in the life of a profeasional business person, these students have had many new doora to their future opened for them. Bagel Bakery comes toGV The Chesapeake Bagel Bakery will celebrate its grand opening Saturday in Green Valley Town Center, 4500 E. Sunset Road. The Chesapeake Bagel Bakery product is distinguished from most of its Competitors because it is made from scratch at each store, a company spokesman said. Bagels offer a fresh, healthy alternative to other fast food operations, the spokesman said. Grand opening festivities will include Mr. Bagel, balloons, facepainting and cheerleaders. The grand opening prize, a mountain bike, will be given away on Sunday. Residents are invited to enter the drawing. Norm Jenkins, Corey Jenkins, Jennifer Jenkins and Jacqueline Bogle are the local franchisees. They also operate a Chesapeake Bagel Bakery in the Rancho Town and Country Shopping Center, 850 S. Rancho Dr. (at Charleston). The privately owned Chesapeake Bagel Bakery is based in McLean, Va.Itisthethird largest bagel retailer in the country. Founded by Alan Manstof and Michael Robinson in 1981, the company has more than 150 locations throughout the U.S., the majority of which are fremchiseowned. The company expectsto have close to 200 locations by the end of 1996. Rob Weidenfeld/News Staff • • .;']:--'''-^-::• '' • • • '. >-^t • '' • • • ': • • • • • • ': • \y • ''' • • ''' • • • • : • • LITTLE SLUGGER — Eric Fritz, 5, a member of the Padres T-ball team in the Green Valley Little League, prepares to knock one into the outfield during the team's practice Saturday morning at Fox Ridge Park. SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER CLOCK REPAin 294-1133 MARCH BREAKFAST SPECIALS 11 p.m. to 11 a.m. 2 Eggs, Bacon or Saussige Hashbrowrns, gL^g^t toast Vf coffee 69 with this couDon 725 Racetrack Rd. (Behind Kmart) Henderson For Info call 566-5555 Q CASINO HUGE SHIPMENT OF FORD PROGRAM VEHICLES Escorts, Taurus, Cougars, T-Birds, Sables, Crown Vies, Aspires, F-Serles Trucks. All With Remaining Factory Wan-anty. SAVINGS UP TO 'BfiOO (Off Orfginaf MSRP; OoTKi *1INT Everything We Do Is Driven By You At The New Valley Auto Mall 280 N. Gibson Rd. 566-FORP(3673) Basic students journey to ^other world' Thomas Lacy News Staff Writer In the 1960s, 'The Twilight Zone" television series first captivated audiences with tales of the unknown. More than 30 years have passed since the program first aired, but science fiction fans can relive the magic of the timeless classic in a stage adaptation presented by Basic High School's Theater Department. According to Basic Theater Director Lanie Laatikainen, 'Twilight Nights 2" will actually be five plays in one, each based on episodes of the original science fiction series. A self-professed fan of 'The TwilightZone," Laatikainen said she requested scripts of the series and rewrote them for the stage. "We did this last year as a class project, [and] the response was so good we decided to put the production on again this year," Laatikainen said. "But this time it was done through open auditions and not limited to just one class." The play began its one-week rvin Tuesday at the Green Valley High School theater, and will continued with 6:30 p.m. showings Feb. 29 and March 2. Ticket prices are $3 in advance and $4 at the door. Laatikainen said last year's production Was based on episodes intended to scare audiences, and this year's episodes are "psychological thrillers." "I think that people really love being tricked, and in these vignettes, you think it's going one way, and all of the sudden it goes another way," Laatikainen said. She said about 14 students werecastforthe production, with each student playing a minimum of three roles. In addition, the set, lighting and costumes are all designed in a manner intended to enhance the science fiction effect for theater-goers. ; : : • '• While most of the set and costumes are done in black and white, the lighting is orchestrated in a multi-colored theme to produce an "other world look" for patrons, Laatikainen said. The job of creating the unique setting has been made easier by the use of the Green Valley High School theater and a high level of cooperation between students of the two theater departments. Ift addition, Laatikainen credited Green Valley High School Theater Department Director Dane Madsen for helping with the transition. For more information about the production, call 799-8000, ext.208. RONALD LIPINSKl Bom: November 7,1940 At Rest: February 9,1996 Resided at: Henderson, Nevada, formerly Chicago, Illinois Husband of: Gloria (Palka) Lipinski Father of: Joe, Michael, Lynn, Laura (Mueller) Lipinski • ,Grandfather of: Jennifer 8 Jason Lipinski; .... Korey, Nicholas & Roxanne Mueller Brother of; Virginia (Salpaka), Darlene (Fagen), Melody Lipinski <. ONE IN A MILLION Ron you gave life a run for its money declining to wear suits, using beepers, being told what to do, you managed to aid many throughout the states by the knowledge you possess regarding your trade while at work. Destined to be together were you and Gloria. Your humor, warmth, caring nature and honesty, were the treads which held your man-lage together for 38 years. You traveled down many paths in life...side by side with Gloria, spreading love and your spiritual beliefs to others. As a Father you gave 100% to your'children, never asking for anything In return except their love. A Grandfather of five grandchildren, you taught the little ones respect, honor, showing off the personal character known as Grandpa. You could build a model plane or tell a story ten stories high for the children who loved you, and you loved. They will miss you. None could ask for a better son, you were always there in mind, body, soul. Mom loves you and is so proud of you. My brother, there are no words to express the memories we shared. I will keep them alive from this day forth, I promise you. If you became Ron's friend, you were his friend for life, and could only ask and the task or deed would be filled. A man named Ronald Lipinski touched all of us, in his own unique way. ..he was one in a million...he embraced us, made us laugh, gave us encouragement he was Ronald Lipinski, a truly remarkable man. Home of the $4.95 PRIME RIB y" International Buffet Featuring Saturday & Sunday Champagne Brunch 8A.M. until 2P.M. for J4.25 plus tax Fresh Omelettes made to order along with Belgian Waffles, Fresh Fruit Salad Bar, Freshly Baked Desserts, Crepes and much, nnuch, more Daily Lunch Buffet Begins at nA.M Daily Dinner Buffet Begins at 3P.M. Senior Ni2ht MONDAY Dinner Buffet 3 P.M. until 9 P.M. 55 & over IRON RAIL CAFE Open 24 Hours Home of the $495 991 PRIME RIB BREAKFAST SPECIALS Daily tunch & Dinner Specials The CONDUCTOR'S ROOM Nightly from 5P.M. until 10P.M. DINNERS STARTING AT $495 + tax includes choice of soup or salacJ bar, potato, rice pilaf or side of spaghetti with hot mini loaf of bread. 2S0Q S. Bouldkr Hwy. 294-5000 Wher* the freeway ends and the fun begins! PERSONAL INJURY FREE CONSULTATION NO RECOVERY FEE 565-0473 218 LEAD ST. (Across from the new Civic Center Plaza) iu LAW OFFICE OF JOHN F. MARCHIANO FORMER HENDERSON CITY ATTORNEY

PAGE 7

^PWWfPFWf^ ^^^^^^'^^^^^mvmmmmmmmmmmfmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmrm Page 6 Henderson Home News Thursday, February 29. 1996 Thursday, February 29,1996 Henderson Home Newt Page? Boss for a Day Students share experiences at work Editor's Note: The following four high school students spent their "Boss for a Day" as reporters for the Henderson Home NeWs. IGarsten Dibb Basic High School One hundred forty-seven anxious students gathered Thursday morning at Green Valley High School for the 32nd annual "Boss for a Day" program sponsored by the Henderson Chamber of Commerce. The 72 students from Green Valley High School and 75 students from Basic High School KHnbriy Banks" "': Green Valley High School • .:; Students from Green Valley and Basic High Schools joined last week with community business leaders for a one-day glimpse of the real world. "Boss for a Day," a program put together by the Henderson Chamber of Commerce, allows students to follow the "boss" around for the day and to see how their respective businesses work. "The program gives the students the opportunity to look at the workplace andhow it is run," said James Hogan, Correction Center administrator of the Jail Administration of Henderson. George Bahr, a Henderson Chevrolet Geo sales consultant, took his group on a tour of the facility, explained about its new showroom, how its repair shop was safer and how, instead of ordering the'parts, it had its own shop inside (he store. The program shows people that we are a consumer-friendly store," Bahr said. -, A member of Bahr's group, Jennifer Torres, said she chose this because she thought it would be fun and didn't know anything about cars to start with. "New experiences are good changes," said Torres, a senior at Green Valley High. '\: The 'Boss for a Day' program was an opportunity for the staff to meet people that they wouldn't normally meet and it also gives the kids a chance to see what they normally don't," said Ron Cady, employee relations manager at Kerr-McGee Chemical Corp. At the chemical plant, employees were able to sit down with the kids and speak to them individually about their positions there. Basic High senior Erika Johnson did not want to be at Kerr-McGee, but because the medical field was full, she was placed in a science-related job. "I didn't want to come but it's not so bad, in fact it turned out pretty interesting" she said. Tim Smith, supervisor for the water reclamation plant of the city of Henderson Utility Department, said, "As bosses, we gain knowledge by seeing what the upcoming job market will be like." As the bosses and students joined to gain knowledge about the jobs of today, they caught a rare glimpse into both the future of the company and the future of their lives. spent the day gathering new experiences and ideas. For Miriam Martinez, a junior at Green Valley, the day was worthwhile. "I have a different point of view and have a lot of new choices,"said Martinez, who spent the day at the Kerr-McGee Chemical Corp. plant. "'Boss for a Day' gives us a chance to meet people we wouldn't normally meet and the students a chance to see things they wouldn't normally see," said Ron Cady, Kerr-McGee's employee relations manager, who was Martinez's supervisor. Erica Bidwell, a senior at Basic, went to the city of Henderson's facilities department where she was guided by Tim Smith, the supervisor for the water reclamation plant. "I don't think Henderson water is gross any more," Bidwell said. The Henderson Police Departmentalso participated in the program. "I learned that I do want to do this as a career," said Heather Larson, a senior at Green Valley, who spent the day at the department. Larson's supervisor was Cindy Kim, the records administrator for the Police Department. "It is nice to have interaction with high school students and to share perspectives," Kim said. The assistant chief of the Henderson Police Department, Kip Botkin, supervised Ray Scott, a senior at Green Valley. Scott felt he learned a lot from Botkin. "I learned how much responsibility he has and how long it takes to get up there," Scott said. The program gives the students an idea of what to look forward to in their futures and also gives the supervisors an opportunity to interact with students who someday could be a part of their business. CRAM SPEAKS — Clark County School District Superintendent of Schools Brian Cram addresses a group of businesspersons and high school students from Basic and Green Valley at the 32nd annual Boss for a Day activities Thursday. TAKING NOTES — Fledgling reporters, from left, Meredith both from Basic High, take notes during an interview. Sanders, of Green Valley High, Kiersten Dibb, and Susan Thomas, Photos by Rob Weidenfeld Susan ThontM Basic High School Students were given the opportunity last week to join the working class emd to experience what life in the workforce is all about. On Thursday, 147 students from Basic and Green Valley High Schools participated in the 32nd annual "Boss For A Day" program sponsored by the Henderson Chamber of Commerce. "I feel that this program is very beneficial for students," said Brad Kreutzer, a battalion chief for the Henderson Fire Department. A student Kreutzer had six years ago in the program is currently working for the Las Vegas Fire Department. "I think the 'Boss for a Day* program gives me the opportunity to experience what this job is all about," said Todd Cecil, a senior at Basic High, who also plans to become a fireman when he graduates. "I have learned that working in the real world takes a lot of commitment and that it is very essential to get your key education," said Ben Robertson, who visited the Kerr-McGee Chemical Corp. plant for the day. "The 'Boss for a Day' is a good opportunity and it helps students decide for their future plans." Ron Cady, a civil engineer who has been working for KerrMcGee for 14 years, believes this program gives the students an opportunity to understand what the workforce is all about. "This program gives us an opportunity to meet people that we usually don't have a chance to meet," Cady said. "It also gives the kids an opportunity to see that in a business the employees work from the time they arrive, until the time they leave and the wide range of activity that goes on." ,Tim Smith from the city of Henderson Utility Department agreed with Cady. "Thfs program provides knowledge for young individuals to see the upcoming job market and what it holds for the future," Smith said. This program gives students a chance to see a variety of jobs and what they're all about. It also provides the students with respect for the employer. "It gives the students a different view of how policemen are and how the Police Department works," said Mike Mayberry, the Uniform Division commander for the Henderson Police Department. "I think this program is excellent in exposing students to come into the working world for a day and hopefully have a positive experience," said Kip Botkin, assistant chief of the Henderson Police Department. City employees played a major part in the program touring students around their facilities and showing them how each department works together to form our community. This program gives the students an opportunity to see how the real world works," said Vicki Cameron, the animal control administrator, a 23-year city employee. After the students experienced "Boss For A Day," they left; with a new view about how our community works. At the same time, employers had an opportunity to meet the students and teach them about the upcoming job market and what tiheir companies are all about. MTERVIEWS — Basic High senior Susan Thomas interviews Todd CecU, also a Basic senior. Thomas chose the Htndanon Honw Ntwsto do her 'niini-4ntemship,' and Cecil was interested in the Hefiderson Fire Depertment. LEARNIIMG THE JOB — Diana Payne, seated, a designer wrth Tate & Snyder Architects, describes aspects of the business to a group of students while designer Kevin Kcmner, second from right looks on. Meredith Sanders Green Valley High School On Thursday, high school students had a chance to approach their future from a new prospective. It was a day for Green Valley and Basic High School students to step into the shoes of the bosses of different occupations to give them the feel for the job. This program, "Boss for a Day," was provided by the Henderson Chamber of Commerce. Groups of students worked alongside people from their chosen fields. Matt Frehner, a senior from Basic High School, spent his day with Brad Kreutzer, a battalion chief of the Henderson Fire Department. "I hope to learn exactly what firefighters do and what their day consists of," Frehner said. Frehner and many others were eager to leam and experience a day in the life of what may be their future professions. Ron Cady, the employee relations manager for 14 years at Kerr-McGee Chemical Corp., was happy to help his group of students to view the plant. This program gives the people here an opportunity to meet the students and for the students themselves to see how our business is run on a normal, but busy day," Cady said. It also gave kids the opportunity to learn general business skills the students will use in any profession. "I learned how to get prepared for engineering and chemical jobs," said Jairo Abrego, a junior at Green Valley High, who spent the day with Cady at KerrMcGee. "I also learned about human relations, which is a necessity in most fields that deal with the public." Nearly 50 entities participated in the program, including First Interstate Bank, the Henderson Police Department, a representative of U.S. Sen. Richard Bryan and St. Rose Dominican Hospital. Because there was such a range ofbusinesses, the students were able to choose a profession for the day that would be relevant to their future. "It is really neat to see what other people do during the day," said Nick Smith, a junior at Green Valley. "It lets you get ahead of yourself and see what things may be like." Tate and Snyder Architects, a Henderson-based architectural firm, took part in the "Boss for a Day" program. Kevin Kemner, a designer at Tate and Snyder, said he likes to be involved in the community. "Architecture isn't always understood throughout the community. Iliis is a chance to introduce it to the community, so they can see how it all works," Kemner said. Shannon Pratt, a senior from Basic High, learned some real values from her day with Kemner. This taught me what the real world is all about — hard work and respcmsibility. I learned how buildings are designed and put on computers," Pratt said. After living a day in the life of a profeasional business person, these students have had many new doora to their future opened for them. Bagel Bakery comes toGV The Chesapeake Bagel Bakery will celebrate its grand opening Saturday in Green Valley Town Center, 4500 E. Sunset Road. The Chesapeake Bagel Bakery product is distinguished from most of its Competitors because it is made from scratch at each store, a company spokesman said. Bagels offer a fresh, healthy alternative to other fast food operations, the spokesman said. Grand opening festivities will include Mr. Bagel, balloons, facepainting and cheerleaders. The grand opening prize, a mountain bike, will be given away on Sunday. Residents are invited to enter the drawing. Norm Jenkins, Corey Jenkins, Jennifer Jenkins and Jacqueline Bogle are the local franchisees. They also operate a Chesapeake Bagel Bakery in the Rancho Town and Country Shopping Center, 850 S. Rancho Dr. (at Charleston). The privately owned Chesapeake Bagel Bakery is based in McLean, Va.Itisthethird largest bagel retailer in the country. Founded by Alan Manstof and Michael Robinson in 1981, the company has more than 150 locations throughout the U.S., the majority of which are fremchiseowned. The company expectsto have close to 200 locations by the end of 1996. Rob Weidenfeld/News Staff • • .;']:--'''-^-::• '' • • • '. >-^t • '' • • • ': • • • • • • ': • \y • ''' • • ''' • • • • : • • LITTLE SLUGGER — Eric Fritz, 5, a member of the Padres T-ball team in the Green Valley Little League, prepares to knock one into the outfield during the team's practice Saturday morning at Fox Ridge Park. SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER CLOCK REPAin 294-1133 MARCH BREAKFAST SPECIALS 11 p.m. to 11 a.m. 2 Eggs, Bacon or Saussige Hashbrowrns, gL^g^t toast Vf coffee 69 with this couDon 725 Racetrack Rd. (Behind Kmart) Henderson For Info call 566-5555 Q CASINO HUGE SHIPMENT OF FORD PROGRAM VEHICLES Escorts, Taurus, Cougars, T-Birds, Sables, Crown Vies, Aspires, F-Serles Trucks. All With Remaining Factory Wan-anty. SAVINGS UP TO 'BfiOO (Off Orfginaf MSRP; OoTKi *1INT Everything We Do Is Driven By You At The New Valley Auto Mall 280 N. Gibson Rd. 566-FORP(3673) Basic students journey to ^other world' Thomas Lacy News Staff Writer In the 1960s, 'The Twilight Zone" television series first captivated audiences with tales of the unknown. More than 30 years have passed since the program first aired, but science fiction fans can relive the magic of the timeless classic in a stage adaptation presented by Basic High School's Theater Department. According to Basic Theater Director Lanie Laatikainen, 'Twilight Nights 2" will actually be five plays in one, each based on episodes of the original science fiction series. A self-professed fan of 'The TwilightZone," Laatikainen said she requested scripts of the series and rewrote them for the stage. "We did this last year as a class project, [and] the response was so good we decided to put the production on again this year," Laatikainen said. "But this time it was done through open auditions and not limited to just one class." The play began its one-week rvin Tuesday at the Green Valley High School theater, and will continued with 6:30 p.m. showings Feb. 29 and March 2. Ticket prices are $3 in advance and $4 at the door. Laatikainen said last year's production Was based on episodes intended to scare audiences, and this year's episodes are "psychological thrillers." "I think that people really love being tricked, and in these vignettes, you think it's going one way, and all of the sudden it goes another way," Laatikainen said. She said about 14 students werecastforthe production, with each student playing a minimum of three roles. In addition, the set, lighting and costumes are all designed in a manner intended to enhance the science fiction effect for theater-goers. ; : : • '• While most of the set and costumes are done in black and white, the lighting is orchestrated in a multi-colored theme to produce an "other world look" for patrons, Laatikainen said. The job of creating the unique setting has been made easier by the use of the Green Valley High School theater and a high level of cooperation between students of the two theater departments. Ift addition, Laatikainen credited Green Valley High School Theater Department Director Dane Madsen for helping with the transition. For more information about the production, call 799-8000, ext.208. RONALD LIPINSKl Bom: November 7,1940 At Rest: February 9,1996 Resided at: Henderson, Nevada, formerly Chicago, Illinois Husband of: Gloria (Palka) Lipinski Father of: Joe, Michael, Lynn, Laura (Mueller) Lipinski • ,Grandfather of: Jennifer 8 Jason Lipinski; .... Korey, Nicholas & Roxanne Mueller Brother of; Virginia (Salpaka), Darlene (Fagen), Melody Lipinski <. ONE IN A MILLION Ron you gave life a run for its money declining to wear suits, using beepers, being told what to do, you managed to aid many throughout the states by the knowledge you possess regarding your trade while at work. Destined to be together were you and Gloria. Your humor, warmth, caring nature and honesty, were the treads which held your man-lage together for 38 years. You traveled down many paths in life...side by side with Gloria, spreading love and your spiritual beliefs to others. As a Father you gave 100% to your'children, never asking for anything In return except their love. A Grandfather of five grandchildren, you taught the little ones respect, honor, showing off the personal character known as Grandpa. You could build a model plane or tell a story ten stories high for the children who loved you, and you loved. They will miss you. None could ask for a better son, you were always there in mind, body, soul. Mom loves you and is so proud of you. My brother, there are no words to express the memories we shared. I will keep them alive from this day forth, I promise you. If you became Ron's friend, you were his friend for life, and could only ask and the task or deed would be filled. A man named Ronald Lipinski touched all of us, in his own unique way. ..he was one in a million...he embraced us, made us laugh, gave us encouragement he was Ronald Lipinski, a truly remarkable man. Home of the $4.95 PRIME RIB y" International Buffet Featuring Saturday & Sunday Champagne Brunch 8A.M. until 2P.M. for J4.25 plus tax Fresh Omelettes made to order along with Belgian Waffles, Fresh Fruit Salad Bar, Freshly Baked Desserts, Crepes and much, nnuch, more Daily Lunch Buffet Begins at nA.M Daily Dinner Buffet Begins at 3P.M. Senior Ni2ht MONDAY Dinner Buffet 3 P.M. until 9 P.M. 55 & over IRON RAIL CAFE Open 24 Hours Home of the $495 991 PRIME RIB BREAKFAST SPECIALS Daily tunch & Dinner Specials The CONDUCTOR'S ROOM Nightly from 5P.M. until 10P.M. DINNERS STARTING AT $495 + tax includes choice of soup or salacJ bar, potato, rice pilaf or side of spaghetti with hot mini loaf of bread. 2S0Q S. Bouldkr Hwy. 294-5000 Wher* the freeway ends and the fun begins! PERSONAL INJURY FREE CONSULTATION NO RECOVERY FEE 565-0473 218 LEAD ST. (Across from the new Civic Center Plaza) iu LAW OFFICE OF JOHN F. MARCHIANO FORMER HENDERSON CITY ATTORNEY

PAGE 8

I Pagt 8 Handarson Home News Thursday. February 29,1996 Thursday, February 29, 1996 Henderson Home New* Page 9 THE NEWS IS YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 6 WELCOME TO B.C. YOUR FIRST STOP ARHEL SHOULD BE DESERT DATA FOR^ ILLY/it ^ FAXING "^f^l^ES COPIES ft '''"'^ '^ ^"^ > ^ ^ COUSIN BENNY. Desert I Data 503 Hotel Plaza Boulder City, NV 89005 (702) 294 6224 FAX: 2940141 Wotd Pfdcessing. rjuwsleltcrs .COLOR lASER COPIES Tt.inscnplion UPSlFedEx .Resumes .Forms .Ijminating .Notary .Binding John Judge/News Staff ,,....,,....-, BUSTED — Dan Reese, assistant prineipai of Basic High School and Officer David Bums of the Henderson Police Department demonstrate one of the consequences of driving while under the influence during the Neon Drunk Driving Simulator at Green Valley High School Tuesday. The car contains a computer which is programmed with the driver's weight and a number of alcoholic drinks. The computer then simulates the effect those drinks would have on the person's driving ability. Students from Green Valley and Basic High Schools participated in the demonstration which was sponsored by Chrysler, Chapman Dodge, KLUC Radio, Stop DUI, the Henderson Fire Dept. and the Henderson Police Dept. • .• • •-; • '-^^ • • • • • • • --.• > • • • -•: • • ;:-.:; • • /..-^ • :--.-^:;< Little Miss &'Mr. Children's Pageant Gifts for all • Preliminary to contestants State Finals Round Crown • Optional Talent All Contestants Category Receive Trophies • Girls 0-16 yrs. Gifts for all (8 Divisions) Division Winners Gold Body Rings • Boys 0-10 yrs. Balloon Bouquets (4 Divisions) Giris, Boys, Babies, Teens March 17, 1996 in Las Vegas, NV For more information call in Califomia (209) 594-4254 Students learn about DUI Paul Dodge n Green Valley High School Every year at Green Valley High School, at least one student is killed or seriously injured in car accidents, said Henderson Fire Department paramedic Bruce Evans. The Henderson Fire Department beheves that an effective way to keep Green Valley High School students from driving while intoxicated is to give them an opportunity to experience it first-hand. Rather than handing out alcoholic beverages, however, the firefighters and paramedics of Station #92 worked in conjunction with Henderson Police and driver's education instructor Ron Morrocco to bring the Drunk Driving Simulator to the GVHS parking lot Feb. 20. Threughout all six periods of the day, students from government and driver's education classes were allowed to drive a Dodge Neon through a course marked off by cones and strewn with pop-up cardboard human figures. The car's brakes and steering were altered by computer to produce the sluggish handling, and slower reaction times experienced by drunk drivers. Students took turns as drivers and other students rode as passengers. Chapman's Dodge and the Chrysler Corp. furnished the car. Student drivers were allowed to run the course once while sober, and then aigain wile "drunk." "The computer "feeds" you a certain number of drinks according to your weight, and then makes it more difficult to drive. The car doesn't do what you want it to," sophomore Jennifer Hastings said. The objective of the program was to combat the rising number of teen deaths in the Henderson area by educating young drivers early on the dangers of drinking and driving. "We wanted to heighten awareness among high schoolers of dnmk driving and give them a realistic simulation of driving under the influence," Battalion Chief Randy Howell said. Evans stressed the importance of events such as the Simulator, which expose youths to the realities of the open road. "Accidents are one of the primary killers of teenagers. We feel a lot of frustration in our department when we see kids dying right out here on Sunset or Warm Springs Road. It's very serious and definitely not a simulation," Evans said. The program's message was directed especially at Morocco's students and others in the driver's education program. Morocco believes that such a dramatic demonstration of alcohol's influence on driving abilities can be most effective on his learning drivers. "It did what we couldn't do in the classroom. We were able to make them see exactly how alcohol affects response, time and judgment," Morocco said. In addition, many felt ithelped to dispel myths about drunk driving, such as alcohol being relaxing or helpful to concentration. "It showed me that my reflexes aren't as great as I thought they'd be," senior Annemarie Schneider said. "It was especially fitting because a drunk person may feel like he or she is in control, but that is only a dangerous illusion," Schneider said. "Many students were expecting to handle it. They found out that when you're under the influence the car will be beyond your control," Morocco said. Evans arranged funding for the program by obtaining a grant from the National Highway Traffic Safety Fund. Among other safety-promoting programs, some of this money was also spent on additional emergency equipment used in extracting victims from car wreckage. "We wanted to achieve two things," Evans said. "One was to reduce the number of accidents teens are in, especially those that are alcohol-related. The second was to reduce the time it takes us to get them [victims] out of the car and into a hospital. With more extrication imits, we can do that." Evans stressed the importance of events such as the Simulator, which expose youths to the realities of the open road. The program was also held during Basic High School's session and has toured other schools in Clark County. The grant money and the donation of the car made the Drunk Driving Simulator possible at Green Valley High School.-' AFTER INVENTORY SALE MUST GO!! PHILLIPS FURNITURE .\CROSS i RO.\l IlMi:'! 4J3 1.nkoMead 565-6050 Need Life Insurance But Hate Annoying Salesmen? Examine your life insurance needs... be sure your current program is the cheapest.. .even purchase a life policy...all over the telephone without ever havTrig to see a pushy insurance salesman! For a no pressure consultation call: Hendron Financial Services 733-8070 FRESH LOOK FOR '96 Bright New Colors" Highest Quality > • Great Prices W. Charleston Store • 0*70 a^ttO Daily 10-6 O/O'DIOA Sun 10-5 6220 W. Charleston (W of Jones) and MrsJ^abo Green Valley Store 436-7736 L'STB I960 W. Sunset (at Valle Verde) AN IMPORTANT UNDERLYING FACTOR IN CHOOSING A NURSING CENTER m 100 E. Lake Mead • 565-4646 Dr. Miles and Staff want to wish our patients a Happy Birthday for the month of March Stacy Hardy Sameena Sapp Kerri Nelson April Leombruno Lori Olscn Shawn Conner Becky Schoen Nona Taytor Becky Laughter Courtney Tessicr Cooper Fouts Chad Workman Kimberiy Mackcy Matthew Wofford Dustin Banks Seth Trodahl Michael Archer Elaine Marino Teresa Ashford Tiffany Coe Jason Bauer Cortney Durand Eloise Neumiller Jon Loiselle Fiona Morris Allison Boyle Jessica Russo James Loiselle Daniel Bollard Jason* Hafen LoubManino Alan Stayton Christopher Dobb TimStyer Jennifer Stewart Matt Salerno Karen Saik>n Maiv-Nell Cde Robert Cowan Tessa Evans Nicole Akirich Adrienne Hayter Heather Russo Shane Myers Ashley Marchant —_ ^ ^ Excellent Care IfiERUTATaON ^Outstanding Service ^State-of-tlie-Art [facilities RERUTATION ^Qualified Staff RERUTATION ^Superior Reliabiiitation RERUTATION ^Affordable Cost RERUTATION There are many things to consider when you're choosing a nursing center. Of course, excellent care is one; personalized service is another; facilities, staff, rehabilitative services and cost are still others. But of all these, the one most important factor to consider is reputation. At Delmar Gardens of Green Valley we have built our excellent reputation on providing our residents with everything they need and want in a warm, homelike atmosphere...surrounded by people who care. But we'd like you to be the judge. Stop by for a visit. Meet our staff. Talk to our residents. Tour our facility. See why Delmar Gardens of Green Valley has everything to offer...including an excellent reputation. OF GREEN VALLEY NURSING AND REHABILITATION CENTER A Mmw Qiiw* EntKprtM 'Dtlmar Gardtnt ofGntn Valley does not ducnnunatt in hmng or any othtr dtcuion on tht boMU of net, color, national ongin, mx, nligion, age, d twab U ity and handicap condition (indudmg AIDS and AIDSrtUUtd condition*) in odmuaioru or aecna to, or Inatmtnt of, tnploymunt in tti HTviet*. progrwHM. and acHeititt.' School groundbreaking March 4 Marking the advent of a new construction program that will ultimately increase the District by 25 new schools, the first schools will begin to fill the need for seats in the nation's fastest growing school district as early as January 1997. To celebrate the historic event, a ceremonial groundbreaking for the first nine elementary schools, will be hosted by the District at 10 a.m. Monday, March 4, at the site of the new Harris and 28th Street school. New school construction will crest by mid-summer, when new construction will be alsd underway at the middle and high school levels; 22 of 25 new schools will be underway by the end of 1996. The nine elementary schools to open in January 1997 will be located at Pala Dura and Charier Oak and at Green Valley and Lake Mead, both in Henderson; and Viking and Cimarron, on the west side. Also, Cielo Vista and Pueblo Vista and at Hammer and Juliano, both in the northwest; at Alexander and Kings Hill and at Washburn and Willis, both in North Las Vegas; and atTreeline and Orchard Valley, which with Harris and 28th, will serve the east. At press time, the new schools had not vet been named. Basic's Yacano wins Target scholarship HIGHEST YIELDING CDs "isf Burr hosts meeting Basic High School senior Keri Yacano, together with 11 other seniors from Clark County, received a Target Department Store scholarship of $1,000. A presentation ceremony was held Feb. 13, at the Target store at Spring Mountain and Rainbow Blvd. Yacano plans to use the funds at Biola University in LaMirada, Calif, where she has already received a four-year academic scholarship. She plans to become a physician. An active sdiool participant, shehas participated in Key Club, Spanish Club, STATUS and the National Honor Society. She has been enrolled in the Marine Corps Junior Reserve Office Training Corps program for four years and is a member of its Unarmed Drill Team. Yacano is also involved in both the youth and adult choirs at her church. She volunteers at St. Rose Dominican Hospital and is a member of Sign Design The"atre, a group which promotes deaf awareness through performing arts. Within the MCJROTC proi gram, she has attended the Idyllwild Institute Leadership Camp in Califomia on a summer scholarship, and is currently the unit's Public Affairs coordinator, including a monthly newsletter. FDIC INSURED 6 NO CHARGES NO FEES .61 O/o SEIBT FINANCIAL SERVICES 2620 Regatta Dr. #207B (Summerlin) 341-5902 4451 E. Sunset Rd. #9 (Green Valley) 898-3587 •Average Annual Yield as of 02-26-96 8645 W. Satiara (The Lakes) 254-6613 A parent advisory committee meeting for the area served by School Board Trustee Jeff Bunwill be held at 10 a.m. Tuesday, March 5, at Dooley Elementary School, 1940 Chickasaw Dr. in Henderson. Burr represents District A, which includes Henderson, Boulder City and Laughlin. The meeting will focus on elementary school topics, and staff from the district's elementary education division will be availGVHS second in Bowl 100 DolinaiGarcions Dnvc hondcisoti. NV 890 •02) 361-G11 • Green Valley High School finished second to Clark High School in the Nevada Regional Science Bowl competition Feb. 23-24 at the Howard R. Hughes College of Engineering, University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Clark High will represent Nevada in the National Science Bowl in Washington, D.C. May 3-6. Two teams represented Green Valley. Carl Jarvinen coached Team 1, comprised of Ted Dickamore, Andy Chin, Rfgwinder S. Jhawar, Joshua Peltier and Lucas Marino. Team 2 was coached by Joan Taylor and comprised of Shiao-Ying Fang, Danielle Tullman, Aditi Singh, Robin Lease and Leopoldo Karanikolas. For placing second. Green Valley received $1,500 from the Desert Research Institute. Placing fourth in the competition was Boulder City High School. The school received a $500 donation from UNLV. Basic High School placed 17th. The Nevada Regional Science Bowl, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Nevada Operations Office, paired 28 teams in an academic competition on the subjects of astronomy, biology, chemistry, computer science, earth science, mathematics and physics. More than 100 students representing Nevada and Utah high schools competed in the fifth annual event. The Defense Department established the Science Bowl to motivate high school students to pursue scientific and technical careers and promote science and mathematic literacy. deGorostiza visits London Silverado High School senior Fiona deGorostiza performed at the London Westminister Parade New Year's Day. She was part of the all-star cheerleader contingent selected from around the country last summer. The squad visited many London sights in addition to participating in the largest parade in the world. The 17-year-old is invohred in the ichoor& student council, taekwondo, singing and is listed in "Who's Who of American High Sdiool Students." able to respond to questions. Parent advisory meetings bring parents together with elected school board representatives to discuss topics of interest and concern. Basic '86 reunion sclieduled The Basic High School Class of 1986 will hold a reunion June 1416. For more information, call 876-6700." OVER 65 AVAILABLE FORD EXPLORERS World's Best-Selling Utility Vehicle. Hard to find. We got'em ail! XLT, Sport, Limited, Eddie Bauer, Centaurus (JuTKi •UNT Everything We Do Is Driven At the New Valley Auto Mdl 280 N. Gibson Rd. 566-FORD(3673) 'ou ^,>^ Crescent g^ j^f^s N\i^i^^* ^^^^H JEWELERS • ni^ '^%f ; & DIAMOND DIAMOND GENTS RING 1 CARAF • 14K FASHION RING $499 59 14K GOLD I • 11 11 f l-ll4 18 INCH 18 INCH 18 INCH 20 INCH 20 INCH 199 $299 399 S60 Monthly 3 DAYS ONLY! FREE? BRACELET WITH EVERY NEW APPROVED CHARGE ACCOUNT PURCHASE LIMIT ONE PfRHOUStHOLD $25 OFF! EXTRA SAVINGS SAVE UP TO 50% OFF S25 OFF ANY NET SALE OFS125 0RMORE DURING OUR GRAND OPENING CELEBRATION! YOU CAN GET IT! CALL 1-800-LUV-GEMS iEittfMtoSh(MC • Cntt Twim SuaiKt to Afprswl THE GAUERIA AT SUNSET 1300 W. Sunset Road • DJ Music on Saturday Only! ,r*. fffmm^gi^'^'^'^g^ia:.

PAGE 9

I Pagt 8 Handarson Home News Thursday. February 29,1996 Thursday, February 29, 1996 Henderson Home New* Page 9 THE NEWS IS YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER 6 WELCOME TO B.C. YOUR FIRST STOP ARHEL SHOULD BE DESERT DATA FOR^ ILLY/it ^ FAXING "^f^l^ES COPIES ft '''"'^ '^ ^"^ > ^ ^ COUSIN BENNY. Desert I Data 503 Hotel Plaza Boulder City, NV 89005 (702) 294 6224 FAX: 2940141 Wotd Pfdcessing. rjuwsleltcrs .COLOR lASER COPIES Tt.inscnplion UPSlFedEx .Resumes .Forms .Ijminating .Notary .Binding John Judge/News Staff ,,....,,....-, BUSTED — Dan Reese, assistant prineipai of Basic High School and Officer David Bums of the Henderson Police Department demonstrate one of the consequences of driving while under the influence during the Neon Drunk Driving Simulator at Green Valley High School Tuesday. The car contains a computer which is programmed with the driver's weight and a number of alcoholic drinks. The computer then simulates the effect those drinks would have on the person's driving ability. Students from Green Valley and Basic High Schools participated in the demonstration which was sponsored by Chrysler, Chapman Dodge, KLUC Radio, Stop DUI, the Henderson Fire Dept. and the Henderson Police Dept. • .• • •-; • '-^^ • • • • • • • --.• > • • • -•: • • ;:-.:; • • /..-^ • :--.-^:;< Little Miss &'Mr. Children's Pageant Gifts for all • Preliminary to contestants State Finals Round Crown • Optional Talent All Contestants Category Receive Trophies • Girls 0-16 yrs. Gifts for all (8 Divisions) Division Winners Gold Body Rings • Boys 0-10 yrs. Balloon Bouquets (4 Divisions) Giris, Boys, Babies, Teens March 17, 1996 in Las Vegas, NV For more information call in Califomia (209) 594-4254 Students learn about DUI Paul Dodge n Green Valley High School Every year at Green Valley High School, at least one student is killed or seriously injured in car accidents, said Henderson Fire Department paramedic Bruce Evans. The Henderson Fire Department beheves that an effective way to keep Green Valley High School students from driving while intoxicated is to give them an opportunity to experience it first-hand. Rather than handing out alcoholic beverages, however, the firefighters and paramedics of Station #92 worked in conjunction with Henderson Police and driver's education instructor Ron Morrocco to bring the Drunk Driving Simulator to the GVHS parking lot Feb. 20. Threughout all six periods of the day, students from government and driver's education classes were allowed to drive a Dodge Neon through a course marked off by cones and strewn with pop-up cardboard human figures. The car's brakes and steering were altered by computer to produce the sluggish handling, and slower reaction times experienced by drunk drivers. Students took turns as drivers and other students rode as passengers. Chapman's Dodge and the Chrysler Corp. furnished the car. Student drivers were allowed to run the course once while sober, and then aigain wile "drunk." "The computer "feeds" you a certain number of drinks according to your weight, and then makes it more difficult to drive. The car doesn't do what you want it to," sophomore Jennifer Hastings said. The objective of the program was to combat the rising number of teen deaths in the Henderson area by educating young drivers early on the dangers of drinking and driving. "We wanted to heighten awareness among high schoolers of dnmk driving and give them a realistic simulation of driving under the influence," Battalion Chief Randy Howell said. Evans stressed the importance of events such as the Simulator, which expose youths to the realities of the open road. "Accidents are one of the primary killers of teenagers. We feel a lot of frustration in our department when we see kids dying right out here on Sunset or Warm Springs Road. It's very serious and definitely not a simulation," Evans said. The program's message was directed especially at Morocco's students and others in the driver's education program. Morocco believes that such a dramatic demonstration of alcohol's influence on driving abilities can be most effective on his learning drivers. "It did what we couldn't do in the classroom. We were able to make them see exactly how alcohol affects response, time and judgment," Morocco said. In addition, many felt ithelped to dispel myths about drunk driving, such as alcohol being relaxing or helpful to concentration. "It showed me that my reflexes aren't as great as I thought they'd be," senior Annemarie Schneider said. "It was especially fitting because a drunk person may feel like he or she is in control, but that is only a dangerous illusion," Schneider said. "Many students were expecting to handle it. They found out that when you're under the influence the car will be beyond your control," Morocco said. Evans arranged funding for the program by obtaining a grant from the National Highway Traffic Safety Fund. Among other safety-promoting programs, some of this money was also spent on additional emergency equipment used in extracting victims from car wreckage. "We wanted to achieve two things," Evans said. "One was to reduce the number of accidents teens are in, especially those that are alcohol-related. The second was to reduce the time it takes us to get them [victims] out of the car and into a hospital. With more extrication imits, we can do that." Evans stressed the importance of events such as the Simulator, which expose youths to the realities of the open road. The program was also held during Basic High School's session and has toured other schools in Clark County. The grant money and the donation of the car made the Drunk Driving Simulator possible at Green Valley High School.-' AFTER INVENTORY SALE MUST GO!! PHILLIPS FURNITURE .\CROSS i RO.\l IlMi:'! 4J3 1.nkoMead 565-6050 Need Life Insurance But Hate Annoying Salesmen? Examine your life insurance needs... be sure your current program is the cheapest.. .even purchase a life policy...all over the telephone without ever havTrig to see a pushy insurance salesman! For a no pressure consultation call: Hendron Financial Services 733-8070 FRESH LOOK FOR '96 Bright New Colors" Highest Quality > • Great Prices W. Charleston Store • 0*70 a^ttO Daily 10-6 O/O'DIOA Sun 10-5 6220 W. Charleston (W of Jones) and MrsJ^abo Green Valley Store 436-7736 L'STB I960 W. Sunset (at Valle Verde) AN IMPORTANT UNDERLYING FACTOR IN CHOOSING A NURSING CENTER m 100 E. Lake Mead • 565-4646 Dr. Miles and Staff want to wish our patients a Happy Birthday for the month of March Stacy Hardy Sameena Sapp Kerri Nelson April Leombruno Lori Olscn Shawn Conner Becky Schoen Nona Taytor Becky Laughter Courtney Tessicr Cooper Fouts Chad Workman Kimberiy Mackcy Matthew Wofford Dustin Banks Seth Trodahl Michael Archer Elaine Marino Teresa Ashford Tiffany Coe Jason Bauer Cortney Durand Eloise Neumiller Jon Loiselle Fiona Morris Allison Boyle Jessica Russo James Loiselle Daniel Bollard Jason* Hafen LoubManino Alan Stayton Christopher Dobb TimStyer Jennifer Stewart Matt Salerno Karen Saik>n Maiv-Nell Cde Robert Cowan Tessa Evans Nicole Akirich Adrienne Hayter Heather Russo Shane Myers Ashley Marchant —_ ^ ^ Excellent Care IfiERUTATaON ^Outstanding Service ^State-of-tlie-Art [facilities RERUTATION ^Qualified Staff RERUTATION ^Superior Reliabiiitation RERUTATION ^Affordable Cost RERUTATION There are many things to consider when you're choosing a nursing center. Of course, excellent care is one; personalized service is another; facilities, staff, rehabilitative services and cost are still others. But of all these, the one most important factor to consider is reputation. At Delmar Gardens of Green Valley we have built our excellent reputation on providing our residents with everything they need and want in a warm, homelike atmosphere...surrounded by people who care. But we'd like you to be the judge. Stop by for a visit. Meet our staff. Talk to our residents. Tour our facility. See why Delmar Gardens of Green Valley has everything to offer...including an excellent reputation. OF GREEN VALLEY NURSING AND REHABILITATION CENTER A Mmw Qiiw* EntKprtM 'Dtlmar Gardtnt ofGntn Valley does not ducnnunatt in hmng or any othtr dtcuion on tht boMU of net, color, national ongin, mx, nligion, age, d twab U ity and handicap condition (indudmg AIDS and AIDSrtUUtd condition*) in odmuaioru or aecna to, or Inatmtnt of, tnploymunt in tti HTviet*. progrwHM. and acHeititt.' School groundbreaking March 4 Marking the advent of a new construction program that will ultimately increase the District by 25 new schools, the first schools will begin to fill the need for seats in the nation's fastest growing school district as early as January 1997. To celebrate the historic event, a ceremonial groundbreaking for the first nine elementary schools, will be hosted by the District at 10 a.m. Monday, March 4, at the site of the new Harris and 28th Street school. New school construction will crest by mid-summer, when new construction will be alsd underway at the middle and high school levels; 22 of 25 new schools will be underway by the end of 1996. The nine elementary schools to open in January 1997 will be located at Pala Dura and Charier Oak and at Green Valley and Lake Mead, both in Henderson; and Viking and Cimarron, on the west side. Also, Cielo Vista and Pueblo Vista and at Hammer and Juliano, both in the northwest; at Alexander and Kings Hill and at Washburn and Willis, both in North Las Vegas; and atTreeline and Orchard Valley, which with Harris and 28th, will serve the east. At press time, the new schools had not vet been named. Basic's Yacano wins Target scholarship HIGHEST YIELDING CDs "isf Burr hosts meeting Basic High School senior Keri Yacano, together with 11 other seniors from Clark County, received a Target Department Store scholarship of $1,000. A presentation ceremony was held Feb. 13, at the Target store at Spring Mountain and Rainbow Blvd. Yacano plans to use the funds at Biola University in LaMirada, Calif, where she has already received a four-year academic scholarship. She plans to become a physician. An active sdiool participant, shehas participated in Key Club, Spanish Club, STATUS and the National Honor Society. She has been enrolled in the Marine Corps Junior Reserve Office Training Corps program for four years and is a member of its Unarmed Drill Team. Yacano is also involved in both the youth and adult choirs at her church. She volunteers at St. Rose Dominican Hospital and is a member of Sign Design The"atre, a group which promotes deaf awareness through performing arts. Within the MCJROTC proi gram, she has attended the Idyllwild Institute Leadership Camp in Califomia on a summer scholarship, and is currently the unit's Public Affairs coordinator, including a monthly newsletter. FDIC INSURED 6 NO CHARGES NO FEES .61 O/o SEIBT FINANCIAL SERVICES 2620 Regatta Dr. #207B (Summerlin) 341-5902 4451 E. Sunset Rd. #9 (Green Valley) 898-3587 •Average Annual Yield as of 02-26-96 8645 W. Satiara (The Lakes) 254-6613 A parent advisory committee meeting for the area served by School Board Trustee Jeff Bunwill be held at 10 a.m. Tuesday, March 5, at Dooley Elementary School, 1940 Chickasaw Dr. in Henderson. Burr represents District A, which includes Henderson, Boulder City and Laughlin. The meeting will focus on elementary school topics, and staff from the district's elementary education division will be availGVHS second in Bowl 100 DolinaiGarcions Dnvc hondcisoti. NV 890 •02) 361-G11 • Green Valley High School finished second to Clark High School in the Nevada Regional Science Bowl competition Feb. 23-24 at the Howard R. Hughes College of Engineering, University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Clark High will represent Nevada in the National Science Bowl in Washington, D.C. May 3-6. Two teams represented Green Valley. Carl Jarvinen coached Team 1, comprised of Ted Dickamore, Andy Chin, Rfgwinder S. Jhawar, Joshua Peltier and Lucas Marino. Team 2 was coached by Joan Taylor and comprised of Shiao-Ying Fang, Danielle Tullman, Aditi Singh, Robin Lease and Leopoldo Karanikolas. For placing second. Green Valley received $1,500 from the Desert Research Institute. Placing fourth in the competition was Boulder City High School. The school received a $500 donation from UNLV. Basic High School placed 17th. The Nevada Regional Science Bowl, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Nevada Operations Office, paired 28 teams in an academic competition on the subjects of astronomy, biology, chemistry, computer science, earth science, mathematics and physics. More than 100 students representing Nevada and Utah high schools competed in the fifth annual event. The Defense Department established the Science Bowl to motivate high school students to pursue scientific and technical careers and promote science and mathematic literacy. deGorostiza visits London Silverado High School senior Fiona deGorostiza performed at the London Westminister Parade New Year's Day. She was part of the all-star cheerleader contingent selected from around the country last summer. The squad visited many London sights in addition to participating in the largest parade in the world. The 17-year-old is invohred in the ichoor& student council, taekwondo, singing and is listed in "Who's Who of American High Sdiool Students." able to respond to questions. Parent advisory meetings bring parents together with elected school board representatives to discuss topics of interest and concern. Basic '86 reunion sclieduled The Basic High School Class of 1986 will hold a reunion June 1416. For more information, call 876-6700." OVER 65 AVAILABLE FORD EXPLORERS World's Best-Selling Utility Vehicle. Hard to find. We got'em ail! XLT, Sport, Limited, Eddie Bauer, Centaurus (JuTKi •UNT Everything We Do Is Driven At the New Valley Auto Mdl 280 N. Gibson Rd. 566-FORD(3673) 'ou ^,>^ Crescent g^ j^f^s N\i^i^^* ^^^^H JEWELERS • ni^ '^%f ; & DIAMOND DIAMOND GENTS RING 1 CARAF • 14K FASHION RING $499 59 14K GOLD I • 11 11 f l-ll4 18 INCH 18 INCH 18 INCH 20 INCH 20 INCH 199 $299 399 S60 Monthly 3 DAYS ONLY! FREE? BRACELET WITH EVERY NEW APPROVED CHARGE ACCOUNT PURCHASE LIMIT ONE PfRHOUStHOLD $25 OFF! EXTRA SAVINGS SAVE UP TO 50% OFF S25 OFF ANY NET SALE OFS125 0RMORE DURING OUR GRAND OPENING CELEBRATION! YOU CAN GET IT! CALL 1-800-LUV-GEMS iEittfMtoSh(MC • Cntt Twim SuaiKt to Afprswl THE GAUERIA AT SUNSET 1300 W. Sunset Road • DJ Music on Saturday Only! ,r*. fffmm^gi^'^'^'^g^ia:.

PAGE 10

• • f Mwtmm^m^^mmtw^mmmmmmmm^^ Page 10 Henderson Home News Thursday, February 29,1996 Thursday, February 29,1996 Henderson Home News Pag* 11 1; Deardoff birthday party • I ">'^-SENIOR CENTER HIGHLIGHTS 27 E. TEXAS ST. 568^990 The center is open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Fnday, from to 10 p.m. Monday through Thursday evenings; and from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Happy Birthday Edna Edna Deardoff will host her "21st Birthday Party" from 2 to 4 p.m. today. This leapyearyoungster, bom 84 years ago, invites her friends to celebrate the grand event. Mayor Bob Groesbeck will bring Sam's Band to entertain and family and friends are coming to town to help celebrate her coming of "legal age." The party is a great way to thank Deardoff for being such a wonderful lady, and for working hard for 22 years to help Henderson seniors. As the Retired Senior Volunteer Program director, she rallies volunteers to ensure the success of a variety of Senior Center projects. From ensuring homebound meals, providing nutritious daily lunches and organizing rides to medical appointments, Deardoff has her hand in everything. Also involved in numerous volunteer projects throughout the city, she has dedicated years of promoting programs to ensure dignity and independence for seniors. Joining the Mayor in this special salute will be Clark County Commissioner Bruce Woodbury, State Sen. Jon Porter, Rep. Richard Perkins and Judges Rodney Burr and Ken Proctor. Rumors abound these gentlemen have a special birthday present for Deardoff. Stop by this afternoon and say "thank you" to a lady who has dedicated her life to seniors. Care Book Thank you to volunteers from the Eldercare Providers Association of Henderson and the students and staff from McCaw Elementary School. Under the leadership of Dorothy Vondenbrink, EPAH kicked off its fundraising campaign last weekend for its Senior Care Book. The volunteer organization of seniors and service providers publishes and distributes the booklet listing all senior services in Henderson. The publication is mailed to all residences in Henderson, and has proved an important tool for seniors as it provides access to existing public, private, and volunteer services that promote independent living. McCaw students joined in the efforts by submitting art work to compete for the front and inside pages. Entries will be on display at the center for voting selection for the next two weeks. McCaw staff, students and parents were also a-wonderful help last weekend for Saturday Brunch. If your business or volunteer group is interested in advertising or assisting, call Vondenbrink, 565-9033. St. Rose Seminar St. Rose Dominican Hospital holds a seminar at the center on the first Friday of each month to highlight new programs, answer questions about services and assist seniors with developing new programs to meet their needs. Stop by at noon Friday, March 1 to learn more about St. Rose and have questions answered. Elvis sighting The city of Henderson's very own print shop staff, Teresa Coop, Maureen Miller, Melynda Chapman, Brian Estep and Curtis Hafen, are planning a special brunch for seniors at 9 a.m. Saturday, March 2. There is truth to the rumor the Print Shop folks are talented cooks, and plan more than a surprise or two. After the second sighting of Elvis at the local Kmart, the crew hunted the famed singer down and "hog tied" him for display at Saturday Brunch. Ladies are asked to check their heart monitors at the door and not scream during the performance. Stop by from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday, March 2 for the special event. Pot Luck On the first Sunday of the month, the center holds a Pot Luck. At 1 p.m. Sunday, March 4, Clark County Commissioner Bruce Woodbury will host this month's event. The feast is gaining a welldeserved reputation of featuring the best food and friendliest company in the valley. Bring a favorite dish, stop by for some great conversation and spend a n afternoon getting to know some of the best people around. • Senior Law '. The Senior Law Project provides legal counsel and assistance to eligible senior citizens in Clark County. A representative comes to the center once a month by appointment. Matters covered include simple wills, living wills, powers of attorney, long-term health care planning, consumer disputes and small claims instructions. For an appointment on Tuesday, March 5, call 2296596. Mark your calendar From 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, March 16, the Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) will host its annual volunteer,luncheon at the center, honoring seniors who volunteer their time, talents and hearts in the community. Volunteers, mark your calendar now so you will not forget the special event in your honor. Call 565-6990 for reservations. Reminders •Social Security will be at the center from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 6 and 20. •Department of Motor Vehicles offers drivers license and photo ID services to Seniors once j^ month. Representatives will be available from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday, March 14. Grand Opening BLACKJACK BAIL BONDSUUffl 565-2900 Collateral Not Always Required O.R. INFORMATION Available 153 Water St. (across from the Eldorado) • In HendersoH 721 S. Main St., Las Vegas • 387-0996 SM Seniors < Page 11 "^fcc^: SopP et cob • ^ O^t^ 0K<^ DINNLK.S 1 5 Loke Mead Dr. 565-0122 FREE PICK-UP Donate furniture,'clothes, appliances, tools, toys, misc. CHURCH YARD SALE Sot. April 20 Our Savior's Lutheran Church Lynn Lane Downtown Henderson 565-8777 ART NEVADA FUNERAL SERVICE Nevada Cremation or Burial Society / LOW COST Full Traditional Funeral Including: • All professional services • 20 gauge steel casket Call for Price Pre-need or At-need Lx)w Cost Cremation $300 382-7378 24 Hour Casino Center & Gass Courtesy Photo ART CONTEST — Senior Ken Polasko talks with McCaw Elementary School teacher Joyce Winternheimer about the student art contest. .; ? ^ •The monthly bus shopping trip is headed for the new Galleria Mall at 10 a.m. Tuesday, March 12. The trip costs $1; call 565-6990 for reservations. •The Rock Hound bus trip has been changed to 10 a.m. Friday, March 29. Activities The Henderson Senior Center has activities rangingfrom art to Scrabble, concerts, health seminars and social services. The center is open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. On Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings, the center is open from 6 to 10pm.,and9a.m. to2p.m. on Saturdays. Check the Henderson Home News,\he Senior Center monthly newsletter or call 565-4990 for details on activities, special events and services. Also call for information on how to receive the monthly newsletter by mail. Activities scheduled for the week are as follows: HEY, IT'S COLD' Get your bike tuned up now! Next week you'll want it in tip top shape. do BIKE STUFF 10 years of quality bikes and service 1268 Wyoming St. in Old Town, Boulder City • 293-BIKE Tues Fri 10 to 6 Sat 9 to 1 Look for the IN THE SUN COLORING CONTEST y in Thursday's Panorama section '' of March 7th issue of the "H I N D I • \ II 'TT?NEWS f^s.^r^ MAR MADHE MARCH 1 31 RULES POSTED ROLL OF COINI On video poker wins, every Monday SENIORS NIGHTSI Mondays & Thursdays Wild Card Buffet $3.95 4pm • 9pm LOGO JACKETS! On $1 Royal Flush wins with maximum coins, no wild cards TRAVEL MUGS! On 5i, 2H & $1 Royal Flush wins with maximum coins played, no wild cards KENOI $1.25 4-spot special pays $250 everydayl 200! $300! 1500! $1000! Progressive cash drawings, every Tuesday FREE T-SHIRT! Hit the four 10s on any video poker machine on Wednesday & receive a FREE T-Shirt, while supplies last. BIRTHDAV BUFFET! 2 buffets for the price of one. Must be at least 21 yrs. of age and show I.D. C A S I NO ANOTHER FIKE BOYD GAMING PROPERTY BOULDER HWy, BETVEEN LAKE MEAD ft SUNSET SENIORS From Page 10 Thursday, Feb. 29: Center open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, bridge at 8 a.m., Scrabble at 10 a.m., bingo at 10 a.m. and Senior Orchestra at 1 p.m. Duphcate bridge at 6 p.m. and pinochle at 6:30 p.m. Friday, March 1: Center open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, Medicare information and assistance and help with medical forms 9 a.m. to noon, free hearing tests by appointment, call 5654990, free ^'-^ Notary Public 9 to 11:30 a.m., j Registrar of Voters 9 to 11:30 a.m., St. Rose Seminar at noon, bridge at 12:30 p.m., canasta and cribbage at 1 p.m. Saturday, March 2: Center open for all activities 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Brunch served from 9 to 11:30 a.m. for $1.25, hosted by the city of Henderson Print Shop. Sunday, March 3: Center open for all activities noon to 3 p.m. Monthly Pot Luck at 1 p m. hosted by Clark County Commissioner Bruce Woodbury. Monday, March 4: Center open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a m. to 4 p.m.. Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a m., billiards all hours center is open, bridge at8 a m., wood carving at 9 a.m., oil pamtmg at 12:30 p.m.. Housing Options for Seniors by appointment, call 732-0304, Humana and pinochle at 1 p.m. Double deck pinochle at 6 p.m. and Mens chorus at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 5: Center open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.. Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, needle craft at 9 a.m., T-shirt painting at 9 a.m.. Senior Law Project at 9 a.m., blood pressure testing at 10 a.m., FHP at 10:30 a.m., pinochle at 1 p.m., line dancing at 2 p.m. and Celebrity City Chorus at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 6: Center open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Retired Senior Volimteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, ceramics 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., free pinochle lessons at 10 a.m., euchre and dominoes at 1 p.m.. Pinochle at 6:30 p.m. and Scrabble at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 7: Center open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.. Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, bridge at 8 a.m.. Scrabble at 10 a.m., bingoat 10 a.m. and Senior Orchestra at 1:30 p.m. Duplicate bridge at 6 p.m. and pinochle at 7 p.m. Menu Catholic Charities of SouthCourtesy Photo • vc.-.. v' • '.•'• .V:.' SUPER BRUNCH — Teachers and staff of McCaw Elementary School cook up a brunch for seniors at the Henderson Senior Center. em Nevada, through Black Mountain Senior Nutrition, provides meals at the Henderson Senior Center Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for a suggested donation of $1.25. For information on the lunch program or Meals on Wheels, call Catholic Charities of Southern Nevada at 385-5284. DUMP From Page 1 Thursday, Feb. 29: Chili Friday, March 30: Macaroni and Cheese Saturday, March 2: Brunch served from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for $1.25. Center open from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, March 3: Monthly potluck at 1 p.m. Center open 12 to 3 p.m. Monday, March 4: Meat Loaf Tuesday, March 6: Barbecue Beef Wednesday, March 6: Baked Chicken Thursday, March 7: Cabbage Rolls REG. '699 SALE '439 5 PC. SET envisioning any type of landfill near Dutchman Pass because of the beauty of the area, not to mention that it would probably cost another $1 million or $2 million." For more than seven months, the Council has been exploring the issue of creating another landfill to alleviate the out-oftown truck traffic. The Council raised the rates for out-of-town trucks twice last year for out-oftown trucks using the Boulder City dump but in the process, lost most of the $200,000 revenue. The City Manager has stated in previous meetings that the landfill could generate upwards of $2 million, depending on the amount of trucks using it. This money could be used to provide services without raising taxes, he added. Lundgaard reminded the audience that the landfill site will not become an eye sore because it will be excavated and restored to its natural setting. The next step will be a request for proposals for contractors wishing to create a landfill at the site. The Boulder City Council took a different look at the possible landfill sites in the Eldorado Valley during a special workshop Feb. 17. First the Council and 10 audience members were treated to £m aerial videotape of the two possible sites in the Eldorado Valley. City Manager Don Eppley said creating a landfill could become ; Margie Nelson, mother of eight and grandmother of 21, will celebrate her 15th birthday today. Although she is 60 years old, she has had only 15 birthdays because she was born on leap Lenten study at church The First Henderson United Methodist invites interested members of the public to the 1996 Lenten Study, "Journeying With Jesus," to be held at the church Classes will begin at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 5, and continue each Tuesday until Easter. The cost is $3.50 for materials. Rev. Marvin Gant will be the instructor. For more information, call 565-6049. Master Masons invited to meeting The Dhahran Daylight Lodge invites all Master Masons, active or retired, to its next meeting at noon Thursday, March 7, at Mt. Moriah Temple, 480 Greenway Road (off Van Wagenen St.) in Henderson. Lunch will be served. The purpose of the meeting is to offer an opportunity to eryoy the Masonic fellowship to thoae unable to attend an evening meeting. For more Information, call Dick Amrt, 451-1181. Ladies are invited to a social hour during the meeting, and to the luncheon following. year, Feb. 29, 1936. Nelson even has four grandchildren who have had more birthdays. ..__ • • • .r.i;-r • ,. Nelson, who moved to Henderson at the age of three, is the daughter of former Henderson a great revenue-producer for the city. Two issues that need to be addressed, he said, were blight and disruption from truck traffic. The idea to create a landfill was raised last year after numerous complaints about the number of out-of-town trucks hauling debris to the Boulder City dump. / In an effort to the curtail outof-town truck traffic, which ran through a residential neighborhood to the landfill, the Council raised the cost twice. But in the process, the city lost most of its annual revenue of approximately $200,000. According to a feasibility study by Broadbent and Associates, the life expectancy for the landfill near the highway is approximately 349 years. That figure is islS city councilman Bill Mainor and has been married to school district truant officer Ron Nelson. ;. Employed at Clark County in the treasurer's office, she enjoys painting, aerobics, cooking and watchinghergrandchildren grow up. based on 100 out-of-town trucks per day. The depth of the landfill would be 22 feet of waste and eight feet of cover material. Gove said the landfill would not become a mountain. Instead, the area would be excavated, compacted and filled in. Mayor Eric Lundgaard stressed the landfill would be a Class IV landfill if it is built. The landfill would only accept construction debris, explained Councilman Robert Kenneston. The first site in the Eldorado Valley is approximately four miles south of the U.S. Highway 93/95 junction. This site has a couple of advantages over ^'e site near Dutchman Pass because it is closer to the highway (one mile away) and has a paved road ;-,":A ..V • ;:...;: ^,;:r • • • • • • • ^..:• • • • leading to it. '* Another advantage the first site has is a 100-square acre fence surrounding the site. The area was previously used by the Ne• vada Department of Transportation as a gravel pit. ALUMONT REG.'1599 SALE '1072 SINGLE CHAIR METAL & WOOD PHILLIPS FURNITURE .\ciu)s> nu)M 1 i.\ii;r 433 Lake Mead 565-6050 IfWreienty-Onetof^H^me, Here's a Deal That's Twice as Fine! REG. '99 MM • > ?? CiNEDOMllZ H E N D t R S O N LUXURY THEATRE COMPLEX ^12 Luxury At^trims •0i/iarf Snack hf •0f% 5fr#9 StHi •llimoU ConlroU$d C9mhrt *i9tkl§g Chair l9§9 SiaU§ •frii Ughtid hrkiai hst Aiiofvs from Sr$M \f9lliy u4 M4t atyl 457^700 { J iAiiUM MAJIHUi *y tvm 9An miom tma usn rnmniaii STARTS FRIDAY CINEDOME 12 HENDERSON • RUMBLE IN THE BRONX (R) 12:55 3:00 4:55 7:30 9:45 11:40 • DOWN PERISCOPE (PG13) 12:20 2X 4:45 720 9:25 11:30 • MARYREILLY(R) 12:15 2:40 5:10 7:35 10:06 MR. WRONG (PG13) 12:25 2:30 4:40 7:10 920 11:20 • BLOOD SPORT (R) 12)2) 3:50 550 7 55 9:55 • BROKEN ARROW (R) 12:30 2:50 5:15 740 10:15 LEAVING LAS VEGAS (R) 12:05 2 30 5:00 7:20 • UP CLOSE & PERSONAL(PG13) 11 50 225 500 745 1030 UNFORGETABLE (R) 945 MUPPETS TREASURE ISLAND (R) 1145 1 55 410 655 905 • DOWN PERISCOPE (PG13) 120 320 5 45 815 1020 HAPI>YGILM0RE(PG13) 12:50 2:55 5 05 7 15 9 35 1135 3 NO PASSES COUPONS OH DtSCOUNTS • LATE SHOW FBI SAT ONLY xmm \ February 29,1996 5p.m. 11 p.m. 4 LIGHT POLE SLIGHT DAMAGE LIMITED SUPPLY REG. "689 SALE $ 299 METAL & WOOD ROCKER REG.'119 NOW WHILE $^Q THEY LAST "f^ • W W II TT1 PUNTER GREEN ONLY REG. '32.95 SALE M7.50 OUTDOOR LIGHTING DESIGN CONSULTANT AVAILABLE NC Must be between the ages of 21 to 49. ID required. One 2-For-l per person. All Rules Posted. DOWNTOWN • HCNDERSON .UJ "IT LASTS" FACTORY DIRECT -2248 SPRING MOUNTAIN ROAD ACROSS FROM TREASURE ISLAND PARKING LOT MAJOR CREDIT CARDS DAILY 10-5 CLOSED SUNDAY 791-5558 WE SHIP ANYWHERE 791-5558

PAGE 11

• • f Mwtmm^m^^mmtw^mmmmmmmm^^ Page 10 Henderson Home News Thursday, February 29,1996 Thursday, February 29,1996 Henderson Home News Pag* 11 1; Deardoff birthday party • I ">'^-SENIOR CENTER HIGHLIGHTS 27 E. TEXAS ST. 568^990 The center is open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Fnday, from to 10 p.m. Monday through Thursday evenings; and from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Happy Birthday Edna Edna Deardoff will host her "21st Birthday Party" from 2 to 4 p.m. today. This leapyearyoungster, bom 84 years ago, invites her friends to celebrate the grand event. Mayor Bob Groesbeck will bring Sam's Band to entertain and family and friends are coming to town to help celebrate her coming of "legal age." The party is a great way to thank Deardoff for being such a wonderful lady, and for working hard for 22 years to help Henderson seniors. As the Retired Senior Volunteer Program director, she rallies volunteers to ensure the success of a variety of Senior Center projects. From ensuring homebound meals, providing nutritious daily lunches and organizing rides to medical appointments, Deardoff has her hand in everything. Also involved in numerous volunteer projects throughout the city, she has dedicated years of promoting programs to ensure dignity and independence for seniors. Joining the Mayor in this special salute will be Clark County Commissioner Bruce Woodbury, State Sen. Jon Porter, Rep. Richard Perkins and Judges Rodney Burr and Ken Proctor. Rumors abound these gentlemen have a special birthday present for Deardoff. Stop by this afternoon and say "thank you" to a lady who has dedicated her life to seniors. Care Book Thank you to volunteers from the Eldercare Providers Association of Henderson and the students and staff from McCaw Elementary School. Under the leadership of Dorothy Vondenbrink, EPAH kicked off its fundraising campaign last weekend for its Senior Care Book. The volunteer organization of seniors and service providers publishes and distributes the booklet listing all senior services in Henderson. The publication is mailed to all residences in Henderson, and has proved an important tool for seniors as it provides access to existing public, private, and volunteer services that promote independent living. McCaw students joined in the efforts by submitting art work to compete for the front and inside pages. Entries will be on display at the center for voting selection for the next two weeks. McCaw staff, students and parents were also a-wonderful help last weekend for Saturday Brunch. If your business or volunteer group is interested in advertising or assisting, call Vondenbrink, 565-9033. St. Rose Seminar St. Rose Dominican Hospital holds a seminar at the center on the first Friday of each month to highlight new programs, answer questions about services and assist seniors with developing new programs to meet their needs. Stop by at noon Friday, March 1 to learn more about St. Rose and have questions answered. Elvis sighting The city of Henderson's very own print shop staff, Teresa Coop, Maureen Miller, Melynda Chapman, Brian Estep and Curtis Hafen, are planning a special brunch for seniors at 9 a.m. Saturday, March 2. There is truth to the rumor the Print Shop folks are talented cooks, and plan more than a surprise or two. After the second sighting of Elvis at the local Kmart, the crew hunted the famed singer down and "hog tied" him for display at Saturday Brunch. Ladies are asked to check their heart monitors at the door and not scream during the performance. Stop by from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday, March 2 for the special event. Pot Luck On the first Sunday of the month, the center holds a Pot Luck. At 1 p.m. Sunday, March 4, Clark County Commissioner Bruce Woodbury will host this month's event. The feast is gaining a welldeserved reputation of featuring the best food and friendliest company in the valley. Bring a favorite dish, stop by for some great conversation and spend a n afternoon getting to know some of the best people around. • Senior Law '. The Senior Law Project provides legal counsel and assistance to eligible senior citizens in Clark County. A representative comes to the center once a month by appointment. Matters covered include simple wills, living wills, powers of attorney, long-term health care planning, consumer disputes and small claims instructions. For an appointment on Tuesday, March 5, call 2296596. Mark your calendar From 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, March 16, the Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) will host its annual volunteer,luncheon at the center, honoring seniors who volunteer their time, talents and hearts in the community. Volunteers, mark your calendar now so you will not forget the special event in your honor. Call 565-6990 for reservations. Reminders •Social Security will be at the center from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 6 and 20. •Department of Motor Vehicles offers drivers license and photo ID services to Seniors once j^ month. Representatives will be available from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday, March 14. Grand Opening BLACKJACK BAIL BONDSUUffl 565-2900 Collateral Not Always Required O.R. INFORMATION Available 153 Water St. (across from the Eldorado) • In HendersoH 721 S. Main St., Las Vegas • 387-0996 SM Seniors < Page 11 "^fcc^: SopP et cob • ^ O^t^ 0K<^ DINNLK.S 1 5 Loke Mead Dr. 565-0122 FREE PICK-UP Donate furniture,'clothes, appliances, tools, toys, misc. CHURCH YARD SALE Sot. April 20 Our Savior's Lutheran Church Lynn Lane Downtown Henderson 565-8777 ART NEVADA FUNERAL SERVICE Nevada Cremation or Burial Society / LOW COST Full Traditional Funeral Including: • All professional services • 20 gauge steel casket Call for Price Pre-need or At-need Lx)w Cost Cremation $300 382-7378 24 Hour Casino Center & Gass Courtesy Photo ART CONTEST — Senior Ken Polasko talks with McCaw Elementary School teacher Joyce Winternheimer about the student art contest. .; ? ^ •The monthly bus shopping trip is headed for the new Galleria Mall at 10 a.m. Tuesday, March 12. The trip costs $1; call 565-6990 for reservations. •The Rock Hound bus trip has been changed to 10 a.m. Friday, March 29. Activities The Henderson Senior Center has activities rangingfrom art to Scrabble, concerts, health seminars and social services. The center is open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. On Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings, the center is open from 6 to 10pm.,and9a.m. to2p.m. on Saturdays. Check the Henderson Home News,\he Senior Center monthly newsletter or call 565-4990 for details on activities, special events and services. Also call for information on how to receive the monthly newsletter by mail. Activities scheduled for the week are as follows: HEY, IT'S COLD' Get your bike tuned up now! Next week you'll want it in tip top shape. do BIKE STUFF 10 years of quality bikes and service 1268 Wyoming St. in Old Town, Boulder City • 293-BIKE Tues Fri 10 to 6 Sat 9 to 1 Look for the IN THE SUN COLORING CONTEST y in Thursday's Panorama section '' of March 7th issue of the "H I N D I • \ II 'TT?NEWS f^s.^r^ MAR MADHE MARCH 1 31 RULES POSTED ROLL OF COINI On video poker wins, every Monday SENIORS NIGHTSI Mondays & Thursdays Wild Card Buffet $3.95 4pm • 9pm LOGO JACKETS! On $1 Royal Flush wins with maximum coins, no wild cards TRAVEL MUGS! On 5i, 2H & $1 Royal Flush wins with maximum coins played, no wild cards KENOI $1.25 4-spot special pays $250 everydayl 200! $300! 1500! $1000! Progressive cash drawings, every Tuesday FREE T-SHIRT! Hit the four 10s on any video poker machine on Wednesday & receive a FREE T-Shirt, while supplies last. BIRTHDAV BUFFET! 2 buffets for the price of one. Must be at least 21 yrs. of age and show I.D. C A S I NO ANOTHER FIKE BOYD GAMING PROPERTY BOULDER HWy, BETVEEN LAKE MEAD ft SUNSET SENIORS From Page 10 Thursday, Feb. 29: Center open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, bridge at 8 a.m., Scrabble at 10 a.m., bingo at 10 a.m. and Senior Orchestra at 1 p.m. Duphcate bridge at 6 p.m. and pinochle at 6:30 p.m. Friday, March 1: Center open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, Medicare information and assistance and help with medical forms 9 a.m. to noon, free hearing tests by appointment, call 5654990, free ^'-^ Notary Public 9 to 11:30 a.m., j Registrar of Voters 9 to 11:30 a.m., St. Rose Seminar at noon, bridge at 12:30 p.m., canasta and cribbage at 1 p.m. Saturday, March 2: Center open for all activities 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Brunch served from 9 to 11:30 a.m. for $1.25, hosted by the city of Henderson Print Shop. Sunday, March 3: Center open for all activities noon to 3 p.m. Monthly Pot Luck at 1 p m. hosted by Clark County Commissioner Bruce Woodbury. Monday, March 4: Center open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a m. to 4 p.m.. Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a m., billiards all hours center is open, bridge at8 a m., wood carving at 9 a.m., oil pamtmg at 12:30 p.m.. Housing Options for Seniors by appointment, call 732-0304, Humana and pinochle at 1 p.m. Double deck pinochle at 6 p.m. and Mens chorus at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 5: Center open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.. Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, needle craft at 9 a.m., T-shirt painting at 9 a.m.. Senior Law Project at 9 a.m., blood pressure testing at 10 a.m., FHP at 10:30 a.m., pinochle at 1 p.m., line dancing at 2 p.m. and Celebrity City Chorus at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 6: Center open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Retired Senior Volimteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, ceramics 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., free pinochle lessons at 10 a.m., euchre and dominoes at 1 p.m.. Pinochle at 6:30 p.m. and Scrabble at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 7: Center open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.. Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, bridge at 8 a.m.. Scrabble at 10 a.m., bingoat 10 a.m. and Senior Orchestra at 1:30 p.m. Duplicate bridge at 6 p.m. and pinochle at 7 p.m. Menu Catholic Charities of SouthCourtesy Photo • vc.-.. v' • '.•'• .V:.' SUPER BRUNCH — Teachers and staff of McCaw Elementary School cook up a brunch for seniors at the Henderson Senior Center. em Nevada, through Black Mountain Senior Nutrition, provides meals at the Henderson Senior Center Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for a suggested donation of $1.25. For information on the lunch program or Meals on Wheels, call Catholic Charities of Southern Nevada at 385-5284. DUMP From Page 1 Thursday, Feb. 29: Chili Friday, March 30: Macaroni and Cheese Saturday, March 2: Brunch served from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for $1.25. Center open from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, March 3: Monthly potluck at 1 p.m. Center open 12 to 3 p.m. Monday, March 4: Meat Loaf Tuesday, March 6: Barbecue Beef Wednesday, March 6: Baked Chicken Thursday, March 7: Cabbage Rolls REG. '699 SALE '439 5 PC. SET envisioning any type of landfill near Dutchman Pass because of the beauty of the area, not to mention that it would probably cost another $1 million or $2 million." For more than seven months, the Council has been exploring the issue of creating another landfill to alleviate the out-oftown truck traffic. The Council raised the rates for out-of-town trucks twice last year for out-oftown trucks using the Boulder City dump but in the process, lost most of the $200,000 revenue. The City Manager has stated in previous meetings that the landfill could generate upwards of $2 million, depending on the amount of trucks using it. This money could be used to provide services without raising taxes, he added. Lundgaard reminded the audience that the landfill site will not become an eye sore because it will be excavated and restored to its natural setting. The next step will be a request for proposals for contractors wishing to create a landfill at the site. The Boulder City Council took a different look at the possible landfill sites in the Eldorado Valley during a special workshop Feb. 17. First the Council and 10 audience members were treated to £m aerial videotape of the two possible sites in the Eldorado Valley. City Manager Don Eppley said creating a landfill could become ; Margie Nelson, mother of eight and grandmother of 21, will celebrate her 15th birthday today. Although she is 60 years old, she has had only 15 birthdays because she was born on leap Lenten study at church The First Henderson United Methodist invites interested members of the public to the 1996 Lenten Study, "Journeying With Jesus," to be held at the church Classes will begin at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 5, and continue each Tuesday until Easter. The cost is $3.50 for materials. Rev. Marvin Gant will be the instructor. For more information, call 565-6049. Master Masons invited to meeting The Dhahran Daylight Lodge invites all Master Masons, active or retired, to its next meeting at noon Thursday, March 7, at Mt. Moriah Temple, 480 Greenway Road (off Van Wagenen St.) in Henderson. Lunch will be served. The purpose of the meeting is to offer an opportunity to eryoy the Masonic fellowship to thoae unable to attend an evening meeting. For more Information, call Dick Amrt, 451-1181. Ladies are invited to a social hour during the meeting, and to the luncheon following. year, Feb. 29, 1936. Nelson even has four grandchildren who have had more birthdays. ..__ • • • .r.i;-r • ,. Nelson, who moved to Henderson at the age of three, is the daughter of former Henderson a great revenue-producer for the city. Two issues that need to be addressed, he said, were blight and disruption from truck traffic. The idea to create a landfill was raised last year after numerous complaints about the number of out-of-town trucks hauling debris to the Boulder City dump. / In an effort to the curtail outof-town truck traffic, which ran through a residential neighborhood to the landfill, the Council raised the cost twice. But in the process, the city lost most of its annual revenue of approximately $200,000. According to a feasibility study by Broadbent and Associates, the life expectancy for the landfill near the highway is approximately 349 years. That figure is islS city councilman Bill Mainor and has been married to school district truant officer Ron Nelson. ;. Employed at Clark County in the treasurer's office, she enjoys painting, aerobics, cooking and watchinghergrandchildren grow up. based on 100 out-of-town trucks per day. The depth of the landfill would be 22 feet of waste and eight feet of cover material. Gove said the landfill would not become a mountain. Instead, the area would be excavated, compacted and filled in. Mayor Eric Lundgaard stressed the landfill would be a Class IV landfill if it is built. The landfill would only accept construction debris, explained Councilman Robert Kenneston. The first site in the Eldorado Valley is approximately four miles south of the U.S. Highway 93/95 junction. This site has a couple of advantages over ^'e site near Dutchman Pass because it is closer to the highway (one mile away) and has a paved road ;-,":A ..V • ;:...;: ^,;:r • • • • • • • ^..:• • • • leading to it. '* Another advantage the first site has is a 100-square acre fence surrounding the site. The area was previously used by the Ne• vada Department of Transportation as a gravel pit. ALUMONT REG.'1599 SALE '1072 SINGLE CHAIR METAL & WOOD PHILLIPS FURNITURE .\ciu)s> nu)M 1 i.\ii;r 433 Lake Mead 565-6050 IfWreienty-Onetof^H^me, Here's a Deal That's Twice as Fine! REG. '99 MM • > ?? CiNEDOMllZ H E N D t R S O N LUXURY THEATRE COMPLEX ^12 Luxury At^trims •0i/iarf Snack hf •0f% 5fr#9 StHi •llimoU ConlroU$d C9mhrt *i9tkl§g Chair l9§9 SiaU§ •frii Ughtid hrkiai hst Aiiofvs from Sr$M \f9lliy u4 M4t atyl 457^700 { J iAiiUM MAJIHUi *y tvm 9An miom tma usn rnmniaii STARTS FRIDAY CINEDOME 12 HENDERSON • RUMBLE IN THE BRONX (R) 12:55 3:00 4:55 7:30 9:45 11:40 • DOWN PERISCOPE (PG13) 12:20 2X 4:45 720 9:25 11:30 • MARYREILLY(R) 12:15 2:40 5:10 7:35 10:06 MR. WRONG (PG13) 12:25 2:30 4:40 7:10 920 11:20 • BLOOD SPORT (R) 12)2) 3:50 550 7 55 9:55 • BROKEN ARROW (R) 12:30 2:50 5:15 740 10:15 LEAVING LAS VEGAS (R) 12:05 2 30 5:00 7:20 • UP CLOSE & PERSONAL(PG13) 11 50 225 500 745 1030 UNFORGETABLE (R) 945 MUPPETS TREASURE ISLAND (R) 1145 1 55 410 655 905 • DOWN PERISCOPE (PG13) 120 320 5 45 815 1020 HAPI>YGILM0RE(PG13) 12:50 2:55 5 05 7 15 9 35 1135 3 NO PASSES COUPONS OH DtSCOUNTS • LATE SHOW FBI SAT ONLY xmm \ February 29,1996 5p.m. 11 p.m. 4 LIGHT POLE SLIGHT DAMAGE LIMITED SUPPLY REG. "689 SALE $ 299 METAL & WOOD ROCKER REG.'119 NOW WHILE $^Q THEY LAST "f^ • W W II TT1 PUNTER GREEN ONLY REG. '32.95 SALE M7.50 OUTDOOR LIGHTING DESIGN CONSULTANT AVAILABLE NC Must be between the ages of 21 to 49. ID required. One 2-For-l per person. All Rules Posted. DOWNTOWN • HCNDERSON .UJ "IT LASTS" FACTORY DIRECT -2248 SPRING MOUNTAIN ROAD ACROSS FROM TREASURE ISLAND PARKING LOT MAJOR CREDIT CARDS DAILY 10-5 CLOSED SUNDAY 791-5558 WE SHIP ANYWHERE 791-5558

