5:41 P.ML ^TlniM For Today Only ^<3.3 SM / Sun/Holiday Show* Starting Botor* 29l P.MLy • Sana Day AdvaoM Sal* Tlekol* NOW Av*llaUa At Boi omoM (El OHvo^ln*) • > '' CENTURY ^ 1^ DESERT GHOST DAD (PQ) 11:402:30 4A5 7:4S 12.-30 I /1641 -2500 •" u* Ik' (Mti • • < •>•• ANOTHER 41 HRS. (R)12:W3:10 S:3Sa010:20 OUKK CHANCE (R) 1:10 3M 5:38 *M 10:10120 GHOST DAD (PG| 1:36 3:30 SaS 730 a5 lias DIE HARDER (R)1.'00 3.-40 TOTAL RECAa (R) 11:50 2:20 4^0 7:30100) nnO FMRLANI (R) 12:901:00 9:15 7:99 10:2012:19 DIE HARDER (R) 11:302:10 4d0 7J010:1S DAvsormuMJEn (PG) 12:00 2:30 $M 7:30 lOflO aREMUNS2 (PG-13) 11:40 20' 4:15 0:40 0:1011 do ARACHNOmOSIA |F0.11)1>:1* 24*1:10 7:X 10:00 12:19 JUNGLE BOOK (G) 12M1M 3^5:30^ 7MM1U BEDROCK TOTAL RECAU (R) 11:502:30 4:50 7:30 fb At PARKWAY Cinftli ANOTHER 41 MRS. (R) 12:45 3:10 5:35 tflO 10:20 BACK TO THE FUTURE III (PG) 112:901:00 9:101:00 10:30 11 ^70-1423 w. cSLon) g • GHOST (PG13) 11i4S2 4:50 7:25 10:10 12:10 FOROFAIRUNE(R) 12i)0 2:10 4:20 OUCK CHANGE (R) GHOST DAD (PG) \yUtMM JUNGLE BOOK (d) 1i)0 2d0 4:40 0^0 • ao 10:10 nRDPAinLANE(t 1M3:10 5a0 7dO tMUM THEJETSONS(G) 1:4S 3:45 54S 7:45 I2il0 2:10 4flS 6il0 9>45 11:4S 7:55 0^01145 JUNGLE BOOK (G) 12M1> 3:40 5:30 7^0 PRETTir WOMAN (R) m0_ BACK TO THE FUTURE (PG) 12:15 2:354M 7:15 a5 DTCK TRACY (PG) 11:45 2:20 50 7:4010:20 PRETTY WOMAN (R) 12:30 2:50 5:10 7:30 (Ml RyiHffi&LL 362-2133 DECiTOR AWm DESERT INN 1 I^^OOSHDE^^^ 1 11:302:10 1 *M 7M 10:15 ARACHNOPHOBIA (P0-13)ia> 3:20 5:40 •M1020 DAYS OF THUNDER ^ (PO) 12:15 2:30 4M 7:15 5:30 11:40 | 1 ARACHHOPHOBIA ft (Pa-i3)i2flotao ^^ 4>W70t0 11:30 MCK TRACY (PG) 1:204S:40 ta012flO DIE HARDER (R) 1 1AI3:40*aO J tMIIJO ^ ^^ $2000 A DAY JULY 16th, THRU JULY 31st, 1990 2 DAILY DRAWINGS TOTALING $100.00 EACH DRAWINGS AT NOON & 8:00 P.M. NEED NOT BE PRESENT 24 HRS. TO CLAIM GIVEAWAY g of perfection Hits High regard Quechuan Indian capita Agree Troubles Turns right End points Arm muscle Ruby and Sandra Unmoving Literary collection Layered rock Mennonite sect 26 Engliah poat 27 Erronooua 28 Plaaaing in sound 29 Star in Orion 30 Gaxa 32 Shallot 36 Stuck faat 37 Care for 40 Breakfaat table item 43 Ocean 45 Energy type: abbr. 46 Make obeisance sourtd .eaning tower town 50 Hotels 51 Neighbor of Mont. 52 Mr. Lugosi 54 Ibsen's doll-wife 55 Burnttie surface of 57 Qttor Brooks 58 Touch lightly Ki 10 II "MARES EAT OATS AND DOES EAT OATS..." • 5 VI "? T 1 1 W 7 ? V V H n V !; I 1 J (1 d V N 5 M 0 0 d 1 N JW3 3 n 0 N I 3 N 1 tj kl IT 0 a d 3 3 M I d N V 5 m u 3 1 9 ^^H 3 1 0 3 d 3 M 0 I H 3 9 d 3 H H 7 3 H i rt 3 N a • 3 3 N i d VI I 1 0 N ^ II > h I i 1 rt s N 0 1 y H 0 H 5 ti i d 5 1 nHs 1 N 0 a BBciB tauuan 5 5 3 3 3 if i^ 0 1^1 H 0 i 1 1 S 1 D J I w 3 a I i 1 1 H i 3 N 0 M 3 A t 1 0 I r d I H S 0 0 1 J I SLAPSTIX :uo|jn|OS SOME ACTORS DO THE STAGE MORE HAM THAN GOOD GARFIELD by Jim Davis PEANUTS by Charles M. Schuiz HO, MY Tl/RN 5I6NAL 15 NOT BROKEN! A ,jj j j,;^^iJn mwm ^ i' 1^

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. ^ ^ ^ ; I I y n i.i • • t H I i^-^^wr^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^iPI^^ ^^H^^^^n^m Page 14B, Henderson Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Thursday. Friday, July 19 & 20, 1990 Thunday, Friday, July 19 & 20, 1990 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News, Green VaUey News Pgf 16B Entertainment Youngsters need exercise By Glenna Kinberg Nevada Cooperative Extension Following are good physical activities for children: •Free play. Encourage children to play actively. •Physical education classes. These classes can tieach appropriate exercise techniques and anphasize the importance of lifetime physical activity. •Community programs. Encourage children to be involved in youth leagues that provide aerobic benefits, but don't overemphasize winning. •The family. Children learn Ufelong activities from their parents. Include activities that the entire family can enjoy. iwiTED/lRTiSri^ l IK aln s BOULDER THEATRE 293-3145 1225 Arizona St. SEATS JUST $3 ON SUNDAY 1st SHOW MATINe^ The Tommy Dorsey Orchestra Dorsey Orchestra coming to Hacienda The Tommy Dorsey Orrangements, as well as more chestra will appear from 7 p.m. modern selections in the bigto 11 p.m. Tuesday at the band style. Hacienda Hotel Matador Arena—-Jbe Tommy Dorsey OrchesBallroom. The 17-member band, under the leadership of Buddy Morrow, will play many of the original Tommy Dorsey artra appearance is hosted by the Southern Nevada Musical Arts Society as a fundraiser in support of the Society's upcoming 28th season. Co-sponsors of the event include Paradise Cove Retirement Community and KORK Radio. The Tommy Dorsey Orchestra is recognized as one of the greatest all-around dance bands of the '40s. In the summer of 1941, it outranked every other band to finish Hrst in Martin Block's "Make Beheve Ballroom" contest. 3,000 poets to gather in Las Vegas r\..„o r\r\f\ i_ c
5:41 P.ML ^TlniM For Today Only ^<3.3 SM / Sun/Holiday Show* Starting Botor* 29l P.MLy • Sana Day AdvaoM Sal* Tlekol* NOW Av*llaUa At Boi omoM (El OHvo^ln*) • > '' CENTURY ^ 1^ DESERT GHOST DAD (PQ) 11:402:30 4A5 7:4S 12.-30 I /1641 -2500 •" u* Ik' (Mti • • < •>•• ANOTHER 41 HRS. (R)12:W3:10 S:3Sa010:20 OUKK CHANCE (R) 1:10 3M 5:38 *M 10:10120 GHOST DAD (PG| 1:36 3:30 SaS 730 a5 lias DIE HARDER (R)1.'00 3.-40 TOTAL RECAa (R) 11:50 2:20 4^0 7:30100) nnO FMRLANI (R) 12:901:00 9:15 7:99 10:2012:19 DIE HARDER (R) 11:302:10 4d0 7J010:1S DAvsormuMJEn (PG) 12:00 2:30 $M 7:30 lOflO aREMUNS2 (PG-13) 11:40 20' 4:15 0:40 0:1011 do ARACHNOmOSIA |F0.11)1>:1* 24*1:10 7:X 10:00 12:19 JUNGLE BOOK (G) 12M1M 3^5:30^ 7MM1U BEDROCK TOTAL RECAU (R) 11:502:30 4:50 7:30 fb At PARKWAY Cinftli ANOTHER 41 MRS. (R) 12:45 3:10 5:35 tflO 10:20 BACK TO THE FUTURE III (PG) 112:901:00 9:101:00 10:30 11 ^70-1423 w. cSLon) g • GHOST (PG13) 11i4S2 4:50 7:25 10:10 12:10 FOROFAIRUNE(R) 12i)0 2:10 4:20 OUCK CHANGE (R) GHOST DAD (PG) \yUtMM JUNGLE BOOK (d) 1i)0 2d0 4:40 0^0 • ao 10:10 nRDPAinLANE(t 1M3:10 5a0 7dO tMUM THEJETSONS(G) 1:4S 3:45 54S 7:45 I2il0 2:10 4flS 6il0 9>45 11:4S 7:55 0^01145 JUNGLE BOOK (G) 12M1> 3:40 5:30 7^0 PRETTir WOMAN (R) m0_ BACK TO THE FUTURE (PG) 12:15 2:354M 7:15 a5 DTCK TRACY (PG) 11:45 2:20 50 7:4010:20 PRETTY WOMAN (R) 12:30 2:50 5:10 7:30 (Ml RyiHffi&LL 362-2133 DECiTOR AWm DESERT INN 1 I^^OOSHDE^^^ 1 11:302:10 1 *M 7M 10:15 ARACHNOPHOBIA (P0-13)ia> 3:20 5:40 •M1020 DAYS OF THUNDER ^ (PO) 12:15 2:30 4M 7:15 5:30 11:40 | 1 ARACHHOPHOBIA ft (Pa-i3)i2flotao ^^ 4>W70t0 11:30 MCK TRACY (PG) 1:204S:40 ta012flO DIE HARDER (R) 1 1AI3:40*aO J tMIIJO ^ ^^ $2000 A DAY JULY 16th, THRU JULY 31st, 1990 2 DAILY DRAWINGS TOTALING $100.00 EACH DRAWINGS AT NOON & 8:00 P.M. NEED NOT BE PRESENT 24 HRS. TO CLAIM GIVEAWAY g of perfection Hits High regard Quechuan Indian capita Agree Troubles Turns right End points Arm muscle Ruby and Sandra Unmoving Literary collection Layered rock Mennonite sect 26 Engliah poat 27 Erronooua 28 Plaaaing in sound 29 Star in Orion 30 Gaxa 32 Shallot 36 Stuck faat 37 Care for 40 Breakfaat table item 43 Ocean 45 Energy type: abbr. 46 Make obeisance sourtd .eaning tower town 50 Hotels 51 Neighbor of Mont. 52 Mr. Lugosi 54 Ibsen's doll-wife 55 Burnttie surface of 57 Qttor Brooks 58 Touch lightly Ki 10 II "MARES EAT OATS AND DOES EAT OATS..." • 5 VI "? T 1 1 W 7 ? V V H n V !; I 1 J (1 d V N 5 M 0 0 d 1 N JW3 3 n 0 N I 3 N 1 tj kl IT 0 a d 3 3 M I d N V 5 m u 3 1 9 ^^H 3 1 0 3 d 3 M 0 I H 3 9 d 3 H H 7 3 H i rt 3 N a • 3 3 N i d VI I 1 0 N ^ II > h I i 1 rt s N 0 1 y H 0 H 5 ti i d 5 1 nHs 1 N 0 a BBciB tauuan 5 5 3 3 3 if i^ 0 1^1 H 0 i 1 1 S 1 D J I w 3 a I i 1 1 H i 3 N 0 M 3 A t 1 0 I r d I H S 0 0 1 J I SLAPSTIX :uo|jn|OS SOME ACTORS DO THE STAGE MORE HAM THAN GOOD GARFIELD by Jim Davis PEANUTS by Charles M. Schuiz HO, MY Tl/RN 5I6NAL 15 NOT BROKEN! A ,jj j j,;^^iJn mwm ^ i' 1^

PAGE 32

^^ iliwi ^MPVP ) Page 16B, Hendeirson Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Thursday, July 19,1990 Thursday, July 19, 1990 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Page 17B Legal Notices BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA NOTICE OF APPLICATION SoathwMt GM CorporaUoB ("SouthwMt") baa filed an application, designated Docket No. 90-701, with the PabUc Sei^ vice Commisaion of Nevada C'Commiaaion") for an Order approving it 1990 Southwn Nevada Resource Plan. The application was filed pnrsuant to Chapters 703 and 704 of Nevada Revised Statutes rNRS") and Nevada Administrtive Code f'NAC"). The Resource PIsn provides ten years of data for the historical period 1980 to 1989 and ten years of data for a forecast period of 1990 to 1999. It inclodes six major sections: Load Forecasting, Demand-Side programs, facilities, gas •apply, financial data and Integration analysis. The 1990 Southern Nevada Resource Plan also includes an Action Plan describing in signficant detail Southwest's resource plans and planning acrtivities for the period commencing March 1991 and ending February 1994. The application is on file and available for public viewing at the of fices of the Conuniasion, 727 Fairview Drive, CarMMi City, Nevada 89710 and the Alexander DawBon building, 4045 Sooth Spencer, Suite A-44, Las Vegas, Nevada 80168. Interested and affected persons may comment in writing and file appropriate Protests and/or Petitions for Leave to Intervene at either of the Commission's offices on or before Wednesday, August 1,1990. By the Commission, WILLIAM H. VANCE, CommissioH Secretary Dated: Carson City, Nevada 7/12/90 (SEAL) H-July 7, 19, 1990. T M • BOUCDER CITY, NEVADA A Municipal jCorporation 401 CaUfomia Avenue Boulder City, Nevada 89006 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Wednesday, the 1st day of August, 1990, at the hour of 7M) P.M., in the Coundi Chamber, City Hall, Boulder City, Nevada, the Boulder City Planning Commission wiU consider the following application: PCAP-90-36-APPEAL FROM STAFF OFFICER'S DECISION: Application for appeal from a staff officer's decision pnrsusnt to Sections 11-34-2 and 6-l-2(E) of the City Code. Appellants, James and Aids Goggins, 518 Jani Place, allege that the staff officer failed to issue a grading permit, issued a building permit in violation of the lot coverage requirements and allege that the building permit was issued in violation of the restrictive covenants of the Marina Highland Estates Subdivision to Roger Hamel, 622 Kati Pkce (Lot 41, Block 6, Marina Highland E8tatea-B.C. No. 19). A copy of the foregoing application, including accompanying maps, is on file in the office of the Community Development Department, City Hall, and available for public inspection. ANY AND ALL PERSONS, indnding property owners within SiOO feet of the applicant's property, may appear before the Planning Commission in person or by counsel and object to or express approval of the proposed application or may, prior to this hearing, file with the Community Development Department written objection thereto or approval thereof. DATED this 17th day of July, 1990. Jeffrey L. Patlovich, AICP Director, Community Development ATTEST: Delia H. Estes, City Clerfe (Seal) '^. B-7ll9m •••••••••••• AGENDA CITY COUNCIL REGULAR MEETING AND PUBLIC HEARING CITY HALL, 401CAUFORNIA AVENUE, BOULDER CITY, NV 89005 TUESDAY, JULY 24,1990-7K)0 P.M. (Flag Salute) 1. APPROVAL OF REGULAR AGENDA: 2. APPROVAL OF CONSENT AGENDA: (Items marked w/*; if removed for discussion, subject will be taken in numerical order unless otherwise stated.) *3. BID AWARDS: A. SUBSTATION 14 INSTRUMENT SWITCHBOARD: (Bids opened 7-5-90; 3 bids rec'd.) B. FUEL STATION RENOVATION: (Bids opened 712-90; 2 bids rec'd.) •4. RESOLUTION NO. 1861 REVISING POSITION RANGES AND CLASSIFICATION TITLES FOR NON-BARGAINING UNIT EMPLOYEES: *6. RESOLUTION NO. 1862 REVISING POSITION RANGES AND CLASSIFICATION TITLES FOR BARGAINING UNIT EMPLOYEES: •6. RESOLUTION NO. 1854, ACCEPTANCE AND FINAL PAYMENT FOR B.C. PROJECT 187-0234-RE, WAPA 69KV LINE* •7. RESOLUTION NO. 1855, ACCEPTANCE AND FINAL PAYMENT FOR B.C. PROJECT #90287-IW, ADAMS BOULEVARD 18" IRRIGATION WATER LINE PRV: •8. CITY MANAGER'S REPORT: A. CLAIMS PAID LIST 1366-JUNE 1990: B. FINANCIAL REPORT-JUNE 1990: •. COUNCIL MINUTES OF 7-10-90 REGULAR MEETING & PUBLIC HEARING: (Reoeaa regular meeting for public hearing.) PUBLIC HEARING: (Notice published 7-l0) 10. RESOLUTION NO. 1856, THE VILLAGES iidAug.2. ^^^^^^ MISCELLANEOUS GRACE COMMUNITY CHURCH 1150 Wyoming St., B.C. VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL .July 23-27 9 a.m.-11:30 a.m. •Bible Lessons •Crafts •Games •Refreshments 'RegistrSoiT: Monday July 23rd 8:45 am. AUCTION ALL OFFICE FIXTURES •Desk •Chairs •File Cabinets •Supplies • • •EVERYTHING MUST GO* • • AUCTIONi July 21tt (Saturday) 10 a.m. Preview 9:30 a.m. only. No telephone Inquires. 131 IVi NEVADA HIGHWAY B.C. /Next to Harshman'8 Health Food Store) I Our Ad lUtoi Are REASONABLE Call for dauUi 293-2302 or 864.1881 ^^^^^^^ REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNER POOL with 4 bdrm, 1% bath home. Sunken den w/fireplace. Large kitchen. Livingroom. Mini blinds, ceiling fans, 2 car plus garage. Corner lot. Mature trees. RV parking. Water softener. Covered patio. $139,500.501 Ave K. 293-4950 days, 294-0101 after 7 p.m. CITY OF BOULDER CITY A Municipal Corporation 401 California Avenue Bonlder Qty, Nevada 89005 NOTICE INVITING PROPOSALS The aty of Bonlder City, Nevada, will receive proposals for the following: Design and constmction of a 2,000 aq. ft. Administration Building at the Boulder City Airport. Spedficatiods and forms may be obtained at the Community Devel(q>ment Department, aty Hall. 401 CaUfomia AveniM, Boulder aty. Nevada 89006. Sealed proposals for such will be reoaived at the office of the Finance Director until lOM) A.M. on August 8, 1990, when they will be opened and read aloud in the aty Conndl Chambers. Boulder aty retains the right to reject any proposal deemed most advantageous to the aty. (s) Robert E. Boyer Robert E. Byer Finance Director B-7/14M ^^^^^^^ PROFESSIONAL SERVICES PUBLIC HEARING CITY COUNCIL OF BOULDER CITY COUNCIL CHAMBER. CITY HALL 401 CAUFORNIA AVENUE BOULDER CITY. NEVADA 8800S TUESDAY, JULY 24. 1990-7:00 FM. TO CONSIDER: (1) RESCINDING 90 ALLOTMENTS AND 90 EXCEPTIONS OF DWELLING UNITS FOR THE VILLAGES (AFDA-88-S7), SUBDIYISION ST. (2) RESCINDING 48 DWELLING ALLOTMENTS FOR VISTA DEL LAGO (AFDA-8IM4). SUBDIVUKm 56. B-7/1M0 CARPENTRY FOR HIRE Framing to finishhomeowner ex oxTtractor. Craftsman with 15 years experience. Local Refererces. John 294-8410 INSTA CLEAN UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP Professional maid & janitorial service includes vinylrtile fkwring, carpet, •acoustic ceiling and all phases of commercial cleaning. 293-^16 ^^^^Jf^ GARAGE SALES We have a long reaebl Our CLASSIFIEDS naeh •BOULDER cm • HENDERSON • GREEN VALLET CaU today 293-2302 or S64-ia81 ^^^^Jf^ GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALE Sat 7/21 8am-? Furniture, hshid 8 oods, Misc. 1302 D ieorgia BC* SAT, JULY 21st. 7am. Torker two bike, new gas mower, new weed eater. Washer, 16.1 cf upright freezer, fufi size canopy, matching wshr/dryr, misc. 1110 Comanche Way BC^ YARD SALE Sat Sam to 4. Sewing machine, TV, some furn. Lost of misc. 531 Ave M. BC* PATIO SALE Saturday July21 Sam til 71719 Red l yitn Dr, BC GARAGE SALE-REGATTA POINTE Bedding, towels, cookware, stainless flatware, vacuums, luggage, 3 TV's, ladders, garden tods, and much more. No junk. 448 America Court. Sat 7/21 8-5. BC MOVING SALE 3x5 table, smoke glass top w/4 Navy chairs, brass trim. Blue-gray sofa. Chest of drawers. Misc. 293-0277 BC FURNITURE, ANTIQUES. 3ed and bath. Scooter, golf bag, brand name clothing, puzzles. FriS-11 am. 15f8 Sandra Dr. BC YARD SALE, Friday, 7-20. Sat 7-21. 7 am til 3 pm. Tools, beds, clothing, jewelry, lots of household i tems. 540 Federal. Big Yard Sale, Saturday only. 6 am to 1 pm. Turn on Pabco Rd. & follow signs to 540 Bastanchury GARAGE SALE)Sat. ONLY, 8 to 4 pm. Large 2 family 647 Glenwood Lane. 25 Bicycles for sale. 3 spd's, 10 spd's and beach cruisers. Priced to sell.565-1161 MOVING SALE: Everything goes, household items, baby stuff, lots of car parts, clothes, electric & plumbing supplies, tools and much more. Many items FREE. 18 Texas, Thur t hru Sunday. 565-1285 MOVING SALE: 160 Victory Rd. Thur Fri & Sat. 8 to 5 pm. Furniture & Misc. 565-7148 MULT! FAMILY yard sale. Furniture, clothing, toys& misc. 251 Princess Ann Court, Hdn. (Off Palo Verde & McKenzie) July 21 & 22 8 am to 1 pm. 565-0983. GARAGE SALE: July 20-^1-22,7 am-? Clothes, Baby items lots of misc. 220 Appian Way, 565-6318. Garage Sale, 21 & 22. Bdrm suite, $200 new. 85 Suzuki 400cc good shape, $750. 4V2 T heat pump. Ideal for mobile home. New $550. Lots of misc. 563 Tabony, Hdn GARAGE SALE-Fri & Sat. 7-20 & 21.8 am to noon. Sales include tods, 2 couches, baby items, childrens toys, exercise bike, ATC, 6o Cart and much more 120 E. Country CiuL, "ri'"* HOUSEHOLD ITEMS and Vdkswagon parts. Odds and ends.MJuly21.22.661Arrayo BC GARAGE SALE Mutthtamtly. Fri and Sat 8-1. Offica equip, t>at>y furn and clothes. Handmade crafts. 650 Otono BC GARAGE SALE MULTI FAMILY Furniture, lawn mowers, oriental mgs, screens, roof tiles, fishing gear, tods, shop vac, burglar alarm. Chevy Nova, trailer, sterling silver, and much more. Saturday, July 21 0-10 a.ni. 603, 519, 840 Birch St., B.C. Yard Sale, 122 Juniper St. July 21, 7 am to 2 pm. MOVING SALE: .1032 San Gabriel (Misskxi HNIs) Fri & Sat. Open at 8 am til ?. Office coffee maker, 30-30 rifle, couch & antique wingt>ack chairs, kXs of great buys. 25" Consde TV. ^^^J^^^ BOATS A RVS BRAND NEW 1989 ESPRE 5th WHEEL Only used twice. Excellent Condition. Sleeps 6. Has 6 year Warranty. •Roof Air. Call 646-8992 or 668-727 -^-^'' FACTORY DIRECT QALAXIE BOATS 17' (140 10) $7,950 18' (140 10) $9,950 19' (140 10) $10,950 2bV} (Catxn) $13,950 0 Down (OAC) 24-0730 Cabover camper for S' bed. Sleeps 4, stove, sink, icebox. $495. PH. 565-9628. FOR RENT 1968 Allegro motorhome. 27' Call 293-4161 BC 73 RAYNELL 16' 75 hp Evinrude, trailer $1,200. 294-1156 call after 4pm, or all day Sunday. BC 16 FT FIBERGLASS BOAT w/trailer. 60 Horse Johnson OB. Fishfinder, trolling motor, am/fm radio. Everything including motor refurbished, like new. Must see to t>elieve. Best offer. Call 294-3176 BC* S ft CAMPER, ice box, propane stove $400. CANOE15ftColeman. 1 yr dd, with paddles $300. 1442 Bronco, BC 1988 CMC SUB Sierra Classte R-2500. Dual air, HD Hydro 454 engine. 4-10 diff. All options. Split rear door. 1,000 lb E2 Hitch. 1987 ALPHA GOLD 32 ft Travel Trailer. All options and Honda gen, color TV, 100 gal water supply and holding tanks, custofTi window covering and floor covering. Both units cleaner than new. Low mileage. 293-6335 BC ^^^^^^j^ MOBILE HOMES Mobile Home for sale. 14 X 60, 2 bdrm, 1 bth, covered parking, porch & shed, in Villa Hermosa. $14,000. 564-5390. FOR SALE BY OWNER Double wide mobile in Boulder City-Glngerwood Adult Park (55 and over). By appt only. Call 564-3161 ask for Lynn. BC FREE PUPPIES to loving homes. Lab & Shepard mix. 7wks. dd Black.Call 5649043. The Animal Foundation Low Cost Spay/Neuter Qlink:. Call 384-3333 tor apbointment. „ FREE KIHENS AND PUPPIES NEED GOOD HOMt. Call 293-5673. Free to good home, two male Chow/Lab pups. 4 mos. old. Golden Retriever female, 4 years dd. 564-4872. STUD SERVICE Available. Keeshond AKC Registered. Champ. Blood 566-0362. Free to good homes, German Shepherd puppies. PH. 566-9583. Cat Lovers. Maine Coon Cat, Hymalayan, Persian Cat, and many more 361 2484. For adoptton, baby pigs, ratv bits, gurnriea pigs, pigeorts, and many more 361-2484. ^^^ LOST & FOUND Found: Female Australian Shepherd cross. Red w/Salt Lake City Tags. Ph. 566-6410. Found: Puppy, pure black, male. Valley view Dr area. Ph 565-0319. ^j^j^^^^^ FIXER UPPER 3 bdrm 2 bath mobile home and lot in Mt Vista Estates. $75,000 Licensee 293-1613 days, 293-1598 nights. BC ^^^^^^ PETS/ANIMALS JOB TRAINING wvu'MnwnuLa • ^ Cj •ASCtATRAPflEP TRAINING •fOREION t DOMESnC AUTOS •NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY WE WH.I. TRAIN / •X)eS WHILE TRAINING •LFETIME JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE •FINANCIAt. AlO AVAKALBU TO QUALIFIED STU0CNT8 •LIMITED • MONTH LIVIN^i EXPENSE ASSISTANCE ro OUAilFlEO STUDENTS f OH AN MTHVKW OM.I WKMUN TtCHMCAl CtMTCT nOCNB /WUONA <4K04tJn4t BIRO BOARDING Aquarium Sat-Up • Malnt. & Feeding CATHn CMTTERS, SEHINQ SERVICE W Can For AH Animal* UowiMd and Bonaaaa CATHY'S CRITTERS Get 10% off in July & Aug. on care of your animals and enter to win a LOVE BIRD. 566-6947 AKC MALTESE PUPPIES Have first shots. 7 generation pedigree. 293-3481 BC^ • FREE KITTENS 1 male, 1 female. 3 mos dd. Very cute. 1 solid black, 1 gray striped. 293-2712 BC' FREE to the right home. Loveable 3 yr old Blue Persian male. 293-3757 BC* NORWEGIAN ELKHOUND PUPPIES AKC registered. Males and females. 5 weeks old. 40 lbs at maturity. Great with kids. Have had shots. Rick 294-5098 after 6pm. BC MAY I HELP YOU GET YOUR DOG OR CAT SPAYED OR NEUTERED FOR A GRACIOUS DISCOUNT? 293-5873 B.C. Anytime. ^^^^^ Plaaao mal aM donaliona to Batty Honn'a Animal Adoption* P.O. Box 00640, HandarKxi, NV 89009. For Stud SenwM, Mala Chinaaa Pug, wMh popera and Show QuaNy. 5664868. FREE to a good home. Kittana (4) 294-a92 BC DoQ Lovers lor adoptwn. AKC Oobarman, toy poodo. CttlMMhua, CMnaaa pug, grayhound, Hungarian vlzwa, and many mora 361-2484. VEHICLES 88 SUBARU 4X4 Wagon. 5 sp manual. Air, cruise, i power doors, windows and steering. Plus much more. Excel cond. MUST | SELL 293-6311 BC* 63 Dodge 0-100 new door needed. Running gear ok, 5 g. tires. Runs g ood $300 FIRM 338 W. asic. 84 Dodge Omni GLH. A/C, AM/FM, PB, PS, runs good asking $1500 565-9231. 88 GMC Mini-Van, Must sell Call 564-2303. Excellent condition. 78 Olds Cutlass, not running, automatic. Best Offer. Also GLC Mazda, stick shift, good condition, nice body. $800 Ph. 665-1588. 78 Camero 350, 5 sp. trans. Air, good tires, new paint job. $2000 & 74 Ford pickup runs good, no air, $1200 565^704 or 565-8200. Perfonnance parts, sm black Chevy & Ford. 2—350 motors rebuildable. 565-1285. 8 am to 6 pm. Jeep for sale, 1975 CJ5. Hard top. Doors & wirv dows, roll t>ar. Rack on top, Extra gas cane, towbar, engine steam cleaned, good condWon. $6000. PH. 565-7783. 82 Yamaha Maxim 400. Good running bike $400. 564-3943. 1975 FORD BRONCO 4x4 302 erigine. Auto, ps, towbar. Very clean. Price $4,500 293-2652 BC* FOflSALE 1984 DODGE Diplomat w/power everything. Moon roof. $4,500 Call 293-7258 evenings or 294-0200 message. BC* 1982 HONDA 450. 23,000 miles. 1 owner. Good cond. 50 mpg. Call 293-2598 BC* 1982 El Camino.PS, A/C, PB, T.D. radio. Very good condition. $3,250 firm. 708 6th 293-0215 BC* 1981 Mazda RX7. Hi $4,000, low $2,900. Asking $3,500 or best. New paint job, a/c, car cover. Pioneer stereo cassette, bra. For appt call 293-5448 and leave message. BC* 81 FORD GRANADA. A/C. One owner. New battery, tires, etc. $2,000 OBO. Very good cond. 293-2532 BC* 1984 NISSAN MAXIMA Excel cond. New paint. Custom wheels and tires. $5,300 293-5229 BC* FOR SALE 73 VW Bug. $1,900. Excel cond. Engine rebuilt. New tires, int. and paint. 293-4855 ask for Denise. BC* Beautiful 85 Lincoln Towncar. Exc. condition. Low mileage. Gr6at Real Estate sales car. $11,500. Ph. 565-5425. EMISSION CONTROL STATION Emission Express and Auto Care. 1400 Nevada Hwy. No wait appointments. 293-2473 BC Pickup wanted. Ford or Chevy w/auto & air. Cash waiting for a good one. 565-8258. RADIATOR-SALES AND. REPAIR 293-7278 Big John, and Sona..Foothill Dr. BC^ 1983BLAZERAuto.PS, P -A/C $6,200 OBO 293-0414 BC* DIRT BIKE for sale. 1986 Honda XR 350. Good condition. Best offer 294-0825 BC* CAMPER SHELL. Fits Fofd Coorlsf, ifwrt bed, imimirm SO X 77 irwhes. ExcrtenI condition $125. Call 896-0621 aftsrepm. 1974, 12' SeaKing & trailer, $600. Ph. 565-7783. 1968 T-bird, 4 dr. Golden w/white top, beautiful cond. under 51,000 ori. miles. Asking $4000. 564-6855. 54 Chrysler, runs & is complete. Has 331 Hami ana Days 565-8200 or 564-7937 eves. S1800 or trade 1982 CHEV CONVERSION VAN New ^ne, ratxiilt transmission. 12,000 mites. Body good condition. Loaded. 293-6125 BC 1979 CHRYSLER NEW YORKER Fifth Ave. Fully loaded w/moon roof. SAFE, comfortable car lor traveling. Well maintained, smogged. $1,800. Please ca 294-1362 BC 1982 MERCURY CAPRI Hatchback, 6 cyl, auto. $2,500 293-4054 BC 89 Honda Elite. E. Black, Low mileage. Asking $800 565-0319. 1979 Mustang 2 dr hardtop, new transmission $2000 OBO 564-9107. 1982 280Z, runs great, $3,000 OBO 565-8200. Great Shape 1979 Toyota Celica, new tires, new battery, new clutch, oil change $1200 FIRM. 564-7905. 1972 CB175 Street b i ke, 565-4413. Honda $200, 81 Dataun 510 4 dr $21.40 wk. 80 Chavy Mallbu $19.3a wK. 82 Ford Eacort '. .$15.45 wk. 82 Chryaler Leb. Convt $32.50 wk. 84 Chavy Camero $25.82 wk. 73 VW Karm $32.50 wk. 79 OMa. Cutlaaa $26.50 wk. 81 Honde Civic Wg $25.77 wk. 81 Pontlac Phoenix $25.77 wk. 77 QMC M ton 454 Eng $38.74 wk. 83 Buick Skyiark $25.77 wk. 84 Dodge Charger .$29.78 wk. 84 Plymouth CoK Vlata $20.18 wk. 80 Toyota Coroila $8.00 wk. American Auto Sales 1534 Boulder Hwy. North Hendoivon, NV 89015 566-0711 oti834KU1L^^ we FINAMCe AMYOm' HIGHEST PRICES PAID FOR OLD CARS WRECKED OR RUNNINO W'ra the chMpMt on parU Try Utfl! AN AiiMrlain AiHo Wracktn FAST CASH TOP PRICES PAID FOR JUMK CARS FREE PICK-UP SERVICE CALL USi 566-1414 NnttA PIC^-nUIT 83 MHlubiahl, 4 wh. dr., axcaNant cond $3,200 or Iwst. 566-200 days, 564-7937 "ATTENTION: GOVERNMENT SEIZED VEHICLES from $100. Fords, Mercedes, Corvettes, Chevys. Surplus Buyers Guide. (1) 602-838-8885, Ext. A-10002." USED AUTO PARTS 2937278. Lat us do tha calling on our new sataMa COODK er.Alstataa and Canada. I John and Sons, Foolhi Dr. BC One VW rail-type Dune Buggy. Will trade for 8' camper shell. PH. 565-5542 Of 564-8809. 86 PONTIAC SUNBIRD One owner $4,500 OBO 294-0707 BC* j^^^^^^^ DOMESTIC HELP BAWMAMTBMNCE Ut Ow Hema QMrtng TMm Tikt CM rf Yow ConplMi HMtdMningNM* •Mwaffw^anh* *WAhdOMM*nOQfi*Carpcli A g • aa-arn • Eaaoiiiwiing. Fina tooih cleaning. $15 par rm. MMmum 3 mna. Belhroorw fraa. Raferancaa. Ph. 565^800. 8 am to 7 pm Mon^Sat. WANTED MATURE RELIABLE WOMAN to' work in my home Sat and Sun 9 am-1 pm. Light housekeeping, cooking, attention to pats. Perhaps grocery shopping. Good pay. Own transportation and references needed Call 294-1586 before 6 pm. Cleaning done to satisfaction—Reasonable. References supplied. Call 564-3398. WANTED-Mature reliable woman to work nighte, Fridays, and Saturdays 7pm to Sam. Must be dependable and honeet. Refereneee required. Call 294-1588 before 8pm. BC* LAWN MAINTENANCE ftoaaonabia A Dapandabie 565-6428 Home & office cleaning. Will clean the old fashioned way. Call Spic & Span cleaning. Ph. 564-9421 Quality child care in my home. All shifts. Sunset & Pabco area. Ph. 566-9217. Tired of cleaning, let us do it for you. Jodi at 564-8367 or Jessica at 565-0640. Childcara provldad for ages 18 mo to 4 yrs old. $50 wk. In Pittman Araa. Ph 565-6857. Quality Childcara, Infants to 5 yrs dd. Nutritious meals provided & lots of love. Call 5641233. OLD FASHIONED HOUSECLEANING Reasonable rates. B.C., Hnd, and Gr Vallay. 293-2960 leave measage. BC CHILDCARE in my home Mon-Fri, anytime. Call NItea 566-0239. BatjysMing in my Henderson Home. An shifts available. Meals provided. Call 566-9428. ^^^4 SITUATIONS WANTED Home Health Care Aide, currently has openings for new paitents. Compassionate, experienced 37 year old female. Reference provided. $10 per hr. Call Kathy 565-6852, ^-^-^ BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES START YOUR OWN BUSINESS FOR LESS THAN $300 and have the opportunity lo have unlimited income potential. Have free time to enjoy your family. Call recorded message, 24 hr request video presentation. 5942153 How to start & operate your own home business. For free information, write Kee Books, P.O. Box 90847, Henderson, NV, 89009-0847 # G ^^4^^ PERSONALS METRIN Warn to look S-IO yam youngai? For fiw lacW ippt Oil Ma or Sua. Do II rww • 293-5268 ^^^^^^^ MISCELLANEOUS A WONDERFUL FAMILY EXPERIENCE, AUSTRALIAN, EUROPEAN, SCANDANIVIAN, YUGOSLAVIAN HIGH SCHOOL EXCHANGE STUDENTS ARRIVING IN AUGUST. BECOME A HOST FAMILY/AMERICAN INTERCULTURAL STUDENT EXCHANGE. CALL 1-800-SIBLING SNEED CREDITS $5,000. Credit Card regardless of cradM hialory. Moor Bank Cards alao available Plus a fabulous camera, film, and vacaHon package. Phone (405) 364-5574 Extansio^43. Cordless Pt)one, AT & T, 3 yrs old. $45. 458-5204. FRESH NEW MEXICQI QREEN CHILE wW be available Aug. 13,1990 Place your order now W4-1033 12 ft. canoe & 2 paddles, $100, Wood & glass gun case, holds 6 guns, $200. Cast iron woodburning stove, pipes & fireplace equipment. Tent, used once, sleeps 4, $50. Ph. 565-7783. UTILITY TRAILER 4'X 4' Plywood sides. Spare tire. Used once. $200 5646882 • CUSTOM MADE 8 ft sofa w/2 footrests. Matching barrel chair. One yr old Perfect cond. $600. Call 293-2220 BC* QUEEN BDRM SET Very good cond. New chiropractic mattress. 14.5 cu ft G.E. chest f reezer. 293-2598 BC 2 VIDEO SETTER UNIVERSALS: 150-200 LINES PER MINUTE 36 GRIDS and FONT TABLES EXPAND CONDENSE REVERSE AND ITALISIZE. SOLD AS IS $500 each. DALE WETENKAMP 702882-2111. FOR SALE 9mm Walttwr samlauto platol. Holatar A apara magazlna $390. S68-0672. Oragon Brria AFivtt FrMh Frozan Your Choice: 14 Family Packs of: BlackbrrlM $22.90 RaspberriM $22.90 BoyMnbtrriM.... $23.90 SluatMrrwt. $23.90 StrwtxW/S $20.90 StrawtlW/0 $21.90 PiaCharnai $21.90 Swaal Cherries... $2190 Sliced Peaches... $22.90 Apricol Halves.... S24.90 Apples Sliced ... $ 19.90 Logan Bemet... $21.90 TO ORDER CALL Andy 564-1443 Furniture, a house fulll (New still in cartons) living, tied, & dinring rm, 17 pieces in al. 1st $1,000 tak^ Win San separately. Warehoused at 4240 Cameron 734-8800 Can deliver. PATIO FURNITURE Redwood. One round tatile, 5 chairs. Exc cond $225 294-3166 BC VOICE/PIANO/DRAMA. Private lessons, specialist teacher and director, all ages, starting age 7. Summer openings avaMatile. Ask about our summer Saturday review classes. Quality vocal & keytxwd entertainment for your wedding, receptions or functions. Ph. Fto Raymond 565-8469, Coral Cove Music Studio. 1000 Mini Cross diet pills for just $10. To order call 1-800-668-4968. ARE YOU LIVING WITH A DRINKING PROBLEM? If 30, why not try Al Anon? Meetings are Tues, 10 am at Club 5f Tues 8:30 pm. Club 51. Wed 8 pm St. Rose Dominican Hospital. Fh. 7:30 pm Water & Pov*r BIdg. Nevada Hwy. Boulder City. For more information call 5659963. GO TO GLITTER GULCH DENA'S for an Indian Affairl Museum quality Jewelry, Tribal Antiquities, SOUTHWEST DECOR. Rock Shop for collectorsi Fantastk: Crystals, GEMS, MINERALS. You deserve the best! It's at GLIHER GULCH DENA'S ON BOULDER HIGHWAY & SUNSET RD. IN HENDEROSN. Dena's Buys & Trades for Silver, Rock & your INDIAN STUFF. 5650711. CLOCK REPAIR •Antique & Othflr •Grandfather/Wall Buying Antique and Estate Clocks WOMEN'S BiBLE STUDY iNTERDENOIMiNATiONAL Every Wedneaday al 9 30 am 571 Adams Blvd Free babysitting and refreshments. If you are a new comar lo Boulder City, come and make new friends Phone 293-77?3. Baby furniture for sale. Everiflo infant carseat xtra cover $30, stroller $40, t>ed w/mattress w/crib bumper pads $90. 565-1067. ••••••••••••• Want to maka extra til? All natural Haaltti a Nutrition producta. L08E WEIGHT a FEEL OREATI 100H 30 day S uarantaa. Call Jill: 17-3321. FOR IJkDIES ONLY Share an evening of laughter and fun with your friends Schedule a FUN. party • Gifts • Prizes and • Dscounts Call 293-5287 BC LOSE WEIGHT FealOraat CailMeNowt Find Out How 387-2624 HAVE A UNIQUE BRIDAL SHOWER. Throw a FUN. Party Call 293-5257 BC Wanted used car or truck, prk:e range from $100 to $600. Fixer-upper OK. $65-9 444. LOSE WEIGHT THE EASY WAY writh Forever Lite, up to 30 lbs per month. Money badk guarantee. Ph. 564-1648. Call Sue for great Mary Kay Products! 454-6175. WHIRLPOOL HEAVY DUTy DRYER. Rebuilt. $125 294-7766 BC NEW CONSTRUCTION Everything must go. 4 complete bedroom sets. Odd size mattresses, bunk bed set, odd dressers, TV 's and stereos, studio speakers, complete oak office, computer, copier machine, washer/dryer, refrigerator. Sofa, loveseat, flower arrangements. Three car garage full of things I need to sell. 658-8166 BC WATER SKI, vest and tow line. $100 firm. Isuzu pickup rear bumper $50.293-0176 BC 19 inch color TV, remote control. Portable sewing' machine. Round end table. Sm desk, oak. New elec lawn mower, rear bagger, 20 in. 2 pc lawn lurn. 293-0531 BC FOR SALE Concrete power trowel. New 5 horse Honda motor. Call eves 294-2393 BC tillSC HSHLD ITEMS and furniture. Call 294-1244 or 1010 Keys Dr, Boulder City ONAN GENERATOR 2,100 watts. Like new. $400 294-1549 BC MINI CAR/GO CART Red Con/ette body. 3 hp Brigos and Stratton Engine. $450 294-1549 BC ALL STEEL CARPORTS-PATIOS Also Alum and Redwood. From 1,095 B C BIdg and Roofing 293-2179 TERRACE CONSTRUCTION INC. aea-ieaa KEEP IT SIMPLE Evefy item 10% above coat plus Ireighl We ael living room suites, bedroom suites, dining rooms, beddings, carpel, pad, linoleum, vinyl, tile and hant wood floors No money down. No Payment lor 90 days 90 Day same as cash 0AC • KEEP IT SIMPLE" 153 Water St. Henderson, MondaySaturday. 9 am.-5 p m. INDEPENDENT MOVERS ^ One Room of Houseful > • Pianos or Any Heavy Load ^Specializing m Henderson Boulder City & Green Valley Fr Estimates and Reasonable Hates Raferancas AvaHabla 293-7911 H & S LAWN CARE Complete Lawn Sarvlca, Tree & Shrub Care, Automatic Sprinkler Repair. Lie. #449 Harold 6 SiMron Crttdtar 294-6200 Wa Do Moiv Than "Mow, Blow & Go" JaffKlncaid 294*1114 SPMnaJW KUa MnNNW OEMMM FREE ESTIMATES BOULDER CITY • HENDERSON • GREEN VALLEY 4M-1991 CASH PAID FOR AUTOGRAPHS OF FAMOUS PEOPLE All lattars Pholoa, Dooumanta, •te of PrmMMit*. Movto ttara, Slnllta, Mualelans, Inventor*, AfwiNooia MM Ml otffior Fonioiio Paopla. AIo old pf>-'70 Mj^of MogMin— CALL SeS-0319 ARTHRITIS: I have no mora, by drinWng Qolden Horizon Int. ALOE VERA JUICE, Money Back Quarantee. 564-1646 For sale: Very nice office daak. $95. Ph. 565-7348. ATTENTION: POSTAL JOBS! Start $11.41/hour! For application info call (1) 602-838-8885 Ext. M-11032,6anrt-10pm, 7 days. Queen waterbed lighted, mirrored headboard. 12 drawers, heater, massager & bumper pads $450. 564-5390 PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRS Reliable restoration and retinishing by Charlie Tuner. 293-6011 BC^ --v SIDE BY SIDE REFRIGERATOR Works t reat. Almond color. 300 293-0414 BC Couch, $175. Lazy Boy rocker, $9&. Bookcase, $20, Trash Compactor, $50. Gas range, $100. Recliner, $50, Exercise bike, $35. Ph. 564-1777 Magic Chef Washer & Gibson Electric Dryer $75 each or $150 for pair. 565-4413. For Sale: Kenmore Apt size washer/dryer, like new, floor to ceiling, off white lined drapes 4541223. Zenith 25" Stereo colored monitor TV w/4 external speakers, Fisher Stereo VCR, swivel rocker, desk, Amana Refrigerator, 3 dr. w/water & ice dispenser, slow cooker. Counter oven broiler, 2 living rm. lamps. Gold drapes, 7' flocked Christmas tree. 873-2355. King size mattress w/box springs $100. Clean & very nice 564-0920. Sears swing set w/slide. Good condition, $30. Self propelled gas mower, $50. Zena Pasta Cutter, $25. Ph. 565-7478. MOVING SALE: King size waterbed w/mirrored canopy. 21' refrigerator, dining table w/wicker back chairs. 25" Curtis Mathis console. Fisher 100 Watt rack stereo GE double oven, lite brown sofa loveseat & chair, some other misc. Ph. 564-8862. ^^J|^JfJ^^44 HELP WANTED Assistant mgr, part time for 3 mos, then full time for expanding mail service center, 734 S. Boulder Hwy. Boulder Mkt Place/Henderson. Babysitter needed. My home. Must have own transportation and be dependable. 8 am to 8 pm. Mn & Fri. 565-5035 $23,700 PER YEAR TO START, plus benefits. U.S. Postal Service soon to accept applications In your area. For informat ion. call (219) 662-0306 FULL CHARGE BOOKKEEPER with computer experience. Resume required. References will be checked. Call for appt with Nola 293-3131 BC* Labor WIHSHIIUNa IMMlbUTILY aiNIIUL LABOR (Utt SO-100 Iba.) No Work Expoflonca Required Muet Have Reliable Traneportatlon EASTRIDQE TEMPS 565-3118 wa W. Lake Meed, Suite C, n, NV HILP WANTED I need I aertotia people to help me wlln ex* pending b uel n ee e FuH training. Start now. 4 CaN 387-261t ASSEMBLERS: Excellent income to assemble g roducts from your home. 04-646-1700 DEFT. P2310. "ATTENTION: EASY WORK EXCELLENT PAY! Assemble products at home. Details (1) 602-838-8885 Ext. W-10002." WANTED by the Oasis Restaurant, Lounoe and RV Park. A fun place to work. We need am and pm cooks. Relief waitress Bartenders/waitress. Retired or semi retirees welcome. We are 24 mies S of Hoover 0am on Hwy 93. Please call or come and aee Oar1er)e. (602) 767-3222.* Applications now being accaplad lor retail boat rrwc^iantc w/commiaak>n only. Must becerttfied. Alao lor lull time maintenance poaition. Apply In peraon Lake Mead Resort, 322 Lakaihore Rd., Boulder CKy. EOE/Authorlzed Conceslionaira lor NPS. Boulder City Christian Science Church seeks VOCAL SOLOIST for Sunday Services. For audition call 293-7279 BC;^ Pre-school teachers, full & part time positions avail. Fall openings. Also taking applications for substitutes. If you enjoy working w/children, please call us at 565-0007 or 456-7008 ATTENTION: HIRING! GOVERNMENTJOBSYOUR AREA! MANY IMMEDIATE OPENINGS WITHOUT WAITING LIST OR TEST! $17,840$69,485. Call 1-602-838-8885 Ext. R-11032. HOSPITAL JOBS. Start Se.SO/hr. your area. Noaxp. naceasary. For Info call 1-900-990-9399 Ext. 571,6 anrva pm. 7 days. $12 phone lee. MANICURIST AND HAIR DRESSER WANTED for buay salon. Lots of walk ins. Call Expreaskxis. Ask for Janet 2935176 BC •HOUSEKEEPERS Contact Lori 293-3329 BC Restaurant hostesses, bus Iperson. Apply in person Gkild Strike Inn and Casino, Hwy. '93. Bou kler City. EARN UP to $339 per week. Assemble our products at home. Amazing recorded maaaage reveals details. Ph. 382-7846. Applcations now t>eing accepted for maids & laundreas, full bme positions. Apply in person Lake Mead Resort Lodge, 32^ Lakeshore Rd., Boulder CKy Ph. 293-2074. EOEAuthorized Concessionaire for NPS., MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST Duties include phones, schefduling appointments. Medical terms helpful. Full time 8 to 5 pm w/weekends off. Apply in person at Dr. Robert Ritchey's Office 110 E. Lake Mead, Suite 203. Call 565-8066. Henderson. St. Roae Dominican Hoapltal currently haa tha following amploymont opportunltlea avallat>le: Full Time & Per Diem • R.N.'s Med/Surg • new grads welcome. ER, OR (min. 3 yrs. exp.) Part-time & Per Diem Med/Surg/OB/GYN L.P.N. (IV Certified) Full-time R.N. House Supervisor • Nursing Administration BSN preferred, 3 yrs. nursing exp. 1 of which must have been in a supervisory capacity. Full-time • Collector • 1 yr exp in medical insurance and collecting. Knowledge of medical terminology and computer. ^^^""^ ;: Full-time Director of Volunteers • BS degree with course in personnel management preferred. Thhee yrs exp in community, social or volunteer work with supervisory responsibilities. Qualified paraona apply at: St. Roae Dominican Hoapltal 102 E. Lake Mead Drive Hendareon, Nevada 89015 (702) 564-2622 EOE/M-F-H FRONT DESK CLERK/ MAIDS/PORTERS Now accepting applications for front desk personnel, porters & maids Full and or part time. Apply in person Gold Strike Inn & Casino, Boulder City. Bring proper ID CAtuuens MBKoeo FOR MOTOR ROUTES Inqtrin at HENDERSON HOME NEWS orjm S9&NNA'S VANITY 565-0a55 — WANTED — WAITERS, WAITRESSES, BUS PERSON, DISHWASHERS. LINE COOK, PREP COOK, GENERAL KITCHEN HELP A CAGE CASHIERS. Apply In person at Railroad Pass HotsI & Casino. Bring propsr ID to 2800 South Bouklsr Highway, Hsndsrson. HOUSEKEEPING ATTENDENTS WANTED Railroad Paea la now accepting applicatlone for full and part time houaekeeplng attendante. Apply In paraon 7 daye a week at Railroad Paaa Hotel ft Caeino, 2800 S. BouMar Hwy., Handaraon. Bring proper 10. GENERAL LABORS/PRODUCTION WORKERS & CLERICAL Immediate Openings Good Pay — No Fee MANPOWER TEMPORARY SERVICES 30 A Water Street Henderson, NV 565-5554 Copies 10C each LONESOME DOVE kSTEAE HOUSE .^:^i .^'ii^ ^'it^ .^'ii^ fJ'Ai.. n^cjjo^ Dance Hall C Saloon Uio-SljBoai • • nyjM 'tfjrrI37S deily-telemarkatafs Take ptione orders lor opportunity putilicatlona. (TCO) 56&^13 Ext D-1 MAIDS/LAUNDRY HELP: Experience or wNI train. Alao part time laundry peraon. Apply in parson at Beat Wealern, 85 W. Lake Mead Drive, Henderson. • AHENTION: GOVERNMENT JOBS-YOUR AREA!$17,840-$69,485. Call (1) 602-838-8885, Ext R-10002. • AHENTION: POSTAL JOBS! Start $11.41/hourl For application info call (1) 602-838-8885, Ext. M-10002,6amto1Opm, 7 days." PAftT TIME COLLECTOR NEEDED Will train. Must have pleasant telephone voice. Call 293-7142 Mon-Fri. BC_* HELP WAhJTED Drivers, mornmg and evenino. $4 hr. Start immad. Call Chris 293-3030 BC SALES/TELEMAR,KETERS. Huge Profits! Publications-Easy Sales! ( 904)581-1571 Ext. B-2 •••••• i^i^^ifJlf)^^ PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Private swim ISMona, Certified swim instructor. 3 yrs experienca. CoHags educated. Works well with kids. Reasonable pricea, flexible schedules. Includes water safety & awareness as well as step by step swim techniquaa. Through enjoyable 1 on 1 basis. For app't scheduling & info, call Ryan Duncan, eSS'OOBI. /\. THE CAVANAUGH'S V -^ PAINTING >i*lr IntarlorV Extarlor Fraa Estlmatta Ucanaad 294-1422 : CLOCK AND ANTIQUE Complete Restoration {*> > All work guaranteed 'Free Estimates V^i iV No Repair — No Ctwrge ^—^ 978-4242 MobMe 29S-9900 By Master l-lordogist/ClocK Maker CARY S. MMIL Discount lor BC fleskJWs AIRLINES t10-f M par hr. Naggnil AMkiM bpaidhig M Cltlm/Cmomr I WM Train For kife )1l44MINIitA123l EARN UP to $339.85 weekly. assemble products at home. Call our fabulous recorded message anytime. Details 1-408-534-1989 X-nv01 Salesperson. 18 to 35, full time or part time. Men or women $36,000 potential. Protected areas. Call Bob 734-1807. Earn Income part-time from your home. FUN JOB! Call 702-594-9034, 24 hr. message. Casino Jobs. All positions, 305-4250314 Ext. Aj^ Super 8 Motel now hiring full time/part time maids. Apply In person anytime. 5288 Boulder Hwy. Hdn Nursing Assistant, Adult health day care center. Must have ability to relate to frail elderly & handicapped. Assist in lifting & transporting clients. Ph. 565-9578. Phone Sales. Experienced or will train. Students or housewives. Part time or full time. $5 per h r. plus commission plus bonuses. Call Bob 734-1807. HOSPITAL JOBS. Start $6.8Q/h[,-your. area. No exp. necessary. For info call 1-900-990-9399 e)ft. 571, 6 am-8 pm 7 days.' $12 phone fee. GOVERNMENT JOBS! Now hiring in your area, both skilled and unskilled. For a current list of jobs and application, call 1-800-782-5142 ext. P792. EXCELLENT WAGES for spare time asembly. Easy work at home, no experience needed. Call 1-504-641-7778 ext. 4480. Open 24 hours, including Sunday. HOOVER DAM STORE Clerk-Dept Manager position. Start SAP part time-full time in 2-4 weeks. Phone 293-1824 BC THE SALVATION ARMY IS IN DESPERATE NEED OF FURNITURE AND CLOTHES. PLEASE CALL THE SALVATION ARMY PICKUP AT 949-2374-5-€ BomeRBEetmc Licensed • Bonded Insured Lie. No. 15187 Call 293*4899 vmm •453-1869 •565-3065 209 foster Ave. Henderson, Nev. M015 Jade Pearson (PERSONAL LAWN CARE) Personalized lawn and garden service. Complete lawn care and cleanup. Call Todd 294-1448* SIMPSON & SONS INC. Bonded & Insuiad Lie'0018823 A 0022307 BscktMM • Hoa Rama • Bobcala CARL SIMPSON 6050 VEH06 WAY LAS VEGAS. NV 89130 645-0882 ) HELP WANTED Casino hotel jobs. Excellent income and exciting work. (702) 366-6313 Ext C-1. PART TIME CROSSING GUARD The City o( Boulder City has openings for Crossing Guard Alternates. Pay is $4.25 per hour, maximum 5 hours a day. Applrcations can be obtained from City Hall Personnel Dept., 401 California Ave. Boulder City, from Monday thru Thursday, 7:00 AM-6;00 PM, and returned to the Police Department, 1005 Arizona Street. Boulder City Is an Equal Opportunity Employer. HOUSEKEEPING Sands Motel. Week and weekends. 809 Nev Hwy. BoUder City. PART TIME SUMMER HELP Must be 21 year or older and reliable. For appt call 293-1891 Boulder Beach Store. BC* REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONAL Join our growing company in new offices this fall Only lull-time, nonsmoking need apply. Contact Bob Boston, Dissert Sun Realty 293-2151 or 293-2314 BC The Beauty Corner is now hiring, stylists & manicurists. Apply in person at 303 Water St Henderson. SUPER BUSY SALON. BOBS ALL FAMILY REbTAURANT now aooaplinq appNcationa for dianwasners, cooks,' waMraaaae. Afipiy IntMnon 761 Nev Hwy BC Household cleaners. Mon tfwo Fri Sck pay, vacation, holiday pay $5 03 hr after trainir)g Grimetxjsiers Makj Service. 798-1002 NEED IMMEDIATELYII Home Aaaambly people, wSing to earn up to S369 par week. aaaambUng producta at home. No experience neceaaary. Send aelfaddrested stamped •nvelope to: HandonAi. 2830 Marathoe, Drive. HenderaooN V 806l4. BOULDER Cin PAINTING & DRYIVALL Acoustic Rvspray Commercial • Raaldantlal • Induatrlal Serving Clark County Free Eetlmates Lie. #25680 insured & Bonded 1638 Nev. Hwy. 293-2906 HENDERSON A-1 PRINTING SCREEN PRINTING Shirts • Caps • Signs • Other Business Cards 15% Off in July •Novelties •Wedding Announcements •Matches •Reunion Printing 565-1133 G&G TRANSFER 8mm Home Movie Transferred to VMS video tape CALL 45M949 LAWNCARE, mowing, raking, pruning, ramovtf PAINTING, Intnor/ •xtarkw, sitwork. QuaMy vMirk. raonatila ralM. Frw Erie 284-3175 CEMENT WORK Block Fences, Patios, Driveways, Slabs, Sidewalks, and Steps. U # 0018577 294-1087 ••••• • Ceramic Tile Installed. Custom Design. Dependable, quality work. 15 yrs. Exprience. Call Mike Palmer 564-2563. HONEY DOS HANDYMAN SERVICECJ Too Hot To Do Your Honay Do's? Callua. 294-3071 566-6811 P*Wi jgi \^'

