Citation
1995-11-16 - Henderson Home News

Material Information

Title:
1995-11-16 - Henderson Home News
Creator:
O'Callaghan, Mike ( Columnist )
Streeter, Kathy ( Columnist )
Bluitt, Jocelyn ( Columnist )
Lacy, Thomas ( Columnist )
Theiss, Roy ( Columnist )
Cohen, Richard ( Columnist )
Shipler, Guy ( Columnist )
Hanlon, Bill ( Columnist )
Lynn, Esther ( Columnist )
Allen, D. J. ( Columnist )
Goldstein, Philip ( Columnist )
Soehlke, Ruth ( Columnist )
Henderson, Barb ( Columnist )
Eicher, Ray ( Columnist )
Andrade, Bill ( Columnist )
Andrews, William ( Columnist )
Earl, Phillip I. ( Columnist )
Bishop, Carolyn D. ( Columnist )
Judge, John ( Photographer )
Weidenfeld, Rob ( Photographer )
Publisher:
O'Callaghan, Mike
HBC Publications, Inc.
Creation Date:
1995-11-16
Language:
English
Materials:
Paper ( medium )

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Nevada
Henderson
East Las Vegas
City and town life -- Nevada -- Henderson
Community life -- Nevada -- Henderson
History -- Henderson (Nev.) -- 20th century
Genre:
Newspapers

Notes

Acknowledgments:
Greenspun Media sponsors this collection.
Collection Location:
Greenspun Media retains possession of the bound, original newspapers. Henderson District Public Libraries retains possession of the microfilm and the digital files.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Holding Location:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Rights Management:
The items in this collection are provided for non-commercial personal and academic use by Henderson Library patrons and may not be republished in any way. Contact Greenspun Media Group for additional information regarding rights to this material: http://www.greenspunmedia.com
Resource Identifier:
hhn4382 ( Digital Id )

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

mm Page 20 Henderson Home News Tuesday, November 14, 1995 H nTETE R S 0 N tINSIIAD >/^^ "iiL^1lliiii 11 urn \im a0^ )^^i Um-^^ TDi irir rciyrn • NEVADA'S BEST VAN SELECTION! IIIU V>IV WCIll ICR1 FAQORY EQUIPPED CUSTOM CONVERSIONS! BRAND NEW 1996 GMC JMMYSISl 2 Dr, 2WD '4 Speed Automatic Trans.. Air Conditioning. Power Windows. Power Door Locks. Tilt Steering | Wheel, Cruise Control & Much Morel (Stk. #61028) PER MOI^riH FOR 42 MONTHS! 42 mo lease, plus $ 1206.18 cap reduction, $350 refundable securty deposil, $450 bank lee. $299 firsl pymt. (excluding taxi. $2305.18 total at start. $12,558 total pymts.. $14,493 purchase option at lease end. I2c per mile over 15.000 miles per year. Plus excess wear & tear, state lee. tax. tag. due at inception with approved credit. Prices include everything excepi lax, title & DOC tee JH P BRAND NEW 1995 GMC SAFARI CARGO VAN PER IWIGISITH FOR 30 IWIOISTTHS! 30 mo. lease, plus $1706 cap reduction, $325 refundable secuhty deposit. $299 first pymt. (excluding tax). $2330 total at start. $8970 total pymts., $10,025.10 purchase option at lease end. 10c per mile over 15.000 miles per year. Plus excess wear & tear, state fee. tax. tag. due at inception with approved credit. Prices include everything except tax. title S DOC fee. BRAND NEW 1996 GMC SONOMA dub Coupe, 2WD 4 TO CHOOSE FROM! SLS Sport, Air Conditioning, Aluminum Wheels, AM/FM Stereo Cassette! (Stk. #61029) Ol^fliliAiii PER MOISITH FOR 42 MONTHS! 42 mo. lease, plus $1500 cap reduction. $250 refundable security deposit. $450 bank fee. 199 first pymt. (exduding tax). $2399 tota' at start. $8358 total pymts,. $8095.36 purchase option a! lease end 10c per mile over 15,000 miles per year. Plus excess wear S tear, state fee, tax. tag. due at inception with approved credit Prices include everything excepi lax. title 4 DOC fee. NEVADA'S BEST SELEQION OF CUSTOM CONVERSION VANS. SUBURBANS. & PICKUP TRUCKS! KEEP YOUR CAR OR TRUCK RUNNING UKE NEW WITH OUR PARTS & SERVICE SPECIALS! f With GoodWrench Engines Anil Transmissions! Parts 2nd CHANCE FINANCING (702) 558-33l)0v<;i''^^TE£p! TOUR OUR NEWEST STA1E•0^THE • FAOUIY FEATURING: B 6 Acres of vehicles on display Q Full service deli for your convenience n Observation area for service department B Air Conditi( >ned service facility B FREE carwf sh witli all service work B Customer business Center Use our phone, fax or copier, while you wait B Courtesy rental cars on premises (See us for detaiii) SERVICE OPEN SATURDAY LEASE HOTUIME: (702) 558-3300 If Ask For KenF '88 CHEVY S-10X-CAB This^Pickup Wont Last! (#51923A). '92 MERCURY TOPAZ Nice Family Sedan! (#UP1129A).... m '92PONnACFORMUIA$ll(l(IA SeeSDnveTOsPontiac!(#51925A).. • I,77V '92FORD/\REOSTAR $ Well Maintained! (#51912A) \m / ALL CARS & TRUCKS ARE INSPECTED / LARGE SELECTION OF THE BEST / ALl CARRY WARRANIUEiK..r>..ier^adi£taiis) P RE-OWN EP VEHICLES IN NEVADA! 1992 TOYOTA CAiWIRY $ A Real Diamond! See It Today! (#51609A)) lUSO 1991 NISSAN 1995 CHEVY VAN Looks Great! Many Options! (#UP1198) 84BUICK SKYLARK Like New, A Must See! (#UP1096A) $ 4990 '91 DODGE SPIRIT 4DR Sedan, Warranty Available! (#51931 A) $ 6990 '94GE0 METRO $' Great Economy! (#412188) 7990 '93 CHEVY X-CABPKXUP Blue, You'll Love This One!(#51545B) i 16,990 '95 CHEVY $AZER4X4 Red, 4DR, 4WD, Like New!(#UP1192) ^,990 '95 CHEVY K4UZERT/UI0E 2DR, White, Get Ready For Snow! (#UP1175) 16,990 Wl AM 1Hi OiHY PIAURSHIP IN TOWN WIIH NJLDJL CiimHiP SAUSPaSOiiS! li \ i <• • • '. ( X^T 1 1'..,. ;-shi..vi• IXJV vs Basic graduate takes aim at Twins' roster f\ii;t' IM (} Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson, Nevada 25^ ONE MAN'S VIEW MIKE O'CALLAGHAN Did you ever have a bad day and believe that things couldn't get any worse? All of us have had such days but after looking around a bit, we can usually find somebody who has had even a worse day. I'm sure that David Gay, a planner for Clark County, had a much worse day than most Nevadans when the Commissioners heard about a talk he made in Santa Barbara, Calif, before some other urban planners. The title of the seminar in which he participated was called "Learning from Las Vegas." Gay, a California transplant, had returned to tell his former associates of the planning mess he had found in Nevada. Clark County didn't pay Gay's expenses to the meeting in Santa Barbara. He must have been the delight of the entire conference because he returned to tell his former colleagues that he had found a place with less comprehensive planning than the hodgepodge called Los Angeles. Columnist Tinim Herdt of The Star newspaper picked up on Gay's comments. When referring to his bosses, he quotes Gay saying, 'The Commissioners' attitude is, 'Look around you—it's working. What do we need controls for? It's making money.'" You have to believe this comment must have resulted in steam conimg out of the ears of our local officials when they heard about it. Herdt's column, which he headlined "Building a disposable city," went on to tell about a slide show and commentary that Gay presented the planners: •A photo of a monorail connecting two hotels: 'There are six different private monorails along the Strip. None is built to the same standards, none will ever connect to another." •A photo of a 30-story, $7.5 million casino sign: 'The sign industry is very powerful. If you don't plan a big enough See One Man's View Page 2 INSIDE A look at area museums Panorama, B1 Fab Four tells story on ABC TV News inside Editorials. Education .6-7 9 Happenings Deaths Seniors .11 Tl 12 Volume 46. 92nd EdHton H.B.C. Publications PO Boi 90430 Handarson, NV 89009 f702)S64-1Bei Revised TV listings Due to substantial increases in the cost of newsprint, the TV News section will only publish schedules of local broadcast stations beginning today. If you are a Prime Cable customer, we suggest you subscribe to Cable monthly magazine. The monthly subscription rate is $1.96. To order, call Prime Cable, 383-4000. Residents oppose power lines along Lake Mead Drive Kathy Streeter News Staff Writer The message was clear: Residents near Bartlett Elementary School do not want a 260-volt transmission line near their homes or their school. Nevada Power Com. held p public meeting at Bartlett Elementary School Tuesday night to inform residents of their plans for the high-voltage line. The power company's preferred route runs on the south side of Lake Mead Drive from Stephanie Street to Eastern Avenue. The second-alternative runs along an existing Valley Electric line south of Lake Mead Drive. The third route, and the one preferred by the majority of those at the meeting, runs along Horizon Ridge Parkway. The roadway is not yet built, but will access neighborhoods in the area south of Lake Mead Drive. If the line follows the Lake Mead route, it will be 325 feet from the Bartlett Elementary School property line. Parents, concerned about the effect of the ines' electromagnetic field on their children spoke strongly against that route. "We feel the Lake Mead route will subject the children and faculty of this school to a risk," a representative of the Parent Teacher Organization said. She sai'^ the PTO uriar.iiucj^l.v .-upports the Honzon Ridge route. 'That route takes |the linel the farthest away from the school and the children.' Resident Debbie Behr collected 53 .signatures from Green Valley Ranch homeowners pp.-„ posed to the Lake Mead route. She said, as a health care professional, that she is concerned about the effect the high-voltage lines may have on children. She said studies have shown a high occurrence of leukemia jnxhildren who attend school near high-voltage lines. She asked that the lines be located along Horizon Ridge Parkway "in the interest of the children and in the interest of our property values." Chris Wener, who spoke for Nevada Power, said there is no conclusive evidence that highvoltage lines cause leukemia or childhood cancers. 'To date, no one really knows," Wener said. 'There hasn't been a conclusive line drawn on if it's safe or not." He said the electromagnetic field, measured in milligauss, directly under the line would be 18 mG on the hottest day in the summer. A hairdryer emits 300 mGs, he said. At the Bartlett Elementary property line, the electromagnetic field would register less than 2 mGs, according to Wener. One resident said it would be more prudent, if the jury was still out on the issue, not to put the line close to a school. Nevada Power will present their proposal, including alternate routes, to the Henderson Planning Commission later this rnoiiih. '.Vuijt f ^aiij tie ourrp'jm will continue to supporr tht i .ike Mead route as th preferred route for the lines. He said the company based See Power City unveils Weils Park improvements Jocelyn Bluitt News Staff Writer A park in one of the city's most historic areas will soon get a make-over from the Henderson Parks and Recreation Department. HPRD unveiled plans for nearly $1 million of improvements in Wells Park during an Economic Development Neighborhood Meeting Tuesday evening. Wells Park, located in the Pittman area bordered by Price Street and Merlayne Drive, was originally constructed in the 1950s on a two-acre site. As the park grew to its current lO-acre size, developers did not tie in the new developments to give the park continuity. "There was no good planning at that time. Now with a master plan, we can develop it and give it continuity throughout. Everything will fit and the park will flow," Superintendent of Parks and Facilities Steve Rongyocsik said. Improvements on the park will include: •A swimming pool and pool house. •Six baskets on a basketball court area constructed with post tension concrete. •Sand volleyball courts with sprinkler systems for cooling the sand on hot summer days. •An upgraded tot-lot with new playground equipment. •New restrooms. •A sidewalk path circling the entire area. The pa'-k will be re-landscaped, planting 2,500 trees that will thrive in this area, and replacing the damaged turf areas. Rongyocsik said. The iniprovei'i nts will be funded by $90(.00(i from the city's park bond passed in 1993, and with $85,000in Community Development Block Grants. Rongyocsik said the remodeling is a culmination of requests by residents in the area and an effortbythecitytoraise ail parks within the city limits to the same standards. "All parks, no matter if they are in an old part or a new part of town shuul'jbe equal. Youcai!,?jc to any of our 17 parks and find the sani-i service," Rongyocsik s;iid. Wells Park will feature just some of the improvements the city has planned to upgrade all p:irks in the city. The improvements, Rongy ocsik said, wiU^Iso eliminate the vandalism and loitering that has become common in the pa rk.-= over thevears. As the park becomes See Park Page 5 Basic HS student charged in assault on campus Thomas Lacy News Staff Writer A Basic High School student is in the Clark Coimty Juvenile Hall today after allegedly assaulting a female student in the women's bathroom at the school last week. According to Hugh Harrison, chief investigator for the Clark County School District Police, the boy hid in the women's bathroom and waited for the 15-year-old girl to enter. The suspect, described as a 15-year-old male, initially complied with the victim's request to leave, but later re-entered. Harrison said the boy was charged with open and gross lewdness as a result of touching the girl. The girl was able to escape and the suspect was later identified through a school video surveillance tape. Investigators learned that the suspect was already in Juvenile Hall on separate charges Tuesday, when the additional charges were filed. The handling of the incident by school officials has some students and parents upset. Basic principal Horrace Smith said the girl was not raped or seriously injured. "We have handled the case in the appropriate manner by turning it over to the Clark County School District Police," Smith added. District Police Chief Dan Reyes said since the suspect was captured shortly after the incident, there was no need to issue a city-wide alert. "If the guy was some unknown person who just walked on campus, we would have made everyone aware," Reyes said. Evie Lopez, whose daughter attends Basic, criticized the handling of the case. They have tried to keep the incident quiet, when in fact, the students need to know that these things are going on in their own school," Lopez said. According to Lopez, she learned that there was an abduction at the school from her daughter,but was surprised that all students had not been informed through a general announcement "When I railed (Basic High dean] Mr. Tiesta, he at first said .iao inddert involving a student SM Student Page 6 Johr jjdge/News Staff DELAYED — Accused murderer Stephen Knapp finds out that his trial will be delayed yet again Tuesday. Knapp's lawyer requested a continuance to further prepere his case. A new trial date has been set for Jin. 29. Knspp it accused of kHIint a man at the Skyline Casino Oct. 5,1992. ORIGINAL DEFECTIVE

PAGE 2

Page 2 Henderson Home News Thursday, November 16,1995 ONE MAN'S VIEW: From Page 1 sign, your plan gets rejected." A photo of a street under repair: "You'll notice that the streets around the Strip are always torn up. That's because we have a zone called H-1 for hotels and casinos, which means you can do anything you want. As a consequence, as soon as a sewer line gets put in, along comes a 1,000-room hotel that forces you to resize the sewer line." Can you imagine the kind of day that Clark County planner David Gay had when Herdt's column was read by members of the Clark County Commission? It had to make D-Day seem like a New York minute in comparison to that day in Gay's life. Now the city and county planners and elected officials had better take a second look at Gay's comments and make certain we aren't on the downhill road creating a new Los Angeles in the desert. Sometimes a new set of eyes sees things more clearly than do eyes that have become accustomed to the changing scenery. When federal workers were furloughed the other day, some media commentators made light of the whole affair. Also, several people on the streets of our cities shrugged it off as being of little or no consequence. It might not be viewed so lightly if you were in need of a passport to travel on business, vacation or to meet a family emergency. What if you had been planning a vacation at Yellowstone National Park and this is the only time of the year yotlr company will give you? What if you are applying for Social Security or veteran's benefits and your appointment was for the same day everybody was sent home? You have been working as a public servant for several years and suddenly you are declared "non-essential" and are sent home. Non-essential? All of these years you have come to believe that your job was important and that's why you do it so well. Yes, and hundreds of other Americans come to rely on your skills and dedication. When you were sent home, nobody would tell you when to return or if you will ever be paid for the time lost. Being furloughed doesn't keep the bank from wanting house and car payments. I'll let other people worry about how the federal shutdown affected the world banks and Wall Street. More important to me is what a shutdown does to people who need services and those who so loyally provide these services to their fellow Americans. This shouldn't happen again. Congress should think more about the effects of its actions before squeezing the American people to punish the president. As early as last April, Speaker Newt Gingrich was quoted in the Washington Times as follows: "House Speaker Newt Gingrich vowed yesterday to create a titanic legislative standoff with President Clinton by adding vetoed bills to must pass legislation increasing the national debt ceiling... "Gingrich boasted that the President 'will veto a number of things, and we'll put them all on the debt ceiling. And then he'll decide how big a crisis he wants.'" Well, they created their crisis and showed that default is a political weapon they will use. Rep. John Kasich, ROhio, said, "If we close down, people will listen." He is correct, but I'm not sure Americans appreciate the message they are hearing from Congress. Next week Guy Shipler's column from Carson City won't be published. Mirian, Guy's wife, passed away this week. Mirian, one of my longtime friends, was born in Winnemucca and raised in Reno. She was an outstanding state employee and active in Republican politics. Her interest in books and art have resulted in several cultural promotions in Carson City. A memorial service will be held for her in Carson City this Saturday. O'Callaghan, a former two-term governor of Nevada, is publisher of the News. Citizens help nab car thieves Thomas K. Lacy News Staff Writer Threejuvenile car thieves who had avoided capture by Henderson police were apprehended Saturday after several citizens helped police track the suspects down. The incident began when a police officer observed the teens in a Toyota Cressida in the area of Pecos and Robindale roads. Police said they ran a check of the car's licence plates and learned the car had been reported stolen out of Las Vegas. When the officer attempted to make a traffic stop, the teenager accelerated north on Pecos. Soon thereafter, the driver of the Toyota lost control of the vehicle, which came to a rest in some shrubbery at Pecos and Five Pennies Lane. The four juveniles, ages 13, 14,14, and 15, exited the vehicle and began running from the scene. While the officer took one suspect into custody, several citizens tracked down the remaining three suspects. When other officers arrived on the scene, they were led to the location of the remaining three suspects, who were hiding in some bushes a short distance from where the car came to rest. All four teenagers where booked into Clark County Juvenile Hall. Police commended the actions of the citizens and said it is doubtful that the teenagers would have been apprehended had it not been for the assistance provided by citizens. Woman attacked by i Thomas K. Lacy News Staff Writer A Henderson woman narrowly escaped serious injury after she was attacked by a knife-wielding man in her backyard. The 32-year-old woman told police that she had left her home, located in the area of Cimmaron Hill Drive, near Green Valley Parkway and Windmill Lane, to find out why her dog was barking in her backyard. • ":: • • There, she encountered a man, whom she described as a white male, about 30 years of age, approximately 5 feet 10 inches tall, with a thin build. According to the vvoman, the man, armed with a "kitchen knife," suddenly charged her. When she raised her hands to protect herself, she received what police termed, "an extremely minor injury" which didn't require medical treatment. The manthen left the scene and was last seen in the area of the Pittman wash. Police conducted a search of the area, but were unable to locate the man, who was last seen wearing blue jeans, a dark shirt and a denim jacket Anyone with information about the case is asked to call the Henderson Police, 565-2009, or Secret Witness, 385-5555. The Reserve under construction j Construction is under way on The Reserve, a hotel and casino at the corner of Interstate 515 and Lake Mead Drive. The $50 million project is slated to open for business July 1996. The first phase of the safarithemed casino and hotel will Federal shut down affects Lake Mead Roy Thsiss Parts of Lake Mead National Recreation Area have closed due to the economic impasse between the Congress and the president. The president vetoed a continuing resolution late Monday which would have kept the federal government-HMmmg. Approximately 800,000 federal employees have been furloughed. At Lake Mead National Recreation Area (LMNRA), 130 of the 200 employees were senthome Tuesday. Employees arrived for work Tuesday but were told they had to leave after three hours. Lake Mead Marina, Desert Princess, the motel and restaurants will remain open, according to LMNRA officials. Emergency personnel, includingfirefighters, law enforcement and employees operating the water and sewer American War Mothers meet The American War Mothers met after lunch at the Senior Center Nov. 7. President Mary Ann Jennings opened the meeting. Chaplain Marion Lee read opening prayer and led members in the collect. The pledge to the flag was said the members. Kathy Weese took roll call and read the minutes from the last meeting. The Treasurer's report was read by Lorrayne Danielson. New members Christine Morhead, who transferred from Silver State chapter, and Anna Mae McLellon were introduced. Rhea Johnson read correspondence. The next meeting will be the Dec. 5 Christmas party at the home of Christine Morhead. Each members should bring a dish for pot luck and a gift to be exchanged. Members were reminded to bring cainned food to the next meeting for the Senior Center food basket. Tixe closing prayer was said, the flag retired, and the meeting was acijoumed. CALL 435-7700 WITH NEWS TIPS plant will continue to work. As of News deadline Tuesday, all Lake Mead public areas are closed including picnic areas, visitors center, swimming areas and boat launching ramps. "It's going to be tough because we have a real positive environmen• tal"8du>;s-:li% MAJOR AVE. a BOULDER HWY, 754 S. BOULDER HWY. HENDERSON, NV 89105 566-9999 CASirra Wmnen vM receive their aakeys Wednesday, November 22nd, from 12 noon to5 pm. Managr^K'nt rowrvns mc right to tliango or distonKnur any pioniotion at any fimc. room to be used as a cafeteria and for most school activities. Plans for the academy are still in thedesign stages. Blakely said they hope to begin construction in January or February of 1996. The Academy is now looking for donations of building materials and manpower from the Henderson community to help build the scljool at a minimal cost. All donations made to this project are tax-deductible. Blakely added that the academy hopes to construct three more schools similar to the one being constructed on Lake Mead Drive, and a Christian high school in the Henderson area within the next six years. Lake Mead Christian Academy offers non-denominational private Christian education to students kindergarten through 12th grade. The student body includes 200 students from more than 40 different congregations throughout the valley. I COFTCQ! Expires 11/24/95 • DUNKIN' DONUTS • 2580 Wigwam Pkwy. at Pecos • 896-4016 iwaz MAIL BOXES, ETC. IT'S NOT WH.XT WE DO. IT'S HOW VVI; DO IT. Authorized UPS Shipping Outlet Private Mail Box Rental COPIES PACKAGING MAIL SER'/ICE SHIPPING OVERNIGHT E3 m FAX STAMPS OmCE SUPPLIES KEYS PACKING S'JPPLIES MONEY TRANSFER NOTARY • PASSPORT PHOTOS MONEY ORDERS ETC, ETC, ETC WESTERN UNION • Personal Street .address • 24 Hour .Access • Mail Forwarding Ask about these too: Voice Mail • Business Cards • Rubber Stamps • Custom Packaging • And alot morel PECOS WI.NDMILL PLAZA 2H.'>7 Windmill Pkwy. HF.,\DERS()N 896-9898 GREEN VALLEY PLAZ.A 2756 Green Valley Pk\*7. •HENDERSON 454-5220 HENDERSO.N SHOPPING VILLAGE 850 S, Boulder Hvvy. 565-1235 •^^ lucKV srniKc Casino & Lanes DOUBLE lACKPOTS Red on ODD Numbered Days Black on EVENT Numbered Days fiOm FLUSHES Plus A Free Night at Players Island Details Posted In Casino *IAC 24 Hours A Day 7 Days A Week 642 SO. BOULDER HIGHWAY HENDERSON • 564-7118 ORIGINAL DEFECTIVF

PAGE 3

Page 2 Henderson Home News Thursday, November 16,1995 ONE MAN'S VIEW: From Page 1 sign, your plan gets rejected." A photo of a street under repair: "You'll notice that the streets around the Strip are always torn up. That's because we have a zone called H-1 for hotels and casinos, which means you can do anything you want. As a consequence, as soon as a sewer line gets put in, along comes a 1,000-room hotel that forces you to resize the sewer line." Can you imagine the kind of day that Clark County planner David Gay had when Herdt's column was read by members of the Clark County Commission? It had to make D-Day seem like a New York minute in comparison to that day in Gay's life. Now the city and county planners and elected officials had better take a second look at Gay's comments and make certain we aren't on the downhill road creating a new Los Angeles in the desert. Sometimes a new set of eyes sees things more clearly than do eyes that have become accustomed to the changing scenery. When federal workers were furloughed the other day, some media commentators made light of the whole affair. Also, several people on the streets of our cities shrugged it off as being of little or no consequence. It might not be viewed so lightly if you were in need of a passport to travel on business, vacation or to meet a family emergency. What if you had been planning a vacation at Yellowstone National Park and this is the only time of the year yotlr company will give you? What if you are applying for Social Security or veteran's benefits and your appointment was for the same day everybody was sent home? You have been working as a public servant for several years and suddenly you are declared "non-essential" and are sent home. Non-essential? All of these years you have come to believe that your job was important and that's why you do it so well. Yes, and hundreds of other Americans come to rely on your skills and dedication. When you were sent home, nobody would tell you when to return or if you will ever be paid for the time lost. Being furloughed doesn't keep the bank from wanting house and car payments. I'll let other people worry about how the federal shutdown affected the world banks and Wall Street. More important to me is what a shutdown does to people who need services and those who so loyally provide these services to their fellow Americans. This shouldn't happen again. Congress should think more about the effects of its actions before squeezing the American people to punish the president. As early as last April, Speaker Newt Gingrich was quoted in the Washington Times as follows: "House Speaker Newt Gingrich vowed yesterday to create a titanic legislative standoff with President Clinton by adding vetoed bills to must pass legislation increasing the national debt ceiling... "Gingrich boasted that the President 'will veto a number of things, and we'll put them all on the debt ceiling. And then he'll decide how big a crisis he wants.'" Well, they created their crisis and showed that default is a political weapon they will use. Rep. John Kasich, ROhio, said, "If we close down, people will listen." He is correct, but I'm not sure Americans appreciate the message they are hearing from Congress. Next week Guy Shipler's column from Carson City won't be published. Mirian, Guy's wife, passed away this week. Mirian, one of my longtime friends, was born in Winnemucca and raised in Reno. She was an outstanding state employee and active in Republican politics. Her interest in books and art have resulted in several cultural promotions in Carson City. A memorial service will be held for her in Carson City this Saturday. O'Callaghan, a former two-term governor of Nevada, is publisher of the News. Citizens help nab car thieves Thomas K. Lacy News Staff Writer Threejuvenile car thieves who had avoided capture by Henderson police were apprehended Saturday after several citizens helped police track the suspects down. The incident began when a police officer observed the teens in a Toyota Cressida in the area of Pecos and Robindale roads. Police said they ran a check of the car's licence plates and learned the car had been reported stolen out of Las Vegas. When the officer attempted to make a traffic stop, the teenager accelerated north on Pecos. Soon thereafter, the driver of the Toyota lost control of the vehicle, which came to a rest in some shrubbery at Pecos and Five Pennies Lane. The four juveniles, ages 13, 14,14, and 15, exited the vehicle and began running from the scene. While the officer took one suspect into custody, several citizens tracked down the remaining three suspects. When other officers arrived on the scene, they were led to the location of the remaining three suspects, who were hiding in some bushes a short distance from where the car came to rest. All four teenagers where booked into Clark County Juvenile Hall. Police commended the actions of the citizens and said it is doubtful that the teenagers would have been apprehended had it not been for the assistance provided by citizens. Woman attacked by i Thomas K. Lacy News Staff Writer A Henderson woman narrowly escaped serious injury after she was attacked by a knife-wielding man in her backyard. The 32-year-old woman told police that she had left her home, located in the area of Cimmaron Hill Drive, near Green Valley Parkway and Windmill Lane, to find out why her dog was barking in her backyard. • ":: • • There, she encountered a man, whom she described as a white male, about 30 years of age, approximately 5 feet 10 inches tall, with a thin build. According to the vvoman, the man, armed with a "kitchen knife," suddenly charged her. When she raised her hands to protect herself, she received what police termed, "an extremely minor injury" which didn't require medical treatment. The manthen left the scene and was last seen in the area of the Pittman wash. Police conducted a search of the area, but were unable to locate the man, who was last seen wearing blue jeans, a dark shirt and a denim jacket Anyone with information about the case is asked to call the Henderson Police, 565-2009, or Secret Witness, 385-5555. The Reserve under construction j Construction is under way on The Reserve, a hotel and casino at the corner of Interstate 515 and Lake Mead Drive. The $50 million project is slated to open for business July 1996. The first phase of the safarithemed casino and hotel will Federal shut down affects Lake Mead Roy Thsiss Parts of Lake Mead National Recreation Area have closed due to the economic impasse between the Congress and the president. The president vetoed a continuing resolution late Monday which would have kept the federal government-HMmmg. Approximately 800,000 federal employees have been furloughed. At Lake Mead National Recreation Area (LMNRA), 130 of the 200 employees were senthome Tuesday. Employees arrived for work Tuesday but were told they had to leave after three hours. Lake Mead Marina, Desert Princess, the motel and restaurants will remain open, according to LMNRA officials. Emergency personnel, includingfirefighters, law enforcement and employees operating the water and sewer American War Mothers meet The American War Mothers met after lunch at the Senior Center Nov. 7. President Mary Ann Jennings opened the meeting. Chaplain Marion Lee read opening prayer and led members in the collect. The pledge to the flag was said the members. Kathy Weese took roll call and read the minutes from the last meeting. The Treasurer's report was read by Lorrayne Danielson. New members Christine Morhead, who transferred from Silver State chapter, and Anna Mae McLellon were introduced. Rhea Johnson read correspondence. The next meeting will be the Dec. 5 Christmas party at the home of Christine Morhead. Each members should bring a dish for pot luck and a gift to be exchanged. Members were reminded to bring cainned food to the next meeting for the Senior Center food basket. Tixe closing prayer was said, the flag retired, and the meeting was acijoumed. CALL 435-7700 WITH NEWS TIPS plant will continue to work. As of News deadline Tuesday, all Lake Mead public areas are closed including picnic areas, visitors center, swimming areas and boat launching ramps. "It's going to be tough because we have a real positive environmen• tal"8du>;s-:li% MAJOR AVE. a BOULDER HWY, 754 S. BOULDER HWY. HENDERSON, NV 89105 566-9999 CASirra Wmnen vM receive their aakeys Wednesday, November 22nd, from 12 noon to5 pm. Managr^K'nt rowrvns mc right to tliango or distonKnur any pioniotion at any fimc. room to be used as a cafeteria and for most school activities. Plans for the academy are still in thedesign stages. Blakely said they hope to begin construction in January or February of 1996. The Academy is now looking for donations of building materials and manpower from the Henderson community to help build the scljool at a minimal cost. All donations made to this project are tax-deductible. Blakely added that the academy hopes to construct three more schools similar to the one being constructed on Lake Mead Drive, and a Christian high school in the Henderson area within the next six years. Lake Mead Christian Academy offers non-denominational private Christian education to students kindergarten through 12th grade. The student body includes 200 students from more than 40 different congregations throughout the valley. I COFTCQ! Expires 11/24/95 • DUNKIN' DONUTS • 2580 Wigwam Pkwy. at Pecos • 896-4016 iwaz MAIL BOXES, ETC. IT'S NOT WH.XT WE DO. IT'S HOW VVI; DO IT. Authorized UPS Shipping Outlet Private Mail Box Rental COPIES PACKAGING MAIL SER'/ICE SHIPPING OVERNIGHT E3 m FAX STAMPS OmCE SUPPLIES KEYS PACKING S'JPPLIES MONEY TRANSFER NOTARY • PASSPORT PHOTOS MONEY ORDERS ETC, ETC, ETC WESTERN UNION • Personal Street .address • 24 Hour .Access • Mail Forwarding Ask about these too: Voice Mail • Business Cards • Rubber Stamps • Custom Packaging • And alot morel PECOS WI.NDMILL PLAZA 2H.'>7 Windmill Pkwy. HF.,\DERS()N 896-9898 GREEN VALLEY PLAZ.A 2756 Green Valley Pk\*7. •HENDERSON 454-5220 HENDERSO.N SHOPPING VILLAGE 850 S, Boulder Hvvy. 565-1235 •^^ lucKV srniKc Casino & Lanes DOUBLE lACKPOTS Red on ODD Numbered Days Black on EVENT Numbered Days fiOm FLUSHES Plus A Free Night at Players Island Details Posted In Casino *IAC 24 Hours A Day 7 Days A Week 642 SO. BOULDER HIGHWAY HENDERSON • 564-7118 ORIGINAL DEFECTIVF

PAGE 4

mmmi Page 4 Henderson Home News Thursday, Novennber 16, 1995 Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson Home News Page 5 HPRD sports relocate to Arroyo Grande complex PARK: Improvements planned From Page 1 As the community awaits the Spring 1996 grand opening of the Arroyo Grande Sports Complex, the Henderson Parks and Recreation Department's Sports Division already calls it home. Recently relocated to the 60acre baseball, softball and multi-use park, HPRD Sports is gearing up for its inaugural season at the premier sports playing facility in Southern Nevada. To HPRD, the move means more breathing room for staff and a streamlining of the sports registration prbcess. It also means the department can focus on expanding its already-busy sports agenda, and enhancing its popular sports programs for athletes of all ages. All youth and adult sports registration will be accepted at the complex, located on Arroyo Grande Boulevard between American Pacific and Saniago Drives. The central location means many residents will have to travel less to sign up for their favorite leagues. It also puts the sports division at the heart of Henderson's new home for sports "Now that we're here at Arroyo Grande, we're going to be able to expand our adult programs and accommodate our youth programs even better," said Gene Trombetti, HPRD sports coordinator. Previously, adult registration was conducted at the former location at BurkholderBaseball Field, while youth registration was accepted at the department's recreation centers. Processing sports through this one location is an ideal hands-on t^-* situation,"Trombetti said. "It will also help weed out any errors that might occur." Arroyo Grande is the ideal player's park, featuring a fourfield Little League complex, a four-field softball complex and two 90-foot baseball fields. It also offers multi-use fields for football and soccer, as well as basketball courts, a horseshoe court, playground stations, a tot lot, exercise clusters and a trail system. It is the city's largest park to date. The 10-acre Phase I has already seen two seasons of Little League play. The 50-acre Phase II—including the softball complex and baseball fields—was recently completed. It heads for a spring grand opening pending a landscape establishment period. With the opening of Phase II, adult softball play will be shifted from Morrell Park to Arroyo Grande, meaning softball fans will break in the new fields in March. Morrell Park will then be restricted to youth softball only. "We will expand the men's, women's and co-rec programs greatly," Trombetti said. "Out on this four-plex we can do 16 teams and/or two divisions a night. "On any given day during baseball/soflball season-, you can come out to Arroyo Grande apd see four youth ball games, two Little League or American Legion games, and four adult softball games,"Trombetti adds. "Alj 10 fields will be in action at the same time in one location. That makes us very unique." In 1995 alone, 3,000 youth played in Henderson Little League teams. In addition, nearly 1,000 children participated in HPRD baseball and Softball programs, while more than 1,400 adults played in its three softball leagues. The annual Midnight Madness and Industrial Days softball tournaments also drew more than 680 players. "We're looking forward to adding Arroyo Grande onto our continually expanding inventory," said Rich Robles, HPRD Superintendent of Recreation. He adds the park includes a number of amenities. "Even through it's called a sports complex, there are a number of other features which make it the perfect destination for fans and families alike," he said. Children already enjoy the state-of-the-art playground attractions in exciting and colorful motifs. Both Phase I and Phase II include their own playground areas, and all equipment is ADA accessible for children of all See Sports Page 5 the center for community and youth activities, residents will take more pride in the area, and work to keep it safe and clean. "After we put these improvements in, you will start to see the neighbors in this area become very protective of this park. This is a neighborhood park, it is unique in thateveryone can walk to this park, he said. "It is a proven fact that if you improve something, the people will use it to death and they will take care of it. They will be more inclined to follow the rules," Rongyocsik said. HPRD will encourage neighborhood use of the park by bringing more activities to this area in conjunction with the library and the Boys ad Girls Club. Rongyocsik said the city plans to begin bidding on the project in the next couple of months. "We are striving to be open in 1996," Rongyocsik said^ The Moser Street Boys and Girls Club building, located within the park, will also be expanded into a Community Center Building. A partnering agreement with the Henderson Boys and Girls Club and the Henderson Library District is investigating the possibility of combining the existing club and the Pittman library into one building at the Wells Park site. "We figured since they need space and we need space, why not just come in and put the two together," Boys and Girls Club board member John Simmons said. "Since we have a homework station at the Boys and Girls Club and things like that, if the library was connected on to the POWER From Page 1 rQ;Ci their decision on three criteria: safety, impact on the surrounding environment and cost. The Valley Electric route would be the least expensive. The wooden pofes currently in place would be replaced by Nevada Power's 120-foot high steel poles. Wener said the route is not favorable because Valley Electric has a contract with *developer which prohibits thera firom increasing the voltage of the line. The line is currently 138 volts and Nevada Power needs 260 volts. Wener said developers in the southwest Henderson area are opposed to the Horizon Ridge ro/ite. That route would also be e most expensive. Several people at Tuesday's meeting said it would be better to build the line where no homes have been built, so that people can choose whether to live near them. They said they did not want the lines near their homes. The line will be built in two years to serve an anticipated demand in southwest Henderson. Plans for the power line will be before the Henderson Planning Commission Nov. 28. BEST Grand Opening Celebration, Friday througli Sunday, l^ovember 17-19! Starting 10am Friday, 3 Days Only, Celebratlon-Prlced Grand Opening Specials! $49.97 3 DAYS ONLY lOK Diamond Ring. 1 ab-crcalcd sapphires (168513, Reg S^H 4y. Rcf 5125+) or amcihvsis (567833. Reg, SH^ W. Rcf, S120t) Save $200! "^'^-^i "--€,. $249.97 3 DAYS ONLY 14K Diamond Anniversary Ring. l/2caral loial diamond weight lllusiralion enlarged 297917 Reg S44g W, Ref 5550+ 3 DAYS ONLY I4K Gold 18" Salin, Polished TwUted Herringbone Chain. 269379 Reg $W W, Rcf SHOt 14K 18" DUmond-Cul SilkRdpe' Chain. Lifetime full warranty 562467 Reg, SlZ^.qg, Rcf, $240t 30 >^ Off Regular Prices On All Karat Gold, Diamond. Colored Stone & Pearl Jewelry Save ^ $10! Timex Menls Triathlon Walch. INDICLO' night-lighi ,-\larniychriin(i H-lap mcmor): 50m water resistant 507709 Reg ^2^) 99 3 DAYS ONLY Buy 1, GeM FREE! Jordarhe Walch. ( lioosiIrdiii .in cMiting assortment ol lun and lashionablc styles' 437115 Reg, $5,9Q. Rcf $9 95+ 3 DAYS ONLY Proclor-Silex Auio-OfT Iron. Stcam/dr)', Salin sole plate, C;ontinuous button groove Stav-put heel rest H 180831 Reg, $24 99. Rcf $29,95+ Olympus Infinily Zoom 230. 38-90mm \f zoom with super macro Rcd-evcredudtion U 828688 Reg $219 99, Rcf $239 95+ 20 • % Off Any Regulariy Priced Watch In stack. EICIHII CrtifM iMt ValiM, W t Ckwmc* itnt. Dazey Natural Wonder" Hard Hat Hair Dryer. 1200 watts High yelotiu air How Touch n Till hood L'SA-made H 874280 Reg $3h,99. Rcf $44 95t Heahh O Meter Professional Floor Model Speedometer Dial Scale. 1 Jigc 7" dial, 300-lb capacity Kas\-rrad x's U 858781 Reg $4999, Ref $59,95+ Magnavox 4-Head VCR. IHl-channcI capable, 8-evcni/l-year programmable On-screen display program U 122807 Reg $21999, Rcf $239 95+ Toastmaster Toaster Oven/Broiler. Bakes, broils, toasts, delrosts & top browns Hinged crumb Irav, USA-made H 180076 Reg $39,99, Rcf $49 95+ GE Cordless Telephone with Dual Wave" Noise Filter. lO" memory large biiiions Digital security system 11733709 Reg $19 99, Rcf $44 95+ $69.97 3 DAYS ONLY WestBend lO-Cup Quik Drip Coffee Maker. Programmable clock timci ,Auio shut-off Pausen serve (56080) IS 180084 Reg $29 99, Ref $34 95+ 3 DAYS ONLY SCM/Smith Corona Electnmic Typewriter. Super subscript, forward, reverse, index. Full-line correction Mote' IS 754854 Reg, $79 99, Ref $94,95+ ^ • ~ Hoover Encore" Vac. 15 0 C E / amp cleaning^ Bare edge cleaning Made m the USA, (U4245-030) || 856193 Reg $79 99, Ref $89 95+ 3 DAYS ONLY Dual Swing-Ann Wall Lamp. Solid bncss sculptua-d back plate Six foot conj 577146 Reg $39 99, Ref $49 95+ Save ^i^ $14,971 3 DAYS ONLY WtarEver4-Qt. Pressure Cooker. Quick, cven-heating aluminum C uis cooking time up to 66% Retains nuincni.s 644986 Reg $29 99, Rcf $39 95+ Farberware 7-Pc. Stainless Steel Cookware Set. 1-. 2& 3-qi cov'd sauce-pans. 8-1/2" open frvpan .Aluminum-clad, 644366 Reg $69 99, Ref $79 95+ Coming Visions' 5-Pc. Staner Set. Includes 1-pl & 1-ql cov'd saucepans and 7" skillet Non-stick interiors 645044 Reg $19 99. Ref $24 95+ Regal Ware Kitchen Pro 8-Pc. Set. 1& 2-qt covd saucepans, 5-qi Dutch oven, 10" frvpan & 8" gourmet pan USA, 179655 Reg $69 99, Rcf 579,95+ j: $79.97 3 DAYS ONLY Eureka Powerline Hardcase Upright Vac. 10 0 amps On-board tools for above-floor cleaning 20' cord 7 carpel height posiiions B205281 Reg $lt^ 99. Ref $129 95 • • • ^"•1 • 1 ^1 1 •>v^Hi • ^ j;^H $9.97 II 3 DAYS ONLY | Magnavox 3-CD Changer Shelf System. 32-track programming .AM/I M cassette More! IS 259632 Reg $179,99, Ref $199 95+ RCA 5-Fiuiction Remote Control, Replaces lost or broken remotes to control VCR, cable box, I audio component & T\' 574554 Reg $17 99, Ref $24 95+ O'SuUivwi 4-Pc. Wbrk Center. Desk w/liuich: 50-1/4-H x36-7"Wx 19-V4-D Assembly Whitewash 1 164658) or oak finish (596620) Ref $99,95T 1 W'^ P$129.97 3 DAYS ONLY | KaltzgraiT "Heritage" 5-Pc, Place Setting. Inclujjcsdinner & salad plates, bowl, cup & saucer 101788 Reg $16 99, Rcf $19 95+ O'SnIUvan Room Divider. Oak lammatc finish 72-H x 55-1/4Wxl6-l/4D Needs assembly USA-made 851043 Reg, $179 99. Rcf $199 95+ Vitamaster Premier Treadmill. 2MP DC motor Speeds from 0-1 Omph 5 wiijdow electronic monitor USA-made IS 873888 Reg $499 99, Ref $599 95+ 3 DAYS ONLY Kolcrafi Caravan Taadcai SiroDer. Dual from swivel wheels w locks: dual rear brakes Basket, canopy, reclining seals 501468 Reg $99 99 Rcf $ 1 24 95+ Sunbcan Cas Grill. 901 sq in toul cooking area 30.000 BTUs ceramic tiriqueltes, 20 lb LP lank USA • I 592 Reg $299 99, Rcf $329 95+ RCA Pcnonal CD Player. Rechargeable ballencs I6-track programmable Inlro scan. Shuffle play Headphones AC/DC • 259624 Reg $99 99. Ref $109,95t Bitscfl Power Steamer. Loosens, removes deep down din Cleaas. rinses, vacuums in 1 operation Made in the USA (1631) B 495476 Reg $99 99. Ref $189 95+ $29.97 Oanmd 19-Pc Imperaior Taaibler Set. Imludrs six eai h large medium arul small glasses 8332*6 Reg $14 99 Ref $:| Q^t Mmtm FoMteg Galelef Son^ TaUc. Natural birch veneer 4 chairs Table opens to 62'andcbses lo 11' i 84S912 Reg $199,99. Ref S24995V, 3 DAYS ONLY 3-Pc. Cava* Laoivt S. Durable cotton canvas Includes 45' garment earner, 20" duffle 6r 11" accessory kii I78IW Reg^ $49 99. Ref $69 95+ Kokrafi Perfect Height High Chair. • height positions I xira-wide, press release iray Padding removes for easier dealing USA 107042 Reg $54 99, Ref $74 95+ ^ m $4.97 O'SaOtvaa EaMttalaaKat Ccater. TV area is 22-1/4H X 28-1/4"W Colonul oak Rnish Overall 66-1/2 'H x 49 1/8"W x 15T) Assembly USA 47M47 Reg $79 99. Ref $99 95t 3 DAYS ONLY Vow Chaicr MM Casteo Gaacs. Each measuia 5* x 3-1/2' Choose Mini BUckiack (244229) or Mini Poker (264137) Reg $12 99, Ref $14 95t Welcome To Your New BESTJ Starting At 10am Friday, Nov. 17, Henderson/Green Valley Will See How We Earned Our Name! After 39 years as one of the nation's leading catalog showrooms, we're Grand Opening our brand new BESr showroom in Henderson/Green Valley on N. Stephanie St. at Sunset Rd. Join us, and let us show you how we earned our name! 4 A Totally New Shopping ^ Experience...That's BEST The finest selection of quality jewelry and watches you'll find anywhere. Guaranteed low prices on the top brand-name merchandise you're looking for. Wider aisles, brighter lighting and exciting displays for more pleasant shopping. Conveniently located order stations with friendly Sales Associates to help you. # Shopping The Way You Want It.a.That's BEST Be^t Express self-ordering terminals let you enter your entire shopping list in one easy stop, then they speed your order electronically to our Checkout Counter. At our central order station, our friendly Sales Associates can offer you personal attention should you need help ordering. And our speedy Checkout Counters are specially designed to get you in and out of our ,^ showrooms quickly and efficiently. ^ Serving You Better.. That's BEST Our Dial-and-Drive service lets you call your order in ahead of time from your home, office or car phone, using any BEST catalog or sale publication. Your order will be ready and waiting when you arrive at our showroom. We'll help you load your purchases into your car, and we can provide home delivery for larger items. • Open A BestCanL Account Now & Get 5% Off Your 1 St Da/s Purchases! With approved BeslCard. credit only 5% discount valid on all purchases only on the day instant credit is approveo Offer good Fnday through Sunday, Nov 17-19 Valid with any ofner promotional offer Ask any Sales Associate for details BestCard. is a credit service of Bank One, Dayton, N A Dayton, OH APR=21 96% Terms subject to change ^ Enter For A Chance To Win A New Dodge Neon in Our Grand Opening Sweepstakes'^ A brand new 1996 Dodge Neon Expresso could be yours! Approximate retail value (ARV) $14,000, Car described not exactly as shown, • WIN Great Prizes!** Enter throughout our showroom for these incredible giveaways: • 14K 1/2ct tdw "S" Link DianK>nd Tennis Bracelet, ARV $400 • South Dakota Gold Men's 10K Eagle & Onyx Ring, ARV $280 • AT&T Cordless Speakerphone/Answerer, ARV $230 • Bush "Visions" Desk/Hutch/Bookcase Combo, ARV $200 • KrtchenAid Stand Mixer, ARV $200 • SunlMam 563 Gas Grill, ARV $150 4 FREE Gift Bag^ to the first 500 customers on Friday, Nov. 17. It's filled with o>sBt $25 in fun merchandise! • FREE 14K Gold 7" Bracelet (a $30 value) to the first 100 people in our jewelry department on Friday. • WIN Great Door Prizes Every Half Houri** Enter in our showroom Fri.Sun., Nov. 17-19, for over $2500 of merchandise! <,: • FREE Fiiii Filnv to the first 300 people in our photo department Friday. # Professional Jewefry Appraisals! First item is just $39.95! On the premises Friday & Saturday, November 17 & 18, only. Appointments V; recommended. Bring in all your fine jewelry and protect your investment. ANo Purchase Necessary. Limit one free gift psr family; wMIe suppli*s last 'Grand Opening Sv^eepstakes: No Purchae Necuary. See official rules al partopating showrooms tor details brmt one entry per person per day Sweepstakes begins r4ovemt)er 17,1995, and erxls Novemper 19, 1996, and is open to legal US Mexico and Canada residents Odds ol winning depend upon the numOer of entries received Void wtiere prohiMed and in the Province ot Quebec "Prize Drawings: No purchase necessary to enter see showroom for entry forms, complete pnze listings and complete rules Please see back cover for important pricing information. A For Hoover Cleaning Effectiveness details see product carton tag or write the Hoover Company M Protect your investment with one of our Keep II Newi extended service or product replacement plans. Our J2 99 one-year replacement plan is also avalabte for items under $30 Ask any Sales Associate for details All The Best At The New BEST., 579 N. Stephanie SL, intersection of Sunset Rd. & Stephanie St, 435-2717 BESTH Power Retail Center oj Sunset Road (0 ^ A to Warm Springs Rd. GRAND OPENING SALE & CELEBRATION, FRIDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17-19 ONLY AT HENDERSON/GREEN VALLEVS NEW BEST. Showroom Hours: Friday & Saturday, 10ani-9pm; Sunday, llam-6pm L7-19 ^_ BEST JE WELR Y-HOME-GIFTS Limited time offers Limited to stock on hand No ram checks Not available ttirougfi Mail Order "Percent savings off regular prxs on In-stock Items Excludes Certified Best Value items. Loose Diamond & Restyle Event items. Black Hills gold, com jewelry appraised diamonds and all diamond solitaires 1ct and larger An items reference retail price, indicated by t^e t symix)!. is your guide to its regular selling price at department stores and similar retailers It Is rtol our pw—nt or former Mlling price. It is ettfwr tt>e retail pnce suggested by tfie mfr m this publication's distnbution area or our own determination of full retail pnce based on customary retailer markups for similar merchandise Pub Code 5855 club, kids could go over to the library to do their homework or they could have story-telling time, or they could work on computers," Boys and Girls Club Executive Director Clyde Caldwell said. "Once they are done over there, they can walk down the hallway into the game room or some other activity," said Caldwell. He added that by placing the library and the club in the same building they will be encouraging young people to be more involved with their education. "These kids our the future. We need to start encouraging our kids and stressing education," Caldwell said. Caldwell said he hoges tohave the new facilTty completed within the next two years. .-,;, SPORTS: HPRD office relocates From Page 4 abilities. In addition, three tunnel slides weaving down a hill in Phase II offer a fun and unique alternative. "It's a completely different kind of play area," Robles said. Located in the park's south end, the sports division's new office features a reception area, staff offices and a resource room. In addition, a meeting room will be put to good use. "The conference room enables us to do all of our official training right here," Trombetti said. "It can all be done in-house, which makes it easier for everybody because we're now centrally located." In addition to league and program registration, the sports division also handles all park and field reservations. Trombetti is joined by six other HPRD employees in the new office. 'Through facilities such as Arroyo Grande, you can really tell the city is growing in both population and programs," Trombetti said. "The need is there for this." "At approximately $8.8 million, the majority of funding for the Arroyo Grande Sports Complex came from an $18 million park bond approved by voters in 1993. Special recreation funds and construction tax funds were also used. For information on HPRD Sports, call 434-4131. The office is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Tree memorial for cancer "Love Lights a Tree," the American Cancer Society's holiday memorial to victims and survivors of cancer, kicks off this month with several Nevada businesses lighting the way. The Nevada Division of the American Cancer Society is sponsoring the local event, with several statewide businesses, such as PriMerit and Nevada State Banks, placing special trees in their lobbies for cancer memorials. Judy Mitchell, executive vicepresident of the Nevada Division of the ACS, explained that with Love Lights a Tree, a person may purchase a special ornament to place on any of the trees at sponsor sites throughout the state. The names of the people appearing on the ornaments will then Jbe read at special ceremonies in December. Now through Dec. 22, residents can receive an ornament, personalized for the honoree of their choice, with a contribution of $10 or more at any of the sponsoring sites. For a $250 donation, businesses can receive a special "Angel of Hope" omament to hang on the trees in memory of employees who have had cancer. For more information or to find out how to purchase an omament, call 798-6877. SUPPORT YOUR CoMiviuNiTY NEWSPAPER ORIGINAL DEFECTIVE

PAGE 5

mmmi Page 4 Henderson Home News Thursday, Novennber 16, 1995 Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson Home News Page 5 HPRD sports relocate to Arroyo Grande complex PARK: Improvements planned From Page 1 As the community awaits the Spring 1996 grand opening of the Arroyo Grande Sports Complex, the Henderson Parks and Recreation Department's Sports Division already calls it home. Recently relocated to the 60acre baseball, softball and multi-use park, HPRD Sports is gearing up for its inaugural season at the premier sports playing facility in Southern Nevada. To HPRD, the move means more breathing room for staff and a streamlining of the sports registration prbcess. It also means the department can focus on expanding its already-busy sports agenda, and enhancing its popular sports programs for athletes of all ages. All youth and adult sports registration will be accepted at the complex, located on Arroyo Grande Boulevard between American Pacific and Saniago Drives. The central location means many residents will have to travel less to sign up for their favorite leagues. It also puts the sports division at the heart of Henderson's new home for sports "Now that we're here at Arroyo Grande, we're going to be able to expand our adult programs and accommodate our youth programs even better," said Gene Trombetti, HPRD sports coordinator. Previously, adult registration was conducted at the former location at BurkholderBaseball Field, while youth registration was accepted at the department's recreation centers. Processing sports through this one location is an ideal hands-on t^-* situation,"Trombetti said. "It will also help weed out any errors that might occur." Arroyo Grande is the ideal player's park, featuring a fourfield Little League complex, a four-field softball complex and two 90-foot baseball fields. It also offers multi-use fields for football and soccer, as well as basketball courts, a horseshoe court, playground stations, a tot lot, exercise clusters and a trail system. It is the city's largest park to date. The 10-acre Phase I has already seen two seasons of Little League play. The 50-acre Phase II—including the softball complex and baseball fields—was recently completed. It heads for a spring grand opening pending a landscape establishment period. With the opening of Phase II, adult softball play will be shifted from Morrell Park to Arroyo Grande, meaning softball fans will break in the new fields in March. Morrell Park will then be restricted to youth softball only. "We will expand the men's, women's and co-rec programs greatly," Trombetti said. "Out on this four-plex we can do 16 teams and/or two divisions a night. "On any given day during baseball/soflball season-, you can come out to Arroyo Grande apd see four youth ball games, two Little League or American Legion games, and four adult softball games,"Trombetti adds. "Alj 10 fields will be in action at the same time in one location. That makes us very unique." In 1995 alone, 3,000 youth played in Henderson Little League teams. In addition, nearly 1,000 children participated in HPRD baseball and Softball programs, while more than 1,400 adults played in its three softball leagues. The annual Midnight Madness and Industrial Days softball tournaments also drew more than 680 players. "We're looking forward to adding Arroyo Grande onto our continually expanding inventory," said Rich Robles, HPRD Superintendent of Recreation. He adds the park includes a number of amenities. "Even through it's called a sports complex, there are a number of other features which make it the perfect destination for fans and families alike," he said. Children already enjoy the state-of-the-art playground attractions in exciting and colorful motifs. Both Phase I and Phase II include their own playground areas, and all equipment is ADA accessible for children of all See Sports Page 5 the center for community and youth activities, residents will take more pride in the area, and work to keep it safe and clean. "After we put these improvements in, you will start to see the neighbors in this area become very protective of this park. This is a neighborhood park, it is unique in thateveryone can walk to this park, he said. "It is a proven fact that if you improve something, the people will use it to death and they will take care of it. They will be more inclined to follow the rules," Rongyocsik said. HPRD will encourage neighborhood use of the park by bringing more activities to this area in conjunction with the library and the Boys ad Girls Club. Rongyocsik said the city plans to begin bidding on the project in the next couple of months. "We are striving to be open in 1996," Rongyocsik said^ The Moser Street Boys and Girls Club building, located within the park, will also be expanded into a Community Center Building. A partnering agreement with the Henderson Boys and Girls Club and the Henderson Library District is investigating the possibility of combining the existing club and the Pittman library into one building at the Wells Park site. "We figured since they need space and we need space, why not just come in and put the two together," Boys and Girls Club board member John Simmons said. "Since we have a homework station at the Boys and Girls Club and things like that, if the library was connected on to the POWER From Page 1 rQ;Ci their decision on three criteria: safety, impact on the surrounding environment and cost. The Valley Electric route would be the least expensive. The wooden pofes currently in place would be replaced by Nevada Power's 120-foot high steel poles. Wener said the route is not favorable because Valley Electric has a contract with *developer which prohibits thera firom increasing the voltage of the line. The line is currently 138 volts and Nevada Power needs 260 volts. Wener said developers in the southwest Henderson area are opposed to the Horizon Ridge ro/ite. That route would also be e most expensive. Several people at Tuesday's meeting said it would be better to build the line where no homes have been built, so that people can choose whether to live near them. They said they did not want the lines near their homes. The line will be built in two years to serve an anticipated demand in southwest Henderson. Plans for the power line will be before the Henderson Planning Commission Nov. 28. BEST Grand Opening Celebration, Friday througli Sunday, l^ovember 17-19! Starting 10am Friday, 3 Days Only, Celebratlon-Prlced Grand Opening Specials! $49.97 3 DAYS ONLY lOK Diamond Ring. 1 ab-crcalcd sapphires (168513, Reg S^H 4y. Rcf 5125+) or amcihvsis (567833. Reg, SH^ W. Rcf, S120t) Save $200! "^'^-^i "--€,. $249.97 3 DAYS ONLY 14K Diamond Anniversary Ring. l/2caral loial diamond weight lllusiralion enlarged 297917 Reg S44g W, Ref 5550+ 3 DAYS ONLY I4K Gold 18" Salin, Polished TwUted Herringbone Chain. 269379 Reg $W W, Rcf SHOt 14K 18" DUmond-Cul SilkRdpe' Chain. Lifetime full warranty 562467 Reg, SlZ^.qg, Rcf, $240t 30 >^ Off Regular Prices On All Karat Gold, Diamond. Colored Stone & Pearl Jewelry Save ^ $10! Timex Menls Triathlon Walch. INDICLO' night-lighi ,-\larniychriin(i H-lap mcmor): 50m water resistant 507709 Reg ^2^) 99 3 DAYS ONLY Buy 1, GeM FREE! Jordarhe Walch. ( lioosiIrdiii .in cMiting assortment ol lun and lashionablc styles' 437115 Reg, $5,9Q. Rcf $9 95+ 3 DAYS ONLY Proclor-Silex Auio-OfT Iron. Stcam/dr)', Salin sole plate, C;ontinuous button groove Stav-put heel rest H 180831 Reg, $24 99. Rcf $29,95+ Olympus Infinily Zoom 230. 38-90mm \f zoom with super macro Rcd-evcredudtion U 828688 Reg $219 99, Rcf $239 95+ 20 • % Off Any Regulariy Priced Watch In stack. EICIHII CrtifM iMt ValiM, W t Ckwmc* itnt. Dazey Natural Wonder" Hard Hat Hair Dryer. 1200 watts High yelotiu air How Touch n Till hood L'SA-made H 874280 Reg $3h,99. Rcf $44 95t Heahh O Meter Professional Floor Model Speedometer Dial Scale. 1 Jigc 7" dial, 300-lb capacity Kas\-rrad x's U 858781 Reg $4999, Ref $59,95+ Magnavox 4-Head VCR. IHl-channcI capable, 8-evcni/l-year programmable On-screen display program U 122807 Reg $21999, Rcf $239 95+ Toastmaster Toaster Oven/Broiler. Bakes, broils, toasts, delrosts & top browns Hinged crumb Irav, USA-made H 180076 Reg $39,99, Rcf $49 95+ GE Cordless Telephone with Dual Wave" Noise Filter. lO" memory large biiiions Digital security system 11733709 Reg $19 99, Rcf $44 95+ $69.97 3 DAYS ONLY WestBend lO-Cup Quik Drip Coffee Maker. Programmable clock timci ,Auio shut-off Pausen serve (56080) IS 180084 Reg $29 99, Ref $34 95+ 3 DAYS ONLY SCM/Smith Corona Electnmic Typewriter. Super subscript, forward, reverse, index. Full-line correction Mote' IS 754854 Reg, $79 99, Ref $94,95+ ^ • ~ Hoover Encore" Vac. 15 0 C E / amp cleaning^ Bare edge cleaning Made m the USA, (U4245-030) || 856193 Reg $79 99, Ref $89 95+ 3 DAYS ONLY Dual Swing-Ann Wall Lamp. Solid bncss sculptua-d back plate Six foot conj 577146 Reg $39 99, Ref $49 95+ Save ^i^ $14,971 3 DAYS ONLY WtarEver4-Qt. Pressure Cooker. Quick, cven-heating aluminum C uis cooking time up to 66% Retains nuincni.s 644986 Reg $29 99, Rcf $39 95+ Farberware 7-Pc. Stainless Steel Cookware Set. 1-. 2& 3-qi cov'd sauce-pans. 8-1/2" open frvpan .Aluminum-clad, 644366 Reg $69 99, Ref $79 95+ Coming Visions' 5-Pc. Staner Set. Includes 1-pl & 1-ql cov'd saucepans and 7" skillet Non-stick interiors 645044 Reg $19 99. Ref $24 95+ Regal Ware Kitchen Pro 8-Pc. Set. 1& 2-qt covd saucepans, 5-qi Dutch oven, 10" frvpan & 8" gourmet pan USA, 179655 Reg $69 99, Rcf 579,95+ j: $79.97 3 DAYS ONLY Eureka Powerline Hardcase Upright Vac. 10 0 amps On-board tools for above-floor cleaning 20' cord 7 carpel height posiiions B205281 Reg $lt^ 99. Ref $129 95 • • • ^"•1 • 1 ^1 1 •>v^Hi • ^ j;^H $9.97 II 3 DAYS ONLY | Magnavox 3-CD Changer Shelf System. 32-track programming .AM/I M cassette More! IS 259632 Reg $179,99, Ref $199 95+ RCA 5-Fiuiction Remote Control, Replaces lost or broken remotes to control VCR, cable box, I audio component & T\' 574554 Reg $17 99, Ref $24 95+ O'SuUivwi 4-Pc. Wbrk Center. Desk w/liuich: 50-1/4-H x36-7"Wx 19-V4-D Assembly Whitewash 1 164658) or oak finish (596620) Ref $99,95T 1 W'^ P$129.97 3 DAYS ONLY | KaltzgraiT "Heritage" 5-Pc, Place Setting. Inclujjcsdinner & salad plates, bowl, cup & saucer 101788 Reg $16 99, Rcf $19 95+ O'SnIUvan Room Divider. Oak lammatc finish 72-H x 55-1/4Wxl6-l/4D Needs assembly USA-made 851043 Reg, $179 99. Rcf $199 95+ Vitamaster Premier Treadmill. 2MP DC motor Speeds from 0-1 Omph 5 wiijdow electronic monitor USA-made IS 873888 Reg $499 99, Ref $599 95+ 3 DAYS ONLY Kolcrafi Caravan Taadcai SiroDer. Dual from swivel wheels w locks: dual rear brakes Basket, canopy, reclining seals 501468 Reg $99 99 Rcf $ 1 24 95+ Sunbcan Cas Grill. 901 sq in toul cooking area 30.000 BTUs ceramic tiriqueltes, 20 lb LP lank USA • I 592 Reg $299 99, Rcf $329 95+ RCA Pcnonal CD Player. Rechargeable ballencs I6-track programmable Inlro scan. Shuffle play Headphones AC/DC • 259624 Reg $99 99. Ref $109,95t Bitscfl Power Steamer. Loosens, removes deep down din Cleaas. rinses, vacuums in 1 operation Made in the USA (1631) B 495476 Reg $99 99. Ref $189 95+ $29.97 Oanmd 19-Pc Imperaior Taaibler Set. Imludrs six eai h large medium arul small glasses 8332*6 Reg $14 99 Ref $:| Q^t Mmtm FoMteg Galelef Son^ TaUc. Natural birch veneer 4 chairs Table opens to 62'andcbses lo 11' i 84S912 Reg $199,99. Ref S24995V, 3 DAYS ONLY 3-Pc. Cava* Laoivt S. Durable cotton canvas Includes 45' garment earner, 20" duffle 6r 11" accessory kii I78IW Reg^ $49 99. Ref $69 95+ Kokrafi Perfect Height High Chair. • height positions I xira-wide, press release iray Padding removes for easier dealing USA 107042 Reg $54 99, Ref $74 95+ ^ m $4.97 O'SaOtvaa EaMttalaaKat Ccater. TV area is 22-1/4H X 28-1/4"W Colonul oak Rnish Overall 66-1/2 'H x 49 1/8"W x 15T) Assembly USA 47M47 Reg $79 99. Ref $99 95t 3 DAYS ONLY Vow Chaicr MM Casteo Gaacs. Each measuia 5* x 3-1/2' Choose Mini BUckiack (244229) or Mini Poker (264137) Reg $12 99, Ref $14 95t Welcome To Your New BESTJ Starting At 10am Friday, Nov. 17, Henderson/Green Valley Will See How We Earned Our Name! After 39 years as one of the nation's leading catalog showrooms, we're Grand Opening our brand new BESr showroom in Henderson/Green Valley on N. Stephanie St. at Sunset Rd. Join us, and let us show you how we earned our name! 4 A Totally New Shopping ^ Experience...That's BEST The finest selection of quality jewelry and watches you'll find anywhere. Guaranteed low prices on the top brand-name merchandise you're looking for. Wider aisles, brighter lighting and exciting displays for more pleasant shopping. Conveniently located order stations with friendly Sales Associates to help you. # Shopping The Way You Want It.a.That's BEST Be^t Express self-ordering terminals let you enter your entire shopping list in one easy stop, then they speed your order electronically to our Checkout Counter. At our central order station, our friendly Sales Associates can offer you personal attention should you need help ordering. And our speedy Checkout Counters are specially designed to get you in and out of our ,^ showrooms quickly and efficiently. ^ Serving You Better.. That's BEST Our Dial-and-Drive service lets you call your order in ahead of time from your home, office or car phone, using any BEST catalog or sale publication. Your order will be ready and waiting when you arrive at our showroom. We'll help you load your purchases into your car, and we can provide home delivery for larger items. • Open A BestCanL Account Now & Get 5% Off Your 1 St Da/s Purchases! With approved BeslCard. credit only 5% discount valid on all purchases only on the day instant credit is approveo Offer good Fnday through Sunday, Nov 17-19 Valid with any ofner promotional offer Ask any Sales Associate for details BestCard. is a credit service of Bank One, Dayton, N A Dayton, OH APR=21 96% Terms subject to change ^ Enter For A Chance To Win A New Dodge Neon in Our Grand Opening Sweepstakes'^ A brand new 1996 Dodge Neon Expresso could be yours! Approximate retail value (ARV) $14,000, Car described not exactly as shown, • WIN Great Prizes!** Enter throughout our showroom for these incredible giveaways: • 14K 1/2ct tdw "S" Link DianK>nd Tennis Bracelet, ARV $400 • South Dakota Gold Men's 10K Eagle & Onyx Ring, ARV $280 • AT&T Cordless Speakerphone/Answerer, ARV $230 • Bush "Visions" Desk/Hutch/Bookcase Combo, ARV $200 • KrtchenAid Stand Mixer, ARV $200 • SunlMam 563 Gas Grill, ARV $150 4 FREE Gift Bag^ to the first 500 customers on Friday, Nov. 17. It's filled with o>sBt $25 in fun merchandise! • FREE 14K Gold 7" Bracelet (a $30 value) to the first 100 people in our jewelry department on Friday. • WIN Great Door Prizes Every Half Houri** Enter in our showroom Fri.Sun., Nov. 17-19, for over $2500 of merchandise! <,: • FREE Fiiii Filnv to the first 300 people in our photo department Friday. # Professional Jewefry Appraisals! First item is just $39.95! On the premises Friday & Saturday, November 17 & 18, only. Appointments V; recommended. Bring in all your fine jewelry and protect your investment. ANo Purchase Necessary. Limit one free gift psr family; wMIe suppli*s last 'Grand Opening Sv^eepstakes: No Purchae Necuary. See official rules al partopating showrooms tor details brmt one entry per person per day Sweepstakes begins r4ovemt)er 17,1995, and erxls Novemper 19, 1996, and is open to legal US Mexico and Canada residents Odds ol winning depend upon the numOer of entries received Void wtiere prohiMed and in the Province ot Quebec "Prize Drawings: No purchase necessary to enter see showroom for entry forms, complete pnze listings and complete rules Please see back cover for important pricing information. A For Hoover Cleaning Effectiveness details see product carton tag or write the Hoover Company M Protect your investment with one of our Keep II Newi extended service or product replacement plans. Our J2 99 one-year replacement plan is also avalabte for items under $30 Ask any Sales Associate for details All The Best At The New BEST., 579 N. Stephanie SL, intersection of Sunset Rd. & Stephanie St, 435-2717 BESTH Power Retail Center oj Sunset Road (0 ^ A to Warm Springs Rd. GRAND OPENING SALE & CELEBRATION, FRIDAY-SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17-19 ONLY AT HENDERSON/GREEN VALLEVS NEW BEST. Showroom Hours: Friday & Saturday, 10ani-9pm; Sunday, llam-6pm L7-19 ^_ BEST JE WELR Y-HOME-GIFTS Limited time offers Limited to stock on hand No ram checks Not available ttirougfi Mail Order "Percent savings off regular prxs on In-stock Items Excludes Certified Best Value items. Loose Diamond & Restyle Event items. Black Hills gold, com jewelry appraised diamonds and all diamond solitaires 1ct and larger An items reference retail price, indicated by t^e t symix)!. is your guide to its regular selling price at department stores and similar retailers It Is rtol our pw—nt or former Mlling price. It is ettfwr tt>e retail pnce suggested by tfie mfr m this publication's distnbution area or our own determination of full retail pnce based on customary retailer markups for similar merchandise Pub Code 5855 club, kids could go over to the library to do their homework or they could have story-telling time, or they could work on computers," Boys and Girls Club Executive Director Clyde Caldwell said. "Once they are done over there, they can walk down the hallway into the game room or some other activity," said Caldwell. He added that by placing the library and the club in the same building they will be encouraging young people to be more involved with their education. "These kids our the future. We need to start encouraging our kids and stressing education," Caldwell said. Caldwell said he hoges tohave the new facilTty completed within the next two years. .-,;, SPORTS: HPRD office relocates From Page 4 abilities. In addition, three tunnel slides weaving down a hill in Phase II offer a fun and unique alternative. "It's a completely different kind of play area," Robles said. Located in the park's south end, the sports division's new office features a reception area, staff offices and a resource room. In addition, a meeting room will be put to good use. "The conference room enables us to do all of our official training right here," Trombetti said. "It can all be done in-house, which makes it easier for everybody because we're now centrally located." In addition to league and program registration, the sports division also handles all park and field reservations. Trombetti is joined by six other HPRD employees in the new office. 'Through facilities such as Arroyo Grande, you can really tell the city is growing in both population and programs," Trombetti said. "The need is there for this." "At approximately $8.8 million, the majority of funding for the Arroyo Grande Sports Complex came from an $18 million park bond approved by voters in 1993. Special recreation funds and construction tax funds were also used. For information on HPRD Sports, call 434-4131. The office is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Tree memorial for cancer "Love Lights a Tree," the American Cancer Society's holiday memorial to victims and survivors of cancer, kicks off this month with several Nevada businesses lighting the way. The Nevada Division of the American Cancer Society is sponsoring the local event, with several statewide businesses, such as PriMerit and Nevada State Banks, placing special trees in their lobbies for cancer memorials. Judy Mitchell, executive vicepresident of the Nevada Division of the ACS, explained that with Love Lights a Tree, a person may purchase a special ornament to place on any of the trees at sponsor sites throughout the state. The names of the people appearing on the ornaments will then Jbe read at special ceremonies in December. Now through Dec. 22, residents can receive an ornament, personalized for the honoree of their choice, with a contribution of $10 or more at any of the sponsoring sites. For a $250 donation, businesses can receive a special "Angel of Hope" omament to hang on the trees in memory of employees who have had cancer. For more information or to find out how to purchase an omament, call 798-6877. SUPPORT YOUR CoMiviuNiTY NEWSPAPER ORIGINAL DEFECTIVE

PAGE 6

VIEWPOINT LETTERS HOMENEV\S *MNi0'Calla9hM Publisher Carolyn O'CaNaghan Co-Publisher Paul Srydalko Mariaging Editor Pag* 6 Henderson Home News Thursday, November 16,1995 NEWS VIEW Park improvements should increase use, decrease crime The Henderson Parks and Recreation Department has announced their plans to improve one of Henderson's oldest parks, Wells Park. This is an effort by the city to provide residents in the older parts of town with the same services and comforts as the residents in the new developments. The plan will include a swimming pool, lighted basketball courts, sand volleyball courts, a new tot-lot, and new landscaping. The city hopes the park will become a place for community activities and family outings for years to SO Haw \)0t% THIS B6CKEY Ot BASEBALL? NO PUBLIC ACCESS RICHARD COHEN come. But making the park a wonderful place to be is not the job of the city alone. Loitering and illegal activities only occur in park areas that are not well-used. By using the wonderful facilities the city is providing, residents will not give these individuals the privacy they need to break the law. It is the responsibility of the residents who use the park to work together to help keep the park looking like new. Vandalism and abuse are the major killers of park facilities. Park rules and regulations are clearly posted in every city park. By following the simple rules, you can help keep the park safe and clean for everyone. City officials cannot be in the parks to monitor the area at all times. If residents see someone in the area who is not following park rules, it is their responsibility to try and encourage that person to comply, or to report them to the authorities. i It is only about 5% of the population who destroys public property. By working together, the other 95% can prevent this from ever happening again. Race not the issue A slap on wrist That sound you heard from the Big West Conference and the UNLV administration was a plink on the wrist—and a most disappointing pHnk it was. UNLVs reprimand for the football team's shameful activities in its game with UNR was as mild as circumstances would permit—no penalties, no probation and, in effect, no punishment. Did everybody give high fives behind the scenes after the spotlights went out? You have to wonder. The conference itself should have been far harder on the UNLV football coaches than it was; it should have GUY SHIPLER been far harder on UNLVs Quincy Sanders, who threw his helmet at the feet of Nevada Coach Chris Ault; and it should not have taken the easy way out by seeming to blame both UNR and UNLV equally for those melees on the field. UNLV Coach Jeff Horton and hfs assistants clearly instigated this mess by overhyping their players and by making this game a personal statement for themselves rather than See UNLV Page? WASHINGTON—It was back during the New York newspaper strike of 1962-63 that Calvin Trillin, parodying the then-liberal (and nonpublishing) New York Post, suggested one of the great tabloid headhnes of all time: "Cold Snap Hits Our Town/Jews, Negroes Suffer Most." Last week, a federal judge in New York went Trillin one better. He blocked a transit fare increase on the grounds that it discriminated against blacks and Hispanics. What he will do with a cold snap is anyone's guess. Whether the judge, Robert P. Patterson Jr., was trying to once again prove the thesis that parody is impossible in America since, in due course, everything comes true, I cannot say. he did, however, have some figures on his side. Transit fares were going to be hiked 20% for subway riders and only 9% for commuters on the suburban train lines. Minorities comprise 60% of subway riders but only 20% of suburban commuters. The judge's ruling may turn out to be totally without consequence since an appeals court suspended it almost immediately. What was surprising, though, was how the decision, while unexpected, was not denounced as the caprice of a madman. The judge ruled that higher fares in the city might violate the U.S. Civil Rights Act. Since the area's mass transit system takes Uncle Sam's money, it has to play by Uncle Sam's rules. OK You can see his point. But what we really have here is yet another example of how we refuse to talk about class differences and, instead, concentrate on race. It's true, of course, that a disproportionate number of blacks are poor and that poverty is, probably, connected to past and present discrimination—not to mention slavery. But what that judge really meant—but could not say—is that the fare rise was tougher on the poor than on the more affluent. For that situation, there can be no remedy. So, in a sense, I'm sympathetic. Poor people are getting screwed and it hardly matters if they are white, black, Hispanic or anything else. But the wholesale use of race (or ethnicity) where we mean class only serves to further divide our society and lead us astray. For instance, let's suppose that the judge is right and, as a consequence, all fares are raised an equal amount. How is that going to help blacks {md Hispanics? Now those in the suburbs can join those in the city in paying 20% more. What's worse, it leads us all on a silly search for parity and proportionality. Take, for instance, the hubbub over the disparate federal penalties for possession of crack_,. cocaine and just plain ol' cocaine. Jesse Jackson himself denounced this from his noble and ethical perch on the right hand of Louis Farrakhan at the Million Man March. Venue aside, Jackson is right. The difference between crack and cocaine should not mean the difference between a short sentence and virtually throwing away the proverbial key. But is that a racial issue—or, as Jackson has put it, "racist?" Not really. In the first place, the vast majority of crack or cocaine arrests are made at the state (not federal) level, where sentencing disparities mostly don't exist. Second, in city after city, these arrests are made by minority police officers who. presumably, are not racist. And third, the reason blacks are disproportionately arrested on drug charges (90% of federal crack defendants) is not on account of race, but on account of what they happen to be doing at the time: selling drugs. Maybe that, in turn, is linked to poverty and then to race, but it cannot be racist to arrest the very people who prey on their own community. If that's the case, then what about murder? Young black men are murdered at 10 times the rate as young white men-^and, usually, by other young black men. Is it racist to put these killers behind bars? Even Jackson may hesitate to make that claim. Sometimes, a disparity does suggest the presence of racism. Who can deny, say, that the lack of blacks in a big city fire department is evidence that something besides coincidence is at work? But arrest ratios may be a different matter. The numbers themselves do not necessarily prove, or even suggest, racism. It is the same with riders on New York's mass transit systems—city or suburban. It's not African Americans or Hispanics who are being wronged, it's anyone of any race or ethnicity who finds a fare hike a real financial burden. That's the one area in which, it seems, America is truly colorblind. When it comes to the poor, regardless of race, sex or ,-ethnicity, we treat them all with indifference. Cohen is a columnist for the Washington Post Writers Group. Compromise: A built-in safety valve One of the more fascinating elements of the American system of government is its built-in safety valve—compromise. House Speaker Newt Gingrich hates the word. So do his feisty young Republican freshmen, who went to Washington convinced that they could ride rough-shod over everything in sight. Their numbers gave them the basic tools and they used them well in their early Sherman-like March on Washington. It was inevitable that their ravage would slow down. Much of what they set out to bum to the ground had become so much a part of the American tapestry that it was apparently flame-proof Gingrich and company didn't count on that, because they forgot that compromise has been the heart of our system since its inception. And recent polls of the populace indicated that it's principle the people themselves have not forgotten. They are not all fanatics who are easily pushed into following a contrary idea without a studied look at it. For instance, a recent Washington Post/ABC News poll showed public disapproval of the GOP plans for Medicare and Medicaid at 68%. Among them, 67% opposed any cuts in Medicare—even if it means hi^er deficits. On top of all that, this survey found that 69% of those polled want Medicare left alone altogether. The standard GOP answer to this is to brush-off polls as a phony Democratic ploy designed to mask reality. They hammer this view so constantly that it has become a major part of the early start on the 1996 election campaign. This propaganda technique is always effective when handled in a professional fashion, so the Republican leadership has managed to soften the figures to some extent. But the slowdown of their revolution against the government has shown up elsewhere because, now it's clear that some kinds of compromises are necessary to take off the brakes. Bitter disputes have arisen among Republican factions in the House. They have been strong enough to delay passage of the Defense and Interior Department appropriation bills, and deductions from the speaker's strong party discipline have delayed farm legislation that cut subsidies to Southern cotton growers. The Senate voted by a wide margin to restore financing for the Legal Services Corporation. This is a government agency that provides lawyers for the poor and which had been marked for the ax. Worse, the Republicans saw they would lose, so they scrapped the scheduled Senate vote on term limits, a sacred issue to the CJOP's right-wing grass roots constituency. Gingrich has naturally kept pretty quiet about all these trends—he had to try to avoid any implication of compromise. Yet the White House confirms that he has been having regular telephone consultations with the President. Early last month the two had agreed on the six-week backstop funding bill that has kept government going past the end of the ""esjr fiscal year. But as that tods, note that it will probably have to be extended fiirther because, as of this writing, 13 annual appropriation bills which must be passed to keep the government running have not gone through. To top off such developments, some local and state elections across the country last week revealed that not everyone buys the Republican revolution. Unexpected elections, or re-elections of Democratic incumbents, indicated that the American people may have a better idea of the need for compromise than those who hate the word like to see. But the Democrats better not get their hopes up. it's a long time until the election, and the Republicans know what"8 going on, and how best to eope with it. ' • • I -^ Shipler writes a column on state politics from Carson City. The News welcomes brief letters, signed with your name, address and phone for verification. Typed letters receive preference and the News resen/es the right to edit for grammar, spelling or length. Please mail to; Editor, Homt New, 2 Commane Center Drive, Hendereon, NV 89014 YOUR Yiim Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson Home News LETTERS Why Mission Hills Day-care should have been approved Editor Sue reasons why the city should have approved the Mission Hills Day-care: 1. It is the same use permit that the school district will apply for on their designated rural-residential property, which is less than 300 feet away from the proposed day-care. 2. The future elementary school and proposed city park will be a source for much more noise than the proposed day care. Doesn't just plain common sense tell them that? 3. Mission Drive is a master-planned 100-foot street, narrowing to a 90-foot right-of-way street, with a vehicle-load capacity of 800 vehicles per hour per lane, for a total of 24,000 vehicle capacity per day. At present, less than 2,000 vehicles per day use Mission Drive. Traflfic is a non-issue. If every lot in Mission Hills were currently occupied, and the elementary school, city park, and day care were already built, the traffic capacity for Mission Drive would still be 70% under utilized. 4. When the elementary school is built, there will be no more busing in Mission Hills, per Clark County School District transportation guidelines. A few of the neighbors think that day care children will be walking themselves to the day care. This of course won't happen, but shouldn't the neighbors be a little more concerned with the 80-100 children who are going to be walking down each of the streets to get to the elementary school. I wonder how they're going to react to that. 5. A couple of neighbors said they don't want to live close to a day care. The city obviously agreed with them by their vote. I ask those Planing Commissioners: Would any of them pay $95,000 for that corner lot, and spend another $150,000 to $200,000 to build their dream home across the street from a city park, kitty-comer across from the retention basin, and with a breathtaking view of the freeway? No. I doubt they would and nobody else will either. Once the elementary school is built, the park will definitely go in. If this day care is not built on this comer lot, acting as a transitional buffer for the neighborhood, this comer lot will probably always remain vacant. The city should ask their police chief how he feels about the prospect of a vacant lot across from a city park. The neighbors should ask themselves if they would rather have infants and toddlers laughing and playing near their back walls, or teenagers smoking and carrying on in their vacant comer lot. 6. The city sent a loud, clear message that this proposed day care is not an issue of the need for day care in our part of Henderson. It's not an issue of children. It's not an issue of quality. It's not an issue of the 2,400 families that align both sides of our freeway from Heather Avenue up to the Foothills who have real life problems and day care is a major concern. It's not an issue that the city of Henderson has provided within its own ordinances that day cares can be built in any type of residential area. It's not an issue that they have passed this exact same kind of use pemiit in residential areas 12 times. It's not the fact that more than 20 emotional mothers and fathers poured out their hearts to the Planning Commission on behalf of their children. It's not even an issue of what the*future impact and tremendous influence a well-run quality day care could have in helping to shape the lives of our children. No. It seems that the city sent the messajje that it is an issue of horses and dogs and chickens and goats, and noise and traffic and location. The city hasn't done its homework. Perhaps none of them have ever spent any significant time in observing a wefP" run day care, and the tiny little miracles that we see everyday that shape the lives of what we all claim is our most precious possession "Our Children" JoAnn and I respectfully withdrawal our application to build the Mission Hills Pre-school & Day-Care in the city of Henderson. ROY and JoANN WORTHEN CECIL AND DIPSTIK Pmg7 RAY COLLINS ...C6CIL,TM£C6l5 SOA^e•rHl^J5 I MAVe -foTELU VoU..,vJgLL,ce-CIC, VOU'peMV" FAvoRire <:Af2roohi CHAPACTER MV~ I LOVE VoO,/AAfA. [H A^V CN^ OF sNOf2^S. CAfZTooN) ct^AfZAcrepi AMD 1 Feci. I ve KNOA/I^ VO(J AU^^^ HFE BILL HANLON Increased standards for graduates? Prose to ponder Editor: Generally, Council meetings are a sight to observe Especially since members are elected to serve. Tuesday night's meeting was no exception Since Councilman Clark set the direction. When issues of zoning at College and Horizon were presented Mr. Jack stated the issue had been relented. Public comment was officially ignored Even though Terra West was graciously granted the floor. The mayor squelched the citizen's voice of concern And the rebuff was stem. Months of debate had preceeded this night And the citizens hoped the Council would be truthful and right. ,,:.;. Possibly the issue had been already decided For the developer and Council suddenly were no longer divided. Tolerance for Councilman Clark's stance of arrogance is waning He must remember that political elections for him may not be retaining. The developer has decided to resubmit at a later date In hopes that their efforts will somehow change their unfortunate fate. This issue will most certainly continue Citizens, watchful and informed, this will include you. When next we meet at the Council chamber door Don't leave with the nagging regret that you could have done more. Would you be supportive of increased standards for high school graduates? A concern I have had for a number of years is the depreciation of the high school diploma. What is its value? Some argue it has very little meaning. At this time, I believe it does not have a great deal of value for many students. Nevada is experiencing four problems that could be solved by setting realistic and practical objectives: •Academically, our state ranks 48th out of 50 states with the percentage of students taking classes beyond Algebra I. Test scores in academic areas seem to reflect that. •Nevada has one of the highest dropout rates in the nation. •We have diminished opportunities for non-college bound students to enroll in occupational education classes so they can be working toward gaining marketable skills upon graduation. •Costs have gone up and will continue to increase, graduating what some might call an inferior product. Since universities already determine what classes prospective students must have to gain "admission to their-sehoete, w h a t I propose will have little or no effect on them. The proposal; simple as it is, will have an immediate and dramatic impact on education in Nevada. And it won't cost the taxpayers a dime. In fact, it will probably decrease current costs and eliminate some proposals made by educators for more funds. All this while increasing standards. How can this be done? How can we increase the value of the diploma? By increasing standards. To do this I believe three things must occur: •We must stop allowing substitutions in the core curriculum and not allow remedial classes to count toward credit for high school graduation. •Place the number of credits needed for high school graduation at the national average —20 credits. • Increase the rigor of the high school exit exam to reflect true high school standards. The proposal is to have the state require the core curriculum that is currently in place in math, English, science, social studies, humanities, fine arts and computers and allow locally elected school trustess to determine other additional requirements and the number of electives needed for high school graduation. The idea is also simple. Allow locally elected trustees the ability and flexibility to develop policy to keep kids in school, encourage them to enroll in more rigorous classes and provide non-college bound students the ability to take vocational classes. The pumber of credits currently TrSSded for high school graduation has backfired academically—fewer students take upper level classes. Research strongly suggests the demographic makeup of a community has a great deal to do with dropouts. Elko will clearly not experience the magnitude of problems that a city like Las Vegas encounters. Realizing local communities have different demographic makeups, it makes sense to give locally elected school trustees flexibility within certain parameters to encourage students, and that won't negatively effect academic standards. The bottom line questions are also simple enough. Do you want to continue policies discouraging students from taking more rigorous classes? Do you want to continue watering down academics by allowing substitutions in the core curriculum? Do you want the continuation of policies that diminish vocational opportunities for non college bound students? Do you want to continue to force students out of school? Do you want costs to continue increasing while the value of a high school diploma seems to be decreasing in value? If you answered "no," then I would ask the next question. Do you really care about the number of electives students take as long as they receive a sound education in the core curriculum? The State Board of Education favors "quantity" over "quality." Stupidly, some on the board have equated the number of credits with quality. While Nevada has the fifth highest credit requirement in the nation needed for high school graduation, our numbers always seem to be in the bottom half It's time to move on: it's time to stop playing silly number games, it's time to address the issue educationally—not politically, it's time to set high academic standards that are measurable not by the number of credits, but by the quality of education. Let's get it done. Hanlon, a Las Vegas resident who writes a column about education, sits on the state Board of Education, is the administrator for the Clark County School Distnct's Math/Science Institute and IS a part-time instructor at UNLV. UNLV From Page 6 JOYCE K. ZAKE Grading the news what it had always been before—a hard-fought but respectful rivalry between the state's two university campuses. Every one of their actions, from beginning to end, seemed intended to affront and egg on Nevada players. From Horton's claim that he needed protection at Mackay Stadium, to permitting (and probably encouraging) UNLV players to cross the 50-yard line into the warmup territory of Nevada players, to UNLV coach Mark Weber pushing a Nevada coach in the back, to many other actions—it was all there in plain sight. Unfortunately, these actions were not all on video-tape. And that is what the very weak leadership of the Big West Conference relied on in making its judgment of guilt. What it should have done was conduct a real investigation by talking to witnesses. The conference office did make a stab at reality by noting that "the your expense A public official having an unhappy relationship with the media is nothing new, but Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary appears to have gone over the line in dealing with the problem. She spent $433,000 in taxpayer money to investigate reports and media outlets covering the Energy Department. This is clearly unacceptable. The sentiment is the same at the White House, which on Thursday asked O'Leary for a full accounting. If the secretary was looking for a way to improve her image, this was not it. O'Leary has been in hot water before. Earlier this year there were critical reports in the media that said her travel expenses were among the highest in the Clinton Cabinet. All this indicates a lack of judgment on the secretary's part that threatens to overshadow her substantial achievements, which include ordering the report that documented three decades of ethical violations by government agencies that performed radiation experiments on unwitting Americans. The latest O'Leary gaffe was reported Thursday by the Vfall Street Journal. Apparently upset with press coverage of the energy secretary and the department, the DOE hired a Washington firm to investigate various reporters and assess their reports, sources and publications. Carma International looked at more than two dozen reporters and hundreds of newspaper, magazine and television reports from December 1994, through last August. It compiled favorably rankings not only on reporters but on their sources and news organizations. The company determined whether the DOE was portrayed positively or negatively on issues ranging from O'Leary's reputation to nuclear waste. A low rating "meant that we weren't getting our message across, that we needed to work on this person a little," Energy Department spokeswoman Barbara Semedo told the Wall Street Journal. Traveling in Baton Rouge, La., O'Leary said she had asked not for an evaluation of reporters but rather for an analysis of news coverage, which, she said, would have cost $170,000— not $80,000, as Semedo said—if done in-house. O'Leary told the White House that the project was portrayed incorrectly in the media on Thursday. Spending tax money to probe the media was overzealous and a misappropriation of public funds. Unless O'Leary can come up promptly with some satisfactory justification, her credibility with the American press and people surely will be diminished. Lot Angeles Timet pregame altercation showed a serious lack of control of their players by the UNLV coaching staff" but the office immediately undercut this position by giving one game suspensions to two players from each team. But most infuriating of all is the one-game suspension for Sanders. When a player throws his helmet at a coach—a heavy object that can be considered a weapon—he should be sent a very strong message about how dangerous and unsupportable this type of behavior is. To give him the same suspension as three other players who did no more than brawl is to undercut the authority of every single coach in the conference. Equally depressing, it appears that neither Horton nor the UNLV administration will take further action against this young man. And that by itself shows how little moral authority resides in the current leadership of that school's football program. Reno Gazette Journal SIGN YOUR LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