PAGE 12

mi^^^r^f^mmmmm^m WPWWIWPWWWW<' l|l ll lllllll lWWW^WWWWtWff^^ Pag 12 Henderson Home News Thursday, February 29, 1996 t, Jb:. Thursday, February 29, 1996 Henderson Home News Pao^ 13 7b wnounc* /our fivoup or otganixaton'a avnta, pluat com by or mail infomation to: 2 Comimroa CantarDriva, Handanon, NV 89014. Community DESERT NEWCOMERS Thuraday, Feb. 29, 10 am., GrMH VaNay Library. The Desert Newcomers Club wM hold its monthly meeting. Women who have lived In the area for less ttian three years are invited to attend. 2631221 or 263-1342. AMATEUR RADIO EXAM Saturday, March 2, noon, Henderson Campus-CCSN. There will be an FCCappmvedamateurradio exam. 565-0242. RAILWAY HISTORICAL SOCIETY Sunday, March 3, 1 p.m.. Rainbow Library, 3150 N. Buffalo Or. The Southern Nevada chapter of the National Railway Historical Society will hold its monthly meeting. Guests are welcome. 453-23S2. JEWISH WAR VETERANS Sunday, March 3, noon. Green Valley Library. The Sgt. Manny Peven Post 65, JWV will hold its monthly meeting. Al, 456-7887. BUTTON SOCIETY Monday, March 4, 6:30 p.m., Henderson Senior Center. The Southem Nevada Button Society will hold a meeting. All newcomers welcome. 4351115. NARFE CHAPTER Monday, March 4, 1:30 p.m., Henderson Senior Center. The Henderson chapterof the National Association of Retired Federal Employeeswill hold its monthly meeting. All present and retired federal employees are welcome. 456-3193. CREDIT COUNSEUNG SERVICE Monday, March 4,6:30-8:30 p.m., 3650 S. Decatur, Suite 30. Consumer Credit Counseling Services will offer the free class, "Credit A Necessity in the '90s." Registration, 364-0344. SPECIAL SERVICES Monday-Wednesday, March 4-6, 7 p.m., First Southern Baptist Church, 240 S. Cholla SL Dr David Davis, who has been endorsed for his worV with teenagers and the DARE program by the White House, will speak on 'hope' tinat is available for each person as they focus on the Bible. 565-6072. RSI PREVENTION Wednesday, March 6, 6-9 p.m.. West Charleston Campus-CCSN. Author Rosemarie Atencio will present a workshop, "Carpal Tunnel Syndrome — How to Relieve and Prevent Wrist 'Burnout!'' $49,877-1133, Ext. 413. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS Mondays-Sundays. Gamblers Anonymous of Southern Nevada has day and evening meetings everyday. 24-hour hodine, 385-7732. ALUMNI CLUB Mondays-Sundays. Alumni and supporters of the University of Texas at Austin are invited to join the formation of a local alumni chapter All alumni who live in Southern Nevada are welcome. Charies Dixon. 876-4589. KIWANIS Mondays, 7:30 a.m., Green's Supper Club, 2241 N. Green Valley Parkway and Wednesdays, 7 a.m.. Omelet House, 317 N. Boulder Highway. The Green Valley Kiwanis Club meets Mondays and the Henderson club meets Wednesdays. AMERICAN LEGION Mondays, first and thirdof each month, 7 p.m., Henderson Jr. Jaycees building, between Water SL And Major Ave. Amencan Legion BMI Post 40 will meet. All veterans welcome. 454-6551. DRAMA WORKSHOP Mondays, 8 p.m., Sam's Town Bowling Center, Room A. Joe Behar's Community Drama worVshop Is free for anyone interested in learning acting and auditioning techniques for motion picture and television wor1(. Open to all ages. 457-0234. MOPS Alternate Mondays and Tuesdays. Mothers of Pre-schoolers (MOPS) is a program forall motiiersof pre-schodiars, birth through 6 years. Enjoy breakfast, a speaker, friendship groups and a craft project while the children are cared for in a structured setting. For cost, k>cations and dates, 735-4004. SUCCESS WITHOUT STRESS Tuesdays, first and third of each month, American Federal Savings Bank, 2231 N. Green Valley Pkwy. Secrets to Success Without Stress Is sponsoring an ongoing free class, "Conquer Negative Emotions."293-7797. POSTPARTUM SUPPORT GROUP Tuaadaya, 7-S:30p.m., UNLV Women's Cantor, CBC Room 227. Through Dec. 5, the Poslpartum Support Group will mat 895-4475. BUSINESS Tumdays and Thursdays, 7 a.m., IHOP Raataurant, 3260 E. Tropicana at Pacosk The Eastskie EarlyBirds Chapter of the Business Network International meets. Evelyn Hess, 792-1343, or Art Goldberg, 732-7693. ROTARY Tuaadays, noon, Eldorado Casino and Thursdays, 7 a.m.. Country Inn, 1990 W. Sunset Road. The Henderson Rotary Club meets Tuesdays and the Green Valley Club meets Thursdays. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Tuesdays, 10 a.m., Green Valley Library. No dues or fees. Additional meetings in the Green Valley area are also beginning on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Call for more information. Dok>res, 433-8269. TOPS Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.. Junior Junction Pre-school, 101 W. Chaparral. TOPS, Take Off Pounds Sensibly, will hold their weekly meeting. LEAN Second Tuesday of each month, 8 p.m. Continental Hotel. The National Law Enforcement Association of Nevada will hod its regular meeting. Retired and active police officers and law enforcement or related professionals are invited. 434-0442. SWEET ADEUNES Tuesdays, 7 p.m., Henderson Senior Center. Rehearsal for Celebrity City Chorus of Sweet Adelines International. For women interested in singing and learning four-part hamiony 'barbershop' style. BUSINESS NETWORK Wednesdays, 7 to 8:30 a.m., Country Inn, Sunsetand Valle Verde. The Green Valley Chapter of Business Network Intl. meets for its weekly meeting. 454-3100. WIDOWED ADJUSTMENT Wednesday, 7:30 p.m., First Christian Church, 101 S. Rancho, room 6. Widowed men and women of all ages meet. 735-5544. ALL PARENTS UNITED Wednesdays, 7 p.m.. White Middle School. All Parents United, a collection of various parents' groups, meet to discuss educational issues. CANCER SUPPORT GROUP Wadneedays, second and fourth of each montti, 6:30 to 8 p.m.. Sunrise Hospital, Pediatric Physical Medicine Department Together We Cope," a support group for cancer patients and families, will meet. Dorothy Howard, 731 8135 or Linda Sooudi, 731-8274. EXECUTIVE LEADS CLUB Thursdays, 7 a.m., Rae's, Pecos and Wigwam. The Executive Leads Club East meets to exchange business leads. Karen Scherer, 736-7755. BARBERSHOP CHORUS Thursdays, 7 p.m., Christ Lutheran Church, Torray Pines Road and the expressway. The Las Vegas GambleAires Mens' Barbershop Chorus meets every week. Men of all ages who enjoy singing are welcome. Gary Forsbettj, 454-7620. :•.-;.;,•:;,, • ':;. :^ SINGLES TRAVEL CLUB Fridays, 6 p.m.. Sail Away, 4225 S. Eastern #7. Singles of all ages who are interested In traveling are Invited. 3634923. ..,..., ELKS HELPING PEOPLE Fridays, 6 to 9 p.m., 631 E. Lake Mead Dr. A complete dinner will be hosted by the Elks club. Cost: $4 donation. 5659959. DAUGHTERS OF AMERICAN REVOLUTION Norwest Bank, Community Room, in Boulder City. The Silver State Chapter of Daughters of ttie American Revolution, sen/ing the Henderson/BouWerCity area, meets monthly (September May). 458-3693 or 293-5863. SINGLES Programs for single men and women of all ages and interests are available 6414634. SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE The Suk:k1e Preventk>n Center is tooking for volunteers to man the hotline. 7312990, ask for Ewy. DIVORCED "Divorced, Separated and Widowed Adjusbnent Inc." offers free support groups for men and women. Men and women of all ages and backgrounds are invited to attend. For times and locations, 7355544. Eco-Faire on Sunday The second annual Eco-Faire, presented by the Sierra Club, will feature electric cars, animals and T-shirts for the kids as well as news on the environmentIt will be held from 1 to 5 p.m.Sunday, March 3, at the Flamingo Library. Groups will answer questions on the environmental movement over the past 25 years, including recent events in Congress. The Opus Dance Ensemble, will give a performance, "Elemental," with dance, music, slides and speakers, from 2 to 3 p.m. in the library's performing arts theatre. Tickets for the performance are $5, available at the theatre box office at time of the show. The event is free, except for the Opus performance, and open to all. For more information, call Randy Hamesi of the Sierra Club, 373-7900. DARE |>ay at Mountasia March 9 Whether it's getting wet on bumper boats, racing go karts, rolleiblading or trying miniature golf, DARE students, families and friends will experience "A Day at Mountasia is Fun For All." Mountasia Family Fun Center, located at 2050 Olympic Ave. in Henderson, is hosting DARE day from 10 a.m. to midnight on Saturday, March 9. Students showing DARE graduate or temporary cards receive an all-day pass for $11 (a savings of $8) which allows unlimited use of all rides all day. Friends and family members without a card can purchase a $16 all-day pass. According to Dale Wood, Boulder City DARE oflficer, 'Mountasia is one of the many businesses in the Las Vegas valley that want to reward students who have committed to leading a drug-fi'ee lifestyle. "In the program, students learn there are activities which are fun and exciting and offer positive alternatives to engaging in drug use and gang violence. "Joining other DARE students at Mountasia, or any of the local businesses that believe in the philosophy, helps to provide and promote positive reinforcement towards maintaining a drug-free lifestyle." Mountasia will donate $2 for each pass purchased on the day to DARE, Inc., the community board for the Drug Abuse Resistance Education program, which is implemented in all Clark County Schools. The program teaches students skills to recognize and resist the subtle and overt pressures that cause them to experiment with drugs and alcohol. It also teaches, gang resistance and how to handle stress and peer pressure. For more information, call Valerie Rosland, president, with the American Toxicology Institute, 452-4999. Stahl to head branch Martin Stahl has joined Nevada State Bank as a branch manager in Henderson. His duties will include supervising branch staff, developing new business andensuring customer relations. His previous experience includes serving as a personal banker at Founders Bank of Arizona. At Chemical Bank in New York City, he served as branch manager, sales manager, operations manager, assistant manager and manager trainee. Stahl holds a bachelor's degree in education from Brooklyn DEATHS Beverly A. Gleason Beverly A. Gleason, 69, died Monday, Feb. 26,1996, in a local hospital. Born in Wisconsin on Oct. 3,1926, she had lived in Henderson since 1985. She was a retired dietician. She is survived by her husband, William H. Gleason, Sr. of Henderson; a daughter, Linda Lee Price, of Las Vegas; a sister, lyone Jorgenson of Three Rivers, Calif.; a brother, Robert Rohweller of Bullhead City, Ariz.; three grand children and five great grandchildren. Graveside servjces will be at 11:30 a.m. today at the Southern Nevada Veterans Memorial Cemetery. Arrangements were handled by Palm Mortuary-Henderson. Sally Griggs Sally Griggs, 73, died Feb. 25, 1996, in a local hospital. Born Nov. 26, 1922, in Visalia, Calif., she had been a 50-year resident of Henderson. She was a member of the Friendship Circle Auxiliary and a volunteer at the Salvation Army Adult Day Care Center. The family suggests donations be made to the Salvation Army Adult Day Care Center. She is survived by three daughters, Renee Hildebrand of Denver, Denise Messinger and Tina Hulsey, both of Henderson; step-son, Buck Enniss of Las Vegas; half-brother, Bud Hill of San Jose, Calif.; four grandchildren and a great grandson. Arrangements were handled by Nevada Funeral Sen/ice of Las Vegas. College as well as an AIB Professionals in Banking certificate. Nevada State' Bank was founded in 1959 by a group of Las Vegas businessmen. It was purchased by Salt Lake Citybased Zions Bancorporation in 1985, but acts as an independent Nevada operation backed by $5 billion in assets managed by the Utah holding company. Today, there are 25 Nevada State Bank branches operating statewide as the bank continues to pursue its goal of providing full-service banking in all counties in the state. John R, Harvey John R. Han/ey, 72, died Monday, Feb. 19, 1996 in a local hospital. Born Sept. 14, 1923 in Rahway, N.J. he had been a resident of Henderson for one year. He was a member of the Green Valley Methodist Church, was a senior tax accountant for the Exxon Corp., and was a veteran of the U.S. Army. He is survived by his wife, Marion of Henderson; son, Brian R. of Matawan, N.J.; daughter, Donna K. Raucher of Henderson; brother, Normal R. of Princeton, N. J.; and two grandchildren. Services were held at Green Valley United Methodist Church. Internment will be at 10:45 a.m. Friday, March 1, in the Southern Nevada Veterans Cemetery, Boulder Cif^;' •' ^ The family suggests donations be made to St. Rose Dominican Hospital, 102 E. Lake Mead Dr., Henderson, NV89015 Arrangements were handled by Desert Memorial of Las Vegas. Carlos B. Chavez Carlos B. Chavez, 54, died on Jan. 31, 1996. Born June 6,1941 inTexas.hehad lived in the area for six years. He is sun/ived by his wife, Cheryl of Henderson; daughter Christina of Los Angeles; son, Carlos C. of Henderson; three brothers, Rene, Cosme, and Henry of California; three sisters, Aurora, Yolanda and Yvonne of California; and grandchildren, Douglas Chavez and Amanda Davey. Sen/ices were private. Arrangements were handled by Palm Mortuary of Henderson. Editor's Note: This is the correct SHOP TALK with Tony Mlo ABS: STOMPED OR STUMPED? Anti-lock braking systems (ABS) is an idea that has caught on with the American public. Fifteen million of the cars on this country's roads are equipped with ABS, and half of the cars sold in the last model year had ABS. The trouble is that a recent study by the American Automobile Association shows that less than half of all drivers of ABS-equipped automobiles know how to use the system. Most drivers hold on to the old notion that the brake pedal should be pumped lightly to avoid wheel lock-up. While this braking strategy applies to stopping cars not equipped with ABS, it only serves to defeat the braking ability of ABS-equipped cars. To make ABS work, it is necessary to apply heavy pressure on the brake pedal and keep it applied. The pulsations that may be felt in the brake pedal are only an indication that the ABS is woridng. To keep ABS on, drivers must "stomp" on the brake pedal and hold the pressure.. A car'.s steering can gradually slip out of adjH.v(>r\M()winormorp'on slol(indl^pnonidcfiincs, MAIflRAVr-UOubrRIIWY. VV. SOUTH BOIII DfR IflGHWAY (70?)566-W9 : PRESTIGE TRAVEL version of a notice that was published Tuesday. Thank You Skyline Restaurant & Casino Employee Contribution Program Members Vincent Bakke Meletia Bond Michael Crassas Deborah Gorder Oiane Hubbard Nellie Johnson Joseph Lewicki Edward Morse Ginger Musso Eiifemia Ocampo Peri Parrott Rickey Raybum Cathy Smith Theresa Sperduti Frank Blanchette Alice Bourbeau Philip Frazer Joseph Gorman Orema Hunt Shannon Kidd Evelyn Maack Judy Moss Sharon Neihart Somjit Outland Dawn Raybum James Sims Lydia Smith Connie Trotter Warren Wallesen USE S TOBB SPE The Best of Hong Kong Dec. 29 1,665 Rnundinp airlare Irom |j.^ Vegas • Transfers • 6 nighis ai Sheraton Hong Kong • 1/2 (lay sighseeing lour • Escorted from Las Vegas and more Waikiki 5 night from 517 Rowidtrip airfare from 1MS Ve,(j V • 5 niglus accommodations • l^i f-reerina transfers and morel Rjlcs arc per pcrsiin hjNiJ nn ik'iblc tMiip.tnLV Rjlcstor itihci islaniK.jn rx-qucMfJ 1 KOI \ 1)1 Nil' \iia \Hi:s k 1 1 DOME STtC A INTERNATIONAL AIRI -ARES Ailjm.1 <.|S4 1 .nnpj 5IS.I l(..inc UMI ItllStOII SISh \\'ii!thinKt(Mi S.'IN l<.ni;;k.>k i^^\ ('hiclpi JIM Ijlnarv $Lt,S 1 loll); Kiiui; V-M Dctrnii US4 \aiKiiiitcr • $in M.llllhl *7I.' \c ^(.rk $1.^ Amsicrdjni $rv4ii Sm|iJ|virc J74i OrLitutii .. IMnl.Klclphu .SI LOUIS JI.W iiw l-'rankfiiri 1 .(indnn I'jris J.SKI $<>.i(l 1 .1I|K'I JM '1111. kMp.' •M'V *IXf jnU Miv. VMWT Iwr. 4|li liuanliaKuM, IK.JjlljMl1t l^t iji'. n, For investing in the youth of Henderson to benefit The Henderson Boys & Girls Club J 11 \ \nir 3 3or4Dy Ba) Crutet 7Dty Hnlcanfllytin OuNtoPMno VHMUMuMn •ndCMoSw luca* 1 FROM I.s2:{fi.'>( Cniktlian loiAngtIn stKHrt lh'Fun Sh|-Motdy CiuM oMir. pbt lun. aouM occtpwcy Save 45% Off Select 1996 Cruise departures on m ms Ryndam • ms Noordara • ms Westcrdam •ttis Siaiendam • ms Nieuw Amslerdam Cninc Ivc imly. IUH no intluilnl CM li liouiils I'UI SIK.I IKW II Tr^vpl A(jf". 5 LOCATIONS IN HEWERSi 64BOULD = 2839 GREEN VALLEY PKWY 898-0994 Toastmasters assist Vo-Tech youth Vo-Tech students benefited as Henderson Toastmasters shared their commimication skills in a Youth Leadership, presented to Jan Brown's 7:00 a.m. "Tools for Success" class. Damencele DiPasqua, John Crowley, Geoff Reeves, and Kyle Tingle, all of Henderson, led the Toastmasters International Youth Leadership Program, for the 27 students. The program is designed to help students overcome their fear of speaking in front of the class. Brown was instrumental in creating and implementing the Tools" curriculum at Vo-Tech and believes communication skills are an integral part of learning. The students have learned a tremendous amount. They will be taking these skills with them through the rest of their life," Brown said. During the program, each student was given the opportunity to speak to the class. Most of the students gave an "Icebreaker" speech, introducing themselves to the class in a more formal setting. Each student was also evaluated by another student to assess their communication skills. During the last Youth Leadership meeting on Jan. 11, student Leah Heiftier said, "I personally enjoyed them (being) here. I would have just died if I was told I had to talk in front of the class. Today, I didn't have any problem at all giving my speech." Brown said, "A migor part of the semester grade is a presentation at the end of the year. Craft festival this weekend The 13th annual Las Vegas Craft Festival will be held March 1-3 at the Cashman Field Center Exhibit Hall. Show hours will be from noon to 7 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday and from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday. Three hundred booths representing 400 independent craft workers from throughout the country will be featured. Three-day admission is $5 for adults, $2 for children 6 through 16 and free for children 5 and under, • -—----r-^-. >-. _=::-^-^.^. At the Library. LYDIA MALCOLM BRANCH '':' • ],:/ • ^' • • \i' 80 N. Pecs—263-7522 ^• • /J^/'v Wednesdays & Thursdays 10 a.m., Storytime for children ages 3 to 5. Wednesday, March 6 3:30 p.m., Storytime for children 6 and older. JAMES GIBSON BRANCH 280 Water Street—565-8402 Tuesday, March 5 9:30 and 10:30 a.m., Pre-school storytime continues. Come share book experiences for children ages 3 to 5. Thursday, March 7 3:30 p.m. Afternoon storytime for school age children. GREEN VALLEY LIBRARY 2797-N.€reen Valley Parkway, Henderson — 435-1840 Thursday, Feb. 29 10 a.m., Desert Newcomers Coffee. Public welcome. (Sunset Room) -'• : • • ^"-i.• 12-4 p.m.. Tax Counseling for the Elderly: A free service provided by AARP for seniors over 60. Call 435-1840 for an appointment. (Sunset Room) 6 p.m., VITA tax preparation for the low income. Call 435-1840 for an appointment. (Conference Room) 6:30 p.m., Retired Investment Seminar offered by Dean Witter. (Sunset Room) ;, Friday,March 1 -^ ,^::ji:^ .. 9-Noon, 1 -3 p.m.. Clark County Health Department's Free Immunization Clinic for Children (Sunset Room) Saturday, March 2 10 a.m., Frontier Estates Homeowners Association General Meeting (Sunset Room) 2 p.m.. Theatre in the Valley (Sunset Room) Sunday, March 3 ^ / .^ :. 1 p.m., Jewish War Veterans (Sunset Room) '-^., ^ Monday, March 4 ^ ; ;;^, *^ >; ; 7 p.m., Theatre in the Valley (Sunset Room) ? Tuesday, March 5 10 a.m., Overeaters Annonymous (Sunset Room) 4 p.m., Home School Science Fair Competition (Sunset Room) Wednesday, March 6 Noon to 4 p.m., Tax counseling for the elderly: A free AARP service. Call 435-1840 for an appointment. (Sunset Room) 6:30 p.m.. Palm Valley Homeowners Association Board Meeting (Conference Room) 6 p.m., Westwood Village Homeowners Association Orientation (Sunset Room) Toastmasters helped the students prepare for the final presentation." During the eight week course, students are exposed to new communication techniques, designed to build upon skills learned in prior sessions. DiPasqua, Reeves and Tingle are members of TNT Toastmasters of Henderson, and Crowley is a member of Valley Voices and Vices, a Bank of America Toastmasters club. Toastmasters is an international organization specializing in helping members develop and improve communication skills. Toastmasters was formed October 22,1924 in the basement of the Santa Ana YMCA. Its original purpose was "to afford practice and training in the art of pubUc speaking and in presiding over meetings, and to promote sociability and good fellowship among its members." The organization has grown steadily, with more than three million men and women having benefited from the communication and leadership programs of TRAFFIC From Page 1 the organization. Currently, Toastmasters International has over 180,000 members in more than 8,000 clubs in over 63 countries. Through chartered clubs, it trains members in the art of public speaking, effective listening, and leadership. "To benefit the commimity, clubs in the Las Vegas Valley hold demonstration meetings for various businesses and in the public libraries. Success Leadership programs are presented in public libraries and Youth Leadership programs are held in the Clark County Detention Center and public schools. Members are also actively involved in various speaker's bureaus, such as WE CAN. For more infonhation on TNT/ Henderson chapter, or on the Youth Leadership program, call Kyle Tingle, 434-8452 or Geoff Reeves, 263-2134. For information on Toastmasters International chapters in the Las Vegas area, call 3671973, .. m Professional Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning 596-6300 436-2883 Truck Mounted • Steam Extraction I^ Health Nuts ^'^ 1635 NV Hwy. 293-1844 Recent research reports that aging due to free radicals can be reduced significantly by consuming antioxidants. :;; • : •* • 25%. Bartels said the adjustments made to Sunset Road prior to the mall's opening should alleviate congestion along the road. As result of the traffic studies, a third lane for traffic, aligning interchanges with mall entrance openings, widening the road surface and creating turning lanes for traffic at lights were created. Bartels said another traffic study is in the works to analyze traffic flow and determine if additional modifications to the roads are needed. Initially, he said, there may be some delays with the light at Stephanie Street until it is timed for the traffic flow. A four-way stop at the intersection of Stephanie Street and Warm Springs Road south of the mall presents another possible problem for congestion. Bartels LANGUAGE From Page 2 said the stop sign will be replaced with a stop light, but it will take six to eight months until it is installed. Those not going to the mall will also feel the increase in traffic, Bartels said. There really are not any good alternatives other than Stmsetif you're traveling through the area," he said. Drivers who use Sunset Road to go to work should not be affected in the morning hours, he said. Most of the increase in traffic will be in the evening. Those traveling through the area could take Lake Mead Drive or Russell Road as alternatives to taking Sunset Road. But these are out of the way, Bartels said.. The trafficpotential of the area is enormous, and once the Sunset Station Hotel-Casino and Santa Fe Hotel-Casino are built along the same road, it will be even larger, Bartels said. CHRISTIAN CENTER IS CELEBRAflNC %. 50 YEARS OF MINISTRY EVERY SUNDAY THIS YEAR! Come rejoice with us at 10:00 a.m. f^ 571 Adams St. • 293-7773 :^:1iou\der City (casual clothes OKI) *; A Express Lube FAST RELIABLE GUARANTEED Boulder Highway & Palo Verde Henderson Phone: 555-0522 ACROSS FROM THE MOVIE THEATER I S5.00 OFF our regular $24.95 14-Point service I ; Oil & Filter Change, I 44 A9S ^^^^ ^"^ 14-Point I Jy^^ Checkup. Includes I '' • :' • 3 Free Car Washes With this ad Mosi cars Includes 5 Quals of Havolme Formula 3 motor oil. Expiiau^ c MARCH SPECIALS All You Can Eat Buffet Style r Spaghetti fif Neatballs 2 for 1 Chicken Ribs Salad peg 3 75 With this coupon We reserve the right to substitute 725 Racetrack Rd. (Behind Kmart) Henderson For info call 566-5555 If cates that the ETPLS system is more effective than other language books on the market, Davis said. "I traveled and I figured out why traditional phonetics didn't work," Davis said. This system has been tested." The books contain key phrases such as "I don't speak Japanese" and Tm lost" as well as a method to combine phrases for one's own sentences. The "phrasemaker" allows a traveler to personalize a question or response while maintaining the correct sentence structure. Travelers aren't the only group to find Davis' language method helpful. In fact, it could help save lives in Clark Coimty. Firefighters and paramedics carry a pamphlet to help them communicate in Spanish. The easyto-read reference contains essential phrases such as "Do not move" and "Is everyone out of the building?" Davis' language method is also used extensively by military personnel. In addition, he develops custom pamphlets for companies, such as utilitieswhose employees need to know key phrases in Spanish or other languages. Davis, 41, was born in Albuquerque. He moved to Honolulu when he was 12. He graduated from the University of Hawaii with a bachelor's degree in journalism. Chapman serves as president of EPLS Language Training Corporation which operates from Green Valley. Davis will host a book signing at B. Dalton in the Galleria at Simset Mall March 1. He will be at the store from 4 to 7 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 47 E. Atlantic Ave. Henderson 565-8577 • I-' ^^^y^"4vLmw' I ^ r' \ii yyNEW BEGINNING MARCH 3, 1996 8:00 am WORSHIP SERVICE Baby Nursery and Children's Church (Ages 2-K) PASTOR RICK WILDER SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:30am 2nd WORKSHIP SERVICE 11:00 am EVENING SERVICE 6:00 pm WEDNESDAY SERVICE FOR ALL AGES 7:00 pm We've Got A Handle On Your Trash Disposal Needs Predsion Waste Managemanl For Borne Or Business For homt, builntM or coMtrucbon, Silvtr state can right diipoial racaptadM for ttw job and uv tinw, natdt. Uacttw available. • Mobk Tolw WMMM fwapMa for oorwaniar* homa uaa. f^pl•CM foar 2(Kgilonkaah cant. (My t3.00 par mo(i Call 735-5151. • Coftlalnar FM* f^ ataaa lor naidanW. Mualrtal or oommaicM ua& Hokk up to Maan as^rion cai of ntaaa. Fioin tiZSO totlSJOporiTKrth. Call 735-5151. • Drop Box For Vw raaly big joba. Yard daarM). corxtruclon ttaa of bualnaaa raluao. may ba ua> petmanartfy. 3 lizaa avalabiB20 • 26 • SO cu yaidt. Coats on^ $6 82 par cubic yard. Call 735-5151. Silver State Disposal Service, Inc. 770 East Sahara Ave Los Vogns NV 89104 In the Green Valley Town Center Open 7 days a w^ek Monday Friday 8 a.m. 7p.m. j^ CHESAPEAKE -^ • FREE Mugs lor Tirst i(K) ciislonicrs • Win a Mountain Bike' • BalitK)ns for ihc kids • Face painting & morel CHESAPEAKE BiAGEL Bu\KEin^ 4500 E. Sunset Road, #16 • Henderson, NV 89014 GRAND OPENING! SATURDAY, MARCH 2ND 10* Senior Cilizcn DiMrounl All Day Noi ^alid with anv diher i.iiup(>n FREE BAGELS! I I I I QCHESAPEAKC I Oi\ ^Ipee Small Soda ft Cookie With Any Deli Sandwich lAUich Specicd! Wkh Coupon only • Expires 3/31/96 r I I 1 I WiihCouponOnlv Expires V^l/Vf) BUYl GET 1 FREE I Buy 1 Bagel Knot & Gel 1 nt I I ^CHESAPEAKE I BAQEL Du<\KERY.

PAGE 13

mi^^^r^f^mmmmm^m WPWWIWPWWWW<' l|l ll lllllll lWWW^WWWWtWff^^ Pag 12 Henderson Home News Thursday, February 29, 1996 t, Jb:. Thursday, February 29, 1996 Henderson Home News Pao^ 13 7b wnounc* /our fivoup or otganixaton'a avnta, pluat com by or mail infomation to: 2 Comimroa CantarDriva, Handanon, NV 89014. Community DESERT NEWCOMERS Thuraday, Feb. 29, 10 am., GrMH VaNay Library. The Desert Newcomers Club wM hold its monthly meeting. Women who have lived In the area for less ttian three years are invited to attend. 2631221 or 263-1342. AMATEUR RADIO EXAM Saturday, March 2, noon, Henderson Campus-CCSN. There will be an FCCappmvedamateurradio exam. 565-0242. RAILWAY HISTORICAL SOCIETY Sunday, March 3, 1 p.m.. Rainbow Library, 3150 N. Buffalo Or. The Southern Nevada chapter of the National Railway Historical Society will hold its monthly meeting. Guests are welcome. 453-23S2. JEWISH WAR VETERANS Sunday, March 3, noon. Green Valley Library. The Sgt. Manny Peven Post 65, JWV will hold its monthly meeting. Al, 456-7887. BUTTON SOCIETY Monday, March 4, 6:30 p.m., Henderson Senior Center. The Southem Nevada Button Society will hold a meeting. All newcomers welcome. 4351115. NARFE CHAPTER Monday, March 4, 1:30 p.m., Henderson Senior Center. The Henderson chapterof the National Association of Retired Federal Employeeswill hold its monthly meeting. All present and retired federal employees are welcome. 456-3193. CREDIT COUNSEUNG SERVICE Monday, March 4,6:30-8:30 p.m., 3650 S. Decatur, Suite 30. Consumer Credit Counseling Services will offer the free class, "Credit A Necessity in the '90s." Registration, 364-0344. SPECIAL SERVICES Monday-Wednesday, March 4-6, 7 p.m., First Southern Baptist Church, 240 S. Cholla SL Dr David Davis, who has been endorsed for his worV with teenagers and the DARE program by the White House, will speak on 'hope' tinat is available for each person as they focus on the Bible. 565-6072. RSI PREVENTION Wednesday, March 6, 6-9 p.m.. West Charleston Campus-CCSN. Author Rosemarie Atencio will present a workshop, "Carpal Tunnel Syndrome — How to Relieve and Prevent Wrist 'Burnout!'' $49,877-1133, Ext. 413. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS Mondays-Sundays. Gamblers Anonymous of Southern Nevada has day and evening meetings everyday. 24-hour hodine, 385-7732. ALUMNI CLUB Mondays-Sundays. Alumni and supporters of the University of Texas at Austin are invited to join the formation of a local alumni chapter All alumni who live in Southern Nevada are welcome. Charies Dixon. 876-4589. KIWANIS Mondays, 7:30 a.m., Green's Supper Club, 2241 N. Green Valley Parkway and Wednesdays, 7 a.m.. Omelet House, 317 N. Boulder Highway. The Green Valley Kiwanis Club meets Mondays and the Henderson club meets Wednesdays. AMERICAN LEGION Mondays, first and thirdof each month, 7 p.m., Henderson Jr. Jaycees building, between Water SL And Major Ave. Amencan Legion BMI Post 40 will meet. All veterans welcome. 454-6551. DRAMA WORKSHOP Mondays, 8 p.m., Sam's Town Bowling Center, Room A. Joe Behar's Community Drama worVshop Is free for anyone interested in learning acting and auditioning techniques for motion picture and television wor1(. Open to all ages. 457-0234. MOPS Alternate Mondays and Tuesdays. Mothers of Pre-schoolers (MOPS) is a program forall motiiersof pre-schodiars, birth through 6 years. Enjoy breakfast, a speaker, friendship groups and a craft project while the children are cared for in a structured setting. For cost, k>cations and dates, 735-4004. SUCCESS WITHOUT STRESS Tuesdays, first and third of each month, American Federal Savings Bank, 2231 N. Green Valley Pkwy. Secrets to Success Without Stress Is sponsoring an ongoing free class, "Conquer Negative Emotions."293-7797. POSTPARTUM SUPPORT GROUP Tuaadaya, 7-S:30p.m., UNLV Women's Cantor, CBC Room 227. Through Dec. 5, the Poslpartum Support Group will mat 895-4475. BUSINESS Tumdays and Thursdays, 7 a.m., IHOP Raataurant, 3260 E. Tropicana at Pacosk The Eastskie EarlyBirds Chapter of the Business Network International meets. Evelyn Hess, 792-1343, or Art Goldberg, 732-7693. ROTARY Tuaadays, noon, Eldorado Casino and Thursdays, 7 a.m.. Country Inn, 1990 W. Sunset Road. The Henderson Rotary Club meets Tuesdays and the Green Valley Club meets Thursdays. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Tuesdays, 10 a.m., Green Valley Library. No dues or fees. Additional meetings in the Green Valley area are also beginning on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Call for more information. Dok>res, 433-8269. TOPS Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.. Junior Junction Pre-school, 101 W. Chaparral. TOPS, Take Off Pounds Sensibly, will hold their weekly meeting. LEAN Second Tuesday of each month, 8 p.m. Continental Hotel. The National Law Enforcement Association of Nevada will hod its regular meeting. Retired and active police officers and law enforcement or related professionals are invited. 434-0442. SWEET ADEUNES Tuesdays, 7 p.m., Henderson Senior Center. Rehearsal for Celebrity City Chorus of Sweet Adelines International. For women interested in singing and learning four-part hamiony 'barbershop' style. BUSINESS NETWORK Wednesdays, 7 to 8:30 a.m., Country Inn, Sunsetand Valle Verde. The Green Valley Chapter of Business Network Intl. meets for its weekly meeting. 454-3100. WIDOWED ADJUSTMENT Wednesday, 7:30 p.m., First Christian Church, 101 S. Rancho, room 6. Widowed men and women of all ages meet. 735-5544. ALL PARENTS UNITED Wednesdays, 7 p.m.. White Middle School. All Parents United, a collection of various parents' groups, meet to discuss educational issues. CANCER SUPPORT GROUP Wadneedays, second and fourth of each montti, 6:30 to 8 p.m.. Sunrise Hospital, Pediatric Physical Medicine Department Together We Cope," a support group for cancer patients and families, will meet. Dorothy Howard, 731 8135 or Linda Sooudi, 731-8274. EXECUTIVE LEADS CLUB Thursdays, 7 a.m., Rae's, Pecos and Wigwam. The Executive Leads Club East meets to exchange business leads. Karen Scherer, 736-7755. BARBERSHOP CHORUS Thursdays, 7 p.m., Christ Lutheran Church, Torray Pines Road and the expressway. The Las Vegas GambleAires Mens' Barbershop Chorus meets every week. Men of all ages who enjoy singing are welcome. Gary Forsbettj, 454-7620. :•.-;.;,•:;,, • ':;. :^ SINGLES TRAVEL CLUB Fridays, 6 p.m.. Sail Away, 4225 S. Eastern #7. Singles of all ages who are interested In traveling are Invited. 3634923. ..,..., ELKS HELPING PEOPLE Fridays, 6 to 9 p.m., 631 E. Lake Mead Dr. A complete dinner will be hosted by the Elks club. Cost: $4 donation. 5659959. DAUGHTERS OF AMERICAN REVOLUTION Norwest Bank, Community Room, in Boulder City. The Silver State Chapter of Daughters of ttie American Revolution, sen/ing the Henderson/BouWerCity area, meets monthly (September May). 458-3693 or 293-5863. SINGLES Programs for single men and women of all ages and interests are available 6414634. SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE The Suk:k1e Preventk>n Center is tooking for volunteers to man the hotline. 7312990, ask for Ewy. DIVORCED "Divorced, Separated and Widowed Adjusbnent Inc." offers free support groups for men and women. Men and women of all ages and backgrounds are invited to attend. For times and locations, 7355544. Eco-Faire on Sunday The second annual Eco-Faire, presented by the Sierra Club, will feature electric cars, animals and T-shirts for the kids as well as news on the environmentIt will be held from 1 to 5 p.m.Sunday, March 3, at the Flamingo Library. Groups will answer questions on the environmental movement over the past 25 years, including recent events in Congress. The Opus Dance Ensemble, will give a performance, "Elemental," with dance, music, slides and speakers, from 2 to 3 p.m. in the library's performing arts theatre. Tickets for the performance are $5, available at the theatre box office at time of the show. The event is free, except for the Opus performance, and open to all. For more information, call Randy Hamesi of the Sierra Club, 373-7900. DARE |>ay at Mountasia March 9 Whether it's getting wet on bumper boats, racing go karts, rolleiblading or trying miniature golf, DARE students, families and friends will experience "A Day at Mountasia is Fun For All." Mountasia Family Fun Center, located at 2050 Olympic Ave. in Henderson, is hosting DARE day from 10 a.m. to midnight on Saturday, March 9. Students showing DARE graduate or temporary cards receive an all-day pass for $11 (a savings of $8) which allows unlimited use of all rides all day. Friends and family members without a card can purchase a $16 all-day pass. According to Dale Wood, Boulder City DARE oflficer, 'Mountasia is one of the many businesses in the Las Vegas valley that want to reward students who have committed to leading a drug-fi'ee lifestyle. "In the program, students learn there are activities which are fun and exciting and offer positive alternatives to engaging in drug use and gang violence. "Joining other DARE students at Mountasia, or any of the local businesses that believe in the philosophy, helps to provide and promote positive reinforcement towards maintaining a drug-free lifestyle." Mountasia will donate $2 for each pass purchased on the day to DARE, Inc., the community board for the Drug Abuse Resistance Education program, which is implemented in all Clark County Schools. The program teaches students skills to recognize and resist the subtle and overt pressures that cause them to experiment with drugs and alcohol. It also teaches, gang resistance and how to handle stress and peer pressure. For more information, call Valerie Rosland, president, with the American Toxicology Institute, 452-4999. Stahl to head branch Martin Stahl has joined Nevada State Bank as a branch manager in Henderson. His duties will include supervising branch staff, developing new business andensuring customer relations. His previous experience includes serving as a personal banker at Founders Bank of Arizona. At Chemical Bank in New York City, he served as branch manager, sales manager, operations manager, assistant manager and manager trainee. Stahl holds a bachelor's degree in education from Brooklyn DEATHS Beverly A. Gleason Beverly A. Gleason, 69, died Monday, Feb. 26,1996, in a local hospital. Born in Wisconsin on Oct. 3,1926, she had lived in Henderson since 1985. She was a retired dietician. She is survived by her husband, William H. Gleason, Sr. of Henderson; a daughter, Linda Lee Price, of Las Vegas; a sister, lyone Jorgenson of Three Rivers, Calif.; a brother, Robert Rohweller of Bullhead City, Ariz.; three grand children and five great grandchildren. Graveside servjces will be at 11:30 a.m. today at the Southern Nevada Veterans Memorial Cemetery. Arrangements were handled by Palm Mortuary-Henderson. Sally Griggs Sally Griggs, 73, died Feb. 25, 1996, in a local hospital. Born Nov. 26, 1922, in Visalia, Calif., she had been a 50-year resident of Henderson. She was a member of the Friendship Circle Auxiliary and a volunteer at the Salvation Army Adult Day Care Center. The family suggests donations be made to the Salvation Army Adult Day Care Center. She is survived by three daughters, Renee Hildebrand of Denver, Denise Messinger and Tina Hulsey, both of Henderson; step-son, Buck Enniss of Las Vegas; half-brother, Bud Hill of San Jose, Calif.; four grandchildren and a great grandson. Arrangements were handled by Nevada Funeral Sen/ice of Las Vegas. College as well as an AIB Professionals in Banking certificate. Nevada State' Bank was founded in 1959 by a group of Las Vegas businessmen. It was purchased by Salt Lake Citybased Zions Bancorporation in 1985, but acts as an independent Nevada operation backed by $5 billion in assets managed by the Utah holding company. Today, there are 25 Nevada State Bank branches operating statewide as the bank continues to pursue its goal of providing full-service banking in all counties in the state. John R, Harvey John R. Han/ey, 72, died Monday, Feb. 19, 1996 in a local hospital. Born Sept. 14, 1923 in Rahway, N.J. he had been a resident of Henderson for one year. He was a member of the Green Valley Methodist Church, was a senior tax accountant for the Exxon Corp., and was a veteran of the U.S. Army. He is survived by his wife, Marion of Henderson; son, Brian R. of Matawan, N.J.; daughter, Donna K. Raucher of Henderson; brother, Normal R. of Princeton, N. J.; and two grandchildren. Services were held at Green Valley United Methodist Church. Internment will be at 10:45 a.m. Friday, March 1, in the Southern Nevada Veterans Cemetery, Boulder Cif^;' •' ^ The family suggests donations be made to St. Rose Dominican Hospital, 102 E. Lake Mead Dr., Henderson, NV89015 Arrangements were handled by Desert Memorial of Las Vegas. Carlos B. Chavez Carlos B. Chavez, 54, died on Jan. 31, 1996. Born June 6,1941 inTexas.hehad lived in the area for six years. He is sun/ived by his wife, Cheryl of Henderson; daughter Christina of Los Angeles; son, Carlos C. of Henderson; three brothers, Rene, Cosme, and Henry of California; three sisters, Aurora, Yolanda and Yvonne of California; and grandchildren, Douglas Chavez and Amanda Davey. Sen/ices were private. Arrangements were handled by Palm Mortuary of Henderson. Editor's Note: This is the correct SHOP TALK with Tony Mlo ABS: STOMPED OR STUMPED? Anti-lock braking systems (ABS) is an idea that has caught on with the American public. Fifteen million of the cars on this country's roads are equipped with ABS, and half of the cars sold in the last model year had ABS. The trouble is that a recent study by the American Automobile Association shows that less than half of all drivers of ABS-equipped automobiles know how to use the system. Most drivers hold on to the old notion that the brake pedal should be pumped lightly to avoid wheel lock-up. While this braking strategy applies to stopping cars not equipped with ABS, it only serves to defeat the braking ability of ABS-equipped cars. To make ABS work, it is necessary to apply heavy pressure on the brake pedal and keep it applied. The pulsations that may be felt in the brake pedal are only an indication that the ABS is woridng. To keep ABS on, drivers must "stomp" on the brake pedal and hold the pressure.. A car'.s steering can gradually slip out of adjH.v(>r\M()winormorp'on slol(indl^pnonidcfiincs, MAIflRAVr-UOubrRIIWY. VV. SOUTH BOIII DfR IflGHWAY (70?)566-W9 : PRESTIGE TRAVEL version of a notice that was published Tuesday. Thank You Skyline Restaurant & Casino Employee Contribution Program Members Vincent Bakke Meletia Bond Michael Crassas Deborah Gorder Oiane Hubbard Nellie Johnson Joseph Lewicki Edward Morse Ginger Musso Eiifemia Ocampo Peri Parrott Rickey Raybum Cathy Smith Theresa Sperduti Frank Blanchette Alice Bourbeau Philip Frazer Joseph Gorman Orema Hunt Shannon Kidd Evelyn Maack Judy Moss Sharon Neihart Somjit Outland Dawn Raybum James Sims Lydia Smith Connie Trotter Warren Wallesen USE S TOBB SPE The Best of Hong Kong Dec. 29 1,665 Rnundinp airlare Irom |j.^ Vegas • Transfers • 6 nighis ai Sheraton Hong Kong • 1/2 (lay sighseeing lour • Escorted from Las Vegas and more Waikiki 5 night from 517 Rowidtrip airfare from 1MS Ve,(j V • 5 niglus accommodations • l^i f-reerina transfers and morel Rjlcs arc per pcrsiin hjNiJ nn ik'iblc tMiip.tnLV Rjlcstor itihci islaniK.jn rx-qucMfJ 1 KOI \ 1)1 Nil' \iia \Hi:s k 1 1 DOME STtC A INTERNATIONAL AIRI -ARES Ailjm.1 <.|S4 1 .nnpj 5IS.I l(..inc UMI ItllStOII SISh \\'ii!thinKt(Mi S.'IN l<.ni;;k.>k i^^\ ('hiclpi JIM Ijlnarv $Lt,S 1 loll); Kiiui; V-M Dctrnii US4 \aiKiiiitcr • $in M.llllhl *7I.' \c ^(.rk $1.^ Amsicrdjni $rv4ii Sm|iJ|virc J74i OrLitutii .. IMnl.Klclphu .SI LOUIS JI.W iiw l-'rankfiiri 1 .(indnn I'jris J.SKI $<>.i(l 1 .1I|K'I JM '1111. kMp.' •M'V *IXf jnU Miv. VMWT Iwr. 4|li liuanliaKuM, IK.JjlljMl1t l^t iji'. n, For investing in the youth of Henderson to benefit The Henderson Boys & Girls Club J 11 \ \nir 3 3or4Dy Ba) Crutet 7Dty Hnlcanfllytin OuNtoPMno VHMUMuMn •ndCMoSw luca* 1 FROM I.s2:{fi.'>( Cniktlian loiAngtIn stKHrt lh'Fun Sh|-Motdy CiuM oMir. pbt lun. aouM occtpwcy Save 45% Off Select 1996 Cruise departures on m ms Ryndam • ms Noordara • ms Westcrdam •ttis Siaiendam • ms Nieuw Amslerdam Cninc Ivc imly. IUH no intluilnl CM li liouiils I'UI SIK.I IKW II Tr^vpl A(jf". 5 LOCATIONS IN HEWERSi 64BOULD = 2839 GREEN VALLEY PKWY 898-0994 Toastmasters assist Vo-Tech youth Vo-Tech students benefited as Henderson Toastmasters shared their commimication skills in a Youth Leadership, presented to Jan Brown's 7:00 a.m. "Tools for Success" class. Damencele DiPasqua, John Crowley, Geoff Reeves, and Kyle Tingle, all of Henderson, led the Toastmasters International Youth Leadership Program, for the 27 students. The program is designed to help students overcome their fear of speaking in front of the class. Brown was instrumental in creating and implementing the Tools" curriculum at Vo-Tech and believes communication skills are an integral part of learning. The students have learned a tremendous amount. They will be taking these skills with them through the rest of their life," Brown said. During the program, each student was given the opportunity to speak to the class. Most of the students gave an "Icebreaker" speech, introducing themselves to the class in a more formal setting. Each student was also evaluated by another student to assess their communication skills. During the last Youth Leadership meeting on Jan. 11, student Leah Heiftier said, "I personally enjoyed them (being) here. I would have just died if I was told I had to talk in front of the class. Today, I didn't have any problem at all giving my speech." Brown said, "A migor part of the semester grade is a presentation at the end of the year. Craft festival this weekend The 13th annual Las Vegas Craft Festival will be held March 1-3 at the Cashman Field Center Exhibit Hall. Show hours will be from noon to 7 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday and from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday. Three hundred booths representing 400 independent craft workers from throughout the country will be featured. Three-day admission is $5 for adults, $2 for children 6 through 16 and free for children 5 and under, • -—----r-^-. >-. _=::-^-^.^. At the Library. LYDIA MALCOLM BRANCH '':' • ],:/ • ^' • • \i' 80 N. Pecs—263-7522 ^• • /J^/'v Wednesdays & Thursdays 10 a.m., Storytime for children ages 3 to 5. Wednesday, March 6 3:30 p.m., Storytime for children 6 and older. JAMES GIBSON BRANCH 280 Water Street—565-8402 Tuesday, March 5 9:30 and 10:30 a.m., Pre-school storytime continues. Come share book experiences for children ages 3 to 5. Thursday, March 7 3:30 p.m. Afternoon storytime for school age children. GREEN VALLEY LIBRARY 2797-N.€reen Valley Parkway, Henderson — 435-1840 Thursday, Feb. 29 10 a.m., Desert Newcomers Coffee. Public welcome. (Sunset Room) -'• : • • ^"-i.• 12-4 p.m.. Tax Counseling for the Elderly: A free service provided by AARP for seniors over 60. Call 435-1840 for an appointment. (Sunset Room) 6 p.m., VITA tax preparation for the low income. Call 435-1840 for an appointment. (Conference Room) 6:30 p.m., Retired Investment Seminar offered by Dean Witter. (Sunset Room) ;, Friday,March 1 -^ ,^::ji:^ .. 9-Noon, 1 -3 p.m.. Clark County Health Department's Free Immunization Clinic for Children (Sunset Room) Saturday, March 2 10 a.m., Frontier Estates Homeowners Association General Meeting (Sunset Room) 2 p.m.. Theatre in the Valley (Sunset Room) Sunday, March 3 ^ / .^ :. 1 p.m., Jewish War Veterans (Sunset Room) '-^., ^ Monday, March 4 ^ ; ;;^, *^ >; ; 7 p.m., Theatre in the Valley (Sunset Room) ? Tuesday, March 5 10 a.m., Overeaters Annonymous (Sunset Room) 4 p.m., Home School Science Fair Competition (Sunset Room) Wednesday, March 6 Noon to 4 p.m., Tax counseling for the elderly: A free AARP service. Call 435-1840 for an appointment. (Sunset Room) 6:30 p.m.. Palm Valley Homeowners Association Board Meeting (Conference Room) 6 p.m., Westwood Village Homeowners Association Orientation (Sunset Room) Toastmasters helped the students prepare for the final presentation." During the eight week course, students are exposed to new communication techniques, designed to build upon skills learned in prior sessions. DiPasqua, Reeves and Tingle are members of TNT Toastmasters of Henderson, and Crowley is a member of Valley Voices and Vices, a Bank of America Toastmasters club. Toastmasters is an international organization specializing in helping members develop and improve communication skills. Toastmasters was formed October 22,1924 in the basement of the Santa Ana YMCA. Its original purpose was "to afford practice and training in the art of pubUc speaking and in presiding over meetings, and to promote sociability and good fellowship among its members." The organization has grown steadily, with more than three million men and women having benefited from the communication and leadership programs of TRAFFIC From Page 1 the organization. Currently, Toastmasters International has over 180,000 members in more than 8,000 clubs in over 63 countries. Through chartered clubs, it trains members in the art of public speaking, effective listening, and leadership. "To benefit the commimity, clubs in the Las Vegas Valley hold demonstration meetings for various businesses and in the public libraries. Success Leadership programs are presented in public libraries and Youth Leadership programs are held in the Clark County Detention Center and public schools. Members are also actively involved in various speaker's bureaus, such as WE CAN. For more infonhation on TNT/ Henderson chapter, or on the Youth Leadership program, call Kyle Tingle, 434-8452 or Geoff Reeves, 263-2134. For information on Toastmasters International chapters in the Las Vegas area, call 3671973, .. m Professional Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning 596-6300 436-2883 Truck Mounted • Steam Extraction I^ Health Nuts ^'^ 1635 NV Hwy. 293-1844 Recent research reports that aging due to free radicals can be reduced significantly by consuming antioxidants. :;; • : •* • 25%. Bartels said the adjustments made to Sunset Road prior to the mall's opening should alleviate congestion along the road. As result of the traffic studies, a third lane for traffic, aligning interchanges with mall entrance openings, widening the road surface and creating turning lanes for traffic at lights were created. Bartels said another traffic study is in the works to analyze traffic flow and determine if additional modifications to the roads are needed. Initially, he said, there may be some delays with the light at Stephanie Street until it is timed for the traffic flow. A four-way stop at the intersection of Stephanie Street and Warm Springs Road south of the mall presents another possible problem for congestion. Bartels LANGUAGE From Page 2 said the stop sign will be replaced with a stop light, but it will take six to eight months until it is installed. Those not going to the mall will also feel the increase in traffic, Bartels said. There really are not any good alternatives other than Stmsetif you're traveling through the area," he said. Drivers who use Sunset Road to go to work should not be affected in the morning hours, he said. Most of the increase in traffic will be in the evening. Those traveling through the area could take Lake Mead Drive or Russell Road as alternatives to taking Sunset Road. But these are out of the way, Bartels said.. The trafficpotential of the area is enormous, and once the Sunset Station Hotel-Casino and Santa Fe Hotel-Casino are built along the same road, it will be even larger, Bartels said. CHRISTIAN CENTER IS CELEBRAflNC %. 50 YEARS OF MINISTRY EVERY SUNDAY THIS YEAR! Come rejoice with us at 10:00 a.m. f^ 571 Adams St. • 293-7773 :^:1iou\der City (casual clothes OKI) *; A Express Lube FAST RELIABLE GUARANTEED Boulder Highway & Palo Verde Henderson Phone: 555-0522 ACROSS FROM THE MOVIE THEATER I S5.00 OFF our regular $24.95 14-Point service I ; Oil & Filter Change, I 44 A9S ^^^^ ^"^ 14-Point I Jy^^ Checkup. Includes I '' • :' • 3 Free Car Washes With this ad Mosi cars Includes 5 Quals of Havolme Formula 3 motor oil. Expiiau^ c MARCH SPECIALS All You Can Eat Buffet Style r Spaghetti fif Neatballs 2 for 1 Chicken Ribs Salad peg 3 75 With this coupon We reserve the right to substitute 725 Racetrack Rd. (Behind Kmart) Henderson For info call 566-5555 If cates that the ETPLS system is more effective than other language books on the market, Davis said. "I traveled and I figured out why traditional phonetics didn't work," Davis said. This system has been tested." The books contain key phrases such as "I don't speak Japanese" and Tm lost" as well as a method to combine phrases for one's own sentences. The "phrasemaker" allows a traveler to personalize a question or response while maintaining the correct sentence structure. Travelers aren't the only group to find Davis' language method helpful. In fact, it could help save lives in Clark Coimty. Firefighters and paramedics carry a pamphlet to help them communicate in Spanish. The easyto-read reference contains essential phrases such as "Do not move" and "Is everyone out of the building?" Davis' language method is also used extensively by military personnel. In addition, he develops custom pamphlets for companies, such as utilitieswhose employees need to know key phrases in Spanish or other languages. Davis, 41, was born in Albuquerque. He moved to Honolulu when he was 12. He graduated from the University of Hawaii with a bachelor's degree in journalism. Chapman serves as president of EPLS Language Training Corporation which operates from Green Valley. Davis will host a book signing at B. Dalton in the Galleria at Simset Mall March 1. He will be at the store from 4 to 7 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 47 E. Atlantic Ave. Henderson 565-8577 • I-' ^^^y^"4vLmw' I ^ r' \ii yyNEW BEGINNING MARCH 3, 1996 8:00 am WORSHIP SERVICE Baby Nursery and Children's Church (Ages 2-K) PASTOR RICK WILDER SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:30am 2nd WORKSHIP SERVICE 11:00 am EVENING SERVICE 6:00 pm WEDNESDAY SERVICE FOR ALL AGES 7:00 pm We've Got A Handle On Your Trash Disposal Needs Predsion Waste Managemanl For Borne Or Business For homt, builntM or coMtrucbon, Silvtr state can right diipoial racaptadM for ttw job and uv tinw, natdt. Uacttw available. • Mobk Tolw WMMM fwapMa for oorwaniar* homa uaa. f^pl•CM foar 2(Kgilonkaah cant. (My t3.00 par mo(i Call 735-5151. • Coftlalnar FM* f^ ataaa lor naidanW. Mualrtal or oommaicM ua& Hokk up to Maan as^rion cai of ntaaa. Fioin tiZSO totlSJOporiTKrth. Call 735-5151. • Drop Box For Vw raaly big joba. Yard daarM). corxtruclon ttaa of bualnaaa raluao. may ba ua> petmanartfy. 3 lizaa avalabiB20 • 26 • SO cu yaidt. Coats on^ $6 82 par cubic yard. Call 735-5151. Silver State Disposal Service, Inc. 770 East Sahara Ave Los Vogns NV 89104 In the Green Valley Town Center Open 7 days a w^ek Monday Friday 8 a.m. 7p.m. j^ CHESAPEAKE -^ • FREE Mugs lor Tirst i(K) ciislonicrs • Win a Mountain Bike' • BalitK)ns for ihc kids • Face painting & morel CHESAPEAKE BiAGEL Bu\KEin^ 4500 E. Sunset Road, #16 • Henderson, NV 89014 GRAND OPENING! SATURDAY, MARCH 2ND 10* Senior Cilizcn DiMrounl All Day Noi ^alid with anv diher i.iiup(>n FREE BAGELS! I I I I QCHESAPEAKC I Oi\ ^Ipee Small Soda ft Cookie With Any Deli Sandwich lAUich Specicd! Wkh Coupon only • Expires 3/31/96 r I I 1 I WiihCouponOnlv Expires V^l/Vf) BUYl GET 1 FREE I Buy 1 Bagel Knot & Gel 1 nt I I ^CHESAPEAKE I BAQEL Du<\KERY.

PAGE 14

•**^>'J*.'.-.'..^,^...... ^MVPVV^WVVWViPiP ...iUiiEiiy!UUl!l!ll'! '!! !]!UUU i i!lLnmiiu i iu^^ ^ ^ P0 14 Henderson Home News Thursday, February 29,1996 ^ H Resident attends toy meeting in Tennessee Henderson resident Denise Shapiro-Glanz has just returned from the national convention of Discovery Toys, Inc. ip Nashville, Tenn. She has been affiliated with the company for 15 years, and oversees a group of 400 consultants. The company announced a new alliance with Reading is Fundamental, the nation's largest literacy organization. Under the umbrella of its Literacy for Life program. Discovery Toys will donate a portion of profits from each book sold, up to $10,000, in support of the community-based organization. Shapiro-Glanz attended three days of seminars in child development, self-esteem and positive parenting, combined with marketing and business management training. Headquartered in Martinez, Calif, Discovery Toys, Inc., is the leading originator of developmental toys, books and games; educational software; personal care products for children and home study parenting programs. Its products are distributed through a network of 40,000 educational consultants. For more information on products or career opportunities, call Denise Shapiro-Glanz, 8976094. THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY Thursday, February 29,1996 Henderson Home Nws Peflt 19 John Judge/News Staff MEMBER — Richard Jesinger, left, president of the Green Valley Kiwanis Club, announces the club's newest member Lois Hlohowskyj. Hlohowskyj is cun-ently self-employed and brings enthusiasm, new ideas and commitment to community service to the Green Valley Kiwanis Club, a club spokesman said. I NOW ACCEPTING NEW CLIENTS I WILLIAM A. SCHULTZ Certified Public Accountant Small Business Financial Services, Tax Return Preparation, Copsulting & Planning, Litigation Support 22 YEARS EXPERIENCE • 898-7120 "FIRST HALF HOUR CONSULTATION FREE WITH AD" V^920 N. Gneen Valley Pkwy., Building 3, 2nd Floor, Suite 4, Hend.^ CPA The CPA. Htm UndefwUcnite Th Value.*' Q> Church offers program of hope TTie First Southern Baptist Church will feature Dr. David Davis, former Small College AllAmerican quarterback at special services this week. Davis has been endorsed for his work with teenagers and the DARE program by the White House, state governors and mayors of cities across our nation. His messages each evening will center on the hope available to each person as they focus on the Bible and express faith by following the will of God. Services will be held at 8:3D a.m., 9:45 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Simday, March 3, and continue with 7 p.m. services Monday through Wednesday, March 4-6. Each service will feature gospel singing. A nursery will be provided for children under 5. Special progframs will be presented for children at 6 p.m. Tuesday, and for youth at 6 p.m. Wednesday. Families are invited to join the congregation at 240 S. Cholla St., next to Wal-Mart, in Henderson. Rene J. Houle is senior pastor. For more information, call 565-6072. Mf^RCH SPECIAL 11 p.m. to 11 a.m. Steak & Eggs 99C Hash browns, toast & coffee • ""'"'""" 725 Racetrack Rd. (Behind Kmart) Henderson For info call 566-5555 C3> CASINO receives St. St Rose Dominican Hospital honored Ann Barren with the Philosophy in Action Award. Barren is chairperson of St. Rese's Board of Directors and economic development director for the city of Henderson. The award program was established by the Catholic Healthea>-e West Board of Directors to recognize and honor individuals within the system for outstanding contributions to the health care ministry. Each year, an award is given to individuals or teams from each CHW division, which includes hospitals throughout California, Arizona, and St. Rose in Henderson. The award recognizes commitment to one of CHW's five core values: dignity, collaboration, justice, stewardship and excellence. Nominations were submitted by employees, physicians and board members at the hospital. In announcing Barron as the winner, Rod A. Davis, president and CEO, said, "Ann is being recognized for her emphasis on justice. We define justice as advocating for change of social structures which undermine human dignity, demonstrating special concern for the poor. "Ann holds a steadfast concern for the poor and disadvantaged throughout Henderson. Specific examples of her accomplishments include low-cost housing, support for atrisk youth and assistance at the Senior Center. .' • .' • • • "Her commitment to establishing a primary care clinic for the poor and encouragement of her staff to reach out to the needy reinforces the values of CHW." "The employees, physicians and volunteers of St. Rose Dominican Hospital are all continually working to make our community a better place to live," said BarrjOR. "T^o .|)e, ,cho§en for this award is a tremendous honor." Barron will be honored on April 11, at the awards banquet of the annual board seminar in San Francisco. -^:^yOther nominees for the award included: Vicki Dalesandro, O.P.; Wanda Flathers; Steven R. Hoer, M.D.; Cheryl Johnston; Carma Krietler, R.N.; Mental Health Resources team; Debra K. Purcell; Positive Impact on Reading Volunteers; Gregg M. Ripplinger, M.D.; Dorothy Vonderbrink; Pat Wundar; and Colleen York, L.S.W. NARFE celebrates 75 years One of America's oldest national associations, the National Association of Retired Federal Employees, is celebrating its 75th anniversary this month. Organized in February 1921, with the mission of protecting earned benefits of retired federal workers and their families^ NARFE has a remarkable record of success in its mission. Most recently, it was instrumental in making sure civil service annuitants were not unfairly targeted for cuts not required of others during budget-balancing negotiations. Over the past 75 years, it has grown from 14 founding members to nearly one million, with more than l,740chapters in every state, as well as overseas. The Henderson chapter numbers 156 members imd Wanda Low presides. The chapter meets at 1:30 p.m. the first Monday of eadi month. at the Henderson Senior Center, 27 E. Texas Ave. Present and retired federal employees are welcome. For more information, call 5641252. GEORGE E. MERINO M.D. FACS, FICS, Board Certified Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery iSenefal Vascular Surgery Specializing in Surgery of the heart, lungs, arteries & veins. Non-invasive in-office • evaluation of circulation disorders. VASCULAR LABORATORY Medicare Assignment Accepted Provider to most PPOs and Insuronce plans. PARK FLAMINGO EAST 2110 E. FLAMINGO RD. SUITE 201 LAS VEGAS, NV 734-2121 / HOMENEWS Delivered to your home every Tuesday & Thursday morning for only $30 00 Per Year HomeDeiivay Just All out the information bdow ark! I mallta HENDERSON HOME NEWS I P.O. BOX 90430 Y Henderson, Ncrndn 89009 I Please start my subscription. I Name [ I Phone I (FOnOFFICtAlUSEONLr) I Enclosed U my chedc or money order for $30 for tiM I one year home delivery subscription. Address. Signed. IftOPEFWOet HENDERSON HOME NEWS 564-1881 -V—' 564-1150 ON BOULDER HWY. AT SUNSET WIN A NEW SATURN SLI Details at Cage Authentic 50's Diner & Soda Fountain Blue Plate Specials from $2.95 DANCING NIGHTLY TO UVE MUSIC THURS FRI SAT: |uke Box Saturday Nite (formerly Danny K tinjrs.) Special Added AnractionThurs... Filipino Recording Star "Rudy Cenaskcy" SATURDAY'Madnee Polka Party i-6pm no. APPHIZERS SUNDAY Rudy Genaskey 8. Motion 8pm lam MONDAY |am with Nick Faikas TUESDAY The Roadhouse All-Stars (Rock-a-Billy) WEDNESDAY Udles Night Dance to'^Flashback" Ladies Drink FREE GREEN VALLEY AREA Executive Homes From The ;; $160,000'$ Prestige, Slyle, Quolily, Lwclion, Securily, Privocy, tlolsOlSemi'dnlon Chokes. •Private Gated Community •Adjacent To A 60 Acre Pork • Semi-Custom Homes• Zoned For Green Valley High School db hi iSniC Rcalux Co-op UpTo 3,638 Sq. Ft. & 7 Bedrooms ^W c-iii r.\,%/itiAi Sales Office Open Djilv I0ainlo5|im 435-7120 Day or Night We Put the Care Back into Health Care HOGAN CLINIC Family Practfee Pediatrics Internal IMedklne Occupational Medicine Minor Injuries X-Ray £ii :iiV:}L Bryant Cilomiok, M.D. V. Jerome MiHcii, M.D. JoiKithan Rofenstein, M.D. Mark Leinwand, PA-C Jamaf M. Hogan, M.D. Appotrttmtnit RacomniandMl Woft-in* Wslcoowd 4 Sunset Woy, #B-2 • 434-1111 |NlolCWU,ChorHl5) • Most rnnjor insiir.uicc pi.ins ncceptecl IVl.istcrC.ird • Distovt'i • Vis.i PUBLISH: Ffbniary 29,1996 HENDERSON HOME NEWS PMIedi WcdncMby, February 28,1996 at Uie following localioiu: City Hall, 240 Water Street Emersency Scrvicea Facility, 223 Lead Street Green Valley Library, 2797 Green Valley Parkway Hendenon Boys' and Girls' Club, 1608 Moser Drive Community College iif Southern Nevada, Building A, 7(K) College Drive AGENDA Tuesday, March 5, 1996 6:45 p.m. AGENPA ITEMS RKCKIVED A^TER ?;30 P.M. ON FEBRVARY 19% WILL NOT BE SEEN ON THE AGENDA AS PUBLISHEP. BUT MAY APPEAR ON THE AGENPA AS ADDEP ITEMS OR ADDENDA. COMMITTEE MEETING COUNCIL CHAMBER HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL 240 WATER STREET NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES Members of the public who are disabled or require special assistance or accommodations at the meeting arc requested to notify the City Clerk by telephoning (702) 565-2057 at least fcventytwo hours in advance of the meeting. NOTE: ALL ITEMS ARE ACTION ITEMS UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED. The Mayor reserves the right lo hear agenda items out of order. L CALL TO ORDER II. CONFIRMATION OF POSTING III. ROLL CALL IV. ACCEPTANCE OF AGENDA V. ITEMS OF BUSINESS Cl. BILL NO. 1295 • PARKING VIOLATIONS' vt. AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON DELETING H.M.C. 10.51 (CIVIL PARKING), EFFECTIVE APRIL 1, 1996; DELETING H.M.C. 10.52 AND 10.56 (PARKING), EFFECTIVEIMMEDIATELYiADOPTING STATE LAWONPARKING; AND PROVIDING THAT CERTAIN CURBS MAY BE PAINTED PARTICULAR COLORS; AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. C-2. BILL NO. 1296 SEXUALLY ORIENTED BUSINESSES AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND CHAPTER 110, TITLE 4 OF THE HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE BY AMENDING REGULATIONS RELATING TO SEXUALLY ORIENTED BUSINESSES AS THEY APPLY TO NUDE DANCING; AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. C-3. BILL NO. 1297 Z-10-96 MARYLAND 10 APPLICANT: REDEVELOPMENT AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REA L PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OFTHE CITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 61 EAST, M.D.B. & M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RS-2 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL) DISTRICT TO RS-6 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL) DISTRICT ON 9.5 ACRES, GENERALLY LOCATED NORTHWEST OF EASTERN AVENUE AND MARYLAND PARKWAY, IN THE WESTGATE PLANNING AREA, AND OTHER MATTER.S RELATING THERETO. C-4. BILL NO. 1298 Z-13-96 ^ GREEN VALLEY/HORIZON RIDGE APPLICANT: OLEN DEVELOPMENT CORP. AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY-AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHINTHE CITY LIMITS OFTHE CITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 61 EAST, M.D.B. & M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RS.2 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL) TO RM-16 (MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTIAL) DISTRICT, LOCATED AT 595 SOUTH GREEN VALLEY PARKWAY, GENERALLY LOCATED NORTHWEST OFGREEN VALLEY PARKWAY AND HORIZON RIIX:E lARKWAY, IN THE GREEN VALLEY RANCH PLANNING AREA; AND OTHER OTTERS RELATING THERETO. <-S. BILL 1299 ZOA-2-96 ZONING ORDINANCE AMENDMENT APPLICANT: CITY OF HENDERSON AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY O HENDERSON TO AMEND TITLE 190FTHE HENDER.SON MUNICIPAL CODE BY AMENDING THE LAND USE REGULATIONS IN COMMERCIAL, INDUSTRIAL, OPEN SPACE AND PUBLIC & SEMIPUBLIC ZONES AS THEY APPLY TO EATING AND DRINKING ESTABLISHMENTS, FOOD AND BEVERAGE SALES, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. XI. ADJOURNMENT PUBLISH: February 29,1996 HENDERSON HOME NEWS Posted: Wednesday, February 28,1996 • at the following l(H-alions: City Han, 240 Water Street Emcrpncy Services Facility, 223 Lead Street • ,. : '^^ ;. *. Green Valley Library, 2797 Green Valley Parkway HendenHin Boys' and Girls' Club, 1608 Moser Drive Community College of Southern Nevada, Building A, 7(M( College Drive AGENDA ... • .. • •-.,.. Tuesday, March 5, 1995 ""^ 7:0(tp.m. • • ::' AGENDA ITEMS RECEIVED AFTER 5;30 P.M, ON Frbreary 22. 19% WILL NOT BESEEN ON THE AGENDA AS I'UBI.ISHRl). BUT MAY APPFAR ON THE AGENDA AS ADDED ITEMS OR ADDENDA. REGULAR MEETING a)UNCIL CHAMBER HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL 240 WATER STREET NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES Members of the public who are disabled or require special assistance or accommodations at the meetii are requested to notify the City Clerk by telephoning (702) 565-2057 at Uml seventytwo hours in advance of the meeting NOTEi ALL ITEMS ARE ACTION ITEMS UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED. The Mayor reserves the right to hear agenda items out of order. L CALL TO ORDER n. CONHRMATION OF POSTING III. ROLL CALL, INVOCATION, PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE IV. ACCEPTANCE OF AGENDA V. PRESENTATIONS PR-L PRESENTATION EMPLOYEE DEDICATION AND SERVICE AWARD FEBRUARY 1996 NICHOLAS A. WALLING PrcMiitation Employee Dedication and .Service Award • Month of February 1996, to Nidiolai A. Walling, Polii-r Training OfTicer, Pf4ice Department PR-X PRESENTATION • EMPLOYEE DEDICATION AND SERVICE AWARD • MARCH 1996 NANCY S. WALK Prcacntation Employee Dedication and Service Award Month of Marth 1996, lo Nwicy S. Walk, Oflice Assistant II, Water Redamation Department VL PUBLIC HEARINGS PH.3. CONTINUED PUBLIC HEARING CPA-53-95 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT FOR BOWLING ALLEY & SUPPER CLUB APPLICANT: MR. A MR.S. A. J. CARMICHAEL Re^aest to amend Ike Und use from Residential to Commercial on 5 acres located • Mrthwcit of Horiioa Ridge Parkway and Green Valley Parkway in the Green Valley Raw* pUmkic area. (CONTINUED FROM FEBRUARY 6,1996. PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDED DENIAL) PIM. RESOLUTION CPA-53-95 BOWLING ALLEY St SUPPER CLUB APPUCANT: MR. AND MRS. A. J. CARMICHAEL ARESOLUTIONOrTHECITYCOUNCILOFTHECITYOFHENDERSf>N, NEVADA, TO AME^a) THE LAND USE POLICY PI>AN OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FOR THE PURPOSE OF CHANGING THE LAND USE DfSIGNATION OF CERTAIN PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON DESCRIBED AS A PARCEL OF LAND CONTAINING 5 ACRES, MORE OR LESS, AND DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 62 EAST, M.D.M.. CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RESIDENTUL TO COMM ERCIA L, LOCATED NORTH WEST OF HORIZON RIDGE PARKWAY AND GREEN VALLEY PARKWAY IN THE GREEN VALLEY RANCH PLAN^aNG AREA. (CONTINUED FROM FEBRUARY 6,1996) PH-S. CCMmNUED PUBLIC HEARING APPEAL-(AP.2.9) ZONE CHANGE FOR BOWLING ALLEY SUPPER CLUB (Z-81-95) APTUCANT: MR. MRS. A. J. CARMICHAEL Appari W dKMan by the PlanntaK CMUMOO regaHkig the review of a redMriOcHtai t torn RS4 (Sl^k FaiUly Riridintial) diatrid to CC (Commanity Cimwiriial) a S mamt hcatirf • atHlwe a l af tforiiaa Ridge Parkway nd Green Valley PHfeway k HM GnaM Vdky Randi plamdocMM. (CONTINUED FROM FEBRUARY I9M. PIANMNG COMMISSION RECOMMENDED DENIAL) PH4. RESOLUTION Z->l-95 ZONE CHANGE FOR BOWLIIW ALLEY SUPPER CLUB APPUCANTi MR. A MRS. A. I CARMICHAEL A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON COMMITTING THE CITY COUNCIL TO REZONE CERTAIN PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 62 EAST, M.D.B. & M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RS-6 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTU L) DISTRICT TO CC (COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL) DISTRICT ON 5 ACRES LOCATED NORTHWESTOFHORIZONRIDGEPARKWAYANDGREENVALLEYPARKWAY IN THE GREEN VALLEY RANCH PLANNING AREA. PH.7. CONTINUED PUBLIC HEARING VAC-34-95 PORTION OF ELDORADO PARKWAY APPLICANT: DON MADDALON, ET AL Request to vacate a portion of EMorado Parkway, in the Green VWley North planning area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDED APPROVAL CONTINUED FROM FEBRUARY 6,1996) PH-8. CONTINUED PUBLIC HEARING VAC-39-95 PORTION OF CARMICHAEL WAY, CERULEAN AVENUE, WATCH AVENUE, AND ANNET STREET APPLICANT: MANLEY DEVELOPMENT INC. Request to vacate a portion of Carmichael Way, Cerulean Avenue, Watch Avenue, and Annet Street in the Green Valley Ranch planning area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDED DENIAL CONTINUED FROM FEBRUARY 6,1996) VII. WATER ALLOCATIONS A. Exemptions Ratiricatiitn of Admiiastrative Approvals B. Stage 1,2 and 3 Developments Ratiilcation of Administrative Approvall C. Stage 4 Developments Hearing Requests D. Stage 5 DevelopmentsHearing Requests --• -• -^-^ri^^~ '. ~t^-~=-^-^^ '-^-'^f E. Late FilingsHearing Requests F. Negotiated Contracti (Reduced Density > 20%)-Hearing Requesb i : ,:^ V. G. Ma.ster Planned CommunitiesHearing Requests H. Revocation Hearings ,.,..'". I. Waiver of Filing Deadline Requirement, Hearings i: C J. Extension-Hearing Requests .._j-i, 'f K. Relinquishments L. Priority Lists Review (Second Council Meeting of Each Month) M. Conversion lo Permanent Water VIIL CONSENT AGENDA UNLESS AN ITEM IS PULLED FOR DISCUSSION, COUNCIL WILL TAKE ACTION ON CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS NO. CA-9 THROUGH CA.52 WITH ONE MOTION, ACCEPTING THE RECOMMEND^IONS AS STATED ON THE AGENDA. TO PULL AN ITEM FOR DISCUSSION, PLEASE NOTIFY THE CITY CLERK BY PRESENTING A YELLOW SIGN-UP CARD BEFORE COUNCIL TAKES ACTION ON THE CONSENT AGENDA. YELLOW SIGNUP CARDS ARE AVAILABLE AT THE BACK OF THE COUNCIL CHAMBERS AND AT THE PODIUM. CA-9. MINUTESCOMMITTEE AND REGULAR MEETINGS FEBRUARY 6,1996 Approval of Minutes of Committee and Regular Meetings of February 6, 1996. CA-10. AMENDMENTN0.3-TRI-PARTYAGREEMENT FLOODCONTROLUNDER GRAND MEDITERRA BLVD AT LAKE LAS VEGAS Amendment No. 3 to the Tri-Parly Agreement for FIminmi>ftttm>Rmv4efiMpmyA,dmk,tktrMk€Vloik Cuatamer nd DaU CoBection Snperviaar. CA-35. PERSONNEL PUBLIC WORKS COMPLEMENTSENIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE Apiwv.1 .r —fdmrnt W staff u i,lliili t far PuMk Watfc. by aMtag •* Setrfar CMtamer Service Clerk d d.leii aM Omw Aaiirtmrt n to ftmd 21-3643. CA-96. PERSONNELPOUCE DEPARTMENT AMEND STAFF COMPLEMENT OFFICE ASSISTANT II AND POUCE RECORDS CLERK Approval of amendment of staff complement for Uie PoHcc Department by aMiag • • •(1) Police Records CIcik to and deleting one (1) Office Assistant • from Fnad Ol-ll-W. CA-37. BUSINESS LICENSE GRUMPY JOE'S ADDITIONAL TEMPORARY CLOSURE Approval of request for additional 120-day temporary dosure of Tavern Buid Bf w( f ai m i f Lonesome Dove hicatian) for Grumpy Joe's, 2140 South Boulder Highway, Htnierwrn, NV 89015. CA-38. BUSINESS LICENSE SANDY'S LOUNGE ADDITIONAL TEMPORARY CLOSURE Approval of Request for Additional 60-day Temporary aosure of Tavcni Budnim fw Saidy's Louise, 650 West Sunset Road, Henderson, NV 89015. CA-39. BUSINESS LICENSEEUGENE R. ALTf>BELLA, SR. G*B AUTO SALES, INC. Approval of Business License for Secondhwd Dealer Class I (Used Vehidcs) Car EaMM R. Altobella, Sr., for G&B Auto Sales, Inc., 875 South Boulder Highway, Mend er —, NV 89015. CA-40. BUSINESS LICENSE -GARY E. ELLIS BILLYS EAST Approval of Business License for Gary E. Ellis, dba Billy's East, 4563 East Sunset Read, Hendenon, NV 89014, (Ownership Change) for Tavern with Package Liquor lictmt mmi Restricted Gaming/40 Slots. CA-41. BUSINESS LICENSE E-T-T, INC. ARCO AM/PM ApprovatofBusinessLicenserorE-T-T,bic.,dbatArcoAM/PM,2601 Wigwam Parfcwqr, Henderson, NV 89014 fur Additional Location for Slot Route Operator for GamlHg Devices/7 Slots. PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDATIONS OF FEBRUARY 22,1996:. CA-42. RIGHT-OF-WAYROW-1-96 APPLICANT: SUNRIDGE DEVELOPMENT CO. Acceptance of a municipal utilities easement for a sewer line acrou Lot IS of SiMuridgc at MacDonald Ranch, in the MacDonald Ranch planning area. -: r V CA-4.r ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW-AR-45-96 LEONARD'S AUTOMOTIVE '' ^ :.' • • -^'l ::-'r-U% APPLICANT: LEONARD MULLVAIN Review of a proposed automotive shop on .8 acre in an IL (Limited Industrial) district, at 331 Sunpac Court, in the Pittman planning area CA.44. TENTATIVE MAPTM-14-96 MONTENEGRO ESTATES APPLICANT: NATIONAL HORIZON CORP. Review of a residential subdivision consisting of 157 lots on 36.6 acres, with a density of 43 dwelling units per acre, in an RS-6 (Single Family Residential) district, located south f Horiz4in Ridge Parkway at the base of Black Mountain, in the McCullougfa HiOs plawdwc area. CA-45. ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW-AR-48-96 AAAABCO/GIBSON MINI-STORAGE • APPLICANT: SAMUEL VENTURA Review of an amended Architectural Review for mini-storage facility at 975 Sttrfllihtam Avenue, in the Midway planning area CA-46. TENTATIVE MAP-TM-96-95 ADOBEHILI.S APPLICANT: B R HOMES Review of a residential subdivision ci^isting of 67 tots on 14.2 acres, with a density of 47 dwdling units peracre, bicaled at the northeast comer ofGreen Valley Parkway and Sandy Ridge Avenue, in the MacDonald Ranch planning area. CA-47. EXTENSION OF TIME U-lS-86 USE PERMIT-CASINO AND TAVERN • APPLICANT: THOMAS BOECKLE Review of an extension of time to February 8, 1997, for casino and tavern at 900 Sonth Boulder Highway, in the Valley View planning area. CA-48A. ZONE CHANGE Z-7-96 CA-48B. PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT-PUD/TM-6-96 TENTATIVE MAP MILLENNIUM HILIJi APPLICANT: MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT Review of a rvdassiricaliim request fn>m RS-2 (Single Family Residential) district to RS6 PUD (Single Family Residential Planned Unit DevHopment) district on 20.4 acres; and review of a Plamwil Unit DevcinpmenI subdivision consisting of 105 Ms on 2(U acrca, with a density of S.l dwelling units per acre, located south of Arroyo Grande Boulevard and west of Stephanie Street, in the (>reen Valley Ranch planning area CA-49A. USE PERMIT U-23.96 /A ARCHITECTURAL REVIEWAR-60-96 CA-49B. GREEN VALLEY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH APPLICANT: GREEN VALLEY UNITED METHODLST CHURCH Request for addition of 2 modular unit meeting rmims in a PS (Public and SemiP ubli c ) district, aL2200 Rohindale Road, in tiie Green Valley planting area CA-50A. USE PERMIT-U-29-96 -^ ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW-AR-36-% CA-50B. SUNRID<;E AT MACIK)NALD RANCH PRIVATE SCHOOL APPLICANTS: PATRICIA RILEY AND ROBERTA HAMILTON ~ Request for private schiMil and caretakers quarters and review of private school site on 5.2 acres, located at 1051 Sandy Ridge, in the MacD
PAGE 15

