Citation
1994-12-22 - Henderson Home News

Material Information

Title:
1994-12-22 - Henderson Home News
Creator:
O'Callaghan, Mike ( Columnist )
Theiss, Roy ( Columnist )
Streeter, Kathy ( Columnist )
Moore, Thomas ( Columnist )
Cohen, Richard ( Columnist )
Shipler, Guy ( Columnist )
Hanlon, Bill ( Columnist )
Vondenbrink, Dorothy A. ( Columnist )
Bowman, Bill ( Columnist )
Allen, D. J. ( Columnist )
Goldstein, Philip ( Columnist )
Brann, Jim ( Columnist )
Soehlke, Ruth ( Columnist )
Joyce, Marilee ( Columnist )
Santor, Jim ( Columnist )
Santor, Kathleen Grace ( Columnist )
Earl, Phillip I. ( Columnist )
Briggs, Ralph T. ( Columnist )
Gant, Marvin R. ( Columnist )
Bishop, Carolyn D. ( Columnist )
Weidenfeld, Rob ( Photographer )
Judge, John ( Photographer )
Publisher:
O'Callaghan, Mike
HBC Publications, Inc.
Creation Date:
1994-12-22
Language:
English
Materials:
Paper ( medium )

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Subjects / Keywords:
Nevada
Henderson
East Las Vegas
City and town life -- Nevada -- Henderson
Community life -- Nevada -- Henderson
History -- Henderson (Nev.) -- 20th century
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Newspapers

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Greenspun Media sponsors this collection.
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Greenspun Media retains possession of the bound, original newspapers. Henderson District Public Libraries retains possession of the microfilm and the digital files.

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Henderson District Public Libraries
Holding Location:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Rights Management:
The items in this collection are provided for non-commercial personal and academic use by Henderson Library patrons and may not be republished in any way. Contact Greenspun Media Group for additional information regarding rights to this material: http://www.greenspunmedia.com
Resource Identifier:
hhn4288 ( Digital Id )

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'N Pagt 20 Henderson Home News Tuesday, December 20, 1994 fREAL ESTATE BC Beautifully Land•capd Home in Lakeview area with pool/ spa, RV Parking, open Roorplan, Quiet Location. $229,000 BRET. Desert Sun Realty. RE526 REAL ESTATE ThePrudential Jenun't Realty r 6061 sq. ft. warehouae zoned IG just off Sunaet. Close to 1-51S. Excellent location. Call Peggy & Joyce. H71756. 564-3333. RIVER LANDING 4 BR. two story. Great yard with a spa too! $119,900. Fred & Ellie Knapp 5664500. ^ ThePrudential (^ Janien'i Realty S^ Custom home under construction Sec. 19 on 1/2 acre lot— 2400> sq. ft. Plans in office. Call Peggy or Joyce. 564-3333. Custom home Three BR, Four years old, inground pool, 1/2 acre lot, RV's,horss, whatever you like. Ownera transferred! Hurry on thie one! $149,900. Fred liEllle Knapp S66-4500. 2 Master Suites, 4 big bdrms., wonderful romantic pool, yard. $185K. •Awesome views ofthepark. Huge4 bdrms., pool/spa, terms. •Built in 1990! 4 bdrms., full landscaping, terms, $21 OK. •Two 2 acre parcels. Panoramic views on Mcndola. ** Sandra Deubler 271-3277 Ontuo;^ Ac!ion Nclwoik 4;-s()i,i) ThePrudential Jenien'i Realty jy^ Custom Home overlooking Lake Mead, 4 BD, 2 1/2 Bath over 2300 sq. ft., pool plus many extras. Call Peggy M. 293-449B. H82444 CUSTOM HOMES Larry Clouse (General Contractor Lie. #27343). Will dssign homes to suit your ilfsstyle. Also we have construction money available. Phone 293-1893. FREE "HOME BUYERS GUIDE TO INSPECTIONS AND WARRANTIES" CALL 456-7515. RE678 ••••**•***••••*••*•***** FOR LEASE/SALE Beautiful custom home, 3 bdrm., 2 1/2 baths, open floor plan, swim spa and more, ^ fabulous views. ^ A Call BC Adobe Realty 293-1708 ^^i, ***•••*•*•••••*••••*••*• BRIGHT & CLEAN READY TO MOVE IN 2 STORY LEWIS HOME. 4 BDRM., 2 1/2 BA., FIREPLACE, POOL, 3 CAR GARAGE. $197,000. MUST SEE. 293-0967 ^^ ^ o Da*wih Bible Realty 1520 Nevada Highway Boulder City, Nevada 89005 DARWIN BIBLE • R*il Etttt* Broktr • (702) 294-1144 DARWIN'S AUCTIONS • NAA • (702) 293 3996 CELLULAR (702) 596-3996 • FAX (702) 293-7896 BOULDER CITY "SLEEPER" Two lot* (th* (Iz* of (our Id*) lor th* pric* of on*. Ov*r $300. fool of unobitmctcd vl*w of Lik* M*ad fromlhl* hllidd* lot. Mod n*worl( I* computed. ThI* la th* b**t buy In th* ar**. If you ar* raady to build th* horn* of your draama or )uat looking lor an axcaltont lnv**tm*nl. L*t u* *how you thi* out*landlng buy. Llatad at only $149,900. Darwin BIM* R*any, 294-1144. FOR LEASE. CUSTOM HOME, 3,300 SQUARE FEET, 4 BDRM., 4 1/2 BATHS, $1,500 MO. PLUS DEPOSITS. DOWNTOWN AREA, 2 BDRM., 1 BATH, CENTRAL AIR & HEAT $750 MO. PLUS DEPOSITS. GOLF COURSE AREA, 3 BDRM., 1 3/4 BATH, 3 CAR GAR., $1,300 MO. PLUS DEPOSITS. CALL BC ADOBE REALTY AT 293-1707. RESIS GOVERNMENT ACQUIRED HOMES Low Down Payment Veterans/Active Duty or Not No Down, Up To $203,000 Eree List Repo Properties & VA Info With Pre-qualiflcation-By Appointment 566-9521 LIBERTY REALTY EDNA SIEDSMA HUD/VA Specialist Buying? Selling? Relocating? Insist on ^ aAwwu insist on 4^^ ^KtiMMtti Honderson8Finest pa*:47i4H* OLAMCERmAMOMBfTNoacari^ ^i. aMV NT* ptaaatng M*n4 of toeays f^—^ _. ISJ kaw4rany**breqragrMtaaal|r*. KJ^'^'^njI • A—awewlnghniinbyaa—Hcwa =C^^ [IK^ priaai cm for daM* and leertan. Cankn21 Henderson Roalty ISWatorSL REAL ESTATE BC 3 Bed/2 Bath Lewis Home $139,500 BRET 294-8482 Desert Sun Realty. RE522 BC Spacious 4+ Bedroom Home on Oversized View Lot, BRET 2946482 Desert Sun Realty. RE524 REAL ESTATE 3 BDRM., 1-1/2 BA., WITH LARGE FAMILY ROOM AND STORAGE. CORNER LOT, CENTRAL AIR AND HEAT. NO PETS. $700/MO., PLUS DEP., CALL AL JENSEN'S REALTY, 564-3333. RE467 REAL ESTATE APARTMENTS FOR SALE. 128 UNITS AND 126 UNITS. GOOD LOCATIONS, 97% OCCUPANCY, ASSUMABLE 9.5%, 30 YEAR LOAN, LOW DOWN, CALL SPEAR DEV., 873-5200. RE609 Don't Make a Move Until You Call Me CERTIFIED RESIDENTIAL SPECIALIST Only 2% of the Realtors in the United States qualify for the CRS designation. I am one of them! This highly coveted designation is like having my Masters degree in residential real estate. As a CRS I have undergone rigorous, specialized, advanced training in listing, selling, investment, taxes and more. My CRS designation is my badge of expertise and your shield of assurance that I will get the job done right. When I work for you, you get proven success with honesty and integrity. Coll Ron today (702) 222-4949^ or at my office 458-8888 >imericana Group, HI AiiuRS Ak Better "Indcpcndvnilv Ovmad Bud OfMtalvd" L5J Proven Success with Honesty & Integrity Ron Rasmussen Realtor* 'You'll be glad you did." Office 458-8888 HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS! PLAN NOW FOR 19951 BE IN BY CHRISTMAS! CELEB RATE THE CHARM! HUGE "SLEIGH" PKING.I EXECUTIVE ADDRESS! WINTER WONDERLAND! 360'VIEW OF SANTA! SANTA WORKSHOP 12X24! STARTER TO START 95 MR & MRS SANTA BDRMS! READY TO DECORATE! NO YARD WORK IN '95! SANTA'a RETIREMENT! YOUR CHRISTMAS HOME! 1127Mariposa 1320Stacey La Dolce Vita 520 Avenue L 1446 RAWHIDE 1026 Kays Drive 455 Enterprise 1016 Wood acre 504 Lake Tahoe 604 Avenue H 1715 Empire Mine La Dolce Vita 698 ML Bona 591 Lake Superior 503 Lake Havasu $193,500 $139,500 $ 69,900 $142,000 $162,500 $445,000 $199,900 $250,000 $142,500 $117,500 $ 98,900 $89,000 $142,000 $229,000 $152,000 DO YOU HAVE A "CUSTOM HOME BUILDING LOT" ON YOUR CHRISTMAS WISH UST? CHOOSE FROM $116,000-$145.900. FREE LIST OF ALL AVAILABLE PROPERTIES m Ml] 1664 Nevada Hwy. Boulder City, NV 89005 293-4663 Fax: 702-293-4645 Toll free: 800-228-8358 f=> Ellen Lamb Stromberg, Brokar After hours call: Pt B*fnsteln 2M'174f "•• Qllm 2M'121( Mary Board 293-72M Barter* Jigw 565-1311 Dennii Conner* 2934737 K"y KlmUrlln 2U-0Mi Untt Davl. 293-1097 SlU Lorn J3-3041 CALLCOLDWELLBANKER COLDWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY D m 501 Nevada Hwy., Boulder City 293-5757 FREE! LIST OF ALL HOMES FOR SALE IN B.C. HOMES BELLA VISTA CUSTOM • 3 bdrm., 3 ba., family rm. w/2 way f/p, wet bar, overaize garage, RV parking, forever lake view. Alarm system, shown by appt. $495,000. LIKE NEW BELLA VISTA PLAN A. 2705 s.f., 3 bdrm., 3 be., fam. rm., f/p in master bdrm. & fam. rm. Pool and view of lake. Lots of upgrades $344,000. BOAT DEEP GARAGE 36x32 with workshop, laundry & 1/2 ba., and evap. cooled. 4 bdrm., 2 ba., large patio with lake view. $305,000. by ReaHor/owner. Call Katie to seel CUSTOM HOME • trl-level 4 bdrm., 3 ba. oversized garage, lake view, f/p in living rm., k)ts of ceramk: tile. $285,000. MOBILES/RENTAL PARKS VALLEY VIEW ESTATES 3 bdrm., 2 ba., covered patio, one year warranty. Home is brand newl Price reducedl $69,500. MANUFACTURED HOMES RETIREE'S HOME-ONE BDRM.. den. all appliances, 12x32 garage plus 2 car carport, covered porch. Owner needs to sell and will k>ok at ail offersi $127,500. OWNER FINANCINGI Honne listed below appraisal and seller wants an offerl Lake view, 3 bdrm.. 2 ba., 2 car garage, fam. rm., w/f.p. and more. Call for i4>pt. to seel $227,500. FORMER MODEL 2 bdrm., 2 full baths, carport, workshop with A/C, covered porch. Immaculate. Sellers motivated so bring an offer. $149,900. OPEN FLOOR PLAN, 2 bd, 2 ba, wrap around porch, carport, all for $149,500. THREE BDRM, 1826 s.f. home, 2 ba. family room, large covered porch, carport k RV parking. $154,000. THREE CAR GARAGE with 1/4 ba., covered RV stall. 2 bdrm., family rm., forsver lake view. $197,500. LARGE LOT k>ts of parking, view of mtns., 2 bdrm den. storage, covered porch. $172,500. BUSINESS ACOMIMERaAL PHOTO SHOP 10 YE ARS ESTABUSHEDI Establishedcliantele, passport photos taken, copies of old prints made, one hour service available, Shown by appt. Call Katia. $125,000. COM'L BLDGS. 3740 s.f. plua 1.504 acre k>t. fenced completely. 100% occupancy wKh good Income. Owner will carry contract. $418,375. Ask for RON for info. ONE LEFT! Com'l tot on Industrial .9 acre for $173,900. OWNER WILL RNANCEI CALL RON FOR INFOI COM'L BLDG. ON COLORADO ST. • 24,000 a.f. total, two level, good parking, $900,000. Privet* financing avaiiabla or possible lease. Call Katie to sael RESTAURANT Located on Nevada Hwy., tongest established in Boulder City. Price includes fbrturM ft signs. $185,000. REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE O Va\^Wm Bible Realty 1520 Nevada Highway Boukier aty, Nevada 89006 D/kRWIN BIBLE • Real E*M Brokar • (702) 294-1144 DARWIN'S AUCTIONS • NAA • (702) 293-3996 CELLULAR (702) S9e-3996 • FAX (702) 293-7896 MAQNIFICENTVIEWOF LAKE MEAOIromthiaLaka Mountain Ealataa Baauly. Spacioua(ovar2a00SF) Manufadurvd honw. Laiga Ulchafl ami pantry maalar Ixdroom auHa wttli ganton tub t ahowar larga oovarad patio overlooka laka. Qroal room wkh wal bar and llraplaco. In door laundry room with bath, garaga and oovoiad oar port, both badrooma hava Itatha, Iota ol axlraa and prioad wall baiow oompa at 1177,500. Danrin BiblaRaatty 294-1144. uNerrBOAm /Ulvjertise in the Neivs Y D E tU 293-6014 & ASSOCIATES 'TOP OF THE WORLDI SOUNDS GOOD WAIT TILL YOU SEE THE VIEWIII OVER 2500 SQ. FT. PLUS GUEST HOUSE. ALMOST 800 SQ. FT. RV GARAGE THAT IS HEATED & COOLED ALL ON 3 1/2 ACRES OVERLOOKING BOULDER CITY. PRICE SLASHED TO $499,000. 'PLENTY OF ROOM FOR THE KIDS, IN LAWS, LOST PEOPLE, PETS OR MAYBE A HORSE OR TWO PLUS ROOM TO EXPAND THIS 5000 SQ. FT. HOME ON 3/4 ACRE LOT IN BOULDER CITY 'LAKE VIEWI ADULT COMMUNITY! GREAT ROOM W/COZY FIREPLACE, 1900 SQ. FT., 2 BEDROOM, 2-1/2 BATH, LARGE COVERED PARKING. (158,900. 'NEW LISTING! HUGE PALM TREES AND ITALIAN CYPRESS, FLOWER BEDS, MAKE THIS HOME VERY SPECIAL, 3 BED., 1 -3/4 BATH, GAS LOG FIREPLACE, OVER 1800 SQ. FT. PRICED FOR TRUE VALUE (142,000. 'MT. VISTA ESTATES! 2 BED., 2 BATH ON CORNER LOT W/COVERED PARK $96,500. 'DOWNTOWN RETAIL STORE FOR LEASE! NEXT TO BOULDER DAM HOTEL! 'LAKE MT. ESTATES RENTAL, ADULT $795 •RENTALS RESIDENTIAL FROM $350.00 OFFICE^ETAIL FROM $250.00. 'BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY! BUY/SELL NEW/ USED-ANTIQUES/MODERN-INVENTORY INCL. CALL BARTON HYDE FOR DETAILS!!! JR REALTY E iixmmoB pnonssiotm CUTE AS A BUG and very liveable, 3 bedroom Chism home. Front & back patioa > easy care landscaping • See this one soon $109,500. GOLF COURSE LUXURY • 4 bedroom home w/approximately 2700 sq. ft. of upgrades. 2 master suites, 2 car garage, designed for family/ entertaining, overlook the greens $199,500. BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM In Section 27 has it alll Huge country kKchen, rock fireplace, family sized wet-bar, spa, patio, lots of tile & more. Over 2500 sq. ft. $145,000. NO HASSLE LIVING Nke 2 bedroom condo with large 2 car garage, private courtyards, super lay-out, 1 .level Ihf ing • great combination of privacy/ convenience, pool acceas, super k>cation $69,950. MASTER BEDROOM DOWNSTAIRS • 4bedroom,2bath home with enctosed petio. Over 1600 sq. ft $95,000. GREAT APPEAL 4 bedroom, loft, livingroom with cozy fireplace. Separate familyroom, pool sized backyard. Only 4 years old. HOUDAY WISHES Stop by for a free 1995 calendar. 101 E. Horizon, Henderson EQUAL HOUSINO OOff^O I ^^ owoRTUNrrr • and ^ mdmiHt o( Cnncy 21 Rnl EiiMc CofponMoa EquI Hoiiani 0{i|Mftnil)f EACH OFFICE WDH€NDeNTt.Y OWNED AND OFCRATED REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE OWNER MUST SELL THIS DOLL HOUSE FIT FOR A QUEEN. IMMACULATE GREEN VALLEY HOME WITHUPGRADESGALORE! CULDE SAC LOCATION. 1135 SQ. FT WITH 2 LARGE MASTER SIZE BEDROOMS, 2 FULL BATHS, FABULOUS FIREPLACE IN LIVING ROOM, GREAT KITCHEN WITH EAT-IN NOOK, INSIDE LAUNDRY AREA, COVERED PATIO AND 2 CAR GARAGE... COMMUNITY POOLS. ASKING $99,999 CALL ROBIN 496-5125 RANCHO VISTA REALTY RE262 DESERT SUIM REALTY [ m t2^ CALL 24 HRS. FULL-TIME (702) 293-2151 FULL-SERVICE SINCE 1979 1000 IMV Hy, 0101, Boulder City I QUIET & PRIVATE: Boulder Square 2' bdrm., $74,750, see today. CUSTOM OPPORTUNITY: unique 1acre panoramic Lake Mead lot, may subdivide for development, more land available, $543,000. FIXER: below appraisal now at $89,900, near Lake Mead. $158,000; upgraded 3-bdrm. Lewis, near B.C. schools, corner lot. POOL/SPA: delightful custom near Lake Mead, $229,000. HORSES: country estate on 1/2 acre, hilltop, $325,000. Banner Realty Experience the Difference! Call 294'1500 HAPPY HOLIDAYS RESIDENTIAL LARGE CUL-DE-SAC LOT W/RV PARKING. Walk to schools and City recreation area. 3 bedrooms, 2-car garage. Asking $210,000. EXQUISITE LAKE MEAD VIEW. Owner built with attention to detail. 4 bedroom, 4 1/2 bath, 5 car garage. REDUCED TO $665,000. IMMEDIATE MOVE IN TO SPECTACULAR LAKE MEAD VIEW HOME. 4 bedroom, 3 car garage. Brand new single story. Truly a must see. $525,000. IMMACULATE 4 Bedroom in Marina Highland Estates, Lake & Mtn. view. Priced for QUICK SALE $219,000. CUSTOM TRI-LEVEL, 2 living rooms, 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, oversized 2 car garage with RV parking. Pride of ownership. Reduced to $295,000. COUNTRY HOME & GUEST HOUSE, 7 Car Garage on huge lot 4 bedrooms, Formal Dining, 3 fireplaces. Horse barn and corrals & more. $495,000. SPECTACULAR LAKE MEAD VIEW. Curved stairway enhances open floor plan. Lake or nwuntain views from all rooms. Large 3 bedrooms, 3 bath, 3 car garage. Fountains, 3 fireplaces, and superb quality throughout. $895,000. PALATIAL ESTATE-On 2 acres—10,000 sq. ft. under roof, pool & horses, separate guest house—$1,985,000. CONDOS AND TOWNHOMES EASY QUALIFYING. Owner will carry. NEW & ready to move in. Custom townhome wKh Lake Mead view. 3 bdrms., 3-1/2 baths, 2 car garage. Reduced to $235,000. LAKEMEAD VIEW. New townhome, 2110 sq. ft., 3 bedroom, 3-1/2 bath, 2 car gar. Rental at $1600 • • • security deposit LAND FULL LAKE MEAD VIEW. Lot is .29 acre in Custom Home Area. Only $160,000. PRIME LOT IN HISTORIC DISTRICT, Good traffic. Seller financing considered. AWESOME LAKE VIEW IN QUIET AREA, 2/3 ACRE. Ready to build. Reduced to $250,000. GREAT COMMERCIAL location in OldTown Boulder City-OWC—$79,500. 1/4 ACRE CORNER LOT in Custom Home area $99,000. MOUNTAIN VIEW Lot in Custom Home Area—$95,000 OWC. MOUNTAIN VIEW + HORSES—1 acre— Won't Last At $89,900. COMMERCIAUPROFESSIONAL—YOUR CHOICE11.0 acre, 3.45 acres, 4.45 acres or 5.63 acres, starting at under $4.00/sq. ft. Owner financing consklered. 2.5 ACRES—Great buy in SW Las Vegas. Reduced to $60,000. COMMERCIAL & BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 1000 sq. ft Medical/Professional Offke for lease. 100 feet from Boulder CHy Hospital. 5000 sq. ft Warehouse/Off ke on .95 acre in Industrial park. 1750 sq. ft owner/manage residence above office. TURN KEY OPPORTUNITY AWAITS YOUl Restaurant in Historic Downtown Boukier City. Land, buikling. equipment furniture and f ixturea. Call 294-1500 for appointment. TAKING RESERVATK)NS for OHk:e/Warehouse, CM zoning, Only 12 unKs available. Exciushrely wHh Banner. Call now. tli3 ItouUltr ( il\ im\ ^ ucia .SI. tr t i(\. Nt\ii(l;iX')05 ypW/;'ji l BE'il

PAGE 2

Page 2 Henderson Home News Thursday, December 22,1994 ONE MAN'S VIEW: From Page 1 seldom loses bowl games. I've watched him win five Fiesta Bowls and one national title in Tempe. Ariz. He has also won three Orange Bowls, two Cotton Bowls and the Aloha Bowl, Holiday Bowl. Liberty Bowl. Sugar Bowl and Citrus Bowl. He has won everything but the Las Vegas Bowl. Paul, it looks like one tough way to start 1995. Paladin. Paladin you're on the way up. Fm talking about Paladin Advertising Agency that*s headed up by its founder Mike Sullivan and Vice President for Account Services Jim Ferrence. Both talented young men are Boulder City Hi^ School products we have watched since they were Eagles. Ferrence. a winner of the Go For Broke football award given by the Newfi and a Notre Dam University graduate, is a valuable asset to Sullivan's operation. Sullivan, a former employee and fellow worker of mine, has both the talent and confidence needed to produce for clients seeking political advice, pubUc relations contacts and advertising skills. He has already developed the reputation of being a winner and believable. Richard Boone. as Paladin, had gun and would travel. Sullivan and Ferrence have the skills and dedication needed to help their clients become winners. Henderson sports fans should be proud of Wolf Pack graduate Keith Clough who had seven tackles for UNLVs 52-24 victory over Central Michigan in Las Vegas Bowl III. Fans should be proud of Keith's play, but not surprised. He has played tough football as a linebacker when both hurt and healthy. No other Rebel has been more consistent and productive than the man from Henderson. From Roll Call newspaper on Capitol Hill comes this bit of interesting information: "Incoming Speaker Newt Gingrich and incoming Mjgority Leader Dick Armey are increasing the budgets of their offices by nearly 50%. Armey's Minority Leader's Office will be funded at $1.5 million per year — an increase of nearly 50% over outgoing mtyority leader Dick Gephardt's $1 milHon budget. Gingrich's Speaker's Office will be funded at $2.1 million per year — also an increase of nearly 50% over outgoing Speaker Tom Foley's $1.4 million budget. Ironically, these budget increases were announced shortly after these same GOP leaders annoimced that they were eliminating funding for Congressional Legislative Service Organizations such as the Black Caucus, the Hispanic Caucus, and Uie Women's Issues Caucus, as a costcutting reform measure." O'Callaghan, a former two-term governor of Nevada, is publisher of the News. Victorian Casino to be considered KathyStrMtcf News Staff Writer The Henderson Planning Commission will hear plans tonight for a casino at Sunset Road and Boulder Highway, a subdivision in the Pittman planning area and a Sprint Cellular/Cellular One monopole and storage shed at Calico Ridge. The Grand Victorian Gambling Parlor will be located in the blue building across from Tom's Sunset Casino on Sunset Road. Charles Englert applied for a comprehensive plan amendment and zone change for the casino. If approved, the property at 333 and 215 W. Sunset Road and 1112 N. Boulder Highway will be changed from general industrial and highway commercial to a highway commercial with master development plan district. The South Valley Ranch development, generally located east of Boulder Highway and north of Athens Avenue in the Pittman planning area, will present five planned unit developments (PUDs) and tentative maps for public discussion. The developments range in size from 22 to 33.8 acres with densities firom 7.1 to 4.3 dwelling units per acre. Sprint Cellular/Cellular One will present plans for an 85-foot high monopole and storage facility at 1150 Norellat Road in the Calico Ridge planning area. The item appeared before the commission Nov. 17, but was continued so that the applicant could meet with concerned homeowners. Residents were concerned that the monopole and storage facility would be an eyesore. Other items on the commission's full agenda include a continued public hearing for a variance requested by Brian and Mjrra Greenspun. The variance would permit the height of a wall at2Dovetail Circle to be increased from six feet to eight feet on a comer side yard street and rear yard. If approved, the wall vrill also be increased from 32 inches to eight feet within a front-yard setback. Other business • Representatives of the Henderson Commerce Center will request an amendment of land use from light industry/business park to community and neighborhood shopping for property at the northeast comer of Warm Springs Road and Stephanie Street • A use permit request and architectural review will be heard forWienerschnitzel.Thefast-food restaurant will be located at 2527 Windmill Parkway in a community commercial district. • Cellular One will request use permits and variances for communications monopoles at 81 North Gibson Road and 875 S. Boulder Highway. Architectural reviews for the 70-foot high monopoles will be presented as well. • The city of Henderson will request a use permit for a three milliongallon water reservoir tank at 1198 South Eastern Ave. in the MacDonald Ranch planning area. An architectural review will also be presented. The meeting will begin tonight at 7 p.m. in the City Council Chambers in City Hall, 240 Water Street. Items voted on by the Commission will advance to City Council for final action. WARDS: Motives of change debated From Page 1 Map rV, Vinny Parolisi, said their goal was to retain each Councilman in their current ward and to move the least amount of precincts. "We want consistent representation as possibl e," Van Wyck said. He then proceeded to crunch a fewnumberstohighlighthispoint that their map contained the fewest changes. Map I moves 23,052 people in 16 precincts. Map II moves 30,313 people in 22 precincts. Map III moves 36,892 in 27 precincts. "I don't think there is any need to move thousand and thousands of people. Seven percent will do it [referring to his map and the total of people moved within the city). If you do not like Map TV, please give the reasons why you choose another map." Parolisi added, "The issue is, is it correct and in the best interest to relocate one-third of the city when we have come forward with amap thataccomplishes the same goal with moving only 7% of the population?" He then commented on the affects of the city's proposed maps on the Councilmen. "It's interesting to note that Ward III gets loaded up and Councilman [Jack] Clark is not up for re-election." More than 14,000 people will not be able to run for election if the Council selected Map III, Parolisi said. Thecity's 1995 general election will be for Wards I, II, IV. Councilman Paul Ruth represents Ward I, Councilman Andy Hafen represents Ward II and Councilman Larry Scheffler represents Ward IV. Ward III, the Mayor's seat and the Municipal Judge's seat are up for re-election in 1997. The discussion became heated midway through the issue. Mayor Bob Groesbeck implied that Parolisi and Van Wyck were Ijdng when they claimed they crunched the precinct numbers wth the use of only a pen and pad instead of using a computer. Although Clark is not up for reelection, he dominated the discussion from the dais. He felt offended with the citizens' presentation. "Itgives an impression that there is a conspiracy and I am part of it." Parolisi replied, "A guilty conscience needs no accuser. There is no conspiracy." Clark said redistricting wards always adversely affects some people. There are a couple of people in the audience that couldn't run last time because of redistricting." But he encourages anyone to run. Rhonda Nassersharif, who has been zoned out of running for office twice because of redistricting the Whitney Ranch area, addressed political ramifications of redrawing the wards. "The CAC [Citizens Advisory Committee! disbanded and was recreated because the city wanted betterrepresentationandbalance. I wondered what will happen to the CAC?" Groesbeck corrected NassersharifstatingtheCAC was reconstituted by ordinance. Jim Frey, a sociologist at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, was concerned with other political repercussions — low voter tumout. Because of recent redistricting, many people in the Whitney Ranch neighborhood have felt disenfranchised,he said. "To avoid alienation with the city, you should move the least City of Henderson, Nevada 1995 WARD MAP WARD 1 ^WARD 2 Prepared by: Information Services, Planning Department amountofpeople,"Freysaid."Map rV may keep more people in the political process." Councilman Andy Hafen said this is the fourth ward map since his tenure and this time the city has had the luxury of using a computer. "I agree 100% with the numbers." Hafen's main reason for sticking with Map III was because he wants a map that represents Henderson geographically, both east and west areas in each ofthe Councilmen's wards. BUFFER: Council rejects change From Page 1 closer. "I can spit over the wall onto the [casino] property. The other people would have to spit 1,200 feet. That's pretty good spitting." Weiss said the zone change would provide more of a buffer between the homeowners and the casino project. Without the zone change, the nearest neighbors could be as 25 feet away from his project, he said. If the Council had approved the zone change, Weiss said he would build a 200-foot buffer. Councilman Jack Clark said he was afraid of something that could happen instead of what is happening in the area. "Someone ii going to come in short order and say single-family is not suitable for the area." Weiis countered saying that his prcgect, if approved with the zone change, will affect the same amount of people as in the old plan, but there would be more distance between the casino and the residents. Councilman Larry SchefHer suggested putting a deed "I can spa over the waU onto the [casino] property. The other people would have to spit 1,200 feet Thafs pretty good spitting." restriction on the adjacent land owner, which would prevent them from re-zoning to multi-family. City Attorney Shauna Hu^es told the Council they could not legally make that motion. In other business, the Council: •Unanimously approved a horse ordinance concerning the setback requirements for corrals. •Unanimously approved the 1994 water and sanitary sewer bond. •Tabled to Jan. 3 revisions for the liquor Ucense ordinance. •Unanimously approved afiveyearleasemtheRobertA. Swadell Justice Facility with Clark County. •Unanimously approved an amendmentforthelandusepolicy plan for American Nevada Corp. on l.SlOacres south of Lake Mead Drive between Pecos Road and WaKerWasner Arroyo Grande Boulevard in the Green Valley Ranch planning area. •Dissolved the Multi-Family Task Force. •Unanimously approved an agreement between the city and Taylor Elementary School for Community Development Block Grants. •Unanimously approved a use permit for a public library in the Pecos-Wigwam Commercial Center at 80 Pecos Road in the Green Valley Southneighborhood. •Unanimously approved a personnel amendment by deleting two administrative assistant positions and adding two economic development analyst positions and a budget augmentation for data processing. •Unanimously approved a business Ucense for a change in ownership from sole owner to corporation for Lake Mead Lounge, 845 E. Lake Mead Dr. in the Valley View neighborhood. •Unanimously approved an architectural review for two "office trailers totaling 1,020 square feet on 14 acres for Bonanza Materials at 1401 American Pacific Dr. •Unanimously approved amendment to the approved tennis court variance to increase the number of lights from six to 10 at 3007 Regency Hill in the Green Valley neighborhood. •Unanimously approved an architectural review for a golf course and club house at 1 Showboat Club Dr. in the Green Valley neighborhood. •Referred to the Jan. 3 meeting an ordinance for neutering or spaying dogs and cats before release from the city's animal shelter. HOLIDAY DEADLINES The following display & classified advertising deadlines will be in effect through the holidays: ISSUE DEADLINE Tuesday Dec. 27 & Jan. 3 Panorama Dec. 29 & Jan. 5 Noon Thursday Dec. 22 & Dec. 29 Noon Friday Dec. 23 & Dec. 30 News offices will be closed Monday, December 26 and January 2, 1995 HOME NEWS An Independent Newspaper Founded June 1, 1951 Henderson Home News (USPS 516649) Published every Tuesday and Thursda> morning at 2 Commerce Center Drive, Henderson, Nevada, by HBC • Publications Inc. Second class postage paid at Henderson, Nevada. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: HENDERSON HOME NEWS 2 Commerce Center Drive Henderson, NV 89014 Phone (702) 564-1861 Customer complaint calls will be accepted from 7 to 10 am on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Missed papers will be distributed by noon. MIKE O'CALLAGHAN Publisher CAROLYN O'CALLAGHAN Co-Publisher TIM O'CALLAGHAN General Manager PAUL SZYDELKO Managing Editor MARY COLLEEN MIELE Circulation Manager HBC PUBUCATIONS Mike O'Callaghan, President; Carolyn O'Callaghan, Vice President; Tim O'Callaghan, TreasurerA/ice President; Mary Colleen Miele, Vice President; Ruthe Deskin, Secretary. SUBSCRIPTION RATES Single 25 cents One Year $20 MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS West of Mississippi$30peryear $20 for six months East of Misslsslppl$35 per year $25 for six rTKXiths 4 Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News Page 3 Christmas trees a no-no for local businesses Thomaa Moor* News Staff Writer Put a hold on that chorus of "0 Christmas Tree" if you own a business in Henderson because the Fire Department is enforcing afire code which all but bans trees from public spaces. At least one local business man feels the enforcement is sudden and unfair. According to Fire Marshal Jim Madden, several local businesses have been warned that the trees they put up are in violation ofthe Fire Code because they have not gotten the necessary permit and the trees have not been treated with an approved fire retardant. But, according to Madden, no retardants or companies which apply retardant have been approved in Henderson. Madden, who said the restriction does not affect people's homes, quoted two different sections ofthe Fire Code, one for pubbc spacesandthe other pertaining generally to businesses. "You have to have a permit to place the tree. The trees should be treated by a retardant approved by the chief or approved by Underwriters Laboratories or recognized by another state fire marshall," Madden said, reading from the code. They have to bear a tag with the type of retardant, the name of the person applying the retardant...." The code also mandates that trees have their stumps cut at an angle at least one inch above the original cut and that hot water be used the first time the tree is watered. Two local business people who were warned by the Fire Department were ambivalent about the code enforcement. Because of fear of retribution, one person would not comment and another would do so only if his name and the name of his business were not mentioned. Both had spentalarge amount of money for their trees— more than $100 each — and one tree was used to help collect toys for the Toys for Tots Christmas Charity. "First, if I had known about this, I would never have put up the tree," the second business man said. "I invested $120 for a tree and they tell you that you have to have a permit, but they aren't issuing any. We had it sprayed and everything." As it stands, the man's business musthave the tree taken down Iby today. The man said the code, which was adopted in 1991, had not been enforced and he questioned why, all of a sudden, the Fire Departr ment would start enforcement withoutnotifyinglocalbusinesses. Madden said the code has been enforced since he started working in the Fire Prevention Division in 1991. He said some businesses have been notified about the code in the past, but admitted no other notification of the rule was done. He said next year he would warn businesses before the Christmas season starts. When describing how the Fire Department approached the enforcement Madden said that businesses would only face the code if someone called the Fire Department and complained. The business would then be made aware of the code, asked to turn offany Christmas lights, and the inspectors would return in a week to ensure compliance. He also said if the person with the tree could show some evidence that the retardant they had used was approved by some authority or some evidence that it worked, they would accept that—for this year. But, for at least one business this Christmas season, the eightfoot tree they used to mark the holiday season and to help gather toys for underprivileged children will be out the door. "Obviously we try to obey the law and do what's right.... They established a precedent by not enforcing it in the past and they should have notified us about it" STOPI ir* SHOP! Ladies Apparel & Accessories 26A Water St. • 565-7334 (Dovwilown Henderson) Judge recognized for helping iiomeiess Thomas Moor* News Staff Writer Henderson Municipal Judge Ken Proctor was recognized by the Clark County Bar Association last week for uprooting his entire courtroom and moving it out of Henderson. Although that may seem to be a peculiar thing for which to receive an honor, it was all done to help the homeless clear a legal patji so they could head toward employment and possibly a new direction in their lives. "Judge Proctor's efforts were a real important gesture to the homeless of Clark County," said Jan Rundus, the directing attorney for Nevada Legal Services, an organization which offers legal help for the poor. What Rundus was-talking about was the second annual Stand Down on Oct 19 when Nevada Legal Services and other groups who help the homeless, along Proctor's municipal court and several other area courts, moved their entire courtrooms to the Cashman Field complex for one day. The reason, according to Rundus, is simple: Helping the BUSINESS: Moves From Page 1 latest business to join the tenants of Gibson Industrial Park. The hydraulic parts and accessories supplier will be located at 6225 Center Point Road and employ approximately eight people after it opens in January. Hydro-craft manufactures hydraulic reservoirs at its Michigan plant. The new Henderson plant will stock these reservoirs and their patented line of MultiClamp and other clamping systems. Valence Technology, a research and development firm, will begin moving to its operation to the former GTE building in April. The building is located near Levi Strauss northwest of the intersection of Boulder Highway and Literstate 515. The company will research rechargeable batteries for electric cars. At least 30 people will work at the Valance facility. The company is relocating from San Jose, Calif Arm Barren, economic development director for the city of Henderson, said she is encouraged by the number ofbusinesses that dioose to relocate in the city. "It's really exciting to have these businesses here," she said. ALIA: Likes Nevada From Page 1 pit is filled in and the land reseeded following government regulations. Alta Gold received the Excellence in Mining Reclamation award in 1993. The award is granted by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, the USDA Forest Service, the Nevada DevelopmentofWildlife,theNevada Department of Minerals and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. Alta Gold moved its headquarters to Henderson from Salt Lake City in November 1993. Bergeson said the company recognized the favorable business climate. "We've always been a Nevada corporation," Bergeson said. "Nevada's support of companies is great — we also liked the weather. And this is an area that's really growing." Although the process of recovering precious and base metals is much more difficult than the "gold rush" days, it can still be profitable. Alta Gold seems to have found the right combination. homeless find work. Many of the homeless have various legal problems that prevent them from getting a Sheriffs Card which is a requirement for getting work at most places inClark County. And, unlike most people, they have no address and so they don't get notifications of warrants and citations. "A lot of the homeless don't know the legal problems they have out there," Rundus said. "We had computer systems on site. If they had any outstanding warrants, we could quash them or in some way deal with it." Proctor pointed out that no one with felony warrants came before him during the Stand Down. He said most of the problems were minor. "The homeless filled out forms and we ran the checks to see if they had any warrants and we would find alternative ways for them to handle it," he explained. "Ninety percent were people who had fmes to pay. No felony warrants came out." Proctor said all of the people who came thiough his court that ( day had warrants for failure to payfinesandjustashedoesinhis regular court, he found alternative methods for people to deal with their violations. "It depended on individual need,"Proctorsaid. "In somecases we gave them community service, in some cases we out and out dismissed them because there was absolutely no way for them to do community service." He said many homeless people, by definition, do not have the means to travel around Clark County to complete community CPR classes offered CPR Plus is offering courses in CPR, First Aid, Emergency Medical Technician, Emergency Medical Technician-Intermediate, and Emergency Medical Technician Refresher. For class time and dates, call CPR PLUS, 252-8969. nm% Green Volley Computer Services Vour Locol Source For PC Solutions S Consulting S Aepoirs B Upgrades Just Need Help? service assignments. Because of his effort, last Thursday, the Clark Coimty Bar Association recognized Proctor and several other judges and legal peopleforhelping these people to change their lot on life. Proctor said it was worth it. At first Stand Down in 1993, he participated because he was asked. But a letter he received afterward prompted his second volunteer effort. "The first year I became involved because I was asked to," Proctor said. "But two months after, I got two different letters from people who were able to clear up warrants and were able to get jobs. They were thanking us [and after that] I was sold on the project." Both Proctor and Rundus said that kind of reaction means the Stand Down will be happening again next year. "]\(^?\ muDP^S" 'u ic( racia • roc ocirieirt OUtr good wilh coupon only Aj portkipatine BoiVm-fiobbtni bcolioni. No* wJid wi#i ony dintr oflir. Limit on* offar par coupon, per cuitomtf ToJWt not indudrc Void w4)tf prahibiMlorrnlriclKlbylow.VolidlhfOughDK 31,1994 4640 E. Sunset Rd. 458-1108 Smirtis Shopping Center Baskin^^Robbins.'^^^^ 2580 Wigwam Pkv/y. 896-4016 Mego Foods Shopping Center ORDER EARLY I • ^Tr\, ^^^^\_mim)m v The 1995 Calenders are in... Come get yours! ^@y.i&) (g^i^y^^ §% ^iF Ear Piercing special $2.99 Reg. $10.00 g^H Zt, GOLD CASTERS =^^-11" "Henderson's Most Trvsted Jewelers' "'P*""" DISTRIBUTOR WANTED FROM HOME ACT TODAY 737-1907 SKIN CARE & COSMETICS, VITAMINS & MINERALS, HEALTH DRINKS FOR ENDURANCE & STRENGTH BIODEGRADABLE LAUNDRY & CLEANING PRODUCTS DIET CONTROL MANAGEMENT. SHAKLEE NO INVESTMENT BUT YOUR TIME. CALL NOW! IND. DISTRIBUTOR I Eldorado's AO-You-Can-Eat Christmas Feast! Roast Tom Turbey with Home Style Dressing and Giblet Gravy Freshly Carved Prime Rib All Dinners Include Home Style Chicken and Dumpling Soup or Fresh Garden Green Salad Choice of Potato (Fresh Whipped Potato. Babed Potato or \^ms) Sweet Corn Rolls and Butter Pumpkin Pie nA.M.-11P.M. 140V;bter St. Downtown Henderson Reservations Suggested I-*"**?! .1," ?•'.', ,1 ff^. W^.l ^(,V

PAGE 3

Page 2 Henderson Home News Thursday, December 22,1994 ONE MAN'S VIEW: From Page 1 seldom loses bowl games. I've watched him win five Fiesta Bowls and one national title in Tempe. Ariz. He has also won three Orange Bowls, two Cotton Bowls and the Aloha Bowl, Holiday Bowl. Liberty Bowl. Sugar Bowl and Citrus Bowl. He has won everything but the Las Vegas Bowl. Paul, it looks like one tough way to start 1995. Paladin. Paladin you're on the way up. Fm talking about Paladin Advertising Agency that*s headed up by its founder Mike Sullivan and Vice President for Account Services Jim Ferrence. Both talented young men are Boulder City Hi^ School products we have watched since they were Eagles. Ferrence. a winner of the Go For Broke football award given by the Newfi and a Notre Dam University graduate, is a valuable asset to Sullivan's operation. Sullivan, a former employee and fellow worker of mine, has both the talent and confidence needed to produce for clients seeking political advice, pubUc relations contacts and advertising skills. He has already developed the reputation of being a winner and believable. Richard Boone. as Paladin, had gun and would travel. Sullivan and Ferrence have the skills and dedication needed to help their clients become winners. Henderson sports fans should be proud of Wolf Pack graduate Keith Clough who had seven tackles for UNLVs 52-24 victory over Central Michigan in Las Vegas Bowl III. Fans should be proud of Keith's play, but not surprised. He has played tough football as a linebacker when both hurt and healthy. No other Rebel has been more consistent and productive than the man from Henderson. From Roll Call newspaper on Capitol Hill comes this bit of interesting information: "Incoming Speaker Newt Gingrich and incoming Mjgority Leader Dick Armey are increasing the budgets of their offices by nearly 50%. Armey's Minority Leader's Office will be funded at $1.5 million per year — an increase of nearly 50% over outgoing mtyority leader Dick Gephardt's $1 milHon budget. Gingrich's Speaker's Office will be funded at $2.1 million per year — also an increase of nearly 50% over outgoing Speaker Tom Foley's $1.4 million budget. Ironically, these budget increases were announced shortly after these same GOP leaders annoimced that they were eliminating funding for Congressional Legislative Service Organizations such as the Black Caucus, the Hispanic Caucus, and Uie Women's Issues Caucus, as a costcutting reform measure." O'Callaghan, a former two-term governor of Nevada, is publisher of the News. Victorian Casino to be considered KathyStrMtcf News Staff Writer The Henderson Planning Commission will hear plans tonight for a casino at Sunset Road and Boulder Highway, a subdivision in the Pittman planning area and a Sprint Cellular/Cellular One monopole and storage shed at Calico Ridge. The Grand Victorian Gambling Parlor will be located in the blue building across from Tom's Sunset Casino on Sunset Road. Charles Englert applied for a comprehensive plan amendment and zone change for the casino. If approved, the property at 333 and 215 W. Sunset Road and 1112 N. Boulder Highway will be changed from general industrial and highway commercial to a highway commercial with master development plan district. The South Valley Ranch development, generally located east of Boulder Highway and north of Athens Avenue in the Pittman planning area, will present five planned unit developments (PUDs) and tentative maps for public discussion. The developments range in size from 22 to 33.8 acres with densities firom 7.1 to 4.3 dwelling units per acre. Sprint Cellular/Cellular One will present plans for an 85-foot high monopole and storage facility at 1150 Norellat Road in the Calico Ridge planning area. The item appeared before the commission Nov. 17, but was continued so that the applicant could meet with concerned homeowners. Residents were concerned that the monopole and storage facility would be an eyesore. Other items on the commission's full agenda include a continued public hearing for a variance requested by Brian and Mjrra Greenspun. The variance would permit the height of a wall at2Dovetail Circle to be increased from six feet to eight feet on a comer side yard street and rear yard. If approved, the wall vrill also be increased from 32 inches to eight feet within a front-yard setback. Other business • Representatives of the Henderson Commerce Center will request an amendment of land use from light industry/business park to community and neighborhood shopping for property at the northeast comer of Warm Springs Road and Stephanie Street • A use permit request and architectural review will be heard forWienerschnitzel.Thefast-food restaurant will be located at 2527 Windmill Parkway in a community commercial district. • Cellular One will request use permits and variances for communications monopoles at 81 North Gibson Road and 875 S. Boulder Highway. Architectural reviews for the 70-foot high monopoles will be presented as well. • The city of Henderson will request a use permit for a three milliongallon water reservoir tank at 1198 South Eastern Ave. in the MacDonald Ranch planning area. An architectural review will also be presented. The meeting will begin tonight at 7 p.m. in the City Council Chambers in City Hall, 240 Water Street. Items voted on by the Commission will advance to City Council for final action. WARDS: Motives of change debated From Page 1 Map rV, Vinny Parolisi, said their goal was to retain each Councilman in their current ward and to move the least amount of precincts. "We want consistent representation as possibl e," Van Wyck said. He then proceeded to crunch a fewnumberstohighlighthispoint that their map contained the fewest changes. Map I moves 23,052 people in 16 precincts. Map II moves 30,313 people in 22 precincts. Map III moves 36,892 in 27 precincts. "I don't think there is any need to move thousand and thousands of people. Seven percent will do it [referring to his map and the total of people moved within the city). If you do not like Map TV, please give the reasons why you choose another map." Parolisi added, "The issue is, is it correct and in the best interest to relocate one-third of the city when we have come forward with amap thataccomplishes the same goal with moving only 7% of the population?" He then commented on the affects of the city's proposed maps on the Councilmen. "It's interesting to note that Ward III gets loaded up and Councilman [Jack] Clark is not up for re-election." More than 14,000 people will not be able to run for election if the Council selected Map III, Parolisi said. Thecity's 1995 general election will be for Wards I, II, IV. Councilman Paul Ruth represents Ward I, Councilman Andy Hafen represents Ward II and Councilman Larry Scheffler represents Ward IV. Ward III, the Mayor's seat and the Municipal Judge's seat are up for re-election in 1997. The discussion became heated midway through the issue. Mayor Bob Groesbeck implied that Parolisi and Van Wyck were Ijdng when they claimed they crunched the precinct numbers wth the use of only a pen and pad instead of using a computer. Although Clark is not up for reelection, he dominated the discussion from the dais. He felt offended with the citizens' presentation. "Itgives an impression that there is a conspiracy and I am part of it." Parolisi replied, "A guilty conscience needs no accuser. There is no conspiracy." Clark said redistricting wards always adversely affects some people. There are a couple of people in the audience that couldn't run last time because of redistricting." But he encourages anyone to run. Rhonda Nassersharif, who has been zoned out of running for office twice because of redistricting the Whitney Ranch area, addressed political ramifications of redrawing the wards. "The CAC [Citizens Advisory Committee! disbanded and was recreated because the city wanted betterrepresentationandbalance. I wondered what will happen to the CAC?" Groesbeck corrected NassersharifstatingtheCAC was reconstituted by ordinance. Jim Frey, a sociologist at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, was concerned with other political repercussions — low voter tumout. Because of recent redistricting, many people in the Whitney Ranch neighborhood have felt disenfranchised,he said. "To avoid alienation with the city, you should move the least City of Henderson, Nevada 1995 WARD MAP WARD 1 ^WARD 2 Prepared by: Information Services, Planning Department amountofpeople,"Freysaid."Map rV may keep more people in the political process." Councilman Andy Hafen said this is the fourth ward map since his tenure and this time the city has had the luxury of using a computer. "I agree 100% with the numbers." Hafen's main reason for sticking with Map III was because he wants a map that represents Henderson geographically, both east and west areas in each ofthe Councilmen's wards. BUFFER: Council rejects change From Page 1 closer. "I can spit over the wall onto the [casino] property. The other people would have to spit 1,200 feet. That's pretty good spitting." Weiss said the zone change would provide more of a buffer between the homeowners and the casino project. Without the zone change, the nearest neighbors could be as 25 feet away from his project, he said. If the Council had approved the zone change, Weiss said he would build a 200-foot buffer. Councilman Jack Clark said he was afraid of something that could happen instead of what is happening in the area. "Someone ii going to come in short order and say single-family is not suitable for the area." Weiis countered saying that his prcgect, if approved with the zone change, will affect the same amount of people as in the old plan, but there would be more distance between the casino and the residents. Councilman Larry SchefHer suggested putting a deed "I can spa over the waU onto the [casino] property. The other people would have to spit 1,200 feet Thafs pretty good spitting." restriction on the adjacent land owner, which would prevent them from re-zoning to multi-family. City Attorney Shauna Hu^es told the Council they could not legally make that motion. In other business, the Council: •Unanimously approved a horse ordinance concerning the setback requirements for corrals. •Unanimously approved the 1994 water and sanitary sewer bond. •Tabled to Jan. 3 revisions for the liquor Ucense ordinance. •Unanimously approved afiveyearleasemtheRobertA. Swadell Justice Facility with Clark County. •Unanimously approved an amendmentforthelandusepolicy plan for American Nevada Corp. on l.SlOacres south of Lake Mead Drive between Pecos Road and WaKerWasner Arroyo Grande Boulevard in the Green Valley Ranch planning area. •Dissolved the Multi-Family Task Force. •Unanimously approved an agreement between the city and Taylor Elementary School for Community Development Block Grants. •Unanimously approved a use permit for a public library in the Pecos-Wigwam Commercial Center at 80 Pecos Road in the Green Valley Southneighborhood. •Unanimously approved a personnel amendment by deleting two administrative assistant positions and adding two economic development analyst positions and a budget augmentation for data processing. •Unanimously approved a business Ucense for a change in ownership from sole owner to corporation for Lake Mead Lounge, 845 E. Lake Mead Dr. in the Valley View neighborhood. •Unanimously approved an architectural review for two "office trailers totaling 1,020 square feet on 14 acres for Bonanza Materials at 1401 American Pacific Dr. •Unanimously approved amendment to the approved tennis court variance to increase the number of lights from six to 10 at 3007 Regency Hill in the Green Valley neighborhood. •Unanimously approved an architectural review for a golf course and club house at 1 Showboat Club Dr. in the Green Valley neighborhood. •Referred to the Jan. 3 meeting an ordinance for neutering or spaying dogs and cats before release from the city's animal shelter. HOLIDAY DEADLINES The following display & classified advertising deadlines will be in effect through the holidays: ISSUE DEADLINE Tuesday Dec. 27 & Jan. 3 Panorama Dec. 29 & Jan. 5 Noon Thursday Dec. 22 & Dec. 29 Noon Friday Dec. 23 & Dec. 30 News offices will be closed Monday, December 26 and January 2, 1995 HOME NEWS An Independent Newspaper Founded June 1, 1951 Henderson Home News (USPS 516649) Published every Tuesday and Thursda> morning at 2 Commerce Center Drive, Henderson, Nevada, by HBC • Publications Inc. Second class postage paid at Henderson, Nevada. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: HENDERSON HOME NEWS 2 Commerce Center Drive Henderson, NV 89014 Phone (702) 564-1861 Customer complaint calls will be accepted from 7 to 10 am on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Missed papers will be distributed by noon. MIKE O'CALLAGHAN Publisher CAROLYN O'CALLAGHAN Co-Publisher TIM O'CALLAGHAN General Manager PAUL SZYDELKO Managing Editor MARY COLLEEN MIELE Circulation Manager HBC PUBUCATIONS Mike O'Callaghan, President; Carolyn O'Callaghan, Vice President; Tim O'Callaghan, TreasurerA/ice President; Mary Colleen Miele, Vice President; Ruthe Deskin, Secretary. SUBSCRIPTION RATES Single 25 cents One Year $20 MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS West of Mississippi$30peryear $20 for six months East of Misslsslppl$35 per year $25 for six rTKXiths 4 Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News Page 3 Christmas trees a no-no for local businesses Thomaa Moor* News Staff Writer Put a hold on that chorus of "0 Christmas Tree" if you own a business in Henderson because the Fire Department is enforcing afire code which all but bans trees from public spaces. At least one local business man feels the enforcement is sudden and unfair. According to Fire Marshal Jim Madden, several local businesses have been warned that the trees they put up are in violation ofthe Fire Code because they have not gotten the necessary permit and the trees have not been treated with an approved fire retardant. But, according to Madden, no retardants or companies which apply retardant have been approved in Henderson. Madden, who said the restriction does not affect people's homes, quoted two different sections ofthe Fire Code, one for pubbc spacesandthe other pertaining generally to businesses. "You have to have a permit to place the tree. The trees should be treated by a retardant approved by the chief or approved by Underwriters Laboratories or recognized by another state fire marshall," Madden said, reading from the code. They have to bear a tag with the type of retardant, the name of the person applying the retardant...." The code also mandates that trees have their stumps cut at an angle at least one inch above the original cut and that hot water be used the first time the tree is watered. Two local business people who were warned by the Fire Department were ambivalent about the code enforcement. Because of fear of retribution, one person would not comment and another would do so only if his name and the name of his business were not mentioned. Both had spentalarge amount of money for their trees— more than $100 each — and one tree was used to help collect toys for the Toys for Tots Christmas Charity. "First, if I had known about this, I would never have put up the tree," the second business man said. "I invested $120 for a tree and they tell you that you have to have a permit, but they aren't issuing any. We had it sprayed and everything." As it stands, the man's business musthave the tree taken down Iby today. The man said the code, which was adopted in 1991, had not been enforced and he questioned why, all of a sudden, the Fire Departr ment would start enforcement withoutnotifyinglocalbusinesses. Madden said the code has been enforced since he started working in the Fire Prevention Division in 1991. He said some businesses have been notified about the code in the past, but admitted no other notification of the rule was done. He said next year he would warn businesses before the Christmas season starts. When describing how the Fire Department approached the enforcement Madden said that businesses would only face the code if someone called the Fire Department and complained. The business would then be made aware of the code, asked to turn offany Christmas lights, and the inspectors would return in a week to ensure compliance. He also said if the person with the tree could show some evidence that the retardant they had used was approved by some authority or some evidence that it worked, they would accept that—for this year. But, for at least one business this Christmas season, the eightfoot tree they used to mark the holiday season and to help gather toys for underprivileged children will be out the door. "Obviously we try to obey the law and do what's right.... They established a precedent by not enforcing it in the past and they should have notified us about it" STOPI ir* SHOP! Ladies Apparel & Accessories 26A Water St. • 565-7334 (Dovwilown Henderson) Judge recognized for helping iiomeiess Thomas Moor* News Staff Writer Henderson Municipal Judge Ken Proctor was recognized by the Clark County Bar Association last week for uprooting his entire courtroom and moving it out of Henderson. Although that may seem to be a peculiar thing for which to receive an honor, it was all done to help the homeless clear a legal patji so they could head toward employment and possibly a new direction in their lives. "Judge Proctor's efforts were a real important gesture to the homeless of Clark County," said Jan Rundus, the directing attorney for Nevada Legal Services, an organization which offers legal help for the poor. What Rundus was-talking about was the second annual Stand Down on Oct 19 when Nevada Legal Services and other groups who help the homeless, along Proctor's municipal court and several other area courts, moved their entire courtrooms to the Cashman Field complex for one day. The reason, according to Rundus, is simple: Helping the BUSINESS: Moves From Page 1 latest business to join the tenants of Gibson Industrial Park. The hydraulic parts and accessories supplier will be located at 6225 Center Point Road and employ approximately eight people after it opens in January. Hydro-craft manufactures hydraulic reservoirs at its Michigan plant. The new Henderson plant will stock these reservoirs and their patented line of MultiClamp and other clamping systems. Valence Technology, a research and development firm, will begin moving to its operation to the former GTE building in April. The building is located near Levi Strauss northwest of the intersection of Boulder Highway and Literstate 515. The company will research rechargeable batteries for electric cars. At least 30 people will work at the Valance facility. The company is relocating from San Jose, Calif Arm Barren, economic development director for the city of Henderson, said she is encouraged by the number ofbusinesses that dioose to relocate in the city. "It's really exciting to have these businesses here," she said. ALIA: Likes Nevada From Page 1 pit is filled in and the land reseeded following government regulations. Alta Gold received the Excellence in Mining Reclamation award in 1993. The award is granted by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, the USDA Forest Service, the Nevada DevelopmentofWildlife,theNevada Department of Minerals and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. Alta Gold moved its headquarters to Henderson from Salt Lake City in November 1993. Bergeson said the company recognized the favorable business climate. "We've always been a Nevada corporation," Bergeson said. "Nevada's support of companies is great — we also liked the weather. And this is an area that's really growing." Although the process of recovering precious and base metals is much more difficult than the "gold rush" days, it can still be profitable. Alta Gold seems to have found the right combination. homeless find work. Many of the homeless have various legal problems that prevent them from getting a Sheriffs Card which is a requirement for getting work at most places inClark County. And, unlike most people, they have no address and so they don't get notifications of warrants and citations. "A lot of the homeless don't know the legal problems they have out there," Rundus said. "We had computer systems on site. If they had any outstanding warrants, we could quash them or in some way deal with it." Proctor pointed out that no one with felony warrants came before him during the Stand Down. He said most of the problems were minor. "The homeless filled out forms and we ran the checks to see if they had any warrants and we would find alternative ways for them to handle it," he explained. "Ninety percent were people who had fmes to pay. No felony warrants came out." Proctor said all of the people who came thiough his court that ( day had warrants for failure to payfinesandjustashedoesinhis regular court, he found alternative methods for people to deal with their violations. "It depended on individual need,"Proctorsaid. "In somecases we gave them community service, in some cases we out and out dismissed them because there was absolutely no way for them to do community service." He said many homeless people, by definition, do not have the means to travel around Clark County to complete community CPR classes offered CPR Plus is offering courses in CPR, First Aid, Emergency Medical Technician, Emergency Medical Technician-Intermediate, and Emergency Medical Technician Refresher. For class time and dates, call CPR PLUS, 252-8969. nm% Green Volley Computer Services Vour Locol Source For PC Solutions S Consulting S Aepoirs B Upgrades Just Need Help? service assignments. Because of his effort, last Thursday, the Clark Coimty Bar Association recognized Proctor and several other judges and legal peopleforhelping these people to change their lot on life. Proctor said it was worth it. At first Stand Down in 1993, he participated because he was asked. But a letter he received afterward prompted his second volunteer effort. "The first year I became involved because I was asked to," Proctor said. "But two months after, I got two different letters from people who were able to clear up warrants and were able to get jobs. They were thanking us [and after that] I was sold on the project." Both Proctor and Rundus said that kind of reaction means the Stand Down will be happening again next year. "]\(^?\ muDP^S" 'u ic( racia • roc ocirieirt OUtr good wilh coupon only Aj portkipatine BoiVm-fiobbtni bcolioni. No* wJid wi#i ony dintr oflir. Limit on* offar par coupon, per cuitomtf ToJWt not indudrc Void w4)tf prahibiMlorrnlriclKlbylow.VolidlhfOughDK 31,1994 4640 E. Sunset Rd. 458-1108 Smirtis Shopping Center Baskin^^Robbins.'^^^^ 2580 Wigwam Pkv/y. 896-4016 Mego Foods Shopping Center ORDER EARLY I • ^Tr\, ^^^^\_mim)m v The 1995 Calenders are in... Come get yours! ^@y.i&) (g^i^y^^ §% ^iF Ear Piercing special $2.99 Reg. $10.00 g^H Zt, GOLD CASTERS =^^-11" "Henderson's Most Trvsted Jewelers' "'P*""" DISTRIBUTOR WANTED FROM HOME ACT TODAY 737-1907 SKIN CARE & COSMETICS, VITAMINS & MINERALS, HEALTH DRINKS FOR ENDURANCE & STRENGTH BIODEGRADABLE LAUNDRY & CLEANING PRODUCTS DIET CONTROL MANAGEMENT. SHAKLEE NO INVESTMENT BUT YOUR TIME. CALL NOW! IND. DISTRIBUTOR I Eldorado's AO-You-Can-Eat Christmas Feast! Roast Tom Turbey with Home Style Dressing and Giblet Gravy Freshly Carved Prime Rib All Dinners Include Home Style Chicken and Dumpling Soup or Fresh Garden Green Salad Choice of Potato (Fresh Whipped Potato. Babed Potato or \^ms) Sweet Corn Rolls and Butter Pumpkin Pie nA.M.-11P.M. 140V;bter St. Downtown Henderson Reservations Suggested I-*"**?! .1," ?•'.', ,1 ff^. W^.l ^(,V

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VIEWPOINT Pag* 4 Henderson Home News HOME NEWS 'MkaO'CrtiiglMii PubKihw 'CwolYiiO'Callighw Co-Publish (f 'PMilSxyMko Managing Editor Thursday, December 22,1994 NEWS VIEW Guessing game part of political process The City Council acted as prognosticators Tuesday night. The task before that body was to select a new map for redrawing election wards, as required by state statute. For the first time in many years, the city had a choice of three proposed maps. Citizens became involved with the political process and offered another map—a map that would reduce the nxmiber of people who would be redistricted by one-fifth the number the Council ultimately selected. Although the citizens' map was valid and met all the state requirements, the Council chose to ignore the map that would redistrict only 7,000 people. Instead they chose a map that will redistrict more than 36,000 people. Because of the city's dynamic growth, the Council reasoned the wards will have to be redrawn dramatically sooner or later. The predominantly east^west configuration of the new map anticipates even growth in each of the wards. Unable to definitely predict where residents will settle in the fiiture, the Council is taking a shot in the dark. They don't want to redistrict large numbers of people in the fiiture, so they will do it now and hope that tlie areas grow evenly. In two years, the Council will have to look again at the population of each ward. People again may be redistricted. How many is anyone's guess. Although the Council attempted to use foresight in its selection process, they are not clairvoyant. Letfs hope this map does the trick and this large a number of people will not have to be redistricted soon. It is hard to imagine that more than one-third of the city will be adversely affected in two years if they selected the citizens' map. The repercussions of the Council's decision is that several thousand people will not be able to run for office in the next election. They were redistricted into another ward which is not up for election until 1997. End of nuclear road; too many safety, waste woes The first generation of nuclear energy came to a close last week when the Tennessee Valley Authority canceled the last three nuclear power plants still under construction in the USA. After 50 years and billions of dollars, the dawn of an era has ended. Hail and farewell, and what went wrong? Essentially, the nation decided that nuclear power wasn't worth the price. Nuclear utilities like TVA just took a while to react The near-meltdown at Pennsylvania's Three Mile Island reactor in 1979 crystallized public doubts about safety and launched a new round of regulation. That uncovered widespread problems that, in turn, increased construction delays and raised costs to uneconomic levels. Not one new reactor has been ordered since. Since then, existing nuclear power plants have continued to produce overpriced power, even as state and federal decisions to eliminate many of nuclear energy's price buffers compounded the problem. Nobody knows this better than the TVA. Of the 17 units it envisioned building, only five ever went m line, and two of those have been shut down for safety reasons. The three plants canceled this week were ordered in 1970. All three had construction permits within four years. Yet 20 years later, one unit is only 88% complete and the others lag far behind. Even if nuclear power still holds distant promise, the current supply of aging reactors can't fulfill it. Years— maybe decades—may pass before a new generation of plants can be certified. In the meantime, other promising technologies are emerging: •Solar energy. Breakthroughs have dropped costs so low that a private company now plans to build a fully commercial solar-power plant in Nevada. •Wind. New studies hint that, especially in the Midwest, windmills can generate competitively priced electricity. •Natural gas. Clean, cheap, plentifiil. •Co-generation. This technology makes power plants more efficient by harnessing heat produced when generating electricity. Cheap and abundant energy may well be possible without nuclear power. Certainly, safer energy is. We produce roughly 1,800 metric tons of radioactive waste annually, but we have no safe place to put it. A plan to hollow out a mountain in Nevada is years behind schedule, may not be feasible due to earthquake activity, and in any event will be too small. Nuclear energy provides only 21% of our electrical needs, 4% of our total energy consumption. Is it worth the trouble? Not until the problems of waste, safety and cost are completely resolved. In the meantime, the first atomic age is coming to an end. Will the last one out turn off the lights? No need. Hie (ioe-bri|^t world of nudear power has already gone dark. U.SA. Today RICHARD COHEN Clintons aren't evil WASHINGTON Of all the books written about the Clinton administration, maybe the most pertinent was published long before Bill Clinton came to Washington and is not about poUtics at all. I am thinking of Truman Capote's "Answered Prayers." The title Capote said was taken from the iiyunction of St. Therese: There are more tears shed over answered prayers than unanswered ones!! Neither Bill nor Hillary Clinton is evil and yet they have suffered as if they were. Their friends have let them down or succumbed to the pressures of Washington. Their administration is barely viable and the Clintons themselves are treated as abstractions, not real people. The meanness, the pettiness, the gross bad taste of some of their critics is, really, beyond the bounds of politics — and those bounds are huge to begin with. The Clinton saga is taking on tragic, almost novelistic, dimensions. Joycelyn Elders, who followed Clinton from Little Rock to Washington, got her prayers answered in the way St. Therese warned. Just a few days before she was fired, Webster Hubbell, a former associate attorney general and onetime Hillary Clinton law partner, pleaded guilty to tax evasion. As a Little Rock lawyer, he cheated both his firm and his clients but it was as a high-profile Washington official that he was exposed. The special prosecutor doesn't go aftr smalltown cheaters. Still earlier, yet another Rose partner and a confidant of Mrs. Clinton's, Vincent Foster, was found dead in a park across the Potomac from Washington. He was a suicide — the official ruling, in any case — but whatever the cause of Foster's death and whatever the reason, he is yet another Arkansan who met tragedy or ridicule in Washington. William H. Kennedy III, yet another Rose partner, has quit as White House associate counsel and is going back to Little Rock. His role in the so-called Travelgate affair was questioned and,earlier, it was disclosed he had failed to pay taxes for his family's nanny. Had he stayed in Arkansas, no one would have cared about him or his nanny. The Clintons must be suffering from a form of shell shock. The toll Washington has taken among their oldest friends amounts to a bloodbath — and the enemy is virtually breaching the White House gate itself In midterm, the Clinton administration has been resoundingly rejected by the American people. Mrs. Clinton is casting around for a role to play. She is blamed for the debacle of health reform and criticized for everything from her administrative abilities to her inability to stick with a hairstyle. As for the president, things are no better. He has a dismal approval rating and is spoken of with bitter contempt in this city. More than a few announce he will not seek a second term. Even those who reject — or recoil from — such a possibility, rally around the president with little more than fatalism. Theirs is a contemporary charge of the Light Brigade. A while back, I received a letter from a resident of Manassas, Va. He told of a visit to the local mall where he passed a gift shop displaying two roles of toilet paper. "One had the name and face of President Clinton on it, sheet by sheet, and the other his wife." The man protested to the store owner, but to no avail. "I ask you, Mr. Cohen, have we descended so low?" he wrote. "I must ask, what is it about the Clintons that arouses such odium?" I don't know. I can provide many reasons, but not enough to account for the antipathy. I can cite Gennifer Flowers, gays in the military, vacillation in foreign policy, the flap about the draft., stuttered decisionmaking and much more — including those running shorts. But I can also cite a country that's at peace and which is fairly prosperous. A little — even a lot — of criticism would be understandable, not to mention deserved. But the Clintons get more than that. They get a pie in the face every day. A sad episode in American political history is being played out here. So many Clinton friends set out for Washington with dreams of hope and glory and so many have been destroyed. The invective, the namecalling, the juvenile spitballs hurled at the White House add insult to what is, really, iiyury. Some of us have just plain lost our manners and have, in the process, forgotten that the presidency has already cost Bill and Hillary Clinton plenty. We may not owe them our political allegiance or, someday, our votes. But for the moment a little sympathy wouldn't hurt. Cohen is a columnist for the Washington Post Waters Group. GUY SHIPLER Alonso couldn't win this one Alfredo Alonso picked up the phone a couple of weeks ago to make a call that would change his life. It was to a fellow Republican and a close friend. Dean Heller, who would take office as Nevada's secretary of state on Jan. 2. Alonso figured he had a good chance of keeping the job he holds under Cheryl Lau—the chief deputy of elections. Now he felt he had to tell his firiend that he would be too much of a liability to serve in his office. Intead, he would resign his state job on the very day Heller Would be sworn in. The reason was clear. Alonso had failed to notify the governor immediately, as the law requires, of two GOP challenges to the election of two Democrats to the Assembly. And they didn't know about the challenges until it was too late to file challenges of their own. Although he swears it had happened totally by accident, Alonso's mistake turned into a poltical mushroom cloud, destroying (he thought) his immaculate record of keeping his dehcate job non-partisan. Suddenly his job had become a key part of the white-hot political uproar resulting from the 21-21 RepublicanDemocratic tie in the Assembly. Alonso's experience in Washington (he had worked for former Sen. Chic Hecht and Barbara Vucanovish) had taught him just how devastasting to his career a mistake like this one would be. He knew the first Democratic accusations of dirty tricks would be aimed at his boss, Cheryl Lau. To try to stem it—and to set the record straight—he quickly announced that he had made the mistake and that Lau had nothing to do with it As usual, it didn't do much good. Democatic Assemblywoman Jan Evans, the object of one of the challenges, aimed her fiiry at Lau for her "dereliction of duty and malfeasance in office" because "You failed to (notify the governor) until after the deadline had passed... "Did this happen because of incompetence or because you and I are in different political parties? You have dishonored yourself and the office you hold. You vrill have to live with this stain on your record and on your conscience." Worst of all, Lau did not notify her personally of the challenge. Lau shot back three hefty missies of her own: (1) She was not even in the country at the time and knew nothing about any challenges; (2) there is no requirement in the law for the secretary of state to notify the recipient of such a challenge; and (3) the Democrats "had all the time they wanted to contest any election. We did nothing to preclude them from doing so." Even before the Evans letter intensifed the situation, Alonso had seen the handwriting on the wall—^his fiiture with Dean Heller was out the window of opportunity. So when Heller answered his call, Alfonso told him he was resigning as Deputy Secretary of State for Elections on Jan. 2, the day his friend would take office. "It was the only honorable thing to do," Alonso told me in an interview last week. "I told Heller that out of respect for him, and the importance of our fiiendship, it would be best for me to go on my way. Even thou^ my failure was an honest mistake, the question that there was some polticial manipulation could taint his tenure as secretary of state if I were oa his staff. It would be a disservice to Heller and to the state." But how could he have made such a huge mistake? The answer he gave in our interview was based, first, on what he has to work with: Alonso's fiiU-time staff consists of two people—himself and one other. Two other people work half-time each. His total of three bodies makes "this office the size of a rural coimty clerk's office. The Clark County clerk has a staff of about 40, Washoe about 18 or 20." But Alonso must oversee the election process in the entire state, ranging from administering filing of candidates for office through the election process itself—and what comes afterwards, including vote recounts and the Supreme Court's final canvass of the votes. Says Alonso: "We deal on the state level, but we also deal with county clerks at the local level—we hear from several of them every day." When the two challenges came in, Alonso had two recounts and a canvass to prepare for, and then supervise. "I spent all day on Saturday on one recount in Fallon, all day Monday on another in Storey Covmty, and Tuesday preparing for the Supreme Court canvass on Wednesday." He says he simply didn't find the challenges buried on his desk unitl too late. Excuses? They look like more than that to me. But in today's climate, facts and figures to prove something don't always matter. As Mark Twain pointed out about 100 years ago, "A lie can go around the world before the truth can even get its boots on." Any American living today who hasn't been in a coma for the past few years knows that lying is easier to sdl than truth in these inglorious 19908 than it ever was in Twain's day. No matter what proof Alfredo Alonso had, he still couldn't have won this one. Shipler writes a column on state politics fronf^ Carson City. LETURS ^Th* Newt walcomM briaf letters, signed with your name, addreta and phone for verification. Typed letters receive preference and the News resen/es the right to edit for grammar, spelling or length. Please mall to: Editor, Homm Nmn, 2 Comitmct Cnt0r Drlv, HMKhrBon.NV 89014 YOURWWS Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News LETTERS CECIL AND DIPSTIK PegeB RAY COLLINS Will miss Othena Editor A dear friend, Othena Williams of Othena's Fashions, is closing her store. This happened for several reasons. 1. Small business have a difficult time. 2. The shoppers of Henderson would rather drive out of the area than support their own community. The same thing happened to Bill Merrell's TV and Appliance. And thirdly was the Water Street restoration — a project that was to be done one block at a time, and we would not lose any parking. Well, we know how that went and it's just another example of the lack of interest in the downtown merchants. A woman's dream will now come to an end, and it is because the shoppers of Henderson do not support their own community. While so many want something for nothing, Othena has given her heart, soul, love, understanding, and compassion to this community she calls home. The coffee was always on. It was a haven. Now when you need a sympathetic ear, a kind word or even a hug it won't be there. And people of Henderson you have no one to blame but yourselves. Fm sorry, Othena. I'll miss your smile and shop on Water Street, but I know youll stay dedicated to your community and friends. SOINMA GIBSON SMITH REPCMVTER'S NOTEBOOK R 0 T H E I S S Scalding problem Editor I read Marilee Joyce's article "Scalding: A Problem in the Fall" (Nov. 3,1994) with great interest, since I represent two children who were burned by hot water while they were taking a bath. You may want to alert your readers, that the scalding problem is particularly prevalent in an apartment complex setting. Typically, each apartment building utilizes one water heater for up to 20 individual units. These water heaters are set at 160F and utilize a recirculation pump. If the hot water is turned on by itself, or there is a fluctuation of use, a tenant vrill be scalded. At 140F, it takes three seconds to cause a scalding ii\jury to adults, less for children. I hope that your article helps educate individuals as well as apartment complex ovmers regarding the dangers of excessive water temperature. Keep up the good work. MICHAEL P. VILLANI. ESa Crocket & Myers Christmas is Near! Understanding the frustration By now, every breathing mammal knows the political cHmate has changed. Even porpoises are laughing in their high-pitch giggle at the Democrats. Without preaching politics, I can understand why the Democrats took a drumming in the last election — sheer frustration. Government has exploded into a behemoth satiating itself and the founding motto of a democracy "of the people, by the people and for the people" is an anachronism. Instead of representing the people, government now is insensitive, aloof and inept. Two recent examples. I tried to call the Veterans Administration at UNLV to inquire about my VEAP (post Vietnam GI Bill) money for college. Having earned a degree a few years ago, I still have a little money in the kitty and wanted to get back the money I put into the matching college tuition program. The VA department at UNLV has always been cordial and prompt Can you feel it, the excitement in the air? The time is close now so pardon if I stare, at the new fallen snow and the moon shining bright, and the trees that are all glistening with pretty red and green lights. The presents are all wrapped, the shopping is done, all the errands and tasks are over you see, now it's time for singing and laughing and fun. The turkey is in the oven, the bread in the pan, now the children must retire so that Santa can come. All the elements point to the night that the Babe was borne in a manger far away, we celebrate His birth and call it Christmas Day, Santa will come in the ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ twinkle of an eye, and if you've been good as I know you to be, all your wishes and Rill H ANLON dreams will be answered you see. ** Now before the hour comes that we've all waited for, let me wish you all great blessings and so much more, may the angels watch over you from the heavens above, and spread all the wonder of our dear Savior's love. Dedicated toy sons. Matt and P.J. remember all the lovely times we have had! when I had to call on their serviceis while attending school. Imagine my surprise to find out that the director of VA services does not return telephone calls. When I called, I got the director's assistant and he told me the director was on the other line. Realizing I am not the only person in the world, I asked the assistant to have the director call me back. He replied, "She doesn't return phone calls." I didn't know if I should try to confront the reasoning behind his statement Instead I hung up, incredulously. I was understanding the recent frustration of government firsthand. The other case of frustration was at the County Registrar's office. When attempting to retrieve the precinct breakdown from the last election, I was informed the Registrar's office will charge us for their services. The cost was around $30 which may not be that burdensome even on a small business. But it was the principle with which I was annoyed. Some staunch conservatives may get U ll* I' a warm fuzzy feeUng knowing more government agencies are starting to conduct business Uke a business. But what I am indignant about is not getting my money's worth in the first place. The primary function of the Registrar's office is to deal with elections. To be asked for precinct breakdowns is part of their job. I don't mind paying the cost of the copies but to actually charge for the service is an insult. The sledgehammer approach by the Republicans to breaking up inefficient government is welcomed by many and feared by those clinging on to the system. The advocation of cutting entire departments or agencies may be a bit extreme but certainly slicing off chunks of fat from around the government's bloated belly can be achieved with little impact to the average individual. Those in government jobs who realize it takes an act of Congress to shake things up may prefer to stand on the San Andreas fault line. • :.:. \l Kits' GRETCHEN E. HENRY Poet Gretchen E. Henry moved to Nevada in 1991 with her husband, Phillip from Virginia. Although it is quite different living here, they both love the desert and its people. Recently published in the "Winter 1994 Arcadia Poetry Anthology," Henry started writing poetry seven years ago. Her inspirations are her family, friends and faith. Christmas Is Near was her 10th poem written in 1989. Expectations of Christmas Dorothy A. Vondenbrink-Dec. 1994 Considering Christmas and the promise it brings. My brain began reeling by the number of things that came to my mind of our modem needs. Preoccupation with self and wanton deeds. Are we any different in our world today than those who lived through that first Christmas Day? Were the people then more thoughtful and caring — Or were they looking for solutions both swifl and daring? Some prophesies told of a Messiah King. Who to Israel, peace and glory would bring. Isaiah prophesied a blessing, servant Messiah. Bring wisdom and peace by His suffering and dying. John preached repentance and baptism to open the way for the Messiah of justice and judgement. Who would save them that way. The angels sang of the Savior's birth, and the promise of love and peace on earth. The Wisemen came bringing gifts for a King, while Herod plotted the death of the infant king. Jesus is the Light, the Truth and the Way. The fulfillment of all expectations, of His day. Yet the haves were offended by the message He taught. While the sick, poor, and lame rejoiced in the healing he brought. I just wonder, if this Christmas were the first Christmas Day, how would WE react? What would WE say? Are your expectations based on YOUR human needs? Based on what you know, of Christ's teaching and deeds. Would you be offended, because He did not meet YOUR needs? From the day of His birth God's expectations Christ knew. From Christ's life and resurrection, Christ told what He expected believers to do. So let's all pretend we are there. On that first Christmas Night; And let's look at Christmas in a whole different light. Instead of looking at your presents, look at your expectations tonight. Then hear the Angels and I think they will say — God's Expectations Come First — When You Follow The Way!! Have a very blessed and joyous Christmas and a blessed and happy new year!! Ifs the credits, stupid!' Did you read the latest news? Nevada's dropout rate continues the climb to the top. It seems state policymakers are bound and determined to chase kids out of school rather than admit their own policies and practices are the cause of the problem. While local school districts often take the blame for the high dropout rate, it is actually the fault of the state Board of Education. When Bill Clinton ran for the presidency, I read he had a sign in his campaign headquarters that read, "It's the economy, stupid." Whether that is true of not, I don't know. But when we examine some of the downfalls of education in Nevada, we should have a sign that says: "It's the number of credits, stupid!" Nevada's high dropout rate is distinguishable from other states because of the numbers of students bailing out It is not something to be proud of. Besides exasperating an already serious dropout problem, the number of credits needed for graduation is also having a chilling effect on students taking more rigorous classes in math and science. That has been demonstrated in our own state's report ranking Nevada's students 48th of 50 in students taking classes beyond Algebra I. We can also see the effects of this policy decision in our students' achievement levels. Nevada is stagnant while the rest of the nation is moving forward. It is interesting to note that the current public school systems of candidates for Nevada state superintendent of education allow students to retake classes without threatening their graduation. Yes, the number of credits needed for graduation is lower in those states and their achievement is higher. There are many people out there that have a great deal of difficulty grasping the concept that the number of credits needed for graduation has precious little to do with learning. They somehow think that more credits translates to higher standards. Now that is dumb. The arithmetic average number of credits needed to graduate around the coimtry is 19.6 credits, the mode is 20. Nevada ranks in the top 10% in the number of credits required for graduation nationwide, but you would not know that by our achievement levels. In Nevada, we have literally reduced graduation to earning credits rather than attainment of knowledge. Some members of the state Board of Education are too concerned that Nevada would be the first state in the nation to reduce the number of credits needed for I graduation. We might MM look foolish. It's time to flR do what's right and take H the heat ^ I There is no greater foolishness than not allowing students to retake a class in algebra if they made a grade of "D" or "F." We should be congratulating students for enrolling in more rigorous classes, not punishing them for taking the initiative. The increased number of credits needed for high school graduation has resulted in lower achievement, few students enrolling in more rigorous classes, fewer opportunities in vocational education, and a skyrocketing dropout rate. Many of our troubles can be traced to the sign that is not on our walls: "It's the number of credits, stupid." Hanlon, a Las Vegas resident who wntes a column about education, sits on the state Board of Education, is the administrator for the Clark County School Distnct's Math/ Science Institute and is a part-time instructor at UNLV. No Fed bailout for Orange County It boggles the mind: Orange County, Cahf, the bastion of wealthy conservatism, borrows billions to leverage tax dollars in the risky derivatives market, only to see its investment crash and bum on the inevitable turn in interest rates. Then it declares bankruptcy, scaring the stuffing out of the huge municipals market, another bastion of what once were conservative values. Whatever happened to fiduciary trust? What was the county's five-member board of supervisors thinking? Where were the rating agencies? The sad fact is that the voters chose in an open election to throw prudence to the winds: In June, the county treasurer ran for reelection on a platform of using derivatives to boost returns on the region's $7.5 billion investment pool. His opponent warned that this was risky business. The people disagreed and voted for a strategy predicated on falUng interest rates. Once the Fed began to tighten, it was all over. So what to do now? If public officials are going to borrow huge sums (Orange County borrowed $2 for every $1 it held) and gamble on interest rates, they should be required to market the value of their portfolios and calculate total returns. That would make their tactics^ including high-flying leveraging, transparent to one and all. But then again, the folks in Orange County weren't exactly hoodwinked. That is why we hope they don't expect Uncle Sam to bail them out This is a local problem that cries out for a local solution. Jitters in the muni market can be managed without extensive federal money. Message to Orange Country: Responsible people must take responsibility for their actions. Businesa Week

PAGE 5

VIEWPOINT Pag* 4 Henderson Home News HOME NEWS 'MkaO'CrtiiglMii PubKihw 'CwolYiiO'Callighw Co-Publish (f 'PMilSxyMko Managing Editor Thursday, December 22,1994 NEWS VIEW Guessing game part of political process The City Council acted as prognosticators Tuesday night. The task before that body was to select a new map for redrawing election wards, as required by state statute. For the first time in many years, the city had a choice of three proposed maps. Citizens became involved with the political process and offered another map—a map that would reduce the nxmiber of people who would be redistricted by one-fifth the number the Council ultimately selected. Although the citizens' map was valid and met all the state requirements, the Council chose to ignore the map that would redistrict only 7,000 people. Instead they chose a map that will redistrict more than 36,000 people. Because of the city's dynamic growth, the Council reasoned the wards will have to be redrawn dramatically sooner or later. The predominantly east^west configuration of the new map anticipates even growth in each of the wards. Unable to definitely predict where residents will settle in the fiiture, the Council is taking a shot in the dark. They don't want to redistrict large numbers of people in the fiiture, so they will do it now and hope that tlie areas grow evenly. In two years, the Council will have to look again at the population of each ward. People again may be redistricted. How many is anyone's guess. Although the Council attempted to use foresight in its selection process, they are not clairvoyant. Letfs hope this map does the trick and this large a number of people will not have to be redistricted soon. It is hard to imagine that more than one-third of the city will be adversely affected in two years if they selected the citizens' map. The repercussions of the Council's decision is that several thousand people will not be able to run for office in the next election. They were redistricted into another ward which is not up for election until 1997. End of nuclear road; too many safety, waste woes The first generation of nuclear energy came to a close last week when the Tennessee Valley Authority canceled the last three nuclear power plants still under construction in the USA. After 50 years and billions of dollars, the dawn of an era has ended. Hail and farewell, and what went wrong? Essentially, the nation decided that nuclear power wasn't worth the price. Nuclear utilities like TVA just took a while to react The near-meltdown at Pennsylvania's Three Mile Island reactor in 1979 crystallized public doubts about safety and launched a new round of regulation. That uncovered widespread problems that, in turn, increased construction delays and raised costs to uneconomic levels. Not one new reactor has been ordered since. Since then, existing nuclear power plants have continued to produce overpriced power, even as state and federal decisions to eliminate many of nuclear energy's price buffers compounded the problem. Nobody knows this better than the TVA. Of the 17 units it envisioned building, only five ever went m line, and two of those have been shut down for safety reasons. The three plants canceled this week were ordered in 1970. All three had construction permits within four years. Yet 20 years later, one unit is only 88% complete and the others lag far behind. Even if nuclear power still holds distant promise, the current supply of aging reactors can't fulfill it. Years— maybe decades—may pass before a new generation of plants can be certified. In the meantime, other promising technologies are emerging: •Solar energy. Breakthroughs have dropped costs so low that a private company now plans to build a fully commercial solar-power plant in Nevada. •Wind. New studies hint that, especially in the Midwest, windmills can generate competitively priced electricity. •Natural gas. Clean, cheap, plentifiil. •Co-generation. This technology makes power plants more efficient by harnessing heat produced when generating electricity. Cheap and abundant energy may well be possible without nuclear power. Certainly, safer energy is. We produce roughly 1,800 metric tons of radioactive waste annually, but we have no safe place to put it. A plan to hollow out a mountain in Nevada is years behind schedule, may not be feasible due to earthquake activity, and in any event will be too small. Nuclear energy provides only 21% of our electrical needs, 4% of our total energy consumption. Is it worth the trouble? Not until the problems of waste, safety and cost are completely resolved. In the meantime, the first atomic age is coming to an end. Will the last one out turn off the lights? No need. Hie (ioe-bri|^t world of nudear power has already gone dark. U.SA. Today RICHARD COHEN Clintons aren't evil WASHINGTON Of all the books written about the Clinton administration, maybe the most pertinent was published long before Bill Clinton came to Washington and is not about poUtics at all. I am thinking of Truman Capote's "Answered Prayers." The title Capote said was taken from the iiyunction of St. Therese: There are more tears shed over answered prayers than unanswered ones!! Neither Bill nor Hillary Clinton is evil and yet they have suffered as if they were. Their friends have let them down or succumbed to the pressures of Washington. Their administration is barely viable and the Clintons themselves are treated as abstractions, not real people. The meanness, the pettiness, the gross bad taste of some of their critics is, really, beyond the bounds of politics — and those bounds are huge to begin with. The Clinton saga is taking on tragic, almost novelistic, dimensions. Joycelyn Elders, who followed Clinton from Little Rock to Washington, got her prayers answered in the way St. Therese warned. Just a few days before she was fired, Webster Hubbell, a former associate attorney general and onetime Hillary Clinton law partner, pleaded guilty to tax evasion. As a Little Rock lawyer, he cheated both his firm and his clients but it was as a high-profile Washington official that he was exposed. The special prosecutor doesn't go aftr smalltown cheaters. Still earlier, yet another Rose partner and a confidant of Mrs. Clinton's, Vincent Foster, was found dead in a park across the Potomac from Washington. He was a suicide — the official ruling, in any case — but whatever the cause of Foster's death and whatever the reason, he is yet another Arkansan who met tragedy or ridicule in Washington. William H. Kennedy III, yet another Rose partner, has quit as White House associate counsel and is going back to Little Rock. His role in the so-called Travelgate affair was questioned and,earlier, it was disclosed he had failed to pay taxes for his family's nanny. Had he stayed in Arkansas, no one would have cared about him or his nanny. The Clintons must be suffering from a form of shell shock. The toll Washington has taken among their oldest friends amounts to a bloodbath — and the enemy is virtually breaching the White House gate itself In midterm, the Clinton administration has been resoundingly rejected by the American people. Mrs. Clinton is casting around for a role to play. She is blamed for the debacle of health reform and criticized for everything from her administrative abilities to her inability to stick with a hairstyle. As for the president, things are no better. He has a dismal approval rating and is spoken of with bitter contempt in this city. More than a few announce he will not seek a second term. Even those who reject — or recoil from — such a possibility, rally around the president with little more than fatalism. Theirs is a contemporary charge of the Light Brigade. A while back, I received a letter from a resident of Manassas, Va. He told of a visit to the local mall where he passed a gift shop displaying two roles of toilet paper. "One had the name and face of President Clinton on it, sheet by sheet, and the other his wife." The man protested to the store owner, but to no avail. "I ask you, Mr. Cohen, have we descended so low?" he wrote. "I must ask, what is it about the Clintons that arouses such odium?" I don't know. I can provide many reasons, but not enough to account for the antipathy. I can cite Gennifer Flowers, gays in the military, vacillation in foreign policy, the flap about the draft., stuttered decisionmaking and much more — including those running shorts. But I can also cite a country that's at peace and which is fairly prosperous. A little — even a lot — of criticism would be understandable, not to mention deserved. But the Clintons get more than that. They get a pie in the face every day. A sad episode in American political history is being played out here. So many Clinton friends set out for Washington with dreams of hope and glory and so many have been destroyed. The invective, the namecalling, the juvenile spitballs hurled at the White House add insult to what is, really, iiyury. Some of us have just plain lost our manners and have, in the process, forgotten that the presidency has already cost Bill and Hillary Clinton plenty. We may not owe them our political allegiance or, someday, our votes. But for the moment a little sympathy wouldn't hurt. Cohen is a columnist for the Washington Post Waters Group. GUY SHIPLER Alonso couldn't win this one Alfredo Alonso picked up the phone a couple of weeks ago to make a call that would change his life. It was to a fellow Republican and a close friend. Dean Heller, who would take office as Nevada's secretary of state on Jan. 2. Alonso figured he had a good chance of keeping the job he holds under Cheryl Lau—the chief deputy of elections. Now he felt he had to tell his firiend that he would be too much of a liability to serve in his office. Intead, he would resign his state job on the very day Heller Would be sworn in. The reason was clear. Alonso had failed to notify the governor immediately, as the law requires, of two GOP challenges to the election of two Democrats to the Assembly. And they didn't know about the challenges until it was too late to file challenges of their own. Although he swears it had happened totally by accident, Alonso's mistake turned into a poltical mushroom cloud, destroying (he thought) his immaculate record of keeping his dehcate job non-partisan. Suddenly his job had become a key part of the white-hot political uproar resulting from the 21-21 RepublicanDemocratic tie in the Assembly. Alonso's experience in Washington (he had worked for former Sen. Chic Hecht and Barbara Vucanovish) had taught him just how devastasting to his career a mistake like this one would be. He knew the first Democratic accusations of dirty tricks would be aimed at his boss, Cheryl Lau. To try to stem it—and to set the record straight—he quickly announced that he had made the mistake and that Lau had nothing to do with it As usual, it didn't do much good. Democatic Assemblywoman Jan Evans, the object of one of the challenges, aimed her fiiry at Lau for her "dereliction of duty and malfeasance in office" because "You failed to (notify the governor) until after the deadline had passed... "Did this happen because of incompetence or because you and I are in different political parties? You have dishonored yourself and the office you hold. You vrill have to live with this stain on your record and on your conscience." Worst of all, Lau did not notify her personally of the challenge. Lau shot back three hefty missies of her own: (1) She was not even in the country at the time and knew nothing about any challenges; (2) there is no requirement in the law for the secretary of state to notify the recipient of such a challenge; and (3) the Democrats "had all the time they wanted to contest any election. We did nothing to preclude them from doing so." Even before the Evans letter intensifed the situation, Alonso had seen the handwriting on the wall—^his fiiture with Dean Heller was out the window of opportunity. So when Heller answered his call, Alfonso told him he was resigning as Deputy Secretary of State for Elections on Jan. 2, the day his friend would take office. "It was the only honorable thing to do," Alonso told me in an interview last week. "I told Heller that out of respect for him, and the importance of our fiiendship, it would be best for me to go on my way. Even thou^ my failure was an honest mistake, the question that there was some polticial manipulation could taint his tenure as secretary of state if I were oa his staff. It would be a disservice to Heller and to the state." But how could he have made such a huge mistake? The answer he gave in our interview was based, first, on what he has to work with: Alonso's fiiU-time staff consists of two people—himself and one other. Two other people work half-time each. His total of three bodies makes "this office the size of a rural coimty clerk's office. The Clark County clerk has a staff of about 40, Washoe about 18 or 20." But Alonso must oversee the election process in the entire state, ranging from administering filing of candidates for office through the election process itself—and what comes afterwards, including vote recounts and the Supreme Court's final canvass of the votes. Says Alonso: "We deal on the state level, but we also deal with county clerks at the local level—we hear from several of them every day." When the two challenges came in, Alonso had two recounts and a canvass to prepare for, and then supervise. "I spent all day on Saturday on one recount in Fallon, all day Monday on another in Storey Covmty, and Tuesday preparing for the Supreme Court canvass on Wednesday." He says he simply didn't find the challenges buried on his desk unitl too late. Excuses? They look like more than that to me. But in today's climate, facts and figures to prove something don't always matter. As Mark Twain pointed out about 100 years ago, "A lie can go around the world before the truth can even get its boots on." Any American living today who hasn't been in a coma for the past few years knows that lying is easier to sdl than truth in these inglorious 19908 than it ever was in Twain's day. No matter what proof Alfredo Alonso had, he still couldn't have won this one. Shipler writes a column on state politics fronf^ Carson City. LETURS ^Th* Newt walcomM briaf letters, signed with your name, addreta and phone for verification. Typed letters receive preference and the News resen/es the right to edit for grammar, spelling or length. Please mall to: Editor, Homm Nmn, 2 Comitmct Cnt0r Drlv, HMKhrBon.NV 89014 YOURWWS Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News LETTERS CECIL AND DIPSTIK PegeB RAY COLLINS Will miss Othena Editor A dear friend, Othena Williams of Othena's Fashions, is closing her store. This happened for several reasons. 1. Small business have a difficult time. 2. The shoppers of Henderson would rather drive out of the area than support their own community. The same thing happened to Bill Merrell's TV and Appliance. And thirdly was the Water Street restoration — a project that was to be done one block at a time, and we would not lose any parking. Well, we know how that went and it's just another example of the lack of interest in the downtown merchants. A woman's dream will now come to an end, and it is because the shoppers of Henderson do not support their own community. While so many want something for nothing, Othena has given her heart, soul, love, understanding, and compassion to this community she calls home. The coffee was always on. It was a haven. Now when you need a sympathetic ear, a kind word or even a hug it won't be there. And people of Henderson you have no one to blame but yourselves. Fm sorry, Othena. I'll miss your smile and shop on Water Street, but I know youll stay dedicated to your community and friends. SOINMA GIBSON SMITH REPCMVTER'S NOTEBOOK R 0 T H E I S S Scalding problem Editor I read Marilee Joyce's article "Scalding: A Problem in the Fall" (Nov. 3,1994) with great interest, since I represent two children who were burned by hot water while they were taking a bath. You may want to alert your readers, that the scalding problem is particularly prevalent in an apartment complex setting. Typically, each apartment building utilizes one water heater for up to 20 individual units. These water heaters are set at 160F and utilize a recirculation pump. If the hot water is turned on by itself, or there is a fluctuation of use, a tenant vrill be scalded. At 140F, it takes three seconds to cause a scalding ii\jury to adults, less for children. I hope that your article helps educate individuals as well as apartment complex ovmers regarding the dangers of excessive water temperature. Keep up the good work. MICHAEL P. VILLANI. ESa Crocket & Myers Christmas is Near! Understanding the frustration By now, every breathing mammal knows the political cHmate has changed. Even porpoises are laughing in their high-pitch giggle at the Democrats. Without preaching politics, I can understand why the Democrats took a drumming in the last election — sheer frustration. Government has exploded into a behemoth satiating itself and the founding motto of a democracy "of the people, by the people and for the people" is an anachronism. Instead of representing the people, government now is insensitive, aloof and inept. Two recent examples. I tried to call the Veterans Administration at UNLV to inquire about my VEAP (post Vietnam GI Bill) money for college. Having earned a degree a few years ago, I still have a little money in the kitty and wanted to get back the money I put into the matching college tuition program. The VA department at UNLV has always been cordial and prompt Can you feel it, the excitement in the air? The time is close now so pardon if I stare, at the new fallen snow and the moon shining bright, and the trees that are all glistening with pretty red and green lights. The presents are all wrapped, the shopping is done, all the errands and tasks are over you see, now it's time for singing and laughing and fun. The turkey is in the oven, the bread in the pan, now the children must retire so that Santa can come. All the elements point to the night that the Babe was borne in a manger far away, we celebrate His birth and call it Christmas Day, Santa will come in the ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ twinkle of an eye, and if you've been good as I know you to be, all your wishes and Rill H ANLON dreams will be answered you see. ** Now before the hour comes that we've all waited for, let me wish you all great blessings and so much more, may the angels watch over you from the heavens above, and spread all the wonder of our dear Savior's love. Dedicated toy sons. Matt and P.J. remember all the lovely times we have had! when I had to call on their serviceis while attending school. Imagine my surprise to find out that the director of VA services does not return telephone calls. When I called, I got the director's assistant and he told me the director was on the other line. Realizing I am not the only person in the world, I asked the assistant to have the director call me back. He replied, "She doesn't return phone calls." I didn't know if I should try to confront the reasoning behind his statement Instead I hung up, incredulously. I was understanding the recent frustration of government firsthand. The other case of frustration was at the County Registrar's office. When attempting to retrieve the precinct breakdown from the last election, I was informed the Registrar's office will charge us for their services. The cost was around $30 which may not be that burdensome even on a small business. But it was the principle with which I was annoyed. Some staunch conservatives may get U ll* I' a warm fuzzy feeUng knowing more government agencies are starting to conduct business Uke a business. But what I am indignant about is not getting my money's worth in the first place. The primary function of the Registrar's office is to deal with elections. To be asked for precinct breakdowns is part of their job. I don't mind paying the cost of the copies but to actually charge for the service is an insult. The sledgehammer approach by the Republicans to breaking up inefficient government is welcomed by many and feared by those clinging on to the system. The advocation of cutting entire departments or agencies may be a bit extreme but certainly slicing off chunks of fat from around the government's bloated belly can be achieved with little impact to the average individual. Those in government jobs who realize it takes an act of Congress to shake things up may prefer to stand on the San Andreas fault line. • :.:. \l Kits' GRETCHEN E. HENRY Poet Gretchen E. Henry moved to Nevada in 1991 with her husband, Phillip from Virginia. Although it is quite different living here, they both love the desert and its people. Recently published in the "Winter 1994 Arcadia Poetry Anthology," Henry started writing poetry seven years ago. Her inspirations are her family, friends and faith. Christmas Is Near was her 10th poem written in 1989. Expectations of Christmas Dorothy A. Vondenbrink-Dec. 1994 Considering Christmas and the promise it brings. My brain began reeling by the number of things that came to my mind of our modem needs. Preoccupation with self and wanton deeds. Are we any different in our world today than those who lived through that first Christmas Day? Were the people then more thoughtful and caring — Or were they looking for solutions both swifl and daring? Some prophesies told of a Messiah King. Who to Israel, peace and glory would bring. Isaiah prophesied a blessing, servant Messiah. Bring wisdom and peace by His suffering and dying. John preached repentance and baptism to open the way for the Messiah of justice and judgement. Who would save them that way. The angels sang of the Savior's birth, and the promise of love and peace on earth. The Wisemen came bringing gifts for a King, while Herod plotted the death of the infant king. Jesus is the Light, the Truth and the Way. The fulfillment of all expectations, of His day. Yet the haves were offended by the message He taught. While the sick, poor, and lame rejoiced in the healing he brought. I just wonder, if this Christmas were the first Christmas Day, how would WE react? What would WE say? Are your expectations based on YOUR human needs? Based on what you know, of Christ's teaching and deeds. Would you be offended, because He did not meet YOUR needs? From the day of His birth God's expectations Christ knew. From Christ's life and resurrection, Christ told what He expected believers to do. So let's all pretend we are there. On that first Christmas Night; And let's look at Christmas in a whole different light. Instead of looking at your presents, look at your expectations tonight. Then hear the Angels and I think they will say — God's Expectations Come First — When You Follow The Way!! Have a very blessed and joyous Christmas and a blessed and happy new year!! Ifs the credits, stupid!' Did you read the latest news? Nevada's dropout rate continues the climb to the top. It seems state policymakers are bound and determined to chase kids out of school rather than admit their own policies and practices are the cause of the problem. While local school districts often take the blame for the high dropout rate, it is actually the fault of the state Board of Education. When Bill Clinton ran for the presidency, I read he had a sign in his campaign headquarters that read, "It's the economy, stupid." Whether that is true of not, I don't know. But when we examine some of the downfalls of education in Nevada, we should have a sign that says: "It's the number of credits, stupid!" Nevada's high dropout rate is distinguishable from other states because of the numbers of students bailing out It is not something to be proud of. Besides exasperating an already serious dropout problem, the number of credits needed for graduation is also having a chilling effect on students taking more rigorous classes in math and science. That has been demonstrated in our own state's report ranking Nevada's students 48th of 50 in students taking classes beyond Algebra I. We can also see the effects of this policy decision in our students' achievement levels. Nevada is stagnant while the rest of the nation is moving forward. It is interesting to note that the current public school systems of candidates for Nevada state superintendent of education allow students to retake classes without threatening their graduation. Yes, the number of credits needed for graduation is lower in those states and their achievement is higher. There are many people out there that have a great deal of difficulty grasping the concept that the number of credits needed for graduation has precious little to do with learning. They somehow think that more credits translates to higher standards. Now that is dumb. The arithmetic average number of credits needed to graduate around the coimtry is 19.6 credits, the mode is 20. Nevada ranks in the top 10% in the number of credits required for graduation nationwide, but you would not know that by our achievement levels. In Nevada, we have literally reduced graduation to earning credits rather than attainment of knowledge. Some members of the state Board of Education are too concerned that Nevada would be the first state in the nation to reduce the number of credits needed for I graduation. We might MM look foolish. It's time to flR do what's right and take H the heat ^ I There is no greater foolishness than not allowing students to retake a class in algebra if they made a grade of "D" or "F." We should be congratulating students for enrolling in more rigorous classes, not punishing them for taking the initiative. The increased number of credits needed for high school graduation has resulted in lower achievement, few students enrolling in more rigorous classes, fewer opportunities in vocational education, and a skyrocketing dropout rate. Many of our troubles can be traced to the sign that is not on our walls: "It's the number of credits, stupid." Hanlon, a Las Vegas resident who wntes a column about education, sits on the state Board of Education, is the administrator for the Clark County School Distnct's Math/ Science Institute and is a part-time instructor at UNLV. No Fed bailout for Orange County It boggles the mind: Orange County, Cahf, the bastion of wealthy conservatism, borrows billions to leverage tax dollars in the risky derivatives market, only to see its investment crash and bum on the inevitable turn in interest rates. Then it declares bankruptcy, scaring the stuffing out of the huge municipals market, another bastion of what once were conservative values. Whatever happened to fiduciary trust? What was the county's five-member board of supervisors thinking? Where were the rating agencies? The sad fact is that the voters chose in an open election to throw prudence to the winds: In June, the county treasurer ran for reelection on a platform of using derivatives to boost returns on the region's $7.5 billion investment pool. His opponent warned that this was risky business. The people disagreed and voted for a strategy predicated on falUng interest rates. Once the Fed began to tighten, it was all over. So what to do now? If public officials are going to borrow huge sums (Orange County borrowed $2 for every $1 it held) and gamble on interest rates, they should be required to market the value of their portfolios and calculate total returns. That would make their tactics^ including high-flying leveraging, transparent to one and all. But then again, the folks in Orange County weren't exactly hoodwinked. That is why we hope they don't expect Uncle Sam to bail them out This is a local problem that cries out for a local solution. Jitters in the muni market can be managed without extensive federal money. Message to Orange Country: Responsible people must take responsibility for their actions. Businesa Week