PAGE 33

^^ iliwi ^MPVP ) Page 16B, Hendeirson Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Thursday, July 19,1990 Thursday, July 19, 1990 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Page 17B Legal Notices BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA NOTICE OF APPLICATION SoathwMt GM CorporaUoB ("SouthwMt") baa filed an application, designated Docket No. 90-701, with the PabUc Sei^ vice Commisaion of Nevada C'Commiaaion") for an Order approving it 1990 Southwn Nevada Resource Plan. The application was filed pnrsuant to Chapters 703 and 704 of Nevada Revised Statutes rNRS") and Nevada Administrtive Code f'NAC"). The Resource PIsn provides ten years of data for the historical period 1980 to 1989 and ten years of data for a forecast period of 1990 to 1999. It inclodes six major sections: Load Forecasting, Demand-Side programs, facilities, gas •apply, financial data and Integration analysis. The 1990 Southern Nevada Resource Plan also includes an Action Plan describing in signficant detail Southwest's resource plans and planning acrtivities for the period commencing March 1991 and ending February 1994. The application is on file and available for public viewing at the of fices of the Conuniasion, 727 Fairview Drive, CarMMi City, Nevada 89710 and the Alexander DawBon building, 4045 Sooth Spencer, Suite A-44, Las Vegas, Nevada 80168. Interested and affected persons may comment in writing and file appropriate Protests and/or Petitions for Leave to Intervene at either of the Commission's offices on or before Wednesday, August 1,1990. By the Commission, WILLIAM H. VANCE, CommissioH Secretary Dated: Carson City, Nevada 7/12/90 (SEAL) H-July 7, 19, 1990. T M • BOUCDER CITY, NEVADA A Municipal jCorporation 401 CaUfomia Avenue Boulder City, Nevada 89006 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Wednesday, the 1st day of August, 1990, at the hour of 7M) P.M., in the Coundi Chamber, City Hall, Boulder City, Nevada, the Boulder City Planning Commission wiU consider the following application: PCAP-90-36-APPEAL FROM STAFF OFFICER'S DECISION: Application for appeal from a staff officer's decision pnrsusnt to Sections 11-34-2 and 6-l-2(E) of the City Code. Appellants, James and Aids Goggins, 518 Jani Place, allege that the staff officer failed to issue a grading permit, issued a building permit in violation of the lot coverage requirements and allege that the building permit was issued in violation of the restrictive covenants of the Marina Highland Estates Subdivision to Roger Hamel, 622 Kati Pkce (Lot 41, Block 6, Marina Highland E8tatea-B.C. No. 19). A copy of the foregoing application, including accompanying maps, is on file in the office of the Community Development Department, City Hall, and available for public inspection. ANY AND ALL PERSONS, indnding property owners within SiOO feet of the applicant's property, may appear before the Planning Commission in person or by counsel and object to or express approval of the proposed application or may, prior to this hearing, file with the Community Development Department written objection thereto or approval thereof. DATED this 17th day of July, 1990. Jeffrey L. Patlovich, AICP Director, Community Development ATTEST: Delia H. Estes, City Clerfe (Seal) '^. B-7ll9m •••••••••••• AGENDA CITY COUNCIL REGULAR MEETING AND PUBLIC HEARING CITY HALL, 401CAUFORNIA AVENUE, BOULDER CITY, NV 89005 TUESDAY, JULY 24,1990-7K)0 P.M. (Flag Salute) 1. APPROVAL OF REGULAR AGENDA: 2. APPROVAL OF CONSENT AGENDA: (Items marked w/*; if removed for discussion, subject will be taken in numerical order unless otherwise stated.) *3. BID AWARDS: A. SUBSTATION 14 INSTRUMENT SWITCHBOARD: (Bids opened 7-5-90; 3 bids rec'd.) B. FUEL STATION RENOVATION: (Bids opened 712-90; 2 bids rec'd.) •4. RESOLUTION NO. 1861 REVISING POSITION RANGES AND CLASSIFICATION TITLES FOR NON-BARGAINING UNIT EMPLOYEES: *6. RESOLUTION NO. 1862 REVISING POSITION RANGES AND CLASSIFICATION TITLES FOR BARGAINING UNIT EMPLOYEES: •6. RESOLUTION NO. 1854, ACCEPTANCE AND FINAL PAYMENT FOR B.C. PROJECT 187-0234-RE, WAPA 69KV LINE* •7. RESOLUTION NO. 1855, ACCEPTANCE AND FINAL PAYMENT FOR B.C. PROJECT #90287-IW, ADAMS BOULEVARD 18" IRRIGATION WATER LINE PRV: •8. CITY MANAGER'S REPORT: A. CLAIMS PAID LIST 1366-JUNE 1990: B. FINANCIAL REPORT-JUNE 1990: •. COUNCIL MINUTES OF 7-10-90 REGULAR MEETING & PUBLIC HEARING: (Reoeaa regular meeting for public hearing.) PUBLIC HEARING: (Notice published 7-l0) 10. RESOLUTION NO. 1856, THE VILLAGES iidAug.2. ^^^^^^ MISCELLANEOUS GRACE COMMUNITY CHURCH 1150 Wyoming St., B.C. VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL .July 23-27 9 a.m.-11:30 a.m. •Bible Lessons •Crafts •Games •Refreshments 'RegistrSoiT: Monday July 23rd 8:45 am. AUCTION ALL OFFICE FIXTURES •Desk •Chairs •File Cabinets •Supplies • • •EVERYTHING MUST GO* • • AUCTIONi July 21tt (Saturday) 10 a.m. Preview 9:30 a.m. only. No telephone Inquires. 131 IVi NEVADA HIGHWAY B.C. /Next to Harshman'8 Health Food Store) I Our Ad lUtoi Are REASONABLE Call for dauUi 293-2302 or 864.1881 ^^^^^^^ REAL ESTATE FOR SALE BY OWNER POOL with 4 bdrm, 1% bath home. Sunken den w/fireplace. Large kitchen. Livingroom. Mini blinds, ceiling fans, 2 car plus garage. Corner lot. Mature trees. RV parking. Water softener. Covered patio. $139,500.501 Ave K. 293-4950 days, 294-0101 after 7 p.m. CITY OF BOULDER CITY A Municipal Corporation 401 California Avenue Bonlder Qty, Nevada 89005 NOTICE INVITING PROPOSALS The aty of Bonlder City, Nevada, will receive proposals for the following: Design and constmction of a 2,000 aq. ft. Administration Building at the Boulder City Airport. Spedficatiods and forms may be obtained at the Community Devel(q>ment Department, aty Hall. 401 CaUfomia AveniM, Boulder aty. Nevada 89006. Sealed proposals for such will be reoaived at the office of the Finance Director until lOM) A.M. on August 8, 1990, when they will be opened and read aloud in the aty Conndl Chambers. Boulder aty retains the right to reject any proposal deemed most advantageous to the aty. (s) Robert E. Boyer Robert E. Byer Finance Director B-7/14M ^^^^^^^ PROFESSIONAL SERVICES PUBLIC HEARING CITY COUNCIL OF BOULDER CITY COUNCIL CHAMBER. CITY HALL 401 CAUFORNIA AVENUE BOULDER CITY. NEVADA 8800S TUESDAY, JULY 24. 1990-7:00 FM. TO CONSIDER: (1) RESCINDING 90 ALLOTMENTS AND 90 EXCEPTIONS OF DWELLING UNITS FOR THE VILLAGES (AFDA-88-S7), SUBDIYISION ST. (2) RESCINDING 48 DWELLING ALLOTMENTS FOR VISTA DEL LAGO (AFDA-8IM4). SUBDIVUKm 56. B-7/1M0 CARPENTRY FOR HIRE Framing to finishhomeowner ex oxTtractor. Craftsman with 15 years experience. Local Refererces. John 294-8410 INSTA CLEAN UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP Professional maid & janitorial service includes vinylrtile fkwring, carpet, •acoustic ceiling and all phases of commercial cleaning. 293-^16 ^^^^Jf^ GARAGE SALES We have a long reaebl Our CLASSIFIEDS naeh •BOULDER cm • HENDERSON • GREEN VALLET CaU today 293-2302 or S64-ia81 ^^^^Jf^ GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALE Sat 7/21 8am-? Furniture, hshid 8 oods, Misc. 1302 D ieorgia BC* SAT, JULY 21st. 7am. Torker two bike, new gas mower, new weed eater. Washer, 16.1 cf upright freezer, fufi size canopy, matching wshr/dryr, misc. 1110 Comanche Way BC^ YARD SALE Sat Sam to 4. Sewing machine, TV, some furn. Lost of misc. 531 Ave M. BC* PATIO SALE Saturday July21 Sam til 71719 Red l yitn Dr, BC GARAGE SALE-REGATTA POINTE Bedding, towels, cookware, stainless flatware, vacuums, luggage, 3 TV's, ladders, garden tods, and much more. No junk. 448 America Court. Sat 7/21 8-5. BC MOVING SALE 3x5 table, smoke glass top w/4 Navy chairs, brass trim. Blue-gray sofa. Chest of drawers. Misc. 293-0277 BC FURNITURE, ANTIQUES. 3ed and bath. Scooter, golf bag, brand name clothing, puzzles. FriS-11 am. 15f8 Sandra Dr. BC YARD SALE, Friday, 7-20. Sat 7-21. 7 am til 3 pm. Tools, beds, clothing, jewelry, lots of household i tems. 540 Federal. Big Yard Sale, Saturday only. 6 am to 1 pm. Turn on Pabco Rd. & follow signs to 540 Bastanchury GARAGE SALE)Sat. ONLY, 8 to 4 pm. Large 2 family 647 Glenwood Lane. 25 Bicycles for sale. 3 spd's, 10 spd's and beach cruisers. Priced to sell.565-1161 MOVING SALE: Everything goes, household items, baby stuff, lots of car parts, clothes, electric & plumbing supplies, tools and much more. Many items FREE. 18 Texas, Thur t hru Sunday. 565-1285 MOVING SALE: 160 Victory Rd. Thur Fri & Sat. 8 to 5 pm. Furniture & Misc. 565-7148 MULT! FAMILY yard sale. Furniture, clothing, toys& misc. 251 Princess Ann Court, Hdn. (Off Palo Verde & McKenzie) July 21 & 22 8 am to 1 pm. 565-0983. GARAGE SALE: July 20-^1-22,7 am-? Clothes, Baby items lots of misc. 220 Appian Way, 565-6318. Garage Sale, 21 & 22. Bdrm suite, $200 new. 85 Suzuki 400cc good shape, $750. 4V2 T heat pump. Ideal for mobile home. New $550. Lots of misc. 563 Tabony, Hdn GARAGE SALE-Fri & Sat. 7-20 & 21.8 am to noon. Sales include tods, 2 couches, baby items, childrens toys, exercise bike, ATC, 6o Cart and much more 120 E. Country CiuL, "ri'"* HOUSEHOLD ITEMS and Vdkswagon parts. Odds and ends.MJuly21.22.661Arrayo BC GARAGE SALE Mutthtamtly. Fri and Sat 8-1. Offica equip, t>at>y furn and clothes. Handmade crafts. 650 Otono BC GARAGE SALE MULTI FAMILY Furniture, lawn mowers, oriental mgs, screens, roof tiles, fishing gear, tods, shop vac, burglar alarm. Chevy Nova, trailer, sterling silver, and much more. Saturday, July 21 0-10 a.ni. 603, 519, 840 Birch St., B.C. Yard Sale, 122 Juniper St. July 21, 7 am to 2 pm. MOVING SALE: .1032 San Gabriel (Misskxi HNIs) Fri & Sat. Open at 8 am til ?. Office coffee maker, 30-30 rifle, couch & antique wingt>ack chairs, kXs of great buys. 25" Consde TV. ^^^J^^^ BOATS A RVS BRAND NEW 1989 ESPRE 5th WHEEL Only used twice. Excellent Condition. Sleeps 6. Has 6 year Warranty. •Roof Air. Call 646-8992 or 668-727 -^-^'' FACTORY DIRECT QALAXIE BOATS 17' (140 10) $7,950 18' (140 10) $9,950 19' (140 10) $10,950 2bV} (Catxn) $13,950 0 Down (OAC) 24-0730 Cabover camper for S' bed. Sleeps 4, stove, sink, icebox. $495. PH. 565-9628. FOR RENT 1968 Allegro motorhome. 27' Call 293-4161 BC 73 RAYNELL 16' 75 hp Evinrude, trailer $1,200. 294-1156 call after 4pm, or all day Sunday. BC 16 FT FIBERGLASS BOAT w/trailer. 60 Horse Johnson OB. Fishfinder, trolling motor, am/fm radio. Everything including motor refurbished, like new. Must see to t>elieve. Best offer. Call 294-3176 BC* S ft CAMPER, ice box, propane stove $400. CANOE15ftColeman. 1 yr dd, with paddles $300. 1442 Bronco, BC 1988 CMC SUB Sierra Classte R-2500. Dual air, HD Hydro 454 engine. 4-10 diff. All options. Split rear door. 1,000 lb E2 Hitch. 1987 ALPHA GOLD 32 ft Travel Trailer. All options and Honda gen, color TV, 100 gal water supply and holding tanks, custofTi window covering and floor covering. Both units cleaner than new. Low mileage. 293-6335 BC ^^^^^^j^ MOBILE HOMES Mobile Home for sale. 14 X 60, 2 bdrm, 1 bth, covered parking, porch & shed, in Villa Hermosa. $14,000. 564-5390. FOR SALE BY OWNER Double wide mobile in Boulder City-Glngerwood Adult Park (55 and over). By appt only. Call 564-3161 ask for Lynn. BC FREE PUPPIES to loving homes. Lab & Shepard mix. 7wks. dd Black.Call 5649043. The Animal Foundation Low Cost Spay/Neuter Qlink:. Call 384-3333 tor apbointment. „ FREE KIHENS AND PUPPIES NEED GOOD HOMt. Call 293-5673. Free to good home, two male Chow/Lab pups. 4 mos. old. Golden Retriever female, 4 years dd. 564-4872. STUD SERVICE Available. Keeshond AKC Registered. Champ. Blood 566-0362. Free to good homes, German Shepherd puppies. PH. 566-9583. Cat Lovers. Maine Coon Cat, Hymalayan, Persian Cat, and many more 361 2484. For adoptton, baby pigs, ratv bits, gurnriea pigs, pigeorts, and many more 361-2484. ^^^ LOST & FOUND Found: Female Australian Shepherd cross. Red w/Salt Lake City Tags. Ph. 566-6410. Found: Puppy, pure black, male. Valley view Dr area. Ph 565-0319. ^j^j^^^^^ FIXER UPPER 3 bdrm 2 bath mobile home and lot in Mt Vista Estates. $75,000 Licensee 293-1613 days, 293-1598 nights. BC ^^^^^^ PETS/ANIMALS JOB TRAINING wvu'MnwnuLa • ^ Cj •ASCtATRAPflEP TRAINING •fOREION t DOMESnC AUTOS •NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY WE WH.I. TRAIN / •X)eS WHILE TRAINING •LFETIME JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE •FINANCIAt. AlO AVAKALBU TO QUALIFIED STU0CNT8 •LIMITED • MONTH LIVIN^i EXPENSE ASSISTANCE ro OUAilFlEO STUDENTS f OH AN MTHVKW OM.I WKMUN TtCHMCAl CtMTCT nOCNB /WUONA <4K04tJn4t BIRO BOARDING Aquarium Sat-Up • Malnt. & Feeding CATHn CMTTERS, SEHINQ SERVICE W Can For AH Animal* UowiMd and Bonaaaa CATHY'S CRITTERS Get 10% off in July & Aug. on care of your animals and enter to win a LOVE BIRD. 566-6947 AKC MALTESE PUPPIES Have first shots. 7 generation pedigree. 293-3481 BC^ • FREE KITTENS 1 male, 1 female. 3 mos dd. Very cute. 1 solid black, 1 gray striped. 293-2712 BC' FREE to the right home. Loveable 3 yr old Blue Persian male. 293-3757 BC* NORWEGIAN ELKHOUND PUPPIES AKC registered. Males and females. 5 weeks old. 40 lbs at maturity. Great with kids. Have had shots. Rick 294-5098 after 6pm. BC MAY I HELP YOU GET YOUR DOG OR CAT SPAYED OR NEUTERED FOR A GRACIOUS DISCOUNT? 293-5873 B.C. Anytime. ^^^^^ Plaaao mal aM donaliona to Batty Honn'a Animal Adoption* P.O. Box 00640, HandarKxi, NV 89009. For Stud SenwM, Mala Chinaaa Pug, wMh popera and Show QuaNy. 5664868. FREE to a good home. Kittana (4) 294-a92 BC DoQ Lovers lor adoptwn. AKC Oobarman, toy poodo. CttlMMhua, CMnaaa pug, grayhound, Hungarian vlzwa, and many mora 361-2484. VEHICLES 88 SUBARU 4X4 Wagon. 5 sp manual. Air, cruise, i power doors, windows and steering. Plus much more. Excel cond. MUST | SELL 293-6311 BC* 63 Dodge 0-100 new door needed. Running gear ok, 5 g. tires. Runs g ood $300 FIRM 338 W. asic. 84 Dodge Omni GLH. A/C, AM/FM, PB, PS, runs good asking $1500 565-9231. 88 GMC Mini-Van, Must sell Call 564-2303. Excellent condition. 78 Olds Cutlass, not running, automatic. Best Offer. Also GLC Mazda, stick shift, good condition, nice body. $800 Ph. 665-1588. 78 Camero 350, 5 sp. trans. Air, good tires, new paint job. $2000 & 74 Ford pickup runs good, no air, $1200 565^704 or 565-8200. Perfonnance parts, sm black Chevy & Ford. 2—350 motors rebuildable. 565-1285. 8 am to 6 pm. Jeep for sale, 1975 CJ5. Hard top. Doors & wirv dows, roll t>ar. Rack on top, Extra gas cane, towbar, engine steam cleaned, good condWon. $6000. PH. 565-7783. 82 Yamaha Maxim 400. Good running bike $400. 564-3943. 1975 FORD BRONCO 4x4 302 erigine. Auto, ps, towbar. Very clean. Price $4,500 293-2652 BC* FOflSALE 1984 DODGE Diplomat w/power everything. Moon roof. $4,500 Call 293-7258 evenings or 294-0200 message. BC* 1982 HONDA 450. 23,000 miles. 1 owner. Good cond. 50 mpg. Call 293-2598 BC* 1982 El Camino.PS, A/C, PB, T.D. radio. Very good condition. $3,250 firm. 708 6th 293-0215 BC* 1981 Mazda RX7. Hi $4,000, low $2,900. Asking $3,500 or best. New paint job, a/c, car cover. Pioneer stereo cassette, bra. For appt call 293-5448 and leave message. BC* 81 FORD GRANADA. A/C. One owner. New battery, tires, etc. $2,000 OBO. Very good cond. 293-2532 BC* 1984 NISSAN MAXIMA Excel cond. New paint. Custom wheels and tires. $5,300 293-5229 BC* FOR SALE 73 VW Bug. $1,900. Excel cond. Engine rebuilt. New tires, int. and paint. 293-4855 ask for Denise. BC* Beautiful 85 Lincoln Towncar. Exc. condition. Low mileage. Gr6at Real Estate sales car. $11,500. Ph. 565-5425. EMISSION CONTROL STATION Emission Express and Auto Care. 1400 Nevada Hwy. No wait appointments. 293-2473 BC Pickup wanted. Ford or Chevy w/auto & air. Cash waiting for a good one. 565-8258. RADIATOR-SALES AND. REPAIR 293-7278 Big John, and Sona..Foothill Dr. BC^ 1983BLAZERAuto.PS, P -A/C $6,200 OBO 293-0414 BC* DIRT BIKE for sale. 1986 Honda XR 350. Good condition. Best offer 294-0825 BC* CAMPER SHELL. Fits Fofd Coorlsf, ifwrt bed, imimirm SO X 77 irwhes. ExcrtenI condition $125. Call 896-0621 aftsrepm. 1974, 12' SeaKing & trailer, $600. Ph. 565-7783. 1968 T-bird, 4 dr. Golden w/white top, beautiful cond. under 51,000 ori. miles. Asking $4000. 564-6855. 54 Chrysler, runs & is complete. Has 331 Hami ana Days 565-8200 or 564-7937 eves. S1800 or trade 1982 CHEV CONVERSION VAN New ^ne, ratxiilt transmission. 12,000 mites. Body good condition. Loaded. 293-6125 BC 1979 CHRYSLER NEW YORKER Fifth Ave. Fully loaded w/moon roof. SAFE, comfortable car lor traveling. Well maintained, smogged. $1,800. Please ca 294-1362 BC 1982 MERCURY CAPRI Hatchback, 6 cyl, auto. $2,500 293-4054 BC 89 Honda Elite. E. Black, Low mileage. Asking $800 565-0319. 1979 Mustang 2 dr hardtop, new transmission $2000 OBO 564-9107. 1982 280Z, runs great, $3,000 OBO 565-8200. Great Shape 1979 Toyota Celica, new tires, new battery, new clutch, oil change $1200 FIRM. 564-7905. 1972 CB175 Street b i ke, 565-4413. Honda $200, 81 Dataun 510 4 dr $21.40 wk. 80 Chavy Mallbu $19.3a wK. 82 Ford Eacort '. .$15.45 wk. 82 Chryaler Leb. Convt $32.50 wk. 84 Chavy Camero $25.82 wk. 73 VW Karm $32.50 wk. 79 OMa. Cutlaaa $26.50 wk. 81 Honde Civic Wg $25.77 wk. 81 Pontlac Phoenix $25.77 wk. 77 QMC M ton 454 Eng $38.74 wk. 83 Buick Skyiark $25.77 wk. 84 Dodge Charger .$29.78 wk. 84 Plymouth CoK Vlata $20.18 wk. 80 Toyota Coroila $8.00 wk. American Auto Sales 1534 Boulder Hwy. North Hendoivon, NV 89015 566-0711 oti834KU1L^^ we FINAMCe AMYOm' HIGHEST PRICES PAID FOR OLD CARS WRECKED OR RUNNINO W'ra the chMpMt on parU Try Utfl! AN AiiMrlain AiHo Wracktn FAST CASH TOP PRICES PAID FOR JUMK CARS FREE PICK-UP SERVICE CALL USi 566-1414 NnttA PIC^-nUIT 83 MHlubiahl, 4 wh. dr., axcaNant cond $3,200 or Iwst. 566-200 days, 564-7937 "ATTENTION: GOVERNMENT SEIZED VEHICLES from $100. Fords, Mercedes, Corvettes, Chevys. Surplus Buyers Guide. (1) 602-838-8885, Ext. A-10002." USED AUTO PARTS 2937278. Lat us do tha calling on our new sataMa COODK er.Alstataa and Canada. I John and Sons, Foolhi Dr. BC One VW rail-type Dune Buggy. Will trade for 8' camper shell. PH. 565-5542 Of 564-8809. 86 PONTIAC SUNBIRD One owner $4,500 OBO 294-0707 BC* j^^^^^^^ DOMESTIC HELP BAWMAMTBMNCE Ut Ow Hema QMrtng TMm Tikt CM rf Yow ConplMi HMtdMningNM* •Mwaffw^anh* *WAhdOMM*nOQfi*Carpcli A g • aa-arn • Eaaoiiiwiing. Fina tooih cleaning. $15 par rm. MMmum 3 mna. Belhroorw fraa. Raferancaa. Ph. 565^800. 8 am to 7 pm Mon^Sat. WANTED MATURE RELIABLE WOMAN to' work in my home Sat and Sun 9 am-1 pm. Light housekeeping, cooking, attention to pats. Perhaps grocery shopping. Good pay. Own transportation and references needed Call 294-1586 before 6 pm. Cleaning done to satisfaction—Reasonable. References supplied. Call 564-3398. WANTED-Mature reliable woman to work nighte, Fridays, and Saturdays 7pm to Sam. Must be dependable and honeet. Refereneee required. Call 294-1588 before 8pm. BC* LAWN MAINTENANCE ftoaaonabia A Dapandabie 565-6428 Home & office cleaning. Will clean the old fashioned way. Call Spic & Span cleaning. Ph. 564-9421 Quality child care in my home. All shifts. Sunset & Pabco area. Ph. 566-9217. Tired of cleaning, let us do it for you. Jodi at 564-8367 or Jessica at 565-0640. Childcara provldad for ages 18 mo to 4 yrs old. $50 wk. In Pittman Araa. Ph 565-6857. Quality Childcara, Infants to 5 yrs dd. Nutritious meals provided & lots of love. Call 5641233. OLD FASHIONED HOUSECLEANING Reasonable rates. B.C., Hnd, and Gr Vallay. 293-2960 leave measage. BC CHILDCARE in my home Mon-Fri, anytime. Call NItea 566-0239. BatjysMing in my Henderson Home. An shifts available. Meals provided. Call 566-9428. ^^^4 SITUATIONS WANTED Home Health Care Aide, currently has openings for new paitents. Compassionate, experienced 37 year old female. Reference provided. $10 per hr. Call Kathy 565-6852, ^-^-^ BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES START YOUR OWN BUSINESS FOR LESS THAN $300 and have the opportunity lo have unlimited income potential. Have free time to enjoy your family. Call recorded message, 24 hr request video presentation. 5942153 How to start & operate your own home business. For free information, write Kee Books, P.O. Box 90847, Henderson, NV, 89009-0847 # G ^^4^^ PERSONALS METRIN Warn to look S-IO yam youngai? For fiw lacW ippt Oil Ma or Sua. Do II rww • 293-5268 ^^^^^^^ MISCELLANEOUS A WONDERFUL FAMILY EXPERIENCE, AUSTRALIAN, EUROPEAN, SCANDANIVIAN, YUGOSLAVIAN HIGH SCHOOL EXCHANGE STUDENTS ARRIVING IN AUGUST. BECOME A HOST FAMILY/AMERICAN INTERCULTURAL STUDENT EXCHANGE. CALL 1-800-SIBLING SNEED CREDITS $5,000. Credit Card regardless of cradM hialory. Moor Bank Cards alao available Plus a fabulous camera, film, and vacaHon package. Phone (405) 364-5574 Extansio^43. Cordless Pt)one, AT & T, 3 yrs old. $45. 458-5204. FRESH NEW MEXICQI QREEN CHILE wW be available Aug. 13,1990 Place your order now W4-1033 12 ft. canoe & 2 paddles, $100, Wood & glass gun case, holds 6 guns, $200. Cast iron woodburning stove, pipes & fireplace equipment. Tent, used once, sleeps 4, $50. Ph. 565-7783. UTILITY TRAILER 4'X 4' Plywood sides. Spare tire. Used once. $200 5646882 • CUSTOM MADE 8 ft sofa w/2 footrests. Matching barrel chair. One yr old Perfect cond. $600. Call 293-2220 BC* QUEEN BDRM SET Very good cond. New chiropractic mattress. 14.5 cu ft G.E. chest f reezer. 293-2598 BC 2 VIDEO SETTER UNIVERSALS: 150-200 LINES PER MINUTE 36 GRIDS and FONT TABLES EXPAND CONDENSE REVERSE AND ITALISIZE. SOLD AS IS $500 each. DALE WETENKAMP 702882-2111. FOR SALE 9mm Walttwr samlauto platol. Holatar A apara magazlna $390. S68-0672. Oragon Brria AFivtt FrMh Frozan Your Choice: 14 Family Packs of: BlackbrrlM $22.90 RaspberriM $22.90 BoyMnbtrriM.... $23.90 SluatMrrwt. $23.90 StrwtxW/S $20.90 StrawtlW/0 $21.90 PiaCharnai $21.90 Swaal Cherries... $2190 Sliced Peaches... $22.90 Apricol Halves.... S24.90 Apples Sliced ... $ 19.90 Logan Bemet... $21.90 TO ORDER CALL Andy 564-1443 Furniture, a house fulll (New still in cartons) living, tied, & dinring rm, 17 pieces in al. 1st $1,000 tak^ Win San separately. Warehoused at 4240 Cameron 734-8800 Can deliver. PATIO FURNITURE Redwood. One round tatile, 5 chairs. Exc cond $225 294-3166 BC VOICE/PIANO/DRAMA. Private lessons, specialist teacher and director, all ages, starting age 7. Summer openings avaMatile. Ask about our summer Saturday review classes. Quality vocal & keytxwd entertainment for your wedding, receptions or functions. Ph. Fto Raymond 565-8469, Coral Cove Music Studio. 1000 Mini Cross diet pills for just $10. To order call 1-800-668-4968. ARE YOU LIVING WITH A DRINKING PROBLEM? If 30, why not try Al Anon? Meetings are Tues, 10 am at Club 5f Tues 8:30 pm. Club 51. Wed 8 pm St. Rose Dominican Hospital. Fh. 7:30 pm Water & Pov*r BIdg. Nevada Hwy. Boulder City. For more information call 5659963. GO TO GLITTER GULCH DENA'S for an Indian Affairl Museum quality Jewelry, Tribal Antiquities, SOUTHWEST DECOR. Rock Shop for collectorsi Fantastk: Crystals, GEMS, MINERALS. You deserve the best! It's at GLIHER GULCH DENA'S ON BOULDER HIGHWAY & SUNSET RD. IN HENDEROSN. Dena's Buys & Trades for Silver, Rock & your INDIAN STUFF. 5650711. CLOCK REPAIR •Antique & Othflr •Grandfather/Wall Buying Antique and Estate Clocks WOMEN'S BiBLE STUDY iNTERDENOIMiNATiONAL Every Wedneaday al 9 30 am 571 Adams Blvd Free babysitting and refreshments. If you are a new comar lo Boulder City, come and make new friends Phone 293-77?3. Baby furniture for sale. Everiflo infant carseat xtra cover $30, stroller $40, t>ed w/mattress w/crib bumper pads $90. 565-1067. ••••••••••••• Want to maka extra til? All natural Haaltti a Nutrition producta. L08E WEIGHT a FEEL OREATI 100H 30 day S uarantaa. Call Jill: 17-3321. FOR IJkDIES ONLY Share an evening of laughter and fun with your friends Schedule a FUN. party • Gifts • Prizes and • Dscounts Call 293-5287 BC LOSE WEIGHT FealOraat CailMeNowt Find Out How 387-2624 HAVE A UNIQUE BRIDAL SHOWER. Throw a FUN. Party Call 293-5257 BC Wanted used car or truck, prk:e range from $100 to $600. Fixer-upper OK. $65-9 444. LOSE WEIGHT THE EASY WAY writh Forever Lite, up to 30 lbs per month. Money badk guarantee. Ph. 564-1648. Call Sue for great Mary Kay Products! 454-6175. WHIRLPOOL HEAVY DUTy DRYER. Rebuilt. $125 294-7766 BC NEW CONSTRUCTION Everything must go. 4 complete bedroom sets. Odd size mattresses, bunk bed set, odd dressers, TV 's and stereos, studio speakers, complete oak office, computer, copier machine, washer/dryer, refrigerator. Sofa, loveseat, flower arrangements. Three car garage full of things I need to sell. 658-8166 BC WATER SKI, vest and tow line. $100 firm. Isuzu pickup rear bumper $50.293-0176 BC 19 inch color TV, remote control. Portable sewing' machine. Round end table. Sm desk, oak. New elec lawn mower, rear bagger, 20 in. 2 pc lawn lurn. 293-0531 BC FOR SALE Concrete power trowel. New 5 horse Honda motor. Call eves 294-2393 BC tillSC HSHLD ITEMS and furniture. Call 294-1244 or 1010 Keys Dr, Boulder City ONAN GENERATOR 2,100 watts. Like new. $400 294-1549 BC MINI CAR/GO CART Red Con/ette body. 3 hp Brigos and Stratton Engine. $450 294-1549 BC ALL STEEL CARPORTS-PATIOS Also Alum and Redwood. From 1,095 B C BIdg and Roofing 293-2179 TERRACE CONSTRUCTION INC. aea-ieaa KEEP IT SIMPLE Evefy item 10% above coat plus Ireighl We ael living room suites, bedroom suites, dining rooms, beddings, carpel, pad, linoleum, vinyl, tile and hant wood floors No money down. No Payment lor 90 days 90 Day same as cash 0AC • KEEP IT SIMPLE" 153 Water St. Henderson, MondaySaturday. 9 am.-5 p m. INDEPENDENT MOVERS ^ One Room of Houseful > • Pianos or Any Heavy Load ^Specializing m Henderson Boulder City & Green Valley Fr Estimates and Reasonable Hates Raferancas AvaHabla 293-7911 H & S LAWN CARE Complete Lawn Sarvlca, Tree & Shrub Care, Automatic Sprinkler Repair. Lie. #449 Harold 6 SiMron Crttdtar 294-6200 Wa Do Moiv Than "Mow, Blow & Go" JaffKlncaid 294*1114 SPMnaJW KUa MnNNW OEMMM FREE ESTIMATES BOULDER CITY • HENDERSON • GREEN VALLEY 4M-1991 CASH PAID FOR AUTOGRAPHS OF FAMOUS PEOPLE All lattars Pholoa, Dooumanta, •te of PrmMMit*. Movto ttara, Slnllta, Mualelans, Inventor*, AfwiNooia MM Ml otffior Fonioiio Paopla. AIo old pf>-'70 Mj^of MogMin— CALL SeS-0319 ARTHRITIS: I have no mora, by drinWng Qolden Horizon Int. ALOE VERA JUICE, Money Back Quarantee. 564-1646 For sale: Very nice office daak. $95. Ph. 565-7348. ATTENTION: POSTAL JOBS! Start $11.41/hour! For application info call (1) 602-838-8885 Ext. M-11032,6anrt-10pm, 7 days. Queen waterbed lighted, mirrored headboard. 12 drawers, heater, massager & bumper pads $450. 564-5390 PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRS Reliable restoration and retinishing by Charlie Tuner. 293-6011 BC^ --v SIDE BY SIDE REFRIGERATOR Works t reat. Almond color. 300 293-0414 BC Couch, $175. Lazy Boy rocker, $9&. Bookcase, $20, Trash Compactor, $50. Gas range, $100. Recliner, $50, Exercise bike, $35. Ph. 564-1777 Magic Chef Washer & Gibson Electric Dryer $75 each or $150 for pair. 565-4413. For Sale: Kenmore Apt size washer/dryer, like new, floor to ceiling, off white lined drapes 4541223. Zenith 25" Stereo colored monitor TV w/4 external speakers, Fisher Stereo VCR, swivel rocker, desk, Amana Refrigerator, 3 dr. w/water & ice dispenser, slow cooker. Counter oven broiler, 2 living rm. lamps. Gold drapes, 7' flocked Christmas tree. 873-2355. King size mattress w/box springs $100. Clean & very nice 564-0920. Sears swing set w/slide. Good condition, $30. Self propelled gas mower, $50. Zena Pasta Cutter, $25. Ph. 565-7478. MOVING SALE: King size waterbed w/mirrored canopy. 21' refrigerator, dining table w/wicker back chairs. 25" Curtis Mathis console. Fisher 100 Watt rack stereo GE double oven, lite brown sofa loveseat & chair, some other misc. Ph. 564-8862. ^^J|^JfJ^^44 HELP WANTED Assistant mgr, part time for 3 mos, then full time for expanding mail service center, 734 S. Boulder Hwy. Boulder Mkt Place/Henderson. Babysitter needed. My home. Must have own transportation and be dependable. 8 am to 8 pm. Mn & Fri. 565-5035 $23,700 PER YEAR TO START, plus benefits. U.S. Postal Service soon to accept applications In your area. For informat ion. call (219) 662-0306 FULL CHARGE BOOKKEEPER with computer experience. Resume required. References will be checked. Call for appt with Nola 293-3131 BC* Labor WIHSHIIUNa IMMlbUTILY aiNIIUL LABOR (Utt SO-100 Iba.) No Work Expoflonca Required Muet Have Reliable Traneportatlon EASTRIDQE TEMPS 565-3118 wa W. Lake Meed, Suite C, n, NV HILP WANTED I need I aertotia people to help me wlln ex* pending b uel n ee e FuH training. Start now. 4 CaN 387-261t ASSEMBLERS: Excellent income to assemble g roducts from your home. 04-646-1700 DEFT. P2310. "ATTENTION: EASY WORK EXCELLENT PAY! Assemble products at home. Details (1) 602-838-8885 Ext. W-10002." WANTED by the Oasis Restaurant, Lounoe and RV Park. A fun place to work. We need am and pm cooks. Relief waitress Bartenders/waitress. Retired or semi retirees welcome. We are 24 mies S of Hoover 0am on Hwy 93. Please call or come and aee Oar1er)e. (602) 767-3222.* Applications now being accaplad lor retail boat rrwc^iantc w/commiaak>n only. Must becerttfied. Alao lor lull time maintenance poaition. Apply In peraon Lake Mead Resort, 322 Lakaihore Rd., Boulder CKy. EOE/Authorlzed Conceslionaira lor NPS. Boulder City Christian Science Church seeks VOCAL SOLOIST for Sunday Services. For audition call 293-7279 BC;^ Pre-school teachers, full & part time positions avail. Fall openings. Also taking applications for substitutes. If you enjoy working w/children, please call us at 565-0007 or 456-7008 ATTENTION: HIRING! GOVERNMENTJOBSYOUR AREA! MANY IMMEDIATE OPENINGS WITHOUT WAITING LIST OR TEST! $17,840$69,485. Call 1-602-838-8885 Ext. R-11032. HOSPITAL JOBS. Start Se.SO/hr. your area. Noaxp. naceasary. For Info call 1-900-990-9399 Ext. 571,6 anrva pm. 7 days. $12 phone lee. MANICURIST AND HAIR DRESSER WANTED for buay salon. Lots of walk ins. Call Expreaskxis. Ask for Janet 2935176 BC •HOUSEKEEPERS Contact Lori 293-3329 BC Restaurant hostesses, bus Iperson. Apply in person Gkild Strike Inn and Casino, Hwy. '93. Bou kler City. EARN UP to $339 per week. Assemble our products at home. Amazing recorded maaaage reveals details. Ph. 382-7846. Applcations now t>eing accepted for maids & laundreas, full bme positions. Apply in person Lake Mead Resort Lodge, 32^ Lakeshore Rd., Boulder CKy Ph. 293-2074. EOEAuthorized Concessionaire for NPS., MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST Duties include phones, schefduling appointments. Medical terms helpful. Full time 8 to 5 pm w/weekends off. Apply in person at Dr. Robert Ritchey's Office 110 E. Lake Mead, Suite 203. Call 565-8066. Henderson. St. Roae Dominican Hoapltal currently haa tha following amploymont opportunltlea avallat>le: Full Time & Per Diem • R.N.'s Med/Surg • new grads welcome. ER, OR (min. 3 yrs. exp.) Part-time & Per Diem Med/Surg/OB/GYN L.P.N. (IV Certified) Full-time R.N. House Supervisor • Nursing Administration BSN preferred, 3 yrs. nursing exp. 1 of which must have been in a supervisory capacity. Full-time • Collector • 1 yr exp in medical insurance and collecting. Knowledge of medical terminology and computer. ^^^""^ ;: Full-time Director of Volunteers • BS degree with course in personnel management preferred. Thhee yrs exp in community, social or volunteer work with supervisory responsibilities. Qualified paraona apply at: St. Roae Dominican Hoapltal 102 E. Lake Mead Drive Hendareon, Nevada 89015 (702) 564-2622 EOE/M-F-H FRONT DESK CLERK/ MAIDS/PORTERS Now accepting applications for front desk personnel, porters & maids Full and or part time. Apply in person Gold Strike Inn & Casino, Boulder City. Bring proper ID CAtuuens MBKoeo FOR MOTOR ROUTES Inqtrin at HENDERSON HOME NEWS orjm S9&NNA'S VANITY 565-0a55 — WANTED — WAITERS, WAITRESSES, BUS PERSON, DISHWASHERS. LINE COOK, PREP COOK, GENERAL KITCHEN HELP A CAGE CASHIERS. Apply In person at Railroad Pass HotsI & Casino. Bring propsr ID to 2800 South Bouklsr Highway, Hsndsrson. HOUSEKEEPING ATTENDENTS WANTED Railroad Paea la now accepting applicatlone for full and part time houaekeeplng attendante. Apply In paraon 7 daye a week at Railroad Paaa Hotel ft Caeino, 2800 S. BouMar Hwy., Handaraon. Bring proper 10. GENERAL LABORS/PRODUCTION WORKERS & CLERICAL Immediate Openings Good Pay — No Fee MANPOWER TEMPORARY SERVICES 30 A Water Street Henderson, NV 565-5554 Copies 10C each LONESOME DOVE kSTEAE HOUSE .^:^i .^'ii^ ^'it^ .^'ii^ fJ'Ai.. n^cjjo^ Dance Hall C Saloon Uio-SljBoai • • nyjM 'tfjrrI37S deily-telemarkatafs Take ptione orders lor opportunity putilicatlona. (TCO) 56&^13 Ext D-1 MAIDS/LAUNDRY HELP: Experience or wNI train. Alao part time laundry peraon. Apply in parson at Beat Wealern, 85 W. Lake Mead Drive, Henderson. • AHENTION: GOVERNMENT JOBS-YOUR AREA!$17,840-$69,485. Call (1) 602-838-8885, Ext R-10002. • AHENTION: POSTAL JOBS! Start $11.41/hourl For application info call (1) 602-838-8885, Ext. M-10002,6amto1Opm, 7 days." PAftT TIME COLLECTOR NEEDED Will train. Must have pleasant telephone voice. Call 293-7142 Mon-Fri. BC_* HELP WAhJTED Drivers, mornmg and evenino. $4 hr. Start immad. Call Chris 293-3030 BC SALES/TELEMAR,KETERS. Huge Profits! Publications-Easy Sales! ( 904)581-1571 Ext. B-2 •••••• i^i^^ifJlf)^^ PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Private swim ISMona, Certified swim instructor. 3 yrs experienca. CoHags educated. Works well with kids. Reasonable pricea, flexible schedules. Includes water safety & awareness as well as step by step swim techniquaa. Through enjoyable 1 on 1 basis. For app't scheduling & info, call Ryan Duncan, eSS'OOBI. /\. THE CAVANAUGH'S V -^ PAINTING >i*lr IntarlorV Extarlor Fraa Estlmatta Ucanaad 294-1422 : CLOCK AND ANTIQUE Complete Restoration {*> > All work guaranteed 'Free Estimates V^i iV No Repair — No Ctwrge ^—^ 978-4242 MobMe 29S-9900 By Master l-lordogist/ClocK Maker CARY S. MMIL Discount lor BC fleskJWs AIRLINES t10-f M par hr. Naggnil AMkiM bpaidhig M Cltlm/Cmomr I WM Train For kife )1l44MINIitA123l EARN UP to $339.85 weekly. assemble products at home. Call our fabulous recorded message anytime. Details 1-408-534-1989 X-nv01 Salesperson. 18 to 35, full time or part time. Men or women $36,000 potential. Protected areas. Call Bob 734-1807. Earn Income part-time from your home. FUN JOB! Call 702-594-9034, 24 hr. message. Casino Jobs. All positions, 305-4250314 Ext. Aj^ Super 8 Motel now hiring full time/part time maids. Apply In person anytime. 5288 Boulder Hwy. Hdn Nursing Assistant, Adult health day care center. Must have ability to relate to frail elderly & handicapped. Assist in lifting & transporting clients. Ph. 565-9578. Phone Sales. Experienced or will train. Students or housewives. Part time or full time. $5 per h r. plus commission plus bonuses. Call Bob 734-1807. HOSPITAL JOBS. Start $6.8Q/h[,-your. area. No exp. necessary. For info call 1-900-990-9399 e)ft. 571, 6 am-8 pm 7 days.' $12 phone fee. GOVERNMENT JOBS! Now hiring in your area, both skilled and unskilled. For a current list of jobs and application, call 1-800-782-5142 ext. P792. EXCELLENT WAGES for spare time asembly. Easy work at home, no experience needed. Call 1-504-641-7778 ext. 4480. Open 24 hours, including Sunday. HOOVER DAM STORE Clerk-Dept Manager position. Start SAP part time-full time in 2-4 weeks. Phone 293-1824 BC THE SALVATION ARMY IS IN DESPERATE NEED OF FURNITURE AND CLOTHES. PLEASE CALL THE SALVATION ARMY PICKUP AT 949-2374-5-€ BomeRBEetmc Licensed • Bonded Insured Lie. No. 15187 Call 293*4899 vmm •453-1869 •565-3065 209 foster Ave. Henderson, Nev. M015 Jade Pearson (PERSONAL LAWN CARE) Personalized lawn and garden service. Complete lawn care and cleanup. Call Todd 294-1448* SIMPSON & SONS INC. Bonded & Insuiad Lie'0018823 A 0022307 BscktMM • Hoa Rama • Bobcala CARL SIMPSON 6050 VEH06 WAY LAS VEGAS. NV 89130 645-0882 ) HELP WANTED Casino hotel jobs. Excellent income and exciting work. (702) 366-6313 Ext C-1. PART TIME CROSSING GUARD The City o( Boulder City has openings for Crossing Guard Alternates. Pay is $4.25 per hour, maximum 5 hours a day. Applrcations can be obtained from City Hall Personnel Dept., 401 California Ave. Boulder City, from Monday thru Thursday, 7:00 AM-6;00 PM, and returned to the Police Department, 1005 Arizona Street. Boulder City Is an Equal Opportunity Employer. HOUSEKEEPING Sands Motel. Week and weekends. 809 Nev Hwy. BoUder City. PART TIME SUMMER HELP Must be 21 year or older and reliable. For appt call 293-1891 Boulder Beach Store. BC* REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONAL Join our growing company in new offices this fall Only lull-time, nonsmoking need apply. Contact Bob Boston, Dissert Sun Realty 293-2151 or 293-2314 BC The Beauty Corner is now hiring, stylists & manicurists. Apply in person at 303 Water St Henderson. SUPER BUSY SALON. BOBS ALL FAMILY REbTAURANT now aooaplinq appNcationa for dianwasners, cooks,' waMraaaae. Afipiy IntMnon 761 Nev Hwy BC Household cleaners. Mon tfwo Fri Sck pay, vacation, holiday pay $5 03 hr after trainir)g Grimetxjsiers Makj Service. 798-1002 NEED IMMEDIATELYII Home Aaaambly people, wSing to earn up to S369 par week. aaaambUng producta at home. No experience neceaaary. Send aelfaddrested stamped •nvelope to: HandonAi. 2830 Marathoe, Drive. HenderaooN V 806l4. BOULDER Cin PAINTING & DRYIVALL Acoustic Rvspray Commercial • Raaldantlal • Induatrlal Serving Clark County Free Eetlmates Lie. #25680 insured & Bonded 1638 Nev. Hwy. 293-2906 HENDERSON A-1 PRINTING SCREEN PRINTING Shirts • Caps • Signs • Other Business Cards 15% Off in July •Novelties •Wedding Announcements •Matches •Reunion Printing 565-1133 G&G TRANSFER 8mm Home Movie Transferred to VMS video tape CALL 45M949 LAWNCARE, mowing, raking, pruning, ramovtf PAINTING, Intnor/ •xtarkw, sitwork. QuaMy vMirk. raonatila ralM. Frw Erie 284-3175 CEMENT WORK Block Fences, Patios, Driveways, Slabs, Sidewalks, and Steps. U # 0018577 294-1087 ••••• • Ceramic Tile Installed. Custom Design. Dependable, quality work. 15 yrs. Exprience. Call Mike Palmer 564-2563. HONEY DOS HANDYMAN SERVICECJ Too Hot To Do Your Honay Do's? Callua. 294-3071 566-6811 P*Wi jgi \^'

PAGE 34

w m • I • I H ^ • • ^'^'?^^^|B?^^ m^^ Page 18B, Henderson Honie News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Thursday, July 19, 1990 J--^^-M&M Wallppr Inttallailon •Stripping •Intvitor Painting 454-3903 THOMPSON'S HOME MAINTENANCE & COOLER SERVICE & REMODELS 865*SS42 CARPENTRY UNLIMITED Interior • Exterior Rough Of Finish Call Brian Yula 564-8703 WALL CLEANING FIJI & Efi.impI Paiiil BC Hend. & GV 294-3071 565-0547 PAPERHAN6IN6 and PAINTING Professionally Done • 30 Years Experience Please call 361-9004 HOWARD HELDERLEIN CONSTRUCTION Commercial • Ilesidential • Remodels and Additons License #021013 565^74 BOULDER SAND & GRAVEL, INC. 624 YUCCA ST., BOULDER CITY, NV 89005 OFFERING THE FOLLOWING CONSTRUCTION AND LANDSCAPING SUPPLIES •DESERT ROSE LANDSCAPE ROCK •TYPE II, REJECT SAND DELIVERY AVAILABLE M-F 7-3 P.M. it NOW AVAILABLE READY MIX CONCRETE 294-1156 LEON PRESSURE CLEANING Tired of a grimy driveway? Tired of that greasy garage floor? Do you want that NEW lool( your driveway, and garage once had? If 80, then call LEON PRESSURE CLEANING 564-6292 We'll have that driveway or garage looking like new in no timel You won't believe your eyesi UGMMI|fttlMail HANDY RANDY "The Affordable Handyman" •Property Maintenance •Quality Workmanship • Rental Reconditioning •RalifcUle Service If You're FuMy, Call Me—Satiitactlon Guaranteed 294-8494 MCS GARDENING Ucenttd Lawn Milntenance Resldantlal & Comimrclal •Tree Trimming •Thatch Reseed •Lawn Clean-Up & Haul OHs •Sprinl^ AUTO UPHOLSTERY JEADLINERS • FURNITURE FREE ESTIMATES • A.M. 5 P.M. MON. FRI. MM •OUISCR HWT. AT TDO^. {Mtmjt TOWARDS HENOemON) BACKHOE and BOBCAT SERVICE •Lots Graded 30 Years Experience Carl W. Ford •Ditching Houriy Rates 293-0593 ELECTRICIAN: No job loo big or too smalt. Call Jeff 5650947. Custofrt Stenciling ''•Walls •Floors •Furniture Free Estimates Allese 294-1422 MIKE MORRISON ELECTRIC, INC. Licensed-Bonded'Insured Lie III30425 Call 564-2145 PAINTING Painter w/40 Ytn ExpttifK* Stnhr aUnnt Dhcounh No Job Too Small CmM John B94-994S STORAGE FOR RENT AN SliM—Fnea4 ReeWanI Manager NMrSunaal Mountain Vtata 458-3990 MURRAY MAINTfNANCE Carpentry, Painting Giaaa Repaira All Household Repairs Roof Repairs 293-8110 BASIC NATURE CARPET CLEANERS Henderson's Finest 564-6716 SAM BLAKELEY MASONRY Custom Glass Block* Windows, Showers, Spas NV Lie. 124144 16 yrs. Experience 564-7764 LOGOS DESIGNED For Business Cards, Etc. Cail Mzr'Jyn 564-1881 RICK RUSSELL Lie. Handyman Carpentry Electrical Drywall Complete Home Repair 564-7488 VAN THE HANDYMAN DO ALL 564-7704 & Beeper 599-4179 AARON FENCING FrM EstlmatM Chain Link A Wood Fencing 20 Years Exp. Pli. 451-8190 State Lie. 15332 GENE'S CARPET CLEANING SERVICE Steam Extract or Shampoo-Waxing and Stripping 564-8055 COOLERS Stimmerized & Repaired. Call Ben Depue, Handyman. 565-7468. Resifltfntial Commercial CLASSIC CARPET CLEANING 389-6327 or 59S-2226 Ptolesswnal OWNEfl-OPEBATED Fmdass Cleaning Mo Ctarft It Net Carpel Upholstery (OM SaMM ALL TYPES ROOFING AND REPAIRS You buy material, I do the labor. You save 30% Call Don at 564-8519 If no inswrr, ralJ after S p.m. Free Estimatea YOU NAME IT, WE'LL DO IT Residential & Commercial Additions Remodel Repair Lie. No. 14492 Ph 293-4284 KEN'S ftHANOYMAN All Type* of Maintenance I Can Fix or Malta Moat Anything 293-0045 TOPCOaNTRY fILBaHS 1. Killa.' T.nw, Clint Black, RCA 2. Livin' II Up, George Strait, MCA 3. No Hnldin' Back, Kandy Tram, Warnet Bros. 4. Couniry Club, Travis Trilt, Warner Bros. 5. RVS III, Ricky Van Shelton, Columbia 6. Pickin' On Nashville, The Kentucky' Headhunten. Mercury 7. Pass il On Down, Alabama, RCA 8. Here in Ihe Real War|d, Alan Jackson, Arista 9. Willow In the Wind, Kathy Mattea, Mercury Feelin Fit! Q Diets often deprive the body of essential vitamins and nutrients. If you've l>een restricting food intake for a while, ask your doctor if he ttiinks you're putting yourself at risk for vitamin deficiency. OKWMIM Al IRON (;\ll S 5f)5-5.VS4 Nt\;i(l:il.ic5')(lf)\ HANDYMAN Yard work, painting, repairs, errands. No job too small. Call Scott 564-8812. POOL SERVICE and r*palr AN Reddantial Pooh MS mo. Cofflfflerdal, Free Estimat**. Call 451 •2293 or 494-2443 SHERMAN CONCRETE LIcflHMd ft Bondad Lie. 130046 FrM EatimatM 294-8349 Cement Work. Block fences, patios, driveways, slabs, sidewalks & steps. Lie # 0018577 Ph. 294-1087. Ceramic Tile Installed. Custom Design. Dependable, quality work. 15 yrs. Experience. Call Mike Palmer 564-2563. Frank Harwoods Cooler Repair & Service Parts & labor guaranteed. 565-7107. "SECOND HAND STORE: Bilmar's, 27 Army SI. Buy and sell brass, tools and small appliances. All merchandise. If you have anything lor sale please zome in. We repair big appliances, all makes and models $20 servk:e call. 5t>4 7367 30 dav guarantee. Appliance parts for do-ityourselfers. Hanwood's Appliances 118 E. Lake Mead. Henderson. 564-2210. HONEY DO'S Handyman. Too Hot To Do Your Honey Dos? Call Us. 294-3071 566-6811 Paint average house $250.24 hrs. Experience. Work Guaranteed. Call Jim 565-4460. CARPENTRY, electrical, painting. 20 years experience. All viork guaranteed. Insured. 383-0955* Portable welding, wrougtit iron repair, gates. Call 565-5071 Anytime. LAWNCARE MOWING, REMOVAL, ROCKWORK ERIC 294^175 LAWNCARE MOWINQ, REMOVAL, ROCKWORK •QtMlltyWork •RunonaM* RatM •FrM EM/nMfM Irie 2M-3178 ••••••• Jf^^4 RENTALS Section 8, duplex for rent. 3 t)drm, 1 bth, $680 mo plus power, plus $300 deposit. 2 bdrm, 1 btti, $605 plus power $300 deposit. 565-8296. Ask for Adah 733-1794. Will give private rm & board, own entrance to female Senior Citizen. Must have own car. For errands etc. $100 mo. If you do more, less rent. Share home. 451-6382 For rent: Furnished 2 bdnm house. $550 mo. Corner Sunset & Boulder. Ph. 565-1945. Studio Apt. Furnished, non-smoker, no pets. $295 mo. utilities included. $50 cleaning deposit. Call 564-5248. 3 BR house with Irg garage. Available 7/1 /90. $575 per mo plus depo. Call 294-0404 BC ,SMALL STUDIO APT for 1 person. Furnished. 293-6815 BC IN BEAUTIFUL BOULDER SQUARE. Two bedroom. Upstairs. New carpets, exceptionally clean. Leases for $550. Call 363-4681 for appointment. BC* Boulder City 10,000 sq ft Ijlock constructed kxiilding. Zoned Commercial/Manufacturing. Three phase power. Smaller sizes availatile. Good rental income property. 293-1978 BC FOR RENT 1 BR unfurnished Boulder City home. $450 per mo plus deposit. 736-6062 BC 2 BR 1 Vz bath condo for rent. $750 per mo. 293-7486 Lillian. BC* FOR LEASE Prime Property, 1,250 eq. ft. Nevada Hwy. next to Heelth Nute. Call 294-0197 or 293-1844. FOR RENT 2 BR apt, fenced yard. Laundry, off street parking. $425 plus sec and cleaning, 293-4097 BC Room for rent, house privileges. 119 Ash St. Male or female. Ph. 566-6719. Teddy's Kitchenettes Just bring your toothbrush Everything furnished Phone 293-1716 uabin on beautiful Panguitch Lake, Utah Lake view, $375 wk, 3 days lor $200. Sleeps 6. Great fishing. Call Hank, 732-2006 or home, 361-4287. CHARMING 3 BR HOUSE on beautiful Birch St. Large rooms. Garage. $750. Call evenings 294-1 444 BC WEEKLY KITCHENEHES No pets Western Inr 2940393 or 293-2044 BC APARTMENTS AS LOW AS $265 a MONTH Furnished 564-6952 TWO BEDROOM 1 bath, utility room. Wood burning atovo, grMnhouM. FIxor Uppw. $65,000 Ask for SfMrylCobb 293-6036 or CENTURY 21 Banvtt 670-5155* Private room for rent, kitchen & bath priveleges.'565-9866. Trailer for rent. 2 bdrm, 12 x 60, tilt oute. $400 mo. $200 cleaning deposit. Ph. 564-6801. For rent: 1 -2-3 tidrm trailers $75 to $ 120 week. 565-6784 or'565-7141. COMMERCIAL BUILDINQ/orflc*/ Storage yard. FOR LEASE OR SALE on Strsst Partclng Sscurt 294-3066 RETAIL OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE Approx 840-3,100 sq ft First Western Plaza 1000 Nev Hwy, Boulder City 293-2367 or 293-6344 FOR RENT 155 sq ft offica, retail, or shop. Excellent location. 294-0887 or 293-7766 OFFICES FOR RENT From 250 sq. ft. Very Rsasonabis Bouldsr Theatsr BIdg. 293-1283 THREE BDRM DUPLEX APT $550 per mo. 294-0648 BC FOR RENT 3 bdrm 2 bath. 2 car garage. All appliances Included. Plaaaa call Beth, Boulder Dam Realty 293-4663/ 293-7074 (home).* VONS CENTER RETAIL FOR LEASE In Boulder City •Good Parking •Good Visibility NEAL SINIAKIN 294-1444 Broker ATLANTIC CITY APARTMENTS Clean, Quality Apartmanta In Handaraon • Central Air • Appllancea • Drapaa 'Carpets • Water Paid • Waaher/Dryer Available In Hnderion, 2 bdrm Apartments. CIsM, Spacious, New and Newly Remodeled. Recently peinted, near shopping and school. Central sir & heat, carpets, washer & dryer available. Move In now. From $440 per month. 565-7028 HENDBWHIl PUUA /V/UIIMBin 730 Center St., Henderson, NV 565-7512 2 tidrm. unfurnished, pool & play yard Near schools & shopping. Free Cable TV. From $420 a month. OFFICE SPACE NOW AVAILABLE in BOULDER STATION 916 Nevada Highway, B.C. 294-0225 APARTMENTS AVAILABLE 1, 2, 3 Bedroom Unlta For Info call 293-161B or 294-0577 HOURS; 9 to 5 Dally CASA DK AUCIA AFTt. M A M II AFTS. Proli CqulneK by Inc. BAKERY FOR SALE established business in Boulder City, Good location. Owner will train. Rant Is $220 month, (lease assumabie) Great Nevada Propertiea 871-0223. 293-4498. B.C. FOR RENT 2 bedroom house. $600/mo. Available August 1. First, last and $300 deposit required. 293-7335 days 293-2968 eves.* — RENTALS — 3 bed., 1 ba., laundry rm., fenced rear yard, VACANT, Child OK. $775. 1,650 sq. ft. condo, private back yard, 2 bed., 2 ba., 2 car gar. $1,200. Vacant. 1 bad., 1 bath A Den houae. all hardwood floors, fenced rear yard, child OK, P.P., Iota of bullt-lna. Yard aervlce Included $650. AVAIL July 1. 2 bad., 2 ba., atg. laundry area. ADULTS OHLY. NO PETS. Avail, by June 9. S500. LAKE TERRACE TOWNHOUSE Nice view L*a Mead, 2 bdrm, 2M bath, 2 car garage, ALL APPL I860 AVAIL NOW. 4 badrma, 2 be., woricahop Lhdng nm. + Fam. rm., new carpet A paint. Avail. Aug. 1, call for appt. to aee, IfTS ehlMran, am. pat OK. DICK BLAIR REALTY ass Nevada Hwy., aouMar City (702) 293-2171 •••••••••••• FOR RENT 4 BR2BA horns. Newty csrpstsd, fuly landscaped. 1537 Dorothy 293-2697 BC F0RLEASE-raiailapac5SS Hotel Plaza 1,200 sq ft. Phone 293-3330 BC 2 bdrm, house for rent. PH. 56^-7141. WHY RENT? Homes for $1.00, REPOS. GOVT Give Away Programs! For information 504-649-0670 Ext. R-1311. Wanted a 4 bdrm house in -Henderson. Section 8 wil pay $750 mo. Ph. 564;5271. Furnished 1 bdrm trailer. $110 per wk. $200 deposit. 216 West Foster or call 564-0984 evenings. FOR LEASE, 2 bdrm, 2 bth, big yard, Henderson. $750 mo plus $300 seburity. No Pets. 565-4128. FOR LEASE 1.300 plus sq ft luxurious office or retail space. Available now 293-4857 BC Studio $265. Utilities paid. 1 -2-3-4 bdrms, rani/own. Sun Realty 735-1244. SS75,2 bdm), oarage, more. Many ieaaa^bpSons all areas. Sun Realty 735-1244. OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT 400 sq ft units w/bathroom. Brand new. 1590 Foothill. Contact for information H.B. BuHders. 294-0200 BC Office for rent, 30<; Water St. 350 sq. ft., S390 includes utilities. Ph. 565-0594. For Rent: 3 bdrm house w/many, many extras. Avail immediately. Call 454-1071, leave message. Lake Mountain Estates 2 BR 2 BA. Carefree living S850 per mo. Call Bart l^yde. Realtor 293-6014 BC 1 BR near Senior Center. Completely remodeled. $600 mo including utilities. Ban Hyde Realtor 293-6014 BC DESERT INN MOTEL Nice dean rooms starting $90 wk. Also maid servne, color TV. KHcheneltes avail 293-2627 800 Nev Hwy BC For Rent: Kitchennettes $55 wk. Utilities paid. Shady Rest Motel 565-7666, Hdn WEEKLY RATES AVAILABLE Boulder Dam Hotel $90 up. 293-1606 flC TWO BDRM 1 bath, utility room. Wood burning stove, greenhouse. Fixer Upper. $65,000. Ask for Sheryl Cobb 293-6036 or CEN TURY21 Barrett. 870-5155 ^^j^^^^^ COMMBRCIAL SPACE FOR RENT Hotel Plaza. Approx 1,900 sq ft. Call 2930604 or 293-6663 BC VERY NICE QUIET 2 bdrm apt. Unfurn. Off street parking. Balcony patio. DW, sep storage rm. Laundry rm. No pool. $450 mo plus elec. CASTILIAN APTS 831 Ave A. See manaoer Apt 4 9am-5:3 0 P M. BC FREE UTILITIES, Child or Pet OK. Furnished apt. near Sahara Hotel, 1 bdrm $140 wk. $495 mo, 2 bdrm, $175 wk, or $595 mo., 1 bdr/n near Silver Nugget $140 wk or $495 mo, 385-5488 or 384-5222. GREAT LOCATION FOR FAMILY 3 bdrms with nice yard for kids. Walk to schools, park and pool. Call Mary Shuman, Amerkana Group, Realtors 796-7777 or 294-0639 2~~BDRM~Tvr~barh BOULDER HILLS CONDO w/pool, washer/dryer, all the extras. No pets. $150 wk. 897-2050* FOR LE ASE-retail space 502 Hotel Plaza. Approx 700 sq ft. Phone 293-3958 BC Boulder City 3 BR 2 bath, 2 car garage on quiet treelined cul de sac. Very very race house. Avail at end of August. Furniture can be purchased from present renter. $875 mo includes gardener. 293-0008 BC 2 BR Duplex. Water and sewer furnished. $550 mo plus deoo. 293-3468 BC BOULDER HILLS CONDO 202B, 2 BR 21/2 bath. SpHt level. 2 car parklng-1 covered. All elec kitchen, washer, dryer. $650 rent 1 St, last. $400 cleaning. Avail 7/1/90 293-6335 BC WEEKLY' KITCHENEHES 565-7929. GARAGE FOR RENT$58 293-4950 or 293-5718 BC; GORGEOUS LAKE VIEW TOWNHOUSE IN REGATTA POINT 1637 sq ft. End unit w/private rear and side yard. 2 car garage. Elegant living with pool privileges. $1,200 mo. 293-2511 BC* REAL ESTATE •••••• Time share units and campground memberships. Distress saiesCHEAPI! Worldwide selections. Call VACATION NETWORK U.S. and Canada 1-800-736-8250 or 1-305-771-6296. Free rental information 1-305-771-6331. For sale by owner, 2 bdrm, m bth Condo w/fireplace. 9V^ % assumabie loan. Ph. 566-0160. Cute 2 bdrm, 1 bth house. Jacuzzi, courtyard, washer/dryer, refrigerator. Water softener, couch & kitchen sets. Package deal. $70,000. Call Ona, 454-3837. TRI-LEVEL FOR SALE BY OWNER 1403 San Felipe Drive, B.C. Three bdrms (possibly 4), 3 fullHbaths, 2,500 sq. ft. Zoned for horses. 2Va car garage. */i acre. Fireplace. Desert landscape. Room for RV's. $237,000. 293-1623 for appointment H Y D E 293-6014 T.ii :ii r.\i-t IStS Atlaaw Hfeel eled^sr Chy, MOOS HOMBUANIVBUSINBSS INVESTMENT CONSULTANTS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT BOULDER CITY LAKE AREAI4 BR, 2V4 iMths. Open Hoor plan. Large comer lot. RV parking with hookups. $219,600. CUSTOM BUILT ON QOLF COURSE Pool w/spa and oeUidc sliowsr. 3 BR, 1V bath. 2M car garage. $259,900. 1V4-BA. Ottfy $84,0IXK • • • • • • • ^ 516 Hopi Place 2 BR, 1 BA. Central heating and cooling. $82,600. CLOSE IN TOWN Utah and Ave 1.2-3 bdrm w/flrplac. On comer lot. $99,600. LAKE IMEAD VIEW ESTATES, 3 bdrm, 2 baUi. TU roof, ahows like • model. 935 VieU Lago. Priced at only $229,900. LAKE VIEW? YOU BETt Thia spectacular 2340 q. ft. home sits high on hiU overlooking lake and mountains. Built with 6 inch exterior walla for added vnlne. Huge great room pins 1.200 aq. ft. garaga/workahop with H baUi. Drive by 879 Jndl Place. Priced at $358,500. Bert Hyde 29S-2144 Pat BwMlelB 294-1746 AalU Hyde I>S-2144 Tonjr Korfmaa 28S4XIM Jerry Marehall 294.16t8 BtySeal 19St7t Teey WlrU lat-TW* SUN REALTY YOUR ON^-STOP Real Estate Company H CALL 24 HRS 1311 NEVADA HIGHWAY (702) BOULDER CITY, NV 89005 "tll^ i,*w* • l • Hours: 9:00-5:00 MON-SAT jg^ FAX-293.0000 and By Appolntmant ENJOY LAKE MEAD: from the privacy of jronr own patio, Uvtngroom, kitchen, etc Pnli view and RV parking, easy access, sdnlt commnnity, $18,950, call today. FOR RENT: Immediate possiasieB, two bedroom two bath, plna. fkom $600486mo. USE YOUR IMAGINATION: Lots of potential, 24evate plna garage pins-r Only $68,900 aad H la in B.C. LOWEST PRICE HOME IN B.C.: Two bedrw do. Only $64JB0. Call new far appehtawt .twobethi R-V GARAGE, DETACHED, PLUS POOL, PLUS EXTRA LARGE LOT. ACROSS FROM B.C. Golf Coves, better thaa new cnetom. $296,000, enll for appeiatassat pisaae. POUR BIO BEDROOMS. LARGE LOT, CUSTOM HOME. YOU PROVIDE THE laadaeaps. oaly $1MJOO. CaU to ase nmr. LOWEST PRICE BUILDING LOT IN B.C.: Oaly SMUIOO. For map aad prieae, atop by the office today. LOOKING FOR SAFBBCURED Short term iavsatmeatr Call Bob Pimim today. •^Hl NIAL ItTATI PROFItSIONALr' KAY KIMBERLIN BRET RUNION BOB BRANCH, Bualneaa Opportunities __^ CLAUOK SMITH LANE MOLSBCRRY """" IRIS BLET8CH, QRI, CRB BOB BOSTON, QRI, OWWER-BROKER. Property Manageniawt aroa av ova omee AMO LOOK ona rm MAMY orma anoaaarma AMUkmM Thursday, July 19,1990 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Pags 19B BRAND NEW HOME WITH UKE VIEW and mountain view. 3 bdrm 2 bath. Family room, corner lot. $168,000 OBO for cash or quick 293^950 293-5718* American Family Really & Management 702-564-2878 800-828-2878 Residential Commercial And Also Managing Associations F.S.B.O. FOR SALE BY OWNER Get on our list "For Sale By Owners' Henderson & Green Valley Areas 566-FSBO OULDE DAM REALTY BOULDER CITY SPECIALISTS 293*4663 11664 NEVADA HWY "MARSHALL PLAZA" "LOTS OF PARKING"RVS WELCOME" "EASY ACCESS"OPEN 9 AM-5 PM M-SAT "PHONE HRS 8 AM-8 PM FAX 702-293-4645 ••••••••••••AI***#^*^^*iH^*^***********^^F*>****^****^ WHEN CONSIDERING A REALTOR, PLEASE ASK: 1. DO YOU WORK FULL-TIME IN REAL ESTATE? 2. DO YOU SPECIALIZE IN BOULDER CITY? 3. IS BOULDER CITY YOUR HOME ? 4. ARE YOU AN ESTABLISHED RESIDENT & REALTOR? 5. SELLERS: WILL MY HOME .BE ON LOCAL "HOME TOUR"? TO WORK WITH FULL-TIME, ESTABLISHED, PROFESSIONAL, BOULDER CITY REALTORS: CALLUS!! WE'RE THE ORIGINAL "FREE LIST" PEOPLE! STOP BY TO PICK UP OR CALL & WE WILL MAIL THE LIST OF ALL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE THROUGH ALL AGENCIES. FREEmmm Infoiinalion for Boulder City AFTER HOURS CALL: 702 MARY BOARD 293-7254 LINETTE DAVIS 293-1097 BETH ALDWORTH DEANE 293-7074 ELLEN LAMB STROMBERG 293-6508 CARL COWAN, BROKER ...293-1499 SUNDAY BY APPOINTMENr* RESIOENTfAL-COMMERCIAL INCOME-RENTALS-LOTS APPRAISALS ica =... 1=) 1. CURRENT LIST of ALL BOULDER CITY HOUSES. Condos.Townhomes and Mobile Homes by Ail Realtors. 2. BOULDER CITY STATISTICS Including; PofHilation, Annual Events,Climate, Major Employers & Much More. S.Current BOULDER CITY MAP. YOURS FREE ~ CALL 702'294'0870 TOP VIDEO ^^ ••••••••••••4^^^^******^^• ''^"TflLS I TWO STORY FOUR BDRM BY OWNER 2Vt bathe, formal dining room. Family room with used brick fireplace. Approx., 2,100 sq. ft. of gracious living. Spotless condition, inside and out. Beautiful mature trees and lovely blocked walled rear yard. Concrete parking area on side for RV or boat. Auto sprinklers front and rear. Asking $189,900. Call to see 293-7465 after 6 p.m. and weekends. 1. The Ulllr Mrrmaid, Anitnated. Wall Disney Home Video (G-1989) 2. Bacit lo Ihr Future Parl II, VichaelJ. Fox. Christopher Llovd, MCA/Universal Home Video (PG-1989) 3. Sea or Love, Al Pacino, Ellen Barkin, MCA/Universal Home Video (R1989) 4. .se\, Wti, and videotape, James Spader, Andie MacDowell. RCA/Columbia Home Video (R-1989) 5. Lool< Who's Talking, John Travolta, Kirstie Alley, RCA/Columbia Home Video (PC-13-1989) 6. Black Rain, Michael Douglas, Andy Garcia, Paramouni Home Video (R1989) 7. Dead Poets Society, Robin M'illiams, Touchsione Home Video (PC-1989) 8. Field or Dreams, Kevin Costner, Amy Madigan, MCA Home Video (PG1989) 9. The Abyss, Ed Harris, Mary Mastrantonio, CBSFox Video (PC-13-1989) 10. Honey, I Shrunk the Kids, Rick Moranis, Wall Disney Home Video (PC1989) iMARY BOARD LOCAL RESIDENT FULL TIME REALTOR OFFICE: (702) 23-4a3 HOME: (702) 2n-72M 16M NEVADA HMHWAY BOULDER CITY, NV nOOS HENDERSON New Custom, owner will carry with 25 % down. Extra large rooms, 3-2, 2400 sq. ft. living area. •5657677 V JUST REDUCED & PRICED TO SELL!! Newly remodeled Lewis Home in Boulder City. 4 bdrm, 2 bth, 2 car garage & over 1700 sq. ft. Great for a growing family. Prices right at $139,000. For more Info call Julie at Jack Matthews & Co. 454-7400 or 565-3567. DUPLEX IN BOULDER CITY One bdrm eacri side. One 20x20 garage w/alley access. A great buy for $84,000 294-0501 ask for John. BC BUYER'S AGENT; now availatile to tielp you find the t>est available real estate opportunity on your terms! For a NO-oWigalion meeting to review your needs and to g rove we are for real, call esert Sun Realty at 702-293-2151 and ask for "BUYERS AGENT APPOINTMENT". •••••• Woodridge Estates, $16,900 down, no qualifying. $819 mo. Pool, much more. Ph. 565-4648. VILLE DEL PRADO 3 bdrm 1% bath. Db gar. 1,355 sq ft, fp, block wall. Landscaped. $128,000. 870-6523 BC • • ATTENTION: Government Homes from $1 (Urepair)! Delinquent tax property. Repossessions, Call (1) 602-838-8885, Ext. GH-10002.^' REDUCED PRICE TRI-PLEX Plus Garage Office Unit In Boulder City. Centrally located furnished units. Ideal fof Single Person to live In one and collect ri Now Only J119,900 J1200 per mo. Income, CALL MANNY 294-0870 •TTTTEJ BilUSIKISRa YoHr Own Triur A LOVELY 2,700 SQ FT HOME on V2 acre with beautiful view of Boulder City. 3 car garage, covered RV parking. Nice backyard enclosed with block wall. Asking $265,000. Call 293-1165 W tan a IOB( rMctal • BOULDER CITT *HENDERSON • GREEN VAIIET Calltadar 293-2302 •r S64-1881 HDN 3 bdmi, 1% bath. 1.333 sq ft. Covered patio. FP, country kitchen. Obi gar. Walk to school. $85,000. 870-6623* DENNIS CONNERS "KNOWS BOULDER CITY" •Free Market Analysis •Free List of Boulder City Homes •Free Buying & Selling Guide •Free Home Warantee Available Over 43 Years in Boulder City Home 293-4737 Mobile 596-1331 1-800-776-4575 JACK MATTHEWS & CO. CALL COLDWELL BANKER COLDWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY O^KN 7 DAYS A WIIKI 293-5757 PRINTINQ BUSINESS-Mrm owntra (or 10 year*. Equipment Hat and Information avallabia to quallflad/slncara purchaaar. $95,000. POPULAR LEWIS BUILT 4 ^^^ BORM naar goH couraa. Pool |Sj alza lot with mountain and J^l^ vallay vlaw. Daaart LandiT'"^ acapad In front. $260,000. M naar cacomor >ig, 2 full In t>aaaTHREE Oovamnv, lot. Wocf Itatha, laa( mant. Sllv"^. VILLA DEL PRAOO-Popular 3 bdrm, 1,374 a.f., 2 ear garaga, Oaaait Landaeaping In front, graaa In back. Covarad patloa, axtra atoraga aliad. $134,000. CUSTOM HOME NEAR QOLF COURSE, 3 badrm, 2 batfi, larga pool, courtyard antry, woodbuming firapteca. $109,000. LEWIS THREE BEDRM on tha golf couraa. Thraa badroom, 3 car garaga, baautlful landaeaplng and homa la Immaeulata. S aWar iaaving araa wanto offar nowl $229,S00. SITUATED ON TWO LOTS FOR PRIVACY AND VIEW of Wia plua 4,000 a.f. ol HvMg In VNa cuaiom oaaignaa noma. 10x36 family room, larga UtGnan wflii oooUng Maud. Stop ki and vlaw our vMae taping 91 tMa homa. $7M,000. HOMEY FOUR BORM on larga raMNly fooni MQ RMVI lsntf> $120,000. ^ SI ufiN In fmr, Aity too OOflMf lOCLoto 0 tlMS pfiviw ywv funiNnM unite, ItodHood tii,900. rRin usr or ALL HOMU FON SALl IN lOULOCII OITY. OIT ON OUR MAIUNO UtT. I'l f. • l^t..fc.A w *lipt. to aaal $210,500. GREAT FOUR BEDRM for family Hvlngl Ovar 2,000 a.f. with gama/rac. room, all appllancaa, woodbuming flraplaca. Aaaumabia FHA loan, all for $134,500. LARGE MODULAR HOME 2,100 a.f., huga 3 car garaga and woftohop larga covared RV parking with watar, aawar and alactrlc naar. Dack/patlo tooMng out to tfw laka ovar antira garaga. Excaptlonal tot. Eaay malntananca landacapIng and mera. $106,000. FOREST HILLS MODEL In BouMar City Eatataa. Thraa badrm, 2H batha, 3 car garaga. Upgradad flooring throughout, oak parquat, tlla and carpel. $230,000. CUSTOM THREE BORM, built wtth akimpatona, 2 fuH batha, w o odb um ing firaplaoa, atrium off maatar badrm, pool apa, vtaw of laka. $246,000. ANCHOR REALTY Ml NMMla Nwy., a mv U Mt CHy 293-5757 BOULDER REALTY iiiff (702) 293-3232 Put your trust m in Number One; rSsOIWM and d-niury ^1 Real bmatv Corvoraiion. Kqual {{ouiiinx Oppnri unity fl INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATEa WANT TO KNOW WHAT YOUR PROPERTY IS WORTH? Free market analysis. Call Roger 293-2939 Realtor, Coldwell Banker/Anchor Realty. LAKE VIEW LOT In BouldiT City. Drive by 522 Jani PI and see wtiere your dream home can be. 82X100 All Util. 293-4236 BC HOUSE FOR SALE BY OWNER Ave I. 2 bdrm, 1 bath plus granny apt. 1 bdrm loft Jacuzzi tub. Central air and heat. V? garage and shop. Washer/dryer. Call eves between 8 and 10 pm. 294-2393. Priced to sell. BC* BOULDER CITY SPECIAL 4 br comer lot home on over Vi aae. Handymans dream. Call Mary Shuman, AMERICANA GROUP REALTORS 796-7777 or 294-0639 60 MAGNIFICENT LAKE and mountain views. 2 bedroom 21 12 bath condo. Over 1,500 sq ft. Numerous upgrades. All appliances. Great assumabie non-qualifying loan. Call Pat, HYDE AND ASSOCIATES 293)14* ?r,:^Ksixik%,k^ COLOUICU. BANKVlex drawing teeome of $025 per month—payaunU ffoiag out $950 a BMWth—realUaf $200 a UMMth in tax retoma-let'a talk aae Janica if jroor lataraatad 29SS2. BOULDER CITY AT $73,600 UNBEUEVABLE BUT IT IS HERB, ONE OF A KIND PROPBRTY-.18 mam with a mobile hooM permaneaUy a tt acfca d St arter haer vacation haaeT LOTS OF ROOM TO EXPANDMOVE THE MOBILE OFF AND BEING A BIGGER ONE ON OR JUST SIMPLY INVEST IN SOMETHING THAT HAS BECOME NONEXISTENT IN BOULDER CITY WITH OUR UMITED GROWTH PROGRAM. THIS ONE IS A WINNER. CaO Don at 2934232-11 Don la boay, aay MM of the MMta at Caatnry 21 Baddar Raahy wiU kelp yon la viewing the property. 702-2934232. NO ASSOCUTION FEES INVOLVED. PUT II TO WORK FOR YOU ^JOR ALL YOUR RIAL ISTATI NEEDS iSl WE UST — WE SELL CAU THI CENTURY 21 PROPESSIONAU TODAY anoli ofneo Iwda p a n dantty ownnd apnratad WE GEr RESULTS JANICE CRAWFORD. Owner 2W4942 MEL DUNAWAY. Brakar 2-24S8 DIANNB VANA8SE IS-4284 DON TAP80N 2B4M0 NELLIE PETERSON 2M-1241 ROSE GALPERIN 2-16M ALAN HARDY *4M88 STUART E LOWE 2W-3(M1 nM\ 90^ ^9^9 <16 NEVADA HIGHWAY \ I Ml} ^9i*lA0^ BOULDER aiY, NEVADA JENSEN'S REALTY 219 Water St. D. "Jim" JcDMn I Brokar Henderson. Nevada 89015 MALTOR* t 564-3333 RESIDENTIAL DIVISION mm COUNTRY CLUB VILLAGE MOBILE HOME ESTATES 7S VIEW LOTS-1 block to golf courae, F.H.A. financing available, call 564-7710 or conUct Jenaen'a Realty 664-3333 NAY #900101 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Mobile Home on large Vi acre land, soned for horaea, excellent cond., RV fndlity, right behind Whitney Ranch. Call Luke. 3.000 SF of the Best of Green Valley, Total priatine 4 BR plnsh, Candle Creek, Aak for Davell HIGHLAND HILLS AREA 3 BDRM 2Vx Bath Townhonae. Private courtyard. Large 2 Car Garage with Electric Door Opener. Very Quiet Street. Central Air/Gaa Heat. 1,462 aq. ft of living apace. Call Richie to aee. LAND FOR HOMES AND MOBILE HOMES IN PAHRUMPGREAT view of Pahnunp Valley. Call Lnke. MOBILE HOME on Toiyabe hi Laa Vegaa. $45,000. CaU Peggy Benedict. INCOME PROPERTY-WeU maintahied 4-plez hi excellent rental area of Henderaon, 4-2 bedroom 1 bath nnita with extra atorage per unit & coin-op laundry room. Fenced, lota of parldng. Oooid Income. Call Randy for dataila. 1989 PARKRIDGE-CHAMPION 14 x 56 Mobile Home with I Acre of land, veil A aeptic. horae coTTala, GREAT VIEW OF THE MOUNTAINS-Pahnunp. S36.90a CaU Luke. — HOME GEM...Coiy fireplace la jnat part of ita appeal. Rehabbed. Great famUy area, evaporative cooUng, gaa heat CALL OFFICE FOR DETAILS, aak for Joyce. LOOKING FOR A HOME thnt'a priced under $70,000? Here it ia, 3 Bedroom 2 Bath, block waUa, ante aprinklera, etc...Priced at $69,600. Aak for Don. HILLTOP PARADISE...FoothUl cnotom ranch. Stucco, moontain/dty viewa. Electric heat paddle faaa, family room with wet bar, country kitchen, 3 BR/IH batha, fencing, wrought iron fence, circnlar drive, apa. Zoned for horaea. CaU Joyce. LIVE ON THE 18th FAIRWAY, b thia benntifnUy remodeled 3 BR. 2 BTH home. For detaOa or to aea. pleaae caU Don. 1,800 SF.. .2 atory.. overlooUng the lake. 924 Keya Drive hi Boulder City. Aak for Dave or Lake. SUNRISE MOBILE ESTATES-HUGE loti Biggeat in arec Almoat Vi acre. Beantifol Undacapfaig. Concrete fencing. RV parking, plna 1-year-old 2 badrm mobile home with covered parting and U appliancea. CaU Peggy Benedict to aae. GREAT INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY: Apartment BaUdh* hi Handaraoa with 6 oniU oonaJatIng of fnnr 2 Bedroona/l Bath Apartmanta aad two Stndioa. Very knr vacancy rate. For mat* hif araiation caU Richie Eddinga. Sae Rax Newell I COMMERCIAL DIVISION gardfaw EXCHANGES. P0R8ALB STRIP CENTER—10 Storoa plaa 18 Stan^ Unite aa Sn; unlta are laaaed. Owner wanta to trade eqiMy far voeant I .Al .Call] BEAUTY SHCW-Actlve I BOULDER HWY. LOT-IOrXllS' Lot en 1 Ken. CHy en Nevada Hwy. 8 •Hwy.$M$U$IO.CaB Priam lacntian. xr aage 1 Ian. Call I ^ • .^.

PAGE 35

w m • I • I H ^ • • ^'^'?^^^|B?^^ m^^ Page 18B, Henderson Honie News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Thursday, July 19, 1990 J--^^-M&M Wallppr Inttallailon •Stripping •Intvitor Painting 454-3903 THOMPSON'S HOME MAINTENANCE & COOLER SERVICE & REMODELS 865*SS42 CARPENTRY UNLIMITED Interior • Exterior Rough Of Finish Call Brian Yula 564-8703 WALL CLEANING FIJI & Efi.impI Paiiil BC Hend. & GV 294-3071 565-0547 PAPERHAN6IN6 and PAINTING Professionally Done • 30 Years Experience Please call 361-9004 HOWARD HELDERLEIN CONSTRUCTION Commercial • Ilesidential • Remodels and Additons License #021013 565^74 BOULDER SAND & GRAVEL, INC. 624 YUCCA ST., BOULDER CITY, NV 89005 OFFERING THE FOLLOWING CONSTRUCTION AND LANDSCAPING SUPPLIES •DESERT ROSE LANDSCAPE ROCK •TYPE II, REJECT SAND DELIVERY AVAILABLE M-F 7-3 P.M. it NOW AVAILABLE READY MIX CONCRETE 294-1156 LEON PRESSURE CLEANING Tired of a grimy driveway? Tired of that greasy garage floor? Do you want that NEW lool( your driveway, and garage once had? If 80, then call LEON PRESSURE CLEANING 564-6292 We'll have that driveway or garage looking like new in no timel You won't believe your eyesi UGMMI|fttlMail HANDY RANDY "The Affordable Handyman" •Property Maintenance •Quality Workmanship • Rental Reconditioning •RalifcUle Service If You're FuMy, Call Me—Satiitactlon Guaranteed 294-8494 MCS GARDENING Ucenttd Lawn Milntenance Resldantlal & Comimrclal •Tree Trimming •Thatch Reseed •Lawn Clean-Up & Haul OHs •Sprinl^ AUTO UPHOLSTERY JEADLINERS • FURNITURE FREE ESTIMATES • A.M. 5 P.M. MON. FRI. MM •OUISCR HWT. AT TDO^. {Mtmjt TOWARDS HENOemON) BACKHOE and BOBCAT SERVICE •Lots Graded 30 Years Experience Carl W. Ford •Ditching Houriy Rates 293-0593 ELECTRICIAN: No job loo big or too smalt. Call Jeff 5650947. Custofrt Stenciling ''•Walls •Floors •Furniture Free Estimates Allese 294-1422 MIKE MORRISON ELECTRIC, INC. Licensed-Bonded'Insured Lie III30425 Call 564-2145 PAINTING Painter w/40 Ytn ExpttifK* Stnhr aUnnt Dhcounh No Job Too Small CmM John B94-994S STORAGE FOR RENT AN SliM—Fnea4 ReeWanI Manager NMrSunaal Mountain Vtata 458-3990 MURRAY MAINTfNANCE Carpentry, Painting Giaaa Repaira All Household Repairs Roof Repairs 293-8110 BASIC NATURE CARPET CLEANERS Henderson's Finest 564-6716 SAM BLAKELEY MASONRY Custom Glass Block* Windows, Showers, Spas NV Lie. 124144 16 yrs. Experience 564-7764 LOGOS DESIGNED For Business Cards, Etc. Cail Mzr'Jyn 564-1881 RICK RUSSELL Lie. Handyman Carpentry Electrical Drywall Complete Home Repair 564-7488 VAN THE HANDYMAN DO ALL 564-7704 & Beeper 599-4179 AARON FENCING FrM EstlmatM Chain Link A Wood Fencing 20 Years Exp. Pli. 451-8190 State Lie. 15332 GENE'S CARPET CLEANING SERVICE Steam Extract or Shampoo-Waxing and Stripping 564-8055 COOLERS Stimmerized & Repaired. Call Ben Depue, Handyman. 565-7468. Resifltfntial Commercial CLASSIC CARPET CLEANING 389-6327 or 59S-2226 Ptolesswnal OWNEfl-OPEBATED Fmdass Cleaning Mo Ctarft It Net Carpel Upholstery (OM SaMM ALL TYPES ROOFING AND REPAIRS You buy material, I do the labor. You save 30% Call Don at 564-8519 If no inswrr, ralJ after S p.m. Free Estimatea YOU NAME IT, WE'LL DO IT Residential & Commercial Additions Remodel Repair Lie. No. 14492 Ph 293-4284 KEN'S ftHANOYMAN All Type* of Maintenance I Can Fix or Malta Moat Anything 293-0045 TOPCOaNTRY fILBaHS 1. Killa.' T.nw, Clint Black, RCA 2. Livin' II Up, George Strait, MCA 3. No Hnldin' Back, Kandy Tram, Warnet Bros. 4. Couniry Club, Travis Trilt, Warner Bros. 5. RVS III, Ricky Van Shelton, Columbia 6. Pickin' On Nashville, The Kentucky' Headhunten. Mercury 7. Pass il On Down, Alabama, RCA 8. Here in Ihe Real War|d, Alan Jackson, Arista 9. Willow In the Wind, Kathy Mattea, Mercury Feelin Fit! Q Diets often deprive the body of essential vitamins and nutrients. If you've l>een restricting food intake for a while, ask your doctor if he ttiinks you're putting yourself at risk for vitamin deficiency. OKWMIM Al IRON (;\ll S 5f)5-5.VS4 Nt\;i(l:il.ic5')(lf)\ HANDYMAN Yard work, painting, repairs, errands. No job too small. Call Scott 564-8812. POOL SERVICE and r*palr AN Reddantial Pooh MS mo. Cofflfflerdal, Free Estimat**. Call 451 •2293 or 494-2443 SHERMAN CONCRETE LIcflHMd ft Bondad Lie. 130046 FrM EatimatM 294-8349 Cement Work. Block fences, patios, driveways, slabs, sidewalks & steps. Lie # 0018577 Ph. 294-1087. Ceramic Tile Installed. Custom Design. Dependable, quality work. 15 yrs. Experience. Call Mike Palmer 564-2563. Frank Harwoods Cooler Repair & Service Parts & labor guaranteed. 565-7107. "SECOND HAND STORE: Bilmar's, 27 Army SI. Buy and sell brass, tools and small appliances. All merchandise. If you have anything lor sale please zome in. We repair big appliances, all makes and models $20 servk:e call. 5t>4 7367 30 dav guarantee. Appliance parts for do-ityourselfers. Hanwood's Appliances 118 E. Lake Mead. Henderson. 564-2210. HONEY DO'S Handyman. Too Hot To Do Your Honey Dos? Call Us. 294-3071 566-6811 Paint average house $250.24 hrs. Experience. Work Guaranteed. Call Jim 565-4460. CARPENTRY, electrical, painting. 20 years experience. All viork guaranteed. Insured. 383-0955* Portable welding, wrougtit iron repair, gates. Call 565-5071 Anytime. LAWNCARE MOWING, REMOVAL, ROCKWORK ERIC 294^175 LAWNCARE MOWINQ, REMOVAL, ROCKWORK •QtMlltyWork •RunonaM* RatM •FrM EM/nMfM Irie 2M-3178 ••••••• Jf^^4 RENTALS Section 8, duplex for rent. 3 t)drm, 1 bth, $680 mo plus power, plus $300 deposit. 2 bdrm, 1 btti, $605 plus power $300 deposit. 565-8296. Ask for Adah 733-1794. Will give private rm & board, own entrance to female Senior Citizen. Must have own car. For errands etc. $100 mo. If you do more, less rent. Share home. 451-6382 For rent: Furnished 2 bdnm house. $550 mo. Corner Sunset & Boulder. Ph. 565-1945. Studio Apt. Furnished, non-smoker, no pets. $295 mo. utilities included. $50 cleaning deposit. Call 564-5248. 3 BR house with Irg garage. Available 7/1 /90. $575 per mo plus depo. Call 294-0404 BC ,SMALL STUDIO APT for 1 person. Furnished. 293-6815 BC IN BEAUTIFUL BOULDER SQUARE. Two bedroom. Upstairs. New carpets, exceptionally clean. Leases for $550. Call 363-4681 for appointment. BC* Boulder City 10,000 sq ft Ijlock constructed kxiilding. Zoned Commercial/Manufacturing. Three phase power. Smaller sizes availatile. Good rental income property. 293-1978 BC FOR RENT 1 BR unfurnished Boulder City home. $450 per mo plus deposit. 736-6062 BC 2 BR 1 Vz bath condo for rent. $750 per mo. 293-7486 Lillian. BC* FOR LEASE Prime Property, 1,250 eq. ft. Nevada Hwy. next to Heelth Nute. Call 294-0197 or 293-1844. FOR RENT 2 BR apt, fenced yard. Laundry, off street parking. $425 plus sec and cleaning, 293-4097 BC Room for rent, house privileges. 119 Ash St. Male or female. Ph. 566-6719. Teddy's Kitchenettes Just bring your toothbrush Everything furnished Phone 293-1716 uabin on beautiful Panguitch Lake, Utah Lake view, $375 wk, 3 days lor $200. Sleeps 6. Great fishing. Call Hank, 732-2006 or home, 361-4287. CHARMING 3 BR HOUSE on beautiful Birch St. Large rooms. Garage. $750. Call evenings 294-1 444 BC WEEKLY KITCHENEHES No pets Western Inr 2940393 or 293-2044 BC APARTMENTS AS LOW AS $265 a MONTH Furnished 564-6952 TWO BEDROOM 1 bath, utility room. Wood burning atovo, grMnhouM. FIxor Uppw. $65,000 Ask for SfMrylCobb 293-6036 or CENTURY 21 Banvtt 670-5155* Private room for rent, kitchen & bath priveleges.'565-9866. Trailer for rent. 2 bdrm, 12 x 60, tilt oute. $400 mo. $200 cleaning deposit. Ph. 564-6801. For rent: 1 -2-3 tidrm trailers $75 to $ 120 week. 565-6784 or'565-7141. COMMERCIAL BUILDINQ/orflc*/ Storage yard. FOR LEASE OR SALE on Strsst Partclng Sscurt 294-3066 RETAIL OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE Approx 840-3,100 sq ft First Western Plaza 1000 Nev Hwy, Boulder City 293-2367 or 293-6344 FOR RENT 155 sq ft offica, retail, or shop. Excellent location. 294-0887 or 293-7766 OFFICES FOR RENT From 250 sq. ft. Very Rsasonabis Bouldsr Theatsr BIdg. 293-1283 THREE BDRM DUPLEX APT $550 per mo. 294-0648 BC FOR RENT 3 bdrm 2 bath. 2 car garage. All appliances Included. Plaaaa call Beth, Boulder Dam Realty 293-4663/ 293-7074 (home).* VONS CENTER RETAIL FOR LEASE In Boulder City •Good Parking •Good Visibility NEAL SINIAKIN 294-1444 Broker ATLANTIC CITY APARTMENTS Clean, Quality Apartmanta In Handaraon • Central Air • Appllancea • Drapaa 'Carpets • Water Paid • Waaher/Dryer Available In Hnderion, 2 bdrm Apartments. CIsM, Spacious, New and Newly Remodeled. Recently peinted, near shopping and school. Central sir & heat, carpets, washer & dryer available. Move In now. From $440 per month. 565-7028 HENDBWHIl PUUA /V/UIIMBin 730 Center St., Henderson, NV 565-7512 2 tidrm. unfurnished, pool & play yard Near schools & shopping. Free Cable TV. From $420 a month. OFFICE SPACE NOW AVAILABLE in BOULDER STATION 916 Nevada Highway, B.C. 294-0225 APARTMENTS AVAILABLE 1, 2, 3 Bedroom Unlta For Info call 293-161B or 294-0577 HOURS; 9 to 5 Dally CASA DK AUCIA AFTt. M A M II AFTS. Proli CqulneK by Inc. BAKERY FOR SALE established business in Boulder City, Good location. Owner will train. Rant Is $220 month, (lease assumabie) Great Nevada Propertiea 871-0223. 293-4498. B.C. FOR RENT 2 bedroom house. $600/mo. Available August 1. First, last and $300 deposit required. 293-7335 days 293-2968 eves.* — RENTALS — 3 bed., 1 ba., laundry rm., fenced rear yard, VACANT, Child OK. $775. 1,650 sq. ft. condo, private back yard, 2 bed., 2 ba., 2 car gar. $1,200. Vacant. 1 bad., 1 bath A Den houae. all hardwood floors, fenced rear yard, child OK, P.P., Iota of bullt-lna. Yard aervlce Included $650. AVAIL July 1. 2 bad., 2 ba., atg. laundry area. ADULTS OHLY. NO PETS. Avail, by June 9. S500. LAKE TERRACE TOWNHOUSE Nice view L*a Mead, 2 bdrm, 2M bath, 2 car garage, ALL APPL I860 AVAIL NOW. 4 badrma, 2 be., woricahop Lhdng nm. + Fam. rm., new carpet A paint. Avail. Aug. 1, call for appt. to aee, IfTS ehlMran, am. pat OK. DICK BLAIR REALTY ass Nevada Hwy., aouMar City (702) 293-2171 •••••••••••• FOR RENT 4 BR2BA horns. Newty csrpstsd, fuly landscaped. 1537 Dorothy 293-2697 BC F0RLEASE-raiailapac5SS Hotel Plaza 1,200 sq ft. Phone 293-3330 BC 2 bdrm, house for rent. PH. 56^-7141. WHY RENT? Homes for $1.00, REPOS. GOVT Give Away Programs! For information 504-649-0670 Ext. R-1311. Wanted a 4 bdrm house in -Henderson. Section 8 wil pay $750 mo. Ph. 564;5271. Furnished 1 bdrm trailer. $110 per wk. $200 deposit. 216 West Foster or call 564-0984 evenings. FOR LEASE, 2 bdrm, 2 bth, big yard, Henderson. $750 mo plus $300 seburity. No Pets. 565-4128. FOR LEASE 1.300 plus sq ft luxurious office or retail space. Available now 293-4857 BC Studio $265. Utilities paid. 1 -2-3-4 bdrms, rani/own. Sun Realty 735-1244. SS75,2 bdm), oarage, more. Many ieaaa^bpSons all areas. Sun Realty 735-1244. OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT 400 sq ft units w/bathroom. Brand new. 1590 Foothill. Contact for information H.B. BuHders. 294-0200 BC Office for rent, 30<; Water St. 350 sq. ft., S390 includes utilities. Ph. 565-0594. For Rent: 3 bdrm house w/many, many extras. Avail immediately. Call 454-1071, leave message. Lake Mountain Estates 2 BR 2 BA. Carefree living S850 per mo. Call Bart l^yde. Realtor 293-6014 BC 1 BR near Senior Center. Completely remodeled. $600 mo including utilities. Ban Hyde Realtor 293-6014 BC DESERT INN MOTEL Nice dean rooms starting $90 wk. Also maid servne, color TV. KHcheneltes avail 293-2627 800 Nev Hwy BC For Rent: Kitchennettes $55 wk. Utilities paid. Shady Rest Motel 565-7666, Hdn WEEKLY RATES AVAILABLE Boulder Dam Hotel $90 up. 293-1606 flC TWO BDRM 1 bath, utility room. Wood burning stove, greenhouse. Fixer Upper. $65,000. Ask for Sheryl Cobb 293-6036 or CEN TURY21 Barrett. 870-5155 ^^j^^^^^ COMMBRCIAL SPACE FOR RENT Hotel Plaza. Approx 1,900 sq ft. Call 2930604 or 293-6663 BC VERY NICE QUIET 2 bdrm apt. Unfurn. Off street parking. Balcony patio. DW, sep storage rm. Laundry rm. No pool. $450 mo plus elec. CASTILIAN APTS 831 Ave A. See manaoer Apt 4 9am-5:3 0 P M. BC FREE UTILITIES, Child or Pet OK. Furnished apt. near Sahara Hotel, 1 bdrm $140 wk. $495 mo, 2 bdrm, $175 wk, or $595 mo., 1 bdr/n near Silver Nugget $140 wk or $495 mo, 385-5488 or 384-5222. GREAT LOCATION FOR FAMILY 3 bdrms with nice yard for kids. Walk to schools, park and pool. Call Mary Shuman, Amerkana Group, Realtors 796-7777 or 294-0639 2~~BDRM~Tvr~barh BOULDER HILLS CONDO w/pool, washer/dryer, all the extras. No pets. $150 wk. 897-2050* FOR LE ASE-retail space 502 Hotel Plaza. Approx 700 sq ft. Phone 293-3958 BC Boulder City 3 BR 2 bath, 2 car garage on quiet treelined cul de sac. Very very race house. Avail at end of August. Furniture can be purchased from present renter. $875 mo includes gardener. 293-0008 BC 2 BR Duplex. Water and sewer furnished. $550 mo plus deoo. 293-3468 BC BOULDER HILLS CONDO 202B, 2 BR 21/2 bath. SpHt level. 2 car parklng-1 covered. All elec kitchen, washer, dryer. $650 rent 1 St, last. $400 cleaning. Avail 7/1/90 293-6335 BC WEEKLY' KITCHENEHES 565-7929. GARAGE FOR RENT$58 293-4950 or 293-5718 BC; GORGEOUS LAKE VIEW TOWNHOUSE IN REGATTA POINT 1637 sq ft. End unit w/private rear and side yard. 2 car garage. Elegant living with pool privileges. $1,200 mo. 293-2511 BC* REAL ESTATE •••••• Time share units and campground memberships. Distress saiesCHEAPI! Worldwide selections. Call VACATION NETWORK U.S. and Canada 1-800-736-8250 or 1-305-771-6296. Free rental information 1-305-771-6331. For sale by owner, 2 bdrm, m bth Condo w/fireplace. 9V^ % assumabie loan. Ph. 566-0160. Cute 2 bdrm, 1 bth house. Jacuzzi, courtyard, washer/dryer, refrigerator. Water softener, couch & kitchen sets. Package deal. $70,000. Call Ona, 454-3837. TRI-LEVEL FOR SALE BY OWNER 1403 San Felipe Drive, B.C. Three bdrms (possibly 4), 3 fullHbaths, 2,500 sq. ft. Zoned for horses. 2Va car garage. */i acre. Fireplace. Desert landscape. Room for RV's. $237,000. 293-1623 for appointment H Y D E 293-6014 T.ii :ii r.\i-t IStS Atlaaw Hfeel eled^sr Chy, MOOS HOMBUANIVBUSINBSS INVESTMENT CONSULTANTS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT BOULDER CITY LAKE AREAI4 BR, 2V4 iMths. Open Hoor plan. Large comer lot. RV parking with hookups. $219,600. CUSTOM BUILT ON QOLF COURSE Pool w/spa and oeUidc sliowsr. 3 BR, 1V bath. 2M car garage. $259,900. 1V4-BA. Ottfy $84,0IXK • • • • • • • ^ 516 Hopi Place 2 BR, 1 BA. Central heating and cooling. $82,600. CLOSE IN TOWN Utah and Ave 1.2-3 bdrm w/flrplac. On comer lot. $99,600. LAKE IMEAD VIEW ESTATES, 3 bdrm, 2 baUi. TU roof, ahows like • model. 935 VieU Lago. Priced at only $229,900. LAKE VIEW? YOU BETt Thia spectacular 2340 q. ft. home sits high on hiU overlooking lake and mountains. Built with 6 inch exterior walla for added vnlne. Huge great room pins 1.200 aq. ft. garaga/workahop with H baUi. Drive by 879 Jndl Place. Priced at $358,500. Bert Hyde 29S-2144 Pat BwMlelB 294-1746 AalU Hyde I>S-2144 Tonjr Korfmaa 28S4XIM Jerry Marehall 294.16t8 BtySeal 19St7t Teey WlrU lat-TW* SUN REALTY YOUR ON^-STOP Real Estate Company H CALL 24 HRS 1311 NEVADA HIGHWAY (702) BOULDER CITY, NV 89005 "tll^ i,*w* • l • Hours: 9:00-5:00 MON-SAT jg^ FAX-293.0000 and By Appolntmant ENJOY LAKE MEAD: from the privacy of jronr own patio, Uvtngroom, kitchen, etc Pnli view and RV parking, easy access, sdnlt commnnity, $18,950, call today. FOR RENT: Immediate possiasieB, two bedroom two bath, plna. fkom $600486mo. USE YOUR IMAGINATION: Lots of potential, 24evate plna garage pins-r Only $68,900 aad H la in B.C. LOWEST PRICE HOME IN B.C.: Two bedrw do. Only $64JB0. Call new far appehtawt .twobethi R-V GARAGE, DETACHED, PLUS POOL, PLUS EXTRA LARGE LOT. ACROSS FROM B.C. Golf Coves, better thaa new cnetom. $296,000, enll for appeiatassat pisaae. POUR BIO BEDROOMS. LARGE LOT, CUSTOM HOME. YOU PROVIDE THE laadaeaps. oaly $1MJOO. CaU to ase nmr. LOWEST PRICE BUILDING LOT IN B.C.: Oaly SMUIOO. For map aad prieae, atop by the office today. LOOKING FOR SAFBBCURED Short term iavsatmeatr Call Bob Pimim today. •^Hl NIAL ItTATI PROFItSIONALr' KAY KIMBERLIN BRET RUNION BOB BRANCH, Bualneaa Opportunities __^ CLAUOK SMITH LANE MOLSBCRRY """" IRIS BLET8CH, QRI, CRB BOB BOSTON, QRI, OWWER-BROKER. Property Manageniawt aroa av ova omee AMO LOOK ona rm MAMY orma anoaaarma AMUkmM Thursday, July 19,1990 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Pags 19B BRAND NEW HOME WITH UKE VIEW and mountain view. 3 bdrm 2 bath. Family room, corner lot. $168,000 OBO for cash or quick 293^950 293-5718* American Family Really & Management 702-564-2878 800-828-2878 Residential Commercial And Also Managing Associations F.S.B.O. FOR SALE BY OWNER Get on our list "For Sale By Owners' Henderson & Green Valley Areas 566-FSBO OULDE DAM REALTY BOULDER CITY SPECIALISTS 293*4663 11664 NEVADA HWY "MARSHALL PLAZA" "LOTS OF PARKING"RVS WELCOME" "EASY ACCESS"OPEN 9 AM-5 PM M-SAT "PHONE HRS 8 AM-8 PM FAX 702-293-4645 ••••••••••••AI***#^*^^*iH^*^***********^^F*>****^****^ WHEN CONSIDERING A REALTOR, PLEASE ASK: 1. DO YOU WORK FULL-TIME IN REAL ESTATE? 2. DO YOU SPECIALIZE IN BOULDER CITY? 3. IS BOULDER CITY YOUR HOME ? 4. ARE YOU AN ESTABLISHED RESIDENT & REALTOR? 5. SELLERS: WILL MY HOME .BE ON LOCAL "HOME TOUR"? TO WORK WITH FULL-TIME, ESTABLISHED, PROFESSIONAL, BOULDER CITY REALTORS: CALLUS!! WE'RE THE ORIGINAL "FREE LIST" PEOPLE! STOP BY TO PICK UP OR CALL & WE WILL MAIL THE LIST OF ALL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE THROUGH ALL AGENCIES. FREEmmm Infoiinalion for Boulder City AFTER HOURS CALL: 702 MARY BOARD 293-7254 LINETTE DAVIS 293-1097 BETH ALDWORTH DEANE 293-7074 ELLEN LAMB STROMBERG 293-6508 CARL COWAN, BROKER ...293-1499 SUNDAY BY APPOINTMENr* RESIOENTfAL-COMMERCIAL INCOME-RENTALS-LOTS APPRAISALS ica =... 1=) 1. CURRENT LIST of ALL BOULDER CITY HOUSES. Condos.Townhomes and Mobile Homes by Ail Realtors. 2. BOULDER CITY STATISTICS Including; PofHilation, Annual Events,Climate, Major Employers & Much More. S.Current BOULDER CITY MAP. YOURS FREE ~ CALL 702'294'0870 TOP VIDEO ^^ ••••••••••••4^^^^******^^• ''^"TflLS I TWO STORY FOUR BDRM BY OWNER 2Vt bathe, formal dining room. Family room with used brick fireplace. Approx., 2,100 sq. ft. of gracious living. Spotless condition, inside and out. Beautiful mature trees and lovely blocked walled rear yard. Concrete parking area on side for RV or boat. Auto sprinklers front and rear. Asking $189,900. Call to see 293-7465 after 6 p.m. and weekends. 1. The Ulllr Mrrmaid, Anitnated. Wall Disney Home Video (G-1989) 2. Bacit lo Ihr Future Parl II, VichaelJ. Fox. Christopher Llovd, MCA/Universal Home Video (PG-1989) 3. Sea or Love, Al Pacino, Ellen Barkin, MCA/Universal Home Video (R1989) 4. .se\, Wti, and videotape, James Spader, Andie MacDowell. RCA/Columbia Home Video (R-1989) 5. Lool< Who's Talking, John Travolta, Kirstie Alley, RCA/Columbia Home Video (PC-13-1989) 6. Black Rain, Michael Douglas, Andy Garcia, Paramouni Home Video (R1989) 7. Dead Poets Society, Robin M'illiams, Touchsione Home Video (PC-1989) 8. Field or Dreams, Kevin Costner, Amy Madigan, MCA Home Video (PG1989) 9. The Abyss, Ed Harris, Mary Mastrantonio, CBSFox Video (PC-13-1989) 10. Honey, I Shrunk the Kids, Rick Moranis, Wall Disney Home Video (PC1989) iMARY BOARD LOCAL RESIDENT FULL TIME REALTOR OFFICE: (702) 23-4a3 HOME: (702) 2n-72M 16M NEVADA HMHWAY BOULDER CITY, NV nOOS HENDERSON New Custom, owner will carry with 25 % down. Extra large rooms, 3-2, 2400 sq. ft. living area. •5657677 V JUST REDUCED & PRICED TO SELL!! Newly remodeled Lewis Home in Boulder City. 4 bdrm, 2 bth, 2 car garage & over 1700 sq. ft. Great for a growing family. Prices right at $139,000. For more Info call Julie at Jack Matthews & Co. 454-7400 or 565-3567. DUPLEX IN BOULDER CITY One bdrm eacri side. One 20x20 garage w/alley access. A great buy for $84,000 294-0501 ask for John. BC BUYER'S AGENT; now availatile to tielp you find the t>est available real estate opportunity on your terms! For a NO-oWigalion meeting to review your needs and to g rove we are for real, call esert Sun Realty at 702-293-2151 and ask for "BUYERS AGENT APPOINTMENT". •••••• Woodridge Estates, $16,900 down, no qualifying. $819 mo. Pool, much more. Ph. 565-4648. VILLE DEL PRADO 3 bdrm 1% bath. Db gar. 1,355 sq ft, fp, block wall. Landscaped. $128,000. 870-6523 BC • • ATTENTION: Government Homes from $1 (Urepair)! Delinquent tax property. Repossessions, Call (1) 602-838-8885, Ext. GH-10002.^' REDUCED PRICE TRI-PLEX Plus Garage Office Unit In Boulder City. Centrally located furnished units. Ideal fof Single Person to live In one and collect ri Now Only J119,900 J1200 per mo. Income, CALL MANNY 294-0870 •TTTTEJ BilUSIKISRa YoHr Own Triur A LOVELY 2,700 SQ FT HOME on V2 acre with beautiful view of Boulder City. 3 car garage, covered RV parking. Nice backyard enclosed with block wall. Asking $265,000. Call 293-1165 W tan a IOB( rMctal • BOULDER CITT *HENDERSON • GREEN VAIIET Calltadar 293-2302 •r S64-1881 HDN 3 bdmi, 1% bath. 1.333 sq ft. Covered patio. FP, country kitchen. Obi gar. Walk to school. $85,000. 870-6623* DENNIS CONNERS "KNOWS BOULDER CITY" •Free Market Analysis •Free List of Boulder City Homes •Free Buying & Selling Guide •Free Home Warantee Available Over 43 Years in Boulder City Home 293-4737 Mobile 596-1331 1-800-776-4575 JACK MATTHEWS & CO. CALL COLDWELL BANKER COLDWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY O^KN 7 DAYS A WIIKI 293-5757 PRINTINQ BUSINESS-Mrm owntra (or 10 year*. Equipment Hat and Information avallabia to quallflad/slncara purchaaar. $95,000. POPULAR LEWIS BUILT 4 ^^^ BORM naar goH couraa. Pool |Sj alza lot with mountain and J^l^ vallay vlaw. Daaart LandiT'"^ acapad In front. $260,000. M naar cacomor >ig, 2 full In t>aaaTHREE Oovamnv, lot. Wocf Itatha, laa( mant. Sllv"^. VILLA DEL PRAOO-Popular 3 bdrm, 1,374 a.f., 2 ear garaga, Oaaait Landaeaping In front, graaa In back. Covarad patloa, axtra atoraga aliad. $134,000. CUSTOM HOME NEAR QOLF COURSE, 3 badrm, 2 batfi, larga pool, courtyard antry, woodbuming firapteca. $109,000. LEWIS THREE BEDRM on tha golf couraa. Thraa badroom, 3 car garaga, baautlful landaeaplng and homa la Immaeulata. S aWar iaaving araa wanto offar nowl $229,S00. SITUATED ON TWO LOTS FOR PRIVACY AND VIEW of Wia plua 4,000 a.f. ol HvMg In VNa cuaiom oaaignaa noma. 10x36 family room, larga UtGnan wflii oooUng Maud. Stop ki and vlaw our vMae taping 91 tMa homa. $7M,000. HOMEY FOUR BORM on larga raMNly fooni MQ RMVI lsntf> $120,000. ^ SI ufiN In fmr, Aity too OOflMf lOCLoto 0 tlMS pfiviw ywv funiNnM unite, ItodHood tii,900. rRin usr or ALL HOMU FON SALl IN lOULOCII OITY. OIT ON OUR MAIUNO UtT. I'l f. • l^t..fc.A w *lipt. to aaal $210,500. GREAT FOUR BEDRM for family Hvlngl Ovar 2,000 a.f. with gama/rac. room, all appllancaa, woodbuming flraplaca. Aaaumabia FHA loan, all for $134,500. LARGE MODULAR HOME 2,100 a.f., huga 3 car garaga and woftohop larga covared RV parking with watar, aawar and alactrlc naar. Dack/patlo tooMng out to tfw laka ovar antira garaga. Excaptlonal tot. Eaay malntananca landacapIng and mera. $106,000. FOREST HILLS MODEL In BouMar City Eatataa. Thraa badrm, 2H batha, 3 car garaga. Upgradad flooring throughout, oak parquat, tlla and carpel. $230,000. CUSTOM THREE BORM, built wtth akimpatona, 2 fuH batha, w o odb um ing firaplaoa, atrium off maatar badrm, pool apa, vtaw of laka. $246,000. ANCHOR REALTY Ml NMMla Nwy., a mv U Mt CHy 293-5757 BOULDER REALTY iiiff (702) 293-3232 Put your trust m in Number One; rSsOIWM and d-niury ^1 Real bmatv Corvoraiion. Kqual {{ouiiinx Oppnri unity fl INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATEa WANT TO KNOW WHAT YOUR PROPERTY IS WORTH? Free market analysis. Call Roger 293-2939 Realtor, Coldwell Banker/Anchor Realty. LAKE VIEW LOT In BouldiT City. Drive by 522 Jani PI and see wtiere your dream home can be. 82X100 All Util. 293-4236 BC HOUSE FOR SALE BY OWNER Ave I. 2 bdrm, 1 bath plus granny apt. 1 bdrm loft Jacuzzi tub. Central air and heat. V? garage and shop. Washer/dryer. Call eves between 8 and 10 pm. 294-2393. Priced to sell. BC* BOULDER CITY SPECIAL 4 br comer lot home on over Vi aae. Handymans dream. Call Mary Shuman, AMERICANA GROUP REALTORS 796-7777 or 294-0639 60 MAGNIFICENT LAKE and mountain views. 2 bedroom 21 12 bath condo. Over 1,500 sq ft. Numerous upgrades. All appliances. Great assumabie non-qualifying loan. Call Pat, HYDE AND ASSOCIATES 293)14* ?r,:^Ksixik%,k^ COLOUICU. BANKVlex drawing teeome of $025 per month—payaunU ffoiag out $950 a BMWth—realUaf $200 a UMMth in tax retoma-let'a talk aae Janica if jroor lataraatad 29SS2. BOULDER CITY AT $73,600 UNBEUEVABLE BUT IT IS HERB, ONE OF A KIND PROPBRTY-.18 mam with a mobile hooM permaneaUy a tt acfca d St arter haer vacation haaeT LOTS OF ROOM TO EXPANDMOVE THE MOBILE OFF AND BEING A BIGGER ONE ON OR JUST SIMPLY INVEST IN SOMETHING THAT HAS BECOME NONEXISTENT IN BOULDER CITY WITH OUR UMITED GROWTH PROGRAM. THIS ONE IS A WINNER. CaO Don at 2934232-11 Don la boay, aay MM of the MMta at Caatnry 21 Baddar Raahy wiU kelp yon la viewing the property. 702-2934232. NO ASSOCUTION FEES INVOLVED. PUT II TO WORK FOR YOU ^JOR ALL YOUR RIAL ISTATI NEEDS iSl WE UST — WE SELL CAU THI CENTURY 21 PROPESSIONAU TODAY anoli ofneo Iwda p a n dantty ownnd apnratad WE GEr RESULTS JANICE CRAWFORD. Owner 2W4942 MEL DUNAWAY. Brakar 2-24S8 DIANNB VANA8SE IS-4284 DON TAP80N 2B4M0 NELLIE PETERSON 2M-1241 ROSE GALPERIN 2-16M ALAN HARDY *4M88 STUART E LOWE 2W-3(M1 nM\ 90^ ^9^9 <16 NEVADA HIGHWAY \ I Ml} ^9i*lA0^ BOULDER aiY, NEVADA JENSEN'S REALTY 219 Water St. D. "Jim" JcDMn I Brokar Henderson. Nevada 89015 MALTOR* t 564-3333 RESIDENTIAL DIVISION mm COUNTRY CLUB VILLAGE MOBILE HOME ESTATES 7S VIEW LOTS-1 block to golf courae, F.H.A. financing available, call 564-7710 or conUct Jenaen'a Realty 664-3333 NAY #900101 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Mobile Home on large Vi acre land, soned for horaea, excellent cond., RV fndlity, right behind Whitney Ranch. Call Luke. 3.000 SF of the Best of Green Valley, Total priatine 4 BR plnsh, Candle Creek, Aak for Davell HIGHLAND HILLS AREA 3 BDRM 2Vx Bath Townhonae. Private courtyard. Large 2 Car Garage with Electric Door Opener. Very Quiet Street. Central Air/Gaa Heat. 1,462 aq. ft of living apace. Call Richie to aee. LAND FOR HOMES AND MOBILE HOMES IN PAHRUMPGREAT view of Pahnunp Valley. Call Lnke. MOBILE HOME on Toiyabe hi Laa Vegaa. $45,000. CaU Peggy Benedict. INCOME PROPERTY-WeU maintahied 4-plez hi excellent rental area of Henderaon, 4-2 bedroom 1 bath nnita with extra atorage per unit & coin-op laundry room. Fenced, lota of parldng. Oooid Income. Call Randy for dataila. 1989 PARKRIDGE-CHAMPION 14 x 56 Mobile Home with I Acre of land, veil A aeptic. horae coTTala, GREAT VIEW OF THE MOUNTAINS-Pahnunp. S36.90a CaU Luke. — HOME GEM...Coiy fireplace la jnat part of ita appeal. Rehabbed. Great famUy area, evaporative cooUng, gaa heat CALL OFFICE FOR DETAILS, aak for Joyce. LOOKING FOR A HOME thnt'a priced under $70,000? Here it ia, 3 Bedroom 2 Bath, block waUa, ante aprinklera, etc...Priced at $69,600. Aak for Don. HILLTOP PARADISE...FoothUl cnotom ranch. Stucco, moontain/dty viewa. Electric heat paddle faaa, family room with wet bar, country kitchen, 3 BR/IH batha, fencing, wrought iron fence, circnlar drive, apa. Zoned for horaea. CaU Joyce. LIVE ON THE 18th FAIRWAY, b thia benntifnUy remodeled 3 BR. 2 BTH home. For detaOa or to aea. pleaae caU Don. 1,800 SF.. .2 atory.. overlooUng the lake. 924 Keya Drive hi Boulder City. Aak for Dave or Lake. SUNRISE MOBILE ESTATES-HUGE loti Biggeat in arec Almoat Vi acre. Beantifol Undacapfaig. Concrete fencing. RV parking, plna 1-year-old 2 badrm mobile home with covered parting and U appliancea. CaU Peggy Benedict to aae. GREAT INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY: Apartment BaUdh* hi Handaraoa with 6 oniU oonaJatIng of fnnr 2 Bedroona/l Bath Apartmanta aad two Stndioa. Very knr vacancy rate. For mat* hif araiation caU Richie Eddinga. Sae Rax Newell I COMMERCIAL DIVISION gardfaw EXCHANGES. P0R8ALB STRIP CENTER—10 Storoa plaa 18 Stan^ Unite aa Sn; unlta are laaaed. Owner wanta to trade eqiMy far voeant I .Al .Call] BEAUTY SHCW-Actlve I BOULDER HWY. LOT-IOrXllS' Lot en 1 Ken. CHy en Nevada Hwy. 8 •Hwy.$M$U$IO.CaB Priam lacntian. xr aage 1 Ian. Call I ^ • .^.