•**^>'J*.'.-.'..^,^...... ^MVPVV^WVVWViPiP ...iUiiEiiy!UUl!l!ll'! '!! !]!UUU i i!lLnmiiu i iu^^ ^ ^ P0 14 Henderson Home News Thursday, February 29,1996 ^ H Resident attends toy meeting in Tennessee Henderson resident Denise Shapiro-Glanz has just returned from the national convention of Discovery Toys, Inc. ip Nashville, Tenn. She has been affiliated with the company for 15 years, and oversees a group of 400 consultants. The company announced a new alliance with Reading is Fundamental, the nation's largest literacy organization. Under the umbrella of its Literacy for Life program. Discovery Toys will donate a portion of profits from each book sold, up to $10,000, in support of the community-based organization. Shapiro-Glanz attended three days of seminars in child development, self-esteem and positive parenting, combined with marketing and business management training. Headquartered in Martinez, Calif, Discovery Toys, Inc., is the leading originator of developmental toys, books and games; educational software; personal care products for children and home study parenting programs. Its products are distributed through a network of 40,000 educational consultants. For more information on products or career opportunities, call Denise Shapiro-Glanz, 8976094. THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY Thursday, February 29,1996 Henderson Home Nws Peflt 19 John Judge/News Staff MEMBER — Richard Jesinger, left, president of the Green Valley Kiwanis Club, announces the club's newest member Lois Hlohowskyj. Hlohowskyj is cun-ently self-employed and brings enthusiasm, new ideas and commitment to community service to the Green Valley Kiwanis Club, a club spokesman said. I NOW ACCEPTING NEW CLIENTS I WILLIAM A. SCHULTZ Certified Public Accountant Small Business Financial Services, Tax Return Preparation, Copsulting & Planning, Litigation Support 22 YEARS EXPERIENCE • 898-7120 "FIRST HALF HOUR CONSULTATION FREE WITH AD" V^920 N. Gneen Valley Pkwy., Building 3, 2nd Floor, Suite 4, Hend.^ CPA The CPA. Htm UndefwUcnite Th Value.*' Q> Church offers program of hope TTie First Southern Baptist Church will feature Dr. David Davis, former Small College AllAmerican quarterback at special services this week. Davis has been endorsed for his work with teenagers and the DARE program by the White House, state governors and mayors of cities across our nation. His messages each evening will center on the hope available to each person as they focus on the Bible and express faith by following the will of God. Services will be held at 8:3D a.m., 9:45 a.m., 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Simday, March 3, and continue with 7 p.m. services Monday through Wednesday, March 4-6. Each service will feature gospel singing. A nursery will be provided for children under 5. Special progframs will be presented for children at 6 p.m. Tuesday, and for youth at 6 p.m. Wednesday. Families are invited to join the congregation at 240 S. Cholla St., next to Wal-Mart, in Henderson. Rene J. Houle is senior pastor. For more information, call 565-6072. Mf^RCH SPECIAL 11 p.m. to 11 a.m. Steak & Eggs 99C Hash browns, toast & coffee • ""'"'""" 725 Racetrack Rd. (Behind Kmart) Henderson For info call 566-5555 C3> CASINO receives St. St Rose Dominican Hospital honored Ann Barren with the Philosophy in Action Award. Barren is chairperson of St. Rese's Board of Directors and economic development director for the city of Henderson. The award program was established by the Catholic Healthea>-e West Board of Directors to recognize and honor individuals within the system for outstanding contributions to the health care ministry. Each year, an award is given to individuals or teams from each CHW division, which includes hospitals throughout California, Arizona, and St. Rose in Henderson. The award recognizes commitment to one of CHW's five core values: dignity, collaboration, justice, stewardship and excellence. Nominations were submitted by employees, physicians and board members at the hospital. In announcing Barron as the winner, Rod A. Davis, president and CEO, said, "Ann is being recognized for her emphasis on justice. We define justice as advocating for change of social structures which undermine human dignity, demonstrating special concern for the poor. "Ann holds a steadfast concern for the poor and disadvantaged throughout Henderson. Specific examples of her accomplishments include low-cost housing, support for atrisk youth and assistance at the Senior Center. .' • .' • • • "Her commitment to establishing a primary care clinic for the poor and encouragement of her staff to reach out to the needy reinforces the values of CHW." "The employees, physicians and volunteers of St. Rose Dominican Hospital are all continually working to make our community a better place to live," said BarrjOR. "T^o .|)e, ,cho§en for this award is a tremendous honor." Barron will be honored on April 11, at the awards banquet of the annual board seminar in San Francisco. -^:^yOther nominees for the award included: Vicki Dalesandro, O.P.; Wanda Flathers; Steven R. Hoer, M.D.; Cheryl Johnston; Carma Krietler, R.N.; Mental Health Resources team; Debra K. Purcell; Positive Impact on Reading Volunteers; Gregg M. Ripplinger, M.D.; Dorothy Vonderbrink; Pat Wundar; and Colleen York, L.S.W. NARFE celebrates 75 years One of America's oldest national associations, the National Association of Retired Federal Employees, is celebrating its 75th anniversary this month. Organized in February 1921, with the mission of protecting earned benefits of retired federal workers and their families^ NARFE has a remarkable record of success in its mission. Most recently, it was instrumental in making sure civil service annuitants were not unfairly targeted for cuts not required of others during budget-balancing negotiations. Over the past 75 years, it has grown from 14 founding members to nearly one million, with more than l,740chapters in every state, as well as overseas. The Henderson chapter numbers 156 members imd Wanda Low presides. The chapter meets at 1:30 p.m. the first Monday of eadi month. at the Henderson Senior Center, 27 E. Texas Ave. Present and retired federal employees are welcome. For more information, call 5641252. GEORGE E. MERINO M.D. FACS, FICS, Board Certified Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery iSenefal Vascular Surgery Specializing in Surgery of the heart, lungs, arteries & veins. Non-invasive in-office • evaluation of circulation disorders. VASCULAR LABORATORY Medicare Assignment Accepted Provider to most PPOs and Insuronce plans. PARK FLAMINGO EAST 2110 E. FLAMINGO RD. SUITE 201 LAS VEGAS, NV 734-2121 / HOMENEWS Delivered to your home every Tuesday & Thursday morning for only $30 00 Per Year HomeDeiivay Just All out the information bdow ark! I mallta HENDERSON HOME NEWS I P.O. BOX 90430 Y Henderson, Ncrndn 89009 I Please start my subscription. I Name [ I Phone I (FOnOFFICtAlUSEONLr) I Enclosed U my chedc or money order for $30 for tiM I one year home delivery subscription. Address. Signed. IftOPEFWOet HENDERSON HOME NEWS 564-1881 -V—' 564-1150 ON BOULDER HWY. AT SUNSET WIN A NEW SATURN SLI Details at Cage Authentic 50's Diner & Soda Fountain Blue Plate Specials from $2.95 DANCING NIGHTLY TO UVE MUSIC THURS FRI SAT: |uke Box Saturday Nite (formerly Danny K tinjrs.) Special Added AnractionThurs... Filipino Recording Star "Rudy Cenaskcy" SATURDAY'Madnee Polka Party i-6pm no. APPHIZERS SUNDAY Rudy Genaskey 8. Motion 8pm lam MONDAY |am with Nick Faikas TUESDAY The Roadhouse All-Stars (Rock-a-Billy) WEDNESDAY Udles Night Dance to'^Flashback" Ladies Drink FREE GREEN VALLEY AREA Executive Homes From The ;; $160,000'$ Prestige, Slyle, Quolily, Lwclion, Securily, Privocy, tlolsOlSemi'dnlon Chokes. •Private Gated Community •Adjacent To A 60 Acre Pork • Semi-Custom Homes• Zoned For Green Valley High School db hi iSniC Rcalux Co-op UpTo 3,638 Sq. Ft. & 7 Bedrooms ^W c-iii r.\,%/itiAi Sales Office Open Djilv I0ainlo5|im 435-7120 Day or Night We Put the Care Back into Health Care HOGAN CLINIC Family Practfee Pediatrics Internal IMedklne Occupational Medicine Minor Injuries X-Ray £ii :iiV:}L Bryant Cilomiok, M.D. V. Jerome MiHcii, M.D. JoiKithan Rofenstein, M.D. Mark Leinwand, PA-C Jamaf M. Hogan, M.D. Appotrttmtnit RacomniandMl Woft-in* Wslcoowd 4 Sunset Woy, #B-2 • 434-1111 |NlolCWU,ChorHl5) • Most rnnjor insiir.uicc pi.ins ncceptecl IVl.istcrC.ird • Distovt'i • Vis.i PUBLISH: Ffbniary 29,1996 HENDERSON HOME NEWS PMIedi WcdncMby, February 28,1996 at Uie following localioiu: City Hall, 240 Water Street Emersency Scrvicea Facility, 223 Lead Street Green Valley Library, 2797 Green Valley Parkway Hendenon Boys' and Girls' Club, 1608 Moser Drive Community College iif Southern Nevada, Building A, 7(K) College Drive AGENDA Tuesday, March 5, 1996 6:45 p.m. AGENPA ITEMS RKCKIVED A^TER ?;30 P.M. ON FEBRVARY 19% WILL NOT BE SEEN ON THE AGENDA AS PUBLISHEP. BUT MAY APPEAR ON THE AGENPA AS ADDEP ITEMS OR ADDENDA. COMMITTEE MEETING COUNCIL CHAMBER HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL 240 WATER STREET NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES Members of the public who are disabled or require special assistance or accommodations at the meeting arc requested to notify the City Clerk by telephoning (702) 565-2057 at least fcventytwo hours in advance of the meeting. NOTE: ALL ITEMS ARE ACTION ITEMS UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED. The Mayor reserves the right lo hear agenda items out of order. L CALL TO ORDER II. CONFIRMATION OF POSTING III. ROLL CALL IV. ACCEPTANCE OF AGENDA V. ITEMS OF BUSINESS Cl. BILL NO. 1295 • PARKING VIOLATIONS' vt. AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON DELETING H.M.C. 10.51 (CIVIL PARKING), EFFECTIVE APRIL 1, 1996; DELETING H.M.C. 10.52 AND 10.56 (PARKING), EFFECTIVEIMMEDIATELYiADOPTING STATE LAWONPARKING; AND PROVIDING THAT CERTAIN CURBS MAY BE PAINTED PARTICULAR COLORS; AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. C-2. BILL NO. 1296 SEXUALLY ORIENTED BUSINESSES AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND CHAPTER 110, TITLE 4 OF THE HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE BY AMENDING REGULATIONS RELATING TO SEXUALLY ORIENTED BUSINESSES AS THEY APPLY TO NUDE DANCING; AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. C-3. BILL NO. 1297 Z-10-96 MARYLAND 10 APPLICANT: REDEVELOPMENT AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REA L PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OFTHE CITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 61 EAST, M.D.B. & M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RS-2 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL) DISTRICT TO RS-6 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL) DISTRICT ON 9.5 ACRES, GENERALLY LOCATED NORTHWEST OF EASTERN AVENUE AND MARYLAND PARKWAY, IN THE WESTGATE PLANNING AREA, AND OTHER MATTER.S RELATING THERETO. C-4. BILL NO. 1298 Z-13-96 ^ GREEN VALLEY/HORIZON RIDGE APPLICANT: OLEN DEVELOPMENT CORP. AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY-AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHINTHE CITY LIMITS OFTHE CITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 61 EAST, M.D.B. & M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RS.2 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL) TO RM-16 (MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTIAL) DISTRICT, LOCATED AT 595 SOUTH GREEN VALLEY PARKWAY, GENERALLY LOCATED NORTHWEST OFGREEN VALLEY PARKWAY AND HORIZON RIIX:E lARKWAY, IN THE GREEN VALLEY RANCH PLANNING AREA; AND OTHER OTTERS RELATING THERETO. <-S. BILL 1299 ZOA-2-96 ZONING ORDINANCE AMENDMENT APPLICANT: CITY OF HENDERSON AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY O HENDERSON TO AMEND TITLE 190FTHE HENDER.SON MUNICIPAL CODE BY AMENDING THE LAND USE REGULATIONS IN COMMERCIAL, INDUSTRIAL, OPEN SPACE AND PUBLIC & SEMIPUBLIC ZONES AS THEY APPLY TO EATING AND DRINKING ESTABLISHMENTS, FOOD AND BEVERAGE SALES, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. XI. ADJOURNMENT PUBLISH: February 29,1996 HENDERSON HOME NEWS Posted: Wednesday, February 28,1996 • at the following l(H-alions: City Han, 240 Water Street Emcrpncy Services Facility, 223 Lead Street • ,. : '^^ ;. *. Green Valley Library, 2797 Green Valley Parkway HendenHin Boys' and Girls' Club, 1608 Moser Drive Community College of Southern Nevada, Building A, 7(M( College Drive AGENDA ... • .. • •-.,.. Tuesday, March 5, 1995 ""^ 7:0(tp.m. • • ::' AGENDA ITEMS RECEIVED AFTER 5;30 P.M, ON Frbreary 22. 19% WILL NOT BESEEN ON THE AGENDA AS I'UBI.ISHRl). BUT MAY APPFAR ON THE AGENDA AS ADDED ITEMS OR ADDENDA. REGULAR MEETING a)UNCIL CHAMBER HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL 240 WATER STREET NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES Members of the public who are disabled or require special assistance or accommodations at the meetii are requested to notify the City Clerk by telephoning (702) 565-2057 at Uml seventytwo hours in advance of the meeting NOTEi ALL ITEMS ARE ACTION ITEMS UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED. The Mayor reserves the right to hear agenda items out of order. L CALL TO ORDER n. CONHRMATION OF POSTING III. ROLL CALL, INVOCATION, PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE IV. ACCEPTANCE OF AGENDA V. PRESENTATIONS PR-L PRESENTATION EMPLOYEE DEDICATION AND SERVICE AWARD FEBRUARY 1996 NICHOLAS A. WALLING PrcMiitation Employee Dedication and .Service Award • Month of February 1996, to Nidiolai A. Walling, Polii-r Training OfTicer, Pf4ice Department PR-X PRESENTATION • EMPLOYEE DEDICATION AND SERVICE AWARD • MARCH 1996 NANCY S. WALK Prcacntation Employee Dedication and Service Award Month of Marth 1996, lo Nwicy S. Walk, Oflice Assistant II, Water Redamation Department VL PUBLIC HEARINGS PH.3. CONTINUED PUBLIC HEARING CPA-53-95 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT FOR BOWLING ALLEY & SUPPER CLUB APPLICANT: MR. A MR.S. A. J. CARMICHAEL Re^aest to amend Ike Und use from Residential to Commercial on 5 acres located • Mrthwcit of Horiioa Ridge Parkway and Green Valley Parkway in the Green Valley Raw* pUmkic area. (CONTINUED FROM FEBRUARY 6,1996. PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDED DENIAL) PIM. RESOLUTION CPA-53-95 BOWLING ALLEY St SUPPER CLUB APPUCANT: MR. AND MRS. A. J. CARMICHAEL ARESOLUTIONOrTHECITYCOUNCILOFTHECITYOFHENDERSf>N, NEVADA, TO AME^a) THE LAND USE POLICY PI>AN OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FOR THE PURPOSE OF CHANGING THE LAND USE DfSIGNATION OF CERTAIN PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON DESCRIBED AS A PARCEL OF LAND CONTAINING 5 ACRES, MORE OR LESS, AND DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 62 EAST, M.D.M.. CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RESIDENTUL TO COMM ERCIA L, LOCATED NORTH WEST OF HORIZON RIDGE PARKWAY AND GREEN VALLEY PARKWAY IN THE GREEN VALLEY RANCH PLAN^aNG AREA. (CONTINUED FROM FEBRUARY 6,1996) PH-S. CCMmNUED PUBLIC HEARING APPEAL-(AP.2.9) ZONE CHANGE FOR BOWLING ALLEY SUPPER CLUB (Z-81-95) APTUCANT: MR. MRS. A. J. CARMICHAEL Appari W dKMan by the PlanntaK CMUMOO regaHkig the review of a redMriOcHtai t torn RS4 (Sl^k FaiUly Riridintial) diatrid to CC (Commanity Cimwiriial) a S mamt hcatirf • atHlwe a l af tforiiaa Ridge Parkway nd Green Valley PHfeway k HM GnaM Vdky Randi plamdocMM. (CONTINUED FROM FEBRUARY I9M. PIANMNG COMMISSION RECOMMENDED DENIAL) PH4. RESOLUTION Z->l-95 ZONE CHANGE FOR BOWLIIW ALLEY SUPPER CLUB APPUCANTi MR. A MRS. A. I CARMICHAEL A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON COMMITTING THE CITY COUNCIL TO REZONE CERTAIN PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 62 EAST, M.D.B. & M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RS-6 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTU L) DISTRICT TO CC (COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL) DISTRICT ON 5 ACRES LOCATED NORTHWESTOFHORIZONRIDGEPARKWAYANDGREENVALLEYPARKWAY IN THE GREEN VALLEY RANCH PLANNING AREA. PH.7. CONTINUED PUBLIC HEARING VAC-34-95 PORTION OF ELDORADO PARKWAY APPLICANT: DON MADDALON, ET AL Request to vacate a portion of EMorado Parkway, in the Green VWley North planning area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDED APPROVAL CONTINUED FROM FEBRUARY 6,1996) PH-8. CONTINUED PUBLIC HEARING VAC-39-95 PORTION OF CARMICHAEL WAY, CERULEAN AVENUE, WATCH AVENUE, AND ANNET STREET APPLICANT: MANLEY DEVELOPMENT INC. Request to vacate a portion of Carmichael Way, Cerulean Avenue, Watch Avenue, and Annet Street in the Green Valley Ranch planning area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDED DENIAL CONTINUED FROM FEBRUARY 6,1996) VII. WATER ALLOCATIONS A. Exemptions Ratiricatiitn of Admiiastrative Approvals B. Stage 1,2 and 3 Developments Ratiilcation of Administrative Approvall C. Stage 4 Developments Hearing Requests D. Stage 5 DevelopmentsHearing Requests --• -• -^-^ri^^~ '. ~t^-~=-^-^^ '-^-'^f E. Late FilingsHearing Requests F. Negotiated Contracti (Reduced Density > 20%)-Hearing Requesb i : ,:^ V. G. Ma.ster Planned CommunitiesHearing Requests H. Revocation Hearings ,.,..'". I. Waiver of Filing Deadline Requirement, Hearings i: C J. Extension-Hearing Requests .._j-i, 'f K. Relinquishments L. Priority Lists Review (Second Council Meeting of Each Month) M. Conversion lo Permanent Water VIIL CONSENT AGENDA UNLESS AN ITEM IS PULLED FOR DISCUSSION, COUNCIL WILL TAKE ACTION ON CONSENT AGENDA ITEMS NO. CA-9 THROUGH CA.52 WITH ONE MOTION, ACCEPTING THE RECOMMEND^IONS AS STATED ON THE AGENDA. TO PULL AN ITEM FOR DISCUSSION, PLEASE NOTIFY THE CITY CLERK BY PRESENTING A YELLOW SIGN-UP CARD BEFORE COUNCIL TAKES ACTION ON THE CONSENT AGENDA. YELLOW SIGNUP CARDS ARE AVAILABLE AT THE BACK OF THE COUNCIL CHAMBERS AND AT THE PODIUM. CA-9. MINUTESCOMMITTEE AND REGULAR MEETINGS FEBRUARY 6,1996 Approval of Minutes of Committee and Regular Meetings of February 6, 1996. CA-10. AMENDMENTN0.3-TRI-PARTYAGREEMENT FLOODCONTROLUNDER GRAND MEDITERRA BLVD AT LAKE LAS VEGAS Amendment No. 3 to the Tri-Parly Agreement for FIminmi>ftttm>Rmv4efiMpmyA,dmk,tktrMk€Vloik Cuatamer nd DaU CoBection Snperviaar. CA-35. PERSONNEL PUBLIC WORKS COMPLEMENTSENIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE Apiwv.1 .r —fdmrnt W staff u i,lliili t far PuMk Watfc. by aMtag •* Setrfar CMtamer Service Clerk d d.leii aM Omw Aaiirtmrt n to ftmd 21-3643. CA-96. PERSONNELPOUCE DEPARTMENT AMEND STAFF COMPLEMENT OFFICE ASSISTANT II AND POUCE RECORDS CLERK Approval of amendment of staff complement for Uie PoHcc Department by aMiag • • •(1) Police Records CIcik to and deleting one (1) Office Assistant • from Fnad Ol-ll-W. CA-37. BUSINESS LICENSE GRUMPY JOE'S ADDITIONAL TEMPORARY CLOSURE Approval of request for additional 120-day temporary dosure of Tavern Buid Bf w( f ai m i f Lonesome Dove hicatian) for Grumpy Joe's, 2140 South Boulder Highway, Htnierwrn, NV 89015. CA-38. BUSINESS LICENSE SANDY'S LOUNGE ADDITIONAL TEMPORARY CLOSURE Approval of Request for Additional 60-day Temporary aosure of Tavcni Budnim fw Saidy's Louise, 650 West Sunset Road, Henderson, NV 89015. CA-39. BUSINESS LICENSEEUGENE R. ALTf>BELLA, SR. G*B AUTO SALES, INC. Approval of Business License for Secondhwd Dealer Class I (Used Vehidcs) Car EaMM R. Altobella, Sr., for G&B Auto Sales, Inc., 875 South Boulder Highway, Mend er —, NV 89015. CA-40. BUSINESS LICENSE -GARY E. ELLIS BILLYS EAST Approval of Business License for Gary E. Ellis, dba Billy's East, 4563 East Sunset Read, Hendenon, NV 89014, (Ownership Change) for Tavern with Package Liquor lictmt mmi Restricted Gaming/40 Slots. CA-41. BUSINESS LICENSE E-T-T, INC. ARCO AM/PM ApprovatofBusinessLicenserorE-T-T,bic.,dbatArcoAM/PM,2601 Wigwam Parfcwqr, Henderson, NV 89014 fur Additional Location for Slot Route Operator for GamlHg Devices/7 Slots. PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDATIONS OF FEBRUARY 22,1996:. CA-42. RIGHT-OF-WAYROW-1-96 APPLICANT: SUNRIDGE DEVELOPMENT CO. Acceptance of a municipal utilities easement for a sewer line acrou Lot IS of SiMuridgc at MacDonald Ranch, in the MacDonald Ranch planning area. -: r V CA-4.r ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW-AR-45-96 LEONARD'S AUTOMOTIVE '' ^ :.' • • -^'l ::-'r-U% APPLICANT: LEONARD MULLVAIN Review of a proposed automotive shop on .8 acre in an IL (Limited Industrial) district, at 331 Sunpac Court, in the Pittman planning area CA.44. TENTATIVE MAPTM-14-96 MONTENEGRO ESTATES APPLICANT: NATIONAL HORIZON CORP. Review of a residential subdivision consisting of 157 lots on 36.6 acres, with a density of 43 dwelling units per acre, in an RS-6 (Single Family Residential) district, located south f Horiz4in Ridge Parkway at the base of Black Mountain, in the McCullougfa HiOs plawdwc area. CA-45. ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW-AR-48-96 AAAABCO/GIBSON MINI-STORAGE • APPLICANT: SAMUEL VENTURA Review of an amended Architectural Review for mini-storage facility at 975 Sttrfllihtam Avenue, in the Midway planning area CA-46. TENTATIVE MAP-TM-96-95 ADOBEHILI.S APPLICANT: B R HOMES Review of a residential subdivision ci^isting of 67 tots on 14.2 acres, with a density of 47 dwdling units peracre, bicaled at the northeast comer ofGreen Valley Parkway and Sandy Ridge Avenue, in the MacDonald Ranch planning area. CA-47. EXTENSION OF TIME U-lS-86 USE PERMIT-CASINO AND TAVERN • APPLICANT: THOMAS BOECKLE Review of an extension of time to February 8, 1997, for casino and tavern at 900 Sonth Boulder Highway, in the Valley View planning area. CA-48A. ZONE CHANGE Z-7-96 CA-48B. PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT-PUD/TM-6-96 TENTATIVE MAP MILLENNIUM HILIJi APPLICANT: MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT Review of a rvdassiricaliim request fn>m RS-2 (Single Family Residential) district to RS6 PUD (Single Family Residential Planned Unit DevHopment) district on 20.4 acres; and review of a Plamwil Unit DevcinpmenI subdivision consisting of 105 Ms on 2(U acrca, with a density of S.l dwelling units per acre, located south of Arroyo Grande Boulevard and west of Stephanie Street, in the (>reen Valley Ranch planning area CA-49A. USE PERMIT U-23.96 /A ARCHITECTURAL REVIEWAR-60-96 CA-49B. GREEN VALLEY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH APPLICANT: GREEN VALLEY UNITED METHODLST CHURCH Request for addition of 2 modular unit meeting rmims in a PS (Public and SemiP ubli c ) district, aL2200 Rohindale Road, in tiie Green Valley planting area CA-50A. USE PERMIT-U-29-96 -^ ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW-AR-36-% CA-50B. SUNRID<;E AT MACIK)NALD RANCH PRIVATE SCHOOL APPLICANTS: PATRICIA RILEY AND ROBERTA HAMILTON ~ Request for private schiMil and caretakers quarters and review of private school site on 5.2 acres, located at 1051 Sandy Ridge, in the MacD
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I • U J IfPP^PV^^ mm • niiiiii Page 16 Hndrson Horn* News Thursday, February 29, 1996 Thursday, February 29,1996 Henderson Home News Page 17 lnne^City Games to begin Friday The Greater Las Vegas InnerCity Games will hold auditions for elementary and middle school students for the junior broadcaster program from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, March 1, at Gilbert Magnet School, 2102 W. Cartier Ave., corner of Clayton and Cartier, in North Las Vegas. Auditioning students will be asked to prepare a two-minute story on the games using a fact sheet and read the story in front of a camera, and will also undergo a brief interview. Selected students will receive training at the UNLV School of Communications on three Saturdays in March. Broadcasters will be teamed with a reporter/newscaster/announcer at a local television or radio station to report on the Games' clinics and preliminary competitions during the summer months, and during the Games to take place from Sept. 21 through Oct. 19. IVIedved to spealc at Hebrew Academy ~4^i4^diael Medved, co-host of the popular weekly PBS television series, "Sneak Previews," will speak at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 29, at the Hebrew Academy in Summerlin. Medved's topic will be "Saving Childhood: Protecting Your Children from the National Assault on Innocence." Thefree lecture, which is open to the public, is part of the Hebrew Acadekny's community-oriented Jewish Life and Culture progrtim. A film and media expert, he has been chief film critic for the New York Post. His latest book, "Hollywood vs America," gained national attention by re-orienting the entertainment industry's attitude toward family entertainment. Medved has authored seven non-fiction books, including bestsellers "What Really Happened to the Class of'65" (1976); "The Shadow Presidents" (1979); "The Golden Turkey Awards" (1980), and "Hospital: The Hidden Lives of a Medical Center Staff" (1983). He has also served as guest host of the Rush Limbaugh radio show. An active volunteer in the Jewish community, he cofounded the Jewish Center in Venice.Calif The Hebrew Academy is the first and onlynon-parochial, nonprofit, accredited, college preparatory school in Nevada with programs for students from the age of three through 12th grade. For more inforihation, call 255-4500. Children's Urgent Care opens in Whitney Ranch Minority coveragle discussed How people of color are portrayed in mainstream media will be discussed at an upcoming forum sponsored by the Las Vegas Association of Black Journalists. "Media Sensitivity: How does the general media see and show us?" will be held from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, March 2, at the West Las Vegas Library, 9^1 W. Lake Mead Blvd. For more information, call 256-0151. Children's Urgent Care, owned by. Dr. Jagannath S. Surpure, opened Feb. 19, at 601 Whitney Ranch Dr., Suite D22. Hours are from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday, and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. Designed to help sick and injured children, the facility provides minor emergency care faster and with less cost than emergency room visits, a spokesman said. Children's UrgentCate treats respiratory distress, high fever, ear pains, nose bleeds, foreign bodies, lacerations and broken bones, seizures and dehydration. The facility does not handle car accidents, serious injuries such as multiple fractures, lifethreatening problems or take any ambulances. Surpure plans to maintain longer hours 365 days a year. Surpure is triple board-certified in pediatrics, pediatrics emergency medicine and adult emergency medicine. He has been a pediatric emergency surgeon for nearly 20 years. He has also published several books in the field. Surpure is assisted by manager Bob Ready, and offiie assistants Sandra Loubert and Bemadette Cannon. AGENDA From Page 15 UB-62. MASTER SIGN PLAN • SP-29.95 OASIS GREENS APPLICANT: OASIS RESIDENTIAL Rrqufst for Master Sign Plan for apartmrnt homes in an RM-24 (Mrdium Density Residential) distrid at 2(M)I Ramrod Avenue in the Green Valley North planning area. (K>ANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDED APPROVAL OF MONUMENT SIGN ONLY.) •. • ;. V • • ; • • ^ ... UB-63. MASTER SIGN PLAN SP-30-95 OASIS SUMMIT APPLICANT: OASIS RESIDENTIAL Request for Master Sign Plan for ^artment homes in an RM-12 (Medium Density Residential) district at 2675 Windmill Parkway, in the Green Valley North planning area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDED APPROVAL OF MONUMENT SIGN ONLY.) UB-64. RESOLUTION SOUTHERN NEVADA WATER AUTHORITY CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON APPROVING AN I.NTERLOCAL COOPERATION A(;REEMENT REGARDING REPAYMENT TO SOUTHERN NEVADA WATER AUTHORITY (SNWA) FOR CERTAIN CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS; AUTHORIZING THE OFFICERS OF THE CITY TO EXECUTE SAME; PROVIDING OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELATED THERETO. ,1 UB-65. BILL NO. 1295 PARKING VIOLATIONS AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON DELETING H.M.C. 10.51 (CIVIL PARKING), EFFECTIVE APRIL 1,1996; DELETING H.M.C. 10.52 AND 1.5(PARKING), EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY; ADOPTING STATE LAW ON PARKING; AND PROVIDING THAT CERTAIN CURBS MAY BE PAINTED PARTICULAR COLORS; AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. (FINAL ACTION) UB-66. BILL NO. 1296 SEXUALLY ORIENTED BUSINESSES AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND CHAPTER 110, TITLE 4 OF THE HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE BY AMENDING REGULATIONS RELATING TO SEXUALLY ORIENTED BUSINESSES AS THEY APPLY TO NUDE DANCING; AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. (FINAL ACTION) UB-67. BILL NO. 1297 Z-10.96 MARYLAND 10 APPLICANT: R/S DEVELOPMENT AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY a)UNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OFTHE CITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 61 EAST, M.D.B. & M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RS-2 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL) DISTRICT TO RS-6 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL) DISTRICT ON 9S ACRES. GENERALLY LOCATED NORTHWEST OK EASTERN AVENUE AND MARYLAND PARKWAY, IN THE WESTGATE PLANNING AREA, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO. (HNAL ACTION) UB-68. BILL NO. 1298 Z-13-96 GREEN VALLEY/HORIZON RIDGE APPLICANT: OLEN DEVELOPMENT CORP. ,, „ AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY-AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHINTHECITY LIMITSOFTHECITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 61 EAST, M.D.B. & M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RS-2 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL)TO RM-16 (MEDIUM DENSITY RESIOENTUL) DISTRICT. LOCATED AT 595 SOUTH GREEN VALLEY PARKWAY, GENERALLY LOCATED NORTH WESTOF GREEN VALLEY PARKWAY AND HORIZON RIDGE PARKWAY, IN THE GREEN VALLEY RANCH PLANNING AREA AND OTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO. (ONAL ACTION) UB-69. BILL 1299 ZOA-2-96 ZONING ORDINANCE AMENDMENT APPLICANT: CITY OF HENDERSON AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON TO AMEND TITLE 19 OF THE HENDER.SON MUNICIPAL CODE BY AMENDING THE LAND USE REGULATIONS IN COMMERCIAL, INDUSTRIAL, OPEN SPACE AND PUBLIC ft SEMI PUBLIC ZONES AS THEY APPLY TO EATING AND DRINKING ESTABLISHMENTS, FOOD AND BEVERAGE SALEiS, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. (FINAL ACTION) XI. NEW BUSINESS NB-70. RATIFY APPOINTMENT-PLANNING DIRECTOR Ratify appointment of Mary Kay Peck as Planning Director. NB-71. BILL NO. 1300ZONING ORDINANCE Z-7-95 APPLICANT: MILLENIUM DEVELOPMENT AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON AME>n)ING ORDINANCE NO. 1130 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN RI-:AL PROPERTY WITHINTHECITY LIMITSOFTHECITY OF HENDERSON. DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 62 EAST, M.D.B. A M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RS-2 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTUL) DISTRICT TO RS-6-PUD (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT) DISTRICT, LOCATED SOUTH OF ARROYOGRANDE BOULEVARD AND WESTOFSTEPHANIESTREET.INTHE GREEN VALLEY RANCH PljANNlNG AREA, ANDOTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO. (REFER TO COMMITTEE AND REGULAR MEETINGS OF MARCH 19. 1996) NB-72. BILL NO. 1301 AMENDS MULTI-FAMILY ORDINANCE ZOA-l-N APPLICANT: CITY OF HENDERSON AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON AMENDING TITLE 19 OF THE HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE BY AMENDING THEMULTI-FAMILYORDINANCEANDOTHER MATTERS RELATEDTHERETO. (REFER TO COMMTTTEE AND REGULAR MEETINGS OF MARCH 19,1996) XII. SET MEETING Xin. ADJOURNMENT Ac.rjmA nFADiiNE Al Htma tor inckadon on lb* Cmncfl Agenda for the Meeting af Martk 19, 1996, • •< be nbniitKd, ki wrMng, no tater Htm nanday, Matt* 7,1 996 at 5:30 fjm. to the CRy Clefk'f afficc Aay McHM rtcrived rfler tke ahoTe dak wil aalamaticaljr kc placed on tke next City CMWU Agenda. H—Tik. 29,1996^ PULTE HOMES I.5-M/WJIVTM096/CM-3H DESIGNATES PROJECT SITE LEGAL NOTICE TO: RODRIGO GUTIERREZ TO: ANY AND ALL PERSONS who may claim an interest in defendant CURRENCY ANDTELEPHONE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 19th day of July, 1995, the City of Henderson and the Henderson Police Department commenced a forfeiture action pursuant to NRS 453.301 in Case Na A348480, Department Number XII, in the Eighth Judicial District Court of the State of Nevada. This action involved One Thousand Ninety Five Dollars ($1,095.00) in United States Currency and One (1) Cellular Telephone; serial number 14201890698 which was seized from Rodrigo Gutierrez on November 30, 1994. You must serve your answer to the complaint upon plaintiff's attorney within twenty (2) days of the termination of this publication. Ydur answer must set forth your response to the Complaint or the nature and existence of any right, title, or interest claimed by you in the defendant currency and telephone. If you fail to answer within the time provided. Judgment hy Default will be entered against you for the rehef demanded in the Complaint. Judge Myma E. Leavitt SHAUNA HUGHES CITY ATTORNEY Signature By: David Mincavage, Esq. Deputy City Attorney 243 Water StrH Henderson, Nevada 89015 H—Feb. 29, March 7,14,21, 1996. NOTICE OF CONTINUED PUBLIC HEARING COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT CPA-3-96 STEPHANIE/CARDONA TOWNHOMES APPLICANT: PULTE HOMES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Henderson, Nevada, will hold a Continued Public Hearing on March'19, 1996, at the hour uf 7:(M) p.m., or as soon thereafler a practicable, in the City Council Chambers. City Hall, 240 WaterStreet, Henderson, to consider a request to amend .the land use fn>m Low Density Residential to Medium Density Residential on 19.9 acres generally located at the mirthwest comer of Cardona Way and Stephanie Street in the Green Valley Ranch planning area. ANY AND ALL interested persoas may appear before the City Council either in person or by counsel, and may abject to or express approval of the propiwed amendments to the Land Use Policy Plan of the City of Henderson Comprehensive Plan, or may prior to the Public Hearing, file with the City Clerk written objection thereto or approval thereof. DATED this 26th day of February, 1996 and published in the Henderson Home News February 29, 1S>96. Is/ Susan Robison SUSAN ROBISON. CITY CLERK H—Feb. 29. 1996. LEGAL NOTICE BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA NOTICE QFAfPLICATION Nevada Power Company ("NPC .>r "Applicant") has filed an application, designated as Docket No. 96-2018, with the Public Service Commission of Nevada ("Commission"). In that application, NPC requests that it be authorized to: a) enter into agreements with Clark County, Nevada ("County") for the issuance and sale of tax-exempt Industrial Development Revenue Bonds ("IDBs") in a principal amount not to exceed $100,000,000 to finance certain expenditures for facilities required to provide local electric service, b) have the option of issuing and pledging First Mortgage Bonds in a like amount as collateral for the IDBs, and c) have the option of obtaining credit enhancements for the IDBs, including bond insurance and bank letters of credit In addition, pursuant to a commitment to the County for allocation of tax-exempt private activity bond volume cap. Applicant requests approval to expend up to $873,426 derived from the IDBs to pro vide facilities for the local fu mishing of electrical energy in the Sandy Valley area and a waiver of any related Rule 9 (line extensions) customer advance requirements. The application was filed pursuant to NRS 704.322 throu^ 704.328, inclusive, and NAC 703.430 through 703.443, indusi ve, and is on file and available for viewing by the public at the offices of the Commission, 727 Fairview Drive, Carson City, Nevada 89710 and 555 E. Washington Avenue, Suite 4600, Las Vegas, Nevada 89101. Persons with a direct and substantial interest in the filing may file Petitions for Leave to Intervene at either of the Commission's offices. Such Petitions must conform to the Commission's regulations and must be filed on or before Wednesday. March 20. 1996. Interested persons may submit Protests for filing at either of the Commission's offices. Protests must conform to the Commission's regulations. Other written comments may also be submitted for filing. By the Commission /s/ William H. Vance WILLL\M H. VANCE Commission SecreUry Dated: Carson City, Nevada 2/20/96 (SEAL) H—Feb. 29, 1996 LEGAL NOTICE BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA NOTICE OF HEARING On December 8,1995. Southwest Gas CorporaUon ("S<.ulhwest") filed with the Public Service Commission of Nevada ("Commission") an application, identified as DockH Na 9512016, for approval of a genend increa.se in its rates and charges for service* on its southern Nevada system (Southern Nevada Division). Southwest estimates that its proposed rates would increase its overall Southern Nevada Division annual revenues by approximately $15,753,720, or 11.89 percent The effect of the proposed request for increased revenues on each class of customer or class of service is as follows: Proposed Incrcasc/(Decreasc) Class Amount Percent ResMenUal Master Metered Mobile Homes General Air Conditioning Water Pumping Gas Service for Compression Street ft Outdoor Lighting Oectric Generation Other $9,941,295 62,942 5,929,431 (11.539) (167,742) 3,1S5 77 (396,288) 392.580 11.89% 11.55 15.87 (8.69) (21.49) L02 4.21 (3a86) 1X77 Southwest also proposes changes to certain of its existing rate elements which include (I) an kicreasc in the normal service establLshment charge; (2) an increase bi the depiwit for Kskicntial custoaien recsUblishing service afler llieir servke has been terminated for nonpayment; and (3) an increa.e in the Bksic Service Charge for residential and small genend cas t oi er s. Soatbwcst states that Ms request for increased revenues reflecU addilioaal coata of utility oper^kHM, not ktdadiag gM costs, experienced since general rate* were last changed ki 1993 by Ik* Caaunission. Soatkwcst also proposes to iaplcinent changes that Southwest beKeva would More accarately reflect current operating conditiona and the restructuring of tke kiterrtale nataralgM Mti transportation markets ordered by tke Federal Energy Rcgalatory Cmmissian. Tke Commissian kas scheduled a consumer sessfam to alkiw Southwest'] customers the oppiirtanlly to coamirDt on tke above rate application, as well as any other matters related to the rate* mtd srnrfec* ptvvidcd br Soutk west The date, Umc and locatkm of the cotmaier scaslaBb M folewi: MaKh 14,1996 at 6KW p-m. In Lm Vcgm at the Laa Vegis-aark Coanty Uhrmrj District (Flamkige Branch), 1401 East Flamingo Road. An evidentiary kcarkic pertaining to rate applicatiois for Soulkwcst's Nevada divisions km keen schedaled by the CamaUasfam to c omment, an Manday,Aprill. 1996, at lOKWajn. at the riiwhiliiri iAka at the Sawyer Baidli^ SS5 East Washfaicton Avenae, Room 4600,hi bcarkv 1,1996 •9710. The IBkig* ky Saattwist arc availaMc for review ky IkepaUk daring normal baskien kawa M Soatkwcst's hMhrnm aOIca and at tke Cammiaaliai's offices at 727 Falrvirw Drive, Caiwa Cky, Ncrada OrriO Md at the Sawyer Biddkig, 5S5 East Waahhigton A vcMR, ROM 4i00, Im ytwm, Nerada WlOl. Written i i—mi ai mmj be sent to >h C —isslB n at oltkcr af Ms •Akas aad AaaM rifercwc Docket No. 9S.1M16. H—r A. 1996. • • Lm VcgM, Nevada. The Comndashm km tcirtalivciy schcrfaled the csridentiary • milhc rate amplkatfciw to contkMW April 22,1996 at 9:30 a.m. and again SB May at 9:30 a.m. at dw Cwamihsiim's offices at IV Fairvifw Drive, Canon City, Nevada PULTE HOMES lONE CHANOE/PLANNB) UNIT UCVtLOFMCWT/TINTATlVff NUm:OMPIIErN>IVi KAN AMEMOMEMT 2-5-9*UOn'M.3-rt:MJ.M ._ ; / DESIGNATES PROJECT SITE LEGAL NOTICE CONTINUED ; : ; PUBLIC HEARING ^ APPEAL OF PLANNING COMMISSION DENIAL • AP6-96 ZONE CHANGE Z-5-96 APPLICANT: CHARLES HARRIS FOR PULTE HOMES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an Application for Appeal of Decision by the Planning Commissian has been filed with the Clerk of the Council of the City of Henderson, Nevada, by Charles Harris, regarding the review of a reclassification request fnim RS-2 (Single Family Residential) district to RM-10 (Medium Density Residential) district on 19.9 acres generally located at the northwest comer of Cardnna Way and Stephanie Street in the River Mountain planning area. A CONTINUED PUBLIC HEARING on said Appeal will be held on Tuesday, March 19,1996,atthehourof7:00p.m.,or as siK>n thereafter as practicable, in the Council Chamber at City Hall, 240 WaterStreet, in the City of Henderson. County of Clark, Nevada. ANY AND ALL persons may appear before the City Council either in person or by counsel, and may object to or express approval of this application, or may prior to Public Hearing, file with the City Clerk written ohjertion thereto or approval thereof. DATED this 22nd day of February, 1996, and PUBLISHED IN THE HENDERSON HOME NEWS on 2129196. /s/Susan Robison SUSAN ROBISON. CFTY CLERK •*=^='"*vw*H—Feb. 29. 1996. PULTE HOMES :0^f • M>NN''ED U.JIT 0€VtLOMtNT/TTtjIIVt MAPlCOWMtimNSIVI PIAK AMWOWihT ; 5 OfifUDnfc'-l i*CP*3 96 1 gcr.,--! DESIGNATtS PROJECT SITE CANCELLATION OF PUBLIC HEARING APPEAL OF PLANNING COMMISSION OENUL • AP-6-96 ZONE CHANGE Z-5-96 APPLICANT: CHARLES HARRIS FOR PULTE HOMES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Public Hearing scheduled for March 5.1996 on an Application for Appeal of Decision by the Planning Commission, filed with the Clerk i>f the Council of Uie City of Henderson, Nevada, by Charies Harris, regarding the review of a redassification request from RS-2 (Single Family Residential) district to RM-10 (Medium Density Residential) district on 19.9acresgenerally located at the northwest corner of Cardona Way and Stephanie Street in the River Mountain planning area, has been cancelled and rescheduled for Tuesday, March 19,1996 at 7:00, or as soon thereafter as practicable, hi the Council Chamber at City Hall. 240 Water Street, fai the City of Henderson, County of Clark, Nevada. ANY AND ALL persons may appear before the City Council either in person or by counsel, and may object to or express approval of this ^plication, or may prior to Continued Public Hearing, file with the City Clerk written objection thereto or approval thereof. Itl Susan Robison SUSAN ROBISON, CITY CLERK H—Feb. 29,1996. SUNRIDGE DEVELOPMENT COMPANY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT / ZONE CHANGE CPA7 9S/Z 14 DESIGNATES PKOJECT SITE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT • CPA-7-96 ZONE CHANGE • Z-14-96 SUNRIDGE AT MACIXNSALD RANCH APPLICANT: SUNROWE DEVELOPMENT CO. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CMjr Comidl of the City uf Henderson, Nevada, win hold a PaUic Hearing on March 19,1996, at the hoar of 7:00 pjH., or M soon thereafter as practicable, in the City COWKI Chambers, City Hall, 240 Water Street, Hendcnoo, to conldrr a miacst to aaMod the land use from Low Density RcaMcnlial and Pablk and ScadPublic to Higk Dcmity Residential, Low Density RcMcntiai and Public and Seml-PaUic; Mid a request to rcbcate ccftaki uses and reionc from RM-IS (Mc4hnn DcMMy R u ld i w Hrf ), RS-4 and RS-6 (Skigle Fandly RcaMcnUalX mid PS (Paklic and Semi-Pablk) district, dl with Master Dcvcla|aMa Han Overlay, to RM-IS (Medhm Density Residential). BS4 and RS-6 (ikici* ^'^y RMMeitflal) and K (PdMc and ScmlPaMk) district, al wMk Master Derdaimiciil Hmi Overlay, on approiiawtcly 509 acre*, tcwralv located oast of Eastcn Avenae, hi tke MacDenald Ranch planning area. ANY AND ALL interested peiaons may appcw kefore tke City Coanell either hi peiaon or ky counsel, smd may afciect J* lyaTH sir* Plsn. or m^ prior to tho PaMk Hearing. IBe>lth the to or expras approval oT the prsMscd Land Use Policy Plan of the City af Ho* toihe aty Clelt written ohjeetien thereto or aw^aj Ihet^ DATED this 26th ^y af Fekraary. 1996 mrf piMbhcd ki the Hendetaan Hsme News Fehnmry 29,1996. ^SManRaMaan SUSAN ROBISON, CfTY CLERK H—Fch. 29,1996w _^_____ !l SPORTS 'muRSDAY Henderson Home News Gators take aim at fourth straight title D J. Allan News Staff Writer This season could be a recordbreaker for Green Valley's baseball team. The Gators are vying for their fourth straight state title this spring — something no other Nevada team has accomplished. While coach Rodger Fairless, who has nine state titles to his name, downplays the possibilities, the players know what's on the line. To us seniors, it's real important," said senior Brandon Mattingly, an all-conference GV seniors want to go out with another baseball crown catcher for the Gators a year ago. "For some ofus, this could be our last year to play. To be able to look back in the future and say, 'Four state titles in four years,' that would be quite an accomplishment." The Gators will return just three starting position players from last year's squad, but this year's pitching staff could make Green Valley fans and their opponents forget about that in a hurry. "It's hard to tell right now what our strength is, but we'd like to think it's our pitching," said Fairless, whose squad topped McQueen 14-3 in the state title game last May. Senior right-hander Taylor Myers, one of the hardest throwers in the valley, will most likely move out of the bullpen this season to anchor the starting rotation. Myers, who has already signed to play at Arizona State, was 4-3 last season with a 2.22 eamed-run average and 66 strikeouts in 56 2/3 innings. Also looking to lead the way 'on the mound will be junior Taylor Smith and seniors Luke Anderson and Cory Frey. The 6foot-5 Anderson may be the surprise of the season for the Gators. "He's made a complete turnaround," said Mattingly of Frey. 'The whole team is actually expecting big things from him." Frey, a lefly who has already signed to play at Cal-Berkeley, will return off an 8-0 all-Sunrise performance of a year ago. John Judge/News Staff •: -. :: • • :: • '••.,,: > • '. -.. • ...:;•' ^ • : • .;•', PRACTICE UNDER WAY — Members of the Silverado baseball team listen to instructions during a practice session Tuesday. Execution, key to Silverado's hopes D.J. Allen News Staff Writer What a difference a year makes. At least that's what Silverado's baseball team is hoping. After finishing 4-22 overall and 2-12 in Sunset Division play in their inaugural season a year ago, the Skyhawks nearly captured a playoflFberth during the summer's American Legion season and are hoping to carry that success over to this spring's prep campaign. "We'll get better through natural maturity," said Silverado coach Brian Whitaker. "Everybody has a lot more experience. It shouldn't be a shock to compete at the varsity level, but we still need to learn how to win." The Skyhawks will be forced to do that without one of their top hitters. Junior rightfielder Sean Tsukamoto, who hit cleanup for Silverado last season, is out for the year with a severe knee injury. "I think our defense and pitching will do the jobs," said Whitaker, who was the head man at Valley before transferring to Silverado last year. "But, we'll have to manufacture rims and pi ay sm all bal 1. We have to execute. We don't have any power hitters." Whitaker said Tsukamoto's absence will be felt right from the start. 'That's going to be real big for us early in the season, before someone can step up and help produce runs," Whitaker said. "He was a key person for us all last year." Leading the Skyhawk offense will be senior shortstop Phil Platanitis, who led Silverado with a .323 average and 15 RBI a season ago. Platanitis will be one of a handful of upperclassmen Whitaker will look to for leadership. "We have some seniors ready to step up and have some big years for themselves," Whitaker said. Senior Marcus Raymond (.273, team-high 14 runs scored) will move from behind the plate to center field this season and his classmate Curtis Davis (.271) will take over for Tsukamoto in right field .after spending last season as the designated hitter. Seniors Nate Bazzell and Josh Barnard are slated to start at third base and second base, respectively. Bazzell said this season should have no resemblance to a year ago. "We should have more success than last year," Bazzell said. "We're just going to have to step it up and play as a team." Silverado will be led on the mound by 6-foot-5, senior righthander Mike Amone and jimior left-hander Mike O'Rourke. O'Rourke spent all of last season, as a sophomore, at the varsity level. Despite finishing the year with a 1-6 mark, O'Rourke led the Skyhawks with a 3.13 eamed-run average, three complete games and 23 strikeouts in 38 innings. Amone was 2-3 on the year with one complete game in four starts. 'The other spots in the rotation arc up for grabs as are the other starting positions," Whitaker said. Sophomore J.C. Maese, who played with the big club a year ago, looks like the front-runner at first base while juniors Brandon Splinter and Larry Yurek will battle for the starting nod behind the plate and juniors Jason Johnson and Jose Herrera will see time in left field. 'Things are Iboking a lot better ,"Whitaker said. "Wehad some success last summer and we hope that will carry over." Bazzell said he believes it will as the Skyhawks — who were outscored 247-90 by their opponents last season — will shoot for a berth in the zone tournament. "We're a lot better than last year," Bazzell said. "We're more experienced and we've had more time to play together." Silverado will begin play at home against Chaparral at 3 p.m. on March 8. Divisional play is set to begin on March 28. Juniors Doug Kohl and lah Jones will also see time on the mound. "It's hard to say who the top four are right now," said Fairless of the staff. The biggest question for the Gators will be in the infield as all four of their starters frojn last year's 31-4 squad graduated, including the Southern Conference's co-Player of the Year, shortstop Chad Hermansen, and all-Sunrise honorees, third baseman Matt Durham and first baseman A.C. Smith. Senior Wes Mosman, a reserve catcher who saw time at designated hitter last season, will most likely get the nod at third base and last year's leftfielder and lead-off hitter, senior Jeff Carter, will look to fill in the void at second. Carter was an allSunrise selection at designated hitter last season. Junior Bobby Pierce will get the task of filling in at shortstop for Hermansen, who was the Pittsburgh Pirates No. 1 draft pick last June. See Gators Page 18 Basic team to rebound in '96 D.J. Allen News Staff Water Last year hurt. Basic's baseball squad started Sunrise Division play 5-0 before battling Green Valley for sole possession of first place in the sixth game of league play. Not only did the Gators beat the Wolves to knock them out of first place, but the loss put Basic into a tail-spin as it lost six of the last nine games and missed the playoffs by a tie-breaker. Valley — which beat Basic 21 on the final day of the regular season — tied Basic for third place at 8-6 in the Sunrise (12-15 overall), but got the third and final berth into the zone tournament as the Vikings were 2-0 against the Wolves. But, that was last year. This is this year. "I'm just excited about this season," said third-year Basic coach Anson Jones. 'We're anxious to get playing. I have high expectations for this team. We should have gotten to zone last year, but we got nudged out. I'm looking forward to getting there this year." Basic will have its deepest squad in years, but for the Wolves to continue into post-season play, the pitching must stay solid. "The key will be if our pitchers can throw strikes," said Jones, who was a member of Basic's 1982 state championship squad. "That will be the determining factor ultimately." The Wolves' pitching staff will be without last year's top two starters who both graduated — Kevin Elliott and Ricky Hunt. Hunt was the workhorse of the squad, finishing 6-2 with a 2.69 eamed-run average and collecting all-Sunrise honors. This year, however, the pitching duties will be held by committee. "I've got six oTSeven pitchers right now I feel comfortable putting on the mound," Jones said. "We have more depth than we've ever had since I've been here pitching-wise." Senior fastballer Aaron Welboume maybe considered the ace of the staff heading into the year. He pitched 27 innings last year and finished with a record of 1-1 and 16 strikeouts. However, Jones is also expecting big things from senior Mike Belch. "Mike is the most improved player on the team," Jones said. Rounding out the pitching staff will be seniors Calvin Garland and Todd Gottschall and juniors Jeff Rednour, Jess Prisbrey and A.C. Carracciolo. :? Garland, an off-speed pitcher, threw 27 innings last year, but the other four pitchers have combined for less than 20 innings at the varsity level. Prisbrey was 6-2 at the JV level a season ago while Rednour, the lone lefthander, was 5-3 with 42 strikeouts in 33 irmings. The Wolves' strength may lie in the outfield. "The outfield will be real strong," Jones said. "There's six outfielders that are all pretty solid. It's going to com^ down to who's going to be hitting." Denny Seybert (.381) and Carlos Lueck (.361) — two of the fastest base-runners in the valley — have a grasp on left field and center field, respectively. Lueck was named all-Sunrise a season ago while Seybert collected Rookie of the Year honors during the American Legion season. Gottschall and juniors Jason Robinson and Angelo Seybert (.477 on JV) will battle for the right field position. On the infield, Welboume will hold the third base spot, while Carracciolo (.306, team-high 19 RBI) will return at shortstop and senior Jeff Novak (.342,15 RBI) will handle most of the duties behind the plate. • • -" Senior Louie Renteria and junior Rico Dye will fight for the nod at second base with senior Jake Rincon (.323) able to play both middle infield positions. At first base, Belch and Garland will look for playing time. However, a possibility later in the year may be sophomore Eric Wise. Wise, who has not worked out with the varsity team while he played basketball, led the JV squad last year with a .512 average and 24 RBI. He could also see some time on the mound. See Basic Page 18 Area boys golf teams getting set to tee it up BiN Bowman News Sports Editor For the rest of the state AAA golf teams, the task is simple: Catch the Green Valley boys if you can. The Gators are coming off back-to-back state championships and return two-time individual champ Russell Nygard. "Wefeel pretty good about this year," Green Valley coach Del Sagers said. But, Sagerq said the competition will be tough. "Bonanza didn't lose anybody," he said. "And Gorman is field ing a good team and Durango and Cimarron should be strong. We really won't know until we get started." The Gators open the season on Monday at 3 p.m. against Cimarron-Memorial at The Legacy. Ba sic gets under way Tuesday at Black Mountain at 7:30 a.m. against Bishop Gorman. Silverado tackles BoulderCity at WildHorse at 3 p.m. Tuesday. Here's a brief rundown of the three area teams: BASIC The Wolves "have four returning lettermen," coach Dennis Smuskiewicz said. The fifth and sixth spots will be the key for us this year." Returning for the Wolves will be senior Steve Zyla, sophomore Ryan Smuskiewicz, jimior Gerry Cram and sophomore Nick Nelson. Smuskiewicz said freshman Richard Ruane and sophomore Randy Robbins will probably fill the fifth and sixth spots in the early going. "We're lookingfor thefirstfour kids to be real solid," coach Smuskiewicz said. Overall, the Wolves "would like to qualify for zone," Smuskiewicz said. "But that's not going to be easy. We would have to be in the top three and it looks like Green Valley will be rocksolid. That leaves second and third between Chaparral, Valley and us." Smuskiewicz said the early matches will be key for the Wolves. "We need the top four to be consistent," he said. "And hopefully one of our last two golfers will shoot in the 40s. We hope to shoot in the 220s early and hope to get around 210 or 215 later in the year." GREEN VALLEY With seniors Nygard and Mike Louden leading the way, the Gators are again in top form. "We return five kids [from last year's team] and that should help us," Sagers said. "There's going to be a lot of competition."* Casey Hall is the other senior on the squad — and a returnee —along with junior Doug Brown and sophomore Avi Khitri. Sagers added the team "definitely sets the goal to win the state championship." To get there, the Gators are looking for consistency again this season. "We've got good players," Sagers said. "But it's going to come down to how deep we go. Our fourth, fifth and sixth golfers will be moving up and down a lot on this team. We just hope we peak at the right time. If we do tKat, we have a real good chance at winning state." SMGof Page 18 Mi i S i pilw*i>ji ^' ii'
PAGE 17

