Citation
1989-09-28 - Henderson Home News

Material Information

Title:
1989-09-28 - Henderson Home News
Creator:
Baker, Ben ( Columnist )
O'Callaghan, Mike ( Columnist )
Scott, Katherine E. ( Columnist )
Cohen, Richard ( Columnist )
Shipler, Guy ( Columnist )
Barbano, Andrew ( Columnist )
Corbalan, Georgina ( Columnist )
Anderson, Hugh J., III ( Columnist )
Romanoski, Peggy ( Columnist )
Bennett, L. Jessie ( Columnist )
VanDerSys, Helen ( Columnist )
Blanco, Marta A. ( Columnist )
Flores, Fred ( Columnist )
McDonnell, Pat ( Columnist )
Curtis, Joey ( Columnist )
Soehlke, Ruth ( Columnist )
Donahue, Mike ( Columnist )
Goff, James E. ( Columnist )
Schneider, Geoff ( Columnist )
Bishop, Carolyn D. ( Columnist )
Earl, Phillip I. ( Columnist )
O'Callaghan, Tim ( Columnist )
Harbour, Bill ( Columnist )
Cowen, Jeff ( Photographer )
Baker, Ben ( Photographer )
Romanoski, Peggy ( Photographer )
Donahue, Mike ( Photographer )
Burke, Stephen ( Photographer )
Publisher:
O'Callaghan, Mike
HBC Publications, Inc.
Creation Date:
1989-09-28
Language:
English
Materials:
Paper ( medium )

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Subjects / Keywords:
Nevada
Henderson
East Las Vegas
City and town life -- Nevada -- Henderson
Community life -- Nevada -- Henderson
History -- Henderson (Nev.) -- 20th century
Genre:
Newspapers

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Acknowledgments:
Greenspun Media sponsors this collection.
Collection Location:
Greenspun Media retains possession of the bound, original newspapers. Henderson District Public Libraries retains possession of the microfilm and the digital files.

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Source Institution:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Holding Location:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Rights Management:
The items in this collection are provided for non-commercial personal and academic use by Henderson Library patrons and may not be republished in any way. Contact Greenspun Media Group for additional information regarding rights to this material: http://www.greenspunmedia.com
Resource Identifier:
hhn3747 ( Digital Id )

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16 HendwoB Home New, Hcnderaon. OblllMERaAL BUILDING FOR SALE I 3.000 aq. ft Zoned CM. Uses: Professional. Retail. Auto Salae or Repairs, Pturn^ng, Bottling, Laboratories, iBuNdIng nuterials, Motnle Home Equipment and Repairs, $127,400. Also Commercial Condo, 600 sq. ft. $29,900. Owner wHI carry. $5,000 down ERA, ** The Really Cc tr. Cal^l-aureen 293-7551 any-, Nevada FOR SALE BY OWNER 4 BDRM HOME Beautiful custom inierior. Ceramic tile, phuh cupel, new country kitchen, new tile tMlhi, mmy curtom featureg. Pool/ipa, ?Ig RV parking. Very private yard, desert view. Located in one of the beat neighborhoods in BC. CaU for qjpointmem. 2935428 THINKINQ ABOUT MAKING A MOVE? We are currently helping many out of state buyers move to our area. We are desparate for home to sell them. For a free market evaluation and a Complimentary video of your home call Richard or Cheryl 595-3291 COLDWELL BANKER. REALTORS. • • •HORSES O.K.I• • • New 3' bedroom, 2 bath, cathedral ceiling. Finished double garage. Take older home in trade. $114,950. 293-1613 Ucenaee. B.C. HAWAIIAN VACATION Buy a home through me by October 15, 1989 and receive 4 nights, 5 days vacation in Hawaii. For details call 396-6385, leave message. Deborah or Lisa, Realtors Jack Matthevirs & Co. Member of MLS For Sale—Seller motivated will M'.'v w/reasonat)lp down, auuue wide mobile tiorrip on 60X100 lot w/fencec) /d',; Quiet area view near Sunrise Mobile Estates. Priced to sell today Call Don 564 9283. T ueadgj, September26, 19(M}: JENSEN'S REALTY IVMTO*^ -" 219 Water St. Henderson. Nevada 89015 564-3333 RESIDENTIAL DIVISION m^S^\ ••Sunrise Mobile Estates*^ Mobile Home Lots for Sale from $25,000. East Lake Mead Drive at Mohawk. GREEN VALLEY Beautiful upgraded home with a park Uke setting. 4 BR. 2^4 BA, 3 car garage. Good Loan. $139,500. Ask for Don. HIGHLAND HILLS BEAUTY. A must to see, 2 story, 4 BR, 2>/4 BA, 2 Car Garage. Priced Right. Ask for Don. FOSTER/COOGAN/CHESTNUT One building lot with curbs and gutters. Level lot and ready to build on. PRICE REDUCED!!! $11,500. Call Randy. GOLF-AREA historic 2 story in country club setting. First owner, mountain/dty views. ALSO 'GARDEN • RV PAD. CONVENTIONAL FINANCING available. $226,000. Call Richie. 349 W. LAKE MEAD DR COMMERCIAL zoning. 3 BDRM, 1 bath, comer lot super location, $75,000. Call Peggy Benedict. HIGH ON A HILL, in SEC 4, custom ranch style home with beautiful view of the Valley, grounds are equipped with barn and arena & fully landscaped. Ask for Richie or Don. Las Vegas—Lambo & Stewart, low down & assume cute metropolitan 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath, 1 car garage, F/P priced at $58,000. Ask for Don or Richie. FOR THAT LARGE FAMILY! Custom home in SEC. 27, 5 BR, 3'/2 Bath, 2 F/P, fully landscaped front and rear. SEE THIS ONE! Ask for Richie or Don. MODEL HOME 3 BDRM, 2 BTH, 1,500 S.F. RV parking, intercom in every room, pool, view of valley. Low Down!!!! Call Dave. BUILDING LOT ON TRUFFLES. $25,000. Call Katie. SECTION 9-2 half acre lots located within one block Jr High School. Call Katie. HALF ACRE fully matured lot with 1,800 sq. ft. house. 3 large bedrooms, 2 full baths. 800 sq. ft. workshop. Remember ask for Dave. VIEW-SITE PARADISE Fantastic tri-level modem. Newly built. Fireside warmth, central air, 4 br/2 baths, large view deck. ALSO •Mountain/City views 'Family room. Call Richie. FULL POTENTIAL—Bright Traditional home promising happy days. Quiet street, great family area, central air, electric heat, eatin kitchen. 3 BR/1.75 Baths, storm windows. Possession now! Call Richie. ^ DESERT! MAGNIFICENT! Consummate mobile home. Cheery fireplace central air, walk-in closets, horses OK. 3 BR/2 baths. Plus •paddle fans-large trees. Price reduced can't last! Call Ray. PRICE REDUCED! 3 BRIVA BATH, 1 car carport. Great starter home or rental property. Call Katie. 1804 MERZE. Back on the market. Appraisal is in at $48,500. Nice 3 bedroom with custom cabinets, ceiling fans, appliances and more. Call Peggy Benedict. SUPER RANCH HOME! 2300 sq ft, 380 sq ft in spa rm, dual air & heat, half acre. $138,500. Priced to sell!! Call Dave. HIGHLAND HILLS. Tastefully decorated 2 story home with a 4 bdrm, 2^2 baths, fireplace, 2 car garage, and lots of RV parking. Call Ken. GREAT POTENTIAL! For professional office townsite home zoned. C-1. Call Don. MISSION DRIVE-Sec. 32,1.1 Acres. Only $22,500. CALL NOW! Near proposed freeway off-ramp. Peggy Benedict. VACANT LAND Essex & Orleans, 5 Acres near New Lakes project. Power & water nearby. Price right. Call Don Jensen. COMMERICAL DIVISION FOR LEASE 2,000 sq. ft. of retail space on Water St. 113 W. Lake Mead, 1,050 sq. ft. Commercial Building—Dynamite Locatibn. High Traffic. FOR SALE STRIP CENTER—10 Stores plus 18 Storage Units on Sunset Road. All units are leased. Owner wants to trade equity for vacant land. Call Ken. BEAUTY SHOP—Active business in Boulder City on Nevada Hwy. 8 hair dreasen and one manicurist. Call Ken. BOIiJ)ER HWY. LOT-100'X125' Lot on Boulder Hwy. $85,000. CaU Km. Industrial Acreage—10.46 Acres Currently being used as wrecking yard. Prime location. Call Ken. Industrial Warehouse—4,800 sq. ft.—other storage on Vi Acre. Call Rex Newell or Peggy Cole. Industrial Warehouse—14,400 sq. ft. with office on approx. Vt acre. Call Feggy Cole or Rex Newell. 84 Indiutrial Acres on Gibaon & 1-615. Call Peggy Cole or Rex Newell. k k FOR SALE Small tidy older tionie w/attractive yard. Only $51,000 Ideal for retiree or first home buyer Convenient location. By appt only. Call Fred Dunham, Garrett Realty 293-3333 BC HILLTOP ESTATES New custom homes from $129,900. Choose your floor plan and lot today. Contact Dome Realty 293-1613 BC By owner—Chism Sonora 3 bdrm, Highland Hills, 1% bth, ceiling fans, RV park, auto sprinklers. Assume w/$ 19,000 or new loan. $97,500. 564-7357. FREE LIST OF BOULDER CITY HOMES, TOWNHOMES/CONDOS, MANUFACTURED HOMES & BUILDING LOTS! STOP BY OR CALL & WE WILL MAIL!! AFTER HOURS CALL: flARY BOARD STS-VgSM LINETTE CAVIS 513-1D17 ELLEN LAHB STROnBERC•-a^a-tSOfi UOOPY KHEELESS 213-lt12 CARL C COUAN-. BROKER. •• aia-lMlT AREA COBE: 702 293*4663 1664 NEVADA HWY. IN MARSHALL PLAZA^ MKSJ 293-6014 Pi-IMnTi. 1S:S ArieMM ^^mt •Boddw Cky, MOOS HOME&LANDBUSINESS INVESTMEan* CONSULTANTS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT BOlil MOBILE HOM section. 2 bdrm, 1^ |CITY •f sac in town. Adult \x. cond. $77,500. LAKE TAHOE IN BOULDER CITY? Yes, Lake Mountain Estates. Drive by 504 Lake Tahoe, 2 bdrm, 2 ba. 2 car carport. Storage, workshop. Fruit trees. All for $119,500. 686 MT. BONA, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths. Lake Mountain Estates $99,900. BE ON THE GOLF COURSE 3 bedroom, huge main bathroom, has tub and separate shower. Master suite has 'A bath and walk in closet. This tile-roofed beauty has pool w/spa and outdoor shower. 2'/2 car garage. $259,900. LOW PRICE Drive by 1305 Shenandoah, 3 bdrm, 2 full baths and garage. Reduced to $80,900. LOW IIVTEREST LOAN 7% avaikble to qualified buyer. 648 Ave. M, 2 bdrm, 1 bath. Fixer upper. Reduced to $59,900. 1294 BLACK MOUl^AIN COURT Manufactured home with style, 2 bdrm, 2 full baths. Carport, workshop building. $89,000. GORGEOUS HOME ON GEORGIA AVE. Near golf course. Drive by 1544 Georgia Ave. to see beautiful landscaping. 3 bdrm, 1^ baths. Over 1,950 sq. ft. in this park like setting for only $189,500. Vi ACRE LOT in Subdivision 11, Boulder City $47,500. MANUFACTURED HOME on 4.68 acres. 2 BR, 1% BA. Additional buildings "including house trailer" on property. Located in Searchlight. All for $100,000. VIEW LAKE new 2 bedroon' $105,000. AINS from this like Spyglass Condo. Only BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Restaurant/Sandwich Shop. Fully equipped. like new. Low, low j rent. Health forces sale. $38,000 includes equipment. Call for more info. BartHyd. Pst BenwteiB 293-5379 AnIU Hyde 293-2144 Tooy Korfman 2934006 Jerry Mardudl 294-1668 Dick Obon 2930371 BerSwd 2934S79 Tony WIrti 293-7959 OWNER3BR2BA2,100sq ft on golf course. Single story, 3 car garage. $195,000 Ph 293-7806 BC EASY LIVING IN BOULDER CITY 1322 Darlene Way. Custom ceramic tile m entry, kitchen, and hallway. 3 BR (extended master bedroom) 1 3/4 bath, 2 car garage, large covered patio. Low maintenance landscaping. Only $102,900. Call Realty USA to see. 454-6454 FOR SALE 3 BR 1 BA dng rm, country kitchen, tile roof, garage, auto sprkirs $98,500 BY APPT ONLY 540 Birch. 294-1983 BC NEED TO SELL YOUR HOUSE? WE WILL BUY IT NOW! 293-1613 G.A. "Curly" Smith, Inc. "^or sale by ow ;jedufifiil2 story ha I 4 txirm swimming poo & spa Miiih more. AsKing $119 500 Call %4 7091 m^A>y>/yy/yy/^^ ^^^ THURSDA Y INSIDE I i Bob Olsen Realty & Insurance Inc. 6 Water St., Henderson 564-1831 5 Acras In Sc. 9, plua 2-(lva adjaoant acras. All or part Baautlful viaw of tha Vallay. 1/2 Acra lot aac. 9, ctoaa to Brown Jr. High. Nioa ft iaval. BouMar City lot, ovarkMkihg Laka Maad on Woodacra Dr. Raady to Build wHh all utilltlaa. Ownar llcanaaa. 21/2 Acras off tha old LA Hwy. naar Paradlaa Spa. Only $45,000-Good Tarma. 21/2 Acraa Sac. A. Only $35,000. Custom Horns on Paradlaa Country Club. 4 Br., 4 batha, 3 firaplacaa, covarad patio deck overlooking Golf Couraa and pool araa. Call for appolnlmant to aaa. Ownar llcensaa. REALTORS SERVMQ TMC HENDERSON AREA FOT M YEARS I I v/y/////y^////////y/^^^/^^^y^/y^>^y//yy/777//A COMMERCIAL BUILDING Offices, Warehouse, Outside Security Storage. 4,000 sq ft total. 294-0686 EXECUTIVE HOUSE for sale by owner on 5/8 acre. Splendid view, possible 5 bdrm, 4 bth, central vac, intercom w/cassette player, sprinkler control and garage control, two fireplaces, conversation pit. Many more extras. Shown by appointment only. Call 564-1806 A MfMKI) OF THE SEAMintlANCIAL NETWOM COLDUieiX BANKeRO PAUL GARGIS & ASSOCIATES RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE An bxlependently Owned and Operated Member of CoMMell Banker Residential Aliiiiales, Inc. PRIME LOCATION—Popular custom tmrna araa, surroundad by lovely custom iniitt homes. Spectacular vlaw of the entire vallay. Four acres, barn and 16 >^,tieraa corral are Included. Priced at $225,000, ownar will carry with sutwtan^#l^ddilMWCeHrn(la Bird for more information. Property number T:78361. PRESTIGIOtJS CALICO RiOQE—Stunning custom home over-looking the entire valtey. Home featurea custom marble entry, aunken formal living room, formal dining, separate family room, three bedrooma, one of which is a loft, 3 full batha and beautiful mauve decor. Call Lola Beavor or fVck Johnston about property C:85903. Priced at $144,900. BEAUTIFUL MISSION HILLS—Located on 1 acra lot with paved atraeta, this country custom has 4 bedrooms, 2.75 batha, featurea two maater sultea, two fireplaces, sunken living room, vaulted ceilings and there are other lovely custom homes ki the area. Aak Wendy WWIams about property S:86742, priced at 9134,950. BEAUTIFUL ROCK FIREPLACE-Three bedrooma, 1.75 batha located on Vi aera tot surrounded by other custom homes. Big bathrooms, two master alzed bedrooma, maater suite and bath are on oppoaite side of the house from tha other bedrooms for real privacy. Call Lois Beavor or Rick Johnaton and aak them about property R:86323, priced at $119,900. GREAT FAMLY HOME—Large rooms with maater suite on aeparate end od the houae, formal living room, formal dining, family room, 4 bedrooms, 2 full batha. Large comer tot, freahly painted, new carpet and full length covered patio. Priced at $119,000. Ask Sharon Kozar about property K:84112. HIGHLAND HILLS BEAUTY-ThIa lovely property waa a fonner model home, maater bath haa been all redone, new roof In June, deluxe atorm windowa, freahly painted. Juat an|oy tha pool while It's warm or curl up in front of the fireplaoe when It geta coM. Priced at $112,000. Aak Anna Smith about proparty 0:94590. SPECTACULAR VIEW—Beautiful cuatom home with many i^radaa, ceramto tile entry, dining, batha and kitchen. CeiHng fans throughout. One bath and bedroom downatidra and 3 bedrooms upstairs, three full bath. Priced at $109,900, aak Sharon Kozar about property F:8S427. ZONED COMMERaAL—Water Street tocation, all utflltlaa are available, and owner will carry with $25,000 down. Price at $100,000. Aak Branda Bird for furtliar litfomiatton alwut property W:77S38. CUL-OE*SAC LOCATION-Over 2,000 S.F. of living apace, four bedrooma, fo^ mal Ihring room, aeparate family room, formal dining room, custom kitchen cabineta, country Idtehan witti large pantry, inside lattndy facilities, breakfast bar, carpet like new and fuat waiting for you. Priced at $84,900. Ask Sharon Kozar about property L:89074. TWO STORY TOWNHOUSE-Fdur bedrooma, 2 maatat*, one upetaira and one downl Two way firaplaca, kitehen haa pantiy and an ^>(>lkmoa8 stay. Located ctoae to extra parking and acroaa from tiM pool, comer lot. Priced at $79,000. Aak Sharon Kozar about property K:843ii. EXTRA £P(TilA LARGE LOT—NIca family area. Iwge Townalte home, thnM be dff oom a, aeparate dining room with bullt-4n eMna eaWnats, buHt-ln book eaaea. aersanad porch and covarad petto. ASSUMABLE LOAN. NO QUALIFYING. Priced at $65,900. Aak Sharon Kozar about property 0:87645. CUL-0E<8AC LOCATION—SuntHinded by other nice homes. Comptotely radeiie, new Mupei, (loora, fbdures and paifil ihroufilli out. Three betkrooms, 1.7Siialha,i ear carport, fnifttraea and auttMwMcapfiiklars. Priced at 164,900. Aak fniaron Kozar lAout propMty L:86428. Livma 18 EASY—In your Townhowe. outaMe malntananee dona by the aa a edatton, you iu en|oy tha niee dem nei(^ibortieod. Great view of Bie meiiirtaina from the baioony, mirrorad cloal doers tai inaater bettoooni, stylMi wreuf^ iron in front. Aak Anna Smith about property S:78149, priced at $86.tO0. PERnsnr LOCATK)N-Wlthin wMdng diaUnce of downtown and actoea from the park a nd aehooi. One bedroom, ibeth condo wllhiew.knyd o w np ayreei tf Priced at $33,500. Crt Tina Wilttama about property V:91060. 160 East Horlioii Drive NMidsrsoiiy Navada 86015 TalapiioiiM (708) 664-M66 L Miller urges new dump abandonment See Page 3 Wolves look for second straight win See Page 16 Tumor fails to halt business owner See Page 7 WEATHER Thursday, High 95 Low 60 '^ I HENDERSON NEVADA'S INDUSTRIAL CENTER nm 68/TO/'70 08250? iZ 980^6 YD BIVAANNOS Av s3np)HV '1 an wnidOHDIW AVfl Volume 40,76th Edition Hendetson. Nevada THE COMMUNITY'S NEWSPAPER 25$ 22 Water St 564-1881 Thursday. Sept, 28. ma Citizens voice concerns on nul(e dump By Ben Baker News Staff Writer The DOE cited the state's refusal to grant permits as the reason studies f a potential waste dump at Yucca Mountain have been halted. State representatives countered that notion Tuesday night by saying the permits have been halted because more information was needed to process the DOE's applications, DOE Project Manager Carl Gertz said the DOE would look into the problem, but he was under the impression the permits had been stalled arbitrarily. The state recently took actions to prohibit the DOE from working on Yucca Mountain. Those actions are considered legal by the state because the moves were taken according to federal law, according to state officials. The DOE has a different opinion, Gertz said. AB 222, the bill prohibiting the storage of high-level waste in Nev&da, is "in direct conflict with the law. The DOE position is that it is in direct opposition to the Constitution," Gertz said. The governor's and Legislature's action condemning the DOE's actions, according to federal law, are "inconsistent with the act and premature," Gertz added. Gertz cited Supreme Court cases in which state laws were overturned after those laws were found to violate the Constitution's supremecy clause. Ori6 IVi^SinJIfiM That aection aays that fedc^l Nevada's Commemorative License Plate VIEW By Mike O'Callaghan see Nuke, Page 2 rrCO\tiliiEMORATIVE PLATE—A spedally d^gnted llcenseplate commemorating the 125th Anniversary of ^fevada's admission into the Union will be available about Nov. 1. A iicw law authorizes the ^Registration Division of the Department of MottnVehicles and Public Safety to issue this commeinorativei>iat(ui|ttt Oct. 31, 199OCard>wn0^js may dwps^ ?mv<4ead of the re^Iar iOvcr aiid-bUie Nevada plate. The new license plate wiK^ iiitow colors and is pat terneilafter the official ibgo of the 125(h Anniversary pf Statehood whkh depict$ a miner and inountains. There will be an initial fee of $35 for the plate and an annual renewal fee of $10—in addition to all regular f^ A unique numbering scheme will be used for the coiranemoraUvel license plates, but personalized prestige ptatcsiip to a maximum) of six characters will be availiMc fn thaconrnKmoratrve formalJ officials iitai^ Owner:* may also have an MUtingUcense ptathum-| ber duplicaied on a commemorative plate. Both personalised aiid duplicate plates involve additional fees. Pkauf by Jtft Coven Gov. Bob Miller recently reassigned the directors of three small state agencies to Las Vegas. The three—the Commission on Post-Secondary Education, the Division of Aging Services and the Manufactured Housing Division of the Dept. of Commerce—all have a much heavier workload in Clark County than they do when compared with the remainder of the state. The move by the governor apparently made several Northern Nevadans nervous and, in some cases, a touch of paranoia appeared evident. Even the somewhat conservative Reno Gazette-Journal ran an editorial entitled "Governor should not move capital to Clark County." It was an excellent editorial and scored some telling points about why the capital should remain in Carson City. The Reno newspaper editorial ended by saying, "Of course, there is room for branch offices m a state's major city. That's the case in Las Vegas now and it works well. "In the future, the governor should tread '•very cautiously in moving state officials and services to areas away See One Man's View, Page 2 2 nabbed, cocaine seized in Basic senior among scholarsiiip finaHsts Green Valley drug bust By Katherine E. Scott JVews Staff Writer A kilo of high-grade cocaine was seized Tuesday and two people were arrested on drug trafficking charges, culminating a joint venture between the Henderson Police Department and the United States Drug Enforcement Agency. Bemadino Orta-Garcia and Maria del Pilar-Valenzuela were arrested at different times Tuesday at their residence, 1818 Paprika Drive in the Green Valley neighborhood, pohce said. Orta-Garcia, 41, was arrested during a 3 p.m. raid on the residence, according to an HPD press release. Officers, armed with an arrest warrant, also seized some $31,000 in cash and $10,000 in jewehry, poUce said. Pilar-Valenzuela, 33. was arrested at the Paprika address about 9 p.m. Tuesday, pohce said. She was booked into Henderson jail on a felony drug trafficking charge. Orta-Garcia was Ijooked into Clark County Jail in Las Vegas on two drug trafficking charges, said Gary Sloboda, DEA resident agent in charge. Sloboda said DEA agents "had purchased a kilo of cocaine from him a while back." OrtaGarcia was subsequently indicted and, Sloboda said, "we arrested him on the state complamt." A search of the house following the arrested revealed another kilo, Sloboda said. A kilo weighs 2.2 pounds, he said. He added that agents paid around $15,000 for the previous purchase. "That was a sample to buy a subsequent 25 kilos," he said. The previous buy was made in Las Vegas. Anthony E. Johnson, a senior at Basic High School, isamong some 1,500 finahsts in the 1990 National Achievement Scholarship Program for Outstanding Negro Students, it was announced Wednesday. A member of the Armed Drill Team of Basic's a ward-winning Marine Corps Junior ROTC for the past four years, Johnson carries a heavy load of science and mathematics classes, as well as being a student in the Distinguished English Class. Reportedly he maintains a 3,5-plus grade average and has made apphcation to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. An offensive center for the Basic Wolves varsity football team, Johnson is also a 3-year track letterman, at which he gained a reputation in hurdles. The academically promising high school seniors will have an o^wrtunity to continue in the competition for approximately 725 Achievenjent Scholarships to be awarded next spring. Sponsor organiAnthony E. Johnson zations and program donors are expected to provide nearly $3 million to underwrite the college undergraduate awards, officials said. Some 90,000 black students from all parts of the coimtry took the 1988 PSAT/NMSQT and requested consideration in the current program. Semifinalists have been designated in geographic regions consisting of several states; they represent the highest-scoring black students in each region. To advance to the finalist level of the competition, s^mifinahsts must have records of higK •cademic performance throughfe*,t secondary school, must be endt>rsed and recommended by thei? scn^ principals, must confirm their PSAT/NMSQT performance the Scholastic Achievem Test and must submit See Scholar, Page 2 Bond refinance saves city $218,000 EVIDENCE—Police seized more than $30,000 cash and a wrapped kilo of cocaine during a drug bust in Green Valley Tuesday. Photo courtesy of Henderson Police Department. ji ORIGINAL DEFECTIVE By Ben Baker News Staff Writer A bond refinancing ordinance the Henderson officials had been considering saved the city $218,000 upon its approval last Tuesday, said Steve Hanson, city finance director. The savings are much greater than Hanson had predicted earlier. He said he was deUghted with the savings. The savings are in payments form, not money to the city, he added. During the Ufe of the old bonds, the city was making interest payments ranging from nine to 11.5 percent. Hanson said the lower rate bonds had matured, so the city was paying for bonds with 10.5 to 11.5 percent interest. The new bonds are financed at 7,1 percent, thereby providing a substantial paymentsavings to the city. The process is just like refinancing a mortgage. Hanson said. A mortgage with a high interest rate can be refinanced at a lower rate. While the amount owed is the same, the payments are reduced. "We payed off the old bond issue and ended up with a bond issue cost of 7.1 percent interest instead of 11.5 percent," he concluded. A Inside City Council Agenda 41 L. Jeaaie Bennett 9 Carolyn Drennan Bishop 221 calendar of Events 21 Claaalfiad 42 Richard Cohen 4 Oomica, Crosaword 39 Joey Curtia 17 DearOat)t>ie 34 Education 30-31 Jim Goff 19 Qroen Valley Naws 7 Horoacopa 34 Le9ai Nonova 40-41 Pat McDonnell 16 ObHuariea 3, 40 20 nvvvyiwf 37,40 Senior Activitiea 13 Quy Shipler 4 Sports 22 This Waa Nevada 29 Helen VanOarSya 13 Viewpoint 4 Your View 5 • ^ammmm

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iM Man's View from Page 1 §-om the capital. Carson City is designed t^ handle the administration of these services and that's where they should stay." The editorial made good sense but probably should have ended by telling everybody to calm down. It's doubtful that very many serious-thinking Nevadans \yant to move the capital to Glark County. We already have more growth and other social problems than w need at this end of the state. Besides, C^k County is geared to a dynamic economy to generate taxes to pay for state services provided to it and other counties. It reminds me of another state, where one town was the state capital and another had the prison. According to the locjil wags, the town with the prison had first choice. • It looks like Carson City had both first aiid second choices or maybe didn't have aiiy choice at all when it got both the (Japitol Building and the prison. : The selection of Gary BeDunnah as tint of three outstanding social studies teachers in Clark County made the day for me. Gary, a Basic High School graduate apd one of my former students, has bieen chairman of the John C. Fremont Junior High School Social Studies Department for the past 22 years. He htis been teaching social studies for 26 y'tais. ..Congrats to a good teacher! There's jpo.jhigher honr a person can receive in A jnvjlised society. ; The scarcity of water in this desert enriEOnment is coming closer and closer to forcing decision-makers and planners to Question and limit new developments. : & recent four-year study costing $8 iniHion jerked the slower growth noose a fjittighter when it concluded the deep tfr^erground aquifiers cannot be counted on^o bring relief to a rapidly developing tsiS Vegas Valley. ; Hie U.S. Geological Survey study warns Os-that withdrawing large amounts of water from the deep aquifiers will cause us water shortage problems in nearby areas. It reminds me of a USGS study almost 30 years ago that told us the valley floor was settling because too much ground water was being withdrawn. Later the Colorado River project gave us relief from that situation. Now that supply is being quickly gobbled up by new, wateroriented development projects. Clark County can no longer continue a growth-at-any-cost philosophy. As this column has pointed out in the past, it's much later than mos^t elected officials are willing to publiclyiidmit. This end of Clark County had a big time on the gridiron last Friday night. Basic, Valley and Boulder City all stayed at home and won important football games. It took a scrappy bunch of Wolves to beat Gorman in four overtimes; Tonopah was no match for the Eagles; and the Vikings, behind the running of Kalin Hall, beat winless Eldorado. If you haven't seen a high school football game this fall, you should take some time and watch the local lads in action. Take a child, granddiild or neighborhood kid along with you and have twice as much fun. The City of Henderson has a beautiful new City Hall. It should be named after Ben Church or at least a large plaque memorializing him should be'on;the,f^ont of the building. Or, how about the Henderson Convention Center being called the Ben Church Convention Center? The years of loyal work and building of early Henderson by educator Ben Church shouldn't be forgotten, because the city determined to use for other purposes the foott^ field named in his honor. Who was Ben Church and where was Ben Church Memorial Football Field? Ask some person who has lived here 30 years or more and they can give you an answer. How soon people forget. TREE-PLANTING CEREMONIES—At left, Emily Oliphant and Becky Andrews, 8-yearold third-graders, plant an apple tree. Melirrda Krovontka, also eight and in the third grade, donated the tree to be planted at John Dooley Elementary School to celebrate Johnny Appleseed's birthday. Photo by Ben Baker Mayor speaks to Museum Guild Huke from Page 1 VOLCANO EXPERT-Geologist Bruce Crowe discusses the possibilty of volcanoes on and around Yucca MountaiQ. Photo by Ben Bdier law takes precedentover state law. The DO^ was also criticized for noi having completed a report on public questions. The report was supposed to be finished in time for Tuesday's meeting. The sheer volume of questions overwhelmed the DOE's task force for the project, Gertz said. He added that each question presented to the DOE will be individually addressed. Child injured in moped accident By Katherine E. Scott News Staff Writer A five-year-old Henderson boy suffered a fractured skull after being hit by a moped on the street in front of his house on • Monday, according to Henderson Police. Ricky Noyola was taken to University Medical Center in a Henderson Fire Department ambulance using its lights and sirens following the 6:15 p.m. accident on Cumberland Drive. Police said Noyola ran out from behind a boat parked and into the path of a yellow moped driven by 12-year-old Lonnie Smith of Henderson. Smith was cited for driving without being studied because Congress a license, according to police. Hazel Gordon, left, and Winifred Smith. City offers zero interest loans is not the site for a high-level radioactive waste site. It IS directed the DOE to study Yuc ca Mountain and Yucca Mountain alone for a possible site, he said. Shipping the waste also drew concerns. DOE officials said no firm routes have been planned. Several options are being looked at, they said. Volcanoes, issue, was Police said a phone call from the five-year-old's father incicated the youngster was expected to recover. Henderson is offering zero interest home improvement loans to qualified city residents. The funds are supplied through HUD bloc grants. The loans must be used to correct substandard living conditions in a Henderson residence, according to city officials. Some of those conditions are: plumbing, electrical, roofing and heating or coohng problems. Spokespersons said to qualify, an applicant must: •Own the home for at least one year; •Have less than $10,000 in assets, excluding the home and furnishings and two automobiles; and Those seeking more information about the HUD loans should call the city's Economic Affairs Department at 565-2164. Henderson Mayor Lorna Kesterson, was the luncheon speaker at a meeting of the Clark County Museum Guild on Monday. She spoke on the Henderson successes and future plans. Prior to the mayor's presentation, president Winnie Smith introduced Charlotte Nolan, immediate past president, who presented a commemorative plaque to Hazel Gordon, charter member and museum historian for many years. Among the members present" were Mark Ryzdynski, curator, Clark County Heritage Museum, and his assistant Dawn JoUiff; Patricia Marchese, superintendent of cultural affairs, Clark County Parks and Recreation; VicePresident Ethel Staton; Secretary Eleanors JoUey; Treasurer Patsy Menefee; Betty McCully; B.C. Nolan; Tina Smith; Vee Cooke; Helene Sheehan; Betty Lou Anderson; Jeanne Block; Hazel Gordon; Jan Kennedy; Doris Kershul; Jessica Kneisle; Marion Kohler; Carol Marshall; Virginia Richardson; Mary Jo Sheehan; Inman Steele; Rose Staub; Martha Cha.se; Lee Farrel; Judy Hampton; ..Vivian Phillips; Pat Porter; Anthony Restivo; Katie Shankland; Eileen Shelton; Marguerite Thomas; Lillian Unger; and Frances Napp. Jewish Higli Holy Days begin Sale to benefit transplant hopeful A garage sale is being organized to help Charles Picka more recenT^^ens, a local man with a birth addressed by defect, receive a liver Speciahsts planning to study Geologist Bruce Crowe. He said transplant. Hri w^aw(4nMB >.. J. J. A.I. 1*1. 1_.1. _1 i* % • m. 1 the mountain made presentathe likelyhood of a volcano tions and fielded audience disturbing a waste site in the questions during the meeting, mountain is very unlikely. The Most of those questions dealt potential for volcanic activity with DOE actions and planned in the area immediately around actions. Several people critithe site ranges from one in 10 cized the DOE outright. million to one in a biUion. One man. Jerry Shaw of Earthquakes and faults were Anchor Bay, said he wished the discussed as well. DOE and The/sale will be from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the old fire station next to the Boy's Club on the comer of Major Avenue and Drake Street, organizers said. All the money rasied in the sale will go to Pickens' transplant fund, they added. Friends and neighbors have pitched in to provide goods to be sold. By Katherine E. Scott News Staff Writer Sundown every Friday has special meaning to Jewish people around the world, for that signals the beginning of each week's Sabbath. Jewish observances traditionally begih at sunset the day before any event. The High Holy Days begin with Rosh Hashanah on Saturday, giving special significance to Friday services this week at synagogues throughout Las Vegas — whether orthodox, conservative or reform. The holiday ends on Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, which falls on Oct. 9 this year. The dates remain constant on the Jewish calendar on which Rosh Hashana is the first day of the new year. See Days, Page 10 Scholar from Page 1 lENDERSON] WBinrai dump could be done immediately. His concern centered on the money the goverment is spending and has spent on the project. He added that he had no problems with the dump. "They should quit loafing around and drawing big money for nothing. Ill move next door to Yucca Mountain after [the waste] is buried there," Shaw I said. He added that if he owned J40 acres, he'd take the waste |and bury it on his own land for nothing. v Gertz said Yucca Mountain application that gives detailed information about their scholastic abilities and extracurricular accompUshments. All winners of achievement scholarships will be selected other scientists have found more than 32 geological faults in the potential dump area. One fault was found directly in a possible storage site. Officials emphasized that the fault has not moved in more than two million years. Several other faults have moved within the last two miUion years, they said. Again, DOE officials said they cannot get to the mounships, spokespersons said tain to do the proper follow-up A committee of college and work because they cannot get secondary school educators will pennJts. evaluate the records, activities and goals of all finalists and will choose the winners in each region. The Achiievement Program, which is conducted by the National Merit Scholarship Corp., is supported by grants from an anticipated group of from some 200 sponsor organabout 1,200 semifinalists who izations and institutions. Since are expected to qualify as finalists. Every finalist will have a chance to win one of the 350 nonrenewable National Achievement $2,000 Scholar1965, more than 13,200 outstanding black students have won Achievement Scholarships valued at $41 million. Approximately 2,700 of the recipients currently are enrolled as undergraduates in nearly 300 of the nation's colleges and universities, officials said. An ladepeadent Newgpaptr Fomtdcd June 1,1951 PaUkhsd evify ToMday ui Thonday moniag at P.O. Bra MMSO, HendaraoB, Nevada, 89009 Pkoaa 564-lMl. NIKE O'CALLAOHAN CAROLYN O'CALLAGHAN PnbllalMr Co-Pobilahar ROBDtT GROVE RSHER Mf i^hm FiMtnr PAUL SZYDELKO AaaodatoEditw H3.C PnbUcatkiBa ,^ Mika O'Callafbaa, PnaidaBt: Carolyn O'Callaghaa, Vice FNddaat: Tim O'CaUagfaaa. Vioa Pnafabat; Rathe DMUa. SMTCtarx Bob Morgan, Traaauiar. Subacriptkm rataa Single 2ScaBta One year SIS SU oMHitha.. JBM Three naatha...S7 Mail anbacriptloM Want of MieaiaaM.. .tSO pw year •16 for aix BMntiu Eaat of Miaaiadppi.. t24 per ye OOferaixBMaths T f Thuraday. September 28. 1989 TBS Gaming Foundation funds scliooi mini-grants again and innovative projects beyond the scope of the established school budget." HendwoB Home News. Hendwon. Nevada Page 8 I ANOTHER DONATION-City Councilman Mike Harris, left, thanks Tom Hood, Lake Las Vegas official, for the project's donation to the Henderson Senior Center. Harris said the money wil go to buy unbudgeted items the center needs. Hood said the donation is part of Lake Las Vegas' ongoing commitment to the community. • Photo by Ben Baker For the fourth year, the Nevada State Board of Education has established a School Improvement Teacher MiniGrant Program which is funded by the Nevada Gaming Foundation for Educational Excellence. The purposfe of the program, said Eugene T. Paslov, superintendent of Public Instruction, is to provide individual classroom teachers with grants of $100 to $750 or a cooperative group of up to three teachers in the same school with grants of up to $2,250 for the direct benefit of students in the classroom. Grants may be used for classroom projects, special or unique materials or equipment, computer software, audiovisual materials or development of teaching programs. Any person employed as a hcensed teacher in one of Nevada's 17 school districts or in one of Nevada's private schools may apply, with the exception of those who received mini-grants in the 1988-89 school year. The standards by which the applications will be judged include the potential for direct and equitable benefit to students in the classroom, originality, creativity and need. Teachers are to submit their applications to their own district superintendents, who will in turn submit the applications to the Nevada Department of Education no later than Friday, Oct. 13, 1989. The Nevada Gaming Foundation for Educational Excellence has funded the minigrant program with $45,000 for this fourth year. Dr. Paslov said that, "We had 225 Nevada teachers apply for mini-grants last year and we anticipate an enthusiastic response from teachers again this year. The awarding of a grant enables teachers toimplement creative SCARED ? Nettling helps? Find relief. Start life all over. Call NEW LIFE. 293-4444 ALPHABET AND MULTIPUCATION TABUS MADE EASY. NEVADA LEARNINO PROORAMS DYSLCXM COfWCCTION ClHTm 739-6373 1815 E. Tropicana, Suite 510 (Camar o* Tfo>l ii n tJmmnn Gov. Miller: Nevada nuke dump should be abandoned Gov. Bob Miler said recently that growing negative evidence clearly indicates that the Department of Energy should abandon its study of Yucca Mountain as the nation's first high-level nuclear waste dump. Miller's comments coincided with the release of a state review of the DOE'S site characteriz4tion program prepared by the Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects. "There are overwhelming technical reasons why the DOE should not pursue, at great expense to taxpayers, Yucca Mountain any longer," Miller said. 'The site characterization plan is further evidence that the DOE is being less than fair in its evaluation of Yucca Mountain. The site is scientifically unsuitable, but instead of using objective opinions to evaluate a site, the DOE is attempting to Justify Yucca Mountain. That is unfair to Nevadans.'' Miller said the DOE's approach to studying Yucca Mountain "consists of little more than an effort to confirm its prejudged assumption that the site is safe, This is not good science. It is not even common sen.se. "I am convinced from this and our previous reviews of DOE's plans that Yucca Mountain should be abandoned now so the nation can get on with seeicing a realistic and safe solution to its commercial nuclear waste problems. "The DOE has long maintained that building a nuclear dump is not a technical problem. Given what wc and other internal scientists from the DOE, NRC and the U.S. Geological Survey know about the major flaws with Yucca Mountain, I can find no rationale for perpetuating such a self-serving view." Robert Loux, executive director of the Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects, said the DOE plans to search only for technical data that will support Yucca Mountain as a nuclear waste dump and is neglecting studies that could disqualify the site. In a cover letter accompanying comments sent to Sam Rousso, acting director of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, I^ux raised a plethora of objections to the study plan, although he depicted the plan as so profound! y insufficient that the comments "must be considered [still] preliminary, given the inadequacy of the current SCP documents." Lxkux said he supported the governor's contention: "From a technical perspective, there is enough evidence in hand to disqualify Yucca Mountain under the DOE's own siting guidelines." Loux said there were at least three "fundamental flaws" in the DOE's site characterization plan "that will be difficult, if not impossible, to rectify" if the plan is implemented. As outlined by Loux, the flaws are: •The unwillingness by the DOE to recognize such potentially hazardous problems such as recurring faulting and volcanism. Loux said the plan "fails to provide a program that places an emphasis on early examination of critical gcotechnical issues" that could disqualify the site. While the SCP discusses the need to determine if such conditions exist, the State said the "findings will apparently be made only at the conclusion of the entire program." The state asserts these findings can be made early in the program, "before substantial, and perhaps unnecessary, resources are committed." Loux also said the plan does not take intS consideration the possibility that Yucca Mountain, inside a proven mining district, could be rich with valued natural resources that could also disqualify the site. •The failure of the DOE "to adequately integrate the planned study and date collection activities." Said Loux: 'This reinforces our and the NRC's earlier conccm that the DOE's site characterization approach is more one designed to ANYTIME RV HERTZE PENSKB TRUCK RENTALS Use of Handtruck or Furniture Pads with Truck Rental (Limited Supply) 2 Locations 2527 E. Fremont 452-9666 Expires 10/5/89 2081 E. Sunst 367-6822 GU ATHLETIC CLUB LIMITED PARTNERSHIP FOR SALE Includes passive Income reduced membership plus cash dividends, 7334008 435-1545 ^ A New and Exciting Addition to Our Office 1100 Arizona St.. Bouldmr Qty Grn Vlly Mtdkal Services 6301 Mountain Vlita Suit* 203. Handarson 456FOOT (3668) 294F00T (3668) Diplomat of American Board of Podlatric Surgery, Fellow American College of Foot Surgeon* "Diet Center works. Theseflguresdon'tlie!' Lose/at, not muscle. Research shows 92% of the weight lost on the Diet Center [program is excess fat not water or lean bod\ mass Eat real food. No expensive prepackaged meals required Get fast results. 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PAGE 3