PAGE 7

VIEWPOINT LETTERS HOMENEV\S *MNi0'Calla9hM Publisher Carolyn O'CaNaghan Co-Publisher Paul Srydalko Mariaging Editor Pag* 6 Henderson Home News Thursday, November 16,1995 NEWS VIEW Park improvements should increase use, decrease crime The Henderson Parks and Recreation Department has announced their plans to improve one of Henderson's oldest parks, Wells Park. This is an effort by the city to provide residents in the older parts of town with the same services and comforts as the residents in the new developments. The plan will include a swimming pool, lighted basketball courts, sand volleyball courts, a new tot-lot, and new landscaping. The city hopes the park will become a place for community activities and family outings for years to SO Haw \)0t% THIS B6CKEY Ot BASEBALL? NO PUBLIC ACCESS RICHARD COHEN come. But making the park a wonderful place to be is not the job of the city alone. Loitering and illegal activities only occur in park areas that are not well-used. By using the wonderful facilities the city is providing, residents will not give these individuals the privacy they need to break the law. It is the responsibility of the residents who use the park to work together to help keep the park looking like new. Vandalism and abuse are the major killers of park facilities. Park rules and regulations are clearly posted in every city park. By following the simple rules, you can help keep the park safe and clean for everyone. City officials cannot be in the parks to monitor the area at all times. If residents see someone in the area who is not following park rules, it is their responsibility to try and encourage that person to comply, or to report them to the authorities. i It is only about 5% of the population who destroys public property. By working together, the other 95% can prevent this from ever happening again. Race not the issue A slap on wrist That sound you heard from the Big West Conference and the UNLV administration was a plink on the wrist—and a most disappointing pHnk it was. UNLVs reprimand for the football team's shameful activities in its game with UNR was as mild as circumstances would permit—no penalties, no probation and, in effect, no punishment. Did everybody give high fives behind the scenes after the spotlights went out? You have to wonder. The conference itself should have been far harder on the UNLV football coaches than it was; it should have GUY SHIPLER been far harder on UNLVs Quincy Sanders, who threw his helmet at the feet of Nevada Coach Chris Ault; and it should not have taken the easy way out by seeming to blame both UNR and UNLV equally for those melees on the field. UNLV Coach Jeff Horton and hfs assistants clearly instigated this mess by overhyping their players and by making this game a personal statement for themselves rather than See UNLV Page? WASHINGTON—It was back during the New York newspaper strike of 1962-63 that Calvin Trillin, parodying the then-liberal (and nonpublishing) New York Post, suggested one of the great tabloid headhnes of all time: "Cold Snap Hits Our Town/Jews, Negroes Suffer Most." Last week, a federal judge in New York went Trillin one better. He blocked a transit fare increase on the grounds that it discriminated against blacks and Hispanics. What he will do with a cold snap is anyone's guess. Whether the judge, Robert P. Patterson Jr., was trying to once again prove the thesis that parody is impossible in America since, in due course, everything comes true, I cannot say. he did, however, have some figures on his side. Transit fares were going to be hiked 20% for subway riders and only 9% for commuters on the suburban train lines. Minorities comprise 60% of subway riders but only 20% of suburban commuters. The judge's ruling may turn out to be totally without consequence since an appeals court suspended it almost immediately. What was surprising, though, was how the decision, while unexpected, was not denounced as the caprice of a madman. The judge ruled that higher fares in the city might violate the U.S. Civil Rights Act. Since the area's mass transit system takes Uncle Sam's money, it has to play by Uncle Sam's rules. OK You can see his point. But what we really have here is yet another example of how we refuse to talk about class differences and, instead, concentrate on race. It's true, of course, that a disproportionate number of blacks are poor and that poverty is, probably, connected to past and present discrimination—not to mention slavery. But what that judge really meant—but could not say—is that the fare rise was tougher on the poor than on the more affluent. For that situation, there can be no remedy. So, in a sense, I'm sympathetic. Poor people are getting screwed and it hardly matters if they are white, black, Hispanic or anything else. But the wholesale use of race (or ethnicity) where we mean class only serves to further divide our society and lead us astray. For instance, let's suppose that the judge is right and, as a consequence, all fares are raised an equal amount. How is that going to help blacks {md Hispanics? Now those in the suburbs can join those in the city in paying 20% more. What's worse, it leads us all on a silly search for parity and proportionality. Take, for instance, the hubbub over the disparate federal penalties for possession of crack_,. cocaine and just plain ol' cocaine. Jesse Jackson himself denounced this from his noble and ethical perch on the right hand of Louis Farrakhan at the Million Man March. Venue aside, Jackson is right. The difference between crack and cocaine should not mean the difference between a short sentence and virtually throwing away the proverbial key. But is that a racial issue—or, as Jackson has put it, "racist?" Not really. In the first place, the vast majority of crack or cocaine arrests are made at the state (not federal) level, where sentencing disparities mostly don't exist. Second, in city after city, these arrests are made by minority police officers who. presumably, are not racist. And third, the reason blacks are disproportionately arrested on drug charges (90% of federal crack defendants) is not on account of race, but on account of what they happen to be doing at the time: selling drugs. Maybe that, in turn, is linked to poverty and then to race, but it cannot be racist to arrest the very people who prey on their own community. If that's the case, then what about murder? Young black men are murdered at 10 times the rate as young white men-^and, usually, by other young black men. Is it racist to put these killers behind bars? Even Jackson may hesitate to make that claim. Sometimes, a disparity does suggest the presence of racism. Who can deny, say, that the lack of blacks in a big city fire department is evidence that something besides coincidence is at work? But arrest ratios may be a different matter. The numbers themselves do not necessarily prove, or even suggest, racism. It is the same with riders on New York's mass transit systems—city or suburban. It's not African Americans or Hispanics who are being wronged, it's anyone of any race or ethnicity who finds a fare hike a real financial burden. That's the one area in which, it seems, America is truly colorblind. When it comes to the poor, regardless of race, sex or ,-ethnicity, we treat them all with indifference. Cohen is a columnist for the Washington Post Writers Group. Compromise: A built-in safety valve One of the more fascinating elements of the American system of government is its built-in safety valve—compromise. House Speaker Newt Gingrich hates the word. So do his feisty young Republican freshmen, who went to Washington convinced that they could ride rough-shod over everything in sight. Their numbers gave them the basic tools and they used them well in their early Sherman-like March on Washington. It was inevitable that their ravage would slow down. Much of what they set out to bum to the ground had become so much a part of the American tapestry that it was apparently flame-proof Gingrich and company didn't count on that, because they forgot that compromise has been the heart of our system since its inception. And recent polls of the populace indicated that it's principle the people themselves have not forgotten. They are not all fanatics who are easily pushed into following a contrary idea without a studied look at it. For instance, a recent Washington Post/ABC News poll showed public disapproval of the GOP plans for Medicare and Medicaid at 68%. Among them, 67% opposed any cuts in Medicare—even if it means hi^er deficits. On top of all that, this survey found that 69% of those polled want Medicare left alone altogether. The standard GOP answer to this is to brush-off polls as a phony Democratic ploy designed to mask reality. They hammer this view so constantly that it has become a major part of the early start on the 1996 election campaign. This propaganda technique is always effective when handled in a professional fashion, so the Republican leadership has managed to soften the figures to some extent. But the slowdown of their revolution against the government has shown up elsewhere because, now it's clear that some kinds of compromises are necessary to take off the brakes. Bitter disputes have arisen among Republican factions in the House. They have been strong enough to delay passage of the Defense and Interior Department appropriation bills, and deductions from the speaker's strong party discipline have delayed farm legislation that cut subsidies to Southern cotton growers. The Senate voted by a wide margin to restore financing for the Legal Services Corporation. This is a government agency that provides lawyers for the poor and which had been marked for the ax. Worse, the Republicans saw they would lose, so they scrapped the scheduled Senate vote on term limits, a sacred issue to the CJOP's right-wing grass roots constituency. Gingrich has naturally kept pretty quiet about all these trends—he had to try to avoid any implication of compromise. Yet the White House confirms that he has been having regular telephone consultations with the President. Early last month the two had agreed on the six-week backstop funding bill that has kept government going past the end of the ""esjr fiscal year. But as that tods, note that it will probably have to be extended fiirther because, as of this writing, 13 annual appropriation bills which must be passed to keep the government running have not gone through. To top off such developments, some local and state elections across the country last week revealed that not everyone buys the Republican revolution. Unexpected elections, or re-elections of Democratic incumbents, indicated that the American people may have a better idea of the need for compromise than those who hate the word like to see. But the Democrats better not get their hopes up. it's a long time until the election, and the Republicans know what"8 going on, and how best to eope with it. ' • • I -^ Shipler writes a column on state politics from Carson City. The News welcomes brief letters, signed with your name, address and phone for verification. Typed letters receive preference and the News resen/es the right to edit for grammar, spelling or length. Please mail to; Editor, Homt New, 2 Commane Center Drive, Hendereon, NV 89014 YOUR Yiim Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson Home News LETTERS Why Mission Hills Day-care should have been approved Editor Sue reasons why the city should have approved the Mission Hills Day-care: 1. It is the same use permit that the school district will apply for on their designated rural-residential property, which is less than 300 feet away from the proposed day-care. 2. The future elementary school and proposed city park will be a source for much more noise than the proposed day care. Doesn't just plain common sense tell them that? 3. Mission Drive is a master-planned 100-foot street, narrowing to a 90-foot right-of-way street, with a vehicle-load capacity of 800 vehicles per hour per lane, for a total of 24,000 vehicle capacity per day. At present, less than 2,000 vehicles per day use Mission Drive. Traflfic is a non-issue. If every lot in Mission Hills were currently occupied, and the elementary school, city park, and day care were already built, the traffic capacity for Mission Drive would still be 70% under utilized. 4. When the elementary school is built, there will be no more busing in Mission Hills, per Clark County School District transportation guidelines. A few of the neighbors think that day care children will be walking themselves to the day care. This of course won't happen, but shouldn't the neighbors be a little more concerned with the 80-100 children who are going to be walking down each of the streets to get to the elementary school. I wonder how they're going to react to that. 5. A couple of neighbors said they don't want to live close to a day care. The city obviously agreed with them by their vote. I ask those Planing Commissioners: Would any of them pay $95,000 for that corner lot, and spend another $150,000 to $200,000 to build their dream home across the street from a city park, kitty-comer across from the retention basin, and with a breathtaking view of the freeway? No. I doubt they would and nobody else will either. Once the elementary school is built, the park will definitely go in. If this day care is not built on this comer lot, acting as a transitional buffer for the neighborhood, this comer lot will probably always remain vacant. The city should ask their police chief how he feels about the prospect of a vacant lot across from a city park. The neighbors should ask themselves if they would rather have infants and toddlers laughing and playing near their back walls, or teenagers smoking and carrying on in their vacant comer lot. 6. The city sent a loud, clear message that this proposed day care is not an issue of the need for day care in our part of Henderson. It's not an issue of children. It's not an issue of quality. It's not an issue of the 2,400 families that align both sides of our freeway from Heather Avenue up to the Foothills who have real life problems and day care is a major concern. It's not an issue that the city of Henderson has provided within its own ordinances that day cares can be built in any type of residential area. It's not an issue that they have passed this exact same kind of use pemiit in residential areas 12 times. It's not the fact that more than 20 emotional mothers and fathers poured out their hearts to the Planning Commission on behalf of their children. It's not even an issue of what the*future impact and tremendous influence a well-run quality day care could have in helping to shape the lives of our children. No. It seems that the city sent the messajje that it is an issue of horses and dogs and chickens and goats, and noise and traffic and location. The city hasn't done its homework. Perhaps none of them have ever spent any significant time in observing a wefP" run day care, and the tiny little miracles that we see everyday that shape the lives of what we all claim is our most precious possession "Our Children" JoAnn and I respectfully withdrawal our application to build the Mission Hills Pre-school & Day-Care in the city of Henderson. ROY and JoANN WORTHEN CECIL AND DIPSTIK Pmg7 RAY COLLINS ...C6CIL,TM£C6l5 SOA^e•rHl^J5 I MAVe -foTELU VoU..,vJgLL,ce-CIC, VOU'peMV" FAvoRire <:Af2roohi CHAPACTER MV~ I LOVE VoO,/AAfA. [H A^V CN^ OF sNOf2^S. CAfZTooN) ct^AfZAcrepi AMD 1 Feci. I ve KNOA/I^ VO(J AU^^^ HFE BILL HANLON Increased standards for graduates? Prose to ponder Editor: Generally, Council meetings are a sight to observe Especially since members are elected to serve. Tuesday night's meeting was no exception Since Councilman Clark set the direction. When issues of zoning at College and Horizon were presented Mr. Jack stated the issue had been relented. Public comment was officially ignored Even though Terra West was graciously granted the floor. The mayor squelched the citizen's voice of concern And the rebuff was stem. Months of debate had preceeded this night And the citizens hoped the Council would be truthful and right. ,,:.;. Possibly the issue had been already decided For the developer and Council suddenly were no longer divided. Tolerance for Councilman Clark's stance of arrogance is waning He must remember that political elections for him may not be retaining. The developer has decided to resubmit at a later date In hopes that their efforts will somehow change their unfortunate fate. This issue will most certainly continue Citizens, watchful and informed, this will include you. When next we meet at the Council chamber door Don't leave with the nagging regret that you could have done more. Would you be supportive of increased standards for high school graduates? A concern I have had for a number of years is the depreciation of the high school diploma. What is its value? Some argue it has very little meaning. At this time, I believe it does not have a great deal of value for many students. Nevada is experiencing four problems that could be solved by setting realistic and practical objectives: •Academically, our state ranks 48th out of 50 states with the percentage of students taking classes beyond Algebra I. Test scores in academic areas seem to reflect that. •Nevada has one of the highest dropout rates in the nation. •We have diminished opportunities for non-college bound students to enroll in occupational education classes so they can be working toward gaining marketable skills upon graduation. •Costs have gone up and will continue to increase, graduating what some might call an inferior product. Since universities already determine what classes prospective students must have to gain "admission to their-sehoete, w h a t I propose will have little or no effect on them. The proposal; simple as it is, will have an immediate and dramatic impact on education in Nevada. And it won't cost the taxpayers a dime. In fact, it will probably decrease current costs and eliminate some proposals made by educators for more funds. All this while increasing standards. How can this be done? How can we increase the value of the diploma? By increasing standards. To do this I believe three things must occur: •We must stop allowing substitutions in the core curriculum and not allow remedial classes to count toward credit for high school graduation. •Place the number of credits needed for high school graduation at the national average —20 credits. • Increase the rigor of the high school exit exam to reflect true high school standards. The proposal is to have the state require the core curriculum that is currently in place in math, English, science, social studies, humanities, fine arts and computers and allow locally elected school trustess to determine other additional requirements and the number of electives needed for high school graduation. The idea is also simple. Allow locally elected trustees the ability and flexibility to develop policy to keep kids in school, encourage them to enroll in more rigorous classes and provide non-college bound students the ability to take vocational classes. The pumber of credits currently TrSSded for high school graduation has backfired academically—fewer students take upper level classes. Research strongly suggests the demographic makeup of a community has a great deal to do with dropouts. Elko will clearly not experience the magnitude of problems that a city like Las Vegas encounters. Realizing local communities have different demographic makeups, it makes sense to give locally elected school trustees flexibility within certain parameters to encourage students, and that won't negatively effect academic standards. The bottom line questions are also simple enough. Do you want to continue policies discouraging students from taking more rigorous classes? Do you want to continue watering down academics by allowing substitutions in the core curriculum? Do you want the continuation of policies that diminish vocational opportunities for non college bound students? Do you want to continue to force students out of school? Do you want costs to continue increasing while the value of a high school diploma seems to be decreasing in value? If you answered "no," then I would ask the next question. Do you really care about the number of electives students take as long as they receive a sound education in the core curriculum? The State Board of Education favors "quantity" over "quality." Stupidly, some on the board have equated the number of credits with quality. While Nevada has the fifth highest credit requirement in the nation needed for high school graduation, our numbers always seem to be in the bottom half It's time to move on: it's time to stop playing silly number games, it's time to address the issue educationally—not politically, it's time to set high academic standards that are measurable not by the number of credits, but by the quality of education. Let's get it done. Hanlon, a Las Vegas resident who writes a column about education, sits on the state Board of Education, is the administrator for the Clark County School Distnct's Math/Science Institute and IS a part-time instructor at UNLV. UNLV From Page 6 JOYCE K. ZAKE Grading the news what it had always been before—a hard-fought but respectful rivalry between the state's two university campuses. Every one of their actions, from beginning to end, seemed intended to affront and egg on Nevada players. From Horton's claim that he needed protection at Mackay Stadium, to permitting (and probably encouraging) UNLV players to cross the 50-yard line into the warmup territory of Nevada players, to UNLV coach Mark Weber pushing a Nevada coach in the back, to many other actions—it was all there in plain sight. Unfortunately, these actions were not all on video-tape. And that is what the very weak leadership of the Big West Conference relied on in making its judgment of guilt. What it should have done was conduct a real investigation by talking to witnesses. The conference office did make a stab at reality by noting that "the your expense A public official having an unhappy relationship with the media is nothing new, but Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary appears to have gone over the line in dealing with the problem. She spent $433,000 in taxpayer money to investigate reports and media outlets covering the Energy Department. This is clearly unacceptable. The sentiment is the same at the White House, which on Thursday asked O'Leary for a full accounting. If the secretary was looking for a way to improve her image, this was not it. O'Leary has been in hot water before. Earlier this year there were critical reports in the media that said her travel expenses were among the highest in the Clinton Cabinet. All this indicates a lack of judgment on the secretary's part that threatens to overshadow her substantial achievements, which include ordering the report that documented three decades of ethical violations by government agencies that performed radiation experiments on unwitting Americans. The latest O'Leary gaffe was reported Thursday by the Vfall Street Journal. Apparently upset with press coverage of the energy secretary and the department, the DOE hired a Washington firm to investigate various reporters and assess their reports, sources and publications. Carma International looked at more than two dozen reporters and hundreds of newspaper, magazine and television reports from December 1994, through last August. It compiled favorably rankings not only on reporters but on their sources and news organizations. The company determined whether the DOE was portrayed positively or negatively on issues ranging from O'Leary's reputation to nuclear waste. A low rating "meant that we weren't getting our message across, that we needed to work on this person a little," Energy Department spokeswoman Barbara Semedo told the Wall Street Journal. Traveling in Baton Rouge, La., O'Leary said she had asked not for an evaluation of reporters but rather for an analysis of news coverage, which, she said, would have cost $170,000— not $80,000, as Semedo said—if done in-house. O'Leary told the White House that the project was portrayed incorrectly in the media on Thursday. Spending tax money to probe the media was overzealous and a misappropriation of public funds. Unless O'Leary can come up promptly with some satisfactory justification, her credibility with the American press and people surely will be diminished. Lot Angeles Timet pregame altercation showed a serious lack of control of their players by the UNLV coaching staff" but the office immediately undercut this position by giving one game suspensions to two players from each team. But most infuriating of all is the one-game suspension for Sanders. When a player throws his helmet at a coach—a heavy object that can be considered a weapon—he should be sent a very strong message about how dangerous and unsupportable this type of behavior is. To give him the same suspension as three other players who did no more than brawl is to undercut the authority of every single coach in the conference. Equally depressing, it appears that neither Horton nor the UNLV administration will take further action against this young man. And that by itself shows how little moral authority resides in the current leadership of that school's football program. Reno Gazette Journal SIGN YOUR LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

PAGE 8

mmm Page 8 Henderson Home News Thursday, November 16, 1995 Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson Home News Page 9 Veterans organizations attend brunch Representatives of the following veterans organizations attended a special brunch at the Henderson Senior Center Nov. 4: American Legion Posts 8, 31, 40,43,55 and 76; Marine Corps. League, Greater Nevada Detachment; WAC's Chapter 77; Amvets Post 9936; Military Order of Purple Heart; 82nd Airborne; Sea Bees; Pearl Harbor Survivors Association; and Veterans of Foreign Wars Posts 3848, 1753, 3574 and 5559. Polish Legion of American Veterans; Women Marines Association;. 1st Marine Division Associations (Las Vegas Chapter); Veterans in Politics; Jewish War Veterans Posts 65 and 711; Disabled American Veterans Chapter 12; and U.S. Navy Armed Guard. American Merchant Marine Veterans Reserve Officers Association; Coast Guard Auxiliary; 3rd Infantry Division; 2nd and 4th Marine Division Associations; China-Burma-India Veterans Chapter 133.. Aage J. Christensen, one of six known World War I veterans who live in Southern Nevada, was honored at the event, brunch chairman George Vavrek said. Courtesy Photo ;, • •;. • .,. HONORED GUEST —Veterans brunch chairman George Vavrek and Rep. John Ensign, R-Nev., present a proclamation to World War I veteran Aage J. Christensen Nov. 4 at the Henderson Senior Center. More than 300 attended the brunch. National Charity League forms local chapter A small group of Los Angeles women, interested in philanthropic work, joined together in 1925 and formed what is known today as the National Charity League, which incorporated in September 1947 for the sole purpose of social, cultural and philanthropic reasons. The first Nevada chapter was recently formed and it has become the largest charter STUDENT From Pagel had taken place in the last two weeks," Lopez said. "But when I questioned him more, he did say that something had happened, but it was supposed to be 'kept quiet.'" Testa refused to comment on th'e assertion, except to say, 'That's incorrect. It's an internal matter, and that was taken completely out of context." One student, though, said an announcement was made by one of her teachers Monday, "to be careful, and not walk the halls alone while classes were in session." Although Lopez criticized Basic's school security, principal Smith said the incident was isolated, and that adequate security, including hall monitors, school police and video surveillance equipment, is provided at the school. CALL 435-7700 WITH NEWS TIPS membership in the League's 75year history. More than 192 mothers and daughters make up the Green Valley chapter of the National Charity League, focusing on philanthropic and cultural opportunities. Their motto is "We search for charity within ourselves and strive for the graciousness to share it with others." Mothers are called Patroness and daughters, in grades seven through twelve, are called Ticktockers. The chapter recently participated as volunteers for the "Shakespeare in the Park," and will be targeting assistance for the Henderson Senior Center, DelMar Gardens Convalescent Home, Henderson parks and Recreation and the Henderson Animal Shelter. New members are invited by chapter members and each is required to fulfill public service obligations. In October, members participatedrm a memory walk for Alzheimer's patients at DelMar Gardens. Members have begun Christmas gift wrapping projects at the Henderson Senior Center. To suggest a philanthropic project in the Henderson-Green Valley area, call Sharron Skupa, 451-8706. UNIVERSAL FUNERALS: Complete Funeral Service $149500 includes metal casket, viewing and chapel or gravesitc service, also casket spray, one limousine Si fruit basket for the family. Does not include cemetery property. DIRECT ^315^ CREMATION '"Sl^^.Sr A Dignified Alternative to the High Cost of Dying RON GIVEN General Manager (Formerly with Palm Mortuary) Senior & Veterans Discounts Pre Arrangements Available Linda Wills, Pres. Donna Thompson, Treas. UNIVERSAL FUNERAL CHAPELS "SERVING ALL FAITHS" Over 60 Years Experience, Over 20 Years in the Las Vegas Valley 2200 East Patrick Lane 262-2230 24 Hours JOIN U S^THIS -7 mURSDAX; NOVEMBER 23 ;t^0AO ^^ JOIN US TfflS THANKSGIVING M-f. THE CONDUCTOR*S ROOM For those who desire quiet, intimate dining, we will be serving our regular men u and a traditional Thanksgiving Dinner firom 2 p.m. 10 p.m. Reservations Suggoled: 294-5000 ADULTS $7.9S (p.us,, Children Under 12 $4il5 (piusia Enjoy vour choice o<'... ROAST TOM TURKEY and sage dressing BAKED VIRGINIA HAM with fruit sauce and candied yaois or.. .a combination o{ ROAST TOM IDRKEYfr BAKED VUUHNU HAM with fruit sauce, candied yams and sage dressing. Each dinnerindudes: Your choice ofioup or salad bar, mashed polatoeswithgiUet gravy, vegetables and cianbeiry sauce, ^mini loaf and butter, mince, ^;appir or pumpkin pie with j;whipped topping. coAw, tea ormiDc. CASINO 2800 S. Boulder Hwy. (702)294-5000 BUFFET FEAST $3.49 (plus lax) Special all day 11 a.m. -10 p.m. All You Can Eat Thanksgiving Buffet Dinner wilti all the trimmings Pku.. .special ambrosia & waidorf salads, pumpkin & mince pie with whipped topping RESTAURANT We wiD be serving traditional Thanksgiving Dinner from 1 2 Noon -10 p.in. Eivoy your choKe of... ROAST TOM TURKEY tatfinming BAKED VIRGINU HAM With fr\iit sauce and candied yam or a combination of ROAST TOM TURKEY AND BAKED VIRGINU HAM with fruit sauce, candied yam and a^(e dreaajng. Each dfauier includcm: your choice of soup or aihd, mahol poMoa wtfi ghkt pavv, wyetaUes and cnuibary sauce, dkner roll md buOer, mince or pim|4dn pir with wh^iped tappni. COOK, ka or nA. ADULTS: $4JBt5 Chadim Under 12: $3il5 (pkit tail (plus lu) SHOP TdLK with Tony Meleo DISPOSING OF TOXIC FLUIDS PROPERLY Ii is estimated that a third of the nearly 4()0 million gallons of used crankcase oil generated by backyard mechariics (ihe equivalent of anywhere from 27 to .^6 Exxon Valdez-size oil spills) is dumped mio landfills, backyards, empty lots, and stomi drains each year. What makes this improper disposal all the more troubling IS that used motor oil is contaminated with gasoline and such heavy metals as lead, cadmium, and others from enginebearing wear. Used crankcase oil is so toxic that one gallon of it can leach into the ground to render one million gallons of fresh water undnnkable Antifreeze/ coolant, one of the most toxic of automotive lluids. should also be spared from the environment. Be sure, then, to recycle used oil and other toxicauto fluids at certified collection stations. If you change the oil in your car, please dispose of properly at a scr\'ice station or recydingcenliT Forthewidest selection of brand name and hard-to-find replacement parts for your car, come to THE PARTS HOUSE. We are a full service Car Quest associate Our professional knowledgeable staff can answer your questions We carry new and rebuilt parts and offer a warranty on many products The shop is located at 7(19 Juniper Way and is open Men.-Fri 8-6. Saturdays 5 Call 29.1-2l9.V'Youll find it at Car Quest." AUTO SPECIALISTS, INC. 705 Juniper Way, Boulder City 293-4776 PAID ADVERTISEMENT EDUCATION Henderson Home News ai|[-al|rJ|rnJlraJlraJI rail rail nUI raJIraJI r^l Thanksgiving Day Food Specials! Roast Turkey Dinner Served with country stuffing, candied yams, green beans almandine. cranberry sauce, choice of potato, soup or salad and roll. Baked Ham with Honey Glaze Served with candied yams, green beans almandine. choice of potato, soup or salad and roll. Both Dinners Served witli Pumpkin Pie $09B John Judge/News Staff THEATER—Brian Blaylock, left, T.J.Candella, middle, and Kierstin through Saturday. Ticket prices are $5 for adults and $2 for Sandberg, right, ofthe Green Valley High School Theater help put students and seniors, on "You Can't Take It With You" at Green Valley High School GVHS presents play through Saturday Jocelyn Bluitt News Staff Writer Your Choice llam-lipm C • A • S • I • N • 0 N • 0 MO Vfeter St. Downtown Henderson Another Fine Boyd Gaming Property The Green Valley High School Theater is now performing the classic comedy, "You Can't Take It With You." The play, written by Moss Hart and George 8. Kaufman, tells the story of two young lovers from different worlds, struggling against their family backgrounds to sustain a relationship. The attractive young Tony Kirby (Jason Goldberg), after falling in love with Alice Sycamore (Amber Madsen), brings his parents to dinner at the Syamore's home on the wrong evening. The Kirbys are shocked by the Sycamore's eccentric behavior, and Alice is convinced that her marriage to Tony is an impossibility. But Tony, who realizes that the Sycamores are right and his own people wrong, will not give Alice up. Director Dane Madsen said this play gave his technical staff an opportunity to show off their talents. Not only did the crew construct the detailed interior of a house on the set, but also incorporated pyrotechnics into the action ofthe play. "This is the first show we have done with pyrotechnics. We even had to go through the fire marshall to get approved. We will be using smoke and special lights for explosions," said Mike Johnson, lighting operation and design crew chief. This play has been ranked the second most popularplay in the nation among high school students. Goldberg said it attracts students because it tells the story of a situation everyone has gone through at some point during their high school years. "It is a romance that high school kids can relate to. They know how hard it is when your parents want one thing and you want the other, and everyone is confused. It really kind of hits home," Goldberg said. This play gave the cast an opportunity to sharpen their acting skills by improving on the physical aspects of becoming a character, Madsen said. "Every fall, I like to try to See Play Page 10 DINNER till 8:00 p.m. Tuesday thru Saturday Additional Dinner Menu OMELET HOUSE 316 N. Boulder Hwy. Henderson Sefior Suertes Cantiiia & IVIexican Itestauranf ie Video Poker 5 will get you 6 Slot Fromotion (Buy and play 5 rolls of quarters and get the 6th one free!) .1640 West Warm Springs, Hendereoni School ^Q DRURY'S ^Q I COMPLETE Includes exam $00 I I EYEWEAR PACKAGE frame & lenses CR 39 wT | I RirnrAI Q n 9A includes exam, DirUl^ALD U-^O frames lensesCR-39 ^491 I I L NO LINE PACKAGE Includes exam, frame & progressive lenses CR-39 $99 I I J EYE EXAM INCLUDED With any frame and lens purchase. Contact fens exam extra. NOW AVAILABLE! VitUt CUJR ONE DAY SERVICE MOST RXs ONE YEAR GUARANTEE AGAINST BREAKAGE DR. DRURY, CD. 565-3937 748 South Boulder Hwy. Henderson, NV "Additional charge for tints, coatings, glass & Specialty RXs. Selected frames Kenmark. Offer good for a limited time. J'PERSONAL INJURY FREE CONSULTATION NO RECOVERY FEE 565-0473 218 LEAD ST. (Across from the new Civic Center Plaza) m LAW OFFICE OF JOHN F. MARCHIANO FORMER HENDERSON CITY ATTORNEY COMFIIIE SIMR Dinner Salad Twice Baked Potato Vegetable of the Day Served TuwdayG Thursday 3pin(ollain 'l^S? FREE Slice of Apple Pie Bnnqtefouponioihp Cook's Hol^('(dlPdn(I^PfpivponffllQ. sJKPolApplpPip' MAJOR AVE a BOULDER HWY. 754 S. BOULDER HWY. HENDERSON, NV 89105 566-9999 ossanD ^>^ OiP AND SA fOff raut Nr nv 70 TNF IKMOMINNBt CAfiNO Mbnagemenf reserves Hie right fo change or discontinue any prornotion Of ih/ tiftte. Everyone is Parading to Tbwn Center .. .even Santa Meet and Greet all your Favorite Friends and Mascots in Green Valley's first Holiday I^ade Heralding the arrival of St. Nick himself. Saturday, November 25th ~ / 1 OLYMPIC AVE \mm^ a' • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ^HB^ ly Nl >I < > z Z TOWN z z CENTER < lU • 2 r • • > • B SUNSET RD ring your camera. The big Parade starts at Discovery Zone (Mountain Vista and Olympic Avenue at 10 a.m. and travels along its festive way to Town Center. Plan to be there to start your holiday celebration with Santa and friends until 1 p.m. in the Town Center Courtyard. (37 TOWN CENTK 4500 East Sunset Rd. Tbys For Tbts will be on hand to collect new, unwrapped toys for children.

PAGE 9

mmm Page 8 Henderson Home News Thursday, November 16, 1995 Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson Home News Page 9 Veterans organizations attend brunch Representatives of the following veterans organizations attended a special brunch at the Henderson Senior Center Nov. 4: American Legion Posts 8, 31, 40,43,55 and 76; Marine Corps. League, Greater Nevada Detachment; WAC's Chapter 77; Amvets Post 9936; Military Order of Purple Heart; 82nd Airborne; Sea Bees; Pearl Harbor Survivors Association; and Veterans of Foreign Wars Posts 3848, 1753, 3574 and 5559. Polish Legion of American Veterans; Women Marines Association;. 1st Marine Division Associations (Las Vegas Chapter); Veterans in Politics; Jewish War Veterans Posts 65 and 711; Disabled American Veterans Chapter 12; and U.S. Navy Armed Guard. American Merchant Marine Veterans Reserve Officers Association; Coast Guard Auxiliary; 3rd Infantry Division; 2nd and 4th Marine Division Associations; China-Burma-India Veterans Chapter 133.. Aage J. Christensen, one of six known World War I veterans who live in Southern Nevada, was honored at the event, brunch chairman George Vavrek said. Courtesy Photo ;, • •;. • .,. HONORED GUEST —Veterans brunch chairman George Vavrek and Rep. John Ensign, R-Nev., present a proclamation to World War I veteran Aage J. Christensen Nov. 4 at the Henderson Senior Center. More than 300 attended the brunch. National Charity League forms local chapter A small group of Los Angeles women, interested in philanthropic work, joined together in 1925 and formed what is known today as the National Charity League, which incorporated in September 1947 for the sole purpose of social, cultural and philanthropic reasons. The first Nevada chapter was recently formed and it has become the largest charter STUDENT From Pagel had taken place in the last two weeks," Lopez said. "But when I questioned him more, he did say that something had happened, but it was supposed to be 'kept quiet.'" Testa refused to comment on th'e assertion, except to say, 'That's incorrect. It's an internal matter, and that was taken completely out of context." One student, though, said an announcement was made by one of her teachers Monday, "to be careful, and not walk the halls alone while classes were in session." Although Lopez criticized Basic's school security, principal Smith said the incident was isolated, and that adequate security, including hall monitors, school police and video surveillance equipment, is provided at the school. CALL 435-7700 WITH NEWS TIPS membership in the League's 75year history. More than 192 mothers and daughters make up the Green Valley chapter of the National Charity League, focusing on philanthropic and cultural opportunities. Their motto is "We search for charity within ourselves and strive for the graciousness to share it with others." Mothers are called Patroness and daughters, in grades seven through twelve, are called Ticktockers. The chapter recently participated as volunteers for the "Shakespeare in the Park," and will be targeting assistance for the Henderson Senior Center, DelMar Gardens Convalescent Home, Henderson parks and Recreation and the Henderson Animal Shelter. New members are invited by chapter members and each is required to fulfill public service obligations. In October, members participatedrm a memory walk for Alzheimer's patients at DelMar Gardens. Members have begun Christmas gift wrapping projects at the Henderson Senior Center. To suggest a philanthropic project in the Henderson-Green Valley area, call Sharron Skupa, 451-8706. UNIVERSAL FUNERALS: Complete Funeral Service $149500 includes metal casket, viewing and chapel or gravesitc service, also casket spray, one limousine Si fruit basket for the family. Does not include cemetery property. DIRECT ^315^ CREMATION '"Sl^^.Sr A Dignified Alternative to the High Cost of Dying RON GIVEN General Manager (Formerly with Palm Mortuary) Senior & Veterans Discounts Pre Arrangements Available Linda Wills, Pres. Donna Thompson, Treas. UNIVERSAL FUNERAL CHAPELS "SERVING ALL FAITHS" Over 60 Years Experience, Over 20 Years in the Las Vegas Valley 2200 East Patrick Lane 262-2230 24 Hours JOIN U S^THIS -7 mURSDAX; NOVEMBER 23 ;t^0AO ^^ JOIN US TfflS THANKSGIVING M-f. THE CONDUCTOR*S ROOM For those who desire quiet, intimate dining, we will be serving our regular men u and a traditional Thanksgiving Dinner firom 2 p.m. 10 p.m. Reservations Suggoled: 294-5000 ADULTS $7.9S (p.us,, Children Under 12 $4il5 (piusia Enjoy vour choice o<'... ROAST TOM TURKEY and sage dressing BAKED VIRGINIA HAM with fruit sauce and candied yaois or.. .a combination o{ ROAST TOM IDRKEYfr BAKED VUUHNU HAM with fruit sauce, candied yams and sage dressing. Each dinnerindudes: Your choice ofioup or salad bar, mashed polatoeswithgiUet gravy, vegetables and cianbeiry sauce, ^mini loaf and butter, mince, ^;appir or pumpkin pie with j;whipped topping. coAw, tea ormiDc. CASINO 2800 S. Boulder Hwy. (702)294-5000 BUFFET FEAST $3.49 (plus lax) Special all day 11 a.m. -10 p.m. All You Can Eat Thanksgiving Buffet Dinner wilti all the trimmings Pku.. .special ambrosia & waidorf salads, pumpkin & mince pie with whipped topping RESTAURANT We wiD be serving traditional Thanksgiving Dinner from 1 2 Noon -10 p.in. Eivoy your choKe of... ROAST TOM TURKEY tatfinming BAKED VIRGINU HAM With fr\iit sauce and candied yam or a combination of ROAST TOM TURKEY AND BAKED VIRGINU HAM with fruit sauce, candied yam and a^(e dreaajng. Each dfauier includcm: your choice of soup or aihd, mahol poMoa wtfi ghkt pavv, wyetaUes and cnuibary sauce, dkner roll md buOer, mince or pim|4dn pir with wh^iped tappni. COOK, ka or nA. ADULTS: $4JBt5 Chadim Under 12: $3il5 (pkit tail (plus lu) SHOP TdLK with Tony Meleo DISPOSING OF TOXIC FLUIDS PROPERLY Ii is estimated that a third of the nearly 4()0 million gallons of used crankcase oil generated by backyard mechariics (ihe equivalent of anywhere from 27 to .^6 Exxon Valdez-size oil spills) is dumped mio landfills, backyards, empty lots, and stomi drains each year. What makes this improper disposal all the more troubling IS that used motor oil is contaminated with gasoline and such heavy metals as lead, cadmium, and others from enginebearing wear. Used crankcase oil is so toxic that one gallon of it can leach into the ground to render one million gallons of fresh water undnnkable Antifreeze/ coolant, one of the most toxic of automotive lluids. should also be spared from the environment. Be sure, then, to recycle used oil and other toxicauto fluids at certified collection stations. If you change the oil in your car, please dispose of properly at a scr\'ice station or recydingcenliT Forthewidest selection of brand name and hard-to-find replacement parts for your car, come to THE PARTS HOUSE. We are a full service Car Quest associate Our professional knowledgeable staff can answer your questions We carry new and rebuilt parts and offer a warranty on many products The shop is located at 7(19 Juniper Way and is open Men.-Fri 8-6. Saturdays 5 Call 29.1-2l9.V'Youll find it at Car Quest." AUTO SPECIALISTS, INC. 705 Juniper Way, Boulder City 293-4776 PAID ADVERTISEMENT EDUCATION Henderson Home News ai|[-al|rJ|rnJlraJlraJI rail rail nUI raJIraJI r^l Thanksgiving Day Food Specials! Roast Turkey Dinner Served with country stuffing, candied yams, green beans almandine. cranberry sauce, choice of potato, soup or salad and roll. Baked Ham with Honey Glaze Served with candied yams, green beans almandine. choice of potato, soup or salad and roll. Both Dinners Served witli Pumpkin Pie $09B John Judge/News Staff THEATER—Brian Blaylock, left, T.J.Candella, middle, and Kierstin through Saturday. Ticket prices are $5 for adults and $2 for Sandberg, right, ofthe Green Valley High School Theater help put students and seniors, on "You Can't Take It With You" at Green Valley High School GVHS presents play through Saturday Jocelyn Bluitt News Staff Writer Your Choice llam-lipm C • A • S • I • N • 0 N • 0 MO Vfeter St. Downtown Henderson Another Fine Boyd Gaming Property The Green Valley High School Theater is now performing the classic comedy, "You Can't Take It With You." The play, written by Moss Hart and George 8. Kaufman, tells the story of two young lovers from different worlds, struggling against their family backgrounds to sustain a relationship. The attractive young Tony Kirby (Jason Goldberg), after falling in love with Alice Sycamore (Amber Madsen), brings his parents to dinner at the Syamore's home on the wrong evening. The Kirbys are shocked by the Sycamore's eccentric behavior, and Alice is convinced that her marriage to Tony is an impossibility. But Tony, who realizes that the Sycamores are right and his own people wrong, will not give Alice up. Director Dane Madsen said this play gave his technical staff an opportunity to show off their talents. Not only did the crew construct the detailed interior of a house on the set, but also incorporated pyrotechnics into the action ofthe play. "This is the first show we have done with pyrotechnics. We even had to go through the fire marshall to get approved. We will be using smoke and special lights for explosions," said Mike Johnson, lighting operation and design crew chief. This play has been ranked the second most popularplay in the nation among high school students. Goldberg said it attracts students because it tells the story of a situation everyone has gone through at some point during their high school years. "It is a romance that high school kids can relate to. They know how hard it is when your parents want one thing and you want the other, and everyone is confused. It really kind of hits home," Goldberg said. This play gave the cast an opportunity to sharpen their acting skills by improving on the physical aspects of becoming a character, Madsen said. "Every fall, I like to try to See Play Page 10 DINNER till 8:00 p.m. Tuesday thru Saturday Additional Dinner Menu OMELET HOUSE 316 N. Boulder Hwy. Henderson Sefior Suertes Cantiiia & IVIexican Itestauranf ie Video Poker 5 will get you 6 Slot Fromotion (Buy and play 5 rolls of quarters and get the 6th one free!) .1640 West Warm Springs, Hendereoni School ^Q DRURY'S ^Q I COMPLETE Includes exam $00 I I EYEWEAR PACKAGE frame & lenses CR 39 wT | I RirnrAI Q n 9A includes exam, DirUl^ALD U-^O frames lensesCR-39 ^491 I I L NO LINE PACKAGE Includes exam, frame & progressive lenses CR-39 $99 I I J EYE EXAM INCLUDED With any frame and lens purchase. Contact fens exam extra. NOW AVAILABLE! VitUt CUJR ONE DAY SERVICE MOST RXs ONE YEAR GUARANTEE AGAINST BREAKAGE DR. DRURY, CD. 565-3937 748 South Boulder Hwy. Henderson, NV "Additional charge for tints, coatings, glass & Specialty RXs. Selected frames Kenmark. Offer good for a limited time. J'PERSONAL INJURY FREE CONSULTATION NO RECOVERY FEE 565-0473 218 LEAD ST. (Across from the new Civic Center Plaza) m LAW OFFICE OF JOHN F. MARCHIANO FORMER HENDERSON CITY ATTORNEY COMFIIIE SIMR Dinner Salad Twice Baked Potato Vegetable of the Day Served TuwdayG Thursday 3pin(ollain 'l^S? FREE Slice of Apple Pie Bnnqtefouponioihp Cook's Hol^('(dlPdn(I^PfpivponffllQ. sJKPolApplpPip' MAJOR AVE a BOULDER HWY. 754 S. BOULDER HWY. HENDERSON, NV 89105 566-9999 ossanD ^>^ OiP AND SA fOff raut Nr nv 70 TNF IKMOMINNBt CAfiNO Mbnagemenf reserves Hie right fo change or discontinue any prornotion Of ih/ tiftte. Everyone is Parading to Tbwn Center .. .even Santa Meet and Greet all your Favorite Friends and Mascots in Green Valley's first Holiday I^ade Heralding the arrival of St. Nick himself. Saturday, November 25th ~ / 1 OLYMPIC AVE \mm^ a' • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ^HB^ ly Nl >I < > z Z TOWN z z CENTER < lU • 2 r • • > • B SUNSET RD ring your camera. The big Parade starts at Discovery Zone (Mountain Vista and Olympic Avenue at 10 a.m. and travels along its festive way to Town Center. Plan to be there to start your holiday celebration with Santa and friends until 1 p.m. in the Town Center Courtyard. (37 TOWN CENTK 4500 East Sunset Rd. Tbys For Tbts will be on hand to collect new, unwrapped toys for children.

PAGE 10

Page 10 Henderson Home News Thursday, November 16,1995 PLAY From Page 9 > SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL NEWSPAPER ADVERTISE IN THE NEWS 564-1881 choose a das sic piece of dramatic literature. This show is rich with language, and rich with action. It forces them to be a physical character on the stage—notjust a mouth piece for the author," Madsen said. "It has really helped them grow as actors and to realize it is not just memorizing lines and spouting them out on stage for the audience. It helps them to realize the physical demands of acting," Madsen said. "I am a senior and I have learned more on this one show than I have in my whole life," Goldberg said. "You Can't Take It With You" performances will run at 7 p.m. tonight through Saturday in the Green Valley High School Theater. Tickets are $2 for students and senior citizens, and $5 for adults. Tickets can be purchased 45 minutes before curtain time at the theater box office. "It is just a great evening's entertainment. It is a funny, funny show. If people will give this show a chance, they will be amazed at what they will see, notjust in performing aspects of the show, but in the technical aspects and in terms of running the show from backstage," Madsen said. 'They will be amazed at what these students are capable of doing. They will be far more impressed with what they see here than by what they will see on their television screens at home," Madsen said. Local chess students ranked among top 25 Henderson elementary school students were crowned co-National Champions for winning first place in the Elementary Division of the Club-Team Competition at the 1995 All American Cup National Chess Championship, held Nov. 10-12 in Scottsdale, Ariz. The winning charge was led by Michael A. Vannozzi Jr. and Jordan Butler, both residents of the Green Valley area of Henderson. They are now ranked among the top 25 Scholastic Chess Players in the nation. Other members of the first place team were Dean Markarian, Devin Ritholz, Laymon McGauhey, Jack Bolton and Brad Havins. The High School Division team won second place national runner-up trophy with all four team members also ranking among the top 25 high school players in the nation. Members of the high school team were Vepa Myalikgukyev, Christian Villaflor, Brian Workman and Princess McGauhey. The Primary Team (Kindergarten through third grade) took home a third place trophy in the event. Team members were George Vaughn, Michael Bolton, Julian Harton, Alex Strabala, and Taylor Wilson. DINNER till 8:00 p.m. Tuesday thru Saturday Additional Dinner Menu OMELET HOUSE 316 N. Boulder Hwy. Henderson Mack parents to meet Parents of students at Mack Elementary School are invited to an informational meeting tonight to discuss whether the school will be converted from a year-round to nine-month calendar. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. in the multi-purpose room. The Clark County School District, through a zoning commission comprised of community members, is attemptingto create new attendance boundaries for all schools throughout the district. To bring parity to all schools, according to the commission, certain facilities are needed for a school to be on a year-round schedule. A 15-year-old school, Mack does iTOt have the recommended facilities such as an physical education room, to remain yearround, according to the commission. Principal Teddy Brewer will brief the parents on the situation and initiate a survey to determine whether parents want to stay on year-round or become a nine-month school. Silyeradb to present 'Carmine's Place' The Silverado High School Masks and Minstrels will present "Carmine's Place," an original melodrama beginning tonight. Performances will begin at 7 p.m. tonight, Friday and Saturday on the school's stage, 1650 Silver Hawk Ave., near Eastern and Pebble. Seating will begin at 6:30 p.m. The stage will be disguised as a speakeasy, set in Chicago in 1941. The little supper club will offer an Italian dinner to an extremely small, intimate audience, who will be entertained by waiters, waitresses and "local talent." The plot is written by advanced students. Live entertainment will be provided by other members of the student body. "Carmine" promises an evening of good food, fine entertainment and unforgettable experiences, a school spokesman said. For more information, call 799-5790, ext. 208. Vo-Tech students host feast for homeless A four-course Thanksgiving feast awaits homeless families of the Crossroads Family and Shade Tree Shelters, courtesy of students at Southern Nevada Vocational Technical Center and their business partner, Preferred Equities Corp. The feast, featuring turkey and all trimmings, will begin at 6 p.m. Monday, Nov. 20, in the second-floor dining room at SNVTC, 5710 Mountain Vista Drive. Entertainment will begin at 6:45 p.m., followed by a visit from St. Nick at 7 p.m. Guests will receive backpacks of hygiene items, and children will receive personalized gifts. This is the third year that NSVTC students have hosted a Thanksgiving dinner for homeless families. Preferred Equities is covering the hard costs associated with the dinner and is also making a $2,000 scholarship donation to the school. Tired Of Ya-M Endosurgical Weight Control Center (EWCC) has the ANI^R CaUl-00^11-EWO EWCC is a Surgical Weight Loss Progi^m May call 7 days, 24 hours^ (Covered by most insurance, consult brodxilg; 2100 N. BOULDER HWY. • HENDERSON • 564-1150 DIM BOULDER HWY. AT SUNSET BLUE PLATE SPECIALS $2.95 & Up NOV. 26th WIN A '56 CHEVY BELAIR NOV. 26th • SUNDAY BLUES NIGHT with John Earl's Boogieman Band • MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL • 50C Drafts & BBQ Dinners $1.95 • TUESDAY* Francisco Gonzalez, |r. (Panchlnto) Latin Jazz Night • WEDS. LADIES NIGHT • Udies Drink FREE (Draft, Wine or Well) 8pm 11 pm WEDS. NOV. 15 THRU SAT. 18 AND WED. NOV. 22 THRU SAT. NOV. 25 ROCK 8 ROLL HEAVEN ~ NOV. 29, 30, DEC. 1 &2 THE SUN SPOTS Bankers don't build banks Customers do Chris Schlaffman Marian Beeler Rick Sager Loan Officer Assistant Vice President, Branch Manager Operations Officer DAILY DRAWINGS FOR $100 CASH.* GRAND PRIZE DRAWING FOR $1000.* ; At Nevada's Bank, Pioneer Citizens, we've been offering Nevadans personal banking for over thirty years. And we know that we never would have made it this far without our customers. So we thank you every day, by giving you the service you desen/e. That's what personal banking is all about. Personal service from real people. People like Marian Beeler, Assistant Vice President, Branch Manager; Rick Sager, Operations Officer,and Chris Schlaffman, Loan Officer. Manan, Rick, Chris and the rest of our Las Vegas staff will be providing personal banking at our new location at 230 Las Vegas Blvd. beginning November 13th. They're looking forward to seeing you. Experience personal banking for yourself at Nevada's Bank, Pioneer Citizens. Come by and see our new building. After all, you helped build it. Left to right: Chris, Marian and Ricl<. NEW LOCATION! 230 Las Vegas Blvd. Opening November 13 Nevad a* 3 3ank CITIZENS Member FD/C Equal Housing Lender Celebrating •Enter at any Pioneer Citizens Bank branch $100 drawings every weekday betv\/een November 13,1995 and November 22,1995 Grand Prize drawing, November 27, 1995 No purchase necessary. /YEARS/ 1965'1995i ^ ofSersing Nevada 382-3440 Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson Home News Page 11 Community DOMESTIC VIOLENCE TASK FORCE Thursday, Nov. 16, 9 a.m. to noon, Clark County Government Center, Pueblo Room, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. The Southern Nevada Domestic Violence Task Force will hold its quarterly meeting. 225-4113. • }.'l • • • :': • • .:. '• ;:' FLEET RESERVE Thursday, Nov. 16, 6 p.m., The Las Vegas Blind Center, 1001 N.Bruce St. The Fleet Reserve Association branch 90 and the Ladies Auxiliary Uhit 90 will conduct their regularly scheduled meeting. 739-0254 or255-0103. NEWCOMERS CLUB Thursday, Nov. 16, 11:30 a.m., Gold Coast Hotel. The Newcomers Club of Las Vegas will holdJts monthly luncheonmeeting. Reservations and details, 4585744. "THE SOUND OF MUSIC" Thursday, Friday and Saturday, Nov. 16 IB, 8 p.m., Summerlin Library. Actors Repertory Theatre will present, 'The Sound of fi^usic." $15 general admission, $13 tor children, seniors and students Also, 2 pm Saturday. $17.50 and $15. 647-7469. CHARISMATIC PRAYER MEETING Friday, Nov. 17,7 p.m., SNRC and St. Peter's Catholic Church, 204 S. Boulder Hwy. There will be a city-wide chansmatic prayer meeting. All are welcome UAW RETIREES Friday, Nov. 17,10a.m.,Zelzah Shrine Temple, 2222 W. Mesquite Road. The Southem Nevada Council of UAW Retirees will meet. Worker retirees and spouses are welcome to attend. SCOUTING FOR FOOD Saturday, Nov. 18. Scout units will distnbute bags in their assigned neighborhood in the moming and collect the food items later that same day. Food will go to food banks. Drop-off sites also include at the comer of Lake Mead Dr. and Boulder Hwy, Green Valley High School and King Elementary SchoolinBoulderCity. Kevin Hanson, 435-1477, Bill Randall, 5657818 or John Zertioss, 294-0600. HOLIDAY CHARITY BAZAAR Saturday, Nov. 18, 9 a.m. 5 p.m.. Hangar #245 on Nellis A.F.B. The N.A.F.B. Officers'Wives'Club will pre sent Its annual "Holiday Treasures Chanty Bazaar" to benefit base and local charitable organizations. Free and open to the public. 643-3185. LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS Saturday, Nov. 18, 8:30 p.m.. The Brickhouse, 2850 E. Flamingo. The League of Women Voters will meet with guest speaker Dr. Carol Harte r, president of UNLV. Breakfast, $10. Rasen/ations, 649-7173. SELF-DEFENSE WORKSHOP Saturday, Nov. IB, 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., McOermott P.E. Center at UNLV. The Jean Nidetch Women's Center is sponsoring a self-defense workshop for men and women. 895-4475. FIBER ARTS GUILD Saturday, Nov. 18,9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Las Vegas Fiber Arts Guild will hold a "Dream Catcher" workshop. Nominal fee. Resen/ations, 254-5743. "THE GIFT OF DREAMS" Monday, Nov. 20,3 p.m.. Green Valley Library. The Gift of Dreams" will be the topic of a free discussion open to the public. Infomnation. 433-2130. SOAR POTLUCK Tuesday, Nov. 21,6 p.m., Steelworkers Hall, 47 Water St SOAR (Steelworkers Organization of Active Retirees) will hold a potluck and short meeting. 658-4487 or 565-0665. AIR FORCE SECURITY Tuesday, Nov. 21, 7 p.m., N.A.F.B. Enlisted Club. The Las Vegas chapter of the Air Force Secunty Police Association will meet. Membership is open to who have served or are serving in the Air Force secunty police. Associate membership IS open to civilian police, law enforcement and secunty officials. Frank Chnstenson, 564-5377 or Dan Gist, 4530855. LA LECHE LEAGUE Tuesday, Nov. 21,12:30 p.m., Whitney Library, 5175 E. Tropicana. The Southeast Group of La Leche League will hold its monthly meeting. All women seeking information on breastfeedingare invited to attend 1-800-717-7628. FESTIVAL OF TREES AND UGHTS Tuesday through Saturday, Nov. 2125, Las Vegas Hilton Grand Ballroom. Down Syndrome Organization of Southem Nevada will hold its annual "Festival of Trees and Lights" Adults $3, seniors $2 and children $1 227-3552. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS Mondays-Sundays. Gamblers Anonymous of Southem Nevada has day and evening meetings everyday. 24-hour hotline. 385-7732. KIWANIS Mondays, 7:30 a.m.. Green's Supper Club, 2241 N. Green Valley Parkway and Wednesdays, 7 a.m., Omelet House, 317 N. Boulder Highway. The Green Valley Kiwanis Club meets Mondays and the Henderson club meets Wednesdays. AMERICAN LEGION Mondays, first and third of each month, 7p.m., Henderson Jr. Jaycses To announce your group or organization's events, please come by or mail information to: 2 Commerce Center Dnve, Henderson, NV 89014 building, between Water St. And Major Ave. American Legion BMI Post 40 will meet. All veterans welcome. 4546551.. MEN AND WOMEN SENIOR SINGLES Mondays, 6 p.m. Senior singles 55-plus Where men and women meet to share new in^erestsand beginnings. 641-4634. DRAMA WORKSHOP Mondays, 8 p.m., Sam's Town Bowling Center, Room A. Joe Behar's Community Drama wortership fee" businessnetworking group, meets every week. Liz Garnson, 224-2598. EXECUTIVE LEADS CLUB Thursdays, 7 a.m., Rae't, Pecos and Wigwam. The Executive Leads Club East m'eetstoexchange business leads Karen Scherer, 736-7755. SINGLES 50-PLUS Thursdays and Saturdays. Henderson area. Planning for shanng of ideas and helping each other. 641-4634. SINGLES TRAVEL CLUB Fridays, 6 p.m., Sail Away, 4225 S. Eastern 7. Singles of all ages who are interested in traveling are invited. 3634923 CHICAGO BEARS FAN CLUB Windy City Pub, 3050 E. Desert Inn a( Pecos. The Chicago Bears Fan Club of Las Vegas will meet for all games. Troy, 696-9261 SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE The SuKide Prevention Center is k)oking for volunteers to man tfie hotline 731-2990, ask for Ewy DIVORCED "Divorced, Separated and Widowed Adjustment Inc offers free support groups for n>en and Mxnen Men and women of all ages and backgrounds are invitedto attend For times and locations. 735-5544 DEATHS William "Bill" Johnson William ""Bill" Johnson, 58, died Sunday, Nov. 12, 1995 in a local hospital. Born March 15,1937 in Cuba, N.M., he was a retired construction journeyman electrician; a member of IBEW and a veteran of the U.S. Marines, having served in Korea. He is survived by three daughters, Beverly Muniz of Henderson, Crystal Sharp of Lake Worth, Texas and Betsy Kozdron of Dallas, Texas; three sisters, Connie De Fer of Las Vegas, Betty Lassiteir of Pandora, Texas and Colleen Edge of New Mexico; and three grandchildren. Services will be held in Botanical Gardens, Fort Worth, Texas. Arrangements were handled by Palm Mortuary of Henderson. Lee A. Calhoon Lee A. Calhoon, 64, died Monday, Nov. 13,1995 in Las Vegas. A resident of Pahrump since 1959j^he was bom Jan. 24, 1931 in Omaha, Neb. He was the owner of Calhoon Sand and Gravel of Pahrump, and was a veteran, serving in Korea with the U.S. Marines. Survivors include his wife Clara M. of Pahrump; a daughter Nancy Cooper of Las Vegas; three sons, Donald and Albert of Henderson, and Ramon of Pahrump; a sister, Elsie Armstrong of Louisiana; two brothers, Harold of Mulino, Ore., and Allan of Melbourne, Fla.; and his mother, Earlean Henry of Henderson; 12 grandchildren and 7 great-grandchildren. Visitation will be from 1 to 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 17, at Palm Mortuary-Henderson. The funeral service will be at 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 18, at Palm Mortuary-Henderson Chapel. Interment will be at Palm Memorial Park, Henderson. Arrangements were handled by Palm Mortuary-Henderson. Isabel A. Sanner Isabel A. Sanner, 71, died Monday, Nov. 13, 1995 in a local hospital. Born Oct. 6, 1924 in Chania, N.M., shehad been ahomemaker in Henderson for 50 years. She was a member of Three Sisters; formerly active in the Henderson Eagles, and the Royal Neighbors of America; was a contributor to the war effort during World War II as a welder of Liberty Ships She is survived by her husband Billy J. of Henderson; three sons Arthur J. of Henderson, Billy J. Jr. and Donald A. both of Seattle, Wash.; one daughter, Lynda of Henderson; three grandchildren and one great grandchild. The family suggests donations to the American Diabetes Association, 2785 E. Desert Inn Road, Las Vegas. Services are private. Arrangements were handled by Palm Mortuary of Henderson. Harold E. Upham Harold E. Upham, 70, died Nov. 12,1995 in a local hospital. Born Dec. 14, 1924 in Wenatchee, Wash., he was a 2 1/ 2 year resident of Henderson, having moved from California. He was a Pacific Telephone lineman, and a Seabees Navy veteran. Upham svas a life member of the Masons, and belonged to the Masons Yuma Lodge in Arizona, the Live Oak Lodge in Oakland, Calif., the Scottish Rite Boulder Chapter Royal Arch-Masons, the Yuma Shrine Temple in Arizona; and the Zelzah Shrine Temple of Las Vegas. Survivors include his wife, Geraldine, of Henderson; son, Lynn, of San Diego Calif.; daughter, Kathleen Congdon of Fresno, Calif.; brother, Robert of Olympia, Wash.; and three grandchildren, Amemorial service will beheld at 2 p.m. Friday, Nov. 18, at Mt. Maria Masonic Lodge. Arrangements were handled by Neptune Society of Nevada. THE NEWS IS YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER CINEDOME12 HENDERSON LUXURY THEATRE COMPLEX •/7 luxury ABitttrium •0$lia$ Snack Bor ^Oelby St$r$o Sound •Climati Controlhd Comfort ^hcking Choir Logo Stating ^Frot Ughtod Farkiag Just mlwHi from 6ri$n Yolky ani touldtf Cityl (Ml 457-3700 eMIAiOAin Mimus "t lYltT Mri wniurs Kfm tsft siifim t MIS mm mon aaaxunx STARTS FRIDAY CINEDOME 12 H t N D f R S O N STARTS FRIDAY • GOLDEN EYE (PG13) 1:25 4:10 7:00 945 • fl TAKES TWO (PG) 12:40 2:50 4 55 710 925 1130 GOLD DIGGERS (PG) 12-55 2-55 5-00 7-05 910 1105 • AMERICAN PRESIDENT (PG13) 1220 245 5.10 7401005 • GOLDEN EYE (PG13) 1230 310 5 50 8 30 11 10 • ACE VENTURA (PG13) \ZM 215 4:15 620 8:20 1020 • AMERICAN PRESIDENT (PG13) 1210 2 35 5 05 7 35 1010 • ACE VENTURA (PG13) 1 15 315 520 720 920 11:15 GET SHORTY (R) • -t?-45 306 525 745 1000 COPYCATS (R) 12:00 2 40 515 750 1025 POWDER (PG13) 12 20 2 45 510 7 40 10 05 • HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS (PG13) 12fl5 225 445 720 940 1150 NO PASSES COUPONS OH DISCOUNTS • LATE SHOW FRI SAT ONLY i nimmmmmummiir Lillian Irene Hicks Lillian Irene Hicks, 74, died Friday, Nov. 10, 1995 in a local hospital. Born Sept. 17, 1921, shehad been a resident of Las Vegas for 50 years, and was a retired waitress. She is survived by three daughters, Billie Homyak and Barbara Foley, both of HenderCALL 435-7700 WITH NEWS TIPS son, and Terri Hicks of Las Vegas; one son, Donnie of Las Vegas; three sisters, Ella Rhoude and Lizabeth Triske, both of Minnesota, and Viola Gulbranson of North Dakota; two brothers, Albert Wierre of Arizona, and Raymond Werre of Minnesota; eight grandchildren and five greatgrandchildren. Memorial services will be held at 7 p.m. Friday at the Palm Mortuary-Henderson Chapel. Arrangements were handled by Palm Mortuary. CENTERFOLD cS" 1024 N. Boulder Hwy. (Next to token Wild) ll/lusi be 21 No Cover Health Nuts 1635 NV Hw>. 293-1844 Homeopathic Medicine For Hyperactivity Cina For Menopause Kali bichromicum ^r I NAPOLI PIZZERIA i| I 30" Party Size Pizza only ^ 7.99* tax I, I (Hand lusM-d with J loppings) li| I 2 Lasagna Dinners, salad & garlic bread |j| only*! 0.99. tax Pizza • Hot Sandwiches • Pasta • Salads 456-2050 1650 W. Warm Springs (nexttoG VHS; FAST FREE DELIVERY WII Feather 2000 GUARANTEED GIVEAWAY 3 Cash Drawings Daily! 6:30p.ni. 8:30p.m. I0:30p.in. too ISO *250 All rules posted. 140 Ufater St. Downtovcn Henderson Another Fine Boyd Gaming Property

PAGE 11

Page 10 Henderson Home News Thursday, November 16,1995 PLAY From Page 9 > SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL NEWSPAPER ADVERTISE IN THE NEWS 564-1881 choose a das sic piece of dramatic literature. This show is rich with language, and rich with action. It forces them to be a physical character on the stage—notjust a mouth piece for the author," Madsen said. "It has really helped them grow as actors and to realize it is not just memorizing lines and spouting them out on stage for the audience. It helps them to realize the physical demands of acting," Madsen said. "I am a senior and I have learned more on this one show than I have in my whole life," Goldberg said. "You Can't Take It With You" performances will run at 7 p.m. tonight through Saturday in the Green Valley High School Theater. Tickets are $2 for students and senior citizens, and $5 for adults. Tickets can be purchased 45 minutes before curtain time at the theater box office. "It is just a great evening's entertainment. It is a funny, funny show. If people will give this show a chance, they will be amazed at what they will see, notjust in performing aspects of the show, but in the technical aspects and in terms of running the show from backstage," Madsen said. 'They will be amazed at what these students are capable of doing. They will be far more impressed with what they see here than by what they will see on their television screens at home," Madsen said. Local chess students ranked among top 25 Henderson elementary school students were crowned co-National Champions for winning first place in the Elementary Division of the Club-Team Competition at the 1995 All American Cup National Chess Championship, held Nov. 10-12 in Scottsdale, Ariz. The winning charge was led by Michael A. Vannozzi Jr. and Jordan Butler, both residents of the Green Valley area of Henderson. They are now ranked among the top 25 Scholastic Chess Players in the nation. Other members of the first place team were Dean Markarian, Devin Ritholz, Laymon McGauhey, Jack Bolton and Brad Havins. The High School Division team won second place national runner-up trophy with all four team members also ranking among the top 25 high school players in the nation. Members of the high school team were Vepa Myalikgukyev, Christian Villaflor, Brian Workman and Princess McGauhey. The Primary Team (Kindergarten through third grade) took home a third place trophy in the event. Team members were George Vaughn, Michael Bolton, Julian Harton, Alex Strabala, and Taylor Wilson. DINNER till 8:00 p.m. Tuesday thru Saturday Additional Dinner Menu OMELET HOUSE 316 N. Boulder Hwy. Henderson Mack parents to meet Parents of students at Mack Elementary School are invited to an informational meeting tonight to discuss whether the school will be converted from a year-round to nine-month calendar. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. in the multi-purpose room. The Clark County School District, through a zoning commission comprised of community members, is attemptingto create new attendance boundaries for all schools throughout the district. To bring parity to all schools, according to the commission, certain facilities are needed for a school to be on a year-round schedule. A 15-year-old school, Mack does iTOt have the recommended facilities such as an physical education room, to remain yearround, according to the commission. Principal Teddy Brewer will brief the parents on the situation and initiate a survey to determine whether parents want to stay on year-round or become a nine-month school. Silyeradb to present 'Carmine's Place' The Silverado High School Masks and Minstrels will present "Carmine's Place," an original melodrama beginning tonight. Performances will begin at 7 p.m. tonight, Friday and Saturday on the school's stage, 1650 Silver Hawk Ave., near Eastern and Pebble. Seating will begin at 6:30 p.m. The stage will be disguised as a speakeasy, set in Chicago in 1941. The little supper club will offer an Italian dinner to an extremely small, intimate audience, who will be entertained by waiters, waitresses and "local talent." The plot is written by advanced students. Live entertainment will be provided by other members of the student body. "Carmine" promises an evening of good food, fine entertainment and unforgettable experiences, a school spokesman said. For more information, call 799-5790, ext. 208. Vo-Tech students host feast for homeless A four-course Thanksgiving feast awaits homeless families of the Crossroads Family and Shade Tree Shelters, courtesy of students at Southern Nevada Vocational Technical Center and their business partner, Preferred Equities Corp. The feast, featuring turkey and all trimmings, will begin at 6 p.m. Monday, Nov. 20, in the second-floor dining room at SNVTC, 5710 Mountain Vista Drive. Entertainment will begin at 6:45 p.m., followed by a visit from St. Nick at 7 p.m. Guests will receive backpacks of hygiene items, and children will receive personalized gifts. This is the third year that NSVTC students have hosted a Thanksgiving dinner for homeless families. Preferred Equities is covering the hard costs associated with the dinner and is also making a $2,000 scholarship donation to the school. Tired Of Ya-M Endosurgical Weight Control Center (EWCC) has the ANI^R CaUl-00^11-EWO EWCC is a Surgical Weight Loss Progi^m May call 7 days, 24 hours^ (Covered by most insurance, consult brodxilg; 2100 N. BOULDER HWY. • HENDERSON • 564-1150 DIM BOULDER HWY. AT SUNSET BLUE PLATE SPECIALS $2.95 & Up NOV. 26th WIN A '56 CHEVY BELAIR NOV. 26th • SUNDAY BLUES NIGHT with John Earl's Boogieman Band • MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL • 50C Drafts & BBQ Dinners $1.95 • TUESDAY* Francisco Gonzalez, |r. (Panchlnto) Latin Jazz Night • WEDS. LADIES NIGHT • Udies Drink FREE (Draft, Wine or Well) 8pm 11 pm WEDS. NOV. 15 THRU SAT. 18 AND WED. NOV. 22 THRU SAT. NOV. 25 ROCK 8 ROLL HEAVEN ~ NOV. 29, 30, DEC. 1 &2 THE SUN SPOTS Bankers don't build banks Customers do Chris Schlaffman Marian Beeler Rick Sager Loan Officer Assistant Vice President, Branch Manager Operations Officer DAILY DRAWINGS FOR $100 CASH.* GRAND PRIZE DRAWING FOR $1000.* ; At Nevada's Bank, Pioneer Citizens, we've been offering Nevadans personal banking for over thirty years. And we know that we never would have made it this far without our customers. So we thank you every day, by giving you the service you desen/e. That's what personal banking is all about. Personal service from real people. People like Marian Beeler, Assistant Vice President, Branch Manager; Rick Sager, Operations Officer,and Chris Schlaffman, Loan Officer. Manan, Rick, Chris and the rest of our Las Vegas staff will be providing personal banking at our new location at 230 Las Vegas Blvd. beginning November 13th. They're looking forward to seeing you. Experience personal banking for yourself at Nevada's Bank, Pioneer Citizens. Come by and see our new building. After all, you helped build it. Left to right: Chris, Marian and Ricl<. NEW LOCATION! 230 Las Vegas Blvd. Opening November 13 Nevad a* 3 3ank CITIZENS Member FD/C Equal Housing Lender Celebrating •Enter at any Pioneer Citizens Bank branch $100 drawings every weekday betv\/een November 13,1995 and November 22,1995 Grand Prize drawing, November 27, 1995 No purchase necessary. /YEARS/ 1965'1995i ^ ofSersing Nevada 382-3440 Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson Home News Page 11 Community DOMESTIC VIOLENCE TASK FORCE Thursday, Nov. 16, 9 a.m. to noon, Clark County Government Center, Pueblo Room, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. The Southern Nevada Domestic Violence Task Force will hold its quarterly meeting. 225-4113. • }.'l • • • :': • • .:. '• ;:' FLEET RESERVE Thursday, Nov. 16, 6 p.m., The Las Vegas Blind Center, 1001 N.Bruce St. The Fleet Reserve Association branch 90 and the Ladies Auxiliary Uhit 90 will conduct their regularly scheduled meeting. 739-0254 or255-0103. NEWCOMERS CLUB Thursday, Nov. 16, 11:30 a.m., Gold Coast Hotel. The Newcomers Club of Las Vegas will holdJts monthly luncheonmeeting. Reservations and details, 4585744. "THE SOUND OF MUSIC" Thursday, Friday and Saturday, Nov. 16 IB, 8 p.m., Summerlin Library. Actors Repertory Theatre will present, 'The Sound of fi^usic." $15 general admission, $13 tor children, seniors and students Also, 2 pm Saturday. $17.50 and $15. 647-7469. CHARISMATIC PRAYER MEETING Friday, Nov. 17,7 p.m., SNRC and St. Peter's Catholic Church, 204 S. Boulder Hwy. There will be a city-wide chansmatic prayer meeting. All are welcome UAW RETIREES Friday, Nov. 17,10a.m.,Zelzah Shrine Temple, 2222 W. Mesquite Road. The Southem Nevada Council of UAW Retirees will meet. Worker retirees and spouses are welcome to attend. SCOUTING FOR FOOD Saturday, Nov. 18. Scout units will distnbute bags in their assigned neighborhood in the moming and collect the food items later that same day. Food will go to food banks. Drop-off sites also include at the comer of Lake Mead Dr. and Boulder Hwy, Green Valley High School and King Elementary SchoolinBoulderCity. Kevin Hanson, 435-1477, Bill Randall, 5657818 or John Zertioss, 294-0600. HOLIDAY CHARITY BAZAAR Saturday, Nov. 18, 9 a.m. 5 p.m.. Hangar #245 on Nellis A.F.B. The N.A.F.B. Officers'Wives'Club will pre sent Its annual "Holiday Treasures Chanty Bazaar" to benefit base and local charitable organizations. Free and open to the public. 643-3185. LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS Saturday, Nov. 18, 8:30 p.m.. The Brickhouse, 2850 E. Flamingo. The League of Women Voters will meet with guest speaker Dr. Carol Harte r, president of UNLV. Breakfast, $10. Rasen/ations, 649-7173. SELF-DEFENSE WORKSHOP Saturday, Nov. IB, 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., McOermott P.E. Center at UNLV. The Jean Nidetch Women's Center is sponsoring a self-defense workshop for men and women. 895-4475. FIBER ARTS GUILD Saturday, Nov. 18,9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Las Vegas Fiber Arts Guild will hold a "Dream Catcher" workshop. Nominal fee. Resen/ations, 254-5743. "THE GIFT OF DREAMS" Monday, Nov. 20,3 p.m.. Green Valley Library. The Gift of Dreams" will be the topic of a free discussion open to the public. Infomnation. 433-2130. SOAR POTLUCK Tuesday, Nov. 21,6 p.m., Steelworkers Hall, 47 Water St SOAR (Steelworkers Organization of Active Retirees) will hold a potluck and short meeting. 658-4487 or 565-0665. AIR FORCE SECURITY Tuesday, Nov. 21, 7 p.m., N.A.F.B. Enlisted Club. The Las Vegas chapter of the Air Force Secunty Police Association will meet. Membership is open to who have served or are serving in the Air Force secunty police. Associate membership IS open to civilian police, law enforcement and secunty officials. Frank Chnstenson, 564-5377 or Dan Gist, 4530855. LA LECHE LEAGUE Tuesday, Nov. 21,12:30 p.m., Whitney Library, 5175 E. Tropicana. The Southeast Group of La Leche League will hold its monthly meeting. All women seeking information on breastfeedingare invited to attend 1-800-717-7628. FESTIVAL OF TREES AND UGHTS Tuesday through Saturday, Nov. 2125, Las Vegas Hilton Grand Ballroom. Down Syndrome Organization of Southem Nevada will hold its annual "Festival of Trees and Lights" Adults $3, seniors $2 and children $1 227-3552. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS Mondays-Sundays. Gamblers Anonymous of Southem Nevada has day and evening meetings everyday. 24-hour hotline. 385-7732. KIWANIS Mondays, 7:30 a.m.. Green's Supper Club, 2241 N. Green Valley Parkway and Wednesdays, 7 a.m., Omelet House, 317 N. Boulder Highway. The Green Valley Kiwanis Club meets Mondays and the Henderson club meets Wednesdays. AMERICAN LEGION Mondays, first and third of each month, 7p.m., Henderson Jr. Jaycses To announce your group or organization's events, please come by or mail information to: 2 Commerce Center Dnve, Henderson, NV 89014 building, between Water St. And Major Ave. American Legion BMI Post 40 will meet. All veterans welcome. 4546551.. MEN AND WOMEN SENIOR SINGLES Mondays, 6 p.m. Senior singles 55-plus Where men and women meet to share new in^erestsand beginnings. 641-4634. DRAMA WORKSHOP Mondays, 8 p.m., Sam's Town Bowling Center, Room A. Joe Behar's Community Drama wortership fee" businessnetworking group, meets every week. Liz Garnson, 224-2598. EXECUTIVE LEADS CLUB Thursdays, 7 a.m., Rae't, Pecos and Wigwam. The Executive Leads Club East m'eetstoexchange business leads Karen Scherer, 736-7755. SINGLES 50-PLUS Thursdays and Saturdays. Henderson area. Planning for shanng of ideas and helping each other. 641-4634. SINGLES TRAVEL CLUB Fridays, 6 p.m., Sail Away, 4225 S. Eastern 7. Singles of all ages who are interested in traveling are invited. 3634923 CHICAGO BEARS FAN CLUB Windy City Pub, 3050 E. Desert Inn a( Pecos. The Chicago Bears Fan Club of Las Vegas will meet for all games. Troy, 696-9261 SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE The SuKide Prevention Center is k)oking for volunteers to man tfie hotline 731-2990, ask for Ewy DIVORCED "Divorced, Separated and Widowed Adjustment Inc offers free support groups for n>en and Mxnen Men and women of all ages and backgrounds are invitedto attend For times and locations. 735-5544 DEATHS William "Bill" Johnson William ""Bill" Johnson, 58, died Sunday, Nov. 12, 1995 in a local hospital. Born March 15,1937 in Cuba, N.M., he was a retired construction journeyman electrician; a member of IBEW and a veteran of the U.S. Marines, having served in Korea. He is survived by three daughters, Beverly Muniz of Henderson, Crystal Sharp of Lake Worth, Texas and Betsy Kozdron of Dallas, Texas; three sisters, Connie De Fer of Las Vegas, Betty Lassiteir of Pandora, Texas and Colleen Edge of New Mexico; and three grandchildren. Services will be held in Botanical Gardens, Fort Worth, Texas. Arrangements were handled by Palm Mortuary of Henderson. Lee A. Calhoon Lee A. Calhoon, 64, died Monday, Nov. 13,1995 in Las Vegas. A resident of Pahrump since 1959j^he was bom Jan. 24, 1931 in Omaha, Neb. He was the owner of Calhoon Sand and Gravel of Pahrump, and was a veteran, serving in Korea with the U.S. Marines. Survivors include his wife Clara M. of Pahrump; a daughter Nancy Cooper of Las Vegas; three sons, Donald and Albert of Henderson, and Ramon of Pahrump; a sister, Elsie Armstrong of Louisiana; two brothers, Harold of Mulino, Ore., and Allan of Melbourne, Fla.; and his mother, Earlean Henry of Henderson; 12 grandchildren and 7 great-grandchildren. Visitation will be from 1 to 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 17, at Palm Mortuary-Henderson. The funeral service will be at 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 18, at Palm Mortuary-Henderson Chapel. Interment will be at Palm Memorial Park, Henderson. Arrangements were handled by Palm Mortuary-Henderson. Isabel A. Sanner Isabel A. Sanner, 71, died Monday, Nov. 13, 1995 in a local hospital. Born Oct. 6, 1924 in Chania, N.M., shehad been ahomemaker in Henderson for 50 years. She was a member of Three Sisters; formerly active in the Henderson Eagles, and the Royal Neighbors of America; was a contributor to the war effort during World War II as a welder of Liberty Ships She is survived by her husband Billy J. of Henderson; three sons Arthur J. of Henderson, Billy J. Jr. and Donald A. both of Seattle, Wash.; one daughter, Lynda of Henderson; three grandchildren and one great grandchild. The family suggests donations to the American Diabetes Association, 2785 E. Desert Inn Road, Las Vegas. Services are private. Arrangements were handled by Palm Mortuary of Henderson. Harold E. Upham Harold E. Upham, 70, died Nov. 12,1995 in a local hospital. Born Dec. 14, 1924 in Wenatchee, Wash., he was a 2 1/ 2 year resident of Henderson, having moved from California. He was a Pacific Telephone lineman, and a Seabees Navy veteran. Upham svas a life member of the Masons, and belonged to the Masons Yuma Lodge in Arizona, the Live Oak Lodge in Oakland, Calif., the Scottish Rite Boulder Chapter Royal Arch-Masons, the Yuma Shrine Temple in Arizona; and the Zelzah Shrine Temple of Las Vegas. Survivors include his wife, Geraldine, of Henderson; son, Lynn, of San Diego Calif.; daughter, Kathleen Congdon of Fresno, Calif.; brother, Robert of Olympia, Wash.; and three grandchildren, Amemorial service will beheld at 2 p.m. Friday, Nov. 18, at Mt. Maria Masonic Lodge. Arrangements were handled by Neptune Society of Nevada. THE NEWS IS YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER CINEDOME12 HENDERSON LUXURY THEATRE COMPLEX •/7 luxury ABitttrium •0$lia$ Snack Bor ^Oelby St$r$o Sound •Climati Controlhd Comfort ^hcking Choir Logo Stating ^Frot Ughtod Farkiag Just mlwHi from 6ri$n Yolky ani touldtf Cityl (Ml 457-3700 eMIAiOAin Mimus "t lYltT Mri wniurs Kfm tsft siifim t MIS mm mon aaaxunx STARTS FRIDAY CINEDOME 12 H t N D f R S O N STARTS FRIDAY • GOLDEN EYE (PG13) 1:25 4:10 7:00 945 • fl TAKES TWO (PG) 12:40 2:50 4 55 710 925 1130 GOLD DIGGERS (PG) 12-55 2-55 5-00 7-05 910 1105 • AMERICAN PRESIDENT (PG13) 1220 245 5.10 7401005 • GOLDEN EYE (PG13) 1230 310 5 50 8 30 11 10 • ACE VENTURA (PG13) \ZM 215 4:15 620 8:20 1020 • AMERICAN PRESIDENT (PG13) 1210 2 35 5 05 7 35 1010 • ACE VENTURA (PG13) 1 15 315 520 720 920 11:15 GET SHORTY (R) • -t?-45 306 525 745 1000 COPYCATS (R) 12:00 2 40 515 750 1025 POWDER (PG13) 12 20 2 45 510 7 40 10 05 • HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS (PG13) 12fl5 225 445 720 940 1150 NO PASSES COUPONS OH DISCOUNTS • LATE SHOW FRI SAT ONLY i nimmmmmummiir Lillian Irene Hicks Lillian Irene Hicks, 74, died Friday, Nov. 10, 1995 in a local hospital. Born Sept. 17, 1921, shehad been a resident of Las Vegas for 50 years, and was a retired waitress. She is survived by three daughters, Billie Homyak and Barbara Foley, both of HenderCALL 435-7700 WITH NEWS TIPS son, and Terri Hicks of Las Vegas; one son, Donnie of Las Vegas; three sisters, Ella Rhoude and Lizabeth Triske, both of Minnesota, and Viola Gulbranson of North Dakota; two brothers, Albert Wierre of Arizona, and Raymond Werre of Minnesota; eight grandchildren and five greatgrandchildren. Memorial services will be held at 7 p.m. Friday at the Palm Mortuary-Henderson Chapel. Arrangements were handled by Palm Mortuary. CENTERFOLD cS" 1024 N. Boulder Hwy. (Next to token Wild) ll/lusi be 21 No Cover Health Nuts 1635 NV Hw>. 293-1844 Homeopathic Medicine For Hyperactivity Cina For Menopause Kali bichromicum ^r I NAPOLI PIZZERIA i| I 30" Party Size Pizza only ^ 7.99* tax I, I (Hand lusM-d with J loppings) li| I 2 Lasagna Dinners, salad & garlic bread |j| only*! 0.99. tax Pizza • Hot Sandwiches • Pasta • Salads 456-2050 1650 W. Warm Springs (nexttoG VHS; FAST FREE DELIVERY WII Feather 2000 GUARANTEED GIVEAWAY 3 Cash Drawings Daily! 6:30p.ni. 8:30p.m. I0:30p.in. too ISO *250 All rules posted. 140 Ufater St. Downtovcn Henderson Another Fine Boyd Gaming Property

PAGE 12

M Page 12 Henderson Home News Thursday, November 16, 1995 Seniors to celebratelbwa Day THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY The center is open for all activities Monday through Friday 8 a.nn, to 4 p.m., Monday through Thursday evenings 6 to 10 p.m. and Saturdays 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Iowa Day Edna Deardoff and Helen Hymas are organizing volunteers for Iowa Day, 9 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 18. They are putting together decorations, entertainment and door prizes. Bring memories, photos and friends and join in the fun with folks from Iowa. Rumor has it that snow is being shipped in from Iowa to remind everyone why they left. For Saturday Brunch regulars, stop on by, enjoy breakfast and the festivities. A special thanks Paula Johnson, choir director from McDoniel Elementary School, brings her students to the center each year to present an original production of "Our Salute to Veterans." When 100 youngsters crowd onto the stage and sing patriotic songs, it brings down the house. But when the young students ask veterans to stand, salute and sing "It's A Grand Old Flag," there's not a dry eye in the house. The annual event is a heartfelt tribute by students who understand the sacrifices our veterans have made, and it is a wonderful reminder to veterans how much we appreciate those sacrifices. SENIOR CENTER HIGHLIGHTS 27 E. TEXAS ST. 565-6990 .Thank You McCaw Elementary Students from McCaw Elementary School made Veterans Day placemats for the dining room in honor of our veterans. Each individually designed mat, made by students from first to sixth grade, had a wonderful message of appreciation. They added a delightful touch to the week-long veterans tribute. Senator Honors Veterans U.S. Sen. Harry Reid returned home this weekend to honor Henderson's veterans. Reid and his wife, Landra, grew up in Henderson and graduated from Basic High School. His paiftici-, pation in the Veterans Day Celebration Friday at the Civic Center Plaza was a personal tribute to relatives, friends and classmates. He joined those at the center afterward. Seniors and veterans alike cherished the afternoon. Good Luck, Ruth The center's own Ruth Smith is headed to the Clark County Ms. Senior Pageant on Saturday, Nov. 18. Seniors have commandeered a bus to the event to cheer her on to the finals. Call 5656990 for details. Holiday Spirit Courtesy Photo .. • • • .. • • ... • .:• • ': • .......v. NATIONAL CHARITY LEAGUE — National Charity League studentsdecorated the Henderson SeniorCenterforthe Thanksgiving holidays. Victoria Barrera, left, and advisor Anna May Barrera, right, present decorations to Black Mountain Nutrition director Sandy Quineil. The National Charity League includes a dedicated group of young ladies in seventh through 12th grade who work diligently on community projects. Without fanfare or publicity, these innovative hard workers have helped us all year long. They've made hand made decorations to brighten holidays, enriched the lives of the homebound seniors and served at brunches special events. Now, the group has come up with a wonderful project—wrapping holiday packages for seniors. From 9 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 25 and Dec. 2,9 and 16, the girls will be "wrapping things up" at the center. Not letting an idle minute pass, they will also serve brunch. Sing-A-Long Remember the good times? Getting together with friends and singing a favorite tune... or two or three or four? That time is Super Special lntroductor\; Offer Lars WU.t: EISTIMATIS CALL TODAY 251-1990 BOULOER CUV fi GREEN VALLEY' JUDO & KARATE CLUB Nationally & Internationally Certified JUDO • TAE KWOIMDO KARATE • JIIKIITSU Bob Salay 7th Degree Black Belt Karate 7th Degree Black Bell Jiu-Jifsu 6th Degree Black Belt Judo Registeredin.U S A • Europe4 Japan • Former Coach US Air Force Academy And US Olympic Training Center • H/lember ol Nafl Governing Body of JUDO • Executive Board Member ol US Karate Assoc • Former US. Rep For JuiJitsu Black Bell Fed For Kids (4yrs S Up) & Adults • Low Rates • No Testing Fees • Unlimited Use ol Oasses • No Contracts Green Valley Athletic Club (Non-Members & Members) FOR MORE inSclBrCT?! ^^^*^"^'^^^ INFOCAU LCCflUfjgJ 1958 FedEx • Packing Supplies • Moneygrams • FAX Mail 564-4429 I Boulder Hwy. & Major • Connection lucky/Poyless Shopping Center. See Seniors Page 13 >i Join the Fun FIGGIE PUDDING CONTEST One of man]; features at this i)ears "> ^ Christmas tree lighting Saturday Nov. 25, 7p.in. Bring \;our pudding and secret recipe at 6pm to be judged. Remember r\o one knows what the traditional english dessert ingredients are! So make up \;our own! One entrant sai/s his has "no figs"!! Courtesy Photo • :-_ > '-'•'• • : • • ":' • ,/:' • :' • • '-'' • ': • • • • ._ • McDONIEL CHOIR — The McDoniel Elementary School choir salutes Senior Center veterans will a special patriotic show. A highlight of their production was asking veterans to stand for a salute. Pledge of Allegiance and a rendition of "It's A Grand Old Flag." The event was a climax of veterans' week at the center. Nov. 23 ^ Baked I^ani Hoast Turkey with Sweet Sauce with Sage Dressing Hoast Turkey with Dressing ^ Baked T^am ^ ^ ; f 3 > : JESTEH'S COUHT Noon 9pm. Dinners include all the trimmings & pumpkin pie! Roast Turkey, Baked Ham and Roast Beef, Sage Dressing, Candied Yams. Mashed Potatoes, Giblet Gravy, Cranberry Sauce, Ambrosia Salad, Waldorff Salad with Full Salad Bar, Soup, Baby Carrots, Green Beans Almondine & Dessert Bar. $4 35 WILD C1\D BQFFET 11am-9pm '^"^mmim^— CASINO ANOTHER FINE BOYD GAMING PROPERTY Boulder Highway, Between Lake Mead & Sunset Friday and Saturday Nights LIVE MUSIC AND DANCING Private Rooms Aval able for Meetings • Birthdays • Wedding Receptions • Parties BOOK YOUR CHRISTMAS PARTY NOW! LAKE MEAD LOUNGE & CASINO 846 E. Lake Mead Dr. (one mile east of Boulder Hwy.) 56S0297 Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson Home News Page 13 SENIORS: Activities listed From Page 12 SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL NEWSPAPER ADVERTISE IN THE NEWS 564-1881 here again. Nancy Blackwell is organizing a Sing-A-Long group starting at 12:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 24. Stop by for fun. Turkey Shoot John Wayne, Roy Rogers and the Henderson Parks and Recreation Department, will hold a 'Turkey Shoot" at the center. There will be tall tails, bad shots, moving targets and lots of fun prizes. Call the center for entry details. Meals On Wheels Moved Catholic Charities of South• em Nevada has moved the Meals on Wheels Program from the Henderson Senior Center to its Las Vegas office. For Meals on Wheels service in Henderson, call 385-5284. Reminders • Ken Dittman, John Hancock Financial Service Company, presents a financial seminar on long term care protection today at 12:30 p.m. in the Conference Room. •The Senior Ride Program, administered by the Nevada State Division of Aging, provides half fare taxi coupons. Call 4866535 for information. •Shearing Eye Institute provides free eye screenings once a month at the center. Call 5656990 for an appointment Nov. 20. The majority of eye problems start without early warning signs of changed vision or pain. Regular screenings will help preserve eyesight. •The center's theater group will meet at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 21. Stop on by for some creative fun. •ThanksgivingDinner will be served at 11 :30 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 23. Activities The Henderson Senior Center has activities ranging from art to Scrabble, concerts, health seminars and social services. The center is open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. On Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings, the center is open from 6 to 10 p.m., and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays. Check the Henderson Home News, the Senior Center monthly newsletter or call 565-6990 for details on activities, special events and services. Also call for information on how to receive the newsletter by mail. Activities scheduled for the week are as follows: Thursday, Nov. 16: Center open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 to 4 p.m., Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, bridge at 8 a.m.. Scrabble at 10 a.m., bingo at 12:30 p.m. and Senior Orchestra at 1 :30 p.m. Duplicate bridge at 6 p.m. and pinochle at 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 17: Center open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, Medicare information and assistance, and help with medical forms, 9 a.m. to noon, free hearing tests by appointment, call 565-6990 bridge at 12:30 p.m., canasta and cribbage at 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov.18: Center open for all activities 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Brunch served 9 to 11 :30 a.m. for $1.25. Monday, Nov. 20: Center open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, bridge at 8 a.m., wood carving at 9 a.m., oil painting at 12:30 p.m.. Housing Options for Seniors by appointment, call 732-0304, and pinochle at 1 p.m. Double deck pinochle at 6:30 p.m. and Mens' chorus at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov.21: Center open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.. Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, needle craft at 9 a.m., T-shirt painting at 9 a.m., blood pressure testing at 10 a.m., pinochle at 1. p.m., line dancing at 2 p.m. and Celebrity City Chorus at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov.22: Center open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.. Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, ceramics 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., euchre at 1 p.m. and dominoes at 1 p.m. Pinochle and Scrabble at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 23: Center open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, bridge at 8 a.m.. Scrabble at 10 a.m., bingo at 12:30 p.m. and Senior Orchestra at 1 :30 p.m. Duplicate bridge at 6 p.m. and pinochle at 7 p.m. HfllR-paSSment Hair ft Nail Profetslonalt Full Set $20.00 E.p.r.s Fills.... $14.00 '"" :..o... ^ Pedicure._,..„..v..7v;;....$ 15.00 Manicure. $8.00 798-4247 '^^ Ask for Judy %"'\\\ "^v Evening Appointments Available I I 1 \nni lET DESERT DATA PUT SOME COLOR IN VOUH LIFE CARDS ^ CANON COLOR LASER COPIES CALENDARS NEW GRAPHICS -CAPABILITIES WOW HOW COULD IT GET ANY BETTER Desert 503 Hotel Plaza Boulder City, NV 89005 (702)294 6224 FAX: 294 0141 Word Processing. lUewslelters. COLOR LASER COPIES. Transcription UPSIFedEx Resumes Forms. Laminating .lUotary.Binding Courtesy Photo REID GREETINGS — Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., stops by tie Henderson Senior Centerto visit with an old friend, Edna Deardoff. We've Got A Handle On Youi Trash Disposal Needs Precision Waste IWanagemenI For Home Or Business For home, business or construction, Silver State can handle your waste management needs. Use the right disposal receptacles for the |ob and save time, money and effort. Monthly rentals available. a fiL^ • Mobile Toter Wheeled receptacle tor convenipn' lome use Replaces lour 20-gaiion fash cans Only S3 00 per montti Call 735-5151. • Container Rentals Four sizes tor residential, induslnal or commercial use Holds up to fifteen 33-gallon cans ot refuse From $12 50 to $19 50 per month Call 735-5151. • Drop Box • For the really big |0b$ Va'd cleanup construction sites of business refuse may be used permanently 3 sizes available 20 • 28 • 50 cu yards Costs only $6.82 per cubic yard. Call 735-5151. Silver State Disposal Service, Inc. 770 East Sahara Ave.. Las Vegas, NV 89104 ->tS-i\l B i-Vv /i ^iS^ ^^S^^\ STEAK HOUSE Open Early Thanksgiving Day 2:00 8:00 P.M. 'h 3 Miles West of Hoover Dam on U.S. 93 i If, <^S!^^ RESTAURANT DINING We will be serving Thanksgiving Dinner in our restaurant from 11 A.M.11 P.M. ^ Thursday, November 23 RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED 293-5000 ONLY Plus tax KIDS UNDER 12 ^7.95 Plus tax in our Steak House, we will be serving Thanksgiving Dinner for those who desire elegant dining. In addition to our regular Steak House menu, we will feature ROAST TOM TURKEY with Sage Dressing VIRGINIA BAKED HAM with fruit sauce $1995 J^^ 4^^ pc<' person Including: chilled relish bowl, fresh faiit compote, cream of chicken soup, Waldorf salad, mashed potatoes with giblet gravy, peas Francoise, jellied whole cranberries, fresh baked rolls & butter, pumpkin, mince or apple pie or ice cream, coffee, tea or milk. ALL YOU CAN EAT Carved & Served Family-Style at Your Table T-^'^:-^^^^. Thanksgiving Dinner "":;:'":'':.'•• ;ll:00a.m. to ILiKip.m. Plus tax KIDS per person UINL/IlK ROAST TOM TURKEY with sage dressing or VIRGINIA BAKED HAM with hiiit sauce and candied yams ONLY... $cr50 I'lus tax Your choice of a complete dinner rjf^ Dinners Include: soup or salad, mashed p<:)tatoes uith gibief gravv. vegetables, cranberry sauce, hot rolls, beverages and pumpkin or apple pie with whipped topping Traditional Thanksgiving Dinner Buffet Feast 11am to 10pm TURKEY, ROAST BEEF AND HAM WITH ALL THE TRIMMINGS Waldorf salad' Pumpkin & Mince Pie will also be served. Plus Tax. Includes a t>everage.

PAGE 13

M Page 12 Henderson Home News Thursday, November 16, 1995 Seniors to celebratelbwa Day THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY The center is open for all activities Monday through Friday 8 a.nn, to 4 p.m., Monday through Thursday evenings 6 to 10 p.m. and Saturdays 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Iowa Day Edna Deardoff and Helen Hymas are organizing volunteers for Iowa Day, 9 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 18. They are putting together decorations, entertainment and door prizes. Bring memories, photos and friends and join in the fun with folks from Iowa. Rumor has it that snow is being shipped in from Iowa to remind everyone why they left. For Saturday Brunch regulars, stop on by, enjoy breakfast and the festivities. A special thanks Paula Johnson, choir director from McDoniel Elementary School, brings her students to the center each year to present an original production of "Our Salute to Veterans." When 100 youngsters crowd onto the stage and sing patriotic songs, it brings down the house. But when the young students ask veterans to stand, salute and sing "It's A Grand Old Flag," there's not a dry eye in the house. The annual event is a heartfelt tribute by students who understand the sacrifices our veterans have made, and it is a wonderful reminder to veterans how much we appreciate those sacrifices. SENIOR CENTER HIGHLIGHTS 27 E. TEXAS ST. 565-6990 .Thank You McCaw Elementary Students from McCaw Elementary School made Veterans Day placemats for the dining room in honor of our veterans. Each individually designed mat, made by students from first to sixth grade, had a wonderful message of appreciation. They added a delightful touch to the week-long veterans tribute. Senator Honors Veterans U.S. Sen. Harry Reid returned home this weekend to honor Henderson's veterans. Reid and his wife, Landra, grew up in Henderson and graduated from Basic High School. His paiftici-, pation in the Veterans Day Celebration Friday at the Civic Center Plaza was a personal tribute to relatives, friends and classmates. He joined those at the center afterward. Seniors and veterans alike cherished the afternoon. Good Luck, Ruth The center's own Ruth Smith is headed to the Clark County Ms. Senior Pageant on Saturday, Nov. 18. Seniors have commandeered a bus to the event to cheer her on to the finals. Call 5656990 for details. Holiday Spirit Courtesy Photo .. • • • .. • • ... • .:• • ': • .......v. NATIONAL CHARITY LEAGUE — National Charity League studentsdecorated the Henderson SeniorCenterforthe Thanksgiving holidays. Victoria Barrera, left, and advisor Anna May Barrera, right, present decorations to Black Mountain Nutrition director Sandy Quineil. The National Charity League includes a dedicated group of young ladies in seventh through 12th grade who work diligently on community projects. Without fanfare or publicity, these innovative hard workers have helped us all year long. They've made hand made decorations to brighten holidays, enriched the lives of the homebound seniors and served at brunches special events. Now, the group has come up with a wonderful project—wrapping holiday packages for seniors. From 9 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 25 and Dec. 2,9 and 16, the girls will be "wrapping things up" at the center. Not letting an idle minute pass, they will also serve brunch. Sing-A-Long Remember the good times? Getting together with friends and singing a favorite tune... or two or three or four? That time is Super Special lntroductor\; Offer Lars WU.t: EISTIMATIS CALL TODAY 251-1990 BOULOER CUV fi GREEN VALLEY' JUDO & KARATE CLUB Nationally & Internationally Certified JUDO • TAE KWOIMDO KARATE • JIIKIITSU Bob Salay 7th Degree Black Belt Karate 7th Degree Black Bell Jiu-Jifsu 6th Degree Black Belt Judo Registeredin.U S A • Europe4 Japan • Former Coach US Air Force Academy And US Olympic Training Center • H/lember ol Nafl Governing Body of JUDO • Executive Board Member ol US Karate Assoc • Former US. Rep For JuiJitsu Black Bell Fed For Kids (4yrs S Up) & Adults • Low Rates • No Testing Fees • Unlimited Use ol Oasses • No Contracts Green Valley Athletic Club (Non-Members & Members) FOR MORE inSclBrCT?! ^^^*^"^'^^^ INFOCAU LCCflUfjgJ 1958 FedEx • Packing Supplies • Moneygrams • FAX Mail 564-4429 I Boulder Hwy. & Major • Connection lucky/Poyless Shopping Center. See Seniors Page 13 >i Join the Fun FIGGIE PUDDING CONTEST One of man]; features at this i)ears "> ^ Christmas tree lighting Saturday Nov. 25, 7p.in. Bring \;our pudding and secret recipe at 6pm to be judged. Remember r\o one knows what the traditional english dessert ingredients are! So make up \;our own! One entrant sai/s his has "no figs"!! Courtesy Photo • :-_ > '-'•'• • : • • ":' • ,/:' • :' • • '-'' • ': • • • • ._ • McDONIEL CHOIR — The McDoniel Elementary School choir salutes Senior Center veterans will a special patriotic show. A highlight of their production was asking veterans to stand for a salute. Pledge of Allegiance and a rendition of "It's A Grand Old Flag." The event was a climax of veterans' week at the center. Nov. 23 ^ Baked I^ani Hoast Turkey with Sweet Sauce with Sage Dressing Hoast Turkey with Dressing ^ Baked T^am ^ ^ ; f 3 > : JESTEH'S COUHT Noon 9pm. Dinners include all the trimmings & pumpkin pie! Roast Turkey, Baked Ham and Roast Beef, Sage Dressing, Candied Yams. Mashed Potatoes, Giblet Gravy, Cranberry Sauce, Ambrosia Salad, Waldorff Salad with Full Salad Bar, Soup, Baby Carrots, Green Beans Almondine & Dessert Bar. $4 35 WILD C1\D BQFFET 11am-9pm '^"^mmim^— CASINO ANOTHER FINE BOYD GAMING PROPERTY Boulder Highway, Between Lake Mead & Sunset Friday and Saturday Nights LIVE MUSIC AND DANCING Private Rooms Aval able for Meetings • Birthdays • Wedding Receptions • Parties BOOK YOUR CHRISTMAS PARTY NOW! LAKE MEAD LOUNGE & CASINO 846 E. Lake Mead Dr. (one mile east of Boulder Hwy.) 56S0297 Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson Home News Page 13 SENIORS: Activities listed From Page 12 SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL NEWSPAPER ADVERTISE IN THE NEWS 564-1881 here again. Nancy Blackwell is organizing a Sing-A-Long group starting at 12:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 24. Stop by for fun. Turkey Shoot John Wayne, Roy Rogers and the Henderson Parks and Recreation Department, will hold a 'Turkey Shoot" at the center. There will be tall tails, bad shots, moving targets and lots of fun prizes. Call the center for entry details. Meals On Wheels Moved Catholic Charities of South• em Nevada has moved the Meals on Wheels Program from the Henderson Senior Center to its Las Vegas office. For Meals on Wheels service in Henderson, call 385-5284. Reminders • Ken Dittman, John Hancock Financial Service Company, presents a financial seminar on long term care protection today at 12:30 p.m. in the Conference Room. •The Senior Ride Program, administered by the Nevada State Division of Aging, provides half fare taxi coupons. Call 4866535 for information. •Shearing Eye Institute provides free eye screenings once a month at the center. Call 5656990 for an appointment Nov. 20. The majority of eye problems start without early warning signs of changed vision or pain. Regular screenings will help preserve eyesight. •The center's theater group will meet at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 21. Stop on by for some creative fun. •ThanksgivingDinner will be served at 11 :30 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 23. Activities The Henderson Senior Center has activities ranging from art to Scrabble, concerts, health seminars and social services. The center is open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. On Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings, the center is open from 6 to 10 p.m., and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays. Check the Henderson Home News, the Senior Center monthly newsletter or call 565-6990 for details on activities, special events and services. Also call for information on how to receive the newsletter by mail. Activities scheduled for the week are as follows: Thursday, Nov. 16: Center open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 to 4 p.m., Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, bridge at 8 a.m.. Scrabble at 10 a.m., bingo at 12:30 p.m. and Senior Orchestra at 1 :30 p.m. Duplicate bridge at 6 p.m. and pinochle at 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 17: Center open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, Medicare information and assistance, and help with medical forms, 9 a.m. to noon, free hearing tests by appointment, call 565-6990 bridge at 12:30 p.m., canasta and cribbage at 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov.18: Center open for all activities 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Brunch served 9 to 11 :30 a.m. for $1.25. Monday, Nov. 20: Center open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, bridge at 8 a.m., wood carving at 9 a.m., oil painting at 12:30 p.m.. Housing Options for Seniors by appointment, call 732-0304, and pinochle at 1 p.m. Double deck pinochle at 6:30 p.m. and Mens' chorus at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov.21: Center open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.. Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, needle craft at 9 a.m., T-shirt painting at 9 a.m., blood pressure testing at 10 a.m., pinochle at 1. p.m., line dancing at 2 p.m. and Celebrity City Chorus at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov.22: Center open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.. Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, ceramics 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., euchre at 1 p.m. and dominoes at 1 p.m. Pinochle and Scrabble at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 23: Center open for all activities 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 6 to 10 p.m. Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, bridge at 8 a.m.. Scrabble at 10 a.m., bingo at 12:30 p.m. and Senior Orchestra at 1 :30 p.m. Duplicate bridge at 6 p.m. and pinochle at 7 p.m. HfllR-paSSment Hair ft Nail Profetslonalt Full Set $20.00 E.p.r.s Fills.... $14.00 '"" :..o... ^ Pedicure._,..„..v..7v;;....$ 15.00 Manicure. $8.00 798-4247 '^^ Ask for Judy %"'\\\ "^v Evening Appointments Available I I 1 \nni lET DESERT DATA PUT SOME COLOR IN VOUH LIFE CARDS ^ CANON COLOR LASER COPIES CALENDARS NEW GRAPHICS -CAPABILITIES WOW HOW COULD IT GET ANY BETTER Desert 503 Hotel Plaza Boulder City, NV 89005 (702)294 6224 FAX: 294 0141 Word Processing. lUewslelters. COLOR LASER COPIES. Transcription UPSIFedEx Resumes Forms. Laminating .lUotary.Binding Courtesy Photo REID GREETINGS — Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., stops by tie Henderson Senior Centerto visit with an old friend, Edna Deardoff. We've Got A Handle On Youi Trash Disposal Needs Precision Waste IWanagemenI For Home Or Business For home, business or construction, Silver State can handle your waste management needs. Use the right disposal receptacles for the |ob and save time, money and effort. Monthly rentals available. a fiL^ • Mobile Toter Wheeled receptacle tor convenipn' lome use Replaces lour 20-gaiion fash cans Only S3 00 per montti Call 735-5151. • Container Rentals Four sizes tor residential, induslnal or commercial use Holds up to fifteen 33-gallon cans ot refuse From $12 50 to $19 50 per month Call 735-5151. • Drop Box • For the really big |0b$ Va'd cleanup construction sites of business refuse may be used permanently 3 sizes available 20 • 28 • 50 cu yards Costs only $6.82 per cubic yard. Call 735-5151. Silver State Disposal Service, Inc. 770 East Sahara Ave.. Las Vegas, NV 89104 ->tS-i\l B i-Vv /i ^iS^ ^^S^^\ STEAK HOUSE Open Early Thanksgiving Day 2:00 8:00 P.M. 'h 3 Miles West of Hoover Dam on U.S. 93 i If, <^S!^^ RESTAURANT DINING We will be serving Thanksgiving Dinner in our restaurant from 11 A.M.11 P.M. ^ Thursday, November 23 RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED 293-5000 ONLY Plus tax KIDS UNDER 12 ^7.95 Plus tax in our Steak House, we will be serving Thanksgiving Dinner for those who desire elegant dining. In addition to our regular Steak House menu, we will feature ROAST TOM TURKEY with Sage Dressing VIRGINIA BAKED HAM with fruit sauce $1995 J^^ 4^^ pc<' person Including: chilled relish bowl, fresh faiit compote, cream of chicken soup, Waldorf salad, mashed potatoes with giblet gravy, peas Francoise, jellied whole cranberries, fresh baked rolls & butter, pumpkin, mince or apple pie or ice cream, coffee, tea or milk. ALL YOU CAN EAT Carved & Served Family-Style at Your Table T-^'^:-^^^^. Thanksgiving Dinner "":;:'":'':.'•• ;ll:00a.m. to ILiKip.m. Plus tax KIDS per person UINL/IlK ROAST TOM TURKEY with sage dressing or VIRGINIA BAKED HAM with hiiit sauce and candied yams ONLY... $cr50 I'lus tax Your choice of a complete dinner rjf^ Dinners Include: soup or salad, mashed p<:)tatoes uith gibief gravv. vegetables, cranberry sauce, hot rolls, beverages and pumpkin or apple pie with whipped topping Traditional Thanksgiving Dinner Buffet Feast 11am to 10pm TURKEY, ROAST BEEF AND HAM WITH ALL THE TRIMMINGS Waldorf salad' Pumpkin & Mince Pie will also be served. Plus Tax. Includes a t>everage.