I • U J IfPP^PV^^ mm • niiiiii Page 16 Hndrson Horn* News Thursday, February 29, 1996 Thursday, February 29,1996 Henderson Home News Page 17 lnne^City Games to begin Friday The Greater Las Vegas InnerCity Games will hold auditions for elementary and middle school students for the junior broadcaster program from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday, March 1, at Gilbert Magnet School, 2102 W. Cartier Ave., corner of Clayton and Cartier, in North Las Vegas. Auditioning students will be asked to prepare a two-minute story on the games using a fact sheet and read the story in front of a camera, and will also undergo a brief interview. Selected students will receive training at the UNLV School of Communications on three Saturdays in March. Broadcasters will be teamed with a reporter/newscaster/announcer at a local television or radio station to report on the Games' clinics and preliminary competitions during the summer months, and during the Games to take place from Sept. 21 through Oct. 19. IVIedved to spealc at Hebrew Academy ~4^i4^diael Medved, co-host of the popular weekly PBS television series, "Sneak Previews," will speak at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 29, at the Hebrew Academy in Summerlin. Medved's topic will be "Saving Childhood: Protecting Your Children from the National Assault on Innocence." Thefree lecture, which is open to the public, is part of the Hebrew Acadekny's community-oriented Jewish Life and Culture progrtim. A film and media expert, he has been chief film critic for the New York Post. His latest book, "Hollywood vs America," gained national attention by re-orienting the entertainment industry's attitude toward family entertainment. Medved has authored seven non-fiction books, including bestsellers "What Really Happened to the Class of'65" (1976); "The Shadow Presidents" (1979); "The Golden Turkey Awards" (1980), and "Hospital: The Hidden Lives of a Medical Center Staff" (1983). He has also served as guest host of the Rush Limbaugh radio show. An active volunteer in the Jewish community, he cofounded the Jewish Center in Venice.Calif The Hebrew Academy is the first and onlynon-parochial, nonprofit, accredited, college preparatory school in Nevada with programs for students from the age of three through 12th grade. For more inforihation, call 255-4500. Children's Urgent Care opens in Whitney Ranch Minority coveragle discussed How people of color are portrayed in mainstream media will be discussed at an upcoming forum sponsored by the Las Vegas Association of Black Journalists. "Media Sensitivity: How does the general media see and show us?" will be held from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, March 2, at the West Las Vegas Library, 9^1 W. Lake Mead Blvd. For more information, call 256-0151. Children's Urgent Care, owned by. Dr. Jagannath S. Surpure, opened Feb. 19, at 601 Whitney Ranch Dr., Suite D22. Hours are from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday, and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. Designed to help sick and injured children, the facility provides minor emergency care faster and with less cost than emergency room visits, a spokesman said. Children's UrgentCate treats respiratory distress, high fever, ear pains, nose bleeds, foreign bodies, lacerations and broken bones, seizures and dehydration. The facility does not handle car accidents, serious injuries such as multiple fractures, lifethreatening problems or take any ambulances. Surpure plans to maintain longer hours 365 days a year. Surpure is triple board-certified in pediatrics, pediatrics emergency medicine and adult emergency medicine. He has been a pediatric emergency surgeon for nearly 20 years. He has also published several books in the field. Surpure is assisted by manager Bob Ready, and offiie assistants Sandra Loubert and Bemadette Cannon. AGENDA From Page 15 UB-62. MASTER SIGN PLAN • SP-29.95 OASIS GREENS APPLICANT: OASIS RESIDENTIAL Rrqufst for Master Sign Plan for apartmrnt homes in an RM-24 (Mrdium Density Residential) distrid at 2(M)I Ramrod Avenue in the Green Valley North planning area. (K>ANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDED APPROVAL OF MONUMENT SIGN ONLY.) •. • ;. V • • ; • • ^ ... UB-63. MASTER SIGN PLAN SP-30-95 OASIS SUMMIT APPLICANT: OASIS RESIDENTIAL Request for Master Sign Plan for ^artment homes in an RM-12 (Medium Density Residential) district at 2675 Windmill Parkway, in the Green Valley North planning area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDED APPROVAL OF MONUMENT SIGN ONLY.) UB-64. RESOLUTION SOUTHERN NEVADA WATER AUTHORITY CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON APPROVING AN I.NTERLOCAL COOPERATION A(;REEMENT REGARDING REPAYMENT TO SOUTHERN NEVADA WATER AUTHORITY (SNWA) FOR CERTAIN CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS; AUTHORIZING THE OFFICERS OF THE CITY TO EXECUTE SAME; PROVIDING OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELATED THERETO. ,1 UB-65. BILL NO. 1295 PARKING VIOLATIONS AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON DELETING H.M.C. 10.51 (CIVIL PARKING), EFFECTIVE APRIL 1,1996; DELETING H.M.C. 10.52 AND 1.5(PARKING), EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY; ADOPTING STATE LAW ON PARKING; AND PROVIDING THAT CERTAIN CURBS MAY BE PAINTED PARTICULAR COLORS; AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. (FINAL ACTION) UB-66. BILL NO. 1296 SEXUALLY ORIENTED BUSINESSES AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND CHAPTER 110, TITLE 4 OF THE HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE BY AMENDING REGULATIONS RELATING TO SEXUALLY ORIENTED BUSINESSES AS THEY APPLY TO NUDE DANCING; AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. (FINAL ACTION) UB-67. BILL NO. 1297 Z-10.96 MARYLAND 10 APPLICANT: R/S DEVELOPMENT AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY a)UNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OFTHE CITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 61 EAST, M.D.B. & M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RS-2 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL) DISTRICT TO RS-6 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL) DISTRICT ON 9S ACRES. GENERALLY LOCATED NORTHWEST OK EASTERN AVENUE AND MARYLAND PARKWAY, IN THE WESTGATE PLANNING AREA, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO. (HNAL ACTION) UB-68. BILL NO. 1298 Z-13-96 GREEN VALLEY/HORIZON RIDGE APPLICANT: OLEN DEVELOPMENT CORP. ,, „ AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY-AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHINTHECITY LIMITSOFTHECITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 61 EAST, M.D.B. & M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RS-2 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL)TO RM-16 (MEDIUM DENSITY RESIOENTUL) DISTRICT. LOCATED AT 595 SOUTH GREEN VALLEY PARKWAY, GENERALLY LOCATED NORTH WESTOF GREEN VALLEY PARKWAY AND HORIZON RIDGE PARKWAY, IN THE GREEN VALLEY RANCH PLANNING AREA AND OTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO. (ONAL ACTION) UB-69. BILL 1299 ZOA-2-96 ZONING ORDINANCE AMENDMENT APPLICANT: CITY OF HENDERSON AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON TO AMEND TITLE 19 OF THE HENDER.SON MUNICIPAL CODE BY AMENDING THE LAND USE REGULATIONS IN COMMERCIAL, INDUSTRIAL, OPEN SPACE AND PUBLIC ft SEMI PUBLIC ZONES AS THEY APPLY TO EATING AND DRINKING ESTABLISHMENTS, FOOD AND BEVERAGE SALEiS, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. (FINAL ACTION) XI. NEW BUSINESS NB-70. RATIFY APPOINTMENT-PLANNING DIRECTOR Ratify appointment of Mary Kay Peck as Planning Director. NB-71. BILL NO. 1300ZONING ORDINANCE Z-7-95 APPLICANT: MILLENIUM DEVELOPMENT AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON AME>n)ING ORDINANCE NO. 1130 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN RI-:AL PROPERTY WITHINTHECITY LIMITSOFTHECITY OF HENDERSON. DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 62 EAST, M.D.B. A M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RS-2 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTUL) DISTRICT TO RS-6-PUD (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT) DISTRICT, LOCATED SOUTH OF ARROYOGRANDE BOULEVARD AND WESTOFSTEPHANIESTREET.INTHE GREEN VALLEY RANCH PljANNlNG AREA, ANDOTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO. (REFER TO COMMITTEE AND REGULAR MEETINGS OF MARCH 19. 1996) NB-72. BILL NO. 1301 AMENDS MULTI-FAMILY ORDINANCE ZOA-l-N APPLICANT: CITY OF HENDERSON AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON AMENDING TITLE 19 OF THE HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE BY AMENDING THEMULTI-FAMILYORDINANCEANDOTHER MATTERS RELATEDTHERETO. (REFER TO COMMTTTEE AND REGULAR MEETINGS OF MARCH 19,1996) XII. SET MEETING Xin. ADJOURNMENT Ac.rjmA nFADiiNE Al Htma tor inckadon on lb* Cmncfl Agenda for the Meeting af Martk 19, 1996, • •< be nbniitKd, ki wrMng, no tater Htm nanday, Matt* 7,1 996 at 5:30 fjm. to the CRy Clefk'f afficc Aay McHM rtcrived rfler tke ahoTe dak wil aalamaticaljr kc placed on tke next City CMWU Agenda. H—Tik. 29,1996^ PULTE HOMES I.5-M/WJIVTM096/CM-3H DESIGNATES PROJECT SITE LEGAL NOTICE TO: RODRIGO GUTIERREZ TO: ANY AND ALL PERSONS who may claim an interest in defendant CURRENCY ANDTELEPHONE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 19th day of July, 1995, the City of Henderson and the Henderson Police Department commenced a forfeiture action pursuant to NRS 453.301 in Case Na A348480, Department Number XII, in the Eighth Judicial District Court of the State of Nevada. This action involved One Thousand Ninety Five Dollars ($1,095.00) in United States Currency and One (1) Cellular Telephone; serial number 14201890698 which was seized from Rodrigo Gutierrez on November 30, 1994. You must serve your answer to the complaint upon plaintiff's attorney within twenty (2) days of the termination of this publication. Ydur answer must set forth your response to the Complaint or the nature and existence of any right, title, or interest claimed by you in the defendant currency and telephone. If you fail to answer within the time provided. Judgment hy Default will be entered against you for the rehef demanded in the Complaint. Judge Myma E. Leavitt SHAUNA HUGHES CITY ATTORNEY Signature By: David Mincavage, Esq. Deputy City Attorney 243 Water StrH Henderson, Nevada 89015 H—Feb. 29, March 7,14,21, 1996. NOTICE OF CONTINUED PUBLIC HEARING COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT CPA-3-96 STEPHANIE/CARDONA TOWNHOMES APPLICANT: PULTE HOMES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Henderson, Nevada, will hold a Continued Public Hearing on March'19, 1996, at the hour uf 7:(M) p.m., or as soon thereafler a practicable, in the City Council Chambers. City Hall, 240 WaterStreet, Henderson, to consider a request to amend .the land use fn>m Low Density Residential to Medium Density Residential on 19.9 acres generally located at the mirthwest comer of Cardona Way and Stephanie Street in the Green Valley Ranch planning area. ANY AND ALL interested persoas may appear before the City Council either in person or by counsel, and may abject to or express approval of the propiwed amendments to the Land Use Policy Plan of the City of Henderson Comprehensive Plan, or may prior to the Public Hearing, file with the City Clerk written objection thereto or approval thereof. DATED this 26th day of February, 1996 and published in the Henderson Home News February 29, 1S>96. Is/ Susan Robison SUSAN ROBISON. CITY CLERK H—Feb. 29. 1996. LEGAL NOTICE BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA NOTICE QFAfPLICATION Nevada Power Company ("NPC .>r "Applicant") has filed an application, designated as Docket No. 96-2018, with the Public Service Commission of Nevada ("Commission"). In that application, NPC requests that it be authorized to: a) enter into agreements with Clark County, Nevada ("County") for the issuance and sale of tax-exempt Industrial Development Revenue Bonds ("IDBs") in a principal amount not to exceed $100,000,000 to finance certain expenditures for facilities required to provide local electric service, b) have the option of issuing and pledging First Mortgage Bonds in a like amount as collateral for the IDBs, and c) have the option of obtaining credit enhancements for the IDBs, including bond insurance and bank letters of credit In addition, pursuant to a commitment to the County for allocation of tax-exempt private activity bond volume cap. Applicant requests approval to expend up to $873,426 derived from the IDBs to pro vide facilities for the local fu mishing of electrical energy in the Sandy Valley area and a waiver of any related Rule 9 (line extensions) customer advance requirements. The application was filed pursuant to NRS 704.322 throu^ 704.328, inclusive, and NAC 703.430 through 703.443, indusi ve, and is on file and available for viewing by the public at the offices of the Commission, 727 Fairview Drive, Carson City, Nevada 89710 and 555 E. Washington Avenue, Suite 4600, Las Vegas, Nevada 89101. Persons with a direct and substantial interest in the filing may file Petitions for Leave to Intervene at either of the Commission's offices. Such Petitions must conform to the Commission's regulations and must be filed on or before Wednesday. March 20. 1996. Interested persons may submit Protests for filing at either of the Commission's offices. Protests must conform to the Commission's regulations. Other written comments may also be submitted for filing. By the Commission /s/ William H. Vance WILLL\M H. VANCE Commission SecreUry Dated: Carson City, Nevada 2/20/96 (SEAL) H—Feb. 29, 1996 LEGAL NOTICE BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA NOTICE OF HEARING On December 8,1995. Southwest Gas CorporaUon ("S<.ulhwest") filed with the Public Service Commission of Nevada ("Commission") an application, identified as DockH Na 9512016, for approval of a genend increa.se in its rates and charges for service* on its southern Nevada system (Southern Nevada Division). Southwest estimates that its proposed rates would increase its overall Southern Nevada Division annual revenues by approximately $15,753,720, or 11.89 percent The effect of the proposed request for increased revenues on each class of customer or class of service is as follows: Proposed Incrcasc/(Decreasc) Class Amount Percent ResMenUal Master Metered Mobile Homes General Air Conditioning Water Pumping Gas Service for Compression Street ft Outdoor Lighting Oectric Generation Other $9,941,295 62,942 5,929,431 (11.539) (167,742) 3,1S5 77 (396,288) 392.580 11.89% 11.55 15.87 (8.69) (21.49) L02 4.21 (3a86) 1X77 Southwest also proposes changes to certain of its existing rate elements which include (I) an kicreasc in the normal service establLshment charge; (2) an increase bi the depiwit for Kskicntial custoaien recsUblishing service afler llieir servke has been terminated for nonpayment; and (3) an increa.e in the Bksic Service Charge for residential and small genend cas t oi er s. Soatbwcst states that Ms request for increased revenues reflecU addilioaal coata of utility oper^kHM, not ktdadiag gM costs, experienced since general rate* were last changed ki 1993 by Ik* Caaunission. Soatkwcst also proposes to iaplcinent changes that Southwest beKeva would More accarately reflect current operating conditiona and the restructuring of tke kiterrtale nataralgM Mti transportation markets ordered by tke Federal Energy Rcgalatory Cmmissian. Tke Commissian kas scheduled a consumer sessfam to alkiw Southwest'] customers the oppiirtanlly to coamirDt on tke above rate application, as well as any other matters related to the rate* mtd srnrfec* ptvvidcd br Soutk west The date, Umc and locatkm of the cotmaier scaslaBb M folewi: MaKh 14,1996 at 6KW p-m. In Lm Vcgm at the Laa Vegis-aark Coanty Uhrmrj District (Flamkige Branch), 1401 East Flamingo Road. An evidentiary kcarkic pertaining to rate applicatiois for Soulkwcst's Nevada divisions km keen schedaled by the CamaUasfam to c omment, an Manday,Aprill. 1996, at lOKWajn. at the riiwhiliiri iAka at the Sawyer Baidli^ SS5 East Washfaicton Avenae, Room 4600,hi bcarkv 1,1996 •9710. The IBkig* ky Saattwist arc availaMc for review ky IkepaUk daring normal baskien kawa M Soatkwcst's hMhrnm aOIca and at tke Cammiaaliai's offices at 727 Falrvirw Drive, Caiwa Cky, Ncrada OrriO Md at the Sawyer Biddkig, 5S5 East Waahhigton A vcMR, ROM 4i00, Im ytwm, Nerada WlOl. Written i i—mi ai mmj be sent to >h C —isslB n at oltkcr af Ms •Akas aad AaaM rifercwc Docket No. 9S.1M16. H—r A. 1996. • • Lm VcgM, Nevada. The Comndashm km tcirtalivciy schcrfaled the csridentiary • milhc rate amplkatfciw to contkMW April 22,1996 at 9:30 a.m. and again SB May at 9:30 a.m. at dw Cwamihsiim's offices at IV Fairvifw Drive, Canon City, Nevada PULTE HOMES lONE CHANOE/PLANNB) UNIT UCVtLOFMCWT/TINTATlVff NUm:OMPIIErN>IVi KAN AMEMOMEMT 2-5-9*UOn'M.3-rt:MJ.M ._ ; / DESIGNATES PROJECT SITE LEGAL NOTICE CONTINUED ; : ; PUBLIC HEARING ^ APPEAL OF PLANNING COMMISSION DENIAL • AP6-96 ZONE CHANGE Z-5-96 APPLICANT: CHARLES HARRIS FOR PULTE HOMES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an Application for Appeal of Decision by the Planning Commissian has been filed with the Clerk of the Council of the City of Henderson, Nevada, by Charles Harris, regarding the review of a reclassification request fnim RS-2 (Single Family Residential) district to RM-10 (Medium Density Residential) district on 19.9 acres generally located at the northwest comer of Cardnna Way and Stephanie Street in the River Mountain planning area. A CONTINUED PUBLIC HEARING on said Appeal will be held on Tuesday, March 19,1996,atthehourof7:00p.m.,or as siK>n thereafter as practicable, in the Council Chamber at City Hall, 240 WaterStreet, in the City of Henderson. County of Clark, Nevada. ANY AND ALL persons may appear before the City Council either in person or by counsel, and may object to or express approval of this application, or may prior to Public Hearing, file with the City Clerk written ohjertion thereto or approval thereof. DATED this 22nd day of February, 1996, and PUBLISHED IN THE HENDERSON HOME NEWS on 2129196. /s/Susan Robison SUSAN ROBISON. CFTY CLERK •*=^='"*vw*H—Feb. 29. 1996. PULTE HOMES :0^f • M>NN''ED U.JIT 0€VtLOMtNT/TTtjIIVt MAPlCOWMtimNSIVI PIAK AMWOWihT ; 5 OfifUDnfc'-l i*CP*3 96 1 gcr.,--! DESIGNATtS PROJECT SITE CANCELLATION OF PUBLIC HEARING APPEAL OF PLANNING COMMISSION OENUL • AP-6-96 ZONE CHANGE Z-5-96 APPLICANT: CHARLES HARRIS FOR PULTE HOMES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Public Hearing scheduled for March 5.1996 on an Application for Appeal of Decision by the Planning Commission, filed with the Clerk i>f the Council of Uie City of Henderson, Nevada, by Charies Harris, regarding the review of a redassification request from RS-2 (Single Family Residential) district to RM-10 (Medium Density Residential) district on 19.9acresgenerally located at the northwest corner of Cardona Way and Stephanie Street in the River Mountain planning area, has been cancelled and rescheduled for Tuesday, March 19,1996 at 7:00, or as soon thereafter as practicable, hi the Council Chamber at City Hall. 240 Water Street, fai the City of Henderson, County of Clark, Nevada. ANY AND ALL persons may appear before the City Council either in person or by counsel, and may object to or express approval of this ^plication, or may prior to Continued Public Hearing, file with the City Clerk written objection thereto or approval thereof. Itl Susan Robison SUSAN ROBISON, CITY CLERK H—Feb. 29,1996. SUNRIDGE DEVELOPMENT COMPANY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT / ZONE CHANGE CPA7 9S/Z 14 DESIGNATES PKOJECT SITE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENT • CPA-7-96 ZONE CHANGE • Z-14-96 SUNRIDGE AT MACIXNSALD RANCH APPLICANT: SUNROWE DEVELOPMENT CO. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CMjr Comidl of the City uf Henderson, Nevada, win hold a PaUic Hearing on March 19,1996, at the hoar of 7:00 pjH., or M soon thereafter as practicable, in the City COWKI Chambers, City Hall, 240 Water Street, Hendcnoo, to conldrr a miacst to aaMod the land use from Low Density RcaMcnlial and Pablk and ScadPublic to Higk Dcmity Residential, Low Density RcMcntiai and Public and Seml-PaUic; Mid a request to rcbcate ccftaki uses and reionc from RM-IS (Mc4hnn DcMMy R u ld i w Hrf ), RS-4 and RS-6 (Skigle Fandly RcaMcnUalX mid PS (Paklic and Semi-Pablk) district, dl with Master Dcvcla|aMa Han Overlay, to RM-IS (Medhm Density Residential). BS4 and RS-6 (ikici* ^'^y RMMeitflal) and K (PdMc and ScmlPaMk) district, al wMk Master Derdaimiciil Hmi Overlay, on approiiawtcly 509 acre*, tcwralv located oast of Eastcn Avenae, hi tke MacDenald Ranch planning area. ANY AND ALL interested peiaons may appcw kefore tke City Coanell either hi peiaon or ky counsel, smd may afciect J* lyaTH sir* Plsn. or m^ prior to tho PaMk Hearing. IBe>lth the to or expras approval oT the prsMscd Land Use Policy Plan of the City af Ho* toihe aty Clelt written ohjeetien thereto or aw^aj Ihet^ DATED this 26th ^y af Fekraary. 1996 mrf piMbhcd ki the Hendetaan Hsme News Fehnmry 29,1996. ^SManRaMaan SUSAN ROBISON, CfTY CLERK H—Fch. 29,1996w _^_____ !l SPORTS 'muRSDAY Henderson Home News Gators take aim at fourth straight title D J. Allan News Staff Writer This season could be a recordbreaker for Green Valley's baseball team. The Gators are vying for their fourth straight state title this spring — something no other Nevada team has accomplished. While coach Rodger Fairless, who has nine state titles to his name, downplays the possibilities, the players know what's on the line. To us seniors, it's real important," said senior Brandon Mattingly, an all-conference GV seniors want to go out with another baseball crown catcher for the Gators a year ago. "For some ofus, this could be our last year to play. To be able to look back in the future and say, 'Four state titles in four years,' that would be quite an accomplishment." The Gators will return just three starting position players from last year's squad, but this year's pitching staff could make Green Valley fans and their opponents forget about that in a hurry. "It's hard to tell right now what our strength is, but we'd like to think it's our pitching," said Fairless, whose squad topped McQueen 14-3 in the state title game last May. Senior right-hander Taylor Myers, one of the hardest throwers in the valley, will most likely move out of the bullpen this season to anchor the starting rotation. Myers, who has already signed to play at Arizona State, was 4-3 last season with a 2.22 eamed-run average and 66 strikeouts in 56 2/3 innings. Also looking to lead the way 'on the mound will be junior Taylor Smith and seniors Luke Anderson and Cory Frey. The 6foot-5 Anderson may be the surprise of the season for the Gators. "He's made a complete turnaround," said Mattingly of Frey. 'The whole team is actually expecting big things from him." Frey, a lefly who has already signed to play at Cal-Berkeley, will return off an 8-0 all-Sunrise performance of a year ago. John Judge/News Staff •: -. :: • • :: • '••.,,: > • '. -.. • ...:;•' ^ • : • .;•', PRACTICE UNDER WAY — Members of the Silverado baseball team listen to instructions during a practice session Tuesday. Execution, key to Silverado's hopes D.J. Allen News Staff Writer What a difference a year makes. At least that's what Silverado's baseball team is hoping. After finishing 4-22 overall and 2-12 in Sunset Division play in their inaugural season a year ago, the Skyhawks nearly captured a playoflFberth during the summer's American Legion season and are hoping to carry that success over to this spring's prep campaign. "We'll get better through natural maturity," said Silverado coach Brian Whitaker. "Everybody has a lot more experience. It shouldn't be a shock to compete at the varsity level, but we still need to learn how to win." The Skyhawks will be forced to do that without one of their top hitters. Junior rightfielder Sean Tsukamoto, who hit cleanup for Silverado last season, is out for the year with a severe knee injury. "I think our defense and pitching will do the jobs," said Whitaker, who was the head man at Valley before transferring to Silverado last year. "But, we'll have to manufacture rims and pi ay sm all bal 1. We have to execute. We don't have any power hitters." Whitaker said Tsukamoto's absence will be felt right from the start. 'That's going to be real big for us early in the season, before someone can step up and help produce runs," Whitaker said. "He was a key person for us all last year." Leading the Skyhawk offense will be senior shortstop Phil Platanitis, who led Silverado with a .323 average and 15 RBI a season ago. Platanitis will be one of a handful of upperclassmen Whitaker will look to for leadership. "We have some seniors ready to step up and have some big years for themselves," Whitaker said. Senior Marcus Raymond (.273, team-high 14 runs scored) will move from behind the plate to center field this season and his classmate Curtis Davis (.271) will take over for Tsukamoto in right field .after spending last season as the designated hitter. Seniors Nate Bazzell and Josh Barnard are slated to start at third base and second base, respectively. Bazzell said this season should have no resemblance to a year ago. "We should have more success than last year," Bazzell said. "We're just going to have to step it up and play as a team." Silverado will be led on the mound by 6-foot-5, senior righthander Mike Amone and jimior left-hander Mike O'Rourke. O'Rourke spent all of last season, as a sophomore, at the varsity level. Despite finishing the year with a 1-6 mark, O'Rourke led the Skyhawks with a 3.13 eamed-run average, three complete games and 23 strikeouts in 38 innings. Amone was 2-3 on the year with one complete game in four starts. 'The other spots in the rotation arc up for grabs as are the other starting positions," Whitaker said. Sophomore J.C. Maese, who played with the big club a year ago, looks like the front-runner at first base while juniors Brandon Splinter and Larry Yurek will battle for the starting nod behind the plate and juniors Jason Johnson and Jose Herrera will see time in left field. 'Things are Iboking a lot better ,"Whitaker said. "Wehad some success last summer and we hope that will carry over." Bazzell said he believes it will as the Skyhawks — who were outscored 247-90 by their opponents last season — will shoot for a berth in the zone tournament. "We're a lot better than last year," Bazzell said. "We're more experienced and we've had more time to play together." Silverado will begin play at home against Chaparral at 3 p.m. on March 8. Divisional play is set to begin on March 28. Juniors Doug Kohl and lah Jones will also see time on the mound. "It's hard to say who the top four are right now," said Fairless of the staff. The biggest question for the Gators will be in the infield as all four of their starters frojn last year's 31-4 squad graduated, including the Southern Conference's co-Player of the Year, shortstop Chad Hermansen, and all-Sunrise honorees, third baseman Matt Durham and first baseman A.C. Smith. Senior Wes Mosman, a reserve catcher who saw time at designated hitter last season, will most likely get the nod at third base and last year's leftfielder and lead-off hitter, senior Jeff Carter, will look to fill in the void at second. Carter was an allSunrise selection at designated hitter last season. Junior Bobby Pierce will get the task of filling in at shortstop for Hermansen, who was the Pittsburgh Pirates No. 1 draft pick last June. See Gators Page 18 Basic team to rebound in '96 D.J. Allen News Staff Water Last year hurt. Basic's baseball squad started Sunrise Division play 5-0 before battling Green Valley for sole possession of first place in the sixth game of league play. Not only did the Gators beat the Wolves to knock them out of first place, but the loss put Basic into a tail-spin as it lost six of the last nine games and missed the playoffs by a tie-breaker. Valley — which beat Basic 21 on the final day of the regular season — tied Basic for third place at 8-6 in the Sunrise (12-15 overall), but got the third and final berth into the zone tournament as the Vikings were 2-0 against the Wolves. But, that was last year. This is this year. "I'm just excited about this season," said third-year Basic coach Anson Jones. 'We're anxious to get playing. I have high expectations for this team. We should have gotten to zone last year, but we got nudged out. I'm looking forward to getting there this year." Basic will have its deepest squad in years, but for the Wolves to continue into post-season play, the pitching must stay solid. "The key will be if our pitchers can throw strikes," said Jones, who was a member of Basic's 1982 state championship squad. "That will be the determining factor ultimately." The Wolves' pitching staff will be without last year's top two starters who both graduated — Kevin Elliott and Ricky Hunt. Hunt was the workhorse of the squad, finishing 6-2 with a 2.69 eamed-run average and collecting all-Sunrise honors. This year, however, the pitching duties will be held by committee. "I've got six oTSeven pitchers right now I feel comfortable putting on the mound," Jones said. "We have more depth than we've ever had since I've been here pitching-wise." Senior fastballer Aaron Welboume maybe considered the ace of the staff heading into the year. He pitched 27 innings last year and finished with a record of 1-1 and 16 strikeouts. However, Jones is also expecting big things from senior Mike Belch. "Mike is the most improved player on the team," Jones said. Rounding out the pitching staff will be seniors Calvin Garland and Todd Gottschall and juniors Jeff Rednour, Jess Prisbrey and A.C. Carracciolo. :? Garland, an off-speed pitcher, threw 27 innings last year, but the other four pitchers have combined for less than 20 innings at the varsity level. Prisbrey was 6-2 at the JV level a season ago while Rednour, the lone lefthander, was 5-3 with 42 strikeouts in 33 irmings. The Wolves' strength may lie in the outfield. "The outfield will be real strong," Jones said. "There's six outfielders that are all pretty solid. It's going to com^ down to who's going to be hitting." Denny Seybert (.381) and Carlos Lueck (.361) — two of the fastest base-runners in the valley — have a grasp on left field and center field, respectively. Lueck was named all-Sunrise a season ago while Seybert collected Rookie of the Year honors during the American Legion season. Gottschall and juniors Jason Robinson and Angelo Seybert (.477 on JV) will battle for the right field position. On the infield, Welboume will hold the third base spot, while Carracciolo (.306, team-high 19 RBI) will return at shortstop and senior Jeff Novak (.342,15 RBI) will handle most of the duties behind the plate. • • -" Senior Louie Renteria and junior Rico Dye will fight for the nod at second base with senior Jake Rincon (.323) able to play both middle infield positions. At first base, Belch and Garland will look for playing time. However, a possibility later in the year may be sophomore Eric Wise. Wise, who has not worked out with the varsity team while he played basketball, led the JV squad last year with a .512 average and 24 RBI. He could also see some time on the mound. See Basic Page 18 Area boys golf teams getting set to tee it up BiN Bowman News Sports Editor For the rest of the state AAA golf teams, the task is simple: Catch the Green Valley boys if you can. The Gators are coming off back-to-back state championships and return two-time individual champ Russell Nygard. "Wefeel pretty good about this year," Green Valley coach Del Sagers said. But, Sagerq said the competition will be tough. "Bonanza didn't lose anybody," he said. "And Gorman is field ing a good team and Durango and Cimarron should be strong. We really won't know until we get started." The Gators open the season on Monday at 3 p.m. against Cimarron-Memorial at The Legacy. Ba sic gets under way Tuesday at Black Mountain at 7:30 a.m. against Bishop Gorman. Silverado tackles BoulderCity at WildHorse at 3 p.m. Tuesday. Here's a brief rundown of the three area teams: BASIC The Wolves "have four returning lettermen," coach Dennis Smuskiewicz said. The fifth and sixth spots will be the key for us this year." Returning for the Wolves will be senior Steve Zyla, sophomore Ryan Smuskiewicz, jimior Gerry Cram and sophomore Nick Nelson. Smuskiewicz said freshman Richard Ruane and sophomore Randy Robbins will probably fill the fifth and sixth spots in the early going. "We're lookingfor thefirstfour kids to be real solid," coach Smuskiewicz said. Overall, the Wolves "would like to qualify for zone," Smuskiewicz said. "But that's not going to be easy. We would have to be in the top three and it looks like Green Valley will be rocksolid. That leaves second and third between Chaparral, Valley and us." Smuskiewicz said the early matches will be key for the Wolves. "We need the top four to be consistent," he said. "And hopefully one of our last two golfers will shoot in the 40s. We hope to shoot in the 220s early and hope to get around 210 or 215 later in the year." GREEN VALLEY With seniors Nygard and Mike Louden leading the way, the Gators are again in top form. "We return five kids [from last year's team] and that should help us," Sagers said. "There's going to be a lot of competition."* Casey Hall is the other senior on the squad — and a returnee —along with junior Doug Brown and sophomore Avi Khitri. Sagers added the team "definitely sets the goal to win the state championship." To get there, the Gators are looking for consistency again this season. "We've got good players," Sagers said. "But it's going to come down to how deep we go. Our fourth, fifth and sixth golfers will be moving up and down a lot on this team. We just hope we peak at the right time. If we do tKat, we have a real good chance at winning state." SMGof Page 18 Mi i S i pilw*i>ji ^' ii'
PAGE 18

fmmmmmmm mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm mmmmmmmm PaO 18 Henderson Home News Thursday, February 29,1996 Single bowling headquarters location studied Nine cities have been contacted concerning interest in possibly becoming the home of bowling headquarters. The sites are part of industry restructuring under Bowling Inc.'s investigating advantages of consolidating and relocating all association headquarters into one facility. Included are the Milwaukee area, current home of ABC, WIBC, YABA and USA Bowling; the Dallas-Ft. Worth area, BPAA's location; and St, Louis. Others are Atlanta, Indianapolis, Kansas City, Nashville, Orlando and San Antonio. The study reviews economic impact generated by headquarters and requests the municipahty to accommodate the organizations with an existing facility or a build-to-suit structure at no or low cost to Bowling Inc. The headquarters needs to be large enough to include support facilities, such as a training center with lanes and locker room; a television production center; research and development center; conference rooms; classrooms; space to accommodate trade shows; office and administration space and nearby hotel facilities. Inquiries, including cities not LINES FROM THE LANES RUTH SOEHLKE 565-8398 listed, should be forwarded to Jane Orlin, Cushman & Wakefield, 51W. 52nd St., New York, N.Y. 10019, or call (212)841-4588 ABC and YABA recognized ABC's Centennial and the best achievements of YABA members are being celebrated by the Bowling Hall of Fame and Museum. A special exhibit in St. Louis offers insight into ABC's first 100 years through a collection of artifacts, photos, illustrations and text. YABA members who have bowled and approved 300 games and 800 series from 1980 to the present are now part of the Hall's Hometown Heroics exhibit. Visitors may access names through a computer keyboard, as they have been able to do for favorite ABC aad WIBC members. Printouts of members' accomplishments are available. YABA will automatically forward youths' names to the GOLF From page 17 And then there's Nygard. "Russell just elevates everyone to his level," Sagers said. "He's a good leader to have." Others battling for spots include "four sophomores who were pretty good as freshmen," Sagers said. Those include: Khitri, Dallas Massey, Jared Monk and Anthony Kindig. SILVERADO The Skyhawks have the numbers, but not the experience. "We had about 20 out and cut down to 10," Silverado coach Randy Minagil said. Minagil said his top returnees will be junior Jason Rowland and sophomore Brian Almassy. "I still have no seniors on my top 10," Minagil said. The Skyhawks' season will be determined "by how well the unknowns do," Minagil said. "We had three kids move in from other schools and they are looking really good." Those three are freshman Bradley Callahan; Mark Zabalio, a junior transfer from Chaparral and Joey Rayes, a sophomore transfer from Bishop Gorman. The key for the Skyhawks will be "finding the best six who can play during a match," Minagil said. "The lineup's always going to change, especially with young kids." Minagil said he's looking forward to the season. "We've got a good nucleus," he said. "And we've got more potential than we had at this time last year." BASIC From Page 17 "We've got a solid extra player at every position," Jones said. Now comes the part of pulling everyone together. "The key will be our team staying together and not bickering with each other," Gottschall said. "But, I don't think there will be much of that this year." • • -^ • ^-r--^^-^y Although missing the prep playoffs last year, Jones said the squad's American Legion experience last summer should help. Basic will open its season on March 8 against Cim-Memorial at 7 p.m. at Burkholder Field. League play is set to begin on March 28. museum four times per year. Names are obtained through high score award applications. SUNDAY STREAKERS: David Willey rolled a new high game of 259-643 for 127 pins over average, Gary Schweitzer 223, Robert Hanson 580-219. HENDERSON OUTLAWS: Amy Doty 201-514, Robin Malmgren 237 hep game, May Eawlings 651 hep series. Also Carla Hall 211, Carol Conrad 503, 671 hep, Henretta Heaney 655. KERR-MCGEE LEAGUE: Mike Hanna 553, Bill Jones 551, Dave Snyder 234-546. Also Mike Hanna 223-600, Mary Jones Jr. 220-594 for 105 pins over average. WOODY CARDUCCI: Dan Bingamon 234-649, Ty Parker 226-595, Ralph Fyke Sr. 255-649, Bill Tate 568, Glen Bridges 562, Luke Alexander 222-554, Alfred Behr 212-553, Robert Brennan 235-551, Sherman Fulbright 544, Ivan Beavor 544, Bill Jones 230, RayVillas219,TomSoehlke214, Marty Martinez 211. Also Charles Brown Sr. 255-651, Scott Miller 245-621, Glen Bridges 229-599, Dan Bingamon 223-597, Ty Parker 213-591, Matt Lanatta 247-584, Pike Spaulding 228GATORS From Page 17 """" Another loss the Gators have suffered is that of utility man Kevin Eberwein, who can now be found in the UNLV Hustlin' Rebels' everyday lineup. Although losing a load of firepower offensively, the Gators have the ingredients to not skip a beat. All-conference centerfielder Nick Day, who has already signed to play at Stanford, will return his 10 home runs and 53 RBI for his senior season as will Mattingly, who hit .442 a year ago with five home runs and 48 RBI. "You would hope to think the seniors would be the leaders of the ball club," said Fairless, whose Green Valley squad has captured the Sunrise Division crown in the school's four years of existence. "That's what we're hoping for right now." Joining Day in the outfield could be seniors John Pashales and Tyson Allgood, but nothing is certain, --.r • • • :.. • v. • .,..: • "We have 10 kids in the outfield fighting for basically two positions," Fairless said. Green Valley will open the season at home against Gorman on March 8 at 3 p.m. Divisional play is set to begin on March 28. DOE COMMUNITY ADVISORY BOARD MEETING The Community Advisory Board for Nevada Test Site Programs will meet Wednesday, March 6, 1996. Agenda Items are: ^ Environmental Restoration Budget Requests 1^ Environmental Impact Statement Time: 5:30 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. Place; Durango High School 7100 W. Dewey Drive, in the Lecture Center Las Vegas, Nevada If you are unable to attend, have comments or questions, please contact: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management P.O. Box 98518 Las Vegas, Nevada 89193-8518 702-295-0197 U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office 569, Bill Tate 551, Ivan Beavor 210-546, BillJones 202-539. HENDERSON HOUSEWIVES: Donna Newton 124 pins over average at 496, Irene Brown 212. Afso Pam Weiss 205, Diana Schultz 506, Fran Burnett 639 hep, Iline Erdman 231 hep. YOUNG AT HEART: Don Bonneau 521,235-635 hep highs, larry Prochazka 233-634, leota Gleason 229, Fran Groforth 649, Ruth Famsworth 225-612 hep. Also, Alfred Wehr 211, 248 hep game, Betty Kramer 244-618 hep, John Goforth 122 pins aover average with 191-497. DONT CARE LEAGUBi Bob Frear 522, Georgette Johnsrud 511, Rick Davis 238 hep game, Dave Turner 613 hep series, Jeanne Brandau 238 hep game and Marie Singer 630 hep series. FOE 2672 EAGLES MIXED: Richard Lopacinski 200-584, Corky Roundy 554, Doug Roundy 214-529, Cindy Kitchen 202-534, Maude Clark 201-514. THURSDAY NOONERS: Barb Boyd 208-511,236-595 hep highs. MISFIT DOUBIES: Rick Davis 146 pins over average with 212-563,707 high hep series. Also Ty Parker 228-201-608, Rick Davis 224-580 Chris Hartman The OCEAN SPRAY HENDERSON BOYS' & GIRLS' CLUB BASKETBALL LEAGUE STANDINGS 524, Eric Jones 213-506, Jennifer Olson 507 for 108 over average, Mary Jones 218-591 fo^l26 over and Rick Davis was 148 over average. SHIRTS & SKIRTS: Reactive B Dan B. 226-610,Arlan Crowl 205-570, Wayne Ross 237536, Dean Duncan 212-204-573, Mitch lowery 525, Dan Kozik 528, Teddy Jones 539, Dave Murphy 521, Mary Jones Jr. 545, Cherie Saunden500. Also John Keithley 220-587, Ted Johns 207-540, Carl Lore 525. MIXED NUTS: Ty Parker 225-584, Tina Wagner 218, Phyllis Morris 543. Also Lee Farrell 226 and Floyd Garcia 596. SENIORS FOR FUN: Alfred Wehr took all four leads with 246-621, 277-714 hep and 138 pins over average, Barbara Lorenz led the women with 219586 hep and season scratch series 482. HENDERSON OUTLAWS: Packy Fein 200-550, Amy Doty 209-537, Mary Henry 511. SUNSET MDffiRS: Norman Pate 238-664, Dave Maimes 247574. VinceThurman 212, Janell Phillips 524, Gigi Jones 516. BREAKFAST ROLLERS: Marian Rogas had 136 pins over average with 210-508, Ginny Standings Summers 514, Barbara Beck 203, Evelyn Bai'ber 513. HIGH RULLERS: Carl Mayrose 212, Werner Craatz 211,Bob Schultt 568, J^dy McLaughlin 202-506. HIZZ & HERS: Robert E. Lee 223-612, Bob Oliver 234-598, Nancy Cloud 503, Tammy Parker 104 over average with a 473. John Ohanian 212-545. ALMOST SCRATCH: Pat Maguinness 146 pins over with 227-587 and Bob Cross 116 over with 220-535, Derek Cardwell 245, Bill Wagner 215-212-629, Andre Jemmott 234-613. ETHEL M: Jeff Missig 217, Joe Lusch 594-213, Steve Pro 214-583, Marsha Ashmore plus 122 pins with 215-551, Linda Wendt plus 103 with 565, Marilyn Gwinn 210. TUESDAY PIONEERS: Doug Kyle 221, Ralph Robles 206, Ron Cole 574, Michael Nesci 559, Shari Bowen 223. PINPOPPERS: David Obal 234-617. Sandy Santiago season high woman's game 214-510, Phil Roszelle 233-577, Ronda Vogel 203-503. Soehike, a Henderson resident, reports local bowling scores in her weekly column. 2-3 GRADE TEAM Nuggets Bulls Rockets Rebels Lakers Suns W 2 2 2 1 0 0 TEAM Kings Bulls Warriors Hawks Magic Skylights Gnzzles Lakers 4-5 GRADE W 4 4 4 3 2 2 0 0 Player of the Week: Jason Garrish (Magic) Player of the Week: Chris Cox (Bulls) TEAM Spurs 6-8 GRADE W 4 L 0 1 1 2 2 3 5 5 L 0 Warriors Sonics Magic Knicks Skylights Hawks Lakers 3 ,3,. • t: : a Player of the Week: Paul Chavez (Skylights) TEAM Rebels Heat GrizzlesSpurs HIGH SCHOOL W a L • 2 3 3 4 Player of the Week: J.D. Green (Heat) PLAY PLAY PLAY Your social security number ItBQJD USE us TO PAY YOUR TAXES LAKE MEAD LOUNGE & CASINO 846 E. LAKE MEAD DR. 11^ Tr^ 111 Just for coming in you will receive a ticket for a (drawing to win up to $1040.00 to use towarcJ your income taxes or as a match to your refuncJ. File in and receive more tickets fpr eating, drinking and playing our slots. t.A ^ M^ iLiJL;i!l: OR MATCH YOUR REFUND WINI WIN! WIN! DRAWING DATE APRIL 15th 12:01 A.M, You have 24 Hrs to claim your winnings. If prize is unclaimed after this time we will draw every 24 Hrs. until we have a winner. NOW FEATURING 6oz. Filet Mignon Tuesday & Thursday Nights Only rllMl mMffi] $1040 4040 *5.95 Remember we will pay you up to this amount. (( One ticket per day per person. No purchase necessary. TRY OUR TAX SEASON FOOD SPECIALS SERVED 24 HOURS TAX PENALTY SPECIAL 70e | Eggs, Hashbrowns & Toast FRINGE BENEFIT 3.25 6oz. New York Steak w/French Fries 2 DEPENDENT SPECIAL (2 for 1) 4.95 Ctiicken Fried Steak w/Mashed. vegetate & soup or salad • or CHICKEN FRIED STEAK & EGGS w/potatoes & toast • TAX LEAN SPECIAL 2.00 | 1/2 lb. Burger & FrerKh Fries. • I FoodapacMkBOOdtnimMvcK ItoApnllS. igS8 MuKtwZiyMnloplay I ^iy4u iJirr'ifii td A>J#\ MLLLLA!! I pJiimiJ H040 PANORAMA • LIFESTYLES • YOUR HEALTH WHAT'S PiAYING • lAST WORDS WATER SAFETY CLASS IN BOULDER CITY PAGE 3 Thursday, February 29, 1996 Ski Lee Lee Canyon offers escape from desert D.B. Marciniak News Staff Writer While many people in the valley are looking forward to warm temperatures, others high in the mountain-tops are busy swooshing away. There is a ski wonderland waiting to be discovered. From Henderson, peering through the smog of the valley, snow-topped mountains wait to be christened. Virgin white snow waits to be carved by skiers. "It's sort of like an oasis in the middle of the desert," said Harold Gabriel, marketing director for the Lee Canyon Ski Area. Lee Canyon provides smallresort skiing with a variety of terrain to conquer, he said. The resort, nestled in the Toiyabe National Forest, about 45 minutes north of Las Vegas, is located in the Mt. Charleston ski area. ;.; • ,; • • f...v,':;-;':^' What makes skiing in Nevada unique is that the weather is usually sunny and warmer than at other prime ski areas across the nation. Gliding down the slopes of Lee Canyon it can eas|hj|tt> jifwW' Bouthem Nevada's OTMid of skiing is different than gloves and, on some days, even a jacket are unnecessary. It is not uncommon for skiers to wear shorts while going down the slopes, Gabriel said. Skiers at the resort enjoy the warmer ski conditions. Jeriann Cavanaugh, a Henderson resident who participates as part of the Lee Canyon Ski Patrol, said the weather on the mountain has been favorable all season. She and her husband moved to the area from Michigan's upper peninsula. Nevada skiing is a welcome change from the cold Northwest where temperatures can be subzero, she said. Skiing so close to a desert environment is still catching on for some in the area, Gabriel said. "People call and say they're coming to Las Vegas for something like a convention and they hear there's skiing. For them, that adds something to their trip," Gabriel said. People from Hawaii, Texas, Japan and Florida frequently visit the ski area. For many of them, it is their first time seeing • snow, he sautgi^^'j^: • • • • < • • ie wB the o aa free ast f i n Colorado. Thermal underwear, thick Sett Ski Pago 2 6KI PATROL — Lonit Brittingham, front and J*rinn Cavanaugh, back, earvt tha slopM as membars of tha Laa Canyon Ski Patrol. Cavanaugh llvas in Handarson and travels to the canyon on a bus three to four times a week. Pagal ,-' "T \%\,\. k P*^" 'h'^^l,^''^ 1 V ^AK ''" ^ tK^ — \ t • L • • • 1^, • •" v^ f i • % ^H^^ • SSI yf" w. M^ ft t* t L *^^u • m ,*4 V''^ i^^^ .\i -'• A t^^^^^^^^^H '^^T 1 / • ^^^^^*! ^^^^^^H ,^.f! U. m^ •*^ *.:^lF<'1 m ^/i --M HM m SCENIC VIEW — The majestic beauty of the surrounding mountains greets skiers as they travel up one of the ski resorts main chair-lifts. Lee Canyon sits at an elevation of 8,510 feet. The top of the longest chair-lift rises to an elevation of 11,400 feet. The mountain peak is 11,900 feet. PHOTOS BV D.B. MARCINIAK SLOW DOWN—Skiing offers f u h f or a II ages. A young girl snow-plows her way down the main slope at the ski area. SKI TIPS UP — Skiers unload from the black chair-lift at the ski area and prepara to venture down one of its main slopes. A 60-Inch base of packed powder is a welcome relief from skiing on manmade snow. SURF'S UP — A snowboarder enjoys the challenges of rugged terrain at Lee Canyon. ii-i •

PAGE 19

fmmmmmmm mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm mmmmmmmm PaO 18 Henderson Home News Thursday, February 29,1996 Single bowling headquarters location studied Nine cities have been contacted concerning interest in possibly becoming the home of bowling headquarters. The sites are part of industry restructuring under Bowling Inc.'s investigating advantages of consolidating and relocating all association headquarters into one facility. Included are the Milwaukee area, current home of ABC, WIBC, YABA and USA Bowling; the Dallas-Ft. Worth area, BPAA's location; and St, Louis. Others are Atlanta, Indianapolis, Kansas City, Nashville, Orlando and San Antonio. The study reviews economic impact generated by headquarters and requests the municipahty to accommodate the organizations with an existing facility or a build-to-suit structure at no or low cost to Bowling Inc. The headquarters needs to be large enough to include support facilities, such as a training center with lanes and locker room; a television production center; research and development center; conference rooms; classrooms; space to accommodate trade shows; office and administration space and nearby hotel facilities. Inquiries, including cities not LINES FROM THE LANES RUTH SOEHLKE 565-8398 listed, should be forwarded to Jane Orlin, Cushman & Wakefield, 51W. 52nd St., New York, N.Y. 10019, or call (212)841-4588 ABC and YABA recognized ABC's Centennial and the best achievements of YABA members are being celebrated by the Bowling Hall of Fame and Museum. A special exhibit in St. Louis offers insight into ABC's first 100 years through a collection of artifacts, photos, illustrations and text. YABA members who have bowled and approved 300 games and 800 series from 1980 to the present are now part of the Hall's Hometown Heroics exhibit. Visitors may access names through a computer keyboard, as they have been able to do for favorite ABC aad WIBC members. Printouts of members' accomplishments are available. YABA will automatically forward youths' names to the GOLF From page 17 And then there's Nygard. "Russell just elevates everyone to his level," Sagers said. "He's a good leader to have." Others battling for spots include "four sophomores who were pretty good as freshmen," Sagers said. Those include: Khitri, Dallas Massey, Jared Monk and Anthony Kindig. SILVERADO The Skyhawks have the numbers, but not the experience. "We had about 20 out and cut down to 10," Silverado coach Randy Minagil said. Minagil said his top returnees will be junior Jason Rowland and sophomore Brian Almassy. "I still have no seniors on my top 10," Minagil said. The Skyhawks' season will be determined "by how well the unknowns do," Minagil said. "We had three kids move in from other schools and they are looking really good." Those three are freshman Bradley Callahan; Mark Zabalio, a junior transfer from Chaparral and Joey Rayes, a sophomore transfer from Bishop Gorman. The key for the Skyhawks will be "finding the best six who can play during a match," Minagil said. "The lineup's always going to change, especially with young kids." Minagil said he's looking forward to the season. "We've got a good nucleus," he said. "And we've got more potential than we had at this time last year." BASIC From Page 17 "We've got a solid extra player at every position," Jones said. Now comes the part of pulling everyone together. "The key will be our team staying together and not bickering with each other," Gottschall said. "But, I don't think there will be much of that this year." • • -^ • ^-r--^^-^y Although missing the prep playoffs last year, Jones said the squad's American Legion experience last summer should help. Basic will open its season on March 8 against Cim-Memorial at 7 p.m. at Burkholder Field. League play is set to begin on March 28. museum four times per year. Names are obtained through high score award applications. SUNDAY STREAKERS: David Willey rolled a new high game of 259-643 for 127 pins over average, Gary Schweitzer 223, Robert Hanson 580-219. HENDERSON OUTLAWS: Amy Doty 201-514, Robin Malmgren 237 hep game, May Eawlings 651 hep series. Also Carla Hall 211, Carol Conrad 503, 671 hep, Henretta Heaney 655. KERR-MCGEE LEAGUE: Mike Hanna 553, Bill Jones 551, Dave Snyder 234-546. Also Mike Hanna 223-600, Mary Jones Jr. 220-594 for 105 pins over average. WOODY CARDUCCI: Dan Bingamon 234-649, Ty Parker 226-595, Ralph Fyke Sr. 255-649, Bill Tate 568, Glen Bridges 562, Luke Alexander 222-554, Alfred Behr 212-553, Robert Brennan 235-551, Sherman Fulbright 544, Ivan Beavor 544, Bill Jones 230, RayVillas219,TomSoehlke214, Marty Martinez 211. Also Charles Brown Sr. 255-651, Scott Miller 245-621, Glen Bridges 229-599, Dan Bingamon 223-597, Ty Parker 213-591, Matt Lanatta 247-584, Pike Spaulding 228GATORS From Page 17 """" Another loss the Gators have suffered is that of utility man Kevin Eberwein, who can now be found in the UNLV Hustlin' Rebels' everyday lineup. Although losing a load of firepower offensively, the Gators have the ingredients to not skip a beat. All-conference centerfielder Nick Day, who has already signed to play at Stanford, will return his 10 home runs and 53 RBI for his senior season as will Mattingly, who hit .442 a year ago with five home runs and 48 RBI. "You would hope to think the seniors would be the leaders of the ball club," said Fairless, whose Green Valley squad has captured the Sunrise Division crown in the school's four years of existence. "That's what we're hoping for right now." Joining Day in the outfield could be seniors John Pashales and Tyson Allgood, but nothing is certain, --.r • • • :.. • v. • .,..: • "We have 10 kids in the outfield fighting for basically two positions," Fairless said. Green Valley will open the season at home against Gorman on March 8 at 3 p.m. Divisional play is set to begin on March 28. DOE COMMUNITY ADVISORY BOARD MEETING The Community Advisory Board for Nevada Test Site Programs will meet Wednesday, March 6, 1996. Agenda Items are: ^ Environmental Restoration Budget Requests 1^ Environmental Impact Statement Time: 5:30 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. Place; Durango High School 7100 W. Dewey Drive, in the Lecture Center Las Vegas, Nevada If you are unable to attend, have comments or questions, please contact: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management P.O. Box 98518 Las Vegas, Nevada 89193-8518 702-295-0197 U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office 569, Bill Tate 551, Ivan Beavor 210-546, BillJones 202-539. HENDERSON HOUSEWIVES: Donna Newton 124 pins over average at 496, Irene Brown 212. Afso Pam Weiss 205, Diana Schultz 506, Fran Burnett 639 hep, Iline Erdman 231 hep. YOUNG AT HEART: Don Bonneau 521,235-635 hep highs, larry Prochazka 233-634, leota Gleason 229, Fran Groforth 649, Ruth Famsworth 225-612 hep. Also, Alfred Wehr 211, 248 hep game, Betty Kramer 244-618 hep, John Goforth 122 pins aover average with 191-497. DONT CARE LEAGUBi Bob Frear 522, Georgette Johnsrud 511, Rick Davis 238 hep game, Dave Turner 613 hep series, Jeanne Brandau 238 hep game and Marie Singer 630 hep series. FOE 2672 EAGLES MIXED: Richard Lopacinski 200-584, Corky Roundy 554, Doug Roundy 214-529, Cindy Kitchen 202-534, Maude Clark 201-514. THURSDAY NOONERS: Barb Boyd 208-511,236-595 hep highs. MISFIT DOUBIES: Rick Davis 146 pins over average with 212-563,707 high hep series. Also Ty Parker 228-201-608, Rick Davis 224-580 Chris Hartman The OCEAN SPRAY HENDERSON BOYS' & GIRLS' CLUB BASKETBALL LEAGUE STANDINGS 524, Eric Jones 213-506, Jennifer Olson 507 for 108 over average, Mary Jones 218-591 fo^l26 over and Rick Davis was 148 over average. SHIRTS & SKIRTS: Reactive B Dan B. 226-610,Arlan Crowl 205-570, Wayne Ross 237536, Dean Duncan 212-204-573, Mitch lowery 525, Dan Kozik 528, Teddy Jones 539, Dave Murphy 521, Mary Jones Jr. 545, Cherie Saunden500. Also John Keithley 220-587, Ted Johns 207-540, Carl Lore 525. MIXED NUTS: Ty Parker 225-584, Tina Wagner 218, Phyllis Morris 543. Also Lee Farrell 226 and Floyd Garcia 596. SENIORS FOR FUN: Alfred Wehr took all four leads with 246-621, 277-714 hep and 138 pins over average, Barbara Lorenz led the women with 219586 hep and season scratch series 482. HENDERSON OUTLAWS: Packy Fein 200-550, Amy Doty 209-537, Mary Henry 511. SUNSET MDffiRS: Norman Pate 238-664, Dave Maimes 247574. VinceThurman 212, Janell Phillips 524, Gigi Jones 516. BREAKFAST ROLLERS: Marian Rogas had 136 pins over average with 210-508, Ginny Standings Summers 514, Barbara Beck 203, Evelyn Bai'ber 513. HIGH RULLERS: Carl Mayrose 212, Werner Craatz 211,Bob Schultt 568, J^dy McLaughlin 202-506. HIZZ & HERS: Robert E. Lee 223-612, Bob Oliver 234-598, Nancy Cloud 503, Tammy Parker 104 over average with a 473. John Ohanian 212-545. ALMOST SCRATCH: Pat Maguinness 146 pins over with 227-587 and Bob Cross 116 over with 220-535, Derek Cardwell 245, Bill Wagner 215-212-629, Andre Jemmott 234-613. ETHEL M: Jeff Missig 217, Joe Lusch 594-213, Steve Pro 214-583, Marsha Ashmore plus 122 pins with 215-551, Linda Wendt plus 103 with 565, Marilyn Gwinn 210. TUESDAY PIONEERS: Doug Kyle 221, Ralph Robles 206, Ron Cole 574, Michael Nesci 559, Shari Bowen 223. PINPOPPERS: David Obal 234-617. Sandy Santiago season high woman's game 214-510, Phil Roszelle 233-577, Ronda Vogel 203-503. Soehike, a Henderson resident, reports local bowling scores in her weekly column. 2-3 GRADE TEAM Nuggets Bulls Rockets Rebels Lakers Suns W 2 2 2 1 0 0 TEAM Kings Bulls Warriors Hawks Magic Skylights Gnzzles Lakers 4-5 GRADE W 4 4 4 3 2 2 0 0 Player of the Week: Jason Garrish (Magic) Player of the Week: Chris Cox (Bulls) TEAM Spurs 6-8 GRADE W 4 L 0 1 1 2 2 3 5 5 L 0 Warriors Sonics Magic Knicks Skylights Hawks Lakers 3 ,3,. • t: : a Player of the Week: Paul Chavez (Skylights) TEAM Rebels Heat GrizzlesSpurs HIGH SCHOOL W a L • 2 3 3 4 Player of the Week: J.D. Green (Heat) PLAY PLAY PLAY Your social security number ItBQJD USE us TO PAY YOUR TAXES LAKE MEAD LOUNGE & CASINO 846 E. LAKE MEAD DR. 11^ Tr^ 111 Just for coming in you will receive a ticket for a (drawing to win up to $1040.00 to use towarcJ your income taxes or as a match to your refuncJ. File in and receive more tickets fpr eating, drinking and playing our slots. t.A ^ M^ iLiJL;i!l: OR MATCH YOUR REFUND WINI WIN! WIN! DRAWING DATE APRIL 15th 12:01 A.M, You have 24 Hrs to claim your winnings. If prize is unclaimed after this time we will draw every 24 Hrs. until we have a winner. NOW FEATURING 6oz. Filet Mignon Tuesday & Thursday Nights Only rllMl mMffi] $1040 4040 *5.95 Remember we will pay you up to this amount. (( One ticket per day per person. No purchase necessary. TRY OUR TAX SEASON FOOD SPECIALS SERVED 24 HOURS TAX PENALTY SPECIAL 70e | Eggs, Hashbrowns & Toast FRINGE BENEFIT 3.25 6oz. New York Steak w/French Fries 2 DEPENDENT SPECIAL (2 for 1) 4.95 Ctiicken Fried Steak w/Mashed. vegetate & soup or salad • or CHICKEN FRIED STEAK & EGGS w/potatoes & toast • TAX LEAN SPECIAL 2.00 | 1/2 lb. Burger & FrerKh Fries. • I FoodapacMkBOOdtnimMvcK ItoApnllS. igS8 MuKtwZiyMnloplay I ^iy4u iJirr'ifii td A>J#\ MLLLLA!! I pJiimiJ H040 PANORAMA • LIFESTYLES • YOUR HEALTH WHAT'S PiAYING • lAST WORDS WATER SAFETY CLASS IN BOULDER CITY PAGE 3 Thursday, February 29, 1996 Ski Lee Lee Canyon offers escape from desert D.B. Marciniak News Staff Writer While many people in the valley are looking forward to warm temperatures, others high in the mountain-tops are busy swooshing away. There is a ski wonderland waiting to be discovered. From Henderson, peering through the smog of the valley, snow-topped mountains wait to be christened. Virgin white snow waits to be carved by skiers. "It's sort of like an oasis in the middle of the desert," said Harold Gabriel, marketing director for the Lee Canyon Ski Area. Lee Canyon provides smallresort skiing with a variety of terrain to conquer, he said. The resort, nestled in the Toiyabe National Forest, about 45 minutes north of Las Vegas, is located in the Mt. Charleston ski area. ;.; • ,; • • f...v,':;-;':^' What makes skiing in Nevada unique is that the weather is usually sunny and warmer than at other prime ski areas across the nation. Gliding down the slopes of Lee Canyon it can eas|hj|tt> jifwW' Bouthem Nevada's OTMid of skiing is different than gloves and, on some days, even a jacket are unnecessary. It is not uncommon for skiers to wear shorts while going down the slopes, Gabriel said. Skiers at the resort enjoy the warmer ski conditions. Jeriann Cavanaugh, a Henderson resident who participates as part of the Lee Canyon Ski Patrol, said the weather on the mountain has been favorable all season. She and her husband moved to the area from Michigan's upper peninsula. Nevada skiing is a welcome change from the cold Northwest where temperatures can be subzero, she said. Skiing so close to a desert environment is still catching on for some in the area, Gabriel said. "People call and say they're coming to Las Vegas for something like a convention and they hear there's skiing. For them, that adds something to their trip," Gabriel said. People from Hawaii, Texas, Japan and Florida frequently visit the ski area. For many of them, it is their first time seeing • snow, he sautgi^^'j^: • • • • < • • ie wB the o aa free ast f i n Colorado. Thermal underwear, thick Sett Ski Pago 2 6KI PATROL — Lonit Brittingham, front and J*rinn Cavanaugh, back, earvt tha slopM as membars of tha Laa Canyon Ski Patrol. Cavanaugh llvas in Handarson and travels to the canyon on a bus three to four times a week. Pagal ,-' "T \%\,\. k P*^" 'h'^^l,^''^ 1 V ^AK ''" ^ tK^ — \ t • L • • • 1^, • •" v^ f i • % ^H^^ • SSI yf" w. M^ ft t* t L *^^u • m ,*4 V''^ i^^^ .\i -'• A t^^^^^^^^^H '^^T 1 / • ^^^^^*! ^^^^^^H ,^.f! U. m^ •*^ *.:^lF<'1 m ^/i --M HM m SCENIC VIEW — The majestic beauty of the surrounding mountains greets skiers as they travel up one of the ski resorts main chair-lifts. Lee Canyon sits at an elevation of 8,510 feet. The top of the longest chair-lift rises to an elevation of 11,400 feet. The mountain peak is 11,900 feet. PHOTOS BV D.B. MARCINIAK SLOW DOWN—Skiing offers f u h f or a II ages. A young girl snow-plows her way down the main slope at the ski area. SKI TIPS UP — Skiers unload from the black chair-lift at the ski area and prepara to venture down one of its main slopes. A 60-Inch base of packed powder is a welcome relief from skiing on manmade snow. SURF'S UP — A snowboarder enjoys the challenges of rugged terrain at Lee Canyon. ii-i •

PAGE 20

1 ^ LIFESTYLES Pag* 2 Panorama Thursday. February 29,1996 Whole family will like Barley's PANORAMA INDEX In the new Green Valley Town center located next to Smith's supermarket on Sunset Road in Henderson, Barley's Casino and Brewery recently opened and has been attracting a sizable crowd ever since. We checked out their restaurant, the Brewer's Cafe, located away from the bar and gaming area, with its own convenient entrance near the fountain. With high ceilings and lots of wood trim, the comfortable restaurant offers good food at reasonable prices for the whole family. Along with friends Margaret, Arlene, Jim and Genevive, and my family, we had a wonderful time trying out the different menu items. LET'S EAT OUT! PHILIP GOLDSTEIN The entrees, from about $3 to $6,, are tasty and well-prepared and include pretzel nachos, quesadillas, sweet and tangy diicken wings, cheese fries, bghtly fried chicken tenders, onion rings and even fried calamari. Soups and salads, from $3 to $6, include onion soup, barley soup, chicken chili, and Caesar and Cobb salads. Sandwiches, from $5 to $7, include club, sausage, pastrami and grilled chicken are. served with excellent steak fries and cole slaw. To add a soup and the salad bar, the price goes up $2.95. Dinners, from about $7 to $12, include fettucini, tortellini, linguini, pork chops, ribs, steak and grilled swordfish. Some dinners include vegetable and/or potato as well as the soup and salad bar. At our table, the kids shared individual pizzas baked on the premises. My wife Julie went with the very largeburgerplatter, while our friends ordered the chicken with fettucini, shrimp with pasta and pork chops. I had the swordfish which was excellent. Everyone eiyoyed their meals very much. Although we^lidn't have room for dessert, the menu did offer cobblers, mud pie and cheese cakes. In addition to theregular menu, a children's menu is also offered. Breakfast items, $2.95, are served with juice or milk. Selections include egg with bacon or sausage and toast, sausage and egg biscuit, French toast, plain or blueberry pancakes with bacon or sausage, as well as an omelet. For lunch or dinner, children's meals are $3.95 and are served with steak fries and fresh fruit. Entrees include grilled cheese, chicken fingers, hot dogs, and cheeseburgers. All in all, we had good food and good service and would definitely consider a return visit in the future. Goldstein, an attorney who lives In Henderson, writes about his dining experiences with his wife Julie, and young children Marcie and Matthew. Outdoors with Barb 3 Math Problem 7 Boating with Ray 3 Dear Debbie 9 Women's Health 5 Horoscope 9 Worship Directory 6 Comics, Crossword.. 10 HBC PUBLICATIONS, INC. 2 COMMCIKX CiNitn DM. HiNDCRSON, NV •9014 (702) 438-7700 "^ BouLDCR CITY Nmn HcNDCRtoN HOME Nmn Brew festival Sunday The richest man in the world In "The Sweetest Fig," Chris Van Allsburg (1993, ages 7 and up), a mean dentist named Monsieur Bibot reluctantly accepts two figs as payment for pulling a penniless old woman's tooth. After eating one, he realizes the woman tried to tell him the figs were magic and had the power to make his dreams come true. His wish is to be the richest man in the world, and the remaining fig will make it happen. His plans go haywire when his dog, Marcel, eats the last fig. This is a thought-provoking story with a surprise ending. Allsburg is a widely respected, award-winning author and illustrator. One of Kis most memorable books is "The Polar Express," which won the Caldecott Award. :: .V Children will love the comical action in "Old Noah's Elephants," an Israeli folk-tale by Warren Ludwig (1991, ages 4-8). Noah's Ark is afloat, and all the animals are safely nestled inside. Things are going smoothly, until the two LET ME TELI^ YOU A STORY ALEXANDRA SPOTTI elephants raid the food storage pen and begin eating everything. Not only are the other animals in danger of starving, but the elephants' weight is increasing, making the ark tip dangerously. Noah is worried until he realizes that prayer is the only hope. The cute story will definitely elicit lots of giggles from younger children. In the Japanese folk-tale, "The Wise Old Woman," by Yoshiko Uchida (1994, ages 7 and up), a cold and cruel young lord decides that people more than 70 are not whom are familiar with other folktales about Anansi. ;' • '( • Happy Reading! Spotti, a long-time Henderson resident who is a librarian at Fyfe Elementary School in Las Vegas, makes recommendations on children's literature. useful, and must be taken to thehas just mad for hims^Jt-But^ conquer the young farmer's yil-. isabighitwithstudents,-mostof lage. When the cowardly young lord begs for mercy, he is told that if he can perform three clever and very difficult tasks, his life and the lives of the people in his village will be spared. After hearing of the young lord's failure to complete the tasks successfully, the farmer's mother, with all the wisdom and experience that age brings, saves the village. And what about the cruel young lord? Well, he learns an important lesson. In "Tiger Soup: An Anansi Story from Jamaica," by Frances Temple (ld94r^eB 5 and up),"Tiger prepares to eat hot soup he, The Nevada Public Radio Corporation, KNPR 89.5, will present Las Vegas' first beer tasting event on Sunday, March 3. The Brews Festival will be held from 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. in the Round House Center ballroom at the Palace Station Hotel and Casino. Featured will be more than 50 microbrew and import beers, snacks and appetizers, live entertainment, microbrew beer preparation demonstrations, and a live and silent auction. A variety of non-alcoholic beverages, including specialty brewed teas and designer waters, will also be available for sampling. The festival is a benefit for KNPR and the Radio Reading Service. Tickets are $25 in advance or $27 at the door, and include sampling beers, appetizers, a souvenir sampling glass and a chance to register for the raffle. Tickets can be purchased by phone or mail directly from KNPR 89.5, call 456-6695, or at the following: Mr. Radz Homebrew Supply Store, 736-8504, and at three branches of PrestigeTravel (Boulevard Mall, 3448 W. Sahara, and 2839 N. Green Valley Parkway). Attendees must be 21 years old wij^h ID. No refunds, exchanges or cancellations will be permitted once tickets are purchased. For more information, call Tracy M. Lowe, 456-6695. mountains to die alone. A young farmer cannot bear to part with his mother who is that age, and he hides her in a deep cave beneath their home for two years. One day, Higa—a neighboring warlord—threatens to along comes the mischievous Anansi the Spider who tricks Tiger into going for a swim so he can gobble up all the soup himself The funny story includes boldcolored "torn and painted paper collage" illustrations. The book MSAA offers scholarships More than $16,000, in 10 college scholarships, is available to high school sophomores, juniors and seniors through a nationwide essay competition sponsored by the Multiple Sclerosis Association of America. Now in its third year, TROJECT: Learn MSTM '96" encourages students to write a 500-1000 word essay on MS, its effects on the family and how society can improve life for the physically challenged. All essays must include an official registration form, $7.50 in prepaid sponsorship, and must be postmarked by May 27. Information is available through localhigh school guidance offices or by calling MSAA, (800)LEARN-MS. Known as the most common neurological disorder of young adults, multiple sclerosis affects as many as 500,000 Americans. Its crippling effects on the central nervous system can produce symptoms rangingfrxim blindness to partial or complete paralysis. According to officials, the project educates students about MS, helps raise funds to support MSAA services and highlights the organization's national "May is MS Awareness Month." Other MSM programs include peer counseling, toll-free hotline, support groups, free loan of therapeutic equipment, newsletter, barrier-free housing, microclimate cooling, and social and group activities. SKI: Lee Canyon Fror '^ .ge 1 Gabriel said many Las Vegans travel to Brian Head, Utah, or Colorado to hit the slopes. While these places are worth visiting to experience skiing, quality skiing is available in their backyard. Skiers do not have to travel more than four hours to experience the health and wellness of skiing, he said. Skiing at Lee Canyon provides physical and mental stimulation which is healthy for individuals, Gabriel said. For 17 years, Gabriel worked in Las Vegas at an office job. For the past four years, he has worked at the ski resort. On weekends when he worked in the valley, he would visit the resort to get away from the city. Escaping is healthy and others in the valley should take advantage of the resources offered in the mountains surrounding the dty, he said. *You come up and the drive is beautiful. The excitement of skiing takes ovr. The danger of falling and being near the trees makes you forget about all your office worries," he said. A storm that swept through the valley Feb. 20 dumped two feet of snow on the resort. Since Sunday, an additional 16 inches has fallen. The ski season should extend to Easter. Prior to the storms, some were concerned about how long the season would last. "This is a season which snowmaking has kept alive," Gabriel said. Mild temperatures kept skiers away from the slopes most of the season, he said, but even when there was only man-made snow, it was worth the trip. Before the storms, the season had survived on man-made snow since Christmas. He said skiers don't need bad weather to go skiing. Activities at the resort go beyond the snow. During the summer and fall, a variety of activities are planned. Once the snow melts, deer, fox and mountain lions can be seen by hikers on the web of trails which run along the mountains. The natural beauty provides an excellent refuge for nature lovers, Gabriel said. Among activities planned following the ski season are a music festival and the Testival of Pines." Gospel Businessmen to meet Gospel Businessmen's Fellowship International will meet at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Mardi 2, at the Best Western Mardi Gras Inn, 3500 Paradise Road, Las Vegas. Buddy Hauser of San Diego will speak. The dinner cost is $13, and seating is limited. For reservations, call 262-5665. •^ „l„., -Ti.^:Thursday, February 29,1996 Panorama Page 3 12th annual Elk Camp begins Feb. 29 in Reno Imagine a beautiful morning in the mountains with the sun beginning to rise over the peaks. During the right time of the year, the sound of bull elk bugling is great to hear in the outdoors. One of the conservation organizations involved in elk and wildlife habitat is the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation. TheRMEFis an international, non-profit conservation organization whose ijnission is to ensure the future of elk, other wildlife and their habitat. Headquartered in Missoula, Mon., and founded in 1984, it OUTDOORS WITH BARB BARB HENDERSON has about 98,000 members who have helped generate nearly $50 million to conserve and enhance 1.8 million acres of wildlife habitat. In Nevada, there are about 2,000 members in nine chapters. Since 1987, membership efforts in the state have helped the organization to spend more than $350,000 conserving and enhancing 200,000 acres of wildlife habitat in the state. Projects include the Bruneau River elk transplant, rangeland enhancement projects include water developments, prescribed burns and reseedings. RMEF members, sportsmen and women, and wildlife enthusiasts will gather in Reno from Feb. 29 to March 3, at the organizations' 12th annual Elk Camp and Exposition. More than 400 exhibit booths will include wildlife art, outdoor gear, hunting trips and a worldrecord trophy elk display. Activities will,include Club Safety class scheduled in BC When I learned the Las Vegas Power Squardron was going to show a water safety film at their regular monthly meeting I called Comm.Dick Walkow, to see if I could invite myself to view the film and pick up some safety pointers. They were alsohavingapotluck dinner and what an array of dishes they had—more than enough for the more than 50 members who attended. That group really can throw a mean pot luck, v Before the film, there was a special presentation honoring Emmit Sullivan and membfers of the Quarter Century Club—25 years of service in the Power Squadron dedicated fr> rromoting safe boating through education. The safety film was geared for small children.but covered basic topics applicable to all ages. First in the presentation was learn to swim if you are interested in water activities or at least learn to float. Other topics covered wearing PFDS when on a boat (adults should set the example by wearBOATING WITH RAY RAY EICHER ing one), what to do if the boat capsi zes (stay with it), and always swim with a buddy. They were all basic safety rules for young and old. When swimming last summer, I found out very quickly that I do nothave much endurance, so don't over extend yourself Take along an approved boat cushion and don't get too far away from your boat or the shore, unless you work out on a regular basis. I bet you don't have much endurance either. If you go out with me, I insist you take a cushion— especially at the beginning of the season. For Boulder City skippers I have good news. A safe boating class will beheld by the Las Vegas Power Squadron from 7 to 9 p.m.Wednesdays from May 1 through June 12, at the Community College, 700 Wyoming St. Call the college to register,294Wildlife Conference in March The 61st%ofth American Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference is set for March 2227 at the Adam's Mark Tulsa, in Tulsa, Okla., sponsored by The Wildlife Management Institute which administers the event. To receive a copy of the advance program interested persons should call WMI, (202)371-1808, fax (202)4085059), or write to Suite 801,1101 14th Street, N.W., Washington, D.C., 20005. The program contains information on opening and special sessions, related meetings, special events, hotel accomodations, air travel discounts, registration and more. The theme of the conference is "Facing Realities in Resource Management." Registration fees are $135 for regular attendees; $ 115 for WMI members; $65 for seniors, age 65 and older; and $45 for students. Spouses and children may register free. The single-day fee is $67.50. Media representatives also may register at no charge. All attendees must register. Macy's presents diabetes fashion show Sunday Macy's will present a fashion show featuring Carole Little, Jones of New York and Liz Claiborne, to benefit the American Diabetes Association, at 11:30 a.m. Sunday, March 3. Also featured will be a Macy's Boutique, the Kenneth Scott Vocal "Theater and raffle prizes. Dee Ladd, president and CEO of Sunrise Children's Hospital Foundation will be honored by the ADA Past honorees have included Frankie Sue Del Papa in 1995, and Diane Ursick Jett in 1994. For reservations and raffle tickets, call the ADA office, 3699995. GREAT FOOD FUN & FRIENDS 990 Breakfast 7 Selections to Choose From! Daily from 11pm 1 lam user i]irfCT Including All You Can lot Sjljd Bar GIANT SHRIMP COCKTAIL ^^^"S^CURV HQO filled to the brim with 6oz. of shrimp & sauce | ^4^ Prime Rib liicliides AllYOU-CAS'-FATSalad liar! <: yv s 1 M cj r //M.. / llUnk Soiilll ill SiiiiH( Ril.. //< y/o.'Jih. 0188. Check your schedule and sign up. No excuses now—no long drives are required. Let's have a good turnout from BC skippers. A few months ago, I wrote that I had purchased a charger for my batteries that I left cormected all the time,called Battery Pal. I had some inquiries as to where I bought it but unfortunately I am in the process of moving and threw away all my catalogs. They may be available locally butifnot, call Overton's, (800)3346541. They sell for $31.95 plus shipping, the item number is 25315. This is not a trickle charger and can be left on your battery indefinitely. Until next time ... keep your bilge dry. Eicher, a long-time valley resident, considers himself a part-time boater and fishernnan. Wapiti for the kids, a video target shooting system and the eighth annual World Elk Calling Championships. During the event, seminars will give guests an opportunity to learn outdoor survival, hunting skills, elk calling, cookery and more, as well as auctions, entertainment, dancing and great food. For tickets and more infbrmation, call (406)523-4500. OUTDOOR RECREATION INFORMATION Elk poaching reward offered Operation Game Thief is offering a $3,000 reward for information leading to the conviction of those involved in the recent poaching of five elk in Lincoln County. Four cows and a calf were shot and lefl to waste near the head of Cobb Creek north of White Rock Peak. The animals were discovered Jan. 16 within a 50-yard radius. To report information, call Operation GameThief, (800)9923030. All calls will remain confidential and anonymous. (^ National Park Service lecture Once one of the most abundant fishes in the Lower Colorado River, the razorback sucker is rarely seen today. The public is invited to attend a lecture by Fisheries biologist Tom Burke to learn why and what is being done to change this, at 7 p.m. Friday, March 1, at the Alan Bible Visitor Center in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area. "Lake Mohave in the Lake Mead NRA supports the largest remaining population of razorback suckers in the world," said Burke, "but th^at number continues to decline each year." It is one of four strange-looking native fish that used to inhabit the silty, fast-moving Colorado River. To help them survive in the fast, strong currents, the fish developed bizarre shapes like' humped backs, wing-like fins and streamlined bodies. A Native Fish Work Group of state and federal agencies has undertaken a joint project to try to keep the endangered species from becoming extinct over the next several years. Burke will describe the efforts underway and the result that have been achieved to date. The Visitor Center is located four miles northeast of Boulder City on U.S. 93. For more information, call the NPS, 293-8990, fi^om 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily. Until next week, enjoy the great outdoors. Henderson, an outdoor enthusiast IS a host and producer of local TV ,' and radio shows. CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE HIGHEST QUALITY LOWEST RATES 8983589 Lasting Impressions Courses designed to transition young girls into young ladies. Uura Hobbs Mrs USA 1994 Director Modeling Poise & Posture Personal Grooming Manners Haircare Skincare Wardrobe Pageant Workshops Available Lenz Agency 1591 E. Desert Inn Road Call 898-3365 Information also available V ;• on the Mrs. Nevada International Pageant —-^!aw The NEW Backstage Dance Studio II "l\//(/y Chi/(III II [(iki • ilialil III Ihllici 3-25 S. Lamb (beivreen Dl & Twain) I.Dob for us off 1-95 jus! before Boulder Hwv 739*1446

PAGE 21

1 ^ LIFESTYLES Pag* 2 Panorama Thursday. February 29,1996 Whole family will like Barley's PANORAMA INDEX In the new Green Valley Town center located next to Smith's supermarket on Sunset Road in Henderson, Barley's Casino and Brewery recently opened and has been attracting a sizable crowd ever since. We checked out their restaurant, the Brewer's Cafe, located away from the bar and gaming area, with its own convenient entrance near the fountain. With high ceilings and lots of wood trim, the comfortable restaurant offers good food at reasonable prices for the whole family. Along with friends Margaret, Arlene, Jim and Genevive, and my family, we had a wonderful time trying out the different menu items. LET'S EAT OUT! PHILIP GOLDSTEIN The entrees, from about $3 to $6,, are tasty and well-prepared and include pretzel nachos, quesadillas, sweet and tangy diicken wings, cheese fries, bghtly fried chicken tenders, onion rings and even fried calamari. Soups and salads, from $3 to $6, include onion soup, barley soup, chicken chili, and Caesar and Cobb salads. Sandwiches, from $5 to $7, include club, sausage, pastrami and grilled chicken are. served with excellent steak fries and cole slaw. To add a soup and the salad bar, the price goes up $2.95. Dinners, from about $7 to $12, include fettucini, tortellini, linguini, pork chops, ribs, steak and grilled swordfish. Some dinners include vegetable and/or potato as well as the soup and salad bar. At our table, the kids shared individual pizzas baked on the premises. My wife Julie went with the very largeburgerplatter, while our friends ordered the chicken with fettucini, shrimp with pasta and pork chops. I had the swordfish which was excellent. Everyone eiyoyed their meals very much. Although we^lidn't have room for dessert, the menu did offer cobblers, mud pie and cheese cakes. In addition to theregular menu, a children's menu is also offered. Breakfast items, $2.95, are served with juice or milk. Selections include egg with bacon or sausage and toast, sausage and egg biscuit, French toast, plain or blueberry pancakes with bacon or sausage, as well as an omelet. For lunch or dinner, children's meals are $3.95 and are served with steak fries and fresh fruit. Entrees include grilled cheese, chicken fingers, hot dogs, and cheeseburgers. All in all, we had good food and good service and would definitely consider a return visit in the future. Goldstein, an attorney who lives In Henderson, writes about his dining experiences with his wife Julie, and young children Marcie and Matthew. Outdoors with Barb 3 Math Problem 7 Boating with Ray 3 Dear Debbie 9 Women's Health 5 Horoscope 9 Worship Directory 6 Comics, Crossword.. 10 HBC PUBLICATIONS, INC. 2 COMMCIKX CiNitn DM. HiNDCRSON, NV •9014 (702) 438-7700 "^ BouLDCR CITY Nmn HcNDCRtoN HOME Nmn Brew festival Sunday The richest man in the world In "The Sweetest Fig," Chris Van Allsburg (1993, ages 7 and up), a mean dentist named Monsieur Bibot reluctantly accepts two figs as payment for pulling a penniless old woman's tooth. After eating one, he realizes the woman tried to tell him the figs were magic and had the power to make his dreams come true. His wish is to be the richest man in the world, and the remaining fig will make it happen. His plans go haywire when his dog, Marcel, eats the last fig. This is a thought-provoking story with a surprise ending. Allsburg is a widely respected, award-winning author and illustrator. One of Kis most memorable books is "The Polar Express," which won the Caldecott Award. :: .V Children will love the comical action in "Old Noah's Elephants," an Israeli folk-tale by Warren Ludwig (1991, ages 4-8). Noah's Ark is afloat, and all the animals are safely nestled inside. Things are going smoothly, until the two LET ME TELI^ YOU A STORY ALEXANDRA SPOTTI elephants raid the food storage pen and begin eating everything. Not only are the other animals in danger of starving, but the elephants' weight is increasing, making the ark tip dangerously. Noah is worried until he realizes that prayer is the only hope. The cute story will definitely elicit lots of giggles from younger children. In the Japanese folk-tale, "The Wise Old Woman," by Yoshiko Uchida (1994, ages 7 and up), a cold and cruel young lord decides that people more than 70 are not whom are familiar with other folktales about Anansi. ;' • '( • Happy Reading! Spotti, a long-time Henderson resident who is a librarian at Fyfe Elementary School in Las Vegas, makes recommendations on children's literature. useful, and must be taken to thehas just mad for hims^Jt-But^ conquer the young farmer's yil-. isabighitwithstudents,-mostof lage. When the cowardly young lord begs for mercy, he is told that if he can perform three clever and very difficult tasks, his life and the lives of the people in his village will be spared. After hearing of the young lord's failure to complete the tasks successfully, the farmer's mother, with all the wisdom and experience that age brings, saves the village. And what about the cruel young lord? Well, he learns an important lesson. In "Tiger Soup: An Anansi Story from Jamaica," by Frances Temple (ld94r^eB 5 and up),"Tiger prepares to eat hot soup he, The Nevada Public Radio Corporation, KNPR 89.5, will present Las Vegas' first beer tasting event on Sunday, March 3. The Brews Festival will be held from 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. in the Round House Center ballroom at the Palace Station Hotel and Casino. Featured will be more than 50 microbrew and import beers, snacks and appetizers, live entertainment, microbrew beer preparation demonstrations, and a live and silent auction. A variety of non-alcoholic beverages, including specialty brewed teas and designer waters, will also be available for sampling. The festival is a benefit for KNPR and the Radio Reading Service. Tickets are $25 in advance or $27 at the door, and include sampling beers, appetizers, a souvenir sampling glass and a chance to register for the raffle. Tickets can be purchased by phone or mail directly from KNPR 89.5, call 456-6695, or at the following: Mr. Radz Homebrew Supply Store, 736-8504, and at three branches of PrestigeTravel (Boulevard Mall, 3448 W. Sahara, and 2839 N. Green Valley Parkway). Attendees must be 21 years old wij^h ID. No refunds, exchanges or cancellations will be permitted once tickets are purchased. For more information, call Tracy M. Lowe, 456-6695. mountains to die alone. A young farmer cannot bear to part with his mother who is that age, and he hides her in a deep cave beneath their home for two years. One day, Higa—a neighboring warlord—threatens to along comes the mischievous Anansi the Spider who tricks Tiger into going for a swim so he can gobble up all the soup himself The funny story includes boldcolored "torn and painted paper collage" illustrations. The book MSAA offers scholarships More than $16,000, in 10 college scholarships, is available to high school sophomores, juniors and seniors through a nationwide essay competition sponsored by the Multiple Sclerosis Association of America. Now in its third year, TROJECT: Learn MSTM '96" encourages students to write a 500-1000 word essay on MS, its effects on the family and how society can improve life for the physically challenged. All essays must include an official registration form, $7.50 in prepaid sponsorship, and must be postmarked by May 27. Information is available through localhigh school guidance offices or by calling MSAA, (800)LEARN-MS. Known as the most common neurological disorder of young adults, multiple sclerosis affects as many as 500,000 Americans. Its crippling effects on the central nervous system can produce symptoms rangingfrxim blindness to partial or complete paralysis. According to officials, the project educates students about MS, helps raise funds to support MSAA services and highlights the organization's national "May is MS Awareness Month." Other MSM programs include peer counseling, toll-free hotline, support groups, free loan of therapeutic equipment, newsletter, barrier-free housing, microclimate cooling, and social and group activities. SKI: Lee Canyon Fror '^ .ge 1 Gabriel said many Las Vegans travel to Brian Head, Utah, or Colorado to hit the slopes. While these places are worth visiting to experience skiing, quality skiing is available in their backyard. Skiers do not have to travel more than four hours to experience the health and wellness of skiing, he said. Skiing at Lee Canyon provides physical and mental stimulation which is healthy for individuals, Gabriel said. For 17 years, Gabriel worked in Las Vegas at an office job. For the past four years, he has worked at the ski resort. On weekends when he worked in the valley, he would visit the resort to get away from the city. Escaping is healthy and others in the valley should take advantage of the resources offered in the mountains surrounding the dty, he said. *You come up and the drive is beautiful. The excitement of skiing takes ovr. The danger of falling and being near the trees makes you forget about all your office worries," he said. A storm that swept through the valley Feb. 20 dumped two feet of snow on the resort. Since Sunday, an additional 16 inches has fallen. The ski season should extend to Easter. Prior to the storms, some were concerned about how long the season would last. "This is a season which snowmaking has kept alive," Gabriel said. Mild temperatures kept skiers away from the slopes most of the season, he said, but even when there was only man-made snow, it was worth the trip. Before the storms, the season had survived on man-made snow since Christmas. He said skiers don't need bad weather to go skiing. Activities at the resort go beyond the snow. During the summer and fall, a variety of activities are planned. Once the snow melts, deer, fox and mountain lions can be seen by hikers on the web of trails which run along the mountains. The natural beauty provides an excellent refuge for nature lovers, Gabriel said. Among activities planned following the ski season are a music festival and the Testival of Pines." Gospel Businessmen to meet Gospel Businessmen's Fellowship International will meet at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Mardi 2, at the Best Western Mardi Gras Inn, 3500 Paradise Road, Las Vegas. Buddy Hauser of San Diego will speak. The dinner cost is $13, and seating is limited. For reservations, call 262-5665. •^ „l„., -Ti.^:Thursday, February 29,1996 Panorama Page 3 12th annual Elk Camp begins Feb. 29 in Reno Imagine a beautiful morning in the mountains with the sun beginning to rise over the peaks. During the right time of the year, the sound of bull elk bugling is great to hear in the outdoors. One of the conservation organizations involved in elk and wildlife habitat is the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation. TheRMEFis an international, non-profit conservation organization whose ijnission is to ensure the future of elk, other wildlife and their habitat. Headquartered in Missoula, Mon., and founded in 1984, it OUTDOORS WITH BARB BARB HENDERSON has about 98,000 members who have helped generate nearly $50 million to conserve and enhance 1.8 million acres of wildlife habitat. In Nevada, there are about 2,000 members in nine chapters. Since 1987, membership efforts in the state have helped the organization to spend more than $350,000 conserving and enhancing 200,000 acres of wildlife habitat in the state. Projects include the Bruneau River elk transplant, rangeland enhancement projects include water developments, prescribed burns and reseedings. RMEF members, sportsmen and women, and wildlife enthusiasts will gather in Reno from Feb. 29 to March 3, at the organizations' 12th annual Elk Camp and Exposition. More than 400 exhibit booths will include wildlife art, outdoor gear, hunting trips and a worldrecord trophy elk display. Activities will,include Club Safety class scheduled in BC When I learned the Las Vegas Power Squardron was going to show a water safety film at their regular monthly meeting I called Comm.Dick Walkow, to see if I could invite myself to view the film and pick up some safety pointers. They were alsohavingapotluck dinner and what an array of dishes they had—more than enough for the more than 50 members who attended. That group really can throw a mean pot luck, v Before the film, there was a special presentation honoring Emmit Sullivan and membfers of the Quarter Century Club—25 years of service in the Power Squadron dedicated fr> rromoting safe boating through education. The safety film was geared for small children.but covered basic topics applicable to all ages. First in the presentation was learn to swim if you are interested in water activities or at least learn to float. Other topics covered wearing PFDS when on a boat (adults should set the example by wearBOATING WITH RAY RAY EICHER ing one), what to do if the boat capsi zes (stay with it), and always swim with a buddy. They were all basic safety rules for young and old. When swimming last summer, I found out very quickly that I do nothave much endurance, so don't over extend yourself Take along an approved boat cushion and don't get too far away from your boat or the shore, unless you work out on a regular basis. I bet you don't have much endurance either. If you go out with me, I insist you take a cushion— especially at the beginning of the season. For Boulder City skippers I have good news. A safe boating class will beheld by the Las Vegas Power Squadron from 7 to 9 p.m.Wednesdays from May 1 through June 12, at the Community College, 700 Wyoming St. Call the college to register,294Wildlife Conference in March The 61st%ofth American Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference is set for March 2227 at the Adam's Mark Tulsa, in Tulsa, Okla., sponsored by The Wildlife Management Institute which administers the event. To receive a copy of the advance program interested persons should call WMI, (202)371-1808, fax (202)4085059), or write to Suite 801,1101 14th Street, N.W., Washington, D.C., 20005. The program contains information on opening and special sessions, related meetings, special events, hotel accomodations, air travel discounts, registration and more. The theme of the conference is "Facing Realities in Resource Management." Registration fees are $135 for regular attendees; $ 115 for WMI members; $65 for seniors, age 65 and older; and $45 for students. Spouses and children may register free. The single-day fee is $67.50. Media representatives also may register at no charge. All attendees must register. Macy's presents diabetes fashion show Sunday Macy's will present a fashion show featuring Carole Little, Jones of New York and Liz Claiborne, to benefit the American Diabetes Association, at 11:30 a.m. Sunday, March 3. Also featured will be a Macy's Boutique, the Kenneth Scott Vocal "Theater and raffle prizes. Dee Ladd, president and CEO of Sunrise Children's Hospital Foundation will be honored by the ADA Past honorees have included Frankie Sue Del Papa in 1995, and Diane Ursick Jett in 1994. For reservations and raffle tickets, call the ADA office, 3699995. GREAT FOOD FUN & FRIENDS 990 Breakfast 7 Selections to Choose From! Daily from 11pm 1 lam user i]irfCT Including All You Can lot Sjljd Bar GIANT SHRIMP COCKTAIL ^^^"S^CURV HQO filled to the brim with 6oz. of shrimp & sauce | ^4^ Prime Rib liicliides AllYOU-CAS'-FATSalad liar! <: yv s 1 M cj r //M.. / llUnk Soiilll ill SiiiiH( Ril.. //< y/o.'Jih. 0188. Check your schedule and sign up. No excuses now—no long drives are required. Let's have a good turnout from BC skippers. A few months ago, I wrote that I had purchased a charger for my batteries that I left cormected all the time,called Battery Pal. I had some inquiries as to where I bought it but unfortunately I am in the process of moving and threw away all my catalogs. They may be available locally butifnot, call Overton's, (800)3346541. They sell for $31.95 plus shipping, the item number is 25315. This is not a trickle charger and can be left on your battery indefinitely. Until next time ... keep your bilge dry. Eicher, a long-time valley resident, considers himself a part-time boater and fishernnan. Wapiti for the kids, a video target shooting system and the eighth annual World Elk Calling Championships. During the event, seminars will give guests an opportunity to learn outdoor survival, hunting skills, elk calling, cookery and more, as well as auctions, entertainment, dancing and great food. For tickets and more infbrmation, call (406)523-4500. OUTDOOR RECREATION INFORMATION Elk poaching reward offered Operation Game Thief is offering a $3,000 reward for information leading to the conviction of those involved in the recent poaching of five elk in Lincoln County. Four cows and a calf were shot and lefl to waste near the head of Cobb Creek north of White Rock Peak. The animals were discovered Jan. 16 within a 50-yard radius. To report information, call Operation GameThief, (800)9923030. All calls will remain confidential and anonymous. (^ National Park Service lecture Once one of the most abundant fishes in the Lower Colorado River, the razorback sucker is rarely seen today. The public is invited to attend a lecture by Fisheries biologist Tom Burke to learn why and what is being done to change this, at 7 p.m. Friday, March 1, at the Alan Bible Visitor Center in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area. "Lake Mohave in the Lake Mead NRA supports the largest remaining population of razorback suckers in the world," said Burke, "but th^at number continues to decline each year." It is one of four strange-looking native fish that used to inhabit the silty, fast-moving Colorado River. To help them survive in the fast, strong currents, the fish developed bizarre shapes like' humped backs, wing-like fins and streamlined bodies. A Native Fish Work Group of state and federal agencies has undertaken a joint project to try to keep the endangered species from becoming extinct over the next several years. Burke will describe the efforts underway and the result that have been achieved to date. The Visitor Center is located four miles northeast of Boulder City on U.S. 93. For more information, call the NPS, 293-8990, fi^om 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily. Until next week, enjoy the great outdoors. Henderson, an outdoor enthusiast IS a host and producer of local TV ,' and radio shows. CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE HIGHEST QUALITY LOWEST RATES 8983589 Lasting Impressions Courses designed to transition young girls into young ladies. Uura Hobbs Mrs USA 1994 Director Modeling Poise & Posture Personal Grooming Manners Haircare Skincare Wardrobe Pageant Workshops Available Lenz Agency 1591 E. Desert Inn Road Call 898-3365 Information also available V ;• on the Mrs. Nevada International Pageant —-^!aw The NEW Backstage Dance Studio II "l\//(/y Chi/(III II [(iki • ilialil III Ihllici 3-25 S. Lamb (beivreen Dl & Twain) I.Dob for us off 1-95 jus! before Boulder Hwv 739*1446