iM Man's View from Page 1 §-om the capital. Carson City is designed t^ handle the administration of these services and that's where they should stay." The editorial made good sense but probably should have ended by telling everybody to calm down. It's doubtful that very many serious-thinking Nevadans \yant to move the capital to Glark County. We already have more growth and other social problems than w need at this end of the state. Besides, C^k County is geared to a dynamic economy to generate taxes to pay for state services provided to it and other counties. It reminds me of another state, where one town was the state capital and another had the prison. According to the locjil wags, the town with the prison had first choice. • It looks like Carson City had both first aiid second choices or maybe didn't have aiiy choice at all when it got both the (Japitol Building and the prison. : The selection of Gary BeDunnah as tint of three outstanding social studies teachers in Clark County made the day for me. Gary, a Basic High School graduate apd one of my former students, has bieen chairman of the John C. Fremont Junior High School Social Studies Department for the past 22 years. He htis been teaching social studies for 26 y'tais. ..Congrats to a good teacher! There's jpo.jhigher honr a person can receive in A jnvjlised society. ; The scarcity of water in this desert enriEOnment is coming closer and closer to forcing decision-makers and planners to Question and limit new developments. : & recent four-year study costing $8 iniHion jerked the slower growth noose a fjittighter when it concluded the deep tfr^erground aquifiers cannot be counted on^o bring relief to a rapidly developing tsiS Vegas Valley. ; Hie U.S. Geological Survey study warns Os-that withdrawing large amounts of water from the deep aquifiers will cause us water shortage problems in nearby areas. It reminds me of a USGS study almost 30 years ago that told us the valley floor was settling because too much ground water was being withdrawn. Later the Colorado River project gave us relief from that situation. Now that supply is being quickly gobbled up by new, wateroriented development projects. Clark County can no longer continue a growth-at-any-cost philosophy. As this column has pointed out in the past, it's much later than mos^t elected officials are willing to publiclyiidmit. This end of Clark County had a big time on the gridiron last Friday night. Basic, Valley and Boulder City all stayed at home and won important football games. It took a scrappy bunch of Wolves to beat Gorman in four overtimes; Tonopah was no match for the Eagles; and the Vikings, behind the running of Kalin Hall, beat winless Eldorado. If you haven't seen a high school football game this fall, you should take some time and watch the local lads in action. Take a child, granddiild or neighborhood kid along with you and have twice as much fun. The City of Henderson has a beautiful new City Hall. It should be named after Ben Church or at least a large plaque memorializing him should be'on;the,f^ont of the building. Or, how about the Henderson Convention Center being called the Ben Church Convention Center? The years of loyal work and building of early Henderson by educator Ben Church shouldn't be forgotten, because the city determined to use for other purposes the foott^ field named in his honor. Who was Ben Church and where was Ben Church Memorial Football Field? Ask some person who has lived here 30 years or more and they can give you an answer. How soon people forget. TREE-PLANTING CEREMONIES—At left, Emily Oliphant and Becky Andrews, 8-yearold third-graders, plant an apple tree. Melirrda Krovontka, also eight and in the third grade, donated the tree to be planted at John Dooley Elementary School to celebrate Johnny Appleseed's birthday. Photo by Ben Baker Mayor speaks to Museum Guild Huke from Page 1 VOLCANO EXPERT-Geologist Bruce Crowe discusses the possibilty of volcanoes on and around Yucca MountaiQ. Photo by Ben Bdier law takes precedentover state law. The DO^ was also criticized for noi having completed a report on public questions. The report was supposed to be finished in time for Tuesday's meeting. The sheer volume of questions overwhelmed the DOE's task force for the project, Gertz said. He added that each question presented to the DOE will be individually addressed. Child injured in moped accident By Katherine E. Scott News Staff Writer A five-year-old Henderson boy suffered a fractured skull after being hit by a moped on the street in front of his house on • Monday, according to Henderson Police. Ricky Noyola was taken to University Medical Center in a Henderson Fire Department ambulance using its lights and sirens following the 6:15 p.m. accident on Cumberland Drive. Police said Noyola ran out from behind a boat parked and into the path of a yellow moped driven by 12-year-old Lonnie Smith of Henderson. Smith was cited for driving without being studied because Congress a license, according to police. Hazel Gordon, left, and Winifred Smith. City offers zero interest loans is not the site for a high-level radioactive waste site. It IS directed the DOE to study Yuc ca Mountain and Yucca Mountain alone for a possible site, he said. Shipping the waste also drew concerns. DOE officials said no firm routes have been planned. Several options are being looked at, they said. Volcanoes, issue, was Police said a phone call from the five-year-old's father incicated the youngster was expected to recover. Henderson is offering zero interest home improvement loans to qualified city residents. The funds are supplied through HUD bloc grants. The loans must be used to correct substandard living conditions in a Henderson residence, according to city officials. Some of those conditions are: plumbing, electrical, roofing and heating or coohng problems. Spokespersons said to qualify, an applicant must: •Own the home for at least one year; •Have less than $10,000 in assets, excluding the home and furnishings and two automobiles; and Those seeking more information about the HUD loans should call the city's Economic Affairs Department at 565-2164. Henderson Mayor Lorna Kesterson, was the luncheon speaker at a meeting of the Clark County Museum Guild on Monday. She spoke on the Henderson successes and future plans. Prior to the mayor's presentation, president Winnie Smith introduced Charlotte Nolan, immediate past president, who presented a commemorative plaque to Hazel Gordon, charter member and museum historian for many years. Among the members present" were Mark Ryzdynski, curator, Clark County Heritage Museum, and his assistant Dawn JoUiff; Patricia Marchese, superintendent of cultural affairs, Clark County Parks and Recreation; VicePresident Ethel Staton; Secretary Eleanors JoUey; Treasurer Patsy Menefee; Betty McCully; B.C. Nolan; Tina Smith; Vee Cooke; Helene Sheehan; Betty Lou Anderson; Jeanne Block; Hazel Gordon; Jan Kennedy; Doris Kershul; Jessica Kneisle; Marion Kohler; Carol Marshall; Virginia Richardson; Mary Jo Sheehan; Inman Steele; Rose Staub; Martha Cha.se; Lee Farrel; Judy Hampton; ..Vivian Phillips; Pat Porter; Anthony Restivo; Katie Shankland; Eileen Shelton; Marguerite Thomas; Lillian Unger; and Frances Napp. Jewish Higli Holy Days begin Sale to benefit transplant hopeful A garage sale is being organized to help Charles Picka more recenT^^ens, a local man with a birth addressed by defect, receive a liver Speciahsts planning to study Geologist Bruce Crowe. He said transplant. Hri w^aw(4nMB >.. J. J. A.I. 1*1. 1_.1. _1 i* % • m. 1 the mountain made presentathe likelyhood of a volcano tions and fielded audience disturbing a waste site in the questions during the meeting, mountain is very unlikely. The Most of those questions dealt potential for volcanic activity with DOE actions and planned in the area immediately around actions. Several people critithe site ranges from one in 10 cized the DOE outright. million to one in a biUion. One man. Jerry Shaw of Earthquakes and faults were Anchor Bay, said he wished the discussed as well. DOE and The/sale will be from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the old fire station next to the Boy's Club on the comer of Major Avenue and Drake Street, organizers said. All the money rasied in the sale will go to Pickens' transplant fund, they added. Friends and neighbors have pitched in to provide goods to be sold. By Katherine E. Scott News Staff Writer Sundown every Friday has special meaning to Jewish people around the world, for that signals the beginning of each week's Sabbath. Jewish observances traditionally begih at sunset the day before any event. The High Holy Days begin with Rosh Hashanah on Saturday, giving special significance to Friday services this week at synagogues throughout Las Vegas — whether orthodox, conservative or reform. The holiday ends on Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, which falls on Oct. 9 this year. The dates remain constant on the Jewish calendar on which Rosh Hashana is the first day of the new year. See Days, Page 10 Scholar from Page 1 lENDERSON] WBinrai dump could be done immediately. His concern centered on the money the goverment is spending and has spent on the project. He added that he had no problems with the dump. "They should quit loafing around and drawing big money for nothing. Ill move next door to Yucca Mountain after [the waste] is buried there," Shaw I said. He added that if he owned J40 acres, he'd take the waste |and bury it on his own land for nothing. v Gertz said Yucca Mountain application that gives detailed information about their scholastic abilities and extracurricular accompUshments. All winners of achievement scholarships will be selected other scientists have found more than 32 geological faults in the potential dump area. One fault was found directly in a possible storage site. Officials emphasized that the fault has not moved in more than two million years. Several other faults have moved within the last two miUion years, they said. Again, DOE officials said they cannot get to the mounships, spokespersons said tain to do the proper follow-up A committee of college and work because they cannot get secondary school educators will pennJts. evaluate the records, activities and goals of all finalists and will choose the winners in each region. The Achiievement Program, which is conducted by the National Merit Scholarship Corp., is supported by grants from an anticipated group of from some 200 sponsor organabout 1,200 semifinalists who izations and institutions. Since are expected to qualify as finalists. Every finalist will have a chance to win one of the 350 nonrenewable National Achievement $2,000 Scholar1965, more than 13,200 outstanding black students have won Achievement Scholarships valued at $41 million. Approximately 2,700 of the recipients currently are enrolled as undergraduates in nearly 300 of the nation's colleges and universities, officials said. An ladepeadent Newgpaptr Fomtdcd June 1,1951 PaUkhsd evify ToMday ui Thonday moniag at P.O. Bra MMSO, HendaraoB, Nevada, 89009 Pkoaa 564-lMl. NIKE O'CALLAOHAN CAROLYN O'CALLAGHAN PnbllalMr Co-Pobilahar ROBDtT GROVE RSHER Mf i^hm FiMtnr PAUL SZYDELKO AaaodatoEditw H3.C PnbUcatkiBa ,^ Mika O'Callafbaa, PnaidaBt: Carolyn O'Callaghaa, Vice FNddaat: Tim O'CaUagfaaa. Vioa Pnafabat; Rathe DMUa. SMTCtarx Bob Morgan, Traaauiar. Subacriptkm rataa Single 2ScaBta One year SIS SU oMHitha.. JBM Three naatha...S7 Mail anbacriptloM Want of MieaiaaM.. .tSO pw year •16 for aix BMntiu Eaat of Miaaiadppi.. t24 per ye OOferaixBMaths T f Thuraday. September 28. 1989 TBS Gaming Foundation funds scliooi mini-grants again and innovative projects beyond the scope of the established school budget." HendwoB Home News. Hendwon. Nevada Page 8 I ANOTHER DONATION-City Councilman Mike Harris, left, thanks Tom Hood, Lake Las Vegas official, for the project's donation to the Henderson Senior Center. Harris said the money wil go to buy unbudgeted items the center needs. Hood said the donation is part of Lake Las Vegas' ongoing commitment to the community. • Photo by Ben Baker For the fourth year, the Nevada State Board of Education has established a School Improvement Teacher MiniGrant Program which is funded by the Nevada Gaming Foundation for Educational Excellence. The purposfe of the program, said Eugene T. Paslov, superintendent of Public Instruction, is to provide individual classroom teachers with grants of $100 to $750 or a cooperative group of up to three teachers in the same school with grants of up to $2,250 for the direct benefit of students in the classroom. Grants may be used for classroom projects, special or unique materials or equipment, computer software, audiovisual materials or development of teaching programs. Any person employed as a hcensed teacher in one of Nevada's 17 school districts or in one of Nevada's private schools may apply, with the exception of those who received mini-grants in the 1988-89 school year. The standards by which the applications will be judged include the potential for direct and equitable benefit to students in the classroom, originality, creativity and need. Teachers are to submit their applications to their own district superintendents, who will in turn submit the applications to the Nevada Department of Education no later than Friday, Oct. 13, 1989. The Nevada Gaming Foundation for Educational Excellence has funded the minigrant program with $45,000 for this fourth year. Dr. Paslov said that, "We had 225 Nevada teachers apply for mini-grants last year and we anticipate an enthusiastic response from teachers again this year. The awarding of a grant enables teachers toimplement creative SCARED ? Nettling helps? Find relief. Start life all over. Call NEW LIFE. 293-4444 ALPHABET AND MULTIPUCATION TABUS MADE EASY. NEVADA LEARNINO PROORAMS DYSLCXM COfWCCTION ClHTm 739-6373 1815 E. Tropicana, Suite 510 (Camar o* Tfo>l ii n tJmmnn Gov. Miller: Nevada nuke dump should be abandoned Gov. Bob Miler said recently that growing negative evidence clearly indicates that the Department of Energy should abandon its study of Yucca Mountain as the nation's first high-level nuclear waste dump. Miller's comments coincided with the release of a state review of the DOE'S site characteriz4tion program prepared by the Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects. "There are overwhelming technical reasons why the DOE should not pursue, at great expense to taxpayers, Yucca Mountain any longer," Miller said. 'The site characterization plan is further evidence that the DOE is being less than fair in its evaluation of Yucca Mountain. The site is scientifically unsuitable, but instead of using objective opinions to evaluate a site, the DOE is attempting to Justify Yucca Mountain. That is unfair to Nevadans.'' Miller said the DOE's approach to studying Yucca Mountain "consists of little more than an effort to confirm its prejudged assumption that the site is safe, This is not good science. It is not even common sen.se. "I am convinced from this and our previous reviews of DOE's plans that Yucca Mountain should be abandoned now so the nation can get on with seeicing a realistic and safe solution to its commercial nuclear waste problems. "The DOE has long maintained that building a nuclear dump is not a technical problem. Given what wc and other internal scientists from the DOE, NRC and the U.S. Geological Survey know about the major flaws with Yucca Mountain, I can find no rationale for perpetuating such a self-serving view." Robert Loux, executive director of the Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects, said the DOE plans to search only for technical data that will support Yucca Mountain as a nuclear waste dump and is neglecting studies that could disqualify the site. In a cover letter accompanying comments sent to Sam Rousso, acting director of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, I^ux raised a plethora of objections to the study plan, although he depicted the plan as so profound! y insufficient that the comments "must be considered [still] preliminary, given the inadequacy of the current SCP documents." Lxkux said he supported the governor's contention: "From a technical perspective, there is enough evidence in hand to disqualify Yucca Mountain under the DOE's own siting guidelines." Loux said there were at least three "fundamental flaws" in the DOE's site characterization plan "that will be difficult, if not impossible, to rectify" if the plan is implemented. As outlined by Loux, the flaws are: •The unwillingness by the DOE to recognize such potentially hazardous problems such as recurring faulting and volcanism. Loux said the plan "fails to provide a program that places an emphasis on early examination of critical gcotechnical issues" that could disqualify the site. While the SCP discusses the need to determine if such conditions exist, the State said the "findings will apparently be made only at the conclusion of the entire program." The state asserts these findings can be made early in the program, "before substantial, and perhaps unnecessary, resources are committed." Loux also said the plan does not take intS consideration the possibility that Yucca Mountain, inside a proven mining district, could be rich with valued natural resources that could also disqualify the site. •The failure of the DOE "to adequately integrate the planned study and date collection activities." 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Viewpoint Paft 4 HMdcraon Hona Nwi, Hradanoa, Nevada MIKE O'CALLAGHAN CAROLYN O'CALLAOHAN Publisher Co-Pnbliihtf Thursday, September 28, 1989 Seniors, bingo andtheGCB No, Virginia, the Gaming Control Board did not close down the bingo games at the Henderson Senior Center. However, the games were stopped recently while Senior Center officials determined how to hold them so that they are not operated against Control Board policy. Rumors since the game stopped have spread among local senior citizens, including one that Gaming Control agents shut down the activity in the middle of a game. The problem began when the price for games was to be set at 50 cents. Somebody complained to Henderson officials, who investigated whether such bingo games — held at churches, senior centers and convalescent homes throughout the country — could be conducted legally. The Gaming Control Board resjionded that such games are condpned in Nevada under some basic conditions: that games not be held frequently, no money is charged for games and no cash prizes are awarded. When bingo starts up again at the Senior Center, which is expected to happen soon, nominal prizes may be provided by donation. Some complain that senior citizens won't play unless there are cash prizes. Others feel those who play at the center are doing so for recreation and companionship. The Gaming Control Board does have a point about restricting the frequency and cash prizes of non-profit bingo games. Unlicensed gaming would provide unfair competition to the legal games at local casinos. Those seniors who want to play for money can go to a casino just a block away from the Senior Center. And those who Uke to play just for fun will still be able to enjoy them.—Legislative cliici^ens Lobbyists spent $245,528 entertaining lawmakers during the 1989 session of the Nevada State Legislature in efforts to influence votes on bills, according to a final report released by the Legislative Counsel Bureau. That doesn't include three of the 531 lobbists who registered diu-ing the session who never filed any reports and whose names are being turned over to the attorney general for possible prosecution. ;.The spending averaged $1,470 a day, or about, $23 a day for each of the 42 Assembly members and 21 state senators. For the entire 167-day session, that's an average of $3,897 for each lawmaker. While that sum seems high, we don't think this report is accurate or complete. A far greater amount tiwn a quarter of million dollars was spent buying votes in Carson City this year. But the people will never know how much was really spent and by whom because there is no system for investigating just what lobbyists in Nevada do and which legislators they do it for. Under state law, lobbyists don't have to name the legislators on whom they spend their money. They merely list their total monthly expenditures on enterainment, gifts and loans. • The Legislature employs no investigative staff to determine :whether the lobbyists prepare accurate reports, although there :are follow-up checks to ensure all the lobbyists file the ^documents. Only a lobbyist who is a fool would not file these documents, because you can report whatever you want. This is the grossest example of allowing the fox to tend the chicken coop in the state. Lobbyists—whose job it is to peddle ; and buy influence—are not going to accurately report how much : money they spend to influence legislators. That could adversely affect how effective they are. P'urthermore, they don't have to worry about lying on the report, there is no check on whether the report has been honestly filled out. In addition, lobbyists don't have to report who they supposedly gave gifts to, bought dinner for or for whom they did other financial favors. It makes the report a joke. A lobbyist can make up any amount of money he or she wants and doesn't have to worry about accounting for the amount or worry about having the amount investigated to determine whether its accurate. Gov. Bob Miller should do one of two things: He should demand tougher lobbyist activity reports with full disclosure on who got what favor from a lobbyist and demand those reports be investigated and proven accurate. Otherwise Miller should see to it these worthless reports are discontinued. The reports currently only give the people a false sense of security that they know what lobbyists are up to. The truth is, we don't. Daily Sparks Tribune Wall of Trash Cans By Richard Cohen WASHINGTON Arriving at work Monday morning, I was greeted (if such is the term) 'by 13 hugh trash cans standing in formation in the newsroom. Other such cans were stationed nearby and on every desk was a cardboard receptacle, called "the white paper desk box." It is not to be confused (please note) with the "cream colored container" which was placed under each desk. These terms are official and should be memorized. The aforementioned "cream colored container" was placed nearby the "plastic lined black trash can," which is yet another official term (state of the art) and which heretofore had just been called the waste-paper basket. Around the newsroom was also placed a metal contraption called "The newspaper drop-off cart" whose design is simpUcity itself and whose purpose is obvious to one and all. In explanation of this plethora of receptacles, those of us who were silly enough to turn on our computers got a niessage: "Good Morning Newsroom. Just a reminder for the first day of recyclmg." Yes, the District of Columbia's recycling law is about to go into effect and the Washington Post, embodying the very essence of civic virtue, had decided to start early. I have decided to comply. I have done so because the instruc• tion sheet left next to my "White paper desk box" informs me that "one of your co-workers has been charged with overseeing paper separation and answering your recycling questions." Knowing the Post, it has chosen any one of several office zealots who will not hesitate to report me to the Trash Police. I do not want to go to the Recycling Reformatory where, as the name suggests, I will be recycled and return to work as an enviornmental reporter. It is for that reason that I intend to spend the rest of the day (and, probably, half the night) committing to memory the various uses of the various trash receptacles, "the white paper desk box," for instance, is—and her I quote—"white computer printout paper (green bar, blue bar)" which has, I think, been kiUing birds in the Everglades. "The cream colored container," however, is not for trash items colored cream. No siree. For obvious reasons (What? What?), it is for envelopes and for something called "Chipboard" which may or may not be a Ben and Jerry's ice-cream flavor. I await a ruhng from the office Trash Monitor about what to do with Rocky Road. 'The plastic-lined black trash can," however, is where things get a tad confusing. The Law says it is for carbon paper, address labels, rubber bands and, among other things, aluminum. I take it, therefore, that should I want to dispose of an envelope, I must remove the address label, toss it in "the plastic-lined desk box," for instance, is-and her l'quote-"white computer printout paper (green bar, blue bar)" which has, I think, been killing birds in the Everglades. The cream colored container," however, is not for trash items colored cream. No su-ee. For obvious reasons (What? What?), it is for envelopes and for something called "Chipboard" which may or may not be a Ben and Jerry's ice-cream flavor. I await a ruUng from the office Trash Monitor about what to do with Rocky Road. "The plastic-lined black trash can," however, is where things get a tad confusing. The Law says it is for carbon paper, address labels, rubber bands and, among other things, aluminum. I take it, therefore, that should I want to dispose of an envelope, I must remove the address label, toss it in "the plastic-lined black trash can" and place the envelope itself in "the cream colored container." A rain gutter, however, goes in "the plasticUned black trash can." Similarly, and for obvious reasons, should I want to throw away one of those yellow tablets I use for taking notes, I must tear off the binding, toss it into the "the plastic lined black trash can" and throw the yellow paper into "the cream colored container." In that way, I will not become a felon. As a parenthetical aside, I must note that this eminently reasonable law was promulgated by the very city government that cannot keep track of foster children and which boasts, among other things, an infant-mortality rate approaching that of Haiti. At the moment, it takes from four hours to an entire day to get license plates from the Motor Vehicle Bureau, which is short some 60 staffers. Nevertheless, there is not the slightest doubt that the city government's recycling police will enforce the new law—as, you and I agree, it should. I might also point out that, in driving to work, I passed over entire streets that were paved with steel plates (temporarily and, it seems, for all time) and breezed through traffic signals that do not work. Near my house is a place where taxicabs are abandoned. SoOn, I'm sure, there will be a receptacle for them. As for the homeless, we all know the city^as a plan^ In that regard, the unfortunate could not be more forfunateT Some people will no doubt greet the city's new Recycling law with cynicism and yearn for Ronald Reagan and the heady days when excessive regulation was condemned. I remind them, in the words of my recycling-instructions sheet, that "We throw away enough office paper and writing pap)er annually to build a wall 12 feet high stretching from Los Angeles to New York City." That will not change. -II 'The wall will now be built of trash cans. Capitol Commentary By Guy Shipier Attorney General Brian McKay, who has not yet announced whether or not he intends to run for governor next year, last week made what sounded like a campaign speech. "In his first, and hopefully last, state of the state address," McKay told the Reno Rotary Club, "the acting governor declared war on the mining industry, and like his predecessors, chose to take tax revenues from the hide of a single industry". Most observers generally agree that the only person on the horizon so far who has any real chance of preventing Bob Miller from making a second state of the state address is Brian McKay. So do the top leaders in the Republican Party. They have put increasing pressure on him to agree to make the run. Other things he said in the speech indicate he might well take them up on it. For instance: "While targeting Nevada's mining industry, the governor said he didn't want to burden homeowners and wage earners with more taxes. "Let's not be fooled. The 1989 Legislature passed, and the governor signed, nearly 50 bills that increased our taxes and the fees we pay to the state by approximately $54 million. That included increased taxes on insiu-ance premiums, cigarettes and personal property... "I say again, let's not be fooled. Who will pay for (these increases]? Nevada homeowners and wage earners. Who will pay the increased property taxes...the higher fees to register their cars, and for hunting and fishing licenses? The answer is the same—you and every other homeowner and wage earner in the state. "The point is, some of our leaders have been playing a game of hide and seek—seeking ways to raise revenues by hiding them from the taxpaying public. The time to put our fiscal house in order has come and gone. We can no longer afford to 'study' the issue. We know what needs to be done and we have known it for some time. It is time for bold, iryiovative action." Those clear and pohshed phrases in themselves don't signify that McKay will run for governor; as one of Nevada's most articulate and outspoken pohtical leaders, he usually says what he thinks whether he's running for office or not. So it may be of more important political significance that he chose to McKay seems like he's running use his speech to tackle the most unpopular and unpleasant issue of all—taxes. If McKay is planning to run for governor, the timing could hardly be better. He knows that, like it or not, taxation will show up in the campaign in some form or another. The problem candidates for most offices will be figuring out how to deal with it and still avoid having it become a trap. Deliberately or not, McKay has dealt with it by taking the initiative and explaining his position not only before a campaign has begun, but before he has even announced his intentions. That doesn't necessarily de-fuse all the land mines surrounding the inherently volatile issue, but it gets rid of .some of them. Based on the old principle of an offense being the best defense, this method of tackling a problem even before it surfaces can be highly effective on the political front, as Paul Laxalt found in his successful run for the U.S. Senate in 1974. The day Laxalt announced he told the press why he had reconsidered the disenchantment for politics that led him not to run for re-election as governor in 1970, a decision that had brought down considerable criticism on his head. He then reminded the media of a couple of other potentially harmful facts—although he was a Roman Catholic, he had been divorced, and he had become the owner of a gambling casino. He knew that these were the juicy kinds of details that could be devastating in the campaign. By publicly acknowledging them before it started, he took the wind out of their sails; they simply didn't become issues. Result: Even though this campaign took place in the middle of the Watergate scandal. Republican Paul Laxalt was elected to the Senate. Unhke those politicians who simply scream and yell and stamp their feet in frustration about paying taxes, Brian McKay made clear that the only thing that does any good is to have a plan. "Our growth and prosperity has us poised to roar into the 1990s and beyond," he proclaimed. "But we can only meet the challenges that lie ahead if we have a sensible tax pohcy that does more than penalize a profitable industry here and there and then deceives taxpayers with hidden tax and fee increases. "It is time for our teachers, gaming, mining, businesses large and small and government to sit down and hammer out a tax policy that is fair and equitable. Call it a summit if you will, a tax summit that government should lead in the interest of all Nevadans." McKay ended the speech sounding like a man who expects to stick around: "1 for one am optimistic about the course of events in the coming decade and I look forward to helping mold our future." Your Views Thursday, September 28. 1989 HMdtnon Home Nw. Hcadcnoa. Ntvada Pag 6 ^£iri3V\/ir< By Andrew Barbano Once upon a tune, Nevada's U.S. senators served under an unwritten rule: part of the job was stayipg in office until death. Pat McCarran was the last to live up to it in 1954. McCarran protege Alan Bible chose not to follow in his mentor's footsteps and stepped down in 1975. Howard Cannon tried, going for a fifth term in 1982. Unfortunately for him, Paul Laxalt and Chic Hecht had other ideas. Laxalt himself walked out after two tenns and now clips millionaire coupons at a Washington juice law firm. Which brings me to the curious case of Harry Mason Reid. Both he and Richard Bryan are young enough to live up to the unwritten rule. Will they? Election for life is usually a bad idea. These days, members of the House of RepresenHarry aslced Fallon: 'What water problem?' tatives are undefeatable without pending criminal charges. I have long advocated mandatory retirement after two terms or eight years for any elected official. However, I have a hard time with that idea when it comes to our two senate seats. Small states have little clout back in the foreign country called the District of Columbia. The biggest reason for passage of the "Screw Nevada" bill (shoving the nuke dump site down our throats), was the newness of our two fair-haired young senators. Hoary Sen. Bennett Johnston, could jiot have pulled such a maneuver had two powerful oldtimers still been minding the store. So does Harry Reid plan to be in office for life, or not? Maybe we can pick up a clue from his involvement in trying to settle the controversy older than this century: the rights to the waters of the Truckee, Carson and Walker rivers. The only thing certain in trying to resolve that particular mess is that you will make a lot of people angry. Fallon agricultural interests want no part of the proposed settlement, prefer ring to take their chances in court. Most Sparks-Reno residents are resentful of the Pyramid Lake Paiute demand for imposition of costly water meters which won't save a drop of water. So, what's the trouble with Harry? Where's the benefit for his career? Is there any real pohtical risk for him? As former Chief Justice Al Gunderson said many years ago, 'The first rule of chess and politics is to defend your king." Reid and Bryan are both Las Vegas Democrats. A Northern Nevada water issue means nothing to populous Clark County. Trying to resolve that Northern hassle presents no risk to Reid's Southern Nevada "king." (Remember, he carried only Clark and Mineral Counties in winning the election three years ago.) Still, he now represents the entire state. If he wants to continue to do so, there's no reason for him to stick his neck out if he doesn't have to. Reid could easily play his cards close to his vest, come home to wave in parades a la Barbara Vucanovich and be guaranteed an overwhehning re-election in '92. So why isn't he doing that? I have a theory about his true motivations. It has to do with when Harry met Fallon. In 1974, then-Lt. Gov. Reid was a heavy favorite over former Gov. Laxalt to replace the retiring Sen. Bible. Had Reid gone to Hawaii in early October, he could have come home tanned and elected in November. Instead, he provided a textbook example of the Vince Lombardi school of politics. The late Green Bay Packer head coach always said that the team making the least mistakes wins. Reid made lots of mistakes. One of the minor ones came one day at Fallon Kiwanis. Both Reid and Laxalt were present. As I heard the story, Harry got the first ques' tion after lunch. "What do you think of our water problem?" "What water problem?" replied Reid. After some embarrassment all around, Laxalt dehvered an inspiring response. He told how he and Ronald Reagan, as governors, had gotten the California-Nevada Water Compact through their respective legislatures in 1969. "The problem is that Congress has not ratified it," said the prettiest, if not the sharpest, of the Basque brothers. Those attending heartily approved. I started hearing stories like that from increasingly demoralized Reid volunteers. That one really hurt, because Reid's campaign manager had been given full background information on the issue months before. Mr. Laxalt won by about 600 votes after a recount. For all his supposed clout during the Reagan years, he failed to get the compact ratified. Reid is now within shouting distance; He has many flaws, to be sure. But political risk or not, if" he gets the long-neglected bis'tate compact ratified as a r2sult of the ongoing and largely unpopular negotiations he started, he will go down in history as the most effective senator since McCarran. In that case, I will wish him a long and productive hfe tenure. Andrew Barbano is a Renobased syndicated columnist. Letters Of ravens and tortoises Editor: The federal government's current approach to protecting the desert tortoise may, in fact, be a greater threat to the tortoise than not proecting it at all. Currently the greatest killer fo baby tortiose are ravens. The raven population continues to increase becaue of unwise government protection and easy food sources provided by urban populations. Dear Editor: Recently a divided Nevada supreme Court declared it cruel and unusual punishment to sentence a 13-year-old to life without the possibility of parole for the murder of a double amputee. Khamsone Kham Naovaralh's sentence was reduced to life with the possibility of parole. On Jan. 1, 1987, Naovarath broke into the home of his neighbor David Footc, threw Foote out of his wheelchair, tied him to a bench and slowly and brutally murdered the helpless paraplegic during the next hour, alternately using glass bottles, carpet shampoo, a knife and an extension cord as weapons. He then escaped with some valuables in the victim's van. At his arrest he confessed to Preservationist gi'oups, such^ as the Sierra Club, are trying to blame livestock grazing as the reason for the tortoise decline so they can eliminate family ranchers and put the land into wilderness. However, the evidence indicates that during the late 1930's, when the tortoises were the most abundant, hvestock grazing decreases, the accumulation of dry grasses will increase dramatically which also increases the danger of range fires. Tortoise not destroyed by the wild fires face a bleak future due to destroyed habitat; that leads to further death from exposure and starvation. Research has shown weeds will propagate replacing the natural forage thereby creating' further tortoise starvation. Livestock grazing is currently the best means available for controlling the accumulation of dry forage andfminimizing the fire hazard. The Best plan for the recovery of the tortoise is to reduce the raven population and increase livestock grazing. The present government policies will manage the desert tortoise into extinction through well-meaning but wrong management practices. What are they teaching nowadays? Revictimization the murder, but could not tell why he did it. Only a year later, at sentencing time, did he claim he was sexually molested by his victim. Although we might not agree that the original sentence was disproportionate to the crime, we can accept the Supreme Court ruling when it is based on the consideration of the offender's young age! What we can not accept, however, are the attacks on the victim's character by statements in Justice Charles Springer's opinion. Justice Springer wrote: "..There is little doubt that if the homosexual child molestcr had not died from his injuries, he would be facing a possible life sentence himself and Naovarath would in all probability be free."!! Justice Springer has nothing to support that and other similar allegations except the presence of some pomographic movies at the crime scene and the accusations by the 13-year-old, of whom Justice Springer wrote in the same opinion that he was considered delusional and unable to "distinguish reality and fantasy."!! David Foote had struggled all his life under, a severe physical handicap which ultimately led to the amputation of both legs. In spite of that, Foote graduated from college and became a productive and independent member of society. He was employed as a telephone retail specialist at a local bank and was an inspiration to other handicapped people in this community. CALVIN L. NAY, Director Desert Tortoise Recovery Institute Foote had never been charged with any wrongdoing, much less convicted. The offensive statements in question are all the more appalling coming from a member of the Supreme Court, an instiftition which is to distinguish right from wrong for the people of Nevada. David Foote was neither able to defend his life against the vicious attacks of a child, nor is he now able to defend himself against this posthumous attack on his character. We, as survivors of homicide victims in Claric County, object to this revictimization of a murder victim. EVA IVI. COLLENBERGER Executive Director Families of Murder Victims To the Editor: School has started again and so have the small salespersons knocking on my door. Is this what education is, teaching them to sell unneedcd and often unwanted things lo neighbors? If we teach eariy enough that selling (and buying) are the primary skills to be learned wc can ensure that the emphasis in the American way will always be wanting more and more things, rather than other values. All the media have been placing great emphasis on dangers to children from neighbors and friends. My bell-ringer was about 6 to 8 years old. He was going around the neighborhood alone, ringing doorbells. Does his order blank pad protect him? Whetherthe selling campaigns are sponsored buy the schools or by the PTA or by other organizations, I think they are giving the wrong message and are dangerous for the children. Of course classrooms want a few extras. Let them have the children write letters to neighbors asking for help. Have the PTA members ring the doorbells. Maybe I'm the neighborhood grouch.lhavcnoitcnccdmy from yard because 1 remember all the possibilities several yards together had for my kids to play. I don't mind new generations using my yard (although I do wish they wouldn't leave their cups and bottles) or my driveway or marking hopscotch squares on my sidewalk. But I will not order anything from these little salespersons. My objections go back to the days when my children were in Cub Scouts and Brownies and I still think pressure-selling gives the wrong training. Many think the emphasis on sports in schools is bad. How about the emphxsis on who can sell the most candy? ALICE BROWN Send us 'Your View' Candidly Candid Are there any entertainment or fun places for teens in Henderson? By Georgina Corbalan "N Tina Dion, 16 "No. There has to be more places like Pistol Pete's. [When there is nothing fun to do,J some kids drink." Jeff Thunstron, 16 "Not really. 1 would like to see an amusement park where teens could go. I now go to Las Vegas with my friends. Henderson could use a bigger miniature golf course." Burtonya Smit, 17 "No. We should be able to go to an arcade, besides Circus Circus. We should have roller skating centers or a bowhng alley. Now teens go down to the Strip and drive arovmd for fun." John Bashaw, 17 "No, not really. Henderson needs a place for teens to dance; all we have now are adult places." Vikki Fairbairn, 17 "They need more dance clubs for teenagers. Vegas is not much different [in terms of teen places)." ^ j; ORIGINAL DEFECTIVE Bfi • aft

PAGE 5

Viewpoint Paft 4 HMdcraon Hona Nwi, Hradanoa, Nevada MIKE O'CALLAGHAN CAROLYN O'CALLAOHAN Publisher Co-Pnbliihtf Thursday, September 28, 1989 Seniors, bingo andtheGCB No, Virginia, the Gaming Control Board did not close down the bingo games at the Henderson Senior Center. However, the games were stopped recently while Senior Center officials determined how to hold them so that they are not operated against Control Board policy. Rumors since the game stopped have spread among local senior citizens, including one that Gaming Control agents shut down the activity in the middle of a game. The problem began when the price for games was to be set at 50 cents. Somebody complained to Henderson officials, who investigated whether such bingo games — held at churches, senior centers and convalescent homes throughout the country — could be conducted legally. The Gaming Control Board resjionded that such games are condpned in Nevada under some basic conditions: that games not be held frequently, no money is charged for games and no cash prizes are awarded. When bingo starts up again at the Senior Center, which is expected to happen soon, nominal prizes may be provided by donation. Some complain that senior citizens won't play unless there are cash prizes. Others feel those who play at the center are doing so for recreation and companionship. The Gaming Control Board does have a point about restricting the frequency and cash prizes of non-profit bingo games. Unlicensed gaming would provide unfair competition to the legal games at local casinos. Those seniors who want to play for money can go to a casino just a block away from the Senior Center. And those who Uke to play just for fun will still be able to enjoy them.—Legislative cliici^ens Lobbyists spent $245,528 entertaining lawmakers during the 1989 session of the Nevada State Legislature in efforts to influence votes on bills, according to a final report released by the Legislative Counsel Bureau. That doesn't include three of the 531 lobbists who registered diu-ing the session who never filed any reports and whose names are being turned over to the attorney general for possible prosecution. ;.The spending averaged $1,470 a day, or about, $23 a day for each of the 42 Assembly members and 21 state senators. For the entire 167-day session, that's an average of $3,897 for each lawmaker. While that sum seems high, we don't think this report is accurate or complete. A far greater amount tiwn a quarter of million dollars was spent buying votes in Carson City this year. But the people will never know how much was really spent and by whom because there is no system for investigating just what lobbyists in Nevada do and which legislators they do it for. Under state law, lobbyists don't have to name the legislators on whom they spend their money. They merely list their total monthly expenditures on enterainment, gifts and loans. • The Legislature employs no investigative staff to determine :whether the lobbyists prepare accurate reports, although there :are follow-up checks to ensure all the lobbyists file the ^documents. Only a lobbyist who is a fool would not file these documents, because you can report whatever you want. This is the grossest example of allowing the fox to tend the chicken coop in the state. Lobbyists—whose job it is to peddle ; and buy influence—are not going to accurately report how much : money they spend to influence legislators. That could adversely affect how effective they are. P'urthermore, they don't have to worry about lying on the report, there is no check on whether the report has been honestly filled out. In addition, lobbyists don't have to report who they supposedly gave gifts to, bought dinner for or for whom they did other financial favors. It makes the report a joke. A lobbyist can make up any amount of money he or she wants and doesn't have to worry about accounting for the amount or worry about having the amount investigated to determine whether its accurate. Gov. Bob Miller should do one of two things: He should demand tougher lobbyist activity reports with full disclosure on who got what favor from a lobbyist and demand those reports be investigated and proven accurate. Otherwise Miller should see to it these worthless reports are discontinued. The reports currently only give the people a false sense of security that they know what lobbyists are up to. The truth is, we don't. Daily Sparks Tribune Wall of Trash Cans By Richard Cohen WASHINGTON Arriving at work Monday morning, I was greeted (if such is the term) 'by 13 hugh trash cans standing in formation in the newsroom. Other such cans were stationed nearby and on every desk was a cardboard receptacle, called "the white paper desk box." It is not to be confused (please note) with the "cream colored container" which was placed under each desk. These terms are official and should be memorized. The aforementioned "cream colored container" was placed nearby the "plastic lined black trash can," which is yet another official term (state of the art) and which heretofore had just been called the waste-paper basket. Around the newsroom was also placed a metal contraption called "The newspaper drop-off cart" whose design is simpUcity itself and whose purpose is obvious to one and all. In explanation of this plethora of receptacles, those of us who were silly enough to turn on our computers got a niessage: "Good Morning Newsroom. Just a reminder for the first day of recyclmg." Yes, the District of Columbia's recycling law is about to go into effect and the Washington Post, embodying the very essence of civic virtue, had decided to start early. I have decided to comply. I have done so because the instruc• tion sheet left next to my "White paper desk box" informs me that "one of your co-workers has been charged with overseeing paper separation and answering your recycling questions." Knowing the Post, it has chosen any one of several office zealots who will not hesitate to report me to the Trash Police. I do not want to go to the Recycling Reformatory where, as the name suggests, I will be recycled and return to work as an enviornmental reporter. It is for that reason that I intend to spend the rest of the day (and, probably, half the night) committing to memory the various uses of the various trash receptacles, "the white paper desk box," for instance, is—and her I quote—"white computer printout paper (green bar, blue bar)" which has, I think, been kiUing birds in the Everglades. "The cream colored container," however, is not for trash items colored cream. No siree. For obvious reasons (What? What?), it is for envelopes and for something called "Chipboard" which may or may not be a Ben and Jerry's ice-cream flavor. I await a ruhng from the office Trash Monitor about what to do with Rocky Road. 'The plastic-lined black trash can," however, is where things get a tad confusing. The Law says it is for carbon paper, address labels, rubber bands and, among other things, aluminum. I take it, therefore, that should I want to dispose of an envelope, I must remove the address label, toss it in "the plastic-lined desk box," for instance, is-and her l'quote-"white computer printout paper (green bar, blue bar)" which has, I think, been killing birds in the Everglades. The cream colored container," however, is not for trash items colored cream. No su-ee. For obvious reasons (What? What?), it is for envelopes and for something called "Chipboard" which may or may not be a Ben and Jerry's ice-cream flavor. I await a ruUng from the office Trash Monitor about what to do with Rocky Road. "The plastic-lined black trash can," however, is where things get a tad confusing. The Law says it is for carbon paper, address labels, rubber bands and, among other things, aluminum. I take it, therefore, that should I want to dispose of an envelope, I must remove the address label, toss it in "the plastic-lined black trash can" and place the envelope itself in "the cream colored container." A rain gutter, however, goes in "the plasticUned black trash can." Similarly, and for obvious reasons, should I want to throw away one of those yellow tablets I use for taking notes, I must tear off the binding, toss it into the "the plastic lined black trash can" and throw the yellow paper into "the cream colored container." In that way, I will not become a felon. As a parenthetical aside, I must note that this eminently reasonable law was promulgated by the very city government that cannot keep track of foster children and which boasts, among other things, an infant-mortality rate approaching that of Haiti. At the moment, it takes from four hours to an entire day to get license plates from the Motor Vehicle Bureau, which is short some 60 staffers. Nevertheless, there is not the slightest doubt that the city government's recycling police will enforce the new law—as, you and I agree, it should. I might also point out that, in driving to work, I passed over entire streets that were paved with steel plates (temporarily and, it seems, for all time) and breezed through traffic signals that do not work. Near my house is a place where taxicabs are abandoned. SoOn, I'm sure, there will be a receptacle for them. As for the homeless, we all know the city^as a plan^ In that regard, the unfortunate could not be more forfunateT Some people will no doubt greet the city's new Recycling law with cynicism and yearn for Ronald Reagan and the heady days when excessive regulation was condemned. I remind them, in the words of my recycling-instructions sheet, that "We throw away enough office paper and writing pap)er annually to build a wall 12 feet high stretching from Los Angeles to New York City." That will not change. -II 'The wall will now be built of trash cans. Capitol Commentary By Guy Shipier Attorney General Brian McKay, who has not yet announced whether or not he intends to run for governor next year, last week made what sounded like a campaign speech. "In his first, and hopefully last, state of the state address," McKay told the Reno Rotary Club, "the acting governor declared war on the mining industry, and like his predecessors, chose to take tax revenues from the hide of a single industry". Most observers generally agree that the only person on the horizon so far who has any real chance of preventing Bob Miller from making a second state of the state address is Brian McKay. So do the top leaders in the Republican Party. They have put increasing pressure on him to agree to make the run. Other things he said in the speech indicate he might well take them up on it. For instance: "While targeting Nevada's mining industry, the governor said he didn't want to burden homeowners and wage earners with more taxes. "Let's not be fooled. The 1989 Legislature passed, and the governor signed, nearly 50 bills that increased our taxes and the fees we pay to the state by approximately $54 million. That included increased taxes on insiu-ance premiums, cigarettes and personal property... "I say again, let's not be fooled. Who will pay for (these increases]? Nevada homeowners and wage earners. Who will pay the increased property taxes...the higher fees to register their cars, and for hunting and fishing licenses? The answer is the same—you and every other homeowner and wage earner in the state. "The point is, some of our leaders have been playing a game of hide and seek—seeking ways to raise revenues by hiding them from the taxpaying public. The time to put our fiscal house in order has come and gone. We can no longer afford to 'study' the issue. We know what needs to be done and we have known it for some time. It is time for bold, iryiovative action." Those clear and pohshed phrases in themselves don't signify that McKay will run for governor; as one of Nevada's most articulate and outspoken pohtical leaders, he usually says what he thinks whether he's running for office or not. So it may be of more important political significance that he chose to McKay seems like he's running use his speech to tackle the most unpopular and unpleasant issue of all—taxes. If McKay is planning to run for governor, the timing could hardly be better. He knows that, like it or not, taxation will show up in the campaign in some form or another. The problem candidates for most offices will be figuring out how to deal with it and still avoid having it become a trap. Deliberately or not, McKay has dealt with it by taking the initiative and explaining his position not only before a campaign has begun, but before he has even announced his intentions. That doesn't necessarily de-fuse all the land mines surrounding the inherently volatile issue, but it gets rid of .some of them. Based on the old principle of an offense being the best defense, this method of tackling a problem even before it surfaces can be highly effective on the political front, as Paul Laxalt found in his successful run for the U.S. Senate in 1974. The day Laxalt announced he told the press why he had reconsidered the disenchantment for politics that led him not to run for re-election as governor in 1970, a decision that had brought down considerable criticism on his head. He then reminded the media of a couple of other potentially harmful facts—although he was a Roman Catholic, he had been divorced, and he had become the owner of a gambling casino. He knew that these were the juicy kinds of details that could be devastating in the campaign. By publicly acknowledging them before it started, he took the wind out of their sails; they simply didn't become issues. Result: Even though this campaign took place in the middle of the Watergate scandal. Republican Paul Laxalt was elected to the Senate. Unhke those politicians who simply scream and yell and stamp their feet in frustration about paying taxes, Brian McKay made clear that the only thing that does any good is to have a plan. "Our growth and prosperity has us poised to roar into the 1990s and beyond," he proclaimed. "But we can only meet the challenges that lie ahead if we have a sensible tax pohcy that does more than penalize a profitable industry here and there and then deceives taxpayers with hidden tax and fee increases. "It is time for our teachers, gaming, mining, businesses large and small and government to sit down and hammer out a tax policy that is fair and equitable. Call it a summit if you will, a tax summit that government should lead in the interest of all Nevadans." McKay ended the speech sounding like a man who expects to stick around: "1 for one am optimistic about the course of events in the coming decade and I look forward to helping mold our future." Your Views Thursday, September 28. 1989 HMdtnon Home Nw. Hcadcnoa. Ntvada Pag 6 ^£iri3V\/ir< By Andrew Barbano Once upon a tune, Nevada's U.S. senators served under an unwritten rule: part of the job was stayipg in office until death. Pat McCarran was the last to live up to it in 1954. McCarran protege Alan Bible chose not to follow in his mentor's footsteps and stepped down in 1975. Howard Cannon tried, going for a fifth term in 1982. Unfortunately for him, Paul Laxalt and Chic Hecht had other ideas. Laxalt himself walked out after two tenns and now clips millionaire coupons at a Washington juice law firm. Which brings me to the curious case of Harry Mason Reid. Both he and Richard Bryan are young enough to live up to the unwritten rule. Will they? Election for life is usually a bad idea. These days, members of the House of RepresenHarry aslced Fallon: 'What water problem?' tatives are undefeatable without pending criminal charges. I have long advocated mandatory retirement after two terms or eight years for any elected official. However, I have a hard time with that idea when it comes to our two senate seats. Small states have little clout back in the foreign country called the District of Columbia. The biggest reason for passage of the "Screw Nevada" bill (shoving the nuke dump site down our throats), was the newness of our two fair-haired young senators. Hoary Sen. Bennett Johnston, could jiot have pulled such a maneuver had two powerful oldtimers still been minding the store. So does Harry Reid plan to be in office for life, or not? Maybe we can pick up a clue from his involvement in trying to settle the controversy older than this century: the rights to the waters of the Truckee, Carson and Walker rivers. The only thing certain in trying to resolve that particular mess is that you will make a lot of people angry. Fallon agricultural interests want no part of the proposed settlement, prefer ring to take their chances in court. Most Sparks-Reno residents are resentful of the Pyramid Lake Paiute demand for imposition of costly water meters which won't save a drop of water. So, what's the trouble with Harry? Where's the benefit for his career? Is there any real pohtical risk for him? As former Chief Justice Al Gunderson said many years ago, 'The first rule of chess and politics is to defend your king." Reid and Bryan are both Las Vegas Democrats. A Northern Nevada water issue means nothing to populous Clark County. Trying to resolve that Northern hassle presents no risk to Reid's Southern Nevada "king." (Remember, he carried only Clark and Mineral Counties in winning the election three years ago.) Still, he now represents the entire state. If he wants to continue to do so, there's no reason for him to stick his neck out if he doesn't have to. Reid could easily play his cards close to his vest, come home to wave in parades a la Barbara Vucanovich and be guaranteed an overwhehning re-election in '92. So why isn't he doing that? I have a theory about his true motivations. It has to do with when Harry met Fallon. In 1974, then-Lt. Gov. Reid was a heavy favorite over former Gov. Laxalt to replace the retiring Sen. Bible. Had Reid gone to Hawaii in early October, he could have come home tanned and elected in November. Instead, he provided a textbook example of the Vince Lombardi school of politics. The late Green Bay Packer head coach always said that the team making the least mistakes wins. Reid made lots of mistakes. One of the minor ones came one day at Fallon Kiwanis. Both Reid and Laxalt were present. As I heard the story, Harry got the first ques' tion after lunch. "What do you think of our water problem?" "What water problem?" replied Reid. After some embarrassment all around, Laxalt dehvered an inspiring response. He told how he and Ronald Reagan, as governors, had gotten the California-Nevada Water Compact through their respective legislatures in 1969. "The problem is that Congress has not ratified it," said the prettiest, if not the sharpest, of the Basque brothers. Those attending heartily approved. I started hearing stories like that from increasingly demoralized Reid volunteers. That one really hurt, because Reid's campaign manager had been given full background information on the issue months before. Mr. Laxalt won by about 600 votes after a recount. For all his supposed clout during the Reagan years, he failed to get the compact ratified. Reid is now within shouting distance; He has many flaws, to be sure. But political risk or not, if" he gets the long-neglected bis'tate compact ratified as a r2sult of the ongoing and largely unpopular negotiations he started, he will go down in history as the most effective senator since McCarran. In that case, I will wish him a long and productive hfe tenure. Andrew Barbano is a Renobased syndicated columnist. Letters Of ravens and tortoises Editor: The federal government's current approach to protecting the desert tortoise may, in fact, be a greater threat to the tortoise than not proecting it at all. Currently the greatest killer fo baby tortiose are ravens. The raven population continues to increase becaue of unwise government protection and easy food sources provided by urban populations. Dear Editor: Recently a divided Nevada supreme Court declared it cruel and unusual punishment to sentence a 13-year-old to life without the possibility of parole for the murder of a double amputee. Khamsone Kham Naovaralh's sentence was reduced to life with the possibility of parole. On Jan. 1, 1987, Naovarath broke into the home of his neighbor David Footc, threw Foote out of his wheelchair, tied him to a bench and slowly and brutally murdered the helpless paraplegic during the next hour, alternately using glass bottles, carpet shampoo, a knife and an extension cord as weapons. He then escaped with some valuables in the victim's van. At his arrest he confessed to Preservationist gi'oups, such^ as the Sierra Club, are trying to blame livestock grazing as the reason for the tortoise decline so they can eliminate family ranchers and put the land into wilderness. However, the evidence indicates that during the late 1930's, when the tortoises were the most abundant, hvestock grazing decreases, the accumulation of dry grasses will increase dramatically which also increases the danger of range fires. Tortoise not destroyed by the wild fires face a bleak future due to destroyed habitat; that leads to further death from exposure and starvation. Research has shown weeds will propagate replacing the natural forage thereby creating' further tortoise starvation. Livestock grazing is currently the best means available for controlling the accumulation of dry forage andfminimizing the fire hazard. The Best plan for the recovery of the tortoise is to reduce the raven population and increase livestock grazing. The present government policies will manage the desert tortoise into extinction through well-meaning but wrong management practices. What are they teaching nowadays? Revictimization the murder, but could not tell why he did it. Only a year later, at sentencing time, did he claim he was sexually molested by his victim. Although we might not agree that the original sentence was disproportionate to the crime, we can accept the Supreme Court ruling when it is based on the consideration of the offender's young age! What we can not accept, however, are the attacks on the victim's character by statements in Justice Charles Springer's opinion. Justice Springer wrote: "..There is little doubt that if the homosexual child molestcr had not died from his injuries, he would be facing a possible life sentence himself and Naovarath would in all probability be free."!! Justice Springer has nothing to support that and other similar allegations except the presence of some pomographic movies at the crime scene and the accusations by the 13-year-old, of whom Justice Springer wrote in the same opinion that he was considered delusional and unable to "distinguish reality and fantasy."!! David Foote had struggled all his life under, a severe physical handicap which ultimately led to the amputation of both legs. In spite of that, Foote graduated from college and became a productive and independent member of society. He was employed as a telephone retail specialist at a local bank and was an inspiration to other handicapped people in this community. CALVIN L. NAY, Director Desert Tortoise Recovery Institute Foote had never been charged with any wrongdoing, much less convicted. The offensive statements in question are all the more appalling coming from a member of the Supreme Court, an instiftition which is to distinguish right from wrong for the people of Nevada. David Foote was neither able to defend his life against the vicious attacks of a child, nor is he now able to defend himself against this posthumous attack on his character. We, as survivors of homicide victims in Claric County, object to this revictimization of a murder victim. EVA IVI. COLLENBERGER Executive Director Families of Murder Victims To the Editor: School has started again and so have the small salespersons knocking on my door. Is this what education is, teaching them to sell unneedcd and often unwanted things lo neighbors? If we teach eariy enough that selling (and buying) are the primary skills to be learned wc can ensure that the emphasis in the American way will always be wanting more and more things, rather than other values. All the media have been placing great emphasis on dangers to children from neighbors and friends. My bell-ringer was about 6 to 8 years old. He was going around the neighborhood alone, ringing doorbells. Does his order blank pad protect him? Whetherthe selling campaigns are sponsored buy the schools or by the PTA or by other organizations, I think they are giving the wrong message and are dangerous for the children. Of course classrooms want a few extras. Let them have the children write letters to neighbors asking for help. Have the PTA members ring the doorbells. Maybe I'm the neighborhood grouch.lhavcnoitcnccdmy from yard because 1 remember all the possibilities several yards together had for my kids to play. I don't mind new generations using my yard (although I do wish they wouldn't leave their cups and bottles) or my driveway or marking hopscotch squares on my sidewalk. But I will not order anything from these little salespersons. My objections go back to the days when my children were in Cub Scouts and Brownies and I still think pressure-selling gives the wrong training. Many think the emphasis on sports in schools is bad. How about the emphxsis on who can sell the most candy? ALICE BROWN Send us 'Your View' Candidly Candid Are there any entertainment or fun places for teens in Henderson? By Georgina Corbalan "N Tina Dion, 16 "No. There has to be more places like Pistol Pete's. [When there is nothing fun to do,J some kids drink." Jeff Thunstron, 16 "Not really. 1 would like to see an amusement park where teens could go. I now go to Las Vegas with my friends. Henderson could use a bigger miniature golf course." Burtonya Smit, 17 "No. We should be able to go to an arcade, besides Circus Circus. We should have roller skating centers or a bowhng alley. Now teens go down to the Strip and drive arovmd for fun." John Bashaw, 17 "No, not really. Henderson needs a place for teens to dance; all we have now are adult places." Vikki Fairbairn, 17 "They need more dance clubs for teenagers. Vegas is not much different [in terms of teen places)." ^ j; ORIGINAL DEFECTIVE Bfi • aft