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Pag* 6 Henderson Home News Thursday. December 22,1 994 Senior center prepares for holiday weeicend The Center is open for all activities Monday through Fnday 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., Monday through Thursday evenings 6 to 1 0 p.m. and Saturdays 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thank You Each and Everyone All of us here at the Henderson Senior Center wish each of you a very grand holiday weekend. This past month has been filled with the joy of the season, because of the community's support throughout the year. We will celebrate the nexttwo weeks with our family and friends, eiyoying the fruits of our work, fim and good firiendship. The center wishes the staff at \heNew8 a wonderfiilholiday, and we hope next year brings even more rewards and awards. And to the Celebrity City Chorus, the Shearing Sun City Singers, McCaw students.Mirage Resorts, employees of the city of Henderson and the many, many others who have filled the center with holiday cheer, thank you. And may your holidays be as bright as you have made our days all year long. In addition, the Black Mountain Senior Nutrition staff extends a special thanks to the many volunteers who contributed, sorted, boxed and delivered our holiday food baskets and gifts to seniors. Your help was greatly appreciated. By the way, if you've never visited the center, orhaven'tbeen by for a while, the holidays are a great time to drop in and renew old friendships and enjoy the beautifully decorated facility. Holiday Seasonings The next two weeks at the center will be devoted to celebrating SENIOR CENTER HiGHUGHTS 27 e. TEXAS ST. 56S-6990 of Columbus, %ie Center's Pinochle Group, ^ack and Chris Greening and Levi Strauss have made brunch a huge success, while providing seniors a special time to invite fami ly and friends S— Shiors Page? Courtesy Photo SUN CITY SINGERS — The Shearing Sun City Singers ghre a special performance at the Henderson Senior Center. the season with our friends. At 11:30 a.m., Friday, Dec. 23, the Nutrition staff will present its special of the year: a Christmas dinner for all to eryoy. Then, from 9to 11:30 a.m. Saturday,Dec. 24, Henderson Police Chief Tom Bums and voltonteers from his staff and their families will provide a very special Christmas Eve brunch and fill the center with holiday entertainment. Everyone is encouraged to join us with Tommy and his Burners." New Year's Eve will be celebrated for the countdown beginning at 11:30 a.m., Friday, Courtesy Photo AUDITION — Receptionist Carinne Kane successfully auditioned for the Celebrity City Chorus. Dec. 30, until noon. Thefestivities will be led by the Young at Heart Band. The traditional good luck meal of black-eyed peas will be served with the special hand of cook Sally Lambert and her kitchen crew. This will be the beginning of a great year for the center and everyone is invited to attend what promises to be a great New Year's party. Merrill Lynch "Call Home for the Holidays" The Las Vegas office of Merrill Lynch & Co. provide the center with a wonderful holiday present, free telephone calls to family and friends. Seniors were invited to the office in Las Vegas to make their calls anywhere in the world, while office volunteers and their families provided refreshments, gifts and entertainment. The homebound or those who could not drive were not forgotten. Special arrangements were made so seniors at home could be connected with their loved ones. Arrangements were also made to accommodate hearing, sight-impaired and non-Engli sh speaking seniors. The center extends sincere thanks for this thoughtful holiday present to organizer Cindy Ingram of Cindy Ingram & Associates. Two Line Dancing Classes The center's popular Line Dancing Class will be expanded this year. In 1995, two classes Is Your Air Conditioner a Cash Guzzler? If it's more than 15 years old it is! Air conditioners are like old cars, they just aren't energy efficient. And if your house has one that's more than 15 years old, you're spending too much money to cool your house. You need to replace that old air conditioner with a new model that has a seasonal Energy Efficiency Rating (SEER) of at least 11.0. New energy efficient air conditioners save you money on your utility bill. And Nevada Power gives you cash back just for making the switch!* AIWERICAW ISTANDARD Buill'IbAlllnlierSlaiidaiTl. 452-8200 4049 E. Lake Mead Day & Night Heating & Air Conditioning Inc. NEVm POWER COMPANY •Purchase required prior to 12/31/94. Minimum requirements and some restrictions apply. will be oflFered — one for beginners and another for second year students. Call the Center, 5656990, for information on class sdiedules. Saturday Brunch Bunch The Saturday Brunch Bunch coordinator, Ledema Doran, and her husband, John, have been hard at work organizing voliuiteers to stop by each Saturday morning to prepare meals at the center. She has also expanded the menu to include hash, hash browns, and for our light breakfast eaters, several low cholesterol choices. The Saturday Bnmch, started by former Nutrition Director Bud Quinnell, has developed into a unique center tradition. Each week, volunteers from throughout the community prepare a made-to-order breakfast. In the past, volunteers from the Knights KARAOKE Every Saturday lilght 9 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. GOLDMINE TAVERN 23 Water St. 565-9391 Downtown Henderson B B ARREL MINUTE GIFTS Desert a)Data 503 Hotel Plaza (702) 2916224 Boulder City, NV 89005 FAX: 294 0141 Word Processing Newsletlnts .COLOR Cnpios .Triins(:ri|ilinn .Fotnis UPSlFndEx Resumes SpteHilsheets Billiny Ciinipiilct Hcnlal Central Christian Church • .. invites you to celebrate Christ's birth with us! We'll offer six identical Candlelight Christmas Services -jSaturday, December 24 at • ^ 4:00, 5:30 & 7:00 pm I • Sunday, December 25 at L 8:15, 9:35 & 11:00 am Child care will bv available for birth 5 years. 3375 S. Mojave Road at Desert Inn Las Vegas, NV (702) 735-4004 .fe'jiJivi.i ij (ir iio PERSONAL INJURY FREE CONSULTATION NO RECOVERY FEE 565-0473 218 LEAD ST. (Across from the new Police Department facilities) LAW OFFICE OF JOHN F. MARCHIANO Former Henderson City Attorney Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News Page? SENIORS: Senior activities From Page 6 over to ei\joy a casual breakfast. Brunch Bunch volunteers provided some special holiday treats this past month, including Levi volunteers — always great cooks — who served firuit and treats. By the way, Quinnell is still around. Every Saturday morning he stops by with treats and sweets donated from Henderson grocery storesfor seniors to er\joy. Seniors, Saturday Brunch is a perfect time to bring family to the center. Our thanks go the Dorans and all the volunteers who have helped make this a great family afiTair. Nutrition Challenge University Medical Center will provide a two-part educational course at the center focusing on the nutritional needs of seniors. TheNutrition Challenge program offers applications of easy-to-use principles for a daily diet, including height, weight and blood pressure monitoring and body mass index. Tips will be given on food selections to lower fat and cholesterol intake, as well as improving cardiovascular fitness. Call the center, 565-6990, for a class schedule. Reminders Because of the holidays, many public services will be dark. Call the center to check on appointments and schedules. Senior Employment services has changed days at the center — employment interviewer Betsy Lynan will now be at the center from 8 a.m. to noon Monday through Thursday. Activities The Henderson Senior Center has activities ranging from art to Scrabble, concerts, health seminars and social services. The center is open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. On Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings, the Center is open from 6 to 10 p.m., and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays. Check.^ew8,the senior center lletter or call 565iO for details on activities, special events and services. Also call to receive the newsletter by mail. Activities scheduled for the week are as follows: Thursday, Dec. 22: Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.. Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, bridgeat8:30a.m., scrabbleat 10 a.m., free bingo at 12:30 p.m. Senior Orchestra rehearsal dark. Center open for all activities at 6 p.m., duplicate bridge and pinochle at 7 p.m. Friday, Dec. 23: Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.. Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, aerobic dance at 9 a.m., Holiday Dinner Celebration at 11:30 a.m. and bridge at 12:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 24: Center open for all activities 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. and a special holiday brunch served by Levi volunteers from 9 to 11:30 a.m. for $1.25. Monday, Dec. 26: Assessor 8 GVHS names students December Students of the Month include Sarah Borgenhagen, art; Kenneth Carluto, Business; Kimberly Steinforth, English; Jennifer Newman, Foreign Language; Peter Battisti, Health/Dr. Ed./ Careers; Justin Lewis, Home Economics; Toni Massaro, Individualized Programs; Jeremiah Johnson, Industrial Arts; Joseph Twesme, Mathematics; Natsumi Kama, Performing Arts; Richard Scow, Physical Education; Alvin Jose Morada, Science; and Beth Fischman, Social Studies. Fischman was also selected as the overall Student of the Month for December. Students' pictures are featured on the Student of the Month display board located in the Green Valley Hi^ Sdiool CounseUng Offke reception area. Each receives a certificate, and will be honored ataforthcominglundieon atOod&ther'sPiiza. a.m. to 4 p.m.. Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, bridge at 8:30 a.m., aerobic dance at 9 a.m., wood carving at 9 a.m.. Shearing Eye Screening dark and pinochle at 1 p.m. Center open for all activities at 6 p.m., 55 ALIVE at6 p.m., and double deck pinochle at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 27: Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.. Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, needle crafl at 9 a.m., T-shirt painting at 9 a.m., free blood pressure testing at 10 a.m., pinochle at 1 p.m. and line dancing at 1 p.m. Center open for all activities at 6 p.m. and Celebrity City Chorus at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 28: Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m.. billiards all hours center is open, aerobic dance 9 a.m., Scrabbleat 10 a.m., bridge at 12:30 p.m. dominoes at 1 p.m., and Clark County Social Services by appt. 565-6990. Center open for all activities at 6 p.m.. Men's Barbershop Chorus at 7 p.m. and pinochle at 7 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 29: Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.. Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, bridge at 8:30 a.m.. Scrabble at 10 a.m. free bingo at 12:30 p.m., and Senior Orchestra rehearsal at 1:30 p.m. Center open for all activities at 6 p.m., duplicate bridge at 6 p.m., and pinochle at 7 p.m. Menu The Black Mountain Senior Nutrition Program serves lunch Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for a suggested donation of $1.25. AH meals are served with coffee, tea and 2% milk. From 9 to 11:30 a.m. every Saturday, brunch is cooked and served by our Saturday Brunch Bunch Volunteers for$1.25. For information on rides to the center. Meals on Wheels or the Nutrition Program, call 5653214. The published menu for the week is as follows: Thursday, Dec. 22: Turkey. Friday, Dec. 23: Christmas Dinner Baked Ham and all the trimmings!. Saturday,Dec.24:Christmas Eve Brunch, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., a special brunch and entertainment by Police Chief Tom Bums and volimteers of his staff. Monday, Dec. 26: Beef Skillet. Tuesday, Dec. 27: Hamburger Steak. Wednesday, Dec. 28: Baked Ham. Thursday, Dec. 29: Sloppy Joes. SMOG NO PASS NO PAY CERT. $6.00 {TAMPERING INSPECTION FAIL FULL PRICE IVERN'S TEXACO Lake Mead & Water St. Henderson S65-0220 Courtesy Photo HOMEBOUND DRIVER — Jack Livesay helps out Black Mountain Senior Nutritmn volunteers Molly Oldfield and Sally Lambert. Courtesy Photo DRIVER AND NIKKI—Volunteer home-bound driver brought Nikki to the senior center for the Christmas party. /' HE'S A ^^HERE! ^^ Timothy Jordan Miele (he's a keeper!) Bom: Dec. 21,1994 Weighing: 7 lbs. 4 oz. Length: 18-1/2 inches long Congratulations Miele Family ''••'*"'•'Ifli'lB HlllMIIIII.I,''.',J.'J\A'*.lllttll**' 'rt*VV CHRISTMAS EVE CANDLELIGHT SERVICE 5:30 p.m. Deciember 24 CHRISTMAS DAY 9:45 Sunday Celebratlbn"6r Jesus Birthday! Music by Robert Baughman "Birthday of the King' A FOURSQUARE CHURCH 571 Adams Blvd. Boulder City • 293-7773 We've Got A Handle On You Trash Disposal Needs Precision Waste Management For Home Or Business For home, business or construction, Sliver State can liandie your waste management needs. Use the right disposal receptacles lor the job and save time, money and effort Monthly rentals available. tiTii" v.: >',liii;!'v; I'-.': • Mobile Totar -Wheeled receptacle lor convenient home use. Replaces lour 20-gallon Irash cans. Only $3.00 per month. Call 735-5151. • Conlainer Rentals Four sizes for residenlial, industrial or commercial use. Holds up to fifteen 33-gallon cans of refuse. From $12.50 to $19.50 per month. Call 735-5151. • Drop Box • For the really t)ig jobs. Yard cleanup, constnjction sites of business refuse, may be used permanently. 4 sizes avaiaUe 20 • 28 35 • 50 cu. yards. Costs only $6.83 per cubic yard. Call 735-5151. Silver State Disposal Service, Inc. 770 East Sahara Ave., Las Vegas, NV 89104 HOLIDAY wINN! DEC. 16 2S WIN!... CASH JOKER'S HOLIDAY SHIRTS! KENO HOLIDAY TURKEYS! WILD CARD BUFIET CHRISTMAS DAY GIFT! (Noon until supplies last) NEW YEAR'S TV BASH! DEC. 26 30 TV QiVEAWAY! 2 DAILY DRAWINGS! EVERY JACKPOT WIN OVER $200.00, WITH MAXIMUM COIN PLAYED, WILL GIVE YOU A CHANCE TO WIN A 13" COLOR TV WITH REMOTE! "ANOTHER FINE BOYD GAMING PROPERTY" C A S I NO BOULDER HIGH WAV, BETWEEN LAKE MEAD & SUNSET 564-8100

PAGE 7

Pag* 6 Henderson Home News Thursday. December 22,1 994 Senior center prepares for holiday weeicend The Center is open for all activities Monday through Fnday 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., Monday through Thursday evenings 6 to 1 0 p.m. and Saturdays 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thank You Each and Everyone All of us here at the Henderson Senior Center wish each of you a very grand holiday weekend. This past month has been filled with the joy of the season, because of the community's support throughout the year. We will celebrate the nexttwo weeks with our family and friends, eiyoying the fruits of our work, fim and good firiendship. The center wishes the staff at \heNew8 a wonderfiilholiday, and we hope next year brings even more rewards and awards. And to the Celebrity City Chorus, the Shearing Sun City Singers, McCaw students.Mirage Resorts, employees of the city of Henderson and the many, many others who have filled the center with holiday cheer, thank you. And may your holidays be as bright as you have made our days all year long. In addition, the Black Mountain Senior Nutrition staff extends a special thanks to the many volunteers who contributed, sorted, boxed and delivered our holiday food baskets and gifts to seniors. Your help was greatly appreciated. By the way, if you've never visited the center, orhaven'tbeen by for a while, the holidays are a great time to drop in and renew old friendships and enjoy the beautifully decorated facility. Holiday Seasonings The next two weeks at the center will be devoted to celebrating SENIOR CENTER HiGHUGHTS 27 e. TEXAS ST. 56S-6990 of Columbus, %ie Center's Pinochle Group, ^ack and Chris Greening and Levi Strauss have made brunch a huge success, while providing seniors a special time to invite fami ly and friends S— Shiors Page? Courtesy Photo SUN CITY SINGERS — The Shearing Sun City Singers ghre a special performance at the Henderson Senior Center. the season with our friends. At 11:30 a.m., Friday, Dec. 23, the Nutrition staff will present its special of the year: a Christmas dinner for all to eryoy. Then, from 9to 11:30 a.m. Saturday,Dec. 24, Henderson Police Chief Tom Bums and voltonteers from his staff and their families will provide a very special Christmas Eve brunch and fill the center with holiday entertainment. Everyone is encouraged to join us with Tommy and his Burners." New Year's Eve will be celebrated for the countdown beginning at 11:30 a.m., Friday, Courtesy Photo AUDITION — Receptionist Carinne Kane successfully auditioned for the Celebrity City Chorus. Dec. 30, until noon. Thefestivities will be led by the Young at Heart Band. The traditional good luck meal of black-eyed peas will be served with the special hand of cook Sally Lambert and her kitchen crew. This will be the beginning of a great year for the center and everyone is invited to attend what promises to be a great New Year's party. Merrill Lynch "Call Home for the Holidays" The Las Vegas office of Merrill Lynch & Co. provide the center with a wonderful holiday present, free telephone calls to family and friends. Seniors were invited to the office in Las Vegas to make their calls anywhere in the world, while office volunteers and their families provided refreshments, gifts and entertainment. The homebound or those who could not drive were not forgotten. Special arrangements were made so seniors at home could be connected with their loved ones. Arrangements were also made to accommodate hearing, sight-impaired and non-Engli sh speaking seniors. The center extends sincere thanks for this thoughtful holiday present to organizer Cindy Ingram of Cindy Ingram & Associates. Two Line Dancing Classes The center's popular Line Dancing Class will be expanded this year. In 1995, two classes Is Your Air Conditioner a Cash Guzzler? If it's more than 15 years old it is! Air conditioners are like old cars, they just aren't energy efficient. And if your house has one that's more than 15 years old, you're spending too much money to cool your house. You need to replace that old air conditioner with a new model that has a seasonal Energy Efficiency Rating (SEER) of at least 11.0. New energy efficient air conditioners save you money on your utility bill. And Nevada Power gives you cash back just for making the switch!* AIWERICAW ISTANDARD Buill'IbAlllnlierSlaiidaiTl. 452-8200 4049 E. Lake Mead Day & Night Heating & Air Conditioning Inc. NEVm POWER COMPANY •Purchase required prior to 12/31/94. Minimum requirements and some restrictions apply. will be oflFered — one for beginners and another for second year students. Call the Center, 5656990, for information on class sdiedules. Saturday Brunch Bunch The Saturday Brunch Bunch coordinator, Ledema Doran, and her husband, John, have been hard at work organizing voliuiteers to stop by each Saturday morning to prepare meals at the center. She has also expanded the menu to include hash, hash browns, and for our light breakfast eaters, several low cholesterol choices. The Saturday Bnmch, started by former Nutrition Director Bud Quinnell, has developed into a unique center tradition. Each week, volunteers from throughout the community prepare a made-to-order breakfast. In the past, volunteers from the Knights KARAOKE Every Saturday lilght 9 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. GOLDMINE TAVERN 23 Water St. 565-9391 Downtown Henderson B B ARREL MINUTE GIFTS Desert a)Data 503 Hotel Plaza (702) 2916224 Boulder City, NV 89005 FAX: 294 0141 Word Processing Newsletlnts .COLOR Cnpios .Triins(:ri|ilinn .Fotnis UPSlFndEx Resumes SpteHilsheets Billiny Ciinipiilct Hcnlal Central Christian Church • .. invites you to celebrate Christ's birth with us! We'll offer six identical Candlelight Christmas Services -jSaturday, December 24 at • ^ 4:00, 5:30 & 7:00 pm I • Sunday, December 25 at L 8:15, 9:35 & 11:00 am Child care will bv available for birth 5 years. 3375 S. Mojave Road at Desert Inn Las Vegas, NV (702) 735-4004 .fe'jiJivi.i ij (ir iio PERSONAL INJURY FREE CONSULTATION NO RECOVERY FEE 565-0473 218 LEAD ST. (Across from the new Police Department facilities) LAW OFFICE OF JOHN F. MARCHIANO Former Henderson City Attorney Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News Page? SENIORS: Senior activities From Page 6 over to ei\joy a casual breakfast. Brunch Bunch volunteers provided some special holiday treats this past month, including Levi volunteers — always great cooks — who served firuit and treats. By the way, Quinnell is still around. Every Saturday morning he stops by with treats and sweets donated from Henderson grocery storesfor seniors to er\joy. Seniors, Saturday Brunch is a perfect time to bring family to the center. Our thanks go the Dorans and all the volunteers who have helped make this a great family afiTair. Nutrition Challenge University Medical Center will provide a two-part educational course at the center focusing on the nutritional needs of seniors. TheNutrition Challenge program offers applications of easy-to-use principles for a daily diet, including height, weight and blood pressure monitoring and body mass index. Tips will be given on food selections to lower fat and cholesterol intake, as well as improving cardiovascular fitness. Call the center, 565-6990, for a class schedule. Reminders Because of the holidays, many public services will be dark. Call the center to check on appointments and schedules. Senior Employment services has changed days at the center — employment interviewer Betsy Lynan will now be at the center from 8 a.m. to noon Monday through Thursday. Activities The Henderson Senior Center has activities ranging from art to Scrabble, concerts, health seminars and social services. The center is open for all activities from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. On Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings, the Center is open from 6 to 10 p.m., and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays. Check.^ew8,the senior center lletter or call 565iO for details on activities, special events and services. Also call to receive the newsletter by mail. Activities scheduled for the week are as follows: Thursday, Dec. 22: Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.. Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, bridgeat8:30a.m., scrabbleat 10 a.m., free bingo at 12:30 p.m. Senior Orchestra rehearsal dark. Center open for all activities at 6 p.m., duplicate bridge and pinochle at 7 p.m. Friday, Dec. 23: Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.. Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, aerobic dance at 9 a.m., Holiday Dinner Celebration at 11:30 a.m. and bridge at 12:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 24: Center open for all activities 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. and a special holiday brunch served by Levi volunteers from 9 to 11:30 a.m. for $1.25. Monday, Dec. 26: Assessor 8 GVHS names students December Students of the Month include Sarah Borgenhagen, art; Kenneth Carluto, Business; Kimberly Steinforth, English; Jennifer Newman, Foreign Language; Peter Battisti, Health/Dr. Ed./ Careers; Justin Lewis, Home Economics; Toni Massaro, Individualized Programs; Jeremiah Johnson, Industrial Arts; Joseph Twesme, Mathematics; Natsumi Kama, Performing Arts; Richard Scow, Physical Education; Alvin Jose Morada, Science; and Beth Fischman, Social Studies. Fischman was also selected as the overall Student of the Month for December. Students' pictures are featured on the Student of the Month display board located in the Green Valley Hi^ Sdiool CounseUng Offke reception area. Each receives a certificate, and will be honored ataforthcominglundieon atOod&ther'sPiiza. a.m. to 4 p.m.. Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, bridge at 8:30 a.m., aerobic dance at 9 a.m., wood carving at 9 a.m.. Shearing Eye Screening dark and pinochle at 1 p.m. Center open for all activities at 6 p.m., 55 ALIVE at6 p.m., and double deck pinochle at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 27: Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.. Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, needle crafl at 9 a.m., T-shirt painting at 9 a.m., free blood pressure testing at 10 a.m., pinochle at 1 p.m. and line dancing at 1 p.m. Center open for all activities at 6 p.m. and Celebrity City Chorus at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 28: Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m.. billiards all hours center is open, aerobic dance 9 a.m., Scrabbleat 10 a.m., bridge at 12:30 p.m. dominoes at 1 p.m., and Clark County Social Services by appt. 565-6990. Center open for all activities at 6 p.m.. Men's Barbershop Chorus at 7 p.m. and pinochle at 7 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 29: Assessor 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.. Retired Senior Volunteer Program 8 to 11 a.m., billiards all hours center is open, bridge at 8:30 a.m.. Scrabble at 10 a.m. free bingo at 12:30 p.m., and Senior Orchestra rehearsal at 1:30 p.m. Center open for all activities at 6 p.m., duplicate bridge at 6 p.m., and pinochle at 7 p.m. Menu The Black Mountain Senior Nutrition Program serves lunch Monday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for a suggested donation of $1.25. AH meals are served with coffee, tea and 2% milk. From 9 to 11:30 a.m. every Saturday, brunch is cooked and served by our Saturday Brunch Bunch Volunteers for$1.25. For information on rides to the center. Meals on Wheels or the Nutrition Program, call 5653214. The published menu for the week is as follows: Thursday, Dec. 22: Turkey. Friday, Dec. 23: Christmas Dinner Baked Ham and all the trimmings!. Saturday,Dec.24:Christmas Eve Brunch, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., a special brunch and entertainment by Police Chief Tom Bums and volimteers of his staff. Monday, Dec. 26: Beef Skillet. Tuesday, Dec. 27: Hamburger Steak. Wednesday, Dec. 28: Baked Ham. Thursday, Dec. 29: Sloppy Joes. SMOG NO PASS NO PAY CERT. $6.00 {TAMPERING INSPECTION FAIL FULL PRICE IVERN'S TEXACO Lake Mead & Water St. Henderson S65-0220 Courtesy Photo HOMEBOUND DRIVER — Jack Livesay helps out Black Mountain Senior Nutritmn volunteers Molly Oldfield and Sally Lambert. Courtesy Photo DRIVER AND NIKKI—Volunteer home-bound driver brought Nikki to the senior center for the Christmas party. /' HE'S A ^^HERE! ^^ Timothy Jordan Miele (he's a keeper!) Bom: Dec. 21,1994 Weighing: 7 lbs. 4 oz. Length: 18-1/2 inches long Congratulations Miele Family ''••'*"'•'Ifli'lB HlllMIIIII.I,''.',J.'J\A'*.lllttll**' 'rt*VV CHRISTMAS EVE CANDLELIGHT SERVICE 5:30 p.m. Deciember 24 CHRISTMAS DAY 9:45 Sunday Celebratlbn"6r Jesus Birthday! Music by Robert Baughman "Birthday of the King' A FOURSQUARE CHURCH 571 Adams Blvd. Boulder City • 293-7773 We've Got A Handle On You Trash Disposal Needs Precision Waste Management For Home Or Business For home, business or construction, Sliver State can liandie your waste management needs. Use the right disposal receptacles lor the job and save time, money and effort Monthly rentals available. tiTii" v.: >',liii;!'v; I'-.': • Mobile Totar -Wheeled receptacle lor convenient home use. Replaces lour 20-gallon Irash cans. Only $3.00 per month. Call 735-5151. • Conlainer Rentals Four sizes for residenlial, industrial or commercial use. Holds up to fifteen 33-gallon cans of refuse. From $12.50 to $19.50 per month. Call 735-5151. • Drop Box • For the really t)ig jobs. Yard cleanup, constnjction sites of business refuse, may be used permanently. 4 sizes avaiaUe 20 • 28 35 • 50 cu. yards. Costs only $6.83 per cubic yard. Call 735-5151. Silver State Disposal Service, Inc. 770 East Sahara Ave., Las Vegas, NV 89104 HOLIDAY wINN! DEC. 16 2S WIN!... CASH JOKER'S HOLIDAY SHIRTS! KENO HOLIDAY TURKEYS! WILD CARD BUFIET CHRISTMAS DAY GIFT! (Noon until supplies last) NEW YEAR'S TV BASH! DEC. 26 30 TV QiVEAWAY! 2 DAILY DRAWINGS! EVERY JACKPOT WIN OVER $200.00, WITH MAXIMUM COIN PLAYED, WILL GIVE YOU A CHANCE TO WIN A 13" COLOR TV WITH REMOTE! "ANOTHER FINE BOYD GAMING PROPERTY" C A S I NO BOULDER HIGH WAV, BETWEEN LAKE MEAD & SUNSET 564-8100

PAGE 8

Page 8 Henderson Home News Thursday, December 22,1994 Thursday, Decembier 22,1994 Henderson Home News Page 9 Shalevs named Mardi Gras king, queen Long-time member of St. Rose Dominican Hospital's medical staff, Joseph Shalev, M.D. and his wife, Bat-sheva, have been selected as the King and Queen of the 1995 Mardi Gras Ball, The Ball is a msyor annual fundraising event for St. Rose Dominican, Southern Nevada's only religiously-sponsored, notfor-profit and non-tax supported hospital. Shalev was bom in Lithuania during World War II and moved to Israel in his early teens. He received his medical degree from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem in 1964. He served two years in the Israeli Defense Forces as a medical officer and took part in the Sinai Campaign. In 1965, he moved to the United States where, following a one-year residency in general surgery he completed an eye residency at Sinai Hospital in Detroit. Call the J^ews with your story ideas Shalev then became chief of the department of ophthalmology at the Kaiser Foundation in Cleveland. The family moved to Las Vegas in 1972, at which time Shalev opened his private practice at Si Rose Dominican Hospital in Henderson. For many years, Shalev was the only ophthamologist in Henderson. Bat-sheva Shalev was bom in Israel, where she received her education as a registered nurse. She and Shalev were married and blessed with three children: Daphna, who is presently a teacher in California; Danny, who isenteringdentalschoolnextyear, and Aric, who is a senior at Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania. A respected member of the St. Rose Dominican medical staff for Rob Weidenfeld/News Staff CHRISTMAS GIFT—Charles Puett, left, president of Disability Access Services, and Puett's son, Sunee, present Dollie Harper with a new electric wheelchair and other gifts Tuesday. Harper lost the use of her left arm and leg and had a difficult time operating a manual wheelchair. Harper received gifts from several community businesses, including a S50 shopping spree at Wal-Mart, a dinner from Lucky supermarkets, and $400 from A-1 Plating. many years, he has made numerous contributions to the hospital and this community. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Ophthalmology, Fellow of the American college of Surgeons, member of the Nevada Medical Association, member of the Clark county Medical Society, and past chief of staff at St Rose Dominican Hospital, where he is currently a member of the board of directors. The '95 Mardi Gras Ball is scheduled for Feb. 24, 1995, at Caesars Palace. Serving as honorary chairperson are all members of the medical staff. "We are very proud of our medical staff," said Rod A. Davis, President/CEO of St. Rose Dominican Hospital. "We are fortunate to have such a dedicated group of professionals who share our mission of providing quality, compassionate health care in an atmosphere of reverence and respect." For more information about &e Mardi Gras Ball, contact Barbara Justiss, director of fund development, 564-4510. Christmas Shopping 26A Water St. 565-7334 (Downtown Henderson) THE BOULDER CITY/HENDERSON SWIM TEAM gratefully acknowledges Kerr-McGee Chemical Corp. for their sponsorship of the Fourth Annual Southern Nevada Winter Novice Swimming Championships held on Saturday, December 3,1994 at Lorin WiUiams Pool in Henderson. Over 100 swimmers, ages 4-18, representing the Las Vegas Gold, Sandpipers Swim Team, and Boulder City/ Henderson participated in this event. Ribbons were awarded fogr First through Eighth place best times. Kerr-McGee's sponsorship of this event assured that all swimmers also received commemorative T-shirts and participation grab bags. Thank you to Kerr-McGee for helping to provide an opportunity for these young swimmers to participate in a competitive swim meet. Motorcyclist killed in accident Is Your Air Conditioner a Cash Guzzler? If it's more than 15 years old it is! Air conditioners are like old cars, they just aren't energy efficient And if your house has one that's more than 15 years old, you're spending too much money to cool your house. You need to replace that old air conditioner with a new model that has a seasonal Energy Efficiency Rating (SEER) of at least 11.0. New energy efficient air conditioners save you money on your utility bill. And Nevada Power gives you cash back just for making the switch!* Carrier Were The Inside Guys. 7311617 3141 WestwoodDr. ^ AIR CONDITIONING SERVICE, INC. NEVADA POWER COMPANY •Purchase rtquired prior to 12/31/94. Minimum requirements and some restrictions apply. Thorn at Moora News Staff Writer A 21 -year-old Henderson man was killed Tuesday at Greenway Road and Mona Lane when the motorcycle he was driving slammed into the passenger side of a 1979 Chrysler. The occupants of the Chrysler were treated for lacerations and released. According to a Henderson Police news release, Matthew Robert Howard was driving his 1993 Kawasaki at a high rate of speed west on Greenway Road. The Chrysler, driven by Brian Gerki, 27, of Henderson, was traveling east on Greenway and turned lefl in front of Howard. Howard's motorcycle hit the car and he was thrown 60 feet The Chrysler was pushed by the impact of the crash and stopped on top of Howard who was pronounced dead at the scene. Witnesses said Howard did not brake before his motorcycle hit the car. The news release did not say whether any charges were pending but the investigation into the accident is continuing. The News is ^'OUR coinnuiniiy newspaper. Ik 12 Days December 15 through December 24,1994 1IILL Christmas T-Shirt With Alt Jacbpots over $400.00 on Keno and Reel Machines and All Royal Flushes (maximum coins played, no wild cards) FDFF Long Sleeve 1 IILL Christmas T-Shirt with Specially Marked Keno Tickets FREETURie With Specially Marked Sports Boob Tickets Daily Cash Drawings 25 ."o up to ^SOO.""' Daily at 4:30p.m. Q Winner need not be present. If winner is present, they will receive Dinner for S in Cactus Ice's! HOVtibter St. Downtown Henderson While Supplies Last HPRD announces holiday hours John Judge/News Staff READING—Ann Stoner, 6, Sandra Mathews, 4, Shantel Straily, and Ashley Straily take some time for a little light reading during the Henderson Library's Holiday Open House Monday evening. The open house included story readings by John Gettleman, library director; Zuki Landau, children's librarian; and Patti Blomstrom, assistant principal at Sewell Elementary School. More than 100 people attended the event. The Henderson Parks and Recreation Department announces the following holiday hours for its three recreation centers and the Lorin L. Williams Indoor Pool. •Loma J. Kesterson Valley View Recreation Center, 500 Harris St: Dec. 24,9a.m.to3p.m. Closed Dec. 25. •Silver Springs Recreation Center, 1951 Silver Springs Parkway: Closed Dec. 24 and 25. •Youth Center, 105 W. Basic Rd.: Dec. 24, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Closed Dec. 25. • Lorin L. Williams Indoor Pool, 500 N. Palo Verde Dr.: Dec. 24,9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Clsoed Dec. 25. Current hours for public swim are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Rob Weidenfeld/News Staff THE LITTLEST CHRISTMAS TREE—Santa and Mrs. Glaus, played by second-graders Denial Medrano and Crystal Jensen, pick out their tree in Galloway Elementary School^s presentation of Teresa Jennings' "The Littlest Christmas Tree' Wednesday. Luisi enrolls at Rochester Jennifer Luisi, a graduate of Basic High School, has enrolled as a freshman at the University of Rochester. Luisi, a resident of Henderson, is a recipient of a Xerox scholarship. Ninety-two fireshman this year received Xerox scholarships which are renewable each year of college. Given for academic merit in the humanities or social'sciences, the award is at least $5,000; if a student demonstrates financial need, the award can be greater. The University of Rochester is one of the most distinguished private universities in the Northeast. Approximately 4,900 undergraduates are enrolled in its humanities, science, engineering, music and nursing programs. SINCE 1975 Lie 38507 iHf consrRVATivf A/C co Air King AIR CONDITIONING HEATING •RFFRIOERATION FREE VIDEO (GOPRUSHLl JOlrj AIR KING THE GOP TIDF 225-0084 JOE BAHDE. MGR. 28 Ycnrs Ep. Sorvinq BC. HencI,. onci LV V.nllcy INSTANT CREDIT BIKES IN STOCK %^i 10% OFF B.£lh CCrkI CHRISTMAS LAYAWAY Q SOfl-dOU 1 AVAILABLE 745 W. Sunset (Between Treeway fit Boulder llwy.) PARTS, SALES, SERVICE, ACCESSORIES WINDOW TINTING • Doesn't block your view • Looks beautiful • Requires no extra maintenance Costs less • Cuts glare • Reduces utility bills year around • Safe for Dual Pane Glass • Blocks harmful U.V. rays Henderson, Boulder City & Green Valley 371-4000 (^ Express Lube ^•^ OIL CHANGE SPECIALIST ROTATE YOUR TIRES $2.00 PER WHEEL with FREE Brake Inspection WHILE YOU WAIT Check our low brake replacement prices before you spend hundreds of SSS elsewhere $5.00 OFF RADIATOR FLUSH $39^5 Rog. Price REFILL Tested to 30 Degrees Includes FREE carwash ,..^29 95 GET YOUR WINTER MAINTENANCE TUNE UP starting. Faster starting saves fuel Free battery efficiency test and post treatment Boulder Highway & Palo Verde • 565-0522 Henderson Boulder City Recycling Center We Buy Recycling Products Aluminum Cardboard Newspapers Copper Yellow and Red Brass Breakage Batteries Recycle Reuse Refill 2500 Utah (Landfill in Boulder City) 293-2276 93 I Stoplight Adams Landfill Corns and sniou a Cnuiimai J^inmx A ^ ^igouri's Restaruant & Casino 1133 Boulder Hwy. Henderson 565-1688 ^(44 ai£ alujaui. alad to naus. a ramilu join ui! OVEN ROAST TURKEY Sage Dressing, Mashed Potatoes, Giblet Gravy with Buttered Green Beans OR VIRGINA BAKED HAM Fruit sauce, sweet potatoes, and Buttered Green Beans

PAGE 9

Page 8 Henderson Home News Thursday, December 22,1994 Thursday, Decembier 22,1994 Henderson Home News Page 9 Shalevs named Mardi Gras king, queen Long-time member of St. Rose Dominican Hospital's medical staff, Joseph Shalev, M.D. and his wife, Bat-sheva, have been selected as the King and Queen of the 1995 Mardi Gras Ball, The Ball is a msyor annual fundraising event for St. Rose Dominican, Southern Nevada's only religiously-sponsored, notfor-profit and non-tax supported hospital. Shalev was bom in Lithuania during World War II and moved to Israel in his early teens. He received his medical degree from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem in 1964. He served two years in the Israeli Defense Forces as a medical officer and took part in the Sinai Campaign. In 1965, he moved to the United States where, following a one-year residency in general surgery he completed an eye residency at Sinai Hospital in Detroit. Call the J^ews with your story ideas Shalev then became chief of the department of ophthalmology at the Kaiser Foundation in Cleveland. The family moved to Las Vegas in 1972, at which time Shalev opened his private practice at Si Rose Dominican Hospital in Henderson. For many years, Shalev was the only ophthamologist in Henderson. Bat-sheva Shalev was bom in Israel, where she received her education as a registered nurse. She and Shalev were married and blessed with three children: Daphna, who is presently a teacher in California; Danny, who isenteringdentalschoolnextyear, and Aric, who is a senior at Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania. A respected member of the St. Rose Dominican medical staff for Rob Weidenfeld/News Staff CHRISTMAS GIFT—Charles Puett, left, president of Disability Access Services, and Puett's son, Sunee, present Dollie Harper with a new electric wheelchair and other gifts Tuesday. Harper lost the use of her left arm and leg and had a difficult time operating a manual wheelchair. Harper received gifts from several community businesses, including a S50 shopping spree at Wal-Mart, a dinner from Lucky supermarkets, and $400 from A-1 Plating. many years, he has made numerous contributions to the hospital and this community. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Ophthalmology, Fellow of the American college of Surgeons, member of the Nevada Medical Association, member of the Clark county Medical Society, and past chief of staff at St Rose Dominican Hospital, where he is currently a member of the board of directors. The '95 Mardi Gras Ball is scheduled for Feb. 24, 1995, at Caesars Palace. Serving as honorary chairperson are all members of the medical staff. "We are very proud of our medical staff," said Rod A. Davis, President/CEO of St. Rose Dominican Hospital. "We are fortunate to have such a dedicated group of professionals who share our mission of providing quality, compassionate health care in an atmosphere of reverence and respect." For more information about &e Mardi Gras Ball, contact Barbara Justiss, director of fund development, 564-4510. Christmas Shopping 26A Water St. 565-7334 (Downtown Henderson) THE BOULDER CITY/HENDERSON SWIM TEAM gratefully acknowledges Kerr-McGee Chemical Corp. for their sponsorship of the Fourth Annual Southern Nevada Winter Novice Swimming Championships held on Saturday, December 3,1994 at Lorin WiUiams Pool in Henderson. Over 100 swimmers, ages 4-18, representing the Las Vegas Gold, Sandpipers Swim Team, and Boulder City/ Henderson participated in this event. Ribbons were awarded fogr First through Eighth place best times. Kerr-McGee's sponsorship of this event assured that all swimmers also received commemorative T-shirts and participation grab bags. Thank you to Kerr-McGee for helping to provide an opportunity for these young swimmers to participate in a competitive swim meet. Motorcyclist killed in accident Is Your Air Conditioner a Cash Guzzler? If it's more than 15 years old it is! Air conditioners are like old cars, they just aren't energy efficient And if your house has one that's more than 15 years old, you're spending too much money to cool your house. You need to replace that old air conditioner with a new model that has a seasonal Energy Efficiency Rating (SEER) of at least 11.0. New energy efficient air conditioners save you money on your utility bill. And Nevada Power gives you cash back just for making the switch!* Carrier Were The Inside Guys. 7311617 3141 WestwoodDr. ^ AIR CONDITIONING SERVICE, INC. NEVADA POWER COMPANY •Purchase rtquired prior to 12/31/94. Minimum requirements and some restrictions apply. Thorn at Moora News Staff Writer A 21 -year-old Henderson man was killed Tuesday at Greenway Road and Mona Lane when the motorcycle he was driving slammed into the passenger side of a 1979 Chrysler. The occupants of the Chrysler were treated for lacerations and released. According to a Henderson Police news release, Matthew Robert Howard was driving his 1993 Kawasaki at a high rate of speed west on Greenway Road. The Chrysler, driven by Brian Gerki, 27, of Henderson, was traveling east on Greenway and turned lefl in front of Howard. Howard's motorcycle hit the car and he was thrown 60 feet The Chrysler was pushed by the impact of the crash and stopped on top of Howard who was pronounced dead at the scene. Witnesses said Howard did not brake before his motorcycle hit the car. The news release did not say whether any charges were pending but the investigation into the accident is continuing. The News is ^'OUR coinnuiniiy newspaper. Ik 12 Days December 15 through December 24,1994 1IILL Christmas T-Shirt With Alt Jacbpots over $400.00 on Keno and Reel Machines and All Royal Flushes (maximum coins played, no wild cards) FDFF Long Sleeve 1 IILL Christmas T-Shirt with Specially Marked Keno Tickets FREETURie With Specially Marked Sports Boob Tickets Daily Cash Drawings 25 ."o up to ^SOO.""' Daily at 4:30p.m. Q Winner need not be present. If winner is present, they will receive Dinner for S in Cactus Ice's! HOVtibter St. Downtown Henderson While Supplies Last HPRD announces holiday hours John Judge/News Staff READING—Ann Stoner, 6, Sandra Mathews, 4, Shantel Straily, and Ashley Straily take some time for a little light reading during the Henderson Library's Holiday Open House Monday evening. The open house included story readings by John Gettleman, library director; Zuki Landau, children's librarian; and Patti Blomstrom, assistant principal at Sewell Elementary School. More than 100 people attended the event. The Henderson Parks and Recreation Department announces the following holiday hours for its three recreation centers and the Lorin L. Williams Indoor Pool. •Loma J. Kesterson Valley View Recreation Center, 500 Harris St: Dec. 24,9a.m.to3p.m. Closed Dec. 25. •Silver Springs Recreation Center, 1951 Silver Springs Parkway: Closed Dec. 24 and 25. •Youth Center, 105 W. Basic Rd.: Dec. 24, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Closed Dec. 25. • Lorin L. Williams Indoor Pool, 500 N. Palo Verde Dr.: Dec. 24,9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Clsoed Dec. 25. Current hours for public swim are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Rob Weidenfeld/News Staff THE LITTLEST CHRISTMAS TREE—Santa and Mrs. Glaus, played by second-graders Denial Medrano and Crystal Jensen, pick out their tree in Galloway Elementary School^s presentation of Teresa Jennings' "The Littlest Christmas Tree' Wednesday. Luisi enrolls at Rochester Jennifer Luisi, a graduate of Basic High School, has enrolled as a freshman at the University of Rochester. Luisi, a resident of Henderson, is a recipient of a Xerox scholarship. Ninety-two fireshman this year received Xerox scholarships which are renewable each year of college. Given for academic merit in the humanities or social'sciences, the award is at least $5,000; if a student demonstrates financial need, the award can be greater. The University of Rochester is one of the most distinguished private universities in the Northeast. Approximately 4,900 undergraduates are enrolled in its humanities, science, engineering, music and nursing programs. SINCE 1975 Lie 38507 iHf consrRVATivf A/C co Air King AIR CONDITIONING HEATING •RFFRIOERATION FREE VIDEO (GOPRUSHLl JOlrj AIR KING THE GOP TIDF 225-0084 JOE BAHDE. MGR. 28 Ycnrs Ep. Sorvinq BC. HencI,. onci LV V.nllcy INSTANT CREDIT BIKES IN STOCK %^i 10% OFF B.£lh CCrkI CHRISTMAS LAYAWAY Q SOfl-dOU 1 AVAILABLE 745 W. Sunset (Between Treeway fit Boulder llwy.) PARTS, SALES, SERVICE, ACCESSORIES WINDOW TINTING • Doesn't block your view • Looks beautiful • Requires no extra maintenance Costs less • Cuts glare • Reduces utility bills year around • Safe for Dual Pane Glass • Blocks harmful U.V. rays Henderson, Boulder City & Green Valley 371-4000 (^ Express Lube ^•^ OIL CHANGE SPECIALIST ROTATE YOUR TIRES $2.00 PER WHEEL with FREE Brake Inspection WHILE YOU WAIT Check our low brake replacement prices before you spend hundreds of SSS elsewhere $5.00 OFF RADIATOR FLUSH $39^5 Rog. Price REFILL Tested to 30 Degrees Includes FREE carwash ,..^29 95 GET YOUR WINTER MAINTENANCE TUNE UP starting. Faster starting saves fuel Free battery efficiency test and post treatment Boulder Highway & Palo Verde • 565-0522 Henderson Boulder City Recycling Center We Buy Recycling Products Aluminum Cardboard Newspapers Copper Yellow and Red Brass Breakage Batteries Recycle Reuse Refill 2500 Utah (Landfill in Boulder City) 293-2276 93 I Stoplight Adams Landfill Corns and sniou a Cnuiimai J^inmx A ^ ^igouri's Restaruant & Casino 1133 Boulder Hwy. Henderson 565-1688 ^(44 ai£ alujaui. alad to naus. a ramilu join ui! OVEN ROAST TURKEY Sage Dressing, Mashed Potatoes, Giblet Gravy with Buttered Green Beans OR VIRGINA BAKED HAM Fruit sauce, sweet potatoes, and Buttered Green Beans

PAGE 10

Plot 10 Htnderwn HonrMNews Thursday, December 22,1994 Community KWANZAA Tuttday, Dc. 27,7 p.m., RMd WhIppI* Cultural Cantor. The local African Dance and Music Ensemble will host and perform for the annual Kwanzaa Celebration. Admission is free. Abayomi Qoodall, 643-5182. PSYCHIC MEETING Tuesday, Dec. 27. For Men and Women Singles 55-plus, all three groups will meet with psychic Karen Lee. 641-4634. "12 STEPS LIVE" Monday through Friday, 8 9 a.m., KLAV, 1230 AM. Support a drugfree comnnunity. ART COLLECTION Through Dec. 31, Crockett Gallery, 2800 W. Sahara. A collection of landscape and abstract watercolors by Arthur Adelmann will be on display. 2536336. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS Mondays-Sundays. Gamblers Anonymous of Southern Nevada has day and evening meetings everyday. 24 hour hotline, 3857732. KIWANIS Mondays, 7:30 a.m., Green's Supper Club, 2241 N. Green Valley Parkway and Wednesdays, 7 a.m.. Lake Mead Lounge. The Green Valley Kiwanis Club meets Mondays and the Henderson club meets Wednesdays. ADJUSTMENT GROUPS Mondays, 7:30 9 p.m., Community Lutheran Church, 3720 E. Tropicana, and Tuesdays, 7:30 9 p.m.. First Christian Church, 101 S. Rancho Dr. Divorced and separated adjustment groups for men and women are offered. 735-5544. MEN AND WOMEN SENIOR SINGLES Mondays, 6 p.m. Senior singles 55-plus. Where men and women meet to share new interests and beginnings. Patio dinners and conservation. 641-4634 for meeting locations and information. ROTARY Tuesdays, noon, Nick's Supper Club, 15 E. Lake Mead Dr. and Thursdays, 7 a.m.. Country Inn, 1990 W. Sunset Road. The Henderson Rotary Club meets Tuesdays and the Green Valley Club meets Thursdays. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Tuesdays, 10 a.m.. Green Valley Library. Noduesorfees. Dotores. 433-8269. RELATIONSHIPS Tuesdays and Fridays, 7:30 p.m. Through December, the Hubbard Dianetics Foundation will be conducting free lectures on relationships. 731-1500. SINGLES LUNCH BUFFET Tuesday and Thursdays. For men and women 55 plus. Lunch buffet and discussions. 6414634. TOPS Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m.. Junior Junction PreTo announc* your group or orgartization's avants, plaaaa coma by or mail information to: 2 Commarca CantarDriva, Handanon, NV89014. school, 101 W. Chaparral. TOPS, Take Off Pounds Sensibly, will hold their weekly meeting. ADELAINES Tuesdays, 7 p.m. 10 p.m., Tuesday, Ssnior Csntsr. Practice for Celebrity City Chorus of Sweet Adelaines. BUSINESS NETWORK Wednesdays, 7 a.m-8:30 a.m., Country Inn, Sunset and Vails Verde. The Green Valley Chapter of Business Network IntI meetsfor its weekly meeting. All guests who are interested in increasing their volume of business are welcome. 4543100. FUNTIMERS Wednesdays, 5 p.m., Waterhole, 4740 S. Arville. Mixer for singles 40 years-okJ and older. Call 226-1882. Fridays, 5 p.m., Tom & Jerry's, 2327 Eastern (just north of Sahara). Where funtimers can see old friends and make new ones. 226-1882. BUSINESS Thursdays, 7 a.m., IHOP Restaurant, 3260 E. Tropicana at Pocos. The Eastside EarlyBirds Chapter of the Business Network Intematbnal invites Business Professk>nals to meet on expanding and upgrading your business. Call Marshall Davis, 436-4359, for more information. NEW BEGINNING SINGLES Sundays, 6 p.m. For singles 65-75. Dinner, conversatk>n, and speakers on toprcs such as "finding each other." Resen/ations only, 641-4634. SOS Save Our Selves of Las Vegas (SOS) is a secular, non-profit group of anonymous nonprofessk)nals dedicated to the recovery from addictive behavior. Call 223-2634 for meeting information. SUICIDE PREVENTION VOLUNTEERS The Suk:kie Prevention Center is accepting new volunteers to man the hotline. Upon completion of training calls are taken in your home. Ewy, 7312990. DIVORCED "Divorced, Separated and Wkiowed Adjustment Inc."offers free support groups for men and women. Men and women of all ages and backgrounds are invited to attend. For times and tocattons. 735-5544. Church SINGLES Sundays, 9:45 a.m.. First Southern Baptist Church, 240 S. Cholla St. Single AduK Bible Study provkies a place to belong. Call 565-6072. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN SINGLES First Presbyterian Singles invites singles of all ages to join them for new ideas. Two groups. Contact Rick Karnsf rom 9 a.m.5 p.m on Monday thai Frkiay, 384-4554. At the Library... Green Valley Library 2797 No. Green Valley Parkway Henderson, NV 89014 435-1840 Thursday, Dec. 22 Piano Recital for Students of Lisa Florenza (Sunset Room). Dec. 17-Dec. 18 Library will be ciosed in observance of Cliristmas Wednesday, Dec. 28 Boy Scouts Troop #6 Adult Committee (Conference Room) Basket recipients sought T^e Greater Henderson Junior Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring Holiday Food Baskets for needy families and senior dtazens in our community. If you are in need or know of someone in need of a food basket. please write a letter stating: Your drcumstances, name, address, phone number and number of fanuly members to: Greater Henderson Junior Chamber of Commerce, P.O. Box 90009, Henderson, Nv. 890090009. Holiday parking tips for McCarran Airport The Clark County Department of Aviation offers the following holiday tips: •Between Christmas and New Year's Eve 352,000 visitors are expected in Las Vegas, 45% of whom (158,400) will pass through McCarran. •Clark County residents are predicted to come out to McCarran in full force with more than 350,000 residents leaving town for the holidays or coming to the airport to pickup or drop off family and friends. •Arrive at least 90 minutes prior to your flight's departure time to allow enough time to locate SUPPORT YOUR CoMiviuNiTY NEWSPAPER a parking space and find the appropriate gate. •If possible, get a ride firom family, friends or use public transportation. •Short-term parking will be on levels 3 and 4 of the parking garage between Dec. 19 and Jan. 2. •Long-term parking in the ing, 261-5121. •Shuttle buses will drop off and pick up passengers on a regular schedule at the Courtesy Curb located in firont of Terminal 1 (Main Terminal) between the Taxi-Limo Curb and the Departures Curb. 'When picking up firiends and garage will be on level 5 and 6 only relatives, call ahead and check and is expected to be full by Tuesday, Dec. 20. •Electronic display signs are posted throughout the airport roadway system and will advise travelers when the remote lot off Russell and Kelly Lanes opens. •Remote parking, once activated, will be at no charge. Shuttles will operate 24 hours a day. •For up to the minute parking information, call McCarran Parkthe flights arrival time with the airline. •There are Flight Information Display Monitors outside the baggage claim area so visitors can check the status of an arriving plane without going inside the terminal. •Drive safely and please, don t drink and drive. •It' r: III CRYSTAL PITCHER & SET OF GLASSESALL f,Sfs 1/2 PRICE •Em.rtow.n Autheotic Vermont Maple Syrup with SIS purchtse GREEN MOUNTAIN GIFTS ^,2,"/^t,. 19 S. Water Street • 565-1300 Downtown Henderson • Hours: Tues Sat 10a.m. to 5 p.m. • -j:-2:"-2;"'A'"'A'"'A'"(5 •.r.-,r.-,,-.,..„.v,.-.-,r.-.rv..-.%r.-,,-^^^^ DID YOU KNOW? FOR ONLY $495 00 DOWN GAG And Your AVERAGE Credit You Can Buy Any New HYUNDAI In Our Inventory With Payments To Fit Your Budget .. .X HYUNDAI "ELANTRA" THIS IS NOT A LEASE!! YOU OWN THE CAR! 2 years or 24,000 miles free maintenance You only buy the gas! 1995 HYUNDAI SONATA CLS Come on out pick the car of your choice Excel Scoupe Elantra or Sonata they are all included. *This is in addition to Hyundai's normal factory warranty. BEN STEPMAN HYUNDAI 460 No. Boulder Hwy. • 565-1500 "In Henderson of Course" .'. 1094 Henderson Home News Peo*" terian Church ves new members : 11, the • ii) Church ers)iip28new ,>f—Think about this tasty combination: tomato sauce, dog food, tuna, sliced pineapple with nice sticky syrup, baked beans and a bit of clam chowder. Yummm. Andthose are just some of the ingredients in that yucky residue clinging to your can opener because it's so difficult to clean. That consumers would rather not mix yesterday's cat food with today's can of chicken noodle soup has not gone unnoticed by household products manufacturers. "Consumers are looking for cleanability, sharp design and better performance," says Paula Etchison, seniorproduct manager at Sunbeam-Oster Household Products. Sunbeam recently introduced Pop and Clean, a can opener with a stainless steel cutter wheel and star blade module that pops out for easy cleaning and is dishwasher safe. Since the cutting wheel and star blade are in a fixed position and are not attached to the can opener's handle, the machine promises a clean cut. And a big, soft-touch handle offers easy operation for aging hands. The can opener comes in a countertop model with a manual knife and scissor sharpener. There's also a space-saving underthe-counter model. Pop and Clean's sleek and contemporary design, with its smooth, rounded edges, gives the can opener a "SOs techno-style that fits in well with any kitchen decor. The Pop and Clean can opener is available through most mass merchandisers and retails for about $19.99 mmm BLACh jVlt. Moriah Lodge installs new officers FREE PARTY FA On Dec. 10, the following oflBcers were installed at Mt. Moriah Lodge F&AM: James LaVeck, worshipful master, Gerald Ogle, senior warden, Richard Hoaglin, junior warden, John Vinski, treasurer, Vem Endreson P.M., secretary, Edward Wood, senior deacon, Steve Gilmore, junior deacon, Frank Senfft P.M., chaplain, Laurance Snowden, marshal, Hugo Capagli, senior steward, Alvah Reger, jimior steward, Nick Bane, Tyler, Floyd "Pete" Buell P.M., historian, M.P. "Mike" Bergemeyer P.M., depu^ grand lecturer, Horacio Lopez P.M., treasurer. The officers were installed by Most Worshipful C.E. "Bud" Shead, Grand Master of Masons in Nevada. Shead has been a resident of Henderson for many years, and was recently installed as the Grand Master of Nevada. A reception immediately followed the ceremony, with approximately 100 persons in attendance. THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY i^^m^MW^^ 44wj^^saM§ UOCKer spaniel, Dionoe maie, **U|llli]Y 8 mos. Needs a little grooming, qg§3 A"*^ • • but very sweet! HENDERSON ANIMAL SHELTER has many nice cats and dogs that need good homes. For infomfiation please call 565-2033 REMEMBER: SPAY and NEUTER...tt tavM animala live*! BINGO 3 BIG GAMES 6:30 P.M. • 8:30 P.M. • 10:30 P.M. FREE FREE lOOCASH DRAWINGS Cabe and Champagne Party Favors at the 10:30 Session $ All Evening Sessions will have a Drav7ing for a $100. ^250 EXTRA All Evening Sessions will have an extra $250 on Cover All Game (Any Color Board) GIVEi 8:. 10: 12:1; FRl Dec Wl of $800. (Maxim 1t40\> !AL HOSPITAL ^ CLINIC '.ccinations every day rs* • 'y care. (^' .>r only $16 /^' 4rcinesfor$29;^ •.'' • • -i\ / ^il and io4D.m. Sun. ^^-JS^l^^^jS^j j appointment lAGNE! r CataUfO' yiTAS FOR 2 ^8.95 beet or Chicben I P.M. I A.M., New Year's Eve V jiion.s Suggested, Frte Party Fator at '.c Glass o( Champagne with all Entrees ': r^l .-''!;Q .'SI MM^^?k^:M' ^iysTt'gc^g^ig'^^ scac • .95 Choice ol Potato. Vegetable ^6,95 GIMlMoJ-BONE STEAK Choice of Potato. Vegetable .95 PRIME RIB DINNER iUiice of Potato. Vegetable v!th ."^dup & Salad .. i r >vM.Ti.ctiulOne I l,'l.i tU.is.-1'! Cti.intpdgn'e. t;NTl;WTAIN.MENT ANDIMNCING DESERT WIND ;^ • V.irvMriio \\\\c l.ouni^e9 p.m. .ivofi and Champagne • !•. iMt tii, Cii
PAGE 11

Plot 10 Htnderwn HonrMNews Thursday, December 22,1994 Community KWANZAA Tuttday, Dc. 27,7 p.m., RMd WhIppI* Cultural Cantor. The local African Dance and Music Ensemble will host and perform for the annual Kwanzaa Celebration. Admission is free. Abayomi Qoodall, 643-5182. PSYCHIC MEETING Tuesday, Dec. 27. For Men and Women Singles 55-plus, all three groups will meet with psychic Karen Lee. 641-4634. "12 STEPS LIVE" Monday through Friday, 8 9 a.m., KLAV, 1230 AM. Support a drugfree comnnunity. ART COLLECTION Through Dec. 31, Crockett Gallery, 2800 W. Sahara. A collection of landscape and abstract watercolors by Arthur Adelmann will be on display. 2536336. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS Mondays-Sundays. Gamblers Anonymous of Southern Nevada has day and evening meetings everyday. 24 hour hotline, 3857732. KIWANIS Mondays, 7:30 a.m., Green's Supper Club, 2241 N. Green Valley Parkway and Wednesdays, 7 a.m.. Lake Mead Lounge. The Green Valley Kiwanis Club meets Mondays and the Henderson club meets Wednesdays. ADJUSTMENT GROUPS Mondays, 7:30 9 p.m., Community Lutheran Church, 3720 E. Tropicana, and Tuesdays, 7:30 9 p.m.. First Christian Church, 101 S. Rancho Dr. Divorced and separated adjustment groups for men and women are offered. 735-5544. MEN AND WOMEN SENIOR SINGLES Mondays, 6 p.m. Senior singles 55-plus. Where men and women meet to share new interests and beginnings. Patio dinners and conservation. 641-4634 for meeting locations and information. ROTARY Tuesdays, noon, Nick's Supper Club, 15 E. Lake Mead Dr. and Thursdays, 7 a.m.. Country Inn, 1990 W. Sunset Road. The Henderson Rotary Club meets Tuesdays and the Green Valley Club meets Thursdays. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Tuesdays, 10 a.m.. Green Valley Library. Noduesorfees. Dotores. 433-8269. RELATIONSHIPS Tuesdays and Fridays, 7:30 p.m. Through December, the Hubbard Dianetics Foundation will be conducting free lectures on relationships. 731-1500. SINGLES LUNCH BUFFET Tuesday and Thursdays. For men and women 55 plus. Lunch buffet and discussions. 6414634. TOPS Tuesdays, 5:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m.. Junior Junction PreTo announc* your group or orgartization's avants, plaaaa coma by or mail information to: 2 Commarca CantarDriva, Handanon, NV89014. school, 101 W. Chaparral. TOPS, Take Off Pounds Sensibly, will hold their weekly meeting. ADELAINES Tuesdays, 7 p.m. 10 p.m., Tuesday, Ssnior Csntsr. Practice for Celebrity City Chorus of Sweet Adelaines. BUSINESS NETWORK Wednesdays, 7 a.m-8:30 a.m., Country Inn, Sunset and Vails Verde. The Green Valley Chapter of Business Network IntI meetsfor its weekly meeting. All guests who are interested in increasing their volume of business are welcome. 4543100. FUNTIMERS Wednesdays, 5 p.m., Waterhole, 4740 S. Arville. Mixer for singles 40 years-okJ and older. Call 226-1882. Fridays, 5 p.m., Tom & Jerry's, 2327 Eastern (just north of Sahara). Where funtimers can see old friends and make new ones. 226-1882. BUSINESS Thursdays, 7 a.m., IHOP Restaurant, 3260 E. Tropicana at Pocos. The Eastside EarlyBirds Chapter of the Business Network Intematbnal invites Business Professk>nals to meet on expanding and upgrading your business. Call Marshall Davis, 436-4359, for more information. NEW BEGINNING SINGLES Sundays, 6 p.m. For singles 65-75. Dinner, conversatk>n, and speakers on toprcs such as "finding each other." Resen/ations only, 641-4634. SOS Save Our Selves of Las Vegas (SOS) is a secular, non-profit group of anonymous nonprofessk)nals dedicated to the recovery from addictive behavior. Call 223-2634 for meeting information. SUICIDE PREVENTION VOLUNTEERS The Suk:kie Prevention Center is accepting new volunteers to man the hotline. Upon completion of training calls are taken in your home. Ewy, 7312990. DIVORCED "Divorced, Separated and Wkiowed Adjustment Inc."offers free support groups for men and women. Men and women of all ages and backgrounds are invited to attend. For times and tocattons. 735-5544. Church SINGLES Sundays, 9:45 a.m.. First Southern Baptist Church, 240 S. Cholla St. Single AduK Bible Study provkies a place to belong. Call 565-6072. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN SINGLES First Presbyterian Singles invites singles of all ages to join them for new ideas. Two groups. Contact Rick Karnsf rom 9 a.m.5 p.m on Monday thai Frkiay, 384-4554. At the Library... Green Valley Library 2797 No. Green Valley Parkway Henderson, NV 89014 435-1840 Thursday, Dec. 22 Piano Recital for Students of Lisa Florenza (Sunset Room). Dec. 17-Dec. 18 Library will be ciosed in observance of Cliristmas Wednesday, Dec. 28 Boy Scouts Troop #6 Adult Committee (Conference Room) Basket recipients sought T^e Greater Henderson Junior Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring Holiday Food Baskets for needy families and senior dtazens in our community. If you are in need or know of someone in need of a food basket. please write a letter stating: Your drcumstances, name, address, phone number and number of fanuly members to: Greater Henderson Junior Chamber of Commerce, P.O. Box 90009, Henderson, Nv. 890090009. Holiday parking tips for McCarran Airport The Clark County Department of Aviation offers the following holiday tips: •Between Christmas and New Year's Eve 352,000 visitors are expected in Las Vegas, 45% of whom (158,400) will pass through McCarran. •Clark County residents are predicted to come out to McCarran in full force with more than 350,000 residents leaving town for the holidays or coming to the airport to pickup or drop off family and friends. •Arrive at least 90 minutes prior to your flight's departure time to allow enough time to locate SUPPORT YOUR CoMiviuNiTY NEWSPAPER a parking space and find the appropriate gate. •If possible, get a ride firom family, friends or use public transportation. •Short-term parking will be on levels 3 and 4 of the parking garage between Dec. 19 and Jan. 2. •Long-term parking in the ing, 261-5121. •Shuttle buses will drop off and pick up passengers on a regular schedule at the Courtesy Curb located in firont of Terminal 1 (Main Terminal) between the Taxi-Limo Curb and the Departures Curb. 'When picking up firiends and garage will be on level 5 and 6 only relatives, call ahead and check and is expected to be full by Tuesday, Dec. 20. •Electronic display signs are posted throughout the airport roadway system and will advise travelers when the remote lot off Russell and Kelly Lanes opens. •Remote parking, once activated, will be at no charge. Shuttles will operate 24 hours a day. •For up to the minute parking information, call McCarran Parkthe flights arrival time with the airline. •There are Flight Information Display Monitors outside the baggage claim area so visitors can check the status of an arriving plane without going inside the terminal. •Drive safely and please, don t drink and drive. •It' r: III CRYSTAL PITCHER & SET OF GLASSESALL f,Sfs 1/2 PRICE •Em.rtow.n Autheotic Vermont Maple Syrup with SIS purchtse GREEN MOUNTAIN GIFTS ^,2,"/^t,. 19 S. Water Street • 565-1300 Downtown Henderson • Hours: Tues Sat 10a.m. to 5 p.m. • -j:-2:"-2;"'A'"'A'"'A'"(5 •.r.-,r.-,,-.,..„.v,.-.-,r.-.rv..-.%r.-,,-^^^^ DID YOU KNOW? FOR ONLY $495 00 DOWN GAG And Your AVERAGE Credit You Can Buy Any New HYUNDAI In Our Inventory With Payments To Fit Your Budget .. .X HYUNDAI "ELANTRA" THIS IS NOT A LEASE!! YOU OWN THE CAR! 2 years or 24,000 miles free maintenance You only buy the gas! 1995 HYUNDAI SONATA CLS Come on out pick the car of your choice Excel Scoupe Elantra or Sonata they are all included. *This is in addition to Hyundai's normal factory warranty. BEN STEPMAN HYUNDAI 460 No. Boulder Hwy. • 565-1500 "In Henderson of Course" .'. 1094 Henderson Home News Peo*" terian Church ves new members : 11, the • ii) Church ers)iip28new ,>f—Think about this tasty combination: tomato sauce, dog food, tuna, sliced pineapple with nice sticky syrup, baked beans and a bit of clam chowder. Yummm. Andthose are just some of the ingredients in that yucky residue clinging to your can opener because it's so difficult to clean. That consumers would rather not mix yesterday's cat food with today's can of chicken noodle soup has not gone unnoticed by household products manufacturers. "Consumers are looking for cleanability, sharp design and better performance," says Paula Etchison, seniorproduct manager at Sunbeam-Oster Household Products. Sunbeam recently introduced Pop and Clean, a can opener with a stainless steel cutter wheel and star blade module that pops out for easy cleaning and is dishwasher safe. Since the cutting wheel and star blade are in a fixed position and are not attached to the can opener's handle, the machine promises a clean cut. And a big, soft-touch handle offers easy operation for aging hands. The can opener comes in a countertop model with a manual knife and scissor sharpener. There's also a space-saving underthe-counter model. Pop and Clean's sleek and contemporary design, with its smooth, rounded edges, gives the can opener a "SOs techno-style that fits in well with any kitchen decor. The Pop and Clean can opener is available through most mass merchandisers and retails for about $19.99 mmm BLACh jVlt. Moriah Lodge installs new officers FREE PARTY FA On Dec. 10, the following oflBcers were installed at Mt. Moriah Lodge F&AM: James LaVeck, worshipful master, Gerald Ogle, senior warden, Richard Hoaglin, junior warden, John Vinski, treasurer, Vem Endreson P.M., secretary, Edward Wood, senior deacon, Steve Gilmore, junior deacon, Frank Senfft P.M., chaplain, Laurance Snowden, marshal, Hugo Capagli, senior steward, Alvah Reger, jimior steward, Nick Bane, Tyler, Floyd "Pete" Buell P.M., historian, M.P. "Mike" Bergemeyer P.M., depu^ grand lecturer, Horacio Lopez P.M., treasurer. The officers were installed by Most Worshipful C.E. "Bud" Shead, Grand Master of Masons in Nevada. Shead has been a resident of Henderson for many years, and was recently installed as the Grand Master of Nevada. A reception immediately followed the ceremony, with approximately 100 persons in attendance. THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY i^^m^MW^^ 44wj^^saM§ UOCKer spaniel, Dionoe maie, **U|llli]Y 8 mos. Needs a little grooming, qg§3 A"*^ • • but very sweet! HENDERSON ANIMAL SHELTER has many nice cats and dogs that need good homes. For infomfiation please call 565-2033 REMEMBER: SPAY and NEUTER...tt tavM animala live*! BINGO 3 BIG GAMES 6:30 P.M. • 8:30 P.M. • 10:30 P.M. FREE FREE lOOCASH DRAWINGS Cabe and Champagne Party Favors at the 10:30 Session $ All Evening Sessions will have a Drav7ing for a $100. ^250 EXTRA All Evening Sessions will have an extra $250 on Cover All Game (Any Color Board) GIVEi 8:. 10: 12:1; FRl Dec Wl of $800. (Maxim 1t40\> !AL HOSPITAL ^ CLINIC '.ccinations every day rs* • 'y care. (^' .>r only $16 /^' 4rcinesfor$29;^ •.'' • • -i\ / ^il and io4D.m. Sun. ^^-JS^l^^^jS^j j appointment lAGNE! r CataUfO' yiTAS FOR 2 ^8.95 beet or Chicben I P.M. I A.M., New Year's Eve V jiion.s Suggested, Frte Party Fator at '.c Glass o( Champagne with all Entrees ': r^l .-''!;Q .'SI MM^^?k^:M' ^iysTt'gc^g^ig'^^ scac • .95 Choice ol Potato. Vegetable ^6,95 GIMlMoJ-BONE STEAK Choice of Potato. Vegetable .95 PRIME RIB DINNER iUiice of Potato. Vegetable v!th ."^dup & Salad .. i r >vM.Ti.ctiulOne I l,'l.i tU.is.-1'! Cti.intpdgn'e. t;NTl;WTAIN.MENT ANDIMNCING DESERT WIND ;^ • V.irvMriio \\\\c l.ouni^e9 p.m. .ivofi and Champagne • !•. iMt tii, Cii
PAGE 12

Pag 12 Henderson Home News Thursday, December 22,1994 Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News Page 13 Rob Weidenfeld/News Staff WINNERS — With the help of their staff members and tutors (back row), these children from the Henderson Boys and Girls Clubs came out at the top of their classes in the club's Educational Enhancement Program. More than 100 students are enrolled in the program for at-risk youths. Tis the season for learning This season, parents can feel confident giving their children educational toys that will enhance theirleamingskills and entertain them with their favorite activities and themes. Parents are more concerned than ever about their children's education, and they understand the benefits of giving them an "edge" from the youngest age possible. This holiday season, Santa's helpers of all ages— infanta/toddlers, preschoolers and older children—will enjoy the fiin of creative interaction with a variety of VTECH toys. •Babies can take their first steps and learn shapes, numbers, animal sounds, and more with Little Smart First Steps • an activity center and walker that grows with the child. The electronic activity board can be removed from the walker for independent play, and the walker folds down for easy portability. •A toddler-sized activity table is the perfect gifl for busy little hands. Little Smart Table Talk • will entertain kids ages 9 months to 3 years for hours on end as they turn knobs and press buttons to activate friendly voices. Little Smart Table Talk has eight learning activities to keep baby very busy. •Making holiday plans longdistance? Preschoolers will love imitating mommy and daddy with the Little Smart Answering Machine' • With more than 70 random, prerecorded messages, Little Smart Answering Machine teaches kids numbers, shapes, colors and characters. When the unit is in the on-hook mode and the child has not placed a call for five seconds, the phone will call the child back. If the child is "screening" his/her calls and does not answer, the incoming call will be "recorded." •While parents enjoy the endless stream of eggnog and holiday punch, preschoolers will get their own creative juices flowing as they learn letters tmd printing with 10 built-in activities on the Little Smart Alphabet Writing Desk • Activity modes include letter identification, spelling, alphabetic order, musical fun and more. For a fi-ee copy of VTECH's "Smart Play: A Guide to Learning and Discovering With Toys," send a stamped, self-addressed, business-size envelope to VTECH "Smart Play Offer," 380 West Palatine Road, Wheeling, IL 60090. Please allow four to six weeks for delivery. Henderson Fire Department contributes time, money Like many departments and organizations, the Henderson Fire Department and its employees give back to the community with contributions of time and donations of money. Each year the Fire Department participates in several different projects that benefit many of the citizens of Henderson. For the past five years the Fire Department has sponsored a Firefighting Explorer Post, a branch of the Boy Scouts of America. The department has helped the Explorer Post both monetarily and with employee support by advising and educating young men and women about careers in the fire service. Another project fire department employees have been involved with for more than five years is the donation of bicycles to needy children. Each year, time and money is spent on refurbishing donated bikes to be given to children for Christmas. Cooperating in this venture. Bike King has provided parts at cost and their mechanics have also contributed many hours to the project. Through the efforts of all these individuals 14 children received bicycles and helmets in 1994 and approximately ten children were given bikes the year before. The Thanksgiving holidays are another time when the Fire Department gets involved with helping less fortunate families. In the past, firefighters have taken turkeys donated to them from Southwest Gas and passed them along to families in need. With money and other contributions, the Fire Department has joined with the Henderson Employees Association to help approximately twenty families over the past two years. Working through the Henderson Firefighters Association, firefighters have also been involved in projects aimed athelping the Henderson Boys and Girls Club. Firefighters from the Association donated their time to construct the scoreboards for the new Little League fields located at the club. Also coordinated by the Firefighters Association, a charity basketball game was held with firefighters playing against the Harlem Clowns. Approximately $1,600 was donated to the Boys and Girls Club as a result of the game and a number of children attended the game thanks to the sponsorships of local businesses. The Fire Department is proud to join the other organizations and departments throughout the city in their efforts to help build a strong community. These projects are just a small example of the Fire Departments commitment to service both on and off the job. THE HEALTH CARE YOU'VE BEEN LOOKING FOR! Comprehensive Adult Care by Board Certified Physicians X-ray, Lab, Ultrasound, EKG and more • Accepting New Patients • WALK-INS WELCOME Dr. John Andrewjeski Dr. Teresa Har)lon Dr. Matt Hemstreet Dr. Robert Gong 105 PecosSte.113 (South on Pecos to Wigwam in the heart of Green Valley) 263-4795 'Use southside canopied entrance 'jnL)/in(,( mcDic^i ctrtifR HENDERSO LUXURY THEATRE COMPL ^12 Luxury AuditvHms •09lifx$ Snack $9r ^Otlby Str$9 Stfimcf •Climat§ Controlhd Comhrt ^ItoAing Chair Logt Siating ^fm U$litid hrkiag Just mlwtti from firiM Yolky ni tooUu C/fy/ (All 457-37Q0 tMnmm MAJiKm mom KMK SMii mM I m Him iMn STARTS FRIDAY CINEDOME 12 HENDERSON STARTS FRIDAY THE SANTA CUUSE(PG) 12:40 2:55 5:10 7:25 9:40 11:55 DROP ZONE (R) 12:20 2:30 4:50 7:00 9.20 11:30 • RICHIE RICH (PQ13) 1:00 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:00 11:00 • INTERVIEW WITH THE VAMPIRE (R) 11:45 ^20 4:55 7:30 IftOO STAR TREK: GENERATIONS (PG) 2:15 7:15 MIDNIGHT • DUMB & DUMBER (PG13) 12:00 2.25 4:45 7:05 925 11:45 • SPEECHLESS (PG13) 12:30 2:45 5:00 7:10 925 11:35 • DISCLOSURE (R) 11:50 2:25 5:00 7:35 10:15 LION KING (G) 11:55 1:55 3:55 5:55 7:55 9:55 MIRACLE ON 34TH ST. (PG) 12:05 2:30 5.00 JUNK)R(PG13) 11:55 4:50 9:50 • STREETFK3HTER(PG13) 12:35 2:55 5:10 725 9:45 11:55 • MIXED NUTS (PG13) 12:45 2:55 5:10 7:20 9:35 NO PASSES CXXJPONS OR DISCOUNTS LATE SHOW FRI. SAT. ONLY VllllllllllliMlMllMMMllllW // Eagles sponsor New Year's dance The Fraternal order of Eagles 2672 will sponsor its annual New Year's Eve Dance at the lodge, 310 Pacific Ave. atVan Wagonen. The event is open to the public. The advance donation is $10 per person. Tickets may be purchased at the Eagle Lodge Bar fTom2to lOp.m. Call 565-2672for more information. There will be door prizes, party favors andheartybreakfisust served at 1 a.m. Combread will provide live music. 18" Satellite Dishes 564-0790 Great Service As a Country Companies agent, my first priority is service. It's the best way to meet my customers' needs — and the best way to keep them. I offer quality life, auto, and home coverage plus a comprehensive personal insurance review. If you like triendiy, nohassle service, please call me. FRED TOWNES 2700 E.Sunset Road #D-33 736-2882 COUNTRY COHMNES. .^-M—...i. INSURANCE GROUP I. m l^am — 6pm lAg ^,ooosq.Ft. mJM of livpooR SijMyppii\r.^ ^ Acres of c^^ilf^lMrklna Roolh Space A^lMlble Register to win a *250 Shopping Spree;! Name Address Phc MUST PRESE^T COUPON MUST BK PRESENT TO WIN. NOT VALID WITH A.NY OTHER OFJER. SOME RESTRICTIONS APPLY. 566-5641" 538 S. Bonlder Highway In The llendprson Plaza Shopping r>nter MARTJ John Judge/News Staff COATS — Capt. Julie Garcia of the Salvation Army accepts coats from students in Betsy Giles first-grade class at Galloway Elementary School. The class collected 41 coats over a period of 10 days. The coats will be distributed to needy families by the Salvation Army of Henderson. Your own holiday gift—get organized! Claudia C. Read Remember holidays past— filled with stress and depression from waiting in long lines, crowds of shoppers, money worries and mental fatigue, not to mention physical exhaustion and lack of energy from having to "shop" for the perfect gift for a special someone? Anew approach with the same gift-givinggoal for futurehoUdays can offer you an enjoyable experience filled with time to eiyoy the holidays, financial savings and even enough energy left over to share your love with others. No longer do we have to dread the holidays, rushing about to buy last-minute gifts. By "Getting Organized" we can manage our time throughout the year to save time right now and eiyoy a less stressful gift-giving holiday season. It can be a fun experience adopting some or all of the folDEATHS • *•((**. Steven D. Henson StevenD. Henson, 17,diedDec. 17, 1994. Bom in Honolulu, Hawaii on Dec, 18,1976, he had been a five-year resident of Henderson and was a student. He is survived by his mother and stepfather, Mark and Veronica Higdon, Henderson; father, Steven Dale Henson, ST., Clarkridge, Ark.; sister, Katrina Lynn Henson, Las Vegas; halfsister, Amanda Henson, half-brothers, Andrew and Matthew Henson, all of Pennsylvania; step-sister, Laura Lee Higdon, Henderson; step-brother, Ryan Douglas Higdon, Laurel, Md.; maternal grandmother. Sue Montgomery, Simi Valley, Calif; maternal grandmother, Elizabeth Higdon, Baltimore, Md.; and paternal grandfather, Andy Henson of Missouri. Viewing is at Palm MortuaryHenderson today from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., followed by services in the Palm Mortuary Chapel. Arrangements werehandled by Palm Mortuary-Henderson. Lorraine Sider Lorraine Sider, 69, died Monday, Dec. 19, 1994 at a local hospital. Bom Nov. 5,1925 in Chicago, 111., she was a homemaker in Henderson for four years; and a member of St. Peter's Catholic Church in Henderson. She is survived by her husband, Nicholas Sider, of Henderson; two daughters, Claudia Sider, of Wood Dale, 111., and Debbie Adams, of San Diego, Calif.; two sisters, Rosemary Michaelsen, and Peggy Levandowski, both of Las Vegas; one brother, Jack Faucault, also of Las Vegas; and two granddiildren. A memorial mass will be held at 10 a.m. Friday, Dec. 23, at St Peter's Catholic Church in Henderson. Arrangements werehandled by Palm Mortuary of Henderson. WIN A FREE SESSION OF ^000 eoLD NueeET BINGO During January we'll be giving away 800 FREE ENTRIES to Two February Bonus Tournaments Awar ding ^10,000 in Total Cash • • I On February 6 and 71 Complt RUIM t Boomtown'i Oper Home Bingo Room^ 263-7777 Ext. 6800 Voted l Cuttomtr Senict fly Loi Vegas Chamber of Commerce Just 5 minutes south of TVopicana • Exit at Blue Diamond Road lowing holiday gift-giving suggestions: Ready, set, begin If the shortage of shopping time has always been a problem during the holiday season, then give yourself more time by controlling your own time early on. Develop a time-management strategy by starting your preliminary Ust in the downtime after New Year's and before the first round of bills starts arriving at the end of January. This is an especially good time since your gift-receiving th&nk-yous are still fresh in your miiul. A pew list for next year is easy to establish from those names. Even if January has already passed, it's never too late to begin developing your list, even starting today! How to develop your gift list When making your list, know for whom you want to buy. Initially, you may not know his/her likes and disUkes, but at least jot down the names of the people you think you may want to include. This is a starting point. It is also one Ust in your life which need not be perfect since an attitude of flexibility can allow your list to be everchanging, right up until the time of the gift purchase. Next, think of a few descriptive words about the person, and his/ her hobbies, interests, likes, etc., during the year and write them down next to the person's name. Do notleave this to memory when shopping. Guaranteed, this is one thingyouwillnotremember later. One method of creating your list is to make four columns on a piece of paper or index card in which the headings are named: 1. Gifl Recipient 2. Ideas/Descriptive Words 3. Cost and How Purchased (Cash, Check, Credit Card, etc.) 4. Date Purchased and Where Columns 1,2 and 3 may change as you work with your list throughout the year. Give yourself the mental permission to alter your list at any time up until the time of purchase. You can also make your list less detailed with just the first two columns and not the remaining two columns. Or expand your list to whatever headings fit your personal needs. A good example of someone on your list: Last Fourth of July at the family cookout, your brother Jim commented he could use some new barbecue mitts. Since you noticed his apron was red, on your list for Jim under "Ideas/Descriptive Words" write "Red Barbecue Mitts." Remember, even Santa is making a list and checking it twice! Always carry your list One frustration for people who are "Getting Organized" by making a list is they never seem to have their hst with them when they hear someone drop a hint about something they need or want. They forget to carry their Ust where they could fill in the information as it is heard. As the saying goes: "Don't leave home without it!" From the inception of your list until the day of giving the gift;, always carry it with you. (Claudia Read, owner of Getting Organized, is a professional organizer working with individuals, businesses and estates throughout the U.S. She can be reached at 1-303-755-7867.) -SHiraN CHRISTMAS DAY SERVICE 9:30 a.m. NEW YEARS DAY ^SERVICE 9:30 a.m. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH of HENDERSON 47 E. Atlantic Downtown Henderson 565-85774 "The News is YOUR community newspaper SATELLITE ^ DISHES^564-0790 Heamiy Hints ^c HCalth NutS 311-V2 Nevada Boulder City, NV • 293-1844 Nature's Antibiotic Taking a Lactobaclilus acidophilus supplement (friendly bacteria) recolonizes the Intestines niore rapidly and effectively than some of the yogurts. Many studies show that Lactobaclilus tal(en as a supplement can correct diarrhea as well as constipation. MONTHLY HEALTH TIP: B6, B12, and lolic add lower blood levels of the amino acid homocyslelne, wtitcti lowers the risk tadortor heart disease Jeltry Blumberg, Ph D., Tufts UniversHy HOURS: 9:30 a.m. 6 p.m. Et^y Healthy & Happy Holidays • Living & Cut Christmas Trees • Fresh Wreaths & Poinsettas Check out our lighted reindeer for your lawn in Marshall Plaza 293-4987 • •••••••••*• POST OFFICE CASINO ^j ^^^i osuwe* Buy a large pie and pnppl receive medium • tftti PONY EXPRESS! CAFE No Personal Checks Accepted rs 1 0:30am. 10:30pm Friday &Satu 10:30am to Midnight • ••••••••• jrday^^H £1 HO^#D\^O\ He knows if you've been sleeping. He i
PAGE 13

Pag 12 Henderson Home News Thursday, December 22,1994 Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News Page 13 Rob Weidenfeld/News Staff WINNERS — With the help of their staff members and tutors (back row), these children from the Henderson Boys and Girls Clubs came out at the top of their classes in the club's Educational Enhancement Program. More than 100 students are enrolled in the program for at-risk youths. Tis the season for learning This season, parents can feel confident giving their children educational toys that will enhance theirleamingskills and entertain them with their favorite activities and themes. Parents are more concerned than ever about their children's education, and they understand the benefits of giving them an "edge" from the youngest age possible. This holiday season, Santa's helpers of all ages— infanta/toddlers, preschoolers and older children—will enjoy the fiin of creative interaction with a variety of VTECH toys. •Babies can take their first steps and learn shapes, numbers, animal sounds, and more with Little Smart First Steps • an activity center and walker that grows with the child. The electronic activity board can be removed from the walker for independent play, and the walker folds down for easy portability. •A toddler-sized activity table is the perfect gifl for busy little hands. Little Smart Table Talk • will entertain kids ages 9 months to 3 years for hours on end as they turn knobs and press buttons to activate friendly voices. Little Smart Table Talk has eight learning activities to keep baby very busy. •Making holiday plans longdistance? Preschoolers will love imitating mommy and daddy with the Little Smart Answering Machine' • With more than 70 random, prerecorded messages, Little Smart Answering Machine teaches kids numbers, shapes, colors and characters. When the unit is in the on-hook mode and the child has not placed a call for five seconds, the phone will call the child back. If the child is "screening" his/her calls and does not answer, the incoming call will be "recorded." •While parents enjoy the endless stream of eggnog and holiday punch, preschoolers will get their own creative juices flowing as they learn letters tmd printing with 10 built-in activities on the Little Smart Alphabet Writing Desk • Activity modes include letter identification, spelling, alphabetic order, musical fun and more. For a fi-ee copy of VTECH's "Smart Play: A Guide to Learning and Discovering With Toys," send a stamped, self-addressed, business-size envelope to VTECH "Smart Play Offer," 380 West Palatine Road, Wheeling, IL 60090. Please allow four to six weeks for delivery. Henderson Fire Department contributes time, money Like many departments and organizations, the Henderson Fire Department and its employees give back to the community with contributions of time and donations of money. Each year the Fire Department participates in several different projects that benefit many of the citizens of Henderson. For the past five years the Fire Department has sponsored a Firefighting Explorer Post, a branch of the Boy Scouts of America. The department has helped the Explorer Post both monetarily and with employee support by advising and educating young men and women about careers in the fire service. Another project fire department employees have been involved with for more than five years is the donation of bicycles to needy children. Each year, time and money is spent on refurbishing donated bikes to be given to children for Christmas. Cooperating in this venture. Bike King has provided parts at cost and their mechanics have also contributed many hours to the project. Through the efforts of all these individuals 14 children received bicycles and helmets in 1994 and approximately ten children were given bikes the year before. The Thanksgiving holidays are another time when the Fire Department gets involved with helping less fortunate families. In the past, firefighters have taken turkeys donated to them from Southwest Gas and passed them along to families in need. With money and other contributions, the Fire Department has joined with the Henderson Employees Association to help approximately twenty families over the past two years. Working through the Henderson Firefighters Association, firefighters have also been involved in projects aimed athelping the Henderson Boys and Girls Club. Firefighters from the Association donated their time to construct the scoreboards for the new Little League fields located at the club. Also coordinated by the Firefighters Association, a charity basketball game was held with firefighters playing against the Harlem Clowns. Approximately $1,600 was donated to the Boys and Girls Club as a result of the game and a number of children attended the game thanks to the sponsorships of local businesses. The Fire Department is proud to join the other organizations and departments throughout the city in their efforts to help build a strong community. These projects are just a small example of the Fire Departments commitment to service both on and off the job. THE HEALTH CARE YOU'VE BEEN LOOKING FOR! Comprehensive Adult Care by Board Certified Physicians X-ray, Lab, Ultrasound, EKG and more • Accepting New Patients • WALK-INS WELCOME Dr. John Andrewjeski Dr. Teresa Har)lon Dr. Matt Hemstreet Dr. Robert Gong 105 PecosSte.113 (South on Pecos to Wigwam in the heart of Green Valley) 263-4795 'Use southside canopied entrance 'jnL)/in(,( mcDic^i ctrtifR HENDERSO LUXURY THEATRE COMPL ^12 Luxury AuditvHms •09lifx$ Snack $9r ^Otlby Str$9 Stfimcf •Climat§ Controlhd Comhrt ^ItoAing Chair Logt Siating ^fm U$litid hrkiag Just mlwtti from firiM Yolky ni tooUu C/fy/ (All 457-37Q0 tMnmm MAJiKm mom KMK SMii mM I m Him iMn STARTS FRIDAY CINEDOME 12 HENDERSON STARTS FRIDAY THE SANTA CUUSE(PG) 12:40 2:55 5:10 7:25 9:40 11:55 DROP ZONE (R) 12:20 2:30 4:50 7:00 9.20 11:30 • RICHIE RICH (PQ13) 1:00 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:00 11:00 • INTERVIEW WITH THE VAMPIRE (R) 11:45 ^20 4:55 7:30 IftOO STAR TREK: GENERATIONS (PG) 2:15 7:15 MIDNIGHT • DUMB & DUMBER (PG13) 12:00 2.25 4:45 7:05 925 11:45 • SPEECHLESS (PG13) 12:30 2:45 5:00 7:10 925 11:35 • DISCLOSURE (R) 11:50 2:25 5:00 7:35 10:15 LION KING (G) 11:55 1:55 3:55 5:55 7:55 9:55 MIRACLE ON 34TH ST. (PG) 12:05 2:30 5.00 JUNK)R(PG13) 11:55 4:50 9:50 • STREETFK3HTER(PG13) 12:35 2:55 5:10 725 9:45 11:55 • MIXED NUTS (PG13) 12:45 2:55 5:10 7:20 9:35 NO PASSES CXXJPONS OR DISCOUNTS LATE SHOW FRI. SAT. ONLY VllllllllllliMlMllMMMllllW // Eagles sponsor New Year's dance The Fraternal order of Eagles 2672 will sponsor its annual New Year's Eve Dance at the lodge, 310 Pacific Ave. atVan Wagonen. The event is open to the public. The advance donation is $10 per person. Tickets may be purchased at the Eagle Lodge Bar fTom2to lOp.m. Call 565-2672for more information. There will be door prizes, party favors andheartybreakfisust served at 1 a.m. Combread will provide live music. 18" Satellite Dishes 564-0790 Great Service As a Country Companies agent, my first priority is service. It's the best way to meet my customers' needs — and the best way to keep them. I offer quality life, auto, and home coverage plus a comprehensive personal insurance review. If you like triendiy, nohassle service, please call me. FRED TOWNES 2700 E.Sunset Road #D-33 736-2882 COUNTRY COHMNES. .^-M—...i. INSURANCE GROUP I. m l^am — 6pm lAg ^,ooosq.Ft. mJM of livpooR SijMyppii\r.^ ^ Acres of c^^ilf^lMrklna Roolh Space A^lMlble Register to win a *250 Shopping Spree;! Name Address Phc MUST PRESE^T COUPON MUST BK PRESENT TO WIN. NOT VALID WITH A.NY OTHER OFJER. SOME RESTRICTIONS APPLY. 566-5641" 538 S. Bonlder Highway In The llendprson Plaza Shopping r>nter MARTJ John Judge/News Staff COATS — Capt. Julie Garcia of the Salvation Army accepts coats from students in Betsy Giles first-grade class at Galloway Elementary School. The class collected 41 coats over a period of 10 days. The coats will be distributed to needy families by the Salvation Army of Henderson. Your own holiday gift—get organized! Claudia C. Read Remember holidays past— filled with stress and depression from waiting in long lines, crowds of shoppers, money worries and mental fatigue, not to mention physical exhaustion and lack of energy from having to "shop" for the perfect gift for a special someone? Anew approach with the same gift-givinggoal for futurehoUdays can offer you an enjoyable experience filled with time to eiyoy the holidays, financial savings and even enough energy left over to share your love with others. No longer do we have to dread the holidays, rushing about to buy last-minute gifts. By "Getting Organized" we can manage our time throughout the year to save time right now and eiyoy a less stressful gift-giving holiday season. It can be a fun experience adopting some or all of the folDEATHS • *•((**. Steven D. Henson StevenD. Henson, 17,diedDec. 17, 1994. Bom in Honolulu, Hawaii on Dec, 18,1976, he had been a five-year resident of Henderson and was a student. He is survived by his mother and stepfather, Mark and Veronica Higdon, Henderson; father, Steven Dale Henson, ST., Clarkridge, Ark.; sister, Katrina Lynn Henson, Las Vegas; halfsister, Amanda Henson, half-brothers, Andrew and Matthew Henson, all of Pennsylvania; step-sister, Laura Lee Higdon, Henderson; step-brother, Ryan Douglas Higdon, Laurel, Md.; maternal grandmother. Sue Montgomery, Simi Valley, Calif; maternal grandmother, Elizabeth Higdon, Baltimore, Md.; and paternal grandfather, Andy Henson of Missouri. Viewing is at Palm MortuaryHenderson today from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., followed by services in the Palm Mortuary Chapel. Arrangements werehandled by Palm Mortuary-Henderson. Lorraine Sider Lorraine Sider, 69, died Monday, Dec. 19, 1994 at a local hospital. Bom Nov. 5,1925 in Chicago, 111., she was a homemaker in Henderson for four years; and a member of St. Peter's Catholic Church in Henderson. She is survived by her husband, Nicholas Sider, of Henderson; two daughters, Claudia Sider, of Wood Dale, 111., and Debbie Adams, of San Diego, Calif.; two sisters, Rosemary Michaelsen, and Peggy Levandowski, both of Las Vegas; one brother, Jack Faucault, also of Las Vegas; and two granddiildren. A memorial mass will be held at 10 a.m. Friday, Dec. 23, at St Peter's Catholic Church in Henderson. Arrangements werehandled by Palm Mortuary of Henderson. WIN A FREE SESSION OF ^000 eoLD NueeET BINGO During January we'll be giving away 800 FREE ENTRIES to Two February Bonus Tournaments Awar ding ^10,000 in Total Cash • • I On February 6 and 71 Complt RUIM t Boomtown'i Oper Home Bingo Room^ 263-7777 Ext. 6800 Voted l Cuttomtr Senict fly Loi Vegas Chamber of Commerce Just 5 minutes south of TVopicana • Exit at Blue Diamond Road lowing holiday gift-giving suggestions: Ready, set, begin If the shortage of shopping time has always been a problem during the holiday season, then give yourself more time by controlling your own time early on. Develop a time-management strategy by starting your preliminary Ust in the downtime after New Year's and before the first round of bills starts arriving at the end of January. This is an especially good time since your gift-receiving th&nk-yous are still fresh in your miiul. A pew list for next year is easy to establish from those names. Even if January has already passed, it's never too late to begin developing your list, even starting today! How to develop your gift list When making your list, know for whom you want to buy. Initially, you may not know his/her likes and disUkes, but at least jot down the names of the people you think you may want to include. This is a starting point. It is also one Ust in your life which need not be perfect since an attitude of flexibility can allow your list to be everchanging, right up until the time of the gift purchase. Next, think of a few descriptive words about the person, and his/ her hobbies, interests, likes, etc., during the year and write them down next to the person's name. Do notleave this to memory when shopping. Guaranteed, this is one thingyouwillnotremember later. One method of creating your list is to make four columns on a piece of paper or index card in which the headings are named: 1. Gifl Recipient 2. Ideas/Descriptive Words 3. Cost and How Purchased (Cash, Check, Credit Card, etc.) 4. Date Purchased and Where Columns 1,2 and 3 may change as you work with your list throughout the year. Give yourself the mental permission to alter your list at any time up until the time of purchase. You can also make your list less detailed with just the first two columns and not the remaining two columns. Or expand your list to whatever headings fit your personal needs. A good example of someone on your list: Last Fourth of July at the family cookout, your brother Jim commented he could use some new barbecue mitts. Since you noticed his apron was red, on your list for Jim under "Ideas/Descriptive Words" write "Red Barbecue Mitts." Remember, even Santa is making a list and checking it twice! Always carry your list One frustration for people who are "Getting Organized" by making a list is they never seem to have their hst with them when they hear someone drop a hint about something they need or want. They forget to carry their Ust where they could fill in the information as it is heard. As the saying goes: "Don't leave home without it!" From the inception of your list until the day of giving the gift;, always carry it with you. (Claudia Read, owner of Getting Organized, is a professional organizer working with individuals, businesses and estates throughout the U.S. She can be reached at 1-303-755-7867.) -SHiraN CHRISTMAS DAY SERVICE 9:30 a.m. NEW YEARS DAY ^SERVICE 9:30 a.m. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH of HENDERSON 47 E. Atlantic Downtown Henderson 565-85774 "The News is YOUR community newspaper SATELLITE ^ DISHES^564-0790 Heamiy Hints ^c HCalth NutS 311-V2 Nevada Boulder City, NV • 293-1844 Nature's Antibiotic Taking a Lactobaclilus acidophilus supplement (friendly bacteria) recolonizes the Intestines niore rapidly and effectively than some of the yogurts. Many studies show that Lactobaclilus tal(en as a supplement can correct diarrhea as well as constipation. MONTHLY HEALTH TIP: B6, B12, and lolic add lower blood levels of the amino acid homocyslelne, wtitcti lowers the risk tadortor heart disease Jeltry Blumberg, Ph D., Tufts UniversHy HOURS: 9:30 a.m. 6 p.m. Et^y Healthy & Happy Holidays • Living & Cut Christmas Trees • Fresh Wreaths & Poinsettas Check out our lighted reindeer for your lawn in Marshall Plaza 293-4987 • •••••••••*• POST OFFICE CASINO ^j ^^^i osuwe* Buy a large pie and pnppl receive medium • tftti PONY EXPRESS! CAFE No Personal Checks Accepted rs 1 0:30am. 10:30pm Friday &Satu 10:30am to Midnight • ••••••••• jrday^^H £1 HO^#D\^O\ He knows if you've been sleeping. He i
PAGE 14