PAGE 22

•nwvHVW mmmmimmm mmm Pag* 4 Panorama Thursday, February 29,1996 Goldfield's Attell-Weeks fight recalled Parti Over the years, Goldfield's fc Gans-Nelson fight, Sept. 3,1906, .and Reno's Johnson-Jeffries heavyweight championship match of July 4,1910 have been the subject of considerable historical note. Both were promoted by George Lewis "Tex" Rickard, who went on to international fame as the promoter of Jack Dempse/s big fights and the builder of New York's Madison Square Garden. Forgotten in the saga of Rickard's life, however, is another Nevada fight, a 10-round mill between featherweight champion Abe Attell and challenger Freddie Weeks in Goldfield on Jan. 14, 1909. Attell, a native of San Francisco, had won his title in St. Louis in October 1901 by defeating George Dixon in a four-man elimination contest. Weeks, born in Butte, Mon. in 1883, had been considered a commer with a long string of victories until Attell knocked him out in four roun d s in Los Angeles on October 29,1907. The Montana boxer wanted a rematch and those who followed the fight game were anxious to see the pair go at it again. Several promoters had tried to arrange a meeting, but it was Rickard who pulled it off. The first Jewish fighter to hold a title in any American weight class, Attell was fighting out of New Orleans at the time of the Goldfield match, and Weeks was living in Cripple Creek, Colo., billing himself as "the featherweight champion of Colorado, Montana and Nevada." Rickard had been in contact j with both camps since early November 1908 and was able to sign the fighters on Dec. 23. He guaranteed a purse of $2,500 to the winner and $1,200 to the loser. When word of the upcoming match reached Goldfield, busi, nessmen, mine owners and town boosters were ecstatic, looking ^^>yard to another publicity bonanza on the scale of the Gans-Nelson fight. Weeks was in Tonopah when he signed for the fight and came to Goldfield a few days later to establish quarters at JumboTHIS WAS NEVADA PHILLIP I. EARL town, a Goldfield suburb. Attell remained in New Orleans for the holidays, arriving in Goldfield on Jan. 6 to establish himself at the Olympic Club gym. By arrangement, both fighters did their road work in the desert, running against the 20mile gales which blew every morning. The trainers also opened up their men's quarters to curious spectators and special arrangements were made for a session with Goldfield's female fight fans on Januar/ 10. Weeks' acclimatization to Cripple Creek's high altitude was thought by some observers to give him an advantage over the champion, but Attell had no trouble adjusting to Goldfield's altitude. The $ 10 ringside tickets at the 1,500-seat Goldfield Athletic Club were snapped up by fight fans from Denver, Butte, San Francisco and Los Angeles within hours of the announcement of the fight and the remainder were sold within the next week. Rickard signed Eddy Graney of San Francisco as the third man in the ring and brought in Sid Humphrey of Tonopah and Jack Shannon, Stockton, to fight an eight-round preliminary match. Oddsmakers gave Attell a slight edge initially, but the fighters were rated even by fight night. Those who visited both camps felt that Attell was not taking Weeks seriously enough and they were impressed by the intensity of the Montana boy, but Attell proved to have matters well in hand. (Next week: More on the Attell-Weeks fight) Earl IS curator of the Nevada Historical Society in Garson City. TIU J.D.HigleyCa • P 9M 1 A FlBinciil Servicci Company • Income Tax Preparation • Established 21 Years •10% Off With This Ad Call Today 293-2323 1234 Wyoming St, Boulder City ^S^^^JiSS Kids Need Help in Math? Would eosy fo understand mofh videos help? MathemoHcal Systems presents the Math, You Can Do If/ series. Whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percenfs, geometry, integers, ratio & proportion Exponentials as well as concepts in Algebra. Only $12.95 per tape To Order Call: 431 -1340 or (800) 218-5482 NOW OPEN Uncover French (Dining 'Elegant food(fiscpyeries that taste even Setter than you imagitudmxiati everydqy revelation at Le 'Bistro Ihi Vin... ./md the only pass]^ort you need is your paCate.Y" Photo insert Nevada Historical Society Illustration -" Abe Attell, principal in the Attell-Weeks fight, Goldfield, 1909 Open 6pm-llptti Tues-Sat ^ Imaginative Menus 4451 East Sunset at Mountain Vista in Green Valley 435-4000 • j^n 'E}(c[usive 'Dining Jaciiity 9^7v Adjoins ^nata's 'With Its Onm Charm &Intimacij for • "Entertaining An Occasion to Remember "Book Your Private Party Now" THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY k.kA WIN CASH PEPPERMILL'S kA^ WIN CASH RAMBOW CLUB CA8M0122 W/OCR ST. HOiDERSON, NV. MMTTT w, YOUR HEALTH Thursday, February 29, 1996 Panorama Page 5 Escape medicine trap ^OMEN^S HEALTH througli chiropractics DR. GEORGE D. WILBANKS Dr. Kent Marshall Henderson Chiropractic It's the world we live in. We're all looking for instant results. We've learned to expect (and demand!) instant meals, instant service, instant credit, instant lotteries, instant energy, instant weight-loss, instant beauty, instant just-about-anythingyour-little-heart desires! v,;:; This obsession with instant gratification has even carried over into the world of health care. We demand instant relief from discomfort, and we expect "miracle pills" and "magic potions." "r/V : • • • ; • ;' • ; • •;"-•; • ; • ; ~-^' Drug manufacturers perpepuate this tragic tale: For every ill there is a pill that will make it go away. We swallow the propaganda as easily as we swallow the pill. We are a nation on medication. When the national media focuses on the "war on drugs," the reference is to illegal "street" drugs. Rarely does the media draw attention to the other drug problem—the overuse and abuse of prescription and over-thecounter medication. On the contrary, radio and television keep promising us much "needed" relief, while ads in newspapers and magazines keep repeating the same message: It's good to take medicine to help us feel better. The key word in the directive is feel. Most medication will only cover up our symptoms and make us tempo;jaP^:jQii|^b
PAGE 23

•nwvHVW mmmmimmm mmm Pag* 4 Panorama Thursday, February 29,1996 Goldfield's Attell-Weeks fight recalled Parti Over the years, Goldfield's fc Gans-Nelson fight, Sept. 3,1906, .and Reno's Johnson-Jeffries heavyweight championship match of July 4,1910 have been the subject of considerable historical note. Both were promoted by George Lewis "Tex" Rickard, who went on to international fame as the promoter of Jack Dempse/s big fights and the builder of New York's Madison Square Garden. Forgotten in the saga of Rickard's life, however, is another Nevada fight, a 10-round mill between featherweight champion Abe Attell and challenger Freddie Weeks in Goldfield on Jan. 14, 1909. Attell, a native of San Francisco, had won his title in St. Louis in October 1901 by defeating George Dixon in a four-man elimination contest. Weeks, born in Butte, Mon. in 1883, had been considered a commer with a long string of victories until Attell knocked him out in four roun d s in Los Angeles on October 29,1907. The Montana boxer wanted a rematch and those who followed the fight game were anxious to see the pair go at it again. Several promoters had tried to arrange a meeting, but it was Rickard who pulled it off. The first Jewish fighter to hold a title in any American weight class, Attell was fighting out of New Orleans at the time of the Goldfield match, and Weeks was living in Cripple Creek, Colo., billing himself as "the featherweight champion of Colorado, Montana and Nevada." Rickard had been in contact j with both camps since early November 1908 and was able to sign the fighters on Dec. 23. He guaranteed a purse of $2,500 to the winner and $1,200 to the loser. When word of the upcoming match reached Goldfield, busi, nessmen, mine owners and town boosters were ecstatic, looking ^^>yard to another publicity bonanza on the scale of the Gans-Nelson fight. Weeks was in Tonopah when he signed for the fight and came to Goldfield a few days later to establish quarters at JumboTHIS WAS NEVADA PHILLIP I. EARL town, a Goldfield suburb. Attell remained in New Orleans for the holidays, arriving in Goldfield on Jan. 6 to establish himself at the Olympic Club gym. By arrangement, both fighters did their road work in the desert, running against the 20mile gales which blew every morning. The trainers also opened up their men's quarters to curious spectators and special arrangements were made for a session with Goldfield's female fight fans on Januar/ 10. Weeks' acclimatization to Cripple Creek's high altitude was thought by some observers to give him an advantage over the champion, but Attell had no trouble adjusting to Goldfield's altitude. The $ 10 ringside tickets at the 1,500-seat Goldfield Athletic Club were snapped up by fight fans from Denver, Butte, San Francisco and Los Angeles within hours of the announcement of the fight and the remainder were sold within the next week. Rickard signed Eddy Graney of San Francisco as the third man in the ring and brought in Sid Humphrey of Tonopah and Jack Shannon, Stockton, to fight an eight-round preliminary match. Oddsmakers gave Attell a slight edge initially, but the fighters were rated even by fight night. Those who visited both camps felt that Attell was not taking Weeks seriously enough and they were impressed by the intensity of the Montana boy, but Attell proved to have matters well in hand. (Next week: More on the Attell-Weeks fight) Earl IS curator of the Nevada Historical Society in Garson City. TIU J.D.HigleyCa • P 9M 1 A FlBinciil Servicci Company • Income Tax Preparation • Established 21 Years •10% Off With This Ad Call Today 293-2323 1234 Wyoming St, Boulder City ^S^^^JiSS Kids Need Help in Math? Would eosy fo understand mofh videos help? MathemoHcal Systems presents the Math, You Can Do If/ series. Whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percenfs, geometry, integers, ratio & proportion Exponentials as well as concepts in Algebra. Only $12.95 per tape To Order Call: 431 -1340 or (800) 218-5482 NOW OPEN Uncover French (Dining 'Elegant food(fiscpyeries that taste even Setter than you imagitudmxiati everydqy revelation at Le 'Bistro Ihi Vin... ./md the only pass]^ort you need is your paCate.Y" Photo insert Nevada Historical Society Illustration -" Abe Attell, principal in the Attell-Weeks fight, Goldfield, 1909 Open 6pm-llptti Tues-Sat ^ Imaginative Menus 4451 East Sunset at Mountain Vista in Green Valley 435-4000 • j^n 'E}(c[usive 'Dining Jaciiity 9^7v Adjoins ^nata's 'With Its Onm Charm &Intimacij for • "Entertaining An Occasion to Remember "Book Your Private Party Now" THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY k.kA WIN CASH PEPPERMILL'S kA^ WIN CASH RAMBOW CLUB CA8M0122 W/OCR ST. HOiDERSON, NV. MMTTT w, YOUR HEALTH Thursday, February 29, 1996 Panorama Page 5 Escape medicine trap ^OMEN^S HEALTH througli chiropractics DR. GEORGE D. WILBANKS Dr. Kent Marshall Henderson Chiropractic It's the world we live in. We're all looking for instant results. We've learned to expect (and demand!) instant meals, instant service, instant credit, instant lotteries, instant energy, instant weight-loss, instant beauty, instant just-about-anythingyour-little-heart desires! v,;:; This obsession with instant gratification has even carried over into the world of health care. We demand instant relief from discomfort, and we expect "miracle pills" and "magic potions." "r/V : • • • ; • ;' • ; • •;"-•; • ; • ; ~-^' Drug manufacturers perpepuate this tragic tale: For every ill there is a pill that will make it go away. We swallow the propaganda as easily as we swallow the pill. We are a nation on medication. When the national media focuses on the "war on drugs," the reference is to illegal "street" drugs. Rarely does the media draw attention to the other drug problem—the overuse and abuse of prescription and over-thecounter medication. On the contrary, radio and television keep promising us much "needed" relief, while ads in newspapers and magazines keep repeating the same message: It's good to take medicine to help us feel better. The key word in the directive is feel. Most medication will only cover up our symptoms and make us tempo;jaP^:jQii|^b
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f ^i^tmmmmmmmmmmu • • • • • • • • • • • • • wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmi Pagt 6 Panorama Thursday, February 29,1996 House of Worship Directory @^^^ Boulder City Assembly of God Church ^ "The church of new beginnings' ^W 7th and Utah '^ • • •'^ (The Boulder City Women's Club Building) Sunday Morning Worship 9:30 A.M. Sunday Evening Services 6:00 P.M. Wednesday Services 7:00 P.M. YOV ARE ALWAYS WELCOME! Duane Jordan. Pastor Phone (702) 293-0620 ^HRimAN COMMUNITY BAPTIST CHURCH 245 E. Foster Ave. • Henderson, NV 89009 Revere nd Sam Roberson, PastorAeacher SUNDAY: Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Evening Service 7:00 p.m. MONDAY: Evagellm Classes 7:00 p.m. TUESDAY: Theology Classes 7:00 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Prayer & Bible Study 7:00 p.m, THURSDAY: Choir Rehearsal 7:00 p.m. FRIDAY: Teachers Meeting • 6:45 p.m. Past Lives, Dreams, and Soul Travel Discover your own answers to questions about your past, present, and future through the ancient wisdom of ECKANKAR. Experience it for yourself, Sunday Worship 10 A.M. 3160 E. Desert Inn Rd., #14 369-0101 jk[ The Dohol Foith ^^ Explore toochings onsWorld Unity, Ellmlnotion of Prejudice, Equality of Men and Women and find onswers to the most perplexing questions of our times. Coll 294-1050 or 293-6660 for free literature of Informotion. '^ A FOURSQUARE CHURCH 571 Adams Blvd. Roiilrt'^'-Citv?P3-7773 Sunday Worship 10K>0 am Home of Christian Center School and Day Care Center Grace Community Church 1150 Wyoming St., Boulder City Office Phone: 293-2018 Founded: Febmary 22, 1933 Worship: 0:00 & 10:30 a.m. 'Christ Caring for People Through People" MeltK>di$t-Pr as byterian-Congregational Dr. Richard W. Smilh, Dr. Ron Freel, Mr. John ^tondt Visit our Intomei Home Page: httpy/coyote.aocessnv.com/rvwmith/ fvt %i GREEN VALLEY ^„ PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Wonhlp Servlcei Saturday Evening 5:30 pm "Infonnal and Intimate: Sunday Morning 8:30 and 11:00 am Sunday Scliooi 9:45 am tor all ages Nurieiy all ceivtcet Phone 454-8484 SOUTHERN BAPTIST CHURCH 240 S, Cholla St. • Hender^n, NV B9015 [702] 565.6072 You're Invited! Sunday Worship Services: 8:30 a.m. 9:45 a.m. 11:00 a.m. 6:00 pm — / 7H<*ce lUt (^** — Pastor Rene Joseph Houla ST. PAUL THE APOSTLE ORTHODOX CHURCH Divine Liturgy: 9.-00 A.M., Sunday | 898-4800 5400 ANNIE OAKLEY DR. (South of Hacienda) LAS VEGAS, NEVADA 89120 IVALLEY m OUTDEACH • • SYNAGOGUE MARCH 1st Mcgillah reading lonturing Ylrachmoal the storyteller and mime Thomas the Silent ^*/^^ A Reconstructionist Congregation ineetinq at Melimdist Cluit':h 22011 U<>l)iiHhili' R(l. >(.MiKi,.i(,Kvi MIDBAR KODESH BUILDINQ THE FUTURE TOGETHER 0 CHlLDREnS SUMMER PROGRAM 0 YOUTH GROUPS 0 RELIGIOUS SCHOOL 0 BAR/BAT MITZVAH PROGRAM SERVICES ARE HELD: 2nd at 4th Friday evenings, 7:30 p.m. Every Shabbat morning, 9 a.m. United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism affiliate 6000 S. Eastern Ave."^, #3B. Call 798-4510 THE CHURCH FOR YOUR FUTURE NOW! GREEN VALLEY Evangelical Lutheran Churchi 1799 WiC|.-.jni f'.iik.vnv • Witivvani and Valle Vordc Sunday Worship 9 and 10:30 a.m.. Wednesday 7 p.m. Sunday School & Adult Bible Study 10:15 a.m. 454-8979 COMMUNfTY CHURCH OF HENDERSON United Church of Christ Congregational 360 E. Horizon Dr., • 565-8563 Worship Service-^ 0:30 am Nursery for Children Church School Sept. to June 9:00 am The Church On The Hill" 711 Valle Verde Ct., Henderson, NV 454-2722 Gary A. Morefield Senior Pastor K.ihiM KiJi.uil SIIKHIUI :m(."m()miT:4.V.-4'>(l(l Green Valley Christian Center Sunday Schedule Morning Worship: 8:45-11:15 AM & 6:00 PM Children's Church: 9:00 -11:15 AM Sunday School: 10:15AM Evening Worship: 6:00 PM Wednesday: Family Night 7:00 PM Thursday: Youth Group (7-12), 6:45 PM Celebrate SUNRISE COMMUNITY CHURCH Meeting in Henderson Convention Center 200 S. Water St. (please use back parking lot) REV. JIM HAMILTON, PASTOR • r'^'-:':-:\ j: • • ':-_. 737-5219 '. Sunday Worship 10am Come and let us help make your life work for you. HENDERSON PRESBY1ERL Hcall/iy Fdiuilies SUNDAY SERVICES: Multi-Denominational Worship 10 A.M. Rediscovering Healthy Families Childcare Available 591 Adams Blvd. • 293-2454 Coiner of Adams & Snn Felipe Boulder City Bethany 'Baptist Cfturtti Sunday Worship Service: 8 am, 10:30 & 6 p.m. Sunday School 9:15 a.m. Dr. Georg^A. Huber Senior Pastor -''' Steve Mbksheor Yoofh Pastor 210 W^OTning, Boulder City Call 293-1912 for futher information OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN CHURCH "Holding Forth the Word of Ufa..." Philipplans 2:16 Sunday School 9 am Adult Bible Class 9 am Sunday Worship 10:45 am PASTOR ED BRUNING 59 Lynn Ln., Henderson 565-9154 Growing together in the grace of our Lord Jesus BLACK MOUNTAIN FELLOWSHIP Ctiurch of the Foursquare Gospel Sunday Worship 10:30AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Wd. Family Night 7 pm Thurs. Parenting Classes 7 pm 315 S. Water St., Henderson HonMol Black Mountain Chriitlan Day Cart 564-2435 St. Timothy's Episcopal Church Pastor Rev. Dr. Lloyd Rupp We Invite You to Come and Worship with Us at 10:00 A.M. E:ach Sunday Pacific & Panama Downtown Henderson Chuch Office 565-8033 Family Worship Center 370 E. Windmill Ln., Las Vegas, NV 897-4480 SUNDAY 8:30AM 10AM -11 AM & 6PM WEDNESDAY 7PM PASTOR J.W. CUNNINGHAM Bible Believing Bible Teaching St. Peter's CathoUc Church 204 S. Boulder Hwy. MASS SCHEDULESat: 5 p.m. Sun: 8 am & 10 am 11:30 am 5 pm Confessions: Sat. 4 to 4:30 St. Matthews Episcopal Church The Working Church Saturday Evening Mass 5:30 pm Sunday Mass 9:45 am Church School During Sunday Mass Nursery Available I 4709 S. Nellis Blvd. 451-24831 2 Bloclis Nofih of Tfopicana on Nellis CALVARY ^ CHAPEL of HENDERSON Services Held at 600 Sunset Rd. (Sunset Plaza) Sunday I GAM [Call for other Service limes 456-3619 Pastor Chuck Trelt TTiv word have I treasured in my heart thai I might not sin against thee." VEGAS VALLEY CHRISTIAN CHURCH 5515 Mfn. Visfo, Los Vegas Phone 451-9211 UNDENOMINATIONAL BIBLE and CHRIST FOCUSED BIBLE SCHOOL 9:30 AM WORSHIP 10:30 AM S.O.W. (Study on Wednesdoy) 7:00 P.M. (Child Core Avoiloble) Serving Green Volley & Los Vcgos Areos near Sunset & Russell Rood .1 pl,-c? to l3:;long n pl.Tcc to become Licensed Child Care Center Phone 451-9665 ^Coine&' iWorslyp CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH 1401 FIFTH STREET BOULDER CITY, NV ; r 293-4332 Saturday Country Wenern Worship 5:00 pm Sunday Traditioruil Worship 9.00 am Sunday School and Adult Bible Study 10:15 am Sunday WOO AM 7Q0PM Wednesday 700 PM Bible Sixjdy FOUNTAIN OF UFE MINISTRIES • ;> • ^ Moving with God in the 90's FOUNTAIN OF UFE MINISTRIES We invite you to come and v^orshlp with the spirit-filled believers ot the Fountain of life Ministries! Come and enjoy solid Bible teaching with a family oimosphere, ontjclpoting with excilemeni, the move of God in the services. (Rev Charles R, Boiterbee, St. Pastor) 4310 E. Tropicana *6 • Los Vagas, NV ComwefVSATropicono • (702)435-7990 FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 1419 5th Street, Boulder City 293-7740 SERVICES Sunday 11 am Sunday School 9:30 am W/ednesday 7 30 pni Reading Room, 534 Nevada Hwy. Open Ivlon. thru Fri. 10 to 1 All Are Welcome Puiore HJI t Paula Norditrom Sunday 10:30am Wd. 7:15pm Saturday Sam Saturday 7pm Church of the Harvest 1000 Nevada Hwy. Boulder City, NV 293-5878 MONDAY FRIDAY PRAYER 6:30 7 AM Praise and Worship Bible Teaching Promise Keepers (Second Sat of the Month) Intercessory Prayer 0 k\ --r ^HlGHLAJ^HlLLS 615 College Drive • Henderson • 566-0200 Sunday Worship Services: 8:30 am. 11:00 am, 6:00 pm Come Join us Sunday! We Care About You and Your Family I SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH Christ The Servant Lutheran Church 263-0802 Sunday Worship • 8 &10:3O am Sunday School • 9:15 am Sunday Evening Worship 7 pm Wednesday 7pni Visitors Welcome • Nursery Available 2 South Pecos Rd. Henderson TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM EstabUshed 1947 The Lorgest Congregation in Nevado Afflilioted with United Synogogue of Conservotive Judaism & Solomon Sched)ter Day Schools OUR MEMBERSHIP IS OPEN, COME GROW WITH US!!! 1600 lost OakayMvd. • Las Vegas, Nwwda • 314-5070 GREEN VALLEY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 454-7989 2200 Robindale Road St. Thomas More Catholic Community 130 n. Pecos Rd. Henderson, 361-3022 MASSES Sat: 4 pm 6f 5:30 pm Sun: 8 am, 9:30 am, 1 lam & 12:30 pm Men Fri. 8:30 am rather Dan nolan, C.S.V. 6:15 Worship Services 9:30 am & 11 am Worship & Surxlay School ChMd Care lor infants and Toddlers Rev. Bob Buma r\ Welcomes YOU each Saturday Bible Study 9:30 am Worship-11:00am Prayer Meeting Wed. 7 pm 591 Adams — Boulder City St. Paul's Charismatic Episcopal Church 1661 QaJleriaDr. (White Middle School, Henderson) SUNDAY WORSHIP 10AM FMher Qeorge Oervd • 564-1152 FMher David HoflF • 294-6226 RELIGIOUS SCIENCE CHURCH of LAS VEGAS 4820 Alpine PI., Ste. ElOl Us Vegas, NV 89107 258-5683 Wednesday 7:00 PM Sunday 9AM & 10:30AM Rev. Sheila Weldon re^^ St Christopher's Episcopal Church Sunday School 9AM Holy Eucharist SuncJoy 10 A.M. 812 Arizona St. • Boulder City • 293-4275 GREEN VALLEY CHURCH OF CHRIST 28 Commerce Center Drive (Ofl Sunset in Commerce Center tsetiind Etfiel M Chocolates) 456-2040 OR 295^5757 Bible Centered Undenominational Always A Welcome DIAL-A'BIBLE MESSAGE PUot^t 456-2040 (A taped weekly inspirational message) Call atMut our FREE BlWe correspondence course. CELEBHATION-PRAISE SERVICE 8:00 A.M TRADITIONAL SERVICE 10:45 A.M SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:15 A.M. CHILD CARE PROVIDED 609 East Horizon Drive Henderson, NV 89015 • (702) 565-6049 CHRISTIAN WEDDINGS INVrTED REV. MARVIN R. GANT. PASTOR GIVING LIFE MINISTRIES 416 Periite Way, Hend. 565-4984 • 5B54104 Pastor; Dave Delaria Sunday Christiui Educaiioa 10 am Sunday Worship Services 11 am & 7 pin Nunery Provided For I Ian Sovicc Wed.BiUcStudy Tpm THE SALVATION ARMY COMMUNITY CENTER A Center For Worship and Service! 830 E. Laka Maad Dr., Handarson. NV (702) 565-9578 Sunday Worship Services: II am & 6pm Sunday School For All Ages: 9:30 am Bible Study Each Thursday: 6 pm W^ > r .j/mmm^mmiimjim i-c*Hr^ • • '"*n A jiiJiiTo^—I'.'ie'^ • ^iyiB.^i(|i(^(w^ifl(^^frmif)(r^^fi!j. u('*|?Tpiiii|iijjtiv< A^;tVflH'ito'TW' "(.f JPl"' Thursday, February 29,1996 Panorama Pago 7 HBC Publications joins the Clark County School District's Math/Science Institute to reach America 2000 goals Henderson Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley Plus First In The World In Mathematics By The Year 2000 Probability By Bill Hanlon The word "probability" is used so often that many of us have a vague notion of what it means. Today, we'll try to bring our notions in focus, But, as usual, in mathematics, we need to develop some vocabulary. EXPERIMENT: An activity under consideration. OUTCOMES: The obsen/ation of what occurs in an experiment. SAMPLE SPACE: The set of all possible outcomes in an experiment. EVENT: Any subset of a sample space. The sample space of an experiment can often be seen more cleariy through the use of a "tree diagram." Each branch of the tree is outcome. EXAMPLE Use a tree diagram to show all possible outcomes of tossing a coin. v.." EXAMPLE Use a tree diagram for throwing a die. /•• / • • • • • • • Piece of cake. What happens if I decide to toss a fair coin twice? Well, on the first toss, I'll either get a head or a tail as shown in the tree diagram. Now, if I got a head on the first toss, then I could get a head or a tail on the second toss. So, I could have gotten a head, then I have the chance of getting either a head or tail on the second toss. Or, if I threw a tail on the first toss, then on the second toss, I have the chance of getting a head or a tail. Again a tree diagram will help me illustrate this. Haid By following all the branches, I will be able to detenmine my sample space (H ,H), (H, T), (T, H) or (T.T). In our experiments, we will make the assumption that all events are equally likely. That is to say, our coin or die will not be weighted. Now, let's define probability. ~ '':' Probability = number of favorable outcomes in an experimen t number of possible outcomes in the experiment Another way to say this is: Probability = number of successes number of successes plus failures Symbolically, we write: p = s Many people confuse probability with odds. Which is a better bet? You go to the race track and the odds of winning are 1 to 6, written 1:6, or throwing a die and getting a 4 which has a probability 1/6? At first glance, you might think they are the same or an equal bet. However, this is why vocabulary is important they are not the same or equal. Odds is defined as the numtier of ways you can win over the number of ways you can lose. odds = win, probability = win lose win + lose Using the example, at the track we can win one way and lose 6 ways. Those odds translate to a probability of 1/7. Definitely, not an equivalent bet. In probability, the biggest difficulty we will face is knowing what the sample space is. In other words, what are all the possible outcomes of an experiment? For now, we'll use the tree diagram. Later, by examining those diagrams, we should find a shortcut. Let's see what happens if we throw two dice, what are all the possible outcomes? 1st Die This needs to be done for each number on the 1st toss. 2fKl Die 1 23456 Again, what that means is on the first throw we could have gotten a 1,2, 3, 4, 5, or 6 and no matter what we got on the second throw. How many possible outcomes are there? AH right, 36. How many different ways could you get two dice that add up to 4? Add to 7? If you were playing "craps," which total would you expect to occur most often? Yes, this stuff is a real blast we'll come back for more later. Bill Hanlon is the Math/Science Institute Coordinator lor the Clark County School District and a part-time math instructor at UNLV. 1996 HBC Publications. Inc. Jewish community to celebrate Purim The festival of Purim will be celebrated from sunset Monday, March 4, to sunset Tuesday, March 5, by the world-wide Jewish community. The holiday commemorates the victory of the Jewish community of ancient Persia over the evil plot of Haman, a minister of King Achasverosh. Mordechai discovered the plot, and his niece, Queen Esther, pleaded with the king for her people Holiday traditions include: The Megillah—the Book of Esther—is read on Monday night and again on Tuesday. Noisemakers are twirled and feet are stamped to blot out Raman's name. Charity should be given to at least two people in need. Gifts of food, including at least two kinds, are sent to at least one friend on Tuesday. Family and friends gather for a special meal before • unset Tuesday. The holiday will be noted at all greater Las Vegas synagogues and Jewish schools. Midbar Kodesh Celebrating the wisdom and courage of Esther, the women of Midbar Kodesh will read from the Book of Esther at services beginning at 7 p.m. Monday, March 4. Children in costume will sing and dance with Penny Ranan who will lead Israeli dancing. The congregation is an affiliate of the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism, and meets at 60(X) S. Eastern Ave., Suite 3B, just north of Patrick. For more information call 7984510. Young Israel of Las Vegas The Orthodox synagogue will sponsor a Purim program including a series of classes and a party. Classes will include a discussions and learning with Rabbi YitechakWyneat7:30p.m. Sunday, March 3. The cost is $5. The reading of the Megillah, costume contests, food and fun begin at 6:30 p.m. Monday, March 4, at the synagogue, 5712 Joshua Point, near Pecos and Russell. For more information, call 4546787. Valley Outreach Synagogue The synagogue welcomes people of all ages and faith traditions to its annual Megillah reading commemorating the holiday of Purim, at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 1. Storyteller Yerachmiel and mime, Thomas the Silent, join telling and acting out the story. All participants are invited to come in costume and traditional Purim treats will be served following the service. The congregation meets at 2200 Robindale, corner of Green Valley Parkway. For more information, call 436-4900. The Hebrew Academy The annual community-wide Purim Carnival will begin at 2 p.m. Sunday, March 3, at the Hebrew Academy campus, 9700 W. Hillpointe Road in Summerhn. Girl Scouts kick off cookie sale Frontier (jrijcl Scout Council will officially begin its 1996 cookie sale with the fifth annual Cookie Kicl^Off, from noon to 2 p.m. Saturday. March 2, at the Sears Court of the Meadows Mall. The event is free and open to the public. AlsoknoWn as the "Architect's Event," it focuses on using the edible and popular cookies as building material. Contestants use their favorite Girl Scout cookie (up to 15 boxes), and use frosting, cheese whiz, peanut butter or similar food as cement, and build a structure, such as a house, office building, bridge or castle. Two hours of construction time is allowed. Judges rate each entry on stability, creativity, use of cookies, adherence to guidelines and overall appearance. Plaques will be given for win, place and show. Certificates will be presented for most creative, best theme, most structurally sound, judge's choice and honorable mentions. Local architectural firms will participate, including Swisher & Hall, The Fielden Companies, Carpenter Sellers, students from the UNLV College of Architecture, as well as students groups from Green Valley, Rancho and Eldorado High Sdiools. It is estimated that more than two million Girl Scouts will take part in the 1996 cookie sale. Locally, about 5,000 girls will be involved. Seven cookie varieties will be sold at $3 per box. Booth sales vnW take place from March 1 to 17. ; Proceeds support a variety of activities, including contemporary issues series, camping programs and troop projects. For more information, or to volunteer, call 385-3677. Middle schools enroll in smoke-free class of 2000 Middle schools through Nevada are joining the American Cancer Society, American Heart Association and the American Lung Association of Nevada in an attempt to make a "Smoke Free''youngAmericabytheyear 2000. Former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop preated the program to teach middle and junior high school students about the risksoftobacco's deadly addiction and howtheir choices are effected by the tobacco industry aJid the media. Participating schools receive a kit containing a tobacco lesson plan and video. All materials focus on tobacco facts, how tobacco companies target youth, tobacco addiction and efforts to create a tobacco-free community. To sign up a school for the program, call the American Cancer Society, 798-6877. INSIGHT TO EYESIGHT J/Vatercolors on display Some of Southern Nevada's best watercolor artists will exhibit at the Nevada Watercolor Societies Spring Show from March 1 through 29, at the Sapienza Art Gallery, 461 S. Decatur Blvd., near Alta. An artists' reception, open to the public, will be held from noon to 3 p.m. Sunday, March 10. Gallery owner Marilyn Sapienza will judge the show which will feature more than 40 paintings by local watercolor artists. For more information, call 259-6471. by Jo8q)h Shalev, M.D. Laser-Sculpted Vision The long-awaited laser treatment tor nearsightedness fmally received federal approval as the Food and Drug Administration recently recommended photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) for people over the age of twenty-one with up to moderate degrees of nearsightedness. The procedure, also known as comeal sculpting, makes use of a !a.ser beam to flatten the eye's clear outer surface (cornea). Because nearsightedness is largely caused by an eyeball that is overly long from front to back, flattening its profile with the new laser-sculpting technique helps properly focus light further back on the retina for a clearer image. Photorefractive keratectomy is not approved for anyone with even moderate astigmatism, which is an irregular curvature of the eyeball. Those who are interested in PRK are advised to schedule appointments with ophthalmologists to assess its suitability to their circumstances. You migtit consider refractive surgery if you wish to decrease your dependence upon glasses or contact lenses. The best method for correcting your vision should be decided after a thorough examination and discu.ssion with us at EYE INSTITUTE OF NEVADA. We care about you and your eyes. We' re located at 999 Adams Blvd.. Suite 101, Boulder City (with two other locations), where we stress preventive health care for the. entire family. Please call 293-0551 to schedule an appointment Mon Fri 9-5; emergency service 24 hours. PS. Among those who are good PRK candidates. .1.S percent will still require corrective lenses after the procedure to achieve 20/20 vision. "This lolumn is hroughl lo you us a public .sersiie i imidfor hv Joseph Shalev, M.D. ,/:, Pell Sparks v FcxDtball Contest $12,500 Karen Clark 2b(t Video Keno $7,000 Peggy & Gary Parker 5^ Red, White & Blue slots and a $3,582 new car Walter Wert Bingo $5,000 You'd be smiling, loo, if you won big at Sam's Town. Don't just sit there green with envy, put the paper down and head on over to Sam's Town. Because we'd like nothing better than to add your name to our next winner's ad. SAM'S TOWN Where Locals Brinj Their Friends ('. n A ^.' n n n 1' I p r R ftpwlW^^^i'-WMr* .--*t>H ^wv^ Ki' I iff^fftntoH I'l* • m^f". •

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f ^i^tmmmmmmmmmmu • • • • • • • • • • • • • wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmi Pagt 6 Panorama Thursday, February 29,1996 House of Worship Directory @^^^ Boulder City Assembly of God Church ^ "The church of new beginnings' ^W 7th and Utah '^ • • •'^ (The Boulder City Women's Club Building) Sunday Morning Worship 9:30 A.M. Sunday Evening Services 6:00 P.M. Wednesday Services 7:00 P.M. YOV ARE ALWAYS WELCOME! Duane Jordan. Pastor Phone (702) 293-0620 ^HRimAN COMMUNITY BAPTIST CHURCH 245 E. Foster Ave. • Henderson, NV 89009 Revere nd Sam Roberson, PastorAeacher SUNDAY: Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Evening Service 7:00 p.m. MONDAY: Evagellm Classes 7:00 p.m. TUESDAY: Theology Classes 7:00 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Prayer & Bible Study 7:00 p.m, THURSDAY: Choir Rehearsal 7:00 p.m. FRIDAY: Teachers Meeting • 6:45 p.m. Past Lives, Dreams, and Soul Travel Discover your own answers to questions about your past, present, and future through the ancient wisdom of ECKANKAR. Experience it for yourself, Sunday Worship 10 A.M. 3160 E. Desert Inn Rd., #14 369-0101 jk[ The Dohol Foith ^^ Explore toochings onsWorld Unity, Ellmlnotion of Prejudice, Equality of Men and Women and find onswers to the most perplexing questions of our times. Coll 294-1050 or 293-6660 for free literature of Informotion. '^ A FOURSQUARE CHURCH 571 Adams Blvd. Roiilrt'^'-Citv?P3-7773 Sunday Worship 10K>0 am Home of Christian Center School and Day Care Center Grace Community Church 1150 Wyoming St., Boulder City Office Phone: 293-2018 Founded: Febmary 22, 1933 Worship: 0:00 & 10:30 a.m. 'Christ Caring for People Through People" MeltK>di$t-Pr as byterian-Congregational Dr. Richard W. Smilh, Dr. Ron Freel, Mr. John ^tondt Visit our Intomei Home Page: httpy/coyote.aocessnv.com/rvwmith/ fvt %i GREEN VALLEY ^„ PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Wonhlp Servlcei Saturday Evening 5:30 pm "Infonnal and Intimate: Sunday Morning 8:30 and 11:00 am Sunday Scliooi 9:45 am tor all ages Nurieiy all ceivtcet Phone 454-8484 SOUTHERN BAPTIST CHURCH 240 S, Cholla St. • Hender^n, NV B9015 [702] 565.6072 You're Invited! Sunday Worship Services: 8:30 a.m. 9:45 a.m. 11:00 a.m. 6:00 pm — / 7H<*ce lUt (^** — Pastor Rene Joseph Houla ST. PAUL THE APOSTLE ORTHODOX CHURCH Divine Liturgy: 9.-00 A.M., Sunday | 898-4800 5400 ANNIE OAKLEY DR. (South of Hacienda) LAS VEGAS, NEVADA 89120 IVALLEY m OUTDEACH • • SYNAGOGUE MARCH 1st Mcgillah reading lonturing Ylrachmoal the storyteller and mime Thomas the Silent ^*/^^ A Reconstructionist Congregation ineetinq at Melimdist Cluit':h 22011 U<>l)iiHhili' R(l. >(.MiKi,.i(,Kvi MIDBAR KODESH BUILDINQ THE FUTURE TOGETHER 0 CHlLDREnS SUMMER PROGRAM 0 YOUTH GROUPS 0 RELIGIOUS SCHOOL 0 BAR/BAT MITZVAH PROGRAM SERVICES ARE HELD: 2nd at 4th Friday evenings, 7:30 p.m. Every Shabbat morning, 9 a.m. United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism affiliate 6000 S. Eastern Ave."^, #3B. Call 798-4510 THE CHURCH FOR YOUR FUTURE NOW! GREEN VALLEY Evangelical Lutheran Churchi 1799 WiC|.-.jni f'.iik.vnv • Witivvani and Valle Vordc Sunday Worship 9 and 10:30 a.m.. Wednesday 7 p.m. Sunday School & Adult Bible Study 10:15 a.m. 454-8979 COMMUNfTY CHURCH OF HENDERSON United Church of Christ Congregational 360 E. Horizon Dr., • 565-8563 Worship Service-^ 0:30 am Nursery for Children Church School Sept. to June 9:00 am The Church On The Hill" 711 Valle Verde Ct., Henderson, NV 454-2722 Gary A. Morefield Senior Pastor K.ihiM KiJi.uil SIIKHIUI :m(."m()miT:4.V.-4'>(l(l Green Valley Christian Center Sunday Schedule Morning Worship: 8:45-11:15 AM & 6:00 PM Children's Church: 9:00 -11:15 AM Sunday School: 10:15AM Evening Worship: 6:00 PM Wednesday: Family Night 7:00 PM Thursday: Youth Group (7-12), 6:45 PM Celebrate SUNRISE COMMUNITY CHURCH Meeting in Henderson Convention Center 200 S. Water St. (please use back parking lot) REV. JIM HAMILTON, PASTOR • r'^'-:':-:\ j: • • ':-_. 737-5219 '. Sunday Worship 10am Come and let us help make your life work for you. HENDERSON PRESBY1ERL Hcall/iy Fdiuilies SUNDAY SERVICES: Multi-Denominational Worship 10 A.M. Rediscovering Healthy Families Childcare Available 591 Adams Blvd. • 293-2454 Coiner of Adams & Snn Felipe Boulder City Bethany 'Baptist Cfturtti Sunday Worship Service: 8 am, 10:30 & 6 p.m. Sunday School 9:15 a.m. Dr. Georg^A. Huber Senior Pastor -''' Steve Mbksheor Yoofh Pastor 210 W^OTning, Boulder City Call 293-1912 for futher information OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN CHURCH "Holding Forth the Word of Ufa..." Philipplans 2:16 Sunday School 9 am Adult Bible Class 9 am Sunday Worship 10:45 am PASTOR ED BRUNING 59 Lynn Ln., Henderson 565-9154 Growing together in the grace of our Lord Jesus BLACK MOUNTAIN FELLOWSHIP Ctiurch of the Foursquare Gospel Sunday Worship 10:30AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Wd. Family Night 7 pm Thurs. Parenting Classes 7 pm 315 S. Water St., Henderson HonMol Black Mountain Chriitlan Day Cart 564-2435 St. Timothy's Episcopal Church Pastor Rev. Dr. Lloyd Rupp We Invite You to Come and Worship with Us at 10:00 A.M. E:ach Sunday Pacific & Panama Downtown Henderson Chuch Office 565-8033 Family Worship Center 370 E. Windmill Ln., Las Vegas, NV 897-4480 SUNDAY 8:30AM 10AM -11 AM & 6PM WEDNESDAY 7PM PASTOR J.W. CUNNINGHAM Bible Believing Bible Teaching St. Peter's CathoUc Church 204 S. Boulder Hwy. MASS SCHEDULESat: 5 p.m. Sun: 8 am & 10 am 11:30 am 5 pm Confessions: Sat. 4 to 4:30 St. Matthews Episcopal Church The Working Church Saturday Evening Mass 5:30 pm Sunday Mass 9:45 am Church School During Sunday Mass Nursery Available I 4709 S. Nellis Blvd. 451-24831 2 Bloclis Nofih of Tfopicana on Nellis CALVARY ^ CHAPEL of HENDERSON Services Held at 600 Sunset Rd. (Sunset Plaza) Sunday I GAM [Call for other Service limes 456-3619 Pastor Chuck Trelt TTiv word have I treasured in my heart thai I might not sin against thee." VEGAS VALLEY CHRISTIAN CHURCH 5515 Mfn. Visfo, Los Vegas Phone 451-9211 UNDENOMINATIONAL BIBLE and CHRIST FOCUSED BIBLE SCHOOL 9:30 AM WORSHIP 10:30 AM S.O.W. (Study on Wednesdoy) 7:00 P.M. (Child Core Avoiloble) Serving Green Volley & Los Vcgos Areos near Sunset & Russell Rood .1 pl,-c? to l3:;long n pl.Tcc to become Licensed Child Care Center Phone 451-9665 ^Coine&' iWorslyp CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH 1401 FIFTH STREET BOULDER CITY, NV ; r 293-4332 Saturday Country Wenern Worship 5:00 pm Sunday Traditioruil Worship 9.00 am Sunday School and Adult Bible Study 10:15 am Sunday WOO AM 7Q0PM Wednesday 700 PM Bible Sixjdy FOUNTAIN OF UFE MINISTRIES • ;> • ^ Moving with God in the 90's FOUNTAIN OF UFE MINISTRIES We invite you to come and v^orshlp with the spirit-filled believers ot the Fountain of life Ministries! Come and enjoy solid Bible teaching with a family oimosphere, ontjclpoting with excilemeni, the move of God in the services. (Rev Charles R, Boiterbee, St. Pastor) 4310 E. Tropicana *6 • Los Vagas, NV ComwefVSATropicono • (702)435-7990 FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 1419 5th Street, Boulder City 293-7740 SERVICES Sunday 11 am Sunday School 9:30 am W/ednesday 7 30 pni Reading Room, 534 Nevada Hwy. Open Ivlon. thru Fri. 10 to 1 All Are Welcome Puiore HJI t Paula Norditrom Sunday 10:30am Wd. 7:15pm Saturday Sam Saturday 7pm Church of the Harvest 1000 Nevada Hwy. Boulder City, NV 293-5878 MONDAY FRIDAY PRAYER 6:30 7 AM Praise and Worship Bible Teaching Promise Keepers (Second Sat of the Month) Intercessory Prayer 0 k\ --r ^HlGHLAJ^HlLLS 615 College Drive • Henderson • 566-0200 Sunday Worship Services: 8:30 am. 11:00 am, 6:00 pm Come Join us Sunday! We Care About You and Your Family I SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH Christ The Servant Lutheran Church 263-0802 Sunday Worship • 8 &10:3O am Sunday School • 9:15 am Sunday Evening Worship 7 pm Wednesday 7pni Visitors Welcome • Nursery Available 2 South Pecos Rd. Henderson TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM EstabUshed 1947 The Lorgest Congregation in Nevado Afflilioted with United Synogogue of Conservotive Judaism & Solomon Sched)ter Day Schools OUR MEMBERSHIP IS OPEN, COME GROW WITH US!!! 1600 lost OakayMvd. • Las Vegas, Nwwda • 314-5070 GREEN VALLEY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 454-7989 2200 Robindale Road St. Thomas More Catholic Community 130 n. Pecos Rd. Henderson, 361-3022 MASSES Sat: 4 pm 6f 5:30 pm Sun: 8 am, 9:30 am, 1 lam & 12:30 pm Men Fri. 8:30 am rather Dan nolan, C.S.V. 6:15 Worship Services 9:30 am & 11 am Worship & Surxlay School ChMd Care lor infants and Toddlers Rev. Bob Buma r\ Welcomes YOU each Saturday Bible Study 9:30 am Worship-11:00am Prayer Meeting Wed. 7 pm 591 Adams — Boulder City St. Paul's Charismatic Episcopal Church 1661 QaJleriaDr. (White Middle School, Henderson) SUNDAY WORSHIP 10AM FMher Qeorge Oervd • 564-1152 FMher David HoflF • 294-6226 RELIGIOUS SCIENCE CHURCH of LAS VEGAS 4820 Alpine PI., Ste. ElOl Us Vegas, NV 89107 258-5683 Wednesday 7:00 PM Sunday 9AM & 10:30AM Rev. Sheila Weldon re^^ St Christopher's Episcopal Church Sunday School 9AM Holy Eucharist SuncJoy 10 A.M. 812 Arizona St. • Boulder City • 293-4275 GREEN VALLEY CHURCH OF CHRIST 28 Commerce Center Drive (Ofl Sunset in Commerce Center tsetiind Etfiel M Chocolates) 456-2040 OR 295^5757 Bible Centered Undenominational Always A Welcome DIAL-A'BIBLE MESSAGE PUot^t 456-2040 (A taped weekly inspirational message) Call atMut our FREE BlWe correspondence course. CELEBHATION-PRAISE SERVICE 8:00 A.M TRADITIONAL SERVICE 10:45 A.M SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:15 A.M. CHILD CARE PROVIDED 609 East Horizon Drive Henderson, NV 89015 • (702) 565-6049 CHRISTIAN WEDDINGS INVrTED REV. MARVIN R. GANT. PASTOR GIVING LIFE MINISTRIES 416 Periite Way, Hend. 565-4984 • 5B54104 Pastor; Dave Delaria Sunday Christiui Educaiioa 10 am Sunday Worship Services 11 am & 7 pin Nunery Provided For I Ian Sovicc Wed.BiUcStudy Tpm THE SALVATION ARMY COMMUNITY CENTER A Center For Worship and Service! 830 E. Laka Maad Dr., Handarson. NV (702) 565-9578 Sunday Worship Services: II am & 6pm Sunday School For All Ages: 9:30 am Bible Study Each Thursday: 6 pm W^ > r .j/mmm^mmiimjim i-c*Hr^ • • '"*n A jiiJiiTo^—I'.'ie'^ • ^iyiB.^i(|i(^(w^ifl(^^frmif)(r^^fi!j. u('*|?Tpiiii|iijjtiv< A^;tVflH'ito'TW' "(.f JPl"' Thursday, February 29,1996 Panorama Pago 7 HBC Publications joins the Clark County School District's Math/Science Institute to reach America 2000 goals Henderson Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley Plus First In The World In Mathematics By The Year 2000 Probability By Bill Hanlon The word "probability" is used so often that many of us have a vague notion of what it means. Today, we'll try to bring our notions in focus, But, as usual, in mathematics, we need to develop some vocabulary. EXPERIMENT: An activity under consideration. OUTCOMES: The obsen/ation of what occurs in an experiment. SAMPLE SPACE: The set of all possible outcomes in an experiment. EVENT: Any subset of a sample space. The sample space of an experiment can often be seen more cleariy through the use of a "tree diagram." Each branch of the tree is outcome. EXAMPLE Use a tree diagram to show all possible outcomes of tossing a coin. v.." EXAMPLE Use a tree diagram for throwing a die. /•• / • • • • • • • Piece of cake. What happens if I decide to toss a fair coin twice? Well, on the first toss, I'll either get a head or a tail as shown in the tree diagram. Now, if I got a head on the first toss, then I could get a head or a tail on the second toss. So, I could have gotten a head, then I have the chance of getting either a head or tail on the second toss. Or, if I threw a tail on the first toss, then on the second toss, I have the chance of getting a head or a tail. Again a tree diagram will help me illustrate this. Haid By following all the branches, I will be able to detenmine my sample space (H ,H), (H, T), (T, H) or (T.T). In our experiments, we will make the assumption that all events are equally likely. That is to say, our coin or die will not be weighted. Now, let's define probability. ~ '':' Probability = number of favorable outcomes in an experimen t number of possible outcomes in the experiment Another way to say this is: Probability = number of successes number of successes plus failures Symbolically, we write: p = s Many people confuse probability with odds. Which is a better bet? You go to the race track and the odds of winning are 1 to 6, written 1:6, or throwing a die and getting a 4 which has a probability 1/6? At first glance, you might think they are the same or an equal bet. However, this is why vocabulary is important they are not the same or equal. Odds is defined as the numtier of ways you can win over the number of ways you can lose. odds = win, probability = win lose win + lose Using the example, at the track we can win one way and lose 6 ways. Those odds translate to a probability of 1/7. Definitely, not an equivalent bet. In probability, the biggest difficulty we will face is knowing what the sample space is. In other words, what are all the possible outcomes of an experiment? For now, we'll use the tree diagram. Later, by examining those diagrams, we should find a shortcut. Let's see what happens if we throw two dice, what are all the possible outcomes? 1st Die This needs to be done for each number on the 1st toss. 2fKl Die 1 23456 Again, what that means is on the first throw we could have gotten a 1,2, 3, 4, 5, or 6 and no matter what we got on the second throw. How many possible outcomes are there? AH right, 36. How many different ways could you get two dice that add up to 4? Add to 7? If you were playing "craps," which total would you expect to occur most often? Yes, this stuff is a real blast we'll come back for more later. Bill Hanlon is the Math/Science Institute Coordinator lor the Clark County School District and a part-time math instructor at UNLV. 1996 HBC Publications. Inc. Jewish community to celebrate Purim The festival of Purim will be celebrated from sunset Monday, March 4, to sunset Tuesday, March 5, by the world-wide Jewish community. The holiday commemorates the victory of the Jewish community of ancient Persia over the evil plot of Haman, a minister of King Achasverosh. Mordechai discovered the plot, and his niece, Queen Esther, pleaded with the king for her people Holiday traditions include: The Megillah—the Book of Esther—is read on Monday night and again on Tuesday. Noisemakers are twirled and feet are stamped to blot out Raman's name. Charity should be given to at least two people in need. Gifts of food, including at least two kinds, are sent to at least one friend on Tuesday. Family and friends gather for a special meal before • unset Tuesday. The holiday will be noted at all greater Las Vegas synagogues and Jewish schools. Midbar Kodesh Celebrating the wisdom and courage of Esther, the women of Midbar Kodesh will read from the Book of Esther at services beginning at 7 p.m. Monday, March 4. Children in costume will sing and dance with Penny Ranan who will lead Israeli dancing. The congregation is an affiliate of the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism, and meets at 60(X) S. Eastern Ave., Suite 3B, just north of Patrick. For more information call 7984510. Young Israel of Las Vegas The Orthodox synagogue will sponsor a Purim program including a series of classes and a party. Classes will include a discussions and learning with Rabbi YitechakWyneat7:30p.m. Sunday, March 3. The cost is $5. The reading of the Megillah, costume contests, food and fun begin at 6:30 p.m. Monday, March 4, at the synagogue, 5712 Joshua Point, near Pecos and Russell. For more information, call 4546787. Valley Outreach Synagogue The synagogue welcomes people of all ages and faith traditions to its annual Megillah reading commemorating the holiday of Purim, at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 1. Storyteller Yerachmiel and mime, Thomas the Silent, join telling and acting out the story. All participants are invited to come in costume and traditional Purim treats will be served following the service. The congregation meets at 2200 Robindale, corner of Green Valley Parkway. For more information, call 436-4900. The Hebrew Academy The annual community-wide Purim Carnival will begin at 2 p.m. Sunday, March 3, at the Hebrew Academy campus, 9700 W. Hillpointe Road in Summerhn. Girl Scouts kick off cookie sale Frontier (jrijcl Scout Council will officially begin its 1996 cookie sale with the fifth annual Cookie Kicl^Off, from noon to 2 p.m. Saturday. March 2, at the Sears Court of the Meadows Mall. The event is free and open to the public. AlsoknoWn as the "Architect's Event," it focuses on using the edible and popular cookies as building material. Contestants use their favorite Girl Scout cookie (up to 15 boxes), and use frosting, cheese whiz, peanut butter or similar food as cement, and build a structure, such as a house, office building, bridge or castle. Two hours of construction time is allowed. Judges rate each entry on stability, creativity, use of cookies, adherence to guidelines and overall appearance. Plaques will be given for win, place and show. Certificates will be presented for most creative, best theme, most structurally sound, judge's choice and honorable mentions. Local architectural firms will participate, including Swisher & Hall, The Fielden Companies, Carpenter Sellers, students from the UNLV College of Architecture, as well as students groups from Green Valley, Rancho and Eldorado High Sdiools. It is estimated that more than two million Girl Scouts will take part in the 1996 cookie sale. Locally, about 5,000 girls will be involved. Seven cookie varieties will be sold at $3 per box. Booth sales vnW take place from March 1 to 17. ; Proceeds support a variety of activities, including contemporary issues series, camping programs and troop projects. For more information, or to volunteer, call 385-3677. Middle schools enroll in smoke-free class of 2000 Middle schools through Nevada are joining the American Cancer Society, American Heart Association and the American Lung Association of Nevada in an attempt to make a "Smoke Free''youngAmericabytheyear 2000. Former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop preated the program to teach middle and junior high school students about the risksoftobacco's deadly addiction and howtheir choices are effected by the tobacco industry aJid the media. Participating schools receive a kit containing a tobacco lesson plan and video. All materials focus on tobacco facts, how tobacco companies target youth, tobacco addiction and efforts to create a tobacco-free community. To sign up a school for the program, call the American Cancer Society, 798-6877. INSIGHT TO EYESIGHT J/Vatercolors on display Some of Southern Nevada's best watercolor artists will exhibit at the Nevada Watercolor Societies Spring Show from March 1 through 29, at the Sapienza Art Gallery, 461 S. Decatur Blvd., near Alta. An artists' reception, open to the public, will be held from noon to 3 p.m. Sunday, March 10. Gallery owner Marilyn Sapienza will judge the show which will feature more than 40 paintings by local watercolor artists. For more information, call 259-6471. by Jo8q)h Shalev, M.D. Laser-Sculpted Vision The long-awaited laser treatment tor nearsightedness fmally received federal approval as the Food and Drug Administration recently recommended photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) for people over the age of twenty-one with up to moderate degrees of nearsightedness. The procedure, also known as comeal sculpting, makes use of a !a.ser beam to flatten the eye's clear outer surface (cornea). Because nearsightedness is largely caused by an eyeball that is overly long from front to back, flattening its profile with the new laser-sculpting technique helps properly focus light further back on the retina for a clearer image. Photorefractive keratectomy is not approved for anyone with even moderate astigmatism, which is an irregular curvature of the eyeball. Those who are interested in PRK are advised to schedule appointments with ophthalmologists to assess its suitability to their circumstances. You migtit consider refractive surgery if you wish to decrease your dependence upon glasses or contact lenses. The best method for correcting your vision should be decided after a thorough examination and discu.ssion with us at EYE INSTITUTE OF NEVADA. We care about you and your eyes. We' re located at 999 Adams Blvd.. Suite 101, Boulder City (with two other locations), where we stress preventive health care for the. entire family. Please call 293-0551 to schedule an appointment Mon Fri 9-5; emergency service 24 hours. PS. Among those who are good PRK candidates. .1.S percent will still require corrective lenses after the procedure to achieve 20/20 vision. "This lolumn is hroughl lo you us a public .sersiie i imidfor hv Joseph Shalev, M.D. ,/:, Pell Sparks v FcxDtball Contest $12,500 Karen Clark 2b(t Video Keno $7,000 Peggy & Gary Parker 5^ Red, White & Blue slots and a $3,582 new car Walter Wert Bingo $5,000 You'd be smiling, loo, if you won big at Sam's Town. Don't just sit there green with envy, put the paper down and head on over to Sam's Town. Because we'd like nothing better than to add your name to our next winner's ad. SAM'S TOWN Where Locals Brinj Their Friends ('. n A ^.' n n n 1' I p r R ftpwlW^^^i'-WMr* .--*t>H ^wv^ Ki' I iff^fftntoH I'l* • m^f". •

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• I II I nn ^^^^^nwM^i^Mv^iiiiai WHAT'S PLAYING Pag8 Panorama Thursday. February 29,1996 Flutist to perform Jean-Pierre Rampal, considered unparalleled among classical flutists around the world, will perform at 8 p.m. Friday, Mardi 1, in Ham Concert Hall at UNLV. Well known as a champion of the baroque, his concert program will range from 17th century music to modem tunes, English folk songs, Japanese classics and the music of India. This season, his concerts include Symphony Hall, Boston; Lincoln Center, New York; and Orchestra Hall, Chicago, for concerts with the Brandenburg Ensemble. As flutist and conductor, he will appear with the Calgary Philharmonic in Canada. Considered the most recorded classical flutist in history, he has received the Grand Prix du Disque for a number of recordings. His music is on the Sony Classical label; 1995 releases include Catalan flute music of the 18th century, and two records on which he conducted the Franz Liszt Chamber Orchestra in "Romantic Harp Concertos with Mai;ifille Nordmann" and Mozart's "Serenade No. 7 in D Migor" with Isaac Stem. Other awards include the Leonie Sonning Prize, the Prix du President de la Repubhque, and the Prix de I'Academie Charles Cros. He has been named Commandeur de la Legion d'Honneur, Commandeur des Arts et des Lettres, and Commandeur de I'Ordre National du M^rite. He also received the Order of the Sacred Treasure from Japan. Tickets—$20, $25, $32.50, $40 and $50—are at the UNLV Performing Arts Center box office, 895-3801. Hours are 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday through Fridayand^ 10 a.m.4 p.m. SaturHnv (TDD 895-4717) The Performing Arts Center at UNLV serves a devoted classical audience of more than 150,000 as well as approximately a million citizens throughout the Greater Las Vegas Metro Areawith the best in classical smd popular music, drama, and dance. Modern dance concert at UNLV Indranee Clarke, a Don King • Scholarship recipient, will present "Works," a concert of modem dance at 8 p.m. March 2 and at 4 p.m.March 3, in room 111, studio 1, of the Ham Fine Arts building at UNLV. Clarke will present the concert in fulfillment of a master's in music degree. She will dance with seven dancers; Lauren Blizzard, Lee Ann Guenther, Cheryl Huffman, Cristie Keinigstein, Jessica Pillsbury, Marko Westwood and Megan Westwood. The program will feature several dances with music including classic, blues, alternative and more. Also included is original choreography by Lonnie Gordon, Louis Kavouras and Margaret Rampey. She has danced in Japan, Finland and New York City, and her style is a blend ofhigh energy and thoughtprovoking, powerful movement. Each piece will be about attitudes of dependence, independence and interdependencie. General admission tickets are $6; $4 for students, military, and senior citizens, and are available at the Performing Arts Center Box Office from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, or call 895-3801 (TDD 895-4717). Travel World International Indulge your passion ro rrovel! Customized vacation for just about any budget Call Cynthia Robinson She will give you the personal time you need for that perfect getaway • •• HAWAII SPECIALS iririr Business or Personal Travel Open 7 Days 564-3122 1-800-856-3931 *********** North of the River CCW FIREARM CLASSES IN B.C. SPRING SCHEDULE Class 1 March 7* & 9 (7:30 5pm) Class 2 March 18-20* Class 3 April 8-10* •,..:_,.: Class 4: May 6-8* ;_ • • :;.;: • r' • *6-9:30pjn plus range time >,; C: Class size very limited. Pre-registration required. COST $100 CALL 293-4256 "^ • • **** • • • • indranee Clarke Mariposa Trio to perform Monday at UNLV The Mariposa Trio—pianist Carol Stivers, violinist Teresa Ling and cellist Kelley Mikkelsen—will perform at 7:30 p.m. Monday, March 4, in the Black Box Theater on the UNLV campus. Stivers is the founding member of the group, formerly named the Nevada Fine Arts Trio. Ling and Mikkelsen are new faculty members in the UNLV music department, and are both former members of the Dakota String Quartet. "It is a joy to work with two such polished musicians who have already played chamber music together for a number of years. What absolute luck to have them in the trio," said Stivers. Northern California-native Ling holds degrees in molecular biophysics and biochemistry from Yale University and in violin performance from the Eastman School of Music. During a year in London as a Rotary Foundation Scholar, she received an advanced diploma from the Royal Academy of Music. She has participated in numerous chamber programs, including the Aspen and Norfolk Music Festivals and the Amadeus Quartet program. Mikkelsen holds degrees from the Eastman School ofMusic and the University of Akron, Ohio. She has performed in master classes of Lawrence Lesser, Samuel Sanders and Yo-Yo Ma. An avid chamber music lover, Mikkelsen has participated in the Aspen, Cape May, Heidelberg, and Luzeme Festivals. She wonfirstprize in the 1992 Yoimg Artist Competition and was a prize winner in the 1993 Chicago Cello Society International Competition. Stivers received degrees from Florida State University and studied with Edward Kilen^i. She has performed in the southeast and southwest, as well as Carnegie Hall in New York City. A chamber musician and accompanist as well as soloist with orchestras, she is a teacher of many prize-winning students, and is coordinator of piano studies at UNLV. Great Food! Great Fun! Great Place! Monday Broasted Chicken iv I vegetable, potato and Italian Bread Tbesday Choice Top Sirloin f & with potato and Thursday Italian Bread Wednesday Roast Pork & Dressing with mashed potatoes & gravy All Dinners Include Our World Famous "AllYou Can Eat" Salad Bar. Offer available 5-lOpm only. 'Buffalo Bill's Stampede' at Deserif Arena March 1-3 Primadonna Casino Resorts, New Country 95.5 KWNR and Cov^wn Boots present for the first time, "Buffalo Bill's Stampede," to be held March 1-3 at Buffalo Bill's Resort & Casino's Star of the Desert Arena Buffalo Bill's is located 35 minutes south ofLas Vegas on the east side of 1-15 at the Southern Nevada/Cahfomia border. The Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association event will feature a thrilling exhibition ride by Tuff Hedeman, on "Desperado," a bull as.strong as Buffalo Bill's roller coaster is tall. Events will take place at 8 p.m. Friday, March 1, 7:30 p.m. Sat> urday, March 2, and at 3 p.m. Sunday, March 3. Tickets are $15 for adults; $12 for seniors and kids under 12; on sale at all Ticketmaster outlets and at Primadonna box offices. /OR mi ,.3^.,wt to yo CASINO & RESTAURANT Boulder Huy., 1 Block South of Sunset Rd., Hvndcrson Mi.UHW HARLEM GLOBETRUnERS. if Heyt it) m / Kitly Ray Nokly SEHIC by mM ON SALE NOW! THDRSDAY, MARCH 14 • 7:30 P.M. TICKETS: $18, $14 & $10 • Spedol VIP sMts also ovodoM* TiJiHiii>iMi It Kit Ihomn I Mock CDIM ficket Offki. SmUtt's IMW Imid!, HOCUMIK MUM mi Uimi/Moy. fc diorgc brphoM. (ol 1701474 4000 nnnwllMrKlnlOfliakMKMM Fri lOom -ipm.Srt. IOi.ffl-4fffl FOR MORI INFORMAriOII, CAU tf 5-3f 00 's?s-*-^"T^fn*^ Visit US ofl ux MbridwKto Wfb H hltp://w.hafteiiiglobrtrom.coin LAST WORDS Thursday, February 29,1996 DEAR DEBBIE Panorama Page 9 DEBORAH WHITE Dear Debbie: In the last six months I have been to two weddings of friends. At least I thought they were friends. Is it just me, or should I not figure on getting a thank-you note for a wedding gift? Two months have gone by since both of these weddings, and not as much as a phone call saying they liked the gift. Do you have any suggestions as to how to get a response from these people? They live out of town, so we don* t see them except on weekends. But even when we do, they have never said a word. OLD-FASHIONED IN KANSAS Dear Old Fashioned: Next time you see them, simply say: "I'm concerned you never received our wedding gift. We sent you a (whatever), and since you haven't mentioned it, I was wondering if it ever got to you." I don't think people are being deliberately rude or don't know any better. Rather, since thank-yous have traditionally been up to the bride, and most women have busy jobs today, they just put it off until it's too late. What we need are revised rules of etiquette with the couple sharing the note writing. Envelopes can be addressed before the wedding, so there' s no excuse to procrastinate. i;'> ..:;>:. ^r '^ Dear Debbie: I was living with a man younger than me for about six years. He came home after a weekend away and told me he might be a daddy to a 7-year-old boy by an ex-girlfriend. After that, things started to go downhill for us. It was like we both gave up on our relationship. I moved out and he moved back home. Last week he told me he was being intimate with other women and was not coming back to me, but we could still be intimate. Deep down I still love the man and probably always will. How can I get it through to him how I feel? WANT HIM BACK Dear Want Him: Your instincts are right. Don't reestablish the relationship by letting him use you for sex. You need to resolve the issue of his other child before you can patch things up. The child will always be in your life. If you can't live with that, there's no use trying to win back the dad. • :^ Just toss a few in the hamper and check next morning. 1 guarantee they will have multiplied over night. The same goes for shoulder pads and clothes hangers. Why are people always saying things like "You're more likely to be killed or injured in an accident in your own home than on an airplane?" Ha! I've got an answer for that onei I've never landed my house in a tree going 500 miles an hour and I bet you haven't either. One last question. What ever happened to people who answer their telephdne when it rings? I've had it up to here with cutesy canned messages like, 'This is the Duke of Windsor. Both Wallis and I are out. At the sound of the beep, leave a mes-' sage. If we happen to return, we'll give you a call." If you have any comments to add to this column, don't contact me. I'm waiting for a call from Mongolia. With any luck, the pickpocket I mentioned earlier will sober up and offer me a few programming clues. 2Sfx)w5-Ma(Ch30 7;30pm and 10pm, Tctets starting at $15, BATTLE OF THE BANDS! Featunng: Si Zentner & Swing Design (The European Big Band cnomponsl Marcti 4 from 6pnn to 1 Opm, $7pefperson • $10pefcouple Fiidoy-AprilScifPpm, (ftHtoryUnpiuggedl Satufclcv-April6at9pm, fotal/Pluggecl) ^ Tckets Starting at $10. BOULDER STATION HOTEL• CASINO April 20 at 7:30pnn and 1 Opm. Tickets starting at $10, Boulder Hiahwav at I 515 SMITHS ROBINSONS • MAV TOWER RECORDS BU)CKBUSTER IWJSC CAU-FOIHIX 17021 4744000 ONUNI MRXMfflM: mn.MmtntatnMcrxM "• • WW^fT'W'-^-.

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• I II I nn ^^^^^nwM^i^Mv^iiiiai WHAT'S PLAYING Pag8 Panorama Thursday. February 29,1996 Flutist to perform Jean-Pierre Rampal, considered unparalleled among classical flutists around the world, will perform at 8 p.m. Friday, Mardi 1, in Ham Concert Hall at UNLV. Well known as a champion of the baroque, his concert program will range from 17th century music to modem tunes, English folk songs, Japanese classics and the music of India. This season, his concerts include Symphony Hall, Boston; Lincoln Center, New York; and Orchestra Hall, Chicago, for concerts with the Brandenburg Ensemble. As flutist and conductor, he will appear with the Calgary Philharmonic in Canada. Considered the most recorded classical flutist in history, he has received the Grand Prix du Disque for a number of recordings. His music is on the Sony Classical label; 1995 releases include Catalan flute music of the 18th century, and two records on which he conducted the Franz Liszt Chamber Orchestra in "Romantic Harp Concertos with Mai;ifille Nordmann" and Mozart's "Serenade No. 7 in D Migor" with Isaac Stem. Other awards include the Leonie Sonning Prize, the Prix du President de la Repubhque, and the Prix de I'Academie Charles Cros. He has been named Commandeur de la Legion d'Honneur, Commandeur des Arts et des Lettres, and Commandeur de I'Ordre National du M^rite. He also received the Order of the Sacred Treasure from Japan. Tickets—$20, $25, $32.50, $40 and $50—are at the UNLV Performing Arts Center box office, 895-3801. Hours are 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday through Fridayand^ 10 a.m.4 p.m. SaturHnv (TDD 895-4717) The Performing Arts Center at UNLV serves a devoted classical audience of more than 150,000 as well as approximately a million citizens throughout the Greater Las Vegas Metro Areawith the best in classical smd popular music, drama, and dance. Modern dance concert at UNLV Indranee Clarke, a Don King • Scholarship recipient, will present "Works," a concert of modem dance at 8 p.m. March 2 and at 4 p.m.March 3, in room 111, studio 1, of the Ham Fine Arts building at UNLV. Clarke will present the concert in fulfillment of a master's in music degree. She will dance with seven dancers; Lauren Blizzard, Lee Ann Guenther, Cheryl Huffman, Cristie Keinigstein, Jessica Pillsbury, Marko Westwood and Megan Westwood. The program will feature several dances with music including classic, blues, alternative and more. Also included is original choreography by Lonnie Gordon, Louis Kavouras and Margaret Rampey. She has danced in Japan, Finland and New York City, and her style is a blend ofhigh energy and thoughtprovoking, powerful movement. Each piece will be about attitudes of dependence, independence and interdependencie. General admission tickets are $6; $4 for students, military, and senior citizens, and are available at the Performing Arts Center Box Office from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, or call 895-3801 (TDD 895-4717). Travel World International Indulge your passion ro rrovel! Customized vacation for just about any budget Call Cynthia Robinson She will give you the personal time you need for that perfect getaway • •• HAWAII SPECIALS iririr Business or Personal Travel Open 7 Days 564-3122 1-800-856-3931 *********** North of the River CCW FIREARM CLASSES IN B.C. SPRING SCHEDULE Class 1 March 7* & 9 (7:30 5pm) Class 2 March 18-20* Class 3 April 8-10* •,..:_,.: Class 4: May 6-8* ;_ • • :;.;: • r' • *6-9:30pjn plus range time >,; C: Class size very limited. Pre-registration required. COST $100 CALL 293-4256 "^ • • **** • • • • indranee Clarke Mariposa Trio to perform Monday at UNLV The Mariposa Trio—pianist Carol Stivers, violinist Teresa Ling and cellist Kelley Mikkelsen—will perform at 7:30 p.m. Monday, March 4, in the Black Box Theater on the UNLV campus. Stivers is the founding member of the group, formerly named the Nevada Fine Arts Trio. Ling and Mikkelsen are new faculty members in the UNLV music department, and are both former members of the Dakota String Quartet. "It is a joy to work with two such polished musicians who have already played chamber music together for a number of years. What absolute luck to have them in the trio," said Stivers. Northern California-native Ling holds degrees in molecular biophysics and biochemistry from Yale University and in violin performance from the Eastman School of Music. During a year in London as a Rotary Foundation Scholar, she received an advanced diploma from the Royal Academy of Music. She has participated in numerous chamber programs, including the Aspen and Norfolk Music Festivals and the Amadeus Quartet program. Mikkelsen holds degrees from the Eastman School ofMusic and the University of Akron, Ohio. She has performed in master classes of Lawrence Lesser, Samuel Sanders and Yo-Yo Ma. An avid chamber music lover, Mikkelsen has participated in the Aspen, Cape May, Heidelberg, and Luzeme Festivals. She wonfirstprize in the 1992 Yoimg Artist Competition and was a prize winner in the 1993 Chicago Cello Society International Competition. Stivers received degrees from Florida State University and studied with Edward Kilen^i. She has performed in the southeast and southwest, as well as Carnegie Hall in New York City. A chamber musician and accompanist as well as soloist with orchestras, she is a teacher of many prize-winning students, and is coordinator of piano studies at UNLV. Great Food! Great Fun! Great Place! Monday Broasted Chicken iv I vegetable, potato and Italian Bread Tbesday Choice Top Sirloin f & with potato and Thursday Italian Bread Wednesday Roast Pork & Dressing with mashed potatoes & gravy All Dinners Include Our World Famous "AllYou Can Eat" Salad Bar. Offer available 5-lOpm only. 'Buffalo Bill's Stampede' at Deserif Arena March 1-3 Primadonna Casino Resorts, New Country 95.5 KWNR and Cov^wn Boots present for the first time, "Buffalo Bill's Stampede," to be held March 1-3 at Buffalo Bill's Resort & Casino's Star of the Desert Arena Buffalo Bill's is located 35 minutes south ofLas Vegas on the east side of 1-15 at the Southern Nevada/Cahfomia border. The Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association event will feature a thrilling exhibition ride by Tuff Hedeman, on "Desperado," a bull as.strong as Buffalo Bill's roller coaster is tall. Events will take place at 8 p.m. Friday, March 1, 7:30 p.m. Sat> urday, March 2, and at 3 p.m. Sunday, March 3. Tickets are $15 for adults; $12 for seniors and kids under 12; on sale at all Ticketmaster outlets and at Primadonna box offices. /OR mi ,.3^.,wt to yo CASINO & RESTAURANT Boulder Huy., 1 Block South of Sunset Rd., Hvndcrson Mi.UHW HARLEM GLOBETRUnERS. if Heyt it) m / Kitly Ray Nokly SEHIC by mM ON SALE NOW! THDRSDAY, MARCH 14 • 7:30 P.M. TICKETS: $18, $14 & $10 • Spedol VIP sMts also ovodoM* TiJiHiii>iMi It Kit Ihomn I Mock CDIM ficket Offki. SmUtt's IMW Imid!, HOCUMIK MUM mi Uimi/Moy. fc diorgc brphoM. (ol 1701474 4000 nnnwllMrKlnlOfliakMKMM Fri lOom -ipm.Srt. IOi.ffl-4fffl FOR MORI INFORMAriOII, CAU tf 5-3f 00 's?s-*-^"T^fn*^ Visit US ofl ux MbridwKto Wfb H hltp://w.hafteiiiglobrtrom.coin LAST WORDS Thursday, February 29,1996 DEAR DEBBIE Panorama Page 9 DEBORAH WHITE Dear Debbie: In the last six months I have been to two weddings of friends. At least I thought they were friends. Is it just me, or should I not figure on getting a thank-you note for a wedding gift? Two months have gone by since both of these weddings, and not as much as a phone call saying they liked the gift. Do you have any suggestions as to how to get a response from these people? They live out of town, so we don* t see them except on weekends. But even when we do, they have never said a word. OLD-FASHIONED IN KANSAS Dear Old Fashioned: Next time you see them, simply say: "I'm concerned you never received our wedding gift. We sent you a (whatever), and since you haven't mentioned it, I was wondering if it ever got to you." I don't think people are being deliberately rude or don't know any better. Rather, since thank-yous have traditionally been up to the bride, and most women have busy jobs today, they just put it off until it's too late. What we need are revised rules of etiquette with the couple sharing the note writing. Envelopes can be addressed before the wedding, so there' s no excuse to procrastinate. i;'> ..:;>:. ^r '^ Dear Debbie: I was living with a man younger than me for about six years. He came home after a weekend away and told me he might be a daddy to a 7-year-old boy by an ex-girlfriend. After that, things started to go downhill for us. It was like we both gave up on our relationship. I moved out and he moved back home. Last week he told me he was being intimate with other women and was not coming back to me, but we could still be intimate. Deep down I still love the man and probably always will. How can I get it through to him how I feel? WANT HIM BACK Dear Want Him: Your instincts are right. Don't reestablish the relationship by letting him use you for sex. You need to resolve the issue of his other child before you can patch things up. The child will always be in your life. If you can't live with that, there's no use trying to win back the dad. • :^ Just toss a few in the hamper and check next morning. 1 guarantee they will have multiplied over night. The same goes for shoulder pads and clothes hangers. Why are people always saying things like "You're more likely to be killed or injured in an accident in your own home than on an airplane?" Ha! I've got an answer for that onei I've never landed my house in a tree going 500 miles an hour and I bet you haven't either. One last question. What ever happened to people who answer their telephdne when it rings? I've had it up to here with cutesy canned messages like, 'This is the Duke of Windsor. Both Wallis and I are out. At the sound of the beep, leave a mes-' sage. If we happen to return, we'll give you a call." If you have any comments to add to this column, don't contact me. I'm waiting for a call from Mongolia. With any luck, the pickpocket I mentioned earlier will sober up and offer me a few programming clues. 2Sfx)w5-Ma(Ch30 7;30pm and 10pm, Tctets starting at $15, BATTLE OF THE BANDS! Featunng: Si Zentner & Swing Design (The European Big Band cnomponsl Marcti 4 from 6pnn to 1 Opm, $7pefperson • $10pefcouple Fiidoy-AprilScifPpm, (ftHtoryUnpiuggedl Satufclcv-April6at9pm, fotal/Pluggecl) ^ Tckets Starting at $10. BOULDER STATION HOTEL• CASINO April 20 at 7:30pnn and 1 Opm. Tickets starting at $10, Boulder Hiahwav at I 515 SMITHS ROBINSONS • MAV TOWER RECORDS BU)CKBUSTER IWJSC CAU-FOIHIX 17021 4744000 ONUNI MRXMfflM: mn.MmtntatnMcrxM "• • WW^fT'W'-^-.