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7 Page 6 Hendenov Home Newi, Henderaon, Nevada Thursda:^, September 28. 1989 Thuraday, September 28, 1989 Hendarton Home Nawa, Henderaon, Nevada Page 7GREEN VALLEY NEWS Brain tumor fails to halt local sandwich shop owner Council demonstrates spirit of cooperation By Hugh J. Andcraon m Prciident, Green Valley Commimity AiwciaUon Recentiy the Henderson City accomidate a Mmdard houae m Council approved a zone change the first at Sunrise Hospital to remove the tumor and the others at Balboa (Calif.) military hospital for ensuing complications. He remained at Balboa for Hve months to receive cobalt treatment. One of the side effects was memory loss. "I've really improved in that area," Reagan said. "I used to See Reagan, Page 8 fnrni ratal residential to R-1 (single-famUy. detached) for a proposed development along Valle Veide, south of the railroad tracks. The significance of that ^si(xi is that the request from the developer was originally for compact lot zoning. Additionally, the council questioned the bowfit to UK community of the RS8 zoning (single-family, compact lot). It appears that when that type of zoning is granted, numerous variances must be approved to such a smaU loL The OVCA applauds the Gty Council for la recent decisioa The council heard several residents comment on various issues including crowded schools and heavy traffic. They also heard the developer outUne his past contributions to the community and describe his proposed project The council then considered and approved a compromise. Special thanks go to Councilmen Andy Hafen and. Lorin Williams, who requested See QVCA. Page 8 OVERCOMES BRAIN TUMOR-Port of Subs owner Dave Reagan, right, overcame a brain tumor and five successive surgeries left (Some 0e/e6,Hite4m^% FRIDAYSEPTEMBERM • By Peggy Romanoski "Chuck is the brains and I'm the brawn in this business," jokes 28-year-old Dave Reagan, owner of Port of Subs at 3720 E. Sunset Road. "Without Chuck's knowledge I wouldn't have this business." Reagan is speaking of his long-time neighbor, Chuck Nelson, 47, who serves as the business' general manager. Reagan and Nelson have formed a noteworthy partnership. Nine years ago Reagan, a jet engine mechanic in the Marine Corps., incurred a head injury and suffered from numerous annoying and disabling symptoms. After consulting Navy doctors for several months with no diagnostic results, he was pegged a malingerer. to start the Sunset Road shop. He was helped by general manager Chuck Nelson, Photo by Peggy Romanoski she tried an eye doctor, who referred Reagan to a specialist who after examining him, quickly checked him into Sunrise Hospital's Intensive Care Unit. Doctors found a swelling of the optic nerve and "Eight months later [after cranial pressure, which further the injury], while I was home investigation revealed on recruiting duty, I got out of bed one morning and passed out. When I came to, I passed out again," Reagan said. His mother took him to the military hospital. When they could not make a diagnosis, she tried a culinary union doctor with similar results. Finally, was caused by a brain tmnor. Reagan explained that the tumor was possibly present since he was a youngster and it grew as he matured, gradually increasing the pressure on his brain. Reagan had five brain surgeries in rapid succession. Why Do My Feet Hurt? Is Laser Surgery For Me? How Do I Begin A Walking Or Running Program? Dr. Loren Hansen, an Ankle and Foot Specialist, will have answers for your concerns at a FREE Seminar at his Green Valley Office. Please call us today and resen/e your seat! THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th 7:00 P.M., OREEN VALLEY OFFICE 2801 Athenian Dr., Ste. 201 Family Haalth Center (In front of Qratn Vallay AtMatle Club) 451-8887 LAS VEQAS 3885 S. Decatur, Ste. 1080 Flamingo Fountains 873-8955 MEDI^LCINTIIt STAKriNG^l ffl • Opening of "Cactus Joe's" 24 Hour Cafe • free Cafce and Champagne Earn Keno Dollars When You Play 20 Game Multi-Keno. • free Dinner if it's Your Birthday Too! • free Progressive Cash Drawings $5,000 Guaranteed Giveaway • Chance to VWn a 1951 Classic Chevy Truck • Special 11 AM Birthday Bingo Games Daily A Birthday Present Given Away Everyday Day • Monday Night 1/2 Time Football Cash Drawings ^ w A • S • I • N • 0 mmmm DOWNTOWN • HENDERSON ALL RULES POSTED. GOOD THRU TUESDAY OCTOBER 31.1989 PERSONAL INJURY FREE CONSULTATION NO RECOVERY NO FEE 565-0473 223 Water Street, Suite A Next to Henderson Justice Court & Municipal Court LAW OFFICE OF JOHN F. MARCHIANO & EDWARD B. HUGHES Criminal Law — DUI Former City Attorney ^.'ORIGINAL DEFECTIVE ^

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7 Page 6 Hendenov Home Newi, Henderaon, Nevada Thursda:^, September 28. 1989 Thuraday, September 28, 1989 Hendarton Home Nawa, Henderaon, Nevada Page 7GREEN VALLEY NEWS Brain tumor fails to halt local sandwich shop owner Council demonstrates spirit of cooperation By Hugh J. Andcraon m Prciident, Green Valley Commimity AiwciaUon Recentiy the Henderson City accomidate a Mmdard houae m Council approved a zone change the first at Sunrise Hospital to remove the tumor and the others at Balboa (Calif.) military hospital for ensuing complications. He remained at Balboa for Hve months to receive cobalt treatment. One of the side effects was memory loss. "I've really improved in that area," Reagan said. "I used to See Reagan, Page 8 fnrni ratal residential to R-1 (single-famUy. detached) for a proposed development along Valle Veide, south of the railroad tracks. The significance of that ^si(xi is that the request from the developer was originally for compact lot zoning. Additionally, the council questioned the bowfit to UK community of the RS8 zoning (single-family, compact lot). It appears that when that type of zoning is granted, numerous variances must be approved to such a smaU loL The OVCA applauds the Gty Council for la recent decisioa The council heard several residents comment on various issues including crowded schools and heavy traffic. They also heard the developer outUne his past contributions to the community and describe his proposed project The council then considered and approved a compromise. Special thanks go to Councilmen Andy Hafen and. Lorin Williams, who requested See QVCA. Page 8 OVERCOMES BRAIN TUMOR-Port of Subs owner Dave Reagan, right, overcame a brain tumor and five successive surgeries left (Some 0e/e6,Hite4m^% FRIDAYSEPTEMBERM • By Peggy Romanoski "Chuck is the brains and I'm the brawn in this business," jokes 28-year-old Dave Reagan, owner of Port of Subs at 3720 E. Sunset Road. "Without Chuck's knowledge I wouldn't have this business." Reagan is speaking of his long-time neighbor, Chuck Nelson, 47, who serves as the business' general manager. Reagan and Nelson have formed a noteworthy partnership. Nine years ago Reagan, a jet engine mechanic in the Marine Corps., incurred a head injury and suffered from numerous annoying and disabling symptoms. After consulting Navy doctors for several months with no diagnostic results, he was pegged a malingerer. to start the Sunset Road shop. He was helped by general manager Chuck Nelson, Photo by Peggy Romanoski she tried an eye doctor, who referred Reagan to a specialist who after examining him, quickly checked him into Sunrise Hospital's Intensive Care Unit. Doctors found a swelling of the optic nerve and "Eight months later [after cranial pressure, which further the injury], while I was home investigation revealed on recruiting duty, I got out of bed one morning and passed out. When I came to, I passed out again," Reagan said. His mother took him to the military hospital. When they could not make a diagnosis, she tried a culinary union doctor with similar results. Finally, was caused by a brain tmnor. Reagan explained that the tumor was possibly present since he was a youngster and it grew as he matured, gradually increasing the pressure on his brain. Reagan had five brain surgeries in rapid succession. Why Do My Feet Hurt? Is Laser Surgery For Me? How Do I Begin A Walking Or Running Program? Dr. Loren Hansen, an Ankle and Foot Specialist, will have answers for your concerns at a FREE Seminar at his Green Valley Office. Please call us today and resen/e your seat! THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th 7:00 P.M., OREEN VALLEY OFFICE 2801 Athenian Dr., Ste. 201 Family Haalth Center (In front of Qratn Vallay AtMatle Club) 451-8887 LAS VEQAS 3885 S. Decatur, Ste. 1080 Flamingo Fountains 873-8955 MEDI^LCINTIIt STAKriNG^l ffl • Opening of "Cactus Joe's" 24 Hour Cafe • free Cafce and Champagne Earn Keno Dollars When You Play 20 Game Multi-Keno. • free Dinner if it's Your Birthday Too! • free Progressive Cash Drawings $5,000 Guaranteed Giveaway • Chance to VWn a 1951 Classic Chevy Truck • Special 11 AM Birthday Bingo Games Daily A Birthday Present Given Away Everyday Day • Monday Night 1/2 Time Football Cash Drawings ^ w A • S • I • N • 0 mmmm DOWNTOWN • HENDERSON ALL RULES POSTED. GOOD THRU TUESDAY OCTOBER 31.1989 PERSONAL INJURY FREE CONSULTATION NO RECOVERY NO FEE 565-0473 223 Water Street, Suite A Next to Henderson Justice Court & Municipal Court LAW OFFICE OF JOHN F. MARCHIANO & EDWARD B. HUGHES Criminal Law — DUI Former City Attorney ^.'ORIGINAL DEFECTIVE ^

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\f Pg 8 Hendwon Home New, H>nderw>n. Nevada Jiursday, September 28, 1989 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nsvada Pie ^ Boulder Bridgers tough competitors As our numbers fgnm to seven and one-half tables, our quality of play was also hotly contested. Winners are: north south— first: Alice and Sid Bloom, second Herb Fox and Don Erick, third Larry Kellar and Miriam Giles, fourth—tie Alice Hamilton and Virginia Kitterman with Anita Ldghton and Larry Van Sickle, east west—first: Paul Bania and Jim Grauman, second Phil Nico and Jean Strong, third Gene Balmer and Evelyn Gubler. fourth—tie Kathy Kellar and Lois Rinker with Louise and Bill Heimlich. Play continues Wednesday at the senior center. New players are welcome. Call President Don Erick to arrange to play. His telephone number is 294-0599. Sea Shells, Etc. COLLECTORS. FANCIERS -GIFTS. SOUVENIRS l.^2l|{Ni\;i(l;i llwv. |{()iil(kTCil\ Tucs.-S.il. 10-3 (Loculed in E J Bjrbcr Shop Complex by Union 76) Reagan from Page 7 have a conversation and right afterward I couldn't remember it..,"I worked in a service station when gas prices "nearly doubled, and I'd forget to charge the new price. Cost me a lot of money," he said, smiling ruefully. Now Reagan Uves alone, drives everywhere and gives no clue in his conversation of the brain damage he has suffered. In fact, he can easily rattle off the multisyllabic terms that describe his rare condition. Only one in 900 brain tumors are of this kind. Although Reagan worked as a repairman for video poker machines both before and after his surgeries, he wanted to start his own business. He approached his neighbor for help. Nelson, who served as Boulder City's engineer and later public works director, also worked for Hohnes and Narver at the Nevada Test Site. For the past 12 years, he has owned Pacific Gateway, an international engineering firm. Reagan came up with the idea of owning a sandwich shop. "I love to eat," he said. "As a teenage 1 used to ride my bike to the buffets at the Aladdin, Showboat, Sahara and the Holiday Inn. And 1 used tojvork at the Sub Station which had great submarine sandwiches." "We traveled' thF entire valley eating out, dreaming up what he wanted to do," Nelson continues the story. "We ate at all the delis in town. Port of Subs has the best and most unique method of making sandwiches. We cut the meat fresh in front of you and make it to your wishes. Everything is fresh. Port of Subs' slogan is'Unique Sandwich Eatery.' With Nelson's help, Reagan applied for and received a Disabled Veterans' loan from the Small Business Administration. "If it hadn't been for Chuck, I'd have told the government to forget it," Reagan said. "They lost papers, and called every Friday afternoon at 2, saying Tou need this, this, this. •" Together, however, with Reagan as owner and Nelson as general manager, they have been making a go of the business. Port of Subs is open daily from 10 a.m! to 9 p.m., and Sundays 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Reagan works a few hours several days a week. Both Nelson and Reagan have lived in the Las Vegas valley most of their lives: Reagan since kindergarten age, while Nelson is a native. Reagan's family was a neighbor of Nelson's wife before she and Nelson married. They now have eight children, ages 18 to 26, some of whom help at Port of Subs. Despite a sometimes uphill battle—permanent baldness from cobalt treatments, a couple of strokes and some seizures, Reagan maintains a philosophical attitude, a good sense of humor and an active l^^. "My situation's not so bad," he said. "You got to be in a military hospital with 80 people. Everybody else is worse. When you see a bunch of guys 21 years old who will never walk again or hug their wives, you feel great about your problems." • r Ramakant Raut, M.D. la pleased to announce the relocation of his new office. Located at 6301 Mountian Vista, Suite 104 (Creen Valley Medical Services) Spedallxlng In Internal Medicine, CardMogy and Arthritis related diseases. 4S8-1515 ^USa^S^HmileTi^S 2 LITTLE SWEET KITTENS GVCA from Page 7 that the higher density zoning classifications be reconsidered for possible elimination. The GVCA had its montly member meeting at Nate Macic School on Sept. 20. The topic was school overcrowding. A panel of experts was assembled to answer citizen concerns on the issue. Panicipants mcluded City Manager Phil Speight, Mayor Loma Kestcrson, American Nevada President Mark Fine, councilman Andy Hafcn, Clark Schools Building Director Kathy Hamcy and School Board Members Marty KravitzandMark Schofield. A panel discussion, moderated by GVCA Vice President Dave Sanchez, attempted to answer questions submitted from the audience. Essentially the Green Valley neighborhood is scheduled for four schools by 1990. It is imperative that objective be achieved. It was noted that an oversight committee now exists which will monitor the progress of the school district to its commitment. Plans are expected to go out to bid witin 90-120 days, officials' indicated. In response to questions about leasing schools from developers, Kathy Hamcy said that it was against Nevada stau; law for that kind of arrangement. A significant development occurred during the^£clc4)f the two events described above. iGVCA membership applications became a scarce commodity. It is becoming clear that, as the community develops at an ever increasing rate, the need for information grows. The association will continue to bring together those organizations and individuals who affect our daily lives. That mission is working, because of the residents of this community not only care, but care enough to work at it. Editor's NoteJhe opinions expressed above are those of the author. Although the Green Valley Community Association may be in agreement with said opinions, the association's support shall not be construed as adoption of said opinions. Any liability arising from statements or opinions expressed in this column, shall be limited to the author of this column. 1 • I I • I I • I I • • I • • • • I • I • • • • • I • • • • I I I • • • • • • • X VicleoTyme J-JL I I -L I • • • ^ • _I Jilt • .L-U B il l l-l-IZ JZi: (SM(^Sf^Sff's CLASSIC WE RENT NINTENDO GAMES I • • • I • I I I I is n: XI BOULDER CITY'S VIDEO TYME 1404 Nevada Hwy. 294-1007 MON..THURS. 10-9 Near AAW FRI. ft SAT. 10-10 ^^^^ '**'"' SUN. 11-9 E LLLJLI_IJLLLJLL IZI • I I I 1 I HENDERSON'S VIDEO TYME 536 S. Boulder Hwy. 565-5854 "Vons Center" MON-THURS 10-10 FRI SAT 10-11 SUN. 11-9 T iPatlMl ChMkeui SMVIcaIn Ncndwaon 11 ri I I I I I I I j_i_j_i • • • • • • • • • • • • • • I Rent 2 Movies Get 1 Free* BOULDER aTY HENDERSON STORES ONLY Nol good with any oihtr ofter EXPIRES 10/31/89 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • iCOUPONa -I I I I 'MiMl b* equal or laaaar vakia ~~if^mw!^ PLEASE GIVE US A CHANCE TO LIVE. WE ARE ONLY 8 WEEKS OLD AND WE HAVE NO MOMMA.AND WE HAVE NOWHERE TO LIVE. WE SURE COULD USE SOME TENDER LOVE AND GOOD CARE. OUR BIG FRIEND WHOSE PICTURE RAN LAST WEEK DIED BECAUSE NOONE TOOK HIM HOME. PLEASE DON'T LET US DIE TOO! WE ARE EACH $5 HENDERSON ANIMAL SHELTER MOSER DRIVE 565-2033 SATURDAY 1 P.M. POKER TOURNAMENT •15.00 Buy-ln MO.OO Re-Buy SATURDAY POKER WINNERS 1. Jesse 2. J.R. ALL NEW IGT VIDEO POKER MACHINES 50 & 25$ DEUCES WJLD MACHINES 1133 BId r. Hwy., Hen. LADIES NITE TUES. i6-oz. 7-9 P.M. T-BONE WELL DRINKS... 50 S5.95 SERVED 4-10 P.M. 10-OZ. NEW YORK 4.95 FREE LIGOURI'S CAP For Every Straight Plush orvii Regular Poker Machine| • CHECK OUT OUR NEW ITALIAN MENU SERVED 7 DAYS A WEEK* CHECK OUR <2.95 DAILY LUNCHEON SP ECIALS MON-FRI FEATURING HOMEMApE_HA M & BEAN SOUP & HOMEMADE CHILI EVERY DAY [iTHURSDAY ^ CORNED BEEF and CABBAGE ^ B-B-QUE SPARE RIBS ^ FRIDAY ^ BATTER DIPPED COD ^ BAKED HALIBUT V ^^..^...$2.95 / .;7....V........$3-75 / ^LONDON BROIL $3.75 ^ '^ SATURDAY ''/ > PRIME RIB S4.95 ^ ^ STUFFED PORK CHOPS $3.95 ^ / SUNDAY fy I BAKED CHICKEN w/DRESSING $4.25 ^SIRLOIN TIPS and NOODLES $3.75 MONDAY BEEF STEW ,,,,,, $2.95 M SALISBURY STEAK .$3.75 / TUESDAY A LIVER and ONIONS $2.95 ^ STUFFED CABBAGE ROLLS $3.75 ^ WEDNESDAY V BAKED LASAGNA ^3.75!; STUFFED SHELLS $3.75^ ITALIAN SAUSAGE and PEPPERS $3.75 Evwyday wt Mrvt FrMh Baked Braad with avcry maal, Soup or SMad wtth ail cjlnnars NOW AT BAR BMA Soup (bowl) M.OO Shrimp Cocktail M.OO ChlH (bowl) M.OS Original Ham Sandwich •2.50 "> W'ofl" '^'^S HMf •2.75 Chlcktn FIngart '2.95 Miscellaneous News Missiles By L. Jessie Bennett Today This is Sept. 28, the 27 Ist day of the year. There are just 94 days left in this year. / It was in 1687, 302 years ago, that the Venetians of Italy bombarded Athens, ruining the Parthenon, which had been standing intact for 2,000 years. A stray shell hit the edifice, which the Turks had been using to store ammunition. It was one of the first of many great buildings to be destroyed by gunpowder The sun rose at 5:53 a.m. and will set at 5:47 p.m. Thought for today "The highest function of a teacher consists not so much in imparting knowledge as in stimulatmg the pupil in its love and pursuit." Henri Fredrick Amiel Of this and that The sounds of a racing fire engine and ambulance makes the blood also race and run cold. The other day, both visited the end of our street for a few minutes. The excitement brought many folks on the street to life as well as quite a few other curious people. We watched but stayed in our yard so that we wouldn't get in the way. It brought to mind the new TV show "9-1-1" and the importance of the men and women who work on the emergency vehicles of our town. We should not only give them all the credit they deserve but all the support that we can. That support could mean quickly moving off the highway and out of the way when sirens are heard, or staying out of the way when emergency is nearby. Ambulance chasers are not appreciated and often hinder those giving aid. Our being "out of the way" will help the rescuers, the'victims and also safeguard our own safety. Flashbacks in history Sept. 28 •1066 William the Conqueror invaded England to claim the throne. •1542 Portuguese navigator Juan Rodiguez Cabrillo discovered what is now San Diego, Calif. •1924 First complete around-the-world flight was made by —^— two U.S. Army planes in 175 days. Sept. 29 • 1789 The U.S. Army was established by the War Department. •1829 Scotland Yard organized in London, England. •1988 Florence Griffith Joyner broke world speed record for women in the 200-meter preliminary race (00:21:56), then in an hour bested her own record with a 00:21:34 to win Gold Medal at Olympics in Korea. • 1988 Space ship "Discovery" made successful launch at Cape Canaveral, Fla. It was the first flight in 32 months. Sept, 30 •1846 The first use of ether as an anesthetic by Dr. William Morton. • 1955 Popular actor James Dean lost his life in an auto accident. Octj. X ,.. „, ^ • 1885 Special delivery mail service began in the United States. •1962 Johnny Carson replaced Jack Parr on NBC "Tonight Show." •1971 Walt Disney World opened in Orlando, Fla. Oct. 2 • 1835 The battle of Guadalupe River between Texans and the Mexican army (who were defeated) started Texas'War for Independence. • 1940 Germans sunk the ship HMS Empress, which was carrying child war refugees. •1975 Japan's emperor, Hirohito, visited the United States. Oct. 3 •1811 First newspaper in Buffalo, N.Y., was issued. •1863 President Lincoln declared the last Thursday in November would be 'Thanksgiving Day." • 1988 The five astronauts aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery landed safely at Edwards Air Force Base in California after a flight that lasted four days, one hour and 57 seconds. Oct. 4 •1824 Mexico became a Federal Republic. •1931 Dick Tracy comic strip first appeared in print. •1957 Space age was born. The Soviet Union launched Sputnik into orbit around the earth. POOR UHLE SAD TERRIER/POODLE THIS LONELY SWEETHEART IS QUIET AND WELL MANNERED. SHE ALSO WILL DIE SOON IF NO HOME IS FOUND $21 INCLRANESSHOTftlAG HENDERSON ANIMAL SHELTER MOSER DRIVE 565-2033 •Oct. •Oct. •Oct. •Oct. •Oct. •Oct. •Oct. •Oct. American War Mothers Meeting The Henderson Chapter of the American War Mothers will hold its meeting on Monday, at the Denny's Cafe on Boulder Highway. Luncheon will be served at noon; the regular meeting will begin at 1 p.m. Lillian Slocum, president, will conduct the meeting. Hispanic Choir The Hispanic Choir has returned to its regular place at St. Peter's CathoUc Church on Boulder Highway afterd" summer of vacations. Their beautiful music can be heard at the 11:30 a.m. mass every Sunday. Their choir leader, Koy Herrera, and -tli^hoir members have been worshipping with special spuritual musi6 for several years now. Attend mass and also enjoy the music of the Hispanic Choir. Special October days 1 World Vegetarian Day. 2 Universal Children's Day. 8 Alvin York Day (Hero of World War I). 9 Columbus Day (observed). Yom Kippur 10 Beginning Fire Prevention Week. 12 Columbus Day (traditional). 16 World Food Day. 24 United Nations Day. •Oct. 27 Navy Day. •Oct. 31 Nevada Day. Halloween. National UNICEF Day. High school reunion LeGrand and Donna Hall did some extensive traveling late this summer. From about Aug. 15 to 22 they started their traveling adventure by going to Rexberg, Idaho, to attend Donna's 35th high school reunion. Donna graduated from Madison High School in 1954. After the excitement of the reunion with head and heart filled with old memories and the warmth of renewed friendships, they returned south to Salt Lake City and Provo, where they visited with Donna's sister, Linda Short, intltah's capitol. They then went to see Dave and Connie (Hall) Rowley, who live in Provo. Connie's a former longtime resident of Henderson and graduated from Basic High School. She and her family are doing well. The Halls returned home in time for LeGrand to return to school. He has been a teacher in Clark County school system for many years. Antique doll show scheduled The Henderson members of the Las Vegas Doll Club are very busy preparing for a coming Doll Show to be held Oct. 21-22 at the Las Vegas Convention Center. Mrs. J. Marshall, a longtime member of the club, recently retiumed from attending the 40th Annual convention of the Unified Federal Doll Club in St. Louis, Mo. In the five days she was there she gathered many ideas and information that will help in the coming show. The Doll Club is a non-profit organization which uses money earned at the show and other activities for several area charities such as the Candle Lighters, the Blind Center, the Salvation Army Christmas program and the Child Haven Thanksgiving food program. Red circle Oct. 21 and 22 on your calandar and attend the Doll Show to see magnificent dolls and learn bits of history as well. California trip Nelson and Ruth Soehlke have had a busy summer this year. They traveled to Sacramento, CaUf., recently to attend the 50th wedding anniversary of Ruth's sister. They returned home in time to prepare for granddaughter Mame Belger's wedding on Saturday, Oct. 23. Hospitalized Brett and Jodie Baldwin's Uttle son, Silas Reed, recently spent some time in a local hospital. Such visits are necessary, it seems, but it sure is wonderful to have well babies back home. Arizona trip Donna HalltMrs. LeGrand) has become a regular jet set traveler these days. Lately she spent 10 days in Arizona, visiting a daughter and friends. Daughter Kathy, now married to Dr. John Hohnes, is living in Gilbert, Arii. While there she attended the wedding reception of the daughter of a friend, Raymond Arave, from her and LeGrand's college days at Brigham Young University. See Missiles, Page 10 A Complete Travel Service tRAVEL TOUR SERVId •Airline Tickets at Airport Prices •Air-Rali-Sea Paclcages •Amtracic-Eurall Ticlcets •Passport Information •Hotel A Air Reservations Visas Obtained 111 WATER STREET, HDN. Henderson Office Now KAS ttA.'i 4 Open Saturdays 9 a.m.-3 p.m. OQDQ^ • 2700 GREEN VALLEY PKWY. STE. H-3 458-8674 THIS WEEK AT NUTRI/SYSTEM RECEIVE THREE WEEKS FREE FOOD "Now Over 1,250 Canters In U.S. & Canada." ^Since Nutri/System, I don't avoicj, full length mirrors anymore." DdorM Brent lovM the way she looks since the lost 85 lbs. on tlM NUTRI/SYSTEM* Weight LMS Progran Out comprer^ensive pvovam works t)ecauee it tncludM •P*rsfMiteMf IVIM LoM From* to Identity your peisonal weight loss problem. •A variety of delicious Nu Syitem Cusint meals and snacks. •Nutrition and Behavior counseling. •BmhairtorBfrnkOtntiah program to long-term success. weight kw cntf Aak about our SwUor CMZMW t MiaiMy RECEIVE THREE WEEKS [ i FREE FOOD • Special oiler does not include cost oINUTRI SYSTEM foods and start-up, and cannot bo* I combined wilti othor otters. As people vary so does their rato otv.Fr(day Saturday by appolntmant 565-7474 .^MCC0GIZED->' m LAKE MEAD BUSINESS CENTER 129 W. LAKE MEAD DRIVE PMA HENDERSON, NV 89015 CHI ROPRACTIC Your trMtmnt inay be at ttMa or no coal to you In accofdanca wMi tha tann af vttir Inwmim nnllfii va wwa iiavaMHaM^e ipwavivv I i 5 •' ORIGINAL DEFECTIVE -***• •

PAGE 9

\f Pg 8 Hendwon Home New, H>nderw>n. Nevada Jiursday, September 28, 1989 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nsvada Pie ^ Boulder Bridgers tough competitors As our numbers fgnm to seven and one-half tables, our quality of play was also hotly contested. Winners are: north south— first: Alice and Sid Bloom, second Herb Fox and Don Erick, third Larry Kellar and Miriam Giles, fourth—tie Alice Hamilton and Virginia Kitterman with Anita Ldghton and Larry Van Sickle, east west—first: Paul Bania and Jim Grauman, second Phil Nico and Jean Strong, third Gene Balmer and Evelyn Gubler. fourth—tie Kathy Kellar and Lois Rinker with Louise and Bill Heimlich. Play continues Wednesday at the senior center. New players are welcome. Call President Don Erick to arrange to play. His telephone number is 294-0599. Sea Shells, Etc. COLLECTORS. FANCIERS -GIFTS. SOUVENIRS l.^2l|{Ni\;i(l;i llwv. |{()iil(kTCil\ Tucs.-S.il. 10-3 (Loculed in E J Bjrbcr Shop Complex by Union 76) Reagan from Page 7 have a conversation and right afterward I couldn't remember it..,"I worked in a service station when gas prices "nearly doubled, and I'd forget to charge the new price. Cost me a lot of money," he said, smiling ruefully. Now Reagan Uves alone, drives everywhere and gives no clue in his conversation of the brain damage he has suffered. In fact, he can easily rattle off the multisyllabic terms that describe his rare condition. Only one in 900 brain tumors are of this kind. Although Reagan worked as a repairman for video poker machines both before and after his surgeries, he wanted to start his own business. He approached his neighbor for help. Nelson, who served as Boulder City's engineer and later public works director, also worked for Hohnes and Narver at the Nevada Test Site. For the past 12 years, he has owned Pacific Gateway, an international engineering firm. Reagan came up with the idea of owning a sandwich shop. "I love to eat," he said. "As a teenage 1 used to ride my bike to the buffets at the Aladdin, Showboat, Sahara and the Holiday Inn. And 1 used tojvork at the Sub Station which had great submarine sandwiches." "We traveled' thF entire valley eating out, dreaming up what he wanted to do," Nelson continues the story. "We ate at all the delis in town. Port of Subs has the best and most unique method of making sandwiches. We cut the meat fresh in front of you and make it to your wishes. Everything is fresh. Port of Subs' slogan is'Unique Sandwich Eatery.' With Nelson's help, Reagan applied for and received a Disabled Veterans' loan from the Small Business Administration. "If it hadn't been for Chuck, I'd have told the government to forget it," Reagan said. "They lost papers, and called every Friday afternoon at 2, saying Tou need this, this, this. •" Together, however, with Reagan as owner and Nelson as general manager, they have been making a go of the business. Port of Subs is open daily from 10 a.m! to 9 p.m., and Sundays 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Reagan works a few hours several days a week. Both Nelson and Reagan have lived in the Las Vegas valley most of their lives: Reagan since kindergarten age, while Nelson is a native. Reagan's family was a neighbor of Nelson's wife before she and Nelson married. They now have eight children, ages 18 to 26, some of whom help at Port of Subs. Despite a sometimes uphill battle—permanent baldness from cobalt treatments, a couple of strokes and some seizures, Reagan maintains a philosophical attitude, a good sense of humor and an active l^^. "My situation's not so bad," he said. "You got to be in a military hospital with 80 people. Everybody else is worse. When you see a bunch of guys 21 years old who will never walk again or hug their wives, you feel great about your problems." • r Ramakant Raut, M.D. la pleased to announce the relocation of his new office. Located at 6301 Mountian Vista, Suite 104 (Creen Valley Medical Services) Spedallxlng In Internal Medicine, CardMogy and Arthritis related diseases. 4S8-1515 ^USa^S^HmileTi^S 2 LITTLE SWEET KITTENS GVCA from Page 7 that the higher density zoning classifications be reconsidered for possible elimination. The GVCA had its montly member meeting at Nate Macic School on Sept. 20. The topic was school overcrowding. A panel of experts was assembled to answer citizen concerns on the issue. Panicipants mcluded City Manager Phil Speight, Mayor Loma Kestcrson, American Nevada President Mark Fine, councilman Andy Hafcn, Clark Schools Building Director Kathy Hamcy and School Board Members Marty KravitzandMark Schofield. A panel discussion, moderated by GVCA Vice President Dave Sanchez, attempted to answer questions submitted from the audience. Essentially the Green Valley neighborhood is scheduled for four schools by 1990. It is imperative that objective be achieved. It was noted that an oversight committee now exists which will monitor the progress of the school district to its commitment. Plans are expected to go out to bid witin 90-120 days, officials' indicated. In response to questions about leasing schools from developers, Kathy Hamcy said that it was against Nevada stau; law for that kind of arrangement. A significant development occurred during the^£clc4)f the two events described above. iGVCA membership applications became a scarce commodity. It is becoming clear that, as the community develops at an ever increasing rate, the need for information grows. The association will continue to bring together those organizations and individuals who affect our daily lives. That mission is working, because of the residents of this community not only care, but care enough to work at it. Editor's NoteJhe opinions expressed above are those of the author. Although the Green Valley Community Association may be in agreement with said opinions, the association's support shall not be construed as adoption of said opinions. Any liability arising from statements or opinions expressed in this column, shall be limited to the author of this column. 1 • I I • I I • I I • • I • • • • I • I • • • • • I • • • • I I I • • • • • • • X VicleoTyme J-JL I I -L I • • • ^ • _I Jilt • .L-U B il l l-l-IZ JZi: (SM(^Sf^Sff's CLASSIC WE RENT NINTENDO GAMES I • • • I • I I I I is n: XI BOULDER CITY'S VIDEO TYME 1404 Nevada Hwy. 294-1007 MON..THURS. 10-9 Near AAW FRI. ft SAT. 10-10 ^^^^ '**'"' SUN. 11-9 E LLLJLI_IJLLLJLL IZI • I I I 1 I HENDERSON'S VIDEO TYME 536 S. Boulder Hwy. 565-5854 "Vons Center" MON-THURS 10-10 FRI SAT 10-11 SUN. 11-9 T iPatlMl ChMkeui SMVIcaIn Ncndwaon 11 ri I I I I I I I j_i_j_i • • • • • • • • • • • • • • I Rent 2 Movies Get 1 Free* BOULDER aTY HENDERSON STORES ONLY Nol good with any oihtr ofter EXPIRES 10/31/89 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • iCOUPONa -I I I I 'MiMl b* equal or laaaar vakia ~~if^mw!^ PLEASE GIVE US A CHANCE TO LIVE. WE ARE ONLY 8 WEEKS OLD AND WE HAVE NO MOMMA.AND WE HAVE NOWHERE TO LIVE. WE SURE COULD USE SOME TENDER LOVE AND GOOD CARE. OUR BIG FRIEND WHOSE PICTURE RAN LAST WEEK DIED BECAUSE NOONE TOOK HIM HOME. PLEASE DON'T LET US DIE TOO! WE ARE EACH $5 HENDERSON ANIMAL SHELTER MOSER DRIVE 565-2033 SATURDAY 1 P.M. POKER TOURNAMENT •15.00 Buy-ln MO.OO Re-Buy SATURDAY POKER WINNERS 1. Jesse 2. J.R. ALL NEW IGT VIDEO POKER MACHINES 50 & 25$ DEUCES WJLD MACHINES 1133 BId r. Hwy., Hen. LADIES NITE TUES. i6-oz. 7-9 P.M. T-BONE WELL DRINKS... 50 S5.95 SERVED 4-10 P.M. 10-OZ. NEW YORK 4.95 FREE LIGOURI'S CAP For Every Straight Plush orvii Regular Poker Machine| • CHECK OUT OUR NEW ITALIAN MENU SERVED 7 DAYS A WEEK* CHECK OUR <2.95 DAILY LUNCHEON SP ECIALS MON-FRI FEATURING HOMEMApE_HA M & BEAN SOUP & HOMEMADE CHILI EVERY DAY [iTHURSDAY ^ CORNED BEEF and CABBAGE ^ B-B-QUE SPARE RIBS ^ FRIDAY ^ BATTER DIPPED COD ^ BAKED HALIBUT V ^^..^...$2.95 / .;7....V........$3-75 / ^LONDON BROIL $3.75 ^ '^ SATURDAY ''/ > PRIME RIB S4.95 ^ ^ STUFFED PORK CHOPS $3.95 ^ / SUNDAY fy I BAKED CHICKEN w/DRESSING $4.25 ^SIRLOIN TIPS and NOODLES $3.75 MONDAY BEEF STEW ,,,,,, $2.95 M SALISBURY STEAK .$3.75 / TUESDAY A LIVER and ONIONS $2.95 ^ STUFFED CABBAGE ROLLS $3.75 ^ WEDNESDAY V BAKED LASAGNA ^3.75!; STUFFED SHELLS $3.75^ ITALIAN SAUSAGE and PEPPERS $3.75 Evwyday wt Mrvt FrMh Baked Braad with avcry maal, Soup or SMad wtth ail cjlnnars NOW AT BAR BMA Soup (bowl) M.OO Shrimp Cocktail M.OO ChlH (bowl) M.OS Original Ham Sandwich •2.50 "> W'ofl" '^'^S HMf •2.75 Chlcktn FIngart '2.95 Miscellaneous News Missiles By L. Jessie Bennett Today This is Sept. 28, the 27 Ist day of the year. There are just 94 days left in this year. / It was in 1687, 302 years ago, that the Venetians of Italy bombarded Athens, ruining the Parthenon, which had been standing intact for 2,000 years. A stray shell hit the edifice, which the Turks had been using to store ammunition. It was one of the first of many great buildings to be destroyed by gunpowder The sun rose at 5:53 a.m. and will set at 5:47 p.m. Thought for today "The highest function of a teacher consists not so much in imparting knowledge as in stimulatmg the pupil in its love and pursuit." Henri Fredrick Amiel Of this and that The sounds of a racing fire engine and ambulance makes the blood also race and run cold. The other day, both visited the end of our street for a few minutes. The excitement brought many folks on the street to life as well as quite a few other curious people. We watched but stayed in our yard so that we wouldn't get in the way. It brought to mind the new TV show "9-1-1" and the importance of the men and women who work on the emergency vehicles of our town. We should not only give them all the credit they deserve but all the support that we can. That support could mean quickly moving off the highway and out of the way when sirens are heard, or staying out of the way when emergency is nearby. Ambulance chasers are not appreciated and often hinder those giving aid. Our being "out of the way" will help the rescuers, the'victims and also safeguard our own safety. Flashbacks in history Sept. 28 •1066 William the Conqueror invaded England to claim the throne. •1542 Portuguese navigator Juan Rodiguez Cabrillo discovered what is now San Diego, Calif. •1924 First complete around-the-world flight was made by —^— two U.S. Army planes in 175 days. Sept. 29 • 1789 The U.S. Army was established by the War Department. •1829 Scotland Yard organized in London, England. •1988 Florence Griffith Joyner broke world speed record for women in the 200-meter preliminary race (00:21:56), then in an hour bested her own record with a 00:21:34 to win Gold Medal at Olympics in Korea. • 1988 Space ship "Discovery" made successful launch at Cape Canaveral, Fla. It was the first flight in 32 months. Sept, 30 •1846 The first use of ether as an anesthetic by Dr. William Morton. • 1955 Popular actor James Dean lost his life in an auto accident. Octj. X ,.. „, ^ • 1885 Special delivery mail service began in the United States. •1962 Johnny Carson replaced Jack Parr on NBC "Tonight Show." •1971 Walt Disney World opened in Orlando, Fla. Oct. 2 • 1835 The battle of Guadalupe River between Texans and the Mexican army (who were defeated) started Texas'War for Independence. • 1940 Germans sunk the ship HMS Empress, which was carrying child war refugees. •1975 Japan's emperor, Hirohito, visited the United States. Oct. 3 •1811 First newspaper in Buffalo, N.Y., was issued. •1863 President Lincoln declared the last Thursday in November would be 'Thanksgiving Day." • 1988 The five astronauts aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery landed safely at Edwards Air Force Base in California after a flight that lasted four days, one hour and 57 seconds. Oct. 4 •1824 Mexico became a Federal Republic. •1931 Dick Tracy comic strip first appeared in print. •1957 Space age was born. The Soviet Union launched Sputnik into orbit around the earth. POOR UHLE SAD TERRIER/POODLE THIS LONELY SWEETHEART IS QUIET AND WELL MANNERED. SHE ALSO WILL DIE SOON IF NO HOME IS FOUND $21 INCLRANESSHOTftlAG HENDERSON ANIMAL SHELTER MOSER DRIVE 565-2033 •Oct. •Oct. •Oct. •Oct. •Oct. •Oct. •Oct. •Oct. American War Mothers Meeting The Henderson Chapter of the American War Mothers will hold its meeting on Monday, at the Denny's Cafe on Boulder Highway. Luncheon will be served at noon; the regular meeting will begin at 1 p.m. Lillian Slocum, president, will conduct the meeting. Hispanic Choir The Hispanic Choir has returned to its regular place at St. Peter's CathoUc Church on Boulder Highway afterd" summer of vacations. Their beautiful music can be heard at the 11:30 a.m. mass every Sunday. Their choir leader, Koy Herrera, and -tli^hoir members have been worshipping with special spuritual musi6 for several years now. Attend mass and also enjoy the music of the Hispanic Choir. Special October days 1 World Vegetarian Day. 2 Universal Children's Day. 8 Alvin York Day (Hero of World War I). 9 Columbus Day (observed). Yom Kippur 10 Beginning Fire Prevention Week. 12 Columbus Day (traditional). 16 World Food Day. 24 United Nations Day. •Oct. 27 Navy Day. •Oct. 31 Nevada Day. Halloween. National UNICEF Day. High school reunion LeGrand and Donna Hall did some extensive traveling late this summer. From about Aug. 15 to 22 they started their traveling adventure by going to Rexberg, Idaho, to attend Donna's 35th high school reunion. Donna graduated from Madison High School in 1954. After the excitement of the reunion with head and heart filled with old memories and the warmth of renewed friendships, they returned south to Salt Lake City and Provo, where they visited with Donna's sister, Linda Short, intltah's capitol. They then went to see Dave and Connie (Hall) Rowley, who live in Provo. Connie's a former longtime resident of Henderson and graduated from Basic High School. She and her family are doing well. The Halls returned home in time for LeGrand to return to school. He has been a teacher in Clark County school system for many years. Antique doll show scheduled The Henderson members of the Las Vegas Doll Club are very busy preparing for a coming Doll Show to be held Oct. 21-22 at the Las Vegas Convention Center. Mrs. J. Marshall, a longtime member of the club, recently retiumed from attending the 40th Annual convention of the Unified Federal Doll Club in St. Louis, Mo. In the five days she was there she gathered many ideas and information that will help in the coming show. The Doll Club is a non-profit organization which uses money earned at the show and other activities for several area charities such as the Candle Lighters, the Blind Center, the Salvation Army Christmas program and the Child Haven Thanksgiving food program. Red circle Oct. 21 and 22 on your calandar and attend the Doll Show to see magnificent dolls and learn bits of history as well. California trip Nelson and Ruth Soehlke have had a busy summer this year. They traveled to Sacramento, CaUf., recently to attend the 50th wedding anniversary of Ruth's sister. They returned home in time to prepare for granddaughter Mame Belger's wedding on Saturday, Oct. 23. Hospitalized Brett and Jodie Baldwin's Uttle son, Silas Reed, recently spent some time in a local hospital. Such visits are necessary, it seems, but it sure is wonderful to have well babies back home. Arizona trip Donna HalltMrs. LeGrand) has become a regular jet set traveler these days. Lately she spent 10 days in Arizona, visiting a daughter and friends. Daughter Kathy, now married to Dr. John Hohnes, is living in Gilbert, Arii. While there she attended the wedding reception of the daughter of a friend, Raymond Arave, from her and LeGrand's college days at Brigham Young University. See Missiles, Page 10 A Complete Travel Service tRAVEL TOUR SERVId •Airline Tickets at Airport Prices •Air-Rali-Sea Paclcages •Amtracic-Eurall Ticlcets •Passport Information •Hotel A Air Reservations Visas Obtained 111 WATER STREET, HDN. Henderson Office Now KAS ttA.'i 4 Open Saturdays 9 a.m.-3 p.m. OQDQ^ • 2700 GREEN VALLEY PKWY. STE. H-3 458-8674 THIS WEEK AT NUTRI/SYSTEM RECEIVE THREE WEEKS FREE FOOD "Now Over 1,250 Canters In U.S. & Canada." ^Since Nutri/System, I don't avoicj, full length mirrors anymore." DdorM Brent lovM the way she looks since the lost 85 lbs. on tlM NUTRI/SYSTEM* Weight LMS Progran Out comprer^ensive pvovam works t)ecauee it tncludM •P*rsfMiteMf IVIM LoM From* to Identity your peisonal weight loss problem. •A variety of delicious Nu Syitem Cusint meals and snacks. •Nutrition and Behavior counseling. •BmhairtorBfrnkOtntiah program to long-term success. weight kw cntf Aak about our SwUor CMZMW t MiaiMy RECEIVE THREE WEEKS [ i FREE FOOD • Special oiler does not include cost oINUTRI SYSTEM foods and start-up, and cannot bo* I combined wilti othor otters. As people vary so does their rato otv.Fr(day Saturday by appolntmant 565-7474 .^MCC0GIZED->' m LAKE MEAD BUSINESS CENTER 129 W. LAKE MEAD DRIVE PMA HENDERSON, NV 89015 CHI ROPRACTIC Your trMtmnt inay be at ttMa or no coal to you In accofdanca wMi tha tann af vttir Inwmim nnllfii va wwa iiavaMHaM^e ipwavivv I i 5 •' ORIGINAL DEFECTIVE -***• •