Page 14 Henderson Home News Thursday, December 22,1994 Protecting pets against lioliday liazards A fleece-lined bed, a new toy...are you wondering what to buy for the furriest family member on your Christmas list? According to the experts, the best gift you can give your pets this year is proper protection from holiday hazards in the home. "Holiday decorations are like a playground brought indoors for your pets, but they can contain hidden dangers. You need to take a little extra care to identify, and prevent, potential problems for your pets," says Dan Carey, D.V.M., the lams Company. HOLIDAY HAZARDS CHECKLIST Review the following holiday checklist to avoid potential pet trouble-spots. Place a Christmas tree in a room that can be closed off when you are away. For pets, one of the most dangerous holiday decorations is the Christmas tree, which they can pull down on top of themselves by accident. •Keep lights high up on the tree, or try substituting low-voltage lights for an even safer tree. Both dogs and cats are prone to chewing on electrical cords, which can eventually cause serious electric shock and bums to the mouth and face. •Unless the tree area is always off-limits to pets, don't use tinsel or glitter. Cats are attracted to shimmery, shiny objects,but these can be fatal if ingested. •Pick up Christmas tree needles as they fall, and keep pets' water dishes full so that they won't want to drink the tree water. Pine needles, roping and even the water at the base of the tree are toxic to pets. •Don't allow pets to play with string, ribbon or wrapping paper. These can be harmful to the digestive system if swallowed. Cats, because of their barbed tongues, have a particularly hard time spitting things out and usually end up swallowing them. •Place popcorn garland high up on the tree, out of pets' reach. While the popcorn itself is harmless, in most cases the string can be dangerous. •Keep pets and munchies apart, and ask guests not to give in to "begging" pets. Dogs and cats should not be allowed to eat too mudi chocolate or "^ople food," as it can upset their digestive systems and balanced diets. •Watch pets carefully for signs that they might be ill or in pain. If you suspect that your pet may have ingested a foreign object, consult your veterinarian. Questions about pet care? Call the lams Pet Nutrition Center at 800-525-4267, ext. 44. Thehotline operates from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. (Eastern time), Monday through Friday, lams also offers free brochures and literature about all aspects of pet care. Self-adhesive stamps available for holidays (NAPS)-^u8t in the "Nick" of time, the U.S. Postal Service is unwrapping holiday-themed postage stamps that don't need a licking to keep on sticking. Bringing convenience to holiday mailing are four colorful and contemporaiy 29-cent self-adhesive stamps—featuring a toy soldier, snowman, reindeer and jack-in-the-box—which are available at post offices nationwide to put a festive accent on all holiday correspondence. Self-adhesive stamps cost consumers the same as traditional postage stamps and require no added moisture—consumers simply peel the stamps off their backing and affix them to envelopes and packages, making it even easier to send the season's greetings to loved ones. In addition to the holiday stamps, the Postal Service also offers self-adhesives featuring red squirrel, rose and eagle designs. The U.S. Postal Service's first self-adhesive stamp, a Christmas dove design, was issued in 1974. Sixteen years later, more selfadhesive stamps were issued. • PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Coundl of the City of Hrndcnon propostd by reading in title the roUowinc Ordinance at iu Regular Meeting, entitled: BILL NO. 1160 AN ORDINANCE RELATING TO THE OPERATION OF GOLF CARTS; AMENDING TITLE 10 OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE OF THE CITY OF HEN DERSON, NEVADA, BY ADDING THERETO A NEW CHAPTER PROVH)ING FOR THE DESIG NATION BY SCHEDULE OFTHEPUBLICSTREETS WHERE THE OPERA TION OF GOLF CARTS IS PERMITTED AND ALLOWING THE OPERATK)NOF(K)LFCARTSON THESE DESIGNATED STREETSONI.Yj PROVIDING FOR OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELATING THERETO; AND REPEALING ALL ORDINANCES AND PARTS OF ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT HEREWITH which ha.4 been referred to a Committee of the Coundl aj a Whole for study and recommendation and a copy of siud Ordinamt has been nird with the City Clerk for general public scrutiny. The Committee MecUnc will be held January 3,199S, at 6:00 p.m. The Council will consider this Ordinance for adoption at the Regular MeeUng of the City Council on the 3rd day of January, 199S; and in any case will adopt or reject this Ordmance within 30 days. DATED this 21st day of December 1994; and published December 22, 1994, in the Henderson Home News. 1 //COLLEEN BELL, CMC, CITY CLERK H—Dec. 22, 1994. PUBLIC NOTICE ORD. NO. 1536 The above Bill No. 1155 and foregoing Ordinance was first proposed and read by title to the City Council of the City of Henderson, Nevada, on December 6, 1994, which was a Regular Meeting of the Council and referred to the following Committee: "COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE" 1994 WATER & SANITARY SEWER BOND ISSUE AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA DESIGNATED BY THE SHORT TITLE "DECEMBER 1994 WATER AND SANITARY SEWER BOND ORDINANCE"; PROVIDING FOR THE ISSUANCE OF ITS REGISTERFJ), NEC:0. TIABLE,GENERALOBLIGATION (LIMITED TAX) WATER BOND (ADDITIONALLY SECURFJ) BY PLEDGED REVENUES) SERIES 1994A AND ITS REGISTERED, NEGOTIABLE, GENERAL OBLIGATION (LIMITED TAX) SANITARY SEWER BOND (ADDITIONALLY SECURED BY PLEDGED REVENUES), SERIES 1994B IN THE MAXIMUM PRINCIPAL AMOUNTS OF $26,300,000 AND $5,600,000 RESPECTIVELY; PROVIDING THAT EACH BOND MAY BE EVIDENCED BY A SINGLE, REGLSTERED BOND; STATING THE PURPOSES FOR WHICH THE BONDS ARE TO BE ISSUED; PROVIDING THE FORM, TERMS AND CONDITIONS THEREOF AND COVENANTS RELATING TO THE PAYMENT OF SUCH BONDS AND THE HANDLING OF FUNDS; PROVIDING FOR THE SALE OF SUCH BONDS; PROVIDING FX>R THE LEVY AND COLLEC TION OF ANNUAL GENERAL (AD VALOREM) TAXES FOR THE PAYMENT OF THE BONDS; ADDITIONALLY SECURING THEIR PAYMENT BY A PLEDGE OF REVENUES DERIVED FROM THE CITY'S WATER AND SANITARY SEWERUTILITY SYSTEM OF WHICH THE FINANCED PROJECTS ARE APART;AND RATIFYING ACTION PREVIOUSLY TAKEN TOWARD THE ISSUANCE OF SUCH BONDS AND EFTECTING THE PURPOSE OF THEIR ISSUANCE; PROVIDING OTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO for recommendation. PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that the typewritten copies of the above mentioned Ordinance are available for inspection by all interested parties at the Office of the City Clerk, 240 Water .Street, Henderson, Nevada; and that said Ordinance No. 1536 was proposed for adoption by CoundlmcmberSchefneroo the 20th day of December 1994 and adopted by the following roll call vote: Voting AYE: Mayor Robert A. Groesbeck Councilmembers Jack Clark, Andy Hafen, Paul Ruth and Larry SchefHer VoUng NAY: None Absent: None Isl ROBERT A. GROESBECK, MAYOR ATTEST: Isl COLLEEN BELL, CMC, CITY CLERK H—Dec. 22, 1994. PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVENthattheCHy Coundl of the City of Henderson proposed by reading in title the following Ordinnce at Hs Regular Meeting, entitled: BILL NO. 1161 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA, AMENDING TITLE 7, CHAPTER 04, SECTION 185 PERTAINING TO NEUTERING OR SPAYING DOGS OR CATS BEFORE RELEASE which has been referred to a Committee of the Coundl as a Whole for study and recommendation and a copy of said Ordinance has been Tiled with the City Clerk for general public scrutiny. The Committee Meeting will be held January 3,1995, at 6:00 p.m. The Council will consider this Ordinance for adoption at the Regular Meeting of the City Coundl on the 3rd day of January, 1995; and in any case will adopt or reject this Ordinance within 30 days. DATED this 21st day of December 1994; and published December 22, 1994, in the Henderson Home News. Itl COLLEEN BELL, CMC, CITY CLERK H—Dec. 22, 1994. LEGAL NOTICE JOHN W. HUNT Plainliir in Proper Person 1908 F^vt Oakey Blvd. Las Vegas, NV 89104 702-457-1847 DISTRICT COURT CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA JOHN W. HUNT, Plaintiff, vs. JOHN BOWMAN HUNT, JULIANA IRENE HUNT, aboknown as JULIANA IRENE HUNT DOBIAS, NATALIE GUENEVERE HUNT, also known as NATALIE GUENEVERE HUNT TYRONE, TIMOTHY J. DOBIAS, SHAWN TYRONE, and all unknown persons who claim any interest in the subject matter of this action Defendants. CIVIL NO. A338989 XV SUMMONS NOTICE: YOU HAVE BEEN SUED. THE COURT MAY DECIDE AGAINST YOU WITHOUT YOUR BEING HEARD UNLF-SS YOU RESPOND WITHIN 20 DAYS. READ THE INFORMATION BELOW: THE STATE OF NEVADA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS: A dvil Complaint has been filed against you and each of you for the relief set forth in the ComplMnt, and the nature of which action has been summarized hereinbelow: This is an action to quiet title to those two certain parcels of real property located in the County of Clark, Slate of Nevada, and further described as: PARCEL 1: WITHDRAWAL OF APPLICATION-REFUND, PREVIOUSLY INVESTIGATED-NO FEE, LICENSECORPORATION-PARTNERSHIP-CHANGES IN MEMBERSHIP, KEY EMPLOYEES, OWNERSHIP OF PREMISES WHERE ALCOHOLIC LIQUOR BUSINESS CONDUCTED-FINANCIER OF ALCOHOLIC LIQUOR BUSINESS, TAVERN LICENSE-ISSUANCE RESTRICTION-POPULATION LIMITATION SPECIFIED, TAVERN LICENSE-DELAY OR DISCONTINUANCE OF USE, TAVERN LICENSE, ISSUANCERESTRICTION-POPULATIONDEnNITION, LICENSE-ISSUANCERESTRICTIONS-PROXIMITYOF TAVERNS SPECIHED, LICENSE-CONVERSION OR TRANSFER-RESTRICTIONS, LICENSE-PERMITTRANSFER OR ASSIGNMENT-COUNCIL APPROVAL REQUIRED, LICENSEE'S OR PERMITTEE'S AGREEMENT TO CONFORM TO LAW, LICENSE RATES, BUSINESS-EMPLOYERS AND EMPLOYERSREGISTRATION CARD REQUIRED-INVESTIGATION FOR CERTAIN INDIVIDUALS, SPECIAL EVENTS PERMITS, LICENSE-ISSUANCE MORATORIUM, LICENSE-PREMISES BUILDING SPECIFICATIONS, DISTANCE LIMITATIONS FOR ALCOHOLIC LIQUOR LICENSES, DISTRIBUTING OFF PREMISES PROHIBITED, INTOXICATION ON PREMISES OF LICENSEE OR EMPLOYEES, PROVIDING TO INTOXICATED PERSON-PROHIBITED, MINORDISTRIBUTINGTO-PROHIBITED, PROSECUTION FOR SERVING MINORS-BURDEN OF PR(X)F, MINOREMPLOYMENT IN LICENSED ESTABLISHMENTS, APPLICATION OF OTHER ORDINANCES, CLARK COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE-HENDERSON CAMPUS-ALCOHOLIC LIQUOR PERMIT, LICENSED PREMISFJ5-ENTERTAINMENT,LICENSEDPREMISF.SCOSTUMES OF MALE AND TOMAl^E EMPLOYEFS, LICENSED PREMISI':S • ENTERTAINMENT RFXTRICTIONSPICTURES FEATURING NUDrPY, LICENSED PREMISES ENTERTAINMENT RESTRICTIONS-APPLICATION, LICENSE-SUSPENSION-REVOCATIONLIMITATION, LICENSEE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE ACTS OF EMPLOYEES, VIOLATION-PENALTY, AND OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELATED THERETO which has been referred to a Committee of the Council as a Whole for study and recommendation and a copy of said Ordinance has been filed with the City Clerk for general public scrutiny. The Committee Meeting will be held January 3,1995, at 6:00 p.m.The Council will coiviidrr this Ordinance for adoption at the Regular Meeting of the City Council on the 3rd day of January, 1995; and in any case will adopt or reject this Ordinance within 30 days. DATED this 21st day of December 1994; and published December 22,1994, in the Henderson Houic News. / COLLEEN BELL, CMC, CITY CLERK H—Dec. 22,1994. I.cated in the City of Las Vegas, Clark County, Nevada, and described as: \M Three (3), Block Four (4), BEL AIRE TRACT NO. 4, as shown by map thereof on Tile in Book 5 of Plats, page 40, in the Office of the County Recorder of Clarii County, Nevada Also kmiwn as 1908 Ea.st Oakey, Las Vegas, Nevada. PARCEL #2: Located in Clark County, Nevada, and further described as: The Northea.meiil against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint, which could result in the taking of money or property or other relief requested in this Complaint 3. If you intend to seek the advice of an attorney in this matter, you should do so promptly, so that your response may be filed on time. Issued at direction ofi /s/John W. Hunt JOHN W. HUNT Plaintiff in Proper Person 1908 East Oakey Us Vegas, NV 89104 H—Dec. 1.8, IS, 22,29,1994. LORETTA BOWMAN, Cleric by DEBORAH HAMBLET Deputy Clerii County Courthouse 200 Court Third Street Las Vegas, NV 89104 Oct 24,1994 (Dtatrid Court Seal) PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City CouncU of the CHy of Henderson proposed by reading in title the following Ordinance at its Reg Jar Meeting, entitled: BILL NO. 1158 LIQUOR LICENSE ORDINANCE REVISIONS AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND TITLE 4 OF THE HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE BY REPEALING IN ITS ENTIRETY CHAPTER 4.36 ENTITLED 'LIQUORREGULATIONS AND LICENSES', AND ESTABLISHING IN ITS PLACE A NEW CHAPTER 4.36 ENTITLED •LIQUOR-REGULATION AND LICENSES', DEFINING SUCH BUSINESSES, GIVING A STATEMENT OF PURPOSE AND INTENT-LICENSE REQUIREDISSUANCE PROHIBITED TO DESIGNATED PERSONS, UNLAWFUL TO OPERATE WITHOUT LICENSE, CONDITIONS APPLYING TO SPECIFIC LICENSE CLASSIFICATIONS, LICENSE-APPLICATIONCONTENTS-GENERAL, LICENSE-APPLICANTBUSINESS PREMISES REQUIRED, LICENSEAPPLICANT-PROVISIONS FOR CORPORATION, LICENSE APPLICATION-CONTENTS-ADDITIONAL, LICENSE-APPLICANT-PERSONAL INFORMATION REQUIRED, INVESTIGATION FEES-REQUIRED-FEES CHARGED, NO REFUND ON INVESTIGATION FEE, LEGAL NOTICE BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA In Re Joint PrtiUon of CENTRAL TELEPHONE COMPANY-NEVADA and NEVADA PAYPHONE ASSOCIATION for revision of the Payphone Inspection Program to implement a Self-Inspection Program. Docket No. 94-8008 NOTICE OF HEARING Central Telephone Company-Nevada ("CcnteT') and the Nevada Payphone Association ("NPA") (collectively, "Joint Petitioners") have filed a joint petition, designated as DtM'ket No. 94-8008, with the Public Service Commission of Nevada ("Commission"). The joint petitioners seek an Order authorizing a change in the current payphone jna|>ection program mandated by the Commission. The joint petitioners request that the Commission authorize (1) the NPA to condud inspections of independentlyowned payphones, (2) the NPA to collect inspection fees in connection witli this program, (3) Centel to relea.se to the NPA, pursuant to a Confidentiality Agreement, the locations of independently-owned payphones, (4) Centel to relinquish the obligation to inspect those payphones subject to the program, and (5) Centd to bill inspection fees from independently-owned payphones and collect those fees on behalf of the NPA. The petition states that Centel has inspected independently-owned payphones in its service territory for compliance with state and federal law since 1988. In November 1993, NPA and Centel commenced dlscassions which led to this petition. NPA proposes implementing a self-inspedion program on a test basis of independently-owned payphones in the Las Vegas area. After a minimum of 12 months, NPA plans to request authority from the CiMnmission to permanently carry this program out throughout the State of Nevada. The petition contains a detailed proposal for the transfer of these responsibilities and for NPA's inspection program and is on file and available for viewing by the public at the offices of the Commission, 727 Fairview Drive, Carson City, Nevada89710 and the Dawson Building, 4045 South Spencer Street, Suite A-44, LM Vegas, Nevada 89158. At a regulariy scheduled agenda meeting held on October 10,1994, the Commission voted to hold a hearing on this joint petition. The Commission has legal authority and jurisdiction to hold a hearing in this matter pursuant to the provisions of NRS 704.120. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Coounission has scheJuled a HEARING in this matter as follows: WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 25 1995 10:00 a.m. Office of the Public Service Commission State Office BuiMii^ 555 East WMhington Avenue, Room 4600 Las VcgM, Nevada 89101 at which time interested persons may appear and be heard. If necessary, the hearing will continue through Thursday, January 26, 1995, at the same location. PREPARED TESTIMONY of Centel d the NPA must be filed with the Commission and recdved by each party of record no later than Tuesday. January 1SLI225Prepared testimony of all other parties must be filed with the Commission and received by each party of record no later than In accordance with the provisions of NRS 704.120, the Commission will consider evidence pertaining to (1) whether this proposal is just, reasonable, sufficient, preferential, not ui^ustly discriminatory, or otherwise in violation of any of the provisiom of Chapter 704 of NRS, (2) the propriety of such payphone inspections being conducted by an assodation of public payphone providers, (3) whether Centel will or should retain ultimate responsibility for the provision of service to public payphones in its service territory, (4) exactly bow the proposed program will operate, and (5) whether this progrsm is in the public interest The Commission may also consider other issues related to the provisiom of Chapters 703 and 704 of NRS and NAC, may discuss public comments, and may make dedsions on the procedural and substantive issues raised at bearing. The Commission may vote at the hearing to approve this program as proposed, to approve H with modifications, to reject the program, or to take such other action as it deems appropriate under the drcumstaoces. Thb notice has been posted at the county courthouses in Carson CHy, Reno, and Las Vegas. By the Commission. Ill William H. Vance WILLIAM H. VANCE, Commission .Secretary Dated: Canon CMy, Nevada \v\sm (SEAL) H—Dec. 22,1994 Loan No. 5570S5/SOER1NK TS#NRW036818 APN: 505-177-13-816-047 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED OCTOBER 16, 1990, UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU. YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER On 01/12/1995 at 10:30 A.M., STANDARD TRUST DEED SERVICE COMPANY as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust, Recorded 10/30/1990 In Book 901030 Inst # 00357 of Oflicial Records in the ofTice of the County Recorder of CLARK County, Nevada; Executed by: HENDRIK B. SOERINK AND FERN E. SOERINK, HUSB/VND AND WIFE WILL SELL at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash (all payable at the time of sale in lawfiil money of the United States:) at: AT THE CLARK COUNTY COURTHOUSE 200 SO. 3RD ST. LAS VEGAS, NV all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County, Nevada, describing the land therein: LOT TWELVE (12) IN BLOCK SEVEN (7) OF MGRINGSDE H UNIT NO. 2. AS SHOWN BY MAP THEREOF ON FILE IN BOOK 45 OF PLATS. PAGE 52, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF CLARK COUNTY, NEV/UDA. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purporteid to be: 18 FAin^ASIA LANE HENDERSON. NV 89014. (The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein.) Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust; The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of sale w. S103.457.66. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. Dated: 12/06/1994 ST/LND/XRD TRUST DEED SERVICE COMPANY. AS TRUSTEE. 2600 STANWELL DRIVE, SUITE 200, CONCORD. CA 94520 (510) 603-7340 By: VERONICA MOSES ASSISTANT SECRETARY RSVP#7321 H—Dec. 22, 29, 1994, Jan. 1,1995 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE LOAN: 113661-3 OTHER:763754 LSB : L10084 A.P. NUMBER 505-180-403-033 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED August 15, 1990, UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice of Trustee's Sale Under Deed of Trust Notice is hereby given that LENDER SERVICE BUREAU, A CALI FORNIA CORPORATION, as trustee, or successor trustee, or substituted taistee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by JAMES W. GARFIELD AND CYNTHIA A. GARFIELD, HUS BAND AND WIFE Recorded on 08/23/1990 as Instrument No. 00176 in Book 900823 Page of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of CLARK County, NEVADA, and pursuant to the Notice of Default and Election to Sell thereunder recorded 09/07/1994 in Book 940907, Page as Instrument No 00134 of said Official Records, WILL SELL on 01/05/1994 at THE CLARK COUNTY COURTHOUSE 200 SO 3RD ST. LAS VEGAS, NV at 10:30 A.M. AT PUBLIC AUCTION, TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable at time of sale In lawful money of the United States), all right, title and Interest, conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State hereinafter described: LOT ONE HUNDRED SIXTYEIGHT (168) IN BLOCK FIVE (5) OF HENDERSON NO. 4 AS SHOWN BY MAP THEREOF ON FILE IN BOOK 5 OF PLATS, PAGE 15, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA. EXCEPTING THEREFROM THE NORTH 6.00 FEET OF SAID LAND. EXCEPT ALL MINERALS AND ALL MINERAL RIGHTS WHICH MAY BE LOCATED UPON OR UNDER THE REAL PROPERTY HEREINABOVE DESCRIBED, AS RESERVED BY RECONSTRUCKJBLICNtyrii^E ORD. NO. 1537 The above Bill No. 1156 and foregoing Ordinance was first proposed and read by title to the City Council of the City of Henderson, Nevada, on December 6,1994, which was a Regular Meeting of the Council and referred to the following Committee: "COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE" ESTABLISHING VOTING WARDS AN ORDINANCE OF THE HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL REPEALING ORDINANCE NO. 137 IN ENTIRETY ANDSETTING FORTH A NEW ORDINANCE ESTABLISHING THE WARDS WITHIN THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA, ACCORDING TO POPULATION AS DETERMINED BY THE LAST PRECEDING NATIONAL DECENNIAL CENSUS CONDUCTED BY THE BUREAU OF CENSUS OF THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AS PROVIDED IN SECTION 1.040, ARTICLE 1, OF THE HENDERSON CITY CHARTER AND UPDATES AS PROVIDED BY THE BUREAU OF CENSUS AND THE CITY PLANNING DEPARTMENT, AND OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELATED THERETO for recommendation. PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that the typewritten copies of the above mentioned Ordinance are available for inspection by all interested parties at the Office of the City Clerk, 240 WaterStrect, Henderson, Nrvada;andthat said Ordinance No. 1537 was proposed for adoption by CouiKilmemberHafcnontlR 20th day of December 1994 and adopted by the following roll call vote: Voting AYE: Councilmembers Jack Qark. Andy Hafen, Paul Ruth and Larry Scfaefller ValiiNAY:MayorGroesbc CORPORATION, IN DEED RECORDED SEPTEMBER 9, 1949 AS DOCUMENT NO. 321823 CLARK COUNTY NEVADA RECORDS, WHICH DEED RESERVES THE RIGHT TO ENTER UPON, PROSPECT FOR, MINE, AND REMOVE SUCH MINERALS. The property address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 104 LINDEN ST HENDERSON, NV 89015 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of sale is: $84,359.17 In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by state or federal savings and loan association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. In the event tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee m^ withhold the issuance of the Trustee's Deed until funds become available to the payee or endorses as a matter of right. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed, advances thereunder, with interest as provided therein, and the unpaid principal balance of the Note secured by said Deed with interest thereon as provided in said Note, fees, charges and expenses of the trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. DATED: 12/08/1994 LENDER SERVICE BUREAU, AS TRUSTEE A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION 19800 Macarthur Blvd. Suite #970 In/ine, CA 92715-2421 (714) 442-2850 By: Linda L. Hussmann Vice President PRIORITY 64886 H-Owc. 15, 22,29,1W4. Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News Page 15 THE ONLY^ DAYS LEFT TO CHRISTMAS! AUTHORITY EXTENDED HOLIDAy HOURS! WED-FRI8AM-11PM SAT 8AM-6PM m psm m THE nm SB£cm mm Gom AHYmwn S^SBH wm im PBict EAGLERIVER26-MEN'S^ OR UDIES' ATB ROLLERBLADE KIVT SKATE Z'^o,. tHARVARD SPORTS NEUI Vm PRICE muRRAY SUPER VALUE i^Rolleitlade. GREAT VALUE (^ 5^ 9 .?==5{ ROLLERBLADE 'ASTROBLADE \DULT IN-LINE SKATES i^Rollerblade. eP Z^ 'a> S iT msMK HUFFY BICVCL£S Assembly Extra SUPER VALUE HUFFY SPORTS^ HUFFY' SPORTS I HUFFY SPORTS 48" PERFORMANCE SERIES ULTAPACK IMYLEC w MYLecl I HUFFY FAST BREAK 48" ULTRA PRO GOAL GRAPHITE MYLEC I BACKBOARD JR. PRO GOAL 22.96 GREAT VALUE TjfT ROLLERBUDE BRAVOBLADE ADULT MN-LINE SKATES Compin il {49.96 XROSMAN 664 SB AIR GUN SPECIAL PURCHASE M^lbidt^ SUPER VALUE COLEMAN RECHARGEABLE TWIN TUBE LANTERN WEIDER HEALTH JANE FONDA MANUAL TREADMILL SPECIAL VALUE \md%i. SUPER VALUE SPECIAL VALUE ::?^!;=^v SPECIAL VALUE PROFORM \730E SERIES TREADMILL HUFFY BICYCLES U*S*A. Assembly Extra HUFFY BLADES'*'26''MEN'S OR LADIES'ATB SUPER VALUE ^4 ivV 'fRttl m HUFFY ELECTRO-LITE 16" BOY'S BICYCLE SUPER VALUE D.P. PATHMASTER TREADMILL PROt suimnno'? Originally $S9.96 NEW LOW PRICE SHIMANO SYMETRE4000 SPINNING REEL Com? ^V^l FLYING LURE MONSTER FISH KIT WENGER ^1 COMMANDER GENUINE SWISS ARMY KNIFE Daiwa! GREAT VALUE I SPECIAL PURCHASE DAIWA ROD/REEL SPINNING COMBO TUNTURI TRI .STEPPER ^^ T^JrsiTuar Viumastfir. VITAMASTER AIRMAXII EXERCISE BIKE w SPECIAL VALUE SUPER VALUE Assembly Extra ilEI IMPEX OLYMPIC WEIGHT BENCH 'CONQUEST BY ROYCE UNION ROAD SHARK 24-BOY'S OR GIRL'S ATB SPECIAL VALUE D.P. IRON WORKS HOME GYM "?sr'"5^?r3 SPECIAL PURCHASE SPECIAL PURCHASE V\ ^ >d SPECIAL PURCHASE r-^^i AVU 1265WWSLA0IES'^ CROSSTRAINERS REEBOK AXT 6000 LADIES'^ CROSSTRAINERS REEBOK BB700G MID MEN'S BASKETBALL SHOES 11 ^OODS ^jyirjirxojp SUPER VALUE M SPECIAL VALUE SPECIAL VALUE 99''ll69''|]l99 MACOREQOR ALLIED *^ DUNLOPGOLF ?orMEY) ?];rA1r^22!ic NEUTRON 15 PIECE JUHTOKLFSET '^"*''"'' "^"^^s" ^^ 8PAL0IN0 TOP FUTE TOUR MODEL GOLF BALLS Compan at $24.96 t^WTs The Sports Authority's PRICE GUARANTEE means just that! I( you ever find a lower competitor's price, we'll match it! Haule Free! m m HOURS DECATURBLVD. MONFRI10AM 9PM SAT 10AM 7PM SUN 11AM-6PM MARYLAND SQUARE MON SUH 10AM 6PM 1-515 R DWIllM V &' THE 1 LAS VEGAS 26?0 S Deuiut Blvd corner of Oeului t W Sativt 368-3335 MARYLAND SQUARE Mjrylind Pkwy t Twam Across Irorn Boulevard Mai (S minutes Irom me Siripl 7K-SS57 AUTHORITY

PAGE 15

Page 14 Henderson Home News Thursday, December 22,1994 Protecting pets against lioliday liazards A fleece-lined bed, a new toy...are you wondering what to buy for the furriest family member on your Christmas list? According to the experts, the best gift you can give your pets this year is proper protection from holiday hazards in the home. "Holiday decorations are like a playground brought indoors for your pets, but they can contain hidden dangers. You need to take a little extra care to identify, and prevent, potential problems for your pets," says Dan Carey, D.V.M., the lams Company. HOLIDAY HAZARDS CHECKLIST Review the following holiday checklist to avoid potential pet trouble-spots. Place a Christmas tree in a room that can be closed off when you are away. For pets, one of the most dangerous holiday decorations is the Christmas tree, which they can pull down on top of themselves by accident. •Keep lights high up on the tree, or try substituting low-voltage lights for an even safer tree. Both dogs and cats are prone to chewing on electrical cords, which can eventually cause serious electric shock and bums to the mouth and face. •Unless the tree area is always off-limits to pets, don't use tinsel or glitter. Cats are attracted to shimmery, shiny objects,but these can be fatal if ingested. •Pick up Christmas tree needles as they fall, and keep pets' water dishes full so that they won't want to drink the tree water. Pine needles, roping and even the water at the base of the tree are toxic to pets. •Don't allow pets to play with string, ribbon or wrapping paper. These can be harmful to the digestive system if swallowed. Cats, because of their barbed tongues, have a particularly hard time spitting things out and usually end up swallowing them. •Place popcorn garland high up on the tree, out of pets' reach. While the popcorn itself is harmless, in most cases the string can be dangerous. •Keep pets and munchies apart, and ask guests not to give in to "begging" pets. Dogs and cats should not be allowed to eat too mudi chocolate or "^ople food," as it can upset their digestive systems and balanced diets. •Watch pets carefully for signs that they might be ill or in pain. If you suspect that your pet may have ingested a foreign object, consult your veterinarian. Questions about pet care? Call the lams Pet Nutrition Center at 800-525-4267, ext. 44. Thehotline operates from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. (Eastern time), Monday through Friday, lams also offers free brochures and literature about all aspects of pet care. Self-adhesive stamps available for holidays (NAPS)-^u8t in the "Nick" of time, the U.S. Postal Service is unwrapping holiday-themed postage stamps that don't need a licking to keep on sticking. Bringing convenience to holiday mailing are four colorful and contemporaiy 29-cent self-adhesive stamps—featuring a toy soldier, snowman, reindeer and jack-in-the-box—which are available at post offices nationwide to put a festive accent on all holiday correspondence. Self-adhesive stamps cost consumers the same as traditional postage stamps and require no added moisture—consumers simply peel the stamps off their backing and affix them to envelopes and packages, making it even easier to send the season's greetings to loved ones. In addition to the holiday stamps, the Postal Service also offers self-adhesives featuring red squirrel, rose and eagle designs. The U.S. Postal Service's first self-adhesive stamp, a Christmas dove design, was issued in 1974. Sixteen years later, more selfadhesive stamps were issued. • PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Coundl of the City of Hrndcnon propostd by reading in title the roUowinc Ordinance at iu Regular Meeting, entitled: BILL NO. 1160 AN ORDINANCE RELATING TO THE OPERATION OF GOLF CARTS; AMENDING TITLE 10 OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE OF THE CITY OF HEN DERSON, NEVADA, BY ADDING THERETO A NEW CHAPTER PROVH)ING FOR THE DESIG NATION BY SCHEDULE OFTHEPUBLICSTREETS WHERE THE OPERA TION OF GOLF CARTS IS PERMITTED AND ALLOWING THE OPERATK)NOF(K)LFCARTSON THESE DESIGNATED STREETSONI.Yj PROVIDING FOR OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELATING THERETO; AND REPEALING ALL ORDINANCES AND PARTS OF ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT HEREWITH which ha.4 been referred to a Committee of the Coundl aj a Whole for study and recommendation and a copy of siud Ordinamt has been nird with the City Clerk for general public scrutiny. The Committee MecUnc will be held January 3,199S, at 6:00 p.m. The Council will consider this Ordinance for adoption at the Regular MeeUng of the City Council on the 3rd day of January, 199S; and in any case will adopt or reject this Ordmance within 30 days. DATED this 21st day of December 1994; and published December 22, 1994, in the Henderson Home News. 1 //COLLEEN BELL, CMC, CITY CLERK H—Dec. 22, 1994. PUBLIC NOTICE ORD. NO. 1536 The above Bill No. 1155 and foregoing Ordinance was first proposed and read by title to the City Council of the City of Henderson, Nevada, on December 6, 1994, which was a Regular Meeting of the Council and referred to the following Committee: "COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE" 1994 WATER & SANITARY SEWER BOND ISSUE AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA DESIGNATED BY THE SHORT TITLE "DECEMBER 1994 WATER AND SANITARY SEWER BOND ORDINANCE"; PROVIDING FOR THE ISSUANCE OF ITS REGISTERFJ), NEC:0. TIABLE,GENERALOBLIGATION (LIMITED TAX) WATER BOND (ADDITIONALLY SECURFJ) BY PLEDGED REVENUES) SERIES 1994A AND ITS REGISTERED, NEGOTIABLE, GENERAL OBLIGATION (LIMITED TAX) SANITARY SEWER BOND (ADDITIONALLY SECURED BY PLEDGED REVENUES), SERIES 1994B IN THE MAXIMUM PRINCIPAL AMOUNTS OF $26,300,000 AND $5,600,000 RESPECTIVELY; PROVIDING THAT EACH BOND MAY BE EVIDENCED BY A SINGLE, REGLSTERED BOND; STATING THE PURPOSES FOR WHICH THE BONDS ARE TO BE ISSUED; PROVIDING THE FORM, TERMS AND CONDITIONS THEREOF AND COVENANTS RELATING TO THE PAYMENT OF SUCH BONDS AND THE HANDLING OF FUNDS; PROVIDING FOR THE SALE OF SUCH BONDS; PROVIDING FX>R THE LEVY AND COLLEC TION OF ANNUAL GENERAL (AD VALOREM) TAXES FOR THE PAYMENT OF THE BONDS; ADDITIONALLY SECURING THEIR PAYMENT BY A PLEDGE OF REVENUES DERIVED FROM THE CITY'S WATER AND SANITARY SEWERUTILITY SYSTEM OF WHICH THE FINANCED PROJECTS ARE APART;AND RATIFYING ACTION PREVIOUSLY TAKEN TOWARD THE ISSUANCE OF SUCH BONDS AND EFTECTING THE PURPOSE OF THEIR ISSUANCE; PROVIDING OTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO for recommendation. PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that the typewritten copies of the above mentioned Ordinance are available for inspection by all interested parties at the Office of the City Clerk, 240 Water .Street, Henderson, Nevada; and that said Ordinance No. 1536 was proposed for adoption by CoundlmcmberSchefneroo the 20th day of December 1994 and adopted by the following roll call vote: Voting AYE: Mayor Robert A. Groesbeck Councilmembers Jack Clark, Andy Hafen, Paul Ruth and Larry SchefHer VoUng NAY: None Absent: None Isl ROBERT A. GROESBECK, MAYOR ATTEST: Isl COLLEEN BELL, CMC, CITY CLERK H—Dec. 22, 1994. PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVENthattheCHy Coundl of the City of Henderson proposed by reading in title the following Ordinnce at Hs Regular Meeting, entitled: BILL NO. 1161 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA, AMENDING TITLE 7, CHAPTER 04, SECTION 185 PERTAINING TO NEUTERING OR SPAYING DOGS OR CATS BEFORE RELEASE which has been referred to a Committee of the Coundl as a Whole for study and recommendation and a copy of said Ordinance has been Tiled with the City Clerk for general public scrutiny. The Committee Meeting will be held January 3,1995, at 6:00 p.m. The Council will consider this Ordinance for adoption at the Regular Meeting of the City Coundl on the 3rd day of January, 1995; and in any case will adopt or reject this Ordinance within 30 days. DATED this 21st day of December 1994; and published December 22, 1994, in the Henderson Home News. Itl COLLEEN BELL, CMC, CITY CLERK H—Dec. 22, 1994. LEGAL NOTICE JOHN W. HUNT Plainliir in Proper Person 1908 F^vt Oakey Blvd. Las Vegas, NV 89104 702-457-1847 DISTRICT COURT CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA JOHN W. HUNT, Plaintiff, vs. JOHN BOWMAN HUNT, JULIANA IRENE HUNT, aboknown as JULIANA IRENE HUNT DOBIAS, NATALIE GUENEVERE HUNT, also known as NATALIE GUENEVERE HUNT TYRONE, TIMOTHY J. DOBIAS, SHAWN TYRONE, and all unknown persons who claim any interest in the subject matter of this action Defendants. CIVIL NO. A338989 XV SUMMONS NOTICE: YOU HAVE BEEN SUED. THE COURT MAY DECIDE AGAINST YOU WITHOUT YOUR BEING HEARD UNLF-SS YOU RESPOND WITHIN 20 DAYS. READ THE INFORMATION BELOW: THE STATE OF NEVADA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS: A dvil Complaint has been filed against you and each of you for the relief set forth in the ComplMnt, and the nature of which action has been summarized hereinbelow: This is an action to quiet title to those two certain parcels of real property located in the County of Clark, Slate of Nevada, and further described as: PARCEL 1: WITHDRAWAL OF APPLICATION-REFUND, PREVIOUSLY INVESTIGATED-NO FEE, LICENSECORPORATION-PARTNERSHIP-CHANGES IN MEMBERSHIP, KEY EMPLOYEES, OWNERSHIP OF PREMISES WHERE ALCOHOLIC LIQUOR BUSINESS CONDUCTED-FINANCIER OF ALCOHOLIC LIQUOR BUSINESS, TAVERN LICENSE-ISSUANCE RESTRICTION-POPULATION LIMITATION SPECIFIED, TAVERN LICENSE-DELAY OR DISCONTINUANCE OF USE, TAVERN LICENSE, ISSUANCERESTRICTION-POPULATIONDEnNITION, LICENSE-ISSUANCERESTRICTIONS-PROXIMITYOF TAVERNS SPECIHED, LICENSE-CONVERSION OR TRANSFER-RESTRICTIONS, LICENSE-PERMITTRANSFER OR ASSIGNMENT-COUNCIL APPROVAL REQUIRED, LICENSEE'S OR PERMITTEE'S AGREEMENT TO CONFORM TO LAW, LICENSE RATES, BUSINESS-EMPLOYERS AND EMPLOYERSREGISTRATION CARD REQUIRED-INVESTIGATION FOR CERTAIN INDIVIDUALS, SPECIAL EVENTS PERMITS, LICENSE-ISSUANCE MORATORIUM, LICENSE-PREMISES BUILDING SPECIFICATIONS, DISTANCE LIMITATIONS FOR ALCOHOLIC LIQUOR LICENSES, DISTRIBUTING OFF PREMISES PROHIBITED, INTOXICATION ON PREMISES OF LICENSEE OR EMPLOYEES, PROVIDING TO INTOXICATED PERSON-PROHIBITED, MINORDISTRIBUTINGTO-PROHIBITED, PROSECUTION FOR SERVING MINORS-BURDEN OF PR(X)F, MINOREMPLOYMENT IN LICENSED ESTABLISHMENTS, APPLICATION OF OTHER ORDINANCES, CLARK COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE-HENDERSON CAMPUS-ALCOHOLIC LIQUOR PERMIT, LICENSED PREMISFJ5-ENTERTAINMENT,LICENSEDPREMISF.SCOSTUMES OF MALE AND TOMAl^E EMPLOYEFS, LICENSED PREMISI':S • ENTERTAINMENT RFXTRICTIONSPICTURES FEATURING NUDrPY, LICENSED PREMISES ENTERTAINMENT RESTRICTIONS-APPLICATION, LICENSE-SUSPENSION-REVOCATIONLIMITATION, LICENSEE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE ACTS OF EMPLOYEES, VIOLATION-PENALTY, AND OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELATED THERETO which has been referred to a Committee of the Council as a Whole for study and recommendation and a copy of said Ordinance has been filed with the City Clerk for general public scrutiny. The Committee Meeting will be held January 3,1995, at 6:00 p.m.The Council will coiviidrr this Ordinance for adoption at the Regular Meeting of the City Council on the 3rd day of January, 1995; and in any case will adopt or reject this Ordinance within 30 days. DATED this 21st day of December 1994; and published December 22,1994, in the Henderson Houic News. / COLLEEN BELL, CMC, CITY CLERK H—Dec. 22,1994. I.cated in the City of Las Vegas, Clark County, Nevada, and described as: \M Three (3), Block Four (4), BEL AIRE TRACT NO. 4, as shown by map thereof on Tile in Book 5 of Plats, page 40, in the Office of the County Recorder of Clarii County, Nevada Also kmiwn as 1908 Ea.st Oakey, Las Vegas, Nevada. PARCEL #2: Located in Clark County, Nevada, and further described as: The Northea.meiil against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint, which could result in the taking of money or property or other relief requested in this Complaint 3. If you intend to seek the advice of an attorney in this matter, you should do so promptly, so that your response may be filed on time. Issued at direction ofi /s/John W. Hunt JOHN W. HUNT Plaintiff in Proper Person 1908 East Oakey Us Vegas, NV 89104 H—Dec. 1.8, IS, 22,29,1994. LORETTA BOWMAN, Cleric by DEBORAH HAMBLET Deputy Clerii County Courthouse 200 Court Third Street Las Vegas, NV 89104 Oct 24,1994 (Dtatrid Court Seal) PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City CouncU of the CHy of Henderson proposed by reading in title the following Ordinance at its Reg Jar Meeting, entitled: BILL NO. 1158 LIQUOR LICENSE ORDINANCE REVISIONS AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND TITLE 4 OF THE HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE BY REPEALING IN ITS ENTIRETY CHAPTER 4.36 ENTITLED 'LIQUORREGULATIONS AND LICENSES', AND ESTABLISHING IN ITS PLACE A NEW CHAPTER 4.36 ENTITLED •LIQUOR-REGULATION AND LICENSES', DEFINING SUCH BUSINESSES, GIVING A STATEMENT OF PURPOSE AND INTENT-LICENSE REQUIREDISSUANCE PROHIBITED TO DESIGNATED PERSONS, UNLAWFUL TO OPERATE WITHOUT LICENSE, CONDITIONS APPLYING TO SPECIFIC LICENSE CLASSIFICATIONS, LICENSE-APPLICATIONCONTENTS-GENERAL, LICENSE-APPLICANTBUSINESS PREMISES REQUIRED, LICENSEAPPLICANT-PROVISIONS FOR CORPORATION, LICENSE APPLICATION-CONTENTS-ADDITIONAL, LICENSE-APPLICANT-PERSONAL INFORMATION REQUIRED, INVESTIGATION FEES-REQUIRED-FEES CHARGED, NO REFUND ON INVESTIGATION FEE, LEGAL NOTICE BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA In Re Joint PrtiUon of CENTRAL TELEPHONE COMPANY-NEVADA and NEVADA PAYPHONE ASSOCIATION for revision of the Payphone Inspection Program to implement a Self-Inspection Program. Docket No. 94-8008 NOTICE OF HEARING Central Telephone Company-Nevada ("CcnteT') and the Nevada Payphone Association ("NPA") (collectively, "Joint Petitioners") have filed a joint petition, designated as DtM'ket No. 94-8008, with the Public Service Commission of Nevada ("Commission"). The joint petitioners seek an Order authorizing a change in the current payphone jna|>ection program mandated by the Commission. The joint petitioners request that the Commission authorize (1) the NPA to condud inspections of independentlyowned payphones, (2) the NPA to collect inspection fees in connection witli this program, (3) Centel to relea.se to the NPA, pursuant to a Confidentiality Agreement, the locations of independently-owned payphones, (4) Centel to relinquish the obligation to inspect those payphones subject to the program, and (5) Centd to bill inspection fees from independently-owned payphones and collect those fees on behalf of the NPA. The petition states that Centel has inspected independently-owned payphones in its service territory for compliance with state and federal law since 1988. In November 1993, NPA and Centel commenced dlscassions which led to this petition. NPA proposes implementing a self-inspedion program on a test basis of independently-owned payphones in the Las Vegas area. After a minimum of 12 months, NPA plans to request authority from the CiMnmission to permanently carry this program out throughout the State of Nevada. The petition contains a detailed proposal for the transfer of these responsibilities and for NPA's inspection program and is on file and available for viewing by the public at the offices of the Commission, 727 Fairview Drive, Carson City, Nevada89710 and the Dawson Building, 4045 South Spencer Street, Suite A-44, LM Vegas, Nevada 89158. At a regulariy scheduled agenda meeting held on October 10,1994, the Commission voted to hold a hearing on this joint petition. The Commission has legal authority and jurisdiction to hold a hearing in this matter pursuant to the provisions of NRS 704.120. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Coounission has scheJuled a HEARING in this matter as follows: WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 25 1995 10:00 a.m. Office of the Public Service Commission State Office BuiMii^ 555 East WMhington Avenue, Room 4600 Las VcgM, Nevada 89101 at which time interested persons may appear and be heard. If necessary, the hearing will continue through Thursday, January 26, 1995, at the same location. PREPARED TESTIMONY of Centel d the NPA must be filed with the Commission and recdved by each party of record no later than Tuesday. January 1SLI225Prepared testimony of all other parties must be filed with the Commission and received by each party of record no later than In accordance with the provisions of NRS 704.120, the Commission will consider evidence pertaining to (1) whether this proposal is just, reasonable, sufficient, preferential, not ui^ustly discriminatory, or otherwise in violation of any of the provisiom of Chapter 704 of NRS, (2) the propriety of such payphone inspections being conducted by an assodation of public payphone providers, (3) whether Centel will or should retain ultimate responsibility for the provision of service to public payphones in its service territory, (4) exactly bow the proposed program will operate, and (5) whether this progrsm is in the public interest The Commission may also consider other issues related to the provisiom of Chapters 703 and 704 of NRS and NAC, may discuss public comments, and may make dedsions on the procedural and substantive issues raised at bearing. The Commission may vote at the hearing to approve this program as proposed, to approve H with modifications, to reject the program, or to take such other action as it deems appropriate under the drcumstaoces. Thb notice has been posted at the county courthouses in Carson CHy, Reno, and Las Vegas. By the Commission. Ill William H. Vance WILLIAM H. VANCE, Commission .Secretary Dated: Canon CMy, Nevada \v\sm (SEAL) H—Dec. 22,1994 Loan No. 5570S5/SOER1NK TS#NRW036818 APN: 505-177-13-816-047 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED OCTOBER 16, 1990, UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU. YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER On 01/12/1995 at 10:30 A.M., STANDARD TRUST DEED SERVICE COMPANY as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust, Recorded 10/30/1990 In Book 901030 Inst # 00357 of Oflicial Records in the ofTice of the County Recorder of CLARK County, Nevada; Executed by: HENDRIK B. SOERINK AND FERN E. SOERINK, HUSB/VND AND WIFE WILL SELL at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash (all payable at the time of sale in lawfiil money of the United States:) at: AT THE CLARK COUNTY COURTHOUSE 200 SO. 3RD ST. LAS VEGAS, NV all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County, Nevada, describing the land therein: LOT TWELVE (12) IN BLOCK SEVEN (7) OF MGRINGSDE H UNIT NO. 2. AS SHOWN BY MAP THEREOF ON FILE IN BOOK 45 OF PLATS. PAGE 52, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF CLARK COUNTY, NEV/UDA. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purporteid to be: 18 FAin^ASIA LANE HENDERSON. NV 89014. (The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein.) Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust; The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of sale w. S103.457.66. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. Dated: 12/06/1994 ST/LND/XRD TRUST DEED SERVICE COMPANY. AS TRUSTEE. 2600 STANWELL DRIVE, SUITE 200, CONCORD. CA 94520 (510) 603-7340 By: VERONICA MOSES ASSISTANT SECRETARY RSVP#7321 H—Dec. 22, 29, 1994, Jan. 1,1995 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE LOAN: 113661-3 OTHER:763754 LSB : L10084 A.P. NUMBER 505-180-403-033 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED August 15, 1990, UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice of Trustee's Sale Under Deed of Trust Notice is hereby given that LENDER SERVICE BUREAU, A CALI FORNIA CORPORATION, as trustee, or successor trustee, or substituted taistee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by JAMES W. GARFIELD AND CYNTHIA A. GARFIELD, HUS BAND AND WIFE Recorded on 08/23/1990 as Instrument No. 00176 in Book 900823 Page of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of CLARK County, NEVADA, and pursuant to the Notice of Default and Election to Sell thereunder recorded 09/07/1994 in Book 940907, Page as Instrument No 00134 of said Official Records, WILL SELL on 01/05/1994 at THE CLARK COUNTY COURTHOUSE 200 SO 3RD ST. LAS VEGAS, NV at 10:30 A.M. AT PUBLIC AUCTION, TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH (payable at time of sale In lawful money of the United States), all right, title and Interest, conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State hereinafter described: LOT ONE HUNDRED SIXTYEIGHT (168) IN BLOCK FIVE (5) OF HENDERSON NO. 4 AS SHOWN BY MAP THEREOF ON FILE IN BOOK 5 OF PLATS, PAGE 15, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA. EXCEPTING THEREFROM THE NORTH 6.00 FEET OF SAID LAND. EXCEPT ALL MINERALS AND ALL MINERAL RIGHTS WHICH MAY BE LOCATED UPON OR UNDER THE REAL PROPERTY HEREINABOVE DESCRIBED, AS RESERVED BY RECONSTRUCKJBLICNtyrii^E ORD. NO. 1537 The above Bill No. 1156 and foregoing Ordinance was first proposed and read by title to the City Council of the City of Henderson, Nevada, on December 6,1994, which was a Regular Meeting of the Council and referred to the following Committee: "COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE" ESTABLISHING VOTING WARDS AN ORDINANCE OF THE HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL REPEALING ORDINANCE NO. 137 IN ENTIRETY ANDSETTING FORTH A NEW ORDINANCE ESTABLISHING THE WARDS WITHIN THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA, ACCORDING TO POPULATION AS DETERMINED BY THE LAST PRECEDING NATIONAL DECENNIAL CENSUS CONDUCTED BY THE BUREAU OF CENSUS OF THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AS PROVIDED IN SECTION 1.040, ARTICLE 1, OF THE HENDERSON CITY CHARTER AND UPDATES AS PROVIDED BY THE BUREAU OF CENSUS AND THE CITY PLANNING DEPARTMENT, AND OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELATED THERETO for recommendation. PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that the typewritten copies of the above mentioned Ordinance are available for inspection by all interested parties at the Office of the City Clerk, 240 WaterStrect, Henderson, Nrvada;andthat said Ordinance No. 1537 was proposed for adoption by CouiKilmemberHafcnontlR 20th day of December 1994 and adopted by the following roll call vote: Voting AYE: Councilmembers Jack Qark. Andy Hafen, Paul Ruth and Larry Scfaefller ValiiNAY:MayorGroesbc CORPORATION, IN DEED RECORDED SEPTEMBER 9, 1949 AS DOCUMENT NO. 321823 CLARK COUNTY NEVADA RECORDS, WHICH DEED RESERVES THE RIGHT TO ENTER UPON, PROSPECT FOR, MINE, AND REMOVE SUCH MINERALS. The property address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 104 LINDEN ST HENDERSON, NV 89015 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of sale is: $84,359.17 In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by state or federal savings and loan association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. In the event tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee m^ withhold the issuance of the Trustee's Deed until funds become available to the payee or endorses as a matter of right. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed, advances thereunder, with interest as provided therein, and the unpaid principal balance of the Note secured by said Deed with interest thereon as provided in said Note, fees, charges and expenses of the trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. DATED: 12/08/1994 LENDER SERVICE BUREAU, AS TRUSTEE A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION 19800 Macarthur Blvd. Suite #970 In/ine, CA 92715-2421 (714) 442-2850 By: Linda L. Hussmann Vice President PRIORITY 64886 H-Owc. 15, 22,29,1W4. Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News Page 15 THE ONLY^ DAYS LEFT TO CHRISTMAS! AUTHORITY EXTENDED HOLIDAy HOURS! WED-FRI8AM-11PM SAT 8AM-6PM m psm m THE nm SB£cm mm Gom AHYmwn S^SBH wm im PBict EAGLERIVER26-MEN'S^ OR UDIES' ATB ROLLERBLADE KIVT SKATE Z'^o,. tHARVARD SPORTS NEUI Vm PRICE muRRAY SUPER VALUE i^Rolleitlade. GREAT VALUE (^ 5^ 9 .?==5{ ROLLERBLADE 'ASTROBLADE \DULT IN-LINE SKATES i^Rollerblade. eP Z^ 'a> S iT msMK HUFFY BICVCL£S Assembly Extra SUPER VALUE HUFFY SPORTS^ HUFFY' SPORTS I HUFFY SPORTS 48" PERFORMANCE SERIES ULTAPACK IMYLEC w MYLecl I HUFFY FAST BREAK 48" ULTRA PRO GOAL GRAPHITE MYLEC I BACKBOARD JR. PRO GOAL 22.96 GREAT VALUE TjfT ROLLERBUDE BRAVOBLADE ADULT MN-LINE SKATES Compin il {49.96 XROSMAN 664 SB AIR GUN SPECIAL PURCHASE M^lbidt^ SUPER VALUE COLEMAN RECHARGEABLE TWIN TUBE LANTERN WEIDER HEALTH JANE FONDA MANUAL TREADMILL SPECIAL VALUE \md%i. SUPER VALUE SPECIAL VALUE ::?^!;=^v SPECIAL VALUE PROFORM \730E SERIES TREADMILL HUFFY BICYCLES U*S*A. Assembly Extra HUFFY BLADES'*'26''MEN'S OR LADIES'ATB SUPER VALUE ^4 ivV 'fRttl m HUFFY ELECTRO-LITE 16" BOY'S BICYCLE SUPER VALUE D.P. PATHMASTER TREADMILL PROt suimnno'? Originally $S9.96 NEW LOW PRICE SHIMANO SYMETRE4000 SPINNING REEL Com? ^V^l FLYING LURE MONSTER FISH KIT WENGER ^1 COMMANDER GENUINE SWISS ARMY KNIFE Daiwa! GREAT VALUE I SPECIAL PURCHASE DAIWA ROD/REEL SPINNING COMBO TUNTURI TRI .STEPPER ^^ T^JrsiTuar Viumastfir. VITAMASTER AIRMAXII EXERCISE BIKE w SPECIAL VALUE SUPER VALUE Assembly Extra ilEI IMPEX OLYMPIC WEIGHT BENCH 'CONQUEST BY ROYCE UNION ROAD SHARK 24-BOY'S OR GIRL'S ATB SPECIAL VALUE D.P. IRON WORKS HOME GYM "?sr'"5^?r3 SPECIAL PURCHASE SPECIAL PURCHASE V\ ^ >d SPECIAL PURCHASE r-^^i AVU 1265WWSLA0IES'^ CROSSTRAINERS REEBOK AXT 6000 LADIES'^ CROSSTRAINERS REEBOK BB700G MID MEN'S BASKETBALL SHOES 11 ^OODS ^jyirjirxojp SUPER VALUE M SPECIAL VALUE SPECIAL VALUE 99''ll69''|]l99 MACOREQOR ALLIED *^ DUNLOPGOLF ?orMEY) ?];rA1r^22!ic NEUTRON 15 PIECE JUHTOKLFSET '^"*''"'' "^"^^s" ^^ 8PAL0IN0 TOP FUTE TOUR MODEL GOLF BALLS Compan at $24.96 t^WTs The Sports Authority's PRICE GUARANTEE means just that! I( you ever find a lower competitor's price, we'll match it! Haule Free! m m HOURS DECATURBLVD. MONFRI10AM 9PM SAT 10AM 7PM SUN 11AM-6PM MARYLAND SQUARE MON SUH 10AM 6PM 1-515 R DWIllM V &' THE 1 LAS VEGAS 26?0 S Deuiut Blvd corner of Oeului t W Sativt 368-3335 MARYLAND SQUARE Mjrylind Pkwy t Twam Across Irorn Boulevard Mai (S minutes Irom me Siripl 7K-SS57 AUTHORITY

PAGE 16

wm Page 16 Henderson Home News Thursday, December 22,1994 SPORTS THURSDAY Henderson Home News Gators come up short against Oak Hill Bill Bowman News Sports Editor Meet the new Desert Swarm. The Green Valley Gators fell to Oak Hill, Va., 94-83 in the Reebok Holiday Prep Classic at Durango High School on Tuesday. But the Gators didn't go down without a fight. Green Valley used a no-holdsbarred, swarming defense to harass Oak Hill, ranked No. 3 in the nation by USA Today. The Gators suffered their first loss of the season, but there was nothing but joy in the Gators' locker room. These kids played outstanding," Green Valley coach Gene Carpenter said. "If more of our shots fall, we win the game." They almost did anyway. The taller — averaging 6-foot8 inside —"Warriors controlled the boards, but that didn't deter the Gators — averaging about 6foot-2 inside. "We wanted to make them play our game," Carpenter said. "We have a new philosophy now. We don't worry about matching up with other teams, we want them to match up with us." Green Valley survived a secondhalf dunk-a-thon by the Warriors as the Gators ran, ran, ran and ran some more in staying with giant-laden Oak Valley. The result: an 83-82 lead with 2:41 left in the game after a Don McCall free throw. But, that was the final points the Gators would score. Oak Hill scored on a slam dunk by Ron Mercer that almost brought down the rim to take the lead for good with 2:28 left in the game. Mercer, who is being wooed by the likes of Kentucky, Arkansas, Tennessee, VanderbiltandMiami — finished the game with 37 points. "We knew we couldn't match up with their height, so we had to try and rattle them," Carpenter **We knew we couUn't match up with [Oak Hill's] height, so we had to try and rattle them. It worked and the guys played their hearts out." said. "It worked and the guys played their hearts out." In the end, Oak Valley broke the Gators' press to score the final 12 points of the game in posting the victory. "We made them work hard," Carpenter said. "These guys just Gene Carpenter Green Valley boys basketball coach won't quit." Eric McCauley and Wade Perkins paced the Green Valley attack with 19 points each while McCall added 18 points and Reggie Richards had 12. The Gators opened the tournament with a 95-55 win over California team beats Basic girls D J. Allen News Staff Writer With a loss to Mira Costa, Calif, early Wednesday morning, Basic fell to 0-3 in the Lady Wolves Christmas Classic "Elite" division, but they went down battling. The Lady Wolves couldn't protect a seven-point lead with six minutes remaining in the game and fell to the Lady Mustangs, 38-37. After taking a 29-28 lead into the final quarter of play, Basic scored the first six points to start the period before Mira Costa went on a 10-2 run to end the game. Alayup from Lady Ranger Sa\ja Hevonoja with 3:05 left on the clock put Mira Costa up 38-35 and left Basic playing catchup. *~ Hevonoja paced the Lady Rangers with 11 points. Senior Jenn Ullrich (eight points) scored from inside the paint with 20 seconds remaining to pull Basic to within one, but the Lady Wolves couldn't gain possession of the ball and fell for the third time in three days against strong competition. Sophomore point guard Brandy DePoorter looked to shoot more against the Lady Rangers as she also scored eight points. Both DePoorter and Ullrich stepped up their play in the second half as they scored 12 of the Lady Wolves' second half points to keep Basic in the contest. Senior Kay Sweeney led Basic with 12. Basic led 13-10 after one quarter of play, but trailed 22-20 at the half. Throughout the tournament. Lady Wolves coach Jan Van Tuyl has stuck with his plan of using the games as experience for all of his players. All 10 Basic players have seen considerable court-time in the three games. "I told them before we started the tournament that they'll get equal amounts of playing time," Van Tuyl said. "What I'm doing is using this as background for later on in the season." On Tuesday, Gahr, Calif., outscored Basic 16-3 in the second quarter en route to a 58-28 victory. Gahr's Nikki Oliver, who Van Tuyl coached ata camp in Indiana this past summer, scored 14 of her game-high 22 points in the first half as Gahr mounted a 29-12 lead after two quarters of play. The Lady Wolves continued to be dominated in the third quarter as they were outscored 17-6. Basic used a seven-of-11 performance fi-om the free-throw line in the fourth period to mount its highest offensive put-out in a quarter against Gahr, 10. A three-pointer form Sweeney (12 points) at the buzzer was Basic's first score from the field in 11:23. After the contest, Gahr coach Tom Pryor talked about what the toumamenthosted by Basic offers teams. "It [the tournament] is an opportunity for the players to get together and get to know each other," Pryor said. "We have 11 kids on the team and there are seven or eight of them who won't be playing basketball past high school. So it gives them a chance to travel, stay together as a team and let them see what it's all about." John Judge/News Staff POSTING UP — Basic junior forward Oriana Christian gets the ball down low against Gahr's Chesasa Kindred (32). Christian scored three points in the Lady Wolves 58-28 loss. Silverado girls hold off Rancho Verde Bill Bowman News Sports Editor For Silverado coach Diane Hernandez, the final buzzer couldn't come soon enough. "It wasn't easy," Hernandez said after her team held on for a 38-34 win over Rancho Verde in the Lady Wolves' Christmas Classic on Tuesday in the "Select" division. Silverado jumped out to a 16-2 lead after the first quarter and led 26-8 at the half. "Our pressure defense worked for us," Hernandez said. "Ithelped us get th^ lead and then we hung on. It wasn't easy. Rancho Verde outscored Silverado 14-5 in the third quarter to narrow the gap to nine, 31-22, heading into the final quarter. "We came out sluggish in the third quarter," Hernandez said. "The press was still working for us, but we didn't shoot well in the third quarter." Then Laraine Ramirez helped seal the victory for Silverado. She buried three fourth quarter jumpers — including two in the final two minutes — to help Silverado hold on for the victory. Rancho Verde outscored Silverado 12-7 in thefinal quarter, but Ramirez's baskets all came at key times to keep Silverado in the lead. "She really hit some key shots for us in the fourth quarter," Hernandez said. "She's the silent one on the team. Hopefully shell keep doing that for us. She's a good shooter, but we'd like her to get more shots." Hernandez said the victory "is a great one for us. I know it feels good to me and I know the girls are real excited." Crissy Buck paced the Silverado attack with 12 points while Ramirez and Joyce Sudario each scored eight. In the second game of the day. Central jumped out to a 12-3 lead in the first quarter and coasted to a 67-33 victory over Green Valley. "I don't know what to say," Green Valley coach Alma Randolph said. "In the end, we were just standing around and getting out-rebounded." Randolph said the girls "showed an improvement on defense in the first half and we shot better in the first half, but we've still got a lot of work to do." Michelle Kuanna led Green Valley with 12 points while Diana Saldana had 17 for Central. Green Valley then lost to Rancho Verde 55-47 on Wednesday. Demetria Carter had 19 points for the Gators while Natalie Coles had 13. FROM THE PRESSBOX Turlock, Ca., and then beat Newport, Wa., 70-48. "rm surprised," Carpenter said of the team's 7-0 start prior to Tuesday's game. "We could have folded l^e tents a few times, but the guys came back to win. It shows what kind of a team this is." • • • Basic is also taking part in the tournament. The Wolves lost to De La Salle, Ca., 78-64 and then fell to Redemptorist, La., 81-54. Damon Caldwell led Basic against De La Salle with 15 points and 12 rebounds. Steven Bentz scored 15 points against Redemptorist Scoreboard Lady Wolves' Christmas Classic Monday's scores Elite Division Cim-Memorial 84, Mira Costa 28 Pleasure Ridge Park 86, Las Vegas 78 Archbiship Mitty 65, Gahr 37 Kent Meridian 55, Basic 8 Westminster 54, Bishop (jorman 29 Pius XI80, Horizon 16 McQueen 47, St. Joseph 46 Chaparral 72, Western 32 Tuesday's scores Pleasure Ridge Park 72, Cim Memorial 52 Kent Meridian 53, Archbishop Mitty 48 Pius XI61, Westminster 33 Chaparral 53, McQueen 43 Las Vegas 59, Mira Costa 46 Gahr 58, Basic 28 Bishop Gorman 69, Horizon 43 Western 68, St. Joseph Notre Dame 40 Select Division Monday's scores Redwood 37, Silverado 20 Eldorado 48, Rancho Verdo 39 28 34 Canyon 51, Green Valley 25 Colfax 52, Central 36 Sahuaro 46, Bonanza 45 Skyline 76, Valley 40 Fremont 61, Lincoln Prep ; Gilroy 67, Clark 32 Tuesday's scores Redwood 42, Eldorado 29 Colfax 56, Canyon 48 Skyline 48, Sahuaro 27 Fremont 39, Gilroy 23 Silverado 38, Rancho Verde [ Central 62, Green Valley 33 Bonanza 44, Valley 33 Lincoln Prep 59, Clark 47 Area Schedule THURSDAY, Dec. 22 BOYS BASKETBALL Basic at Reeboii Holiday Classic, Times TEA Green Valley at Reebok Holiday Classic, Times TEA GIRLS BASKETBALL Basic hosting Lady Wolves Tournament, Times TBA Green Valley at Lady Wolves Tournament, Times TBA Silverado at Lady Wolves Tournament, Times TBA Sports figures' wish-list: Who's been naughty and nice? DJ-AMMI News Staff Writer Don't ask me how I got it, I juBt have connections. Yes, it is true. I talked to the big man up at the North Pole this past week and he gave me the skinny on whatsome sport figures have been asking for this Christmas. Chris Webber — Another raise for next season. AFC — A win the last week of January — for once. Michael Jordan — The ability to hit an off-speed pitch. Chicago Cubsfans— Mercy. (Or see Buffalo Bills fans.) Buffalo Bills fans —A face to laugh in. (Or see Chicago Cubs fans.) UNLVfans —The Tarkanian/ Rothermel years back. Deion Sanders — A new nickname. Some guy named Lloyd in Seattle —A bumper sticker that says, "Go Mariners... And take the Seahawks with you." (1 hope Tm not fired today. My editor is from Washington.) Rich Kotite — A job next season. New England Patriots — "Hie USFL back, so they could have somewhere to play in those uniforms. Houston Oilers —The USFL back, so they could join theleague and maybe finish over .500. Chicago Bulls fans — The book, "How to Cope with Reality." UNR (Who cares?) A cannon to paint blue. Scottie Pippen — A trip to Supercuts. Drew Bledsoe — A running back so his arm won't fall off. Steve McNair — A chance to turn back the clock to four years ago so he could play Division-I football. Jerry Jones — A Jimmy Johnson voo-doo doll. Jimmy Johnson — A Jerry Jones voo-doo doll. Baseball and Hockey — A wake-up call. Oregon Ducks —A prayer to be answered the second day of the new year. (If my sports editor doesn't fire me, my managing editor might. He graduated from Oregon.) and Myself ~ All 1 want is peace and joy around the world...and, of course, a whole bunch of presents, including aRed Rider BB-gun. HENDERSON HOME NEWS 'BOULDER CITY NEWS T LIFESTYLES T YOUR HEALTH T WHAT'S PLAYING • LAST WORDS SECTION Thursday, December 22, 1994 Henderson and Boulder City, Nevada PageBI PHOTOS BY ROB WEIDENFELD Ron Decker and dau^ter Chantel, 4, put together a snowf lake made from plastic sixpack rings. |ce sculptor Mixsi puts the finishing touches on a sculpture that included two reindeer, Santa's sleigh, and a base bearing a greeting. Winter Wonderland. Two year-old Kristen Tovar enjoys a pony ride at Saturday's iwonderland The Clark County Parks and Recreation Department hosted its annual Winter WonderlandatSunset Park Saturday. Thousands of youngsters got a taste of winter on the desert floor. Kevin Stanciu, 6, gets Frosty the Snowman painted on his cheek. Face-painting was one of the many activities available for children and aduKs at Saturday's event. John Carra, 3, catches some wind as sister Victoria, 1, holds on tight. CaWin Raber, 1, chats with Frosty the Snowman during his visit to Children of all ages enjoyed a romp in the snow, courtesy of Mount Christopher Anderson, 6, works diligently on a clothespin reindeer. Sunset Partc CharlestonandtheClarkCountyParksandRecreationDepartment. while dad Mike lends a hand. • • Ma

PAGE 17

wm Page 16 Henderson Home News Thursday, December 22,1994 SPORTS THURSDAY Henderson Home News Gators come up short against Oak Hill Bill Bowman News Sports Editor Meet the new Desert Swarm. The Green Valley Gators fell to Oak Hill, Va., 94-83 in the Reebok Holiday Prep Classic at Durango High School on Tuesday. But the Gators didn't go down without a fight. Green Valley used a no-holdsbarred, swarming defense to harass Oak Hill, ranked No. 3 in the nation by USA Today. The Gators suffered their first loss of the season, but there was nothing but joy in the Gators' locker room. These kids played outstanding," Green Valley coach Gene Carpenter said. "If more of our shots fall, we win the game." They almost did anyway. The taller — averaging 6-foot8 inside —"Warriors controlled the boards, but that didn't deter the Gators — averaging about 6foot-2 inside. "We wanted to make them play our game," Carpenter said. "We have a new philosophy now. We don't worry about matching up with other teams, we want them to match up with us." Green Valley survived a secondhalf dunk-a-thon by the Warriors as the Gators ran, ran, ran and ran some more in staying with giant-laden Oak Valley. The result: an 83-82 lead with 2:41 left in the game after a Don McCall free throw. But, that was the final points the Gators would score. Oak Hill scored on a slam dunk by Ron Mercer that almost brought down the rim to take the lead for good with 2:28 left in the game. Mercer, who is being wooed by the likes of Kentucky, Arkansas, Tennessee, VanderbiltandMiami — finished the game with 37 points. "We knew we couldn't match up with their height, so we had to try and rattle them," Carpenter **We knew we couUn't match up with [Oak Hill's] height, so we had to try and rattle them. It worked and the guys played their hearts out." said. "It worked and the guys played their hearts out." In the end, Oak Valley broke the Gators' press to score the final 12 points of the game in posting the victory. "We made them work hard," Carpenter said. "These guys just Gene Carpenter Green Valley boys basketball coach won't quit." Eric McCauley and Wade Perkins paced the Green Valley attack with 19 points each while McCall added 18 points and Reggie Richards had 12. The Gators opened the tournament with a 95-55 win over California team beats Basic girls D J. Allen News Staff Writer With a loss to Mira Costa, Calif, early Wednesday morning, Basic fell to 0-3 in the Lady Wolves Christmas Classic "Elite" division, but they went down battling. The Lady Wolves couldn't protect a seven-point lead with six minutes remaining in the game and fell to the Lady Mustangs, 38-37. After taking a 29-28 lead into the final quarter of play, Basic scored the first six points to start the period before Mira Costa went on a 10-2 run to end the game. Alayup from Lady Ranger Sa\ja Hevonoja with 3:05 left on the clock put Mira Costa up 38-35 and left Basic playing catchup. *~ Hevonoja paced the Lady Rangers with 11 points. Senior Jenn Ullrich (eight points) scored from inside the paint with 20 seconds remaining to pull Basic to within one, but the Lady Wolves couldn't gain possession of the ball and fell for the third time in three days against strong competition. Sophomore point guard Brandy DePoorter looked to shoot more against the Lady Rangers as she also scored eight points. Both DePoorter and Ullrich stepped up their play in the second half as they scored 12 of the Lady Wolves' second half points to keep Basic in the contest. Senior Kay Sweeney led Basic with 12. Basic led 13-10 after one quarter of play, but trailed 22-20 at the half. Throughout the tournament. Lady Wolves coach Jan Van Tuyl has stuck with his plan of using the games as experience for all of his players. All 10 Basic players have seen considerable court-time in the three games. "I told them before we started the tournament that they'll get equal amounts of playing time," Van Tuyl said. "What I'm doing is using this as background for later on in the season." On Tuesday, Gahr, Calif., outscored Basic 16-3 in the second quarter en route to a 58-28 victory. Gahr's Nikki Oliver, who Van Tuyl coached ata camp in Indiana this past summer, scored 14 of her game-high 22 points in the first half as Gahr mounted a 29-12 lead after two quarters of play. The Lady Wolves continued to be dominated in the third quarter as they were outscored 17-6. Basic used a seven-of-11 performance fi-om the free-throw line in the fourth period to mount its highest offensive put-out in a quarter against Gahr, 10. A three-pointer form Sweeney (12 points) at the buzzer was Basic's first score from the field in 11:23. After the contest, Gahr coach Tom Pryor talked about what the toumamenthosted by Basic offers teams. "It [the tournament] is an opportunity for the players to get together and get to know each other," Pryor said. "We have 11 kids on the team and there are seven or eight of them who won't be playing basketball past high school. So it gives them a chance to travel, stay together as a team and let them see what it's all about." John Judge/News Staff POSTING UP — Basic junior forward Oriana Christian gets the ball down low against Gahr's Chesasa Kindred (32). Christian scored three points in the Lady Wolves 58-28 loss. Silverado girls hold off Rancho Verde Bill Bowman News Sports Editor For Silverado coach Diane Hernandez, the final buzzer couldn't come soon enough. "It wasn't easy," Hernandez said after her team held on for a 38-34 win over Rancho Verde in the Lady Wolves' Christmas Classic on Tuesday in the "Select" division. Silverado jumped out to a 16-2 lead after the first quarter and led 26-8 at the half. "Our pressure defense worked for us," Hernandez said. "Ithelped us get th^ lead and then we hung on. It wasn't easy. Rancho Verde outscored Silverado 14-5 in the third quarter to narrow the gap to nine, 31-22, heading into the final quarter. "We came out sluggish in the third quarter," Hernandez said. "The press was still working for us, but we didn't shoot well in the third quarter." Then Laraine Ramirez helped seal the victory for Silverado. She buried three fourth quarter jumpers — including two in the final two minutes — to help Silverado hold on for the victory. Rancho Verde outscored Silverado 12-7 in thefinal quarter, but Ramirez's baskets all came at key times to keep Silverado in the lead. "She really hit some key shots for us in the fourth quarter," Hernandez said. "She's the silent one on the team. Hopefully shell keep doing that for us. She's a good shooter, but we'd like her to get more shots." Hernandez said the victory "is a great one for us. I know it feels good to me and I know the girls are real excited." Crissy Buck paced the Silverado attack with 12 points while Ramirez and Joyce Sudario each scored eight. In the second game of the day. Central jumped out to a 12-3 lead in the first quarter and coasted to a 67-33 victory over Green Valley. "I don't know what to say," Green Valley coach Alma Randolph said. "In the end, we were just standing around and getting out-rebounded." Randolph said the girls "showed an improvement on defense in the first half and we shot better in the first half, but we've still got a lot of work to do." Michelle Kuanna led Green Valley with 12 points while Diana Saldana had 17 for Central. Green Valley then lost to Rancho Verde 55-47 on Wednesday. Demetria Carter had 19 points for the Gators while Natalie Coles had 13. FROM THE PRESSBOX Turlock, Ca., and then beat Newport, Wa., 70-48. "rm surprised," Carpenter said of the team's 7-0 start prior to Tuesday's game. "We could have folded l^e tents a few times, but the guys came back to win. It shows what kind of a team this is." • • • Basic is also taking part in the tournament. The Wolves lost to De La Salle, Ca., 78-64 and then fell to Redemptorist, La., 81-54. Damon Caldwell led Basic against De La Salle with 15 points and 12 rebounds. Steven Bentz scored 15 points against Redemptorist Scoreboard Lady Wolves' Christmas Classic Monday's scores Elite Division Cim-Memorial 84, Mira Costa 28 Pleasure Ridge Park 86, Las Vegas 78 Archbiship Mitty 65, Gahr 37 Kent Meridian 55, Basic 8 Westminster 54, Bishop (jorman 29 Pius XI80, Horizon 16 McQueen 47, St. Joseph 46 Chaparral 72, Western 32 Tuesday's scores Pleasure Ridge Park 72, Cim Memorial 52 Kent Meridian 53, Archbishop Mitty 48 Pius XI61, Westminster 33 Chaparral 53, McQueen 43 Las Vegas 59, Mira Costa 46 Gahr 58, Basic 28 Bishop Gorman 69, Horizon 43 Western 68, St. Joseph Notre Dame 40 Select Division Monday's scores Redwood 37, Silverado 20 Eldorado 48, Rancho Verdo 39 28 34 Canyon 51, Green Valley 25 Colfax 52, Central 36 Sahuaro 46, Bonanza 45 Skyline 76, Valley 40 Fremont 61, Lincoln Prep ; Gilroy 67, Clark 32 Tuesday's scores Redwood 42, Eldorado 29 Colfax 56, Canyon 48 Skyline 48, Sahuaro 27 Fremont 39, Gilroy 23 Silverado 38, Rancho Verde [ Central 62, Green Valley 33 Bonanza 44, Valley 33 Lincoln Prep 59, Clark 47 Area Schedule THURSDAY, Dec. 22 BOYS BASKETBALL Basic at Reeboii Holiday Classic, Times TEA Green Valley at Reebok Holiday Classic, Times TEA GIRLS BASKETBALL Basic hosting Lady Wolves Tournament, Times TBA Green Valley at Lady Wolves Tournament, Times TBA Silverado at Lady Wolves Tournament, Times TBA Sports figures' wish-list: Who's been naughty and nice? DJ-AMMI News Staff Writer Don't ask me how I got it, I juBt have connections. Yes, it is true. I talked to the big man up at the North Pole this past week and he gave me the skinny on whatsome sport figures have been asking for this Christmas. Chris Webber — Another raise for next season. AFC — A win the last week of January — for once. Michael Jordan — The ability to hit an off-speed pitch. Chicago Cubsfans— Mercy. (Or see Buffalo Bills fans.) Buffalo Bills fans —A face to laugh in. (Or see Chicago Cubs fans.) UNLVfans —The Tarkanian/ Rothermel years back. Deion Sanders — A new nickname. Some guy named Lloyd in Seattle —A bumper sticker that says, "Go Mariners... And take the Seahawks with you." (1 hope Tm not fired today. My editor is from Washington.) Rich Kotite — A job next season. New England Patriots — "Hie USFL back, so they could have somewhere to play in those uniforms. Houston Oilers —The USFL back, so they could join theleague and maybe finish over .500. Chicago Bulls fans — The book, "How to Cope with Reality." UNR (Who cares?) A cannon to paint blue. Scottie Pippen — A trip to Supercuts. Drew Bledsoe — A running back so his arm won't fall off. Steve McNair — A chance to turn back the clock to four years ago so he could play Division-I football. Jerry Jones — A Jimmy Johnson voo-doo doll. Jimmy Johnson — A Jerry Jones voo-doo doll. Baseball and Hockey — A wake-up call. Oregon Ducks —A prayer to be answered the second day of the new year. (If my sports editor doesn't fire me, my managing editor might. He graduated from Oregon.) and Myself ~ All 1 want is peace and joy around the world...and, of course, a whole bunch of presents, including aRed Rider BB-gun. HENDERSON HOME NEWS 'BOULDER CITY NEWS T LIFESTYLES T YOUR HEALTH T WHAT'S PLAYING • LAST WORDS SECTION Thursday, December 22, 1994 Henderson and Boulder City, Nevada PageBI PHOTOS BY ROB WEIDENFELD Ron Decker and dau^ter Chantel, 4, put together a snowf lake made from plastic sixpack rings. |ce sculptor Mixsi puts the finishing touches on a sculpture that included two reindeer, Santa's sleigh, and a base bearing a greeting. Winter Wonderland. Two year-old Kristen Tovar enjoys a pony ride at Saturday's iwonderland The Clark County Parks and Recreation Department hosted its annual Winter WonderlandatSunset Park Saturday. Thousands of youngsters got a taste of winter on the desert floor. Kevin Stanciu, 6, gets Frosty the Snowman painted on his cheek. Face-painting was one of the many activities available for children and aduKs at Saturday's event. John Carra, 3, catches some wind as sister Victoria, 1, holds on tight. CaWin Raber, 1, chats with Frosty the Snowman during his visit to Children of all ages enjoyed a romp in the snow, courtesy of Mount Christopher Anderson, 6, works diligently on a clothespin reindeer. Sunset Partc CharlestonandtheClarkCountyParksandRecreationDepartment. while dad Mike lends a hand. • • Ma

PAGE 18

LIFESTYLES Page B2 Henderson Home News • Boulder City News Thursday, December 22, 1994 Take three of your best friends to Three Amigos Fve heard a lot of talk about Three Amigos, the Mexican restaurant located at 6250 Mountain Vista Street, near Sunset Road, in Henderson. With my wife Julie, daughter Marcie, 8, and son Matthew, 5, we went for dinner along with my father-in-law, Bemie. Seeking some good Mexican food, we were all eager to try out this place, which recently underwent an expansion. We were greeted with a bowl of some great chips and salsa. These chips, thidier than most, had the crispiness of those wide Chinese Trees mark victims STOP DUI held a memorial tree planting on Dec. 17 in Sunset Park in remembrance of the innocent victims of DUI. The trees will not only serve as a memorial, but as a reminder to the public not to drink and drive," says Sandy Heverly, executive direction of the organization. Each tree carried a plaque with the name of a DUI victim. Attending the dedication were DUI victims, law enforcement, dignitaries and representatives from Sprint Cellular, the Clark County Parks and Recreation and Plant World Nursery. "We are extremely grateful to everyone who has participated in .the plaoniDg of the very important dedicAtion," gayi Heverly. LET'S EAT OUT! PHILIP GOLDSTEIN noodles. The waiter brought out three bowls of chips, and as things normally go, Matthew moved one bowl in front ofhimself and Marcie moved the second bowl for herself—leaving bowl number three to be shared by my wife, her dad, and me! Something just wasn't right here. Fortunately, our parenting sense kicked in. "Don'teat too many or you won't have room for your dinner!" That was all we needed to say. The adults reclaimed the three bowls of chips and we munched away while our two youngsters scowled! Who says parenting doesn't have its privileges? Anyway, we found many things to choose from on the Three Amigos' abundant menu. Children's plates, ranging in price from $3.25 to $3.95, offered a choice of taco, enchilada, burrito, and "Kidadilla," all with rice and beans. Fearing that we would order too much food, Marcie and Matthew agreed to share aburrito. We did the right things because with samplings from the grownups, there was plenty for all. Appetizers, ranging in price from $4.25 to $5.50, included nachos, quesadilla, Mexican pizza and chicken wings. Entrees could be ordered ala carte or by complete dinners. Forthedifferenceofprice we foimd it well worth it to order coniplete dinners which were served with rice and beans and a choice of soup or salad. I had the meatball or "albondigas" soup, and of course, my son and daughter ended up getting most of it away from me! It was very good! Tacos, enchiladas, tamales and burritos came in combinations of all sorts, by chicken, pork, beef and even broccoli fillings. Dinners were priced from $5.95 to $6.50. I went with the enchiladas siiisa which were excellent. The enchiladas were filled with chicken and covered with a tasty green chile sauce. Julie went with the broccoli buritto which was reported to be excellent. My fatherin-law went with the chicken chimichanga and was impressed by the large amount of chicken served. All in all, our meals were very good and came in ample portions. The food was mild in seasoning and I would have like a bit more kick! However, Julie and Bemie said that it was perfect for them and they enjoyed the mild flavor. Next time wegoback,Imay simply request that the food be a little spicier! But overall, the food was very good—definitely worth a "Let's Eat Out" return! Goldstein, an attorney who lives in Henderson, wntes about his dining experiences with his wife Julie, and young children Marcie and Matthew. Living revocable trust offers many advantages Do you worry about how your assets will be handled after you're gone? Will they be distributed to your children and other beneficiaries as you wish? Will that distribution be subject to probate, unnecessary delays and highlegal expenses? Those are common worries for most people, but today there is an alternative to the common will that might help avoid most of those problems. Aliving revocable trust could help your estate avoid probate, have more privacy, and minimize estate taxes. One benefit of a living revocable trust that many people appreciate is the privacy it offers. The directionsforproperty disposition that a will specifies are open to public scrutiny when the will is probated. But assets passed on through a living revocable trust generally avoid probate and being made nart. nfthei nuhlic record. Living revocable trusts also provide protection for your investments while you are still alive. The trust agreement normally includes designating a successor trustee to manage the assets of the trust if you become ill or incapacitated, or are simply away on travel for an extended time. The designation of the successor trustee, who can be a family member or a financial professional, is made by the person establishing the trust. ^ It is important to see an attorney in order to establish a living revocable trust. Each trust is in dividually planned to meet an individual's needs and to meet the laws of the state in which it is written. An added benefit of the living revocable trust is that it can be modified or even canceled as your needs change over the years. For more information about a living revocable trust and its benefits, write for a free booklet, "Gaining Maximum Benefits from a Living Revocable Trust," from the American Institute for Cancer Research, Dept. LRT, Washingtop, DC 20069. i£^ •P'l'n BaCarmen Miranda has triumphant return Philip Goldstein Contnbuting Writer ^:'"ii', Si^'ti' ** Sliopping mail safety tips offered The Citizens Committee for Victim Rights along with local and federal law enforcement agencies and the Directors of Security for area malls wants to insure the safety of all area residents. Although this is the festive time of the year, holiday shoppers are prime targets for crime. The following tips are provided by the Citizens committee for Victim Rights with the hope that everyone will eryoy a safe holiday. •Safety begins atyour car when you enter the parking lot. Choose a visible area, or a well-lighted one if after dark. Once you park and lock your car, look for a landmark that will help you remember where you left your car. •If you have any packages or valuables, move them to the trunk, or place them under a seat. Gifts in the back seat or a visible area make your car a more tempting target. •When youleave your car, take the time to secure your wallet or purse. A wallet should be placed either in your front pocket or inside a jacket. Purses should be snugly wrapped around your arm, not dangling from your hand. •Don't carry large amounts of cash on your person. Use checks or credit cards instead. Be sure to use the same "street smarts" when using a mall ATM as well. •Upon enteringthe mall, if you are with children, immediately choose a "meeting place" if you happen to get separated. Know where the customer service desk and security office are located in case you need assistance. •If you can, makea special trip with your children to see Santa and the decor. This allows you to devote your fiill attention to them. Otherwise, try to leave small children at home. If you must bring them to the mall while you are shopping, be sure to hold a hand or use another method of restraint. •If you can't find your child, don't panic. Immediately enter a store and have them call security. Give a description of the clothing and other features and carry a recent photo. Then stay in your location so that when security finds your child, they don't have to go looking for you. •Be sure your children are aware of what you are wearing, or that they can give a description of you. Also, make sure they know that if someone approaches them who they don't know, they can yell for help. •Always be aware of your surroundings. Don't forget to watch where you are going. •Keep these ideas in mind as you shop this holiday. Being prepared will make you a safer shopper, and most likely, a happier one as well! Goldstein continues his series on local family-onented attractions. For those old enough to remember Carmen Miranda as that lady who wore a bowl of firuit or bunch of bananas on her head, and those who think that Rio Rita originated that finiit cocktail hat, a visit to the "Conga" show at the Rio Suites Hotel and Casino is a must! Along with my wife Julie, daughter Marcie and son Matthew, we decided to see "Conga." At a price of $29.95 plus tax and tip, the dinner and show were well worth the price. We noticed other children in the audience and we can easily claim tha:^ our kids enjAy^d' themselves and lasted throughout the two hour show! For thatspedal occasion, children will really feel grown up! Set in a round theater encircled by wall size projection screens, we found ourselves transported to Supper Club reminiscent of the 1930s and 1940s. The live music, song and dance numbers offered through the evening fit in nicely as dinner was served. One treat was watching the singing and dancing chefs prepare the meal on stage and on screen and then, announcing the meal ready, treat the crowd to a parade of waiters entering live with the finished meal. It was quite different and very eixjoyable. The meal itself was delicious. Having previously eiyoyed the excellentfood at the Rio buffet, we found the dinner food even better! After a very good spinach salad, we were given a choice of roasted chicken, prime rib or salmon filet for the main course. Along with steamed vegetables and potato, we all enjoyed our food. Matthew went with the chicken and had a large boned quarter of chicken. Marcie ordered the salmon and surprised us by practically finishing her meal. Julie and I each had the prime rib and that too was delicious. For dessert, with coffee, we had a strawberry napoleon, filled with fresh strawberries and whipped cream. I need not say any more— the dinner was delicious and the kids were calm and quiet as they eryoyed their supper writhout a single tumed-up nose! The show itself was al so a treat, for both us and the kids. During many Latin songs, the .li^sh landscapes of Brazil were projected on the screens. As Rio Rita herself sang some standard Carmen Miranda songs, we were treated to the original Carmen singing along on screen! I can tell you that I was very impressed how my kids were caught up and enthralled by the show! Julie and I were captivated by the overall feel of the showroom and the excitement and energy of the show and its performers. The Latin beat really energized the audience, it was also nice to be serenaded by a live band during dinner. I can be sure that my wife will be gently suggesting that we return to the Conga showroom sometime during Valentines Day—for a romantic evening without our son and daughter. Uh oh! I think my investigation proved too successful! Drinlcing and driving costs AtexmdwJ.Wah MD, FACS Like most people, you probably think that alcohol-related traffic accidents only happen to other people — not to you or your loved ones. Therefore, you may be surprised to learn that the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) estimates that approximately two out of every five Americans will be involved in an alcohol-related crash at some time in their lives. It is also estimated that 2.75 million drunk driving crashes each year victimize 1.64 million innocent people who are ii\jured or have their vehicles damaged. These are staggering revelations about a dangerous practice — drinking and driving. NHTSA defines a fatal traffic crash as being alcohol-related if either a driver or a non-occupant (for example, a pedestrian) has a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.01 grams per deciUter (g/dl) or greater in apolice-reported traffic accident According to data released by NHTSA, human losses associated with alcohol-related traffic accidents remain almost constant An estimated 17,461 persons died in 1993 in alcohol-related traffic crashes, an average of one victim every 30 minutes. This alarming number of preventable deaths accounted for 43.5 percent of the total traftic fatalities in 1993. But the human toll of drinking anddrivingdoesn't limit itself only to the passengers or drivers of cars on the highway. According to NHTSA, motorcycle operators involved in fatal crashes in 1992 had higher intoxication rates, with ablood BAC of 0. lOg/dl or greater, than any other type of motor vehicle driver. Besides these devastating losses in human terms, drunk driving has a huge impact on society in terms of financing. Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) estimates that direct costs of alcohol-related accidents are more than $46 billion yearly. The organization also notes that each year an additional $102 billion is lost because of the reduced quality of life of accident victims. Overall, MADD estimates that the cost for each ir^ured victim of an alcohol-related crash averaged $68,000 in 1993, of which $14,000 represented health care costs and lost productivity. In simpler terms, alcohol-related crashes cost society $1.09 per drink of $2.40 per ounce of alcohol consumed. Unfortunately, drinking and driving becomes more prevalent during the holiday season, when the greatest number of people become victims of this dangerous practice. Drunk driving accidents are not discriminatory. They take the U ves of many innocent people who are simply in the wrong place at the wrong time. Therefore, it is important that we all work to avoid such incidents by being responsible and using common sense. How can you help achieve this goal? Make a pledge to yourself that you will never get behind the wheel of an automobile after you have had a drink. Dr. Walt is a mennber of the department of Surgery at Harper Hospital, Detroit, Ml, and President of the Annerican College of Surgeons. For more infomnation write to: Annerican College of Surgeons, Office of Public Information, Department 394, 55 East Erie Street Chicago, IL 60611 or call the Office of Public Information at 312-6644050, extension 391. CEOs advised that employee concerns deserve top priority Amid the intense competition that characterizes business in the '90s, a sample of the nation's senior executives believe CEOs should spend more than one-third (347o) of their time building the morale and productivity of their troops. The results underscore the strategic importance now being given to staffing and employee retention issues in U.S. companies. The survey was developed by Robert Half International Inc.,the world's first and largest staffing services firm specializing in the accounting, fmance and information technology fields. It was conducted by an independent research firm, which polled 150 executives from the nation's 1,000 largest companies. Executives were asked, "What percentage of a CEO's time should be spent fostering positive employee relations?" The mean response was 34% percent "Promoting job satisfaction and > reducing employee turnover are viewed as top priorities for corporate leaders, especially in the wake of the recent recession," said Max Messmer, chairman and CEO of Robert Half International. "Professionals who waited for improved economic conditions to look for better jobs are now on the move, so it's more important than ever to foster a positive working environment—or companies may lose some of their best talent." The fact that other executives recognize the level of involvement required of CEOs is encouraging given the many issues facing management today, noted Messmer. He advises companies to extend this involvement to all senior level employees. Some tips: •Avoid pitting employees against one another in unhealthy competition, instead motivate them to work toward benefiting the department or company. •Maintain open lines of communication at all levels, thus preventing the potential for resentment. Encourage employees to look for constructive solutions for settling disputes. •Reward teamwork by recognizing the efforts of all employees who have contributed to a successful project "The job outlook is better for candidates than it has been for some time," said Lynn Gerard, Robert Half s branch manager for Las Vegas. "And with hiring activity on the rise, it's more important than ever for CEOs to pay attention to job satisfaction, retention and other employee morale issues. "When the head of a company spends time on issues critical to staff members, it makes a strong impact because everyone i s aware of how valuable and limited the executive's time is," she added. Robert Half International has more than 175officesintheUnited States, Canada and Europe. CALL 435-7700 WITH NEWS TIPS f Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News, Boulder CHy News Page B3 NFL playoff picture an interesting blur Christmas is upon us and the NFL playoff picture is interest ingly blurred. By Sunday night we'll know who's going where to play, then settle in for some excellentgames priortoapredictably dull Super Bowl.... Meanwhile, there's some movement on the baseball front. The strike could end quickly or we could be facing a 1995 season with boarded-up stadiums.... If you're still looking for a lastminute Christmas present or the traditional stocking stuffer, I recommend the book "Lords of the Realm" by John Helyar who wrote the highly acclaimed "Barbarians at the Gate." It's fascinating detail of the ri se of the Player's Association and the rugged hostility of the ovraers ("Lord s") makes for must reading. Helyar's tome is well-documented and pulls no punches. It's the type of book you won't be able to put down and, as a result, the historical presentation gives you a front seat for today's goings-on. Detailed are the arguments among owners and their stubborn resistance to any form of comproBRANDO'S TURN JIM BRANN mise. Hardships by individual players involved in what became free agency are explained as is the tug of war involved in getting strike authorization from the players. The author details innocuous behavior by many general managers and owners as well as the hard-ball efforts by some to break the player's union. Oakland A's owner Charles 0. Finley is portrayed as a man ahead of his time yet his headline grabbing actions of the 1970s take the reader deep into the mind of what many have called a maverick. The step-by-step maneuvers by Marvin Miller, first Player's Association counsel, will leave you in awe of a man who was skewered by everyone except the ones who mattered—the players. Fans are on both sides of the fence in the current dispute and they are the ones hurting most. Bitterness hangs in the air and it is as thick as marijuana smoke at SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER a rock concert. Pick up and read "Lords of the Realm." You won't be disappointed. IN THE PRGS-Eiyoyed a solid Saturday last week with Detroit and San Frandsco and added Pittsburgh on Sunday. Green Bay won but didn't cover so the 3-1 mark moved season record to 26-35-3. A guaranteed losing season is in the cards because pickingfourgames this week is no easy feat. However, will go with Los Angeles Raiders (-4) over Kansas City; Pittsburgh (+3) over San Diego; Tampa Bay (+5) over Green Bay and Arizona (-1) over Atlanta. • raE COLLEGE SCENE— This week will name selections for the nine bowl games to be played before Jan. 1. In the Aloha Bowl Kansas State (-1 1/2) the choice over Boston College; Arizona (-5) over Utah in the Freedom; Virginia (-10) over TCU in the Independence; BYU (+2) over Oklahoma in the Copper; Texas (-1) over North Carolina in the Sun; Virginia Tech (+7) over Tennessee in the Gator; Michigan (-8) over Colorado State in the Holiday; East Carolina (+7 1/2) over Illinois in the Liberty and Washington State (-5) over Baylor in the Alamo. 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PAGE 19