PAGE 14

Page 14 Henderson Home News Thursday, November 16,1995 Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson Home News Page 15 The fugitives featured in this publication are wanted by area law enforcement. It is believed these suspects are still living in the Las Vegas area. Michael R. Massey white make adult, DOB/03-31-67 67", 180 lbs. brown hair, brown eyes Wanted for grand larceny and possession of stolen propertyf. Warrant Issued on October 30th, 1995 out of justice court Henderson township. W/A# 95F07I5X. massey was Involved In the taking of personal property belonging to victim/female, on or between January 15th and January 30th, 1995. Cash Reward Up To ^ 1,000 Robert Orlando Smith black male adult DOB/05-29-54 6", 200 lbs. black hair, brown eyes Wanted for bribe or intimidate witness to Influence testimony. Warrant Issue dout of Clark COunty Justice court on 10/27/95. Ball set at J I 0,000.00 W/N# 95F09363X. Smith Is a suspect In a reported robbery of a Smiths Food King on 08-1495. Smith Is accused of intimidating one of the witnesses in this crime. James Steven Erickson white male adult DOB / 04-28-69 5'9", 165 lbs., black hair, brown eyes Tatoo Initial "JE' left hand Wanted for battery with use deadly weapon. Warrantissue dout of Justice court, Henderson Township on October 30th, 1995. W/A #9SFH0793X. DINNER till 8:00 p.m. Tuesday thru Saturday Additional Dinner Menu OMELET HOUSE 316 N. Boulder Hwy. Henderson If you have information on the location of any of these fugitives, call: ~ Secret Witness Reward Hotline: Reginald Slaughter black male adult DOB/06-30-67 6'3", 180 lbs. black hair, brown eyes Wanted for sales of a controlled substance. Warrant issue d on September 27th, 1995 out of Clark County Justice Court. W/A# 95F0763X, $10,000.00 bail. Fugitives featured are wanted as of Nov. 7, 1995 Clarence Edward Ragland aka Clarence Ingram aka Clarence Feralson aka Clarence Raland black male adult DOB/08-13-60 5'H", I 70 lbs. black hair, brown eyes Ten (10) time registered ex-felon. Tatoo on chest, tatoo on right arm Wanted for first degree kidnapping, sexual assault with a minor under fourteen of age (Sets) and burglary. Warrant Issued on October 3rd, 1 995 out of North Las vcgas Justice court. W/A #94FN0743X. 1180.000.00 bail. Suspect entered an apartment in NLV on June 25th, 1994 and committed the aforementioned crimes to a young 14 YOA female. Hoover Dam to be open Thanksgiving Guided tours of Hoover Dam will be offered on Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 23, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 'The Hoover Dam Visitor Facility was previously scheduled to be closed for the holiday but in response to customer requests, THE NEWS IS YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER guided tours will be available," said Dan Jensen, Hoover Dam visitor services manager. The Visitor Center parking facility and concessionaires will be open. Regular tour hours, from 8 a.m. to 5:40 p.m., will resume after the holiday. More than 31 million people have tourfed the site since'it fifst opened to the public in 1937. GREEN VALLEY AREA Communitv Executive Homes From The $160,000's Prestige, Style, Quality, Lotallon, Setutily, Privo(y, i lots Of Seini-Custom Chokes. • Private Coted Community • • Adjacent To A 60 Acre Park • Semi-Custom Homes • Zoned For Green Valley High School Up To 3,638 Sq. Ft. & 7 Bedrooms Sales OlTicc Open Daily lOamU) Spill 434-4912 >OPmi| l ^ h —--Realior lOim' Co-Op l£} Westmark H 0 M E .S *k 1-515 <^ HiNsn ID wicww nun • UK! MUD OR 5 h Hi WIN ^500 EVERY MONDAY NKWr rOOIBALL GAME During every Monday Night Football Game you can win $500 in cash and other great prizes during Boomtowns No Bets-Go 4 It Football Contest! Best of all you don't need to make a bet in our Sportsbook to play. Just get a "4 of a Kind" in fours on any .25 or $ 1 video poker machine with maximum coins played (no wild cards). The attendant will give you a special entry ticket. Make your prediction for the outcome of the next game and take it to Rattlesnake Ricky's Lounge before 5.00pm Monday. It's that easy! We'll award $500 to the person with the con-ect or closest prediction when the game's over, but you must be present to win. The pregame party starts at 4:30pm with a hot dog and beer for a buck and many more prizes. WDM A FREE TRIP TO 1HE SUPER BOWL! Every qualifying entry ticket is eligible to win a free trip to the Super Bowl for two. including room and airfare! LBSVEGBS • BOTEIi '^5n>'W* A UCCNDMnr WESIUN vimiE. SMMIIIlSSOUniOFTROPICANAONI'IS* EXn 33 Hebrew Academy commemorates life of Rabin Speaking oftheir deep respect and affection for Yitzhak Rabin, Hebrew Academy students and faculty mourned the Israeli leader's assassination at a special ceremony Monday, Nov. 6. "The assassin's bullet hasn't only taken the life of a leader who started Israel's peace process, it also was a bullet that penetrated the heart of a nation," Dr. Tamar Lubin, school head, told the audience. "This act contributed to the loss of our heritage as we know it." .''/; • • • ; Lubin speaks from personal experience. She had known Rabin since she was a young girl living in Jerusalem. When Rabin was a 24-year-old soldier, he led the platoon that freed the city from a Palestinian-Jordanian siege during the 1948 Independence War. Lubin's father was seriously injured during the city's defense. "The loss of Yitzhak Rabin is a loss for us all," Rabbi Louis Lederman told the students. He referred to Rabin's grandchild's speech at the leader's funeral. "We must remember Rabin and allofourgrandparents whohave' died to create a greater Israel," he said. Students lit candles in memory of Rabin, recited the 23rd Psalm and ''Kaddish," thetraditional Jewish prayer for the dead. Students sang songs for peace in Hebrew, including the song Rabin had joined in moments before his death. "The Prime Minister's death came as such a shock," said Hebrew Academy junior Marty Paz. "He played a major role in the Middle Eastern peace negotiations, which will make the future better for all ofus." In addition to the students, parents. Las Vegas residents and Israeli UNLV students attended the ceremony honoringRabin and his untimely passing. The Hebrew Academy is the first and only non-parochial, nonprofit, accredited, college-preparatory school in Nevada with programs for three-year-olds through 12th grade. For more information, call 255-4500. HPRD Cliristmas quilting workshop Saturday HPRD will offer a "Log Cabin Christmas Tree Workshop" to demonstrate how to arrange quilt blocks into a festive wall-hanging perfect for gift-giving or ho]idjy decorating, from 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 18, at the Silver Springs Recreation Center, 1951 Silver Springs Parkway. Sponsored by the Henderson Parks and Recreation Department, it is open to those 16 and older. The project is ideal for beginners as well as experienced quilters. : \ .., For a complete list of holiday workshops, call the Kesterson Valley View Recreation Center, 565-2121, or the Silver Springs Recreation Center, 435-3814. NOTicK ((i>ed sports book in a CC (Coniniunily Commeri'ial) dislriil al 4.^INI K. .Suiisil Knad,.Suite .^(1. in the (Ireen Valley North planning area. TOWN USE KRMII UlOl 95 CENTER AMUSEMENTS, INC. -"i ^ I • tf~'\ '<.v, .,^ — |. if •m*' fw 1... -"^^^ ^ ._ • • '•• .*''.S^ <" 1 ..-. ^g QJ, ;GN*'-IJ PHQJtCi Slit ';-'<.^'' ANY AND ALI, inli-resled persons may appear before Ih PlunninK Commission, either in person or by counsel, and may object to or express approval of Ihe above application, or may, prior lo Ihe puhlic hearinK, I'lle uilh the Planning Department written ohjeclion thereto or approval Ihereor. For additional inromialion, call .^65-2474. DA TED: November 1 .\ 1 995 M RONALD B. FRAME, Chairman Henderson Planning Commission H—Nov. 16, 1995. NOTICE OF PL'lHI.IC HEAHINi; NOTICE IS HEREBY (JIVEN that Ihe Planning Commi sion of the City of Henderson. Nevada, will hold a public hearing on November 2H, 1995, al 7:IKI p.m. in the City Council Chanihers. Cily Hall, 24y counsel, and may object lo or express approval of the above application, or may, prior to Ihe public hearing, file with the Ilanning Department written objei-tion thereto or approval thereof. F'or additional inromialion, call 565-2474. DATED November l.\ 1995 Isl RONALD B. FRAMH; Chairman Henderson Ilanning CommissiiHi H—N.iv. 16. 1995^ ANY ANT) ALL interested persons may appear before Ihe Planning Commission, either in person or by counsel, and may object lo or expre.ss appnival ( the above application, or may, prior lo the public hearing, file with Ihe Planning Department written ohjeciion thereto or appnival thereof. Fofadditional information, call 565-2474. DATED: November 13, 1995 /s/RONALD B. FRAME, Chairman Henderson Planning Commission H—Nov. 16, 1995. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARI.NG NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Planning Commission of the City of Henderson, Nevada, will hold a public hearing on November 28, 1995, at 7:()0 p.m. in Ihe City Council Chambers, City Hall, 240 WaterSlreel. Henderson, Nevada, to consider the following application. U-l(l2-95 PUBLIC HEARI.NG -USE PERMIT FOR GREEN VALLEY PET GROOMING APPLICANT: ELLEN GARDNER Request for a dog gry c-unsel, and may object to or express approval of the above application, or may, prior to Ihe puhlic hearing, file with the Ilanning Department written ohjection thereto or approval thereof. For additional information, call 565-2474. DATED: November 13, 1995 Isl RONALD B. FRAME, Chairman Henderson Planning Comniis.sion H—Nov. 16. 1995. '.. • I NOTICE OF SALE OF PROPERTY FOR DELINQUENT ASSESSMENTS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN punuant lo N.RX Chapter 271, Consolidated Local Improvement Laws, thai the following properly owners are in default on Ihe payment oftheir special as.se.s.smenLs as set forth herein. The Cily Council of the Cily of Henderson, Nevada pursuant lo slate .statute and the City ordinances impising the special as.sessmenL< has al its November 7,1995 regular meeting ordered Ihe sale of the herein listed parcels of real pnipeHy to satisfy the delinquent and unpaid assessments. TIME. DATE ANT) PLACESET FOR THE SALE Date: December 11, 1995 Time: 10:00 a.m. Place: City Council Chambers Henderson City Hall • '•.'"^. 240 WaterSlreel •,.'"• •' • : • • T' '" • • "' • .--"' Henderson, NV 89015 ~^ ,^... „ ......-, ^^^ ^__^__„^, ^-. Said sale shall be continued from day lo day, omitting Sundays and legal holidays until all the herein described parcels which .still have delinquent assessments unpaid are .sold or stricken off Ihe as.sessment roll lo the Cily. Rieht t" <,'M rf (Hearing l. The properly owner, al any time before the dale set for the sale, may pay the amount of all delinquent inslallmenLs originally becoming due and presently unpaid, along with interest thereon and all penalties accrued and thereupon shall be restored to the right thereafter to pay in installments in the same manner as if default had not been suffered. Election lo Accelerate A.ssessmenI (Hearing). The City Council of the City of Henderson, Nevada has elected that in the event Ihe default is not cured by Ihe property owner prior lo the dale of sale that Ihe whole uf the assessment shall be accelerated and become due and payable al the time ofsale along with all accrued interest, penalties and costs or collection. Each parivl of property described herein will be sold lo satisfy the total amount due thereon. The following is the list of pniperlies and owners by local improvement dlslricl thai are delinquent in the payment uf Iheir special wsessmenLs as certified on October 19, 199S by the undersigned Name of Last Known Owner Description of Properly hy County Assessor Number Amount Due lo Cure Default Prior to Sale' Amount Due al Time of Sale" LOCAL IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT 818 Marie Zeller Kenneth A Judith Rowc Lewis & Alice Drssormeau John May Gray Ralph & Anne Violandi Howard D. A Merilee Clark 179-19101 -004 PT NW4 NW4 SEC 19 22 63 179-19-108-005 445 Crestway Road Henderson, NV 89015 179-19-201-004 251 W. Rmhell Drive Hendenon, N'V 89015 179-19-205-006 270 W. Cyprrss Dr. Hendenon, N'V 89015 179-19-1108-001 251 E. Chaparral Dr. Hendenon, NV 89015 $650.12 $539.94 $4,358.40 $487.23 $ 1.153.74 16,374.04 $5,243.64 $9,246.64 $4,827.02 $5,961^7 'This figure represenU principal, interest and penaltin calculated to 1IV19/9S. Defending on pay-olT date, additional penalties shall be calculated Mtd assessed. Penalties are based on 1 % per month (except for LID 811^ wkidi is 2% per month of accrued principal and interest. 'This figure represents the full pay-nffnf the special assessment based on accelrralinn as of the date of sale (12/11/K) plus a ciilleclion fee of $200.00 and penalties. DATED this 8lh day of November, 1995. H—Nov. 16, 21. 30 A Pec. 7. 1995. / • / Steven M. Hanson, Finance Director Cily of Hendrraon, Nevada ATTESTED: hi Sasan Rohison, City Clerk City of Hendenon HIGHEST YIELDING CDs IN THE USA FDIC INSURED y.4o o/o NO CHARGES NO FEES SEIBT FINANCIAL SERVICES 8645 W. Sahara (The Lakes) 254-6613 2620 Regatta Dr. #207B (Summerlln) 341-5902 4451 E. Sunset Rd. #9 (Green Valley) 898-3587 •Average Annual Yield as of 11 -13-95 i; viAKs ^)^ IXPIKIINC i Complete Design Services LANDSCAPE DESIGN & INSTALLATION DESERT • DROUGHT TOLERANT LUSH • TROPICAL • TRADITIONAL PATIOS • PATIO COVERS • POOLS & SPAS WATERFALLS • MIST SYSTEMS 565-4744.;:,.;:. j;5ti:" 100% financing, OAC SOUTHSHORE LANDSCAPING CORP. RESIDENTIAL ( () M M E R ( I C FREMONT MEDICAL CENTERS NOW OPEN are pleased to announce the opening of their new location in Henderson and the Association of BYRON KILPATRICK, MD Medical Director Family Practice Joining Dr. Kilpatrick and the Fremont Medical Staff are: BERALDO VAZQUEZ, MD SUSAN MEYER, MD Internal Medicine and Geriatrics Board Certified Emergency Medicine ^ MOSTAFA SHETA, MD • Board Certified Family Practice # Quality care for the entire family Including treatment of on-the-fob Infurle59 595 W. LAKE MEAD • 566-5500 Appointments • Preferred ^ Provider for most major insurances. Medicare assignment accepted. OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK $711.00 A DAY Dec. I thru Dec. 20 ALYSTRA LUCKY 7-11 GIVEAWAY $7,011.00 A DAY Dec. 21 thru Dec. 23 Sign up in the month of November for drawings held in December. Drawing will be field daily in the month of December between 4p.m. & 7p.m. All participants must be Club ALYSTRA members. See posted rules throughout the casino. No Club Membership Fee. All participants entering during November will be entered into the Grand iPrize Drawing to be held on December 21st, 22nd, and 23rd. Management reserves the right to alter or discontinue promotion at any time. Winners must be present to win. JOIN NOW! THE ALYSTRA CLUB Where 250 Points Equal $1.00! (No Membership Fee) FREE KEY CHAINS FOR NEW MEMBERS THANKSGIVING OAT 5^''^^'^ ^''^ '3.m. • 9p.m. Roasted turkey, sage dressing, cranberry sauce, sweet potato, green beans, hot bread, soft beverage, pumpkin pie, or peach cobbler. ,'~ MONDAY THRU THURSDAY I 2 for 1 Dally Specials • In the Grille House I Breakfast, Lunch or Dinner. Valid 30 days from the date of issue Management of Alystra reserves all rights to discontinue offer at any time L J THURSDAY SPECIAL 2 FOR 1 ON ANY MENU ITEM when you cash your check and sign up for the double your paycheck drawing. ENTERTAINMENT NIGHTLY till Solomon Ouo DOUBLE YOUR PAYCHECK UP TO $500 OR WIN A TRIP FOR TWO 'LOC^I piyroll. p*ni
PAGE 15

Page 14 Henderson Home News Thursday, November 16,1995 Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson Home News Page 15 The fugitives featured in this publication are wanted by area law enforcement. It is believed these suspects are still living in the Las Vegas area. Michael R. Massey white make adult, DOB/03-31-67 67", 180 lbs. brown hair, brown eyes Wanted for grand larceny and possession of stolen propertyf. Warrant Issued on October 30th, 1995 out of justice court Henderson township. W/A# 95F07I5X. massey was Involved In the taking of personal property belonging to victim/female, on or between January 15th and January 30th, 1995. Cash Reward Up To ^ 1,000 Robert Orlando Smith black male adult DOB/05-29-54 6", 200 lbs. black hair, brown eyes Wanted for bribe or intimidate witness to Influence testimony. Warrant Issue dout of Clark COunty Justice court on 10/27/95. Ball set at J I 0,000.00 W/N# 95F09363X. Smith Is a suspect In a reported robbery of a Smiths Food King on 08-1495. Smith Is accused of intimidating one of the witnesses in this crime. James Steven Erickson white male adult DOB / 04-28-69 5'9", 165 lbs., black hair, brown eyes Tatoo Initial "JE' left hand Wanted for battery with use deadly weapon. Warrantissue dout of Justice court, Henderson Township on October 30th, 1995. W/A #9SFH0793X. DINNER till 8:00 p.m. Tuesday thru Saturday Additional Dinner Menu OMELET HOUSE 316 N. Boulder Hwy. Henderson If you have information on the location of any of these fugitives, call: ~ Secret Witness Reward Hotline: Reginald Slaughter black male adult DOB/06-30-67 6'3", 180 lbs. black hair, brown eyes Wanted for sales of a controlled substance. Warrant issue d on September 27th, 1995 out of Clark County Justice Court. W/A# 95F0763X, $10,000.00 bail. Fugitives featured are wanted as of Nov. 7, 1995 Clarence Edward Ragland aka Clarence Ingram aka Clarence Feralson aka Clarence Raland black male adult DOB/08-13-60 5'H", I 70 lbs. black hair, brown eyes Ten (10) time registered ex-felon. Tatoo on chest, tatoo on right arm Wanted for first degree kidnapping, sexual assault with a minor under fourteen of age (Sets) and burglary. Warrant Issued on October 3rd, 1 995 out of North Las vcgas Justice court. W/A #94FN0743X. 1180.000.00 bail. Suspect entered an apartment in NLV on June 25th, 1994 and committed the aforementioned crimes to a young 14 YOA female. Hoover Dam to be open Thanksgiving Guided tours of Hoover Dam will be offered on Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 23, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 'The Hoover Dam Visitor Facility was previously scheduled to be closed for the holiday but in response to customer requests, THE NEWS IS YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER guided tours will be available," said Dan Jensen, Hoover Dam visitor services manager. The Visitor Center parking facility and concessionaires will be open. Regular tour hours, from 8 a.m. to 5:40 p.m., will resume after the holiday. More than 31 million people have tourfed the site since'it fifst opened to the public in 1937. GREEN VALLEY AREA Communitv Executive Homes From The $160,000's Prestige, Style, Quality, Lotallon, Setutily, Privo(y, i lots Of Seini-Custom Chokes. • Private Coted Community • • Adjacent To A 60 Acre Park • Semi-Custom Homes • Zoned For Green Valley High School Up To 3,638 Sq. Ft. & 7 Bedrooms Sales OlTicc Open Daily lOamU) Spill 434-4912 >OPmi| l ^ h —--Realior lOim' Co-Op l£} Westmark H 0 M E .S *k 1-515 <^ HiNsn ID wicww nun • UK! MUD OR 5 h Hi WIN ^500 EVERY MONDAY NKWr rOOIBALL GAME During every Monday Night Football Game you can win $500 in cash and other great prizes during Boomtowns No Bets-Go 4 It Football Contest! Best of all you don't need to make a bet in our Sportsbook to play. Just get a "4 of a Kind" in fours on any .25 or $ 1 video poker machine with maximum coins played (no wild cards). The attendant will give you a special entry ticket. Make your prediction for the outcome of the next game and take it to Rattlesnake Ricky's Lounge before 5.00pm Monday. It's that easy! We'll award $500 to the person with the con-ect or closest prediction when the game's over, but you must be present to win. The pregame party starts at 4:30pm with a hot dog and beer for a buck and many more prizes. WDM A FREE TRIP TO 1HE SUPER BOWL! Every qualifying entry ticket is eligible to win a free trip to the Super Bowl for two. including room and airfare! LBSVEGBS • BOTEIi '^5n>'W* A UCCNDMnr WESIUN vimiE. SMMIIIlSSOUniOFTROPICANAONI'IS* EXn 33 Hebrew Academy commemorates life of Rabin Speaking oftheir deep respect and affection for Yitzhak Rabin, Hebrew Academy students and faculty mourned the Israeli leader's assassination at a special ceremony Monday, Nov. 6. "The assassin's bullet hasn't only taken the life of a leader who started Israel's peace process, it also was a bullet that penetrated the heart of a nation," Dr. Tamar Lubin, school head, told the audience. "This act contributed to the loss of our heritage as we know it." .''/; • • • ; Lubin speaks from personal experience. She had known Rabin since she was a young girl living in Jerusalem. When Rabin was a 24-year-old soldier, he led the platoon that freed the city from a Palestinian-Jordanian siege during the 1948 Independence War. Lubin's father was seriously injured during the city's defense. "The loss of Yitzhak Rabin is a loss for us all," Rabbi Louis Lederman told the students. He referred to Rabin's grandchild's speech at the leader's funeral. "We must remember Rabin and allofourgrandparents whohave' died to create a greater Israel," he said. Students lit candles in memory of Rabin, recited the 23rd Psalm and ''Kaddish," thetraditional Jewish prayer for the dead. Students sang songs for peace in Hebrew, including the song Rabin had joined in moments before his death. "The Prime Minister's death came as such a shock," said Hebrew Academy junior Marty Paz. "He played a major role in the Middle Eastern peace negotiations, which will make the future better for all ofus." In addition to the students, parents. Las Vegas residents and Israeli UNLV students attended the ceremony honoringRabin and his untimely passing. The Hebrew Academy is the first and only non-parochial, nonprofit, accredited, college-preparatory school in Nevada with programs for three-year-olds through 12th grade. For more information, call 255-4500. HPRD Cliristmas quilting workshop Saturday HPRD will offer a "Log Cabin Christmas Tree Workshop" to demonstrate how to arrange quilt blocks into a festive wall-hanging perfect for gift-giving or ho]idjy decorating, from 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 18, at the Silver Springs Recreation Center, 1951 Silver Springs Parkway. Sponsored by the Henderson Parks and Recreation Department, it is open to those 16 and older. The project is ideal for beginners as well as experienced quilters. : \ .., For a complete list of holiday workshops, call the Kesterson Valley View Recreation Center, 565-2121, or the Silver Springs Recreation Center, 435-3814. NOTicK ((i>ed sports book in a CC (Coniniunily Commeri'ial) dislriil al 4.^INI K. .Suiisil Knad,.Suite .^(1. in the (Ireen Valley North planning area. TOWN USE KRMII UlOl 95 CENTER AMUSEMENTS, INC. -"i ^ I • tf~'\ '<.v, .,^ — |. if •m*' fw 1... -"^^^ ^ ._ • • '•• .*''.S^ <" 1 ..-. ^g QJ, ;GN*'-IJ PHQJtCi Slit ';-'<.^'' ANY AND ALI, inli-resled persons may appear before Ih PlunninK Commission, either in person or by counsel, and may object to or express approval of Ihe above application, or may, prior lo Ihe puhlic hearinK, I'lle uilh the Planning Department written ohjeclion thereto or approval Ihereor. For additional inromialion, call .^65-2474. DA TED: November 1 .\ 1 995 M RONALD B. FRAME, Chairman Henderson Planning Commission H—Nov. 16, 1995. NOTICE OF PL'lHI.IC HEAHINi; NOTICE IS HEREBY (JIVEN that Ihe Planning Commi sion of the City of Henderson. Nevada, will hold a public hearing on November 2H, 1995, al 7:IKI p.m. in the City Council Chanihers. Cily Hall, 24y counsel, and may object lo or express approval of the above application, or may, prior to Ihe public hearing, file with the Ilanning Department written objei-tion thereto or approval thereof. F'or additional inromialion, call 565-2474. DATED November l.\ 1995 Isl RONALD B. FRAMH; Chairman Henderson Ilanning CommissiiHi H—N.iv. 16. 1995^ ANY ANT) ALL interested persons may appear before Ihe Planning Commission, either in person or by counsel, and may object lo or expre.ss appnival ( the above application, or may, prior lo the public hearing, file with Ihe Planning Department written ohjeciion thereto or appnival thereof. Fofadditional information, call 565-2474. DATED: November 13, 1995 /s/RONALD B. FRAME, Chairman Henderson Planning Commission H—Nov. 16, 1995. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARI.NG NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Planning Commission of the City of Henderson, Nevada, will hold a public hearing on November 28, 1995, at 7:()0 p.m. in Ihe City Council Chambers, City Hall, 240 WaterSlreel. Henderson, Nevada, to consider the following application. U-l(l2-95 PUBLIC HEARI.NG -USE PERMIT FOR GREEN VALLEY PET GROOMING APPLICANT: ELLEN GARDNER Request for a dog gry c-unsel, and may object to or express approval of the above application, or may, prior to Ihe puhlic hearing, file with the Ilanning Department written ohjection thereto or approval thereof. For additional information, call 565-2474. DATED: November 13, 1995 Isl RONALD B. FRAME, Chairman Henderson Planning Comniis.sion H—Nov. 16. 1995. '.. • I NOTICE OF SALE OF PROPERTY FOR DELINQUENT ASSESSMENTS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN punuant lo N.RX Chapter 271, Consolidated Local Improvement Laws, thai the following properly owners are in default on Ihe payment oftheir special as.se.s.smenLs as set forth herein. The Cily Council of the Cily of Henderson, Nevada pursuant lo slate .statute and the City ordinances impising the special as.sessmenL< has al its November 7,1995 regular meeting ordered Ihe sale of the herein listed parcels of real pnipeHy to satisfy the delinquent and unpaid assessments. TIME. DATE ANT) PLACESET FOR THE SALE Date: December 11, 1995 Time: 10:00 a.m. Place: City Council Chambers Henderson City Hall • '•.'"^. 240 WaterSlreel •,.'"• •' • : • • T' '" • • "' • .--"' Henderson, NV 89015 ~^ ,^... „ ......-, ^^^ ^__^__„^, ^-. Said sale shall be continued from day lo day, omitting Sundays and legal holidays until all the herein described parcels which .still have delinquent assessments unpaid are .sold or stricken off Ihe as.sessment roll lo the Cily. Rieht t" <,'M rf (Hearing l. The properly owner, al any time before the dale set for the sale, may pay the amount of all delinquent inslallmenLs originally becoming due and presently unpaid, along with interest thereon and all penalties accrued and thereupon shall be restored to the right thereafter to pay in installments in the same manner as if default had not been suffered. Election lo Accelerate A.ssessmenI (Hearing). The City Council of the City of Henderson, Nevada has elected that in the event Ihe default is not cured by Ihe property owner prior lo the dale of sale that Ihe whole uf the assessment shall be accelerated and become due and payable al the time ofsale along with all accrued interest, penalties and costs or collection. Each parivl of property described herein will be sold lo satisfy the total amount due thereon. The following is the list of pniperlies and owners by local improvement dlslricl thai are delinquent in the payment uf Iheir special wsessmenLs as certified on October 19, 199S by the undersigned Name of Last Known Owner Description of Properly hy County Assessor Number Amount Due lo Cure Default Prior to Sale' Amount Due al Time of Sale" LOCAL IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT 818 Marie Zeller Kenneth A Judith Rowc Lewis & Alice Drssormeau John May Gray Ralph & Anne Violandi Howard D. A Merilee Clark 179-19101 -004 PT NW4 NW4 SEC 19 22 63 179-19-108-005 445 Crestway Road Henderson, NV 89015 179-19-201-004 251 W. Rmhell Drive Hendenon, N'V 89015 179-19-205-006 270 W. Cyprrss Dr. Hendenon, N'V 89015 179-19-1108-001 251 E. Chaparral Dr. Hendenon, NV 89015 $650.12 $539.94 $4,358.40 $487.23 $ 1.153.74 16,374.04 $5,243.64 $9,246.64 $4,827.02 $5,961^7 'This figure represenU principal, interest and penaltin calculated to 1IV19/9S. Defending on pay-olT date, additional penalties shall be calculated Mtd assessed. Penalties are based on 1 % per month (except for LID 811^ wkidi is 2% per month of accrued principal and interest. 'This figure represents the full pay-nffnf the special assessment based on accelrralinn as of the date of sale (12/11/K) plus a ciilleclion fee of $200.00 and penalties. DATED this 8lh day of November, 1995. H—Nov. 16, 21. 30 A Pec. 7. 1995. / • / Steven M. Hanson, Finance Director Cily of Hendrraon, Nevada ATTESTED: hi Sasan Rohison, City Clerk City of Hendenon HIGHEST YIELDING CDs IN THE USA FDIC INSURED y.4o o/o NO CHARGES NO FEES SEIBT FINANCIAL SERVICES 8645 W. Sahara (The Lakes) 254-6613 2620 Regatta Dr. #207B (Summerlln) 341-5902 4451 E. Sunset Rd. #9 (Green Valley) 898-3587 •Average Annual Yield as of 11 -13-95 i; viAKs ^)^ IXPIKIINC i Complete Design Services LANDSCAPE DESIGN & INSTALLATION DESERT • DROUGHT TOLERANT LUSH • TROPICAL • TRADITIONAL PATIOS • PATIO COVERS • POOLS & SPAS WATERFALLS • MIST SYSTEMS 565-4744.;:,.;:. j;5ti:" 100% financing, OAC SOUTHSHORE LANDSCAPING CORP. RESIDENTIAL ( () M M E R ( I C FREMONT MEDICAL CENTERS NOW OPEN are pleased to announce the opening of their new location in Henderson and the Association of BYRON KILPATRICK, MD Medical Director Family Practice Joining Dr. Kilpatrick and the Fremont Medical Staff are: BERALDO VAZQUEZ, MD SUSAN MEYER, MD Internal Medicine and Geriatrics Board Certified Emergency Medicine ^ MOSTAFA SHETA, MD • Board Certified Family Practice # Quality care for the entire family Including treatment of on-the-fob Infurle59 595 W. LAKE MEAD • 566-5500 Appointments • Preferred ^ Provider for most major insurances. Medicare assignment accepted. OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK $711.00 A DAY Dec. I thru Dec. 20 ALYSTRA LUCKY 7-11 GIVEAWAY $7,011.00 A DAY Dec. 21 thru Dec. 23 Sign up in the month of November for drawings held in December. Drawing will be field daily in the month of December between 4p.m. & 7p.m. All participants must be Club ALYSTRA members. See posted rules throughout the casino. No Club Membership Fee. All participants entering during November will be entered into the Grand iPrize Drawing to be held on December 21st, 22nd, and 23rd. Management reserves the right to alter or discontinue promotion at any time. Winners must be present to win. JOIN NOW! THE ALYSTRA CLUB Where 250 Points Equal $1.00! (No Membership Fee) FREE KEY CHAINS FOR NEW MEMBERS THANKSGIVING OAT 5^''^^'^ ^''^ '3.m. • 9p.m. Roasted turkey, sage dressing, cranberry sauce, sweet potato, green beans, hot bread, soft beverage, pumpkin pie, or peach cobbler. ,'~ MONDAY THRU THURSDAY I 2 for 1 Dally Specials • In the Grille House I Breakfast, Lunch or Dinner. Valid 30 days from the date of issue Management of Alystra reserves all rights to discontinue offer at any time L J THURSDAY SPECIAL 2 FOR 1 ON ANY MENU ITEM when you cash your check and sign up for the double your paycheck drawing. ENTERTAINMENT NIGHTLY till Solomon Ouo DOUBLE YOUR PAYCHECK UP TO $500 OR WIN A TRIP FOR TWO 'LOC^I piyroll. p*ni
PAGE 16

I • 1 • • ^^>^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^w !• • Page 16 Henderson Home News Thursday, November 16, 1995 Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson Home News Page 17 Alystra: An everyday getaway Esther Lynn If it's been awhile since you have ventured out Sun set Road— past the soon-to-open Galleria shopping mall—heading toward Boulder Highway, you will be aniSzed by what's happened to the neighborhood. One of the additions is' the new Alystra Casino Restaurant. Open since Sept. 20, the attractive, Victorian-looking, bluewith-white-trim building sits on the south side of Sunset Road, just west of Boulder Highway. Alystra's current 20,000square-feet of interior space is made up of 15,000-square-feet of slots and live blackjack, the 24hour Grille House Restaurant, a sports bar and the Alystra Lounge. There is plenty of welllit parking and the property is completely wheelchair-accessible. The Grille House, seating approximately 130 people, includes a cozy fireplace. A reasonablypriced Continental menu offers complete breakfasts starting at $1.99, along with lunch and dinner items—such as old-fashioned pot roast, chicken Marsala, steaks, slow-roast chicken, short ribs, shrimp dishes, as well as primaveras and pastas. Carol Barclift, Food and Beverage manager, a Missouri transplant, said the restaurant offers daily specials —two at lunch and two at dinner—in addition to the regular menu. Some recent featured specials were liver and onions, chicken pot pie, beef tips over rice, and Champagne chicken with red grapes. A fresh loaf of homemade bread is included with dinners. The intimate sports bar has four television screens for easy viewing, as well as bar-top video poker machines for half-time play. The entertainment lounge currently features the Bill Solomon Duo, from 6 to 11 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday and from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. Friday and CALL 435-7700 WITH NEWS TIPS Saturday. They also have an 80" TV screen for viewing sporting events. Alystra General Manager Phil Rossi (no, he's not related to Steve, the singinghalf of the Allen & Rossi comedy team) states that expansion plans are already on the drawing board. Within the next two years, a 200-300 room hotel, along with banquet areas, retail shops, additional entertainment and gaming, including keno and sports book and, possibly, tennis facilities, will be built. The tennis part is probably inevitable, given the fact that Grand Victorian, Inc., dba Alystra Casino, is owned by real estate developer John Connors, brother of tennis great Jimmy Connors. John, whose headquarters are located in Illinois, is no novice when it comes to gaming. He is a pioneer in the Midwest Riverboat Casino, owning floating gambling establishments in Iowa, Louisiana, Missouri and his home state. Late next year in Indiana, Connors is scheduled to open the largest of the casinos on water. He is also the owner of Capper Jack's a land-based casino in Cripple Creek, Colo. He is also the developer/owner of the 96,000-square-foot King's Pointe Athletic and Tennis Club in Belleville, 111. Rossi calls Connors the best boss he has ever worked for, saying he has the highest level ofrespect for his employer. Rossi is no newcomer to the casino business. The Henderson family man takes great pride in the Alystra and its 165 friendly employees. Rossi said that happy workers make for happy customers and boasts he has the best staff around. Originally from Long Island, N.Y., the one-time Los Angeles studio musician previously worked for Harrah's and National Bible Sunday at First Henderson United Methodist First Henderson United Methodist Church will celebrate national Bible Sunday on Nov. 19 at both the 8 a.m. celebration and praise service and the 10:45 a.m. traditional worship service. The Sunday School Department will make presentations to various classes. Representatives from the Gideon Bible Society International will speak on the work of the society during and after worship services. Rev. Marvin R. Gant will preach at both services on "The Book: How the Bible came to be." The church is at 609 E. Horizon Drive in the Highland Hills area of Henderson. For more information, call the church, 565-6049. AlAShA MS VVLNDVVARD May 6,1996 7 days from ^972 Cruise imly Plus I'uri (/iijrx'CA. luxes and law mr add nn. \i i:\ic.\.\B\j\ 3 or 4 Days '*234 50 troni i(i5 Ahfelei'EnsmiJa'iCiinili'uii CniKe r'> 'Phi"' 'II'tMim 2 for 1 Round trip from Ft. Lauderdale Sky Princess Ciui\t only. Plus pttrt dutrgm. Hiies L()M)()\ HARROD-S SHOPPING Jan. 16 999 Rumdirip air • 5 ni$hi hotel slay • Cimlinenwl breakfast daily • Escorted i more Dfptinur/ bUfi not iiKlmitit i\Kii{iii:\\ SAVE 50% 7 days from Q^^f Western or Eastern Caribbean 'CruiseOnly Plus[xmcharge. air and taxes •Rith pt' i'tr\on. h:^tj:iti ,u<:il\i ri<< ii/>.;f!i i l'hi> Mies. Ctrtam daw & alher resinilions apply. DOMESTIC & INTERNATIONAL AIRFARES ^tljntj ,. ,...„......„. $1 S.S Uiistdn ;..,.4-,.—.yr"""-"~ J"*** Hur'tj \i>...>.,.l.„..t^J^/.i^ $47H (;harlotte .-..-,.-W.~..-.. $*">• (:im. jgo • ..^^,..,...f...„.^.. $15(1 I )ciri>ii.,.^,;„.;,.„,.i........ $Z6H l|jftf<.fd..,; .„.*:.;J $2.1H 1...UISMIIC-.'.-:"-' ilhs Mcmphu Miami Minnca|Kilis \c Orleans...„ • ;. .Nevi \uik —,.„ Niirfdik Orlando f'hil:i SaUm $1715 I „Jnn $.M() Jakarta S'il^ Harare $1770 Mns^.u f7VS Kiialal.iimpur $741 Jnhanncsburg $1640 I'lns ihM) Manila $757 Kilamarijafo $1.S40 Komc $ft0 SinKapofC $741 Lilongwe $1770 Stmkholm $7(K) Taipei $A.V? Lome $1,590 \icnna $68(1 Nairobi $1540 •ReanctioiH apply fat^ wb)Ki lo availabilit> ind may change iihoui notice Europe. Orient and Africi Winter Fiiti Oilier taxes nuv apply Limned ume only rklSIK.I IkAMI Travel Agency 5 LOCA TIONS IN HENDERSON 16 Addtlional Locations in Las Vegas 2839 GREEN VALLEY PKWY 898-0994 864 BOULDER HWY 695 N STEPHANIE .565-7797 454-2776 2651 WINDMILL PKWY 8)7ub tAbltHTJ AVh 897-8442 b')M17j CLOCK REPAIR 294-1U3 Phil Rossi Harvey's in Northern Nevada and at both Bally's and Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. Courtesy and customer service is of utmost importance to Rossi, who considers gaming another form of entertainment, and he wants the Alystra environment to convey that feeling. One of Alystra's customers photographed the tastefully landscaped property with a beautiful Southern Nevada rainbow in the background. The enlarged, matted photo sits in a prominent spot in Rossi's office. The gift to the casino notes, in a carefully handlettered inscription, 'The pot-of-gold at the end of the rainbow is at the Alystra." If guests feel that way about the property, obviously, they are doing something right. Yes, a Turkey Tree. November 16th 21st we'll have daily drawings to choose special Tom Turbeys from the "Turbey Tree." Your turkey could be worth big cash! Win up to '500. One Drawing Daily 8:15p.m. Five (5) ticbets will be drawn. All rules posted. MOVXbter St. Downtown Henderson Another Fine Boyd Gaming Property VANITY / LADIES WRITING DESK With hand beveled mirror & Price $1,149 SALE 4>574 • .' Most Credit Cards Accepted 8160 S. Eastern Ave. • 896-3888 Albertson's Plaza WiiKlniill at Eastern Boulder City Chamber of Commerce CHRISTMAS CALENDAR Theme: Children, the Miracle of Christmas JTRADHI^ CHRISTMAS TREE LIGHTING SAT. NOV. 25 Frank T. Crowe Park on Nevada Hwy. "ifetiL in Boulder City -T 7:00 P.M. Holiday Entertainment & Refreshments 'Y:r^ '^^f^^-^ Chris Mouse, Mrs, Santa, the Christmas Elves & Snowmen of various sizes FIGGIE PUDDING CONTEST Bring your pudding to be judged by 6pm and share the recipe PRIZES WILL BE AWARDED. Baskets will be available for food donations for the Boulder City Welfare Pantry. Food is needed for this holiday season canned & boxed goods also hams and turkeys can be frozen. • "^ Dress Warmly! Wear your hat & gloves and bring a blanket or chair! CHRISTMAS PARADE SATURDAY, DECEMBER 2 10:00 A.M. Santa's Party immediately following LUMINARIA FRIDAY, DECEMBER 8 7:00 BICENTENNIAL PARK Live re-enactment of the Nativity Entertainment and Refreshments For More Information Call Boulder City Chamber of Commerce 293-2034 PUBLISH: Novrmher 16,1995 HENDERSON HOME NEWS Poslrd: Wrdm-iiday, November 15, 1995 at (h( rollowini; location.^: City Hall, 240 Water Street Pillman Library, 1640 Price Street Emergency Services Facility, 223 I-ead Street Green Valley Library, 2797 Green Valley Parkway Community Ciillege tiTSouthern Nevada, Building A, 700 College Drive AGENDA Tuesday, November 21, 1995 6:45 p.m. .AGENDA ITEMS RECEIVED AFl RR firaJkP.M. ON NOVF.MBEH 9. 1995 WILL NOT BE SEEN ON THE AGEN DA AS PDRLlSH Ell. BtJT MAY APPEAR O.N THE AGENDA AS ADDED ITEMS OR ADDENDA. COMMITTEE MEETING HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL COUNCIL CHAMBER 240 WATER STREET NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES Members of the public who are disabled or require .special a.tsi.slance or accommodations at the meeting are requested to notify the City Clerk by telephoning (702) 565-2057 at least seventytwo hours in advance of the meeting. NOTE: ALL ITEMS ARE ACTK)N ITEMS UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED. Mayor re.serves the right to hear agenda items out of order. ... '' L CALL TO ORDER r :---^.S'r •r"'-:"^:": .:"'"': ''-"'' H. CONKIK.MATION OF POSTING in. ROLLCALL ; IV. ACCE1"TANCE OF AGENDA V. ITEMS OF BUSINF-SS C-1. BILL NO. 1270 ZOA-18-95 SKIRTS POOL (STORTS BOOKS) AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDER.SON AMEMJING TITLE 19 BY ADDIMJ DEFINITIONS AND REGULATIONS FOR SI"ORTS IH)OL(SIH)RTS BOOKS), AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO VI. ADJOURNMENTPUBLISH: November 16, 1995 HENDERSON HOME NEWS Posted: WediK-.sday, November 15, 1995 at the following locutions: City Hall, 240 Water .Street Pillman Library, 1640 Price Street Emergency Services Faiilily, 223 Lead Street (Jreen Valley Library, 2797 Green Valley Parkway Community College of Southern Nevada, Building A, 700 College Drive At; EN DA Tuesday, November 21,1995 7:00 p.m. A(;ENDA ITEM S RECEIVED AH ER S-.M) PM. ON .NOVEMBER 9.1995 APPEAR ON THE A(;ENDA A.S ADDED ITEMS OR ADDENTJA. RECJULAR MEETIM; COUNCIL CHAMBER HENI)ER.SON CITY COUNCIL 240 WATER STREET NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES Members of the public who are disuhli'd or require special a.ssistance or accommodations at the meeting are requested to notify the City d'lerk by teleplioiiing (702) 565-2057 at least seventytwo hours in advance of the meeting. NOTE: ALL ITEMS ARE ACTION ITEMS UNLF^SS OTHERWISE INDICATED. The .Vlayor reserves the right to hear agenda Items out of order. L CALL TO ORDER II. CONFIRMATION OK IHISTINC; III. ROLLCALL, IN'AOCATION, PLEIMJEOFALLEGIANCE IV. ACCEPTANCE OF A(;ENDA V. PRESENTATIONS PR-1. PRESENTATIONOPPORTUNITY V|LLA(;E Presentation by olTicers ofOpixirlunity Village regarding future activities in Henderscwi. VI. PUBLIC HEARINGS PH-2. CONTINX'ED PUBLIC HEARINtJ VAC-21-95 AMERICAN NEVADA Ct)RI>0 RATION Request lo vacate a ptirtion of Aqua Lane, Alba Vi.sta Drive, Valle Verde Drive, Puerto Way, and LakewiNid Drive in the Green Valley .South planning area. PH-3. PUBLIC HEARI.Nt; VAC-23-95 APPLICANT: THE LEANEY (;R<)UI' Request to vacate the soulheni ten feel of Newport Drive including spandrel areas from Racetrack Road tii Magic Way in the River Mountain planning area. PH-4. PUBLIC HEARING VAC-24-yS APPLICANT: RHODF^S DI-ISIGN & DEVELOPMENT Request to vacate ptirtiimv of right-of-way and public utility ea.semenLs along Crestway Drive, Debbie Road and Armory Drive in the McCullough Hills planning area. PH-5. PUBLIC HEARINt; VAC-25-y5 APPLICANT: PARDEE CONSTRUCTION CO. Request to vacate a portion of WestwiMid Village in the (Jreen Valley North planning area. PH-6. PUBLIC HEARING CPA-47-9S ARROYO (JRANDE SI-ORTS PLAZA APPLICANT: ZARCOR DEVELOPMENT Reque.st to amend the land use fnmi Light Industry/Busine.ss Park to Community and Neighborhood Shopping on 1.66 acres to develop a convenience .store with gasidim and liquor sales and a supper club generally located at the comer of Windmill Parkway and Arroyo Grande Boulevard in the Green Valley North planning area. PH-7. RESOLUTION CPA-47-95 ARROYO (JRANDE SI>ORTS PLAZA APPLICANT: ZARCOR DEVELOPMENT A RESOLLTIONOFTHECITYCOUNCILOFTHECITYOFHENDERSON, NEVADA, TO AMEND THE LAND USE POLICY PLAN OF THE CITY OF HENT)ER.SON COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FOR THE PURPOSE OF CHANGING THE LAM) USE DF-SIGNATION OF CERTAIN PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON DESCRIBED AS A PARCEL OF LAND Cf)NTAINING 1.66 ACRF.S. .MORE OR LKSS, AND DESCRIBED AS A WIRTION OF SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 22 SOLTH, RAN(;E 62 EA.ST, M.D.M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, raO.M LKJHT INDU.STRY/BUSINRSS PARK TO COM.MUNITY AND NEI(;HBORHOOD SHOPPING, LOCATED AT THE CORNER OF WINDMILL PARKWAY AM> ARROYO GRA.NDE BOULEVARD IN THE GREEN VALLEY NORTH PLANNINt; AREA. PH-8 PUBLIC HEARI.Nt; APPEAL AP-Il-95 Z-70-95 ARROYO GRANDE SPt)RTS PLAZA APPLICANT: ZARCOR DEVELOPMENT Review ofa retlassilUalion request from UR (Urban Reserve) district toCC (Community > Commercial)dist rid on 1.66 ac res to deveh>p a convenience store with gasoline and liquor sales and a supper club g.... rally located at the comer on 1.66 acres in a propipsed CC (Community Commercial) district at 2.34 N. Arroyo (;raiide Boulevard In the Green Valley North planning area. PH-10. PUBLIC HEARING APPEAL-AP-12-9S-PUD/TM-78-95-ARROYQGRANDE SPORTS PLAZA • •' • • -' .' • APPLICANT: ZARCOR DEVELOPMENT • • • • • • i • Review of • commercial subdivision cun.sisting of 1.66 acres in a pniposed CC (Community Commercial) district to develop a convenience store with gasoline and liquor sales and a supper club generally liK'aled at the corner of Windmill Park way and ArrnyuGk-ande Boulevard in the Green Valley North planning area PH-11. PUBLIC HEARI.NG CPA-48-9S ARROYO GRANDE 15 APPLICANT: BRODACK, ET AL Request to amend the land u.ve fnmi Medium Density Residential (\fl)R) to High Density Residential (HDR) on 15 acres Imated northwest of Arroyo Grande Boulevard and Stephanie Street in the Green Valley RaiH-h planning area. PH-12. RE.SOLUTION CPA-48-9S ARRt)YO (;RANDE IS ARESOLUTIONOFTHECITYCOUNCILOFTHECfFYOFHENDERSON.NEVADA, TO AMEND THE LAND USE POLICY PLAN OF THE CITY OF HENDER.SON COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FOR THE PURPOSE OF CHANGING THE LAND USE DESIGNATION OF CERTAIN PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDER.SON DESCRIBED AS A PARCEL OF LAND CONTAINING IS ACUES, MORE OR LE.S.S, AND DF-SCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP 22 SOLTH, RANGE 62 EA.ST, M.D.M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM MEDIUM DENSITY RF^SIDENTIAL (MDR)TO HIGH DENSITY RESIDENTIAL (HDR) LOCATED NORTHWFXT OF ARROYO GRANDE BOULEVARD AND STEPHANIE STREET IN THE GREEN VALLEY RANCH PLANNING AREA. VII. WATER ALLOCATIONS A. Exemptions Ratification of Administrative Approvals B. Stage 1, 2 and 3 Developments Ratirication of Administrative Approvals C. Stage 4 DevelopmenLs Hearing Requests D. Stage 5 DevelopmentsHearing Requests E. Late FilingsHearing Requests F. Negotiated Conlracti (Reduced Density > 20%) Hearing RequesU G. Master Planned CommunitiesHearing RequestJ H. Revocation Hearings I. Waiver of Pilii^ Deadline Requirement Hearingi J. ExtensionHearing Requests K. RHinquishments L Priority Lists Review (Second Council Meeting of Each Mnnlli) M. Conversion to Permanent Water VIII. CONSE.NT AGENDA UNLESS AN ITEM IS l-ULLED FX)R DISCUSSION, COUNCIL WILL TAKE ACTION ON CONSENT A(;EM)A ITEM NOS. 13 THROUGH 69 WITH ONE MOTION, ACCEPTING THE RECO.M.ME.NDATIONS AS .STATED ON THE AGENTM. TO PULL AN ITEM FOR DISCUSSION, PLEASE NOTIFY THE CITY CLERK BY PRESENTING A YELLOW SIGN-UP CARD BLESiM, COUNCIL TAKES ACTION ON THE CONSENT AGENDA. YELLOW SU;N-UP CARDS ARE AVAILABLE AT THE BACK OF THE COUNCIL CHAMBERS AND AT THE PODIUM. CA-13. CASH REQUIREMENTS REGISTER Cash Requimnenta Register. CA-14 MINUTES SPECIAL MEETING OF OCTOBER 4,1995 COMMITTEE AND REGULAR MEETING OF OCTOBER 17,1995 ^ „..>_ ^ Minvlei Special Meeting rf OcliAer 4, IV95 and Commillee and Regular Meetinc of CAIIS'AGVE^NT HENDERSON ALLIEDCOMMUNTTY ADVOCATES(HACA) • SENIOR CITIZEN HOUSING Atreraienl between the City of Httt4tnmm Md the Hendenwn AHM CaMmanMy Ailvacala for Low Income Hoinc Tin* FM* and CDBG fands for the aa|Mf Hydrology Review Fees. CA-26. BUD(;ET AUGMENTATION • FIRE DEPARTMENT APPROVE TUNNEL RESCUE TRAINING KAJIMA ENGINEERING AND CON.STRUCTION, INC. Budget augmentation forthe Fire Department for reimburiemenl from Kajima Engineering and Construction, Inc. for tuniwl rescue training. Account No. 01-2IM11-40.V>. CA-27. BUIM;ET AUGMENTATION PLANNING DEPARTMENT Budget augmentation for the llaniiing Department's Account No. 01 -0901-4020 to cover the cost for a lloater until the end of the fiscal year. CA-28. BUIM;ET AUGMENTATH)N USGS Augment the Public Works Expenditure Account No. 31 -31 -01 -6.300 for collet lions from Lake Las Vegas, Revenue Account No. 3I-(MMH)-3653. CA-29. BUIX;ET AUGMENTATION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT McCAW SCHtWL OF MINES PROJECT Budget augmentation in Fund 54 for the McCaw Schmtl of Mines Pniject CA-30. APJ'ORTIONMENT REW)RT AND RNAL ASSE.SSMENT ROLLAMENDMENT NO. 28 LID T.4 GREEN VALLEY RANCH, PHASE U, PARCEL 22 Apportionment Report and Final Assessment Roll, Amendment Number 28, LID T-4, Green Valley Ranch, Phase II, Parcel 22, dated October 25, 1995. CA-31. LID 862 LOT SPLIT REAPItlRTIONMENTS LID 862 lot split reapportionments. CA-32. AWARD OF BID NO. 107-95*96 -IS PA.SSENGER VAN Award of Rid No. 107-9596 for 15 passenger van. CA-33. AUTHORIZATION TO (;o TO BID VALLE VERDE DRIVE 16" WATER \UIN CONTRACT NO. 95-96*01 Authorization to go lo bid for Valle Verde Drive 16" water main. Contract No. 95-96*01. CA-34. AUTHORIZATION TO RECEIVE BIDS APACHE PLACE REPLACEMENT SEWER CONTRACT NO. 95-96*06 Authorization to receive bids for the Apache Place Replacement Sewer, Cvement District T.4 Project ADP-27, TCL-27a. CA-36. RATHT PAYMENT TO ANC, INC. • LID T-4 PROJECT ADP-30 TCL-.W Ratify payment to American Nevada Corporation, Inc. for reimbursement of acquisition costs relating lo Local Improvement Dislric-t T-4 Project ADP-30, TCL-30. CA-37. PURCHASE • TWO 2-WAY RADIOS TRAFFIC/STREETLI(;HTING PERSONNEL Allocate funds for the purchase of two-way radios for Traflic/Slreellighting personnel. CA.38. PAVEMENT CUT ARROYO GRANDE BLVD L. BRUCE NYBO/FALCON HOMES Pavement cut for Arroyo G rande Boulevard, sooth of Warm Sprincs Road, for the purpose of installing a waleriine and .sewer line for the proposed Tapatio II project. CA-39. DEFERRAL OF OFFSITES RUSSELL P. FRIEND -1432 ATHOL AVENUE Deferral of offsites for 1432 Athol Avenue for Russell P. Friend. CA-40. REVOCABLE PERMIT • STEPHANIE STREET LEWIS HOMES ReviH-able permit for occupancy of City of Henderson right-of-way for aci-ess lo and maintenance of five (5) feet of landscaping with City of Henderson rigbt-iJ-way along Stephanie Street adjacent lo Emerald Valley Nos. 1 and 3. CA-41. NAMING OFNEW HENDER.SON ANIMAL SHELTER WILLIAM ROBERT (BOB) HAMPTON ANIMAL SHELTER Name the new animal shelter as the William Robert (Bob) Hampton Animal Shelter. CA-42. DEDICATION OF RI(;HT-OF-WAY ARROWHEAD TRAIL Dedication of a 30.(M) fool wide strip right-of-way between Santa Ynez Avenue and Vista SereiHi Court for Arrowhead Trail, from Cily-TO,INC. Request for mini-stori^e caretaker's quarters and reduced parking in an K; ((;eneral Industrial) district, at .Stephanie Lane and I-SIS, in the Whitney Rantii planning area CA-54. AR-146.95 MINI .STORAGE APPLICANT: R-.STO. INC. Review of a proposed mini-storage cortsisting of 84,862 square feet on 2.4 acres in an Hi (General Industrial) district, at .Stephanie Lane and 1-5 IS, in the Whitney Ranch planning area. CA-SS. Z-71-94 LAKE MEAD AND MARYLAND PARKWAY APPLICANT: CITY OF HENT)ER.SON Reviewof a rrclassincation request from IG (General IndasI rial) district to IP(lndu.strial Park), CC(Cmmunity Commerxial),C.N(NetghborhcMMlCommercial). RM-10(Medium Density Residential), RS-6 (Single Family Residential), and PS (Public and .Semi-Public) districts and ^pruvd of a Master Development Plan (Keriay on 14tUI acres, hirated at Lake Mead Drive and Maryland Parkway, in the Westgate planning area. CA-56. V-50-95 VALLEY ALTONULL APPLICANT: A.F.H.C. Request to alkiw 12 fool front setback where 35 foot setback is reijuired, in a CA (Automall Commercial) district, at 3tlO Prte Findlay Road, in the (;ibsn Springs planning area. CA-S7. AR-150-95 VALLEY ALTt)MALL APPLICANT: A.F.H.C. W/CONDITIONS Review of a proposed administrative building consisting of 1,305 square feet on 5 acre* in a CA (Automall Commercial district, at 300 PHe Fbidlay Road, in the Gihson Springs planning area CA-5. PUD/TM-80.95 GREEN VALLEY RANCH PARCEL 41A APPLICANT: (;REEN VALLEY DEVELOPMENT LIMITED PARTNERSHIP Review of 96 h>ts on 19.2 acres in an RS-6-MP (Single Family Residential with Master DevelopmenI Itan OveHay) district, with a density of 4.8 dwelling units per acre, located south of Amargosa Power easement and east of Camrgie Drive, in the (;reen Valley Ranch planning area CA-59. U-94 95 PRIVATE SCHOOL APPLICANT: LAKE MEAD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY Reouest for ^>proval nf development regulalians and offstrert parUng for a privrir tehool hi a PStPaWic and .Sewi-PuKlk) district, located at 540 East Lake Mead Drive, in the Vrfley Virw plamang area CA-6. AR-174-95 PRIVATE SCH(K)L • APPLICANT: LAKE MEAD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY Review ofa proposed private schiMil consisting of 3.3,0(HI square feel on 5.6 acres in a PS (Public and Semi-Public)dislrict, liKuled at 540 East Lake .Mead Drive, in the Valley View planning area CA-61. Z-73.95 BOARDWALK ENTERPRISES APPLICANT: MICHAEL PEIKOFF PENSION PLAN Review ofa reclassification request from UR (Urban Reserve) district lo C.N (NeighborhiNid Commercial) district on 2.0 acres, generally liMjlid at the southwest corner of Windmill Parkway and Arroyo Grande Boulevard, in the Green Valley .South planning area. CA-62. U.96-9S ECO.NO LUBE APPLICANT: SAXTON, INC. • '.*. Request for quick oil change facility on .4 acre in 3 CC (Coniniunity Commercial) district, at 2610 Windmill Parkway, In the (;reen Valley North planning area. CA-63. AR-176-95 ECO.NO ELBE APPLICANT: SAXTON, INC. vV Review of a proposed quick oil change facility consisting of one lot on .4 acre in a CC (Community Commercial)district, at 2610 Windmill Parkway,in the (;reen Valley North planning area CA-64. U-97-95 BIG TYME FOt)D MART AND CAR WA.SH APPLICANT: .SAXTON, INC. Request to allow the sale of gasoline, packaged liquor/wim'/ciMjer and non-attended car wash in a CC (Community Coinmerdal) district, at 201 .North Pecos Road, in the Green Valley North planning area. CA.65. AR-177-95 • BIG TY.ME F(K)D MART AND CAR W ASH • APPLICANT: SAXTON, INC. V Review ofa prop isinn cuaslsling of 1.'6 Ids on .^3..' acres + with a density of 4.1 dwelling units per acre in an RS-6.MP (Single Kaniilv Kcsidcntial with Master Development Plan Overlay) district located south of .Seven Hills lloulcvard and Maryland Parkway in the Westgale planning area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOM.MENDED APPROVAL CONTINUED FROM NOVKMHKR 7, 1 Wl UB-79. FI.NAL .NUP FM-I22-95 PALANTINE HII.L-SKVEN Hll.l S PVRCEL C APPLICANT: DUR,\BLE HOMES. INC. Final .Map (F.M-122-95) for Palanline Hill, Seven Hills Parcel i;. 50 lots. 14.1 acres. UB-80. Z-.M-91 FOOTHILLS AT MacDONAI.I) RANCH APPLICA.NT: THE F(K)THILUS CORPORATION Discussion/AcliiMi: Request for an extension <,r time for Resolution of Inlciil No. 1628 (formerly 1465) for zone change fn.ni I'R-C; (I'rbaii Reser>c with Gaming Enterprise Overlay)dislrici to CN-G (Neiglib.prhood Commercial with Gaming Enlir|irisf Overiaj, CT-<;-MP(rourislConimertial wi(h t;aminK KiilerpriseO\ ). RS-2-(;-MP, RS-4-t;MP, RS-6-(;-.\IP(Single Family Residential ilh (;aniing Knii qiriseOvcriav 1. RM-K-GMP,RM-10-(;-MP (Medium De/isity Risidtiitijl wilh (;aiiiint: Knterprisi ( )stHj>) and 0S-(;-.MP(OpenSpace wilh(;ainingEnlerprisi(>verla> idislricts.as jdcsi(;iialfI)tMlopmFTRANSPOkTATU>N INS I ALL AND .MAINTAIN BUS SHELTERS AND BENCHES A RESOLLTION OF THE CITY CtH N( II. OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON TO E.NTERI.NTOANINTERLOCALC(K)l'KkATI\KAi;RKEMEVrwnHTHK.STATE OF NEVADA DEPARTMENT" OF TRANSl'ORIATION Ft)R PER.MISSION Tt) INSTALL AND MAI.NTAIN BCS SHELTERS AND HENCHh:S WITHIN .STATE RU;H Tt)F-W AY, AND OTHER NUTTERS REI.A I KD THERETO. NB-85. RRSOIXTION PERMANENT KASK.MENTS CONSTRl ( TION OF THE WATER TRANSMLSSION MAIN AND THE SOlTIIWK.ST HINDI K.soN IMERCEITt)R SEWER A RE.S0LIT10N OF THE CrrVlCt)l NCIL OF THE CM V OF HENDERSON STATI.NGTHEPUBLICNEEDANDNECF.SSITVTOOHTAINPIRMANKNI EASEMENTS FOR THE CON.STRUCTION t)F THE WATER TRANSMISSION M MNAND THE SOLTHWI'IST HENDER.SON INTERCEITOR SEWER WITH SEI'AkATK TEMIt)RARY CON.STRUCTION I':ASEMENTS FOR THE Dl RATION OF THE CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS; AND OTHER MATIIRS REI.ATKD THERETO. NB 86. RtSOLLTION Z-73-95 • BOARDWALK ENTERPRISES A RESOLUTION t)F THE CITY COLNCIL OF THE CUV OF HENDERSON COMMITTLN(;THECITY COUNCIL TO REZONE CERTAIN PROPER r\ WIIHIVTHE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDER.SON. DESCklKKD AS A ItiRTlON OF SECTION 16,TOWNSHIP22.SOnH,R.\Nt;EA2F.A.sr.M.D.B&M..l LARKCOINTV. NEVADA, FRO.M UR (URBAN RF.SEKVK) DLSTRICT TO t N (NEK.MKORHtMH) COM.MERCIAL) DISTRICT, t;ENERALLY LOCATED AT THE SIUTHHIXST CORNER OF WINDMILL PARKWAY AND ARROYO (5R WDE Bol I KVARD. IN THE (;REEN VALLEY SOLTH PLANNINt; AREA. NB-87. BILLM). 1271 ZOA-19.95 VKTERINAR^ HOSPITAUS AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY CtRNCII. OF THE CIT^ OF HENDER.SON AMENDI.NG TITLE 190FTHE HENDER.SON Ml Nit ll'AL CODE HV AMENDINt; THE LAND USE RE(;ULATU)NS FOR VCTERINAKV HOSPITAl-S IN CERTAIN COM.MERCIAL Zt)NE.S, AND OTHER MATTERS RKI ATKI) THERKTl). (REFER Tt) CO.M.MITTEE MEETINt; OF DECEMBER 5, 1>"<5 FOR REVIEW ANT) RECO.MMENDATH)N) NB-88. BILL NO. 1272 Z-2-92 • R. V. JONF-S CORP. AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY Ct)UNCIL t)F THE CITY OF HENDERSON AMENDINt; ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY AMENDINt; THE /ONINt; MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS tF HENDER.St).N.l)l>CRIBEI)ASAPORTU)NOFSECTION 13, TOWNSHIP22 SOLTH. RA.NGE 61 EAST. M.D.B.AM.. CLARK COUNTY. NEVADA. FROM I R (URBAN RESERVE) DISTRICT TO RM-12 (MEI)ll M DENSITY RESIDENTIAL). DISTRICT ANDTt>REPF:ALRESOLlTIONOF INTENT NO. 1558IN ITS ENTIRETY. UK ATED SfKTHWEST OF WINDMILL PARKWAY AND PECOS ROAD IN THE <;REEN VALLEY .St)UTH PLANNINt; AREA, AND OTHER .MATTERS RELATINt; tHERETO. (REFTR TO COMMITTEE MEFTINt; OF DECEMBER 5. 1995 M)R REVIEW AND RECOMMENDATION) XL CITIZEN'S Ct)NCERNS XII. SET MEETING XIII. ADJOURNMENT All items for inclusion tm Ihe Cwmil Agenda for the Meeting of December 5, 1995, must be suhmilled. in writing, no later than Thur^sy. Novemhrr 22, 1995 at 5:.W pja. to the City Clerk's olTk-r. Any Rrais m-rived aDer tkr abfive dale will aulimatis-aliy be placed on the nrxl City CiHincil .Agenda. H—Nov. 16, 1995

PAGE 17

I • 1 • • ^^>^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^w !• • Page 16 Henderson Home News Thursday, November 16, 1995 Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson Home News Page 17 Alystra: An everyday getaway Esther Lynn If it's been awhile since you have ventured out Sun set Road— past the soon-to-open Galleria shopping mall—heading toward Boulder Highway, you will be aniSzed by what's happened to the neighborhood. One of the additions is' the new Alystra Casino Restaurant. Open since Sept. 20, the attractive, Victorian-looking, bluewith-white-trim building sits on the south side of Sunset Road, just west of Boulder Highway. Alystra's current 20,000square-feet of interior space is made up of 15,000-square-feet of slots and live blackjack, the 24hour Grille House Restaurant, a sports bar and the Alystra Lounge. There is plenty of welllit parking and the property is completely wheelchair-accessible. The Grille House, seating approximately 130 people, includes a cozy fireplace. A reasonablypriced Continental menu offers complete breakfasts starting at $1.99, along with lunch and dinner items—such as old-fashioned pot roast, chicken Marsala, steaks, slow-roast chicken, short ribs, shrimp dishes, as well as primaveras and pastas. Carol Barclift, Food and Beverage manager, a Missouri transplant, said the restaurant offers daily specials —two at lunch and two at dinner—in addition to the regular menu. Some recent featured specials were liver and onions, chicken pot pie, beef tips over rice, and Champagne chicken with red grapes. A fresh loaf of homemade bread is included with dinners. The intimate sports bar has four television screens for easy viewing, as well as bar-top video poker machines for half-time play. The entertainment lounge currently features the Bill Solomon Duo, from 6 to 11 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday and from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. Friday and CALL 435-7700 WITH NEWS TIPS Saturday. They also have an 80" TV screen for viewing sporting events. Alystra General Manager Phil Rossi (no, he's not related to Steve, the singinghalf of the Allen & Rossi comedy team) states that expansion plans are already on the drawing board. Within the next two years, a 200-300 room hotel, along with banquet areas, retail shops, additional entertainment and gaming, including keno and sports book and, possibly, tennis facilities, will be built. The tennis part is probably inevitable, given the fact that Grand Victorian, Inc., dba Alystra Casino, is owned by real estate developer John Connors, brother of tennis great Jimmy Connors. John, whose headquarters are located in Illinois, is no novice when it comes to gaming. He is a pioneer in the Midwest Riverboat Casino, owning floating gambling establishments in Iowa, Louisiana, Missouri and his home state. Late next year in Indiana, Connors is scheduled to open the largest of the casinos on water. He is also the owner of Capper Jack's a land-based casino in Cripple Creek, Colo. He is also the developer/owner of the 96,000-square-foot King's Pointe Athletic and Tennis Club in Belleville, 111. Rossi calls Connors the best boss he has ever worked for, saying he has the highest level ofrespect for his employer. Rossi is no newcomer to the casino business. The Henderson family man takes great pride in the Alystra and its 165 friendly employees. Rossi said that happy workers make for happy customers and boasts he has the best staff around. Originally from Long Island, N.Y., the one-time Los Angeles studio musician previously worked for Harrah's and National Bible Sunday at First Henderson United Methodist First Henderson United Methodist Church will celebrate national Bible Sunday on Nov. 19 at both the 8 a.m. celebration and praise service and the 10:45 a.m. traditional worship service. The Sunday School Department will make presentations to various classes. Representatives from the Gideon Bible Society International will speak on the work of the society during and after worship services. Rev. Marvin R. Gant will preach at both services on "The Book: How the Bible came to be." The church is at 609 E. Horizon Drive in the Highland Hills area of Henderson. For more information, call the church, 565-6049. AlAShA MS VVLNDVVARD May 6,1996 7 days from ^972 Cruise imly Plus I'uri (/iijrx'CA. luxes and law mr add nn. \i i:\ic.\.\B\j\ 3 or 4 Days '*234 50 troni i(i5 Ahfelei'EnsmiJa'iCiinili'uii CniKe r'> 'Phi"' 'II'tMim 2 for 1 Round trip from Ft. Lauderdale Sky Princess Ciui\t only. Plus pttrt dutrgm. Hiies L()M)()\ HARROD-S SHOPPING Jan. 16 999 Rumdirip air • 5 ni$hi hotel slay • Cimlinenwl breakfast daily • Escorted i more Dfptinur/ bUfi not iiKlmitit i\Kii{iii:\\ SAVE 50% 7 days from Q^^f Western or Eastern Caribbean 'CruiseOnly Plus[xmcharge. air and taxes •Rith pt' i'tr\on. h:^tj:iti ,u<:il\i ri<< ii/>.;f!i i l'hi> Mies. Ctrtam daw & alher resinilions apply. DOMESTIC & INTERNATIONAL AIRFARES ^tljntj ,. ,...„......„. $1 S.S Uiistdn ;..,.4-,.—.yr"""-"~ J"*** Hur'tj \i>...>.,.l.„..t^J^/.i^ $47H (;harlotte .-..-,.-W.~..-.. $*">• (:im. jgo • ..^^,..,...f...„.^.. $15(1 I )ciri>ii.,.^,;„.;,.„,.i........ $Z6H l|jftf<.fd..,; .„.*:.;J $2.1H 1...UISMIIC-.'.-:"-' ilhs Mcmphu Miami Minnca|Kilis \c Orleans...„ • ;. .Nevi \uik —,.„ Niirfdik Orlando f'hil:i SaUm $1715 I „Jnn $.M() Jakarta S'il^ Harare $1770 Mns^.u f7VS Kiialal.iimpur $741 Jnhanncsburg $1640 I'lns ihM) Manila $757 Kilamarijafo $1.S40 Komc $ft0 SinKapofC $741 Lilongwe $1770 Stmkholm $7(K) Taipei $A.V? Lome $1,590 \icnna $68(1 Nairobi $1540 •ReanctioiH apply fat^ wb)Ki lo availabilit> ind may change iihoui notice Europe. Orient and Africi Winter Fiiti Oilier taxes nuv apply Limned ume only rklSIK.I IkAMI Travel Agency 5 LOCA TIONS IN HENDERSON 16 Addtlional Locations in Las Vegas 2839 GREEN VALLEY PKWY 898-0994 864 BOULDER HWY 695 N STEPHANIE .565-7797 454-2776 2651 WINDMILL PKWY 8)7ub tAbltHTJ AVh 897-8442 b')M17j CLOCK REPAIR 294-1U3 Phil Rossi Harvey's in Northern Nevada and at both Bally's and Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. Courtesy and customer service is of utmost importance to Rossi, who considers gaming another form of entertainment, and he wants the Alystra environment to convey that feeling. One of Alystra's customers photographed the tastefully landscaped property with a beautiful Southern Nevada rainbow in the background. The enlarged, matted photo sits in a prominent spot in Rossi's office. The gift to the casino notes, in a carefully handlettered inscription, 'The pot-of-gold at the end of the rainbow is at the Alystra." If guests feel that way about the property, obviously, they are doing something right. Yes, a Turkey Tree. November 16th 21st we'll have daily drawings to choose special Tom Turbeys from the "Turbey Tree." Your turkey could be worth big cash! Win up to '500. One Drawing Daily 8:15p.m. Five (5) ticbets will be drawn. All rules posted. MOVXbter St. Downtown Henderson Another Fine Boyd Gaming Property VANITY / LADIES WRITING DESK With hand beveled mirror & Price $1,149 SALE 4>574 • .' Most Credit Cards Accepted 8160 S. Eastern Ave. • 896-3888 Albertson's Plaza WiiKlniill at Eastern Boulder City Chamber of Commerce CHRISTMAS CALENDAR Theme: Children, the Miracle of Christmas JTRADHI^ CHRISTMAS TREE LIGHTING SAT. NOV. 25 Frank T. Crowe Park on Nevada Hwy. "ifetiL in Boulder City -T 7:00 P.M. Holiday Entertainment & Refreshments 'Y:r^ '^^f^^-^ Chris Mouse, Mrs, Santa, the Christmas Elves & Snowmen of various sizes FIGGIE PUDDING CONTEST Bring your pudding to be judged by 6pm and share the recipe PRIZES WILL BE AWARDED. Baskets will be available for food donations for the Boulder City Welfare Pantry. Food is needed for this holiday season canned & boxed goods also hams and turkeys can be frozen. • "^ Dress Warmly! Wear your hat & gloves and bring a blanket or chair! CHRISTMAS PARADE SATURDAY, DECEMBER 2 10:00 A.M. Santa's Party immediately following LUMINARIA FRIDAY, DECEMBER 8 7:00 BICENTENNIAL PARK Live re-enactment of the Nativity Entertainment and Refreshments For More Information Call Boulder City Chamber of Commerce 293-2034 PUBLISH: Novrmher 16,1995 HENDERSON HOME NEWS Poslrd: Wrdm-iiday, November 15, 1995 at (h( rollowini; location.^: City Hall, 240 Water Street Pillman Library, 1640 Price Street Emergency Services Facility, 223 I-ead Street Green Valley Library, 2797 Green Valley Parkway Community Ciillege tiTSouthern Nevada, Building A, 700 College Drive AGENDA Tuesday, November 21, 1995 6:45 p.m. .AGENDA ITEMS RECEIVED AFl RR firaJkP.M. ON NOVF.MBEH 9. 1995 WILL NOT BE SEEN ON THE AGEN DA AS PDRLlSH Ell. BtJT MAY APPEAR O.N THE AGENDA AS ADDED ITEMS OR ADDENDA. COMMITTEE MEETING HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL COUNCIL CHAMBER 240 WATER STREET NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES Members of the public who are disabled or require .special a.tsi.slance or accommodations at the meeting are requested to notify the City Clerk by telephoning (702) 565-2057 at least seventytwo hours in advance of the meeting. NOTE: ALL ITEMS ARE ACTK)N ITEMS UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED. Mayor re.serves the right to hear agenda items out of order. ... '' L CALL TO ORDER r :---^.S'r •r"'-:"^:": .:"'"': ''-"'' H. CONKIK.MATION OF POSTING in. ROLLCALL ; IV. ACCE1"TANCE OF AGENDA V. ITEMS OF BUSINF-SS C-1. BILL NO. 1270 ZOA-18-95 SKIRTS POOL (STORTS BOOKS) AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDER.SON AMEMJING TITLE 19 BY ADDIMJ DEFINITIONS AND REGULATIONS FOR SI"ORTS IH)OL(SIH)RTS BOOKS), AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO VI. ADJOURNMENTPUBLISH: November 16, 1995 HENDERSON HOME NEWS Posted: WediK-.sday, November 15, 1995 at the following locutions: City Hall, 240 Water .Street Pillman Library, 1640 Price Street Emergency Services Faiilily, 223 Lead Street (Jreen Valley Library, 2797 Green Valley Parkway Community College of Southern Nevada, Building A, 700 College Drive At; EN DA Tuesday, November 21,1995 7:00 p.m. A(;ENDA ITEM S RECEIVED AH ER S-.M) PM. ON .NOVEMBER 9.1995 APPEAR ON THE A(;ENDA A.S ADDED ITEMS OR ADDENTJA. RECJULAR MEETIM; COUNCIL CHAMBER HENI)ER.SON CITY COUNCIL 240 WATER STREET NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES Members of the public who are disuhli'd or require special a.ssistance or accommodations at the meeting are requested to notify the City d'lerk by teleplioiiing (702) 565-2057 at least seventytwo hours in advance of the meeting. NOTE: ALL ITEMS ARE ACTION ITEMS UNLF^SS OTHERWISE INDICATED. The .Vlayor reserves the right to hear agenda Items out of order. L CALL TO ORDER II. CONFIRMATION OK IHISTINC; III. ROLLCALL, IN'AOCATION, PLEIMJEOFALLEGIANCE IV. ACCEPTANCE OF A(;ENDA V. PRESENTATIONS PR-1. PRESENTATIONOPPORTUNITY V|LLA(;E Presentation by olTicers ofOpixirlunity Village regarding future activities in Henderscwi. VI. PUBLIC HEARINGS PH-2. CONTINX'ED PUBLIC HEARINtJ VAC-21-95 AMERICAN NEVADA Ct)RI>0 RATION Request lo vacate a ptirtion of Aqua Lane, Alba Vi.sta Drive, Valle Verde Drive, Puerto Way, and LakewiNid Drive in the Green Valley .South planning area. PH-3. PUBLIC HEARI.Nt; VAC-23-95 APPLICANT: THE LEANEY (;R<)UI' Request to vacate the soulheni ten feel of Newport Drive including spandrel areas from Racetrack Road tii Magic Way in the River Mountain planning area. PH-4. PUBLIC HEARING VAC-24-yS APPLICANT: RHODF^S DI-ISIGN & DEVELOPMENT Request to vacate ptirtiimv of right-of-way and public utility ea.semenLs along Crestway Drive, Debbie Road and Armory Drive in the McCullough Hills planning area. PH-5. PUBLIC HEARINt; VAC-25-y5 APPLICANT: PARDEE CONSTRUCTION CO. Request to vacate a portion of WestwiMid Village in the (Jreen Valley North planning area. PH-6. PUBLIC HEARING CPA-47-9S ARROYO (JRANDE SI-ORTS PLAZA APPLICANT: ZARCOR DEVELOPMENT Reque.st to amend the land use fnmi Light Industry/Busine.ss Park to Community and Neighborhood Shopping on 1.66 acres to develop a convenience .store with gasidim and liquor sales and a supper club generally located at the comer of Windmill Parkway and Arroyo Grande Boulevard in the Green Valley North planning area. PH-7. RESOLUTION CPA-47-95 ARROYO (JRANDE SI>ORTS PLAZA APPLICANT: ZARCOR DEVELOPMENT A RESOLLTIONOFTHECITYCOUNCILOFTHECITYOFHENDERSON, NEVADA, TO AMEND THE LAND USE POLICY PLAN OF THE CITY OF HENT)ER.SON COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FOR THE PURPOSE OF CHANGING THE LAM) USE DF-SIGNATION OF CERTAIN PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON DESCRIBED AS A PARCEL OF LAND Cf)NTAINING 1.66 ACRF.S. .MORE OR LKSS, AND DESCRIBED AS A WIRTION OF SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 22 SOLTH, RAN(;E 62 EA.ST, M.D.M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, raO.M LKJHT INDU.STRY/BUSINRSS PARK TO COM.MUNITY AND NEI(;HBORHOOD SHOPPING, LOCATED AT THE CORNER OF WINDMILL PARKWAY AM> ARROYO GRA.NDE BOULEVARD IN THE GREEN VALLEY NORTH PLANNINt; AREA. PH-8 PUBLIC HEARI.Nt; APPEAL AP-Il-95 Z-70-95 ARROYO GRANDE SPt)RTS PLAZA APPLICANT: ZARCOR DEVELOPMENT Review ofa retlassilUalion request from UR (Urban Reserve) district toCC (Community > Commercial)dist rid on 1.66 ac res to deveh>p a convenience store with gasoline and liquor sales and a supper club g.... rally located at the comer on 1.66 acres in a propipsed CC (Community Commercial) district at 2.34 N. Arroyo (;raiide Boulevard In the Green Valley North planning area. PH-10. PUBLIC HEARING APPEAL-AP-12-9S-PUD/TM-78-95-ARROYQGRANDE SPORTS PLAZA • •' • • -' .' • APPLICANT: ZARCOR DEVELOPMENT • • • • • • i • Review of • commercial subdivision cun.sisting of 1.66 acres in a pniposed CC (Community Commercial) district to develop a convenience store with gasoline and liquor sales and a supper club generally liK'aled at the corner of Windmill Park way and ArrnyuGk-ande Boulevard in the Green Valley North planning area PH-11. PUBLIC HEARI.NG CPA-48-9S ARROYO GRANDE 15 APPLICANT: BRODACK, ET AL Request to amend the land u.ve fnmi Medium Density Residential (\fl)R) to High Density Residential (HDR) on 15 acres Imated northwest of Arroyo Grande Boulevard and Stephanie Street in the Green Valley RaiH-h planning area. PH-12. RE.SOLUTION CPA-48-9S ARRt)YO (;RANDE IS ARESOLUTIONOFTHECITYCOUNCILOFTHECfFYOFHENDERSON.NEVADA, TO AMEND THE LAND USE POLICY PLAN OF THE CITY OF HENDER.SON COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FOR THE PURPOSE OF CHANGING THE LAND USE DESIGNATION OF CERTAIN PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDER.SON DESCRIBED AS A PARCEL OF LAND CONTAINING IS ACUES, MORE OR LE.S.S, AND DF-SCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP 22 SOLTH, RANGE 62 EA.ST, M.D.M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM MEDIUM DENSITY RF^SIDENTIAL (MDR)TO HIGH DENSITY RESIDENTIAL (HDR) LOCATED NORTHWFXT OF ARROYO GRANDE BOULEVARD AND STEPHANIE STREET IN THE GREEN VALLEY RANCH PLANNING AREA. VII. WATER ALLOCATIONS A. Exemptions Ratification of Administrative Approvals B. Stage 1, 2 and 3 Developments Ratirication of Administrative Approvals C. Stage 4 DevelopmenLs Hearing Requests D. Stage 5 DevelopmentsHearing Requests E. Late FilingsHearing Requests F. Negotiated Conlracti (Reduced Density > 20%) Hearing RequesU G. Master Planned CommunitiesHearing RequestJ H. Revocation Hearings I. Waiver of Pilii^ Deadline Requirement Hearingi J. ExtensionHearing Requests K. RHinquishments L Priority Lists Review (Second Council Meeting of Each Mnnlli) M. Conversion to Permanent Water VIII. CONSE.NT AGENDA UNLESS AN ITEM IS l-ULLED FX)R DISCUSSION, COUNCIL WILL TAKE ACTION ON CONSENT A(;EM)A ITEM NOS. 13 THROUGH 69 WITH ONE MOTION, ACCEPTING THE RECO.M.ME.NDATIONS AS .STATED ON THE AGENTM. TO PULL AN ITEM FOR DISCUSSION, PLEASE NOTIFY THE CITY CLERK BY PRESENTING A YELLOW SIGN-UP CARD BLESiM, COUNCIL TAKES ACTION ON THE CONSENT AGENDA. YELLOW SU;N-UP CARDS ARE AVAILABLE AT THE BACK OF THE COUNCIL CHAMBERS AND AT THE PODIUM. CA-13. CASH REQUIREMENTS REGISTER Cash Requimnenta Register. CA-14 MINUTES SPECIAL MEETING OF OCTOBER 4,1995 COMMITTEE AND REGULAR MEETING OF OCTOBER 17,1995 ^ „..>_ ^ Minvlei Special Meeting rf OcliAer 4, IV95 and Commillee and Regular Meetinc of CAIIS'AGVE^NT HENDERSON ALLIEDCOMMUNTTY ADVOCATES(HACA) • SENIOR CITIZEN HOUSING Atreraienl between the City of Httt4tnmm Md the Hendenwn AHM CaMmanMy Ailvacala for Low Income Hoinc Tin* FM* and CDBG fands for the aa|Mf Hydrology Review Fees. CA-26. BUD(;ET AUGMENTATION • FIRE DEPARTMENT APPROVE TUNNEL RESCUE TRAINING KAJIMA ENGINEERING AND CON.STRUCTION, INC. Budget augmentation forthe Fire Department for reimburiemenl from Kajima Engineering and Construction, Inc. for tuniwl rescue training. Account No. 01-2IM11-40.V>. CA-27. BUIM;ET AUGMENTATION PLANNING DEPARTMENT Budget augmentation for the llaniiing Department's Account No. 01 -0901-4020 to cover the cost for a lloater until the end of the fiscal year. CA-28. BUIM;ET AUGMENTATH)N USGS Augment the Public Works Expenditure Account No. 31 -31 -01 -6.300 for collet lions from Lake Las Vegas, Revenue Account No. 3I-(MMH)-3653. CA-29. BUIX;ET AUGMENTATION ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT McCAW SCHtWL OF MINES PROJECT Budget augmentation in Fund 54 for the McCaw Schmtl of Mines Pniject CA-30. APJ'ORTIONMENT REW)RT AND RNAL ASSE.SSMENT ROLLAMENDMENT NO. 28 LID T.4 GREEN VALLEY RANCH, PHASE U, PARCEL 22 Apportionment Report and Final Assessment Roll, Amendment Number 28, LID T-4, Green Valley Ranch, Phase II, Parcel 22, dated October 25, 1995. CA-31. LID 862 LOT SPLIT REAPItlRTIONMENTS LID 862 lot split reapportionments. CA-32. AWARD OF BID NO. 107-95*96 -IS PA.SSENGER VAN Award of Rid No. 107-9596 for 15 passenger van. CA-33. AUTHORIZATION TO (;o TO BID VALLE VERDE DRIVE 16" WATER \UIN CONTRACT NO. 95-96*01 Authorization to go lo bid for Valle Verde Drive 16" water main. Contract No. 95-96*01. CA-34. AUTHORIZATION TO RECEIVE BIDS APACHE PLACE REPLACEMENT SEWER CONTRACT NO. 95-96*06 Authorization to receive bids for the Apache Place Replacement Sewer, Cvement District T.4 Project ADP-27, TCL-27a. CA-36. RATHT PAYMENT TO ANC, INC. • LID T-4 PROJECT ADP-30 TCL-.W Ratify payment to American Nevada Corporation, Inc. for reimbursement of acquisition costs relating lo Local Improvement Dislric-t T-4 Project ADP-30, TCL-30. CA-37. PURCHASE • TWO 2-WAY RADIOS TRAFFIC/STREETLI(;HTING PERSONNEL Allocate funds for the purchase of two-way radios for Traflic/Slreellighting personnel. CA.38. PAVEMENT CUT ARROYO GRANDE BLVD L. BRUCE NYBO/FALCON HOMES Pavement cut for Arroyo G rande Boulevard, sooth of Warm Sprincs Road, for the purpose of installing a waleriine and .sewer line for the proposed Tapatio II project. CA-39. DEFERRAL OF OFFSITES RUSSELL P. FRIEND -1432 ATHOL AVENUE Deferral of offsites for 1432 Athol Avenue for Russell P. Friend. CA-40. REVOCABLE PERMIT • STEPHANIE STREET LEWIS HOMES ReviH-able permit for occupancy of City of Henderson right-of-way for aci-ess lo and maintenance of five (5) feet of landscaping with City of Henderson rigbt-iJ-way along Stephanie Street adjacent lo Emerald Valley Nos. 1 and 3. CA-41. NAMING OFNEW HENDER.SON ANIMAL SHELTER WILLIAM ROBERT (BOB) HAMPTON ANIMAL SHELTER Name the new animal shelter as the William Robert (Bob) Hampton Animal Shelter. CA-42. DEDICATION OF RI(;HT-OF-WAY ARROWHEAD TRAIL Dedication of a 30.(M) fool wide strip right-of-way between Santa Ynez Avenue and Vista SereiHi Court for Arrowhead Trail, from Cily-TO,INC. Request for mini-stori^e caretaker's quarters and reduced parking in an K; ((;eneral Industrial) district, at .Stephanie Lane and I-SIS, in the Whitney Rantii planning area CA-54. AR-146.95 MINI .STORAGE APPLICANT: R-.STO. INC. Review of a proposed mini-storage cortsisting of 84,862 square feet on 2.4 acres in an Hi (General Industrial) district, at .Stephanie Lane and 1-5 IS, in the Whitney Ranch planning area. CA-SS. Z-71-94 LAKE MEAD AND MARYLAND PARKWAY APPLICANT: CITY OF HENT)ER.SON Reviewof a rrclassincation request from IG (General IndasI rial) district to IP(lndu.strial Park), CC(Cmmunity Commerxial),C.N(NetghborhcMMlCommercial). RM-10(Medium Density Residential), RS-6 (Single Family Residential), and PS (Public and .Semi-Public) districts and ^pruvd of a Master Development Plan (Keriay on 14tUI acres, hirated at Lake Mead Drive and Maryland Parkway, in the Westgate planning area. CA-56. V-50-95 VALLEY ALTONULL APPLICANT: A.F.H.C. Request to alkiw 12 fool front setback where 35 foot setback is reijuired, in a CA (Automall Commercial) district, at 3tlO Prte Findlay Road, in the (;ibsn Springs planning area. CA-S7. AR-150-95 VALLEY ALTt)MALL APPLICANT: A.F.H.C. W/CONDITIONS Review of a proposed administrative building consisting of 1,305 square feet on 5 acre* in a CA (Automall Commercial district, at 300 PHe Fbidlay Road, in the Gihson Springs planning area CA-5. PUD/TM-80.95 GREEN VALLEY RANCH PARCEL 41A APPLICANT: (;REEN VALLEY DEVELOPMENT LIMITED PARTNERSHIP Review of 96 h>ts on 19.2 acres in an RS-6-MP (Single Family Residential with Master DevelopmenI Itan OveHay) district, with a density of 4.8 dwelling units per acre, located south of Amargosa Power easement and east of Camrgie Drive, in the (;reen Valley Ranch planning area CA-59. U-94 95 PRIVATE SCHOOL APPLICANT: LAKE MEAD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY Reouest for ^>proval nf development regulalians and offstrert parUng for a privrir tehool hi a PStPaWic and .Sewi-PuKlk) district, located at 540 East Lake Mead Drive, in the Vrfley Virw plamang area CA-6. AR-174-95 PRIVATE SCH(K)L • APPLICANT: LAKE MEAD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY Review ofa proposed private schiMil consisting of 3.3,0(HI square feel on 5.6 acres in a PS (Public and Semi-Public)dislrict, liKuled at 540 East Lake .Mead Drive, in the Valley View planning area CA-61. Z-73.95 BOARDWALK ENTERPRISES APPLICANT: MICHAEL PEIKOFF PENSION PLAN Review ofa reclassification request from UR (Urban Reserve) district lo C.N (NeighborhiNid Commercial) district on 2.0 acres, generally liMjlid at the southwest corner of Windmill Parkway and Arroyo Grande Boulevard, in the Green Valley .South planning area. CA-62. U.96-9S ECO.NO LUBE APPLICANT: SAXTON, INC. • '.*. Request for quick oil change facility on .4 acre in 3 CC (Coniniunity Commercial) district, at 2610 Windmill Parkway, In the (;reen Valley North planning area. CA-63. AR-176-95 ECO.NO ELBE APPLICANT: SAXTON, INC. vV Review of a proposed quick oil change facility consisting of one lot on .4 acre in a CC (Community Commercial)district, at 2610 Windmill Parkway,in the (;reen Valley North planning area CA-64. U-97-95 BIG TYME FOt)D MART AND CAR WA.SH APPLICANT: .SAXTON, INC. Request to allow the sale of gasoline, packaged liquor/wim'/ciMjer and non-attended car wash in a CC (Community Coinmerdal) district, at 201 .North Pecos Road, in the Green Valley North planning area. CA.65. AR-177-95 • BIG TY.ME F(K)D MART AND CAR W ASH • APPLICANT: SAXTON, INC. V Review ofa prop isinn cuaslsling of 1.'6 Ids on .^3..' acres + with a density of 4.1 dwelling units per acre in an RS-6.MP (Single Kaniilv Kcsidcntial with Master Development Plan Overlay) district located south of .Seven Hills lloulcvard and Maryland Parkway in the Westgale planning area. (PLANNING COMMISSION RECOM.MENDED APPROVAL CONTINUED FROM NOVKMHKR 7, 1 Wl UB-79. FI.NAL .NUP FM-I22-95 PALANTINE HII.L-SKVEN Hll.l S PVRCEL C APPLICANT: DUR,\BLE HOMES. INC. Final .Map (F.M-122-95) for Palanline Hill, Seven Hills Parcel i;. 50 lots. 14.1 acres. UB-80. Z-.M-91 FOOTHILLS AT MacDONAI.I) RANCH APPLICA.NT: THE F(K)THILUS CORPORATION Discussion/AcliiMi: Request for an extension <,r time for Resolution of Inlciil No. 1628 (formerly 1465) for zone change fn.ni I'R-C; (I'rbaii Reser>c with Gaming Enterprise Overlay)dislrici to CN-G (Neiglib.prhood Commercial with Gaming Enlir|irisf Overiaj, CT-<;-MP(rourislConimertial wi(h t;aminK KiilerpriseO\ ). RS-2-(;-MP, RS-4-t;MP, RS-6-(;-.\IP(Single Family Residential ilh (;aniing Knii qiriseOvcriav 1. RM-K-GMP,RM-10-(;-MP (Medium De/isity Risidtiitijl wilh (;aiiiint: Knterprisi ( )stHj>) and 0S-(;-.MP(OpenSpace wilh(;ainingEnlerprisi(>verla> idislricts.as jdcsi(;iialfI)tMlopmFTRANSPOkTATU>N INS I ALL AND .MAINTAIN BUS SHELTERS AND BENCHES A RESOLLTION OF THE CITY CtH N( II. OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON TO E.NTERI.NTOANINTERLOCALC(K)l'KkATI\KAi;RKEMEVrwnHTHK.STATE OF NEVADA DEPARTMENT" OF TRANSl'ORIATION Ft)R PER.MISSION Tt) INSTALL AND MAI.NTAIN BCS SHELTERS AND HENCHh:S WITHIN .STATE RU;H Tt)F-W AY, AND OTHER NUTTERS REI.A I KD THERETO. NB-85. RRSOIXTION PERMANENT KASK.MENTS CONSTRl ( TION OF THE WATER TRANSMLSSION MAIN AND THE SOlTIIWK.ST HINDI K.soN IMERCEITt)R SEWER A RE.S0LIT10N OF THE CrrVlCt)l NCIL OF THE CM V OF HENDERSON STATI.NGTHEPUBLICNEEDANDNECF.SSITVTOOHTAINPIRMANKNI EASEMENTS FOR THE CON.STRUCTION t)F THE WATER TRANSMISSION M MNAND THE SOLTHWI'IST HENDER.SON INTERCEITOR SEWER WITH SEI'AkATK TEMIt)RARY CON.STRUCTION I':ASEMENTS FOR THE Dl RATION OF THE CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS; AND OTHER MATIIRS REI.ATKD THERETO. NB 86. RtSOLLTION Z-73-95 • BOARDWALK ENTERPRISES A RESOLUTION t)F THE CITY COLNCIL OF THE CUV OF HENDERSON COMMITTLN(;THECITY COUNCIL TO REZONE CERTAIN PROPER r\ WIIHIVTHE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDER.SON. DESCklKKD AS A ItiRTlON OF SECTION 16,TOWNSHIP22.SOnH,R.\Nt;EA2F.A.sr.M.D.B&M..l LARKCOINTV. NEVADA, FRO.M UR (URBAN RF.SEKVK) DLSTRICT TO t N (NEK.MKORHtMH) COM.MERCIAL) DISTRICT, t;ENERALLY LOCATED AT THE SIUTHHIXST CORNER OF WINDMILL PARKWAY AND ARROYO (5R WDE Bol I KVARD. IN THE (;REEN VALLEY SOLTH PLANNINt; AREA. NB-87. BILLM). 1271 ZOA-19.95 VKTERINAR^ HOSPITAUS AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY CtRNCII. OF THE CIT^ OF HENDER.SON AMENDI.NG TITLE 190FTHE HENDER.SON Ml Nit ll'AL CODE HV AMENDINt; THE LAND USE RE(;ULATU)NS FOR VCTERINAKV HOSPITAl-S IN CERTAIN COM.MERCIAL Zt)NE.S, AND OTHER MATTERS RKI ATKI) THERKTl). (REFER Tt) CO.M.MITTEE MEETINt; OF DECEMBER 5, 1>"<5 FOR REVIEW ANT) RECO.MMENDATH)N) NB-88. BILL NO. 1272 Z-2-92 • R. V. JONF-S CORP. AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY Ct)UNCIL t)F THE CITY OF HENDERSON AMENDINt; ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY AMENDINt; THE /ONINt; MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS tF HENDER.St).N.l)l>CRIBEI)ASAPORTU)NOFSECTION 13, TOWNSHIP22 SOLTH. RA.NGE 61 EAST. M.D.B.AM.. CLARK COUNTY. NEVADA. FROM I R (URBAN RESERVE) DISTRICT TO RM-12 (MEI)ll M DENSITY RESIDENTIAL). DISTRICT ANDTt>REPF:ALRESOLlTIONOF INTENT NO. 1558IN ITS ENTIRETY. UK ATED SfKTHWEST OF WINDMILL PARKWAY AND PECOS ROAD IN THE <;REEN VALLEY .St)UTH PLANNINt; AREA, AND OTHER .MATTERS RELATINt; tHERETO. (REFTR TO COMMITTEE MEFTINt; OF DECEMBER 5. 1995 M)R REVIEW AND RECOMMENDATION) XL CITIZEN'S Ct)NCERNS XII. SET MEETING XIII. ADJOURNMENT All items for inclusion tm Ihe Cwmil Agenda for the Meeting of December 5, 1995, must be suhmilled. in writing, no later than Thur^sy. Novemhrr 22, 1995 at 5:.W pja. to the City Clerk's olTk-r. Any Rrais m-rived aDer tkr abfive dale will aulimatis-aliy be placed on the nrxl City CiHincil .Agenda. H—Nov. 16, 1995