PAGE 36

TV >.jn^i p 1 n. ^^i^mwm mmm^mmmm'^^^^ mmw^ Page 20B, Henderson Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Thursday. July 19,1990 FOR SALE BY OWNER 3 bdrm, 2 bth, Ig. master bedroom. Solar screens. Assumable Loan at 9V8% or cash to n^w loan. Carpet allowance. Call Sandy 565-03t9 •••••-^•••••^ '^.^2 i DOME REALTY 1610 Nevada Highway Boulder City, Nevada 89005 • OULDIR CITY HOIMIS THREE NEW CUSTOM HOMES Td BE BUILT. Two In tub 11 and .1 In lake area. See us for price end details. 1313 HIGHLAND COURT—Custom home almost completed—4 bedrooms, 2W baths, 3 car garage—$224,000. •OULMR CITY MOBILE HOME SALES PRICE REDUCTIGNII! 10 x 46-fumlshed— upgraded carpeting—$9,950. 1975 LYNN HAVEN-2 bedroom-IVi bathgood location—$20,500. 1977 CAMERON—Boulder City Trailer Parl(-2 bedrooms, ^V^ baths—$15,950. VISTA MOBILE HOME PARK-Hender* son—1976 Champion—14x60—2 bedrooms, 1 bath—$8,500. 702 / 293-1613 • 293-3267 JR REALTY maa EVERYONE WILL LOVE IT—Rover will love the enclosed back yard, dad will love the RV parking, mom will love the updated kitchen, and the kids will love ail the space. Everyone will love the price of $72,500. TOUCH THE STARS-You will think you can when you move into this charming custom home high In the hospitals. Large V* acre lot Ideal for horses and kids. Only $ 129,900. JUST REDUCED—Great looking Mission Hills home with 6 car garage. Two attached, 4 detached, ideal for someone with lots of stuff or a weekend mechanic. Now only $179,500. SELLER TRANSFERRED—IMust leave t beautiful custom home in section 19. Half acre view lot, tile roof, fireplace, formal | dining. See this one soon. $138,500. OVER 1,800 SQ. FT.-This four bedroom has been completely redone. New roof, fresh paint, new landscaping. Only $73,900. ENJOY THE REST OF THE SUMMER-ln this lovely tiled roof home on a quiet cul-de-sac. Easy care front landscaping, lush tropical rear yard with beautiful pool. You will love the southwest decor. Only $114,900. ASSUMABLE-NO QUALIFYING-Cute three bedroom Paradise Heights home. RV parking, close to school and park. Only $88,900. 204 W. Pacific Ave. Henderson M 564-5142 • • • •i..,!.i,.,,a. .rdir,,-. -I K.'.,! i.i.,i. i • ,,... ,|,... I -I ...1 ii'Ni. i'L'ii;>ii. ,tiii,ii\ a ^:ullo^TK>:ls|^|lf i>KM)f:\Ti^ IAVM n WHDIM H VHK J K^ifi^i^^^^'Condo, Highland Hills BEAUTY SALON ,nbu.ness Saoe'sSLded'arel' over 10 years with lots of Sf i? ,i r, ^?cllentel and all equip for sale Washer/dryer. Non qualiUnder $10,000. Ask lor 'ying assumable Sheryl Cobts 293-6036. 564-1777 or 652-3064. CENTURY 21 Barrett 870-5155 Tvw) 1/2 acre building lots. Section 4 in HerKterson Zoned for horses. One w/financing, one lor cash. $25,000 each. 294-0501 ask for John. BC BY OWNER New Key Largo 3 bdrm home with lake view. For sale or lease. $175,000 293-4950 or 293-5718 BC COMK^ERCIAL1,400sqftof Offices plus 950 sq ft refrigerated warehouse/ marxjfacturing with 16 It high aervKO door. Walled rear yard with gate. Caretaker Quarters permitted. iOULDER DAM REALTY .293-4663 BC LET ME handle all of your Real Estate needs. HUD Homes, assumables, nonE ""ying homes with low payments Call John er at the Americana Group Realtors. 564-7603 or 598-5845. SPYGLASS HILL CONDO IN B.C. M7 Marine Dr. No. 39. 2 br, 2V:i baths. Was model unit. CaU Oeaeil liiipire Realty, aak for Larry 2S1-5499. Owner/Licensee VET or NOT! Own Your Own Home *PiM Qurifytng *FrM IMt *lJtHl VA tncTHUD Rlpo Into taiMiv M MghMqurilr ante • unB lo haM (Mnnh|> IvouQh VA W OOM t HM LOW DOWN III VETERANS III And AoDve MMteiy *Ne OoiMi P|imM to tlS4,ooo ANoEnmrFw •459-8387^ A tanMM d \MBI fM EMM Cop, EMII Oto h OantdmtOpnM vMicsi noumg bwmri —MtlMNTIALBniNQYOURHORSESIFtaturss Include over 1,700s(|.fl.,hugskltchen, large IMng area, formal dining room, 3 corrals, 1 full tcrs, tack room and artna with an FHA assumabia no qualifying k>anat>MH.CaUnowfor an appolnlmanl. FABULOUS LOCATIONOver 1,B00 *q. ft.. 4 bedrooms, formal dining room with a stone fireplaca, IMng room and a famlty room. En|oy the dty t mountain view from your back porchi Call today to see this home. CUSTOM WITH 3 CAR QARAOE-Just one of meny amenMlee oftefsd, i bdrs, potential In-law quarters, 2H batlw, great room with fireplaee, large kitchen/laundry room, huge bedroome, apprax* Imataty H acre fenced ares, zoned heraee, fabuloua vtew M, end elly aewer tool Pileod to eel al tiU.SOO. BE YOUR OWN BOSS Well established deli/sandwich shop In Boulder City BOULDER DAM REALlV 293-4663 DC QREEN VALLEY setting 2,600 tq' Morel Morel Onl' REALTY USA. LM. DSCOUNTBROKBiAGE CaHi.aureen Fulton 293-7551 kyard park-like 3 car garage. SUMMERLIN Qulct^i^>^ Only $92,900. Sonora model. • • SPECTACULAR LAKE MEAD VIEW LOT In prestlgloua setting. Not many left at this value $139,900. • • • DIVIDEND PRODUCER rented and ready. Money-making four-plex In B.C. LUXURY LIVING AT REQATTA POINTE T0WNH0U8ES. Monterey, Laguna and Newport rnodels available. Priced from $161 ,500 to $1 79,500. Totally upgraded. Call DICK BLAIR REALTY, REALTOR 293-2171 BC. THREE BDRM 1% tath. 2 car garage. Naar Laka View Park. $119,900. COLDWELL BANKER Jennifer 293-3483 458-7070 BC* Boulder City 10,000 sq ft block constructed building. Zoned Commercial/ Manufasturing. Three phase pc^er. Smaller sizes available. Good rental income property. 293-1978 BC •••'•••• IMMACUUTE 2 BR Boulder Hills Condo. Complex fws pool and is across from schools and tennis coJrts. Kids and pet OK, $70,000. MoneyWorld REALTORS. Call Cary Fisher 293-6573 SOUTHEAST, 2 bdrm, 2 bth, 2 car garage, exceptionally Ig. master bedroom and l-Sper 293-6075 Rbonda Beck 293-7975 Crietina Antonio 293^)116 Marilyn J. Fitc 2944)524 Rich Moynihan 293-1802 RobcrU McUan 294-1730 HOMES OPEN FLOOR PLAN & SPA ROOM are some of the highlights of this 2,500 sq. ft. custom home, designed with Southwest decor in mind. 4 bedrm., 2Vi ba., large island kitchen, ceramic tUe floors, MANY EXTRAS. 2 car fin. gar. & large comer 'lot. CALL FOR APPT. $215,000. A ONE OF A KIND HOME FOR THE CONNOISSEURII This home is CUSTOM THROUGHOUT-with 2,100 sq. ft., cathedral ceilings, GOURMET KIT. with Italian marble, separate dine, rm. & famUy r., Italian marble in baths, SW. POOL, BUILT IN B^R-B^UE, A PLACE TO LIVE AND ENTERTAIN LAVISHLY, RV & BOAT PAAKG., Block fence. THIS UNUSUAL HOME IS A RARE FIND AT $300,000. CONDOS TOWNHOUSES REGATTA POINT-NEWPORT MODEL END UNIT W/LOTS OF UPGRADES-2 bedrm. 2 ba. + den, overlooking common green area. 1,696 sq. ft.plusprivateyard, 2car gar. Atrium, F.P. $179,500. EVERGREENUPSTAIRSC0ND02BR, 2 bath, fireplace. Under total facelift. Assumable loan. Owner/Licensee. $63,900. EVERGREEN CONDOMINIUM-Immaculate downstairs, 2 bedrm., 2 ba. with F.P. & laundry area. Excellent comer location. $64,900. MAINTENANCE FREELIVING,PLUS PRIVACY-highlight this l,696sq. ft. end unit condo. Lovely landscaped yard, 2 bedrm. & den, 2 car gar. Many upgrades, priced to sell at $168,500. LAGUNA MODEL TOWNHOUSE 2 bedrm., 2 ba. 1,400 sq. ft., F.P., covered patio, community pool & spa. Covered patio AND MORE Just reduced to $161,000. LUXURY I POINT-Mo throughout. $161,500. at REGATTA idel. Upgraded '£ ba., 2 car gar. MOBILE HOMES 24'x57' 2 bedrm., 1 y4 ba.. Carport, FULLY LANDSCAPED COR. LOT in Coronado Estates-ADULT ONLY SECTION $90,000. MOUNTAIN VISTA ESTATES-24'x 60'Mobilehome,2bedrm.,2ba.,cornerlot, central Air/heat. PRICED TO SELL. $77,000. READY FOR EASY LIVING? Very nice 2 bed. 2 ba. mobile home in GINGERWOOD with 7'6" X 50' add-on $35,000. LAND VIEW LOT IN PRESTIGIOUS LAKE MEAD AREA-Just the spot for YOUR DREAM HOMEI $125,000. PRESTIGIOUS AREA OF BOULDER CITY View Lot. Priced to seU $80,000. '/tAcrelotinSUB.ll,with exceptional view of CITY & MTNS. $94,500. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES Tired of working for someone else? Here are TWO WELL ESTABLISHED BUSINESSES-just waiting for you. 1-Florist Shop. 1-FAST FOOD ESTABLISHMENT. Same location 30 years. EXCELLENT LOCATIONS FOR BOTH. CALL FOR DETAILS. COMMERCIAL RENTALS OOOsq. f t. in business plaza—IDEAL FOR COMMERCIALOFFICE.Callfor details. $375 per month. Stop by and pick up your FREE CURRENT LIST OF PROPERTIES AVAILABLE FOR SALE. TOLL FREEH 1.800.62M910 Et E41 SINCERITY AND INTEGRITY IS OUR SPECIALTT-. • •)- • • • CENTURY 21 HENDERSON REALTY •TARTERS DELIOHTThlt 3 ba*eoni, 3 faalh •M la n deeipii, do** to •choele and shopping with • no quellfytng loen. Call now, Mfclng only 178,000. PRICED TO SELL-Tofrttle location In addition to 3 Mre, family room wKh fireplaee, large dining are*, garage with 280 avallaM*, fenced, lantfaoaped, no qtMNtybig loan or new financing avaH• M*. A walk to downtown for 171,000. UMM CUSTOM HOMCAMomodate* any tin tanrily. 4 or ( bdn, 1 bathe, i car garage, tebulaii* view loi indudM eIrcMlardrtve, landM^ring •lio fiwM ififreund pool. Lane Mahsn, braaMM noeli.tannaiMdlntannal tfmng lar I17,N0. SPACIOUS 4 BEDROOM HOME-Baautlful upgraded Uwlo 2 atory, IH bath*, 2 ear garage, tot* of RV pwldng, *ttractW* design with foimal/lnfofmal *nl*rtaMng, larg* f*nc*d lot, fuly land•c*p*d, balcony off mader bedroom, and no qualifying or new finanoIng *alHbl*lor119,600. A VIEW FROM EVERV wmoow-WhenlMngm thi* custom 3 bdr, 1H bath, 2 car g*r*g*, popular Mlaalon Hill* Estate*, comer cu-d*-**c let, circular driv*, frecMy p*lnt*d Interior, new earpet and linoleum. Pileed at ftM,giM. FOR NELUS A.P.B. PERSONNEL-or flr*t ttnie buyer*. 4 bdr*, 2 baHM wtlh central air and rrvvmy poNnoOi WOVI^ MiC fli IMB pftCO HIOHUND HILLS LOCAnON-Lovrty 3 bdr, 1H bath, 2 ear garag*, quaillyCMnbuM Sonera floor pMnwIlhdouMafbeplae*, ooverwl petto, RVpartdng. aunlcen living room, upgraded linoleum thruout and Iraahly painted In•ld*Bndoutfartl00,9S0. MOBILE HOME/LAND COMBWATION-Eiciting 4 bdr, floor plan on large MX 100 lot, NO RENT SPACE RENT HERE. Deelgned for handtoap neede, central cooVheet, wNMn minute* to Lek* Meed r*creatio erea. Financing aeaHaMe... •M,000...eannowl AMUSTTOSEE-Xoned tar herae* and (Nuatod en owr .7 aere e. Beeutlftily mmntabiad 2 bdr, 2 bath menufaoturad home wHh • *psrato2eargaMfaiM wortielwp, fruK treea gatoie and unique gr*en UNDfteOMMmciAL BUILD YOUR OREAM HOME HERE-Popular Section 27 near Old Vega*, approx Vk acre, wnod for horaaa, aco**e to utWtl**. 020,000. 10 ACRES IN PAHRUMP —wed, *i*cti1city on pro^ •fty. T*i*phon* *vallabl*. Good view of property. AUTO MARINE REPAIR8600 aq.fl.Mhr equipped turn key opemtlen. Ec* M n t JocaHen on Lake MMM DflVO* 1 ACM, WiKtBH, POWER —.eomar jj^ in Section 4, good view. Owner wNf cerry. PRIMe LOCAtlON—1.46 aeraa with Laiw Meed fran to B*. Lacatod on Lake MMB BMnioMo. Prto#4 at 1210,000. SrnON31-9.8aor**of baeuOtUl high property. Conveniently leeaitd ctoee la prepoaed free* wey. Cat for detaHa. HACM-ln deeirabi* loeallon. Seelicn 27. AM uliBllee k Mieet. CeN now aa R went iaal. 18 WAflR STREET, HiNDERSON, NV 8M1S 564-2515 B*^ E>AlfDQnKATm NEED TO SELL YOUR HOUSE? WE WILL BUY ITNOWI (^ 293-1613 O.A. "CMily" twlth. Inc. HOUSE FOR SALE BY OWNER, Boulder City 4 or 5 bdrm 2 1/2 bath. Approx 2,500sqft. Pool. $165,000. Call 293-0138 BC ••••••••••••*!, "WORKINQMANS HOME Low. low down. 3 bdrm, 2 bth house w/garage on large lot. Family neighborhood In henderson. New loan, easy qualifying. Impact Realty, 386-1900. PERFECT STARTER HOME. Older house but almost totally remodeled. 3 bdrm, IV* bth, family rm, laundry rm. 1392 sq. ft. All this for $73,000. Ask for Gertie 736-8551 or Beeper 381-9660. The Realty Center. HENDERSON, Seller Place. 2 story condo w/balcony. 2 bdrm, 2 bth, 2 car carport, great for 1 st time buyers or retired people. Ask for Gertie 736-8551 or Beeper 381-9660. The Realty Center. GOVERNMENT HOMES from $1.00 (U-repair) Foreclosures, Repos, Tax Delinquent Properties. Now selling your area. Call 1-315-736-7375. Ext. H-NV-HI current lists. 24 hrs. 2400 PLUS SQ FT. LAKE VIEW HOME. New RV parking in quiet cul de sac, 129 Forest Lane. Call for appt. 293-2215. B.C. V/////////////////////////////////777ym Bob Olsen Realty % & Insurance Inc, I"! | .. i ...:, 1 1 6 Water St., Henderson WlM 564-1831 Boulder CHy lot, overlooking Lake Mead on Woodacre Dr. Ready to^ild with all utilitle*. Owner llceneee. iitiToa*finnNaTHCMMOmoN ARU FO* W VIAM ^ RtAlTOa* Sf aVWO THC MMOCMON ARUFOaiOVIAm o CALL COLDWELL BANKER PAUL GARGIS & ASSOCIATES RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE An Idependently Owned and Operated Member of Coldwell Banker Residential Affiliates. Inc VIDEO STORE—£*tabllahed 9 yeara, free (tending building located on main afreet, over 6000 litlea. Trade or exchange conaldered. Call Steve Coleman, 564-6969. THE VIEW SPEAKS FOR ITSELF-So doea thia beautiful executive home. Four bedroome plua, 2.7S bathe, 3 marble front firepalce*, drematlc entrance, eweeping etalrcaae, marble floore througfwut, onyx batha, Corrian countera In kitchen. Calico RIdge location. Priced at $289,000. Call Brenda Bird or Wendy Wllllema and aak about property 0:7226. SOUTHWESTERN STYLE CUSTOM-Located In Section 19, comer W aore lot, great view, four bedroome, 3 full tMtha, grand entrance, formal living and dining rooma, ceramic tile Mtdien and batha, maater aulte featurea It'a own firaplece, rolled edge eve*, custom plantere, the beat of everything can be youra for $189,900. Call Wendy Wlllleme and aak to *ee property R:9e667. MOBILE ON 60X100 LOT—Oreat for reUred or young family, haa new eveporatlvc cooler plue window air. Fenced and ha* acreened patio. Warranty Inaurince 16 offered by the owner. Call Elaine Smith about property M:1455. WANT SECLUSION PRIVACY—Thie home I* for you... three bedroom*. 2.76 bethe, epectacular view of the city and mounlalna, located high up In Sectton 32, nice open floor plan, atrium, formal dining, aunkan conversation pit faces gorgeoua flreplece, too many cuatom featuree to mention. Call Wendy or Brenda and aak to aee property T:3126. Priced at 8169,900. MISSION HILLS BEAUTY—Cuatom two atory wKh 3 car garage, four bedroom*, three full batha, formal Hving and dining, aoparata family room, glamoroua master aulte wKh balcony. Priced at $166,900. Call Wendy or Brende and kak to see property S:7211. GREAT INVESTMENT PROPERTY—Near race track, 2 five (5) acre percale, can be purchaaed aeparately or aa a package, call Tina Wllllama about properties. ,T:4312&431B. BEAUTIFUL CtiSTOM—Locatigl In popular Section 19, three bedroome, 2 batha, two marble trimmed fireplaceo, Spanieh Ula roof, Southweetem deeign exterior, profeeelonally landacaped uaing a unk|ue combination of graea and deaert landscaping. Priced al $163,000. Catt Bill Clonto and aak to aee property R:6766. CUSTOM HOME LOTS—Located near goH courae, paved etreet, all utIHtlos, fantaatic view of the entire valley and golf courae. 60 x 100, $40,000 each. 6all Paul, 564-6969. QREEN VALLEY-three bedroom, 1.75 both, nice floor plen, formal aunken HvIng room, formal dining, aeparate femlly room, lerge kitchen, vaulted ceilings and flreplace. Yard being eodded. Priced at $112,900. Call Wendy WIIHama about property S:4704. HIGHLAND HILLS BEAUTY—Three bedroom, 1.75 bath, two car garage, glaaa front flreplace featuree blower to dieperae lieal, beveled mlrrore In Hvihg room, cuetom gee brick bar-lH|ue, covered patio, fountain h front yard. Beat no qualifying aeeumptlon In Highland HUM CaU Anne Smith about property B:7164, priced at $107,000. NICE STARTER HOME—Three bedroome, 1 full both, 20 x 13 femlly room loto of built-in book ahehrss, front and rsar yard eprinklered. Call Elaine Smith, eek ebout property 0:3239. Priced et $67,000. LOW MAINTENANCE YARD-Located In Highland Hllla, three bedroom, 1.75 batha, 2 car gerage, great netghborttood, good echoole neertty. Priced at $94,500. Call Angle Mundo or Lole Bsavor, eek about property S:7413. NOTHING LEFT TO DO-Juat move In, freeMy painted IneMe and out, huge yerd, big maater bedroom, eunaereena and aecurtty bare are alreedy InetalM to give you maximum effldency and sscurlty, thrse bsdrooms, 1.75 baths, 2 car garage. Priced at $66,500. Aak Unda Lewie about property E:7607. ABSOLUTELY BEAUTIFUL—Two bedroom, 2 both moMlo home tocated In Oeeert Inn Mobile Eetatee. Over 1600 8F, triple wMe Sl^ercre8t, extremely weH kept, looke like a model home. Priced at $64,900, lot Indudedt Aek for Bill Clonta and property B:442. OPEN FLOOR PLAN—Roomy 3 bedroom, 1.76 bethe, partdng for 3 care, garage end cerport, kitchen haa been remodeled, extra caMnete, mirrored ckisel doors, epacloua maater bedroom. Great aeeumptlon, no qualifying. Priced et $79,900. Aek BIN CtonU about property V:7709. JUST RIGHT FOR TWO—Two bwlrooma, 2 full bathe, 2 cer gerage, kMka Nke a model home, cuetom drapee, flreplace wHh gee tog, priced at $76,600. CaU Angle or Lole end aak for property L:2968. ALL APPLIANCES STAY-Thres bedroom, 2 tuN batha, new roof, euelom oak cablnete In kitchen, new air conditioner, ceramlo tile In bethe end kllottsn, new bsthroom flxturss, new tub and new einks. Plus rsfrigerator, waaher dryer all eteyl Priced at $79,900. Call Brende SImmona about property J:7376. NEW. NEW, NEW-New carpet, new point, new tile, new aolar i bNnda and a new dWiwaaher. Two bedroome. 1H bath, garage, aulo c end ell applla n ce e atay. Nothing to do, everything le newt Priced i Aak Lola Beavor or Angle Mundo about property 8:3091. IMEistNofbonDiin NiMMfMAi Ntndi NOIS TiliphoMi(702)SMINI \mwm 8301 The Hone Seilere.' .HENDERSON t -* i*^' NEVADA'S INDUSTRIAL CENtEB 'vW Hendenoi CAY jICt^OFILH 1115 F. AfauFS AV 3UN;iyv"AL[. CA 94086 'S NEWSPAPER 25$ 22 WatBr St 564-1881 Prosecution's witness jailed overnight Thirstbusters bosses bound over foi extortion, coercion, talse imprisonment By Katherine E. Scott News Staff Writer Four bosses of a Henderson tavern won't face charges of second-degree kidnapping in District^oiirt, but five other counts were upheld during a two-day preliminary hearing last week in Henderson Justice Court. The defendants were bound over to Dept. 10 of Clark County District Court by Justice of the Peace Larry Tabony at the conclusion of the hearing Thursday. The prosecution's witness, a former employee who claimed he was bound, gagged, beaten and nearly drowned in a commode by one or all of the four defendants, was jailed overnight Wednesday. Tabony said it was the first time in his tenure he had incarcerated a witness "to protect the integrity of the case." An Aug. 8 District Court arraignment was scheduled for Roiiald Thomas Coury, Arthur Steven Coury, Robert John Williams and Arthur Peter Charles in the case. The charges, each filed against at least two defendants, include two counts each of coercion and extortion. Tabony dismissed a kidnapping charge against all four men on the first day of the hearing Wednesday, but allowed to stand against each defendant one count of false OVERNIGHT — Joseph Stapp, foreground, stayed overnight in Henderson Jail last week when he testified against defendants, background with their attorneys, accused of beating and threatening him last November. Justice of the Peace Larry Tabony incarcerated him after he responded to questions from other witnesses, who allegedly overheard his testimony through the courtroom doors. Photo by Katherine E. Scott imprisonment for an incident said to have occurred at Thirstbusters Sports Connection on Nov. 17. Tabony also dismissed a charge of coercion against on* defendant and removed from the same charge, whicb r*raained against two otllfe'^^,'^' clause for use of a deadly weapon. A fourth defendant was not named in that count. That count of coercion in**'^olved an incident in which former employee Joseph Stapp said defendants threatened to immerse his hand in a container of hot grease. Stapp testified that a plastic band on one wrist, with which he said he had been previously bound, was cut by Arthur Coury and that it, or another that was attached to it, "fell in the grease [and melted]." Tabony ruled the grease did not qualify as a deadly weapon, and removed that clause from the charge against both Courys. Charles was removed from the count due to Stapp's testimony that he had not been involved in that part of the incident. All of the charges stem from a two-hour period in which Stapp said he was beaten and threatened, including with guns aimed at his head and chest, in a management office of Thirstbusters at 697 N. Valle Verde Drive. Stapp admitted in court he had been altering cash register receipts to give away drinks during some two months as a waiter at Thirstbusters. "I was tip-chasing," he testified. He estimated that practice had lost about $200 in revenues for his employers, but said he was forced on Nov. 17 to sign a confession stating he owed the company $2,000. During arguments to dismiss charges against his client, Ronald Coury, defense attorney Charles Thompson said that Stapp's going to the police rather than paying $2,000 by See Thirstkuisters, Page 2 Nevada DOT to test soil aidng Boulder Highway for weed-killer By Katherine E. Scott News Staff Writer m weed-killer sprayed in January 1989 on land bordering Boulder Highway may cause the soil to be contaminated for up to five years, members of the Boulder Highway Improvement Committee were told last week. Fred Droes of the Nevada Department of Transporation said Monday that soil samples taken last week are to be tested by the Deptartmept of Agriculture in Reno. After that, he said, "well know whether we can plant. vegetatation." He said there will be options to rectify the problem when construction begins on the Boulder Highway Beautification Project^ adding that they are all expensive. Acting Project Manager Curt Chandler said the committee was told that in dry areas the soil sterilizer used has been "lasting in the ground much longer than it's expected." He said he was "fairly confident thatst won't affect the plantings on the highway." Chandler said the committee approved modifications to cut more costs from the multi-, million dollar project after consultants advised a possible increase in construction costs had not been considered when the panel previously modified design specifications. The five-mile long project was postponed after bids came in more than $1 million over budget. Chandler said that in drafing the final redesigns, consultants from Howard, Needles, Tammen and Bergen doff "came across some changes that they thought would save some additipnal money." He said members of the firm suggested "restricting improvements in the Pittman area to the channel," and eliminating those along the outside edges of the highway. 'The Sunset [Road improvements] would remain," he said. He said the savings in irrigation and planting along the sid^s of the highway north of Pabco Road was estimated to save some $200,000 of the project costs. He said committee members appeared not to favor the recommendations "because they felt that if any part of the highway was in need of improvements, it was Pittman." Ann Barron, Henderson's Economic Development Department director, told the committed that part of the justification for receiving a $4,8 million federal grant was the improvement for the Pittman neighborhood. She said eliminating those improvements would put the grant money in jeopardy. The committee voted to leave Pittman portion of the project aspreviousy planned, Chandler said. Chandler said some changes approved by the committee included reduction in some of the turf areas, which not only would reduce costs but would help comply with a Nevada Department of Environmental Protection requirement to avoid the reuse water from being sprayed on paved sm-faces. He said the committee also considered replacing ohve trees with another selection due to high costs. However, he said, the sole supplier of that tree agreed to provide a discoimt due to the quantity that would bg)urchased. Traffic llglits may have malfunctioned Overview Woman injured wtiile searcliing for car By Robert Grove Fisher Managing Editor For more than a decade, there has been a concerted and relentless effort to drastically change—perhaps eliminate altogether—a morale-building pubUcation available to U.S. Armed Forces personnel serving overseas. Just one week from today, on Tuesday, July 31, the latest attack on that venerable publication. Stars and Stripes, will take effect. The Readiness Subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committee has ordered that The Defense Department will implement the Stars and Stripes consoUdation ^dings of the Government Accounting Office and report to the conmuttee|. by July 31,1990. If an olqective assessment of this consoUdation^ is not forthcoming, the committee will assume the savings in the GAO are vahd and reduce funding accordingly. Ask any veteran who served overseas during thepast 40-8ome years what he thought of Stars and Stripes and there will be a virtual unanimous approval of the serviceman's newspaper. The two major editions of Strip&a—one printed in Darmstadt, Germany, and the other printed in Tokyo, Japan—are part of the Department of Defense's Morale, Welfare and Recreation program. As such, the pubUcations are entitled to receive See Overview, Page 2 By Katherine E. Scott News Staff Writer A Henderson woman v^as seriously injured in a traffic accident Friday while searching for her own car and Henderson police said a traffic Ught may have malfunctioned, causing the collision. While the vehicles involved in that accident were still at the scene, poUce said the missing car was-involved in another accident one block away. Catherine Coroneos, 39 was taken to University Medical Center in serious condition and the driver of the car in which she was riding was admitted to UMC in good condition, police said. Joy Coroneos, 62, was driving westbound on Basic Road about 5:30 p.m. in a tan Ford Taurus when she collided With a white Dodge pickup truck driven south on Boulder High* way by Dean Funk, 53, of Tuscon, Ariz. Funk and liis wife; Shirley; were treated and released at St. Rose Dominican Hospital, police said. "Witnesses stated tha^it appeared that both vehicles were traveling on a green traffic light," poUce wrote in a press release. Officers are investigating'the possiblity of a traffic hght malfunction. Traffic signals at several Boulder Highway intersections h&d tinned off several times on Friday, bringing police attention. Pohce said that while officers were still at the scene of that accident, a friend who had found Coroneos' car and was driving it home to her was involved in a traffic accident one block north at Boulder Highway and Texas Avenue. HPD Sgt. Gary Smith said the red Mustang pulled onto' Boulder Highway in front of a tractor-trailer driving northbound. He said that caused the truck to jack-knife, adding that its deisel gas tank was punctiu-ed. "A large amount of diesel was dumped on the highway," Smith said. Later, the Henderson Fire Department washed down the pavement, he said. Jet fuel dumped over Henderson fqr second time in two weelcs A commercial airliner was observed dumping fuel over Henderson shortly before 9 a.m. Friday—the second time in as many weeks that the emergency procedure was performed over the city. McCarran Airport spokespersons confirmed that a 40-year-old female passenger on a United Airhnes flight from Los Angeles to Chicago became ill enroute and the pilot requested permission to land at Las Vegas. Federal safety regulations required, because of the large amount of fuel that the aircraft still had on board. that it be bled off into the atmosphere so that the plane could land safely. The passenger, whose name was not imm^iately available, was taken to a local hospital, where her condition was unreported. On July 10, a Northwest Airhnes 727 jet, experiencing difficulty in retracting its flaps shortly after takeoff from McCarran, dumped most of its fuU load of fuel over HenderscHi prior to returning the the airport, where the flaps were repaired. f* ^^,^*^;


Citation
1990-07-19 - Henderson Home News

Material Information

Title:
1990-07-19 - Henderson Home News
Creator:
Scott, Katherine E. ( Columnist )
O'Callaghan, Mike ( Columnist )
Szydelko, Paul ( Columnist )
Mayes, Aaron ( Columnist )
Cohen, Richard ( Columnist )
Shipler, Guy ( Columnist )
Larson, Nathan ( Columnist )
Sanchez, David M. ( Columnist )
Bennett, L. Jessie ( Columnist )
Colletta, Chuck ( Columnist )
McDonnell, Pat ( Columnist )
Curtis, Joey ( Columnist )
Soehlke, Ruth ( Columnist )
King, John W. ( Columnist )
Goff, James E. ( Columnist )
Donahue, Mike ( Columnist )
Schneider, Geoff ( Columnist )
Fisher, Robert Grove ( Columnist )
Flores, Fred ( Columnist )
Earl, Phillip I. ( Columnist )
Serada, Jim ( Columnist )
O'Callaghan, Tim ( Columnist )
Bishop, Carolyn D. ( Columnist )
Kindberg, Glenna ( Columnist )
Scott, Katherine E. ( Photographer )
Mayes, Aaron ( Photographer )
Phillips, Dave ( Photographer )
Pearson, Howard B. ( Photographer )
Donahue, Mike ( Photographer )
Burke, Stephen ( Photographer )
Publisher:
O'Callaghan, Mike
HBC Publications, Inc.
Creation Date:
1990-07-19
Language:
English
Materials:
Paper ( medium )

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Subjects / Keywords:
Nevada
Henderson
East Las Vegas
City and town life -- Nevada -- Henderson
Community life -- Nevada -- Henderson
History -- Henderson (Nev.) -- 20th century
Genre:
Newspapers

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Acknowledgments:
Greenspun Media sponsors this collection.
Collection Location:
Greenspun Media retains possession of the bound, original newspapers. Henderson District Public Libraries retains possession of the microfilm and the digital files.

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Henderson District Public Libraries
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Henderson District Public Libraries
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The items in this collection are provided for non-commercial personal and academic use by Henderson Library patrons and may not be republished in any way. Contact Greenspun Media Group for additional information regarding rights to this material: http://www.greenspunmedia.com
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hhn3830 ( Digital Id )

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i^-^-^iiV^^^^^i^BP mpp Page 14 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Tuesday, July 17, 1990 TRI-LEVEL FOR SALE BY OWNER 1403 San Felipe Drive, B.C. Three bdrms (possibly 4). 3 fuU baths, 2,500 sq. ft. Zoned for horscB. 272 car garage. Vs acre. Fireplace. Desert landscape. Room for RV's, $237,000. 293-1523 for appointment DOME REALTY 1610 Nevada Highway Boulder City, Nevada B9005 BOULOIR CITY HOMES 1313 HIGHLAND COURT-Custom home near completion—4 bedroom, 2Vt bath—3 car garage —$224,000. THREE NEW CUSTOM HOMES TO BE BUILT. Two In aub 11 and 1 In lake area. See us for price and details. GREAT FAMILY HOME-Pool and apa-4 bedrooms, 2Vt batha—$215,000. Near golf course. • OUU>CR CITY MOBILE HOME SALES PRICE REDUCTIONIII 10 x 46-furnishedupgrsded carpeting—$9,950. 1975 Lynn Haven—2 bedroom—1V^ bathgood location—$20,500. 1977 CAMERON-Boulder City Trailer Park—2 bedrooms. ^V^ baths-$15,950. VISTA MOBILE HOME PARK-Hendereon—1976 Champion—14x60—2 bedrooms, 1 bath-$8,500. 702 / 293-1613 • 293-3267 JR REALTY ^m NEW ON THE MARKET-Chirmlng (amlly horn* with lomMl dining, batutllul kitchen, thrM •paclou* bMlroomt wHh roomy clOMta and two bilh*. Shdd bactiyard, Idoil lor kida and pat*. Only t72,S0O.00. FIRST CLASS—Urga (oyar and bright living arva with the vlaw of tha pool and golf coursa ehat1ully walcomaa aach vlaitor. Relax and pimpar youraalf in tha spacloua maatar badrocma and laviah bath. Entartalnmant la aaay with tha fonnal dining room, (amlly room, and tha afftclantly daalgnad Wtchan. Call aoon to aaa Ihia lovaly Black Mountain Golf Courka homa. BEST KEPT SECflET-Cozy thrM bwlroom homa on a multlpla zonad lot. Room for mort unlta. Only $99,900.00. BEST BUY IN TOWN-Fourbodrooms, ho bha, ovar 1,800 iq. ft. Only 173,900.00. YOUR DREAIH HOME-Lovaly naw cuatom home ovarlooMng Black Mountain Golf Couraa. Open floor plen with tile roof. Home la now finlahed and ready lor your Inapection. so MUCH SPACE—Both yard and home are apaclout and well kept. Lovely new fimlly room, rwfflodeied mastartMrth, cozy (Irtplaca. Now only t9,900.00. A FUN HOME-Lovety pool for cooling off on hot daya. Cuddle up In front ol the lirepiac* In the winter and enjoy tha buitt in bar In the family room In all aeaaona. Eaay care deeert landacaping plua RV parlcing. Only $89,900.00. CONQRATULATIONS TO ELLIE KNAPP TOP PRODUCER AND JEAN KESTERSON TOP LISTING AGENT FOR THE SECOND QUARTER. 204 W. Pacific Ave. Henderson 564-5142 K U II (IHll K ISI\l:i'KMIt:XTI.V (AVMilUMIDI'IK AT TWO BDRM TWO BATH Maintenance free yard. Adult community. Beautiful view $125,000. 294-1871 HC House for sale by owner. Highland Hills. 3 bdrm, 2 bth, $92,500. Ph 565-0770. Two 1/2 acre building lots. Section 4 in Henderson. Zoned for horses. One w/financing, one lor cash. $25,000 each. 2940501 ask lor John. BC 3 BR 1 3/4 baths, 2 car garage, fenced, landscaped, appliances, new paint, carpet. $11,000 down, $850 mo No qualifying. Henderson. 870-6523 BY OWNER New Key Largo 3 bdrm home vwth lake view. For sale or lease $175,000 293-4950 or 293-5718 BC COMMERCIAL 1,400 sq ft of offices plus 950 sq ft refrigerated warehouse/ manulacturing with 16 ft high service door. Walled rear yard with gate. Caretaker quarters permitted. BOULDER DAM REALTY .293-4663 BC LET ME handle all ol your Real Estate needs. HUO Homes, assumaWes, nonn 'ying homes with low payments. Call John fincher at the Americana Group Realtors. 564-7603 or 596-5845. SPYGLASS HILL CONDO IN B.C. ear MWUM DT. NO. as. 2 br. 2Vi baths. Was modal unit. Call Dssirt Impin Realty, aak for Lwry 281-54SS. Owner/Licensee VET or NOT! Own Your Own Horns *Fnequ^ *Fra*Liali *lmmVA ano HUO Rapo Mo NM*ig >• NgMwrily aritoa tM^iQ to lont oMMnNp ivQu^ VA NO OOSN t MA LOW DOWN III VETERANS III And AcOvs MHKvy *No Qpwi Ptfimt to $lM.aoD •NsEnowto •459-8387^ Mlta.-apit7dk)i-BM A FwMM tf vaOTR tad &Mto ,FiwtW C ap, tart OSata Mipaidady Ovad and VMinn HowfeM I •IMC.BenMaM. -MtlOINTIALBRINQYOURHOflSESI[ Faaturat Include over I 1,700*q.fi.,hugkKciMn, large Hving area, formal dining room, 3 coirala, 1 { full acra, tack room and arena with an FHA aaaumable no qualifying loan at SHH. Can now lor an appointment. FABULOUS LOCATIONOver 1,900 tq. n., 4 bedroomt, lormal dining room with e ttone fireplace, living room and a famHy room. En>oy tha dty • mountain view from your back porchi Call today to tee IMa homa. CUSTOM WITH 3 CAR GAHAQE-Juat one of many amanttiaa oNetad, 3 bdra, potential In-law quarters, 2H batha, great roofii with firaptaca, large kitchen/laundry room, huge bodrooma, approximately H acre fenced area, lonad horaaa, fabuNua view lol, and dty aawar woi rnueo w aaa •I tINtSOO. BEAUTY SALON in buaness over 10 years with lots ol ciientel and all equip lor sale. Under $10,000. Ask for Sheryl Cobb 293-6036. CENTURY 21 Barrett 870-5155 BE YOUA OWN BOSS Well established deli/sandwich shop in Boulder City. BOULDER DAM REALlV 293-4663 DC A-****** LUXURY LIVING AT REQATTA POINTE T0WNH0USE8. Monterey, Laguna and Newport models available. Priced from $161 ,500 to $179,500. Totally upgraded. Call DICK BLAIR REALTY, REALTOR 293-2171 BC. 2625 N. Green Valley Pkwy. Suite 150 Henderst>n,NV 89014 Office: (702) 458-8888 Res: (702) 293-3174 Toll Free: 1-800-544-5231 JAMES H. GOnFREDSON Sales Associate 1,20C SQ. FT. HOME, nlc corner lot. Good neighborhood. 3 br., 1 3/4 bi. Assume nnortgage, no quailtylng. $122,500. 1,500 SQ. FT. HOME, nice lot 3 br, 2 lull ba., balanced power. Walk to schools. Excellent family residence. $128,500. -./Cmerjconaftl Better ra Group B£cation 30 years. EXCELLENT LOCATIONS FOR BOTH. CALL FOR DETAILS. COMMERCIAL RENTALS OOOsq. f t.in businessplaza—IDEAL FOR COMMERCIALOFFICE. CaU for details. $375 per month. _Stopbyandpickupyou^^ CURRENT LIST OF PROPERTIES AVAILABLE FOR SALE. ^,,, ^TOLL PREEII 1^00-62M910 EzL E41 SINCERITY AND INTEGRITY IS OUR SPEClALTTi AM^^ CENTURY 21 HENDERSON REALTY STARTERS DELIQNTThlt 3 bedroom, 2 betti noiTW M fwwiy rMnooM#0| sH land s c a ped, cioss to schools and shopping nrlth • no qualifying lean. Call now, Mking only irs.ooo. PRICED TO SELL-Tsrilficlocatlon In addMon to ] bdrt, family room ndlh flreplKs, largo dining •rea, garage with 220 •vaiiaWe. fenced, landteapsd, no qusMylng loan or naw financing svsllsMe. A walk to downtown for 971,000. LAROC CUSTOM HOMEAccomodates any six* fsmRy. 4 or S bdrs, 1H baths, 2 car gtrags, MNiteus view lot Indiidss dreularditws, Imdseaplng and grsat Ingraund pool. Largo kllehen, brsaktSM nook, femial and Informal dining for II 7*,*00. SPACIOUS 4 BEDROOM HOME-Beautlful upgraded Lewis 2 story, 2H baths, 2 car garage, lots l RV parking, attraethra design rlth formal/lnlormal •ntertalning, large lanced lot, fuly landscaped, balcony off master Iwdroom, and no qualifying or new financing avallabla for tl19,S0O. A VIEW FROM EVERY WINOOW-WhanlMngIn this custom I bdr, m bath, 2 car garagt, popular Mission Hill* Estates, comer eul-d4ae lot, drculsr drive, freshly psinted Interior, new carpet and linoleum. Priced at I1S4,900. FOR NELLIS A.F.S. PERSONNBL-or first Mmo biiyofs. 4 bdrs, 2 beths wNh central Kr snd heat. FresMy painted, Is n ds c spsd snd fsnoed. Wont lest at IMS price SSI,SOO. HIQHUNO HILLS LOCATION-Lovsly J bdr, ^H l>Mh, i car gsrags, qusHtyCMambuMSonen floor plan with douMsfliapls t s, covrsdpallo.llV parking, sunken living room, upgrsdM Hnoleum thruout and frasMy pointed Inside and out torllOS.MO. MOBILE HOMEA.ANO COMBINAnON-Exeiang 4 bdr, floor alsn on large 60X100 lot, NO RENT S^CE RENT HERE. ^ntral eoeWieet, Mn minulae te Lake M|ad racreatlon area. Financing available... MO.OOO ..cMlnowt A MUST TO SEt-Zansd for horsM MisNusisd en evsr .7 (era*. BeeiilNuly "wIntalnM t Mr, < halh manuf actiHWi hww adih ••parsie 2 ctf fsmgs ivMt workshop, fruN trees galore and unlqiia graen uNoacoMnmeiAL BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME HERB-Popular Section 27 near Old Vegas, approi H acre, aonad for horaee, eocess te uMMse. SM.OOO. 10 ACHIS m PAHRUMP —was. sle cti l cl ty on prop. erly. Tslsphons ivaSsbli. Good lew of property. AUTO MARINE REPAIRSMOaq.n.fuRyequlppod turn toy operation. EsoeNeiM location on Lake 1 ACNE. WATER, POWER -HDOHMT lol In 8#otlon 4| 0000 VHHV* OWIMC WW earry. PRHSe LOCATI0N->1.4< aerse wWi Lato Msad frontage. Leeelsdan Lake Meed and Puebki. Meod at 1810,000. SECTION S1-.laeres of keeutHid Mgh property. Conveniently loested close to pfopoesd frseway. Can lor dstsNs. HAME-ln deelrsMe MII wont iMt 18 WATER STREET, HENDERSON, NV 8901S g 564-2515 .WsarsMBairRrownD rnmsD AMecnajom NEED TO SELL YOUR HOUSE? WE.WILL BUY IT NOWl (^tt4i 293-1613 Q.A. "Cufly" SmWi, Inc. HOUSE FOR SALE BY WORKING MAN^S HOME OWNER Boiilfior Titu 4 nr Low, low down 3 bdrm, 2 ^MrnTo H?o K 1 A^ bthhousow/gsrsgeonlarge 5 bdrm 2 1/2 bath. Approx ,ot, Family neighborhood in 2,500 sq ft. Pool. $165,000. henderson. New loan, easy Call 2930 138 BC qualifyina. Impact Realty, ~~T 386M900. PERFECT STARTER HOME. Older house but almost totally remodeled. 3 bdrm, 1% bth, family rm, laundry rm. 1392'sq. ft. All this for $73,000. Ask for Genie 736-8551 or Beeper 381-9660. The Realty Center. HENDERSON, Seller Place. 2 story condo w/balcony. 2 bdrm, 2 bth, 2 car carport, great for 1 st time buyers or retired people. Ask for Gertie 736-8551 or Beeper 381-9660. The Realty Center. GOVERNMENT HOMES from $1.00 (U-repair) Foreclosures, Repos, Tax Delinquent Properties. Now selling your area. Call 1-315-736-7375. Ext. H-NV-HI current lists. 24 hrs." 3^ 2400 PLUS SQ FT. LAKE VIEW HOME. New RV parking in quiet cul de sac, 129 Forest Lane. Call for appt. 293-2215. B.C. V////////////////// //////////////^/^/P7m Bob Olsen Realty & Insurance Inc. 6 Water St., Henderson 564-1831 Boulder CHy lot, overlooking Lake Mead on Woodacre Or. Ready to Build with all utilltlaa. Owner llcsnsee. REALTOn* MRVWO THC HCNOCRSON AREA rOS 40 VtANS /^ REALTOHI SEHVWO THE HENOERION AREA rOR iO TIMn ^ CALL COLDWELL BANKER PAUL GARGIS & ASSOCIATES RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE An Idependently Owned and Operated Member ol Coldwell Banker Residential Afliliales inc VIDEO STORE—Eslsbllahed 9 yesrs, free stsnding building locsted on msin street, over 60OO titles. Trsde or exchsnge considered. Csll Steve Coleman, 564-6969. THE VIEW SPEAKS FOR ITSELF—So does this beautiful executive home. Four bedrooma plus, 2.75 baths, 3 msrbls front firepalces, drsmstic sntrsnce, sweeping stalrcass, msrbls floors throughout, onyx bsths, Conian countsrs In kitchen. Calico Ridge location. Priced at $289,000. Csll Brenda Bird or Wendy Williams and sak about property C:7228. SOUTHWESTERN STYLE CUSTOM—Located In Section 19, corner H acre lol, great view, lour bedrooma, 3 full batha, grarid entrance, formal living and dining rooms, ceramic tile kitchen and tMtha, maater suite testures It's own flrsplace, rolled edge evea, custom planters, ths beet ol everything csn be yours for $189,900. Call Wendy Williams and ask to see property R:98867. MOBILE ON 60X100 LOT—Qreat for retired or young family, haa new evaporative eoeler plus window air. ^ned and haa acreened patio^ Warranty Inaurance Is offered by tlie owner. Call Elaine Smith about property M:1455. WANT SECLUSION A PRIVACY-Thls home Is for you... three bedroome, 2.7S bsths, spectacular view of the city artd mountslna, located high up In Section 32, nice open floor plan, strlum, formal dining, sunksn convsrsatlon pit lacea gorgeoua fireplace, too many cuatom feeluree to mention. Call Wendy of Brenda and aak to aee property T:3126. Priced at $169,900. MISSION HILLS BEAUTY—Custom two story with 3 csr gsrsgs, four bsdrooms, three fuH tMtfie, formsl Hving snd dining, separata family room, glamoroua master suite with balcony. Priced at $166,900. Call Wendy or Brenda and ksk to see property S:7211. GREAT INVESTMENT PROPERTY—Nesr race track, 2 five (5) scrs psrcels, csn be purchaaad ssparataly or as a package, call Tina Wllllama about properties. T:4312&4318. BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM—Locsted In populsr Section 19, three bedrooms, 2 belhs, hwo msrble trimmed fireplaces, Spanlah tile roof, Southweatem decign exterior, profeaaionally lartdscaped using a unk)ue combination of graaa and desert IsndsGi^ing. Priced st $153,000. Call Bill Clonta snd aak to see property R:S768. CUSTOM HOME LOTS—Loceted neer golf course, paved street, sll utilltiee, fsntsstie visw of tits sniire vslley snd golf course. 80 x 100, $40,000 esch. Call Paul, 964^969. QREEN VAUEY—three bedroom, 1.75 beth, nice floor plan, formal aunken Hving room, formal dining, separete fsmlly room, isrgs kitchen, veuited celllnge snd firsplacs. Ysrd being soddsd. Priced at $112,900. Call Wendy Wllllama about property S:4704. HIQHLAND HILLS BEAUTY-Three bedroom, 1.75 bath, two car garage, glass front flrsplace features blower to diaperee haet, beveled mirrors in living room, custom gaa brick bar-b-que, covered petio, fountain In front yard. Beat no qualifying aasumptlon In Highland HlUal Call Anne SmHh about property B:7164, priced at $107,000. NICE STARTER HOME—Three bedroome, 1 full beth, 20 x 13 family room added, lota of built-in book shelves, front and rear yard sprlnkiered. Call Elaine Smith, ask sbout propsrty 0:3239. Prtcsd st $87,000. LOW MAINTENANCE YARD-Located in Highland Hills, three bedroom, 1.75 bsths, 2 csr garage, greet neighborhood, good echoola nearby. Prteed at $94,500. Call Angle Mundo or Lole Beavor, aak about property S:7413. NOTHING LEFT TO DO—Just move In, freshly painted Inelde end out, huge yard, big maater bedroom, sunscrsena and aecurlty bars are already installed to give you maximum efficiency end sscurtty, three bedrooms, 1.75 batha, 2 car garage. Priced at $88,500. Ask Linda Lewis sbout properly E:7807. ABSOLUTELY BEAUTIFUL—Two bedroom, 2 bath moMIe home locstsd in Deeert inn Mobile Eetates. Ovsr 1000 SF, triple wide Sllvercrest, sxtrsmsly wsli kept, looks llks s model home. Priced el $84,900, lot includedl Ask for Bill Clonts and propsrty B:442. OPEN FLOOR PLAN—Roomy 3 bedroom, 1.78 batha, parking for 3 cara, garage end eerport, Utchen has bsen remodeled, extra caMnete, mirrored ckMet doon, epacloua master bedroom. Great aaaumptlon, no qualifying. Priced at $79,900. Ask Bill Clonts sbout property V:7709. JUST RIGHT FOR TWO—Two bedrooms, 2 full bsths, 2 csr gsrsgs, looks llks a model homo, cuatom drapes, firsplsce with gaa k>g, priced at $76,900. Call Angle or Lole and ask for property L:2985. ALL APPLIANCES STAY-Three bedroom, 2 full batha, new roof, cuatom oak caMnete in kitohen, new air oondHtoner, ceramk: tile In baths snd kitchen, new bethroom fixtures, new tub end nsw sinks. Plus refrlgerstor, wssher A dryer sll sisyl Prteed at $79,900. 6sll Brenda SImmona about property J:7376. NEW, NEW, NEW-New cerpet, new paint, new tile, new solsr i blinds snd s new dWnvasher. Two bedroome, 1H beth, garage, euto ( and all appNanoes stay. Nolliing to do, everything le newl Priced ( Ask Lola Beavor or Angle Mundo about property 8:3091^ IMEutNorizoiilMvi HtidifioRi Nmy MIS' TiliplMM(7l|SI44NI THURSDAY INSIDE Child Seekers moves to new TV location See Page 3 Pedroza wins again See Page 15 ^ GV youngster to attend new kind of space camp See Page 7 WEATHER Thursday, High 98 Low 76 HENDERSON NEVADA'S INDUSTRIAL CENTER Volume 41,58th Edition Hcnderson, Nevada THE COMMUNITY'S NEWSPAPER 250 22 Water St. 564-1881 Thursday. July 19,1990 Cause of Kerr-McGee A-P fire still unknown By Katheiine E. Scott News Staff Writer The Clark County Fire Department is still investigating the cause of a July 12 ammonium perchlorate fire at Kerr-McGee Chemical Corp. A CCFD spokesperson said investigators are examining the site and talking with experts, but have not yet determined how the 106 tons of AP were ignited. The fire began shortly after 11:30 p.m. Thursday and was extinguished some two hours later after burning itself out, according to CCFD. By Mike O'Callaghan Kerr-McGee and the Clark Cotmty Fire Department tried to put out citizen concern about 100 tons of burning ammonium perchlorate in Henderson as rapidly as the fire was doused. It took only 40 mintues to put out the fire, but memories of the killer Pepcon explosion of 1988 has made it more difficult to put out citizen concern over the fire and the acid smoke it produced. We must give KerrMcGee credit for being good Nevada citizens by making the expensive move to an isolated area and still remaining here in the Silver State. It's too bad they didn't make certain the company constructing the new plant wouldn't bring in scab ironworkers from out of state. The fire last week emphasizes the need for the move as soon as possible. The product is needed for our nation's safety and outer space programs and to have it produced in our area is a plus for Nevada and the state's workers. The Thursday-night fire at the Kerr-McGee plant in the county doughnut hole surrounded by the City of Henderson still leaves us with more questions than answers. A county fire inspector says the fire occurred on a storage pad 800 feet from the nearest building and there was no electricity or other 'lieat source" to start See One Man's View, Page 2 The hundreds of 500-gallon drums of A-P that disintegrated in flames last week were only a small portion of some 4,600 tons of the rocket fuel oxydizer stored at the site, Kerr-McGee spokespersons said. Storage of ammonium perchlorate at the plant, located in the Clark County "Donut Hole" between residential and commercial sites on Boulder Highway and Lake Mead Drive, was modified after the same chemical was involved in the Pepcon explosions oil May 1988. Pads holding no more than 125 tons of A-P are separated by block walls and surrounded by a berm, Kerr-McGee spokespersons said. Kerr-McGee said there was no danger to employees or the public during the incident. Toxic barrels nfiay have been inside local business in April By Katherine E. Scott News Staff Writer Four 55-gallon drums that held a toxic chemical, found dumped in a Henderson desert last week, may have been seen inside a local business in April, the Home News has learned. The barrels themselves may have last been seen in the possession of day workers hired to clean out the Green Valley neighborhood building before it was auctioned on behalf of the Small Business Administration. Eric Nelson, who auctioned the Procon building at 740 N. Valle Verde Drive on May 16, said he saw at least half a dozen 55-gallon drums inside the building when he had it cleaned before the auction. "One had glue in it, somebody had said when we were out there," Nelson said in a telephone interview Thursday. Most were empty, but he said he saw one full barrel. He said the contents were described to him as a "valuable glue." Methylene chloride, contained in the four barrels found July 7 in a desert area on a trail that extends from Pacific Avenue west of Horizon Drive, was described by Henderson Police as an industrial glue. Nelson said he had no idea whether the barrels he saw three months ago were the same found in the desert. Those barrels, labeled with danger signs warning of its hazardous contents, included one with a shipping label for Procon Manufacturing. One of See Toxic, Page 2 GOIN' HOME — Neitha McGhie, riding her buckskin Gabie, returns home Monday after picking up her daughter and nephew from swimming lessons at the city's BMI swimming pool. With her is Gabrielle McGhie, and riding the Appaloosa pony, Spirit, is Ryan Borchik. All live in the Section 19 neighborhood, where the horses are stabled on the McGhie's property. Photo by Katherine E. Scott Silver Springs apartments approved by City Council By Paul Szydelko Associate Editor A proposed 352-unit apartment complex in Silver Springs, protested by adjacent homeowners for nearly a month, was approved by the Henderson City Council Tuesday night. Both a tentative map for the project and an extension of time for a resolution of intent for a zone change were approved with 5-0 votes. The 20.45-acre site, northwest of Green Valley Parkway and Robindale Road, has been zoned RM-24 (multi-family residential, with no more than 24 units an acre) by resolution of intent since 1980. The underlying zone is industrial. Pacific Properties' complex would have a density of 14.38 units per gross acre. Several residents spoke in oppcoitionto the propo.sa' before both the Henderson Planning Commission earlier this month and the City Council Tuesday. They were concerned about the project's impacts on utilities, traffic, school overcrowding and police and fire protection. "We feel that our project isn't to going to adversely impact any of those issues. ," said Pacific Properties' representative Mark Tomlinson. "We feel that the plan speaks for itself. It's an excellent plan." The developer agreed to a number of suggestions from residents to reduce the impact of the project. Forty-eight parking spaces were removed from the tentative map to allow a 24-foot landscaped strip. The current owner of the project, the American Nevada Corp., agreed that after the units are built, the property would be rezoned from industrial to RM-16 (multi-family residential, with no more than 16 units an acre). Added as a condition of approval, that move would further Umit the density of future development on the site. The extension of the resolution of intent was approved ^ith the condition that the deveWpment conforms with the original approved final map. "I want to make sure, if the Council goes along with this, if this changes owners, this tentative map is still going to be part of this project [and] residents won't have to go through this again," said Councilman Andy Hafen. Tomlinson later assured the Council that financing has been secured to develop the property. HPD training improved by new work schedule TRAINING CLASS HPD Training Officer Ron Ntmleen, cento*, supervises Officer Patrick Davidson, right, daring a first aid class held last week as Officer Cedric Saiz observes. Training has been incorporated into HPD's regular schedule undw a new fourday work week that began this month. Piioto by Ketherine E. Scott By Katherine E. Scott News Staff Writer Part 2 of 2 "Before [the Henderson Police Department's new work schedule]," Assistant Chief Kip Botkin said in a recent interview, "when we did training, we either had to pay overtime or take [officers] off their existing shift, which lowered the manpower." Now, with two groups of three shifts — days, swing and graveyard—working four days at a time, there is one day each week that all officers are scheduled for such duty. "We caD that Training Day," Botkin said, "because [training is] the priority for that day." HPD's switch to four 10-hour shifts resolved several issues besides training, according to Botkin. Among the improvements, he said, are that more Councilman Larry Scheffler extensively questioned representatives of the developer on whether they would agree to extend a wall that separates the project from six adjacent homes in the Glen Ridge subdivision to six feet if the city's building regulations permit. While the wall is under six feet high on the homeowners' side, it is 13 feet high on the apartments' side and homeowners were concerned about children scaling the wall to reach their property. Another suggestion from the residents to ehminate 60 more parking spaces for a buffer was rejected by the City Council as excessive. Many of the residents have said they were deceived by both the city and their homes' builder about the zoning of the adjacent property, adding that they never would have bought See Silver, Page 2 See HPD, Page 2 Inside L. Jessie Bennett 8 Carolyn Orennen Blshop13B| Classified 16B Richard Cohen 4 Comics, CroMword 15B Joey Curtis 16 Dear Debbie 138 Entertainment 14B Fred Fiores V JImGoff IB Green Vaile'y News 7 Horoscope 13B Legal Notices 6B, 11B 3,6, ,16B Obituaries 8B ,108 Religion 118 Senior Activities 13 Guy Shipler 4 Sports 15-28 Viewpoint 4 WorM Map Series 48 I Your View lilMfeiiMik iMiM