LIFESTYLES Page B2 Henderson Home News • Boulder City News Thursday, December 22, 1994 Take three of your best friends to Three Amigos Fve heard a lot of talk about Three Amigos, the Mexican restaurant located at 6250 Mountain Vista Street, near Sunset Road, in Henderson. With my wife Julie, daughter Marcie, 8, and son Matthew, 5, we went for dinner along with my father-in-law, Bemie. Seeking some good Mexican food, we were all eager to try out this place, which recently underwent an expansion. We were greeted with a bowl of some great chips and salsa. These chips, thidier than most, had the crispiness of those wide Chinese Trees mark victims STOP DUI held a memorial tree planting on Dec. 17 in Sunset Park in remembrance of the innocent victims of DUI. The trees will not only serve as a memorial, but as a reminder to the public not to drink and drive," says Sandy Heverly, executive direction of the organization. Each tree carried a plaque with the name of a DUI victim. Attending the dedication were DUI victims, law enforcement, dignitaries and representatives from Sprint Cellular, the Clark County Parks and Recreation and Plant World Nursery. "We are extremely grateful to everyone who has participated in .the plaoniDg of the very important dedicAtion," gayi Heverly. LET'S EAT OUT! PHILIP GOLDSTEIN noodles. The waiter brought out three bowls of chips, and as things normally go, Matthew moved one bowl in front ofhimself and Marcie moved the second bowl for herself—leaving bowl number three to be shared by my wife, her dad, and me! Something just wasn't right here. Fortunately, our parenting sense kicked in. "Don'teat too many or you won't have room for your dinner!" That was all we needed to say. The adults reclaimed the three bowls of chips and we munched away while our two youngsters scowled! Who says parenting doesn't have its privileges? Anyway, we found many things to choose from on the Three Amigos' abundant menu. Children's plates, ranging in price from $3.25 to $3.95, offered a choice of taco, enchilada, burrito, and "Kidadilla," all with rice and beans. Fearing that we would order too much food, Marcie and Matthew agreed to share aburrito. We did the right things because with samplings from the grownups, there was plenty for all. Appetizers, ranging in price from $4.25 to $5.50, included nachos, quesadilla, Mexican pizza and chicken wings. Entrees could be ordered ala carte or by complete dinners. Forthedifferenceofprice we foimd it well worth it to order coniplete dinners which were served with rice and beans and a choice of soup or salad. I had the meatball or "albondigas" soup, and of course, my son and daughter ended up getting most of it away from me! It was very good! Tacos, enchiladas, tamales and burritos came in combinations of all sorts, by chicken, pork, beef and even broccoli fillings. Dinners were priced from $5.95 to $6.50. I went with the enchiladas siiisa which were excellent. The enchiladas were filled with chicken and covered with a tasty green chile sauce. Julie went with the broccoli buritto which was reported to be excellent. My fatherin-law went with the chicken chimichanga and was impressed by the large amount of chicken served. All in all, our meals were very good and came in ample portions. The food was mild in seasoning and I would have like a bit more kick! However, Julie and Bemie said that it was perfect for them and they enjoyed the mild flavor. Next time wegoback,Imay simply request that the food be a little spicier! But overall, the food was very good—definitely worth a "Let's Eat Out" return! Goldstein, an attorney who lives in Henderson, wntes about his dining experiences with his wife Julie, and young children Marcie and Matthew. Living revocable trust offers many advantages Do you worry about how your assets will be handled after you're gone? Will they be distributed to your children and other beneficiaries as you wish? Will that distribution be subject to probate, unnecessary delays and highlegal expenses? Those are common worries for most people, but today there is an alternative to the common will that might help avoid most of those problems. Aliving revocable trust could help your estate avoid probate, have more privacy, and minimize estate taxes. One benefit of a living revocable trust that many people appreciate is the privacy it offers. The directionsforproperty disposition that a will specifies are open to public scrutiny when the will is probated. But assets passed on through a living revocable trust generally avoid probate and being made nart. nfthei nuhlic record. Living revocable trusts also provide protection for your investments while you are still alive. The trust agreement normally includes designating a successor trustee to manage the assets of the trust if you become ill or incapacitated, or are simply away on travel for an extended time. The designation of the successor trustee, who can be a family member or a financial professional, is made by the person establishing the trust. ^ It is important to see an attorney in order to establish a living revocable trust. Each trust is in dividually planned to meet an individual's needs and to meet the laws of the state in which it is written. An added benefit of the living revocable trust is that it can be modified or even canceled as your needs change over the years. For more information about a living revocable trust and its benefits, write for a free booklet, "Gaining Maximum Benefits from a Living Revocable Trust," from the American Institute for Cancer Research, Dept. LRT, Washingtop, DC 20069. i£^ •P'l'n BaCarmen Miranda has triumphant return Philip Goldstein Contnbuting Writer ^:'"ii', Si^'ti' ** Sliopping mail safety tips offered The Citizens Committee for Victim Rights along with local and federal law enforcement agencies and the Directors of Security for area malls wants to insure the safety of all area residents. Although this is the festive time of the year, holiday shoppers are prime targets for crime. The following tips are provided by the Citizens committee for Victim Rights with the hope that everyone will eryoy a safe holiday. •Safety begins atyour car when you enter the parking lot. Choose a visible area, or a well-lighted one if after dark. Once you park and lock your car, look for a landmark that will help you remember where you left your car. •If you have any packages or valuables, move them to the trunk, or place them under a seat. Gifts in the back seat or a visible area make your car a more tempting target. •When youleave your car, take the time to secure your wallet or purse. A wallet should be placed either in your front pocket or inside a jacket. Purses should be snugly wrapped around your arm, not dangling from your hand. •Don't carry large amounts of cash on your person. Use checks or credit cards instead. Be sure to use the same "street smarts" when using a mall ATM as well. •Upon enteringthe mall, if you are with children, immediately choose a "meeting place" if you happen to get separated. Know where the customer service desk and security office are located in case you need assistance. •If you can, makea special trip with your children to see Santa and the decor. This allows you to devote your fiill attention to them. Otherwise, try to leave small children at home. If you must bring them to the mall while you are shopping, be sure to hold a hand or use another method of restraint. •If you can't find your child, don't panic. Immediately enter a store and have them call security. Give a description of the clothing and other features and carry a recent photo. Then stay in your location so that when security finds your child, they don't have to go looking for you. •Be sure your children are aware of what you are wearing, or that they can give a description of you. Also, make sure they know that if someone approaches them who they don't know, they can yell for help. •Always be aware of your surroundings. Don't forget to watch where you are going. •Keep these ideas in mind as you shop this holiday. Being prepared will make you a safer shopper, and most likely, a happier one as well! Goldstein continues his series on local family-onented attractions. For those old enough to remember Carmen Miranda as that lady who wore a bowl of firuit or bunch of bananas on her head, and those who think that Rio Rita originated that finiit cocktail hat, a visit to the "Conga" show at the Rio Suites Hotel and Casino is a must! Along with my wife Julie, daughter Marcie and son Matthew, we decided to see "Conga." At a price of $29.95 plus tax and tip, the dinner and show were well worth the price. We noticed other children in the audience and we can easily claim tha:^ our kids enjAy^d' themselves and lasted throughout the two hour show! For thatspedal occasion, children will really feel grown up! Set in a round theater encircled by wall size projection screens, we found ourselves transported to Supper Club reminiscent of the 1930s and 1940s. The live music, song and dance numbers offered through the evening fit in nicely as dinner was served. One treat was watching the singing and dancing chefs prepare the meal on stage and on screen and then, announcing the meal ready, treat the crowd to a parade of waiters entering live with the finished meal. It was quite different and very eixjoyable. The meal itself was delicious. Having previously eiyoyed the excellentfood at the Rio buffet, we found the dinner food even better! After a very good spinach salad, we were given a choice of roasted chicken, prime rib or salmon filet for the main course. Along with steamed vegetables and potato, we all enjoyed our food. Matthew went with the chicken and had a large boned quarter of chicken. Marcie ordered the salmon and surprised us by practically finishing her meal. Julie and I each had the prime rib and that too was delicious. For dessert, with coffee, we had a strawberry napoleon, filled with fresh strawberries and whipped cream. I need not say any more— the dinner was delicious and the kids were calm and quiet as they eryoyed their supper writhout a single tumed-up nose! The show itself was al so a treat, for both us and the kids. During many Latin songs, the .li^sh landscapes of Brazil were projected on the screens. As Rio Rita herself sang some standard Carmen Miranda songs, we were treated to the original Carmen singing along on screen! I can tell you that I was very impressed how my kids were caught up and enthralled by the show! Julie and I were captivated by the overall feel of the showroom and the excitement and energy of the show and its performers. The Latin beat really energized the audience, it was also nice to be serenaded by a live band during dinner. I can be sure that my wife will be gently suggesting that we return to the Conga showroom sometime during Valentines Day—for a romantic evening without our son and daughter. Uh oh! I think my investigation proved too successful! Drinlcing and driving costs AtexmdwJ.Wah MD, FACS Like most people, you probably think that alcohol-related traffic accidents only happen to other people — not to you or your loved ones. Therefore, you may be surprised to learn that the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) estimates that approximately two out of every five Americans will be involved in an alcohol-related crash at some time in their lives. It is also estimated that 2.75 million drunk driving crashes each year victimize 1.64 million innocent people who are ii\jured or have their vehicles damaged. These are staggering revelations about a dangerous practice — drinking and driving. NHTSA defines a fatal traffic crash as being alcohol-related if either a driver or a non-occupant (for example, a pedestrian) has a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.01 grams per deciUter (g/dl) or greater in apolice-reported traffic accident According to data released by NHTSA, human losses associated with alcohol-related traffic accidents remain almost constant An estimated 17,461 persons died in 1993 in alcohol-related traffic crashes, an average of one victim every 30 minutes. This alarming number of preventable deaths accounted for 43.5 percent of the total traftic fatalities in 1993. But the human toll of drinking anddrivingdoesn't limit itself only to the passengers or drivers of cars on the highway. According to NHTSA, motorcycle operators involved in fatal crashes in 1992 had higher intoxication rates, with ablood BAC of 0. lOg/dl or greater, than any other type of motor vehicle driver. Besides these devastating losses in human terms, drunk driving has a huge impact on society in terms of financing. Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) estimates that direct costs of alcohol-related accidents are more than $46 billion yearly. The organization also notes that each year an additional $102 billion is lost because of the reduced quality of life of accident victims. Overall, MADD estimates that the cost for each ir^ured victim of an alcohol-related crash averaged $68,000 in 1993, of which $14,000 represented health care costs and lost productivity. In simpler terms, alcohol-related crashes cost society $1.09 per drink of $2.40 per ounce of alcohol consumed. Unfortunately, drinking and driving becomes more prevalent during the holiday season, when the greatest number of people become victims of this dangerous practice. Drunk driving accidents are not discriminatory. They take the U ves of many innocent people who are simply in the wrong place at the wrong time. Therefore, it is important that we all work to avoid such incidents by being responsible and using common sense. How can you help achieve this goal? Make a pledge to yourself that you will never get behind the wheel of an automobile after you have had a drink. Dr. Walt is a mennber of the department of Surgery at Harper Hospital, Detroit, Ml, and President of the Annerican College of Surgeons. For more infomnation write to: Annerican College of Surgeons, Office of Public Information, Department 394, 55 East Erie Street Chicago, IL 60611 or call the Office of Public Information at 312-6644050, extension 391. CEOs advised that employee concerns deserve top priority Amid the intense competition that characterizes business in the '90s, a sample of the nation's senior executives believe CEOs should spend more than one-third (347o) of their time building the morale and productivity of their troops. The results underscore the strategic importance now being given to staffing and employee retention issues in U.S. companies. The survey was developed by Robert Half International Inc.,the world's first and largest staffing services firm specializing in the accounting, fmance and information technology fields. It was conducted by an independent research firm, which polled 150 executives from the nation's 1,000 largest companies. Executives were asked, "What percentage of a CEO's time should be spent fostering positive employee relations?" The mean response was 34% percent "Promoting job satisfaction and > reducing employee turnover are viewed as top priorities for corporate leaders, especially in the wake of the recent recession," said Max Messmer, chairman and CEO of Robert Half International. "Professionals who waited for improved economic conditions to look for better jobs are now on the move, so it's more important than ever to foster a positive working environment—or companies may lose some of their best talent." The fact that other executives recognize the level of involvement required of CEOs is encouraging given the many issues facing management today, noted Messmer. He advises companies to extend this involvement to all senior level employees. Some tips: •Avoid pitting employees against one another in unhealthy competition, instead motivate them to work toward benefiting the department or company. •Maintain open lines of communication at all levels, thus preventing the potential for resentment. Encourage employees to look for constructive solutions for settling disputes. •Reward teamwork by recognizing the efforts of all employees who have contributed to a successful project "The job outlook is better for candidates than it has been for some time," said Lynn Gerard, Robert Half s branch manager for Las Vegas. "And with hiring activity on the rise, it's more important than ever for CEOs to pay attention to job satisfaction, retention and other employee morale issues. "When the head of a company spends time on issues critical to staff members, it makes a strong impact because everyone i s aware of how valuable and limited the executive's time is," she added. Robert Half International has more than 175officesintheUnited States, Canada and Europe. CALL 435-7700 WITH NEWS TIPS f Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News, Boulder CHy News Page B3 NFL playoff picture an interesting blur Christmas is upon us and the NFL playoff picture is interest ingly blurred. By Sunday night we'll know who's going where to play, then settle in for some excellentgames priortoapredictably dull Super Bowl.... Meanwhile, there's some movement on the baseball front. The strike could end quickly or we could be facing a 1995 season with boarded-up stadiums.... If you're still looking for a lastminute Christmas present or the traditional stocking stuffer, I recommend the book "Lords of the Realm" by John Helyar who wrote the highly acclaimed "Barbarians at the Gate." It's fascinating detail of the ri se of the Player's Association and the rugged hostility of the ovraers ("Lord s") makes for must reading. Helyar's tome is well-documented and pulls no punches. It's the type of book you won't be able to put down and, as a result, the historical presentation gives you a front seat for today's goings-on. Detailed are the arguments among owners and their stubborn resistance to any form of comproBRANDO'S TURN JIM BRANN mise. Hardships by individual players involved in what became free agency are explained as is the tug of war involved in getting strike authorization from the players. The author details innocuous behavior by many general managers and owners as well as the hard-ball efforts by some to break the player's union. Oakland A's owner Charles 0. Finley is portrayed as a man ahead of his time yet his headline grabbing actions of the 1970s take the reader deep into the mind of what many have called a maverick. The step-by-step maneuvers by Marvin Miller, first Player's Association counsel, will leave you in awe of a man who was skewered by everyone except the ones who mattered—the players. Fans are on both sides of the fence in the current dispute and they are the ones hurting most. Bitterness hangs in the air and it is as thick as marijuana smoke at SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER a rock concert. Pick up and read "Lords of the Realm." You won't be disappointed. IN THE PRGS-Eiyoyed a solid Saturday last week with Detroit and San Frandsco and added Pittsburgh on Sunday. Green Bay won but didn't cover so the 3-1 mark moved season record to 26-35-3. A guaranteed losing season is in the cards because pickingfourgames this week is no easy feat. However, will go with Los Angeles Raiders (-4) over Kansas City; Pittsburgh (+3) over San Diego; Tampa Bay (+5) over Green Bay and Arizona (-1) over Atlanta. • raE COLLEGE SCENE— This week will name selections for the nine bowl games to be played before Jan. 1. In the Aloha Bowl Kansas State (-1 1/2) the choice over Boston College; Arizona (-5) over Utah in the Freedom; Virginia (-10) over TCU in the Independence; BYU (+2) over Oklahoma in the Copper; Texas (-1) over North Carolina in the Sun; Virginia Tech (+7) over Tennessee in the Gator; Michigan (-8) over Colorado State in the Holiday; East Carolina (+7 1/2) over Illinois in the Liberty and Washington State (-5) over Baylor in the Alamo. 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Pag B4 Henderson Home News, Boulder CKy News Thursday, December 22,1994 SNBA Senior Singles Tournament registration continues to Jan. 9 SNBA SENIOR SINGLES TOURNAMENT IN PAHRUMP: The Nevada State Senior's Tournament in November was a huge success in the Mountain View Bowling Center, Pah rump. Now, the Southern Nevada Bowling Association is holdingtheirMen'sSeniorSingles ChampionshipToumamentinthe same lanes Feb. 4-5,11-12. Minimum age is 55 with four Divisions, 90% of 220 handicap, and $25 entry fee. The format will consist of bowling six games, three games each on two separate squads or one six game squad. Tournament closing date is Jan. 9, 1995. PAUL RENTERU BOWLS PERFECT GAME: Three bowlers earned awards from American Bowling Congress on the same night when competing on the 600 Scratch league at Sunset lanes. Wally Fellman and Jim Topping each left that nasty 10 pin on the last ball to be cheated out of the perfect game. Paul Renteria was right on the mark for his 12 deliveries attaining that always-sought-for 300 game. With Renteria's other games of 258 and 259, he also now holds high scratch series of 817 at Sunset lanes. Congratulations, gentlemen!! Another award was earned by Herb Smith for his recent 191 triplicate games. BREAKFAST ROLLERS EARN AWARDS: Karen Williams and Betty Estin will receive a 175 pin from Women's International Congress for their 189 and 176 respectively. Also, BarbaraWaltoneameda lOOpins over average patch with her 181 game. MUTT & JEFF LEAGUE: LINES FROivi THE LANES RUTH SOEHLKE Congratulations to Vikki Wood, Grant Nicholson, John Bertone and Mark Koehler on winning firsthalfofthe league season. Bill Francksrolleda205-462.Rebecca Heuer, a member of the league took 3rd place at the Steve Bowman Memorial Tournament on December 3. SUNDAY STREAKERS: Dennis Lucero took series 620, 659 hep, Ira Parker 234 game and Dennis Zohovetz 256 hep. game. Mary Jones 607 hep series and Debbie Hansen 230 hep game. SENIORS FOR SUN: John Dromrecki led the men with 464, 632 hep series, Frank Baea 183, 231 hep game. Barbara Lorenz took all highs for the women with 169-464,233-656 hep. FOE 2672 LEAGUE: Ike Eikum led with 227-596, Corky Roundy 217-666, Myron Setjje 216-544, 252-652 hep. Donna Carducci led the women with 241625 hep highs. BLACK DUMOND (HAVABALL) LEAGUE: Gary Sandy led with 700 hep series, Dan Branscum 277 hep game. Lori Bridges topped the women with 254-727hcpgameand series, 166463 scratch for 97 pins above her average. HENDERSON HOUSEWIVES LEAGUE: Roehelle Neige bowled 125 Pins over average with a 544 and will receive a local award and WIBC. Ruby Hawkins a 223-565 to earn awards from both the association and WIBC. Laura Kemp bowled a 205 game for a HWBA pin as well as WIBC. Pam Weiss won the pot. YOUNG AT HEART SENIORS: Al Wehr took all the Courtesy Photo FATHER AND SON TO COACH SKI TEAM—The Lee Canyon Ski Team, a junior racing program for ages 10-19, has announced their coaches f orthe upcoming season. They are Col. Jim Tilley, USAF (Ret.) and his son, James, a UNLV engineering student. Jim is certified by the U.S. Ski Coaches Association and the Professional Ski Instnjctors of America, and a Masters racer. James is a lifelong skier and a regional Junior Olympics Qualifier. The team of 15 boys and girls trains at nearby Lee Canyon Ski Area on weekends from Thanksgiving to Easter and travels to U.S. Ski Association sanctk>ned racesin Calif omia throughout the season. The best books for Santa's bag Finally, a kid's Christmas gift that doesn't need batteries — books. Shane Templeton, a children's reading expert at the University of Nevada Reno, says booksellers have really beefed up their kids' selections. The downside is the abundant choices can make a trip to the children's section overwhelming. To get the right book foryour child, Templeton suggests that you match your child's reading level Preachool to firat grade: Picture bookg are best. Look for illustrations flill of color and detail that will "draw the child in." Some messages or illustrations may be too intense for your child so pick a book you'll feel comfortable with. Rhyming books are not only fun, th^ are naturallinkto reading. Primaiy gndes (1^^) Picture books are still popular, but most kids are ready for more text Kids this age like fairy tales and fables where anfmals are the character. They also like stories with a humorous twist Intermediate grades (4^,6) Preteens like mysteries and "contemporary realism" where young characters face real-life issues. Kids with hig^ verbal skills may also enjoy fantasies. Don't be put off by the subrject matter covered in contemporary realism books, like puberty. Templeton says these books can be a wholesome way to discuss issues confronting children at this age. Your child's school librarian can pointy ou in the right direction. Don't foist your own childhood fiavorites on your kids. It's okay to pass along a few. But balance them with more recent efforts by authors in tune with today's kids. Keep in mind your child's likes and dislikes, which may be very different from yours. Pick up a guidebook like The New Read-Aloud Handbook" by Jim Trelease. It lists hundreds of book suggestions for kids from preschool throu^ middle school. men's highs with 193-501, 247663 hep. Iline Mayrose rolled 94 pins over average with 211-493, 271-673 hep. THURSDAY DOUBLES LEAGUE: Jonathan Wilson led with 691 hep series, Bobby Compton 263 hep game. Dan fiingamon had a 216 game and Bill Millman 561 series. May the beauty of this season bring joy and happiness at Christmas and all through the new year. Soehike, a Henderson resident, reports local bowling scores in her weekly column. Local holiday special to air Christmas Eve on TV-13 The spirit of Christmas, not often associated with Las Vegas, visits the entertainment capital of of the world when "Merry Christmas Las Vegas" airs Christmas Eve at 7 p.m. on KTNV TV-13. Local producer and host Tony Sacca, with his partner, Darlene Mae Sacca of All Media Promotions, presents an exciting lineup of talent from the Las Vegas entertainment community in a program of seasonal song and laughter. Highlights include a performance by the consummate singer/ entertainer, Freddie Bell; and Christmas with Cher and Elvis as seen by popular singer/comedian, Kelly Clinton. Featured also are the sophisticated vocal stylings of Sinatra impressionist Gary Corsello; the appealing choral group, the Las Vegas Young Entertainers, led by Helen Joy; and the visual and verbal comedy of celebrity puppeteer, Jerry Halliday. The spiritual aspect of the season is a touchstone of the production and comes to the fore in a soulful "Let There Be Peace on Earth from singer/spokesmodel, Zee Marie, and a stunning "0, Holy Night" performed by Debbie Keller. Musical backing for the evening is elegantly provided by the Michael T. Quartet featuring keyboardist Paul Bedia; bassist Bob Sachs; guitarist Bill Moio; and conductor and drummer, Mike Tramontane. Additional accompaniment is provided by guitarist, R.J. Fox. The show was taped live Dee. 12 at the Mt. Charleston Hotel before an enthusiastic audience of standing room only. Proceeds from the Dec. 12 performance benefit the Youth Foundation for the Performing Arts, a non-profit organization which awards grants and scholarships to students and teachers in the field of the performing arts. Christmas Day Menu The Holidays Are More Flavorful In The New West Christmas Day Menu Sunday, December 25,1994 We're unwrapping delicious tioiiday dining for you and your family in these great Sam's Town restaurants: Smokey Joe's Served 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Roast Tom Turkey with Dressing or Glazed Ham with Raspberry Sauce and all the trimmings. $6.95 Mary's Diner Served 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Roast Tom Turkey with Dressing or Glazed Ham with Raspberry Sauce and all the trimmings. $6.95 Uptown Buffet Served 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Virginia Ham, Leg of Lamb and Prime Rib on the carving station. $7.95 Billy Bob's Steak House and Saloon Served 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Roast Tom Turkey or Glazed Duck or Virginia Ham $14.95 Special Menus only from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Regular menu served in addition to special menu 5 p.m. to 11 p.m. Reservations suggested 454-8041. Diamond Ul's Brunch from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dinner from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. Roast Tom Turkey or Glazed Duck $14.95 Specials served in addition to regular menus all day. Reservations suggested 454-8009. Chuckwagon Food Court Served 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Roast Tom Turkey or Glazed Ham $4.95 Welcome To The New West. HOTEL 8c GAMBLING HALL FLAMINGO AND BOULDER HIGHWAY YOUR HEALTH Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News • Boulder City News PageBS JA ERE'S TO LIFE MARILEE JOYCE No resolutions about it — maintain your health routine When it's early December and all the holiday season activities are being planned, the furthest thing firom your mind is New Year's Day. But it's out there. And it's coming. And just like last year and the year before and the year before that, you're going to look in the mirror and pout over those 7 to 11 new pounds of fat and wonder where they came from. And you're going to once again start the day with this vow: "I resolve to diet and exercise and get back to my fighting/high school/pre-babynumber-one weight" Wait. I have another idea. How about this: This year, why don't you vow right now, in early December that you won't go crazy this year at holiday parties, that you won't have that second piece of Grandma's famous fudge, that you won't "sample" every pastry brought to the office? Why don't you make a pledge that you will remain faithful to your workout schedule and to your commitment to look for ways to lesson the stress in your life? Every year, it seems the January edition of every magazine has on their covers the latest diet, exercise plan, health tips — all aimed at Ms. and Mr. Average Human who have blown it yet again during the Holidays. It's almost as if society expects and allows us to plump every winter. As if it is, in fact, common to just let yourself go. Well, I for one don't buy into it. And ni tell you something that you may envy (and I hope you do so that you'll be encouraged to follow my lead): I don't have health related regrets on New Year's. I have been committed to fitness and good eating habits for many years, and part of that commitment means that I make a conscious effort to continue working out and eating healthy during the holiday season. That doesn't mean I don't enjoy the goodies of the season; I love to sample the forbidden foods just as much as the next person. It just means that I stay on top of what I'm doing and don't let myself go overboard. And that's what it's really all about, isn't? Balance. Let yourself enjoy the holidays. Go to the parties. But you don't need three eggnogs, okay? They are incredibly fattening! One is enough. One fudge square is enough. One slice of pumpkin pie is enough. Don't act hke some fat food guzzling alien during the holidays. Be aware of what you're putting in your body and how oflen you're meeting your exercise commitment. And join me in celebrating the New Year without a resolution to diet! Joyce, a television medical reporter, writes a column on health. G ouNSELiNG CORNER JIMfli KATHLEEN GRACE SANTOR Setting limits through assertiveness Assertiveness is the mark of a person with autonomy or a well-developed sense of self. Assertive people have learned to be honest and direct in a way that supports their own rights but also respects the rights of others. They have an aura of self-confidence without being intimidating. They do not fear rejection by others and do not strive for the approval of others. Self-approval is what counts for them. Assertive communication is characterized by honesty and directness that are delivered in a non-offensive manner. "I messages" are used oflen rather than accusatory or blaming statements such as "You never spend any time with me. All you do is work." "I messages" are direct, clear statements about what you feel, think, want, etc. "I ordered the tuna salad. You have brought the tuna sandwich instead. Could you take this back and bring the salad?... Thank you." Another example might involve feelings: "I miss you a lot when you work late so much. Could we find a way to spend more time together and still get your work done? It would mean a lot to me." "I messages are much more effective than blaming, complaining, whining or attacking. They create more interaction and generate less defensiveness in others. Assertive people can say "no" without feeling guilty or fearing disapproval. If someone asks for a favor they will be honest about whether or not they can do it. Unassertive people are usually passive or aggressive to one degree or another. Passive individuals don't usually express their feelings openly. They fear rejection and oflen feel selfish or guilty asserting themselves. Anger and resentment tend to build up in these people as they try to please everyone but themselves and feel taken advantage of Passive persons usually do too much for others, disregard their own rights and have poor boundaries. Aggressive people are usually confrontational and disregard the rights of others. They use "You messages" primarily and tend to make others angry. They oflen become alienated and disliked and may be perceived as rude. Aggressive people tend to feel misunderstood and resentfiil of others. Both passive and aggressive persons have low-.self-esteem and problems with personal boundaries. Passive people do not have good boundaries and therefore feel "walked all over." Aggressive people violate others' boundaries. Being assertive is not something that comes naturally for most of us. It is a style of communicating that can be learned. There are classes, books and audio tapes on the subject. Because most of us are taught either more passive or aggressive styles of communicating, we strongly recommend that if you want to improve in this area you seek out resources that can help you. For most people, the greatest obstacles to overcome in becoming assertive are feelings of guilt or fear of appearing selfish and fear of rejection by others. Just remember that assertiveness is not only about standing up for yourself, it is also about respecting others and communicating that respect while setting reasonable limits. Kathleen Grace Santor, M.Ed., Ed.S., and Jim Santor, M.A., M.S., licensed mamage and family therapists, wnte about family counseling. High-tech tool helps make decisions Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a high-tech tool that can help patients with painful limbs make decisions about when itfs time to return to exercise, said a Stanford Medical Center orthopedic surgeon. Dr. Donald Nagel, professor of functional restoration, said MRI can help determine if a painful iiyury to a joint has been caused by a torn Ugament or instead by a bruise that has resulted in a buildup of blood inside the bone. "The treatment strategy for a badly torn ligament is entirely different from the recommended recovery strategy for an internal bruise, but as recently as five years ago, without MRI, we could only make an educated guess about which of the two was causing the patient's problem," he said. MRI uses magnetic field s and a computerized detection system to create a picture of the internal structure of "soft" body parts or substances, including blood and tissue such as ligaments. It's uniquely suited, Nagel said, to image soft tissue and find a buildup of blood inside the bone. On the other hand, traditional Xrays photograph breaks or cracks in "hard" objects, most notably bones. He notes that eventual recovery is fastest when tomligaxnents are immobilized in a castor splint, whereas patients suffering from internal bruises or partially torn ligaments should begin using the ii^ured limb as soon as the pain goes away or becomes minimal. A cast or splint is not needed for an internal bruise and, in fact, can slow down recovery, he said. "An internal bruise is much more forgiving and able to benefit from reasonable exercise than a torn ligament, so knowing which condition you're dealing with is useful in developing a personal strategy," Nagel said. "After almost any orthtqpedic ii^ry, the best advice is for patients to take charge of their care by asking their physicians or therapists about exercise, and then take the initiative to do as much as possible to strengthen the ir\jured area. It is, of course, important to remember that pain is a warning sign. In general, don't stop exercising at the first sign of discomfort, but do stop when pain becomes noticeable, particularly if it increases," he said. How the doctor sees you. How you see the doctor. Free Physician Referral if you're new in town, or never got around to selecting your own personal physician, here's a referral line to help you with that important decision. Perhaps you need a choice of physicians to match your health insurance. Whatever your need, Sunnse Medical KeflTral can help you with the largest physician referral network in Nevada. Sunrise Medical Referral can save you the extra expense of doctors appointments outside your health plan. Free Health Information Line There's nothing hke it anywhere in the state. Our Health Infomiation Line covers every topic you can imagine. Over 8(K) subjects in all, and all the infomiation is fi-ee. Just the touch of a few buttons on your telephone and you can get answers fa.st. So give us a call at 731-8888. You've got nothing to loose and everything to gain, especially your good health. It's all free, from the hospital that "sets the standard everyday." To get our tree Health Infonnation Line directory, which lists the four-digit codes to access all 8(H) topics, drop by the infonnation desk at Sunrise Hospital. Sunrise Medical Referral: 731-8888 3186 South Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, Nevada 89109

PAGE 21

Pag B4 Henderson Home News, Boulder CKy News Thursday, December 22,1994 SNBA Senior Singles Tournament registration continues to Jan. 9 SNBA SENIOR SINGLES TOURNAMENT IN PAHRUMP: The Nevada State Senior's Tournament in November was a huge success in the Mountain View Bowling Center, Pah rump. Now, the Southern Nevada Bowling Association is holdingtheirMen'sSeniorSingles ChampionshipToumamentinthe same lanes Feb. 4-5,11-12. Minimum age is 55 with four Divisions, 90% of 220 handicap, and $25 entry fee. The format will consist of bowling six games, three games each on two separate squads or one six game squad. Tournament closing date is Jan. 9, 1995. PAUL RENTERU BOWLS PERFECT GAME: Three bowlers earned awards from American Bowling Congress on the same night when competing on the 600 Scratch league at Sunset lanes. Wally Fellman and Jim Topping each left that nasty 10 pin on the last ball to be cheated out of the perfect game. Paul Renteria was right on the mark for his 12 deliveries attaining that always-sought-for 300 game. With Renteria's other games of 258 and 259, he also now holds high scratch series of 817 at Sunset lanes. Congratulations, gentlemen!! Another award was earned by Herb Smith for his recent 191 triplicate games. BREAKFAST ROLLERS EARN AWARDS: Karen Williams and Betty Estin will receive a 175 pin from Women's International Congress for their 189 and 176 respectively. Also, BarbaraWaltoneameda lOOpins over average patch with her 181 game. MUTT & JEFF LEAGUE: LINES FROivi THE LANES RUTH SOEHLKE Congratulations to Vikki Wood, Grant Nicholson, John Bertone and Mark Koehler on winning firsthalfofthe league season. Bill Francksrolleda205-462.Rebecca Heuer, a member of the league took 3rd place at the Steve Bowman Memorial Tournament on December 3. SUNDAY STREAKERS: Dennis Lucero took series 620, 659 hep, Ira Parker 234 game and Dennis Zohovetz 256 hep. game. Mary Jones 607 hep series and Debbie Hansen 230 hep game. SENIORS FOR SUN: John Dromrecki led the men with 464, 632 hep series, Frank Baea 183, 231 hep game. Barbara Lorenz took all highs for the women with 169-464,233-656 hep. FOE 2672 LEAGUE: Ike Eikum led with 227-596, Corky Roundy 217-666, Myron Setjje 216-544, 252-652 hep. Donna Carducci led the women with 241625 hep highs. BLACK DUMOND (HAVABALL) LEAGUE: Gary Sandy led with 700 hep series, Dan Branscum 277 hep game. Lori Bridges topped the women with 254-727hcpgameand series, 166463 scratch for 97 pins above her average. HENDERSON HOUSEWIVES LEAGUE: Roehelle Neige bowled 125 Pins over average with a 544 and will receive a local award and WIBC. Ruby Hawkins a 223-565 to earn awards from both the association and WIBC. Laura Kemp bowled a 205 game for a HWBA pin as well as WIBC. Pam Weiss won the pot. YOUNG AT HEART SENIORS: Al Wehr took all the Courtesy Photo FATHER AND SON TO COACH SKI TEAM—The Lee Canyon Ski Team, a junior racing program for ages 10-19, has announced their coaches f orthe upcoming season. They are Col. Jim Tilley, USAF (Ret.) and his son, James, a UNLV engineering student. Jim is certified by the U.S. Ski Coaches Association and the Professional Ski Instnjctors of America, and a Masters racer. James is a lifelong skier and a regional Junior Olympics Qualifier. The team of 15 boys and girls trains at nearby Lee Canyon Ski Area on weekends from Thanksgiving to Easter and travels to U.S. Ski Association sanctk>ned racesin Calif omia throughout the season. The best books for Santa's bag Finally, a kid's Christmas gift that doesn't need batteries — books. Shane Templeton, a children's reading expert at the University of Nevada Reno, says booksellers have really beefed up their kids' selections. The downside is the abundant choices can make a trip to the children's section overwhelming. To get the right book foryour child, Templeton suggests that you match your child's reading level Preachool to firat grade: Picture bookg are best. Look for illustrations flill of color and detail that will "draw the child in." Some messages or illustrations may be too intense for your child so pick a book you'll feel comfortable with. Rhyming books are not only fun, th^ are naturallinkto reading. Primaiy gndes (1^^) Picture books are still popular, but most kids are ready for more text Kids this age like fairy tales and fables where anfmals are the character. They also like stories with a humorous twist Intermediate grades (4^,6) Preteens like mysteries and "contemporary realism" where young characters face real-life issues. Kids with hig^ verbal skills may also enjoy fantasies. Don't be put off by the subrject matter covered in contemporary realism books, like puberty. Templeton says these books can be a wholesome way to discuss issues confronting children at this age. Your child's school librarian can pointy ou in the right direction. Don't foist your own childhood fiavorites on your kids. It's okay to pass along a few. But balance them with more recent efforts by authors in tune with today's kids. Keep in mind your child's likes and dislikes, which may be very different from yours. Pick up a guidebook like The New Read-Aloud Handbook" by Jim Trelease. It lists hundreds of book suggestions for kids from preschool throu^ middle school. men's highs with 193-501, 247663 hep. Iline Mayrose rolled 94 pins over average with 211-493, 271-673 hep. THURSDAY DOUBLES LEAGUE: Jonathan Wilson led with 691 hep series, Bobby Compton 263 hep game. Dan fiingamon had a 216 game and Bill Millman 561 series. May the beauty of this season bring joy and happiness at Christmas and all through the new year. Soehike, a Henderson resident, reports local bowling scores in her weekly column. Local holiday special to air Christmas Eve on TV-13 The spirit of Christmas, not often associated with Las Vegas, visits the entertainment capital of of the world when "Merry Christmas Las Vegas" airs Christmas Eve at 7 p.m. on KTNV TV-13. Local producer and host Tony Sacca, with his partner, Darlene Mae Sacca of All Media Promotions, presents an exciting lineup of talent from the Las Vegas entertainment community in a program of seasonal song and laughter. Highlights include a performance by the consummate singer/ entertainer, Freddie Bell; and Christmas with Cher and Elvis as seen by popular singer/comedian, Kelly Clinton. Featured also are the sophisticated vocal stylings of Sinatra impressionist Gary Corsello; the appealing choral group, the Las Vegas Young Entertainers, led by Helen Joy; and the visual and verbal comedy of celebrity puppeteer, Jerry Halliday. The spiritual aspect of the season is a touchstone of the production and comes to the fore in a soulful "Let There Be Peace on Earth from singer/spokesmodel, Zee Marie, and a stunning "0, Holy Night" performed by Debbie Keller. Musical backing for the evening is elegantly provided by the Michael T. Quartet featuring keyboardist Paul Bedia; bassist Bob Sachs; guitarist Bill Moio; and conductor and drummer, Mike Tramontane. Additional accompaniment is provided by guitarist, R.J. Fox. The show was taped live Dee. 12 at the Mt. Charleston Hotel before an enthusiastic audience of standing room only. Proceeds from the Dec. 12 performance benefit the Youth Foundation for the Performing Arts, a non-profit organization which awards grants and scholarships to students and teachers in the field of the performing arts. Christmas Day Menu The Holidays Are More Flavorful In The New West Christmas Day Menu Sunday, December 25,1994 We're unwrapping delicious tioiiday dining for you and your family in these great Sam's Town restaurants: Smokey Joe's Served 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Roast Tom Turkey with Dressing or Glazed Ham with Raspberry Sauce and all the trimmings. $6.95 Mary's Diner Served 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Roast Tom Turkey with Dressing or Glazed Ham with Raspberry Sauce and all the trimmings. $6.95 Uptown Buffet Served 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Virginia Ham, Leg of Lamb and Prime Rib on the carving station. $7.95 Billy Bob's Steak House and Saloon Served 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Roast Tom Turkey or Glazed Duck or Virginia Ham $14.95 Special Menus only from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Regular menu served in addition to special menu 5 p.m. to 11 p.m. Reservations suggested 454-8041. Diamond Ul's Brunch from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dinner from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. Roast Tom Turkey or Glazed Duck $14.95 Specials served in addition to regular menus all day. Reservations suggested 454-8009. Chuckwagon Food Court Served 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Roast Tom Turkey or Glazed Ham $4.95 Welcome To The New West. HOTEL 8c GAMBLING HALL FLAMINGO AND BOULDER HIGHWAY YOUR HEALTH Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News • Boulder City News PageBS JA ERE'S TO LIFE MARILEE JOYCE No resolutions about it — maintain your health routine When it's early December and all the holiday season activities are being planned, the furthest thing firom your mind is New Year's Day. But it's out there. And it's coming. And just like last year and the year before and the year before that, you're going to look in the mirror and pout over those 7 to 11 new pounds of fat and wonder where they came from. And you're going to once again start the day with this vow: "I resolve to diet and exercise and get back to my fighting/high school/pre-babynumber-one weight" Wait. I have another idea. How about this: This year, why don't you vow right now, in early December that you won't go crazy this year at holiday parties, that you won't have that second piece of Grandma's famous fudge, that you won't "sample" every pastry brought to the office? Why don't you make a pledge that you will remain faithful to your workout schedule and to your commitment to look for ways to lesson the stress in your life? Every year, it seems the January edition of every magazine has on their covers the latest diet, exercise plan, health tips — all aimed at Ms. and Mr. Average Human who have blown it yet again during the Holidays. It's almost as if society expects and allows us to plump every winter. As if it is, in fact, common to just let yourself go. Well, I for one don't buy into it. And ni tell you something that you may envy (and I hope you do so that you'll be encouraged to follow my lead): I don't have health related regrets on New Year's. I have been committed to fitness and good eating habits for many years, and part of that commitment means that I make a conscious effort to continue working out and eating healthy during the holiday season. That doesn't mean I don't enjoy the goodies of the season; I love to sample the forbidden foods just as much as the next person. It just means that I stay on top of what I'm doing and don't let myself go overboard. And that's what it's really all about, isn't? Balance. Let yourself enjoy the holidays. Go to the parties. But you don't need three eggnogs, okay? They are incredibly fattening! One is enough. One fudge square is enough. One slice of pumpkin pie is enough. Don't act hke some fat food guzzling alien during the holidays. Be aware of what you're putting in your body and how oflen you're meeting your exercise commitment. And join me in celebrating the New Year without a resolution to diet! Joyce, a television medical reporter, writes a column on health. G ouNSELiNG CORNER JIMfli KATHLEEN GRACE SANTOR Setting limits through assertiveness Assertiveness is the mark of a person with autonomy or a well-developed sense of self. Assertive people have learned to be honest and direct in a way that supports their own rights but also respects the rights of others. They have an aura of self-confidence without being intimidating. They do not fear rejection by others and do not strive for the approval of others. Self-approval is what counts for them. Assertive communication is characterized by honesty and directness that are delivered in a non-offensive manner. "I messages" are used oflen rather than accusatory or blaming statements such as "You never spend any time with me. All you do is work." "I messages" are direct, clear statements about what you feel, think, want, etc. "I ordered the tuna salad. You have brought the tuna sandwich instead. Could you take this back and bring the salad?... Thank you." Another example might involve feelings: "I miss you a lot when you work late so much. Could we find a way to spend more time together and still get your work done? It would mean a lot to me." "I messages are much more effective than blaming, complaining, whining or attacking. They create more interaction and generate less defensiveness in others. Assertive people can say "no" without feeling guilty or fearing disapproval. If someone asks for a favor they will be honest about whether or not they can do it. Unassertive people are usually passive or aggressive to one degree or another. Passive individuals don't usually express their feelings openly. They fear rejection and oflen feel selfish or guilty asserting themselves. Anger and resentment tend to build up in these people as they try to please everyone but themselves and feel taken advantage of Passive persons usually do too much for others, disregard their own rights and have poor boundaries. Aggressive people are usually confrontational and disregard the rights of others. They use "You messages" primarily and tend to make others angry. They oflen become alienated and disliked and may be perceived as rude. Aggressive people tend to feel misunderstood and resentfiil of others. Both passive and aggressive persons have low-.self-esteem and problems with personal boundaries. Passive people do not have good boundaries and therefore feel "walked all over." Aggressive people violate others' boundaries. Being assertive is not something that comes naturally for most of us. It is a style of communicating that can be learned. There are classes, books and audio tapes on the subject. Because most of us are taught either more passive or aggressive styles of communicating, we strongly recommend that if you want to improve in this area you seek out resources that can help you. For most people, the greatest obstacles to overcome in becoming assertive are feelings of guilt or fear of appearing selfish and fear of rejection by others. Just remember that assertiveness is not only about standing up for yourself, it is also about respecting others and communicating that respect while setting reasonable limits. Kathleen Grace Santor, M.Ed., Ed.S., and Jim Santor, M.A., M.S., licensed mamage and family therapists, wnte about family counseling. High-tech tool helps make decisions Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a high-tech tool that can help patients with painful limbs make decisions about when itfs time to return to exercise, said a Stanford Medical Center orthopedic surgeon. Dr. Donald Nagel, professor of functional restoration, said MRI can help determine if a painful iiyury to a joint has been caused by a torn Ugament or instead by a bruise that has resulted in a buildup of blood inside the bone. "The treatment strategy for a badly torn ligament is entirely different from the recommended recovery strategy for an internal bruise, but as recently as five years ago, without MRI, we could only make an educated guess about which of the two was causing the patient's problem," he said. MRI uses magnetic field s and a computerized detection system to create a picture of the internal structure of "soft" body parts or substances, including blood and tissue such as ligaments. It's uniquely suited, Nagel said, to image soft tissue and find a buildup of blood inside the bone. On the other hand, traditional Xrays photograph breaks or cracks in "hard" objects, most notably bones. He notes that eventual recovery is fastest when tomligaxnents are immobilized in a castor splint, whereas patients suffering from internal bruises or partially torn ligaments should begin using the ii^ured limb as soon as the pain goes away or becomes minimal. A cast or splint is not needed for an internal bruise and, in fact, can slow down recovery, he said. "An internal bruise is much more forgiving and able to benefit from reasonable exercise than a torn ligament, so knowing which condition you're dealing with is useful in developing a personal strategy," Nagel said. "After almost any orthtqpedic ii^ry, the best advice is for patients to take charge of their care by asking their physicians or therapists about exercise, and then take the initiative to do as much as possible to strengthen the ir\jured area. It is, of course, important to remember that pain is a warning sign. In general, don't stop exercising at the first sign of discomfort, but do stop when pain becomes noticeable, particularly if it increases," he said. How the doctor sees you. How you see the doctor. Free Physician Referral if you're new in town, or never got around to selecting your own personal physician, here's a referral line to help you with that important decision. Perhaps you need a choice of physicians to match your health insurance. Whatever your need, Sunnse Medical KeflTral can help you with the largest physician referral network in Nevada. Sunrise Medical Referral can save you the extra expense of doctors appointments outside your health plan. Free Health Information Line There's nothing hke it anywhere in the state. Our Health Infomiation Line covers every topic you can imagine. Over 8(K) subjects in all, and all the infomiation is fi-ee. Just the touch of a few buttons on your telephone and you can get answers fa.st. So give us a call at 731-8888. You've got nothing to loose and everything to gain, especially your good health. It's all free, from the hospital that "sets the standard everyday." To get our tree Health Infonnation Line directory, which lists the four-digit codes to access all 8(H) topics, drop by the infonnation desk at Sunrise Hospital. Sunrise Medical Referral: 731-8888 3186 South Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, Nevada 89109

PAGE 22

Page B6 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, December 22,1994 Temple of Justice: White Pine County Courthouse in Ely THIS WAS NEVADA PHILLIP I. EARL Temples of Justice: County Courthouses in Nevada," by Ronald L. James of the Nevada State Historic Preservation Office, was recently released by the University of Nevada Presss. Among the courthouses chronicled is the White Pine County courthouse in Ely—as elegant a structure as can be found anywhere in the state. Ely is White Pine County's second seat of government, succeeding Hamilton on Aug. 1, 1887. The present-day courthouse is the third in the history of the county. Hamilton's two-story brick courthouse was constructed in the fall of 1869, some six months after the creation ofWhite Pine County, and was destroyed by fire on Jan. 5, 1885. The mines in that area had begun to decline several years earlier and voters in other communities were anxious to snatch away the seat of government. The Ely spokesmen for Ely prevailed, however, and Gov.The transferbecame official on Aug. 1. Charles C. Stevenson signed a legislative actremovingthecounty seat to Ely on Jan. 28,1887. The courthouse park and fountain. Ely. Nevada Surveyors laid out a new secon the courthouse site was dotion of Ely in April 1887 and architectural plans drawn up by Morrill John Curtis for a one-story wooden courthouse were accepted three months later. On Sept. 18, a construction contract was awarded to Jacob C. Moon. James Osterguard was appointed construction superintendent and work began. In October 1888, land for a park nated to the county by George D. Harter and his wife. Over the next 20 years, several landscape gardeners coaxed grass and trees to grow in the seven-acre parcel where only boulders and sagebrush had adorned the landscape. Described as "a good substantial structure, sufficient for the wants of the county for many years to come" and "the cheapest building of the kind ever constructed in this state," the second courthouse served county government needs until the copper boom began shortly after the turn of the century. Plans drawn up for a new building by architect and construction superintendent George T. Beardslee in 1908 called for a neo-classical structure with Italianate elements. A contract for $49,699 was awarded to RE. Dodson and G. W. Weller and the county accepted the building on August 16,1909. As the structure was going up, county officials conceived the idea of crowning the courthouse with a copper dome and put up an additional $3,384 to fund it. At the time of construction, the county was only beginning to recover from a serious national financial panic and county officials had difficulty in selling their bonds. A few farseeing citizens came forward, however, urged on by the fear thatthe citizens of the new town of Ely City — today's East Ely — might fund the venture and get the courthouse. The bonds were finally retired in February 1924, the backers expressing their entire satisfaction with their investment. In April 1910, county officials hired Louis Manguine to design andplan the landscapingand turn the area into a park. He planted additional trees and shrubs and planned the small lake and fountain which give such a distinctive appearance to the courthouse grounds. Several swans were later acquired and the lake became home to other waterfowl species. The copper dome later acquired a greenish patina and had to be cleaned and polished periodically. During the summer of 1948, a crew from the local jail cleaned it once again, finishing the task by applying a coat of shellac which has kept it gleaming since that time. Readers interested in acquiring the book for their own collection can call the Nevada Historical Society book shop, (702)688-1191, or the University ofNevada Press at (702)784-5673). Earl IS curator of the Nevada Historical Society in Reno. Call St. Jude's to check fund raising Concerned supporters have recently called St. Jude's Ranch for Children to ask about fund raisers and telephone solicitations for the ranch. St. Jude's said that very few of theorganizationscalledaboutare checking to verify that they are operating within the ranch's guidelines "It's a shame," said Karen Stevens, special projects coordinator for St. Jude's. "We'd like to be able to endorse adtivities sponsored by legitimate organizations on our behalf as well as to discourage unscrupulous groups or persons from using our name. "What we have found lately, is that we have become a magnet for telemarketers who use our name to take advantage of the generosity ofthe people of Southern Nevada." Many would-be benefactors are oflen left feeling angry and suspicious when they discover ranch staff do not have knowledge of a pfiHi<^il|r evit, Kh&.added, "When organizations put on fund raisers in our name, but don't let us know about them, we don't have any information to give people who call us for details. It makes us, as well as those sponsoring the event, look like no one knows what's going on. "It creates a bad feeling in people who would like to support charitable organizations, but don't know which organizations are trustworthy," Stevens said. Trout design picked for stamp Michigan artist Larry Tucci's design has been selected for Nevada's 10th annual State Trout Stamp Art Contest sponsored this year by the Nevada Wildlife Federation. The 30-year-old artist, who took top honors with a painting of a Lahontan cutthroat trout, placed fourth with his first entry last year. "My first art contest win came a few months ago in the Northwest Steelheaders Association's Patron Print Art Contest, but Nevada is the first m^or state contest that I have won." Tucci, a commercial artist who hopes to turn to wildlife art fulltime in the fiiture, is a graduate of the Center for Creative Studies, an art school in Detroit, Mich. "Art i s a big part of my life," he says, "but my biggest concern is conservation and taking care of our natural resources, so I tend to gear all of my art toward wildlife. 'To be able to do some kind of work that financially benefits or at least raises awareness of wildlife conservation is just a great Call home for free opportunity for me." His painting will be depicted in full color on the 1995 State Trout Stamp. Although there is no financial prize, the artist retains full reproduction rights, and limited edition reprints are produced and sold for approximately $140 each year. The artist also donates 50 special Conservation Edition prints that are auctioned at various wildlife clubs and organizations fund raising banquets each year throughout the state. Tucci's painting will also be printed on the cover ofthe state's 1995-96 fishing seasons and regulations booklet available in early February 1995. The stamp, which is required of everyone 12 years of age and older who fish for or possess trout, will also be available in February. A portion ofthe proceeds from the sale of the stamps is used to pay for the Division's newest fish hatchery in the Mason Valley Wildlife Management Area near Yerington. She recommends that groups or persons interested in helping St. Jude's call Jim Knox, public relations coordinator, 293-3131, or stop by to pick up an event application. "We really appreciate all that's done on our behalf within the community. If it weren't for the support ofthe people of Southern Nevada, we wouldn't be here. The fact is, we can't sanction any fund raisers using our i.ame, without knowing who is raising the funds, by what methods, and for what purpose," Stevens added. "It's extremely important for people to know that we never solicit donations by phone. If someone calls asking for money, or to buy tickets to an event to support St. Jude's, please call the Ranch to verify the event before making any donations," she said. St. Jude's Ranch for Children is a home for abandoned, abused and troubled children. Ithasbeen located in Boulder City since 1966. today CRC Corporation, a locally owned and operated long distance company, is opening their doors and their hearts to the community from 12 noon to 6 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 22. CRC is inviting everyone to call home for the holidays. The public is invited to their office to place a free long-distance call, to anywhere in the United States. Admittance is one can of food or unwrapped toy that will be donated to Goodwill Industries for distribution within the community. CRC's offices are located at4275 E. Sahara Avenue, Suite 6, Las Vegas, NV 89104. For additional information, contact Richelle Shaw, 641-5177. DOWNTOWN'S FOOTBAU PARTY • MONDAYS AT THE KING'S PAVIUION • so ft Draft Beer • S1 \A/ell DrinkB • S1 Hot Oogs • Prize Giveaways Kick off your week with the four Queens and Miller Lite as they t^ost a night of great NFL action in the King's Pavillion Enjoy the games on three big screens, including our giant 10 toot by 10 toot TV. Our fabulous Four Queens and the Miller Lite Girls will be on hand each Monday night to host the lootball party with tood and drink specials and prize giveaways You can add to the action by betting on your favorite teams at our Sports Book No one knows how to throw a party like the Four Queens, so |Oin them every Monday at 5 pm Try it once and you'll be a Ian For information call (702) 385-4011 or (800) 634-6045 Ute Four Queens 4565 E. Sunset Road NEW YEAR'S EVE PARTY Champagne Buffet ) • Party hats • Noise Makers • Color Pin Shots SAT. DEC. 31 9:00 P.M. 325.00 per bowler 315.00 non bowler 4 hours of bowling Child C.-iro ProvirtPd Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Page B7 •ColorTV • Mountain Bike "Xt!!'^ AM/FM Radio plus More Surprises Call Lois or Eileen 736-2695 Advanced Paid Reservations Due by Dec. 25th ^(E New Year's i Celebration Abocird the Desert Princess Ring in 1995 aboard the Desert Princess witti Party Favors, Music and Dancing featuring the GOLDYNS. ^ Spin to 12:30ain ^^ Celebrate Twice • First in Arizona and then in Nevada, if Mai^e Your Reservations Today! "^ 293-6180 RESERVATIONS REQUIRED l.akc McatI Cruises is an Authorized Concessionaire of the National Park Service. • MA HBC Publications joins the Clark County School District's Math/Science Institute to reach America 2000 goals Henderson Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News fLM'i 3000 First In The World In Mathematics By The Year 2000 Areas and Perimeters By Bill Hanlon An AREA of a polygon tells you how many squares ( • 's) will fit inside a 2-dimensional figure. For our purposes, a polygon is any closed figure made up of straight lines EXAMPLES Angel Tree project delivers present to kids at Child Haven D All those are polygons. Often they have other names that are more specific, such as triangle, square, rectangle, pentagon, and hexagon If we were to look at a rectangle with dimensions 4 units by 2 units, we might find ways of determining how many squares will fit inside. By dividing the inside into equal squares, we can count eight squares. In mathematics, we call that eight square units because we are counting squares. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 If we divide a number of different rectangles in this same way, eventually we would see a pattern. Rather than drawing the rectangle, all you do is multiply the dimensions. Since there are two dimensions, we give them names; LENGTH and WIDTH. We now have our first formula. The AREA of a RECTANGLE is LENGTH times WIDTH. Symbolically, A=LW. Now, if I take any rectangle, as shown below, and cut it along the dotted line and move the cut piece to the other side of the rectangle, I get what looks like a pushed-over rectangle. A / We could have easily found the area of the original rectangle by using the formula A=LW. But how do we find the area of the pushed over rectangle? If we think about it, we did not remove any area, we just re-arranged it. So the area of the pushed-over rectangle should be the same as the original rectangle. Saying "pushed-over" rectangle is too cumbersome, let's give that specific looking figure a name— PARALLELOGRAM. Great choice, right? If I look at a parallelogram, how do I determine the area? Well, I could cut it out along the dotted line as shown below and make a rectangle, then use the formula A=LW. S/ b b Again, if I do enough of these, I will eventually see a pattern develop that will allow me not to have to do cut-outs. Let's call the bottom b, the sides s, and the height h. Again, looking at the picture, what would we multiply to get the area? The bottom times the height. In math, we call the bottom the BASE, the side the SLANT HEIGHT, and the height stays the height the shortest distance from top to bottom. Now we have a formula or shortcut that allows us to find the area of a PARALLELOGRAM without doing cut-outs: A=bh. This will tell you how many squares fit inside that parallelogram. Don't you love this? Are you hoping for more relationships to find areas of different polygons (shapes)? That's getting into the spirit of math—looking for discoveries through patterns. If we look at a parallelogram and cut it in half as shown, we get two new shapes. We'll call them TRIANGLES. Wouldn't it be dandy to find the area of a triangle? Yes, you say. Notice that a tnangle is half a parallelogram. If the area of a parallelogram is bh, then shouldn't the area of a triangle be one half of bh or the area divided by 2? Remember, when finding the area, you are trying to find out how many squares fit inside. We use the expression "square units" to describe area. We can find the area of others by looking for more patterns. The PERIMETER of a polygon is the sum of all the lengths of the sides forming it. To find a perimeter, add ALL sides. But a circle has no sides. It is not a polygon because it is not made up of straight lines, so we cannot find a perimeter. We make a new name for the aistance around a circle and call it the CIRCUMFERENCE. The areas we have found are for RECTANGLE, PARALLELOGRAM, AND TRIANGLE. A= Iw A = bh 2 Bill Hanlon is the Math/Science Institute Coordinator for the Clark County School District and a part-time math instructor at UNLV 1993 HBC Publications. Inc. 1994 MSAA funds bee venom study This holiday season the employees at Raytheon Services Nevada decided to do something special for the children at Child Haven. The "Angel Tree" program provided gifts to approximately 76 children temporarily housed at Child Haven. Child Haven is a division of !he Clark County Juvenile Court Services in Nevada that provides temporary care and treatment for abused, neglected, and abandoned children. Through no faultof their own, many children are placed in protective custody at Child Haven each month. The program, a first for Raytheon, was a success. Paper angels with the children's names were hung on a tree in the lobby of the Raytheon facility. Employees chose angels and bought presents for the children. Raytheon Services Nevada is a prime contractor in Nevada and thepaciiictotheU.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office. It is a $9 billion diversified technology company with four business segments: electronics, aircraft products, energy and environmental; and major appliances. Headquartered in Lexington, Mass., Raytheon employs 59,000people worldwide. Recyclers help needy children to see Six-year-old Mayra is looking at the world through new eyes now. Fuzzy shapes on the blackboard are clear to her at last thanks to New Eyes for the Needy, Inc., a unique recycling organization in Short Hills, N.J. "Children who can see, can read, can stay in school, can go on to get jobs," said New Eyes president Joan Daeschler, "and we are asking people to help us help the thousands of children who, like Mayra, cannot afford eyeglasses." Since 1932, New Eyes for the Nee<^y has helped more than 4 million people both in the United States and overseas through a unique recycling program. Individuals and organizations donate reusable eyeglasses and precious metal scrap such as old watches, jewelry and silver pieces, and dental gold. Metal scrap is sold to a refiner and the jewelry is sold in the New THE NEWS IS YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER Eyes gift shop. Funds from these sales pay for new prescription glasses for needy Americans of all ages. Plastic framed glasses are sorted and classified by some 200 community volunteers and sent to homeless American veterans and medical missions and hospitals in 25 countries as far as Ukraine, India, Zaire and Brazil. Send tax-deductible recyclables to New Eyes for the Needy, Inc. Room A, 549 Millbum Ave., Short Hills, N.J. 07078, or call (201)3764903 to order posters and brochures to conducta community collection drive. All cash donations are used to purchase eyeglasses for needy Americans. The Multiple Sclerosis Association of America has announced plans to become the first organization in the country to fund a clinical study on the effects of bee venom therapy and MS. Earlier this year, the MS Association funded noted immunologist Dr. John Santilli with a $25,000 grant to manufacture bee venom extract. The venom extract is currently in production and awaits review by the Food and Drug Administration. Upon FDA clearance, MSAA will fund and additional $40,000 to principal investigators Dr. Santilli, Dr. John Richert of Georgetown University and Dr. Jay Rosenberg of Kaiser Hospital in San Diego for a six month Phase I study. The Phase I study will test the venom extract for safety on chronic progressive MS patients and determine the appropriate dose for future clinical trials. Multiple sclerosis is a crippling disorder of the central nervous system, affecting over 300,000 Americans. During an MS attack, the loss ofthe myelin (insulation) coating. When myelin is damaged, nerve signal transmission ntay be slowed or blocked, leading to symptoms such as blindness, fatigue or paralysis. Overthepastfewyears, reports in the national media have suggested that bee venom may be an effective treatment for those with multiple sclerosis. It is now estimated that between 5,000 to 10,000 MS patients are stinging themselves with honey bees in order to test claims of symptom relief "It's an unbelievable movement throughout the MS community with little to no scientific evidence," saidMSAAPresidentJohn Hodson. "Rather than risk a let's waitand see approach, we realized that this is a dangerous situation which needs to be carefully and scientifically studied. We're proud to be the first organization in the country to work with the FDA in developing a method of studying this unusual treatment option for those with MS." In addition to bee venom therapy, MSAA's patient care programs include counseling, support groups, the free loan of therapeutic equipment, barrierfreehousing, microclimate cooling from NASA technology, newsletter and referral assistance. The MS Association of America is an independent organization and is not affiliated with the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. For more information, call the MSAA 800-833-4672. PARTY WITH US 8p..ia.f^ Evening of entsrtainment. Dance to the sounds of ^^^ "Knew Country Bantd" Free Champagne Party Favors DINNER SERVED sp^toiop. Enjoy Our Special Gourmet Dinner Buffet in our Bingo Roonn featuring Roast New York Steak with Bernaise Sauce Shrimp Scampi, Chicken Kiev, Stuffed Pork Chops S. much, much more ^9.95 Tickets Going Fast TICKETS ON SALE AT MOTEL FRONT DESK 8 CASHIERS CAGE 3 Miles West of Hoovei Dam on U.S. 93 • (702) 293-5000 Sundance Chiropractic opens Sundance Family Chiropractic Centre recently opened at 1631E. Sunset Road, Suite 104, Las Vegas, according to owners Dr. P.J. and Brenda T. Dyer. Dyer, a chiropractor with many years experience in family chiropractic health care, said "Sundance Family Chiropractic Centre emphasizes maintainance, as well as corrective spinal care." "Our office," he said, "utilizes full spinal examination, analysis and adjusting in coixjunction with Chiro-Jet, the Back Man Power Massage...the greatest water therapy availablewithoutgetting wet." For a complimentary consultation to evaluate health care needs, call 896-7570 for an appointment. FinJing your next uiictor can no thai easy ii you call tne Pnysician RciL-rral FVogram at St. Rose Dominican Hospital. One call can put you in touch witn one ol our 300 qualitieJ pnysicians, representing a wide variety oi specialties. Dial 5(>4-45('8, Monday tnrougn Friday from 8 am until 4:30 pm and a nurse will answer your call, determine your needs and rcier you to a pnysician wno s just riglit iiir you. Our PKysician Referral Nurse understands tke importance of a strong dcKtor/patienl rclationsliip. Slie can tell you things aknit a doctor that friends and family can't; lite insurance plans and special training. Regardless of the doctor you cnixise it s nice to know you are liidied to the progressive services and protessiorudg who understand the healing power of compassion. St. Rose Dominican HOSPITAL \v\ logy mends. Compassion 564-4508 heals. ISMMMIiMMMMMMi

PAGE 23

Page B6 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, December 22,1994 Temple of Justice: White Pine County Courthouse in Ely THIS WAS NEVADA PHILLIP I. EARL Temples of Justice: County Courthouses in Nevada," by Ronald L. James of the Nevada State Historic Preservation Office, was recently released by the University of Nevada Presss. Among the courthouses chronicled is the White Pine County courthouse in Ely—as elegant a structure as can be found anywhere in the state. Ely is White Pine County's second seat of government, succeeding Hamilton on Aug. 1, 1887. The present-day courthouse is the third in the history of the county. Hamilton's two-story brick courthouse was constructed in the fall of 1869, some six months after the creation ofWhite Pine County, and was destroyed by fire on Jan. 5, 1885. The mines in that area had begun to decline several years earlier and voters in other communities were anxious to snatch away the seat of government. The Ely spokesmen for Ely prevailed, however, and Gov.The transferbecame official on Aug. 1. Charles C. Stevenson signed a legislative actremovingthecounty seat to Ely on Jan. 28,1887. The courthouse park and fountain. Ely. Nevada Surveyors laid out a new secon the courthouse site was dotion of Ely in April 1887 and architectural plans drawn up by Morrill John Curtis for a one-story wooden courthouse were accepted three months later. On Sept. 18, a construction contract was awarded to Jacob C. Moon. James Osterguard was appointed construction superintendent and work began. In October 1888, land for a park nated to the county by George D. Harter and his wife. Over the next 20 years, several landscape gardeners coaxed grass and trees to grow in the seven-acre parcel where only boulders and sagebrush had adorned the landscape. Described as "a good substantial structure, sufficient for the wants of the county for many years to come" and "the cheapest building of the kind ever constructed in this state," the second courthouse served county government needs until the copper boom began shortly after the turn of the century. Plans drawn up for a new building by architect and construction superintendent George T. Beardslee in 1908 called for a neo-classical structure with Italianate elements. A contract for $49,699 was awarded to RE. Dodson and G. W. Weller and the county accepted the building on August 16,1909. As the structure was going up, county officials conceived the idea of crowning the courthouse with a copper dome and put up an additional $3,384 to fund it. At the time of construction, the county was only beginning to recover from a serious national financial panic and county officials had difficulty in selling their bonds. A few farseeing citizens came forward, however, urged on by the fear thatthe citizens of the new town of Ely City — today's East Ely — might fund the venture and get the courthouse. The bonds were finally retired in February 1924, the backers expressing their entire satisfaction with their investment. In April 1910, county officials hired Louis Manguine to design andplan the landscapingand turn the area into a park. He planted additional trees and shrubs and planned the small lake and fountain which give such a distinctive appearance to the courthouse grounds. Several swans were later acquired and the lake became home to other waterfowl species. The copper dome later acquired a greenish patina and had to be cleaned and polished periodically. During the summer of 1948, a crew from the local jail cleaned it once again, finishing the task by applying a coat of shellac which has kept it gleaming since that time. Readers interested in acquiring the book for their own collection can call the Nevada Historical Society book shop, (702)688-1191, or the University ofNevada Press at (702)784-5673). Earl IS curator of the Nevada Historical Society in Reno. Call St. Jude's to check fund raising Concerned supporters have recently called St. Jude's Ranch for Children to ask about fund raisers and telephone solicitations for the ranch. St. Jude's said that very few of theorganizationscalledaboutare checking to verify that they are operating within the ranch's guidelines "It's a shame," said Karen Stevens, special projects coordinator for St. Jude's. "We'd like to be able to endorse adtivities sponsored by legitimate organizations on our behalf as well as to discourage unscrupulous groups or persons from using our name. "What we have found lately, is that we have become a magnet for telemarketers who use our name to take advantage of the generosity ofthe people of Southern Nevada." Many would-be benefactors are oflen left feeling angry and suspicious when they discover ranch staff do not have knowledge of a pfiHi<^il|r evit, Kh&.added, "When organizations put on fund raisers in our name, but don't let us know about them, we don't have any information to give people who call us for details. It makes us, as well as those sponsoring the event, look like no one knows what's going on. "It creates a bad feeling in people who would like to support charitable organizations, but don't know which organizations are trustworthy," Stevens said. Trout design picked for stamp Michigan artist Larry Tucci's design has been selected for Nevada's 10th annual State Trout Stamp Art Contest sponsored this year by the Nevada Wildlife Federation. The 30-year-old artist, who took top honors with a painting of a Lahontan cutthroat trout, placed fourth with his first entry last year. "My first art contest win came a few months ago in the Northwest Steelheaders Association's Patron Print Art Contest, but Nevada is the first m^or state contest that I have won." Tucci, a commercial artist who hopes to turn to wildlife art fulltime in the fiiture, is a graduate of the Center for Creative Studies, an art school in Detroit, Mich. "Art i s a big part of my life," he says, "but my biggest concern is conservation and taking care of our natural resources, so I tend to gear all of my art toward wildlife. 'To be able to do some kind of work that financially benefits or at least raises awareness of wildlife conservation is just a great Call home for free opportunity for me." His painting will be depicted in full color on the 1995 State Trout Stamp. Although there is no financial prize, the artist retains full reproduction rights, and limited edition reprints are produced and sold for approximately $140 each year. The artist also donates 50 special Conservation Edition prints that are auctioned at various wildlife clubs and organizations fund raising banquets each year throughout the state. Tucci's painting will also be printed on the cover ofthe state's 1995-96 fishing seasons and regulations booklet available in early February 1995. The stamp, which is required of everyone 12 years of age and older who fish for or possess trout, will also be available in February. A portion ofthe proceeds from the sale of the stamps is used to pay for the Division's newest fish hatchery in the Mason Valley Wildlife Management Area near Yerington. She recommends that groups or persons interested in helping St. Jude's call Jim Knox, public relations coordinator, 293-3131, or stop by to pick up an event application. "We really appreciate all that's done on our behalf within the community. If it weren't for the support ofthe people of Southern Nevada, we wouldn't be here. The fact is, we can't sanction any fund raisers using our i.ame, without knowing who is raising the funds, by what methods, and for what purpose," Stevens added. "It's extremely important for people to know that we never solicit donations by phone. If someone calls asking for money, or to buy tickets to an event to support St. Jude's, please call the Ranch to verify the event before making any donations," she said. St. Jude's Ranch for Children is a home for abandoned, abused and troubled children. Ithasbeen located in Boulder City since 1966. today CRC Corporation, a locally owned and operated long distance company, is opening their doors and their hearts to the community from 12 noon to 6 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 22. CRC is inviting everyone to call home for the holidays. The public is invited to their office to place a free long-distance call, to anywhere in the United States. Admittance is one can of food or unwrapped toy that will be donated to Goodwill Industries for distribution within the community. CRC's offices are located at4275 E. Sahara Avenue, Suite 6, Las Vegas, NV 89104. For additional information, contact Richelle Shaw, 641-5177. DOWNTOWN'S FOOTBAU PARTY • MONDAYS AT THE KING'S PAVIUION • so ft Draft Beer • S1 \A/ell DrinkB • S1 Hot Oogs • Prize Giveaways Kick off your week with the four Queens and Miller Lite as they t^ost a night of great NFL action in the King's Pavillion Enjoy the games on three big screens, including our giant 10 toot by 10 toot TV. Our fabulous Four Queens and the Miller Lite Girls will be on hand each Monday night to host the lootball party with tood and drink specials and prize giveaways You can add to the action by betting on your favorite teams at our Sports Book No one knows how to throw a party like the Four Queens, so |Oin them every Monday at 5 pm Try it once and you'll be a Ian For information call (702) 385-4011 or (800) 634-6045 Ute Four Queens 4565 E. Sunset Road NEW YEAR'S EVE PARTY Champagne Buffet ) • Party hats • Noise Makers • Color Pin Shots SAT. DEC. 31 9:00 P.M. 325.00 per bowler 315.00 non bowler 4 hours of bowling Child C.-iro ProvirtPd Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Page B7 •ColorTV • Mountain Bike "Xt!!'^ AM/FM Radio plus More Surprises Call Lois or Eileen 736-2695 Advanced Paid Reservations Due by Dec. 25th ^(E New Year's i Celebration Abocird the Desert Princess Ring in 1995 aboard the Desert Princess witti Party Favors, Music and Dancing featuring the GOLDYNS. ^ Spin to 12:30ain ^^ Celebrate Twice • First in Arizona and then in Nevada, if Mai^e Your Reservations Today! "^ 293-6180 RESERVATIONS REQUIRED l.akc McatI Cruises is an Authorized Concessionaire of the National Park Service. • MA HBC Publications joins the Clark County School District's Math/Science Institute to reach America 2000 goals Henderson Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News fLM'i 3000 First In The World In Mathematics By The Year 2000 Areas and Perimeters By Bill Hanlon An AREA of a polygon tells you how many squares ( • 's) will fit inside a 2-dimensional figure. For our purposes, a polygon is any closed figure made up of straight lines EXAMPLES Angel Tree project delivers present to kids at Child Haven D All those are polygons. Often they have other names that are more specific, such as triangle, square, rectangle, pentagon, and hexagon If we were to look at a rectangle with dimensions 4 units by 2 units, we might find ways of determining how many squares will fit inside. By dividing the inside into equal squares, we can count eight squares. In mathematics, we call that eight square units because we are counting squares. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 If we divide a number of different rectangles in this same way, eventually we would see a pattern. Rather than drawing the rectangle, all you do is multiply the dimensions. Since there are two dimensions, we give them names; LENGTH and WIDTH. We now have our first formula. The AREA of a RECTANGLE is LENGTH times WIDTH. Symbolically, A=LW. Now, if I take any rectangle, as shown below, and cut it along the dotted line and move the cut piece to the other side of the rectangle, I get what looks like a pushed-over rectangle. A / We could have easily found the area of the original rectangle by using the formula A=LW. But how do we find the area of the pushed over rectangle? If we think about it, we did not remove any area, we just re-arranged it. So the area of the pushed-over rectangle should be the same as the original rectangle. Saying "pushed-over" rectangle is too cumbersome, let's give that specific looking figure a name— PARALLELOGRAM. Great choice, right? If I look at a parallelogram, how do I determine the area? Well, I could cut it out along the dotted line as shown below and make a rectangle, then use the formula A=LW. S/ b b Again, if I do enough of these, I will eventually see a pattern develop that will allow me not to have to do cut-outs. Let's call the bottom b, the sides s, and the height h. Again, looking at the picture, what would we multiply to get the area? The bottom times the height. In math, we call the bottom the BASE, the side the SLANT HEIGHT, and the height stays the height the shortest distance from top to bottom. Now we have a formula or shortcut that allows us to find the area of a PARALLELOGRAM without doing cut-outs: A=bh. This will tell you how many squares fit inside that parallelogram. Don't you love this? Are you hoping for more relationships to find areas of different polygons (shapes)? That's getting into the spirit of math—looking for discoveries through patterns. If we look at a parallelogram and cut it in half as shown, we get two new shapes. We'll call them TRIANGLES. Wouldn't it be dandy to find the area of a triangle? Yes, you say. Notice that a tnangle is half a parallelogram. If the area of a parallelogram is bh, then shouldn't the area of a triangle be one half of bh or the area divided by 2? Remember, when finding the area, you are trying to find out how many squares fit inside. We use the expression "square units" to describe area. We can find the area of others by looking for more patterns. The PERIMETER of a polygon is the sum of all the lengths of the sides forming it. To find a perimeter, add ALL sides. But a circle has no sides. It is not a polygon because it is not made up of straight lines, so we cannot find a perimeter. We make a new name for the aistance around a circle and call it the CIRCUMFERENCE. The areas we have found are for RECTANGLE, PARALLELOGRAM, AND TRIANGLE. A= Iw A = bh 2 Bill Hanlon is the Math/Science Institute Coordinator for the Clark County School District and a part-time math instructor at UNLV 1993 HBC Publications. Inc. 1994 MSAA funds bee venom study This holiday season the employees at Raytheon Services Nevada decided to do something special for the children at Child Haven. The "Angel Tree" program provided gifts to approximately 76 children temporarily housed at Child Haven. Child Haven is a division of !he Clark County Juvenile Court Services in Nevada that provides temporary care and treatment for abused, neglected, and abandoned children. Through no faultof their own, many children are placed in protective custody at Child Haven each month. The program, a first for Raytheon, was a success. Paper angels with the children's names were hung on a tree in the lobby of the Raytheon facility. Employees chose angels and bought presents for the children. Raytheon Services Nevada is a prime contractor in Nevada and thepaciiictotheU.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office. It is a $9 billion diversified technology company with four business segments: electronics, aircraft products, energy and environmental; and major appliances. Headquartered in Lexington, Mass., Raytheon employs 59,000people worldwide. Recyclers help needy children to see Six-year-old Mayra is looking at the world through new eyes now. Fuzzy shapes on the blackboard are clear to her at last thanks to New Eyes for the Needy, Inc., a unique recycling organization in Short Hills, N.J. "Children who can see, can read, can stay in school, can go on to get jobs," said New Eyes president Joan Daeschler, "and we are asking people to help us help the thousands of children who, like Mayra, cannot afford eyeglasses." Since 1932, New Eyes for the Nee<^y has helped more than 4 million people both in the United States and overseas through a unique recycling program. Individuals and organizations donate reusable eyeglasses and precious metal scrap such as old watches, jewelry and silver pieces, and dental gold. Metal scrap is sold to a refiner and the jewelry is sold in the New THE NEWS IS YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER Eyes gift shop. Funds from these sales pay for new prescription glasses for needy Americans of all ages. Plastic framed glasses are sorted and classified by some 200 community volunteers and sent to homeless American veterans and medical missions and hospitals in 25 countries as far as Ukraine, India, Zaire and Brazil. Send tax-deductible recyclables to New Eyes for the Needy, Inc. Room A, 549 Millbum Ave., Short Hills, N.J. 07078, or call (201)3764903 to order posters and brochures to conducta community collection drive. All cash donations are used to purchase eyeglasses for needy Americans. The Multiple Sclerosis Association of America has announced plans to become the first organization in the country to fund a clinical study on the effects of bee venom therapy and MS. Earlier this year, the MS Association funded noted immunologist Dr. John Santilli with a $25,000 grant to manufacture bee venom extract. The venom extract is currently in production and awaits review by the Food and Drug Administration. Upon FDA clearance, MSAA will fund and additional $40,000 to principal investigators Dr. Santilli, Dr. John Richert of Georgetown University and Dr. Jay Rosenberg of Kaiser Hospital in San Diego for a six month Phase I study. The Phase I study will test the venom extract for safety on chronic progressive MS patients and determine the appropriate dose for future clinical trials. Multiple sclerosis is a crippling disorder of the central nervous system, affecting over 300,000 Americans. During an MS attack, the loss ofthe myelin (insulation) coating. When myelin is damaged, nerve signal transmission ntay be slowed or blocked, leading to symptoms such as blindness, fatigue or paralysis. Overthepastfewyears, reports in the national media have suggested that bee venom may be an effective treatment for those with multiple sclerosis. It is now estimated that between 5,000 to 10,000 MS patients are stinging themselves with honey bees in order to test claims of symptom relief "It's an unbelievable movement throughout the MS community with little to no scientific evidence," saidMSAAPresidentJohn Hodson. "Rather than risk a let's waitand see approach, we realized that this is a dangerous situation which needs to be carefully and scientifically studied. We're proud to be the first organization in the country to work with the FDA in developing a method of studying this unusual treatment option for those with MS." In addition to bee venom therapy, MSAA's patient care programs include counseling, support groups, the free loan of therapeutic equipment, barrierfreehousing, microclimate cooling from NASA technology, newsletter and referral assistance. The MS Association of America is an independent organization and is not affiliated with the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. For more information, call the MSAA 800-833-4672. PARTY WITH US 8p..ia.f^ Evening of entsrtainment. Dance to the sounds of ^^^ "Knew Country Bantd" Free Champagne Party Favors DINNER SERVED sp^toiop. Enjoy Our Special Gourmet Dinner Buffet in our Bingo Roonn featuring Roast New York Steak with Bernaise Sauce Shrimp Scampi, Chicken Kiev, Stuffed Pork Chops S. much, much more ^9.95 Tickets Going Fast TICKETS ON SALE AT MOTEL FRONT DESK 8 CASHIERS CAGE 3 Miles West of Hoovei Dam on U.S. 93 • (702) 293-5000 Sundance Chiropractic opens Sundance Family Chiropractic Centre recently opened at 1631E. Sunset Road, Suite 104, Las Vegas, according to owners Dr. P.J. and Brenda T. Dyer. Dyer, a chiropractor with many years experience in family chiropractic health care, said "Sundance Family Chiropractic Centre emphasizes maintainance, as well as corrective spinal care." "Our office," he said, "utilizes full spinal examination, analysis and adjusting in coixjunction with Chiro-Jet, the Back Man Power Massage...the greatest water therapy availablewithoutgetting wet." For a complimentary consultation to evaluate health care needs, call 896-7570 for an appointment. FinJing your next uiictor can no thai easy ii you call tne Pnysician RciL-rral FVogram at St. Rose Dominican Hospital. One call can put you in touch witn one ol our 300 qualitieJ pnysicians, representing a wide variety oi specialties. Dial 5(>4-45('8, Monday tnrougn Friday from 8 am until 4:30 pm and a nurse will answer your call, determine your needs and rcier you to a pnysician wno s just riglit iiir you. Our PKysician Referral Nurse understands tke importance of a strong dcKtor/patienl rclationsliip. Slie can tell you things aknit a doctor that friends and family can't; lite insurance plans and special training. Regardless of the doctor you cnixise it s nice to know you are liidied to the progressive services and protessiorudg who understand the healing power of compassion. St. Rose Dominican HOSPITAL \v\ logy mends. Compassion 564-4508 heals. ISMMMIiMMMMMMi

PAGE 24

Page B8 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, December 22,1994 Hispanic genealogy-^ question of culture Whether by legal or illegal immigration.foreconomicor political asylum, it is a fact: Hispanics are the fastest-growing ethnic group in our nation. Post-census reports by the Bureau of Census show that in March 19093 the estimated Hispanic-origin population was about 22.8 million. This is about 8.9% of the total U.S. population. In 1990 the census enumerated 22,354,059 persons of Hispanic origin. As shown in the recent Cuban influx, Hispanics continue to arrive in the U.S. as refugees and immigrants. Others, though bom in the U.S., are separated from their Hispanic culture due to the passage of time and loss of older relatives. Some of these have early lineages, such as the New Mexico families who are descended from early 17th century Spanish explorers and settlers. As they lose touch with their original homeland, more are turning to genealogy to recapture their roots. Unfortunately, early research can be a challenge to those who have lost the language. Therisingdemand for Hispanic material has shown that resources which address their needs are lacking. One way to ameliorate this is to produce more publications of early Spanish records within the U.S. along with the other nations involved. For example, the collection of "Papeles Procedentses de Cuba," available at various American universities, provides ample research material for the early Spanish colonial period within the present American borders. This collection, dating from the 16th to 19th centuries, consists of copies of records from the Archivo General de Indias in Seville, Spain. They pertain to East and West Florida, Louisiana and portions of other present states at one time settled by Spain. In 1916, the Carnegie Institution in Washington, D.C., published "A Descriptive Catalogue of the Documents Relating to the History of the U.S. in the Archivo General de Indias," by Roscow Hill. This publication, along with James Alexander Robertson's "List of Documents in Spanish Archives Relating to the History of the United States Which Have Been Printed or of which Transcripts are Preserved in American Libraries," published in 1910 by the same institute, provides many samples of available documentation. One Must Bridge the Generation Gap to Understand: Perhaps even more important is a thorough understanding of Hispanic culture. The discussion of the five main points which follow will allow the writer, speaker and researcher to bridge the gap between their intentions and purposes and the needs of Hispanic genealogists: extended households; Catholicism and Hispanics; indistinct cousins; tightly knit culture, and double surname systems. Hispanics live in a society of extended households. It is not uncommon to have four generations under the same roof [similar to the Chinese!. Though normally a patriarchy, if the oldest member is woman, then she will be the one from whom everyone seeks advice and guidance. Members may make their own decisions, but probably after consulting with the head of the family. Catholicism and Hispanics go hand in hand. Most records prior to ci vi 1 registration will come from the Catholic Church. These include records of baptism, confirmation, marriage and burial. One may also need to consult records of marriage dispensations for marriages of cousins—usually of the third degree or less. Speaking of cousins, it should be noted that in Hispanic societies there is usually no distinction about the type of cousins. In other words, there are no first cousins twice removed or third cousins once removed. Instead, one finds first, second, third and sometimes fourth cousins. Beyond that, the persons would simply be knowft as a "prime leijano' or far-away (not distant) cousin. Many Hispanics have stated that they find it very difficult to get information firom their older FAMILY HISTORY RALPH T. BRIGGS relatives. This problem may have arisen due to the way in which their questions were asked. Alternatively it could be because, as in any tightly knit culture, there is a certain code of conduct to which family members must adhere. One of them is this "code of silence (?)" not to reveal any secrets which may cause the family shame or harm. The person making the inquiries must realize that his grandparents grew up in a different era, both socially and technologically. Children were seen, but not hear d. They certainly didn't question their grandparents for information they did not wish to share. Persistence and thoughtful inquiries are the only two tools which come to mind when tackling this impediment. Rephrasing the question may do the trick. Another most important tenet ofthe Hispanic world is the double surname system. This is a topic in itself and will be explored in a future column. The following are some references and addresses to help family historians and researchers: The Family History Center, in Salt Lake City, Utah, and more See Family Page B9 Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News PageB9 Uiitit ()iit ( ountni I'rr lamih Limit ()nt luiii i'tr ( inipHi I l.lUiiivt iHuinlur 1\ thru ImtinlKr j" l'>'K I VONS VALUABLE COUPON Canada Dry Mixers Uiili Miinnuiin SlO(><) I'urdijst' I XLIIKUS Uuuur lohjiLo Irish lliiid Milk Prmluiis.! kciruiiK \ Irct 0)U|H)ri Iitim L l.irnil t)(tt (iHinoii PIT I amiU l.iinil ( Mic luin IVr (oiipon llkiiivt iHiirnlHT 2\ thru IkumtxT 2^ IWI I VONS VALUABLE COUPON K( M.(iilumlHjn liir. turopi-jn iir lljwjiun I2luhlli (in (bdiKkillcijflrlrulrll) Without Coupon 3.49 Vkilli Minimum $I(MM) PUKIUSC IXVIIRU-S Ijnuor Tohicio. Irtsh I'luul Milk PriKluttslliitroriK Jt hrif (.iiu}xtn licniN L l.imit OIK( oiitwm IVr lamily linui i)iu lum IVr( tiuptm llttHiivt iHitmbcr 21 thru DciinilKr 2"' 1W4 I Cool Whip Whipped Topping Lilc Non DiiT) or txtni Cramy I H Oz (;()ntaincr • Fn)zcn I Country Hearth 172 Lb. Bread Sckiu-d Varitlics 1 29 Minute Maid Ades, Punches or Apple Juice Selected Varieties 12 Ounce Can • Frozen ;:89 VONS VALUE 'jiaci -peas Frieda's ^^1 BlackeyedPeas 11 Ounce Bag (DiccdOnionsSDz. Pkg99) Ready Pac Salad Mix 1 Pound Package (Cucumbers 2 For 1 00) E-ZFoil Bakeware Disposable Selected Types & Size 1/2 PRICE Vons Frozen Vegetables or Vegeuble Blends • 16 Oz. Bag I .Seleaed Varieties I Vons Large Pitted Olives 6 Ounce Can .79 Vegetable^ Party Platter tody Pac (Aqua Party Sticks 2 Lb Big-2.99) FAMILY: Understanding Hispanic culture From Page B8 than 2,000 world-wide LDS Family History Libraries. [Check your phone directories] Beers, Henry P. French and Spanish Records of Louisiana, A Bibliographical Guide to Archive and Manuscript Sources. Baton Rouge: Louisiana University Press, 1989. (The best for locaUng Louisiana sources in the U.S.) Spanish and Mexican Records ofthe American Southwest, Tucson, Ariz. University of Arizona Press, 1979. (The best for locating Hispanic Southwest sources within U.S.). Carr, Peter E., Guide to Cuban Genealogical Research. San Bernardino, Calif The Cuban Index, 1991. (The most comprehensive guide to Cuban material). Flores, Norma and Patsy Ludwig. A Beginner's Guide to Hispanic Genealogy, San Mateo, Calif. Western Book-Journal Press, 1993. (In Spanish and English for beginners). Ryskamp, George R., Tracing Your Hispanic Heritage, Riverside, Calif.; Hispanic Family History Research, 1984. (Without question the best and most thorough guide to Hispanicgenealogy). Society of Hispanic Historical and Ancestral Research, P.O. Box 5294, Fullerton, Calif 92635, PH: (714) 773-1510. Spanish American Genealogical Association, P.O. Box 794, Corpus Christi, Texas 784030794,(512)855-1183. (jienealogical Society of Hispanic America, P.O. Box 1031, Placentia, CaUf 92670. Institute of Genealogy & History of Latin America, 316 West 500 North, St. George, Utah 84770. [Sources: Council of Genealogy Coliunnists, Inc., Peter E. Carr and myself. Carr is a native of Cuba, who arrived in the U.S. on Washington's birthday in 1962 at the age of 11 years. He received a bachelor's degree in anthropology Vons Fresh Young Turkeys Hen -12 to 14 Lbs. Avg. Wt. Tom -18 to 20 Lbs. Avg. Wt. Farmer John Whole Ham Limit One Per Family While Supplies Last! No Center Slices Removed 14 to 18 Lb. Average Wt. Fully Cooked Water Added Minute Maid Premium VONS VALUABLE COUPON Blue Bonnet Quarters OiU" Hound I'jilJm^ I Buy IWo Get One | Oiif h>und I'jikJgi Buyiwodeiun ^REE Without I Coupon I .69 Ea. L jiiiii ^ f • • >. t .t'uiroii • VI 1 III III) t IJII ill l/liv ll\ III (VI i..t/U|nill. lintttivT IXxcmbtT n ihru Dictmlxr 2". I Wi I • s Ullt Fri>h FluiU Milk Protlin.i>.I:k(.tn>nic & Friir.tmpon Ilciiw IJinJi One Counoti Her I-JimU Uinii One luni Per Cimpon. Jim Beam Bourbon I • 'SLilcrBiillk(Savf An Addiliiinal 10% When You Buy Tht (AW SinRlf Bonk Pncc • 1} Sd) Canadian Mist Whisky 1 ""S LiltT Bolllc (^avc An Addillimil 1W When You J Buy Tht (j.st • Slnglf Bottle Price • 112S) • Clan MacGregor Scotch l.^S Ulcr Hdtllc ((.aw Hna• 10.62 Per Btl j 14 99 Korbel Brut Champagne VnUirhci 12.49 miniiiwi -4.IHI £:8.49 or hxtra l)n • "Si) Ml. Bolile (Save An Additional 10',, Vi nil (liir (>-l'li Wine (Jrrier Mnttle Bottle Pnie lni Cooii's Brut Champagne talraDnorlllusli "iOMI,llollle ISave An Addilional 10",. With Our ()-Hk Wine (amer • Sinnle hotile Pnte Mil Butterball Young T\irkey i lOtoiOLhs Avei^KcWl 1 1 Frozen 1 i'.99 I *2.00 OFF H The Total Puce ol An Fresh • or Fioieii Whole Turkey With • Your VonsClubCard ^ 1 Jerseymaid Butter Gold Medal Winner One Pound Paclugc • yuancr> J9 Boneless Pork Loin Chops or Ro;isl I'ork the Other White Meal Fresh Ground Beef 7% Fat • Value Pack 3 Pounds or More Jerseymaid Sour Cream Reitular or Light 16 Ountc Container :89 I ywBACOWM?*'/ ,";r. Fanner John Sliced Bacon Assorted Varieties 16 Ounce Package 1 49 Ea. Tombstone 12" Original Pizza Selected Varieties • Frozen 21 S to22 8SOz Pkg m Vons Cream Cheese Regular or Light 8 Ounce Package 64 Ounce Carton Jerseymaid Egg Nog 99 Hansen's Natural General Mills Wheaties Cereal18Ounce Box orTrix 12 Ounce Box 2 99 Prices Effective Wednesday December 21 thru 1\ie$day December 27,1994. (^t (702) 454*7553 for llic VONS Iftialiiiii iicircsl>ou. wiit (iir uiKTiloi s issisurice Salt's in mail (|iiaiiliuts I! M) A ((I(KI siam[) toiipoiis RJaiiK' acct*plt*(l Tins ad flTcclivc in l V((U ni CUrk Caunly >ri oni). .Suinc llcflis or vandii'S may liul txavajjabkin I'vi-ry More Ur rcsiTvc lliinglil lo limit (|uanuut-s from California State University, Long Beach in 1986. He has been involved with genealogy research since 1965, specializing in Cuban, French, American and Spanish history in all eras. He is also a fellow columnist, author and publisher]. Briggs, a valley resident, writes a column about genealogy. CCSN has law class in spring Glynda White, J.D., will teach "Legal Environmentof Business," during the spring semester at the Community College of Southern Nevada's Cheyenne campus. It is a course designed to give students abasicunderstandingof laws and legal principles relevant to the operation and functions of any business. The three-credit course, transferable to UNLV or UNR, will provide students with a general knowledge of laws pertinent to opening a business, employeremployee rights and due-process pursuant to the Fourth and Fourteenth Amendments, according to White. The course is recommended for business and management majors, business professionals and anyone interested in starting their own business. The course will be held Tuesday evenings from 6-8:50 p.m. For more information, call 651-4173. Realtors complete training Janet Butler and John Johnson of Century21JRRealty and Leslie Huntington, Jameel Sadd and JanineTuedeauofCENTURY21 Action Network have completed the CENTURY 21 "21Plus Training." By successfully meeting the course requirements, the associates are now equipped with state-of-the-art tools and programs "that will help us better serve our cHents." The broker/owners of CENTURY 21 franchises agree that all sales associates should complete this "thorough and innovative" 21Plus Training toward fulfilling the mission of providing customers and clients with unparalleled quality service. The associates report that the training helped them bridge the gap between the theoretical and practical aspects ofthe real estate profession. Nevada index available Nevada Magazine has released a comprehensive index of its issuespublished between 1980 and 1993. The 168-page index, which utilizes Library of Congress protocols, contains more than 6,000 individual entries listing subjects, authors and titles of articles that have appeared in Nevada Magazine during the 1980s and early 1990s. This is an invaluable tool for libraries or anyone keeping track of back issues of Nevada Moffizine," publisher RichMoreno said. He added that the magazine is developing an index of previous years (1936-1979) and plans periodic updates. The "Index to Nevada Magazine, 1980-1993," is available for $14.95. For more information, write Nevada Magazine, 1800 Highway, 50 East, Suite 200, Carson City, NV 89710, or call (702)687-5416.

PAGE 25

Page B8 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, December 22,1994 Hispanic genealogy-^ question of culture Whether by legal or illegal immigration.foreconomicor political asylum, it is a fact: Hispanics are the fastest-growing ethnic group in our nation. Post-census reports by the Bureau of Census show that in March 19093 the estimated Hispanic-origin population was about 22.8 million. This is about 8.9% of the total U.S. population. In 1990 the census enumerated 22,354,059 persons of Hispanic origin. As shown in the recent Cuban influx, Hispanics continue to arrive in the U.S. as refugees and immigrants. Others, though bom in the U.S., are separated from their Hispanic culture due to the passage of time and loss of older relatives. Some of these have early lineages, such as the New Mexico families who are descended from early 17th century Spanish explorers and settlers. As they lose touch with their original homeland, more are turning to genealogy to recapture their roots. Unfortunately, early research can be a challenge to those who have lost the language. Therisingdemand for Hispanic material has shown that resources which address their needs are lacking. One way to ameliorate this is to produce more publications of early Spanish records within the U.S. along with the other nations involved. For example, the collection of "Papeles Procedentses de Cuba," available at various American universities, provides ample research material for the early Spanish colonial period within the present American borders. This collection, dating from the 16th to 19th centuries, consists of copies of records from the Archivo General de Indias in Seville, Spain. They pertain to East and West Florida, Louisiana and portions of other present states at one time settled by Spain. In 1916, the Carnegie Institution in Washington, D.C., published "A Descriptive Catalogue of the Documents Relating to the History of the U.S. in the Archivo General de Indias," by Roscow Hill. This publication, along with James Alexander Robertson's "List of Documents in Spanish Archives Relating to the History of the United States Which Have Been Printed or of which Transcripts are Preserved in American Libraries," published in 1910 by the same institute, provides many samples of available documentation. One Must Bridge the Generation Gap to Understand: Perhaps even more important is a thorough understanding of Hispanic culture. The discussion of the five main points which follow will allow the writer, speaker and researcher to bridge the gap between their intentions and purposes and the needs of Hispanic genealogists: extended households; Catholicism and Hispanics; indistinct cousins; tightly knit culture, and double surname systems. Hispanics live in a society of extended households. It is not uncommon to have four generations under the same roof [similar to the Chinese!. Though normally a patriarchy, if the oldest member is woman, then she will be the one from whom everyone seeks advice and guidance. Members may make their own decisions, but probably after consulting with the head of the family. Catholicism and Hispanics go hand in hand. Most records prior to ci vi 1 registration will come from the Catholic Church. These include records of baptism, confirmation, marriage and burial. One may also need to consult records of marriage dispensations for marriages of cousins—usually of the third degree or less. Speaking of cousins, it should be noted that in Hispanic societies there is usually no distinction about the type of cousins. In other words, there are no first cousins twice removed or third cousins once removed. Instead, one finds first, second, third and sometimes fourth cousins. Beyond that, the persons would simply be knowft as a "prime leijano' or far-away (not distant) cousin. Many Hispanics have stated that they find it very difficult to get information firom their older FAMILY HISTORY RALPH T. BRIGGS relatives. This problem may have arisen due to the way in which their questions were asked. Alternatively it could be because, as in any tightly knit culture, there is a certain code of conduct to which family members must adhere. One of them is this "code of silence (?)" not to reveal any secrets which may cause the family shame or harm. The person making the inquiries must realize that his grandparents grew up in a different era, both socially and technologically. Children were seen, but not hear d. They certainly didn't question their grandparents for information they did not wish to share. Persistence and thoughtful inquiries are the only two tools which come to mind when tackling this impediment. Rephrasing the question may do the trick. Another most important tenet ofthe Hispanic world is the double surname system. This is a topic in itself and will be explored in a future column. The following are some references and addresses to help family historians and researchers: The Family History Center, in Salt Lake City, Utah, and more See Family Page B9 Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News PageB9 Uiitit ()iit ( ountni I'rr lamih Limit ()nt luiii i'tr ( inipHi I l.lUiiivt iHuinlur 1\ thru ImtinlKr j" l'>'K I VONS VALUABLE COUPON Canada Dry Mixers Uiili Miinnuiin SlO(><) I'urdijst' I XLIIKUS Uuuur lohjiLo Irish lliiid Milk Prmluiis.! kciruiiK \ Irct 0)U|H)ri Iitim L l.irnil t)(tt (iHinoii PIT I amiU l.iinil ( Mic luin IVr (oiipon llkiiivt iHiirnlHT 2\ thru IkumtxT 2^ IWI I VONS VALUABLE COUPON K( M.(iilumlHjn liir. turopi-jn iir lljwjiun I2luhlli (in (bdiKkillcijflrlrulrll) Without Coupon 3.49 Vkilli Minimum $I(MM) PUKIUSC IXVIIRU-S Ijnuor Tohicio. Irtsh I'luul Milk PriKluttslliitroriK Jt hrif (.iiu}xtn licniN L l.imit OIK( oiitwm IVr lamily linui i)iu lum IVr( tiuptm llttHiivt iHitmbcr 21 thru DciinilKr 2"' 1W4 I Cool Whip Whipped Topping Lilc Non DiiT) or txtni Cramy I H Oz (;()ntaincr • Fn)zcn I Country Hearth 172 Lb. Bread Sckiu-d Varitlics 1 29 Minute Maid Ades, Punches or Apple Juice Selected Varieties 12 Ounce Can • Frozen ;:89 VONS VALUE 'jiaci -peas Frieda's ^^1 BlackeyedPeas 11 Ounce Bag (DiccdOnionsSDz. Pkg99) Ready Pac Salad Mix 1 Pound Package (Cucumbers 2 For 1 00) E-ZFoil Bakeware Disposable Selected Types & Size 1/2 PRICE Vons Frozen Vegetables or Vegeuble Blends • 16 Oz. Bag I .Seleaed Varieties I Vons Large Pitted Olives 6 Ounce Can .79 Vegetable^ Party Platter tody Pac (Aqua Party Sticks 2 Lb Big-2.99) FAMILY: Understanding Hispanic culture From Page B8 than 2,000 world-wide LDS Family History Libraries. [Check your phone directories] Beers, Henry P. French and Spanish Records of Louisiana, A Bibliographical Guide to Archive and Manuscript Sources. Baton Rouge: Louisiana University Press, 1989. (The best for locaUng Louisiana sources in the U.S.) Spanish and Mexican Records ofthe American Southwest, Tucson, Ariz. University of Arizona Press, 1979. (The best for locating Hispanic Southwest sources within U.S.). Carr, Peter E., Guide to Cuban Genealogical Research. San Bernardino, Calif The Cuban Index, 1991. (The most comprehensive guide to Cuban material). Flores, Norma and Patsy Ludwig. A Beginner's Guide to Hispanic Genealogy, San Mateo, Calif. Western Book-Journal Press, 1993. (In Spanish and English for beginners). Ryskamp, George R., Tracing Your Hispanic Heritage, Riverside, Calif.; Hispanic Family History Research, 1984. (Without question the best and most thorough guide to Hispanicgenealogy). Society of Hispanic Historical and Ancestral Research, P.O. Box 5294, Fullerton, Calif 92635, PH: (714) 773-1510. Spanish American Genealogical Association, P.O. Box 794, Corpus Christi, Texas 784030794,(512)855-1183. (jienealogical Society of Hispanic America, P.O. Box 1031, Placentia, CaUf 92670. Institute of Genealogy & History of Latin America, 316 West 500 North, St. George, Utah 84770. [Sources: Council of Genealogy Coliunnists, Inc., Peter E. Carr and myself. Carr is a native of Cuba, who arrived in the U.S. on Washington's birthday in 1962 at the age of 11 years. He received a bachelor's degree in anthropology Vons Fresh Young Turkeys Hen -12 to 14 Lbs. Avg. Wt. Tom -18 to 20 Lbs. Avg. Wt. Farmer John Whole Ham Limit One Per Family While Supplies Last! No Center Slices Removed 14 to 18 Lb. Average Wt. Fully Cooked Water Added Minute Maid Premium VONS VALUABLE COUPON Blue Bonnet Quarters OiU" Hound I'jilJm^ I Buy IWo Get One | Oiif h>und I'jikJgi Buyiwodeiun ^REE Without I Coupon I .69 Ea. L jiiiii ^ f • • >. t .t'uiroii • VI 1 III III) t IJII ill l/liv ll\ III (VI i..t/U|nill. lintttivT IXxcmbtT n ihru Dictmlxr 2". I Wi I • s Ullt Fri>h FluiU Milk Protlin.i>.I:k(.tn>nic & Friir.tmpon Ilciiw IJinJi One Counoti Her I-JimU Uinii One luni Per Cimpon. Jim Beam Bourbon I • 'SLilcrBiillk(Savf An Addiliiinal 10% When You Buy Tht (AW SinRlf Bonk Pncc • 1} Sd) Canadian Mist Whisky 1 ""S LiltT Bolllc (^avc An Addillimil 1W When You J Buy Tht (j.st • Slnglf Bottle Price • 112S) • Clan MacGregor Scotch l.^S Ulcr Hdtllc ((.aw Hna• 10.62 Per Btl j 14 99 Korbel Brut Champagne VnUirhci 12.49 miniiiwi -4.IHI £:8.49 or hxtra l)n • "Si) Ml. Bolile (Save An Additional 10',, Vi nil (liir (>-l'li Wine (Jrrier Mnttle Bottle Pnie lni Cooii's Brut Champagne talraDnorlllusli "iOMI,llollle ISave An Addilional 10",. With Our ()-Hk Wine (amer • Sinnle hotile Pnte Mil Butterball Young T\irkey i lOtoiOLhs Avei^KcWl 1 1 Frozen 1 i'.99 I *2.00 OFF H The Total Puce ol An Fresh • or Fioieii Whole Turkey With • Your VonsClubCard ^ 1 Jerseymaid Butter Gold Medal Winner One Pound Paclugc • yuancr> J9 Boneless Pork Loin Chops or Ro;isl I'ork the Other White Meal Fresh Ground Beef 7% Fat • Value Pack 3 Pounds or More Jerseymaid Sour Cream Reitular or Light 16 Ountc Container :89 I ywBACOWM?*'/ ,";r. Fanner John Sliced Bacon Assorted Varieties 16 Ounce Package 1 49 Ea. Tombstone 12" Original Pizza Selected Varieties • Frozen 21 S to22 8SOz Pkg m Vons Cream Cheese Regular or Light 8 Ounce Package 64 Ounce Carton Jerseymaid Egg Nog 99 Hansen's Natural General Mills Wheaties Cereal18Ounce Box orTrix 12 Ounce Box 2 99 Prices Effective Wednesday December 21 thru 1\ie$day December 27,1994. (^t (702) 454*7553 for llic VONS Iftialiiiii iicircsl>ou. wiit (iir uiKTiloi s issisurice Salt's in mail (|iiaiiliuts I! M) A ((I(KI siam[) toiipoiis RJaiiK' acct*plt*(l Tins ad flTcclivc in l V((U ni CUrk Caunly >ri oni). .Suinc llcflis or vandii'S may liul txavajjabkin I'vi-ry More Ur rcsiTvc lliinglil lo limit (|uanuut-s from California State University, Long Beach in 1986. He has been involved with genealogy research since 1965, specializing in Cuban, French, American and Spanish history in all eras. He is also a fellow columnist, author and publisher]. Briggs, a valley resident, writes a column about genealogy. CCSN has law class in spring Glynda White, J.D., will teach "Legal Environmentof Business," during the spring semester at the Community College of Southern Nevada's Cheyenne campus. It is a course designed to give students abasicunderstandingof laws and legal principles relevant to the operation and functions of any business. The three-credit course, transferable to UNLV or UNR, will provide students with a general knowledge of laws pertinent to opening a business, employeremployee rights and due-process pursuant to the Fourth and Fourteenth Amendments, according to White. The course is recommended for business and management majors, business professionals and anyone interested in starting their own business. The course will be held Tuesday evenings from 6-8:50 p.m. For more information, call 651-4173. Realtors complete training Janet Butler and John Johnson of Century21JRRealty and Leslie Huntington, Jameel Sadd and JanineTuedeauofCENTURY21 Action Network have completed the CENTURY 21 "21Plus Training." By successfully meeting the course requirements, the associates are now equipped with state-of-the-art tools and programs "that will help us better serve our cHents." The broker/owners of CENTURY 21 franchises agree that all sales associates should complete this "thorough and innovative" 21Plus Training toward fulfilling the mission of providing customers and clients with unparalleled quality service. The associates report that the training helped them bridge the gap between the theoretical and practical aspects ofthe real estate profession. Nevada index available Nevada Magazine has released a comprehensive index of its issuespublished between 1980 and 1993. The 168-page index, which utilizes Library of Congress protocols, contains more than 6,000 individual entries listing subjects, authors and titles of articles that have appeared in Nevada Magazine during the 1980s and early 1990s. This is an invaluable tool for libraries or anyone keeping track of back issues of Nevada Moffizine," publisher RichMoreno said. He added that the magazine is developing an index of previous years (1936-1979) and plans periodic updates. The "Index to Nevada Magazine, 1980-1993," is available for $14.95. For more information, write Nevada Magazine, 1800 Highway, 50 East, Suite 200, Carson City, NV 89710, or call (702)687-5416.

PAGE 26

Page BIO Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, December 22,1994 Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Page B11 Credit card tips offered It's a sinkingfeeling—you're in line ready to pay for a hoHday purchase or on the phone confirming your plane reservations, when you can't find your credit card. A panic attack sets in as you dig through your wallet Attorney General Frankie Sue Del Papa cautions if you misplace a credit card or believe it has been stolen, it's crucial to act immediately. Delaying a report to the credit card issuer could cost you a lot of money. When you pay with a credit card, the items or services are charged and billed to you at a later date. If you report a lost credit card before someone else uses it, you have no liability. Under federal law, however, you're responsible for up to $50 for charges made on each unreported card. Federal law also provides] protection for you as a credit card holder. If you have a dispute with a merchant and are unable to solve it directly, your card issuer] will negotiate chargebacks for billing errors. Here is another problem area| to watch out for when holiday shopping. When you pay for your purchase with a credit car, you may be asked for your phone number or other bankingj information. Don't give it out! Ethel M opens new airport stores Ethel M Chocolates opened two new stores and two newly-renovated shops during recent ceremonies at McCarran International Airport. Gov. Bob Miller, who assisted with the ribbon cutting at the new stores, call the event "my idea of heaven," and congratulated the company on its growth and contributions to the state's economy. The event was the grant opening for a new store in the expanded C Concourse, a new kiosk in the Charter International Terminal, and the redesign of stores in the A-B and C Concourses. The new C Concourse store is the first fi-anchise for thebusiness, is owned by former UNLV and National Basketball Association player Sidney Green. Mary Foster, Ethel M business director, said the company "is pleased to be a growing part of the Las Vegas community. Our unique chocolates and new store design will make purchasing our products a real pleasure for cxistomers," Foster said. The four retail shops, designed by New York architect Daniel J. Barteluce, feature a curvilinear design and thick glass shelves to display thenew Ethel M gift boxes, which make it easier for lovers of Sprint Cellular Star DUI hotline marks 3rd year Marking its third armiversary this month. Star DUI Hotline calls resulted in more than 1,172 arrests between Jan. 1 and Oct. 30. The Hotline generated 8,363 calls during the same time period. "In a city where more than 140,000 persons routinely carry cellular phones. Star DUI has proven itself to be an invaluable tool in deterring drunk driving as well as in the apprehension of drunk driving offenders," said Kent Van Metre, regional marketing manager of Sprint Cellular. "Anyone contemplating driving while under the influence now only has to think once, not twice, to know that their peers— concerned citizens—have the ability to immediately report erratic driving," he said. Sandy Heverly, executive director of STOP DUI, says stati sties show that driving under the influence vehicular crashes are down by 547 in Clark County since 1990. In that year, prior to the inception of Star DUI, vehicular crashes associated with DUI in Clark County were at a record 2,605. Heverly credits programs such as Sprint Cellul ar's Star DUI with increasing public awareness. "Sprint Cellular is to be commended for its foresight in being the first to develop a program that enables the average citizen to take a pro-active stand against drunk driving," he said. To report suspected DUIs, Sprint Cellular customers dial • DUI ( • 384) and press "send" to reach the hotline. There are no charges for Hotline usage. Callers are asked not to follow or interfere in any way with a suspected drunk driver. Rather, they are asked to provide the vehicle's make, color, license number, roadway location, direction of travel and any other pertinent information that may be helpful to police officers. According to Van Metre, Star DUI in Southern Nevada is helping to save lives. "Sprint Cellular is committed to being a integral part in the well-being of the communities we serve. Business and industry must be active participants in the overall health of its communities and neighbors. Star DUI is just one way Sprint Cellular continues to demonstrate this commitment." K !"" "' '9 f • ^^K^^Ll H.Ji—iS -^ ^^^BL-J—li Natalie J. Blackorby Blackorby named Miss Junior Natalie J. Blackorby, daughter of Jerry and Cathy Blackorby, earned the title Miss Junior East Highland Hills Teen Queen Nov. 1. The Henderson resident is active on the junior varsity quiz team. National Honor Society, leadership club and teen volunteer program. She is an eighth-grader at Burkholder Middle School. She will advance to the Miss' Junior America Nevada competition in June. Blackorby has been honored with The President's Youth Service Award and National Junior Honor Society. Her sponsors wereherparents. Gold Casters Jewelry, Hairitage Beauty Salon and Horizon Video. Duracell invites students to enter scholarship competition Duracell is calling all high school students to join in the 13th annual Duracell/NSTA Scholarship Competition. Winners will be eligible for a\yard8 totalling over $90,000 in savings bonds. The Duracell/NSTA Competition offers students in grades 9-12 thecreative challenge of inventing a battery-powered device. The device can be made at home or as part of a science or industrial arts class project. One hundred students receive U.S. Savings Bonds for their battery-powered ideas and everyone who enters receives a free gift. The top six winners, with their parents and science teachers, are guests of Duracell at the 43rd annual Convention of the National Science Teachers Association in Philadelphia. The top awards will be presented at a luncheon on March 23 where the winners will demonstrate their inventions for scientists and educators. Lastyear's top prize of a $20,000 U.S. savings bond went to Tracy Phillips of Long Island, NY, for her invention of Money Talks, a billfold that audibly reports the denominations of paper money. Other winners include a bicycle alarm, a timed pill dispenser, and an automatic page turner for musicians. The competition grants a first place savings bond of $20,000, five second place $10,000 bonds, ten third place $1,000 bonds, 25fourth place bonds of $200 each, and savings bonds of $100 each for 59 fifth place winners. Theora Webb, Duracell Director of Public Affairs, said, "In this competition many young women and men in our nation's high schools create interesting and unusual technological, electronic and mechanical devices. We appreciate seeing the sense of accomplishment that students get from this experience." To enter the competition a student must design and build a battery-powered device that is educational, useful and/or entertaining. It must run on any one or a combination of Duracell batteries — AAA, AA, D, C, 9-volt or lantern size. Entrants must also submit a written description, wiringdiagram, and photo of their device by 5 p.m. Friday, Jan. 13, 1995. Entries are judged on creativity, practicality, energy efficiency and on the clarity of the written descriptions. Teachers of the top 100 finalists receive gifts and sponsoring teachers of the top sue winners receive an IBM PSI computer system. Entry forms and rules are available from science and to her teachers, and from the: Duracell/ NSTA Scholarship Competition, 1840 Wilson Blvd, Arlington, VA 222 01-3000, 703-243-7100. O O] O O O O Tis the Season... 3sLJ CAFE SENSATIONS We create Sensational party trays and dessert platters for your holiday gatherings. Heated Outdoor Seating • Live Music Fri & Sat Speciality Baskets created by Stephanie that will compliment any occasion. Voted #1 by lh L.V. Entertainment book :si;i:oi u A MI; I Iooi). • Soups, Salads, Sandwiches • Dascerts • b—r. Win* • Frth Bakad Muffins, Cookis, FahffM Muffins 4350 E. Sunttt • Hndfson, 1^ 89014 (corner of Athenian & Suntel) 456-7803. oo Everyone is welcome to have mass at ST. PETER'S 1994 Masses Christmas Eve Saturday v5;00. 7:00p.m. & Midnight Christmas Day. Sunday 8:00. 10:00. 11:30 (Spanish) a.m. & 5:00 p.m. New Year's Eve Saturday 5:00 p.m. New Year's Day Sunday 8:00. 10:00. 11:30 a.m. & 5 p.m. St. Peter the Apostle Church 204 South Boulder Hwy. 565-8406 the chocolates to buy their favorite products. In recent years, the company has started creating white chocolate confections and also sells Ethel M Ice Cream in its Henderson factory retail location at SunsetRoad and Mountain Vista. A privately held corporation, Ethel M Chocolates is a mtgor contributor to the boxed chocolate industry that grossed more than $1 billion nationwide last year. According to Larry Larsen, McCarran's assistant director of business, the company is one of the facility's leading general merchandise retailejrs. "In terms of sales, Ethel M Chocolates is one of the top concessions in the airport," he said. The company directly ships premium gourmet chocolates to customers around the country from its Henderson-based headquarters, with delimy made within three days to guarantee freshness. Founded in 1981 by renowned chocolate manufacturer Forrest Mars, the firm employs 450 people and operates retail stores in Las Vegas, Arizona and Pennsylvania. For more information contact brand manager Rich Clemmensen, 435-2639. HENDERSON'S LAS VEGAS LANDSCAPE SUPPLY DISCOUNT PRICES! Complete Line of Decorative Rocl( Custom Soil Blends & Planting Mixes Irrigation & Drip Systems Win ^SOQco in Jewels WEEKLY! from Rebel Jewelers Listen to ART KEVIN Weekdays 6-lOa.m. AWnite Cnristmas Returns to Las\fe^as. Ihe aream of a white Cnristmas in Las Vegas is now a reality. Announcing the return of the World Famous Royal Lipizxaner Stallions! Behold an unparalleled performance of grace, power, and majesty And witness an equestrian Symphony in White. Just in time to celebrate Christmas in the Royal Spirit of Excalibur. Snowtimes: 2pm. Monday tnni Friday 12 noon & 2pm. Sat. & Sun. Dark Tec nesday per person VQumm HOTEL/CASINO 597-7600 Jewish Community Center welcomes new director The Jewish Community Center of Southern Nevada recently announced the appointment of Shelly Katz as its first executive director. "We feel very fortunate to have been able to bring to Las Vegas a person of such outstanding qualifications and extensive experience within the JCC movement," said Nadine Kaufman, JCCSN president. There is no question in my mind that Shelly Katz is the person to meet the challenge of developing the kind of Jewish Community CenterthatSouthem Nevada so desperately needs," said Kaufman. Katz' experience in the Jewish community, and particularly as president of the Jewish Community Center of Albany, N.Y., made her a natural for the position of JCCSN executive director. The post was made possible through the generous support of the Jewish Federation of Las Vegas. A native of Youngstown, Ohio, Katz spent the last 15 years in Albany, N.Y. Her extensive background includes professional. entrepreneurial, and volunteer positions in a variety of organizations. Aa presidentofthe Albany JCC, she was responsible for policy direction of an organization of 1,900 members with a $2 million budget. The mother of three, Katz opted to move to Las Vegas to be closer to her family in Los Angeles. Her daughter, Jessica, a junior at Cornell University, is studying this year at Tel Aviv University. Her daughter Alisa, who recently spent several months at school in Hod Ha'Sharon in Israel, is a senior at the Las Vegas Academy for the Performing Arts and International Studies. Her son David, an aspiring actor, also attends Las Vegas Academy as a sophomore. Volunteers are needed to hielp Katz in the development and growth of JCC which is destined to serve the entire Jewish community in the Las Vegas area with social, cultural and athletic activities for all age groups. For more information, call 794-0090. Courtesy Photo HELPING UMC—FromleftareDeweyDooian, director of operations, Taco Bell, Leroy Mace, Reina Muric, Francisca Esquierda, Marysue Soltero, human resources, Taco Bell, Blanca Muric, and Stephanie De La Cruz. Kids and seniors receive holiday bonus The Children's Miracle Network and senior food banks in Clark County are receiving a substantial holiday bonus from Pepsi Bottling Company and Taco Bell restaurants. Continuing to Christmas Day, one cent from each original taco sold and one cent from each 32 oz. Pepsi are being donated to help children through the UMC Children's Miracle Network. More than 800,000 tacos and 90,000 Pepsi drinks have already been sold. At the same time, thousands of non-perishable food items for senior citizenshavebeen collected at food bank drop-off points at every local Taco Bell. Employees are donating their time helping to collect and distribute food bank items at each location. "Las Vegans have shown a big appetite to help the children and seniors in our community," said Dewey Doolan, director of operations for Taco Bell Restaurants. Contact Tim Quillin at 3683333 for more information. You're Invited Candlelight Christmas Eve Services 5:00 and 8:00 P.M. December 24th Christmas Day Worship Service 10:00 A.M. December 25th Highland Hills Baptist Church 615 College Drive, Henderson (College at Horizon) 566-0200 ^••wBSI Come Celebrate Christmas With UsI Don't mix drugs without labels Although over-the-counter medicines are usually quite safe when taken as directed, it's important to give product labels an especially close look before taking two or more drugs at the same time, says a registered pharmacist at Stanford University Medical Center. Lisa Tuomi, drug information coordinator for Stanford Health Services, says a common hazard is combining an aspirin or aspirin substitute with a cold medicine that may contain the same ingredient. "Cold medications often contain aspirin or a similar analgesic, and if so, you'll be getting a potentially dangerous overdose if you take both at the same time," she says. Side effects from excessive doses of .aspirin include gastric bleedingorstomachirritation.and ringing in the ears. Similarly, decongestants or nasal sprays (Neo-Synephrine and Sudafed are common examples), often contain ingredients similar or identical to those in diet pills, adding up to a potentially dangerous dose when combined. "Again, these drugs are safe when taken as directed, but when combined, they can trigger dangerous reactions, including high blood pressure, glaucoma or THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY heart palpitations," the pharmacist says. She says look on labels to see if any of the active ingredients li sted are the same on each medication. If so, a potentially excessive dose is likely. Tuomi suggests that when people have questions about drug combinations, they should check with their physician or a registered pharmacist to ensure that they are not doubHng up or mixing incompatible medicines. When your doctor writes a prescription, it' s a good idea to mention any other drugs— including over-the-counter medications—you're already taking, Tuomi says. Adrug that might initially seem to be the best choice for your condition might be dangerous if taken with something else. Prescription drugs taken in the wrong combination can be even more dangerous than incompatible over-the-counter medications, she notes. l/'^ff'f|rvv^:S?:>:^* • y^^. .-A*' Aging Eyes... Have Attractive Options hieredilary fat deposits Drooping upper lid Bagg/ng lower lid Traditional eye lifts will help drooping, tired looking eyes look younger and refreshed. A newer specialized procedure smooths away hereditary fat deposits which cause eyes to look older. Using this procedure, puffy fat deposits forming bags belcw the eyes are removed without external incisions and patients can return to normal activities the following day. We offer the latest refinements in cosmetic and plastic surgery for the eyes. Please call for a consultation and let's discuss the options which can help your eyes look their very best. 3201 S. Maryland Pkwy., las \fegas 732-3255 DR. JOSEPH SHALEV, M.D., FA.C.S. Board Certified Ophthalrvic Physician & Surgeon 108 E. Lake Mead, Henderson • 999 Adams Blvd., Boulder City 564-2539 293-0551 HOLIDAY CASH Holiday Fantasy _Cash Giveaway December 15-30,1994 Drannss each nisht in the casino Just in time for the holidays! From Dec. 15 thru Dec. 30 we're giving away up to $3,000 in cash a day as part of our Holiday Fantasy Cash Giveaway promotion. You can start earning drawing tickets in the casino as early as noon Monday, Dec. 12. The more you play, the more chances you have to win. It's easy and it's free. Details are posted in the casino. Sam's Town's Holiday Fantasy Cash Giveaway. It's another reason why the holidays are brighter in the New West! Welcome to the New liesti SAM'S TOVTN HOTEL & GAMBLING HALL I I A M I N Ci () AND i; () LI L 1) I iv H U. M VV A^ SSBBBSKSSW • ^J3RSP5?