PAGE 18

Page 18 Henderson Home News Thursday, November 16, 1995 LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN tht the Plannin,; Commission ot thr Cily uf Hrndrrson, Nevada, will hijd a public hraring tm Nuvrmhrr 28, 19V5, at 7:tlt) p.m. in thr City Council Chambers, Cily Hall, 240 WaterStrect, Henderson, Nevada, to consider the Tollowing application. Z-78-9S PUBLIC HEARINt; ZONE CHANGE FOR HIGHLAND GLEN APPLICANT: BEAZER HOMES Retiew of a reclaiisincatiun rrquest from UR (Urban Reserve) district tu US-6 (Single F'amily Residential) district and to ad ^;5f-; ^ ,ay^ r^'^M."^ Bl DESIGNArtS MOJECT SITP\W AND ALL interested persons may appear before the Planning Commission, either in person or by cval of the above application, or may, prior to the public hearing, (lie with the Planning Department written objection thereto or appnivul tliiTeof. For additional information, call 56S-2474. DATED November !3, 1995. /s/ RO.NALD B. FRAME, Chairman Henderson Planning Commission H—Nov. 16,1995. • • • • NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Planning Commission of the City of Henderson, Nevada, will hold a public hearing on November 28,1995, at 7:(0 p.m. in the Cily Council Chambers, City Hall, 244) Water Street, Henderson, Nevada, to consider the following application. U-4.V95 PUBLIC HFJVRING L'SK PERMIT FOR GREEN VALLEY TRANSMISSION LINE APPLICANT: NEVADA POWER COMPANT Request Ut approve a 230/138 overhead KV electrical transmission line located along West Lake Mead Drive from Eastern Avenue to the proposed Gibson Road substation, and to construct a 138 KV transmission line to connect the existing Wigwam substation to a proposed substation facility in the vicinity of Green Valley Parkway and Horizon Ridge Parkway in the Green Valley Ranch planning area. NEVADA POWER COMPANY USE PERW T U43 9b V __-—^--— PROPOSt Legal Notice Century21JKRially,10lE. Horizon Drive. Notice of abandoned personal property and household giMids to hr sold by scali^J hid on .Nilveniber 1, 1995. Items abandoned by the fidloMJng party. Maiiin-523 Oukwmtd Court H—Nov. 2, 7,9, 14. 16. 1995. ANT AND ALL jnleresled persoas may appear before the Planning Commission, either in person or by counsel, and may object to or express approval of the abovf application, or may, prior to the public bearing, file with the ilanning Department written objection thereto or appn>val thereof. For additional information, call 565-2474. DATED: November 13, 1995 /s/ RO.NALD B. FRAME, Chairman Henderson Planning Commission H—Nov. 16, 1995^ NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Planning Commi.ssion of the City of Henderson, Nevada, will hold a public hearing on November 2, 1995, at 7:(K) p.m. in the City Council Chambers, Cily Hall, 24<) WalerStrert, Henderson, Nevada, to consider the following application. V-51-9SPUBLICHEARING-VARIANCER>R U.S. BANK APPLICANT: AD ART SIGN CORPORATION Request to allow double face, illuminated monument .sign in a CH (Highway Commercial) district at 65 W. Lake Mead Drive in the Townsite planning area. AD ART SIGN CORPORATION VARtANCb V fi1-95 1 u x^ '>^-< • ^' rC5?-c9 ANT AND ALL interested persons may appear before the Itanning Commission, either in person or by oiunsel, and may object to or express approval of the above application, or may, prior to the public hearing, fde with the I*lanning Department written objection thereto or approval thereof. For additional information, call 565-2474. DATED: November 13, 1995 "" /s/RONALD B. FRAME, Chairman Henderson Planning Commission H—Nov. 16, 1995. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Planning Commission of the City of Henderson, Nevada, will hold a public hearing on November 28, 1995, at 7:(N) p.m. in the Cily Council Chambers, City Hall, 241) WaterStreel, Henderson, Nevada, to consider the following application. V.53-95 PUBLIC HEARIM; VARIANCE FOR GREEN HORIZON CHEVRON AND SPORTING CHANCE II TAVERN APPLICANT: GREEN HORIZON INTESTMENTS Request to waive the 10 acre minimum site requirement for CC ziming, waive the five fmtl landscaping requirement on north and west boundaries and to reduce landscaping requirement on east and south boundaries fn>m 25 feel to 15 feel htcaled at the corner of Horizon Ridge Parkway and Green Valley Parkway at 22(H) W. Horizon Ridge Parkway in the (ireen Valley Ranch planning area. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Ilanning Comniislion of the City of Henderson, Nevada, will ht'o nNATES PflOJECT \ Tf ANT AND ALL interested persons may appear before the Planning Commission, either in person or by counsel, and may object to or expre.ss appntval of the above application, or may, prior to the public hearing, file with the Itanning Department writlen objection thereof. For additional information, call 565-2474,, DATED: November 13, 1995 As/RONALD B. FRAME, Chairman Henderson Itanning CcmimissiiHi H—Nov. 16J995. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINt; NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Itanning Commission of the City of Henderson, Nevada, will hold a public hearing on November 28, 1995, at 7:IK) p.m. in the City Council Chambers, City Hall, 240 Water .Street, Henderson, Nevada, to consider the following application. PUD/TM-88-95 PUBLIC HEARIN(; PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT & TENTATIVE MAP FOR FOXFIELD UNIT III APPLICANT: TRU-WEST DEVELOPMENT OWNERSACRAMENTO PROPERTIES Review of a residential subdivision consisting of 61 lots on 13.4 acres with a density of 4.6 dwelling units per acre in an R.S-6-(> (.Single Family Residential with (taming Enterprise Overlay) district generally located north of Boulder Highway on Racetrack Road in the River Mountain planning area. ANT AND ALL irileresled persons may appear before the Planning Commission, either in person or by counsel, and may ohjitt to or express approval of the above application, or may, prior to the public hearing, file with the Itanning Department written objeilion thereto or approval thereof. For additional information, call 565-2474. DATED: November 13, 1995 IsJ RO.NALD B. FRAME, Chairman Henderson Planning Commission H—Nov. 16, 1995. LEGAL ADVERTISE.ME.NT IN COMPLIANCE WITH AND PURSUANT TO N.R.S. 354.602, 266.480, AND 268.030, THE CITY OF HE.NDER.SON D()I-:S HERBY REI'ORT THE FOLLOWING: TOTAL RECEIITS AND DISBURSE.ME.NTS FOR THE FIR.ST QUARTER ENDI.Nt; SEPTEMBER 30, 1995, OF THE 1995-96 BLDGET YEAR THE ABOVE FINANCIAL REI'ORT WAS PREPARED BY THE FINANCE DEPARTMENT AND FILED WITH THE CITY CLERK, SEITE.MBER 29,1995, BY .STEVEN ,M. HANSO.N, FINANCE DIRECTOR. APPROVED: /s/ ROBERT A. GROESBECK, NL\YOR ATTEST: /s/ SUSAN, ROBISON, CITY CLERK PUBLISHED IN THE HENDERSON HOME NEWS: 11/16/V5 H—Nov. 16, 1995. CITY OF HENDERSON QUARTERLY REPORT FIRST QUARTER 1995/96 UNAUDITED RBVEMJES TUM Huattt & PerRici laie riovern menu 1 Revenue* Cbarga for ServJcet F!B4Fof£elB Miteellaneoui TriDifer la ., OiiftonStleofBjtedAiicu Beglnnlcg PUDd Balujce TOTAL AVAILABLE RESOURCES EXPENDITURES General Oo<^rnri)l.' Public Safety judiciii *; /. '\ Public Worlu • -' • *" • • • • Culture tftd Recfcaiion • Trtifer Oui • -. • • • Total Expoodliurof nd Older Utct EndinlFunfl Bilineo Unfecrvieellene6UI TOTAL Bipendllurei^ Trawtolt Out ^ End<$?r>:DESIGNATES PROJECT SlTE-f-A.NY AND ALL interested persoas may appear before the Pluiniing Commission, either in person or by counsel, and may object to or express approval of the above application, or may, prior to the public hearing, file vilh the Ilanning Department viritten objectiim thereto or appntval thereof. For additional information, call 565-2474. DATED: November 13, 1995 /s/ RONALD B. FRA.ME, Chairman Henderson Planning Conimissimi H—Nov. 16, 1995. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Planning Commij. sion of thr City of Henderson, Nevada, will hold a public hearing on November 28, 1995, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, Cily Hall, 24(1 WaterSlrert, Henders.m, Nevada, to consider the following application. Z-71-9S CONTINUED PUBLIC HEARING • ZONE CHANGE FOR PASEO VERDE 30 APPLICANT: CHAMPION HOMES Review uf a reclassification request fnan RS-2-(> (Single Family Residential with Gaming Enterprise Overlay) to RS6 (Single Fani ily Residenti al) dist ricts on 30.44 acres liaated at the northeast comer of Paiitera Street and Cielo Abierlo Wav in the Green Valley Ranch planning area. CHAMPION HOMES ZONE CHANGE 2 71-96 i AN^Y AND ALL interr.sled persoas may appear before the Plaiiiung Commission, either in person or by cd Balioee TOTAL 807.879 807.879 MM. 0 2.081,759 0^ 2.081.759 30,490 2,051269 0 2.081.759 0 W.9OO 5,778,898 1.327.305 69.336 0 7,036.867 7.1Q6.203 897.403 7.895 905.298 37.916 877,382 905.298 i.498,995 180,939 0_ 6.659.934 481,313 0 6-I7H21 6.6S9.934 (00.000 L CITY OF HENDERSON QUARTERLY REPORT FIRST QUARTER 1995/96 UNAUDITED DEBT 5BRVICE FWD iHP VALORRAC GENERAL OBUQATION DEHT Beginning Fund Balance Revecuet BondProceedi Tranifen In TOTAL Expendllurei Trantten Out Ending Fund Balance TOTAL DEBT SERVICE FUND f OPBRATINQ) SPEQIAL A SSESSMENT DrS TfirCTS Beginning Fund Balance Revenue! TVaniron In TOTAL Eipendiiura Tiaaifen Out Ending Fund Balance TOTAL WATER ENTERPRISE PUND Total Operating Revenue Total Operating Expcnte Total Nanoperailng Revenue Total Nonoperating Expense Trantfeit In Net IDCOOC (Loat) SSWERfNTERyBISE PUj^fD Toul OperaclBg Revenue Total Operating Expenac Toul Nonoperating Revenue Toul NonopetatJag Expenac TraoiCeti Out Net Ineone (LOM) ORIOINAL ANNUAL BUDGET 2.408,703 6,505,150 0 2.025,516 7.245.968 40.000 3,653,401 ACTUAL YEAJITO -OATS 2,534,107 181.924 0 0 383.251 0 2,332,780 18,612,111 8,991.894 0_ 27.604.005 10.686,199 0 16,917,806 18,967,150 20,092.882 450.000 3,519,703 0 18,990.469 1,177,204 246,115 2.834,538 176,204 17,403,046 2(^,413.7jy 5,839,258 4,155,267 679,700 10,963 0 Total Operating Revenue Toul Operating Eipenie Toul Nonoperating Revenue Net Ineoae (Loa*} ENOINBEWNQ INTERNAL SERVICE PUND Toul Operauog Revenue Total Opera liog Bxpent* Total Nonoperaiing Revenue Toul NonoparaUng Expanac Trtflibralo Net leeome (Lsaa) CITY IHOP itfTBttWAi aRBVTrn pimn Total Operating Riuc Toul Opnradng Expenae Toul Nenopvathii Revenue Toul NonoparaUng Bi^enae TraotCara In WM U ecMi (taee) 8,355.900 9.689,025 850.000 1.990,677 0. f2.473.80y) 339.000 434,332 6.000 f-332^ 1.775,000 4,S37J45 130,000 4,506 1.917.250 f72y.50n S,44l.45l 2.9n,9W r,ooo 52.840 0 ,saM. 2.288,024 2,030,621 379,028 638,496 0 102.149 3.1gl 601.204 862.095 39.3:9 0 0 jMLm 0 320.852 0 L f23^>l<3 Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson Home News Page 19 SPORTS THURSDAY Henderson Home News Basic's Lathum gets his chance Outfielder now with Twins after nnaking a big innpact last season D.J. Allen News Staff Writer • At the time the Los Angeles Dodgers made a deal for pitchers Kevin Tapani and Scott Guthrie from the Minnesota Twins this past summer, 1991 Basic High graduate Chris Lathum had no idea his life would be altered by that same trade. But, more than a month after the hurlers helped the Dodgers hold off the Colorado Rockies for the National League-West crown, Lathum got a phone call. After spending four years in the Dodgers system since signing as an llth-round draft pick in '91, Lathum found out he was on his way to the Minnesota organization to complete the mid-season trade and possibly get his shot at the big leagues. "With this trade, centerfield is wide open for me," said Lathum after returning from a trip to Minnesota a week ago to meet with Twin executives. "If I put up a good spring training, I have agreat shot of making the team." Larry Corrigan, the minor league field coordinator for the Twins, said Lathum has the tools to be in Minnesota next year. "He made such good strides in '95," Corrigan said. "He's a commodity that fits for almost every organization — a switch-hitting outfielder with speed." At the beginning of last season, it seemed as though Lathum only had one realistic shot of being a Major Leaguer in such a short time — as a 'scab.' Having played rookie ball for two seasons and clas's A ball for two more, when the Dodgers offered their minor leaguers the chance to be replacement players during the Major League players' strike, Lathum jumped at the opportunity. "The strike was on and they asked a lot of guys if they wanted to cross," Lathum said. "It was a tough situation, but I had my baby on the way and that was the only thing I started thinking about—putting food on the table for him." While the immediate financial bonuses helped Lathum and his wife, Sarah — and now their "The main thing in baseball is you have to put in extra worli. Extra worl( all the time leads to success. ff Chris Lathum Basic graduate and member of the Minnesota Twins seven-week-old boy Christopher Jerrel — the experience Lathum got from crossing may come in even handier. "I was really happy I did it because I got to meet all of the big league staft"— [Dodger manager]. Tommy Lasorda and everybody," Lathum said. "I also got more attention than you do in the minor leagues. They work with you one-on-one over there and I got a lot better." 'Better' is an understatement. After four average years in the Dodgers organization, Lathum exploded on the scene this season as one of the franchise's top prospects. With the strike resolved, Lathum was reassigned back to class A Vero Beach. But, after hitting .286 with six home runs, 39 RBI and 42 stolen bases in 71 games, Lathum was promoted to class AA in San Antonio before ending the year at class AAA Albuquerque. In all, he ended the season hitting 15 homers with 79 RBI and 54 stolen bases. Then this fall — before being sidelined with arthroscopic surgery on his right shoulder — Lathum continued his pace in the Arizona Fall League against even tougher competition which included many Major Leaguers. Before the surgery — which will only keep him out of training for 6-8 weeks — Lathum was in the top 10 in hitting, while leading the league in triples and slugging percentage. "I just put everything together," said Lathum about his Courtesy Photo MAJOR LEAGUE PROSPECT — Chris Lathum, left, a 1991 Basic High graduate, stands with Los Angeles Dodgers' rookie shortstop Chad Fonville. Lathum and Fonville played together in Arizona Fall League with the Peoria Javelines. Lathum was leading the league in triples and slugging percentage before having surgery on his shoulder. '95 season that caught the eye of such publications as U.S.A. Today's Baseball Weekly. 'This year was a big year for me. I came out every day and worked my tail off to get better and better. It just came through for me. • 'The main thing in baseball is you have to put in extra work. Extra work all the time leads to success." Lathum's work ethic this season is one reason the Twins hope they may have their centerfielder of the future with the 22-year-old from the Henderson high school. — • "I think he rededicated himself," Corrigan said. "I think that's what happened to another one of your local boys, Marty Cordova ['87 Gorman graduate). Marty's a good example of work ethic and professionalism." Lathum and Cordova, who was recently named the American League Rookie of the Year, have worked out together in past off-seasons and Lathum said it would be fun playing side-byside with a friend at such a high level. "It's going to be great with See Lathum Page 20 Basic boys and girls pick up bowling wins By th News Staff The Basic boys and girls varsity bowling teams rolled to victories over Rancho on Monday. The varsity boys won 3-1 behind Jason Hansen's 218 game and 556 series. Craig Wiley added a 206 game. The varsity girls picked up a 4-0 win as Leanne Giseburt had a 185 game followed by Andi Beffa's 180. The JV boys won 4-0 with Adam Derengowski leading the way with a 182. The JV girls also won 4-0 as Renee Laskowitz had a 167 game. On Tuesday, the Basic boys varsity team beat Chaparral 40. Steve Zyla had a 215 game and a 573 series while Hansen added a 214 game and a 548 series. The Wolves' varsity girls alsp won 40 with Suzanne Latelle posting a 181 game. The JV boys won 4-0 with Derengowski's 165 game leading the way. The JV girls also won 40 with Gabby Abbott scoring a 166. GV VARSITY TEAMS SWEEP: The Gator boy s breezed to a 4-0 victory over Chaparral in bowlingaction Monday with Josh Samp and Brian Priebe leading the way. Samp had games of 265, 225 and 224 for a 714 series while Priebe had games of 235,226 and 248 for a 707 series. Chris Klerk added a 231 for the Gators while George Palumbo posted a 206. The GV varsity girls also won 4-Obehind Melanie Darden's 206. The Gators' JV boys won 4-0 while the JV girls split 2-2. On Tuesday, the varsity boys won 3-1 over Boulder City as Klerk had a 202 game and 559 series. The varsity girls fell 4-0 as Wendy Galella had a 170 game and 443 series. The Green Valley JV boys won won 4-0 as Palumbo had games of 204 and 2O0 to finish with a 538 series. John Flynn had a 220 game and a 546 series. SILVERADO VARSITY TEAMS FALL: The Silverado boysand girls fellvictimto Clark, both losing 3-1 in bowling action Monday. Ricky Gourrier led the Silverado boys with a 189 game while the Skyhawks girls were led by Amy Fehr's 148. The Silverado JV boys won 31 with Justin Maxwell rolling a 179. The Skyhawks'JV girls won 4-0 with Samantha Hicks posting a 183 game. FROM THE PRESSBOX Basic enters Reebolc Classic By the News Staff Basic will be one of 54 boys basketball teams taking part in this year's 19th Reebok Holiday Prep Classic on Dec. 18-21 in Las Vegas. The 54 teams is a record mark for the tournament, which is presented by Las Vegas Events. The Classic, which is the largest tournament of its kind in the nation, has 106 games scheduled to be played at Durango High School as well as the Sawyer Middle School gymThe interest level is just so high for this tournament, we felt we had to add some additional teams," Jim Allen, tournament director, said. "We seem to say it every year, but this field looks to be our best in terms not only of quantity, but quality. There could be as many as 10 of the teams playing in this year's tournament ranked among top 25 pre-season polls. After last year's capacity crowds for several games, I sincerely hope people buy their tickets early for this year. This will be one of the finest weeks of prep basketball in the history of Nevada." In all, 13 states, the District of Columbia and Canada will be represented in the 1995 Classic. Included will defending champion Oak Hill Academy of Mouth of Wilson, Va., and runnerup Mater Dei of Santa Ana, Calif California leads the way with 21 entries in the tournament followed by Nevada with 10. Las Vegas squads joining Basic in the Classic will include Bishop Gorman, Bonanza, Cheyenne, Cim-Memorial, Clark, Durango, Valley and Western. The other Nevada squad is Douglas High School. Classic founder and current executive director Larry McKay, an assistant principal at Durango, turned over the tournament director duties this year to his hfe-long friend and associate Jim Allen. "Jim has been associated with the Holiday Prep Classic in some form since it began, so the transition from me to him has been extremely smooth and quick," McKay said. Tournament season tickets, priced at $30 each, are now available through the tournament office. Single day tickets, good for all games at both tournament sites, will be $8"5ach and will be sold only at the door. For more Classic information, call 799-5850, ext. 223. NFL quarterbaclcs a big hit — with clefensive linemen D J. Allen News Staff Writer Mamas, don't let your babies grow up to be ... Cowboy quarterbacks. Forty Niner quarterbacks. Dolphin quarterbacks, Bronco quarterbacks and so on and so on. You get the picture. There is a new marked man in the NFL — the quarterback. •Oh,"you might say, "he's been -marked since football was invented." True, but if something doesn't change — and soon — they'll have to start marking theseguys with tombstones. Just look at last week, remember the shot John Elway took against the Eagles? I hope you do, because he sure doesn't. Some of these hits are getting scary. T^is season we've seen the best and most physical quarterbacks in the NFL go down. Count'em — Steve Young, Troy Aikman, Dan Marino, Elway, Jeff" Hostetler, N eil O'Donne ll, Stan Humphries. The bottom line is someone is going to get hurt—and hurt bad. I must admit, I used to mock quarterbacks when I saw them shde in front of a defensive back to avoid being hit, but now I understand. When a defensive player gets a shot at the quarterback, the only thing on his mind is taking the play-caller out of the game — preferably on a stretcher. They want him gone, out of action. But they're the only ones. Look at last Sunday's 'matchup of the year' between the 49ers and the Cowboys. Borrowing a line from Wayne and Garth in "Wayne's Worid," watching Elvis Grbac versus Wade Wilson fand then Jason Garrett) was about as exciting as a vacation to Delaware. Football — and we can thank our new J.R. Ewing — Jerry Jones — for making this clear — is definitely a business. Now I'm just a communications miuor at UNLV, but I did take one business class my first semester and if I remember correctly, the best way to run a business is to give your consumers the best product. The fans want Young vs. Aikman, Marino vs. Elway, but the league is giving them Vince Evans taking on Ty Detmer. That's like being forced to watch reruns or'Gidget'for three hours. I don't have the answer, but SMNFL Page 20

PAGE 19

Page 18 Henderson Home News Thursday, November 16, 1995 LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN tht the Plannin,; Commission ot thr Cily uf Hrndrrson, Nevada, will hijd a public hraring tm Nuvrmhrr 28, 19V5, at 7:tlt) p.m. in thr City Council Chambers, Cily Hall, 240 WaterStrect, Henderson, Nevada, to consider the Tollowing application. Z-78-9S PUBLIC HEARINt; ZONE CHANGE FOR HIGHLAND GLEN APPLICANT: BEAZER HOMES Retiew of a reclaiisincatiun rrquest from UR (Urban Reserve) district tu US-6 (Single F'amily Residential) district and to ad ^;5f-; ^ ,ay^ r^'^M."^ Bl DESIGNArtS MOJECT SITP\W AND ALL interested persons may appear before the Planning Commission, either in person or by cval of the above application, or may, prior to the public hearing, (lie with the Planning Department written objection thereto or appnivul tliiTeof. For additional information, call 56S-2474. DATED November !3, 1995. /s/ RO.NALD B. FRAME, Chairman Henderson Planning Commission H—Nov. 16,1995. • • • • NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Planning Commission of the City of Henderson, Nevada, will hold a public hearing on November 28,1995, at 7:(0 p.m. in the Cily Council Chambers, City Hall, 244) Water Street, Henderson, Nevada, to consider the following application. U-4.V95 PUBLIC HFJVRING L'SK PERMIT FOR GREEN VALLEY TRANSMISSION LINE APPLICANT: NEVADA POWER COMPANT Request Ut approve a 230/138 overhead KV electrical transmission line located along West Lake Mead Drive from Eastern Avenue to the proposed Gibson Road substation, and to construct a 138 KV transmission line to connect the existing Wigwam substation to a proposed substation facility in the vicinity of Green Valley Parkway and Horizon Ridge Parkway in the Green Valley Ranch planning area. NEVADA POWER COMPANY USE PERW T U43 9b V __-—^--— PROPOSt Legal Notice Century21JKRially,10lE. Horizon Drive. Notice of abandoned personal property and household giMids to hr sold by scali^J hid on .Nilveniber 1, 1995. Items abandoned by the fidloMJng party. Maiiin-523 Oukwmtd Court H—Nov. 2, 7,9, 14. 16. 1995. ANT AND ALL jnleresled persoas may appear before the Planning Commission, either in person or by counsel, and may object to or express approval of the abovf application, or may, prior to the public bearing, file with the ilanning Department written objection thereto or appn>val thereof. For additional information, call 565-2474. DATED: November 13, 1995 /s/ RO.NALD B. FRAME, Chairman Henderson Planning Commission H—Nov. 16, 1995^ NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Planning Commi.ssion of the City of Henderson, Nevada, will hold a public hearing on November 2, 1995, at 7:(K) p.m. in the City Council Chambers, Cily Hall, 24<) WalerStrert, Henderson, Nevada, to consider the following application. V-51-9SPUBLICHEARING-VARIANCER>R U.S. BANK APPLICANT: AD ART SIGN CORPORATION Request to allow double face, illuminated monument .sign in a CH (Highway Commercial) district at 65 W. Lake Mead Drive in the Townsite planning area. AD ART SIGN CORPORATION VARtANCb V fi1-95 1 u x^ '>^-< • ^' rC5?-c9 ANT AND ALL interested persons may appear before the Itanning Commission, either in person or by oiunsel, and may object to or express approval of the above application, or may, prior to the public hearing, fde with the I*lanning Department written objection thereto or approval thereof. For additional information, call 565-2474. DATED: November 13, 1995 "" /s/RONALD B. FRAME, Chairman Henderson Planning Commission H—Nov. 16, 1995. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Planning Commission of the City of Henderson, Nevada, will hold a public hearing on November 28, 1995, at 7:(N) p.m. in the Cily Council Chambers, City Hall, 241) WaterStreel, Henderson, Nevada, to consider the following application. V.53-95 PUBLIC HEARIM; VARIANCE FOR GREEN HORIZON CHEVRON AND SPORTING CHANCE II TAVERN APPLICANT: GREEN HORIZON INTESTMENTS Request to waive the 10 acre minimum site requirement for CC ziming, waive the five fmtl landscaping requirement on north and west boundaries and to reduce landscaping requirement on east and south boundaries fn>m 25 feel to 15 feel htcaled at the corner of Horizon Ridge Parkway and Green Valley Parkway at 22(H) W. Horizon Ridge Parkway in the (ireen Valley Ranch planning area. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Ilanning Comniislion of the City of Henderson, Nevada, will ht'o nNATES PflOJECT \ Tf ANT AND ALL interested persons may appear before the Planning Commission, either in person or by counsel, and may object to or expre.ss appntval of the above application, or may, prior to the public hearing, file with the Itanning Department writlen objection thereof. For additional information, call 565-2474,, DATED: November 13, 1995 As/RONALD B. FRAME, Chairman Henderson Itanning CcmimissiiHi H—Nov. 16J995. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINt; NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Itanning Commission of the City of Henderson, Nevada, will hold a public hearing on November 28, 1995, at 7:IK) p.m. in the City Council Chambers, City Hall, 240 Water .Street, Henderson, Nevada, to consider the following application. PUD/TM-88-95 PUBLIC HEARIN(; PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT & TENTATIVE MAP FOR FOXFIELD UNIT III APPLICANT: TRU-WEST DEVELOPMENT OWNERSACRAMENTO PROPERTIES Review of a residential subdivision consisting of 61 lots on 13.4 acres with a density of 4.6 dwelling units per acre in an R.S-6-(> (.Single Family Residential with (taming Enterprise Overlay) district generally located north of Boulder Highway on Racetrack Road in the River Mountain planning area. ANT AND ALL irileresled persons may appear before the Planning Commission, either in person or by counsel, and may ohjitt to or express approval of the above application, or may, prior to the public hearing, file with the Itanning Department written objeilion thereto or approval thereof. For additional information, call 565-2474. DATED: November 13, 1995 IsJ RO.NALD B. FRAME, Chairman Henderson Planning Commission H—Nov. 16, 1995. LEGAL ADVERTISE.ME.NT IN COMPLIANCE WITH AND PURSUANT TO N.R.S. 354.602, 266.480, AND 268.030, THE CITY OF HE.NDER.SON D()I-:S HERBY REI'ORT THE FOLLOWING: TOTAL RECEIITS AND DISBURSE.ME.NTS FOR THE FIR.ST QUARTER ENDI.Nt; SEPTEMBER 30, 1995, OF THE 1995-96 BLDGET YEAR THE ABOVE FINANCIAL REI'ORT WAS PREPARED BY THE FINANCE DEPARTMENT AND FILED WITH THE CITY CLERK, SEITE.MBER 29,1995, BY .STEVEN ,M. HANSO.N, FINANCE DIRECTOR. APPROVED: /s/ ROBERT A. GROESBECK, NL\YOR ATTEST: /s/ SUSAN, ROBISON, CITY CLERK PUBLISHED IN THE HENDERSON HOME NEWS: 11/16/V5 H—Nov. 16, 1995. CITY OF HENDERSON QUARTERLY REPORT FIRST QUARTER 1995/96 UNAUDITED RBVEMJES TUM Huattt & PerRici laie riovern menu 1 Revenue* Cbarga for ServJcet F!B4Fof£elB Miteellaneoui TriDifer la ., OiiftonStleofBjtedAiicu Beglnnlcg PUDd Balujce TOTAL AVAILABLE RESOURCES EXPENDITURES General Oo<^rnri)l.' Public Safety judiciii *; /. '\ Public Worlu • -' • *" • • • • Culture tftd Recfcaiion • Trtifer Oui • -. • • • Total Expoodliurof nd Older Utct EndinlFunfl Bilineo Unfecrvieellene6UI TOTAL Bipendllurei^ Trawtolt Out ^ End<$?r>:DESIGNATES PROJECT SlTE-f-A.NY AND ALL interested persoas may appear before the Pluiniing Commission, either in person or by counsel, and may object to or express approval of the above application, or may, prior to the public hearing, file vilh the Ilanning Department viritten objectiim thereto or appntval thereof. For additional information, call 565-2474. DATED: November 13, 1995 /s/ RONALD B. FRA.ME, Chairman Henderson Planning Conimissimi H—Nov. 16, 1995. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Planning Commij. sion of thr City of Henderson, Nevada, will hold a public hearing on November 28, 1995, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, Cily Hall, 24(1 WaterSlrert, Henders.m, Nevada, to consider the following application. Z-71-9S CONTINUED PUBLIC HEARING • ZONE CHANGE FOR PASEO VERDE 30 APPLICANT: CHAMPION HOMES Review uf a reclassification request fnan RS-2-(> (Single Family Residential with Gaming Enterprise Overlay) to RS6 (Single Fani ily Residenti al) dist ricts on 30.44 acres liaated at the northeast comer of Paiitera Street and Cielo Abierlo Wav in the Green Valley Ranch planning area. CHAMPION HOMES ZONE CHANGE 2 71-96 i AN^Y AND ALL interr.sled persoas may appear before the Plaiiiung Commission, either in person or by cd Balioee TOTAL 807.879 807.879 MM. 0 2.081,759 0^ 2.081.759 30,490 2,051269 0 2.081.759 0 W.9OO 5,778,898 1.327.305 69.336 0 7,036.867 7.1Q6.203 897.403 7.895 905.298 37.916 877,382 905.298 i.498,995 180,939 0_ 6.659.934 481,313 0 6-I7H21 6.6S9.934 (00.000 L CITY OF HENDERSON QUARTERLY REPORT FIRST QUARTER 1995/96 UNAUDITED DEBT 5BRVICE FWD iHP VALORRAC GENERAL OBUQATION DEHT Beginning Fund Balance Revecuet BondProceedi Tranifen In TOTAL Expendllurei Trantten Out Ending Fund Balance TOTAL DEBT SERVICE FUND f OPBRATINQ) SPEQIAL A SSESSMENT DrS TfirCTS Beginning Fund Balance Revenue! TVaniron In TOTAL Eipendiiura Tiaaifen Out Ending Fund Balance TOTAL WATER ENTERPRISE PUND Total Operating Revenue Total Operating Expcnte Total Nanoperailng Revenue Total Nonoperating Expense Trantfeit In Net IDCOOC (Loat) SSWERfNTERyBISE PUj^fD Toul OperaclBg Revenue Total Operating Expenac Toul Nonoperating Revenue Toul NonopetatJag Expenac TraoiCeti Out Net Ineone (LOM) ORIOINAL ANNUAL BUDGET 2.408,703 6,505,150 0 2.025,516 7.245.968 40.000 3,653,401 ACTUAL YEAJITO -OATS 2,534,107 181.924 0 0 383.251 0 2,332,780 18,612,111 8,991.894 0_ 27.604.005 10.686,199 0 16,917,806 18,967,150 20,092.882 450.000 3,519,703 0 18,990.469 1,177,204 246,115 2.834,538 176,204 17,403,046 2(^,413.7jy 5,839,258 4,155,267 679,700 10,963 0 Total Operating Revenue Toul Operating Eipenie Toul Nonoperating Revenue Net Ineoae (Loa*} ENOINBEWNQ INTERNAL SERVICE PUND Toul Operauog Revenue Total Opera liog Bxpent* Total Nonoperaiing Revenue Toul NonoparaUng Expanac Trtflibralo Net leeome (Lsaa) CITY IHOP itfTBttWAi aRBVTrn pimn Total Operating Riuc Toul Opnradng Expenae Toul Nenopvathii Revenue Toul NonoparaUng Bi^enae TraotCara In WM U ecMi (taee) 8,355.900 9.689,025 850.000 1.990,677 0. f2.473.80y) 339.000 434,332 6.000 f-332^ 1.775,000 4,S37J45 130,000 4,506 1.917.250 f72y.50n S,44l.45l 2.9n,9W r,ooo 52.840 0 ,saM. 2.288,024 2,030,621 379,028 638,496 0 102.149 3.1gl 601.204 862.095 39.3:9 0 0 jMLm 0 320.852 0 L f23^>l<3 Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson Home News Page 19 SPORTS THURSDAY Henderson Home News Basic's Lathum gets his chance Outfielder now with Twins after nnaking a big innpact last season D.J. Allen News Staff Writer • At the time the Los Angeles Dodgers made a deal for pitchers Kevin Tapani and Scott Guthrie from the Minnesota Twins this past summer, 1991 Basic High graduate Chris Lathum had no idea his life would be altered by that same trade. But, more than a month after the hurlers helped the Dodgers hold off the Colorado Rockies for the National League-West crown, Lathum got a phone call. After spending four years in the Dodgers system since signing as an llth-round draft pick in '91, Lathum found out he was on his way to the Minnesota organization to complete the mid-season trade and possibly get his shot at the big leagues. "With this trade, centerfield is wide open for me," said Lathum after returning from a trip to Minnesota a week ago to meet with Twin executives. "If I put up a good spring training, I have agreat shot of making the team." Larry Corrigan, the minor league field coordinator for the Twins, said Lathum has the tools to be in Minnesota next year. "He made such good strides in '95," Corrigan said. "He's a commodity that fits for almost every organization — a switch-hitting outfielder with speed." At the beginning of last season, it seemed as though Lathum only had one realistic shot of being a Major Leaguer in such a short time — as a 'scab.' Having played rookie ball for two seasons and clas's A ball for two more, when the Dodgers offered their minor leaguers the chance to be replacement players during the Major League players' strike, Lathum jumped at the opportunity. "The strike was on and they asked a lot of guys if they wanted to cross," Lathum said. "It was a tough situation, but I had my baby on the way and that was the only thing I started thinking about—putting food on the table for him." While the immediate financial bonuses helped Lathum and his wife, Sarah — and now their "The main thing in baseball is you have to put in extra worli. Extra worl( all the time leads to success. ff Chris Lathum Basic graduate and member of the Minnesota Twins seven-week-old boy Christopher Jerrel — the experience Lathum got from crossing may come in even handier. "I was really happy I did it because I got to meet all of the big league staft"— [Dodger manager]. Tommy Lasorda and everybody," Lathum said. "I also got more attention than you do in the minor leagues. They work with you one-on-one over there and I got a lot better." 'Better' is an understatement. After four average years in the Dodgers organization, Lathum exploded on the scene this season as one of the franchise's top prospects. With the strike resolved, Lathum was reassigned back to class A Vero Beach. But, after hitting .286 with six home runs, 39 RBI and 42 stolen bases in 71 games, Lathum was promoted to class AA in San Antonio before ending the year at class AAA Albuquerque. In all, he ended the season hitting 15 homers with 79 RBI and 54 stolen bases. Then this fall — before being sidelined with arthroscopic surgery on his right shoulder — Lathum continued his pace in the Arizona Fall League against even tougher competition which included many Major Leaguers. Before the surgery — which will only keep him out of training for 6-8 weeks — Lathum was in the top 10 in hitting, while leading the league in triples and slugging percentage. "I just put everything together," said Lathum about his Courtesy Photo MAJOR LEAGUE PROSPECT — Chris Lathum, left, a 1991 Basic High graduate, stands with Los Angeles Dodgers' rookie shortstop Chad Fonville. Lathum and Fonville played together in Arizona Fall League with the Peoria Javelines. Lathum was leading the league in triples and slugging percentage before having surgery on his shoulder. '95 season that caught the eye of such publications as U.S.A. Today's Baseball Weekly. 'This year was a big year for me. I came out every day and worked my tail off to get better and better. It just came through for me. • 'The main thing in baseball is you have to put in extra work. Extra work all the time leads to success." Lathum's work ethic this season is one reason the Twins hope they may have their centerfielder of the future with the 22-year-old from the Henderson high school. — • "I think he rededicated himself," Corrigan said. "I think that's what happened to another one of your local boys, Marty Cordova ['87 Gorman graduate). Marty's a good example of work ethic and professionalism." Lathum and Cordova, who was recently named the American League Rookie of the Year, have worked out together in past off-seasons and Lathum said it would be fun playing side-byside with a friend at such a high level. "It's going to be great with See Lathum Page 20 Basic boys and girls pick up bowling wins By th News Staff The Basic boys and girls varsity bowling teams rolled to victories over Rancho on Monday. The varsity boys won 3-1 behind Jason Hansen's 218 game and 556 series. Craig Wiley added a 206 game. The varsity girls picked up a 4-0 win as Leanne Giseburt had a 185 game followed by Andi Beffa's 180. The JV boys won 4-0 with Adam Derengowski leading the way with a 182. The JV girls also won 4-0 as Renee Laskowitz had a 167 game. On Tuesday, the Basic boys varsity team beat Chaparral 40. Steve Zyla had a 215 game and a 573 series while Hansen added a 214 game and a 548 series. The Wolves' varsity girls alsp won 40 with Suzanne Latelle posting a 181 game. The JV boys won 4-0 with Derengowski's 165 game leading the way. The JV girls also won 40 with Gabby Abbott scoring a 166. GV VARSITY TEAMS SWEEP: The Gator boy s breezed to a 4-0 victory over Chaparral in bowlingaction Monday with Josh Samp and Brian Priebe leading the way. Samp had games of 265, 225 and 224 for a 714 series while Priebe had games of 235,226 and 248 for a 707 series. Chris Klerk added a 231 for the Gators while George Palumbo posted a 206. The GV varsity girls also won 4-Obehind Melanie Darden's 206. The Gators' JV boys won 4-0 while the JV girls split 2-2. On Tuesday, the varsity boys won 3-1 over Boulder City as Klerk had a 202 game and 559 series. The varsity girls fell 4-0 as Wendy Galella had a 170 game and 443 series. The Green Valley JV boys won won 4-0 as Palumbo had games of 204 and 2O0 to finish with a 538 series. John Flynn had a 220 game and a 546 series. SILVERADO VARSITY TEAMS FALL: The Silverado boysand girls fellvictimto Clark, both losing 3-1 in bowling action Monday. Ricky Gourrier led the Silverado boys with a 189 game while the Skyhawks girls were led by Amy Fehr's 148. The Silverado JV boys won 31 with Justin Maxwell rolling a 179. The Skyhawks'JV girls won 4-0 with Samantha Hicks posting a 183 game. FROM THE PRESSBOX Basic enters Reebolc Classic By the News Staff Basic will be one of 54 boys basketball teams taking part in this year's 19th Reebok Holiday Prep Classic on Dec. 18-21 in Las Vegas. The 54 teams is a record mark for the tournament, which is presented by Las Vegas Events. The Classic, which is the largest tournament of its kind in the nation, has 106 games scheduled to be played at Durango High School as well as the Sawyer Middle School gymThe interest level is just so high for this tournament, we felt we had to add some additional teams," Jim Allen, tournament director, said. "We seem to say it every year, but this field looks to be our best in terms not only of quantity, but quality. There could be as many as 10 of the teams playing in this year's tournament ranked among top 25 pre-season polls. After last year's capacity crowds for several games, I sincerely hope people buy their tickets early for this year. This will be one of the finest weeks of prep basketball in the history of Nevada." In all, 13 states, the District of Columbia and Canada will be represented in the 1995 Classic. Included will defending champion Oak Hill Academy of Mouth of Wilson, Va., and runnerup Mater Dei of Santa Ana, Calif California leads the way with 21 entries in the tournament followed by Nevada with 10. Las Vegas squads joining Basic in the Classic will include Bishop Gorman, Bonanza, Cheyenne, Cim-Memorial, Clark, Durango, Valley and Western. The other Nevada squad is Douglas High School. Classic founder and current executive director Larry McKay, an assistant principal at Durango, turned over the tournament director duties this year to his hfe-long friend and associate Jim Allen. "Jim has been associated with the Holiday Prep Classic in some form since it began, so the transition from me to him has been extremely smooth and quick," McKay said. Tournament season tickets, priced at $30 each, are now available through the tournament office. Single day tickets, good for all games at both tournament sites, will be $8"5ach and will be sold only at the door. For more Classic information, call 799-5850, ext. 223. NFL quarterbaclcs a big hit — with clefensive linemen D J. Allen News Staff Writer Mamas, don't let your babies grow up to be ... Cowboy quarterbacks. Forty Niner quarterbacks. Dolphin quarterbacks, Bronco quarterbacks and so on and so on. You get the picture. There is a new marked man in the NFL — the quarterback. •Oh,"you might say, "he's been -marked since football was invented." True, but if something doesn't change — and soon — they'll have to start marking theseguys with tombstones. Just look at last week, remember the shot John Elway took against the Eagles? I hope you do, because he sure doesn't. Some of these hits are getting scary. T^is season we've seen the best and most physical quarterbacks in the NFL go down. Count'em — Steve Young, Troy Aikman, Dan Marino, Elway, Jeff" Hostetler, N eil O'Donne ll, Stan Humphries. The bottom line is someone is going to get hurt—and hurt bad. I must admit, I used to mock quarterbacks when I saw them shde in front of a defensive back to avoid being hit, but now I understand. When a defensive player gets a shot at the quarterback, the only thing on his mind is taking the play-caller out of the game — preferably on a stretcher. They want him gone, out of action. But they're the only ones. Look at last Sunday's 'matchup of the year' between the 49ers and the Cowboys. Borrowing a line from Wayne and Garth in "Wayne's Worid," watching Elvis Grbac versus Wade Wilson fand then Jason Garrett) was about as exciting as a vacation to Delaware. Football — and we can thank our new J.R. Ewing — Jerry Jones — for making this clear — is definitely a business. Now I'm just a communications miuor at UNLV, but I did take one business class my first semester and if I remember correctly, the best way to run a business is to give your consumers the best product. The fans want Young vs. Aikman, Marino vs. Elway, but the league is giving them Vince Evans taking on Ty Detmer. That's like being forced to watch reruns or'Gidget'for three hours. I don't have the answer, but SMNFL Page 20

PAGE 20

1 W ^ \ X \ A t *. X '. \ '. • HHMillli Page 20 Henderson Home News Ttiursday, November 16, 1995 LATHUM Sports in the area From Page 19 both of us being from Las Vegas," Lathum said. "He'll be able to show me the ropes over there in Minnesota." Although he played with the big club last year in spring training before the strike was resolved, Lathum said he never considered that as making 'the show.' "Doing that just helped me work 100% harder just to get back to there," he said. "In my eyes, I wasn't thinking I was a big leaguer as I crossed, I was just over there playing ball. I just said to myself, 'I'm going to work harder to get back there.'" If he does make it to the majors, Lathum said he doesn't expect to be questioned much about crossing the line last season to play as a replacement. "I don't think I'll run into problems, but I'll run into attitudes from players," Lathum said. "Once you run across some of those older guys who have established themselves up there, they'll have attitudes towards you. But, a lot of people don't understand the reason why you did it. Some guys did it because they'll never be there. "A lot of people asked me why I crossed being only 22-years-old with the talent that I had, but ''We are rebuilding. tCliris Lathum] is an intricate part in Uie trade/' Sean Sarlin Twins' media relations once I tell them the situation I was in, they totally understand." At age 22, Lathum fits in well with the ideology of the Twins, who struggled through a losing season this past year., "We are rebuilding," said the Twins' assistant director of media relations, Sean Sarlin. "He's an intricate part in the trade." It's no secret that Lathum enjoyed playing in the Dodgers organization and respects the club, but he thinks the trade will benefit him. "With the Dodgers, they just re-signed [centerfielder] Brett Butler, which I think is a bad move because they have guys who are ready to fill that spot up there now, which is setting everybody back a year," Lathum said. Scoreboard The Twins hope the Dodgers' decision to go after a title with experience next year will help Minnesota in the future. "What we do is compile all kinds of reports throughout the year and when we made the trade, [Lathum] was a guy we were aware of in the organization, all the way back to his days at Basic High School," Corrigan said. If Lathum does make the jump to the majors this season, he'll join '87 graduate Doug Brady (Chicago White Sox) and '89 graduate Scott Baker (Oakland A's) as former Wolves who are seeing plaining time in the mayors. It's something Lathum has wanted his whole life. "It's great getting paid to do something you love — you can't beat it," Lathum said. "Not too many people in the world can say they get paid to do something they love. It's awesome getting ready to play up there. I've always dreamed about it, watching the guys and going to the games when I was ayoungkid, and now I'm knocking on the door." The Twins are about to answer that knock. Basic's Seybert earns all-state honor Basic junior Angelo Seybert received all-state honors for boys cross country this season. Seybert finished 14th at the state finals nearly two weeks ago. He is the only runner from any of the three Henderson-area high schools to be named all-state. Larkin collects 18 tackles for Lake Forest Linebacker CorDell Larkin, the son of Henderson's Eudora Leavett, recorded 18 tackles for Lake Forest College, III, in its 31-20 loss to Beloit College in the season finale. The Foresters finished 0-9 on the year with six of their losses coming by 11 points or less. Larkin is a junior at Lake Forest. NFL From Page 19 something has to change. Maybe this year is just a fluke, but Drew Bledsoe and his left shoulder may say, "Maybe not." And who knows, maybe if Marino's agent would have been able to get Marino on the cup with Bugs Bunny, everything would be OK. But for now, it isn't even close to OK. Look at the betting lines this week. As of Tuesday, five games were off the board because of injured QBs. That's npt good for the sport. y. ; : • I know quarterbacks can't ride around in a little'Popemobile' to protect themselves, but something has to be done to keep the marquee QB's on the field rather than on the sidelines. If they don't, that McDonalds guy really may finish the season for the Patriots at quarterback. Well, come to think of it, with the year Bledsoe is having, maybe that wouldn't be such a bad idea. Q Express Lube FAST RELIABLE GUARANTEED Boulder Highway & Palo Verde jH Henderson Phone: 565-0522 ACROSS FROM THE MOVIE THEATER • S5.00 OFF our regular S24.95 14-Po int service Oil & Filter Change, il9 95 Lube and 14-Point Checkup. Includes 3 Free Car Washes (a $9,00 value!) • 30-95 With ihis ad MosI cars Includes 5 Quarts ol Havoline Formula 3 molor oil Expires '. ^ .HENDERSON PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT ADULT BASEBALL 16/Over League W L FSBC 11 2 B F.D. Allstars 7 6 Lion Kings 7 6 GES 7 6 P. I.e. 4 9 MGM Grand Madness 3 10 HENDERSON PARKS and RECREATTON DEPARTMENT SOCCER Valley View 3/4 Silver W Lightning 6 Jaguars 5 Bushwackers 3 Raptors 2 Green Hornets 1 Hot Shots 1 Valley View 3/4 East W Orange Crush 7 Stars 6 Screaming Eagles 3 Red Devils 2 Blue Bombers 1 Tornados 0 Valley View 5/6 Gold W Screaming Eagles 6 Shockers — 6 Blades 5 Cowboys "~ 3 Comets ,3 Field Masters 2 Rockets • 3 Panthers 1 Cougars 1 Hot Shots 0 Valley View 7/8 Diamond W United 5 Cosmo 4 Scorpions 2 Bombers 1 Silver Spring* 3/4 East W Falcons .5 Coyotes • -4 Hurricanes • ., • • • ^-".•..' 4 Raiders • 3 Screaming Eagles ^; ; .' .3 Fighting Irish 2 Silver Springs 3/4 Panthers Muddogs Gators Jaguars Strikers Maddogs W 7 T 0 1 2 2 1 0 T 0 0 2 1 1 0 T 1 1 1 1 2 0 0 3 0 0 T 0 2 1 1 T 0 0 0 0 0 0 T 0 Silver Springs 3/4 West W L T Rushing Himcanes 7 0 0 Big Slammers 3 2 2 Panthers 3 3 1 Torpedos 2 3 2 Strikers 2 4 1 Chargers 16 0 Silver Springs 5/6 Gold East W L T Eagles 5 11 Roadrunners 5 2 0 Panthers 3 2 2 Hawks 2 4 1 Sidewinders 2 5 0 Desen Rats 1 Silver Springs 5/6 Gold W Cougars 6 Panthers • 5 Jaguars 3 Meerkats .2 Strikers '" \ 2 G.V. Fearless 2 Bulldogs 2 Sharks 2 Silver Springs 7/8 Diamond Sting Panthers Strykers Jaguars Tigers Scorpions Aces Falcons W 6 4 3 3 3 2 2 0 GRID PICKS 1 MATCHUP Bill Bowman D.J. Allen | COLLEGES New Mexico St. at UNLV New Mexico St. New Mexico St. San Jose St. at UNR UNR UNR Colorado at Kansas State Colorado Colorado Utah at BYU BYU BYU Notre Dame at Air Force Air Force Notre Dame Alabama at Auburn Auburn Auburn Michigan at Penn State Michigan Penn State 1 PROS 1 NY Giants at Philadelphia Philadelphia Phlladephia Green Bay at Cleveland Green Bay Green Bay Detroit at Chicago Chicago Chicago Pittsburgh at Cincinnati Pittsburgh Cincinnati Arizona at Carolina Carolina Arizona Dallas at Oakland Oalcland Dallas San Diego at Denver Denver San Diego San Francisco at Miami Miami Miami RECORD 94 68 3 96 • 66 • 3 THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY Las Vegas Gamblers Softball Club 'i=>f ^-i' The Las Vegas Gamblers Softball Club is having tryouts for its 14 & under ASA team for the 1996 season. Any girl interested in playing competitive fast pitch Softball that will be 14 or younger on September 1, 1996 is invited to the tryout. Tryouts are November 18 at 10:00 a.m. at Jaycee Park and November 19 at 3:30 p.m. at Maslow Park. Praclfices will begin in December and the team will start competing in tournaments in Arizona, California, and Nevada during late January or February. The Gamblers is the only club in Las Vegas to offer teams in three age divisions 14 & under, 16 & under, and 18 & under. For additional information contact: Diana Truax, Vice-President, 456-0138 Tommy Moores, Treasurer, 896-6521 Nina Hughes, Secretary, 645-3496 YIianHsQi\7inQ Nov. 23 W#V ^Vt^-^tV/^* Let us take care of Thanksgiving dinner this year while you relax with your family and friends. Choice of: ir ROAST TURKEY & Chestnut dressing served with fresh whipped potatoes, and giblet gravy ir GLAZED RAKED HAM served with Candied Yams & Champagne raisin sauce ROAST LEG of LAMR with Mint sauce. SPECIAL THANKSGIVING MEND $495 All Dinners served with soup or dinner salad & freshly balced bread. II a.m. to 10:30 p.m. 444 Sunset Rd. Herxlerson, Nevada Bahed TJam Tloas!" Turhcy with Sweet Sauce with Sage Dressing Hoast Turkey with Dressing :$c;-i-^v^""'^ • §4.95 '\':::S::-^;P^ JESTER'S COaiiT Noon 9pm. Dinnei^ include all the trimmings & pumpkin pie! 1/4 Mile West of Boulder Highway Roast Turkey, Baked Ham and Roast Beef, Sage Dressing, Candied Yams. Mashed Potatoes, Giblet Gravy, Cranberry Sauce, Ambrosia Salad, Waldorff Salad with Full Salad Bar, Soup, Baby Carrots, Green Beans Almondine & Dessert Bar. §4.95 WILD CaUD BaFFET 11 am 9pm C A S I NO ANOTHER FINE BOYD GAMING PROPERTY Boulder Highway, Between Lake Mead & Sunset HENDERSON HOME NEWS 'BOULDER CITY NEWS • LIFESTYLES • YOUR HEALTH T WHAT'S PLAYING T LAST WORDS •4 4 .1 'i SEcnoN Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson and Boulder City, Nevada P*gB1 MUSEUMS: \fe^l Thomas K. Lacy Nev>/s Staff Writer For many of us living in the Las Vegas Valley, a steady flow of visiting relatives is the norm rather than the exception. • • / :-^j • They get a place to stay in the entertainment capital of the world, and we get a chance to brush up on tour guide and Strip-driving skills for a few days. Trips to the casinos are standard, but museums may not top the list of must-see atti'actions. It may be time for a change, though. No fewer than 14 museums are located in Las Vegas, Boulder City and Henderson. And as the area continues to experience commercial and population growth, we're likely to see an even greater number of museums in the future. Whether you're into hands-on science type exhibits or the traditional wildlife displays in scenic dioramas, a variety of museums are within a halfhour's drive from most parts of the valley. While most museums are not located inside casinos, there are a few notable exceptions. When Howard Carter and Lord Carnarvon discpvered King Tutankhamun's tomb in 1922, it's a good bet they never expected a fullsized replica to be built in Las Vegas. Enter the Luxor. Since 1993, when King Tut's Tomb and Museam opened at the Luxor, -^^ hundreds of thousands of visitors have traveled 3,300 years back in time to see how the "boy king" prepared for the after-life. More than 500 assorted pieces are placed throughout the burial chamber as they remained undisturbed for three millennium. Here, visitors can see an exact replica of what the two archaeologists discovered when they first laid eyes on Tut's tomb more than 60 years ago. A narrative is played throughout the tour, ensuring an educational as well as entertaining experience. If you're in the mood to visit a museum, but don't care to dodge cabs, buses and gawking tourists on the Strip, a good choice is the Liberace Museum. Rated the third most popular attraction in Nevada, the Liberace Museum displays a dazzling collection of jewelry, priceless antiques, a million-dollar wardrobe and several rare classic cars used by "Mr. Showmanship." Proceeds from the museum and its adjoining gift shop support The Liberace Foundation for the Performing and Creative Arts, which provides financial assistance for gifted students of the arts. Perhaps the glitz and glamor synonymous with Liberace are not your cup of tea? Then maybe a trip to the Lied Discovery Children's Museum might capture your attention. A non-profit museum, it is designed to provide entertaining, yet eixjoyable learning experiences for visitors. Although geared towards children of all ages, many exhibits are entertaining and educational for adults as well. One exhibit, "Hurricane Hugo," allows visitors to learn about hurricanes and how to equip a ship for rough seas. One of the most popular sites at Lied is "Tornado." Using fans, lighting and vapor, the attraction simulates the look and movement of an actual tornado. A trip to the museum may take from one to three hours or more depending on the person. But, in terms of handson displays, there's no other museum in the area that comes close to the number of exhibits at Lied. So the next time you're looking for a way to get out of trudging through the endless stream of casinos, a day of sight-seeing at a few museums may be just the ticket A piano played by Chopin is one of a dozen on display at the Liberace Museum. Photos by John Judge and Rob Weidenfeld Visitors to the Luxor's King Tut's Tomb will-see replicas such as this coffin in which the boy king was buried. An Egyptian guard watches over King Tut's Tomb at the Luxor. -Stuffee,'a large stuffed figure, is used at the Lied Children's Museum to demonstrate the workings of the human body. An engine dating to 1916 is one of the many Clark County Heritage Museum exhibits. Summary of area museum locations, features Hoover Dam Museum Boulder City/Hoover Dam Museum, 444 Hotel Plaza, Boulder City, houses historical artifocts relating to the workers and construction of Hoover Dam. Admission: $ 1 general; 50 cents for seniors and children. (294-1988) Guinness World of Records Museum The Guinness World of Records, 2780 S. Las Vegas Blvd., has hands-on displays orxd the "World of Las Vegas" exhibit of superbtives ond records set in Las Vegas. The museum is open from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. doily. Admission; $4.95 general; $3.95 for senior citizens, military personnel and students; $2.95 for chilcfren ages 5-12; and free for chiWren under 4. (792-3766) Heritoge Museum Clark County Heritage Museum, 1830 S. Boulder Highway in Henderson, houses 0 vortety of exhibits, including a timeline of Sou#>em NevocJo, the Heritage Street hisioricol residence area and Nevodo ghost town display. Admission: $1.50 general; $1 for senk>r citizens and children. Hours are from 9 to 4:30 daily. (455-7955) Hollxwood AAovie Museum Debbie Reyndds HoNywood Movie Museum, locoted inside Debbie Reynolds Hotel, 305 Convention Center Dr., has a private collection of Hollywood memorabilia. Tours ore held on tne hour from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturday, and Sundays and Mondays from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Admission: $7.95. (7332334) Indian Village Bruno's Indian Village, 1306 Nevada Highway, Boulder City, features o turquoise museum, trading post and art gallery. Guided tours are offered doily. Admission: $2. (293-4865) Liberace Museum The Liberace Museum, 1 775 E. Tropicona Ave., houses exhibits of the late pianist's jewelry, antiques, pianos, wardrobe and rare cars. Admission: $6.50 general; $4.50 for senior citizens; $3.50 Tor stucients; and $2 for children 6-12.(798-5595) Ued DtKOverv Museum Lied Discovery Chilciren's Museum ot 833 N. Las Vegas Blvd., features more ifion 100 bonds-on exhibits, workshops, performances and demonstrations. Admission: $5 general; $4 for senior citizens; $3 for children oges 3-11 and free for children 2 and younger. (382-5437) Lost City Museum Lost City Museum in Overton, 60 miles northeast of Los Vegas off Interstate 15, provides on extensive collection of early Pueblo Indian artifacts. Admission: $2 for adults 18 ond older (1-397-2193) Magic and Movie Hall of Fame The Mogic and Movie Noll of Fame, on the second floor of CSheas, 3555 S. Las Vegas Blvd., showcases antique memorooilia from famous nxigicians and ventriloquists ond popular nxjvies. It is open from 1 to 11 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays. Admission: $5.50. (7381343) Natural History Los Vegas Noturol History Museum, 900 N. Las Vegos Blvd., offers a dioromo featuring the scenic beauty of Southern Nevacfo and 0 3,000-gallon aquarium shark exhibit. Hours ore from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. doily. Admission: $5 general; $4 for senior citizens, military personnel and students; and free for children urider 4. (384-3466) Nevodo Stole Museum Nevada State Museum and Historical Society, 700 Twin Lakes Dr. in Lorenzi Pork, offen permanent exhibits on regkjnol and noiurol history in oddition to their current speciol exhibits, "Bafc!"and "Venomous Reptiles of Southern Nevada." It is open doilv from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission: $2 for adults, free for children. (486-5205) Sculpture Museum Green Volley Outdoor Sculpture Museum Information Center, in the Green Valley Shopping Plaza on Sunset Rood and Green Valley Parkway, provides location mops and information on the various outdoor sculptures located throughout the Green Volley/Henderson oreo. (458-8855) King Tuf s Tomb King Tut's Tomb and Museum, inside the Luxor, 3900 S. Las Vegas Blvd., is a reproducticxi of the boy Icing's tomb as unearthed by Howord Carter and Lord CorrKjrvon in 1922. Admission: $3 for a 20-minute guided tour. (262-4000) UNLV Museum The Marjorie Borrick Museum of Noturol History is on the UNLV contpus, 4505 S. AtoryJofKl Porkwoy. Smithsonian Institution eMiibits ore on display. (8953381)

PAGE 21

1 W ^ \ X \ A t *. X '. \ '. • HHMillli Page 20 Henderson Home News Ttiursday, November 16, 1995 LATHUM Sports in the area From Page 19 both of us being from Las Vegas," Lathum said. "He'll be able to show me the ropes over there in Minnesota." Although he played with the big club last year in spring training before the strike was resolved, Lathum said he never considered that as making 'the show.' "Doing that just helped me work 100% harder just to get back to there," he said. "In my eyes, I wasn't thinking I was a big leaguer as I crossed, I was just over there playing ball. I just said to myself, 'I'm going to work harder to get back there.'" If he does make it to the majors, Lathum said he doesn't expect to be questioned much about crossing the line last season to play as a replacement. "I don't think I'll run into problems, but I'll run into attitudes from players," Lathum said. "Once you run across some of those older guys who have established themselves up there, they'll have attitudes towards you. But, a lot of people don't understand the reason why you did it. Some guys did it because they'll never be there. "A lot of people asked me why I crossed being only 22-years-old with the talent that I had, but ''We are rebuilding. tCliris Lathum] is an intricate part in Uie trade/' Sean Sarlin Twins' media relations once I tell them the situation I was in, they totally understand." At age 22, Lathum fits in well with the ideology of the Twins, who struggled through a losing season this past year., "We are rebuilding," said the Twins' assistant director of media relations, Sean Sarlin. "He's an intricate part in the trade." It's no secret that Lathum enjoyed playing in the Dodgers organization and respects the club, but he thinks the trade will benefit him. "With the Dodgers, they just re-signed [centerfielder] Brett Butler, which I think is a bad move because they have guys who are ready to fill that spot up there now, which is setting everybody back a year," Lathum said. Scoreboard The Twins hope the Dodgers' decision to go after a title with experience next year will help Minnesota in the future. "What we do is compile all kinds of reports throughout the year and when we made the trade, [Lathum] was a guy we were aware of in the organization, all the way back to his days at Basic High School," Corrigan said. If Lathum does make the jump to the majors this season, he'll join '87 graduate Doug Brady (Chicago White Sox) and '89 graduate Scott Baker (Oakland A's) as former Wolves who are seeing plaining time in the mayors. It's something Lathum has wanted his whole life. "It's great getting paid to do something you love — you can't beat it," Lathum said. "Not too many people in the world can say they get paid to do something they love. It's awesome getting ready to play up there. I've always dreamed about it, watching the guys and going to the games when I was ayoungkid, and now I'm knocking on the door." The Twins are about to answer that knock. Basic's Seybert earns all-state honor Basic junior Angelo Seybert received all-state honors for boys cross country this season. Seybert finished 14th at the state finals nearly two weeks ago. He is the only runner from any of the three Henderson-area high schools to be named all-state. Larkin collects 18 tackles for Lake Forest Linebacker CorDell Larkin, the son of Henderson's Eudora Leavett, recorded 18 tackles for Lake Forest College, III, in its 31-20 loss to Beloit College in the season finale. The Foresters finished 0-9 on the year with six of their losses coming by 11 points or less. Larkin is a junior at Lake Forest. NFL From Page 19 something has to change. Maybe this year is just a fluke, but Drew Bledsoe and his left shoulder may say, "Maybe not." And who knows, maybe if Marino's agent would have been able to get Marino on the cup with Bugs Bunny, everything would be OK. But for now, it isn't even close to OK. Look at the betting lines this week. As of Tuesday, five games were off the board because of injured QBs. That's npt good for the sport. y. ; : • I know quarterbacks can't ride around in a little'Popemobile' to protect themselves, but something has to be done to keep the marquee QB's on the field rather than on the sidelines. If they don't, that McDonalds guy really may finish the season for the Patriots at quarterback. Well, come to think of it, with the year Bledsoe is having, maybe that wouldn't be such a bad idea. Q Express Lube FAST RELIABLE GUARANTEED Boulder Highway & Palo Verde jH Henderson Phone: 565-0522 ACROSS FROM THE MOVIE THEATER • S5.00 OFF our regular S24.95 14-Po int service Oil & Filter Change, il9 95 Lube and 14-Point Checkup. Includes 3 Free Car Washes (a $9,00 value!) • 30-95 With ihis ad MosI cars Includes 5 Quarts ol Havoline Formula 3 molor oil Expires '. ^ .HENDERSON PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT ADULT BASEBALL 16/Over League W L FSBC 11 2 B F.D. Allstars 7 6 Lion Kings 7 6 GES 7 6 P. I.e. 4 9 MGM Grand Madness 3 10 HENDERSON PARKS and RECREATTON DEPARTMENT SOCCER Valley View 3/4 Silver W Lightning 6 Jaguars 5 Bushwackers 3 Raptors 2 Green Hornets 1 Hot Shots 1 Valley View 3/4 East W Orange Crush 7 Stars 6 Screaming Eagles 3 Red Devils 2 Blue Bombers 1 Tornados 0 Valley View 5/6 Gold W Screaming Eagles 6 Shockers — 6 Blades 5 Cowboys "~ 3 Comets ,3 Field Masters 2 Rockets • 3 Panthers 1 Cougars 1 Hot Shots 0 Valley View 7/8 Diamond W United 5 Cosmo 4 Scorpions 2 Bombers 1 Silver Spring* 3/4 East W Falcons .5 Coyotes • -4 Hurricanes • ., • • • ^-".•..' 4 Raiders • 3 Screaming Eagles ^; ; .' .3 Fighting Irish 2 Silver Springs 3/4 Panthers Muddogs Gators Jaguars Strikers Maddogs W 7 T 0 1 2 2 1 0 T 0 0 2 1 1 0 T 1 1 1 1 2 0 0 3 0 0 T 0 2 1 1 T 0 0 0 0 0 0 T 0 Silver Springs 3/4 West W L T Rushing Himcanes 7 0 0 Big Slammers 3 2 2 Panthers 3 3 1 Torpedos 2 3 2 Strikers 2 4 1 Chargers 16 0 Silver Springs 5/6 Gold East W L T Eagles 5 11 Roadrunners 5 2 0 Panthers 3 2 2 Hawks 2 4 1 Sidewinders 2 5 0 Desen Rats 1 Silver Springs 5/6 Gold W Cougars 6 Panthers • 5 Jaguars 3 Meerkats .2 Strikers '" \ 2 G.V. Fearless 2 Bulldogs 2 Sharks 2 Silver Springs 7/8 Diamond Sting Panthers Strykers Jaguars Tigers Scorpions Aces Falcons W 6 4 3 3 3 2 2 0 GRID PICKS 1 MATCHUP Bill Bowman D.J. Allen | COLLEGES New Mexico St. at UNLV New Mexico St. New Mexico St. San Jose St. at UNR UNR UNR Colorado at Kansas State Colorado Colorado Utah at BYU BYU BYU Notre Dame at Air Force Air Force Notre Dame Alabama at Auburn Auburn Auburn Michigan at Penn State Michigan Penn State 1 PROS 1 NY Giants at Philadelphia Philadelphia Phlladephia Green Bay at Cleveland Green Bay Green Bay Detroit at Chicago Chicago Chicago Pittsburgh at Cincinnati Pittsburgh Cincinnati Arizona at Carolina Carolina Arizona Dallas at Oakland Oalcland Dallas San Diego at Denver Denver San Diego San Francisco at Miami Miami Miami RECORD 94 68 3 96 • 66 • 3 THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY Las Vegas Gamblers Softball Club 'i=>f ^-i' The Las Vegas Gamblers Softball Club is having tryouts for its 14 & under ASA team for the 1996 season. Any girl interested in playing competitive fast pitch Softball that will be 14 or younger on September 1, 1996 is invited to the tryout. Tryouts are November 18 at 10:00 a.m. at Jaycee Park and November 19 at 3:30 p.m. at Maslow Park. Praclfices will begin in December and the team will start competing in tournaments in Arizona, California, and Nevada during late January or February. The Gamblers is the only club in Las Vegas to offer teams in three age divisions 14 & under, 16 & under, and 18 & under. For additional information contact: Diana Truax, Vice-President, 456-0138 Tommy Moores, Treasurer, 896-6521 Nina Hughes, Secretary, 645-3496 YIianHsQi\7inQ Nov. 23 W#V ^Vt^-^tV/^* Let us take care of Thanksgiving dinner this year while you relax with your family and friends. Choice of: ir ROAST TURKEY & Chestnut dressing served with fresh whipped potatoes, and giblet gravy ir GLAZED RAKED HAM served with Candied Yams & Champagne raisin sauce ROAST LEG of LAMR with Mint sauce. SPECIAL THANKSGIVING MEND $495 All Dinners served with soup or dinner salad & freshly balced bread. II a.m. to 10:30 p.m. 444 Sunset Rd. Herxlerson, Nevada Bahed TJam Tloas!" Turhcy with Sweet Sauce with Sage Dressing Hoast Turkey with Dressing :$c;-i-^v^""'^ • §4.95 '\':::S::-^;P^ JESTER'S COaiiT Noon 9pm. Dinnei^ include all the trimmings & pumpkin pie! 1/4 Mile West of Boulder Highway Roast Turkey, Baked Ham and Roast Beef, Sage Dressing, Candied Yams. Mashed Potatoes, Giblet Gravy, Cranberry Sauce, Ambrosia Salad, Waldorff Salad with Full Salad Bar, Soup, Baby Carrots, Green Beans Almondine & Dessert Bar. §4.95 WILD CaUD BaFFET 11 am 9pm C A S I NO ANOTHER FINE BOYD GAMING PROPERTY Boulder Highway, Between Lake Mead & Sunset HENDERSON HOME NEWS 'BOULDER CITY NEWS • LIFESTYLES • YOUR HEALTH T WHAT'S PLAYING T LAST WORDS •4 4 .1 'i SEcnoN Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson and Boulder City, Nevada P*gB1 MUSEUMS: \fe^l Thomas K. Lacy Nev>/s Staff Writer For many of us living in the Las Vegas Valley, a steady flow of visiting relatives is the norm rather than the exception. • • / :-^j • They get a place to stay in the entertainment capital of the world, and we get a chance to brush up on tour guide and Strip-driving skills for a few days. Trips to the casinos are standard, but museums may not top the list of must-see atti'actions. It may be time for a change, though. No fewer than 14 museums are located in Las Vegas, Boulder City and Henderson. And as the area continues to experience commercial and population growth, we're likely to see an even greater number of museums in the future. Whether you're into hands-on science type exhibits or the traditional wildlife displays in scenic dioramas, a variety of museums are within a halfhour's drive from most parts of the valley. While most museums are not located inside casinos, there are a few notable exceptions. When Howard Carter and Lord Carnarvon discpvered King Tutankhamun's tomb in 1922, it's a good bet they never expected a fullsized replica to be built in Las Vegas. Enter the Luxor. Since 1993, when King Tut's Tomb and Museam opened at the Luxor, -^^ hundreds of thousands of visitors have traveled 3,300 years back in time to see how the "boy king" prepared for the after-life. More than 500 assorted pieces are placed throughout the burial chamber as they remained undisturbed for three millennium. Here, visitors can see an exact replica of what the two archaeologists discovered when they first laid eyes on Tut's tomb more than 60 years ago. A narrative is played throughout the tour, ensuring an educational as well as entertaining experience. If you're in the mood to visit a museum, but don't care to dodge cabs, buses and gawking tourists on the Strip, a good choice is the Liberace Museum. Rated the third most popular attraction in Nevada, the Liberace Museum displays a dazzling collection of jewelry, priceless antiques, a million-dollar wardrobe and several rare classic cars used by "Mr. Showmanship." Proceeds from the museum and its adjoining gift shop support The Liberace Foundation for the Performing and Creative Arts, which provides financial assistance for gifted students of the arts. Perhaps the glitz and glamor synonymous with Liberace are not your cup of tea? Then maybe a trip to the Lied Discovery Children's Museum might capture your attention. A non-profit museum, it is designed to provide entertaining, yet eixjoyable learning experiences for visitors. Although geared towards children of all ages, many exhibits are entertaining and educational for adults as well. One exhibit, "Hurricane Hugo," allows visitors to learn about hurricanes and how to equip a ship for rough seas. One of the most popular sites at Lied is "Tornado." Using fans, lighting and vapor, the attraction simulates the look and movement of an actual tornado. A trip to the museum may take from one to three hours or more depending on the person. But, in terms of handson displays, there's no other museum in the area that comes close to the number of exhibits at Lied. So the next time you're looking for a way to get out of trudging through the endless stream of casinos, a day of sight-seeing at a few museums may be just the ticket A piano played by Chopin is one of a dozen on display at the Liberace Museum. Photos by John Judge and Rob Weidenfeld Visitors to the Luxor's King Tut's Tomb will-see replicas such as this coffin in which the boy king was buried. An Egyptian guard watches over King Tut's Tomb at the Luxor. -Stuffee,'a large stuffed figure, is used at the Lied Children's Museum to demonstrate the workings of the human body. An engine dating to 1916 is one of the many Clark County Heritage Museum exhibits. Summary of area museum locations, features Hoover Dam Museum Boulder City/Hoover Dam Museum, 444 Hotel Plaza, Boulder City, houses historical artifocts relating to the workers and construction of Hoover Dam. Admission: $ 1 general; 50 cents for seniors and children. (294-1988) Guinness World of Records Museum The Guinness World of Records, 2780 S. Las Vegas Blvd., has hands-on displays orxd the "World of Las Vegas" exhibit of superbtives ond records set in Las Vegas. The museum is open from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. doily. Admission; $4.95 general; $3.95 for senior citizens, military personnel and students; $2.95 for chilcfren ages 5-12; and free for chiWren under 4. (792-3766) Heritoge Museum Clark County Heritage Museum, 1830 S. Boulder Highway in Henderson, houses 0 vortety of exhibits, including a timeline of Sou#>em NevocJo, the Heritage Street hisioricol residence area and Nevodo ghost town display. Admission: $1.50 general; $1 for senk>r citizens and children. Hours are from 9 to 4:30 daily. (455-7955) Hollxwood AAovie Museum Debbie Reyndds HoNywood Movie Museum, locoted inside Debbie Reynolds Hotel, 305 Convention Center Dr., has a private collection of Hollywood memorabilia. Tours ore held on tne hour from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturday, and Sundays and Mondays from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Admission: $7.95. (7332334) Indian Village Bruno's Indian Village, 1306 Nevada Highway, Boulder City, features o turquoise museum, trading post and art gallery. Guided tours are offered doily. Admission: $2. (293-4865) Liberace Museum The Liberace Museum, 1 775 E. Tropicona Ave., houses exhibits of the late pianist's jewelry, antiques, pianos, wardrobe and rare cars. Admission: $6.50 general; $4.50 for senior citizens; $3.50 Tor stucients; and $2 for children 6-12.(798-5595) Ued DtKOverv Museum Lied Discovery Chilciren's Museum ot 833 N. Las Vegas Blvd., features more ifion 100 bonds-on exhibits, workshops, performances and demonstrations. Admission: $5 general; $4 for senior citizens; $3 for children oges 3-11 and free for children 2 and younger. (382-5437) Lost City Museum Lost City Museum in Overton, 60 miles northeast of Los Vegas off Interstate 15, provides on extensive collection of early Pueblo Indian artifacts. Admission: $2 for adults 18 ond older (1-397-2193) Magic and Movie Hall of Fame The Mogic and Movie Noll of Fame, on the second floor of CSheas, 3555 S. Las Vegas Blvd., showcases antique memorooilia from famous nxigicians and ventriloquists ond popular nxjvies. It is open from 1 to 11 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays. Admission: $5.50. (7381343) Natural History Los Vegas Noturol History Museum, 900 N. Las Vegos Blvd., offers a dioromo featuring the scenic beauty of Southern Nevacfo and 0 3,000-gallon aquarium shark exhibit. Hours ore from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. doily. Admission: $5 general; $4 for senior citizens, military personnel and students; and free for children urider 4. (384-3466) Nevodo Stole Museum Nevada State Museum and Historical Society, 700 Twin Lakes Dr. in Lorenzi Pork, offen permanent exhibits on regkjnol and noiurol history in oddition to their current speciol exhibits, "Bafc!"and "Venomous Reptiles of Southern Nevada." It is open doilv from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission: $2 for adults, free for children. (486-5205) Sculpture Museum Green Volley Outdoor Sculpture Museum Information Center, in the Green Valley Shopping Plaza on Sunset Rood and Green Valley Parkway, provides location mops and information on the various outdoor sculptures located throughout the Green Volley/Henderson oreo. (458-8855) King Tuf s Tomb King Tut's Tomb and Museum, inside the Luxor, 3900 S. Las Vegas Blvd., is a reproducticxi of the boy Icing's tomb as unearthed by Howord Carter and Lord CorrKjrvon in 1922. Admission: $3 for a 20-minute guided tour. (262-4000) UNLV Museum The Marjorie Borrick Museum of Noturol History is on the UNLV contpus, 4505 S. AtoryJofKl Porkwoy. Smithsonian Institution eMiibits ore on display. (8953381)

PAGE 22

LIFESTYLES Page B2 Henderson Home News • Boulder City News Thursday, November 16,1995 Willy & Jose's an easy choice We Recently decided to brave the crowds visiting ever-changing Sam's Town to try Willy & Jose's Cantina and Mexican Restaurant. My wife Julie, daughter Marcie and son Matthew, and I had a very good meal. Although not a large restaurant, the half-Western, halfMexican decor was visually inviting. Marcie complained that she didn't really care for restaurants with soft lighting. What adults call ambiance, kids call suspicious. The large menu offers a wide selection. Appetizers, from about $3 to $6, included nachos, taquitos, quesadilla and Mexican pizza. The regular size portion of nachos at a neighboring table was very large. We ordered the LET'S EAT OUT! PHILIP GOLDSTEIN smaller nachos for our two kids and found that was enough to satisfy them for dinner. Tostadas and chimichangas were available for dinner. Ranging from $6.25 to $7.95, beef, chicken or seafood tostadas were served with guacamole and sour cream. Chimichanga fillings included beef, chicken and seafood. Chicken and beef dinners, served with a choice of soup or salad plus rice and beans, included pechuga verde (grilled marinated chicken breast with cheese, polio fundido (crispy fried tortilla filled with chicken, cheese and sour cream), sincronizada (flour tortilla stuffed with sirloin chunks and peppers with onion, topped with tomatillo sauce and cheese), and steak picado. Dinners ranged fi-om $7.95 to $9.95. Sizzling beef, chicken, pork or shrimp fajitas, at $8.50 or $9.50, were served with soup or salad, rice, guacamole and sour cream. Other items included various burritos, shrimp and scallop entrees, as well as huachinango Veracruz (red snapper fillet), which sounded very interesting. Combination meals, also served with soup or salad plus rice and beans, offered small, medium and large dinners, from $5.95 to $8.50. Although there is no specific children's menu, we found many appetizers, a la carte tacos, enchiladas, and other items could be ordered at a reasonable price. Our kids eiyoyed their nachos and even shared a large bowl of albondigas (meatball) soup. I ordered the sincronizada which was very good, and started the meal with the excellent albondigas soup. I understand it is one of the most popular items on the menu, and deservedly so. Julie ordered the fajitas and also enjoyed her meal very much. For a treat, we tried the flan (custard) a la Kahlua—a sweet way to end our meal. It is easy to see why Willy & Jose's is abusy place. The service is very good and the food very tasty. An easy choice for a repeat visit. Goldstein, an attorney who lives in Henderson, wntes about his dining experiences with his wife Julie and young children Marcia and Matthew. FASTNET offers next-day alternative Olympic torchbearers selection begins The search for 10,000 torchbearers began Oct. 26. They will carry the Olympic flame to Atlanta during the 1996 Olympic Torch Relay presented by Coca-Cola, passing through thousands of American communities. The Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games and CocaCola announced the torchbearer selection process will be the most extensive search in Olympics history honoring extraordinary people who represent Olympic ideals. On April 27, 1996, the first torchbearer will receive the Olympic flame in Los Angeles and begin an 84-day, 15,000-mile journey across America—the largest ever relay. After traveling through 42 states, relay concludes in Atlanta July 19 for the Opening Ceremony of the 1996 Centennial Olympic Games. Tthe flame will bum for 100 days on U.S. soil. "Carrying the Olympic flame is a distinct honor that will be bestowed on very special people who exemplify the ideals and spirit of the Olympic Games," said Billy Payne, president and CEOofACOG. Selection methods are: •5,500 torchbearers will be nominated through the Community Hero application process, selected by local community judging panels •2,5U0 torchbearers will be selected through the "Share the Spirit" program of Coca-Cola, a global search including up to 500 torchbearers from other nations •2,000 Olympians and others who participate in the Olympic movement ;' : Community Heroes ACOG seeks to honor America's Community Heroes— eople whose service to others and meaningful community contributions bring light into the lives of millions of Americans. Nominees will be chosen by leaders and citizens in the communities the torchbearers are from. "Community Heroes are the foundation of America's greatness," said Payne 'These men and women, with their diverse backgrounds, are the catalysts of the programs and institutions that contribute so much to the future of our communities. Who better deserves the honor of carrying the Olympic fiame than these local heroes who everyday, in every action, bring to life the meaning of the Olympic Spirit." Applicants may nominate themselves or others through an entry form that includes writing 100 words or less about the qualities of the nominee. Those selected will possess one or more core values and ideals to be evaluated: performs outstanding volunteer work; serves as a community leader, role model or mentor; performs acts of generosity or kindness; performs extraordinary feats or accomplishments, locally ornationally. Throughout November entry forms will be available in communities through local United Way organizations or by calling (800)496-COKE. "Share the Spirit" ., Coca-Cola will offer 2,500 people—nationally and internationally—the chance to "Share the Spirit" by selecting someone special in their lives to carry the flame. Beginning in February 1996, people will be given the opportunity to select a special person they believe most deserves to run with the Olympic flame. Olympians Up to 1,000 Olympian torchbearers will be asked to carry the flame honoring 100 years of Olympic athletic competition and feats. The U.S. Olympic Committee will draw from the family of previous Olympians to carry the flame. Other torchbearers selected by ACOG will include media representatives and others who participate in the Olympic movement. Once Selected Torchbearers will carry the flame for up to one kilometer. ACOG will supply all 1996 torchbearers with a uniform and make available for purchase the torch carried by each torchbearer, and will designate a segment and date for each bearer along the route. Torchbearers representing every state will be selected to participate. A torchbearer must be 12 or older on April 27,1996, which weighs 3-1/2 pounds. Torchbearers with disabilities will be assisted. There is no fee or purchase requirementfor any part of the torchbearer selection process. Since 1936, the final road to every Olympic Games has been a trail of celebration and drama. The passing of the flame from hand to hand, torch to torch signals an era of peace and the joining of people. The approaching flame evokes a powerful sense of awe and respect. Audiences cheer, emotions swell, and the Olympic torch is proudly carried aloft. The flame is passed. To provide affordable prices on next-day delivery to local businesses, the Postal Service introduced local parcel service, FASTNET, in May in Las Vegas as part of phase two of the national test. Phase one was implemented in Orlando, Fla., in 1994. Twelve additional cities, including Las Vegas, were added to the successful test program, a spokesman said. FASTNET offers a more economical option for businesses now using UPS, local delivery service or in-house delivery. It can save companies up to $500 a week by eliminating overnight delivery charges and/or the expense of a delivery van, the spokesman said. Statistics show customers can expect to save up to 38% over local, in-house, and national competitors. For example, FASTNET users can send a 10pound parcel for $3.10, while UPS customers will spend $4.06 for the same package. "The main reason we started using FASTNET is because the USPScostforsendinga 70-poimd package to a consumer through FASTNET is lower than if we deliver it ourselves," said Darvin Schlepitz, production supervisor of Addressing and Mailing Inc. Other advantages of FASTNET includ Saturday pick-up, late afternoon acceptance at local post offices, and late night drop-off at designated postal facilities. Merchandise from one pound to a maximum of 70 pounds can be delivered. Customers are provided bar code labels, a parcel number and a number that identifies a parcel or a container. Bar codes are scanned at acceptance, in-route and on arrival at the delivery unit. According to Jeff Conwell, district coordinator, in addition to providing an economical way for businesses to ship locally, USPS also hopes FASTNET will offset a decrease in the use of letter correspondence. • The decrease is caused partly by the technology boom providing e-mail and fax, which led to a decrease in business-to-business letter size mail, and banking by phone and personal computer, which allows customers to pay bills without using the postal service. The service hopes that FASTNET will become the ship per of choice for home businesses and home shopping clubs and catalogs, increasing significantly across the country. In Las Vegas, FASTNET already has 58 customers who process and deliver more than 1,300 parcels. To insure proper and timely delivery, the parcels are given a high-profile appearance. FASTNET labels are attached to each parcel, with logo and colors prominently displayed, then transported in bright purple sacks—highly visible and easily identifiable to postal workers "The commitment of the employees that provide this timely service will make FASTNET a success," Conwell said. The Las Vegas test has proved successful with a 99.7% on-time delivery rate. IN CONCIRT Origami class Nov. 18 A two-hour origami workshop will be offered from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Nov. 18, at the Reed Whipple Cultural Center, 821 N. Las Vegas Blvd. Instructor Walter Brock will teach the easy, fun and relaxing ;*, \ fi \ fine artofpaperfolding. Learn to make interesting, colorful decorations for the home, treeor for a special gift wrap touch. The fee is $12 and enrollment is limited. For more information or to sign up, call 229-6211. SIDS group to meet The Clark County affiliate of the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Alliance will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 21, at 1600 Pinto Lane, third floor (west entrance). The purpose of the meeting is to provide support to all SIDS parents. All interested parents, family members and friends are invited to attend. For more information, call 455-3894. Adoption Fair Saturday The Division of Child and Family Services will host an Adoption-Foster Care Awareness Fair from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday.Nov. 18,attheGrantSawyer State Building, Room 4412, 555 E. Washington St., Las Vegas. For more information, call Ann Coleman, 486-5195, or Beverly A. George-Crosby, 486-6178. Don't miss the rea/maL. Neal McCoy's two No. 1 singles, "Wink' and "No Doubt About It," and a gold album say a lot about Neal's music, but it doesn't even begin to describe his live show. On stage, Neal's got a brand of country rock with a whole lot of roll, mixed all up with some R&B and even a little country rap. [ Known for his outrageous on-stage antics, Neal's show kicks butt. Buy your tickets today! December 2 Si 3 8 & 10:30 December 4 Si 5 10:30 only Tickets $2Z50 Per person. On sale at Player Services Booth. No phone calls. Where Locals Bring Their Friends Floinidcjo (iiul BoiildtM Hicjhwciy Thursday, November16, 1995 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Pag B3 ',£-"'#' • THE 40,000 SQ. FOOT ^^iimn^ it SPORTING GOODSI A\EET UNLV ATHLETIC COACHES MEGASTORE! UNIV I OPf Niliia GiVFiW>S BILL BAYNO IIM BOLLA Runnin' Rebel Basketball Coach Lady Rebel Bosketball Coach November 1 7, 6-8pm November 18, 2-4pm tRANP PRIZED ^f / TOYOTA TACOMA !s'.::;7 M^ 3 o. • =i.w i • •oiKmtii^. • • '***3--^i^ .^ '<^. v^ JEFF HORTON FRED DALLIMOREI Rebel Football Coach Hustlin' Rebel Baseball Coach November 16, 5-7pm November 16, 4-6pm ALSO APPEALING UNLV Cheerleaders UNJV| "Hey Reb" Mascot • "^ .Jfc<54 PATRICE LEFEBVRE ALSO MEET HEAD COACH ELAINE MOORE CHRIS MCSORLEY Thursday Nov. 16lh 6-8pm I TOYOTA WOMA • ^I^ SPORTS VACATION FOR 4 TO OriandO FLORIDA "you llflyUSAir-theifl airline for Florida travel USAit IS a 'egislered service mark ol USAir Inc Passes to 8ea\\6iid^ TAKING YOU WHERE YOU'VE NEVER BEEN BEFORE, OflandO, Florida 5 nights stay at ^oy^sY^^. 1-800-366-6299 SunSpree Resort ii SunSpree Resort ^-^^7 Tickets Around an of golf NBA gam^ at fre 2ND PRIZE 3RD PRIZE W'liiH.'ll l GOlFl|f^CLUB 4TH PRIZE |^P|[ •NFL jersey FAN ^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ PACK £'LBOIIW )^g^ •NBA jersey FAN *^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ DAfU *0fficial SPALDING rMVI>Spa|ding basketball $tOOciFTCERTIFICATi ^^CERTIFICATE Goodot I any one of over I 120 The Sports I Avtiwrity lo
PAGE 23

LIFESTYLES Page B2 Henderson Home News • Boulder City News Thursday, November 16,1995 Willy & Jose's an easy choice We Recently decided to brave the crowds visiting ever-changing Sam's Town to try Willy & Jose's Cantina and Mexican Restaurant. My wife Julie, daughter Marcie and son Matthew, and I had a very good meal. Although not a large restaurant, the half-Western, halfMexican decor was visually inviting. Marcie complained that she didn't really care for restaurants with soft lighting. What adults call ambiance, kids call suspicious. The large menu offers a wide selection. Appetizers, from about $3 to $6, included nachos, taquitos, quesadilla and Mexican pizza. The regular size portion of nachos at a neighboring table was very large. We ordered the LET'S EAT OUT! PHILIP GOLDSTEIN smaller nachos for our two kids and found that was enough to satisfy them for dinner. Tostadas and chimichangas were available for dinner. Ranging from $6.25 to $7.95, beef, chicken or seafood tostadas were served with guacamole and sour cream. Chimichanga fillings included beef, chicken and seafood. Chicken and beef dinners, served with a choice of soup or salad plus rice and beans, included pechuga verde (grilled marinated chicken breast with cheese, polio fundido (crispy fried tortilla filled with chicken, cheese and sour cream), sincronizada (flour tortilla stuffed with sirloin chunks and peppers with onion, topped with tomatillo sauce and cheese), and steak picado. Dinners ranged fi-om $7.95 to $9.95. Sizzling beef, chicken, pork or shrimp fajitas, at $8.50 or $9.50, were served with soup or salad, rice, guacamole and sour cream. Other items included various burritos, shrimp and scallop entrees, as well as huachinango Veracruz (red snapper fillet), which sounded very interesting. Combination meals, also served with soup or salad plus rice and beans, offered small, medium and large dinners, from $5.95 to $8.50. Although there is no specific children's menu, we found many appetizers, a la carte tacos, enchiladas, and other items could be ordered at a reasonable price. Our kids eiyoyed their nachos and even shared a large bowl of albondigas (meatball) soup. I ordered the sincronizada which was very good, and started the meal with the excellent albondigas soup. I understand it is one of the most popular items on the menu, and deservedly so. Julie ordered the fajitas and also enjoyed her meal very much. For a treat, we tried the flan (custard) a la Kahlua—a sweet way to end our meal. It is easy to see why Willy & Jose's is abusy place. The service is very good and the food very tasty. An easy choice for a repeat visit. Goldstein, an attorney who lives in Henderson, wntes about his dining experiences with his wife Julie and young children Marcia and Matthew. FASTNET offers next-day alternative Olympic torchbearers selection begins The search for 10,000 torchbearers began Oct. 26. They will carry the Olympic flame to Atlanta during the 1996 Olympic Torch Relay presented by Coca-Cola, passing through thousands of American communities. The Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games and CocaCola announced the torchbearer selection process will be the most extensive search in Olympics history honoring extraordinary people who represent Olympic ideals. On April 27, 1996, the first torchbearer will receive the Olympic flame in Los Angeles and begin an 84-day, 15,000-mile journey across America—the largest ever relay. After traveling through 42 states, relay concludes in Atlanta July 19 for the Opening Ceremony of the 1996 Centennial Olympic Games. Tthe flame will bum for 100 days on U.S. soil. "Carrying the Olympic flame is a distinct honor that will be bestowed on very special people who exemplify the ideals and spirit of the Olympic Games," said Billy Payne, president and CEOofACOG. Selection methods are: •5,500 torchbearers will be nominated through the Community Hero application process, selected by local community judging panels •2,5U0 torchbearers will be selected through the "Share the Spirit" program of Coca-Cola, a global search including up to 500 torchbearers from other nations •2,000 Olympians and others who participate in the Olympic movement ;' : Community Heroes ACOG seeks to honor America's Community Heroes— eople whose service to others and meaningful community contributions bring light into the lives of millions of Americans. Nominees will be chosen by leaders and citizens in the communities the torchbearers are from. "Community Heroes are the foundation of America's greatness," said Payne 'These men and women, with their diverse backgrounds, are the catalysts of the programs and institutions that contribute so much to the future of our communities. Who better deserves the honor of carrying the Olympic fiame than these local heroes who everyday, in every action, bring to life the meaning of the Olympic Spirit." Applicants may nominate themselves or others through an entry form that includes writing 100 words or less about the qualities of the nominee. Those selected will possess one or more core values and ideals to be evaluated: performs outstanding volunteer work; serves as a community leader, role model or mentor; performs acts of generosity or kindness; performs extraordinary feats or accomplishments, locally ornationally. Throughout November entry forms will be available in communities through local United Way organizations or by calling (800)496-COKE. "Share the Spirit" ., Coca-Cola will offer 2,500 people—nationally and internationally—the chance to "Share the Spirit" by selecting someone special in their lives to carry the flame. Beginning in February 1996, people will be given the opportunity to select a special person they believe most deserves to run with the Olympic flame. Olympians Up to 1,000 Olympian torchbearers will be asked to carry the flame honoring 100 years of Olympic athletic competition and feats. The U.S. Olympic Committee will draw from the family of previous Olympians to carry the flame. Other torchbearers selected by ACOG will include media representatives and others who participate in the Olympic movement. Once Selected Torchbearers will carry the flame for up to one kilometer. ACOG will supply all 1996 torchbearers with a uniform and make available for purchase the torch carried by each torchbearer, and will designate a segment and date for each bearer along the route. Torchbearers representing every state will be selected to participate. A torchbearer must be 12 or older on April 27,1996, which weighs 3-1/2 pounds. Torchbearers with disabilities will be assisted. There is no fee or purchase requirementfor any part of the torchbearer selection process. Since 1936, the final road to every Olympic Games has been a trail of celebration and drama. The passing of the flame from hand to hand, torch to torch signals an era of peace and the joining of people. The approaching flame evokes a powerful sense of awe and respect. Audiences cheer, emotions swell, and the Olympic torch is proudly carried aloft. The flame is passed. To provide affordable prices on next-day delivery to local businesses, the Postal Service introduced local parcel service, FASTNET, in May in Las Vegas as part of phase two of the national test. Phase one was implemented in Orlando, Fla., in 1994. Twelve additional cities, including Las Vegas, were added to the successful test program, a spokesman said. FASTNET offers a more economical option for businesses now using UPS, local delivery service or in-house delivery. It can save companies up to $500 a week by eliminating overnight delivery charges and/or the expense of a delivery van, the spokesman said. Statistics show customers can expect to save up to 38% over local, in-house, and national competitors. For example, FASTNET users can send a 10pound parcel for $3.10, while UPS customers will spend $4.06 for the same package. "The main reason we started using FASTNET is because the USPScostforsendinga 70-poimd package to a consumer through FASTNET is lower than if we deliver it ourselves," said Darvin Schlepitz, production supervisor of Addressing and Mailing Inc. Other advantages of FASTNET includ Saturday pick-up, late afternoon acceptance at local post offices, and late night drop-off at designated postal facilities. Merchandise from one pound to a maximum of 70 pounds can be delivered. Customers are provided bar code labels, a parcel number and a number that identifies a parcel or a container. Bar codes are scanned at acceptance, in-route and on arrival at the delivery unit. According to Jeff Conwell, district coordinator, in addition to providing an economical way for businesses to ship locally, USPS also hopes FASTNET will offset a decrease in the use of letter correspondence. • The decrease is caused partly by the technology boom providing e-mail and fax, which led to a decrease in business-to-business letter size mail, and banking by phone and personal computer, which allows customers to pay bills without using the postal service. The service hopes that FASTNET will become the ship per of choice for home businesses and home shopping clubs and catalogs, increasing significantly across the country. In Las Vegas, FASTNET already has 58 customers who process and deliver more than 1,300 parcels. To insure proper and timely delivery, the parcels are given a high-profile appearance. FASTNET labels are attached to each parcel, with logo and colors prominently displayed, then transported in bright purple sacks—highly visible and easily identifiable to postal workers "The commitment of the employees that provide this timely service will make FASTNET a success," Conwell said. The Las Vegas test has proved successful with a 99.7% on-time delivery rate. IN CONCIRT Origami class Nov. 18 A two-hour origami workshop will be offered from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Nov. 18, at the Reed Whipple Cultural Center, 821 N. Las Vegas Blvd. Instructor Walter Brock will teach the easy, fun and relaxing ;*, \ fi \ fine artofpaperfolding. Learn to make interesting, colorful decorations for the home, treeor for a special gift wrap touch. The fee is $12 and enrollment is limited. For more information or to sign up, call 229-6211. SIDS group to meet The Clark County affiliate of the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Alliance will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 21, at 1600 Pinto Lane, third floor (west entrance). The purpose of the meeting is to provide support to all SIDS parents. All interested parents, family members and friends are invited to attend. For more information, call 455-3894. Adoption Fair Saturday The Division of Child and Family Services will host an Adoption-Foster Care Awareness Fair from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday.Nov. 18,attheGrantSawyer State Building, Room 4412, 555 E. Washington St., Las Vegas. For more information, call Ann Coleman, 486-5195, or Beverly A. George-Crosby, 486-6178. Don't miss the rea/maL. Neal McCoy's two No. 1 singles, "Wink' and "No Doubt About It," and a gold album say a lot about Neal's music, but it doesn't even begin to describe his live show. On stage, Neal's got a brand of country rock with a whole lot of roll, mixed all up with some R&B and even a little country rap. [ Known for his outrageous on-stage antics, Neal's show kicks butt. Buy your tickets today! December 2 Si 3 8 & 10:30 December 4 Si 5 10:30 only Tickets $2Z50 Per person. On sale at Player Services Booth. No phone calls. Where Locals Bring Their Friends Floinidcjo (iiul BoiildtM Hicjhwciy Thursday, November16, 1995 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Pag B3 ',£-"'#' • THE 40,000 SQ. FOOT ^^iimn^ it SPORTING GOODSI A\EET UNLV ATHLETIC COACHES MEGASTORE! UNIV I OPf Niliia GiVFiW>S BILL BAYNO IIM BOLLA Runnin' Rebel Basketball Coach Lady Rebel Bosketball Coach November 1 7, 6-8pm November 18, 2-4pm tRANP PRIZED ^f / TOYOTA TACOMA !s'.::;7 M^ 3 o. • =i.w i • •oiKmtii^. • • '***3--^i^ .^ '<^. v^ JEFF HORTON FRED DALLIMOREI Rebel Football Coach Hustlin' Rebel Baseball Coach November 16, 5-7pm November 16, 4-6pm ALSO APPEALING UNLV Cheerleaders UNJV| "Hey Reb" Mascot • "^ .Jfc<54 PATRICE LEFEBVRE ALSO MEET HEAD COACH ELAINE MOORE CHRIS MCSORLEY Thursday Nov. 16lh 6-8pm I TOYOTA WOMA • ^I^ SPORTS VACATION FOR 4 TO OriandO FLORIDA "you llflyUSAir-theifl airline for Florida travel USAit IS a 'egislered service mark ol USAir Inc Passes to 8ea\\6iid^ TAKING YOU WHERE YOU'VE NEVER BEEN BEFORE, OflandO, Florida 5 nights stay at ^oy^sY^^. 1-800-366-6299 SunSpree Resort ii SunSpree Resort ^-^^7 Tickets Around an of golf NBA gam^ at fre 2ND PRIZE 3RD PRIZE W'liiH.'ll l GOlFl|f^CLUB 4TH PRIZE |^P|[ •NFL jersey FAN ^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ PACK £'LBOIIW )^g^ •NBA jersey FAN *^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ DAfU *0fficial SPALDING rMVI>Spa|ding basketball $tOOciFTCERTIFICATi ^^CERTIFICATE Goodot I any one of over I 120 The Sports I Avtiwrity lo
PAGE 24

Page B4 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, November 16,1995 Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Pege B5 F • It TWEAR A huge selection of athletic shoes for the entire family! 4THLETIC APPAREL Great Selection of Menhir Ladies' Athletic Apparel! HUGE SELECTION IN EVERY DEPARTMENT The best name in-line skates, plus a qreal ^election of padding andf helmets! ROLLER DERBY CHARGER YOUTH IN-LINE SKATES COLEMAN 3 LB. SLEEPING BAG 33-x75-,3lb. Insul100 fill, nylon outer, poly/ nylon liner, Temp rating +50T SPECIAL PURCHASE MAO INSTRUMENT 3 IT & 2 'AA' COMBO KRYPTON LAMP Made from aircraft grade aluminum SOUTH BEND COMPETITOR LONG CAST SPINNING COMBO Ball bearing drive, front disc drag, rigtit or left hand retrieve reel matctied witfi 6 1'2 2 piece grapfiite composite rod. BiSniwAN NORMAN' LURE ASSORTMENT Cfioose from a variety of sizes and colors ^>^>. LURIS SPECIAL PURCHASE 98 SOUTHBEND I Choose from a variety of lengths and actions INSIDE EDGE LADIES' ALTITUDE PARKA 3/4 lengtfi parka, higfi collar, assorted solid colors. BusHneu. BUSHNBLL 8X22 COMPACT BINOCUURS 8PBED0 AQUA PRO GOGGLE I UV protection BLAOERUNNER DISCOVERY ADULT I M-UNE SKATES BIADIKUNWH SPORTS ^ AUTHORITY fivuamMjf xX--..'.^ "-, '^" MOSSBBRQ 500 12 GAUGE SHOTGUN 28' vent rib barrel 2 Accu-Choke tubes, syntt)etic stock and Oown Grade style synthetic forearm SALOMON OPTIMA 4.2 OR 4.2L ULTRALIGHT BOOTS Lightest ski boot available, with a comfortable and consistent fit SAI.OAIC/V INCLUDES: BINDINGS, POLES AND INSTALLATION! SUPER VALUE 269 K2 CTX 7.2 SKI PACKAGE Excellent entry level package Includes CTX 7 2 skis, Salomon Quad 600 bindings, ski poles and installation m There's No Better Place for Sporting Goods Equipment and Apparel! RACQUET SPORTS Join our frequent stringer program! 5th stringing free with purchase of 4 stringings. GOLF EQUIPMENT Clubs & Eguipment from the top manufacturers! EKTELON RACQUETBALLS REEBOK SMALL CORPORATE BAG 420 denier nylon in polyurethane coating.' adiuitable shoulder strap, embroidered logo U*S*A MRES HUFFY MANITOBA 26" MEN'S OR LADIES' ATB DuraiiteS mountain frame, 18 speed index thumb shifters power cantilever brakes EXPERT SERVICE • EVERYDAY LOW PRICES TEAIVI SPORTS From Soccer to Basketball, weVe got it all. HARVARD TOURNAMENT CABINET AND DARTSET Includes bnstleboard darts and cabinet €i9ii'^^',M^. A great selection of equipment, with assembly and convenient home delivery available. The Sports Mfi Authority ^^, PRICE m, GUARANTEE "^ ...means just that! If you ever find a lower competitor s price, well match it! Haul! FrttI HENDERSON igiFi^ Stephanie and Sunset im) ILwJ ^^ 1%. tik Stephanie and Sunset (70S) 433-2676 AUTHORITY Name Brand Sporting Goods at Everyday Low Prices...Guaranteed.

PAGE 25

Page B4 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, November 16,1995 Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Pege B5 F • It TWEAR A huge selection of athletic shoes for the entire family! 4THLETIC APPAREL Great Selection of Menhir Ladies' Athletic Apparel! HUGE SELECTION IN EVERY DEPARTMENT The best name in-line skates, plus a qreal ^election of padding andf helmets! ROLLER DERBY CHARGER YOUTH IN-LINE SKATES COLEMAN 3 LB. SLEEPING BAG 33-x75-,3lb. Insul100 fill, nylon outer, poly/ nylon liner, Temp rating +50T SPECIAL PURCHASE MAO INSTRUMENT 3 IT & 2 'AA' COMBO KRYPTON LAMP Made from aircraft grade aluminum SOUTH BEND COMPETITOR LONG CAST SPINNING COMBO Ball bearing drive, front disc drag, rigtit or left hand retrieve reel matctied witfi 6 1'2 2 piece grapfiite composite rod. BiSniwAN NORMAN' LURE ASSORTMENT Cfioose from a variety of sizes and colors ^>^>. LURIS SPECIAL PURCHASE 98 SOUTHBEND I Choose from a variety of lengths and actions INSIDE EDGE LADIES' ALTITUDE PARKA 3/4 lengtfi parka, higfi collar, assorted solid colors. BusHneu. BUSHNBLL 8X22 COMPACT BINOCUURS 8PBED0 AQUA PRO GOGGLE I UV protection BLAOERUNNER DISCOVERY ADULT I M-UNE SKATES BIADIKUNWH SPORTS ^ AUTHORITY fivuamMjf xX--..'.^ "-, '^" MOSSBBRQ 500 12 GAUGE SHOTGUN 28' vent rib barrel 2 Accu-Choke tubes, syntt)etic stock and Oown Grade style synthetic forearm SALOMON OPTIMA 4.2 OR 4.2L ULTRALIGHT BOOTS Lightest ski boot available, with a comfortable and consistent fit SAI.OAIC/V INCLUDES: BINDINGS, POLES AND INSTALLATION! SUPER VALUE 269 K2 CTX 7.2 SKI PACKAGE Excellent entry level package Includes CTX 7 2 skis, Salomon Quad 600 bindings, ski poles and installation m There's No Better Place for Sporting Goods Equipment and Apparel! RACQUET SPORTS Join our frequent stringer program! 5th stringing free with purchase of 4 stringings. GOLF EQUIPMENT Clubs & Eguipment from the top manufacturers! EKTELON RACQUETBALLS REEBOK SMALL CORPORATE BAG 420 denier nylon in polyurethane coating.' adiuitable shoulder strap, embroidered logo U*S*A MRES HUFFY MANITOBA 26" MEN'S OR LADIES' ATB DuraiiteS mountain frame, 18 speed index thumb shifters power cantilever brakes EXPERT SERVICE • EVERYDAY LOW PRICES TEAIVI SPORTS From Soccer to Basketball, weVe got it all. HARVARD TOURNAMENT CABINET AND DARTSET Includes bnstleboard darts and cabinet €i9ii'^^',M^. A great selection of equipment, with assembly and convenient home delivery available. The Sports Mfi Authority ^^, PRICE m, GUARANTEE "^ ...means just that! If you ever find a lower competitor s price, well match it! Haul! FrttI HENDERSON igiFi^ Stephanie and Sunset im) ILwJ ^^ 1%. tik Stephanie and Sunset (70S) 433-2676 AUTHORITY Name Brand Sporting Goods at Everyday Low Prices...Guaranteed.