PAGE 2

rw^r^^^^ ^wmmmKmmm^^ mm Page 2 Henderson Home Newa, Henderson, Nevada Thursday. July 19. 1990 One Man's View from Page 1 HPD from Page 1 the fire in that no-smoking area. So did it start by itself? No, because according to experts, it cannot ignite by itself. For several reasons I'm not ready to accept, the theory is that it was started by* lightning; No, the questions and concerns of Henderson residents cannot be easily answered or dismissed. But all agree the sooner the plant is moved to the desert the happier local residents will be. The recent Department of Energy revelations of deadly radiation leaks at Hanford, Wash., during the 1940s brought back many memories. My father worked on the plant /or almost 20 years prior to passing away in 1961, and I earned my journeymsm ironworker's card there in the spring of 1948, after coming back from Marine overseas duty. The very dangerous radiation releases came between 1944 and 1947. Records show the emissions continued into the mid-1950s. Several times during past years I have heard farmers and workers in the Tri-City area complain about the health problems they have experienced. Dining this entire period of time, the Atomic Energy Commission, and later the DOE, denied any problems or possible radiation release in that area. The denials were much like the lies told Southern Nevadans and the people of Utah downwind from the Nevada Test Site following the aboveground nuke weapon explosions and underground accidents which resulted in radiation leaks. DOE now tells us that between 350.000 and 400,000 curies of radioactive material were released into the air in one big incident in 1945. That release wasn't accidental; it was done intentionally. A curie equals the radiation emitted in one second by 1,400 pounds of enriched uranium. By the time our government accepts the blame for those atrocities, most of the injured will probably be dead or dying. The AEC recognized the problem in 1948 but continued the coverup until 1986. Then DOE wonders why Nevadans don't trust its plans for dragging nuke waste from almost every state and around the world to be buried just north of Las Vegas. Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me. How about the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruling that says a policeman can't stop a car because an intoxicated passenger is hanging out a window, yelling vulgarities and making obscene gestures at him? The court ruled that the loudmouth's behavior was disgraceful but "it was not illegal; criticism of the police is not a crime." Wow! I wouldn't suggest that any local drunks try out that ruling on Metro or the cops of North Las Vegas, Henderson or Boulder City. It wouldn't even be a wise move on the part of the judges who made the ruling. It's one thing to write a legal decision in San Francisco and something else again to practice the ruling in the hot streets of Southern Nevada. officers are now available during the peak hours of police activity and less overtime is needed for training and report writing. Pohce also hope the schedule will enable "the possibUty of more hands-on involvement in projects such as Neighborhood Watch, the DARE program and Adopt-a-Cop," Botkin said. Adopt-a-Cop is a new program being developed by the U.S. Attorney's Office, he said. 'The theory ... is that certain classrooms adopt an officer as their own," he explained. That officer then "makes periodic visits to the classroom and talks to the kids about anything they want." That could be an extension of the Drugs And Alcohol Resistance Education program now being taught at Henderson's elementary schools, which HPD has said is highly successful. "I have a concern that we're missing the junior high and high school levels," Botkin said. Adopt-a-Cop, he said, "is designed at breaking down the barrier between pohce and the youth." Stressing that HPD needs time to work out the details of the new schedule, Botkin said Museum Guild's support recognized The Clark County Heritage Museum Guild recently received special recognition form the Clark County Heritage Museimi for outstanding work in Historic Preservation. In a decade-long effort, the Museum Guild has been responsible for the relpcation and renovation of several historic structures at the Clark County Heritage Museum. The newly relandscaped Heritage Street, the hving history area of the Museum, is home to many of the Clark County Museum Guild's history preservtion efforts. Today a Henderson Townsite House from the 1940s, a Boulder City home from the 1930s and an historic house from Goldfield (1910) are open to the pubUc, due to the efforts of the Museum Guild. A project that the Musemn Guild and Museum could use some help on is the reroofing of the Heritage House, spokespersons said. It is the last remaining unopened house on Heritage Street. When complete, the historic 1930s home from downtown Las Vegas promises to be a historic show piece at the Museum. More than $4,000 has been raised for the Heritage House roof and volunteer clean-up hours will be donated, but a civic-minded Southern Nevada roofing company needs to contact the Museum to make this project complete, officials said. In an effort to make everything old new again, the Clark County Museum Guild and the Clark County Heritage Museum have teamed up as partners in historic preservation, preserving the culture, history and architecture of Southern Nevada. The pubhc is encouraged to tour Heritage Street and the new Museum Exhibit Center at 1830 S. Boulder Highway in Henderson or call 455-7955 for further information. Concert scheduled Greg \blz, fomieriy of Peu^ and known as "The Voice of Christian Music," and Rick Cua, fomier bass player for the Outlaws, wUl perfonn at 7:30 p.m. Fridaylt the Hallelujah Fellowship, 800 N. Rancho Drive. Council approves casino expansion, park By Aaron Mayes News Staff Writer The Henderson City Council on Tuesday approved the expansion plans for Tom's Sunset Casino, 444 Sunset Road, and gave an unconditional approval for a park to be located at 150 Pecos Road. Tom's Sunset Casino will construct a 2,993-8quare-foot addition and remove other existing buildings on the site. The addition may include a Sports Book, an arcade for the children, a snack bar and a gift shop. "We are very excited," said Tom Yarbrough, owner of Tom's Sunset Casino. "Henderson has been very good for us and we love the area." "We can't run with the big guys," Yarbrough said. "We just have to give better service and work harder for our customers." The City Council also approved an approximately 10-acre park that will be generally located in the area northeast of Wigwam Parkway, and Pecos Road in the Green Valley South golf course master-planned community. The park will consist of one baseball and two softball fields, two tennis courts, a basketball court, one playground area and full restroom, storage and parking facilities. According to members of the Henderson Parks and Recreation Department, the facihty will not be ready until next summer. During the council meeting Henderson resident David Beamis asked the city panel for support in his bid to aquire funding from the Department of Housing and Urban Developih^t for ^eveloptaeht of handicapped housing and related faciUties. Beamis was accompanied by Las Vegas City Councilman Steve Miller. "David has been recognized by Sens. Richard Bryan and Harry Reid and Congresswoman Vucanovich for his help with the handicapped in the area." Miller said. Toxic from Page 1 the four was full, while the others were partially empty. "There were three or foiu*, maybe five — I don't know how many there were — that had some glue in them," said Chff McCarlie, a man hired by Nelson to clean out the building, in a telephone interview Tuesday. He said he found some day workers seeking jobs on Bonanza Road in Las Vegas to do the week-long cleaning job in April. "They thought that [glue] was the greatest." he said, adding, "they thought they could sell [the barrels] and make some money off them." He said the men were paid mostly by selling wood and scrap metal from inside the abandoned building. He thought the empty barrels may have been sold for storage use. McCarhe said the men seemed to be familiar with the product in the drums and didn't read the labels himself. Some of the contents had spilled to the floor, he said, adding, "When you cleaned it up you could hardly push a brush across it." Discussing the four drums foimd in the desert here last week, McCarlie said, "I don't know if those were the same ones." Henderson Pohce are looking into the desert dumping incident and McCarUe said he will cooperate with the investigation. Lake Las Vegas one step closer By Aaron Mayes News Staff Writer ^The State of Nevada Board of Finance, chaired by Gov. Bob Miller, has approved a $125 miUion bond issue for the Lake Las Vegas development in southeast Henderson. Roads, water, sewer and other utilities will be constructed for the 2.245-acre development using revenue from the City of Henderson PubUc Improvement Trust bonds. Henderson City Councilman Lorin L. Williams called Lake Las Vegas "one of the most soUd developments we have had." "I think it's wonderful," WiUiams said. "It will have great benefits to not only Henderson but the Las Vegas area as a whole." Lake Las Vegas, co-developed by Transcontinental Properties Inc. of Scottsdale. Ariz., and Pacific MaUbu Development Corp. of Los Angeles, will be located north of Lake Mead Drive in HendersonfThe $3.5 biUion project will featiure a 315-acre man-made lake, eight hotels, five golf courses and more than 255 acres of residential development. "We are very excited about the Lake Las Vegas project," said William Smith, city of Henderson's chief planner. It will help the quahty of projects that will come to Henderson." According to Bob Campbell of Lake Las Vegas, "the project is somewhere around four months ahead of schedule." It's going to bring to the City of Henderson and the state of Nevada a new dimension in tourism," Campbell said. A 4,300-foot earthen dam is under construction and twin concrete-and-steel pipelines to carry water from Las Vegas Wash have already been completed. Silver from Page 1 their homes had they known apartments would be built next door. While one resident cited a conversation she had with a member of the city's planning office in March 1989, city officials don't believe a mistake was made until December 1989, when its consultant erroneously labeled the site for single-family residential instead of industrial. City officials said a zoning map which reflects the current resolutions of intent for changes is available for review in the planning department office. A representative. of the homeowners. Brady Davies. said later that the majority of residents wanted major oonoessions. but added that the approved changes made the project more acceptable. there may soon be a better opportunity for officers to participate more fully in the community. 'Tor somebody to make an appearance at Neighborhood Wateh," he said, "it takes overtime or schedule adjustments." He expects the time may come, although not for a while, when officers may help with schoolsponsored bicycle rodeos and accept more pubUc speaking invitations. Pohce agencies beleive that attempts at bringing officers closer the the pubhc have been beneficial and help to decrease criminal activity. "Historically." Botkin said, "when we took the officer off the foot beat and put him in the patrol car ... we eliminated daily personal contact with the citizens." HPD hopes to develop better personal relations with the pubhc. The priority now, however, is training, Botkin said. 'In the past," HPD Training Bureau Commander Lt. Ron DeUa said in a separate interview, "training had been at the cost of overtime or puUing [officers] off the street." By having one shift-group attend classes on the day the two overlap, he said, "no one will suffer because theyll be on duty, but there wiU be a full complement of officers on the street while the others are training." As with other aspects of the schedule change, now in its second week, Deha said the training program "is new and we're trying to work out the ghtches." Still, he said, "It seems to be working out.'It's going to be an opportunity for training that we have never really had ut tiiis dep^ment." Immediate plans are to have all officers recertified in ongoing needs, such as first aid and cardio-pulmonary resuscitation. "In the past," Botkin said, "we haven't kept that certification up on everybody. Now," he continued, "well be able to." Keeping specific pohce requirements updated, such as weapons firing and use of the side-handle baton, will also be scheduled on training days, pohce said. The group of officers that is on duty the first part of each week attended the first classes under the new schedule last week, pohce said. The second class, covering the same subAir traffic controller tests scheduled The Federal Aviation Administration, Western-Pacific Region, is currently recniiting air traffic controllers. Four-hour tests for die positions are held on a first-come, first-served basis. Applicants must be U.S. citizens with picture identification, have three years of general work experience or a college degree, or a mixture of the two equalling three years and be at least 18 years old. Locally, walk-in testing will be done at 8 a.m. Saturday at 699 Wright Brothers Lane. For more information, call 388-6559 or 297-0207. An Independent Newspaper Founded June 1, 1951 PubUahed every Tueedior ud ThumUy morniag at P.O. Box 90430. Hendenon, Nevada, 89009 Phone 664-1881. ject, was h^ld jthis week. "Almost all of the training that we will be providing is going to be Nevada POSTcertified," DeUa said. Most states have a POST Pohce Officers Standard of Training — which Deha said "regulates the quahty and the level of training that the officers throughout the state get." Most of the classes will be conducted by HPD's Training Bureau, headed by Deha. Officer Nick Walling and Officer Ron Nordeen "do the bulk of the training," Deha said. He coordinates the activities and does some teaching himself. In addition, he said, "We use the skills and expertise that are available throughout the department and from outside agencies." One class schedided next month will be a satelhte broadcast, sponsored by the FBI, Deha said. He said HPD has participated in the Law Enforcement Satelhte Television Network ever since it began. Locations for classes are spread out in municipal buildings throughout the city, Delia said. Administration and other office work is accomplished in a house on Basic Road purchased by the city earher this year. "We call it'The Little House on the Prairie,'" Deha said, describing how he and the training officers walk to and from that building and HPD. He added that aside from being Training Bureau Commander, he is also HPD's Night Station Commander. "Not only do I change hats," he said, "I change offices. At 5:30 p.m., I leave the Little House on the Prairie and walk over to the pohce station." •.) Some oif the training isdohe at nighVtb fcCommodjlte of-* ficers on the swing and graveyard shifts, he said. After mandatory recertification training is completed, he said some officers may be trained in other areas of thenpersonal^ interest and expertise. Subjects to be taught cover a multitude of topics, Botkin said. He said there are "a lot of firearms classes, narcotics, officer survival .. satanism aiA witehcraft, stress management, tactical management." Others included DUI procedures, hostage negotiations, hazardous materials, courtroom demeanor and crimes against children and the elderly, he said. W I MIKE O'CALLAOHAN Publiaber CAROLYN O'CALLAGHANi Co-Pabliaher ROBERT QROVB HSHBR MMgiag Editor PAUL SZYDBLKO AaaodaU Editor ILB.C. PabUoatkiM MOn O'CaDHbaa. PntUmt: Cmfyu 0'C_ dt; Tha O'Odagbaa, Vlee Pneideat; Rathe I Bob Morgali, ~ .VkoPnei. Bwcricarjr; Snbocrlptioa ratea 8fah 2Seiata Oae year tl6 ShnMatha ...10.80 Three • oatha...t7 MaO aofaaariptioBa West of BflMJMJiipl. .120 per year 116 for ttz aoatha Thnrsday, July 19, 1990 PARTNERS HELPING PEOPLE—Nevada Child Seekers Executive Director Patty J. Giles discusses her organization's relocation to Henderson with KVVU-TV Channel 5 Vice President and General Manager Rusty Durante. Photo bj Aaron Mayes Child Seekers moves to TV station By Aaron Mayes News Staff Writer The Nevada Child Seekers, a non-profit organization dedicated to locating missing and abducted children has moved its offices to a location within KVVU-TV Channel 5. "We were at the stage when we thought that we were going to have to close the office and cease to exist," said Patty J. Giles, executive director of Nevada Child Seekers. "TVS has been just great. They called us up and said that we had a home. KWU Fox 5 is definitely omr hero." Child Seekers, founded in 1985 by Steve Shore and a parent of a missing child, boasts a 90 percent recovery rate. "We have the top recovery rate statistics in the nation," says Giles, "arid Nevada is one of the Vucanovich to speaic at Rally for Life Nevada Congressman Barbara Vucanovich will join other notables and celebrities Sunday at the state's first "Rally for Life" in Las Vegas, organizers have confirmed. Vucanovich, an outspoken pro-hfe advocate in the U.S. Congress, will appear at the rally, with Dr. John C. Willke. president of the Washington-based National Right-to-Life, according to Aletha Atwell, an organizer. The rally is scheduled from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Hacienda Hotel convention center at the south end of the Las Vegas Strip. Music, refreshments and a special video presentation are also planned. lowest in str:anger abductions cases." Giles says that the low stranger abduction rate can be attributed to "the famihes and general pubhc who pay attention to small children." She said that fingerprinting of small children and keeping up-todate pictures can reaUy help if something was to happen to a child. "We are basically an extra eyes, ears and hands for the law enforcement," Giles claims. "We are also here for the parents." In 1989 the Nevada Child Seekers program televised 140 missing childrens pictures on local TV channels 8 and 3. TVS helped with appproximately 175 public service announcements, and 25,000 missing children's bumper stickers were distributed by radio KRRI FM 105.5. Hinkley & Schmitt Water Co. had missing chiV dren's pictures on 75,000 water bottles and 25 trucks. -^^ 'TV5 has bent over backwards to help us," Giles said. "The entire staff has gone out of their way to make us welcome." "We had the space available and they were welcome to it," said Rusty Durante. vice president and general manager of TV5. "It's that simple." Besides giving the office space, TV5 erected a wall so that the confidentiahty of Child Seekers chente can be maintained. "The loads have not even been a consideration," Durante said. "They are performing a drastically needed service so cost has nothing to do with it." Nevada Child Seekers will continue to provide prevention and intervention services, including fingerprinting, photo I.D.s for children, crisis counsehng for parents, and 24-hour access to law enfor^jement. parents and children themselves. The new mailing address for Nevada Child Seeh;ers is 25 TVS Drive. Henderson. Nev. 89014. telephone 458-7009. Dr. Millie Bogardus dead at 92 Dr. MiUie H. Bogardus. 92, a 60-year Las Vegas resident, died Sunday at the Nathan Adelson Hospice. Bom July 9,1898. in Salt Lake City. Utah, she was a retired chiropractor. She retired from her practice at age 85. She was a member of Altrusa. Chiropractic Assoc., Sigma Phi Chi Chiropractic Sorority and Professional Business Woman. The family requests donations be made to the Nathan Adelson Hospice, 4141 South Swenson St., Las Vegas, Nev. 89119. She is survived by two daughters, Therese C. Tliomas of Las Vegas, and Nina J. Breig of Miami, Fla.; and eight grandchildren and 17 great grandchildren. Viewing services are scheduled from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. today with funeral services following in the Palm Chapel in Las Vegas. Palm Mortuary handled arrangemente. ?We've expanded our hoursj I to better serve your Chiropractic needs. We're now open: 7 Aaiia-T P.M. MONa, WED., & Fl 8 A.M.-6 PaMa TUE. & THURa 8A.iia-11 AaMa-SAT. CLOSED SUNDAY A full staff is available to assist you at lili times HENDERSON CHIROPRACTIC OOR we* [^ Vv^ 309 W. Lak* MMd Oriv* HMMtorson 565-0377 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Page 3 Kansas expert to become development chief On Tuesday, George Garcia, presently tiic asi8itant planning director of Overland Park, Kan., accepted the city of Henderson's offer to become the city's director of community planning and development. Overland Park is a suburb of Kansas City Mo. with a population of approximately 100,000. Assessor's office open In Henderson The Qaric County Assessor's Office has opened a branch in Rooms 28-29of the SeniorFriendshipCenter, 201 Lead St., through Aug. 17. The telephone number is 455-7960. Garcia has served in that capacity for the past nine years and has been responsible for staff supervision, budgeting, special project management, downtown revitelization and implementation of Overland Park's Geographic Information System. Overland Park is similar to Henderson in size and its relationship as a major suburb to a larppr metropohtan area officials said. Overland Park has gone through many of the growth stages that Henderson is now facing, they added. Garcia has a bachebr of arts degree from the University of Dlinois, Chicago and has woi^ted towards his masters in planning. G^xiais married with three children and will move his family to Henderson by mid-August. He will assume his duties as director on Aug. 20. SENSING Trust your sensing and find out for yourself. NEW LIFE classes 293-44441 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF CLOSE OF REGISTRATION FOR THE PRIMARY ELECTION IN CLARK COUNTY STATE OF NEVADA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that registration for the Primary Election to be held on September 4th, 1990, will close on Saturday, August 4th, 1990, at the hour of 9:00 P.M. Electors may register for the ensuing election by appearing at the Clark County Election Department, 333 S. 6th Street, or by appearing before a Deputy Registrar in the manner provided by law. Electors may also register at any of the local Department of Motor Vehicle offices. The Clark County Election Department is open Monday through Friday, 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.; and from Tuesday, July 31st through Saturday, August 4th from 8:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. (s) Deborah West DEBORAH WEST Registrar of Voters Clark County, Nevada July 3, 1990 (SEAL) HBG-July 19,20,26,27, Aug. 3, 4 WE MAKE FRESH JUICES DAILY 1000 Buchanan, B.C. ''V'" ^WE DELIVER 294-1000 MF 77 SAT 10-2 'RECYCLE BINS ON SITE 1 -xcaz: az: as 33= snr •snr VINYL BY THE YARD OR ROLL PRESPACE LETTERING, LOGOS, BANNERST'ETC. Custom Vinyl Letters ^0% off Dealer for the HTD Sign Computers Several Different Machines Available For Information, Call Debbie Babcock or Gary Peters Sign and Frame Department 451-7662 FAX IN YOUR REQUEST FOR A QUOTE (702)451-8196 Dick Blick West^;;^ 1951 RAMROAO AVE. 451-7662 9-6 MON-FRI 9-5 SATURDAY •arc rzz: aE az: az: az: as Ba.,HM>42*' ***2S,Si'Bo-^^ • ^^^^QlflMMHi iAAjMMA^aaa

PAGE 3

rw^r^^^^ ^wmmmKmmm^^ mm Page 2 Henderson Home Newa, Henderson, Nevada Thursday. July 19. 1990 One Man's View from Page 1 HPD from Page 1 the fire in that no-smoking area. So did it start by itself? No, because according to experts, it cannot ignite by itself. For several reasons I'm not ready to accept, the theory is that it was started by* lightning; No, the questions and concerns of Henderson residents cannot be easily answered or dismissed. But all agree the sooner the plant is moved to the desert the happier local residents will be. The recent Department of Energy revelations of deadly radiation leaks at Hanford, Wash., during the 1940s brought back many memories. My father worked on the plant /or almost 20 years prior to passing away in 1961, and I earned my journeymsm ironworker's card there in the spring of 1948, after coming back from Marine overseas duty. The very dangerous radiation releases came between 1944 and 1947. Records show the emissions continued into the mid-1950s. Several times during past years I have heard farmers and workers in the Tri-City area complain about the health problems they have experienced. Dining this entire period of time, the Atomic Energy Commission, and later the DOE, denied any problems or possible radiation release in that area. The denials were much like the lies told Southern Nevadans and the people of Utah downwind from the Nevada Test Site following the aboveground nuke weapon explosions and underground accidents which resulted in radiation leaks. DOE now tells us that between 350.000 and 400,000 curies of radioactive material were released into the air in one big incident in 1945. That release wasn't accidental; it was done intentionally. A curie equals the radiation emitted in one second by 1,400 pounds of enriched uranium. By the time our government accepts the blame for those atrocities, most of the injured will probably be dead or dying. The AEC recognized the problem in 1948 but continued the coverup until 1986. Then DOE wonders why Nevadans don't trust its plans for dragging nuke waste from almost every state and around the world to be buried just north of Las Vegas. Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me. How about the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruling that says a policeman can't stop a car because an intoxicated passenger is hanging out a window, yelling vulgarities and making obscene gestures at him? The court ruled that the loudmouth's behavior was disgraceful but "it was not illegal; criticism of the police is not a crime." Wow! I wouldn't suggest that any local drunks try out that ruling on Metro or the cops of North Las Vegas, Henderson or Boulder City. It wouldn't even be a wise move on the part of the judges who made the ruling. It's one thing to write a legal decision in San Francisco and something else again to practice the ruling in the hot streets of Southern Nevada. officers are now available during the peak hours of police activity and less overtime is needed for training and report writing. Pohce also hope the schedule will enable "the possibUty of more hands-on involvement in projects such as Neighborhood Watch, the DARE program and Adopt-a-Cop," Botkin said. Adopt-a-Cop is a new program being developed by the U.S. Attorney's Office, he said. 'The theory ... is that certain classrooms adopt an officer as their own," he explained. That officer then "makes periodic visits to the classroom and talks to the kids about anything they want." That could be an extension of the Drugs And Alcohol Resistance Education program now being taught at Henderson's elementary schools, which HPD has said is highly successful. "I have a concern that we're missing the junior high and high school levels," Botkin said. Adopt-a-Cop, he said, "is designed at breaking down the barrier between pohce and the youth." Stressing that HPD needs time to work out the details of the new schedule, Botkin said Museum Guild's support recognized The Clark County Heritage Museum Guild recently received special recognition form the Clark County Heritage Museimi for outstanding work in Historic Preservation. In a decade-long effort, the Museum Guild has been responsible for the relpcation and renovation of several historic structures at the Clark County Heritage Museum. The newly relandscaped Heritage Street, the hving history area of the Museum, is home to many of the Clark County Museum Guild's history preservtion efforts. Today a Henderson Townsite House from the 1940s, a Boulder City home from the 1930s and an historic house from Goldfield (1910) are open to the pubUc, due to the efforts of the Museum Guild. A project that the Musemn Guild and Museum could use some help on is the reroofing of the Heritage House, spokespersons said. It is the last remaining unopened house on Heritage Street. When complete, the historic 1930s home from downtown Las Vegas promises to be a historic show piece at the Museum. More than $4,000 has been raised for the Heritage House roof and volunteer clean-up hours will be donated, but a civic-minded Southern Nevada roofing company needs to contact the Museum to make this project complete, officials said. In an effort to make everything old new again, the Clark County Museum Guild and the Clark County Heritage Museum have teamed up as partners in historic preservation, preserving the culture, history and architecture of Southern Nevada. The pubhc is encouraged to tour Heritage Street and the new Museum Exhibit Center at 1830 S. Boulder Highway in Henderson or call 455-7955 for further information. Concert scheduled Greg \blz, fomieriy of Peu^ and known as "The Voice of Christian Music," and Rick Cua, fomier bass player for the Outlaws, wUl perfonn at 7:30 p.m. Fridaylt the Hallelujah Fellowship, 800 N. Rancho Drive. Council approves casino expansion, park By Aaron Mayes News Staff Writer The Henderson City Council on Tuesday approved the expansion plans for Tom's Sunset Casino, 444 Sunset Road, and gave an unconditional approval for a park to be located at 150 Pecos Road. Tom's Sunset Casino will construct a 2,993-8quare-foot addition and remove other existing buildings on the site. The addition may include a Sports Book, an arcade for the children, a snack bar and a gift shop. "We are very excited," said Tom Yarbrough, owner of Tom's Sunset Casino. "Henderson has been very good for us and we love the area." "We can't run with the big guys," Yarbrough said. "We just have to give better service and work harder for our customers." The City Council also approved an approximately 10-acre park that will be generally located in the area northeast of Wigwam Parkway, and Pecos Road in the Green Valley South golf course master-planned community. The park will consist of one baseball and two softball fields, two tennis courts, a basketball court, one playground area and full restroom, storage and parking facilities. According to members of the Henderson Parks and Recreation Department, the facihty will not be ready until next summer. During the council meeting Henderson resident David Beamis asked the city panel for support in his bid to aquire funding from the Department of Housing and Urban Developih^t for ^eveloptaeht of handicapped housing and related faciUties. Beamis was accompanied by Las Vegas City Councilman Steve Miller. "David has been recognized by Sens. Richard Bryan and Harry Reid and Congresswoman Vucanovich for his help with the handicapped in the area." Miller said. Toxic from Page 1 the four was full, while the others were partially empty. "There were three or foiu*, maybe five — I don't know how many there were — that had some glue in them," said Chff McCarlie, a man hired by Nelson to clean out the building, in a telephone interview Tuesday. He said he found some day workers seeking jobs on Bonanza Road in Las Vegas to do the week-long cleaning job in April. "They thought that [glue] was the greatest." he said, adding, "they thought they could sell [the barrels] and make some money off them." He said the men were paid mostly by selling wood and scrap metal from inside the abandoned building. He thought the empty barrels may have been sold for storage use. McCarhe said the men seemed to be familiar with the product in the drums and didn't read the labels himself. Some of the contents had spilled to the floor, he said, adding, "When you cleaned it up you could hardly push a brush across it." Discussing the four drums foimd in the desert here last week, McCarlie said, "I don't know if those were the same ones." Henderson Pohce are looking into the desert dumping incident and McCarUe said he will cooperate with the investigation. Lake Las Vegas one step closer By Aaron Mayes News Staff Writer ^The State of Nevada Board of Finance, chaired by Gov. Bob Miller, has approved a $125 miUion bond issue for the Lake Las Vegas development in southeast Henderson. Roads, water, sewer and other utilities will be constructed for the 2.245-acre development using revenue from the City of Henderson PubUc Improvement Trust bonds. Henderson City Councilman Lorin L. Williams called Lake Las Vegas "one of the most soUd developments we have had." "I think it's wonderful," WiUiams said. "It will have great benefits to not only Henderson but the Las Vegas area as a whole." Lake Las Vegas, co-developed by Transcontinental Properties Inc. of Scottsdale. Ariz., and Pacific MaUbu Development Corp. of Los Angeles, will be located north of Lake Mead Drive in HendersonfThe $3.5 biUion project will featiure a 315-acre man-made lake, eight hotels, five golf courses and more than 255 acres of residential development. "We are very excited about the Lake Las Vegas project," said William Smith, city of Henderson's chief planner. It will help the quahty of projects that will come to Henderson." According to Bob Campbell of Lake Las Vegas, "the project is somewhere around four months ahead of schedule." It's going to bring to the City of Henderson and the state of Nevada a new dimension in tourism," Campbell said. A 4,300-foot earthen dam is under construction and twin concrete-and-steel pipelines to carry water from Las Vegas Wash have already been completed. Silver from Page 1 their homes had they known apartments would be built next door. While one resident cited a conversation she had with a member of the city's planning office in March 1989, city officials don't believe a mistake was made until December 1989, when its consultant erroneously labeled the site for single-family residential instead of industrial. City officials said a zoning map which reflects the current resolutions of intent for changes is available for review in the planning department office. A representative. of the homeowners. Brady Davies. said later that the majority of residents wanted major oonoessions. but added that the approved changes made the project more acceptable. there may soon be a better opportunity for officers to participate more fully in the community. 'Tor somebody to make an appearance at Neighborhood Wateh," he said, "it takes overtime or schedule adjustments." He expects the time may come, although not for a while, when officers may help with schoolsponsored bicycle rodeos and accept more pubUc speaking invitations. Pohce agencies beleive that attempts at bringing officers closer the the pubhc have been beneficial and help to decrease criminal activity. "Historically." Botkin said, "when we took the officer off the foot beat and put him in the patrol car ... we eliminated daily personal contact with the citizens." HPD hopes to develop better personal relations with the pubhc. The priority now, however, is training, Botkin said. 'In the past," HPD Training Bureau Commander Lt. Ron DeUa said in a separate interview, "training had been at the cost of overtime or puUing [officers] off the street." By having one shift-group attend classes on the day the two overlap, he said, "no one will suffer because theyll be on duty, but there wiU be a full complement of officers on the street while the others are training." As with other aspects of the schedule change, now in its second week, Deha said the training program "is new and we're trying to work out the ghtches." Still, he said, "It seems to be working out.'It's going to be an opportunity for training that we have never really had ut tiiis dep^ment." Immediate plans are to have all officers recertified in ongoing needs, such as first aid and cardio-pulmonary resuscitation. "In the past," Botkin said, "we haven't kept that certification up on everybody. Now," he continued, "well be able to." Keeping specific pohce requirements updated, such as weapons firing and use of the side-handle baton, will also be scheduled on training days, pohce said. The group of officers that is on duty the first part of each week attended the first classes under the new schedule last week, pohce said. The second class, covering the same subAir traffic controller tests scheduled The Federal Aviation Administration, Western-Pacific Region, is currently recniiting air traffic controllers. Four-hour tests for die positions are held on a first-come, first-served basis. Applicants must be U.S. citizens with picture identification, have three years of general work experience or a college degree, or a mixture of the two equalling three years and be at least 18 years old. Locally, walk-in testing will be done at 8 a.m. Saturday at 699 Wright Brothers Lane. For more information, call 388-6559 or 297-0207. An Independent Newspaper Founded June 1, 1951 PubUahed every Tueedior ud ThumUy morniag at P.O. Box 90430. Hendenon, Nevada, 89009 Phone 664-1881. ject, was h^ld jthis week. "Almost all of the training that we will be providing is going to be Nevada POSTcertified," DeUa said. Most states have a POST Pohce Officers Standard of Training — which Deha said "regulates the quahty and the level of training that the officers throughout the state get." Most of the classes will be conducted by HPD's Training Bureau, headed by Deha. Officer Nick Walling and Officer Ron Nordeen "do the bulk of the training," Deha said. He coordinates the activities and does some teaching himself. In addition, he said, "We use the skills and expertise that are available throughout the department and from outside agencies." One class schedided next month will be a satelhte broadcast, sponsored by the FBI, Deha said. He said HPD has participated in the Law Enforcement Satelhte Television Network ever since it began. Locations for classes are spread out in municipal buildings throughout the city, Delia said. Administration and other office work is accomplished in a house on Basic Road purchased by the city earher this year. "We call it'The Little House on the Prairie,'" Deha said, describing how he and the training officers walk to and from that building and HPD. He added that aside from being Training Bureau Commander, he is also HPD's Night Station Commander. "Not only do I change hats," he said, "I change offices. At 5:30 p.m., I leave the Little House on the Prairie and walk over to the pohce station." •.) Some oif the training isdohe at nighVtb fcCommodjlte of-* ficers on the swing and graveyard shifts, he said. After mandatory recertification training is completed, he said some officers may be trained in other areas of thenpersonal^ interest and expertise. Subjects to be taught cover a multitude of topics, Botkin said. He said there are "a lot of firearms classes, narcotics, officer survival .. satanism aiA witehcraft, stress management, tactical management." Others included DUI procedures, hostage negotiations, hazardous materials, courtroom demeanor and crimes against children and the elderly, he said. W I MIKE O'CALLAOHAN Publiaber CAROLYN O'CALLAGHANi Co-Pabliaher ROBERT QROVB HSHBR MMgiag Editor PAUL SZYDBLKO AaaodaU Editor ILB.C. PabUoatkiM MOn O'CaDHbaa. PntUmt: Cmfyu 0'C_ dt; Tha O'Odagbaa, Vlee Pneideat; Rathe I Bob Morgali, ~ .VkoPnei. Bwcricarjr; Snbocrlptioa ratea 8fah 2Seiata Oae year tl6 ShnMatha ...10.80 Three • oatha...t7 MaO aofaaariptioBa West of BflMJMJiipl. .120 per year 116 for ttz aoatha Thnrsday, July 19, 1990 PARTNERS HELPING PEOPLE—Nevada Child Seekers Executive Director Patty J. Giles discusses her organization's relocation to Henderson with KVVU-TV Channel 5 Vice President and General Manager Rusty Durante. Photo bj Aaron Mayes Child Seekers moves to TV station By Aaron Mayes News Staff Writer The Nevada Child Seekers, a non-profit organization dedicated to locating missing and abducted children has moved its offices to a location within KVVU-TV Channel 5. "We were at the stage when we thought that we were going to have to close the office and cease to exist," said Patty J. Giles, executive director of Nevada Child Seekers. "TVS has been just great. They called us up and said that we had a home. KWU Fox 5 is definitely omr hero." Child Seekers, founded in 1985 by Steve Shore and a parent of a missing child, boasts a 90 percent recovery rate. "We have the top recovery rate statistics in the nation," says Giles, "arid Nevada is one of the Vucanovich to speaic at Rally for Life Nevada Congressman Barbara Vucanovich will join other notables and celebrities Sunday at the state's first "Rally for Life" in Las Vegas, organizers have confirmed. Vucanovich, an outspoken pro-hfe advocate in the U.S. Congress, will appear at the rally, with Dr. John C. Willke. president of the Washington-based National Right-to-Life, according to Aletha Atwell, an organizer. The rally is scheduled from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Hacienda Hotel convention center at the south end of the Las Vegas Strip. Music, refreshments and a special video presentation are also planned. lowest in str:anger abductions cases." Giles says that the low stranger abduction rate can be attributed to "the famihes and general pubhc who pay attention to small children." She said that fingerprinting of small children and keeping up-todate pictures can reaUy help if something was to happen to a child. "We are basically an extra eyes, ears and hands for the law enforcement," Giles claims. "We are also here for the parents." In 1989 the Nevada Child Seekers program televised 140 missing childrens pictures on local TV channels 8 and 3. TVS helped with appproximately 175 public service announcements, and 25,000 missing children's bumper stickers were distributed by radio KRRI FM 105.5. Hinkley & Schmitt Water Co. had missing chiV dren's pictures on 75,000 water bottles and 25 trucks. -^^ 'TV5 has bent over backwards to help us," Giles said. "The entire staff has gone out of their way to make us welcome." "We had the space available and they were welcome to it," said Rusty Durante. vice president and general manager of TV5. "It's that simple." Besides giving the office space, TV5 erected a wall so that the confidentiahty of Child Seekers chente can be maintained. "The loads have not even been a consideration," Durante said. "They are performing a drastically needed service so cost has nothing to do with it." Nevada Child Seekers will continue to provide prevention and intervention services, including fingerprinting, photo I.D.s for children, crisis counsehng for parents, and 24-hour access to law enfor^jement. parents and children themselves. The new mailing address for Nevada Child Seeh;ers is 25 TVS Drive. Henderson. Nev. 89014. telephone 458-7009. Dr. Millie Bogardus dead at 92 Dr. MiUie H. Bogardus. 92, a 60-year Las Vegas resident, died Sunday at the Nathan Adelson Hospice. Bom July 9,1898. in Salt Lake City. Utah, she was a retired chiropractor. She retired from her practice at age 85. She was a member of Altrusa. Chiropractic Assoc., Sigma Phi Chi Chiropractic Sorority and Professional Business Woman. The family requests donations be made to the Nathan Adelson Hospice, 4141 South Swenson St., Las Vegas, Nev. 89119. She is survived by two daughters, Therese C. Tliomas of Las Vegas, and Nina J. Breig of Miami, Fla.; and eight grandchildren and 17 great grandchildren. Viewing services are scheduled from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. today with funeral services following in the Palm Chapel in Las Vegas. Palm Mortuary handled arrangemente. ?We've expanded our hoursj I to better serve your Chiropractic needs. We're now open: 7 Aaiia-T P.M. MONa, WED., & Fl 8 A.M.-6 PaMa TUE. & THURa 8A.iia-11 AaMa-SAT. CLOSED SUNDAY A full staff is available to assist you at lili times HENDERSON CHIROPRACTIC OOR we* [^ Vv^ 309 W. Lak* MMd Oriv* HMMtorson 565-0377 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Page 3 Kansas expert to become development chief On Tuesday, George Garcia, presently tiic asi8itant planning director of Overland Park, Kan., accepted the city of Henderson's offer to become the city's director of community planning and development. Overland Park is a suburb of Kansas City Mo. with a population of approximately 100,000. Assessor's office open In Henderson The Qaric County Assessor's Office has opened a branch in Rooms 28-29of the SeniorFriendshipCenter, 201 Lead St., through Aug. 17. The telephone number is 455-7960. Garcia has served in that capacity for the past nine years and has been responsible for staff supervision, budgeting, special project management, downtown revitelization and implementation of Overland Park's Geographic Information System. Overland Park is similar to Henderson in size and its relationship as a major suburb to a larppr metropohtan area officials said. Overland Park has gone through many of the growth stages that Henderson is now facing, they added. Garcia has a bachebr of arts degree from the University of Dlinois, Chicago and has woi^ted towards his masters in planning. G^xiais married with three children and will move his family to Henderson by mid-August. He will assume his duties as director on Aug. 20. SENSING Trust your sensing and find out for yourself. NEW LIFE classes 293-44441 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF CLOSE OF REGISTRATION FOR THE PRIMARY ELECTION IN CLARK COUNTY STATE OF NEVADA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that registration for the Primary Election to be held on September 4th, 1990, will close on Saturday, August 4th, 1990, at the hour of 9:00 P.M. Electors may register for the ensuing election by appearing at the Clark County Election Department, 333 S. 6th Street, or by appearing before a Deputy Registrar in the manner provided by law. Electors may also register at any of the local Department of Motor Vehicle offices. The Clark County Election Department is open Monday through Friday, 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.; and from Tuesday, July 31st through Saturday, August 4th from 8:00 A.M. to 9:00 P.M. (s) Deborah West DEBORAH WEST Registrar of Voters Clark County, Nevada July 3, 1990 (SEAL) HBG-July 19,20,26,27, Aug. 3, 4 WE MAKE FRESH JUICES DAILY 1000 Buchanan, B.C. ''V'" ^WE DELIVER 294-1000 MF 77 SAT 10-2 'RECYCLE BINS ON SITE 1 -xcaz: az: as 33= snr •snr VINYL BY THE YARD OR ROLL PRESPACE LETTERING, LOGOS, BANNERST'ETC. Custom Vinyl Letters ^0% off Dealer for the HTD Sign Computers Several Different Machines Available For Information, Call Debbie Babcock or Gary Peters Sign and Frame Department 451-7662 FAX IN YOUR REQUEST FOR A QUOTE (702)451-8196 Dick Blick West^;;^ 1951 RAMROAO AVE. 451-7662 9-6 MON-FRI 9-5 SATURDAY •arc rzz: aE az: az: az: as Ba.,HM>42*' ***2S,Si'Bo-^^ • ^^^^QlflMMHi iAAjMMA^aaa

PAGE 4

^M>^^*^p^p ^^^W^^^WMVV^Vl^l Viewpoint .H ENDERSON ^EHSHEE dl*#i^ Page 4 Henderson Home News, Henderson Nevada MIKE O'CALLAGHAN CAROLYN O'CALLAGHAN Publisher Co-Publisher Thuraday. July 19,1990 Who carries the Several weeks ago, a Henderson dwelling biuned to the ground as firefighters stood by, virtually helpless. There were no fire hydrants in that neighborhood to which they could connect their equipment. Surprisingly, water in quantity reportedly was available, both at that house and at several nearby homes. Where was that water? In the residents' swimming pools, including the house that burned down, into which an input hose might have been dropped, nm into a Fire Department pumper and then through hoses with which to fight the fire. When asked about such a procedure. Fire Department spokespersons said they did not have such an input hose on their vehicles. To which, knowing that the area where they were going did not have hydrants, the question must be asked, why not? Perhaps it is not feasible to equip the fire trucks with such tjTJes of hoses. There may also be a legal question of whether dropping an input hose into a neighbor's house would constitute trespass; after all, the neighbor's house was not burning. (It is doubtful that anyone would ever press that issue; Henderson folks generally band together to help one another in times of peril.) One solution to the no-hydrant problem perhaps worth considering would be to store necessary hoses at central, accessible locations in those neighborhoods. The Fire Department would know in advance where those hoses were stored and, in cases when the residents at those locations who had the hoses in their garages or sheds were not home, would be equipped with keys and permission to enter. Years ago, the late Walt Kelly, creator of the comic strip, Togo," had one of his cartoon characters, dress^ in a firefighter's helmet, constantly sajring, "I carry the hose." Perhaps the time has come for someone to carry—or store— an input hose. Volunteers, anyone? It happened this week 1,5,10,20 and 30 years ago HPD a dictatorship, ex-cop in 1970 By Nathan Larson News Staff Writer 1960 The Southem Nevada Industrial Foundation appeared before the City Council July 18 to request permission to build a plant in Henderson's industrial park. H.I. Thompson Fiberglass Co. of Los Angeles, with total assets of about $5.5 million, wanted to build a 20,000-square-foot plant, which would make a plastic product with the help of acid from the Stauffer plant, on 18 acres of land. "Even if we have to give the land to them...let's do it in order to help our city," Councilman Pete Mendive said. Mayor Bill Byrne wrote a letter to Basic Management Inc. July 20 asking that Henderson be given the right of first refusal of salable water. After the city had been repeatedly reminded of its 5 milliongallon per day limit by^MI, it had sought other sources. BMI was seen as going after profit by giving the Las Vegas Valley Water District all i t needed, because L V VWD was charged $123 per million gallons while Henderson paid a bill of $70 per million gallons. BMI said its cost was $70 per million gallons. 1970 During a City Council committee meeting July 14 discussing a change in an ordinance dealing with citations and prisoners, a former reserve officer accused the Henderson Police Department of being a dictatorship. Municipal Judge Milton Sant said that the council had no reason to discuss the ordinance, since it should have gone through his office, he said. Also in the meeting a man in the audience said that the whole thing was so stupid that he didn 't want to discuss it, although he did stay for the rest of the meeting. 1980 James Goff, then-assistant director of public safety, said that lack of parent supervision led to an apparently juvenile-caused crime wave during the weekend of July 12-13. Several businesses were broken into, but only one had money stolen from it. Various acts of vandalism also occurred. A survey by the Greater Las Vegas Chamber of Commerce which studied real estate growth trends from 1969 to 1979 showed that Henderson's increased from $2 million to $66 million, a 3,300percent growth. 1985 The City Council weakened a commercial building fire sprinkler requirement July 15 but ordered a study that upon approval would require fire sprinkling systems in all new residential construction. The Nevada State Welfare Division of Aging Services investigated allegations of negligence in the death of a Henderson Convalescent Center resident. Samuel Shackman wandered away from the home July 4 and was found more than five hours later behind the Playland Skating Rink. As the temperamre reached 120 degrees that day, the Dark County coroner said Shackman died of heat prostration. Public Administrator Jared Shafer, Shackman's legal guardian, said that he saw no evidence of negligence; "Sam was a wanderer." He also said that by law the center could not restrain its occupants or lock them up. 1989 A bill allowing the sale of federal land to Qark County, which would let KeiT-McGee move portions of its ammonium perchlorate production facility, was passed unanimously by the Senate July 18. The bill woyld pemiit the county to buy more than 20,000 acres at Apex, some of which would be usedby Kcrr-McGec. The Henderson plant was expected to remain in full operation. for Demos to act By Richard Cohen WASHINGTON—On the day President George Bush decided that the 1988 campaign was over and taxes might have to be raised, Ron Brown, chairman of what's left of the Democratic. Party, put on his Clark Clifford-model statesman's suit and said it was "no time for gloating." C'mon offit.Ron. It's precisely that time. I say that not just because (in declaring a conflict of interest) I am about to collect on a substantial bet that Bush would raise taxes (gloat, gloat), but because ever since Bush uttered his famous "read my lips" vow, anyone who could read numbers knew the statement was sheer demagoguery. If the Democrats cannot gloat when the president finally owns up to reality, then there is no glee in the misfortunes of Donald Trump cither. But if the Democrats simply go into their oh-so-responsiblc bipartisan mode, they will not only pass up the opportunity for sweet political revenge but the chance to show some leadership as well. From all indications. Bush would like to avoid raising the income tax and get revenues from other sources, presumably user fees. At the same time, the administration would like the Democratic Congress to join it in an agreement to cut entitlement programs—and lower the capital-gains tax. In the end, what would come out is one neat package in which the White House and Congress would do a Three Musketeers act: All for one and one for all. But, once again, it's the middle class that would be skewered. In the 1980s, the Democratic party not only lost the White House, but its very soul. It helped enact a rcvi.scd tax code in which the wealthiest of Americans had their taxes substantially cut and the less rich Americans, particularly the middle class, had their taxes raised. Most people had their income taxes reduced .some and ihcirSocial Security contributions increased even more. The upshot was a tax increase. Worse yet, the Democrats played accomplice to What, even in retrospect, was a mind-boggling income-tax formula where the wealthy paid proportionately less in taxes than the upper middle class. This is the so-called "bubble": the very wealthy pay 28 percent and the less .jd iiii-iwealthy 33 percent. I am still waiting for someone—including the vaunted Sen. Bill Bradley—to tell me why that is fair. >:_ Fair or not. the rich got even richer. The richest fifth of the population went from haying 41.6 percent of national income in 1980 to 44 percent by the end of the decade. At the same time, the real wages of average Americans declined. For the Democrats to now help Bush cobble together some sort of deficit-reduction program—higher taxes and reduced expenditures— ^ is like painting overa rotting building. The stmcture ought to be razed, starting with that regressive tax code. The Democratic Party of old had a pretty good idea: a progressive income tax in which the rich paid proportionately more than the poor. It's still a good idea and. better than that, equitable. Moreover, the Democrats might give some thought about what those higher taxes could be used for, like investing in America. Our antiquated infrastructure, oursony education system, ouroverwhelmed health-care system, our failure to invest property in non-defense research—those are all areas where more money could be spent wisely and pnidently. A country whose roads and bridges are dilapidated and whose schools turn out functional illiterates is at a competitiv&disadvantage with nations like Japan and Germany. Those countries not only get goods to market on time, but have woricers who acmally can read packing instructions. At risk of being called a bleeding-heart liberal, I might also say that we are talking quality of life here, life itself when it comes to health care. Given that some of the best brains in the Democratic Party suffered from ideological vertigo during the Reagan years, the party might want turn to a Republican, Kevin Phillips, for an outline of how to proceed. His new book, "The Politics of Rich and Poor." suggests a populist revolution is brewing out there, that people are fed up with the Tnimp set—their parties, planes, homes, cars and. most of all. their smug assumption that they earned it all. Throw in the savings-and-loan swindlers and even mild-marmered people get into a Bastille-stonning mood. So gloat, ye Democrats—and take as much as a week to do it But then set to work raising taxes on those who can affonl to pay, cut the defense budget because the Cold War is over, protect worthy entitlements like Social Security that have been paying their own way, invest in something other than Sunbelt shopping centers (want one, cheap?). Act, in short, like the Democratic Party of old. If the Democrats try that, they might be gloating for a long time to come, Capitol Cominentarv Sedway's impact lasting By Guy Shipler Some called him Marvelous Marvin out of affection, some out of fearful respect; there seemed to be no middle ground. No wonder for eight years the Democratic assemblyman from District 15 in Las Vegas shook up the Nevada Legislature as few had before him. A man of great personal courage and conviction, Marvin Sedway called everything as he saw it, no holds barred. An admirable trait to many, but anathema among others. In Sedway's case, the latter attitude got the biggest public attention because of the way he ran the Assembly Ways and Means Committee, which he chaired. He had special targets among the executive agency people who had to face him to justify their budgets. His victims came away from the session feeling as if they had been through the Inquisition, and his critics denounqed him as "cruel, unfair and urmecessarily vicious," as one of his fellow lawmakers privately put it. So how could such an apparently villanous personaUty be regarded with affection by anyone? Because the other side of that personality, oddly, was just the reverse of the public image. Marvin Sedway was an intense, fierce champion of the people in the truest sense of that cliche. To him, that meant fighting in their behalf every waking minute against the injustices he felt society had so rudely inflicted on the poor, the defeated, the crushed in spirit. The problem he faced in trying to carry out that fight was the roadblock of frustration. He felt, often, that nobody was listening, that he couldn't persuade those with the ability to do something substantial about the helpless and the disenfranchised to take effective action. Even having power in the Legislature didn't help Sedway in his campaign. It was too diverse a body, a group made up of the full spectium of poUtieal, regional and other specialjnteresta. Getting it to focus on more concretervfeible andeven essential legislation required hours and days and months of haggling and compromising. His was too vague an issue to jell. So the frustration built into a burning anger. It seemed to me, in covering Ways and Means Committee meetings, that it became the only place he could release that anger. Watching him lash out at executive branch officials who had clearly done no wrong, one could only sympathize with the victim of a cruel attack. Yet in his heart Marvin Sedway was anything but a cruel man. In private conversation he would express his high regard for decency and justice softly and gently, sometimes ahnost whispering, as though he stood in a house of prayer. He had a hero worship of any person or group who actively helped people, and something close to contempt for those who didn't. Like it or not, a stance like that takes real courage—and invites tough criticism. Sedway didn't care, he knew where he stood and willingly took his lumps. What mattered was the principle, not the popularity. In the end, being so controversial paid off in the man's impact. He faced the dreaded subject of taxes when others wouldn't, finally hammering his reluctant colleagues to approve a higher levy on mining. He insisted on greater funding for education; he started the drive for a general business tax, which now stands in the forefront of political issues this year. And he led the successful drive for more major architectural and other changes in the Capitol Complex from talk to action. The first part of that move, well underway, will result in a new Supreme Court Building, a new state library, major design changes in the Legislative Building and a 400 • Pressed further by ABC's Ted Koppcl, Mandela expressed sympa-. thy for Jewish u-avails and admiration for "the lack of racialism ( amongst the Jewish communities," acknowledged the Jewish lawyers who had defended the ANC and provided his own legal training ,. and reviewed his consultations with Jewish leaders in SouUi Africa J and elsewhere. i It is hardly noble of Nelson Mandela, who is exceedingly articulate / about human rights conditions in his own country, to decline to comI ment on human rights conditions in some of the mthless, even I murderous, places where the ANC has found allies. If others followed i his rule of avoiding interest in the internal affairs of other countries, f moreover, his own cause would suffer. But his choices are understandable at the least as the expedient tactics of a stmggling Third Worid lil)eraiion movement. Washington Post j Boulder Dan & Dipstik Duck By Ray Collins ^ ...TWE9L/VNsezi80 MILLION ACRES OF LAND OPERATE UNDER. OuTOATEP /WNASEMENT CLAS5I PiCATioN f Tf^HBR ul 1 \ ~^ • ^^:y7o^^.;7.7;rjt^T^T.7l:;; • JET'';^:; • x^;-' • "^ ^ --•;;4~;'; >SKSi^7; .^^ :-z^ -r. I ma I I I. i^^^^M >^iMliii Miatili^i^t.

PAGE 5

^M>^^*^p^p ^^^W^^^WMVV^Vl^l Viewpoint .H ENDERSON ^EHSHEE dl*#i^ Page 4 Henderson Home News, Henderson Nevada MIKE O'CALLAGHAN CAROLYN O'CALLAGHAN Publisher Co-Publisher Thuraday. July 19,1990 Who carries the Several weeks ago, a Henderson dwelling biuned to the ground as firefighters stood by, virtually helpless. There were no fire hydrants in that neighborhood to which they could connect their equipment. Surprisingly, water in quantity reportedly was available, both at that house and at several nearby homes. Where was that water? In the residents' swimming pools, including the house that burned down, into which an input hose might have been dropped, nm into a Fire Department pumper and then through hoses with which to fight the fire. When asked about such a procedure. Fire Department spokespersons said they did not have such an input hose on their vehicles. To which, knowing that the area where they were going did not have hydrants, the question must be asked, why not? Perhaps it is not feasible to equip the fire trucks with such tjTJes of hoses. There may also be a legal question of whether dropping an input hose into a neighbor's house would constitute trespass; after all, the neighbor's house was not burning. (It is doubtful that anyone would ever press that issue; Henderson folks generally band together to help one another in times of peril.) One solution to the no-hydrant problem perhaps worth considering would be to store necessary hoses at central, accessible locations in those neighborhoods. The Fire Department would know in advance where those hoses were stored and, in cases when the residents at those locations who had the hoses in their garages or sheds were not home, would be equipped with keys and permission to enter. Years ago, the late Walt Kelly, creator of the comic strip, Togo," had one of his cartoon characters, dress^ in a firefighter's helmet, constantly sajring, "I carry the hose." Perhaps the time has come for someone to carry—or store— an input hose. Volunteers, anyone? It happened this week 1,5,10,20 and 30 years ago HPD a dictatorship, ex-cop in 1970 By Nathan Larson News Staff Writer 1960 The Southem Nevada Industrial Foundation appeared before the City Council July 18 to request permission to build a plant in Henderson's industrial park. H.I. Thompson Fiberglass Co. of Los Angeles, with total assets of about $5.5 million, wanted to build a 20,000-square-foot plant, which would make a plastic product with the help of acid from the Stauffer plant, on 18 acres of land. "Even if we have to give the land to them...let's do it in order to help our city," Councilman Pete Mendive said. Mayor Bill Byrne wrote a letter to Basic Management Inc. July 20 asking that Henderson be given the right of first refusal of salable water. After the city had been repeatedly reminded of its 5 milliongallon per day limit by^MI, it had sought other sources. BMI was seen as going after profit by giving the Las Vegas Valley Water District all i t needed, because L V VWD was charged $123 per million gallons while Henderson paid a bill of $70 per million gallons. BMI said its cost was $70 per million gallons. 1970 During a City Council committee meeting July 14 discussing a change in an ordinance dealing with citations and prisoners, a former reserve officer accused the Henderson Police Department of being a dictatorship. Municipal Judge Milton Sant said that the council had no reason to discuss the ordinance, since it should have gone through his office, he said. Also in the meeting a man in the audience said that the whole thing was so stupid that he didn 't want to discuss it, although he did stay for the rest of the meeting. 1980 James Goff, then-assistant director of public safety, said that lack of parent supervision led to an apparently juvenile-caused crime wave during the weekend of July 12-13. Several businesses were broken into, but only one had money stolen from it. Various acts of vandalism also occurred. A survey by the Greater Las Vegas Chamber of Commerce which studied real estate growth trends from 1969 to 1979 showed that Henderson's increased from $2 million to $66 million, a 3,300percent growth. 1985 The City Council weakened a commercial building fire sprinkler requirement July 15 but ordered a study that upon approval would require fire sprinkling systems in all new residential construction. The Nevada State Welfare Division of Aging Services investigated allegations of negligence in the death of a Henderson Convalescent Center resident. Samuel Shackman wandered away from the home July 4 and was found more than five hours later behind the Playland Skating Rink. As the temperamre reached 120 degrees that day, the Dark County coroner said Shackman died of heat prostration. Public Administrator Jared Shafer, Shackman's legal guardian, said that he saw no evidence of negligence; "Sam was a wanderer." He also said that by law the center could not restrain its occupants or lock them up. 1989 A bill allowing the sale of federal land to Qark County, which would let KeiT-McGee move portions of its ammonium perchlorate production facility, was passed unanimously by the Senate July 18. The bill woyld pemiit the county to buy more than 20,000 acres at Apex, some of which would be usedby Kcrr-McGec. The Henderson plant was expected to remain in full operation. for Demos to act By Richard Cohen WASHINGTON—On the day President George Bush decided that the 1988 campaign was over and taxes might have to be raised, Ron Brown, chairman of what's left of the Democratic. Party, put on his Clark Clifford-model statesman's suit and said it was "no time for gloating." C'mon offit.Ron. It's precisely that time. I say that not just because (in declaring a conflict of interest) I am about to collect on a substantial bet that Bush would raise taxes (gloat, gloat), but because ever since Bush uttered his famous "read my lips" vow, anyone who could read numbers knew the statement was sheer demagoguery. If the Democrats cannot gloat when the president finally owns up to reality, then there is no glee in the misfortunes of Donald Trump cither. But if the Democrats simply go into their oh-so-responsiblc bipartisan mode, they will not only pass up the opportunity for sweet political revenge but the chance to show some leadership as well. From all indications. Bush would like to avoid raising the income tax and get revenues from other sources, presumably user fees. At the same time, the administration would like the Democratic Congress to join it in an agreement to cut entitlement programs—and lower the capital-gains tax. In the end, what would come out is one neat package in which the White House and Congress would do a Three Musketeers act: All for one and one for all. But, once again, it's the middle class that would be skewered. In the 1980s, the Democratic party not only lost the White House, but its very soul. It helped enact a rcvi.scd tax code in which the wealthiest of Americans had their taxes substantially cut and the less rich Americans, particularly the middle class, had their taxes raised. Most people had their income taxes reduced .some and ihcirSocial Security contributions increased even more. The upshot was a tax increase. Worse yet, the Democrats played accomplice to What, even in retrospect, was a mind-boggling income-tax formula where the wealthy paid proportionately less in taxes than the upper middle class. This is the so-called "bubble": the very wealthy pay 28 percent and the less .jd iiii-iwealthy 33 percent. I am still waiting for someone—including the vaunted Sen. Bill Bradley—to tell me why that is fair. >:_ Fair or not. the rich got even richer. The richest fifth of the population went from haying 41.6 percent of national income in 1980 to 44 percent by the end of the decade. At the same time, the real wages of average Americans declined. For the Democrats to now help Bush cobble together some sort of deficit-reduction program—higher taxes and reduced expenditures— ^ is like painting overa rotting building. The stmcture ought to be razed, starting with that regressive tax code. The Democratic Party of old had a pretty good idea: a progressive income tax in which the rich paid proportionately more than the poor. It's still a good idea and. better than that, equitable. Moreover, the Democrats might give some thought about what those higher taxes could be used for, like investing in America. Our antiquated infrastructure, oursony education system, ouroverwhelmed health-care system, our failure to invest property in non-defense research—those are all areas where more money could be spent wisely and pnidently. A country whose roads and bridges are dilapidated and whose schools turn out functional illiterates is at a competitiv&disadvantage with nations like Japan and Germany. Those countries not only get goods to market on time, but have woricers who acmally can read packing instructions. At risk of being called a bleeding-heart liberal, I might also say that we are talking quality of life here, life itself when it comes to health care. Given that some of the best brains in the Democratic Party suffered from ideological vertigo during the Reagan years, the party might want turn to a Republican, Kevin Phillips, for an outline of how to proceed. His new book, "The Politics of Rich and Poor." suggests a populist revolution is brewing out there, that people are fed up with the Tnimp set—their parties, planes, homes, cars and. most of all. their smug assumption that they earned it all. Throw in the savings-and-loan swindlers and even mild-marmered people get into a Bastille-stonning mood. So gloat, ye Democrats—and take as much as a week to do it But then set to work raising taxes on those who can affonl to pay, cut the defense budget because the Cold War is over, protect worthy entitlements like Social Security that have been paying their own way, invest in something other than Sunbelt shopping centers (want one, cheap?). Act, in short, like the Democratic Party of old. If the Democrats try that, they might be gloating for a long time to come, Capitol Cominentarv Sedway's impact lasting By Guy Shipler Some called him Marvelous Marvin out of affection, some out of fearful respect; there seemed to be no middle ground. No wonder for eight years the Democratic assemblyman from District 15 in Las Vegas shook up the Nevada Legislature as few had before him. A man of great personal courage and conviction, Marvin Sedway called everything as he saw it, no holds barred. An admirable trait to many, but anathema among others. In Sedway's case, the latter attitude got the biggest public attention because of the way he ran the Assembly Ways and Means Committee, which he chaired. He had special targets among the executive agency people who had to face him to justify their budgets. His victims came away from the session feeling as if they had been through the Inquisition, and his critics denounqed him as "cruel, unfair and urmecessarily vicious," as one of his fellow lawmakers privately put it. So how could such an apparently villanous personaUty be regarded with affection by anyone? Because the other side of that personality, oddly, was just the reverse of the public image. Marvin Sedway was an intense, fierce champion of the people in the truest sense of that cliche. To him, that meant fighting in their behalf every waking minute against the injustices he felt society had so rudely inflicted on the poor, the defeated, the crushed in spirit. The problem he faced in trying to carry out that fight was the roadblock of frustration. He felt, often, that nobody was listening, that he couldn't persuade those with the ability to do something substantial about the helpless and the disenfranchised to take effective action. Even having power in the Legislature didn't help Sedway in his campaign. It was too diverse a body, a group made up of the full spectium of poUtieal, regional and other specialjnteresta. Getting it to focus on more concretervfeible andeven essential legislation required hours and days and months of haggling and compromising. His was too vague an issue to jell. So the frustration built into a burning anger. It seemed to me, in covering Ways and Means Committee meetings, that it became the only place he could release that anger. Watching him lash out at executive branch officials who had clearly done no wrong, one could only sympathize with the victim of a cruel attack. Yet in his heart Marvin Sedway was anything but a cruel man. In private conversation he would express his high regard for decency and justice softly and gently, sometimes ahnost whispering, as though he stood in a house of prayer. He had a hero worship of any person or group who actively helped people, and something close to contempt for those who didn't. Like it or not, a stance like that takes real courage—and invites tough criticism. Sedway didn't care, he knew where he stood and willingly took his lumps. What mattered was the principle, not the popularity. In the end, being so controversial paid off in the man's impact. He faced the dreaded subject of taxes when others wouldn't, finally hammering his reluctant colleagues to approve a higher levy on mining. He insisted on greater funding for education; he started the drive for a general business tax, which now stands in the forefront of political issues this year. And he led the successful drive for more major architectural and other changes in the Capitol Complex from talk to action. The first part of that move, well underway, will result in a new Supreme Court Building, a new state library, major design changes in the Legislative Building and a 400 • Pressed further by ABC's Ted Koppcl, Mandela expressed sympa-. thy for Jewish u-avails and admiration for "the lack of racialism ( amongst the Jewish communities," acknowledged the Jewish lawyers who had defended the ANC and provided his own legal training ,. and reviewed his consultations with Jewish leaders in SouUi Africa J and elsewhere. i It is hardly noble of Nelson Mandela, who is exceedingly articulate / about human rights conditions in his own country, to decline to comI ment on human rights conditions in some of the mthless, even I murderous, places where the ANC has found allies. If others followed i his rule of avoiding interest in the internal affairs of other countries, f moreover, his own cause would suffer. But his choices are understandable at the least as the expedient tactics of a stmggling Third Worid lil)eraiion movement. Washington Post j Boulder Dan & Dipstik Duck By Ray Collins ^ ...TWE9L/VNsezi80 MILLION ACRES OF LAND OPERATE UNDER. OuTOATEP /WNASEMENT CLAS5I PiCATioN f Tf^HBR ul 1 \ ~^ • ^^:y7o^^.;7.7;rjt^T^T.7l:;; • JET'';^:; • x^;-' • "^ ^ --•;;4~;'; >SKSi^7; .^^ :-z^ -r. I ma I I I. i^^^^M >^iMliii Miatili^i^t.

PAGE 6

FT "T 1 "T" II p pivif^wi I I i T^p^^v^^^^mBp^^^^^^pp Pag* 6 Henderson Home Newe, Henderson, Nevada ThoTMlajr. July 19. 1990 Thursday, July 19,1990 LegalNotrces PUBLIC NOTICE Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Page ^ WORD WISE Q. Which is correct: Toward or towards and forward or forwards? I hear the words most often with an "s" on the end. A. This is one of those rare instances, when you can take your picl. With or without the "s" is perfectly acceptable; however, toward and forward are both one letter shorter and, therefore, somewhat easier to pronounce. It's always best to stick with the shortest, simplest word when you can. Srnd questions or commenis for Word Wise to P.O. Box 4367. Orlando. Fla. 328024367. LEGAL NOTICE Tht game of badminton i> a praiant-day form ol an tarliar and simpler game called battledor*, that Brhlih officers learned in India. LEGAL NOTICE PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City CooncU of the City of Hcnderaon propoMd by NMUng in title the follow lag Ordinance at iti R^lar Meeting, entitled: BILL NO. 787 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDER' SON, NEVADA, TO AMEND TITLE 19 BY ALLOWING CERTAIN USED VEHICLE SALES IN THE IG (GENERAL INDUSTRY) AND IL (UMITED INDUSTRY) ZONING DISTRICTS, AND OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELATED THERETO. which haa been referred to a Committee of the Coandlaa a Whole for study and recommendation and a copy of aaid Ordinance haa bMn rOed wiUi the City Clerk for general public acmtiny. The Committee Meeting will be held Ainst7,1990at6:46P.M at 240 Water Street. The Cowidl win conaidcr this OnUnancc for adoption at the Regular Meeting of Uw aty CooncO on the 7th day o(Angn8t,1990;andiaaay eaae will adopt or reject Uiis Ordinance within 30 daya. DATED thb 17th day of July 1990, and published July 19, 1990, in the Henderson Home News. DOROTHY A VONDENBRINK, CMC. CLERK H-Joly 19, 1990. LEGAL NOTICE PUBLIC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. 1191 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF HENDER SON, NEVADA. AN ORDINANCE CON CERNINGTHECITYOF HENDERSON, NEVA DA, IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT NO. 862; DESIGNATED BY THE SHORT TITLE "8-1-90 BOND ORDINANCE"; PROVIDING FOR THE ISSUANCE BY THE CITY OF HENDERSON. IN CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, OF ITS REGISTERED LOCAL IMPROVEMENT BONDS, SERIES AUGUST 1. 1990. FOR IMPROVMENT DIS TRICT NO. 862. IN THE PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF $4,200,000 TO FINANCE THE CON STRUCTION OF A STREET PROJECT; AC CEPTING A BID FOR THE PURCHASE OF SUCH BONDS; RATIFY ING, APPROVING AND CONFIRMING ALL AC TION PREVIOUSLY TAKEN; PROVIDING FOR THE ISSUANCE AND SALE OF FULLY REGISTERED BONDS IN VARIOUS DENOMINATIONS; PRESCRIB ING THE FORM OF SAID BONDS, PRO VIDING THE SOURCE OF PAYMENT AND OTHER DETAILS IN CONNECTION THEREWITH AND OTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO; AND BY DECLARING THAT THIS ORDI NANCE PERTAINS TO THE SALE, ISSUANCE AND PAYMENT OF THE BONDS. PRO VIDING FOR ITS ADOP TION AS IF AN EMERGENCY EXISTS. The above Bill No. 784 and foregoing Ordinance was first proposed and read by title to the City Council of the City of Henderson. Nevada, on July 17. 1990. which was a Regular Meeting of the Council and finally adopted as if an emergency exits. PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that the typewriten copies of the above mentioned Ordinance are available for inspection by all interested parties at the Office of the City Clerk. 240 Water Street. Henderson, Nevada; and that said Ordinance No. 1191 was proposed for adoption by Councilman Williams and seconded by Councilman Hafen on the 17th day of July 1990. and adopted by the following roll call vote: Voting AYE: MAYOR LORNA KESTERSON COUNCILMEMBERS: MICHAEL HARRIS. AN DY HAFEN, LARRY SCHEFFLER, LORIN L, WILLIAMS Voting NAY: NONE Absent: NONE LORNA KESTERSON MAYOR ATTEST: DOROTHY A. VONDEN BRINK. CMC CITY CLERK H-July 19, 1990. LEGAL NOTICE PUBLIC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. 1193 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF HENDER SON, NEVADA. AN ORDINANCE AP PROVING THE RESO LUTION OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NE VADA PUBLIC IM PROVEMENT TRUST AUTHORIZING THE REFINANCING OF MULTIFAMILY HOUS ING FACILITIES AND RELATED PROPERTY FOR THE FURTHER ANCE OF THE PUR • POSES OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON. NEVA DA, PUBLIC IMPROVE MENT TRUST; AU THORIZING THE IS SUANCE OF $11,500,000 MULTIFAMILY HOUS ING REVENUE RE FUNDING BONDS (PUEBLO VERDE II APARTMENTS PRO JECT) SERIES I990B IN CONNECTION THERE WITH; AUTHORIZING THE EXECUTION AND DELIVERY OF A LOAN AGREEMENT BET WEEN THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA PUBLIC IMPROVE MENT TRUST AND LIN COLN PUEBLO VERDE LIMITED PARTNER SHIP; AUTHORIZING THE EXECUTION AND DELIVERY OF A TRUST INDENTURE SECURING SAID BONDS; AUTHORIZING THE DISTRIBUTION OF AN PRELIMINARY OFFICIAL STATE MENT AND THE EX ECUTIONANDDISTRI BUTION OF AN OF FICIAL STATEMENT DESCRIBING SAID ISSUE OF BONDS: AND AUTHORIZING THE EXECUTION OF A BOND PURCHASES AGREEMENT PROVIDING FOR THE SALE OF SAID BONDS TO THE PURCHASER THEREOF: PROVIDING FOR THE ADOPTION OF SAID ORDINANCE AS IN THE CASE OF EMERGENCY AND OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELATED THERETO. The above Bill No. 786 and foregoing Ordinance was first proposed and read by title to the City Council of the City of Henderson. Nevada, on July 17. 1990, which was a Regular Meeting of the Council and finally adopted as if an emergency exits. PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that the typewritten copies of the afaHDve mentioned Ordinance are available for inspection by all interested parties at the Office of the City Clerk, 240 Water Street, Henderson, Nevada; and that said Ordinance No. 1193 was proposed for adoption by Councilman Scheffler and seconded by Councilman Hafen on the 17th day of July 1990, and adopted by the following roll call vote: Voting AYE: MAYOR LORNA KESTERSON COUNCILMEMBERS: MICHAEL HARRIS, AN DY HAFEN. LARRY SCHEFFLER, LORIN L WILLIAMS Voting NAY: NONE Absent: NONE LORNA KESTERSON MAYOR LEGAL NOTICE ATTEST: DOROTHY A. VONDENBRINK. CMC CITY CLERK H-July 19. 1990. PUBLIC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. 1192 AN ORDINANCE AP PROVING THE RESO LUTION OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON. NE VADA PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT TRUST AUTHORIZING THE REFINANCING OF MULTIFAMILY HOUSING FACILITIES AND RELATED PROPERTY FOR THE FURTHER ANCE OF THE PUB POSES OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA, PUBUC IMPROVEMENT TRUST; AU THORIZING THE IS SUANCE OF $11,715,000 MULTIFAMILY HOUSING REVENUE RE FUNDING BONDS (PUEBLO VERDE I APARTMENTS PRO JECT) SERIES 1990A IN CONNECTION THERE WITH; AUTHORIZNG THE EXECUTION AND DELIVERY OF A LOAN AGREEMENT BE TWEEN THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA PUBLIC IMRPOVE MENT TRUST AND HENDERSON GREEN I LIMITED PAIITNER SHIP; AUTHORIZING THE EXECUTION AND DELIVERY OF A TRUST INDENTURE SECURING SAID BONDS; AUTHORIZING THE DISTRIBUTION OF A PRELIMINARY OFFICIAL STATE MENT AND THE DIS TRIBUTION OF A PRELIMINARY OF FICIAL STATEMENT AND THE EXECUTION AND DISTRIBUTION OF AN OFFICIAL STATEMENT DESCRI& ING SAID ISSUE OF BONDS; AND AUTHORIZING THE EXECU TION OF A BOND PURCHASE AGREEMENT PROVIDING FOR THE SALE OF SAID BONDS TO THE PURCHASER THEREOF: PROVIDING FOR THE ADOPTION OF SAID ORDINANCE AS IN THE CASE OF EMERGENCY AND OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELATED THERETO. The above Bill No. 785 and foregoing Ordinance was first proposed and read by title to the City Council of the City of Henderson, Nevada, on July 17, 1990, which was a Regular Meeting of the Council and finally adopted as if an emergency exita. PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that the typewriten copies of the above mentioned Ordinance are available for inspection by all interested parties at the Office of the City Clerk, 240 Water Street, Henderson, Nevada; and that said Ordinance No. 1192 was proposed for adoption by Councilman Williams and seconded by Coundlman Hafen on the 17th day of July 1990, and adopted by the following roll call vote: VoUng AYE: MAYOR LORNA KESTERSON COUNCILMEMBERS: MICHAEL HARRIS, ANDY HAFEN, LARRY SCHEFFLER, LORIN L. WILLIAMS Voting NAY: NONE Absent: NONE LORNA KESTERSON MAYOR ATTEST: DOROTHY A. VONDENBRINK, CMC CITY CLERK H-July 19, 1990. PUBLIC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. 1190 AN ORDINANCE OF THEClTYOFHENDEaRSON, NEVADA. AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA, TO AMEND TITU: 19 BY CREATING AN AMORTIZATION PERIOD FOR CASINO USE PERMITS APPROVED PRIOR TO THE ADOPTION OF ORDINANCE 1137, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. The above Bill No. 783 and foregoing Ordinance was ffarst proposed and read by title to the City Council of the City of Henderson, Nevada, on July 3, 1990, which was a Regular Meeting of the Coundl and refer red to the following Committee: "COUNCIL AS A WHOLE" for recommendation PUBLIC NOTICE in hereby given that the typewritten copies of the alM>ve mentioned Ordinance are available for inspection by all intereated parties at the Office of the City Clerk, 240 Water Street, Henderaon, Nevada; and that said Ordinance No. 1190 was proposed for adoption by Coundlman Williams and seconded by Coundlman Hafen on the 17th day of July 1990, and adopted by the foUoyring roll call vote: VoUog AYE: MAYOR LORNA KESTERSON COUNCILMEMBERS: MICHAEL HARRIS, ANDY HAFEN, LARRY SCHEFFLER, LORIN L. WILLIAMS Voting NAY: NONE Absent: NONE LORNA KESTERSON MAYOR ATTEST: DOROTHY A. VONDENBRINK, CMC CITY CLERK H-July 19, 1990. ORDINANCE NO. 1189 Afi ORDINANCE OF CITY OF HENDER, NEVADA. AH ORDINANCE OF THB CITY COUNCIL OF THB CITY OF HENDER SON, AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFYCERTIAN REAL PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF HENDERSON. DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH. RANGE 62 EAST, M.D.B. k M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM IG-G (GENERAL INDUSTRIAL WITH GAMING ENTERPRISE OVERLA Y) DISTRICT TO CH' G (HIGHWAY COMEMRCIAL Wmi GAMING OVERLAY) DISTRICT, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. The above BiU No. 782 and foregoing Ordinance waaJbst propoaed and read by title to the City Coundl of the City of Henderson, Nevada, on July 3. 1990. which was a Rqrolar Meeting of the Coundl and refer red to the following Committee: "COUNCIL AS A WHOLE" for recommendation PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that the typewritten copiea of the above mentioned Ordinance are available for inapection by aU interested parties at the Office of the City Clerk, 240 Water Street, Henderson, Nevada; and that said Ordinance No. 1189 was proposed for adoption by Coundlman Hafen and seconded by Coundlman Harria on the 17th day of July 1990, and adopted by the foUowing roll call vote: VoUnf AYE: MAYOR LORNA KESTERSON COUNCILMEMBERS: MICHAEL HARRIS, ANDY HAFEN. LARRY SCHEFFLER, LORIN L WILLIAMS Voting NAY: NONE Absent: NONE LORNA KESTERSON MAYOR ATTEST: DOROTHY A. VONDENBRINK, CMC CITY CLERK H-July 19, 1990. • *"• • -' • • f:Mmm..^-.^*f^l^-i..^s ^'^i.Ah^;*^ *,,.. PERSONAL FREE CONSULTATION NO RECOVERY NO FEE 565-0473 223 Water Street, Suite A Next to Henderson Justice Court & Municipal Court LAW OFFICE OF JOHN F. MARCHIANO Former Henderson City Attorney & EDWARD B. HUGHES Criminal Law — DUI • *' • ;>. *•' Green Valley News Cannon ninth-grader Invited to Student Space Station The Davis Planetarium Foundation, a Mississippibased organization, has selected Hadden Hoppert, a ninth grader at Helen C. Cannon Junior High School, as one of 20 students to participate in the first national mission of Student Space Station. The program involves a unique 14-day residency in science studies and a 96-hour space-flight simulation at the foundation's facilities in Jackson, Miss. Hadden was chosen from more than 600 applicants nationwide. He is the son of Herschel and Jean Hoppert of Henderson. Student Space Station was launched three years ago as a way to provide exceptional students an opportunity to inHadden Hoppert vestigate their own questions about science though an iiftevsive "hands-on" experimental program that is tailored to each participant's own interests. It utilizes the laboratories of Belhaven College and a $200,000 space station simulator at the Russell C. Davis Planetarium. The 96-hour "mission" that cape the two-week adventure provides a scenario in which the students' experiments can be interfaced with a high-tech simulation of a research environment in earth orbit. Students spend 10 days developing their research ideas into workable "flight experiments" for the space station. Then they take roles as science officers ('astronauts') and flight controllers and direct the mission, attempting to keep all 40-50 flight experiments operating on schedule, while attending to many of the comphcated logistical concerns that are necessary to keep a real space mission going. One of the principal criteria used in the student selection process is the quality of a student's own proposals for scientific investigations that could be carried out aboard a space station. While attending Student Space Station, Hadden will conduct experiments in the area of plant growth and development. Another very significant factor is the recommendation of a teacher from the student's home school. Hadden received a strong recommendation to the project from Monte Bay, a science teacher at Cannon. Richard Knapp, project director of Student Space Station, said, "We are extremely See Space, Page 10 Valle Verde: Then and now By David M. Sanchez President Green Valley Conununity Association I remember the tirst time I saw Green Valley. My wife and I were coming down from Boulder City and we made a left tium on Sunset Road because we saw a big sign advertising a chocolate candy factory. As we passed Sunset and Valle Wprde, my wife and I both turned to oiuleft, and we saw a sign that said Green Valley. My wife wanted to stop because she loves to look at model homes. But, I thought to myself, this is too far out; ^ who would want to live out iiere?. A year later, we moved into our new Green Valley home and have been there ever since. The other day, my wife and I decided to take a sentimental journey through Green Valley just to see how things have been developing. Jeanne andX" decided to start on Sunset and Valle Verde and come back up through our Green Valley community. As we paused at the comer of Valle Verde and Sunset, I reminisced about the first time I saw Jim Arrendale on top of his van handing out petitions to stop construction of a proposed casino on Valle Verde. I looked around and saw a thriving shopping center containing 'Thirstbusters," the Green Valley Lutheran church, a yogurt shop, a nail shop, H&R Block, a pet hospital and a Bridgestone shop, as well as a Circle-K. Across from the Circle-K was Barry Yost's 7-11and a variety of other stores. Things seem to have changed IJratnatically frona that first 1981 view of the comer of Valle Verde and Sunset. We proceeded south on Valle Verde and ran into some weeds at Highview and some signs advertising a development. Further on up Valle Verde and Valley East Drive we found a political sign on the comer. One block up at Valle Verde and Osbom, we saw two more signs and some dead trees on the corner. A little further* up Valle See Valle, Page 10 Dozens of Ready-Made Picture Frames, Woods and Lacquers, most sizes while they last! DJckBlJck^ 1951 Ramrod Ave. 451-7662 9-6, Monday-Friday 9-5 Saturday -I i4 .^mmm*' i SATURDAY 1 P.II. |)p9KER TOURNAMENT •15.00 Buy-In $10.00 Re-Buy SATURDAY POKER WINNERS 1. Bill 2. J.B. ?, Black Bfirt ALL NEW IQT VIDEO POKER MACHINES & 5^ & 25C DEUCES WILD MACHINES 1133 BIdr. Hwy., Hen LADIES NITE TUES. 16-oz. 7-9 P.M. T-BONE WELL DRINKS... 50^ <5.95 SERVED 4-10 P.M. 10-oz. FREE LIGOURI'S CAP NEW YORK Free Every Straight Flush ^4.95 on a Regular Poker Machine U CHECK OUT OUR NEW ITALIAN MENU SERVED 7 DAYS A WEEK^I CHECK OUR 3.50 DAILY LUNCHEON SPECIALS MON.-FRI. FEATURINQJ10MEIIIA0EJ1AM & BEAN SOUP ft HOMEMADE CHILI EVERY DAY l ^C '^yyyy ^5p t^ ^ ^ T^ i g^ 'C^ ^ 'y ^ c^^' ^ ^ t1THURSDAY r CORNED BEEF & CABBAGE ^3.95 I BEEF STROQANOFF .. .^^^ .^3.95 iM FRIDAY /, BATTER DIPPED COD f .^3.95 LONDON BROIL 93.95 DEEP FRIED CATFISH 93.95 SATURDAY SHORT RIBS .3.95 ^ ROAST PRIME RIB OF BEEF 95.25 < SUNDAY < BAKED CHICKEN 94.25>^ MSIRLOIN TIPS & NOODLES 93. [^OUT OUR BEAUTIFUL jmPPESSiONJl£^^^B LOCATED AT 309 W. LAKE MEAD IN HENDERSON Hurry Only Three (3l) Spaces Left! (660 Sq. Ft. to 914 Sq. Ft.) Ample Parking MONDAY UVER 9L ONIONS 93.50 iiCABBAGE ROLLS .. .^ .93.95 TUESDAY STUFFED PEPPERS 93. BARBEQUE BEEF RIBS 93 WEDNESDAY MANICOTTI 93,95 EQQPLANT PARMESAN .93. STUFFED SHELLS 93. A cvwyday wc ^^ / NOW AT BAR jBhrtmp Cocktail •1.00 HamSMMMch 92.80 i4.*)ir* 92.75 lyy myl. Saup Of tl>d wW • dliww BMn Soup (bowl) (LOO ChUI(l)Owl) M.95 HotWingt *2M CMdwn nngwB •2M •CPA •Attorney •Insurance Agent •Credit Union •Optometrist •Podiatrist •Real Estate Agent •Diet Center For a limited time those qualifying can receive up to five (5) FREE months on their lease! STOP BY OR CALL TARI FOR DETAILS 565-0377 .-./j