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mm^mfmmmmm mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm Pg 10 Panorama Thursday, February ^9,1996 by D.B.DoiK>v8n NOYKED • J) 1 1 REEBOF r Tin CROSSWORD PUZZLE M^(^^ THE Twaaz QCr KTTVE Now vnofe the drded Idtcn lo fonn the HfprlK auwcr, M suggoted b)'Ibe tbowculoan. graodaa Aa^iNoa woxna AWMIH „ OHHoa ONV wcx)a — [3|oq UMOi-nBUis aqj )8 JOS J3[3AEIJ sqi ICI^YV Answers: Answer = SLAPSTIX —=== A journey of 1,000 miles begins with a single delay of two hours before takeoff. Good wishes are more important than gifts t)ecause they can't be bought. • • • By the time you realize you have a reputation, it's too late to change iL • • • Passions may make people feel more intensely, but they often don't see as well as they once did. • • • High principles mean nothing if you don't abide by them. • • • Never expect anyone but yourself to keep a secret. AfriHEWRUL 14 17 20 10 11 12 13 16 19 22 Mn IS NflGICWORD PSFERAUQS C I LBUP HOW TO PLAY: Read the llct of words. Look el ttie puzzle. REODSNIAMEROMAN You'll find these words In all directloni—horizontally, verticalty, diagonally, bactmrards. Draw a circle around each EMREXCAVATIONGO letter of a word found in the puzzle, then strike It off the list arcling it will show a letter has been used but will leave It SOUIUNCOVEREDEI visible should tt also form iMirt of another word. Find the big words first When letters of all listed words are circled, you'll ftave ttie given number of letters left over. They'll spell out your MAGICWORO. EHMRYRETSAS I DMT RMOUNTVESUVIUSP POMPEII (sol.: 8 letters) VSNBSN I UK S SYSTU A-Andent dty, Ardiaeologists, Ashes; B-Bodies, Biiried; C-Cinders, Columns; D-Damage, Disaster, EEEOTRS CCRTREAR E-Erosion, Eruption, • Excavation; F-Forum, D I DDI ANET AOOATE Found; G-Gems; H-Hidden, History, Homes; IItaly, Ivory, L-Lava, Learn; M-Moimt Vesuvius, NRDI SEMIVNNTLUG Mysteries; P-Preserved, Public square; RUE I E I LUAVOESEEA Remains, Roman, Ruins; S5ealed, Statues, Stone; U-UiKXJvered; V-Victims, Visit OTHSVDL YROVIDSM • ':' • • • • .. • -, • • • • • : • .' • • • ..: • -' • • • • • .' • ^ • FSTSIGOLOEAHCRA '" .—:: :'.'. :" AYLAT I CEROS IOND This Week's Answer HaAOOSIQ SMI TCI VSREDN ICA O 1996. Tribune Media Services THAM S?HD. SOLUTION: s 1 u i 1 0 N o 1 3 1 a a H 1 1 a 0 N 3 N 1 A 8 s n d 1 0 1 0 1 3 1 s 0 V ] a • • 3 Z V a 3 N V 0 3 V 0 1 u • 1 1 N 3 -! • • • ^^ • l H n N • • 3 1 a V u V t u ( • > x 0 A 3 1 1 0 N V H II V 0 u 0 1 3 3 1 0 N 0 1 V 1 3 M a N N u 0 a • H V H i T 1 1 1 1 • i n y i^^H ^^ • s t V (^ • 3 1 1 0 3 H i 1 X a 1 u n n 3 ^1 3 1 u 3 ] 1 3 H 1 3 0 i 3 1 s 0 U i s 1 3 d 0 X V 1 1 n a | m V. _!_ iMil 1 V s s 3 j Oj ACROSS 1 —at Sea" 6 Mineoand Maglie 10 Thailand 14 Mature 15 Upon 16 Different 17 —the riveter 18 Points of convergence 19 Apportion 20 — tfieRed 21 Leg bone 22 Leave 23 Brazilian port 25 Talk back 27 Reliance 30 Small 34 Emoter 37 Decorate \ 39 Staircase post 40 Forward 42 TV's f^/lajors 43 Frog's noise 44 Asian capitol 45 Call forth 1 47 Some students: 2 at)br. 3 48 Fit for 4 plowing 5 50 Habituate 52 Fast time 6 54 Edit 7 58 Great canine 8 61 Befuddled 64 Brainstorm 9 65 Andy's 10 partner 12 66 Some tea 67 Reef with a 13 lagoon 68 Ado 21 69 Ivy, for one 24 70 Aristocratic 26 71 Sfiade 28 source 29 72 English school 31 73 Lock of 32 hair DOWN 33 Challenge hurler 34 Love 35 Pop or jazz o6G ^OM 36 38 Saull — 41 Marie 46 Secure Particle 49 Center of 51 activity Helix 53 Sqhool term Italian 55 commune bb Have a 57 session bti Vendetta Delicate 59 Unfeigned Flat fish 60 Famed 62 fountain Pairs 63 Tragic king of drama 67 Fratemal group Laugh Winglike — Lisa Glowing gas — oblige Iraqi tribesman Escarole Magazine worker Unspoken Sun-dried brick Cubicles Stories Slightly mad Asian river Facial feature Greek stote Briton Anthony Social insect 7 •i I i' :. • : :! • • Garfield by Jim Davis PEANUTS by Charles M. Schuiz The story turned to boring. FINALLV, MV INTtLLECTOAL £QUAL> / HI,I'AA\ VRARLA I fpON'TV > FLATTER vSOURSELfv r^ ^& W ffT^ ^§ Wi iKM PAVT*. i I SeCAOftE I WA6 60AN TO ROO&iE/ IVE OFTEN WONDERED MOU YOU COPE.. I MEAN, HOU/ DO YOU SURVIVE ? Thursday, February 29, 1996 Panorama Page 11 1 LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICE BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OFNEVADA In tke MsMcr oT the AppHcaUon by On Demand Sedan Srv k,Iac Rcqnctting a Certificate of Public Convenience and Ncoenity or a penUt to operate at a common carrier of tranportatlon tcrvkc within Nevada. Docket No. 9S-MS7 land Notice Of Hfjrimr An anpNcation wai Hied with the Comminion by On Demnd Sedan Services, Inc. ("Applicant") requesting a CertificaUorPublic Convenience md Necessity lo operate a* a coMBion or contract carrier of transportation service within the SUtc of Nevada. The application was dcsitnatcd as Docket No. 9S-MS7. Apjpiicant't orifinal aopiicatioa requested a CertMcate of PnbHc ConvodcnccandNecesaity pursuant to NRS 706.386 throorii NRS 706.411. The specific authority requested was that of a "Aathoriicd Carrier" as defined in NAC 706.019. AppUcant'sproposcd services, "shall be those oTa 'limousine', as dfflned hi NAC 706.079, for the transportation ofpnsengers and thdr baaafe primarily between points md places in Clark County, Nevada. The services will be 'On call over irregular routes' as defined in NAC 706.091." On October 26, 1995, the Applicant filed m amended appUcallon which, among other matters, further described its proposed service as "charteiyexclusivc occupancy limo license with operations being preformed (sic) primarily in Oark County with occasional trips outside of Qark County." On February 9,1996, the Applicant filed a second amendment in order to clarify sections 5 and 6 of its application, dealing with the Proposed Geographic Area and Proposed Map of Service Area. The Applicant requests that the statement of its proposed service be changed to "provide oncall irregular route transportation of passengers and their baggage in charter limousine service between poinLo and places within aark County, Nevada." The Applicant stales that it win IM providing all services directly and not, as pireviousiyindicated,bycontractwilhMulli-Service Leasing. The application, and amendments, were filed pursuant to Nevada Revised Statutes ("NRS") and Nevada AdminislraUve Code ("NAC") Chapters 703 and 706. The Commission has legal authority and jurisdiction to hold a hearing in this mailer pursuant to the provisions of NRS 706.391. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Commission has scheduled a hearingin this matter a.s follows: WFJNESDAY. MARCH 27 1996 9:30 a.m. OfDce of the PuMicService Commission Slate Office Building, Hearing Room B 555 East Washington Avenue, Suite 4600 L.as Vegas, Nevada 89101 at which lime interested persons may appear and be heard. The hearing may proceed from day to day and, if necessary, this mailer will be continued lo a lime to be determined at the hearing. Pursuant to the provisions of NRS 706.151, NRS 706.391, and NAC 706.010 to 706.361, inclusive, the Commis.le debt, and g) extend by two years the authorization given in Docket No. 94-5036, which expires December 31,1S>97, to isinie up to $150 miOkn of sbort-tem ansecared promissonr notes. Applicant proposes that the aathoriiatioa woM expire for all or any part of the comnon stock, Refunding Prcfertvd Stock, new taxable debt and new tax-advantaged prefemd securities which are not sold before December 31, 1997. Applicant also proposes that the authorization to issue unsecured promissory notes not to exceed $150 milUon be effective for a period from the date of an older from the Commisiion granting such authorization through December 31,1999. The application was filed pursuant to NRS 704.322 throo^ 704.328, hidusive,and NAC 703.430 through 703.440, faidusi ve, snd is on file Mid avaflable for viewing by the public at the offices of the Commission, 727 Fairview Drive, Carson City, Nevada 89710 and 555 E. Washington Avenue, SuiU 4600, Las Vegas. Nevada S9101. Persons with a direct ssid substantial interest in the fillip may file Petitions for Leave to Intervene at either of the Commissian's offices. Such Petitions must conform to the Commissian's regulations and must be filed on or before Wednesdav. M arch 2a 1996. Interested persons may submit Protests for filiiK at cither of the Commission's offices. Protests must cnnlorm to the Commisrion's regulations. Other written comments may also be submitted for filing. By the Commission, /s/ William H. Vance WILLIAM H. VANCE, Commission Secretary Dated: Carson City, Nevada 2/20/96 (SEAL) H—Feb. 29,1996 LEGAL NOTICE BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA ApplicaUon by NEVADA POWER COMPANY to construe the Arden-Northwest 230 kV transmUsion line pursuant to the provisions of the Utility Environmental Protection Act Docket No. 95-10009 NOTICE OF HEARING Docket No. 95-10009 is an application filed with the Public Service Commission of Nevada ("Commission") by Nevada Power Company ("Nevada Power"). The application is filed pursuant to Nevada Revised Statutes ("NRS") and Nevada Administrative Code ("NAC) Chapters 703 and 704, NRS 704.820 to NRS 704.900, inclusive, and NAC 703.415 to NAC 703.428, indu.'iive. Nevada Power requests from the Commission a permit to con.struct utility facilities assodated with the Arden/Northwest 230/138 kiluvolt transmission line. Nevada Power .stales that the proposed transmission line would be approximately 31 miles long, the overhead facilities would be supported by approximately 130-feet high steel structures, and the transmission line would be located on the west side of the Las Vegas valley. The tran.smissing the east border of the Rednn-k Canyon Conservation Area, to Cheyenne Avenue. From Cheyeime A venue, the line I rHs*ath,paraMiiig the ftitiire Outer Beltway in a shared use uUMty conldor thnMgb the Summerlin masterdanned cammanity, to tke pswdmity of the intersection of Flamingo Road and Hoaiapai Way. From nmingo Road nd Hualani Way, the line runs generally south wid east until it reaches the Arden substation. A map of the proposed route for the transmissian line is in the appVcation. Nevada Power states that the puipose of the proposed transmission Unc is to ensure that Nevada Power can provide electricity to its customen and to maintain adequate transmission c^abdUy. Pursuant to NRS 704MO, the Commission will coivene a HEARING on Nevada Power's application m folknrst FRIDAY. MARCH M 1996 10:00 ajn. Public Servke Commission of Nevada The Sawyer BuiMing 555 East WasMngtnn Avenue, 4th floor Las Vegas, Nevada The purpose of the hearing is for the Commission to take evidence from the parties on matters pertaining to Docket No. 95-10009. At the hearing, the Commission may m^e decisions on the procedural Mid sulKtanlivr issues raised at the hearing and review any agreements among the parties. At the hearing, the Commission may take puMic comment and discuss those comments. Al the hearing, the Commission may vote to grant or deny, in whole or part, the applicatinUatieil ads) CLASSIFIED Published Tuesdays, Thursdays • • NO*.'.. ACCEPTING PLEASE READ YOUR AD FOR ERRORS the first day it appears. H.B.C. Publications, Inc assumes no responsibility AFTER THE FIRST INSERTION, nor for en'ors not affecting the value of the ad. All claims for settlement adjustments must be made within 12 days after expiration of ad. Henderson Home News 564-1881 • 435-7700 Hours: Men. Fri. 8-4 Boulder City News 293-2302 Hours: Monday ttiru Friday 8 5 DEADLINES Hendersori Home News Tuesday's Issue 4:00 P.M. FRIDAY Henderson Home News • Boulder City News Thursday's Issue 12:00 NOON TUESDAY PREPAYMENTS: Yard. Garage, and Moving Sales require cash in advance. (Exception subscribers) Out-of-town and out-of-state also require prepayment. GARAGE SALES Big cjarage sale Sat., 3/ 2. 8-12. NO EARLY BIRDS PLS. 1511 Dorothy Dr.. BC. Lots of stuff, kitchen, bath, bedding, prom dresses, ironing board & Iron, golf clubs & much more. GS12819 Many misc. items, corner Yucca St. & Cedar Dr. in BC. 8 AM-3 PM, Fri./Sat.. March 1&2. GS12827 MOVING SALE Fri. thru Sun.,3/1-3/3,9AM-6PM, 206 Meyers, Hend. Big variety, antiques, antique glassware, garden equipment, alot of misc. toonumeroustomention. GS12875 2 Family sale. 1609 Bermuda Dunes. BC. Sat., 3/2. 8 AM-2 PM, NO EARLY BIRDS, childrens little tyke toys, household gooas & much more. GS12838 2 Family sale, 1609 Bermuda Dunes. BC. Sat.. 3/2. 8 AM-2 PM, NO EARLY BIRDS, childrens little tyke toys, household goocis & much more. GS12895 MOVING SALE. Fri. only, 7 AM-2 PM. 1026 Keys Dr.. BC, 294-0767. GS12891 Yard Sale 1317 Elsa Way tools, household, clothes appliances. Sat. & Sun., 9 AM. GS12955 PERSONALS Poor, lonely, honest rogue/professional free lance adventurer/entertainer seeking a sugar mama to adventure with. Write to Rocky 40 Year Old Roving Rogue, alias. Dusty the Dancing Dude, 830 S. Boulder Hwy., Suite 107. Henderson. NV. 89015. PE127S4 20^0 WITHOUT GLASSES! Safe, rapid, non-surj^l, pemianent restoration in 6-6 weeks. Airline pikA devekioed. Doctor approved. Pre* Information by mail. 800) 422-7320. ext. 222. 406) 961-5570, Fax 406)961-5577. SATIS-ACTION GUARANTEED. PE12780 GARAGE SALES 119 Joshua St., Hend., behind Albertsons. Fri., 9-? Gun. car, rollaway. & lots more. GS 12504 1005 AtlictJS Ave., (Boulder/Racetrack Home Stretch Development) Salt water aquarium, toys, baby Kems. quilt, lots of everything. Sun., March 3rd at 7am-2pm. GS12938 Antiques! 5 hrs. SAT ONLY 8 A to 1 P. 1445 San Felipe, BC GS12956 MOVING Eveythingfrom appliances, clothing, exer. equip., drapes, bikes, to a 25 FT self contained travel trailer & much more. Fri., Sat. & Sun..'1501 Equestrian Dr. Hend. next street past K-MART on Boulder Hwy. going South. 3 FAMILY GARAGE SALE lots of things for everyone. Antiques, collectibles, bedding, dishes, curtains, clothing, new doggy door, some furniture new & used, everything even kitchen sink. Lake Mead to Warm Springs follow to Race Track. L to Havre. Cornerof Lisbon. Sat. & Sun.. 8 AM to 4 PM. NO EARLY BIRDS. GS12909 l| PROFESSIONAL y PROFESSIONAL irpROFESSIONAL SERVICES I SERVICES I SERVICES CARPET & VINYL Installation & Repairs & Restretches. 293-2304 or 223-5402. PS 12853 4Lines*6'ti5sue cosh role ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS 7daytawk.ilBPM, Nee. AniMi behind • • -r 1 ^-y -irfi^i-^ ruTJ-fi^ti 'i-JT'". PERSONALS ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDER. Potentially no more Ritalin. Natural relief is now available. Call MAXIMUM ENTERPRISES at 1-800-7243344 ext. 112 for free information. PE12787 SHARE the American culture with an exchange student from Scandinavia, Europe. South America, Asia. High school students from over 40 countries arriving August. Call AISE for information on ho8tingl1-800-SIBLING. PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Trash Hauling. Yard Cleanup. Handyman. Call Ray. 293-0745. Handiman for hire, paint, clean, repairorwhatever. Call 897-9421 & Iv. number. PS12930 16T0N TOP SOIL $112. 263-2266 NEON SIGNS & GRAPHICS Reasonable Rates 262-6352 HANDY ANDY Handyman services Electrical, plumb. paint, etc. 564-0681 mwm MR. FIXIT Handyman Servrce Quality Home Maintenance 294-6214 BOULDER DAM VAC & SEW 1660Nev. Hwy.. BC (Marshall Plaza) 293-3770 Sales and Repair WINDOW TINTING Lower your cooling & heating costs. Protect your window coverings, furniture & carpets. Altemative to solar screens. Easiertoclean&care for 10 yrs. exp. Call for free estimate. Desert Glass Tinting 877-9000. PS12436 EACLE PRINTMC Business Forms Flyers • Brochures Tickets • Pads Newsletters OveumOtHI 101 Atlantic 566-5172 FAXlSM-5171 BEATTHE HEAT B&N Screens Solar screens, replacement screens, screen doors & security doors 565-7511 Pooper Scooper Service ONLY $4.5(VWEEK "We Pick It Up And Take It Away" 558-0505 4Lines*6'^ssue GENE'S CARPET CLEANING and WINDOW CLEANING Res. & Comm. 564-8055 We move res. & comm. Free estimates, we load/ unload rental trucks anywhere in town. 566-8898 or Beep 599-0652. PS 12730 YARD LABOR SERVICE YARD clean-up, trash hauling, lawn mowing, minor sprinkler repairs. Ik. #164-010521. 5655810. PS245 Drains, plumbing & heating SVC, water lines, etc. 40 yrs. exp. Low discounts. Ouck. reliable & efficient. The best for less. 434-9168 or 6929243 (pager). PS12306 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES We clean your garage and dispose of unwanted clutter. Call Dave for FREE ESTIMATE. 5655668. PS5390 Patio covers, room addition, remodeling, deck, garage conversion. 371 9193. PS12665 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Good quality housecleaning. 293-5486. Concrete by Vince Garcia 565-0385 432-6471 (Home) 378-0639 (Mobile) Lie. #41042 Atlantis Pool Service & Repair 361-0111 Uemntml A Imund Jjftj^ MCS GARDENING •THEE THIMMINQ 'FREE ESTIMATES •RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL •EMERG. PIPE t VALVE REPAIR SENIOR DISCOUNTS ^* LICENSED LAWN MAINTENANCE SINCE 1964 564-6742 HOWARD HELDERLEIN CONSTRUCTION Commercial • Residential • Remodels and Additions License #021013 ^yyae 565-0874 Inlarior. Mtterior hom, apart, eondoa. drywall rapair, aoceuabc repair, laxturing, all phaaaa of painDng. Raaaonalila rat* aatimalM. 25 yrs. asp. DESERT PAINTING 565-3995 ptiatii HAPPY GARDNER We Care For Your Lawn George R. Rogan, III #164-13888 565-3583 „7ti GUITAR LESSONS By Exp. Teacher SKVhr. Call 564-7718 12725 FIX-IT GUY Carpenlry/Dryw.ill Plumbing/Phone Jacks Electrical/Etc. Small Job Handyman scottiy 598-3229 HdVEREPMRSbyCC Aito IMwIor/ExtwIor Priming 23 yra. Exparianca Call 564-4292 For Fraa Estima^ Prompt, Dependable Service 1272*1 SHERMAN CONCRETE Licensed & Bonded Lie # 30046 Free Estimates 293-4323 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES — rmrdp — EATING ALONE? Party of Eight brings people together for dinner to meet new friends. 251-8830 ANGELO'S LAWN SERVICES Lkenaed All work guaranteed 592-0968 BRICK, BLOCK | ALL MASONRY 564-1487 Lie. #015257 ,252, PROFESSIONAL SERVICES CARPET REPAIR & RESTRETCH 293-2122 .25.. BILL LICENSED HANDY MAN <<• Complete home repairs Rick at 564-7488 or pager 599-7474. YOU NAME IT WE DO IT 'Residential 'Commerdai 'Remodel Ca//294-1039 or Ca//496-1990 CanKto> Ih. Na 0OI4MI FREE ESTIMATES JIFFY TRIM LAWN CARE •Wa Work While You Play" Licensed Insured HENDERSON GREEN VALLEY ,>>>K CALL 565-1593 ^ THE CAVANAUGH'S PAINTING Interior/Exterior Free Eathnrntee 294*1 422 f-^'"*^ Philip D. Levy, JD Tax Advisor & Preparer • Since 1961 Profeeaiortal Service with a Personal Touch 433-7629 By Appointment Only JiasL Harry's Quality Painting 15 Years in Boukier City Interior/Exterior Residential/Commercial Acoustical Celling • Repair • Text Drywall Taping • Texturing • Wallpapering 293-1523 Free Eetirmtma Uc • Bonded • Insured BOULDER CITY CARPET CARE Carpet Claaniftg spacialiata, upholatary, auto, boat, RV intarkira, 24 hr. aarvica, Carpet A fabric prolaction. Soft water for claanar, aoftar carpats. 293-4148 lUK MARY KAY COSMETICS Independent Beauty Consultant since 1989 Dee Dee Senko 293-5550 ELITE Houaaclaanlng Service RMaonaUe rat, 2 hr. ifiln, lie, bonded 260-7721 Quality Concrete Call Eagle Ready Mix Office 263-9740 Mobile 493-7361 The King's Kids Service Co. For all your maintenance needs. Call 565-0731 LJcanced & Insured TREE TRIMMING Very Reasonable Rates 361-2399 BACKHOE and BOBCAT SERVICE •Lots Graded •Ditching 30 Years Experience — Hourly Rates Cari W. Ford 293-0593 12618 BOULDER CITY PLUMBING 293-0300 Service & Repair Specialists 4;a: NV. Lie. #38792 BOULDER TREE SERVICE Commercial & Residential Topping Pruning Removal Palm Trees Senior Discount Businass LJcenw #3-1-96-7255-0 • 20 yrs. Experience Owner Brian Buhl 702-293-4594 EEMOORE CXEARLY WINDOW CLEANING Reasonable Rates Jeff Kincaid 294-1114 Nawpagar 222-6926 12614 ^tjpMAWTBWNa^p am MBIMffll SHRLEY CAUi •M-7417W4M437I Owns 12617 IBI.ACK MOUNTAIN PLUMBING SERVICE FAST SERVICE HENDERSON BOULDER CITY 565-6749 uc-tituMt 294-7713 See Next Page For More Professional Services Tt J • I \

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mm^mfmmmmm mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm Pg 10 Panorama Thursday, February ^9,1996 by D.B.DoiK>v8n NOYKED • J) 1 1 REEBOF r Tin CROSSWORD PUZZLE M^(^^ THE Twaaz QCr KTTVE Now vnofe the drded Idtcn lo fonn the HfprlK auwcr, M suggoted b)'Ibe tbowculoan. graodaa Aa^iNoa woxna AWMIH „ OHHoa ONV wcx)a — [3|oq UMOi-nBUis aqj )8 JOS J3[3AEIJ sqi ICI^YV Answers: Answer = SLAPSTIX —=== A journey of 1,000 miles begins with a single delay of two hours before takeoff. Good wishes are more important than gifts t)ecause they can't be bought. • • • By the time you realize you have a reputation, it's too late to change iL • • • Passions may make people feel more intensely, but they often don't see as well as they once did. • • • High principles mean nothing if you don't abide by them. • • • Never expect anyone but yourself to keep a secret. AfriHEWRUL 14 17 20 10 11 12 13 16 19 22 Mn IS NflGICWORD PSFERAUQS C I LBUP HOW TO PLAY: Read the llct of words. Look el ttie puzzle. REODSNIAMEROMAN You'll find these words In all directloni—horizontally, verticalty, diagonally, bactmrards. Draw a circle around each EMREXCAVATIONGO letter of a word found in the puzzle, then strike It off the list arcling it will show a letter has been used but will leave It SOUIUNCOVEREDEI visible should tt also form iMirt of another word. Find the big words first When letters of all listed words are circled, you'll ftave ttie given number of letters left over. They'll spell out your MAGICWORO. EHMRYRETSAS I DMT RMOUNTVESUVIUSP POMPEII (sol.: 8 letters) VSNBSN I UK S SYSTU A-Andent dty, Ardiaeologists, Ashes; B-Bodies, Biiried; C-Cinders, Columns; D-Damage, Disaster, EEEOTRS CCRTREAR E-Erosion, Eruption, • Excavation; F-Forum, D I DDI ANET AOOATE Found; G-Gems; H-Hidden, History, Homes; IItaly, Ivory, L-Lava, Learn; M-Moimt Vesuvius, NRDI SEMIVNNTLUG Mysteries; P-Preserved, Public square; RUE I E I LUAVOESEEA Remains, Roman, Ruins; S5ealed, Statues, Stone; U-UiKXJvered; V-Victims, Visit OTHSVDL YROVIDSM • ':' • • • • .. • -, • • • • • : • .' • • • ..: • -' • • • • • .' • ^ • FSTSIGOLOEAHCRA '" .—:: :'.'. :" AYLAT I CEROS IOND This Week's Answer HaAOOSIQ SMI TCI VSREDN ICA O 1996. Tribune Media Services THAM S?HD. SOLUTION: s 1 u i 1 0 N o 1 3 1 a a H 1 1 a 0 N 3 N 1 A 8 s n d 1 0 1 0 1 3 1 s 0 V ] a • • 3 Z V a 3 N V 0 3 V 0 1 u • 1 1 N 3 -! • • • ^^ • l H n N • • 3 1 a V u V t u ( • > x 0 A 3 1 1 0 N V H II V 0 u 0 1 3 3 1 0 N 0 1 V 1 3 M a N N u 0 a • H V H i T 1 1 1 1 • i n y i^^H ^^ • s t V (^ • 3 1 1 0 3 H i 1 X a 1 u n n 3 ^1 3 1 u 3 ] 1 3 H 1 3 0 i 3 1 s 0 U i s 1 3 d 0 X V 1 1 n a | m V. _!_ iMil 1 V s s 3 j Oj ACROSS 1 —at Sea" 6 Mineoand Maglie 10 Thailand 14 Mature 15 Upon 16 Different 17 —the riveter 18 Points of convergence 19 Apportion 20 — tfieRed 21 Leg bone 22 Leave 23 Brazilian port 25 Talk back 27 Reliance 30 Small 34 Emoter 37 Decorate \ 39 Staircase post 40 Forward 42 TV's f^/lajors 43 Frog's noise 44 Asian capitol 45 Call forth 1 47 Some students: 2 at)br. 3 48 Fit for 4 plowing 5 50 Habituate 52 Fast time 6 54 Edit 7 58 Great canine 8 61 Befuddled 64 Brainstorm 9 65 Andy's 10 partner 12 66 Some tea 67 Reef with a 13 lagoon 68 Ado 21 69 Ivy, for one 24 70 Aristocratic 26 71 Sfiade 28 source 29 72 English school 31 73 Lock of 32 hair DOWN 33 Challenge hurler 34 Love 35 Pop or jazz o6G ^OM 36 38 Saull — 41 Marie 46 Secure Particle 49 Center of 51 activity Helix 53 Sqhool term Italian 55 commune bb Have a 57 session bti Vendetta Delicate 59 Unfeigned Flat fish 60 Famed 62 fountain Pairs 63 Tragic king of drama 67 Fratemal group Laugh Winglike — Lisa Glowing gas — oblige Iraqi tribesman Escarole Magazine worker Unspoken Sun-dried brick Cubicles Stories Slightly mad Asian river Facial feature Greek stote Briton Anthony Social insect 7 •i I i' :. • : :! • • Garfield by Jim Davis PEANUTS by Charles M. Schuiz The story turned to boring. FINALLV, MV INTtLLECTOAL £QUAL> / HI,I'AA\ VRARLA I fpON'TV > FLATTER vSOURSELfv r^ ^& W ffT^ ^§ Wi iKM PAVT*. i I SeCAOftE I WA6 60AN TO ROO&iE/ IVE OFTEN WONDERED MOU YOU COPE.. I MEAN, HOU/ DO YOU SURVIVE ? Thursday, February 29, 1996 Panorama Page 11 1 LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICE BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OFNEVADA In tke MsMcr oT the AppHcaUon by On Demand Sedan Srv k,Iac Rcqnctting a Certificate of Public Convenience and Ncoenity or a penUt to operate at a common carrier of tranportatlon tcrvkc within Nevada. Docket No. 9S-MS7 land Notice Of Hfjrimr An anpNcation wai Hied with the Comminion by On Demnd Sedan Services, Inc. ("Applicant") requesting a CertificaUorPublic Convenience md Necessity lo operate a* a coMBion or contract carrier of transportation service within the SUtc of Nevada. The application was dcsitnatcd as Docket No. 9S-MS7. Apjpiicant't orifinal aopiicatioa requested a CertMcate of PnbHc ConvodcnccandNecesaity pursuant to NRS 706.386 throorii NRS 706.411. The specific authority requested was that of a "Aathoriicd Carrier" as defined in NAC 706.019. AppUcant'sproposcd services, "shall be those oTa 'limousine', as dfflned hi NAC 706.079, for the transportation ofpnsengers and thdr baaafe primarily between points md places in Clark County, Nevada. The services will be 'On call over irregular routes' as defined in NAC 706.091." On October 26, 1995, the Applicant filed m amended appUcallon which, among other matters, further described its proposed service as "charteiyexclusivc occupancy limo license with operations being preformed (sic) primarily in Oark County with occasional trips outside of Qark County." On February 9,1996, the Applicant filed a second amendment in order to clarify sections 5 and 6 of its application, dealing with the Proposed Geographic Area and Proposed Map of Service Area. The Applicant requests that the statement of its proposed service be changed to "provide oncall irregular route transportation of passengers and their baggage in charter limousine service between poinLo and places within aark County, Nevada." The Applicant stales that it win IM providing all services directly and not, as pireviousiyindicated,bycontractwilhMulli-Service Leasing. The application, and amendments, were filed pursuant to Nevada Revised Statutes ("NRS") and Nevada AdminislraUve Code ("NAC") Chapters 703 and 706. The Commission has legal authority and jurisdiction to hold a hearing in this mailer pursuant to the provisions of NRS 706.391. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Commission has scheduled a hearingin this matter a.s follows: WFJNESDAY. MARCH 27 1996 9:30 a.m. OfDce of the PuMicService Commission Slate Office Building, Hearing Room B 555 East Washington Avenue, Suite 4600 L.as Vegas, Nevada 89101 at which lime interested persons may appear and be heard. The hearing may proceed from day to day and, if necessary, this mailer will be continued lo a lime to be determined at the hearing. Pursuant to the provisions of NRS 706.151, NRS 706.391, and NAC 706.010 to 706.361, inclusive, the Commis.le debt, and g) extend by two years the authorization given in Docket No. 94-5036, which expires December 31,1S>97, to isinie up to $150 miOkn of sbort-tem ansecared promissonr notes. Applicant proposes that the aathoriiatioa woM expire for all or any part of the comnon stock, Refunding Prcfertvd Stock, new taxable debt and new tax-advantaged prefemd securities which are not sold before December 31, 1997. Applicant also proposes that the authorization to issue unsecured promissory notes not to exceed $150 milUon be effective for a period from the date of an older from the Commisiion granting such authorization through December 31,1999. The application was filed pursuant to NRS 704.322 throo^ 704.328, hidusive,and NAC 703.430 through 703.440, faidusi ve, snd is on file Mid avaflable for viewing by the public at the offices of the Commission, 727 Fairview Drive, Carson City, Nevada 89710 and 555 E. Washington Avenue, SuiU 4600, Las Vegas. Nevada S9101. Persons with a direct ssid substantial interest in the fillip may file Petitions for Leave to Intervene at either of the Commissian's offices. Such Petitions must conform to the Commissian's regulations and must be filed on or before Wednesdav. M arch 2a 1996. Interested persons may submit Protests for filiiK at cither of the Commission's offices. Protests must cnnlorm to the Commisrion's regulations. Other written comments may also be submitted for filing. By the Commission, /s/ William H. Vance WILLIAM H. VANCE, Commission Secretary Dated: Carson City, Nevada 2/20/96 (SEAL) H—Feb. 29,1996 LEGAL NOTICE BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA ApplicaUon by NEVADA POWER COMPANY to construe the Arden-Northwest 230 kV transmUsion line pursuant to the provisions of the Utility Environmental Protection Act Docket No. 95-10009 NOTICE OF HEARING Docket No. 95-10009 is an application filed with the Public Service Commission of Nevada ("Commission") by Nevada Power Company ("Nevada Power"). The application is filed pursuant to Nevada Revised Statutes ("NRS") and Nevada Administrative Code ("NAC) Chapters 703 and 704, NRS 704.820 to NRS 704.900, inclusive, and NAC 703.415 to NAC 703.428, indu.'iive. Nevada Power requests from the Commission a permit to con.struct utility facilities assodated with the Arden/Northwest 230/138 kiluvolt transmission line. Nevada Power .stales that the proposed transmission line would be approximately 31 miles long, the overhead facilities would be supported by approximately 130-feet high steel structures, and the transmission line would be located on the west side of the Las Vegas valley. The tran.smissing the east border of the Rednn-k Canyon Conservation Area, to Cheyenne Avenue. From Cheyeime A venue, the line I rHs*ath,paraMiiig the ftitiire Outer Beltway in a shared use uUMty conldor thnMgb the Summerlin masterdanned cammanity, to tke pswdmity of the intersection of Flamingo Road and Hoaiapai Way. From nmingo Road nd Hualani Way, the line runs generally south wid east until it reaches the Arden substation. A map of the proposed route for the transmissian line is in the appVcation. Nevada Power states that the puipose of the proposed transmission Unc is to ensure that Nevada Power can provide electricity to its customen and to maintain adequate transmission c^abdUy. Pursuant to NRS 704MO, the Commission will coivene a HEARING on Nevada Power's application m folknrst FRIDAY. MARCH M 1996 10:00 ajn. Public Servke Commission of Nevada The Sawyer BuiMing 555 East WasMngtnn Avenue, 4th floor Las Vegas, Nevada The purpose of the hearing is for the Commission to take evidence from the parties on matters pertaining to Docket No. 95-10009. At the hearing, the Commission may m^e decisions on the procedural Mid sulKtanlivr issues raised at the hearing and review any agreements among the parties. At the hearing, the Commission may take puMic comment and discuss those comments. Al the hearing, the Commission may vote to grant or deny, in whole or part, the applicatinUatieil ads) CLASSIFIED Published Tuesdays, Thursdays • • NO*.'.. ACCEPTING PLEASE READ YOUR AD FOR ERRORS the first day it appears. H.B.C. Publications, Inc assumes no responsibility AFTER THE FIRST INSERTION, nor for en'ors not affecting the value of the ad. All claims for settlement adjustments must be made within 12 days after expiration of ad. Henderson Home News 564-1881 • 435-7700 Hours: Men. Fri. 8-4 Boulder City News 293-2302 Hours: Monday ttiru Friday 8 5 DEADLINES Hendersori Home News Tuesday's Issue 4:00 P.M. FRIDAY Henderson Home News • Boulder City News Thursday's Issue 12:00 NOON TUESDAY PREPAYMENTS: Yard. Garage, and Moving Sales require cash in advance. (Exception subscribers) Out-of-town and out-of-state also require prepayment. GARAGE SALES Big cjarage sale Sat., 3/ 2. 8-12. NO EARLY BIRDS PLS. 1511 Dorothy Dr.. BC. Lots of stuff, kitchen, bath, bedding, prom dresses, ironing board & Iron, golf clubs & much more. GS12819 Many misc. items, corner Yucca St. & Cedar Dr. in BC. 8 AM-3 PM, Fri./Sat.. March 1&2. GS12827 MOVING SALE Fri. thru Sun.,3/1-3/3,9AM-6PM, 206 Meyers, Hend. Big variety, antiques, antique glassware, garden equipment, alot of misc. toonumeroustomention. GS12875 2 Family sale. 1609 Bermuda Dunes. BC. Sat., 3/2. 8 AM-2 PM, NO EARLY BIRDS, childrens little tyke toys, household gooas & much more. GS12838 2 Family sale, 1609 Bermuda Dunes. BC. Sat.. 3/2. 8 AM-2 PM, NO EARLY BIRDS, childrens little tyke toys, household goocis & much more. GS12895 MOVING SALE. Fri. only, 7 AM-2 PM. 1026 Keys Dr.. BC, 294-0767. GS12891 Yard Sale 1317 Elsa Way tools, household, clothes appliances. Sat. & Sun., 9 AM. GS12955 PERSONALS Poor, lonely, honest rogue/professional free lance adventurer/entertainer seeking a sugar mama to adventure with. Write to Rocky 40 Year Old Roving Rogue, alias. Dusty the Dancing Dude, 830 S. Boulder Hwy., Suite 107. Henderson. NV. 89015. PE127S4 20^0 WITHOUT GLASSES! Safe, rapid, non-surj^l, pemianent restoration in 6-6 weeks. Airline pikA devekioed. Doctor approved. Pre* Information by mail. 800) 422-7320. ext. 222. 406) 961-5570, Fax 406)961-5577. SATIS-ACTION GUARANTEED. PE12780 GARAGE SALES 119 Joshua St., Hend., behind Albertsons. Fri., 9-? Gun. car, rollaway. & lots more. GS 12504 1005 AtlictJS Ave., (Boulder/Racetrack Home Stretch Development) Salt water aquarium, toys, baby Kems. quilt, lots of everything. Sun., March 3rd at 7am-2pm. GS12938 Antiques! 5 hrs. SAT ONLY 8 A to 1 P. 1445 San Felipe, BC GS12956 MOVING Eveythingfrom appliances, clothing, exer. equip., drapes, bikes, to a 25 FT self contained travel trailer & much more. Fri., Sat. & Sun..'1501 Equestrian Dr. Hend. next street past K-MART on Boulder Hwy. going South. 3 FAMILY GARAGE SALE lots of things for everyone. Antiques, collectibles, bedding, dishes, curtains, clothing, new doggy door, some furniture new & used, everything even kitchen sink. Lake Mead to Warm Springs follow to Race Track. L to Havre. Cornerof Lisbon. Sat. & Sun.. 8 AM to 4 PM. NO EARLY BIRDS. GS12909 l| PROFESSIONAL y PROFESSIONAL irpROFESSIONAL SERVICES I SERVICES I SERVICES CARPET & VINYL Installation & Repairs & Restretches. 293-2304 or 223-5402. PS 12853 4Lines*6'ti5sue cosh role ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS 7daytawk.ilBPM, Nee. AniMi behind • • -r 1 ^-y -irfi^i-^ ruTJ-fi^ti 'i-JT'". PERSONALS ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDER. Potentially no more Ritalin. Natural relief is now available. Call MAXIMUM ENTERPRISES at 1-800-7243344 ext. 112 for free information. PE12787 SHARE the American culture with an exchange student from Scandinavia, Europe. South America, Asia. High school students from over 40 countries arriving August. Call AISE for information on ho8tingl1-800-SIBLING. PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Trash Hauling. Yard Cleanup. Handyman. Call Ray. 293-0745. Handiman for hire, paint, clean, repairorwhatever. Call 897-9421 & Iv. number. PS12930 16T0N TOP SOIL $112. 263-2266 NEON SIGNS & GRAPHICS Reasonable Rates 262-6352 HANDY ANDY Handyman services Electrical, plumb. paint, etc. 564-0681 mwm MR. FIXIT Handyman Servrce Quality Home Maintenance 294-6214 BOULDER DAM VAC & SEW 1660Nev. Hwy.. BC (Marshall Plaza) 293-3770 Sales and Repair WINDOW TINTING Lower your cooling & heating costs. Protect your window coverings, furniture & carpets. Altemative to solar screens. Easiertoclean&care for 10 yrs. exp. Call for free estimate. Desert Glass Tinting 877-9000. PS12436 EACLE PRINTMC Business Forms Flyers • Brochures Tickets • Pads Newsletters OveumOtHI 101 Atlantic 566-5172 FAXlSM-5171 BEATTHE HEAT B&N Screens Solar screens, replacement screens, screen doors & security doors 565-7511 Pooper Scooper Service ONLY $4.5(VWEEK "We Pick It Up And Take It Away" 558-0505 4Lines*6'^ssue GENE'S CARPET CLEANING and WINDOW CLEANING Res. & Comm. 564-8055 We move res. & comm. Free estimates, we load/ unload rental trucks anywhere in town. 566-8898 or Beep 599-0652. PS 12730 YARD LABOR SERVICE YARD clean-up, trash hauling, lawn mowing, minor sprinkler repairs. Ik. #164-010521. 5655810. PS245 Drains, plumbing & heating SVC, water lines, etc. 40 yrs. exp. Low discounts. Ouck. reliable & efficient. The best for less. 434-9168 or 6929243 (pager). PS12306 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES We clean your garage and dispose of unwanted clutter. Call Dave for FREE ESTIMATE. 5655668. PS5390 Patio covers, room addition, remodeling, deck, garage conversion. 371 9193. PS12665 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Good quality housecleaning. 293-5486. Concrete by Vince Garcia 565-0385 432-6471 (Home) 378-0639 (Mobile) Lie. #41042 Atlantis Pool Service & Repair 361-0111 Uemntml A Imund Jjftj^ MCS GARDENING •THEE THIMMINQ 'FREE ESTIMATES •RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL •EMERG. PIPE t VALVE REPAIR SENIOR DISCOUNTS ^* LICENSED LAWN MAINTENANCE SINCE 1964 564-6742 HOWARD HELDERLEIN CONSTRUCTION Commercial • Residential • Remodels and Additions License #021013 ^yyae 565-0874 Inlarior. Mtterior hom, apart, eondoa. drywall rapair, aoceuabc repair, laxturing, all phaaaa of painDng. Raaaonalila rat* aatimalM. 25 yrs. asp. DESERT PAINTING 565-3995 ptiatii HAPPY GARDNER We Care For Your Lawn George R. Rogan, III #164-13888 565-3583 „7ti GUITAR LESSONS By Exp. Teacher SKVhr. Call 564-7718 12725 FIX-IT GUY Carpenlry/Dryw.ill Plumbing/Phone Jacks Electrical/Etc. Small Job Handyman scottiy 598-3229 HdVEREPMRSbyCC Aito IMwIor/ExtwIor Priming 23 yra. Exparianca Call 564-4292 For Fraa Estima^ Prompt, Dependable Service 1272*1 SHERMAN CONCRETE Licensed & Bonded Lie # 30046 Free Estimates 293-4323 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES — rmrdp — EATING ALONE? Party of Eight brings people together for dinner to meet new friends. 251-8830 ANGELO'S LAWN SERVICES Lkenaed All work guaranteed 592-0968 BRICK, BLOCK | ALL MASONRY 564-1487 Lie. #015257 ,252, PROFESSIONAL SERVICES CARPET REPAIR & RESTRETCH 293-2122 .25.. BILL LICENSED HANDY MAN <<• Complete home repairs Rick at 564-7488 or pager 599-7474. YOU NAME IT WE DO IT 'Residential 'Commerdai 'Remodel Ca//294-1039 or Ca//496-1990 CanKto> Ih. Na 0OI4MI FREE ESTIMATES JIFFY TRIM LAWN CARE •Wa Work While You Play" Licensed Insured HENDERSON GREEN VALLEY ,>>>K CALL 565-1593 ^ THE CAVANAUGH'S PAINTING Interior/Exterior Free Eathnrntee 294*1 422 f-^'"*^ Philip D. Levy, JD Tax Advisor & Preparer • Since 1961 Profeeaiortal Service with a Personal Touch 433-7629 By Appointment Only JiasL Harry's Quality Painting 15 Years in Boukier City Interior/Exterior Residential/Commercial Acoustical Celling • Repair • Text Drywall Taping • Texturing • Wallpapering 293-1523 Free Eetirmtma Uc • Bonded • Insured BOULDER CITY CARPET CARE Carpet Claaniftg spacialiata, upholatary, auto, boat, RV intarkira, 24 hr. aarvica, Carpet A fabric prolaction. Soft water for claanar, aoftar carpats. 293-4148 lUK MARY KAY COSMETICS Independent Beauty Consultant since 1989 Dee Dee Senko 293-5550 ELITE Houaaclaanlng Service RMaonaUe rat, 2 hr. ifiln, lie, bonded 260-7721 Quality Concrete Call Eagle Ready Mix Office 263-9740 Mobile 493-7361 The King's Kids Service Co. For all your maintenance needs. Call 565-0731 LJcanced & Insured TREE TRIMMING Very Reasonable Rates 361-2399 BACKHOE and BOBCAT SERVICE •Lots Graded •Ditching 30 Years Experience — Hourly Rates Cari W. Ford 293-0593 12618 BOULDER CITY PLUMBING 293-0300 Service & Repair Specialists 4;a: NV. Lie. #38792 BOULDER TREE SERVICE Commercial & Residential Topping Pruning Removal Palm Trees Senior Discount Businass LJcenw #3-1-96-7255-0 • 20 yrs. Experience Owner Brian Buhl 702-293-4594 EEMOORE CXEARLY WINDOW CLEANING Reasonable Rates Jeff Kincaid 294-1114 Nawpagar 222-6926 12614 ^tjpMAWTBWNa^p am MBIMffll SHRLEY CAUi •M-7417W4M437I Owns 12617 IBI.ACK MOUNTAIN PLUMBING SERVICE FAST SERVICE HENDERSON BOULDER CITY 565-6749 uc-tituMt 294-7713 See Next Page For More Professional Services Tt J • I \

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^Wji.j.f.yLuyj. i .i^.j. ii .juj^i ^^jgp^Piyyywypywwpj^fij^B'IffgiB wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm wmmm PaO12 Panorama Thursday, February 29, 1996 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES PROFESSIONAL SERVICES NELSOrS COMUTE HOtVE (EPMR All Rapairt From A-Z & caramic tila work NO JOB TOO SMALL-FREE ESTIMATES 565-3418 UC. 18000; BEEPER 268-5776 ,g,flBi CUSTOM BOAT COVERS • BMINI TOPS FRAMEWORK • INTERIORS • TRACTOR SEATS CARL'S Upholstery AUTO•RV^MAMNECRAFT RwEaHnMlH 7M Cnym M^ BotMw Oty, NVIMOS Beeper 252-1339 (702)293-0591 12419 Need your Castle Cleaned? W^Mkly • Bl WMkly Boats • Aprtinnl Houaa Condoa • Toin^tlousa* Partial or Full claanlns FTMErtimalM Call John or Lynii Delia • He >7174 BolUcler Cily 2.V0S6 Miftise in the NeHa YARDVARK'S LAWN AND MAINTENANCE "^ ProfMsional TrM Trimming | Solving BC, Green Valley i Henderson } 294-1114 Pager 222-6926 12615 Lie. INS. B.C. BLOG. & ROOFING CAR/RV/BOAT PORTS CONCRETE WORK PATK) COVERS 293-2179 „.. ^> V • .-i': nAY n SAFI, CAU A UCCNKO CONTMACTOII No Job Too Big or Too Small W Paint TTiam All J.P.S. L.T.D. mi*-" PaMkig A Pnuun WaMng Jerry SchloMw 702 898-1329 LkLABonOdMaaiatMA lnt1A&1^ BOULDER CONCRETE WANTS TO MEET YOUR CONCRETE NEEDS FOR FREE ESTIMATES AND QUALITY WORKMANSHIP CALL MICK CASEY Boulder City 293-1571 Uc.*oi6898 P812M3 TAX SERVICE In The Privacy of Your Home 1-800-417-2763 Phone Access Code 28 18 yrs. experience MISCELLANEOUS I MISCELLANEOUS WOLFF TANNING BEDS. TAN AT HOME. Buy DIRECT and SAVE! Commercial/Home units from $199. Low Monthly Payments. FREE Color Catalog. Call TODAY. 1800-842-1305. MI12785 24 ft. above ground pool, excel, cond., $600. Call 564-8242. Ml 12774 Misc. for sale 72 OLDS 88 HT sedan, family camping tent, 2 single bed mattresses & box springs solid dark mahogany finished wood bookcase/desksuitcase, 2 black matching bar stools 294-2612. Artist's Drafting Table 36" X 48", w/Ulano Glideliner straight edge and Luxo flourescent lamp land freebies: executivecnair, steel file dividers, etc.) $100 for all; Duo-pane Picture Window 4'x6'-as is $50. MacintoshOuk:ktel 14,400 fax/nnodem by Logk;ode, lif etinne limited warranty, $50; call 564-3598. MM 2812 Craftsman 6-1/8 in. jointer-planner $300; amaha PSR12 Sports Keyboard $75; enter ctr. $40; 21 cu. ft. frig. $75. 565-1979. Ml 12809 v FREE railroad ties. Call after 4 PM, 456-9856. MI12863 Bikes, two women's Schwinn 10-speeds. one in good cond., one excellent. $50 & $100. 4356839. MI7933 BrunswKk 7 ft. oak pool table, 3/4' slate, leather pockets, like new. $1500.00. 435-6839. Ml 12093 BRASS BED, all brand new, w/premium queen nnat. set & warranty, still in box, paki $825 sacrifice $300. Call 281-3677. MM 2742 DAYBED, complete set, new, wArundle, 2 top of the line ortho mattresses, v^He vwbrass. Cost $675 first $325. Call 263-7926. MI12743 WASHER / Dryers $125.00 Each. 2936101.80 Ml 12286 Full size bed $40; couch love seat, chair $200; coffee table $50; 2 end tables $20, call 2947710. MM2881 Cal King mattress & box spring, good cond., $75 293-0806. Ml 12880 Walnut hutch $350; gun safe 30"x60" $500. 2935087. Ml 12913 ELECTROSTATIC AIR FILTERS-STOP DUST, POLLEN, BACTERIA. 5 yr. guarantee, washable, most sizes $34.95. We also have 20 X 40 and up. Las Vegas 655-5502; or Hnd. 566-6933. Ml 12926 5 man canvas tent, 3 burner Coleman stove, 2 coleman lanterns, 10x10 tarp, all tor $100. 5656938. Ml 12923 Davenport, gold fabric, 9' long, $45; insulation batting, 30' plus/minus long 16" wide $5. Call 294-2939. Ml 12953 Pooltable (barsized) 7x8, 4x4. Excel. Cond. $400. Bar w/5 swivel chairs $100 OBO, 293-3955. Ml 12957 ARTHRITIS Suffers, live pain free. Had it for 20years now I am pain free. Cost is as low as $15 per mo., not medicine, natural food & energy supplements. Guaranteed, 564-1648. MI254 GLITTER GULCH DENA'S JEWELRY crystals, minerals, authentk: Indian jewelry, fossils, artifacts, NEW HOURS 11 AM4 PM, Mon.-Sat., 1419 N. Boulder Hwy., Hend., 565-0711. Ml 12405 ANNOUNCEMENTS Like new CRIB/MATTRESS. w/Minnie & Mickey Bedding, wall hangiria nrwbKe. $140. 294-3852. Ml 12763 USED APPLIANCES Westinghouse double oven range. Admiral refrigerator^reezer. Oua•er microwave oven. All in good working condition. Call 293-1898. MM 2904 COMING IN MARCH: NEW BEGINNINGS COMMUNfTY CHURCH is being started in GV. Pastor looking for special people to volunteer to help with music, drama, and other tasks to help start this Chruch in its early stages. 2633024. MCI2731 WANT TO BUY Exefcisa equipment, tree weights, benches, dunveis, exercise bikee, Nordic tracks, stair climbers. 294-0644. >^ii:^?* MERCHANDISE WANTED OLD GUITARS WANTED!! Fender. Gibson, Martin, Gretsch, National, Bigsby, 0'Angelk:o, Stromoerg, Epiphone. Mosrite. Also GiTOon Mandolins,^19001960's. These Brands Only Please. Top Cash Paid! 1-800-401-0440^ FURNITURE 4 piece steel blue sectional, makes into full size bed, w/recliners at ea. end, $250, 293-2530. ANTIQUE MARBLE TABLE, sm. round top pedestal $55; sm. glass top table, wrought iron base $45 293-4357. Sofa sleeper w/match loveseat, ex cond, sleeper never used, $345; tandy computer, modem, printer, VGA monitor, learning videos, stands, $150; exer. equip, make offer. 5669671. MCI 2896 2 piece semi circle sofa, brown floral, $100. Call 293-1877 MCI2918 BUILDING SUPPLIES STEEL BUILDINGS, factory discounts. Farm & Ranch Styles. 40x30 to 60x200. Many at$1.99 sf. Commercial styles 18x21 to 100x200 from $3.69 sf. McCrowsky Const. 962-5192. MCI 2088 3 steel arch bidg., new; 40x30 was $6,150 now $2,990; 40x58 was $10,840 now $5,990; 50x120 was $20,450 now $11,990 endwalls avail. 800-745-2685. Steel Building Manufacturer. 1995 Liquidation. Remaining inventory MUSTBE SOLD. Freight included. Free storage until delivery. Callforfree brochure. STEELMASTER 1-800-626-1110. STEEL BUILDINGS 2% Over Factory CostAll Remaining Inventory 1-800-973-3366. STORAGE RENTALS STORAGE UNITS 10'X20' 293-1135 ItiWi Mini Storage For Rent Off Boulder Hwy. & Athol $35 monthly 24 hr. access 431-4442 1EALTH & FITNESS PERSONAL BITNESS TRAINER Free Consultation 454-700^ 12M AUCTION Ritchie Bros. Auctioneers Intl. Unreserved Construction Equipment Auction LAS VEGAS, NEVADA—MARCH 25, 1996. To add your units or receive a free color brochure, phone (702) 566-0961. MC12795 PnS ANIMALS ADQHI CATS & Dogs from your shelters, Save a Life. BC PA LAS VEGAS VALLEY HUMANE SOCIETY. Beautiful, healthy, kittens, cats, puppies, dogs. Spayed/neutered, tested, shots. PetsMart, Trop-Eastern store only. Thurs., Fri., Sat., Sun., 11-4. PA12843 EMUS Yeariings $600/ pr. 2 yr. old breeders $1000/pr. Proven breeders $1600/pr. Free delivery. Financing Available. Call (409) 584-2411. PA12677 A.K.C. YELLOW smart, loyal, great family dogs $400 males, females also avail. Vgoodpedg., 2935022. PA12877 €xtra, extra Ig. dog cage. Like new was $195, asking $100. 434-4480. Free to good home Male Collie, 7 yrs. old. Call between 3-6 pm only, 565-8830. PA 12939 Betty Hohn's non profit Animal Adoption Ltd. is accepting unlimited numberofunwantedpets by appointment only. You are welcome to view adoptable pets 7 days a week. Call first 361-2484. THERE IS NO GUIDED TOURS OF THE PREMISES AT THIS TIME, OF NATIVE, NON-NATIVE, OR WILD AND EXOTIC ANIMALS. PET GROOMING Legacy Animal Hospital, S.E. corner of Pecos & Windmill, 263-9004, Mon. thru. Sat. PA12416 1 pair society 10 ea., 1 pairzebra10ea.,32mo. old grey/white 5 ea., 2932865. PA12906 Beautiful Dalmatian female looking for excellent home. Call for details. 294-8483. EDUCATION PETS/ANIMALS A 4 year old Samoyed needs a place to stay while his owners at work. Will pay $10 a day. Beeper #1-800-6997215. PA12822 Thursday. February 29.1996 Panorama Pge 13 INCOME TAX PETS/ANIMALS THE ANIMAL FOUNDATION will help you financially spay or neuter your cat or dog. Very inexpensive in Las Vegas. 384-3333 BC PA • • • • • • I INCOME TAX THE TAX PROFESSIONALS Less than 15 min. away! 916Nev. Hwy., Suite4 BaC. 293-4688 „,.,^. ENTERTAINMENT —l llllfl OVALITY VOCAL PIANO B**"^ OR KEYBOARD!!! EnUrtaiMhcnL Available for your organization or event Professional singer & Co. Ro Raymond Coral Cove MueicalArta Studio. 565-8469 VOICE PIANO DRAMA LESSONS CMkkOT a t^in* 7 md up. OuaMy. PiotMaloinl laacMno. no Rayaicnd* Cord COM HuaictI Alia Stido. Ofwiikiga avallablo piMHwnowtorappl. S65-8469 7iy^/f/ffitU\V\^(:^\v{^w^^ LOST & FOUND I LOST & FOUND FOUND AUSSIbHUPHY 3/4 mos. old, male, near Bask: & Water St. Rebecca, 799-8930/days. LF12758 LOST at Lucky's IN HEND ON BOULDER HWY. SUN., 2/18, round silver key ring w/keys. Pis. call 558-0091. $25 REWARD For the return of Teddy's 24' Extension Ladder. 2 Men who trimmed trees in Boulder City were seen driving away with it strapped on top of an "Old Blue Van" BRING IT BACK OR ELSE 293-1716 EDUCATION EDUCATION Health Care Is The Future Train for TOMORROW! Learn to be a: + Medical Assistant c%rc + Advanced Medical Biller ^ • •f Computerized Medical Billing ^ Health Claims Examiner Call 259-6263 ACADEMY OF MEDICAL CAREERS 5243W.Charelston,Sle.2 WE OFFER: • Small Classes • Individualized Attention ^ ;, • Extemship Program • Job Placement Assistance FINANCIAL AID (To those who qualify.) A Licensed by Nevada Commission on Postsccondary Education AUCTION AUCTION AUCTION DARWIN'S AUCTIONS 1524 NEVADA HWY. • i3^-l BOULDER CITY, NV. j I (702)293-3996 Darwin Bible, Auctioneer ANTIQUES & PRIMITIVES AUCTION FRIDAY EVENING • MARCH 8TH • 7 P.M. ANTIQUES AND PRIMITIVES IN OUTSTANDING CONDITION THE FOLLOWING IS A PARTIAL LIST OF HUNDREDS OF PIECES TO BE SOLD WITH NO MINIMUM BID. •LARGE GRISWOLD CAST IRON COLLECTION 'MANY RARE OLD TOOLS, INCLUDING SEVERAL FOR FORD MODEL A'S -CAST IRON DOOR STOPS •MAILBOX •MATCHBOX •HORSE DRAWN FIRE WAGON "OLD BUDWEISER CLYDESDALES -DUTCH OVENS -3 LEGGED POTS ^SMELTING POTS 'LADLES 'CRISPY CORN STICK PANS 'MUFFIN PANS •TRIVETS •BOOKS ENDS •MORTAR & PESTLE •SKILLETS •EGG PANS •WAFFLE IRONS •POTTERY-WELLER-REDWING-McCOY •CARNIVAL GLASS •DEPRESSION GLASS •VERY OLD CARPENTER'S TOOLS •TOBACCO TWIST OAK CHAIRS •BRASS FIRE NOZZLES •SCALES •COIN COLLECTION -OLD IRONS •BRONZE BOOK ENDS •BROAD AXES •BRIDDEL MEATCLEAVERS-OLDFUEL CANS .UNIQUE CREAM CANS •MILKCANS'ANTIQUE CAR JACKS .RARE CAST IRON TEA KETTLE •TOBACCO SHREDDER '2 BURNER CAST IRON STOVE •HAND CRANK MEAT SLICER •CHERRY FITTERS •WOOD PLANES (SOME BOX PLANES) •DRAW KNIVES •ICE TONGS ^ENAMEL WASH BASIN *3 HAND CARVED AZTEC GODDESSES •PULLEYS •SAMPLE SUITCASE •BRASS BLOW TORCHES •S PC. WATERFALL BEDROOM SET •HORSE TACK •OLD KITCHEN COLLECTIBLES •EXCELLENT WELL PUMPS AND CISTRIN PUMPS •STRAND OF PFj^RLS/DROP EARRINGS 'ELVIS DECANTER •RAILROAD TOOLS •WILD TURKEY BOTTLE COLLECTION •SILVER SERVICE PIECES •ENTERPRISE COFFEE GRINDER "ORNATE PUTNAM PARLOR STOVE AND SO VERY MUCH MORE. DON'T MKS THIS ONE! 10% BUYERS PREMIUM DARWIN'S AUCTIONS 293-3996 COMPUTER COMPUTER REPAIR All work done in your Home or Office. Reasonable Rates. 683-2653 4Llr>e?S^ cosh rote HELP WANTED Bob's All Family Restaurant now hiring experienced waitresses, breakfast & dinner. Apply in person, 761 NevadaHwy.BCHWl2604 Accepting applications for RESTAURANT CASHIERS, LINE COOKS. WAITRESSES & NIGHT AUDITORS at Lake Mead Resort. Apply in person: 322 Lake Shore Rd.,BC.EEO, Authorized Concessionaire NPS. HW12706 HELP WANTED — Hoover Dam Snacketeria, Cashier positions. Shuttle sen/ice available from BC. Call 293-4364 for information. $40,OOOnrEAR INCOME POTENTIAL. Home Typists/PC users. Toll free 1-800-898-9778 Ext. T-4332 for listings. Fee required. HW12777 The Tahoe World, an award-winning weekly, seeks a news photographer. Box 138, Tahoe City, CA. 96145 or fax (916) 583-7109; e-mail: world tahoe.comm. HW12775 $35,000/YEAR INCOME potential. Reading Books. Toll free 1-800898-9778 Ext. R-4332for details. Fee required. HW12778 Delivery/Cook, Days. Apply at Caps Sandwich, 1312 Nevada Hwy., BC, 293-7070. HW12894 Part Time couple retired or semi-retired for model home cleaning. Clean transportation, very neat appearance, GV area. 363-7354. HW12813 Experiencedtravel aaent Hend. area excel, benefits, (401K plan), salary, comm. & bonus. Call Dan at 253-9934 Ext. 22, Prestige American ExK ress Travel EOE. W12197 Will pay you to lose weight. Wanted 42 people to lose weight. All natural, guaranteed, dr. recommended 303-4569590. HW12535 ATTENTION BOULDER CITY POSTAL JOBS $12.68/hr. to start, plus benefits. Carriers, sorters, clerk, computer trainees. For an applnation & exam inforrr^tion, call 1-800-636-5601, Ext. P5201, 8 AM-8 PM. 7 days. HW12534 GOVERNMENTPOSTAL JOBS Now hiring for 1996. Start $23K-$34K/yr. Forappl./ info, call (818) 764-9016 ext. 8071. HW12759 Floral Designer, 2931641,'Edie's Flowers. HW12892 HOME BASED INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS $500-$5000 A MO. 1020 HRS. WEEKLY. CALL FOR FREE BOOKLET, 800-995-7906. HW12916 HAIR STYLISTS & MANICURIST STATION AVAILABLE Professional & pleasant salon. Call 293-4322. HW12917 Exp. Bookkeeper gaming knowledge helpful, apply in person. Triple J Casino, 725 S. Racetrack Rd., Hend. HW12905 Roadhouse Casino, Dinner & Breakfast Cooks, call chief, 5669999. HW12926 •ATTN: HENDERSON* Postal Positions. Permanent FT for clerk/ sorters. Full benefits. For exam, app. & salary info, call 708-264-1839 Ext. 6398 8 AM-8 PM. HW12804 RESTAURANT Fast paced full time person needed to handle phones, coordinate delivery, register, customer service as well food prep. Must be available on weekends. Apply in person between 2-4:30. SIDEWALK CAFE HOMEMADE MEXICAN FOOD. 87 E. Lake Mead Dr. HND. HW12807 Attn: Honnemakers and handcrafters. Need honne demonstrator* for growing RUBBER STAMP BUSINESS. PART-TIME. NO INVESTMENT. Will train. Call 293-1366 SherritI Graff. HW12810 WORKERS NEEDED Daily Work, Daly Pay APPLY AT LABOR FINDERS Mon.-Fri., 5 am to 6 pm 331 Water St. HND 564-9592 HW12167 HELP WANTED I HELP WANTE LAW ENFORCEMENT JOBS no exper. necee; Now hiring US Custom, officer, etc. Call 818-7591134ext.162. HW12814 TELECOMMUTING IS THE RAGE Earn top income from home. Telecommute + Dr. developed patented products = oppor. Senous? Call 1-800-224-1915. HW12824 HELPWANTED-Men/ Women earn $480 weekly assemblingcircuit boaras/electronic components at home. Experience unnecessary, will train. Imnnediate openings your local area. Call 1-520-680-4647 Ext. 1864D. HW12888 ************* i, GOLD STRIKE INN • CASINO • NOWHIRING: * SMUitty Ouwil* i, EnglnMrs ^ HoMnt/CMhtora ^ Pcrtir. aiMl>nom Cuttno Gag* CMhtor* HouMkMfMTt. IbM cook* ft • tf dliliwMmn it ^ Pirl4liiM gm (hop partoa ^ Apply In parson al ^ CasNaraCaga us HWY n-Him Hoovar Dam .jjif ************* Wanted & Needed Forward thinking, creative, energetk; office manager; experienced in basic computer skills ger>eral accounting, phone saws. Call for appt. 293-1860. HW12936 HOUSEKEEPER NEEDED Part time. Please a^ly: Nevada Inn Motel, Boulder City. HW12555 Office help, computer exp., heavy phones, MF. Apply at: Snap Tow, 1239 Boulder Hwy., Hend. HW12799 BLIMPIE SUBS & SALAD is now hiring. Days & eves. 1146 W. Sunset, 898-7850. HW12797 PT MAID apply Flamingo Inn Motel. 804 Nevada Hwy.. BC HW12860 Hairstylist & Manicurist busy salon-walk ins. Ask for Judi or Marcie, 2941627. HW12859 STOCK PERSON/ STORE CLERK position avail. Apply in person at Lake Mead Resort, BC, Fri.. 3/1, from 11 AM-1 PM, see Jeff Gunther. EOE, Authorized Concessionaire NPS. HW12865 Advertising Sales for a twice-a-month agriculture/rural newspaper. Mainly phone sales, limited traveling required. Benefits pkg. Part of a multi-newspaper group. Top commissions paid. Fax resunne to 702-8822556, or mailto: Ad Sales, 1218 W. Eddy St., Gardnerville,NV 89410. HW12793 INSURANCE BILLING CLERK needed part-time for Physician's Group. Must know medical codes and have good offk:e skills. Apply with resume at 1228 Arizona, St., BC. HW12868 DMS Vow hourly Vow IneooM and Vour B owdol AVON tHolM {ra2)M170 Call Today! CAFE SENSATIONS G.V. Cafe aeeMng full time expe. pantry cook. Kitchen auper' vlaor poaltlon avallabie bring refererKes. Appllcatlona accepted In peraon M W F, 9 am to 11 am, 2-4 pm, 4350 E. Suneet #110 at Atttlnean. Henderaon. HW255 WILDLIFE/CONSERVATION JOBS. Game wardens, security, maintenance, etc. No exp. necassary. Now Hiring. For Info. Call (219) 7940010 ext. 9007. 6 AM-8 PM/7days. HW12385 HOME BASED INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS $500-$5000 A MO. 1020 HRS. WEEKLY, CALL FOR FREE BOOKLET 800-995-7906. CRUISE SHIPS HIRING—Earn up to $2,000+/mQ. working on Cruise Ships or LandTour companies. World Travel. No exp. necessary. For directory, call: 1-206-971-3552 ext. C89773. HW12782 NATIONAL PARKS HIRING —Positions are now available at National Parits, Forests & Wildlife Preserves. Benefits • • • bonuses! For employment directory, call (206) 971-3622 ext. N89775. HW12783 NATIONAL CO. seeking 3 energetic iridividuals with great peop/le skills who are teachable. Excel, earning potential. Call for appt. 251-0270. Cleaning service needs honest & dependable persons to work P/T. Call 565-4750. HW11976 DRIVERS EXPERIENCED OR INEXPERIENCED. North American Van Lines currently has owner operatoropenings (single-op & double-op) in Relocation Services, High Value Products & Blanket Wrap Divisions. Tuition-free trainingi Tractor purchase programs, no trailer maintenance expenses. Pay for Performance plans and much more! 1 -800-3482147, Dept. A-22. HW12788 DESK CLERK PT Mature, no exp. required. Apply at Nevada Inn Motel, Boulder City. HW12933 NOW HIRING SMILING FACES. THE HOOVER DAM STORE. A people oriented company totally committed to the Disney philosophy of excellence in guest service & cast member training has job opportunities available. Two part/full time. Start immediately. Must have transportation. Work weekends. Salary or wage based on experience. Visually impairedj and physically challenged welcome to apply. Phone 596-1082. HW12492 BEVERAGE CARTS ATTENDANT, 3-11 shift. Green Valley Golf Range, 434-4300. HW12755 Wanted housekeeper willing to work 5 hrs. 1 day a week, for $50. Some ironing involved. 565-1167. HW12750 LOOKING FOR ADVENTURE? Joinohe irresistible force. The Nevada Army National Guard has excitement just waiting for you if you qualify. Call today for more information! 7537268. HW11636 BOULDER CITY'S AUTHORIZED SHIPPING Agent for UPS, FED EX, WESTERN UNION and other companies. Custom packing •Horns pickup if desired •Helpful, courteous & friendly. MAIL BOXES ETC. Von't Shopping Center Phone 702-293-2164 Fax 702-293-2164 SECURITY OFFICERS-UNARMED (5.25 HR. to eUrt HENDERSON G.V. vea*. Full A Part-Time. WMkdays WMkends. MUST HAVE WORKING PHONE TTRANSP0RTAT10N. PiMse apply in peraon MON.-THURS., 10a-3p, EOE CURTIS SECURITY, 3305 Spring Mtn. Rd., Ste. 93. HWIZIM TEACHER WANTED PART-TIME Experienced in 'Kindcrg.irten • Elementary Educ.ifion or Child Devclopmciil OAKLANE PRESCHOOL 1308 Wyoming St. 293-5188 DIETARY PERSONNEL NEEDED Coota^rap cookaMtehwaahar/dlatary atd. Variow poeaiofa avallaWa. For inormallon pertaining lo Ihaea poeNlona plaeei Inqulra al: Henderson Convalescent Hospital 11B0E.Ljri(eMead Hendefaon.NV 89015 1216J Join a Wmnmg Team} Excellent Carvar OpporlunMy for part tiina •mpk>yment We aiB kx>hing tor a friendy, conganial. tan moivaiad, aalea counlar cashier w/piaaiani plK>ne voice Md a pntesiiortal appMranca and aOiluda. On tta job paid mining. A p p fca faia riM be aocaptad. •2t 8. BouUer Hwy^ In Hnd. HELP WANTED We are fellow Hend. residents who have found a business oppor. like none other. All of us pjao to be making over $70,000 within the year. If you would like to know nrwre about this tremendous opportunity pis. call 5646675. HW12413 Cleaning persons for evening jobs for comm. bidgs. 263-8838., H\AM2108 HTSIH STYLIST NEEDED • Exp. prefsn-ed. Full servk:e salon. Call 294-8477. HELP WANTED DOCTORS OFFICE: Service oriented front desk person needed. We are-fooking for a selfmotivated, people ori-: ented believer in natural healing and wholistic health. Complete job description and application at LIFELINE CHIROPRACTIC. 1228 Arizona, Boulder City. CLERK-All shifts. Must be 21 yrs. Cashier/ Stockroom. Mighty Mart Convenience Store located in Green Valley. 433-4343. HW12897 SECURITY OFFICERS 12716 WELLS FARGO GUARD SERVICE. EMPLOYMENT OPENINGS IN HEND./G.V. AREAS. WE OPPER FLEXIBLE WORK HOURS, UNIFORMS PROVIDED, PAID VACATIONS AND OTHER BENEFITS. APPLY Monday-Friday, 9 am to 3:30 pm, 3305 W. Spring Mountain, #66. Equal Opportunity Employer. HOSPITAL DIETARY AIDE Full time position. _, If interested contact: Human Resource Dept. 293-4111 at Boulder City Hosp., 901 Adame Blvd. BC IMMEDIATE OPENINfiS12414 Clerical and Industrial, Immediate openings all areas. Contact Renee: 566-7840 /ALLEY ^0^^ TEMPS INC 30 A Water SL Handaraon, NV. A IDC Part-Time, Flexible HoursI Individuals needed to conduct phone follow-up with graduates and friends of distinguished institutione. We've been in business for 21-years plual Friendly, professional environment. $7/hr. Contact 565-9038. HW12720 • •••••••••••••••* • *** • ** SECURITY OFFICERS Needed for greeter Henderson, GV area,* FULL TIME and PART TIME, flexible houre.* Must have dependable transportation k* phone. Call ALUED SECURITY, 795-3317."^ Monday-Friday, 8:30-4:30 pm, 1515 E."^ Tropicana Ave.. SuHe 395. EOE/M-F/H-V. 12714* ••••••••••••••••**•••••* S ALES Join a Winning Team! Excellent Career Opportunity for energetic, custonner oriented, self motivated sales person with a professional appearance and attitude. On the job paidtraining. Applk:ations will be accepted. 828 S. BouMer Hwy., In Hnd. appLefiif! lemporary/Full-Tlme Emptoyment Services IMMEDIATE OPENINGS! NEVER A FEE Receptionist, Word Processing, Data Entry dper. & More. 898-1956 3510 E. Tropicana, #K at Pecos COME CRUISE WITH US LAKE MEAD CRUISES Is Now Hiring: • Food Servers Galley Deck Hands Banquet/Catering/Maint. experience helpful! Apply in parson: Lake Mead Cruises 707 Wells Rd., BC ^.^ Tow drivers needed, part time avail., exp. preferred but not necesaary. Must be clean cut, have valid Nevada driver's iicenae with current DMV printout. Must live in BC. Apply in person at 705 Juniper Way, BC HW12284 FREE AUDITKmS FOR NASHVILLE: Record, T.V. and Movie Producssfs. SAT., MARCH • SUPERIMoiel 704 Nevada Hwy. BouldwCNy,NV. Frem 2:00 pm-10:00 pm aaeaam racwMnga al, MNetae: Caumry, Pap, aM aenf, brinf back.ip a m al c Ma Rack m Rap. af yaur • MTRIHttNTAta: DANCERS: BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES NOTICE TO READERS: The HBC Publications does not vouch for the legitimacy of items, jobs, or money-making opportunities advertised in this classification. We suggest you carefully evaluate such offers and not send nrioney to these advertisers unless you are certain you know with whom you are dealing and you know all terms and conditions of the offer. BO Big Bear Laka, CA Lock A Key Buainaaa oppor. equip., inventory, & good will nets $70K annual. Mika Dolan, agani 909-866-6453. HELP WANTED I DOMESTIC HELP ALASKA EMPLOYMENT Fishing Industry. Earn up to $3,000$6.000-i-permonth Room & BoardI Transportatk>n! No experience necessary! Male/Female. Age 18-70. For more Information call: (206) 9713512 ext. A89774. HW12791 Avon HaaAPIacaforYOUl To Buy or Salt Cai Roala Miannan 293-0110 Jim RESUMES rT0$t9990ntmy 0ott9 • CrSiUSMCSSSERVKCS OpanDaaytte* 14eo CoMrado (al Aah) B.C. nti 293-5361 DRIVERS AND LABORERS 50 Needed Daily/Weekly Pay Apply LABOR EXPRESS 39 E. Basic Rd. ,j^^ CAGE CASHIERS Money handling experience. Apply al Caaino Cage, Railroad Pee* Hotel A Caelno, 2800 S. Boulder Hwy., HND. EOE HW,UI Acutemps A leinporjry Sffuice T T T T ***N0 FEES*** • • • NO FEES^^* Interviewing for: 'Word Proceesora 'Secretaries *Raceptk>nists 'Accountants 'Bookkeepers 'Data Entry 'A/PandA/R Interview! at 2909 W. Charleston Mon.-Fri. 8 AM-3PM /Vione; 877-6775 Must have proper ID FINANCIAL SERVICES WE BUY MORTGAGES. Trust Deeds, Annuities. Did You Sell Your Property? Receiving Payments? Why Wart! GET CASH NOW! Jslationwide. Great Prices. Call 1-800-659-2274, Ext. 32. FS12781 AVOID & STOP FORECLOSURE. Behind 2 payments or more, residential or commercial, immediate help 24 hrs. USHERSON BANKS & CRAWFORD, 564-4281. FS12767 Jj YOUR LOCAL li^l PAYROLL COMPANY & GenemL Ledger •m/lOee M^a>ac Mrdt* •Lock Bos ( •Coado BlUlag* m nTAKfiR roK •C0NVSISI0NSeT4n> •EMPL0YB8 ADMTIONS •RIIPL0YB8CHANC8S •USBI PAnOU. CHBCE9 PAnoixncxDr MAGNEnC TATS MEDU •OOAKTESLY TAX KETOITS •snsuroKT nVAM FINMCIAL CoaCEPR BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES Spiritual Design shirts (tee's, sweats, polos, etc.) caps, aprons, tote bags, license plates and other Christian products are now available directly to you and your friends, relatives and fellow Church Members. Sell retail for immediate income and Sponsor others to earn longterm monthly checks. You have a future with AMERICAN SPIRITUAL DESIGNS. Call Now2930038 PHIL BRENNAN per oofciTTw mdi per iMue AMERICAN MFG. Seeking individuals to service national, government & military accounts in your area. $40,000 PART TIME $80,000 FULL TIME 'Over 20 years success 'Tax shelter 'Company financing *6 month R.O.I. 'Part time or fuH time 'Min. investment $15,900. We are tookingfor indivkiuals with strong desire to succeed. If you are serious about your future, can afford to invest $15,900 CASH (100% secured) and can begin NOW, caH Don KeVy TODAY! 1-800-8S6-0019 Adult Church Nursery Attendant needed Sun. 9:15-11:15 at $6/hr. Call 293-7773. DH12935~ Will babysit from Mon.Sat., mornings & nights, nice clean house, lunch incl. Babys & up. Grandma type babysitting. 566-5491 askforBet^. DH12380 Child care, any shift, 2 exper. moms avail., NON-SMOKERS, fenced yd. 564-6318 or 564-1670. DH12675 New to Area New House -Child Care any shift FT/ PT. Outstanding ref. 5580185 aft. 5. DH12727 Lisa's Babysitting in our Hend. Home. Excel. Ref. former nanny, full-time. Call for interview 5582968. DH12833 HOUSECLEANING Tired of bad housekeepers? Call Wendy 5658107. DH12862 Single Grandma NONSMOKER have lots of TLC for your baby. Birth to 9 mo. Boulder Hwy. & Horizon. 566-5403. DH12861 Advertise in the Htm VACATION RENTALS Ski Brian Head. Condo with view. Sleeps 8, 2 mast., 1 loft br., den, Jacuzzi tub,f'rpl., gar. 702294-2320. MCI 2852 VACATION PROPERTY Time share units and campground memberships. Distress sales— Cheap! Worldwide selections. Call Vacation Network US and Canada. 1-800-543-6173. Free rental information. 305563-5586. MCI2790 COMMERCIAL SALES FOR SALE WAREHOUSE $39,950. 20 x 30. Call 294-0225. MC9767 COMMERCIAL RENTALS FENCE EQUIPMENT/ Storage yard, 216 W. Foster, 564-0147. C011227 Office Space for Lease. 1950 square foot office space for lease in prime BC location. Top floor, nice building, private bath, $2000 month, 916 Nevada Highway, 2940225. CO12061 CM Zoning BC 1600 SF of shop area w/600 SF of caretakers quarters. Washer & dryer incl. Lease $1200/mo. 2932202 BEFORE 6 PM. CO12607 Professional office space available in Boulder City, Eagles Nest Office ParK, 1000 NV Hwy. /Vpprox. 800 or 1600 sq.ft., terms negotiable. Phone 2935496 or 293-3119. CO12280 Hwy. frontage, 1000 s.f., separate entrance, bath rm., central htgVcooling, Utilrties paid. Will carpet to suit. $750 per mo. CALL Katie 293-5757 for info. C012874 4000 SF WAREHOUSE SHELL Directly across from (Lakes of Lae Vegas), perfect for sub contract. Lake Mead Boat Storage, 565-0700. C012883 DOMESTIC HELP Loving mother of 1 will babysit your child, nw home, reasonable & flexible rates, hot meals & snacks, have ref., call Julie 898-3206. Lovina mother of 1 will care for your child/children in miy home M-F, 6 AM-6 PM. 566-3031. DH12086 LICENSED HOME HEALTH CARE for elderly/convalescing. Affordable Rates. Companion sen/ice to long term nursing care. 4376977/494-0880 (pager). DH12549 IRONING TO PERFECTION $1.00 A PIECE CALL SELMA 565-1507 HCXJSECLEANING Will clean your house with a personal touch. Reasonable Rates 558-6993 ROOMS FOR RENT Furn. studio, priv. ba., kit & ent., N-S, BC & Hend. $375 incl. util. + dep. 2936799. RR12121 Roommate wanted, Hend. home, NONISMOKER, call evenings 566-9837. RR12494 ROOMMATE WANTED new home in Palm Canyon, $450-t-1/2 util. Pis. call 495-4202 pager. RR12563 • Clean fur bd. w/priv. ba. jn beautiful home, full house priv. 566-1777. RR12830 Master Bdrm. w/walk-in closet, pn/t. bath, senior welcome, avail, now. 596-4653 or 294-1934. RR12893 Large bedroom w/private ent., cable TV, light krtchen priv. $350/mo., near Skyline Casino, 566-0858. RR12899 Comfortable clean full house priv. employed man call evenings, 2931022. RR12903 COMMERCIAL RENTALS 3500 sq. ft. Warehouse space for rent, 710 W. Sunset, 564-4100. CO12410 Office warehouse suite 1000 sq. ft., 1557 Foothill Dr. Street frontage BC $650 mo. wrth $550 Security Dep., 293-3115. C012281 BC Office/Warehouse Only $800/month. BRET 294-8482 Desert Sun RIty. C012934 BC office space for rent. 1,000 to 24,000 SF at 50 cents/SF/mo. located at 1404 Colorado. 1-1/2 blocks from main PO. 293-7007. C011321 Warehouse/Office in BC, 1300+ SF, $650/mo., 293-2433. C012798 Office warehouse, 3000 SF in BC, 3 phase pwr. avaiL Call 294-1213. C012837 Approx. 800 sq. ft. Office Space for lease for as low as $450. Prime lo'-"^ cation in BC, ph. 2933119. C012855 Boulder City Retail/Office Space Terms Negotiable B.C. Adobe Realty 293-1707 AVAILABLE FOR LEASE Approx. 1000 sq. ft. warahousa w/bathroom located in new Plaza on highway. Phona prewired, ovapocoolar, reception aiea, roll up door. $S2Q/mo. Call 294-1500 to see WE'RE MOVING! WE'RE MOVING! After 14 years at 501 Nevada Hwy. we are moving March 4th to 1497 NEVADA HWY., STE A., formerly the Chamber of Commerce donie. There will be no interruptk>n of service, our phone number and P.O. Box remain the same. We are looking forward to this move and to continuing to serve you in our new location. Entering Boukler City on Hwy. 93 we're the only domeon the rIghLCOLDWELLBANKER ANCHOR REALTY, INC., 293-5757. coi76 CONDO SALES CONDO SALES 2 bd, 2 be., 2 car gar., pool, clubhouse, partial lakeview.$119.500.2933482. CS12658 I NOW SELLING N9W'Luxury CONDOS rfv^^ S20 MROIM€AO IRAl* leceSON S6M570'OPEN DAILY 10AM • SPM CONDO RENTALS Lg. neat & clean BC condo. 2 bd, 2 ba., w/ frpl., w/d hookup, gr. area overlooking custom homes, $660. Call Kay, owner/lk:en8ee Boulder Dam Realty, 293-4663 or 477-4818. CR12712 Luxury condo w/incredible lake view, 2 bd., 23/4 ba., extra park, $1150/mo. Gary Fisher 293-5599. CRl21ie 1 bd., 1-1/2 ba., $480/ mo. • • dep. 564-7853. CR12539 2 bd., 2 ba., 2 car gar., pool, clubhouse, partial lake view, $750/mo., 1st & last. 293-3482. CR12657 New PACIFIC LEGENDS TOWNHOUSE gated comm, pool/spa/ exer. rm., 3 bd., 1-3/4 ba., all appl. $1000/mo. • I$800/sec., 1 yr. lease, no pets. Call Donna Century 21 JR Realty, 564-5142. CR12761 HEND. TOWNHOUSE 2 bd.,2-1/2ba.,2story,1st & last -I$200 cleaning dep., $650 w/o or $700 w/appl. Avail, now. Phone 566-3120/5643349. CR12762 Fully furnished spy glass condo, 2 bd., 2-1/2 ba., $1200/mo. Ellen, Boulder Dam Realty, 293-4663. CR12209 Evergreen condo, 2 bd., 2 ba. $650 •dep. Boulder Dam Realty, Ellen 293-4663. CR12208 Country Hills new qated community in Hend. Upstairs, lg., 2 bd., 2 ba., frpl. w/pool, clubhouse & exercise rm. privileges, $795/mo., 293-6383. CR12313 Boulder Hills Condo 2 bd. overlooking pool $650/mo. Call 294-1884 after 5 pm. CR12741 2 BDRM., 1-1/2 BATH CONDO w/d, cov. arking, dishwasher. ehind Joker's Wild $625/mo. "Sec" O.K. 564-3344. CR12907 HOUSE RENTALS Darling 2 bd.. 1 ba.. cottage, in histork: district. Yard SVC incL $675,2936285. HR12496 3 br., 2.5 ba. -tloft/den, 1544 sf, 1 mi. from Galleria Mall. Call Jim 4338016, HR12644 BC clean 2 bd., 1 ba., $675/mo. + $700 sec dep. 294-1698. HR12691 NEWHOME3bd.,2ba., 2 car gar., located at Freeway & Horizon, $1025/mo., 294-0728. HR12801 HEND. 3 bd., 2 ba. custom home on 1/2 acre $995/mo. + dep. Call Sharon 378-1692. HR12867 Exciting new 1668 SF, 3 bdrm., 2 ba., frpl., Palm Canyon, $1050 MO-i-.N/ S, NO PETS, owner/le., 263-1172 or 361-4188. HR12886 1650sf, 3bd., 2fullba., 2 car gar., stove/refrig., sec. gated. Flamingo & 95. $850 +sec. Call (702) 254-8576 or (909) 3129280. HR12902 Historic district charm w/ modern luxury. 2 bd., 2 ba., Ig. master suite w/ Jacuzzi tub & walk-in closet. Yard svc incl. $875, 293-6285. HR12497 •••••*• ^ AVAIL MHEO. ^ .X.4 BD. I BA FOMUL UN. IM..4. ^ EAT-a BTCH, PANTHY, FRW., ^ .X. KARGAILCOWEII LOT. ONLY.4. ^ l1tSaH0.,4S4-N. ^ *•*•*•• BuikJ your dream home with no downpayment on materiala. Become an owner-involved builder and save $$$ while building equity. Miles Homes offers attractive construction financing. Choose from 50 styles andfloorplans. Call Miles Homes today at 1 800-343-2884. Advertis^ HOUSE RENTALS HEND. 3 bd., 2 be., 2 car ar., 2 yr. old, in bodridge. NO PETS $975, 565-9437. HR12207 SI HOUSE RENTALS I MOBIIE HOMES BC townhouse, 3 bd72 ba., spa, garage, lake view, $1250. Desert Sun Realty, 293-2151. Lake Mountain Estates Unsurpassed view of mountains & lake. Spotless 2 bd.. 2 be., huge Ivrm., 2 car gar. w/workshop. 14x24 cov. patio & deck, all appl.. beautifully landscaped. 55+ only pis.. $935/mo. Pis. call 791 2011. HR1291B APT. RENTALS One br. apt. Clean laund. fac. in Boulder City $450. Call Don, 595-8803. AR12857 SPACIOUS 2 BD.,1BA. DUPLEX-W/Dhookup, no pets, $495/mo. + sec. Call 565-4906. AR12872 Very clean 2 bd. apart, w/ laundiy facilities in BC. Quiet & ideal for seniors. NO SMOKING or PETS pis. $490 + Sec. 3618099. AR12889 2 bd., 1 ba., in quiet BC, NO PETS, $525/mo. + dep. Avail. 3/15. 2941213. AR12772 Location 302 W. Bask: Rd, Hend, 2 bd., 1 ba., unfur. apart., very clean, SORRY NO PETS, monthly rent $475+Dep. Call43S-8261. AR12898 FOR RENT: Kitchenettes, $65/wk. Utilrties pd. SHADY REST MOTEL, 565-7688. AR9597 UNFURNISHED 2 bd.,1 ba., single story, Sr. welcome, carport, $500/ mo., 293-4832. AR12096 1 bd., 1 ba. $425/mo., 208 Bruce Way, Hend. contact Apart. A, 5648785. AR12105 CORNER COURT APTS. 2 bdrm., 1 ba. Near Bask: High, $500/ mo. + sec. dep. 4349827. AR12201 2 Bd. apart, nejar downtown & schools $495/ mo., 293-0566. AR12251 APARTMENTS AS LOW AS $275 a Month furnished 564-6952 ... NEW KITCHENETTES STARVIEW, 293-1658 APT. RENTALS $595~mo. 1st, last. Sec. Immed. occupancy, 2 bdrms., 1 bath. Central BC NO PETS 223-6748 after 6 pm. AR 12705 Teddy's kitchenettes. Just bring your toothbrush. Everything furnished PH. 293-1716. BC NEW KITCHENETTES, phone, satellite, maid service. STARVIEW MOTEL 293-1658. BC AR12279 APARTMENT FOR PERSONS W/PHYSICALDISABILITIESAND/ OR BRAIN INJURIES. Barrier free, subsidized 1 & 2 bd. apart, for indiv. w/physical disabilities anchor brain injuries. Fully wheelchair accessible, laundry, Ig. community rm., secured entry, on site caretaker. Supportive svc for residents of the Carol Haynes Apart, are available from various sources depending on disability & eligibility for funding. For info, call Lynn Gondorcin at 702359-7779. AR12567 Cherry Lynn Apts. 1 bdrm. No pets. Sr. preferred. Lease for 12 mo. 293-0420. AR12717 1 bd., near downtown, cable & uti. fur. $425/mo. $150 dep. perfect for single. Call 293-5533 afterS. AR12734 2 BD, 1 BA, family unrt, $460/nrH3. + deps. Avail. 3/1. Call 391-3435. AR12751 1 bd. guest hpuse in BC. covered park. wtr. & cable incl. $450/mo., $300 dep., 294-4385. Kitchenettes, fully furnished with cable, in Boulder City. 293-6269 Cell. 682-7914 CASA DE ALICIA AND M&M II APT We're not giving away the kitchen sink. WE DON'T HAVE TO. Let our features & professbnal staff speak for themselves. 1, 2 & 3 bdrm. from $550. Pools, pk:nk: areas. Walk In closets. 293-1615 AR1227I Boulder Citv. ATLANTIC CITY APARTMENTS Clean, Quality 1-2-3 Bedroom Apartments in Henderson • Central Air & Heat • Appliances • Blinds • Carpets • Water Paid • Washer/Dryer Available Apartments are $420 & up per month, newly remodeled, spacious near schools, park & shopping. 565-7028 12508 CHOICE MOBILE home/ building lots in Sandy Valley. 2 +/acres ea. Power at the site, underground phone, paved and/or gravel roads. Seller offering good terms. Phone Grace, at Americor Realty, 3651953. L0253 LAKE MEAD VIEW ESTATES, custom home lots overlooking Lake Mead. 702-294-0475. liiiknnd FREE LISTof Idaho land bargains along Snake and SalnDon Rivers and Hell's Canyon 20 to 1,000 acres from $24,900. Excellent financing. Call now 208-839-2501. Open 7 days, 8:30-8:30. 1958 42X10 in Moorea Park in BC. $6000 OBO. •Call 208-467-2070. 'MH12391 Own your home & lot, nk:e locatton, 2 bd., 1 -3/4 bath MOBILE HOME. Asking $95,500 (Below. Appraisal) 294-0472..' MH12688 ^J Trailer Space for rent -! 216W. Foster, Hnd..5640147. MH12610 Under $475/mo.OAC for this 3 bd.,1-1/2 ba., new kitchen cabinets, new carpet, nice FAMILY PARK IN HEND. CaOP 595-3279. MH12841 Boulder Hwy. & Russell Rd., 3 bd., 2 ba.. doublewide, under $690/ mo. OAC. KIDS & PETS OK. CO-OP 595-3279. TRAILERS RENT OR SALE Park Models good for 1 or 2 people. Rents starts $375/up. Sales start $1500/up. Ask for Melanie/Mario. 294-8888 ,„. MOBILE HOME RENTAL 3bd (12x60) 1-1/2 ba. in BC. Fenced yard, w/d hook-ups, partially furnished, NO SMOKING, $725/mo. + dep., Senior Disc. 293-2575. TRACTORS Landtciping. 214 wheel drive Dietel tridon A impleinentt Gold Prospectors Supply 1680 Boukler Hwy. BC (702) 293-0672 BOULUenaTY-B-HILL AREA 1/2 ACRE-READY TO BUILOII FABULOUS LOCATIONIt CALL BOULDER DAM REALTY • ek for Pat 23-4e63. L0IJ7 North Boundary: South Boundery: Ea at Boundary: Waat Boundary: llaSXT • athne. THE UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE Needs Land in Henderson (Vaile Verde Station), Nevada I >< In oWw>ie 10 Me lanaM Mna as a eiaa im k Warm SprlnQe Roed Hoftion Dnve Slaphanie Street BOB HACOLL, PROJECT MANAtlER UNHEO STATEt POSTAL SERVICC DENVER FACa.niES SERVICE OFFICE SOSS E. TiiRe Avenue, twae 400 Denver, CO senr-iasi Tetaahene (aomatMK? •.It ACREAGE 2.39 ACRES on-B" Hill in Boulder City, more than $35,000 below appraisal. Call Jerry, Centui^i21*RSalty Assoc, 454-2204 or 367-0990. HOMES WANTED •I NEED 2-4 BDRM. HOMES* Cash out or assume & make back payments. Fast cash. 294-1091. MC12715 Responsible clean family of 4 needs a 3 bd. house or doublewide mobile to rent or rent ^ own in nice neighbor^ hood of Hend. Can do maint. & repair, NO • PETS, NON-SMOK-; ERS, $400 to $500/mo. • Move in before April SOfh. Call Margaret anytime, 294-0675. MCI2672 REAL ESTATE Exceptional La Dolce Vita Townhome! 2-story, 2bedroom, 1-1/2 bath, near schools. Includes deck with stairs, patio with storage, professional landscaping with yard iight and automatic sprinklers, combination gas/log fireplace, delux carpeting, stove, dishwasher, disposal, washer, and dryer. $98,500.00! Call 2948406 or 294-2441 for appointment to see. RE12914 GREEN VALLEYOPEN HOUSE/TREASURE HUNT Follow/ the map & find these homes to register for a $100 Gift Certificate. 819 Longbranch, 2006 Angel Falls, 316 Santa Monica. Saturday 3/2/96. 11:00-3:00 PM. Onsite Loan Officer to help you with any of your financing questions. For more information call 376-0823. RE 12927 Charming 2 bd., 1 ba. Many extras including oakfloors, detachedgar., mat. landscape, walk to OldTowne $108K. 2940423. RE12794 $10,000 down. $885 nryj., 1600 sf. 3 bdrm., sun room, neat & clean, ck>se to downtown BC. Call eves. 223-6748. RE12703 5bd.,3ba.onBCcul-desac. New Ig. krt., roof & heat/air, assum., no qual., own/lie. RV pk., • cov. patio, $139,500. 293-6036. RE 12398 Hend. for sale by owner, 4 bd.. 2-3/4 ba., pool w/ waterfall, huge deck with a gr. view, excel neighborhood, $139,995. Call 565-5889. RE 12664 BC 3 Bed./2 Bath • Home, $105K. Call BRET 294-8482 Desert Sun •' RIty. RE 12950 i HEND. COLLEGE AREA. 3 yr. okj. 3 bd., 2 ba., 1600 SF. below appraisal. 933 WAGONTRAIN DR. By owner. $110,000-564-4243. RE11876 BC DEL PRADO • 4 br.. 1662 sf, open fk. pin., covered RV pkno.. • renwd. w/new kit, batlw, quiet, clean, $163,500, 643 Arrayo. 293-4329. RE 12929 if