PAGE 26

Page B6 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, November 16, 1 995 Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Page B7 Neige wins state Senior title For the second consecutive year, the Henderson Women's BowUng Association will be represented at the Women's International Bowling Congress Senior Championship Tournament Rochelle Neige won the Nevada WBA Senior Tournament in Division D (age 55-59) with a 1384 total in the event finals Nov. 12 in Yerington. The winner in Division A is Irene Miller with 1333. Fern Payne of Las Vegas took fourth with 1280. Div. 3 champion is Trudy Buchanan of Greater Reno with 1360. Betty Cagle of Las Vegas was fourth at 1284. Div. C winner is Marjorie Potter of Colorado River with 1386. Betty LaComb of Las Vegas came in seventh with 1289. :^;y^~'^' Each champion will receive free entry to the WIBC Senior Tournament next spring in Buffalo, N.Y. in addition to the state awards. MISFIT DOUBIES RESULTS: Ty Parker 233-632, Bob Jones 220-598, Mary Jones, Jr. 243-648, Phyllis Morris 225-622. SHIRTS& SKIRTSrCarl Lore 213-577, Dan Odegard 210-200553, Bon Lore 231 hep game, Julie Baker 646 hep series. Odegard was 193 pins over average. FOE 2672 EAGIES MIXED: Randy Birdsall 257 671 hep, 223569 scratch, Corky Oundy 2 26-579, lola Kirk 520, 640 hep, Nancy Barker 241 hep game. DON'T CARE LEAGUE: Tony Watts 201-554, Ken Brandau 214-605 hcD. Rick Davis 213-594 hep, Melodie Thompson 225-613, Marie Singer 613. WOODY CARDUCCI: Scott Miller 243-588, Ty Parker 211688, Dan Bingamon 582, Charles Brown, Jr. 215-577, John Keithley 225-577, Glen Bridges 218-563, Wendell Welcome 557, Dan Partridge 556,673 hep. Jack Tittman 556, Bill Jones 553, John Pomykal 223, Pike Spaulding 217, Walt Wagner 214, Ralph Fyke, Sr. 209, Tony Valdez. KERR-MCGEE: Mike Hanna 245-586, 267-652 hep, Tommi Bryan 220-582, Gregory Manuel 208, 259-572 hep, Geraldine Hardy 206, Judy Buck 206, Geraldine Hardy 562. Last week James Rudd 235635 hep, Larry Loueks 223, Eric Hays 594, Mary Jones, Jr. 226, Kim Harris 218, Judy Buck 625, Sharon Simpson 603, all hep. HENDERSON OUTLAWS: Dovie Spear 235-624, Kerrissa Lewis 234-617, Edie Aldrieh 617, all hep highs. SENIORS FOR FUN: Vem Halhday 506, 229-626 hep, Dick Salter 250-649, Micki Formentini 233, Sue Husch 610 hep. SUNDAYSTREAKERS:207507,256-654 hep, Alan Willey 545, 236-671 hep, Mary Jones 212-581, 249-692 hep, Susan Sprague 237, Robyn Reynolds 632 hep. RENATA'S ROOKIES: Scott Valtos 267-672, 292-747 hep, RiLlNES FROM THE LANES RUTH SOEHLKE 565-8398 chard Boyd 712 hep. Lalainya Schaeffer 120 pins above average with 192-423, 303-756 hep. Thefollowing week Scott Valtos 279 scratch game. Rick Benard 266-771 for 147 Dins over average, Trish McGregor 170-422,260 hep game, Kim Williamson 406, 721 hep series. TUMBLEWEEDS: Steve Harms226-629, BrentClouse225, 268 hep, Todd Hegardt 576. Sami Zelinski 203-490, Sue Schlepitz 539-198, Maryellen Collette 254652 hep and lOOpins overaverage. FUNTIMERS:MichaelWhite 236-611, Josh Donahe 219, Brian Munger 219,. Karla Kapcia 209481, Annette Reavy 187-481. FRIDAY FIVE SPECIAL: Andre Jemmott 259-650, Murel Huckaba 221, Matt Bradley 570. Last week Sandy Simpson 235615, Bob Hunt 225, Al Horsehler 252-704 hep, 222-621 for 614 and 128 pins over average, Simpson was 117 over average. Linda Wharram 239 hep game, Lori Maneilly 632 hep series. Dean Shar 220-606, Bob Hunt 604. MIXED UP JOKERS: Chuck Damico 241-202-639, John Hope 226,287-114 hep, Mary Daddario 521, Beth Glenk 235 hep. Hope was 135 pins over average. FRIDAY FRIENDS: John Pekarek 241-673, David Barton 225, Bill Hall 586, Steve Slaughter 116 over average. Dolores Xepoleas 203-537 GREEN VALLEY MDCED: Horacio Miteff 259, Mike Gamer 622, John Santos 233, James Schultz 205-200-597, Heide Tumley 116 pins over average with 229-581, Kay Lacy 195, Arlene Rossi 521. Nov. 10 John Leong, Jr. 224-636, Brian Munger 215, Danny Fejerang 543, Lawrence Weir, Jr. 212, Lawrence Weir, Sr. 200. Dede McDonough 207-525, Heidi 552,Jodi Grennan 105 pins over average, 250-681 hep. P.O.E.T.S.: Andy Anderson 224, Daye Degeest 2157 Harvey Lee 569, Al Narcesse 560, Ryan Hickman 130 pins over average with 685 hep. last week Jim Buckley -588, Brian Wing 220, Al Narcesse 220, Tom Reichel 212202-601 Sidney Lawrence 219. BROOKLYN CLUB OF LV: David Bondurant 202, Joe Cavaliere 222, Charlie Cable 200, Teresa Neilson 198,254-627 hep, ChrisTrippiedi 240-608 hep, Nick Damore 116 pins over average. Last week Joe Cavaliere led at 222-564, Bob Moore 244-648 hep highs, Pamela Busse217-513,257633 hep, Jim Thomson 209 and Robert Lauro 234. DAYTIMERS: Betty Keamer 202,236 hep, John Ross 199-521, Al Friend 522242-660, hep, Kay Pullia 505, Jane Strong 574 hep series, Al Friend 138 pins over CALL 736-BOWL SAVINGS LEAGUES NOW FORMING ll^lBeginning in January 10AM Morxiays Ladies Trio 8:30PM Mondays Any Foursome Nwna: Woffc Phone: Day Ptione: Leave at Bowling Center or CaU Lois 736-2695 average. Last week Randy Howe 253-637, 256-646 and 109 pins over average, Juanita Rael 190, 226597 hep, Kay Pullia 519. GO GETTERS: Alan Gottlieb 245-603, Mariano Lo Monaco 213571, Kay Pullia 199-538, Goldie Frons 236 hep game, Kay Pullia 634 hep series. Lo Monaco 100 pins overaverage. Last week Allan Gottlieb 224-612, Sedge Frons 212-585, Gottlieb 247-681 hep, Pauline 486,630 hep, Doris Heaps 628 hep series, 100 pins over average. GASSERS: Kelly Wiggins 241, Dave Sehlueter 236-621, David Lewis 218-606, Jerry Campbell 203-2553 hep game. Bob Nyland 662 hep series, Eugene Thomfohrda202. Last week Leroy Skochenski 236, Chuck Damico 223-2-9-604,691 hep and 103over average. Noel Thomson 200. STARLIGHTERS: Tony Smith 263-663, Roland Padua 224, Randy Higashi224, Lyn Berry 216-576, Janell Phillips 561. Ust week Steve Pro 275, Tony Smith 248-673, Benji Garrison 648, Janell Phillips 215, Karen Smith 214, 586 Kottie Kemp 214, Traci Butkiewicz 550. Charles Kadetz had 100 pins over average. WEDNESDAY WONDERS: Jack Battle 214-512, Gym Doerr 551, LynnOehmann 173-472. Last week Rick Serra 236-554, Bob Klobuchar219-523,DianeGandy 168-411, Tammy Parker, 245-630 hep highs. LATESTARTERS: Bob Woolheater 235-605, Chuck Damico 225-651, Kim Guertin 199-548, John Lawyer 264-712 hep, Margaret Cook 269-692 hep. Last week Rich Avalos 231, Dennis Collins 217-211-633, Bill Nichols 223, BobWeelheater 204200-600, Kim Guertin 211-545, Dawn Foren 548. Mel Martini 210207 for 119 over average. BEAUTIES & BEASTS: Jerry Herren 233, Dennis Guinn 588, Richard Gottlieb 218, Fulton Rapoza and David Calmelat 568, Judith Cole 193-517, Barbara Hernandez 175. Last week Dave Ross 234, Rex Hanson 214-212576, Dennis Guinn 567, Gigi Jones 193-530, Howard Ewald 213. ALLEY GATORS: Monica Trylovich 191-499, Judy Ray 515, Teresa Neilson 183 Last week Deann Wiley 198-496, Loretta Westly 191, Kim Talbot 485. Karen Brown had 131 pins over average with 165-482. BANK DF AMERICAJay Messimore221-587, Mike Weddell 205-542, Sharla Jones 185 Dee Brathor481. LADIES NIGHT OUT: Jane Gray 200-507, Carol Lassiter 191492Connie Maggart 587 hep series, Jane Gray 226 hep game. AFTERSCHOOLSPECIAL: Eddie Vance 158-381, Chris Barden 139-390, Vance 252-663 hep, Toni Mogollon 158-370,239613 hep highs. BREAKFASTCLUB:Tammy Buchholz 222-549,239 hep, Angie Fleitz 188, Lois Weisman 640 hep series. THURSDAY NITERS: Richard Krieger 277-642, Steve Pro 225, Mike McKinney 201-580. Rainy Roth 184, Sherry Teo 485, Michelle Brown 603 hep series. Krieger had 123 pins overaverage. HENDERSON TEACHERS: Jim Siple 238-200-606, Sal Locascio 227, Daryl Marsh 209202-601, Audrey Meinke 189-489. Mike Piseiotta 205. HALL OF FAME TIPS: Wayne Zahn, inducted in the ABC Hall of Fame in 1960 offers this basic advice: Pretend it's practice. In 1965, Bill Buenetta helped me overcome the pres sure ofhighlevel competition. His philosophy was basic: treat competition the same way you do practice. Concentrate on a mental image of whatyou want to do, and go ahead and do it." Soehike, a Henderson resident, reports local bowling scores in her weekly column. GRAND OPENING Plastercraft • Paints • Jewelry Windchimes • Hair Accessories • Indian Artifacts • Incense • Silk Plants & Trees Hand Blown Glass and More! ^We have low prices for all your gift buying needs. Kmart Center Sunset & Sandhill 451-9016 family Owned & Operated HENDERSON'S LAS VEGAS LANDSCAPE SUPPLY DISCOUNT PRICES! TiiE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY Complete Line of Decorative Rock Custom Soil Blends Irrigation & Drip Systems Wagon Wheels & Fountains > DRAWGS. .. ..-.-m feT 5:00 PM • 7:00 DM • 9:00 m^^^, ymktS AVAILABLE THROUGHOUT RESTAURANT AND CASINC^i NOVEMBEQ 16 22 •GUARANTEED WINNERS* -A WNNEPMUSTBE' PPESENTTOWINl ONE\CINNEPPEP' FAMILV. SKYLIKE / EMPLOYEES APE;, I INELIGIBLE '" mmmig ^ FINANCINQ AVAILABLE TOMS MATIOMWIiNE 3835 S, Maryland Pkwy. 794-4338 6565 W. Sahara Ave. 873-0055 ur> I c. SjuribLM 435-1533 ASK ABOUT oun' Fraa Raplacamanf onmnoATi 3440 Spring Mountain 876-9226 4RR1 F Flamingo 451-1453 J^JU fJ. Boulder Hwy. 565-8874 HOURS: MON-FRI 6:30^ SAT. 8:30-5 4431 N. Rancho '•"?!.. 645-5330 900 N Nellis Blvd. 438-1018 Mountain lions topic of board meeting When the Clark County Wildlife Advisory Board meets this month, the main topic will be the "Draft Mountain Lion Comprehensive Management Plan." The Nevada Division of Wildlife encourages those interested in the future of mountain lion management to attend the meeting at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 28, at the O.C. Lee Building, 1250 E. Bumham, Las Vegas. Keven Picardo, Wildlife and Habitat Improvement of Nevada president, stated his board voted : to give up his group's meeting time in support of the CCWAB. NDOW feels the future of mountain lion management in Nevada should be of interest to the public beyond the traditional hunter/sportsmen's constituency. The plan will be prsented by NDOW representatives on the team that developed the draft. The presentation includes a 45minute slide presentation and OUTDOORS WITH BARB BARB HENDERSON question time. Chairman Jack Coons of the CCWAB, encourages both the general public and sportsmen to add input at the Advisory Board meeting, prior to the Nevada Board of Wildlife Commissioner's meeting scheduled for Saturday, Dec. 2 in Las Vegas. For more information, call Jack Coons, 5647136, or NDOW, 486-5127. Outdoor Information Wildlife agencies receive $268 million Continuing a 60-year conservation tradition, state fish and wildlife agencies will receive $268 million in excise taxes in 1996 from hunters, anglers, target shooters and boaters. Nevada's share is expected to be slightly more than $1.8 miUion, the majority of which will go to NDOW. It is derived primarily from excise taxes on firearms and ammunition, archery equipment, fishing equipment, trolling motors and sonar fish finders. Funds are used by states for wildlife conservation through land acquisition, habitat improvement, research, game management and other programs. Funds also pay for hunting education programs and wildlife-related recreation programs. To date, these excise taxes have generated more than $4.8 billion for wildlife conservation in the U.S. Nominations for Conservation Award Nominations for the 1995 Kirch Nevada Wildlife Conservation Award are sought by the state's Board ofWildlife Commissioners. According to NDOW, an individual, a nonprofit organization, or an outdoor sports club will receive the award for achievement of significant results towards the conservation, management or enhancement of wildlife in the state during 1995. Nominees' accomplishments must also demonstrate the value of cooperative partnerships between the public and NDOW or the Board of Wildlife Commissioners. Selection of the winning nominee will be made solely from the official NWCA nominations form and supporting material. Seven judges will evaluate and assign a point score to each application. A simple majority of votes of the judges will decide the winner. The Fraternity of the Desert Bighorn, long noted for its work with Nevada's bighorn sheep, was the first recipient of the Wayne E. Kirch Wildlife Conservation Award in 1994. The award is named in memory of Wayne E. Kirch who served on SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER the Fish and Game Commission for more than 25 years, the longe'st tenure on the board since its inception in 1877. Kirch, of Las Vegas, passed away Aug. 27,1989. The recipient receives a specially cast bronze plaque produced under the direction of and donated by Wildlife Commissioners Marlene Kirch, daughter ofKirch. A permanent plaque that will bear the names of all recipients has been designed and will be displayed at the NDOW office nearest the recipient. Required official nomination forms are available fi"om NDOW, P.O. Box 89520. Nominations must be postmarked by Jan. 31, 1996. Until next week, ergoy the great outdoors. • • • • Henderson, an outdoor enthusiast, IS a host and producer of local TV and radio shows. Toot your horn for Parade of Lights I hope you are in full swing by now with the holiday season, have your thoughts and ideas ready to decorate your boat for the LMBOA Parade of Lights on Dec. 9. Registration forms are available at the Callville Bay, Las Vegas Bay and Lake Mead Marinas. If you haven't yet picked one up, the LMBOA has placed a copy of the form in today's paper. Because I write my columns in advance, I can't report with any accuracy how many boats have already entered. My hope is that we have reached our limit of 50 boats, the maximum we are allowed by permit. If this is your first parade, don't be hesitant about entering. It is quite simple. No theme is BOATING WITH RAY RAY EICHER required—only colored Christmas lights. One year I used only alot of white lights. When you check in at the registration desk, you will be given a instructions concerning safety, parade route, the 6 plm. start time, and when awards will be given, to mention a few concerns. A mandatory captains' meeting will take place at 4 p.m. to review instructions and answer questions. Many LIMBOA members will be available at the Lake Mead Marina to assist. There is a random start for the parade and you just follow behind someone. The park ranger leads out and guides the parade along the parade route and returns to the marina. It makes steering at night with a boatload of lights much easier. Just follow the boat in front of you. Having a VHF radio on board is beneficial but not required. Perhaps you can borrow a handheld one for this event if you don't have one. For the folks on the beach, the show is an opportunity for skippers to present an outstanding event featuring their boats. If you have never seen this show before, you are in for a treat. The special events beach area just below Lake Mead Marina is where you can park. The parade sails right in front of that area, proceeding to Hemmenway Harbor, then turning to come back along the parade route for viewing by boats on the water. Dress warmly as the night is usually chilly. When the boats pass your area, show your appreciation by lowing your horn. From the boats, we can't see spectators too well, but we can certainly hear the horns. After the parade is a short awards ceremony and you can see the boats up close. Hope to see you there, or at least hear your horn. Until next time keep your bilge dry. Eicher, a long-time valley resident, considers himself a part-time boater and fisherman. Nevada artist wins Trout Stamp contest Carson City artist Steve Asikainen, 42, won the 11th State Trout Stamp Art Contest, sponsored by the Sagebrush chapter of Trout Unlimited. The artist, who took top honors with a painting of a mountain whitefish, has never entered an art contest before. "I entered the contest because I was fascinated by the mountain whitefish," Asikainen said. "In fact, I went out several times and tried to catch one, but they turned out to be quite elusive, at least to me. The self-employed architectural illustrator in Carson City, is only the fourth Nevadan to take top honors in the contest during its 11 year history. "I tried to get as much information on the anatomy of the fish and put it all together in that regard, and then balance the painting so that they would contrast well." The mountain whitefish, also known as the Rocky Mountain whitefish, is one of only a very few native salmonids (trout, salmon, char and whitefish) found in Nevada. Its body is generally cylindrical. Body coloration is brown on the dorsal surface, shading to silver and white on the belly. The nose and lower jaw are much shorter than its salmonid cousins, giving it the appearance of a sucker fish to some. Asikainen's painting will be depicted in full color on the 1996 trout stamp. Although there is no financial prize, the artist retains full reproduction rights, and limited edition reprints are produced and sold for approximately $140 each year. The artist donates 75 special Conservation Edition prints that are auctioned at various wildlife club's and organization's fundraising banquets each year throughout the state. His painting will be printed on the cover of the state's 199697 fishing seasons and regulations booklet available in early February 1996. it.II o.ioc.i T..iso.Hfiif,<„..,,„o,r„,,c,„,..,„, iHv.-,,,,„ r.cs^us.i .i. DEATH and TAXES We Can Help You Handle One of Them Ber\jainin Franklin once wrote to a friend, "In this world, nothing is certain but death and taxes." What was true in Franklin's time is still true in ours. "Taxes have become an inescapable part of being a member of society. It's frustrating, but inevitable. That's where we come in. We'd like to help you understand how the tax system works and show you strategies you can use right now to reduce your income tax liability. So, while we may not be able to help you handle the grim reaper, we can help you handle your taxes. COME JOIN US! There's No Cost or Obligation. Seating i$ Umittd Thtu*sday, November 30 • 6:30 p.m. So. Nevada Community College 700 Wyoming, Boulder City Presented By: John D. Higley, Certified Financial Planner J.D. Higley, Co. 293-2323 f DM/INGS ^^ NOVEMBEQ 16 22 \f^ % i^ ,J:7AT 5:00 DM • 7:00 PM • 9:00 "OWr^Ml M^ICKETS AVAILABLE THROUGHOUT RESTAURANT AND CASINC^i •GUARANTEED WINNERS* -A TONER MUST 5E', PPESENTTOWINii ONEWINNEPPEP. fAMILV SKYLINE I CASINO RESTAURANT BOULDER HIGHWAY SOUTH OF SUNSET WANT ONE? CALL US! • Fast Quality Work • Low OFF SEASON PRICES • Ea.sy Financing Sr. Discount ~\ FREE Estimate No Obligation 252-0090 PERFECT PATIOS'^ AlumaLumbef^ • Stucco Tile DIV ot Soulhern Contracling of NovySS Lie #0039874 Copyrighl (C) 1995 SCNSS t iaz a GRAND OPENING SALE 30% OFF on Hard Covers* 'Some Rtstrictions Apply HUGE INVENTORY OF HARDCOVERS and PAPERBACKS ALL SUBJECTS 7380 S. Eastern, Ste. 102 • 263 2692 (Corner of Warm Springs & Eastern) JOIN THE FUN! • Only Minutes from Las Vegas • Spectacular Views • Sightseeing & Meal Cruises • Incredible Food & Full Service Bar • Special Evening Dinner/Dance Cruises Reservations & Information 293"6l8U Rctcivchalf off scctinj fare when acinmpanyinp a tuli paying fare of grcaicr or equal value Musi present ihis ad fiirdiscouni Limii 4 passi-ngcrs per ad Offer expife\ !()/,M/y6 LaUMead Caiiscs H an Auiht>nzcd Concts Monaire of the National Pjrk Service AH fa' Grammy-Award Wlmiing Lead Sin^r of the group "CHICAGO" AUDDin THEATRt FOR THE PERPORMIMQ ARTS SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 19 7:30PM •nCKETA ON MLE NOW AT THE ALADDIN TBEATIX DQX.OI7K3 AND AIX TICKrmAdTTD ODTITTA NATlONAI. RTISTS COWKMATION ^AUi. Ui RAW

PAGE 27

Page B6 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, November 16, 1 995 Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Page B7 Neige wins state Senior title For the second consecutive year, the Henderson Women's BowUng Association will be represented at the Women's International Bowling Congress Senior Championship Tournament Rochelle Neige won the Nevada WBA Senior Tournament in Division D (age 55-59) with a 1384 total in the event finals Nov. 12 in Yerington. The winner in Division A is Irene Miller with 1333. Fern Payne of Las Vegas took fourth with 1280. Div. 3 champion is Trudy Buchanan of Greater Reno with 1360. Betty Cagle of Las Vegas was fourth at 1284. Div. C winner is Marjorie Potter of Colorado River with 1386. Betty LaComb of Las Vegas came in seventh with 1289. :^;y^~'^' Each champion will receive free entry to the WIBC Senior Tournament next spring in Buffalo, N.Y. in addition to the state awards. MISFIT DOUBIES RESULTS: Ty Parker 233-632, Bob Jones 220-598, Mary Jones, Jr. 243-648, Phyllis Morris 225-622. SHIRTS& SKIRTSrCarl Lore 213-577, Dan Odegard 210-200553, Bon Lore 231 hep game, Julie Baker 646 hep series. Odegard was 193 pins over average. FOE 2672 EAGIES MIXED: Randy Birdsall 257 671 hep, 223569 scratch, Corky Oundy 2 26-579, lola Kirk 520, 640 hep, Nancy Barker 241 hep game. DON'T CARE LEAGUE: Tony Watts 201-554, Ken Brandau 214-605 hcD. Rick Davis 213-594 hep, Melodie Thompson 225-613, Marie Singer 613. WOODY CARDUCCI: Scott Miller 243-588, Ty Parker 211688, Dan Bingamon 582, Charles Brown, Jr. 215-577, John Keithley 225-577, Glen Bridges 218-563, Wendell Welcome 557, Dan Partridge 556,673 hep. Jack Tittman 556, Bill Jones 553, John Pomykal 223, Pike Spaulding 217, Walt Wagner 214, Ralph Fyke, Sr. 209, Tony Valdez. KERR-MCGEE: Mike Hanna 245-586, 267-652 hep, Tommi Bryan 220-582, Gregory Manuel 208, 259-572 hep, Geraldine Hardy 206, Judy Buck 206, Geraldine Hardy 562. Last week James Rudd 235635 hep, Larry Loueks 223, Eric Hays 594, Mary Jones, Jr. 226, Kim Harris 218, Judy Buck 625, Sharon Simpson 603, all hep. HENDERSON OUTLAWS: Dovie Spear 235-624, Kerrissa Lewis 234-617, Edie Aldrieh 617, all hep highs. SENIORS FOR FUN: Vem Halhday 506, 229-626 hep, Dick Salter 250-649, Micki Formentini 233, Sue Husch 610 hep. SUNDAYSTREAKERS:207507,256-654 hep, Alan Willey 545, 236-671 hep, Mary Jones 212-581, 249-692 hep, Susan Sprague 237, Robyn Reynolds 632 hep. RENATA'S ROOKIES: Scott Valtos 267-672, 292-747 hep, RiLlNES FROM THE LANES RUTH SOEHLKE 565-8398 chard Boyd 712 hep. Lalainya Schaeffer 120 pins above average with 192-423, 303-756 hep. Thefollowing week Scott Valtos 279 scratch game. Rick Benard 266-771 for 147 Dins over average, Trish McGregor 170-422,260 hep game, Kim Williamson 406, 721 hep series. TUMBLEWEEDS: Steve Harms226-629, BrentClouse225, 268 hep, Todd Hegardt 576. Sami Zelinski 203-490, Sue Schlepitz 539-198, Maryellen Collette 254652 hep and lOOpins overaverage. FUNTIMERS:MichaelWhite 236-611, Josh Donahe 219, Brian Munger 219,. Karla Kapcia 209481, Annette Reavy 187-481. FRIDAY FIVE SPECIAL: Andre Jemmott 259-650, Murel Huckaba 221, Matt Bradley 570. Last week Sandy Simpson 235615, Bob Hunt 225, Al Horsehler 252-704 hep, 222-621 for 614 and 128 pins over average, Simpson was 117 over average. Linda Wharram 239 hep game, Lori Maneilly 632 hep series. Dean Shar 220-606, Bob Hunt 604. MIXED UP JOKERS: Chuck Damico 241-202-639, John Hope 226,287-114 hep, Mary Daddario 521, Beth Glenk 235 hep. Hope was 135 pins over average. FRIDAY FRIENDS: John Pekarek 241-673, David Barton 225, Bill Hall 586, Steve Slaughter 116 over average. Dolores Xepoleas 203-537 GREEN VALLEY MDCED: Horacio Miteff 259, Mike Gamer 622, John Santos 233, James Schultz 205-200-597, Heide Tumley 116 pins over average with 229-581, Kay Lacy 195, Arlene Rossi 521. Nov. 10 John Leong, Jr. 224-636, Brian Munger 215, Danny Fejerang 543, Lawrence Weir, Jr. 212, Lawrence Weir, Sr. 200. Dede McDonough 207-525, Heidi 552,Jodi Grennan 105 pins over average, 250-681 hep. P.O.E.T.S.: Andy Anderson 224, Daye Degeest 2157 Harvey Lee 569, Al Narcesse 560, Ryan Hickman 130 pins over average with 685 hep. last week Jim Buckley -588, Brian Wing 220, Al Narcesse 220, Tom Reichel 212202-601 Sidney Lawrence 219. BROOKLYN CLUB OF LV: David Bondurant 202, Joe Cavaliere 222, Charlie Cable 200, Teresa Neilson 198,254-627 hep, ChrisTrippiedi 240-608 hep, Nick Damore 116 pins over average. Last week Joe Cavaliere led at 222-564, Bob Moore 244-648 hep highs, Pamela Busse217-513,257633 hep, Jim Thomson 209 and Robert Lauro 234. DAYTIMERS: Betty Keamer 202,236 hep, John Ross 199-521, Al Friend 522242-660, hep, Kay Pullia 505, Jane Strong 574 hep series, Al Friend 138 pins over CALL 736-BOWL SAVINGS LEAGUES NOW FORMING ll^lBeginning in January 10AM Morxiays Ladies Trio 8:30PM Mondays Any Foursome Nwna: Woffc Phone: Day Ptione: Leave at Bowling Center or CaU Lois 736-2695 average. Last week Randy Howe 253-637, 256-646 and 109 pins over average, Juanita Rael 190, 226597 hep, Kay Pullia 519. GO GETTERS: Alan Gottlieb 245-603, Mariano Lo Monaco 213571, Kay Pullia 199-538, Goldie Frons 236 hep game, Kay Pullia 634 hep series. Lo Monaco 100 pins overaverage. Last week Allan Gottlieb 224-612, Sedge Frons 212-585, Gottlieb 247-681 hep, Pauline 486,630 hep, Doris Heaps 628 hep series, 100 pins over average. GASSERS: Kelly Wiggins 241, Dave Sehlueter 236-621, David Lewis 218-606, Jerry Campbell 203-2553 hep game. Bob Nyland 662 hep series, Eugene Thomfohrda202. Last week Leroy Skochenski 236, Chuck Damico 223-2-9-604,691 hep and 103over average. Noel Thomson 200. STARLIGHTERS: Tony Smith 263-663, Roland Padua 224, Randy Higashi224, Lyn Berry 216-576, Janell Phillips 561. Ust week Steve Pro 275, Tony Smith 248-673, Benji Garrison 648, Janell Phillips 215, Karen Smith 214, 586 Kottie Kemp 214, Traci Butkiewicz 550. Charles Kadetz had 100 pins over average. WEDNESDAY WONDERS: Jack Battle 214-512, Gym Doerr 551, LynnOehmann 173-472. Last week Rick Serra 236-554, Bob Klobuchar219-523,DianeGandy 168-411, Tammy Parker, 245-630 hep highs. LATESTARTERS: Bob Woolheater 235-605, Chuck Damico 225-651, Kim Guertin 199-548, John Lawyer 264-712 hep, Margaret Cook 269-692 hep. Last week Rich Avalos 231, Dennis Collins 217-211-633, Bill Nichols 223, BobWeelheater 204200-600, Kim Guertin 211-545, Dawn Foren 548. Mel Martini 210207 for 119 over average. BEAUTIES & BEASTS: Jerry Herren 233, Dennis Guinn 588, Richard Gottlieb 218, Fulton Rapoza and David Calmelat 568, Judith Cole 193-517, Barbara Hernandez 175. Last week Dave Ross 234, Rex Hanson 214-212576, Dennis Guinn 567, Gigi Jones 193-530, Howard Ewald 213. ALLEY GATORS: Monica Trylovich 191-499, Judy Ray 515, Teresa Neilson 183 Last week Deann Wiley 198-496, Loretta Westly 191, Kim Talbot 485. Karen Brown had 131 pins over average with 165-482. BANK DF AMERICAJay Messimore221-587, Mike Weddell 205-542, Sharla Jones 185 Dee Brathor481. LADIES NIGHT OUT: Jane Gray 200-507, Carol Lassiter 191492Connie Maggart 587 hep series, Jane Gray 226 hep game. AFTERSCHOOLSPECIAL: Eddie Vance 158-381, Chris Barden 139-390, Vance 252-663 hep, Toni Mogollon 158-370,239613 hep highs. BREAKFASTCLUB:Tammy Buchholz 222-549,239 hep, Angie Fleitz 188, Lois Weisman 640 hep series. THURSDAY NITERS: Richard Krieger 277-642, Steve Pro 225, Mike McKinney 201-580. Rainy Roth 184, Sherry Teo 485, Michelle Brown 603 hep series. Krieger had 123 pins overaverage. HENDERSON TEACHERS: Jim Siple 238-200-606, Sal Locascio 227, Daryl Marsh 209202-601, Audrey Meinke 189-489. Mike Piseiotta 205. HALL OF FAME TIPS: Wayne Zahn, inducted in the ABC Hall of Fame in 1960 offers this basic advice: Pretend it's practice. In 1965, Bill Buenetta helped me overcome the pres sure ofhighlevel competition. His philosophy was basic: treat competition the same way you do practice. Concentrate on a mental image of whatyou want to do, and go ahead and do it." Soehike, a Henderson resident, reports local bowling scores in her weekly column. GRAND OPENING Plastercraft • Paints • Jewelry Windchimes • Hair Accessories • Indian Artifacts • Incense • Silk Plants & Trees Hand Blown Glass and More! ^We have low prices for all your gift buying needs. Kmart Center Sunset & Sandhill 451-9016 family Owned & Operated HENDERSON'S LAS VEGAS LANDSCAPE SUPPLY DISCOUNT PRICES! TiiE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY Complete Line of Decorative Rock Custom Soil Blends Irrigation & Drip Systems Wagon Wheels & Fountains > DRAWGS. .. ..-.-m feT 5:00 PM • 7:00 DM • 9:00 m^^^, ymktS AVAILABLE THROUGHOUT RESTAURANT AND CASINC^i NOVEMBEQ 16 22 •GUARANTEED WINNERS* -A WNNEPMUSTBE' PPESENTTOWINl ONE\CINNEPPEP' FAMILV. SKYLIKE / EMPLOYEES APE;, I INELIGIBLE '" mmmig ^ FINANCINQ AVAILABLE TOMS MATIOMWIiNE 3835 S, Maryland Pkwy. 794-4338 6565 W. Sahara Ave. 873-0055 ur> I c. SjuribLM 435-1533 ASK ABOUT oun' Fraa Raplacamanf onmnoATi 3440 Spring Mountain 876-9226 4RR1 F Flamingo 451-1453 J^JU fJ. Boulder Hwy. 565-8874 HOURS: MON-FRI 6:30^ SAT. 8:30-5 4431 N. Rancho '•"?!.. 645-5330 900 N Nellis Blvd. 438-1018 Mountain lions topic of board meeting When the Clark County Wildlife Advisory Board meets this month, the main topic will be the "Draft Mountain Lion Comprehensive Management Plan." The Nevada Division of Wildlife encourages those interested in the future of mountain lion management to attend the meeting at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 28, at the O.C. Lee Building, 1250 E. Bumham, Las Vegas. Keven Picardo, Wildlife and Habitat Improvement of Nevada president, stated his board voted : to give up his group's meeting time in support of the CCWAB. NDOW feels the future of mountain lion management in Nevada should be of interest to the public beyond the traditional hunter/sportsmen's constituency. The plan will be prsented by NDOW representatives on the team that developed the draft. The presentation includes a 45minute slide presentation and OUTDOORS WITH BARB BARB HENDERSON question time. Chairman Jack Coons of the CCWAB, encourages both the general public and sportsmen to add input at the Advisory Board meeting, prior to the Nevada Board of Wildlife Commissioner's meeting scheduled for Saturday, Dec. 2 in Las Vegas. For more information, call Jack Coons, 5647136, or NDOW, 486-5127. Outdoor Information Wildlife agencies receive $268 million Continuing a 60-year conservation tradition, state fish and wildlife agencies will receive $268 million in excise taxes in 1996 from hunters, anglers, target shooters and boaters. Nevada's share is expected to be slightly more than $1.8 miUion, the majority of which will go to NDOW. It is derived primarily from excise taxes on firearms and ammunition, archery equipment, fishing equipment, trolling motors and sonar fish finders. Funds are used by states for wildlife conservation through land acquisition, habitat improvement, research, game management and other programs. Funds also pay for hunting education programs and wildlife-related recreation programs. To date, these excise taxes have generated more than $4.8 billion for wildlife conservation in the U.S. Nominations for Conservation Award Nominations for the 1995 Kirch Nevada Wildlife Conservation Award are sought by the state's Board ofWildlife Commissioners. According to NDOW, an individual, a nonprofit organization, or an outdoor sports club will receive the award for achievement of significant results towards the conservation, management or enhancement of wildlife in the state during 1995. Nominees' accomplishments must also demonstrate the value of cooperative partnerships between the public and NDOW or the Board of Wildlife Commissioners. Selection of the winning nominee will be made solely from the official NWCA nominations form and supporting material. Seven judges will evaluate and assign a point score to each application. A simple majority of votes of the judges will decide the winner. The Fraternity of the Desert Bighorn, long noted for its work with Nevada's bighorn sheep, was the first recipient of the Wayne E. Kirch Wildlife Conservation Award in 1994. The award is named in memory of Wayne E. Kirch who served on SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER the Fish and Game Commission for more than 25 years, the longe'st tenure on the board since its inception in 1877. Kirch, of Las Vegas, passed away Aug. 27,1989. The recipient receives a specially cast bronze plaque produced under the direction of and donated by Wildlife Commissioners Marlene Kirch, daughter ofKirch. A permanent plaque that will bear the names of all recipients has been designed and will be displayed at the NDOW office nearest the recipient. Required official nomination forms are available fi"om NDOW, P.O. Box 89520. Nominations must be postmarked by Jan. 31, 1996. Until next week, ergoy the great outdoors. • • • • Henderson, an outdoor enthusiast, IS a host and producer of local TV and radio shows. Toot your horn for Parade of Lights I hope you are in full swing by now with the holiday season, have your thoughts and ideas ready to decorate your boat for the LMBOA Parade of Lights on Dec. 9. Registration forms are available at the Callville Bay, Las Vegas Bay and Lake Mead Marinas. If you haven't yet picked one up, the LMBOA has placed a copy of the form in today's paper. Because I write my columns in advance, I can't report with any accuracy how many boats have already entered. My hope is that we have reached our limit of 50 boats, the maximum we are allowed by permit. If this is your first parade, don't be hesitant about entering. It is quite simple. No theme is BOATING WITH RAY RAY EICHER required—only colored Christmas lights. One year I used only alot of white lights. When you check in at the registration desk, you will be given a instructions concerning safety, parade route, the 6 plm. start time, and when awards will be given, to mention a few concerns. A mandatory captains' meeting will take place at 4 p.m. to review instructions and answer questions. Many LIMBOA members will be available at the Lake Mead Marina to assist. There is a random start for the parade and you just follow behind someone. The park ranger leads out and guides the parade along the parade route and returns to the marina. It makes steering at night with a boatload of lights much easier. Just follow the boat in front of you. Having a VHF radio on board is beneficial but not required. Perhaps you can borrow a handheld one for this event if you don't have one. For the folks on the beach, the show is an opportunity for skippers to present an outstanding event featuring their boats. If you have never seen this show before, you are in for a treat. The special events beach area just below Lake Mead Marina is where you can park. The parade sails right in front of that area, proceeding to Hemmenway Harbor, then turning to come back along the parade route for viewing by boats on the water. Dress warmly as the night is usually chilly. When the boats pass your area, show your appreciation by lowing your horn. From the boats, we can't see spectators too well, but we can certainly hear the horns. After the parade is a short awards ceremony and you can see the boats up close. Hope to see you there, or at least hear your horn. Until next time keep your bilge dry. Eicher, a long-time valley resident, considers himself a part-time boater and fisherman. Nevada artist wins Trout Stamp contest Carson City artist Steve Asikainen, 42, won the 11th State Trout Stamp Art Contest, sponsored by the Sagebrush chapter of Trout Unlimited. The artist, who took top honors with a painting of a mountain whitefish, has never entered an art contest before. "I entered the contest because I was fascinated by the mountain whitefish," Asikainen said. "In fact, I went out several times and tried to catch one, but they turned out to be quite elusive, at least to me. The self-employed architectural illustrator in Carson City, is only the fourth Nevadan to take top honors in the contest during its 11 year history. "I tried to get as much information on the anatomy of the fish and put it all together in that regard, and then balance the painting so that they would contrast well." The mountain whitefish, also known as the Rocky Mountain whitefish, is one of only a very few native salmonids (trout, salmon, char and whitefish) found in Nevada. Its body is generally cylindrical. Body coloration is brown on the dorsal surface, shading to silver and white on the belly. The nose and lower jaw are much shorter than its salmonid cousins, giving it the appearance of a sucker fish to some. Asikainen's painting will be depicted in full color on the 1996 trout stamp. Although there is no financial prize, the artist retains full reproduction rights, and limited edition reprints are produced and sold for approximately $140 each year. The artist donates 75 special Conservation Edition prints that are auctioned at various wildlife club's and organization's fundraising banquets each year throughout the state. His painting will be printed on the cover of the state's 199697 fishing seasons and regulations booklet available in early February 1996. it.II o.ioc.i T..iso.Hfiif,<„..,,„o,r„,,c,„,..,„, iHv.-,,,,„ r.cs^us.i .i. DEATH and TAXES We Can Help You Handle One of Them Ber\jainin Franklin once wrote to a friend, "In this world, nothing is certain but death and taxes." What was true in Franklin's time is still true in ours. "Taxes have become an inescapable part of being a member of society. It's frustrating, but inevitable. That's where we come in. We'd like to help you understand how the tax system works and show you strategies you can use right now to reduce your income tax liability. So, while we may not be able to help you handle the grim reaper, we can help you handle your taxes. COME JOIN US! There's No Cost or Obligation. Seating i$ Umittd Thtu*sday, November 30 • 6:30 p.m. So. Nevada Community College 700 Wyoming, Boulder City Presented By: John D. Higley, Certified Financial Planner J.D. Higley, Co. 293-2323 f DM/INGS ^^ NOVEMBEQ 16 22 \f^ % i^ ,J:7AT 5:00 DM • 7:00 PM • 9:00 "OWr^Ml M^ICKETS AVAILABLE THROUGHOUT RESTAURANT AND CASINC^i •GUARANTEED WINNERS* -A TONER MUST 5E', PPESENTTOWINii ONEWINNEPPEP. fAMILV SKYLINE I CASINO RESTAURANT BOULDER HIGHWAY SOUTH OF SUNSET WANT ONE? CALL US! • Fast Quality Work • Low OFF SEASON PRICES • Ea.sy Financing Sr. Discount ~\ FREE Estimate No Obligation 252-0090 PERFECT PATIOS'^ AlumaLumbef^ • Stucco Tile DIV ot Soulhern Contracling of NovySS Lie #0039874 Copyrighl (C) 1995 SCNSS t iaz a GRAND OPENING SALE 30% OFF on Hard Covers* 'Some Rtstrictions Apply HUGE INVENTORY OF HARDCOVERS and PAPERBACKS ALL SUBJECTS 7380 S. Eastern, Ste. 102 • 263 2692 (Corner of Warm Springs & Eastern) JOIN THE FUN! • Only Minutes from Las Vegas • Spectacular Views • Sightseeing & Meal Cruises • Incredible Food & Full Service Bar • Special Evening Dinner/Dance Cruises Reservations & Information 293"6l8U Rctcivchalf off scctinj fare when acinmpanyinp a tuli paying fare of grcaicr or equal value Musi present ihis ad fiirdiscouni Limii 4 passi-ngcrs per ad Offer expife\ !()/,M/y6 LaUMead Caiiscs H an Auiht>nzcd Concts Monaire of the National Pjrk Service AH fa' Grammy-Award Wlmiing Lead Sin^r of the group "CHICAGO" AUDDin THEATRt FOR THE PERPORMIMQ ARTS SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 19 7:30PM •nCKETA ON MLE NOW AT THE ALADDIN TBEATIX DQX.OI7K3 AND AIX TICKrmAdTTD ODTITTA NATlONAI. RTISTS COWKMATION ^AUi. Ui RAW

PAGE 28

PiiiPMIMHiil YOUR HEALTH Thursday, November 16,1993 Henderson Home News, Boulder Crty News Page B9 Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson Home News • Boulder City News Page B 8 W ELLNESS OR. BILL ANDRADE Feeding frenzy On Thanksgiving day, families will sit down to dinner.The annual family feeding frenzy will begin. Let a spot appear on your plate and Aunt Bemice will have the dressing bowl speeding toward you like a Troy Aikman pass. Beforethe holiday season is overthe average person will have gained five to seven more pounds of fat, even though one of three adults already weighs too much. Not just a few pounds and a couple of inches either. We're talking serious sags and unflattering bulges. Is it any wonder that the single most common New Year's resolution is to lose weight? Now that I've gotten all this straightened out, you'll be cutting way back on holiday eating, right? Not exactly. Of course you will eat too much. But this year try something different: damage control. Here is a three point strategy you can put to work right away. Stay in Mental Control Begin by admitting that you will moderately overeat. Forgive yourself in advance. Eliminate the all-or-nothing dieter's mindset that can launch you into a calorie freefall. Don't get too hungry. Frequently meals are skipped in anticipation of the big meal. Eat less for breakfast but choose something filling. Exercise More, Not Less Get more exercise to compensate for overeating. Be realistic and decrease the intensity of workouts. Can't get to the gym? Try walking. Walking a mile bums only 10-20% fewer calories than jogging a mile. Look for creative ways to mix exercise into the holiday season. Avoid Caloric Bombs Eat more of the foods you enjoy that are also less fattening: your favorite turkey meat without the skin, or cranberry sauce, another low calorie favorite. Reduce or eliminate whipped cream, butter, and egg nog. Set a goal to have only one piece of pecan pie. Avoid appetizers unless you are choosing celery and carrots. Go light on cheeses and dips. A three hour walk of more than 10 miles is necessary to compensate for an extra piece of pumpkin pie with whipped cream, one cup of egg nog, and four tablespoonfuls of gravy. The holidays are a time to be with family and friends, have fun and give thanks for everything we normally take for granted. Keep your holiday positive by avoiding the guilt and preoccupation that comes with overindulging. Practice moderation. Andrade, a graduate of Duke University, has a practice at the Green Valley Athletic Club and focuses on preventative medicine. U/ONiEN''s HE ALTH DR. WILLIAM ANDREWS The uses of ultrasound Ultrasound, a procedure using sound waves to produce an image of internal organs, is now a useful tool in many areas of women's health. Also known as a "sonogram," its images can help physicians provide prenatal care, treat infertility, and diagnose certain pelvic problems. Using a device called a transducer, a physician or special technologist scans certain body surfaces. Sound waves from the transducer bounce off tissues in the body and are converted into an image on a television-like screen. In abdominal ultrasound, the transducer is moved along the abdomen. Sometimes this procedure requires a full bladder, so you may be asked to drinkseveral glasses of water and not urinate before the exam. With vaginal ultrasound, a condom is placed over a transducer specially designed to be placed in the vagina. A full bladder is often not needed for this exam. The most wellknown use of ultrasound is during certain pregnancies. Ultrasound is not necessary for every woman or in every pregnancy. However, your doctor may suggest ultrasound if he or she wants to get certain information about the pregnancy, or to rule out certain problems. Images can help determine the age and position of the fetus, how fast the fetus is growing, how the placenta is placed, and the amount of amniotic fluid in the uterus. Ultrasound can also enhance fertility treatments, for example, by monitoring ovulation (the release of an egg by an ovary). Vaginal ultrasound is useful in locating and retrieving eggs for in vitro fertilization (the fertilization of sperm and egg in a lab dish, for placement in a woman's uterus), without the need for major surgery. Because of its ability to "see" inside the body, ultrasound has been used to •find lUDs when the string is missing, to determine if certain organs are in place and a healthy size, and to locate cysts or lumps in the pelvic area. Most cysts that form on the ovaries are harmless and soon disappear. Ultrasound can sometimes confirm that a lump on an ovary is indeed a cyst. The procedure is painless, quick, and available through most hospitals and some doctors' offices. No studies to date have shown that the levels of ultrasound used to diagnose problems cause any damage to tissues or to a fetus. Combined with other tests and exams, ultrasound can be an important "window" of information for you and your doctor. Single, free copies of "Ultrasound Exams in Ob/ Gyn" (AP025) are available by sending a stamped, selfaddressed, business-size envelope with the booklet name to: The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Resource Center, 409 12th St., SW, Washington, DC 20024. Andrews is president of the Amencan College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Contact lens hotline available THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY The Contact Lens Council has announced a new toll-free consumer information line and Internet address. Current wearers and those considering contacts can call (800)884-4CLC to receive information op today's lenses, including health and safety guidelines, and tips on proper wear and care. "More than half of all Americans require some type of vision correction," said Orlando Rodrigues, CLC chairman. "Of those, almost 26 million people have chosen to wear contact lenses." There are a variety of lens options for consumers to choose from to meet vision and lifestyle needs, The information line, is designed to provide access to the latest information on advances in lenses and eye care. "With so many improvements in contact lenses and lens care products, there has never been a better time to consider the benefits of contact lenses," said Rodrigues. Callers can receive information about lenses, as well as specialized materials designed to answer common questions about presbyopia—a natural aging of the eye, orthokeratology—a treatment process th'et uses contact lenses to reduce or correct refractive errors; and refractive surgery—a relatively new procedure involving surgery on the eye to correct refractive errors. People 40 and over who think they have no alternatives to bifocals will be surprised to find that contact lenses may provide several correction options. The line is a consumer service of the Contact Lens, Councjl, a non-profit organization which serves as an educational resource on vision correction. It operates weekdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern Time. Materials may also be accessed via the CLC Home Page on the^ Internet World Wide Web http://www.tiac.net/users/igc/ clc.html. The CLC is devoted to promoting the safe use of contact lenses and is sponsored by Alcon Laboratories, Allergan Optical, Bausch & Lomb, CIBA Vision, Pilkington Barnes Hind, Vistakon, a division of Johnson & Johnson Vision Products, Inc., Wesley Jessen, and the Contact Lens Manufacturers Association. The American Optometric Association.'Contact Lens Association; of Ophthalmologists, and the Contact Lens Society of America are advisory members of the CLC. CALL 435-7700 WITH NEWS TIPS Could these car doors last opening and closing 10 million times? r--' -.-. • .1 -: • • -• • Your knees endure much more. The fact is. we apply much more wear and If ar on our major joints than Uie stress we give to Uie vehicles we drive. Resilient as the human twdy Is. we still.come across life's unforeseen accidents and chronic ailments. Thafs where Orthopaedics at Sunrise can truly make the difference. Wlielher your first meeting takes place in the emergencv" room, or Is a planned stay based upon your physician's referral, your well-being Is in the hands of some of the most highly respected orthopaedic physfclans and surgeons in the Southwest. Additionally, our staff has at their disposal, the leading-edge technologies in health care. P'rom surgery to rehabilitation. It's all part of the way we continue to set the standard, every dav Sunnse HOSPflAL ft MEDICAL CENTER Setting the standard, every day. I HBC Publications joins the Clark County School District's Math/Science Institute to reach America 2000 goals ^_„-.^.^^^_^ Henderson Home News, BOulder City News, Green Valley News First In The World In Mathematics By The Year 2000 Adding and subtracting decimals By Greg Snelling A decimal is a special fraction whose denominator is a power of 10. Examples of powers of 10 are: 10,100, 10OO, 10,000, ... Since a decimal is a fraction, it has a numerator and a denominator. The numerator is the number to the right of the decimal point, the denominator is NOT written, it is implied by the number of digits to the right of the decimal point. The number of decimal places to the right of the decimal point is the same as the number of zeros in denominator, i.e. 10, 100, 1000, Therefore, one place is tenths, two places is hundredths. three places is thousandths, and so on. ,•• : • EXAMPLE .56 2 places = 56A100 .532 3 places = 532/1000 : • ,. • 3.2 1 place = 3 2/10 The correct way to say a decimal numeral is to say the number just like the decimal point is not there, then say its denominator with a "ths." EXAMPLE .53-fiftythreehundredTHS .702 seven hundred two thousandTHS When there are numbers on both sides of the decimal point, the decimal point is read as "and." You read the number on the left, then the number on the right with the "THS". EXAMPLE 14.6-fourteen AND six tenTHS 2013.405 two thousand thirteen AND four hundred five thousandTHS To convert a decimal to a fraction, the numerator is the number without the decimal point. The denominator will be a power of 10 with the same number of zeros as digits to the right of the decimal point. EXAMPLE .52 = 52/100, reduce 21/50 .603 = 603/1000, can not be reduced To convert a fraction to a decimal, we must make an equivalent fraction whose denominator is a power of 10. Then put a decimal point in front of that number without writing the denominator. EXAMPLE Convert 3/5 to a decimal 3/5 = 6/10,3/5 = .6 EXAMPLE Convert 3/4 to a decimal 3/4 = 75/100. 3/4 = .75 The difficulty in converting that way is many times the denominator will not go into a power of 10 evenly (without a remainder), ex. 1/3, 3 does not go into a power of 10. We then find an alternate method. Another method is to divide the denominator into the numerator. Look at the 3/5 example we have already done, By di viding 5 into 3, let's see what happens. 5 13.0, the answer is .6 just like before How about 3/4, 4 |3X)0 is .75, again like before Now the question is, how do 1 know how many zeros to add to the end of the numt>er? The answer is as many as you like or as many as you are instructed to add. Normally three zeros is acceptable. Since decimals are fractions, we add and subtract them the same way we add or subtract fractions. In other words, we find a common denominator, make equivalent fractions, add/subtract the numerators, and bring down the denominator. The nice thing about decimals is it is real easy to find a common denominator and make equivalent fractions. All you do is add zeros to the end of the number, For example .23 is the same as .230. EXAMPLE .23 + .5 + .t26 By adding zeros to the end of each decimal so each number has three numbers to the right of the decimal point, we have found a common denominator (1000) and at the same time made equivalent fractions. ; • : : .230 + .500 + .726 Now ail we do is add the numerators and bring the decimal point straight down. .230 • • ; • • • • ; • .. • •: ^; ;; • ; • • • • -;' .500 + J2fi • 1.456' • If a number does not have a decimal point, it is understood to go to the right of the decimal. For example 15 = 15, EXAMPLE 12.4 -115 + 1.83 We rewrite this as 12,40 + 15,00 + 1,83 We found a common denominator and made equivalent fractions by adding those zeros. Now line up the decimal points and add, bringing the decimal point straight down is the same as bringing down the denominator in fractions, 12.40 15.00 + 122 29.23 Isn't it nice to know fractions and decimals are related like this? One more example, this time subtracting. EXAMPlf 23.2 5.742 How many zeros must I add? Rewriting this, we have 23.200 5.742 23,200 17,458 Let's see what you know, 1. Write 17.302 the way you should say it. 2. Convert 12.34 to a fraction, 3. Convert .043 to a fraction, 4. Convert 3/25 to a decimal, ~. 5. Which number is larger .5 or .237? 6.12.3 +15 + 2,57 7.23.4 8,93 Answers: 1) seventeen and three hundred two thousandTHS 2) 12 17/503)43/10004), 12 5) .56) 29.87 7.14.47 Greg Snelling is a math teacher at Eldorado High School. 1995 HBC Publications, Inc. CCSN offers classes in BC The Community College of Southern Nevada, Boulder City campus will offer the following courses: Spanish for fun and travel In six sessions, participants will learn Spanish via cartoon, verb sequences, conversational dialogues, and singing. Instructor Beverly Dandurand takes a total physical response approach to learning the Spanish language. Join in the circle for a review of language patterns, phrases and vocabulary, and/or continue on with personal "athome" study. ^ The class begins at 1:30 p.m. Nov. 27, and continues through Dec. 13. For more information, call 294-0188. Public Speaking Marion West-Hoffman will conduct a course in public speaking to be held from 6 to 7:30 p.m. on four consecutive Wednesdays beginning Nov. 29. She has taught public speaking for several years and promises, to teach how to make butterflies in your stomach serve you to your best advantage. The class also includes voice modulation and podium posture. Confidence will be stressed. Some homework will be required but the instructor promises a fun class. For registration information, call 294-0188. German Cooking Instructor Klaus Bremmer will offer a delicious course in German cooking from 5 to 8 p.m. Dec. 5. The fee is $3 senior, $9 non-senior, and a $5 fee paid to the instructor for food. Seating is limited. To register, visit the CCSN-Boulder City campus, 700 Wyoming St. to register, or call 294-0188. Scout f ( More than 8,000 Boy Scouts from the Boulder Dam Area Council, Boy Scouts of America and volunteers will participate in the seventh annual Scouting for Food campaign Saturday, Nov. 18. The drive is in keeping with the Boy Scouts tradition of National Good Turn Programs. It was created to help feed millions of Americans who go hungry every month. Last year more than 63 tons of food were collected for Southern Nevada's needy famiIIIII drive Saturday lies. This year's goal is to collect more than 80 tons. Scouts will leave plastic collection; bags on neighborhood doors Saturday morning, hoping that families will contribute canned goods. Later the same day Scouts will pick up the food, and take it to local Salvation Army food banks for distribution to those in need. The greatest need is for nutritional canned food items such as baby formula, soup, chili, fish, meats and vegetables. High Rollers meet Friday The High Rollers chapter of the American Merchant Marine Veterans will meet at 11 a.m. Friday, Nov. 17, at the Police Protective Association Building, 1250 Bumham, one block south of Charleston. All Merchant Marine veterans are invited to attend along with members of the Navy Armed Guard and Army Transport Service who also served on cargo ships. Honors Orchestra concert Saturday The Clark County School District Honors Orchestra Concert will be held at 7 p.m. Nov. 18, at the Las Vegas Academy of Performing Arts auditorium, at the corner of 10th Street and Clark. The concert features selected middle school and high school orchestra players who will perform under the direction of Dr. Glenn Cooper and Dr. Kevin Call. It is free and open to the public. For more information, call Clarke Dinsmore, 892-9669. Food not picked up can be taken to any of the five Salvation Army Thrift Stores, 801N. Lamb; 4001W. Charleston; 433 W. Lake Mead Dr., Henderson; 2035 Yale St., North Las Vegas; 5200 Boulder Highway; or the Boulder Dam Area Council, 1135 University Road. According to the Salvation Army, the annual food program is responsible for a large portion of food collected and distributed by the Salvation Army during the holiday season. Last year's drive fed 7,000 families for 26 weeks. This year's drive is sponsored by Loral Aerospace who donated materials and the printing costs for thousands of collection bags. 4 m DRAWINGS g;.^^DDAWlNGS HELD NIGfflLY|f ,,# ^'-' • ^ NOVEMDED 16-22 )/ ^^^ ^ ^m 5:00 PM • 7:00 PM • 9:00 PMr;i^, ^ THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY TICKETS AVAILABLE THROUGHOUT RESTAURANT AND CASING W, J>.^:-r) ^v, 'GUARANTEEDWINNERS* mmmsi^' -^ -, —^"— PPESENT TO m. 1 ONEWINNElJPEP. FAMILY SKYLINE I \ EMPLOYEES APE INELIGIBLE CASINO 8c RESTAURANT BOULDER HIGHWAY SOUTH OF SUNSET CELLUUR USA MOTOROLA DPC/550 FLIP PHONE 'Afltr$IOOAirTinMRel>a1t E^ Wireless Service \ rAIW Aumoraea Dealer ERKSSONAH210 MKRO FLIP PHONE Unlimited Local Cellular Useage Evenings & Weekends Until 1996 Largest Selection of Accessories in Nevada LOV\^EST PRICES GUARANTEED! 4581 W. FLAMINGO IBetween Arville A Decalur| 871-9887 SUNSET & 95 Next to Home Depot 451-2402 MEADOWS MALL lUppef level next to Seors| 877-2402 t 2 month service contract, new acltvotion required $29 99 minimum plan Some restnciionj opply FREE PAGERS Big band featured at Whiskey Pete's Friday Si Zentner and his Orchestra will entertain audiences with their big band sound on Friday, Nov. 17, at Whiskey Pete's Showroom, with a 7 p.m. dinner show and a 9 p.m. dance show. Whiskey Pete's is located 35 minutes south of Las Vegas at Stateline, and is owned and operated by Primadonna Resorts. Heralded as being the last of the great big band leaders, Zentner and his orchestra are known for such great classics as "Up a Uzy River," "Stripper," "Boogie Woogie," Take the A Train," "Sentimental Journey" as well as many others. Zentner hai also produced many new •ongB that appeal to all generations. He set out on his big band journey because people said it couldn't be done. AJFler 33 albums and Grammy awards for "Best Performance by an Orchestra for Dancing" and for the album "Great Band With Great Voices," Zentner proved critics wrong, and excited music fans throughout the world. Tickets are $42, including a two-night hotel stay, cocktail party, dinner and dance; or $21 for dinner and dance only. Ticketa can be purchased at any of the Primadonna Box Offices or by calling Ticketmaster, (702)474-4000. Forrservations or more information call (800)rUN-STOP. '/ • ; • Finding your next doctor can Ix.tkat easy if you call tne Physician Referral Program at M. Kcise Dominican Hospital. One call can put you in touch -ith one o\ our 3tX) qualihed physicians, Representing a wide variet\' of specialties. Dial 5(>4-4508, .^londay tlirougli Fridav from 8 am until 4;30 pm and a nurse will answer your call, detennine your needs and refer you lo a physician who's just tight for you. Our Plivsician Referral Nurse understands the importance of a strong divtor'patienl relationship. Slie can tell you tilings alxiut a divior that friends and family can t; lite insurance plans and special training. Regardless of the dixtor you chixise it s nice to know you are linked to tlie proi!ressive • ervices and pnifessionals wnotjtulerstand tne healing power of compassion. St. Rose Dominican HOSPITAL Tecnnology mtnas. Compatston haU. 564^*508 o

PAGE 29

PiiiPMIMHiil YOUR HEALTH Thursday, November 16,1993 Henderson Home News, Boulder Crty News Page B9 Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson Home News • Boulder City News Page B 8 W ELLNESS OR. BILL ANDRADE Feeding frenzy On Thanksgiving day, families will sit down to dinner.The annual family feeding frenzy will begin. Let a spot appear on your plate and Aunt Bemice will have the dressing bowl speeding toward you like a Troy Aikman pass. Beforethe holiday season is overthe average person will have gained five to seven more pounds of fat, even though one of three adults already weighs too much. Not just a few pounds and a couple of inches either. We're talking serious sags and unflattering bulges. Is it any wonder that the single most common New Year's resolution is to lose weight? Now that I've gotten all this straightened out, you'll be cutting way back on holiday eating, right? Not exactly. Of course you will eat too much. But this year try something different: damage control. Here is a three point strategy you can put to work right away. Stay in Mental Control Begin by admitting that you will moderately overeat. Forgive yourself in advance. Eliminate the all-or-nothing dieter's mindset that can launch you into a calorie freefall. Don't get too hungry. Frequently meals are skipped in anticipation of the big meal. Eat less for breakfast but choose something filling. Exercise More, Not Less Get more exercise to compensate for overeating. Be realistic and decrease the intensity of workouts. Can't get to the gym? Try walking. Walking a mile bums only 10-20% fewer calories than jogging a mile. Look for creative ways to mix exercise into the holiday season. Avoid Caloric Bombs Eat more of the foods you enjoy that are also less fattening: your favorite turkey meat without the skin, or cranberry sauce, another low calorie favorite. Reduce or eliminate whipped cream, butter, and egg nog. Set a goal to have only one piece of pecan pie. Avoid appetizers unless you are choosing celery and carrots. Go light on cheeses and dips. A three hour walk of more than 10 miles is necessary to compensate for an extra piece of pumpkin pie with whipped cream, one cup of egg nog, and four tablespoonfuls of gravy. The holidays are a time to be with family and friends, have fun and give thanks for everything we normally take for granted. Keep your holiday positive by avoiding the guilt and preoccupation that comes with overindulging. Practice moderation. Andrade, a graduate of Duke University, has a practice at the Green Valley Athletic Club and focuses on preventative medicine. U/ONiEN''s HE ALTH DR. WILLIAM ANDREWS The uses of ultrasound Ultrasound, a procedure using sound waves to produce an image of internal organs, is now a useful tool in many areas of women's health. Also known as a "sonogram," its images can help physicians provide prenatal care, treat infertility, and diagnose certain pelvic problems. Using a device called a transducer, a physician or special technologist scans certain body surfaces. Sound waves from the transducer bounce off tissues in the body and are converted into an image on a television-like screen. In abdominal ultrasound, the transducer is moved along the abdomen. Sometimes this procedure requires a full bladder, so you may be asked to drinkseveral glasses of water and not urinate before the exam. With vaginal ultrasound, a condom is placed over a transducer specially designed to be placed in the vagina. A full bladder is often not needed for this exam. The most wellknown use of ultrasound is during certain pregnancies. Ultrasound is not necessary for every woman or in every pregnancy. However, your doctor may suggest ultrasound if he or she wants to get certain information about the pregnancy, or to rule out certain problems. Images can help determine the age and position of the fetus, how fast the fetus is growing, how the placenta is placed, and the amount of amniotic fluid in the uterus. Ultrasound can also enhance fertility treatments, for example, by monitoring ovulation (the release of an egg by an ovary). Vaginal ultrasound is useful in locating and retrieving eggs for in vitro fertilization (the fertilization of sperm and egg in a lab dish, for placement in a woman's uterus), without the need for major surgery. Because of its ability to "see" inside the body, ultrasound has been used to •find lUDs when the string is missing, to determine if certain organs are in place and a healthy size, and to locate cysts or lumps in the pelvic area. Most cysts that form on the ovaries are harmless and soon disappear. Ultrasound can sometimes confirm that a lump on an ovary is indeed a cyst. The procedure is painless, quick, and available through most hospitals and some doctors' offices. No studies to date have shown that the levels of ultrasound used to diagnose problems cause any damage to tissues or to a fetus. Combined with other tests and exams, ultrasound can be an important "window" of information for you and your doctor. Single, free copies of "Ultrasound Exams in Ob/ Gyn" (AP025) are available by sending a stamped, selfaddressed, business-size envelope with the booklet name to: The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Resource Center, 409 12th St., SW, Washington, DC 20024. Andrews is president of the Amencan College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Contact lens hotline available THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY The Contact Lens Council has announced a new toll-free consumer information line and Internet address. Current wearers and those considering contacts can call (800)884-4CLC to receive information op today's lenses, including health and safety guidelines, and tips on proper wear and care. "More than half of all Americans require some type of vision correction," said Orlando Rodrigues, CLC chairman. "Of those, almost 26 million people have chosen to wear contact lenses." There are a variety of lens options for consumers to choose from to meet vision and lifestyle needs, The information line, is designed to provide access to the latest information on advances in lenses and eye care. "With so many improvements in contact lenses and lens care products, there has never been a better time to consider the benefits of contact lenses," said Rodrigues. Callers can receive information about lenses, as well as specialized materials designed to answer common questions about presbyopia—a natural aging of the eye, orthokeratology—a treatment process th'et uses contact lenses to reduce or correct refractive errors; and refractive surgery—a relatively new procedure involving surgery on the eye to correct refractive errors. People 40 and over who think they have no alternatives to bifocals will be surprised to find that contact lenses may provide several correction options. The line is a consumer service of the Contact Lens, Councjl, a non-profit organization which serves as an educational resource on vision correction. It operates weekdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern Time. Materials may also be accessed via the CLC Home Page on the^ Internet World Wide Web http://www.tiac.net/users/igc/ clc.html. The CLC is devoted to promoting the safe use of contact lenses and is sponsored by Alcon Laboratories, Allergan Optical, Bausch & Lomb, CIBA Vision, Pilkington Barnes Hind, Vistakon, a division of Johnson & Johnson Vision Products, Inc., Wesley Jessen, and the Contact Lens Manufacturers Association. The American Optometric Association.'Contact Lens Association; of Ophthalmologists, and the Contact Lens Society of America are advisory members of the CLC. CALL 435-7700 WITH NEWS TIPS Could these car doors last opening and closing 10 million times? r--' -.-. • .1 -: • • -• • Your knees endure much more. The fact is. we apply much more wear and If ar on our major joints than Uie stress we give to Uie vehicles we drive. Resilient as the human twdy Is. we still.come across life's unforeseen accidents and chronic ailments. Thafs where Orthopaedics at Sunrise can truly make the difference. Wlielher your first meeting takes place in the emergencv" room, or Is a planned stay based upon your physician's referral, your well-being Is in the hands of some of the most highly respected orthopaedic physfclans and surgeons in the Southwest. Additionally, our staff has at their disposal, the leading-edge technologies in health care. P'rom surgery to rehabilitation. It's all part of the way we continue to set the standard, every dav Sunnse HOSPflAL ft MEDICAL CENTER Setting the standard, every day. I HBC Publications joins the Clark County School District's Math/Science Institute to reach America 2000 goals ^_„-.^.^^^_^ Henderson Home News, BOulder City News, Green Valley News First In The World In Mathematics By The Year 2000 Adding and subtracting decimals By Greg Snelling A decimal is a special fraction whose denominator is a power of 10. Examples of powers of 10 are: 10,100, 10OO, 10,000, ... Since a decimal is a fraction, it has a numerator and a denominator. The numerator is the number to the right of the decimal point, the denominator is NOT written, it is implied by the number of digits to the right of the decimal point. The number of decimal places to the right of the decimal point is the same as the number of zeros in denominator, i.e. 10, 100, 1000, Therefore, one place is tenths, two places is hundredths. three places is thousandths, and so on. ,•• : • EXAMPLE .56 2 places = 56A100 .532 3 places = 532/1000 : • ,. • 3.2 1 place = 3 2/10 The correct way to say a decimal numeral is to say the number just like the decimal point is not there, then say its denominator with a "ths." EXAMPLE .53-fiftythreehundredTHS .702 seven hundred two thousandTHS When there are numbers on both sides of the decimal point, the decimal point is read as "and." You read the number on the left, then the number on the right with the "THS". EXAMPLE 14.6-fourteen AND six tenTHS 2013.405 two thousand thirteen AND four hundred five thousandTHS To convert a decimal to a fraction, the numerator is the number without the decimal point. The denominator will be a power of 10 with the same number of zeros as digits to the right of the decimal point. EXAMPLE .52 = 52/100, reduce 21/50 .603 = 603/1000, can not be reduced To convert a fraction to a decimal, we must make an equivalent fraction whose denominator is a power of 10. Then put a decimal point in front of that number without writing the denominator. EXAMPLE Convert 3/5 to a decimal 3/5 = 6/10,3/5 = .6 EXAMPLE Convert 3/4 to a decimal 3/4 = 75/100. 3/4 = .75 The difficulty in converting that way is many times the denominator will not go into a power of 10 evenly (without a remainder), ex. 1/3, 3 does not go into a power of 10. We then find an alternate method. Another method is to divide the denominator into the numerator. Look at the 3/5 example we have already done, By di viding 5 into 3, let's see what happens. 5 13.0, the answer is .6 just like before How about 3/4, 4 |3X)0 is .75, again like before Now the question is, how do 1 know how many zeros to add to the end of the numt>er? The answer is as many as you like or as many as you are instructed to add. Normally three zeros is acceptable. Since decimals are fractions, we add and subtract them the same way we add or subtract fractions. In other words, we find a common denominator, make equivalent fractions, add/subtract the numerators, and bring down the denominator. The nice thing about decimals is it is real easy to find a common denominator and make equivalent fractions. All you do is add zeros to the end of the number, For example .23 is the same as .230. EXAMPLE .23 + .5 + .t26 By adding zeros to the end of each decimal so each number has three numbers to the right of the decimal point, we have found a common denominator (1000) and at the same time made equivalent fractions. ; • : : .230 + .500 + .726 Now ail we do is add the numerators and bring the decimal point straight down. .230 • • ; • • • • ; • .. • •: ^; ;; • ; • • • • -;' .500 + J2fi • 1.456' • If a number does not have a decimal point, it is understood to go to the right of the decimal. For example 15 = 15, EXAMPLE 12.4 -115 + 1.83 We rewrite this as 12,40 + 15,00 + 1,83 We found a common denominator and made equivalent fractions by adding those zeros. Now line up the decimal points and add, bringing the decimal point straight down is the same as bringing down the denominator in fractions, 12.40 15.00 + 122 29.23 Isn't it nice to know fractions and decimals are related like this? One more example, this time subtracting. EXAMPlf 23.2 5.742 How many zeros must I add? Rewriting this, we have 23.200 5.742 23,200 17,458 Let's see what you know, 1. Write 17.302 the way you should say it. 2. Convert 12.34 to a fraction, 3. Convert .043 to a fraction, 4. Convert 3/25 to a decimal, ~. 5. Which number is larger .5 or .237? 6.12.3 +15 + 2,57 7.23.4 8,93 Answers: 1) seventeen and three hundred two thousandTHS 2) 12 17/503)43/10004), 12 5) .56) 29.87 7.14.47 Greg Snelling is a math teacher at Eldorado High School. 1995 HBC Publications, Inc. CCSN offers classes in BC The Community College of Southern Nevada, Boulder City campus will offer the following courses: Spanish for fun and travel In six sessions, participants will learn Spanish via cartoon, verb sequences, conversational dialogues, and singing. Instructor Beverly Dandurand takes a total physical response approach to learning the Spanish language. Join in the circle for a review of language patterns, phrases and vocabulary, and/or continue on with personal "athome" study. ^ The class begins at 1:30 p.m. Nov. 27, and continues through Dec. 13. For more information, call 294-0188. Public Speaking Marion West-Hoffman will conduct a course in public speaking to be held from 6 to 7:30 p.m. on four consecutive Wednesdays beginning Nov. 29. She has taught public speaking for several years and promises, to teach how to make butterflies in your stomach serve you to your best advantage. The class also includes voice modulation and podium posture. Confidence will be stressed. Some homework will be required but the instructor promises a fun class. For registration information, call 294-0188. German Cooking Instructor Klaus Bremmer will offer a delicious course in German cooking from 5 to 8 p.m. Dec. 5. The fee is $3 senior, $9 non-senior, and a $5 fee paid to the instructor for food. Seating is limited. To register, visit the CCSN-Boulder City campus, 700 Wyoming St. to register, or call 294-0188. Scout f ( More than 8,000 Boy Scouts from the Boulder Dam Area Council, Boy Scouts of America and volunteers will participate in the seventh annual Scouting for Food campaign Saturday, Nov. 18. The drive is in keeping with the Boy Scouts tradition of National Good Turn Programs. It was created to help feed millions of Americans who go hungry every month. Last year more than 63 tons of food were collected for Southern Nevada's needy famiIIIII drive Saturday lies. This year's goal is to collect more than 80 tons. Scouts will leave plastic collection; bags on neighborhood doors Saturday morning, hoping that families will contribute canned goods. Later the same day Scouts will pick up the food, and take it to local Salvation Army food banks for distribution to those in need. The greatest need is for nutritional canned food items such as baby formula, soup, chili, fish, meats and vegetables. High Rollers meet Friday The High Rollers chapter of the American Merchant Marine Veterans will meet at 11 a.m. Friday, Nov. 17, at the Police Protective Association Building, 1250 Bumham, one block south of Charleston. All Merchant Marine veterans are invited to attend along with members of the Navy Armed Guard and Army Transport Service who also served on cargo ships. Honors Orchestra concert Saturday The Clark County School District Honors Orchestra Concert will be held at 7 p.m. Nov. 18, at the Las Vegas Academy of Performing Arts auditorium, at the corner of 10th Street and Clark. The concert features selected middle school and high school orchestra players who will perform under the direction of Dr. Glenn Cooper and Dr. Kevin Call. It is free and open to the public. For more information, call Clarke Dinsmore, 892-9669. Food not picked up can be taken to any of the five Salvation Army Thrift Stores, 801N. Lamb; 4001W. Charleston; 433 W. Lake Mead Dr., Henderson; 2035 Yale St., North Las Vegas; 5200 Boulder Highway; or the Boulder Dam Area Council, 1135 University Road. According to the Salvation Army, the annual food program is responsible for a large portion of food collected and distributed by the Salvation Army during the holiday season. Last year's drive fed 7,000 families for 26 weeks. This year's drive is sponsored by Loral Aerospace who donated materials and the printing costs for thousands of collection bags. 4 m DRAWINGS g;.^^DDAWlNGS HELD NIGfflLY|f ,,# ^'-' • ^ NOVEMDED 16-22 )/ ^^^ ^ ^m 5:00 PM • 7:00 PM • 9:00 PMr;i^, ^ THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY TICKETS AVAILABLE THROUGHOUT RESTAURANT AND CASING W, J>.^:-r) ^v, 'GUARANTEEDWINNERS* mmmsi^' -^ -, —^"— PPESENT TO m. 1 ONEWINNElJPEP. FAMILY SKYLINE I \ EMPLOYEES APE INELIGIBLE CASINO 8c RESTAURANT BOULDER HIGHWAY SOUTH OF SUNSET CELLUUR USA MOTOROLA DPC/550 FLIP PHONE 'Afltr$IOOAirTinMRel>a1t E^ Wireless Service \ rAIW Aumoraea Dealer ERKSSONAH210 MKRO FLIP PHONE Unlimited Local Cellular Useage Evenings & Weekends Until 1996 Largest Selection of Accessories in Nevada LOV\^EST PRICES GUARANTEED! 4581 W. FLAMINGO IBetween Arville A Decalur| 871-9887 SUNSET & 95 Next to Home Depot 451-2402 MEADOWS MALL lUppef level next to Seors| 877-2402 t 2 month service contract, new acltvotion required $29 99 minimum plan Some restnciionj opply FREE PAGERS Big band featured at Whiskey Pete's Friday Si Zentner and his Orchestra will entertain audiences with their big band sound on Friday, Nov. 17, at Whiskey Pete's Showroom, with a 7 p.m. dinner show and a 9 p.m. dance show. Whiskey Pete's is located 35 minutes south of Las Vegas at Stateline, and is owned and operated by Primadonna Resorts. Heralded as being the last of the great big band leaders, Zentner and his orchestra are known for such great classics as "Up a Uzy River," "Stripper," "Boogie Woogie," Take the A Train," "Sentimental Journey" as well as many others. Zentner hai also produced many new •ongB that appeal to all generations. He set out on his big band journey because people said it couldn't be done. AJFler 33 albums and Grammy awards for "Best Performance by an Orchestra for Dancing" and for the album "Great Band With Great Voices," Zentner proved critics wrong, and excited music fans throughout the world. Tickets are $42, including a two-night hotel stay, cocktail party, dinner and dance; or $21 for dinner and dance only. Ticketa can be purchased at any of the Primadonna Box Offices or by calling Ticketmaster, (702)474-4000. Forrservations or more information call (800)rUN-STOP. '/ • ; • Finding your next doctor can Ix.tkat easy if you call tne Physician Referral Program at M. Kcise Dominican Hospital. One call can put you in touch -ith one o\ our 3tX) qualihed physicians, Representing a wide variet\' of specialties. Dial 5(>4-4508, .^londay tlirougli Fridav from 8 am until 4;30 pm and a nurse will answer your call, detennine your needs and refer you lo a physician who's just tight for you. Our Plivsician Referral Nurse understands the importance of a strong divtor'patienl relationship. Slie can tell you tilings alxiut a divior that friends and family can t; lite insurance plans and special training. Regardless of the dixtor you chixise it s nice to know you are linked to tlie proi!ressive • ervices and pnifessionals wnotjtulerstand tne healing power of compassion. St. Rose Dominican HOSPITAL Tecnnology mtnas. Compatston haU. 564^*508 o

PAGE 30

wmmmm Page BIO Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, November 16, 1995 A New Beginning Boulder City Assembly of God Church E^xperience a fresh breath of worship >^ and the Word of God ^nn Every Sunday at 6:00 p.m. : ^^*^ (Meeting In the 'LltUe Chapel of Grace Commnlty Church) 1150 Wyoming St., Boulder City. Nevada Duane Jordan, Pastor Please Call 293-0620 for more information first Apostolic Church of Henderson meets at 360 E. Horizon Wednesday at 7pin Sunday at 2pm Rev. Don tt Shirley Reilly 565-9490 House of Worship Directory COMMUNITY BAPTIST CHURCH 245 E. Foster Ave. • Henderson, NV 89009 Reve rend Sam Roberson, Pastor/Teacher SUNDAY: Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Evening Service • 7:00 p.m. MONDAY: Evagelim Classes 7:00 p.m. TUESDAY: Theology Classes 7:00 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Prayer & Bible Study 7:00 p.m. THURSDAY: Choir Rehearsal 7:00 p.m. FRIDAY: Teachers Meeting 6:45 p.m. rtEfflER A FOURSQUARE ^j^ CHURCH 571 Adams Blvd. "• '• • • • BoiJiflpr Citv 2P3-7773 Sunday Worship 10K>0 am Home of Christian Center School and Day Care Center ST. PAUL THE APOSTLE ORTHODOX CHURCH Divine Liturgy: 9:00 A.M., Simday 898-4800 5400 ANNIE OAKLEY DR. (South of Hacienda) LAS VEGAS, NEVADA 89120 raiDBAR KODESH BUILDONG THE FUTURE TOGETHER 0 CHILDREnS SUMMER PROQRAM 0 YOUTM GROUPS < • RELIGIOUS SCHOOL < • BAR/BAT MITZVAH PROGRAM SERVICES ARE HELD: 2nd at 4th Friday evenings, 7:30 p.m. Eveiy Shabtwt moming, 9 a.m. United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism affiliate 6000 S. Eastern Ave., #3B. Call 798-4510 To list your congregation in our directory, call Goldie at 435-7700 after 2 p.ni. 7U^ "Tft^ (^^inMccut ^€Hte^ AUtftt Piewi, PAMSW CHURCH/OF Sunday School 9:30 AM Sunday Worship 10:45 AM Sunday Evening 6 PM Family Training Wednesday, 7 PM 519 North Pueblo, Henderson 566-9f3^ THE CHURCH FOR YOUR FUTURE NOW! GREEN VALLEY Evangelical Lutheran Church 1799 Wigwam Parl^vvay • Wigvvnm and Vailc Verde Sunday Worship 9 and 10:30 a.m.. Wednesday 7p.m. Sunday School & Adult Bible Study 10:15 a.m. 454-8979 COMMUIUnY CHURCH OF HENDERSON United Church of Christ Congregational 360 E. Horizon Dr., • 565-8563 Worship Service 10:30 am Nursery for Children Church School Sept. to June 9:00 am The Church On The Hill" 711 Valle Verde Ct., Henderson, NV 454-2722 Gary A. Morefleld Senior Pastor Green Valley Christian Center Sunday Schedule Moming Worship: 9:00 & 11:15 AM Children's Church: 9:00 -11:15 AM Sunday School: 10:25 AM Evening Worship: 6:00 PM Wednesday: Family Night 7:00 PM Thursday: Youth Group (7-12), 6:45 PM SUNRISE COMMUNITY CHURCH Meeting in Henderson Convention Center 200 S. Water St. (please use back paildng lot) REV. JIM HAMILTON, PASTOR 737-5219 Sunday Worship 10am Come and let us help moke your life work for you. Thursday, November 16,1995 Henderson Home News. Boulder City News Page B11 ^ N M la y • %1 IK '~t^HI mm^i^^ u Wr^^" 1 II ir / to • :|HENDERSOIN PRESBrmRiAn ,, CHURCH UI_ 601 n. Major 565-9684 Worship Services 8:30 fif 11:00 am Sunday School ..*'.*???. 9:30 am ROSS DOYEL, PASTOR nunery provided for 10 am service FAITH CHRISTIAN CHURCH \V,''rr h'n/i scorrriii^L^ llralthy Fdinilics SUNDAY SERVICES; Multi-Denominational Worship 10 A.M. Rediscovering Healthy Families Childcare Available 591 Adams Blvd. • 293-2454 Corner of Adams & San Felipe Boulder City Arvirpa GodvMii K Ted Godwin CALVERY CHAPEL HAVEN formerly of Green Valley Services Held at Henderson Senior Center Sunday 10AM I Call for other Service times 456-3619 Pastor Cliuck Trett I "77iv word have I treasured in my heart that I might not sin against thee. (Betfumy'Baptist CfiuTtIt Sunday Worship Service: 8 am, 10:30 & 6 p.m. Sunday School 9:1 5 a.m. Dr. George A. Huber Senior Pastor Steve Blockshear Youth Pastor 210 Wyoming, Boulder City Call 293-1912 for futher information BLACK MOUNTAIN FELLOWSHIP Church of the Foursquare Gospel Sunday Worship 10:30AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Wed. Family Night 7 pm Thurs. Parenting Classes 7 pm 315 S. Water St., Henderson Homtof Black Mountain Chrtftian Day Caw 564-2435 St. Timothy's Episcopal Church Pastor Rev. Dr. Lloyd Rupp We InvUe You to Come and Worship with Us at 10:00 AM. Each Sunday Pacific & Panama Downtown Henderson Chuch Office 565-8033 Family Worship Center The Church With A Hiart 370 E. WindmiU Ln. Las Vegas, NV 897-4480 ^ .' SUNDAY: Sunday School 10:00 Am • .'.] • Moming Worship 11:00 AM Evening Worship 6:0OPM WEDNESDAY Family Night 7:00 PM PASTOR J.W. CUNNINGHAM Bible Believing Bit>le Teaching* • / • HlGHLANgtilLLS I I J I ( M U C 615 College Drive • Henderson • 566-020O Sunday Worship Services: 8:30 am. 11:00 am, 6:00 pm Come Join us Sunday! We Care About You and Your Family! SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN CHURCH "Holding Forth the Word of Life..." Philippians2:16 Sunday School 9 am Adult Bible Class 9 am Sunday Worship 10:45 am PASTOR ED BRUNiNG 59 Lynn Ln.; Henderson 565-9154 Growing together in the grace of our Lord Jesus t SL Peter's Catholic Church 204 S. Boulder Hwy. IWASS SCHEDUIE: Sat: 5 p.m. Sun: 8 am & 10 am 11:30 am 5 pm Confessions: Sat. 4 to 4:30 St. Matthews Episcopal Church The Working Church Saturday Evening MaSs 5:30 pm Sunday Mass 9:45 am Church School During Sunday Mass Nursery Availablel 4709 j. Neilis Blvd. 451-2483| 2 Blocks North of Tropicana on Nellis ,Come&' IWorsIyp VEGAS VALLEY CHRISTIAN CHURCH 5515 Mtn. Visfo, Los Vegas Phone 451-9211 UNDENOMINATIONAL BIBLE and CHRIST FOCUSED BIBLE SCHOOL 9:30 AM WORSHIP 10:30 AM S.O.W. (Study on Wednesdoy) 7:00 P.M. (Child Core Avoiloble) Serving Green Volley £> Los Vegos Areos neor Sunset & Russell Rood a place to belong a place to become Licensed Child Care Center • Phone 451-9665 FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 1419 5th Street, Boulder City 293-7740 CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH 1401 FIFTH STREET BOULDER CITY, NV 293-4332 Saturday Country Westerrx Worship 5.00 pm Sunday Traditioruil Worship 9.00 am Sunday School and Adult Bible Study 10:15 am Sunday 10:00 A.M. 7:00 f.M. Wedneidoy 7.00 P.M Bible Study FOUNTAIN OF UFE MINISTRIES Moving with God in the 90's FOUNTAIN OF UFE MINISTRIES We invite you to conne and worship with the spirihfilled believers at the Fountain of Life Ministries! Come and enjoy solid Bible teoching with a family atmosphere, anticipating with excitement, the move of (jod in the services (Rev, Charles R. Batterbee, Sr. Pastor) 4310 E. Tropkano 6 • Las Vegas, NV Comar of 95 A Trapicana (702) 435-7990 SERVICES Sunday 11 am Sunday Sclnool .9 30 am VVocliicsd.iy 7 30 |)in Reading Room, 534 Nevada Hwy, Open Mon. tfiru Fri. 10 to 1 All Are Welcome Pauors nil A Paula Nordstrom Sunday Wed. Saturday Sam Saturday 7pm Church of the Harvest 1000 Nevada Hwy. Boulder City, NV 293-5878 MONDAY • FRIDAY PRAYER 6:30 7 AM 10:30am Praise and Worship 7:15pm Bible Teaching Promise Keepers (Second Sat, of the Month) Intercessory Prayer Christ The Servant Lutheran Church 263-0802 Sunday Worship 8 & 10:30 am Sunday Schiwl 9:15 am Sunday Evening Worship • 7 pm Wednesday 7pm Visiton Wekome • Nursery Available 2 South Pecos Rd. Henderson TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM EstabUshed 1947 The largest CongregaKon in Nevada Afllilialed with United Synogogue of Conservative Judaism & Solomon Schechter Doy Schools OUR MEMBERSHIP IS OPEN, COME GROW WITH US!!! 1600 iort Oolwy Blvd. • Las Vegat, Nwroda • SM-SO/O St. Thomas More Catholic Community 130 n. Pecos Rd. Henderson, 361-3022 MASSES Sat: 5 pm Sun: 8 am, 9:30 am, 1 lam dr 12:30 pm Mon Fri. 8:30 am Patber Dan nolan. CS.V. GREEN VALLEY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 454-7989 2200 Robindale Road 8:15 Worship Senrices 9:30 am & 11 am Worship & Sunday School ChM Cere for Infants and Toddlers Rev. Bob Bums ^\ Welcomes YOU each Saturday Bible Study 9:30 am Worship-11:00am Prayer Mealing Wad. 7 pm 591 Adams Boulder City St. Paul's Charismatic Episcopal Church 1661 Qalleria Dr. (White Middle School, Henderson) SUNDAY WORSHIP 10AM rMher George Qerar^ • 564-1152 rather David Hoff • 294-6226 To List Your Church in our Directory, call Goldie at 435-7700 after 2:00 p.m. GREEN VALLEY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH AfoNT Saturday Service 5:30 p.m. Sunday Worship 8:30a.m. All a.m. SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 a.m. Nursery AH Services 1798 Wigwam PIcwy. (NE cmr of Wgwwn Pkwy 1 VaM Verda Dri.) Phone: 454-8484 St Christopher's Episcopal Church Sunday School 9AM Holy Eucharist Sunday 10 A.M. 812 Arizona St. • Boulder Chy • 293-4275 GREEN VALLEY CHURCH OF CHRIST 28 Commerce Center Drive (On Sunset In Commerce Center t>ehind Ethel M Chocoletes) AhvAys A WEICOME For more information call Minister Barney Cargile DIAL'A'BIBLE MESSAGE (WEEKLY) 456-2040 New each day, a taped inspirational and encouraging message. Call atx>ut our FREE Bt>le correspondence course. GIVIIXIG LIFE IVIiiMISTRIES 4l6PerliteWay, Hend. 5694884 • 564104 Pastor: Dave Delaria Sonday Chriidan Education I Gun Sunday Wonhip' Services 11 am & 7 pm Nursery ProvKled For I Im Service Wed BibleStwiy Tpm CELEBRATION-PflAISE SERVICE 8:00 AM TRADITIONAL SERVICE 10:45 A.M SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:15 AM. CHILD CARE PROVIDED 609 East Horizon Drive Henderson. NV 89015 • (702) 565-6049 CHRISTIAN WED0INQ8 INVrTED REV. l^dAflVIN R. GAHT, PASTOR (|) THE SALVATION ARMY COMMUNITY CENTER A Center For Worship and Service! 830 E. Lake Mad Dr.. Henderson. NV (702) 565-9S78 Sunday Worship Services: II am & 6pm Sunday School For Ail Ages: 9:30 am BiMe Study Each Thursday: 6 pm If 1 S^ T:^ ? 4: ^^^^^^^^^^^^^m ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^B ^^^ • '4|£^^^^| 1 1 1 1 ,1 Holiday home-selling tips offered TEST SITE COIMTRACT — U.S. Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., congratulates R.C. Johnstone Jr., president of Bechtel National, on winning the contract at the Nevada Test Site. Johnstone told Reid that he believed Bechtel won the contract because they were committed to bringing new businesses to the Test Site and to Nevada. Using Bechtel's wide resources, he said he hopes to mai(e the Test Site an efficient world class laboratory. "I encourage Bechtel to take advantage of all the Silver State has to offer and form lasting partnerships within the community," Reid said. Don't fall into the trap of putting off listing your home until after the November-December holiday season. This is actually one of the best times to list a home. Fewer listings are taken because of the perceived slowdown in buyer activity. However, reality is that buyers are still very active in the marketplace. Bob and Loren Sweeney of Americana Group Realtors answer some myths about the holiday selling season. •Nobody buys a home during the holidays. Wrong. This time of year actually is a beehive of activity, because many visitors to Las Vegas during this time are here for the purpose of buying a home. Only serious buyers are out looking for homes; "looky loos" are busy with holiday gift shopping. •Visiting family and friends makes the house look cluttered and crowded. Wrong. The family atmosphere and festive holiday decor make most homes more inviting and enhance the homey feel. •If my home does sell over the holidays, I will have to pack and move before the holidays are over. Wrong. Closing dates are also a negotiation item to accommodate both the seller and buyer. Most buyers imderstand you want to stay put through the holidays. •I just know we will have lookers during Thanksgiving dinner. Wrong. You can say no to inconvenient times for showings. The more accessible your home is, the more traffic you will receive. Remember that buyers de understand that you are living in your house, and that's what makes it a home. •I know when I am just ready to go shopping or when I'm out of town, someone will want to see the house and I will need to be there. Wrong. New high tech key safes enable you to be gone and allows the real estate agent and their client access conveniently and securely. Just leave on some soft music and a few lights and leave it to the professionals you hired. Their suggestion is to list your who are ensuring their chents home now with agents who yecget no less than the best service ognize the holiday advantage and now and throughout the year. Senior health program opens at Desert Springs legacy, a medical and mental health treatment program for seniors—the only one of its kind in Las Vegas—has opened at Desert Springs Hospital. The 18bed unit began admitting patients Oct. 1. Catherine M. Pelley, chief executive officer at the hospital, said diagnostic and treatment services are provided for persons 65 and older. 'This is a wonderful program," said Pelley. "What we have here focuses on patients who have medical problems as well as mental health problems such as depression, dementia, acute psychoses, or adjustment disorders of aging. We provide care for the total patient and not just Holland installed as Realtors chief Barbara Holland was installed as the 1996 president of the Greater Las Vegas Association of Realtors. She received the gavel from Rosa Herwick, 1995 president, at recent installation ceremonies. Herwick, co-owner of Century 21JR Realty, said "The Association of Realtors experienced record growth in membership. The booming Las Vegas area economy is creating an interest in the real estate field. As a result, the education classes at the Association are filled to thebrim. I am honored to have been able one aspect of it." According to Pelley, Legacy provides an individualized treatment program. Approaches used include group, individual, and family counseling. Specialities such as occupational, physical, and recreational therapy are also provided. Donna Hall, LASW, CCM, Legacy program director, said a perfect example of what Legacy is all about was the second patient admitted to the program. "A lady was brought in who recently underwent a hip replacement, ," explained Hall. "She was unable to care for herself or her husband and became deeply troubled. We started working with her and combined physical therapy with counseling and she made wonderful progress. She's now back home and doing very well." Hall said many disciplines are involved in the care of the patient, including psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, psychiatric nurses, registered dieticians, and occupational therapists. The patient's primary care physician is also an active member of the medical management team. She said a patient's family is considered an important part of the treatment team and is "encouraged to participate in the family conferences, discharge planning, and weekly family support groups. This ensures that the patient's progress and accomplishments are maintained by the new living skills learned in the program". Legacy was developed so that physicians, mental health professionals, potential patients or family members can make referrals by contacting the hospital directly, 894-5600. The patient, if clinically appropriate after evaluation, will be admitted and then be seen by a psychiatrist for follow-up treatment. Winchester Gallery presents 'Cuentos' Rosa Herwick to serve as president of an organization that promotes professionalism and ethics. Herwick will serve as immediate past president on the 1996 GLVAR board of directors. The Winchester Gallery will present "Cuentos," an exhibit of twoand three-dimensional worksbyArizona artists, through Jan. 11, 1996. An opening reception will be held from 5 to 7 p.m., Friday, Nov. 17. The exhibition is based on a collaboration between artists, arts organizations, curators and communities. From the voice and heart of Tucson writer Rita Magdaleno, to the eyes and ears of children and adults in Mesa and Wickenburg, to the hands of 10 Arizona artists, personal stories have been transformed by the group into expressions of community and shared culture. "Cuentos" ("stories" in Spanish) serves to introduce audiences to those who come from the American Southwest and Mexico and who contribute their experiences to the richness of Mexican American culture in Arizona. Stories told range from accounts of family trips and celebrations to memories of individuals. The Winchester Gallery, 3130 So. McLeod, is open from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. There is no admission fee. For more information, call 4557340. "Cuentos" is toured by the Traveling Exhibitions Program of the Arizona Commission on the Arts. The Las Vegas exhibit is also supported by a grant from the Nevada State Council on the Arts, a state agency. THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY FENCE DO IT YOURSELF SPECIAL! OPENING SOON 50' ROLL • =,'CHAIN LINK Custom Fit Great to Beautify Blocl< Walls CUSTOM MADERA IRON GATES Wood pfivcy with the beauty of onamental iron Bnng m gate opening size lOf Free Eatimale Single 1 double gate speciality DOG RUN Owck and easy to install 'prs-'*''' panels Pre^hunggate 4x6x10 S149.00 AMERICAN FENCE COMPANY Yow COMPtETE fenca Siora ONMON/IW7 30AM-5.00 • SATl*OAY SAMI 00 Alw A Fi4 Lin* (X How Lag Vego* CorTMwnAlYourNwda 4330 LoM Rd 10% Off Any Ni.v 89030 Hore Corral w/Ad 399-3669 Bfmg n any cofnpelitors ad Wen meet of 09a v*" pnc on comparabM Mmsl Uncover 'Jnnch (Dining 'Ekgant food discoveries that taste even better than you imagined are an everyday revelation at Le "Bistro 1)u "Vin... and the only passport you need is your palate. 4451 East Sunset at Mountain Vista in Green Valley 435-4000 ^ 'private THning faciiity 9^wiidjoins %enata 's With Its Oum Charm & Intimacy for 'Entertaining Avant Qarde 'Decor Imaginative CMenus ^[aiuiess Coordinaticn An Occasion to Remember "Book \\n\r Friv.itf Kirlv N<)v. Come One! Come All! KATHY'S SOUTHERN COOKING owt THANKSGIVING FEAST ^etv^ TURKEY & HAM 6 PRIME RIB (Choice ot 2 mem) Homemade Cornbread Dressing, Mashed Potatoes & Cravy, Fresh Greens or Green Beans, Cranberry Sauce. Includes Peach Cobbler for Dessert $1 C99 per $799 per I ^ person # child Take Home Dinner Packages Feeds 4-12 people. 12-20lb, turkey, mashed potatoes, gravy, cornbread dressing. Choice of yams, green beans or greens. Order Early & Receive Dessert "FREE!" NONHtfUNDABLl DEPOSIT KlQUIKtDi Serving Dinner from 1-8p.m. Resen/ations Appreciated 6407 Mountain Vista Acrossirom Eihei M 433-1005 Lunch.