PAGE 27

Page BIO Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, December 22,1994 Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Page B11 Credit card tips offered It's a sinkingfeeling—you're in line ready to pay for a hoHday purchase or on the phone confirming your plane reservations, when you can't find your credit card. A panic attack sets in as you dig through your wallet Attorney General Frankie Sue Del Papa cautions if you misplace a credit card or believe it has been stolen, it's crucial to act immediately. Delaying a report to the credit card issuer could cost you a lot of money. When you pay with a credit card, the items or services are charged and billed to you at a later date. If you report a lost credit card before someone else uses it, you have no liability. Under federal law, however, you're responsible for up to $50 for charges made on each unreported card. Federal law also provides] protection for you as a credit card holder. If you have a dispute with a merchant and are unable to solve it directly, your card issuer] will negotiate chargebacks for billing errors. Here is another problem area| to watch out for when holiday shopping. When you pay for your purchase with a credit car, you may be asked for your phone number or other bankingj information. Don't give it out! Ethel M opens new airport stores Ethel M Chocolates opened two new stores and two newly-renovated shops during recent ceremonies at McCarran International Airport. Gov. Bob Miller, who assisted with the ribbon cutting at the new stores, call the event "my idea of heaven," and congratulated the company on its growth and contributions to the state's economy. The event was the grant opening for a new store in the expanded C Concourse, a new kiosk in the Charter International Terminal, and the redesign of stores in the A-B and C Concourses. The new C Concourse store is the first fi-anchise for thebusiness, is owned by former UNLV and National Basketball Association player Sidney Green. Mary Foster, Ethel M business director, said the company "is pleased to be a growing part of the Las Vegas community. Our unique chocolates and new store design will make purchasing our products a real pleasure for cxistomers," Foster said. The four retail shops, designed by New York architect Daniel J. Barteluce, feature a curvilinear design and thick glass shelves to display thenew Ethel M gift boxes, which make it easier for lovers of Sprint Cellular Star DUI hotline marks 3rd year Marking its third armiversary this month. Star DUI Hotline calls resulted in more than 1,172 arrests between Jan. 1 and Oct. 30. The Hotline generated 8,363 calls during the same time period. "In a city where more than 140,000 persons routinely carry cellular phones. Star DUI has proven itself to be an invaluable tool in deterring drunk driving as well as in the apprehension of drunk driving offenders," said Kent Van Metre, regional marketing manager of Sprint Cellular. "Anyone contemplating driving while under the influence now only has to think once, not twice, to know that their peers— concerned citizens—have the ability to immediately report erratic driving," he said. Sandy Heverly, executive director of STOP DUI, says stati sties show that driving under the influence vehicular crashes are down by 547 in Clark County since 1990. In that year, prior to the inception of Star DUI, vehicular crashes associated with DUI in Clark County were at a record 2,605. Heverly credits programs such as Sprint Cellul ar's Star DUI with increasing public awareness. "Sprint Cellular is to be commended for its foresight in being the first to develop a program that enables the average citizen to take a pro-active stand against drunk driving," he said. To report suspected DUIs, Sprint Cellular customers dial • DUI ( • 384) and press "send" to reach the hotline. There are no charges for Hotline usage. Callers are asked not to follow or interfere in any way with a suspected drunk driver. Rather, they are asked to provide the vehicle's make, color, license number, roadway location, direction of travel and any other pertinent information that may be helpful to police officers. According to Van Metre, Star DUI in Southern Nevada is helping to save lives. "Sprint Cellular is committed to being a integral part in the well-being of the communities we serve. Business and industry must be active participants in the overall health of its communities and neighbors. Star DUI is just one way Sprint Cellular continues to demonstrate this commitment." K !"" "' '9 f • ^^K^^Ll H.Ji—iS -^ ^^^BL-J—li Natalie J. Blackorby Blackorby named Miss Junior Natalie J. Blackorby, daughter of Jerry and Cathy Blackorby, earned the title Miss Junior East Highland Hills Teen Queen Nov. 1. The Henderson resident is active on the junior varsity quiz team. National Honor Society, leadership club and teen volunteer program. She is an eighth-grader at Burkholder Middle School. She will advance to the Miss' Junior America Nevada competition in June. Blackorby has been honored with The President's Youth Service Award and National Junior Honor Society. Her sponsors wereherparents. Gold Casters Jewelry, Hairitage Beauty Salon and Horizon Video. Duracell invites students to enter scholarship competition Duracell is calling all high school students to join in the 13th annual Duracell/NSTA Scholarship Competition. Winners will be eligible for a\yard8 totalling over $90,000 in savings bonds. The Duracell/NSTA Competition offers students in grades 9-12 thecreative challenge of inventing a battery-powered device. The device can be made at home or as part of a science or industrial arts class project. One hundred students receive U.S. Savings Bonds for their battery-powered ideas and everyone who enters receives a free gift. The top six winners, with their parents and science teachers, are guests of Duracell at the 43rd annual Convention of the National Science Teachers Association in Philadelphia. The top awards will be presented at a luncheon on March 23 where the winners will demonstrate their inventions for scientists and educators. Lastyear's top prize of a $20,000 U.S. savings bond went to Tracy Phillips of Long Island, NY, for her invention of Money Talks, a billfold that audibly reports the denominations of paper money. Other winners include a bicycle alarm, a timed pill dispenser, and an automatic page turner for musicians. The competition grants a first place savings bond of $20,000, five second place $10,000 bonds, ten third place $1,000 bonds, 25fourth place bonds of $200 each, and savings bonds of $100 each for 59 fifth place winners. Theora Webb, Duracell Director of Public Affairs, said, "In this competition many young women and men in our nation's high schools create interesting and unusual technological, electronic and mechanical devices. We appreciate seeing the sense of accomplishment that students get from this experience." To enter the competition a student must design and build a battery-powered device that is educational, useful and/or entertaining. It must run on any one or a combination of Duracell batteries — AAA, AA, D, C, 9-volt or lantern size. Entrants must also submit a written description, wiringdiagram, and photo of their device by 5 p.m. Friday, Jan. 13, 1995. Entries are judged on creativity, practicality, energy efficiency and on the clarity of the written descriptions. Teachers of the top 100 finalists receive gifts and sponsoring teachers of the top sue winners receive an IBM PSI computer system. Entry forms and rules are available from science and to her teachers, and from the: Duracell/ NSTA Scholarship Competition, 1840 Wilson Blvd, Arlington, VA 222 01-3000, 703-243-7100. O O] O O O O Tis the Season... 3sLJ CAFE SENSATIONS We create Sensational party trays and dessert platters for your holiday gatherings. Heated Outdoor Seating • Live Music Fri & Sat Speciality Baskets created by Stephanie that will compliment any occasion. Voted #1 by lh L.V. Entertainment book :si;i:oi u A MI; I Iooi). • Soups, Salads, Sandwiches • Dascerts • b—r. Win* • Frth Bakad Muffins, Cookis, FahffM Muffins 4350 E. Sunttt • Hndfson, 1^ 89014 (corner of Athenian & Suntel) 456-7803. oo Everyone is welcome to have mass at ST. PETER'S 1994 Masses Christmas Eve Saturday v5;00. 7:00p.m. & Midnight Christmas Day. Sunday 8:00. 10:00. 11:30 (Spanish) a.m. & 5:00 p.m. New Year's Eve Saturday 5:00 p.m. New Year's Day Sunday 8:00. 10:00. 11:30 a.m. & 5 p.m. St. Peter the Apostle Church 204 South Boulder Hwy. 565-8406 the chocolates to buy their favorite products. In recent years, the company has started creating white chocolate confections and also sells Ethel M Ice Cream in its Henderson factory retail location at SunsetRoad and Mountain Vista. A privately held corporation, Ethel M Chocolates is a mtgor contributor to the boxed chocolate industry that grossed more than $1 billion nationwide last year. According to Larry Larsen, McCarran's assistant director of business, the company is one of the facility's leading general merchandise retailejrs. "In terms of sales, Ethel M Chocolates is one of the top concessions in the airport," he said. The company directly ships premium gourmet chocolates to customers around the country from its Henderson-based headquarters, with delimy made within three days to guarantee freshness. Founded in 1981 by renowned chocolate manufacturer Forrest Mars, the firm employs 450 people and operates retail stores in Las Vegas, Arizona and Pennsylvania. For more information contact brand manager Rich Clemmensen, 435-2639. HENDERSON'S LAS VEGAS LANDSCAPE SUPPLY DISCOUNT PRICES! Complete Line of Decorative Rocl( Custom Soil Blends & Planting Mixes Irrigation & Drip Systems Win ^SOQco in Jewels WEEKLY! from Rebel Jewelers Listen to ART KEVIN Weekdays 6-lOa.m. AWnite Cnristmas Returns to Las\fe^as. Ihe aream of a white Cnristmas in Las Vegas is now a reality. Announcing the return of the World Famous Royal Lipizxaner Stallions! Behold an unparalleled performance of grace, power, and majesty And witness an equestrian Symphony in White. Just in time to celebrate Christmas in the Royal Spirit of Excalibur. Snowtimes: 2pm. Monday tnni Friday 12 noon & 2pm. Sat. & Sun. Dark Tec nesday per person VQumm HOTEL/CASINO 597-7600 Jewish Community Center welcomes new director The Jewish Community Center of Southern Nevada recently announced the appointment of Shelly Katz as its first executive director. "We feel very fortunate to have been able to bring to Las Vegas a person of such outstanding qualifications and extensive experience within the JCC movement," said Nadine Kaufman, JCCSN president. There is no question in my mind that Shelly Katz is the person to meet the challenge of developing the kind of Jewish Community CenterthatSouthem Nevada so desperately needs," said Kaufman. Katz' experience in the Jewish community, and particularly as president of the Jewish Community Center of Albany, N.Y., made her a natural for the position of JCCSN executive director. The post was made possible through the generous support of the Jewish Federation of Las Vegas. A native of Youngstown, Ohio, Katz spent the last 15 years in Albany, N.Y. Her extensive background includes professional. entrepreneurial, and volunteer positions in a variety of organizations. Aa presidentofthe Albany JCC, she was responsible for policy direction of an organization of 1,900 members with a $2 million budget. The mother of three, Katz opted to move to Las Vegas to be closer to her family in Los Angeles. Her daughter, Jessica, a junior at Cornell University, is studying this year at Tel Aviv University. Her daughter Alisa, who recently spent several months at school in Hod Ha'Sharon in Israel, is a senior at the Las Vegas Academy for the Performing Arts and International Studies. Her son David, an aspiring actor, also attends Las Vegas Academy as a sophomore. Volunteers are needed to hielp Katz in the development and growth of JCC which is destined to serve the entire Jewish community in the Las Vegas area with social, cultural and athletic activities for all age groups. For more information, call 794-0090. Courtesy Photo HELPING UMC—FromleftareDeweyDooian, director of operations, Taco Bell, Leroy Mace, Reina Muric, Francisca Esquierda, Marysue Soltero, human resources, Taco Bell, Blanca Muric, and Stephanie De La Cruz. Kids and seniors receive holiday bonus The Children's Miracle Network and senior food banks in Clark County are receiving a substantial holiday bonus from Pepsi Bottling Company and Taco Bell restaurants. Continuing to Christmas Day, one cent from each original taco sold and one cent from each 32 oz. Pepsi are being donated to help children through the UMC Children's Miracle Network. More than 800,000 tacos and 90,000 Pepsi drinks have already been sold. At the same time, thousands of non-perishable food items for senior citizenshavebeen collected at food bank drop-off points at every local Taco Bell. Employees are donating their time helping to collect and distribute food bank items at each location. "Las Vegans have shown a big appetite to help the children and seniors in our community," said Dewey Doolan, director of operations for Taco Bell Restaurants. Contact Tim Quillin at 3683333 for more information. You're Invited Candlelight Christmas Eve Services 5:00 and 8:00 P.M. December 24th Christmas Day Worship Service 10:00 A.M. December 25th Highland Hills Baptist Church 615 College Drive, Henderson (College at Horizon) 566-0200 ^••wBSI Come Celebrate Christmas With UsI Don't mix drugs without labels Although over-the-counter medicines are usually quite safe when taken as directed, it's important to give product labels an especially close look before taking two or more drugs at the same time, says a registered pharmacist at Stanford University Medical Center. Lisa Tuomi, drug information coordinator for Stanford Health Services, says a common hazard is combining an aspirin or aspirin substitute with a cold medicine that may contain the same ingredient. "Cold medications often contain aspirin or a similar analgesic, and if so, you'll be getting a potentially dangerous overdose if you take both at the same time," she says. Side effects from excessive doses of .aspirin include gastric bleedingorstomachirritation.and ringing in the ears. Similarly, decongestants or nasal sprays (Neo-Synephrine and Sudafed are common examples), often contain ingredients similar or identical to those in diet pills, adding up to a potentially dangerous dose when combined. "Again, these drugs are safe when taken as directed, but when combined, they can trigger dangerous reactions, including high blood pressure, glaucoma or THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY heart palpitations," the pharmacist says. She says look on labels to see if any of the active ingredients li sted are the same on each medication. If so, a potentially excessive dose is likely. Tuomi suggests that when people have questions about drug combinations, they should check with their physician or a registered pharmacist to ensure that they are not doubHng up or mixing incompatible medicines. When your doctor writes a prescription, it' s a good idea to mention any other drugs— including over-the-counter medications—you're already taking, Tuomi says. Adrug that might initially seem to be the best choice for your condition might be dangerous if taken with something else. Prescription drugs taken in the wrong combination can be even more dangerous than incompatible over-the-counter medications, she notes. l/'^ff'f|rvv^:S?:>:^* • y^^. .-A*' Aging Eyes... Have Attractive Options hieredilary fat deposits Drooping upper lid Bagg/ng lower lid Traditional eye lifts will help drooping, tired looking eyes look younger and refreshed. A newer specialized procedure smooths away hereditary fat deposits which cause eyes to look older. Using this procedure, puffy fat deposits forming bags belcw the eyes are removed without external incisions and patients can return to normal activities the following day. We offer the latest refinements in cosmetic and plastic surgery for the eyes. Please call for a consultation and let's discuss the options which can help your eyes look their very best. 3201 S. Maryland Pkwy., las \fegas 732-3255 DR. JOSEPH SHALEV, M.D., FA.C.S. Board Certified Ophthalrvic Physician & Surgeon 108 E. Lake Mead, Henderson • 999 Adams Blvd., Boulder City 564-2539 293-0551 HOLIDAY CASH Holiday Fantasy _Cash Giveaway December 15-30,1994 Drannss each nisht in the casino Just in time for the holidays! From Dec. 15 thru Dec. 30 we're giving away up to $3,000 in cash a day as part of our Holiday Fantasy Cash Giveaway promotion. You can start earning drawing tickets in the casino as early as noon Monday, Dec. 12. The more you play, the more chances you have to win. It's easy and it's free. Details are posted in the casino. Sam's Town's Holiday Fantasy Cash Giveaway. It's another reason why the holidays are brighter in the New West! Welcome to the New liesti SAM'S TOVTN HOTEL & GAMBLING HALL I I A M I N Ci () AND i; () LI L 1) I iv H U. M VV A^ SSBBBSKSSW • ^J3RSP5?

PAGE 28

Page B12 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, December 22,1994 Network group meets The Power Breakfast, a new, no membership fee," business networking group meets every Thursday morning at 7 am. at the R-Bar located at 6000 West Charleston Blvd. (comer of Jones and West Charleston). Each week, a member will have the opportunity to make a presentation about their company or line of work. On Thursday, Dec. 22, Michael Firestone (aka The Pen Man") will make a presentation on his designer pen business. For more information about the networking group, contact Liz Garrison, 658-2252. Pacific Properties and Pacific Homes employees visit the UMC pediatric department. Pacific Homes' employees celebrate season This holiday season has already been a fulfilling one for the 186 employees of Pacific Properties and Pacific Homes, all of whom pitched in to make the hohdays brighter for children at University Medical Center and Sunrise Hospital and patients at Nathan Adeison Hospice. The employees contributed to a fund used to purchase gifts for patients at each of those facilities, then a group of employees sang Christmas carols as the gifts were presented. Wearing matching outfits and bearing a large sack of gifts, Pacific Properties and Pacific Homes employees, their children and Santa, met last Saturday, Dec. 10, to distribute gifts and sing carols to the children in the pediatric department at UMC. The group will also visit the pediatric department at Sunrise Hospital and patients at Nathan Adeison Hospice this week. The holiday greetings were organized by Sharon Pribil, an executive assistant for Steven Molasky, who along with brother Alan, owns Pacific Homes. "We wanted to do something that would make us feel truly good this holiday season," Pribil said. Using the company's newsletter to communicate, she recruited volunteers for the caroling while Nancy Licata, sales and marketing assistant, asked employees to contribute for the gifls. The group also held several caroling practices before its appearances at the local hospitals. Reclamation enters agreement witli Hoover Dam power consumers to hold power costs down A new agreement between the producers and consumers of Hoover Dam power will hold electricity costs down while maintaining the reliability of on of the largest powerplants in America. Fifteen wholesale and retail electric utilities in Arizona, California, and Nevada receive the hydroelectric power generated at Hoover by the Bureau of Reclamation and sold by the Western Area Power Administration. This new partnership ensures continued low-cost power consistent with sound business practices. Daniel P. Beard, commissioner of the Bureau of Reclamation, signed the agreement, culminating more than 20 months of negotiations among Reclamation, Western, and the power contractors to resolve issues related to the operation and maintenance of Hoover Dam. "This agreement brings the Hoover power consumers into our decision-making process in an unprecedented way," Beard said. "It clearly demonstrates the federal government's commitment to customer service. We are listening to our customers' SUPPORT YOUR COMIVIUNITY NEWSPAPER concerns and inviting them to participate in our decisions to ensure they are satisfied with our services and products." The major issues resolved by the agreement included: •Creating a coordinating committee, consisting of a member from each power contractor and federal agency, to review and seek agreementon all criteria, policies, and procedures developed by Reclamation and Western for Hoover's operation, maintenance, marketing, and repair. •Protecting currentcustomers again over-investment in the replacement of long-lasting equipment. •Recovering the cost overruns on the Hoover Visitor Facilities with a new system of user fees and concession revenues to the greatest extent possible. •Expeditingfinancial audits of the books, records,and financial statements of the project. Hoover generates an average of 4.5 million kilowatt-hours of hydroelectricpower annually. The power is delivered by the Western Area Power Administration to 15 contractors. WIC (Women, Infants, and Children Supplemental Food Program) Providing Food to Low Income pregnant, breastfeeding women, anjd families with children under 5 years of age. For more information contact an E.O.B. Health Clinic near you East Las Vegas 451-7699 Henderson 565-0727 SCOTT L. BINDRUP, ESQ. Admitted to Practice in Nevada, Texas & New York Is Pleased to Announce the Relocation of LAW OFFICES OF SCOTT L. BINDRUP A Professional Corporation Practice Limited To CRIMINAL DEFENSE to FIRST INTERSTATK BANK BUILDING 302 EAST CARSON AVENUE, SUITE 806 LAS VEGAS, NEVADA 89101 (702) 382-2222 Fax (702) 382-3443 FIRST HENDERSON United Methodist Church 609 Horizon Dr., Henderson Rev. Marvin R. Cant, Pastor CHRISTMAS EVE SERVICES Saturday, December 24 5 p.m. Celebration of Praise of Jesus' Birth Candlelight Service 7 p.m. Family Candlelight Service 11 p.m. Holy Communion Candlelight Service CHRISTMAS DAY SERVICES Sunday, December 25 8 a.m. Christmas Day Celebration & Praise 10:45 Christmas Day Traditional Worship Sen/ice "ENJOY YOUD CHDBTMAS ...m\}& HANDLE THE HOLIDAY FEA6TI." ONLY Per Person Your Choice December 25 • Served from 11 am to 10 pm Glass of wine for Adults Glass of Apple Juice for Children Chicken Supreme soup or "All You Can Eal" Salad Bar DOA6TYOUNG TUQKEY Chestnut Dressing Giblet Gravy Cranberry Sauce or BAKED (SUGAD CUDED HAM Brandy Fruit Sauce ?mafp\e Rin^ Whipped Potatoes or Candied Yame Dutch Mixed Vegetables 'Hot Pinner Rolls Pumpkin Pie or Minced Meat Pie Coffee or Tea LIVE ENTERTAINMENT IN THE • SILHOUETTE LOUNGE Thursday, 7:30 pm • Fri. & Sat. 8:30 pm • Sun. 5:30 pm OUR U5UAL EXTENSIVE AND COMPLETE MENU WILL ALSO BE ON HAND (NO BUFFET TOPAY) CASINO & RESTAURANT GREAT FOOD. GREAT FUN. GREAT PLACE! 1741 N, Boulder Hwy. (1 block S. of Sunset Rd. Henderson, NV) Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Pege B13 'Christmas is God's Answer' A man sent his friend a cryptic Christmas card. It said: A B C D E FGHIJKMNOPQRSTUV WXYZ. The recipient puzzled over it for weeks, finally gave up and wrote asking for an explanation. In July he received the explanation on a postcard: "No L." And indeed "Noel," Christmas is Crod's answer to our questions for life and truth. And in many ways we want and don't want that answer. We cannot stand the person who seems to have all the answers and many times with good reason. Can we stand God's answer even if we were sure it was his? Once we admired honest and constructive faith; our ideal today seems to be the honesty of the doubter and destroyers of the faith, particularly if he or she can deny the content of faith in the name of faith. But there are moods when we are more receptive to faith's findings. Christmas offers us peculiarly the mood of faith. It is no time for the argumentative mood any more than the spirit of credulity. But it can give us the dtancefor honestopenness beyond our ordinary routine for critical thinking. Within this unusual setting of openness I want simply to suggest God's answer to our need for life and truth, within the kind of simplicity, in fact, that leaves both sincerity and sophistication behind. St. John tells us in his Gospel "And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, full of grace and truth; we have beheld his glory, glory as of the only Son firom the Father." (John 1:14, New Revised Standard Version). Christ, bom of the Virgin Mary, the Incarnation of God in a man, completely human and yet completely divine (Colossians 2:9). Before Christ came, people could only know God partially. After Christ came, people could know God fully, because he became visible and tangible in Christ. Christ is the perfect expression of God in human form. In this fiillness of time God answered men and women's quest for the truth by a kind of life. The most meaningful truth is neither of thought nor of fact but it is a way of living. The deepest understanding comes not at the end of an argument but through the beginning of a new relationship with the Son of God. Harvard University has a venerable motto, "Veritas pro Christo et Ecclesia." Modem citizens, usually make use of the first word only. But the motto is right in its deepest insistence that truth is for a kind of life and a kind of See Sermon Page B4 WEEKLY SERMON MARVING/JNT"^^""^ UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Church & Synagogue Directory ^•to i^MAaMttl mm mmmmm SUNDAY Morning Bible Study 9:30 Morning Worship 10:30 Evening Worship 6:00 WEDNESDAY Bible Study 7 pm 104 Victory Rd. (off Water St.) 565-8186 To List Your Qiurch in our Directory, call Goldie at 435-7700 after 2:00 p.m. _jHiGHL^HlLLS 615 CoUege Drive • Henderson • 566-0200 Sunday Worship Services: 8:30 am. 11:00 am, 7:00 pm Come join this Sunday! We Care About Your Famllyl TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM EstabUshed 1947 The Largest Congregation in Nevoda Atflilioted with United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism & Solomon Schechter Day Schools OUR MEMBERSHIP IS OPEN, COME GROW WITH US!!! l600EaflOak*yBlvd. • Lat Vagat, Navodo • 384-5070 GREEN VAIIEY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH New Saturday Service 5:30 p.m. Sunday Worship 8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 a.m. Nursery All Sen/ices 1798 Wigwam Pkwy. MJ (NE corner of \A^igwam PkMry & S^SB Valle Verde Drr) Phone: 454-8484 ^7\ im Christ The Servant Lutheran Church 263-0802 Sunday Worship 8 & 10:30 am Sunday School 9:15 am Sunday Evening Worship 7 pm Visitors Welcome • Nursery Available 2 South Pecos Rd. Henderson Henderson Grace Church of the Nazerene Newton Elem. School Greenwoy & Horizon Sunday School 9AM Worship 10 AM 434-1312 St. Timothy's Episcopal Church Pastor Rev. Dr. Uoyd Rupp We Invite You to Come and Worship with Us cd 10:00 A.M. Each Sunday Pacific & Panama Downtown Henderson Church Office 565-8033 GREEN VALLEY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 454-7989 2200 Robindale Road 8:15 Worship Services 9:30 am & 11 am Worship & Sunday School Child Care lor Infants and Toddlers Rev. Tom Mattick THE CHURCH FOR YOUR FUTURE NOW! GREEN VALLEY Evangelical Lutheran Churcti 1799 Wigwam Parlships not buildmqs W/" FOUNDED IN 1920 BY l-W*/ PARAMAHANSA YOCANANDA Las Vegas Meditation Group Sundays 11:00 a.m. Thursdays 7:00 p.m. Please ull for inforination: 645-2303 L [i>o/y • ^0[ /'A :.^\^ iCjJ ^ i 1^1^^^ y ^^VfS B ^ i^PiSmM M m i 1 ^ 1

PAGE 29

Page B12 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, December 22,1994 Network group meets The Power Breakfast, a new, no membership fee," business networking group meets every Thursday morning at 7 am. at the R-Bar located at 6000 West Charleston Blvd. (comer of Jones and West Charleston). Each week, a member will have the opportunity to make a presentation about their company or line of work. On Thursday, Dec. 22, Michael Firestone (aka The Pen Man") will make a presentation on his designer pen business. For more information about the networking group, contact Liz Garrison, 658-2252. Pacific Properties and Pacific Homes employees visit the UMC pediatric department. Pacific Homes' employees celebrate season This holiday season has already been a fulfilling one for the 186 employees of Pacific Properties and Pacific Homes, all of whom pitched in to make the hohdays brighter for children at University Medical Center and Sunrise Hospital and patients at Nathan Adeison Hospice. The employees contributed to a fund used to purchase gifts for patients at each of those facilities, then a group of employees sang Christmas carols as the gifts were presented. Wearing matching outfits and bearing a large sack of gifts, Pacific Properties and Pacific Homes employees, their children and Santa, met last Saturday, Dec. 10, to distribute gifts and sing carols to the children in the pediatric department at UMC. The group will also visit the pediatric department at Sunrise Hospital and patients at Nathan Adeison Hospice this week. The holiday greetings were organized by Sharon Pribil, an executive assistant for Steven Molasky, who along with brother Alan, owns Pacific Homes. "We wanted to do something that would make us feel truly good this holiday season," Pribil said. Using the company's newsletter to communicate, she recruited volunteers for the caroling while Nancy Licata, sales and marketing assistant, asked employees to contribute for the gifls. The group also held several caroling practices before its appearances at the local hospitals. Reclamation enters agreement witli Hoover Dam power consumers to hold power costs down A new agreement between the producers and consumers of Hoover Dam power will hold electricity costs down while maintaining the reliability of on of the largest powerplants in America. Fifteen wholesale and retail electric utilities in Arizona, California, and Nevada receive the hydroelectric power generated at Hoover by the Bureau of Reclamation and sold by the Western Area Power Administration. This new partnership ensures continued low-cost power consistent with sound business practices. Daniel P. Beard, commissioner of the Bureau of Reclamation, signed the agreement, culminating more than 20 months of negotiations among Reclamation, Western, and the power contractors to resolve issues related to the operation and maintenance of Hoover Dam. "This agreement brings the Hoover power consumers into our decision-making process in an unprecedented way," Beard said. "It clearly demonstrates the federal government's commitment to customer service. We are listening to our customers' SUPPORT YOUR COMIVIUNITY NEWSPAPER concerns and inviting them to participate in our decisions to ensure they are satisfied with our services and products." The major issues resolved by the agreement included: •Creating a coordinating committee, consisting of a member from each power contractor and federal agency, to review and seek agreementon all criteria, policies, and procedures developed by Reclamation and Western for Hoover's operation, maintenance, marketing, and repair. •Protecting currentcustomers again over-investment in the replacement of long-lasting equipment. •Recovering the cost overruns on the Hoover Visitor Facilities with a new system of user fees and concession revenues to the greatest extent possible. •Expeditingfinancial audits of the books, records,and financial statements of the project. Hoover generates an average of 4.5 million kilowatt-hours of hydroelectricpower annually. The power is delivered by the Western Area Power Administration to 15 contractors. WIC (Women, Infants, and Children Supplemental Food Program) Providing Food to Low Income pregnant, breastfeeding women, anjd families with children under 5 years of age. For more information contact an E.O.B. Health Clinic near you East Las Vegas 451-7699 Henderson 565-0727 SCOTT L. BINDRUP, ESQ. Admitted to Practice in Nevada, Texas & New York Is Pleased to Announce the Relocation of LAW OFFICES OF SCOTT L. BINDRUP A Professional Corporation Practice Limited To CRIMINAL DEFENSE to FIRST INTERSTATK BANK BUILDING 302 EAST CARSON AVENUE, SUITE 806 LAS VEGAS, NEVADA 89101 (702) 382-2222 Fax (702) 382-3443 FIRST HENDERSON United Methodist Church 609 Horizon Dr., Henderson Rev. Marvin R. Cant, Pastor CHRISTMAS EVE SERVICES Saturday, December 24 5 p.m. Celebration of Praise of Jesus' Birth Candlelight Service 7 p.m. Family Candlelight Service 11 p.m. Holy Communion Candlelight Service CHRISTMAS DAY SERVICES Sunday, December 25 8 a.m. Christmas Day Celebration & Praise 10:45 Christmas Day Traditional Worship Sen/ice "ENJOY YOUD CHDBTMAS ...m\}& HANDLE THE HOLIDAY FEA6TI." ONLY Per Person Your Choice December 25 • Served from 11 am to 10 pm Glass of wine for Adults Glass of Apple Juice for Children Chicken Supreme soup or "All You Can Eal" Salad Bar DOA6TYOUNG TUQKEY Chestnut Dressing Giblet Gravy Cranberry Sauce or BAKED (SUGAD CUDED HAM Brandy Fruit Sauce ?mafp\e Rin^ Whipped Potatoes or Candied Yame Dutch Mixed Vegetables 'Hot Pinner Rolls Pumpkin Pie or Minced Meat Pie Coffee or Tea LIVE ENTERTAINMENT IN THE • SILHOUETTE LOUNGE Thursday, 7:30 pm • Fri. & Sat. 8:30 pm • Sun. 5:30 pm OUR U5UAL EXTENSIVE AND COMPLETE MENU WILL ALSO BE ON HAND (NO BUFFET TOPAY) CASINO & RESTAURANT GREAT FOOD. GREAT FUN. GREAT PLACE! 1741 N, Boulder Hwy. (1 block S. of Sunset Rd. Henderson, NV) Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Pege B13 'Christmas is God's Answer' A man sent his friend a cryptic Christmas card. It said: A B C D E FGHIJKMNOPQRSTUV WXYZ. The recipient puzzled over it for weeks, finally gave up and wrote asking for an explanation. In July he received the explanation on a postcard: "No L." And indeed "Noel," Christmas is Crod's answer to our questions for life and truth. And in many ways we want and don't want that answer. We cannot stand the person who seems to have all the answers and many times with good reason. Can we stand God's answer even if we were sure it was his? Once we admired honest and constructive faith; our ideal today seems to be the honesty of the doubter and destroyers of the faith, particularly if he or she can deny the content of faith in the name of faith. But there are moods when we are more receptive to faith's findings. Christmas offers us peculiarly the mood of faith. It is no time for the argumentative mood any more than the spirit of credulity. But it can give us the dtancefor honestopenness beyond our ordinary routine for critical thinking. Within this unusual setting of openness I want simply to suggest God's answer to our need for life and truth, within the kind of simplicity, in fact, that leaves both sincerity and sophistication behind. St. John tells us in his Gospel "And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, full of grace and truth; we have beheld his glory, glory as of the only Son firom the Father." (John 1:14, New Revised Standard Version). Christ, bom of the Virgin Mary, the Incarnation of God in a man, completely human and yet completely divine (Colossians 2:9). Before Christ came, people could only know God partially. After Christ came, people could know God fully, because he became visible and tangible in Christ. Christ is the perfect expression of God in human form. In this fiillness of time God answered men and women's quest for the truth by a kind of life. The most meaningful truth is neither of thought nor of fact but it is a way of living. The deepest understanding comes not at the end of an argument but through the beginning of a new relationship with the Son of God. Harvard University has a venerable motto, "Veritas pro Christo et Ecclesia." Modem citizens, usually make use of the first word only. But the motto is right in its deepest insistence that truth is for a kind of life and a kind of See Sermon Page B4 WEEKLY SERMON MARVING/JNT"^^""^ UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Church & Synagogue Directory ^•to i^MAaMttl mm mmmmm SUNDAY Morning Bible Study 9:30 Morning Worship 10:30 Evening Worship 6:00 WEDNESDAY Bible Study 7 pm 104 Victory Rd. (off Water St.) 565-8186 To List Your Qiurch in our Directory, call Goldie at 435-7700 after 2:00 p.m. _jHiGHL^HlLLS 615 CoUege Drive • Henderson • 566-0200 Sunday Worship Services: 8:30 am. 11:00 am, 7:00 pm Come join this Sunday! We Care About Your Famllyl TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM EstabUshed 1947 The Largest Congregation in Nevoda Atflilioted with United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism & Solomon Schechter Day Schools OUR MEMBERSHIP IS OPEN, COME GROW WITH US!!! l600EaflOak*yBlvd. • Lat Vagat, Navodo • 384-5070 GREEN VAIIEY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH New Saturday Service 5:30 p.m. Sunday Worship 8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:45 a.m. Nursery All Sen/ices 1798 Wigwam Pkwy. MJ (NE corner of \A^igwam PkMry & S^SB Valle Verde Drr) Phone: 454-8484 ^7\ im Christ The Servant Lutheran Church 263-0802 Sunday Worship 8 & 10:30 am Sunday School 9:15 am Sunday Evening Worship 7 pm Visitors Welcome • Nursery Available 2 South Pecos Rd. Henderson Henderson Grace Church of the Nazerene Newton Elem. School Greenwoy & Horizon Sunday School 9AM Worship 10 AM 434-1312 St. Timothy's Episcopal Church Pastor Rev. Dr. Uoyd Rupp We Invite You to Come and Worship with Us cd 10:00 A.M. Each Sunday Pacific & Panama Downtown Henderson Church Office 565-8033 GREEN VALLEY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 454-7989 2200 Robindale Road 8:15 Worship Services 9:30 am & 11 am Worship & Sunday School Child Care lor Infants and Toddlers Rev. Tom Mattick THE CHURCH FOR YOUR FUTURE NOW! GREEN VALLEY Evangelical Lutheran Churcti 1799 Wigwam Parlships not buildmqs W/" FOUNDED IN 1920 BY l-W*/ PARAMAHANSA YOCANANDA Las Vegas Meditation Group Sundays 11:00 a.m. Thursdays 7:00 p.m. Please ull for inforination: 645-2303 L [i>o/y • ^0[ /'A :.^\^ iCjJ ^ i 1^1^^^ y ^^VfS B ^ i^PiSmM M m i 1 ^ 1

PAGE 30

Page B14 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, December 22,1994 Salvation Army, Coldwell Banker cooperate in food drive for needy The public was invited to participate in the Salvation Army food drive by bringing non-perishable food items to three Coldwell Banker Premier Realty offices. According to Coldwell Banker Premier Realty's regional vice president George Murphy, "We have decided to make this worthy effort a biannual event. Keeping th"! pantries filled at this time of year is vitolly iinportant—just as it is in the summer months." Regional administrator Amy Payne pointed out, "It was such a success in July when we had our last food drive that some of our agents volunteered over the holidays in the Salvation Army dining room." According to Sumner Dodge, community relations director for the Salvation 'Army, "While we give food boxes away every day in our Family Service Center, we gave 275 Thanksgiving baskets and 275 Christmas baskets to our most needy famiUes." Dodge said thatthe most necessary non-perishable items were: cans of meat such as canned hams, tuna. Spam, ete., cons of vegetables, fruit and soup, canned milk and baby food, peanutbutter, boxes of dry soup mixes, macaroni and cheese and hot cereals. He said community support ran high during the holidays and that they had 1,000 "hands-on" volunteers who served in the dining room and coordinated gifts for the "Angel Trees" which held the names of needy children's requests for new toys and clothing. Dodge said that, this year, they have served 24,000 more meals in the dining room and 42% more homeless people have stayed in the shelter than last year. "Fifly thousand people will avail themselves of our over-all services during the year. Two thousand people will join us for holiday dinners alone. He said that there is a real need for donated turkeys and canned hams. Those interested in donating holiday items can call him, 870-4430. UNLVy local singing teachers present convention workshop The National Association of Teachers of Singing Las Vegas Chapter, and the UNLV music department will present the 1995 NATS Winter Workshop Jan. 1316, at Harrah's Casino Hotel. Clinicians and guest artists from around the country will present master classes, lectures and performances. Clinicians include Stephen Wadsworth, Chloe Owen, Elizabeth Mosher, Madeline Capelle, Violet Mesrop, Carol Kimball, Bruce Lunkley, Jean Westermann Gregg, Edward Baird and Louise Lerch. Teresa Santiago, soprano, is the winner of the 1994 Walter W. Naumberg Foundation International Vocal Competition. As part of UNLV's Chamber Music SouthwestSeries, she will present arecital on Friday, Jan. 13, in the Artemus W. Ham Concert Hall. Robert Breault, tenor, will present a recital on Sunday, Jan. 15, in the Nevada Ballroom at Harrah's. He is a Western Regional Winner of the National Association ofTeachers of Singing Artist's Awards and enjoys a varied career that features opera, oratorio and concert works. This season includes his Carnegie Hall debut and performances with the Atlanta Symphony, Utah Symphony, Atlanta Opera and his San Francisco Opera Debut Recitel. He is assistant professor of voice and director of opera at the University of Utah. Wadsworth, a leading teacher of acting to singers for over a decade will present a master class entitled "Freeing the Actor in a Singer." Owen, professor emerita at Boston University, has taught at Westminster Choir College on the Master Teachers Series, and as a Master Teacher for the NATS Internship program. She will present a master class entitled "Using the Alexander Technique in the Voice Studio." Mosher, professor and coordinator of voice at the University of Arizona. A Naumberg Award Winner, she will present a master class in 19th Century German Romantic Lied. Capella, an artist-in-residence and touring roster artist for the states of Idaho, Nevada, North and South Dakota, Oregon, and Wyoming, she works in music therapy. Registration for daily or full attendance is available. For more information, call 896-7452. SERMON: God's Answer From Page B13 community, for the community of the kind of faith where peace comes through goodwill. "Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace and good will toward all men and women" is a most needed truth especially in our dangerous day. What characterized the life of Jesus was his self-giving. He gave of himself to people. He walked with those who were shut out by society. His best gifts were his presence and of His power. Christmas never becomes alive in its true meaning and mystery until we see the lonely, struggling man on the cross. The joy of Christmas is not the joy of a pagan day nor of nature's turning, nor in cult mysticism or rampant commercialism. It is the joy of the Word made Flesh. God's answer to us comes in an eternal Word of Love. This is the meaning of Christmas. This is the mystery of Christmas. A little child gazing at the living candles of the Christmastide has become wrapped up in the mysterious light of the Christmas story. The meaning can be put into words, but the mystery knows only the luminous silence that flickers in the darkness...humankind's deepest need to know the meaning of love. Two thousand years ago, God came into a dark world with a strange kind of light. The world is still dark ana inai ngni is sun strange. But those who receive it even today, receive the power to become sons and daughters of the livingGod. Those who imderstand the light in the darkness as they were bom not of blood nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of men or women, but of God. As inner love gives newness of life, the Christmas light trembles with the fairest radiance life affords, and out of the darkness there still comes voices in the night, singing... "Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace and good will toward men and women." "For unto you is bom this day a Savior, which is Christ the Lord." y SN' Wishing You & Your Family a Happy Old Fashioned Christmas...Sunday, December 25 STEAK HOUSE 2:00 P.M. 8:00 P.M. Ill our Steak House, we will be serving Cliristma.s Dinner lor llio.se who desire more elegant (lining. KHSKRVATIONS SUGGHS TED 293-5000 In addition to our regular .Steak House menu, we will lealure RESTAURANT DINING 11:00 A.M.11:00 P.M. CHRISTMAS DINNER ONLY... ^5^^ ""'"' Children under 12...$3.95 plus tax Your choice of a complete dinner ROAST TOM TURKEY ROAST TOM TURKEY and Sage Dressing and Sage Dressing VIRGINIA BAKED HAM VIRGINIA BAKED HAM with fnill sauce and candied yams Int liMttiifl I |illl< r5 with ){ihlrl gravy, vrnrlalilrs, rrjuilwrry taiicr, h(il rrrlU, t)vf r.grs and |Hini|ikhi or apple pie wllh whipiml topp*n|. BUFFET FEAST Noon. • 10 p.m. CHRISTMAS $049 BUFFET DINNER 0(Piu.T.) STYLE TURKEY, ROAST BEEF AND fUM WITH AU TME TRIMMINGS Includes a beverage Courtesy Photo SHARING IS CARING — Staff and sales associates of Coldwell Banker Premier Realty are shown with Salvation Army community relations director Sumner Dodge displaying collection bins for nonperishable food items which were given to needy families of Southern Nevada. 3:00 p.m. Jesus' Birthday Party for young children and their families in our Fellowship Hall (A live animal and puppets will be there!) 4:00 p.m. Family Christmas Service featuring God's Music Makers (grades 3-5) and favorite carols 5:30 p.m. Family Christmas Services featuring special solos, instmmental music and carols 7:00 p.m. Candlelight and Holy Communion Service featuring the Celebration Singers and carols 8:30 p.m. Candlelight and Holy Communion Service featuring the Celebration Singers and carols 10:00 p.m. Candlelight and Holy Communion Service featuring the Chancel Choir and brass ensemble 11:30 p.m. Candlelight and Holy Communion Service featuring the Chancel Choir and brass ensemble Christmas Day^ Sunday, December 2$ 11:00 a.m. Christmas Day Holy Communion Services with 7:00 p.m. special music and candlelight PARKING: Professional parking attendants have been hired to assist you on Christmas Eve. CHILD CARE: Available in our new nursery in the main church next to the sanctuary. No charge. Professional sitters will be caring for your children. 3720 E. Tropicana Ave. Las Vegas, Nevada Phone: 458-2241 FLAMINGO \ Community Lutheran L_l TROPICANA \ § Q. RUSSELL r 1 SUNSET \ \ WHAT'S PIAYING Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News • Boulder City News PageBiB Palladium Players present 'Cinderella' The Palladium Panto Players, in association with the Kravenko Academy ofDance, will make their Las Vegas premiere in a unique version of the classic tale, "Cinderella," from Dec. 20-31. Performed by a castof 67 adults and children, with elaborate sets and costumes in traditional British Panto style, it will run at the Cashman Theatre, 850 N. Las Vegas Blvd. The production will benefit a number of local charities, including Child Haven, and AFAN (Aid for AIDS of Nevada), with complimentary tickets going to the Salvation Army, for distribution to children of lesser means and their families. Scholarships for the performing arts will be granted by the newly formed TOTH Foundation (Theater of the Homeless), a registered Nevada non-profit organization playing an active part in theatrical development of talented local youth. British Panto originated in England and dates back hundreds of years to thes Renaissance. Usually performed during the holiday season, it is based on traditional fairy tales with the addition of topical local comedy, unique characters, and song and dance. While retaining the basic, recognizable fable, the Panto version of "Cinderella," will contain enough current humor to make it appealing and entertaining to both young and old. Canadian Jerry Allen is the creative founder of the Panto Palladium players. Noting the long running success of similar projects in Canada and Britain, he felt this style of entertainment would become equally popular in Las Vegas. Allen was a founding member of AMBA formed 30 years ago in Canada, and similar to the Las Vegas group. Allen has been recognized for the costumes and sets he designed for "The Mikado," a production of the city Las Vegas Cultural arid Community Affairs. He has been associated creatively with numerous television projects and 32 mjyor motion pictures, including "Superman," "Who's Harry Crumb?" He received two Oscar nominations for "Days of Heaven," and "The Journey of Natty Gann." Performances will be at 4:30 p.m. for matinees and 7:30 p.m. for evening performances beginning Tuesday, Dec. 20 through Friday, Dec. 30 with a 2 p.m. matinee performance Saturday, Dec. 31. There will be no shows Dec. 24 or 25. Tickets are $10 and may be purchased at any Ticket Master outlet. For additional information, or for children's groups or theatre THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY Imperial Palace cars to open airport tunnel The McCarran International Airport Connector and Roadway System will celebrate its grand opening at 8 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 31. Vehicles from Imperial Palace's Antique & Classic Auto Collection will be the first to drive through the new passage. The cars will lead the procesForum adopts families Spearheaded by The Forum Shops management team under the direction of Metro Police Department, employees representing a variety of stores at The Foruin Shops at Caesars are reaching out to families in need with the second annual "Adopt-AFamily" community program. The Forum Shops family of merchants embraced the opportunity to provide a special Christmas celebration to families flom.,.yAJCiou8 housing^ developments in West Las Vegas. Gifl selections were tailored to the individual needs of our "adopted" family members via wish lists obtained from a visit to the families. Many employees purchased gifts with money that would have otherwise been used for an office gift exchange. Others teamed up with co-workers to provide gift certificates to area supermarkets or purchase higher priced items. The party is scheduled for 8:30 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 22. Breakfast, compliments of Bertolini's, begins the event, followed by the delightful a capella sounds of the musical group Thru Faith. Santa Claus will lead the families to a private viewing of the Festival Fountain show. The event concludes with the gift exchange where The Forum Shops employees meet their adopted family members while presenting gifts. Transportation to andfiromThe Forum Shops isbeing provided by Ray & Ross Transport company. The event incorporate more than twenty merchants including employees from Louis Vuitton, Gianni VersaQ$, f^xpress, Knot Shop, Sweet Factory, Chocolate Chariot and Bertolini"s. "In the spirit of giving, we are firm believers that what you give to others will come back to you ten-fold. It is exciting to see the enthusiasm of our staff and how its touched so many employees throughout the center," said Maureen Taylor Crampton, marketing director of The Forum Shops. "We realized that we have so much to give, working in such a wonderful environment. We wanted to share our good fortune and open our doors to members of our community who may not always have this opportunity." sion of Las Vegas dignitaries and airport ofticials as they make the inaugural pass through the new tunnel. Ed Crispell, general manager of the Imperial Palace, will be the keynote speaker on behalf of Nevada's Hotel and Motel Association, speaking on the benefits of the to area resorts... Cast members from the awardwinning "Legends in Concert" show will be featured during the procession and entertainment programs. Three noted vehicles from the Auto Collection will make a rare appearance. A pink 1955 Lincoln Capri Convertible, once owned by actress Marilyn Monroe, will stand out among the parade participants. AnothervehicleisLeoCarrillo's custom 1948 Town & Country Convertible Coupe, equipped with a horn that bellows Uke a bull and a steerhead (with rolling eyes) mounted on the hood. Wayne Newton's 1929 Murphy Duesenberg Convertible Coupe, originally built for Howard Hughes, will round outthisgroup. The Airport Connector and Roadway System is a $200-million project to provide non-stop service to McCarran International from Interstate 15 and the Southern beltway. The project will also serve as an alternate eastwest corridor across the Las Vegas Strip. "It is an honor to be a part of such a noteworthy event," said Richie Clyne, Administrator of Imperial Palace's AutoCollection. "The tunnel will be appreciated by both residents and visitors alike as it will make a distinct difference in the busy traffic patterns in the city of Las Vegas." The Imperial Palace Antique & Classic Auto Collection is located on the fifth floor of the parking garage of the Imperial Palace Hotel & Casino, 3535 Las Vegas Blvd. More than 750 vehicles are in the collection, with more than 200 vehicles on display. Many are rotated monthly to maintain a fresh look for the thousands of repeat visitors. The collection is open from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. It'll KnockYou Off Your Seat! Feast witn your fingers on tnu^tiorJfan Jiile Imce Imi^ts in shining armor perform feats of great strength ana skill. hpic Aditn. .Wdtini Afikjs'. Mamall\ke. A most splenaidlime is guanmtealfor M. Tui) -Vdursi? linner simre iiijilli^ vtr)/^ f~)Cl^ ?"" • ^^^ CmtuHymcluid Dinner Snous al t) and 8:30 pm. To purchase tickets, can 5Q7-7000. mimm HOTEL/CASINO .1 {'irtiu ( '-KUi f-.nltrjftm ^OAO ^. Dinner in Our Dining Room Foi Miosn wlK) desife tiiiiol. inllmalo dining, wo will hfi snrvlny our fogular menu ami a Iradilional Christmas Dinner Irom 2 p.m. • 10 p m Enjoy your choice of... ROAST TOM TURKEY and sa};c dressinu BAKED VIRGINIA HAM ^ with fruit sauce and candied yams or...a combination of ROAST TOM TURKEY & BAKED VIRGINIA HAM with fruit sauce, candied yaim and sage dressing Each Jimia iiu.ltJf.s.Your clviicc nl stnip or siibil Kir, miislicil |Hi|jlocs willi i;iMcl Kr.tvy, vc);ct;iMi-s uml cranlx-rry sjiiicc. mini lo;i( ami Iniltcr. miiKO, apple or pumpkin piiwilli wliip|H.'il topping, coKic, lea or niiik ADULTS $8.95 (Plus Tan) [Children I Under 12 $4*95 (Plu T) 2800 S. 0 ^ Christmas Day Sunday, December 25 nOTXL BUFFET FEAST $3.49 (plus tax) Special all day Noon 10 p.m. All You Can Eat Christmas Buffet Dinner witfi all the trimmings l'lus...s|M-cial nmbn>sin & wnldorf saliids, pumpkin & iiiintc pic witli whipped loppiii);^ CASxSo COFFEE SHOP Wc will be serving traditional Christmas Dinner from 12 Noon 10 p.m. Enjoy your choice of... ROAST TOM TURKEY (f tagc drctsin^.j BAKED VIRGINIA HAM with fruit sauce and candied yams or a combination of ROAST TOM TURKEY AND BAKED VIRGINIA HAM with fruit sauce, candied yams & sage dressing Each dinner includes: your choice of soup or gNjlL, salad, oiashed potatoes with giblet gravy, vegetables ^^ and cranberry sauce, dinner rolls and butler, mince or pumpkin pie with whipped topping, coKee, tea or milk. • 'ADULTS: $4*93 Under 12: $I.Srd (Plut Ta) (Pkn Tti) NOTICE TO TAXPAYERS The Third Installment of Real Property Taxes is Due January 3,1995. If Your Taxes Are Not Being Paid Through Your Mortgage Company and You Have Not Received a Tax Bill, Please Contact the Clark County Treasurer to Request a Duplicate Copy to Avoid Any Penalties. MARK ASTON TREASURERTAX RECEIVER > > ^ > > 4 4 E. Bridger Avenue 1st Floor Las Vegas, NV 89155 455-4323

PAGE 31

Page B14 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, December 22,1994 Salvation Army, Coldwell Banker cooperate in food drive for needy The public was invited to participate in the Salvation Army food drive by bringing non-perishable food items to three Coldwell Banker Premier Realty offices. According to Coldwell Banker Premier Realty's regional vice president George Murphy, "We have decided to make this worthy effort a biannual event. Keeping th"! pantries filled at this time of year is vitolly iinportant—just as it is in the summer months." Regional administrator Amy Payne pointed out, "It was such a success in July when we had our last food drive that some of our agents volunteered over the holidays in the Salvation Army dining room." According to Sumner Dodge, community relations director for the Salvation 'Army, "While we give food boxes away every day in our Family Service Center, we gave 275 Thanksgiving baskets and 275 Christmas baskets to our most needy famiUes." Dodge said thatthe most necessary non-perishable items were: cans of meat such as canned hams, tuna. Spam, ete., cons of vegetables, fruit and soup, canned milk and baby food, peanutbutter, boxes of dry soup mixes, macaroni and cheese and hot cereals. He said community support ran high during the holidays and that they had 1,000 "hands-on" volunteers who served in the dining room and coordinated gifts for the "Angel Trees" which held the names of needy children's requests for new toys and clothing. Dodge said that, this year, they have served 24,000 more meals in the dining room and 42% more homeless people have stayed in the shelter than last year. "Fifly thousand people will avail themselves of our over-all services during the year. Two thousand people will join us for holiday dinners alone. He said that there is a real need for donated turkeys and canned hams. Those interested in donating holiday items can call him, 870-4430. UNLVy local singing teachers present convention workshop The National Association of Teachers of Singing Las Vegas Chapter, and the UNLV music department will present the 1995 NATS Winter Workshop Jan. 1316, at Harrah's Casino Hotel. Clinicians and guest artists from around the country will present master classes, lectures and performances. Clinicians include Stephen Wadsworth, Chloe Owen, Elizabeth Mosher, Madeline Capelle, Violet Mesrop, Carol Kimball, Bruce Lunkley, Jean Westermann Gregg, Edward Baird and Louise Lerch. Teresa Santiago, soprano, is the winner of the 1994 Walter W. Naumberg Foundation International Vocal Competition. As part of UNLV's Chamber Music SouthwestSeries, she will present arecital on Friday, Jan. 13, in the Artemus W. Ham Concert Hall. Robert Breault, tenor, will present a recital on Sunday, Jan. 15, in the Nevada Ballroom at Harrah's. He is a Western Regional Winner of the National Association ofTeachers of Singing Artist's Awards and enjoys a varied career that features opera, oratorio and concert works. This season includes his Carnegie Hall debut and performances with the Atlanta Symphony, Utah Symphony, Atlanta Opera and his San Francisco Opera Debut Recitel. He is assistant professor of voice and director of opera at the University of Utah. Wadsworth, a leading teacher of acting to singers for over a decade will present a master class entitled "Freeing the Actor in a Singer." Owen, professor emerita at Boston University, has taught at Westminster Choir College on the Master Teachers Series, and as a Master Teacher for the NATS Internship program. She will present a master class entitled "Using the Alexander Technique in the Voice Studio." Mosher, professor and coordinator of voice at the University of Arizona. A Naumberg Award Winner, she will present a master class in 19th Century German Romantic Lied. Capella, an artist-in-residence and touring roster artist for the states of Idaho, Nevada, North and South Dakota, Oregon, and Wyoming, she works in music therapy. Registration for daily or full attendance is available. For more information, call 896-7452. SERMON: God's Answer From Page B13 community, for the community of the kind of faith where peace comes through goodwill. "Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace and good will toward all men and women" is a most needed truth especially in our dangerous day. What characterized the life of Jesus was his self-giving. He gave of himself to people. He walked with those who were shut out by society. His best gifts were his presence and of His power. Christmas never becomes alive in its true meaning and mystery until we see the lonely, struggling man on the cross. The joy of Christmas is not the joy of a pagan day nor of nature's turning, nor in cult mysticism or rampant commercialism. It is the joy of the Word made Flesh. God's answer to us comes in an eternal Word of Love. This is the meaning of Christmas. This is the mystery of Christmas. A little child gazing at the living candles of the Christmastide has become wrapped up in the mysterious light of the Christmas story. The meaning can be put into words, but the mystery knows only the luminous silence that flickers in the darkness...humankind's deepest need to know the meaning of love. Two thousand years ago, God came into a dark world with a strange kind of light. The world is still dark ana inai ngni is sun strange. But those who receive it even today, receive the power to become sons and daughters of the livingGod. Those who imderstand the light in the darkness as they were bom not of blood nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of men or women, but of God. As inner love gives newness of life, the Christmas light trembles with the fairest radiance life affords, and out of the darkness there still comes voices in the night, singing... "Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace and good will toward men and women." "For unto you is bom this day a Savior, which is Christ the Lord." y SN' Wishing You & Your Family a Happy Old Fashioned Christmas...Sunday, December 25 STEAK HOUSE 2:00 P.M. 8:00 P.M. Ill our Steak House, we will be serving Cliristma.s Dinner lor llio.se who desire more elegant (lining. KHSKRVATIONS SUGGHS TED 293-5000 In addition to our regular .Steak House menu, we will lealure RESTAURANT DINING 11:00 A.M.11:00 P.M. CHRISTMAS DINNER ONLY... ^5^^ ""'"' Children under 12...$3.95 plus tax Your choice of a complete dinner ROAST TOM TURKEY ROAST TOM TURKEY and Sage Dressing and Sage Dressing VIRGINIA BAKED HAM VIRGINIA BAKED HAM with fnill sauce and candied yams Int liMttiifl I |illl< r5 with ){ihlrl gravy, vrnrlalilrs, rrjuilwrry taiicr, h(il rrrlU, t)vf r.grs and |Hini|ikhi or apple pie wllh whipiml topp*n|. BUFFET FEAST Noon. • 10 p.m. CHRISTMAS $049 BUFFET DINNER 0(Piu.T.) STYLE TURKEY, ROAST BEEF AND fUM WITH AU TME TRIMMINGS Includes a beverage Courtesy Photo SHARING IS CARING — Staff and sales associates of Coldwell Banker Premier Realty are shown with Salvation Army community relations director Sumner Dodge displaying collection bins for nonperishable food items which were given to needy families of Southern Nevada. 3:00 p.m. Jesus' Birthday Party for young children and their families in our Fellowship Hall (A live animal and puppets will be there!) 4:00 p.m. Family Christmas Service featuring God's Music Makers (grades 3-5) and favorite carols 5:30 p.m. Family Christmas Services featuring special solos, instmmental music and carols 7:00 p.m. Candlelight and Holy Communion Service featuring the Celebration Singers and carols 8:30 p.m. Candlelight and Holy Communion Service featuring the Celebration Singers and carols 10:00 p.m. Candlelight and Holy Communion Service featuring the Chancel Choir and brass ensemble 11:30 p.m. Candlelight and Holy Communion Service featuring the Chancel Choir and brass ensemble Christmas Day^ Sunday, December 2$ 11:00 a.m. Christmas Day Holy Communion Services with 7:00 p.m. special music and candlelight PARKING: Professional parking attendants have been hired to assist you on Christmas Eve. CHILD CARE: Available in our new nursery in the main church next to the sanctuary. No charge. Professional sitters will be caring for your children. 3720 E. Tropicana Ave. Las Vegas, Nevada Phone: 458-2241 FLAMINGO \ Community Lutheran L_l TROPICANA \ § Q. RUSSELL r 1 SUNSET \ \ WHAT'S PIAYING Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News • Boulder City News PageBiB Palladium Players present 'Cinderella' The Palladium Panto Players, in association with the Kravenko Academy ofDance, will make their Las Vegas premiere in a unique version of the classic tale, "Cinderella," from Dec. 20-31. Performed by a castof 67 adults and children, with elaborate sets and costumes in traditional British Panto style, it will run at the Cashman Theatre, 850 N. Las Vegas Blvd. The production will benefit a number of local charities, including Child Haven, and AFAN (Aid for AIDS of Nevada), with complimentary tickets going to the Salvation Army, for distribution to children of lesser means and their families. Scholarships for the performing arts will be granted by the newly formed TOTH Foundation (Theater of the Homeless), a registered Nevada non-profit organization playing an active part in theatrical development of talented local youth. British Panto originated in England and dates back hundreds of years to thes Renaissance. Usually performed during the holiday season, it is based on traditional fairy tales with the addition of topical local comedy, unique characters, and song and dance. While retaining the basic, recognizable fable, the Panto version of "Cinderella," will contain enough current humor to make it appealing and entertaining to both young and old. Canadian Jerry Allen is the creative founder of the Panto Palladium players. Noting the long running success of similar projects in Canada and Britain, he felt this style of entertainment would become equally popular in Las Vegas. Allen was a founding member of AMBA formed 30 years ago in Canada, and similar to the Las Vegas group. Allen has been recognized for the costumes and sets he designed for "The Mikado," a production of the city Las Vegas Cultural arid Community Affairs. He has been associated creatively with numerous television projects and 32 mjyor motion pictures, including "Superman," "Who's Harry Crumb?" He received two Oscar nominations for "Days of Heaven," and "The Journey of Natty Gann." Performances will be at 4:30 p.m. for matinees and 7:30 p.m. for evening performances beginning Tuesday, Dec. 20 through Friday, Dec. 30 with a 2 p.m. matinee performance Saturday, Dec. 31. There will be no shows Dec. 24 or 25. Tickets are $10 and may be purchased at any Ticket Master outlet. For additional information, or for children's groups or theatre THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY Imperial Palace cars to open airport tunnel The McCarran International Airport Connector and Roadway System will celebrate its grand opening at 8 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 31. Vehicles from Imperial Palace's Antique & Classic Auto Collection will be the first to drive through the new passage. The cars will lead the procesForum adopts families Spearheaded by The Forum Shops management team under the direction of Metro Police Department, employees representing a variety of stores at The Foruin Shops at Caesars are reaching out to families in need with the second annual "Adopt-AFamily" community program. The Forum Shops family of merchants embraced the opportunity to provide a special Christmas celebration to families flom.,.yAJCiou8 housing^ developments in West Las Vegas. Gifl selections were tailored to the individual needs of our "adopted" family members via wish lists obtained from a visit to the families. Many employees purchased gifts with money that would have otherwise been used for an office gift exchange. Others teamed up with co-workers to provide gift certificates to area supermarkets or purchase higher priced items. The party is scheduled for 8:30 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 22. Breakfast, compliments of Bertolini's, begins the event, followed by the delightful a capella sounds of the musical group Thru Faith. Santa Claus will lead the families to a private viewing of the Festival Fountain show. The event concludes with the gift exchange where The Forum Shops employees meet their adopted family members while presenting gifts. Transportation to andfiromThe Forum Shops isbeing provided by Ray & Ross Transport company. The event incorporate more than twenty merchants including employees from Louis Vuitton, Gianni VersaQ$, f^xpress, Knot Shop, Sweet Factory, Chocolate Chariot and Bertolini"s. "In the spirit of giving, we are firm believers that what you give to others will come back to you ten-fold. It is exciting to see the enthusiasm of our staff and how its touched so many employees throughout the center," said Maureen Taylor Crampton, marketing director of The Forum Shops. "We realized that we have so much to give, working in such a wonderful environment. We wanted to share our good fortune and open our doors to members of our community who may not always have this opportunity." sion of Las Vegas dignitaries and airport ofticials as they make the inaugural pass through the new tunnel. Ed Crispell, general manager of the Imperial Palace, will be the keynote speaker on behalf of Nevada's Hotel and Motel Association, speaking on the benefits of the to area resorts... Cast members from the awardwinning "Legends in Concert" show will be featured during the procession and entertainment programs. Three noted vehicles from the Auto Collection will make a rare appearance. A pink 1955 Lincoln Capri Convertible, once owned by actress Marilyn Monroe, will stand out among the parade participants. AnothervehicleisLeoCarrillo's custom 1948 Town & Country Convertible Coupe, equipped with a horn that bellows Uke a bull and a steerhead (with rolling eyes) mounted on the hood. Wayne Newton's 1929 Murphy Duesenberg Convertible Coupe, originally built for Howard Hughes, will round outthisgroup. The Airport Connector and Roadway System is a $200-million project to provide non-stop service to McCarran International from Interstate 15 and the Southern beltway. The project will also serve as an alternate eastwest corridor across the Las Vegas Strip. "It is an honor to be a part of such a noteworthy event," said Richie Clyne, Administrator of Imperial Palace's AutoCollection. "The tunnel will be appreciated by both residents and visitors alike as it will make a distinct difference in the busy traffic patterns in the city of Las Vegas." The Imperial Palace Antique & Classic Auto Collection is located on the fifth floor of the parking garage of the Imperial Palace Hotel & Casino, 3535 Las Vegas Blvd. More than 750 vehicles are in the collection, with more than 200 vehicles on display. Many are rotated monthly to maintain a fresh look for the thousands of repeat visitors. The collection is open from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. It'll KnockYou Off Your Seat! Feast witn your fingers on tnu^tiorJfan Jiile Imce Imi^ts in shining armor perform feats of great strength ana skill. hpic Aditn. .Wdtini Afikjs'. Mamall\ke. A most splenaidlime is guanmtealfor M. Tui) -Vdursi? linner simre iiijilli^ vtr)/^ f~)Cl^ ?"" • ^^^ CmtuHymcluid Dinner Snous al t) and 8:30 pm. To purchase tickets, can 5Q7-7000. mimm HOTEL/CASINO .1 {'irtiu ( '-KUi f-.nltrjftm ^OAO ^. Dinner in Our Dining Room Foi Miosn wlK) desife tiiiiol. inllmalo dining, wo will hfi snrvlny our fogular menu ami a Iradilional Christmas Dinner Irom 2 p.m. • 10 p m Enjoy your choice of... ROAST TOM TURKEY and sa};c dressinu BAKED VIRGINIA HAM ^ with fruit sauce and candied yams or...a combination of ROAST TOM TURKEY & BAKED VIRGINIA HAM with fruit sauce, candied yaim and sage dressing Each Jimia iiu.ltJf.s.Your clviicc nl stnip or siibil Kir, miislicil |Hi|jlocs willi i;iMcl Kr.tvy, vc);ct;iMi-s uml cranlx-rry sjiiicc. mini lo;i( ami Iniltcr. miiKO, apple or pumpkin piiwilli wliip|H.'il topping, coKic, lea or niiik ADULTS $8.95 (Plus Tan) [Children I Under 12 $4*95 (Plu T) 2800 S. 0 ^ Christmas Day Sunday, December 25 nOTXL BUFFET FEAST $3.49 (plus tax) Special all day Noon 10 p.m. All You Can Eat Christmas Buffet Dinner witfi all the trimmings l'lus...s|M-cial nmbn>sin & wnldorf saliids, pumpkin & iiiintc pic witli whipped loppiii);^ CASxSo COFFEE SHOP Wc will be serving traditional Christmas Dinner from 12 Noon 10 p.m. Enjoy your choice of... ROAST TOM TURKEY (f tagc drctsin^.j BAKED VIRGINIA HAM with fruit sauce and candied yams or a combination of ROAST TOM TURKEY AND BAKED VIRGINIA HAM with fruit sauce, candied yams & sage dressing Each dinner includes: your choice of soup or gNjlL, salad, oiashed potatoes with giblet gravy, vegetables ^^ and cranberry sauce, dinner rolls and butler, mince or pumpkin pie with whipped topping, coKee, tea or milk. • 'ADULTS: $4*93 Under 12: $I.Srd (Plut Ta) (Pkn Tti) NOTICE TO TAXPAYERS The Third Installment of Real Property Taxes is Due January 3,1995. If Your Taxes Are Not Being Paid Through Your Mortgage Company and You Have Not Received a Tax Bill, Please Contact the Clark County Treasurer to Request a Duplicate Copy to Avoid Any Penalties. MARK ASTON TREASURERTAX RECEIVER > > ^ > > 4 4 E. Bridger Avenue 1st Floor Las Vegas, NV 89155 455-4323

PAGE 32

mmm LAST WORDS Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Page B17 PageBie Henderson Home News • Boulder City News Thursday, pecember 22, 1994 HOROSCOPE LINDA BLACK Weekly Tip: Don't even try to do anything seriously. People will be confused, or simply not paying attention, and conflicts could develop. Aries (March 21-April 19). Casual remarks could start heated discussions. You love that sort of thing, but somebody might take offense. Do the job so you can pay the bills. Taurus (April 20-May 20). Paperwork may interfere with other plans. Catch up on reading and writing, instead of fighting the crowds. Consult a partner and then make decisions. Gemini (May 21-June 21).Too bad you don't have more money to play with. Focus on your work, there wil 1 be many interruptions later. Don't buy something that plunges you into debt! Cancer (June-July 22). Don't try to do everything yourself; delegate to a reliable friend. You can find more time to spend with your sweetie. Plans you make will flourish. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22). You'll find the answer to a work-related problem in a good book. Deal with a domestic problem. Don't avoid the issue, it needs to be completed instead! Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Put in the effort and save on a'luxury item for the home. Spend these days with your sweetheart. Happy disruptions could wreck your schedule. Libra (Sept 23-Oct. 23). Decorate your house. Shop for household items and hold out for the best quality for your money. Spend time studying and writing letters. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). You're under pressure to do what you promised. Finish paperwork and return phone calls. You'll be ready to take on a new challenge. Push hard for what you want, while you're going to do next. You'll be too busy, finishing what you've already started. Avoid making decisions, or commitments. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Meet with friends and figure out what you're going to do next. Youll be too busy, finishing what you've already started. Avoid making decisions, or commitments. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Expect disagreement from an authority figure and have your defense ready. Consultations with firiends could lead to a breakthrough. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). A long-distance call could be necessary, to get a bothersome problem solved. You may have to go along with another person's wishes, even if you don't agree. Meetings and parties should be lots of fun, but you may have trouble meeting a deadline. Pisces (Feb. 19-March. 20).To keep from going fiirther into debt, getout of a bad deal. Comply with an older person's whims. It'll be more fim if you don't take yourself, or the other person too seriously. Mention something you need, and you might get it. If You're Having a Birthday This Week: You get to learn to negotiate. Compromise is a handy skill to acquire. Work with a team to maximize your efforts and achieve massive objectives. Finish what you promised. (01994, Tribune Media Services How's your family's stress juggling act Juggling the demands of family and work life is one of the leading causes of stress today. According to lOF Foresters Family stress expert, Dr. Richard Earle, parents can be filled with self-doubts that fiiel personal and family stress. He advises that juggling demands effectively is the key to managing stress. Whether at home or work, stress heats up when the gap between "I should" and "I really can" grows too big. To help parents cope, a free brochure offering tips on juggling responsibilities effectively is available from the lOF Foresters. Stress-reducing suggestions include: •Lower expectations and abandon the notion of being perfect. Sometimes the dishes can wait, but your family can't. •Get the entire family to help run the household from day-today. Give up the idea that only you can do a certain job. •Develop a support network of friends or family to help out at certain times, especially if you're a single parent. •Partners can shift tasks, like shopping or bill paying, to each other for short periods of time whenever one of you needs to focus 0 something of immediate importance. Busy parents should learn to budget time wisely, plan regular stress breaks for the wholefamily, and stop trying to do everything. Cut back and take time to relax. A not-for-profit fraternal benefit organization with more than 1 n^illion members, the lOF Foresters is dedicated to helping families with free fingerprinting for children, care for needy hospitalized kids through the Children's Miracle Network, child abuse prevention programs and parenting education by the Lamaze Institute for Family Education. Formorefreetips,call(800)9224-IOF. THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY DEAR DEBBIE DEBORAH WHITE Deborah Whit* Dear Debbie: I have a m£uor crush on a boy, but I don't know if he likes me or not. I told my friend to tell him I like him. She told him, but he never answered to me. Fm too shy to go over to him when he's sitting with his friends. Sometimes I get the nerve to go, and when I do sit with him, my best friend encourages me to talk to him. His firiends do, too. They say they think he likes me. What should I do to go with this boy? He says to me he really is looking for a girl like me. —HAVE A CRUSH Dear Have a Crush: It's exciting to have a crush on a guy, and I understand why you want to move faster. But you've done as much as you can do right now. You can't control a relationship; there's someone else involved, too. This is only the first step, but so far, so good. He knows you like him, and he seems to welcome the attention. Now you need to step back and let him make a few moves. Continue to be pleasant and fiiendly and try to be patient, it's a trait you'll need in relationships with guys the rest of your life. Dear Debbie: I'm dating a man Tm in love with. He says he feels the same about me. I have two problems: When our friends ask us if we're serious about each other, we say, "I don't know." The other problem is that we don't communicate well. He'll start to say something, but he doesn't finish it. He gets embarrassed about whatever he's going to say. I feel if we don't correct our problems, our relationship may end early. I love him too much to lose him. Can you help? -CONCERNED Dear Concerned: Your partner sounds like a private man who has difficulty dealing with his own feelings. He may need more time than you do to work them out in his head. Give him plenty of time and space to get comfortable with intimacy. Make him feel safe sharing his private thoughts with you. That means not telling the world and not pressuring him,. Be protective of his need for privacy and he'll open up more. It's a matter of trust, and trusting someone always takes time. This guy sounds Uke he's well worth the time and effort 1994, Tribune Media Services Explaining sudden disappearances Have you ever wondered about all the people who disappear and no big fiiss is made about it? Well, if you haven't, I have. For instance, nothing can be more maddening to a cook than those countless kids who vanish the minute you call, "Dinner is on the table." One minute they are hanging aro und lookingfamished and the next, Poofl They're gone. Nothing is more certain to make a clerk disappear than the arrival of a customer. I once spent the better part of an hour tracking down a salesperson. When I finally found her, she left for her coffee break. No one has seen her since. On the other hand, those endless lines of people at the cash register never disappear. They multiply like fleas on a dog. You know how fleas are, the minute one finds a likely place to land, he yells, "Over here!" and all his aunts, uncles and cousins join him. The other day, after I joined a line at a local supermarket check-out counter, the two people ahead of ST. ROSE BIRTHS Dec. 7,1994 Penelope and Edwin Tomaszewski, girl; Davonna and Patrick Ferguson, girl; Birgit and Darryl Hutchings,boy; Dawn andThuan Nguyen, boy. Dec. 8, 1994 Cheryl and Wade Watson, girl; Hisini Davis, girl; Susan and James Ward, boy. Dec. 9, 1994 JoDeann and Randall Meyer, boy. Dec. 10, 1994 Carmen and JohnNichols,girl; Sandra and Kurt Bauer, boy; Amalia and Javier Arceo, girl. Dec. 11,1994 Dana and Gilbert Wilson Jr., girl. Dec. 12, 1994 Tina and Joseph Zamora, boy; Veronica and John Lynch, boy. Dec. 13,1994 Jana D. Mowery, girl. Dec. 14,1994 Theresa and Christopher Noone, boy; Jessica C. Layton, boy. OLD PHOTOS RESTORED Before We can take those old damaged family photos (any size) and make an electronically repaired copy at a price you can afford. You will receive a fully repaired copy of your original plus a negative. We also make prints from those old odd size negatives B&W or color. All work is done on the premises. WESTERN COLOR LAB (JOOO South Ka.stern Avo. #4E .S(v Is Tod.ivoi ( .ill r)!l7-l 111 • Ur \M' \/s(; \ /7///.S Cdlor I.ah ONCE OVER LIGHTLY CAROLYN DRENNAN BISHOP me suddenly expanded into an extended family group of 10. Each with his own shopping cart. Then there's those kids who beg on bended knee for a pet. "I promise to feed him, groom him and clean up after him," they plead. Once the dog is in thehouse, the kid is gone. Pohtician's promises disappear in a puff of smoke the minute they win an election. Likewise, so do those people who voted for the public official who is later unmasked as a fi'aud. I always wonder what happens to those psychics who predict the end of the earth, invasion by aliens from other planets and World War III. This is all supposed to happen on the first of January. The only scenario I can figure out is that the aliens came on New Year's Day, took Mr. or Mrs. Psychic back to wherever aliens come fi-om, and then forgot to tell us. If you run across any other people who disappear before your eyes, don't bother to tell me about it. I probably won't be home. I just got a hot tip that my favorite saleswoman has returned fi'om the coffee break she took last March. CHRISTMAS AT SAINT MATTHEW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH CHRISTMAS EVE (December 24) 5:30p.m. Eucharist with Sermon & Hymns 9:30p.m. Family Sung Eucharist with Sermon Music by our "Christmas Band" Saint Matthew's Choir, and Janet Robinson, Organist CHRISTMAS DAY (December 25) 9:45 a.m. Family Eucharist Saint Matthew's Church School Christmas Pageant 4709 S. Nellis Blvd. (Between Tropicana & Boulder Hwy.) 451-2483 G>rDC>OG^3€X3e>0 Viijtoi!>^ • % • Vi9^ SATIN JACKET S&/ GIVEAWAY '". by D.B.Donovan I MGIC L \^^i>'*t' Mothers Against Drank Riders were the lesser known predecessers of the first actual M.A.D,D. chapter. L^ k I CYom GLUNJE} ^T L. A DAYPOR I CROSSWORD PUZZLE Now arrange Ihe clrikd letters to form the surprise answer, as su|u;ested by the above cartoon. MtktSUVMSMISWBItoi "K Y Y Y Y k vl^ A A A "T" Answers: Answer: ..OMOIH.. — HUI^UIMI^ njir WM Jifl/a mo TiuHt3)i Aooavd aiONfif AHona DNIOI 1= SLAPSJIX ——^= Genealogist: One who traces your family as far as your money will go Wisdom is attained for its own sake, not for the sake of others. • • • investment in knowledge pays the best dividends. • • • Self-love is humankind's first interest. • • • Every now and then, a little nonsense is enjoyed by the best of men. • • • It is not breeding, but noble conduct that makes men good. 0fFTHE\NNl MfiQICWORD HOW TO PLAY: Read the list of words. Look at the puzzle. You'll find these words in all directions—horizontally, vertically, diagonally, backwards. Draw a circle around each letter of a word found in the puzzle, then strike it off the list. Circling It will show a letter has been used but will leave it visible should it also form part of another word. Find the big words first. When letters of all listed words are circled, you'll have the given number of letters left over. They'll spell out your MAGICWORD. A CHRISTMAS CAROL (sol.: 11 letters) A-Angry, B-Bah huinbug, Bless, Bob Crachet, Boss; C-Care, Change, Charles Dickens, Classic, Coins, Cold; D-Dark; E-Ebenezer Scrooge; F-Foolish, Future; G-Ghosts, Grumpy; H-Holiday; Image, Insight; J-Jacob Marley; LLesson; M-Mean, Miser, Mock, Money; NNight; 0-Office; P-Past, Poor; R-Rich; S-Scare, Show, Spirit, Startle, Stingy, Story; Tiny Tim, True; V-Vision; W-Wealth This Week's Answer: SSaiMaAIOHOJ G 1994, Tribune Media Services KYE LRAMBOC AJ FRO CEGNAHCGE SPIRIT OYOBSVIUCRNSECI MPOL TBMB INSIGHT I MREOS AMFNO I S I V TUG SRTGUFYGNITS YRSSYGEHOLIDAYE NGRS TS OHGOTHG IN I LE S SONACMKRADE TAZTSAPBDAEPOOR SNEKC I D S ELRAHCU CGNSTARTLEOCNST ARERAC I S S ALCBHU RYBEURT IHSI LOOF EYENOMMHTLAEWWB \\ you CAMNOT GET ^\^^ o\ Tt TAMIlY SIClllTOM, you MAy AS Will MAi|£jl'
PAGE 33

mmm LAST WORDS Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Page B17 PageBie Henderson Home News • Boulder City News Thursday, pecember 22, 1994 HOROSCOPE LINDA BLACK Weekly Tip: Don't even try to do anything seriously. People will be confused, or simply not paying attention, and conflicts could develop. Aries (March 21-April 19). Casual remarks could start heated discussions. You love that sort of thing, but somebody might take offense. Do the job so you can pay the bills. Taurus (April 20-May 20). Paperwork may interfere with other plans. Catch up on reading and writing, instead of fighting the crowds. Consult a partner and then make decisions. Gemini (May 21-June 21).Too bad you don't have more money to play with. Focus on your work, there wil 1 be many interruptions later. Don't buy something that plunges you into debt! Cancer (June-July 22). Don't try to do everything yourself; delegate to a reliable friend. You can find more time to spend with your sweetie. Plans you make will flourish. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22). You'll find the answer to a work-related problem in a good book. Deal with a domestic problem. Don't avoid the issue, it needs to be completed instead! Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). Put in the effort and save on a'luxury item for the home. Spend these days with your sweetheart. Happy disruptions could wreck your schedule. Libra (Sept 23-Oct. 23). Decorate your house. Shop for household items and hold out for the best quality for your money. Spend time studying and writing letters. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). You're under pressure to do what you promised. Finish paperwork and return phone calls. You'll be ready to take on a new challenge. Push hard for what you want, while you're going to do next. You'll be too busy, finishing what you've already started. Avoid making decisions, or commitments. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Meet with friends and figure out what you're going to do next. Youll be too busy, finishing what you've already started. Avoid making decisions, or commitments. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). Expect disagreement from an authority figure and have your defense ready. Consultations with firiends could lead to a breakthrough. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). A long-distance call could be necessary, to get a bothersome problem solved. You may have to go along with another person's wishes, even if you don't agree. Meetings and parties should be lots of fun, but you may have trouble meeting a deadline. Pisces (Feb. 19-March. 20).To keep from going fiirther into debt, getout of a bad deal. Comply with an older person's whims. It'll be more fim if you don't take yourself, or the other person too seriously. Mention something you need, and you might get it. If You're Having a Birthday This Week: You get to learn to negotiate. Compromise is a handy skill to acquire. Work with a team to maximize your efforts and achieve massive objectives. Finish what you promised. (01994, Tribune Media Services How's your family's stress juggling act Juggling the demands of family and work life is one of the leading causes of stress today. According to lOF Foresters Family stress expert, Dr. Richard Earle, parents can be filled with self-doubts that fiiel personal and family stress. He advises that juggling demands effectively is the key to managing stress. Whether at home or work, stress heats up when the gap between "I should" and "I really can" grows too big. To help parents cope, a free brochure offering tips on juggling responsibilities effectively is available from the lOF Foresters. Stress-reducing suggestions include: •Lower expectations and abandon the notion of being perfect. Sometimes the dishes can wait, but your family can't. •Get the entire family to help run the household from day-today. Give up the idea that only you can do a certain job. •Develop a support network of friends or family to help out at certain times, especially if you're a single parent. •Partners can shift tasks, like shopping or bill paying, to each other for short periods of time whenever one of you needs to focus 0 something of immediate importance. Busy parents should learn to budget time wisely, plan regular stress breaks for the wholefamily, and stop trying to do everything. Cut back and take time to relax. A not-for-profit fraternal benefit organization with more than 1 n^illion members, the lOF Foresters is dedicated to helping families with free fingerprinting for children, care for needy hospitalized kids through the Children's Miracle Network, child abuse prevention programs and parenting education by the Lamaze Institute for Family Education. Formorefreetips,call(800)9224-IOF. THE NEWS COVERS YOUR COMMUNITY DEAR DEBBIE DEBORAH WHITE Deborah Whit* Dear Debbie: I have a m£uor crush on a boy, but I don't know if he likes me or not. I told my friend to tell him I like him. She told him, but he never answered to me. Fm too shy to go over to him when he's sitting with his friends. Sometimes I get the nerve to go, and when I do sit with him, my best friend encourages me to talk to him. His firiends do, too. They say they think he likes me. What should I do to go with this boy? He says to me he really is looking for a girl like me. —HAVE A CRUSH Dear Have a Crush: It's exciting to have a crush on a guy, and I understand why you want to move faster. But you've done as much as you can do right now. You can't control a relationship; there's someone else involved, too. This is only the first step, but so far, so good. He knows you like him, and he seems to welcome the attention. Now you need to step back and let him make a few moves. Continue to be pleasant and fiiendly and try to be patient, it's a trait you'll need in relationships with guys the rest of your life. Dear Debbie: I'm dating a man Tm in love with. He says he feels the same about me. I have two problems: When our friends ask us if we're serious about each other, we say, "I don't know." The other problem is that we don't communicate well. He'll start to say something, but he doesn't finish it. He gets embarrassed about whatever he's going to say. I feel if we don't correct our problems, our relationship may end early. I love him too much to lose him. Can you help? -CONCERNED Dear Concerned: Your partner sounds like a private man who has difficulty dealing with his own feelings. He may need more time than you do to work them out in his head. Give him plenty of time and space to get comfortable with intimacy. Make him feel safe sharing his private thoughts with you. That means not telling the world and not pressuring him,. Be protective of his need for privacy and he'll open up more. It's a matter of trust, and trusting someone always takes time. This guy sounds Uke he's well worth the time and effort 1994, Tribune Media Services Explaining sudden disappearances Have you ever wondered about all the people who disappear and no big fiiss is made about it? Well, if you haven't, I have. For instance, nothing can be more maddening to a cook than those countless kids who vanish the minute you call, "Dinner is on the table." One minute they are hanging aro und lookingfamished and the next, Poofl They're gone. Nothing is more certain to make a clerk disappear than the arrival of a customer. I once spent the better part of an hour tracking down a salesperson. When I finally found her, she left for her coffee break. No one has seen her since. On the other hand, those endless lines of people at the cash register never disappear. They multiply like fleas on a dog. You know how fleas are, the minute one finds a likely place to land, he yells, "Over here!" and all his aunts, uncles and cousins join him. The other day, after I joined a line at a local supermarket check-out counter, the two people ahead of ST. ROSE BIRTHS Dec. 7,1994 Penelope and Edwin Tomaszewski, girl; Davonna and Patrick Ferguson, girl; Birgit and Darryl Hutchings,boy; Dawn andThuan Nguyen, boy. Dec. 8, 1994 Cheryl and Wade Watson, girl; Hisini Davis, girl; Susan and James Ward, boy. Dec. 9, 1994 JoDeann and Randall Meyer, boy. Dec. 10, 1994 Carmen and JohnNichols,girl; Sandra and Kurt Bauer, boy; Amalia and Javier Arceo, girl. Dec. 11,1994 Dana and Gilbert Wilson Jr., girl. Dec. 12, 1994 Tina and Joseph Zamora, boy; Veronica and John Lynch, boy. Dec. 13,1994 Jana D. Mowery, girl. Dec. 14,1994 Theresa and Christopher Noone, boy; Jessica C. Layton, boy. OLD PHOTOS RESTORED Before We can take those old damaged family photos (any size) and make an electronically repaired copy at a price you can afford. You will receive a fully repaired copy of your original plus a negative. We also make prints from those old odd size negatives B&W or color. All work is done on the premises. WESTERN COLOR LAB (JOOO South Ka.stern Avo. #4E .S(v Is Tod.ivoi ( .ill r)!l7-l 111 • Ur \M' \/s(; \ /7///.S Cdlor I.ah ONCE OVER LIGHTLY CAROLYN DRENNAN BISHOP me suddenly expanded into an extended family group of 10. Each with his own shopping cart. Then there's those kids who beg on bended knee for a pet. "I promise to feed him, groom him and clean up after him," they plead. Once the dog is in thehouse, the kid is gone. Pohtician's promises disappear in a puff of smoke the minute they win an election. Likewise, so do those people who voted for the public official who is later unmasked as a fi'aud. I always wonder what happens to those psychics who predict the end of the earth, invasion by aliens from other planets and World War III. This is all supposed to happen on the first of January. The only scenario I can figure out is that the aliens came on New Year's Day, took Mr. or Mrs. Psychic back to wherever aliens come fi-om, and then forgot to tell us. If you run across any other people who disappear before your eyes, don't bother to tell me about it. I probably won't be home. I just got a hot tip that my favorite saleswoman has returned fi'om the coffee break she took last March. CHRISTMAS AT SAINT MATTHEW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH CHRISTMAS EVE (December 24) 5:30p.m. Eucharist with Sermon & Hymns 9:30p.m. Family Sung Eucharist with Sermon Music by our "Christmas Band" Saint Matthew's Choir, and Janet Robinson, Organist CHRISTMAS DAY (December 25) 9:45 a.m. Family Eucharist Saint Matthew's Church School Christmas Pageant 4709 S. Nellis Blvd. (Between Tropicana & Boulder Hwy.) 451-2483 G>rDC>OG^3€X3e>0 Viijtoi!>^ • % • Vi9^ SATIN JACKET S&/ GIVEAWAY '". by D.B.Donovan I MGIC L \^^i>'*t' Mothers Against Drank Riders were the lesser known predecessers of the first actual M.A.D,D. chapter. L^ k I CYom GLUNJE} ^T L. A DAYPOR I CROSSWORD PUZZLE Now arrange Ihe clrikd letters to form the surprise answer, as su|u;ested by the above cartoon. MtktSUVMSMISWBItoi "K Y Y Y Y k vl^ A A A "T" Answers: Answer: ..OMOIH.. — HUI^UIMI^ njir WM Jifl/a mo TiuHt3)i Aooavd aiONfif AHona DNIOI 1= SLAPSJIX ——^= Genealogist: One who traces your family as far as your money will go Wisdom is attained for its own sake, not for the sake of others. • • • investment in knowledge pays the best dividends. • • • Self-love is humankind's first interest. • • • Every now and then, a little nonsense is enjoyed by the best of men. • • • It is not breeding, but noble conduct that makes men good. 0fFTHE\NNl MfiQICWORD HOW TO PLAY: Read the list of words. Look at the puzzle. You'll find these words in all directions—horizontally, vertically, diagonally, backwards. Draw a circle around each letter of a word found in the puzzle, then strike it off the list. Circling It will show a letter has been used but will leave it visible should it also form part of another word. Find the big words first. When letters of all listed words are circled, you'll have the given number of letters left over. They'll spell out your MAGICWORD. A CHRISTMAS CAROL (sol.: 11 letters) A-Angry, B-Bah huinbug, Bless, Bob Crachet, Boss; C-Care, Change, Charles Dickens, Classic, Coins, Cold; D-Dark; E-Ebenezer Scrooge; F-Foolish, Future; G-Ghosts, Grumpy; H-Holiday; Image, Insight; J-Jacob Marley; LLesson; M-Mean, Miser, Mock, Money; NNight; 0-Office; P-Past, Poor; R-Rich; S-Scare, Show, Spirit, Startle, Stingy, Story; Tiny Tim, True; V-Vision; W-Wealth This Week's Answer: SSaiMaAIOHOJ G 1994, Tribune Media Services KYE LRAMBOC AJ FRO CEGNAHCGE SPIRIT OYOBSVIUCRNSECI MPOL TBMB INSIGHT I MREOS AMFNO I S I V TUG SRTGUFYGNITS YRSSYGEHOLIDAYE NGRS TS OHGOTHG IN I LE S SONACMKRADE TAZTSAPBDAEPOOR SNEKC I D S ELRAHCU CGNSTARTLEOCNST ARERAC I S S ALCBHU RYBEURT IHSI LOOF EYENOMMHTLAEWWB \\ you CAMNOT GET ^\^^ o\ Tt TAMIlY SIClllTOM, you MAy AS Will MAi|£jl'
PAGE 34