PAGE 10

• ^^ • Page 10 HwHtoraon Home Newa. Hendereoa, Nevada Thuwday. Septwnber 28. 1989 Missiles from Page 9 1 tsp chili powder V4'tsp salt and pepper Va cup enchilada sauce Wearing caat Roy Huffmgton, son of Ron and Nancy Huffmgton, is sporting a neck brace these days. It ia set in place to help the healling process of some fractured neck vertebrae received in an 'accident some weeks ago. Get well quick message goes out to Roy. Good food Summer is gone, but good, quick meals are still popular. Try these beef enchiladas that can be ready in 20 to 30 minutes. 1 lb ground beef 6 large com tortillas 1 tsp minced garlic 2 tsp vegetable oil 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese 1 cup Monterey Jack, shredded 1 cup (4 oz) whole green chilies drained, cut in strips Combine beef, garlic, chili powder, salt and pepper in microwave-proof pie plate. Cook on high 6 minutes (or cook and brown in skillet). Drain, stir in one-fourth of the sauce. Brush tortillas with oil. Cover and microwave for about 1 minute. Enjoy. Soap box Wonder what happened ... •To the big, exciting plans for development of the old Carver Park area? •A detailed plan to evacuate city residents in case of civil emergency-war or otherwise? •To the development of the former site of Victory Village? Wonder why.. •Isn't there an access road (in good repair) from the 7-Eleven on Lake Mead Drive that goes to the Post OfHce, K-Mart and other places for the convenience of people of eastern part of town without having to use the crowded highway? Visits Santa Fe, N.M. Mr. and Mrs. Koy Herrera ended their summer with a special vacation to Santa Fe, N.M. There they visited with Mra. Herrera's folks and many friends in the area. It was a great way toC end the summer, they said. Emergency conceni Had a call from a concerned lady the other day. She was D^ys from Page 2 Although the 'Ten Days of RjBpentance" is normally ushered in by blowing the siofar — a ram's horn — on Ri)8h Hashanah, that tradition iaf omitted when the holiday fills on the Sabbath as it does tljis year, according to "Dictionary of the Jewish Religion" bj Dr. Ben Isaacson. •By Jewish tradition, on Roah Hashanah God reads the scrolls o( life written by each person bjjf his or her deeds throughout t^e preceding year and pronounces judgment. ITThis decree ., is not final," llerman Wouk wrote in 'This i^My God; The Jewish Way of See Days, Page 11 CARUNO SILVER CO. /4 Ktm 1lf$M (!ti$ 7M^ SILVER & GOLD 24 HR. HOTLINE FOR PRICES 384-1909 E. Fremoiif St. "iMldo TIffanya" 382-1469 Now you have a better way to keep trash in its place...rent a mobile Ibter REPLACES FOUR 20 GALLON^^ TRASH CANS! Silver State DitpoMi Service Inc. 770 E. SalMra Avtnm LM VgM, Nevada M104 732-1001 concerned about the safety of her grandchildren and ethers as well, in case of a disastrous fire or other dangerous accident that would again involve Henderson citizens and a possible evacuation. It could be a fire, an explosion or the wreck of a big truck carrying dangerous material on the highway (especially since so many of these vehicles pass through residential areas). Her fear was triggered by a fire that coincided with the latest big fire on the Laa Vegas Strip and was reported on a late ni^t national talk ahow on the radio. She thought that perhaps the Home Newa or the city engineers or someone could draw up a step-by-step plan to place in every home. I know that sometime ago the Civil Defense had such a plan. But what about now? .-DUP meeting repmt The Camp Desert Sunrise Chapter of the Daughters of Utah Pioneers met Monday, Sept. 18, for the opening of its 1989-1990 year. The year started out with 19 ladies present. The new officers are: Irene Campbell, Captain; Evelyn Charles, first vice captain; Vera Seitz, second vice captain; Rhea Johnson, secretary-treasurer; Jessie Bermett, registrar; Nancy Huffington, historian; Nellie Rae Jones, lesson leader; Florence Baird, Sunshine Club; Laviimia Gardner, chaplain/flag ceremony; Carol Marshall, parliamentarian; and Mema Dennison, hostess/refreshments. Others present were: Flora Kellar, Ruth Soehler, Juanta Koaaen. Lark McKee, Laura Jean Miller, Elida Seiber and Jenna Jacobs and guests JuUe Hall and Mary Munford. An inspiring lesson was presented by Nellie Rae Jones, together with a tribute to deceased member Ruth Moore by Juanita Kossen. The DUP members are dedicated to preserving the memonea of ancestors who moved west between 1847 and 1869 when the silver rails of the raikoad connected east and west. Their theme ia, "Savor the memories of yesterday-find a compass for tomorrow." The reason the individual clubs are called "camps" is because when the large companies of immigrants traveled to the West via wagon and hand-cart, they organized into sfnaller groups called "camps" for closer leadership and better organization that made for better protection. It is somewhat like the military organizations of today. Style "Style is the dress of thoughts; let them be ever so just; if your style is homely, coarse, and vulgar, they will appear as See Missiles, Page 11 -( >v*^ *, Come and Celebrate with Us at Our KOTSL & CASZiro 0\ •o 9ARTK J 2 PM TO MIDNIGHT WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY OCTOBER 4 & 5, 1989 2 TO 10 P-W• MAVtf York Strip, W^ plus tax V Including Beverage -DRAW.NGSTHROUGHg^^ 294-5000 CASH pwas2800 South BouWer Hwy T V i mm s Thursday, September 28. 1989 Henderson Home Mews. Hasderaon, Nevada Page 11 Health fair planned A Health Fair featuring cholesterol testing, spinal, eye and blood pressure exams, is set for 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Smith's Pl^^fiVerde Restaurant. Booths wiU The event is being cosponbe set up in front of the eatery, sored by Drs. Jim Cocks and The event is open to the pubUc, Douglas Lee and the Casa spokespersons said. Missiles from Page 10 much disadvantage and be as ill-received, as your person, though ever so well proportioned, would be if dressed in rags, dirt and tatters. Lord Chesterfield Anniversaries Sept. 28 Jim and Pauline Rinker (39) and Keith and Lily Wessman. Sept. 29 Dale and Linda Johnson and Mike and Lisa Conrad. Sept. 30 Mark and Dawna Gubler, Kim and Lani Anderson and Howard and LaRae Cagle. Oct. 1 David and Lori Littlefield have been married one year today; and Frank and ^ina Huntsman. Oct. 2 Wally and Grace Murray. Oct. 3 Craig and Tracy Miller, Paul and Becky Franks, Mont and Ruriko Spencer and Garen and Joy Anderson. Oct 4 Therold and Erma Brook, Troy and Cynthia Benham have been married one year today, Jim and Sarah Hamby and William and Carol Sowers. Oct. 5 Don and Alta Excell, Jack and Hazel Redmon, Don and Kathryn Van Brunt, Jim and Janice Kephart and Randy and Theresa Harris. Birthdays Sept. 28 Amy Dickinson, Lorna Cavalieri, Phildon DeMille, Christina Lindsey Everett, Lucille Hicken, Johnny Abbott, Tyson Probert, LeAn Jensen, Brent Honey, Christopher Tyler, Kelli Gubler, Shaylia Boyes, Jeanette DeMille, Christina Braun, Denise Edwards, Cortney Hoesch Wilke and Yvonne Gray. Celebrities: CBS founder William S. Paley, 88; actor William Windom, 66; actor Marcello Mastronianni, 65; and French actress Brigitte Bardot, 55. Sept. 29 Rikk Bennett, Carmajean Call, Jennifer Marie Wardlaw, Michael Patchett, Melinda Walker, Bobby Tannehill, Jason Hess, Maria Madsen, Brian Anderson, David Pendletohn, Jill Dennett, Roxie Sturgis, Brandon Hillstead, Daniel D. Walker Jr., Paul Morris Jr., Sara Beth Wilkins, Carol Savage, Todd Carducci, Tracey Emling, Scott J. Graff, Laddie Stewart, Stephanie Weideman, Donna J. Tippets, Joseph Brazzeal Jr., Patrick Gill, Keith Light and James Edward Reber. Celebrities: Western singing star and baseball magnate Gene Autry, 82; actress Greer Garson, 81; movie director Michelangelo Antonioni, 77; actor Trevor Howard, 73; movie producer Stanley Kramer, 76; football coach Bum Phillips, 66; actress Anita Eckberg, 58; singer Jerry Lee Lewis, 54; actor Larry Linville, 50; and actress Madeline Kahn, 47. Sept. 30 Amy Jo Bond, Tony Hafen, Ronald Blau, Maria Rose Summers, Joy Phelan, Pam Walker, Stephanie Crane, Krista Nielson, Reggie Snowden, Verlene SulUvan, Mary J. Lee, Jennifer Lyn Gamett, Kathy Harah, Brent Buckles, Amy Lee Scott and James W. Bell. Celebrities: Former Gov. Lester Maddox, 74; actress Deborah Kerr, 68; actress Angie Dickinson, 57; singer Johnny Mathis, 54; singer Marilyn McCoo, 46 and former White House Press Secretary Jody Powell, 46. Oct. 1 Chad Shepherd, Andy Groft, Donna Hall, Crystina Scott, Chad Edward Romero i^one year old today, Jennifer Thompson, William J. Sherman, Brice Baker, Alana Weller, Brett Parmenter, Pat Penuelas, Bruce Morris, Fred Smith, Zona Tobler, Lynnae Hill, Curtis Smith, Dennis Foster, Cal Smith, Brandon Kutzea^Suzy Sullivan, Shaun Walker, Ralph Lopez, Davaid Darrow, Jenni Hall, Robert Hein, Tammy Phillips, Teresa Egan and Nickole Jade King. Celebrities: Actor George Peppard, 61; pianist Vladimer Horowitz, 85; actor Walter Matthau, 69; actor James Whitmore, 68; former President Jimmie Carter, 65; Justice William m BOULDER CITY TRAVEL u^ • xes! 806 Buchanan Blvd. Suite 107 293-3807 Boulder City FREE TICKET DELIVERY PASSPORT PHOTOS AVAILABLE SI00,000 Flight Insurance FREE with any airline ticket purchased MON-FRI 8 A.M. TO 5:30 P.M. SAT 9 A.M. TO 2 P.M. CLUB MEO'S FAU BREAKAWAY Warm Tropical Breezes, White Beaches, Blue Seas, Friendly Faces, Fantastic Food, Nightlife, Arts & Crafts, Sports, Total Relaxation.. .CLUB MED! IXTAPA, MEXICO 999* PLAYA BLANCA.MEXICO... .S999* SONORA BAY, MEXICO '999* HUATULCO, MEXICO M,199* MOOREA, TAHITI •1.499* 'Per Parson, Doubt* Occupancy, Includlnfl Air from Lot AnglM Tu, MMnbtraMp FM Extra ''.m THE LOVE BOAT SPECIAL STANDBY OFFER: 9599 TO MEXICO!! This is a SAVINGS of up to *40P aw pMMnll j: QRiGiNAiT DEFECTlVE Rehnquist, 55; actors Tom Bosley, 61; Richard Harris, 56; actress/singer Julie Andrews, 54; and baseball great Rod Carew, 42. Oct. 2 Trent Seitz and Sarah Anne Oldermath are one-year-old today, LeGrande (Lee) Jones Jr., Jillian Janae Miller, Bryan Mack, Richard Bauer H, Richard Hunt, Damon Harris, DeAnn Garlick, Rhea Gifford, Matthew Muirbrook, Malinda Stratton, Penny Noble, Billy Joe Scott, Helen Gilger, Rohn Solomon, Sylvia Manzanares, Jimmie Brown, Donald J. Jensen, Andrew Nelson, Crystal Hague, Lisa Konold, Bryon Jenkins, Cindy Goddard, Cheryl Bringhurst, Dennis Chidister, KeUi Ann Gallacher, Jason Robert Layne, Kathy Gregerson, Bill Clement and Raymond Wilcock. Celebrities: PubUsher Clay S. Felker, 54; actors Spanky MacFarland, 69, and Moses Gunn, 62; baseball great Maury Wills, 57; movie critic Rex Reed, 51; and wnger/song writer Don McLean, 43. Oct. 3 Rodney Kyle Fleming, Annette Davis Burr, Jame Lorraine Hopster, Aimee Lyn Angell, Rebecca Woodbury, Jennifer Cocks, Ben David Westover, Glade Prisbrey, Sean Carter, Sheryl Speegle, Paige Hillman, Cheri Lynn Schofield, Bruce Anderson, Joseph Savage, Shannon Braithwaite, Erick Light and Heather Stubbs. Celebrities: Author Gore Vidal, 64; actress Madlyn Rhue, 55; rock star Chubby Checker, 48; and baseball's Dave Winfield, 38. Oct. 4 Angie Blackburn, Marjorie Ana Abbott, Bonnie Murray, Barbara Hunt, Robert Hillyer, Carl Diether, Jim Butters, Calvin Carlsen, Judy Lynn Miller, Jason E. Excell, Mawson Schmidt, Sammy Lynn Schmidt, Scot Fredrickson and Franklin Parmenter. Celebrities: Comedian Jan Murray, 72; actor Charlton Heston, 66; actor Clifton Davis, 45; actress Susan Sarandon, 43; and actor Armand Assante, 40. Oct. 5 Vance Kennedy, James J. Sawyer, Rebecca Dean, Chandie Sturgis, Tara Kephart, Kenneth McKay Hall, June Marshall, Malee Brubaker, Kenneth Bryan, Dave Tucker, Holly Prisbrey, Jeremy Evans, Mary Louise Hafen, Mikchael K. West, Carolyn Steward, Don Van Brunt, Connie Rae Stewart, Diane Traasfahl, Erin Haddow, Betty Hoover, Sandra Kay Barkley and Shawn Butz. Celebrities: ProduceWdirector Joshua Logan, 81; actor Donald.Pleasance, 70; actress Glynis Johns, 66; comedian Bill Dana, 65; singer Steve Miller, 46; rock singer Bob Geldorf, 35: and actress Karen Allen, 38. Days from Page 10 Life." "Men have 10 days in which to search their acts^ repent of misdeeds, perform good works to alter the balance as it stands, pledge themselves to better conduct, and throw themselves on the Judge's mercy in prayer." Yom Kippur is the "most solemn day of the Jewish religious year," the "Dictionary of the Jewish ReHgion" states. "Jews spend the entire day in fasting and prayer, soulsearching and repenting for past transgressions, and vowing to lead better Uves in the years ahead." "As the sun sinks into the Horizon," Wouk wrote in 'This is My God," "the scrolls of fate ABOUT FACE See Days, Page 13 AHEND CHURCH SUNDAY Sponsorsd By Pl/mtO YOUR BEST FACE FOmtARD Do you itink ttiat ddn pcMlsim ike acne, blacithsads, snlargsd -pores or daifc drdss an uniqua to you? OtoouTMnot Would you like to try a lyttofn that sinoa 1832 hat normalizod the tkin of miHlont of people al over tte world? ItETRIN is an original formula by a renowned btochemist whose research led to a formula that cleared up hit own acne-ll(e condition and pertislani dty skin. And your skin win took years younger. Is your face worth it? The fact of the matter Is that your face is priceless when you make a fantastic first impresikml Try METRIN yourself. With the METRIN guarantee you have everythink to gain...and notNng to lose. • • • Treat yoursaH to a free METRIN demonstration. Call SUE or BEE at 293-5268 for an appointment. Nuke from Page 3 Although the DOE plan includes alternative conceptual models, the state contends they "are more confusing than enlightening," and "are biased to confirm the 'current view* and dismiss the alternatives." •The DOE's "imposition of an unrealistic schedule" of study "prior to a detennination by the DOE of the site's suitatnlity for submission of a repository license application to the NRC." Loux added that "our review indicates that sufficient duration of time is not provided in the plan for adequate execution of some critical hydrologic tests." The state noted that when the DOE released its preliminary site study document eariy last year— the purpose of which was to obtain early feedback on the approach, adequacy, and completeness of the Yucca Mountain study plan—the state provided comments a year ago, but they were neither acknowledged by the DOE nor considered in the development of the final plan. Further, the state issued preliminary comments on the exploratory shaft portion of the pi an, but there has been no response from the EKDE to those, either. In summary, the comments said the DOE plan "docs not incorporate the basic elements of a dedicated and credible scientific investigation...the SCT, in fact, docs just the opposite." L.A. BOUNTY introduces Ruger (Sybil Donning), o wonran os tough os she is beautiful. A cop until her partner was killed, she's now a bounty hunter who works outside the low becouse thofs where you find the crooks. A candidate for mayor is kidnapped. The polite ore powerless as a madman holds the dty hostoge until Ruger swings into odion. As the psychopothic ciimind mastermind wrho munlered her partner pits himself against o terrorized population, only her resourufulness threatens his plans. With dl the explosive energy of today's hecxJIines, this thrilling oction-odventure careens to o harrowing dimax. Your customers will be coming back for more once they realize ifs Ruger who rules the dty! HORIZON VIDEO 120 E. Horizon, Heiuierson 564-5558 Atitionnd Omrttmi IMM Inrc. me DON'T DIET!!! I STOP SMOKING!! LOSE WEIGHT FOREVER! ATTEND ONE 2 HOUR HYPNOSIS SEMINAR AND •ACHIEVE WILLPOWER •SELF-CONTROL •SELF-CONFIDENCE tor anyone who has ever said, "I would lose weight, If I had the willpower." $49 "" Complete Training and Cassette Tape Visa. Mastarcharga, Check or Cash Accepted Only IN 2 HOURS FLAT! ATTEND ONE 2 HOUR HYPNOSIS SEMINAR AND WALK OUT A NON-SMOKER •NO WITHDRAWAL SYMPTOMS •NO WEIGHT GAIN •FEEL GREAT on., $49 8:30 p.in. Complete Training and Cassette Tape Visa, Mastercharge, Check or Caeh Accepted H HYPNOSIS: Preseniod by Personal Success Instiluio o) Utah, with Dr. Clillord Webb, CHT. past president ot National Society ot Hypnotherapist, toaiurcd on PM Magazine, ABC, CBS and NBC news. ATTEND ONE 2 HOUR SEMINAR THURSDAY • OCTOBER 5 HENDERSON CONVENTION CENTER 200 SOUTH WATER HENDERSON WEIGHT-6 P.M. SMOKING • 8:30 P.M. SAFE AND EFFECTIVE 7SH Plus Success. You'll be hypnotized twice during this group hypnosis seminsr. No Pro-registration required. Information (801) 224)622 GAIN WILLPOWER! MONEY BACK GUARANTEE-FIRST HOUR 4 MMMI

PAGE 11

• ^^ • Page 10 HwHtoraon Home Newa. Hendereoa, Nevada Thuwday. Septwnber 28. 1989 Missiles from Page 9 1 tsp chili powder V4'tsp salt and pepper Va cup enchilada sauce Wearing caat Roy Huffmgton, son of Ron and Nancy Huffmgton, is sporting a neck brace these days. It ia set in place to help the healling process of some fractured neck vertebrae received in an 'accident some weeks ago. Get well quick message goes out to Roy. Good food Summer is gone, but good, quick meals are still popular. Try these beef enchiladas that can be ready in 20 to 30 minutes. 1 lb ground beef 6 large com tortillas 1 tsp minced garlic 2 tsp vegetable oil 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese 1 cup Monterey Jack, shredded 1 cup (4 oz) whole green chilies drained, cut in strips Combine beef, garlic, chili powder, salt and pepper in microwave-proof pie plate. Cook on high 6 minutes (or cook and brown in skillet). Drain, stir in one-fourth of the sauce. Brush tortillas with oil. Cover and microwave for about 1 minute. Enjoy. Soap box Wonder what happened ... •To the big, exciting plans for development of the old Carver Park area? •A detailed plan to evacuate city residents in case of civil emergency-war or otherwise? •To the development of the former site of Victory Village? Wonder why.. •Isn't there an access road (in good repair) from the 7-Eleven on Lake Mead Drive that goes to the Post OfHce, K-Mart and other places for the convenience of people of eastern part of town without having to use the crowded highway? Visits Santa Fe, N.M. Mr. and Mrs. Koy Herrera ended their summer with a special vacation to Santa Fe, N.M. There they visited with Mra. Herrera's folks and many friends in the area. It was a great way toC end the summer, they said. Emergency conceni Had a call from a concerned lady the other day. She was D^ys from Page 2 Although the 'Ten Days of RjBpentance" is normally ushered in by blowing the siofar — a ram's horn — on Ri)8h Hashanah, that tradition iaf omitted when the holiday fills on the Sabbath as it does tljis year, according to "Dictionary of the Jewish Religion" bj Dr. Ben Isaacson. •By Jewish tradition, on Roah Hashanah God reads the scrolls o( life written by each person bjjf his or her deeds throughout t^e preceding year and pronounces judgment. ITThis decree ., is not final," llerman Wouk wrote in 'This i^My God; The Jewish Way of See Days, Page 11 CARUNO SILVER CO. /4 Ktm 1lf$M (!ti$ 7M^ SILVER & GOLD 24 HR. HOTLINE FOR PRICES 384-1909 E. Fremoiif St. "iMldo TIffanya" 382-1469 Now you have a better way to keep trash in its place...rent a mobile Ibter REPLACES FOUR 20 GALLON^^ TRASH CANS! Silver State DitpoMi Service Inc. 770 E. SalMra Avtnm LM VgM, Nevada M104 732-1001 concerned about the safety of her grandchildren and ethers as well, in case of a disastrous fire or other dangerous accident that would again involve Henderson citizens and a possible evacuation. It could be a fire, an explosion or the wreck of a big truck carrying dangerous material on the highway (especially since so many of these vehicles pass through residential areas). Her fear was triggered by a fire that coincided with the latest big fire on the Laa Vegas Strip and was reported on a late ni^t national talk ahow on the radio. She thought that perhaps the Home Newa or the city engineers or someone could draw up a step-by-step plan to place in every home. I know that sometime ago the Civil Defense had such a plan. But what about now? .-DUP meeting repmt The Camp Desert Sunrise Chapter of the Daughters of Utah Pioneers met Monday, Sept. 18, for the opening of its 1989-1990 year. The year started out with 19 ladies present. The new officers are: Irene Campbell, Captain; Evelyn Charles, first vice captain; Vera Seitz, second vice captain; Rhea Johnson, secretary-treasurer; Jessie Bermett, registrar; Nancy Huffington, historian; Nellie Rae Jones, lesson leader; Florence Baird, Sunshine Club; Laviimia Gardner, chaplain/flag ceremony; Carol Marshall, parliamentarian; and Mema Dennison, hostess/refreshments. Others present were: Flora Kellar, Ruth Soehler, Juanta Koaaen. Lark McKee, Laura Jean Miller, Elida Seiber and Jenna Jacobs and guests JuUe Hall and Mary Munford. An inspiring lesson was presented by Nellie Rae Jones, together with a tribute to deceased member Ruth Moore by Juanita Kossen. The DUP members are dedicated to preserving the memonea of ancestors who moved west between 1847 and 1869 when the silver rails of the raikoad connected east and west. Their theme ia, "Savor the memories of yesterday-find a compass for tomorrow." The reason the individual clubs are called "camps" is because when the large companies of immigrants traveled to the West via wagon and hand-cart, they organized into sfnaller groups called "camps" for closer leadership and better organization that made for better protection. It is somewhat like the military organizations of today. Style "Style is the dress of thoughts; let them be ever so just; if your style is homely, coarse, and vulgar, they will appear as See Missiles, Page 11 -( >v*^ *, Come and Celebrate with Us at Our KOTSL & CASZiro 0\ •o 9ARTK J 2 PM TO MIDNIGHT WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY OCTOBER 4 & 5, 1989 2 TO 10 P-W• MAVtf York Strip, W^ plus tax V Including Beverage -DRAW.NGSTHROUGHg^^ 294-5000 CASH pwas2800 South BouWer Hwy T V i mm s Thursday, September 28. 1989 Henderson Home Mews. Hasderaon, Nevada Page 11 Health fair planned A Health Fair featuring cholesterol testing, spinal, eye and blood pressure exams, is set for 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Smith's Pl^^fiVerde Restaurant. Booths wiU The event is being cosponbe set up in front of the eatery, sored by Drs. Jim Cocks and The event is open to the pubUc, Douglas Lee and the Casa spokespersons said. Missiles from Page 10 much disadvantage and be as ill-received, as your person, though ever so well proportioned, would be if dressed in rags, dirt and tatters. Lord Chesterfield Anniversaries Sept. 28 Jim and Pauline Rinker (39) and Keith and Lily Wessman. Sept. 29 Dale and Linda Johnson and Mike and Lisa Conrad. Sept. 30 Mark and Dawna Gubler, Kim and Lani Anderson and Howard and LaRae Cagle. Oct. 1 David and Lori Littlefield have been married one year today; and Frank and ^ina Huntsman. Oct. 2 Wally and Grace Murray. Oct. 3 Craig and Tracy Miller, Paul and Becky Franks, Mont and Ruriko Spencer and Garen and Joy Anderson. Oct 4 Therold and Erma Brook, Troy and Cynthia Benham have been married one year today, Jim and Sarah Hamby and William and Carol Sowers. Oct. 5 Don and Alta Excell, Jack and Hazel Redmon, Don and Kathryn Van Brunt, Jim and Janice Kephart and Randy and Theresa Harris. Birthdays Sept. 28 Amy Dickinson, Lorna Cavalieri, Phildon DeMille, Christina Lindsey Everett, Lucille Hicken, Johnny Abbott, Tyson Probert, LeAn Jensen, Brent Honey, Christopher Tyler, Kelli Gubler, Shaylia Boyes, Jeanette DeMille, Christina Braun, Denise Edwards, Cortney Hoesch Wilke and Yvonne Gray. Celebrities: CBS founder William S. Paley, 88; actor William Windom, 66; actor Marcello Mastronianni, 65; and French actress Brigitte Bardot, 55. Sept. 29 Rikk Bennett, Carmajean Call, Jennifer Marie Wardlaw, Michael Patchett, Melinda Walker, Bobby Tannehill, Jason Hess, Maria Madsen, Brian Anderson, David Pendletohn, Jill Dennett, Roxie Sturgis, Brandon Hillstead, Daniel D. Walker Jr., Paul Morris Jr., Sara Beth Wilkins, Carol Savage, Todd Carducci, Tracey Emling, Scott J. Graff, Laddie Stewart, Stephanie Weideman, Donna J. Tippets, Joseph Brazzeal Jr., Patrick Gill, Keith Light and James Edward Reber. Celebrities: Western singing star and baseball magnate Gene Autry, 82; actress Greer Garson, 81; movie director Michelangelo Antonioni, 77; actor Trevor Howard, 73; movie producer Stanley Kramer, 76; football coach Bum Phillips, 66; actress Anita Eckberg, 58; singer Jerry Lee Lewis, 54; actor Larry Linville, 50; and actress Madeline Kahn, 47. Sept. 30 Amy Jo Bond, Tony Hafen, Ronald Blau, Maria Rose Summers, Joy Phelan, Pam Walker, Stephanie Crane, Krista Nielson, Reggie Snowden, Verlene SulUvan, Mary J. Lee, Jennifer Lyn Gamett, Kathy Harah, Brent Buckles, Amy Lee Scott and James W. Bell. Celebrities: Former Gov. Lester Maddox, 74; actress Deborah Kerr, 68; actress Angie Dickinson, 57; singer Johnny Mathis, 54; singer Marilyn McCoo, 46 and former White House Press Secretary Jody Powell, 46. Oct. 1 Chad Shepherd, Andy Groft, Donna Hall, Crystina Scott, Chad Edward Romero i^one year old today, Jennifer Thompson, William J. Sherman, Brice Baker, Alana Weller, Brett Parmenter, Pat Penuelas, Bruce Morris, Fred Smith, Zona Tobler, Lynnae Hill, Curtis Smith, Dennis Foster, Cal Smith, Brandon Kutzea^Suzy Sullivan, Shaun Walker, Ralph Lopez, Davaid Darrow, Jenni Hall, Robert Hein, Tammy Phillips, Teresa Egan and Nickole Jade King. Celebrities: Actor George Peppard, 61; pianist Vladimer Horowitz, 85; actor Walter Matthau, 69; actor James Whitmore, 68; former President Jimmie Carter, 65; Justice William m BOULDER CITY TRAVEL u^ • xes! 806 Buchanan Blvd. Suite 107 293-3807 Boulder City FREE TICKET DELIVERY PASSPORT PHOTOS AVAILABLE SI00,000 Flight Insurance FREE with any airline ticket purchased MON-FRI 8 A.M. TO 5:30 P.M. SAT 9 A.M. TO 2 P.M. CLUB MEO'S FAU BREAKAWAY Warm Tropical Breezes, White Beaches, Blue Seas, Friendly Faces, Fantastic Food, Nightlife, Arts & Crafts, Sports, Total Relaxation.. .CLUB MED! IXTAPA, MEXICO 999* PLAYA BLANCA.MEXICO... .S999* SONORA BAY, MEXICO '999* HUATULCO, MEXICO M,199* MOOREA, TAHITI •1.499* 'Per Parson, Doubt* Occupancy, Includlnfl Air from Lot AnglM Tu, MMnbtraMp FM Extra ''.m THE LOVE BOAT SPECIAL STANDBY OFFER: 9599 TO MEXICO!! This is a SAVINGS of up to *40P aw pMMnll j: QRiGiNAiT DEFECTlVE Rehnquist, 55; actors Tom Bosley, 61; Richard Harris, 56; actress/singer Julie Andrews, 54; and baseball great Rod Carew, 42. Oct. 2 Trent Seitz and Sarah Anne Oldermath are one-year-old today, LeGrande (Lee) Jones Jr., Jillian Janae Miller, Bryan Mack, Richard Bauer H, Richard Hunt, Damon Harris, DeAnn Garlick, Rhea Gifford, Matthew Muirbrook, Malinda Stratton, Penny Noble, Billy Joe Scott, Helen Gilger, Rohn Solomon, Sylvia Manzanares, Jimmie Brown, Donald J. Jensen, Andrew Nelson, Crystal Hague, Lisa Konold, Bryon Jenkins, Cindy Goddard, Cheryl Bringhurst, Dennis Chidister, KeUi Ann Gallacher, Jason Robert Layne, Kathy Gregerson, Bill Clement and Raymond Wilcock. Celebrities: PubUsher Clay S. Felker, 54; actors Spanky MacFarland, 69, and Moses Gunn, 62; baseball great Maury Wills, 57; movie critic Rex Reed, 51; and wnger/song writer Don McLean, 43. Oct. 3 Rodney Kyle Fleming, Annette Davis Burr, Jame Lorraine Hopster, Aimee Lyn Angell, Rebecca Woodbury, Jennifer Cocks, Ben David Westover, Glade Prisbrey, Sean Carter, Sheryl Speegle, Paige Hillman, Cheri Lynn Schofield, Bruce Anderson, Joseph Savage, Shannon Braithwaite, Erick Light and Heather Stubbs. Celebrities: Author Gore Vidal, 64; actress Madlyn Rhue, 55; rock star Chubby Checker, 48; and baseball's Dave Winfield, 38. Oct. 4 Angie Blackburn, Marjorie Ana Abbott, Bonnie Murray, Barbara Hunt, Robert Hillyer, Carl Diether, Jim Butters, Calvin Carlsen, Judy Lynn Miller, Jason E. Excell, Mawson Schmidt, Sammy Lynn Schmidt, Scot Fredrickson and Franklin Parmenter. Celebrities: Comedian Jan Murray, 72; actor Charlton Heston, 66; actor Clifton Davis, 45; actress Susan Sarandon, 43; and actor Armand Assante, 40. Oct. 5 Vance Kennedy, James J. Sawyer, Rebecca Dean, Chandie Sturgis, Tara Kephart, Kenneth McKay Hall, June Marshall, Malee Brubaker, Kenneth Bryan, Dave Tucker, Holly Prisbrey, Jeremy Evans, Mary Louise Hafen, Mikchael K. West, Carolyn Steward, Don Van Brunt, Connie Rae Stewart, Diane Traasfahl, Erin Haddow, Betty Hoover, Sandra Kay Barkley and Shawn Butz. Celebrities: ProduceWdirector Joshua Logan, 81; actor Donald.Pleasance, 70; actress Glynis Johns, 66; comedian Bill Dana, 65; singer Steve Miller, 46; rock singer Bob Geldorf, 35: and actress Karen Allen, 38. Days from Page 10 Life." "Men have 10 days in which to search their acts^ repent of misdeeds, perform good works to alter the balance as it stands, pledge themselves to better conduct, and throw themselves on the Judge's mercy in prayer." Yom Kippur is the "most solemn day of the Jewish religious year," the "Dictionary of the Jewish ReHgion" states. "Jews spend the entire day in fasting and prayer, soulsearching and repenting for past transgressions, and vowing to lead better Uves in the years ahead." "As the sun sinks into the Horizon," Wouk wrote in 'This is My God," "the scrolls of fate ABOUT FACE See Days, Page 13 AHEND CHURCH SUNDAY Sponsorsd By Pl/mtO YOUR BEST FACE FOmtARD Do you itink ttiat ddn pcMlsim ike acne, blacithsads, snlargsd -pores or daifc drdss an uniqua to you? OtoouTMnot Would you like to try a lyttofn that sinoa 1832 hat normalizod the tkin of miHlont of people al over tte world? ItETRIN is an original formula by a renowned btochemist whose research led to a formula that cleared up hit own acne-ll(e condition and pertislani dty skin. And your skin win took years younger. Is your face worth it? The fact of the matter Is that your face is priceless when you make a fantastic first impresikml Try METRIN yourself. With the METRIN guarantee you have everythink to gain...and notNng to lose. • • • Treat yoursaH to a free METRIN demonstration. Call SUE or BEE at 293-5268 for an appointment. Nuke from Page 3 Although the DOE plan includes alternative conceptual models, the state contends they "are more confusing than enlightening," and "are biased to confirm the 'current view* and dismiss the alternatives." •The DOE's "imposition of an unrealistic schedule" of study "prior to a detennination by the DOE of the site's suitatnlity for submission of a repository license application to the NRC." Loux added that "our review indicates that sufficient duration of time is not provided in the plan for adequate execution of some critical hydrologic tests." The state noted that when the DOE released its preliminary site study document eariy last year— the purpose of which was to obtain early feedback on the approach, adequacy, and completeness of the Yucca Mountain study plan—the state provided comments a year ago, but they were neither acknowledged by the DOE nor considered in the development of the final plan. Further, the state issued preliminary comments on the exploratory shaft portion of the pi an, but there has been no response from the EKDE to those, either. In summary, the comments said the DOE plan "docs not incorporate the basic elements of a dedicated and credible scientific investigation...the SCT, in fact, docs just the opposite." L.A. BOUNTY introduces Ruger (Sybil Donning), o wonran os tough os she is beautiful. A cop until her partner was killed, she's now a bounty hunter who works outside the low becouse thofs where you find the crooks. A candidate for mayor is kidnapped. The polite ore powerless as a madman holds the dty hostoge until Ruger swings into odion. As the psychopothic ciimind mastermind wrho munlered her partner pits himself against o terrorized population, only her resourufulness threatens his plans. With dl the explosive energy of today's hecxJIines, this thrilling oction-odventure careens to o harrowing dimax. Your customers will be coming back for more once they realize ifs Ruger who rules the dty! HORIZON VIDEO 120 E. Horizon, Heiuierson 564-5558 Atitionnd Omrttmi IMM Inrc. me DON'T DIET!!! I STOP SMOKING!! LOSE WEIGHT FOREVER! ATTEND ONE 2 HOUR HYPNOSIS SEMINAR AND •ACHIEVE WILLPOWER •SELF-CONTROL •SELF-CONFIDENCE tor anyone who has ever said, "I would lose weight, If I had the willpower." $49 "" Complete Training and Cassette Tape Visa. 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PAGE 12

P^ 12 Hiid Thnnday. Septeinbw 28. 1988 Entertainment Showscan Festival Joins Omnimax ity. The six-channel audio is' biplanes, toboggans, white water ampUfled through stereo-surralUng. jet boats and helicopters, roundspcakerslocatedbehindthe The film sttis Ned Beatty.HoUy•cieen and in the upper back of wood star of many fUms includEigbt films ftom Showacan Productions is feaoned In a threemonth evening film ftallval ttutt began this month in the Omnimax Theatre at Caegaia Palace. The films join the Omnimax futuits.'^flaganH-MinKles, Myths S Magic" and "Uving Planet," iwhich are shown from 11 un. through 5 p.m. daily. The Showscan films will be shown on the hour from 6 through 11 p.m., with two fihns at each sealing. The new fihns are "Night QfthcDreams.""BigBaU.""Lefs :|3o," "Kiwi Magic." Celebrating :Us."*' New Magic," "Discovery" ijuHl "Call from Space." •: Showscan fihns are photoIgraphcd and projected on 70mm •film at 60 frames per seoMxl, ijurhicli is faster, brightcrand larger '^m the feature film standard of '$5mm film at 24 frames per sectlie theater. The extensive Omnimax sound system has been augmented with additional subwooiiBr motorized speakers for low-fkequency enhancement ThedgtttShowscanfibnsoffer • wide variety of viewing. "Big Ball" is a youth-oriented, fastpaced action film that pits the iKmietown boys against slick newcomers in a game of dunebuggy soccer with a 6-foot beach ball. Played on the roUing dunes of the Pacific coast of California, the spoit makes a thrilling movie experience as Showscan places the viewerbeWnd the wheel for all the rough-and-tumble action. "Call from Space" blends sci^ond. The technique gives 10 times ence fiction, time travel, fantasy ^ore Infonnation to the human and romance into an ^jpealhig lenses than standard fiUning story for audiences of all ages. ^methods, allowing the viewer to Experience greater depth, visual Jfclarity, sound precision and vibrancy of color. The revolution•kry process approximates the iiye's natural perception of rcalJlty, providing the audience upre^(iedented interaction with the ^ents on the screen. ^' Unlike Omnimax fihns, which lire projected on the entire domed Screen of the Omnimax Theatre, Showscan films are made for a Octangular curved surface and Project an image 70 feet wide on |he Caesars screen. : Invented by celebrated nhnmaker Douglas Tmmbull, the ^howscan process features sixqiannel digital soundtrack reprded in Dolby SR format, giving compact disc audio qualThe film stars James Cobum, Sherri Krenn and William Campbell, and features Chariton Heston in the special role of an alien voice contacting Earth through a deep-space communication satellite. "Let's Go" tells the story of a young Japanese boy's visit to a futuristic inteiaational research center, where a scientist and intelligent robot guide him through a remarkable world of ocean engineering, electron microscopes and other technological wonders. "Kiwi Magic" showcases the rugged and majestic New Zealand scenery as an harassed American executive journeys with a comedian 'hrough hair-raising and hilarious navels around the country by way of Would War I r Showscan's "Big Ball" film at Caesars Palace Play auditions scheduled tJlark County Community College Theatre will conduct open auditions for John Bdshop's comedy, "The Musical Comedy Murders of 1940,"at nfion Saturday, Oct. 7, in the CSCCC Theatre, Room 1201. •Rehearsals will begin midOctober with performances scheduled for Dec. 1-9. : Parts are available for five njales and five females ages 20-50, spokespersons said. All apditions will involve cold readings. Applicants should prepare a 1 to 2-minute comic monologue and bring a resume and photo, they said, stressing that minorities are encouraged to audition. A copy of the script will be on reserve at the CCCC Library. Clark County Conununity College Theatre is located at 3200 E. Cheyerme Ave. For further information, call 644-PLAY (7529). Fall Crafts Fair scheduled ;A Fall Crafts Fair will be held taken at Silver Springs Comolt Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 2$ and 29 at Fox Ridge Park, pnly original and handcikfted works will be conii|ered. At the time of registra munity Center, 1961 Robindale Road, through Oct. 14, either by person or through the mail. Individuals who participate must committee for tierative organization. "I wanted to live in a smaller town than Las Vegas, where there was an emphasis on the arts," he said. He now lives in Blue Diamond. Plyler, who speaks conversational Spanish, has traveled to Guatemalaseventimes since 1980 where he photographed the architecture and Mayans as part of his interest in th American Indian. An exhibit of his May an portraits will be on display in the Natural History Museum in December on the campus of UNLV. "The Guatemalans are wonderful," he said. "My experiences in Central America have all been good. Even during politically intense times, I never saw a dead body—mainly as a matter of lucic." The Guatemalan government, through its Tourist Institute, commissioned Plyler in 1983 to photograph the country however he saw fit That job cuhninated in an exhibit of his work in Guatemala City. ivilchacl Plyler's black-and-white photo of steps talcen in Italy. Hilary Williams, adjunct facility instructor at Clark County Community College, the produ^tio^ is aimed at bringing Gre€K drama with its timeless messages to modem audiences. Although no specific time is set, the play's action could be happening today or tomorrow as well as two thousand years ago. The universal themes such as youth versus maturity, male roles versus female roles, the rights of the individual versus { the rights of the state or moral laws versus sociological law* are as topic today as when Sophocles first wrote them down. Schooled on Shakespeare and the classics in her native | England where she earned a masters of fine arts degree in English from Oxford University, Williams was also inspired to do an adaptation to "Antigone" due to the hesitation she eiux)imtered in English and literature students to tackle the early works. Because of the unfamiliar language and ctistoms, the concepts contained in the classics seemed distant. Yet she knew if they could just get past the language difficulties, they would find the literary works valid and entertaining. Hence, in this version of "Antigone" the characters speak in modem verbiage. The set, designed by her husband. David Dekker, who enjoys an international reputation as a set designer, uses futuristic furniture and employs audience space. According to Williams, she choose "Antigone" because, as an actress, she portrayed the heroine in a London prodoction of the play. 'Tm not trying to emulate Sophocles. That would be impossible, but with this update, I tried to put in more visual elements because we live in the video age. "We also bve soap operas and the classics have strong tones of soap operas. They tain the same elements, as love, revenge, war and I for power. I expect the performances to be a hit with the Lu Vegas aildienoe," she said. Thanks to the Library District dnd its free performances, it means art can take a risk with such classics as "Antigone, All performances of "Anr tigone" art open to the puUk. Call 647.SHOW fa furttsr infonnation. thurwiay, September 28. 19M Activities Hmdmrnm Home Ntmrn, Headerson. Nevada Page Seniors for Seniors to meet Seniors for l^eniors will meet Senior Center Highlights After 20 yea^, voiunteer, friend reunited By Helm VuiDerSys As a result of a recent Highlights column in the Henderson Home] Nem in which Walter "Mick" Mickens was named September's Seni
PAGE 13

P^ 12 Hiid Thnnday. Septeinbw 28. 1988 Entertainment Showscan Festival Joins Omnimax ity. The six-channel audio is' biplanes, toboggans, white water ampUfled through stereo-surralUng. jet boats and helicopters, roundspcakerslocatedbehindthe The film sttis Ned Beatty.HoUy•cieen and in the upper back of wood star of many fUms includEigbt films ftom Showacan Productions is feaoned In a threemonth evening film ftallval ttutt began this month in the Omnimax Theatre at Caegaia Palace. The films join the Omnimax futuits.'^flaganH-MinKles, Myths S Magic" and "Uving Planet," iwhich are shown from 11 un. through 5 p.m. daily. The Showscan films will be shown on the hour from 6 through 11 p.m., with two fihns at each sealing. The new fihns are "Night QfthcDreams.""BigBaU.""Lefs :|3o," "Kiwi Magic." Celebrating :Us."*' New Magic," "Discovery" ijuHl "Call from Space." •: Showscan fihns are photoIgraphcd and projected on 70mm •film at 60 frames per seoMxl, ijurhicli is faster, brightcrand larger '^m the feature film standard of '$5mm film at 24 frames per sectlie theater. The extensive Omnimax sound system has been augmented with additional subwooiiBr motorized speakers for low-fkequency enhancement ThedgtttShowscanfibnsoffer • wide variety of viewing. "Big Ball" is a youth-oriented, fastpaced action film that pits the iKmietown boys against slick newcomers in a game of dunebuggy soccer with a 6-foot beach ball. Played on the roUing dunes of the Pacific coast of California, the spoit makes a thrilling movie experience as Showscan places the viewerbeWnd the wheel for all the rough-and-tumble action. "Call from Space" blends sci^ond. The technique gives 10 times ence fiction, time travel, fantasy ^ore Infonnation to the human and romance into an ^jpealhig lenses than standard fiUning story for audiences of all ages. ^methods, allowing the viewer to Experience greater depth, visual Jfclarity, sound precision and vibrancy of color. The revolution•kry process approximates the iiye's natural perception of rcalJlty, providing the audience upre^(iedented interaction with the ^ents on the screen. ^' Unlike Omnimax fihns, which lire projected on the entire domed Screen of the Omnimax Theatre, Showscan films are made for a Octangular curved surface and Project an image 70 feet wide on |he Caesars screen. : Invented by celebrated nhnmaker Douglas Tmmbull, the ^howscan process features sixqiannel digital soundtrack reprded in Dolby SR format, giving compact disc audio qualThe film stars James Cobum, Sherri Krenn and William Campbell, and features Chariton Heston in the special role of an alien voice contacting Earth through a deep-space communication satellite. "Let's Go" tells the story of a young Japanese boy's visit to a futuristic inteiaational research center, where a scientist and intelligent robot guide him through a remarkable world of ocean engineering, electron microscopes and other technological wonders. "Kiwi Magic" showcases the rugged and majestic New Zealand scenery as an harassed American executive journeys with a comedian 'hrough hair-raising and hilarious navels around the country by way of Would War I r Showscan's "Big Ball" film at Caesars Palace Play auditions scheduled tJlark County Community College Theatre will conduct open auditions for John Bdshop's comedy, "The Musical Comedy Murders of 1940,"at nfion Saturday, Oct. 7, in the CSCCC Theatre, Room 1201. •Rehearsals will begin midOctober with performances scheduled for Dec. 1-9. : Parts are available for five njales and five females ages 20-50, spokespersons said. All apditions will involve cold readings. Applicants should prepare a 1 to 2-minute comic monologue and bring a resume and photo, they said, stressing that minorities are encouraged to audition. A copy of the script will be on reserve at the CCCC Library. Clark County Conununity College Theatre is located at 3200 E. Cheyerme Ave. For further information, call 644-PLAY (7529). Fall Crafts Fair scheduled ;A Fall Crafts Fair will be held taken at Silver Springs Comolt Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 2$ and 29 at Fox Ridge Park, pnly original and handcikfted works will be conii|ered. At the time of registra munity Center, 1961 Robindale Road, through Oct. 14, either by person or through the mail. Individuals who participate must committee for tierative organization. "I wanted to live in a smaller town than Las Vegas, where there was an emphasis on the arts," he said. He now lives in Blue Diamond. Plyler, who speaks conversational Spanish, has traveled to Guatemalaseventimes since 1980 where he photographed the architecture and Mayans as part of his interest in th American Indian. An exhibit of his May an portraits will be on display in the Natural History Museum in December on the campus of UNLV. "The Guatemalans are wonderful," he said. "My experiences in Central America have all been good. Even during politically intense times, I never saw a dead body—mainly as a matter of lucic." The Guatemalan government, through its Tourist Institute, commissioned Plyler in 1983 to photograph the country however he saw fit That job cuhninated in an exhibit of his work in Guatemala City. ivilchacl Plyler's black-and-white photo of steps talcen in Italy. Hilary Williams, adjunct facility instructor at Clark County Community College, the produ^tio^ is aimed at bringing Gre€K drama with its timeless messages to modem audiences. Although no specific time is set, the play's action could be happening today or tomorrow as well as two thousand years ago. The universal themes such as youth versus maturity, male roles versus female roles, the rights of the individual versus { the rights of the state or moral laws versus sociological law* are as topic today as when Sophocles first wrote them down. Schooled on Shakespeare and the classics in her native | England where she earned a masters of fine arts degree in English from Oxford University, Williams was also inspired to do an adaptation to "Antigone" due to the hesitation she eiux)imtered in English and literature students to tackle the early works. Because of the unfamiliar language and ctistoms, the concepts contained in the classics seemed distant. Yet she knew if they could just get past the language difficulties, they would find the literary works valid and entertaining. Hence, in this version of "Antigone" the characters speak in modem verbiage. The set, designed by her husband. David Dekker, who enjoys an international reputation as a set designer, uses futuristic furniture and employs audience space. According to Williams, she choose "Antigone" because, as an actress, she portrayed the heroine in a London prodoction of the play. 'Tm not trying to emulate Sophocles. That would be impossible, but with this update, I tried to put in more visual elements because we live in the video age. "We also bve soap operas and the classics have strong tones of soap operas. They tain the same elements, as love, revenge, war and I for power. I expect the performances to be a hit with the Lu Vegas aildienoe," she said. Thanks to the Library District dnd its free performances, it means art can take a risk with such classics as "Antigone, All performances of "Anr tigone" art open to the puUk. Call 647.SHOW fa furttsr infonnation. thurwiay, September 28. 19M Activities Hmdmrnm Home Ntmrn, Headerson. Nevada Page Seniors for Seniors to meet Seniors for l^eniors will meet Senior Center Highlights After 20 yea^, voiunteer, friend reunited By Helm VuiDerSys As a result of a recent Highlights column in the Henderson Home] Nem in which Walter "Mick" Mickens was named September's Seni
PAGE 14