PAGE 31

wmmmm Page BIO Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, November 16, 1995 A New Beginning Boulder City Assembly of God Church E^xperience a fresh breath of worship >^ and the Word of God ^nn Every Sunday at 6:00 p.m. : ^^*^ (Meeting In the 'LltUe Chapel of Grace Commnlty Church) 1150 Wyoming St., Boulder City. Nevada Duane Jordan, Pastor Please Call 293-0620 for more information first Apostolic Church of Henderson meets at 360 E. Horizon Wednesday at 7pin Sunday at 2pm Rev. Don tt Shirley Reilly 565-9490 House of Worship Directory COMMUNITY BAPTIST CHURCH 245 E. Foster Ave. • Henderson, NV 89009 Reve rend Sam Roberson, Pastor/Teacher SUNDAY: Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Morning Service 11:00 a.m. Evening Service • 7:00 p.m. MONDAY: Evagelim Classes 7:00 p.m. TUESDAY: Theology Classes 7:00 p.m. WEDNESDAY: Prayer & Bible Study 7:00 p.m. THURSDAY: Choir Rehearsal 7:00 p.m. FRIDAY: Teachers Meeting 6:45 p.m. rtEfflER A FOURSQUARE ^j^ CHURCH 571 Adams Blvd. "• '• • • • BoiJiflpr Citv 2P3-7773 Sunday Worship 10K>0 am Home of Christian Center School and Day Care Center ST. PAUL THE APOSTLE ORTHODOX CHURCH Divine Liturgy: 9:00 A.M., Simday 898-4800 5400 ANNIE OAKLEY DR. (South of Hacienda) LAS VEGAS, NEVADA 89120 raiDBAR KODESH BUILDONG THE FUTURE TOGETHER 0 CHILDREnS SUMMER PROQRAM 0 YOUTM GROUPS < • RELIGIOUS SCHOOL < • BAR/BAT MITZVAH PROGRAM SERVICES ARE HELD: 2nd at 4th Friday evenings, 7:30 p.m. Eveiy Shabtwt moming, 9 a.m. United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism affiliate 6000 S. Eastern Ave., #3B. Call 798-4510 To list your congregation in our directory, call Goldie at 435-7700 after 2 p.ni. 7U^ "Tft^ (^^inMccut ^€Hte^ AUtftt Piewi, PAMSW CHURCH/OF Sunday School 9:30 AM Sunday Worship 10:45 AM Sunday Evening 6 PM Family Training Wednesday, 7 PM 519 North Pueblo, Henderson 566-9f3^ THE CHURCH FOR YOUR FUTURE NOW! GREEN VALLEY Evangelical Lutheran Church 1799 Wigwam Parl^vvay • Wigvvnm and Vailc Verde Sunday Worship 9 and 10:30 a.m.. Wednesday 7p.m. Sunday School & Adult Bible Study 10:15 a.m. 454-8979 COMMUIUnY CHURCH OF HENDERSON United Church of Christ Congregational 360 E. Horizon Dr., • 565-8563 Worship Service 10:30 am Nursery for Children Church School Sept. to June 9:00 am The Church On The Hill" 711 Valle Verde Ct., Henderson, NV 454-2722 Gary A. Morefleld Senior Pastor Green Valley Christian Center Sunday Schedule Moming Worship: 9:00 & 11:15 AM Children's Church: 9:00 -11:15 AM Sunday School: 10:25 AM Evening Worship: 6:00 PM Wednesday: Family Night 7:00 PM Thursday: Youth Group (7-12), 6:45 PM SUNRISE COMMUNITY CHURCH Meeting in Henderson Convention Center 200 S. Water St. (please use back paildng lot) REV. JIM HAMILTON, PASTOR 737-5219 Sunday Worship 10am Come and let us help moke your life work for you. Thursday, November 16,1995 Henderson Home News. Boulder City News Page B11 ^ N M la y • %1 IK '~t^HI mm^i^^ u Wr^^" 1 II ir / to • :|HENDERSOIN PRESBrmRiAn ,, CHURCH UI_ 601 n. Major 565-9684 Worship Services 8:30 fif 11:00 am Sunday School ..*'.*???. 9:30 am ROSS DOYEL, PASTOR nunery provided for 10 am service FAITH CHRISTIAN CHURCH \V,''rr h'n/i scorrriii^L^ llralthy Fdinilics SUNDAY SERVICES; Multi-Denominational Worship 10 A.M. Rediscovering Healthy Families Childcare Available 591 Adams Blvd. • 293-2454 Corner of Adams & San Felipe Boulder City Arvirpa GodvMii K Ted Godwin CALVERY CHAPEL HAVEN formerly of Green Valley Services Held at Henderson Senior Center Sunday 10AM I Call for other Service times 456-3619 Pastor Cliuck Trett I "77iv word have I treasured in my heart that I might not sin against thee. (Betfumy'Baptist CfiuTtIt Sunday Worship Service: 8 am, 10:30 & 6 p.m. Sunday School 9:1 5 a.m. Dr. George A. Huber Senior Pastor Steve Blockshear Youth Pastor 210 Wyoming, Boulder City Call 293-1912 for futher information BLACK MOUNTAIN FELLOWSHIP Church of the Foursquare Gospel Sunday Worship 10:30AM Sunday School 9:30 AM Wed. Family Night 7 pm Thurs. Parenting Classes 7 pm 315 S. Water St., Henderson Homtof Black Mountain Chrtftian Day Caw 564-2435 St. Timothy's Episcopal Church Pastor Rev. Dr. Lloyd Rupp We InvUe You to Come and Worship with Us at 10:00 AM. Each Sunday Pacific & Panama Downtown Henderson Chuch Office 565-8033 Family Worship Center The Church With A Hiart 370 E. WindmiU Ln. Las Vegas, NV 897-4480 ^ .' SUNDAY: Sunday School 10:00 Am • .'.] • Moming Worship 11:00 AM Evening Worship 6:0OPM WEDNESDAY Family Night 7:00 PM PASTOR J.W. CUNNINGHAM Bible Believing Bit>le Teaching* • / • HlGHLANgtilLLS I I J I ( M U C 615 College Drive • Henderson • 566-020O Sunday Worship Services: 8:30 am. 11:00 am, 6:00 pm Come Join us Sunday! We Care About You and Your Family! SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH OUR SAVIORS LUTHERAN CHURCH "Holding Forth the Word of Life..." Philippians2:16 Sunday School 9 am Adult Bible Class 9 am Sunday Worship 10:45 am PASTOR ED BRUNiNG 59 Lynn Ln.; Henderson 565-9154 Growing together in the grace of our Lord Jesus t SL Peter's Catholic Church 204 S. Boulder Hwy. IWASS SCHEDUIE: Sat: 5 p.m. Sun: 8 am & 10 am 11:30 am 5 pm Confessions: Sat. 4 to 4:30 St. Matthews Episcopal Church The Working Church Saturday Evening MaSs 5:30 pm Sunday Mass 9:45 am Church School During Sunday Mass Nursery Availablel 4709 j. Neilis Blvd. 451-2483| 2 Blocks North of Tropicana on Nellis ,Come&' IWorsIyp VEGAS VALLEY CHRISTIAN CHURCH 5515 Mtn. Visfo, Los Vegas Phone 451-9211 UNDENOMINATIONAL BIBLE and CHRIST FOCUSED BIBLE SCHOOL 9:30 AM WORSHIP 10:30 AM S.O.W. (Study on Wednesdoy) 7:00 P.M. (Child Core Avoiloble) Serving Green Volley £> Los Vegos Areos neor Sunset & Russell Rood a place to belong a place to become Licensed Child Care Center • Phone 451-9665 FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 1419 5th Street, Boulder City 293-7740 CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH 1401 FIFTH STREET BOULDER CITY, NV 293-4332 Saturday Country Westerrx Worship 5.00 pm Sunday Traditioruil Worship 9.00 am Sunday School and Adult Bible Study 10:15 am Sunday 10:00 A.M. 7:00 f.M. Wedneidoy 7.00 P.M Bible Study FOUNTAIN OF UFE MINISTRIES Moving with God in the 90's FOUNTAIN OF UFE MINISTRIES We invite you to conne and worship with the spirihfilled believers at the Fountain of Life Ministries! Come and enjoy solid Bible teoching with a family atmosphere, anticipating with excitement, the move of (jod in the services (Rev, Charles R. Batterbee, Sr. Pastor) 4310 E. Tropkano 6 • Las Vegas, NV Comar of 95 A Trapicana (702) 435-7990 SERVICES Sunday 11 am Sunday Sclnool .9 30 am VVocliicsd.iy 7 30 |)in Reading Room, 534 Nevada Hwy, Open Mon. tfiru Fri. 10 to 1 All Are Welcome Pauors nil A Paula Nordstrom Sunday Wed. Saturday Sam Saturday 7pm Church of the Harvest 1000 Nevada Hwy. Boulder City, NV 293-5878 MONDAY • FRIDAY PRAYER 6:30 7 AM 10:30am Praise and Worship 7:15pm Bible Teaching Promise Keepers (Second Sat, of the Month) Intercessory Prayer Christ The Servant Lutheran Church 263-0802 Sunday Worship 8 & 10:30 am Sunday Schiwl 9:15 am Sunday Evening Worship • 7 pm Wednesday 7pm Visiton Wekome • Nursery Available 2 South Pecos Rd. Henderson TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM EstabUshed 1947 The largest CongregaKon in Nevada Afllilialed with United Synogogue of Conservative Judaism & Solomon Schechter Doy Schools OUR MEMBERSHIP IS OPEN, COME GROW WITH US!!! 1600 iort Oolwy Blvd. • Las Vegat, Nwroda • SM-SO/O St. Thomas More Catholic Community 130 n. Pecos Rd. Henderson, 361-3022 MASSES Sat: 5 pm Sun: 8 am, 9:30 am, 1 lam dr 12:30 pm Mon Fri. 8:30 am Patber Dan nolan. CS.V. GREEN VALLEY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 454-7989 2200 Robindale Road 8:15 Worship Senrices 9:30 am & 11 am Worship & Sunday School ChM Cere for Infants and Toddlers Rev. Bob Bums ^\ Welcomes YOU each Saturday Bible Study 9:30 am Worship-11:00am Prayer Mealing Wad. 7 pm 591 Adams Boulder City St. Paul's Charismatic Episcopal Church 1661 Qalleria Dr. (White Middle School, Henderson) SUNDAY WORSHIP 10AM rMher George Qerar^ • 564-1152 rather David Hoff • 294-6226 To List Your Church in our Directory, call Goldie at 435-7700 after 2:00 p.m. GREEN VALLEY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH AfoNT Saturday Service 5:30 p.m. Sunday Worship 8:30a.m. All a.m. SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 a.m. Nursery AH Services 1798 Wigwam PIcwy. (NE cmr of Wgwwn Pkwy 1 VaM Verda Dri.) Phone: 454-8484 St Christopher's Episcopal Church Sunday School 9AM Holy Eucharist Sunday 10 A.M. 812 Arizona St. • Boulder Chy • 293-4275 GREEN VALLEY CHURCH OF CHRIST 28 Commerce Center Drive (On Sunset In Commerce Center t>ehind Ethel M Chocoletes) AhvAys A WEICOME For more information call Minister Barney Cargile DIAL'A'BIBLE MESSAGE (WEEKLY) 456-2040 New each day, a taped inspirational and encouraging message. Call atx>ut our FREE Bt>le correspondence course. GIVIIXIG LIFE IVIiiMISTRIES 4l6PerliteWay, Hend. 5694884 • 564104 Pastor: Dave Delaria Sonday Chriidan Education I Gun Sunday Wonhip' Services 11 am & 7 pm Nursery ProvKled For I Im Service Wed BibleStwiy Tpm CELEBRATION-PflAISE SERVICE 8:00 AM TRADITIONAL SERVICE 10:45 A.M SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:15 AM. CHILD CARE PROVIDED 609 East Horizon Drive Henderson. NV 89015 • (702) 565-6049 CHRISTIAN WED0INQ8 INVrTED REV. l^dAflVIN R. GAHT, PASTOR (|) THE SALVATION ARMY COMMUNITY CENTER A Center For Worship and Service! 830 E. Lake Mad Dr.. Henderson. NV (702) 565-9S78 Sunday Worship Services: II am & 6pm Sunday School For Ail Ages: 9:30 am BiMe Study Each Thursday: 6 pm If 1 S^ T:^ ? 4: ^^^^^^^^^^^^^m ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^B ^^^ • '4|£^^^^| 1 1 1 1 ,1 Holiday home-selling tips offered TEST SITE COIMTRACT — U.S. Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., congratulates R.C. Johnstone Jr., president of Bechtel National, on winning the contract at the Nevada Test Site. Johnstone told Reid that he believed Bechtel won the contract because they were committed to bringing new businesses to the Test Site and to Nevada. Using Bechtel's wide resources, he said he hopes to mai(e the Test Site an efficient world class laboratory. "I encourage Bechtel to take advantage of all the Silver State has to offer and form lasting partnerships within the community," Reid said. Don't fall into the trap of putting off listing your home until after the November-December holiday season. This is actually one of the best times to list a home. Fewer listings are taken because of the perceived slowdown in buyer activity. However, reality is that buyers are still very active in the marketplace. Bob and Loren Sweeney of Americana Group Realtors answer some myths about the holiday selling season. •Nobody buys a home during the holidays. Wrong. This time of year actually is a beehive of activity, because many visitors to Las Vegas during this time are here for the purpose of buying a home. Only serious buyers are out looking for homes; "looky loos" are busy with holiday gift shopping. •Visiting family and friends makes the house look cluttered and crowded. Wrong. The family atmosphere and festive holiday decor make most homes more inviting and enhance the homey feel. •If my home does sell over the holidays, I will have to pack and move before the holidays are over. Wrong. Closing dates are also a negotiation item to accommodate both the seller and buyer. Most buyers imderstand you want to stay put through the holidays. •I just know we will have lookers during Thanksgiving dinner. Wrong. You can say no to inconvenient times for showings. The more accessible your home is, the more traffic you will receive. Remember that buyers de understand that you are living in your house, and that's what makes it a home. •I know when I am just ready to go shopping or when I'm out of town, someone will want to see the house and I will need to be there. Wrong. New high tech key safes enable you to be gone and allows the real estate agent and their client access conveniently and securely. Just leave on some soft music and a few lights and leave it to the professionals you hired. Their suggestion is to list your who are ensuring their chents home now with agents who yecget no less than the best service ognize the holiday advantage and now and throughout the year. Senior health program opens at Desert Springs legacy, a medical and mental health treatment program for seniors—the only one of its kind in Las Vegas—has opened at Desert Springs Hospital. The 18bed unit began admitting patients Oct. 1. Catherine M. Pelley, chief executive officer at the hospital, said diagnostic and treatment services are provided for persons 65 and older. 'This is a wonderful program," said Pelley. "What we have here focuses on patients who have medical problems as well as mental health problems such as depression, dementia, acute psychoses, or adjustment disorders of aging. We provide care for the total patient and not just Holland installed as Realtors chief Barbara Holland was installed as the 1996 president of the Greater Las Vegas Association of Realtors. She received the gavel from Rosa Herwick, 1995 president, at recent installation ceremonies. Herwick, co-owner of Century 21JR Realty, said "The Association of Realtors experienced record growth in membership. The booming Las Vegas area economy is creating an interest in the real estate field. As a result, the education classes at the Association are filled to thebrim. I am honored to have been able one aspect of it." According to Pelley, Legacy provides an individualized treatment program. Approaches used include group, individual, and family counseling. Specialities such as occupational, physical, and recreational therapy are also provided. Donna Hall, LASW, CCM, Legacy program director, said a perfect example of what Legacy is all about was the second patient admitted to the program. "A lady was brought in who recently underwent a hip replacement, ," explained Hall. "She was unable to care for herself or her husband and became deeply troubled. We started working with her and combined physical therapy with counseling and she made wonderful progress. She's now back home and doing very well." Hall said many disciplines are involved in the care of the patient, including psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, psychiatric nurses, registered dieticians, and occupational therapists. The patient's primary care physician is also an active member of the medical management team. She said a patient's family is considered an important part of the treatment team and is "encouraged to participate in the family conferences, discharge planning, and weekly family support groups. This ensures that the patient's progress and accomplishments are maintained by the new living skills learned in the program". Legacy was developed so that physicians, mental health professionals, potential patients or family members can make referrals by contacting the hospital directly, 894-5600. The patient, if clinically appropriate after evaluation, will be admitted and then be seen by a psychiatrist for follow-up treatment. Winchester Gallery presents 'Cuentos' Rosa Herwick to serve as president of an organization that promotes professionalism and ethics. Herwick will serve as immediate past president on the 1996 GLVAR board of directors. The Winchester Gallery will present "Cuentos," an exhibit of twoand three-dimensional worksbyArizona artists, through Jan. 11, 1996. An opening reception will be held from 5 to 7 p.m., Friday, Nov. 17. The exhibition is based on a collaboration between artists, arts organizations, curators and communities. From the voice and heart of Tucson writer Rita Magdaleno, to the eyes and ears of children and adults in Mesa and Wickenburg, to the hands of 10 Arizona artists, personal stories have been transformed by the group into expressions of community and shared culture. "Cuentos" ("stories" in Spanish) serves to introduce audiences to those who come from the American Southwest and Mexico and who contribute their experiences to the richness of Mexican American culture in Arizona. Stories told range from accounts of family trips and celebrations to memories of individuals. The Winchester Gallery, 3130 So. McLeod, is open from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. There is no admission fee. For more information, call 4557340. "Cuentos" is toured by the Traveling Exhibitions Program of the Arizona Commission on the Arts. The Las Vegas exhibit is also supported by a grant from the Nevada State Council on the Arts, a state agency. THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY FENCE DO IT YOURSELF SPECIAL! OPENING SOON 50' ROLL • =,'CHAIN LINK Custom Fit Great to Beautify Blocl< Walls CUSTOM MADERA IRON GATES Wood pfivcy with the beauty of onamental iron Bnng m gate opening size lOf Free Eatimale Single 1 double gate speciality DOG RUN Owck and easy to install 'prs-'*''' panels Pre^hunggate 4x6x10 S149.00 AMERICAN FENCE COMPANY Yow COMPtETE fenca Siora ONMON/IW7 30AM-5.00 • SATl*OAY SAMI 00 Alw A Fi4 Lin* (X How Lag Vego* CorTMwnAlYourNwda 4330 LoM Rd 10% Off Any Ni.v 89030 Hore Corral w/Ad 399-3669 Bfmg n any cofnpelitors ad Wen meet of 09a v*" pnc on comparabM Mmsl Uncover 'Jnnch (Dining 'Ekgant food discoveries that taste even better than you imagined are an everyday revelation at Le "Bistro 1)u "Vin... and the only passport you need is your palate. 4451 East Sunset at Mountain Vista in Green Valley 435-4000 ^ 'private THning faciiity 9^wiidjoins %enata 's With Its Oum Charm & Intimacy for 'Entertaining Avant Qarde 'Decor Imaginative CMenus ^[aiuiess Coordinaticn An Occasion to Remember "Book \\n\r Friv.itf Kirlv N<)v. Come One! Come All! KATHY'S SOUTHERN COOKING owt THANKSGIVING FEAST ^etv^ TURKEY & HAM 6 PRIME RIB (Choice ot 2 mem) Homemade Cornbread Dressing, Mashed Potatoes & Cravy, Fresh Greens or Green Beans, Cranberry Sauce. Includes Peach Cobbler for Dessert $1 C99 per $799 per I ^ person # child Take Home Dinner Packages Feeds 4-12 people. 12-20lb, turkey, mashed potatoes, gravy, cornbread dressing. Choice of yams, green beans or greens. Order Early & Receive Dessert "FREE!" NONHtfUNDABLl DEPOSIT KlQUIKtDi Serving Dinner from 1-8p.m. Resen/ations Appreciated 6407 Mountain Vista Acrossirom Eihei M 433-1005 Lunch.

PAGE 32

i7!-TWTT"rrTWT^"!'ff^?^^'W ?W PP Pag* B12 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, November 16, 1995 Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Page B13 American Ground Zero on display "American Ground Zero: The SecretNuclear War"is a powerful and moving collection of portraits of citizens—primarily from Utah, Nevada and Northern Arizona— who were adversely affected by radioactive fallout from government-sponsored nuclear testing in Nevada during the 1950s. The exhibit by Carole Gallagher will open Monday, Nov. 20 and continue through Jan. 5, 1996, at the Beam Fine Art Gallery at UNLV. The exhibition contains 50 black-and-white prints and extensive text panels excerpted from the artist's interviews with the subjects. o ; ^:;'Abandoning her career as a successful New York photographer, Carole Gallagher moved to Utah in 1983 and spent the next decade going door-to-door to find people willing to be photographed and tell their stories. Diane Nielson, who grew up in Henderson, remembered playing in the fallout as a kid. "After a bomb, there would be the fallout, fine like flour, kind of grayish white. We would play like that was our snow... we would go out and write our names in it, it was thick enough you could write your name in it and see it." Each of the 126 nuclear clouds that floated across the American West contained radiation comparable to the amount released atChemabyl.yet downwind area residents were consistently told there was no danger and were encouraged to watch the fallout clouds drifting over their homes. Gallagher penetrated the veil of official secrecy to document the incredible untold story of the Americans whose misfortune it was to live downwind of testing. She has documented the lethal working conditions of test site workers and the lives and deaths of soldiers assigned to military maneuvers on the Random House paperback edition Spring 1994. It contains 462 pages, 129 duotones and one map. The Beam Fine Art Gallery is located on the UNLV campus and is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. For more information, call 895-3893. OLD PHOTOS RESTORED Bton Atttr We can take those old damaged family photos (any size) and make an electronically repaired qopy at a price you, can afford. You will receive a fully repaired copy of your original plus a negative. We also make prints from those old odd size negatives B&W or color. All work Is done on the premises. WESTERN COLOR LAB tiilOO .Sonlh liLstcin Avi-. #li; .i\ iir I ,ill .i!), lull \ll I,. I • 'Herman Hagen's Hands,' a Henderson resident who succumbed to nuclear radiation, is part of a photo exhibit by Carole Gallagher entitled, "American Ground Zero: The Secret Nuclear War," to be displayed from Nov. 20to Jan. 5,1996, In the UNLV Beam Fine Art Gallery. For more information, call 895-3801. nuclear battlefield, witnessing the bomb as close as 2,500 yards from Ground Zero. Laveri Woosley and her family used to go camping in the desert outside Ruth. Nobody warned them not to. "I remember seeing lots of clouds," she told Gallagher. "Different clouds. I broke out in a rash my whole body." Only rarely do Gallagher's photographs convey the subjects' considerable physical suffering. Instead "they portray the beauty and value of these ordinary people," said Jerry Schefcik, director of the Fine Art Gallery. The exhibit will travel to Texas and England. The exhibition and tour are organized by the International Center of Photography, New York City, and made possible by grants from the Columbia Foundation, The Aaron Diamond Foundation, and the Threshold Foundation, with additional support from The LEF Foundation and the Glickenhaus Foundation. The tour is sponsored by the Deer Creek Foundation and the Ruth Mott Fund. The Beam exhibition is funded in part by a grant from the Nevada State Council on the Arts a State Agency. The exhibition is accompanied by a book of the same title published by MIT Press, spring 1993; OPEN 7 DAYS 10-8 Monday thru Sat 10-6 Sunday NOW OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Las Vegas Wholesale Foliage, Inc. Gorgeous, Live Exotic Indoor Plants and Trees? § • • at 50% to 75% off retail prices, • n; ;;;;;• Bring this ad and receive -1 %-/:-:\M 10% OFF Our Already Low Prices Las Vegas Wholesale Foliage 9175 Las Vegas Blvd. So. ^^One Coupon Per Customer^' Partnersfiips are effective in worker safety Public/private partnerships can be very effective, especially when the topic is worker safety. The Nevada Department of Business and Industry Division of Industrial Relations and builder associations statewide recently formed an alliance to create a "fall protection plan" that would significantly improve employee safety. The result is a unique program providing better safety protection than the original federal standard. This is the first pubbc/private program of its kind in the nation. The Southern Nevada Home Builders Association initiated the partnership in February 1995. The association contacted the DIR to receive a six-month variance on a federal "fall protection standard" being adopted nationwide. The federal standard would have been extremely difficult for residential construction firms to interpret and implement. "The federal standard focused on "high rise' construction, with only a 'blanket' appendix on residential construction. Our association was concerned with the impact, and feasibility, of this legislation," said Jesse Wells, government affairs specialist for the SNHBA. Residential contractors in the state were granted a variance under two conditions: builders would continue to train employees, and they would establish a task force with DIR to develop a new residential standard acceptable to the state, as well as homebuilders. "We immediately formed a committee comprised of all major builders in the state, sub-contractors and representatives from the Nevada Occupational Safety and Health Enforcement Section, an agency of DIR. In addition to meeting as a large group, we divided into sub-committees and addressed the feasibility and safety of each issue. The whole process was very proactive," Welles said. Ron Landram, OSHES enforcement supervisor and task force chairperson agrees, "From the beginning, the group was adamant about providing for the best fall protection plan to improve worksite safety. The result was a unique cooperative effort to write a comprehensive 'shell' that each contractor can use as a guide." The task force created three plans for speci fie subcontractors: residential framing, tile roofing and a general plan which includes plumbing, electrical wiringand roofaccess. Each plan is designed to prevent injuries associated with falls and can be adapted to fit individual businesses and worksites. 'The resulting fall protection plans for the state of Nevada provide a greater level of employee protection than the existing federal (residential) plan," Welles said. In addition to ensuring the safety of construction worksites, the SNBA is credited for openinga door to future partnerships. "While OSHES has always tried to work with businesses, this is the first time we have formed a public-private task force. This experience was very positive and cooperative. We are encouraging other associations t contact our offices regarding safety issues that affect their employees," concludes Landram. Ner Tamid to host bazaar Congregation Ner Tamid and the Sisterhood will hold its annual Chanukah Bazaar Shopping Fair from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 19. Gifls, decorations, arts and crafts, books and games will be available, in addition to food. A raffle will be held for the Campership Program which helps send children to Jewish camps. A highlight of the annual event is the Ms. Noodle Koogle Contest. To enter the contest, call Fran SanoflF, 457-0876, or Shirley Gellin, 457-6320. Entertainment will be provided by the Junior Choir. The congregation is at 2761 Emerson Ave., one block south of Desert Inn off Eastern. Blind center needs help How would you Uke to help a young blind mother learn a trade and at the same time get a tax credit? The Las Vegas Blind Center needs IBM compatible computers in working order to start a medical transcribing program to teach blind people a work skill. The Las Vegas Blind Center is a non-profit organization which has been in service for 36 years. Contributions are tax deductible. If you can help, call Catherine, 642,6000. ..,• fir There's Something New On Flamingo Road. Announcing the opening of Sunrise Hospitals new Flamingo Surgery Center! It's conveniently located at 2565 East Flamingo Koad in Las Vegas. Specializing in outpatient care, the new surgery center is just another example of how Sunrise continues to set the standard in health care in Las Vegas. FLAMINGO SURGERY CENTER 697-7900 Phone number effective 11/20/95 /^ ighth c^^nnual (Pld (^^^shioned Christmas "Celebration CLARK COUNTY HERITAGE MUSEUM 1830 South Boulder Highway Henderson SATURDAY, DECEMBER 9 Craft Booth Shopping Old-time handcrafted gifts Reception Carol sing-along • Strolling Carolers Santa and Mrs. Claus Exhibit Center and Heritage Street in Holiday Decor "Rock and Roll: Toys of the Baby Boomers" Exhibit on loan from the Detroit Antique Toy Museum J1.50 Adult, J 1.00 Senior/Child (festive (^oodsl ^m \ Catered Champagne Brunch 11:30A.M. % vU > \^ .H am and Turkey Dinner with all the trimmings 5 & 7p.m. Harp and Bell Choir Music ^ Raffle and Door Prizes Adult $15.00, Child under 12 $10.00 CALL 455-7955 FOR RESERVATIONS McCarran airport garage update The new 9-story parking garage at McCarran International Airport is under construction and on schedule. The $77 million project is 45% complete, and has 391 more days to go. Level 4 of the garage is anticipated to be complete by mid-November. More than 50,000 cubic yards of concrete have been poured for the garage which will accommodate up to 6,000 vehicles^, Once completed, vehicles will enter the garage via one of three ramps located east of the existing garage, or via a spiral roadway, which will access each level up and down the full vertical height of the building. Level 6 of the spijral roadway is near completion. Two pedestrian bridges equipped with moving walkways Reagans establish | Alzheimer'^ institute Former President Ronald Reagan and First Lady Nancy Reagan have joined with the National Alzheimer's Association, including the Southern Nevada chapter, to establish the Ronald arid Nancy Reagan Research Institute. An expansion of the existing research program, the institute will unite leading international scientific minds with drug and biotech companies to speed information exchange and find treatments, prevention and cures. The Reagan Institute was established to serve as a symbol of hope to all those who share our dream of finding a cure for Alzheimer's disease," said Nancy Reagan, whose husband announced in a letter to the American people on Nov. 5,1994 that he is suffering from the early stages of Alzheimer's disease. "Honestly, we can't wait any longer to step up the research." Approximately 4 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease/! an incurable, degenerative disease of the brain that destroys memory, cognitive abilities and judgment. One in 10 persons over 65 and nearly half of those over 85 have Alzheimer's disease. The disease also affects an estimated 400,000 Americans in their 40s and 50s. As many as 7 million Americans may be afflicted by the year 2010, when the large Baby Boom generation reaches 65. "If we don't accelerate research, we're going Festival of Trees and Lights at LV Hilton The DowTi Syndrome Organization of Southern Nevada will hold the seventh annual Festival of Trees and Lights from Wednesday, Nov. 22 to 25, at the Las Vegas Hilton. The event was first held in 1989 at Caesars Palace and raised $10,000 with approximately 1,500 people attending. Festival '94 raised $ 170,000 with 10,000 people attending. The event is expected to raise $190,000 and attract 15,000 people"The four-day holiday display and community celebration features beautifully decorated trees, wreaths, centerpieces and a gingerbread village designed by amateur and professional decorators, artists, and florists. Highlights will include live entertainment, childrens' crafts, gift shop and bake shop. The DSOSN mission is to help people with Down Syndrome and their families. Members of the non-profit organization have a child with Down Syndrome or other rare chromosomal abnormalities. The DSOSN is supported by fundraisers such as Uie festival and by private donations. Hours are Wednesday, Nov. 22:11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.. Let's Do Lunch, advance sales only; 2 to 9 p.m., general admission. Thursday, Nov. 23: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., general admission. Friday, Nov. 23: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. general admission, 6 to 10 p.m. Family Night. Saturday, Nov. 25:10 a.m. to 9 p.m. general admission. For more information on volunteering, designing, sponsoring, or to purchase Let's Do Lunch or general admission tickets, call 227-3552. to face a ticking time bomb as the population ages and the cost of this disease increases beyond the $100 billion it is today," said Bobbie Jean Denny, Southern Nevada chapter president. "We can conquer this disease through the Alzheimer's Association and the Reagan Institute by bringing together the best talents of this country to work together toward the common goal of finding a treatment for this said Zaven Khachaturian, an Alzheimer expert who serves as primary consultant to the association on the Reagan Institute. The initial focus will be to providegrants to innovative research, and promote cooperative working relationships among the association, scientists, pharmaceutical and biotech companies, universities and medical centers, private foundations and government. The Southern Nevada chapter is part of a network of more than 200 Alzheimer's Association chapters nationwide. The association is the only national voluntary health organization dedicated to research for the causes, cure, treatments and prevention of Alzheimer's, and to providing education and support for patients, families and caregivers. For more information call the national office, (800) 272-3900 or the Southern Nevada chapter, 366-0811. INSIGHT TO EYESIGHT by Joseph Shalev, ALD. RECOMMENDATION FORDUBETICS People with diabetes should routinely submit to a dilated eye examination for the detection of the serious condition known as diabetic retinopathy. This overgrowth of blood vessels and fibrous tissue around the eye's retina is the leading cause of new cases of blindness. In its mild form, known as nonproliferative retinopathy. the condition may lead to a weakening of the eye's blood vessel walls. At this point, vision is not likely to be affected. However, if non-proliforative retinopathy goes untreated, it may develop into the more serious proliferative retinopathy, which results when new blood vessels and fibrous tissue form on the retina. With early detection and laser photocoagulation therapy, the American Diabetes Association says that the risk of severe vision loss can be reduced by almost 60 percent. During November, "Diabetic Eye Disease Month." we would like to increa.se the awareness of how good or poor control of diabetes can affect retinopathy, cataracLs, and glaucoma At EYE INSTITUTE OF NEVADA, we are committed to providing high quality, conscientious eye care. We're located ai 999 Adams Blvd Suite 101, Boulder City (with two other locations), where our total eye care involves preventive eye care, early tfcaunent of disease, and surgery if necessary. Please call 293-0531 to schedule an appointment All diabetics need to get a dilated eye exam at least once a year. PS. Because a diabetic can have diabetic retinopathy and not know it. a medical eye exam is of the utmost importance. "Tha cobum is brough w you at a pubUc tervict i paid for In Joseph Shalev. M D will link the new garage to the -terminal building. Construction of the pedestrian bridge for level 1 is near completion. Steel has been erected, and the concrete deck has been placed for the pedestrian bridge on level 3. Moving walkways on both levels are in place. "We are pleased that the McCarran Parking Garage is progressing smoothly and on time," said RobertN. Broadbent, Director of the Clark County Department of Aviation. "We are looking forward to opening the new parking garage in about a year." Broadbent noted that the increase in vehicle traffic and parking at the airport can be attributed to the fact that Mi:Carran is currently the ninth busiest airport in the nation, and 13th busiest in the world. "The new garage will allow McCarran to better serve Clark County residents and tourists alike," he said. McCarran International Airport is part of the Clark County Airport System, publicly owned by Clark County, Nevada and operated under the direction of the Board of County Commissioners, the authority of Donald L. "Pat" Shalmy, County Manager, and the management of Robert N. Broadbent, Director of Aviation. The Department of Aviation is a self-sufficient enterprise and operates without County general fiind tax revenue. ST. JUDE'S FASHION SHOW—Pam McMahon (Mrs. Ed McMahon), left, and County Commissioner Lorraine Hunt purchased tickets recently for the Friends of St. Jude's Ranch for Children fashion show to be held Nov. 18 at the Sheraton Desert Inn's Terrace Room. The Bob Mackie collection and fashions from Saks will be featured at the event. For information, call 363-7260. The Grcmde Buffet at Sam's Town Only $12.95. \ i ii.<^ A Thanksgiving so delicious, the turkeys are making advance reservations. With holiday dining this delicious, it's no wonder that even the turkeys are making advance reservations! Menus include juicy fresh-roasted turkey, cinnamon and clove-baked ham, roast duck, roast goose and mesquite-grllled chicken, just to name a few. Plus, we're serving V an array of fresh salads, enticing side dishes and tantalizing desserts. We're even recreating all the exciting atmosphere of the world-famous Macy's Day parade right in our Spectacular Grande Buffet complete with grandstands, floating character balloons and a marching band. Reservations suggested. E-' Grande Buffet 11 a.m. 5 p.m., 454-8044 Try our special Thanksgiving Day menu additions at our other Sam's Town restaurants. Billy Bob's 454-8031 3:00 -10:00 p.m. Traditional Turkey Dinner, $10.95 Roast Goose, $11.95 Diamond Lil's 454^009 Brunch 9:30 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Dinner 4:00 p.m. -10:00 p.m. Fresh Roast Tur1
PAGE 33

i7!-TWTT"rrTWT^"!'ff^?^^'W ?W PP Pag* B12 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, November 16, 1995 Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Page B13 American Ground Zero on display "American Ground Zero: The SecretNuclear War"is a powerful and moving collection of portraits of citizens—primarily from Utah, Nevada and Northern Arizona— who were adversely affected by radioactive fallout from government-sponsored nuclear testing in Nevada during the 1950s. The exhibit by Carole Gallagher will open Monday, Nov. 20 and continue through Jan. 5, 1996, at the Beam Fine Art Gallery at UNLV. The exhibition contains 50 black-and-white prints and extensive text panels excerpted from the artist's interviews with the subjects. o ; ^:;'Abandoning her career as a successful New York photographer, Carole Gallagher moved to Utah in 1983 and spent the next decade going door-to-door to find people willing to be photographed and tell their stories. Diane Nielson, who grew up in Henderson, remembered playing in the fallout as a kid. "After a bomb, there would be the fallout, fine like flour, kind of grayish white. We would play like that was our snow... we would go out and write our names in it, it was thick enough you could write your name in it and see it." Each of the 126 nuclear clouds that floated across the American West contained radiation comparable to the amount released atChemabyl.yet downwind area residents were consistently told there was no danger and were encouraged to watch the fallout clouds drifting over their homes. Gallagher penetrated the veil of official secrecy to document the incredible untold story of the Americans whose misfortune it was to live downwind of testing. She has documented the lethal working conditions of test site workers and the lives and deaths of soldiers assigned to military maneuvers on the Random House paperback edition Spring 1994. It contains 462 pages, 129 duotones and one map. The Beam Fine Art Gallery is located on the UNLV campus and is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. For more information, call 895-3893. OLD PHOTOS RESTORED Bton Atttr We can take those old damaged family photos (any size) and make an electronically repaired qopy at a price you, can afford. You will receive a fully repaired copy of your original plus a negative. We also make prints from those old odd size negatives B&W or color. All work Is done on the premises. WESTERN COLOR LAB tiilOO .Sonlh liLstcin Avi-. #li; .i\ iir I ,ill .i!), lull \ll I,. I • 'Herman Hagen's Hands,' a Henderson resident who succumbed to nuclear radiation, is part of a photo exhibit by Carole Gallagher entitled, "American Ground Zero: The Secret Nuclear War," to be displayed from Nov. 20to Jan. 5,1996, In the UNLV Beam Fine Art Gallery. For more information, call 895-3801. nuclear battlefield, witnessing the bomb as close as 2,500 yards from Ground Zero. Laveri Woosley and her family used to go camping in the desert outside Ruth. Nobody warned them not to. "I remember seeing lots of clouds," she told Gallagher. "Different clouds. I broke out in a rash my whole body." Only rarely do Gallagher's photographs convey the subjects' considerable physical suffering. Instead "they portray the beauty and value of these ordinary people," said Jerry Schefcik, director of the Fine Art Gallery. The exhibit will travel to Texas and England. The exhibition and tour are organized by the International Center of Photography, New York City, and made possible by grants from the Columbia Foundation, The Aaron Diamond Foundation, and the Threshold Foundation, with additional support from The LEF Foundation and the Glickenhaus Foundation. The tour is sponsored by the Deer Creek Foundation and the Ruth Mott Fund. The Beam exhibition is funded in part by a grant from the Nevada State Council on the Arts a State Agency. The exhibition is accompanied by a book of the same title published by MIT Press, spring 1993; OPEN 7 DAYS 10-8 Monday thru Sat 10-6 Sunday NOW OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Las Vegas Wholesale Foliage, Inc. Gorgeous, Live Exotic Indoor Plants and Trees? § • • at 50% to 75% off retail prices, • n; ;;;;;• Bring this ad and receive -1 %-/:-:\M 10% OFF Our Already Low Prices Las Vegas Wholesale Foliage 9175 Las Vegas Blvd. So. ^^One Coupon Per Customer^' Partnersfiips are effective in worker safety Public/private partnerships can be very effective, especially when the topic is worker safety. The Nevada Department of Business and Industry Division of Industrial Relations and builder associations statewide recently formed an alliance to create a "fall protection plan" that would significantly improve employee safety. The result is a unique program providing better safety protection than the original federal standard. This is the first pubbc/private program of its kind in the nation. The Southern Nevada Home Builders Association initiated the partnership in February 1995. The association contacted the DIR to receive a six-month variance on a federal "fall protection standard" being adopted nationwide. The federal standard would have been extremely difficult for residential construction firms to interpret and implement. "The federal standard focused on "high rise' construction, with only a 'blanket' appendix on residential construction. Our association was concerned with the impact, and feasibility, of this legislation," said Jesse Wells, government affairs specialist for the SNHBA. Residential contractors in the state were granted a variance under two conditions: builders would continue to train employees, and they would establish a task force with DIR to develop a new residential standard acceptable to the state, as well as homebuilders. "We immediately formed a committee comprised of all major builders in the state, sub-contractors and representatives from the Nevada Occupational Safety and Health Enforcement Section, an agency of DIR. In addition to meeting as a large group, we divided into sub-committees and addressed the feasibility and safety of each issue. The whole process was very proactive," Welles said. Ron Landram, OSHES enforcement supervisor and task force chairperson agrees, "From the beginning, the group was adamant about providing for the best fall protection plan to improve worksite safety. The result was a unique cooperative effort to write a comprehensive 'shell' that each contractor can use as a guide." The task force created three plans for speci fie subcontractors: residential framing, tile roofing and a general plan which includes plumbing, electrical wiringand roofaccess. Each plan is designed to prevent injuries associated with falls and can be adapted to fit individual businesses and worksites. 'The resulting fall protection plans for the state of Nevada provide a greater level of employee protection than the existing federal (residential) plan," Welles said. In addition to ensuring the safety of construction worksites, the SNBA is credited for openinga door to future partnerships. "While OSHES has always tried to work with businesses, this is the first time we have formed a public-private task force. This experience was very positive and cooperative. We are encouraging other associations t contact our offices regarding safety issues that affect their employees," concludes Landram. Ner Tamid to host bazaar Congregation Ner Tamid and the Sisterhood will hold its annual Chanukah Bazaar Shopping Fair from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 19. Gifls, decorations, arts and crafts, books and games will be available, in addition to food. A raffle will be held for the Campership Program which helps send children to Jewish camps. A highlight of the annual event is the Ms. Noodle Koogle Contest. To enter the contest, call Fran SanoflF, 457-0876, or Shirley Gellin, 457-6320. Entertainment will be provided by the Junior Choir. The congregation is at 2761 Emerson Ave., one block south of Desert Inn off Eastern. Blind center needs help How would you Uke to help a young blind mother learn a trade and at the same time get a tax credit? The Las Vegas Blind Center needs IBM compatible computers in working order to start a medical transcribing program to teach blind people a work skill. The Las Vegas Blind Center is a non-profit organization which has been in service for 36 years. Contributions are tax deductible. If you can help, call Catherine, 642,6000. ..,• fir There's Something New On Flamingo Road. Announcing the opening of Sunrise Hospitals new Flamingo Surgery Center! It's conveniently located at 2565 East Flamingo Koad in Las Vegas. Specializing in outpatient care, the new surgery center is just another example of how Sunrise continues to set the standard in health care in Las Vegas. FLAMINGO SURGERY CENTER 697-7900 Phone number effective 11/20/95 /^ ighth c^^nnual (Pld (^^^shioned Christmas "Celebration CLARK COUNTY HERITAGE MUSEUM 1830 South Boulder Highway Henderson SATURDAY, DECEMBER 9 Craft Booth Shopping Old-time handcrafted gifts Reception Carol sing-along • Strolling Carolers Santa and Mrs. Claus Exhibit Center and Heritage Street in Holiday Decor "Rock and Roll: Toys of the Baby Boomers" Exhibit on loan from the Detroit Antique Toy Museum J1.50 Adult, J 1.00 Senior/Child (festive (^oodsl ^m \ Catered Champagne Brunch 11:30A.M. % vU > \^ .H am and Turkey Dinner with all the trimmings 5 & 7p.m. Harp and Bell Choir Music ^ Raffle and Door Prizes Adult $15.00, Child under 12 $10.00 CALL 455-7955 FOR RESERVATIONS McCarran airport garage update The new 9-story parking garage at McCarran International Airport is under construction and on schedule. The $77 million project is 45% complete, and has 391 more days to go. Level 4 of the garage is anticipated to be complete by mid-November. More than 50,000 cubic yards of concrete have been poured for the garage which will accommodate up to 6,000 vehicles^, Once completed, vehicles will enter the garage via one of three ramps located east of the existing garage, or via a spiral roadway, which will access each level up and down the full vertical height of the building. Level 6 of the spijral roadway is near completion. Two pedestrian bridges equipped with moving walkways Reagans establish | Alzheimer'^ institute Former President Ronald Reagan and First Lady Nancy Reagan have joined with the National Alzheimer's Association, including the Southern Nevada chapter, to establish the Ronald arid Nancy Reagan Research Institute. An expansion of the existing research program, the institute will unite leading international scientific minds with drug and biotech companies to speed information exchange and find treatments, prevention and cures. The Reagan Institute was established to serve as a symbol of hope to all those who share our dream of finding a cure for Alzheimer's disease," said Nancy Reagan, whose husband announced in a letter to the American people on Nov. 5,1994 that he is suffering from the early stages of Alzheimer's disease. "Honestly, we can't wait any longer to step up the research." Approximately 4 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease/! an incurable, degenerative disease of the brain that destroys memory, cognitive abilities and judgment. One in 10 persons over 65 and nearly half of those over 85 have Alzheimer's disease. The disease also affects an estimated 400,000 Americans in their 40s and 50s. As many as 7 million Americans may be afflicted by the year 2010, when the large Baby Boom generation reaches 65. "If we don't accelerate research, we're going Festival of Trees and Lights at LV Hilton The DowTi Syndrome Organization of Southern Nevada will hold the seventh annual Festival of Trees and Lights from Wednesday, Nov. 22 to 25, at the Las Vegas Hilton. The event was first held in 1989 at Caesars Palace and raised $10,000 with approximately 1,500 people attending. Festival '94 raised $ 170,000 with 10,000 people attending. The event is expected to raise $190,000 and attract 15,000 people"The four-day holiday display and community celebration features beautifully decorated trees, wreaths, centerpieces and a gingerbread village designed by amateur and professional decorators, artists, and florists. Highlights will include live entertainment, childrens' crafts, gift shop and bake shop. The DSOSN mission is to help people with Down Syndrome and their families. Members of the non-profit organization have a child with Down Syndrome or other rare chromosomal abnormalities. The DSOSN is supported by fundraisers such as Uie festival and by private donations. Hours are Wednesday, Nov. 22:11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.. Let's Do Lunch, advance sales only; 2 to 9 p.m., general admission. Thursday, Nov. 23: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., general admission. Friday, Nov. 23: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. general admission, 6 to 10 p.m. Family Night. Saturday, Nov. 25:10 a.m. to 9 p.m. general admission. For more information on volunteering, designing, sponsoring, or to purchase Let's Do Lunch or general admission tickets, call 227-3552. to face a ticking time bomb as the population ages and the cost of this disease increases beyond the $100 billion it is today," said Bobbie Jean Denny, Southern Nevada chapter president. "We can conquer this disease through the Alzheimer's Association and the Reagan Institute by bringing together the best talents of this country to work together toward the common goal of finding a treatment for this said Zaven Khachaturian, an Alzheimer expert who serves as primary consultant to the association on the Reagan Institute. The initial focus will be to providegrants to innovative research, and promote cooperative working relationships among the association, scientists, pharmaceutical and biotech companies, universities and medical centers, private foundations and government. The Southern Nevada chapter is part of a network of more than 200 Alzheimer's Association chapters nationwide. The association is the only national voluntary health organization dedicated to research for the causes, cure, treatments and prevention of Alzheimer's, and to providing education and support for patients, families and caregivers. For more information call the national office, (800) 272-3900 or the Southern Nevada chapter, 366-0811. INSIGHT TO EYESIGHT by Joseph Shalev, ALD. RECOMMENDATION FORDUBETICS People with diabetes should routinely submit to a dilated eye examination for the detection of the serious condition known as diabetic retinopathy. This overgrowth of blood vessels and fibrous tissue around the eye's retina is the leading cause of new cases of blindness. In its mild form, known as nonproliferative retinopathy. the condition may lead to a weakening of the eye's blood vessel walls. At this point, vision is not likely to be affected. However, if non-proliforative retinopathy goes untreated, it may develop into the more serious proliferative retinopathy, which results when new blood vessels and fibrous tissue form on the retina. With early detection and laser photocoagulation therapy, the American Diabetes Association says that the risk of severe vision loss can be reduced by almost 60 percent. During November, "Diabetic Eye Disease Month." we would like to increa.se the awareness of how good or poor control of diabetes can affect retinopathy, cataracLs, and glaucoma At EYE INSTITUTE OF NEVADA, we are committed to providing high quality, conscientious eye care. We're located ai 999 Adams Blvd Suite 101, Boulder City (with two other locations), where our total eye care involves preventive eye care, early tfcaunent of disease, and surgery if necessary. Please call 293-0531 to schedule an appointment All diabetics need to get a dilated eye exam at least once a year. PS. Because a diabetic can have diabetic retinopathy and not know it. a medical eye exam is of the utmost importance. "Tha cobum is brough w you at a pubUc tervict i paid for In Joseph Shalev. M D will link the new garage to the -terminal building. Construction of the pedestrian bridge for level 1 is near completion. Steel has been erected, and the concrete deck has been placed for the pedestrian bridge on level 3. Moving walkways on both levels are in place. "We are pleased that the McCarran Parking Garage is progressing smoothly and on time," said RobertN. Broadbent, Director of the Clark County Department of Aviation. "We are looking forward to opening the new parking garage in about a year." Broadbent noted that the increase in vehicle traffic and parking at the airport can be attributed to the fact that Mi:Carran is currently the ninth busiest airport in the nation, and 13th busiest in the world. "The new garage will allow McCarran to better serve Clark County residents and tourists alike," he said. McCarran International Airport is part of the Clark County Airport System, publicly owned by Clark County, Nevada and operated under the direction of the Board of County Commissioners, the authority of Donald L. "Pat" Shalmy, County Manager, and the management of Robert N. Broadbent, Director of Aviation. The Department of Aviation is a self-sufficient enterprise and operates without County general fiind tax revenue. ST. JUDE'S FASHION SHOW—Pam McMahon (Mrs. Ed McMahon), left, and County Commissioner Lorraine Hunt purchased tickets recently for the Friends of St. Jude's Ranch for Children fashion show to be held Nov. 18 at the Sheraton Desert Inn's Terrace Room. The Bob Mackie collection and fashions from Saks will be featured at the event. For information, call 363-7260. The Grcmde Buffet at Sam's Town Only $12.95. \ i ii.<^ A Thanksgiving so delicious, the turkeys are making advance reservations. With holiday dining this delicious, it's no wonder that even the turkeys are making advance reservations! Menus include juicy fresh-roasted turkey, cinnamon and clove-baked ham, roast duck, roast goose and mesquite-grllled chicken, just to name a few. Plus, we're serving V an array of fresh salads, enticing side dishes and tantalizing desserts. We're even recreating all the exciting atmosphere of the world-famous Macy's Day parade right in our Spectacular Grande Buffet complete with grandstands, floating character balloons and a marching band. Reservations suggested. E-' Grande Buffet 11 a.m. 5 p.m., 454-8044 Try our special Thanksgiving Day menu additions at our other Sam's Town restaurants. Billy Bob's 454-8031 3:00 -10:00 p.m. Traditional Turkey Dinner, $10.95 Roast Goose, $11.95 Diamond Lil's 454^009 Brunch 9:30 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Dinner 4:00 p.m. -10:00 p.m. Fresh Roast Tur1
PAGE 34

nfVIHHIIIM Page B14 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, November 16,1995 I NEVADA HISTORICAL SOCIETY PHOTOGRAPH Early-day Goldfield, subject of a new book Goldfield memories In hew Three years ago, we became involved in the collection of Goldfield memories to assist our old friend Virginia Ridgeway with a proposed publication on the community. The response by readers was incredible and the book, "Goldfield Remembered," is now off the press, published by the Goldfield Historical Society. It is for sale through both the Goldfield Historical Society, P.O. Box 219, Goldfield, NV, 89013 or the Nevada Historical Society, 1650 N. Virginia St., Reno, 89503, for THIS WAS NEVADA PHILLIP I. EARL $14.95 plus $1.50 postage and handling. The publication is a worthy addition to anyone's library. For more information, call the Goldfield Historical Society, (702)485-6365, or the Nevada Historical Society in Reno, (702)688-1191. Opened to mining in 1903, Goldfield's boom was brief, but colorful. Many accounts of the camp's history have appeared in print over the years—the most recent being Sally Zanjani's "Goldfield: The Last Gold Rush on the Western Frontier." In contrast, "Goldfield Remembered" consists of personal reminiscences by those who were there during the boom years and those who either stayed on or arrived during the long decline in the mines and the depopulation of the town. Featured are accounts of family life, life as it was for children and young adults in the isolated desert community, churches and religion, transportation, business evolution, law enforcement among other topics. Genealogists will also find much to interest them here and more formal historians seeking to detail life in faded Nevada mining camps will find grist for their mills. Earl IS curator of the Nevada Historical Society in Carson City. Heritage IVIuseiim exhibits Toys of Baby Boomers' The Clark County Heritage Museum on Boulder Highway between Henderson and Boulder City is featuring a special exhibit, "Rock and Roll: Toys of the Baby Boomers" through Jan. 28,1996. The exhibit of more than 100 toysfromTinkerToytoMcHale's Navy and Barbie to Attacking Martian Robots provides an opportunity to see what made growing up in the 1950s and 60s so much fun. The exhibit is traveling from the Detroit Antique Toy Museum, and will show daily in the museum's Heritage Gallery. THE NEWS tiovERs YOUR COIVIIVIUNITY The Baby Boom period covered nearly two decades between the years 1946 and 1965 when approximately 73 million babies were bom in America. Never was a generation welcomed as warmly as that generation born after World War II. The children of the baby boom years had more attention, more play time, and more play things than any previous generation in history. The influence of toys was a mind-boggling array of new products catering to every whim of this new generation. A profusion of toys and games flooded the market to the delight of millions of little consumers. The show brings back memories of the toys that were loved. Visit, and see how many times you hear, "I had one of those!" The Clark County Heritage Museum is a function of the Clark County Department of Parks and Recreation. Museum admission is $ 1.50 for adults; $1 for seniors and children. Hours are from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily. For more information, call 455-7955. ^ NEPTUNE SOCIETY $495 Call 24 Hours 474-6699 Simple Cremation Includes: Removal from place of death. Preparation of death certificates and permits. Cremation, mimmum urn and land scattering. Fully Licensed PRENEED AHHANCEMENTS Monl'i'y faymenls Total Coils No Hidden Cliargei 259-6667 1111 Las Vegas Blvd. No., • Las Vegas, NV 89101 Simple Direct Burial $995 Includes: Casket and Graveside Servire at Veterans Cemetery. I Name I Address I City I Phone -Age .Slate. -Zip I I I I I Please rush me without obligation your special infom^ation i For: Q Cremation • Burial Q Sea Scattering We are pleased to announce that we now offer investment securities through -' \ i : :•; Robert Thomas Securities, Inc. ';}:;; • ;• ,U;.r;,. ; • Member NASD/SIPC, • • :: • ;: • ; ^^K; •: >:• a wholly owned subsidiary of :;>. • • :.'\',^':'^ ;: • : Raymond James Financial, Inc/; ;> • U 'M'::-..:::,':.: (NYSE-RJF) ;.,:..„ • .. • .;'•:/1/;'^ bringing a new level of service and investment opportunities to the Boulder City/Henderson area. J.D. Higley Company 1234 Wyoming • 293-2323 A Financial Services Company @ Robert Thomas Securities, inc. As an Advertising and Public Relations Professional in Your Community A high-earning, prestigious opportunity awaits you as a WELCOME WAGON Representative in this area. Meet exciting people. Become acquainted with influential government and business leaders. Enjoy high earnings as you manage your own flexible 40-hour week. Represent local businesses and professionals when you call on new U.S. citizens, engaged women, new parents, and movers. For a personalintervieu), contact: WELCOME WAGON JANNYGARD Men or Fri only at 898-0567 or call 474-1313 anytime Management pomtioni available in L.aa Vegaa. INTERNATIONAL, INC. Equal (>pp(>nunlty Emplttycr LAKE MEAD BOAT OWNERS ASSOCIATION In Cooperation With THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE & lAKE MEAD MARINA presents THE 19TH ANNUAL PARADE OF LIGHTS Dedicated to the Memory; of Don Ho\\ada\; Sat., Dec. 9, 1995 • Trophies Awarded in Eight Classes 1^0 ENTRY FEE ATTENTION ON DECK! Only 50 entries permitted enter cariy to ensure your place! Final check in at Lake Mead Marina from 9AM to 2PM, December 9th. 1. The PARADE will depart from Lake Mead Marina at 6PM. 2. MANDATORY Captains meeting at 4PM at Lake Mead Marina. 3. Boats will be judged from the Starboard side. 4. Boats will be USCG safety inspected In The Water between 9AM and 2:30PM 5. Use the entry forni below to register; mail no later than November 27, 1995. 6. NO WALK UP ENTRES AFTER 2PM, DECEMBER 9th. 7. In case if inclement weather, entrants will be judged in the water, dockside. 8. Questions, contact Diane Palmer, Parade Chaiawoman, at (702) 457-2797 or Bob Gaudet at (702) 438-2485. Detach and mail to: LM.B.O.A., 3135 Palora Aveue, Las Vegas. NV 89121 REGISTRATION FORM 1995 PARADE OF UGHTS CAFTAiN: ^^^'^ (first; (Initial) ADDRESS PHONE: Daytime: ( BOAT NAME: CITY -STATE ZIP ) 7 YES NO SUP* ENTRY THEME: BotlMd at L^M MMd VHFRaiae? YES NO CUM* (PICM Chedi Otic) 1. 16 FT to 20 FT-ALL 2. 21 FT to 25 FT-Al 3. 26FTftUP-SAI. 4. 26 FT to 30 FT Pomet A Howaboat ( ) MAKE a LENGTH: I CoutMy Skp? YES (HIgMy RwoouMiKlcdl) NO 5. 31 FT to 35 FT POWOT A HouMboM 3 FT A UP POWDI 7. 3 FT A UP HOUKBOAT •. AU COMV^ROAL ENTIOES 1^ 1990 W. SUNSET AT VALLE VERDE • 898-8183 Breakfast 7am 11pm Dinner 1 lam 10pm (Nov. 23 No Reservation Please) THANKSGIVING DAY MENU All dinners served wltti a relish tray, fruit salad, and a slice of pie. TURKEY DINNER Served wltti mastied potatoes, yams, stuffing, and broccoli witti cheese sauce. HAM DINNER Served vAth pineapple glaze, mashed potatoes, yams, and broccoli with cheese sauce. PORK DINNER Served with mashed potatoes, yams, stuffing, and broccoli with cheese sauce. YOUR CHOICE. $1099 DUCK DINNER Served with rice or mashed Cl ^ QS potatoes and yams, and broccoli with cheese sauce. M. mL CHILD S DINNER TURKEY DINNER or HAM DINNER YOUR CHOICE.. $^95 TURKEY PACKAGES lor I|ike-out only. Order by Monday Nov. 20 1-Turkey or Ham. 1 gal. Stuffing. 1 gal. Gravy Whole $ 95 (makes approx. Z0-2S dinners) Carved $ ] 00 1 Turkey or Ham. 1 gal. stuffing. 1 gal. mashed Whole$135 potatoes. 1 gal. gravy, 3 doz. rolls. 3 pies Guved $140 (nriakes approx. 20 25 dinners) 1/2 Carved Turkey or Ham, 1/2 gal. stuffing, 1/2 gal. mashed potatoes, 1/2 gal. gravy. 2 doz. rolls. 2 pies $89 251b. Turkey (whole) $70 251b. Turkey (carved) $75 Turkey (half) $45 INDIVIDUAL fTEMS ALSO AVAILABLE ? f l J • -^^if^ffX WHAT'S PLAYING Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson Home News..JB.pulder City News PageB1& Southern Nevada Musical Arts Society opens 33rd season Sunday The Southern Nevada Musical Arts Society will open its 33rd season with "A Concert of Peace" honoring Chief Warrant Officer John D. Peterson (19661995) at 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 19, in the Horn Theatre CCSN Performing Arts Center. ;.;'. The Musical Arts Chorus and Orchestra will perform the world premiere of "Remembering Those Who Fly," a newly-commissioned choral work by Alice Parker, one of America's leading choral composers. The work is dedicated to John D. Peterson, son of Musical Arts Society director Dr. Douglas R. Peterson, who died in a helicopter accident May 21, while serving in the U.S. Army. The concert will feature the 60-voice chorus and orchestra in Joseph Haydn'sl796 "Missa in Tempore Belli" (Mass in Time of War).. The closing section is a prayer for peace. Haydn Mass soloists include Rebecca Cervantes (soprano), Helen Maynard (contralto), Steve Robinson (tenor) and Gary Golbart (baritone). Also featured will be John Rutter's 1974 exuberant "Gloria," which also contains a message of peace. Howard Hanson's "Song of Democracy" will conclude the program. The Society's season includes: •"A Concert of Peace" with the Musical Arts Chorus and Orchestra, 3 p.m. Nov. 19, Horn Theatre, CCSN. • •"Sounds of the Season" by the Musical Arts Singer, 3 p.m. Dec. 17, Clark County Library Theatre. •"With Love from the Musical Arts Singers," a Valentine concert, 3 p.m., Feb. 11, 1996, Tam Alumni Center,UNLV. •"St.MatthewPassion"byJ.S. Bach, with the Premiere Chorale from Pierce College and the Musical Arts Chorus, guest soloists, and Orchestra, 3 p.m., March 24, Horn Theatre CCSN. •"A Gershwin Celebration"by the Musical Arts Chorus at 8 p.m. June 15 and 3 p.m. June 16, Horn Theatre, CCSN. Admission to all concerts is $10 adults; $7 for seniors, students, military, and the handicapped. Tickets may be purchased at the UNLV Performing Arts Center Box Office, 895-3801, or at the door. Dr. Douglas R. Peterson iDosa trio at UNLV Nov. 20 The MariposaTrio will present a free concert at 8 p.m. Monday, Nov. 20, featuring works by Beethoven, Rachmaninoff, and a former UNLV student. The Trio consists of violinist Teresa Ling, a member of the UNLV music faculty; cellist Andrew Smith, a fall addition to both the UNLV faculty and pianist Carol Stivers coordinator of piano studies at UNLV. The concert will be in UNLV Black Box Theatre, and will include Beethoven's Ghost Trio—"Opus 70, No. 1 in D Major," and Rachmaninoffs 'Trio Elegiac, Opus 9" written as a tribute to Tchaikovsky. "Mariposa de Obsidiana" by Eric Whittacre, a former UNLVstudent, was commissioned by the trio and the Music Teachers National Association. Whittacre, now studying under composer David Diamond while-attending" the JttllKard School in New York, is also the MariposaTrio author of "Ghost Train." The piece was a composition commissioned and performed by the UNLV Wind Symphony. It enjoys growing national recognition. Ling has performed at Carnegie Hall and at the Kennedy Center with the New THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY York String Orchestra under Alexander Schneider. She has a master's in music performance from the Eastman School. Prior to moving to Las Vegas, she was concertmaster of the South Dakota Symphony and first violinist with the Dakota Shing Quartet. She has taught at Northwestern and the University of South Dakota Smith has performed with the American Symphony Orchestra, New York's Manhattan Philharmonic, the Santa Barbara Symphony and the Santa Barbara Chamber Orchestra. He played for three years with the Nicoletti String Quartet at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has a master's degree from the Mannes College of Music in New York where he studied cello with Timothy Eddy. Stivers, renown as a pianist in the southwest, has performed nationwide as well as at New York's Carnegie Hall, in New York. She has been featured as a soloist with numerous orchestras as well as a chamber musician and accompanist. She holds a master's degree from Florida State University PEPPERMILL'S kA^ HAM OR TURKEY DINNER Holiday salad, Stuffing, Candied Yams, Mashed Potatoes and Gravy, Cranberry Sauce, Rolls and Butter. TREE SLICE OF MINCEMEAT OR PUMPKIN PIE WITH DINNER $4.99 SERVED 12PM • 10PM "THURSDAY SPECIALPORK LOrN ROAST WITH ^^ mi SPECIAL ^JiTT SAUCE 3 PM-11PM omueMMtm oiNmmn VALUABLE COUPON ITALIAN SAUSAGE & PEPPERS IN MARINARA SAUCE, CHOKE OF SOUP OR SALAD, GARUC TOAST. WOW t% TS ONLY9''^' SERVED DAILY 3PM 11PM EXPIRES 11/28/96 OOOO UP TO 4 PCKIONS. ONE COUTON PE* VWT couran NOT wue nmi Mrr oTMR oiPlR MMwr iMR (Moawa WHERE IT PAYS TO EAT & PLAY' RAINBOW CLUB CASINO 122 WATER ST. HENDERSON. NV. 565-9777 gS S )5B w i r i w#iy w !i M i i
PAGE 35

nfVIHHIIIM Page B14 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, November 16,1995 I NEVADA HISTORICAL SOCIETY PHOTOGRAPH Early-day Goldfield, subject of a new book Goldfield memories In hew Three years ago, we became involved in the collection of Goldfield memories to assist our old friend Virginia Ridgeway with a proposed publication on the community. The response by readers was incredible and the book, "Goldfield Remembered," is now off the press, published by the Goldfield Historical Society. It is for sale through both the Goldfield Historical Society, P.O. Box 219, Goldfield, NV, 89013 or the Nevada Historical Society, 1650 N. Virginia St., Reno, 89503, for THIS WAS NEVADA PHILLIP I. EARL $14.95 plus $1.50 postage and handling. The publication is a worthy addition to anyone's library. For more information, call the Goldfield Historical Society, (702)485-6365, or the Nevada Historical Society in Reno, (702)688-1191. Opened to mining in 1903, Goldfield's boom was brief, but colorful. Many accounts of the camp's history have appeared in print over the years—the most recent being Sally Zanjani's "Goldfield: The Last Gold Rush on the Western Frontier." In contrast, "Goldfield Remembered" consists of personal reminiscences by those who were there during the boom years and those who either stayed on or arrived during the long decline in the mines and the depopulation of the town. Featured are accounts of family life, life as it was for children and young adults in the isolated desert community, churches and religion, transportation, business evolution, law enforcement among other topics. Genealogists will also find much to interest them here and more formal historians seeking to detail life in faded Nevada mining camps will find grist for their mills. Earl IS curator of the Nevada Historical Society in Carson City. Heritage IVIuseiim exhibits Toys of Baby Boomers' The Clark County Heritage Museum on Boulder Highway between Henderson and Boulder City is featuring a special exhibit, "Rock and Roll: Toys of the Baby Boomers" through Jan. 28,1996. The exhibit of more than 100 toysfromTinkerToytoMcHale's Navy and Barbie to Attacking Martian Robots provides an opportunity to see what made growing up in the 1950s and 60s so much fun. The exhibit is traveling from the Detroit Antique Toy Museum, and will show daily in the museum's Heritage Gallery. THE NEWS tiovERs YOUR COIVIIVIUNITY The Baby Boom period covered nearly two decades between the years 1946 and 1965 when approximately 73 million babies were bom in America. Never was a generation welcomed as warmly as that generation born after World War II. The children of the baby boom years had more attention, more play time, and more play things than any previous generation in history. The influence of toys was a mind-boggling array of new products catering to every whim of this new generation. A profusion of toys and games flooded the market to the delight of millions of little consumers. The show brings back memories of the toys that were loved. Visit, and see how many times you hear, "I had one of those!" The Clark County Heritage Museum is a function of the Clark County Department of Parks and Recreation. Museum admission is $ 1.50 for adults; $1 for seniors and children. Hours are from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily. For more information, call 455-7955. ^ NEPTUNE SOCIETY $495 Call 24 Hours 474-6699 Simple Cremation Includes: Removal from place of death. Preparation of death certificates and permits. Cremation, mimmum urn and land scattering. Fully Licensed PRENEED AHHANCEMENTS Monl'i'y faymenls Total Coils No Hidden Cliargei 259-6667 1111 Las Vegas Blvd. No., • Las Vegas, NV 89101 Simple Direct Burial $995 Includes: Casket and Graveside Servire at Veterans Cemetery. I Name I Address I City I Phone -Age .Slate. -Zip I I I I I Please rush me without obligation your special infom^ation i For: Q Cremation • Burial Q Sea Scattering We are pleased to announce that we now offer investment securities through -' \ i : :•; Robert Thomas Securities, Inc. ';}:;; • ;• ,U;.r;,. ; • Member NASD/SIPC, • • :: • ;: • ; ^^K; •: >:• a wholly owned subsidiary of :;>. • • :.'\',^':'^ ;: • : Raymond James Financial, Inc/; ;> • U 'M'::-..:::,':.: (NYSE-RJF) ;.,:..„ • .. • .;'•:/1/;'^ bringing a new level of service and investment opportunities to the Boulder City/Henderson area. J.D. Higley Company 1234 Wyoming • 293-2323 A Financial Services Company @ Robert Thomas Securities, inc. As an Advertising and Public Relations Professional in Your Community A high-earning, prestigious opportunity awaits you as a WELCOME WAGON Representative in this area. Meet exciting people. Become acquainted with influential government and business leaders. Enjoy high earnings as you manage your own flexible 40-hour week. Represent local businesses and professionals when you call on new U.S. citizens, engaged women, new parents, and movers. For a personalintervieu), contact: WELCOME WAGON JANNYGARD Men or Fri only at 898-0567 or call 474-1313 anytime Management pomtioni available in L.aa Vegaa. INTERNATIONAL, INC. Equal (>pp(>nunlty Emplttycr LAKE MEAD BOAT OWNERS ASSOCIATION In Cooperation With THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE & lAKE MEAD MARINA presents THE 19TH ANNUAL PARADE OF LIGHTS Dedicated to the Memory; of Don Ho\\ada\; Sat., Dec. 9, 1995 • Trophies Awarded in Eight Classes 1^0 ENTRY FEE ATTENTION ON DECK! Only 50 entries permitted enter cariy to ensure your place! Final check in at Lake Mead Marina from 9AM to 2PM, December 9th. 1. The PARADE will depart from Lake Mead Marina at 6PM. 2. MANDATORY Captains meeting at 4PM at Lake Mead Marina. 3. Boats will be judged from the Starboard side. 4. Boats will be USCG safety inspected In The Water between 9AM and 2:30PM 5. Use the entry forni below to register; mail no later than November 27, 1995. 6. NO WALK UP ENTRES AFTER 2PM, DECEMBER 9th. 7. In case if inclement weather, entrants will be judged in the water, dockside. 8. Questions, contact Diane Palmer, Parade Chaiawoman, at (702) 457-2797 or Bob Gaudet at (702) 438-2485. Detach and mail to: LM.B.O.A., 3135 Palora Aveue, Las Vegas. NV 89121 REGISTRATION FORM 1995 PARADE OF UGHTS CAFTAiN: ^^^'^ (first; (Initial) ADDRESS PHONE: Daytime: ( BOAT NAME: CITY -STATE ZIP ) 7 YES NO SUP* ENTRY THEME: BotlMd at L^M MMd VHFRaiae? YES NO CUM* (PICM Chedi Otic) 1. 16 FT to 20 FT-ALL 2. 21 FT to 25 FT-Al 3. 26FTftUP-SAI. 4. 26 FT to 30 FT Pomet A Howaboat ( ) MAKE a LENGTH: I CoutMy Skp? YES (HIgMy RwoouMiKlcdl) NO 5. 31 FT to 35 FT POWOT A HouMboM 3 FT A UP POWDI 7. 3 FT A UP HOUKBOAT •. AU COMV^ROAL ENTIOES 1^ 1990 W. SUNSET AT VALLE VERDE • 898-8183 Breakfast 7am 11pm Dinner 1 lam 10pm (Nov. 23 No Reservation Please) THANKSGIVING DAY MENU All dinners served wltti a relish tray, fruit salad, and a slice of pie. TURKEY DINNER Served wltti mastied potatoes, yams, stuffing, and broccoli witti cheese sauce. HAM DINNER Served vAth pineapple glaze, mashed potatoes, yams, and broccoli with cheese sauce. PORK DINNER Served with mashed potatoes, yams, stuffing, and broccoli with cheese sauce. YOUR CHOICE. $1099 DUCK DINNER Served with rice or mashed Cl ^ QS potatoes and yams, and broccoli with cheese sauce. M. mL CHILD S DINNER TURKEY DINNER or HAM DINNER YOUR CHOICE.. $^95 TURKEY PACKAGES lor I|ike-out only. Order by Monday Nov. 20 1-Turkey or Ham. 1 gal. Stuffing. 1 gal. Gravy Whole $ 95 (makes approx. Z0-2S dinners) Carved $ ] 00 1 Turkey or Ham. 1 gal. stuffing. 1 gal. mashed Whole$135 potatoes. 1 gal. gravy, 3 doz. rolls. 3 pies Guved $140 (nriakes approx. 20 25 dinners) 1/2 Carved Turkey or Ham, 1/2 gal. stuffing, 1/2 gal. mashed potatoes, 1/2 gal. gravy. 2 doz. rolls. 2 pies $89 251b. Turkey (whole) $70 251b. Turkey (carved) $75 Turkey (half) $45 INDIVIDUAL fTEMS ALSO AVAILABLE ? f l J • -^^if^ffX WHAT'S PLAYING Thursday, November 16, 1995 Henderson Home News..JB.pulder City News PageB1& Southern Nevada Musical Arts Society opens 33rd season Sunday The Southern Nevada Musical Arts Society will open its 33rd season with "A Concert of Peace" honoring Chief Warrant Officer John D. Peterson (19661995) at 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 19, in the Horn Theatre CCSN Performing Arts Center. ;.;'. The Musical Arts Chorus and Orchestra will perform the world premiere of "Remembering Those Who Fly," a newly-commissioned choral work by Alice Parker, one of America's leading choral composers. The work is dedicated to John D. Peterson, son of Musical Arts Society director Dr. Douglas R. Peterson, who died in a helicopter accident May 21, while serving in the U.S. Army. The concert will feature the 60-voice chorus and orchestra in Joseph Haydn'sl796 "Missa in Tempore Belli" (Mass in Time of War).. The closing section is a prayer for peace. Haydn Mass soloists include Rebecca Cervantes (soprano), Helen Maynard (contralto), Steve Robinson (tenor) and Gary Golbart (baritone). Also featured will be John Rutter's 1974 exuberant "Gloria," which also contains a message of peace. Howard Hanson's "Song of Democracy" will conclude the program. The Society's season includes: •"A Concert of Peace" with the Musical Arts Chorus and Orchestra, 3 p.m. Nov. 19, Horn Theatre, CCSN. • •"Sounds of the Season" by the Musical Arts Singer, 3 p.m. Dec. 17, Clark County Library Theatre. •"With Love from the Musical Arts Singers," a Valentine concert, 3 p.m., Feb. 11, 1996, Tam Alumni Center,UNLV. •"St.MatthewPassion"byJ.S. Bach, with the Premiere Chorale from Pierce College and the Musical Arts Chorus, guest soloists, and Orchestra, 3 p.m., March 24, Horn Theatre CCSN. •"A Gershwin Celebration"by the Musical Arts Chorus at 8 p.m. June 15 and 3 p.m. June 16, Horn Theatre, CCSN. Admission to all concerts is $10 adults; $7 for seniors, students, military, and the handicapped. Tickets may be purchased at the UNLV Performing Arts Center Box Office, 895-3801, or at the door. Dr. Douglas R. Peterson iDosa trio at UNLV Nov. 20 The MariposaTrio will present a free concert at 8 p.m. Monday, Nov. 20, featuring works by Beethoven, Rachmaninoff, and a former UNLV student. The Trio consists of violinist Teresa Ling, a member of the UNLV music faculty; cellist Andrew Smith, a fall addition to both the UNLV faculty and pianist Carol Stivers coordinator of piano studies at UNLV. The concert will be in UNLV Black Box Theatre, and will include Beethoven's Ghost Trio—"Opus 70, No. 1 in D Major," and Rachmaninoffs 'Trio Elegiac, Opus 9" written as a tribute to Tchaikovsky. "Mariposa de Obsidiana" by Eric Whittacre, a former UNLVstudent, was commissioned by the trio and the Music Teachers National Association. Whittacre, now studying under composer David Diamond while-attending" the JttllKard School in New York, is also the MariposaTrio author of "Ghost Train." The piece was a composition commissioned and performed by the UNLV Wind Symphony. It enjoys growing national recognition. Ling has performed at Carnegie Hall and at the Kennedy Center with the New THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY York String Orchestra under Alexander Schneider. She has a master's in music performance from the Eastman School. Prior to moving to Las Vegas, she was concertmaster of the South Dakota Symphony and first violinist with the Dakota Shing Quartet. She has taught at Northwestern and the University of South Dakota Smith has performed with the American Symphony Orchestra, New York's Manhattan Philharmonic, the Santa Barbara Symphony and the Santa Barbara Chamber Orchestra. He played for three years with the Nicoletti String Quartet at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has a master's degree from the Mannes College of Music in New York where he studied cello with Timothy Eddy. Stivers, renown as a pianist in the southwest, has performed nationwide as well as at New York's Carnegie Hall, in New York. She has been featured as a soloist with numerous orchestras as well as a chamber musician and accompanist. She holds a master's degree from Florida State University PEPPERMILL'S kA^ HAM OR TURKEY DINNER Holiday salad, Stuffing, Candied Yams, Mashed Potatoes and Gravy, Cranberry Sauce, Rolls and Butter. TREE SLICE OF MINCEMEAT OR PUMPKIN PIE WITH DINNER $4.99 SERVED 12PM • 10PM "THURSDAY SPECIALPORK LOrN ROAST WITH ^^ mi SPECIAL ^JiTT SAUCE 3 PM-11PM omueMMtm oiNmmn VALUABLE COUPON ITALIAN SAUSAGE & PEPPERS IN MARINARA SAUCE, CHOKE OF SOUP OR SALAD, GARUC TOAST. WOW t% TS ONLY9''^' SERVED DAILY 3PM 11PM EXPIRES 11/28/96 OOOO UP TO 4 PCKIONS. ONE COUTON PE* VWT couran NOT wue nmi Mrr oTMR oiPlR MMwr iMR (Moawa WHERE IT PAYS TO EAT & PLAY' RAINBOW CLUB CASINO 122 WATER ST. HENDERSON. NV. 565-9777 gS S )5B w i r i w#iy w !i M i i
PAGE 36

LAST WORDS PageBie Henderson Home News • Boulder City News Thursday, November 16,1995 DEAR DEBBIE HOROSCOPE DEBORAH WHITE Dear Debbie: I don't know what to do about my son. Since he graduated fVom high school in May, all he does is sleep and hang out with his friends. I'm a single parent. I've done my best to raise him. Now I need him to act like a man. But he refuses to even look for a job. What are my options? I don't know how to handle this situation. DESPERATE MOM Dear Mom: I suggest this three-pronged approach: Cut him off financially. Tell him he can sleep and eat in your home, but you won't give him any money. Make sure he has no access to your bank account or credit cards. At the same time, set a goal for something he wants, like a trip or a car. Offer to match what he earns to help him pay for it, or promise to co-sign a loan if he stays employed and comes up with a sizeable down payment. Offer to pay for technical or community college courses that will lead to a job. Most community colleges offer a career counseling service. That may help get him started. I would also look into the military. Dear Debbie: I found out through other people that the man I love and thought was faithful got another woman pregnant. We've been living together for three yars. I thought we were good together. We don't argue, we get along nicely and I consider myself a loving person. I've been living with this information for a month, waitingfor him to tell me. But he doesn't even act like anything's wrong. I feel like I'm going to burst. What should I do now? SECRET LIFE Dear Secret Life: Your man will probably try to avoid the situation as long as possible. He knows he's in big trouble. Whether you or he brings it out in the open, there's no way to avoid an argument. This is a legitimate crisis in your relationship. You've been betrayed, and you're entitled to feel angry and hurt. What happens from there will depend on his reaction and behavior. But even if you decide to forgive him, it will take a long time to repair the trust. Write to Dear Debbie, P.O. Box 4328, Chicago, 111. 60680. 1996, Tribune Media Service* UNDA BLACK Weekly Tip: The sun and moon are both in Scorpio. There'll be more action than talk while that's in effect. Aries (March 21-ApriI 19). Research sources of funding. You may find a hidden treasure. A difficult taskmaster will be even worse. You'd better have the material down cold. Taurus (April 20-May 20). Let your partner take the lead. You be the support person. Read the fine print before you sign anything. Don't offer to buy drinks for the house, either. Your luck improves. Cremini (May 21-June 21). It's important thatyou focus on your work, even if you'd much rather be doing something else. Allow yourself to be talked into a minor transgression. Cancer (June 22-July 22). You should have a great time. Make a few decisions you can build upon for a secure future. There's more work than you can do by yourself, so don't be afraid to delegate! Leo (July 23-Aug. 22). You may have to comply with a friend's demands just to keep peace. Don't worry, you'll more than make up for it. You could fall madly in love again. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). You could learn a lot if you pay attention. This lesson may not be in the regular curriculum. Don't do all the work by yourself, make the others help. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Sell something you're not using any more. You'll think of lots of ways to spend the money, very soon. Expound on your favorite topic to gain accolades from family and friends. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). You're so powerful you'll have to be careful not to hurt anybody. Get as much dpneas possible because you'll lose a brg advantage soon. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Watch what you say. You're being graded, but not in a class. This important lesson is in real life! Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Team efforts should be very successful. Get your network of friends to help you solve a tough problem. You may feel pressured but don't take it too seriously. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). Let a control freak run the show. Do what's expected; your job could depend upon it. True love prospers, too. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20). You're lucky. Besides that, you have good contacts! Ask them, if you need help. Your bosses should be in a good mood even if they give you way too much to do. If You're Having a Birthday This Week: You're awesome this year! Make decisions that change the course of your destiny. You have never been luckier in love, travel, adventure and completion. £>1995, Tribune Media Services In the middle of the night ST. ROSE BIRIHS Oct. 30, 1995 Ruby Jacobs, boy. Nov. 1, 1995 Terri Rowe, boy; Rebecca and Daniel Hollingsworth, boy. Nov. 3, 1995 Margaret and Gregory Halopoff, boy; Sara and Howard Scow, boy. Nov. 4, 1995 Gloria and Christopher Healy, boy; Tricia and Ronald Reid, boy; Stefanie and Kris Hensley, boy. Nov. 5, 1995 Kimberly and Randall Sparks, girl; Julie and Robert Large, II, girl. Nov. 6, 1995 Elizabeth and Danny Patterson, boy; Monica and Daniel Ramirez, girl; Alyssa and John Ortolano, boy; Leslie and Richard Fleetwood, boy; Linda and Edward Rosek, girl; Susanne and Jeffrey Beardall, boy; Robynn and Thomas Wood, girl. Nov. 7,1995 Jessica and Douglas Stokely, boy. Festival benefits diversity The Food, Wine and Spirits Festival of the Community College of Southern Nevada will benefit student diversity programs. The festival will be held from 4:30 to 8:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 18, at the Cheyenne campus, 3200 E. Cheyenne Ave. The event will feature foods prepared by CCSN's nationally recognized culinary arts studentchefs as well as Ethel M Chocolates and The Bread Factory. • -] ;;•; • .:,-;... • • -: • Highlights will include samples of wines, beers and liqueurs firom around the world, as well as prize raffles. Attendees must be 21 years old. Event chairman is Ray Vega, president of Ray Vega Enterprises, the largest Hispanic-owned business in Nevada. The cost is $15 or $25 per couple; $10 for students. A $50 VIP package includes admission for two, valet parking and raffle prize tickets. Tickets are available at all Lee's Discount Liquors, Spirits Plus and Town Pump Liquors, from all CCSN campus bursar's offices and the CCSN Box Office at the Cheyenne campus. For more information, call the Student Center for Diversity, 651-4013. Yes, dear readers, I was up in the middle of the night. Not only that, I was awake until the sun crept over the moimtain. Or is it the moon that creeps? Anyway, talk about thoughts! I not only answered questions, I posed quite a few. It was a long night. For instance, I've always wondered why mothers are forever preaching, "Be sure and wear clean underwear." Do they honestly think that there is going to be an underwear reporter standing on the street corner checking? Is the reporter going to rush back to his paper and write, "Mrs. Smith's daughter caught wearing torn underwear on June 12th"? While you're mulling that over, here's another mystery. Has UNLVoffers vocational workshop The Division of Continuing Education at UNLV will hold a self-assessment workshop on work-related abilities, interests and values fi"om 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 18, in the Classroom building complex, roomC148. Eileen McGarry, director of career services, said participants will take the "California Ability Placement Survey," the "Self Directed Search," and the "Kiersey Temperment Sorter." Based on the results of each, participants will receive a personal vocational report identifying occupational areas best matching their particular interests. SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER Serving Henderson, Boulder City & Green Valley Dr. Richard Diskin, D.O. Board Certified Dermatologist • Acne, Warts, Moles & Cosmetic Skin Care • Skin Cancer ft Skin Growth, Disease of the Hair, Skin ft Nails i ^ iU' ONCE OVER LIGHTLY CAROLYN DRENNAN BISHOP evolution made an unprecedented step forward in the next generation? How else do you explain the teenager who casually operates a computer while programming your baffling new watch to tell time in seven foreign countries? More questions: Why, I ask, is my picnic plate always the one targeted by a low-flying pigeon? The same bird can zero in on my car with equal ease. Here's a clue: I believe that "The Pigeon Phenomena" is somehow related to "The Gum Incident" which generally occurs when I'm dressed in my finest and standing in line at a chic wedding reception. It's not easy trying to appear sophisticated with one shoe glued to the carpet and the other trailing a piece of gum-attached toilet paper. Why can't I ever buy the right gift for husband-person? After buying him everything from rotor-rooters to toad stools, I thought I'd finally hit upon the perfect present when I visited a tiny shop in a back alley of a remote village in Scotland. There, in a quaint shop, I found a sweater that met all my impossible mate's requirements. It was his favorite color. It zipped up the front and it had four pockets and was Shetland wool. It might even have played the bagpipes for all I know. The man wore the sweater once before he snagged it on a pineapple in Smith's Food King produce section. From all accounts, both he and the sleeve were considerably unraveled by the time he regained his freedom. While we're on the subject of husband-person, I think he has his nerve sleeping peacefully! If he laid awake a night or two, he wouldn't be so picky! ,^ • ^ Enjoy Our "C THANKSGIVING DAY SPECIALS Thursday, November 23^ 1995 Served from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. jP|* Glass of wine for Adults glass of apple juice for children ^Si^St Chicken Supreme Soup or Our All-You-Can-Eat Salad Bar ptOAST YOUNG TURKEY [Chestnut Dressing Giblet Gravy Cranberry Sauce ROAST LEG OF LAMB ^ Chestnut Dressing Gravy Mint Jelly or BAKED SUGAR CURED HAMj Brandy Fruit Sauce Pineapple Ring K$C25 KV^J OMI V W Per person Cwi ^ ^ Yourchoice Whipped Potatoes or Candied Yams, Dutch Mixed Vegetables Hot Dinner Rolls Pumpkin or Mincement Pie Coffee or Tea Our usual extensive and complete menu will also be available (no luncheon buffet today) ENJOY LIVE ENTERTAINMENT IN THE SILHOaETTE LOUNGE Al^i^Thursday thru Saturday, 8p.m. and Sunday 5:30^ CASINO ar RESTAURANT FGREAT FOOD GREAT FUN GREAT PLACEJ >J|| fThere's no place like our place for • ^ breakfast lunch or dinner ^' Thursday, November 10, 1995 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Page B17 by D.B.Donovan UDKiWDblc IhtM rour words, OM iMter to cadi iqiiarc, to form four ordiiuvy wofib. Words of Wisdom CROSSWORD PUZZLE Now urangc the drckd ttner* to rorm the surprise answer, m suggested by the above cartooa. ^ Y Y i r Y Y Y wvsTva aiiDxa asAVd aoa^v 3dvi am — uoiSumsD/i/^ ui dn-u iv^t Jof 9}qtsuods^ Inspire hqw, and you are a healer. Mediocrity is its own reward. • • • Responsibilities are heavy only if you fail to spread them equally. • • • A small burden often gives a large shadow. • • • Fear grows greater when it is unexpressed. mwLWX to.. Catch of the Day j^SLApSjlX Put all your eggs in one basket and watch the basket. O I99S. Trilwnc Media Servictt MflGICWORD HOW TO PUkY: Read the list of words. Look at the puzzle. You'll find these words In all directions—horizontally, vertically, diagonally, backwards. Draw a circle around each letter of a word found In the puzzle, then strike it off the list. Circling it will show a letter has l>een used but will leave it visible should it also form iiart of another word. Find the big words first. When letters of all listed words are circled, vouTi have the given number of letters left over. They'll spell out your MAGTCWORD. NURSERY RHYMES (sol.: 7 letters) B-Bells; C-Cherish, Childhood, Cockle shells, Curds, Cute; E-Enjoy; F-Fall, Favorite; G-Georgie Porgie; H-JCll, Horse, Humpty Dumpty; J-Jack and Jill, Jest; K-Kitten; L-Lamb, Little Bo-Peep, Lucy Locket; M-Mary, Mouse; P-Polly, Pony, Posies, Pretty maids; R-Redte, Rings; S-Sheep, Silver, Spider, Sweet; T-Tale, TeU, Three Blind Mice, Tuffet; W-Whey, Wool This Week's Answer: TVOIOVW C 1995, Tribune Media Services PEEKS MYCLL EL I TT I LMRE GODAT RPNCU OS I CC FILER ELBS L I VEFA GEENE RRRHO OCH I L EET I R GHUMP LEL I HS LEB D I P G I J RDS TYO E T T LEH LL S TT I RSE DHO OVA T YD ATE I RE OPE S LL SWE DM0 JNE YMA SEL GN I KWO E T I ODP FPO UMP FFUT HCWT EPHE EBEK ETYC USEO BMAL I DSY KCOC RCMU OLAL CER J ONYE S I ES T YAT mP A SMILE ON ^ 1(m fACt. IT MOTHIN^ USl, • ITWILIMAICE SUSFICIOUS ABOUT WHAT YOU'VE BEEN tOlM&. 1 2 3 4 1 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 IS 16 17 ie 19 20 21 ^H H22 23 24 25 26 ^H 27 mr 1 29 30 31 32 33 34 ^^H35 36 37 38 39 w 41 42 T • • 1 43 44 ^^H45 46 47 ^ • 48 49 ^^H • 51 52 53 54 55 S6 57 ^^^^H58 59 60 61 62 1 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 SOLUTION: a 8 N jH J H 3 I • • s 8 3 ^\ S 3 U slu 3 11 dHal U 0 ^\ V 1 0 1 1] A 1 0I3 a 1 VI ana U 3 71 o^^Hila ai 3 T 1 V i V 3 •• 1 J 0 MTN 1 ^H • M IvIijSlIU 3 • • u 3 1 r di 1 V 3 "m"^ 1 t N • o| S X s lirTTiHaiJ* 1 l| n u i| 1 N V • vluljIdio^M 0 1 s ACROSS 1 Handout 5 Moves along 10 Great distance 14 Tide 15 "—a Parade" 16 Annoy 17 Andrews of films 18 Forty— 19 Stumble '2b Platfoma 22 Grasping tools 23 Painlessly abrupt 27 "—the ramparts..." 28 Privy to 29 Capture 32 Pack away 35 Musical drama 36 Cuckoo 37 Have — (rely on) 40 Joins the army 42 Ump'scall 43 Goose 45 Spruce 46 Each 47 Via's relative 48 Depot: abbr. 50 Quick as a flash 56 West Point man 58 Late 59 To shelter 60 Branch or oil 63 Panicle 64 Nobleman 65 Stingy one 66 Musical direction: abbr. 67 Smaller amount 68 Cubic meter 69 Mass. motto word DOWN 1 Mountain systems 2 Dog curt) 3 —man (frank) 4 Small birds Greek poet Foreigner Chili — came End of day Weight of India — Shaw Get to — (accomplish something) "It's a sin to tell —Ribbed fabrics Dined Corruptible Party dish Villain's expression 26 Shabby 30 Square pillar 31 Pith 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 21 22 24 25 32 Traffic sign 33 Factual 34 Attendants on horseback 35 Attack 38 Blemish 39 Division word 41 Quick as a bunny 44 Silkwomn 48 Harsh 49 Toward: Scot. 51 Requires 52 Trucker 53 Embellish 54 Guitar-like instruments 55 Real estate contract 56 Poker term 57 Medicinal plant 60 Goddess of the harvest Ignited Eisenhower 61 62 Garfield by Jim Davis PEANUTS by Charles M. Schuiz HEV, I'M TRVINfr TO PO A SHOW H£R£/ WOULP VOO TWO MINP PAVIN& ATTENTION?.' <^ ^^^^n^^ \ 5 \ i N T-'II 1 1 'i| II LL WET AND I CANT SEE A THIN6 ?y^ I THINK IT'5^ 60IN6TOBE A TRICK PLAY. 'ANYONE TRIES TO 6ET W ME 6ET5 MIT WITH THE UMBRELLA;. //> f/'it^ ) Fli Syndcaw I

PAGE 37

LAST WORDS PageBie Henderson Home News • Boulder City News Thursday, November 16,1995 DEAR DEBBIE HOROSCOPE DEBORAH WHITE Dear Debbie: I don't know what to do about my son. Since he graduated fVom high school in May, all he does is sleep and hang out with his friends. I'm a single parent. I've done my best to raise him. Now I need him to act like a man. But he refuses to even look for a job. What are my options? I don't know how to handle this situation. DESPERATE MOM Dear Mom: I suggest this three-pronged approach: Cut him off financially. Tell him he can sleep and eat in your home, but you won't give him any money. Make sure he has no access to your bank account or credit cards. At the same time, set a goal for something he wants, like a trip or a car. Offer to match what he earns to help him pay for it, or promise to co-sign a loan if he stays employed and comes up with a sizeable down payment. Offer to pay for technical or community college courses that will lead to a job. Most community colleges offer a career counseling service. That may help get him started. I would also look into the military. Dear Debbie: I found out through other people that the man I love and thought was faithful got another woman pregnant. We've been living together for three yars. I thought we were good together. We don't argue, we get along nicely and I consider myself a loving person. I've been living with this information for a month, waitingfor him to tell me. But he doesn't even act like anything's wrong. I feel like I'm going to burst. What should I do now? SECRET LIFE Dear Secret Life: Your man will probably try to avoid the situation as long as possible. He knows he's in big trouble. Whether you or he brings it out in the open, there's no way to avoid an argument. This is a legitimate crisis in your relationship. You've been betrayed, and you're entitled to feel angry and hurt. What happens from there will depend on his reaction and behavior. But even if you decide to forgive him, it will take a long time to repair the trust. Write to Dear Debbie, P.O. Box 4328, Chicago, 111. 60680. 1996, Tribune Media Service* UNDA BLACK Weekly Tip: The sun and moon are both in Scorpio. There'll be more action than talk while that's in effect. Aries (March 21-ApriI 19). Research sources of funding. You may find a hidden treasure. A difficult taskmaster will be even worse. You'd better have the material down cold. Taurus (April 20-May 20). Let your partner take the lead. You be the support person. Read the fine print before you sign anything. Don't offer to buy drinks for the house, either. Your luck improves. Cremini (May 21-June 21). It's important thatyou focus on your work, even if you'd much rather be doing something else. Allow yourself to be talked into a minor transgression. Cancer (June 22-July 22). You should have a great time. Make a few decisions you can build upon for a secure future. There's more work than you can do by yourself, so don't be afraid to delegate! Leo (July 23-Aug. 22). You may have to comply with a friend's demands just to keep peace. Don't worry, you'll more than make up for it. You could fall madly in love again. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). You could learn a lot if you pay attention. This lesson may not be in the regular curriculum. Don't do all the work by yourself, make the others help. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Sell something you're not using any more. You'll think of lots of ways to spend the money, very soon. Expound on your favorite topic to gain accolades from family and friends. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). You're so powerful you'll have to be careful not to hurt anybody. Get as much dpneas possible because you'll lose a brg advantage soon. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Watch what you say. You're being graded, but not in a class. This important lesson is in real life! Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Team efforts should be very successful. Get your network of friends to help you solve a tough problem. You may feel pressured but don't take it too seriously. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). Let a control freak run the show. Do what's expected; your job could depend upon it. True love prospers, too. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20). You're lucky. Besides that, you have good contacts! Ask them, if you need help. Your bosses should be in a good mood even if they give you way too much to do. If You're Having a Birthday This Week: You're awesome this year! Make decisions that change the course of your destiny. You have never been luckier in love, travel, adventure and completion. £>1995, Tribune Media Services In the middle of the night ST. ROSE BIRIHS Oct. 30, 1995 Ruby Jacobs, boy. Nov. 1, 1995 Terri Rowe, boy; Rebecca and Daniel Hollingsworth, boy. Nov. 3, 1995 Margaret and Gregory Halopoff, boy; Sara and Howard Scow, boy. Nov. 4, 1995 Gloria and Christopher Healy, boy; Tricia and Ronald Reid, boy; Stefanie and Kris Hensley, boy. Nov. 5, 1995 Kimberly and Randall Sparks, girl; Julie and Robert Large, II, girl. Nov. 6, 1995 Elizabeth and Danny Patterson, boy; Monica and Daniel Ramirez, girl; Alyssa and John Ortolano, boy; Leslie and Richard Fleetwood, boy; Linda and Edward Rosek, girl; Susanne and Jeffrey Beardall, boy; Robynn and Thomas Wood, girl. Nov. 7,1995 Jessica and Douglas Stokely, boy. Festival benefits diversity The Food, Wine and Spirits Festival of the Community College of Southern Nevada will benefit student diversity programs. The festival will be held from 4:30 to 8:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 18, at the Cheyenne campus, 3200 E. Cheyenne Ave. The event will feature foods prepared by CCSN's nationally recognized culinary arts studentchefs as well as Ethel M Chocolates and The Bread Factory. • -] ;;•; • .:,-;... • • -: • Highlights will include samples of wines, beers and liqueurs firom around the world, as well as prize raffles. Attendees must be 21 years old. Event chairman is Ray Vega, president of Ray Vega Enterprises, the largest Hispanic-owned business in Nevada. The cost is $15 or $25 per couple; $10 for students. A $50 VIP package includes admission for two, valet parking and raffle prize tickets. Tickets are available at all Lee's Discount Liquors, Spirits Plus and Town Pump Liquors, from all CCSN campus bursar's offices and the CCSN Box Office at the Cheyenne campus. For more information, call the Student Center for Diversity, 651-4013. Yes, dear readers, I was up in the middle of the night. Not only that, I was awake until the sun crept over the moimtain. Or is it the moon that creeps? Anyway, talk about thoughts! I not only answered questions, I posed quite a few. It was a long night. For instance, I've always wondered why mothers are forever preaching, "Be sure and wear clean underwear." Do they honestly think that there is going to be an underwear reporter standing on the street corner checking? Is the reporter going to rush back to his paper and write, "Mrs. Smith's daughter caught wearing torn underwear on June 12th"? While you're mulling that over, here's another mystery. Has UNLVoffers vocational workshop The Division of Continuing Education at UNLV will hold a self-assessment workshop on work-related abilities, interests and values fi"om 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 18, in the Classroom building complex, roomC148. Eileen McGarry, director of career services, said participants will take the "California Ability Placement Survey," the "Self Directed Search," and the "Kiersey Temperment Sorter." Based on the results of each, participants will receive a personal vocational report identifying occupational areas best matching their particular interests. SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER Serving Henderson, Boulder City & Green Valley Dr. Richard Diskin, D.O. Board Certified Dermatologist • Acne, Warts, Moles & Cosmetic Skin Care • Skin Cancer ft Skin Growth, Disease of the Hair, Skin ft Nails i ^ iU' ONCE OVER LIGHTLY CAROLYN DRENNAN BISHOP evolution made an unprecedented step forward in the next generation? How else do you explain the teenager who casually operates a computer while programming your baffling new watch to tell time in seven foreign countries? More questions: Why, I ask, is my picnic plate always the one targeted by a low-flying pigeon? The same bird can zero in on my car with equal ease. Here's a clue: I believe that "The Pigeon Phenomena" is somehow related to "The Gum Incident" which generally occurs when I'm dressed in my finest and standing in line at a chic wedding reception. It's not easy trying to appear sophisticated with one shoe glued to the carpet and the other trailing a piece of gum-attached toilet paper. Why can't I ever buy the right gift for husband-person? After buying him everything from rotor-rooters to toad stools, I thought I'd finally hit upon the perfect present when I visited a tiny shop in a back alley of a remote village in Scotland. There, in a quaint shop, I found a sweater that met all my impossible mate's requirements. It was his favorite color. It zipped up the front and it had four pockets and was Shetland wool. It might even have played the bagpipes for all I know. The man wore the sweater once before he snagged it on a pineapple in Smith's Food King produce section. From all accounts, both he and the sleeve were considerably unraveled by the time he regained his freedom. While we're on the subject of husband-person, I think he has his nerve sleeping peacefully! If he laid awake a night or two, he wouldn't be so picky! ,^ • ^ Enjoy Our "C THANKSGIVING DAY SPECIALS Thursday, November 23^ 1995 Served from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. jP|* Glass of wine for Adults glass of apple juice for children ^Si^St Chicken Supreme Soup or Our All-You-Can-Eat Salad Bar ptOAST YOUNG TURKEY [Chestnut Dressing Giblet Gravy Cranberry Sauce ROAST LEG OF LAMB ^ Chestnut Dressing Gravy Mint Jelly or BAKED SUGAR CURED HAMj Brandy Fruit Sauce Pineapple Ring K$C25 KV^J OMI V W Per person Cwi ^ ^ Yourchoice Whipped Potatoes or Candied Yams, Dutch Mixed Vegetables Hot Dinner Rolls Pumpkin or Mincement Pie Coffee or Tea Our usual extensive and complete menu will also be available (no luncheon buffet today) ENJOY LIVE ENTERTAINMENT IN THE SILHOaETTE LOUNGE Al^i^Thursday thru Saturday, 8p.m. and Sunday 5:30^ CASINO ar RESTAURANT FGREAT FOOD GREAT FUN GREAT PLACEJ >J|| fThere's no place like our place for • ^ breakfast lunch or dinner ^' Thursday, November 10, 1995 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Page B17 by D.B.Donovan UDKiWDblc IhtM rour words, OM iMter to cadi iqiiarc, to form four ordiiuvy wofib. Words of Wisdom CROSSWORD PUZZLE Now urangc the drckd ttner* to rorm the surprise answer, m suggested by the above cartooa. ^ Y Y i r Y Y Y wvsTva aiiDxa asAVd aoa^v 3dvi am — uoiSumsD/i/^ ui dn-u iv^t Jof 9}qtsuods^ Inspire hqw, and you are a healer. Mediocrity is its own reward. • • • Responsibilities are heavy only if you fail to spread them equally. • • • A small burden often gives a large shadow. • • • Fear grows greater when it is unexpressed. mwLWX to.. Catch of the Day j^SLApSjlX Put all your eggs in one basket and watch the basket. O I99S. Trilwnc Media Servictt MflGICWORD HOW TO PUkY: Read the list of words. Look at the puzzle. You'll find these words In all directions—horizontally, vertically, diagonally, backwards. Draw a circle around each letter of a word found In the puzzle, then strike it off the list. Circling it will show a letter has l>een used but will leave it visible should it also form iiart of another word. Find the big words first. When letters of all listed words are circled, vouTi have the given number of letters left over. They'll spell out your MAGTCWORD. NURSERY RHYMES (sol.: 7 letters) B-Bells; C-Cherish, Childhood, Cockle shells, Curds, Cute; E-Enjoy; F-Fall, Favorite; G-Georgie Porgie; H-JCll, Horse, Humpty Dumpty; J-Jack and Jill, Jest; K-Kitten; L-Lamb, Little Bo-Peep, Lucy Locket; M-Mary, Mouse; P-Polly, Pony, Posies, Pretty maids; R-Redte, Rings; S-Sheep, Silver, Spider, Sweet; T-Tale, TeU, Three Blind Mice, Tuffet; W-Whey, Wool This Week's Answer: TVOIOVW C 1995, Tribune Media Services PEEKS MYCLL EL I TT I LMRE GODAT RPNCU OS I CC FILER ELBS L I VEFA GEENE RRRHO OCH I L EET I R GHUMP LEL I HS LEB D I P G I J RDS TYO E T T LEH LL S TT I RSE DHO OVA T YD ATE I RE OPE S LL SWE DM0 JNE YMA SEL GN I KWO E T I ODP FPO UMP FFUT HCWT EPHE EBEK ETYC USEO BMAL I DSY KCOC RCMU OLAL CER J ONYE S I ES T YAT mP A SMILE ON ^ 1(m fACt. IT MOTHIN^ USl, • ITWILIMAICE SUSFICIOUS ABOUT WHAT YOU'VE BEEN tOlM&. 1 2 3 4 1 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 IS 16 17 ie 19 20 21 ^H H22 23 24 25 26 ^H 27 mr 1 29 30 31 32 33 34 ^^H35 36 37 38 39 w 41 42 T • • 1 43 44 ^^H45 46 47 ^ • 48 49 ^^H • 51 52 53 54 55 S6 57 ^^^^H58 59 60 61 62 1 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 SOLUTION: a 8 N jH J H 3 I • • s 8 3 ^\ S 3 U slu 3 11 dHal U 0 ^\ V 1 0 1 1] A 1 0I3 a 1 VI ana U 3 71 o^^Hila ai 3 T 1 V i V 3 •• 1 J 0 MTN 1 ^H • M IvIijSlIU 3 • • u 3 1 r di 1 V 3 "m"^ 1 t N • o| S X s lirTTiHaiJ* 1 l| n u i| 1 N V • vluljIdio^M 0 1 s ACROSS 1 Handout 5 Moves along 10 Great distance 14 Tide 15 "—a Parade" 16 Annoy 17 Andrews of films 18 Forty— 19 Stumble '2b Platfoma 22 Grasping tools 23 Painlessly abrupt 27 "—the ramparts..." 28 Privy to 29 Capture 32 Pack away 35 Musical drama 36 Cuckoo 37 Have — (rely on) 40 Joins the army 42 Ump'scall 43 Goose 45 Spruce 46 Each 47 Via's relative 48 Depot: abbr. 50 Quick as a flash 56 West Point man 58 Late 59 To shelter 60 Branch or oil 63 Panicle 64 Nobleman 65 Stingy one 66 Musical direction: abbr. 67 Smaller amount 68 Cubic meter 69 Mass. motto word DOWN 1 Mountain systems 2 Dog curt) 3 —man (frank) 4 Small birds Greek poet Foreigner Chili — came End of day Weight of India — Shaw Get to — (accomplish something) "It's a sin to tell —Ribbed fabrics Dined Corruptible Party dish Villain's expression 26 Shabby 30 Square pillar 31 Pith 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 21 22 24 25 32 Traffic sign 33 Factual 34 Attendants on horseback 35 Attack 38 Blemish 39 Division word 41 Quick as a bunny 44 Silkwomn 48 Harsh 49 Toward: Scot. 51 Requires 52 Trucker 53 Embellish 54 Guitar-like instruments 55 Real estate contract 56 Poker term 57 Medicinal plant 60 Goddess of the harvest Ignited Eisenhower 61 62 Garfield by Jim Davis PEANUTS by Charles M. Schuiz HEV, I'M TRVINfr TO PO A SHOW H£R£/ WOULP VOO TWO MINP PAVIN& ATTENTION?.' <^ ^^^^n^^ \ 5 \ i N T-'II 1 1 'i| II LL WET AND I CANT SEE A THIN6 ?y^ I THINK IT'5^ 60IN6TOBE A TRICK PLAY. 'ANYONE TRIES TO 6ET W ME 6ET5 MIT WITH THE UMBRELLA;. //> f/'it^ ) Fli Syndcaw I