Page B18 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, December 22,1994 Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Page B19 LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES I.F/JAt, NOTICE lilt Vf hit Im liilrd hrrrin art upforpuhlir Mictinn. Auction xrllhrhrld January 16,1995 1.1 ll:(M) a.m. at HK; JOHN.S IOWIM;, ISM FoolhillDr, Bouldrr Clly.NV 89005. W rrirrvr titt ri|>ht to bid. '70 FORD YIN ()(;.<;KH22IH4I >>I,&ST MJ(0l.lOKKOKKNNKTH II BKI,I„ I.A,S VWJA.S NV I,0 DONALD J STUMM JR., LASVKGASNV. •86 BtlICK VIN I(;4HR37.Y1(;H464626 IM.AST I90KYT NV RO JAMKS CHIAPKTI LAS VE(;A,SNVI,OSTANSFAR wK,sr Atrro LA.S VE(;A.S NV. •70 VW VIN 1102212636 I'L&.ST UNKNOWN RO&LO RANDY THOMAS BOULDER CITY NV. •76 MERC VIN 6A9.1H532545 PL4ST UNKNOWN RO&LO ADOLFO OR JOANN CAIRO, I^S VEGAS NV. '74 PLY VIN VL29C4B225832 PL4ST UNKNOWN RO&LO STACY L LAKZARO, HENDER.SON NV. •78I'X)RVINK91T199643 PL&ST UNKNOWN RO&LO DANNY J OR LORETTA C COOPER, HENDERSON NV. BC—D. 22, 29, 1994, Jan. 5,1995. 4 Lines ^,,1 MARK SCHNIPPEL VACAririW VAr, 11 1)4 ^^ • vn H ( 1 III III 1 ^ ^' II II 1 II II 1)1 I! 1 1 1 ] • "!'' l""| III! Ill 1^ 1 p? iJT LEGAL NOTICE VACATION OF HKJHT-OF-WAY VAC.31-94 NEWI'ORT DRIVE NorUE IS HEREBY (;iVEN (hat a p<fDe(vinber, l994,andPUBLI.SHEDIN I UK HENDERSON HOME NEWS on 12/22/94 and 12/29/94. IHI Colleen Bell COLLEEN BELL, CMC, CITY CLERK H—Dec. 22,1994 LEGAL NOTICE Lftal: Erick S. Wilion, TMM I. Wilion, 2140 Fountain Springs, Hendenon, NV 89014. Boat: 1964 ChrliCraft, 29-08" NV0400BE Hull *BNV400BE. Interested Parties: Perry Wibon, Erin WUson, 2140 Fountain Springs, Henderson, IW 89014. S.L. Hensley, NHUe Hensley, Trustees, 4)141 Roliingwood Clr, Las Vegas, NV 89121. 1970 Portcniisc NV0I87BN 26'0" HuU*BNV187BN Interested Parties: Tom Stone, Box 19506, Jean, NV 89019. Walter G. Staples, P.O. Box 31SS Pahnimp, NV S9041. 1960 Beachcraft iro" NV0002AC HullNVZ002AC1291. SUvenD.Haibeck,29I7Siki Ct.A,La8Vegas,NV 89101. 1974S(arcran 16'03" NVS056KD HullfSTR11956M74J Donald S. Kicman, 5912 Fawn Ave., Las Vegas, NV 89107. 1969 CoUa iro" NV30eOKL Hull NJZ0467047 The Auction will be held on January 6, 1995, at the Las Vegas Bay Marina, at Las Vegaa Bay, on Lake Mead, at 8:00 am. H—Dec. 15. 22, 29, 1994. TRU-WEST DEVELOPMENT cownDCNsn/E PUN Akcrocm CPA-40-4 i AMERICAN NEVADA CORPORATION VAr:A1iOH i LEtJAL NOTICE VACATION OF RI<;HT-0F-WAY VAC-29-94 I'ORTlONSOFtJKEEN VALLEY PARKWAY NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a petition has been filed willf the Clerk of the Council of the City of Henderson, Nevada, requesting the vacation of portions of Green Valley Parkway. HIE PETITIONER, AMERICAN NEVADA CORPORAIK >N, has requested this vacation because this righ(-4if-way is iMi longer needed for access. A PUBLIC HKARINt; on said vacation will be held on Tuesday, January .\ IV9S, at Ibe hour of 7:(MI p.m., or as soon Ihrrealter as practicable, in the Council Chamber at City Hull, 240 Water .Street, in the City of Henderson, County of t!|urk, Nevada. IFUPON.SUCHHEARINt;, the City Council of said City of Henderson is satisHed that tlie public will not be materially injured by such pniper, 1994, and PUBLISHED IN THE HENDER.SONHOMENEWS on 12/22/94 and 12/29/94. /s/ Colleen Bell COLLEEN BELL, CMC, CITY CLERK H—Dec. 22, 29, 1994. mt NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING (CPA-40-9) NOTICE IS HEREBY (HVEN that the City Council of the City of Henderson, Nevada, will hold a Public Hearing on January 3, 1995, at the hour of 7:00 P.M., or as soon (hereafter as practicable, in the City Council Chambers, City Hail, 240 Water Street, Henderson, to consider an amendment to the Comprehensive Plan Amendment to amend the land use from Touris( Commercial (o ResidenUaJ on 10 acres more or less, located on the west side of Racetrack Road, between Bclmont Drive and Sausalito Drive in the River Mountain planning area. ANY AND ALL interested persons may appear before the City Council either in penon or by counsel, and may object to or express approval of the proposed amendments to the Land Use Policy Plan of the CityofHenderson Comprehensive Plan, or may prior to the Public Hearing, file with the City Clerk written objection thereto or approval thereof. DATED this 12(h day of December, 1994 and published in the Henderson Home News 12/22/94 and 12/29/94. /s/ Colleen Bell COLLEEN BELL, CMC, CITY CLERK H—Dec. 22, 29,1994. 3RD GENERATION LTD. PARTNERSHIP VACATION VAC00-94 1 LEGAL NOTICE VACATION OF RIGHT-OF-WAY • VAC-30-94 NORCROSS STREET NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a pctiUon has been (lied with the Clerk of the Council of the City of HenderMn, Nevada, requesting the vacation of a portion of Norcross Street THE PETITIONER, 3RD GENERATION LTD. PARTNERSHIP, has requested this vacation becau.se this right-ofway is no longer needed for access. A PUBLIC HEARING on said vacation will be held on Tuesday, January 3,1995, at the hour of 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter H practicable, in the Council Chamber at City Hall, 240 Water Street, in (he City of Henderson, County of Clark, Nevada. IFUPON SUCH HEARINt;, (he City Council ofsaid City of Henderson is satisfied that (he public will no( be ma(erially injured by such proposed vacation, (he above-described right-of-way will be vacated. DATED (his I4(h day of December, 1994, and PUBLISH ED IN THE HENDERSOrf HOME NEWS on 12/22/94 and 1 V19/94. M Colleen Bell COLLEEN BELU CMC, CITY CLERK H—Dec. 22, 29, 1994^ LEGAL NOTICE Title Order No. 91010SDK Tnutee Sale No. 94-70145 Reference No. 53927M NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 07/10/89. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD ATA PUBLIC SALE. IF VOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OFTH E NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 01/06/95 at U) A.M., Professional Foreclosure Corporation as the duly appointed (rustce under and pursuant to Deed of Trus(, Recorded on 07/13/89 as Document No. 00164 Book 890713 Page of OfTicial Records in the office of the Recorder of CLARK County, Nevada, cxecu(ed by: JAMES K. MORRIS A>fD MELANIE K. MORRIS, HUSBAND/WIFE, as Trustor MARGARETTEN & COMPANY, INC., as Beneficiary WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United Stales, by cash, a cashier's check drawn by a stale or national bank, a check drawn by a state of federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to d o business in th is state.) At: AT THE FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 200 SOUTH 3RD STREET, LAS VEGAS, NV all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by i( under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County, Nevada describing the land therein: LOT NINETEEN(I9)IN BLOCK THUEE(3)OFCITVVIEW TERRACE UNIT NO. 3, AS SHOWN BY MAP THEREOF ON FILE IN BOOK 25 OF PLATS, PAG E 35, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 434 BOX ELDER WAY, HENDERSON, NV 89015. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any Incorrectness of the street address and o(hcr common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will bemade, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum oflhe note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said n(i(e(s),advanced,if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the tru.sts created by said Deed ofTrwit, tu-wit: S65.45183 Estimated Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase (his figure prior to sale. The beneficiary under said Deed of Tru-st heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a wri((en Declaralion of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice ofDefault and Election (o Sell. The undersigned caused said No(ice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where (he real property is located and more than three months have elapsed since such recordation. DATE: 11/29/94 Professional Foreclosure Corporation as Trustee 2030 E. Flamingo Rd., Suite 145 Las Vegas, NV 89119 Telephone Number: (702)369-4255 x/s/ Kelly L. Rader KELLY L. RADER, TRUSTEESALEOFHCER H—Dec. 15, 22, 29, 1994. LEGAL NOTICE PUBLIC AUCTION A claim has been placed on (he goods s(ored in .STUFF UR STORAGE, 651 EASTGATE, HENDERSON, NV 89015 to recover past due charges owed to STUFF UR STORAGE. All units will be sold to the h ighest bidder on 1-7-95 at 10:00 A.M. All owners of units up for sale must pay charges owed in full on or before 5 pm I -695. Personal property and household items to be sold are stored by or for the following parties: D107-I^slie Wilfong E204-Paul Bunyon G209-Teresa Clark G224-Christine Reynolds H203-Raquel Banks H208-Melody Elgin STUFF UR STORAGE reserves the right to bid on any/ or all units and accept or reject any/or allbids it deems is in its best interest H—Dec. 22, 29, 1994. LEt;AL NOTICE KENYA MARIA PASKO 129 Park Ridge Lane Henderson, Nevada 89015 Telephone: 566-3687 Petitioner in Proper Person HLED DEC. 20 12:58 P.M. '94 (s) Loretla Bowman CLERIC DISTRICT COURT CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA IN THE MATTER OF A PETITION OF KENYA MARIA PASKO, FORCHAN(;EOFNAME. CASE NO. D183202 DEPARTMENT NO, F NOTICE OK HEARING PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN (hat KENYA MARIA PASKO has lllcd in (his Court, a Petition praying for an Order of this Court changing her name to K ENYA MARU TERRITO, and a hearing thereon has been set for the I9(h day of January, 1995, at 9:00 a.m., at the Courthouse of the above entiUed Court, at 200 South ThiH Street, Las Vegas, Nevada. All persons interested in said Pe(i(i(m are notified (o appear and show cause if any (hey have why (he Petition should not be granted. DATED this 20 day of December, 1994. LORETTA BOWMAN, Clerit By: DIANNE SHELDON Deputy Clerk (DISTRICT COURT SEAL) H—Dec. 22,29,1994, Jan. 5, 12,1995 PUBLIC NOTICE OF LIEN SALE I.T98I CHEVY MALIBU STATION WAGON VIN *1GAD35A5BP640747 LAST KNOWN OWNER OFTHISVEHICLETERRY GILBERT SOME BODY DAMAGE COST OF REPAIRS PLUS STORAGE 2.1982 CADILIAC KLEETWOOD FOUR DOOR SEDAN LAST KNOWN OWNER JESSIE CHAVEZ NO MOTOR COST OF REPAIRS AND STORAGE 3. FORD ESCORT VIN # IFAPP2<)96LW197250 4. CHEVY CHEVETTE #1GIAB68989A135740 5. VW BUG VIN #1332525673 JAMCEY MOTOR FUELS ANTJ REPAIRS WILLSELL THESEVEHICLESIFALL CHARGES AND STORAG E FEES ARE NOT PAID WITHIN 15DAYSOFTHIS NOTICE H—Dec. 20, 22,1994 CLASSIFIED AD s 4 p.m. Friday for Henderson Tuesday issue Noon Tuesday for Henderson Thursday, Boulder City and Green Valley issues Doxed Ads 7' per column inch per week LEGAL NOTICE Title Order No. 9I0863-DK Trustee Sale No. 94-70378 Reference No. 044717-1 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 01/16/92. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PR(yrECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE, IK YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THENATUREOFTHE PROCEEDINGS AGAINSTYOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 0I/O4/9S at 11:00 A.M., Professional Foreclosure Corporidon as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant (o Deed of Trust, Recorded on 01/17/92 as DocumenI No. 00539 Book 920117 Page — of Official Records in (he office of (he Recorded of CLARK County, Nevada, executed by: ELSA PIRAK BISHOP, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN, as TruMor ICM MORTGAGECORPORATION, BeneflclaryWILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, (payable at time of sale In lawful money of the United SUtes, by cash, a cashier's check drawn by a sUte or niUonal bank, a check drawn by a sUle or federal credit unkMi, of achecfc drawn by a sUieor federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified In section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do buslneasin this state.) At: ATTHEFRONT ENTRANCETO THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 200 SOUTH 3RD STREET, LAS VFXIAS, NV all rlgh(, title and Interest conveyed (o and now held by l( under said Deed of Trust In the property sl(ua(ed In said Couniy, Nevada describingUie land (herein: SEE EXHIBIT A' ATFACHED HERETO AND MADE A PART HEREOF The street address and other common designation, if any, of (he real property described above b purported to be: 2251 WIGWAM PARKWAY #511, HENDERSON, NV 89014. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any Incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or Implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided In said note(s), advances, If any, under (he terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expcnsesof tbeTrustee and of the trusts created by said deed of Trust, to-wit: $65,922.21 Estimated Accrued Interest and additional advances If any, will increase this figure prior to sale. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and l':iertion to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located and more than three months have elapsed since siKh recordation. DATE: 11/30/94 Professional Foreclosure Corporation as Trustee 2030 E. namingo Rd., Suite 145 LasVefia.sNV89I19 Telephone Number: (702) 369-4255 /s/Gary W.Hyatt, GARY W. HYATT EXHIBIT "A" Situate in the County of Clark, Sute of Nevada described as follows: A condominium Comprised Of: PARCEL I: Unit Five Hundred FJeven (511) In Building Five (5) of Legacy Condominiums Unit I, a condominium subdivision filed pursuant to the provisions of N.R.S. 117.020, recorded In Book 49 of Plats, page 13, In the Official Records of the County Recorder, Clark Counly, Nevada. And as defined in (ha( cer(aln Declaradon of Restrictions (Enabling Declaration Establishing a Plan for Condominium Ownership of Legacy Condominiums) recorded August 28, 1991 In Book 910828 of Official Records, Clark Counfy, Nevada, as DocumenI No. 00507. PARCEL II: An undivided l/60th Interest in and to the Common Area shown as Lot A, Phase lA upon the Plat of Legacy Condominiums Uni( I, a Condominium subdivLslon filed pursuant to the provisions of N.R.S. 117.020 recorded In Book 49 of Plats, page 13, in the Official recordsof the County Recorder, Clark County, Nevada. And as defined in that certain Declaration of Restrictions(Enabling Declaration Establishing a Plan for Condominium Ownership of Legacy Condominiums Unit I) recorded August 28, 1991 in Book 910828 of Official Records, Clark County, Nevada, as Document No. 00507. PARCEL HI: A non-exclusive easemen( for Ingress and egress, public utilides and prlva(e streets shown over Lots A and B of Condominium Project, as shown upon the Plat of Legacy Condominiums Unit 1, a Condominium subdivision filed pursuant (o (he provisions of N.R.S. 117.020 recorded in Book 49 of Plals, page 13, in (he Official records of (he Coun(y Recorder, Clark County, Nevada. And as defined In that certain Declaration of Restrictions (F^nabling Declaration Establishing a Plan for Condominium Ownership of Legacy Condominiums Unit 1) recorded August 28, 1991 in Book 910828 of Official Records, Clark County, Nevada, as Document No. 00507. PARCEL IV: An exclusive easemen( (o use (ha( pordon of (he Common Area designated as Exclusive Use Area Parking Space No. P511 and Garage No. G-511, as well as all areas shown as patios, balconies or chimneys, as shown upon the Plat of Amended Map of Legacy Condominiums Phase I, a Condominium Subdivision filed pursuani (o (he provisions of N.R.S. 117.020 recorded in Book 49 of Plais, page 13, in (he Omclal records of lh Coonly Recorder, Clurk Counly, Nevada. And aL\di^\\>^> Advertise in the Hm PALMS FROM $10. Mulberrys from S30. Hedges & stirubs. You'll love my work • you'll love my rates. Dunem for 20 yrs. Champion Lawn Care 293-6756. CJ's LAWN CARE Professional Landscape Maintenance Most Lawns, $15 Lie. #164014571 565'7630 Frae EatlnMitea PS702 Bo's Landscaping iLawn Service • Sprinklers'HJ 294-6274 '< ]l\!J'''^5arv|n9: B.C., Hond., Of—n Vollay PS73ff PS341 IBLACKMOUNTAI, PLUMBING SERVICE DRAIN CLEANING g-j FAST SERVICE HENDERSON BOULDER CITY 565-6749 uc.ioois4 294-7713 CLASSIFIEDS CAN WORK FOR YOU! CALL 564-1881 OR 293-2302 TREE TRIMMING Hedges, Pruning, Topping, Stumps & Trees Removal Low Rates Elderly Discount Free Estimates Professional Job 564-5976 PS420 Save for retirement with U.S. Savings Bonds. They'll mature before you do. You refuse to grow old "gracefully." Which is why you buy "casual" shoes, not "sensible" shoes. Why you call it "bringing out those natural highlights," not "hiding the gray" • And why you still haven't started to save for retirement. Exactly what are you waiting for? The first day of your retirement, when you find yourself with no more job and no more paychecks? Give your retirement savings program a solid foundation by investing in U.S. Savings Bonds. They're backed by the full faith and credit of the United States and guaranteed to earn interest.'* And they're easy to buy for just a few dollars each payday through your employer's U.S. Savings Bonds Payroll Savings Plan. Or buy them at your bank. Plus, the interest earned on U.S. Savings Bonds is exempt from state and local income taxes and can be deferred for federal income tax purposes for up to 30 years. Ask your banker or your employer about including U.S. Savings Bonds in your retirement savings program. Even if you call it "saving for a rainy day" For more information, write to: U.S. Savings Bonds, Washington, DC 20226. For a recorded message of current rate information, call 1-800-4US BOND • 1-800-487-2663 InTnS^OJOiVDS Cuncntly-lssued Scries EE Savings Bonds have a final maturity of 30 years. A public service of this newspaper CUSTOM STENaUNG BYAUESE WALLS, n-oont, FURMTUNE FREE ESTIIVIATES 294-1422 P8628 HANDYMAN, NO JOB TO SMALL, 12 YEARS EXP., HONEST, RELIABLE, AND REASONABLE RATES. S65-345S r^H, CLASSIFIED AD MM 4 p.m. Friday for Tuesday issue Noon Tuesday for Panorama COMPLETELY COMPLETE PAINTING MOVE OVER MICHELANGELO. QUAUTY PAINTING AT ITS FINEST. 645-6101, TODD. nn BATH TUB REPAIR Tubs and Sinks rsglazed, chips rspaired, Rbsrglass and mors. 564-2276 Boxed Ads ^T' per column Inch per week RELIABLE LAWN CARE We do it all 293-5268 4 p.m. Friday for Tuesday issue, Noon Tuesday (or Panoraiia"' SHERMAN CONCRETE Licensed & Bonded Lie. #30046 Free Estimates 294-2343 ps688 HANDYMAN MItc. Horn* Rapairt Carpanlry, Plumbing, ale. Reasonable/ Reliable Call Dan.. .564-2827 PS697 RPM AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE TUNEUPS TO OVERHAUL 565-CARS{2277) MR. FIXIT "The Handyman" No time to do It ynuself? Let me do it for you! 294-6214 PS737 .CLASSIFIED i p.m. Friday for Tuesday issue, Noon Tuesday for Pariorama"' MASTER CRAFTSMAN Custom woodworking to your specs. Furniture mantles cabinets • antique repair • retinish • make now wood look old anything in wood Over 20 yrs, exp exc ref 5fi5 5IfiR 651 DEAN'S BODY AND PAINT Collision repair Frss towing w/rspairs 20 yrs. sxp. call 565-8200 Irss estimates 745 W. Sunset Rd, HndNV Suits *20 PS24S HENDERSON SWAP MART FrI-Sat-Sun IISHOP AIR SERVICE ^— AIR SERVICE Air CondWoBlns • lliai| | CemmMtiaiRssidential •Air Conditioning • • Hooting • • Rofrigoratlon* 565-9800 Llc.*36$S4 711 Brtcfc Or. Hara^Mn PROFESSIONAL SERVICES SANTA GLAUS look alike for hire for parties and child entertainment at your home. 566-6940. Lv. Msg. PS406 CHIMNEY CLEANING, recommended at least every 2 years. Reas. Prices. No Mess. Footbusters, 293-4244. We move res. & comm. Free estimates, we load/ unload rental trucks anywhere in town. 566-8898. PS 360 Customized wrought iron gates, fences, ect. Built right, priced reasonable for free estimates, call gates by Curtis, 566-5979 or beeper 599-4638. lie. #01014415. PS 359 YARD LABOR SERVICE YARD clean-up, trash hauling, lawn mowing, minor sprinkler repairs. Lk:. #164-010521, 5655810. PS245 POINTING Ihavedonsitallinovsr 24 yrs. If you wsnt quality call MKE 223-1845 serving HND/BC PS423 MISCELLANEOUS GLITTER GULCH DENA's (The Rock Queen), in Henderson offering Amerkian Indian Decor gifts, jewelry, Pipes, drums, flutes, rocks, quartz crystals, minerals, fossils. We are a Community Pride, a special Indian place. Attention: (Health problems, force Dena to reduce most of her Primo collectibles). Must reduce inventory to make it easier to operate. Conne in, select pieces you always wanted. Generous discount. Act quickly. Remember, these things are one of a kind. 5650711. MI763 COLLOIDAL SILVER. It is known to be effective against 600 different disease organisms. Call 293-5239 or 294-1910. BC Ml 571 LOSE WEIGHT! Feel Great! With the guaranteed formula of the 90's. THERMOGENESIS. 100% Natural Herbal Blond. For info. Call 2935239 or 294-1910.BC. MI571 LIVING ROOM FURN., KITCHEN TABLE AND CHAIRS, BDRM. FURN., MUST SELL IMMEDIATELY. 433-5774,6PM10 PM. Ml RETIRED MECH. Selling tools, $25,000 OBO for more info. Call 2931949. MI578 VERY OLD FIDDLE $8,000. Must see. For more info, call 293-1949. MI579 WATKINS PRODUCTS 702-293-4803. MI580 FOR SALE, aluminum awning, for mobile home. 10 ft. X 60 ft. complete with hardware, $750. 294-1055. BC. MI581 HONDA XR-80 1988 XLNT COND. $700, O.B.O. 294-1173. MI638 '91 HONDA ELITE, 1300 MILES, EXCELLENT CONDITION, $850.2930173 OR 293-4766. VE648 SOLOFLEX GREAT XMAS GIFT $795 LIKE NEW 263-0723 ARER 5:30 PM OR 436-7775. MI677 Regular Nintendo $109. Ganrws and more 8988556. MI691 1 Red and 1 Blue 80cc Moto 4 $800 each Mornings before 12:30 pm. 294-6203. Ml DINING ROOM SET 7 CANE BACK CHAIRS PADDED SEATS $200, CALL 294-0083. MI768 25" RCA color Console, Sears exerciser Lif estyler 500 Skier/Rower used twice $7 each. Head Ski Jacket lavender sz. 10, Can Crusher, heavy duty, make offer. 564-3848. MI767 FIREWOOD FOR SALE, ALL HARDWOODS FROM $125 PER CORD. 564-2325. MI604 '81 HARLEY DAVIDSON. FXEF, EXCELLENT COND., 565-6642. MI626 KITCHEN CABINETS, COMPLETE SET. ALL APPLIANCES INCL. EXCELLENT CONDITION. BEST QUALITY, $1,750. 293-5693. MI624 PHOTO EQUIPMENT35 MM CAMERA. TRI-POD, AND SOME LENSES 293-1581. MI639 WASHER / Dryers $125.00 Each. 2936101. BC Mi731 ARTHRITIS Suffers, live pain free. Had it for 20 years now I am pain free. Cost is as low as $15 per mo., not medicine, natural food & energy supplements. Guaranteed. 564-1648. MI2S4 MISCELLANEOUS NEED NEW FURNITURE? Tired of looking? Solution: Furniture Cioseouts Warehouse. Brand names, full furniture lines, cioseouts, discontinued items, display furniture! Save Big Money! Examples, Mattress sets: twins $69; fulls $79; queens $119; kings $149; brand names & guarantees. 6000 S. Eastern Ave., BIdg. 8 (Sunset to Eastern, turn north, to next traffk: light, then right on PatrckIn. 4th bidg. on left.) 5% discount with this ad. 7 Days a Week; 10 am to 7 pm. Closed: Dec. 24 throughDec.31 forXmas holidays. Opens Jan. 1, 1995.739-0338. MI673 Side by side Frigidaire refrigerator $175. 385 Verbena HND. 5643388. MI708 New Evenflo Light Weight Portable Bed/ Playpen with cariy bag, Mas connpact. $50.5653467. MI709 NORDIC TRAC "SEQUOIA" model with Electronics and Video Excel. Cond. $395. 2936489. MI723 FOR SALE: 22" Webertype grill. New, unopened in original box $35; Olympus mount, ASANUMA 80-250 autozoom lens, excellent $75. 564-3598. MI721 AST Computer 286-80 MIG Hard drive BLK/ WHT Monrtor not used much $300 Lillian 2931765 or 293-7486. For sale Washer Dryer Air Conditioner Beds Refrigerator 294-2305. MI781 Couch and matching love seat $200 king size bed $100, 351 Ford Motor, 19ft. Ski Boat 294-2422. MI787 FOR SALE DINING ROOM TABLE WITH ONE LEAF. SIX CHAIRS, MATCHING HUTCH, $400 EA OR $700 FOR SET. MINI TRUCK UTILITY BOX $70, CALL 293-2582. MI583 MAPLE DESK W CHAIR SEGA GENESIS & VIDEO CABINET 2" HUFFY BIKE WET/DRY & BLOWER SHOP VAC R/C PLANES & EQUIPMENT ACCORDIAN & 2 BASS GUITARS & MISC. EFFECTS 293-7197. BC M!814 DOUBLE-BED MATTRESS. GOOD COND. $20, 293-2226 LV. MESSAGE. MI813 GARAGE SALES EXPERIENCED MERCHANDISE THRIFT STORE. 527 Nevada Hwy., near Ace Shopper Stopper, yard sale pnces. Hours: M-F, 10-2, Sat. 10-1. GS799 Craft Sale Front Yard Friday & Sat. Only 8:00 am-2:00 pm NO EARLY BIRDS. 151? CHRISTINADR.BC.NV. GS797 LOST & FOUND LOST AKITA White and Fawn. 2 yrs. old, weighs 100 lbs. Last seen Hand. Center St. area. Please call if found 564-7785. LF710 LOST BIk. and White Great Dane, has Heart Condition, needs medKation. please call 373-1457. LF766 LOST, CHESAPEAKE BAY RETRIEVER. BROWN, FEMALE, 1218-94 VICINITY OF UGOURI'S, S. BOULDER HWY. 565-7161. GRAYBEU-A. LF771 PETS/ANIMALS PUREBRED COCKER SPANIEL, BUFF COLORED, FEM.,1YR., MALE,6MOS.,$50EA., 565-3750. PA608 THE ANIMAL FOUNDATION will help you financially spay or neuter your cat or dog. Very inexpensive in Las Vegas. 384-3333 BC PA ADOPT CATS & Dogs from your shelters. Save a Life. BC PA LAS VEGAS VALLEY HUMANE SOCIETY. Beautiful, healthy, kittens, cats, puppies, dogs. Spayed/neutered, tested, shots. PetsMart, Trop-Eastern store only. Thurs., Fri., Sat., Sun., 11-4. PA 429 FREE family fun safari in the desert. Visitors welcome for guided tours daily to see lions, tigers, bears, cougars, woWes, parrots and hundreds of others 361-2484. PA236 AKC REGISTERED PUREBRED MALE ROTTWEILER FOR STUD.GREATDISPOSrnON,CAa FOR STUD FEE. BECKY, Sae-M22 sfisf 5 pm. Plan

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Page B18 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, December 22,1994 Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Page B19 LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES I.F/JAt, NOTICE lilt Vf hit Im liilrd hrrrin art upforpuhlir Mictinn. Auction xrllhrhrld January 16,1995 1.1 ll:(M) a.m. at HK; JOHN.S IOWIM;, ISM FoolhillDr, Bouldrr Clly.NV 89005. W rrirrvr titt ri|>ht to bid. '70 FORD YIN ()(;.<;KH22IH4I >>I,&ST MJ(0l.lOKKOKKNNKTH II BKI,I„ I.A,S VWJA.S NV I,0 DONALD J STUMM JR., LASVKGASNV. •86 BtlICK VIN I(;4HR37.Y1(;H464626 IM.AST I90KYT NV RO JAMKS CHIAPKTI LAS VE(;A,SNVI,OSTANSFAR wK,sr Atrro LA.S VE(;A.S NV. •70 VW VIN 1102212636 I'L&.ST UNKNOWN RO&LO RANDY THOMAS BOULDER CITY NV. •76 MERC VIN 6A9.1H532545 PL4ST UNKNOWN RO&LO ADOLFO OR JOANN CAIRO, I^S VEGAS NV. '74 PLY VIN VL29C4B225832 PL4ST UNKNOWN RO&LO STACY L LAKZARO, HENDER.SON NV. •78I'X)RVINK91T199643 PL&ST UNKNOWN RO&LO DANNY J OR LORETTA C COOPER, HENDERSON NV. BC—D. 22, 29, 1994, Jan. 5,1995. 4 Lines ^,,1 MARK SCHNIPPEL VACAririW VAr, 11 1)4 ^^ • vn H ( 1 III III 1 ^ ^' II II 1 II II 1)1 I! 1 1 1 ] • "!'' l""| III! Ill 1^ 1 p? iJT LEGAL NOTICE VACATION OF HKJHT-OF-WAY VAC.31-94 NEWI'ORT DRIVE NorUE IS HEREBY (;iVEN (hat a p<fDe(vinber, l994,andPUBLI.SHEDIN I UK HENDERSON HOME NEWS on 12/22/94 and 12/29/94. IHI Colleen Bell COLLEEN BELL, CMC, CITY CLERK H—Dec. 22,1994 LEGAL NOTICE Lftal: Erick S. Wilion, TMM I. Wilion, 2140 Fountain Springs, Hendenon, NV 89014. Boat: 1964 ChrliCraft, 29-08" NV0400BE Hull *BNV400BE. Interested Parties: Perry Wibon, Erin WUson, 2140 Fountain Springs, Henderson, IW 89014. S.L. Hensley, NHUe Hensley, Trustees, 4)141 Roliingwood Clr, Las Vegas, NV 89121. 1970 Portcniisc NV0I87BN 26'0" HuU*BNV187BN Interested Parties: Tom Stone, Box 19506, Jean, NV 89019. Walter G. Staples, P.O. Box 31SS Pahnimp, NV S9041. 1960 Beachcraft iro" NV0002AC HullNVZ002AC1291. SUvenD.Haibeck,29I7Siki Ct.A,La8Vegas,NV 89101. 1974S(arcran 16'03" NVS056KD HullfSTR11956M74J Donald S. Kicman, 5912 Fawn Ave., Las Vegas, NV 89107. 1969 CoUa iro" NV30eOKL Hull NJZ0467047 The Auction will be held on January 6, 1995, at the Las Vegas Bay Marina, at Las Vegaa Bay, on Lake Mead, at 8:00 am. H—Dec. 15. 22, 29, 1994. TRU-WEST DEVELOPMENT cownDCNsn/E PUN Akcrocm CPA-40-4 i AMERICAN NEVADA CORPORATION VAr:A1iOH i LEtJAL NOTICE VACATION OF RI<;HT-0F-WAY VAC-29-94 I'ORTlONSOFtJKEEN VALLEY PARKWAY NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a petition has been filed willf the Clerk of the Council of the City of Henderson, Nevada, requesting the vacation of portions of Green Valley Parkway. HIE PETITIONER, AMERICAN NEVADA CORPORAIK >N, has requested this vacation because this righ(-4if-way is iMi longer needed for access. A PUBLIC HKARINt; on said vacation will be held on Tuesday, January .\ IV9S, at Ibe hour of 7:(MI p.m., or as soon Ihrrealter as practicable, in the Council Chamber at City Hull, 240 Water .Street, in the City of Henderson, County of t!|urk, Nevada. IFUPON.SUCHHEARINt;, the City Council of said City of Henderson is satisHed that tlie public will not be materially injured by such pniper, 1994, and PUBLISHED IN THE HENDER.SONHOMENEWS on 12/22/94 and 12/29/94. /s/ Colleen Bell COLLEEN BELL, CMC, CITY CLERK H—Dec. 22, 29, 1994. mt NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING (CPA-40-9) NOTICE IS HEREBY (HVEN that the City Council of the City of Henderson, Nevada, will hold a Public Hearing on January 3, 1995, at the hour of 7:00 P.M., or as soon (hereafter as practicable, in the City Council Chambers, City Hail, 240 Water Street, Henderson, to consider an amendment to the Comprehensive Plan Amendment to amend the land use from Touris( Commercial (o ResidenUaJ on 10 acres more or less, located on the west side of Racetrack Road, between Bclmont Drive and Sausalito Drive in the River Mountain planning area. ANY AND ALL interested persons may appear before the City Council either in penon or by counsel, and may object to or express approval of the proposed amendments to the Land Use Policy Plan of the CityofHenderson Comprehensive Plan, or may prior to the Public Hearing, file with the City Clerk written objection thereto or approval thereof. DATED this 12(h day of December, 1994 and published in the Henderson Home News 12/22/94 and 12/29/94. /s/ Colleen Bell COLLEEN BELL, CMC, CITY CLERK H—Dec. 22, 29,1994. 3RD GENERATION LTD. PARTNERSHIP VACATION VAC00-94 1 LEGAL NOTICE VACATION OF RIGHT-OF-WAY • VAC-30-94 NORCROSS STREET NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a pctiUon has been (lied with the Clerk of the Council of the City of HenderMn, Nevada, requesting the vacation of a portion of Norcross Street THE PETITIONER, 3RD GENERATION LTD. PARTNERSHIP, has requested this vacation becau.se this right-ofway is no longer needed for access. A PUBLIC HEARING on said vacation will be held on Tuesday, January 3,1995, at the hour of 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter H practicable, in the Council Chamber at City Hall, 240 Water Street, in (he City of Henderson, County of Clark, Nevada. IFUPON SUCH HEARINt;, (he City Council ofsaid City of Henderson is satisfied that (he public will no( be ma(erially injured by such proposed vacation, (he above-described right-of-way will be vacated. DATED (his I4(h day of December, 1994, and PUBLISH ED IN THE HENDERSOrf HOME NEWS on 12/22/94 and 1 V19/94. M Colleen Bell COLLEEN BELU CMC, CITY CLERK H—Dec. 22, 29, 1994^ LEGAL NOTICE Title Order No. 91010SDK Tnutee Sale No. 94-70145 Reference No. 53927M NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 07/10/89. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD ATA PUBLIC SALE. IF VOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OFTH E NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 01/06/95 at U) A.M., Professional Foreclosure Corporation as the duly appointed (rustce under and pursuant to Deed of Trus(, Recorded on 07/13/89 as Document No. 00164 Book 890713 Page of OfTicial Records in the office of the Recorder of CLARK County, Nevada, cxecu(ed by: JAMES K. MORRIS A>fD MELANIE K. MORRIS, HUSBAND/WIFE, as Trustor MARGARETTEN & COMPANY, INC., as Beneficiary WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United Stales, by cash, a cashier's check drawn by a stale or national bank, a check drawn by a state of federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to d o business in th is state.) At: AT THE FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 200 SOUTH 3RD STREET, LAS VEGAS, NV all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by i( under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County, Nevada describing the land therein: LOT NINETEEN(I9)IN BLOCK THUEE(3)OFCITVVIEW TERRACE UNIT NO. 3, AS SHOWN BY MAP THEREOF ON FILE IN BOOK 25 OF PLATS, PAG E 35, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 434 BOX ELDER WAY, HENDERSON, NV 89015. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any Incorrectness of the street address and o(hcr common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will bemade, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum oflhe note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said n(i(e(s),advanced,if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the tru.sts created by said Deed ofTrwit, tu-wit: S65.45183 Estimated Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase (his figure prior to sale. The beneficiary under said Deed of Tru-st heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a wri((en Declaralion of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice ofDefault and Election (o Sell. The undersigned caused said No(ice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where (he real property is located and more than three months have elapsed since such recordation. DATE: 11/29/94 Professional Foreclosure Corporation as Trustee 2030 E. Flamingo Rd., Suite 145 Las Vegas, NV 89119 Telephone Number: (702)369-4255 x/s/ Kelly L. Rader KELLY L. RADER, TRUSTEESALEOFHCER H—Dec. 15, 22, 29, 1994. LEGAL NOTICE PUBLIC AUCTION A claim has been placed on (he goods s(ored in .STUFF UR STORAGE, 651 EASTGATE, HENDERSON, NV 89015 to recover past due charges owed to STUFF UR STORAGE. All units will be sold to the h ighest bidder on 1-7-95 at 10:00 A.M. All owners of units up for sale must pay charges owed in full on or before 5 pm I -695. Personal property and household items to be sold are stored by or for the following parties: D107-I^slie Wilfong E204-Paul Bunyon G209-Teresa Clark G224-Christine Reynolds H203-Raquel Banks H208-Melody Elgin STUFF UR STORAGE reserves the right to bid on any/ or all units and accept or reject any/or allbids it deems is in its best interest H—Dec. 22, 29, 1994. LEt;AL NOTICE KENYA MARIA PASKO 129 Park Ridge Lane Henderson, Nevada 89015 Telephone: 566-3687 Petitioner in Proper Person HLED DEC. 20 12:58 P.M. '94 (s) Loretla Bowman CLERIC DISTRICT COURT CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA IN THE MATTER OF A PETITION OF KENYA MARIA PASKO, FORCHAN(;EOFNAME. CASE NO. D183202 DEPARTMENT NO, F NOTICE OK HEARING PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN (hat KENYA MARIA PASKO has lllcd in (his Court, a Petition praying for an Order of this Court changing her name to K ENYA MARU TERRITO, and a hearing thereon has been set for the I9(h day of January, 1995, at 9:00 a.m., at the Courthouse of the above entiUed Court, at 200 South ThiH Street, Las Vegas, Nevada. All persons interested in said Pe(i(i(m are notified (o appear and show cause if any (hey have why (he Petition should not be granted. DATED this 20 day of December, 1994. LORETTA BOWMAN, Clerit By: DIANNE SHELDON Deputy Clerk (DISTRICT COURT SEAL) H—Dec. 22,29,1994, Jan. 5, 12,1995 PUBLIC NOTICE OF LIEN SALE I.T98I CHEVY MALIBU STATION WAGON VIN *1GAD35A5BP640747 LAST KNOWN OWNER OFTHISVEHICLETERRY GILBERT SOME BODY DAMAGE COST OF REPAIRS PLUS STORAGE 2.1982 CADILIAC KLEETWOOD FOUR DOOR SEDAN LAST KNOWN OWNER JESSIE CHAVEZ NO MOTOR COST OF REPAIRS AND STORAGE 3. FORD ESCORT VIN # IFAPP2<)96LW197250 4. CHEVY CHEVETTE #1GIAB68989A135740 5. VW BUG VIN #1332525673 JAMCEY MOTOR FUELS ANTJ REPAIRS WILLSELL THESEVEHICLESIFALL CHARGES AND STORAG E FEES ARE NOT PAID WITHIN 15DAYSOFTHIS NOTICE H—Dec. 20, 22,1994 CLASSIFIED AD s 4 p.m. Friday for Henderson Tuesday issue Noon Tuesday for Henderson Thursday, Boulder City and Green Valley issues Doxed Ads 7' per column inch per week LEGAL NOTICE Title Order No. 9I0863-DK Trustee Sale No. 94-70378 Reference No. 044717-1 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 01/16/92. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PR(yrECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE, IK YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THENATUREOFTHE PROCEEDINGS AGAINSTYOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 0I/O4/9S at 11:00 A.M., Professional Foreclosure Corporidon as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant (o Deed of Trust, Recorded on 01/17/92 as DocumenI No. 00539 Book 920117 Page — of Official Records in (he office of (he Recorded of CLARK County, Nevada, executed by: ELSA PIRAK BISHOP, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN, as TruMor ICM MORTGAGECORPORATION, BeneflclaryWILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, (payable at time of sale In lawful money of the United SUtes, by cash, a cashier's check drawn by a sUte or niUonal bank, a check drawn by a sUle or federal credit unkMi, of achecfc drawn by a sUieor federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified In section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do buslneasin this state.) At: ATTHEFRONT ENTRANCETO THE COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 200 SOUTH 3RD STREET, LAS VFXIAS, NV all rlgh(, title and Interest conveyed (o and now held by l( under said Deed of Trust In the property sl(ua(ed In said Couniy, Nevada describingUie land (herein: SEE EXHIBIT A' ATFACHED HERETO AND MADE A PART HEREOF The street address and other common designation, if any, of (he real property described above b purported to be: 2251 WIGWAM PARKWAY #511, HENDERSON, NV 89014. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any Incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or Implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided In said note(s), advances, If any, under (he terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expcnsesof tbeTrustee and of the trusts created by said deed of Trust, to-wit: $65,922.21 Estimated Accrued Interest and additional advances If any, will increase this figure prior to sale. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and l':iertion to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located and more than three months have elapsed since siKh recordation. DATE: 11/30/94 Professional Foreclosure Corporation as Trustee 2030 E. namingo Rd., Suite 145 LasVefia.sNV89I19 Telephone Number: (702) 369-4255 /s/Gary W.Hyatt, GARY W. HYATT EXHIBIT "A" Situate in the County of Clark, Sute of Nevada described as follows: A condominium Comprised Of: PARCEL I: Unit Five Hundred FJeven (511) In Building Five (5) of Legacy Condominiums Unit I, a condominium subdivision filed pursuant to the provisions of N.R.S. 117.020, recorded In Book 49 of Plats, page 13, In the Official Records of the County Recorder, Clark Counly, Nevada. And as defined in (ha( cer(aln Declaradon of Restrictions (Enabling Declaration Establishing a Plan for Condominium Ownership of Legacy Condominiums) recorded August 28, 1991 In Book 910828 of Official Records, Clark Counfy, Nevada, as DocumenI No. 00507. PARCEL II: An undivided l/60th Interest in and to the Common Area shown as Lot A, Phase lA upon the Plat of Legacy Condominiums Uni( I, a Condominium subdivLslon filed pursuant to the provisions of N.R.S. 117.020 recorded In Book 49 of Plats, page 13, in the Official recordsof the County Recorder, Clark County, Nevada. And as defined in that certain Declaration of Restrictions(Enabling Declaration Establishing a Plan for Condominium Ownership of Legacy Condominiums Unit I) recorded August 28, 1991 in Book 910828 of Official Records, Clark County, Nevada, as Document No. 00507. PARCEL HI: A non-exclusive easemen( for Ingress and egress, public utilides and prlva(e streets shown over Lots A and B of Condominium Project, as shown upon the Plat of Legacy Condominiums Unit 1, a Condominium subdivision filed pursuant (o (he provisions of N.R.S. 117.020 recorded in Book 49 of Plals, page 13, in (he Official records of (he Coun(y Recorder, Clark County, Nevada. And as defined In that certain Declaration of Restrictions (F^nabling Declaration Establishing a Plan for Condominium Ownership of Legacy Condominiums Unit 1) recorded August 28, 1991 in Book 910828 of Official Records, Clark County, Nevada, as Document No. 00507. PARCEL IV: An exclusive easemen( (o use (ha( pordon of (he Common Area designated as Exclusive Use Area Parking Space No. P511 and Garage No. G-511, as well as all areas shown as patios, balconies or chimneys, as shown upon the Plat of Amended Map of Legacy Condominiums Phase I, a Condominium Subdivision filed pursuani (o (he provisions of N.R.S. 117.020 recorded in Book 49 of Plais, page 13, in (he Omclal records of lh Coonly Recorder, Clurk Counly, Nevada. And aL\di^\\>^> Advertise in the Hm PALMS FROM $10. Mulberrys from S30. Hedges & stirubs. You'll love my work • you'll love my rates. Dunem for 20 yrs. Champion Lawn Care 293-6756. CJ's LAWN CARE Professional Landscape Maintenance Most Lawns, $15 Lie. #164014571 565'7630 Frae EatlnMitea PS702 Bo's Landscaping iLawn Service • Sprinklers'HJ 294-6274 '< ]l\!J'''^5arv|n9: B.C., Hond., Of—n Vollay PS73ff PS341 IBLACKMOUNTAI, PLUMBING SERVICE DRAIN CLEANING g-j FAST SERVICE HENDERSON BOULDER CITY 565-6749 uc.ioois4 294-7713 CLASSIFIEDS CAN WORK FOR YOU! CALL 564-1881 OR 293-2302 TREE TRIMMING Hedges, Pruning, Topping, Stumps & Trees Removal Low Rates Elderly Discount Free Estimates Professional Job 564-5976 PS420 Save for retirement with U.S. Savings Bonds. They'll mature before you do. You refuse to grow old "gracefully." Which is why you buy "casual" shoes, not "sensible" shoes. Why you call it "bringing out those natural highlights," not "hiding the gray" • And why you still haven't started to save for retirement. Exactly what are you waiting for? The first day of your retirement, when you find yourself with no more job and no more paychecks? Give your retirement savings program a solid foundation by investing in U.S. Savings Bonds. They're backed by the full faith and credit of the United States and guaranteed to earn interest.'* And they're easy to buy for just a few dollars each payday through your employer's U.S. Savings Bonds Payroll Savings Plan. Or buy them at your bank. Plus, the interest earned on U.S. Savings Bonds is exempt from state and local income taxes and can be deferred for federal income tax purposes for up to 30 years. Ask your banker or your employer about including U.S. Savings Bonds in your retirement savings program. Even if you call it "saving for a rainy day" For more information, write to: U.S. Savings Bonds, Washington, DC 20226. For a recorded message of current rate information, call 1-800-4US BOND • 1-800-487-2663 InTnS^OJOiVDS Cuncntly-lssued Scries EE Savings Bonds have a final maturity of 30 years. A public service of this newspaper CUSTOM STENaUNG BYAUESE WALLS, n-oont, FURMTUNE FREE ESTIIVIATES 294-1422 P8628 HANDYMAN, NO JOB TO SMALL, 12 YEARS EXP., HONEST, RELIABLE, AND REASONABLE RATES. S65-345S r^H, CLASSIFIED AD MM 4 p.m. Friday for Tuesday issue Noon Tuesday for Panorama COMPLETELY COMPLETE PAINTING MOVE OVER MICHELANGELO. QUAUTY PAINTING AT ITS FINEST. 645-6101, TODD. nn BATH TUB REPAIR Tubs and Sinks rsglazed, chips rspaired, Rbsrglass and mors. 564-2276 Boxed Ads ^T' per column Inch per week RELIABLE LAWN CARE We do it all 293-5268 4 p.m. Friday for Tuesday issue, Noon Tuesday (or Panoraiia"' SHERMAN CONCRETE Licensed & Bonded Lie. #30046 Free Estimates 294-2343 ps688 HANDYMAN MItc. Horn* Rapairt Carpanlry, Plumbing, ale. Reasonable/ Reliable Call Dan.. .564-2827 PS697 RPM AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE TUNEUPS TO OVERHAUL 565-CARS{2277) MR. FIXIT "The Handyman" No time to do It ynuself? Let me do it for you! 294-6214 PS737 .CLASSIFIED i p.m. Friday for Tuesday issue, Noon Tuesday for Pariorama"' MASTER CRAFTSMAN Custom woodworking to your specs. Furniture mantles cabinets • antique repair • retinish • make now wood look old anything in wood Over 20 yrs, exp exc ref 5fi5 5IfiR 651 DEAN'S BODY AND PAINT Collision repair Frss towing w/rspairs 20 yrs. sxp. call 565-8200 Irss estimates 745 W. Sunset Rd, HndNV Suits *20 PS24S HENDERSON SWAP MART FrI-Sat-Sun IISHOP AIR SERVICE ^— AIR SERVICE Air CondWoBlns • lliai| | CemmMtiaiRssidential •Air Conditioning • • Hooting • • Rofrigoratlon* 565-9800 Llc.*36$S4 711 Brtcfc Or. Hara^Mn PROFESSIONAL SERVICES SANTA GLAUS look alike for hire for parties and child entertainment at your home. 566-6940. Lv. Msg. PS406 CHIMNEY CLEANING, recommended at least every 2 years. Reas. Prices. No Mess. Footbusters, 293-4244. We move res. & comm. Free estimates, we load/ unload rental trucks anywhere in town. 566-8898. PS 360 Customized wrought iron gates, fences, ect. Built right, priced reasonable for free estimates, call gates by Curtis, 566-5979 or beeper 599-4638. lie. #01014415. PS 359 YARD LABOR SERVICE YARD clean-up, trash hauling, lawn mowing, minor sprinkler repairs. Lk:. #164-010521, 5655810. PS245 POINTING Ihavedonsitallinovsr 24 yrs. If you wsnt quality call MKE 223-1845 serving HND/BC PS423 MISCELLANEOUS GLITTER GULCH DENA's (The Rock Queen), in Henderson offering Amerkian Indian Decor gifts, jewelry, Pipes, drums, flutes, rocks, quartz crystals, minerals, fossils. We are a Community Pride, a special Indian place. Attention: (Health problems, force Dena to reduce most of her Primo collectibles). Must reduce inventory to make it easier to operate. Conne in, select pieces you always wanted. Generous discount. Act quickly. Remember, these things are one of a kind. 5650711. MI763 COLLOIDAL SILVER. It is known to be effective against 600 different disease organisms. Call 293-5239 or 294-1910. BC Ml 571 LOSE WEIGHT! Feel Great! With the guaranteed formula of the 90's. THERMOGENESIS. 100% Natural Herbal Blond. For info. Call 2935239 or 294-1910.BC. MI571 LIVING ROOM FURN., KITCHEN TABLE AND CHAIRS, BDRM. FURN., MUST SELL IMMEDIATELY. 433-5774,6PM10 PM. Ml RETIRED MECH. Selling tools, $25,000 OBO for more info. Call 2931949. MI578 VERY OLD FIDDLE $8,000. Must see. For more info, call 293-1949. MI579 WATKINS PRODUCTS 702-293-4803. MI580 FOR SALE, aluminum awning, for mobile home. 10 ft. X 60 ft. complete with hardware, $750. 294-1055. BC. MI581 HONDA XR-80 1988 XLNT COND. $700, O.B.O. 294-1173. MI638 '91 HONDA ELITE, 1300 MILES, EXCELLENT CONDITION, $850.2930173 OR 293-4766. VE648 SOLOFLEX GREAT XMAS GIFT $795 LIKE NEW 263-0723 ARER 5:30 PM OR 436-7775. MI677 Regular Nintendo $109. Ganrws and more 8988556. MI691 1 Red and 1 Blue 80cc Moto 4 $800 each Mornings before 12:30 pm. 294-6203. Ml DINING ROOM SET 7 CANE BACK CHAIRS PADDED SEATS $200, CALL 294-0083. MI768 25" RCA color Console, Sears exerciser Lif estyler 500 Skier/Rower used twice $7 each. Head Ski Jacket lavender sz. 10, Can Crusher, heavy duty, make offer. 564-3848. MI767 FIREWOOD FOR SALE, ALL HARDWOODS FROM $125 PER CORD. 564-2325. MI604 '81 HARLEY DAVIDSON. FXEF, EXCELLENT COND., 565-6642. MI626 KITCHEN CABINETS, COMPLETE SET. ALL APPLIANCES INCL. EXCELLENT CONDITION. BEST QUALITY, $1,750. 293-5693. MI624 PHOTO EQUIPMENT35 MM CAMERA. TRI-POD, AND SOME LENSES 293-1581. MI639 WASHER / Dryers $125.00 Each. 2936101. BC Mi731 ARTHRITIS Suffers, live pain free. Had it for 20 years now I am pain free. Cost is as low as $15 per mo., not medicine, natural food & energy supplements. Guaranteed. 564-1648. MI2S4 MISCELLANEOUS NEED NEW FURNITURE? Tired of looking? Solution: Furniture Cioseouts Warehouse. Brand names, full furniture lines, cioseouts, discontinued items, display furniture! Save Big Money! Examples, Mattress sets: twins $69; fulls $79; queens $119; kings $149; brand names & guarantees. 6000 S. Eastern Ave., BIdg. 8 (Sunset to Eastern, turn north, to next traffk: light, then right on PatrckIn. 4th bidg. on left.) 5% discount with this ad. 7 Days a Week; 10 am to 7 pm. Closed: Dec. 24 throughDec.31 forXmas holidays. Opens Jan. 1, 1995.739-0338. MI673 Side by side Frigidaire refrigerator $175. 385 Verbena HND. 5643388. MI708 New Evenflo Light Weight Portable Bed/ Playpen with cariy bag, Mas connpact. $50.5653467. MI709 NORDIC TRAC "SEQUOIA" model with Electronics and Video Excel. Cond. $395. 2936489. MI723 FOR SALE: 22" Webertype grill. New, unopened in original box $35; Olympus mount, ASANUMA 80-250 autozoom lens, excellent $75. 564-3598. MI721 AST Computer 286-80 MIG Hard drive BLK/ WHT Monrtor not used much $300 Lillian 2931765 or 293-7486. For sale Washer Dryer Air Conditioner Beds Refrigerator 294-2305. MI781 Couch and matching love seat $200 king size bed $100, 351 Ford Motor, 19ft. Ski Boat 294-2422. MI787 FOR SALE DINING ROOM TABLE WITH ONE LEAF. SIX CHAIRS, MATCHING HUTCH, $400 EA OR $700 FOR SET. MINI TRUCK UTILITY BOX $70, CALL 293-2582. MI583 MAPLE DESK W CHAIR SEGA GENESIS & VIDEO CABINET 2" HUFFY BIKE WET/DRY & BLOWER SHOP VAC R/C PLANES & EQUIPMENT ACCORDIAN & 2 BASS GUITARS & MISC. EFFECTS 293-7197. BC M!814 DOUBLE-BED MATTRESS. GOOD COND. $20, 293-2226 LV. MESSAGE. MI813 GARAGE SALES EXPERIENCED MERCHANDISE THRIFT STORE. 527 Nevada Hwy., near Ace Shopper Stopper, yard sale pnces. Hours: M-F, 10-2, Sat. 10-1. GS799 Craft Sale Front Yard Friday & Sat. Only 8:00 am-2:00 pm NO EARLY BIRDS. 151? CHRISTINADR.BC.NV. GS797 LOST & FOUND LOST AKITA White and Fawn. 2 yrs. old, weighs 100 lbs. Last seen Hand. Center St. area. Please call if found 564-7785. LF710 LOST BIk. and White Great Dane, has Heart Condition, needs medKation. please call 373-1457. LF766 LOST, CHESAPEAKE BAY RETRIEVER. BROWN, FEMALE, 1218-94 VICINITY OF UGOURI'S, S. BOULDER HWY. 565-7161. GRAYBEU-A. LF771 PETS/ANIMALS PUREBRED COCKER SPANIEL, BUFF COLORED, FEM.,1YR., MALE,6MOS.,$50EA., 565-3750. PA608 THE ANIMAL FOUNDATION will help you financially spay or neuter your cat or dog. Very inexpensive in Las Vegas. 384-3333 BC PA ADOPT CATS & Dogs from your shelters. Save a Life. BC PA LAS VEGAS VALLEY HUMANE SOCIETY. Beautiful, healthy, kittens, cats, puppies, dogs. Spayed/neutered, tested, shots. PetsMart, Trop-Eastern store only. Thurs., Fri., Sat., Sun., 11-4. PA 429 FREE family fun safari in the desert. Visitors welcome for guided tours daily to see lions, tigers, bears, cougars, woWes, parrots and hundreds of others 361-2484. PA236 AKC REGISTERED PUREBRED MALE ROTTWEILER FOR STUD.GREATDISPOSrnON,CAa FOR STUD FEE. BECKY, Sae-M22 sfisf 5 pm. Plan

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Page B20 Henderson Home News, Boulder Cfty News Thursday, December 22,1994 VEHICLES 72CAMARO350,ORIG. PAINT AND ENG., $1,750.. 293-0813. VE627 TT FORD CONVERSION VAN, E150, 302V8, HI TOPDUAL A/C. DUAL TANKS, 4 CAP. CHAIRS, COLOR TV, 73KM, $5,900. 5661802. VE694 71 VOLKSWAGEN Bug $600. Ruris well, needs minor repairs. 293-6585. BC. VE P/U 85 Nissan King Cab with sun roof and schell Power steering Brakes, windows and locks. Excellent Cond. Garage Kept. $5500. CALL 2931167. Leave message. 86 BUICK SKYHAWk SENIOR 1 OWNER AC AM/FM RADIO, LIKE NEW, GREAT MILEAGE $3400,080,87 HONDA CIVIX DXACARTAPE DECK RUNS AND LOOKS FANTASTIC $2900 OBO 431-4211. MAILBOX RENTALS The Postal Station, Mailbox Rentals, UPS, Copies & Fax, Keys, 120 Market St., 566-4771. MR MUSICAL INSTRUIMENTS WURLITZER PIANO $900 good condition. 293-6585. BC. Ml VEHICLES '1985 Honda CRX, exc. cond. new paint, brakes &aornator.111k$3,500 O.B.O., LVE MSG. 2932375. VE506 79 Dodge Pickup 4 speed withshell318encilne, a/ C. Call 565-5782. VE770 Used Auto parts Foreign IDomestk:, Big John and Sons, 1631 Foothill Dr. 293-PART. VE777 See Radiator Master Located inside Emission Express, 1400 NV Hwy, 293-RAD1. VE778 Emission Express & complete Automotive. Emission Express Auto Care, 1400 NV HWY, 293-2473. VE779 89 Pontiac FM350 Loaded T-TOP-LOW Miles $7400 454-8308. BIO JOHN'S TOWINO Llgtit and HMvy duly towing, r*cov*ry •pKlalMt. (702) 294-HELP 1586 Foothill D r. B.C. FAST CASH TOP PRICES PAID FOR JUNK CARS FREE PICK-UP SERVICE CALL US! 565-1414 NEVADA PIC-A-PART VE69S TIRED OF TRYING TO SELL YOUR CAR? DON'T WANT STRANGERS COMING TO YOUR HOUSE? WE PAY CASH FOR CLEAN TRUCKS & CARS! ANY AUTO SALES 1112 NEVADA HWY. BOULDER CITY, NEVADA 293-2000 YOU COULD BE DRIVING 1988 or newer car, truck or van If you have $500 and any one of these, direct phone access, previous car credit, home-owners, credit card, 2 yrs. on the job, checking account or telephone in buyers name. HOLLIS USED CARS, 1760 N. Nellls, 437-8870^^/E337 PERSONALS $$ IN YOUR XMAS BUDGET & FIX YOUR BAD CREDIT. Veiy Low Cost-Free Consultation Lexington Law Firms 800-453-9529. PE363 Prayer to the Blessed Virgin (Never known to fail) O most beautiful flower of Mount Carmel, fruitful vine, splendor of Heaven, Blessed Mother of the Son of God, Immaculate Virgin, assist me in my necessity. O' Star of the Sea, help me and show nf>e where you are my mother. 0' Holy Mary, Mother of Goa, Queen of Heaven and Earth, I humbly beseech you from the bottom of my heart to secure me in my necessity. There are none that can withstand your power. O' Mary conceived without sin pray for us who have recoursed to thee. Holy Mary, I place this cause in your hands. Say this prayer for 3 consecutive days and then you must publish and it will be granted to you. S.G. SINGLES: MEET single people throughout rural America. Confidential, reputable, establsihed plan. Free Details. Country Connections Newsleter, PO Box 406, S uperior, 68978. PE635 CHRISTIAN DATING AND FRIENDSHIP SERVICE. Since 1989, 6,000 current members. For free package and a free introduction to a Christian single in your area. 1-800-399-1994. PE636 THANK YOU HOLY SPIRIT AND BLESSED MOTHER, AND SAINT JUDE. B.C. PE720 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS MMl7dayiawk.itSPM, Rac. Anntx bahind Bouldar Dam CradH Union. ALAWOW-AL*TtB< ^*-*^" TRAVEL LUGGAGE RENTAL Why buy when you can rent quality luagage at a fraction of the cost. Let us save you money and time on your next vacation. FREE pickup and delivery. Luggage Lenders 565-3737. TR762 4 Lines 16 cosh rote PERSONALS Prayer to the Blessed Virgin (Never known to fail) O' most beautiful flower of Mount Carmel, fruitful vine, splendor of Heaven, Blessed Mother of the Son of God, Immaculate Virgin, assist me in nry necessity. 0' Star of the Sea, help me and show me where you are my mother. O' Holy Mary, Mother of God, Quean of Heaven and Earth, I humbly beseech you from the bottom of my heart to secure me in my necessity. There are none that can withstand your power. O' Mary conceived without sin pray for us who have recoursed to thee. Holy Mary, I place this cause in your hands. Say this prayer for 3 consecutive days and then you must publish and it will bo granted to you. C.E. 794 Advertise in the News^ BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES NOTICE TO READERS: The HBC Publications does not vouch for the legitimacy of items, jobs, or money-making opportunrties advertised in this classification. We suggest you carefully evaluate such offers and not send money to these advertisers unless you are certain you know with whom you are dealing and you know all terms and conditions of the offer. BO Cleaning Franchise BUILD A FAMILY BUSINESS. Let the ServiceMaster family helpyourfamily start your own residential or commercial cleaning franchise for as little as $5955 down. Fortune service 500 company offering unique training and marketing support. Financing available. Call for a free brochure: 1-800-2302360. B0396 Cleaning FranchiseBUILD A FAMILY BUSINESS Let the ServiceMaster family help your family start your own residential or commercial cleaning franchise for as little as $5955 down. Fortune 500 company offering unique training and marketing support. Financing available. Call for a free brochure: 1800-230-2360. BOATS & RVs 1972 GLASTRON DEEP V 171/2 FT $1500 VOLVO IN/OUT BOARD, 6 CYL, NEEDS VALVE JOB AND PISTON, SEE ANYTIME AT 1105 INDUSTRIAL BC NV. BR493 21' Trophy Cutty Bayliner, 1985 Volvo Penta, 325 hours, excellent condition, slipped at K^arina. $9500. 4354891. BR585 tnm^ '80 Nomad 32' fifth wheel, many extras, $5300, not firm, 293-6688 STORAGE RENTALS FOR RENT 10 X 20 STORAGE UNITS. 2931135. CR606 A little short between paydays? In 1994—If you will earn under $23,755,and Have at least one child living with you In the U.S., you may be eligible for extra noncy in each paycheck. Aek your empioyer about the Advance Earned Income Credit, or call the IRS at \-&00-&29-1040 Advertise in tlie Thanks to you, all sorts of everyday products are being made from the paper, plastic, metal and glass that you've been recycling. But to keep recycling working to help protect the environment, you need to buy those products. BUY RiCYCLEB. B ANi SAVE: So look for products made from gm recycled materials, and buy them. It B would mean the world to all of us. B To receive a free brochure, write Buy Recycled, Environmental Defense Fund. 257 Park Ave. South. New York. NY 10010. or call 1-800-CALL-EDF. I iSP BMI ENVIRONMENTAI. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES CAPITAL AVAILABLE FOR BUSINESS. Commarcial and Venture Capital $25,000 Up. CALL 1-310-550-7142. B0436 SEEKING TWO INVESTORS/MANAGERS FOR 50-50 PARTNERSHIP IN RETAILS STORES IN HEND. AND BC, JOIN A GROWTH OPPORTUNITY, STUART 435-1333. 80558 CLEANING FRANCHISE, WE INVEST IN YOU! Service Master Targets Boulder City. One connpany believes that hard workshouldpay off. That's why, when you invest in a Sen/ice Master franchise, we invest in you. We're the nation's largest professional cleaning company. And we provide the best training, the best equipment and the very best support, including national advertising. Get started with as little as about $8000 down plus working capital. Financing available. For free infornnation. Call 1-800230-2360. BO posmoN WANTED Home and CRITTER Sitter, bonded, reasonable rates, 361-7470. Page 892-5920. DOMESTIC HELP HIS HAND EXTENDED DAY CARE. 2 Christian Women will care for your children in their home, Mon.-Fri., 6 am-6 pm. Ages 2 to 5. Will have preschool activities, $65 a child. Call 566-5068 for more information. Licensed. DH760 PROFESSIONAL Ironing & sewing. Free pick up & delivery for Boulder City residents. 293-4200. BC DH New Year's Eve Babysitting in rny home over night available, all ages. 566-4548. After 6 PM. DH593 PROFESSIONAL CLEANING, HOME, COMMERCIAL AND APARTMENT. WE DO THE BEST FOR LESS. 10 YRS. EXPERIENCE. 565-7397. DH622 KIDS KLUBI is accepting enrollment before and after school for elementary age children. Transportation to and from school, nutritious snacks, recreation program. Phone 293-7773. IRONING TO PERFECTION .80 a Piece CALL THELMA 565-1507 DH242 Christian Family looking for domestic help, N/S, must love children, be neat, clean and tidy. M-F, some Sat., Sun. Call 456-3831 Retiree/Sr. HELP WANTED Part time/Full time, janitorial help, will train, 5654750. HW361 HOOVER DAM SNACKETERIA IS CURRENTLY SEEKING KITCHEN HELP. APPLY AT HOOVER DAM SNACKETERIA, NEVADA SPILLWAY AT HOOVER DAM, 2934364. HW616 HOUSEHOLD CLEANERS, days, M-F, no weekend or holidays, vacation, sk:k and holiday pay. GRIMEBUSTERS 798-1002. HW285 LIGHT DUTY MECHANIC Must have own tools, tow driving exp. helpful. NV. Drivers license. Apply in person. Auto Specialists, 705 Juniper. BC HW EXPERIENCED Manicurist wanted. Brand new station available for rent. Great shop, benefits. Hot Tips, 1000 Nev. Hwy. #205. BC. HW689 Wanted PaVt Time Babysitter in my home evenings and weekends, call 293-0101. Leave MSG. HW7B8 HOME TYPISTS, PC users needed. $35,000 potential. Details. Call (1) 805-962-8000 Ext. B5695. HW791 SANDWICH MAKER Maturs woman Must have transportation Pick up applk:atk>n 1312 Nevada Hwy. CAPS SANDWICH SHOP 293-7070g^ HELP WANTED Now hiring all positions, day or evening. Servers, Cooks. Prep, and Drivers. Apply PIZZA HUT, 1208 NV. HWY. HW765 MOTEL MAID experience helpful. Immediate opening, apply in person, also laundry person PT. Best Western Motel, 85 W. Lake Mead Dr., Hend. HW41B FOOD SERVER, New Gourmet Coffee House. Apply in person, Super 8 Motel, 704 Nv. Hwy. BC HW FRONT DESK CLERK, Benefits, immediate opening. Apply at Super 8 Motel, 704 Nv. Hwy. BC HW BARTENDERS POSITION Open, Apply at Super 8 Motel 704 Nev. Hwy. BC HW PROFESSIONAL DRIVERS NEEDED: TOP PAY TO RUN 11 WESTERN STATES. MUSTBE25YEARSOR OVER AND HAVE 2 YEARS' FLATBED EXPERIENCE. WE OFFER UP TO 26 CENTS A MILE, PAID VACATIONS. 8 PAID HOLIDAYS, EXCELLENT MEDICAL INSURANCE ON EMPLOYEE AND FAMILY, LIFE INSURANCE ON EMPLOYEE, .PROFIT SHARING, PLUS VERY LITTLE LAYOVER. ALL TRUCKS ARE 1992 AND NEWER, WITH 400 CATS & CUMMINS. CONTACT S.M.P. INC. AT (801) 374-0761. HW716 DRIVERS: FLATBED 48 stateOTR. Assigned new conventionals. Competitive pay, benefits, $1,000 sign-on bonus. Rider Program. Flexible time off. Call Roadrunner Trucking 1-800-8767784. HW715 PROJECT MANAGERTransportation Organization is accepting resumes for the above position. Will be responsible for the provision of public transportation services in Eastern Nevada. Qualifications: Thorough knowledge of transit operations; Effective communication/public relation skills; skill in budget development/general accounting principles; familiar with state/federal laws, rules and regulations; BA/BS in Transportation, Business Administration or related field with graduate course-work in Business; 5 years experience in transportation and 2 years supervisory experience. Rural transportation experience is preferred with emphasis on successful coordination and consolidation efforts. Equivalent education may be substrtuted for transportation experience. We offer comprehensive benefits and a competitive salary. To apply submit resume with salary requirements to: Ely Daily Times, Box XX, Ely, NV 89301 C/OCarol. Salary DOE, Closes 12/ 5/94. EOE. HW269 HELP WANTED PART TIME JANITOR/ STORE CLERK NEEDED apply in person at Opportunity village, 12 W Pacific, Mon. thru Sat. between 10 am & 4 pm. HW300 Industrial laundry taking applk;ations for part time positions various duties will train. Monday thru Friday, NO WEEKENDS, apply at Work Clothes RentI, 568 Parkson Rd., Henderson, NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. NOW HIRING BUSSER/ DELIVERY PERSON. PIZZA COOK. APPLY AT 120 MARKET ST., HEND. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. HW700 EXCELLENT Pay. Honne workers needed. Over 400 companies need homeworkers/distributors now. Call for amazing recorded message, 895-8123 24 hours. HW722 CARPET CLEANERS Exp. and non-smoker preferred. Must have own transportation. 5646716. HW761 RESUMES Compod, EdllMi, Ty|Md-Fatt t Accurti*. BEE'S BUSINESS SVC. •DAILYS-6 Sit. KM" 1400 CoorMk>,(K: 8.0. 293-5361 Hair station for rent, small, clean, full service salon. Call Lynette, 293-7427 LMVtnM*-Mg HW742 OiooMTawlwiici, You kMsm Mid Tow Roowdil AVON (702)2M-t170 Call Today! WANTED, Light houMk**pr 2 or 3 dayi par w**k. English not ImporUntUvalnorout, privatt room. kIL priv., call lor mor*lnfo.ftappL 791-SS99 CAFE SENSATIONS Q.V.Cafsaaaklngfuii time sxps. pantry cook. Kitchen supervisor position avallabla bring rsfarsncss. Applications accepted In person M W F, 9 am to 11 am, 2-4 pm, 4350 E. Sunst110 at Athlnaan. Henderson. HW266 AHENTICN REAL ESTATE AGENT 2nd Office Opening Soon In S.E. Only $100 per month fee. You keep 98.6% of your commission. Full Broker Svc. No hidden costs. Call PattI or Mario for confidential Intervtaw. 647-5909 T&M Group Realty aam SECURITY OFFICERS WELLS FARGO GUARD SERVICE. EMPLOYMENT OPENINGS IN HEND./G.V. AREAS. WE OFFER FLEXIBLE WORK HOURS, UNIFORMS PROVIDED, PAYEDVACATIONSANDOTHER BENEFITS. APPLY Monday-Friday, 9 am to 3:30 pm, 3305 W. Spring Mountain, #66, Equal Opportunity Emp loye r. tu •••••*••*••*•**••••*•*** SECURITY OFFICERS ^ NMded for greatw Hendwson, GV area, FULL^ ^ T1MEandPARTTIME,flxiblalMurs,hommakM,.^ ^ student* encouraged to apply. DOE, must be iMe.^ .^ to obtain Sheriffs card, have dependable ^ ^ transportation a phone. Call ALUED SECURITY, ^ ^ 364-5774, Monday-Friday, 8:30-4:30 pm, 3355 ^ ^ Spring Mtn. Rd, BIdg. C, Suite MSS. EOEA^ F/H-V. 8,7 •*••••••**•*•••••*•••*•• 1995 WanUd two full and part tima RECEPTIONISTS, axcaliant pay, no axp. nac..1 part tima DRIVER PLUS Two sailing MANAGERS muct hava a minimum 2 yrs. coilaga or 1 yaar diract saias. Sand Rasumaa to W.H. FOOD COMPANY, 39 E. BASIC ROAD HENDERSON, NV 89015 714 EARN EXTRA MONEY $$$ FOR THE HOLIDAYS $$$ Dalivartha Naw LAS VEGAS TELEPHONE BOOK Immadlata paymant upon suqcassful completion of your dallvary. Must b 18 oroidar, liava insurad vahicia, and ba availabia for 4 daylight hour*. Routas availabia In LAS VEGAS, BOULDER CITY, HENDERSON, BLUE DIAMOND, N. LAS VEGAS and aurrounding araaa. CALL NOW, DELIVERY ALREADY IN PROGRESSIIi 388-0312 Monday thru Friday 8 AM to 4 PM E.O.E. ^^ HELP WANTED NOW HIRINa CL£RK8 FOR SWING AND GRAVEYARD SHIFTS. Jr. Food MartTexaco, 902 S Boulder Highway, I Hnd. 56S-im or 565-1670 NOW HIRING LINE COOKS, DISHWASHERS, FOOD SERVERS APPLY IN PERSON. U.S. HWY. 93, BC MOBILE HOMES Lake Mountain Estates, Drastically reduced, fabulous home with lal(e view, nunrterous amenities. Boulder Dam Realty. Call Pat, 293-4663. MH802 PAYMENTS UNDER $512/mo. with space. 3 bdrm., 2 ba., a I appliances, nice family park in Henderson. Tota price $17,000. Co-op 5953279. BC. MH803 NIELSON NV. 2 BDRM. 1 BA., 1986 MODEL MINT COND. FULLY FURNISHED, BEAUTIFUL VIEWS $33,500 BOULDER DAM REALTY, ASK FOR PAT 293-4663. MH465 2 bdrm., 1 ba.. Mobile Home, $600/mo., Iv. mesg. 564-5471. MH706 FOR SALE HOME 10 X 40,1 BDRM., COVERED PATIO IN HENDERSON MOBILE HOME PARK $3,800 OR PARTIAL TRADE, CALL 433-4898. MH559 1974 SKYLINE 12X60 FULLY FURNISHED, 700 ELM ST., SP. 8, BOULDER CITY, NV. 293-5986. MH655 CON DO SALES BOULDER CITY CONDO, 960 Sq. ft.. Ground level. 2 bdrm., 2 bath, & garage. Central located to schools, stores & downtown. Ceiling fans, W/D, fridge included. $88,000. Call evenings 293-3019. BC CS804 SPANISH STEPS CONDO. 2 bdrm.. 2 bath. $95,000. Call for appt. 293-6800. BC. CS CONDO RENTALS FOR LEASE. LAKE VIEW. 2 BDRM., CONDO., CLUBHOUSE, POOL, GAR., $750/MO. 1ST & LAST, 293-3482. CR458 NEW 2 BDRM., 2 BA., APPLIANCES, G.V. $750+DEP. 565-8816. CR560 Condo for rent Boulder Hills condo, 2 bdrm., 1.5 ba., Washer Dryer Very Clean $650+DEP. CALL 454-2678. CR786 2 + 2 NEW LUXURY CONDO-Fantastic view, Jacuzzitub, $800 per mo. 293-4484. BC CR687 BOULDER CITY CONDO,2stoty,2bdrm., 2 bath, w/private enclosed yard, all appl. $775permo. + $750dep. Call Marie 293-4418. BC. CR733 WORKING PERSON to share 2 bdrm. condo 436-3204. CR587 COMMERCIAL SALES 5000 SQ. FT. Industrial/ retail building in BC on 1 acre, w/additional 1750 sq. ft. 3 bdrm. apt. over offices. Offered by Banner Realty, Cary Fisher, 293-5599. BC. CS COMMERCIAL RENTALS BRAND NEW! 02 office space, 2000 + sq. ft., $1500/mo. Call 2941080. BC CO680 Warehouse/Office 3500 sq. ft. total will build to suit, immediate availability. References a must. Sunset road frontage. 564-4100. OFFICE OR STORE, 1319 B, Nevada Hwy., 15x25.1/2 ba., heat, a/c, $235/mo., off street pknq., 293-3646. BC^ Advertise Advertise HOUSE RENTALS NICE 4 BDRM., 2-3/4 BA., RV PARKING, 1/2 ACRE LOT FOR RENT 293-6345. HR466 FORRENT:3BR.,2BA., NICE AREA $875 PLUS DEPOSIT. CALL ELAINE 592-2046. HR517 FOR LEASE, CUSTOM HOME WITH 3,300 SQ. FT., 4 BDRMS., 4-1/2 BA., $1,800/MO., PLUS DEPOSITS. CALL BC ADOBE REALTY, 2931707. HR527 BC HOUSE, 2 bdrm., 1 bath,central /VC & heat. Quiet, laundry rm., 1 yr. lease, $695 mo. 2941444. Owner/Broker, BC. HR 3 BDRM., 1 1/2 BA., with large family room and storage, corner lot, central air and heat. No pets. $750 per mo. plus dep. Call Al, Jensen's Realty 564-3333. HR428 BC-Desert Landscape, 3 bdrm., 2 1/2 bath, pool, rec. rm. w/yr. round spa, new appl., garaae, extra private, covered parking. $1350 per mo. + dep. 293-0359. BC. HR FOR RENT, 2 bdrm., 1 ba.. walk to town, $575/ mo., first and last $250 dep. 564-6699 or 5924735. HR713 WANTED: HUSBAND AND WIFE ON SOCIAL SECURITY. LAST COUPLE STAYED 10 YEARS. 1 BDRM. HOUSE, PRIVATE, STOVE, FRIDGE, FURN., OFF-STREET PKG., $300/MO. + CLEANING DEP. 5641648. HR611 3 BR., 2 BA., NEWER HOME IN HIGHLAND HILLS. IMMED. OCCUPANCY $865 MO. 2934663 BOULDER DAM REALTY. HR669 Highland Hills, 3bdrm., 2 ba.,roomforR.V.$800 + DEP. 598-4402. HR783 Duplex for rent, 1 bdrm., 1 ba., $475 mo. includes utilities deposits req. NO PETS565-8296. HR78S 2 bdrm., Washer-Dryer Refrigerator, A/C-Heat, Close to schools $800 mo. 293-6016. HR790 3 BR 2 BA NEWER HOME IN HIGHLAND HILLS. IMMED. OCCUPANCY $865 MO. 2934663 EVE. 294-1236 BOULDER DAM REALTY. HR669 1 BDRM. GUEST HOUSE W/CAR PORT CABLE AND WATER INCLUDED $450 MO. 293-1580. HR810 2 Bedrooms, 2 bath* CONDO In all adult complax, AVAIL. BY Jan. 5. 1S95, $500.00. NICE 1/2 DUPLEX-2 btdrmt., 1 bath, 1 car gar. Ownar payi watr/wr. Ideal for mature alngl*/ coupla NON-SMOKERS $650/MO. 3 badrm., 2 bait) homa, larga raar yard. AVAIL. NOW ownar pay* landacapa aarv. $1,100.00. 1/2 Duplex 3 bdrm. 2 ba ownar paya water and Landscaping, Fireplace and Laundry rm. Avail. 15, $728 MO. Contact DICK BLAIR REALTY 293-2171 HR7251 COMMERCIAL RENTALS STORAGE FOR RENT All Sizes—FancMl Resident Managw Near Sunaat Mountain VisU ^583990 VON'S PLAZA! 800 sq. ft. Available Neal Siniakin Lk:ensed Real Estate Brolcer 294-1444 Principals Please CfiZ2& RETAIL OFFICE SPACE 2200 sq. ft. avaiiabi* Can ba divldad. Tanns nagotiabla Call BC Adobe Realty 293-1707 Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Page B21 ROOMS FOR RENTllROOMS FOR RENT ROOM FOR RENT. FEMALE, N/S, NO DRUGS, NO PETS. $29S/MO. + 1/2 UTIL. 564-1919. DEBBIE. RR607 FEMALE N/STOSHARE HOUSE WITH OWN ROOM, 261-0831 LV. MSG. RR631 Room for rent in our 3 bdrm. home for steady working person or retired with income NO DRUGS, NO DRINKING $300 mo. fullhouseprivileges, 565739 7. RR776 CHOICE MOBILE home/ building lots in Sandy Valley. 2 +/acres ea. Power at the site, underground phone, paved and/or gravel roads. Seller offering good terms. Phone Grace, Century 21 Money World, 593-7704 L0253 Bella Vista 1/4 Acre Lake & Ml. View lot. Few left Overlooks Development 95K Message 294-4415. APT. RENTALS FURN.. 2 BD. APT.. VERY CLEAN. WATER, GARBAGE FURN., REFS. NEEDED. NO PETS. 565-6814. AR490 BC2bdrm., unfurnished, adult section, carport, $500 mo. 293-4832. BC Teddy's Kitchenettes, Just bring your toothbrush. Everything furnished PH. 293-1716. BC AR NEW KITCHENETTES, phone, satellite, maid service. STARVIEW MOTEL 293-1658. BC AR732 WEEKLY KITCHENETTES. CALL 565-7929. AR311 New 2 bdrm. 2 ba. Apts. Merlayne Villas, 417 Merlayne, $625, 566, 4190. AR757 2 BDRM. APT., HEND., $460/MO., 897-9421. AR668 STUDIO APT. PARTIALLY FURN., ALL UTILITIES AND CABLE INCLUDED $300 MO. $200 DEP. 293-1580. AR809 APT. FOR RENT, 1 BED. VERY CLEAN, LAUNDRY FAC. CALL DON 595-8803. BC Advertise lirttteMmSl Apartment for Rent. 2 bedroom, ail electric, $450.00 per month. Seniors welcomed! Call 565-8564. AR338 STUDIO APT. $330 mo. All utimiee Incl. Stove, rafrtgaritor, Senior CHIzen No Sec. Ocp. CALL 435-8446 AR401 CORNER COURT APARTIMENTS 2 bdrm., 1 ba., near Basic High, UGOImo. plus security. Sec. 8 OK. NO PETS 737-9141 421 NICE STUDK) Combination kitclien, Iv. room, bedroom. Quiet, tree lined atreet near downtown. $33(Vmo. No pale pleaaa. Call 435-S44 6 ,. APARTMENTS AS LOW AS $275 a Month furnished 564-6952 ^„ WESITERN INN 921 Nevada Highway. Rooms & Kitchenettes for rent on first come, first served basis. Rates are from $115 to $165 per week depending on availability. Kitchenettes accomnnodate 1 or 2 persons only. No Pets. 294-0393. BC. RR734 Non-Smoking Gentleman, working or retired, must be neat, 564-6477 or 565-1600. Ask for Lois. WANYED FEMALE ROOMMATE 25-35 TO SHARE LUXURY 3 BDRM. POOL HOME $295 MO. PLUS HALF GAS AND ELEC. MUST BE EMPLOYED. ASK FOR PAUL 564-5541. LV.MSG. RR463 For rent sleeping room for working gentleman, references. $180 mo. HEND. 565-7339. CALL AFTER 4 P.M. RR707 ROOM FOR RENT, male only, avail. Jan. 1st, full house privileges, $350 Mo. 293-4417. RR712 APT. RENTALS 2 BEDROOM, UNFURNISHED, No pets, references, lease. $600 mo. 293-0420. BC AR686 FINANCIAL SERVICES WE BUY MORTGAGES and T rust Deeds. Did you sell property? Receiving payments? Why wait! Fast. CASH NOW! Any size-Nationwide. Great prices. Call 1-800-659-, CASH{2274). FS717 Jj YOURIX)CAL t PAYROLL COMPANY ft^Troll Sarvioes & General Ledger •ws/iosg •VcrA-noii.TKKvr • lAOMKnCTAFB MEDU iQllAKTEILY TAX KEPOnS •avB ntron L733-0378J ffiVAM mttlCUL COHCIPTS APT. RENTALS FOR RENT: Kitchenettes $65 wk. Utilities paid. Shady Rest Motel, 5657688. Hnd. AR310 HENDERSON PLAZA APARTMENTS 2 bdrm. 1 ba., $460/mo. Pool, playground, free cable TV, free hot water, Close to schools & shopping, small community. 565-7512. flflZa DESERT GARDENS APT. 2 bdrm., 1 ba., washer hook-up. Storage. $200 off 565-9051 Apartment For Rent Upstairs 2 bedroom in B.C. Now Available! Central air & heat. No fenced yard, No pets. Good size living room. $575 per month. ANCHOR REALTY/ Call Manny 294-0870 CASADE ALICIA ANDM&MIIAPT 1307 DARLENE WAY Boulder City (702)293-1615 When you leaae.... Expect It! Faturing 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, sparkling pools, small quiet communities. Professional & friendly on site management ARess Morrell Park Apts. 525 Harris St. Henderson, NV 89015 (702) 565-8080 Now P-Leasing! 1, 2 & 3 bedrooms, across from park, close to schools & shopping. Professional & friendly on site staff. Call today. j^ ATLANTIC CITY APARTMENTS Clean, Quality 1-2-3 Bedroom Apartments in Henderson • Central Air & Heat • Appliances • Blinds • Carpets • Water Paid • Washer/Dryer Available Apartments are $410 & up per month, newly remodeled, spacious near schools, park & shopping. 565-7028 AR759 Ask About Our Holiday Move-in Special... Bring your family liome to GATEWAY VILLAGE 1-2-3 bedroom spacious apartment homes available from $498 to $690 Community features: • Free Basic Cable TV • Large Closets • Walking Distance toSdiools 8. Parks • Walking Distance to Busline • Full Playground Facilities • Nightly Patrol No deposits for ^ seniors or mllltaiy A EquilHouingOppaitifMy The Community You Have Been Looking For! 1100 N. Center, Hend. 564-2258 REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE CUSTOM HOMES Larry Clouse (Geriiral Contractor Lk. #27343). Will detl^n homes to suit your lifestyle. Airc we have construction money ava il able. Phone, 293-1893. ,^ Adviertise in the News FREE "HOME BUYERS GUIDE TO INSPECTIONS AND WARRANTIES" CALL 456-7515. REBTB •*••••••••**•••••*••••** FOR LEASE/SALE • Beautiful custom home, 3 bdrm., 21/2 batht, open floor plan, swim spa and nrtore, ^ fabulous view*. ^ i, Call BC Adobe Realty 293-1708 ^^3^ *•••*••••••••*•••••••••* Buying? Selling? Relocating? 8AN011A MOSSER EUWR* TIEDEMAIM Insist on fJ!^ln^*i Henderson's Finest pii^.ni^% QLANCEFODAMOMBITNclmrt^ ^. MMy irptMnlngMido .1*. \JOmlM)fy. Ad winning horn by BMvHon.a rrt MO HOUDA^ SEASOI\/ ^mrrepAm BOl^iOERDAM Rmn ^ Da>*wi^A BiWe Realty 1520 Nevada Highway Boulder City, Nevada B9005 DARWIN BIBLE • R*il Eilat* Broker • (702) 294-1144 DARWIN'S AUCTIONS • NAA • (702) 293-3996 CELLULAR (702) 596-3996 • FAX (702) 293-7896 BOULDER CITY "StEEPEH" Two lot* (Ihe tin o( tour lot*) forth* pric* of on*. Ov*r $300. foot of unol>itruct*d vl*w of Llk* M*ad fromlhl* hllltid* lot. Moat *n* wortc la complatad. ThI* la th* tMd buy in th* ar**. If you ar* r*ady to build ttia tiom* of your draama or |uat looking tor an axcallant invastmant. LM ua ahow you thia outatanding buy. Llt*d at only $149,900. Darwin BIU* R*any, 294-1144. O^NNER MUST SELL THIS DOLL HOUSE FIT FOR A QUEEN. IMMACULATE GREEN VALLEY HOME WITH UPGRADES GALORE! CULDE SAC LOCATION. 1135 SQ. FT WITH 2LARGE MASTER SIZE BEDROOMS,! FULL BATHS, FABULOUS FIREPLACE IN LIVING ROOM, GREAT KITCHEN WITH EAT-IN NOOK, INSIDE LAUNDRY AREA, COVERED PATIO AND 2 CAR GARAGE... COMMUNITY POOLS. ASKING $99,999 CALL ROBIN 496-5125 RANCHO VISTA REALTY RE262 Merry Christinas From Cedair City Affordable Property in So. Utah • Hillside Condo Why rent when you can own. 2BR 1.5BA. Includes all utilities. $55,000. CTOC3 HODOW mils Phase 2: From 2 acres for C27,000 to 4.5 acres at $61,000. Gas, wa'.er, power, telephone & roads to property. Fabulous moiJitain views with year round access. • New SloQiie $ 112,500: 3 bedroom 2 bath, 2 car finished gy., blockwall fence, RV Parking. • Elegant ^ Hlji oom 3 Bath Home on Half AcreiVfjve in Now! $89,500. • Brian Head Cot:J.o: 3 bedroom 3 baths, GiantSteps 2, Furnished, Sleeps 10, Now $104,500 • Custom Log Home: 3700 sq. ft, 4 Bedrooms 2+baths.Seienewoodedscttingon20acres.$275,000 Soullu'i-ii I liih Ki;il lAtiiti' Call MANNY 294-0870 ERA Realty Center REAL ESTATE LOW PRICE $82,900. Mobile home & lot/ Coronado Estatee. 2934578. BC RE682 BC 3 Bed/2 Bath Lewis Home $139,500 BRET 294-8482 Desert Sun Realty. RES22 BC Beautifully Landscaped Home in Lakeview area with pool/ spa, RV Parking, open Floorplan, Quiet Location. $229,000 BRET. Desert Sun Realty. 2948482. RE526 APARTMENTS FOR SALE. 128 UNITS AND 126 UNITS. GOOD LOCATIONS, 97% OCCUPANCY, ASSUMABLE 9.5%, 30 YEAR LOAN, LOW DOWN, CALL SPEAR DEV.. 873-5200. RE609 FORSALEBYOWNERNewly remodeled inside and out. New a/c, new heat, balanced power, 3 bdrm., 2 ba., laundry room, 2 car garage, ner schools. 433-4105. BC. KEY LARGO, Lake view, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, $185,000. Leave message for appt. 293-7972. 4 bdrm., 2 bath, large country kitchen, huge 68 X 170 lot, quiet cul-desac street. Home warranty included. Please call 293-7197. BC RE 3BR.,2BA.,Fam.rm.w/ fireplace, formal dining & living rm. 1,725 sq. ft., 4 yrs. old, private quiet st. xtra off-st. pkg. Owner 294-4444 after 4:30 or Iv. msg. RE 4 BDRI^., 2 bath, large kKchen, etc., 293-7197. CUSTOM BUILT HOME on large lot, close to schools, on quiet cul-desac. Vaulted ceilings throughout, fireplace, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 2-1/2 car garage, much more. $198,000,293-1696. BC SEC.19,3BDRM.2BA., 1635 SQ. FT. 6 yr. old Home, oversized 2 car garage, ceramic and marble floors, sun screens, covered patio 1/2 acre with fantastic valley view by owner $137,900, 564-4418. 3 BDRM., 1-1/2 BA., WITH LARGE FAMILY ROOM AND STORAGE. CORNER LOT, CENTRAL AIR AND HEAT. NO PETS. $700/MO., PLUS DEP., CALL AL JENSEN'S REALTY, 564-3333. RE467 N O N Q U A L TOWNHOUSE FOR SALE BY OWNER, GREAT AREA, 1700 SQ. FT.. 2 MASTER BDRM., 2-1/2 BA., 2 CAR GAR., FRPLC, PRIVATE PATIO, ALL APPLNCES.. owe. CALL FOR TERMS, SERIOUS BUYERS ONLY. 458-3027. ThePrudential (^ Jensen's Realty J|^^ Extravagafit 2 Bdrm. w/Dan, Cathedral celling*, fabulous fireplace, outstanding floor plan. Must see. Call Luke. H75500. 293-3355. ThePrudential Jensen's Realty Country Living on 2 ac, horse corral, tack room, 5 BR, 3 2/3 Baths—a must see— Custom kitchen. Call Peggy C. or Joyce. H71789. 564-3333. ThePrudential Jensen's Realty ^nt^ 6061 sq. ft. warehouse zoned IG just off Sunset. Close to 1-515. Excellent location. Call Peggy & Joyce. H71756. REAL ESTATE BC Spacious 4-f Bedroom Home on Oversized View Lot. BRET 2948482 Desert Sun Realty. RE524 HENDERSON, BY OWNER, NICE VERY CLEAN, FRESHLY PAINTED, INSIDE AND OUT, 2 BDRM., 1.5 BA., 1250 SQ. FT., AUTO. SPRINKLER, LG. FENCED YARD, MATURE FRUIT TREES, NEAR SCHOOLS AND PARKS. $95,000, 419 SCENICDR.,CALL5642680 OR 361-5039 FOR APPOINTMENT. RE 121 BOULDER CITY, ENJOY SMALL TOWN ATMOSPHERE IN CUSTOM, STUCCO HOME ON QUIET CUL-DESAC, CLOSE TO GOOD SCHOOL. 3 BDRM.. 2 BA., FRPL, VAULTED CEILINGS THROUGHOUT, 2.5CAR GAR., LG. LOT. $198,000. 2931696. RE374 CUSTOM RUSTIC RANCH STYLE HOME, 4bdrms.,3baths, lotsof wood tile & brick, POOL & SPA, 4th bedrm. w/ bath, perfect mother-inlaw qtrs. PRICE REDUCED TO $199,000. DICK BLAIR REALTY. RE724 Condo for sale. Popular La Dolce Vita. Great Assumable Loan, 2 bdrm., 2 Ba., Small yard, Living room with fireplace $89,900. CALL KAY, BOULDER DAM REALTY, 293-4663. Advertise i in the News-l ThePrudential Jensen's Realty ^^ Custom Home overlooking Lake Mead, 4 BD, 2 1/2 Batti over 2300 sq. ft., pool plus many extras. Call Peggy M. 293-4498. H82444 ThePrudential Jensen's Realty ^^ Stop spending your time fixing up your house ft move into a home where it's all iMing done, 3 BR. 2 B*.$110.000.A*klof Lulw 293-3355. H7S302 ThePrudential Jensen's Realty^ Paradise Valley C.C— Truly a t>eautiful home sitting off the road. Over 2900 sq. It. of living. Lg. garage, pool. Call Jim or Don. $284,900. H79926. 564-3333. REAL ESTATE NEAT & CLEAN: READY TO MOVE IN, 3 BR., 1 BATH. CALL ELAINE, 592-2046, CENTURY 21 HENDERSON REALTY. RE633 REAL ESTATE WANTTOKNOWWHAT YOUR PROPERTY IS WORTH? Free market analysis. Call Rooer 2932939 Realtor, Coldwell Banker/Anchor Realty. BRIGHT & CLEAN READY TO MOVE IN 2 STORY LEWIS HOME. 4 BDRM., 2 1/2 BA., FIREPLACE, POOL, 3 CAR GARAGE. $197,000. MUST SEE. 293-0967 ^j„ 'sU^MMtw £lu^i'Smith A,,*Smitk Sl^Kutr r' (^juy • HENDERSON REALTY To oiir very viiliicd clients who liiivc psiiroiiizcd CHNTUHY 21 lIciulerKOii HciiUy for tlic psi.si 2.' years, may wc lliank you f^H* ninkiiig 1904 a very successful year. Vour frieii(lslii|) & loynNy arc fully appreciated So, from our home
PAGE 37