Page 14 Hendereon Home Newg, Henderaon, Nevada Thursday, September 28,19811 • Thuraday. Sqptembar 28,1M9 Gonzales, Vasquez to marry Sunday :w;^r : Editor's Note: Tuesday's News erroneously carried the following story prema turely— fis if the event bad already happened. Below is the correct advance story. The News apologizes for any inconve^ence and nuisunderstanding ihe error may have caused. \ Sadie Gonzales of Henderson 5and Steven Vasquez of El Hoate, Calif., are scheduled to exchange wedding vows in a double-ring ceremony at 3 p.m. Saturday at St. Peter's Catholic ;Chttrch in Henderson. Father iCaesar Caviglia will conduct 'the ritual sacrament. More :than 200 persons are expected •.to attend, spokespersons said. Th bride-to-be is the daughter of Elsa Gonzales of ihenderson. The groom is the flon of Alfonso and Gloria Vasquez of El Monte, Calif. Miss Gonzales will be given away by her brother, who is stationed at Ft. Meade, Md. Matron of honor is the bride's sister, Mrs. Mark McGinty of Henderson. Bridesmaids include two of Miss Gonzales' cousins, Cohnie Sandoval and Sandra Gonzales, both of Henderson; two of the groom's cousins, Natalie and Jackie Likens of California; and Jane Garcia, also of California, a friend of both the bride and groom. Ring bearer will be Rudy Sandoval, son of Michael and Betty Sandoval of Henderson, a cousin. Similarly, another cousin, Amanda Sandoval, daughter of Manuel and Erin Sandoval of Las Vegas, and a neice, Vannessa Gomez, daughter of Deana Gomez, also of Las Vegas, will perform the duties of flower girls. Mark McGinty of Henderson, brother-in-law of Miss Gonzales, will be the best Sadie Gonzales and Steven Vasquez man. Ushers include the bride's Verde Restaurant will cater the brothers, Gilbert and Mario Gonzales, both of Henderson; the groom's brothers, Chris and Andre Vasquez, both of California; and David Apodaca of California, a friend qf the groom. Following the ceremony, the affair. Music will be provided by the Arco Iris band. The wedding cake, a pink, three-tier creation plus two satellites, containing a fountain and bearing two white 'swans, will be provided by Boblin's Bakery, with Henderson's Armory Hill. Casa This week Young athletes go for gold wedding party and guests will additional decorations by the attend a" reception at family. The couple has planned a week-long honeymoon at Lake Tahoe, after which they will reside in Henderson, family spokespersons said. The bride's gown, veil and flowers are being created by .} By Fred Florea What's the payoff for our youth in saying, "No To Drugs"? Nevada can point With pride that our state, jpnlike any other state in the .fJnion, can claim not one, but jCwo true stories that saying no jjo drugs by our youth has paid iiff by reaching for the gold. One story is that of Fenando §anchez, 16, from North Las iVegas, who won the Nevada State Junior Olympic boxing ehampionship and then went to Ireland to win the International Junior Olympic boxing Championship. The other story 9 that of Juan Carlos Canosa, I 17-year-old Clark High School student who won the State and National Junior Olympic Tae Kwon-Do Championship. Juan Carlos Canosa, or Carlos as his friends call him, was born in Galicia, Spain, in |972. With the prodding of his flncle, he began his interest in' I'ae Kwon-Do at the tender age if six years. Seven years later, with the energy of a 13-year^Id, he began to compete in the )t;300-year-old oriental art of ^If defense. > Elder Jose Canosa studied jiido and was into auto racing in Europe. After he noticed how his son took to the orienijil art—like a the proverbial dflick takes to water—Jose l^gan to encourage Carlos ^riously. > The Canosa family left their native Spain and took up Horace Greeley's age old advice: "Go west, young man," and made Las Vegas their home. Carlos continued his martial arts at Kim's World Tae Kwon-Do Studios, located in Commerical Center. His teacher, an 8th-degree black belt, quickly saw the potential in Juan Carlos and started the youngster on an intensive training program. On May 13, after all the encouragement Of his parents and the training he received, Carlos won the Junior Olympics Gold Medal from the State of Nevada. As though that was not enough, Carlos and his father then went on to Rochester, N. Y., to compete in the 9th USTU National Junior Olympic Tae Kwon-Do Championships. Carlos reached for the gold and got it. On the road looking for Presidential appointments. Our Washington news source has it that Cleveland disabled attorney Evan Kemp has been named by President George Bush as the new Chairman for the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. If confirmed by the Senate, Kemp will be the first Anglo to hold the EEOC chairmanship for some time. Meanwhile incumbent Clarence Thomas is slated to be Bush's nominee as Federal Appellate Court Judge, a position which was denied to Robert Bork. Sen. Orrin Hatch has named Fernado Oaxaca as chairman to the Advisory Committee of the U.S. Senate Task Force on Hispanic Affairs. Oaxaca currently heads the public relations firm of Coronado Communication Corp. in Los Angeles. Maybe now the Hispanic news media can get news from the Task Force. By the by. Sen. Hany Reid was recently appointed to that senatorial task force and we should be hearing from him about those issues in the very near future. Speaking of Sen. Hatch. Donicio Morales, president of the Mexican-American Opportunity Foundation in Los Angeles, will honor Sen. Hatch on Oct. 13. MAOP will host its annual Recognition Award Banquet on that date. More on this later. The ever-increasing Hispanic community in Las Vegas. A few months ago we saw the growth and the diversity of our Hispanic community in Las Vegas with the beginning of the Columbian Club. Now it's the Peruanos. The newly formed organization will have its first picnic at Sunset Park beginning at noon Sunday. So come out and have some good food from Peru and meet the newest organization in Southern Nevada. Memo to politicians: See you there?? If you don't succeed at first, try and try again. Certainly Tom Rodriguez, Hispanic activist and former Hispanics in Politics chairman, believes in this saying: According to a news story in the Las Vegas Sun, Tom is slated to fill the affirmative action slot^ the Clark County School District. Informed sources have it that Rodriguesz applied for the same position with the state, only to lose his bid to Ann MuUer. We shall see. Eleganza Boutique. CASA VERDE GREAT FOOT LONG SUBMARINES DELIVERY SERVICE 564-2121 842 Buldr Hwy., Hndrson 2 Christian Center • "7*" >i 571 Adams Blvd 293-7773 • t"^"^) Boulder City .. ^^--^''Only 15 minutes from Henderson Of Course!" f SUNDAY OCT. 1 8:15 & 10:30 A.M. Pastor Marjoria KItchell '^THE HOLY SPIRIT" 6 P.M. Praise Celebration and Comhiunion "Beautiful Music-All Services" 9:30 a.m. Sunday School Monday 7:00 p.m. Youth Night WEOHESOAY 9:30 a.m. Womon'a CoHaa Hour and Bible Study 7:00,p.m. BlWa Studies For All Agas HOME OF CHRISTIAN CENTER SCHOOL AND DAY CARE CENTER OTUNCIL IS IN SESSION-CWWreii from Breakout, an organizers try to iiidude to make the program more exdting, pRD ikrogram for ehUdnn enroUed in yearnond scliopb tliey aaid. Breakoat enrollment is ongoing. For more inforbat on quad-break, tour Qty Hall with Mayor Kesterson, mation, caU HPRD at 666-2124. ffhe tour was one of the unannounced activities that Meto ay BM aaktr Gov. Miller names Ramadan to head drug division ^eifvuf'^ S • r I ,..M -j;ai /?• (seRB^'J! '**''^-:;...v .••.^•. • ^ wm WASHINGTON-Sen. Harry Reid last week began his push in the Senate to pass legislation to use closed military bases as prisons for drug dealers. Reid's legislation was immediately praised on the Senate floor by Republicans and Democrats alike. Reid introduced the "Drug Prison Act" of 1989 on July 25. The legislation gives the Federal Bureau of Prisons the Authority to convert closed military facilities into prisons for convicted drug dealers and drug kingpins. ~ Sen. Reid said: "Drugs are the most praised on the Senate floor by Sens. Alfonse D'Amato, and James Exon, who asked to cosponsor the legislation. Republican D'Amato said: "I would like to commend the distinguished senator for his vision and, indeed, his thoughtfulness, in urging that we use all of the resources of this country in the battle against drugs and, indeed, the military facilities that can he utilized and turned into prisons. There is no excuse for our languishing in this war." Referring to the war on drugs and the debate over how to pay for it, Sen. Exon said: "T. believe, that with the tremendous exdevastating problem in our pense it faces, anything we can country today. In the coming do to follow up on suggestions THE STEAK HOUSE For an Evening of Tine Dining at AfTordable Prices —THIS MONTH'S NEW SPECIALS— Porterhouse Steak ^8.95 Steak Diane $15.95 A Delicious Steak Dish Prepared At Your Table ir* QK Cajun Shrimp • ^^^-^ •' "^ Tasty Cajun Shrimp with Sauce a oc Chicken Janee / • • • n" •' *-^ Chicken Breast Stuffed with Apple Almond Dressing — NEW PRICES — King Cut Prime Pib 22-oz $8.95 16-oz. Cut of Prime Dib w/Au Jus $6.95 Chicken Kiev Vcloute • $5.95 5onele*a Chicken Brcaat StufTcd w/Garlic Butter Dolled & Baked to Perfection m m ^ SERVED S-11 P.M. DcAcrvBtioos Decofflmeadcd 295-5000 weeks, there will be much debate over how much money is needed to win the war against drugs. President Bush made by the governors and others for less expensive penal facilities, then we are going to be able to save that money and wants to spend $1.5 billion on put it on other parts of the drug new prison construction. It program that need attention. doesn't make any sense to talk about spending money we don't have when closed military bases could be turned into priiBons at a fraction of the cost. ."iVe can fight the drug war and save money. My Drug Prvon Act does both. It should b^irincluded in the National Dt^g Control Policy." ^e National Governor's Aoiociation has urged the praident to use closed military baaes as prisons for drug offenders. Florida Gov. Bob Martiivz has said: The land is thgre. The facilities are there. VtVre not talking big money." jteid's tough money-saving piAposal was immediately "I congratulate the senator from Nevada for his excellent remarks. They make an awful lot of sense." There is a nationwide "prison space crisis" that is devastating federal, state and local efforts to fight the drug problem. According to the Bureau of Prisons, the federal inmate population has grown by more than 20,000 since 1981. Most recent convictions are drugrelated. The existing prisons cannot accommodate this increase in the number of inmates, offlcials said. Bureau of Prison statistics indicate that 44 percent of inmates currently in the prison system are drug offenders. The latest projections by the Department of Justice indicate that the Bureau of Prisons will house 94,000 inmates by the year 1995.65,000 of those will be drug-related convictioins. In August of this year, the National Governor's Association made anti-drug policy recommendations to President Bush, including one explaining the economic benefits of using closed military bases to house drug offenders. Earlier this year, U.S. Council of Mayors resolution committee unanimously approved a measure, urging Congress to convert closed military bases into drug prisons. d I 1^ ^ LAKE MEAD LAUNDROMAT 842 E. Lak Mad Driv, Henderson 564-4047 Try Our Fluff & Fold Service.. .65^ a lb. • WASHERS • DRYERS • BIG WASHERS Ask About Our Discount Csrd OPEN 7 DAYS HOURS: 7 A.M.-LAST LOAD 10 P.M. Mgr. ShMty Bsardcn pWefldings E-B4ceptions tiBohventions Seminars Banquets Meetings Garden Setting n Professional And Courteous Staff To Serve You Henderson Convention Center • 200 Water St. 565-2171 c I8t 2 Bottles FREEI with this ad Premium Quality Bottled Water COMPARE OUR PRICE AND TASTE Get The HENDERSON HOME NEWS Delivered to your doorstep every Tuesday & Thursday morning for only $15.00 Per Year Just nil out the handy coupon below and mall HENDERSON HOME NEWS P.O. Box 90430 V Henderson, Nevada 89009 Please start my subscription to the HENDERSON HOME NEWS: Name Address Phone (FOM OFFICE USE ONLY) Enclosed is my check, or money order for $15 for the one-year subscription. Signed HSNDERSON HOME NEWS P.O. Box 90430 Henderson, Nevada 89009 Telephone 564-1881 I ^^_M^ ; ORIGINAL DEFECTIVE

PAGE 15

Page 14 Hendereon Home Newg, Henderaon, Nevada Thursday, September 28,19811 • Thuraday. Sqptembar 28,1M9 Gonzales, Vasquez to marry Sunday :w;^r : Editor's Note: Tuesday's News erroneously carried the following story prema turely— fis if the event bad already happened. Below is the correct advance story. The News apologizes for any inconve^ence and nuisunderstanding ihe error may have caused. \ Sadie Gonzales of Henderson 5and Steven Vasquez of El Hoate, Calif., are scheduled to exchange wedding vows in a double-ring ceremony at 3 p.m. Saturday at St. Peter's Catholic ;Chttrch in Henderson. Father iCaesar Caviglia will conduct 'the ritual sacrament. More :than 200 persons are expected •.to attend, spokespersons said. Th bride-to-be is the daughter of Elsa Gonzales of ihenderson. The groom is the flon of Alfonso and Gloria Vasquez of El Monte, Calif. Miss Gonzales will be given away by her brother, who is stationed at Ft. Meade, Md. Matron of honor is the bride's sister, Mrs. Mark McGinty of Henderson. Bridesmaids include two of Miss Gonzales' cousins, Cohnie Sandoval and Sandra Gonzales, both of Henderson; two of the groom's cousins, Natalie and Jackie Likens of California; and Jane Garcia, also of California, a friend of both the bride and groom. Ring bearer will be Rudy Sandoval, son of Michael and Betty Sandoval of Henderson, a cousin. Similarly, another cousin, Amanda Sandoval, daughter of Manuel and Erin Sandoval of Las Vegas, and a neice, Vannessa Gomez, daughter of Deana Gomez, also of Las Vegas, will perform the duties of flower girls. Mark McGinty of Henderson, brother-in-law of Miss Gonzales, will be the best Sadie Gonzales and Steven Vasquez man. Ushers include the bride's Verde Restaurant will cater the brothers, Gilbert and Mario Gonzales, both of Henderson; the groom's brothers, Chris and Andre Vasquez, both of California; and David Apodaca of California, a friend qf the groom. Following the ceremony, the affair. Music will be provided by the Arco Iris band. The wedding cake, a pink, three-tier creation plus two satellites, containing a fountain and bearing two white 'swans, will be provided by Boblin's Bakery, with Henderson's Armory Hill. Casa This week Young athletes go for gold wedding party and guests will additional decorations by the attend a" reception at family. The couple has planned a week-long honeymoon at Lake Tahoe, after which they will reside in Henderson, family spokespersons said. The bride's gown, veil and flowers are being created by .} By Fred Florea What's the payoff for our youth in saying, "No To Drugs"? Nevada can point With pride that our state, jpnlike any other state in the .fJnion, can claim not one, but jCwo true stories that saying no jjo drugs by our youth has paid iiff by reaching for the gold. One story is that of Fenando §anchez, 16, from North Las iVegas, who won the Nevada State Junior Olympic boxing ehampionship and then went to Ireland to win the International Junior Olympic boxing Championship. The other story 9 that of Juan Carlos Canosa, I 17-year-old Clark High School student who won the State and National Junior Olympic Tae Kwon-Do Championship. Juan Carlos Canosa, or Carlos as his friends call him, was born in Galicia, Spain, in |972. With the prodding of his flncle, he began his interest in' I'ae Kwon-Do at the tender age if six years. Seven years later, with the energy of a 13-year^Id, he began to compete in the )t;300-year-old oriental art of ^If defense. > Elder Jose Canosa studied jiido and was into auto racing in Europe. After he noticed how his son took to the orienijil art—like a the proverbial dflick takes to water—Jose l^gan to encourage Carlos ^riously. > The Canosa family left their native Spain and took up Horace Greeley's age old advice: "Go west, young man," and made Las Vegas their home. Carlos continued his martial arts at Kim's World Tae Kwon-Do Studios, located in Commerical Center. His teacher, an 8th-degree black belt, quickly saw the potential in Juan Carlos and started the youngster on an intensive training program. On May 13, after all the encouragement Of his parents and the training he received, Carlos won the Junior Olympics Gold Medal from the State of Nevada. As though that was not enough, Carlos and his father then went on to Rochester, N. Y., to compete in the 9th USTU National Junior Olympic Tae Kwon-Do Championships. Carlos reached for the gold and got it. On the road looking for Presidential appointments. Our Washington news source has it that Cleveland disabled attorney Evan Kemp has been named by President George Bush as the new Chairman for the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. If confirmed by the Senate, Kemp will be the first Anglo to hold the EEOC chairmanship for some time. Meanwhile incumbent Clarence Thomas is slated to be Bush's nominee as Federal Appellate Court Judge, a position which was denied to Robert Bork. Sen. Orrin Hatch has named Fernado Oaxaca as chairman to the Advisory Committee of the U.S. Senate Task Force on Hispanic Affairs. Oaxaca currently heads the public relations firm of Coronado Communication Corp. in Los Angeles. Maybe now the Hispanic news media can get news from the Task Force. By the by. Sen. Hany Reid was recently appointed to that senatorial task force and we should be hearing from him about those issues in the very near future. Speaking of Sen. Hatch. Donicio Morales, president of the Mexican-American Opportunity Foundation in Los Angeles, will honor Sen. Hatch on Oct. 13. MAOP will host its annual Recognition Award Banquet on that date. More on this later. The ever-increasing Hispanic community in Las Vegas. A few months ago we saw the growth and the diversity of our Hispanic community in Las Vegas with the beginning of the Columbian Club. Now it's the Peruanos. The newly formed organization will have its first picnic at Sunset Park beginning at noon Sunday. So come out and have some good food from Peru and meet the newest organization in Southern Nevada. Memo to politicians: See you there?? If you don't succeed at first, try and try again. Certainly Tom Rodriguez, Hispanic activist and former Hispanics in Politics chairman, believes in this saying: According to a news story in the Las Vegas Sun, Tom is slated to fill the affirmative action slot^ the Clark County School District. Informed sources have it that Rodriguesz applied for the same position with the state, only to lose his bid to Ann MuUer. We shall see. Eleganza Boutique. CASA VERDE GREAT FOOT LONG SUBMARINES DELIVERY SERVICE 564-2121 842 Buldr Hwy., Hndrson 2 Christian Center • "7*" >i 571 Adams Blvd 293-7773 • t"^"^) Boulder City .. ^^--^''Only 15 minutes from Henderson Of Course!" f SUNDAY OCT. 1 8:15 & 10:30 A.M. Pastor Marjoria KItchell '^THE HOLY SPIRIT" 6 P.M. Praise Celebration and Comhiunion "Beautiful Music-All Services" 9:30 a.m. Sunday School Monday 7:00 p.m. Youth Night WEOHESOAY 9:30 a.m. Womon'a CoHaa Hour and Bible Study 7:00,p.m. BlWa Studies For All Agas HOME OF CHRISTIAN CENTER SCHOOL AND DAY CARE CENTER OTUNCIL IS IN SESSION-CWWreii from Breakout, an organizers try to iiidude to make the program more exdting, pRD ikrogram for ehUdnn enroUed in yearnond scliopb tliey aaid. Breakoat enrollment is ongoing. For more inforbat on quad-break, tour Qty Hall with Mayor Kesterson, mation, caU HPRD at 666-2124. ffhe tour was one of the unannounced activities that Meto ay BM aaktr Gov. Miller names Ramadan to head drug division ^eifvuf'^ S • r I ,..M -j;ai /?• (seRB^'J! '**''^-:;...v .••.^•. • ^ wm WASHINGTON-Sen. Harry Reid last week began his push in the Senate to pass legislation to use closed military bases as prisons for drug dealers. Reid's legislation was immediately praised on the Senate floor by Republicans and Democrats alike. Reid introduced the "Drug Prison Act" of 1989 on July 25. The legislation gives the Federal Bureau of Prisons the Authority to convert closed military facilities into prisons for convicted drug dealers and drug kingpins. ~ Sen. Reid said: "Drugs are the most praised on the Senate floor by Sens. Alfonse D'Amato, and James Exon, who asked to cosponsor the legislation. Republican D'Amato said: "I would like to commend the distinguished senator for his vision and, indeed, his thoughtfulness, in urging that we use all of the resources of this country in the battle against drugs and, indeed, the military facilities that can he utilized and turned into prisons. There is no excuse for our languishing in this war." Referring to the war on drugs and the debate over how to pay for it, Sen. Exon said: "T. believe, that with the tremendous exdevastating problem in our pense it faces, anything we can country today. In the coming do to follow up on suggestions THE STEAK HOUSE For an Evening of Tine Dining at AfTordable Prices —THIS MONTH'S NEW SPECIALS— Porterhouse Steak ^8.95 Steak Diane $15.95 A Delicious Steak Dish Prepared At Your Table ir* QK Cajun Shrimp • ^^^-^ •' "^ Tasty Cajun Shrimp with Sauce a oc Chicken Janee / • • • n" •' *-^ Chicken Breast Stuffed with Apple Almond Dressing — NEW PRICES — King Cut Prime Pib 22-oz $8.95 16-oz. Cut of Prime Dib w/Au Jus $6.95 Chicken Kiev Vcloute • $5.95 5onele*a Chicken Brcaat StufTcd w/Garlic Butter Dolled & Baked to Perfection m m ^ SERVED S-11 P.M. DcAcrvBtioos Decofflmeadcd 295-5000 weeks, there will be much debate over how much money is needed to win the war against drugs. President Bush made by the governors and others for less expensive penal facilities, then we are going to be able to save that money and wants to spend $1.5 billion on put it on other parts of the drug new prison construction. It program that need attention. doesn't make any sense to talk about spending money we don't have when closed military bases could be turned into priiBons at a fraction of the cost. ."iVe can fight the drug war and save money. My Drug Prvon Act does both. It should b^irincluded in the National Dt^g Control Policy." ^e National Governor's Aoiociation has urged the praident to use closed military baaes as prisons for drug offenders. Florida Gov. Bob Martiivz has said: The land is thgre. The facilities are there. VtVre not talking big money." jteid's tough money-saving piAposal was immediately "I congratulate the senator from Nevada for his excellent remarks. They make an awful lot of sense." There is a nationwide "prison space crisis" that is devastating federal, state and local efforts to fight the drug problem. According to the Bureau of Prisons, the federal inmate population has grown by more than 20,000 since 1981. Most recent convictions are drugrelated. The existing prisons cannot accommodate this increase in the number of inmates, offlcials said. Bureau of Prison statistics indicate that 44 percent of inmates currently in the prison system are drug offenders. The latest projections by the Department of Justice indicate that the Bureau of Prisons will house 94,000 inmates by the year 1995.65,000 of those will be drug-related convictioins. In August of this year, the National Governor's Association made anti-drug policy recommendations to President Bush, including one explaining the economic benefits of using closed military bases to house drug offenders. Earlier this year, U.S. Council of Mayors resolution committee unanimously approved a measure, urging Congress to convert closed military bases into drug prisons. d I 1^ ^ LAKE MEAD LAUNDROMAT 842 E. Lak Mad Driv, Henderson 564-4047 Try Our Fluff & Fold Service.. .65^ a lb. • WASHERS • DRYERS • BIG WASHERS Ask About Our Discount Csrd OPEN 7 DAYS HOURS: 7 A.M.-LAST LOAD 10 P.M. Mgr. ShMty Bsardcn pWefldings E-B4ceptions tiBohventions Seminars Banquets Meetings Garden Setting n Professional And Courteous Staff To Serve You Henderson Convention Center • 200 Water St. 565-2171 c I8t 2 Bottles FREEI with this ad Premium Quality Bottled Water COMPARE OUR PRICE AND TASTE Get The HENDERSON HOME NEWS Delivered to your doorstep every Tuesday & Thursday morning for only $15.00 Per Year Just nil out the handy coupon below and mall HENDERSON HOME NEWS P.O. Box 90430 V Henderson, Nevada 89009 Please start my subscription to the HENDERSON HOME NEWS: Name Address Phone (FOM OFFICE USE ONLY) Enclosed is my check, or money order for $15 for the one-year subscription. Signed HSNDERSON HOME NEWS P.O. Box 90430 Henderson, Nevada 89009 Telephone 564-1881 I ^^_M^ ; ORIGINAL DEFECTIVE

PAGE 16

wsrt • *•'-• wm^mp Page 16 Henderwn Home New. Henderaon. Nevada \ \ Thursday, September 28,1989 Thursday, September 28; 1989 Hendewon Home Newi H Hendereen, Nevada Page 17 V SPORTS • # Basic to face Chaparral's option attacl( in final non-divisional game By Pat McDonnell NewB Sports Editor The Basic Wolves' defense will face a new challenge Friday afternoon in the last weekend of non-divisional play. Basic will have to stop Chapiarral's vaunted option offense, the top rushing attack in the Southern AAA Conference thus far. The Cowboys, led by senior quarterback Shannon White and junior running back Mark Jackson, have run for over 600 yards in three games. Jackson, who was ineligible last year, has filled in admirably for injured back Greg Matlock. Chaparral Coach Bob ciphnson expected Matlock, along-with White, to lead the team on the ground this season, but it is Jackson who ranks fourth among league rushers and holds a 7.6 yards-per-carry average going into the Cowboys' fourth game. "He has been a real good surprise," Johnson said Tuesday. "He has the ability to cut and %e makes very fluid motions." The Wolves will have to con•tain Jackson, as well as Matlock, who vnR return to the Chaparral line-up after suffering a hip pointer in the opener against Rancho. 'They have two [rushing] threats and White is an experienced quarterback," Basic Head Coach Rich Whitehead said. Johnson said the Cowboys will try to improve a struggling vpassing game. White has completed just two of 12 passes this fall and Chaparral has thrown •for a total of about 60 yards, including no pass completions in a 13-7 victory over Eldorado. But, so far, the Cowboys •;have not needed to worry about an aerial attack. Of Chaparral's seven touchdowns this season, only one has come on a pass. Whitehead said the Wolves will have to actively defend the option. "We will stunt and we will probably be more of an attacking style defense," he said. "If we sit there and read, I think we can get beat." Basic has allowed an average of 180 yards rushing in games against Valley, Clark and Bishop Gorman. Wolves' running backs, when healthy, have also achieved good yardage. Tailback Tyrone Brewer, Umited to five carries in the loss to Clark because of an injured elbow, ran for 98 yards against Gorman last week and carried for 68 yards in the season opener against the Vikings. He has also scored three touchdowns. Basic fullback Robert Richter ran the ball in for three scores last week against the Gaels. He has totalled 146 yards on 27 carries. 'Tm hoping we can get some consistency in our running game," Whitehead said. "Sometimes it is hard to play two good games in a row." Chaparral should be at an emotional high this week. Johnson said the Cowboys' roster is filled with players who participated in last season's 31-0 Basic victory. Those players, he said, will not want to suffer a second consecutive loss to the Wolves, particularly on home turf. "This game means a lot to them," Johnson said. "Basic has always been our nemesis. They have beaten us in years when we had good football teams." Chaparral, coming off a 24-7 win at Las Vegas, enters the game with a 3-0 record. The Wolves, 32-26 overtime winners over Gorman last Friday, stand 2-1. Kickoff is set for 4:30 p.m. Wolves' notes •Johnson reported Cowboys linebacker Alex Moore is questionable for Friday's game. He has a severe bruise above his knee. All-state defensive end James Williams and center Casey Kupish are both nursing sore knees. They are probable, Johnson said. •Basic offensive left tackle Mike Sweet is questionable for the Chaparral game. He is bothered by sore tendons in his leg. • •Whitehead said the Wolves are ready for the Cowboys' "revenge" factor. "They know what happened last year," the coachfsaid. "It's gonna be a good battle." Prep standings Southern AAA football Sunrise Division Team W-L Pet. Basic Western Eldorado Las Vegas Rancho 2-1 2-1 0-3 0-3 0-3 .667 .667 .000 .000 .000 Sunset Division Team W-L Pet. Bonanza 3-0 1.000 Chaparral 3-0 1.000 Clark 2-1 .667 Valley 2-1 .667 Gorman 1-2 .333 Last week's results Basic 32, Bishop Gorman 26 (40T) Western 10, Clark 0 Bonanza 10, Rancho 9 Chaparral 24, Las Vegas 7 Valley 26, Eldorado 14 Friday's games Basic at Chaparral, 4:30 p.m. Bishop Gorman at Las Vegas, 4:30 p.m. Eldorado at Clark, 4:30 p.m. Western at Bonanza, 4:30 p.m. Valley at Rancho, 4:30 p.m. flA/ THE BALL LEADING RECEIVER—Senior wide receiver David Rollins, Wolves could call on Rollins Friday to exploit a Chaparral pictured making a catch against Bishop Gorman, is the top secondary which was troubled by pass interference calls last Basic pass receiver. He has seven catches for 91 yards. The week. photo by Jeff Cowen Rancho hands Basic another volleyball loss NET GAIN-The Lady Wolves' Shonna Wicklund goes up to block a Rancho hit Tuesday. Also defending for Basic By Pat McDonnell News Sports Editor The Basic High Lady Wolves is Rebecca Virden, left, and Kathy Larrimore, right. Photo by Jeff Cowen helped Rancho rebound from a slow start Tuesday, dropping their seventh straight volleyball match, 15-13, 15-8 at Basic. The defeat came despite a strong first half effort by the Lady Wolves, allowing the home team to take leads of 10-5 and 11-7 before losing. Basic, now 0-7, fell behind early in the second game, mounted a brief comeback, then struggled through the final points of the match. Lady Wolves senior Lisa Brezette led the Basic upset bid with a two-game total of four kills and nine blocks. Tanya Blackburn had seven digs. Junior Melonie Soffer recorded seven service points. Revonda Whitley headed the Rancho effort with seven kills. Tina Bagg compiled 11 assists and Heather Jarrett had seven service points. "She played a key role," Rancho Head Coach Bonnie Flaagan said of Jarrett. "I thought she was the player of the game." Basic Head Coach C. J. Curry tried to shake up the Lady Wolves with various line-up changes. "We're trying to find the right combination and we haven't yet," Curry said after the match. Rancho, which improved to 4-3 with the victory, varied its offensive attack, sometimes setting up Whitley for a spike and using tip shots at the net to cross up the Lady Wolves. Curry said Basic had difficulty reading the Lady Rams' strategy changes. The Lady Wolves' lack of execution troubles the coaching staff. Curry said. "If it is 10-5 [Basic] and we cannot put someone away, it's scary," she said. The 2-5 Western Warriors provide the next opposition in a 4 p.m. match today at Basic. JV wins in straight sets The Lady Wolves junior varsity outscored Rancho Tuesday, 17-15, 15-3. Karey Stumbaugh was the key Basic player, serving for the first 10 points in the second game. World Series will end up in the Bay, as Giants, A's win playoff battles By Pat McDonnell News Sports Editor All right, baseball fans. It's here. That magical time of year you have been waiting for. The major league playoffs begin Tuesday in the American League and Wednesday in the National. For the next three weeks, prepare for an allout wave of key hits, game-saving catches and big strikeouts. Despite the fact that only the Chicago Cubs have earned their way yito the playoffs (as of Wednesday), expect to see the San Francisco Giants, Oakland Athletics and Toronto Blue Jays join the Cubs in the battle for World Series berths, as well. Although the Baltimore Orioles have a good shot at dethroning the Blue Jays this weekend, in a head-to-head Skydome tussle, Toronto should be able to hold on to its slim lead. Look for reliever Tom Henke to bail out the Jays in at least two games this weekend. With the AL East title decided by Sunday, the Blue Jays, A's, Cubs and Giants can get down to the business of the League Championship Series. Toronto has three good starting pitchers in John Cerutti,'Dave Stieb and Mike Flanagan, but Oakland can counter with four aces (Mike Moore, Dave Stewart, Storm Davis and Bob Welch). The Blue Jays match the Athletics' big bats. Toronto's George Bell and Fred McGriff rate with Jose Canseco and Mark McGwire. With a week to go in the season, the Blue Jays had hit about 20 more home runs than their Westem Division counterparts. The key to the series will come down to the performances of two players: The Athletics' Carney Lansford and Toronto's Bell. Whoever has a better week will lead his team to victory. Prediction: Oakland (with timely hitting from Lansford) defeats Toronto in six games. In the National League playoffs, the Giants have never won a World Series since they moved to San Francisco in 1958. The Cube have failed to go all the way for the last 81 years. Pitching will rule the match-up of hungry teams. The Giants bring out Scott Garrelts, Don Robinson, Rick Reuschel, Mike LaCoss and Bob Knepper with a combined record of 59-44. The Cubs' main starters (Greg Maddux, Rick Sutclif fe, Mike Bielecki, Paul Kilgus and Scott Sanderson) tallied a mark of 67-49. San Francisco appears to have more depth | in the bullpen, an important factor in the seven} game playoffs. Manager Roger Craig can turn | to either Steve Bedrosian or Craig Lefferts t for relief. The Cubs have little beyond Mitch | Williams, although "The Wild Thing" is a certifiable savior with 36 rescues. Look for Giants veteran Ken Oberkfell to t come off the bench and pace San Francisco ( to a seven-game series victory. Lady Wolves' golfers ease to win over Las Vegas ^^' Deana Smith and Laurie .Trueworthy paced the Basic ^^y Wolves to a one-sided golf Sctory over Las Vegas Tues.^ at Black Mountain Country Club. Smith led Basic, now 2-3, with a nine-hole score of 51 for medalist honors. Trueworthy was next at 52. The Lady Wolves' 293-394 victory over the Lady Wildcats was also secured by Patti Morian, Tracy Paterson and Donna Rutledge. Morian and Paterson shot 638 and Rutledge scored 64. Last Thursday, Basic lost a home match with Clark, 287-318. Trueworthy headed the Lady Wolves' effort with a 57. Basic goes against Chaparral and Vo-Tech at 3 p.m. today in a match at the Showboat Country Club. Boys tennis Craig Barlow, Randy Jefferies and Gary Sawdy won all of their singles matches Friday to help the Wolves post a 17-11 win at Rancho. Barlow and Jefferies were both 4-0 and Sawdy took all three of his matches as Basic improved its overall record to 2-3. A week ago Wednesday, Basic fell to Clark by a 191/2-81/2 score. Barlow won four singles matches and Jefferies recorded two victories in the Wolves' homecourt defeat. Basic took on Las Vegas Wednesday in a home match after Home News deadline. Cross country The Basic boys cross countryteam avoided its first dual meet loss since 1983 Thursday, edging Eldorado by a 27-29 score. Although the Sundevils' Brandon Rock and Adam Duis took the first two positions in the varsity race, the Wolves garnered the third, fourth, fifth, seventh and eighth place finishes to pull out the match. Basic Head Coach Larry Burgess said senior Andrew McEvers, who took seventh, keyed the Wolves to the triumph. "He saved us," Burgess said. Sophomore Jamie McGeahy had the top Basic finish, placing third with a time of 13:47. In the girls varsity race, Basic junior Amy Blackwell finished well ahead of the pack of 35 runners to lead the Lady Wolves to a 23-50 win over Las Vegas. Eldorado took third place in the team standings with 55 points. Blackwell's time of 16:35 over the 2.5-mile Basic High course was 93 seconds faster than that of runner-up Wendy Vandeventer of Las Vegas. Five Lady Wolves crossed the finish line among the top seven runners. Both Basic teams compete in a triangular meet versus Chaparral and Bishop Gorman today. Girls tennis Las Vegas won seven of eight doubles matches Tuesday at Basic to take a 211/2-61/2 win over the Lady Wolves. Basic senior Candy Dahpe won three of her four singles sets. Susan Drake and Jennifer Matzke also won a set for the Lady Wolves. Angelica Schwalm and Amy Allord scored a doubles victory. Basic,-now 1-5, gained its first match victory last Thursday against Rancho, 15-13. Dalipe swept four singles sets, (ihrista Ainsworth won three of four singles sets and the doubles team of MatzkeDrake gained victories against three other teams. The Lady Wolves take on Bonanza at 3 p.m. today in a home match. Soccer Eldorado's Carlos Bordinhau scored five goals in leading the Sundevils over Basic 12-0 Tuesday at Eldorado. It was the Wolves' fourth loss in four matches this season. Basic played evenly with Las Vegas last Thursday at the Silver Bowl before falling, 4-3. Jake Sanchez scored the Wolves' first goal of the season in the first half, giving his team a 1-0 lead. Curtis' Corner By Joey Curtis There arc five worid championship fights slated for this week alone, and five more recently announced world championship bouts set for the future as well. Four world championship battles this week are outside the United States. Tonight in Maine,WBA Junior Lightweight Champion Brian Mitchell will go against Irving Mitchell (no relation). Also tonight in Korea, WBC Light Flyweight Champion Humberto Gonzalez puts his crown on the line against Jung Koo Chang. Tomorrow night in Thailand, IBF Junior Flyweight Champion Maungshai Kittikasen puts his title up for grabs against Tracy Macelos. On Saturday, WBA Flyweight Champion Fidel Bassa and Jesus Rojas are matched up. Now for the new boxing news, listed in order by fight date. The war between IBF Junior Bantamweight Champion Ellys Pical and Juan Polo Perez in Italy has been switched from Oct. 2 to Oct. 14. Another IBF clash has been set for Oct. 21. The fight pairs up Cmiserweight Champion Glenn McCrory against Siza Makahthini in England. Yet another IBF tiff, this one matching Super Middleweight Champion Graciano Rocchighiani and former IBF Middleweight C:hamp Frank Tate, has been moved from OcL 19 to Oct. 23 in West Berlin, a new location. On OcL 24 WBA Ljght Heavyweight Champion Virgil Hill, Green Valley resident who is trained by Las Vegans Eddie Fytch. the ageless vet, and former world-rated challenger Freddie Roa(^h, collkles with James Kinchen in Bismarck, N. D. Yet airaihcr IBF encounter which has moved to various sites takes place Oct. 27 in Italy. Juntor Middleweight Champion Gianfranco Rofii is paired against Troy Waters. Finally, on Oct 29, IBF Bantamweight Champion Orlando Cani2^1es defends his championship against an opponent to be named in the Soviet Union. That's right, Russia. • ^t Remember to maik your calendar for the first Martin Luther King Aihateur Boxing Tournament, Jan. 13 through Jan. IS. The tourney will Tvn Saturday, Sunday and Monday at the Maxim Hotel. Las Vegas tied the game before halftime and the Wildcats' Danny Baldonado upped the Las Vegas lead to 4-1 in the second half. But Basic's Roland Garcia and Darren Rothwell added goals in the second half to ac count for the final score. The Wolves battle Bishop Gorman in a 3 p.m. Silver Bowl game today. B VoUeyball The Lady Wolves B volleyball team increased its season record to 6-0 with a 15-3, 15-5 win over Rancho Tuesday. Basic travels to Moa{)a for a 5 p.m. game today. Junior varsity football Erik Oliver threw two touchdown passes and running backs Brin Gibson and King Chan combined for two touchdowns and 254 rushing yards Thursday as the Wolves junior varsity ripped Bishop Gorman 45-0. Steve Baca, Jeremy Richter and Jason Woodard also ran for scores as Basic increased its season record to 3-0. The Wolves have outscored opponents by a margin of 91-20. Ryan Taylor had two interceptions against Gorman. Gibson, Richter and Jose Zabala also picked off passes. The Wolves take on Chaparral in a 5:30 p.m. road game today. Freshman football Joe Braxton carried in a 33-yard screen pass for a touchdown and scored on a oneyard run to pace the Basic freshmen to a 20-6 home triumph over Bishop Gorman Thursday. Richard Reed had an 83-yard scoring run for the Wolves, now 2-1 on the season. Defensive tackle Mike Marshall and Braxton led the Basic defense. The Wolves host Chaparral in a 5:30 p.m. contest today. 'Duel in the Desert' tickets on sale A premier collegiate basketball doubleheader will come to Las Vegas Saturday, Dec. 23, when the Thomas & Mack Center hosts the "Duel in the Desert." Tickets for the fourteam event, featuring UNLV, Iowa, Michigan and Seton Hall are on sale only at the Thomas & Mack Center Box Office. The nationally televised doubleheader features the Michigan Wolverines battling the Seton Hall Pirates. The Wolverines defeated Seton Hall in last year's NCAA championship game. The other half of the basketball twin bill pits the Runnin' Rebels against the Iowa Hawkeyes. The opening game—UNLV vs. Iowa— starts at 10:30 a.m., with Michigan vs. Seton Hall immediately following the first game. Ticket prices for the showdown are $25 courtside, $17.50 center plaza, $12.50 end plaza and $10 balcony. The Thomas & Mack Center Box Office is open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, call 739-3900. To charge by phone, call 1-800-992-2128. ^V%|W|m!" WATCHING THE WOLVES-Basic Head Coach Rich Whitehead is preparing the Wolves for consecutive games against top Southern AAA teams. After Friday's road clash with undefeated Chaparral, Basic opens its Sunrise Division schedule versus 21 Western. I Pheto by Jeff Cowen GVAC to host tennis tourney Video Tyme and the Green Valley Athletic Club are the major sponsors of this year's Jill Gaynor Community 'Tennis Championships, Oct. 30Nov. 5. The tournament, sanctioned by the Nevada Tennis Association and the USTA, will feature match play, daily raffles and a Saturday playday with area junior players. Proceeds from the tournament go to a scholarship fund for local high school seniors. All matches will be played at the Green Valley Athletic Club. AppUcations are available at all 16 locations of Video Tyme, the Green Valley Athletic Club, and local tennis clubs. The entry deadline is October 25. |^f.> Kyds World \0^ INFANTS • TODDL ERS • CHILDREN'S CLOTHIN< i & GIFTS 1100 Nev. Hwy.Suite A Bciulder City, Nevada 89005 (Previously C :oast to Coast) 294-1479 BRliNG IN THIS AD AND RECEIVE 10% OFF Except Sale Items Expires October 7, 1989 Layav^'ays 20% Down, 30 Days Boulder City Resident and Hearing Aid Specialist ^I^Q^IQ £g^ Hearing Aia 's are not just made so you can 'Hear.'' 7/?. ?y are made so you can understand words and conversations better. /?% Miracle-Ear' CENTERS •Boulder City Mon & Tues 9-5 1100 Arizona St. : 293-7945 •Henderson Wed !i Thurs 565-6656 8 W. Pacific, In Heniderson Drug miifcu/iKim^l^ heatres BOULDER THEATRE 293-3145 1223 Arizona St. Monday thru Saturdiiy—Adult .. .M.SO Juniors *3.00 Sanlofs ChlMrM •2.S0 Held Over! RATED PG MON.-FRI. 6:00 8:15 SAT.-SUN. 1:30 3:45 6:00 8:15 PATI ECONOMY SEATING (1st SHOW ONLY) MATINEES $2.50 A LL SEATS JUST t^3 ON SUNDAY V '; ORIGINAL DEFECTIVE J

PAGE 17

wsrt • *•'-• wm^mp Page 16 Henderwn Home New. Henderaon. Nevada \ \ Thursday, September 28,1989 Thursday, September 28; 1989 Hendewon Home Newi H Hendereen, Nevada Page 17 V SPORTS • # Basic to face Chaparral's option attacl( in final non-divisional game By Pat McDonnell NewB Sports Editor The Basic Wolves' defense will face a new challenge Friday afternoon in the last weekend of non-divisional play. Basic will have to stop Chapiarral's vaunted option offense, the top rushing attack in the Southern AAA Conference thus far. The Cowboys, led by senior quarterback Shannon White and junior running back Mark Jackson, have run for over 600 yards in three games. Jackson, who was ineligible last year, has filled in admirably for injured back Greg Matlock. Chaparral Coach Bob ciphnson expected Matlock, along-with White, to lead the team on the ground this season, but it is Jackson who ranks fourth among league rushers and holds a 7.6 yards-per-carry average going into the Cowboys' fourth game. "He has been a real good surprise," Johnson said Tuesday. "He has the ability to cut and %e makes very fluid motions." The Wolves will have to con•tain Jackson, as well as Matlock, who vnR return to the Chaparral line-up after suffering a hip pointer in the opener against Rancho. 'They have two [rushing] threats and White is an experienced quarterback," Basic Head Coach Rich Whitehead said. Johnson said the Cowboys will try to improve a struggling vpassing game. White has completed just two of 12 passes this fall and Chaparral has thrown •for a total of about 60 yards, including no pass completions in a 13-7 victory over Eldorado. But, so far, the Cowboys •;have not needed to worry about an aerial attack. Of Chaparral's seven touchdowns this season, only one has come on a pass. Whitehead said the Wolves will have to actively defend the option. "We will stunt and we will probably be more of an attacking style defense," he said. "If we sit there and read, I think we can get beat." Basic has allowed an average of 180 yards rushing in games against Valley, Clark and Bishop Gorman. Wolves' running backs, when healthy, have also achieved good yardage. Tailback Tyrone Brewer, Umited to five carries in the loss to Clark because of an injured elbow, ran for 98 yards against Gorman last week and carried for 68 yards in the season opener against the Vikings. He has also scored three touchdowns. Basic fullback Robert Richter ran the ball in for three scores last week against the Gaels. He has totalled 146 yards on 27 carries. 'Tm hoping we can get some consistency in our running game," Whitehead said. "Sometimes it is hard to play two good games in a row." Chaparral should be at an emotional high this week. Johnson said the Cowboys' roster is filled with players who participated in last season's 31-0 Basic victory. Those players, he said, will not want to suffer a second consecutive loss to the Wolves, particularly on home turf. "This game means a lot to them," Johnson said. "Basic has always been our nemesis. They have beaten us in years when we had good football teams." Chaparral, coming off a 24-7 win at Las Vegas, enters the game with a 3-0 record. The Wolves, 32-26 overtime winners over Gorman last Friday, stand 2-1. Kickoff is set for 4:30 p.m. Wolves' notes •Johnson reported Cowboys linebacker Alex Moore is questionable for Friday's game. He has a severe bruise above his knee. All-state defensive end James Williams and center Casey Kupish are both nursing sore knees. They are probable, Johnson said. •Basic offensive left tackle Mike Sweet is questionable for the Chaparral game. He is bothered by sore tendons in his leg. • •Whitehead said the Wolves are ready for the Cowboys' "revenge" factor. "They know what happened last year," the coachfsaid. "It's gonna be a good battle." Prep standings Southern AAA football Sunrise Division Team W-L Pet. Basic Western Eldorado Las Vegas Rancho 2-1 2-1 0-3 0-3 0-3 .667 .667 .000 .000 .000 Sunset Division Team W-L Pet. Bonanza 3-0 1.000 Chaparral 3-0 1.000 Clark 2-1 .667 Valley 2-1 .667 Gorman 1-2 .333 Last week's results Basic 32, Bishop Gorman 26 (40T) Western 10, Clark 0 Bonanza 10, Rancho 9 Chaparral 24, Las Vegas 7 Valley 26, Eldorado 14 Friday's games Basic at Chaparral, 4:30 p.m. Bishop Gorman at Las Vegas, 4:30 p.m. Eldorado at Clark, 4:30 p.m. Western at Bonanza, 4:30 p.m. Valley at Rancho, 4:30 p.m. flA/ THE BALL LEADING RECEIVER—Senior wide receiver David Rollins, Wolves could call on Rollins Friday to exploit a Chaparral pictured making a catch against Bishop Gorman, is the top secondary which was troubled by pass interference calls last Basic pass receiver. He has seven catches for 91 yards. The week. photo by Jeff Cowen Rancho hands Basic another volleyball loss NET GAIN-The Lady Wolves' Shonna Wicklund goes up to block a Rancho hit Tuesday. Also defending for Basic By Pat McDonnell News Sports Editor The Basic High Lady Wolves is Rebecca Virden, left, and Kathy Larrimore, right. Photo by Jeff Cowen helped Rancho rebound from a slow start Tuesday, dropping their seventh straight volleyball match, 15-13, 15-8 at Basic. The defeat came despite a strong first half effort by the Lady Wolves, allowing the home team to take leads of 10-5 and 11-7 before losing. Basic, now 0-7, fell behind early in the second game, mounted a brief comeback, then struggled through the final points of the match. Lady Wolves senior Lisa Brezette led the Basic upset bid with a two-game total of four kills and nine blocks. Tanya Blackburn had seven digs. Junior Melonie Soffer recorded seven service points. Revonda Whitley headed the Rancho effort with seven kills. Tina Bagg compiled 11 assists and Heather Jarrett had seven service points. "She played a key role," Rancho Head Coach Bonnie Flaagan said of Jarrett. "I thought she was the player of the game." Basic Head Coach C. J. Curry tried to shake up the Lady Wolves with various line-up changes. "We're trying to find the right combination and we haven't yet," Curry said after the match. Rancho, which improved to 4-3 with the victory, varied its offensive attack, sometimes setting up Whitley for a spike and using tip shots at the net to cross up the Lady Wolves. Curry said Basic had difficulty reading the Lady Rams' strategy changes. The Lady Wolves' lack of execution troubles the coaching staff. Curry said. "If it is 10-5 [Basic] and we cannot put someone away, it's scary," she said. The 2-5 Western Warriors provide the next opposition in a 4 p.m. match today at Basic. JV wins in straight sets The Lady Wolves junior varsity outscored Rancho Tuesday, 17-15, 15-3. Karey Stumbaugh was the key Basic player, serving for the first 10 points in the second game. World Series will end up in the Bay, as Giants, A's win playoff battles By Pat McDonnell News Sports Editor All right, baseball fans. It's here. That magical time of year you have been waiting for. The major league playoffs begin Tuesday in the American League and Wednesday in the National. For the next three weeks, prepare for an allout wave of key hits, game-saving catches and big strikeouts. Despite the fact that only the Chicago Cubs have earned their way yito the playoffs (as of Wednesday), expect to see the San Francisco Giants, Oakland Athletics and Toronto Blue Jays join the Cubs in the battle for World Series berths, as well. Although the Baltimore Orioles have a good shot at dethroning the Blue Jays this weekend, in a head-to-head Skydome tussle, Toronto should be able to hold on to its slim lead. Look for reliever Tom Henke to bail out the Jays in at least two games this weekend. With the AL East title decided by Sunday, the Blue Jays, A's, Cubs and Giants can get down to the business of the League Championship Series. Toronto has three good starting pitchers in John Cerutti,'Dave Stieb and Mike Flanagan, but Oakland can counter with four aces (Mike Moore, Dave Stewart, Storm Davis and Bob Welch). The Blue Jays match the Athletics' big bats. Toronto's George Bell and Fred McGriff rate with Jose Canseco and Mark McGwire. With a week to go in the season, the Blue Jays had hit about 20 more home runs than their Westem Division counterparts. The key to the series will come down to the performances of two players: The Athletics' Carney Lansford and Toronto's Bell. Whoever has a better week will lead his team to victory. Prediction: Oakland (with timely hitting from Lansford) defeats Toronto in six games. In the National League playoffs, the Giants have never won a World Series since they moved to San Francisco in 1958. The Cube have failed to go all the way for the last 81 years. Pitching will rule the match-up of hungry teams. The Giants bring out Scott Garrelts, Don Robinson, Rick Reuschel, Mike LaCoss and Bob Knepper with a combined record of 59-44. The Cubs' main starters (Greg Maddux, Rick Sutclif fe, Mike Bielecki, Paul Kilgus and Scott Sanderson) tallied a mark of 67-49. San Francisco appears to have more depth | in the bullpen, an important factor in the seven} game playoffs. Manager Roger Craig can turn | to either Steve Bedrosian or Craig Lefferts t for relief. The Cubs have little beyond Mitch | Williams, although "The Wild Thing" is a certifiable savior with 36 rescues. Look for Giants veteran Ken Oberkfell to t come off the bench and pace San Francisco ( to a seven-game series victory. Lady Wolves' golfers ease to win over Las Vegas ^^' Deana Smith and Laurie .Trueworthy paced the Basic ^^y Wolves to a one-sided golf Sctory over Las Vegas Tues.^ at Black Mountain Country Club. Smith led Basic, now 2-3, with a nine-hole score of 51 for medalist honors. Trueworthy was next at 52. The Lady Wolves' 293-394 victory over the Lady Wildcats was also secured by Patti Morian, Tracy Paterson and Donna Rutledge. Morian and Paterson shot 638 and Rutledge scored 64. Last Thursday, Basic lost a home match with Clark, 287-318. Trueworthy headed the Lady Wolves' effort with a 57. Basic goes against Chaparral and Vo-Tech at 3 p.m. today in a match at the Showboat Country Club. Boys tennis Craig Barlow, Randy Jefferies and Gary Sawdy won all of their singles matches Friday to help the Wolves post a 17-11 win at Rancho. Barlow and Jefferies were both 4-0 and Sawdy took all three of his matches as Basic improved its overall record to 2-3. A week ago Wednesday, Basic fell to Clark by a 191/2-81/2 score. Barlow won four singles matches and Jefferies recorded two victories in the Wolves' homecourt defeat. Basic took on Las Vegas Wednesday in a home match after Home News deadline. Cross country The Basic boys cross countryteam avoided its first dual meet loss since 1983 Thursday, edging Eldorado by a 27-29 score. Although the Sundevils' Brandon Rock and Adam Duis took the first two positions in the varsity race, the Wolves garnered the third, fourth, fifth, seventh and eighth place finishes to pull out the match. Basic Head Coach Larry Burgess said senior Andrew McEvers, who took seventh, keyed the Wolves to the triumph. "He saved us," Burgess said. Sophomore Jamie McGeahy had the top Basic finish, placing third with a time of 13:47. In the girls varsity race, Basic junior Amy Blackwell finished well ahead of the pack of 35 runners to lead the Lady Wolves to a 23-50 win over Las Vegas. Eldorado took third place in the team standings with 55 points. Blackwell's time of 16:35 over the 2.5-mile Basic High course was 93 seconds faster than that of runner-up Wendy Vandeventer of Las Vegas. Five Lady Wolves crossed the finish line among the top seven runners. Both Basic teams compete in a triangular meet versus Chaparral and Bishop Gorman today. Girls tennis Las Vegas won seven of eight doubles matches Tuesday at Basic to take a 211/2-61/2 win over the Lady Wolves. Basic senior Candy Dahpe won three of her four singles sets. Susan Drake and Jennifer Matzke also won a set for the Lady Wolves. Angelica Schwalm and Amy Allord scored a doubles victory. Basic,-now 1-5, gained its first match victory last Thursday against Rancho, 15-13. Dalipe swept four singles sets, (ihrista Ainsworth won three of four singles sets and the doubles team of MatzkeDrake gained victories against three other teams. The Lady Wolves take on Bonanza at 3 p.m. today in a home match. Soccer Eldorado's Carlos Bordinhau scored five goals in leading the Sundevils over Basic 12-0 Tuesday at Eldorado. It was the Wolves' fourth loss in four matches this season. Basic played evenly with Las Vegas last Thursday at the Silver Bowl before falling, 4-3. Jake Sanchez scored the Wolves' first goal of the season in the first half, giving his team a 1-0 lead. Curtis' Corner By Joey Curtis There arc five worid championship fights slated for this week alone, and five more recently announced world championship bouts set for the future as well. Four world championship battles this week are outside the United States. Tonight in Maine,WBA Junior Lightweight Champion Brian Mitchell will go against Irving Mitchell (no relation). Also tonight in Korea, WBC Light Flyweight Champion Humberto Gonzalez puts his crown on the line against Jung Koo Chang. Tomorrow night in Thailand, IBF Junior Flyweight Champion Maungshai Kittikasen puts his title up for grabs against Tracy Macelos. On Saturday, WBA Flyweight Champion Fidel Bassa and Jesus Rojas are matched up. Now for the new boxing news, listed in order by fight date. The war between IBF Junior Bantamweight Champion Ellys Pical and Juan Polo Perez in Italy has been switched from Oct. 2 to Oct. 14. Another IBF clash has been set for Oct. 21. The fight pairs up Cmiserweight Champion Glenn McCrory against Siza Makahthini in England. Yet another IBF tiff, this one matching Super Middleweight Champion Graciano Rocchighiani and former IBF Middleweight C:hamp Frank Tate, has been moved from OcL 19 to Oct. 23 in West Berlin, a new location. On OcL 24 WBA Ljght Heavyweight Champion Virgil Hill, Green Valley resident who is trained by Las Vegans Eddie Fytch. the ageless vet, and former world-rated challenger Freddie Roa(^h, collkles with James Kinchen in Bismarck, N. D. Yet airaihcr IBF encounter which has moved to various sites takes place Oct. 27 in Italy. Juntor Middleweight Champion Gianfranco Rofii is paired against Troy Waters. Finally, on Oct 29, IBF Bantamweight Champion Orlando Cani2^1es defends his championship against an opponent to be named in the Soviet Union. That's right, Russia. • ^t Remember to maik your calendar for the first Martin Luther King Aihateur Boxing Tournament, Jan. 13 through Jan. IS. The tourney will Tvn Saturday, Sunday and Monday at the Maxim Hotel. Las Vegas tied the game before halftime and the Wildcats' Danny Baldonado upped the Las Vegas lead to 4-1 in the second half. But Basic's Roland Garcia and Darren Rothwell added goals in the second half to ac count for the final score. The Wolves battle Bishop Gorman in a 3 p.m. Silver Bowl game today. B VoUeyball The Lady Wolves B volleyball team increased its season record to 6-0 with a 15-3, 15-5 win over Rancho Tuesday. Basic travels to Moa{)a for a 5 p.m. game today. Junior varsity football Erik Oliver threw two touchdown passes and running backs Brin Gibson and King Chan combined for two touchdowns and 254 rushing yards Thursday as the Wolves junior varsity ripped Bishop Gorman 45-0. Steve Baca, Jeremy Richter and Jason Woodard also ran for scores as Basic increased its season record to 3-0. The Wolves have outscored opponents by a margin of 91-20. Ryan Taylor had two interceptions against Gorman. Gibson, Richter and Jose Zabala also picked off passes. The Wolves take on Chaparral in a 5:30 p.m. road game today. Freshman football Joe Braxton carried in a 33-yard screen pass for a touchdown and scored on a oneyard run to pace the Basic freshmen to a 20-6 home triumph over Bishop Gorman Thursday. Richard Reed had an 83-yard scoring run for the Wolves, now 2-1 on the season. Defensive tackle Mike Marshall and Braxton led the Basic defense. The Wolves host Chaparral in a 5:30 p.m. contest today. 'Duel in the Desert' tickets on sale A premier collegiate basketball doubleheader will come to Las Vegas Saturday, Dec. 23, when the Thomas & Mack Center hosts the "Duel in the Desert." Tickets for the fourteam event, featuring UNLV, Iowa, Michigan and Seton Hall are on sale only at the Thomas & Mack Center Box Office. The nationally televised doubleheader features the Michigan Wolverines battling the Seton Hall Pirates. The Wolverines defeated Seton Hall in last year's NCAA championship game. The other half of the basketball twin bill pits the Runnin' Rebels against the Iowa Hawkeyes. The opening game—UNLV vs. Iowa— starts at 10:30 a.m., with Michigan vs. Seton Hall immediately following the first game. Ticket prices for the showdown are $25 courtside, $17.50 center plaza, $12.50 end plaza and $10 balcony. The Thomas & Mack Center Box Office is open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, call 739-3900. To charge by phone, call 1-800-992-2128. ^V%|W|m!" WATCHING THE WOLVES-Basic Head Coach Rich Whitehead is preparing the Wolves for consecutive games against top Southern AAA teams. After Friday's road clash with undefeated Chaparral, Basic opens its Sunrise Division schedule versus 21 Western. I Pheto by Jeff Cowen GVAC to host tennis tourney Video Tyme and the Green Valley Athletic Club are the major sponsors of this year's Jill Gaynor Community 'Tennis Championships, Oct. 30Nov. 5. The tournament, sanctioned by the Nevada Tennis Association and the USTA, will feature match play, daily raffles and a Saturday playday with area junior players. Proceeds from the tournament go to a scholarship fund for local high school seniors. All matches will be played at the Green Valley Athletic Club. AppUcations are available at all 16 locations of Video Tyme, the Green Valley Athletic Club, and local tennis clubs. The entry deadline is October 25. |^f.> Kyds World \0^ INFANTS • TODDL ERS • CHILDREN'S CLOTHIN< i & GIFTS 1100 Nev. Hwy.Suite A Bciulder City, Nevada 89005 (Previously C :oast to Coast) 294-1479 BRliNG IN THIS AD AND RECEIVE 10% OFF Except Sale Items Expires October 7, 1989 Layav^'ays 20% Down, 30 Days Boulder City Resident and Hearing Aid Specialist ^I^Q^IQ £g^ Hearing Aia 's are not just made so you can 'Hear.'' 7/?. ?y are made so you can understand words and conversations better. /?% Miracle-Ear' CENTERS •Boulder City Mon & Tues 9-5 1100 Arizona St. : 293-7945 •Henderson Wed !i Thurs 565-6656 8 W. Pacific, In Heniderson Drug miifcu/iKim^l^ heatres BOULDER THEATRE 293-3145 1223 Arizona St. Monday thru Saturdiiy—Adult .. .M.SO Juniors *3.00 Sanlofs ChlMrM •2.S0 Held Over! RATED PG MON.-FRI. 6:00 8:15 SAT.-SUN. 1:30 3:45 6:00 8:15 PATI ECONOMY SEATING (1st SHOW ONLY) MATINEES $2.50 A LL SEATS JUST t^3 ON SUNDAY V '; ORIGINAL DEFECTIVE J