PAGE 38

• • • • Page B18 Henderson Home fdews. Boulder City News Thursday, November 16,1995 LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN (ha( (ht Planning Commit lion oT (he Ci(y of Hrndrnon, Nevada, will htiid • puhlic hearini: on November 28, 1995, at 7:00 p.ni. in the Ci(y CouncU Chambers, City Hail, 240 WatcrStrect, Hendenon, Nevada, to consider the riJ(-ntial)di.stricl to CC (Community Commercial)di.strict on 2^ acres Itnated at the comer of Horizon Ridge Parkway and Green Valley Parkway in the Green Valley Ranch planning area. GREEN HORIZON INVESTMENTS ZONE CHANGE Z 7695 rl-• • DESIGNATES PflOJECT SITE ANY ANU ALL interested persons may appear before the Planning Commission, either in person or by counsel, and may uhjet-l to or express approval of the above application, or may, prior to the public hearing, file with the Planning Department written objection thereto or approval (hereof. For additional information, call 565-2474. DATED: November 13, 1995 /s/RONALD B. FRAME, Chairman Henderson Planning Commission H—Nov. Ifi, 1995. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Planning Commission of the City of Henderson, Nevada, will hold a public hearing on November 28, 1995, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, City Hall, 240 Water Slree(, Henderson, .Nevada, to consider the following applicatitm. ZOA-20.95 PUBLIC HEARING ZONING ORDINANCE AMENDMENT APPLICANT: CITY OF HENDERSON An ordinance to amend Title 19 of the Henderson Municipal Code by amending mini-storage facility parking and caretaker requirements, and other matters related thereto. ANT ANT) ALL interested persons may appear before (he Planning Commission, either in person or by counsel, and may object to or express approval of the above application, or may, prior to the public hearing. Tile with the Planning Department written objection thereto or approval thereof. For additional information, call 5A5-2474. DATED: November 13. 1995 /s/RONALD B. FRA.ME, Chairman Henderson Planning Commissiitn H—Nov. 16,1995. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN (hat (he Planning Commission of (he Ci(y of Hendrnoa, Nevada, will h • •..". DESIGNATES PdOJECT SITE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN (hat the Planning Commission of the City of Henderson, Nevada, will hold a public hearing on November 28, 1995, a( 7:00 p.m. in (he City Council Chambers, City Hall, 240 WaterStreH, Hendersol^ Nevada, to consider the following application. U-103-95 PUBLIC HEARING USE PERMIT FOR SKY HARBOR AIRPORT APPLICANT: ELIOT ALPER Reques( to al low a 10,000 gallon above ground fuel tank in an IG (General Industrial) district at 3801 W. Lake Mead Drive in the Westgate planning area. ELIOT A. ALPER DESIGNATES PflOJECT SITE ANY AND ALL interested persons may appear before the Planning Commission, either in person or by counsel, and may object to or express approval of the above application, or may, prior to the public hearing, (lie with the Planning Department written objection thereto or approval (hereof. For addiUonai information, call 565-2474. DATED: November 13,1995 /s/RONALD B. FRAME, Chairman Henderson Planning Commi.ssi*ii* t2:00 NOON TUESDAY NOW ACCEPTING PREPAYMENTS: Yard, Garage, and Moving Sales require cash in advance. (Exception subscribers) Out-ol-town and out-of-state also require prepayment. PROFESSIONAL SERVICES HONEY LOVELY'S CLEANING "Let us do your dirty worl<" Big or small We'll do it all Reasonable rates Free estimates Private or commercial 293-0076 PS9492 Advertise in the NEWS PROFESSIONAL SERVICES We move res. & comm. Free estimates, we load/ unload rental trucks anywhere in town. 566-8898 or Beep 599-0652. YARD LABOR SERVICE YARD clean-up, trash hauling, lawn mowing, minor sprinkler repairs. Lc. #164-010521, 5655810. PS245 ACTIONWORKS Cleaning of your home or business, excellenceyou can know and trust. Lie/ Bonded. 566-4883 KIM & BECKY'S HOUSECLEANING SERVICES. Quality work, dependable & honest. Pis. call 5659035 or 565-1439. PS9842 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Get ready for the Holidays! ACTION CLEANING SERVICE, home & offk:e. Licensed-reasonable rates, 293-1430. PS9173 BIFF HALLS HENDERSON 2 men will haul anything, anywhere, anytime. 24 hrs., 7 days a week, 438-2532. PIANO LESSONS All aMt, 22 yrt. txp., $20/45 min. Anandad Btrkiay Collagt of Music, Botton OV Ranch Araa 260-6313 The rewards will make you feel like a winner every day of your life. For more information, can l)0-5&GIVE-5. SS--— rf9f WVf 0 HPff SAv fiw pf^nVl Wf99f tKW^t ^HOW-OFF PRODUCTIONS 739-6995 'Celebrity Impersonal k>ns 'Singing Telegrams 'Custom Jingle Writing 'Costume Design A Rental 'Specialty Entertainment 'Actors A VkJeo Jillian Penney Director ROB'S REMODELINGPatio covers, roof repair, home remodeling, block wall spraying. 263-3713. PS9645 HOME REPAIRS All trades, FREE ESTIMATE. 15 yrs. exp. Paul 293-2245. PS9351 PLUMBING REPAIRS General) Low discounts, free estimates, 39 yrs. experience. Aircondition/ heating units cleaned, filters installed. 434-9166 or 692-9243 (pager). PS9717 Handy helpers can get you clean for the holidays & keep you that way. Have pickup, can clean garage & haul off trash, reasonable 593-8904. Doxed Ads *d per column Inch per week PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Availabfe at Lake Mead Marina, artist to paint names and stripes on boats. Monthly boat maintenance and detailing. Call Mara 493-9710. PS8195 PROFESSIONAL • PROFESSIONAL SERVICES I SERVICES YOU NAME IT WE DOIT ^7 'Residential 'Commercial 'Remodel C//294-1039 or Ce//#496-1990 CanlraclasUcNaOOl Mn BATH TUB REPAIR Tubs and Sinks reglazad, chips repaired. Fiberglass and more. 564-2276 M4. CARPET REPAIR & RESTRETCH 293-2122 paiSSS BILL K B S LANDSCAPING Sod, Rock, Low Watar Planting Lk.#3572* Free Ettimatet 435-2799 NEVADA'S FINEST SINGLES WharaOuallty Singlas Coma Togathar. SJncara, Exciting, Conridantlal. Muat ba 18. Placa a FREE ad by calling (702) 391-0498. In buslnaaa ainca 1991...AII lllaalylaa. INI LXI PAINTINQ CcWnQs, WaN'i, Woodwofli Craaiaa Stucco 3ayrt.(pk Rat ^adly gIvM CaaOk* 678-8423 MR. FIXIT Handyman Service Quality Home Maintenance 294-6214 YARD CLEAN-UP. Weeds cleared, trash hauled sprinkler repair. Eric 294-8487 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES MASONRY REPAIRS BLOCK. CONCRETE, 294-1622 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES PROFESSIONAL SERVICES PERSONAL FITNESS TRAINER Free Consultation 454-700g^ Sa7l2 IWjy^li'/UsteW^JiNJ Residential GENERAL REMODELING AND NEW EDITION Roofing Plumbing Concrata Elactrlcal Fraa Ealimata Satlsractlon Guaranlaad RATKO MIRIC 702-434-6096 J ._ FREE ESTIMATES IFFY TRIM LAWN CARE 'W Work While You Play" Licensed Insured HENDERSON CALL GREEN VALLEY ,^^ 565-1593 JOHN'S DRYWALL REPAIRS SPECIAUZING IN WATER DAMAGE, GENERAL REPAIR AND CUSTOIM ADDITIONS. FREE ESTIMATES 5658739. PS9S60 HONE REPAIRS by CC. Mao Martor/EHarlar PaMInt 23 yrs. Experience Call 564-4292 For Free Estimale Prompt, Dependable Service 77o AIM'S *Fast Machines* SALE OR LEASE Holiday Special Call Today 433-3963 HOWARD HELDERLEIN CONSTRUCTION Commercial • Rctidcntlal • Remodels and Additions License #021013 ^ 565-0874 71m 96S6 Olivers ^OOl I amukm • TOPS in Pool Sorvloo TECHfiaM BOULDER CONCRETE WANTS TO MEET YOUn CONCRETE NEEDS FOR FREE ESTIMATES AND QUALITY WORKMANSHIP CALL MICK CASEY Boulder City 293-1571 Lie #oi6398 I rmr* WHOLESALE HEARING AID CENTER SAVE UP TO $2000 ON YOUR HEARING AID NEEDS, BOARD CERTIFIED FOR YOUR PROTECTION. FREE HEARING TESTS (IN-HOME OR OFFICE). CALL US FOR HELP TODAY! 456-1110 J IRRIGATION SYSTEMS S LANDSCAPE CONTRACTORS P.O. BOX 61801. BOULDER CITY, NVa006 702-2M-14e • FAX 702-2M-1MS A Complmtm LMndmcmp* Inmtmll. Dave Sulllna Oartwal ItartagM' St. Lie. 00274S6 10201 SAND & TYPE II ROCK & SAND CLEAN FILL DIRT DELIVERED JIM 564-8371 Moblto 376-7666 E&MOORE CLEARLY WINDOW CLEANING Reasonable Rates Jeff KIncaid 294-1114 New pager 222-6926 8764 HAPPY GARDNER We Care For Your Lawn George R. Regan, 111 #164-13888 565-3583 771 JONATHON HUNT CONSTRUCTION oS^ouotio PATIO COVERS • Call us Last Senior CMUena Gat your baat prica and wa'll • OisaMed beat iti From Custom Home to Tenant Improvemantsl ^^^3^ 434-9908 9859 BACKHOE and BOBCAT SERVICE •Lots Graded •Oitchir^g 30 Years Experience — Hourly Rates Cart W. Ford 293-0593 8766 Harry's Quality Painting 15 Years In BoukJer City Interior/Exterior Residential/Commercial Acoustical Ceiling • Repair • Text Orywall Taping • Texturing • Wallpapering 293-1523 firee E$timat99 Lie • Bonded • Insured g^^ CONSERVE POWER Aluminum Pstfo Covert Carporta Window Avmlngs Sunshield Awning RsprMsntatlve Call 293-3750 For free in-home estimate PS10207 C-N-C SERVICES SHAW'S PLUMBING & DRAIN SERVICE TOR AU. YOUR PLUMBINO WATES TREATMENT NEEDS Repair. Remodel, Replpe. Water Healers. Water Solteners & Reverse Osmosis, SALES i SERVICE. Free Est. Competitive """ 564-9118 ^ MCS GARDENING •TREE TRIMMING .FREE ESTIMATES •RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL •EMEHG. PIPE I VALVE REPAIR • SENIOR DISCOUNTS *** LICENSED LAWN MAINTENANCE SINCE 1984 564-6742 ,r>o, Need your Castle Cleaned? Weakly • Bl VVMkly mtm • Apsr1ntnlfi • II mm CntMl%ti ComparMas CRAFT SHOW CRAFTS R US • Huge craft show Gifts Galore! Home decor, jewelry,, baked goodfs and n>ore. • • Fn.. 2-9; Sat, 9-5; Sun. 1 10-3.1424 Colt Dr., Hnd.' Behind Heritage Museum (Boulder Hwy. at Equestnan) Follow tht green signs' MC10139 EMPLOYMfNT StRVICl^ AIRLINE HIRING NOW. Entry Level, Flight Attendants. Baggage, Customer Service, Maintenance. Paid training. Money back guar--' • nta. For How-To Ma* teriata call (702) Ml1401 MCI 0d37 I

PAGE 39

• • • • Page B18 Henderson Home fdews. Boulder City News Thursday, November 16,1995 LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN (ha( (ht Planning Commit lion oT (he Ci(y of Hrndrnon, Nevada, will htiid • puhlic hearini: on November 28, 1995, at 7:00 p.ni. in the Ci(y CouncU Chambers, City Hail, 240 WatcrStrect, Hendenon, Nevada, to consider the riJ(-ntial)di.stricl to CC (Community Commercial)di.strict on 2^ acres Itnated at the comer of Horizon Ridge Parkway and Green Valley Parkway in the Green Valley Ranch planning area. GREEN HORIZON INVESTMENTS ZONE CHANGE Z 7695 rl-• • DESIGNATES PflOJECT SITE ANY ANU ALL interested persons may appear before the Planning Commission, either in person or by counsel, and may uhjet-l to or express approval of the above application, or may, prior to the public hearing, file with the Planning Department written objection thereto or approval (hereof. For additional information, call 565-2474. DATED: November 13, 1995 /s/RONALD B. FRAME, Chairman Henderson Planning Commission H—Nov. Ifi, 1995. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Planning Commission of the City of Henderson, Nevada, will hold a public hearing on November 28, 1995, at 7:00 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, City Hall, 240 Water Slree(, Henderson, .Nevada, to consider the following applicatitm. ZOA-20.95 PUBLIC HEARING ZONING ORDINANCE AMENDMENT APPLICANT: CITY OF HENDERSON An ordinance to amend Title 19 of the Henderson Municipal Code by amending mini-storage facility parking and caretaker requirements, and other matters related thereto. ANT ANT) ALL interested persons may appear before (he Planning Commission, either in person or by counsel, and may object to or express approval of the above application, or may, prior to the public hearing. Tile with the Planning Department written objection thereto or approval thereof. For additional information, call 5A5-2474. DATED: November 13. 1995 /s/RONALD B. FRA.ME, Chairman Henderson Planning Commissiitn H—Nov. 16,1995. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN (hat (he Planning Commission of (he Ci(y of Hendrnoa, Nevada, will h • •..". DESIGNATES PdOJECT SITE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN (hat the Planning Commission of the City of Henderson, Nevada, will hold a public hearing on November 28, 1995, a( 7:00 p.m. in (he City Council Chambers, City Hall, 240 WaterStreH, Hendersol^ Nevada, to consider the following application. U-103-95 PUBLIC HEARING USE PERMIT FOR SKY HARBOR AIRPORT APPLICANT: ELIOT ALPER Reques( to al low a 10,000 gallon above ground fuel tank in an IG (General Industrial) district at 3801 W. Lake Mead Drive in the Westgate planning area. ELIOT A. ALPER DESIGNATES PflOJECT SITE ANY AND ALL interested persons may appear before the Planning Commission, either in person or by counsel, and may object to or express approval of the above application, or may, prior to the public hearing, (lie with the Planning Department written objection thereto or approval (hereof. For addiUonai information, call 565-2474. DATED: November 13,1995 /s/RONALD B. FRAME, Chairman Henderson Planning Commi.ssi*ii* t2:00 NOON TUESDAY NOW ACCEPTING PREPAYMENTS: Yard, Garage, and Moving Sales require cash in advance. (Exception subscribers) Out-ol-town and out-of-state also require prepayment. PROFESSIONAL SERVICES HONEY LOVELY'S CLEANING "Let us do your dirty worl<" Big or small We'll do it all Reasonable rates Free estimates Private or commercial 293-0076 PS9492 Advertise in the NEWS PROFESSIONAL SERVICES We move res. & comm. Free estimates, we load/ unload rental trucks anywhere in town. 566-8898 or Beep 599-0652. YARD LABOR SERVICE YARD clean-up, trash hauling, lawn mowing, minor sprinkler repairs. Lc. #164-010521, 5655810. PS245 ACTIONWORKS Cleaning of your home or business, excellenceyou can know and trust. Lie/ Bonded. 566-4883 KIM & BECKY'S HOUSECLEANING SERVICES. Quality work, dependable & honest. Pis. call 5659035 or 565-1439. PS9842 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Get ready for the Holidays! ACTION CLEANING SERVICE, home & offk:e. Licensed-reasonable rates, 293-1430. PS9173 BIFF HALLS HENDERSON 2 men will haul anything, anywhere, anytime. 24 hrs., 7 days a week, 438-2532. PIANO LESSONS All aMt, 22 yrt. txp., $20/45 min. Anandad Btrkiay Collagt of Music, Botton OV Ranch Araa 260-6313 The rewards will make you feel like a winner every day of your life. For more information, can l)0-5&GIVE-5. SS--— rf9f WVf 0 HPff SAv fiw pf^nVl Wf99f tKW^t ^HOW-OFF PRODUCTIONS 739-6995 'Celebrity Impersonal k>ns 'Singing Telegrams 'Custom Jingle Writing 'Costume Design A Rental 'Specialty Entertainment 'Actors A VkJeo Jillian Penney Director ROB'S REMODELINGPatio covers, roof repair, home remodeling, block wall spraying. 263-3713. PS9645 HOME REPAIRS All trades, FREE ESTIMATE. 15 yrs. exp. Paul 293-2245. PS9351 PLUMBING REPAIRS General) Low discounts, free estimates, 39 yrs. experience. Aircondition/ heating units cleaned, filters installed. 434-9166 or 692-9243 (pager). PS9717 Handy helpers can get you clean for the holidays & keep you that way. Have pickup, can clean garage & haul off trash, reasonable 593-8904. Doxed Ads *d per column Inch per week PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Availabfe at Lake Mead Marina, artist to paint names and stripes on boats. Monthly boat maintenance and detailing. Call Mara 493-9710. PS8195 PROFESSIONAL • PROFESSIONAL SERVICES I SERVICES YOU NAME IT WE DOIT ^7 'Residential 'Commercial 'Remodel C//294-1039 or Ce//#496-1990 CanlraclasUcNaOOl Mn BATH TUB REPAIR Tubs and Sinks reglazad, chips repaired. Fiberglass and more. 564-2276 M4. CARPET REPAIR & RESTRETCH 293-2122 paiSSS BILL K B S LANDSCAPING Sod, Rock, Low Watar Planting Lk.#3572* Free Ettimatet 435-2799 NEVADA'S FINEST SINGLES WharaOuallty Singlas Coma Togathar. SJncara, Exciting, Conridantlal. Muat ba 18. Placa a FREE ad by calling (702) 391-0498. In buslnaaa ainca 1991...AII lllaalylaa. INI LXI PAINTINQ CcWnQs, WaN'i, Woodwofli Craaiaa Stucco 3ayrt.(pk Rat ^adly gIvM CaaOk* 678-8423 MR. FIXIT Handyman Service Quality Home Maintenance 294-6214 YARD CLEAN-UP. Weeds cleared, trash hauled sprinkler repair. Eric 294-8487 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES MASONRY REPAIRS BLOCK. CONCRETE, 294-1622 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES PROFESSIONAL SERVICES PERSONAL FITNESS TRAINER Free Consultation 454-700g^ Sa7l2 IWjy^li'/UsteW^JiNJ Residential GENERAL REMODELING AND NEW EDITION Roofing Plumbing Concrata Elactrlcal Fraa Ealimata Satlsractlon Guaranlaad RATKO MIRIC 702-434-6096 J ._ FREE ESTIMATES IFFY TRIM LAWN CARE 'W Work While You Play" Licensed Insured HENDERSON CALL GREEN VALLEY ,^^ 565-1593 JOHN'S DRYWALL REPAIRS SPECIAUZING IN WATER DAMAGE, GENERAL REPAIR AND CUSTOIM ADDITIONS. FREE ESTIMATES 5658739. PS9S60 HONE REPAIRS by CC. Mao Martor/EHarlar PaMInt 23 yrs. Experience Call 564-4292 For Free Estimale Prompt, Dependable Service 77o AIM'S *Fast Machines* SALE OR LEASE Holiday Special Call Today 433-3963 HOWARD HELDERLEIN CONSTRUCTION Commercial • Rctidcntlal • Remodels and Additions License #021013 ^ 565-0874 71m 96S6 Olivers ^OOl I amukm • TOPS in Pool Sorvloo TECHfiaM BOULDER CONCRETE WANTS TO MEET YOUn CONCRETE NEEDS FOR FREE ESTIMATES AND QUALITY WORKMANSHIP CALL MICK CASEY Boulder City 293-1571 Lie #oi6398 I rmr* WHOLESALE HEARING AID CENTER SAVE UP TO $2000 ON YOUR HEARING AID NEEDS, BOARD CERTIFIED FOR YOUR PROTECTION. FREE HEARING TESTS (IN-HOME OR OFFICE). CALL US FOR HELP TODAY! 456-1110 J IRRIGATION SYSTEMS S LANDSCAPE CONTRACTORS P.O. BOX 61801. BOULDER CITY, NVa006 702-2M-14e • FAX 702-2M-1MS A Complmtm LMndmcmp* Inmtmll. Dave Sulllna Oartwal ItartagM' St. Lie. 00274S6 10201 SAND & TYPE II ROCK & SAND CLEAN FILL DIRT DELIVERED JIM 564-8371 Moblto 376-7666 E&MOORE CLEARLY WINDOW CLEANING Reasonable Rates Jeff KIncaid 294-1114 New pager 222-6926 8764 HAPPY GARDNER We Care For Your Lawn George R. Regan, 111 #164-13888 565-3583 771 JONATHON HUNT CONSTRUCTION oS^ouotio PATIO COVERS • Call us Last Senior CMUena Gat your baat prica and wa'll • OisaMed beat iti From Custom Home to Tenant Improvemantsl ^^^3^ 434-9908 9859 BACKHOE and BOBCAT SERVICE •Lots Graded •Oitchir^g 30 Years Experience — Hourly Rates Cart W. Ford 293-0593 8766 Harry's Quality Painting 15 Years In BoukJer City Interior/Exterior Residential/Commercial Acoustical Ceiling • Repair • Text Orywall Taping • Texturing • Wallpapering 293-1523 firee E$timat99 Lie • Bonded • Insured g^^ CONSERVE POWER Aluminum Pstfo Covert Carporta Window Avmlngs Sunshield Awning RsprMsntatlve Call 293-3750 For free in-home estimate PS10207 C-N-C SERVICES SHAW'S PLUMBING & DRAIN SERVICE TOR AU. YOUR PLUMBINO WATES TREATMENT NEEDS Repair. Remodel, Replpe. Water Healers. Water Solteners & Reverse Osmosis, SALES i SERVICE. Free Est. Competitive """ 564-9118 ^ MCS GARDENING •TREE TRIMMING .FREE ESTIMATES •RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL •EMEHG. PIPE I VALVE REPAIR • SENIOR DISCOUNTS *** LICENSED LAWN MAINTENANCE SINCE 1984 564-6742 ,r>o, Need your Castle Cleaned? Weakly • Bl VVMkly mtm • Apsr1ntnlfi • II mm CntMl%ti ComparMas CRAFT SHOW CRAFTS R US • Huge craft show Gifts Galore! Home decor, jewelry,, baked goodfs and n>ore. • • Fn.. 2-9; Sat, 9-5; Sun. 1 10-3.1424 Colt Dr., Hnd.' Behind Heritage Museum (Boulder Hwy. at Equestnan) Follow tht green signs' MC10139 EMPLOYMfNT StRVICl^ AIRLINE HIRING NOW. Entry Level, Flight Attendants. Baggage, Customer Service, Maintenance. Paid training. Money back guar--' • nta. For How-To Ma* teriata call (702) Ml1401 MCI 0d37 I

PAGE 40

Page B20 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, November 16,1995 Thursday, November 16.1995 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Page B21 KEYBOARD FOR SALE CHRISTMAS PRESENT FOR YOU OR YOUR KIDS. I have a practically new CASIO CTK 150 PIANO 30 SONG BANK KEYBOARD. I paid $280, best cash offertakes. Call Vi at 564-7553. MC7088 II WAREHOUSE 20x30 warehouse for rent. $350/mo., 707 Canyon Rd., BC 2940225. MCI 0014 FOR SALE WARE• HOUSE $39,950. 20 X 30. Call 294-0225. MC 8880 BUILDING SUPPLIES MONTH'S SPECIAL Kohlr kilchn faucet with spray. $75 Professional Installation Available 293-1050 BUILDING MATERIALS BUILDING SUPPLIES STEEL BUILDING SALE! 20x20x8, $2660. 24x24x8. $3185. 30x30x10, $3995. Other sizes available. Sale is limited to inventory in stock! Don't miss out! Call now 1-800-766-4790. BUILDING MATERIALS STEEL BLDGS. Factory special. Fast delivery. Will erect. Huge savings. Must sell by Nov. 30th. Teresa 702-645-6231. MC97B7 PERSONALS DON'T PLAY CRAPS until you read our inexpensive manual. 72craps table bets analyzed. Free brochure: CP Press, P.O. Box 71291, Las Vegas, NV 89170; 800-4240144; FAX 702-7950111. MC8288 I, Richard Noble, will not be responsible for Brenda Noble's debts any longer. PE9355 Looking for a challenge? Volunteers needed to help start N EW BEGINNINGS COMMUNITY CHURCH. Pastor seeks interested people. Call 263-3024. PE10185 PERSONALS 2(V20WrTHOUrGLASSeS! Safe, rapid, non-surgical, permanent restoration in 6-8 weeks. Airline pilot developed. Doctor approved. Free Information by mail: (800) 4227320 ext. 222. (406) 9615570. Fax (406) 9615577. Satisfaction Guaranteed. PE10033 SCHOOL INSTRUCTION JVT REALTY V SCHOOL $199 (Total pric LImHad tllM) •SIOO Down $99 upon complllon 'Start any Monday *2-3 or 4 waak couraaa *PlacanMnt Aulatanca 'Claaaroom or Corraapondanca *n.E. Commlaalon Approvad •S030 PARAOtSE. C-109 •798-9699 or l-aOO-472-3893 HCMTS PACKAGE SHIPPING AUTHORIZED SHIPPING CENTER FEDI RESS Con^pv* pnoM nao Cen—tNp WMi uai OPEN 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday thru Frktoy BEE'S BUSINESS MAIL SERVICE 1400 Colorado SIraal (at Aah StrMl) t/M Our Connnknl Btck Door! 70 LOST & FOUND I LOST & FOUND LOST MED. SIZE PARROT Green w/yellow head. 6-8 in. tall. Partially clipped wings. Wolf whistles, talks. If seen or heard please call 5657609. CAREFUL HE BITES! LF9228 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Mtata 7 daya a wk. at 5 PM, Rac. Annax bahind Bouldar Dam Cradlt Unloa ALANON-ALATEBi2M421S JS3, ENTERTAINMENT VOICE PIANO DRAMA LESSONS OiMran a AiMli 7 Mid 19. OiiaMy, Plotoslonil IM Cam MuHcil *n> Stoao. Openings •valtabia phoMiwolorappl. S65-846S UYAlfilfiiUWkdi^VtS^ jg Wfllffl QUALITY VOCAL PIANO kt im""* fjif KEYBOARD.'!' Enlcrttiinmrnt Availahlcrnryourorganization or event PrrrssionaI singrr & Co. Flo Raymond Coral Cove Mutical ArU Studio. 565-8469 AUCTION AUCTION FOUND solid gray fluffy female cat, yound, very friendly, vicinity of Platinum St., Hand. 5580961. LFl0025 PETS/ANIMALS ADOPT CATS & Dogs from your shelters, Save a Life. BC PA LAS VEGAS VALLEY HUMANE SOCIETY. Beautiful, healthy, kittens, cats, puppies, dogs. Spayed/neutered, tested, shots. PetsMart, Trop-Eastern store only. Thurs., Fri., Sat., Sun., 11-4. PA9854 Free to good home Male Collie, 7 years old. Call between 3 p.m. & 6 p.m. only. 565-8830. PA9974 Lost 10/30/95 puppy. 5 mo. old. Reddish brown, no tail, extra toes on back feet. Her name is Ginger. Lost in the Arkansas/ Nebraska area. Pis. call 564-3391. PA9870 5 yr. old Pure Lab., qreat pal for older kids. FREE TO GOOD HOME. Call 565-7929 Ext. 100. Female AKC German Shepard puppy, 12wks. old, championship blood line, daughter allergic. $275 OBO. Call anytime 232-1828. PA10132 Free to good home, 1/2 mini lab. & cocker, 8 mo. old, all shots, black, house broken, loves people. Call 294-0029. AUCTION FOUND (Burkholder/ Major] Brown/White female Akita/Lab mix, 6 yrs. old. Call Animal Shelter 565-2033 (Cage 20) FOUND Black cat w/ collar and bell. Call 2933565. LF9709 In vrcinity of 7th and K. Beige, shorthaired cat. | Blue eyes, one brown and one grey ear. Dark tail. Can 294-8438. PETS/ANIMALS THE ANIMAL FOUNDATION will help you financially spay or neuter your cat or dog. Very inexpensive in Las Vegas. 384-3333 BC PA Betty Hohn's non profit Animal Adoption Ltd. is accepting unlimited number of unwanted pets by appointment only. You are welcome to view adoptable pets 7 days a week. Call first 361-2484. THERE IS NO GUIDED TOURS OF THE PREMISES AT THIS TIME, OF NATIVE, NON-NATIVE, OR WILD AND EXOTIC ANIMALS. PA9574 White German Shepherd Puppies, 7 wks. old, no papers. $300 ea. Call Jean 565-0683. PA9796 Free kittens to good homes, 6 weeks old, lots of colors 565-3975. PA9996 Cocker Spaniel puppies, 3 female, 1 male. Call any time 566-4117. AUCTION HELP WANTED LOOKING FOR ADVENTURE? Join the irresistible force. The Nevada Army National Guard has excitement just waiting for you if you qualify. Call today for more information! 4357228. HW8285 CHRISTMAS BELL RINGERS. Apply at Salvation Army, 830 Lake Mead. Hen. HW9385 Green Valley Travel Agency lookingforsharp, aggressive, motivated self-starter with travel experience. PT/FT positions available. Great opportunity for the right person. (702) 898-8882. HW9623 HELP WANTED VtT ASSISTANT P/T position open. Duties incl. receptionist, technical & kennel work. Must be 18 yrs. or older. For more info, call 294-0001. HW9914 DJ'S DAYCARE CENTER in need of a responsible caregiver w/1 yr. exp. FT/PT. Accepting applications, 360 Horizon, HND. (cross street Greenway). 5664070. HW9475 Applications are currently being accepted for a F/T TRUCK WASH POSITION. Duties include hand washing & hand waxing delivery trucks. Will train. No weekends. Uniforms furnished plus benefits. Apply at Work Clothes Rental, 568 Parkson Rd., Hnd. No phone calls pis. HW9933 Part-time telemarketer— NO SALES—Salary & Bonus. 20 hrs per week. Call Sally 566-7040 between9&2 HW9941 Handy helpers can get you clean forthe holidays & keep you that way. Have picKup, can clean garage & haul off trash, reasonable 593-6904. PS9950 Unemployed manfor odd jobs, drive stick shift, live in? 293-1022 evenings. HW10016 PLUMBER HENDERSON AREA, NEW CONSTRUCTION. EXPERIENCED HELPER CONSIDERED. 564-7573. HW9846 WORKERS NEEDED Daily Work, Daily Pay APPLY AT LABOR FINDERS Mon.-Fri., 5 am to 6 pm 331 Water St. HND 564-9592 HW9212 Help wanted $1,000 week stuffing envelopes at home. FREE INFO. Send SASE Box 6797D, Stateline, NV 89449. HW9372 Advertise bitht NKWS AUCTION Overlook seamstress wanted, will train. 2932697. HW9210 DRIVERS-EXPERIENCED OR INEXPERIENCED North American Van Lines currently has owneroperatoropenings (sinqle-op & double-op) in Relocation Services, High Value Products & Blanket Wrap Divisions. Tuition-free tralnlngi Tractor purchase programs, no trailer maintenance expenses. Pay for Performance plans and much more! 1-800-3482147 Dept. A-22. HW10027 ALASKA EMPLOYMENT-Fishing Industry. Earn up to $3,000$6,000+ per month. Room & Board! Transportation! No experience necessary! Male/Female. Age 18-70. For employment directory and information, call: (206)545-4155 ext. A89771.HW10026 CAREER OPPORTUNITY National company expanding locally. Openinos for self-motivated, high caliber qo getters. Flexible PT/FT Hrs. Training avail. Call 433-1697/1-800-2098102 EXT. 4. HW9802 Housekeeper needed part time. Please apply Nevada Inn Motel, Boulder City. HW9583 TEXAS REFINERY CORP. needs responsible person now in your area. Regardless of training, write: C. Y. HOPKINS, DEPT. C89009, BOX 711, FT. WORTH, TX. 76101. HW9397 Part-time weekend office help needed in Real Estate Office. Pleasant phone etiquette a must! knowledge in WP helpful but will train rignt person. Applications being taken at 1647 Nev. Hwy. HW9959 AUCTION HELP WANTED SECURITY GUARDS • Green Valley Security is seeking full time and part time employees for Bouldar City and Henderson locations. Please call 261-0440 to schedule an appointment. Seniors are invited to apply. HW9890 FTELP WANTED Kitchen & cashier people needed. No e>serience necessary. Starting $5.50/hr. Paid vacation, health insurance benefits & college student benefits. Transportation furnished. Apply at Snackateria at Hoover Dam or call 293-4364. HW9882 DESK CLERK needed R art time. Please apply levada Inn Motel, ETOUIderCity. HW9956 GRAND OPENING Company expanding in Las Vegas, looking for motivated individuals to fill positions. Call 8989042. HW9961 Looking for women who like to clean. Approx. 30 hr8.wk.M-F.$150-$200/ wk. 294-6232. HW9108 DELIVERY DRIVER NEEDED. MAKE UP TO $10 PER HOUR. APPLY IN PERSON, 87 E. LAKE IMEAD DR. Apply Between 1 pm-5 pm. Must have own Traneportation. HW8940 DANCE TEACHERS/ DANCE COUNSELORS. Arthur Murray Dance School now taking applications for teacher training & sales/ dance counseling program. See how you may qualify for training in the largest dance organization of its kind. Learn to teach all the exciting dances from ballroom, latin, night club & country. Call for interview, 7984552. HW9596 MODELS WANTED for TV & National Magazines. Male, Females, Children. All types, all sizes. No experience necessary. For information call 1-800-211-2099. (Fee) HW8478 DRIVERS: FLATBED 48 STATE OTR. Assigned new conventionals. Competitive pay, benefits, $1,000 sign on bonus, rider program, flexible time off. Call Roadrunner Trucking 1-800876-7784. HW8481 AUCTION HELP WANTED $500/day In your mailbdx for Information send $1.00 -f self addressed stamped envelope, 2756 N. Green Valley Pkwy., Suite #238 Henderson, NV. 89014. B09436 Interested in real estate sales? Contact Jean at CENTURY 21 JRREALTY. 101 E. Horizon Hen.. NV 564-5142. HW Acme Paralegal Services announces hs grand opening in Henderson/Green valley. Divorce, Bankruptcy, Wills etc., call for special rates 435-0885. HW7736 CASHIER/STOCKER any shift full and part time. Apply between 9 am and 5 bm, M-F at 721 E. Lake Mead Dr., Hend. HW10024 ._ PROFESSIONAL DRIVERS NEEDED: TOP PAYTORUN11 WESTERN STATES. MUST BE 25 YEARS OR OVER AND HAVE 2 YEARS FLATBED EXPERIENCE. WE OFFER UP TO 26 CENTS A MILE, PAID VACATIONS, 8 PAID HOLIDAYS, EXCELLENT MEDICAL INSURANCE ON EMPLOYEE AND FAMILY, LIFE INSURANCE ON EMPLOYEE, PROFIT SHARING, PLUS VERY LITTLE LAYOVER. ALL TRUCKS ARE 1993 AND NEWER, WITH 400 CATS & CUMMINS. CONTACT S.M.P. INC. AT (801) 374-0761. HW10031 GIRL FRIOAY-For fastpaced service office. Needs excellent communication, customer servk:e and clerical skills. Part-time, entry level position with full-time potential. Send resume to:SPMC,1400Cok)rado St., Boulder City, NV 89005. HW10051 Head Maintenanceposition available AT BC APARTMENT COMMUNITY must be HVAC Certified. Call for appointment 293-1615. HW10112 CUSTOM CARPET CLEANING CO. seeking individual with management potential. F/PT. Call 897-670B, HW10084 FULL TIME COUNTER HELPWANTED-Davsi evenings, apply at Subway 1311 Nev. Hwy., BC. P94-4496. HW10103 AUCTION DARWIN'S AUCTIONS 1524 Nevada Highway Boulder City, Nevada 89005 Darwin Bible, Auctioneer (702) 293-3996 AUCTION /ilvj..::' SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1995 9:00 A.M, TO BE HELD AT M AUCTIONS 1524 NEVADA HWY, BOULDER CITY, NV 89005 HELP WANTED IMMEDIATE OPENINGS The Nevada Army National Guard has immediate openings for qualKied young men and women between the ages of 17-34. Work about one weekend a month and two weeks a year. Many other opportunities include paid training and hands-on experience. Call today! 435-7228. HW7100 VETERANS...JOIN A PROUD TRADITION. The Nevada Army Guard has extended its offer to all veterans not yet retired Put your prior sen/ice skills back to work and earn excellent benefits. Earn retirement, PX, Commissary, and Space A privileges again! Call today! 435-7228. HW10001 BAKERY WORKER NEEDED IMMEDIATELY. No experience necessary. Night time hours. 566-5901/4319249 and ask for Brian. HW10126 INSTALLERS for ORNAMENTAL IRON CO needed. Minimum 2 yrs. field exp. necessary. Ref. of past job exp. required. (702) 293-5300. HWioni CLERK All shifts. Must be 21 yrs. Cashier/ Stockroom. Mighty Mart Convenience Store located in Green Valley. 433-4343. HW10117 BOOKKEEPER/RECEPTIONIST, Full time, good phone & office skills, title knowledge a big plus. Great opportunity for neat, people oriented person. Apply BOULDER CITY MOTORS, 1112 Nevada Hwy. HWl0n6 HAIR STYLISTS WANTED for busy salon. Call Jeff 293-6377. HW8914 GOLD STRIKE INN • & CASINO NOW HIRING: • A Sacurtty Quard* • k EnglnMri ^ Hotai/CMMrt ^ KMO Rmxrt ''"*" Bus Pfon ^ Caakw Caga CaaMara '* • k Houaakaapart, Una cooka • k dahwaahara ^ fmUJlim gm atiop paraon, ^ Apply In paraon at CaahtoriCaga US HWY SMtear Hoovar Dm ********** W AUCTION • ?:: FARM ANTIQUES TOOLS COLLECTIBLES Contents of Farm of late Black Hills, South Dakota farmer, Ira Wintrode, born April 23, 1893, died July 4, 1994. Semi-truck load includes hundreds of rare and unique farm and ranch items. The following is a partial list. Everything to be sold with no minimum bids. RAILROAD DEPOT CART 2 LUMBER WAGONS GRAIN WAGON WOOD BURNING KITCHEN AND PARLOR STOVES SEVERAL UNIQUE KEROSENE STOVES 4 PREWAR WASHING MACHINES "ROCKET" HAND ROCKER WASHING MACHINE CAST IRON MISSION AND SCHOOL BELLS WITH ROCKER ASSEMBLY STEAMBOAT, STAGE COACH, RAILROAD AND IMMIGRANT TRUNK COLLECTION ASSORTED CORN SHELLERS 2 RIDING CORN PLANTERS CALVERY, PLEASURE AND BUCKING SADDLES OAK BARRELS AND KEGS WOOD & STEEL WAGON WHEELS APPROXIMATELY 40 CREAM & MILK CANS (SOME RARE) CAST IRON KITCHEN WARE BRANDING IRONS SEVERAL COPPER BOILERS "GASBOY" GASOLINE PUMP CROCKS & CROCK JUGS IRONS & SAD IRONS BRASS BLOWTORCHES MERCHANT COMPLIMENT ITEMS MANY MANY FARM TOOLS PORCELAIN, COPPER & ALUMINUM KETTLES RAILROAD ITEMS CARPENTERS WOOD PLANES OLD RAILROAD MAP 12 HORSE COLLAR/ HAMES/MIRRORS KEROSENE LANTERN COLLECTION COWBELLS (SOME WITH COLLARS) McCORMICK DEEPING AND ROYAL BLUE CREAM SEPERATORS (5 ALL COMPLETE) SEVERAL KEROSENE HEATERS COAL BUCKETS & SHOVELS SICKLES & SCYTHES CAST IRON AND STEEL IMPLEMENT SEATS BREAD OVENS WAGON JACKS 1909 KEROSENE BRASS AUTO LAMP HAY KNIVES WOODEN PULLEYS SEVERAL ANTIQUE RADIOS TREADLE SEWING MACHINES FRESNOS PLATFORM SCALES WASHBOARDS & HAND WRINGERS WALKING PLOWS AND GARDEN CULTIVATORS CAST IRON SKILLETS & POTS NECK YOKES SINGLETREES DOUBLETREES HORSE LEATHER &TACK •TWO MAN SAWS BRASS SOLDERING IRONS ROLLING PINS RARE & UNIQUE 4-WAY RAILROAD SIGNAL PITCHER & CISTERN PUMPS SAUSAGE STUFFERS 4 PRESSURE COOKERS BRASS FIRE EXTINGUISHERS ENAMEL COFFEE POTS ALUMINUM BOILERS AND SO MUCH MORE OVER 500 CHOICE PIECES ALL TO BE SOLD WITH NO MINIMUM BIDS 10% BUYERS PREMIUM AUCTIONEERS NOTE: Due to the large number of lots, and the weight of manv pieces, these items will be SOLD IN PLACE! Each registered bidder will receive a catalog and items will be sold in catalog order We will not be moving these pieces to the front as we sell, so come earl\^ to view ar)d keep notes on \four catalog. We will be open for review the Frida\f (17th) before the sale and Saturday, NovemberlSth (sale da\f) from 7:00 A.M. DARWIN BIBLE, AUCTIONEER (702) 293-3996 HELP WANTED CLASS A CDL DRIVERS: CALICO EXPRESS, INC. To Go Over-The-Road 100,000 Miles Min. Exp. Retirement, Benefits, Paid Vacation, Bonuses. Call MF. 10-2,1-800-554-2889. HW10030 NATIONAL PARKS HIRING-Seasonal&fulltinrie employnDent available at National Parks, Forests & Wildlile Reserves. Benefits -ibonuses! Foremployment directory, call (206) 5454804 ext. N89772. $$ STAY HOME $$ Single mom making full time income from home base business. FREE START UP. FREE TRAINING. Call now 260-1170. HW9798 100 people wanted, will pay you to lose 5-29 lbs. Call 226-1064. HW9805 Ctioos* Your hour*, Vow Incoiiia and Your RvwwiNI AVON Maxin* Ho*l (702)24170 Call Today! CAGE CASHIER. Monay handling axparianca prafarrad. HOTEL DESK CLEHK, axparianca prafarrad. Apply at Casino Gaga, Railroad Pasa Holal A Casino, 2800 S. Bouldar Hwy., HND. EOE H,Mi WANTED, Light housakeapar 2 or 3 days par wsak. English not important Liva In or out privata room, kit priv., call (or ntora info. A appL 791-5599 CAFE SENSATIONS G.V. Cafe seeking full time expe. pantry cook. Kitchen supervisor position available bring references. Applications accepted In person M W F, 9 am to 11 am, 2-4 pm, 4350 E. Sunset #110 at Athlnean. Henderson. HW25S WANTED! Real Estate Trainee Top National Company Call Mitch 458-7653 TEACHER WANTED PART-TIME Experienced in *Kindergarten *Elementary Education or Child Development OAKLANE PRESCHOOL 1308 Wyoming St. 293-5188 Ac u temps A Iffmporary W T TT ***N0 FEES*** • **N0 FEES*** Interviewing for: 'Word Processors 'Secretaries 'Receptionists 'Accountants 'Bookkeepers 'Data Entry *A/P and A/R InterviewK at 2909 W. Charleston Mon.-Pri.8AM-3PM P/ione; 877-6775 Muft have proper ID A GREAT BONUS OFFER FOR HIGH SCHOOL GRADSI 10^ For those who qualify, the Army is offering great Incentives but only Tor a ttmUedttme Ifyou want the pride thai comes from being a member of a special team, the Army offers you many choices like infantry armor and artillery These are some of the hi tech Army^ combat arms. Soldiers who qualify io become member of Itieae teams are among the Arm^ best ToiriNadMMMeaf j —iBc al ra cru S ir inday 1566-67661 MAaYOfCAIIIf. HELP WANTED Attention GED Holders! If you have ever thought about entering the military, the door is open again! Take advantage of the Nevada Army Isfational Guard while you still can! Unbeatable benefits and part-time income. Your local Nevada Army National Guard is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Call today! 435-7228. DRIVERS AND LABORERS 50 Needed Daily/Weekly Pay Apply LABOR EXPRESS 39 E 6asic Rd. RESUMES Pro^flonlly Dona Ronatly Pricad BCrs BUSINESS SERVICES Opan Dally • to ( 1400 Colorado (al Aah) B.C. 293S361 HEALTHY, CHEERFUL AND HARD WORKING? FIVE HOURS OF WORK IN BOULDER CITY, 9:30-2:30. Please call. 293-5510. HELP WANTED Attention Boulder City •POSTAL JOBS*$12.68/ hr. to start, plus benefits. Carriers, sorters, computer trainees. For an application & exam information call 1 -219-791 1191 Ext. P23, 6 am-6 pm. 7days. HV\/9691 Hairdressers/Manicurists wanted. Merle Norman Cosmetics, 19 Water St., #C, Hend. 565-0158. HW9697 RESUMES Composad, Editad, Typad-Faat A Accurala BEE'S BUSINESS SVC. "DAILY 8- Sal. 10-4" 1400 Colorado, *CB.C. 293-5361 923 srvij.sT. MANICHKISTS I.VCK.NIIVE.S & VA( AIION ACUIAHOVK 294-3151 TEACHER WANTED PART-TIME Experienced in ^Kindergarten ^Elementary Education or Child Development OAKLANE PRESCHOOL 1308 Wyoming St. 293-5188 H1M2 SECURITY OFFICERS WELLS FARGO GUARD SERVICE. EMPLOYMENT OPENINGS IN HEND./G.V. AREAS. WE OFFER FLEXIBLE WORK HOURS, UNIFORMS PROVIDED, PAYED VACATIONS AND OTHER BE NEFITS, APPLY Monday-Friday. 9 am to 3:30 pm, 3305 W. Spring Mountain, #66, Equal Opportunity Employer. 10199 NOW ACCEPTING APPUCATIONS FOR: MANAGERS, ASSISTANT MANAGERS & OEt VERY DRIVERS Apply in person d06 Buchanan, Boulder City (Vons Shopping Center) or 118 E. Lake Mead Dr. Henderson. liBASTRJDisiE"Tem ps' CASHIERS/STOCKERS Lr long term ascignment. Fun job. Call 666-9662 for appt 320 S. Boulder Hwy., Ste. 102 Never a Fe SECURITY OFFICERS-UNARMED $5.25 HR. to start HENDERSON G.V. area*. Full & Part-Time. Weekdays A Weekends. MUST HAVE WORKING PHONE A TRANSPORTATION. Please apply in person MON.-THURS., 10a-3p,EOE CURTIS /ALLEY ^f.o* OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE 2 units in BOULDER DAM HOTEL. Newly renovated. $275/mo. and up. incl. utils. 293-7731 for info. 101K CONDO SALES BOULDER HILLS by owner. Quiet 2 bd.. 1-1/2 ba., 2 story condo overlooking pool area, will consider Lease Option w/ good down payment. Call eves. 293-1471. CONDO SALES BC Spanish Steps Only $95,900 BRET 294-8482 Desert Sun RIty. CS10197 SLinestlt^SPY GLASS CONDO 2 bd., 2-1/2 ba., Lake View Balcony, patio, pool, spa, etc. $127,500. Call Heinz 2930545 Prudential Southwest Realty. CONDO RENTALS I CONDO RENTALS 1 bd, 1 1/2 ba, nk:e lake view, incl washer & dryer, covered parking. $650/ mo. Call Russ Gilmore at 293-4663 Boulder Dam Realty CR9936 BOULDER CFTY CONDO Brand new Spanish Steps w/great valley view. 2 bdrm., 2 bath, upgraded carpet. F.P & more. AvaiL now at $695. Call Dick Blair Realty, 293-2171. CR9877 2 BDRM., 2 BA., w/tp, laundry area, overlooking B-Hill area. Great view. Upstairs unit. Small Pet OK. $650/mo. 2940046. CR9915 AftamrtiM kiiheNEWS Green Valley 2bdrm., 2 bath, condo. very clean and upgraded, all appliances included. $750/ mo. Call Don 564-3333. CR9435 GVAREA2bdrm.,2ba., spirt level ground floor, 2 car attached gar. w/elec. opener, washer/dryer, all elec., 2 door ref rig., A/C, ceiling fans, vertical blinds, NO PETS or SMOKERS, adults, patio-view, $750 mo.. 1st, last •• • $400 security dep., 1 yr. lease. 293-6335. CR10080 2 bd.. 2 ba.. furnished corvfo. in BC. Convenient location, custom features, extra storage, adults, non-snrx>kar, no pets $775/mo. Call 2937476. CR10142 CONDO RENTALS I CONDO RENTALS I APT. RENTALS CONDO ESTATE FOR RENT BC Like New Nk:e 2 Bed./2 Bath, Fireplace, Covered Pka. Great Location. Only $675/nx)nth. Call Jim at 293-0822. CR9969 Boulder City Retail 1 Office •pace Terms Negotiable B.C. Adobe Realty 293-"'707 ,_,^ Great Lake Terrace! 3 bd., 2 ba., jac. tub! Best unit/view/area $975 mo. plus $165 dues. 2932030. CR9410 BOULDER CITY • Luxury custom condo for rent. 2650 sf, new, overlooking beautiful Lake Mead.3bd.,3ba.,frpl. in master bd. & living rm., attached 2 car gar. $1500/mo. + $1500/ cleaning dep. Avail. Now. 263-0565 or 294-1500. EFFICIENCY CONDO-CHALET VEGAS One block from Hard Rock Cafe and Hotel. On Paradise Road. LR-BR-K-Olnette-AC & Poolaida. Ideal for UNLV Student, aingle, snowbird, little love nest for young couple. PRINCIPALS ONLY! $29,900 RRM. Call 293-4391. CR68SS HOUSE RENTALS HIGHLAND HILLS. 731 Greenway 4 bd.. 1 3/4 ba., 2 car gar., 1288 sf. Avail. 10/01. Call Randy 228-5957. HR9312 In BC. 4 bdrm., 1-3/4 bath. Central air & heat. Washer & dryer. Close to schools. Pets OK $850/ mo., 293-7664. HR9680 REAL ESTATE FOR RENT BC Executive Home on Golf Course, Spacious 3 8ed./2 Bath, Only $1395/month. Call Bruce 294-8482 or 4932107. HR9965 4 plus bedroom house for rent. Avail. Dec. 9. kids, pets, welcome, 608 Ave. G, BC 293-5634. HR10015 KEYLARG0-2bd., excel view of lake, $1000/ mo., 293-5737. HR9873 For Rent, 3 bd, 1 ba., house, avail. Dec. 10, $725/mo., first mo. + $800 dep. 565-3581 after 3 p.m. HR9905 3 bd., 2 ba., 2 car garage on .2 acre in Hend. Foothill Area. Yard serv. incl. $850/mo. Avail. Nov. 15.566-3895. HR9913 HOUSE RENTALS In Henderson 3 bd.,1 3/ 4 ba., fenced yard, 2 car gar. $800/mo. + dep. Call 565-1854. HR10042 BOULDER CITY—3 bdrm., 2 ba., 2 car gar., Lewis Home. 1850 sf. $850/mo. $200 sec. dep., 1 year lease, available approx. 11/20/95. Call 294-0003 for appt. HR10102 DUPLEX 1 bd., 1 ba., 500 SF, $550/mo. includes all utilities, vacant. Call 565-1120. HR9e75 IN^MEDIATE OCCUPANCY Ig, 1 bd. duplex, Pittman area $475/mo, $1150 move in cost. Call 564-1990. HR10163 4 bd., fenced yard, 10 Wyoming St., Hend. $725/mo. + $725 dep. 564-6742. HR9957 B.C. Historic 2 br., 2 ba., basement 2 car, private yard. $800 + sec. dep. Available now. Call 5647667/592-2046 ask for Elaine. HR10005 2bd.,2ba., AC, balance power, near schools, refrig. $800/Mo. in BC. 293-6016. HR10038 BOULDER CITY RENTALS HOME 3 bdrm., 1-V4 bi., 2 car gir. Pool $99S/n)0. • $99S/dtp. HOME 3 bdrm., 2-t/2 ba., Ig. gar. $92S/mo. dapt. NO PETS. NO SMOKERS. HOME 3 bdrm.. 3 baa., 2 car gar. $1 lOO/nw. t dap. 1/3 DUPLEX • 1 bad., t bt., $40Q/mo. + dapa. BC ADOBE REALTY 293-1707 APT. RENTALS FOR RENT: Kitchenettes, $65/wk. Utilities pd. SHADY REST MOTEL, 565-7688. AR9597 1 bd.nrwtherin law apart., some utils. rncl. 42 Ocean, Hend. $350/mo. + $350 dep. 564-6742. AR9958 1 bdrm. APT. vacant, 1 yr. lease. $450/mo. 1st, fast and $500 dep. NO PETS. Nearuptown. 2931471 eves. AR10194 Studio Duplex Apt. Downtown Hend $300 dep. $325 Mo. call 5656283. AR9972 Studio apart, unfurnished ofl Major Ave. N of Boulder Hwy. Util. included at $325/mo.Len451-6318. AR9995 One Person, 1 bd. furnished apart me ntforrent, 23 W. Basic Rd., Hend. NO PETS, NO KIDS, $265/mo. + dep. AR9989 Avail. 1 Dec. Studio private ent., toilet, appli., etc. Call 293-1132-$295/MO + DEP. INCL UTIL. & CABLE. AR10089 APARTMENT-2/BDnear downtown & schools $495/mo. Appliances and water included. 2940128.AR9175 Are you leeling closed in? Lakewood Cove Apts. can help you stretch out! l42bdnn.,3bdmi,town. Irom $535 Henderson 1 MONTH FREE 564-2258 APT. RENTALS 2 Bedroom, 1 ba. apt. $500 mo. $200 dep. Henderson near Bask: HS.564-5712.AR10049 UNFURNISHED 2bdnn., 1 ba.,1-story apt., carport, seniors weteome, $500/mo. 293-4832. Quiet, 2 bdrm. apt. in Henderson, $470/mo. 897-9421. AR10145 Teddy's Kitchenettes, Just bring your toothbrush. Everything furnished. PH. 293-1716. BC NEW KITCHENETTES, phone, satellite, maid service. STARVIEW MOTEL 293-1658. BC Furn. studio, old town, laun. no drugs, ak:ohol. smoking. $350/mo. + dep. Phil 293-0038. AR9775 ROOM FOR RENT IN HENDERSON-Share2 bd., apt. $250/mo. + 1/2 util. 268-9082 or 5665976. AR9925 APARTMENTS AS LOW AS $275 a Month furnished 564-6952 „ DESERT GARDENS 565-9051 2 BDRM.. 1 BA. Extra Storage. Small Pet Welcome AR9639 HENDERSON PLAZA APARTMENTS 2 bdrm. 1 ba., $510/mo. Pool, layground, free Basic cable TV, free ot water. (Ask about Newly Remodeled Apartments.) 565-7512. ^22^ R ATLANTIC CITY APARTMENTS Clean, Quality 1-2-3 Bedroom Apartments in Henderson • Central Air A Heat • Appliances • Blinds • Carpets • Water Paid • Washer/Dryer Available Apartments are $410 & up per month, newly rertKxleled, spacious near schools, park A shopping. 565-7028 ^AR 9551 2 bdrm.. Apt. in Henderson, 208 Randy Way. Section 8 wek:onne. 4359123. AR8473 2 bdrm.. $440. 208 Randy Way. Section 8/ Srs. discount. 435-9123. MOBILE HOMES BC NICE 3 Bed./2 Bath Man. Home wKh Huge Cul De Sac Lot. RV Prkng. $99,500 BRET 294-8482 Desert Sun RIty. MH9971 55-tspace rent only $255, 2 bd. 2 ba., on bus line. Close to shopping Bonanza & Nellis. Cash prk:e $5000. CO-OP 5953279. MH9387 Boulder Highway & Russell Rd., 2 bd.. 1 ba. 1993, 14x56 as low as $1500 OAC. $24,000. KIDS & PETS OK. COOP 595-3279. MH9388 Big 3 bdrm., 2 ba., nice family park, as low as $1400 dn. OAC. Total $27,900. CO-OP 5953279. MH9386 WANTED in Lake Shore Trailer Village. Call collect (707) 538-2099 after 6 pm. MH9491 3 bd.,SE Las Vegas, fenced yard, $800/mo. 434-0851. HR9539 Perfect starter home, must sell, we've outgrown, letting go below appraisal. Call 294-0472. MH10170 TRAILER IN NICE PARK, 14X70.2 BDRf*^., 2 BA., LG. KIT. $16K. CALL 564-5642 FOR APPT. MH9852 BC Coronado Estates. 60' X 100' lot, 18X38 mobile home, 1 bd., 1 ba., fumished. $68,000 owner. 800-729-6001. MH9689 10X55.2bd.,1ba.. newly remodeled, 10X16 covered patio, 2 storage sheds, 1 with 110 & 220 washer/dryer hookup, all fenced with underground sprinkler sys., $4600 OBO. 564-7267. MH9808 24X44 MOBILE HOME 2 bd., 2 ba. water softener, osmosis, washer/ diyer and deep freeze in Gingerwood. Call 2931493. MH9889 FOR SALE Furnished 1993 Mobile Home + Land, asking $96,000. Down payment of $12,000 & take over mo. paymts. ot approK. $fii77/ mo. Age restricted park 55 i over. Call Virginia at HORIZON PROPERTIES 731-6677. MH10115 TRAILERS RENT OR SALE Park Models good for 1 or 2 people. Rent* starU S37S/up. Sales start $1500/up. Ask for Jeannette/ Mario. 294-8888 REAL ESTATE GVSOUTH-4bd.,2ba., tropical lands. $146,900. 361-0738. RE7598 3 BR., 1-3/4 BATH W/ ATTGARAGE,1364SQ. FT. ON QUIET CUL-DESAC, RV PARKING, LG. PATIO, LANDSCAPE, SHADE TREES, WELL KEPT MUST SEE. 798 AMY CT.,BC 293-5112. RE10211 LAKE VIEW DEAL Beautiful 2400 sf custom 3 bdrm.. 2-1/2 ba., upgrades throughout, won't last, $299k. 294-1586 or 293-5599 ask for Cary. RE9042 BC COMMERCIAL Office/Warehouse, possible living qtrs. 4 units. All for $219,500. Call BRET 294-8482 Desert Sun RIty. RE9978 NO MONEY DOWNNew program. If you are working or retired you may qualify to purchase a home with no money down. Call me today to find out how. George 371 5375 RE993 YOU CAN own your own home! No down payment on Miles materials, attractive constructoin financing. Call Miles Homes today. 1-800343-2884 ext. 1. RE 10036 $25.47 per acre, Oregon 20.000 ac. Nevada. 40 acre parcels, 20 minutes to Reno, $37,000. Terms or exchange. 18.000 acres. California. 916332-2979, Bkr. RE 10035 A LITTLE BIT OF COUNTRY. 2 Bedroom, 2Bath, New Home, 1.25 Acres, Water Rights. Mountain Views, Lovelock, Nevada. 702538-7503. RE 10034 HOUSE FOR SALE BY OWNER, FABULOUS LAKE, DESERT AND MOUNTAIN VIEWS, 2058 SO FT. REAL PROPERTY $245,000. 702-204-0058. RE95S4 CHOICE MOBILE home/ building lots in Sandy Valley. 2 Wacres ea. Power at the site, underground phone, paved and/or gravel roads. Seller offering good terms. Phone Grace, at Americor Realty. 3651953. L0253 LAKE MEAD VIEW ESTATES, custom home lots overlooking Lake Mead. 702-294-0475. 20 acres power, well, septK, cottaae, 9arage $118,000, adjoining 20 acres $42,000, Cedar City, Ut., 293-4642. 1/2 ACRE LOT for custom home site. Section 27.564-5269. L09783 LAST CUSTOM HOME LOT-Locatedon Boulder City Golf Course. Build your dream home. 104x100. 879 Fairway. Call Now! This will not last! Coldwell Banker Realty. Call Trish 4587070/376-0733. LO10179 ThePrudential Jensen's Realty ValuabI* Alia trontags, on* of the largest lots on Ihoroughfar* leading to new country complex A proposed sports stadium. Prtcea In INs area art going up. CaN now!! Don, Randy or AltMrt T. S64-3333 H39747 JSSSL. m FINANCIAL SERVICES WE BUY MORTGAGES, Trust Deeds, Annuities. Did You Sell Your Property? Receiving Payments? Why Wait! GET CASH NOW! Nationwide. Great Prices. Call 1-800-659-2274 Ext. 32. r^Jj \OVR IJOCAL it PAYROLL COMPANY I^TQII SarvicBS & General Ledger •m/iom M^xoc M •Lock Box •C4Hi4o Bllllj^a •CMtoaSoftww* \n rmRfip mg, CCNVEKSICWSET4TP .EMPLOYEE APOmoNS •EMPLOYEE CBANOES •LASES PAYIOLL CBECIS •PAVBOLL PICK IIP •MAOHETIC TAPE MEDU •QUABTESLY TAX KEPOKTS •SnSREPOKT t hfe Rdc lt> i Dsliver-, •733-0378-1 NEVADA FDUJCIAL CONCEPTS ^ —-J^ UTAH REAL ESTATE GOLF COURSE VIEW ST. GEORGE 2 Br. Park Model in Twin Lakes RV Park. 7'x35' covered Deck plus small deck off 2nd bedroom. Lot included, Clubhouse, yearround pool. Hot tub, exercise room. Low dues. Rent/Lease/Sale under $50,000. Call 702-2941563 or 520-757-2344. MC5815 REAL ESTATE NO MONEY DOWNI BUY YOUR NEW OR EXISTING HOME NOW. EUGIBLE TOWNS ARE: BOULDER CITY, MT. CHARLESTON, LAUGHLIN,MESOUITE, LAKE MEAD, OR ANY OTHER CLARK COUNTY AREA EXCEPT: LAS VEGAS & HENDERSON. MAX LOAN LIMIT IS: $119,500. GOOD CREDIT IS REQUIRED. CALL: 702-64-LOANS AND TELL THEM YOU WANT INFO ON THE NO MONEY DOWN PROGRAM. GRAND CAPITAL MORTGAGE L.V. BY OWNER—Waters Edge, 2 story, gorgeous I landscaping, 2100 SF, 3 bd., 3ba., with loft, solar I screens, wood blinds, I ceiling fans, many upgrades. Lake view from master suite, mountain view from living area. $291,500. Call 294-0981 Iv. msq. RE10190 I TIME SHARE UNITS I AND CAMPGROUND MEMBERSHIPS, DISI TRESS SALES-CHEAP! WORLDWIDE SELECTIONS. CALL VACATION NETWORK U.S. AND CANADA 1-800'< 543-6173. FREE RENTAL INFORMATION 305-563-5586. RE6025 i HEND.3bd.,2ba.,2car gar., fully landscaped, extra Ig. covered patio I with spa $115,900. 566I 4931. RE10004 CALICO RIDGE 3 bd.. study, pool, rolling shutters, kwautlful horn* new financing or owner carry $68K w/$25K down i & qualify for $90Kbl. on I toan Askino $183K Liberty Realty. Edne Siedsma 566-9521.

PAGE 41

Page B20 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, November 16,1995 Thursday, November 16.1995 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Page B21 KEYBOARD FOR SALE CHRISTMAS PRESENT FOR YOU OR YOUR KIDS. I have a practically new CASIO CTK 150 PIANO 30 SONG BANK KEYBOARD. I paid $280, best cash offertakes. Call Vi at 564-7553. MC7088 II WAREHOUSE 20x30 warehouse for rent. $350/mo., 707 Canyon Rd., BC 2940225. MCI 0014 FOR SALE WARE• HOUSE $39,950. 20 X 30. Call 294-0225. MC 8880 BUILDING SUPPLIES MONTH'S SPECIAL Kohlr kilchn faucet with spray. $75 Professional Installation Available 293-1050 BUILDING MATERIALS BUILDING SUPPLIES STEEL BUILDING SALE! 20x20x8, $2660. 24x24x8. $3185. 30x30x10, $3995. Other sizes available. Sale is limited to inventory in stock! Don't miss out! Call now 1-800-766-4790. BUILDING MATERIALS STEEL BLDGS. Factory special. Fast delivery. Will erect. Huge savings. Must sell by Nov. 30th. Teresa 702-645-6231. MC97B7 PERSONALS DON'T PLAY CRAPS until you read our inexpensive manual. 72craps table bets analyzed. Free brochure: CP Press, P.O. Box 71291, Las Vegas, NV 89170; 800-4240144; FAX 702-7950111. MC8288 I, Richard Noble, will not be responsible for Brenda Noble's debts any longer. PE9355 Looking for a challenge? Volunteers needed to help start N EW BEGINNINGS COMMUNITY CHURCH. Pastor seeks interested people. Call 263-3024. PE10185 PERSONALS 2(V20WrTHOUrGLASSeS! Safe, rapid, non-surgical, permanent restoration in 6-8 weeks. Airline pilot developed. Doctor approved. Free Information by mail: (800) 4227320 ext. 222. (406) 9615570. Fax (406) 9615577. Satisfaction Guaranteed. PE10033 SCHOOL INSTRUCTION JVT REALTY V SCHOOL $199 (Total pric LImHad tllM) •SIOO Down $99 upon complllon 'Start any Monday *2-3 or 4 waak couraaa *PlacanMnt Aulatanca 'Claaaroom or Corraapondanca *n.E. Commlaalon Approvad •S030 PARAOtSE. C-109 •798-9699 or l-aOO-472-3893 HCMTS PACKAGE SHIPPING AUTHORIZED SHIPPING CENTER FEDI RESS Con^pv* pnoM nao Cen—tNp WMi uai OPEN 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday thru Frktoy BEE'S BUSINESS MAIL SERVICE 1400 Colorado SIraal (at Aah StrMl) t/M Our Connnknl Btck Door! 70 LOST & FOUND I LOST & FOUND LOST MED. SIZE PARROT Green w/yellow head. 6-8 in. tall. Partially clipped wings. Wolf whistles, talks. If seen or heard please call 5657609. CAREFUL HE BITES! LF9228 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Mtata 7 daya a wk. at 5 PM, Rac. Annax bahind Bouldar Dam Cradlt Unloa ALANON-ALATEBi2M421S JS3, ENTERTAINMENT VOICE PIANO DRAMA LESSONS OiMran a AiMli 7 Mid 19. OiiaMy, Plotoslonil IM Cam MuHcil *n> Stoao. Openings •valtabia phoMiwolorappl. S65-846S UYAlfilfiiUWkdi^VtS^ jg Wfllffl QUALITY VOCAL PIANO kt im""* fjif KEYBOARD.'!' Enlcrttiinmrnt Availahlcrnryourorganization or event PrrrssionaI singrr & Co. Flo Raymond Coral Cove Mutical ArU Studio. 565-8469 AUCTION AUCTION FOUND solid gray fluffy female cat, yound, very friendly, vicinity of Platinum St., Hand. 5580961. LFl0025 PETS/ANIMALS ADOPT CATS & Dogs from your shelters, Save a Life. BC PA LAS VEGAS VALLEY HUMANE SOCIETY. Beautiful, healthy, kittens, cats, puppies, dogs. Spayed/neutered, tested, shots. PetsMart, Trop-Eastern store only. Thurs., Fri., Sat., Sun., 11-4. PA9854 Free to good home Male Collie, 7 years old. Call between 3 p.m. & 6 p.m. only. 565-8830. PA9974 Lost 10/30/95 puppy. 5 mo. old. Reddish brown, no tail, extra toes on back feet. Her name is Ginger. Lost in the Arkansas/ Nebraska area. Pis. call 564-3391. PA9870 5 yr. old Pure Lab., qreat pal for older kids. FREE TO GOOD HOME. Call 565-7929 Ext. 100. Female AKC German Shepard puppy, 12wks. old, championship blood line, daughter allergic. $275 OBO. Call anytime 232-1828. PA10132 Free to good home, 1/2 mini lab. & cocker, 8 mo. old, all shots, black, house broken, loves people. Call 294-0029. AUCTION FOUND (Burkholder/ Major] Brown/White female Akita/Lab mix, 6 yrs. old. Call Animal Shelter 565-2033 (Cage 20) FOUND Black cat w/ collar and bell. Call 2933565. LF9709 In vrcinity of 7th and K. Beige, shorthaired cat. | Blue eyes, one brown and one grey ear. Dark tail. Can 294-8438. PETS/ANIMALS THE ANIMAL FOUNDATION will help you financially spay or neuter your cat or dog. Very inexpensive in Las Vegas. 384-3333 BC PA Betty Hohn's non profit Animal Adoption Ltd. is accepting unlimited number of unwanted pets by appointment only. You are welcome to view adoptable pets 7 days a week. Call first 361-2484. THERE IS NO GUIDED TOURS OF THE PREMISES AT THIS TIME, OF NATIVE, NON-NATIVE, OR WILD AND EXOTIC ANIMALS. PA9574 White German Shepherd Puppies, 7 wks. old, no papers. $300 ea. Call Jean 565-0683. PA9796 Free kittens to good homes, 6 weeks old, lots of colors 565-3975. PA9996 Cocker Spaniel puppies, 3 female, 1 male. Call any time 566-4117. AUCTION HELP WANTED LOOKING FOR ADVENTURE? Join the irresistible force. The Nevada Army National Guard has excitement just waiting for you if you qualify. Call today for more information! 4357228. HW8285 CHRISTMAS BELL RINGERS. Apply at Salvation Army, 830 Lake Mead. Hen. HW9385 Green Valley Travel Agency lookingforsharp, aggressive, motivated self-starter with travel experience. PT/FT positions available. Great opportunity for the right person. (702) 898-8882. HW9623 HELP WANTED VtT ASSISTANT P/T position open. Duties incl. receptionist, technical & kennel work. Must be 18 yrs. or older. For more info, call 294-0001. HW9914 DJ'S DAYCARE CENTER in need of a responsible caregiver w/1 yr. exp. FT/PT. Accepting applications, 360 Horizon, HND. (cross street Greenway). 5664070. HW9475 Applications are currently being accepted for a F/T TRUCK WASH POSITION. Duties include hand washing & hand waxing delivery trucks. Will train. No weekends. Uniforms furnished plus benefits. Apply at Work Clothes Rental, 568 Parkson Rd., Hnd. No phone calls pis. HW9933 Part-time telemarketer— NO SALES—Salary & Bonus. 20 hrs per week. Call Sally 566-7040 between9&2 HW9941 Handy helpers can get you clean forthe holidays & keep you that way. Have picKup, can clean garage & haul off trash, reasonable 593-6904. PS9950 Unemployed manfor odd jobs, drive stick shift, live in? 293-1022 evenings. HW10016 PLUMBER HENDERSON AREA, NEW CONSTRUCTION. EXPERIENCED HELPER CONSIDERED. 564-7573. HW9846 WORKERS NEEDED Daily Work, Daily Pay APPLY AT LABOR FINDERS Mon.-Fri., 5 am to 6 pm 331 Water St. HND 564-9592 HW9212 Help wanted $1,000 week stuffing envelopes at home. FREE INFO. Send SASE Box 6797D, Stateline, NV 89449. HW9372 Advertise bitht NKWS AUCTION Overlook seamstress wanted, will train. 2932697. HW9210 DRIVERS-EXPERIENCED OR INEXPERIENCED North American Van Lines currently has owneroperatoropenings (sinqle-op & double-op) in Relocation Services, High Value Products & Blanket Wrap Divisions. Tuition-free tralnlngi Tractor purchase programs, no trailer maintenance expenses. Pay for Performance plans and much more! 1-800-3482147 Dept. A-22. HW10027 ALASKA EMPLOYMENT-Fishing Industry. Earn up to $3,000$6,000+ per month. Room & Board! Transportation! No experience necessary! Male/Female. Age 18-70. For employment directory and information, call: (206)545-4155 ext. A89771.HW10026 CAREER OPPORTUNITY National company expanding locally. Openinos for self-motivated, high caliber qo getters. Flexible PT/FT Hrs. Training avail. Call 433-1697/1-800-2098102 EXT. 4. HW9802 Housekeeper needed part time. Please apply Nevada Inn Motel, Boulder City. HW9583 TEXAS REFINERY CORP. needs responsible person now in your area. Regardless of training, write: C. Y. HOPKINS, DEPT. C89009, BOX 711, FT. WORTH, TX. 76101. HW9397 Part-time weekend office help needed in Real Estate Office. Pleasant phone etiquette a must! knowledge in WP helpful but will train rignt person. Applications being taken at 1647 Nev. Hwy. HW9959 AUCTION HELP WANTED SECURITY GUARDS • Green Valley Security is seeking full time and part time employees for Bouldar City and Henderson locations. Please call 261-0440 to schedule an appointment. Seniors are invited to apply. HW9890 FTELP WANTED Kitchen & cashier people needed. No e>serience necessary. Starting $5.50/hr. Paid vacation, health insurance benefits & college student benefits. Transportation furnished. Apply at Snackateria at Hoover Dam or call 293-4364. HW9882 DESK CLERK needed R art time. Please apply levada Inn Motel, ETOUIderCity. HW9956 GRAND OPENING Company expanding in Las Vegas, looking for motivated individuals to fill positions. Call 8989042. HW9961 Looking for women who like to clean. Approx. 30 hr8.wk.M-F.$150-$200/ wk. 294-6232. HW9108 DELIVERY DRIVER NEEDED. MAKE UP TO $10 PER HOUR. APPLY IN PERSON, 87 E. LAKE IMEAD DR. Apply Between 1 pm-5 pm. Must have own Traneportation. HW8940 DANCE TEACHERS/ DANCE COUNSELORS. Arthur Murray Dance School now taking applications for teacher training & sales/ dance counseling program. See how you may qualify for training in the largest dance organization of its kind. Learn to teach all the exciting dances from ballroom, latin, night club & country. Call for interview, 7984552. HW9596 MODELS WANTED for TV & National Magazines. Male, Females, Children. All types, all sizes. No experience necessary. For information call 1-800-211-2099. (Fee) HW8478 DRIVERS: FLATBED 48 STATE OTR. Assigned new conventionals. Competitive pay, benefits, $1,000 sign on bonus, rider program, flexible time off. Call Roadrunner Trucking 1-800876-7784. HW8481 AUCTION HELP WANTED $500/day In your mailbdx for Information send $1.00 -f self addressed stamped envelope, 2756 N. Green Valley Pkwy., Suite #238 Henderson, NV. 89014. B09436 Interested in real estate sales? Contact Jean at CENTURY 21 JRREALTY. 101 E. Horizon Hen.. NV 564-5142. HW Acme Paralegal Services announces hs grand opening in Henderson/Green valley. Divorce, Bankruptcy, Wills etc., call for special rates 435-0885. HW7736 CASHIER/STOCKER any shift full and part time. Apply between 9 am and 5 bm, M-F at 721 E. Lake Mead Dr., Hend. HW10024 ._ PROFESSIONAL DRIVERS NEEDED: TOP PAYTORUN11 WESTERN STATES. MUST BE 25 YEARS OR OVER AND HAVE 2 YEARS FLATBED EXPERIENCE. WE OFFER UP TO 26 CENTS A MILE, PAID VACATIONS, 8 PAID HOLIDAYS, EXCELLENT MEDICAL INSURANCE ON EMPLOYEE AND FAMILY, LIFE INSURANCE ON EMPLOYEE, PROFIT SHARING, PLUS VERY LITTLE LAYOVER. ALL TRUCKS ARE 1993 AND NEWER, WITH 400 CATS & CUMMINS. CONTACT S.M.P. INC. AT (801) 374-0761. HW10031 GIRL FRIOAY-For fastpaced service office. Needs excellent communication, customer servk:e and clerical skills. Part-time, entry level position with full-time potential. Send resume to:SPMC,1400Cok)rado St., Boulder City, NV 89005. HW10051 Head Maintenanceposition available AT BC APARTMENT COMMUNITY must be HVAC Certified. Call for appointment 293-1615. HW10112 CUSTOM CARPET CLEANING CO. seeking individual with management potential. F/PT. Call 897-670B, HW10084 FULL TIME COUNTER HELPWANTED-Davsi evenings, apply at Subway 1311 Nev. Hwy., BC. P94-4496. HW10103 AUCTION DARWIN'S AUCTIONS 1524 Nevada Highway Boulder City, Nevada 89005 Darwin Bible, Auctioneer (702) 293-3996 AUCTION /ilvj..::' SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1995 9:00 A.M, TO BE HELD AT M AUCTIONS 1524 NEVADA HWY, BOULDER CITY, NV 89005 HELP WANTED IMMEDIATE OPENINGS The Nevada Army National Guard has immediate openings for qualKied young men and women between the ages of 17-34. Work about one weekend a month and two weeks a year. Many other opportunities include paid training and hands-on experience. Call today! 435-7228. HW7100 VETERANS...JOIN A PROUD TRADITION. The Nevada Army Guard has extended its offer to all veterans not yet retired Put your prior sen/ice skills back to work and earn excellent benefits. Earn retirement, PX, Commissary, and Space A privileges again! Call today! 435-7228. HW10001 BAKERY WORKER NEEDED IMMEDIATELY. No experience necessary. Night time hours. 566-5901/4319249 and ask for Brian. HW10126 INSTALLERS for ORNAMENTAL IRON CO needed. Minimum 2 yrs. field exp. necessary. Ref. of past job exp. required. (702) 293-5300. HWioni CLERK All shifts. Must be 21 yrs. Cashier/ Stockroom. Mighty Mart Convenience Store located in Green Valley. 433-4343. HW10117 BOOKKEEPER/RECEPTIONIST, Full time, good phone & office skills, title knowledge a big plus. Great opportunity for neat, people oriented person. Apply BOULDER CITY MOTORS, 1112 Nevada Hwy. HWl0n6 HAIR STYLISTS WANTED for busy salon. Call Jeff 293-6377. HW8914 GOLD STRIKE INN • & CASINO NOW HIRING: • A Sacurtty Quard* • k EnglnMri ^ Hotai/CMMrt ^ KMO Rmxrt ''"*" Bus Pfon ^ Caakw Caga CaaMara '* • k Houaakaapart, Una cooka • k dahwaahara ^ fmUJlim gm atiop paraon, ^ Apply In paraon at CaahtoriCaga US HWY SMtear Hoovar Dm ********** W AUCTION • ?:: FARM ANTIQUES TOOLS COLLECTIBLES Contents of Farm of late Black Hills, South Dakota farmer, Ira Wintrode, born April 23, 1893, died July 4, 1994. Semi-truck load includes hundreds of rare and unique farm and ranch items. The following is a partial list. Everything to be sold with no minimum bids. RAILROAD DEPOT CART 2 LUMBER WAGONS GRAIN WAGON WOOD BURNING KITCHEN AND PARLOR STOVES SEVERAL UNIQUE KEROSENE STOVES 4 PREWAR WASHING MACHINES "ROCKET" HAND ROCKER WASHING MACHINE CAST IRON MISSION AND SCHOOL BELLS WITH ROCKER ASSEMBLY STEAMBOAT, STAGE COACH, RAILROAD AND IMMIGRANT TRUNK COLLECTION ASSORTED CORN SHELLERS 2 RIDING CORN PLANTERS CALVERY, PLEASURE AND BUCKING SADDLES OAK BARRELS AND KEGS WOOD & STEEL WAGON WHEELS APPROXIMATELY 40 CREAM & MILK CANS (SOME RARE) CAST IRON KITCHEN WARE BRANDING IRONS SEVERAL COPPER BOILERS "GASBOY" GASOLINE PUMP CROCKS & CROCK JUGS IRONS & SAD IRONS BRASS BLOWTORCHES MERCHANT COMPLIMENT ITEMS MANY MANY FARM TOOLS PORCELAIN, COPPER & ALUMINUM KETTLES RAILROAD ITEMS CARPENTERS WOOD PLANES OLD RAILROAD MAP 12 HORSE COLLAR/ HAMES/MIRRORS KEROSENE LANTERN COLLECTION COWBELLS (SOME WITH COLLARS) McCORMICK DEEPING AND ROYAL BLUE CREAM SEPERATORS (5 ALL COMPLETE) SEVERAL KEROSENE HEATERS COAL BUCKETS & SHOVELS SICKLES & SCYTHES CAST IRON AND STEEL IMPLEMENT SEATS BREAD OVENS WAGON JACKS 1909 KEROSENE BRASS AUTO LAMP HAY KNIVES WOODEN PULLEYS SEVERAL ANTIQUE RADIOS TREADLE SEWING MACHINES FRESNOS PLATFORM SCALES WASHBOARDS & HAND WRINGERS WALKING PLOWS AND GARDEN CULTIVATORS CAST IRON SKILLETS & POTS NECK YOKES SINGLETREES DOUBLETREES HORSE LEATHER &TACK •TWO MAN SAWS BRASS SOLDERING IRONS ROLLING PINS RARE & UNIQUE 4-WAY RAILROAD SIGNAL PITCHER & CISTERN PUMPS SAUSAGE STUFFERS 4 PRESSURE COOKERS BRASS FIRE EXTINGUISHERS ENAMEL COFFEE POTS ALUMINUM BOILERS AND SO MUCH MORE OVER 500 CHOICE PIECES ALL TO BE SOLD WITH NO MINIMUM BIDS 10% BUYERS PREMIUM AUCTIONEERS NOTE: Due to the large number of lots, and the weight of manv pieces, these items will be SOLD IN PLACE! Each registered bidder will receive a catalog and items will be sold in catalog order We will not be moving these pieces to the front as we sell, so come earl\^ to view ar)d keep notes on \four catalog. We will be open for review the Frida\f (17th) before the sale and Saturday, NovemberlSth (sale da\f) from 7:00 A.M. DARWIN BIBLE, AUCTIONEER (702) 293-3996 HELP WANTED CLASS A CDL DRIVERS: CALICO EXPRESS, INC. To Go Over-The-Road 100,000 Miles Min. Exp. Retirement, Benefits, Paid Vacation, Bonuses. Call MF. 10-2,1-800-554-2889. HW10030 NATIONAL PARKS HIRING-Seasonal&fulltinrie employnDent available at National Parks, Forests & Wildlile Reserves. Benefits -ibonuses! Foremployment directory, call (206) 5454804 ext. N89772. $$ STAY HOME $$ Single mom making full time income from home base business. FREE START UP. FREE TRAINING. Call now 260-1170. HW9798 100 people wanted, will pay you to lose 5-29 lbs. Call 226-1064. HW9805 Ctioos* Your hour*, Vow Incoiiia and Your RvwwiNI AVON Maxin* Ho*l (702)24170 Call Today! CAGE CASHIER. Monay handling axparianca prafarrad. HOTEL DESK CLEHK, axparianca prafarrad. Apply at Casino Gaga, Railroad Pasa Holal A Casino, 2800 S. Bouldar Hwy., HND. EOE H,Mi WANTED, Light housakeapar 2 or 3 days par wsak. English not important Liva In or out privata room, kit priv., call (or ntora info. A appL 791-5599 CAFE SENSATIONS G.V. Cafe seeking full time expe. pantry cook. Kitchen supervisor position available bring references. Applications accepted In person M W F, 9 am to 11 am, 2-4 pm, 4350 E. Sunset #110 at Athlnean. Henderson. HW25S WANTED! Real Estate Trainee Top National Company Call Mitch 458-7653 TEACHER WANTED PART-TIME Experienced in *Kindergarten *Elementary Education or Child Development OAKLANE PRESCHOOL 1308 Wyoming St. 293-5188 Ac u temps A Iffmporary W T TT ***N0 FEES*** • **N0 FEES*** Interviewing for: 'Word Processors 'Secretaries 'Receptionists 'Accountants 'Bookkeepers 'Data Entry *A/P and A/R InterviewK at 2909 W. Charleston Mon.-Pri.8AM-3PM P/ione; 877-6775 Muft have proper ID A GREAT BONUS OFFER FOR HIGH SCHOOL GRADSI 10^ For those who qualify, the Army is offering great Incentives but only Tor a ttmUedttme Ifyou want the pride thai comes from being a member of a special team, the Army offers you many choices like infantry armor and artillery These are some of the hi tech Army^ combat arms. Soldiers who qualify io become member of Itieae teams are among the Arm^ best ToiriNadMMMeaf j —iBc al ra cru S ir inday 1566-67661 MAaYOfCAIIIf. HELP WANTED Attention GED Holders! If you have ever thought about entering the military, the door is open again! Take advantage of the Nevada Army Isfational Guard while you still can! Unbeatable benefits and part-time income. Your local Nevada Army National Guard is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Call today! 435-7228. DRIVERS AND LABORERS 50 Needed Daily/Weekly Pay Apply LABOR EXPRESS 39 E 6asic Rd. RESUMES Pro^flonlly Dona Ronatly Pricad BCrs BUSINESS SERVICES Opan Dally • to ( 1400 Colorado (al Aah) B.C. 293S361 HEALTHY, CHEERFUL AND HARD WORKING? FIVE HOURS OF WORK IN BOULDER CITY, 9:30-2:30. Please call. 293-5510. HELP WANTED Attention Boulder City •POSTAL JOBS*$12.68/ hr. to start, plus benefits. Carriers, sorters, computer trainees. For an application & exam information call 1 -219-791 1191 Ext. P23, 6 am-6 pm. 7days. HV\/9691 Hairdressers/Manicurists wanted. Merle Norman Cosmetics, 19 Water St., #C, Hend. 565-0158. HW9697 RESUMES Composad, Editad, Typad-Faat A Accurala BEE'S BUSINESS SVC. "DAILY 8- Sal. 10-4" 1400 Colorado, *CB.C. 293-5361 923 srvij.sT. MANICHKISTS I.VCK.NIIVE.S & VA( AIION ACUIAHOVK 294-3151 TEACHER WANTED PART-TIME Experienced in ^Kindergarten ^Elementary Education or Child Development OAKLANE PRESCHOOL 1308 Wyoming St. 293-5188 H1M2 SECURITY OFFICERS WELLS FARGO GUARD SERVICE. EMPLOYMENT OPENINGS IN HEND./G.V. AREAS. WE OFFER FLEXIBLE WORK HOURS, UNIFORMS PROVIDED, PAYED VACATIONS AND OTHER BE NEFITS, APPLY Monday-Friday. 9 am to 3:30 pm, 3305 W. Spring Mountain, #66, Equal Opportunity Employer. 10199 NOW ACCEPTING APPUCATIONS FOR: MANAGERS, ASSISTANT MANAGERS & OEt VERY DRIVERS Apply in person d06 Buchanan, Boulder City (Vons Shopping Center) or 118 E. Lake Mead Dr. Henderson. liBASTRJDisiE"Tem ps' CASHIERS/STOCKERS Lr long term ascignment. Fun job. Call 666-9662 for appt 320 S. Boulder Hwy., Ste. 102 Never a Fe SECURITY OFFICERS-UNARMED $5.25 HR. to start HENDERSON G.V. area*. Full & Part-Time. Weekdays A Weekends. MUST HAVE WORKING PHONE A TRANSPORTATION. Please apply in person MON.-THURS., 10a-3p,EOE CURTIS /ALLEY ^f.o* OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE 2 units in BOULDER DAM HOTEL. Newly renovated. $275/mo. and up. incl. utils. 293-7731 for info. 101K CONDO SALES BOULDER HILLS by owner. Quiet 2 bd.. 1-1/2 ba., 2 story condo overlooking pool area, will consider Lease Option w/ good down payment. Call eves. 293-1471. CONDO SALES BC Spanish Steps Only $95,900 BRET 294-8482 Desert Sun RIty. CS10197 SLinestlt^SPY GLASS CONDO 2 bd., 2-1/2 ba., Lake View Balcony, patio, pool, spa, etc. $127,500. Call Heinz 2930545 Prudential Southwest Realty. CONDO RENTALS I CONDO RENTALS 1 bd, 1 1/2 ba, nk:e lake view, incl washer & dryer, covered parking. $650/ mo. Call Russ Gilmore at 293-4663 Boulder Dam Realty CR9936 BOULDER CFTY CONDO Brand new Spanish Steps w/great valley view. 2 bdrm., 2 bath, upgraded carpet. F.P & more. AvaiL now at $695. Call Dick Blair Realty, 293-2171. CR9877 2 BDRM., 2 BA., w/tp, laundry area, overlooking B-Hill area. Great view. Upstairs unit. Small Pet OK. $650/mo. 2940046. CR9915 AftamrtiM kiiheNEWS Green Valley 2bdrm., 2 bath, condo. very clean and upgraded, all appliances included. $750/ mo. Call Don 564-3333. CR9435 GVAREA2bdrm.,2ba., spirt level ground floor, 2 car attached gar. w/elec. opener, washer/dryer, all elec., 2 door ref rig., A/C, ceiling fans, vertical blinds, NO PETS or SMOKERS, adults, patio-view, $750 mo.. 1st, last •• • $400 security dep., 1 yr. lease. 293-6335. CR10080 2 bd.. 2 ba.. furnished corvfo. in BC. Convenient location, custom features, extra storage, adults, non-snrx>kar, no pets $775/mo. Call 2937476. CR10142 CONDO RENTALS I CONDO RENTALS I APT. RENTALS CONDO ESTATE FOR RENT BC Like New Nk:e 2 Bed./2 Bath, Fireplace, Covered Pka. Great Location. Only $675/nx)nth. Call Jim at 293-0822. CR9969 Boulder City Retail 1 Office •pace Terms Negotiable B.C. Adobe Realty 293-"'707 ,_,^ Great Lake Terrace! 3 bd., 2 ba., jac. tub! Best unit/view/area $975 mo. plus $165 dues. 2932030. CR9410 BOULDER CITY • Luxury custom condo for rent. 2650 sf, new, overlooking beautiful Lake Mead.3bd.,3ba.,frpl. in master bd. & living rm., attached 2 car gar. $1500/mo. + $1500/ cleaning dep. Avail. Now. 263-0565 or 294-1500. EFFICIENCY CONDO-CHALET VEGAS One block from Hard Rock Cafe and Hotel. On Paradise Road. LR-BR-K-Olnette-AC & Poolaida. Ideal for UNLV Student, aingle, snowbird, little love nest for young couple. PRINCIPALS ONLY! $29,900 RRM. Call 293-4391. CR68SS HOUSE RENTALS HIGHLAND HILLS. 731 Greenway 4 bd.. 1 3/4 ba., 2 car gar., 1288 sf. Avail. 10/01. Call Randy 228-5957. HR9312 In BC. 4 bdrm., 1-3/4 bath. Central air & heat. Washer & dryer. Close to schools. Pets OK $850/ mo., 293-7664. HR9680 REAL ESTATE FOR RENT BC Executive Home on Golf Course, Spacious 3 8ed./2 Bath, Only $1395/month. Call Bruce 294-8482 or 4932107. HR9965 4 plus bedroom house for rent. Avail. Dec. 9. kids, pets, welcome, 608 Ave. G, BC 293-5634. HR10015 KEYLARG0-2bd., excel view of lake, $1000/ mo., 293-5737. HR9873 For Rent, 3 bd, 1 ba., house, avail. Dec. 10, $725/mo., first mo. + $800 dep. 565-3581 after 3 p.m. HR9905 3 bd., 2 ba., 2 car garage on .2 acre in Hend. Foothill Area. Yard serv. incl. $850/mo. Avail. Nov. 15.566-3895. HR9913 HOUSE RENTALS In Henderson 3 bd.,1 3/ 4 ba., fenced yard, 2 car gar. $800/mo. + dep. Call 565-1854. HR10042 BOULDER CITY—3 bdrm., 2 ba., 2 car gar., Lewis Home. 1850 sf. $850/mo. $200 sec. dep., 1 year lease, available approx. 11/20/95. Call 294-0003 for appt. HR10102 DUPLEX 1 bd., 1 ba., 500 SF, $550/mo. includes all utilities, vacant. Call 565-1120. HR9e75 IN^MEDIATE OCCUPANCY Ig, 1 bd. duplex, Pittman area $475/mo, $1150 move in cost. Call 564-1990. HR10163 4 bd., fenced yard, 10 Wyoming St., Hend. $725/mo. + $725 dep. 564-6742. HR9957 B.C. Historic 2 br., 2 ba., basement 2 car, private yard. $800 + sec. dep. Available now. Call 5647667/592-2046 ask for Elaine. HR10005 2bd.,2ba., AC, balance power, near schools, refrig. $800/Mo. in BC. 293-6016. HR10038 BOULDER CITY RENTALS HOME 3 bdrm., 1-V4 bi., 2 car gir. Pool $99S/n)0. • $99S/dtp. HOME 3 bdrm., 2-t/2 ba., Ig. gar. $92S/mo. dapt. NO PETS. NO SMOKERS. HOME 3 bdrm.. 3 baa., 2 car gar. $1 lOO/nw. t dap. 1/3 DUPLEX • 1 bad., t bt., $40Q/mo. + dapa. BC ADOBE REALTY 293-1707 APT. RENTALS FOR RENT: Kitchenettes, $65/wk. Utilities pd. SHADY REST MOTEL, 565-7688. AR9597 1 bd.nrwtherin law apart., some utils. rncl. 42 Ocean, Hend. $350/mo. + $350 dep. 564-6742. AR9958 1 bdrm. APT. vacant, 1 yr. lease. $450/mo. 1st, fast and $500 dep. NO PETS. Nearuptown. 2931471 eves. AR10194 Studio Duplex Apt. Downtown Hend $300 dep. $325 Mo. call 5656283. AR9972 Studio apart, unfurnished ofl Major Ave. N of Boulder Hwy. Util. included at $325/mo.Len451-6318. AR9995 One Person, 1 bd. furnished apart me ntforrent, 23 W. Basic Rd., Hend. NO PETS, NO KIDS, $265/mo. + dep. AR9989 Avail. 1 Dec. Studio private ent., toilet, appli., etc. Call 293-1132-$295/MO + DEP. INCL UTIL. & CABLE. AR10089 APARTMENT-2/BDnear downtown & schools $495/mo. Appliances and water included. 2940128.AR9175 Are you leeling closed in? Lakewood Cove Apts. can help you stretch out! l42bdnn.,3bdmi,town. Irom $535 Henderson 1 MONTH FREE 564-2258 APT. RENTALS 2 Bedroom, 1 ba. apt. $500 mo. $200 dep. Henderson near Bask: HS.564-5712.AR10049 UNFURNISHED 2bdnn., 1 ba.,1-story apt., carport, seniors weteome, $500/mo. 293-4832. Quiet, 2 bdrm. apt. in Henderson, $470/mo. 897-9421. AR10145 Teddy's Kitchenettes, Just bring your toothbrush. Everything furnished. PH. 293-1716. BC NEW KITCHENETTES, phone, satellite, maid service. STARVIEW MOTEL 293-1658. BC Furn. studio, old town, laun. no drugs, ak:ohol. smoking. $350/mo. + dep. Phil 293-0038. AR9775 ROOM FOR RENT IN HENDERSON-Share2 bd., apt. $250/mo. + 1/2 util. 268-9082 or 5665976. AR9925 APARTMENTS AS LOW AS $275 a Month furnished 564-6952 „ DESERT GARDENS 565-9051 2 BDRM.. 1 BA. Extra Storage. Small Pet Welcome AR9639 HENDERSON PLAZA APARTMENTS 2 bdrm. 1 ba., $510/mo. Pool, layground, free Basic cable TV, free ot water. (Ask about Newly Remodeled Apartments.) 565-7512. ^22^ R ATLANTIC CITY APARTMENTS Clean, Quality 1-2-3 Bedroom Apartments in Henderson • Central Air A Heat • Appliances • Blinds • Carpets • Water Paid • Washer/Dryer Available Apartments are $410 & up per month, newly rertKxleled, spacious near schools, park A shopping. 565-7028 ^AR 9551 2 bdrm.. Apt. in Henderson, 208 Randy Way. Section 8 wek:onne. 4359123. AR8473 2 bdrm.. $440. 208 Randy Way. Section 8/ Srs. discount. 435-9123. MOBILE HOMES BC NICE 3 Bed./2 Bath Man. Home wKh Huge Cul De Sac Lot. RV Prkng. $99,500 BRET 294-8482 Desert Sun RIty. MH9971 55-tspace rent only $255, 2 bd. 2 ba., on bus line. Close to shopping Bonanza & Nellis. Cash prk:e $5000. CO-OP 5953279. MH9387 Boulder Highway & Russell Rd., 2 bd.. 1 ba. 1993, 14x56 as low as $1500 OAC. $24,000. KIDS & PETS OK. COOP 595-3279. MH9388 Big 3 bdrm., 2 ba., nice family park, as low as $1400 dn. OAC. Total $27,900. CO-OP 5953279. MH9386 WANTED in Lake Shore Trailer Village. Call collect (707) 538-2099 after 6 pm. MH9491 3 bd.,SE Las Vegas, fenced yard, $800/mo. 434-0851. HR9539 Perfect starter home, must sell, we've outgrown, letting go below appraisal. Call 294-0472. MH10170 TRAILER IN NICE PARK, 14X70.2 BDRf*^., 2 BA., LG. KIT. $16K. CALL 564-5642 FOR APPT. MH9852 BC Coronado Estates. 60' X 100' lot, 18X38 mobile home, 1 bd., 1 ba., fumished. $68,000 owner. 800-729-6001. MH9689 10X55.2bd.,1ba.. newly remodeled, 10X16 covered patio, 2 storage sheds, 1 with 110 & 220 washer/dryer hookup, all fenced with underground sprinkler sys., $4600 OBO. 564-7267. MH9808 24X44 MOBILE HOME 2 bd., 2 ba. water softener, osmosis, washer/ diyer and deep freeze in Gingerwood. Call 2931493. MH9889 FOR SALE Furnished 1993 Mobile Home + Land, asking $96,000. Down payment of $12,000 & take over mo. paymts. ot approK. $fii77/ mo. Age restricted park 55 i over. Call Virginia at HORIZON PROPERTIES 731-6677. MH10115 TRAILERS RENT OR SALE Park Models good for 1 or 2 people. Rent* starU S37S/up. Sales start $1500/up. Ask for Jeannette/ Mario. 294-8888 REAL ESTATE GVSOUTH-4bd.,2ba., tropical lands. $146,900. 361-0738. RE7598 3 BR., 1-3/4 BATH W/ ATTGARAGE,1364SQ. FT. ON QUIET CUL-DESAC, RV PARKING, LG. PATIO, LANDSCAPE, SHADE TREES, WELL KEPT MUST SEE. 798 AMY CT.,BC 293-5112. RE10211 LAKE VIEW DEAL Beautiful 2400 sf custom 3 bdrm.. 2-1/2 ba., upgrades throughout, won't last, $299k. 294-1586 or 293-5599 ask for Cary. RE9042 BC COMMERCIAL Office/Warehouse, possible living qtrs. 4 units. All for $219,500. Call BRET 294-8482 Desert Sun RIty. RE9978 NO MONEY DOWNNew program. If you are working or retired you may qualify to purchase a home with no money down. Call me today to find out how. George 371 5375 RE993 YOU CAN own your own home! No down payment on Miles materials, attractive constructoin financing. Call Miles Homes today. 1-800343-2884 ext. 1. RE 10036 $25.47 per acre, Oregon 20.000 ac. Nevada. 40 acre parcels, 20 minutes to Reno, $37,000. Terms or exchange. 18.000 acres. California. 916332-2979, Bkr. RE 10035 A LITTLE BIT OF COUNTRY. 2 Bedroom, 2Bath, New Home, 1.25 Acres, Water Rights. Mountain Views, Lovelock, Nevada. 702538-7503. RE 10034 HOUSE FOR SALE BY OWNER, FABULOUS LAKE, DESERT AND MOUNTAIN VIEWS, 2058 SO FT. REAL PROPERTY $245,000. 702-204-0058. RE95S4 CHOICE MOBILE home/ building lots in Sandy Valley. 2 Wacres ea. Power at the site, underground phone, paved and/or gravel roads. Seller offering good terms. Phone Grace, at Americor Realty. 3651953. L0253 LAKE MEAD VIEW ESTATES, custom home lots overlooking Lake Mead. 702-294-0475. 20 acres power, well, septK, cottaae, 9arage $118,000, adjoining 20 acres $42,000, Cedar City, Ut., 293-4642. 1/2 ACRE LOT for custom home site. Section 27.564-5269. L09783 LAST CUSTOM HOME LOT-Locatedon Boulder City Golf Course. Build your dream home. 104x100. 879 Fairway. Call Now! This will not last! Coldwell Banker Realty. Call Trish 4587070/376-0733. LO10179 ThePrudential Jensen's Realty ValuabI* Alia trontags, on* of the largest lots on Ihoroughfar* leading to new country complex A proposed sports stadium. Prtcea In INs area art going up. CaN now!! Don, Randy or AltMrt T. S64-3333 H39747 JSSSL. m FINANCIAL SERVICES WE BUY MORTGAGES, Trust Deeds, Annuities. Did You Sell Your Property? Receiving Payments? Why Wait! GET CASH NOW! Nationwide. Great Prices. Call 1-800-659-2274 Ext. 32. r^Jj \OVR IJOCAL it PAYROLL COMPANY I^TQII SarvicBS & General Ledger •m/iom M^xoc M •Lock Box •C4Hi4o Bllllj^a •CMtoaSoftww* \n rmRfip mg, CCNVEKSICWSET4TP .EMPLOYEE APOmoNS •EMPLOYEE CBANOES •LASES PAYIOLL CBECIS •PAVBOLL PICK IIP •MAOHETIC TAPE MEDU •QUABTESLY TAX KEPOKTS •SnSREPOKT t hfe Rdc lt> i Dsliver-, •733-0378-1 NEVADA FDUJCIAL CONCEPTS ^ —-J^ UTAH REAL ESTATE GOLF COURSE VIEW ST. GEORGE 2 Br. Park Model in Twin Lakes RV Park. 7'x35' covered Deck plus small deck off 2nd bedroom. Lot included, Clubhouse, yearround pool. Hot tub, exercise room. Low dues. Rent/Lease/Sale under $50,000. Call 702-2941563 or 520-757-2344. MC5815 REAL ESTATE NO MONEY DOWNI BUY YOUR NEW OR EXISTING HOME NOW. EUGIBLE TOWNS ARE: BOULDER CITY, MT. CHARLESTON, LAUGHLIN,MESOUITE, LAKE MEAD, OR ANY OTHER CLARK COUNTY AREA EXCEPT: LAS VEGAS & HENDERSON. MAX LOAN LIMIT IS: $119,500. GOOD CREDIT IS REQUIRED. CALL: 702-64-LOANS AND TELL THEM YOU WANT INFO ON THE NO MONEY DOWN PROGRAM. GRAND CAPITAL MORTGAGE L.V. BY OWNER—Waters Edge, 2 story, gorgeous I landscaping, 2100 SF, 3 bd., 3ba., with loft, solar I screens, wood blinds, I ceiling fans, many upgrades. Lake view from master suite, mountain view from living area. $291,500. Call 294-0981 Iv. msq. RE10190 I TIME SHARE UNITS I AND CAMPGROUND MEMBERSHIPS, DISI TRESS SALES-CHEAP! WORLDWIDE SELECTIONS. CALL VACATION NETWORK U.S. AND CANADA 1-800'< 543-6173. FREE RENTAL INFORMATION 305-563-5586. RE6025 i HEND.3bd.,2ba.,2car gar., fully landscaped, extra Ig. covered patio I with spa $115,900. 566I 4931. RE10004 CALICO RIDGE 3 bd.. study, pool, rolling shutters, kwautlful horn* new financing or owner carry $68K w/$25K down i & qualify for $90Kbl. on I toan Askino $183K Liberty Realty. Edne Siedsma 566-9521.