PAGE 31

^Wji.j.f.yLuyj. i .i^.j. ii .juj^i ^^jgp^Piyyywypywwpj^fij^B'IffgiB wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm wmmm PaO12 Panorama Thursday, February 29, 1996 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES PROFESSIONAL SERVICES NELSOrS COMUTE HOtVE (EPMR All Rapairt From A-Z & caramic tila work NO JOB TOO SMALL-FREE ESTIMATES 565-3418 UC. 18000; BEEPER 268-5776 ,g,flBi CUSTOM BOAT COVERS • BMINI TOPS FRAMEWORK • INTERIORS • TRACTOR SEATS CARL'S Upholstery AUTO•RV^MAMNECRAFT RwEaHnMlH 7M Cnym M^ BotMw Oty, NVIMOS Beeper 252-1339 (702)293-0591 12419 Need your Castle Cleaned? W^Mkly • Bl WMkly Boats • Aprtinnl Houaa Condoa • Toin^tlousa* Partial or Full claanlns FTMErtimalM Call John or Lynii Delia • He >7174 BolUcler Cily 2.V0S6 Miftise in the NeHa YARDVARK'S LAWN AND MAINTENANCE "^ ProfMsional TrM Trimming | Solving BC, Green Valley i Henderson } 294-1114 Pager 222-6926 12615 Lie. INS. B.C. BLOG. & ROOFING CAR/RV/BOAT PORTS CONCRETE WORK PATK) COVERS 293-2179 „.. ^> V • .-i': nAY n SAFI, CAU A UCCNKO CONTMACTOII No Job Too Big or Too Small W Paint TTiam All J.P.S. L.T.D. mi*-" PaMkig A Pnuun WaMng Jerry SchloMw 702 898-1329 LkLABonOdMaaiatMA lnt1A&1^ BOULDER CONCRETE WANTS TO MEET YOUR CONCRETE NEEDS FOR FREE ESTIMATES AND QUALITY WORKMANSHIP CALL MICK CASEY Boulder City 293-1571 Uc.*oi6898 P812M3 TAX SERVICE In The Privacy of Your Home 1-800-417-2763 Phone Access Code 28 18 yrs. experience MISCELLANEOUS I MISCELLANEOUS WOLFF TANNING BEDS. TAN AT HOME. Buy DIRECT and SAVE! Commercial/Home units from $199. Low Monthly Payments. FREE Color Catalog. Call TODAY. 1800-842-1305. MI12785 24 ft. above ground pool, excel, cond., $600. Call 564-8242. Ml 12774 Misc. for sale 72 OLDS 88 HT sedan, family camping tent, 2 single bed mattresses & box springs solid dark mahogany finished wood bookcase/desksuitcase, 2 black matching bar stools 294-2612. Artist's Drafting Table 36" X 48", w/Ulano Glideliner straight edge and Luxo flourescent lamp land freebies: executivecnair, steel file dividers, etc.) $100 for all; Duo-pane Picture Window 4'x6'-as is $50. MacintoshOuk:ktel 14,400 fax/nnodem by Logk;ode, lif etinne limited warranty, $50; call 564-3598. MM 2812 Craftsman 6-1/8 in. jointer-planner $300; amaha PSR12 Sports Keyboard $75; enter ctr. $40; 21 cu. ft. frig. $75. 565-1979. Ml 12809 v FREE railroad ties. Call after 4 PM, 456-9856. MI12863 Bikes, two women's Schwinn 10-speeds. one in good cond., one excellent. $50 & $100. 4356839. MI7933 BrunswKk 7 ft. oak pool table, 3/4' slate, leather pockets, like new. $1500.00. 435-6839. Ml 12093 BRASS BED, all brand new, w/premium queen nnat. set & warranty, still in box, paki $825 sacrifice $300. Call 281-3677. MM 2742 DAYBED, complete set, new, wArundle, 2 top of the line ortho mattresses, v^He vwbrass. Cost $675 first $325. Call 263-7926. MI12743 WASHER / Dryers $125.00 Each. 2936101.80 Ml 12286 Full size bed $40; couch love seat, chair $200; coffee table $50; 2 end tables $20, call 2947710. MM2881 Cal King mattress & box spring, good cond., $75 293-0806. Ml 12880 Walnut hutch $350; gun safe 30"x60" $500. 2935087. Ml 12913 ELECTROSTATIC AIR FILTERS-STOP DUST, POLLEN, BACTERIA. 5 yr. guarantee, washable, most sizes $34.95. We also have 20 X 40 and up. Las Vegas 655-5502; or Hnd. 566-6933. Ml 12926 5 man canvas tent, 3 burner Coleman stove, 2 coleman lanterns, 10x10 tarp, all tor $100. 5656938. Ml 12923 Davenport, gold fabric, 9' long, $45; insulation batting, 30' plus/minus long 16" wide $5. Call 294-2939. Ml 12953 Pooltable (barsized) 7x8, 4x4. Excel. Cond. $400. Bar w/5 swivel chairs $100 OBO, 293-3955. Ml 12957 ARTHRITIS Suffers, live pain free. Had it for 20years now I am pain free. Cost is as low as $15 per mo., not medicine, natural food & energy supplements. Guaranteed, 564-1648. MI254 GLITTER GULCH DENA'S JEWELRY crystals, minerals, authentk: Indian jewelry, fossils, artifacts, NEW HOURS 11 AM4 PM, Mon.-Sat., 1419 N. Boulder Hwy., Hend., 565-0711. Ml 12405 ANNOUNCEMENTS Like new CRIB/MATTRESS. w/Minnie & Mickey Bedding, wall hangiria nrwbKe. $140. 294-3852. Ml 12763 USED APPLIANCES Westinghouse double oven range. Admiral refrigerator^reezer. Oua•er microwave oven. All in good working condition. Call 293-1898. MM 2904 COMING IN MARCH: NEW BEGINNINGS COMMUNfTY CHURCH is being started in GV. Pastor looking for special people to volunteer to help with music, drama, and other tasks to help start this Chruch in its early stages. 2633024. MCI2731 WANT TO BUY Exefcisa equipment, tree weights, benches, dunveis, exercise bikee, Nordic tracks, stair climbers. 294-0644. >^ii:^?* MERCHANDISE WANTED OLD GUITARS WANTED!! Fender. Gibson, Martin, Gretsch, National, Bigsby, 0'Angelk:o, Stromoerg, Epiphone. Mosrite. Also GiTOon Mandolins,^19001960's. These Brands Only Please. Top Cash Paid! 1-800-401-0440^ FURNITURE 4 piece steel blue sectional, makes into full size bed, w/recliners at ea. end, $250, 293-2530. ANTIQUE MARBLE TABLE, sm. round top pedestal $55; sm. glass top table, wrought iron base $45 293-4357. Sofa sleeper w/match loveseat, ex cond, sleeper never used, $345; tandy computer, modem, printer, VGA monitor, learning videos, stands, $150; exer. equip, make offer. 5669671. MCI 2896 2 piece semi circle sofa, brown floral, $100. Call 293-1877 MCI2918 BUILDING SUPPLIES STEEL BUILDINGS, factory discounts. Farm & Ranch Styles. 40x30 to 60x200. Many at$1.99 sf. Commercial styles 18x21 to 100x200 from $3.69 sf. McCrowsky Const. 962-5192. MCI 2088 3 steel arch bidg., new; 40x30 was $6,150 now $2,990; 40x58 was $10,840 now $5,990; 50x120 was $20,450 now $11,990 endwalls avail. 800-745-2685. Steel Building Manufacturer. 1995 Liquidation. Remaining inventory MUSTBE SOLD. Freight included. Free storage until delivery. Callforfree brochure. STEELMASTER 1-800-626-1110. STEEL BUILDINGS 2% Over Factory CostAll Remaining Inventory 1-800-973-3366. STORAGE RENTALS STORAGE UNITS 10'X20' 293-1135 ItiWi Mini Storage For Rent Off Boulder Hwy. & Athol $35 monthly 24 hr. access 431-4442 1EALTH & FITNESS PERSONAL BITNESS TRAINER Free Consultation 454-700^ 12M AUCTION Ritchie Bros. Auctioneers Intl. Unreserved Construction Equipment Auction LAS VEGAS, NEVADA—MARCH 25, 1996. To add your units or receive a free color brochure, phone (702) 566-0961. MC12795 PnS ANIMALS ADQHI CATS & Dogs from your shelters, Save a Life. BC PA LAS VEGAS VALLEY HUMANE SOCIETY. Beautiful, healthy, kittens, cats, puppies, dogs. Spayed/neutered, tested, shots. PetsMart, Trop-Eastern store only. Thurs., Fri., Sat., Sun., 11-4. PA12843 EMUS Yeariings $600/ pr. 2 yr. old breeders $1000/pr. Proven breeders $1600/pr. Free delivery. Financing Available. Call (409) 584-2411. PA12677 A.K.C. YELLOW smart, loyal, great family dogs $400 males, females also avail. Vgoodpedg., 2935022. PA12877 €xtra, extra Ig. dog cage. Like new was $195, asking $100. 434-4480. Free to good home Male Collie, 7 yrs. old. Call between 3-6 pm only, 565-8830. PA 12939 Betty Hohn's non profit Animal Adoption Ltd. is accepting unlimited numberofunwantedpets by appointment only. You are welcome to view adoptable pets 7 days a week. Call first 361-2484. THERE IS NO GUIDED TOURS OF THE PREMISES AT THIS TIME, OF NATIVE, NON-NATIVE, OR WILD AND EXOTIC ANIMALS. PET GROOMING Legacy Animal Hospital, S.E. corner of Pecos & Windmill, 263-9004, Mon. thru. Sat. PA12416 1 pair society 10 ea., 1 pairzebra10ea.,32mo. old grey/white 5 ea., 2932865. PA12906 Beautiful Dalmatian female looking for excellent home. Call for details. 294-8483. EDUCATION PETS/ANIMALS A 4 year old Samoyed needs a place to stay while his owners at work. Will pay $10 a day. Beeper #1-800-6997215. PA12822 Thursday. February 29.1996 Panorama Pge 13 INCOME TAX PETS/ANIMALS THE ANIMAL FOUNDATION will help you financially spay or neuter your cat or dog. Very inexpensive in Las Vegas. 384-3333 BC PA • • • • • • I INCOME TAX THE TAX PROFESSIONALS Less than 15 min. away! 916Nev. Hwy., Suite4 BaC. 293-4688 „,.,^. ENTERTAINMENT —l llllfl OVALITY VOCAL PIANO B**"^ OR KEYBOARD!!! EnUrtaiMhcnL Available for your organization or event Professional singer & Co. Ro Raymond Coral Cove MueicalArta Studio. 565-8469 VOICE PIANO DRAMA LESSONS CMkkOT a t^in* 7 md up. OuaMy. PiotMaloinl laacMno. no Rayaicnd* Cord COM HuaictI Alia Stido. Ofwiikiga avallablo piMHwnowtorappl. S65-8469 7iy^/f/ffitU\V\^(:^\v{^w^^ LOST & FOUND I LOST & FOUND FOUND AUSSIbHUPHY 3/4 mos. old, male, near Bask: & Water St. Rebecca, 799-8930/days. LF12758 LOST at Lucky's IN HEND ON BOULDER HWY. SUN., 2/18, round silver key ring w/keys. Pis. call 558-0091. $25 REWARD For the return of Teddy's 24' Extension Ladder. 2 Men who trimmed trees in Boulder City were seen driving away with it strapped on top of an "Old Blue Van" BRING IT BACK OR ELSE 293-1716 EDUCATION EDUCATION Health Care Is The Future Train for TOMORROW! Learn to be a: + Medical Assistant c%rc + Advanced Medical Biller ^ • •f Computerized Medical Billing ^ Health Claims Examiner Call 259-6263 ACADEMY OF MEDICAL CAREERS 5243W.Charelston,Sle.2 WE OFFER: • Small Classes • Individualized Attention ^ ;, • Extemship Program • Job Placement Assistance FINANCIAL AID (To those who qualify.) A Licensed by Nevada Commission on Postsccondary Education AUCTION AUCTION AUCTION DARWIN'S AUCTIONS 1524 NEVADA HWY. • i3^-l BOULDER CITY, NV. j I (702)293-3996 Darwin Bible, Auctioneer ANTIQUES & PRIMITIVES AUCTION FRIDAY EVENING • MARCH 8TH • 7 P.M. ANTIQUES AND PRIMITIVES IN OUTSTANDING CONDITION THE FOLLOWING IS A PARTIAL LIST OF HUNDREDS OF PIECES TO BE SOLD WITH NO MINIMUM BID. •LARGE GRISWOLD CAST IRON COLLECTION 'MANY RARE OLD TOOLS, INCLUDING SEVERAL FOR FORD MODEL A'S -CAST IRON DOOR STOPS •MAILBOX •MATCHBOX •HORSE DRAWN FIRE WAGON "OLD BUDWEISER CLYDESDALES -DUTCH OVENS -3 LEGGED POTS ^SMELTING POTS 'LADLES 'CRISPY CORN STICK PANS 'MUFFIN PANS •TRIVETS •BOOKS ENDS •MORTAR & PESTLE •SKILLETS •EGG PANS •WAFFLE IRONS •POTTERY-WELLER-REDWING-McCOY •CARNIVAL GLASS •DEPRESSION GLASS •VERY OLD CARPENTER'S TOOLS •TOBACCO TWIST OAK CHAIRS •BRASS FIRE NOZZLES •SCALES •COIN COLLECTION -OLD IRONS •BRONZE BOOK ENDS •BROAD AXES •BRIDDEL MEATCLEAVERS-OLDFUEL CANS .UNIQUE CREAM CANS •MILKCANS'ANTIQUE CAR JACKS .RARE CAST IRON TEA KETTLE •TOBACCO SHREDDER '2 BURNER CAST IRON STOVE •HAND CRANK MEAT SLICER •CHERRY FITTERS •WOOD PLANES (SOME BOX PLANES) •DRAW KNIVES •ICE TONGS ^ENAMEL WASH BASIN *3 HAND CARVED AZTEC GODDESSES •PULLEYS •SAMPLE SUITCASE •BRASS BLOW TORCHES •S PC. WATERFALL BEDROOM SET •HORSE TACK •OLD KITCHEN COLLECTIBLES •EXCELLENT WELL PUMPS AND CISTRIN PUMPS •STRAND OF PFj^RLS/DROP EARRINGS 'ELVIS DECANTER •RAILROAD TOOLS •WILD TURKEY BOTTLE COLLECTION •SILVER SERVICE PIECES •ENTERPRISE COFFEE GRINDER "ORNATE PUTNAM PARLOR STOVE AND SO VERY MUCH MORE. DON'T MKS THIS ONE! 10% BUYERS PREMIUM DARWIN'S AUCTIONS 293-3996 COMPUTER COMPUTER REPAIR All work done in your Home or Office. Reasonable Rates. 683-2653 4Llr>e?S^ cosh rote HELP WANTED Bob's All Family Restaurant now hiring experienced waitresses, breakfast & dinner. Apply in person, 761 NevadaHwy.BCHWl2604 Accepting applications for RESTAURANT CASHIERS, LINE COOKS. WAITRESSES & NIGHT AUDITORS at Lake Mead Resort. Apply in person: 322 Lake Shore Rd.,BC.EEO, Authorized Concessionaire NPS. HW12706 HELP WANTED — Hoover Dam Snacketeria, Cashier positions. Shuttle sen/ice available from BC. Call 293-4364 for information. $40,OOOnrEAR INCOME POTENTIAL. Home Typists/PC users. Toll free 1-800-898-9778 Ext. T-4332 for listings. Fee required. HW12777 The Tahoe World, an award-winning weekly, seeks a news photographer. Box 138, Tahoe City, CA. 96145 or fax (916) 583-7109; e-mail: world tahoe.comm. HW12775 $35,000/YEAR INCOME potential. Reading Books. Toll free 1-800898-9778 Ext. R-4332for details. Fee required. HW12778 Delivery/Cook, Days. Apply at Caps Sandwich, 1312 Nevada Hwy., BC, 293-7070. HW12894 Part Time couple retired or semi-retired for model home cleaning. Clean transportation, very neat appearance, GV area. 363-7354. HW12813 Experiencedtravel aaent Hend. area excel, benefits, (401K plan), salary, comm. & bonus. Call Dan at 253-9934 Ext. 22, Prestige American ExK ress Travel EOE. W12197 Will pay you to lose weight. Wanted 42 people to lose weight. All natural, guaranteed, dr. recommended 303-4569590. HW12535 ATTENTION BOULDER CITY POSTAL JOBS $12.68/hr. to start, plus benefits. Carriers, sorters, clerk, computer trainees. For an applnation & exam inforrr^tion, call 1-800-636-5601, Ext. P5201, 8 AM-8 PM. 7 days. HW12534 GOVERNMENTPOSTAL JOBS Now hiring for 1996. Start $23K-$34K/yr. Forappl./ info, call (818) 764-9016 ext. 8071. HW12759 Floral Designer, 2931641,'Edie's Flowers. HW12892 HOME BASED INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS $500-$5000 A MO. 1020 HRS. WEEKLY. CALL FOR FREE BOOKLET, 800-995-7906. HW12916 HAIR STYLISTS & MANICURIST STATION AVAILABLE Professional & pleasant salon. Call 293-4322. HW12917 Exp. Bookkeeper gaming knowledge helpful, apply in person. Triple J Casino, 725 S. Racetrack Rd., Hend. HW12905 Roadhouse Casino, Dinner & Breakfast Cooks, call chief, 5669999. HW12926 •ATTN: HENDERSON* Postal Positions. Permanent FT for clerk/ sorters. Full benefits. For exam, app. & salary info, call 708-264-1839 Ext. 6398 8 AM-8 PM. HW12804 RESTAURANT Fast paced full time person needed to handle phones, coordinate delivery, register, customer service as well food prep. Must be available on weekends. Apply in person between 2-4:30. SIDEWALK CAFE HOMEMADE MEXICAN FOOD. 87 E. Lake Mead Dr. HND. HW12807 Attn: Honnemakers and handcrafters. Need honne demonstrator* for growing RUBBER STAMP BUSINESS. PART-TIME. NO INVESTMENT. Will train. Call 293-1366 SherritI Graff. HW12810 WORKERS NEEDED Daily Work, Daly Pay APPLY AT LABOR FINDERS Mon.-Fri., 5 am to 6 pm 331 Water St. HND 564-9592 HW12167 HELP WANTED I HELP WANTE LAW ENFORCEMENT JOBS no exper. necee; Now hiring US Custom, officer, etc. Call 818-7591134ext.162. HW12814 TELECOMMUTING IS THE RAGE Earn top income from home. Telecommute + Dr. developed patented products = oppor. Senous? Call 1-800-224-1915. HW12824 HELPWANTED-Men/ Women earn $480 weekly assemblingcircuit boaras/electronic components at home. Experience unnecessary, will train. Imnnediate openings your local area. Call 1-520-680-4647 Ext. 1864D. HW12888 ************* i, GOLD STRIKE INN • CASINO • NOWHIRING: * SMUitty Ouwil* i, EnglnMrs ^ HoMnt/CMhtora ^ Pcrtir. aiMl>nom Cuttno Gag* CMhtor* HouMkMfMTt. IbM cook* ft • tf dliliwMmn it ^ Pirl4liiM gm (hop partoa ^ Apply In parson al ^ CasNaraCaga us HWY n-Him Hoovar Dam .jjif ************* Wanted & Needed Forward thinking, creative, energetk; office manager; experienced in basic computer skills ger>eral accounting, phone saws. Call for appt. 293-1860. HW12936 HOUSEKEEPER NEEDED Part time. Please a^ly: Nevada Inn Motel, Boulder City. HW12555 Office help, computer exp., heavy phones, MF. Apply at: Snap Tow, 1239 Boulder Hwy., Hend. HW12799 BLIMPIE SUBS & SALAD is now hiring. Days & eves. 1146 W. Sunset, 898-7850. HW12797 PT MAID apply Flamingo Inn Motel. 804 Nevada Hwy.. BC HW12860 Hairstylist & Manicurist busy salon-walk ins. Ask for Judi or Marcie, 2941627. HW12859 STOCK PERSON/ STORE CLERK position avail. Apply in person at Lake Mead Resort, BC, Fri.. 3/1, from 11 AM-1 PM, see Jeff Gunther. EOE, Authorized Concessionaire NPS. HW12865 Advertising Sales for a twice-a-month agriculture/rural newspaper. Mainly phone sales, limited traveling required. Benefits pkg. Part of a multi-newspaper group. Top commissions paid. Fax resunne to 702-8822556, or mailto: Ad Sales, 1218 W. Eddy St., Gardnerville,NV 89410. HW12793 INSURANCE BILLING CLERK needed part-time for Physician's Group. Must know medical codes and have good offk:e skills. Apply with resume at 1228 Arizona, St., BC. HW12868 DMS Vow hourly Vow IneooM and Vour B owdol AVON tHolM {ra2)M170 Call Today! CAFE SENSATIONS G.V. Cafe aeeMng full time expe. pantry cook. Kitchen auper' vlaor poaltlon avallabie bring refererKes. Appllcatlona accepted In peraon M W F, 9 am to 11 am, 2-4 pm, 4350 E. Suneet #110 at Atttlnean. Henderaon. HW255 WILDLIFE/CONSERVATION JOBS. Game wardens, security, maintenance, etc. No exp. necassary. Now Hiring. For Info. Call (219) 7940010 ext. 9007. 6 AM-8 PM/7days. HW12385 HOME BASED INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS $500-$5000 A MO. 1020 HRS. WEEKLY, CALL FOR FREE BOOKLET 800-995-7906. CRUISE SHIPS HIRING—Earn up to $2,000+/mQ. working on Cruise Ships or LandTour companies. World Travel. No exp. necessary. For directory, call: 1-206-971-3552 ext. C89773. HW12782 NATIONAL PARKS HIRING —Positions are now available at National Parits, Forests & Wildlife Preserves. Benefits • • • bonuses! For employment directory, call (206) 971-3622 ext. N89775. HW12783 NATIONAL CO. seeking 3 energetic iridividuals with great peop/le skills who are teachable. Excel, earning potential. Call for appt. 251-0270. Cleaning service needs honest & dependable persons to work P/T. Call 565-4750. HW11976 DRIVERS EXPERIENCED OR INEXPERIENCED. North American Van Lines currently has owner operatoropenings (single-op & double-op) in Relocation Services, High Value Products & Blanket Wrap Divisions. Tuition-free trainingi Tractor purchase programs, no trailer maintenance expenses. Pay for Performance plans and much more! 1 -800-3482147, Dept. A-22. HW12788 DESK CLERK PT Mature, no exp. required. Apply at Nevada Inn Motel, Boulder City. HW12933 NOW HIRING SMILING FACES. THE HOOVER DAM STORE. A people oriented company totally committed to the Disney philosophy of excellence in guest service & cast member training has job opportunities available. Two part/full time. Start immediately. Must have transportation. Work weekends. Salary or wage based on experience. Visually impairedj and physically challenged welcome to apply. Phone 596-1082. HW12492 BEVERAGE CARTS ATTENDANT, 3-11 shift. Green Valley Golf Range, 434-4300. HW12755 Wanted housekeeper willing to work 5 hrs. 1 day a week, for $50. Some ironing involved. 565-1167. HW12750 LOOKING FOR ADVENTURE? Joinohe irresistible force. The Nevada Army National Guard has excitement just waiting for you if you qualify. Call today for more information! 7537268. HW11636 BOULDER CITY'S AUTHORIZED SHIPPING Agent for UPS, FED EX, WESTERN UNION and other companies. Custom packing •Horns pickup if desired •Helpful, courteous & friendly. MAIL BOXES ETC. Von't Shopping Center Phone 702-293-2164 Fax 702-293-2164 SECURITY OFFICERS-UNARMED (5.25 HR. to eUrt HENDERSON G.V. vea*. Full A Part-Time. WMkdays WMkends. MUST HAVE WORKING PHONE TTRANSP0RTAT10N. PiMse apply in peraon MON.-THURS., 10a-3p, EOE CURTIS SECURITY, 3305 Spring Mtn. Rd., Ste. 93. HWIZIM TEACHER WANTED PART-TIME Experienced in 'Kindcrg.irten • Elementary Educ.ifion or Child Devclopmciil OAKLANE PRESCHOOL 1308 Wyoming St. 293-5188 DIETARY PERSONNEL NEEDED Coota^rap cookaMtehwaahar/dlatary atd. Variow poeaiofa avallaWa. For inormallon pertaining lo Ihaea poeNlona plaeei Inqulra al: Henderson Convalescent Hospital 11B0E.Ljri(eMead Hendefaon.NV 89015 1216J Join a Wmnmg Team} Excellent Carvar OpporlunMy for part tiina •mpk>yment We aiB kx>hing tor a friendy, conganial. tan moivaiad, aalea counlar cashier w/piaaiani plK>ne voice Md a pntesiiortal appMranca and aOiluda. On tta job paid mining. A p p fca faia riM be aocaptad. •2t 8. BouUer Hwy^ In Hnd. HELP WANTED We are fellow Hend. residents who have found a business oppor. like none other. All of us pjao to be making over $70,000 within the year. If you would like to know nrwre about this tremendous opportunity pis. call 5646675. HW12413 Cleaning persons for evening jobs for comm. bidgs. 263-8838., H\AM2108 HTSIH STYLIST NEEDED • Exp. prefsn-ed. Full servk:e salon. Call 294-8477. HELP WANTED DOCTORS OFFICE: Service oriented front desk person needed. We are-fooking for a selfmotivated, people ori-: ented believer in natural healing and wholistic health. Complete job description and application at LIFELINE CHIROPRACTIC. 1228 Arizona, Boulder City. CLERK-All shifts. Must be 21 yrs. Cashier/ Stockroom. Mighty Mart Convenience Store located in Green Valley. 433-4343. HW12897 SECURITY OFFICERS 12716 WELLS FARGO GUARD SERVICE. EMPLOYMENT OPENINGS IN HEND./G.V. AREAS. WE OPPER FLEXIBLE WORK HOURS, UNIFORMS PROVIDED, PAID VACATIONS AND OTHER BENEFITS. APPLY Monday-Friday, 9 am to 3:30 pm, 3305 W. Spring Mountain, #66. Equal Opportunity Employer. HOSPITAL DIETARY AIDE Full time position. _, If interested contact: Human Resource Dept. 293-4111 at Boulder City Hosp., 901 Adame Blvd. BC IMMEDIATE OPENINfiS12414 Clerical and Industrial, Immediate openings all areas. Contact Renee: 566-7840 /ALLEY ^0^^ TEMPS INC 30 A Water SL Handaraon, NV. A IDC Part-Time, Flexible HoursI Individuals needed to conduct phone follow-up with graduates and friends of distinguished institutione. We've been in business for 21-years plual Friendly, professional environment. $7/hr. Contact 565-9038. HW12720 • •••••••••••••••* • *** • ** SECURITY OFFICERS Needed for greeter Henderson, GV area,* FULL TIME and PART TIME, flexible houre.* Must have dependable transportation k* phone. Call ALUED SECURITY, 795-3317."^ Monday-Friday, 8:30-4:30 pm, 1515 E."^ Tropicana Ave.. SuHe 395. EOE/M-F/H-V. 12714* ••••••••••••••••**•••••* S ALES Join a Winning Team! Excellent Career Opportunity for energetic, custonner oriented, self motivated sales person with a professional appearance and attitude. On the job paidtraining. Applk:ations will be accepted. 828 S. BouMer Hwy., In Hnd. appLefiif! lemporary/Full-Tlme Emptoyment Services IMMEDIATE OPENINGS! NEVER A FEE Receptionist, Word Processing, Data Entry dper. & More. 898-1956 3510 E. Tropicana, #K at Pecos COME CRUISE WITH US LAKE MEAD CRUISES Is Now Hiring: • Food Servers Galley Deck Hands Banquet/Catering/Maint. experience helpful! Apply in parson: Lake Mead Cruises 707 Wells Rd., BC ^.^ Tow drivers needed, part time avail., exp. preferred but not necesaary. Must be clean cut, have valid Nevada driver's iicenae with current DMV printout. Must live in BC. Apply in person at 705 Juniper Way, BC HW12284 FREE AUDITKmS FOR NASHVILLE: Record, T.V. and Movie Producssfs. SAT., MARCH • SUPERIMoiel 704 Nevada Hwy. BouldwCNy,NV. Frem 2:00 pm-10:00 pm aaeaam racwMnga al, MNetae: Caumry, Pap, aM aenf, brinf back.ip a m al c Ma Rack m Rap. af yaur • MTRIHttNTAta: DANCERS: BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES NOTICE TO READERS: The HBC Publications does not vouch for the legitimacy of items, jobs, or money-making opportunities advertised in this classification. We suggest you carefully evaluate such offers and not send nrioney to these advertisers unless you are certain you know with whom you are dealing and you know all terms and conditions of the offer. BO Big Bear Laka, CA Lock A Key Buainaaa oppor. equip., inventory, & good will nets $70K annual. Mika Dolan, agani 909-866-6453. HELP WANTED I DOMESTIC HELP ALASKA EMPLOYMENT Fishing Industry. Earn up to $3,000$6.000-i-permonth Room & BoardI Transportatk>n! No experience necessary! Male/Female. Age 18-70. For more Information call: (206) 9713512 ext. A89774. HW12791 Avon HaaAPIacaforYOUl To Buy or Salt Cai Roala Miannan 293-0110 Jim RESUMES rT0$t9990ntmy 0ott9 • CrSiUSMCSSSERVKCS OpanDaaytte* 14eo CoMrado (al Aah) B.C. nti 293-5361 DRIVERS AND LABORERS 50 Needed Daily/Weekly Pay Apply LABOR EXPRESS 39 E. Basic Rd. ,j^^ CAGE CASHIERS Money handling experience. Apply al Caaino Cage, Railroad Pee* Hotel A Caelno, 2800 S. Boulder Hwy., HND. EOE HW,UI Acutemps A leinporjry Sffuice T T T T ***N0 FEES*** • • • NO FEES^^* Interviewing for: 'Word Proceesora 'Secretaries *Raceptk>nists 'Accountants 'Bookkeepers 'Data Entry 'A/PandA/R Interview! at 2909 W. Charleston Mon.-Fri. 8 AM-3PM /Vione; 877-6775 Must have proper ID FINANCIAL SERVICES WE BUY MORTGAGES. Trust Deeds, Annuities. Did You Sell Your Property? Receiving Payments? Why Wart! GET CASH NOW! Jslationwide. Great Prices. Call 1-800-659-2274, Ext. 32. FS12781 AVOID & STOP FORECLOSURE. Behind 2 payments or more, residential or commercial, immediate help 24 hrs. USHERSON BANKS & CRAWFORD, 564-4281. FS12767 Jj YOUR LOCAL li^l PAYROLL COMPANY & GenemL Ledger •m/lOee M^a>ac Mrdt* •Lock Bos ( •Coado BlUlag* m nTAKfiR roK •C0NVSISI0NSeT4n> •EMPL0YB8 ADMTIONS •RIIPL0YB8CHANC8S •USBI PAnOU. CHBCE9 PAnoixncxDr MAGNEnC TATS MEDU •OOAKTESLY TAX KETOITS •snsuroKT nVAM FINMCIAL CoaCEPR BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES Spiritual Design shirts (tee's, sweats, polos, etc.) caps, aprons, tote bags, license plates and other Christian products are now available directly to you and your friends, relatives and fellow Church Members. Sell retail for immediate income and Sponsor others to earn longterm monthly checks. You have a future with AMERICAN SPIRITUAL DESIGNS. Call Now2930038 PHIL BRENNAN per oofciTTw mdi per iMue AMERICAN MFG. Seeking individuals to service national, government & military accounts in your area. $40,000 PART TIME $80,000 FULL TIME 'Over 20 years success 'Tax shelter 'Company financing *6 month R.O.I. 'Part time or fuH time 'Min. investment $15,900. We are tookingfor indivkiuals with strong desire to succeed. If you are serious about your future, can afford to invest $15,900 CASH (100% secured) and can begin NOW, caH Don KeVy TODAY! 1-800-8S6-0019 Adult Church Nursery Attendant needed Sun. 9:15-11:15 at $6/hr. Call 293-7773. DH12935~ Will babysit from Mon.Sat., mornings & nights, nice clean house, lunch incl. Babys & up. Grandma type babysitting. 566-5491 askforBet^. DH12380 Child care, any shift, 2 exper. moms avail., NON-SMOKERS, fenced yd. 564-6318 or 564-1670. DH12675 New to Area New House -Child Care any shift FT/ PT. Outstanding ref. 5580185 aft. 5. DH12727 Lisa's Babysitting in our Hend. Home. Excel. Ref. former nanny, full-time. Call for interview 5582968. DH12833 HOUSECLEANING Tired of bad housekeepers? Call Wendy 5658107. DH12862 Single Grandma NONSMOKER have lots of TLC for your baby. Birth to 9 mo. Boulder Hwy. & Horizon. 566-5403. DH12861 Advertise in the Htm VACATION RENTALS Ski Brian Head. Condo with view. Sleeps 8, 2 mast., 1 loft br., den, Jacuzzi tub,f'rpl., gar. 702294-2320. MCI 2852 VACATION PROPERTY Time share units and campground memberships. Distress sales— Cheap! Worldwide selections. Call Vacation Network US and Canada. 1-800-543-6173. Free rental information. 305563-5586. MCI2790 COMMERCIAL SALES FOR SALE WAREHOUSE $39,950. 20 x 30. Call 294-0225. MC9767 COMMERCIAL RENTALS FENCE EQUIPMENT/ Storage yard, 216 W. Foster, 564-0147. C011227 Office Space for Lease. 1950 square foot office space for lease in prime BC location. Top floor, nice building, private bath, $2000 month, 916 Nevada Highway, 2940225. CO12061 CM Zoning BC 1600 SF of shop area w/600 SF of caretakers quarters. Washer & dryer incl. Lease $1200/mo. 2932202 BEFORE 6 PM. CO12607 Professional office space available in Boulder City, Eagles Nest Office ParK, 1000 NV Hwy. /Vpprox. 800 or 1600 sq.ft., terms negotiable. Phone 2935496 or 293-3119. CO12280 Hwy. frontage, 1000 s.f., separate entrance, bath rm., central htgVcooling, Utilrties paid. Will carpet to suit. $750 per mo. CALL Katie 293-5757 for info. C012874 4000 SF WAREHOUSE SHELL Directly across from (Lakes of Lae Vegas), perfect for sub contract. Lake Mead Boat Storage, 565-0700. C012883 DOMESTIC HELP Loving mother of 1 will babysit your child, nw home, reasonable & flexible rates, hot meals & snacks, have ref., call Julie 898-3206. Lovina mother of 1 will care for your child/children in miy home M-F, 6 AM-6 PM. 566-3031. DH12086 LICENSED HOME HEALTH CARE for elderly/convalescing. Affordable Rates. Companion sen/ice to long term nursing care. 4376977/494-0880 (pager). DH12549 IRONING TO PERFECTION $1.00 A PIECE CALL SELMA 565-1507 HCXJSECLEANING Will clean your house with a personal touch. Reasonable Rates 558-6993 ROOMS FOR RENT Furn. studio, priv. ba., kit & ent., N-S, BC & Hend. $375 incl. util. + dep. 2936799. RR12121 Roommate wanted, Hend. home, NONISMOKER, call evenings 566-9837. RR12494 ROOMMATE WANTED new home in Palm Canyon, $450-t-1/2 util. Pis. call 495-4202 pager. RR12563 • Clean fur bd. w/priv. ba. jn beautiful home, full house priv. 566-1777. RR12830 Master Bdrm. w/walk-in closet, pn/t. bath, senior welcome, avail, now. 596-4653 or 294-1934. RR12893 Large bedroom w/private ent., cable TV, light krtchen priv. $350/mo., near Skyline Casino, 566-0858. RR12899 Comfortable clean full house priv. employed man call evenings, 2931022. RR12903 COMMERCIAL RENTALS 3500 sq. ft. Warehouse space for rent, 710 W. Sunset, 564-4100. CO12410 Office warehouse suite 1000 sq. ft., 1557 Foothill Dr. Street frontage BC $650 mo. wrth $550 Security Dep., 293-3115. C012281 BC Office/Warehouse Only $800/month. BRET 294-8482 Desert Sun RIty. C012934 BC office space for rent. 1,000 to 24,000 SF at 50 cents/SF/mo. located at 1404 Colorado. 1-1/2 blocks from main PO. 293-7007. C011321 Warehouse/Office in BC, 1300+ SF, $650/mo., 293-2433. C012798 Office warehouse, 3000 SF in BC, 3 phase pwr. avaiL Call 294-1213. C012837 Approx. 800 sq. ft. Office Space for lease for as low as $450. Prime lo'-"^ cation in BC, ph. 2933119. C012855 Boulder City Retail/Office Space Terms Negotiable B.C. Adobe Realty 293-1707 AVAILABLE FOR LEASE Approx. 1000 sq. ft. warahousa w/bathroom located in new Plaza on highway. Phona prewired, ovapocoolar, reception aiea, roll up door. $S2Q/mo. Call 294-1500 to see WE'RE MOVING! WE'RE MOVING! After 14 years at 501 Nevada Hwy. we are moving March 4th to 1497 NEVADA HWY., STE A., formerly the Chamber of Commerce donie. There will be no interruptk>n of service, our phone number and P.O. Box remain the same. We are looking forward to this move and to continuing to serve you in our new location. Entering Boukler City on Hwy. 93 we're the only domeon the rIghLCOLDWELLBANKER ANCHOR REALTY, INC., 293-5757. coi76 CONDO SALES CONDO SALES 2 bd, 2 be., 2 car gar., pool, clubhouse, partial lakeview.$119.500.2933482. CS12658 I NOW SELLING N9W'Luxury CONDOS rfv^^ S20 MROIM€AO IRAl* leceSON S6M570'OPEN DAILY 10AM • SPM CONDO RENTALS Lg. neat & clean BC condo. 2 bd, 2 ba., w/ frpl., w/d hookup, gr. area overlooking custom homes, $660. Call Kay, owner/lk:en8ee Boulder Dam Realty, 293-4663 or 477-4818. CR12712 Luxury condo w/incredible lake view, 2 bd., 23/4 ba., extra park, $1150/mo. Gary Fisher 293-5599. CRl21ie 1 bd., 1-1/2 ba., $480/ mo. • • dep. 564-7853. CR12539 2 bd., 2 ba., 2 car gar., pool, clubhouse, partial lake view, $750/mo., 1st & last. 293-3482. CR12657 New PACIFIC LEGENDS TOWNHOUSE gated comm, pool/spa/ exer. rm., 3 bd., 1-3/4 ba., all appl. $1000/mo. • I$800/sec., 1 yr. lease, no pets. Call Donna Century 21 JR Realty, 564-5142. CR12761 HEND. TOWNHOUSE 2 bd.,2-1/2ba.,2story,1st & last -I$200 cleaning dep., $650 w/o or $700 w/appl. Avail, now. Phone 566-3120/5643349. CR12762 Fully furnished spy glass condo, 2 bd., 2-1/2 ba., $1200/mo. Ellen, Boulder Dam Realty, 293-4663. CR12209 Evergreen condo, 2 bd., 2 ba. $650 •dep. Boulder Dam Realty, Ellen 293-4663. CR12208 Country Hills new qated community in Hend. Upstairs, lg., 2 bd., 2 ba., frpl. w/pool, clubhouse & exercise rm. privileges, $795/mo., 293-6383. CR12313 Boulder Hills Condo 2 bd. overlooking pool $650/mo. Call 294-1884 after 5 pm. CR12741 2 BDRM., 1-1/2 BATH CONDO w/d, cov. arking, dishwasher. ehind Joker's Wild $625/mo. "Sec" O.K. 564-3344. CR12907 HOUSE RENTALS Darling 2 bd.. 1 ba.. cottage, in histork: district. Yard SVC incL $675,2936285. HR12496 3 br., 2.5 ba. -tloft/den, 1544 sf, 1 mi. from Galleria Mall. Call Jim 4338016, HR12644 BC clean 2 bd., 1 ba., $675/mo. + $700 sec dep. 294-1698. HR12691 NEWHOME3bd.,2ba., 2 car gar., located at Freeway & Horizon, $1025/mo., 294-0728. HR12801 HEND. 3 bd., 2 ba. custom home on 1/2 acre $995/mo. + dep. Call Sharon 378-1692. HR12867 Exciting new 1668 SF, 3 bdrm., 2 ba., frpl., Palm Canyon, $1050 MO-i-.N/ S, NO PETS, owner/le., 263-1172 or 361-4188. HR12886 1650sf, 3bd., 2fullba., 2 car gar., stove/refrig., sec. gated. Flamingo & 95. $850 +sec. Call (702) 254-8576 or (909) 3129280. HR12902 Historic district charm w/ modern luxury. 2 bd., 2 ba., Ig. master suite w/ Jacuzzi tub & walk-in closet. Yard svc incl. $875, 293-6285. HR12497 •••••*• ^ AVAIL MHEO. ^ .X.4 BD. I BA FOMUL UN. IM..4. ^ EAT-a BTCH, PANTHY, FRW., ^ .X. KARGAILCOWEII LOT. ONLY.4. ^ l1tSaH0.,4S4-N. ^ *•*•*•• BuikJ your dream home with no downpayment on materiala. Become an owner-involved builder and save $$$ while building equity. Miles Homes offers attractive construction financing. Choose from 50 styles andfloorplans. Call Miles Homes today at 1 800-343-2884. Advertis^ HOUSE RENTALS HEND. 3 bd., 2 be., 2 car ar., 2 yr. old, in bodridge. NO PETS $975, 565-9437. HR12207 SI HOUSE RENTALS I MOBIIE HOMES BC townhouse, 3 bd72 ba., spa, garage, lake view, $1250. Desert Sun Realty, 293-2151. Lake Mountain Estates Unsurpassed view of mountains & lake. Spotless 2 bd.. 2 be., huge Ivrm., 2 car gar. w/workshop. 14x24 cov. patio & deck, all appl.. beautifully landscaped. 55+ only pis.. $935/mo. Pis. call 791 2011. HR1291B APT. RENTALS One br. apt. Clean laund. fac. in Boulder City $450. Call Don, 595-8803. AR12857 SPACIOUS 2 BD.,1BA. DUPLEX-W/Dhookup, no pets, $495/mo. + sec. Call 565-4906. AR12872 Very clean 2 bd. apart, w/ laundiy facilities in BC. Quiet & ideal for seniors. NO SMOKING or PETS pis. $490 + Sec. 3618099. AR12889 2 bd., 1 ba., in quiet BC, NO PETS, $525/mo. + dep. Avail. 3/15. 2941213. AR12772 Location 302 W. Bask: Rd, Hend, 2 bd., 1 ba., unfur. apart., very clean, SORRY NO PETS, monthly rent $475+Dep. Call43S-8261. AR12898 FOR RENT: Kitchenettes, $65/wk. Utilrties pd. SHADY REST MOTEL, 565-7688. AR9597 UNFURNISHED 2 bd.,1 ba., single story, Sr. welcome, carport, $500/ mo., 293-4832. AR12096 1 bd., 1 ba. $425/mo., 208 Bruce Way, Hend. contact Apart. A, 5648785. AR12105 CORNER COURT APTS. 2 bdrm., 1 ba. Near Bask: High, $500/ mo. + sec. dep. 4349827. AR12201 2 Bd. apart, nejar downtown & schools $495/ mo., 293-0566. AR12251 APARTMENTS AS LOW AS $275 a Month furnished 564-6952 ... NEW KITCHENETTES STARVIEW, 293-1658 APT. RENTALS $595~mo. 1st, last. Sec. Immed. occupancy, 2 bdrms., 1 bath. Central BC NO PETS 223-6748 after 6 pm. AR 12705 Teddy's kitchenettes. Just bring your toothbrush. Everything furnished PH. 293-1716. BC NEW KITCHENETTES, phone, satellite, maid service. STARVIEW MOTEL 293-1658. BC AR12279 APARTMENT FOR PERSONS W/PHYSICALDISABILITIESAND/ OR BRAIN INJURIES. Barrier free, subsidized 1 & 2 bd. apart, for indiv. w/physical disabilities anchor brain injuries. Fully wheelchair accessible, laundry, Ig. community rm., secured entry, on site caretaker. Supportive svc for residents of the Carol Haynes Apart, are available from various sources depending on disability & eligibility for funding. For info, call Lynn Gondorcin at 702359-7779. AR12567 Cherry Lynn Apts. 1 bdrm. No pets. Sr. preferred. Lease for 12 mo. 293-0420. AR12717 1 bd., near downtown, cable & uti. fur. $425/mo. $150 dep. perfect for single. Call 293-5533 afterS. AR12734 2 BD, 1 BA, family unrt, $460/nrH3. + deps. Avail. 3/1. Call 391-3435. AR12751 1 bd. guest hpuse in BC. covered park. wtr. & cable incl. $450/mo., $300 dep., 294-4385. Kitchenettes, fully furnished with cable, in Boulder City. 293-6269 Cell. 682-7914 CASA DE ALICIA AND M&M II APT We're not giving away the kitchen sink. WE DON'T HAVE TO. Let our features & professbnal staff speak for themselves. 1, 2 & 3 bdrm. from $550. Pools, pk:nk: areas. Walk In closets. 293-1615 AR1227I Boulder Citv. ATLANTIC CITY APARTMENTS Clean, Quality 1-2-3 Bedroom Apartments in Henderson • Central Air & Heat • Appliances • Blinds • Carpets • Water Paid • Washer/Dryer Available Apartments are $420 & up per month, newly remodeled, spacious near schools, park & shopping. 565-7028 12508 CHOICE MOBILE home/ building lots in Sandy Valley. 2 +/acres ea. Power at the site, underground phone, paved and/or gravel roads. Seller offering good terms. Phone Grace, at Americor Realty, 3651953. L0253 LAKE MEAD VIEW ESTATES, custom home lots overlooking Lake Mead. 702-294-0475. liiiknnd FREE LISTof Idaho land bargains along Snake and SalnDon Rivers and Hell's Canyon 20 to 1,000 acres from $24,900. Excellent financing. Call now 208-839-2501. Open 7 days, 8:30-8:30. 1958 42X10 in Moorea Park in BC. $6000 OBO. •Call 208-467-2070. 'MH12391 Own your home & lot, nk:e locatton, 2 bd., 1 -3/4 bath MOBILE HOME. Asking $95,500 (Below. Appraisal) 294-0472..' MH12688 ^J Trailer Space for rent -! 216W. Foster, Hnd..5640147. MH12610 Under $475/mo.OAC for this 3 bd.,1-1/2 ba., new kitchen cabinets, new carpet, nice FAMILY PARK IN HEND. CaOP 595-3279. MH12841 Boulder Hwy. & Russell Rd., 3 bd., 2 ba.. doublewide, under $690/ mo. OAC. KIDS & PETS OK. CO-OP 595-3279. TRAILERS RENT OR SALE Park Models good for 1 or 2 people. Rents starts $375/up. Sales start $1500/up. Ask for Melanie/Mario. 294-8888 ,„. MOBILE HOME RENTAL 3bd (12x60) 1-1/2 ba. in BC. Fenced yard, w/d hook-ups, partially furnished, NO SMOKING, $725/mo. + dep., Senior Disc. 293-2575. TRACTORS Landtciping. 214 wheel drive Dietel tridon A impleinentt Gold Prospectors Supply 1680 Boukler Hwy. BC (702) 293-0672 BOULUenaTY-B-HILL AREA 1/2 ACRE-READY TO BUILOII FABULOUS LOCATIONIt CALL BOULDER DAM REALTY • ek for Pat 23-4e63. L0IJ7 North Boundary: South Boundery: Ea at Boundary: Waat Boundary: llaSXT • athne. THE UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE Needs Land in Henderson (Vaile Verde Station), Nevada I >< In oWw>ie 10 Me lanaM Mna as a eiaa im k Warm SprlnQe Roed Hoftion Dnve Slaphanie Street BOB HACOLL, PROJECT MANAtlER UNHEO STATEt POSTAL SERVICC DENVER FACa.niES SERVICE OFFICE SOSS E. TiiRe Avenue, twae 400 Denver, CO senr-iasi Tetaahene (aomatMK? •.It ACREAGE 2.39 ACRES on-B" Hill in Boulder City, more than $35,000 below appraisal. Call Jerry, Centui^i21*RSalty Assoc, 454-2204 or 367-0990. HOMES WANTED •I NEED 2-4 BDRM. HOMES* Cash out or assume & make back payments. Fast cash. 294-1091. MC12715 Responsible clean family of 4 needs a 3 bd. house or doublewide mobile to rent or rent ^ own in nice neighbor^ hood of Hend. Can do maint. & repair, NO • PETS, NON-SMOK-; ERS, $400 to $500/mo. • Move in before April SOfh. Call Margaret anytime, 294-0675. MCI2672 REAL ESTATE Exceptional La Dolce Vita Townhome! 2-story, 2bedroom, 1-1/2 bath, near schools. Includes deck with stairs, patio with storage, professional landscaping with yard iight and automatic sprinklers, combination gas/log fireplace, delux carpeting, stove, dishwasher, disposal, washer, and dryer. $98,500.00! Call 2948406 or 294-2441 for appointment to see. RE12914 GREEN VALLEYOPEN HOUSE/TREASURE HUNT Follow/ the map & find these homes to register for a $100 Gift Certificate. 819 Longbranch, 2006 Angel Falls, 316 Santa Monica. Saturday 3/2/96. 11:00-3:00 PM. Onsite Loan Officer to help you with any of your financing questions. For more information call 376-0823. RE 12927 Charming 2 bd., 1 ba. Many extras including oakfloors, detachedgar., mat. landscape, walk to OldTowne $108K. 2940423. RE12794 $10,000 down. $885 nryj., 1600 sf. 3 bdrm., sun room, neat & clean, ck>se to downtown BC. Call eves. 223-6748. RE12703 5bd.,3ba.onBCcul-desac. New Ig. krt., roof & heat/air, assum., no qual., own/lie. RV pk., • cov. patio, $139,500. 293-6036. RE 12398 Hend. for sale by owner, 4 bd.. 2-3/4 ba., pool w/ waterfall, huge deck with a gr. view, excel neighborhood, $139,995. Call 565-5889. RE 12664 BC 3 Bed./2 Bath • Home, $105K. Call BRET 294-8482 Desert Sun •' RIty. RE 12950 i HEND. COLLEGE AREA. 3 yr. okj. 3 bd., 2 ba., 1600 SF. below appraisal. 933 WAGONTRAIN DR. By owner. $110,000-564-4243. RE11876 BC DEL PRADO • 4 br.. 1662 sf, open fk. pin., covered RV pkno.. • renwd. w/new kit, batlw, quiet, clean, $163,500, 643 Arrayo. 293-4329. RE 12929 if