PAGE 18

Pft 18 HMdenoa HeBderaon, Nevada BIG WINNER—RobflrtG^Hrihst of Las Vegas took home the S rat place trophy and SUM in the recent Las Vegas Boat arbor striper tottmwiwii, His catch weighed six pounds, one ounce. Presenting tiw mmtad is Pat Gripentog. Photo by Jeff Cowen Lines from the lanes Bf Biilh Soehike TOURNAMENT NOIES: JS^wts are filling quickly now for entry in the No-tap toumamBnt at Showboat Lanes, Saturday, Oct. 21. The Arizona & Tucsaaifcowlerettes h^ve invited Nevada women bowlers to join lliemiinttlie fun tournament. Make checks payable to Vi Daly, AZJJVKb-ffap ($12), Phone 293-0997 for more information. The Nevada Women's Bewling Association is holding the seventh annual Senior Toikmament at the Silver Lanes in Tonopah, Nov. 4-5. Entry fees of $20 ($10 singles, $10doubles) are due. They must be mailed by Oct. 5 to Dorothy Smith, Chairman, P.O. Box 284, lonopah, 89049. Entry forms are available at all bowUng hoofieis. :^i BOULDER CITY WBA MEETING: The fall meeting of the Boulder City Women's Betwding Association will be held at 7 p.m. Oct. 5 in the First Western Savings Building (on the highway in Boulder City). BOWLING IS BIG BUSENESS: Here is the second part of the prize-winning article written by Las Vegan Joyce Deitch for the National Women Bowling Writers: "The American Bowling Alliiince wiU bring its National Collegiate Bowling Championships to Las Vegas in 1989. While entry is small, with only ISmtm's and 12 women's teams competing, they are the nation's top collegiate teams and have a large following. "All three membership ocgaiuzations conduct annual championships for their members,''l)oth locally and statewide. This year, the Nevada State men's-eyent will be at Arizona Charlie's, opening April 30 to run two wtjekends. The Nevada State youth event will be at the AMF College Park Bowl for three weekends in May. This event also indkides qualifying for the National Junior Bowling Championdajfps, sponsored by Coca-Cola USA. "All the tournament bowling aside, some 19,614 men, women and children in Southern Nevada are active in the men's, women's and youth associatiims here. Since many of them bowl in more than one league, liieir combined bowHng strength is approximately 30,000. • ^sing $450 as a base aunual expenditure, that means bowlers in the area sptend approximately $13.5 million with local bowling centers. And that's just for bowling, food, beverages and equipment with the bowhog center. "Who and what are bowleiti? According to information collected last year by Market Facts, Inc., eight million American youths, adults and seniors net^larly participate in sanctioned leagues. However, 68 nullien iVmericans visit the neighborhood bowhng center at least once :a year. Their median age is 27.4 years with 38 percent in Hkh 18-34 range, 58 percent in the 18-49 range and 45 percent in, the 25-49 range. Family oriented, 73 percent of them are maaMud and 78 percent own their own homes. They are white ooBrr by a ratio of 75 percent to 25 percent blue collar. Nine)^' three percent are high school graduates and 52 percent ikitve graduated from or attended college. "Local bowling centers employ 2(X)-225 full-time personnel and add part-time emplojw during peak periods. It is difficult to equate their opecations with centers in other communities, since the most successful .operations in Southern Nevada are part of hotel-cBno operations. Even some of the center managers confess 1< being unaware of their total income, since revenues from food service, beverages and slot machines usually go into tteJjjotel and casino operation's coffers. "TTiere is no question itel the result is a bonanza for local participants, who enjqjr hargain basement prizes in palatial environments. The avBrtge^ cost for a game of bowling in Southern Nevada is $1.4E PaintsiadkllMgh game and series with 624-1,725. Ruby Hawkins led thelsigiie with 199-487,255-655 handicap. Thursday, September 28, 1989 Gold Coast 300 helps decide off-road series championsliips Like the classic lyrics from "September Song," the days are dwindling down to a precious few for those battling to the wire for season championships on the HDRA/SCORE OffRoad Series. With justtwo events remaining the HDRA Gold Coast 300 Oct. 14 at Las Vegas and the SCORE President Baja 1000 in Mexico Nov. 11, several of the 16 class titles and all three of the overall championships are far from decided. Veteran off-reader Tom DeNault, San Clemente, Calif., has taken over the lead in the fight for the overall series championship with 211 points at the top of the 1600 cc division, but Class 9 leader Rich Richardson, Capistrano Beach, Calif., with 201, and Class 5 pacesetter Hartmut Klawitter, Santee, Calif., at 200 are within striking distance of the series' grand prize. A pair of Las Vegas drives, Jack Johnson and Rob MacCachren, are currently ahead in the races for heavy metal and mini-metal titles, respectively. Theyll be leading the elite field of off-road drivers from around the nation into the Gold Coast 300, the seventh of eight stops in the series staged jointly by the High Desert Racing Association of Las Vegas and SCORE International of Westlake Village, Calif. The Gold Coast 300, hosted and sponsored by the Gold Coast Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, will consist of four laps around a 77-mile course. The start-finish Une will be located near Jean, 30 miles south of Las Vegas, off Interstate 15. HDRA President Danny Cau said the event will be run under severe restrictions brought about by the recent listing of the desert tortoise as an endangered species. "We are working very closely with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on ways in which we can minimize any impact our event might have on the tortoise," said Cau. "Since our races are run only on existing roads and trails, they have not had a serious effect in the past on the animals." Among the added precautions, however, Cau said there will be no pre-ninning, or prerace practice on the race course, and pit areas will be limited. The Gold Coast will start at 7 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 14. and although off-road events are traditionally open free to the public, spectator viewing will be strictly controlled. Race fans are invited to view the cars and trucks during technical inspection along contingency row at the Gold Coast, from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 13. "We always look forward to the Gold Coast race because of the old-fashioned Las Vegas hospitality afforded the drivers by Michael Gaughan and his staff," said Cau. "From the welcoming cocktail party to the awards brunch, everyone always has a lot of fun." For most, however, it's serious business when the green flag falls at 7 a.m. drivers will have 12 hours to officially complete the event although the faster classes will be finishing early Saturday afternoon. Current class leaders include Bill Church, Irvine, Calif., with a 22-point margin over Las Vegas driver Troy Herbst in Class 1; Matt McBride, Brea, Cahf., who took over the Class 2 lead from Las Vegan Ed Herbst who crashed while leading the Nevada 500 with 20 miles to go; David Ashley, Riverside, Calif., in class 3-14; DarrylCook, Palmdale, Calif., in the 1600 cc Baja Bug division; Evan Evans, Riverside, Calif., still leading Class 6 despite being sidelined by a spinal cord injury suffered in a motorcycle accident; fomouus Indy car driver Roger Meftrs," Bakersfield, Calif., just one point ahead of perennial Class 7 mini truck champion Mai)^y Esquerra, Parker, Ariz.; P^ul Simon, Fallbrook, Calif., in 4X4 mini trucks; Frank Vessels, Mountain Center, Cahf., locked in a close duel with defending Class 8 champ Robby Gordon; Randy Wilson, Long Beach, Calif., in Class 10; Ramon Castro, Ensenada, Mexico, in 11 and Charles Townsley, San Diego, in the new Mini-Mag class. LADY WOLVES' STAR—Basic senior Lisa Brezette sends a spike over the net Tuesday versus Rancho. Also pictured for the Lady Wolves are Shonna Wicklund (21) and Melonie Soffer (33). ^ Photo by Jeff Cowen Basic High Sciiooi CLASS OF '59 REUNION Who put the Bop in the Bop-sh-Bop-sh-Bop? Who put the Lang in Lang-a-Lang-a-Lang Ding Dong We did 30 Years Ago!! Now We're Bacl( for our 30th reunion OCT. 12-13-14, 1989 l\/lissing classmates Bob Albert Leonard Bloomgreen Evan Bridgewater Colleen Brooks Butterworth Patricia Burt Shoemaker Blllie Cureton Leany Wayne Deane Esie Gallegot Crane Larry Gilea Mason Qebe Linda Pollock Shamblin Fay Long Williams Bob Russell Gary Shaw Joyce McKectnie Melvin Means Gary Mears Charles Nason Wanda Reynolds Dinklns Ronald Weaver Jack Kerkuta Ron Kaylor BASIC HIOH ALUMNI A TEACHERS INVITED TO NO HOST COCKTAIL PARTY OCT. 14 AT BLACK MOUNTAIN COUNTRY CLUB. CALL US IF YOU KNOW WHERE OUR IMiSSING FRIENDS ARE OR FOR MORE INFORMATION Lob Kopthlus Foster • 566-7838 Fred Rothwell • 564-5883 Thuraday, September 28, 1980 Henderaon Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News, Page 19 Game season hunting brochures availabie Falcons ready to fly the coop By Miice Donaliue Special to tlic ^iyi r f 1 The Nevada Department of Wffdlifc program creating an artificial nest or "hacic" for four peregrine falcons on top of the Las Vegas Hilton Hotel has come of age. ^llte four young raptors that -.turned'three months old Sept. 1, are ready to solo and have already begun to carve out thei r own niche in the environment, according to Ross Haley, the NDOW biologist in charge of the program. The young falcons have called the top of the Strip resort home since July 1. Wildlife commissioner Kathy Giovenco, wife of John Giovenco, president of Hilton Nevada Corporation, helped NDOW in spearheading the drive to get the raptors in place. "The birds look and act pretty much liice adults now," Haley said. "They arc accomplished fliers and ihey aren't returning to the hacIc site as often anymore." Sharp-eyed Las Vegans and tourists who make the effort to peer heavenward during early morning or evening hours may be rewarded with an aerial show performed by the graceful predators that dive and dodge like combat jets. Windy days are best for watching the peregrines since they like to bke advantage of flowing currents and eddys. Oftentimes, eagle-eyed observers can sec these noble birds perched atop the Hilton or other nearby casinos. One day recently, three of the falcons occupied different letters in the huge Hilton sign on top of the luxury hotel; their eyes relentlessly probing lower altitudes for flying prey. 'Time for peregrine watching is oinning short; however, because they are at an age when we OKpcct them to take off on their own," according to Haley. He said the birds are beginning to hunt on their own and have begun taking prey. "It is no longer necessary for NDOW y" Two peregrine falcons perch on a LV Hilton Hotel neon sign biologists to put food out for the falcons on a regular basis. "Even if all the birds disappeared tomonow, Haley said, "we would consider the program a real success. The whole reason for the Hilton hack was to put more birds in the wild and to increase the breeding chances of wild birds. We believe we have accomplished this, primarily because we have been able to keep track of all the birds for so long and assist them, when needed, to get to this stage in their lives." Haley said there is no guarantee the falcons will remain in the Las Vegas area, but because of the Hilton hack, it is likely they will return. "They do have some fidelity to the nesting area," he added. Haley said there was a hack program in the Ruby Valley area of Eastern Nevada and biologists have yet to document birds returning to that nest area. "What they do know for sure," he explained, "is that one of the Ruby Valley birds was nesting on a bridge in Long Beach, Calif." Haley said the raptors in Las Vegas have made it through a very critical period in their young lives but they sriU face several risks for survival. 'The mortality rate is about 70 percent the first year," he said, "and it goes down to 25 to 40 Guidelines r,-:By Jim Goff :; Fishing tournaments continue to dominate the fishing scene on Lake Mead. Last week's two-day Silver State Bass Anglers .Tournament out of Temple Bar saw a fair catch for a late sumaher tournament. First place went to Bill Andress with 10 fish iiotaling 11.84 pounds. Second place was taken by Joe Kolasky ^th nine fish weighing 11.79 pounds. Third place was taken %y Charles Conchigan with nine Bass weighing 9.47 pounds. .; Big bass of the tournament was a bass weighing 2.78 pounds Xaught by Bob Branson. With the hydroplane races rambling in the distance this past Friday and Saturday, anglers continued to catch limits of stripers feeding heavily along the northern shores of the Lower Basin of Lake Mead, from Swallow Cove to Las Vegas Wash. The morning boils didn't last more than 30 minutes after sunrise, but anglers who switched to Jigging Spoons or live fchad continued to take stripers well into mid-morning. t .Those who have been so dependent on the downriggers have lound that the downrigger action has slowed the past two weeks. With so much bait available, any striper would be a fool to take an artificial lure. Now is the time to consider using live shad, as they will out-fish most any artificial lure for the next month or two. With the late shad spawn this year, the fish are now keying on the bait and are working the bait schools teavily throughout the day. Just because tailwhipping surface action isn't seen doesn't mean the fish are not feeding. 5liey feed heavily below the surface. Early in the morning the bait will try to leave the coves and the stripers will try to keep them pinned in the coves and against the shorelines. Working shorelines with topwater lures and Bucktail Jigs will take stripers throughout the day. With both stripers and bass hugging the shorelines, a white Buzz Bait or small spinner bait can be fished in and through the bushes and heavy grasses that the bait is relating to. '" This time of year anglers must take extra care in the maintenance of their boat batteries. The cooler mornings make those boats a little harder to start and a low battery or dirty connectors will leave you at the launch ramp cussing rather than heading out to your fishing spot. Even if your boat has an alternator that charges the battery, it doesn't hurt to put the trinkle charger on over night from time to time. Clean those connectors and cables and cover them with a good coat pf petroleum jelly to keep them clean. If you don't have a good i^air of battery jumper cables in your boat, you may be sorry. *uy the long 10-foot or so type, with heavy duty clamps. Make jare that if you do use them, be extra careful as an exploding ^ttery caused by a buildup of acid vapor and a spark can cause 2^vere bums or loss of eyesight. J^JCeep your hooks sharp and good fishing! percent each year following that. While these birds can live to be 17 years old, the average life span is about 2 1/2 years figuring in the mortality rate of the first year." Haley cited figures from a project covering Northern California and Southern Oregon that showed of 28 nest sites, only four produced young. The biggest problem facing the birds today are from chemicals in the environment including pesticides and PCBs. The most dangerous pesticide currently causing problems such as thin shells on falcon eggs is DDT. Although it has been banned in the U.S., it is still widely used in South America. Since the peregrine's main food .supply is migratory birds, the flacons ingest DDT through the prey they eat. Haley said peregrine programs across the U.S. appear to be of a phenomenal success—but that may be in jeopardy. The thin egg shell problem is beginning to appear again, as well as embryonic mutations caused by other chemicals. Much more study is needed, as well as continuing projects to enhance the wild population with healthy raptors. The Las Vegas program is only one of many across the U.S., and, hopefully, through successful projects such as this, the peregrine can once again take it's place in the environmental picture. Huriter's safety course offered A hunter's safety course will be offered from 6 p.m. to 9:15 p.m., Monday through Wednesday at the Civic Center, 201 Lead Street. The course is open to individuals 11 years and older. The fee is $5 and is paid to the instructor on the first day of the course. The hunter's safety course is required for all hunters bom in 1960 or later. It meets the Nevada State requirement to receive a State of Nevada Big Game Hunting License. Interested persons should call the Nevada State Department of Wildlife at 486-5127 to reserve a spot for the course, officials said. For further information, call the Civic Center at 565-2121. Sportsman numbers increase The number of people buying state hunting and fishing licenses, as well as the amounts they paid for those licenses, increased for the second consecutive year in 1988, the Wildlife Management Institute reports. A total of 15,918,522 people bought hunting licenses in 1988. compared to 15,812,528 in 1987. Licensed fishermen numbered 31,478,490 last year, compared to 30,345,714 in 1987. State hunting license revenue increased from $345,282,520 in 1987 to $380,747,727 in 1988. Fishing license revenue went from $315,272,561 to $329,833,060 during the same period. < Sniall game hunting season brochures covering the various small game hunts are now available at all license agents and Department of Wildlife offices throughout the state. 1989-90 rabbit, upland and migratory game bird season dates, limits and various other regulations are contained in one brochure. Fuibearing animal trapping and mountain lion hunting season parameters is available in a separate pamphlet. The majority of the hunting and trapping rules and regulations in the two brochures were adopted by the nine member Wildlife commission during an August meeting in Hawthorne. Eariy opening seasons (dove, snowcock, grouse pigeon) were also set by the Conunission, Most of the upland game seasons (chukar, quail, rabbits and some sage grouse) open Oct. 7. The various waterfowl hunts open Oct. 14 in all but Qark County, where the duck season opens Nov. 11, and geese on Nov. 25. The pheasant season will extend Nov. 11-13 in 13 counties, with this same hunt mnning Nov. 4-5 in Claric. Duck hunters will see a continuation of the limit restrictions on the harvest of several species including pintail, mallard, redTongass Bill approved The House has approved legislation to radically change resource management on the Tongass National Forest in Alaska. The act, annuls timber contracts adopted decades ago and poses a better future for fish and wildlife on the nation's largest national forest, according to the Wildlife Management Institute. The Alaska national Interest Lands Conservation Act of 1980 (ANILCA) requires the U.S. Forest Service to supply '4.5 billion board feet of Tongass timber each decade under two timber contracts negotiated in the 1950s^ head and canvasback ducks. The overall combined daily limit will be four ducks, with an eight possession limit in efi^ect. The limit and species harvest restrictions are in response to a continentwide decline in duck numbers. Waterfowl hunters will again be required to use steel shot loaded shotgun shells in most of the state's waterfowl hunting areas. Nine such hunting clubs, refuges and state wildlife management areas where steel shot will be required are listed in the hunting brochure. The majority of the state's fiitbearer trapping seasons wall be similar to last year's. The statewide season for the taking ob bobcat will extend Dec. 30 through March 4.1990. a longer season than was in effectlast year. The mountain lion hunting season will extend from Get 1 through April 30,1990, the same as last year. The harvest quota was raised to a total of 222. Game bird hunting seasons cunently open include snowcock, through Sunday; blue and ruffed grouse, through Nov. 30; and mourning dove and band-tailed pigeon through Saturday. FIREWOOD PRE SEASON SALE CEDAR $125.00 • A CORD DELIVERED FULL CORDS GUARANTEED We'd like to thank all our naw and rapaat cuatomara IRELAND'S WOOD BIN 1425 Athol, Henderson 565-9694 ATTENTION! FATHER & SON TEAM 50 YEARS EXPERIENCE TRANSMISSION • Chang* nuid SERVICE SPECIAL I gl^lPT" C ifl ^^95 Changs trans-nitar ^ • 2^ • AdjMtt bands & linkage ^" ^^ • Road t*st (Ffool wtwl drtva. i4. R.V j ixUij GREEN VALLEY • HENDERSON • BOULDER CITY MOTORISTS! try EXPERT TRANSMISSIONSwa'ra CIOMT than you thinki EXPERT TRANSMISSIONS wamAnma 1554 N. Boulder Hwy. Handaraon 565-6458 AP^ontTttmr TPRRIRI F'S We are "The ProfMlonl" ,_ I CnniDUI^ iJ WE FEATURE PENN20IL AIR AND OIL FILTERM LUBE .^^SX •CHANGE THE OIL •CHANGE THE FILTER •COMPLETE CHASSIS LUBE •CHECK AND FILL THE BAHERY •CHECK AND FILL THE BRAKE FLUID CHECK AND FILL POWER STEERING •CHECK AND FILL DIFFERENTIAL $1995 Wa Do Domaatlc k Foratgn Can and Motor Homaa •CHECK AND FILL TRANSMISSION •CHECK AND FILL TIRES •CHECK AND FILL WINDSHIELD WASHER •CHECK AND CLEAN AIR FILTER •WASH WINDSHIELDS r 306 N. Boulder Highway 6484 Annie Oakley (Sunset & Annie Oakley) 2718 E. Tropicana (Corner E. Trop. & Harrison COUPON— (^^^1 i 5300 OFF FULL SERVICE OIL CHANGE I WE FEATURE PENNZOIL AIR AND OIL FILTERS I Explraa Octobar 31, IMe FREE CAR.WA8H WITM nJLt.SEHVICE_^ j 5 PM-9PM • SPORTS BOOK FreeT-Shirt Witli minimum $1D parlay card or minimum $20 haiftime bet... while supplies last. *1 Hot Dog & Beer Where locals brlai their friends. SAM'S TOWN HOTEL GL GAMBLING HALL Boulder Highway & Nellis 456-7777 / Another fine Boyd Group hotel ORIGINAL DEFECTIVE ^MMi^^ki lAMMMM^a sssmm

PAGE 19

Pft 18 HMdenoa HeBderaon, Nevada BIG WINNER—RobflrtG^Hrihst of Las Vegas took home the S rat place trophy and SUM in the recent Las Vegas Boat arbor striper tottmwiwii, His catch weighed six pounds, one ounce. Presenting tiw mmtad is Pat Gripentog. Photo by Jeff Cowen Lines from the lanes Bf Biilh Soehike TOURNAMENT NOIES: JS^wts are filling quickly now for entry in the No-tap toumamBnt at Showboat Lanes, Saturday, Oct. 21. The Arizona & Tucsaaifcowlerettes h^ve invited Nevada women bowlers to join lliemiinttlie fun tournament. Make checks payable to Vi Daly, AZJJVKb-ffap ($12), Phone 293-0997 for more information. The Nevada Women's Bewling Association is holding the seventh annual Senior Toikmament at the Silver Lanes in Tonopah, Nov. 4-5. Entry fees of $20 ($10 singles, $10doubles) are due. They must be mailed by Oct. 5 to Dorothy Smith, Chairman, P.O. Box 284, lonopah, 89049. Entry forms are available at all bowUng hoofieis. :^i BOULDER CITY WBA MEETING: The fall meeting of the Boulder City Women's Betwding Association will be held at 7 p.m. Oct. 5 in the First Western Savings Building (on the highway in Boulder City). BOWLING IS BIG BUSENESS: Here is the second part of the prize-winning article written by Las Vegan Joyce Deitch for the National Women Bowling Writers: "The American Bowling Alliiince wiU bring its National Collegiate Bowling Championships to Las Vegas in 1989. While entry is small, with only ISmtm's and 12 women's teams competing, they are the nation's top collegiate teams and have a large following. "All three membership ocgaiuzations conduct annual championships for their members,''l)oth locally and statewide. This year, the Nevada State men's-eyent will be at Arizona Charlie's, opening April 30 to run two wtjekends. The Nevada State youth event will be at the AMF College Park Bowl for three weekends in May. This event also indkides qualifying for the National Junior Bowling Championdajfps, sponsored by Coca-Cola USA. "All the tournament bowling aside, some 19,614 men, women and children in Southern Nevada are active in the men's, women's and youth associatiims here. Since many of them bowl in more than one league, liieir combined bowHng strength is approximately 30,000. • ^sing $450 as a base aunual expenditure, that means bowlers in the area sptend approximately $13.5 million with local bowling centers. And that's just for bowling, food, beverages and equipment with the bowhog center. "Who and what are bowleiti? According to information collected last year by Market Facts, Inc., eight million American youths, adults and seniors net^larly participate in sanctioned leagues. However, 68 nullien iVmericans visit the neighborhood bowhng center at least once :a year. Their median age is 27.4 years with 38 percent in Hkh 18-34 range, 58 percent in the 18-49 range and 45 percent in, the 25-49 range. Family oriented, 73 percent of them are maaMud and 78 percent own their own homes. They are white ooBrr by a ratio of 75 percent to 25 percent blue collar. Nine)^' three percent are high school graduates and 52 percent ikitve graduated from or attended college. "Local bowling centers employ 2(X)-225 full-time personnel and add part-time emplojw during peak periods. It is difficult to equate their opecations with centers in other communities, since the most successful .operations in Southern Nevada are part of hotel-cBno operations. Even some of the center managers confess 1< being unaware of their total income, since revenues from food service, beverages and slot machines usually go into tteJjjotel and casino operation's coffers. "TTiere is no question itel the result is a bonanza for local participants, who enjqjr hargain basement prizes in palatial environments. The avBrtge^ cost for a game of bowling in Southern Nevada is $1.4E PaintsiadkllMgh game and series with 624-1,725. Ruby Hawkins led thelsigiie with 199-487,255-655 handicap. Thursday, September 28, 1989 Gold Coast 300 helps decide off-road series championsliips Like the classic lyrics from "September Song," the days are dwindling down to a precious few for those battling to the wire for season championships on the HDRA/SCORE OffRoad Series. With justtwo events remaining the HDRA Gold Coast 300 Oct. 14 at Las Vegas and the SCORE President Baja 1000 in Mexico Nov. 11, several of the 16 class titles and all three of the overall championships are far from decided. Veteran off-reader Tom DeNault, San Clemente, Calif., has taken over the lead in the fight for the overall series championship with 211 points at the top of the 1600 cc division, but Class 9 leader Rich Richardson, Capistrano Beach, Calif., with 201, and Class 5 pacesetter Hartmut Klawitter, Santee, Calif., at 200 are within striking distance of the series' grand prize. A pair of Las Vegas drives, Jack Johnson and Rob MacCachren, are currently ahead in the races for heavy metal and mini-metal titles, respectively. Theyll be leading the elite field of off-road drivers from around the nation into the Gold Coast 300, the seventh of eight stops in the series staged jointly by the High Desert Racing Association of Las Vegas and SCORE International of Westlake Village, Calif. The Gold Coast 300, hosted and sponsored by the Gold Coast Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas, will consist of four laps around a 77-mile course. The start-finish Une will be located near Jean, 30 miles south of Las Vegas, off Interstate 15. HDRA President Danny Cau said the event will be run under severe restrictions brought about by the recent listing of the desert tortoise as an endangered species. "We are working very closely with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on ways in which we can minimize any impact our event might have on the tortoise," said Cau. "Since our races are run only on existing roads and trails, they have not had a serious effect in the past on the animals." Among the added precautions, however, Cau said there will be no pre-ninning, or prerace practice on the race course, and pit areas will be limited. The Gold Coast will start at 7 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 14. and although off-road events are traditionally open free to the public, spectator viewing will be strictly controlled. Race fans are invited to view the cars and trucks during technical inspection along contingency row at the Gold Coast, from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 13. "We always look forward to the Gold Coast race because of the old-fashioned Las Vegas hospitality afforded the drivers by Michael Gaughan and his staff," said Cau. "From the welcoming cocktail party to the awards brunch, everyone always has a lot of fun." For most, however, it's serious business when the green flag falls at 7 a.m. drivers will have 12 hours to officially complete the event although the faster classes will be finishing early Saturday afternoon. Current class leaders include Bill Church, Irvine, Calif., with a 22-point margin over Las Vegas driver Troy Herbst in Class 1; Matt McBride, Brea, Cahf., who took over the Class 2 lead from Las Vegan Ed Herbst who crashed while leading the Nevada 500 with 20 miles to go; David Ashley, Riverside, Calif., in class 3-14; DarrylCook, Palmdale, Calif., in the 1600 cc Baja Bug division; Evan Evans, Riverside, Calif., still leading Class 6 despite being sidelined by a spinal cord injury suffered in a motorcycle accident; fomouus Indy car driver Roger Meftrs," Bakersfield, Calif., just one point ahead of perennial Class 7 mini truck champion Mai)^y Esquerra, Parker, Ariz.; P^ul Simon, Fallbrook, Calif., in 4X4 mini trucks; Frank Vessels, Mountain Center, Cahf., locked in a close duel with defending Class 8 champ Robby Gordon; Randy Wilson, Long Beach, Calif., in Class 10; Ramon Castro, Ensenada, Mexico, in 11 and Charles Townsley, San Diego, in the new Mini-Mag class. LADY WOLVES' STAR—Basic senior Lisa Brezette sends a spike over the net Tuesday versus Rancho. Also pictured for the Lady Wolves are Shonna Wicklund (21) and Melonie Soffer (33). ^ Photo by Jeff Cowen Basic High Sciiooi CLASS OF '59 REUNION Who put the Bop in the Bop-sh-Bop-sh-Bop? Who put the Lang in Lang-a-Lang-a-Lang Ding Dong We did 30 Years Ago!! Now We're Bacl( for our 30th reunion OCT. 12-13-14, 1989 l\/lissing classmates Bob Albert Leonard Bloomgreen Evan Bridgewater Colleen Brooks Butterworth Patricia Burt Shoemaker Blllie Cureton Leany Wayne Deane Esie Gallegot Crane Larry Gilea Mason Qebe Linda Pollock Shamblin Fay Long Williams Bob Russell Gary Shaw Joyce McKectnie Melvin Means Gary Mears Charles Nason Wanda Reynolds Dinklns Ronald Weaver Jack Kerkuta Ron Kaylor BASIC HIOH ALUMNI A TEACHERS INVITED TO NO HOST COCKTAIL PARTY OCT. 14 AT BLACK MOUNTAIN COUNTRY CLUB. CALL US IF YOU KNOW WHERE OUR IMiSSING FRIENDS ARE OR FOR MORE INFORMATION Lob Kopthlus Foster • 566-7838 Fred Rothwell • 564-5883 Thuraday, September 28, 1980 Henderaon Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News, Page 19 Game season hunting brochures availabie Falcons ready to fly the coop By Miice Donaliue Special to tlic ^iyi r f 1 The Nevada Department of Wffdlifc program creating an artificial nest or "hacic" for four peregrine falcons on top of the Las Vegas Hilton Hotel has come of age. ^llte four young raptors that -.turned'three months old Sept. 1, are ready to solo and have already begun to carve out thei r own niche in the environment, according to Ross Haley, the NDOW biologist in charge of the program. The young falcons have called the top of the Strip resort home since July 1. Wildlife commissioner Kathy Giovenco, wife of John Giovenco, president of Hilton Nevada Corporation, helped NDOW in spearheading the drive to get the raptors in place. "The birds look and act pretty much liice adults now," Haley said. "They arc accomplished fliers and ihey aren't returning to the hacIc site as often anymore." Sharp-eyed Las Vegans and tourists who make the effort to peer heavenward during early morning or evening hours may be rewarded with an aerial show performed by the graceful predators that dive and dodge like combat jets. Windy days are best for watching the peregrines since they like to bke advantage of flowing currents and eddys. Oftentimes, eagle-eyed observers can sec these noble birds perched atop the Hilton or other nearby casinos. One day recently, three of the falcons occupied different letters in the huge Hilton sign on top of the luxury hotel; their eyes relentlessly probing lower altitudes for flying prey. 'Time for peregrine watching is oinning short; however, because they are at an age when we OKpcct them to take off on their own," according to Haley. He said the birds are beginning to hunt on their own and have begun taking prey. "It is no longer necessary for NDOW y" Two peregrine falcons perch on a LV Hilton Hotel neon sign biologists to put food out for the falcons on a regular basis. "Even if all the birds disappeared tomonow, Haley said, "we would consider the program a real success. The whole reason for the Hilton hack was to put more birds in the wild and to increase the breeding chances of wild birds. We believe we have accomplished this, primarily because we have been able to keep track of all the birds for so long and assist them, when needed, to get to this stage in their lives." Haley said there is no guarantee the falcons will remain in the Las Vegas area, but because of the Hilton hack, it is likely they will return. "They do have some fidelity to the nesting area," he added. Haley said there was a hack program in the Ruby Valley area of Eastern Nevada and biologists have yet to document birds returning to that nest area. "What they do know for sure," he explained, "is that one of the Ruby Valley birds was nesting on a bridge in Long Beach, Calif." Haley said the raptors in Las Vegas have made it through a very critical period in their young lives but they sriU face several risks for survival. 'The mortality rate is about 70 percent the first year," he said, "and it goes down to 25 to 40 Guidelines r,-:By Jim Goff :; Fishing tournaments continue to dominate the fishing scene on Lake Mead. Last week's two-day Silver State Bass Anglers .Tournament out of Temple Bar saw a fair catch for a late sumaher tournament. First place went to Bill Andress with 10 fish iiotaling 11.84 pounds. Second place was taken by Joe Kolasky ^th nine fish weighing 11.79 pounds. Third place was taken %y Charles Conchigan with nine Bass weighing 9.47 pounds. .; Big bass of the tournament was a bass weighing 2.78 pounds Xaught by Bob Branson. With the hydroplane races rambling in the distance this past Friday and Saturday, anglers continued to catch limits of stripers feeding heavily along the northern shores of the Lower Basin of Lake Mead, from Swallow Cove to Las Vegas Wash. The morning boils didn't last more than 30 minutes after sunrise, but anglers who switched to Jigging Spoons or live fchad continued to take stripers well into mid-morning. t .Those who have been so dependent on the downriggers have lound that the downrigger action has slowed the past two weeks. With so much bait available, any striper would be a fool to take an artificial lure. Now is the time to consider using live shad, as they will out-fish most any artificial lure for the next month or two. With the late shad spawn this year, the fish are now keying on the bait and are working the bait schools teavily throughout the day. Just because tailwhipping surface action isn't seen doesn't mean the fish are not feeding. 5liey feed heavily below the surface. Early in the morning the bait will try to leave the coves and the stripers will try to keep them pinned in the coves and against the shorelines. Working shorelines with topwater lures and Bucktail Jigs will take stripers throughout the day. With both stripers and bass hugging the shorelines, a white Buzz Bait or small spinner bait can be fished in and through the bushes and heavy grasses that the bait is relating to. '" This time of year anglers must take extra care in the maintenance of their boat batteries. The cooler mornings make those boats a little harder to start and a low battery or dirty connectors will leave you at the launch ramp cussing rather than heading out to your fishing spot. Even if your boat has an alternator that charges the battery, it doesn't hurt to put the trinkle charger on over night from time to time. Clean those connectors and cables and cover them with a good coat pf petroleum jelly to keep them clean. If you don't have a good i^air of battery jumper cables in your boat, you may be sorry. *uy the long 10-foot or so type, with heavy duty clamps. Make jare that if you do use them, be extra careful as an exploding ^ttery caused by a buildup of acid vapor and a spark can cause 2^vere bums or loss of eyesight. J^JCeep your hooks sharp and good fishing! percent each year following that. While these birds can live to be 17 years old, the average life span is about 2 1/2 years figuring in the mortality rate of the first year." Haley cited figures from a project covering Northern California and Southern Oregon that showed of 28 nest sites, only four produced young. The biggest problem facing the birds today are from chemicals in the environment including pesticides and PCBs. The most dangerous pesticide currently causing problems such as thin shells on falcon eggs is DDT. Although it has been banned in the U.S., it is still widely used in South America. Since the peregrine's main food .supply is migratory birds, the flacons ingest DDT through the prey they eat. Haley said peregrine programs across the U.S. appear to be of a phenomenal success—but that may be in jeopardy. The thin egg shell problem is beginning to appear again, as well as embryonic mutations caused by other chemicals. Much more study is needed, as well as continuing projects to enhance the wild population with healthy raptors. The Las Vegas program is only one of many across the U.S., and, hopefully, through successful projects such as this, the peregrine can once again take it's place in the environmental picture. Huriter's safety course offered A hunter's safety course will be offered from 6 p.m. to 9:15 p.m., Monday through Wednesday at the Civic Center, 201 Lead Street. The course is open to individuals 11 years and older. The fee is $5 and is paid to the instructor on the first day of the course. The hunter's safety course is required for all hunters bom in 1960 or later. It meets the Nevada State requirement to receive a State of Nevada Big Game Hunting License. Interested persons should call the Nevada State Department of Wildlife at 486-5127 to reserve a spot for the course, officials said. For further information, call the Civic Center at 565-2121. Sportsman numbers increase The number of people buying state hunting and fishing licenses, as well as the amounts they paid for those licenses, increased for the second consecutive year in 1988, the Wildlife Management Institute reports. A total of 15,918,522 people bought hunting licenses in 1988. compared to 15,812,528 in 1987. Licensed fishermen numbered 31,478,490 last year, compared to 30,345,714 in 1987. State hunting license revenue increased from $345,282,520 in 1987 to $380,747,727 in 1988. Fishing license revenue went from $315,272,561 to $329,833,060 during the same period. < Sniall game hunting season brochures covering the various small game hunts are now available at all license agents and Department of Wildlife offices throughout the state. 1989-90 rabbit, upland and migratory game bird season dates, limits and various other regulations are contained in one brochure. Fuibearing animal trapping and mountain lion hunting season parameters is available in a separate pamphlet. The majority of the hunting and trapping rules and regulations in the two brochures were adopted by the nine member Wildlife commission during an August meeting in Hawthorne. Eariy opening seasons (dove, snowcock, grouse pigeon) were also set by the Conunission, Most of the upland game seasons (chukar, quail, rabbits and some sage grouse) open Oct. 7. The various waterfowl hunts open Oct. 14 in all but Qark County, where the duck season opens Nov. 11, and geese on Nov. 25. The pheasant season will extend Nov. 11-13 in 13 counties, with this same hunt mnning Nov. 4-5 in Claric. Duck hunters will see a continuation of the limit restrictions on the harvest of several species including pintail, mallard, redTongass Bill approved The House has approved legislation to radically change resource management on the Tongass National Forest in Alaska. The act, annuls timber contracts adopted decades ago and poses a better future for fish and wildlife on the nation's largest national forest, according to the Wildlife Management Institute. The Alaska national Interest Lands Conservation Act of 1980 (ANILCA) requires the U.S. Forest Service to supply '4.5 billion board feet of Tongass timber each decade under two timber contracts negotiated in the 1950s^ head and canvasback ducks. The overall combined daily limit will be four ducks, with an eight possession limit in efi^ect. The limit and species harvest restrictions are in response to a continentwide decline in duck numbers. Waterfowl hunters will again be required to use steel shot loaded shotgun shells in most of the state's waterfowl hunting areas. Nine such hunting clubs, refuges and state wildlife management areas where steel shot will be required are listed in the hunting brochure. The majority of the state's fiitbearer trapping seasons wall be similar to last year's. The statewide season for the taking ob bobcat will extend Dec. 30 through March 4.1990. a longer season than was in effectlast year. The mountain lion hunting season will extend from Get 1 through April 30,1990, the same as last year. The harvest quota was raised to a total of 222. Game bird hunting seasons cunently open include snowcock, through Sunday; blue and ruffed grouse, through Nov. 30; and mourning dove and band-tailed pigeon through Saturday. FIREWOOD PRE SEASON SALE CEDAR $125.00 • A CORD DELIVERED FULL CORDS GUARANTEED We'd like to thank all our naw and rapaat cuatomara IRELAND'S WOOD BIN 1425 Athol, Henderson 565-9694 ATTENTION! FATHER & SON TEAM 50 YEARS EXPERIENCE TRANSMISSION • Chang* nuid SERVICE SPECIAL I gl^lPT" C ifl ^^95 Changs trans-nitar ^ • 2^ • AdjMtt bands & linkage ^" ^^ • Road t*st (Ffool wtwl drtva. i4. R.V j ixUij GREEN VALLEY • HENDERSON • BOULDER CITY MOTORISTS! try EXPERT TRANSMISSIONSwa'ra CIOMT than you thinki EXPERT TRANSMISSIONS wamAnma 1554 N. Boulder Hwy. Handaraon 565-6458 AP^ontTttmr TPRRIRI F'S We are "The ProfMlonl" ,_ I CnniDUI^ iJ WE FEATURE PENN20IL AIR AND OIL FILTERM LUBE .^^SX •CHANGE THE OIL •CHANGE THE FILTER •COMPLETE CHASSIS LUBE •CHECK AND FILL THE BAHERY •CHECK AND FILL THE BRAKE FLUID CHECK AND FILL POWER STEERING •CHECK AND FILL DIFFERENTIAL $1995 Wa Do Domaatlc k Foratgn Can and Motor Homaa •CHECK AND FILL TRANSMISSION •CHECK AND FILL TIRES •CHECK AND FILL WINDSHIELD WASHER •CHECK AND CLEAN AIR FILTER •WASH WINDSHIELDS r 306 N. Boulder Highway 6484 Annie Oakley (Sunset & Annie Oakley) 2718 E. Tropicana (Corner E. Trop. & Harrison COUPON— (^^^1 i 5300 OFF FULL SERVICE OIL CHANGE I WE FEATURE PENNZOIL AIR AND OIL FILTERS I Explraa Octobar 31, IMe FREE CAR.WA8H WITM nJLt.SEHVICE_^ j 5 PM-9PM • SPORTS BOOK FreeT-Shirt Witli minimum $1D parlay card or minimum $20 haiftime bet... while supplies last. *1 Hot Dog & Beer Where locals brlai their friends. SAM'S TOWN HOTEL GL GAMBLING HALL Boulder Highway & Nellis 456-7777 / Another fine Boyd Group hotel ORIGINAL DEFECTIVE ^MMi^^ki lAMMMM^a sssmm