PAGE 7

FT "T 1 "T" II p pivif^wi I I i T^p^^v^^^^mBp^^^^^^pp Pag* 6 Henderson Home Newe, Henderson, Nevada ThoTMlajr. July 19. 1990 Thursday, July 19,1990 LegalNotrces PUBLIC NOTICE Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Page ^ WORD WISE Q. Which is correct: Toward or towards and forward or forwards? I hear the words most often with an "s" on the end. A. This is one of those rare instances, when you can take your picl. With or without the "s" is perfectly acceptable; however, toward and forward are both one letter shorter and, therefore, somewhat easier to pronounce. It's always best to stick with the shortest, simplest word when you can. Srnd questions or commenis for Word Wise to P.O. Box 4367. Orlando. Fla. 328024367. LEGAL NOTICE Tht game of badminton i> a praiant-day form ol an tarliar and simpler game called battledor*, that Brhlih officers learned in India. LEGAL NOTICE PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City CooncU of the City of Hcnderaon propoMd by NMUng in title the follow lag Ordinance at iti R^lar Meeting, entitled: BILL NO. 787 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDER' SON, NEVADA, TO AMEND TITLE 19 BY ALLOWING CERTAIN USED VEHICLE SALES IN THE IG (GENERAL INDUSTRY) AND IL (UMITED INDUSTRY) ZONING DISTRICTS, AND OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELATED THERETO. which haa been referred to a Committee of the Coandlaa a Whole for study and recommendation and a copy of aaid Ordinance haa bMn rOed wiUi the City Clerk for general public acmtiny. The Committee Meeting will be held Ainst7,1990at6:46P.M at 240 Water Street. The Cowidl win conaidcr this OnUnancc for adoption at the Regular Meeting of Uw aty CooncO on the 7th day o(Angn8t,1990;andiaaay eaae will adopt or reject Uiis Ordinance within 30 daya. DATED thb 17th day of July 1990, and published July 19, 1990, in the Henderson Home News. DOROTHY A VONDENBRINK, CMC. CLERK H-Joly 19, 1990. LEGAL NOTICE PUBLIC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. 1191 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF HENDER SON, NEVADA. AN ORDINANCE CON CERNINGTHECITYOF HENDERSON, NEVA DA, IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT NO. 862; DESIGNATED BY THE SHORT TITLE "8-1-90 BOND ORDINANCE"; PROVIDING FOR THE ISSUANCE BY THE CITY OF HENDERSON. IN CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, OF ITS REGISTERED LOCAL IMPROVEMENT BONDS, SERIES AUGUST 1. 1990. FOR IMPROVMENT DIS TRICT NO. 862. IN THE PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF $4,200,000 TO FINANCE THE CON STRUCTION OF A STREET PROJECT; AC CEPTING A BID FOR THE PURCHASE OF SUCH BONDS; RATIFY ING, APPROVING AND CONFIRMING ALL AC TION PREVIOUSLY TAKEN; PROVIDING FOR THE ISSUANCE AND SALE OF FULLY REGISTERED BONDS IN VARIOUS DENOMINATIONS; PRESCRIB ING THE FORM OF SAID BONDS, PRO VIDING THE SOURCE OF PAYMENT AND OTHER DETAILS IN CONNECTION THEREWITH AND OTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO; AND BY DECLARING THAT THIS ORDI NANCE PERTAINS TO THE SALE, ISSUANCE AND PAYMENT OF THE BONDS. PRO VIDING FOR ITS ADOP TION AS IF AN EMERGENCY EXISTS. The above Bill No. 784 and foregoing Ordinance was first proposed and read by title to the City Council of the City of Henderson. Nevada, on July 17. 1990. which was a Regular Meeting of the Council and finally adopted as if an emergency exits. PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that the typewriten copies of the above mentioned Ordinance are available for inspection by all interested parties at the Office of the City Clerk. 240 Water Street. Henderson, Nevada; and that said Ordinance No. 1191 was proposed for adoption by Councilman Williams and seconded by Councilman Hafen on the 17th day of July 1990. and adopted by the following roll call vote: Voting AYE: MAYOR LORNA KESTERSON COUNCILMEMBERS: MICHAEL HARRIS. AN DY HAFEN, LARRY SCHEFFLER, LORIN L, WILLIAMS Voting NAY: NONE Absent: NONE LORNA KESTERSON MAYOR ATTEST: DOROTHY A. VONDEN BRINK. CMC CITY CLERK H-July 19, 1990. LEGAL NOTICE PUBLIC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. 1193 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF HENDER SON, NEVADA. AN ORDINANCE AP PROVING THE RESO LUTION OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NE VADA PUBLIC IM PROVEMENT TRUST AUTHORIZING THE REFINANCING OF MULTIFAMILY HOUS ING FACILITIES AND RELATED PROPERTY FOR THE FURTHER ANCE OF THE PUR • POSES OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON. NEVA DA, PUBLIC IMPROVE MENT TRUST; AU THORIZING THE IS SUANCE OF $11,500,000 MULTIFAMILY HOUS ING REVENUE RE FUNDING BONDS (PUEBLO VERDE II APARTMENTS PRO JECT) SERIES I990B IN CONNECTION THERE WITH; AUTHORIZING THE EXECUTION AND DELIVERY OF A LOAN AGREEMENT BET WEEN THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA PUBLIC IMPROVE MENT TRUST AND LIN COLN PUEBLO VERDE LIMITED PARTNER SHIP; AUTHORIZING THE EXECUTION AND DELIVERY OF A TRUST INDENTURE SECURING SAID BONDS; AUTHORIZING THE DISTRIBUTION OF AN PRELIMINARY OFFICIAL STATE MENT AND THE EX ECUTIONANDDISTRI BUTION OF AN OF FICIAL STATEMENT DESCRIBING SAID ISSUE OF BONDS: AND AUTHORIZING THE EXECUTION OF A BOND PURCHASES AGREEMENT PROVIDING FOR THE SALE OF SAID BONDS TO THE PURCHASER THEREOF: PROVIDING FOR THE ADOPTION OF SAID ORDINANCE AS IN THE CASE OF EMERGENCY AND OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELATED THERETO. The above Bill No. 786 and foregoing Ordinance was first proposed and read by title to the City Council of the City of Henderson. Nevada, on July 17. 1990, which was a Regular Meeting of the Council and finally adopted as if an emergency exits. PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that the typewritten copies of the afaHDve mentioned Ordinance are available for inspection by all interested parties at the Office of the City Clerk, 240 Water Street, Henderson, Nevada; and that said Ordinance No. 1193 was proposed for adoption by Councilman Scheffler and seconded by Councilman Hafen on the 17th day of July 1990, and adopted by the following roll call vote: Voting AYE: MAYOR LORNA KESTERSON COUNCILMEMBERS: MICHAEL HARRIS, AN DY HAFEN. LARRY SCHEFFLER, LORIN L WILLIAMS Voting NAY: NONE Absent: NONE LORNA KESTERSON MAYOR LEGAL NOTICE ATTEST: DOROTHY A. VONDENBRINK. CMC CITY CLERK H-July 19. 1990. PUBLIC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. 1192 AN ORDINANCE AP PROVING THE RESO LUTION OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON. NE VADA PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT TRUST AUTHORIZING THE REFINANCING OF MULTIFAMILY HOUSING FACILITIES AND RELATED PROPERTY FOR THE FURTHER ANCE OF THE PUB POSES OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA, PUBUC IMPROVEMENT TRUST; AU THORIZING THE IS SUANCE OF $11,715,000 MULTIFAMILY HOUSING REVENUE RE FUNDING BONDS (PUEBLO VERDE I APARTMENTS PRO JECT) SERIES 1990A IN CONNECTION THERE WITH; AUTHORIZNG THE EXECUTION AND DELIVERY OF A LOAN AGREEMENT BE TWEEN THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA PUBLIC IMRPOVE MENT TRUST AND HENDERSON GREEN I LIMITED PAIITNER SHIP; AUTHORIZING THE EXECUTION AND DELIVERY OF A TRUST INDENTURE SECURING SAID BONDS; AUTHORIZING THE DISTRIBUTION OF A PRELIMINARY OFFICIAL STATE MENT AND THE DIS TRIBUTION OF A PRELIMINARY OF FICIAL STATEMENT AND THE EXECUTION AND DISTRIBUTION OF AN OFFICIAL STATEMENT DESCRI& ING SAID ISSUE OF BONDS; AND AUTHORIZING THE EXECU TION OF A BOND PURCHASE AGREEMENT PROVIDING FOR THE SALE OF SAID BONDS TO THE PURCHASER THEREOF: PROVIDING FOR THE ADOPTION OF SAID ORDINANCE AS IN THE CASE OF EMERGENCY AND OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELATED THERETO. The above Bill No. 785 and foregoing Ordinance was first proposed and read by title to the City Council of the City of Henderson, Nevada, on July 17, 1990, which was a Regular Meeting of the Council and finally adopted as if an emergency exita. PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that the typewriten copies of the above mentioned Ordinance are available for inspection by all interested parties at the Office of the City Clerk, 240 Water Street, Henderson, Nevada; and that said Ordinance No. 1192 was proposed for adoption by Councilman Williams and seconded by Coundlman Hafen on the 17th day of July 1990, and adopted by the following roll call vote: VoUng AYE: MAYOR LORNA KESTERSON COUNCILMEMBERS: MICHAEL HARRIS, ANDY HAFEN, LARRY SCHEFFLER, LORIN L. WILLIAMS Voting NAY: NONE Absent: NONE LORNA KESTERSON MAYOR ATTEST: DOROTHY A. VONDENBRINK, CMC CITY CLERK H-July 19, 1990. PUBLIC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. 1190 AN ORDINANCE OF THEClTYOFHENDEaRSON, NEVADA. AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA, TO AMEND TITU: 19 BY CREATING AN AMORTIZATION PERIOD FOR CASINO USE PERMITS APPROVED PRIOR TO THE ADOPTION OF ORDINANCE 1137, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. The above Bill No. 783 and foregoing Ordinance was ffarst proposed and read by title to the City Council of the City of Henderson, Nevada, on July 3, 1990, which was a Regular Meeting of the Coundl and refer red to the following Committee: "COUNCIL AS A WHOLE" for recommendation PUBLIC NOTICE in hereby given that the typewritten copies of the alM>ve mentioned Ordinance are available for inspection by all intereated parties at the Office of the City Clerk, 240 Water Street, Henderaon, Nevada; and that said Ordinance No. 1190 was proposed for adoption by Coundlman Williams and seconded by Coundlman Hafen on the 17th day of July 1990, and adopted by the foUoyring roll call vote: VoUog AYE: MAYOR LORNA KESTERSON COUNCILMEMBERS: MICHAEL HARRIS, ANDY HAFEN, LARRY SCHEFFLER, LORIN L. WILLIAMS Voting NAY: NONE Absent: NONE LORNA KESTERSON MAYOR ATTEST: DOROTHY A. VONDENBRINK, CMC CITY CLERK H-July 19, 1990. ORDINANCE NO. 1189 Afi ORDINANCE OF CITY OF HENDER, NEVADA. AH ORDINANCE OF THB CITY COUNCIL OF THB CITY OF HENDER SON, AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFYCERTIAN REAL PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF HENDERSON. DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH. RANGE 62 EAST, M.D.B. k M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM IG-G (GENERAL INDUSTRIAL WITH GAMING ENTERPRISE OVERLA Y) DISTRICT TO CH' G (HIGHWAY COMEMRCIAL Wmi GAMING OVERLAY) DISTRICT, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. The above BiU No. 782 and foregoing Ordinance waaJbst propoaed and read by title to the City Coundl of the City of Henderson, Nevada, on July 3. 1990. which was a Rqrolar Meeting of the Coundl and refer red to the following Committee: "COUNCIL AS A WHOLE" for recommendation PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that the typewritten copiea of the above mentioned Ordinance are available for inapection by aU interested parties at the Office of the City Clerk, 240 Water Street, Henderson, Nevada; and that said Ordinance No. 1189 was proposed for adoption by Coundlman Hafen and seconded by Coundlman Harria on the 17th day of July 1990, and adopted by the foUowing roll call vote: VoUnf AYE: MAYOR LORNA KESTERSON COUNCILMEMBERS: MICHAEL HARRIS, ANDY HAFEN. LARRY SCHEFFLER, LORIN L WILLIAMS Voting NAY: NONE Absent: NONE LORNA KESTERSON MAYOR ATTEST: DOROTHY A. VONDENBRINK, CMC CITY CLERK H-July 19, 1990. • *"• • -' • • f:Mmm..^-.^*f^l^-i..^s ^'^i.Ah^;*^ *,,.. PERSONAL FREE CONSULTATION NO RECOVERY NO FEE 565-0473 223 Water Street, Suite A Next to Henderson Justice Court & Municipal Court LAW OFFICE OF JOHN F. MARCHIANO Former Henderson City Attorney & EDWARD B. HUGHES Criminal Law — DUI • *' • ;>. *•' Green Valley News Cannon ninth-grader Invited to Student Space Station The Davis Planetarium Foundation, a Mississippibased organization, has selected Hadden Hoppert, a ninth grader at Helen C. Cannon Junior High School, as one of 20 students to participate in the first national mission of Student Space Station. The program involves a unique 14-day residency in science studies and a 96-hour space-flight simulation at the foundation's facilities in Jackson, Miss. Hadden was chosen from more than 600 applicants nationwide. He is the son of Herschel and Jean Hoppert of Henderson. Student Space Station was launched three years ago as a way to provide exceptional students an opportunity to inHadden Hoppert vestigate their own questions about science though an iiftevsive "hands-on" experimental program that is tailored to each participant's own interests. It utilizes the laboratories of Belhaven College and a $200,000 space station simulator at the Russell C. Davis Planetarium. The 96-hour "mission" that cape the two-week adventure provides a scenario in which the students' experiments can be interfaced with a high-tech simulation of a research environment in earth orbit. Students spend 10 days developing their research ideas into workable "flight experiments" for the space station. Then they take roles as science officers ('astronauts') and flight controllers and direct the mission, attempting to keep all 40-50 flight experiments operating on schedule, while attending to many of the comphcated logistical concerns that are necessary to keep a real space mission going. One of the principal criteria used in the student selection process is the quality of a student's own proposals for scientific investigations that could be carried out aboard a space station. While attending Student Space Station, Hadden will conduct experiments in the area of plant growth and development. Another very significant factor is the recommendation of a teacher from the student's home school. Hadden received a strong recommendation to the project from Monte Bay, a science teacher at Cannon. Richard Knapp, project director of Student Space Station, said, "We are extremely See Space, Page 10 Valle Verde: Then and now By David M. Sanchez President Green Valley Conununity Association I remember the tirst time I saw Green Valley. My wife and I were coming down from Boulder City and we made a left tium on Sunset Road because we saw a big sign advertising a chocolate candy factory. As we passed Sunset and Valle Wprde, my wife and I both turned to oiuleft, and we saw a sign that said Green Valley. My wife wanted to stop because she loves to look at model homes. But, I thought to myself, this is too far out; ^ who would want to live out iiere?. A year later, we moved into our new Green Valley home and have been there ever since. The other day, my wife and I decided to take a sentimental journey through Green Valley just to see how things have been developing. Jeanne andX" decided to start on Sunset and Valle Verde and come back up through our Green Valley community. As we paused at the comer of Valle Verde and Sunset, I reminisced about the first time I saw Jim Arrendale on top of his van handing out petitions to stop construction of a proposed casino on Valle Verde. I looked around and saw a thriving shopping center containing 'Thirstbusters," the Green Valley Lutheran church, a yogurt shop, a nail shop, H&R Block, a pet hospital and a Bridgestone shop, as well as a Circle-K. Across from the Circle-K was Barry Yost's 7-11and a variety of other stores. Things seem to have changed IJratnatically frona that first 1981 view of the comer of Valle Verde and Sunset. We proceeded south on Valle Verde and ran into some weeds at Highview and some signs advertising a development. Further on up Valle Verde and Valley East Drive we found a political sign on the comer. One block up at Valle Verde and Osbom, we saw two more signs and some dead trees on the corner. A little further* up Valle See Valle, Page 10 Dozens of Ready-Made Picture Frames, Woods and Lacquers, most sizes while they last! DJckBlJck^ 1951 Ramrod Ave. 451-7662 9-6, Monday-Friday 9-5 Saturday -I i4 .^mmm*' i SATURDAY 1 P.II. |)p9KER TOURNAMENT •15.00 Buy-In $10.00 Re-Buy SATURDAY POKER WINNERS 1. Bill 2. J.B. ?, Black Bfirt ALL NEW IQT VIDEO POKER MACHINES & 5^ & 25C DEUCES WILD MACHINES 1133 BIdr. Hwy., Hen LADIES NITE TUES. 16-oz. 7-9 P.M. T-BONE WELL DRINKS... 50^ <5.95 SERVED 4-10 P.M. 10-oz. FREE LIGOURI'S CAP NEW YORK Free Every Straight Flush ^4.95 on a Regular Poker Machine U CHECK OUT OUR NEW ITALIAN MENU SERVED 7 DAYS A WEEK^I CHECK OUR 3.50 DAILY LUNCHEON SPECIALS MON.-FRI. FEATURINQJ10MEIIIA0EJ1AM & BEAN SOUP ft HOMEMADE CHILI EVERY DAY l ^C '^yyyy ^5p t^ ^ ^ T^ i g^ 'C^ ^ 'y ^ c^^' ^ ^ t1THURSDAY r CORNED BEEF & CABBAGE ^3.95 I BEEF STROQANOFF .. .^^^ .^3.95 iM FRIDAY /, BATTER DIPPED COD f .^3.95 LONDON BROIL 93.95 DEEP FRIED CATFISH 93.95 SATURDAY SHORT RIBS .3.95 ^ ROAST PRIME RIB OF BEEF 95.25 < SUNDAY < BAKED CHICKEN 94.25>^ MSIRLOIN TIPS & NOODLES 93. [^OUT OUR BEAUTIFUL jmPPESSiONJl£^^^B LOCATED AT 309 W. LAKE MEAD IN HENDERSON Hurry Only Three (3l) Spaces Left! (660 Sq. Ft. to 914 Sq. Ft.) Ample Parking MONDAY UVER 9L ONIONS 93.50 iiCABBAGE ROLLS .. .^ .93.95 TUESDAY STUFFED PEPPERS 93. BARBEQUE BEEF RIBS 93 WEDNESDAY MANICOTTI 93,95 EQQPLANT PARMESAN .93. STUFFED SHELLS 93. A cvwyday wc ^^ / NOW AT BAR jBhrtmp Cocktail •1.00 HamSMMMch 92.80 i4.*)ir* 92.75 lyy myl. 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PAGE 8

"< iw iwn wi^T^^>y^^^W^^W^^W|PIWWWWP^PPPP mmmm Pag 8 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada ji^ Thursday, July 19, 1990 Thursday, July 19, 1990 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Psga 9 ^ Miscellaneous News Missiles Miscellaneous News Missiles By L. Jessie Bennett Today Today is July 19, the 200th day of 1990, with 165 days left in the year. On this day in 1941, 49 years ago, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill launched a "V for Victory" campaign during World War H.. Thought for today "Mountains viewed from a distance seem to be unscalable, but they can be cUmbed, and the way to begin is to take the first upward step. From that moment, the mountains are less high. The slopes that seem so steep from a distance seem to level off as we near them." Anon Of this and that Some time ago I was asked this question: "What color is pain?" With much after thought, that became quite a comphcated question and I had many afterthoughts. All of us experience pain in a lifetime. Each of us handles it in our own individual way. And each of us has a different pain threshold. Pain is a part of mortal hfe. physically and mentally. But, what color is pain? Like you perhaps, I thought first of 'red film of pain" or "white hot" or "dull grey." Most often I had thought of pain as being round or jagged or pin-point, etc. What are your thoughts? ^ Had a couple of broken ribs and I think that constant pain was a dull brown with flashes of silver hghtning. Don't suffer any broken ribs; it's awful, no matter what the color of pain. Historical flashbacks July 19 1848 A women's rights convention was held in Seneca Falls, N.Y. The leaders responsible were Elizabeth Cady Stanton'and Lucretia C. Mott. 1980 The Moscow Summer Olympics began. Several countries did not participate in protest against Soviet intervention in Afghanistan. July 20 1881 Sioux Indian leader Sitting Bull, a fugitive since the Battle of the Little ^ig Horn, surrendered to federal „: authorities 1969 Neil Armstrng and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin, American astronauts, became the first men to set foot on the moon. 1977 A flash flood in Johnstown, Pa., killed 80 people and did $350 miUion dollars in damage. July 21 1588 The Spanish Armada was attacked by Sir Francis Drake in defense of Great Britain. 1954 France surrrendered North Vietnam to the Communist forces. July 22 1812 English troops under the Duke of WeUington defeated the French at the battle of Salamanca in Spain. 1933 U.S. aviator Wiley Post completed the ftrat solo flight around the world in 7 days, 18 hours and 45 minutes. 1934 Bank robber John Dillinger was shot to death by "GMen"—federal agents—in Chicago. 1953 KLAS-TV Channel 8 began broadcasting in Las Vegas. July 23 1851 Bloomer costume for women introduced at Lowell, Mass. 1904 According to some accounts the ice cream cone was invented by Charles E. Menches during the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis. July 24 1701 The city of Detroit was first settled. 1847 The leader of the LDS Church (Mormon) reached the Great Salt Lake Valley and declared that it would be where the members would settle. 1946 An atomic bomb was detonated by the U.S. in the first underwater test at Bikini Atoll in the Pacific. July 25 1785 American merchant schooner "Maria" seized by Algeria Corsairs The crew was sold into slavery or imprisoned. 1956 The Itahan liner Andrea Doria sank after colliding with the Swedish ship Stockhohn. Early rescue efforts kept the Ufe loss to 51. 1984 Soviet cosmonaut Sveltlana Savitskaya became the first woman to walk in space. Boy Scout camp Some Henderson Boy Scouts recently returned home after attending Scout Camp at Maple Dell Scout Camp in Payson Canyon near Payson, Utah. Spokesman for tKe group said that it was a great experience. It was cool and the surrounding area was beautiful and green. The Scouts had to work and play hard as they learned the skills offered by the scouting program. They all earned scouting and merit badges. Some of those lucky and energetic young men who attended were: Rick, Ryan, Russell and Randon Taylor; Matt and Hardy Segler; Jason Bidwell; Alan Cavaheri; Mike, Matt and Joey Tannehill; Chad Murray; Brian Mortenson; Ryan Mocci; Ben WEstover; Jason Hayden; Andy and Joey Groft; Rick Hunt; Doug Honey; Matt and Brett Bennett; and Mark Lewis. An interesting note: The grandfather of Matt and Brett Bennett, William R. Bennett, attended that Scout camp when it first opened many years ago. Family records Do you have a complete family tree or pedigree chart starting with yourself and extending three or more generations? The ideal record would be first yourself and children, your parents, grandparents and great grandparents with their families. There are some beautiful pedigree charts that can be framed and are wonderful on your wall or for family gifts. Try it!! Phantoms Phantoms walking through the mind Weave patterns of long ago Soft whispers twist, turn and wind, Sweet memories flash then ebb and flow, Yesterday's faces float to the fore To make alive generations of yesteryear. Dream faces drift from shore to shore. Ages apart, memory and love bring them near. L. Jessie Bennett Dillards have 1st baby Little Carson Bailey Dillard made her debut at the Womens Hospital in Las Vegas on Thursday, July 5. Her beauty queen measurements were 7 lb. 12 oz. a future Miss Henderson, no doubt about it. She is the daughter and first child of Kurt and Teddi Dillard. The lucky httle girl's grandparents aU hve in Henderson. Proud to add her picture to their brag book are Tony and Jacque Dillard and Duane and Dotty Ruhffson. Congratulations to the family. Zodiac The sign of the zodiac. Cancer, the Crab, came into power on June 20 and will change on Monday. I noticed that baby Carson Dillard will share this zodiac sign with her Dad, Kurt. They should remember the following: July, originally QuintiUs, or the fifth month, was re-named in 44 B.C. for Juhus Caesar. A year later, the JuUan Calendar was established. Flower: Larkspur or Waterlilly T Birthstone: Ruby, symboUzing contentment. Lucky numbers: 2, 7, and 3. Color: Violet. Lucky Day: Wednesday. Mineral: Silver. See Missiles, Page 9 will be ofhtnd sf th following locatlona: By appolnimont only: Call 731*5890 for all appolntmants July 19, 1990 9:00 a.m.-tMon Or. Calvin Van Rvkaa 3680 S. Eaatam tuNa 300 Laa Vagaa, NV. July 20, 1990 1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.in. Framont Madical Cantar Waat 4415 W. Flamingo Ava. Laa Vagaa, NV ^ July 24, 1990 2:00 p.m.-S:00 p.m. Df. Donald ftNlfoiU 1101 N. Dacatur Laa Vagaa, NV July 26,1990 1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. Of. William Shoamakar 3043 Joa W. Brown Laa Vagaa, NV July 31,1990 9:00 a.m.-ftoon Dr. John Challl 1229 E. Sahara Laa Vagaa, NV. Auguai 1,1990 1:00p.m.-4:00p.m. Dr. Robart RtcMa 110 E. Laka Maad Orlva, Sulta 203 NV BOULDER CITY TRAVEL ^ 806 Buchanan Blvd., Suite 107 \^1 293-3807 Boulder City FREE TICKET DELIVERY PASSPORT PHOTOS AVAILABLE S 100,000 Flight Insurance FREE with any airline ticket purchased MON-FRI 8 A.M. TO 5:30 P.M. SAT 9 A.M. TO 2 P.M. CRUISE ALASKA'S FJORDS AND SAVE up to ^1,300!! FROM JULY 29th, THROUGH SEPT. 16th, YOU AND A FRIEND CAN CIRUI8E THE SPECTACULAR INSIDE PASSAGE INISRAND ROYAL CARIBBEAN STYLE AND RECEIVE HALF OFF THE SECOND FARE. Prlcaafrom^1|195 par paraon (firat faro) ^W^l and pay just ^597 for tha aacond fara MEXICO FOR LESSf SPECIAL PRINCESS CRUISE UNES DEPARTURE DATES: SEPT. 29, OCT. 6. 13, 20 AND 27, NOV. 3, 10, 17 AND Pricaa atait at just *OA9 par paraon FOR A FUN-nLLID 7 DAY MIXICAN CRUIKI FALL FOUAQE CRUISM'OUR 10 COLORFUL DAYS FROM $1,095* REGENCY CRUISES SPECIAL DEPARTURES: SEPT. 2. 9, 23, 30 AND OCT. 7 ONLY. CRUISING NEW YORK TO MONTREAL 'Airfare extra • oio,, 471 Boulder Highway, Henderson • 565*7310 COMPLETE AUTO REPAIR •Starters •Alternators •Carburetors •Brakes •Engines •Transmissions •Front End •Electrical COMPLETE MOTOR HOME SERVICE & REPAIR ALL MECHANICAL AND INTERIOR REPAIRS —Haatar, Air Conditioner, Refrtgeralors, eto. LUBE, OIL AND FILTER ON ALL VEHICLES w EMtem N Prices Effective July 20th-July 27th One-Stop Garden Spot'' p^^-oo^^ RAT flnn..<;nr 2081 E. Siihset Rd. 896-0414 SAT. 8:00-5:00 SUN. 9:00-5.-00 •QUALITY •SERVICE •SELECTION IRMISTICK'willbehere Saturday July 21 st 9:00-12:00 To Demonstrate our Mistick Outdoor Cooling System MIST coas UP 25" BOTH KITS 8, ACCESSORIES AVAIUBLE VINCA • ^, HEAT LOVING ^ WATER CONSERVING SUMMER COLOR $1200 STERNS MIRACLE GRO NO-CLOG GARDEN & LAWN FEEDER For use with all Sterns Miracle Gro Fertilizers SAVE 20%Now^7W ALSO ON SALE IVi 3 & 5 LBS. FERTILIZERS Super for Climbing Roses, Honeysuckle^ and other Vines. $399 Reg. ^6.99 Summer Stock Reduction Come In Now For Best Selection Varieties To Numerous to List. 1 Gallons 15 Gallons SALE PRICES RANGE FROM tO $34.87 CONTRACTORS WELCOME!! Stop by today and meet our friendly staff SEE YOU SOONI Protect plants, people and animals against sun, wind, rain and even heavy hail. 70% 50% Shade $1.49 Shade $1.19 per linear foot Missiles from Page 8 Persons born under the sign of the Crab are usually good workers and have great imaginations. They are protective of those close to them—family and also friends. They often talk too much, They tend to be homebodies and make very good parents and hold on to material possessions once acquired. Birthday party Micah Rincon, the son of Donni Rincon, became 10 years old on June 26 and celebrated his birthday with a family party. His grandmother, Joan Hacker, aunt Terri Chavez and cousins Chris and Mikey from Kingman, Ariz., along with his godparents, Ray and Karen Martinez, together with their daughter, Kathleen, were present. His brothers Jake and Nathan and his mom helped to make this a special day for him, A belated happy birthday to Micah. High Uintah vacation Coni Lang, with children Charise, Kristi, Nicole and Ryan, joined her mother, Geniel Reay of Greenriver, Utah, uncle Lavar Davies of Springville, Utah, and cousins Duane and Margaret Davies of Duchesne, Utah, to pack into the High Uintah mountains for about 20 miles on sturdy horses to do some spectacular fishing and camping. All that came pretty natural for the group. Coni's grandfather, Willie Davies, owned a lodge and was a quide for such groups for many, many years. It was reported that it was a very memorable trip for all. Kesterson SOB and heir bom Teaira and Teanna Kesterson are the proud big sister to a baby brother named Kelton Lamond Kesterson who was bom on Tuesday, July 3, at St. Rose Dominican Hospital. Kelton's dad and mom are James and Lori Kesterson. Grandparents, all of Henderson, will help Kelton grow. They are Lamond and Eva Harrison and Bob and Loma Kesterson. Welcome to thi^ young manandcpngratulations to his family. ^^"^^ -"' *^ Eagle Scout Darrell Garlick, a jimior at Basic High School, recently was awarded the rank of Eagle Scout in the Scouting Program. Darrell is the son of Ira and Dorothea Garlick. He is an honor student at high school and hopes to pursue a career as a welder or taxidermist. His interests include hunting, fishing, woodworking and arts and crafts. Congratulations to Darrell for attain his much-prized goal. Reunion Just a very few of the names of some of the 1970 Basic High graduates who attended the 20th reunion were: [maiden names of ladies] Darrel Erickson, Tia Bennett, Jeff Burr, Janet Benavidez, Alicia Smalley, Leslie Miller, Janet Campbell, Manchi Cole, Pam Eighmy, Laura Pagan and, Mary-K Butters. Can you add to the list? Soap box Receiving junk mail (some very expensive junk mail!) in the America^ mailboxes is a fact of life. As for myiiouse, it keeps the Silver State Industries in business. The other day one offer w£U3 from a magazine calle "Magistic" offering 12 issues entirely dedicated to England's Royal house for only $49! Those are fine people and mean a lot to the English, but newspaper and TV coverage is enough for this American (who had nine or 10 great + grand-fathers fight in the American Revolution) I wonder how many people subscribe to the magazine? But then it is our right of choice, isn't it? The American way. In the news It was recently reported in the News that David Butler, son of Jan Butler of Henderson had been elected vice president of the Rockhurst College Student Senate for the year 1990-1991. He is a sophomore majoring in political science/biology. He is a graduate of Bafiic High School. Congratulations to David. What's so great about hugs? "There's no such thing as a bad hug. only good ones and great ones. They're not fattening and they don't cause cancer or cavities. They're all-natural, with no preservatives, artificial ingredients or pesticide residue. They're cholesterol-free, naturally sweet, 100 percent wholesome. And they're a completely renewable natural resource. "They don't require batteries, tune-ups or X-rays. They're nontaxable, fully returnable and energy-efficient. "They're safe in all kinds of weather; in fact, they're especially good for cold, rainy days. And they're exceptionally effective in treating problems like bad dreams or the Monday blahs. "Moral? Never wait until tomorrow to hug someone you could hug today!!" Anon Anniversaries July 19 Cal and Gay Riddle. July 20 Keith and Karen Peoples. July 21 Paul and Carol Msui^hall, Dwayne and Phyllis Lefler, Annette and Nathan Peeples, Brent and Becky Frogley, Tom and Dora Blake and Bill and Varua Jones. July 22 David and Gerri Munford and Dave and Dorothy Shepherd. July 23 Brent and Tracey Johnson. July 24 Joe §aid Lori Eckman and Kyle and Gwen Peeples. July 25 John and Saralee Shearin. July 26 Tab and Lana Nelson, Russ and Billie Bates [54], Robert and Janice Hillman, L. "Jack" and Cecelia Grabeal [55] and Ansley and Amber Brown. Birthdays July 19 Stephany Anne Franks is 1-year-old today, Ferris Murphy, Everett Evans, Julie Kittell, Tara Lynn Walker, Harold Brimhall, Frank Gifford, Kriste Carter, Jeri Tobler, Christine Lesue, Stormie Stoker, Pam Memmer, Mark Alcott, Carl J. Greer, Peggy J. Lawrence, Ryan Hardy, Julian Grant, Rowena Nicole Cherry, Jarrold Bringhurst and Warren Edgel. Celebrities: Former Gov. George McGovern, 68; actress Helen Gallagher, 54; singer Vickie Carr, 48; actor Dennis Cole, 47; aind actor Peter Barton, 31^ ^^ July 20 Kurtis Dillard, G. Cash Wilson, Andrew Peeples, Brandy Benavidez, Marie Jones, Michael Hinton, Heather Bennett, Krista Stuart, Jennifer Selch, Wade Massey, Charlene Price, Alison Sant, Buck Humphries, Karen Heki, Charles Stephens, Tuler Derek Jappe, Jessica Jones and Teresa J. Madill. Celebrities: Actress/singer Sally Ann Howes, 60'video artist Nam June Paik, 58; and actress Dianna Rigg, 52. July 21 Sagen Juanita Frei is 1-year-old today, Andrea Michele Scoble, Carlie Orton, Winnie Prince, Gary Murphy, Cindy Petty, Arnold Holyoak, Michael Lasko, Mona Griffin, Sidney Bellingheri, Gary Stephens and Marijeanne Prisbrey. Celebrities: Violinist Isaac Stem, 70; singer Kay Starr, 68; actoi^comedian Don Knotts, 66; movie director Norman Jewiaon, 64; actor Edward Herrmann, 47; singer Cat Stevens, 43; and comedian/actor Robin Williams, 38. July 22 Marge Jones, Mandy Dawn Griffin, Mildred Bame, Gail Tolboe, Christine Mathews, Hayley Wolfe, Roger Doughtery, Mike A. Gardner, Coxuiiiey Shea, Maurine Goff, Sam Gutierrez Sr., Carl Bigler, Eric Muirbrook, Marv Bame, Richard Pack, Margaret Holyoak, Kathryn Van Brunt, Mark Barrell, Denby Wade, Laura Smith, Clara Wikins, Jean Bench and John Whipple. Celebrities: Rose Kennedy, 100; Sen. Bob Dole, 67; singer Margaret Whiting, 66; actor/comedian Orson Bean, 61; fashion designer Oscar de la Renta, 58; actor Terence Stamp, 50; actor/singer Bobby Sherman, 45; and actor/comedian Albert Brooks, 43. See Missiles, Page 10 LOSEE ROAD ANTIQUES Replica Antique Lamp Posts and Furniture $9000 814175 649-3800 2270 Losee Road (Just South of Carey) GREAT FOOD, GREAT PRICES, GREAT PLACE! SaadKf 1/2 BBQ Chicken 3.95 Western Steak 3.95 iBabyBackPoARibs 4.75 Bfondiy Old-Fashioned Ham Steak 3.95 Porterhotise Steak 4.95 Prime Rb 4.95 Tacaday Chicken Fried Steak 3.95 "21" Shrimp Uver&Onk>ns 3.95 12 oz. Rib &e Steak 4.^ Wednesday N.Y. Steak Prime Rib 4.95 4.95 Tharsday Pork Chops 3.95 Cornish Hen 4.50 Friday N.Y.orT-Bone 4.95 Filet K^gnoh 7.95 Trout Almondine 4.50 SatutlaY N.Y.orT-Bone 4.95 RletMlgnon 7.95 Catfish 4.50 Daily Dinner Specials • pin) 99C Breakfast served 24 hours $2.95 All You Can Eat Luncheon Buffet N:BODII)ERHWT.SOUIHOFS(JNSET CASINO ft REST A U R A N T AJI choices include: Oui Famous' (All You Can Eat) Salad Bar, or Soup and choice of potato All Specials Dine-in Only 565-9116 HENDERSON, NEVADA

PAGE 9

"< iw iwn wi^T^^>y^^^W^^W^^W|PIWWWWP^PPPP mmmm Pag 8 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada ji^ Thursday, July 19, 1990 Thursday, July 19, 1990 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Psga 9 ^ Miscellaneous News Missiles Miscellaneous News Missiles By L. Jessie Bennett Today Today is July 19, the 200th day of 1990, with 165 days left in the year. On this day in 1941, 49 years ago, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill launched a "V for Victory" campaign during World War H.. Thought for today "Mountains viewed from a distance seem to be unscalable, but they can be cUmbed, and the way to begin is to take the first upward step. From that moment, the mountains are less high. The slopes that seem so steep from a distance seem to level off as we near them." Anon Of this and that Some time ago I was asked this question: "What color is pain?" With much after thought, that became quite a comphcated question and I had many afterthoughts. All of us experience pain in a lifetime. Each of us handles it in our own individual way. And each of us has a different pain threshold. Pain is a part of mortal hfe. physically and mentally. But, what color is pain? Like you perhaps, I thought first of 'red film of pain" or "white hot" or "dull grey." Most often I had thought of pain as being round or jagged or pin-point, etc. What are your thoughts? ^ Had a couple of broken ribs and I think that constant pain was a dull brown with flashes of silver hghtning. Don't suffer any broken ribs; it's awful, no matter what the color of pain. Historical flashbacks July 19 1848 A women's rights convention was held in Seneca Falls, N.Y. The leaders responsible were Elizabeth Cady Stanton'and Lucretia C. Mott. 1980 The Moscow Summer Olympics began. Several countries did not participate in protest against Soviet intervention in Afghanistan. July 20 1881 Sioux Indian leader Sitting Bull, a fugitive since the Battle of the Little ^ig Horn, surrendered to federal „: authorities 1969 Neil Armstrng and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin, American astronauts, became the first men to set foot on the moon. 1977 A flash flood in Johnstown, Pa., killed 80 people and did $350 miUion dollars in damage. July 21 1588 The Spanish Armada was attacked by Sir Francis Drake in defense of Great Britain. 1954 France surrrendered North Vietnam to the Communist forces. July 22 1812 English troops under the Duke of WeUington defeated the French at the battle of Salamanca in Spain. 1933 U.S. aviator Wiley Post completed the ftrat solo flight around the world in 7 days, 18 hours and 45 minutes. 1934 Bank robber John Dillinger was shot to death by "GMen"—federal agents—in Chicago. 1953 KLAS-TV Channel 8 began broadcasting in Las Vegas. July 23 1851 Bloomer costume for women introduced at Lowell, Mass. 1904 According to some accounts the ice cream cone was invented by Charles E. Menches during the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis. July 24 1701 The city of Detroit was first settled. 1847 The leader of the LDS Church (Mormon) reached the Great Salt Lake Valley and declared that it would be where the members would settle. 1946 An atomic bomb was detonated by the U.S. in the first underwater test at Bikini Atoll in the Pacific. July 25 1785 American merchant schooner "Maria" seized by Algeria Corsairs The crew was sold into slavery or imprisoned. 1956 The Itahan liner Andrea Doria sank after colliding with the Swedish ship Stockhohn. Early rescue efforts kept the Ufe loss to 51. 1984 Soviet cosmonaut Sveltlana Savitskaya became the first woman to walk in space. Boy Scout camp Some Henderson Boy Scouts recently returned home after attending Scout Camp at Maple Dell Scout Camp in Payson Canyon near Payson, Utah. Spokesman for tKe group said that it was a great experience. It was cool and the surrounding area was beautiful and green. The Scouts had to work and play hard as they learned the skills offered by the scouting program. They all earned scouting and merit badges. Some of those lucky and energetic young men who attended were: Rick, Ryan, Russell and Randon Taylor; Matt and Hardy Segler; Jason Bidwell; Alan Cavaheri; Mike, Matt and Joey Tannehill; Chad Murray; Brian Mortenson; Ryan Mocci; Ben WEstover; Jason Hayden; Andy and Joey Groft; Rick Hunt; Doug Honey; Matt and Brett Bennett; and Mark Lewis. An interesting note: The grandfather of Matt and Brett Bennett, William R. Bennett, attended that Scout camp when it first opened many years ago. Family records Do you have a complete family tree or pedigree chart starting with yourself and extending three or more generations? The ideal record would be first yourself and children, your parents, grandparents and great grandparents with their families. There are some beautiful pedigree charts that can be framed and are wonderful on your wall or for family gifts. Try it!! Phantoms Phantoms walking through the mind Weave patterns of long ago Soft whispers twist, turn and wind, Sweet memories flash then ebb and flow, Yesterday's faces float to the fore To make alive generations of yesteryear. Dream faces drift from shore to shore. Ages apart, memory and love bring them near. L. Jessie Bennett Dillards have 1st baby Little Carson Bailey Dillard made her debut at the Womens Hospital in Las Vegas on Thursday, July 5. Her beauty queen measurements were 7 lb. 12 oz. a future Miss Henderson, no doubt about it. She is the daughter and first child of Kurt and Teddi Dillard. The lucky httle girl's grandparents aU hve in Henderson. Proud to add her picture to their brag book are Tony and Jacque Dillard and Duane and Dotty Ruhffson. Congratulations to the family. Zodiac The sign of the zodiac. Cancer, the Crab, came into power on June 20 and will change on Monday. I noticed that baby Carson Dillard will share this zodiac sign with her Dad, Kurt. They should remember the following: July, originally QuintiUs, or the fifth month, was re-named in 44 B.C. for Juhus Caesar. A year later, the JuUan Calendar was established. Flower: Larkspur or Waterlilly T Birthstone: Ruby, symboUzing contentment. Lucky numbers: 2, 7, and 3. Color: Violet. Lucky Day: Wednesday. Mineral: Silver. See Missiles, Page 9 will be ofhtnd sf th following locatlona: By appolnimont only: Call 731*5890 for all appolntmants July 19, 1990 9:00 a.m.-tMon Or. Calvin Van Rvkaa 3680 S. Eaatam tuNa 300 Laa Vagaa, NV. July 20, 1990 1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.in. Framont Madical Cantar Waat 4415 W. Flamingo Ava. Laa Vagaa, NV ^ July 24, 1990 2:00 p.m.-S:00 p.m. Df. Donald ftNlfoiU 1101 N. Dacatur Laa Vagaa, NV July 26,1990 1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. Of. William Shoamakar 3043 Joa W. Brown Laa Vagaa, NV July 31,1990 9:00 a.m.-ftoon Dr. John Challl 1229 E. Sahara Laa Vagaa, NV. Auguai 1,1990 1:00p.m.-4:00p.m. Dr. Robart RtcMa 110 E. Laka Maad Orlva, Sulta 203 NV BOULDER CITY TRAVEL ^ 806 Buchanan Blvd., Suite 107 \^1 293-3807 Boulder City FREE TICKET DELIVERY PASSPORT PHOTOS AVAILABLE S 100,000 Flight Insurance FREE with any airline ticket purchased MON-FRI 8 A.M. TO 5:30 P.M. SAT 9 A.M. TO 2 P.M. CRUISE ALASKA'S FJORDS AND SAVE up to ^1,300!! FROM JULY 29th, THROUGH SEPT. 16th, YOU AND A FRIEND CAN CIRUI8E THE SPECTACULAR INSIDE PASSAGE INISRAND ROYAL CARIBBEAN STYLE AND RECEIVE HALF OFF THE SECOND FARE. Prlcaafrom^1|195 par paraon (firat faro) ^W^l and pay just ^597 for tha aacond fara MEXICO FOR LESSf SPECIAL PRINCESS CRUISE UNES DEPARTURE DATES: SEPT. 29, OCT. 6. 13, 20 AND 27, NOV. 3, 10, 17 AND Pricaa atait at just *OA9 par paraon FOR A FUN-nLLID 7 DAY MIXICAN CRUIKI FALL FOUAQE CRUISM'OUR 10 COLORFUL DAYS FROM $1,095* REGENCY CRUISES SPECIAL DEPARTURES: SEPT. 2. 9, 23, 30 AND OCT. 7 ONLY. CRUISING NEW YORK TO MONTREAL 'Airfare extra • oio,, 471 Boulder Highway, Henderson • 565*7310 COMPLETE AUTO REPAIR •Starters •Alternators •Carburetors •Brakes •Engines •Transmissions •Front End •Electrical COMPLETE MOTOR HOME SERVICE & REPAIR ALL MECHANICAL AND INTERIOR REPAIRS —Haatar, Air Conditioner, Refrtgeralors, eto. LUBE, OIL AND FILTER ON ALL VEHICLES w EMtem N Prices Effective July 20th-July 27th One-Stop Garden Spot'' p^^-oo^^ RAT flnn..<;nr 2081 E. Siihset Rd. 896-0414 SAT. 8:00-5:00 SUN. 9:00-5.-00 •QUALITY •SERVICE •SELECTION IRMISTICK'willbehere Saturday July 21 st 9:00-12:00 To Demonstrate our Mistick Outdoor Cooling System MIST coas UP 25" BOTH KITS 8, ACCESSORIES AVAIUBLE VINCA • ^, HEAT LOVING ^ WATER CONSERVING SUMMER COLOR $1200 STERNS MIRACLE GRO NO-CLOG GARDEN & LAWN FEEDER For use with all Sterns Miracle Gro Fertilizers SAVE 20%Now^7W ALSO ON SALE IVi 3 & 5 LBS. FERTILIZERS Super for Climbing Roses, Honeysuckle^ and other Vines. $399 Reg. ^6.99 Summer Stock Reduction Come In Now For Best Selection Varieties To Numerous to List. 1 Gallons 15 Gallons SALE PRICES RANGE FROM tO $34.87 CONTRACTORS WELCOME!! Stop by today and meet our friendly staff SEE YOU SOONI Protect plants, people and animals against sun, wind, rain and even heavy hail. 70% 50% Shade $1.49 Shade $1.19 per linear foot Missiles from Page 8 Persons born under the sign of the Crab are usually good workers and have great imaginations. They are protective of those close to them—family and also friends. They often talk too much, They tend to be homebodies and make very good parents and hold on to material possessions once acquired. Birthday party Micah Rincon, the son of Donni Rincon, became 10 years old on June 26 and celebrated his birthday with a family party. His grandmother, Joan Hacker, aunt Terri Chavez and cousins Chris and Mikey from Kingman, Ariz., along with his godparents, Ray and Karen Martinez, together with their daughter, Kathleen, were present. His brothers Jake and Nathan and his mom helped to make this a special day for him, A belated happy birthday to Micah. High Uintah vacation Coni Lang, with children Charise, Kristi, Nicole and Ryan, joined her mother, Geniel Reay of Greenriver, Utah, uncle Lavar Davies of Springville, Utah, and cousins Duane and Margaret Davies of Duchesne, Utah, to pack into the High Uintah mountains for about 20 miles on sturdy horses to do some spectacular fishing and camping. All that came pretty natural for the group. Coni's grandfather, Willie Davies, owned a lodge and was a quide for such groups for many, many years. It was reported that it was a very memorable trip for all. Kesterson SOB and heir bom Teaira and Teanna Kesterson are the proud big sister to a baby brother named Kelton Lamond Kesterson who was bom on Tuesday, July 3, at St. Rose Dominican Hospital. Kelton's dad and mom are James and Lori Kesterson. Grandparents, all of Henderson, will help Kelton grow. They are Lamond and Eva Harrison and Bob and Loma Kesterson. Welcome to thi^ young manandcpngratulations to his family. ^^"^^ -"' *^ Eagle Scout Darrell Garlick, a jimior at Basic High School, recently was awarded the rank of Eagle Scout in the Scouting Program. Darrell is the son of Ira and Dorothea Garlick. He is an honor student at high school and hopes to pursue a career as a welder or taxidermist. His interests include hunting, fishing, woodworking and arts and crafts. Congratulations to Darrell for attain his much-prized goal. Reunion Just a very few of the names of some of the 1970 Basic High graduates who attended the 20th reunion were: [maiden names of ladies] Darrel Erickson, Tia Bennett, Jeff Burr, Janet Benavidez, Alicia Smalley, Leslie Miller, Janet Campbell, Manchi Cole, Pam Eighmy, Laura Pagan and, Mary-K Butters. Can you add to the list? Soap box Receiving junk mail (some very expensive junk mail!) in the America^ mailboxes is a fact of life. As for myiiouse, it keeps the Silver State Industries in business. The other day one offer w£U3 from a magazine calle "Magistic" offering 12 issues entirely dedicated to England's Royal house for only $49! Those are fine people and mean a lot to the English, but newspaper and TV coverage is enough for this American (who had nine or 10 great + grand-fathers fight in the American Revolution) I wonder how many people subscribe to the magazine? But then it is our right of choice, isn't it? The American way. In the news It was recently reported in the News that David Butler, son of Jan Butler of Henderson had been elected vice president of the Rockhurst College Student Senate for the year 1990-1991. He is a sophomore majoring in political science/biology. He is a graduate of Bafiic High School. Congratulations to David. What's so great about hugs? "There's no such thing as a bad hug. only good ones and great ones. They're not fattening and they don't cause cancer or cavities. They're all-natural, with no preservatives, artificial ingredients or pesticide residue. They're cholesterol-free, naturally sweet, 100 percent wholesome. And they're a completely renewable natural resource. "They don't require batteries, tune-ups or X-rays. They're nontaxable, fully returnable and energy-efficient. "They're safe in all kinds of weather; in fact, they're especially good for cold, rainy days. And they're exceptionally effective in treating problems like bad dreams or the Monday blahs. "Moral? Never wait until tomorrow to hug someone you could hug today!!" Anon Anniversaries July 19 Cal and Gay Riddle. July 20 Keith and Karen Peoples. July 21 Paul and Carol Msui^hall, Dwayne and Phyllis Lefler, Annette and Nathan Peeples, Brent and Becky Frogley, Tom and Dora Blake and Bill and Varua Jones. July 22 David and Gerri Munford and Dave and Dorothy Shepherd. July 23 Brent and Tracey Johnson. July 24 Joe §aid Lori Eckman and Kyle and Gwen Peeples. July 25 John and Saralee Shearin. July 26 Tab and Lana Nelson, Russ and Billie Bates [54], Robert and Janice Hillman, L. "Jack" and Cecelia Grabeal [55] and Ansley and Amber Brown. Birthdays July 19 Stephany Anne Franks is 1-year-old today, Ferris Murphy, Everett Evans, Julie Kittell, Tara Lynn Walker, Harold Brimhall, Frank Gifford, Kriste Carter, Jeri Tobler, Christine Lesue, Stormie Stoker, Pam Memmer, Mark Alcott, Carl J. Greer, Peggy J. Lawrence, Ryan Hardy, Julian Grant, Rowena Nicole Cherry, Jarrold Bringhurst and Warren Edgel. Celebrities: Former Gov. George McGovern, 68; actress Helen Gallagher, 54; singer Vickie Carr, 48; actor Dennis Cole, 47; aind actor Peter Barton, 31^ ^^ July 20 Kurtis Dillard, G. Cash Wilson, Andrew Peeples, Brandy Benavidez, Marie Jones, Michael Hinton, Heather Bennett, Krista Stuart, Jennifer Selch, Wade Massey, Charlene Price, Alison Sant, Buck Humphries, Karen Heki, Charles Stephens, Tuler Derek Jappe, Jessica Jones and Teresa J. Madill. Celebrities: Actress/singer Sally Ann Howes, 60'video artist Nam June Paik, 58; and actress Dianna Rigg, 52. July 21 Sagen Juanita Frei is 1-year-old today, Andrea Michele Scoble, Carlie Orton, Winnie Prince, Gary Murphy, Cindy Petty, Arnold Holyoak, Michael Lasko, Mona Griffin, Sidney Bellingheri, Gary Stephens and Marijeanne Prisbrey. Celebrities: Violinist Isaac Stem, 70; singer Kay Starr, 68; actoi^comedian Don Knotts, 66; movie director Norman Jewiaon, 64; actor Edward Herrmann, 47; singer Cat Stevens, 43; and comedian/actor Robin Williams, 38. July 22 Marge Jones, Mandy Dawn Griffin, Mildred Bame, Gail Tolboe, Christine Mathews, Hayley Wolfe, Roger Doughtery, Mike A. Gardner, Coxuiiiey Shea, Maurine Goff, Sam Gutierrez Sr., Carl Bigler, Eric Muirbrook, Marv Bame, Richard Pack, Margaret Holyoak, Kathryn Van Brunt, Mark Barrell, Denby Wade, Laura Smith, Clara Wikins, Jean Bench and John Whipple. Celebrities: Rose Kennedy, 100; Sen. Bob Dole, 67; singer Margaret Whiting, 66; actor/comedian Orson Bean, 61; fashion designer Oscar de la Renta, 58; actor Terence Stamp, 50; actor/singer Bobby Sherman, 45; and actor/comedian Albert Brooks, 43. See Missiles, Page 10 LOSEE ROAD ANTIQUES Replica Antique Lamp Posts and Furniture $9000 814175 649-3800 2270 Losee Road (Just South of Carey) GREAT FOOD, GREAT PRICES, GREAT PLACE! SaadKf 1/2 BBQ Chicken 3.95 Western Steak 3.95 iBabyBackPoARibs 4.75 Bfondiy Old-Fashioned Ham Steak 3.95 Porterhotise Steak 4.95 Prime Rb 4.95 Tacaday Chicken Fried Steak 3.95 "21" Shrimp Uver&Onk>ns 3.95 12 oz. Rib &e Steak 4.^ Wednesday N.Y. Steak Prime Rib 4.95 4.95 Tharsday Pork Chops 3.95 Cornish Hen 4.50 Friday N.Y.orT-Bone 4.95 Filet K^gnoh 7.95 Trout Almondine 4.50 SatutlaY N.Y.orT-Bone 4.95 RletMlgnon 7.95 Catfish 4.50 Daily Dinner Specials • pin) 99C Breakfast served 24 hours $2.95 All You Can Eat Luncheon Buffet N:BODII)ERHWT.SOUIHOFS(JNSET CASINO ft REST A U R A N T AJI choices include: Oui Famous' (All You Can Eat) Salad Bar, or Soup and choice of potato All Specials Dine-in Only 565-9116 HENDERSON, NEVADA

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HI'^W^'^I Page 10 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Scarlett, Majewski exchange vows Thursday. July 19.1990 Thursday, July 19, 1990 Karen Lee Scarlett and Scott Robert Majewski exchanged vows recently at Grace Coihmunity Church in Boulder City. -The Rev. Joel Bastida officiated. The bride is the daughter of Wilford and Mary Scarlett of Henderson. She is a 1985 graduate of Basic High School and is currently employed with the Bureau of Reclamation. The groom, son of Ben and Margaret Majewski, of Lake George, Mich, is a 1984 graduate of Boulder City High School and is currently employed with Foiu* Seasons Pool Service. Attending the bride were Sharon Huddleson, maid of honor, and Debbie Majewski, Rhonda Powell and Andrea Orosco bridesmaids. Serving the groom was Dale Majewski, best man. GroomsChurch festival huge success Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Page 11 Officials of the First Henderson United Methodist Church this week extended thanks to a number of local businesses that helped the church's recent "Summer Sizzle Fun Festival" become an event t3M was, as they termed it, "a huge sucLynn Burdick, a new Sun City resident, gets a free ride with FIBee. the First Interstate Bank mascot, to the new driveup window at Its Sun City Branch that opened Monday. FIB initiates new drive-up concept Business participating included: Air Ads, A-Z Vac and Sewing, Cactus Joe's Restaurant, California Hotel ai:d Casino, Color and Curl Beauty Salon. Crystal Palace Skating Center, Disneyland, Ethel M's Chocolates, Fantastic Sam's. Henderson Home News, KMart, Lucky Food Centers. McDonald's Restaurants, Playland Skating Center, Rainbow Club and Casino, Raihx}ad Pass, Skyline Restaurant and Casino, Smith's Food and Drug Store. Videotyme and Von's. The businesses' donations helped First Henderson United Methodist Church raise the funds necessary to enlarge the church's education programs," spokespersons said. NdSd3aN3H • NMOlNMOa N Karen and Scott Majewski men were Steve Scarlett, Jim Majewski and Mike Scarlett. Ushers were Bob Wireman and Chris Majewski. A reception was held at the Elks Lodge in Boulder City. After honeymooning in San Diego, the couple resides in Henderson. Seen everything? Not quite. The First histerstate Bank of Nevada has installed a new drive-up window for golf carts at its Sun City Branch, which opened Monday. The l,440-8quare-foot structure, situated on a 400-foot by 300-foot lot, provides adequate customer parking for golf carts, bicycles, and cars. The branch welcomes customers to visit and enjoy a game of bocce ball, golf putting, television or just coffee while doing their banking. A grand opening celebration is set from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday. Festivities will include a bocce ball tournament, and performances by a barbershop quartet and a pianist. Lull at SB A can benefit businesses The U.S. Small Business Administration advises small businesses or those wanting to start a business that the best time to seek assistance is during the months of July and August, when many people go on vacation. A pit-business orientation is available to the public, as is oneon-one counseling. The SB A offices are located at 301E. Stewait, near the Transportation Center. For more infonnation, call 388-6611. ^ Missiles from Page 9 July 23 Joshua Bowen, Adam^omas Burr, David R. Walker Sr., Kathleen Shaw, Greorge T.HiUstead, Mari-Kay Preddy, Jared Martin Porter, Jessica Hougen, Ted Watts, Laura Smith, Sherry Simpkins, Julie Edgel, Sandra O'Dell and Natalie Ann Ebert. Celebrities: Psychiatrist Dr. Karl Menninger, 97; actrete Gloria de Haven, 65; and baseball pitcher Don Drysdale, 54. July 24 Kristy Ann Atkinson [In Memory], Philip Swartzlander, Rosella Warren, Lola Kirk, Chad Graham, Valerie Wall, Steven Adams, Tysa Gubler, Debbie Robb, Tammy Rauren Shamo, Paarl Sinanian, Roger Walsh, Debbie Poff, Dawn Mahaffey, Beverly Jones, Renee Keele, David Askew, Traci Waisath, Tricia Noble, Robert Lockwood, Ed Lamb, Beverly Blanchard. Darlene Nix, Cherie Walford, Vivian Famsworth. David Bondurant. Steve Famsworth, Jack Bradshaw and Von Famsworth. Celebrities: Producer Alexander Cohen, 70; Bella Abzug, 70; comi •• ledian Ruth Buz^i, 54; actor Chris Sarandon, 48; actor Robert -f— mmm^ — • • ^— Valle from Page 7 Hays, 43; and actress Lynda Carter, 39. July 25 Santiago Quintana, Loris Westovaer, Eveline Whitmore, Jason Cox, Tom Blake, Twins Allen and Arnold Porter, Merridy E. Lawrence, Richard Coil, Jeannette Rae Collins, David Haner, Michael Workman, Ronald Averett and Brenda Buckles. Celebrities: Actor Jack Gilford, 83; and singer Donna Theodore, 45. July 26 Randon Paul Roundy (4), Carrie Ann Jacobson, Margaret Sanders, Gay Pendleton, James E. Lambert, Robert Earl Lindsay n. Rick Chase, Ora May Robinson, Tomas M. Toia Jr., Randy Elkins Winget, Regina Marie Miller, D. J. Prisbrey, Amber Brown, Ashley Brown and Heather Page. Celebrities: Actor Jason Robards Jr., 68; director Blake Edwards, 68; director Stanley Kubrick, 62; rock star Mick Jagger, 47; actress Susan George, 40; and tennis player Vitas Gerulaities, The Arctic-^^StM^ •pends three fnonths of each year in the arctic regions, three months in the Antarctic and almost six months In the air. *vK^S,Verde there were a couple of cardboard box signs advertising yard sales. As we got up to Navarre and Green Valley Parkway, we found water running down Navarre, headed south on Valle Verde at a fast pace. As we went all the way down Valle Verde to where it dead-ended, we found graffiti. Turning around from the dead end, we drove by the Silver Springs gym which has since been dedicated in fine fashion. We then found ourselves going through the Fountains to look at some model homes. We traveled through the Glen Ridge and South Ridge estates and finally ended up going through the Legacy golf course. Later on that morning, we drove Windmill Road to the Mobile Home Estates to view the development in that area. It was quite clear to me and my wife that things had changed radically in the Green Valley area and that growth was progressing at a very fast pace. We turned around and went back on Valle Verde and noted that the white wall which Arrendale loves to paint was doing fine with the exception of some weeds. However, there were a number of weeds that we discovered in the median on Sunset between Green Valley Parkway and Annie Oakley. All in all, the neighborhood seemed to be in fairly good shape. The political signs on the comers, which were on private property, were soon to pome down. My wife and I did attend the grand opening and ribboncutting ceremony of the Silver Springs Community Center, but, much to my dismay, the weeds along Valle Verde still remain. Questions or comments on GVCA activities are always welcome. Please mail them to: Green Valley Community Association, P.O. Box 50034, Henderson, Nev. 89016. Editor's Note: The opinions expressed above are thc^e of the author. Although the Green Valley Community Association may be in agreement with said opinions, the Association's support shall not be construed as ad<^tion of said opinions. Any liability arising from statements or opinions expressed in this column shall belimited to the author of this column. RBAL B$TAT£ UPMTE ROSA HERWICK, QRI, CRS HOME A BLUE CHIP INVESTMENT QUESTION: One nomially refers to ilocks and bonds as blue chip invcslmcnis. Shouldn't real estate be included in this category? ANSWER: A well-built home in a good neighborhood is. indeed, a blue chip investment. In fact, real esute values have consistently increased far more than the value of stocks and bonds. And housing values have always more than kept abreast of the general rise in consumer prices. There is no reason to believe that this situation will change in the future. There is an increasing demand for homes. Also, real estate tax bteaks allow you to keep iHoraof^^at^dti'^m.It'sa blue chip investment plus! KW/{ LOOK FOR THE BEST HOIME yotir nmnay can buy-In a good location and anjpy your Muo chip InvottnMnt. For all yofl real estate needs whetiMT selllag or baying, eall the profeuioaals at CENTURY 21JR Realty, 204 W. Pacific Ave.. Hendcnon, i^jlliiBftPlmMf702) 664414^ .^'^Ati'Psve f Iptetion please can or lirtte OS for the answers. V pit i^w "ff^^^^s^^t^ CHILDREN'S PORTRAIT SPECIAL • CONTEMPORARY COLOR PORTRAITS • THREE POSES • AGES 1 YEAR-13 YEARS • OFFER AVAILABLE 7/20-8/4 • FOR APPOINTMENT CALL 566-4141 55 WATER STREET • HENDERSON $9.95 Ofie 5 X 7 or 4 wallets ao 09$ aide 05$ udi lpJ3A03 UOMVX os$ udi iJBpmvis A|U09iUE9M18 uowi-X 09$ Old I ..mcSP^H.. uo wdejl^ d5issdJ$0Jd 09$ uowj-x 09$ aid( uonn-x 09$ uid9 OjUlfl ^ __ uowj-X 09$ uidi ..lUBSPUU. uo 09$ uid6 09$ uid) llwaAOj UOBJ)-X 09$ uids 09$ udi Alu09LUB9m8 OjUlfl UOBU-X 09$ uidi uo 09$ uid6 oSuia UOB-X 09$ wdi ..UIBSPUIJ,, uo 09$ uid6 ^umeiQ dAissdJ^oJd 09$ uidi llwaAOj UOBJI-X uids 1^ )^Cr9tbec>M)8oSuia UOBJI-X ~ 09$ ad I Ipjd^oo uowvx mdsJJ o5uia^^ oowi-X 09$ mdi ..umSP^H" 00 09$ uid6 3MSsaJ$0Jd 09$ udi li^iSim iJ5?!?^ llBW^o^ 09$ mds 3A|s$aJ$0Jd 09$ mi\ Ipja^oj uow)-X 09$ udc 'A|U08iAiB9m8 oSora UOBJI-X 09$ mil. ..uiBSP^H. DO 09$ md6 JumBJfl a^issaJ^oJd 09$ mdi Space from Page 7 excited about oiu* ftrst national mission. The caliber of the students who applied for the' project was very high, and we were able to select a group of youngsters in which every one is bringing in at least one really good research question. This niakes it fun for the staff, as weU as rewarding for the kids, and the infusion of good new ideas keeps the program vital and signihcant.'' Student research proposals range from studying the effects of altered gravity on plant growth to solar astronomy, structural engineering in qMce, superconductanoe, pest control in space and wound healing. While attending Student Space Station, each young scientist will pursue research on fundamental scientiflc questions relevant to their chosen topic. The twenty out-of-state students chosen for "Mission 90-B" will be joined by twelve Mississippi youth who also competed in the selection process. Knapp said that the project has not previously been open to out-of-state students because the majority of its established funding came him li's private sector, WATER CONDITIONERS 30% OFF SALE "^-^ which wants the program to remain primarily accessible to the state's youth. 'Tfational missions like this will be the ezoeptioo rather than the rule,* Kni^p said. The decision to invite a limited number of outof-state students this summer was motivated Iqr a deiire to give Stu^nt Space Station wider visibility. x^ 10 FEATURES TO COMPARE •NO ELECTRIC CONTROLS •METER OPERATED •NEW ULTRA-RNE RESIN •USES LESS THAN 1H OF SALT REQENERATION •3.5 MINUTES, COUNTER FLOW, DEMAND REGENERATION •ONLY 73 GALLONS OF WATER PER REQENERATION •HIGH KENETIC RESIN FOR IS TIMES FASTER EXCHANGE •USES 100H SATURATED SOLIDS •PRE-FILTER FOR REMOVING SOUOS •FAST mSTALLATION, NO START-UP OR ADJUSTMENTS The Efficient GLC AUTOMATIC WATER CONOmONER '^fy SPECIAL OFFER Reverse Osmosis Drinking Water System $29999 ERRA PURE WATB? SYSTEM 2777 E. Suna rt Rd. • 456-5777 snuog o^uig THIS AD RAN IN THM POSTTION AT ReCNJCST Of AOVDmtBI

PAGE 11

HI'^W^'^I Page 10 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Scarlett, Majewski exchange vows Thursday. July 19.1990 Thursday, July 19, 1990 Karen Lee Scarlett and Scott Robert Majewski exchanged vows recently at Grace Coihmunity Church in Boulder City. -The Rev. Joel Bastida officiated. The bride is the daughter of Wilford and Mary Scarlett of Henderson. She is a 1985 graduate of Basic High School and is currently employed with the Bureau of Reclamation. The groom, son of Ben and Margaret Majewski, of Lake George, Mich, is a 1984 graduate of Boulder City High School and is currently employed with Foiu* Seasons Pool Service. Attending the bride were Sharon Huddleson, maid of honor, and Debbie Majewski, Rhonda Powell and Andrea Orosco bridesmaids. Serving the groom was Dale Majewski, best man. GroomsChurch festival huge success Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Page 11 Officials of the First Henderson United Methodist Church this week extended thanks to a number of local businesses that helped the church's recent "Summer Sizzle Fun Festival" become an event t3M was, as they termed it, "a huge sucLynn Burdick, a new Sun City resident, gets a free ride with FIBee. the First Interstate Bank mascot, to the new driveup window at Its Sun City Branch that opened Monday. FIB initiates new drive-up concept Business participating included: Air Ads, A-Z Vac and Sewing, Cactus Joe's Restaurant, California Hotel ai:d Casino, Color and Curl Beauty Salon. Crystal Palace Skating Center, Disneyland, Ethel M's Chocolates, Fantastic Sam's. Henderson Home News, KMart, Lucky Food Centers. McDonald's Restaurants, Playland Skating Center, Rainbow Club and Casino, Raihx}ad Pass, Skyline Restaurant and Casino, Smith's Food and Drug Store. Videotyme and Von's. The businesses' donations helped First Henderson United Methodist Church raise the funds necessary to enlarge the church's education programs," spokespersons said. NdSd3aN3H • NMOlNMOa N Karen and Scott Majewski men were Steve Scarlett, Jim Majewski and Mike Scarlett. Ushers were Bob Wireman and Chris Majewski. A reception was held at the Elks Lodge in Boulder City. After honeymooning in San Diego, the couple resides in Henderson. Seen everything? Not quite. The First histerstate Bank of Nevada has installed a new drive-up window for golf carts at its Sun City Branch, which opened Monday. The l,440-8quare-foot structure, situated on a 400-foot by 300-foot lot, provides adequate customer parking for golf carts, bicycles, and cars. The branch welcomes customers to visit and enjoy a game of bocce ball, golf putting, television or just coffee while doing their banking. A grand opening celebration is set from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday. Festivities will include a bocce ball tournament, and performances by a barbershop quartet and a pianist. Lull at SB A can benefit businesses The U.S. Small Business Administration advises small businesses or those wanting to start a business that the best time to seek assistance is during the months of July and August, when many people go on vacation. A pit-business orientation is available to the public, as is oneon-one counseling. The SB A offices are located at 301E. Stewait, near the Transportation Center. For more infonnation, call 388-6611. ^ Missiles from Page 9 July 23 Joshua Bowen, Adam^omas Burr, David R. Walker Sr., Kathleen Shaw, Greorge T.HiUstead, Mari-Kay Preddy, Jared Martin Porter, Jessica Hougen, Ted Watts, Laura Smith, Sherry Simpkins, Julie Edgel, Sandra O'Dell and Natalie Ann Ebert. Celebrities: Psychiatrist Dr. Karl Menninger, 97; actrete Gloria de Haven, 65; and baseball pitcher Don Drysdale, 54. July 24 Kristy Ann Atkinson [In Memory], Philip Swartzlander, Rosella Warren, Lola Kirk, Chad Graham, Valerie Wall, Steven Adams, Tysa Gubler, Debbie Robb, Tammy Rauren Shamo, Paarl Sinanian, Roger Walsh, Debbie Poff, Dawn Mahaffey, Beverly Jones, Renee Keele, David Askew, Traci Waisath, Tricia Noble, Robert Lockwood, Ed Lamb, Beverly Blanchard. Darlene Nix, Cherie Walford, Vivian Famsworth. David Bondurant. Steve Famsworth, Jack Bradshaw and Von Famsworth. Celebrities: Producer Alexander Cohen, 70; Bella Abzug, 70; comi •• ledian Ruth Buz^i, 54; actor Chris Sarandon, 48; actor Robert -f— mmm^ — • • ^— Valle from Page 7 Hays, 43; and actress Lynda Carter, 39. July 25 Santiago Quintana, Loris Westovaer, Eveline Whitmore, Jason Cox, Tom Blake, Twins Allen and Arnold Porter, Merridy E. Lawrence, Richard Coil, Jeannette Rae Collins, David Haner, Michael Workman, Ronald Averett and Brenda Buckles. Celebrities: Actor Jack Gilford, 83; and singer Donna Theodore, 45. July 26 Randon Paul Roundy (4), Carrie Ann Jacobson, Margaret Sanders, Gay Pendleton, James E. Lambert, Robert Earl Lindsay n. Rick Chase, Ora May Robinson, Tomas M. Toia Jr., Randy Elkins Winget, Regina Marie Miller, D. J. Prisbrey, Amber Brown, Ashley Brown and Heather Page. Celebrities: Actor Jason Robards Jr., 68; director Blake Edwards, 68; director Stanley Kubrick, 62; rock star Mick Jagger, 47; actress Susan George, 40; and tennis player Vitas Gerulaities, The Arctic-^^StM^ •pends three fnonths of each year in the arctic regions, three months in the Antarctic and almost six months In the air. *vK^S,Verde there were a couple of cardboard box signs advertising yard sales. As we got up to Navarre and Green Valley Parkway, we found water running down Navarre, headed south on Valle Verde at a fast pace. As we went all the way down Valle Verde to where it dead-ended, we found graffiti. Turning around from the dead end, we drove by the Silver Springs gym which has since been dedicated in fine fashion. We then found ourselves going through the Fountains to look at some model homes. We traveled through the Glen Ridge and South Ridge estates and finally ended up going through the Legacy golf course. Later on that morning, we drove Windmill Road to the Mobile Home Estates to view the development in that area. It was quite clear to me and my wife that things had changed radically in the Green Valley area and that growth was progressing at a very fast pace. We turned around and went back on Valle Verde and noted that the white wall which Arrendale loves to paint was doing fine with the exception of some weeds. However, there were a number of weeds that we discovered in the median on Sunset between Green Valley Parkway and Annie Oakley. All in all, the neighborhood seemed to be in fairly good shape. The political signs on the comers, which were on private property, were soon to pome down. My wife and I did attend the grand opening and ribboncutting ceremony of the Silver Springs Community Center, but, much to my dismay, the weeds along Valle Verde still remain. Questions or comments on GVCA activities are always welcome. Please mail them to: Green Valley Community Association, P.O. Box 50034, Henderson, Nev. 89016. Editor's Note: The opinions expressed above are thc^e of the author. Although the Green Valley Community Association may be in agreement with said opinions, the Association's support shall not be construed as ad<^tion of said opinions. Any liability arising from statements or opinions expressed in this column shall belimited to the author of this column. RBAL B$TAT£ UPMTE ROSA HERWICK, QRI, CRS HOME A BLUE CHIP INVESTMENT QUESTION: One nomially refers to ilocks and bonds as blue chip invcslmcnis. Shouldn't real estate be included in this category? ANSWER: A well-built home in a good neighborhood is. indeed, a blue chip investment. In fact, real esute values have consistently increased far more than the value of stocks and bonds. And housing values have always more than kept abreast of the general rise in consumer prices. There is no reason to believe that this situation will change in the future. There is an increasing demand for homes. Also, real estate tax bteaks allow you to keep iHoraof^^at^dti'^m.It'sa blue chip investment plus! KW/{ LOOK FOR THE BEST HOIME yotir nmnay can buy-In a good location and anjpy your Muo chip InvottnMnt. For all yofl real estate needs whetiMT selllag or baying, eall the profeuioaals at CENTURY 21JR Realty, 204 W. Pacific Ave.. Hendcnon, i^jlliiBftPlmMf702) 664414^ .^'^Ati'Psve f Iptetion please can or lirtte OS for the answers. V pit i^w "ff^^^^s^^t^ CHILDREN'S PORTRAIT SPECIAL • CONTEMPORARY COLOR PORTRAITS • THREE POSES • AGES 1 YEAR-13 YEARS • OFFER AVAILABLE 7/20-8/4 • FOR APPOINTMENT CALL 566-4141 55 WATER STREET • HENDERSON $9.95 Ofie 5 X 7 or 4 wallets ao 09$ aide 05$ udi lpJ3A03 UOMVX os$ udi iJBpmvis A|U09iUE9M18 uowi-X 09$ Old I ..mcSP^H.. uo wdejl^ d5issdJ$0Jd 09$ uowj-x 09$ aid( uonn-x 09$ uid9 OjUlfl ^ __ uowj-X 09$ uidi ..lUBSPUU. uo 09$ uid6 09$ uid) llwaAOj UOBJ)-X 09$ uids 09$ udi Alu09LUB9m8 OjUlfl UOBU-X 09$ uidi uo 09$ uid6 oSuia UOB-X 09$ wdi ..UIBSPUIJ,, uo 09$ uid6 ^umeiQ dAissdJ^oJd 09$ uidi llwaAOj UOBJI-X uids 1^ )^Cr9tbec>M)8oSuia UOBJI-X ~ 09$ ad I Ipjd^oo uowvx mdsJJ o5uia^^ oowi-X 09$ mdi ..umSP^H" 00 09$ uid6 3MSsaJ$0Jd 09$ udi li^iSim iJ5?!?^ llBW^o^ 09$ mds 3A|s$aJ$0Jd 09$ mi\ Ipja^oj uow)-X 09$ udc 'A|U08iAiB9m8 oSora UOBJI-X 09$ mil. ..uiBSP^H. DO 09$ md6 JumBJfl a^issaJ^oJd 09$ mdi Space from Page 7 excited about oiu* ftrst national mission. The caliber of the students who applied for the' project was very high, and we were able to select a group of youngsters in which every one is bringing in at least one really good research question. This niakes it fun for the staff, as weU as rewarding for the kids, and the infusion of good new ideas keeps the program vital and signihcant.'' Student research proposals range from studying the effects of altered gravity on plant growth to solar astronomy, structural engineering in qMce, superconductanoe, pest control in space and wound healing. While attending Student Space Station, each young scientist will pursue research on fundamental scientiflc questions relevant to their chosen topic. The twenty out-of-state students chosen for "Mission 90-B" will be joined by twelve Mississippi youth who also competed in the selection process. Knapp said that the project has not previously been open to out-of-state students because the majority of its established funding came him li's private sector, WATER CONDITIONERS 30% OFF SALE "^-^ which wants the program to remain primarily accessible to the state's youth. 'Tfational missions like this will be the ezoeptioo rather than the rule,* Kni^p said. The decision to invite a limited number of outof-state students this summer was motivated Iqr a deiire to give Stu^nt Space Station wider visibility. x^ 10 FEATURES TO COMPARE •NO ELECTRIC CONTROLS •METER OPERATED •NEW ULTRA-RNE RESIN •USES LESS THAN 1H OF SALT REQENERATION •3.5 MINUTES, COUNTER FLOW, DEMAND REGENERATION •ONLY 73 GALLONS OF WATER PER REQENERATION •HIGH KENETIC RESIN FOR IS TIMES FASTER EXCHANGE •USES 100H SATURATED SOLIDS •PRE-FILTER FOR REMOVING SOUOS •FAST mSTALLATION, NO START-UP OR ADJUSTMENTS The Efficient GLC AUTOMATIC WATER CONOmONER '^fy SPECIAL OFFER Reverse Osmosis Drinking Water System $29999 ERRA PURE WATB? SYSTEM 2777 E. Suna rt Rd. • 456-5777 snuog o^uig THIS AD RAN IN THM POSTTION AT ReCNJCST Of AOVDmtBI

PAGE 12

• ^ • SI^TT 1 TWiT W" \i %Page 12 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada ,^lanning your vacation, stop by Prestige Travel 6 let Sonni or Joanne organize your trip. By making us successful, we can help make your business prosper. >.Ii(.K/ huu • • •iv/ t. vr\ (3*^C?-3 (ij£i= ^ r • SEE YOU THERE! • FRIENDLY SERVICE • SUPER BUFFET Biggop $3f Includes a Beverage DAVVAM THAN EVER BEFORE Over 45 Hot & Cold Items including 7 Hot Entrees FBIOAY HIOHT SEAFOOD plus tax Incl. iBvAlso Included: ^ ^.tthSonlce cream Sv^^WoriwTopP^I EMturlna Fri"' ShrimP;! S?!lS.SlFriJF..fnd 1 much mo r^^^^ SEMIO^NWHT ^ r^;H"1iTBUFFET For those 55 pU8 1.99 OJ % -,-A'.v-a.'a^:-^i-----.'"'^'ir" Senior Activities CoDependents meeting scheduled CoDependents Anonymous meets at 10 a.m,every Monday at the 51 Club behind the Henderson Drug Store. The public is welcome, spokespersons said. J Rose Zimmerman conducts a cardio-pulmonary resuscita tion class at the Salvation Army Day Care Center. Eddie Carpenter, a volunteer at the Salvation Army Day Care Center, enjoys putting jigsaw puzzles together. Day Care Center seelcs volunteers Volunteers are being sought to assist staff members with arts and crafts and trips at the Salvation Army's Adult Day Care Center in Henderson, officials announced this week. The Center, located at 830 E. Lake Mead Drive, provides care for individuals living with family or alone who need a proSenior Center Highlights tective setting and supportive care for the entire day or part of a day. The facility, open from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, provides medication administration and supervision, blood pressure screenings, clinical evaluations and recreational and educational services such as arts and crafts, exercise, field trips, television and movies and other entertainment, as well as community speakers. Hot, nutritious noontime meals are furnished daily, along with morning and afternoon snacks, spokespersons said. Cost for care is provided on a sliding income scale. Medicaid will also cover costs in some instances, they said. Limited transportation Is^ furnished to the Day Care Center from areas of Henderson, Boulder City and East Las Vegas. For more information, call 565-9578. Hot weather spells danger for seniors By Chuck Colletta The Henderson Senior Center recently hosted a seminar on the dangers of heat stress. Important information was provided by Al O'Neal of the Southwest Gas Corp. O'Neal warned, as we head into the very hot days of summer, that hot weather (above 90 degrees) can place a dangerous strain on the body, particularly for those who are elderly. High humidity with high temperatures greatly increases that danger, he said, and can produce heat stress, including heat exhaustion, stroke and heart failure. He told the seniors to remember to keep cool and spend time in air-conditioned facilities such as the Senior Center. Take cool baths or showers (with water around 75 degrees) to provide reUef from the heat, he said? Other suggestions included wearing lightweight, loose-fitting clothing, drinking fluid often and not waiting until one becomes thirsty. Water is the best beverage to drink, he said. 'Take it easy," he said. "Avoid heavy meals and alcohol. Check with a doctor before taking salt or potassium tablets. Be alert to any sign of heat stress such as dizziness, rapid heartbeat, nausea, general weakness, mental changes or breathing problems. Be stare to pay attention to these early signs and remember to 'stay cool'" The Senior Center, together with Opticare 2000, will provide free vision screening for seniors between the horn's of 10 a.m. to noon, Tuesday. Technicians from Opticare 2000, a service of the Shepherd Eye Institute, will be available in the social service building. Persons who desire to pre-register should call the Center at 565-6990 and give a name. The center has added a new activity. At 10 a.m., Thursdays, Scrabble will be played. All those interested are invited to come at that time -^ % -' LARGE PEPPERONI PIZZA i Or Any Large I-Item Pizza Only #!• ^ I Henderson BoiUder Hwy & Lake Mead Dr 565-5757 Offer Good Only With TMi Coupon • Not Good With Any Other Offer • Please Add Sales Tax And 259 Each For To Go Orders • Expires 8/2/90 See Seniors, Page 14 Obristian Center 571 Adams Blvd 293-7773 Boulder City 'Only 15 minutes from Henderson—Of Course!" SUNDAY, JULY 22 8:15 & 10:30 A.M. Pastor Carl Swenberg 6 P.M. PRAISE & WORSHIP CELEBRATION "Beautiful Music—All Services" 9:30 a.m. Sunday School Monday 7:00 p.m. — Youth Night WEDNESDAY 9:30 a.m. — Women's Coffee Hour and Bible Study 7:00 p.m. — Bible Studies For All Ages HOME OF CHRISTIAN CENTER SCHOOL A^iD DAY CARE CENTER • • • • • i-i I I I • I • • • • • • I I I i~r~i~i~i III iiTi I —VideoTu me • • • • • • • • • • i 1' I • I I j^ni:! _iri71 I 11:1: in ii 1 OUSTW MATTHEW CONNERY HOFFMAN BRODERICK FAMILY BUSINESS VIDEO TYME H MOVIE CLUB ^Rent 4 Movies for $9 or 6 for $12 ^All Cartoons 50


PAGE 13

• ^ • SI^TT 1 TWiT W" \i %Page 12 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada ,^lanning your vacation, stop by Prestige Travel 6 let Sonni or Joanne organize your trip. By making us successful, we can help make your business prosper. >.Ii(.K/ huu • • •iv/ t. vr\ (3*^C?-3 (ij£i= ^ r • SEE YOU THERE! • FRIENDLY SERVICE • SUPER BUFFET Biggop $3f Includes a Beverage DAVVAM THAN EVER BEFORE Over 45 Hot & Cold Items including 7 Hot Entrees FBIOAY HIOHT SEAFOOD plus tax Incl. iBvAlso Included: ^ ^.tthSonlce cream Sv^^WoriwTopP^I EMturlna Fri"' ShrimP;! S?!lS.SlFriJF..fnd 1 much mo r^^^^ SEMIO^NWHT ^ r^;H"1iTBUFFET For those 55 pU8 1.99 OJ % -,-A'.v-a.'a^:-^i-----.'"'^'ir" Senior Activities CoDependents meeting scheduled CoDependents Anonymous meets at 10 a.m,every Monday at the 51 Club behind the Henderson Drug Store. The public is welcome, spokespersons said. J Rose Zimmerman conducts a cardio-pulmonary resuscita tion class at the Salvation Army Day Care Center. Eddie Carpenter, a volunteer at the Salvation Army Day Care Center, enjoys putting jigsaw puzzles together. Day Care Center seelcs volunteers Volunteers are being sought to assist staff members with arts and crafts and trips at the Salvation Army's Adult Day Care Center in Henderson, officials announced this week. The Center, located at 830 E. Lake Mead Drive, provides care for individuals living with family or alone who need a proSenior Center Highlights tective setting and supportive care for the entire day or part of a day. The facility, open from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, provides medication administration and supervision, blood pressure screenings, clinical evaluations and recreational and educational services such as arts and crafts, exercise, field trips, television and movies and other entertainment, as well as community speakers. Hot, nutritious noontime meals are furnished daily, along with morning and afternoon snacks, spokespersons said. Cost for care is provided on a sliding income scale. Medicaid will also cover costs in some instances, they said. Limited transportation Is^ furnished to the Day Care Center from areas of Henderson, Boulder City and East Las Vegas. For more information, call 565-9578. Hot weather spells danger for seniors By Chuck Colletta The Henderson Senior Center recently hosted a seminar on the dangers of heat stress. Important information was provided by Al O'Neal of the Southwest Gas Corp. O'Neal warned, as we head into the very hot days of summer, that hot weather (above 90 degrees) can place a dangerous strain on the body, particularly for those who are elderly. High humidity with high temperatures greatly increases that danger, he said, and can produce heat stress, including heat exhaustion, stroke and heart failure. He told the seniors to remember to keep cool and spend time in air-conditioned facilities such as the Senior Center. Take cool baths or showers (with water around 75 degrees) to provide reUef from the heat, he said? Other suggestions included wearing lightweight, loose-fitting clothing, drinking fluid often and not waiting until one becomes thirsty. Water is the best beverage to drink, he said. 'Take it easy," he said. "Avoid heavy meals and alcohol. Check with a doctor before taking salt or potassium tablets. Be alert to any sign of heat stress such as dizziness, rapid heartbeat, nausea, general weakness, mental changes or breathing problems. Be stare to pay attention to these early signs and remember to 'stay cool'" The Senior Center, together with Opticare 2000, will provide free vision screening for seniors between the horn's of 10 a.m. to noon, Tuesday. Technicians from Opticare 2000, a service of the Shepherd Eye Institute, will be available in the social service building. Persons who desire to pre-register should call the Center at 565-6990 and give a name. The center has added a new activity. At 10 a.m., Thursdays, Scrabble will be played. All those interested are invited to come at that time -^ % -' LARGE PEPPERONI PIZZA i Or Any Large I-Item Pizza Only #!• ^ I Henderson BoiUder Hwy & Lake Mead Dr 565-5757 Offer Good Only With TMi Coupon • Not Good With Any Other Offer • Please Add Sales Tax And 259 Each For To Go Orders • Expires 8/2/90 See Seniors, Page 14 Obristian Center 571 Adams Blvd 293-7773 Boulder City 'Only 15 minutes from Henderson—Of Course!" SUNDAY, JULY 22 8:15 & 10:30 A.M. Pastor Carl Swenberg 6 P.M. PRAISE & WORSHIP CELEBRATION "Beautiful Music—All Services" 9:30 a.m. Sunday School Monday 7:00 p.m. — Youth Night WEDNESDAY 9:30 a.m. — Women's Coffee Hour and Bible Study 7:00 p.m. — Bible Studies For All Ages HOME OF CHRISTIAN CENTER SCHOOL A^iD DAY CARE CENTER • • • • • i-i I I I • I • • • • • • I I I i~r~i~i~i III iiTi I —VideoTu me • • • • • • • • • • i 1' I • I I j^ni:! _iri71 I 11:1: in ii 1 OUSTW MATTHEW CONNERY HOFFMAN BRODERICK FAMILY BUSINESS VIDEO TYME H MOVIE CLUB ^Rent 4 Movies for $9 or 6 for $12 ^All Cartoons 50