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II IH i l. .1 1 • .. i jj. i i .i i i M i "WWWW!IWW^ rrm: PaO* 14 Panorama Thursday, February 29,1996 REAL ESTATE "BO LEWIS HOME. COMMERCIAL LEASE Office/ Warehouse 2 full units avail. 1 w/ apt. Newbldgs. Great area! Call for prices. 294-1500 REAL ESTATE NEED NEW or EXPERIENCED R.E. agents for expanding offne in BC. 100% convnisaton desks available 0 $100 nno., $150 per transactton •• • E&O. NO franchise fees, also liberal split arrangements. Non-MLS availabhs. For more info, and conf kfential interview, call Katie, CB Anchor Realty, 293-5757. RE12199 FOR SALE BY OWNER Lovely 3 bd., 2 ba., 2 car garage, RV pkg., many extras $109,000. Call for apt. 566-3229 after 3 PM on weekdays. RE11973 BC condo, 4 bdrm., 3 ba., fam. fp w bar, sgl. gar., pool, total new interior, nice owner will carry $165K, 294-0290. RE12736 CAREFUL, IT'S LOADED, with all the upgrades you desire! Just move-in & enjoy this BETTER THAN NEW 3 bd., 2 ba. Beautiful pool w/inground speakers, alarm sys., patios & much more! Call Valerie to view 498-3291 only $119,000 or 3% down avail. Lk;ensee. OPEN HOUSE TODAY. RE12756 PRICE REDUCED! Home completely redone 10 months ago! All new kitchen. $159,900 294-1500 Ul I) MOI M \l\ REALTY PRICED TO SELL 2BR/2BA Man. home in beautiful 55-)community. Nuetral decor, open floor plan. $129,000 294-1500 Ul DMOI MAIN REALTY GOLFCOURSE LOCATION 4BR/SBA 3 car gar. Home was model! Upgrades galore. $359,900 294-1500 MAKE MEMORIES in this new custom home on 1/2 acre. Over 2700 sq. ., 3 bdrms., 3 baths, 3 car garage. Spacious open Idtchen w/breakfast bar, garden window & nook area. Built-in entertainment area. All this and the privacy of a fenced yard including RV or boat parking. $218,000. HERE'STHEKEYtoyour happiness with this new custom home. Currently under construction. 3 bdrms., 2 baths, over 2000 sq. ft.-3 car garage. 9 feet walls, w/vaulted ceilings, pot shelves, niches. $185,900. 2 STORY EXECUTIVE home w/over 3000 sq. ft., w/indoor spa & private master suite w/sitting room. Formal dining, 5 large bdrms. w/bdrm. & bath dowr^tairs for guests or in-laws. Familyroom, wet t>ar, pot shelves, much more. $189,000 FOR FAMILY PLEASURES over 2300 sq. ft., 3 bdrm. home w/2.75 baths. 1/2 acre corner lot w/RV-boat parking, lush landscaping & an inground pool, patio w/mist system & custom BBQ. There's more $229,000. Call BONNIE MUSSELMAN 373-1967 JR REALTY PRICED Td SELL NdWIII 3600 sq. ft Home 3 Bedroom 3-1/2 Bath 4 car gar. w/wor1(shop large, home theater room, Jacuzzi tub, upgraded kitchan. Many extras. Over $100,000 bk>w appraisal. Phone 293-1893 IMMACULATE HOME IN BC mSCummings 3 bedrooms, 1-3/4 baths worfcihop, 2 car gar, open floor plan, vaulted oailir>gs and much, much moral $185,000 Shown by appowtmant 294-2926 Knap^ •**• TMTt "W mak0 hout* ceMs te it iw liri bMiiM* *M 1W r I 1* Weat PacHIc Ava.. Ma. 11, Nandarsen, NV MOll I 566-8185-Bus. Irfa 474-1560-Pager REAL ESTATE GOVERNMENT FORECLOSED HOMES for pennies on $1. Delinquent Tax, Repo'a, liEO'8. Your area. Toll free 1-800-898-9778 Ext. H-4332 for current listings. Fee required. RE12779 ^ FREE RENTAL ^ SERVICE HOMES A • CONOOS-ANY AREA. CALL TIM QROUP ^ REALTY ASK FOR ^ ELAINE, 454-ao40 *****•• REAL ESTATE NO MONEY DOWN • New program. If you are working or retired you nnay qualify to purchase a home with no money down. Call me today to find out how. George 371 5375. RE12945 • ^S^ "THIS IS IT ^^!, 1M0SF.S RV/Parl(, view of valley, workshop, gorgeoua window traalmenta. Call Dave, RE/MAX Eagle's View 566-6700. Preetigioue Lakeview custom home, 3 Ig. bd., oversize park-like lot. Priced at $214,900. Call me today 283-4422 Karen Reyes, Americana Realtors. ^fj^m. ba.lMiiii,1sn ^WJJP SP.biEM* \CBm CiMl M*. 1 yr. Loll Of eitrnt, Iff. lei, t1t*,ta*. Ak lor Corby or nyss flt REMAX ESQ'M VIMV SM47ae. EOIOO Pe\\7t BARELY LIVED IN! 3BR/3.SBA Beautiful custom home with Lake Mead view. Bonus room. S22S.000 7O;M 294-1500 REAL ESTATE 3 bd., 1-3/4 ba., 2 car garage w/door opener, customized kitchen, front desert landscape, back enclosed yard w/rosas, kimon tree & artichoke, extended patio w/cookin^ area, buiK in refer. & raised brick herb garden, vegetable garden w/ strawberry bed, water conservation system enclosed lawn equipment storage. Ck)se to schools and hospitaL $136,500. 1400 Stacey Lane, 2934660. RE12858 "^^ 'EAGLE VJfiU|^ CREST ^^^ Buy of the 1370 SF of comfort 3 bd., 1.75 ba., patio w/mist ays. while you shoot "HOOPS". Shows excel. Call Dave, RE/MAX Eagle's View S66-67(X). J£i££, Wtien you're ttilnking of buying or' fHflMllHI VMIMS • selling a home, you'll want the transaction to proceed swiftly and effidentty. That's why you should look lor a real estate professional with special expertise In listing, selling, Investment and taxes. Someone with a proven record of experience! Someone you can trust. That someone I Is a Certified Residential Specialist (CRS), your best choice In real estate. Call Dave Berard Re/Max Eagle's View Brokaf/G.R.I. CRS (702) 566-6700 CALLCOLDWELLBANKER D Q COLDWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY 1497 Nevada Hvwy., Boulder City Hwy. 83 to B.C. only dome on right 293-5757 ; FREE! LIST OF ALL HOMES FOR SAU IN B.C. .. • • -. • • • a. 'r^ HOMES • • • • • • ^--'-. • ''' DEL PR ADO -tile roof, 1577 s.f., freshly painted interior, covered patio, sparkling pool & more...$189,900. TILED ENTRY, KITCHEN & FM. RM.. 4 bd., 3.5 ba., bit.-in surround sound, pool, spa, gazebo, 3190 s.f. $397,500. KEY LARGO 3 bd., 2 be., tile firs. & counters in kitchen, & f m. rm. Lake view, insulated garage. $209,900. INVESTOR OR 1st time buyer! Needs some work, best price around. 3 bd., 1 ba. $79,900. ITALIAN MARBLE thru entry, kitchen & L/R. Skylight in entry, new carpet in bedrms., 2 car garage, pool. $146,500. ROOM FOR TOYSI4 bd., 3 ba., 3027 s.f., oversized garage, lake view. rock f/p in L/R, bonus rm. downstairs & more. $269,500. MANUFACTURED HOMES NEW ON MARKET! 2 bd., 2 ba., 3 car carport, 2 c. garage, RV prkg., covered porch, too much to tell. $128,500. PEACE & OUIET • 2 bd., 2 ba., fam. rm., lakeview, covered porch, carpet, vinyl paint 1995. $127,900. LAKE VIEW, corner lot, garage, carport, covered patio, family rm. w/ fireplace. Lots of extras. $178,950. BREATHTAKING VIEW from this one, island cooking & huge pantry, island cooking, fm. rm., oversized garage. $210,000. LIKE NEW! 2 bd., 2 ba.. stucco exterior on permanent foundation, new appliances, carpet, cabinets & more. $102,000. OPEN FLOOR PLAN & lake view! Oversized 1 car garage with 17x17 laundry & workshop. Neutral colors t/o. $169,900. LAKE VIEW from screened in patio and front rooms. 2 bd., 2 ba., 3 car carport. Lots of RV parking & large storage bidg. $137,280. THREE BDRM., 2 ba., large covered porch with some lake view. Nice patio, storage/hobby room & more! Reduced to $142,500. LAKE VIEW • large lot in cul-de-sac, lots of RV parking, 2 bdrm., 2 ba., storage sheds & morel $155,000. MOBILES IN PARKS UPGRADED DBL. WIDE in Gingerwood. Lots of ceramic tile in kitchen & baths, berber carpet t/o, carport. Furnished $48,500. IMMACULATE 2 bd., den, covered porch, parking & patio, all appliances! Needs to sell. $26,900. In Gingerwood. DESERT VIEW from covered porch. 44x24 home wHh drywall interior. 1991 Silvercrest, all appliances, 2 bd. $60,000. COMMERCIAL LOT FOR SALE with 4 car garage and each one rented. $70,000. BLDG. & BUSINESS in the heart of B.C. Gas station with mechanic on duty. Busy corner on Nev. Hwy. $395,000. COMMERCIAL BLDG.-640 s.f. was hamburger rest., on large 99x156 lot Hwy. frontage. $275,000. CORNER LOT HWY. FRONTAGE 9900 s.f. bIdg. on 93x166 lot New roof, Dock doors, 4 lane hwy. $750,000. t£) eiSSO CoUtnl Banker RasidcnIicI RMI ElUtt. An Equal Opporlunty Cotnpany. Equal Houting Opportunly. Som* OHioM lndtp*ndntly Omiad and Oparatad REAL ESTATE BC-PRICE REDUCED3lg. bd., 2ba., 1725sf, $159,600.5yrs.oki,3% to realtora 391-1644. RE11931 BCNICE 4 Bed. Lewis Home, Great cond., pool, $169K. Call BRET 2048482, Desert Sun RIty. RE12948 LAKEVIEW 2BR/3BA RV + 1 car garage. Balcony with incredible view of Lake Mead & mountans. $186,000 294-1500 REAL ESTATE BC6EAUnFUL4bd.,3 bath; 2 story, large pool, everything new and upgraded. 294-8482 Lk:ensee. RE12954 BC^HIiillRciAirsr fice/Warehouse 4 units rent for $2200. Sell for $218,900. Call BRET 294-8482 Desert Sun RIty. RE129S2 ^ tlEIICUliXA^ N^ property. Ctm 4bd., 2 ba., 1700 SF, RV/parking. Gorgeous tile in kitchan family, dining with F/P. Call Dave, RE/MAX Eagle's View 566-6700. REAL ESTATE 8yowner1600SF,4bd.. 3ba., newly painted int., Ig. livrm. wA/aulted ceiling & gas frpL, sep. fam. rm., prof, landscaped back yard w/|}atio & redwood patio cover. Nk:e neighborhood, close to schools, park & shopping $119,900. Can 564-5161. RE11901 LUXURY HOlVfE With Gorgeous view of lake. 4BR/5BAw/4car garage. Built-in Enter tainment System. $750,000 294-1500 REAL ESTATE PRICE REDUCED FOR QUICK SALE, 3 bd., 2 ba., $155,500. 3% to realtors, 391-1844. RE128S0 FOR SALE BY OWNER. 5 yr. old home, 3 bd., 2 ba., 2 car garage, RV pkg, $109,000. Call for apt. 566-3229 after 3 PM on weekdays. RE11973 ^ "STEAL ^WA^ OF THE l&W E E K 1606 SF, Spanish nwtif. 3 bd., 3 full bath -f extras. $115,900. Call Dave, RE/MAX Eagle's View 566-6700. a_,^^_—^i—^^^££i m r I Adobe Reolty OFfOmWfTT (702) 293-1707 1 HOMES NEW ON THE MARKET..Semi custom home, 3 ixirms. • • • den, 2 baths, over 1850 sq. ft., finished 2 car garage, pool & spa...$215,000. GREAT STARTER HOME...3 bdrms., 2 baths. 2car garage, over 1350 sq. ft...$139,500. IN GOLF COURSE ESTATES...2790 sq. ft., 4 bdrms., 3-1/2 baths, 2 fireplaces, 3 car garage, so many extras...$272,000. ZONED FOR HORSES...4 bdrms.. 1-3/4 bath, super kitchen, large lot on B. Hill, 2-car garage...$249,900. CHARMING ^^MK^I^eUlOO sq. ft. home, 3 bdrms., 2 baffl^J^o^l|[J£^]lce. 2-car garage plus carport..T$149,900. OPEN FL(X>R^LAN.5^UU sq. ft. master suite w/deckWyyly fdniy ike & mtns., 4 bdrms., 4 batnS; ^San9&rage...$399,000. REDUCED...Newer Del Prado 3 bdrms., 1-3/4 baths, 2 car|^i|[^,|def^ landscapings ...$169,500. 301^1 SEMI-CUSTOI nice area RVp TRI-LEVEL CUSTOM HOME...Spaciou8 living areas, separate bdrm. with bath, pool & spa, plus 3 bdrms. & 2 baths, upper level, 2 car garage...$214,900. MANY UPGRADES...4 bdrms., 2-1/2 baths, 3 car garage, exterior workshop with 1/2 bath, extra storage, RV pkg. with full hookups, heated spa...$199,500. CUSTOM HOME WITH EXTRAS 4^...This home has its own Movie Theatre room -f 3 bdrms., 3 baths, 4 car garage & more...$298,000. NEW HOME UNDER CONSTRUCTION...Pick your own up-grades, 4 bdrms., 3 baths, 3 car garage, great area...$290,000. ONE OF A KIND...Unobstt-ucted views of Lake Mead and mtns., totally up-graded ocean style glass patio, 3 bdrms., 3 baths...$319,900. NEAR THE 15TH GREEN ON THE GOLF COURSE...One level Lewis Home, 4 bdrms., 3-1/2 baths, 3 car garage plus Pool & Spa...$355,000. UNOBSTRUCTED VIEWS...Lake & Mtns., over 2,600 sq. ft., 3 bdrms., 3 baths, oversized garage...$369,900, .v.;,; j-;,-;; -:",./;, MUST SEE...3 bdrm., 3 bath home, nicely upgraded, 2 car garage...$167,900. NEWLY REDONE...0ver 1850 sq.ft., 4 bdrms., new roof, new court yard, new mirrored doors, new paint in and out...$174,500. 1/2 ACRE ON CORNER LOT...3300* sq. ft., 4 bdrms., 3-1/2 baths plus office, 3 car garage, R.V. pkg...$305,000. s=. ,^ l ely upgraded, ps...$182,500. ON THE GOLF C0URSE...4 bdrms., 3 baths, 2 fireplaces, 3-c0^r'|Js KUk RV parking, pooL.,$335,00d^>^^"^ BEAUTIFUL VIEWS OF LAKE AND MTNS...4 bdrms., 3-1/2 baths, to be sold with lot next door, $520,000 for the pkg. OPEN FLOOR PLAN...Custom 3100^^ sq. ft. with beautiful views, 5 bdrms., 3 baths, 3 car garage & more...$440,000. ELEGANT CUSTOM HOME...This home has4 bdrms., 4-1/2 baths, 5 car garage, pool, spa, 4800 sq. ft. and let's not forget the movie theatre...$575,000. CONDO/TOWNHOME LAKETREE...2 bdrms., 1-3/4 bath, comm. LAKE TERRACE CONDO...With view of lake, pool (leased), call for details...$109,900. 3 bdrms., 2 baths, 2 car garage...$179,900 SPANISH ^TEPS...2 bdrms., 1-3/4 baths, REGATTA P0INTE...2 to choose from...one at shows weli.only $97,500. $149,900 one for $188,700. Call for details. ^^,• ^•^ • :^p^ • •" • • • ^; • • • -LAND '"' • LAKE & MOUNTAIN VIEW LOTS MANY TO CHOOSE FROM $84,380 TO $249,900. CALL FOR DETAILS MANUFACTURED HOMES immaculate 2 bdrm., 2 READYTOMOVEIN...Upgraded3bdrm.,2 bath home, with separate den, mountain view, covered patio and porch, 2 car gar...$133,500. PRICED RIGHT, baths, storage, workshop...$122,500 SO MUCH FOR THE $$$$ Over 1600 sq. ft., 2 bdrms., 2 baths, some lake & mtn. view, enclosed carport...$129,500. i '"We have many other properties available for sale or lease** COME IN OR CALL FOR A FREE LIST OF ALL AVAILABLE PROPERTIES FOR SALE 1310 NEVADA HWY BOULDER CITY FAX 702-293-7477 Joan Curran 293-14S7 Oordhy Molln 293-S087 Claudia Raecka 293-9949 DIanna Vanata* 293-42S4 Helen Qriy-S92-1230 Belh Aktworth 293-7074 Crtatlna LeBrelonFernald, Broker293-2212 TOLL FREE #1-800-553-8081 ii FREE LISTS! OF ALL AVAILABLE PROPERTIES — PICK UP—MAIL—FAX FREE FULLCOLOR BROCHURE OFBOULDER CITY HOMES The Boulder City Specialists! Serving All Southern Nevada 293-4663 1-800-228-8358 Fax (702) 293-4645 1664 Nevada Hwy. Boulder City, NV 89005 LAKE TERRACE CUSTOM 4 bdrm., 3^ba., GfMt VIEWI $425,000. LAKEVIEW SfTES, LAKE TERRACE & B-HILL custom lots. $118,500^ STREET LEVEL OVERLAND Condo, 2 bdrm., 1-3/4 ba. Storage stMd. $76,950. MANUFACTURED HOME 4 FAMILY. 3 bdrm. HUGE YARD. $99,900 FOUR ADJACENT LAKE VIEW LOTS. DavalopMV Opportunityl $125,000 aa. PEACEFUL WATER VEWS OSSI.Laki Supariorl $219,000. MAQMFK^ENT 3500 aq. ft. CUSTOM homa, 4 bd., 3 ba., pool, Laisa Vlaw, lavaL $410,000. "VILLA FLORENCE" Navvest Town Homes 11700-2800 sf from $225,000. MARINA HIGHLANDS CUSTOMIIII Immaculate, 2 bd. 2 ba., dan. $219,900. ARD! 3 bdrm. JUSTLIS^ 1-3/4 ba.M J-J L*i. 1 II ^m^ ilocatad3bd. I AS NEW ^Vffypflf ETl 170Of af. ramodak $121,500. GREAT 2 BDRM. Condo on DalRay w/ garage. UKE NEW. $89,000. BEAUTII biHandai SPYGLASS CONDO W/LAKE VIEWI $127,500 or Fumishad 9 $1200/tno. UNOBSTRUCTED Laka Viewl Spyglass Cond. 2 bd., 2-1/2 ba. Claan $133,500. FOR RENT: 2 EVERGREEN CONDOS. 2 bdmt, 2 ba.. Laundry area. $650^o. CLAREMONT HEIGHTS CUSTOM. Swisational Homa Vlaw. $639,500. PRICE Homaoi Em 2 bdrm., 2 ba. 138,000. 3 BDRM., 3 LEVEL W/ELEVATOR. Unobstructad vlaw. $415,000. SINGLE LEVEL FAMILY HOME. Homa naar schools. $170,000. MANUFACTURED HOME IN LAKE MTN. LIka Naw. ONLY $169,500. OPEN MorvFri 9 am to 4 pm Sat 10 am-4 pm Sun. & eves byappointmt Convenientty Located In Marshall Plaza Near TWO GALS" Great Parking Easy Access After hours call: PatBamateIn Mary Board Unetle Davis Kay Klmbarlln Sherry Lalhaiii StuLowa 6644769 2B3-72S4 293-1097 (pagar)477-W16 2944166 293-3041 ENm Lamb Stromberg. Broker 2934506 -IREAL ESTATE PVH Real Estate Hwy. 160, next to Terrible Herbst, 3 models to choose from, $50 sq. ft., over 200 lots available, 1-702-727-O445. RE12171 REDUCED!!!!!!! 4BR/3BA Custom Trilevel with oversized 2 ear gamge w/RV. parking, 2 living rooms. $285,000 294-1500 \CSSdf built in "1994." 836 SF, fabulous view, upgraded carpet, open floor plan. Call Dave, RE/ MAX Eagle's View 566-6700. EOIOO -*€ BUYER'S AGENT Call ROSALEE New Homa/Sales Lets see beautiful GV/ Hend. area. Model homes range from $100,000 on up. 224-7547 PAGER 433-0659 RESIDENCE Cedar CIfy Southern Utah 20 Acres, Breathtaking Mountain Views $56,500 New 3BR 2ba $87,500 Deli-Coffie Shop $79,900 5 Bedroom Brick Home Now OnJy $89,900. • Goigeous Custom Homes From $249,000 to 256,800 Land, Land Phis More. Call Manny 294-0870 ERA Realty Center VOl)RnRSTHOME'24x6(V 3 bdrm.. approx. 1440 sq ft., in perfecl shape, mobile home. Can be converted! So many new ilcms & upgrades. A must .see! B C 106.500k. •CLOSE TO HEAVEN* Stunning lake views. 3 bdrm.. 2400 sq. ft., spa/4 decks upgraded to the max! B.C. 28.'ik •NOBODY SLEPT HERE* 3 bdrm. Almost 1/2 acre, new home. 2338 approx. sq. ft., ton of amenities 349K Reduced! •BEING SQUEEZED 4 BDRM.* Single-story. quiet culde-sac. 4 bdrm., 4 bath. Lake view.22l9sq.ft.28Sk Reduced! All furniture can be purcha.sed. BC •OPEN SPACE FOREVER" The desert and a forever view of the lake, large lot. 3 bdrm.. cozy home, a must see! B.C. 219k. BARBIE'S DREAM HOUSE IS FOR SALE!Exquisite new cunlom 3789 .sq. ft., 5 bdrm., 5 baths, pool size lot. 3 car detached garage, ton of amenities! Full tranquil view of Lake Mead! Make offer, owner may carry! Reduced! Mu.st sell! Owcrs want out! 460k. BC UNDER APPRAISAL* Location! Location! Very quiet neighbortiood. tile roof. 3 bd. or 2 & large den. lots of RV parking. 2 car (blocked In & gated) cloie to schools. Newer home Best buy in the area! Reduced! I63K. •MOVE IN READY* The perfect home, new carpet, just nmodeled. 2 car. R. V. Oean. close 10 ichools. All land.scaped. lap pool & spa. 1648 sq. ft. A must KC! *BErrERTHANNEW*House shows like i model. 3 bdrm. Kfftox. l668sq.fi.only4years oM, lush landscaping, many upgrades, motivated seller! I27K Henderson. •GOLFER'S PARADISE* 4 Br. 2790 sq. ft. 100 x 125 lot. hiidwood floors, many upgrades, a show plaoe & a pool to die for! $349,930 BC *BACKS UP TO GOLF COURSE* 2 sioty. 4 bdrm.. 4 bith A bonus room, lush landiciping. romantic master suite. 3154 approx much more, a true beauty. 369.900k B.C. *ACT FAST* Over 1500 iq. ft. New beautiful condo. phced to bottom dollar at 129.900k. B C. *GREEN VALLEY CONDO* 2 master suites upstatn. private comer unit Beautiful mountain views, itiodel perfect 98K • A GREAT START* 4 bdrm. 2 cargnge. fully landscaped, cov pMK>. very clean and ready for yov 10 move into. Hend 98K Sandra Deubler 271.3277 REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE ThePrudential (M Jensen's Realty''"^ Thinking of Buying or Selling? The Rock is the answer! The Prudential Jensen's Realty Specializes in Residential-Commercial and Property Management We're here to serve you Henderson Boulder CHy Jg]—, CCA oooo 293-3355 — tqUAL NOUSINC Sfii-'iTW OrrOtTUNITY •'''' • ^O*" iWvitiie In the Ateiitf mtOtMmttf Delia's Best Buys NO QUALIFYING • 20,000 dn., take over$l635 iDO., custom home, 4 bedroom, 3 bath, 2 car garage, spa w/gazebo, view, lireplace, great room, landscaped w/curbing, 1/2 acre lot, block wall. 404 Glasgow. lAKEAiJlt Boulder City living at it's best. 4 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage, landscaped, designer pool/spa, new thru-out, $169,999. 1313 Elsa. SUPER SHARP3 bedroom, huge lot, block wall, slab lor RV/ boat, covered patio, storage shed, new thru-out, $83,500.136 Elm St. CHEFS PEirrE: Huge kitchen, custom oak cabinets, tiled thru-out, 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, newer home, $99,750. 373 Rochell. COMMERCIA L POTENTIAL • 3 bedroom fixer, down town Henderson, comer lot. Wow! Ownerw/carry. $89,900.302 Tin. CALICO RlDGE-4 r^Rdrnnm custom, 3 bath, 3 car garage, tile roof, 2500 sq. ft., superlative view, overlooks It all, 1/2 acre, block wall, 1995, fireplace, martle/granite/tile thai-out, jet tub (2-person), stucco covered patio, too many upgrades to list. Sacrificed $295,000 tinr). 1125 Rubellite. 5 ACRESRural/single zoning w/commerclal potential, water/ power/paving going In now. Sets on Commerce just past Ann Rd., cross street Tropical Pkwy. Owner w/carry $275,900. Put an energetic, personable, multi-million dollar, go-getter producer to work lor you today: I'll pay lor your home warranty or your appraisal. Call Delia at 565-3852 REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS... Call Henderson's #1 Real Estate Team BRENDA BIRD GRI, CRS Lifetime Henderson Resident 564-1127 WENDY WILLIAMS ^^ 378-1689 Wr wJn Over $100,000,000 in Sales 27 years combined Real Estate experience! "The DYNAMIC DUO Sells Homes!" Group, n>i'oiiI I — n. i.ti'kiXiir Henderson Realty, Inc. "The Property People" 18 Water Street 564-2515 Call now for naw home information! BEAUTIFUL & ROOMY! 4 bd. 2 ba., fam. im. w/fireplace. 1787 sq. ft., shows like a model. E:48630 A PERFECT "10" 2 bd., 2 ba., .shows like a model, all new paint, ceiling fans, cooled gar., all appliances stay. Don't miss this one $99,000. M: 50509 CONDO 2 bd., 1 ba., 2 c. gar., rehts for $700, owner needs offer quick. $73,000. C:47107 SECTION 19 -1/2 acre, tri-level, 4 bd., 2.5 ba., totally redone. P(K)1, RV parking. Shows great $192,000. C:45665 WHITNEY RANCH Clo.se to everything, side by side homes, one w/ptxil, both highly upgraded. Must see. F:49443 & F:49444 1=1 EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENUY OWNED OfTORTWITY AND OPERATED. DICK BLAIR REALTY 833 NEVADA HWY., BOULDER CITY ^ (702) 293-2171 (ET P.lly GufTey-Spttr 293-6075 *""^'* """"* '^*'-'Boh BUIr, Broktr W3-2049 Andrt* Andrrmn 293-.122)l j Cindy Bandy 294-2919 KhnndaSled( 293-7975 Nancy Murphy 293-3292 Rich Moynihan 293-1802 Richard Guy 293-4915 Serving Boulder City Since 1968 HOMES WALL TO WALL PERFECTION, In this ONE OWNER HOME! 3 bedrms., 2 baths, 2 car gar. TILE ROOF, $184,500. HANDYMAN'S DREAM—in Golf Course area, 3 bedrms., 21/2 baths, 2 car gar., needs a bit of T.L.C. $168,000. UPGRADED T/O CUSTOM KIT. 3 Bedrms., 2035 sq. ft, 13/4 bath, Den, Fam. rm.. Gar., Cov. patio. Pool, Spa, 2 Tuff sheds, $189,000. FANTASTIC FAMILY HOME-FINE NEIGHBORHOOD, 3,000 sq. ft, 4 bedrms., 3 baths, fam. & game rms. MUCH MORE. $335,000. REMODEL TO YOUR HEARTS DESIRE. OVar 1700 sq. ft custom home. 2 bdrm., den, island kit, 3 frpl. & more. $149,500. CREAM PUFFI 4 bedrms., 2 bath, 2 car gar., or bonus rm., beautiful back yard w/putting green & SPA, cov. patio, $149,500. ^. 3 bedrm., 2 bath, 2 car gar. SHOWS PRIDE OF OWNERSHIP! $115,000. 5 bedrm. GREEN VALLEY TRI-LEVEL Sparkling pool/Designer deck, 2<882 sq. ft, wet bar, solar screens. $229,900. 1,417sq. ft 2 bedrm., open floor plan. 1/4 ac. lot, RV Parkg., sparkling pool A spa, in Whitney Ranch. $139,900. 4 bedrm.. Master Suite downstairs, 1,970 sq. ft, F.P., Cov. Patio, TILE ROOF, $129,900. POPULAR DEL PRADO 2 STORY-2150 sq. ft, 4 bdrm., 2 1/2 bath, fam. rm. w/f.p. & wet bar, PERFECT COND. Low maint yard. $182,500. CONDOMINIUMS A TOWNHOMES 1,660 sq. ft, 2 bedrms., 2 1/2 baths, PLUS BONUS ROOM. Lake area. Pool & Spa. $139,000. CONVENIENT & comfortable living in this 2 bedrm., 13/4 bath Condo, in GREAT LOCATION! Offered for $99,900. IN HENDERSON—Tired of ranting looking for a DEAL? This Immaculate CONDO is PRICED FOR QUICK SALE! 1 bMlrm., 1 1/2 bath. $49,900. SPANISH STEPS CONDO-Ground Floor unit IN EXCELLENT CONDITION, 2 bedrms., 2 baths. PRICED BELOW MARKET $94,500. RARE TRI-LEVEL CONDO-1,500 sq. ft TOTALLY REMODELED, MANY EXTRAS! 4 bwlrms., 2 3/4 bath, CALL NOW. $165,000. MODULAR HOMES WITH LAND MTN. VISTA ESTATES Cor. lot. low maintenance, 2 bedrms., 2 baths, cov. carport, GREAT CONDITION! $95,500. CORONAOO ESTATES—2 bedrm., 2 bath. Mobile home/large car/motor home port, PLUS Single car gwyworkshop. YOURS FOR $125,000. MOBILE HOMES IN PARKS NEW USTINGI! CLEAN 2 bedrm., all appH. NEW REDECORATED INTERIOR, LARGE A/C unit, fenced yard. BRING CHECKBOOK $18,500. M GINGERWOOD—1978 Bainbridge, 14'xS', 3 bedrms., 2 battta, front htt. $2S,000. 1975 HILLCREST—14x64' 2 bedrms., 2 baths, SEE THIS ONE TODAY! $21,75a v 1977 Champion 12'xS6' SUPER SHARP! 2 bedrms., 2 baths. NEW DRAPES, CARPET, DRYWALL-FURNISHED! ;.,. • .., v,>.-: • •.,-„/.. • • • • .; • • : MOORE'S MOBILE HOME PARK—2 bedrm., 1 Ba., 1976 TRAVEL-EZE. $7,500. MOORE'S MOBILE HOME PARK-2 bedrm., 1 bath, W/10'x18' screened porch. $16,000. 1974—12'xS6' 2 bedrm., 1 1/2 bath, fenced yard, $16,500. ELDORADO PARK-1973 SKYLINE-12x60 with 6'x12' living room expansion. Light and airy interior. 2 bed., 2 bath. $14,550. MOORE'S PARK-1969 NAMCO—12x58, 2 bed., loft, 1 1/2 bath, living room extension. Attached storage room -f double storage shed. $15,500. ELDORADO MOBILE HOME PARK-WHAT A BUY, 2 bedrms., 1 bath, awnings, Central Air/Heat, NEAT AS A PIN NOW ONLY $16,900. GINGERWOOD ADULT PARK'14'x66', 2 bedrm., 2 bath. Central Air/Heat & Evap. Cooler. 2 awnings, porch $23,000. LAND IN HENDERSON CUSTOM HOME AREA. Over 1/2 acre Views of LV VALLEY A UGHTS, SUNRISE MTN. & MORE. $65,000. GREAT BUY for this 1/2 ac. lot in LAKE MEAD VIEW EST. LAKE & MTN. VIEWS!! $250,000. IS AC. in ELDORADO VALLEY-Cleared A fenced. Part UTIL ZONED UGHT MFG. $600,000. COMMERCIAL INCOME PROPERTY GREATESTABUSHEDBUSINESS-GiHshopw/pkg. liquor. Central location-on hwy. near motels. $355,000 incl. bIdg. Aland. RENTALS 3 bedrms., 2 baths, 2 car gar., fenced rear yard, avalL Now. $1,250. NICE 1/2 DUPLEX WITH POOL 2 BEDRMS., 1 3/4 BATH, laundry rm., fenced rear yard. Avail. NOW $700. Very nice NEW WATERS EDGE HOME—MANY EXXRAS, 3 bedrms., 3 baths, 2 car gar., cloae to Lake Mead $1,296. VERY NICE 2 Bwiroom, 2 Bath, Fully Furnished Condo. AVAIL NOW. $700.00 BOULDER HILLS CONDO 2 Bwlrms., 1-1/2 balti. Avail. 3/1/96. $625. No pets. 3 bedrm., 1 bath. Gar., Shed., Wkahp., nice arM, lots shade trees, NEW A/C44Mt AvaiL 3/1/96. $850. NEW CONDO 2 bed, 2 bath • dan A office. AU APPL, COMM. POOL $875. No pels. 2 bwL, 2 bath, 2 carpts. NO PETS. $750. 2 bedrm., 2 ballt, 2 cov. carpkg. IsL II., no pels, aval. MAR. 1.$0a Stop by and pick up your FREE CURRENT LIST OF PROPERTIES AVAILABLE FOR SALE TOa FREE! 1-800-5254810 Ext. E41 SINCERITY AND INTEGRITY 18 OUR 8PECU\LTY REAL ESTATE In BC 6 yr. old, 3 bd., 2 ba., 1627 sf, on private St. Lg. lot, 2 car gar. w/60' driveway, shed, fully land, Ig. cov. patio, upgraded, openfloorplan, Ig. rooms, fp. $158,500. 293-1303. RE12467 Thursday, February 29,1996 Panorama Page 15 --4REAL ESTATE BC exacuth/e home-super clean, original owners, never pets or smokers, great location. $196,650. Owner licensee, 294-2627, Desert Sun Realty. RE12921 Lake View $399,950 Fabulous New Mead View Estates Custom 4 bedroom 3 baths, Open Floor Plan 2800 + sq. ft. 3 Fireplaces, Goigeous Master suite. French wooden doors. Comer of Stone Canyon Rd & Villa Grande Way. Beautiful Custom Tile. Reduced to S399,950 Reduced,l24,900 2 Bedroom House, Carport & 2 Studio units Actual Rent is $1,155 mcmthly. Potential for more income. SSak^J^ call M-ny ANCHOR REALTY ^y^-Ub/'U BOATS 8. RVs 16' GLA88PAR W TRAILER 90 hp Johnson Outboard vweiectric tilt, runs great, great buy at $1700. Call 641-8817. BR12232 Y D E 293-6014 Save money high quali^ boat covers factory di:t. Warranty included. sa/MC293-4509. 12600 1976 18-1/2 Ft. Trihull, OMC, I/O, w/trailer, $1000 OBO. 293-4566. BR12808 1985 Minnie Winnie 21 foot motor home, good condition, 293-3097. BOATS -^ 'eauty offers 3 bedrooms, 2.75 t>aths, over 2300 s/f, corner lot w/RV-boat prkg., lush landscaping & In-ground pool. There's more! Call to seel BEST PRICED 4 BEDROOM ... split floor plan, vaulted living area, sunny eat-In kitchen, 2 car garage. Indoor laundry, Irg. patio, low traffic street, nice area of newer homes. $110,000. HOP, SKIP & JUMP to shopping center, 3 bedrooms, separate family rm., skylight, upgraded kitchen cabinets, central c/h, rear yard RV access, seller will entertain all offers ...$81,900. DON'T SNOOZE ON THIS ONE. Pretty 3 bedroom, 2 bath located on quiet cul-desac, approx. 1800 a/f, huge family room w/ fireplace, country kitchen, dual panes, almost new roof, priced right... $90,000. GREEN VALLEY/NO OUAL! 1 Story, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, great room, fireplace, dining area, 2 car garage on quiet cul-de< sac. Owner may carry small second. Only $124,000. OWNER WILL CARRY FINANCING-Home on Black Mtn. Golf Course-Large Master bedroom sulte-4 Bedrooms-Game room In addltkm to Family room-Overelzad poolRV parking. Call for more details! EXCELLENT TERMS! Vacant land In Henderson/MlsskNi Hllle custom area. Comer lot wAJtllltiee In street Zoned for horsas. Don't mlas this opportunity. CaH today for more Info! X^^ m BgUAL HOUSING ammnmy IIMat*K r" 101E. Horiion. Hendenon 564-6546 a EACNan>icEWDBDKNn.YowNH>^NDamiATH> a. MOTORCYCLES 1 BOATS & RVs 1993 VIRAGO 1100CC. low mileage, garage kept, see at Bikers Dream. 2425 Bouldar Hwy. at Dl. CaH 7311310. MC12718 Ventura Test Trailar, sleeps 8, gr. cond., propane stove, ice box. water pump, $1650. CaH 294-1186. BR 12879 See Radiator Master Located inside Emission Express, 1400 NV Hwy, 293-RAD1. VE12525 1988 Cad. Seville 78K mi., exc. cond. loaded lumbar front seats $8500, 294-1893. VE 12628 '65 Ford 3/4 ton pickup, good tires, 23585X16, good 360 engine, new clutch & good body. $1000 OBO. 565-1367. VE12641 Cracked dash? Solve it fast. Molded coverlay dash as shown on TV's TRUCKER USA installs fast. Looks original. Visa/ MC, 293-4509. 1979 Lincoln Continental, 120,000 mi., inL like new, body good cond., $2300. Eden 293-4663. VE12733 1986 GMC Sien'a, 4x4, 20,000 mi. on new 350 engine, manual trans., PS, PB, AL, pwr. windows & locks, am/fm cassette, fiberglass shell w/carpet kit, very clean!! $7000 OBO. Call 3618700. VE12757 1978 Chevy Camaro must sell $900 OBO. Auto, pwr. windows, cassette, spoiler package, may need trans, work. Call anytime 2753852. BC VE12749 1980 HUSKY 250CC. adult owned, very good cond., $550; 1983 HUSKY 500CC, adult owned, very good cond. $750. 558-0147. VE12744 86 Olds Delta 88, low miles, excel, cond., $3500. 293-4406. VE12900 1978280Z,2+2.5speed, AC, outstanding cond., $1978. 293-6043. VE12924 92 Suburban 4WD, 56K, 4K left on warranty, dual air, pwr. everything, excel, cond., $23,000,2932809. VE12928 VEHICLES '91 Ford Tempo, 4 dr., AC, loaded, $5000,56B1363 VE12674 SEIZED CARS FROM $175. Porsches, Cadillacs, Chevy's BMW's, Corvettes, mo Jeeps, 4 WD's. Your Area. Toll free 1 -800-8989778 Ext. A-4332 for cun'ent listings. Fee required. VE 12776 1974 VW $600. Call 5648242. VE12773 '56 FORD, CALL FOR INFORMATION, 5646883. VE12765 77 CHEVY 1/2 TON, W/ SHELL 3" BODY LIFT, 350 MOTOR. RUNS AND LOOKS GREAT. $2250 OR O.B.O. TRUCK BED TRAILER WITH SHELL $100. 83 SUBARU 4/DR., HCT/ BACK, W/AIR, RUNS EXCEL. $1500 OR O.B.O. 564-1296. VE12764 '58 T-BIRD Ready to paint, runs good, new tires/wheels. Call 5643344. VE12908 Used auto parts foreign & domestic Big John and Sons, 1631 Foothill Dr., 293-PART. VE 12524 90 FORD AEROSTAR 4X4 EXCEL. COND.. LOW Ml., $10,500, 6645642. VE12828 72 Olds Delta 88 ht sedan, 350V8, 108K, new tires, battery, clean dependable transportation $1000. 294-2612. VE12836 BIG JOHN'S TOWING > Light and Haavy duty lowing, recovery •pcialM*. (702) 294-HELP 1566 Foothill Dr. aC. Great Transportation, Runs Good, Fun to Dnve $1800 060 565-9675 or 599-0652 (Beep) 94 FORD F150 XLT LARIAT CLUB CAB PICKUP W/CAP 4.9 LITER MINT COND., 2935112. VE12856 ; 1985 DODGE VAN 250 CUSTOM SLANT 6, 4 SPEED. AC, STEREO 1990 FIRM. 293-6745. VE12829 68 Chevy pckup, w/ladder racks & tool box, $1000 firm, passed sm*g, 294-0707. VE12870 65 International Scout, body good, runs good, extras, $1750. 031(29^ 1186 after 4 p.mi. VE 12878 I $$$$$$$$$$$! \ TOP CASH PAID : 4 Far Cm k Tnidit Cll IIM frti n CMM t*) ^ n ktat ny tflar ^ I Out o( itaU OK 2 Z Gal Sam anytkn* $ 595-3991 J $$$$$$$($$$$ .7"5 '89 MUSTANG 5.0 GT CONVERTIBLE 25th Anniversary Edition New top, low miles, excellent condition. Priced to sell at $7500. Call 263-2629. VE111 TIRED OF TRYING TO SELL YOUR CAR? Don't want strangers coming to your house? WE PAY CASH FOR CLEAN CARS & TRUCKS! BOULDER CITY MOTORS 1112 Nevada Hwy. Boulder CHy, NV. 293-2000 New 97's Here Now! Ford F-Series Worltft Bst-Sellin9 Truck Hard to fhid. We got "rnn all. 350't-2S0's-4x4't Craw Cabs Suparcabs EYwytNng W0DOIS Drtvmi By You AtfUNMrVobyAMtoMol 280 N. GItMon Rd. 566-FORD( 1 'T^Z32"^ • )"if(W".' I .im;i|>|im^p"^^'rTT?N

PAGE 33

II IH i l. .1 1 • .. i jj. i i .i i i M i "WWWW!IWW^ rrm: PaO* 14 Panorama Thursday, February 29,1996 REAL ESTATE "BO LEWIS HOME. COMMERCIAL LEASE Office/ Warehouse 2 full units avail. 1 w/ apt. Newbldgs. Great area! Call for prices. 294-1500 REAL ESTATE NEED NEW or EXPERIENCED R.E. agents for expanding offne in BC. 100% convnisaton desks available 0 $100 nno., $150 per transactton •• • E&O. NO franchise fees, also liberal split arrangements. Non-MLS availabhs. For more info, and conf kfential interview, call Katie, CB Anchor Realty, 293-5757. RE12199 FOR SALE BY OWNER Lovely 3 bd., 2 ba., 2 car garage, RV pkg., many extras $109,000. Call for apt. 566-3229 after 3 PM on weekdays. RE11973 BC condo, 4 bdrm., 3 ba., fam. fp w bar, sgl. gar., pool, total new interior, nice owner will carry $165K, 294-0290. RE12736 CAREFUL, IT'S LOADED, with all the upgrades you desire! Just move-in & enjoy this BETTER THAN NEW 3 bd., 2 ba. Beautiful pool w/inground speakers, alarm sys., patios & much more! Call Valerie to view 498-3291 only $119,000 or 3% down avail. Lk;ensee. OPEN HOUSE TODAY. RE12756 PRICE REDUCED! Home completely redone 10 months ago! All new kitchen. $159,900 294-1500 Ul I) MOI M \l\ REALTY PRICED TO SELL 2BR/2BA Man. home in beautiful 55-)community. Nuetral decor, open floor plan. $129,000 294-1500 Ul DMOI MAIN REALTY GOLFCOURSE LOCATION 4BR/SBA 3 car gar. Home was model! Upgrades galore. $359,900 294-1500 MAKE MEMORIES in this new custom home on 1/2 acre. Over 2700 sq. ., 3 bdrms., 3 baths, 3 car garage. Spacious open Idtchen w/breakfast bar, garden window & nook area. Built-in entertainment area. All this and the privacy of a fenced yard including RV or boat parking. $218,000. HERE'STHEKEYtoyour happiness with this new custom home. Currently under construction. 3 bdrms., 2 baths, over 2000 sq. ft.-3 car garage. 9 feet walls, w/vaulted ceilings, pot shelves, niches. $185,900. 2 STORY EXECUTIVE home w/over 3000 sq. ft., w/indoor spa & private master suite w/sitting room. Formal dining, 5 large bdrms. w/bdrm. & bath dowr^tairs for guests or in-laws. Familyroom, wet t>ar, pot shelves, much more. $189,000 FOR FAMILY PLEASURES over 2300 sq. ft., 3 bdrm. home w/2.75 baths. 1/2 acre corner lot w/RV-boat parking, lush landscaping & an inground pool, patio w/mist system & custom BBQ. There's more $229,000. Call BONNIE MUSSELMAN 373-1967 JR REALTY PRICED Td SELL NdWIII 3600 sq. ft Home 3 Bedroom 3-1/2 Bath 4 car gar. w/wor1(shop large, home theater room, Jacuzzi tub, upgraded kitchan. Many extras. Over $100,000 bk>w appraisal. Phone 293-1893 IMMACULATE HOME IN BC mSCummings 3 bedrooms, 1-3/4 baths worfcihop, 2 car gar, open floor plan, vaulted oailir>gs and much, much moral $185,000 Shown by appowtmant 294-2926 Knap^ •**• TMTt "W mak0 hout* ceMs te it iw liri bMiiM* *M 1W r I 1* Weat PacHIc Ava.. Ma. 11, Nandarsen, NV MOll I 566-8185-Bus. Irfa 474-1560-Pager REAL ESTATE GOVERNMENT FORECLOSED HOMES for pennies on $1. Delinquent Tax, Repo'a, liEO'8. Your area. Toll free 1-800-898-9778 Ext. H-4332 for current listings. Fee required. RE12779 ^ FREE RENTAL ^ SERVICE HOMES A • CONOOS-ANY AREA. CALL TIM QROUP ^ REALTY ASK FOR ^ ELAINE, 454-ao40 *****•• REAL ESTATE NO MONEY DOWN • New program. If you are working or retired you nnay qualify to purchase a home with no money down. Call me today to find out how. George 371 5375. RE12945 • ^S^ "THIS IS IT ^^!, 1M0SF.S RV/Parl(, view of valley, workshop, gorgeoua window traalmenta. Call Dave, RE/MAX Eagle's View 566-6700. Preetigioue Lakeview custom home, 3 Ig. bd., oversize park-like lot. Priced at $214,900. Call me today 283-4422 Karen Reyes, Americana Realtors. ^fj^m. ba.lMiiii,1sn ^WJJP SP.biEM* \CBm CiMl M*. 1 yr. Loll Of eitrnt, Iff. lei, t1t*,ta*. Ak lor Corby or nyss flt REMAX ESQ'M VIMV SM47ae. EOIOO Pe\\7t BARELY LIVED IN! 3BR/3.SBA Beautiful custom home with Lake Mead view. Bonus room. S22S.000 7O;M 294-1500 REAL ESTATE 3 bd., 1-3/4 ba., 2 car garage w/door opener, customized kitchen, front desert landscape, back enclosed yard w/rosas, kimon tree & artichoke, extended patio w/cookin^ area, buiK in refer. & raised brick herb garden, vegetable garden w/ strawberry bed, water conservation system enclosed lawn equipment storage. Ck)se to schools and hospitaL $136,500. 1400 Stacey Lane, 2934660. RE12858 "^^ 'EAGLE VJfiU|^ CREST ^^^ Buy of the 1370 SF of comfort 3 bd., 1.75 ba., patio w/mist ays. while you shoot "HOOPS". Shows excel. Call Dave, RE/MAX Eagle's View S66-67(X). J£i££, Wtien you're ttilnking of buying or' fHflMllHI VMIMS • selling a home, you'll want the transaction to proceed swiftly and effidentty. That's why you should look lor a real estate professional with special expertise In listing, selling, Investment and taxes. Someone with a proven record of experience! Someone you can trust. That someone I Is a Certified Residential Specialist (CRS), your best choice In real estate. Call Dave Berard Re/Max Eagle's View Brokaf/G.R.I. CRS (702) 566-6700 CALLCOLDWELLBANKER D Q COLDWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY 1497 Nevada Hvwy., Boulder City Hwy. 83 to B.C. only dome on right 293-5757 ; FREE! LIST OF ALL HOMES FOR SAU IN B.C. .. • • -. • • • a. 'r^ HOMES • • • • • • ^--'-. • ''' DEL PR ADO -tile roof, 1577 s.f., freshly painted interior, covered patio, sparkling pool & more...$189,900. TILED ENTRY, KITCHEN & FM. RM.. 4 bd., 3.5 ba., bit.-in surround sound, pool, spa, gazebo, 3190 s.f. $397,500. KEY LARGO 3 bd., 2 be., tile firs. & counters in kitchen, & f m. rm. Lake view, insulated garage. $209,900. INVESTOR OR 1st time buyer! Needs some work, best price around. 3 bd., 1 ba. $79,900. ITALIAN MARBLE thru entry, kitchen & L/R. Skylight in entry, new carpet in bedrms., 2 car garage, pool. $146,500. ROOM FOR TOYSI4 bd., 3 ba., 3027 s.f., oversized garage, lake view. rock f/p in L/R, bonus rm. downstairs & more. $269,500. MANUFACTURED HOMES NEW ON MARKET! 2 bd., 2 ba., 3 car carport, 2 c. garage, RV prkg., covered porch, too much to tell. $128,500. PEACE & OUIET • 2 bd., 2 ba., fam. rm., lakeview, covered porch, carpet, vinyl paint 1995. $127,900. LAKE VIEW, corner lot, garage, carport, covered patio, family rm. w/ fireplace. Lots of extras. $178,950. BREATHTAKING VIEW from this one, island cooking & huge pantry, island cooking, fm. rm., oversized garage. $210,000. LIKE NEW! 2 bd., 2 ba.. stucco exterior on permanent foundation, new appliances, carpet, cabinets & more. $102,000. OPEN FLOOR PLAN & lake view! Oversized 1 car garage with 17x17 laundry & workshop. Neutral colors t/o. $169,900. LAKE VIEW from screened in patio and front rooms. 2 bd., 2 ba., 3 car carport. Lots of RV parking & large storage bidg. $137,280. THREE BDRM., 2 ba., large covered porch with some lake view. Nice patio, storage/hobby room & more! Reduced to $142,500. LAKE VIEW • large lot in cul-de-sac, lots of RV parking, 2 bdrm., 2 ba., storage sheds & morel $155,000. MOBILES IN PARKS UPGRADED DBL. WIDE in Gingerwood. Lots of ceramic tile in kitchen & baths, berber carpet t/o, carport. Furnished $48,500. IMMACULATE 2 bd., den, covered porch, parking & patio, all appliances! Needs to sell. $26,900. In Gingerwood. DESERT VIEW from covered porch. 44x24 home wHh drywall interior. 1991 Silvercrest, all appliances, 2 bd. $60,000. COMMERCIAL LOT FOR SALE with 4 car garage and each one rented. $70,000. BLDG. & BUSINESS in the heart of B.C. Gas station with mechanic on duty. Busy corner on Nev. Hwy. $395,000. COMMERCIAL BLDG.-640 s.f. was hamburger rest., on large 99x156 lot Hwy. frontage. $275,000. CORNER LOT HWY. FRONTAGE 9900 s.f. bIdg. on 93x166 lot New roof, Dock doors, 4 lane hwy. $750,000. t£) eiSSO CoUtnl Banker RasidcnIicI RMI ElUtt. An Equal Opporlunty Cotnpany. Equal Houting Opportunly. Som* OHioM lndtp*ndntly Omiad and Oparatad REAL ESTATE BC-PRICE REDUCED3lg. bd., 2ba., 1725sf, $159,600.5yrs.oki,3% to realtora 391-1644. RE11931 BCNICE 4 Bed. Lewis Home, Great cond., pool, $169K. Call BRET 2048482, Desert Sun RIty. RE12948 LAKEVIEW 2BR/3BA RV + 1 car garage. Balcony with incredible view of Lake Mead & mountans. $186,000 294-1500 REAL ESTATE BC6EAUnFUL4bd.,3 bath; 2 story, large pool, everything new and upgraded. 294-8482 Lk:ensee. RE12954 BC^HIiillRciAirsr fice/Warehouse 4 units rent for $2200. Sell for $218,900. Call BRET 294-8482 Desert Sun RIty. RE129S2 ^ tlEIICUliXA^ N^ property. Ctm 4bd., 2 ba., 1700 SF, RV/parking. Gorgeous tile in kitchan family, dining with F/P. Call Dave, RE/MAX Eagle's View 566-6700. REAL ESTATE 8yowner1600SF,4bd.. 3ba., newly painted int., Ig. livrm. wA/aulted ceiling & gas frpL, sep. fam. rm., prof, landscaped back yard w/|}atio & redwood patio cover. Nk:e neighborhood, close to schools, park & shopping $119,900. Can 564-5161. RE11901 LUXURY HOlVfE With Gorgeous view of lake. 4BR/5BAw/4car garage. Built-in Enter tainment System. $750,000 294-1500 REAL ESTATE PRICE REDUCED FOR QUICK SALE, 3 bd., 2 ba., $155,500. 3% to realtors, 391-1844. RE128S0 FOR SALE BY OWNER. 5 yr. old home, 3 bd., 2 ba., 2 car garage, RV pkg, $109,000. Call for apt. 566-3229 after 3 PM on weekdays. RE11973 ^ "STEAL ^WA^ OF THE l&W E E K 1606 SF, Spanish nwtif. 3 bd., 3 full bath -f extras. $115,900. Call Dave, RE/MAX Eagle's View 566-6700. a_,^^_—^i—^^^££i m r I Adobe Reolty OFfOmWfTT (702) 293-1707 1 HOMES NEW ON THE MARKET..Semi custom home, 3 ixirms. • • • den, 2 baths, over 1850 sq. ft., finished 2 car garage, pool & spa...$215,000. GREAT STARTER HOME...3 bdrms., 2 baths. 2car garage, over 1350 sq. ft...$139,500. IN GOLF COURSE ESTATES...2790 sq. ft., 4 bdrms., 3-1/2 baths, 2 fireplaces, 3 car garage, so many extras...$272,000. ZONED FOR HORSES...4 bdrms.. 1-3/4 bath, super kitchen, large lot on B. Hill, 2-car garage...$249,900. CHARMING ^^MK^I^eUlOO sq. ft. home, 3 bdrms., 2 baffl^J^o^l|[J£^]lce. 2-car garage plus carport..T$149,900. OPEN FL(X>R^LAN.5^UU sq. ft. master suite w/deckWyyly fdniy ike & mtns., 4 bdrms., 4 batnS; ^San9&rage...$399,000. REDUCED...Newer Del Prado 3 bdrms., 1-3/4 baths, 2 car|^i|[^,|def^ landscapings ...$169,500. 301^1 SEMI-CUSTOI nice area RVp TRI-LEVEL CUSTOM HOME...Spaciou8 living areas, separate bdrm. with bath, pool & spa, plus 3 bdrms. & 2 baths, upper level, 2 car garage...$214,900. MANY UPGRADES...4 bdrms., 2-1/2 baths, 3 car garage, exterior workshop with 1/2 bath, extra storage, RV pkg. with full hookups, heated spa...$199,500. CUSTOM HOME WITH EXTRAS 4^...This home has its own Movie Theatre room -f 3 bdrms., 3 baths, 4 car garage & more...$298,000. NEW HOME UNDER CONSTRUCTION...Pick your own up-grades, 4 bdrms., 3 baths, 3 car garage, great area...$290,000. ONE OF A KIND...Unobstt-ucted views of Lake Mead and mtns., totally up-graded ocean style glass patio, 3 bdrms., 3 baths...$319,900. NEAR THE 15TH GREEN ON THE GOLF COURSE...One level Lewis Home, 4 bdrms., 3-1/2 baths, 3 car garage plus Pool & Spa...$355,000. UNOBSTRUCTED VIEWS...Lake & Mtns., over 2,600 sq. ft., 3 bdrms., 3 baths, oversized garage...$369,900, .v.;,; j-;,-;; -:",./;, MUST SEE...3 bdrm., 3 bath home, nicely upgraded, 2 car garage...$167,900. NEWLY REDONE...0ver 1850 sq.ft., 4 bdrms., new roof, new court yard, new mirrored doors, new paint in and out...$174,500. 1/2 ACRE ON CORNER LOT...3300* sq. ft., 4 bdrms., 3-1/2 baths plus office, 3 car garage, R.V. pkg...$305,000. s=. ,^ l ely upgraded, ps...$182,500. ON THE GOLF C0URSE...4 bdrms., 3 baths, 2 fireplaces, 3-c0^r'|Js KUk RV parking, pooL.,$335,00d^>^^"^ BEAUTIFUL VIEWS OF LAKE AND MTNS...4 bdrms., 3-1/2 baths, to be sold with lot next door, $520,000 for the pkg. OPEN FLOOR PLAN...Custom 3100^^ sq. ft. with beautiful views, 5 bdrms., 3 baths, 3 car garage & more...$440,000. ELEGANT CUSTOM HOME...This home has4 bdrms., 4-1/2 baths, 5 car garage, pool, spa, 4800 sq. ft. and let's not forget the movie theatre...$575,000. CONDO/TOWNHOME LAKETREE...2 bdrms., 1-3/4 bath, comm. LAKE TERRACE CONDO...With view of lake, pool (leased), call for details...$109,900. 3 bdrms., 2 baths, 2 car garage...$179,900 SPANISH ^TEPS...2 bdrms., 1-3/4 baths, REGATTA P0INTE...2 to choose from...one at shows weli.only $97,500. $149,900 one for $188,700. Call for details. ^^,• ^•^ • :^p^ • •" • • • ^; • • • -LAND '"' • LAKE & MOUNTAIN VIEW LOTS MANY TO CHOOSE FROM $84,380 TO $249,900. CALL FOR DETAILS MANUFACTURED HOMES immaculate 2 bdrm., 2 READYTOMOVEIN...Upgraded3bdrm.,2 bath home, with separate den, mountain view, covered patio and porch, 2 car gar...$133,500. PRICED RIGHT, baths, storage, workshop...$122,500 SO MUCH FOR THE $$$$ Over 1600 sq. ft., 2 bdrms., 2 baths, some lake & mtn. view, enclosed carport...$129,500. i '"We have many other properties available for sale or lease** COME IN OR CALL FOR A FREE LIST OF ALL AVAILABLE PROPERTIES FOR SALE 1310 NEVADA HWY BOULDER CITY FAX 702-293-7477 Joan Curran 293-14S7 Oordhy Molln 293-S087 Claudia Raecka 293-9949 DIanna Vanata* 293-42S4 Helen Qriy-S92-1230 Belh Aktworth 293-7074 Crtatlna LeBrelonFernald, Broker293-2212 TOLL FREE #1-800-553-8081 ii FREE LISTS! OF ALL AVAILABLE PROPERTIES — PICK UP—MAIL—FAX FREE FULLCOLOR BROCHURE OFBOULDER CITY HOMES The Boulder City Specialists! Serving All Southern Nevada 293-4663 1-800-228-8358 Fax (702) 293-4645 1664 Nevada Hwy. Boulder City, NV 89005 LAKE TERRACE CUSTOM 4 bdrm., 3^ba., GfMt VIEWI $425,000. LAKEVIEW SfTES, LAKE TERRACE & B-HILL custom lots. $118,500^ STREET LEVEL OVERLAND Condo, 2 bdrm., 1-3/4 ba. Storage stMd. $76,950. MANUFACTURED HOME 4 FAMILY. 3 bdrm. HUGE YARD. $99,900 FOUR ADJACENT LAKE VIEW LOTS. DavalopMV Opportunityl $125,000 aa. PEACEFUL WATER VEWS OSSI.Laki Supariorl $219,000. MAQMFK^ENT 3500 aq. ft. CUSTOM homa, 4 bd., 3 ba., pool, Laisa Vlaw, lavaL $410,000. "VILLA FLORENCE" Navvest Town Homes 11700-2800 sf from $225,000. MARINA HIGHLANDS CUSTOMIIII Immaculate, 2 bd. 2 ba., dan. $219,900. ARD! 3 bdrm. JUSTLIS^ 1-3/4 ba.M J-J L*i. 1 II ^m^ ilocatad3bd. I AS NEW ^Vffypflf ETl 170Of af. ramodak $121,500. GREAT 2 BDRM. Condo on DalRay w/ garage. UKE NEW. $89,000. BEAUTII biHandai SPYGLASS CONDO W/LAKE VIEWI $127,500 or Fumishad 9 $1200/tno. UNOBSTRUCTED Laka Viewl Spyglass Cond. 2 bd., 2-1/2 ba. Claan $133,500. FOR RENT: 2 EVERGREEN CONDOS. 2 bdmt, 2 ba.. Laundry area. $650^o. CLAREMONT HEIGHTS CUSTOM. Swisational Homa Vlaw. $639,500. PRICE Homaoi Em 2 bdrm., 2 ba. 138,000. 3 BDRM., 3 LEVEL W/ELEVATOR. Unobstructad vlaw. $415,000. SINGLE LEVEL FAMILY HOME. Homa naar schools. $170,000. MANUFACTURED HOME IN LAKE MTN. LIka Naw. ONLY $169,500. OPEN MorvFri 9 am to 4 pm Sat 10 am-4 pm Sun. & eves byappointmt Convenientty Located In Marshall Plaza Near TWO GALS" Great Parking Easy Access After hours call: PatBamateIn Mary Board Unetle Davis Kay Klmbarlln Sherry Lalhaiii StuLowa 6644769 2B3-72S4 293-1097 (pagar)477-W16 2944166 293-3041 ENm Lamb Stromberg. Broker 2934506 -IREAL ESTATE PVH Real Estate Hwy. 160, next to Terrible Herbst, 3 models to choose from, $50 sq. ft., over 200 lots available, 1-702-727-O445. RE12171 REDUCED!!!!!!! 4BR/3BA Custom Trilevel with oversized 2 ear gamge w/RV. parking, 2 living rooms. $285,000 294-1500 \CSSdf built in "1994." 836 SF, fabulous view, upgraded carpet, open floor plan. Call Dave, RE/ MAX Eagle's View 566-6700. EOIOO -*€ BUYER'S AGENT Call ROSALEE New Homa/Sales Lets see beautiful GV/ Hend. area. Model homes range from $100,000 on up. 224-7547 PAGER 433-0659 RESIDENCE Cedar CIfy Southern Utah 20 Acres, Breathtaking Mountain Views $56,500 New 3BR 2ba $87,500 Deli-Coffie Shop $79,900 5 Bedroom Brick Home Now OnJy $89,900. • Goigeous Custom Homes From $249,000 to 256,800 Land, Land Phis More. Call Manny 294-0870 ERA Realty Center VOl)RnRSTHOME'24x6(V 3 bdrm.. approx. 1440 sq ft., in perfecl shape, mobile home. Can be converted! So many new ilcms & upgrades. A must .see! B C 106.500k. •CLOSE TO HEAVEN* Stunning lake views. 3 bdrm.. 2400 sq. ft., spa/4 decks upgraded to the max! B.C. 28.'ik •NOBODY SLEPT HERE* 3 bdrm. Almost 1/2 acre, new home. 2338 approx. sq. ft., ton of amenities 349K Reduced! •BEING SQUEEZED 4 BDRM.* Single-story. quiet culde-sac. 4 bdrm., 4 bath. Lake view.22l9sq.ft.28Sk Reduced! All furniture can be purcha.sed. BC •OPEN SPACE FOREVER" The desert and a forever view of the lake, large lot. 3 bdrm.. cozy home, a must see! B.C. 219k. BARBIE'S DREAM HOUSE IS FOR SALE!Exquisite new cunlom 3789 .sq. ft., 5 bdrm., 5 baths, pool size lot. 3 car detached garage, ton of amenities! Full tranquil view of Lake Mead! Make offer, owner may carry! Reduced! Mu.st sell! Owcrs want out! 460k. BC UNDER APPRAISAL* Location! Location! Very quiet neighbortiood. tile roof. 3 bd. or 2 & large den. lots of RV parking. 2 car (blocked In & gated) cloie to schools. Newer home Best buy in the area! Reduced! I63K. •MOVE IN READY* The perfect home, new carpet, just nmodeled. 2 car. R. V. Oean. close 10 ichools. All land.scaped. lap pool & spa. 1648 sq. ft. A must KC! *BErrERTHANNEW*House shows like i model. 3 bdrm. Kfftox. l668sq.fi.only4years oM, lush landscaping, many upgrades, motivated seller! I27K Henderson. •GOLFER'S PARADISE* 4 Br. 2790 sq. ft. 100 x 125 lot. hiidwood floors, many upgrades, a show plaoe & a pool to die for! $349,930 BC *BACKS UP TO GOLF COURSE* 2 sioty. 4 bdrm.. 4 bith A bonus room, lush landiciping. romantic master suite. 3154 approx much more, a true beauty. 369.900k B.C. *ACT FAST* Over 1500 iq. ft. New beautiful condo. phced to bottom dollar at 129.900k. B C. *GREEN VALLEY CONDO* 2 master suites upstatn. private comer unit Beautiful mountain views, itiodel perfect 98K • A GREAT START* 4 bdrm. 2 cargnge. fully landscaped, cov pMK>. very clean and ready for yov 10 move into. Hend 98K Sandra Deubler 271.3277 REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE ThePrudential (M Jensen's Realty''"^ Thinking of Buying or Selling? The Rock is the answer! The Prudential Jensen's Realty Specializes in Residential-Commercial and Property Management We're here to serve you Henderson Boulder CHy Jg]—, CCA oooo 293-3355 — tqUAL NOUSINC Sfii-'iTW OrrOtTUNITY •'''' • ^O*" iWvitiie In the Ateiitf mtOtMmttf Delia's Best Buys NO QUALIFYING • 20,000 dn., take over$l635 iDO., custom home, 4 bedroom, 3 bath, 2 car garage, spa w/gazebo, view, lireplace, great room, landscaped w/curbing, 1/2 acre lot, block wall. 404 Glasgow. lAKEAiJlt Boulder City living at it's best. 4 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage, landscaped, designer pool/spa, new thru-out, $169,999. 1313 Elsa. SUPER SHARP3 bedroom, huge lot, block wall, slab lor RV/ boat, covered patio, storage shed, new thru-out, $83,500.136 Elm St. CHEFS PEirrE: Huge kitchen, custom oak cabinets, tiled thru-out, 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, newer home, $99,750. 373 Rochell. COMMERCIA L POTENTIAL • 3 bedroom fixer, down town Henderson, comer lot. Wow! Ownerw/carry. $89,900.302 Tin. CALICO RlDGE-4 r^Rdrnnm custom, 3 bath, 3 car garage, tile roof, 2500 sq. ft., superlative view, overlooks It all, 1/2 acre, block wall, 1995, fireplace, martle/granite/tile thai-out, jet tub (2-person), stucco covered patio, too many upgrades to list. Sacrificed $295,000 tinr). 1125 Rubellite. 5 ACRESRural/single zoning w/commerclal potential, water/ power/paving going In now. Sets on Commerce just past Ann Rd., cross street Tropical Pkwy. Owner w/carry $275,900. Put an energetic, personable, multi-million dollar, go-getter producer to work lor you today: I'll pay lor your home warranty or your appraisal. Call Delia at 565-3852 REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS... Call Henderson's #1 Real Estate Team BRENDA BIRD GRI, CRS Lifetime Henderson Resident 564-1127 WENDY WILLIAMS ^^ 378-1689 Wr wJn Over $100,000,000 in Sales 27 years combined Real Estate experience! "The DYNAMIC DUO Sells Homes!" Group, n>i'oiiI I — n. i.ti'kiXiir Henderson Realty, Inc. "The Property People" 18 Water Street 564-2515 Call now for naw home information! BEAUTIFUL & ROOMY! 4 bd. 2 ba., fam. im. w/fireplace. 1787 sq. ft., shows like a model. E:48630 A PERFECT "10" 2 bd., 2 ba., .shows like a model, all new paint, ceiling fans, cooled gar., all appliances stay. Don't miss this one $99,000. M: 50509 CONDO 2 bd., 1 ba., 2 c. gar., rehts for $700, owner needs offer quick. $73,000. C:47107 SECTION 19 -1/2 acre, tri-level, 4 bd., 2.5 ba., totally redone. P(K)1, RV parking. Shows great $192,000. C:45665 WHITNEY RANCH Clo.se to everything, side by side homes, one w/ptxil, both highly upgraded. Must see. F:49443 & F:49444 1=1 EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENUY OWNED OfTORTWITY AND OPERATED. DICK BLAIR REALTY 833 NEVADA HWY., BOULDER CITY ^ (702) 293-2171 (ET P.lly GufTey-Spttr 293-6075 *""^'* """"* '^*'-'Boh BUIr, Broktr W3-2049 Andrt* Andrrmn 293-.122)l j Cindy Bandy 294-2919 KhnndaSled( 293-7975 Nancy Murphy 293-3292 Rich Moynihan 293-1802 Richard Guy 293-4915 Serving Boulder City Since 1968 HOMES WALL TO WALL PERFECTION, In this ONE OWNER HOME! 3 bedrms., 2 baths, 2 car gar. TILE ROOF, $184,500. HANDYMAN'S DREAM—in Golf Course area, 3 bedrms., 21/2 baths, 2 car gar., needs a bit of T.L.C. $168,000. UPGRADED T/O CUSTOM KIT. 3 Bedrms., 2035 sq. ft, 13/4 bath, Den, Fam. rm.. Gar., Cov. patio. Pool, Spa, 2 Tuff sheds, $189,000. FANTASTIC FAMILY HOME-FINE NEIGHBORHOOD, 3,000 sq. ft, 4 bedrms., 3 baths, fam. & game rms. MUCH MORE. $335,000. REMODEL TO YOUR HEARTS DESIRE. OVar 1700 sq. ft custom home. 2 bdrm., den, island kit, 3 frpl. & more. $149,500. CREAM PUFFI 4 bedrms., 2 bath, 2 car gar., or bonus rm., beautiful back yard w/putting green & SPA, cov. patio, $149,500. ^. 3 bedrm., 2 bath, 2 car gar. SHOWS PRIDE OF OWNERSHIP! $115,000. 5 bedrm. GREEN VALLEY TRI-LEVEL Sparkling pool/Designer deck, 2<882 sq. ft, wet bar, solar screens. $229,900. 1,417sq. ft 2 bedrm., open floor plan. 1/4 ac. lot, RV Parkg., sparkling pool A spa, in Whitney Ranch. $139,900. 4 bedrm.. Master Suite downstairs, 1,970 sq. ft, F.P., Cov. Patio, TILE ROOF, $129,900. POPULAR DEL PRADO 2 STORY-2150 sq. ft, 4 bdrm., 2 1/2 bath, fam. rm. w/f.p. & wet bar, PERFECT COND. Low maint yard. $182,500. CONDOMINIUMS A TOWNHOMES 1,660 sq. ft, 2 bedrms., 2 1/2 baths, PLUS BONUS ROOM. Lake area. Pool & Spa. $139,000. CONVENIENT & comfortable living in this 2 bedrm., 13/4 bath Condo, in GREAT LOCATION! Offered for $99,900. IN HENDERSON—Tired of ranting looking for a DEAL? This Immaculate CONDO is PRICED FOR QUICK SALE! 1 bMlrm., 1 1/2 bath. $49,900. SPANISH STEPS CONDO-Ground Floor unit IN EXCELLENT CONDITION, 2 bedrms., 2 baths. PRICED BELOW MARKET $94,500. RARE TRI-LEVEL CONDO-1,500 sq. ft TOTALLY REMODELED, MANY EXTRAS! 4 bwlrms., 2 3/4 bath, CALL NOW. $165,000. MODULAR HOMES WITH LAND MTN. VISTA ESTATES Cor. lot. low maintenance, 2 bedrms., 2 baths, cov. carport, GREAT CONDITION! $95,500. CORONAOO ESTATES—2 bedrm., 2 bath. Mobile home/large car/motor home port, PLUS Single car gwyworkshop. YOURS FOR $125,000. MOBILE HOMES IN PARKS NEW USTINGI! CLEAN 2 bedrm., all appH. NEW REDECORATED INTERIOR, LARGE A/C unit, fenced yard. BRING CHECKBOOK $18,500. M GINGERWOOD—1978 Bainbridge, 14'xS', 3 bedrms., 2 battta, front htt. $2S,000. 1975 HILLCREST—14x64' 2 bedrms., 2 baths, SEE THIS ONE TODAY! $21,75a v 1977 Champion 12'xS6' SUPER SHARP! 2 bedrms., 2 baths. NEW DRAPES, CARPET, DRYWALL-FURNISHED! ;.,. • .., v,>.-: • •.,-„/.. • • • • .; • • : MOORE'S MOBILE HOME PARK—2 bedrm., 1 Ba., 1976 TRAVEL-EZE. $7,500. MOORE'S MOBILE HOME PARK-2 bedrm., 1 bath, W/10'x18' screened porch. $16,000. 1974—12'xS6' 2 bedrm., 1 1/2 bath, fenced yard, $16,500. ELDORADO PARK-1973 SKYLINE-12x60 with 6'x12' living room expansion. Light and airy interior. 2 bed., 2 bath. $14,550. MOORE'S PARK-1969 NAMCO—12x58, 2 bed., loft, 1 1/2 bath, living room extension. Attached storage room -f double storage shed. $15,500. ELDORADO MOBILE HOME PARK-WHAT A BUY, 2 bedrms., 1 bath, awnings, Central Air/Heat, NEAT AS A PIN NOW ONLY $16,900. GINGERWOOD ADULT PARK'14'x66', 2 bedrm., 2 bath. Central Air/Heat & Evap. Cooler. 2 awnings, porch $23,000. LAND IN HENDERSON CUSTOM HOME AREA. Over 1/2 acre Views of LV VALLEY A UGHTS, SUNRISE MTN. & MORE. $65,000. GREAT BUY for this 1/2 ac. lot in LAKE MEAD VIEW EST. LAKE & MTN. VIEWS!! $250,000. IS AC. in ELDORADO VALLEY-Cleared A fenced. Part UTIL ZONED UGHT MFG. $600,000. COMMERCIAL INCOME PROPERTY GREATESTABUSHEDBUSINESS-GiHshopw/pkg. liquor. Central location-on hwy. near motels. $355,000 incl. bIdg. Aland. RENTALS 3 bedrms., 2 baths, 2 car gar., fenced rear yard, avalL Now. $1,250. NICE 1/2 DUPLEX WITH POOL 2 BEDRMS., 1 3/4 BATH, laundry rm., fenced rear yard. Avail. NOW $700. Very nice NEW WATERS EDGE HOME—MANY EXXRAS, 3 bedrms., 3 baths, 2 car gar., cloae to Lake Mead $1,296. VERY NICE 2 Bwiroom, 2 Bath, Fully Furnished Condo. AVAIL NOW. $700.00 BOULDER HILLS CONDO 2 Bwlrms., 1-1/2 balti. Avail. 3/1/96. $625. No pets. 3 bedrm., 1 bath. Gar., Shed., Wkahp., nice arM, lots shade trees, NEW A/C44Mt AvaiL 3/1/96. $850. NEW CONDO 2 bed, 2 bath • dan A office. AU APPL, COMM. POOL $875. No pels. 2 bwL, 2 bath, 2 carpts. NO PETS. $750. 2 bedrm., 2 ballt, 2 cov. carpkg. IsL II., no pels, aval. MAR. 1.$0a Stop by and pick up your FREE CURRENT LIST OF PROPERTIES AVAILABLE FOR SALE TOa FREE! 1-800-5254810 Ext. E41 SINCERITY AND INTEGRITY 18 OUR 8PECU\LTY REAL ESTATE In BC 6 yr. old, 3 bd., 2 ba., 1627 sf, on private St. Lg. lot, 2 car gar. w/60' driveway, shed, fully land, Ig. cov. patio, upgraded, openfloorplan, Ig. rooms, fp. $158,500. 293-1303. RE12467 Thursday, February 29,1996 Panorama Page 15 --4REAL ESTATE BC exacuth/e home-super clean, original owners, never pets or smokers, great location. $196,650. Owner licensee, 294-2627, Desert Sun Realty. RE12921 Lake View $399,950 Fabulous New Mead View Estates Custom 4 bedroom 3 baths, Open Floor Plan 2800 + sq. ft. 3 Fireplaces, Goigeous Master suite. French wooden doors. Comer of Stone Canyon Rd & Villa Grande Way. Beautiful Custom Tile. Reduced to S399,950 Reduced,l24,900 2 Bedroom House, Carport & 2 Studio units Actual Rent is $1,155 mcmthly. Potential for more income. SSak^J^ call M-ny ANCHOR REALTY ^y^-Ub/'U BOATS 8. RVs 16' GLA88PAR W TRAILER 90 hp Johnson Outboard vweiectric tilt, runs great, great buy at $1700. Call 641-8817. BR12232 Y D E 293-6014 Save money high quali^ boat covers factory di:t. Warranty included. sa/MC293-4509. 12600 1976 18-1/2 Ft. Trihull, OMC, I/O, w/trailer, $1000 OBO. 293-4566. BR12808 1985 Minnie Winnie 21 foot motor home, good condition, 293-3097. BOATS -^ 'eauty offers 3 bedrooms, 2.75 t>aths, over 2300 s/f, corner lot w/RV-boat prkg., lush landscaping & In-ground pool. There's more! Call to seel BEST PRICED 4 BEDROOM ... split floor plan, vaulted living area, sunny eat-In kitchen, 2 car garage. Indoor laundry, Irg. patio, low traffic street, nice area of newer homes. $110,000. HOP, SKIP & JUMP to shopping center, 3 bedrooms, separate family rm., skylight, upgraded kitchen cabinets, central c/h, rear yard RV access, seller will entertain all offers ...$81,900. DON'T SNOOZE ON THIS ONE. Pretty 3 bedroom, 2 bath located on quiet cul-desac, approx. 1800 a/f, huge family room w/ fireplace, country kitchen, dual panes, almost new roof, priced right... $90,000. GREEN VALLEY/NO OUAL! 1 Story, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, great room, fireplace, dining area, 2 car garage on quiet cul-de< sac. Owner may carry small second. Only $124,000. OWNER WILL CARRY FINANCING-Home on Black Mtn. Golf Course-Large Master bedroom sulte-4 Bedrooms-Game room In addltkm to Family room-Overelzad poolRV parking. Call for more details! EXCELLENT TERMS! Vacant land In Henderson/MlsskNi Hllle custom area. Comer lot wAJtllltiee In street Zoned for horsas. Don't mlas this opportunity. CaH today for more Info! X^^ m BgUAL HOUSING ammnmy IIMat*K r" 101E. Horiion. Hendenon 564-6546 a EACNan>icEWDBDKNn.YowNH>^NDamiATH> a. MOTORCYCLES 1 BOATS & RVs 1993 VIRAGO 1100CC. low mileage, garage kept, see at Bikers Dream. 2425 Bouldar Hwy. at Dl. CaH 7311310. MC12718 Ventura Test Trailar, sleeps 8, gr. cond., propane stove, ice box. water pump, $1650. CaH 294-1186. BR 12879 See Radiator Master Located inside Emission Express, 1400 NV Hwy, 293-RAD1. VE12525 1988 Cad. Seville 78K mi., exc. cond. loaded lumbar front seats $8500, 294-1893. VE 12628 '65 Ford 3/4 ton pickup, good tires, 23585X16, good 360 engine, new clutch & good body. $1000 OBO. 565-1367. VE12641 Cracked dash? Solve it fast. Molded coverlay dash as shown on TV's TRUCKER USA installs fast. Looks original. Visa/ MC, 293-4509. 1979 Lincoln Continental, 120,000 mi., inL like new, body good cond., $2300. Eden 293-4663. VE12733 1986 GMC Sien'a, 4x4, 20,000 mi. on new 350 engine, manual trans., PS, PB, AL, pwr. windows & locks, am/fm cassette, fiberglass shell w/carpet kit, very clean!! $7000 OBO. Call 3618700. VE12757 1978 Chevy Camaro must sell $900 OBO. Auto, pwr. windows, cassette, spoiler package, may need trans, work. Call anytime 2753852. BC VE12749 1980 HUSKY 250CC. adult owned, very good cond., $550; 1983 HUSKY 500CC, adult owned, very good cond. $750. 558-0147. VE12744 86 Olds Delta 88, low miles, excel, cond., $3500. 293-4406. VE12900 1978280Z,2+2.5speed, AC, outstanding cond., $1978. 293-6043. VE12924 92 Suburban 4WD, 56K, 4K left on warranty, dual air, pwr. everything, excel, cond., $23,000,2932809. VE12928 VEHICLES '91 Ford Tempo, 4 dr., AC, loaded, $5000,56B1363 VE12674 SEIZED CARS FROM $175. Porsches, Cadillacs, Chevy's BMW's, Corvettes, mo Jeeps, 4 WD's. Your Area. Toll free 1 -800-8989778 Ext. A-4332 for cun'ent listings. Fee required. VE 12776 1974 VW $600. Call 5648242. VE12773 '56 FORD, CALL FOR INFORMATION, 5646883. VE12765 77 CHEVY 1/2 TON, W/ SHELL 3" BODY LIFT, 350 MOTOR. RUNS AND LOOKS GREAT. $2250 OR O.B.O. TRUCK BED TRAILER WITH SHELL $100. 83 SUBARU 4/DR., HCT/ BACK, W/AIR, RUNS EXCEL. $1500 OR O.B.O. 564-1296. VE12764 '58 T-BIRD Ready to paint, runs good, new tires/wheels. Call 5643344. VE12908 Used auto parts foreign & domestic Big John and Sons, 1631 Foothill Dr., 293-PART. VE 12524 90 FORD AEROSTAR 4X4 EXCEL. COND.. LOW Ml., $10,500, 6645642. VE12828 72 Olds Delta 88 ht sedan, 350V8, 108K, new tires, battery, clean dependable transportation $1000. 294-2612. VE12836 BIG JOHN'S TOWING > Light and Haavy duty lowing, recovery •pcialM*. (702) 294-HELP 1566 Foothill Dr. aC. Great Transportation, Runs Good, Fun to Dnve $1800 060 565-9675 or 599-0652 (Beep) 94 FORD F150 XLT LARIAT CLUB CAB PICKUP W/CAP 4.9 LITER MINT COND., 2935112. VE12856 ; 1985 DODGE VAN 250 CUSTOM SLANT 6, 4 SPEED. AC, STEREO 1990 FIRM. 293-6745. VE12829 68 Chevy pckup, w/ladder racks & tool box, $1000 firm, passed sm*g, 294-0707. VE12870 65 International Scout, body good, runs good, extras, $1750. 031(29^ 1186 after 4 p.mi. VE 12878 I $$$$$$$$$$$! \ TOP CASH PAID : 4 Far Cm k Tnidit Cll IIM frti n CMM t*) ^ n ktat ny tflar ^ I Out o( itaU OK 2 Z Gal Sam anytkn* $ 595-3991 J $$$$$$$($$$$ .7"5 '89 MUSTANG 5.0 GT CONVERTIBLE 25th Anniversary Edition New top, low miles, excellent condition. Priced to sell at $7500. Call 263-2629. VE111 TIRED OF TRYING TO SELL YOUR CAR? Don't want strangers coming to your house? WE PAY CASH FOR CLEAN CARS & TRUCKS! BOULDER CITY MOTORS 1112 Nevada Hwy. Boulder CHy, NV. 293-2000 New 97's Here Now! Ford F-Series Worltft Bst-Sellin9 Truck Hard to fhid. We got "rnn all. 350't-2S0's-4x4't Craw Cabs Suparcabs EYwytNng W0DOIS Drtvmi By You AtfUNMrVobyAMtoMol 280 N. GItMon Rd. 566-FORD( 1 'T^Z32"^ • )"if(W".' I .im;i|>|im^p"^^'rTT?N

PAGE 34

m^t^fifmrntm^mmmmmmm mmmmmmmmmmmm m [L Pag 16 Panorama Thursday. February 29,1996 imlTt 'OESERTMLEY SMC L£/iP YEAR HOP ON OVBR TO m VAUEYf W LiHii,^ .R ^"^ ^ I""" i r'^i t ^ i i8 ii s j j J i W !j ^#iw^^ 1994 GJMC Low Milgs, Factory Warranty. Many Extras! (#61076A)^ 1994 CMC Red,Sportside,#UPl242 ASK FOR DAUID OR TOM • II 15 990 ^^•''.^.^^Jii^ imimiNDAi EXCEL Only 5500 Miss, Mutt ^ SMI UP1268/ 7990 199SJIUICK JtEfiAi Ftod,MI11iGoQdwa,' #UPt277 >AN 1995 CHEVY COlSli Low m—. Ha Wananty.LotsOfExii #UP1276 ion 9990 irstw CORUETTE Only 44,500 Original Miles, Red/Silver. Get Ready For Spring! #61163A / ?=~ -T~~ •\ •! '^o EXPLORER 4 Dr., 4x4, V-6. All The Extras. Won't Last! #61047A 14.990 i' BANKRUPTCIES TAX LEINS • REPOSSESSIONS JUDGEMENT WE (AN HELP! ASK FOR TOM K l^V SUBURBAN Power Windows-Locks, Leather & Much More! #UP1240 2&990 )?^r. coumm KAN Great For Camping, Must Drive This One! #UP1219A L£5vi*biu.. 1993CHEVy BiKk, CiMtonnid InckjoEng Ruminp Botrdil Tast Oriw Todiy)(IUPl2e2) i i I ; i^.s#m /t.)ils Sale ends Fob 27 tQ' ^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^ ^Q^^P ^^^^^ .,,^-'-tT.-.-,.,,(4,i:;7--.