PAGE 20

^ Pate 20, Henderson Home News, Boulder aty News. Green VaUey News Thursday, September 28, 1989 Thursday, September 28, 1989 Wildlife pioneer-s legacy remembered By Geoff Schneider The death of Wayne E. Kirch in late August marked the closing chapter on more than three decades of resource conservation and service to Nevada's wildlife. He was 80 years old. The passing of Wayne Kirch marks the end of an era for wildlife management in Nevada," said William Molini, director of the Nevada Department of Wildlife. "It was under his guidance that the foundation was laid for management of the state's resources." According to Molini, Kirch's involvement with Nevada's wildlife programs began Jan. 20, 1951, when he was appointed to the Fish and Game Board. He was subsequently elected to the 17-member board by Clark County voters and received successive appointments from Gov. Paul Laxalt and Mike O'Callaghan. He served on the Fish and Game Board (now WildUfe Commission) until July, 1977. He served for 14 years as chairman of the Board from 1953-1955 and 1957-1969. He also served for a nember of years as vice chairman. "More than anything, Kirch will be remembered as the father of Nevada's wildUfe management area system," said Molini. Almost all of the nine areas, totaling more than 300,000 acres, were acquired during his tenure with the Commission." Mohni pointed out that the management areas were purchased and are managed primarily for waterfowl. Of equal significance, they are utilized by thousands of anglers each year and are inhabited by numerous species of game and nongame birds and animals. As a tribute to his work, a management area in eastern Nye Co. bears his name. In an interview conducted two years ago, Kirch said his involvement in the wildlife field began at an opportune time. "In the early 508, wildlife management was a growing field. It was a time when people with vision could make significant contributions," he said. One of the contributions he made was ironing out an agreement between Nevada and Arizona concerning fishing regulations on Lake Mead. "There was a time when no agreement existed between the states and game wardens were issuing citations to anglers from the other state for fishing without a proper license," Kirch explained. 'It took a case of Scotch and almost a week of down-to earth meetings in a Phoenix hotel room to reach accord on (Colorado Special Use fishing stamps that are still in effect today." According to Nevada department of Wildlife records, Kirch's contributions are significant. He championed construction of both the federal hatchery at Willow Beach on Lake Mohave, and the NDOW hatchery at Lake Mead. He served from 1952 through 1977 as chairman of Colorado River Wildlife Council and chairman of the Nevada Predator and Rodent Control Committee. Kirch was also a memer of the Pacific Flyway Council for 19 years and was a member of the advisory committee on federal Land Law Revision. Kirch's many honors include recognition as conservationist of the Year by the Nevada WildUfe Federation, Honorary Life Member Award by the Western Association of State Fish and Game commissioners and the Charles A. Richey memorial Award from the Nar Quiz Master c)Quiz Master, Inc. By Fred Weeks Malapropisms Malapropisms are words which are used inappropriately. Mrs. Malaprop was a character in a play produced in 1775. She was remembered for one main reason; her constant misuse of words. Malapropisms arc often used for their humorous effect. The word originated from the French Language and has come to mean a verbal blunder. Sec how many of the following verbal blunders you can identify and then write in the correct words. Score six out of 10 and you majored in English! An Example: I was so hungry, I gouged myself, gorged 1. A bamboo is an Italian baby. 2. Pardon me for protruding. 3. The team insisted that the empire get new glasses from the optimist. — and 4. My affluence over my niece is very limited. 5. He preached his senjm to a large conjugation, and I 6. The doctor said my perplexes were excellenL 7. Are you incinerating that I am wrong? 8.1 take deception to that remark. 9.1 read all about the families who had been forced to excavate their home during the flood. 10. The combinafions of the hotel arc excellent. B ONUS: Olivia was absolutely rabbit when she learned that she had received a note from a boy. piqw :saisioa ANSWERS suonepouxuiosse oi uojicSaiSuoD puB uomias g ajBHDBAa 6 jouanuui > uoi)dd3V3 % jsLnauiojdo pue ajidiun £ 8unBnujsui 7, Suipnjiui i S3xa[jai-9 ouiquregi tional Park Service, as well as civic awards mnuraerous eluding "Nevada's Outstanding Citizen." Over the years, he was instrumental in securing annual monetary grants from the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority for various wildlife projects conducted by the Department of Wildlife in Southern Nevada. Kirch was bom in Kansas in 1909 and came to Las Vegas in 1936. He worked as a parttime bartender and bouncer at night and worked days in an auto body shop. He opened his own paint and body shop, Wayne's Auto Body, in 1940 and operated it for more than 40 years. He is survived by his wife, Bernice, a son, Michael, a daughter, Marlene, and three sisters. GAMBLING HALL & SALOON 46 Water St., Henderson MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL SPECIAL FOOT LONG HOT DOG 99$ TUESDAY NIGHT RIFLE DRAWING SPECIAL 1 doz. Wings $3.25 WEDNESDAY NIGHT TOURNAMENT SPECIAL B.B.QUED SPARE RIBS $3.95 THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL ALL YOU CAN EAT SPAGHETTI ^, w/SALAD $3.95 Helen & Mary's Family Styla Restaurant FRL NEW YORK STEAK & SHRIMP $4.95 COMPLETE DINNERS SAT. PRIME RIB $4.95 SUN. CHICKEN & DUMPLINGS] $3.95 890 BREAKFAST DAILY • )UNI liRt LU OVINT T|B| CO Hunter's TIRE SALE Special ALL TERRAIN RV $5499 P3a6mni5/B LT2^5R1$/C 3O-9.S0ni5/C 31-10.SOR1$/C 32-11.S0ni5/C 32-12.S0ni5/C P23S/75R1SXL SKMT KMQ PATHFINOen BFQ. J 8t.M (IM SS.99 74.N IT.M lOO.n 7I.N U.M 99.99 M.M tun 109.99 M.M 91.99 117.99 t2.t 103.M 124.99 *T1UILT/A YOKOHAMA TRUCK "V^ 7.00-li MUD TERRAIN RV 7 50-16/0 aoo-iss/0 • 7S-16 S/O 9 SO-ie 5/0 LT 235/8S-1/0 LT 23S/SS-16/E • • ItS/E $80^^ LT23S/75R15/C MUO KINO BFQ MIT •iO.99 '108.99 •82.99 •109.99 •96.99 '118.99 32-11.S0R1S/C •ge.gg '126.99 33-12.S0R15/C •96.99 '134.99 OTHER SIZES AVAILABLE IN T/A t LT235/75ni5/C 30-9.SOniS/C 31-10.S0R1S/C METRIC RADIALS •22J1, FIBERGLASS BELTS issni3 I65R13 175R14 165R1S t75/70R13 185/70R13 185/70ni4 195/70R14 1SM12 • eONOMT PI •as" 26* 29" 29" 32" 34" 15" 37" *20A P165/80B13 PI 95/75814 P205/75B14 P215/75B14 P215/75B15 P225/75B15 P235/75B15 -600-15 STEEL RADIAL WHITEWALL | PERFORMANCE RADIALS | CUSTOM WHEELS I MANAGERS CLEARANCE $0499 ^^ P155/5 P165/80R13 P185/76RU P195/75R14 P205/75ni4 P215/75R15 P225/75R15 P235/75R15 155/50R13 35,000 45,000 50,000 29.99 34.99 39.99 32.99 37.99 42.99 33.99 38.99 43.99 3S.99 40.99 45.99 38.99 43.99 48.99 39.99 44.99 49.99 40.99 45.99 S0.99 39SS M7S/70R13 RWL P18S/70R13 P2O5/70R14 PJ15/70R14 pias/tonu P22$/<0ni4 P1S/0RtS P33/t0nii $18 14< WHT SPK won woo. MOO ouruii 4x6 18.M 2199 32.M 74.M 5x7 21.n 31.99 36.99 83.99 5x8 23.99 31M 37.99 92.99 6x7 3U9 64.99 9.n lOT.H Ml aRAN06 OF CUSTOM WMOLS KHUMkE P165/80R13 18S/60HR14 195/60HR14 195/60HR15 215/65R15 225/502R16 IB60-13 Michelin XA4 Defender Defender Defender 45.99 47.99 49.99 49.99 44.99 129.99 155R12 OrbLOUNT TIRE CO lISCOUNT T IHE CO OtSCOUNT 1 RE LLI P-4 P-44 155H13 34.99 175/70R13 165R13 37.99 185/70R13 P-8 P-6 185/65SR15 69.99 195/60HR15 41.99 i 45.99 1 102.99 i t)l SCOLINT TtRt CO ni*;rntiMT SCOUNT TIRI CO :yYOKOHAMA |$^S99 • ^ Mm ^M 155R13 ^M ^F Y867 1I5COUNI rrBf CO A 509 195/60HR14 $75.99 205/60HR14 82.99 225/60HR14 87.99 195/60HR15 78.99 "NEW" ALL SEASON PERFORMANCE TIRESI AVS A+4 195/60VR15 $118.99 205/55VR16 224.99 225/50VR16 229.99 255/50VR16 240.99 DISCOUNT Tint CO DISCOUNT tlE CO BECAUSE SO MUCH IS RIDING ON YOUR TIRES. Call On Availability Buckle Up For Safetyl MICHELIN XZX/MXL I^ICHELIN XH MICHELIN XA 4 mn 55R13 165R13 40.99 175/70R13 48 99 ]I!5'1 **-^ 185/70R14 59.99 ]!f5 J ^-^ 195/70R14 62.99 165H15 49.99 195/65R15 61.99 54 M P175/SOR13 Pll5/Mni3 S.>9 P21S/7SR15 73.99 P205/7SR14ea.a9 P23S/7SR15 79.99 P205/7SR1S 70.99 15799 %r • PI 75/1 P175/80R13 P18S/80R13 60.99 P215/70R15 78.S9 P185/70R14 64.99 P225/75R15 79.99 P205/75R14 72.99 P235/75R1S 84.99 P215/75R1S 77.99 MICHELIN MXV | MICHELIN EPX I MICHELIN BLEMS $69 99 175/70HR13 185/70HR13 70.99 205/70HR14 83.99 185/70HR14 74.99 195/60HR14 68.99 195/70HR14 78.99 195/60HR15 94.99 '67 ^r Bp 99 P19S/70R14 RBL P195/70R14 69.99 P235/60R15 63.99 P22S/70R15 79.99 P245/60R15 69.99 P22S/60R14 76.99 OUTLINE WHITE LETTER $3499 W • PI 55, P155/80R13 XA4 B/W XA4 XW4 W/W XCH4 RWL XZ4 W/W LXI B/W 175/70R14 P205/75R15 P225/75R15 P205/70R15 P215/70R15 LIMITED SUPPLY CALL FIRST AMKRICAW LAIMCSTIMDOKNOCNT TIM Ca PflOUDLY SERVING YOU WITH 208 STORES NATIONWIDE ^HK^Mi •nRECCIMC W discount'•verythlng but your safety. **** 362S S. Maryland Phwy. I FlMiiinM 6 Twain) 900 N. Nallia (at aonanta) 4381018 6S4S W. Sahara (Balwaan RaWibowA Jonaal 873-5365 4W1 E-FISfniflQO (On BouMar Hwy.) 451-1453 9440 SpnflQ Mtn. (At Polartt) 8769226 390 N. BouWar (in H#iMttfson) 565-8674 Continuing Gallery Exhibits: Saturday, Sept. 30 "6th Annual Citywide Slide Competition": First Place winning entries, cosponsored by the Nevada Camera club (through 10/22). Clark County, Main Gallery. TafoUa Exhibit: Color and black and white photographs by Leo Tafolla (through 9/30). Clark County. Constitution Week: Copies of the U.S. Constitution and related documents exhibited by the Francisco Garces and Valley of Fire chapters of the DAR (through 9/30). Clark County Upstairs Foyer 733-3613. New Ceramic Sculptures: Brightly painted, full-size New Ceramic sculptures by LesUe Safarik, are on loan from the Smith Andersen Gallery. Co-sponsored by the Green Valley Art Association with partial funding provided by the American Nevada Corporation (through 10/29). Green Valley, Gallery. The Civilized Condition: Mixed-media wall and floor sculptures by Diane Butner, deals with primitive man (through 10/31). Spring Valley, Lull Gallery. Earth Mark: Calligrapliy works on mixed media by Char Purcell (through 10/17). Sunrise. Tribute To a Lady: Large photographs by Lee and Gayle Phelps, pay homage to Lola Falana (through 10/24). West Las Vegas Casselle Gallery. Programs: Saturday, Sept. 30 | (YPL = Young People's Library) ^ Author! Authorf: Celebrate the birthday of Caldecott Honor winner John Steptoe, author and illustrator of "Stevie" and "Mufaro's Beautiful Daughters." Noon, West Las Vegas, 647-2117. Good stuff from the library: Create a babysitter's survival bag filled with ideas for fun activities. For ages 9 and up. 10:30 a.m. Green Valley, 435-1840. Introduction to calligraphy: A hands-on workshop taught by Char Purcell introduces the ancient script known as calligraphy, an art form in its own right. Pre-registration is requested. 1 p.m., West Las Vegas, 647-2117. Monday, Oct. 2 A hauntingly safe Halloween: Assistant scoutmaster Bert Friesen shares ideas on how to plan, construct and operate simple, inexpensive haunted houses for home, church or school carnivals. For adults and children, ages 9 and up. 7 p.m., Green Valley, 435-1840 Tuesday, Oct. 3 Gallery opening and reception:'' Southern Europe: Spain, Italy and France," large format black and white photographs by Michael Plyler feature architecture, train images and street photography (through 11/7). 5 p.m., Clark C!ounty, Photography Gallery, 435-0919. Wednesday, Oct. 4 Become user friendly with the library: Volunteer docents Calendar of Events invite you to take behind-the-scenes tours of the library. 10 a.m. Clark County, Main Gallery, 733-3622. Jazz for children: Janet Anthony, member of the Jazz Harp Trio, introduces jazz music and songs to school-age youngsters. 10:30 a.m.. West Las Vegas, 647-2117. The divorce experience: A three-part educational program on the legal, emotional and family aspects involved in the dissolution of marriages. Co-sponsored by Junior League of Las Vegas and the Eighth Judicial District Court, Child Custody Division. Part I presents an overview of court processes and current domestic laws. 7 p.m., Clark County, Aud., 733-3613. Friday, Oct. 6 Antigone: Actors Repertory Theatre presents a modem adaptation of Sophocles'classic Greek drama. 8 p.m., Clark County, Aud., 733-3613 Thursday, Sept. 28 Shel Siverstein Day: Encounter Sarah Sylvia Stout who would not take the garbage out and other imaginable characters. Be sure to vote for your favorite Silverstein poem! 4 p.m. Clark County, 733-3616. Jazz Tom Harrell, trumpet, and George Roberts, saxophone, and their quintet will perform during "Alan Grant's Monday Night Jazz at the Four Queens" October 2. Shows are at 7:30, 9:30 and 11:30 p.m. There is a $3 cover charge and the performance will be recorded for later broadcast on KNPR 89.5 FM. 3854011. Saxophonist CharUe Owens will perform "Jazz at the Hob Nob," from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m., in the Hob Nob Lounge. 734-2426. Jimmy Cook, saxophone plays "Jazz at the Hob Nob" Wednesdays from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m., in the Hob Nob Lounge. 734-2426. Sorta Dixie Jazz Band. Noon to 5:30 p.m., daily except Saturday and Sunday, in the Gold Coast Casino East Lounge. 367-7111. New Orleans Jazz Band. 4 to 8 p.m., nightly except Mondays, Bourbon Street Hotel and Casino. 737-7200. Jennie Mistie, Vocalist and Last Generation Jazz Band, 6 to 10 p.m., Sudays, Moulin Rouge Club, 900 West Bonanza, 648-5040. Music The Las Vegas Symphony Orchestra will present an outdoor "Picnic Pops" concert on Oct. 1, on the lawn at UNLV. Gates open at 4:30 p.m., tickets are $8 for Adults, with family tickets $18 (two adults, two children). Sponsored by Valley Bank. 739-3420. "Romemce of the Spanish Guitar," a fundraiser for the Nevada Guitar Society, featuring guitarists Hernan Morales and Gino D'Auri and dancer Luisa Triana, will be held Oct. 3 at 8 p.m., in the Artemus Ham Concert Hall. Tickets are $15 adults; $10 for members of the Allied Arts Council, Nevada Guitar Society, Las Vegas Chanber of Commerce and the Latin Chamber Henderson Home News, Boulder City News. Green Vsllsj News, Page 2l of Commerce; $8 students, seniors and disabled. $50 tickets include post-concert reception. 798-8077. The Las Vegas Civic Orchestra will perform at 3 p.m., Oct. 8, in the Reed Whipple Cultural Center. $5 adults, $3 sttidents, seniors and handicapped. Sponsored by the City of Las Vegas 386-6211. Theatre "Celebration," a musical by Harvey Schmidt and Tom Jones, will be presented by the University Theatre, at 8 p.m., Oct. 4,5, 6 and 7, and at 2 p.m., Oct. 1 and 8, in the Judy Bayley Theatre. Tickets are $7 general admission, $5 students under 18, seniors, mihtary and handicapped. 739-3353. The final performance of "Rock Stories," by the Rainbow company at 2 p.m., October 1, in the Reed Whipple Cultural Center. Tickets are $4 for adults, $3 for students and seniors and $2 for children. 386-6211. Auditions for Clark County Community College Theatre's production of John Bishop's comedy "The Musical Comedy Murders of 1940" will be held at noon, October 7, in the Community College Theatre. Parts are available for five males and five females, ages 20 through 50. Auditions involve cold readings and prepared comic monologues. 644-PLAY. "Antigone," the classic Greek drama, has been updated by Hilary Wilhams-Dekker and will be presented by Actors Repertory Theatre at 8 p.m. on Oct. 6, 7, 13 and 14; 2 p.m., Oct. 7 and 7 p.m., Oct. 12, in the Jewel Box Theatre in the Clark County Library. The production is free. 647-SHOW. The second City comedy troupe's national touring group will perform at 7:30 p.m., October 4, in the Artemus Ham Concet Hall. Tickets are $8 general admission, $4 for UNLV students. 739-3221. Joe Behar's Community Drama workshop meets Mondays, 8 to 10 p.m., in Sam's Town BowUng Center, room A. 457-0234. Theatre Arts Group Workshop meets Tuesdays, 6:30 to 9 p.m., in Fremont Junior High School's room 709. 877-6463. Fihn "Casablanca," the classic film starring Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman, will be shown at 7:30 p.m., Oct. 6, as part of the "American Classic Film Series" sponsored by the City of Las Vegas. Admission is $1. 386-6383. "In the White City," a French and German film by Alain Tanner, with English subtitles, will be shown at 7 p.m., Oct. 5, in UNLV's Wright Hall Auditorium. Dr. Hart Wegner will introduce the free film. 739-3547. • • • Visual arts ~ ^7 Exhibits opening this week: "Southern France: Spain, Italy and France," photographs by Michael Plyler, will be displayed in the Clark County Library's main and Photographic galleries from Oct. 3 through Nov. 7. A reception will be held 5 to 7 p.m., Oct. 3. Hours; 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday through Thursday. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday. 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday. 435-0919. Inside the action may be hotter than ever, but outside you won't have to worry about your car being that way. Not when you discover the wide open spaces of one of the biggest indoor parking facilities in Las Veeas. A mammoth fivestory structure that s secure. Well lit. Features 1525 large spaces. And a speed ramp that allows you to go from ground level to top without stopping. Best of all, there's direct, convenient access to the newly ..^^ded Olppic Casmo. Which puts vou even closer to oi bigger, more luxurious Race and Sports Book. Additional slot So don't park your chariot just anywhere Drive it to Caesars.We guarantee you'll find it's the best spot under the sun.
PAGE 21

^ Pate 20, Henderson Home News, Boulder aty News. Green VaUey News Thursday, September 28, 1989 Thursday, September 28, 1989 Wildlife pioneer-s legacy remembered By Geoff Schneider The death of Wayne E. Kirch in late August marked the closing chapter on more than three decades of resource conservation and service to Nevada's wildlife. He was 80 years old. The passing of Wayne Kirch marks the end of an era for wildlife management in Nevada," said William Molini, director of the Nevada Department of Wildlife. "It was under his guidance that the foundation was laid for management of the state's resources." According to Molini, Kirch's involvement with Nevada's wildlife programs began Jan. 20, 1951, when he was appointed to the Fish and Game Board. He was subsequently elected to the 17-member board by Clark County voters and received successive appointments from Gov. Paul Laxalt and Mike O'Callaghan. He served on the Fish and Game Board (now WildUfe Commission) until July, 1977. He served for 14 years as chairman of the Board from 1953-1955 and 1957-1969. He also served for a nember of years as vice chairman. "More than anything, Kirch will be remembered as the father of Nevada's wildUfe management area system," said Molini. Almost all of the nine areas, totaling more than 300,000 acres, were acquired during his tenure with the Commission." Mohni pointed out that the management areas were purchased and are managed primarily for waterfowl. Of equal significance, they are utilized by thousands of anglers each year and are inhabited by numerous species of game and nongame birds and animals. As a tribute to his work, a management area in eastern Nye Co. bears his name. In an interview conducted two years ago, Kirch said his involvement in the wildlife field began at an opportune time. "In the early 508, wildlife management was a growing field. It was a time when people with vision could make significant contributions," he said. One of the contributions he made was ironing out an agreement between Nevada and Arizona concerning fishing regulations on Lake Mead. "There was a time when no agreement existed between the states and game wardens were issuing citations to anglers from the other state for fishing without a proper license," Kirch explained. 'It took a case of Scotch and almost a week of down-to earth meetings in a Phoenix hotel room to reach accord on (Colorado Special Use fishing stamps that are still in effect today." According to Nevada department of Wildlife records, Kirch's contributions are significant. He championed construction of both the federal hatchery at Willow Beach on Lake Mohave, and the NDOW hatchery at Lake Mead. He served from 1952 through 1977 as chairman of Colorado River Wildlife Council and chairman of the Nevada Predator and Rodent Control Committee. Kirch was also a memer of the Pacific Flyway Council for 19 years and was a member of the advisory committee on federal Land Law Revision. Kirch's many honors include recognition as conservationist of the Year by the Nevada WildUfe Federation, Honorary Life Member Award by the Western Association of State Fish and Game commissioners and the Charles A. Richey memorial Award from the Nar Quiz Master c)Quiz Master, Inc. By Fred Weeks Malapropisms Malapropisms are words which are used inappropriately. Mrs. Malaprop was a character in a play produced in 1775. She was remembered for one main reason; her constant misuse of words. Malapropisms arc often used for their humorous effect. The word originated from the French Language and has come to mean a verbal blunder. Sec how many of the following verbal blunders you can identify and then write in the correct words. Score six out of 10 and you majored in English! An Example: I was so hungry, I gouged myself, gorged 1. A bamboo is an Italian baby. 2. Pardon me for protruding. 3. The team insisted that the empire get new glasses from the optimist. — and 4. My affluence over my niece is very limited. 5. He preached his senjm to a large conjugation, and I 6. The doctor said my perplexes were excellenL 7. Are you incinerating that I am wrong? 8.1 take deception to that remark. 9.1 read all about the families who had been forced to excavate their home during the flood. 10. The combinafions of the hotel arc excellent. B ONUS: Olivia was absolutely rabbit when she learned that she had received a note from a boy. piqw :saisioa ANSWERS suonepouxuiosse oi uojicSaiSuoD puB uomias g ajBHDBAa 6 jouanuui > uoi)dd3V3 % jsLnauiojdo pue ajidiun £ 8unBnujsui 7, Suipnjiui i S3xa[jai-9 ouiquregi tional Park Service, as well as civic awards mnuraerous eluding "Nevada's Outstanding Citizen." Over the years, he was instrumental in securing annual monetary grants from the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority for various wildlife projects conducted by the Department of Wildlife in Southern Nevada. Kirch was bom in Kansas in 1909 and came to Las Vegas in 1936. He worked as a parttime bartender and bouncer at night and worked days in an auto body shop. He opened his own paint and body shop, Wayne's Auto Body, in 1940 and operated it for more than 40 years. He is survived by his wife, Bernice, a son, Michael, a daughter, Marlene, and three sisters. GAMBLING HALL & SALOON 46 Water St., Henderson MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL SPECIAL FOOT LONG HOT DOG 99$ TUESDAY NIGHT RIFLE DRAWING SPECIAL 1 doz. Wings $3.25 WEDNESDAY NIGHT TOURNAMENT SPECIAL B.B.QUED SPARE RIBS $3.95 THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL ALL YOU CAN EAT SPAGHETTI ^, w/SALAD $3.95 Helen & Mary's Family Styla Restaurant FRL NEW YORK STEAK & SHRIMP $4.95 COMPLETE DINNERS SAT. PRIME RIB $4.95 SUN. CHICKEN & DUMPLINGS] $3.95 890 BREAKFAST DAILY • )UNI liRt LU OVINT T|B| CO Hunter's TIRE SALE Special ALL TERRAIN RV $5499 P3a6mni5/B LT2^5R1$/C 3O-9.S0ni5/C 31-10.SOR1$/C 32-11.S0ni5/C 32-12.S0ni5/C P23S/75R1SXL SKMT KMQ PATHFINOen BFQ. J 8t.M (IM SS.99 74.N IT.M lOO.n 7I.N U.M 99.99 M.M tun 109.99 M.M 91.99 117.99 t2.t 103.M 124.99 *T1UILT/A YOKOHAMA TRUCK "V^ 7.00-li MUD TERRAIN RV 7 50-16/0 aoo-iss/0 • 7S-16 S/O 9 SO-ie 5/0 LT 235/8S-1/0 LT 23S/SS-16/E • • ItS/E $80^^ LT23S/75R15/C MUO KINO BFQ MIT •iO.99 '108.99 •82.99 •109.99 •96.99 '118.99 32-11.S0R1S/C •ge.gg '126.99 33-12.S0R15/C •96.99 '134.99 OTHER SIZES AVAILABLE IN T/A t LT235/75ni5/C 30-9.SOniS/C 31-10.S0R1S/C METRIC RADIALS •22J1, FIBERGLASS BELTS issni3 I65R13 175R14 165R1S t75/70R13 185/70R13 185/70ni4 195/70R14 1SM12 • eONOMT PI •as" 26* 29" 29" 32" 34" 15" 37" *20A P165/80B13 PI 95/75814 P205/75B14 P215/75B14 P215/75B15 P225/75B15 P235/75B15 -600-15 STEEL RADIAL WHITEWALL | PERFORMANCE RADIALS | CUSTOM WHEELS I MANAGERS CLEARANCE $0499 ^^ P155/5 P165/80R13 P185/76RU P195/75R14 P205/75ni4 P215/75R15 P225/75R15 P235/75R15 155/50R13 35,000 45,000 50,000 29.99 34.99 39.99 32.99 37.99 42.99 33.99 38.99 43.99 3S.99 40.99 45.99 38.99 43.99 48.99 39.99 44.99 49.99 40.99 45.99 S0.99 39SS M7S/70R13 RWL P18S/70R13 P2O5/70R14 PJ15/70R14 pias/tonu P22$/<0ni4 P1S/0RtS P33/t0nii $18 14< WHT SPK won woo. MOO ouruii 4x6 18.M 2199 32.M 74.M 5x7 21.n 31.99 36.99 83.99 5x8 23.99 31M 37.99 92.99 6x7 3U9 64.99 9.n lOT.H Ml aRAN06 OF CUSTOM WMOLS KHUMkE P165/80R13 18S/60HR14 195/60HR14 195/60HR15 215/65R15 225/502R16 IB60-13 Michelin XA4 Defender Defender Defender 45.99 47.99 49.99 49.99 44.99 129.99 155R12 OrbLOUNT TIRE CO lISCOUNT T IHE CO OtSCOUNT 1 RE LLI P-4 P-44 155H13 34.99 175/70R13 165R13 37.99 185/70R13 P-8 P-6 185/65SR15 69.99 195/60HR15 41.99 i 45.99 1 102.99 i t)l SCOLINT TtRt CO ni*;rntiMT SCOUNT TIRI CO :yYOKOHAMA |$^S99 • ^ Mm ^M 155R13 ^M ^F Y867 1I5COUNI rrBf CO A 509 195/60HR14 $75.99 205/60HR14 82.99 225/60HR14 87.99 195/60HR15 78.99 "NEW" ALL SEASON PERFORMANCE TIRESI AVS A+4 195/60VR15 $118.99 205/55VR16 224.99 225/50VR16 229.99 255/50VR16 240.99 DISCOUNT Tint CO DISCOUNT tlE CO BECAUSE SO MUCH IS RIDING ON YOUR TIRES. Call On Availability Buckle Up For Safetyl MICHELIN XZX/MXL I^ICHELIN XH MICHELIN XA 4 mn 55R13 165R13 40.99 175/70R13 48 99 ]I!5'1 **-^ 185/70R14 59.99 ]!f5 J ^-^ 195/70R14 62.99 165H15 49.99 195/65R15 61.99 54 M P175/SOR13 Pll5/Mni3 S.>9 P21S/7SR15 73.99 P205/7SR14ea.a9 P23S/7SR15 79.99 P205/7SR1S 70.99 15799 %r • PI 75/1 P175/80R13 P18S/80R13 60.99 P215/70R15 78.S9 P185/70R14 64.99 P225/75R15 79.99 P205/75R14 72.99 P235/75R1S 84.99 P215/75R1S 77.99 MICHELIN MXV | MICHELIN EPX I MICHELIN BLEMS $69 99 175/70HR13 185/70HR13 70.99 205/70HR14 83.99 185/70HR14 74.99 195/60HR14 68.99 195/70HR14 78.99 195/60HR15 94.99 '67 ^r Bp 99 P19S/70R14 RBL P195/70R14 69.99 P235/60R15 63.99 P22S/70R15 79.99 P245/60R15 69.99 P22S/60R14 76.99 OUTLINE WHITE LETTER $3499 W • PI 55, P155/80R13 XA4 B/W XA4 XW4 W/W XCH4 RWL XZ4 W/W LXI B/W 175/70R14 P205/75R15 P225/75R15 P205/70R15 P215/70R15 LIMITED SUPPLY CALL FIRST AMKRICAW LAIMCSTIMDOKNOCNT TIM Ca PflOUDLY SERVING YOU WITH 208 STORES NATIONWIDE ^HK^Mi •nRECCIMC W discount'•verythlng but your safety. **** 362S S. Maryland Phwy. I FlMiiinM 6 Twain) 900 N. Nallia (at aonanta) 4381018 6S4S W. Sahara (Balwaan RaWibowA Jonaal 873-5365 4W1 E-FISfniflQO (On BouMar Hwy.) 451-1453 9440 SpnflQ Mtn. (At Polartt) 8769226 390 N. BouWar (in H#iMttfson) 565-8674 Continuing Gallery Exhibits: Saturday, Sept. 30 "6th Annual Citywide Slide Competition": First Place winning entries, cosponsored by the Nevada Camera club (through 10/22). Clark County, Main Gallery. TafoUa Exhibit: Color and black and white photographs by Leo Tafolla (through 9/30). Clark County. Constitution Week: Copies of the U.S. Constitution and related documents exhibited by the Francisco Garces and Valley of Fire chapters of the DAR (through 9/30). Clark County Upstairs Foyer 733-3613. New Ceramic Sculptures: Brightly painted, full-size New Ceramic sculptures by LesUe Safarik, are on loan from the Smith Andersen Gallery. Co-sponsored by the Green Valley Art Association with partial funding provided by the American Nevada Corporation (through 10/29). Green Valley, Gallery. The Civilized Condition: Mixed-media wall and floor sculptures by Diane Butner, deals with primitive man (through 10/31). Spring Valley, Lull Gallery. Earth Mark: Calligrapliy works on mixed media by Char Purcell (through 10/17). Sunrise. Tribute To a Lady: Large photographs by Lee and Gayle Phelps, pay homage to Lola Falana (through 10/24). West Las Vegas Casselle Gallery. Programs: Saturday, Sept. 30 | (YPL = Young People's Library) ^ Author! Authorf: Celebrate the birthday of Caldecott Honor winner John Steptoe, author and illustrator of "Stevie" and "Mufaro's Beautiful Daughters." Noon, West Las Vegas, 647-2117. Good stuff from the library: Create a babysitter's survival bag filled with ideas for fun activities. For ages 9 and up. 10:30 a.m. Green Valley, 435-1840. Introduction to calligraphy: A hands-on workshop taught by Char Purcell introduces the ancient script known as calligraphy, an art form in its own right. Pre-registration is requested. 1 p.m., West Las Vegas, 647-2117. Monday, Oct. 2 A hauntingly safe Halloween: Assistant scoutmaster Bert Friesen shares ideas on how to plan, construct and operate simple, inexpensive haunted houses for home, church or school carnivals. For adults and children, ages 9 and up. 7 p.m., Green Valley, 435-1840 Tuesday, Oct. 3 Gallery opening and reception:'' Southern Europe: Spain, Italy and France," large format black and white photographs by Michael Plyler feature architecture, train images and street photography (through 11/7). 5 p.m., Clark C!ounty, Photography Gallery, 435-0919. Wednesday, Oct. 4 Become user friendly with the library: Volunteer docents Calendar of Events invite you to take behind-the-scenes tours of the library. 10 a.m. Clark County, Main Gallery, 733-3622. Jazz for children: Janet Anthony, member of the Jazz Harp Trio, introduces jazz music and songs to school-age youngsters. 10:30 a.m.. West Las Vegas, 647-2117. The divorce experience: A three-part educational program on the legal, emotional and family aspects involved in the dissolution of marriages. Co-sponsored by Junior League of Las Vegas and the Eighth Judicial District Court, Child Custody Division. Part I presents an overview of court processes and current domestic laws. 7 p.m., Clark County, Aud., 733-3613. Friday, Oct. 6 Antigone: Actors Repertory Theatre presents a modem adaptation of Sophocles'classic Greek drama. 8 p.m., Clark County, Aud., 733-3613 Thursday, Sept. 28 Shel Siverstein Day: Encounter Sarah Sylvia Stout who would not take the garbage out and other imaginable characters. Be sure to vote for your favorite Silverstein poem! 4 p.m. Clark County, 733-3616. Jazz Tom Harrell, trumpet, and George Roberts, saxophone, and their quintet will perform during "Alan Grant's Monday Night Jazz at the Four Queens" October 2. Shows are at 7:30, 9:30 and 11:30 p.m. There is a $3 cover charge and the performance will be recorded for later broadcast on KNPR 89.5 FM. 3854011. Saxophonist CharUe Owens will perform "Jazz at the Hob Nob," from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m., in the Hob Nob Lounge. 734-2426. Jimmy Cook, saxophone plays "Jazz at the Hob Nob" Wednesdays from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m., in the Hob Nob Lounge. 734-2426. Sorta Dixie Jazz Band. Noon to 5:30 p.m., daily except Saturday and Sunday, in the Gold Coast Casino East Lounge. 367-7111. New Orleans Jazz Band. 4 to 8 p.m., nightly except Mondays, Bourbon Street Hotel and Casino. 737-7200. Jennie Mistie, Vocalist and Last Generation Jazz Band, 6 to 10 p.m., Sudays, Moulin Rouge Club, 900 West Bonanza, 648-5040. Music The Las Vegas Symphony Orchestra will present an outdoor "Picnic Pops" concert on Oct. 1, on the lawn at UNLV. Gates open at 4:30 p.m., tickets are $8 for Adults, with family tickets $18 (two adults, two children). Sponsored by Valley Bank. 739-3420. "Romemce of the Spanish Guitar," a fundraiser for the Nevada Guitar Society, featuring guitarists Hernan Morales and Gino D'Auri and dancer Luisa Triana, will be held Oct. 3 at 8 p.m., in the Artemus Ham Concert Hall. Tickets are $15 adults; $10 for members of the Allied Arts Council, Nevada Guitar Society, Las Vegas Chanber of Commerce and the Latin Chamber Henderson Home News, Boulder City News. Green Vsllsj News, Page 2l of Commerce; $8 students, seniors and disabled. $50 tickets include post-concert reception. 798-8077. The Las Vegas Civic Orchestra will perform at 3 p.m., Oct. 8, in the Reed Whipple Cultural Center. $5 adults, $3 sttidents, seniors and handicapped. Sponsored by the City of Las Vegas 386-6211. Theatre "Celebration," a musical by Harvey Schmidt and Tom Jones, will be presented by the University Theatre, at 8 p.m., Oct. 4,5, 6 and 7, and at 2 p.m., Oct. 1 and 8, in the Judy Bayley Theatre. Tickets are $7 general admission, $5 students under 18, seniors, mihtary and handicapped. 739-3353. The final performance of "Rock Stories," by the Rainbow company at 2 p.m., October 1, in the Reed Whipple Cultural Center. Tickets are $4 for adults, $3 for students and seniors and $2 for children. 386-6211. Auditions for Clark County Community College Theatre's production of John Bishop's comedy "The Musical Comedy Murders of 1940" will be held at noon, October 7, in the Community College Theatre. Parts are available for five males and five females, ages 20 through 50. Auditions involve cold readings and prepared comic monologues. 644-PLAY. "Antigone," the classic Greek drama, has been updated by Hilary Wilhams-Dekker and will be presented by Actors Repertory Theatre at 8 p.m. on Oct. 6, 7, 13 and 14; 2 p.m., Oct. 7 and 7 p.m., Oct. 12, in the Jewel Box Theatre in the Clark County Library. The production is free. 647-SHOW. The second City comedy troupe's national touring group will perform at 7:30 p.m., October 4, in the Artemus Ham Concet Hall. Tickets are $8 general admission, $4 for UNLV students. 739-3221. Joe Behar's Community Drama workshop meets Mondays, 8 to 10 p.m., in Sam's Town BowUng Center, room A. 457-0234. Theatre Arts Group Workshop meets Tuesdays, 6:30 to 9 p.m., in Fremont Junior High School's room 709. 877-6463. Fihn "Casablanca," the classic film starring Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman, will be shown at 7:30 p.m., Oct. 6, as part of the "American Classic Film Series" sponsored by the City of Las Vegas. Admission is $1. 386-6383. "In the White City," a French and German film by Alain Tanner, with English subtitles, will be shown at 7 p.m., Oct. 5, in UNLV's Wright Hall Auditorium. Dr. Hart Wegner will introduce the free film. 739-3547. • • • Visual arts ~ ^7 Exhibits opening this week: "Southern France: Spain, Italy and France," photographs by Michael Plyler, will be displayed in the Clark County Library's main and Photographic galleries from Oct. 3 through Nov. 7. A reception will be held 5 to 7 p.m., Oct. 3. Hours; 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Monday through Thursday. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday. 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday. 435-0919. Inside the action may be hotter than ever, but outside you won't have to worry about your car being that way. Not when you discover the wide open spaces of one of the biggest indoor parking facilities in Las Veeas. A mammoth fivestory structure that s secure. Well lit. Features 1525 large spaces. And a speed ramp that allows you to go from ground level to top without stopping. Best of all, there's direct, convenient access to the newly ..^^ded Olppic Casmo. Which puts vou even closer to oi bigger, more luxurious Race and Sports Book. Additional slot So don't park your chariot just anywhere Drive it to Caesars.We guarantee you'll find it's the best spot under the sun.
PAGE 22

^m tmmm • Page 22. Henderson Home New. Boulder City New. Green VMy Net < Thursday. September 28. 1989 Librarians to meet in BC Boulder Gty will extend its hospitality to Nevada's librarians during Nevada Library Association-'s Annual Conference from Thursday, Oct. 12 through Saturday, Oct. 14. I A number of guest speakers will highlight the conference's programs. Opening the sessions with a dynamic presenution will be keynote speakers Susan Goldberg, managing director of the Arizona Theatre Company and poet Roily Kent. Southern Nevadans will have the opportunity to hear Kent when he speaks and presents a poetry reading on Wednesday evening, Oct. ll.atUNLV. Honoring the conference will be Patricia Berger, president of the American Library Association. Bcrgcrwill speak at the President's Awards Dinner on Friday, Oct. 13. Famed authors/instructors Nancy Polcttc and Keith Polette will lead a literacy and thinking sidlls woricshop which runs concun^ntly with the other featured programs during the conference. Attending the Nevada Young Readers Award Luncheon as guest speakers will be award-winning children's and young adult authors Lois Duncan, Felicia Bond, Laura Joffe Numeroff and Willo Davis Roberts. The many speakers, together with the informative scheduled programs, ensures a successful and memorable conference for Nevada's librarians, officials said. Fall Senioride Coupons ready The Taxicab Authority is preparing for it's fall distribution of Senioride Coupons. The coupons are available for purchase by individuals 60 years of age or older, who are residents of Clark County and who are registered with the Taxicab Authority for the program. Seniors must register in person at the Taxicab Authority office, 1785 E. Sahara, Suite to the Tudcab Authority office. 200, between 8 a.m. and noon, The last date for mailing in Monday through Thursday, requests is Oct. 15, officials Those ahready registered need said. Seniors may expect to not do so again. receive the coupon books about Upon completion of registratwo weeks after the deadline tion, requests for a maximiun date, of two books per person, along Questions may be directed to with a business-size, selfthe Senioride coordinator from addressed, stamped envelope 8 a.in. to noon, Monday and a check or money order for through Thursday, at $10 per book, may be mailed 486-6535. Christinas Contest opens A Christmas Theme contest is being held by the Commemora tive Beautification Commission through Oct. 6. Junior and senior high school students are invited toentera twoto six-word phrase that which will depict the Henderson Christmas lighting ceremony and activities held by the Commemorative Beautification Commission. The entry which is chosen will receive a $50 gift certificate to a local clothing store. Entries should be mailed or delivered to the Henderson Parks and Recreation Depanmcnt, 240 I Water St. OneeiMt ri)lilly By Carolyn Drennan Bishop This may sound totally off the wall, but I suspect that as a small child my husband may have been frightened by a vacuum cleaner or, at the very least, by a dust rag. Why? Because this man is Mr. Clean personified. I should have suspected I was in for a sanitized future when, as we left the church after our wedding, he paused and swept the rice off the steps. And, I couldn't believe my eyes when we entered our honeymoon suite. Mr. C. unpacked his suitcase, hung up his clothes in mothproof plastic bags and ran a finger across the top of the door frame searching for a telltale mote of dust. On our return air flight, my perfectly clean mate reorganized the lettle pocket on the back of the seat, wiped the tray table and offered to help the stewardess collect empty plasses, peanut wrappers and napitins. Settling into our first home was a real eye-opener into the world of the perfectly tidy. In the whisk of an eye, closets were disinfected and clothes hung in color-coordinated order. By the time Mr. C. had completed his sanitizing crusade, the house, yard, the dog and myself could have posed for a portrait entitled, "Mrs. Pristine Purity at Home." I'm often asked if living with this paragon of cleanliness has rubbed off on me. Not really. Let me put it this way. I like to think that my slothful ways have added spice and dash to our marriage! More Buys & 10 Lb. Russet Potatoes Bdt.f, HdilorKrvI'S. So I Umit One Hag Per Family Large Bosc Pears (!(ilif(iriiii] GrciiMi l.iirRc MH.I Harllcll I'fcirs 89 Lb.) SOVC .10 Lo. Save 1.00 4J1OO iiCr-wi, Save.04 Mclntosh Apples ^,,,. g 9 Snow White, Cauliflower Great for Dips Lb. Qilifornia Croivn Green ^i^*^Onions or /!( • (/ H()(/is/i(,.s fTc.s/i-f.'iiii/orniii (.'rinvii (T('/I frf*nt iujii'.h i'.t'hnni'in Q Mini Pumpkins ,,,.99 1^ Large Valencia Oranges ,,,.49 @ Organic Carrots 1 Lb. Bag 3„100 @ Fresh Package Spinach ,,,119 Save.10 Lb. Saladette Tomatoes HedWpe Lb.{ Hahd Favorite Sove .10 Lb. Fresh Passion Fruit ^^, 5 9 KrieHas Fmest-(,'tiiiNirni(i (Jniwri Fresh Parsnips p^^.79 \H Ounce Parkijgfl^ilifornia (iri)i\n Laige California Pistachio Nuts 3 ^ ^ I found ng iSun Miiid Hnisin-24 u/ Hog :iy; Sun Maid Raisins ^69 Ten-1 xes in Ihf Bag-Kmnilv Po( li 6" Blooming Primula ,^599 iiiuii hfii CarnuUons 4 9*) LIQUOR 12 Pad |jeisterBrauBeer. Save 1.30 flf'gij/ar or Liffi ; Ounce Cuns Gallo White Grenache C'ris/j & FniH\ 1.3 Lifer Bolf/c .329 ^e 1.30 w GROCERY/BAKERY Downy Fflhn'r ^f 'Fabric Softener i*^' Hegu/ar or Siinniis, ^^ !> Ounrf Mtlf Quaker Cinnamon I jfe Cerpal 999 .79 CtiidenoftheSeaCblLiolitTuna ;1_49 Franio .American Teddy O's 2;; 1 ^^ Milk-Bone Biscuits tor Large Dogs 4^9 Dole Rneapple luice .99 III Our, • 1 .111 Countn' Hearth Donuts ^09 Q Kinij's Hawaiian Bread ^59 Pace Picante Sauce Mciliiiiii. Mi/ild.)), • • !i. I'.i, ,1,11 Scott Family Paper N'apkins KWCiMin' I'.niiiui' Tang Drinks-3 Pack ;iror:. DAIRY/DELI 1^ Oscar Mayer Bologna 199 flefl or W'li ] li, Plj il.m Huh Turin franlvlt 0.: 109' Yoplait Yogurt ,59 96 Oz. Minute Maid 349 (Jrringe /iiii cRcs. cir f jiiinlrv Slvlc Vons Longhom Cheddar Cheese, IViKi.onsin (.hf'Hstr-Mnre I'c •s (j or Mung(v32 Oz. Gorton ,.259 @ Kerns Nectars ^29 ^imr ^ • -^^bt^^yflano^(!,GlJ(J^vJ or Mung(v320z-Gorton @ Weight Watchers Margarine .99 (^ Alouette Spiced Cheese ^49 ^Hm^ Selected VariPtiCi-J (^z. Otntuinfr 1^ Austrian .Alps Sliced Swiss Cheese 12 9 ^ Danola Sliced Cooked Ham 2^^ >tl^ liii,irti'fl-H ():•.. .SniKire nr Oblong Pl. ^ Wilson Jumbo Franks .99 Kraft Cracker Barrel Sharp Cheddar 2^9 or Extra Sharp-10 0^. PatkaiU' Kith' Litter L Cat Litter Priniiii.'.i CiilBoxFi/lcr 8 r.iiiiiil Hujt 179 FROZEN Jerseymaid (|F| Ice Cream Old Fashioned Assorted Flavors Hull Gallon Round Carlon Sove 1.18 Oil 2 Dole Frozen Novelties 2 ^ ^ Selei tpd Vorif tjrs-6 to a CounI Ptjckoji'' Eggo Waffles l44 Rdisfii nruti ur .VulriCrain-il Oz. Pitg@ Green Giant Single Servings .79 Chicago Bros. Pizza 2^9 Pi|i()i'roiii-l'65 Oi or lMiiv'28 Oz Swift Brown & Serve Sausage .Micro Orijnal Countf\ Lnk Broun (^Servf Bec'orPorldOz, Pkj .95 Campbell's Chicken Noodle Soup, 10.7,') Oi/ncc Cull Until 3 Cuns Per Family Save 1.29 on MORE BUY Golden Delicious Fxtra Fancy Apples Save. 10 Lb. Coca Cola 6 Packs Reg. ur Diel-A.s.sl. Varielie.s Dr Pepper or Sprile-I2 0z. Cans (^^y^ ^Q Nabisco Crackers Wheat Thins Re%. Low Sail. Cheese, .N'ultv orOollVhealThins-OloIOOz-flbx Save .46 Gourmet Pride Soup Assortea Varieties 2.5 Ounce Cup Save.14 A U.S.D.C. Fresh Catfish Fillets K 349 U.S.D.C. Fresh Cajun Catfish Fillets ,.449 PiiSmvi... J anil flr.pJi li. L.-.. '•'' • ^ a U.S.D.C. Pacific True Cod Fillets ,^369 (iicut lor Sulijiis or 5* rw Oi Htnnlikniv 1 U.S.D.C. Pacific True Cod Fillets Lin ll^llcFl^^ ni.anlHa...r Si U.S.D.C. Rainbow Trout ^Hf F'irrun^.f A U.S.D.C. Eastern Bay Scallops A U.S.D.C. Pacific Shark Fillets W fr:-, H|,,r.. \|,,,. Lb 229 u699 a, 539 419 JL Lb. Thuriday, September 28, 1989 UNLV enrollment sets new record HcadenoB Home New*. Boulder (3ty News, Green Vall^j Newt Page 2S UNLV's fall enrollment has set yet another record, reaching 16,320, according to preliminary, unofficial figures. The total number of students attending the university climbed by 9.8 percent over last year, an increase of nearly 1,500. "I attribute this dramatic growth of our student body to,the excellent quality of our faculty and staff, and to the strength of our academic programs," said President Robert C. Maxsoa Thepresidentnotedthat,"This is an exciting time for UNLV. Thanks to the Nevada Legislature, we are adding many talented, dedicated scholars to our faculty. We will soon begin construction on new campus buildings and remodeling of certain existing stmctures. And most important, we are attracting the best student scholars in the state." St. Jude's seeks furntture St. Jude's Ranch-Good Shepherd Campus, 7000 N. Jones, is in need of three goo^ sofas or couches, as well as lamps, tables and chairs to furnish its fourth unit scheduled to open shortly. Persons who have items to contribute are asked to call 64S1300 for pickup. St Jude's Ranch-Good Shepherd Campus is located at the site of the former Home of the Good Shepherd. The facility will house 48 girls between the ages of 13 and 18 when it reaches capacity after opening the fourth apartment There are 12giilsineadiof the four units, according to the Rev. William Willaid, resident director. The charity also needs good gills clothes in various sizes for teenagers, as well as personal toUetry items, he said. Double Coupons JL *Details In Store Half Price! 4 Pack Pillsbmy Biscuits Bultennilk, Country Style or Tender-Layer Save.50 Kraft Singles Wrapped Cheese Food 16 Ounce Package Save .50 UiU)A CHOICE niQ TriTip.Roast^J*' Un trimmed Boneless flee/ Save 1.79 Lb. All French's Sauce & Gravy O Mixes-Foil Pack Assorted Varieties OF Everyday Prices -.Coimtiy Hearth ^ VA Lb. Bread White or Wheat 124 Ounce Loaf) Fasolino's Pasta Selected Varieties 16 Ounce Package Save.30 hours' *Moil Voni Are Portidpalin^ Check Your Local Stores AD PRKXS EFRCnVE 7 niLL DAYS Stoitiag I AAt Wtd—why tkn WdrigM T—Jr Save .44 on 2 MS M kMi • ^. 7 *n • MA VAD A. Ui mm iMfMajMl n*^ TV. m lender FrozeniDe/rosled U.S.D.C. Fresh Dover Sole Fillets Fnxnlhertaricacnn as U.&D.C Fresh Western Oysters WeOuiK;iir Lb. Lb399 Eo279 U5D.C Whole CooitedDungeness Crabs Lb.3^9 Froten'Ot^lad US.D.C. Fancy Lobster Tails Lb 14^^ tb599 Lb 699 From Mewco U.S.D.C Orange Roughy Fillets Fnimi'Ur/rosMJ iKow SMiOn Shri!fip.Sl to eo Ct-S* U.S.D.C Seabass FUlets Fruten'DrfniclccI ; nPiniNAL DEFECTIVE Save. 60 Lb. Wilson Sausage Smoked, Polish or Smoked with Cheese 198 JL Lb. Save .51 Lb. 269 • • Lb. Boneless QJ,Q Top Sirloin A^^ Steaks-Vons Lean Beef • 'A" Thin Trimmed Save 1.00 Lb. Boneless i Rib Steaks Vons Lean Beef V4" Thin Trimmed ggyg yg Lb. ^ Boneless Sirloin Tip Roasts Lb.2^^ ^••^ Vons Lean Beef-W" Thin Trimmed A Boneless Stewing Beef Lb.2^^ ^•^ Vons Leon Beef Wilson Boneless Half Ham,, 319 Masterpiece Lloyd's BIQ. Pork Spareribs ,,3^^ or L/oyds B.aQ. Chicken Breasts Boneless Pork Chops Lb 3 ^^ Wilson Recipe Ready or /ohn Morrel Fresh Beef ^ HQ Brisket ^ '*> Point Cut J^ Lb. (Beef Brisket Flat Cut Lb. t-99)Save .19 Lb. Swift Sizzlean 12 Oz. Pk& ,„ .99 Regular or Beef Cook's Ham Slices ,,2^ or Farmer John Hum Slices Vons Whole Hog Sausage ,, l^^ Mild. Hoi or Apple Cinnamon Armour Low Salt Bacon ^^ 1^^ Slic(id-I2 Ounce Pockojje Shensons Corned Beef Brisket Lbl^ Point Cut Iflot Cut Lb. 189) Foioffy, a store that mda. SERVICK DELI U Lb. Italian ^ Meatloaf Fully Cooked Delicious ItoJian Flavor 8 Pc. Bucket!^ Fried Chicken __„ Fried in Cholesterol Fice Oil ^^ DUCJcet Hot 6-Ready to Serve S1IV6 1 00 Available Only In Stores With A Service Deli FULL SERVICE BAKERY All ButtersPound Cake Plain, Moj^ble or Chocolate 10 Ounce Loo/ SOVS .20 199 X Ea. ""^^^I 69 WX Ea. Bread IW Pound Loaf Best Served Warm Save.10 HEALTH & BEAUTY aL199 For Cats or Dogs ^^L Small, Medium & Large Alb Seltzer Antadd-Flavored 2"*^ fresh Toste floratd-* Toljleli in 18 Foil Packs Alka Seltzer Antacidi Pain Reliever 2^^ Oiginai J6 TobJtfs in 18 fal Poclu Extra Strength Alka Seltzer 2^9 24 Tnblels in 2 Foil Pocks Excedrin Extra Strength 4^^ 100 Tablets Excedrin Pain Reliever 499 80 Caplets UBRARY Th is Week's Feature VOLUME 15 \ Ride, Float and Fly $2.79 VOLUME 1-.99 .1? BAirtUI BOOKS. MOWJOWV T> HMLI OWV COMMWT ELECTED-Fred Knapp hu been elected Exalted Ruler of Henderson Elks Lodge 1956 for the year 1989-1990. Knapp, an active Elk since 1959, resides with his wife, Ellie, in the Highland Hills neighborhood. Both are realtors associated with Century 21JR Realty in Henderson. The local BPOE Lodge is kicated on Lake Mead Drive. Disability job fair • starts lUlonday As part of the National Disability Employment Awareness Month, more than SO area employers are attending the Biannual Job Fair for Disabled Persons, OcL 2-5. The job fair, which wiU run Monday through Thursday at the Meadows Mall, is being sponsored by the Governor's Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities. Suzanne Thomas, regional representative, said handicapped persons or disabled veterans attending the fair are only required to fill out one generic job applicatkm fonn. Copies aie provided free for the applicants to vie to various employers. Job-seeking skills are available for participants. Call 4865230 for reservations. Interpreters for the deaf will be provided, spokespersons said. Volunteer counselors needed Cbmmunity Action Against Rape, Qark County's only crisis intervention center for child and adult victims of sexual assault, will hold its 36hour training course Get 1627. The training course in crisis intervention counseling includes sessions on ho^tal, police, courtroom procedures (civil and criminal), county and state ccmpensation, fat^-toface and over-the-phone crisis counseling. The training course will be held in the conference room at 749 Veterans Memorial Drive. For furtherinfonnation aid an application, call 385-2153. Auditions upcoming Several male roles are still avaUable for the UNLV's theatre production of Shakespeare's "Love's Labour's Lost," to be presented on tiie Judy Bayley Theatre stage Nov. 30-Dec. 10. Auditions will be held at 12 p.m., Sept. 30 in the acting studio in Alta Ham Fine Arts, Room 101. Rehearsals will begin Oct. 23. The play is being directed by Roderick Horn of the Royal Shakespeare Company. Nine male roles are available, including: Ferdinand, King of Navarre: Boyet, a vrorldly. ironic man; Sir Nathaniel, a naive curate, preferably in his 60s; and Moth; the witty young Page to Armado. Fbr more infonnation. call the I UNLV theatre arts department at I 739-3666. 4ti )i H + "MSWir'ifa^ iai.-^^fc• -*-# -.t"-..***