Page B20 Henderson Home News, Boulder Cfty News Thursday, December 22,1994 VEHICLES 72CAMARO350,ORIG. PAINT AND ENG., $1,750.. 293-0813. VE627 TT FORD CONVERSION VAN, E150, 302V8, HI TOPDUAL A/C. DUAL TANKS, 4 CAP. CHAIRS, COLOR TV, 73KM, $5,900. 5661802. VE694 71 VOLKSWAGEN Bug $600. Ruris well, needs minor repairs. 293-6585. BC. VE P/U 85 Nissan King Cab with sun roof and schell Power steering Brakes, windows and locks. Excellent Cond. Garage Kept. $5500. CALL 2931167. Leave message. 86 BUICK SKYHAWk SENIOR 1 OWNER AC AM/FM RADIO, LIKE NEW, GREAT MILEAGE $3400,080,87 HONDA CIVIX DXACARTAPE DECK RUNS AND LOOKS FANTASTIC $2900 OBO 431-4211. MAILBOX RENTALS The Postal Station, Mailbox Rentals, UPS, Copies & Fax, Keys, 120 Market St., 566-4771. MR MUSICAL INSTRUIMENTS WURLITZER PIANO $900 good condition. 293-6585. BC. Ml VEHICLES '1985 Honda CRX, exc. cond. new paint, brakes &aornator.111k$3,500 O.B.O., LVE MSG. 2932375. VE506 79 Dodge Pickup 4 speed withshell318encilne, a/ C. Call 565-5782. VE770 Used Auto parts Foreign IDomestk:, Big John and Sons, 1631 Foothill Dr. 293-PART. VE777 See Radiator Master Located inside Emission Express, 1400 NV Hwy, 293-RAD1. VE778 Emission Express & complete Automotive. Emission Express Auto Care, 1400 NV HWY, 293-2473. VE779 89 Pontiac FM350 Loaded T-TOP-LOW Miles $7400 454-8308. BIO JOHN'S TOWINO Llgtit and HMvy duly towing, r*cov*ry •pKlalMt. (702) 294-HELP 1586 Foothill D r. B.C. FAST CASH TOP PRICES PAID FOR JUNK CARS FREE PICK-UP SERVICE CALL US! 565-1414 NEVADA PIC-A-PART VE69S TIRED OF TRYING TO SELL YOUR CAR? DON'T WANT STRANGERS COMING TO YOUR HOUSE? WE PAY CASH FOR CLEAN TRUCKS & CARS! ANY AUTO SALES 1112 NEVADA HWY. BOULDER CITY, NEVADA 293-2000 YOU COULD BE DRIVING 1988 or newer car, truck or van If you have $500 and any one of these, direct phone access, previous car credit, home-owners, credit card, 2 yrs. on the job, checking account or telephone in buyers name. HOLLIS USED CARS, 1760 N. Nellls, 437-8870^^/E337 PERSONALS $$ IN YOUR XMAS BUDGET & FIX YOUR BAD CREDIT. Veiy Low Cost-Free Consultation Lexington Law Firms 800-453-9529. PE363 Prayer to the Blessed Virgin (Never known to fail) O most beautiful flower of Mount Carmel, fruitful vine, splendor of Heaven, Blessed Mother of the Son of God, Immaculate Virgin, assist me in my necessity. O' Star of the Sea, help me and show nf>e where you are my mother. 0' Holy Mary, Mother of Goa, Queen of Heaven and Earth, I humbly beseech you from the bottom of my heart to secure me in my necessity. There are none that can withstand your power. O' Mary conceived without sin pray for us who have recoursed to thee. Holy Mary, I place this cause in your hands. Say this prayer for 3 consecutive days and then you must publish and it will be granted to you. S.G. SINGLES: MEET single people throughout rural America. Confidential, reputable, establsihed plan. Free Details. Country Connections Newsleter, PO Box 406, S uperior, 68978. PE635 CHRISTIAN DATING AND FRIENDSHIP SERVICE. Since 1989, 6,000 current members. For free package and a free introduction to a Christian single in your area. 1-800-399-1994. PE636 THANK YOU HOLY SPIRIT AND BLESSED MOTHER, AND SAINT JUDE. B.C. PE720 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS MMl7dayiawk.itSPM, Rac. Anntx bahind Bouldar Dam CradH Union. ALAWOW-AL*TtB< ^*-*^" TRAVEL LUGGAGE RENTAL Why buy when you can rent quality luagage at a fraction of the cost. Let us save you money and time on your next vacation. FREE pickup and delivery. Luggage Lenders 565-3737. TR762 4 Lines 16 cosh rote PERSONALS Prayer to the Blessed Virgin (Never known to fail) O' most beautiful flower of Mount Carmel, fruitful vine, splendor of Heaven, Blessed Mother of the Son of God, Immaculate Virgin, assist me in nry necessity. 0' Star of the Sea, help me and show me where you are my mother. O' Holy Mary, Mother of God, Quean of Heaven and Earth, I humbly beseech you from the bottom of my heart to secure me in my necessity. There are none that can withstand your power. O' Mary conceived without sin pray for us who have recoursed to thee. Holy Mary, I place this cause in your hands. Say this prayer for 3 consecutive days and then you must publish and it will bo granted to you. C.E. 794 Advertise in the News^ BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES NOTICE TO READERS: The HBC Publications does not vouch for the legitimacy of items, jobs, or money-making opportunrties advertised in this classification. We suggest you carefully evaluate such offers and not send money to these advertisers unless you are certain you know with whom you are dealing and you know all terms and conditions of the offer. BO Cleaning Franchise BUILD A FAMILY BUSINESS. Let the ServiceMaster family helpyourfamily start your own residential or commercial cleaning franchise for as little as $5955 down. Fortune service 500 company offering unique training and marketing support. Financing available. Call for a free brochure: 1-800-2302360. B0396 Cleaning FranchiseBUILD A FAMILY BUSINESS Let the ServiceMaster family help your family start your own residential or commercial cleaning franchise for as little as $5955 down. Fortune 500 company offering unique training and marketing support. Financing available. Call for a free brochure: 1800-230-2360. BOATS & RVs 1972 GLASTRON DEEP V 171/2 FT $1500 VOLVO IN/OUT BOARD, 6 CYL, NEEDS VALVE JOB AND PISTON, SEE ANYTIME AT 1105 INDUSTRIAL BC NV. BR493 21' Trophy Cutty Bayliner, 1985 Volvo Penta, 325 hours, excellent condition, slipped at K^arina. $9500. 4354891. BR585 tnm^ '80 Nomad 32' fifth wheel, many extras, $5300, not firm, 293-6688 STORAGE RENTALS FOR RENT 10 X 20 STORAGE UNITS. 2931135. CR606 A little short between paydays? In 1994—If you will earn under $23,755,and Have at least one child living with you In the U.S., you may be eligible for extra noncy in each paycheck. Aek your empioyer about the Advance Earned Income Credit, or call the IRS at \-&00-&29-1040 Advertise in tlie Thanks to you, all sorts of everyday products are being made from the paper, plastic, metal and glass that you've been recycling. But to keep recycling working to help protect the environment, you need to buy those products. BUY RiCYCLEB. B ANi SAVE: So look for products made from gm recycled materials, and buy them. It B would mean the world to all of us. B To receive a free brochure, write Buy Recycled, Environmental Defense Fund. 257 Park Ave. South. New York. NY 10010. or call 1-800-CALL-EDF. I iSP BMI ENVIRONMENTAI. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES CAPITAL AVAILABLE FOR BUSINESS. Commarcial and Venture Capital $25,000 Up. CALL 1-310-550-7142. B0436 SEEKING TWO INVESTORS/MANAGERS FOR 50-50 PARTNERSHIP IN RETAILS STORES IN HEND. AND BC, JOIN A GROWTH OPPORTUNITY, STUART 435-1333. 80558 CLEANING FRANCHISE, WE INVEST IN YOU! Service Master Targets Boulder City. One connpany believes that hard workshouldpay off. That's why, when you invest in a Sen/ice Master franchise, we invest in you. We're the nation's largest professional cleaning company. And we provide the best training, the best equipment and the very best support, including national advertising. Get started with as little as about $8000 down plus working capital. Financing available. For free infornnation. Call 1-800230-2360. BO posmoN WANTED Home and CRITTER Sitter, bonded, reasonable rates, 361-7470. Page 892-5920. DOMESTIC HELP HIS HAND EXTENDED DAY CARE. 2 Christian Women will care for your children in their home, Mon.-Fri., 6 am-6 pm. Ages 2 to 5. Will have preschool activities, $65 a child. Call 566-5068 for more information. Licensed. DH760 PROFESSIONAL Ironing & sewing. Free pick up & delivery for Boulder City residents. 293-4200. BC DH New Year's Eve Babysitting in rny home over night available, all ages. 566-4548. After 6 PM. DH593 PROFESSIONAL CLEANING, HOME, COMMERCIAL AND APARTMENT. WE DO THE BEST FOR LESS. 10 YRS. EXPERIENCE. 565-7397. DH622 KIDS KLUBI is accepting enrollment before and after school for elementary age children. Transportation to and from school, nutritious snacks, recreation program. Phone 293-7773. IRONING TO PERFECTION .80 a Piece CALL THELMA 565-1507 DH242 Christian Family looking for domestic help, N/S, must love children, be neat, clean and tidy. M-F, some Sat., Sun. Call 456-3831 Retiree/Sr. HELP WANTED Part time/Full time, janitorial help, will train, 5654750. HW361 HOOVER DAM SNACKETERIA IS CURRENTLY SEEKING KITCHEN HELP. APPLY AT HOOVER DAM SNACKETERIA, NEVADA SPILLWAY AT HOOVER DAM, 2934364. HW616 HOUSEHOLD CLEANERS, days, M-F, no weekend or holidays, vacation, sk:k and holiday pay. GRIMEBUSTERS 798-1002. HW285 LIGHT DUTY MECHANIC Must have own tools, tow driving exp. helpful. NV. Drivers license. Apply in person. Auto Specialists, 705 Juniper. BC HW EXPERIENCED Manicurist wanted. Brand new station available for rent. Great shop, benefits. Hot Tips, 1000 Nev. Hwy. #205. BC. HW689 Wanted PaVt Time Babysitter in my home evenings and weekends, call 293-0101. Leave MSG. HW7B8 HOME TYPISTS, PC users needed. $35,000 potential. Details. Call (1) 805-962-8000 Ext. B5695. HW791 SANDWICH MAKER Maturs woman Must have transportation Pick up applk:atk>n 1312 Nevada Hwy. CAPS SANDWICH SHOP 293-7070g^ HELP WANTED Now hiring all positions, day or evening. Servers, Cooks. Prep, and Drivers. Apply PIZZA HUT, 1208 NV. HWY. HW765 MOTEL MAID experience helpful. Immediate opening, apply in person, also laundry person PT. Best Western Motel, 85 W. Lake Mead Dr., Hend. HW41B FOOD SERVER, New Gourmet Coffee House. Apply in person, Super 8 Motel, 704 Nv. Hwy. BC HW FRONT DESK CLERK, Benefits, immediate opening. Apply at Super 8 Motel, 704 Nv. Hwy. BC HW BARTENDERS POSITION Open, Apply at Super 8 Motel 704 Nev. Hwy. BC HW PROFESSIONAL DRIVERS NEEDED: TOP PAY TO RUN 11 WESTERN STATES. MUSTBE25YEARSOR OVER AND HAVE 2 YEARS' FLATBED EXPERIENCE. WE OFFER UP TO 26 CENTS A MILE, PAID VACATIONS. 8 PAID HOLIDAYS, EXCELLENT MEDICAL INSURANCE ON EMPLOYEE AND FAMILY, LIFE INSURANCE ON EMPLOYEE, .PROFIT SHARING, PLUS VERY LITTLE LAYOVER. ALL TRUCKS ARE 1992 AND NEWER, WITH 400 CATS & CUMMINS. CONTACT S.M.P. INC. AT (801) 374-0761. HW716 DRIVERS: FLATBED 48 stateOTR. Assigned new conventionals. Competitive pay, benefits, $1,000 sign-on bonus. Rider Program. Flexible time off. Call Roadrunner Trucking 1-800-8767784. HW715 PROJECT MANAGERTransportation Organization is accepting resumes for the above position. Will be responsible for the provision of public transportation services in Eastern Nevada. Qualifications: Thorough knowledge of transit operations; Effective communication/public relation skills; skill in budget development/general accounting principles; familiar with state/federal laws, rules and regulations; BA/BS in Transportation, Business Administration or related field with graduate course-work in Business; 5 years experience in transportation and 2 years supervisory experience. Rural transportation experience is preferred with emphasis on successful coordination and consolidation efforts. Equivalent education may be substrtuted for transportation experience. We offer comprehensive benefits and a competitive salary. To apply submit resume with salary requirements to: Ely Daily Times, Box XX, Ely, NV 89301 C/OCarol. Salary DOE, Closes 12/ 5/94. EOE. HW269 HELP WANTED PART TIME JANITOR/ STORE CLERK NEEDED apply in person at Opportunity village, 12 W Pacific, Mon. thru Sat. between 10 am & 4 pm. HW300 Industrial laundry taking applk;ations for part time positions various duties will train. Monday thru Friday, NO WEEKENDS, apply at Work Clothes RentI, 568 Parkson Rd., Henderson, NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. NOW HIRING BUSSER/ DELIVERY PERSON. PIZZA COOK. APPLY AT 120 MARKET ST., HEND. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. HW700 EXCELLENT Pay. Honne workers needed. Over 400 companies need homeworkers/distributors now. Call for amazing recorded message, 895-8123 24 hours. HW722 CARPET CLEANERS Exp. and non-smoker preferred. Must have own transportation. 5646716. HW761 RESUMES Compod, EdllMi, Ty|Md-Fatt t Accurti*. BEE'S BUSINESS SVC. •DAILYS-6 Sit. KM" 1400 CoorMk>,(K: 8.0. 293-5361 Hair station for rent, small, clean, full service salon. Call Lynette, 293-7427 LMVtnM*-Mg HW742 OiooMTawlwiici, You kMsm Mid Tow Roowdil AVON (702)2M-t170 Call Today! WANTED, Light houMk**pr 2 or 3 dayi par w**k. English not ImporUntUvalnorout, privatt room. kIL priv., call lor mor*lnfo.ftappL 791-SS99 CAFE SENSATIONS Q.V.Cafsaaaklngfuii time sxps. pantry cook. Kitchen supervisor position avallabla bring rsfarsncss. Applications accepted In person M W F, 9 am to 11 am, 2-4 pm, 4350 E. Sunst110 at Athlnaan. Henderson. HW266 AHENTICN REAL ESTATE AGENT 2nd Office Opening Soon In S.E. Only $100 per month fee. You keep 98.6% of your commission. Full Broker Svc. No hidden costs. Call PattI or Mario for confidential Intervtaw. 647-5909 T&M Group Realty aam SECURITY OFFICERS WELLS FARGO GUARD SERVICE. EMPLOYMENT OPENINGS IN HEND./G.V. AREAS. WE OFFER FLEXIBLE WORK HOURS, UNIFORMS PROVIDED, PAYEDVACATIONSANDOTHER BENEFITS. APPLY Monday-Friday, 9 am to 3:30 pm, 3305 W. Spring Mountain, #66, Equal Opportunity Emp loye r. tu •••••*••*••*•**••••*•*** SECURITY OFFICERS ^ NMded for greatw Hendwson, GV area, FULL^ ^ T1MEandPARTTIME,flxiblalMurs,hommakM,.^ ^ student* encouraged to apply. DOE, must be iMe.^ .^ to obtain Sheriffs card, have dependable ^ ^ transportation a phone. Call ALUED SECURITY, ^ ^ 364-5774, Monday-Friday, 8:30-4:30 pm, 3355 ^ ^ Spring Mtn. Rd, BIdg. C, Suite MSS. EOEA^ F/H-V. 8,7 •*••••••**•*•••••*•••*•• 1995 WanUd two full and part tima RECEPTIONISTS, axcaliant pay, no axp. nac..1 part tima DRIVER PLUS Two sailing MANAGERS muct hava a minimum 2 yrs. coilaga or 1 yaar diract saias. Sand Rasumaa to W.H. FOOD COMPANY, 39 E. BASIC ROAD HENDERSON, NV 89015 714 EARN EXTRA MONEY $$$ FOR THE HOLIDAYS $$$ Dalivartha Naw LAS VEGAS TELEPHONE BOOK Immadlata paymant upon suqcassful completion of your dallvary. Must b 18 oroidar, liava insurad vahicia, and ba availabia for 4 daylight hour*. Routas availabia In LAS VEGAS, BOULDER CITY, HENDERSON, BLUE DIAMOND, N. LAS VEGAS and aurrounding araaa. CALL NOW, DELIVERY ALREADY IN PROGRESSIIi 388-0312 Monday thru Friday 8 AM to 4 PM E.O.E. ^^ HELP WANTED NOW HIRINa CL£RK8 FOR SWING AND GRAVEYARD SHIFTS. Jr. Food MartTexaco, 902 S Boulder Highway, I Hnd. 56S-im or 565-1670 NOW HIRING LINE COOKS, DISHWASHERS, FOOD SERVERS APPLY IN PERSON. U.S. HWY. 93, BC MOBILE HOMES Lake Mountain Estates, Drastically reduced, fabulous home with lal(e view, nunrterous amenities. Boulder Dam Realty. Call Pat, 293-4663. MH802 PAYMENTS UNDER $512/mo. with space. 3 bdrm., 2 ba., a I appliances, nice family park in Henderson. Tota price $17,000. Co-op 5953279. BC. MH803 NIELSON NV. 2 BDRM. 1 BA., 1986 MODEL MINT COND. FULLY FURNISHED, BEAUTIFUL VIEWS $33,500 BOULDER DAM REALTY, ASK FOR PAT 293-4663. MH465 2 bdrm., 1 ba.. Mobile Home, $600/mo., Iv. mesg. 564-5471. MH706 FOR SALE HOME 10 X 40,1 BDRM., COVERED PATIO IN HENDERSON MOBILE HOME PARK $3,800 OR PARTIAL TRADE, CALL 433-4898. MH559 1974 SKYLINE 12X60 FULLY FURNISHED, 700 ELM ST., SP. 8, BOULDER CITY, NV. 293-5986. MH655 CON DO SALES BOULDER CITY CONDO, 960 Sq. ft.. Ground level. 2 bdrm., 2 bath, & garage. Central located to schools, stores & downtown. Ceiling fans, W/D, fridge included. $88,000. Call evenings 293-3019. BC CS804 SPANISH STEPS CONDO. 2 bdrm.. 2 bath. $95,000. Call for appt. 293-6800. BC. CS CONDO RENTALS FOR LEASE. LAKE VIEW. 2 BDRM., CONDO., CLUBHOUSE, POOL, GAR., $750/MO. 1ST & LAST, 293-3482. CR458 NEW 2 BDRM., 2 BA., APPLIANCES, G.V. $750+DEP. 565-8816. CR560 Condo for rent Boulder Hills condo, 2 bdrm., 1.5 ba., Washer Dryer Very Clean $650+DEP. CALL 454-2678. CR786 2 + 2 NEW LUXURY CONDO-Fantastic view, Jacuzzitub, $800 per mo. 293-4484. BC CR687 BOULDER CITY CONDO,2stoty,2bdrm., 2 bath, w/private enclosed yard, all appl. $775permo. + $750dep. Call Marie 293-4418. BC. CR733 WORKING PERSON to share 2 bdrm. condo 436-3204. CR587 COMMERCIAL SALES 5000 SQ. FT. Industrial/ retail building in BC on 1 acre, w/additional 1750 sq. ft. 3 bdrm. apt. over offices. Offered by Banner Realty, Cary Fisher, 293-5599. BC. CS COMMERCIAL RENTALS BRAND NEW! 02 office space, 2000 + sq. ft., $1500/mo. Call 2941080. BC CO680 Warehouse/Office 3500 sq. ft. total will build to suit, immediate availability. References a must. Sunset road frontage. 564-4100. OFFICE OR STORE, 1319 B, Nevada Hwy., 15x25.1/2 ba., heat, a/c, $235/mo., off street pknq., 293-3646. BC^ Advertise Advertise HOUSE RENTALS NICE 4 BDRM., 2-3/4 BA., RV PARKING, 1/2 ACRE LOT FOR RENT 293-6345. HR466 FORRENT:3BR.,2BA., NICE AREA $875 PLUS DEPOSIT. CALL ELAINE 592-2046. HR517 FOR LEASE, CUSTOM HOME WITH 3,300 SQ. FT., 4 BDRMS., 4-1/2 BA., $1,800/MO., PLUS DEPOSITS. CALL BC ADOBE REALTY, 2931707. HR527 BC HOUSE, 2 bdrm., 1 bath,central /VC & heat. Quiet, laundry rm., 1 yr. lease, $695 mo. 2941444. Owner/Broker, BC. HR 3 BDRM., 1 1/2 BA., with large family room and storage, corner lot, central air and heat. No pets. $750 per mo. plus dep. Call Al, Jensen's Realty 564-3333. HR428 BC-Desert Landscape, 3 bdrm., 2 1/2 bath, pool, rec. rm. w/yr. round spa, new appl., garaae, extra private, covered parking. $1350 per mo. + dep. 293-0359. BC. HR FOR RENT, 2 bdrm., 1 ba.. walk to town, $575/ mo., first and last $250 dep. 564-6699 or 5924735. HR713 WANTED: HUSBAND AND WIFE ON SOCIAL SECURITY. LAST COUPLE STAYED 10 YEARS. 1 BDRM. HOUSE, PRIVATE, STOVE, FRIDGE, FURN., OFF-STREET PKG., $300/MO. + CLEANING DEP. 5641648. HR611 3 BR., 2 BA., NEWER HOME IN HIGHLAND HILLS. IMMED. OCCUPANCY $865 MO. 2934663 BOULDER DAM REALTY. HR669 Highland Hills, 3bdrm., 2 ba.,roomforR.V.$800 + DEP. 598-4402. HR783 Duplex for rent, 1 bdrm., 1 ba., $475 mo. includes utilities deposits req. NO PETS565-8296. HR78S 2 bdrm., Washer-Dryer Refrigerator, A/C-Heat, Close to schools $800 mo. 293-6016. HR790 3 BR 2 BA NEWER HOME IN HIGHLAND HILLS. IMMED. OCCUPANCY $865 MO. 2934663 EVE. 294-1236 BOULDER DAM REALTY. HR669 1 BDRM. GUEST HOUSE W/CAR PORT CABLE AND WATER INCLUDED $450 MO. 293-1580. HR810 2 Bedrooms, 2 bath* CONDO In all adult complax, AVAIL. BY Jan. 5. 1S95, $500.00. NICE 1/2 DUPLEX-2 btdrmt., 1 bath, 1 car gar. Ownar payi watr/wr. Ideal for mature alngl*/ coupla NON-SMOKERS $650/MO. 3 badrm., 2 bait) homa, larga raar yard. AVAIL. NOW ownar pay* landacapa aarv. $1,100.00. 1/2 Duplex 3 bdrm. 2 ba ownar paya water and Landscaping, Fireplace and Laundry rm. Avail. 15, $728 MO. Contact DICK BLAIR REALTY 293-2171 HR7251 COMMERCIAL RENTALS STORAGE FOR RENT All Sizes—FancMl Resident Managw Near Sunaat Mountain VisU ^583990 VON'S PLAZA! 800 sq. ft. Available Neal Siniakin Lk:ensed Real Estate Brolcer 294-1444 Principals Please CfiZ2& RETAIL OFFICE SPACE 2200 sq. ft. avaiiabi* Can ba divldad. Tanns nagotiabla Call BC Adobe Realty 293-1707 Thursday, December 22,1994 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Page B21 ROOMS FOR RENTllROOMS FOR RENT ROOM FOR RENT. FEMALE, N/S, NO DRUGS, NO PETS. $29S/MO. + 1/2 UTIL. 564-1919. DEBBIE. RR607 FEMALE N/STOSHARE HOUSE WITH OWN ROOM, 261-0831 LV. MSG. RR631 Room for rent in our 3 bdrm. home for steady working person or retired with income NO DRUGS, NO DRINKING $300 mo. fullhouseprivileges, 565739 7. RR776 CHOICE MOBILE home/ building lots in Sandy Valley. 2 +/acres ea. Power at the site, underground phone, paved and/or gravel roads. Seller offering good terms. Phone Grace, Century 21 Money World, 593-7704 L0253 Bella Vista 1/4 Acre Lake & Ml. View lot. Few left Overlooks Development 95K Message 294-4415. APT. RENTALS FURN.. 2 BD. APT.. VERY CLEAN. WATER, GARBAGE FURN., REFS. NEEDED. NO PETS. 565-6814. AR490 BC2bdrm., unfurnished, adult section, carport, $500 mo. 293-4832. BC Teddy's Kitchenettes, Just bring your toothbrush. Everything furnished PH. 293-1716. BC AR NEW KITCHENETTES, phone, satellite, maid service. STARVIEW MOTEL 293-1658. BC AR732 WEEKLY KITCHENETTES. CALL 565-7929. AR311 New 2 bdrm. 2 ba. Apts. Merlayne Villas, 417 Merlayne, $625, 566, 4190. AR757 2 BDRM. APT., HEND., $460/MO., 897-9421. AR668 STUDIO APT. PARTIALLY FURN., ALL UTILITIES AND CABLE INCLUDED $300 MO. $200 DEP. 293-1580. AR809 APT. FOR RENT, 1 BED. VERY CLEAN, LAUNDRY FAC. CALL DON 595-8803. BC Advertise lirttteMmSl Apartment for Rent. 2 bedroom, ail electric, $450.00 per month. Seniors welcomed! Call 565-8564. AR338 STUDIO APT. $330 mo. All utimiee Incl. Stove, rafrtgaritor, Senior CHIzen No Sec. Ocp. CALL 435-8446 AR401 CORNER COURT APARTIMENTS 2 bdrm., 1 ba., near Basic High, UGOImo. plus security. Sec. 8 OK. NO PETS 737-9141 421 NICE STUDK) Combination kitclien, Iv. room, bedroom. Quiet, tree lined atreet near downtown. $33(Vmo. No pale pleaaa. Call 435-S44 6 ,. APARTMENTS AS LOW AS $275 a Month furnished 564-6952 ^„ WESITERN INN 921 Nevada Highway. Rooms & Kitchenettes for rent on first come, first served basis. Rates are from $115 to $165 per week depending on availability. Kitchenettes accomnnodate 1 or 2 persons only. No Pets. 294-0393. BC. RR734 Non-Smoking Gentleman, working or retired, must be neat, 564-6477 or 565-1600. Ask for Lois. WANYED FEMALE ROOMMATE 25-35 TO SHARE LUXURY 3 BDRM. POOL HOME $295 MO. PLUS HALF GAS AND ELEC. MUST BE EMPLOYED. ASK FOR PAUL 564-5541. LV.MSG. RR463 For rent sleeping room for working gentleman, references. $180 mo. HEND. 565-7339. CALL AFTER 4 P.M. RR707 ROOM FOR RENT, male only, avail. Jan. 1st, full house privileges, $350 Mo. 293-4417. RR712 APT. RENTALS 2 BEDROOM, UNFURNISHED, No pets, references, lease. $600 mo. 293-0420. BC AR686 FINANCIAL SERVICES WE BUY MORTGAGES and T rust Deeds. Did you sell property? Receiving payments? Why wait! Fast. CASH NOW! Any size-Nationwide. Great prices. Call 1-800-659-, CASH{2274). FS717 Jj YOURIX)CAL t PAYROLL COMPANY ft^Troll Sarvioes & General Ledger •ws/iosg •VcrA-noii.TKKvr • lAOMKnCTAFB MEDU iQllAKTEILY TAX KEPOnS •avB ntron L733-0378J ffiVAM mttlCUL COHCIPTS APT. RENTALS FOR RENT: Kitchenettes $65 wk. Utilities paid. Shady Rest Motel, 5657688. Hnd. AR310 HENDERSON PLAZA APARTMENTS 2 bdrm. 1 ba., $460/mo. Pool, playground, free cable TV, free hot water, Close to schools & shopping, small community. 565-7512. flflZa DESERT GARDENS APT. 2 bdrm., 1 ba., washer hook-up. Storage. $200 off 565-9051 Apartment For Rent Upstairs 2 bedroom in B.C. Now Available! Central air & heat. No fenced yard, No pets. Good size living room. $575 per month. ANCHOR REALTY/ Call Manny 294-0870 CASADE ALICIA ANDM&MIIAPT 1307 DARLENE WAY Boulder City (702)293-1615 When you leaae.... Expect It! Faturing 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms, sparkling pools, small quiet communities. Professional & friendly on site management ARess Morrell Park Apts. 525 Harris St. Henderson, NV 89015 (702) 565-8080 Now P-Leasing! 1, 2 & 3 bedrooms, across from park, close to schools & shopping. Professional & friendly on site staff. Call today. j^ ATLANTIC CITY APARTMENTS Clean, Quality 1-2-3 Bedroom Apartments in Henderson • Central Air & Heat • Appliances • Blinds • Carpets • Water Paid • Washer/Dryer Available Apartments are $410 & up per month, newly remodeled, spacious near schools, park & shopping. 565-7028 AR759 Ask About Our Holiday Move-in Special... Bring your family liome to GATEWAY VILLAGE 1-2-3 bedroom spacious apartment homes available from $498 to $690 Community features: • Free Basic Cable TV • Large Closets • Walking Distance toSdiools 8. Parks • Walking Distance to Busline • Full Playground Facilities • Nightly Patrol No deposits for ^ seniors or mllltaiy A EquilHouingOppaitifMy The Community You Have Been Looking For! 1100 N. Center, Hend. 564-2258 REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE CUSTOM HOMES Larry Clouse (Geriiral Contractor Lk. #27343). Will detl^n homes to suit your lifestyle. Airc we have construction money ava il able. Phone, 293-1893. ,^ Adviertise in the News FREE "HOME BUYERS GUIDE TO INSPECTIONS AND WARRANTIES" CALL 456-7515. REBTB •*••••••••**•••••*••••** FOR LEASE/SALE • Beautiful custom home, 3 bdrm., 21/2 batht, open floor plan, swim spa and nrtore, ^ fabulous view*. ^ i, Call BC Adobe Realty 293-1708 ^^3^ *•••*••••••••*•••••••••* Buying? Selling? Relocating? 8AN011A MOSSER EUWR* TIEDEMAIM Insist on fJ!^ln^*i Henderson's Finest pii^.ni^% QLANCEFODAMOMBITNclmrt^ ^. MMy irptMnlngMido .1*. \JOmlM)fy. Ad winning horn by BMvHon.a rrt MO HOUDA^ SEASOI\/ ^mrrepAm BOl^iOERDAM Rmn ^ Da>*wi^A BiWe Realty 1520 Nevada Highway Boulder City, Nevada B9005 DARWIN BIBLE • R*il Eilat* Broker • (702) 294-1144 DARWIN'S AUCTIONS • NAA • (702) 293-3996 CELLULAR (702) 596-3996 • FAX (702) 293-7896 BOULDER CITY "StEEPEH" Two lot* (Ihe tin o( tour lot*) forth* pric* of on*. Ov*r $300. foot of unol>itruct*d vl*w of Llk* M*ad fromlhl* hllltid* lot. Moat *n* wortc la complatad. ThI* la th* tMd buy in th* ar**. If you ar* r*ady to build ttia tiom* of your draama or |uat looking tor an axcallant invastmant. LM ua ahow you thia outatanding buy. Llt*d at only $149,900. Darwin BIU* R*any, 294-1144. O^NNER MUST SELL THIS DOLL HOUSE FIT FOR A QUEEN. IMMACULATE GREEN VALLEY HOME WITH UPGRADES GALORE! CULDE SAC LOCATION. 1135 SQ. FT WITH 2LARGE MASTER SIZE BEDROOMS,! FULL BATHS, FABULOUS FIREPLACE IN LIVING ROOM, GREAT KITCHEN WITH EAT-IN NOOK, INSIDE LAUNDRY AREA, COVERED PATIO AND 2 CAR GARAGE... COMMUNITY POOLS. ASKING $99,999 CALL ROBIN 496-5125 RANCHO VISTA REALTY RE262 Merry Christinas From Cedair City Affordable Property in So. Utah • Hillside Condo Why rent when you can own. 2BR 1.5BA. Includes all utilities. $55,000. CTOC3 HODOW mils Phase 2: From 2 acres for C27,000 to 4.5 acres at $61,000. Gas, wa'.er, power, telephone & roads to property. Fabulous moiJitain views with year round access. • New SloQiie $ 112,500: 3 bedroom 2 bath, 2 car finished gy., blockwall fence, RV Parking. • Elegant ^ Hlji oom 3 Bath Home on Half AcreiVfjve in Now! $89,500. • Brian Head Cot:J.o: 3 bedroom 3 baths, GiantSteps 2, Furnished, Sleeps 10, Now $104,500 • Custom Log Home: 3700 sq. ft, 4 Bedrooms 2+baths.Seienewoodedscttingon20acres.$275,000 Soullu'i-ii I liih Ki;il lAtiiti' Call MANNY 294-0870 ERA Realty Center REAL ESTATE LOW PRICE $82,900. Mobile home & lot/ Coronado Estatee. 2934578. BC RE682 BC 3 Bed/2 Bath Lewis Home $139,500 BRET 294-8482 Desert Sun Realty. RES22 BC Beautifully Landscaped Home in Lakeview area with pool/ spa, RV Parking, open Floorplan, Quiet Location. $229,000 BRET. Desert Sun Realty. 2948482. RE526 APARTMENTS FOR SALE. 128 UNITS AND 126 UNITS. GOOD LOCATIONS, 97% OCCUPANCY, ASSUMABLE 9.5%, 30 YEAR LOAN, LOW DOWN, CALL SPEAR DEV.. 873-5200. RE609 FORSALEBYOWNERNewly remodeled inside and out. New a/c, new heat, balanced power, 3 bdrm., 2 ba., laundry room, 2 car garage, ner schools. 433-4105. BC. KEY LARGO, Lake view, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, $185,000. Leave message for appt. 293-7972. 4 bdrm., 2 bath, large country kitchen, huge 68 X 170 lot, quiet cul-desac street. Home warranty included. Please call 293-7197. BC RE 3BR.,2BA.,Fam.rm.w/ fireplace, formal dining & living rm. 1,725 sq. ft., 4 yrs. old, private quiet st. xtra off-st. pkg. Owner 294-4444 after 4:30 or Iv. msg. RE 4 BDRI^., 2 bath, large kKchen, etc., 293-7197. CUSTOM BUILT HOME on large lot, close to schools, on quiet cul-desac. Vaulted ceilings throughout, fireplace, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 2-1/2 car garage, much more. $198,000,293-1696. BC SEC.19,3BDRM.2BA., 1635 SQ. FT. 6 yr. old Home, oversized 2 car garage, ceramic and marble floors, sun screens, covered patio 1/2 acre with fantastic valley view by owner $137,900, 564-4418. 3 BDRM., 1-1/2 BA., WITH LARGE FAMILY ROOM AND STORAGE. CORNER LOT, CENTRAL AIR AND HEAT. NO PETS. $700/MO., PLUS DEP., CALL AL JENSEN'S REALTY, 564-3333. RE467 N O N Q U A L TOWNHOUSE FOR SALE BY OWNER, GREAT AREA, 1700 SQ. FT.. 2 MASTER BDRM., 2-1/2 BA., 2 CAR GAR., FRPLC, PRIVATE PATIO, ALL APPLNCES.. owe. CALL FOR TERMS, SERIOUS BUYERS ONLY. 458-3027. ThePrudential (^ Jensen's Realty J|^^ Extravagafit 2 Bdrm. w/Dan, Cathedral celling*, fabulous fireplace, outstanding floor plan. Must see. Call Luke. H75500. 293-3355. ThePrudential Jensen's Realty Country Living on 2 ac, horse corral, tack room, 5 BR, 3 2/3 Baths—a must see— Custom kitchen. Call Peggy C. or Joyce. H71789. 564-3333. ThePrudential Jensen's Realty ^nt^ 6061 sq. ft. warehouse zoned IG just off Sunset. Close to 1-515. Excellent location. Call Peggy & Joyce. H71756. REAL ESTATE BC Spacious 4-f Bedroom Home on Oversized View Lot. BRET 2948482 Desert Sun Realty. RE524 HENDERSON, BY OWNER, NICE VERY CLEAN, FRESHLY PAINTED, INSIDE AND OUT, 2 BDRM., 1.5 BA., 1250 SQ. FT., AUTO. SPRINKLER, LG. FENCED YARD, MATURE FRUIT TREES, NEAR SCHOOLS AND PARKS. $95,000, 419 SCENICDR.,CALL5642680 OR 361-5039 FOR APPOINTMENT. RE 121 BOULDER CITY, ENJOY SMALL TOWN ATMOSPHERE IN CUSTOM, STUCCO HOME ON QUIET CUL-DESAC, CLOSE TO GOOD SCHOOL. 3 BDRM.. 2 BA., FRPL, VAULTED CEILINGS THROUGHOUT, 2.5CAR GAR., LG. LOT. $198,000. 2931696. RE374 CUSTOM RUSTIC RANCH STYLE HOME, 4bdrms.,3baths, lotsof wood tile & brick, POOL & SPA, 4th bedrm. w/ bath, perfect mother-inlaw qtrs. PRICE REDUCED TO $199,000. DICK BLAIR REALTY. RE724 Condo for sale. Popular La Dolce Vita. Great Assumable Loan, 2 bdrm., 2 Ba., Small yard, Living room with fireplace $89,900. CALL KAY, BOULDER DAM REALTY, 293-4663. Advertise i in the News-l ThePrudential Jensen's Realty ^^ Custom Home overlooking Lake Mead, 4 BD, 2 1/2 Batti over 2300 sq. ft., pool plus many extras. Call Peggy M. 293-4498. H82444 ThePrudential Jensen's Realty ^^ Stop spending your time fixing up your house ft move into a home where it's all iMing done, 3 BR. 2 B*.$110.000.A*klof Lulw 293-3355. H7S302 ThePrudential Jensen's Realty^ Paradise Valley C.C— Truly a t>eautiful home sitting off the road. Over 2900 sq. It. of living. Lg. garage, pool. Call Jim or Don. $284,900. H79926. 564-3333. REAL ESTATE NEAT & CLEAN: READY TO MOVE IN, 3 BR., 1 BATH. CALL ELAINE, 592-2046, CENTURY 21 HENDERSON REALTY. RE633 REAL ESTATE WANTTOKNOWWHAT YOUR PROPERTY IS WORTH? Free market analysis. Call Rooer 2932939 Realtor, Coldwell Banker/Anchor Realty. BRIGHT & CLEAN READY TO MOVE IN 2 STORY LEWIS HOME. 4 BDRM., 2 1/2 BA., FIREPLACE, POOL, 3 CAR GARAGE. $197,000. MUST SEE. 293-0967 ^j„ 'sU^MMtw £lu^i'Smith A,,*Smitk Sl^Kutr r' (^juy • HENDERSON REALTY To oiir very viiliicd clients who liiivc psiiroiiizcd CHNTUHY 21 lIciulerKOii HciiUy for tlic psi.si 2.' years, may wc lliank you f^H* ninkiiig 1904 a very successful year. Vour frieii(lslii|) & loynNy arc fully appreciated So, from our home
PAGE 38

Page B22 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, December 22,1994 REAL ESTATE ThePrudential Jenien'i Realty Jl^ Cuatom home under conatructlon Sec. 19 on 1/2 acre lot— 24004^ aq. ft. Plena in office. Call Peggy or Joyce. 564-3333. REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE ThePrudential Jen ten's Realty JQ2 Miaaion Hilla, 3000 aq. ft. of cuatom home, 4 BR, 3 Bath, over 1200 aq. ft. garage, rorrala, pool, call Jim or Don. H764B6. 564-3333. *•••*•••••*••••••••*•* CLAREMONT HEIGHTS OVERLOOKING LAKE MEAD. FORMAL DINING ROOM, GOURMET KITCHEN, LARGE KITCHEN NOOK, IN-OOOR LAUNDRY, MARBLE FIREPLACE, LOTS OF OAK THROUGHOUT, 3 CAR GARAGE, BEAUTIFUL, MAINTENANCE FREE DESERT LANDSCAPING, NUMEROUS AMENITIES. CALL OWNER 294-3 166 617 ••**••••*••••*••*•**•* HBC PUBLICATIONS RIVER LANDING 4 BR. two story. Great yard with a spa tool $119,900. Fred & Ellie Knapp 5664500. 806 ThePrudential JenMn's Realty J^^ Boulder CHy—4 Bdrm. Mobile home & lot. Excellent condition, nicely landscaped, n ew root, Great Family Home. Call LuKe. H83690. 293-3355. GREEN VALLEY, BEAUTIFUL, 5 BDRM., 3 BA., 3 CAR GAR. EXEC. HOME. 3,000 SQ. FT., POOL & SPA MUST SELL, $264,900. CALL ELAINE, 596-2156. RE67S JR REALTY E. mm ThePrudential Jen ten'i Realty J^p Sec. 27 — Cuatom home over 2600 aq. ft., 1/2 ac, 3 BR, 3 Bath, detached 1500 aq. ft. garage/office, 3/4 Bath. Call Sally. H70708. 564-3333. US HOMES FINEST-3 BR. single story. This home Is a winner! $106,500. Fred & Eliie Knapp 566805 SERIOUS SELLER...haa purchaaed another home, lovely 3 bdrm., 1.75 bth.. 2 car gar.. Highland Hiila location Igr. rma., cov. patio, fireplace, fairly new roof. Write your offer now...$107,500. REDUCED, REDUCED & REDUCED AGAIN...How low can the owner go to move thia 4 bedroom Green Valley honte. Over 2200 aquare feet of living area, aeparate family and livlngroom plua formal dining. Fenced rear yard with above ground apa and located on a corner lot. Hurry ia not fast enough to call on thia. BE PREPARED FOR SUMMER! Great 4 bedroom, 2-1/2 bath home in Highland Hills area. Inground pool with aeparate aecurity fence. Overaized lot for plenty of RV parking. Recently painted and carpeted on the interior. Don't heaKate, call today to aee. NEW SEMI-CUSTOM homea on oversized cu l-de-sac lots. 3 floor plans to choose from. 1400 to 1800 sq. ft., many upgrades included. Close to all conveniences • Starting in low $1 OOs. JUST REDUCEDII 4 bedrm., 2 atory home in Highland Hills. Your family will love to atart the New Year in thia 1850 aq. ft. home. Large back yard lota of room for pool. Roll-down ahuttera on all windowa for privacy & tow utility bllla. A Must Seel HOLIDAY WISHES STOP BY FOR A FREE 1995 CALENDAR. 101 E. Horizon, Henderson ^ 564''5142 EQUAL HOUSrNti **^^ *• • ^Mm OPPORTUNITY • ind • uademift of CMuty 21 Reil EiUlc Cof ponlion Eqiu) Mouiini OpfMvlunily EAal OFFICE INDEPENDENTI.Y OWNED AND OPERATED CALLCOLDWELLBANKER COLDWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY Q 501 Nevada Htniy., Boulder City 1 293-5757 FREE! LIST OF ALL HOMES FOR SALE IN B.C. HOMES BELLA VISTA CUSTOM 3 bdrm., 3 ba., family rm. w/2 way f/p, wet bar, overaiza garage, RV parking, forever lake view. Alarm ayatem, shown by appt. $495,000. LIKE NEW BELLA VISTA PLAN A. 2705 a.f., 3 bdrm., 3 ba., fam. rm., f/p in maater bdrm. & fanrL rm. Pool and view of lake. Lota of upgradea. $344,000. BOAT DEEP GARAGE 36x32 with workahop, laundry & 1/2 ba., and evap. cooled. 4 bdrm., 2 ba., large patto with lake view. $305,000. by ReaKor/ownar. Call Katie to aeel CUSTOM HOME tri-level 4 bdrm., 3 ba. overaized garage, lake view, f/p In living rm., lota of ceramic tile. $285,000. MOBILES/RENTAL PARKS VALLEY VIEW ESTATES 3 bdrm., 2 be., covered patto, one year warranty. Home la brand new! Price reduced! $69,500. MANUFACTURED HOMES REDUCED IN PRICE Ownera want an offer! 2 bdrm., 2 ba., 3 car garage with deck over and lake view. Covered RV stall, family rm. and lots of storage. Now $189,500. RETIREE'S HOME-ONE BDRM., den, all appliancea, 12x32 garage plua 2 car carport, covered porch. Owner needs to aee and will took at all offeral $127,500. OWNER FINANCINGI Home liated below appraiaal and seller wants an offer! Lake view, 3 bdrm., 2 ba., 2 car garage, fam. rm., w/f.p. and more. Call for appt. to aeel $227,500. FORMER MODEL 2 bdrm., 2 full bathe, carport, workahop with A/C, covered porch, imnuculate. Sellers motivated so bring an offer. $149,900. OPEN FLOOR PLAN, 2 bd, 2 ba, wrap around porch, carport, all for $149,500. THREE BDRM, 1826 a.f. home, 2 ba, family room, large covered porch, carport & RV parking. $154,000. LARGE LOT • tote of parking, view of mtns., 2 bdrm. den, storage, covered porch. $172,500. BUSINESS&COMMERCIAL PHOTO SHOP 10 YEARS ESTABUSHEDI Eatabliahed clientele, paaaport photoa taken, coplea of okJ printa made, one hour aervice available. Shown by ^pt. Call Katie. $125,000. COM'L BLDGS. 3740 a.f. plua 1.504 acre lot, fenced completely, 100% occupancy with good inconw. Owner will carry contract. $418,375. Ask for RON for info. ONE LEFTI Com'l tot on Industrial .9 acre for $173,900. OWNER WILL FINANCEI CALL RON FOR INFO! COM'L BLDG. ON COLORADO ST. • 24,000 a.f. total, two level, good parking, $900,000. Private financing available or poaalble leaae. Call Katie to aaal RESTAURANT • Located on Nevada Hwy., tongeat eatabliahed in Boulder City. Prtoc includea fixturwa A aigna. $185,000. REAL ESTATE NO MONEY DOWN New program. If you are working or retired you may qualify to purchase a home wrth no money down. Call me today to find out. George 3715375. RE574 YOU CAN OWN your own home! No downpayment on Miles materials, attractive construction financing. Call Miles Homes today. 1-800-343-2884, ext. 1. RE-484 ThePrudential Jenten'i Realty Las Vegas — Vegaa MarKX—Beautiful 4 BR, 13/4 bath, 3 car garage, cattiedral ceilings, with breattvtaking entrarKe. CaN Coirine. H82968. 564-3333. Custom home Three BR, Four years old, inground pool, 1/2 acrs lot, RV's, horses, whatever you llks. Owners transferred! Hurry on this onel $149,900. Fred AEIIIe Knapp 566-4500. „„, '^^ 807 GATED IN GREEN VALLEY, LOVELY 1 STORY, UPGRADED HOME, 2300SQ.FT.,1YR. OLD AND BETTER THAN NEW. OVERSIZED LOT, 3 CAR GAR. $199,950. CALL ELAINE, 5962156. RE676 REAL ESTATE Two 4 B/R HUD homes In Hend. this week appn. $4000. Cash reg. each 2 B/R condo Sellers Pk: $100. down. 2 yr. work history & good credit required owner/ occupants only. Liberty Realty, Edna Siedsma 566-9521. RE642 REAL ESTATE GOT A CAMPGROUND MEMBERSHIP OR TIMESHARE? WE'LL TAKE IT. AMERICA'S MOST SUCCESSFUL RESORT RESALE CLEARINGHOUSE. CALLRESORT SALES INFORMATION TOLL FREE HOTLINE: 1-800423-5967. RE318 o Dai'wih Bible Realty 1520 Nevada Highway Boukler City, Nevada 8900S D/kRWIN BIBLE • Real EsW* Brok*r • (702) 294-1144 DARWIN'S AUCTIONS • NAA • (702) 293-3996 CELLULAR (702) S96-3996 • FAX (702) 293-7896 MAGNIFICENT VIEW OF LAKE MEAD from this Lika Mountain Eilala* Baauly. Spaeloua (ovar 3300SF)Manu4actuidhoma. Larga kttchan and pantry maalar badroom auHa wHh ganJan tubs ahowar larga eovarad patio ovartooka laka. Qraal room wKh wal bar and llraplaea. In door laundry room with bath, garaga and eovarad car port, both badrooma hav* batha, iota at axiraa and prioad wall balow oompa at t177,500. Darwin BiMa Raaltv 294-1144. REAL ESTATE BC Nicely Remodeled 2 Bed./2 Bath. Central Heat/Air. Like new inside, big bedrooms, new baths, new roof. ONLY $99,500 BRET 294-8482 Desert Sun Realty. RE528 BC Incredible 4 Bed./2 Bath Single Story Home. Pool, Top of the line. $192,500. BRET 2948482, Desert Sun Realty. RE529 ThePrudential Jtnaan't RaaRy Excellent home for City of Hand. 1st Tims Homebuyer Program. Home has new roof, freshly painted insido& ouL 3 Bdrm., 13/4 Bath. Call Patty or Don. H79929.564-3333. Ortluv^ HN| \i\llii:miiiiiks 2 Master Suites, 4 big bdrms., wonderful romantic pool, yard. $185K. •Awesome views oflhepark. Huge4 bdrms., pool/spa, terms. Built in 1990! 4 bdrms., full landscaping, terms, $21 OK. •Two 2 acre parcels. Panoramic views on Mcndola. ** Sandra Deubler 271-3277 Ailion Ndwiiik 4fK-S()l.l) Don't Make a Move Until You Call Me CERTIFIED RESIDENTIAL SPECIALIST Only 2% of the Realtors in the United States qualify for the CRS designation. I am one of them! This highly coveted designation is like having my Masters degree in residential real estate. As a CRS I have undergone rigorous, specialized, advanced training in listing, selling, investment, taxes and more. My CRS designation is my badge of expertise and your shield of assurance that I will get the job done right. When I work for you, you get proven success with honesty and integrity. Call Ron today (702) 222-4949^ or at my office 458-8888 yimericona GrOtJp.HtALIOltS Ai fitter lnil*pndtnllv Owntd and Oprmld i — i Proven Success with Honesty & Integrity Ron Rasmussen Realtor* 'You'll be glad you did." Office 458-8888 HOME FOR THE HOUDAYSI PIJVN NOW FOR 19951 BE IN BY CHRISTMASI CELEB RATE THE CHARM! HUGE "SLEIGH" PKING.I EXECUTIVE ADDRESSI WINTER WONDERLAND! 360 VIEW OF SANTA! SANTA WORKSHOP 12X24! STARTER TO START '95 MR & MRS SANTA BDRMS! READY TO DECORATE! NO YARD WORK IN '95! SANTA'S RETIREMENT! YOUR CHRISTMAS HOME! 1127Mariposa 1320 Stacay La Dolce Vita 520 Avenue L 1446 RAWHIDE 1026 Kays Drive 455 Enterprise 1016 Woodacre 504 Lake Tahoa 604 Avenue H 1715 Empire Mine La Dolce Vita 698 Mt Bona 591 Lake Superior 503 Lake Havasu $193,500 $139,500 $ 89,900 $142,000 $162,500 $445,000 $199,900 $250,000 $142,500 $117,500 $ 98,900 $89,000 $142,000 $229,000 $152,000 DO YOU HAVE A "CUSTOM HOME BUILDING LOT" ON YOUR CHRISTMAS V/ISH UST? CHOOSE FROM $116,000-$145,900. FREE LIST OF ALL AVAILABLE PROPERTIES 1664 Nevada Hwy. Boulder City, NV 89005 293-4663 Fax: 702-293-4645 Toll free: 800-228-8358 fS> Ellen Lamb StromlMrg, Broker Aflcr hours call: Pal BwniMn 2M.174 •'"•t QHmor* JM-1JJ* Mvy Bowd M1-72M Barbara Jagar SS-1I11 Dannia Cofmari 2W77 KiV KlnOanin 2M-004( Unalta Davla. 2-10*7 •" Lowa 2t-M41 Q (702) 293-1707 HOMES 7mli'l^J^^^V"'^''"^''^'"'' WATER'S EDGE...LIka new 3 bdrm., 3 :;:^:s^.%^--Soro~;^:aLr£5^.• -oo'lnVvh^a^i^V'''"'''''''''*''"''^ NEW!VIEW!...2600.q.H.cuatomhomaw/ open living area. 2 car garaga, mature 3 bdrma. plua studio or den. 2-1/2 batha landscapeall on quiet culKe-aac...$164,500. covered RV pkg. Owner/licenaee...$372,500. ENTERTAIN IN STYLE!...Lake & BRING THE FAMILY...B.autifully rnountalnvlewa abound In all living areaa of upgradwl 4 bdrm. horn* overlooking goN thia beautiful cuatom 3 bdrm., 3-1/2 bath. 2 couraa, 3-car garaga, RV parking* more call car garage, pool w/waterfall...$495,000. for detalla...$340,000. READY,SET, MOVE! ...Cuatom3bdrm., CHECKIT0UT!...4bdrm.. 1.3/4bathhorm 1-3/4 bath home, w/open living area, 2 car with tola of tile, remodled kitchen 2 car garage. RV pkg.. pool...$182.500. garage, RV parking...$149.000. ***We have many other properties available for sale or lease*** COME IN OR CALL FOR A FREE LIST OF ALL AVAILABLE PROPERTIES FOR SALE L 1310 NEVADA HWY BOULDER CITY FAX 702.293-7477 11 Joan Curran 293-14S7 Oorolhy Mdin 293-S0S7 Claudia Raaeka 293-tM Dtamw Vanaese • 293-42B4 II Beth AMworlh [)arM, Broker 293-7074 CiMina LsBraton FarnaM, Broker 293-011< ^aM TOLL FREE #1-800-553-8081 ..^=1 5? i REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE 293-6014 & ASSOCIATES •TOP OF THE WORLD! SOUNDS GOOD WAIT TILL YOU SEE THE VIEWIII OVER 2500 SQ, FT. PLUS GUEST HOUSE. ALMOST BOO SO. FT. RV GARAGE THAT IS HEATED & COOLED ALL ON 3 1/2 ACRES OVERLOOKING BOULDER CITY. PRICE SLASHED TO $499,000. •PLENTY OF ROOM FOR THE KIDS, IN LAWS, LOST PEOPLE, PETS OR MAYBE A HORSE OR TWO PLUS ROOM TO EXPAND THIS 5000 SQ. FT. HOME ON 3/4 ACRE LOT IN BOULDER CITY •LAKE VIEWI ADULT COMMUNITYI GREAT ROOM W/COZY RREPLACE, 1900 SQ. FT., 2 BEDROOM, 2-1/2 BATH, LARGE COVERED PARKING. $158,900. •NEW LISTINGI HUGE PALM TREES AND ITAUAN CYPRESS, FLOWER BEDS, MAKE THIS HOME VERY SPECIAL, 3 BED., 1 -3/4 BATH, GAS LOG RREPLACE, OVER 1800 SQ. FT. PRICED FOR TRUE VALUE (142,000. •MT. VISTA ESTATESI 2 BED., 2 BATH ON CORNER LOT W/COVERED PARK $95,500. •DOWNTOWN RETAIL STORE FOR LEASEI NEXT TO BOULDER DAM HOTEL! •UKE MT. ESTATES RENTAL, ADULT $795 •RENTALS RESIDENTIAL FROM $350.00 OFRCE/RETAIL FROM $250.00. •BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY! BUY/SELL NEW/ USED-ANTIQUES/MODERN-INVENTORY INCL. CALL BARTON HYDE FOR DETAILS!!! Banner Realty I Experience the Difference! Call 294-1500 HAPPY HOLIDAYS RESIDENTIAL EXQUISITE LAKE MEAD VIEW. Owner built with attention to detail. 4 bedroom. 4 1/2 bath. 5 car garage. REDUCED TO $665,000. IMMEDIATE MOVE IN TO SPECTACULAR LAKE MEAD VIEW HOME. 4 bedroom. 3 car garage. Brand new single story. Truly a muat aee. $525,000. IMMACULATE 4 Bedroom in Marina Highland Estatea, Lake & Mtn. view. Prk:ad for QUICK SALE $219,000. CUSTOM TRI-LEVEL, 2 living rooms, 4 bedrooma, 3 baths, oversized 2 car garage with RV parking. Pride of ownership. Reduced to $295,000. COUNTRY HOME & GUEST HOUSE, 7 Car Garage on huge lot. 4 bedrooms, Formal Dining. 3 fireplaces, Horse barn and corrala & more. $495,000. SPECTACULAR LAKE MEAD VIEW.Curved atairway enhances open floor plan. Lake or mountain views from all rooms. Large 3 bedrooma, 3 bath. 3 car garage. Fountains, 3 fireplacea, and auperb quality through* out. $895,000. PALATIAL ESTATE—On 2 acrea—10,000 aq. ft. under roof, pool & horaes, aeparate gueat house—$1,985,000. 2 BEDROOM FIXER UPPER. Central Henderaon $65,900. CONDOS AND TOWNHOMES EASY QUALIFYING. Owner will carry. NEW & ready to move in. Custom townhome with Lake Mead view. 3 bdrma.. 3-1/2 baths. 2 car garage. Reduced to $225,000. LAKEMEAD VIEW. New townhome, 2110 aq. ft., 3 bedroom, 3-1/2 bath, 2 car gar. Rental at $1400 -f security depoaK. LAND FULL LAKE MEAD VIEW. Lot ia .29 acre In Custom Home Area. Only $160,000. PRIME LOT IN HISTORIC DISTRICT. Good traffic. Seller financing considered. AWESOME LAKE VIEW IN QUIET AREA. 2/3 ACRE. Ready to build. Reduced to $250,000. GREAT COMMERCIAL location in OldTown Boulder City—OWC—$79,500. 1/4 ACRE CORNER LOT in Custom Home area $99,000. MOUNTAIN VIEW Lot in Custom Home Area—$95,000 OWC. MOUNTAIN VIEW + HORSES—1 acre— Won't Laat At $89,900. COMMERCIAUPROFESSIONAL-YOUR CHOICE11.0 acre, 3.45 acres. 4.45 acres or 5.63 acrea. starting at under $4.00/sq. ft. Owner financing considered. 2.5 ACRES—Great buy in SW Laa Vegaa. Reduced to $60,000. COMMERCIAL ft BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 1000 aq. ft. Medical/Professional Offke for laaaa. 100 feat from Boulder City Hoapital. 5000 aq. ft. Warehouse/Office on .95 acre in Induatrial park. 1750 aq. ft. owner/manage reaidenca above office. TURN KEY OPPORTUNITY AWAITS YOUl Raataurart in Histork: Downtown Boulder City. Land, buikling, equipn>ent, furnitura andf brturaa. Call 294-1500 for appointment. I Vn llotililei City • I.us Ven;is 7(I'>A Vuii;) St. l!oiil(lerCit\. Nevada >)(M5

PAGE 39

Page B22 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News Thursday, December 22,1994 REAL ESTATE ThePrudential Jenien'i Realty Jl^ Cuatom home under conatructlon Sec. 19 on 1/2 acre lot— 24004^ aq. ft. Plena in office. Call Peggy or Joyce. 564-3333. REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE ThePrudential Jen ten's Realty JQ2 Miaaion Hilla, 3000 aq. ft. of cuatom home, 4 BR, 3 Bath, over 1200 aq. ft. garage, rorrala, pool, call Jim or Don. H764B6. 564-3333. *•••*•••••*••••••••*•* CLAREMONT HEIGHTS OVERLOOKING LAKE MEAD. FORMAL DINING ROOM, GOURMET KITCHEN, LARGE KITCHEN NOOK, IN-OOOR LAUNDRY, MARBLE FIREPLACE, LOTS OF OAK THROUGHOUT, 3 CAR GARAGE, BEAUTIFUL, MAINTENANCE FREE DESERT LANDSCAPING, NUMEROUS AMENITIES. CALL OWNER 294-3 166 617 ••**••••*••••*••*•**•* HBC PUBLICATIONS RIVER LANDING 4 BR. two story. Great yard with a spa tool $119,900. Fred & Ellie Knapp 5664500. 806 ThePrudential JenMn's Realty J^^ Boulder CHy—4 Bdrm. Mobile home & lot. Excellent condition, nicely landscaped, n ew root, Great Family Home. Call LuKe. H83690. 293-3355. GREEN VALLEY, BEAUTIFUL, 5 BDRM., 3 BA., 3 CAR GAR. EXEC. HOME. 3,000 SQ. FT., POOL & SPA MUST SELL, $264,900. CALL ELAINE, 596-2156. RE67S JR REALTY E. mm ThePrudential Jen ten'i Realty J^p Sec. 27 — Cuatom home over 2600 aq. ft., 1/2 ac, 3 BR, 3 Bath, detached 1500 aq. ft. garage/office, 3/4 Bath. Call Sally. H70708. 564-3333. US HOMES FINEST-3 BR. single story. This home Is a winner! $106,500. Fred & Eliie Knapp 566805 SERIOUS SELLER...haa purchaaed another home, lovely 3 bdrm., 1.75 bth.. 2 car gar.. Highland Hiila location Igr. rma., cov. patio, fireplace, fairly new roof. Write your offer now...$107,500. REDUCED, REDUCED & REDUCED AGAIN...How low can the owner go to move thia 4 bedroom Green Valley honte. Over 2200 aquare feet of living area, aeparate family and livlngroom plua formal dining. Fenced rear yard with above ground apa and located on a corner lot. Hurry ia not fast enough to call on thia. BE PREPARED FOR SUMMER! Great 4 bedroom, 2-1/2 bath home in Highland Hills area. Inground pool with aeparate aecurity fence. Overaized lot for plenty of RV parking. Recently painted and carpeted on the interior. Don't heaKate, call today to aee. NEW SEMI-CUSTOM homea on oversized cu l-de-sac lots. 3 floor plans to choose from. 1400 to 1800 sq. ft., many upgrades included. Close to all conveniences • Starting in low $1 OOs. JUST REDUCEDII 4 bedrm., 2 atory home in Highland Hills. Your family will love to atart the New Year in thia 1850 aq. ft. home. Large back yard lota of room for pool. Roll-down ahuttera on all windowa for privacy & tow utility bllla. A Must Seel HOLIDAY WISHES STOP BY FOR A FREE 1995 CALENDAR. 101 E. Horizon, Henderson ^ 564''5142 EQUAL HOUSrNti **^^ *• • ^Mm OPPORTUNITY • ind • uademift of CMuty 21 Reil EiUlc Cof ponlion Eqiu) Mouiini OpfMvlunily EAal OFFICE INDEPENDENTI.Y OWNED AND OPERATED CALLCOLDWELLBANKER COLDWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY Q 501 Nevada Htniy., Boulder City 1 293-5757 FREE! LIST OF ALL HOMES FOR SALE IN B.C. HOMES BELLA VISTA CUSTOM 3 bdrm., 3 ba., family rm. w/2 way f/p, wet bar, overaiza garage, RV parking, forever lake view. Alarm ayatem, shown by appt. $495,000. LIKE NEW BELLA VISTA PLAN A. 2705 a.f., 3 bdrm., 3 ba., fam. rm., f/p in maater bdrm. & fanrL rm. Pool and view of lake. Lota of upgradea. $344,000. BOAT DEEP GARAGE 36x32 with workahop, laundry & 1/2 ba., and evap. cooled. 4 bdrm., 2 ba., large patto with lake view. $305,000. by ReaKor/ownar. Call Katie to aeel CUSTOM HOME tri-level 4 bdrm., 3 ba. overaized garage, lake view, f/p In living rm., lota of ceramic tile. $285,000. MOBILES/RENTAL PARKS VALLEY VIEW ESTATES 3 bdrm., 2 be., covered patto, one year warranty. Home la brand new! Price reduced! $69,500. MANUFACTURED HOMES REDUCED IN PRICE Ownera want an offer! 2 bdrm., 2 ba., 3 car garage with deck over and lake view. Covered RV stall, family rm. and lots of storage. Now $189,500. RETIREE'S HOME-ONE BDRM., den, all appliancea, 12x32 garage plua 2 car carport, covered porch. Owner needs to aee and will took at all offeral $127,500. OWNER FINANCINGI Home liated below appraiaal and seller wants an offer! Lake view, 3 bdrm., 2 ba., 2 car garage, fam. rm., w/f.p. and more. Call for appt. to aeel $227,500. FORMER MODEL 2 bdrm., 2 full bathe, carport, workahop with A/C, covered porch, imnuculate. Sellers motivated so bring an offer. $149,900. OPEN FLOOR PLAN, 2 bd, 2 ba, wrap around porch, carport, all for $149,500. THREE BDRM, 1826 a.f. home, 2 ba, family room, large covered porch, carport & RV parking. $154,000. LARGE LOT • tote of parking, view of mtns., 2 bdrm. den, storage, covered porch. $172,500. BUSINESS&COMMERCIAL PHOTO SHOP 10 YEARS ESTABUSHEDI Eatabliahed clientele, paaaport photoa taken, coplea of okJ printa made, one hour aervice available. Shown by ^pt. Call Katie. $125,000. COM'L BLDGS. 3740 a.f. plua 1.504 acre lot, fenced completely, 100% occupancy with good inconw. Owner will carry contract. $418,375. Ask for RON for info. ONE LEFTI Com'l tot on Industrial .9 acre for $173,900. OWNER WILL FINANCEI CALL RON FOR INFO! COM'L BLDG. ON COLORADO ST. • 24,000 a.f. total, two level, good parking, $900,000. Private financing available or poaalble leaae. Call Katie to aaal RESTAURANT • Located on Nevada Hwy., tongeat eatabliahed in Boulder City. Prtoc includea fixturwa A aigna. $185,000. REAL ESTATE NO MONEY DOWN New program. If you are working or retired you may qualify to purchase a home wrth no money down. Call me today to find out. George 3715375. RE574 YOU CAN OWN your own home! No downpayment on Miles materials, attractive construction financing. Call Miles Homes today. 1-800-343-2884, ext. 1. RE-484 ThePrudential Jenten'i Realty Las Vegas — Vegaa MarKX—Beautiful 4 BR, 13/4 bath, 3 car garage, cattiedral ceilings, with breattvtaking entrarKe. CaN Coirine. H82968. 564-3333. Custom home Three BR, Four years old, inground pool, 1/2 acrs lot, RV's, horses, whatever you llks. Owners transferred! Hurry on this onel $149,900. Fred AEIIIe Knapp 566-4500. „„, '^^ 807 GATED IN GREEN VALLEY, LOVELY 1 STORY, UPGRADED HOME, 2300SQ.FT.,1YR. OLD AND BETTER THAN NEW. OVERSIZED LOT, 3 CAR GAR. $199,950. CALL ELAINE, 5962156. RE676 REAL ESTATE Two 4 B/R HUD homes In Hend. this week appn. $4000. Cash reg. each 2 B/R condo Sellers Pk: $100. down. 2 yr. work history & good credit required owner/ occupants only. Liberty Realty, Edna Siedsma 566-9521. RE642 REAL ESTATE GOT A CAMPGROUND MEMBERSHIP OR TIMESHARE? WE'LL TAKE IT. AMERICA'S MOST SUCCESSFUL RESORT RESALE CLEARINGHOUSE. CALLRESORT SALES INFORMATION TOLL FREE HOTLINE: 1-800423-5967. RE318 o Dai'wih Bible Realty 1520 Nevada Highway Boukler City, Nevada 8900S D/kRWIN BIBLE • Real EsW* Brok*r • (702) 294-1144 DARWIN'S AUCTIONS • NAA • (702) 293-3996 CELLULAR (702) S96-3996 • FAX (702) 293-7896 MAGNIFICENT VIEW OF LAKE MEAD from this Lika Mountain Eilala* Baauly. Spaeloua (ovar 3300SF)Manu4actuidhoma. Larga kttchan and pantry maalar badroom auHa wHh ganJan tubs ahowar larga eovarad patio ovartooka laka. Qraal room wKh wal bar and llraplaea. In door laundry room with bath, garaga and eovarad car port, both badrooma hav* batha, iota at axiraa and prioad wall balow oompa at t177,500. Darwin BiMa Raaltv 294-1144. REAL ESTATE BC Nicely Remodeled 2 Bed./2 Bath. Central Heat/Air. Like new inside, big bedrooms, new baths, new roof. ONLY $99,500 BRET 294-8482 Desert Sun Realty. RE528 BC Incredible 4 Bed./2 Bath Single Story Home. Pool, Top of the line. $192,500. BRET 2948482, Desert Sun Realty. RE529 ThePrudential Jtnaan't RaaRy Excellent home for City of Hand. 1st Tims Homebuyer Program. Home has new roof, freshly painted insido& ouL 3 Bdrm., 13/4 Bath. Call Patty or Don. H79929.564-3333. Ortluv^ HN| \i\llii:miiiiiks 2 Master Suites, 4 big bdrms., wonderful romantic pool, yard. $185K. •Awesome views oflhepark. Huge4 bdrms., pool/spa, terms. Built in 1990! 4 bdrms., full landscaping, terms, $21 OK. •Two 2 acre parcels. Panoramic views on Mcndola. ** Sandra Deubler 271-3277 Ailion Ndwiiik 4fK-S()l.l) Don't Make a Move Until You Call Me CERTIFIED RESIDENTIAL SPECIALIST Only 2% of the Realtors in the United States qualify for the CRS designation. I am one of them! This highly coveted designation is like having my Masters degree in residential real estate. As a CRS I have undergone rigorous, specialized, advanced training in listing, selling, investment, taxes and more. My CRS designation is my badge of expertise and your shield of assurance that I will get the job done right. When I work for you, you get proven success with honesty and integrity. Call Ron today (702) 222-4949^ or at my office 458-8888 yimericona GrOtJp.HtALIOltS Ai fitter lnil*pndtnllv Owntd and Oprmld i — i Proven Success with Honesty & Integrity Ron Rasmussen Realtor* 'You'll be glad you did." Office 458-8888 HOME FOR THE HOUDAYSI PIJVN NOW FOR 19951 BE IN BY CHRISTMASI CELEB RATE THE CHARM! HUGE "SLEIGH" PKING.I EXECUTIVE ADDRESSI WINTER WONDERLAND! 360 VIEW OF SANTA! SANTA WORKSHOP 12X24! STARTER TO START '95 MR & MRS SANTA BDRMS! READY TO DECORATE! NO YARD WORK IN '95! SANTA'S RETIREMENT! YOUR CHRISTMAS HOME! 1127Mariposa 1320 Stacay La Dolce Vita 520 Avenue L 1446 RAWHIDE 1026 Kays Drive 455 Enterprise 1016 Woodacre 504 Lake Tahoa 604 Avenue H 1715 Empire Mine La Dolce Vita 698 Mt Bona 591 Lake Superior 503 Lake Havasu $193,500 $139,500 $ 89,900 $142,000 $162,500 $445,000 $199,900 $250,000 $142,500 $117,500 $ 98,900 $89,000 $142,000 $229,000 $152,000 DO YOU HAVE A "CUSTOM HOME BUILDING LOT" ON YOUR CHRISTMAS V/ISH UST? CHOOSE FROM $116,000-$145,900. FREE LIST OF ALL AVAILABLE PROPERTIES 1664 Nevada Hwy. Boulder City, NV 89005 293-4663 Fax: 702-293-4645 Toll free: 800-228-8358 fS> Ellen Lamb StromlMrg, Broker Aflcr hours call: Pal BwniMn 2M.174 •'"•t QHmor* JM-1JJ* Mvy Bowd M1-72M Barbara Jagar SS-1I11 Dannia Cofmari 2W77 KiV KlnOanin 2M-004( Unalta Davla. 2-10*7 •" Lowa 2t-M41 Q (702) 293-1707 HOMES 7mli'l^J^^^V"'^''"^''^'"'' WATER'S EDGE...LIka new 3 bdrm., 3 :;:^:s^.%^--Soro~;^:aLr£5^.• -oo'lnVvh^a^i^V'''"'''''''''*''"''^ NEW!VIEW!...2600.q.H.cuatomhomaw/ open living area. 2 car garaga, mature 3 bdrma. plua studio or den. 2-1/2 batha landscapeall on quiet culKe-aac...$164,500. covered RV pkg. Owner/licenaee...$372,500. ENTERTAIN IN STYLE!...Lake & BRING THE FAMILY...B.autifully rnountalnvlewa abound In all living areaa of upgradwl 4 bdrm. horn* overlooking goN thia beautiful cuatom 3 bdrm., 3-1/2 bath. 2 couraa, 3-car garaga, RV parking* more call car garage, pool w/waterfall...$495,000. for detalla...$340,000. READY,SET, MOVE! ...Cuatom3bdrm., CHECKIT0UT!...4bdrm.. 1.3/4bathhorm 1-3/4 bath home, w/open living area, 2 car with tola of tile, remodled kitchen 2 car garage. RV pkg.. pool...$182.500. garage, RV parking...$149.000. ***We have many other properties available for sale or lease*** COME IN OR CALL FOR A FREE LIST OF ALL AVAILABLE PROPERTIES FOR SALE L 1310 NEVADA HWY BOULDER CITY FAX 702.293-7477 11 Joan Curran 293-14S7 Oorolhy Mdin 293-S0S7 Claudia Raaeka 293-tM Dtamw Vanaese • 293-42B4 II Beth AMworlh [)arM, Broker 293-7074 CiMina LsBraton FarnaM, Broker 293-011< ^aM TOLL FREE #1-800-553-8081 ..^=1 5? i REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE 293-6014 & ASSOCIATES •TOP OF THE WORLD! SOUNDS GOOD WAIT TILL YOU SEE THE VIEWIII OVER 2500 SQ, FT. PLUS GUEST HOUSE. ALMOST BOO SO. FT. RV GARAGE THAT IS HEATED & COOLED ALL ON 3 1/2 ACRES OVERLOOKING BOULDER CITY. PRICE SLASHED TO $499,000. •PLENTY OF ROOM FOR THE KIDS, IN LAWS, LOST PEOPLE, PETS OR MAYBE A HORSE OR TWO PLUS ROOM TO EXPAND THIS 5000 SQ. FT. HOME ON 3/4 ACRE LOT IN BOULDER CITY •LAKE VIEWI ADULT COMMUNITYI GREAT ROOM W/COZY RREPLACE, 1900 SQ. FT., 2 BEDROOM, 2-1/2 BATH, LARGE COVERED PARKING. $158,900. •NEW LISTINGI HUGE PALM TREES AND ITAUAN CYPRESS, FLOWER BEDS, MAKE THIS HOME VERY SPECIAL, 3 BED., 1 -3/4 BATH, GAS LOG RREPLACE, OVER 1800 SQ. FT. PRICED FOR TRUE VALUE (142,000. •MT. VISTA ESTATESI 2 BED., 2 BATH ON CORNER LOT W/COVERED PARK $95,500. •DOWNTOWN RETAIL STORE FOR LEASEI NEXT TO BOULDER DAM HOTEL! •UKE MT. ESTATES RENTAL, ADULT $795 •RENTALS RESIDENTIAL FROM $350.00 OFRCE/RETAIL FROM $250.00. •BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY! BUY/SELL NEW/ USED-ANTIQUES/MODERN-INVENTORY INCL. CALL BARTON HYDE FOR DETAILS!!! Banner Realty I Experience the Difference! Call 294-1500 HAPPY HOLIDAYS RESIDENTIAL EXQUISITE LAKE MEAD VIEW. Owner built with attention to detail. 4 bedroom. 4 1/2 bath. 5 car garage. REDUCED TO $665,000. IMMEDIATE MOVE IN TO SPECTACULAR LAKE MEAD VIEW HOME. 4 bedroom. 3 car garage. Brand new single story. Truly a muat aee. $525,000. IMMACULATE 4 Bedroom in Marina Highland Estatea, Lake & Mtn. view. Prk:ad for QUICK SALE $219,000. CUSTOM TRI-LEVEL, 2 living rooms, 4 bedrooma, 3 baths, oversized 2 car garage with RV parking. Pride of ownership. Reduced to $295,000. COUNTRY HOME & GUEST HOUSE, 7 Car Garage on huge lot. 4 bedrooms, Formal Dining. 3 fireplaces, Horse barn and corrala & more. $495,000. SPECTACULAR LAKE MEAD VIEW.Curved atairway enhances open floor plan. Lake or mountain views from all rooms. Large 3 bedrooma, 3 bath. 3 car garage. Fountains, 3 fireplacea, and auperb quality through* out. $895,000. PALATIAL ESTATE—On 2 acrea—10,000 aq. ft. under roof, pool & horaes, aeparate gueat house—$1,985,000. 2 BEDROOM FIXER UPPER. Central Henderaon $65,900. CONDOS AND TOWNHOMES EASY QUALIFYING. Owner will carry. NEW & ready to move in. Custom townhome with Lake Mead view. 3 bdrma.. 3-1/2 baths. 2 car garage. Reduced to $225,000. LAKEMEAD VIEW. New townhome, 2110 aq. ft., 3 bedroom, 3-1/2 bath, 2 car gar. Rental at $1400 -f security depoaK. LAND FULL LAKE MEAD VIEW. Lot ia .29 acre In Custom Home Area. Only $160,000. PRIME LOT IN HISTORIC DISTRICT. Good traffic. Seller financing considered. AWESOME LAKE VIEW IN QUIET AREA. 2/3 ACRE. Ready to build. Reduced to $250,000. GREAT COMMERCIAL location in OldTown Boulder City—OWC—$79,500. 1/4 ACRE CORNER LOT in Custom Home area $99,000. MOUNTAIN VIEW Lot in Custom Home Area—$95,000 OWC. MOUNTAIN VIEW + HORSES—1 acre— Won't Laat At $89,900. COMMERCIAUPROFESSIONAL-YOUR CHOICE11.0 acre, 3.45 acres. 4.45 acres or 5.63 acrea. starting at under $4.00/sq. ft. Owner financing considered. 2.5 ACRES—Great buy in SW Laa Vegaa. Reduced to $60,000. COMMERCIAL ft BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 1000 aq. ft. Medical/Professional Offke for laaaa. 100 feat from Boulder City Hoapital. 5000 aq. ft. Warehouse/Office on .95 acre in Induatrial park. 1750 aq. ft. owner/manage reaidenca above office. TURN KEY OPPORTUNITY AWAITS YOUl Raataurart in Histork: Downtown Boulder City. Land, buikling, equipn>ent, furnitura andf brturaa. Call 294-1500 for appointment. I Vn llotililei City • I.us Ven;is 7(I'>A Vuii;) St. l!oiil(lerCit\. Nevada >)(M5

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Page C2 HBC Publications Holiday Section 1994 Holiday Section 1994 HBC Publications Page C3 May this Holiday bring you Joyful hours, pleasant memories and much happiness. We thank you for your support. American Nevada corporafioM A Greenspun Company Sound advice on surviving, reducing holiday stress With the holiday season lasting longer each year, more and more Americans are showing signs of holiday depression. Whether we realize it or not, the burdens we place upon ourselves during this time—idealized expectations, JoneUness and financial stress— lure taking their toll. ^ In the winter issue of Friendly Give ;the gift jof light t -" fl^APS)—Fragrant, festive and Vonderfully inexpensive: Candles are a bright idea when it comes to holiday gift-giving. '^. Candles can bring a special •flow to the holiday season, many 'agree. Dress up your favorite iiouseplant by inserting a column j::andle in the center and adding a festive bow. Or surround three iolumn candles with fragrant -holly branches for a holiday party .centerpiece. Check out the many special jiioliday shaped candles and holi. day fragrance candles that can fill jour home with the aroma of evrgreen. Other scents available 'mclude floral and food fragrances that can really give your home a festive air. A bright idea for holiday party lights: glass jars filled with deco. rati ve candles and tied at the neck ; with Christmas ribbons. Remember never to leave candles burning unattended and extinguish them when they get within two inches of their holders or decorations. Gift Ideas A world of fun (NAPS)—If there's someone on your gift list of whom you think the world, why not give him or her a planet to play with? Here's how: A new video game lets players create their own worlds via computer graphics and their own decisions. Many parents, teachers, environmentalists and others consider this as educational as it is entertaining. Called SimEarth and made by FCI for Super Nintendo, it won the Parent's Choice award and is available at local toy and video stores, as are the company's other games, including Ultima Runes of Virtue I & II, BreakTime—The National Pool Tour, Panel Action Bingo for Game Boy and AD&D DragonStrike, among others. Exchange, Perry Buffington, Ph.D., noted lecturer and psychologist suggests a simple method for combating seasonal blues—just remember the word "HOLIDAY." He breaks the word down into helpful categories, with each letter designed to reduce holiday stress: H: HelpOther8:it'sthetruespirit of the season, and an unselfish act will improve one's mood. O: Only do important stuff: choose the things you can do, and avoid the rest. L: Lessen the cost of gifts: Overspending is directly linked to holiday, and post-holiday sadness. I: Individualize: strive for gifts that are special to the person. D: Don't diet! Allow yourself to indulge in some of the holiday's goodies. A: Anniversaries: Remember a universal anniversary with any and all friendships. Y: Yule feel better in January! Don't Worry, it will all end soon enough! Merry Christmas! Welcome to the special holiday section published annually by HBC Publications. In this colorful section, youll find tips on decorating the house, last-minute gift ideas for both the adults and children in your life, plus taste-tempting recipes for Christmas dinner and dessert. The staff of the Hen£ferson//bmiVieu;s and Boulder City News thanks the advertisers who made this section possible. We wish all of our advertisers and readers a very special and safe holiday season: vvvvvvvvv Santa visits Henderson earlier this month during a parade down Water Street. MAIL BOXES ETC It's the perfect opportunity for us to send you all our holiday best... along with our thanks. Millie and Dave Cogluod Mem Christmas, Friends "^ 27% N. Green Valley Pkwy. 454-5220 Grcoi Vallcjr Ahoppitg Cetlcr .HOLIDAY GREETINGS Our wishes for a season of love and faith. A warm wonderful thanks to all. Judge Rodney and Annette Burr and Children Holiday facts & fancies (NAPS) — Where did we get those holiday customs? The tradition of giving gifts during the holidays, for instance, probably began in ancient Rome and northern Europe. People gave each other small presents as part of their year-end celebrations. The Christmas tree probably developed in medieval Germany from the "Paradise Tree," a type of evergreen that was used in a popular Christmas play. CREETJNGS escw
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Page C2 HBC Publications Holiday Section 1994 Holiday Section 1994 HBC Publications Page C3 May this Holiday bring you Joyful hours, pleasant memories and much happiness. We thank you for your support. American Nevada corporafioM A Greenspun Company Sound advice on surviving, reducing holiday stress With the holiday season lasting longer each year, more and more Americans are showing signs of holiday depression. Whether we realize it or not, the burdens we place upon ourselves during this time—idealized expectations, JoneUness and financial stress— lure taking their toll. ^ In the winter issue of Friendly Give ;the gift jof light t -" fl^APS)—Fragrant, festive and Vonderfully inexpensive: Candles are a bright idea when it comes to holiday gift-giving. '^. Candles can bring a special •flow to the holiday season, many 'agree. Dress up your favorite iiouseplant by inserting a column j::andle in the center and adding a festive bow. Or surround three iolumn candles with fragrant -holly branches for a holiday party .centerpiece. Check out the many special jiioliday shaped candles and holi. day fragrance candles that can fill jour home with the aroma of evrgreen. Other scents available 'mclude floral and food fragrances that can really give your home a festive air. A bright idea for holiday party lights: glass jars filled with deco. rati ve candles and tied at the neck ; with Christmas ribbons. Remember never to leave candles burning unattended and extinguish them when they get within two inches of their holders or decorations. Gift Ideas A world of fun (NAPS)—If there's someone on your gift list of whom you think the world, why not give him or her a planet to play with? Here's how: A new video game lets players create their own worlds via computer graphics and their own decisions. Many parents, teachers, environmentalists and others consider this as educational as it is entertaining. Called SimEarth and made by FCI for Super Nintendo, it won the Parent's Choice award and is available at local toy and video stores, as are the company's other games, including Ultima Runes of Virtue I & II, BreakTime—The National Pool Tour, Panel Action Bingo for Game Boy and AD&D DragonStrike, among others. Exchange, Perry Buffington, Ph.D., noted lecturer and psychologist suggests a simple method for combating seasonal blues—just remember the word "HOLIDAY." He breaks the word down into helpful categories, with each letter designed to reduce holiday stress: H: HelpOther8:it'sthetruespirit of the season, and an unselfish act will improve one's mood. O: Only do important stuff: choose the things you can do, and avoid the rest. L: Lessen the cost of gifts: Overspending is directly linked to holiday, and post-holiday sadness. I: Individualize: strive for gifts that are special to the person. D: Don't diet! Allow yourself to indulge in some of the holiday's goodies. A: Anniversaries: Remember a universal anniversary with any and all friendships. Y: Yule feel better in January! Don't Worry, it will all end soon enough! Merry Christmas! Welcome to the special holiday section published annually by HBC Publications. In this colorful section, youll find tips on decorating the house, last-minute gift ideas for both the adults and children in your life, plus taste-tempting recipes for Christmas dinner and dessert. The staff of the Hen£ferson//bmiVieu;s and Boulder City News thanks the advertisers who made this section possible. We wish all of our advertisers and readers a very special and safe holiday season: vvvvvvvvv Santa visits Henderson earlier this month during a parade down Water Street. MAIL BOXES ETC It's the perfect opportunity for us to send you all our holiday best... along with our thanks. Millie and Dave Cogluod Mem Christmas, Friends "^ 27% N. Green Valley Pkwy. 454-5220 Grcoi Vallcjr Ahoppitg Cetlcr .HOLIDAY GREETINGS Our wishes for a season of love and faith. A warm wonderful thanks to all. Judge Rodney and Annette Burr and Children Holiday facts & fancies (NAPS) — Where did we get those holiday customs? The tradition of giving gifts during the holidays, for instance, probably began in ancient Rome and northern Europe. People gave each other small presents as part of their year-end celebrations. The Christmas tree probably developed in medieval Germany from the "Paradise Tree," a type of evergreen that was used in a popular Christmas play. CREETJNGS escw
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Page C4 HBC PubUcations Holiday Section 1994 mm^ |^J)%<5imes Celebrate with us the joy of giving and the warmth of sharing. 62 E. Basic Rd. Henderson Ph 564-1155 May Your Cup Runneth Over With Happiness! Customers like you are the cream of the crop. Thank you for your loyal patronage. Happy Holidays from CAFE SENSATIONS 456-7803 4350 E. Sunset Henderson, NV 89014 We*re SOLD... On Neighbors Like You! We couldn't have asked for a finer community to do business with. May your home be blessed with contentment, prosperity and joy this holiday season. BOB & LOREN SWEENEY Company Leading Team Over $25 Million Sold > V^ TV?^ i^ A HOLIDAY GREETING FROM Your Friends at Silver State Disposal As we gather together this joyful time of year, all of us at Silver State Disposal wish our valued customers and friends a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year! A special holiday "Thank You!" to all Las Vegas Valley residents who are participating in recycling. Thanks to you, the response to. this program has been outstanding! Please watch for new recycling pick-up schedules in your January billing statement As always, Silver State Disposal will be "on the job" for uninterrupted trash collection service throughout the holidays. Please continue to put out your trash for collection as you normally would. Sh^t state Disposal Recycles Nevada Have a Healthy and Happy Holiday Season Miss Amy and Staff of DANCE ETC. 525 Hotel Plaza Boulder City 293-5001 THANKS To the People of Henderson and Boulder City For Your Kindness Friendship and Patronage. May the Coming Year bring you joy and prosperity Vem & the Guys Vern's Texaco E. Lake Mead Dr. • Henderson 567 Nevada Hwy • Boulder City We're never too busy to pause and wish you the best for this holiday season. Thank you for letting us serve you. ^RESTAURANT and CASINO 1133 N. Boulder Hwy.

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Page C4 HBC PubUcations Holiday Section 1994 mm^ |^J)%<5imes Celebrate with us the joy of giving and the warmth of sharing. 62 E. Basic Rd. Henderson Ph 564-1155 May Your Cup Runneth Over With Happiness! Customers like you are the cream of the crop. Thank you for your loyal patronage. Happy Holidays from CAFE SENSATIONS 456-7803 4350 E. Sunset Henderson, NV 89014 We*re SOLD... On Neighbors Like You! We couldn't have asked for a finer community to do business with. May your home be blessed with contentment, prosperity and joy this holiday season. BOB & LOREN SWEENEY Company Leading Team Over $25 Million Sold > V^ TV?^ i^ A HOLIDAY GREETING FROM Your Friends at Silver State Disposal As we gather together this joyful time of year, all of us at Silver State Disposal wish our valued customers and friends a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year! A special holiday "Thank You!" to all Las Vegas Valley residents who are participating in recycling. Thanks to you, the response to. this program has been outstanding! Please watch for new recycling pick-up schedules in your January billing statement As always, Silver State Disposal will be "on the job" for uninterrupted trash collection service throughout the holidays. Please continue to put out your trash for collection as you normally would. Sh^t state Disposal Recycles Nevada Have a Healthy and Happy Holiday Season Miss Amy and Staff of DANCE ETC. 525 Hotel Plaza Boulder City 293-5001 THANKS To the People of Henderson and Boulder City For Your Kindness Friendship and Patronage. May the Coming Year bring you joy and prosperity Vem & the Guys Vern's Texaco E. Lake Mead Dr. • Henderson 567 Nevada Hwy • Boulder City We're never too busy to pause and wish you the best for this holiday season. Thank you for letting us serve you. ^RESTAURANT and CASINO 1133 N. Boulder Hwy.

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Fuse C6 HBC Publications Holiday Section 1994 > Holiday Section 1994 HBC Publications Page C7 V B,0 U LD E R DAM/ Happy Holidays from your friends at BOULDER DAM REALTY 1664 Nevada Hwy. 293-4663 Marshall Plaza Boulder City It's Always Nice To See You! Won't you drop in again soon? We'd love to wish you a Merry Christmas in person. Meanwhile, happy, happy to you ana yours! A CM ontf CocHol Gpartonca 4451 E. Sunset • Green Valley • 435-4000 Gifts for Adults M "^< ^'! i Savor the joy of giving Make your own high-tech video gifts Looking for a gift that says "I made it myself," but can't knit? Try a high-tech version of the traditional homemade gift, a personalized VHS video. According to Stan Hametz, vice president and general manager of the VHS Division for Panasonic Company, "The huge boom in home videotaping allows anyone with a camcorder to create a personalized letter or gift. A customized VHS video is personal, long-lasting, and easy to eryoy on any VHS VCR." Holiday videos are easy and inexpensive, and the ideas are numerous. Make-your-own-video options include a recipe video created from a family favorite, a personalized be4time-story video for a small child, or a video biography or "roast" for a close friend or a "Wish I could be there" video for Christmas. Among the most popular customized videos, according to Panasonic, are recordings of parties for those who couldn't oe there and "video letters" to send holiday greetings from the '.vhole family. To ensure best results for your video, Hametz makes these suggestions: •Don't overuse the zoom feature of your camcorder. Constant zooming in and out of a scene makes the viewer quickly lose sight of what you're trying to present. The zoom feature can be effective, however, if used sparingly. For example, for a bedtime video, open the scene tightly on the book cover to show its title; slowly zoom out to show the full scene and hold that position for the duration of the story. •Special effects, like digital fades, wipes, borders and tilting, can give your video a more "professional" appearance. Fades and wipes, for instance, are perfect for transitions between stages of showing a holiday recipe—there's no need to show someone whipping butter for five minutes. •Be sure your subject is welllighted. While all high-quality camcorders will work in low-light levels, the color of the image is the first to be impaired as light decreases. The best way to check light level is to use one of the new IQ camcorders that have a color electronic viewfinder for a true "what you see is what you get" image. •When shooting a video, it's easy to forget that you're also capturing sound on tape too, and the audio portion plays an equally important part in the outcome. Make a test recording to check sound levels and move closer to your subject if necessary. If the holiday pany you're recording moves outside, use a camcorder equipped with a microphone wind cover to eliminate wind noise from the recording. •Avoid the "jitters." While home videos are made for moving images, a shaky scene can be extremely annoying to the viewer. Use a tripod or lean against a steady surface, such as a wall, to keep the camcorder as steady as possible while you shoot. Some camcorders help you in this area. They contain a Digital Electronic Image Stabilization (DEIS) system. Purpose: It electronically compensates for slight camcorder movement, automatically recording a steady scene. • Finally, and most importantly for gift-giving, use a full-size VHS or Compact-VHS camcorder. ,j .'. av lb fil .'1 Seven steps to buying first computer Mark Ivey (NAPS) — Buying your first computer can be frustrating, especially in the middle of the Christmas shopping rush. There aredozensofdifferentmodelsand numerous issues. How much power do you need? How much storage?Which bells and whistles will be useful? To make your holiday season happier, consider following these seven easy steps when choosing your new PC. 1. Applications—First, determine what type of applications you'll run. If you plan on doing mostly word processing or writing, your requirements will be quite different than if you are going to be working with spreadsheets, video or multimedia. 2. Price—Although PC prices have fallen in the last couple of years, don't make your decision on price alone. You might sacrifice important features. More importantly, the cheapest models may not be powerful enough to run tomorrow's applications. 3. Processing Power—Be careful choosing your central processing unit (CPU), since operating systems like Microsoft Windows and new graphics require lots of horsepower. Experts recommend an Intel486 CPUbased svstem for most users. For more power, consider a PC with an i486 DX2 CPU, which can run programs an average of 70 percent faster than a conventional i486 chip. Yet the extra cost is usually less than $200. 4. Memory—Random Access Memory (RAM) is your main concern, since programs need enough RAM (which stores programs temporarily) to run properly. You need a minimum of 4 megabytes (MB) to take advantage of features in certain programs; 8 MB is better. 5. Storage—There are two types of storage—"hard" or fixed disk drives and "floppy" disk drives. Floppy disk drives come in 3.5and 5.25-inch sizes; it's nice to have both. Don't settle for less than a 120 MB hard disk drive; if you need to store many programs, consider a 220 MB or larger disk drive. 6. Monitor—The standard computer starts with a 14-inch color VGA monitor and may offer a higher-resolution Super VGA mode. Consider splurging on a larger screen if you do desktop publishing or graphics work (the characters are easier to read on a 16or 17-inch screen, also). Try to compare monitors side-by-side, just as you would a television. 7. Other peripherals—If you're going to buv a CD-ROM or a fax modem later, consider buying them bundled in your PC. You will probably get them cheaper. Above all, shop around. Do your homework. Talk to e.xperts and knowledgeable friends. Yourtime invested will pay off many times over. Making t Difference The City of Henderson is proud of the service we provide for our Citizens. We know that our employees' dedication and loyalty to customer service play an important part in that success. To our Employee of the Year and each of our Employee of the Month winners, along with every other City of Henderson employee... thank youYOU MAKE THE DIFFERENCE! • • (NAPS>-If the idea of finding time to shop for everyone on your list is beginning to make you shiver, you might want to con sider following a new trend: a gift for the whole family. Lookingfor ideas for family gifts? Here are just a few to contemplate: •Has your family always wanted to hike in the Rockies, visit Disney World or tour the Big Apple? Combineyour holiday and vacation budgets, and take your dream vacation this year. Give the kids their tickets for Christmas. your money: Family gifts •Home computers have never been less expensive or more invaluable. The hardest part is deciding which system. You might check the classifieds to see if someone is selling a used system you want. If your budget allows, give the computer to the family, and give each family member a small piece of software. •One way to make vacations more affordable is by roughing it. You can get a lifetime set-up of a tent and sleeping bags for the wholefamily for less than it would cost for a weekend at a hotel. •Jump-start everyone's brains by investing in a set of encyclopedias. You'll finally be able to answer all your kids' questions (like"how does television work?"), your kids will get ahead in school and you'll all have a resource to turn to for years to come. Experts recommend The World Book Encyclopedia for families with school-age children because of its accuracy, up-to-date information and readahiltiy. • Help the whole family keep fit by buying equipment for a home gym. Surprise them by having it all set up, out of sight, on Christmas morning. Give sweats, leotards or sweatbands as individual gifts. There is one family gift that experts believe you shouldn't indulge in—namely, a new pet. Animal shelters are crowded in January with "surprise" pets that didn't work out. Pets should only come into a home where everyone is aware, ahead of time, of the lifelong responsibility and is prepared to meet all the long-term obligations associated with a pet. Experts recommend home, auto electronics Choosing a gift for friends or relatives who love electronics can test the patience of some of the most techno-friendly shoppers. With so many bells and whistles tochoosefrom, and the dependable push in the wrong direction from all-too-friendly salespeople, you might end up with a not-so-perfect gift. Instead of giving up, however, take a few notes from the electronics experts who can give some unbiased direction to your holiday shopping. Many of the experts who write about electronics for newspapers and magazines really do their homework in picking the best products on the market With a well-rounded knowledge of what those extra knobs and buttons really offer in the way of extra value, the experts can send you straight to the right purchase with little or no hassle. Two electronics products that are rapidly growing in popularity are CD changers for the home and automobile. Many people have invested in a single CD player, but a new crop of CD changers are becoming available with more CD capacity and convenience that adds an entirely new dimension to musical listening. Fisher AudioA^ideo has introduced a 24-disc home audio component called the Studio 24 CD Management System thathas received great reviews from many of the audio experts who write for big-city newspapers. Rich Warren, of the Chicago Tribune, writes the following: "When it comes to the best new mousetrap, Fisher beats them all with its DAC-2403 Studio 24 CD Management System 24-disc changer." A CD management system allows the user to store and categorizemusicforeasyplayback without frequent loading and unloading of CDs that often puts 1 iSI-J ft i > Si* V X. 1 • 1 irstni' ii ; • K^ ll r Is Mi"^ v\ J iiini • '"'^^mivi-mm^ B P^^^HM^I^BO A CD MANAGEMENT SYSTEM allows the user to store and categorize music for easy playback without frequent loading and unloading of CDs. Above, RsheKs system 9425 incorporates innovative Studio 24 CD managreement with a complete audio/video system. nasty scratches or dirt spots on the disc. Studio 24's multi-CD system keeps track of which CD is which, and conveniently organ izes your collection the way you like to listen to it. For families where each member has a little different taste in music, Studio 24 allows each person to keep their own CDs separately labeled for easy access. Preset categories allow CDs to be categorized by musical type (i.e., jazz, rock, classical, etc.). Using the alphanumeric keypad, each user can choose his or her own custom categories, such as by mood (i.e., morning, romantic), owner (i.e., mom's, dad's, Bobby's or Susie's music), occasion (i.e., party mix l,partymix2),or simply by disc name (i.e., Elton John). Then, when you input jazz or any other category, one or several CDs belonging to the category are automatically played back. With all the added utility that a CD management system offers, you might think the system to be rather complex to operate. This is not so, according to Kathy Price, electronics writer for the Arizona Republic. "Here's a compact disc player that's user-friendly," she writes. Studio 24 is available as a single audio component for less than $300, as part of a fully integrated component system or as part of a compact disc shelf system. Fisher has an entire line of new products—including four new audio component systems and one audio/ video system—that all offer its exclusive Studio 24 CD Management System. When it comes to car audio, smaller is usually better, and Sanyo Mobile .\udio makes a 6disc CD changer that is one of the smallest available. The electronics experts also had good things to say about Sanyo's MAX-6600 system. "A flawless performer," writes reviewer Joel Cohen of Car Audio & Electronics magazine. "The sound quality and measured performance for the Sanyo MAX-6600 were absolutely fine, which, on top of its small size and many features, makes it number one on my shopping list." The small size of the MAX6600 allows it to be installed in theglove boxes of many cars,under the passenger or driver seats, or under the console for quick and convenient changing of CDs. In the past, most CD changers were too large to be installed anywhere other than the trunk, which required the entire vehicle to be stopped in order to switch the choice of music in the CD library. Whatever electronics gifts you choose this year, save some time and money by tuning into what the experts are saying about all the latest gadgets and gizmos. Not only will you save yourself from added legwork and the dreaded sales pitch, but you will up your chances of making a people-pleasing choice. Personalized clothing takes off (NAPS)—More than a mere monogram, the way to set your own style this season is with a personalized piece of clothingthat carries your name. Thanks to modem technology and a clever idea, one shirt company can offer T-shirts, sweatshirts, polo shirts, totes, aprons and more emblazoned with any surname from all over the world. Surname apparel is especially popular for family reunions, though all sorts of groups like to get in on the fun. The company does something even more exclusive for some 1,800 surnames by producing customized catalogs. The target name appears on the cover and on some of the clothing oisplayed. To get a free copy of a customized catalog, call l-800-233-630{i. CRAFTS Shop for Handcrafted Gifts by Local Artists Whether you're finishing your holiday shopping or just beginning, you won't want to miss the Sam's Town Western Emporium Tent Sale. You'll find special values on first quality boots and western apparel, plus a great selection of unique arts and crafts including: Adobes on Sandstone A Blown Glass A Ceramics A Dried Spices A Gems & Minerals A Handcrafted Gourds A Indian Jewelry A Jewelry & Coordinating Garments A Minerals & Crystal Jewelry A Pottery A Quilts A Southwest Art A Watercolors & Oil Paintings A Wildlife Art A Windchimes A Wood Toys A Works Handcrafted From Clay The Tent Sale is open daily, from 9 a.m. until 6 p.m., now through December 24th. flMPORIUM AT SAM*S TOWN FUunliigo ft Boulder • 454-8017 • Open Daily Bppy Holidays From all of U9 at A Mf MBCR Of TME SCARS FINANCIAL HETWDfM COLDUJeiX BANKeRQ ANCHOR REALTY, INC. 293-5757 501 Nev. Hwy #1 and 2 Realtors Katie Carttldge, Car! Cowan, Marion Crane, Manny Mosqueda, Roger Foiey, Chuck Kessler, Diana Leseberg, Ron Fenito, rODee Zambetti, Rhonda Swan '— )fii CHRISTMAS IS A MOST APPROPRIATE TIME TO REFLEaAND CIVE THANKS FOR THOSE THINCS WE USUALLY TAKE FOR GRANTED, OUR HEALTH, PEACE IN AMERICA, OUR FAMILIES, OUR FAFTH IN THE FUTURE. AT THE END OF THIS BUSY YEAR WE WOULD LIKE TO TAKE PAUSE AND OFFER YOU OUR MOST SINCERE THANKS FOR ALLOWING US TO SERVE YOU AND YOUR FAMILY from ourstafk, ourkunilles and ourselves; PLEASE HAVE A WONDERFUL CHRISTMAS AND THE VERY BEST OF THE YEARS TO COME. FAMILYDOCrORS OFBOULDERCnV 8. GREEN VALLEY CINDY &< HERVE BEZARD PATSY 8< WARREN SMFTH ROSLYN TABOR JILL 8. JOE HARDY G5 •

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Fuse C6 HBC Publications Holiday Section 1994 > Holiday Section 1994 HBC Publications Page C7 V B,0 U LD E R DAM/ Happy Holidays from your friends at BOULDER DAM REALTY 1664 Nevada Hwy. 293-4663 Marshall Plaza Boulder City It's Always Nice To See You! Won't you drop in again soon? We'd love to wish you a Merry Christmas in person. Meanwhile, happy, happy to you ana yours! A CM ontf CocHol Gpartonca 4451 E. Sunset • Green Valley • 435-4000 Gifts for Adults M "^< ^'! i Savor the joy of giving Make your own high-tech video gifts Looking for a gift that says "I made it myself," but can't knit? Try a high-tech version of the traditional homemade gift, a personalized VHS video. According to Stan Hametz, vice president and general manager of the VHS Division for Panasonic Company, "The huge boom in home videotaping allows anyone with a camcorder to create a personalized letter or gift. A customized VHS video is personal, long-lasting, and easy to eryoy on any VHS VCR." Holiday videos are easy and inexpensive, and the ideas are numerous. Make-your-own-video options include a recipe video created from a family favorite, a personalized be4time-story video for a small child, or a video biography or "roast" for a close friend or a "Wish I could be there" video for Christmas. Among the most popular customized videos, according to Panasonic, are recordings of parties for those who couldn't oe there and "video letters" to send holiday greetings from the '.vhole family. To ensure best results for your video, Hametz makes these suggestions: •Don't overuse the zoom feature of your camcorder. Constant zooming in and out of a scene makes the viewer quickly lose sight of what you're trying to present. The zoom feature can be effective, however, if used sparingly. For example, for a bedtime video, open the scene tightly on the book cover to show its title; slowly zoom out to show the full scene and hold that position for the duration of the story. •Special effects, like digital fades, wipes, borders and tilting, can give your video a more "professional" appearance. Fades and wipes, for instance, are perfect for transitions between stages of showing a holiday recipe—there's no need to show someone whipping butter for five minutes. •Be sure your subject is welllighted. While all high-quality camcorders will work in low-light levels, the color of the image is the first to be impaired as light decreases. The best way to check light level is to use one of the new IQ camcorders that have a color electronic viewfinder for a true "what you see is what you get" image. •When shooting a video, it's easy to forget that you're also capturing sound on tape too, and the audio portion plays an equally important part in the outcome. Make a test recording to check sound levels and move closer to your subject if necessary. If the holiday pany you're recording moves outside, use a camcorder equipped with a microphone wind cover to eliminate wind noise from the recording. •Avoid the "jitters." While home videos are made for moving images, a shaky scene can be extremely annoying to the viewer. Use a tripod or lean against a steady surface, such as a wall, to keep the camcorder as steady as possible while you shoot. Some camcorders help you in this area. They contain a Digital Electronic Image Stabilization (DEIS) system. Purpose: It electronically compensates for slight camcorder movement, automatically recording a steady scene. • Finally, and most importantly for gift-giving, use a full-size VHS or Compact-VHS camcorder. ,j .'. av lb fil .'1 Seven steps to buying first computer Mark Ivey (NAPS) — Buying your first computer can be frustrating, especially in the middle of the Christmas shopping rush. There aredozensofdifferentmodelsand numerous issues. How much power do you need? How much storage?Which bells and whistles will be useful? To make your holiday season happier, consider following these seven easy steps when choosing your new PC. 1. Applications—First, determine what type of applications you'll run. If you plan on doing mostly word processing or writing, your requirements will be quite different than if you are going to be working with spreadsheets, video or multimedia. 2. Price—Although PC prices have fallen in the last couple of years, don't make your decision on price alone. You might sacrifice important features. More importantly, the cheapest models may not be powerful enough to run tomorrow's applications. 3. Processing Power—Be careful choosing your central processing unit (CPU), since operating systems like Microsoft Windows and new graphics require lots of horsepower. Experts recommend an Intel486 CPUbased svstem for most users. For more power, consider a PC with an i486 DX2 CPU, which can run programs an average of 70 percent faster than a conventional i486 chip. Yet the extra cost is usually less than $200. 4. Memory—Random Access Memory (RAM) is your main concern, since programs need enough RAM (which stores programs temporarily) to run properly. You need a minimum of 4 megabytes (MB) to take advantage of features in certain programs; 8 MB is better. 5. Storage—There are two types of storage—"hard" or fixed disk drives and "floppy" disk drives. Floppy disk drives come in 3.5and 5.25-inch sizes; it's nice to have both. Don't settle for less than a 120 MB hard disk drive; if you need to store many programs, consider a 220 MB or larger disk drive. 6. Monitor—The standard computer starts with a 14-inch color VGA monitor and may offer a higher-resolution Super VGA mode. Consider splurging on a larger screen if you do desktop publishing or graphics work (the characters are easier to read on a 16or 17-inch screen, also). Try to compare monitors side-by-side, just as you would a television. 7. Other peripherals—If you're going to buv a CD-ROM or a fax modem later, consider buying them bundled in your PC. You will probably get them cheaper. Above all, shop around. Do your homework. Talk to e.xperts and knowledgeable friends. Yourtime invested will pay off many times over. Making t Difference The City of Henderson is proud of the service we provide for our Citizens. We know that our employees' dedication and loyalty to customer service play an important part in that success. To our Employee of the Year and each of our Employee of the Month winners, along with every other City of Henderson employee... thank youYOU MAKE THE DIFFERENCE! • • (NAPS>-If the idea of finding time to shop for everyone on your list is beginning to make you shiver, you might want to con sider following a new trend: a gift for the whole family. Lookingfor ideas for family gifts? Here are just a few to contemplate: •Has your family always wanted to hike in the Rockies, visit Disney World or tour the Big Apple? Combineyour holiday and vacation budgets, and take your dream vacation this year. Give the kids their tickets for Christmas. your money: Family gifts •Home computers have never been less expensive or more invaluable. The hardest part is deciding which system. You might check the classifieds to see if someone is selling a used system you want. If your budget allows, give the computer to the family, and give each family member a small piece of software. •One way to make vacations more affordable is by roughing it. You can get a lifetime set-up of a tent and sleeping bags for the wholefamily for less than it would cost for a weekend at a hotel. •Jump-start everyone's brains by investing in a set of encyclopedias. You'll finally be able to answer all your kids' questions (like"how does television work?"), your kids will get ahead in school and you'll all have a resource to turn to for years to come. Experts recommend The World Book Encyclopedia for families with school-age children because of its accuracy, up-to-date information and readahiltiy. • Help the whole family keep fit by buying equipment for a home gym. Surprise them by having it all set up, out of sight, on Christmas morning. Give sweats, leotards or sweatbands as individual gifts. There is one family gift that experts believe you shouldn't indulge in—namely, a new pet. Animal shelters are crowded in January with "surprise" pets that didn't work out. Pets should only come into a home where everyone is aware, ahead of time, of the lifelong responsibility and is prepared to meet all the long-term obligations associated with a pet. Experts recommend home, auto electronics Choosing a gift for friends or relatives who love electronics can test the patience of some of the most techno-friendly shoppers. With so many bells and whistles tochoosefrom, and the dependable push in the wrong direction from all-too-friendly salespeople, you might end up with a not-so-perfect gift. Instead of giving up, however, take a few notes from the electronics experts who can give some unbiased direction to your holiday shopping. Many of the experts who write about electronics for newspapers and magazines really do their homework in picking the best products on the market With a well-rounded knowledge of what those extra knobs and buttons really offer in the way of extra value, the experts can send you straight to the right purchase with little or no hassle. Two electronics products that are rapidly growing in popularity are CD changers for the home and automobile. Many people have invested in a single CD player, but a new crop of CD changers are becoming available with more CD capacity and convenience that adds an entirely new dimension to musical listening. Fisher AudioA^ideo has introduced a 24-disc home audio component called the Studio 24 CD Management System thathas received great reviews from many of the audio experts who write for big-city newspapers. Rich Warren, of the Chicago Tribune, writes the following: "When it comes to the best new mousetrap, Fisher beats them all with its DAC-2403 Studio 24 CD Management System 24-disc changer." A CD management system allows the user to store and categorizemusicforeasyplayback without frequent loading and unloading of CDs that often puts 1 iSI-J ft i > Si* V X. 1 • 1 irstni' ii ; • K^ ll r Is Mi"^ v\ J iiini • '"'^^mivi-mm^ B P^^^HM^I^BO A CD MANAGEMENT SYSTEM allows the user to store and categorize music for easy playback without frequent loading and unloading of CDs. Above, RsheKs system 9425 incorporates innovative Studio 24 CD managreement with a complete audio/video system. nasty scratches or dirt spots on the disc. Studio 24's multi-CD system keeps track of which CD is which, and conveniently organ izes your collection the way you like to listen to it. For families where each member has a little different taste in music, Studio 24 allows each person to keep their own CDs separately labeled for easy access. Preset categories allow CDs to be categorized by musical type (i.e., jazz, rock, classical, etc.). Using the alphanumeric keypad, each user can choose his or her own custom categories, such as by mood (i.e., morning, romantic), owner (i.e., mom's, dad's, Bobby's or Susie's music), occasion (i.e., party mix l,partymix2),or simply by disc name (i.e., Elton John). Then, when you input jazz or any other category, one or several CDs belonging to the category are automatically played back. With all the added utility that a CD management system offers, you might think the system to be rather complex to operate. This is not so, according to Kathy Price, electronics writer for the Arizona Republic. "Here's a compact disc player that's user-friendly," she writes. Studio 24 is available as a single audio component for less than $300, as part of a fully integrated component system or as part of a compact disc shelf system. Fisher has an entire line of new products—including four new audio component systems and one audio/ video system—that all offer its exclusive Studio 24 CD Management System. When it comes to car audio, smaller is usually better, and Sanyo Mobile .\udio makes a 6disc CD changer that is one of the smallest available. The electronics experts also had good things to say about Sanyo's MAX-6600 system. "A flawless performer," writes reviewer Joel Cohen of Car Audio & Electronics magazine. "The sound quality and measured performance for the Sanyo MAX-6600 were absolutely fine, which, on top of its small size and many features, makes it number one on my shopping list." The small size of the MAX6600 allows it to be installed in theglove boxes of many cars,under the passenger or driver seats, or under the console for quick and convenient changing of CDs. In the past, most CD changers were too large to be installed anywhere other than the trunk, which required the entire vehicle to be stopped in order to switch the choice of music in the CD library. Whatever electronics gifts you choose this year, save some time and money by tuning into what the experts are saying about all the latest gadgets and gizmos. Not only will you save yourself from added legwork and the dreaded sales pitch, but you will up your chances of making a people-pleasing choice. Personalized clothing takes off (NAPS)—More than a mere monogram, the way to set your own style this season is with a personalized piece of clothingthat carries your name. Thanks to modem technology and a clever idea, one shirt company can offer T-shirts, sweatshirts, polo shirts, totes, aprons and more emblazoned with any surname from all over the world. Surname apparel is especially popular for family reunions, though all sorts of groups like to get in on the fun. The company does something even more exclusive for some 1,800 surnames by producing customized catalogs. The target name appears on the cover and on some of the clothing oisplayed. To get a free copy of a customized catalog, call l-800-233-630{i. CRAFTS Shop for Handcrafted Gifts by Local Artists Whether you're finishing your holiday shopping or just beginning, you won't want to miss the Sam's Town Western Emporium Tent Sale. You'll find special values on first quality boots and western apparel, plus a great selection of unique arts and crafts including: Adobes on Sandstone A Blown Glass A Ceramics A Dried Spices A Gems & Minerals A Handcrafted Gourds A Indian Jewelry A Jewelry & Coordinating Garments A Minerals & Crystal Jewelry A Pottery A Quilts A Southwest Art A Watercolors & Oil Paintings A Wildlife Art A Windchimes A Wood Toys A Works Handcrafted From Clay The Tent Sale is open daily, from 9 a.m. until 6 p.m., now through December 24th. flMPORIUM AT SAM*S TOWN FUunliigo ft Boulder • 454-8017 • Open Daily Bppy Holidays From all of U9 at A Mf MBCR Of TME SCARS FINANCIAL HETWDfM COLDUJeiX BANKeRQ ANCHOR REALTY, INC. 293-5757 501 Nev. Hwy #1 and 2 Realtors Katie Carttldge, Car! Cowan, Marion Crane, Manny Mosqueda, Roger Foiey, Chuck Kessler, Diana Leseberg, Ron Fenito, rODee Zambetti, Rhonda Swan '— )fii CHRISTMAS IS A MOST APPROPRIATE TIME TO REFLEaAND CIVE THANKS FOR THOSE THINCS WE USUALLY TAKE FOR GRANTED, OUR HEALTH, PEACE IN AMERICA, OUR FAMILIES, OUR FAFTH IN THE FUTURE. AT THE END OF THIS BUSY YEAR WE WOULD LIKE TO TAKE PAUSE AND OFFER YOU OUR MOST SINCERE THANKS FOR ALLOWING US TO SERVE YOU AND YOUR FAMILY from ourstafk, ourkunilles and ourselves; PLEASE HAVE A WONDERFUL CHRISTMAS AND THE VERY BEST OF THE YEARS TO COME. FAMILYDOCrORS OFBOULDERCnV 8. GREEN VALLEY CINDY &< HERVE BEZARD PATSY 8< WARREN SMFTH ROSLYN TABOR JILL 8. JOE HARDY G5 •

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Page C8 HBC Publications Holiday Section 1994 Holiday Section 1994 HBC Publications Page C9 Creative wrapping counts M^rryl^ristmasJoAlll<'r(ni our rainily to yours... have a Mirry (!liri.s(iniisaml \/ Happy New Year! WESTERN COLOR LAB • the people who restore your old photos 6000 South Eastern Ave. #4E 597-11 11 Specializing in Henderson Properties Rock solid in real estate. I*in SOLD... On Neighbors Like You! I couldn't have uked for a finer community to do buslneu with. May your home be blessed with contentment, prosperity and |oy thli holiday season. JOSIE OLSON, GRI. CRS REALTOR MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR CLUB REALTY EXECUTIVES 2920 N. Green Valley Parkway 795-4500 (NAPS)—After hours of trying to find a parking space at the mall, fighting crowds at the store and finding the perfect present for everyone on your list, who has the energy and enthusiasm to add personality to the wrapping of gifts? This year you can! Wrapping gifts in fun and creative ways makes each present even more special. And it can be as easy as using materials that are already in your home. Following are some holiday gift wrapping ideas from The DMC Corporation, the leading manufacturer of fine embroidery floss and needlecraft threads that will add a warm, personal touch to all of your gifts: • Fool your friend who always guesses what is in each box by wrapping a small gift in a large box and then wrap that box in an even larger box. • Design your own wrapping paper by using plain white wrapping or packaging paper and writing notes, quotes or holiday greetings all over it. Use stickers, stamps or sponges dipped in paint to add color. • Brighten your packages by placing live flowers in the ribbons. If the live flowers will not survive due to time or travel, make flowers using embroidery floss (available at any craft or needlework store) and floral supplies. • Add humor by wrapping your gifls in the Sunday comics—the recipient will appreciate your effort to recycle! • Give a flair to your wrapping style by making floss tassels to go with or in place of your ribbons. Thetasselscanbemadeinholiday colors or to match the paper. And the best part is your friend or family can use them again to dress up their shoes, key chains, barrettes, or anything they own. Soothe and pamper someone special with a personal masseur Think unique this holiday season, and offer a year-round, in-home masseur for yourself or that special person on your list. The Original Shower Massage • by Teledyne Water Pik offers this environmentally correct, pampering device for those hard-to-please people onyour gift list. After poimding the malls for hours on end or sweating through the newest fitness video in preparationfortheholidayseason, why not pamper yourself with a hot, pulsating body massage from the Original Shower Massage showerhead. histead of spending a fortiuie on a weekly masseur, the tiny, vibrating "fingers" of the shower massage showerhead will knead the imnecessary pressures of the season away. Environmentally conscious consumers will appreciate the conservative water-flow rate of 2.5 gallons per minute, compared to standard showerheads that yield six to eight gallons of water per minute. With the help of the SmartFlow water pressure sensory mechanism, the Original Shower Massage family of showerheadsprovides a consistent uje ujisr) ueu tne ueru tfiis (^f\mtrY)QS... and nooy oil ofuour T)euu 'gear's wlsftes ceme true. Oflo^or ^e^ert "ft. (3^roes^ec^>^ Qr)dtf\e dijendersor) Cit^ (^eur)cJl Jbc^ Claris, . ^V J: 4 • '. ^ ^^ '^^\^ • •^' • • '^miisii ,^ 1 Wishing you the best! Richard & Bonnie BRYAN

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Page C8 HBC Publications Holiday Section 1994 Holiday Section 1994 HBC Publications Page C9 Creative wrapping counts M^rryl^ristmasJoAlll<'r(ni our rainily to yours... have a Mirry (!liri.s(iniisaml \/ Happy New Year! WESTERN COLOR LAB • the people who restore your old photos 6000 South Eastern Ave. #4E 597-11 11 Specializing in Henderson Properties Rock solid in real estate. I*in SOLD... On Neighbors Like You! I couldn't have uked for a finer community to do buslneu with. May your home be blessed with contentment, prosperity and |oy thli holiday season. JOSIE OLSON, GRI. CRS REALTOR MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR CLUB REALTY EXECUTIVES 2920 N. Green Valley Parkway 795-4500 (NAPS)—After hours of trying to find a parking space at the mall, fighting crowds at the store and finding the perfect present for everyone on your list, who has the energy and enthusiasm to add personality to the wrapping of gifts? This year you can! Wrapping gifts in fun and creative ways makes each present even more special. And it can be as easy as using materials that are already in your home. Following are some holiday gift wrapping ideas from The DMC Corporation, the leading manufacturer of fine embroidery floss and needlecraft threads that will add a warm, personal touch to all of your gifts: • Fool your friend who always guesses what is in each box by wrapping a small gift in a large box and then wrap that box in an even larger box. • Design your own wrapping paper by using plain white wrapping or packaging paper and writing notes, quotes or holiday greetings all over it. Use stickers, stamps or sponges dipped in paint to add color. • Brighten your packages by placing live flowers in the ribbons. If the live flowers will not survive due to time or travel, make flowers using embroidery floss (available at any craft or needlework store) and floral supplies. • Add humor by wrapping your gifls in the Sunday comics—the recipient will appreciate your effort to recycle! • Give a flair to your wrapping style by making floss tassels to go with or in place of your ribbons. Thetasselscanbemadeinholiday colors or to match the paper. And the best part is your friend or family can use them again to dress up their shoes, key chains, barrettes, or anything they own. Soothe and pamper someone special with a personal masseur Think unique this holiday season, and offer a year-round, in-home masseur for yourself or that special person on your list. The Original Shower Massage • by Teledyne Water Pik offers this environmentally correct, pampering device for those hard-to-please people onyour gift list. After poimding the malls for hours on end or sweating through the newest fitness video in preparationfortheholidayseason, why not pamper yourself with a hot, pulsating body massage from the Original Shower Massage showerhead. histead of spending a fortiuie on a weekly masseur, the tiny, vibrating "fingers" of the shower massage showerhead will knead the imnecessary pressures of the season away. Environmentally conscious consumers will appreciate the conservative water-flow rate of 2.5 gallons per minute, compared to standard showerheads that yield six to eight gallons of water per minute. With the help of the SmartFlow water pressure sensory mechanism, the Original Shower Massage family of showerheadsprovides a consistent uje ujisr) ueu tne ueru tfiis (^f\mtrY)QS... and nooy oil ofuour T)euu 'gear's wlsftes ceme true. Oflo^or ^e^ert "ft. (3^roes^ec^>^ Qr)dtf\e dijendersor) Cit^ (^eur)cJl Jbc^ Claris, . ^V J: 4 • '. ^ ^^ '^^\^ • •^' • • '^miisii ,^ 1 Wishing you the best! Richard & Bonnie BRYAN