PAGE 14

^ .^ ,,^ ^M, H^ ^^^ ^i^^i^^^^^^W^^^I^^^^^^ m^^^^v^v^^ ^^^mVPIi^i^ilP J*g9 14 Henderson Home News, Henderson. Nevada Thursday. July 19. 1990 Thursday, July 19, 1990 Henderson Home News, Henderson. Nevada Page 16 • Seniors meeting scheduled Dan Hawley, president of the Senior Cooperative Alert Network, has announced that a SCAN meeting will be held at 1 p.m. Monday at the Zelzah Shrine Temple, 2222 W. Mesquite Ave. Hawley intends to kick off a new national petition drive seeking the removal of the Social Security Trust Fund from the national budget, which the President and Congress has been using to offsetthe deficit. "It is time for the General Trust Fund of Social Security to be removed entirely from the budget and the hands of Congress," he said. The fund. "should be put into a trustworthy independent fund as it was created originally," he insisted. Hawley aid the fund should be supervised by accountable persons who are professional and businessHke, not Congressmen. Student-built house, sheds to be auctioned The Clark County School District will hold a public, auction of a house and two sheds that were built by students at Southern Nevada Vocational-Technical Center. Minimum bid prices and a copy of procedures for the auction may be obtained at the Clark County School District's Purchasing and Warehousing Department, 4212 Eucalyptus Ave. from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Proceeds from the auction will be used to purchase construction materials for next year's carpentry students. The house has three bedrooms, one and threequarters bath, and measures 1,424 square feet.* Minimum .bid price for the house is $24,900, which represents the cost of materials. The storage sheds are 8 feet by 10 feet. Minimum bid price for one storage shed is $495 to cover the cost of materials. Prospective bidders may view the property to be auctioned at Vo-Tech between 8 a.m. and 1 p.m. Monday through July 26. The keys and blueprints to the house are available in the office at Vo-Tech. The school's office also has copies of the sale procedures. For more information, call 799-5225 or 799-5226. Seniors from Page 13 and join in the play. Emma Swinney is the prime mover for the activity. Call Swinney at 564-7294 or the Center at 565-990,'tb sign up. Aii"€aM^''itfe'ff6tice:'the center is planning to schedule another "5-Alive" Mature Driving Course on Sept. 17-18. The two previous courses were a great success and filled to capacity. Persons who plan to be available to take the September class are asked to call the center to pre-register. A minimum of 12 persons is needed but the session is limited to a maximum of 20. There is a $7 fee, payable to AARP to attend. Activities The scheduled activities for the week are: Monday, July 23 Free tennis lessons and play at Morrell Park at 7 a.m.; bridge at 8:30 a.m.; art class at 12:30 p.m; grocery shopping at 12:30 p.m; and cribbage at 1 p.m. Tuesday, July 24 Needlecraft at 9 a.m.; Opticare 2000 free vision screening from 10 a.m. to noon; pinochle at 12:30 p.m.; and free transportation to Tom's Casino at 1 p.m. Wednesday, July 25 Tennis at 7 a.m. at Morrell Park; Social Security Administration representation at 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.; a crime prevention seminar by Citizens Against Crime at 10:45 a.m.; bridge at noon; and Kitchen Band rehearsal at 12:30 p.m. Thursday, July 26 Bridge at 8:30 a.m.; Scrabble at 10 a.m.; free bingo at 12:30 p.m.; quilting class at 1 p.m.; and pinochle play at 7 p.m. Friday, July 27 Tennis at Morrell Park at 7 a.m.; movie travelogue at 8:30 a.m.; bridge at noon; and art class at 12:30 p.m. Menu A lunch meal is served at the Henderson Senior Center on Monday through Friday between 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. All meals include: Two percent milk, coffee and tea. The Black Mountain Senior Nutrition Program suggests a donation of $1.25 for seniors age 60 and older. There is a $3 charge for persons under 60. *The published nieriu for the week is: Monday: Tuna-noodle casserole, tossed salad, beets, fruit compote and orange juice. Tuesday: Baked chicken, cranberry salad, green beans, wheat bread and fresh fruit. Wednesday: Roast beef, three-bean salad, parslied carrots, mashed potatoes and cherry crisps. Thursday: Ham, peacucumber salad, cauliflower, sweet potatoes and fresh fruit. Friday: Turkey salad on lettuce, vegetable salad, sliced tomatoes, hot rolls, lemon pudding and cranberry sauce. For your insurance call Farmers Insurance Group Auto • Life • Homowners •Business •Boat Monthly Payments BOB BINGHAM Insuranc* Agncy 34 Water St., Henderson PHONE 565-6581 "This is a matter that concerns seniors, not just for themselves," he allowed, "but for their own children and grandchildren." Issues such as removing the fund, earnings test and seniors who were bom between 1917 through 1921 and on to 1926, often referred to as "Notch Babies," a term Hawley feels is degrading to seniors, will be discussed. National petitions will be handed out dining the meeting to begin a drive similar to the Catastrophic Health Care Act repeal for which Hawley and his members becaine known nationally. SCAN was begun in March of this year because former members of the Senior coalition Against the Catastrophic Act felt other senior issues should be addressed. Having disbanded the SCACA organization, Hawley and other members organized SCAN, which is now recognized in 44 states and the District of Columbia. Members throughout all those states will be passing out petitions on that date as well. SCAN is best kiiown for the monthly national newsletter it produces for its membership. Within the newsletter is a survey regarding issues of the day to which members respond. A copy of the survey results are then mailed to • the congressmen and senators in Washington so that the politicians know first-hand the feelings of the seniors about the issues—and most importantly, senior voters, SCAN spokespersons said. The repeal of the Catastrophic Act showed the power of senior activists determined to change as issue in Congress, they said, adding that the upcoming meeting will undoubtedly be the beginning of another such response with the petitions regarding the Social Security Trust Fund. For further information regarding the meeting, call 646-1775, the national SCAN headquarters, or write to SCAN, 3800 Golf Lane, Las Vegas, Nev. 89108. BUSINESS OWNERS WANTED BXI Is looking for a selective group of businesses to Join our membership. Increase sales, decrease overhead. Extend your buying power, put your unused capacity to work. A Free Gift For New Members As easy as banking Get in on the trade secret Bob 734-1807 Coupon APOLLO VIDEO OFFERS YOU HENDERSONS LARGEST ADULT MOVIE SELECtlON IN VMS & BETA BRING THIS COUPON, RENT ONE ADULT MOVIE AND RECEIVE YOUR SECOND ADULT i\10VIE FREE 10 Water St. L> — ••->- >Coupon 564-7582 ( >7 Drawings Both Days \^) Bar-B-Que Buffet / ONLY ^2.59 FREE "21" TOURNAMENT SLOT TOURNAMENT WIN OVER 300.00 IN CASH AND PRIZES FOR AN ENTRY FEE OF Only $30.00 T-SHIRT • BUFFET FOR 2 DRINK FOR 2 PRIZE MONEY PREUMINARY SEMIONS: FINAL SESSION 1ST PLACE: $100.00 1ST PLACE $200.00 2ND PLACE: $ 75.00 2ND PLACE: $100.00 3RD PLACE: $ 50.00 3R0 PLACE: $ 78.00 4TH PLACE: $ 30.00 4TH PLACE: DINNER FOR 2 5TH PLACE: $ 30.00 DINING ROOM SPORTS Crosstown rivals beat Henderson All-Stars By Aaron Mayes News Staff Writer The Green Valley All-Stars advanced in the Nevada District 2 Senior Little League Tournament Monday by handing crosstown rival Henderson its second loss of the doubleelimination tournament 2-1, in a hard fought, eight-inning game at Ed Fountain Park. It was a contest dominated by excellent pitching, featuring 15 strikeouts by Green Valley pitcher Tom LaRosa and eight by Henderson pitcher Dennis Crine. Green Valley shortstop Chris Day had two of the four hits given up by Crine. "I knew that if I could hit the ball hard, I could get on," Day said following the victory. Henderson struck first, scoring its only run in the second •inning. Third baseman Mike Marshall walked and was promptly moved to second on fielder Gerald Bustamante's single up the middle. Marshall moved to third base on a ground ball as Frank Paonessa reached on a fielders choice. With Marshall on third and Paonessa on first, Marshall scored on a double steel after Green Valley tried to catch Paonessa between first and second base. Green Valley tied the game in the bottom of the fourth. Crine hit Jason Batelle with a pitch. Batelle then stole second and moved to third on a sacrifice bv Shaw Casev. Batelle scored wjtien Jeff Lavine hit a shot to third baseman Marshall, who made a diving catch to stop the ball, but couldn't get the runner at first. With the score tied 1-1, Green Valley put the game away in the bottom of the eighth. Crine walked the first two batters, with the count two balls and two strikes, Crine threw another ball to Lavine, who headed for first, thinking that it was ball four. The other Green Valley runners, also believing Crine walked Lavine, made a move to the next base Henderson catcher Chad Brandon ran at Tony Festa See Seniors, Page 16 Pedroza escapes jaws of defeat By Pat McDonnell News Sports Editor It was an agitated Engels Pedroza who sat in his locker room Monday night after gaining a win by technical knockout over Augustin Caballero. The Henderson welterweight boxer had gained his 31st win in 33 professional bouts by stopping Caballero at 2:59 of the eighth round. He had bagged his 30th knockout. But Pedroza was still upset with Caballero following the scheduled 10-round fight at the Dunes Hotel because the Panama native left his tooth marks in Pedroza's upper arm. Referee Richard Steele penalized Caballero one point for the unusual biting episode in the fifth round, but Pedroza still shook his head in disgust after the bout. "He bit me twice," Pedroza said. "He tried to dominate my mind. He tried to put his finger in my eye." Caballero, a wild left-handed puncher, was on the offensive late in the eighth roxmd. But after steadying himself on the ropes, Pedroza unleashed a strong two-handed attack which sent Caballero to the canvas^ Steele completed the eightcount over Caballero, who quickly rose to his feet. The bout was stopped when Caballero said he could not fight because of a hand injury. The ringside physician said Caballero suffered either a broken or dislocated right thumb. Pedroza landed a left hook and a short right to Caballero's head in the sixth for the fight's first knockdown. The Venezuelan native said he sometimes had trouble controlling the fight because of Caballero's awkward style. "He is a difficult fighter," Pedroza said. "He gave me a good surprise." Pedroza, ranked No. 3 among welterweight contenders by the World Boxing Association, had the lead on all three judges' scorecards after seven rounds. Timet accumulates 11 runs in five innings in whipping Sunset Signs FROZEN BASE RUNNER-Timet catcher Shane Wilson, right, closes in on Sunset Sign's John O'Rourke Tuesday at Baker Park. Wilson tagged out O'Rourke between third base and home plate in the first inning of the Wolves' win over the Warriors. Photo by Dave Phillips By Pat McDonnell News Sports Editor Timet's Chris Sledge, Shane Wilson and Brian Stauffer combined for seven hits and four runs batted in Tuesday, leading the Wolves to a 13-2 Connie Mack baseball victory over Sunset Signs at Baker Park. The trio's performance spurred a six-run Timet uprising in the top of the third inning, increasing a a 3-2 Wolves' lead to a 9-2 bulge. In the decisive rally, Timet's Torry Watson and Tim Woods stole home to break down the Warriors. The triumph, gained in just five innings because of the 10-run rule, was the Wolves' 13th win in 28 league games. Timet is 15-19 overall, entering Wednesday's home doubleAfter sweeping Rancho Santiago, Reds gear for La Verne By Pat McDonnell News Sports Editor A five-game winning streak has boosted the spirits oTthe Las Vegas Reds Intercollegiate' Baseball Team, entering this weekend's three-game home series with the University of La Verne (Cahf.). The Reds, now 8-6-1 overall, were efficient last weekend in ; a three-game sweep of the Rancho Santiago College (Calif.) Dons. The Henderson-based team garnered 4-3 and 5-3 wins Saturday over Rancho Santiago in a doubleheader at -fiurkholder Field. The-Reds knocked off the Dons by an 8-6 •margin Sunday. Las Vegas Manager Bob Foust said the Reds have been consistent, both in the field and at bat. "We are starting to peak," Foust said. "We're playing better as a team." Reds infielders Dave Snyder and Guy Taketa and outfielder Vic McCraney helped Las Vegas take Saturday's first game. Snyder went,2-for-3 with a triple, Taketa was 3-for-3 and McCraney collected three hits in four at-bats while scoring a pair of runs. "He went into a Uttle slump [earlier in the season]," Foust said of Taketa, who attends Rancho Santiago dining the school year. "We did a little work with him. He has been fierce lately." Reds starting pitcher Danny Falcone earned the victory, allowing three runs in five innings. Left bander Joe Fushey, who struck out the final Dons batter with the tying run on third base in the seventh, picked up the' save. In the second game. Las Vegas first baseman John Romero wielded the big bat. Romero went 2-for-2 with a solo home run. Reds right bander Ron Dale, who relieved starter Eugene Caruso in the fourth, collected four strikeouts. At one point, he retired 11 consecutive Rancho Santiago batters. "Ron just shut the door on them," Foust said. Trailing 2-0 in the first inning of Sunday's game, the Reds recovered to post five runs in their opening at-bat. A double by infielder Bret Hurskainen completed the rally. Las Vegas' Ryan Anthony, John DiSabato, Mike Hubel and Romero contributed in the final triumph. Anthony was 2-for-2, DiSabato hit a two-run home run, Romero scored two runs and Hubel went 2-for-3. "He is hitting the ball hard right now," Foust said of Hubel, After traveling to Santa Ana, Cahf., today for a 5 p.m. game with Rancho Santiago, the Reds open their weekend set with La Verne. Saturday's first game of a doubleheader begins at 6:05 p.m. A single game will be played at 9:30 a.m. Sunday. "This will be a good test for us," Foust said of the games with La Verne. "I think their pitching won't be as good as ours." The coach said La Verne comes into the series with an 11-3 overall record. header against St. George (Utah) played after Home News deadline. Starting pitcher Stauffer earned the victory for the Wolves. Stauffer gave up five hits and one earned run in five innings. He walked three batters and struck out one in gaining his second victory in five decisions. ~ Timet took advantage of three Sunset errors in the first inning for a trio of runs. Sledge, Wilson and Pancho Quintana all reached base and scored in the inning. The Wolves batted around in the third and talhed four more runs in the fourth pn two hits and another Warrior error. Chuck Segura, Matt Plugge and Stauffer drove in runs in the fourth. Sunset's offense was led by Danny Dillingham and Larry Norman, who had two hits apiece. Dillingham singled and scored in the first. Las Vegas rips Wolves Las Vegas scored nine runs in the top of the sixth inning Monday at Baker on the way to a 20-2 thrashing of Timet. The Wildcats had 14 hits and benefitted from six Wolves errors in winning their fifth straight game. Timet was headed by Segura, who went 3-for-3 with a triple. Stauffer and pitcher Cory Frehner also had extra base hits against Las Vegas starting pitcher Lloyd Nelson. Wolves complete league schedule Following the two nonleague games with St. George Wednesday, Timet is scheduled for a pair of contests today with the Las Vegas Knights. The first game with the Knights is the resumption of a suspended game, started July 1. The game will be picked up in the top of the eighth inning with Timet batting. The Wolves held a 6-4 lead when umpires called the game^after an on-field altercation with Timet coaches. After the suspended game is played, the Wolves and Knights will meet in a second regularly scheduled game. Both contests will be played at Sunset Park, beginning at 7 p.m. Timet, hoping to secure one of the top eight spots in the league standings and qualify for next week's state tournament, may need a sweep over the Knights to make the playoffs. Connie Mack All-Star game Saturday A nine-inning league All-Star game will be played at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at UNLV's Bamson Field. Timet's Shane Wilson, Eddie Bustmante, Tim Woods, Pancho Quintana and Rich Stegman will join the Eastern Division All-Stars in the the game against the Western Division All-Stars. The Wolves' Kevin Clark and Chrjs^edge will compete in a Home Run Derby contest, scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Connie Macl( baseball Monday, July 16 Las Vegas 20 Timet 2 Game went six innings LM Vegaa 310 619-20 14 1 Timet 010 010-2 5 6 Nelson and Hillers. Frehner, Segura (5) and Wilson. W—Nelson. L— Frehner (2-6). 2B-A. Johnson (LV), Stauffer (Tim). 3B-Peccole (LV), Segura (Tim), Frehner (Tim). HR-A. Johnson (LV), two on in 4th; Blackburn (LV), one on in 6th. Connie Mack baseball Tuesday, July 17 Timet 13 Sunset Signs 2 Game went five innings nmet 306 40-13 11 2 Simaet 200 00-2 6 4 Stauffer and Wilson. McClain, Sco. Zavsza (4) and O'Rourke. W-Stauffer (2-3). L-McClain. 2BWilson (Tim), Stauffer (Tim). 3B—Quintana (Tim). Henderson Major All-Stars eliminated after losses to Paradise Valley, Red Rock ON HIS TOES—Dave Snyder (8), a second baseman for the Las Vegas Reds Intercollegiate Baseball Team, went 2-f or^ with a triple in last Saturday's opening game witn the Rancho Santiago (CaUf.) Dona. He is pictured at left in a recent Reds game against the Colton (Calif.) Expos. Photo by Howwd Pmrmm Successive losses to Paradise Valley American and Red Rock eliminated the Henderson AllStars from the District 2 Major Little League Tournament at Sunset Park this week. The local team lost its opening game Monday 8-2 to the PVA All-Stars, then fell 6-1 to Red Rock in Tuesday's losers' bracket game. The Mtgor All-Stars were the last Henderson Little League team still alive in district playoff action. Henderson took an early 1-0 lead against Red Rock in the first inning of the elimination game. (Carlos Lueck and Chad Angell both reached on hits with Angell's safety scoring Lueck. See Ma)ors, Page 16

PAGE 15

^ .^ ,,^ ^M, H^ ^^^ ^i^^i^^^^^^W^^^I^^^^^^ m^^^^v^v^^ ^^^mVPIi^i^ilP J*g9 14 Henderson Home News, Henderson. Nevada Thursday. July 19. 1990 Thursday, July 19, 1990 Henderson Home News, Henderson. Nevada Page 16 • Seniors meeting scheduled Dan Hawley, president of the Senior Cooperative Alert Network, has announced that a SCAN meeting will be held at 1 p.m. Monday at the Zelzah Shrine Temple, 2222 W. Mesquite Ave. Hawley intends to kick off a new national petition drive seeking the removal of the Social Security Trust Fund from the national budget, which the President and Congress has been using to offsetthe deficit. "It is time for the General Trust Fund of Social Security to be removed entirely from the budget and the hands of Congress," he said. The fund. "should be put into a trustworthy independent fund as it was created originally," he insisted. Hawley aid the fund should be supervised by accountable persons who are professional and businessHke, not Congressmen. Student-built house, sheds to be auctioned The Clark County School District will hold a public, auction of a house and two sheds that were built by students at Southern Nevada Vocational-Technical Center. Minimum bid prices and a copy of procedures for the auction may be obtained at the Clark County School District's Purchasing and Warehousing Department, 4212 Eucalyptus Ave. from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Proceeds from the auction will be used to purchase construction materials for next year's carpentry students. The house has three bedrooms, one and threequarters bath, and measures 1,424 square feet.* Minimum .bid price for the house is $24,900, which represents the cost of materials. The storage sheds are 8 feet by 10 feet. Minimum bid price for one storage shed is $495 to cover the cost of materials. Prospective bidders may view the property to be auctioned at Vo-Tech between 8 a.m. and 1 p.m. Monday through July 26. The keys and blueprints to the house are available in the office at Vo-Tech. The school's office also has copies of the sale procedures. For more information, call 799-5225 or 799-5226. Seniors from Page 13 and join in the play. Emma Swinney is the prime mover for the activity. Call Swinney at 564-7294 or the Center at 565-990,'tb sign up. Aii"€aM^''itfe'ff6tice:'the center is planning to schedule another "5-Alive" Mature Driving Course on Sept. 17-18. The two previous courses were a great success and filled to capacity. Persons who plan to be available to take the September class are asked to call the center to pre-register. A minimum of 12 persons is needed but the session is limited to a maximum of 20. There is a $7 fee, payable to AARP to attend. Activities The scheduled activities for the week are: Monday, July 23 Free tennis lessons and play at Morrell Park at 7 a.m.; bridge at 8:30 a.m.; art class at 12:30 p.m; grocery shopping at 12:30 p.m; and cribbage at 1 p.m. Tuesday, July 24 Needlecraft at 9 a.m.; Opticare 2000 free vision screening from 10 a.m. to noon; pinochle at 12:30 p.m.; and free transportation to Tom's Casino at 1 p.m. Wednesday, July 25 Tennis at 7 a.m. at Morrell Park; Social Security Administration representation at 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.; a crime prevention seminar by Citizens Against Crime at 10:45 a.m.; bridge at noon; and Kitchen Band rehearsal at 12:30 p.m. Thursday, July 26 Bridge at 8:30 a.m.; Scrabble at 10 a.m.; free bingo at 12:30 p.m.; quilting class at 1 p.m.; and pinochle play at 7 p.m. Friday, July 27 Tennis at Morrell Park at 7 a.m.; movie travelogue at 8:30 a.m.; bridge at noon; and art class at 12:30 p.m. Menu A lunch meal is served at the Henderson Senior Center on Monday through Friday between 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. All meals include: Two percent milk, coffee and tea. The Black Mountain Senior Nutrition Program suggests a donation of $1.25 for seniors age 60 and older. There is a $3 charge for persons under 60. *The published nieriu for the week is: Monday: Tuna-noodle casserole, tossed salad, beets, fruit compote and orange juice. Tuesday: Baked chicken, cranberry salad, green beans, wheat bread and fresh fruit. Wednesday: Roast beef, three-bean salad, parslied carrots, mashed potatoes and cherry crisps. Thursday: Ham, peacucumber salad, cauliflower, sweet potatoes and fresh fruit. Friday: Turkey salad on lettuce, vegetable salad, sliced tomatoes, hot rolls, lemon pudding and cranberry sauce. For your insurance call Farmers Insurance Group Auto • Life • Homowners •Business •Boat Monthly Payments BOB BINGHAM Insuranc* Agncy 34 Water St., Henderson PHONE 565-6581 "This is a matter that concerns seniors, not just for themselves," he allowed, "but for their own children and grandchildren." Issues such as removing the fund, earnings test and seniors who were bom between 1917 through 1921 and on to 1926, often referred to as "Notch Babies," a term Hawley feels is degrading to seniors, will be discussed. National petitions will be handed out dining the meeting to begin a drive similar to the Catastrophic Health Care Act repeal for which Hawley and his members becaine known nationally. SCAN was begun in March of this year because former members of the Senior coalition Against the Catastrophic Act felt other senior issues should be addressed. Having disbanded the SCACA organization, Hawley and other members organized SCAN, which is now recognized in 44 states and the District of Columbia. Members throughout all those states will be passing out petitions on that date as well. SCAN is best kiiown for the monthly national newsletter it produces for its membership. Within the newsletter is a survey regarding issues of the day to which members respond. A copy of the survey results are then mailed to • the congressmen and senators in Washington so that the politicians know first-hand the feelings of the seniors about the issues—and most importantly, senior voters, SCAN spokespersons said. The repeal of the Catastrophic Act showed the power of senior activists determined to change as issue in Congress, they said, adding that the upcoming meeting will undoubtedly be the beginning of another such response with the petitions regarding the Social Security Trust Fund. For further information regarding the meeting, call 646-1775, the national SCAN headquarters, or write to SCAN, 3800 Golf Lane, Las Vegas, Nev. 89108. BUSINESS OWNERS WANTED BXI Is looking for a selective group of businesses to Join our membership. Increase sales, decrease overhead. Extend your buying power, put your unused capacity to work. A Free Gift For New Members As easy as banking Get in on the trade secret Bob 734-1807 Coupon APOLLO VIDEO OFFERS YOU HENDERSONS LARGEST ADULT MOVIE SELECtlON IN VMS & BETA BRING THIS COUPON, RENT ONE ADULT MOVIE AND RECEIVE YOUR SECOND ADULT i\10VIE FREE 10 Water St. L> — ••->- >Coupon 564-7582 ( >7 Drawings Both Days \^) Bar-B-Que Buffet / ONLY ^2.59 FREE "21" TOURNAMENT SLOT TOURNAMENT WIN OVER 300.00 IN CASH AND PRIZES FOR AN ENTRY FEE OF Only $30.00 T-SHIRT • BUFFET FOR 2 DRINK FOR 2 PRIZE MONEY PREUMINARY SEMIONS: FINAL SESSION 1ST PLACE: $100.00 1ST PLACE $200.00 2ND PLACE: $ 75.00 2ND PLACE: $100.00 3RD PLACE: $ 50.00 3R0 PLACE: $ 78.00 4TH PLACE: $ 30.00 4TH PLACE: DINNER FOR 2 5TH PLACE: $ 30.00 DINING ROOM SPORTS Crosstown rivals beat Henderson All-Stars By Aaron Mayes News Staff Writer The Green Valley All-Stars advanced in the Nevada District 2 Senior Little League Tournament Monday by handing crosstown rival Henderson its second loss of the doubleelimination tournament 2-1, in a hard fought, eight-inning game at Ed Fountain Park. It was a contest dominated by excellent pitching, featuring 15 strikeouts by Green Valley pitcher Tom LaRosa and eight by Henderson pitcher Dennis Crine. Green Valley shortstop Chris Day had two of the four hits given up by Crine. "I knew that if I could hit the ball hard, I could get on," Day said following the victory. Henderson struck first, scoring its only run in the second •inning. Third baseman Mike Marshall walked and was promptly moved to second on fielder Gerald Bustamante's single up the middle. Marshall moved to third base on a ground ball as Frank Paonessa reached on a fielders choice. With Marshall on third and Paonessa on first, Marshall scored on a double steel after Green Valley tried to catch Paonessa between first and second base. Green Valley tied the game in the bottom of the fourth. Crine hit Jason Batelle with a pitch. Batelle then stole second and moved to third on a sacrifice bv Shaw Casev. Batelle scored wjtien Jeff Lavine hit a shot to third baseman Marshall, who made a diving catch to stop the ball, but couldn't get the runner at first. With the score tied 1-1, Green Valley put the game away in the bottom of the eighth. Crine walked the first two batters, with the count two balls and two strikes, Crine threw another ball to Lavine, who headed for first, thinking that it was ball four. The other Green Valley runners, also believing Crine walked Lavine, made a move to the next base Henderson catcher Chad Brandon ran at Tony Festa See Seniors, Page 16 Pedroza escapes jaws of defeat By Pat McDonnell News Sports Editor It was an agitated Engels Pedroza who sat in his locker room Monday night after gaining a win by technical knockout over Augustin Caballero. The Henderson welterweight boxer had gained his 31st win in 33 professional bouts by stopping Caballero at 2:59 of the eighth round. He had bagged his 30th knockout. But Pedroza was still upset with Caballero following the scheduled 10-round fight at the Dunes Hotel because the Panama native left his tooth marks in Pedroza's upper arm. Referee Richard Steele penalized Caballero one point for the unusual biting episode in the fifth round, but Pedroza still shook his head in disgust after the bout. "He bit me twice," Pedroza said. "He tried to dominate my mind. He tried to put his finger in my eye." Caballero, a wild left-handed puncher, was on the offensive late in the eighth roxmd. But after steadying himself on the ropes, Pedroza unleashed a strong two-handed attack which sent Caballero to the canvas^ Steele completed the eightcount over Caballero, who quickly rose to his feet. The bout was stopped when Caballero said he could not fight because of a hand injury. The ringside physician said Caballero suffered either a broken or dislocated right thumb. Pedroza landed a left hook and a short right to Caballero's head in the sixth for the fight's first knockdown. The Venezuelan native said he sometimes had trouble controlling the fight because of Caballero's awkward style. "He is a difficult fighter," Pedroza said. "He gave me a good surprise." Pedroza, ranked No. 3 among welterweight contenders by the World Boxing Association, had the lead on all three judges' scorecards after seven rounds. Timet accumulates 11 runs in five innings in whipping Sunset Signs FROZEN BASE RUNNER-Timet catcher Shane Wilson, right, closes in on Sunset Sign's John O'Rourke Tuesday at Baker Park. Wilson tagged out O'Rourke between third base and home plate in the first inning of the Wolves' win over the Warriors. Photo by Dave Phillips By Pat McDonnell News Sports Editor Timet's Chris Sledge, Shane Wilson and Brian Stauffer combined for seven hits and four runs batted in Tuesday, leading the Wolves to a 13-2 Connie Mack baseball victory over Sunset Signs at Baker Park. The trio's performance spurred a six-run Timet uprising in the top of the third inning, increasing a a 3-2 Wolves' lead to a 9-2 bulge. In the decisive rally, Timet's Torry Watson and Tim Woods stole home to break down the Warriors. The triumph, gained in just five innings because of the 10-run rule, was the Wolves' 13th win in 28 league games. Timet is 15-19 overall, entering Wednesday's home doubleAfter sweeping Rancho Santiago, Reds gear for La Verne By Pat McDonnell News Sports Editor A five-game winning streak has boosted the spirits oTthe Las Vegas Reds Intercollegiate' Baseball Team, entering this weekend's three-game home series with the University of La Verne (Cahf.). The Reds, now 8-6-1 overall, were efficient last weekend in ; a three-game sweep of the Rancho Santiago College (Calif.) Dons. The Henderson-based team garnered 4-3 and 5-3 wins Saturday over Rancho Santiago in a doubleheader at -fiurkholder Field. The-Reds knocked off the Dons by an 8-6 •margin Sunday. Las Vegas Manager Bob Foust said the Reds have been consistent, both in the field and at bat. "We are starting to peak," Foust said. "We're playing better as a team." Reds infielders Dave Snyder and Guy Taketa and outfielder Vic McCraney helped Las Vegas take Saturday's first game. Snyder went,2-for-3 with a triple, Taketa was 3-for-3 and McCraney collected three hits in four at-bats while scoring a pair of runs. "He went into a Uttle slump [earlier in the season]," Foust said of Taketa, who attends Rancho Santiago dining the school year. "We did a little work with him. He has been fierce lately." Reds starting pitcher Danny Falcone earned the victory, allowing three runs in five innings. Left bander Joe Fushey, who struck out the final Dons batter with the tying run on third base in the seventh, picked up the' save. In the second game. Las Vegas first baseman John Romero wielded the big bat. Romero went 2-for-2 with a solo home run. Reds right bander Ron Dale, who relieved starter Eugene Caruso in the fourth, collected four strikeouts. At one point, he retired 11 consecutive Rancho Santiago batters. "Ron just shut the door on them," Foust said. Trailing 2-0 in the first inning of Sunday's game, the Reds recovered to post five runs in their opening at-bat. A double by infielder Bret Hurskainen completed the rally. Las Vegas' Ryan Anthony, John DiSabato, Mike Hubel and Romero contributed in the final triumph. Anthony was 2-for-2, DiSabato hit a two-run home run, Romero scored two runs and Hubel went 2-for-3. "He is hitting the ball hard right now," Foust said of Hubel, After traveling to Santa Ana, Cahf., today for a 5 p.m. game with Rancho Santiago, the Reds open their weekend set with La Verne. Saturday's first game of a doubleheader begins at 6:05 p.m. A single game will be played at 9:30 a.m. Sunday. "This will be a good test for us," Foust said of the games with La Verne. "I think their pitching won't be as good as ours." The coach said La Verne comes into the series with an 11-3 overall record. header against St. George (Utah) played after Home News deadline. Starting pitcher Stauffer earned the victory for the Wolves. Stauffer gave up five hits and one earned run in five innings. He walked three batters and struck out one in gaining his second victory in five decisions. ~ Timet took advantage of three Sunset errors in the first inning for a trio of runs. Sledge, Wilson and Pancho Quintana all reached base and scored in the inning. The Wolves batted around in the third and talhed four more runs in the fourth pn two hits and another Warrior error. Chuck Segura, Matt Plugge and Stauffer drove in runs in the fourth. Sunset's offense was led by Danny Dillingham and Larry Norman, who had two hits apiece. Dillingham singled and scored in the first. Las Vegas rips Wolves Las Vegas scored nine runs in the top of the sixth inning Monday at Baker on the way to a 20-2 thrashing of Timet. The Wildcats had 14 hits and benefitted from six Wolves errors in winning their fifth straight game. Timet was headed by Segura, who went 3-for-3 with a triple. Stauffer and pitcher Cory Frehner also had extra base hits against Las Vegas starting pitcher Lloyd Nelson. Wolves complete league schedule Following the two nonleague games with St. George Wednesday, Timet is scheduled for a pair of contests today with the Las Vegas Knights. The first game with the Knights is the resumption of a suspended game, started July 1. The game will be picked up in the top of the eighth inning with Timet batting. The Wolves held a 6-4 lead when umpires called the game^after an on-field altercation with Timet coaches. After the suspended game is played, the Wolves and Knights will meet in a second regularly scheduled game. Both contests will be played at Sunset Park, beginning at 7 p.m. Timet, hoping to secure one of the top eight spots in the league standings and qualify for next week's state tournament, may need a sweep over the Knights to make the playoffs. Connie Mack All-Star game Saturday A nine-inning league All-Star game will be played at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at UNLV's Bamson Field. Timet's Shane Wilson, Eddie Bustmante, Tim Woods, Pancho Quintana and Rich Stegman will join the Eastern Division All-Stars in the the game against the Western Division All-Stars. The Wolves' Kevin Clark and Chrjs^edge will compete in a Home Run Derby contest, scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Connie Macl( baseball Monday, July 16 Las Vegas 20 Timet 2 Game went six innings LM Vegaa 310 619-20 14 1 Timet 010 010-2 5 6 Nelson and Hillers. Frehner, Segura (5) and Wilson. W—Nelson. L— Frehner (2-6). 2B-A. Johnson (LV), Stauffer (Tim). 3B-Peccole (LV), Segura (Tim), Frehner (Tim). HR-A. Johnson (LV), two on in 4th; Blackburn (LV), one on in 6th. Connie Mack baseball Tuesday, July 17 Timet 13 Sunset Signs 2 Game went five innings nmet 306 40-13 11 2 Simaet 200 00-2 6 4 Stauffer and Wilson. McClain, Sco. Zavsza (4) and O'Rourke. W-Stauffer (2-3). L-McClain. 2BWilson (Tim), Stauffer (Tim). 3B—Quintana (Tim). Henderson Major All-Stars eliminated after losses to Paradise Valley, Red Rock ON HIS TOES—Dave Snyder (8), a second baseman for the Las Vegas Reds Intercollegiate Baseball Team, went 2-f or^ with a triple in last Saturday's opening game witn the Rancho Santiago (CaUf.) Dona. He is pictured at left in a recent Reds game against the Colton (Calif.) Expos. Photo by Howwd Pmrmm Successive losses to Paradise Valley American and Red Rock eliminated the Henderson AllStars from the District 2 Major Little League Tournament at Sunset Park this week. The local team lost its opening game Monday 8-2 to the PVA All-Stars, then fell 6-1 to Red Rock in Tuesday's losers' bracket game. The Mtgor All-Stars were the last Henderson Little League team still alive in district playoff action. Henderson took an early 1-0 lead against Red Rock in the first inning of the elimination game. (Carlos Lueck and Chad Angell both reached on hits with Angell's safety scoring Lueck. See Ma)ors, Page 16

PAGE 16

• ^ I ^ ^ H j .1 111 ifMM I ^U ^ • I W <^|,1^ s. l' ? ^i^^^^^^^^^WW^^^^ ivq^v9inw i-. Page 16 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Thursday, July 19, 1990 Local swim team wins first meet The Henderson Parks and Recreation Department swim team won its first competitive meet Saturday at Lorin Williams Pool. Matched against a team representing the Clark County Parks and Recreation Department, the Henderson swimmers outscored their visitors, 884-511. Eight HPRD team members posted first place finishes in the competition. The Henderson event winners, Usted with their age division, swim events and times, iiicluded: John McMahon, boys 8 and under division, first in 25-yard butterfly (28.82 seconds), 25 breaststroke (28.65) and 25 freestyle (22.96); Matt Herren, boys 8 and under, 25 backstroke (26.37); Brian McMahon, boys 9-10,251)reast (22.71) and 2f5" free (21.06). In the 11-12-year-old girls division, HPRD's Cara and Calleen Chamberlain gained event victories. Cara Chamberlain won the 50-yard fly in 40.82 and the 50 breast in 45.94. Calleen Chamberlain took the 50 free with a time of 35.38. Darren Weed chalked up another victory for HPRD in the 11-12 boys division. He won the 50 breast in 45.81. Teammate Ryan Tennant was fastest in the 50 breast for boys 15 and older. He clocked a 36.46 in winning the event. HPRD's Ronnie Blau swept the four races in the boys 13-14 division. Blau won the 50 fly in 36.53, took the 50 back in 38.0, triumphed in the 50 breast in 36.44 and finished first in the 50 free with a time of 31.28. The local team, coached by Chris McMahon and Cameron Plummer, goes for its second meet victory against an undetermined opponent at 9 a.m. Saturday, also at Lorin Williams. TOPPING C-DIVISION SOFTBALLThe Gargis Realty men's softball team captured the Parks and Recreation CDivision championship. The team won all 17 of its games this season. Gargis team members include, in no particular order: Ernie Aguilar, Jimmie Light, Kenny Kanger, Mike Sandoval, Dan DriscoU and Roy Sipes. Other team members are: Don LeClair, James Gutierrez, Carlos Archuleta, John Shifflett, Kenny Ash and Tony Lopez. Danny Montano and Coach Jim Ash complete the team. Photo by Dave Phillips HPRD to offer softball by moonlight The Henderson Parks and team, double-ehmination men's Seniors from Page 15 (the runner heading to third). Festa raced for third and came home with the winning run when Brandon, trying to throw Festa out, overthrew third. "Everybody enjoyed being involved in the game," HenderRecreation Department holds its second annual Midnight Madness One-Pitch Softball Tournament this weekend at Morrell Park. A round-robin, co-recreational tournament for six teams is set to begin at 7 p.m. Friday. On Saturday, an eighttournament is scheduled. The championship game in the men's tourney is scheduled for 11:10 p.m. The softball games are expected to conclude about midnight both Friday and Saturday. For more information, call 565-2116. -7 7 ^-From Curtis' Corner By Joey Curtis Another busy week is ahead in boxing with three world championship fights set. The first title bout takes place tonight in Seattle, where IBF Super Middleweight Champion LindeU Holmes puts his title on the line against Carl Sullivan. The second scheduled championship fight is set for Friday in France, where World Boxing Association Cruiserweight Champion Paul Tiozza fights Paul Whittaker. On Saturday in Sydney, Australia, unbeaten Jeff Fenech was to vie for his fourth world championship, the World Box-, ing Coimcil super featherweight crown, against former featherweight and junior Ughtweight champion Juan LaPorte. But Fenech is weak from a hngering virus and he dropped out of the bout. Lines from the lanes By Ruth Soehlke Nevada amateur no-tap tournament: The tirst no-tap bowling tournament sponsored by Southwest Promotions and the Nevada Amateur No-Tap Tournament Club begins Friday at the El Rancho Hotel BowUng Center. The tourney finals will be held at 4:30 p.m., Simday. The event is open to all Nevada residents with an average of 179 or lower. Eventually, the tournament will run once a month. For more information, contact Southwest Promotions at 645-9631. Amateur Super Bowl Tournament: The weekly tommament will be held at Gold (Doast Lanes this weekend and other move to the Showboat Lanes July 27-29. The Amateur Super Bowl tournaments offer a guaranteed $1,000 top prize weekly. Bowler Derby at Showboat: Bowlers can sign up early for the annual Bowler Derby at the Showboat Hotel and Bowling Center for $7. The event, co-sponsored by the Showboat and KTNV-TV, will be held July 28, with proceeds going to the Hollyhock Adult Day Care Center. The early entry deadhne is July 27. Late entries will be accepted for $10. The two highest-scoring bowlers from each group: men, women, seniors and juniors will roll off in the finals, scheduled at noon, July 30. The tournament championship will be broadcast on KTNV (Channel 13) at 3:30 p;m., Aug. 4. Ladies Pro Bowling Tour: The Ladies Professional Bowling Tournament Gold Rush Mixed Doubles Shoot-Out will be held at Sam's Town Lanes, Aug. 18. The LPBT National Doubles will follow Aug. 19-20. ESPN, tomney finals broadcast will be at 9 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 15. K-Mart challenge to reward perfect game: K-mart, the world's largest retailer of bowling products, has sweetened the pot for bowlers reaching nationally televised Ladies Pro Bowlers Tour stepladder finals. The K-mart Challenge will reward the first woman bowler who rolls a 300 game during televised finals with a $1(X),(XX) bonus. The award is the fust cash prize of its kind to be offered in women's bowling. Majors from Page 15 "In the first three innings, we had their pitcher on the ropes," Henderson Majors Head Coach Kent Bitsko said. "We scored only one run and [the Red Rock pitcher] settled down after that." Angell was the starting pitcher for the Henderson AllStars. Although Red Rock taUied six runs against the local hurler, half of the runs Angell allowed were unearned. In the opening loss to PVA, Henderson trailed 4-2 through three and a half innings. But Paradise Valley American colson Manager Tom Grine said. "Someone had to lose and unfortunately, it was us." • Day was not shy about expressing admiration for the Henderson club. "That is the best team I have ever seen them have," he said. "Dennis Crine is awsome." The Henderson team, representing its league for the first time in the Seniors tournament, finished with one victory. As the teams left the field, the Henderson All-Stars gathered for a spirited huddle. Before the team shouted out its name, an unidentified player said, "make it loud and proud." lected four runs in the bottom of the fourth to take control. Jeremy Botkin and Aric Sandoval each singled and scored a run for the local team. Mike Constantin also had a hit. Henderson loaded the bases with no outs in the third, but was able to plate just two runs. "Our pitching was as good as I expected, but we did not hit the ball," Bitsko said. Bitsko said the team was not beaten by a lack of effort. 'The kids worked real hard," the coach said. Fenech is one of the most underrated and overlooked fighters in the world today. Not many people know Fenech has already won three world championships, the same number of titles won by the well-known Alexis Arguello and one less championship than famous slugger Roberto Duran gained. Another upcoming championship will be held Monday in the Forum in Inglewood, Calif, where WBC Light Flyweight Champion Humberto Gonzalez goes up against Jung-Keun Lim. The fight is scheduled for 12 rounds. The word is if Gonzalez beats Lim, then Gonzalez' next title defense will be against Domingo Sosa. Looking ahead, another title fight has been scheduled next week. On July 28 in St. Petersburg, Fla., International Boxing Federation Cruiserweight Champion Jeff Lampkin meets Siza Makhathini. In Tokyo World Boxing Association Yul-Woo Lee is scheduled to defend his crown against Leopard Tamakuma on July 29. IBF Light Heavyweight Champion Prince Charles Wilhams takes on Michael Moorer Aug. 18 in either Aubiu^ Hills, Mich, or in Atlantic City. WB A Junior Middleweight Champion Julian Jackson is moving up in weight. He is set to challenge Herol Graham for the vacant WBC middleweight championship. If Jackson wins, he will reUnquish the WBA junior middleweight title and Carlos EUiott and Jun-Sok Hwang will then fight for the vacant crown. If Jackson is unsuccessful in his attempt for the WBC championship, then he will keep his WBA title and fight Elliot. 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Friday, July 19 & 20, 1990 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Page IB Sports 'Yosemite Valley of Nevada' protected ELKO—On the maps, it's called Lamoille Canyon. But Lamoille's spectacular beauty has earned it a special nickname: the "Yosemite Valley of Nevada." The Trust for Public Land has just completed transferring 5,589 acres of the canyon to the Humboldt National Forest. The property is completely siuTounded by national forest land. Lamoille is located about 30 miles south of Elko in the Ruby Mountains and is known for its 12-miIe-long, steep glacial walls, cool forestlands, freeflowing steams, aspen groves that splash the area with fall color and breathtaking scenic vistas. Efforts to protect Lamoille involved a partnership between TPL, a San Francisco-based national land conservation organization, the U.S. Forest Service, national citizens groups and a host of local businesses and residents. "Elko residents were the driving force for need to preserve the canyon and its heritage for future generations," said AarMi Peskin, TPL project manager for Lamoille. "It was a pleasure to be involved with a citizens' effort to preserve one of Nevada's greatest natiual wonders in the heart of the Ruby Moxmtains," said Peskin, adding that 70,000 people visit the siurounding range each year. More than $180,000 was raised from local residents and mining companies towards the purchase price. "This was a very difficult See Valley, Page 2B Mlines ^ B Jim Goff "l?Pliat'& that buzzing noise? It's the alarm clock. 5 a.m. That was a short night. Another day starts in the life of a fishing guide. Put the coffee pot on and hit the shower. After dressing, outside to take the cover off the boat and prepare it for another day. After all these years, the routine is automatic. How many chents today? Re-check the charter book, three people from Chicaco, two men one woman. Wonder what type of equipment the/re used to? Better play it safe and take some spinning and bait-casting gear. Back into the house, don't forget the six to 10 bags of anchovies we will need for today. Hope the wind doesn't blow like yesterday. Turn on the weather channel; looks good. Maybe today we will run out of the lower basin to the upper part of the Lake to get away from the other boats that crowd in on you the minute they see you net a tish. Gulp down a cup of coffee and fill the thermos. Most clients like coffee. Hope they haven't been up gambling all night and have hangovers. If we are going to run up the lake, better stop and get a little more gas in the boat. Today looks like we will be using about 30 gallons, better play it safe and put in 40. If we're leaving the lower basin, better pick up some sandwiches and more pop from the deli. Better get going, have to meet them at 6 a.m. at the tackle shop. Hope the shop has licenses and stamps. After exchanging lies with the people at the tackle shop, the clients arrive. Seems like a nice group, everyone's eager to go—finally we're off! They follow me to the launch ramp. I unload and launch the boat, as they collect windbreakers, sun screen and hats from their vehicles. Yes, they have their licenses and stamps. All aboard! Up the lake we go 30 miles. They ooh and aah at the beauty of the desert, as we go through the canyon into the upper basin. They don't have moimtains like this in Chicago. Having traveled this route for years, I take it for granted. I'm pleased they notice small things like birds, wild burros and hawks. It's apparent they enjoy the outdoors and are glad to be away from the big city. After a 40-minute run, I ease the boat to idle, turn on the Hsh Hnder and start searching for those evermoving stripers. Suddenly there they are, showing suspended in 50 feet of water in the brush near the bottom. I ease the anchor down and start chumming, after a few minutes you can see them coming up from the bottom to get the chum. It's a dirty job, but somebody's got to do it. Finally, the 30th fish is placed on ice in the cooler. After a great deal of back-ali^ping, laughing and reliving many of the bites and guessing the size of the ones that got away, we eat the sandwiches, drink a cold pop and work our way back down the lake, taking in some of the sights, such as Boulder Waah, Wishing Well Cove and Jamee Bay. Back at the dock, they head for the restrooms and I head for the fish cleaner. Oh no!! the cleaner's broke. After cleaning fish on the tailgate of the truck with no water you wonder if it's all worth it. I hand them their fillets in Zip-k)ck bags and we say our goodbyes. Wall, I better get home and clean the boat, another charter tomorrow. I k>ve it!I Keq> your hooks sharp and good fishing. 1990 archery, muzzleloader tag drawings completed By John W. King Nevada hunters who missed the June 13 archery and muzzleloader deer tag deadline have another opportunity to obtain a tag and hunt in the state, according to Nevada Department of Wildlife. Results of the computerized drawing held on July 6, show 110 resident archery and one muzzleloader deer himt tags remain available. All but eight nonresident archery tags were allocated, according to an NDOW spokesman, and no nonresident muzzleloader tags remained after the drawing. Hunters who apply for and obtain one of the remaining 110 reident archery tags may hunt in all areas open to archery deer hunting, except those management areas with specified restricted quotas as described in the 1990 Deer Seasons and Regulations brochure. Adijacent is a complete listing of remaining resident and nonresident deer tags. All remaining archery and muzzleloader tags will be available and sold through the Reno office to eligible applicants through the process explained in the 1990 Deer Seasons and Regulations brochure. To allow those in remote areas of the state the same opportunity as individuals living Mgmt. Area Statewide, except qpota areas Hunt 1141—Resident Deer Archery Hunt Hunter Choice # Season Dates 14 Aug. 11-Sept. 7 Quota 110 Hunt 1171—Resident Deer Muzzleloader Hunt Mgmt. Area Hunter Choice # Season Dates 250 33 Sept. 8-23 Quota 1 Hunt 1241—Nonresident Deer Archery Hunt Mgmt. Area Hunter Choice # Season Dates 022 05 Aug. 11-Sept. 7 192 10 Aug. 11-Sept. 7 195 ^ 12 Aug. 11-Sept. 7 291 13 Aug. 11-Sept. 7 Quota 1 2 3 2 in close proximity to Reno, NDOW has established Tuesday, July 31, as the first day they wiU accept applications for the remaining tags. All applications must have a July 31 or later U.S. Postal Service or other authorized mail service cancellation date. 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• ^ I ^ ^ H j .1 111 ifMM I ^U ^ • I W <^|,1^ s. l' ? ^i^^^^^^^^^WW^^^^ ivq^v9inw i-. Page 16 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Thursday, July 19, 1990 Local swim team wins first meet The Henderson Parks and Recreation Department swim team won its first competitive meet Saturday at Lorin Williams Pool. Matched against a team representing the Clark County Parks and Recreation Department, the Henderson swimmers outscored their visitors, 884-511. Eight HPRD team members posted first place finishes in the competition. The Henderson event winners, Usted with their age division, swim events and times, iiicluded: John McMahon, boys 8 and under division, first in 25-yard butterfly (28.82 seconds), 25 breaststroke (28.65) and 25 freestyle (22.96); Matt Herren, boys 8 and under, 25 backstroke (26.37); Brian McMahon, boys 9-10,251)reast (22.71) and 2f5" free (21.06). In the 11-12-year-old girls division, HPRD's Cara and Calleen Chamberlain gained event victories. Cara Chamberlain won the 50-yard fly in 40.82 and the 50 breast in 45.94. Calleen Chamberlain took the 50 free with a time of 35.38. Darren Weed chalked up another victory for HPRD in the 11-12 boys division. He won the 50 breast in 45.81. Teammate Ryan Tennant was fastest in the 50 breast for boys 15 and older. He clocked a 36.46 in winning the event. HPRD's Ronnie Blau swept the four races in the boys 13-14 division. Blau won the 50 fly in 36.53, took the 50 back in 38.0, triumphed in the 50 breast in 36.44 and finished first in the 50 free with a time of 31.28. The local team, coached by Chris McMahon and Cameron Plummer, goes for its second meet victory against an undetermined opponent at 9 a.m. Saturday, also at Lorin Williams. TOPPING C-DIVISION SOFTBALLThe Gargis Realty men's softball team captured the Parks and Recreation CDivision championship. The team won all 17 of its games this season. Gargis team members include, in no particular order: Ernie Aguilar, Jimmie Light, Kenny Kanger, Mike Sandoval, Dan DriscoU and Roy Sipes. Other team members are: Don LeClair, James Gutierrez, Carlos Archuleta, John Shifflett, Kenny Ash and Tony Lopez. Danny Montano and Coach Jim Ash complete the team. Photo by Dave Phillips HPRD to offer softball by moonlight The Henderson Parks and team, double-ehmination men's Seniors from Page 15 (the runner heading to third). Festa raced for third and came home with the winning run when Brandon, trying to throw Festa out, overthrew third. "Everybody enjoyed being involved in the game," HenderRecreation Department holds its second annual Midnight Madness One-Pitch Softball Tournament this weekend at Morrell Park. A round-robin, co-recreational tournament for six teams is set to begin at 7 p.m. Friday. On Saturday, an eighttournament is scheduled. The championship game in the men's tourney is scheduled for 11:10 p.m. The softball games are expected to conclude about midnight both Friday and Saturday. For more information, call 565-2116. -7 7 ^-From Curtis' Corner By Joey Curtis Another busy week is ahead in boxing with three world championship fights set. The first title bout takes place tonight in Seattle, where IBF Super Middleweight Champion LindeU Holmes puts his title on the line against Carl Sullivan. The second scheduled championship fight is set for Friday in France, where World Boxing Association Cruiserweight Champion Paul Tiozza fights Paul Whittaker. On Saturday in Sydney, Australia, unbeaten Jeff Fenech was to vie for his fourth world championship, the World Box-, ing Coimcil super featherweight crown, against former featherweight and junior Ughtweight champion Juan LaPorte. But Fenech is weak from a hngering virus and he dropped out of the bout. Lines from the lanes By Ruth Soehlke Nevada amateur no-tap tournament: The tirst no-tap bowling tournament sponsored by Southwest Promotions and the Nevada Amateur No-Tap Tournament Club begins Friday at the El Rancho Hotel BowUng Center. The tourney finals will be held at 4:30 p.m., Simday. The event is open to all Nevada residents with an average of 179 or lower. Eventually, the tournament will run once a month. For more information, contact Southwest Promotions at 645-9631. Amateur Super Bowl Tournament: The weekly tommament will be held at Gold (Doast Lanes this weekend and other move to the Showboat Lanes July 27-29. The Amateur Super Bowl tournaments offer a guaranteed $1,000 top prize weekly. Bowler Derby at Showboat: Bowlers can sign up early for the annual Bowler Derby at the Showboat Hotel and Bowling Center for $7. The event, co-sponsored by the Showboat and KTNV-TV, will be held July 28, with proceeds going to the Hollyhock Adult Day Care Center. The early entry deadhne is July 27. Late entries will be accepted for $10. The two highest-scoring bowlers from each group: men, women, seniors and juniors will roll off in the finals, scheduled at noon, July 30. The tournament championship will be broadcast on KTNV (Channel 13) at 3:30 p;m., Aug. 4. Ladies Pro Bowling Tour: The Ladies Professional Bowling Tournament Gold Rush Mixed Doubles Shoot-Out will be held at Sam's Town Lanes, Aug. 18. The LPBT National Doubles will follow Aug. 19-20. ESPN, tomney finals broadcast will be at 9 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 15. K-Mart challenge to reward perfect game: K-mart, the world's largest retailer of bowling products, has sweetened the pot for bowlers reaching nationally televised Ladies Pro Bowlers Tour stepladder finals. The K-mart Challenge will reward the first woman bowler who rolls a 300 game during televised finals with a $1(X),(XX) bonus. The award is the fust cash prize of its kind to be offered in women's bowling. Majors from Page 15 "In the first three innings, we had their pitcher on the ropes," Henderson Majors Head Coach Kent Bitsko said. "We scored only one run and [the Red Rock pitcher] settled down after that." Angell was the starting pitcher for the Henderson AllStars. Although Red Rock taUied six runs against the local hurler, half of the runs Angell allowed were unearned. In the opening loss to PVA, Henderson trailed 4-2 through three and a half innings. But Paradise Valley American colson Manager Tom Grine said. "Someone had to lose and unfortunately, it was us." • Day was not shy about expressing admiration for the Henderson club. "That is the best team I have ever seen them have," he said. "Dennis Crine is awsome." The Henderson team, representing its league for the first time in the Seniors tournament, finished with one victory. As the teams left the field, the Henderson All-Stars gathered for a spirited huddle. Before the team shouted out its name, an unidentified player said, "make it loud and proud." lected four runs in the bottom of the fourth to take control. Jeremy Botkin and Aric Sandoval each singled and scored a run for the local team. Mike Constantin also had a hit. Henderson loaded the bases with no outs in the third, but was able to plate just two runs. "Our pitching was as good as I expected, but we did not hit the ball," Bitsko said. Bitsko said the team was not beaten by a lack of effort. 'The kids worked real hard," the coach said. Fenech is one of the most underrated and overlooked fighters in the world today. Not many people know Fenech has already won three world championships, the same number of titles won by the well-known Alexis Arguello and one less championship than famous slugger Roberto Duran gained. Another upcoming championship will be held Monday in the Forum in Inglewood, Calif, where WBC Light Flyweight Champion Humberto Gonzalez goes up against Jung-Keun Lim. The fight is scheduled for 12 rounds. The word is if Gonzalez beats Lim, then Gonzalez' next title defense will be against Domingo Sosa. Looking ahead, another title fight has been scheduled next week. On July 28 in St. Petersburg, Fla., International Boxing Federation Cruiserweight Champion Jeff Lampkin meets Siza Makhathini. In Tokyo World Boxing Association Yul-Woo Lee is scheduled to defend his crown against Leopard Tamakuma on July 29. IBF Light Heavyweight Champion Prince Charles Wilhams takes on Michael Moorer Aug. 18 in either Aubiu^ Hills, Mich, or in Atlantic City. WB A Junior Middleweight Champion Julian Jackson is moving up in weight. He is set to challenge Herol Graham for the vacant WBC middleweight championship. If Jackson wins, he will reUnquish the WBA junior middleweight title and Carlos EUiott and Jun-Sok Hwang will then fight for the vacant crown. If Jackson is unsuccessful in his attempt for the WBC championship, then he will keep his WBA title and fight Elliot. 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Friday, July 19 & 20, 1990 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Page IB Sports 'Yosemite Valley of Nevada' protected ELKO—On the maps, it's called Lamoille Canyon. But Lamoille's spectacular beauty has earned it a special nickname: the "Yosemite Valley of Nevada." The Trust for Public Land has just completed transferring 5,589 acres of the canyon to the Humboldt National Forest. The property is completely siuTounded by national forest land. Lamoille is located about 30 miles south of Elko in the Ruby Mountains and is known for its 12-miIe-long, steep glacial walls, cool forestlands, freeflowing steams, aspen groves that splash the area with fall color and breathtaking scenic vistas. Efforts to protect Lamoille involved a partnership between TPL, a San Francisco-based national land conservation organization, the U.S. Forest Service, national citizens groups and a host of local businesses and residents. "Elko residents were the driving force for need to preserve the canyon and its heritage for future generations," said AarMi Peskin, TPL project manager for Lamoille. "It was a pleasure to be involved with a citizens' effort to preserve one of Nevada's greatest natiual wonders in the heart of the Ruby Moxmtains," said Peskin, adding that 70,000 people visit the siurounding range each year. More than $180,000 was raised from local residents and mining companies towards the purchase price. "This was a very difficult See Valley, Page 2B Mlines ^ B Jim Goff "l?Pliat'& that buzzing noise? It's the alarm clock. 5 a.m. That was a short night. Another day starts in the life of a fishing guide. Put the coffee pot on and hit the shower. After dressing, outside to take the cover off the boat and prepare it for another day. After all these years, the routine is automatic. How many chents today? Re-check the charter book, three people from Chicaco, two men one woman. Wonder what type of equipment the/re used to? Better play it safe and take some spinning and bait-casting gear. Back into the house, don't forget the six to 10 bags of anchovies we will need for today. Hope the wind doesn't blow like yesterday. Turn on the weather channel; looks good. Maybe today we will run out of the lower basin to the upper part of the Lake to get away from the other boats that crowd in on you the minute they see you net a tish. Gulp down a cup of coffee and fill the thermos. Most clients like coffee. Hope they haven't been up gambling all night and have hangovers. If we are going to run up the lake, better stop and get a little more gas in the boat. Today looks like we will be using about 30 gallons, better play it safe and put in 40. If we're leaving the lower basin, better pick up some sandwiches and more pop from the deli. Better get going, have to meet them at 6 a.m. at the tackle shop. Hope the shop has licenses and stamps. After exchanging lies with the people at the tackle shop, the clients arrive. Seems like a nice group, everyone's eager to go—finally we're off! They follow me to the launch ramp. I unload and launch the boat, as they collect windbreakers, sun screen and hats from their vehicles. Yes, they have their licenses and stamps. All aboard! Up the lake we go 30 miles. They ooh and aah at the beauty of the desert, as we go through the canyon into the upper basin. They don't have moimtains like this in Chicago. Having traveled this route for years, I take it for granted. I'm pleased they notice small things like birds, wild burros and hawks. It's apparent they enjoy the outdoors and are glad to be away from the big city. After a 40-minute run, I ease the boat to idle, turn on the Hsh Hnder and start searching for those evermoving stripers. Suddenly there they are, showing suspended in 50 feet of water in the brush near the bottom. I ease the anchor down and start chumming, after a few minutes you can see them coming up from the bottom to get the chum. It's a dirty job, but somebody's got to do it. Finally, the 30th fish is placed on ice in the cooler. After a great deal of back-ali^ping, laughing and reliving many of the bites and guessing the size of the ones that got away, we eat the sandwiches, drink a cold pop and work our way back down the lake, taking in some of the sights, such as Boulder Waah, Wishing Well Cove and Jamee Bay. Back at the dock, they head for the restrooms and I head for the fish cleaner. Oh no!! the cleaner's broke. After cleaning fish on the tailgate of the truck with no water you wonder if it's all worth it. I hand them their fillets in Zip-k)ck bags and we say our goodbyes. Wall, I better get home and clean the boat, another charter tomorrow. I k>ve it!I Keq> your hooks sharp and good fishing. 1990 archery, muzzleloader tag drawings completed By John W. King Nevada hunters who missed the June 13 archery and muzzleloader deer tag deadline have another opportunity to obtain a tag and hunt in the state, according to Nevada Department of Wildlife. Results of the computerized drawing held on July 6, show 110 resident archery and one muzzleloader deer himt tags remain available. All but eight nonresident archery tags were allocated, according to an NDOW spokesman, and no nonresident muzzleloader tags remained after the drawing. Hunters who apply for and obtain one of the remaining 110 reident archery tags may hunt in all areas open to archery deer hunting, except those management areas with specified restricted quotas as described in the 1990 Deer Seasons and Regulations brochure. Adijacent is a complete listing of remaining resident and nonresident deer tags. All remaining archery and muzzleloader tags will be available and sold through the Reno office to eligible applicants through the process explained in the 1990 Deer Seasons and Regulations brochure. To allow those in remote areas of the state the same opportunity as individuals living Mgmt. Area Statewide, except qpota areas Hunt 1141—Resident Deer Archery Hunt Hunter Choice # Season Dates 14 Aug. 11-Sept. 7 Quota 110 Hunt 1171—Resident Deer Muzzleloader Hunt Mgmt. Area Hunter Choice # Season Dates 250 33 Sept. 8-23 Quota 1 Hunt 1241—Nonresident Deer Archery Hunt Mgmt. Area Hunter Choice # Season Dates 022 05 Aug. 11-Sept. 7 192 10 Aug. 11-Sept. 7 195 ^ 12 Aug. 11-Sept. 7 291 13 Aug. 11-Sept. 7 Quota 1 2 3 2 in close proximity to Reno, NDOW has established Tuesday, July 31, as the first day they wiU accept applications for the remaining tags. All applications must have a July 31 or later U.S. Postal Service or other authorized mail service cancellation date. 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H^^W^a^VWi mmim' mm Page 2B. HenderMn Home News, Boulder Qty Newt, Green Valley News ThuTMlay, Friday. July 19 & 20, 1990 Tortoise projects racing along By Mike Donahue Projects aimed at giving the threatened desert tortoise a permanent toehold on existence are progressing rapidly, according to the Nevada Department of Wildlife. Not only is the planned Desert Tortoise Conservation Center swiftly taking shape under the auspices of the Bureau of Land Management, but successfiil collection of the slow-moving animals from planned construction sites is a daily occurrence. Bob Turner, NDOW supervising wildlife biologist, said agency personnel have gathered approximately 150 tortoises just a month after the U.S. Fish and WildUfe Service issued the collection permit. The permit allows for collection of up to 871 animals from specifled parcels. "Out of the 7,000 acres designated for tortoise removal, about 1,000 acres has been cleared," Turner said. "That means that construction development on those areas can resume. "The process so far has been for environmental consultants, hired by the developer, to locate tortoises on designated land," Turner said. "Then NDOW personnel go out to collect the animals and bring them back to the lab facilities at the regional office. These lab facilities will eventually be located at the tort conservation center." After the animal is in the lab, Turner said biologists draw blood, flush its nasal passages with a culture medium to check for bacteria, take various measurements including weight and length, and then permanently mark it. The blood and culture medium are both sent to a Las Vegas lab where a proHle will be determined. Turner said tortoises collected that exhibit the upper respiratory disease syndrome, responsible for the deaths of so many of the creatures, will probably be sent to the University of Florida, Gainesville, for fiuiiier study. Three tortoises a month are scheduled to be sent to the school. "After testing at the lab facility, the animals are then taken to the pens constructed at DTCC. The entire complex covers one square mile or 640 acres," Turner said. Ilowever, only about 240 acres have been fenced so far." Inside the fenced area there are about 150 pena of varying sizes, "all the way from 60 feet by 50 feet, down to 6 feet by 6 feet," Turner added. Hatchling pens have been constructed and covered with a mesh fabric so that ravens cannot reach the smaller tortoises. "Everything we can do is being done to make the environment as natural as possible for the animals," Turner said. "We have constructed burrows for them and installed Bihall plots of grass so they can feed whenever they want. "Through the cooperation of everyone concerned with the preservation efforts of the desert tortoise, we can expect them to survive and even prosper," Turner said. Herpetologist Brad Hardenbrook is the Nevada Department of WUdlife's resident tortoise expert. Photo by Mike DoMhne HPRD family day set The Henderson Parks and Recreation Deparunent. in concluding Recreation and Parks month, has scheduled a family day torn 4:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Saturday, July 28, at Fox lUdge Park. Spokespersons said that there will be EMxieland music, spoits, games and childrens' crafts provided. There will also be a sidewalk drawing contest. For more information, call the Silver Springs Community Center at 435-3814. Aerobics Class set The Henderson Parks and Recreadon Department will hold an aerobics class from 7 pjn. to 8 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays at the HendeRon Gvic Center, 201 Lead St histmctor Kathy Kline will begin the session on July 23. Cost of the four-week session is $6, spokespersons said. Those interested should register at the Civic Center For more information, call 5652121 or 435-3814. Hilton peregrines ready to talce to the air By Geoff Schneider The three young peregrine falcons that were placed atop the Las Vegas Hilton recently should be taking to the air soon —or may have already done so, according to the Nevada Department of WildUfe. They are progressing very well and are just beginning to fly," said NDOW biologist Ross Haley. "Hopefully, we will soon be seeing some of their spectacular acrobatics above the hotel." On June 11, the Department of Wildlife placed the three eyas (chicks) on top of the f'l^fnSF^'^me of then: release they were sUghtly more i than a month old. I The birds are being housed — in a specially constructed "Hack box," but are free to wander about the roof. They are being monitored aroundthe-clock by NDOW biologists via a closed-circuit television, which is also transmitted to television sets in all of the hotle's guest rooms. "So far all three birds have attempted to fly and, as expected, have flown from the roof down to the Hilton's parking lot and the nearby Las Vegas Coimtry Club," Haley said. "Since they are not yet strong enough to fly back to the r( f, we have had to pick them up and return them to the hotel." Haley said the three birds should soon be strong enough to make the return flight to the roof of the 30-8tory hotel. Within two weeks they will probably begin chasing each other and staging mock combat in preparation for the day when they will have to fend for theinselveg:'"' • Currently, NDOW biologists and university students are providing for all of the falcon's needs. They are provided with water and daily rations of dometic quail and pigeons. "It will still be quite awhile before they make their Hrst kills," Haley said, "and even after they begin making kills. Tags from Page 1B we will continue to provide food until the time that they are fully able to fend for themselves." It is the second year that the NDOW has placed peregrine falcons on top of the Hilton. Last year, three male birds and one female bird were released at the hotel. The current release consists of two males and one female bird. Teregrine falcons are an endangered species and this program is part of an ongoing national effort for the recovery of thft ^qiecias," Hal^ aaid. "Because of reintroductions aadi at this, we are hopeful that someday per^pines may be removed from the endangered species list." The Las Vegas Hilton has provided $10,000 grants for the past two years to the NDOW to purchase the falcons. The hotel has also provided many thousands of dollars worUi of material assistance with the program. Valley from Page IB transaction which would not have been successful without the generous contributions and positive response from the community," Peskin said, gold mining companies Dee Gold, American Barrick and Newmont gold, and many individuals contributed to the acquisition campaign. Each year, thousands of visitors make the 30-minute drive from downtown Elko, climbing out of arid sagebrush into the welcome contrast of the canyon's mahogany, limber pine and aspen groves. The canyon is a favorite of hikers, Hshermen, equestrians and cyclists^, spokespersons. said. "For several years this acquisition has been our No. 1 priority^* said John Inman, supervisor of the Humboldt National Forest. The beauty of Lamoille Canyon is virtually unmatched." The support of the entire Nevada Congressional delegation was key to securing Land and Water Conservation Funds from Congress. ^'^fir^^,4,^^,^,i,u^t^^^t4f^k^^^f^t^f^,^t^r^f^t^,^,•k^,^,^t^r^r^t^t^, FACTORY-DIRECT I SOLAR SCREENS Participating in Nevada Power rebate PLAN AHEAD INDUSTRIES A Henderson Company CALL NOW 565-1246 ••••••••••••••••••^•^^^^•^^^•••••^^•••i It THEALLNEW^ M, ;ii; J*: |J| /H • -* FnOAY, JULY 20ih SATUNDAY. JULY 21at ALL DAY AND NMHT RELAXED, CASUAL ATiMOSPHERE Women, Couplet & Bachelor Parties Welcome UVE DJ EVERY NIQHT 1024 N. Bouldr Hwy., (Next to the CMtie Bwtm Ceeino) (DMignatad Offver Program Honored) antlerless hunts will be announced no later than Aug. 1; however, it is likely that applicants will know whether or not they draw a tag prior to that date. Those who did obtain a rifle buck tag may not apply for or obtain a muzzleloader or archery deer hunt tag. Those who obtained an antlerless (doe) tag may apply for a remaining muzzleloader or a remaining archery tag, not both. Those who are unsuccessful in obtaining a rifle buck tag may apply for any remaining rifle buck, muzzleloader or archery tags, but may obtain no more than a total of one tag of the three types. Seasons and regulations brochures are available at all fishing and hunting license agents and at all NDOW offices. HP^'ciLLULAFr ^ FROM 299! 11 I HAN0HELDSFROM*SM I BEST TELEPHONE E • sous HfSTMCTIOMSiVKT • • • f\A2ii&^ A Pre-owned Gar or Truck & Save $1000's! By leaslns a pre-owned car or truck from Las Mesas Auto Leasing, you can save thousands in monthly payments! We can lease any car — new or used — to Just about anyone. And, approve the deal in less than one hour. • Low rates • No credit hassles • One-hour approval Who could ask for morel Can us today for more information. Las Vegas Auto Leasing New and Used Cars tucks RVs Boats Equipment Computers And morel HEMEMMIt: We would like to hove your leasing txjsiness. If you have t>cen turned dov^ for any reason, please call and see If we can help. CallJimBonacci 457-1021 Located at FIndlayOkJs 3094 East Fremont J Pick a pair and pocket the savings. Men's Abilene Boots...OnlY $89.98 You're guaranteed quality, comfort, style, and savings when you pick a pair of spcdaDy priced men's boots by Abilene. Ohoose black, gray or tan with 13" allleather quarter, narrow round toe and dress western heel. Suggested Retail: $100.00 AiVM'UV\Z\ JUT SAM'S TOWN Boulder & Nellls / 454-8017 Open Dally Sale price good while supplies last on In-stock merchandise only. Thnnday, Friday, Jii]y 19 A 20. 1990 Handeraon Homa Newa, Boulder City Nawa, Graaa Vallay Nawa Pia SB Currier files for county treasurer John Currier, 62, a lifetime Democrat, has Hied for the office of Clark County treasurer. He ran for the office four years ago, and lost in the primary election. Now he must face the incumbent, Mark Aston, in the 1990 primary. Currier is seeking the office of county treasurer because he says he knows that he is qualified, due to his 33 years in the hotel-gaming industry, both as a casino games supervisor and casino counting room cash count and audit supervisor. He served as former founding director and treasurer of the Riviera Hotel employees foundation, where he worked from 1968 to 1977, and also served for several years as treasurer of his local Baptist Church. Currier was employed more than 12 years as a casino supervisor in 1977, at the MGM Grand, that later became Ball/s Grand Hotel. He retired in 1990 to run for the office df Clark County treasurer. Currier has served as a volunteer search and rescue pilot for the Clark County Sheriffs Aero Squadron and was the unit's former operations officer. He also flew search missions for the Civil Air Patrol Squadron 43 in California. Currier is also a volunteer deputy constable, North Las Vegas Township, supporting the charitable functions held in Clark County over the years, during which more than 17,000 hours of pubUc service have been contributed by the deputies and NLV Constable's office. Currier has been active for many years as Democratic precinct chairman and was a delegate to the 1990 Clark County and State Democratic conventions. He is also a longtime member of the North Las Vegas Democratic Club. Currier is a member of the Showboat gathering to address national problems John Currier National Sheriffs Association, The American Legion, a U.S. Army Air Corps veteran and is a member of the American Association of Retired Persons. Currier was in the printing business for several years and now as a hobby is publisher of the New Nevada Democrat newsletter. He and his wife. Pearl, have three daughters, four grandchildren and one great-grandson. All but the latter help "grandpa" with circulation of the paper, family spokespersons said. State AFL-CIO convention underway The Nevada Stiite AFL-CIO is holding its 34 th annual convention through Saturday at the Dunes Hotel in Las Vegas. Claude Evans, executive secretary-tressurer of the state labor group, says that approximately 200 delegates representing 79 local unions, two building and construction trades coimcils, two central labor councils and eight retiree groups, are scheduled to attend the annual convention. John Sweeney, international president of the Service Employees Union with a nationwide membership of 900,000, is the keynote speaker as well as Ken Young, executive assistant to AFL-CIO president Lane Kirkland. The Rev. Jesse Jackson will address a Rainbow Coalition luncheon scheduled at 6 p.m. today at the Dimes Hotel and will lead a rally for striking union members later this evening downtown on Fremont Street. Elections to endorse statewide pohtical candidates will be held Friday. In order for the Nevada State AFL-CIO to endorse a candidate, 66% percent of the delegates at the convention must cast their vote for the candidate. Evans said, "Elections will also be held on Saturday for the positions of president and executive secretary-treasurer of the Nevada State AFL-CIO and five vice presidents on the Nevada State AFL-CIO Executive Board." Census forms Census fonms are available in Room 29 of the Henderson Civic Center for those who were missed in the count. The city of Henderson will mail completed fomis, spokespersons said. Formore information, call 5650235 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. By Robert Grove Fisher Managing Editor Representatives from more than 2,400 dvic groups have been invited to attend "Freedom Call "90," a threenlay series of discussions on issues and problems facing the nation scheduled to begin Sunday at the Showboat Hotel in Las Vegas. The event is sponsored by the Center for Action, headquartered m Boulder City. Paul Fisher, founder and owner of the Fisher Space Pen Co. in Boulder City, is president of the CFA. According to Fisher, "The CFA has a positive plan to baUmce the Federal budget... and would federalize the Federal Reserve System, equalize foreign trade and credit, repeal the 17th Amendment and require literal interpretation, compliance and accurate enforcement of the Cpnstitution. "The CFA also has a plan to elevate American education," Fisher wrote in a flyer announcing "Freedom Call '90." "Because of unique advantages, the CFA is working a solution to the drug problem and continues to seek freedom for our prisoners of war," he added. Fisher wrote that CFA believes "the way to change 'the' government back to 'our' government is through grassroots citizen-intensive programs providing solutions to correct identified problems." Among the scheduled speakers at "Freedom Call '90" is Army Col. James "Bo" Gritz, the U.S.'s most-decorated Green Beret commander and a sometimes controversial international figure who has been attempting to secure the release of U.S. prisoners of war that he maintains are still heM in Vietnam. He is the author of "A Nation Betrayed," which describes his journey from the White House to Burma's mfamous Golden Triangle, where he met with Gen. Khun Sa, reputedly the drug overlord of that region. Other speakers include Fisher, the Rev. Bill Davis, Barbara Honneger, T. David Horton, Brad Kleitz, Don McAlvany, Cy Minett, Eustace Mullins, Walt Myers, Shawn O'Connor, Bob Price, Bob Libertarians qualify By Robert Grove Fisher Managing Editor The Libertarian Party has qualified to have its candidates placed on the ballot in the November General Election— but just barely. In a press advisory issued Friday by the Office of the Secretary of State, it was noted that the Clark County Registrar of Voters Office had completed verifications of the Libertarian Party's Ballot Access petition with a total number of valid signatures of 10,958. "The petition needed 10,325 valid signatures—3 percent of the total Nevada votes cast for Congress in the 1988 elections (344,i73)-from registered voters to qualify the party for ballot access. Of tiie total number of signatures, 10,897 came from Clark Coimty, ofRichards, Dr. Robert Strecker, Bemadine Smith and John Stockwell. For additional information on the "Freedom Call '90" convention, including prices for the various activities—which include, in addition to the conferences and discussions, lunches, dinners and a dance—call 293-3100. Representatives of the Clark County and Esmeralda County Libertarian Parties have reserved a hospitality suite at the Showboat, spokespersons for those organizations said. for November baliot ficials said. The other 61 came from Carson City and Washoe County. The press advisory stressed that the Libertarian candidates' names would appear on the General Election ballot only. Libertarian candidates who will appear on Henderson and Boulder City ballots in November, together with the offices they seek, include: William "Bill" Moore, Congressional District 1; James Frye, governor; G. Francis Smith, Nevada secretary of state; Brendan J. Trainer, Nevada treasurer; Kent Cromwell, controller; and Louis Roger Tomburello, Nevada attorney general. For information concerning the Libertarian Party, its candidates or its platformd, call 734-3733. Handicap Bus services offered The Henderson Senior Friendship Center offers bus rides for the handicapped Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Those interested should call 24 hours in advance, ^kespersons said. For information on cost and reservations, call 565-0235 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. • •. >* • • NEVADA WORKS BEST WHEN WE SAY... •"riie AFL-CIO has done more good for more people than any other group in America in its legislative efforts." Lyndon B. Johnson Tm convinced that the truest act of manliness is to sacrifice ourselves for others in a totally non-violent struggle for justice." Cesar Chavez "Our needs are identical with labor's needs — decent wages, fair \yorking conditions, livable housing, old-age security, health and welfare measures, conditions in which families can grow, have education for their children and respect in the community." Martin Luther King, Jr. Tou will find some people saying that they are for the so-called 'nght-to-work' law, but th^ also believe in unions. This is absurd — it's like saying you are for motherhood but against children." President Harry Truman 1947 "Only a fool would try to deprive working men and working women of the right to join the union of their choice." Dwight D. Eisenhower i~rci' 'The union shop, in agreement with employers, is the application of the principle that those who enjoy the benefits and advantages resulting from an agreement shall also equally bear the moral and financial responsibility involved." Samuel Gompers 1905 'All that serves labor serves the nation. All that harms is treason .... If a man tells you he loves America, yet hates labor, he is a liar..." Abraham Lincoln "If I were a worker in a factory, the first thing I would do would be to join a union" Franklin Delano Roosevelt "Every man owes a part of his time and money to the business or industry in which he is engaged. No man has moral right to withhold his support from an organization that is striving to improve conditions within his sphere." President Theodore Roosevelt n; 1 think it is a fair judgement to make that a free, active, progressive trade union movement stands for a free, active, progressive country. And that is the kind of country I am proud to be President of." President John F. Kennedy "EARLY TO BED AND EARLY TO RISE, LET'S CONTINUE TO ORGANIZE" Blackie Evans 1990 ALL NEVADA WORKERS: I Join Your Follow Workors THURSDAY, JULY 19th, AT 6:00 P.M., DOWNTOWN LAS VEQAS for I BO rally witli Rovorond Josso Jaokson aiid National Labor Loadors to show our Labor Solidarity.! •^ ^glSiw W -m^ ^mSSm^S^^ mmm. • ptlilflBBSWf