PAGE 42

f?!S5;,'.rJJ4.!-J!?i4i,J • JHI H i]! mmmm Page B22 Henderson Home News. Boulder City News Thursday, November 16, 1995 Thursday, November 16,1995 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Page B23 REAL ESTATE PVH Real Estate Hwy. 160, next to Terrible Herbst, 3 models to choose from, $50 sq, ft., over 200 lots available. 1-702-727-0445. WANT TO? Buy or Sell? Call Your Local Real Estate Agent for all your real estate needs. SANDRA MQSSER Century 21 Henderson Realty Pager 693-0391 ThePrudential Jensen's Realty J Bd., 2 1/2 Ba.. 2401 K). ft. MotI popular modal In SiMptochtM-wlll look tMtttr than nw whan tha naw caipal la Inalallad intwior la fraahly paintad. Landacaplng baing pro-Uaalonally ranovatad. Can Don, Randy or Patty SS4-3333. HMOM 10011 19 ft Ul I) MOl M \l\ REALTY TERRIFIC FLOORPLAN Home completely redone 10 months ago! All new kitchen. $166300 (702) 294-1500 ThePrudential Jensen's Realty ^^^^ 5 BD, 3-1/2 BA, 6400 so. FT. HOME. Cradlad In on* of th* most spectacular salting* w/ unobttructad viaw of Laka Maad A Mtni. Has 40x50 •ntartalnmantroom w/wat bar. Call Luk* 293-3355. KID MOl MAIN REALTY HOUSE+I RENTAL 4+BR house/2BR/2BA rental. Very low maintenance. Old (own EC. $164,000 021 294-1500 ThePrudential Jensen's Realty '^'•Sir 3 Bdrm., 2 Ba. homa, 1572 sq. It. Has naw rool A carpaling. Covarad patio, IronI S back, aaparata living room t lamlly room, addHk>nal 20* aq. tt. bomb ahaHar/baaamanl. SS7,500. Cal Dan or liana 564-3333. H3IW1S „^ KIDMOI MAIN REALTY VIEWS GALORE Beautiful custom home w/skylights, itrium & dual pane windows. $299,000 294-1500 ThePrudential Jensen's Realty 4S7S Joplln Cr., LV ONLY $132,500 Lot 446X19<.2t1( sq. ft living araa, 3 BO, 2.S Ba. Working araa 2>22, Storaga 10x50, RV/Boat up to 40', Too many Opa. to list. In a rush 24 Hrs. 795-5453 or 5(4-3333. Ask lor Manual. H37370 ma M BC CUSTOM. 3 BR/2 BA NICEI Rock Firaplaca Hand-mado wood cabinsis 2-car garaga, fully landscapad, larg* id 70'x120', Block snclosad. $160,000. 293-5520 by appL 6774 ThePrudential (j^ Jensen's Realty ""^ Comfortabla, wall kapt Ranch-Typo homa, zonad for horMS,3Bd.,2Ba.,2330 aq. n.. Built-in BBQ, fully fancad, Ig. bdrms., imprasslva rock llraplaca. Call Sally 564-3333. H345S5 H273 FORMERMODEL! 4BR/2BA Home in laktvlew art*. Many extras, large backyard. 2 car gar. S269,000 294-1500 $$ CASH NOW$$ Priv. investor, 35 yrs. buying houses in Vegas. Looking for houses, all areas. Behind in pymts., in default, just want out? Call 655-8924 for cash. •> REAL ESTATE CALICO TRAILS 3 BDRM. + study, pool & courtyard. Rolling shutters throughout for heat control & security. Magnificent home ready for occupancy. Owner may carry $50K for 3 years. Asking $183K. Edna Siedsma, Liberty Realty 566-9521. RE10017 NO MONEY DOWN New program. If you are working or retired you may qualify to purchase a home with no money down. Call me today to findout howGeorge371 5375. RE9938' Ul I) MOl M \IN REALTY EXCELLENT VIEW! 3BR/4BA Home overlooks Lake Mead. Bonus room, den. Great Buy! $219,900 294-1500 ThePrudential / Jensen's Realty 4 Bd., 2 Ba., 21 IS sq-"' l*on<* >" Sac. 27-lon>d lor horiM. 1920 garag* w/nulon* intercom in garag* S throughout homa t patio. Houa* Is wirad lor alarm aytttm. CorTY>ut*riztd thcrmoatat. Vtry unique home w/many axiret Milr. hat jcl tub. Call Jim or Sally tS4-3]3]. H402at^ 1000S MB. KIDMOINTAIN REALTY MOTIVATED SELLER 3BR/I-3/4 BA Well maintained & upgraded home on quiet street. 3 car garage. SI 54.900 (7021 294-1500 REAL ESTATE HOMEOWNERS: 100% LTV Debit consolidation and home improvement loans. No Appraisal. No Equity. Call AI 566-5615. Ul DMOt M \l\ REALTY BARELY LIVED IN! 3BR/3.5BA Beaulifil cuslom home with Lake Mead view. Bonus room. $225,000 (7021 294-1500 REAL ESTATE INVESTORS: 10% DOWN-Also 90% cash out refinance 1st and 2nds. Call AI 566-5615. ThePrudential/ Jensen's Realty Flxar-uppar, carport is naw, carpal ft vinyl rsplacad within tha past yaar. 4 bd.. 1 1/3 ba., 1804 sq.n. 4th bdrm. Is notfInishad. $M,000.Taka a look and mafca an oflor-l 00 Cholla. Call Paggy Banadlct S64-3333. H34B72 i^ S277 BC LEWIS HOME 3 bd., 1 3/4 ba., remodeled kitchen w/new appliances, new flooring, carpet & interior paint, new central A/C & heating, 2 car garage plus 12x32workshop, large backyard & patio, RV parking, large shade trees, 1 yr. old roof $139,000. Call 294-4129. RE10176 RID MOl M \IN REALTY CUSTOM TRILEVEL! 4BR/3BA Oversized 2 car garage w/R.V. parking, 2 living rooms. $295,000 (702) 294-1500 BC GOLF COURSE4 bedrooms + bonus room, 3 baths, 3 car garage. Pool and spa. Just reduced to $335,000. Call Joan Curran, B.C., ADOBE REALTY. 293-1707. TliePrudential Jensen's Realty Groan Valley Lagacy Villaga, ownar linancing, S bd., 2 1/2 ba., 2.Da SF. walk to Lagacy GotI Courss a Rastaurant, community pools, spa, play pool, Jogging trail, picnic grounda. alllor SI G9,9g. Ask lor Slavs P. at 564-3333 or 361-S003. H37787 „^ UIDMOIM Al\ REALTY COMMERCUL Lot in downtown BC. Whole lot is buildable because city provides parking. S78.000 (702, 294-1500 ********************** Boulder City & Henderson Retail office space 850 sq. ft., terms negotiable Call B.C. Adobe Realty 293-1707 ********************** WHY RENT, WHEN YOU CAN BUY FOR AS LITTLE AS $750.00 TOTAL You and your family CAN realize the AMERICAN DREAM of home ownership. THE MORTGAGE SHOPPE in association with THE CITY OF HENDERSON have programs availalbe to purchase a home for at little as $750.00 total to BUYII Certain restrictions apply. Call: AL ARROYO, MANAGER THE MORTGAGE$HOPPE 26-A Water St. Henderson =sttsi OFFICE: 566-5615 PGR: 389-2666 ThePrudential (j^ Jensen's Realty ^^' Realty Magnlflcant Vlaw In Ranch Estalaa Araa-1/2 acras. Unlqua homa 2/4 b(WhtanrdiMr. { • Eacapc to 10 Acra 11/2 nOci &,orKMUTavflle si the btie of the nKMiotaina backs to BLM land, in the tTMO, Muoul itrtaa. A ran Bad ot $47,000 • Brtoa Head OMMO, GrMt GUw11 Bcdntoa EvonrMM Ccado. Excellent Condmon Furaiiure todwfed. Wood BumlogFlit place. lteduoedTo.$S8,S00. • • w i c oa HUi SabdtTWoa Lot: BMitlfU Mountain Viewi from Comer Lot Ideal to buUd • walk-oul bMameaLLotsixe 103'xl0O'Oitt Family Am, tUJM. •Nnr Uritaf-S BlRM Mefc HH doH to SUU with finoedyttdud shed. Youn for $92,500, Flrni. •GnathTMtatMl 2 9lW7BfMTi1pkx3.2,ud 1 bedroom ipoitmenu, Hlfh tmt$i Demand, or ltd BrMUhft. on 100 West Over 2900 Sq. pL $173JOO. • It Acm h TwM far only $10/X)0, Wjldemew W eit Cal Now to Scfl or Bay Cedar atjr or So. Utak RMd Estate. RMaraibor Yoiir Soathcn Utah, S^NtvdaCoiwcttoB^JaitMktMrMaav \iilll loj ( il:ii ( il\ Kt.ij I s|;il( Call MANNY 2940870 or 800-819-2771 ERA Realty Center CALLCOLDWELLBANKER COLDWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY m 501 Nevada Hwy., Boulder City ^1 293-5757 FREE! LIST OF ALL HOMES FOR SALE IN B.C. HOMES BEST BUY IN B.C. Needs some TLC but the price is right! $86,900. for this 3 bdrm., 1 bath, fenced yd. LAKE MEAD VIEW 3 bdrm., 3-1/2 ba., den, fam. rm., custom window & carpeting. Reduced to $399,000. LARGE 3 BDRM., 2 ba., 2 car garage plus heated/cooled hobby rm., covered patio, freshly painted. $175,000. AWESOME PRICE for this 4 bdrm., 3 ba. home with family rnt formal dining, 3 car garage, pool & lake view. $410,000. HISTORICAL AREA new 3 bdrm., 2-1/2 ba., plus 4 car garage wHh bedrm. & 3/4 ba., lots of extras. Reduced $337,000! REDUCED to $269,500 for this custom tri-level, oversized garage, 4 bdrm., large lot & lake view. MANUFACTURED HOMES LAKE VIEW • large lot in cul-de-sac, lots of RV parking, 2 bdrm., 2 ba., storage sheds & more! $155,000. REDUCED Seller anxious, needs a little TLC and carpeting. Lake view possible from back of lot. $113,500. IMMACULATE 2 bd., 2 ba., 2 car carport, storage bkJg., lots of extras. Reduced to $112,500. FORMER MODEL 2 bdrm., 2 car garage, 10x20 covered patio, all appliances, desert landscaped. Reduced! $122,900. CORNER LOT w/lake view forever! 2 bdrm., oversized 2 car garaga & carport Island cooking, brkfst. bar, $225,000. MOBILES IN PARKS 14xS8, 1984 Progressivo 2 bd., 2 ba.. covered porch, dasart viaw, storage bidg., new carpet, vlnyL $25,000. 1992 SILVERCREST 2 bd., 2 ba., all appliances, brkfst. bar, carport, storage, great view. REDUCED $60,000. GINGERWOOD DOUBLE WIDE! • 2 bd., 2 ba., rtew carpet, window coverings, ceramic tile counters and floor in kitehan, also mat bath $45,000. COMMERaAL BLOG. 24,000 s.f., sprinklared, handicap rampa, parking for 61 cars. REDUCED TO $500,000111 CaH Katie to ^^ eieeo C Exquisite new custom 3789 sq. ft., 6 bdrm., 5 baths, pool size lot, 3 car detached garage, ton of amenities! Full tranquil view of Lake Mead! Make offer, owner may carry! 514k BC •CLOSE TO SCHOOLS' Only 8 years old. RV. boat parking, 2car gar., 3 bdrm. or 2/ Den. Single slory/Approx 1577, all appliances/main, free yard. BC. 168k. •YOU CAN AFFORD THIS!* Single story. 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 2 car garage, large rooms. Approx. 95x100 lot. BC 165k •CREAM PUFF' 24x58 approx. mobile home, 3 bd., 2 baths, huge sheds w/workshop. RV parking. 60 xlOO lot. in great shape, motivated seller. BC97K 'BETTER THAN NEW' House shows like a model, 3 bdrm. Approx. I668sq. ft. only 4 years old. lush landscaping, many upgrades, motivated seller! 127K Henderson. •GOLFER'S PARADISE* 4 Br. 2790sq. ft. IOOxl25k)t, hardwood floors, many upgrades, a show place & a pool to die for! $349,950 B.C. •HANDYMAN'S SPECIAL* 2 houses for one, 4 bdrm. 1015 sq. ft & a studio in back yard to rent out. Great investment! $93,900 Hendenon Thlnldng aboat boytag ar (dllnf? CaUtodijr • • Sandra Deubler 271-3277 REAL ESTATE BC SPACIOUS 1/2 Acre Estate, Panoramic Views $315K BRET 294-8482 Desert Sun RIty. RE9224 PVH Real Estate Hwy. 160 next to Terrible Herbst, 3 models to choose from $50 sq. tt. over 200 lots available, 1-702-727-0445. Rennodeled 4 bd.y2 ba., new roof, fam. rm., 1650 SF, ct. yard patio. 2934756 msg. RE9745 1 dm "EAGLE CREST AREA" 3bad.,1.7S bath, great family home, 1370 SF $113,500. Call RE/ MAX Eagle's View and aak for Oave 566-6700 EOKX) *44] $1000 DOWN And 12inoa. good credit ia all you rteed to purchaae a home. Call Mark, Coaat to Coaat Realty, for details. 796-1956 or 381-4560 ThePrudential ^^^^^^ Jenaen'i Realty "^S*"' BC Business owners need your building for expansion — have 4000 sq. ft. Ovepton rental duplex to exchange — Page me, Tom at 224-6183. ^ 82(12 H^ REAL ESTATE HEND. NEW LEWIS BED./2 BATH $124,900 BRET 294-8482 Desert Sun RIty. RE9550 House for sale, 3 bd., 1 ba., $79,999. Owner real estate license fee 5658296. RE9573 Lake View Estate! 5000' 4 bdrm., 4 ba., twosuites. W/jacuzzi, cost $500K to build! $395,000. 2932030. RE REAL ESTATE Largest WAREHOUSE/ OFFICE building available in BC. 11,000 sq. ft., exceptionally well built & maintained $780K T&fvl Group Realty. Call Wayne Blue 499-7223. REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BC VIEWS! Large Custom Home on Huge Lot ONLY $295K BRET 294-8482 Desert Sun RKy. RE9961 ThePrudential Jensen's Realty ^^S^'' C uMom Homt In Prttlglou Sc. 10 on Ig. cu)-eautlful tile floors $284,950 CLAREMONT HEIGHTS CUSTOM lias unbelievable view of valley A lake. Professionally decorated, very secluded, 2 bdrm., 3-1/2 ba $639,500 LAKE TERRACE TOWNHOME lias Unobstnjctable view of Lake Mead. 3 levels, 3 bdrm. -f den, 2-1/2 ba., 3 car garage, extra pking., overlooks pool..$415,000 STEP BACK Ta"BOULDER CITY" HISTORY on Blrcft Street. 2 bdrm. sitting nn., 2 full baths, 1400 sf. New paint, carpets. A/C $146,500 GORGEOUS WELL MAINTAINED HOME on extra large cul-de-sac lot. 4 bdrms., 2 ba., 2 car garage, R V pking., 12x16 workshop, yard fountain....$182,000 SUPER HOME IN SUPER NEIGHBORHOOD near scliools & sfiopplng. SIngielevel, 4 bdrm., 1 -3/4 ba., garage, pool/spa, open floor plan $174,500 THIS HOME HAS IT ALL...over 2400 sf, 2 levels for family privacy. 4 bdrm., 2-1/2 ba., 2 car garage, great rear yard, near schools $179,900 BETTER THAN NEW OVER 1700 sf near everything! New roof, new windows, new baths, new central: 4 txlrms., 2 full ba.....$124,500 SINGLE LEVEL "LEWIS" HOME on Irene Drive has pool. 4 bdnns., 1-3/4 ba., 2 car garage, RV pking., over 1800 sf $183,950 MANUFACTURED HOMES 591 LAKE SUPERIOR: 2 bdrm., 1 -3/4 ba., 2car garage, grealiake view $229,000 615 MT. WILUAMSON: 2 bdrm., 1 -3/4 ba., 1629 sf, 2 car garage, like new $189,000 607 MT. HUNTER: 2 bdrm., 1-3/4 ba.. 1664 sf. great condition $173,900 669 MT. BLACKBURN: 2 bdrm., 1-3/4 ba., 1850 sf. corner lot $135,000 These manufactured homes are located In the Senior Community of Lake Mountain Estatea, on Lake Mountain Drive, overlooking Lake Mead and surrounding mountains. Enjoy the low taxes of having your lot (6O'fXl0O') taxed separately from your Siivercresi Manufactured home. Call for details. 1291 BLACK MOUNTAIN COURT: 1536 sf home on HUGE Mountain Vista lot 3 bdrms., 1-3/4 ba., sep. family I LR. Room lor garagWpool/RVs A morel..$99,900 TOWNHOMFS:ONDQS SPANISH STEPS: Street level, 2 bdrm., 2 ba. highly upgraded with plush carpets, ceramic tile, custom fireplace, plantation shutters. Great price! $99,900 SPYGLASS: "Front line", 2 bdrm., 2-1/2 ba. units have unobstructed Laka View. We have 2 ctirrenlly • vailabl...aM tttam both $133,500 A $127,500 •60 DEL REY condo has 2 bdrms., 2 ba., 1 car garaga, sbeel level, nice..$89,900 SPANSH STEPS: Single level 2 bdrm., 2 ba. OWNER FINANCING OAeytanm $109,950 rimTQM HOUE BUILDIMGS LOTS We have 14 k>li Overlooking Laka Mead...Cali for k>calk>ns A details; from.$12ZOO0 CUSTOM LOT ON B-MLL.READY FOR YOUR NEW HOME...CALL TODAY $116,500 After houri call: PalBarnellan W4-9769 Rui Qllmora 294-1236 Mary Board 293-7JS4 Kay WmberUe 2M-0046 DMWWS Connar* 29J-47J7 StuLoara 293-3041 LInetta Oavia 299-1097 EHsn Lamb Strombarg, Brokar 2t3-6S0l CaH, write, or stop by for a fret list ofavdlahle properties REAL ESTATE INVESTORS DREAM, BOULDER CITY SPECIAL, over 1900 sq. fL 3 bedrooms, 2 bath, great terms, can own free and clear in 13 years, low payments, owner licensee. CALL PAT 3710825 or 381-0408. ThePrudential Jenien'i Realty Nice townhome in quiet clean townhouse community. Will be repainted, new carpet A vinyl. 2 bd., 1 1/2 ba., 1320 sq. ft Call Randy 564-3333. H37313, •111 m REAL ESTATE BC NICE 3 Bed/2 Batfi Man. Home with Huge CuldeSacLot.RVPrkng. $99,500BRET 294-8482 Desert Sun RIty. REAL ESTATE CALICO COVE 5 min to Lake Mead, 1 yr. old, 3 bd., 2 ba., Salltilo tile & many upgrades. $134,500. Call 565-6354. OUR CUSTOMERS ARE #1 "Serving the Hendmrton area wIVi pride einceiSaS" ^ FIRST-TIME HOMEBUYERS We have programs for you with low down. OUBLiSTIWCSSELL! Cal us and set ready to mova, "WE MAKE HOUSE CALLS" FRED & ELLIE KNAPP, REALTY EXECUTIVES 474-1560 REAL ESTATE 3 bd., 1-3/4 ba., 1,455 SF, RV parking, corner lot and circular drive. $157,000-293-2679. RE9674 ThePrudential Jensen's Realty MOBILE HOME In Sunrise Trailer Estates. 1400 sf, 2 bd, 2 ba, 60x100 lot This is in excallent condition. Call Corrine or Jim 564-3333. H33964 REAL ESTATE BOULDER CITY OWNER Super nk:e 3 bd., 2 ba., fam. rm., 2 car, pool, spa, many upgrades. Will consider offer under appr. $ 175,000. See 1516 Marita Dr., or call 294-7712. RE9631 REAL ESTATE CENTURY 21 JR REALTY PRESENTS A spectacular golf course property in Boulder City. Solar heated pool, spa, tileroof, 4bd.,3ba., only $343,500. Pis. call Jackson Meeker 564-5142 or page 253-3037. RE9986 BEST BUY IN HEMENWAY VALLEY A MUST SEE Beautiful custom home with lush, lush landscaping. 3 bdrni. + family room and den. $250.00. Call for details. BOULDER DAM REALTY, 293-4663. RE^KK 'tUm* (702) 565-970/ o^iu*. (702) 566-6700 ^mMUit^/' } i n'e i t t mt m t 6v4f 4 V mf tt /iie^ 'Re^ideHti Sine* f 95911 gtel (s^ OPEN HOUSE ^.lllllll.l^ 14 I'M ( .iiiMiii Ku.ui. I'tiiiihh I ( DESERT ^ SUIM REALTY Q v^CALL 24 HRS. RJLL-TIME L=J (7021 RJLUSERVICE SINCE 1979 293-2151 1000 NV Hy, #101, Boulder City TRANSFERRED: must sell, below market at $151,9501 Immaculate 4 bdrm., all the extras, see today, B.C. INVESTORS: good cash flow from officewhse. In B.C.; also rental property available, all with good history. LAKE MEAD VIEW: corner lot, townhome with garage, no stairs, $126,980, call now. IMMACULATE: newer Lewis home, 2-story, exclusively ours in B.C. at $198,650, 4-bdrm., 2-1/2 baths, extras. $119,450: well-maintained 2 or 3-bdrm. older, but better, home will delight you! Call now. SEARCHLIGHT: 20 acres, well-located, see Bob Boston. '"' '^'"' FOR ALL YOUR Real Estate needs...call us todayl ^ aaaaaBBaaaaaaaasBaa ^ HOME FOR THE HOUDAYS buy now and decorate your home for Christmasliving rm. w/large picture window perfect for the Christmas tree or hand your stockings by the fireplace In the family rm.—large country kitchen for preparing the feast! Call today for more details. OASIS IN THE DESERT—Located In an area of all Custom Homes. This beauty offers 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, over 2300 SF, corner lot w/RV-boat prkg., lush landscaping & In-ground pool for all your family pleasures—There's more—CALL US TO SEE...ilstecl at $229,000. LIFE IS TOO SHORT—To waste your time dreaming atx>ut owning a "new" home. This one Is currently under construction. You can pick finishing touchesi Offers 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, over 2000 SF, 3 car garage on 1/3 acre corner lot WOW! listed at only $185,9001 FIVE BEDROOM TRI-LEVEL JUST REDUCED! 3 full baths, oversized 3 car garage, large Island kitchen, & tiled counters. Cathedral celling and open planning lend an air of cool elegance. Upgrades galore in this newer home! Reduced to $155,0001 Won't last long at this price, call for even more Information! HARD TO FIND SO MUCH FOR SUCH A PRICE OF $75,900. Alley access 3 bedroom, 2 bath plus a family rm. Walking dIstarKe from downtown. Great for a beginning family with a blossoming future! CONGRATULATIONS TO PATTY DIEHL TOP PRODUCER FOR OCTOBER & GRACE CARROLL TOP USTING AGENT FOR OCTOBER! guomsivti IW 1994 ^*> 101 E. Horizon, Hendereon "^i^f^*^^ 564-5142 • mf^ iraikaiitoraMMyJI SnJ EMM Ctoqmikia Fabiiloiu New Mead View Eitatcs CiMtom 4 bcdroon 3 btth, Open Floor Flan 2S004sq. It 3 FIrepUccs, GOIMOUS Master Suite. Freach Woodca Doors. Coracr of Stoaa Ouyoa Rd ft VUla Grande Way JkavUAd TUe Work. Rcdaced to $425,0M. New Tucan Trails BeautlAiI Light and Airy Home In Boulder City. Better than New Just 6 months old. 3 Bedroom 2 baU^ 3 car garage, Fully hndscapedPhia apgrades throudMut, Tile root $lfOJM BANKGRc::] Call MANNY ANCHOR REALTY 294-0870 EACH omcS MDmNDDrTLY OWNED AND unaUTED V. J DICK BLAIR REALTY 833 NEVADA HWY., BOULDER CITY (702) 293-2171 ^ MLS Prtly Gu(rty-Spr W-6OTS *""*" ""^'^ ^^'^^ B..b Bl.ir, Br.Arr W.V2049 Andre* AndrrMHi. 29i-322 < Cindy Bandy 294-2*19 Rhonda Slrdnc 29.1-7975 Nancy Murphy 29JI-3292 Rich Mnynlhan 29.1-1X02 Kirhard Guy 29.4-4915 Serving Boulder City Since 1968 HOMES Popular Lewis Home floor plan, UPGRADED T/O CUSTOM KIT., 3 bdrms., 1-3/4 baths, Den, Fam. rm., Garage, Covered Patio, Pool, Spa, 2 Tuff sheds, 2,035 sq. ft, SUPER SHARP! $189,000. FANTASTIC FAMILY HOME! Beautiful Pebble Beach model, in Golf Course Ests. 3,000 sq. ft, 4 bedrms., 3 baths, fam. rm. 'f game rm., 3 car gar. RV PARKG., A many more amenities. Offered at $340,000. DEL PRADO—ONE OWNER HOME, 3 bedrms., plus DEN, 2 baths, 2 car gar., TILE ROOF, desert landscaping PD TO $184,500. CUSTOM HOME ADJACENT TO B C GOLF COURSE. Large great room w/ custom P.P., Huge Kitchen, 2 bedrms., 2-1/2 baths, 16 x 22 Bonus rm., RV PARKG., $189,500. SPECTACULAR UNOBSTRUCTED VIEW OF LAKE MEAD, CUSTOM 3 bedroom, 3 bath, 3 car gar. NEW TILE ROOF, 3,200 sq. ft living space $400,000. FLAMINGO Mobile home, in GINGERWOOD PARK. 2 bedrms., 1 1/2 baths, 2 additions, MANY AMENITIES $29,900. BRING YOUR TOOTH BRUSH!! TOTALLY FURNISHED, (Dislies, pots & pans, appliances, etc.) 24'x60' 3 bedrms., 2 baths, IN GINGERWOOD!! Yours for $42,500. ELDORAIX) MOBILE HOME PARK: SUPER SHARP!! 1970 Champion, 2 bedrms., 1 bath, awnings, stg. shed, PARTIALLY FURNISHED—MUST SEEPRICED TO SELL"$19,900. DON'T MISSTHiSONE!!!!Pricereduced to $17,000inciudes some furniture. 2 bedroom, 1 bath in Gingerwood. 14x60. Checit it out 1977 CHAMPION-12x56' SUPER SHARP!! 2 bedrms. 2 baths, NEW DRAPES, CARPET & DRYWALL Must see to appreciate & FURNISHED TOO. Now only $16,900. BEAUTIFULLAKEVIEW-CUSTOM 3 bedrm.,2baths, Nice 1969 SPARTAN2ax^Wi M&MMOBILE HOME 2 car gar. Low maint iandskpg.. Open floor plan PARK. 2 bedrmi,/fWkj|ln.ARGE 17'x20' work$325,000. shop/laundry n lwJb e fenced yard, $25,500. 2 bedrms. BONUS ROOM, 1-3/4 baths, 2 car gar. MAKES THIS DOLL HOUSE A GREAT BUY IN B.C.! $115,000. AUGUSTA MODEL LEWIS HOME-TOTALLY UPGRADED 3,468 sq. ft., 3 bdrms., 4 1/2 baths, office, family rm. plus Ig. den/TV room. Handicap adapted. ON GOLF COURSE-GREAT VIEW. Pool & Spa, 3 car garage. TERRIFIC HOUSE for $389,900. CUTE HOME-NICE STREET. Well built block home, 1057 sq. ft, 3 bdrm., 1 bath, screen rm., 2 car gar., nice yard. $118,750. CAPE CODE CHARMER on corner lot close to schools/town. Over 2350 sq. ft, 5 bdrms., 4 baths, Ig. mstr. bdrm. w/dressing room. 2 car gar. $236,500. CUSTOM HOME WITH LOTS OF POTENTIAL 1713 sq. ft, 2 bdrms., 2 1/2 baths, den, large kitchen w/ island sink. Lois of features like 3 fireplaces. 2 car garage, Ig. patio. $149,500. CONDOMINIUMS & TOWNHOMES BUY INSTEAD OF RENT • STI^ right condo., 2 bedrms., 2 baths, FweglAMi PAINT, CARPET. All appliances inclfeli%54.500. 1,660 sq. ft, 2 bedrms., 2 1/2 baths, PLUS BONUS ROOM. Bright & Clean ready to move into. Lake area, Pool & Spa $139,000. Convenient & comfortable living in this 2 bedrm., 1 3/4 bath Condo, in GREAT LOCATION! Offered for $99,900. IN HENDERSON—rired of renting A looking for a DEAL? This immaculate CONDO is PRICED FOR QUICK SALE! 1 bedrm., 1 1/2 bath. $49,900. MODULAR HOMES WITH LAND LOOKING FOR PEACE & QUIET? Come see this nice 24'x40' SONORA, 2 bedrms., 2 baths, cov. carport & patio, shows very well PRICED FOR QUICK SALE at $29,500. M&M MOBILE HOME PARK-1 bedrm., 1 bath, 1969 FASHION MANOR. Close to shopping, etc. $16,250. LAND UKE MEAD VIEW ESTATES-Lake and mountain views from this 1/2 acre lot READY TO BUILD ON SEE IT TODAY!! $285,000. .• • • ) • • • IN HENDERSON CUSTOM HOME AREA. Over 1/2 acre Views of LV VALLEY & LIGHTS, SUNRISE MTN. 4 MORE. $65,000. ; 15 acres in ELDORADO VALLEY. Zoned Light Manufacturing $600,000. COMMERCIAL PROPERTY GREAT BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY! Gas sUtion & food mart Own land & business. Inventory separate $685,000. CALL FOR APPT. COMMERCIAL INCOME PROPERTY HIGHWAY FRONTAGE-GREAT LOCATION, LOTS OF POTENTIAL. CALL FOR APPT. $485,000. EXCELLENT BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY-Established since 19S0-GIFT SHOP w/pkg. liquor. Great highway location. PRICE OF $355,000 INCLUDES BLDG. & LAND -Business and BIdg. can be bought separately. CALL FOR MORE INFO. RENTALS BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM EXECUTIVE HOME In prestigeous area—3,400 sq. ft., 4 bedrms., 2 full baths A 2-1/2 baths, 2 car detached gar., view of city & mtns., AvaiL NOW. $1,495. DRASTIC PRICE LAKE MOUNTAI on this HOME. t>eautilui LAKE & NEW WATERS EDGE—3 bed., TRAS. $1,295. 3 ba. MANY EXMOUNTAIN VIEWS now $149,999. MTN. VISTA ESTATES Cor. lot, low maintenance, 2 bedrms., 2 baths, cov. carport GREAT CONDITION! $95,500. Nice corner lol in MTN. VISTA ESTATES, 2 bedrm., 2 baths, 24'x60' low maintenance, extra parkg. $95,500. MOBILE HOMES IN PARKS BRAND NEW SPANISH STEPS with great view of valley. 2 bdrm., 2 bath, fp., AVAIL NOW, $750. ALL NEW PAINT THROUGHOUT this Boulder Hills condo. 2 bedrms., 1-1/2 baths, all appl. 2 carports, comm. pool. AVAIL. NOW. Prefer Mature single or couple. $625. SEE IT TODAY! EASY LIVING AT SPANISH STEPS! 2 bedrm., 2 bath, ail appliances. UKE NEW AVAIL NOW $750. MPW I usTiMftii ri PAN 9 h..
PAGE 43

f?!S5;,'.rJJ4.!-J!?i4i,J • JHI H i]! mmmm Page B22 Henderson Home News. Boulder City News Thursday, November 16, 1995 Thursday, November 16,1995 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Page B23 REAL ESTATE PVH Real Estate Hwy. 160, next to Terrible Herbst, 3 models to choose from, $50 sq, ft., over 200 lots available. 1-702-727-0445. WANT TO? Buy or Sell? Call Your Local Real Estate Agent for all your real estate needs. SANDRA MQSSER Century 21 Henderson Realty Pager 693-0391 ThePrudential Jensen's Realty J Bd., 2 1/2 Ba.. 2401 K). ft. MotI popular modal In SiMptochtM-wlll look tMtttr than nw whan tha naw caipal la Inalallad intwior la fraahly paintad. Landacaplng baing pro-Uaalonally ranovatad. Can Don, Randy or Patty SS4-3333. HMOM 10011 19 ft Ul I) MOl M \l\ REALTY TERRIFIC FLOORPLAN Home completely redone 10 months ago! All new kitchen. $166300 (702) 294-1500 ThePrudential Jensen's Realty ^^^^ 5 BD, 3-1/2 BA, 6400 so. FT. HOME. Cradlad In on* of th* most spectacular salting* w/ unobttructad viaw of Laka Maad A Mtni. Has 40x50 •ntartalnmantroom w/wat bar. Call Luk* 293-3355. KID MOl MAIN REALTY HOUSE+I RENTAL 4+BR house/2BR/2BA rental. Very low maintenance. Old (own EC. $164,000 021 294-1500 ThePrudential Jensen's Realty '^'•Sir 3 Bdrm., 2 Ba. homa, 1572 sq. It. Has naw rool A carpaling. Covarad patio, IronI S back, aaparata living room t lamlly room, addHk>nal 20* aq. tt. bomb ahaHar/baaamanl. SS7,500. Cal Dan or liana 564-3333. H3IW1S „^ KIDMOI MAIN REALTY VIEWS GALORE Beautiful custom home w/skylights, itrium & dual pane windows. $299,000 294-1500 ThePrudential Jensen's Realty 4S7S Joplln Cr., LV ONLY $132,500 Lot 446X19<.2t1( sq. ft living araa, 3 BO, 2.S Ba. Working araa 2>22, Storaga 10x50, RV/Boat up to 40', Too many Opa. to list. In a rush 24 Hrs. 795-5453 or 5(4-3333. Ask lor Manual. H37370 ma M BC CUSTOM. 3 BR/2 BA NICEI Rock Firaplaca Hand-mado wood cabinsis 2-car garaga, fully landscapad, larg* id 70'x120', Block snclosad. $160,000. 293-5520 by appL 6774 ThePrudential (j^ Jensen's Realty ""^ Comfortabla, wall kapt Ranch-Typo homa, zonad for horMS,3Bd.,2Ba.,2330 aq. n.. Built-in BBQ, fully fancad, Ig. bdrms., imprasslva rock llraplaca. Call Sally 564-3333. H345S5 H273 FORMERMODEL! 4BR/2BA Home in laktvlew art*. Many extras, large backyard. 2 car gar. S269,000 294-1500 $$ CASH NOW$$ Priv. investor, 35 yrs. buying houses in Vegas. Looking for houses, all areas. Behind in pymts., in default, just want out? Call 655-8924 for cash. •> REAL ESTATE CALICO TRAILS 3 BDRM. + study, pool & courtyard. Rolling shutters throughout for heat control & security. Magnificent home ready for occupancy. Owner may carry $50K for 3 years. Asking $183K. Edna Siedsma, Liberty Realty 566-9521. RE10017 NO MONEY DOWN New program. If you are working or retired you may qualify to purchase a home with no money down. Call me today to findout howGeorge371 5375. RE9938' Ul I) MOl M \IN REALTY EXCELLENT VIEW! 3BR/4BA Home overlooks Lake Mead. Bonus room, den. Great Buy! $219,900 294-1500 ThePrudential / Jensen's Realty 4 Bd., 2 Ba., 21 IS sq-"' l*on<* >" Sac. 27-lon>d lor horiM. 1920 garag* w/nulon* intercom in garag* S throughout homa t patio. Houa* Is wirad lor alarm aytttm. CorTY>ut*riztd thcrmoatat. Vtry unique home w/many axiret Milr. hat jcl tub. Call Jim or Sally tS4-3]3]. H402at^ 1000S MB. KIDMOINTAIN REALTY MOTIVATED SELLER 3BR/I-3/4 BA Well maintained & upgraded home on quiet street. 3 car garage. SI 54.900 (7021 294-1500 REAL ESTATE HOMEOWNERS: 100% LTV Debit consolidation and home improvement loans. No Appraisal. No Equity. Call AI 566-5615. Ul DMOt M \l\ REALTY BARELY LIVED IN! 3BR/3.5BA Beaulifil cuslom home with Lake Mead view. Bonus room. $225,000 (7021 294-1500 REAL ESTATE INVESTORS: 10% DOWN-Also 90% cash out refinance 1st and 2nds. Call AI 566-5615. ThePrudential/ Jensen's Realty Flxar-uppar, carport is naw, carpal ft vinyl rsplacad within tha past yaar. 4 bd.. 1 1/3 ba., 1804 sq.n. 4th bdrm. Is notfInishad. $M,000.Taka a look and mafca an oflor-l 00 Cholla. Call Paggy Banadlct S64-3333. H34B72 i^ S277 BC LEWIS HOME 3 bd., 1 3/4 ba., remodeled kitchen w/new appliances, new flooring, carpet & interior paint, new central A/C & heating, 2 car garage plus 12x32workshop, large backyard & patio, RV parking, large shade trees, 1 yr. old roof $139,000. Call 294-4129. RE10176 RID MOl M \IN REALTY CUSTOM TRILEVEL! 4BR/3BA Oversized 2 car garage w/R.V. parking, 2 living rooms. $295,000 (702) 294-1500 BC GOLF COURSE4 bedrooms + bonus room, 3 baths, 3 car garage. Pool and spa. Just reduced to $335,000. Call Joan Curran, B.C., ADOBE REALTY. 293-1707. TliePrudential Jensen's Realty Groan Valley Lagacy Villaga, ownar linancing, S bd., 2 1/2 ba., 2.Da SF. walk to Lagacy GotI Courss a Rastaurant, community pools, spa, play pool, Jogging trail, picnic grounda. alllor SI G9,9g. Ask lor Slavs P. at 564-3333 or 361-S003. H37787 „^ UIDMOIM Al\ REALTY COMMERCUL Lot in downtown BC. Whole lot is buildable because city provides parking. S78.000 (702, 294-1500 ********************** Boulder City & Henderson Retail office space 850 sq. ft., terms negotiable Call B.C. Adobe Realty 293-1707 ********************** WHY RENT, WHEN YOU CAN BUY FOR AS LITTLE AS $750.00 TOTAL You and your family CAN realize the AMERICAN DREAM of home ownership. THE MORTGAGE SHOPPE in association with THE CITY OF HENDERSON have programs availalbe to purchase a home for at little as $750.00 total to BUYII Certain restrictions apply. Call: AL ARROYO, MANAGER THE MORTGAGE$HOPPE 26-A Water St. Henderson =sttsi OFFICE: 566-5615 PGR: 389-2666 ThePrudential (j^ Jensen's Realty ^^' Realty Magnlflcant Vlaw In Ranch Estalaa Araa-1/2 acras. Unlqua homa 2/4 b(WhtanrdiMr. { • Eacapc to 10 Acra 11/2 nOci &,orKMUTavflle si the btie of the nKMiotaina backs to BLM land, in the tTMO, Muoul itrtaa. A ran Bad ot $47,000 • Brtoa Head OMMO, GrMt GUw11 Bcdntoa EvonrMM Ccado. Excellent Condmon Furaiiure todwfed. Wood BumlogFlit place. lteduoedTo.$S8,S00. • • w i c oa HUi SabdtTWoa Lot: BMitlfU Mountain Viewi from Comer Lot Ideal to buUd • walk-oul bMameaLLotsixe 103'xl0O'Oitt Family Am, tUJM. •Nnr Uritaf-S BlRM Mefc HH doH to SUU with finoedyttdud shed. Youn for $92,500, Flrni. •GnathTMtatMl 2 9lW7BfMTi1pkx3.2,ud 1 bedroom ipoitmenu, Hlfh tmt$i Demand, or ltd BrMUhft. on 100 West Over 2900 Sq. pL $173JOO. • It Acm h TwM far only $10/X)0, Wjldemew W eit Cal Now to Scfl or Bay Cedar atjr or So. Utak RMd Estate. RMaraibor Yoiir Soathcn Utah, S^NtvdaCoiwcttoB^JaitMktMrMaav \iilll loj ( il:ii ( il\ Kt.ij I s|;il( Call MANNY 2940870 or 800-819-2771 ERA Realty Center CALLCOLDWELLBANKER COLDWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY m 501 Nevada Hwy., Boulder City ^1 293-5757 FREE! LIST OF ALL HOMES FOR SALE IN B.C. HOMES BEST BUY IN B.C. Needs some TLC but the price is right! $86,900. for this 3 bdrm., 1 bath, fenced yd. LAKE MEAD VIEW 3 bdrm., 3-1/2 ba., den, fam. rm., custom window & carpeting. Reduced to $399,000. LARGE 3 BDRM., 2 ba., 2 car garage plus heated/cooled hobby rm., covered patio, freshly painted. $175,000. AWESOME PRICE for this 4 bdrm., 3 ba. home with family rnt formal dining, 3 car garage, pool & lake view. $410,000. HISTORICAL AREA new 3 bdrm., 2-1/2 ba., plus 4 car garage wHh bedrm. & 3/4 ba., lots of extras. Reduced $337,000! REDUCED to $269,500 for this custom tri-level, oversized garage, 4 bdrm., large lot & lake view. MANUFACTURED HOMES LAKE VIEW • large lot in cul-de-sac, lots of RV parking, 2 bdrm., 2 ba., storage sheds & more! $155,000. REDUCED Seller anxious, needs a little TLC and carpeting. Lake view possible from back of lot. $113,500. IMMACULATE 2 bd., 2 ba., 2 car carport, storage bkJg., lots of extras. Reduced to $112,500. FORMER MODEL 2 bdrm., 2 car garage, 10x20 covered patio, all appliances, desert landscaped. Reduced! $122,900. CORNER LOT w/lake view forever! 2 bdrm., oversized 2 car garaga & carport Island cooking, brkfst. bar, $225,000. MOBILES IN PARKS 14xS8, 1984 Progressivo 2 bd., 2 ba.. covered porch, dasart viaw, storage bidg., new carpet, vlnyL $25,000. 1992 SILVERCREST 2 bd., 2 ba., all appliances, brkfst. bar, carport, storage, great view. REDUCED $60,000. GINGERWOOD DOUBLE WIDE! • 2 bd., 2 ba., rtew carpet, window coverings, ceramic tile counters and floor in kitehan, also mat bath $45,000. COMMERaAL BLOG. 24,000 s.f., sprinklared, handicap rampa, parking for 61 cars. REDUCED TO $500,000111 CaH Katie to ^^ eieeo C Exquisite new custom 3789 sq. ft., 6 bdrm., 5 baths, pool size lot, 3 car detached garage, ton of amenities! Full tranquil view of Lake Mead! Make offer, owner may carry! 514k BC •CLOSE TO SCHOOLS' Only 8 years old. RV. boat parking, 2car gar., 3 bdrm. or 2/ Den. Single slory/Approx 1577, all appliances/main, free yard. BC. 168k. •YOU CAN AFFORD THIS!* Single story. 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 2 car garage, large rooms. Approx. 95x100 lot. BC 165k •CREAM PUFF' 24x58 approx. mobile home, 3 bd., 2 baths, huge sheds w/workshop. RV parking. 60 xlOO lot. in great shape, motivated seller. BC97K 'BETTER THAN NEW' House shows like a model, 3 bdrm. Approx. I668sq. ft. only 4 years old. lush landscaping, many upgrades, motivated seller! 127K Henderson. •GOLFER'S PARADISE* 4 Br. 2790sq. ft. IOOxl25k)t, hardwood floors, many upgrades, a show place & a pool to die for! $349,950 B.C. •HANDYMAN'S SPECIAL* 2 houses for one, 4 bdrm. 1015 sq. ft & a studio in back yard to rent out. Great investment! $93,900 Hendenon Thlnldng aboat boytag ar (dllnf? CaUtodijr • • Sandra Deubler 271-3277 REAL ESTATE BC SPACIOUS 1/2 Acre Estate, Panoramic Views $315K BRET 294-8482 Desert Sun RIty. RE9224 PVH Real Estate Hwy. 160 next to Terrible Herbst, 3 models to choose from $50 sq. tt. over 200 lots available, 1-702-727-0445. Rennodeled 4 bd.y2 ba., new roof, fam. rm., 1650 SF, ct. yard patio. 2934756 msg. RE9745 1 dm "EAGLE CREST AREA" 3bad.,1.7S bath, great family home, 1370 SF $113,500. Call RE/ MAX Eagle's View and aak for Oave 566-6700 EOKX) *44] $1000 DOWN And 12inoa. good credit ia all you rteed to purchaae a home. Call Mark, Coaat to Coaat Realty, for details. 796-1956 or 381-4560 ThePrudential ^^^^^^ Jenaen'i Realty "^S*"' BC Business owners need your building for expansion — have 4000 sq. ft. Ovepton rental duplex to exchange — Page me, Tom at 224-6183. ^ 82(12 H^ REAL ESTATE HEND. NEW LEWIS BED./2 BATH $124,900 BRET 294-8482 Desert Sun RIty. RE9550 House for sale, 3 bd., 1 ba., $79,999. Owner real estate license fee 5658296. RE9573 Lake View Estate! 5000' 4 bdrm., 4 ba., twosuites. W/jacuzzi, cost $500K to build! $395,000. 2932030. RE REAL ESTATE Largest WAREHOUSE/ OFFICE building available in BC. 11,000 sq. ft., exceptionally well built & maintained $780K T&fvl Group Realty. Call Wayne Blue 499-7223. REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BC VIEWS! Large Custom Home on Huge Lot ONLY $295K BRET 294-8482 Desert Sun RKy. RE9961 ThePrudential Jensen's Realty ^^S^'' C uMom Homt In Prttlglou Sc. 10 on Ig. cu)-eautlful tile floors $284,950 CLAREMONT HEIGHTS CUSTOM lias unbelievable view of valley A lake. Professionally decorated, very secluded, 2 bdrm., 3-1/2 ba $639,500 LAKE TERRACE TOWNHOME lias Unobstnjctable view of Lake Mead. 3 levels, 3 bdrm. -f den, 2-1/2 ba., 3 car garage, extra pking., overlooks pool..$415,000 STEP BACK Ta"BOULDER CITY" HISTORY on Blrcft Street. 2 bdrm. sitting nn., 2 full baths, 1400 sf. New paint, carpets. A/C $146,500 GORGEOUS WELL MAINTAINED HOME on extra large cul-de-sac lot. 4 bdrms., 2 ba., 2 car garage, R V pking., 12x16 workshop, yard fountain....$182,000 SUPER HOME IN SUPER NEIGHBORHOOD near scliools & sfiopplng. SIngielevel, 4 bdrm., 1 -3/4 ba., garage, pool/spa, open floor plan $174,500 THIS HOME HAS IT ALL...over 2400 sf, 2 levels for family privacy. 4 bdrm., 2-1/2 ba., 2 car garage, great rear yard, near schools $179,900 BETTER THAN NEW OVER 1700 sf near everything! New roof, new windows, new baths, new central: 4 txlrms., 2 full ba.....$124,500 SINGLE LEVEL "LEWIS" HOME on Irene Drive has pool. 4 bdnns., 1-3/4 ba., 2 car garage, RV pking., over 1800 sf $183,950 MANUFACTURED HOMES 591 LAKE SUPERIOR: 2 bdrm., 1 -3/4 ba., 2car garage, grealiake view $229,000 615 MT. WILUAMSON: 2 bdrm., 1 -3/4 ba., 1629 sf, 2 car garage, like new $189,000 607 MT. HUNTER: 2 bdrm., 1-3/4 ba.. 1664 sf. great condition $173,900 669 MT. BLACKBURN: 2 bdrm., 1-3/4 ba., 1850 sf. corner lot $135,000 These manufactured homes are located In the Senior Community of Lake Mountain Estatea, on Lake Mountain Drive, overlooking Lake Mead and surrounding mountains. Enjoy the low taxes of having your lot (6O'fXl0O') taxed separately from your Siivercresi Manufactured home. Call for details. 1291 BLACK MOUNTAIN COURT: 1536 sf home on HUGE Mountain Vista lot 3 bdrms., 1-3/4 ba., sep. family I LR. Room lor garagWpool/RVs A morel..$99,900 TOWNHOMFS:ONDQS SPANISH STEPS: Street level, 2 bdrm., 2 ba. highly upgraded with plush carpets, ceramic tile, custom fireplace, plantation shutters. Great price! $99,900 SPYGLASS: "Front line", 2 bdrm., 2-1/2 ba. units have unobstructed Laka View. We have 2 ctirrenlly • vailabl...aM tttam both $133,500 A $127,500 •60 DEL REY condo has 2 bdrms., 2 ba., 1 car garaga, sbeel level, nice..$89,900 SPANSH STEPS: Single level 2 bdrm., 2 ba. OWNER FINANCING OAeytanm $109,950 rimTQM HOUE BUILDIMGS LOTS We have 14 k>li Overlooking Laka Mead...Cali for k>calk>ns A details; from.$12ZOO0 CUSTOM LOT ON B-MLL.READY FOR YOUR NEW HOME...CALL TODAY $116,500 After houri call: PalBarnellan W4-9769 Rui Qllmora 294-1236 Mary Board 293-7JS4 Kay WmberUe 2M-0046 DMWWS Connar* 29J-47J7 StuLoara 293-3041 LInetta Oavia 299-1097 EHsn Lamb Strombarg, Brokar 2t3-6S0l CaH, write, or stop by for a fret list ofavdlahle properties REAL ESTATE INVESTORS DREAM, BOULDER CITY SPECIAL, over 1900 sq. fL 3 bedrooms, 2 bath, great terms, can own free and clear in 13 years, low payments, owner licensee. CALL PAT 3710825 or 381-0408. ThePrudential Jenien'i Realty Nice townhome in quiet clean townhouse community. Will be repainted, new carpet A vinyl. 2 bd., 1 1/2 ba., 1320 sq. ft Call Randy 564-3333. H37313, •111 m REAL ESTATE BC NICE 3 Bed/2 Batfi Man. Home with Huge CuldeSacLot.RVPrkng. $99,500BRET 294-8482 Desert Sun RIty. REAL ESTATE CALICO COVE 5 min to Lake Mead, 1 yr. old, 3 bd., 2 ba., Salltilo tile & many upgrades. $134,500. Call 565-6354. OUR CUSTOMERS ARE #1 "Serving the Hendmrton area wIVi pride einceiSaS" ^ FIRST-TIME HOMEBUYERS We have programs for you with low down. OUBLiSTIWCSSELL! Cal us and set ready to mova, "WE MAKE HOUSE CALLS" FRED & ELLIE KNAPP, REALTY EXECUTIVES 474-1560 REAL ESTATE 3 bd., 1-3/4 ba., 1,455 SF, RV parking, corner lot and circular drive. $157,000-293-2679. RE9674 ThePrudential Jensen's Realty MOBILE HOME In Sunrise Trailer Estates. 1400 sf, 2 bd, 2 ba, 60x100 lot This is in excallent condition. Call Corrine or Jim 564-3333. H33964 REAL ESTATE BOULDER CITY OWNER Super nk:e 3 bd., 2 ba., fam. rm., 2 car, pool, spa, many upgrades. Will consider offer under appr. $ 175,000. See 1516 Marita Dr., or call 294-7712. RE9631 REAL ESTATE CENTURY 21 JR REALTY PRESENTS A spectacular golf course property in Boulder City. Solar heated pool, spa, tileroof, 4bd.,3ba., only $343,500. Pis. call Jackson Meeker 564-5142 or page 253-3037. RE9986 BEST BUY IN HEMENWAY VALLEY A MUST SEE Beautiful custom home with lush, lush landscaping. 3 bdrni. + family room and den. $250.00. Call for details. BOULDER DAM REALTY, 293-4663. RE^KK 'tUm* (702) 565-970/ o^iu*. (702) 566-6700 ^mMUit^/' } i n'e i t t mt m t 6v4f 4 V mf tt /iie^ 'Re^ideHti Sine* f 95911 gtel (s^ OPEN HOUSE ^.lllllll.l^ 14 I'M ( .iiiMiii Ku.ui. I'tiiiihh I ( DESERT ^ SUIM REALTY Q v^CALL 24 HRS. RJLL-TIME L=J (7021 RJLUSERVICE SINCE 1979 293-2151 1000 NV Hy, #101, Boulder City TRANSFERRED: must sell, below market at $151,9501 Immaculate 4 bdrm., all the extras, see today, B.C. INVESTORS: good cash flow from officewhse. In B.C.; also rental property available, all with good history. LAKE MEAD VIEW: corner lot, townhome with garage, no stairs, $126,980, call now. IMMACULATE: newer Lewis home, 2-story, exclusively ours in B.C. at $198,650, 4-bdrm., 2-1/2 baths, extras. $119,450: well-maintained 2 or 3-bdrm. older, but better, home will delight you! Call now. SEARCHLIGHT: 20 acres, well-located, see Bob Boston. '"' '^'"' FOR ALL YOUR Real Estate needs...call us todayl ^ aaaaaBBaaaaaaaasBaa ^ HOME FOR THE HOUDAYS buy now and decorate your home for Christmasliving rm. w/large picture window perfect for the Christmas tree or hand your stockings by the fireplace In the family rm.—large country kitchen for preparing the feast! Call today for more details. OASIS IN THE DESERT—Located In an area of all Custom Homes. This beauty offers 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, over 2300 SF, corner lot w/RV-boat prkg., lush landscaping & In-ground pool for all your family pleasures—There's more—CALL US TO SEE...ilstecl at $229,000. LIFE IS TOO SHORT—To waste your time dreaming atx>ut owning a "new" home. This one Is currently under construction. You can pick finishing touchesi Offers 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, over 2000 SF, 3 car garage on 1/3 acre corner lot WOW! listed at only $185,9001 FIVE BEDROOM TRI-LEVEL JUST REDUCED! 3 full baths, oversized 3 car garage, large Island kitchen, & tiled counters. Cathedral celling and open planning lend an air of cool elegance. Upgrades galore in this newer home! Reduced to $155,0001 Won't last long at this price, call for even more Information! HARD TO FIND SO MUCH FOR SUCH A PRICE OF $75,900. Alley access 3 bedroom, 2 bath plus a family rm. Walking dIstarKe from downtown. Great for a beginning family with a blossoming future! CONGRATULATIONS TO PATTY DIEHL TOP PRODUCER FOR OCTOBER & GRACE CARROLL TOP USTING AGENT FOR OCTOBER! guomsivti IW 1994 ^*> 101 E. Horizon, Hendereon "^i^f^*^^ 564-5142 • mf^ iraikaiitoraMMyJI SnJ EMM Ctoqmikia Fabiiloiu New Mead View Eitatcs CiMtom 4 bcdroon 3 btth, Open Floor Flan 2S004sq. It 3 FIrepUccs, GOIMOUS Master Suite. Freach Woodca Doors. Coracr of Stoaa Ouyoa Rd ft VUla Grande Way JkavUAd TUe Work. Rcdaced to $425,0M. New Tucan Trails BeautlAiI Light and Airy Home In Boulder City. Better than New Just 6 months old. 3 Bedroom 2 baU^ 3 car garage, Fully hndscapedPhia apgrades throudMut, Tile root $lfOJM BANKGRc::] Call MANNY ANCHOR REALTY 294-0870 EACH omcS MDmNDDrTLY OWNED AND unaUTED V. J DICK BLAIR REALTY 833 NEVADA HWY., BOULDER CITY (702) 293-2171 ^ MLS Prtly Gu(rty-Spr W-6OTS *""*" ""^'^ ^^'^^ B..b Bl.ir, Br.Arr W.V2049 Andre* AndrrMHi. 29i-322 < Cindy Bandy 294-2*19 Rhonda Slrdnc 29.1-7975 Nancy Murphy 29JI-3292 Rich Mnynlhan 29.1-1X02 Kirhard Guy 29.4-4915 Serving Boulder City Since 1968 HOMES Popular Lewis Home floor plan, UPGRADED T/O CUSTOM KIT., 3 bdrms., 1-3/4 baths, Den, Fam. rm., Garage, Covered Patio, Pool, Spa, 2 Tuff sheds, 2,035 sq. ft, SUPER SHARP! $189,000. FANTASTIC FAMILY HOME! Beautiful Pebble Beach model, in Golf Course Ests. 3,000 sq. ft, 4 bedrms., 3 baths, fam. rm. 'f game rm., 3 car gar. RV PARKG., A many more amenities. Offered at $340,000. DEL PRADO—ONE OWNER HOME, 3 bedrms., plus DEN, 2 baths, 2 car gar., TILE ROOF, desert landscaping PD TO $184,500. CUSTOM HOME ADJACENT TO B C GOLF COURSE. Large great room w/ custom P.P., Huge Kitchen, 2 bedrms., 2-1/2 baths, 16 x 22 Bonus rm., RV PARKG., $189,500. SPECTACULAR UNOBSTRUCTED VIEW OF LAKE MEAD, CUSTOM 3 bedroom, 3 bath, 3 car gar. NEW TILE ROOF, 3,200 sq. ft living space $400,000. FLAMINGO Mobile home, in GINGERWOOD PARK. 2 bedrms., 1 1/2 baths, 2 additions, MANY AMENITIES $29,900. BRING YOUR TOOTH BRUSH!! TOTALLY FURNISHED, (Dislies, pots & pans, appliances, etc.) 24'x60' 3 bedrms., 2 baths, IN GINGERWOOD!! Yours for $42,500. ELDORAIX) MOBILE HOME PARK: SUPER SHARP!! 1970 Champion, 2 bedrms., 1 bath, awnings, stg. shed, PARTIALLY FURNISHED—MUST SEEPRICED TO SELL"$19,900. DON'T MISSTHiSONE!!!!Pricereduced to $17,000inciudes some furniture. 2 bedroom, 1 bath in Gingerwood. 14x60. Checit it out 1977 CHAMPION-12x56' SUPER SHARP!! 2 bedrms. 2 baths, NEW DRAPES, CARPET & DRYWALL Must see to appreciate & FURNISHED TOO. Now only $16,900. BEAUTIFULLAKEVIEW-CUSTOM 3 bedrm.,2baths, Nice 1969 SPARTAN2ax^Wi M&MMOBILE HOME 2 car gar. Low maint iandskpg.. Open floor plan PARK. 2 bedrmi,/fWkj|ln.ARGE 17'x20' work$325,000. shop/laundry n lwJb e fenced yard, $25,500. 2 bedrms. BONUS ROOM, 1-3/4 baths, 2 car gar. MAKES THIS DOLL HOUSE A GREAT BUY IN B.C.! $115,000. AUGUSTA MODEL LEWIS HOME-TOTALLY UPGRADED 3,468 sq. ft., 3 bdrms., 4 1/2 baths, office, family rm. plus Ig. den/TV room. Handicap adapted. ON GOLF COURSE-GREAT VIEW. Pool & Spa, 3 car garage. TERRIFIC HOUSE for $389,900. CUTE HOME-NICE STREET. Well built block home, 1057 sq. ft, 3 bdrm., 1 bath, screen rm., 2 car gar., nice yard. $118,750. CAPE CODE CHARMER on corner lot close to schools/town. Over 2350 sq. ft, 5 bdrms., 4 baths, Ig. mstr. bdrm. w/dressing room. 2 car gar. $236,500. CUSTOM HOME WITH LOTS OF POTENTIAL 1713 sq. ft, 2 bdrms., 2 1/2 baths, den, large kitchen w/ island sink. Lois of features like 3 fireplaces. 2 car garage, Ig. patio. $149,500. CONDOMINIUMS & TOWNHOMES BUY INSTEAD OF RENT • STI^ right condo., 2 bedrms., 2 baths, FweglAMi PAINT, CARPET. All appliances inclfeli%54.500. 1,660 sq. ft, 2 bedrms., 2 1/2 baths, PLUS BONUS ROOM. Bright & Clean ready to move into. Lake area, Pool & Spa $139,000. Convenient & comfortable living in this 2 bedrm., 1 3/4 bath Condo, in GREAT LOCATION! Offered for $99,900. IN HENDERSON—rired of renting A looking for a DEAL? This immaculate CONDO is PRICED FOR QUICK SALE! 1 bedrm., 1 1/2 bath. $49,900. MODULAR HOMES WITH LAND LOOKING FOR PEACE & QUIET? Come see this nice 24'x40' SONORA, 2 bedrms., 2 baths, cov. carport & patio, shows very well PRICED FOR QUICK SALE at $29,500. M&M MOBILE HOME PARK-1 bedrm., 1 bath, 1969 FASHION MANOR. Close to shopping, etc. $16,250. LAND UKE MEAD VIEW ESTATES-Lake and mountain views from this 1/2 acre lot READY TO BUILD ON SEE IT TODAY!! $285,000. .• • • ) • • • IN HENDERSON CUSTOM HOME AREA. Over 1/2 acre Views of LV VALLEY & LIGHTS, SUNRISE MTN. 4 MORE. $65,000. ; 15 acres in ELDORADO VALLEY. Zoned Light Manufacturing $600,000. COMMERCIAL PROPERTY GREAT BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY! Gas sUtion & food mart Own land & business. Inventory separate $685,000. CALL FOR APPT. COMMERCIAL INCOME PROPERTY HIGHWAY FRONTAGE-GREAT LOCATION, LOTS OF POTENTIAL. CALL FOR APPT. $485,000. EXCELLENT BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY-Established since 19S0-GIFT SHOP w/pkg. liquor. Great highway location. PRICE OF $355,000 INCLUDES BLDG. & LAND -Business and BIdg. can be bought separately. CALL FOR MORE INFO. RENTALS BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM EXECUTIVE HOME In prestigeous area—3,400 sq. ft., 4 bedrms., 2 full baths A 2-1/2 baths, 2 car detached gar., view of city & mtns., AvaiL NOW. $1,495. DRASTIC PRICE LAKE MOUNTAI on this HOME. t>eautilui LAKE & NEW WATERS EDGE—3 bed., TRAS. $1,295. 3 ba. MANY EXMOUNTAIN VIEWS now $149,999. MTN. VISTA ESTATES Cor. lot, low maintenance, 2 bedrms., 2 baths, cov. carport GREAT CONDITION! $95,500. Nice corner lol in MTN. VISTA ESTATES, 2 bedrm., 2 baths, 24'x60' low maintenance, extra parkg. $95,500. MOBILE HOMES IN PARKS BRAND NEW SPANISH STEPS with great view of valley. 2 bdrm., 2 bath, fp., AVAIL NOW, $750. ALL NEW PAINT THROUGHOUT this Boulder Hills condo. 2 bedrms., 1-1/2 baths, all appl. 2 carports, comm. pool. AVAIL. NOW. Prefer Mature single or couple. $625. SEE IT TODAY! EASY LIVING AT SPANISH STEPS! 2 bedrm., 2 bath, ail appliances. UKE NEW AVAIL NOW $750. MPW I usTiMftii ri PAN 9 h..
PAGE 44

' • • • • j p n ^niw^^pw^^^ww^^pw^^^i mmmmm wmm '' Page B24 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, November 1 6.1995 Thursday, November 16, 1995 Hend'irson Home News, Boulder City News Poe B2S HENDERSON HOME NEWS • BOULDER CM NEWS NEWS Boulder City Motors: 'Where you buy local and save'' i > • Bill Graff Special to the Auto News "Our Cars Are A Lit'l Better." So reads a yellow and red sign greeting you at Boulder City Motors. Everyone knows the folks over the hill in BC are a "litl" different, so the sign fits right in at 1112 Nevada Highway. Up there, you won't see slot machines, flashy lights and gated communities. No sir, it's no frills. And it's the only car dealership. "Our main focus, along with selling high quality vehicles, is the small town atmosphere with no high pressure sales. If we didn't adhere4 our philosophy, they'd put us out of business," he continues. "We're doing something right." About 650 cars have been sold in the short, three year history of Boulder City Motors. And by the way, the owner is the employee. He's doing it "right," all right. And he's doing it pretty quick. Bill Graff left Boston for Southern Nevada several years ago. Three years ago, he started Boulder City Motors, with the intent of welcoming residents to a one-man, one-to-one kind of place where the service was oneof-a kind. Now, he maintains a lot of about 40 used vehicles, from currents to classics. And when he tells you he'd like to be known for "basically selling a good car at a fair price and being honest with people" you believe him. You have to. Graffs the guy you'll run into on the lot, save for another buyer. He's the one youll talk to about your wheels. You and he talk price, options and financing. Got a question? Take it to Graff. Grot a complaint? Graff will be with you shortly. Grot a compliment? Graff will be with you shortly. He's Boulder City's oneman band. "What you'll get in big dealerships is a multitude of salespeople," he says, adding the influx of new residents flooding Southern Nevada means most dealers lose their interest in customers as soon as they've lured them in the door...the next concern is the next spin of the turnstile. And then the next. "They're not really concerned with competitive business," he adds. "With 5,000 people a month moving in, I don't know that they care. People like to be dealt with honestly. Like we do. Not only do I sell the cars, but I'm the buyer." Three years ago, Graff says, he saw the need for Boulder City to have a responsible place for residents to purchase a vehicle. "Being the only car dealership in Boulder City, we service our cars and are there for the customer. Unlike other dealers in Las Vegas," he says. "I've developed a rapport with a lot of customers to the point that under no circumstances, no matter what, they will not go into Las Vegas to buy a car." When Graff uses phrases like "Friendly Boulder City," and "Buy Local and Save," you also have to believe him. After all, this is his business, and his life. And his name goes on the paycheck, so to speak. With the price of new cars often soaring to more thail $20,000, Graffsays Boulder City Motors offers an alternative to high prices, high pressure and high payments. On his lot, youll see price tags a "litl" bit easier to swallow: usually between $3,000 to $12,000. Cars and trucks. Currents and classics. Graff says he prides himself in handpickingthe best used cars available. He looks for low mileage, good condition, high quality. He also studies what's hot, and what's not, in the market. And of course, he follows the trends. Buyers in the market for a used car want one thing, Graff says. They want to be dealt with honestly. That's why he advertises the prices of his vehicles "If people would just come in and inspect our inventory, they would be impressed with the selection and quality we have," he says. "Nine times out of 10, if someone from Las Vegas comes out here to look at a vehicle, I will sell them a vehicle. They're really impressed with the dealership." He's sold one regular customer five cars. And he also sells a lot to tourists, who happen to see their dream drive smile at them while they whiz by on their way to or from the lake or dam. "Compared to other used car dealerships in Las Vegas, I don't think anyone is more attentive to caring about their reputation as I am," Graff says. "I eiyoy— honestly—the satisfaction of the sale. Everybody's happy." Boulder City Motors is open Monday through Saturday, and Sunday by appointment. For more information, call Graff, 2932000. You, your vehicle and the environment If you've been putting off routine car maintenance, think again. A properly maintained and operated vehicle runs more efficiently, is safer, lasts longer, commands a higher resale value and will help the environment. The following tips are from the experts at the non-profit National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE), the group that tests and certifies automotive technicians. •Keep your engine tuned up. A misfiring spark plug can reduce fuel efficience as much as 30 percent. Replace filters and fluids as recommended in your owner's manual. You'll" help reduce air pollution. •Check your tires for proper inflation and alignment. Underinflated or poorly aligned tires force the engine to work harder, wasting fuel. Properly maintained tires last longer, saving you money and lessening the burden at landfills. •Properly dispose of used motor oil, antifreeze/coolant and old batteries. Never dump oil, antifreeze or other automotive Quick and easy tips (NU)—Your car needs extra attention in cold weather. These tips from Protect All Quick & Easy Wash will help you save money, prevent wear and tear, and drive safer this winter. •Keep your car clean year around without spending money at the car wash. Quick & Easy Wash lets you wash any size car with just one gallon of water without any rinsing. One ounce added to a bucket of water will clean dirt, dust and grime. No fluids on the ground, in streams or sewers. Many repair facilities accept these items; otherwise, call your local government for recycling sites. •If you are not a "do-ityourselfer," find a good technician. Ask friends and associates for recommendations. Check the reputation of the repair shop with your local consumer group. Look for certified technicians. ASE-certified auto technicians have passed national competency exams in specialties such as engine performance and air conditioning. Repair facilities with ASE technicians usually display the ASE blue and white sign, while the technicians wear shoulder insignia and carry personalized credentials. •Keep your air conditioner in top condition and have it serviced only by a technician certified competent to handle/recycle refrigerants. Most air conditioners contain ozone-depicting chemicals. Improper service can cause some of these chemicals to leak into the atmosphere. to keep your car on hoses, no mess. Best of all, you can wash the car ri^t in the garage. •For every 10 degrees of temperatur^drop, tire pressure drops by one pound. You can lose three to four miles per galbn if tires aren't at maximum pressure, and under-inflated tires are dangerous on icy, slippery roads. •When weaUter and road conditions are bad, use your car only when really necessary. Short trips are expensive—a cold engine gets •Observe speed limits. Mileage decreases above 55 mph. •Drive gently. Avoid sudden accelerations and jerky stops. Use cruise control on highways to maintain a steady pace. •Avoid excessive idling. Shut off the engine while waiting for friends and family. •Remove excess items from the vehicle. Less weight means better mileage. Store luggage/ cargo in the trunk rather than on the roof to reduce air drag. •Plan trips. ConsoHdate daily errands to eliminate unnecessary driving. Travel when traffic is light to avoid stop-and-go conditions. Join a car pool. Good driving habits and regular vehicle maintenance will help you, your car and the environment. ASE has produced a brochure called "Keeping Your Vehicle In Tune With The Environment." For a free copy, send a #10, selfaddressed, stamped envelope to ASE, Department E-NU, 13505 Dulles Technology Drive, Hemdon, VA 22071. the road this winter just halfits usual mileage for the first two or three miles. Combining errands saves gas and reduces wear and tear. For a sample duopak of Quick & Easy Wash and new Protect All Polish & Protectant, send $1 to Protect All, Inc., Department NU, P.O. Box 5968-NWSA2, Orange CA 92613. Both products are available at Camping World, recreational vehicle stores or directly from Protect All, Inc. at 1-800322-4491. EMPLOYEE NAMED Alice Sharp was named employee of the month at Desert Valley GMC on Gibson Road in Henderson. With the corporation since 1991, she has contributed to many of the committees involved with the move to Henderson. Ed Reed, vice president and general manager, said "Alice exemplifies 'customer service,' the foremost goal of Desert Valley GMC." OUTSTANDING JOB Ed Reed (right), vice president of Desert Valley GMC, congratulates salesman of the month Ken Fisher. "Ken is the fleet manager and a salesman. He has done an outstanding job in producing sales as well as training other sales people. Fisher is a positive influence at Desert Valley GMC," said Reed. XOP 10 REASONS FOR NOT BUYING A CAR IN THE "BIG CITY" (ACTUALLY WE FOUND MORE!) BILL GRAFF, OWNER 22 YRS. AUTOMOTIVE EXPERIENCE 1. BAITS, SWITCH (it happens and ifs illegal) 2. SUPER LOW FINANCING (Yeah, on diesel Yugos with no air conditioning) 3. REBATES (Yes, and they raise prices every year so they can give you one) • • • ,?'• .' 4. TENT SALES (Hey, I got permanent awnings over my cars!) 5. OFF PREMISE SALES (I'm going to have a sale in the middle of the Spaghetti Bowl at S:O0 p.m.) 6. BIG EXPENSIVE ADS (You know who really pays for them. Look in the mirror!) 7. T.O. 's (When they keep turning you over & over to different salesmen until you crack) 8. "RENTAL CAR SALES ("This beauty was only driven by 132 different drivers ") 9. LEASING (Eternal payments on a vehicle you got tired of 2 years ago) 10. "NO MONEY DOWN" (You can pay off a mortgage quicker) 11. NEW CARS (They're nice but some lose as much as 40% of their value after 1 year) 12. "POT" LOTS (Some of these places should have a dismantlers license) 13. SUCK SALESMEN (Why do they stand like vultures at dealership entrances?) 14. EVEN SLICKER SALES MANAGERS (In their 'Towers ") 15. EVEN YET SUCKER OWNERS ("I can 8> veel finance you!") YES, I'M POKING FUN...BUT BUYING A CAR IS SERIOUS BUSINESS...WHEN I SAY "HONEST CARS—HONEST VALUE" I MEAN IT. NO GIMMICKS NO GAMES. AS I APPROACH THE 650TH SALE SINCE OPENING, I FEEL I'M PROVING MYSELF TO EVERY ONE. I TREASURE YOUR SUPPORT & WELCOME YOUR INPUT. T>^iJid(/i LiMi n<)to^ .;,* 'Just minutes on 95 South ffom Hsndsrsofi A QrMO Vail*/ 1112 NEVADA HWY. BOULDER CITY 293-2000 1 sxchangs Amsrioin currsncy for vahicutar mans ol transpodalion* TRAVEL TRAVEL TRAVEL i NOi^WEGlANThe Beautiful Dreamward Western Caribbean Grand Cayman • Playa del Carmen • Cozumel • Caiicun • NCL's Private Island Pticingfor Decenil/er 10 from no98 includes air! 11/19-12/3 & 12/17 ni98,^ ^1298 outside WIST 871-7447 ^HOLIDATSr :ms£h. EAST Artienian Center 4350 Eost Sumer, Suire#101 • 898-6999 Ratal at par parion ond appt/ to firil ond iwrond paiiingtr Applicabl. to Nw FIT ond Group bookingi. Cabin otignmnl will b* modt any lim wilhin four WMICI prior lo loiling, onc finol paymnl ho btan t7 (>r>^ UN 460 NO. BOULDER HWY 565-1500 IN HENDERSON OF COURSE

PAGE 45

' • • • • j p n ^niw^^pw^^^ww^^pw^^^i mmmmm wmm '' Page B24 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, November 1 6.1995 Thursday, November 16, 1995 Hend'irson Home News, Boulder City News Poe B2S HENDERSON HOME NEWS • BOULDER CM NEWS NEWS Boulder City Motors: 'Where you buy local and save'' i > • Bill Graff Special to the Auto News "Our Cars Are A Lit'l Better." So reads a yellow and red sign greeting you at Boulder City Motors. Everyone knows the folks over the hill in BC are a "litl" different, so the sign fits right in at 1112 Nevada Highway. Up there, you won't see slot machines, flashy lights and gated communities. No sir, it's no frills. And it's the only car dealership. "Our main focus, along with selling high quality vehicles, is the small town atmosphere with no high pressure sales. If we didn't adhere4 our philosophy, they'd put us out of business," he continues. "We're doing something right." About 650 cars have been sold in the short, three year history of Boulder City Motors. And by the way, the owner is the employee. He's doing it "right," all right. And he's doing it pretty quick. Bill Graff left Boston for Southern Nevada several years ago. Three years ago, he started Boulder City Motors, with the intent of welcoming residents to a one-man, one-to-one kind of place where the service was oneof-a kind. Now, he maintains a lot of about 40 used vehicles, from currents to classics. And when he tells you he'd like to be known for "basically selling a good car at a fair price and being honest with people" you believe him. You have to. Graffs the guy you'll run into on the lot, save for another buyer. He's the one youll talk to about your wheels. You and he talk price, options and financing. Got a question? Take it to Graff. Grot a complaint? Graff will be with you shortly. Grot a compliment? Graff will be with you shortly. He's Boulder City's oneman band. "What you'll get in big dealerships is a multitude of salespeople," he says, adding the influx of new residents flooding Southern Nevada means most dealers lose their interest in customers as soon as they've lured them in the door...the next concern is the next spin of the turnstile. And then the next. "They're not really concerned with competitive business," he adds. "With 5,000 people a month moving in, I don't know that they care. People like to be dealt with honestly. Like we do. Not only do I sell the cars, but I'm the buyer." Three years ago, Graff says, he saw the need for Boulder City to have a responsible place for residents to purchase a vehicle. "Being the only car dealership in Boulder City, we service our cars and are there for the customer. Unlike other dealers in Las Vegas," he says. "I've developed a rapport with a lot of customers to the point that under no circumstances, no matter what, they will not go into Las Vegas to buy a car." When Graff uses phrases like "Friendly Boulder City," and "Buy Local and Save," you also have to believe him. After all, this is his business, and his life. And his name goes on the paycheck, so to speak. With the price of new cars often soaring to more thail $20,000, Graffsays Boulder City Motors offers an alternative to high prices, high pressure and high payments. On his lot, youll see price tags a "litl" bit easier to swallow: usually between $3,000 to $12,000. Cars and trucks. Currents and classics. Graff says he prides himself in handpickingthe best used cars available. He looks for low mileage, good condition, high quality. He also studies what's hot, and what's not, in the market. And of course, he follows the trends. Buyers in the market for a used car want one thing, Graff says. They want to be dealt with honestly. That's why he advertises the prices of his vehicles "If people would just come in and inspect our inventory, they would be impressed with the selection and quality we have," he says. "Nine times out of 10, if someone from Las Vegas comes out here to look at a vehicle, I will sell them a vehicle. They're really impressed with the dealership." He's sold one regular customer five cars. And he also sells a lot to tourists, who happen to see their dream drive smile at them while they whiz by on their way to or from the lake or dam. "Compared to other used car dealerships in Las Vegas, I don't think anyone is more attentive to caring about their reputation as I am," Graff says. "I eiyoy— honestly—the satisfaction of the sale. Everybody's happy." Boulder City Motors is open Monday through Saturday, and Sunday by appointment. For more information, call Graff, 2932000. You, your vehicle and the environment If you've been putting off routine car maintenance, think again. A properly maintained and operated vehicle runs more efficiently, is safer, lasts longer, commands a higher resale value and will help the environment. The following tips are from the experts at the non-profit National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE), the group that tests and certifies automotive technicians. •Keep your engine tuned up. A misfiring spark plug can reduce fuel efficience as much as 30 percent. Replace filters and fluids as recommended in your owner's manual. You'll" help reduce air pollution. •Check your tires for proper inflation and alignment. Underinflated or poorly aligned tires force the engine to work harder, wasting fuel. Properly maintained tires last longer, saving you money and lessening the burden at landfills. •Properly dispose of used motor oil, antifreeze/coolant and old batteries. Never dump oil, antifreeze or other automotive Quick and easy tips (NU)—Your car needs extra attention in cold weather. These tips from Protect All Quick & Easy Wash will help you save money, prevent wear and tear, and drive safer this winter. •Keep your car clean year around without spending money at the car wash. Quick & Easy Wash lets you wash any size car with just one gallon of water without any rinsing. One ounce added to a bucket of water will clean dirt, dust and grime. No fluids on the ground, in streams or sewers. Many repair facilities accept these items; otherwise, call your local government for recycling sites. •If you are not a "do-ityourselfer," find a good technician. Ask friends and associates for recommendations. Check the reputation of the repair shop with your local consumer group. Look for certified technicians. ASE-certified auto technicians have passed national competency exams in specialties such as engine performance and air conditioning. Repair facilities with ASE technicians usually display the ASE blue and white sign, while the technicians wear shoulder insignia and carry personalized credentials. •Keep your air conditioner in top condition and have it serviced only by a technician certified competent to handle/recycle refrigerants. Most air conditioners contain ozone-depicting chemicals. Improper service can cause some of these chemicals to leak into the atmosphere. to keep your car on hoses, no mess. Best of all, you can wash the car ri^t in the garage. •For every 10 degrees of temperatur^drop, tire pressure drops by one pound. You can lose three to four miles per galbn if tires aren't at maximum pressure, and under-inflated tires are dangerous on icy, slippery roads. •When weaUter and road conditions are bad, use your car only when really necessary. Short trips are expensive—a cold engine gets •Observe speed limits. Mileage decreases above 55 mph. •Drive gently. Avoid sudden accelerations and jerky stops. Use cruise control on highways to maintain a steady pace. •Avoid excessive idling. Shut off the engine while waiting for friends and family. •Remove excess items from the vehicle. Less weight means better mileage. Store luggage/ cargo in the trunk rather than on the roof to reduce air drag. •Plan trips. ConsoHdate daily errands to eliminate unnecessary driving. Travel when traffic is light to avoid stop-and-go conditions. Join a car pool. Good driving habits and regular vehicle maintenance will help you, your car and the environment. ASE has produced a brochure called "Keeping Your Vehicle In Tune With The Environment." For a free copy, send a #10, selfaddressed, stamped envelope to ASE, Department E-NU, 13505 Dulles Technology Drive, Hemdon, VA 22071. the road this winter just halfits usual mileage for the first two or three miles. Combining errands saves gas and reduces wear and tear. For a sample duopak of Quick & Easy Wash and new Protect All Polish & Protectant, send $1 to Protect All, Inc., Department NU, P.O. Box 5968-NWSA2, Orange CA 92613. Both products are available at Camping World, recreational vehicle stores or directly from Protect All, Inc. at 1-800322-4491. EMPLOYEE NAMED Alice Sharp was named employee of the month at Desert Valley GMC on Gibson Road in Henderson. With the corporation since 1991, she has contributed to many of the committees involved with the move to Henderson. Ed Reed, vice president and general manager, said "Alice exemplifies 'customer service,' the foremost goal of Desert Valley GMC." OUTSTANDING JOB Ed Reed (right), vice president of Desert Valley GMC, congratulates salesman of the month Ken Fisher. "Ken is the fleet manager and a salesman. He has done an outstanding job in producing sales as well as training other sales people. Fisher is a positive influence at Desert Valley GMC," said Reed. XOP 10 REASONS FOR NOT BUYING A CAR IN THE "BIG CITY" (ACTUALLY WE FOUND MORE!) BILL GRAFF, OWNER 22 YRS. AUTOMOTIVE EXPERIENCE 1. BAITS, SWITCH (it happens and ifs illegal) 2. SUPER LOW FINANCING (Yeah, on diesel Yugos with no air conditioning) 3. REBATES (Yes, and they raise prices every year so they can give you one) • • • ,?'• .' 4. TENT SALES (Hey, I got permanent awnings over my cars!) 5. OFF PREMISE SALES (I'm going to have a sale in the middle of the Spaghetti Bowl at S:O0 p.m.) 6. BIG EXPENSIVE ADS (You know who really pays for them. Look in the mirror!) 7. T.O. 's (When they keep turning you over & over to different salesmen until you crack) 8. "RENTAL CAR SALES ("This beauty was only driven by 132 different drivers ") 9. LEASING (Eternal payments on a vehicle you got tired of 2 years ago) 10. "NO MONEY DOWN" (You can pay off a mortgage quicker) 11. NEW CARS (They're nice but some lose as much as 40% of their value after 1 year) 12. "POT" LOTS (Some of these places should have a dismantlers license) 13. SUCK SALESMEN (Why do they stand like vultures at dealership entrances?) 14. EVEN SLICKER SALES MANAGERS (In their 'Towers ") 15. EVEN YET SUCKER OWNERS ("I can 8> veel finance you!") YES, I'M POKING FUN...BUT BUYING A CAR IS SERIOUS BUSINESS...WHEN I SAY "HONEST CARS—HONEST VALUE" I MEAN IT. NO GIMMICKS NO GAMES. AS I APPROACH THE 650TH SALE SINCE OPENING, I FEEL I'M PROVING MYSELF TO EVERY ONE. I TREASURE YOUR SUPPORT & WELCOME YOUR INPUT. T>^iJid(/i LiMi n<)to^ .;,* 'Just minutes on 95 South ffom Hsndsrsofi A QrMO Vail*/ 1112 NEVADA HWY. BOULDER CITY 293-2000 1 sxchangs Amsrioin currsncy for vahicutar mans ol transpodalion* TRAVEL TRAVEL TRAVEL i NOi^WEGlANThe Beautiful Dreamward Western Caribbean Grand Cayman • Playa del Carmen • Cozumel • Caiicun • NCL's Private Island Pticingfor Decenil/er 10 from no98 includes air! 11/19-12/3 & 12/17 ni98,^ ^1298 outside WIST 871-7447 ^HOLIDATSr :ms£h. EAST Artienian Center 4350 Eost Sumer, Suire#101 • 898-6999 Ratal at par parion ond appt/ to firil ond iwrond paiiingtr Applicabl. to Nw FIT ond Group bookingi. Cabin otignmnl will b* modt any lim wilhin four WMICI prior lo loiling, onc finol paymnl ho btan t7 (>r>^ UN 460 NO. BOULDER HWY 565-1500 IN HENDERSON OF COURSE

PAGE 46

.. u .i .u.ti4.Jl.i.i.H t^^^W^W^^^^PW P8 B26 Henderson Home News. Boulder City News Thursday, November 16, 1995 H E N D E R SON "^1^^ "Y^ X IJ-J Tfiree Gators sign college letters-of-intent Wv.'x 1 > •Tuesday, November 21,1995 -Her>derson, Nevada 25* 42 mo. lease, plus $1206.18 cap reduction, $350 refundable security deposit. $450 bank fee. $299 first pyntt. (excluding lax). $2305.18 total at start, $12,558 total pymts.. $14,493 purctiase option at lease end I2c per mile over 15.000 miles per year. Plus excess wear & tear, state fee, tax, tag, due ai inception with approved credit. Prices include everything except tax, title S DOC fee. 30 mo. lease, plus $1706 cap reduction, $325 refundable security deposit, $299 first pymt. (excluding tax). $2330 total at start, $8970 total pymts., $10,025.10 purchase option at lease end. 10c per mile over 15.000 miles per year. Plus excess wear & tear, state fee. tax, tag, due at inception vnith approved credit. Prices include everything except tax, titfe & DOC fee. PER MONTH FOR 42 MONTHS! 42 mo. lease, plus Si500 cap reduction. $250 refundable security deposit. $450 bank fee, 199 first pymt (excluding tax), $2399 total at start, $8358 total pymts., $8095.36 purchase option at lease end. 10c per mile over 15.000 miles per year. Plus excess wear S tear, state fee. tax, tag. due at inception with approved credit. Prices include everything except tax, title & DOC fee. LSUBURBANS.& PICKUP TRUCKS! KEEP YOUR CAR OR TRUCK RUNNING UKE NEW WITH OUR PARTS & SERVICE SPECIALS! REPOWER With GoodWrench Engines And Transmissions! Parts 2nd CHANCE FINANCING (702) 5S8-3300,/fr<^N'H"El^, [TOUR OUR NEWEST STATE-OF-M-/ FACIUTY FEATURING: O 6 Acres of vehicles on display S Full service deli for your convenience n Observation area for service department n Air Conditioned service facility n FREE carwash with all service work B Customer Business Center • Use our phone, fax or copier, while you wait B Courtesy rental cars on premises (See us for detaiisi SERVICE OPEN SATURDAY LEASE HOTUNE: (702) 558-3300 ^ Ask For KenF. / ALL CARS & TRUCKS ARE INSPEQED / LARGE SELECTION OF THE BEST / AU CARRY WARRANTIES (soe DO ,i.r For Details) PRE-0WNED VEHICLES IN NEVADA! RE-ESTABUSH YOUR CREDTT TODAY! '92MERCURYTOPAZ f Nice Family Sedan! (#UP1129A) m '92PONT1ACFORMUIA$IIAM Sees Drive Tills Ponliac! (151925A)„ il,7yV '92FORDAREOSTAR $14 AM Well Maintained! (<51912A) mmjvi '91MSSANPATIiFNDER$i Red, 4 Door! (#51889A) \m 1984 BUICK SKYLARK Low Miles, Looks Like New! (#UP1096A) 1995 BUICK & OLDS PROGRAM CARS CENIURIES & OERAS All With Factory Warranty! 8 To Cfioose From As Low As LOW, LOW 1994 PONTIAC A White Diamond! (#UP1118) '91 CHEVY S-10 PICKUP White, Good Little Work Truck! (#UP1156A) ^6750 '94GE0 Nice, White, Economy Car! (#412186) $ 7990 '95 NISSAN AL11MA $ Great Looking Car! (#UP1176) 13,990 '95 CHEVY X-CABPKKUP Lots Of Custom Work, Won't Last, See Today! (#UP1204) SAVE! '93 CHEVY SUBURBAN 454 Loaded, Lots Of Room For A Large Family! (#UP1061) SAVE! '94 JEEP GUNDOBOIEIID Liflsjted, Get Ready For The Snow! (#UP1150A) SAVE! Wl AIM TW ONIY PMURSHIP IN lOVVN WIIH tiJLDJL CnmniD SALESPERSOi^ j. 3 3 O N. GIBSON RD. ^^W CIN THE VAi.LEY AUTO IWIilLl.L> Relief from freeway noise on way Jocelyn Bluitt News Staff Writer Henderson residents living along Interstate 515 may finally get some peace and quiet. The National Highway System Designation Act passed the Senate-House Conference on Nov. 15, allocating $45 million in transportation funds to Nevada. U. S. Sen. Harry Reid, who was a member of the HouseSenate conference panel, said he secured this money for Nevada to promote the revitalization of the state's highway system. "We are the fastest growing state in the nation and these funds will help relieve some of the pressure placed on our highways," Reid said, v :^ Reid also inserted language into the Act that requires the Federal Highway Administration, the Nevada Department of Transportation, Clark County, and the city of Henderson to work together to create a plan to decrease the noise for residential living along Interstate 515. "Henderson residents have been burdened by increasing noise for years, and it's about time we solve the problem," Reid said. "This language is significant because it compels the FHA to solve the problem," Reid said. "Withbut it, there was nothing compelling them to feel obligated. Now it is the law and they will abide by it. We in effect are ordering the FHA to come up with a plan to stop the noise," Reid said. When the Nevad a Department of Transportation created the plans for the newest portion of I515 in the late 1980s, they did not incorporate provisions to control the noise levels. It is NDOTs policy to only build sound walls alongexisting homes aligning the freeway. At that time, there were no homes in this area. By the time this portion of the freeway was completed, the area along its path had been fully developed, A consultant for the city of Henderson measured noise levels above the 67 decibel level used by the federal government in six different spots. Once the act is approved by the President, the funds should be available in the third quarter of 1996. Reid said the cooperating agencies must submit a plan for noise mitigation, then the funds may be approved and allocated by the panel. John Judge/News Staff THINK IT OVER — Tiffany Huebner. left, and Heather Larson receivetheirbabiesatthe beginning of the Baby Think It Over Program at Green Valley High School Wednesday. The two students took care of the babies from Wednesday to Friday. The children were programmed to cry at various times to indicate that they were hungry or needed to be held. Green Valley High School had five programmable babies for the program which is intended to give students an accurate idea of what bejng a teenage parent would be like. Arroyo Grande supper club before Council Kathy Streeter News Staff Writer The Henderson City Council will hear plans tonight for a commercial center across the street from the Arroyo Grande Sports Complex. Zarcor Development would like to build a gas station/convenience store and a supper club at the corner of Windmill Parkway and Arroyo Grande Boulevard. The comii^ny is requesting a land' use change, zoning and a use permR for the project. Residents spoke in opposition to the development during a Henderson Planning Commission meeting Oct. 26, They said alcohol sales near the complex would pose a threat to those who use the park — especially children. Planning commissioners agreed that children traveling to and from the park may be endangered by intoxicated drivers. They voted unanimously to recommend denial of Zarcor's requests. Other business before the Council includes: •A request for a pre-school and day care center at 80.3 Mission Dr. in the Mission Hills area. The commission recommended denial of the project after hearing testimony from homeowners in the area. Many were opposed to the traffic and noise the centei" would create. The facility would be licensed for 185 children, age 9 and younger. In a letter to the News published last Thursday, the applicants said they are going to withdraw the request. But Cif. Clerk Susan Rohison said Monday morning the issue is still on the Council's agenda. •A recommendatic to hire a c6nsultant to address safety concerns on Water Street. Thff Citizens Traffic Advisory Board recommended the study ae to complaints from residents about the Water Street Beautification Project. They said concerns had been raised about business access and pedestrian safety. •Plans for Lake Mead Christian Academy, a private school See Council Page 2 Chamber honors 22 teachers The Henderson Chamber of Commerce recognized 22 educators in the Henderson area for excellence in education during the November luncheon last Thursday. "We recognize that the children and the educators are what help forge our future. We need to recogni ze them because they put in a lot of time and effort and the children are our future," Chamber Executive Director Alice Martz said. "Without us and businesses in the area supporting education, there would be no business in the future. These students coming out need to be prepared," she said. "As a parent who has children in the school district in Henderson, I realize that teachers are valuable. That is why I invest a lot of my effort toward education. Chamber President Tim O'Callaghan said. "I would like to thank each and every one of you for being a teacher because teaching isn't always an easy job," O'Callaghan said. The teachers were nominated for this award by their individual schools based on their outstanding achieveSe Teachers Page 7 INSIDE Overview Education Sports 13 Classifieds. 15 Velumi 4$, 93ii BdHon H.B.C. PuMteaHom POBoiMM NsiitfMPOni WVI (702) SM-1M1 Former constable pleads no contest Former Henderson Constable James Ebert pleaded no contest and was found guilty of two misdemeanors Friday for using false statements t* collect workers' compensation benefits. Agrand jury indicted Ebertin March 1995 on six counts of theft by misrepresentation. The indictment alleged that in 1991, Ebert submitted false compensation forms to Nevada State Industrial Insurance System (SIIS). The forms represented that he was toUlly disabled" and unable to work, which meant he could receive two-thirds of his salary from SIIS, The Attorney Ceneral's ofTioe alleged that during the time he was getting those SIIS benefits, Ebert intentionally failed to disclose to SIIS that he was working as the Henderson constable. All six counts referred to a period from Sept. 5 to Dec. 4, 1991, when Ebert collected money for being injured at Titanium Metals Corp.'s Henderson plant. Ebert began working as a constable for the city on the first day he was claiming temporary U>tal SM Ebert Jocetyn Bluitt News Staff Writer As the management of Sky Harbor Airport changes hands, the legacy of one man continues. Sky Harbor Airport, located at 500 E. Lake Mead Dr., was founded in 1969. Current manager Eliot Alper said the airport was the dream child of his father, Arby Alper. "My father had the vision and saw the need for another airport in the area. He acquired the land and then built this airport from scratch," Alper said. Using their own money, the Alper family slowly acquired the structures currently located on the airport property as scrap metal, or as parts of other developments throughout the valley area. "Every building you see here has been another structure in Las Vegas at some time. There is a lot of history here," Alper said. "I remember as a child watching ray father put it all together with just a handful of people and watching this airport grow," Alper said. Today, Sky Harbor is a base for more than 200 different general aviation crafls each year. The airport is the home of several tour companies, and commuter fli^U. But over time, Alper said, it became harder and harder for Sky Harbor to meet the litmiands Eliot Alper of the expanding aviation community. As the area's population and business environment grew, the demand for additional aviation ,^pace exploded. McCarran International Airport, owned and managed by Clark County, became bogged down with small aircraft, causing long delays for larger flights. When the county acquired the North Las Vegas Airport, it offered some relief, but not neariy enough 'There are a lot of Inisiiicss and people out there that want to get into aviation but they have no where to go. We have a long list of tenants waiting to get into the airport but we do not have the space," Alper said. Alper said every possible rentable space on the airport property, including several modular trailers is full. Without the money needed to expand the airport, there was no way he SMAIpr ) >h .^' f..' r ^VN.*j,-^><*%'