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Page CIO HBC PubUcations Holiday Section 1994 Holiday Section 1994 HBC Publications Page Cll 'Tis The Season To Be Wary. Please Don't Drink and Drive... (and Watch Out for the Other Guy!) Please Use Good Judgement and Common Sense Best Wishes for a Happy ?^:^ and SAFE New Year. Frank's Auto Body, Inc. 1432 N. Boulder Hwy. Hend. 564-6472 or 564-6475 Wr^^>-r Gift ideas tliat aren't too liot to handle (NU)—^Many new hair care products are making a debut this holiday season, but don't be swayed by glossy ads and slipk commercials when shopping for that perfect gift. Find out what special features set one brand apart from the next to ensure a smart buy. Hot hair care gifts this season include products that allow women to pamper themselves, such as a new set of hot rollers. But the hot roller field is crowded and one needs to sifl through the conflicting messages to find the best model. Here are some tips firom the gift experts at Caruso International, Inc.: •Women who use conventional hot rollers want strong, long-lastingcurls, so look for abrand name with a proven track record for providing curls that last throughout the day. •An increasing number of the newer products offer special features designed to be kinder to your hair. For example, Richard Caruso FlexiRolls has speciallydesigned rollers that are concave and cushioned. This allows hair to be wrapped tighter for a better. First In te rstate Bank FIRST INTERSTATE BANK OF NEVADA, N.A. Member FDIC • Equal Opportunity Employer Henderson Office 112 Water Boulder Major 724 Boulder Hwy. Sunset^Green Valley 2851 Green Valley Parkway Green Valley Parkway Office 2762 Valley Parkway Pecos-Wigwam 101 N. Pecos Boulder City Office 412 Nevada Hwy. Sunset & Eastern 2420 E. Sunset Rd. smoother curl without damaging the hair. The ribbing on the rollers grips hair firmly yet gently for a tighter curl. •Many new brands feature a ready dot that indicates when the rollers are hot enough to curl. To avoid unnecessary bums, only buy brands designed so that the outer rims of the rollers stay cool enou^ to handle safely. •Other things to look for include a variety of roller sizes for optimum hair-settingoptions, and models with one-sizeheatingposts that will allow customizing of the roller set to suit individual styling needs. • For the woman on the go, look for the new compact units, perfect for home, office or travel, that heat up in only one minute. These and other conventional hot roller models can be found at area stores for less than $34.99. To find out where to buy these and other hair care products, call Caruso International, Inc.'s "Caruso Cares Hotline" at 1-800942-2080. Newest holiday gift ideas (NAPS>—What do Elvis jackets, autographed baseballs, Harley Davidson telephones and 1950s-style wristwatches have in common? Answer: They're all amongthis season's "hottest" gifl items. For those who enjoy liqueurs, a new premium black and white Irish spirit called Sheridan's (from Dublin-based R. & A. Bailey & Co.) is quickly becoming a popular "find." Sheridan's elegant glass bottle features an innovative design: black and white spirits are presented side-by-side in separate compartments, each with its own cap. The white "head" of thisunique spirit is made from fresh cream and tastes like rich vanilla ice cream, while the dark lower "body" is reminiscent of a blend of the world's most treasured coffees, infused with fine dark chocolate. Both the head and the body have been imbued with Ireland's finest spirit This holiday, Sheridan's will also be available in a handsome pinstriped gift box, complete with two glasses: a gift to be enjoyed as an aperitif or after a meal, with coffee or dessert. Make your holiday shine Searching for a unique gifl for someone special this holiday season?Trygiftcertificatesforfreeor discounted car washes at your neighborhood professional car wash. Gift certificates are practical, affordable and give that someone special a reason to feel good. Come on, admit it^you feel better when driving around in a clean car. In fact, according to an independent study conducted for the International Carwash Association (ICA), car owners said driving a clean car made them "feel good," the same feeling they got after "taking a shower or going to the hair stylist" Individual car wash gift certificates cost only about $5 each. Books of five or more washes are available, as are certificates offering discounts on additional services such as detailing, waxing, vacuuming, etc. They make wonderful grab-bag gifts at the office party, as well as perfect stocking stuffers. For more information on how to obtain gift certificates, consult with the manager of your neighborhood professional car wash. UNIQUE ENTRY — Princess Gladney, 2, and Jonathon Phelps, 3, winners in the Unique 1 to 7 Years category, slowly make their way down Water Street during the Christmas Parade eariier this month. Sparking holiday gifts to trigger a man's memory (NAPS)—Ask a man what he got tor Christmas last year, and chances are he's forgotten. In fact, according to a national telephone survey conducted by OmniTel Survey of Bruskin/Goldring Research, half of the men polled stated that they have trouble remembering or don't remember at all because the gifts were not special. The mtgority of the men, almost 70 percent, said they typically receive gifts like sweaters, shirts, ties or socks. So what will men remember? Over half of the men surveyed consider a gift of diamond jewelry extremely, very or somewhat memorable as compared to the usual types of gifts they received from their wife or girlfriend. And diamond jewelry ranked the highest as a gift most expressive of love. Aside from being memorable and sentimental, do men really want to wear diamonds? Accordingto Tom Julian fashion director of The Fashion Association, "Diamond jewelry is an important fashion accessory in a time when style is a priority for men." In fact, according to the Brand Tracking Survey conducted by N.W. Ayer in 1992, 46 percent of men surveyed felt that men's diamond jewelry is fashionable and contempprary, up nine percent from 1991, reflecting men's growing enthusiasm. "New designs in men's diamond jewelry offer a variety of choices to suit every man's personal taste," says Julian. An ideal gift that will make an elegant and tasteful fashion statementisdiamondcuff" links. French cuffs are a* fastgrowing trend, one that can be found in blockbuster Hollywood films such as Reversal of Fortune and The Firm. "Cuff links are the fastestgrowing area in our line," says one designer, William Schraft of William Schraft Designs. "Men are dressing better and are becoming more aware of fashioYi, and diamond cuff links are the perfect accessory for men to show their sense of style." For sports lovers, another gift idea is sport-themed pieces such as football players, tennis rackets "' and golf clubs that can be worn as tie tacks or lapel pins. If one is looking for a gift with a more formal flair, a simple diamond stud will add a festive sparkle to a tuxedo bow tie. Whether the choice is a set of stylish diamond cuff" links or an elegant bow tie stud, as holiday shopping becomes increasingly selective, diamond jewelry is an everlasting gift choice that is sure to be remembered. Holiday gift lists shape up While festive foods and holiday gatherings may warm the heart, they can wreck havoc on the figure. Many active women fight this fate by filling their holiday wish lists with gifts to help them get back on track when the new year sets in. Today's fitness-focused women are eager to get back to their normal workout routines as soon as the holidays are over," says C!hristy Bedgio, vice president, general merchandise manager of Lady Foot Locker, the nation's largest retail chain specializing ir women's athletic footwear and apparel. "Our stores are flooded with people shopping for the sports-minded, fashion-conscious women on their lists." According to Bedgio, many traditional fitness products now double as fashion essentials. Even running shoes, long worn strictly for the sport, are now very vogue. Accessories, such as sporty backpacks and bags, have also taken a trendy turn. There's something for every woman to give — and receive — this holiday season. Lady Foot Locker offers these gift ideas: •Mini-bags — From naturalhued oiled canvas trimmed in leather to basic canvas, these convenient mini-bags will go anywhere a woman's sport or fashion demands take her. •Polar fleece gift set—For the athlete who doesn't want to bring her workout indoors during the winter months. She can wear the soft fleece headband, mittens and scarf while jogging, walking, skiing, running errands or commuting to work. •Outerwear jackets — For added warmth on brisk days, fashionable polyfilled jackets in outdoorsy colors from Nike, Fila and Adidas. •Beyond Performance athletic mini crew gift pack—Three pairs of athletic socks housed in a reusable clear plastic case trimmed in red, yellow or royal blue. It makes a great tote for cosmetics and other workout gear. •Backpacks and duffels — From classic canvas backpacks to more modem mini-backpacks in oiled canvas to top-loading wool duffels in traditional plaids, these are bags to meet the needs and personality of every woman. •Gift certificates — Can't decide? Let her choose her favorite fitness gift, such as a stylish nylon or silk warm-up suit or athletic or casual fashion footwear. Lady Foot Locker has more than 580 stores throu^out the United States and Puerto Rico. TO YOU From all of us at HBC PUBLICATIONS \ Mike O'Callaghan Publisher ADMINISTRATION Colleen Miele, Manager Eileen Weber Robin Weber Christie Taylor, Receptionist CLASSIFIED Lori Mooney, Boulder City Ruth Graham, Henderson Becky Mosser, Henderson ART DEPARTMENT Donna O'Callaghan, Art Director Donna Blobel, Graphic Design Super Mac Jack, Computer Graphics DISPLAY ADVERTISING Anne Picking, Manager Elaine Blue, Henderson Goldie Begley, Boulder City Vina Curtis, Henderson PHOTOGRAPHY JohnJudge Rob Weidenfeld Carolyn 0*CalIaghan Co-Publisher Tim O'Callaghan General Manager PRODUCTION Stephanie Fucile Russ Wheeler EDITORIAL Paul Szydelko, Managing Editor Bill Harbour, Boulder City Editor Bill Bowman, Sports Editor Kathy Streeter, Reporter Roy Theiss, Reporter Thomas Moore, Reporter D J. Allen, Sports Reporter Kathleen Wood, Boulder City Sports Carolyn Bishop, Contributing Columnist Jim Brann, Contributing Columnist Teddy Fenton, Contributing Columnist Bill Hanlon, Contributing Columnist Don Holladay, Contributing Columnist Ruth Soehlke, Contributing Columnist TYPING Shirley Long, Mananger June Andrews Virginia Conti Valoy Heiki Shelly Dardashti Here's hoping your season brings good news and happiness. We thank you for your loyal readership and support. u

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Page CIO HBC PubUcations Holiday Section 1994 Holiday Section 1994 HBC Publications Page Cll 'Tis The Season To Be Wary. Please Don't Drink and Drive... (and Watch Out for the Other Guy!) Please Use Good Judgement and Common Sense Best Wishes for a Happy ?^:^ and SAFE New Year. Frank's Auto Body, Inc. 1432 N. Boulder Hwy. Hend. 564-6472 or 564-6475 Wr^^>-r Gift ideas tliat aren't too liot to handle (NU)—^Many new hair care products are making a debut this holiday season, but don't be swayed by glossy ads and slipk commercials when shopping for that perfect gift. Find out what special features set one brand apart from the next to ensure a smart buy. Hot hair care gifts this season include products that allow women to pamper themselves, such as a new set of hot rollers. But the hot roller field is crowded and one needs to sifl through the conflicting messages to find the best model. Here are some tips firom the gift experts at Caruso International, Inc.: •Women who use conventional hot rollers want strong, long-lastingcurls, so look for abrand name with a proven track record for providing curls that last throughout the day. •An increasing number of the newer products offer special features designed to be kinder to your hair. For example, Richard Caruso FlexiRolls has speciallydesigned rollers that are concave and cushioned. This allows hair to be wrapped tighter for a better. First In te rstate Bank FIRST INTERSTATE BANK OF NEVADA, N.A. Member FDIC • Equal Opportunity Employer Henderson Office 112 Water Boulder Major 724 Boulder Hwy. Sunset^Green Valley 2851 Green Valley Parkway Green Valley Parkway Office 2762 Valley Parkway Pecos-Wigwam 101 N. Pecos Boulder City Office 412 Nevada Hwy. Sunset & Eastern 2420 E. Sunset Rd. smoother curl without damaging the hair. The ribbing on the rollers grips hair firmly yet gently for a tighter curl. •Many new brands feature a ready dot that indicates when the rollers are hot enough to curl. To avoid unnecessary bums, only buy brands designed so that the outer rims of the rollers stay cool enou^ to handle safely. •Other things to look for include a variety of roller sizes for optimum hair-settingoptions, and models with one-sizeheatingposts that will allow customizing of the roller set to suit individual styling needs. • For the woman on the go, look for the new compact units, perfect for home, office or travel, that heat up in only one minute. These and other conventional hot roller models can be found at area stores for less than $34.99. To find out where to buy these and other hair care products, call Caruso International, Inc.'s "Caruso Cares Hotline" at 1-800942-2080. Newest holiday gift ideas (NAPS>—What do Elvis jackets, autographed baseballs, Harley Davidson telephones and 1950s-style wristwatches have in common? Answer: They're all amongthis season's "hottest" gifl items. For those who enjoy liqueurs, a new premium black and white Irish spirit called Sheridan's (from Dublin-based R. & A. Bailey & Co.) is quickly becoming a popular "find." Sheridan's elegant glass bottle features an innovative design: black and white spirits are presented side-by-side in separate compartments, each with its own cap. The white "head" of thisunique spirit is made from fresh cream and tastes like rich vanilla ice cream, while the dark lower "body" is reminiscent of a blend of the world's most treasured coffees, infused with fine dark chocolate. Both the head and the body have been imbued with Ireland's finest spirit This holiday, Sheridan's will also be available in a handsome pinstriped gift box, complete with two glasses: a gift to be enjoyed as an aperitif or after a meal, with coffee or dessert. Make your holiday shine Searching for a unique gifl for someone special this holiday season?Trygiftcertificatesforfreeor discounted car washes at your neighborhood professional car wash. Gift certificates are practical, affordable and give that someone special a reason to feel good. Come on, admit it^you feel better when driving around in a clean car. In fact, according to an independent study conducted for the International Carwash Association (ICA), car owners said driving a clean car made them "feel good," the same feeling they got after "taking a shower or going to the hair stylist" Individual car wash gift certificates cost only about $5 each. Books of five or more washes are available, as are certificates offering discounts on additional services such as detailing, waxing, vacuuming, etc. They make wonderful grab-bag gifts at the office party, as well as perfect stocking stuffers. For more information on how to obtain gift certificates, consult with the manager of your neighborhood professional car wash. UNIQUE ENTRY — Princess Gladney, 2, and Jonathon Phelps, 3, winners in the Unique 1 to 7 Years category, slowly make their way down Water Street during the Christmas Parade eariier this month. Sparking holiday gifts to trigger a man's memory (NAPS)—Ask a man what he got tor Christmas last year, and chances are he's forgotten. In fact, according to a national telephone survey conducted by OmniTel Survey of Bruskin/Goldring Research, half of the men polled stated that they have trouble remembering or don't remember at all because the gifts were not special. The mtgority of the men, almost 70 percent, said they typically receive gifts like sweaters, shirts, ties or socks. So what will men remember? Over half of the men surveyed consider a gift of diamond jewelry extremely, very or somewhat memorable as compared to the usual types of gifts they received from their wife or girlfriend. And diamond jewelry ranked the highest as a gift most expressive of love. Aside from being memorable and sentimental, do men really want to wear diamonds? Accordingto Tom Julian fashion director of The Fashion Association, "Diamond jewelry is an important fashion accessory in a time when style is a priority for men." In fact, according to the Brand Tracking Survey conducted by N.W. Ayer in 1992, 46 percent of men surveyed felt that men's diamond jewelry is fashionable and contempprary, up nine percent from 1991, reflecting men's growing enthusiasm. "New designs in men's diamond jewelry offer a variety of choices to suit every man's personal taste," says Julian. An ideal gift that will make an elegant and tasteful fashion statementisdiamondcuff" links. French cuffs are a* fastgrowing trend, one that can be found in blockbuster Hollywood films such as Reversal of Fortune and The Firm. "Cuff links are the fastestgrowing area in our line," says one designer, William Schraft of William Schraft Designs. "Men are dressing better and are becoming more aware of fashioYi, and diamond cuff links are the perfect accessory for men to show their sense of style." For sports lovers, another gift idea is sport-themed pieces such as football players, tennis rackets "' and golf clubs that can be worn as tie tacks or lapel pins. If one is looking for a gift with a more formal flair, a simple diamond stud will add a festive sparkle to a tuxedo bow tie. Whether the choice is a set of stylish diamond cuff" links or an elegant bow tie stud, as holiday shopping becomes increasingly selective, diamond jewelry is an everlasting gift choice that is sure to be remembered. Holiday gift lists shape up While festive foods and holiday gatherings may warm the heart, they can wreck havoc on the figure. Many active women fight this fate by filling their holiday wish lists with gifts to help them get back on track when the new year sets in. Today's fitness-focused women are eager to get back to their normal workout routines as soon as the holidays are over," says C!hristy Bedgio, vice president, general merchandise manager of Lady Foot Locker, the nation's largest retail chain specializing ir women's athletic footwear and apparel. "Our stores are flooded with people shopping for the sports-minded, fashion-conscious women on their lists." According to Bedgio, many traditional fitness products now double as fashion essentials. Even running shoes, long worn strictly for the sport, are now very vogue. Accessories, such as sporty backpacks and bags, have also taken a trendy turn. There's something for every woman to give — and receive — this holiday season. Lady Foot Locker offers these gift ideas: •Mini-bags — From naturalhued oiled canvas trimmed in leather to basic canvas, these convenient mini-bags will go anywhere a woman's sport or fashion demands take her. •Polar fleece gift set—For the athlete who doesn't want to bring her workout indoors during the winter months. She can wear the soft fleece headband, mittens and scarf while jogging, walking, skiing, running errands or commuting to work. •Outerwear jackets — For added warmth on brisk days, fashionable polyfilled jackets in outdoorsy colors from Nike, Fila and Adidas. •Beyond Performance athletic mini crew gift pack—Three pairs of athletic socks housed in a reusable clear plastic case trimmed in red, yellow or royal blue. It makes a great tote for cosmetics and other workout gear. •Backpacks and duffels — From classic canvas backpacks to more modem mini-backpacks in oiled canvas to top-loading wool duffels in traditional plaids, these are bags to meet the needs and personality of every woman. •Gift certificates — Can't decide? Let her choose her favorite fitness gift, such as a stylish nylon or silk warm-up suit or athletic or casual fashion footwear. Lady Foot Locker has more than 580 stores throu^out the United States and Puerto Rico. TO YOU From all of us at HBC PUBLICATIONS \ Mike O'Callaghan Publisher ADMINISTRATION Colleen Miele, Manager Eileen Weber Robin Weber Christie Taylor, Receptionist CLASSIFIED Lori Mooney, Boulder City Ruth Graham, Henderson Becky Mosser, Henderson ART DEPARTMENT Donna O'Callaghan, Art Director Donna Blobel, Graphic Design Super Mac Jack, Computer Graphics DISPLAY ADVERTISING Anne Picking, Manager Elaine Blue, Henderson Goldie Begley, Boulder City Vina Curtis, Henderson PHOTOGRAPHY JohnJudge Rob Weidenfeld Carolyn 0*CalIaghan Co-Publisher Tim O'Callaghan General Manager PRODUCTION Stephanie Fucile Russ Wheeler EDITORIAL Paul Szydelko, Managing Editor Bill Harbour, Boulder City Editor Bill Bowman, Sports Editor Kathy Streeter, Reporter Roy Theiss, Reporter Thomas Moore, Reporter D J. Allen, Sports Reporter Kathleen Wood, Boulder City Sports Carolyn Bishop, Contributing Columnist Jim Brann, Contributing Columnist Teddy Fenton, Contributing Columnist Bill Hanlon, Contributing Columnist Don Holladay, Contributing Columnist Ruth Soehlke, Contributing Columnist TYPING Shirley Long, Mananger June Andrews Virginia Conti Valoy Heiki Shelly Dardashti Here's hoping your season brings good news and happiness. We thank you for your loyal readership and support. u

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i t Page C12 HBC PubUcations Holiday Section 1994 >7 ^D. WSmMiri^~0AMiswm!m -r'^ t...•^' '\ A / Holiday Section 1994 HBC Publications Page C13 Central Tclephonc-Xevada TEEN TALK Give your teen somelhing to talk about! CALL 811 CRANBERRY COUNTRY STYLE RIBS 2 pounds boneless country style porfc ribs PUREE 2 • / • cups OCEAN SPRAY* Fresh or Frozen Cranberries 'A cup water 'A cup sugar SAUCE 1 recipe cranberry puree 1 cup Drown sugar '/i cup chill sauce • /< cup • 2 tablespoons vinegar Vi cup chopped onion V* cup Lea & Perrlns Worcestershire Sauce Preheat oven to 350. Bake ribs until halfway done, approximately 30 minutes. Meanwhile, prepare puree and sauce. TO PREPARE PUREE; Bring all puree ingredients to a boil in a medium saucepan. Cook until cranberries pop. Place a wire mesi) strainer over a medium mixing bowl. Pour contents of saucepan Into strainer. Press cranberries with the back of spoon, frcuuenlly scraping the outside of the strainer, until no pulp is left. Stir contents of bowl. TO PREPARE SAUCE: Combine ail sauce ingredients in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until sauce thickens, about 20 minutes, stirring frequently. Drain partiallv baked ribs. I\xir sauce over ribs and bake until pork Is no longer pink, about 15 minutes. Makes 4 servings. CHOCOLATE CRANBERRY DESSERT SAUCE 1 16-ounce can OCEAN SPRAY* Killed Cranberry Sauce 'A cup semi-sweet chocolate bits Combine cranberry sauce and chocolate bits in a medium saucepan. Melt over medium heat, whisking occasionally until smooth. Cool. Serve over desserts, ice cream, crepes, etc. Makes 2 cups. Tkx MEX CRANBERRY SALSA 1 cup water I cup sugar 1 l2-ounce package OCEAN SPRAY* Fresh or Frozen Cranberries 2 tablespoons chopped canned |alapcik> peppers 1 teaspoon dried cilantro Vi teaspoon ground cumin 1 green onion, while and green parts, sliced I teaspoon lime juice Combine water and sugar in a medium saucepan. Bring to a boll over medium heat. Add cranberries; return to a lioll. Gently boll cranberries for 10 minutes without stirring. Pour into a medium glass or plastic mixing bowl. Gently stir in remaining ingredients. Place a piece of plastic wrap directly on salsa. Cool to room temperature and refrleeraie. Best If served at room temperature. Makes about 2'/i cups. CINNAMON SNAP 4 ounces OCEAN SPRAY* Cranberry |ulce CockUli 1 ounce Southern Comfort V* ounce cinnamon schnapps Heat all Ingredients in a small saucepan. Pour Into a mug. MaKes I serving. CRANBERRY BOURSIN TbRKEY CROISSANT Spread softened Boursin cheese and CRANFRUIT" Crushed Fruit on top half of a croissant. Place some red leaf lettuce and turkey slices on the bottom half. Place halves together. Serve with a fresh garden salad and deTlcious cranberry vinaigrette salad dressing. CRANBERRY HONEY GLAZE 1 8-ounce can OCEAN SPRAY* lelUed Cranberry Sauce 'A cup honey Combine ingredients in a small saucepan. Cook over medium heat just until sauce Is smooth, whisking frequently. Liberally brush on poultry or ham during cooking. Makes about 1 cup. PfeCAN BREADED PORK WTTH CRANBERRY APRICOT SAUCE I pound boneless pork loin 1 egg 2 cups ftnely chopped pecans 2Vi cups OCEAN SPRAY* Fresh or Frozen Cranberries 'A cup water '/i cup sugar Vi cup apricot jam Trim fat off pork. Cut each loin In halfhorizoniaUy, forming two '/^-inch thk:k slices. Pound each piece to Vi-inch thick. Beat egg with 2 tablespoons water. Dip each piece of porkTnto egg, then lightly coat with pecans, pressing to stick, if necessary. Set aside. Bring cranberries, water and sugar to a boil in a medium saucepan. Cook until berries pop. Place a wire muh strainer over a medium mbcing bowl. Pour contents of saucepan into strainer. Press cranbenles with the back of a spoon, frequently scraping the outside of the strainer, until no pulp Is left Stir contents of bowl. Return puree to saucepan. Add jam and heat until jam is combined, stirring occasional^. Keep sauce warm until serving time. Heat 'A-cup oil in a skllleL Frv pork 2-3 minutes on each side or until pork Is goiden brown and cooked throughout lYansfer pork to a serving platter. Pour some sauce over perk and serve extra sauce on the side. Makes 4-6 servings. mki

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i t Page C12 HBC PubUcations Holiday Section 1994 >7 ^D. WSmMiri^~0AMiswm!m -r'^ t...•^' '\ A / Holiday Section 1994 HBC Publications Page C13 Central Tclephonc-Xevada TEEN TALK Give your teen somelhing to talk about! CALL 811 CRANBERRY COUNTRY STYLE RIBS 2 pounds boneless country style porfc ribs PUREE 2 • / • cups OCEAN SPRAY* Fresh or Frozen Cranberries 'A cup water 'A cup sugar SAUCE 1 recipe cranberry puree 1 cup Drown sugar '/i cup chill sauce • /< cup • 2 tablespoons vinegar Vi cup chopped onion V* cup Lea & Perrlns Worcestershire Sauce Preheat oven to 350. Bake ribs until halfway done, approximately 30 minutes. Meanwhile, prepare puree and sauce. TO PREPARE PUREE; Bring all puree ingredients to a boil in a medium saucepan. Cook until cranberries pop. Place a wire mesi) strainer over a medium mixing bowl. Pour contents of saucepan Into strainer. Press cranberries with the back of spoon, frcuuenlly scraping the outside of the strainer, until no pulp is left. Stir contents of bowl. TO PREPARE SAUCE: Combine ail sauce ingredients in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until sauce thickens, about 20 minutes, stirring frequently. Drain partiallv baked ribs. I\xir sauce over ribs and bake until pork Is no longer pink, about 15 minutes. Makes 4 servings. CHOCOLATE CRANBERRY DESSERT SAUCE 1 16-ounce can OCEAN SPRAY* Killed Cranberry Sauce 'A cup semi-sweet chocolate bits Combine cranberry sauce and chocolate bits in a medium saucepan. Melt over medium heat, whisking occasionally until smooth. Cool. Serve over desserts, ice cream, crepes, etc. Makes 2 cups. Tkx MEX CRANBERRY SALSA 1 cup water I cup sugar 1 l2-ounce package OCEAN SPRAY* Fresh or Frozen Cranberries 2 tablespoons chopped canned |alapcik> peppers 1 teaspoon dried cilantro Vi teaspoon ground cumin 1 green onion, while and green parts, sliced I teaspoon lime juice Combine water and sugar in a medium saucepan. Bring to a boll over medium heat. Add cranberries; return to a lioll. Gently boll cranberries for 10 minutes without stirring. Pour into a medium glass or plastic mixing bowl. Gently stir in remaining ingredients. Place a piece of plastic wrap directly on salsa. Cool to room temperature and refrleeraie. Best If served at room temperature. Makes about 2'/i cups. CINNAMON SNAP 4 ounces OCEAN SPRAY* Cranberry |ulce CockUli 1 ounce Southern Comfort V* ounce cinnamon schnapps Heat all Ingredients in a small saucepan. Pour Into a mug. MaKes I serving. CRANBERRY BOURSIN TbRKEY CROISSANT Spread softened Boursin cheese and CRANFRUIT" Crushed Fruit on top half of a croissant. Place some red leaf lettuce and turkey slices on the bottom half. Place halves together. Serve with a fresh garden salad and deTlcious cranberry vinaigrette salad dressing. CRANBERRY HONEY GLAZE 1 8-ounce can OCEAN SPRAY* lelUed Cranberry Sauce 'A cup honey Combine ingredients in a small saucepan. Cook over medium heat just until sauce Is smooth, whisking frequently. Liberally brush on poultry or ham during cooking. Makes about 1 cup. PfeCAN BREADED PORK WTTH CRANBERRY APRICOT SAUCE I pound boneless pork loin 1 egg 2 cups ftnely chopped pecans 2Vi cups OCEAN SPRAY* Fresh or Frozen Cranberries 'A cup water '/i cup sugar Vi cup apricot jam Trim fat off pork. Cut each loin In halfhorizoniaUy, forming two '/^-inch thk:k slices. Pound each piece to Vi-inch thick. Beat egg with 2 tablespoons water. Dip each piece of porkTnto egg, then lightly coat with pecans, pressing to stick, if necessary. Set aside. Bring cranberries, water and sugar to a boil in a medium saucepan. Cook until berries pop. Place a wire muh strainer over a medium mbcing bowl. Pour contents of saucepan into strainer. Press cranbenles with the back of a spoon, frequently scraping the outside of the strainer, until no pulp Is left Stir contents of bowl. Return puree to saucepan. Add jam and heat until jam is combined, stirring occasional^. Keep sauce warm until serving time. Heat 'A-cup oil in a skllleL Frv pork 2-3 minutes on each side or until pork Is goiden brown and cooked throughout lYansfer pork to a serving platter. Pour some sauce over perk and serve extra sauce on the side. Makes 4-6 servings. mki

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• • w Page C14 HBC PubUcations Holiday Section 1994 HBC Publications Page CIS Holiday Section 1994 Gifts for Children Choose toys that both educate and entertain M ^ Vi ^HL frt Ini (NAPS)—Children learn best through play, and caring parents select toys that can educate children as well as entertain them. Today there are a number of toys that can do both. Following are some recommendations from Child's Play Communications, specialists in children's products. Math is made as easy as 1,2,3 with the Headsmart Count's Talking Numberland from Tectron. Developed with the producers of Sesame Street and based on the show's curriculum, this interactive electronic toy features afavorite characterfrom the show, the Count von Count. With his Transylvanian accent and encouraging comments, the Count delights youngsters ages three to seven as they learn to do simple addition and subtraction. This quality toy is designed specifically to teach age-appropriate skills in a way that makes learning fun. Puzzle play helps children learn eye-hand coordination and problem solving, among other important early-childhood skills. Gait toys' Nursery Rhymes Giant Floor Puzzle is a winner of the prestigious Parent's Choice award. The beautifully designed 2' X 3' puzzle depicts favorite nursery rhymes. Its 30 interlocking pieces include eight templates shaped like the rhymes' main characters, such as Humpty Dumpty and Jack and Jill. Very youngchildren will easily identify where these pieces fit into the puzzle and older children will enjoy tracing them and coloring in the results. For ages three to six. •Blocks are wonderful for building toddlers' visual and motor skills. The only drawback? Block play typically takes place all over the floor, and parents have to clean up afterward. The Construc-table from Brik Toy is a table with a special top that serves as a contained play space for blocks, and also has a grid to hold the blocks securely for building. Wee Waffle which also comes with two inserts—one to fit standard building blocks such as Legos and another for preschool blocks such as Duplos. Both insertsflipovertoprovide a smooth surface for coloring, drawing or writing once blockbuildingtime isover—so one small table serves multiple purposes for ages two and up. Drawing is a favorite way for younpters to express themselves. Irwin Toy's Creative Imagineers Watercolor Pencil Drawing Art Kits provide a new and easy way to create water colors: by drawing on a grid. This allows youngsters ages eight and up to produce realistic, accurate images. The kits include drawing materials and child-friendly instructions for creating dinosaurs, horses or sports action figures. Now parents can preview video games before buying them By Dan Fsffannan (NU) Children's 'edutainment' It may have a nice ring to it, but this video game niche has had a tough time competing with rock 'em, sock 'em, actiontype titles. Parents would be only too happy if the hours their children spent in front of the video screen were actually used for more edutainment than violent entertainment. Action games that promote interactive learning would be a welcome new alternative to the nonstop violence of many current hits. Well, now there is an alternative. Recognizingthat parents still control the purse strings of their younger children, Hi Tech Entertainment recently introduced a whole new line of children's video games backed up by a novel way to ensure that parents won't be disappointed with their purchase. The assurance comes from a new program called "Rent It, Try It, Buy It" that Hi Tech is now rolling out to video stores across the countiy. Consumers can rent some of Hi Tech's most popular new titles, take them home and watch them. If they decide to purchase any of the titles, theyll receive a $5 rebate from Hi Tech. The titles include: •"Barbie Vacation Adventure." •'T^ickey's Playtown Adven ture." •"Mickey's Ultimate Chal lenge." •Tom vs. Jerry: The Chase Is On." •"Beethoven." •"Baby's Day Out." •"A Dinosaur's Tale." •"Bobby's World." No "R" ratings here. Each and every game is chock full of entertaining fun and educational learning adventures. To help the program reach as many parents as possible, Hi Tech is encouraging video stores to create special in-store areas for children's video games. Children's gifts made easy (NAPS)—This holiday season, you can give your youngsters gifts that will add some spring to their steps: Fun footwear accessories such as slippers, rainboots and shoe bags can be unique and affordable gifts likely to get a warm welcome. To keep feet warm on cold mornings, there are slippers in a wide range of styles, including adorable animals and other popular characters. Many topquality slippers retail for only $ 10 to $12. Make sure they feature skid-resistant bottoms for safety. Bright rubber rainboots can please plenty of little puddlejumpers. While water-resistant boots are good for snowy winter days, waterproof boots will keep The folks at Sam^s Town wish you a beautiful Holiday Season and a New Year of Peace and Happiness. m^ feet dry during April's showers, Rainboots should be lightweight; waterproof and comfortable. They look great with bright-colored slickers and the average retail price is about $15. Looking for a place where children can keep their favorite party or play shoes? Colorful shoe bags to hang on a closet door come in a variety of shapes and sizes. They can be a fun addition to a child's room and a good way to teach children about putting things in the proper place. Whether slippers, boots or bags, there are plenty to choose from this season. Many parents find the best place to look for such items is in a shoe store such as Stride Rite that carries a full range ofchildren's footwear. There, they say, you find a great selection and unbeatable service. ., .<. ; Prehistoric reptjj^s are more popular than ever, and Stride Rite offers a full line of items featuring Dino Dave and his pal Dina, a duo of friendly, bright-green dinosaurs. Finding such fine gifts for youngsters' feet at local stores can help keep gift shopping from bringing you to your knees. We're happy lo take this time to express our very best wishes for a mcny Christmas, along with our sincere thanks. Glen & Shirley Olson & Staff Boulder Bowl Toys should spark children's creativity Your children are clamoring for the latest "hot" toys advertised on the Saturday morning cartoon shows. And when you wander through a toy department, you're overwhelmed by the selection. With 150,000 toys on the market, how dp you know what to buy? What will challenge your children and hold their attention long after the holidays are over? "Toys should encourage the creative side of children, because play is such an important part of a child's development," says Peter Reynolds, president of BRIO Corporation, a toy company based in Milwaukee, Wis. Educating the public about the importance of play and quality toys is a key mission of the American Specialty Toy Retailers Association (ASTRA), a national trade association for which Reynolds is a director. "A good toy is a tool to unleash the child's creativity," says Jeff Franklin, ASTRA president and owner of Be Beep—AToy Shop, in Annapolis, Md. The child should supply the action and sounds— the bells and whistles. The toy should enable the child to create his own play activity, rather than being passively entertained or mimicking something he's seen on television." •Safety. Safe toys have no sharp edges and do not propel objects. Parts are securely fastened, and there are no harmful chemicalsorflammablematerials. Remember, too, to supervise the play area. A "safe toy" may be used in an unsafe way or pose a hazard for a child too young to play with it, such as a toddler playing writh small pieces. •Multiple uses. An openended toy, such as blocks or a building set, encourages children to create their own play, and offers them an opportunity to play with the toy in different ways as they grow. There's no right or wrong way. •Durability. The toy should be well-made of qualitymaterials. If a toy breaks, it may have a negative impact on a child because it suggests that he is destructive. He's also disappointed because he has lost a favorite plaything. •Age appropriateness. Choose toys appropriate for the child's age. Most children are given toys that are too old for them. Too often, we push them to that one higher level, which can be friistrating and undermine their self-esteem. •The child's interests. Look at what your child likes. Let him lead you. If he's always playing 'Birdie Christmas tree' Here are some ideas to tiy on your own Birdie Tree: 1. Small, powdered-sugar coated doughnuts—attach to tree branches with peanut butter. 2. Strings of popcorn. 3. Orange halves filled with peanuts, raisins, Grape Nuts, sunflower seeds. 4. Small foil cups covered with ribbon and filled with peanuts, raisins, Grape Nuts, sunflower seeds. OPEN-ENDED TOYS — Toys such as BIO's Wooden Railway encourage children's creativity and exercise their imaginations. inside, you may want to buy him a ball to encourage him to go outside, to give him a different opportunity. But start on a small scale, rather than investing a lot in an activity he may not Uke. •Social interaction. A good toy can includothers. Children sometimes like to play with other children and with adults. Some of their toys should encourage parent-child interaction. •Empowerment. Children leam by doing. They discover they can affect their environment. Children are empowered through the accomplishments and successes of play. •Moderation. Children often have too many toys, and that can be both overwhelming and overstimulating. Choose a few open-ended toys that offer many different play experiences, rather than buying a lot of toys. Also, rotate the toys available for play, and store others for future use. A number of BRIO toys, includinghe BRIO Wooden Railway, have won international awards for fim, quality, safety and durabihty. The magic of a child's rocking horse A rocking horse is a most treasured childhood toy. Everyone remembers their first rocking horse and the magic of riding it tirelessly for hours on end. Although its reputation of being the quintessential play toy cannot be disputed, the rocking horse plays a larger role in a toddler's development than most parents may realize. What is it that is so magical about a child's first rocking horse? Perhaps it's the imagery of cowboys on horseback that makes a firm impression early on and truly fascinates children. Achild's first rocking horse provides a big, fun fantasy toy for the active toddler who imagines he can be riding a real horse. The rocking horse also helps children strength their little bodies, stimulate their little minds and develop a love for active play —so necessary to a child's growth and development. One toy manufacturer. Today's Kids,has developed two ride-on toys perfect for each state in a toddler's development. A handsome rocking horse, Midrught Mustang • designed for ages 1 1/2 to 5 years, has four motion-activated realistic-ride horse sounds. They are digitally recorded and randomly sequenced to give kids higher quality and more variety while they are in the saddle. Parents also have control of quiet "trot time" with the use of an on-ofF switch. A child's first rocking horse should combine afriendly, realistic horse with an improved sale and structurally sound design to assure parents peace of mind while their little ones are at play. That's whyTodays Kidshas constructed the Midnight Mustang with an exclusive Rubber Bounce • hinge system, a design breakthrough that gives young riders safer rocking horse action without springs. A raised molded saddle, safehold handle grips and specially designed stirrups assure toddlers of comfortable and secure galloping, whether indoors or out. A molded step-up base allows children to mount and dismount easily, while the toy's adjustable height accommodates various child sizes. A foot-to-floor ride-on horse to start younger cowgirls and cowboys who are between the ages of 9 months to 3 years, the Giddy-up Pony • is another excitingsensory play experience. This lovable little pony is made of durable plastic, is ibrightly colored, has true-to-life galloping motion and lively clippety-clop sound. Children can flip the pony's molded bridle forward, creating a lead rein for easy-pulling play. The fun giddy-up motion and hoofbeat sound are activated when the pony is pushed, pulled or ridden. Both the Midnight Mustang and Giddy-Up Pony come with Today's Kids' Kid Tough Guarantee. Here's hoping that the joyful spirit of the season blooms in your hearts all year long! • ^^11 Rower Shopp* if/lliW 3730 Qrawi ViNay Pkwy'.LW*^ Qw
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• • w Page C14 HBC PubUcations Holiday Section 1994 HBC Publications Page CIS Holiday Section 1994 Gifts for Children Choose toys that both educate and entertain M ^ Vi ^HL frt Ini (NAPS)—Children learn best through play, and caring parents select toys that can educate children as well as entertain them. Today there are a number of toys that can do both. Following are some recommendations from Child's Play Communications, specialists in children's products. Math is made as easy as 1,2,3 with the Headsmart Count's Talking Numberland from Tectron. Developed with the producers of Sesame Street and based on the show's curriculum, this interactive electronic toy features afavorite characterfrom the show, the Count von Count. With his Transylvanian accent and encouraging comments, the Count delights youngsters ages three to seven as they learn to do simple addition and subtraction. This quality toy is designed specifically to teach age-appropriate skills in a way that makes learning fun. Puzzle play helps children learn eye-hand coordination and problem solving, among other important early-childhood skills. Gait toys' Nursery Rhymes Giant Floor Puzzle is a winner of the prestigious Parent's Choice award. The beautifully designed 2' X 3' puzzle depicts favorite nursery rhymes. Its 30 interlocking pieces include eight templates shaped like the rhymes' main characters, such as Humpty Dumpty and Jack and Jill. Very youngchildren will easily identify where these pieces fit into the puzzle and older children will enjoy tracing them and coloring in the results. For ages three to six. •Blocks are wonderful for building toddlers' visual and motor skills. The only drawback? Block play typically takes place all over the floor, and parents have to clean up afterward. The Construc-table from Brik Toy is a table with a special top that serves as a contained play space for blocks, and also has a grid to hold the blocks securely for building. Wee Waffle which also comes with two inserts—one to fit standard building blocks such as Legos and another for preschool blocks such as Duplos. Both insertsflipovertoprovide a smooth surface for coloring, drawing or writing once blockbuildingtime isover—so one small table serves multiple purposes for ages two and up. Drawing is a favorite way for younpters to express themselves. Irwin Toy's Creative Imagineers Watercolor Pencil Drawing Art Kits provide a new and easy way to create water colors: by drawing on a grid. This allows youngsters ages eight and up to produce realistic, accurate images. The kits include drawing materials and child-friendly instructions for creating dinosaurs, horses or sports action figures. Now parents can preview video games before buying them By Dan Fsffannan (NU) Children's 'edutainment' It may have a nice ring to it, but this video game niche has had a tough time competing with rock 'em, sock 'em, actiontype titles. Parents would be only too happy if the hours their children spent in front of the video screen were actually used for more edutainment than violent entertainment. Action games that promote interactive learning would be a welcome new alternative to the nonstop violence of many current hits. Well, now there is an alternative. Recognizingthat parents still control the purse strings of their younger children, Hi Tech Entertainment recently introduced a whole new line of children's video games backed up by a novel way to ensure that parents won't be disappointed with their purchase. The assurance comes from a new program called "Rent It, Try It, Buy It" that Hi Tech is now rolling out to video stores across the countiy. Consumers can rent some of Hi Tech's most popular new titles, take them home and watch them. If they decide to purchase any of the titles, theyll receive a $5 rebate from Hi Tech. The titles include: •"Barbie Vacation Adventure." •'T^ickey's Playtown Adven ture." •"Mickey's Ultimate Chal lenge." •Tom vs. Jerry: The Chase Is On." •"Beethoven." •"Baby's Day Out." •"A Dinosaur's Tale." •"Bobby's World." No "R" ratings here. Each and every game is chock full of entertaining fun and educational learning adventures. To help the program reach as many parents as possible, Hi Tech is encouraging video stores to create special in-store areas for children's video games. Children's gifts made easy (NAPS)—This holiday season, you can give your youngsters gifts that will add some spring to their steps: Fun footwear accessories such as slippers, rainboots and shoe bags can be unique and affordable gifts likely to get a warm welcome. To keep feet warm on cold mornings, there are slippers in a wide range of styles, including adorable animals and other popular characters. Many topquality slippers retail for only $ 10 to $12. Make sure they feature skid-resistant bottoms for safety. Bright rubber rainboots can please plenty of little puddlejumpers. While water-resistant boots are good for snowy winter days, waterproof boots will keep The folks at Sam^s Town wish you a beautiful Holiday Season and a New Year of Peace and Happiness. m^ feet dry during April's showers, Rainboots should be lightweight; waterproof and comfortable. They look great with bright-colored slickers and the average retail price is about $15. Looking for a place where children can keep their favorite party or play shoes? Colorful shoe bags to hang on a closet door come in a variety of shapes and sizes. They can be a fun addition to a child's room and a good way to teach children about putting things in the proper place. Whether slippers, boots or bags, there are plenty to choose from this season. Many parents find the best place to look for such items is in a shoe store such as Stride Rite that carries a full range ofchildren's footwear. There, they say, you find a great selection and unbeatable service. ., .<. ; Prehistoric reptjj^s are more popular than ever, and Stride Rite offers a full line of items featuring Dino Dave and his pal Dina, a duo of friendly, bright-green dinosaurs. Finding such fine gifts for youngsters' feet at local stores can help keep gift shopping from bringing you to your knees. We're happy lo take this time to express our very best wishes for a mcny Christmas, along with our sincere thanks. Glen & Shirley Olson & Staff Boulder Bowl Toys should spark children's creativity Your children are clamoring for the latest "hot" toys advertised on the Saturday morning cartoon shows. And when you wander through a toy department, you're overwhelmed by the selection. With 150,000 toys on the market, how dp you know what to buy? What will challenge your children and hold their attention long after the holidays are over? "Toys should encourage the creative side of children, because play is such an important part of a child's development," says Peter Reynolds, president of BRIO Corporation, a toy company based in Milwaukee, Wis. Educating the public about the importance of play and quality toys is a key mission of the American Specialty Toy Retailers Association (ASTRA), a national trade association for which Reynolds is a director. "A good toy is a tool to unleash the child's creativity," says Jeff Franklin, ASTRA president and owner of Be Beep—AToy Shop, in Annapolis, Md. The child should supply the action and sounds— the bells and whistles. The toy should enable the child to create his own play activity, rather than being passively entertained or mimicking something he's seen on television." •Safety. Safe toys have no sharp edges and do not propel objects. Parts are securely fastened, and there are no harmful chemicalsorflammablematerials. Remember, too, to supervise the play area. A "safe toy" may be used in an unsafe way or pose a hazard for a child too young to play with it, such as a toddler playing writh small pieces. •Multiple uses. An openended toy, such as blocks or a building set, encourages children to create their own play, and offers them an opportunity to play with the toy in different ways as they grow. There's no right or wrong way. •Durability. The toy should be well-made of qualitymaterials. If a toy breaks, it may have a negative impact on a child because it suggests that he is destructive. He's also disappointed because he has lost a favorite plaything. •Age appropriateness. Choose toys appropriate for the child's age. Most children are given toys that are too old for them. Too often, we push them to that one higher level, which can be friistrating and undermine their self-esteem. •The child's interests. Look at what your child likes. Let him lead you. If he's always playing 'Birdie Christmas tree' Here are some ideas to tiy on your own Birdie Tree: 1. Small, powdered-sugar coated doughnuts—attach to tree branches with peanut butter. 2. Strings of popcorn. 3. Orange halves filled with peanuts, raisins, Grape Nuts, sunflower seeds. 4. Small foil cups covered with ribbon and filled with peanuts, raisins, Grape Nuts, sunflower seeds. OPEN-ENDED TOYS — Toys such as BIO's Wooden Railway encourage children's creativity and exercise their imaginations. inside, you may want to buy him a ball to encourage him to go outside, to give him a different opportunity. But start on a small scale, rather than investing a lot in an activity he may not Uke. •Social interaction. A good toy can includothers. Children sometimes like to play with other children and with adults. Some of their toys should encourage parent-child interaction. •Empowerment. Children leam by doing. They discover they can affect their environment. Children are empowered through the accomplishments and successes of play. •Moderation. Children often have too many toys, and that can be both overwhelming and overstimulating. Choose a few open-ended toys that offer many different play experiences, rather than buying a lot of toys. Also, rotate the toys available for play, and store others for future use. A number of BRIO toys, includinghe BRIO Wooden Railway, have won international awards for fim, quality, safety and durabihty. The magic of a child's rocking horse A rocking horse is a most treasured childhood toy. Everyone remembers their first rocking horse and the magic of riding it tirelessly for hours on end. Although its reputation of being the quintessential play toy cannot be disputed, the rocking horse plays a larger role in a toddler's development than most parents may realize. What is it that is so magical about a child's first rocking horse? Perhaps it's the imagery of cowboys on horseback that makes a firm impression early on and truly fascinates children. Achild's first rocking horse provides a big, fun fantasy toy for the active toddler who imagines he can be riding a real horse. The rocking horse also helps children strength their little bodies, stimulate their little minds and develop a love for active play —so necessary to a child's growth and development. One toy manufacturer. Today's Kids,has developed two ride-on toys perfect for each state in a toddler's development. A handsome rocking horse, Midrught Mustang • designed for ages 1 1/2 to 5 years, has four motion-activated realistic-ride horse sounds. They are digitally recorded and randomly sequenced to give kids higher quality and more variety while they are in the saddle. Parents also have control of quiet "trot time" with the use of an on-ofF switch. A child's first rocking horse should combine afriendly, realistic horse with an improved sale and structurally sound design to assure parents peace of mind while their little ones are at play. That's whyTodays Kidshas constructed the Midnight Mustang with an exclusive Rubber Bounce • hinge system, a design breakthrough that gives young riders safer rocking horse action without springs. A raised molded saddle, safehold handle grips and specially designed stirrups assure toddlers of comfortable and secure galloping, whether indoors or out. A molded step-up base allows children to mount and dismount easily, while the toy's adjustable height accommodates various child sizes. A foot-to-floor ride-on horse to start younger cowgirls and cowboys who are between the ages of 9 months to 3 years, the Giddy-up Pony • is another excitingsensory play experience. This lovable little pony is made of durable plastic, is ibrightly colored, has true-to-life galloping motion and lively clippety-clop sound. Children can flip the pony's molded bridle forward, creating a lead rein for easy-pulling play. The fun giddy-up motion and hoofbeat sound are activated when the pony is pushed, pulled or ridden. Both the Midnight Mustang and Giddy-Up Pony come with Today's Kids' Kid Tough Guarantee. Here's hoping that the joyful spirit of the season blooms in your hearts all year long! • ^^11 Rower Shopp* if/lliW 3730 Qrawi ViNay Pkwy'.LW*^ Qw
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Page C16 HBC PubUcations Holiday Section 1994 Holiday Section 1994 HBC Publications Page C17 Toys mix learning witli fun DOG DAYS — Snowball, Eight Angel EsposKo shows off her aunt's poodles. Ball and Lady. Most kids think playing with an "educational" toy offers about the same amount of fun as a visit to the dentist. And, considering how dry and boring many of these products are who can blame them? Well, here's somethingdifferent— toys that are so much fun that kids will have no idea they're learning anything. Toymakers are being extra clever this holiday season, providing a host of products ihat subtly offer great leamingbenefits to kids, while putting the primary emphasis on fun. The result: products both parent and child will love. Let's start with Golden Books Arts & Crafls, where the days of weaving walletsfrom plastic strips and decorating egg crates are over. Today's generation of Arts & Crafls products are designed to develop imagination and enhance a young person's creativity. New items for 1994 include: •Shrinky Dinks—Here's a product you probably remember from your childhood. Color in the plastic figure, then bake and watch as it shrinks to one-third its original size and three times its original thickness—in minutes! Kids can turn the finished pieces intobarrettes, key chains, jewelry and more. For ages 6 and up. •Barbie for Girls Designs by Me— Now the world of high fashion has come to girls' bedrooms across America. Kidscreate their very own unique no-sew fashions for Barbie with these easy-to-do-kits. Ages: 3 to 7. •Jim Henson's Muppets Woricshop—These ingenuous kits Crayons to Russian pastels DICK BUCK Art Materials DO-IT-YOURSELF VIDEOS LARGE SELECTION $ 1.00 Per day Caiigraphy, Stained Glass, Wood Carving, Fine Arts & More combine a host of great craft activities with America's favorite characters. Ages: 3 to 7. Electronic Books have become one of the hottest categories in toydom, and no wonder. These examples of technological wizardry give kids a thrill, while instilling a love of words and reading. These new toys for 1994, from industry leader Golden Books, all have the added benefit of encouraging parent/chiTd interaction: •Sounds By Me Books—It'slike giving a child their own multimillion-dollar recording studio —for $ 19.95. Now kids can become part of the story by recording their very own sounds and playingthem back as the book is read. Sounds stay programmed until new sound is recorded. Ages: 5 and up. •Magic Comer Books—Now even very young children can get in on the electronic book f\an with Magic Comer Books. The stories are simple, the pages are sturdy and the four random sounds are available at the touch of a single button. Books include characters from Sesame Street and The Lion King. Ages: 2 and up. Educational benefits shouldn't be forgotten when selecting stocking stuffer items. Here are some products that are sure to do a child a great deal more good than a box of candy or a new pair of socks. These products fi-om Golden Books Color/Activity, teach children school readiness skills and promote hand-eye coordination, problem-solving skills and imagination —and they do it at a great price: •Preschool Sticker Books — Featuring 16 pages jam-packed with colorful pressure-sensitive stickers. Preschool Sticker Books offer plenty of play value at a great low price. 'Titles include: Be Safe with Barney and Sesame Street. Ages: 2 to 4. •Preschool Sticker Story Books— Kids step right on to Old McDonald's Farm, or inside the House that Jack Built, thanks to Preschool Sticker Story books. Sports toys nurture skills of young athletes Drafting & Graphic Supplies Tables, Equipment 125 Ultima Table $148 Redi & Custom-Made Frames Matting Boards, Glass YARKA PASTELS $18.95 30 Colors A PERFECT SET for The Beginner PAASCHE MODEL VL AIRBRUSH SET $64.99 D500 AIR COMPRESSOR $99 Selected Paint 50% Off CLASSES LO STOCKING STUFFERS • Carton Creation Kit • Chalk Laces • Beads • Glitter • Sponges • Sand PaintingDip & Print • Oragami Paper Sculpture KITS FOR KIDS • Water Colors • Pencils • Crayons • Pencil Sharpener • Plastic Carrying Case & More $9,95 50% OFF Yarn Playing is crucial to the development of a child's athleticism and sportsmanship. As they grow, youngsters derive many benefits —and pleasures—from realistic play with a variety of sports toys. The spirit of competition and pursuit of excellence, as demonstrated by many famous athletes, are learned at a very young age. This holiday, give your youngsters toys that will let them score points early on and learn all the rules of the game. The portable two-sport Play 'n' Fold • Soccer & Hockey set, by Today's Kids, is endorsed by the American Youth Soccer Organization as an early skills builder. Designed for ages 1 1/2 to 5 years, the game lets kids master dribbling, blocking, ball control,passingand shootingwith a realistic soccer ball. Two hockey sticks and puckball provide youngsters with another two-player action game — the quality exciting Summer Olympic sport of field hockey. A player advances the ball by dribbling, passing, shooting and trapping, and like soccer, the ob-' ject is getting the ball into the opposing team's goal. The sturdy goal has built-in storage space for accessories and an easy-to-read scorekeeper on both sides. The goal can also be weighted with sand for highspirited action. A weatherresistant nylon net is included. This interactive two-in-one play toy also introduces children to positive traits that enhance their • developmental growth, such as> generosity, teamwork, courtesy' and competitiveness. Abasic skills bookletis included with each toy. All toys are made of, durable, molded plastic for plenty of action, play, and are backed by Today's Kids' Kid Tough Guarantee. ARTS & CRAFTS KITS & SUPPLIES GIFT CERTIFICATES EARN BUCK BUCKS USE BUCK BUCKS ON ITEMS Marked Down 50% Already Spend Earn Blick Bucks** $50 $10 $25 $5 $75 $15 $100 $20 *(Thru Dec. 31) DICK BUCK Art Material 1951 Ramrod Ave. Green Valley Area 1/2 Mile South of Russell Rd. East of Mountain Vista 451 -7662 Choose toys that will light up little faces this holiday season They grow up so fast!" We've all made that statement about our children at one time or another. But just iaecause the toddler or preschooler in your life seems advanced doesn't mean that toys designed for older children are appropriate. For instance, some toys that are age-graded for older children may contain small parts that a younger child could choke on. In addition, productsmeantfor older children may be frustrating to younger children who are not developmentally ready for the toys. Most traditional race car sets, for example, are meantfor schoolage children. However, the Radio Control Raceway by Fisher-Price is a new toy which has been designed specifically with preschoolers in mind. Unlike typical race car sets, the Radio Control Raceway has easy-to-use controls with two speeds, allowing the set to grow with a child's abilities. Inaddition, there are grooves in the track so the cars stay on the track more easily. Dr. Katherine Karlsrud, clinical instructor of pediatrics at Cornell University Medical Center and assistant attending pediatrician at The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, advises parents to pay attention to age-labeling when shoppingfor toys. "Age-labeling should be a primary factor in selecting toys for children. Along with safety considerations, you want to avoid frustrating your child with a toy that's too hard for him to use. The Radio Control Raceway works well for both my children because my 4-year-oldhasfun with the slower speed, while my 8-year-old enjoys the faster pace." Fisher-Price's Radio Control Raceway is age-graded for children 3 and up. Clubhouse for toddlers has all the amenities A clubhouse makes a fun addition to a child's toy collection. It's a crawlspace that actually gives children an insider's view of all the action. Toddlers all over the neighborhood can romp and crawl inside and out for hours of fun. One toy maker who knows the importance of toys to little ones' growth and development is Today's Kids. That's why it developed a cool Play 'n' Fold • Clubhouse with an open floor plan that gives toddlers, ages 9 months to 3-1/2 years, lots of play space. Best of all, it's designed for easy portability by parentsSpecial hinges allow it to fold flat for take-along play, indoors or out. Clubhouse activities include a giant crawl-through, look-out window with working shutters, easy-exit slide, clicking light switch, show-my-photo picture frame and portable echo phone. The innovative front door has a turn key, drop-through slot, ringing-sovuid doorbell and secret note holder. The house is decorated with molded design extras like friendly flowers, arched window, phone cord and geometric shapes. This durable plastic clubhouse comes with Today's Kids' Kid Tough Guarantee. New toy possibilities for girls (NU)—Like many other things in modem life, society's view of what kinds of toys are good for boys or girls is changing. Especially for girls, opportunities for play are opening up that were once assumed to be for boys only. Even Lego, the world-renowned children's construction toy company, has created a new line of adventure playsets for girls called Belville. The sets' specially designed shapes are meant to help girls gain many needed skills, including eye-hand coordination, small muscle exercise and communication. Belville playsets have articulated family figures, big pieces for easy building and distinctive play systems—Playhouse, Playland, Love N'Lullabies and Pony Stables. According to Stevanne Auerbach, Ph.D., the child development specialist known as "Dr. Toy" and author of The Toy Chest, the new playsets are "strategic to building imagination and providing developmental skills. This is an excellent new product and is exactly what parents and girls have been asking for." Boys have always been active, avidconstruction-toy builders. Dr. Auerbach says. They have naturally gravitated to building sets and enjoyed the fun of creating their own models. Conversely, most girls perceived construction toys as their brothers' toys. But construction play. Dr. Auerbach says, is essential for girls, too. She says the ways in which girls can benefit from playing with the new Belville playsets include: • Gaining in their ability to observe and think as they build. These abilities apply to math, science and reading. • Gaining practical, important daily living skills. • Practicingusing creative and Playing up the holidays language abilities as they make up dialogue to fit the different play experiences. • Gaining skills in observation. A girl may add pieces to the structure or do something completely unexpected. • Buildinggreater self-esteem, confidence and self-control through construction play adventures. • Gaining knowledge and mastery plus experiencing the joy of discovery. Dr. Auerbach points out that the benefits of construction play adventure are important for the world of school, home and work. Theholiday season is filled with excitement, especially for children. The following tips provided by Gymboree can help ensure a special hoHday time for the whole family. •Children eiyoy famibarity and continuity in most things, including hoUday traditions. Look back on your own holiday memories as a child. Perhaps you would like to incorporate some of these memorable events into the traditions of your new family. Maybe you would like to create a new family tradition, such as a special family gathering around the fireplace or a holiday party for family and close friends. •Holiday time can be both exciting and stressful. Amidst the many activities, make a special point of planning one-on-one time with your child, where you can spend quality time together. This will help reduce the stress your child may be feeling, and allow you a needed change of pace as well. Don't set unrealistic expectations on yourself Prioritize what is most important to make the celebration significant. •Simple activities can be as meaningful as big celebrations. Your child may not remember the elaborate meal orhand-madegifts, but will cherish the memory of hearing special holiday stories and songs. Take walks together to observe the change in reasons, and look for signs of plant and animal life found only in winter. Your warmth and affection will create the real magic of the season for your child. •Be safety conscious. Avoid using decorations that look like candy or food, and ensure that large ornamentation is well-anchored. Carefully examine all toys your child receives. Look for small parts that can be removed and swallowed. Stuffed animals should be made of non-toxic materials only. •Anticipation can be overwhelming for toddlers. With their sense of time not yet developed, waiting can seem endless. It is best to wait until the event is near before discussing it. Keep schedules as normal as possible. Mensa panel picks best new games (NU)—^A panel of seven game enthusiasts from Mensa, the international high-IQ society, i-ecently picked this year's five bestnew word and strategygames. The "Mensa Mind Games" competition is in its fifth year. Games were critiqued for their originality, game play, play value, aesthetics and clarity of instructions. This year's "Mensa Select" winners were: "^agic: The Gathering" by Wizards of the Coast; "Char" by Bechter Productions, Inc.; "Chung Toi" by House-ofChung Enterprises; "Downfall" by Western Publishing Co.; and "Pyraos" by Great American Trading Co. "Great mind games aren't necessarily complex, and many of the games we liked can be played by children and adults alike," said Steve Weinreich, chairman of the Mensa panel and also an inventor and game expert. Mensa is a nonprofit organization made up of individuals who have scored in the top 2% of the population on a standardized intelligence test American Mensa, Ltd., based in New York, has more than 55,000 members in 142 chapters across the United States. "Mensa Select" games can be purchased in stores nationwide or through Game Show, (212)633-6328, the official distributor of the winning games. For a free brochure about Mensa, call (800)66MENSA, Dept. 6494. l/Haq As the holiday nears* we wish you the most treasured gift of all... peace and love. For your loyalty and friendship, our sincere thanks. B & J BODY SHOP Jake, Charles & Roger 1512 Nevada Hwy. Boulder City 293-1140 Smile... And Say Noel! Catch the spirit of Christmas! Thank You and Merry Christmas to All! DESERT INDIAN PHOTO 293-6778 ^ B 1-HOUR PHOTot OPEN MON-FRI 9-5P.M. DROP BOX AVAILABLE WE CAN DEVELOP AND PRINT YOUR FILM IN JUST ONE HOUR! 501 Nevada Hwy. #2 Boulder City As we celebrate the spirit of friendship and good will throughout the world, we'd like to extend our special greetings to those of you whose friendship and patronage we hold so dear May your holiday season be truly blessed.

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Page C16 HBC PubUcations Holiday Section 1994 Holiday Section 1994 HBC Publications Page C17 Toys mix learning witli fun DOG DAYS — Snowball, Eight Angel EsposKo shows off her aunt's poodles. Ball and Lady. Most kids think playing with an "educational" toy offers about the same amount of fun as a visit to the dentist. And, considering how dry and boring many of these products are who can blame them? Well, here's somethingdifferent— toys that are so much fun that kids will have no idea they're learning anything. Toymakers are being extra clever this holiday season, providing a host of products ihat subtly offer great leamingbenefits to kids, while putting the primary emphasis on fun. The result: products both parent and child will love. Let's start with Golden Books Arts & Crafls, where the days of weaving walletsfrom plastic strips and decorating egg crates are over. Today's generation of Arts & Crafls products are designed to develop imagination and enhance a young person's creativity. New items for 1994 include: •Shrinky Dinks—Here's a product you probably remember from your childhood. Color in the plastic figure, then bake and watch as it shrinks to one-third its original size and three times its original thickness—in minutes! Kids can turn the finished pieces intobarrettes, key chains, jewelry and more. For ages 6 and up. •Barbie for Girls Designs by Me— Now the world of high fashion has come to girls' bedrooms across America. Kidscreate their very own unique no-sew fashions for Barbie with these easy-to-do-kits. Ages: 3 to 7. •Jim Henson's Muppets Woricshop—These ingenuous kits Crayons to Russian pastels DICK BUCK Art Materials DO-IT-YOURSELF VIDEOS LARGE SELECTION $ 1.00 Per day Caiigraphy, Stained Glass, Wood Carving, Fine Arts & More combine a host of great craft activities with America's favorite characters. Ages: 3 to 7. Electronic Books have become one of the hottest categories in toydom, and no wonder. These examples of technological wizardry give kids a thrill, while instilling a love of words and reading. These new toys for 1994, from industry leader Golden Books, all have the added benefit of encouraging parent/chiTd interaction: •Sounds By Me Books—It'slike giving a child their own multimillion-dollar recording studio —for $ 19.95. Now kids can become part of the story by recording their very own sounds and playingthem back as the book is read. Sounds stay programmed until new sound is recorded. Ages: 5 and up. •Magic Comer Books—Now even very young children can get in on the electronic book f\an with Magic Comer Books. The stories are simple, the pages are sturdy and the four random sounds are available at the touch of a single button. Books include characters from Sesame Street and The Lion King. Ages: 2 and up. Educational benefits shouldn't be forgotten when selecting stocking stuffer items. Here are some products that are sure to do a child a great deal more good than a box of candy or a new pair of socks. These products fi-om Golden Books Color/Activity, teach children school readiness skills and promote hand-eye coordination, problem-solving skills and imagination —and they do it at a great price: •Preschool Sticker Books — Featuring 16 pages jam-packed with colorful pressure-sensitive stickers. Preschool Sticker Books offer plenty of play value at a great low price. 'Titles include: Be Safe with Barney and Sesame Street. Ages: 2 to 4. •Preschool Sticker Story Books— Kids step right on to Old McDonald's Farm, or inside the House that Jack Built, thanks to Preschool Sticker Story books. Sports toys nurture skills of young athletes Drafting & Graphic Supplies Tables, Equipment 125 Ultima Table $148 Redi & Custom-Made Frames Matting Boards, Glass YARKA PASTELS $18.95 30 Colors A PERFECT SET for The Beginner PAASCHE MODEL VL AIRBRUSH SET $64.99 D500 AIR COMPRESSOR $99 Selected Paint 50% Off CLASSES LO STOCKING STUFFERS • Carton Creation Kit • Chalk Laces • Beads • Glitter • Sponges • Sand PaintingDip & Print • Oragami Paper Sculpture KITS FOR KIDS • Water Colors • Pencils • Crayons • Pencil Sharpener • Plastic Carrying Case & More $9,95 50% OFF Yarn Playing is crucial to the development of a child's athleticism and sportsmanship. As they grow, youngsters derive many benefits —and pleasures—from realistic play with a variety of sports toys. The spirit of competition and pursuit of excellence, as demonstrated by many famous athletes, are learned at a very young age. This holiday, give your youngsters toys that will let them score points early on and learn all the rules of the game. The portable two-sport Play 'n' Fold • Soccer & Hockey set, by Today's Kids, is endorsed by the American Youth Soccer Organization as an early skills builder. Designed for ages 1 1/2 to 5 years, the game lets kids master dribbling, blocking, ball control,passingand shootingwith a realistic soccer ball. Two hockey sticks and puckball provide youngsters with another two-player action game — the quality exciting Summer Olympic sport of field hockey. A player advances the ball by dribbling, passing, shooting and trapping, and like soccer, the ob-' ject is getting the ball into the opposing team's goal. The sturdy goal has built-in storage space for accessories and an easy-to-read scorekeeper on both sides. The goal can also be weighted with sand for highspirited action. A weatherresistant nylon net is included. This interactive two-in-one play toy also introduces children to positive traits that enhance their • developmental growth, such as> generosity, teamwork, courtesy' and competitiveness. Abasic skills bookletis included with each toy. All toys are made of, durable, molded plastic for plenty of action, play, and are backed by Today's Kids' Kid Tough Guarantee. ARTS & CRAFTS KITS & SUPPLIES GIFT CERTIFICATES EARN BUCK BUCKS USE BUCK BUCKS ON ITEMS Marked Down 50% Already Spend Earn Blick Bucks** $50 $10 $25 $5 $75 $15 $100 $20 *(Thru Dec. 31) DICK BUCK Art Material 1951 Ramrod Ave. Green Valley Area 1/2 Mile South of Russell Rd. East of Mountain Vista 451 -7662 Choose toys that will light up little faces this holiday season They grow up so fast!" We've all made that statement about our children at one time or another. But just iaecause the toddler or preschooler in your life seems advanced doesn't mean that toys designed for older children are appropriate. For instance, some toys that are age-graded for older children may contain small parts that a younger child could choke on. In addition, productsmeantfor older children may be frustrating to younger children who are not developmentally ready for the toys. Most traditional race car sets, for example, are meantfor schoolage children. However, the Radio Control Raceway by Fisher-Price is a new toy which has been designed specifically with preschoolers in mind. Unlike typical race car sets, the Radio Control Raceway has easy-to-use controls with two speeds, allowing the set to grow with a child's abilities. Inaddition, there are grooves in the track so the cars stay on the track more easily. Dr. Katherine Karlsrud, clinical instructor of pediatrics at Cornell University Medical Center and assistant attending pediatrician at The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, advises parents to pay attention to age-labeling when shoppingfor toys. "Age-labeling should be a primary factor in selecting toys for children. Along with safety considerations, you want to avoid frustrating your child with a toy that's too hard for him to use. The Radio Control Raceway works well for both my children because my 4-year-oldhasfun with the slower speed, while my 8-year-old enjoys the faster pace." Fisher-Price's Radio Control Raceway is age-graded for children 3 and up. Clubhouse for toddlers has all the amenities A clubhouse makes a fun addition to a child's toy collection. It's a crawlspace that actually gives children an insider's view of all the action. Toddlers all over the neighborhood can romp and crawl inside and out for hours of fun. One toy maker who knows the importance of toys to little ones' growth and development is Today's Kids. That's why it developed a cool Play 'n' Fold • Clubhouse with an open floor plan that gives toddlers, ages 9 months to 3-1/2 years, lots of play space. Best of all, it's designed for easy portability by parentsSpecial hinges allow it to fold flat for take-along play, indoors or out. Clubhouse activities include a giant crawl-through, look-out window with working shutters, easy-exit slide, clicking light switch, show-my-photo picture frame and portable echo phone. The innovative front door has a turn key, drop-through slot, ringing-sovuid doorbell and secret note holder. The house is decorated with molded design extras like friendly flowers, arched window, phone cord and geometric shapes. This durable plastic clubhouse comes with Today's Kids' Kid Tough Guarantee. New toy possibilities for girls (NU)—Like many other things in modem life, society's view of what kinds of toys are good for boys or girls is changing. Especially for girls, opportunities for play are opening up that were once assumed to be for boys only. Even Lego, the world-renowned children's construction toy company, has created a new line of adventure playsets for girls called Belville. The sets' specially designed shapes are meant to help girls gain many needed skills, including eye-hand coordination, small muscle exercise and communication. Belville playsets have articulated family figures, big pieces for easy building and distinctive play systems—Playhouse, Playland, Love N'Lullabies and Pony Stables. According to Stevanne Auerbach, Ph.D., the child development specialist known as "Dr. Toy" and author of The Toy Chest, the new playsets are "strategic to building imagination and providing developmental skills. This is an excellent new product and is exactly what parents and girls have been asking for." Boys have always been active, avidconstruction-toy builders. Dr. Auerbach says. They have naturally gravitated to building sets and enjoyed the fun of creating their own models. Conversely, most girls perceived construction toys as their brothers' toys. But construction play. Dr. Auerbach says, is essential for girls, too. She says the ways in which girls can benefit from playing with the new Belville playsets include: • Gaining in their ability to observe and think as they build. These abilities apply to math, science and reading. • Gaining practical, important daily living skills. • Practicingusing creative and Playing up the holidays language abilities as they make up dialogue to fit the different play experiences. • Gaining skills in observation. A girl may add pieces to the structure or do something completely unexpected. • Buildinggreater self-esteem, confidence and self-control through construction play adventures. • Gaining knowledge and mastery plus experiencing the joy of discovery. Dr. Auerbach points out that the benefits of construction play adventure are important for the world of school, home and work. Theholiday season is filled with excitement, especially for children. The following tips provided by Gymboree can help ensure a special hoHday time for the whole family. •Children eiyoy famibarity and continuity in most things, including hoUday traditions. Look back on your own holiday memories as a child. Perhaps you would like to incorporate some of these memorable events into the traditions of your new family. Maybe you would like to create a new family tradition, such as a special family gathering around the fireplace or a holiday party for family and close friends. •Holiday time can be both exciting and stressful. Amidst the many activities, make a special point of planning one-on-one time with your child, where you can spend quality time together. This will help reduce the stress your child may be feeling, and allow you a needed change of pace as well. Don't set unrealistic expectations on yourself Prioritize what is most important to make the celebration significant. •Simple activities can be as meaningful as big celebrations. Your child may not remember the elaborate meal orhand-madegifts, but will cherish the memory of hearing special holiday stories and songs. Take walks together to observe the change in reasons, and look for signs of plant and animal life found only in winter. Your warmth and affection will create the real magic of the season for your child. •Be safety conscious. Avoid using decorations that look like candy or food, and ensure that large ornamentation is well-anchored. Carefully examine all toys your child receives. Look for small parts that can be removed and swallowed. Stuffed animals should be made of non-toxic materials only. •Anticipation can be overwhelming for toddlers. With their sense of time not yet developed, waiting can seem endless. It is best to wait until the event is near before discussing it. Keep schedules as normal as possible. Mensa panel picks best new games (NU)—^A panel of seven game enthusiasts from Mensa, the international high-IQ society, i-ecently picked this year's five bestnew word and strategygames. The "Mensa Mind Games" competition is in its fifth year. Games were critiqued for their originality, game play, play value, aesthetics and clarity of instructions. This year's "Mensa Select" winners were: "^agic: The Gathering" by Wizards of the Coast; "Char" by Bechter Productions, Inc.; "Chung Toi" by House-ofChung Enterprises; "Downfall" by Western Publishing Co.; and "Pyraos" by Great American Trading Co. "Great mind games aren't necessarily complex, and many of the games we liked can be played by children and adults alike," said Steve Weinreich, chairman of the Mensa panel and also an inventor and game expert. Mensa is a nonprofit organization made up of individuals who have scored in the top 2% of the population on a standardized intelligence test American Mensa, Ltd., based in New York, has more than 55,000 members in 142 chapters across the United States. "Mensa Select" games can be purchased in stores nationwide or through Game Show, (212)633-6328, the official distributor of the winning games. For a free brochure about Mensa, call (800)66MENSA, Dept. 6494. l/Haq As the holiday nears* we wish you the most treasured gift of all... peace and love. For your loyalty and friendship, our sincere thanks. B & J BODY SHOP Jake, Charles & Roger 1512 Nevada Hwy. Boulder City 293-1140 Smile... And Say Noel! Catch the spirit of Christmas! Thank You and Merry Christmas to All! DESERT INDIAN PHOTO 293-6778 ^ B 1-HOUR PHOTot OPEN MON-FRI 9-5P.M. DROP BOX AVAILABLE WE CAN DEVELOP AND PRINT YOUR FILM IN JUST ONE HOUR! 501 Nevada Hwy. #2 Boulder City As we celebrate the spirit of friendship and good will throughout the world, we'd like to extend our special greetings to those of you whose friendship and patronage we hold so dear May your holiday season be truly blessed.

PAGE 56

Page C18 HBC Publications Holiday Section 1994 HoUday Section 1994 HBC Publications Page CI9 ^m ^oltiMl^ Decorations Christmas tree is bededced witli customs, history We Join In Prayer For Worldwide Peace and Understanding From the corners of our town to the four corners ofthe Earth, may love and peace triumph. BOULDER CITY TRAVEL 806 Buchanan Blvd. Boulder City (Von's Shopping Center) 293-3807 TO OUR "BEST" MANYppigjijjs We're pulling for you to have a simply splendid season. Happy Holidays! Fred & Ellie Knapp Realty Executives 309 W. Lake Mead Driy.e • 565-4500 Of all Christmas customs, perhaps the most universally treasured is the Christmas tree. Brightly decorated with shimmering lights and glittering ornaments, the tree is as likely to reflect the traditions (if each individual family, as it is those of the world at large. From the exciting moment when the tree is erected, usually some day s in advance of Christmas Eve, it commands a position of central importance during all holiday festivities. So much so,thatitisdifiicultto believe that, a scant 200 years ago, the custom of tri mming a tree at Christmastide was not wridely observed outside its native Germany. One legend credits Martin Luther, the 16th-century theologian, with having set up the very first Chri stmas tree. According to this legend, Luther conceived of a tree alight with countless candles as a way of representing to his children the glory of the starlit Heaven. However, historical sources indicate that the first Christmas tree can be traced to the early 17th century, when fir trees— decorated with colored paper, gold foil, apples, toys and candies— were reported in the German city of Stasburg. What are the antique origins of the Christmas tree? Historians point to a multitude of sources, among them the Roman custom of decking residences with evergreens during the festival of the Kalends, which occurred in the early part of January. Parallels between the Roman observation of Kalends and the festivities traditional at Christmas are many and include those of decorating thehome with lights, extending lavish hospitality to finends and family, as well as extravagant gifl-giving. Many early Christian beliefs stand behind the tradition of trimming a tree at Christmas. For instance, it was customary for people to bring flowering trees, such as hawthorn or cherry, indoors during the autumn, so that they might bloom and bring forth firuit on Christmas Eve. This tradition may derive from the belief that St. Joseph of Arimathea, settling at Glastonbury in western England, planted his staff in the earth. whereupon it became a thorn tree and sprouted leaves. Furthermore, it miraculously blossomed. December 24th, according to the old Church calendar, was the Feast of Adam and Eve, on which day it was traditional to hang afir tree with red apples. This Paradise Tree, as it was called, is certainly aforerunnerof theChristmas tree as we know it. There are some very pretty stories associated with both pine and fir trees, among the most popular choices for Christmas trees. According to one legend, the pine tree provided a hiding place for the Holy Family when they were fleeing fVom the soldiers of Herod. The fir tree, according to arotherlegend,boastedbothflowers and fruits until Eve discovered the tree and plucked its treasures. From that time on, the legend continues, only needles grew on the fir tree until, on the evening of Nativity, it suddenly blossomed once again. Today, centuries later, the Christmas spirit is still represented in the timeless manifestation ofthe ever-beautifiil, ever-enchanting Christmas tree. How to outlive your lifetime! Your life is not only interesting and unique, it's also worth recording and sharing for yourself, for your fiiends and family, and forthefiiture, statesfamily history researcher Timothy W. Polk in yoBTiev/hookHowToOutUveYour Lifetime! "No one else can record and remember your actions, thoughts and feelings as accurately as you can," Polk maintains. Polk saysHow To Outlive Your Lifetime! was bom out of his fipustration at not being able to find adequate information about his ancestors' lives, including people who passed away as little as 10 or 15 years ago. This is really the book I wish my parents and grandparents and ancestors had read and used," he states. "And it's the book I want to use to save a part of my life for my daughter and those who come later." A variety of how-to ideas is presented, ranging from the simple, such as having a special file folder designated for saving important papers, to the more involved, such as writing a personal history. Topics covered include photographic memories, videc/audio ideas, writingprojects andgivinggifts that lasta lifetime, among others. Thebook'sinteractive approach stimulates the reader's thoughts and ideas through simple questions and exercises. Because of this, Outlive! will become an important personal heirloom, and makes a great holiday gift for newlyweds, people with young children, retirees and genealogists. Folk's book, published by Family Life International, Sunnyvale, California, also says taking action to leave something behind for fixture generations encourages people to lead better Uves worth preserving. This, he says, ultimately enhances and strengthens family life. "Almc'it all of us every day confront our need to lead a meaningful life, one that contributes positively to this world we live in and one that won't be forgotten," he says. "Preserving a part of your life with an eye toward tomorrow encourages you to enhance your life today." The book includes one example of a woman who wrote 50 pages of autobiographical information about the time her family was forced to flee their native land during World War H. For several weeksherhusband was "too busy" to read it, hurting the writer's feeUngs. One day, however, the husband found his wife and gave her a hug and a kiss and thanked her for the written story—it had moved him deeply and they have developed a new closeness. Copies of How To Outlive Your Lifetime! (soflcover $10.95) are available at bookstores or by calling 1-800-357-7772. (Timothy W. Polk has been researchingfamilyhistoriesformore than 15 years. An active speaker and contributor to newspapers and magazines, he is a member of The National Trust for Historic Preservation and several genea: logical organizations.) Tips for tresses (NAPS)—You can give yourself a beauty boost this holiday season by heeding these hints on how to turn daytimehairstylesinto nighttime party hair sensations from The Rave Fashion Design Team. • The most popular holiday hairstyle today is the French Twist. Tum your head over and starttwistinghair in one direction from the bottom up, secure with bobby pins and decorative hairpieces. Afler securing, lift up head and sculpt any curls left out of your twist • Add a hairpiece to an up-do. Tease hair at the top ofthe head, create a straight line from ear to ear. Put in hair pins, curl hair ends in the back with a curling iron, place some alluring pieces of hair in front ofthe face. • If you have straight hair in a blunt cut, create finger waves around your face and hold them with Rave Hairspray. • Throw in some hot rollers for a tousled, curly look; or to revive droopy curls, use a curl booster to give them a lift. Deck your halls with florals Jelly beans sparkle in gifts, baking (NAPS)—^You can be a blooming genius this holiday season by giving the gift of flowers. Just a phone call away, flowers from your local florist make a fabulous gift for just about anyone on your list—including yourself if you're looking for some great ways to decorate your home. Here are some holiday hints from expert FTD florists: •Use evergreens mixed with mistletoe, holly, ivy, pine-cones or berries to decorate throughout yourhouse. These firagrantgreens can be wrapped around banisters, draped over doorways, made into festive centerpieces or used as decorative touches to your giftwrapping. •Longer-lasting flowers, such as white snowflake mums or red carnations, make beautiful placecard decorations, hostess gifts or bouquets for the guest bedroom. •Ivy plants come in a variety of shapes, including the ever-popular topiary, and msJce elegant tabletop decorations—especially when lit with tiny white lights or decorated with tiny wooden ornaments, miniature balls or bows. •Poinsettias in nontraditional colors such as corals and a variety of shades of pink are increasingly popular. •Working with an FTD professional florist makes for convenientone-stop shopping and can be a great way to create a personalized hoUday gift which can be hand-deUvered by you or sent virtually anywhere. Share with the florist the taste, color schemes and something special about the recipient which you think might be useful. Consider sending gift or gourmet baskets filled with fresh flowers and other goodies. Especially nice for the holidays: FTD's Little Drummer Boy Bouquet. •Consider using fresh flowers on your Christmas tree. Your FTD florist can provide small water tubes which can be attached to individual branches. •Wreaths, miniature ever\ green trees and fireside baskets of flowers and foliage are some floral alternatives at holiday time. The beauty ofnature can be er\joyed in homes and offices as well as outr' doors. Display holiday photos (NAPS)—Okay, you've just taken some of the best holiday photographsyou've ever snapped. If you're like many people, your next step after getting them developed is putting them in a photo album. The catch? Photo albums also keep them out of sight. Here are some tips from the experts at the Photography Information Council (PIC) on ways to displayyour photographs this holiday season. Tlie Sweet-Huck Wreath Your Christmas Wreath can take on a whole new twist with the help of your favorite photographs. Byusingsnapshotsofyour family and friends and framing them with shells from family vacations, youcan create anaturally beautiful piece. The photographs will remind you of all the wonderful moments you've had throughout the year and, once the holidays have passed, the wreath alspmakesabeautifiil accent piece year-round. Happily, it'squite easy to make: • First, the wreath, made of natural Sweet-Huck, may be purchased atyour local arts and crafts shop. • Position the shells around the wreath and apply them with rubber cement. If possible, use the shells that have been collected on your family vacation. If you've left your shells at the beach, they can alsobepurchasedinmostarts and crafts shops. •Place the photosin clear, lucite frames and decorate the border of the frame with smaller shells. Photo Centerpiece A nice w^ to bringByig j^^^j^ and friends into focus this holiday season is to personalize your holiday table with a photo centerpiece and photo placecards. Simply get out those silly photographs from camp, photographs from the prom or even family reunions. It's best to start taking pictures several weeks in advance so youll have a great selection. Have your camera ready so you won't miss any opportunities. ^fening jnou aU toiee. Here in our comer of tne world Wre tlessea witk die opportunity to fcnow ana serve so many people. May me spirit of tne toli Jay season be wita you today and alwaya ~~~ Governor Bob Miller Sandy, Ross, Corrine and Megan (NAPS)—The Easter bunny may be the biggest fan of jelly beans, but the gourmet variety of beans are showing up in some surprising places this holiday season. Jelly beans have become a colorful and sweet-tasting part of the winter holiday since they were given to dignitaries visiting the White House. The original Jellybeans, known as Jelly Belly, make festive decorations on baked goodies from the kitchen, are easy to handle and come in forty flavors. Some ofthe most unusual flavors are peanut butter, watermelon, chocolate fudge and even a jalapefiojelly bean. They also come in holiday flavors of cranberry, candy cane and egg nog. Gift Ideas Gifts from your kitchen don't have to take weeks of work and can be fun for the kids to participate in the creations Here are a few tips for homemade gifts: Fill a pretty mug with eggnogflavor Jelly Belly beans. Wrap the filled mug in cellophane and tie with gold cord. Vinegar bottles, crystal dishes and olf-fashioned tins are other ideas for containers. Use red, green and white jelly beans or match colors to the container. A square of cellophane and a handful ofbeans are all you need to make a fun gift package tie-on. Simply select the colors of Jelly Belly beans to match your gift or gift-wrapping paper. Put some Jelly Belly beans on the cello square and twist closed. Tie onto the package and finish with a bow. Holiday Baking The options are endless for using the bri^t colors of the jelly beans to add festive decorations on gingerbread sleighs and yule log cakes. Cookies shaped into C!hristmas trees are perfect for hanging jelly bean ornaments from the branches. Simply pipe on a frosting garland and press bean ornaments into place. Traditional popcorn balls receive holiday sparkle when the surprise ingredientis 11/2 cups of red and green jelly beans added to your favorite recipe. For New Year family celebrations, the same recipe works using Jelly Belly beans in champagne punch and chocolate fudge flavors. Gourmet jelly beansdifferfrom standard beans because the gourmet variety is intensely flavored in the centers and in the shells, while traditional jelly beans have no flavoring in the center. Jelly Belly beans come in a wide variety of flavors which can be individually chosen, eliminating the problem of unwanted leftovers. For a fi-ee brochure with some delicious jelly bean recipes, call I-800JB-BEANS. Holiday decorating hints Santa's little helpers df^ the halls (NAPS>—This Christmas, set up Santa's workshop in your home and let your children make their own decorative cards and gift wrap. With the help of the craft specialists at Eberhard Faber, theyHl have hours of fun creating trimmings that family and friends will cherish for years. • Kids love to fingerpaint, so your kids should love making "thumbprint' reindeer cards; you won't have to'worry about the mess if you use Coloray' washable markers. Have your child color his thumb with a red marker and then press down onto white paper folded like a card: repeat until there are several prints across the bottom of the card. Using a black marker, he can add the reindeer's heads, antlers and legs, and finish by writing a special holiday greeting. • Kids can let their imaginations run wrild as they transform paper bags into personalized holiday gift bags using stencils of Clhristmas trees and candy canes you've cut out for them. Have them color over the stencils to create flawless images. Forbaghandles, simply punch a hole in the center of each side ofthe bag and tie with ribbon. (NAPS)—If holiday preparations seem more of a chore than a joy, considerthesehassle-free tips to spread the season's cheer all through the house: •Deck the halls without ruining your walls! Hang garlands in hallways and above windows and doors with Velcro brand Sticky Back coins to eliminate unsightly nails and tacks. Attach coins to wall and to garland. Press together firmly. •Coordinate placemats, napkin rings and place cards using themed appUqu^s such as Santas and snowflakes. Decorations can be changed to suit every occasion when attached with Sticky Back coins. • Display holidaygreeting cards by affixing coins at one-inch intervals to lengths of ribbon and cards. Press together to fasten. •Decorate candlestick holders with pine cones, cinnamon sticks and bits ofholly held in place with coinsattached to candlesticks and to decorations. They're removable after the holidays. • Use more Velcro brand Sticky Back coins and design your own special wreath for all seasons by affixing antique toys, miniature ornaments and appliques. For a free holiday craft booklet write to Velcro USA, Dept. H., P.O. Box 6441, Riverton, N.J. 08077-6441. A^ay tAK\iveK'sal joy be ours fl^is (Z\\f'\smas, We Qppt*ecia+e you>* pQ+*onQge. State Farm Insurance jean^ln^Sy^A Mike 501 Nevada Hwy. Suite 3, Boulder City • 293-2002 Season's Greetings from all of us at Boulder Auto Parts 1500 Nvada Hwy. Boulder City k s ^^?sr km £a Petite Jfcademg^ Thanks so much for filling our stocking with your support and patronage this past year. "Fhe Parents Partner Preschool ^ cm Care 2560 N. Green Valley Pkwy. 451-2661 76 N. Pecos at Wigwam 897-0171 /.<^^% i ^(: -^r GOOD TIDINGS May this Holiday Season bring the light of hope to guide the way to a better world for all. From Our Family To Yours Landra— and Harry Reid ma^itm • M

PAGE 57

Page C18 HBC Publications Holiday Section 1994 HoUday Section 1994 HBC Publications Page CI9 ^m ^oltiMl^ Decorations Christmas tree is bededced witli customs, history We Join In Prayer For Worldwide Peace and Understanding From the corners of our town to the four corners ofthe Earth, may love and peace triumph. BOULDER CITY TRAVEL 806 Buchanan Blvd. Boulder City (Von's Shopping Center) 293-3807 TO OUR "BEST" MANYppigjijjs We're pulling for you to have a simply splendid season. Happy Holidays! Fred & Ellie Knapp Realty Executives 309 W. Lake Mead Driy.e • 565-4500 Of all Christmas customs, perhaps the most universally treasured is the Christmas tree. Brightly decorated with shimmering lights and glittering ornaments, the tree is as likely to reflect the traditions (if each individual family, as it is those of the world at large. From the exciting moment when the tree is erected, usually some day s in advance of Christmas Eve, it commands a position of central importance during all holiday festivities. So much so,thatitisdifiicultto believe that, a scant 200 years ago, the custom of tri mming a tree at Christmastide was not wridely observed outside its native Germany. One legend credits Martin Luther, the 16th-century theologian, with having set up the very first Chri stmas tree. According to this legend, Luther conceived of a tree alight with countless candles as a way of representing to his children the glory of the starlit Heaven. However, historical sources indicate that the first Christmas tree can be traced to the early 17th century, when fir trees— decorated with colored paper, gold foil, apples, toys and candies— were reported in the German city of Stasburg. What are the antique origins of the Christmas tree? Historians point to a multitude of sources, among them the Roman custom of decking residences with evergreens during the festival of the Kalends, which occurred in the early part of January. Parallels between the Roman observation of Kalends and the festivities traditional at Christmas are many and include those of decorating thehome with lights, extending lavish hospitality to finends and family, as well as extravagant gifl-giving. Many early Christian beliefs stand behind the tradition of trimming a tree at Christmas. For instance, it was customary for people to bring flowering trees, such as hawthorn or cherry, indoors during the autumn, so that they might bloom and bring forth firuit on Christmas Eve. This tradition may derive from the belief that St. Joseph of Arimathea, settling at Glastonbury in western England, planted his staff in the earth. whereupon it became a thorn tree and sprouted leaves. Furthermore, it miraculously blossomed. December 24th, according to the old Church calendar, was the Feast of Adam and Eve, on which day it was traditional to hang afir tree with red apples. This Paradise Tree, as it was called, is certainly aforerunnerof theChristmas tree as we know it. There are some very pretty stories associated with both pine and fir trees, among the most popular choices for Christmas trees. According to one legend, the pine tree provided a hiding place for the Holy Family when they were fleeing fVom the soldiers of Herod. The fir tree, according to arotherlegend,boastedbothflowers and fruits until Eve discovered the tree and plucked its treasures. From that time on, the legend continues, only needles grew on the fir tree until, on the evening of Nativity, it suddenly blossomed once again. Today, centuries later, the Christmas spirit is still represented in the timeless manifestation ofthe ever-beautifiil, ever-enchanting Christmas tree. How to outlive your lifetime! Your life is not only interesting and unique, it's also worth recording and sharing for yourself, for your fiiends and family, and forthefiiture, statesfamily history researcher Timothy W. Polk in yoBTiev/hookHowToOutUveYour Lifetime! "No one else can record and remember your actions, thoughts and feelings as accurately as you can," Polk maintains. Polk saysHow To Outlive Your Lifetime! was bom out of his fipustration at not being able to find adequate information about his ancestors' lives, including people who passed away as little as 10 or 15 years ago. This is really the book I wish my parents and grandparents and ancestors had read and used," he states. "And it's the book I want to use to save a part of my life for my daughter and those who come later." A variety of how-to ideas is presented, ranging from the simple, such as having a special file folder designated for saving important papers, to the more involved, such as writing a personal history. Topics covered include photographic memories, videc/audio ideas, writingprojects andgivinggifts that lasta lifetime, among others. Thebook'sinteractive approach stimulates the reader's thoughts and ideas through simple questions and exercises. Because of this, Outlive! will become an important personal heirloom, and makes a great holiday gift for newlyweds, people with young children, retirees and genealogists. Folk's book, published by Family Life International, Sunnyvale, California, also says taking action to leave something behind for fixture generations encourages people to lead better Uves worth preserving. This, he says, ultimately enhances and strengthens family life. "Almc'it all of us every day confront our need to lead a meaningful life, one that contributes positively to this world we live in and one that won't be forgotten," he says. "Preserving a part of your life with an eye toward tomorrow encourages you to enhance your life today." The book includes one example of a woman who wrote 50 pages of autobiographical information about the time her family was forced to flee their native land during World War H. For several weeksherhusband was "too busy" to read it, hurting the writer's feeUngs. One day, however, the husband found his wife and gave her a hug and a kiss and thanked her for the written story—it had moved him deeply and they have developed a new closeness. Copies of How To Outlive Your Lifetime! (soflcover $10.95) are available at bookstores or by calling 1-800-357-7772. (Timothy W. Polk has been researchingfamilyhistoriesformore than 15 years. An active speaker and contributor to newspapers and magazines, he is a member of The National Trust for Historic Preservation and several genea: logical organizations.) Tips for tresses (NAPS)—You can give yourself a beauty boost this holiday season by heeding these hints on how to turn daytimehairstylesinto nighttime party hair sensations from The Rave Fashion Design Team. • The most popular holiday hairstyle today is the French Twist. Tum your head over and starttwistinghair in one direction from the bottom up, secure with bobby pins and decorative hairpieces. Afler securing, lift up head and sculpt any curls left out of your twist • Add a hairpiece to an up-do. Tease hair at the top ofthe head, create a straight line from ear to ear. Put in hair pins, curl hair ends in the back with a curling iron, place some alluring pieces of hair in front ofthe face. • If you have straight hair in a blunt cut, create finger waves around your face and hold them with Rave Hairspray. • Throw in some hot rollers for a tousled, curly look; or to revive droopy curls, use a curl booster to give them a lift. Deck your halls with florals Jelly beans sparkle in gifts, baking (NAPS)—^You can be a blooming genius this holiday season by giving the gift of flowers. Just a phone call away, flowers from your local florist make a fabulous gift for just about anyone on your list—including yourself if you're looking for some great ways to decorate your home. Here are some holiday hints from expert FTD florists: •Use evergreens mixed with mistletoe, holly, ivy, pine-cones or berries to decorate throughout yourhouse. These firagrantgreens can be wrapped around banisters, draped over doorways, made into festive centerpieces or used as decorative touches to your giftwrapping. •Longer-lasting flowers, such as white snowflake mums or red carnations, make beautiful placecard decorations, hostess gifts or bouquets for the guest bedroom. •Ivy plants come in a variety of shapes, including the ever-popular topiary, and msJce elegant tabletop decorations—especially when lit with tiny white lights or decorated with tiny wooden ornaments, miniature balls or bows. •Poinsettias in nontraditional colors such as corals and a variety of shades of pink are increasingly popular. •Working with an FTD professional florist makes for convenientone-stop shopping and can be a great way to create a personalized hoUday gift which can be hand-deUvered by you or sent virtually anywhere. Share with the florist the taste, color schemes and something special about the recipient which you think might be useful. Consider sending gift or gourmet baskets filled with fresh flowers and other goodies. Especially nice for the holidays: FTD's Little Drummer Boy Bouquet. •Consider using fresh flowers on your Christmas tree. Your FTD florist can provide small water tubes which can be attached to individual branches. •Wreaths, miniature ever\ green trees and fireside baskets of flowers and foliage are some floral alternatives at holiday time. The beauty ofnature can be er\joyed in homes and offices as well as outr' doors. Display holiday photos (NAPS)—Okay, you've just taken some of the best holiday photographsyou've ever snapped. If you're like many people, your next step after getting them developed is putting them in a photo album. The catch? Photo albums also keep them out of sight. Here are some tips from the experts at the Photography Information Council (PIC) on ways to displayyour photographs this holiday season. Tlie Sweet-Huck Wreath Your Christmas Wreath can take on a whole new twist with the help of your favorite photographs. Byusingsnapshotsofyour family and friends and framing them with shells from family vacations, youcan create anaturally beautiful piece. The photographs will remind you of all the wonderful moments you've had throughout the year and, once the holidays have passed, the wreath alspmakesabeautifiil accent piece year-round. Happily, it'squite easy to make: • First, the wreath, made of natural Sweet-Huck, may be purchased atyour local arts and crafts shop. • Position the shells around the wreath and apply them with rubber cement. If possible, use the shells that have been collected on your family vacation. If you've left your shells at the beach, they can alsobepurchasedinmostarts and crafts shops. •Place the photosin clear, lucite frames and decorate the border of the frame with smaller shells. Photo Centerpiece A nice w^ to bringByig j^^^j^ and friends into focus this holiday season is to personalize your holiday table with a photo centerpiece and photo placecards. Simply get out those silly photographs from camp, photographs from the prom or even family reunions. It's best to start taking pictures several weeks in advance so youll have a great selection. Have your camera ready so you won't miss any opportunities. ^fening jnou aU toiee. Here in our comer of tne world Wre tlessea witk die opportunity to fcnow ana serve so many people. May me spirit of tne toli Jay season be wita you today and alwaya ~~~ Governor Bob Miller Sandy, Ross, Corrine and Megan (NAPS)—The Easter bunny may be the biggest fan of jelly beans, but the gourmet variety of beans are showing up in some surprising places this holiday season. Jelly beans have become a colorful and sweet-tasting part of the winter holiday since they were given to dignitaries visiting the White House. The original Jellybeans, known as Jelly Belly, make festive decorations on baked goodies from the kitchen, are easy to handle and come in forty flavors. Some ofthe most unusual flavors are peanut butter, watermelon, chocolate fudge and even a jalapefiojelly bean. They also come in holiday flavors of cranberry, candy cane and egg nog. Gift Ideas Gifts from your kitchen don't have to take weeks of work and can be fun for the kids to participate in the creations Here are a few tips for homemade gifts: Fill a pretty mug with eggnogflavor Jelly Belly beans. Wrap the filled mug in cellophane and tie with gold cord. Vinegar bottles, crystal dishes and olf-fashioned tins are other ideas for containers. Use red, green and white jelly beans or match colors to the container. A square of cellophane and a handful ofbeans are all you need to make a fun gift package tie-on. Simply select the colors of Jelly Belly beans to match your gift or gift-wrapping paper. Put some Jelly Belly beans on the cello square and twist closed. Tie onto the package and finish with a bow. Holiday Baking The options are endless for using the bri^t colors of the jelly beans to add festive decorations on gingerbread sleighs and yule log cakes. Cookies shaped into C!hristmas trees are perfect for hanging jelly bean ornaments from the branches. Simply pipe on a frosting garland and press bean ornaments into place. Traditional popcorn balls receive holiday sparkle when the surprise ingredientis 11/2 cups of red and green jelly beans added to your favorite recipe. For New Year family celebrations, the same recipe works using Jelly Belly beans in champagne punch and chocolate fudge flavors. Gourmet jelly beansdifferfrom standard beans because the gourmet variety is intensely flavored in the centers and in the shells, while traditional jelly beans have no flavoring in the center. Jelly Belly beans come in a wide variety of flavors which can be individually chosen, eliminating the problem of unwanted leftovers. For a fi-ee brochure with some delicious jelly bean recipes, call I-800JB-BEANS. Holiday decorating hints Santa's little helpers df^ the halls (NAPS>—This Christmas, set up Santa's workshop in your home and let your children make their own decorative cards and gift wrap. With the help of the craft specialists at Eberhard Faber, theyHl have hours of fun creating trimmings that family and friends will cherish for years. • Kids love to fingerpaint, so your kids should love making "thumbprint' reindeer cards; you won't have to'worry about the mess if you use Coloray' washable markers. Have your child color his thumb with a red marker and then press down onto white paper folded like a card: repeat until there are several prints across the bottom of the card. Using a black marker, he can add the reindeer's heads, antlers and legs, and finish by writing a special holiday greeting. • Kids can let their imaginations run wrild as they transform paper bags into personalized holiday gift bags using stencils of Clhristmas trees and candy canes you've cut out for them. Have them color over the stencils to create flawless images. Forbaghandles, simply punch a hole in the center of each side ofthe bag and tie with ribbon. (NAPS)—If holiday preparations seem more of a chore than a joy, considerthesehassle-free tips to spread the season's cheer all through the house: •Deck the halls without ruining your walls! Hang garlands in hallways and above windows and doors with Velcro brand Sticky Back coins to eliminate unsightly nails and tacks. Attach coins to wall and to garland. Press together firmly. •Coordinate placemats, napkin rings and place cards using themed appUqu^s such as Santas and snowflakes. Decorations can be changed to suit every occasion when attached with Sticky Back coins. • Display holidaygreeting cards by affixing coins at one-inch intervals to lengths of ribbon and cards. Press together to fasten. •Decorate candlestick holders with pine cones, cinnamon sticks and bits ofholly held in place with coinsattached to candlesticks and to decorations. They're removable after the holidays. • Use more Velcro brand Sticky Back coins and design your own special wreath for all seasons by affixing antique toys, miniature ornaments and appliques. For a free holiday craft booklet write to Velcro USA, Dept. H., P.O. Box 6441, Riverton, N.J. 08077-6441. A^ay tAK\iveK'sal joy be ours fl^is (Z\\f'\smas, We Qppt*ecia+e you>* pQ+*onQge. State Farm Insurance jean^ln^Sy^A Mike 501 Nevada Hwy. Suite 3, Boulder City • 293-2002 Season's Greetings from all of us at Boulder Auto Parts 1500 Nvada Hwy. Boulder City k s ^^?sr km £a Petite Jfcademg^ Thanks so much for filling our stocking with your support and patronage this past year. "Fhe Parents Partner Preschool ^ cm Care 2560 N. Green Valley Pkwy. 451-2661 76 N. Pecos at Wigwam 897-0171 /.<^^% i ^(: -^r GOOD TIDINGS May this Holiday Season bring the light of hope to guide the way to a better world for all. From Our Family To Yours Landra— and Harry Reid ma^itm • M

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Page C20 HBC PubUcations Holiday Section 1994 Holiday Recipes • frx)r^^k^^\k^
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Page C22 HBC PubUcations Holiday Section 1994 CHRISTMAS DAY at RAE'S December 25,1994 • Served from 12 Noon Gioice of Soup or Salad Vegetable Soup • Chicken Supreme • Waldorf Salad on Lettuce Leaves or • Season's Greens with Choice o( Dressing Entrees Traditional Roast Turkey Dinner with all the Trimmings Sugar Baked Glazed Ham, Sweet Sauce Sautee Trout Almondine, Lemon Butter Sauce Accompaniments Mashed Potatoes • Yams • Corn on the Cob • Peas Cranberry Sauce Oiolce of Dessert Pumpkin, Mince Meat Pie, Apple Pie • Ice Cream or Sherbet $ 9.95 ^all about Partyl! Children 12 or Under $5.95 Regular dinner menu available alter 4 p.m. Christmas Reservations Accepted 897-2000 2531 Wigwam at Pecos in Green Valley At this liappiest time of year, we express our sincere thanl