PAGE 19

H^^W^a^VWi mmim' mm Page 2B. HenderMn Home News, Boulder Qty Newt, Green Valley News ThuTMlay, Friday. July 19 & 20, 1990 Tortoise projects racing along By Mike Donahue Projects aimed at giving the threatened desert tortoise a permanent toehold on existence are progressing rapidly, according to the Nevada Department of Wildlife. Not only is the planned Desert Tortoise Conservation Center swiftly taking shape under the auspices of the Bureau of Land Management, but successfiil collection of the slow-moving animals from planned construction sites is a daily occurrence. Bob Turner, NDOW supervising wildlife biologist, said agency personnel have gathered approximately 150 tortoises just a month after the U.S. Fish and WildUfe Service issued the collection permit. The permit allows for collection of up to 871 animals from specifled parcels. "Out of the 7,000 acres designated for tortoise removal, about 1,000 acres has been cleared," Turner said. "That means that construction development on those areas can resume. "The process so far has been for environmental consultants, hired by the developer, to locate tortoises on designated land," Turner said. "Then NDOW personnel go out to collect the animals and bring them back to the lab facilities at the regional office. These lab facilities will eventually be located at the tort conservation center." After the animal is in the lab, Turner said biologists draw blood, flush its nasal passages with a culture medium to check for bacteria, take various measurements including weight and length, and then permanently mark it. The blood and culture medium are both sent to a Las Vegas lab where a proHle will be determined. Turner said tortoises collected that exhibit the upper respiratory disease syndrome, responsible for the deaths of so many of the creatures, will probably be sent to the University of Florida, Gainesville, for fiuiiier study. Three tortoises a month are scheduled to be sent to the school. "After testing at the lab facility, the animals are then taken to the pens constructed at DTCC. The entire complex covers one square mile or 640 acres," Turner said. Ilowever, only about 240 acres have been fenced so far." Inside the fenced area there are about 150 pena of varying sizes, "all the way from 60 feet by 50 feet, down to 6 feet by 6 feet," Turner added. Hatchling pens have been constructed and covered with a mesh fabric so that ravens cannot reach the smaller tortoises. "Everything we can do is being done to make the environment as natural as possible for the animals," Turner said. "We have constructed burrows for them and installed Bihall plots of grass so they can feed whenever they want. "Through the cooperation of everyone concerned with the preservation efforts of the desert tortoise, we can expect them to survive and even prosper," Turner said. Herpetologist Brad Hardenbrook is the Nevada Department of WUdlife's resident tortoise expert. Photo by Mike DoMhne HPRD family day set The Henderson Parks and Recreation Deparunent. in concluding Recreation and Parks month, has scheduled a family day torn 4:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Saturday, July 28, at Fox lUdge Park. Spokespersons said that there will be EMxieland music, spoits, games and childrens' crafts provided. There will also be a sidewalk drawing contest. For more information, call the Silver Springs Community Center at 435-3814. Aerobics Class set The Henderson Parks and Recreadon Department will hold an aerobics class from 7 pjn. to 8 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays at the HendeRon Gvic Center, 201 Lead St histmctor Kathy Kline will begin the session on July 23. Cost of the four-week session is $6, spokespersons said. Those interested should register at the Civic Center For more information, call 5652121 or 435-3814. Hilton peregrines ready to talce to the air By Geoff Schneider The three young peregrine falcons that were placed atop the Las Vegas Hilton recently should be taking to the air soon —or may have already done so, according to the Nevada Department of WildUfe. They are progressing very well and are just beginning to fly," said NDOW biologist Ross Haley. "Hopefully, we will soon be seeing some of their spectacular acrobatics above the hotel." On June 11, the Department of Wildlife placed the three eyas (chicks) on top of the f'l^fnSF^'^me of then: release they were sUghtly more i than a month old. I The birds are being housed — in a specially constructed "Hack box," but are free to wander about the roof. They are being monitored aroundthe-clock by NDOW biologists via a closed-circuit television, which is also transmitted to television sets in all of the hotle's guest rooms. "So far all three birds have attempted to fly and, as expected, have flown from the roof down to the Hilton's parking lot and the nearby Las Vegas Coimtry Club," Haley said. "Since they are not yet strong enough to fly back to the r( f, we have had to pick them up and return them to the hotel." Haley said the three birds should soon be strong enough to make the return flight to the roof of the 30-8tory hotel. Within two weeks they will probably begin chasing each other and staging mock combat in preparation for the day when they will have to fend for theinselveg:'"' • Currently, NDOW biologists and university students are providing for all of the falcon's needs. They are provided with water and daily rations of dometic quail and pigeons. "It will still be quite awhile before they make their Hrst kills," Haley said, "and even after they begin making kills. Tags from Page 1B we will continue to provide food until the time that they are fully able to fend for themselves." It is the second year that the NDOW has placed peregrine falcons on top of the Hilton. Last year, three male birds and one female bird were released at the hotel. The current release consists of two males and one female bird. Teregrine falcons are an endangered species and this program is part of an ongoing national effort for the recovery of thft ^qiecias," Hal^ aaid. "Because of reintroductions aadi at this, we are hopeful that someday per^pines may be removed from the endangered species list." The Las Vegas Hilton has provided $10,000 grants for the past two years to the NDOW to purchase the falcons. The hotel has also provided many thousands of dollars worUi of material assistance with the program. Valley from Page IB transaction which would not have been successful without the generous contributions and positive response from the community," Peskin said, gold mining companies Dee Gold, American Barrick and Newmont gold, and many individuals contributed to the acquisition campaign. Each year, thousands of visitors make the 30-minute drive from downtown Elko, climbing out of arid sagebrush into the welcome contrast of the canyon's mahogany, limber pine and aspen groves. The canyon is a favorite of hikers, Hshermen, equestrians and cyclists^, spokespersons. said. "For several years this acquisition has been our No. 1 priority^* said John Inman, supervisor of the Humboldt National Forest. The beauty of Lamoille Canyon is virtually unmatched." The support of the entire Nevada Congressional delegation was key to securing Land and Water Conservation Funds from Congress. ^'^fir^^,4,^^,^,i,u^t^^^t4f^k^^^f^t^f^,^t^r^f^t^,^,•k^,^,^t^r^r^t^t^, FACTORY-DIRECT I SOLAR SCREENS Participating in Nevada Power rebate PLAN AHEAD INDUSTRIES A Henderson Company CALL NOW 565-1246 ••••••••••••••••••^•^^^^•^^^•••••^^•••i It THEALLNEW^ M, ;ii; J*: |J| /H • -* FnOAY, JULY 20ih SATUNDAY. JULY 21at ALL DAY AND NMHT RELAXED, CASUAL ATiMOSPHERE Women, Couplet & Bachelor Parties Welcome UVE DJ EVERY NIQHT 1024 N. Bouldr Hwy., (Next to the CMtie Bwtm Ceeino) (DMignatad Offver Program Honored) antlerless hunts will be announced no later than Aug. 1; however, it is likely that applicants will know whether or not they draw a tag prior to that date. Those who did obtain a rifle buck tag may not apply for or obtain a muzzleloader or archery deer hunt tag. Those who obtained an antlerless (doe) tag may apply for a remaining muzzleloader or a remaining archery tag, not both. Those who are unsuccessful in obtaining a rifle buck tag may apply for any remaining rifle buck, muzzleloader or archery tags, but may obtain no more than a total of one tag of the three types. Seasons and regulations brochures are available at all fishing and hunting license agents and at all NDOW offices. HP^'ciLLULAFr ^ FROM 299! 11 I HAN0HELDSFROM*SM I BEST TELEPHONE E • sous HfSTMCTIOMSiVKT • • • f\A2ii&^ A Pre-owned Gar or Truck & Save $1000's! By leaslns a pre-owned car or truck from Las Mesas Auto Leasing, you can save thousands in monthly payments! We can lease any car — new or used — to Just about anyone. And, approve the deal in less than one hour. • Low rates • No credit hassles • One-hour approval Who could ask for morel Can us today for more information. Las Vegas Auto Leasing New and Used Cars tucks RVs Boats Equipment Computers And morel HEMEMMIt: We would like to hove your leasing txjsiness. If you have t>cen turned dov^ for any reason, please call and see If we can help. CallJimBonacci 457-1021 Located at FIndlayOkJs 3094 East Fremont J Pick a pair and pocket the savings. Men's Abilene Boots...OnlY $89.98 You're guaranteed quality, comfort, style, and savings when you pick a pair of spcdaDy priced men's boots by Abilene. Ohoose black, gray or tan with 13" allleather quarter, narrow round toe and dress western heel. Suggested Retail: $100.00 AiVM'UV\Z\ JUT SAM'S TOWN Boulder & Nellls / 454-8017 Open Dally Sale price good while supplies last on In-stock merchandise only. Thnnday, Friday, Jii]y 19 A 20. 1990 Handeraon Homa Newa, Boulder City Nawa, Graaa Vallay Nawa Pia SB Currier files for county treasurer John Currier, 62, a lifetime Democrat, has Hied for the office of Clark County treasurer. He ran for the office four years ago, and lost in the primary election. Now he must face the incumbent, Mark Aston, in the 1990 primary. Currier is seeking the office of county treasurer because he says he knows that he is qualified, due to his 33 years in the hotel-gaming industry, both as a casino games supervisor and casino counting room cash count and audit supervisor. He served as former founding director and treasurer of the Riviera Hotel employees foundation, where he worked from 1968 to 1977, and also served for several years as treasurer of his local Baptist Church. Currier was employed more than 12 years as a casino supervisor in 1977, at the MGM Grand, that later became Ball/s Grand Hotel. He retired in 1990 to run for the office df Clark County treasurer. Currier has served as a volunteer search and rescue pilot for the Clark County Sheriffs Aero Squadron and was the unit's former operations officer. He also flew search missions for the Civil Air Patrol Squadron 43 in California. Currier is also a volunteer deputy constable, North Las Vegas Township, supporting the charitable functions held in Clark County over the years, during which more than 17,000 hours of pubUc service have been contributed by the deputies and NLV Constable's office. Currier has been active for many years as Democratic precinct chairman and was a delegate to the 1990 Clark County and State Democratic conventions. He is also a longtime member of the North Las Vegas Democratic Club. Currier is a member of the Showboat gathering to address national problems John Currier National Sheriffs Association, The American Legion, a U.S. Army Air Corps veteran and is a member of the American Association of Retired Persons. Currier was in the printing business for several years and now as a hobby is publisher of the New Nevada Democrat newsletter. He and his wife. Pearl, have three daughters, four grandchildren and one great-grandson. All but the latter help "grandpa" with circulation of the paper, family spokespersons said. State AFL-CIO convention underway The Nevada Stiite AFL-CIO is holding its 34 th annual convention through Saturday at the Dunes Hotel in Las Vegas. Claude Evans, executive secretary-tressurer of the state labor group, says that approximately 200 delegates representing 79 local unions, two building and construction trades coimcils, two central labor councils and eight retiree groups, are scheduled to attend the annual convention. John Sweeney, international president of the Service Employees Union with a nationwide membership of 900,000, is the keynote speaker as well as Ken Young, executive assistant to AFL-CIO president Lane Kirkland. The Rev. Jesse Jackson will address a Rainbow Coalition luncheon scheduled at 6 p.m. today at the Dimes Hotel and will lead a rally for striking union members later this evening downtown on Fremont Street. Elections to endorse statewide pohtical candidates will be held Friday. In order for the Nevada State AFL-CIO to endorse a candidate, 66% percent of the delegates at the convention must cast their vote for the candidate. Evans said, "Elections will also be held on Saturday for the positions of president and executive secretary-treasurer of the Nevada State AFL-CIO and five vice presidents on the Nevada State AFL-CIO Executive Board." Census forms Census fonms are available in Room 29 of the Henderson Civic Center for those who were missed in the count. The city of Henderson will mail completed fomis, spokespersons said. Formore information, call 5650235 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. By Robert Grove Fisher Managing Editor Representatives from more than 2,400 dvic groups have been invited to attend "Freedom Call "90," a threenlay series of discussions on issues and problems facing the nation scheduled to begin Sunday at the Showboat Hotel in Las Vegas. The event is sponsored by the Center for Action, headquartered m Boulder City. Paul Fisher, founder and owner of the Fisher Space Pen Co. in Boulder City, is president of the CFA. According to Fisher, "The CFA has a positive plan to baUmce the Federal budget... and would federalize the Federal Reserve System, equalize foreign trade and credit, repeal the 17th Amendment and require literal interpretation, compliance and accurate enforcement of the Cpnstitution. "The CFA also has a plan to elevate American education," Fisher wrote in a flyer announcing "Freedom Call '90." "Because of unique advantages, the CFA is working a solution to the drug problem and continues to seek freedom for our prisoners of war," he added. Fisher wrote that CFA believes "the way to change 'the' government back to 'our' government is through grassroots citizen-intensive programs providing solutions to correct identified problems." Among the scheduled speakers at "Freedom Call '90" is Army Col. James "Bo" Gritz, the U.S.'s most-decorated Green Beret commander and a sometimes controversial international figure who has been attempting to secure the release of U.S. prisoners of war that he maintains are still heM in Vietnam. He is the author of "A Nation Betrayed," which describes his journey from the White House to Burma's mfamous Golden Triangle, where he met with Gen. Khun Sa, reputedly the drug overlord of that region. Other speakers include Fisher, the Rev. Bill Davis, Barbara Honneger, T. David Horton, Brad Kleitz, Don McAlvany, Cy Minett, Eustace Mullins, Walt Myers, Shawn O'Connor, Bob Price, Bob Libertarians qualify By Robert Grove Fisher Managing Editor The Libertarian Party has qualified to have its candidates placed on the ballot in the November General Election— but just barely. In a press advisory issued Friday by the Office of the Secretary of State, it was noted that the Clark County Registrar of Voters Office had completed verifications of the Libertarian Party's Ballot Access petition with a total number of valid signatures of 10,958. "The petition needed 10,325 valid signatures—3 percent of the total Nevada votes cast for Congress in the 1988 elections (344,i73)-from registered voters to qualify the party for ballot access. Of tiie total number of signatures, 10,897 came from Clark Coimty, ofRichards, Dr. Robert Strecker, Bemadine Smith and John Stockwell. For additional information on the "Freedom Call '90" convention, including prices for the various activities—which include, in addition to the conferences and discussions, lunches, dinners and a dance—call 293-3100. Representatives of the Clark County and Esmeralda County Libertarian Parties have reserved a hospitality suite at the Showboat, spokespersons for those organizations said. for November baliot ficials said. The other 61 came from Carson City and Washoe County. The press advisory stressed that the Libertarian candidates' names would appear on the General Election ballot only. Libertarian candidates who will appear on Henderson and Boulder City ballots in November, together with the offices they seek, include: William "Bill" Moore, Congressional District 1; James Frye, governor; G. Francis Smith, Nevada secretary of state; Brendan J. Trainer, Nevada treasurer; Kent Cromwell, controller; and Louis Roger Tomburello, Nevada attorney general. For information concerning the Libertarian Party, its candidates or its platformd, call 734-3733. Handicap Bus services offered The Henderson Senior Friendship Center offers bus rides for the handicapped Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Those interested should call 24 hours in advance, ^kespersons said. For information on cost and reservations, call 565-0235 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. • •. >* • • NEVADA WORKS BEST WHEN WE SAY... •"riie AFL-CIO has done more good for more people than any other group in America in its legislative efforts." Lyndon B. Johnson Tm convinced that the truest act of manliness is to sacrifice ourselves for others in a totally non-violent struggle for justice." Cesar Chavez "Our needs are identical with labor's needs — decent wages, fair \yorking conditions, livable housing, old-age security, health and welfare measures, conditions in which families can grow, have education for their children and respect in the community." Martin Luther King, Jr. Tou will find some people saying that they are for the so-called 'nght-to-work' law, but th^ also believe in unions. This is absurd — it's like saying you are for motherhood but against children." President Harry Truman 1947 "Only a fool would try to deprive working men and working women of the right to join the union of their choice." Dwight D. Eisenhower i~rci' 'The union shop, in agreement with employers, is the application of the principle that those who enjoy the benefits and advantages resulting from an agreement shall also equally bear the moral and financial responsibility involved." Samuel Gompers 1905 'All that serves labor serves the nation. All that harms is treason .... If a man tells you he loves America, yet hates labor, he is a liar..." Abraham Lincoln "If I were a worker in a factory, the first thing I would do would be to join a union" Franklin Delano Roosevelt "Every man owes a part of his time and money to the business or industry in which he is engaged. No man has moral right to withhold his support from an organization that is striving to improve conditions within his sphere." President Theodore Roosevelt n; 1 think it is a fair judgement to make that a free, active, progressive trade union movement stands for a free, active, progressive country. And that is the kind of country I am proud to be President of." President John F. Kennedy "EARLY TO BED AND EARLY TO RISE, LET'S CONTINUE TO ORGANIZE" Blackie Evans 1990 ALL NEVADA WORKERS: I Join Your Follow Workors THURSDAY, JULY 19th, AT 6:00 P.M., DOWNTOWN LAS VEQAS for I BO rally witli Rovorond Josso Jaokson aiid National Labor Loadors to show our Labor Solidarity.! •^ ^glSiw W -m^ ^mSSm^S^^ mmm. • ptlilflBBSWf

PAGE 20

^'^ il u ^M •wm^m^mf^^^ ^^m mmmmmimmmmmmmmmti mm§ Itl^age 4B, Henderaon Home Newa, Boulder City Nr vs, Green Valley Nwg Thursday, Friday, July 19 & 20, 1990 OF GEOGRAPHY r^^rwrrtf un ify i —^^f^TW FRANCE I LIECHTENSTEIN ANDORRA — The Principality of Andorra (185 square miles, 49,000 population) is situated In the Pyrenees Mountains between France and Spain. It is jointly administered by France and the Roman Catholic bishop of Urgel (in Spain) under a 1278 treaty. Its largest ethnic groups are Spanish and native Andorrans who speak a language called Catalan. It is a popular ski resort and tourist center. LIECHTENSTEIN — This tiny principality (28,000 population) lies in the Rhine River valley between Austria and Switzerland. It covers 62 square miles and is surrounded by the Alps. Princes of the House of Liechtenstein have ruled in almost unbroken succession since 1342. Its Alemannic people speak German and their own dialect. Tourism and manufacture of textiles and precision tools are Its top industries. MONACO — This resort center on the Mediterranean coast (0.6 square mile, 28,800 population) is the most famous principality in Europe. It has been ruled by the House of Grimaldi since 1297. Its present prince, Rainier III, made history by marrying American movie star Grace Kelly. Its warm climate, scenery and world-famous casino make it a tourist mecca. It is ctosely aligned ethnically with France. SAN MARINO — This tiny republic (24 square miles, 23,000 population) on Italy's Adriatic coast claims to be the oldest independent state in Europe, dating to the 4th century. It lies on the slopes of Mt. Titano and relies on tourism and sales of its colorful postage stamps for revenue. The people speak Italian, but are ethnically Sanmarinese. In recent years it has had a socialist government. c 1989 The Fiasno Bee WEST GERMANY CZECHOSLOVAKIA SIZE: 32,374 square miles (slightly smaller than Maine) POPULATION: 7,546,000 LANGUAGES: German, Slovene GEOGRAPHY: The west is very mountainous. Danube River basin covers the east. GOVERNMENT: Parliamentary OVERVIEW: This scenic country with its pristine mountains and lush meadows has long been one of the most influential countries in Europe. Its capital, Vienna, is considered one of the world's great cultural centers. Austria's economy is primarily industrial with steel, machinery and optical manufacturing. Its farms (grain, pototoes, grapes and dairy products) grow most of Austria's food, jts ski slopes, opera houses, cafes and scenery also bring in millk^sof tourist dollars. The history of Austria as a nation begins in 803 when Holy Roman Emperor Charlemagne conquered the Asian Avars people. Austria came to dominate the fractured Holy Roman Empire and its royal family, the Hapsburgs, ruled from 1278 to 1918. WorW War I crushed the Austrian empire and its German allies. The country was overrun again by Adolf Hitler's forces in 1938 and full independence was not restored until 1955. One Austrian president, former U.N. chief Kurt Waldheim, has been accused of aiding the Nazis in Worid War II. The country now strictly maintains its neutrality and is often the site of international conferences. DID YOU KNOW? As the home of composers Haydn, Mozart, Schubert and Strauss, Austria's contributions to the world of music are perhaps unsurpassed. = 19a9 The Fresno Bee Clark County Museum Guild member Tina Smith, together with Museum Curator Mark Ryzdynski, work on Heritage Street landscaping at the Clark County Heritage Museum. Museum Guild's support recognized Local Inventor claims: The Glark County Heritage Guild recently received special recognition from the Clark County Heritage Museum for outstanding work in Historic Preservation. In a decade-long effort, the Museum Guild has been responsible for the relocation and renovation of several historic structures at the Clark County Heritage Museum. The newly relandscaped Heritage Street, the Uving history area of the Museum, is home to many of the Clark County Museum Guild's hi§toig( prepprvation efforts. Today a Henderson Townsite House from the 1940s, a Boulder City home from the 1930s and an historic house from Goldfield (1910) are open to the public, due to the efforts of the Museum Guild. A project that the Museum Guild and Musleum could use some help on is the reroofing of the Heritage House, spokespersons said. If the last remaining unopened house on Heritage Street. When complete, the historic 1930s home from downtown Las Vegas promises to be historic show piece at the Museum. More than $4,000 has been raised for the Heritage House roof and volunteer clean-up hours will be donated but a civic-minded Southern Nevada rooHng company needs to contact the Museum to make this project complete, officials said. In an effort to make everything old new again, the Clark County Museum Guild and tfiie ^!!krk tounty Heritagd Museum have teamed up as partners in historic preservation, preserving the culture, history and architecture of Southern Nevada. The public is encouraged to tour Heritage Street and the new Museum Exhibit Center at 1830 S. Boulder Highway in Henderson or call 455-7955 for further information. Revolutionary propulsion system developed By Robert Grove Fisher Managing Editor Henderson resident Gary W. Wright is looking for an angel — but not one with wings; he says hell provide those. What he's seeking is someone who will help him underwrite the costs of construction of a prototype of a radically new propulsion system, something he calls "a undirectional, forceproducing device, a thrust generator." It will take about a month to construct, he said, but he needs about $5,000 to pay for development costs. A patent application is already under way, he said. A full-size version of the machine, he said in an exclusive Home News interview last weeK, would be so powerful and so cheap as to make space travel affordable to the average person. Preliminary parts for the prototype will be manufactured by the Mitchell Space Engineering Co. in Las Vegas, Wright said. To demonstrate its feasabiUty, Wright intends initially to incorporate the device into both a parafoil and a boat. Wright Tpffintflina that the system will be able to Uf t much more than its own weight straight up. not using air as a Gary W. Wright lifting force, as do airfoils on aircraft and heUcopters. Attached to an electric car, Wright said, it would have a range of some 500 miles, about fotu* times the range of present state-of-the-art electric vehicles. He stressed that The device is not an end in itself. What I am doing is providing a transportation system for ordinary people to be able to buy a ticket for a flight into space." Behind closed doors, he revealed the intricate details of his invention — but only after insisting that those details not, be revealed and requiring a signed and dated statement to that effect be provided. He pointed out that the device uses a principle of physics first observed and described by a German scientist in the mid-19th century. He said that he wants no government funding for his project, saying that he did not want the invention being taken over for military use. So far, he has conmiissioned an art firm to prepare artwork and marketing for the project. A local travel agency, he said, plans to form an association to sell and market certificates that would be a deposit on space travel. Wright, a single parent of two boys — Randy, 11, and Bryan, 10—said that as a chiM his mother used to tell him that he was related to the Wright Brothers. But she never explained just what that relationship was, he added. Persons interested in Wright's innovation may write to him at P.O. Box 50361, Henderson, Nev. 89016, or call him at 436-9530. Having Trouble ... Hearing in Noise? ^ Introducing the Miracle-Ear that automatically reduces background noise. The Clarifler adjusts • utomatically to the varying levels of sound around you. So you can walk from a quiet conversation in one room to a loud party In another without having to manually turn dowm the volume on your hearing aid. No Volume Control NeMled! The Clarifier Is Available Only at Miracle-Ear Centers The state-of-the-art circuit In the Clarifler was developad by Miracle-Ear, so the Clarifler is available only at Miracle-Ear center*. Of course, with over 1,500 offices and service centers around the country, there Is certainly a Miracle-Ear Center near you. The Miracle-Ear Clarifler"' Inconsplcuous/Automatlc/No Volume Control to Adjust Special Hearing Help Workshop >F0R THIS SPEOAL WORKSHOP ONLYI THURS., JULY 19 TUES., JULY 31 IMPORTANT RK8H0P ONLYI ^>% ^% ^%#iM SAVE ^300^0 .n Clarifler'^^ Canal Harlng Inatmrnant •$150,00 OFF PER INSTRUMENT During this special workshop, bring your spouse or family member with a familiar voice. Call For An Appointment to Avoid Waiting ^^ '^ Mfn^^vL America's Better Hearing Centers LAS VEGAS W. LASVEQAS E. LAS VEQAS HENDERSON BOULDER CITY 3101 &MatytidPIy., #108 Mortgonwy Ward 3260 E. Tropkatu SliB C BPadcAvwue IIOO/MontSM Aeroas from Humane HoapW 2120 S. Dacatur Localad rwd to Qraal Buna m Hendaraon Drug in Bouldar Ciy CHc 73^1634 875-5858 456-0002 5664656 203-7045 • :&rr Thursday, Friday, July 19 & 20, 1990 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley Newa Pi^ i xanaAMD SAmes 60 HAND gHONDATUKKn Boneless Beef Top Sirioin Steaks FAMILY PAK, U.S.D.A. SELECT Fresh Frying Chicken Whoie Ijegs JUMBO PAK Redj Ripe Whoie yy^rmeion Vine fVpened Honeyde\/^ Meion SWEET, JUICY fJkie iOetorgent REGULAR, UNSCENTEO 136 OZ. PKQ OR WITH BLEACH fKeKogg's iCom Flakes 99 iSSSI CEREAL fLady Lee ^Nonfat Mtk 18 OZ. PKQ. GAL. BTL 5 1591 9091 ^V ME> REGULAR 39 OZ. CAN ELECTRA PERK OR DRIP Lady Lee Com on the Cob FROZEN LadyLae Franks MEAT S CT. PKG. 16 OZ. PKQ. A991 ff59 ^^^' SpMMate Paper Towels 1 CT. PKG. MILLER LITE, 24 PACK GENUINE DRAFT OR 12 OZ. CANS GENUINE DRAFT LK3HT, SUITCASE P9l m ASS Aurora BeHhroom Tissue ASSORTED OR PRINTS 4 CT PKQ. .79 8" t09 OurPrlwProttctlonPoScyg mwnte M from S a.m. WadfiMday, July 18 thru Copy>t|MC1N0 by Lucky aiOTM, Inc. AN mgMs prioM to b •ffwitw In Clartc County TuMday, July 24, 1990. Still the Low Price Leader. QUALITY; Meat THE CHOICE IS YOURS! Choose from U.S.D.A. Select and U.S.D.A. Choice government graded beef, both expertly trimmed to 1/4 inch. • • • FRESHNESS YOU CAN m TASTE...GUARANTEED. • • • iV-57nf?f CONVBIB/CE o First Interstate Bank Doing your banking and your shopping just got easier! The next time you shop Lucky, just stop by the First Interstate Bank located right inside the store. First Interstate Bank can serve your checking, savings, car loan, and home loan needs. Plus, you'll enjoy the convenience of 24-hour ATM service. There are four Lucky/First Interstate Bank locations to serve you: Henderson • Boulder Highway at Major Avenue • Green Valley Parkway at Sunset Road Las Vegas • E. Charleston Boulevard at Burnham Avenue • Raintxjw Boulevard at Charleston Boulevard 1>f EOtMlHOWIK LENDER Member FDIC FIRST INTERSTATE BANK HOURS: Monday thru Saturday; 9 am to 7 pm • • • THERE'S A LUCKY NEAR YOU.:. Henderson • 2851 Green Valley Parkway at Sunset Road Green Valley Town & Country Cntr. (702) 435-9846 \ Service Deli, Service Bakery, Fresh Seafitod Counter, Pizza Shop, Cheest Island, Fresh Melon Bar, F%irmacy, In-Store Florist, Book Shop. First Interstate Bank Branch • 724 Boulder Highway at Major Avenue (702) 5650095 Service Deli, Service Bakery, Fresh Seafood Counter, Pizza Shop, Cheese Island, Fresh Melon Bar, In-Store Florist, Pharmacy, Reading Center, First Interstate Bank Branch

PAGE 21

^'^ il u ^M •wm^m^mf^^^ ^^m mmmmmimmmmmmmmmti mm§ Itl^age 4B, Henderaon Home Newa, Boulder City Nr vs, Green Valley Nwg Thursday, Friday, July 19 & 20, 1990 OF GEOGRAPHY r^^rwrrtf un ify i —^^f^TW FRANCE I LIECHTENSTEIN ANDORRA — The Principality of Andorra (185 square miles, 49,000 population) is situated In the Pyrenees Mountains between France and Spain. It is jointly administered by France and the Roman Catholic bishop of Urgel (in Spain) under a 1278 treaty. Its largest ethnic groups are Spanish and native Andorrans who speak a language called Catalan. It is a popular ski resort and tourist center. LIECHTENSTEIN — This tiny principality (28,000 population) lies in the Rhine River valley between Austria and Switzerland. It covers 62 square miles and is surrounded by the Alps. Princes of the House of Liechtenstein have ruled in almost unbroken succession since 1342. Its Alemannic people speak German and their own dialect. Tourism and manufacture of textiles and precision tools are Its top industries. MONACO — This resort center on the Mediterranean coast (0.6 square mile, 28,800 population) is the most famous principality in Europe. It has been ruled by the House of Grimaldi since 1297. Its present prince, Rainier III, made history by marrying American movie star Grace Kelly. Its warm climate, scenery and world-famous casino make it a tourist mecca. It is ctosely aligned ethnically with France. SAN MARINO — This tiny republic (24 square miles, 23,000 population) on Italy's Adriatic coast claims to be the oldest independent state in Europe, dating to the 4th century. It lies on the slopes of Mt. Titano and relies on tourism and sales of its colorful postage stamps for revenue. The people speak Italian, but are ethnically Sanmarinese. In recent years it has had a socialist government. c 1989 The Fiasno Bee WEST GERMANY CZECHOSLOVAKIA SIZE: 32,374 square miles (slightly smaller than Maine) POPULATION: 7,546,000 LANGUAGES: German, Slovene GEOGRAPHY: The west is very mountainous. Danube River basin covers the east. GOVERNMENT: Parliamentary OVERVIEW: This scenic country with its pristine mountains and lush meadows has long been one of the most influential countries in Europe. Its capital, Vienna, is considered one of the world's great cultural centers. Austria's economy is primarily industrial with steel, machinery and optical manufacturing. Its farms (grain, pototoes, grapes and dairy products) grow most of Austria's food, jts ski slopes, opera houses, cafes and scenery also bring in millk^sof tourist dollars. The history of Austria as a nation begins in 803 when Holy Roman Emperor Charlemagne conquered the Asian Avars people. Austria came to dominate the fractured Holy Roman Empire and its royal family, the Hapsburgs, ruled from 1278 to 1918. WorW War I crushed the Austrian empire and its German allies. The country was overrun again by Adolf Hitler's forces in 1938 and full independence was not restored until 1955. One Austrian president, former U.N. chief Kurt Waldheim, has been accused of aiding the Nazis in Worid War II. The country now strictly maintains its neutrality and is often the site of international conferences. DID YOU KNOW? As the home of composers Haydn, Mozart, Schubert and Strauss, Austria's contributions to the world of music are perhaps unsurpassed. = 19a9 The Fresno Bee Clark County Museum Guild member Tina Smith, together with Museum Curator Mark Ryzdynski, work on Heritage Street landscaping at the Clark County Heritage Museum. Museum Guild's support recognized Local Inventor claims: The Glark County Heritage Guild recently received special recognition from the Clark County Heritage Museum for outstanding work in Historic Preservation. In a decade-long effort, the Museum Guild has been responsible for the relocation and renovation of several historic structures at the Clark County Heritage Museum. The newly relandscaped Heritage Street, the Uving history area of the Museum, is home to many of the Clark County Museum Guild's hi§toig( prepprvation efforts. Today a Henderson Townsite House from the 1940s, a Boulder City home from the 1930s and an historic house from Goldfield (1910) are open to the public, due to the efforts of the Museum Guild. A project that the Museum Guild and Musleum could use some help on is the reroofing of the Heritage House, spokespersons said. If the last remaining unopened house on Heritage Street. When complete, the historic 1930s home from downtown Las Vegas promises to be historic show piece at the Museum. More than $4,000 has been raised for the Heritage House roof and volunteer clean-up hours will be donated but a civic-minded Southern Nevada rooHng company needs to contact the Museum to make this project complete, officials said. In an effort to make everything old new again, the Clark County Museum Guild and tfiie ^!!krk tounty Heritagd Museum have teamed up as partners in historic preservation, preserving the culture, history and architecture of Southern Nevada. The public is encouraged to tour Heritage Street and the new Museum Exhibit Center at 1830 S. Boulder Highway in Henderson or call 455-7955 for further information. Revolutionary propulsion system developed By Robert Grove Fisher Managing Editor Henderson resident Gary W. Wright is looking for an angel — but not one with wings; he says hell provide those. What he's seeking is someone who will help him underwrite the costs of construction of a prototype of a radically new propulsion system, something he calls "a undirectional, forceproducing device, a thrust generator." It will take about a month to construct, he said, but he needs about $5,000 to pay for development costs. A patent application is already under way, he said. A full-size version of the machine, he said in an exclusive Home News interview last weeK, would be so powerful and so cheap as to make space travel affordable to the average person. Preliminary parts for the prototype will be manufactured by the Mitchell Space Engineering Co. in Las Vegas, Wright said. To demonstrate its feasabiUty, Wright intends initially to incorporate the device into both a parafoil and a boat. Wright Tpffintflina that the system will be able to Uf t much more than its own weight straight up. not using air as a Gary W. Wright lifting force, as do airfoils on aircraft and heUcopters. Attached to an electric car, Wright said, it would have a range of some 500 miles, about fotu* times the range of present state-of-the-art electric vehicles. He stressed that The device is not an end in itself. What I am doing is providing a transportation system for ordinary people to be able to buy a ticket for a flight into space." Behind closed doors, he revealed the intricate details of his invention — but only after insisting that those details not, be revealed and requiring a signed and dated statement to that effect be provided. He pointed out that the device uses a principle of physics first observed and described by a German scientist in the mid-19th century. He said that he wants no government funding for his project, saying that he did not want the invention being taken over for military use. So far, he has conmiissioned an art firm to prepare artwork and marketing for the project. A local travel agency, he said, plans to form an association to sell and market certificates that would be a deposit on space travel. Wright, a single parent of two boys — Randy, 11, and Bryan, 10—said that as a chiM his mother used to tell him that he was related to the Wright Brothers. But she never explained just what that relationship was, he added. Persons interested in Wright's innovation may write to him at P.O. Box 50361, Henderson, Nev. 89016, or call him at 436-9530. Having Trouble ... Hearing in Noise? ^ Introducing the Miracle-Ear that automatically reduces background noise. The Clarifler adjusts • utomatically to the varying levels of sound around you. So you can walk from a quiet conversation in one room to a loud party In another without having to manually turn dowm the volume on your hearing aid. No Volume Control NeMled! The Clarifier Is Available Only at Miracle-Ear Centers The state-of-the-art circuit In the Clarifler was developad by Miracle-Ear, so the Clarifler is available only at Miracle-Ear center*. Of course, with over 1,500 offices and service centers around the country, there Is certainly a Miracle-Ear Center near you. The Miracle-Ear Clarifler"' Inconsplcuous/Automatlc/No Volume Control to Adjust Special Hearing Help Workshop >F0R THIS SPEOAL WORKSHOP ONLYI THURS., JULY 19 TUES., JULY 31 IMPORTANT RK8H0P ONLYI ^>% ^% ^%#iM SAVE ^300^0 .n Clarifler'^^ Canal Harlng Inatmrnant •$150,00 OFF PER INSTRUMENT During this special workshop, bring your spouse or family member with a familiar voice. Call For An Appointment to Avoid Waiting ^^ '^ Mfn^^vL America's Better Hearing Centers LAS VEGAS W. LASVEQAS E. LAS VEQAS HENDERSON BOULDER CITY 3101 &MatytidPIy., #108 Mortgonwy Ward 3260 E. Tropkatu SliB C BPadcAvwue IIOO/MontSM Aeroas from Humane HoapW 2120 S. Dacatur Localad rwd to Qraal Buna m Hendaraon Drug in Bouldar Ciy CHc 73^1634 875-5858 456-0002 5664656 203-7045 • :&rr Thursday, Friday, July 19 & 20, 1990 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley Newa Pi^ i xanaAMD SAmes 60 HAND gHONDATUKKn Boneless Beef Top Sirioin Steaks FAMILY PAK, U.S.D.A. SELECT Fresh Frying Chicken Whoie Ijegs JUMBO PAK Redj Ripe Whoie yy^rmeion Vine fVpened Honeyde\/^ Meion SWEET, JUICY fJkie iOetorgent REGULAR, UNSCENTEO 136 OZ. PKQ OR WITH BLEACH fKeKogg's iCom Flakes 99 iSSSI CEREAL fLady Lee ^Nonfat Mtk 18 OZ. PKQ. GAL. BTL 5 1591 9091 ^V ME> REGULAR 39 OZ. CAN ELECTRA PERK OR DRIP Lady Lee Com on the Cob FROZEN LadyLae Franks MEAT S CT. PKG. 16 OZ. PKQ. A991 ff59 ^^^' SpMMate Paper Towels 1 CT. PKG. MILLER LITE, 24 PACK GENUINE DRAFT OR 12 OZ. CANS GENUINE DRAFT LK3HT, SUITCASE P9l m ASS Aurora BeHhroom Tissue ASSORTED OR PRINTS 4 CT PKQ. .79 8" t09 OurPrlwProttctlonPoScyg mwnte M from S a.m. WadfiMday, July 18 thru Copy>t|MC1N0 by Lucky aiOTM, Inc. AN mgMs prioM to b •ffwitw In Clartc County TuMday, July 24, 1990. Still the Low Price Leader. QUALITY; Meat THE CHOICE IS YOURS! Choose from U.S.D.A. Select and U.S.D.A. Choice government graded beef, both expertly trimmed to 1/4 inch. • • • FRESHNESS YOU CAN m TASTE...GUARANTEED. • • • iV-57nf?f CONVBIB/CE o First Interstate Bank Doing your banking and your shopping just got easier! The next time you shop Lucky, just stop by the First Interstate Bank located right inside the store. First Interstate Bank can serve your checking, savings, car loan, and home loan needs. Plus, you'll enjoy the convenience of 24-hour ATM service. There are four Lucky/First Interstate Bank locations to serve you: Henderson • Boulder Highway at Major Avenue • Green Valley Parkway at Sunset Road Las Vegas • E. Charleston Boulevard at Burnham Avenue • Raintxjw Boulevard at Charleston Boulevard 1>f EOtMlHOWIK LENDER Member FDIC FIRST INTERSTATE BANK HOURS: Monday thru Saturday; 9 am to 7 pm • • • THERE'S A LUCKY NEAR YOU.:. Henderson • 2851 Green Valley Parkway at Sunset Road Green Valley Town & Country Cntr. (702) 435-9846 \ Service Deli, Service Bakery, Fresh Seafitod Counter, Pizza Shop, Cheest Island, Fresh Melon Bar, F%irmacy, In-Store Florist, Book Shop. First Interstate Bank Branch • 724 Boulder Highway at Major Avenue (702) 5650095 Service Deli, Service Bakery, Fresh Seafood Counter, Pizza Shop, Cheese Island, Fresh Melon Bar, In-Store Florist, Pharmacy, Reading Center, First Interstate Bank Branch

PAGE 22

mfm Thursday. Friday, July 19 ik 20, 1990 Page 6B, Henderson Home Newt, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Legal Notices LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN of • PubUc Hearing on the PeitiUon for Anaexatkm of rl proporty in the County of Cbvk, State of Nevada, goncraUy dMcribed M: That portion of Section 36, TowaaUp 21 South, Range 62 Eaat lying eonth of Rnaaell ROMI, north of Brockway Avenue (Athena Avenne) and eaat of Gibaon Road and weet of Bnma Road. The parcel ia biaected by North Boulder Highway. SAID PUBLIC HEARING ahaU be held in Uie Council ChauSera at City Hall, 240 Water Street, Henderaon, Nevada on Taeaday, Aoguat 7,1990, at the hour of 7.-00 P.M. or aa aoon thereafter aa practicable. REPORTS aa required by NRS 288.678, concerning the City's intention and purpoae for Annexation ahall be filed with the City Clerk of the City of Henderaon and be available for examination by the publie for a period of at leaat 20 daya prior to the 7th day of August, 1990. Any Record OwneHa) of property within the territory propoaed to be annexed may: (1) Appear and be heard at such public hearing and may file with the City Clerk of the City of Henderaon written protest to such annexation at any time within 16 days after the conclusion of such public hearing; or (2) Appear and be heard at auch public hearing or may file with the City Clerk of the City of Henderson written protest to such annexation at any time within 15 daya after the conclusion of such public hearing. Unlesa the majority of the property owners in Uie tenitory proposed to be annexed protest the annexation, wither verbally at the public hearing or in writing within 16 daya after the conclnain thereof, the City Council ahall have the authority to adopt an ordinance extending the corporate limita of the City of Henderson to include all or part of the territory herein deacribed. Dated this 9th day of July, 1990 (a) Dorothy A. Vondenbrink DOROTHY A. VONDENBRINK, CMC, CITY CLERK PUBLISHED IN THE HENDERSON HOME NEWS 7/19/90 & 7/26/90. H-Jniy 19, 26, 1990 Legal Notka Notice haa hereby given thatI,ParkPlaaa.wiUaaU at anctloa by aeakd bid the contenta of atorage unit H-7, to aatiafy a storage Uan, Chuck Latonia, 701 North lOUi St. LaaVegaa, NV 89101. Auction win ba held at 9 AM. at 1603 Foothill Dr. BooMsr aty, NV. on Monday, Aug. 6. 1900. Park Plasa reaervea the right to Md. Contenta may be inapected batwaen 8 and 9 A.M. on the day of aak. Thia aale ia aubject to caneailatkai in the event all monies are paid prior to tiiiadata. H-Jnlyl9-26andAug.2. LEGAL NOTICE National Ante Salvnfe Aoetion 661 W. Snnast, Henderaon, Nv. 89016. Vahida to be add at ane tioa August 11, 1900. ThlaUoffldalnotieaofi lien aale proeeaa to obtaia titie for Uie vehicle diacrib ed below: 1968 Toyota Camiy VINIJT2SV21E9J3261661I White Rsgiatarad Ownan Daria A laiao Otero, Jr, 1017 Broadway Baratew, CA 92311 Ford Motor Credit 1616 Orange Tiae Lane /216 Redlanda, CA 92373 H-Jnly 19, 26, Aug. 2, 1990. MAX COLE AWCXATION RfOUCST ANX-ltO LEGAL NOTICE VACATION OF RIGHT-OF-WAY OF THE 20 FOOT ALLEY IN HILLCREST MANOR, LOCATED BETWEEN HILLCREST DRIVE AND W. VICTORY ROAD NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Utat a petition haa hen fUed with the Clerk of the CouncU of the Gty of Henderaon, Nevada, requeating the vacatian of the 20 foot aUey fai HOkreat Manor. k>cated between HOkreat Drive and W. VictoryRd. THE PETITIONER, Gary L. WilUama, haa reqneated thia vacation becauae tUa right'^f-way ia no longer required for aooeaa. A PUBLIC HEARING on tiie said vacation will be held on August 7,1990, at the hour of JM P.M., or aa aoon thereof ter aa practicable, hi the CooncU Chamber at City Hall, 240 Water Street b tiie aty of Hsndwaon, County of Clark, Nevada. IF, UPON SUCH HEARING, tiie aty CooacU of said aty of Henderaon ia aatiafied tiiat the pabUc will not be materially injured by atuch propoaed vacation, the above-deacribed right-of-way will be vacated. THIS NOTICE ia given pnranant to aa order made by the City CouncU of the aty of Henderson, Nevada, at a R^nlar Meeting, heM July 3,1990. DATED tills 9Ui day of July, 1990 and PUBUSHED IN THE HENDERSON HOME NEWS 7/19m and 7/26m. (a) Dorothy A. Vondenbrink DOROTHY A. VONDENBRINK, CMC. CITY CLERK H^July 19. 26. 1990 LEGAL NOTICE LJJS. JOINT VENTURE THE EVENT ALL 1648 ATHOI. AVENUE MONIES PAID ft HENDBSON,NV 89016 ^O^M REMOVED WE 584.1(196 RESmVB THE RIGHT NOTICE IS HEREBY TO BID. GIVEN THAT I. LM8 AUCTION TO BE HELD STORAGE WILL SELL FRIDAY,72790 at lOHW CONTENTS OF BELOW A.M. „^„„„,„ MENTIONED UNITS TO Unit # 176; ROBERT SATISFY STORAGE INGALLS. 638 EVANS LIENaTHISSALESUBROAD, TOLEDO. WA JECT TO PRIOR 9W1. CANCELLATION IN H-7/12) LEGAL NOTICE BEFORE THE PUBUC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA NOTICE OF APPUCATION AJaiatapplicnti4)n,faiantiliadaa Docket No. 90662, baa bean fliad whh the PribleSarvfaaCoonrfaiion ofNavdarCnmmkiInn") by John Lsnvitt dbn John'a Thiddag, for anthoritjr to aail and tranafar, and of John'a IVacUng Inc. to parchaaa and aoqoiie Cartificnto of PnbUc Convanianoa and Naoeaaity CPC A-2486. CPC A-2486 antboriaaa comaion carrier motor vahide tranqioration, oncall, ^vw farragnlar rontaa of and, gravel, rack, fill dirt, dndsra, aaphah mix, damoUtioa dabria, road mix, top soil, water and Hmaato n e be t ween polnta and pinoss within a 404nife radina of Laa Vegaa, Nevada. The apiJkatkm waa fDed pvaoant to NAC 703 and NRS706ii41Landbonffle land available for viewing by the pnbUc at the officea of the Conuniaaion, 727 Fairviaw Drive, Carson CH7, Nevada 80710 and tiie Alexander Dawaon Bnikiing, 4046 Sooth Spenow. Suite A-44, Laa Vegaa, Nevada 89168. Intereetad and affected peraona may comment in writing and file appropriate Proteste and/or Petitiona for Leave to Intervene at either of the Commiaaion'a of ficea on or before Wedneaday, Angnat 1,1990. By the Conuniaaion, /a/ Jeanne Reynolda, Aast. Secretary WILLIAM H. VANCE. Commission Secretary Dated: Caraon City, Nevada (SEAL) H-July 7.19, 1990. BEFORE THETPUBLIC SERVICE COMMIS SIGN OF NEVADA NOTICE OF APPUCATION Aap|ilicatk,identinad aa Docket No. 90-722, haa been Jointly filed by BB4D, Inc. r Seller") and Nevada Fleet Management,} Inc. dba Fleet IMIviiry Servfce r'Bny") with the PnbUc Service Conuniaaion of Nevada fCommisdnii') requesting authority to sell and transfer Certificate of PnbUc Convenience and Neoeaaity, CPC A-2426, tram the Seller to the Bayer porsnadt to NRS 706.6411 and Chapters 703 and 706 of NRS and tiie Nevada Adminiatratlve Code. CPC A-2426 anthorixea on-call. irregular route tranaportation of amaU paroala and light exprea a except business records, bookkaepiag materiala and computer printouta, between pointe and places within Clark County, Nevada. The application ia on file and available for public viewing at the offkea of tiie Conuniaaion, 727 Fairview Drive, Carson aty, Nevada 89710 and the Alexander Dawaon bnilding, 4046 Sontii Spencer, Suite A-44, Laa Vegaa, Nevada 89168. latcreated and affected persona may comment in writing and fUe appropriate ProtesU and/or Petitiona for Leave to Intervene at either of the CommlaaJoa's offfoes on or before Wednesday, August 1,1990. By the Commiadon. WILUAM H. VANCE. Commission Secretary Dated: Carson City, Nevada 7/12/90 (SEAL) H-Jdy 7,19, 1990. Sales workshop scheduled Are you a "No-Limit Person'7 If not, you can leam how to be one at a sales professional workshop consisting of national presenters scheduled for Friday, Sept 14 at the Riviera Hotel. Dr. Wayne Dyer, an eiqwrt on turning life around, will be the keynote speaker. Dyer has written five best sellers including "Your Erroneous Zones," "Pulling Your Own Strings," and "The Sky's The Limit;*^^ Besides being an author, Dyer has taught at many levels of education from high school to the Teaching Hospital of Cornell University Medical College. In addition, he has appeared on more than S.200 television and radio programs, including "The Tonight Show," "The Today Show," "Phil Donahue Show" and "Oprah Winfrey." Anne Boe, author of "Is Your Net-Woricing?" will also speak at the workshop. Boe is a motivational speaker specializing in employee motivation, communication and sales skills and gaining a competitive edge through networkiiig and customer service. Sample chapters from her book include titles such as "Networidng in the •90s and Beyond," "Information is Power," "Quid Pro Quo (or. How Useful Are You to Someone Else)" The woricshop will be held in conjunction with tiie annual conference of tiie National Association of Professional Saleswomen. Businesses may buy blocks of reserved seating for tiie event. For more information and reservations, caU 796-7422 or 258-6169. Forexhibit ^ce, call 386-0423. YCSI WEHAVETHEIM CORDLESS PHONES BATTERIES I ANTENNAS Ask for Cro8$lown Spaclal and \ Rc0lv 10% Discount BEST TELEPHONE COMPANY | 11 f. Chadttlon MISMt Callulw T MT. MORIAH WED. SILVER THUR8. LODGE #39 7:30 P.M. CORD 7:30 P.M. 400 QfMnway Rd. HONEY DO'S HANDYMAN SERVICES TOO HOT TO DO YOUR HONEY DO'S? CALL US 2943071 5666811 MEDIFAX The medical hittoiy in your wallet allows emergency medical and other medical people immediate accai to (hit important infomuuion without the UK of (pedal equipment and no waiting. If your medical Mitoiy changei, juit notify MEDIFAX, be. lo update your pemianent matter file a* well u your MEDIFAX wallet LD. caid. Ifyouloeit,JujtrequeitAffiDIFAX, LK. to tend a duplicate (Tbete ii a HnaO proceiiing and handling fee).' If you have no alleigiei and lake no medication, it it very important for emergency penoonel to have thit infonnaiiaa toa Once MEDIFAX, Inc. receivei your filled-in, dated and tigned Medical Data fomi and regittiation fee, a laminated MEDIFAX wallet I.D. caid will be made for you and a peimanentfile will be opened in your name at MEDIFAX (pleast typt or print Itgibty in black). All you have to do for thit "ounce of prevention'' it Tdl in the data theet, sign, date and mail it with a check or money order for $4.95 ($1 for pottage, handling and talet tax • toul $5.95) Your Name and Addreit Send for your MEDIFAX dau theet now MEDIFAX, INC. 1000 Nevada Hwy., Suite 203 Boulder City. NV 89005 294-4113 -'-I franchises receive top awards TteeelocalCentury 21 franchises have been lauded for top production during the month of April and for year-to-date production through April, announced Larry Bryson, regional director of Century 21 of the Southwest Inc. Century 21 Action Network Realty, Century 21 Henderson Realty, Inc. and Century 21 JR Realty were recognized as members of the President's Round Table and the President's Circle. A production award based on year-to-date figures, the President's Roimd Table award requires that an office meet or exceed a specified dollar amount in gross closed commissions per month, every month. Meeting that "outstanding amount" in gross closed commissions for a one-month period qualifies an office for the prestigious President's Circle award. o Sfi€CiCtU All Summer Blouses in Cotton & Polyester Now Only Shorts, Clamdigger and Cuiotte Vi price Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Saturday OTHENA'S FASHION: 26A Water StreetT^^ Henderson ___^v. piMAMpiiiilHiaiiill'^' NOTICE TO TAXPAYERS THE FIRST INSTALLMENT OF REAL PROPERTY TAXES IS DUE AUGUST 6, 1990. IF YOUR TAXES ARE NOT BEING PAID THROUGH YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY AND YOU HAVE NOT RECEIVED A TAX BILL, PLEASE CONTACT THE CLARK COUNTY TREASURER TO REQUEST A DUPLICATE COPY TO AVOID ANY PENALTIES. MARK ASTON TREASURERTAX RECEIVER ******** 225 E. Bridget Avenue let Floor Las Vegas, NV 89155 455-4323 X Thnnday, Friday, July 19 & 20.1990 This Week Salsa Festival, Part II, flops Henderson Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Pags 7B Voting registration deadline iooms ''*'*'• '*'"'*' "^ •• ^""""i' ^^^ w w DA.. T .K.iiA^'ia TTlt<.i/

  • mote the event and had a special junket come to Vegas just for the Salsa Gsla event on Saturday night. A number of persons who called me complained that if the security force was not so large in number there could have b^een a riot with persons demanding and signing petitions to get their money back. Why? According to a commentary by German Grijalva on UNLV radio station KNUV, there was only one of the three top Salsa groups advertised that played at 1:30 p.m. By that time, groups of persons who paid $60 per person had left. The musical numbers that were presented early on were not Las Vegas Show Capital of the World caliber. According to Grijalva's radio commentary, the Salsa fans came at 8 p.m., expecing to hear, see and dance to the top musical groups in the Salsa world—Eddie Santiago, Willie Chirino and Andy Motanez. Instead the audience was ripped off, according to G] ^ who 'called me Sunday morning. Some of us remember the rock and roll shows at the Convention Center during the days of some of the promoters like Gary Naseef (a former coworker at Circus Circus under Jay Samo). There were some terrific rock shows but then groups began to fail to appear and the Convention Center Authority generated the requirement of a performance bond for the promoters. When groups failed to show up, the promoters were required to refund the price of admission. Memo to tiie hotels: A similar performance bond should be required when any event is announced as having top musical stars and groups. In the case of the so-called promotional group, Nevada Hispanics for Special Events, the name sounds professional, but some of the monbers of those profit-making groups need years of promotional and public relations experience. It will be interesting if the groups will offer a pubhc statement to all the media with their explanation of the Saturday night massacre of Salsa fans and whether they will refund the money. ThisWeek offers equal space to a responsible member of Nevada Hispanics for Special Events to give their side of the disappointing event. • On the road, picking on a minority group... Now it's the FUipinoe who are moving to the Las Vegas valley and wanting to eBtabUsh thenoselves like you and 1.1 was somewhat taken by a columnist who used to wQck at Channel 10 beck in the 70s when I had my Cine en EqMmol TV Show. George Knapp, KLAS-Channel 8 news penoa, apparently didnt do his usual homework when he wrote the negative article on the ixtn l(xig lines at the local DMV offices. He said that Filipinos, speaking little English and well-dressed, #ere causing some "eyebrow raising" because of the large number who were applying for ID cards. If Knapp checked his facts flrst, e.g. calling the U.S. Bureau of the Census, Islanders (as Filipinos are classLHed) are the fastest-growing group in the country and the top minority group that is lending themselves to the current census count. He would have also found that, unlike my fellow cousins from Latin American countries who are still entering our country, the Fihpibos speak Enghsh quite'well. In fact, English is a rigid requirement of children in private and pubhc schools there. Memo to George Knapp: 1 am surprised at you for not checking this important story before you wrote yoiu* article— or did you have a deadline catching you unprepared? As for the long lines, you could not pay me enough to work at the DMV. What with 4,000 to 5,000 persons per month moving to Las Vegas, the lines for ID cards and drivers licenses are long and will continue to grow. But, because of the color of your skin, you're singled out as an easy target. The close of registration for the upcoming Sept. 4 Primary election will be at 9 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 4, officials have announced. The Clark County Election Department, 333 S. 6th St., is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday; and (rom 8 a.m. until 9 p.m. beginning Tuesday, July 31, through Saturday, Aug. \, For those people who have moved since registering, their address must be changed to their new residence, they said. Addresses may ]t)e changed by calling the Election Department at 455-4055 through July 27; after that date, however, addresses only may be changed at the County Election Depailment. In addition to the Clark County Election Department, qualified electors may also register at any of the city Clerk's Offices located in Las Vegas, North Las Vegas, Boulder City, Henderson and Mesquite (contact should be made to ascertain office hours); additionally, any local branch of the Department of Motor Vehicle's will register qualified electors for the Primary Election until 5 p.m. Friday, Aug. 3.; or registration may be done by any Field Deputy Registrar who will be sitting out in the maUs, grocery stores, etc., they said. KV.fjT7 ,^^ >^^^*^W*rt'^'f.Rev. Lucretia Uhrich, assistant minister at Community Church of Henderson. United Church of Christ, wilj^resent a sermon topic, "Practicable Parable," for Sunday's worship services. Scripture for Rev. Uhrich's message are from Matthew 13:24-30 and 3643. Two worship services are held, one at 8 a.m. in an informal setting, and one at 10:30 a.m. for traditional liturgies. Community Church is located at 360 E. Horizon Drive, near the comer of Greenway Road. A youth metitation is given during the second service and there is a -supervised area for the younger children during the rest of the service. The church office is (^pen from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays eadi week. For further informatkii, call 565-8563. There are two active woaun's groups at Ommunily Church, the Women's Association which meets at noon on the second Tuesday of each month for a potluck lunch and meeting, and the Joy Fellowship which meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month. Both groups meet at the church and for the summer are actually meeting every week to work on special bazaar projects. The chancel choir rehearses at 9 a.m. each Sunday. Those who like to sing are welcome to join with them. Joyd Elwood Caldwell Boyd Elwood Caldwell, 79, died Thursday, July 12, in Las Vegas. Bom May 4,1911 in Molen, Utah, he was a resident of Henderson for 40 years. He was a retired employee of the Bureau of Mines, and served in the United States Navy. He was also a member of Mt. Moriah Masonic Temple, Henderson (31st Degree Mason); also a member of Scottish Rite Las Vegas, Member of Naval Fleet Reserve, Past Post Ck)mmander, American Legion Boulder City, Nev. He is survived by his wife, Norma Caldwell and a granddaughter, Leslee Claldwell, both of Henderson; two great-grandsons, Chad Allen, and Andrew Boyd Hill, both of Bountiful, Utah; a brother, John Caldwell, of Boulder City and two sisters, Areta Peckham of Provo, Utah, and Aleta (Collins, of Salt Lake City, Utah. The family suggests memorials in his name to Nathan Adelson Hospice, Las Vegas. Services were handled by Palm Mortuary of Henderson. TRY THE NEW TWO COIN DOLLAR PROGRESSIVES *250,000 AND GROWING!!! Smaller JadqxH Meters Pay Constantly AU Jackpo^,PaiHjn,One Checic Dr. William N. Evans, M.D, Pediatric Cardiology '*What will happen when I go the the hospital" is a great concern of many children. Our responsive stair at the HumanaTChildren's Hospital is devoted to serving the special physical and emotional needs of your child. We have brought together a dedicated team of independent, pediatric physicians, several with specialities never before available in Las Vegas, to create a quality, health care bdlity for children in Nevada. Patty Carpenter, R.N. Pediatrics Their presence represents a significant step for orientation program for parents and children, the health care of children in Nevada. Specialties Beyond the physical needs our goal is to make include intensive care, cardiology, neonatoiogy, every child's stay pleasant as possible. Offering the pediatric surgery, oncology and ophthalmology, love, care and attention your child deserves, that's among many others. what Humana' Children's Hospital Las Vegas is The exclusive 140-bed children's facility offers all about a specially trained pediatric nursing staff; pedi atric equipment; children's menus; play therapist; complete playroom; resources library; presurgery tours; pharmacy; radiology; and an % Special care for chUdretiyfrom the name you trust -Humana'Children's Hospital A 3186 Maryland Parkway • Las Vegas, Nevada 89109 • 731-8000 Human^Children's Hospital is part of HumansTHospitalSunrite. HO-))-00W 01989 Hiiaiai*lnc \W

    PAGE 23

    mfm Thursday. Friday, July 19 ik 20, 1990 Page 6B, Henderson Home Newt, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Legal Notices LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN of • PubUc Hearing on the PeitiUon for Anaexatkm of rl proporty in the County of Cbvk, State of Nevada, goncraUy dMcribed M: That portion of Section 36, TowaaUp 21 South, Range 62 Eaat lying eonth of Rnaaell ROMI, north of Brockway Avenue (Athena Avenne) and eaat of Gibaon Road and weet of Bnma Road. The parcel ia biaected by North Boulder Highway. SAID PUBLIC HEARING ahaU be held in Uie Council ChauSera at City Hall, 240 Water Street, Henderaon, Nevada on Taeaday, Aoguat 7,1990, at the hour of 7.-00 P.M. or aa aoon thereafter aa practicable. REPORTS aa required by NRS 288.678, concerning the City's intention and purpoae for Annexation ahall be filed with the City Clerk of the City of Henderaon and be available for examination by the publie for a period of at leaat 20 daya prior to the 7th day of August, 1990. Any Record OwneHa) of property within the territory propoaed to be annexed may: (1) Appear and be heard at such public hearing and may file with the City Clerk of the City of Henderaon written protest to such annexation at any time within 16 days after the conclusion of such public hearing; or (2) Appear and be heard at auch public hearing or may file with the City Clerk of the City of Henderson written protest to such annexation at any time within 15 daya after the conclusion of such public hearing. Unlesa the majority of the property owners in Uie tenitory proposed to be annexed protest the annexation, wither verbally at the public hearing or in writing within 16 daya after the conclnain thereof, the City Council ahall have the authority to adopt an ordinance extending the corporate limita of the City of Henderson to include all or part of the territory herein deacribed. Dated this 9th day of July, 1990 (a) Dorothy A. Vondenbrink DOROTHY A. VONDENBRINK, CMC, CITY CLERK PUBLISHED IN THE HENDERSON HOME NEWS 7/19/90 & 7/26/90. H-Jniy 19, 26, 1990 Legal Notka Notice haa hereby given thatI,ParkPlaaa.wiUaaU at anctloa by aeakd bid the contenta of atorage unit H-7, to aatiafy a storage Uan, Chuck Latonia, 701 North lOUi St. LaaVegaa, NV 89101. Auction win ba held at 9 AM. at 1603 Foothill Dr. BooMsr aty, NV. on Monday, Aug. 6. 1900. Park Plasa reaervea the right to Md. Contenta may be inapected batwaen 8 and 9 A.M. on the day of aak. Thia aale ia aubject to caneailatkai in the event all monies are paid prior to tiiiadata. H-Jnlyl9-26andAug.2. LEGAL NOTICE National Ante Salvnfe Aoetion 661 W. Snnast, Henderaon, Nv. 89016. Vahida to be add at ane tioa August 11, 1900. ThlaUoffldalnotieaofi lien aale proeeaa to obtaia titie for Uie vehicle diacrib ed below: 1968 Toyota Camiy VINIJT2SV21E9J3261661I White Rsgiatarad Ownan Daria A laiao Otero, Jr, 1017 Broadway Baratew, CA 92311 Ford Motor Credit 1616 Orange Tiae Lane /216 Redlanda, CA 92373 H-Jnly 19, 26, Aug. 2, 1990. MAX COLE AWCXATION RfOUCST ANX-ltO LEGAL NOTICE VACATION OF RIGHT-OF-WAY OF THE 20 FOOT ALLEY IN HILLCREST MANOR, LOCATED BETWEEN HILLCREST DRIVE AND W. VICTORY ROAD NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Utat a petition haa hen fUed with the Clerk of the CouncU of the Gty of Henderaon, Nevada, requeating the vacatian of the 20 foot aUey fai HOkreat Manor. k>cated between HOkreat Drive and W. VictoryRd. THE PETITIONER, Gary L. WilUama, haa reqneated thia vacation becauae tUa right'^f-way ia no longer required for aooeaa. A PUBLIC HEARING on tiie said vacation will be held on August 7,1990, at the hour of JM P.M., or aa aoon thereof ter aa practicable, hi the CooncU Chamber at City Hall, 240 Water Street b tiie aty of Hsndwaon, County of Clark, Nevada. IF, UPON SUCH HEARING, tiie aty CooacU of said aty of Henderaon ia aatiafied tiiat the pabUc will not be materially injured by atuch propoaed vacation, the above-deacribed right-of-way will be vacated. THIS NOTICE ia given pnranant to aa order made by the City CouncU of the aty of Henderson, Nevada, at a R^nlar Meeting, heM July 3,1990. DATED tills 9Ui day of July, 1990 and PUBUSHED IN THE HENDERSON HOME NEWS 7/19m and 7/26m. (a) Dorothy A. Vondenbrink DOROTHY A. VONDENBRINK, CMC. CITY CLERK H^July 19. 26. 1990 LEGAL NOTICE LJJS. JOINT VENTURE THE EVENT ALL 1648 ATHOI. AVENUE MONIES PAID ft HENDBSON,NV 89016 ^O^M REMOVED WE 584.1(196 RESmVB THE RIGHT NOTICE IS HEREBY TO BID. GIVEN THAT I. LM8 AUCTION TO BE HELD STORAGE WILL SELL FRIDAY,72790 at lOHW CONTENTS OF BELOW A.M. „^„„„,„ MENTIONED UNITS TO Unit # 176; ROBERT SATISFY STORAGE INGALLS. 638 EVANS LIENaTHISSALESUBROAD, TOLEDO. WA JECT TO PRIOR 9W1. CANCELLATION IN H-7/12) LEGAL NOTICE BEFORE THE PUBUC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA NOTICE OF APPUCATION AJaiatapplicnti4)n,faiantiliadaa Docket No. 90662, baa bean fliad whh the PribleSarvfaaCoonrfaiion ofNavdarCnmmkiInn") by John Lsnvitt dbn John'a Thiddag, for anthoritjr to aail and tranafar, and of John'a IVacUng Inc. to parchaaa and aoqoiie Cartificnto of PnbUc Convanianoa and Naoeaaity CPC A-2486. CPC A-2486 antboriaaa comaion carrier motor vahide tranqioration, oncall, ^vw farragnlar rontaa of and, gravel, rack, fill dirt, dndsra, aaphah mix, damoUtioa dabria, road mix, top soil, water and Hmaato n e be t ween polnta and pinoss within a 404nife radina of Laa Vegaa, Nevada. The apiJkatkm waa fDed pvaoant to NAC 703 and NRS706ii41Landbonffle land available for viewing by the pnbUc at the officea of the Conuniaaion, 727 Fairviaw Drive, Carson CH7, Nevada 80710 and tiie Alexander Dawaon Bnikiing, 4046 Sooth Spenow. Suite A-44, Laa Vegaa, Nevada 89168. Intereetad and affected peraona may comment in writing and file appropriate Proteste and/or Petitiona for Leave to Intervene at either of the Commiaaion'a of ficea on or before Wedneaday, Angnat 1,1990. By the Conuniaaion, /a/ Jeanne Reynolda, Aast. Secretary WILLIAM H. VANCE. Commission Secretary Dated: Caraon City, Nevada (SEAL) H-July 7.19, 1990. BEFORE THETPUBLIC SERVICE COMMIS SIGN OF NEVADA NOTICE OF APPUCATION Aap|ilicatk,identinad aa Docket No. 90-722, haa been Jointly filed by BB4D, Inc. r Seller") and Nevada Fleet Management,} Inc. dba Fleet IMIviiry Servfce r'Bny") with the PnbUc Service Conuniaaion of Nevada fCommisdnii') requesting authority to sell and transfer Certificate of PnbUc Convenience and Neoeaaity, CPC A-2426, tram the Seller to the Bayer porsnadt to NRS 706.6411 and Chapters 703 and 706 of NRS and tiie Nevada Adminiatratlve Code. CPC A-2426 anthorixea on-call. irregular route tranaportation of amaU paroala and light exprea a except business records, bookkaepiag materiala and computer printouta, between pointe and places within Clark County, Nevada. The application ia on file and available for public viewing at the offkea of tiie Conuniaaion, 727 Fairview Drive, Carson aty, Nevada 89710 and the Alexander Dawaon bnilding, 4046 Sontii Spencer, Suite A-44, Laa Vegaa, Nevada 89168. latcreated and affected persona may comment in writing and fUe appropriate ProtesU and/or Petitiona for Leave to Intervene at either of the CommlaaJoa's offfoes on or before Wednesday, August 1,1990. By the Commiadon. WILUAM H. VANCE. Commission Secretary Dated: Carson City, Nevada 7/12/90 (SEAL) H-Jdy 7,19, 1990. Sales workshop scheduled Are you a "No-Limit Person'7 If not, you can leam how to be one at a sales professional workshop consisting of national presenters scheduled for Friday, Sept 14 at the Riviera Hotel. Dr. Wayne Dyer, an eiqwrt on turning life around, will be the keynote speaker. Dyer has written five best sellers including "Your Erroneous Zones," "Pulling Your Own Strings," and "The Sky's The Limit;*^^ Besides being an author, Dyer has taught at many levels of education from high school to the Teaching Hospital of Cornell University Medical College. In addition, he has appeared on more than S.200 television and radio programs, including "The Tonight Show," "The Today Show," "Phil Donahue Show" and "Oprah Winfrey." Anne Boe, author of "Is Your Net-Woricing?" will also speak at the workshop. Boe is a motivational speaker specializing in employee motivation, communication and sales skills and gaining a competitive edge through networkiiig and customer service. Sample chapters from her book include titles such as "Networidng in the •90s and Beyond," "Information is Power," "Quid Pro Quo (or. How Useful Are You to Someone Else)" The woricshop will be held in conjunction with tiie annual conference of tiie National Association of Professional Saleswomen. Businesses may buy blocks of reserved seating for tiie event. For more information and reservations, caU 796-7422 or 258-6169. Forexhibit ^ce, call 386-0423. YCSI WEHAVETHEIM CORDLESS PHONES BATTERIES I ANTENNAS Ask for Cro8$lown Spaclal and \ Rc0lv 10% Discount BEST TELEPHONE COMPANY | 11 f. Chadttlon MISMt Callulw T MT. MORIAH WED. SILVER THUR8. LODGE #39 7:30 P.M. CORD 7:30 P.M. 400 QfMnway Rd. HONEY DO'S HANDYMAN SERVICES TOO HOT TO DO YOUR HONEY DO'S? CALL US 2943071 5666811 MEDIFAX The medical hittoiy in your wallet allows emergency medical and other medical people immediate accai to (hit important infomuuion without the UK of (pedal equipment and no waiting. If your medical Mitoiy changei, juit notify MEDIFAX, be. lo update your pemianent matter file a* well u your MEDIFAX wallet LD. caid. Ifyouloeit,JujtrequeitAffiDIFAX, LK. to tend a duplicate (Tbete ii a HnaO proceiiing and handling fee).' If you have no alleigiei and lake no medication, it it very important for emergency penoonel to have thit infonnaiiaa toa Once MEDIFAX, Inc. receivei your filled-in, dated and tigned Medical Data fomi and regittiation fee, a laminated MEDIFAX wallet I.D. caid will be made for you and a peimanentfile will be opened in your name at MEDIFAX (pleast typt or print Itgibty in black). All you have to do for thit "ounce of prevention'' it Tdl in the data theet, sign, date and mail it with a check or money order for $4.95 ($1 for pottage, handling and talet tax • toul $5.95) Your Name and Addreit Send for your MEDIFAX dau theet now MEDIFAX, INC. 1000 Nevada Hwy., Suite 203 Boulder City. NV 89005 294-4113 -'-I franchises receive top awards TteeelocalCentury 21 franchises have been lauded for top production during the month of April and for year-to-date production through April, announced Larry Bryson, regional director of Century 21 of the Southwest Inc. Century 21 Action Network Realty, Century 21 Henderson Realty, Inc. and Century 21 JR Realty were recognized as members of the President's Round Table and the President's Circle. A production award based on year-to-date figures, the President's Roimd Table award requires that an office meet or exceed a specified dollar amount in gross closed commissions per month, every month. Meeting that "outstanding amount" in gross closed commissions for a one-month period qualifies an office for the prestigious President's Circle award. o Sfi€CiCtU All Summer Blouses in Cotton & Polyester Now Only Shorts, Clamdigger and Cuiotte Vi price Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Saturday OTHENA'S FASHION: 26A Water StreetT^^ Henderson ___^v. piMAMpiiiilHiaiiill'^' NOTICE TO TAXPAYERS THE FIRST INSTALLMENT OF REAL PROPERTY TAXES IS DUE AUGUST 6, 1990. IF YOUR TAXES ARE NOT BEING PAID THROUGH YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY AND YOU HAVE NOT RECEIVED A TAX BILL, PLEASE CONTACT THE CLARK COUNTY TREASURER TO REQUEST A DUPLICATE COPY TO AVOID ANY PENALTIES. MARK ASTON TREASURERTAX RECEIVER ******** 225 E. Bridget Avenue let Floor Las Vegas, NV 89155 455-4323 X Thnnday, Friday, July 19 & 20.1990 This Week Salsa Festival, Part II, flops Henderson Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Pags 7B Voting registration deadline iooms ''*'*'• '*'"'*' "^ •• ^""""i' ^^^ w w DA.. T .K.iiA^'ia TTlt<.i/
  • mote the event and had a special junket come to Vegas just for the Salsa Gsla event on Saturday night. A number of persons who called me complained that if the security force was not so large in number there could have b^een a riot with persons demanding and signing petitions to get their money back. Why? According to a commentary by German Grijalva on UNLV radio station KNUV, there was only one of the three top Salsa groups advertised that played at 1:30 p.m. By that time, groups of persons who paid $60 per person had left. The musical numbers that were presented early on were not Las Vegas Show Capital of the World caliber. According to Grijalva's radio commentary, the Salsa fans came at 8 p.m., expecing to hear, see and dance to the top musical groups in the Salsa world—Eddie Santiago, Willie Chirino and Andy Motanez. Instead the audience was ripped off, according to G] ^ who 'called me Sunday morning. Some of us remember the rock and roll shows at the Convention Center during the days of some of the promoters like Gary Naseef (a former coworker at Circus Circus under Jay Samo). There were some terrific rock shows but then groups began to fail to appear and the Convention Center Authority generated the requirement of a performance bond for the promoters. When groups failed to show up, the promoters were required to refund the price of admission. Memo to tiie hotels: A similar performance bond should be required when any event is announced as having top musical stars and groups. In the case of the so-called promotional group, Nevada Hispanics for Special Events, the name sounds professional, but some of the monbers of those profit-making groups need years of promotional and public relations experience. It will be interesting if the groups will offer a pubhc statement to all the media with their explanation of the Saturday night massacre of Salsa fans and whether they will refund the money. ThisWeek offers equal space to a responsible member of Nevada Hispanics for Special Events to give their side of the disappointing event. • On the road, picking on a minority group... Now it's the FUipinoe who are moving to the Las Vegas valley and wanting to eBtabUsh thenoselves like you and 1.1 was somewhat taken by a columnist who used to wQck at Channel 10 beck in the 70s when I had my Cine en EqMmol TV Show. George Knapp, KLAS-Channel 8 news penoa, apparently didnt do his usual homework when he wrote the negative article on the ixtn l(xig lines at the local DMV offices. He said that Filipinos, speaking little English and well-dressed, #ere causing some "eyebrow raising" because of the large number who were applying for ID cards. If Knapp checked his facts flrst, e.g. calling the U.S. Bureau of the Census, Islanders (as Filipinos are classLHed) are the fastest-growing group in the country and the top minority group that is lending themselves to the current census count. He would have also found that, unlike my fellow cousins from Latin American countries who are still entering our country, the Fihpibos speak Enghsh quite'well. In fact, English is a rigid requirement of children in private and pubhc schools there. Memo to George Knapp: 1 am surprised at you for not checking this important story before you wrote yoiu* article— or did you have a deadline catching you unprepared? As for the long lines, you could not pay me enough to work at the DMV. What with 4,000 to 5,000 persons per month moving to Las Vegas, the lines for ID cards and drivers licenses are long and will continue to grow. But, because of the color of your skin, you're singled out as an easy target. The close of registration for the upcoming Sept. 4 Primary election will be at 9 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 4, officials have announced. The Clark County Election Department, 333 S. 6th St., is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday; and (rom 8 a.m. until 9 p.m. beginning Tuesday, July 31, through Saturday, Aug. \, For those people who have moved since registering, their address must be changed to their new residence, they said. Addresses may ]t)e changed by calling the Election Department at 455-4055 through July 27; after that date, however, addresses only may be changed at the County Election Depailment. In addition to the Clark County Election Department, qualified electors may also register at any of the city Clerk's Offices located in Las Vegas, North Las Vegas, Boulder City, Henderson and Mesquite (contact should be made to ascertain office hours); additionally, any local branch of the Department of Motor Vehicle's will register qualified electors for the Primary Election until 5 p.m. Friday, Aug. 3.; or registration may be done by any Field Deputy Registrar who will be sitting out in the maUs, grocery stores, etc., they said. KV.fjT7 ,^^ >^^^*^W*rt'^'f.Rev. Lucretia Uhrich, assistant minister at Community Church of Henderson. United Church of Christ, wilj^resent a sermon topic, "Practicable Parable," for Sunday's worship services. Scripture for Rev. Uhrich's message are from Matthew 13:24-30 and 3643. Two worship services are held, one at 8 a.m. in an informal setting, and one at 10:30 a.m. for traditional liturgies. Community Church is located at 360 E. Horizon Drive, near the comer of Greenway Road. A youth metitation is given during the second service and there is a -supervised area for the younger children during the rest of the service. The church office is (^pen from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays eadi week. For further informatkii, call 565-8563. There are two active woaun's groups at Ommunily Church, the Women's Association which meets at noon on the second Tuesday of each month for a potluck lunch and meeting, and the Joy Fellowship which meets at 7 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month. Both groups meet at the church and for the summer are actually meeting every week to work on special bazaar projects. The chancel choir rehearses at 9 a.m. each Sunday. Those who like to sing are welcome to join with them. Joyd Elwood Caldwell Boyd Elwood Caldwell, 79, died Thursday, July 12, in Las Vegas. Bom May 4,1911 in Molen, Utah, he was a resident of Henderson for 40 years. He was a retired employee of the Bureau of Mines, and served in the United States Navy. He was also a member of Mt. Moriah Masonic Temple, Henderson (31st Degree Mason); also a member of Scottish Rite Las Vegas, Member of Naval Fleet Reserve, Past Post Ck)mmander, American Legion Boulder City, Nev. He is survived by his wife, Norma Caldwell and a granddaughter, Leslee Claldwell, both of Henderson; two great-grandsons, Chad Allen, and Andrew Boyd Hill, both of Bountiful, Utah; a brother, John Caldwell, of Boulder City and two sisters, Areta Peckham of Provo, Utah, and Aleta (Collins, of Salt Lake City, Utah. The family suggests memorials in his name to Nathan Adelson Hospice, Las Vegas. Services were handled by Palm Mortuary of Henderson. TRY THE NEW TWO COIN DOLLAR PROGRESSIVES *250,000 AND GROWING!!! Smaller JadqxH Meters Pay Constantly AU Jackpo^,PaiHjn,One Checic Dr. William N. Evans, M.D, Pediatric Cardiology '*What will happen when I go the the hospital" is a great concern of many children. Our responsive stair at the HumanaTChildren's Hospital is devoted to serving the special physical and emotional needs of your child. We have brought together a dedicated team of independent, pediatric physicians, several with specialities never before available in Las Vegas, to create a quality, health care bdlity for children in Nevada. Patty Carpenter, R.N. Pediatrics Their presence represents a significant step for orientation program for parents and children, the health care of children in Nevada. Specialties Beyond the physical needs our goal is to make include intensive care, cardiology, neonatoiogy, every child's stay pleasant as possible. Offering the pediatric surgery, oncology and ophthalmology, love, care and attention your child deserves, that's among many others. what Humana' Children's Hospital Las Vegas is The exclusive 140-bed children's facility offers all about a specially trained pediatric nursing staff; pedi atric equipment; children's menus; play therapist; complete playroom; resources library; presurgery tours; pharmacy; radiology; and an % Special care for chUdretiyfrom the name you trust -Humana'Children's Hospital A 3186 Maryland Parkway • Las Vegas, Nevada 89109 • 731-8000 Human^Children's Hospital is part of HumansTHospitalSunrite. HO-))-00W 01989 Hiiaiai*lnc \W

    PAGE 24

    > • I I i — r^^^^^^^^^ III II p^wwWPiWi>i"<'^^i<^^i—W—W^W Thursday, Friday, July 19 & 20, 1990 Page 8B, Head^non Home New*, Boulder aty News, Oreen VaUey News OLD FASHIONED SONGS—Pretty music from an earlier era is often played before each New Life class. Students gather around opera star Nancy Shade at the piano to sing along. For more information on New Life classes, call 293-4444. Photo by Stephen Burke 'What Happens To Slanderers' is topic "What Happens To Slanderers," with biblical reference to Psalms 34:21, which warns that those who hate the righteous will be spiritually destroyed by their own evil, is the topic of talks this weelc at New Life Foundation, 700 Wyoming St., at thf CMMT of Utah Street in Boulder^iii)i^. .i-^^v -w^'New Life classes in innerdevelopment are conducted at 7 p.m. Wednesday and Friday and at 9 a.m. Saturday and Sunday on a donation basis. Author Vemon Howard directs classes and speaks each Sunday morning at 9 a.m. "I used to fall asleep in church—but not any more," New Life student Gordon Rand said. "The wisdom offered at New Life sparked my interest from the beginning. Until now I never knew the moment-bymoment true excitement of taking the upward path of higher learning." As a public service to Southem Nevada, the New Life Foundation Speakers Bureau provides speakers free of charge to local service organizations, women's clubs and church groups. Psychiatrists, psychologists and other researchers in the field of human psychology give talks on a variety of practical subjects. New Life receives letters from all over the world, written by individuals who have read books by Howard or heard him speak on radio or cassette tape. A woman from Jonesboro, Ga., recently wrote: "After years of searching and suffering, 1 would like to e^efldmy gratitude to Mr. Howard for helping me sec the problem and accept the cure." ~" Area residents may obtain a free copy of "Do You Remember When?" by visiting New Life or by calling 293-4444. It will strike a right chord in those who remember a gentler, more selfresponsible era, spokespersons said. In the flyer Howard says: "Do you remember when clean television taught decency? Do you remember when wrong was not called right? Do you remember when God and sacredness were honored?" Call 293-4444 for more information or directions to the classes. TELEPHONES "ANSWERING MACHINES^^ EVEHV-PHONC THtNd" VOU r'Ctb rACIOMT AUTHOMIIO UMWCl AND tAlit BEST TELEPHONE COMPANY 382SM LAMCtT UltCliOM m SOUIHtHN NfVAO* COKMA or l>IM lll CHAMIITON IMH II'I MOW OPEN TO SERVE YOU PRO-TECH AUTO BODY LICENSED • BONDED •Professional Frame Straightening •Unl Body Allignment •Complete Automotive Reflnishing (any make or model) ^FREE ESTIMATES ^ALL INSURANCE ESTIMATES ACCEPTED ^24 HOUR TOWING ^ALL WORK GUARANTEED ^ RENTAL CARS AVAILABLE Larry MeChek (lormarty wh Friendly Fd) 649 Mlddl^gate tunst Industrial Parit, Handarson (/. 565-3188 OMtuaries Carroll C. Andrews Robert W. Vamon Robert Walton Vamon, 76, died Tuesday, July 10, in Henderson. Born Oct. 8, 1913, in Stockdale, Texas, he was a resident of Henderson (Green Valley) for IVi years. He was a retired Chief Warrant Officer for the United States Navy. His length of duty has lasted 30 years. He served in WWn, Korea and Vietnam. He was a member of Retired Officers Association. The family requests donations be made to the American Diabetes Association, 4045 South Spencer St., Suite A-62, Las Vegas, Nev. 89119. He is survived by his wife, Louise of Green Valley; three sons, Richard Varnon, of Sagus, Caiif., Peter Yeatrakas, of San Mateo, Calif., and James Yeatrakas of Groose Creek, S.C.; two sisters, Bertie Thompson of Grand Junction, Colo., and Leona Coday of Skellytown, Texas; and Hve grandchildren. Arrangements were handled by Palm Valley View Mortuary oiP Las Vegas. CarroU C. Andrews, 82, died Wednesday, July 11, in a local hospital. Bom Feb. 22, 1908, in Chariot, Mich., he was a resident of Boulder City for two years. He was an electronics quality control manager, and served in the United States Navy. He was also the President Emeratus of Dallas Coin Club, of Dallas, Texas, and a member of the bpard of American Numismatic Assoc. He is survived by his wife, L. Mae Andrews and a daughter, Carol K. Sivright, both of Boulder City. The family "suggests" memorials in his name to: U.S. Navy Memorial Foundation, Box 332 McLean, Va. 22101. Arrangements were handled by Palm Mortuary of Henderson. Robert Craig Barrie Robert CraigBarrie, 77, died He is survived by two nieces. Saturday, July 7, in a local hospital. Bom Sept. 27, 1912, in Pittsburg, Pa., he was a retired steel fabrication machinist and served in the United States Air Force. Marilyn Spudich of West Mifflin, Pa., and Nancy Morton of McKeesport, Pa. Arrangements were handled by Palm Mortuary of Henderson. Kevin Michael Hawes John G. Cox Jr. Kevin Michael Hawes, infant, died Wednesday, July 4 in a local hospital. He was bom July 3,1990 in Henderson. He is survived by his parents, Deanna Lyime and Jack Edward Hawes of Henderson; grandmother, Virginia Conti of Henderson; grandfather, Roy Mendoza of La Verkin, Utah; and grandparents, Beverly and Roger Kidd of Henderson. Graveside services were held. Palm Mortuary handled the arrangements. John G. Cox Jr., 56, died Sunday at a local Convalescent center. Bom Oct. 15,1933, in Los Angeles, Calif., he was a resident of Henderson since 1955. He was a melting operator at Timet. He is siu^ved by his wife. Patricia M. Cox; two daughters, Helen Marie Webb and Roxaime Louise Ottemess; a son, John G. Cox III; his parents, John G. Sr. and Marie Cox, all of Henderson; and six grandchildren. Palm Mortuary of Henderson handled arrangements. CHOICEONE found a 'Jj'l worKs as UCMKRFnC Ren a hardworking CHO/CEO/\£ Checking Account at any Valley Bank branch, and you'll get: • Free personalized checks for the life of the account • An automatic teller machine card • • Interest on a balance of $1,000 or more • No-fee Visa or MasterCard* • Check Guarantee Card* • No-fee DirectLine Credit* • Unlimited check writing • 24-hour Bank by Phone • Check storage service All this for just a $9.00 monthly fee. Also, if you choo.se to pay an additional $2.00 charge, you'll receive: Credit Card Protection, Emergency Cash Advance, Accidental Death Insurance, plus other discounts and bonuses. CHOICEONE from Valley Bank. We believe in working hard for you. Call our 24-h()ur An.swcrLine for additional information: 1-800-388-BANK (Oul.sidc the La.s Vef?a.s area) 654-1000 (U,s Vega.s) Or vi.sit any Valley Bank branch VUky Baric ofNcMda Thursday. Friday, July 19 & 20, 1990 18 Pack Vons Large Grade AA Egg 1 Vi Dozen Carion limit 2 Cartons Per Family m FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES Vons Eitra Lai^ Tomatoes Vine Ripened Nutritious Bananas High in Fiber Lb. .89 Lb..m Fresh BluebeiTies Ea.99 12 Ounce Container (Fresh Crepes "Frieda's Finest"—2.99 Pkg.) Fresh Eggplant SslOO ^ Approx 26 Coiories Per 3 OuncesMediom Size FRESH DAIRY/DELI PRODUCTS GriUmaster Chicken Bologna ^09 One Pound Packa$t A KnudsenLowfat Yogurt 2sl^^ ^^ Seiected Vdrieliw-a CHince Carton HenderaoD Home News, Boulder Oty Newa, Green Valley News Page 9B Saves You More! Boneless ^^^ Whole Top Sirloin Vons Lean Beef (Untrimmed) (Top Sirloin Steaks—Lb. 2.49) Save .60 199 JLlb. n U.S.DJV CHOICF Beef Rib Eye Steaks Fresh Chicken Drumsticks or Thighs ^h Value Packi$oitlhem ^ ^ Great/or BB.Q '^•j Save .50 3SI Doritos TortiUa Chips Keystone#j Beer 12 Pack Regular or Light 12 Ounce Cans Save 140 329 FRESH MEAT & SEAFOOD Boneless Rump Roast ^^. 189 Vons Lean Beef-'A" Thin Trimmed (Boneiess Eye of Hound—1^2.89) Swift Butterball Cooked Turkey Breast .^ 3 29 Honey Breast or Mesquile Breasl-Slice N' Serve Zacky or Foster Farms Best of Fiyer ^b 1^^ Prime Quality-CdIi/ornia GroHn ChicJcen Fanner John Links or Patties 12 Ounce Paciiage UMC Extra Large Cooked Shrimp ,,798 PBeted-Froien/DB/rwtBd Eo 149 BEER & WINE Sebastiani Chardonnay or Cabernet Sauvignon-1.5 Litar Botik Corona Beer Extra or Ught-6 Pack/12 Ounce BoHht 549 429 GROCERY Sunshine Cookies Animal Cmritan dm^nrnv Rpnrc 39 Animal Cracliefs, Grahamy Bears, O.T, Bears orOioc Sounis^ to sUi Pkj .99 Hunt's Barbecue Sauce Original. Hickory or Southern Style-18 Oz. Bottle KeDogg's Com Flakes 18 Ounce Box ^ 9-Iives Canned Cat Food ^ • ^ Aatortod VaiMOunce Can 159 .29 FROZEN A Healthy Choice Dinners ^^ SeJ*dVarieti, las to 11.75 Oz.Pkg • Weight Watchers Desserts Seiacted VoiMieat 175 to 7 OK. Pkft 299 135 i i AD PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS • Starting 8 ajn. Wendesday thni Midnight Tuesday |nly It thru July 24,1990. 'll! l B'y '.' .u u s, "l l I, jl'^Mj'iiVff'' F r^^^^ ^'^i T m i E a^sgrT^^ J r • •y W.Wl i I l |L il J I "il ^lJUHHf*.fW ^.

    PAGE 25

    > • I I i — r^^^^^^^^^ III II p^wwWPiWi>i"<'^^i<^^i—W—W^W Thursday, Friday, July 19 & 20, 1990 Page 8B, Head^non Home New*, Boulder aty News, Oreen VaUey News OLD FASHIONED SONGS—Pretty music from an earlier era is often played before each New Life class. Students gather around opera star Nancy Shade at the piano to sing along. For more information on New Life classes, call 293-4444. Photo by Stephen Burke 'What Happens To Slanderers' is topic "What Happens To Slanderers," with biblical reference to Psalms 34:21, which warns that those who hate the righteous will be spiritually destroyed by their own evil, is the topic of talks this weelc at New Life Foundation, 700 Wyoming St., at thf CMMT of Utah Street in Boulder^iii)i^. .i-^^v -w^'New Life classes in innerdevelopment are conducted at 7 p.m. Wednesday and Friday and at 9 a.m. Saturday and Sunday on a donation basis. Author Vemon Howard directs classes and speaks each Sunday morning at 9 a.m. "I used to fall asleep in church—but not any more," New Life student Gordon Rand said. "The wisdom offered at New Life sparked my interest from the beginning. Until now I never knew the moment-bymoment true excitement of taking the upward path of higher learning." As a public service to Southem Nevada, the New Life Foundation Speakers Bureau provides speakers free of charge to local service organizations, women's clubs and church groups. Psychiatrists, psychologists and other researchers in the field of human psychology give talks on a variety of practical subjects. New Life receives letters from all over the world, written by individuals who have read books by Howard or heard him speak on radio or cassette tape. A woman from Jonesboro, Ga., recently wrote: "After years of searching and suffering, 1 would like to e^efldmy gratitude to Mr. Howard for helping me sec the problem and accept the cure." ~" Area residents may obtain a free copy of "Do You Remember When?" by visiting New Life or by calling 293-4444. It will strike a right chord in those who remember a gentler, more selfresponsible era, spokespersons said. In the flyer Howard says: "Do you remember when clean television taught decency? Do you remember when wrong was not called right? Do you remember when God and sacredness were honored?" Call 293-4444 for more information or directions to the classes. TELEPHONES "ANSWERING MACHINES^^ EVEHV-PHONC THtNd" VOU r'Ctb rACIOMT AUTHOMIIO UMWCl AND tAlit BEST TELEPHONE COMPANY 382SM LAMCtT UltCliOM m SOUIHtHN NfVAO* COKMA or l>IM lll CHAMIITON IMH II'I MOW OPEN TO SERVE YOU PRO-TECH AUTO BODY LICENSED • BONDED •Professional Frame Straightening •Unl Body Allignment •Complete Automotive Reflnishing (any make or model) ^FREE ESTIMATES ^ALL INSURANCE ESTIMATES ACCEPTED ^24 HOUR TOWING ^ALL WORK GUARANTEED ^ RENTAL CARS AVAILABLE Larry MeChek (lormarty wh Friendly Fd) 649 Mlddl^gate tunst Industrial Parit, Handarson (/. 565-3188 OMtuaries Carroll C. Andrews Robert W. Vamon Robert Walton Vamon, 76, died Tuesday, July 10, in Henderson. Born Oct. 8, 1913, in Stockdale, Texas, he was a resident of Henderson (Green Valley) for IVi years. He was a retired Chief Warrant Officer for the United States Navy. His length of duty has lasted 30 years. He served in WWn, Korea and Vietnam. He was a member of Retired Officers Association. The family requests donations be made to the American Diabetes Association, 4045 South Spencer St., Suite A-62, Las Vegas, Nev. 89119. He is survived by his wife, Louise of Green Valley; three sons, Richard Varnon, of Sagus, Caiif., Peter Yeatrakas, of San Mateo, Calif., and James Yeatrakas of Groose Creek, S.C.; two sisters, Bertie Thompson of Grand Junction, Colo., and Leona Coday of Skellytown, Texas; and Hve grandchildren. Arrangements were handled by Palm Valley View Mortuary oiP Las Vegas. CarroU C. Andrews, 82, died Wednesday, July 11, in a local hospital. Bom Feb. 22, 1908, in Chariot, Mich., he was a resident of Boulder City for two years. He was an electronics quality control manager, and served in the United States Navy. He was also the President Emeratus of Dallas Coin Club, of Dallas, Texas, and a member of the bpard of American Numismatic Assoc. He is survived by his wife, L. Mae Andrews and a daughter, Carol K. Sivright, both of Boulder City. The family "suggests" memorials in his name to: U.S. Navy Memorial Foundation, Box 332 McLean, Va. 22101. Arrangements were handled by Palm Mortuary of Henderson. Robert Craig Barrie Robert CraigBarrie, 77, died He is survived by two nieces. Saturday, July 7, in a local hospital. Bom Sept. 27, 1912, in Pittsburg, Pa., he was a retired steel fabrication machinist and served in the United States Air Force. Marilyn Spudich of West Mifflin, Pa., and Nancy Morton of McKeesport, Pa. Arrangements were handled by Palm Mortuary of Henderson. Kevin Michael Hawes John G. Cox Jr. Kevin Michael Hawes, infant, died Wednesday, July 4 in a local hospital. He was bom July 3,1990 in Henderson. He is survived by his parents, Deanna Lyime and Jack Edward Hawes of Henderson; grandmother, Virginia Conti of Henderson; grandfather, Roy Mendoza of La Verkin, Utah; and grandparents, Beverly and Roger Kidd of Henderson. Graveside services were held. Palm Mortuary handled the arrangements. John G. Cox Jr., 56, died Sunday at a local Convalescent center. Bom Oct. 15,1933, in Los Angeles, Calif., he was a resident of Henderson since 1955. He was a melting operator at Timet. He is siu^ved by his wife. Patricia M. Cox; two daughters, Helen Marie Webb and Roxaime Louise Ottemess; a son, John G. Cox III; his parents, John G. Sr. and Marie Cox, all of Henderson; and six grandchildren. Palm Mortuary of Henderson handled arrangements. CHOICEONE found a 'Jj'l worKs as UCMKRFnC Ren a hardworking CHO/CEO/\£ Checking Account at any Valley Bank branch, and you'll get: • Free personalized checks for the life of the account • An automatic teller machine card • • Interest on a balance of $1,000 or more • No-fee Visa or MasterCard* • Check Guarantee Card* • No-fee DirectLine Credit* • Unlimited check writing • 24-hour Bank by Phone • Check storage service All this for just a $9.00 monthly fee. Also, if you choo.se to pay an additional $2.00 charge, you'll receive: Credit Card Protection, Emergency Cash Advance, Accidental Death Insurance, plus other discounts and bonuses. CHOICEONE from Valley Bank. We believe in working hard for you. Call our 24-h()ur An.swcrLine for additional information: 1-800-388-BANK (Oul.sidc the La.s Vef?a.s area) 654-1000 (U,s Vega.s) Or vi.sit any Valley Bank branch VUky Baric ofNcMda Thursday. Friday, July 19 & 20, 1990 18 Pack Vons Large Grade AA Egg 1 Vi Dozen Carion limit 2 Cartons Per Family m FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES Vons Eitra Lai^ Tomatoes Vine Ripened Nutritious Bananas High in Fiber Lb. .89 Lb..m Fresh BluebeiTies Ea.99 12 Ounce Container (Fresh Crepes "Frieda's Finest"—2.99 Pkg.) Fresh Eggplant SslOO ^ Approx 26 Coiories Per 3 OuncesMediom Size FRESH DAIRY/DELI PRODUCTS GriUmaster Chicken Bologna ^09 One Pound Packa$t A KnudsenLowfat Yogurt 2sl^^ ^^ Seiected Vdrieliw-a CHince Carton HenderaoD Home News, Boulder Oty Newa, Green Valley News Page 9B Saves You More! Boneless ^^^ Whole Top Sirloin Vons Lean Beef (Untrimmed) (Top Sirloin Steaks—Lb. 2.49) Save .60 199 JLlb. n U.S.DJV CHOICF Beef Rib Eye Steaks Fresh Chicken Drumsticks or Thighs ^h Value Packi$oitlhem ^ ^ Great/or BB.Q '^•j Save .50 3SI Doritos TortiUa Chips Keystone#j Beer 12 Pack Regular or Light 12 Ounce Cans Save 140 329 FRESH MEAT & SEAFOOD Boneless Rump Roast ^^. 189 Vons Lean Beef-'A" Thin Trimmed (Boneiess Eye of Hound—1^2.89) Swift Butterball Cooked Turkey Breast .^ 3 29 Honey Breast or Mesquile Breasl-Slice N' Serve Zacky or Foster Farms Best of Fiyer ^b 1^^ Prime Quality-CdIi/ornia GroHn ChicJcen Fanner John Links or Patties 12 Ounce Paciiage UMC Extra Large Cooked Shrimp ,,798 PBeted-Froien/DB/rwtBd Eo 149 BEER & WINE Sebastiani Chardonnay or Cabernet Sauvignon-1.5 Litar Botik Corona Beer Extra or Ught-6 Pack/12 Ounce BoHht 549 429 GROCERY Sunshine Cookies Animal Cmritan dm^nrnv Rpnrc 39 Animal Cracliefs, Grahamy Bears, O.T, Bears orOioc Sounis^ to sUi Pkj .99 Hunt's Barbecue Sauce Original. Hickory or Southern Style-18 Oz. Bottle KeDogg's Com Flakes 18 Ounce Box ^ 9-Iives Canned Cat Food ^ • ^ Aatortod VaiMOunce Can 159 .29 FROZEN A Healthy Choice Dinners ^^ SeJ*dVarieti, las to 11.75 Oz.Pkg • Weight Watchers Desserts Seiacted VoiMieat 175 to 7 OK. Pkft 299 135 i i AD PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS • Starting 8 ajn. Wendesday thni Midnight Tuesday |nly It thru July 24,1990. 'll! l B'y '.' .u u s, "l l I, jl'^Mj'iiVff'' F r^^^^ ^'^i T m i E a^sgrT^^ J r • •y W.Wl i I l |L il J I "il ^lJUHHf*.fW ^.

    PAGE 26

    f^^^^^w^mm mmmmmif^ ipn m Page lOB, Henderson Home News, Boulder City Newt, Green Valley News Thursday, Friday, July 19 & 20,1990 Thursday, Friday. July 19 & 20. 1990 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Page IIB This Was Nevada Who ts buried in Billy Stiles'jrave? By PhllUp I. Earl Next Thiu^ay, July 26, Reno's Peppermill Hotel and Casino will be hosting the annual rendezvous of the National Outlaw and Lawman Association'. The public is invited to attend the lectures and other programs or become NOLA members. There will also be a mock gunfight at noon on Saturday, July 28. For further information, call this writer at 1-323-2571 after 5 p.m. in Reno. On Saturday morning, the last day of the gathering, at 10:30 a.m.. this writer will deliver a lecture entitled, "The Strange and Mysterious Death of William Larkin Stiles, or Who is Buried in Billy Stiles' Grave?" If the title intrigues you. the details are even more bizarre. As is the case with many frontier desperados, Stiles' life is a tangled web and we are uncertain of either his true name or his place of birth. There was a William Larkin Stiles who rode with Jesse James and his gang in the 1870s. Also known as Bill Chadwell, he died in a hail of gunfire on Sept. 7,1876. in Northfield, Minn., when he took part in an attempted robbery of a local bank. He had just turned 19 years of age. We are fairly certain of his death, because a yotmg medical student, Henry M. Wheeler, secured the corpse and later displayed the skeleton in his office when he went into practice. Is this the origin of the name? Possibly. In any case, a young man calling himself Billy Stiles showed up in the Arizona Territory about 1892. For a time, he worked for William Breakenridge, chief detective for the Southern Pacific Railroad and was involved in tracking down a gang of men who robbed a train near Maricopa on Oct. 1, 1894. It is entirely likely that young Billy had begun to work both sides of the law by this time, but he made his formal debut as an outlaw on Sept. 9,1899, with the hold-up of a Southern Pacific train at Cochise Station. His confederates in that venture were Bert Alvord, Matt Burts and William Downing. Stiles had been working as Wells, Fargo & Co. messenger on the Southern Pacific and Alvord was a Cochise County Constable. It appears to have been an inside job. 'Wells, Fargo detective John Tacker took Stiles and Alvord along on a foray into New Mexico in pursuit of the trainmen, but soon began to suspect the pair as principals in the robbery. Stiles confessed and provided information leading to the arrest of the others. Jailed in Tombstone, Burts, Downing and Alvord were brought to trial and convicted on the basis of testimony provided by Stiles. Now at liberty, he had a change of heart, returning to the jail at noon on April 7,1900, when only jailer George Bravin was on duty and breaking his comrades out. Bravin was wounded in the encounter, but was able to convince the other prisoners not to take advantage of the situation. In 1902, Stiles and Alvord were commissioned in the Arizona Rangers by Capt. Burt Mossman to effect the capture of Agustin Chacon, a murderer and cattle thief who had formerly ridden with them. Chalcon was later hanged, but Stiles and Alvord were soon back on the other side, being implicated in the robbery of a train on Feb. 15, 1903. at Fairbank. Alvord later served two years at the Territorial Prison for the caper, but Stiles escaped through a rue involving a promise to turn state's evidence in the case—which he never fulfiUed. Their next foray into crime was a payroll job at the Delores Mine near Chihuahua, Mexico, in March 1906. Stiles and Alvord disappeared thereafter. Reports later getting back to Arizona authorities were that they had been seen in Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, China, the Philippines and Australia. In reality they had come to Nevada. On Sunday, Feb. 3,1907, a man known as OUie Kiimebaugh was shot and killed by Robert E. Lane in a saloon at the Amargosa mining camp in southern Nye County. At a hearing two days later. Lane's attorneys introduced evidence that the deceased was really Bert Alvord.' There were elements of selfdefense in the shooting, so Lane was not charged. Since Alvord and Stiles were almost inseperable, it is likely that Billy was somewhere in the vicinity at that time. Billy's wife. Maria, told Arizona officials that she had heard from him in Mill City, Humboldt County, but had had no further word. He had apparently moved north, taken the name William Larkin and found a job as a buckaroo on a ranch in the King's River coimtry. The ranchers in that area were having trouble with cattle rustlers at that time and one of them prevailed upon Sheriff Graham Lamb to deputize Larkin so he could apprehend and arrest those suspected of deaUng in stolen stock. Lamb later claimed that he knew nothing of Larkin's background and would not have commissioned him if he had. There is good reason to question the sheriffs assertion since he was famous for his contacts with lawmen all over the west and must have known with whom he was dealing. In any case, Larkin's career on both sides of the law came to an abrupt end on Dec. 5,1908, when he was shot and killed in cold blood on the Riley Ranch at King's River while out serving some court papers for the sheriff. His killer, Charles Barr, made good his escape. An inquest was held at the ranch and the body was brought to Winnemucca on Dec. 7. Among those on hand at the autopsy and subsequent funeral was a woman who claimed to be his wife. She had arrived in town on the very day of the shooting and was 8ta)ring with John Thacker and his family. That is the same John Thacker who had known Stiles in connection with his service as a Wells, Fargo detective, retired and living in Winnemucca at that time. The woman was actually Luisa Cameron. Stiles' sister-in-law. She identified the body as that of Billy Stiles, and informed Ed Myers of Casa Grande, who in turn told Stiles' mother of the death of her son. "'' Among those Arizonians who had their doubts that Billy Stiles had actually met his maker was a young reporter for the Arizona Daily Star of Tucson, Bessie M. Beach. She sent a photograph of Stiles to Sheriff Lamb in January 1909, and received word back that there was no resemblance between the murdered deputy and the man in the picture. In April, she wrote to Thacker. In a reply dated April 12, 1909, he wrote as follows: In looking over my letters today, I find one from you in regard to Billy Stiles. The mai| Larkin, killed north of Winnemucca, was not Billy Stiles. I was personally acquainted with both men. so know without doubt that the report was incorrect. Stiles is in Australia, went there from China." Charles Barr, his killer, was later located at the Colorado State Prison and brought back to Winnemucca for trial in 1914, but was subsequently acquitted due to the fact that memories of witnesses had faded during the intervening five years. His attorneys brought forth additional evidence that William Larkin and Billy Stiles were one and the same, but doubts persist. And there the matter rests. Who is buried in Billy Stiles' grave? Did he in some way arrange for a body to be identified as his? Was Luisa a part of the scheme? Did he pull a "Butch Cassidy and Sundance Kid Act" and go on to live another Ufe? We may never know. Should the plaque for "BiU Larkin" remain at the Nevada Peace Officers' Memorial in Reno's Idlewild Park? For additional details, join us on Saturday. ATTENTION! FATHER & SON TEAM 50 YEARS EXPERIENCE THE AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL PRCERAM. f|^ American Heart Auociotion This space provided as a public service. TRANSMISSION SERVICE SPECIAL $1 095 19 Change fluid Clan pan Replace pan gasket Change trans-filter Adjust bands & llnicage Road teat (Front wheel drive, 4x4, R.V.t Extra) mUOass Pwtectum* GREEN VALLEY • HENDERSON • BOULDER CITY MOTORISTS! try EXPERT TRANSMISSIONS • we'rt cloMT than you thinki EXKRT ^m^^S .M U-;BOARD1 PAPOOSE BINGO PLAYED ON PAPER. $1,000 OR $2,000 GUARANTEED COVERALL Every Sot. 9 pm 1 3 cnv 5 dn & 7 (in SESSIONS PUYED ON PAPER. OUR BEST REFERENCE IS LOCAL PREFERENCE Hora, CASM ft BOMUB cana^us VEBAS Comer d Fremont & Qiarbton • 38Mn8 Religion Weekly sermon The search for meaning By The Rev. James Serada New Life Church and Literary Foundation 700 Wyoming Street, Boulder City Today, I believe more than at any other time in the history of humanity, people are searching and seeking for answers to life. They ask, "What is life all about?. What is our purpose on this earth?" This could be called the age of stress, anxiety, frustration—not knowing what the future holds. Did you know that every, eight minutes in the United States a person commits suicide? And the suicide rate is growing among juveniles. The highest rate is among professional people, especially psychiatrists—those who are supposed to have answers to Ufe. :_——— -^ Why? Something must be" wrong. Could it be because we have failed to find out what our purpose in Ufe is? That seems to me to be the explanation. If we knew what life was about, would we harm or destroy ourselves? In his popular booklet guide, "Your Power to Say No," Vemon Howard gives a clear, precise statement on our true purpose: "The real purpose of Ufe? It is to develop inwardly, to experience deep spiritual transformation, to actuaUy become a different kind of human being, to find one's true self, to contact reaUty. The restless wanderer makes the mistake of finding only himself in every -experience, like looking in a mirror and hoping to find something new, but seeing only the usual. The restless person is caught in the painful contradiction of demanding at the same time both his old nature and a new nature. That is like insisting on being both outdoors and indoors at the same time. The impossible condition tears him apart. The methods in this book show how to rise above the agonizing contradictions by rising above oneself. Then you are no longer tormented by your own restI Christian ^Academy registration under way School registration is currently under way at the Henderson Campus of Paradise Christian Academy. The academy had postponed its spring registration pending a decision concerning faciUties for the upcoming year. Recently the school was given approval by the city of Henderson to place a 2,200-quare-foot modular building at 601 Major Ave. The building wiU accommodate all grades at the academy, which is state-recognized for kindergarten through 12th grade. PCA-Henderson Campus is a ministry of Paradise Bible Baptist Church, located at 2525 Emerson Ave., Las Vegas. The church operates an academy in Las Vegas, estabUshed in 1979 and in Henderson, estabUshed in 1989. Both schools use the popular ABEKA Christian school curriculum. Returning students are asked to secure their enrollment by contacting the school office at 565-5831. Questions may also be directed to the Henderson administrator at 565-0216. Enrollment per grade is Umited to insure a low teacher-tostudent ratio. PCA-Henderson foUows the Clark County School District's nine-month school calendar and wiU begin the school year on August 27. Tortoise lecture Members of TORT-Group. an organization which infomis the public about adopting and caring for desert tortoises, will give a program forchildren at 10:30 a.m. Monday at the James I. Gibson Libfaryr280 Water Si. The program is pan of the library's summer reading club. For more information, call 5658402. lessness. The weary wanderer has at last arrived home. "The individual who discovers the purpose of Ufe is pleased at how a single new meaning in Ufe is also found. Previously there was confusion £18 to the many apparent meanings in events of Ufe, which turned out be meaningless meanings. If a man won the affection of a certain woman, he thought that meant he was attractive and desirable. If he bought a new home, he thought that meant he was financiaUy successful. But the more of those kinds of meanings he coUected, the more desperate he became to find real meaning. The entire problem collapses by seeing Ufe's true meaning. It means everything to face yourself as you actuaUy are, then let reahty change you." As the Master Himself said two thousand years ago: "Seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his rigtheousness; and all these things shaU be added unto you" (Matt. 6:33). How many of us are foUowing this Ufe-heaUng approach? Or have we become a nation of greedy, self-serving, arrogant and spiteful people? That can never give us a right purpose, a true answer to Ufe. We must go much deeper. We must see where we are taking wrong as right, bad as good, temporary acquisitions and thrills as security and happiness. Only spiritual development can give us the insight, strength and right guidance to do this. To stop the terrible toll of self-destruction, we must find new and authentic meaning that gives us moment-tomoment understanding of Ufe. "Because strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it." (Matt. 7:14). dJ^ LA PORTA |L7 INSURANCE r^ AQENCY,INC. PrefcMlonal Inturanc* Planning •Louis LaPorta •Marvin Rosa •Bill Paynter FG. Rusty Hammond (Heirith & Life) 129 Water St., Henderson 565-6411 3700 Pecoi4lcLeod, Las Vegas 454-1400 Three things a spa salesman won't tell you. 2. Is the tpa engineered and manufactured as a system? FACT: We engineer and manufacture every single item that goes into our spas. You can count on them to perform. 3. How much does it really ooatT Every Jacuzzi spa comes complete, ready to enjoy. When you purchase a genuine Jacuzzi brand q>a you are getting the best dnigned, best built, and best backed spa you can buy. Period. 1. Haw powvM are tha JatsT FACT: We move more watar through bigger jets than any other manufacturer. When it comes to muscle soothing relaxation, Jacuad* • bfaad spas are the choice of professionals. $3,995 THE REAL ONE. COMPLETE • VECTRAII SPAS UNLIMITED 2250 E. Troplcana Renaissance Center Las Vegas, NV 89119 (702) 736-1933 A #" •*, f ^W li r t 4* ^ i o }t -: 9 -y V^^.t^ m HI ^^ 1 r ^•'^>V. *' MSHI^^I r 1 FOOD FESTIVAL-Several young ladies from St. John's Greek Orthodox Church sample some of the Greek delicacies to be served at the 18th annual Greek Food Festival, to be held on from 11 a.m. to 10 Vacation Bible School Plans are being completed for a high quaUty Vacation Bible School at First Southern Baptist Church, 240 ChoUa Street. Enrollment for ages 4 years through sixth grade has ab-eady begun.The classes wiU be held from 9 a.m. to noon, Aug. 6-10,. For pre-enroUment call 565-6072. p.m. Sunday, July 29, at the Hotel Saliara Space Center. The event, sponsored by St. John's Greek Orthodox Church, attracts more than 10,000 residents and tourists each year. f\Wt 0\*\*G 1634 Nevada Hwy Marshall Plaza Boulder City 293-6052 Open 4 to 10 Dally — Closed Mondays Sermon topics for Sunday are 'The Salvation We Dare Not Neglecf'at 11 a.m. and The Holy Road" at 7 p.m. Bible Study each Sunday for all ages is from 9:30 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. THURSDAY Veal Chops FRIDAY Lobster Tails .. -— ~ Cajun Butterfly Shrimp SATURDAY. Blackened or Grilled Swordflsh GREEN VALLEY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH SUNDAY WORSHIP 8:30 & 10:30 SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 a.m. Nursery Provided Both Services Pastor HILDA PECORARO 2301 E. Sunset Road .>'".l**r. at Eastern (SunM Pati Plaza Shopping Caitv) Phone; 361-6263 SUNDAY • Veal Oscar MONDAY Closed TUESDAY Shrimp Boat WEDNESDAY Blackened N.Y. Strip Steak SEE OUR NEW MENU WITH LOWER, LOWER PRICES Along with our regular menu we offer these daily specials •Crabmeat Salad in edible bowl •Chicken or Veal Parmagiani with Linguini Early Bird Special BetweerT^G p.m. Order one entree, get second entree of equal or lesser price for Va price. t imyiM.i' nr Kg^NGFif Q. I have been dieting for the past six months and have reached my goal weight. The problem is my hips and thighs are still of the saddle-bag variety. I've got embarrassing cellulite, and after all this dieting I still wouldn't be caught dead in a bathing suit. I've been told you can't gel rid oj" cellulite. But then 1 see claims in magazines about the power of massage, which can break up the cellulite. What do you think of this? Will it work? A. A good masseuse can be very effective at moving around deposits of body fat. But that's all that happens. It moves, but doesn't disappear. You've got to burn off that fat yourself, and no masseuse can do that for you. Don't believe that you can't get rid of cellulite. It's not some form of special, untouchable fat. It's just fat and women happen to have thick layers of fat on their bottoms and thighs. Granted, it's dimpled and hard to remove, but that doesn't make it anything other than fat. The hips and thighs are the last areas to shed excessive fat. And even though you've reached your ideal weight, you need to keep going with moderate dieting and increased exercise. It takes a while for weight loss to become evenly distributed, often as much as six months. 1990, Tribune Media Services LEGAL NOTICE BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA ID Re FiUng by Ray & ROM TnuMport, Inc.) of revisiona to Ciiarter and Special Services) Tariff No. 1, P.S.C.N. No. 7, pabUshing a) per-hour rate for 8-23 paaaenger capacity) vehicles.) \ Docliet No. 90-201 NOTICE OF HEARING Ray & Ross Transport, Inc. baa filed proposed tariffs and revisions thereto with the PnbUc Service CommissioB of Nevada C'Commiaaion"). The Commission has designated this tariff filing Docket No. 90-201. The effect of thia tariff filing ia to pnblish the per-honr rate for i-Zi paaae n ger capacity vaUdea. The tariff filing ia on fib awl aTaiiable for viewing by the public at both of ficaa of the Cammlsaion 727 Fairview drive, Caraon Oty, Nevada 88710 and Alexander Dawson Building 4046 South Spencer Street, Suite A-44, Las Vegaa, Nevada 89158. Pormant to Nevada Reviaed Statates r'NRS") 706J26, the Commission haa legal aotkority and Jnriadiction to hold a hearing on thia matter. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a hearing in the abovatitled matter will be held aa follows: THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, liNN) lOKMajn. McCarraa Intaraational Airport CoaMhaionwa' MaeUng Room, 5th Floor ParUag StnMtnre 6757 Wayne Newton Boulevard LM Vegaa, Nevada 89119 when and where all interested partiaa oMqr appear aad be had. lasaaa a the hearing iadnde hit may Mt be • mited to, the pfopriety of tWa tariff. Tha ipacMe alatirtsa aad NfaktlaM involvad iachidi NR8 701SM, 701.311, TOaaiMd Nevada i^ihiririrtiallw Code 7W3>B.7WJ06. 706JO7, 706J11. 706.314 and 706J17. By the Cnaiwfarfiia. IMI Jaaaae ReyaoUa, Aaat. 8 icta to y for WILUAM H. VANCE. Coaualarioa Sacwtary Dated: Caraoa City. Navada 7/6m
    PAGE 27

    f^^^^^w^mm mmmmmif^ ipn m Page lOB, Henderson Home News, Boulder City Newt, Green Valley News Thursday, Friday, July 19 & 20,1990 Thursday, Friday. July 19 & 20. 1990 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Page IIB This Was Nevada Who ts buried in Billy Stiles'jrave? By PhllUp I. Earl Next Thiu^ay, July 26, Reno's Peppermill Hotel and Casino will be hosting the annual rendezvous of the National Outlaw and Lawman Association'. The public is invited to attend the lectures and other programs or become NOLA members. There will also be a mock gunfight at noon on Saturday, July 28. For further information, call this writer at 1-323-2571 after 5 p.m. in Reno. On Saturday morning, the last day of the gathering, at 10:30 a.m.. this writer will deliver a lecture entitled, "The Strange and Mysterious Death of William Larkin Stiles, or Who is Buried in Billy Stiles' Grave?" If the title intrigues you. the details are even more bizarre. As is the case with many frontier desperados, Stiles' life is a tangled web and we are uncertain of either his true name or his place of birth. There was a William Larkin Stiles who rode with Jesse James and his gang in the 1870s. Also known as Bill Chadwell, he died in a hail of gunfire on Sept. 7,1876. in Northfield, Minn., when he took part in an attempted robbery of a local bank. He had just turned 19 years of age. We are fairly certain of his death, because a yotmg medical student, Henry M. Wheeler, secured the corpse and later displayed the skeleton in his office when he went into practice. Is this the origin of the name? Possibly. In any case, a young man calling himself Billy Stiles showed up in the Arizona Territory about 1892. For a time, he worked for William Breakenridge, chief detective for the Southern Pacific Railroad and was involved in tracking down a gang of men who robbed a train near Maricopa on Oct. 1, 1894. It is entirely likely that young Billy had begun to work both sides of the law by this time, but he made his formal debut as an outlaw on Sept. 9,1899, with the hold-up of a Southern Pacific train at Cochise Station. His confederates in that venture were Bert Alvord, Matt Burts and William Downing. Stiles had been working as Wells, Fargo & Co. messenger on the Southern Pacific and Alvord was a Cochise County Constable. It appears to have been an inside job. 'Wells, Fargo detective John Tacker took Stiles and Alvord along on a foray into New Mexico in pursuit of the trainmen, but soon began to suspect the pair as principals in the robbery. Stiles confessed and provided information leading to the arrest of the others. Jailed in Tombstone, Burts, Downing and Alvord were brought to trial and convicted on the basis of testimony provided by Stiles. Now at liberty, he had a change of heart, returning to the jail at noon on April 7,1900, when only jailer George Bravin was on duty and breaking his comrades out. Bravin was wounded in the encounter, but was able to convince the other prisoners not to take advantage of the situation. In 1902, Stiles and Alvord were commissioned in the Arizona Rangers by Capt. Burt Mossman to effect the capture of Agustin Chacon, a murderer and cattle thief who had formerly ridden with them. Chalcon was later hanged, but Stiles and Alvord were soon back on the other side, being implicated in the robbery of a train on Feb. 15, 1903. at Fairbank. Alvord later served two years at the Territorial Prison for the caper, but Stiles escaped through a rue involving a promise to turn state's evidence in the case—which he never fulfiUed. Their next foray into crime was a payroll job at the Delores Mine near Chihuahua, Mexico, in March 1906. Stiles and Alvord disappeared thereafter. Reports later getting back to Arizona authorities were that they had been seen in Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, China, the Philippines and Australia. In reality they had come to Nevada. On Sunday, Feb. 3,1907, a man known as OUie Kiimebaugh was shot and killed by Robert E. Lane in a saloon at the Amargosa mining camp in southern Nye County. At a hearing two days later. Lane's attorneys introduced evidence that the deceased was really Bert Alvord.' There were elements of selfdefense in the shooting, so Lane was not charged. Since Alvord and Stiles were almost inseperable, it is likely that Billy was somewhere in the vicinity at that time. Billy's wife. Maria, told Arizona officials that she had heard from him in Mill City, Humboldt County, but had had no further word. He had apparently moved north, taken the name William Larkin and found a job as a buckaroo on a ranch in the King's River coimtry. The ranchers in that area were having trouble with cattle rustlers at that time and one of them prevailed upon Sheriff Graham Lamb to deputize Larkin so he could apprehend and arrest those suspected of deaUng in stolen stock. Lamb later claimed that he knew nothing of Larkin's background and would not have commissioned him if he had. There is good reason to question the sheriffs assertion since he was famous for his contacts with lawmen all over the west and must have known with whom he was dealing. In any case, Larkin's career on both sides of the law came to an abrupt end on Dec. 5,1908, when he was shot and killed in cold blood on the Riley Ranch at King's River while out serving some court papers for the sheriff. His killer, Charles Barr, made good his escape. An inquest was held at the ranch and the body was brought to Winnemucca on Dec. 7. Among those on hand at the autopsy and subsequent funeral was a woman who claimed to be his wife. She had arrived in town on the very day of the shooting and was 8ta)ring with John Thacker and his family. That is the same John Thacker who had known Stiles in connection with his service as a Wells, Fargo detective, retired and living in Winnemucca at that time. The woman was actually Luisa Cameron. Stiles' sister-in-law. She identified the body as that of Billy Stiles, and informed Ed Myers of Casa Grande, who in turn told Stiles' mother of the death of her son. "'' Among those Arizonians who had their doubts that Billy Stiles had actually met his maker was a young reporter for the Arizona Daily Star of Tucson, Bessie M. Beach. She sent a photograph of Stiles to Sheriff Lamb in January 1909, and received word back that there was no resemblance between the murdered deputy and the man in the picture. In April, she wrote to Thacker. In a reply dated April 12, 1909, he wrote as follows: In looking over my letters today, I find one from you in regard to Billy Stiles. The mai| Larkin, killed north of Winnemucca, was not Billy Stiles. I was personally acquainted with both men. so know without doubt that the report was incorrect. Stiles is in Australia, went there from China." Charles Barr, his killer, was later located at the Colorado State Prison and brought back to Winnemucca for trial in 1914, but was subsequently acquitted due to the fact that memories of witnesses had faded during the intervening five years. His attorneys brought forth additional evidence that William Larkin and Billy Stiles were one and the same, but doubts persist. And there the matter rests. Who is buried in Billy Stiles' grave? Did he in some way arrange for a body to be identified as his? Was Luisa a part of the scheme? Did he pull a "Butch Cassidy and Sundance Kid Act" and go on to live another Ufe? We may never know. Should the plaque for "BiU Larkin" remain at the Nevada Peace Officers' Memorial in Reno's Idlewild Park? For additional details, join us on Saturday. ATTENTION! FATHER & SON TEAM 50 YEARS EXPERIENCE THE AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL PRCERAM. f|^ American Heart Auociotion This space provided as a public service. TRANSMISSION SERVICE SPECIAL $1 095 19 Change fluid Clan pan Replace pan gasket Change trans-filter Adjust bands & llnicage Road teat (Front wheel drive, 4x4, R.V.t Extra) mUOass Pwtectum* GREEN VALLEY • HENDERSON • BOULDER CITY MOTORISTS! try EXPERT TRANSMISSIONS • we'rt cloMT than you thinki EXKRT ^m^^S .M U-;BOARD1 PAPOOSE BINGO PLAYED ON PAPER. $1,000 OR $2,000 GUARANTEED COVERALL Every Sot. 9 pm 1 3 cnv 5 dn & 7 (in SESSIONS PUYED ON PAPER. OUR BEST REFERENCE IS LOCAL PREFERENCE Hora, CASM ft BOMUB cana^us VEBAS Comer d Fremont & Qiarbton • 38Mn8 Religion Weekly sermon The search for meaning By The Rev. James Serada New Life Church and Literary Foundation 700 Wyoming Street, Boulder City Today, I believe more than at any other time in the history of humanity, people are searching and seeking for answers to life. They ask, "What is life all about?. What is our purpose on this earth?" This could be called the age of stress, anxiety, frustration—not knowing what the future holds. Did you know that every, eight minutes in the United States a person commits suicide? And the suicide rate is growing among juveniles. The highest rate is among professional people, especially psychiatrists—those who are supposed to have answers to Ufe. :_——— -^ Why? Something must be" wrong. Could it be because we have failed to find out what our purpose in Ufe is? That seems to me to be the explanation. If we knew what life was about, would we harm or destroy ourselves? In his popular booklet guide, "Your Power to Say No," Vemon Howard gives a clear, precise statement on our true purpose: "The real purpose of Ufe? It is to develop inwardly, to experience deep spiritual transformation, to actuaUy become a different kind of human being, to find one's true self, to contact reaUty. The restless wanderer makes the mistake of finding only himself in every -experience, like looking in a mirror and hoping to find something new, but seeing only the usual. The restless person is caught in the painful contradiction of demanding at the same time both his old nature and a new nature. That is like insisting on being both outdoors and indoors at the same time. The impossible condition tears him apart. The methods in this book show how to rise above the agonizing contradictions by rising above oneself. Then you are no longer tormented by your own restI Christian ^Academy registration under way School registration is currently under way at the Henderson Campus of Paradise Christian Academy. The academy had postponed its spring registration pending a decision concerning faciUties for the upcoming year. Recently the school was given approval by the city of Henderson to place a 2,200-quare-foot modular building at 601 Major Ave. The building wiU accommodate all grades at the academy, which is state-recognized for kindergarten through 12th grade. PCA-Henderson Campus is a ministry of Paradise Bible Baptist Church, located at 2525 Emerson Ave., Las Vegas. The church operates an academy in Las Vegas, estabUshed in 1979 and in Henderson, estabUshed in 1989. Both schools use the popular ABEKA Christian school curriculum. Returning students are asked to secure their enrollment by contacting the school office at 565-5831. Questions may also be directed to the Henderson administrator at 565-0216. Enrollment per grade is Umited to insure a low teacher-tostudent ratio. PCA-Henderson foUows the Clark County School District's nine-month school calendar and wiU begin the school year on August 27. Tortoise lecture Members of TORT-Group. an organization which infomis the public about adopting and caring for desert tortoises, will give a program forchildren at 10:30 a.m. Monday at the James I. Gibson Libfaryr280 Water Si. The program is pan of the library's summer reading club. For more information, call 5658402. lessness. The weary wanderer has at last arrived home. "The individual who discovers the purpose of Ufe is pleased at how a single new meaning in Ufe is also found. Previously there was confusion £18 to the many apparent meanings in events of Ufe, which turned out be meaningless meanings. If a man won the affection of a certain woman, he thought that meant he was attractive and desirable. If he bought a new home, he thought that meant he was financiaUy successful. But the more of those kinds of meanings he coUected, the more desperate he became to find real meaning. The entire problem collapses by seeing Ufe's true meaning. It means everything to face yourself as you actuaUy are, then let reahty change you." As the Master Himself said two thousand years ago: "Seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his rigtheousness; and all these things shaU be added unto you" (Matt. 6:33). How many of us are foUowing this Ufe-heaUng approach? Or have we become a nation of greedy, self-serving, arrogant and spiteful people? That can never give us a right purpose, a true answer to Ufe. We must go much deeper. We must see where we are taking wrong as right, bad as good, temporary acquisitions and thrills as security and happiness. Only spiritual development can give us the insight, strength and right guidance to do this. To stop the terrible toll of self-destruction, we must find new and authentic meaning that gives us moment-tomoment understanding of Ufe. "Because strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it." (Matt. 7:14). dJ^ LA PORTA |L7 INSURANCE r^ AQENCY,INC. PrefcMlonal Inturanc* Planning •Louis LaPorta •Marvin Rosa •Bill Paynter FG. Rusty Hammond (Heirith & Life) 129 Water St., Henderson 565-6411 3700 Pecoi4lcLeod, Las Vegas 454-1400 Three things a spa salesman won't tell you. 2. Is the tpa engineered and manufactured as a system? FACT: We engineer and manufacture every single item that goes into our spas. You can count on them to perform. 3. How much does it really ooatT Every Jacuzzi spa comes complete, ready to enjoy. When you purchase a genuine Jacuzzi brand q>a you are getting the best dnigned, best built, and best backed spa you can buy. Period. 1. Haw powvM are tha JatsT FACT: We move more watar through bigger jets than any other manufacturer. When it comes to muscle soothing relaxation, Jacuad* • bfaad spas are the choice of professionals. $3,995 THE REAL ONE. COMPLETE • VECTRAII SPAS UNLIMITED 2250 E. Troplcana Renaissance Center Las Vegas, NV 89119 (702) 736-1933 A #" •*, f ^W li r t 4* ^ i o }t -: 9 -y V^^.t^ m HI ^^ 1 r ^•'^>V. *' MSHI^^I r 1 FOOD FESTIVAL-Several young ladies from St. John's Greek Orthodox Church sample some of the Greek delicacies to be served at the 18th annual Greek Food Festival, to be held on from 11 a.m. to 10 Vacation Bible School Plans are being completed for a high quaUty Vacation Bible School at First Southern Baptist Church, 240 ChoUa Street. Enrollment for ages 4 years through sixth grade has ab-eady begun.The classes wiU be held from 9 a.m. to noon, Aug. 6-10,. For pre-enroUment call 565-6072. p.m. Sunday, July 29, at the Hotel Saliara Space Center. The event, sponsored by St. John's Greek Orthodox Church, attracts more than 10,000 residents and tourists each year. f\Wt 0\*\*G 1634 Nevada Hwy Marshall Plaza Boulder City 293-6052 Open 4 to 10 Dally — Closed Mondays Sermon topics for Sunday are 'The Salvation We Dare Not Neglecf'at 11 a.m. and The Holy Road" at 7 p.m. Bible Study each Sunday for all ages is from 9:30 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. THURSDAY Veal Chops FRIDAY Lobster Tails .. -— ~ Cajun Butterfly Shrimp SATURDAY. Blackened or Grilled Swordflsh GREEN VALLEY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH SUNDAY WORSHIP 8:30 & 10:30 SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 a.m. Nursery Provided Both Services Pastor HILDA PECORARO 2301 E. Sunset Road .>'".l**r. at Eastern (SunM Pati Plaza Shopping Caitv) Phone; 361-6263 SUNDAY • Veal Oscar MONDAY Closed TUESDAY Shrimp Boat WEDNESDAY Blackened N.Y. Strip Steak SEE OUR NEW MENU WITH LOWER, LOWER PRICES Along with our regular menu we offer these daily specials •Crabmeat Salad in edible bowl •Chicken or Veal Parmagiani with Linguini Early Bird Special BetweerT^G p.m. Order one entree, get second entree of equal or lesser price for Va price. t imyiM.i' nr Kg^NGFif Q. I have been dieting for the past six months and have reached my goal weight. The problem is my hips and thighs are still of the saddle-bag variety. I've got embarrassing cellulite, and after all this dieting I still wouldn't be caught dead in a bathing suit. I've been told you can't gel rid oj" cellulite. But then 1 see claims in magazines about the power of massage, which can break up the cellulite. What do you think of this? Will it work? A. A good masseuse can be very effective at moving around deposits of body fat. But that's all that happens. It moves, but doesn't disappear. You've got to burn off that fat yourself, and no masseuse can do that for you. Don't believe that you can't get rid of cellulite. It's not some form of special, untouchable fat. It's just fat and women happen to have thick layers of fat on their bottoms and thighs. Granted, it's dimpled and hard to remove, but that doesn't make it anything other than fat. The hips and thighs are the last areas to shed excessive fat. And even though you've reached your ideal weight, you need to keep going with moderate dieting and increased exercise. It takes a while for weight loss to become evenly distributed, often as much as six months. 1990, Tribune Media Services LEGAL NOTICE BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA ID Re FiUng by Ray & ROM TnuMport, Inc.) of revisiona to Ciiarter and Special Services) Tariff No. 1, P.S.C.N. No. 7, pabUshing a) per-hour rate for 8-23 paaaenger capacity) vehicles.) \ Docliet No. 90-201 NOTICE OF HEARING Ray & Ross Transport, Inc. baa filed proposed tariffs and revisions thereto with the PnbUc Service CommissioB of Nevada C'Commiaaion"). The Commission has designated this tariff filing Docket No. 90-201. The effect of thia tariff filing ia to pnblish the per-honr rate for i-Zi paaae n ger capacity vaUdea. The tariff filing ia on fib awl aTaiiable for viewing by the public at both of ficaa of the Cammlsaion 727 Fairview drive, Caraon Oty, Nevada 88710 and Alexander Dawson Building 4046 South Spencer Street, Suite A-44, Las Vegaa, Nevada 89158. Pormant to Nevada Reviaed Statates r'NRS") 706J26, the Commission haa legal aotkority and Jnriadiction to hold a hearing on thia matter. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a hearing in the abovatitled matter will be held aa follows: THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, liNN) lOKMajn. McCarraa Intaraational Airport CoaMhaionwa' MaeUng Room, 5th Floor ParUag StnMtnre 6757 Wayne Newton Boulevard LM Vegaa, Nevada 89119 when and where all interested partiaa oMqr appear aad be had. lasaaa a the hearing iadnde hit may Mt be • mited to, the pfopriety of tWa tariff. Tha ipacMe alatirtsa aad NfaktlaM involvad iachidi NR8 701SM, 701.311, TOaaiMd Nevada i^ihiririrtiallw Code 7W3>B.7WJ06. 706JO7, 706J11. 706.314 and 706J17. By the Cnaiwfarfiia. IMI Jaaaae ReyaoUa, Aaat. 8 icta to y for WILUAM H. VANCE. Coaualarioa Sacwtary Dated: Caraoa City. Navada 7/6m
    PAGE 28

    — —! ^^t:..i'vi"r ff r r?'!;! II I f !". TTf^^PPW mm^^i^ mmm ii:-i:ir Page 12B, Henderaon Home News, Boulder City News. Cfreen Vl^ News Thnrsdmr, Friday. July 19 & 20. 1990 Thursday. Friday, July 19 & 20. 1990 Henderson Home News. Boulder City News. Green Valley News Pag* 13B > • I "•Si*-. • FALCONI'S TROPICANA HONDA GUARANTEED TRADE-IN SALE! UP TO 57.500 -^*^ FOR YOUR TRADE-IN (NOW THAT'S A LOT MONEY) BUY A NEW HONDA FROM FALCONI'S TROPICANA HONDA BY TOMORROW NIGHT, AND GET UP TO THE FOLLOWING TRADE-IN VALUES UP TO $7,500 GUARANTEED FOR YOUR TRADE-IN ,r.. •^ ...a UP TO $6,500 GUARANTEED FOR YOUR TRADE-IN $2,500 FOR YOUR TRADE-IN (WHETHER YOU HAVE TO PUSH, PULL, TUB OR TOW IT IN) ONLY AT THE LOWEST PRICED HONDA IN AMERICA! $5,500 GUARANTEED FOR YOUR TRADE-IN GUARANTEED FOR YOUR TRADE-IN Offer limited to new cars In display area only. Amount given forirade-in based on Dealers Retail Price for new car. Trade-In mileage not to exceed 15,000 per year: 10 cents deducted for every mile over 15,000 per year. No sub-compacts or diesels. Appropriate deductions for any needed reconditioning. WE VALUE OUR FRIENDS IN HENDERSON AND BOULDER CITY SO MUCH, WE'LL GIVE YOU A FREE CAR WASH WHEN YOU BRING YOUR CAR IN FOR SERVICE! _^ —and— IF YOU NEED US TO, WE'LL TAKE YOU BACK TO HENDERSON OR BOULDER CITY WHEN YOU DROP OFF YOUR CAR FOR MAJOR SERVICE. WHAT YOU PAY FOR YOUR CAR ISN T NEARLY AS IMPORTANT AS WHAT YOUR CAR WILL BE WORTH WHEN YOU'RE DONE PAYING FOR IT. AND WE GUARANTEE IT AT FALCONI'S WITH OWNER'S EDGE* TROPICANA H O ]V D A. Lowest Priced Honda Dealer In America! 4645 W. TROPICANA at DECATUR HOURS: B:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., Mon.-Sd. SERVICE: 7 a.m. lo 5:30 p.m.. Mon.-Fri. PARTS: 7 •m. lo 6:30 p.m.,. MoB.-fri. SERVICE PARTS: • a.m. lo 4pjn.. SaL SOON TO BE CAR COUNTRY INTERNATIONAL 367-1919 NarDmie Dear Debbie: I've been married for eight years and though I love my husband, I've had nine lovers since we were married. My sex life with my husband is great, but I'm attractive and love to turn on other men. I was afraid that if my husband ever found out he would be very hurt, so I promised myself I would never sleep with another man. That was my New Year's resolution, but now I've met a man who I know is very attracted to me and my willpower is going away. I can't seem to help myself. It's this thing I've just got to do. Is this normal, or is there something wrong with me? -CRAVING SEX Dear Craving Sex: All people Uke to flirt. Your problem is that you don't stop with flirting and instead have a full-fledged affair. You may be suffering from a sex addiction or simply selfishness. Whatever you call it, it's destructive, since you can't seem to control it. Just as an alcohoUc swears he will never touch another drop of alcohol, you are doi^ig the same about extramarital affairs. And in both situations, unless you've really identified your addiction as a problem, you will always succumb to the temptation of "just one more time." I suggest a therapist. You need to explore the root of the problem. It could be a poor self-esteem that you try to elevate through your sexual encounters. If you don't get the counseling you need, one of these days your husband will find out and then you'll have a real mess on your hands. It will be painful for both of you if you don't resolve to change before it's too late. Send letters to Dear Debbie, P.O. Box 4367, Orlando, Fla. 32802-4367. 1990 Tribune Media Services YOUR FINANCIAL FITNESS Family income splitting after tax reform By Joyce Jillson Weekly Tip: Moon in Aries energy keeps you positive and upbeat. Surprise love interests. \ Arfes (March 21-ApHl 19) Ugh, you could feel stone-walled; avoid pushing too hard. This mVt koroseo^ family situation solves itself; try to stay above the fray. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Refuse to let one mistake ruin the week. Turnarounds on Friday. Love stabilizes; for singlefl new love soon. Capricorn (Dec. 22>Jan. 19) Transitions all this week and next Taorus (April 20-May 20) Catch up on rest. Partners ipay actually point you in the direction of career success. Be willing not see eye-to-eye with you until after Tuesday. Talking leads to a^^r patterns. to action Gemini (May 21-June 21) Attend to your jangled nerves. Perhaps a major financial decision on Monday. Disbelieve half of what you hear. Cancel* (June 22-Jiily 22) You need someone to snuggle with. Your spirits soar; perhaps plan for your next trip. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) The week starts off with intensity. Monday finds you making vital personal decisions. Virgo (Aug. 23 Sept. 22) Give yourself a day or two to get your footing. Avoid deceptive people. A terrific Wednesday. Libra (Sept. 23Oct. 23) Your finances may get juggled this guide to dating, romance and reiationsliips. For a copy, send week, but you must balance the budget. Annoying neighbors $2.25 to Dating Guide for WtMnen, in care of tliis newspaper, or co-workers need help. P.O. Box 4426, Orlando, Fla. 32802-4426. Make checks payable Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21) Confirm vacation plans. A trying to New8paperl>ooks. 1990, Tribune Media Servioea Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You must set clear priorities. Refuse to follow the crowd. Your originaUty peaks. Pices (Feb. 19-March 20) Music, parties and new friendships thrill you this week. Voice opinions; others in power back you. If You Were Bom This Week This month shows more than the usual amount of personal decisions to make—new favorable job conditions and investment possibilities. Accept money through partners in August. Women, find your lucldest signs in Joyce Jillson's new OiKe over ri§lili|f i By Tim O'CaUaghan Once upon a time, saving for a college education followed a tried-and-true pattern. Parents would invest any spare funds in their children's name, most often in the form of a custodial account under the state's Uniform Gifts to Minors Act, so that interest and dividends would be taxed at the children's income tax rate. Since that rate was typically lower than the parents' rate, funds could aornmiilate considerably lilMiter. ft'Now two things have happened to change the rules: Tax brackets have been reduced so that, there are effectively just three brackets: 15 percent, 28 percent and, due to a surcharge on certain taxpayers, 33 percent. The unearned income of children under age 14 is now taxed at their parents' highest rate. That imeamed income might be the intrest on a savings account built from the youngster's own paper route or it might be dividends on a large stock portfolio. Either way, it's taxed at the parents' rate. Unearned income of children 14 or over, on the other hand, is taxed at their own tax rate. It still makes sense, therefore, to transfer some assets to children. Here are some points to consider: • The first $500 of any youngster's unearned income is not taxed at all. The second 1^00, even for an under-14 year old, is taxed at the child's own rate. This means that a youyngster can accumulate up to $1,000 in intrest or dividends in any one year before being taxed at the higher parental rate. It takes approximately $12,000, earning 8 percent, to produce $1,000. As long as your youngster's nest egg is under $12,000, taxes shouldn't be a problem. • It will take more than $12,000 to pay for coUege. The way to amass larger sums, and still steer clear of the tax rap, is to invest in things that are either tax-free or won't throw off much income until later cm. One poflnbility is good old U.S. government E£-bonds. They are free of state inccmie tax, which can help if you're in a hi|^-tax state. More important, tax on the accumulated interett can be deferred until the bonds are redeemed; at that point your college-bound youngster, no matter how bright, will be past 14 aiid therefore taxed at his or her own rate. Mimicipal bonds might also do the trick. And another possibility is common stock with low current dividends but good appreciation potential. Life insurance purchased on the life of a juvenile can offer advantages that children will never be able to provide for themselves: Such benefits as tax deferred accumulations, an im|aec|^te estate and a rate guiir3|Ke|d;t(rbe lower-than policies purchased later in life. e The National AnodaUon of Life llBtlcfwrtten Shakespearean Festival trip set The Nevada Opera Theatre has slated a bus trip to the Utah Shakespearean Festival in Cedar City for a showing of "Romeo and Juliet" Aug. 4. Lunch on the bus and dinner at the Gable House in St. George will be provided. The costofthetripis$95. caU NOT at 451-6331. NAPS requests exiiibltors Exhibit applications are available for the National Association for Professional Saleswomen's national convention to be held Sept. 12-15 at the Riviera Hotel. For an exhibit application and more infomiation, call 386-0423. By Caroljm Drennan Bishop Young mothers must be possessed with imlimited bravado and optimism! Why do I say that? Because, the other night as I casually prepared a goiumet meal for eight (yes, I said casually), I recalled the many times I'd entertained dinner guests when the children were small. Those were the days, my friend, those were the days! Standing out in dismal detail was a certain evevntful evening many years ago. My adorable pajama-clad 2-yearold toddled in diuing the cocktail hour preceding a dinner party. Soothing music was casting an illusion of serenity and elegance as he padded demiu-ely to the side of our honored guest. Spontaneously, he was seized with an acute stomach upset directly in the lap of aforesaid guest! Need I say more? Another lingering memory was the evening my guests arrived to find me, their hostess, floundering in a snow bank with three naked httle boys. How did that happen? I'll tell you how. In an effort to be efficient and organized, I had seized the opportunity while the boys were in the tub enmasse to carry out the last garof the evening. You Teenagers sought for Nevada Business Week Applications from high school sophomores and juniors from throughout the state are being accepted for participation in Nevada Business Week through July 31. From Aug. 5 to Aug. 11, teens will stay on campus at the University of Nevada, Reno and participate in Business Week activities designed to give them a "real look" at the work world and the private enterprise system. Full scholarships are available for students who will learn about business and economics through the use of games, computer simulations, lectures and hands-on experience as they master techniques designed to help them run a biisiness. Students will discover everything from the importance of quality control and employee motivation, to the significance of advertising and marketing, officials said. They'll have an opportunity to learn why businesses succeed or fail and they'll find out why communication is so important, they added. Business professionals volunteer their time to participate in Nevada Business Week. Individuals from all sectors of the business community participate as instructors and advisors in the week-long program. To find out more about Nevada Business Week, or to enroll in the program, call 786-8828 or write to Nevada Business Week, P.O. Box 40096, Reno. Nev. 89505. fuKly • Prie§ • S§rvh§ Vi OFF ^5900 N79S. fiUliM Kait Salft/StiYiM MOO •. CaaMfii (tarfc MOO) 597-5157 SALE • SALE • SALE • SALE Komansjl Datli and Draperies Complete Interior Design, Full line of Bath and Home Accessories, Custom Draperies, Minis, Verticals, Duettes, Pleated shades, and woodens. 693 N. Valle Verde 454-0248 Hondf oo n/Qf—n Valley Weddings Receptlone Conventions Seminars Banquets Meetings Garden Setting Professional And Courteous Staff To Serve You Henderson Convention Center • 200 Water St. 565-2171 \ y gT >T n' 'jlrgpi^ guessed it. I was followed out the back door I'd left invitingly open. My venture into at-home entertaining also included a rash attempt to stage a coffee party for 25. Minutes before the arrival of the guests, my eldest son energetically doused himself with the contents of a gallon container of bleach. Not to be outdone, the youngest struck his head on an end table that had moved directly in his stumbling path. I heard what a success the party was when I arrived home from the emergency room and met my departing guests on the front walk. Thankfully, as the children grew older, entertaining was not accompanied by such high drama. Only minor emergencies confronted visitors. For instance, there was the evening when terrified screams emanated from the guest bathroom, accompanied by the emergence of our guest and a tremendous desert tortoise who had been lounging casually under the sink. I don't know about you, but I'm exhausted by this step back in time. All I can say is, my apron's off to you, younger mothers! As for you grandma's out there, think about it: all th6 great chefs are ladies and gentlemen of "advanced years." We know why. ACTS Vascular Laboratory Non-inv5sTve In-officeEvaiuation of Circulation Disorders Medicare Assignment Accepted George E. Merino. MO. FAGS BoanSCtlOM SPECIALIZING IN Surgtrvofthe Heart, Lungs, Arteries & Vtins Laser Vascular Surgary 2110 E. Flamingo Rd. Suite 201 Las Vegas, NV 89119 734-2121 II PROFESSIONAL CAREERS K WANTE PET GRaOMER TRAINEES f^uN y/; EASY *Cla*sM Starting Now! CALL' 11 IHHII THIS WEEK AT NUTRI/SYSTEM? Lose all the weight you want for only $249 program cost plus $100 rebate TZ^' pon compu rmn i ( m.iinirn,in."( **rm In great shape since I lost 98 lbs. with Nutri/System." limmttou^otmifi^ttbting MirMraeMitirtf/Mnrto ^k0i/Sf0tn. Mow; tot 99 0m m mlnHfrmn txlm.tao.-lvm iqpartM ii • to aM rhir Utamlooulttimmcncalahm Jntf taw iMioM AMW iMr iwr* >vM ftkNTHw iwdy'f *i The NuifVSyfllifn* Welahi Loss PfOQfMi IndudM s vsnflly counMNnfl, iQht Kllvfly, end ? OVER 1JOO CBrTERS ACROSS N. AMERICA SERVMG NORTH AMERICA F OR OVER Ifl YEARS Cta-hOKf. nutri system ^^MIQM MM oMitoni mm Losr .ti th'^ • .veight you want (or only S2-U* program cost plus Si00 rob.itp I

    PAGE 29

    — —! ^^t:..i'vi"r ff r r?'!;! II I f !". TTf^^PPW mm^^i^ mmm ii:-i:ir Page 12B, Henderaon Home News, Boulder City News. Cfreen Vl^ News Thnrsdmr, Friday. July 19 & 20. 1990 Thursday. Friday, July 19 & 20. 1990 Henderson Home News. Boulder City News. Green Valley News Pag* 13B > • I "•Si*-. • FALCONI'S TROPICANA HONDA GUARANTEED TRADE-IN SALE! UP TO 57.500 -^*^ FOR YOUR TRADE-IN (NOW THAT'S A LOT MONEY) BUY A NEW HONDA FROM FALCONI'S TROPICANA HONDA BY TOMORROW NIGHT, AND GET UP TO THE FOLLOWING TRADE-IN VALUES UP TO $7,500 GUARANTEED FOR YOUR TRADE-IN ,r.. •^ ...a UP TO $6,500 GUARANTEED FOR YOUR TRADE-IN $2,500 FOR YOUR TRADE-IN (WHETHER YOU HAVE TO PUSH, PULL, TUB OR TOW IT IN) ONLY AT THE LOWEST PRICED HONDA IN AMERICA! $5,500 GUARANTEED FOR YOUR TRADE-IN GUARANTEED FOR YOUR TRADE-IN Offer limited to new cars In display area only. Amount given forirade-in based on Dealers Retail Price for new car. Trade-In mileage not to exceed 15,000 per year: 10 cents deducted for every mile over 15,000 per year. No sub-compacts or diesels. Appropriate deductions for any needed reconditioning. WE VALUE OUR FRIENDS IN HENDERSON AND BOULDER CITY SO MUCH, WE'LL GIVE YOU A FREE CAR WASH WHEN YOU BRING YOUR CAR IN FOR SERVICE! _^ —and— IF YOU NEED US TO, WE'LL TAKE YOU BACK TO HENDERSON OR BOULDER CITY WHEN YOU DROP OFF YOUR CAR FOR MAJOR SERVICE. WHAT YOU PAY FOR YOUR CAR ISN T NEARLY AS IMPORTANT AS WHAT YOUR CAR WILL BE WORTH WHEN YOU'RE DONE PAYING FOR IT. AND WE GUARANTEE IT AT FALCONI'S WITH OWNER'S EDGE* TROPICANA H O ]V D A. Lowest Priced Honda Dealer In America! 4645 W. TROPICANA at DECATUR HOURS: B:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., Mon.-Sd. SERVICE: 7 a.m. lo 5:30 p.m.. Mon.-Fri. PARTS: 7 •m. lo 6:30 p.m.,. MoB.-fri. SERVICE PARTS: • a.m. lo 4pjn.. SaL SOON TO BE CAR COUNTRY INTERNATIONAL 367-1919 NarDmie Dear Debbie: I've been married for eight years and though I love my husband, I've had nine lovers since we were married. My sex life with my husband is great, but I'm attractive and love to turn on other men. I was afraid that if my husband ever found out he would be very hurt, so I promised myself I would never sleep with another man. That was my New Year's resolution, but now I've met a man who I know is very attracted to me and my willpower is going away. I can't seem to help myself. It's this thing I've just got to do. Is this normal, or is there something wrong with me? -CRAVING SEX Dear Craving Sex: All people Uke to flirt. Your problem is that you don't stop with flirting and instead have a full-fledged affair. You may be suffering from a sex addiction or simply selfishness. Whatever you call it, it's destructive, since you can't seem to control it. Just as an alcohoUc swears he will never touch another drop of alcohol, you are doi^ig the same about extramarital affairs. And in both situations, unless you've really identified your addiction as a problem, you will always succumb to the temptation of "just one more time." I suggest a therapist. You need to explore the root of the problem. It could be a poor self-esteem that you try to elevate through your sexual encounters. If you don't get the counseling you need, one of these days your husband will find out and then you'll have a real mess on your hands. It will be painful for both of you if you don't resolve to change before it's too late. Send letters to Dear Debbie, P.O. Box 4367, Orlando, Fla. 32802-4367. 1990 Tribune Media Services YOUR FINANCIAL FITNESS Family income splitting after tax reform By Joyce Jillson Weekly Tip: Moon in Aries energy keeps you positive and upbeat. Surprise love interests. \ Arfes (March 21-ApHl 19) Ugh, you could feel stone-walled; avoid pushing too hard. This mVt koroseo^ family situation solves itself; try to stay above the fray. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Refuse to let one mistake ruin the week. Turnarounds on Friday. Love stabilizes; for singlefl new love soon. Capricorn (Dec. 22>Jan. 19) Transitions all this week and next Taorus (April 20-May 20) Catch up on rest. Partners ipay actually point you in the direction of career success. Be willing not see eye-to-eye with you until after Tuesday. Talking leads to a^^r patterns. to action Gemini (May 21-June 21) Attend to your jangled nerves. Perhaps a major financial decision on Monday. Disbelieve half of what you hear. Cancel* (June 22-Jiily 22) You need someone to snuggle with. Your spirits soar; perhaps plan for your next trip. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) The week starts off with intensity. Monday finds you making vital personal decisions. Virgo (Aug. 23 Sept. 22) Give yourself a day or two to get your footing. Avoid deceptive people. A terrific Wednesday. Libra (Sept. 23Oct. 23) Your finances may get juggled this guide to dating, romance and reiationsliips. For a copy, send week, but you must balance the budget. Annoying neighbors $2.25 to Dating Guide for WtMnen, in care of tliis newspaper, or co-workers need help. P.O. Box 4426, Orlando, Fla. 32802-4426. Make checks payable Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21) Confirm vacation plans. A trying to New8paperl>ooks. 1990, Tribune Media Servioea Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You must set clear priorities. Refuse to follow the crowd. Your originaUty peaks. Pices (Feb. 19-March 20) Music, parties and new friendships thrill you this week. Voice opinions; others in power back you. If You Were Bom This Week This month shows more than the usual amount of personal decisions to make—new favorable job conditions and investment possibilities. Accept money through partners in August. Women, find your lucldest signs in Joyce Jillson's new OiKe over ri§lili|f i By Tim O'CaUaghan Once upon a time, saving for a college education followed a tried-and-true pattern. Parents would invest any spare funds in their children's name, most often in the form of a custodial account under the state's Uniform Gifts to Minors Act, so that interest and dividends would be taxed at the children's income tax rate. Since that rate was typically lower than the parents' rate, funds could aornmiilate considerably lilMiter. ft'Now two things have happened to change the rules: Tax brackets have been reduced so that, there are effectively just three brackets: 15 percent, 28 percent and, due to a surcharge on certain taxpayers, 33 percent. The unearned income of children under age 14 is now taxed at their parents' highest rate. That imeamed income might be the intrest on a savings account built from the youngster's own paper route or it might be dividends on a large stock portfolio. Either way, it's taxed at the parents' rate. Unearned income of children 14 or over, on the other hand, is taxed at their own tax rate. It still makes sense, therefore, to transfer some assets to children. Here are some points to consider: • The first $500 of any youngster's unearned income is not taxed at all. The second 1^00, even for an under-14 year old, is taxed at the child's own rate. This means that a youyngster can accumulate up to $1,000 in intrest or dividends in any one year before being taxed at the higher parental rate. It takes approximately $12,000, earning 8 percent, to produce $1,000. As long as your youngster's nest egg is under $12,000, taxes shouldn't be a problem. • It will take more than $12,000 to pay for coUege. The way to amass larger sums, and still steer clear of the tax rap, is to invest in things that are either tax-free or won't throw off much income until later cm. One poflnbility is good old U.S. government E£-bonds. They are free of state inccmie tax, which can help if you're in a hi|^-tax state. More important, tax on the accumulated interett can be deferred until the bonds are redeemed; at that point your college-bound youngster, no matter how bright, will be past 14 aiid therefore taxed at his or her own rate. Mimicipal bonds might also do the trick. And another possibility is common stock with low current dividends but good appreciation potential. Life insurance purchased on the life of a juvenile can offer advantages that children will never be able to provide for themselves: Such benefits as tax deferred accumulations, an im|aec|^te estate and a rate guiir3|Ke|d;t(rbe lower-than policies purchased later in life. e The National AnodaUon of Life llBtlcfwrtten Shakespearean Festival trip set The Nevada Opera Theatre has slated a bus trip to the Utah Shakespearean Festival in Cedar City for a showing of "Romeo and Juliet" Aug. 4. Lunch on the bus and dinner at the Gable House in St. George will be provided. The costofthetripis$95. caU NOT at 451-6331. NAPS requests exiiibltors Exhibit applications are available for the National Association for Professional Saleswomen's national convention to be held Sept. 12-15 at the Riviera Hotel. For an exhibit application and more infomiation, call 386-0423. By Caroljm Drennan Bishop Young mothers must be possessed with imlimited bravado and optimism! Why do I say that? Because, the other night as I casually prepared a goiumet meal for eight (yes, I said casually), I recalled the many times I'd entertained dinner guests when the children were small. Those were the days, my friend, those were the days! Standing out in dismal detail was a certain evevntful evening many years ago. My adorable pajama-clad 2-yearold toddled in diuing the cocktail hour preceding a dinner party. Soothing music was casting an illusion of serenity and elegance as he padded demiu-ely to the side of our honored guest. Spontaneously, he was seized with an acute stomach upset directly in the lap of aforesaid guest! Need I say more? Another lingering memory was the evening my guests arrived to find me, their hostess, floundering in a snow bank with three naked httle boys. How did that happen? I'll tell you how. In an effort to be efficient and organized, I had seized the opportunity while the boys were in the tub enmasse to carry out the last garof the evening. You Teenagers sought for Nevada Business Week Applications from high school sophomores and juniors from throughout the state are being accepted for participation in Nevada Business Week through July 31. From Aug. 5 to Aug. 11, teens will stay on campus at the University of Nevada, Reno and participate in Business Week activities designed to give them a "real look" at the work world and the private enterprise system. Full scholarships are available for students who will learn about business and economics through the use of games, computer simulations, lectures and hands-on experience as they master techniques designed to help them run a biisiness. Students will discover everything from the importance of quality control and employee motivation, to the significance of advertising and marketing, officials said. They'll have an opportunity to learn why businesses succeed or fail and they'll find out why communication is so important, they added. Business professionals volunteer their time to participate in Nevada Business Week. Individuals from all sectors of the business community participate as instructors and advisors in the week-long program. To find out more about Nevada Business Week, or to enroll in the program, call 786-8828 or write to Nevada Business Week, P.O. Box 40096, Reno. Nev. 89505. fuKly • Prie§ • S§rvh§ Vi OFF ^5900 N79S. fiUliM Kait Salft/StiYiM MOO •. CaaMfii (tarfc MOO) 597-5157 SALE • SALE • SALE • SALE Komansjl Datli and Draperies Complete Interior Design, Full line of Bath and Home Accessories, Custom Draperies, Minis, Verticals, Duettes, Pleated shades, and woodens. 693 N. Valle Verde 454-0248 Hondf oo n/Qf—n Valley Weddings Receptlone Conventions Seminars Banquets Meetings Garden Setting Professional And Courteous Staff To Serve You Henderson Convention Center • 200 Water St. 565-2171 \ y gT >T n' 'jlrgpi^ guessed it. I was followed out the back door I'd left invitingly open. My venture into at-home entertaining also included a rash attempt to stage a coffee party for 25. Minutes before the arrival of the guests, my eldest son energetically doused himself with the contents of a gallon container of bleach. Not to be outdone, the youngest struck his head on an end table that had moved directly in his stumbling path. I heard what a success the party was when I arrived home from the emergency room and met my departing guests on the front walk. Thankfully, as the children grew older, entertaining was not accompanied by such high drama. Only minor emergencies confronted visitors. For instance, there was the evening when terrified screams emanated from the guest bathroom, accompanied by the emergence of our guest and a tremendous desert tortoise who had been lounging casually under the sink. I don't know about you, but I'm exhausted by this step back in time. All I can say is, my apron's off to you, younger mothers! As for you grandma's out there, think about it: all th6 great chefs are ladies and gentlemen of "advanced years." We know why. ACTS Vascular Laboratory Non-inv5sTve In-officeEvaiuation of Circulation Disorders Medicare Assignment Accepted George E. Merino. MO. FAGS BoanSCtlOM SPECIALIZING IN Surgtrvofthe Heart, Lungs, Arteries & Vtins Laser Vascular Surgary 2110 E. Flamingo Rd. Suite 201 Las Vegas, NV 89119 734-2121 II PROFESSIONAL CAREERS K WANTE PET GRaOMER TRAINEES f^uN y/; EASY *Cla*sM Starting Now! CALL' 11 IHHII THIS WEEK AT NUTRI/SYSTEM? Lose all the weight you want for only $249 program cost plus $100 rebate TZ^' pon compu rmn i ( m.iinirn,in."( **rm In great shape since I lost 98 lbs. with Nutri/System." limmttou^otmifi^ttbting MirMraeMitirtf/Mnrto ^k0i/Sf0tn. Mow; tot 99 0m m mlnHfrmn txlm.tao.-lvm iqpartM ii • to aM rhir Utamlooulttimmcncalahm Jntf taw iMioM AMW iMr iwr* >vM ftkNTHw iwdy'f *i The NuifVSyfllifn* Welahi Loss PfOQfMi IndudM s vsnflly counMNnfl, iQht Kllvfly, end ? OVER 1JOO CBrTERS ACROSS N. AMERICA SERVMG NORTH AMERICA F OR OVER Ifl YEARS Cta-hOKf. nutri system ^^MIQM MM oMitoni mm Losr .ti th'^ • .veight you want (or only S2-U* program cost plus Si00 rob.itp I

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    . ^ ^ ^ ; I I y n i.i • • t H I i^-^^wr^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^iPI^^ ^^H^^^^n^m Page 14B, Henderson Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Thursday. Friday, July 19 & 20, 1990 Thunday, Friday, July 19 & 20, 1990 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News, Green VaUey News Pgf 16B Entertainment Youngsters need exercise By Glenna Kinberg Nevada Cooperative Extension Following are good physical activities for children: •Free play. Encourage children to play actively. •Physical education classes. These classes can tieach appropriate exercise techniques and anphasize the importance of lifetime physical activity. •Community programs. Encourage children to be involved in youth leagues that provide aerobic benefits, but don't overemphasize winning. •The family. Children learn Ufelong activities from their parents. Include activities that the entire family can enjoy. iwiTED/lRTiSri^ l IK aln s BOULDER THEATRE 293-3145 1225 Arizona St. SEATS JUST $3 ON SUNDAY 1st SHOW MATINe^ The Tommy Dorsey Orchestra Dorsey Orchestra coming to Hacienda The Tommy Dorsey Orrangements, as well as more chestra will appear from 7 p.m. modern selections in the bigto 11 p.m. Tuesday at the band style. Hacienda Hotel Matador Arena—-Jbe Tommy Dorsey OrchesBallroom. The 17-member band, under the leadership of Buddy Morrow, will play many of the original Tommy Dorsey artra appearance is hosted by the Southern Nevada Musical Arts Society as a fundraiser in support of the Society's upcoming 28th season. Co-sponsors of the event include Paradise Cove Retirement Community and KORK Radio. The Tommy Dorsey Orchestra is recognized as one of the greatest all-around dance bands of the '40s. In the summer of 1941, it outranked every other band to finish Hrst in Martin Block's "Make Beheve Ballroom" contest. 3,000 poets to gather in Las Vegas r\..„o r\r\f\ i_ c