PAGE 23

^m tmmm • Page 22. Henderson Home New. Boulder City New. Green VMy Net < Thursday. September 28. 1989 Librarians to meet in BC Boulder Gty will extend its hospitality to Nevada's librarians during Nevada Library Association-'s Annual Conference from Thursday, Oct. 12 through Saturday, Oct. 14. I A number of guest speakers will highlight the conference's programs. Opening the sessions with a dynamic presenution will be keynote speakers Susan Goldberg, managing director of the Arizona Theatre Company and poet Roily Kent. Southern Nevadans will have the opportunity to hear Kent when he speaks and presents a poetry reading on Wednesday evening, Oct. ll.atUNLV. Honoring the conference will be Patricia Berger, president of the American Library Association. Bcrgcrwill speak at the President's Awards Dinner on Friday, Oct. 13. Famed authors/instructors Nancy Polcttc and Keith Polette will lead a literacy and thinking sidlls woricshop which runs concun^ntly with the other featured programs during the conference. Attending the Nevada Young Readers Award Luncheon as guest speakers will be award-winning children's and young adult authors Lois Duncan, Felicia Bond, Laura Joffe Numeroff and Willo Davis Roberts. The many speakers, together with the informative scheduled programs, ensures a successful and memorable conference for Nevada's librarians, officials said. Fall Senioride Coupons ready The Taxicab Authority is preparing for it's fall distribution of Senioride Coupons. The coupons are available for purchase by individuals 60 years of age or older, who are residents of Clark County and who are registered with the Taxicab Authority for the program. Seniors must register in person at the Taxicab Authority office, 1785 E. Sahara, Suite to the Tudcab Authority office. 200, between 8 a.m. and noon, The last date for mailing in Monday through Thursday, requests is Oct. 15, officials Those ahready registered need said. Seniors may expect to not do so again. receive the coupon books about Upon completion of registratwo weeks after the deadline tion, requests for a maximiun date, of two books per person, along Questions may be directed to with a business-size, selfthe Senioride coordinator from addressed, stamped envelope 8 a.in. to noon, Monday and a check or money order for through Thursday, at $10 per book, may be mailed 486-6535. Christinas Contest opens A Christmas Theme contest is being held by the Commemora tive Beautification Commission through Oct. 6. Junior and senior high school students are invited toentera twoto six-word phrase that which will depict the Henderson Christmas lighting ceremony and activities held by the Commemorative Beautification Commission. The entry which is chosen will receive a $50 gift certificate to a local clothing store. Entries should be mailed or delivered to the Henderson Parks and Recreation Depanmcnt, 240 I Water St. OneeiMt ri)lilly By Carolyn Drennan Bishop This may sound totally off the wall, but I suspect that as a small child my husband may have been frightened by a vacuum cleaner or, at the very least, by a dust rag. Why? Because this man is Mr. Clean personified. I should have suspected I was in for a sanitized future when, as we left the church after our wedding, he paused and swept the rice off the steps. And, I couldn't believe my eyes when we entered our honeymoon suite. Mr. C. unpacked his suitcase, hung up his clothes in mothproof plastic bags and ran a finger across the top of the door frame searching for a telltale mote of dust. On our return air flight, my perfectly clean mate reorganized the lettle pocket on the back of the seat, wiped the tray table and offered to help the stewardess collect empty plasses, peanut wrappers and napitins. Settling into our first home was a real eye-opener into the world of the perfectly tidy. In the whisk of an eye, closets were disinfected and clothes hung in color-coordinated order. By the time Mr. C. had completed his sanitizing crusade, the house, yard, the dog and myself could have posed for a portrait entitled, "Mrs. Pristine Purity at Home." I'm often asked if living with this paragon of cleanliness has rubbed off on me. Not really. Let me put it this way. I like to think that my slothful ways have added spice and dash to our marriage! More Buys & 10 Lb. Russet Potatoes Bdt.f, HdilorKrvI'S. So I Umit One Hag Per Family Large Bosc Pears (!(ilif(iriiii] GrciiMi l.iirRc MH.I Harllcll I'fcirs 89 Lb.) SOVC .10 Lo. Save 1.00 4J1OO iiCr-wi, Save.04 Mclntosh Apples ^,,,. g 9 Snow White, Cauliflower Great for Dips Lb. Qilifornia Croivn Green ^i^*^Onions or /!( • (/ H()(/is/i(,.s fTc.s/i-f.'iiii/orniii (.'rinvii (T('/I frf*nt iujii'.h i'.t'hnni'in Q Mini Pumpkins ,,,.99 1^ Large Valencia Oranges ,,,.49 @ Organic Carrots 1 Lb. Bag 3„100 @ Fresh Package Spinach ,,,119 Save.10 Lb. Saladette Tomatoes HedWpe Lb.{ Hahd Favorite Sove .10 Lb. Fresh Passion Fruit ^^, 5 9 KrieHas Fmest-(,'tiiiNirni(i (Jniwri Fresh Parsnips p^^.79 \H Ounce Parkijgfl^ilifornia (iri)i\n Laige California Pistachio Nuts 3 ^ ^ I found ng iSun Miiid Hnisin-24 u/ Hog :iy; Sun Maid Raisins ^69 Ten-1 xes in Ihf Bag-Kmnilv Po( li 6" Blooming Primula ,^599 iiiuii hfii CarnuUons 4 9*) LIQUOR 12 Pad |jeisterBrauBeer. Save 1.30 flf'gij/ar or Liffi ; Ounce Cuns Gallo White Grenache C'ris/j & FniH\ 1.3 Lifer Bolf/c .329 ^e 1.30 w GROCERY/BAKERY Downy Fflhn'r ^f 'Fabric Softener i*^' Hegu/ar or Siinniis, ^^ !> Ounrf Mtlf Quaker Cinnamon I jfe Cerpal 999 .79 CtiidenoftheSeaCblLiolitTuna ;1_49 Franio .American Teddy O's 2;; 1 ^^ Milk-Bone Biscuits tor Large Dogs 4^9 Dole Rneapple luice .99 III Our, • 1 .111 Countn' Hearth Donuts ^09 Q Kinij's Hawaiian Bread ^59 Pace Picante Sauce Mciliiiiii. Mi/ild.)), • • !i. I'.i, ,1,11 Scott Family Paper N'apkins KWCiMin' I'.niiiui' Tang Drinks-3 Pack ;iror:. DAIRY/DELI 1^ Oscar Mayer Bologna 199 flefl or W'li ] li, Plj il.m Huh Turin franlvlt 0.: 109' Yoplait Yogurt ,59 96 Oz. Minute Maid 349 (Jrringe /iiii cRcs. cir f jiiinlrv Slvlc Vons Longhom Cheddar Cheese, IViKi.onsin (.hf'Hstr-Mnre I'c •s (j or Mung(v32 Oz. Gorton ,.259 @ Kerns Nectars ^29 ^imr ^ • -^^bt^^yflano^(!,GlJ(J^vJ or Mung(v320z-Gorton @ Weight Watchers Margarine .99 (^ Alouette Spiced Cheese ^49 ^Hm^ Selected VariPtiCi-J (^z. Otntuinfr 1^ Austrian .Alps Sliced Swiss Cheese 12 9 ^ Danola Sliced Cooked Ham 2^^ >tl^ liii,irti'fl-H ():•.. .SniKire nr Oblong Pl. ^ Wilson Jumbo Franks .99 Kraft Cracker Barrel Sharp Cheddar 2^9 or Extra Sharp-10 0^. PatkaiU' Kith' Litter L Cat Litter Priniiii.'.i CiilBoxFi/lcr 8 r.iiiiiil Hujt 179 FROZEN Jerseymaid (|F| Ice Cream Old Fashioned Assorted Flavors Hull Gallon Round Carlon Sove 1.18 Oil 2 Dole Frozen Novelties 2 ^ ^ Selei tpd Vorif tjrs-6 to a CounI Ptjckoji'' Eggo Waffles l44 Rdisfii nruti ur .VulriCrain-il Oz. Pitg@ Green Giant Single Servings .79 Chicago Bros. Pizza 2^9 Pi|i()i'roiii-l'65 Oi or lMiiv'28 Oz Swift Brown & Serve Sausage .Micro Orijnal Countf\ Lnk Broun (^Servf Bec'orPorldOz, Pkj .95 Campbell's Chicken Noodle Soup, 10.7,') Oi/ncc Cull Until 3 Cuns Per Family Save 1.29 on MORE BUY Golden Delicious Fxtra Fancy Apples Save. 10 Lb. Coca Cola 6 Packs Reg. ur Diel-A.s.sl. Varielie.s Dr Pepper or Sprile-I2 0z. Cans (^^y^ ^Q Nabisco Crackers Wheat Thins Re%. Low Sail. Cheese, .N'ultv orOollVhealThins-OloIOOz-flbx Save .46 Gourmet Pride Soup Assortea Varieties 2.5 Ounce Cup Save.14 A U.S.D.C. Fresh Catfish Fillets K 349 U.S.D.C. Fresh Cajun Catfish Fillets ,.449 PiiSmvi... J anil flr.pJi li. L.-.. '•'' • ^ a U.S.D.C. Pacific True Cod Fillets ,^369 (iicut lor Sulijiis or 5* rw Oi Htnnlikniv 1 U.S.D.C. Pacific True Cod Fillets Lin ll^llcFl^^ ni.anlHa...r Si U.S.D.C. Rainbow Trout ^Hf F'irrun^.f A U.S.D.C. Eastern Bay Scallops A U.S.D.C. Pacific Shark Fillets W fr:-, H|,,r.. \|,,,. Lb 229 u699 a, 539 419 JL Lb. Thuriday, September 28, 1989 UNLV enrollment sets new record HcadenoB Home New*. Boulder (3ty News, Green Vall^j Newt Page 2S UNLV's fall enrollment has set yet another record, reaching 16,320, according to preliminary, unofficial figures. The total number of students attending the university climbed by 9.8 percent over last year, an increase of nearly 1,500. "I attribute this dramatic growth of our student body to,the excellent quality of our faculty and staff, and to the strength of our academic programs," said President Robert C. Maxsoa Thepresidentnotedthat,"This is an exciting time for UNLV. Thanks to the Nevada Legislature, we are adding many talented, dedicated scholars to our faculty. We will soon begin construction on new campus buildings and remodeling of certain existing stmctures. And most important, we are attracting the best student scholars in the state." St. Jude's seeks furntture St. Jude's Ranch-Good Shepherd Campus, 7000 N. Jones, is in need of three goo^ sofas or couches, as well as lamps, tables and chairs to furnish its fourth unit scheduled to open shortly. Persons who have items to contribute are asked to call 64S1300 for pickup. St Jude's Ranch-Good Shepherd Campus is located at the site of the former Home of the Good Shepherd. The facility will house 48 girls between the ages of 13 and 18 when it reaches capacity after opening the fourth apartment There are 12giilsineadiof the four units, according to the Rev. William Willaid, resident director. The charity also needs good gills clothes in various sizes for teenagers, as well as personal toUetry items, he said. Double Coupons JL *Details In Store Half Price! 4 Pack Pillsbmy Biscuits Bultennilk, Country Style or Tender-Layer Save.50 Kraft Singles Wrapped Cheese Food 16 Ounce Package Save .50 UiU)A CHOICE niQ TriTip.Roast^J*' Un trimmed Boneless flee/ Save 1.79 Lb. All French's Sauce & Gravy O Mixes-Foil Pack Assorted Varieties OF Everyday Prices -.Coimtiy Hearth ^ VA Lb. Bread White or Wheat 124 Ounce Loaf) Fasolino's Pasta Selected Varieties 16 Ounce Package Save.30 hours' *Moil Voni Are Portidpalin^ Check Your Local Stores AD PRKXS EFRCnVE 7 niLL DAYS Stoitiag I AAt Wtd—why tkn WdrigM T—Jr Save .44 on 2 MS M kMi • ^. 7 *n • MA VAD A. Ui mm iMfMajMl n*^ TV. m lender FrozeniDe/rosled U.S.D.C. Fresh Dover Sole Fillets Fnxnlhertaricacnn as U.&D.C Fresh Western Oysters WeOuiK;iir Lb. Lb399 Eo279 U5D.C Whole CooitedDungeness Crabs Lb.3^9 Froten'Ot^lad US.D.C. Fancy Lobster Tails Lb 14^^ tb599 Lb 699 From Mewco U.S.D.C Orange Roughy Fillets Fnimi'Ur/rosMJ iKow SMiOn Shri!fip.Sl to eo Ct-S* U.S.D.C Seabass FUlets Fruten'DrfniclccI ; nPiniNAL DEFECTIVE Save. 60 Lb. Wilson Sausage Smoked, Polish or Smoked with Cheese 198 JL Lb. Save .51 Lb. 269 • • Lb. Boneless QJ,Q Top Sirloin A^^ Steaks-Vons Lean Beef • 'A" Thin Trimmed Save 1.00 Lb. Boneless i Rib Steaks Vons Lean Beef V4" Thin Trimmed ggyg yg Lb. ^ Boneless Sirloin Tip Roasts Lb.2^^ ^••^ Vons Lean Beef-W" Thin Trimmed A Boneless Stewing Beef Lb.2^^ ^•^ Vons Leon Beef Wilson Boneless Half Ham,, 319 Masterpiece Lloyd's BIQ. Pork Spareribs ,,3^^ or L/oyds B.aQ. Chicken Breasts Boneless Pork Chops Lb 3 ^^ Wilson Recipe Ready or /ohn Morrel Fresh Beef ^ HQ Brisket ^ '*> Point Cut J^ Lb. (Beef Brisket Flat Cut Lb. t-99)Save .19 Lb. Swift Sizzlean 12 Oz. Pk& ,„ .99 Regular or Beef Cook's Ham Slices ,,2^ or Farmer John Hum Slices Vons Whole Hog Sausage ,, l^^ Mild. Hoi or Apple Cinnamon Armour Low Salt Bacon ^^ 1^^ Slic(id-I2 Ounce Pockojje Shensons Corned Beef Brisket Lbl^ Point Cut Iflot Cut Lb. 189) Foioffy, a store that mda. SERVICK DELI U Lb. Italian ^ Meatloaf Fully Cooked Delicious ItoJian Flavor 8 Pc. Bucket!^ Fried Chicken __„ Fried in Cholesterol Fice Oil ^^ DUCJcet Hot 6-Ready to Serve S1IV6 1 00 Available Only In Stores With A Service Deli FULL SERVICE BAKERY All ButtersPound Cake Plain, Moj^ble or Chocolate 10 Ounce Loo/ SOVS .20 199 X Ea. ""^^^I 69 WX Ea. Bread IW Pound Loaf Best Served Warm Save.10 HEALTH & BEAUTY aL199 For Cats or Dogs ^^L Small, Medium & Large Alb Seltzer Antadd-Flavored 2"*^ fresh Toste floratd-* Toljleli in 18 Foil Packs Alka Seltzer Antacidi Pain Reliever 2^^ Oiginai J6 TobJtfs in 18 fal Poclu Extra Strength Alka Seltzer 2^9 24 Tnblels in 2 Foil Pocks Excedrin Extra Strength 4^^ 100 Tablets Excedrin Pain Reliever 499 80 Caplets UBRARY Th is Week's Feature VOLUME 15 \ Ride, Float and Fly $2.79 VOLUME 1-.99 .1? BAirtUI BOOKS. MOWJOWV T> HMLI OWV COMMWT ELECTED-Fred Knapp hu been elected Exalted Ruler of Henderson Elks Lodge 1956 for the year 1989-1990. Knapp, an active Elk since 1959, resides with his wife, Ellie, in the Highland Hills neighborhood. Both are realtors associated with Century 21JR Realty in Henderson. The local BPOE Lodge is kicated on Lake Mead Drive. Disability job fair • starts lUlonday As part of the National Disability Employment Awareness Month, more than SO area employers are attending the Biannual Job Fair for Disabled Persons, OcL 2-5. The job fair, which wiU run Monday through Thursday at the Meadows Mall, is being sponsored by the Governor's Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities. Suzanne Thomas, regional representative, said handicapped persons or disabled veterans attending the fair are only required to fill out one generic job applicatkm fonn. Copies aie provided free for the applicants to vie to various employers. Job-seeking skills are available for participants. Call 4865230 for reservations. Interpreters for the deaf will be provided, spokespersons said. Volunteer counselors needed Cbmmunity Action Against Rape, Qark County's only crisis intervention center for child and adult victims of sexual assault, will hold its 36hour training course Get 1627. The training course in crisis intervention counseling includes sessions on ho^tal, police, courtroom procedures (civil and criminal), county and state ccmpensation, fat^-toface and over-the-phone crisis counseling. The training course will be held in the conference room at 749 Veterans Memorial Drive. For furtherinfonnation aid an application, call 385-2153. Auditions upcoming Several male roles are still avaUable for the UNLV's theatre production of Shakespeare's "Love's Labour's Lost," to be presented on tiie Judy Bayley Theatre stage Nov. 30-Dec. 10. Auditions will be held at 12 p.m., Sept. 30 in the acting studio in Alta Ham Fine Arts, Room 101. Rehearsals will begin Oct. 23. The play is being directed by Roderick Horn of the Royal Shakespeare Company. Nine male roles are available, including: Ferdinand, King of Navarre: Boyet, a vrorldly. ironic man; Sir Nathaniel, a naive curate, preferably in his 60s; and Moth; the witty young Page to Armado. Fbr more infonnation. call the I UNLV theatre arts department at I 739-3666. 4ti )i H + "MSWir'ifa^ iai.-^^fc• -*-# -.t"-..***

PAGE 24

Pg 24. Hmdfon Home New. Boulder Qty New. Qntn Valley New Thursday, September 28, 1989 Two Brownie Girl Scouts recite the Girl Scout Promise and Law during a ceremony. Girl Scouts change to meet needs Since its inception in 1912, Girl Scouts of the USA has been „'.cping pace with the needs and interests of girls. In the beginning, the Girl :JCOULS provided service to their community and to their country with projects to benefit the U.S. During war time, the Girl Scouts leamed first aid and how 10 tic knots, cooking and camping, using a compass and Morse code. The membership consisted of 118 girls from Savannah, Ga. The organization grew to reach its first million members in 1944. By then, the principles of the Movement dedicated to the advancement of girls and women included members of all races, religions and status. Today there are more than three million members of Giri Scouts of the USA, making it the worid's largest voluntary organization of girls. As the worid changes and becomes more complex, Girl Scouting moves with the limes, officials point out. The organization continues to find new ways 10 help girls and young women develop a sense of values and make meaningful contributions to society. The all-girl experience of Girl Scouting presents giris with a world where they can take the leadership position. It provides environment—maybe the only such*environment a girl will encounter during her formative years—where the special needs and interests of giris come first In 1985, Giri Scouts of the USA introduced the first in a series of contemporary issues programs dealing witii drug and alcohol abuse. During die past five years, the "Say No to Dnigs" program has had tremendous success. Other issues being addressed by the organization are; teen pregnancy, teen suicide, child abuse and growing up females in today's society. Our leaders strive to build Uie self-esteem of each giri by giving her the opportunity to participate in a program that has her best interests at heart. Giris learn to make decisions and choices and, while considering the interests of otiiers, they learn to conuibute to society and relate to oUiers. Developing values and deepening self-awareness are as much a part of the program as cookies and camping, FroniierGiri 'Scout Council is chartered by Giri Scouts of the USA to serve Uie five southeastem counties of Nevada and a strip of California, including Needles and tile DeaUi Valley area. The council serves 7,205 giris a year and 1,600 adults. Flyers are being passed out in each of the schools, while vblunteers organize groups of giris into troops. Staff members are busy recniiting and training leaders as die 1989-90 membership year kicks-off to a great start. Witii tiie growth of Las Vegas, two new geographical service areas have been formed tills year. Alternative programs and nontraditional troops make it possible for giris who are unable to a tend a weekly meeting or are unable to get transportation to and from a meeting place, to find a way to participate in die Giri Scout program. Beginning with five-year-olds or giris in Kiridcrgarten and continuing to senior high school students, the Giri Scouts offer a variety of activities to meet the changing needs of giris. To volunteer to join Giri Scouting call (702) 385-3677 or, in Henderson, caU at 565-6290. Thursday, September 28.1989 Thanks to Gaining. All over Nevada. 149,000 people leave home each day to work in our state's largest industry gaming. Yi>u see, gaming accounts for many more jobs than any other Nevada industry 28% of Nevada's entire workforce. That's 149,000 paychecks for mothers and fathers, single men and women. 149,000 paychecks for rent, groceries, clothing, dental hills and recreational activities. What's more, gaming accounts for an additional 223,000 workers whose jobs supply needed products and services utilized by the gaming industry. So you see, gaming isn't Just another job, it's a way of life in Nevada. Gaming and Emp lo yment. Inseparable. A New Rose Has Blossomed. •. iy 't. Hose de Lima Hospital has a new name. The hospital is dedicated to the memory of St. Rose of Lima, Peru, a selfless woman who devoted her life to caring for the poor and outcast of her city. The new name promotes St. Rose's religious order. Dominican, as a stronger way of identifying with our heritage. So, you see, the change will instill a greater appreciation for the Dominican spirit, one of compassion and truth, which has made the hospital what it is today. It is, indeed, a very special place to receive medical care. At St. Rose Dominican Hospital, the tradition of quality Catholic healthcare continues. • r- ^Qse Domini can S P IT W2 E. lake Mead Drive • Henderson, NV 89015' (702)564-2622 -. + Served Dally From a.m. to 10:30 p.m. SUNDAY. MONDAY. TUESDAY. RANCH HAND STEW _BAR-B-Q BEEF RIBS .CHICKEN FRIED STEAK WEDNESDAY. THURSDAY_ FRIDAY _OLD FASHION MEAT LOAF — NEVADA FRIED CHICKEN .SOUTHERN FRIED CAT RSH (Includes Salad Bar) HOT DOG & DRAFT BEEF^ ^•te*! for 11 a.m. to 7 pm. f NACHOS WITH MELTED CHEESE "BUD TIME" 500 *?• toep-" SLOT SEEKERS CLUB Double Points Midnight Sun. till Midnight Thurs. 444 Sunset Rd. Henderson 1/4 MILE WEST gOF ^ BOlfLDER HWY + This Was Nevada HndnoD Home Nw, Boulder City News. Qn$n VeUey Newe Paaa 2B Tule Springs Park walking tour Saturday By PUlUp I. Earl Next Saturday, personnel of the Nevada State Parks Department will present a slide show and walking tour of the historic Tule Springs Ranch at Floyd R. Lamb State Park, located off highway 95,10 miles north of Las Vegas. Persons interested should meet in front of the ranch at 2 p.m. For further information, write Floyd R. Lamb State Park, 9200 Tule Springs Road, Las Vegas, Nev. 89131, or call (702) 486-5413. One of Clark County's most historic sites, Tule Springs is also of interest to anthropologists. Stratified excavations in the area indicate human habitation as early as 13,000 years ago. In historic times, Indians who referred to themselves as "Tudini" ("Desert People") camped at the natural watering hole. The name Tule Springs, however, has its origin with a cartographer accompanying a party led by Lieutenant George M. Wheeler of the U.S. Army's Corps of Engineers, which stopped in 1869 during a reconnaisance through Southern Nevada. In the 18908, a Southern Paiute by the name of Benjamin Ben settled at the springs with his family. Known as "Whispering Ben" and "Chief Ben," he later operated a small trading station on the wagon road from Las Vegas to the mining camps which developed in central Nevada after 1900. About 1905, a drifter by the name of Levandowski established the United States Saloon and Restaurant at the springs. Much gold and silver bullion was being sent south to the railhead at Las Vegas at that time and there were occasional robberies on the road. So the story goes, a teamster friend of Levandowski's was shot and killed near the springs one day. His assailants discovered that the gold was cast in four bars weighing 150 pounds each. Their horses were tired, so they buried two of the bars and headed for Hidden Forest with the other two. After finding his friend's body, Levandowski buried him and followed the trail of the two road agents. He killed them a few days later, telling the authorities that the men had cached the gold before he tracked them down. Mining company officials did not want to call attention to the size of their shipments, so did not report the loss. Levandowski disappeared shortly thereafter and the story is that he took the gold with him. The Las Vegas and Tonopah Railroad put the freighters out of business by 1907 and the springs were abandoned until Bert and Anne Nay arrived in 1910. Bert and his young wife moved into the old adobe house which they fixed up for a home. They raised goats, rabbits, horse and a few cattle, planted fruit trees, put in a garden, built a five-room house and raised a family of two boys and five girls over the next few years. Bert worked on nearby ranches from time to time to supplement the family income^and Anne and the children raised Angora goats which they sheared yearly for the valuable wool. By 1924, the Tule Springs Ranch comprise a full 40 acres, which included a large reservoir. In 1927, Bert and Anne decided to move on;
PAGE 25

Pg 24. Hmdfon Home New. Boulder Qty New. Qntn Valley New Thursday, September 28, 1989 Two Brownie Girl Scouts recite the Girl Scout Promise and Law during a ceremony. Girl Scouts change to meet needs Since its inception in 1912, Girl Scouts of the USA has been „'.cping pace with the needs and interests of girls. In the beginning, the Girl :JCOULS provided service to their community and to their country with projects to benefit the U.S. During war time, the Girl Scouts leamed first aid and how 10 tic knots, cooking and camping, using a compass and Morse code. The membership consisted of 118 girls from Savannah, Ga. The organization grew to reach its first million members in 1944. By then, the principles of the Movement dedicated to the advancement of girls and women included members of all races, religions and status. Today there are more than three million members of Giri Scouts of the USA, making it the worid's largest voluntary organization of girls. As the worid changes and becomes more complex, Girl Scouting moves with the limes, officials point out. The organization continues to find new ways 10 help girls and young women develop a sense of values and make meaningful contributions to society. The all-girl experience of Girl Scouting presents giris with a world where they can take the leadership position. It provides environment—maybe the only such*environment a girl will encounter during her formative years—where the special needs and interests of giris come first In 1985, Giri Scouts of the USA introduced the first in a series of contemporary issues programs dealing witii drug and alcohol abuse. During die past five years, the "Say No to Dnigs" program has had tremendous success. Other issues being addressed by the organization are; teen pregnancy, teen suicide, child abuse and growing up females in today's society. Our leaders strive to build Uie self-esteem of each giri by giving her the opportunity to participate in a program that has her best interests at heart. Giris learn to make decisions and choices and, while considering the interests of otiiers, they learn to conuibute to society and relate to oUiers. Developing values and deepening self-awareness are as much a part of the program as cookies and camping, FroniierGiri 'Scout Council is chartered by Giri Scouts of the USA to serve Uie five southeastem counties of Nevada and a strip of California, including Needles and tile DeaUi Valley area. The council serves 7,205 giris a year and 1,600 adults. Flyers are being passed out in each of the schools, while vblunteers organize groups of giris into troops. Staff members are busy recniiting and training leaders as die 1989-90 membership year kicks-off to a great start. Witii tiie growth of Las Vegas, two new geographical service areas have been formed tills year. Alternative programs and nontraditional troops make it possible for giris who are unable to a tend a weekly meeting or are unable to get transportation to and from a meeting place, to find a way to participate in die Giri Scout program. Beginning with five-year-olds or giris in Kiridcrgarten and continuing to senior high school students, the Giri Scouts offer a variety of activities to meet the changing needs of giris. To volunteer to join Giri Scouting call (702) 385-3677 or, in Henderson, caU at 565-6290. Thursday, September 28.1989 Thanks to Gaining. All over Nevada. 149,000 people leave home each day to work in our state's largest industry gaming. Yi>u see, gaming accounts for many more jobs than any other Nevada industry 28% of Nevada's entire workforce. That's 149,000 paychecks for mothers and fathers, single men and women. 149,000 paychecks for rent, groceries, clothing, dental hills and recreational activities. What's more, gaming accounts for an additional 223,000 workers whose jobs supply needed products and services utilized by the gaming industry. So you see, gaming isn't Just another job, it's a way of life in Nevada. Gaming and Emp lo yment. Inseparable. A New Rose Has Blossomed. •. iy 't. Hose de Lima Hospital has a new name. The hospital is dedicated to the memory of St. Rose of Lima, Peru, a selfless woman who devoted her life to caring for the poor and outcast of her city. The new name promotes St. Rose's religious order. Dominican, as a stronger way of identifying with our heritage. So, you see, the change will instill a greater appreciation for the Dominican spirit, one of compassion and truth, which has made the hospital what it is today. It is, indeed, a very special place to receive medical care. At St. Rose Dominican Hospital, the tradition of quality Catholic healthcare continues. • r- ^Qse Domini can S P IT W2 E. lake Mead Drive • Henderson, NV 89015' (702)564-2622 -. + Served Dally From a.m. to 10:30 p.m. SUNDAY. MONDAY. TUESDAY. RANCH HAND STEW _BAR-B-Q BEEF RIBS .CHICKEN FRIED STEAK WEDNESDAY. THURSDAY_ FRIDAY _OLD FASHION MEAT LOAF — NEVADA FRIED CHICKEN .SOUTHERN FRIED CAT RSH (Includes Salad Bar) HOT DOG & DRAFT BEEF^ ^•te*! for 11 a.m. to 7 pm. f NACHOS WITH MELTED CHEESE "BUD TIME" 500 *?• toep-" SLOT SEEKERS CLUB Double Points Midnight Sun. till Midnight Thurs. 444 Sunset Rd. Henderson 1/4 MILE WEST gOF ^ BOlfLDER HWY + This Was Nevada HndnoD Home Nw, Boulder City News. Qn$n VeUey Newe Paaa 2B Tule Springs Park walking tour Saturday By PUlUp I. Earl Next Saturday, personnel of the Nevada State Parks Department will present a slide show and walking tour of the historic Tule Springs Ranch at Floyd R. Lamb State Park, located off highway 95,10 miles north of Las Vegas. Persons interested should meet in front of the ranch at 2 p.m. For further information, write Floyd R. Lamb State Park, 9200 Tule Springs Road, Las Vegas, Nev. 89131, or call (702) 486-5413. One of Clark County's most historic sites, Tule Springs is also of interest to anthropologists. Stratified excavations in the area indicate human habitation as early as 13,000 years ago. In historic times, Indians who referred to themselves as "Tudini" ("Desert People") camped at the natural watering hole. The name Tule Springs, however, has its origin with a cartographer accompanying a party led by Lieutenant George M. Wheeler of the U.S. Army's Corps of Engineers, which stopped in 1869 during a reconnaisance through Southern Nevada. In the 18908, a Southern Paiute by the name of Benjamin Ben settled at the springs with his family. Known as "Whispering Ben" and "Chief Ben," he later operated a small trading station on the wagon road from Las Vegas to the mining camps which developed in central Nevada after 1900. About 1905, a drifter by the name of Levandowski established the United States Saloon and Restaurant at the springs. Much gold and silver bullion was being sent south to the railhead at Las Vegas at that time and there were occasional robberies on the road. So the story goes, a teamster friend of Levandowski's was shot and killed near the springs one day. His assailants discovered that the gold was cast in four bars weighing 150 pounds each. Their horses were tired, so they buried two of the bars and headed for Hidden Forest with the other two. After finding his friend's body, Levandowski buried him and followed the trail of the two road agents. He killed them a few days later, telling the authorities that the men had cached the gold before he tracked them down. Mining company officials did not want to call attention to the size of their shipments, so did not report the loss. Levandowski disappeared shortly thereafter and the story is that he took the gold with him. The Las Vegas and Tonopah Railroad put the freighters out of business by 1907 and the springs were abandoned until Bert and Anne Nay arrived in 1910. Bert and his young wife moved into the old adobe house which they fixed up for a home. They raised goats, rabbits, horse and a few cattle, planted fruit trees, put in a garden, built a five-room house and raised a family of two boys and five girls over the next few years. Bert worked on nearby ranches from time to time to supplement the family income^and Anne and the children raised Angora goats which they sheared yearly for the valuable wool. By 1924, the Tule Springs Ranch comprise a full 40 acres, which included a large reservoir. In 1927, Bert and Anne decided to move on;
PAGE 26

ParM. HMIOII Horn* Ntwt. Bouldf Qty Nwri. Qnn VUy Nwi Thursday, September 28, 1989 ThnrsdUiy, September 28, 1989 Participants in last year's tour prepare to board a bus. Annual City Tour set for Oct. 12 The City ofHenderson and the Henderson Chamber of Commerce are putting the flnal touches on this year's "It's Happening in Henderson" bus tour. The tour is scheduled for Thursday, Oct. 12, and will begin at die new Henderson City Hall, 240 Water St. Itisthe 12thycarthatthcpublic has been offered the opportunity to participate in a narrated tour of all the new developments taking place in the City of Henderson. Because of anticipated attendance, this year's tour has been designed to allow participants the option of selecting a particular departure lime, beginning at 1 p.m. Last year's tour had more than 330 individuals who touted some 183 projects within the city limits. This year's tour will feature close to 200 projects, officials said. As an extra, several of Henderson's major developers have again opted to host complimentary refreshments at the new Henderson City Hall for tour participants at the end of the trip. City staff members also will provide a tour of the new City Hall for this year's bus tourguests. Reservations can be made and tickets, priced at $10 each, can be purchased through Uie Henderson Chamber of Commerce, 100 E. Lake Mead Drive, Henderson. For further information, call 565-8951. Centel looking to students for January 1990 color insert Centel is encouraging area students to take a camera in hand to capture their life at school, work or play, from now through Oct. 4, for the January 1990 color insert section of the Las Vegas telephone directory. Production of the Centel phone book color insert section for January 1990 is currently underway. The insert, which appears in the middle of the directory, is tentatively titled "A Day in the Life of Southern Nevada's Youth." The theme of the section is Southern Nevada through the eyes of a student. The project is open to all children enrolled in a Clark County public or private school from kindergarten through 12th grade. Age catagories are kindergarten to 5th grade, 6th grade to 8th grades and 9th to 12th grade. All entries must be in the form of 35mm slides, officials said. Each participating student may submit up to and only three slides. Entries must be clearly identified with the entrant's name, phone number and age category. The entries must include written permission of the people being photographed to allow publication of their photos. Deadline for entries is Tuesday, Oct. 10. A drop box has been set up in the public relations office at Centel's main office, 330 S. Valley View Blvd. All entries become the property of Centel. For further information on the project, call 382-5202. CATCHUP Don't Let Another Sunday Get Away Without Attending Church Mh 8:30 A.M. WORSHIP SERVICE 9:45 A.M. CHURCH SCHOOL 11:00 A.M. WORSHIP SERVICE HENDERSON PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 601 N. Mlor Av 565-9e84 Special postal cancellation for Nevada's 125th birthday Carson Oty and Las Vegas Post Offices are having a special cancellation commemorating Nevada's 125th anniversary of statehood. Secretary of State Frankie Sue Del Papa, executive director of Nevada's 125th Birthday Commission, commended postal officials for their support of the important occasion in Nevada's history. "It is truly anhonor to receive a cancellation recognition for Nevada's 125th Birthday, since there are very few authorized by die postal service. This an opportunity for Nevadans to collect a piece of our history." she said. Postal officials will have a University Medical Center Foundation booth set up for the Nevada Day Celebration in Southem Nevada at the North Las Vegas 11 th Annual Fairshow, to be held Friday through Sunday, OcL 2729. Other commemorative gifts will be available at the boodi as weU. The Little Stampers Qub of Carson City^4S offering special cachet envelopes for $1 each at the chamber as well. The Little Stampers is a group of postal employee* who are trying to raise money for a day care center for the children of postal workers, which diey hope to open in the spring. Persons wishing to order die special cancellation by mail may do so by sending Uieir request, along with a stamped envelope, to: Nevada Day Postal Cancellation. 1001 East Sunset Road, Las Vegas, Nev. 89199-9996. For more infomiaUon, contact Dcby Panish, Carson City superintendent of window services, at 887-7000. rTTVT-77 The two great RenaisMnce artists MIchaelangelo and Leonardo Da Vinci were both left-handed. HendcraoB Horn* Maws, Bouldtr City Nwra, QrMa VUy Newa Paca 27: 20% OFF ALL GIFT ITEMS THRMGHOUT OCTOBER MBUMM TM • 5^4. ^ Roaring 20*8 Player Pianos •AuttMnUe Aimriean •Rapraa •Muate leiM indlwi jMMiiy •Hand CialMd NMM •WMtam Art •UniqiM OMI ttwrn I Rug* •AnIlquM •COUCCUMM d Oct 2 M F 8:30-4 30 •u u^o> OKM SM 104:30 ^'i:r.ir^ aM-i4M • 294-1M1 Veteran's Assistance? Poison liiloriiialioir! Call St. Rose Dominican Hospital^ Community Resource Service 564-4665 Ask for Kathy Pantnso, R.N. For Information on Where to Get Help. INTRODUCINa 24-HOUR BINGO ATTHE 'BOAT! MORE BINGO MORE OPPORIUNITY TO WIN You're invited to a 24-hour, 7 day-a-week Bingo party! During our multi-million dollar renovation, we're introducing 24-hour Bingo with more games for more chances to win. The 3:00 am, 5:00 am and 7:00 am sessions will be played on paper. On September 11,12 and 13, all players during these sessions will receive free daubers! FREEBREAKMST ,^3:00 am, 5:d(5'am and 7:00 am session players all receive free breakfast! Plus each session will have an odd-even progressive coverall. OUR NEW 24-HOUR SCHEDULE 1:00 am 9:30 am 5:00 pm 3:00 am 11:00 am 7:00 pm 5:00 am 1:00 pm 9:00 pm 7:00 am 3:00 pm 11:00 pm 4/1 Around'The-Clock Bingo Party! SHOWBOAT HOTEL, CASINO & BOWLING CENTER } SAVE • SALE DAYS • SAVE at LOVE FURNITURE •FREE IN HOME DESIGN SERVICE •CUSTOM DRAPES •DESIGER CARPET •WALLCOVERINGS •CUSTOM FURNITURE Professionals coordinating all your design needs Let Us Help You Make Your House A Home comer of eouider Hwy. & Lake Mead Drive I m\iC BEST PRICES IN NEVADA! In Henderson LV V C FURNITURE open seven Days a Week (702) 565-5911 Up With People show to benefit Opportunity Security Pacific Bank Nevada presents the Las Vegas premier of Up With People's ail-new 1989-91 production "Face to Face" at 7:30 p.m. Friday. Oct. 6th at Artemus W. Ham Hall. Thetwo-hourmusical extravaganza, which features a cast of 120 young people from 16 countries, is cosponsored by KLASTV Channel 8, with proceeds benefiting Opportunity Village. All seats are reserved for the exclusive Las Vegas public perlormance by Up With People, tickets are $8. $10 and $12 and are available at Artemus W. Ham Hall Box Office and Opportunity Village, 917 S. First St. Discount coupons for $2 off each ticket are available at any branch of Security Pacific Bank Nevada. ~ The public performance culminates two days of community involvement activities that will take the cast throughout Las Vegas, visiting hospitals, nursing homes, senior citizen centers, schools and Opportunity Village. "Face to Face" is the Silver Celebration Edition of the Up With People show, featuring a striding new set, costuming and lighUng, celebrating Up With People's 25 years of entertaining millions around the worid. The Up With People show is international at heart, with rock "n" roll in tis soul. The beat is contagious, with something for everyone from rock to gospel, folk and traditional to contemporary ballads and international pageantry to be-bopping dance numbers. With Up With People, it's hard to tell where the stage ends and the audience begins, observers say. In a blur of color, the aisles become flooded with dozens of young performers whose faces reveal not only the ethnic diversity of the many countries they represent, but also their genuine excitement to be with the audience. Everyone's a part of the show. But there's more to Up With People than entertainment, spokespersons said. The aim of Up With People is to encourage understanding among people of all nations through a unique program of intercultural education. Up With People recruits local students The intematibrial educational program. Up With People, is actively recniiting smdents in the Las Vegas area from now through Oct. 6 to join their fuUire casts. Young people who enjoy international travel, musical performance, meeting people, learning about different cultures and are between the ages of 18 and 25. should consider a year with Up With People, spokespersons said. During the one-year planned educational program, each cast of 120 young men and women from dozens of countries will travel 32,000 miles on at least two continents, live with host families in each of the 100 cities visited. A,year in Up With People provides extensive opportunities to develop and enhance career skills critical for entry into competidve job maricets. Results can be seen in personal growth as well as specific skill development in the areas of mariccting, communication, business and the performing arts, officials said. College credits are available through the Unlvenlty of Arizona and through independent study programs students create with their own universities. Interviews for interested applicants will be held from 1 p.* until 4 p.m. Wednesday at UNL^ Interviewing will again take plaa| after the cast's performance^ Ham Hall. No musical audition^ are required. ^: For more information aboij^ joining the Up With People ptek gram, call advance recruiter Julib Marehall at 384-8170. Two members of the cast of Up With People musical performance and public community activities and civic ^•^i*^' affairs wherever they go. Eachyearmoretiian600young For more infonnation on the adults, divided among five interUpWithPeoplevisittoLas Vegas, national touring companies, spend call 384-8170. 11 months traveling to many lands, entertaining audiences worldwide, sharing experiences, and involving themselves in Bright brass doorknobs and lanterns will last for the life of your ERA SUNBELT REALTY is proud to announce the association off Sue Nelson. Sue is one of ERA'S top listers — specializing in the Southeast and Green Vaiiey/Henderson area. For any and ail your Real Estate needs, you can depend on Sue Nelson. You may call her at 364-1699. SUNBELT REALTY 3101 Spring MounUin Rd. 1 Ut Megas, NV 89102 ^ October 1-7 IS National Physical Therapy Week In special recognition of the skilled physical therapy staff whose services reflect a commitment to the community and the profession. Congratulations and thanks from St. Rose Dominican Hospital and Green Valley Medical Services! St. Rose Dominican Bill Randall, RPT Department Manager Pat Basta, Secretary Ella Blazzard, Aid Carroll Berghuls, Aid Kimra Cheek, Aid Jean Lopez, RPT Rotwrta Rosa, Aid/Receptionist Green Valley Medical Services Katherine Frei, RPT Department Manager Matt Cheek, Aid St. Rose Dominican HOSPITAL 102 LUkeMndDrive-Henderson. NV89013 At St. Rose Dominican Hospital, the tradition of quality Catholic healthcare continues. George E. Merino MJ). F.A.C.S. F.I.C.S. GREEN VALLEY MEDICAL SERVICES I SPECIALinNG Of — SURGERY OP THE HEART. LUNGS. ARTERIES 4 VEINS LASER VASCULAR SURGERY 6301 Mtn. Vista, Suit* 209 (AeroM Irom EMwl M's) 456-3359 3006 S. Maryland Pkwy. 734-1940 700 Shadow Lana 384-0899 MEDICARE PROVIDER ACTS Vascular l.aboratory Complato nvaalva in-OffIca Evaluation of Circulation Olaordara Two Good Reasons zto Transfer Your IRA to Valley Bank 1. Higher Rates. 2. IfsEasy. One coupon. One step. iBHBBBaamaiBBHBBaaBi IRA Request to Transfer Funds to Valley Bank of Nevada This i notification of my intent to diicctly transfer all or part of my present IRA to an esUbliahed IRA with Valley Bank of Nevada. Mv IRA is now with. Address: City:_j State: Zip My IRA IS in the name of:_ Account No.: '. Address: • City: Home Phone: n Transfer $ Slate: Work Phone: Zip n Transfer Balance of Account Depositors Signature: Transfer at Maturity Transfer Immediately Date It's this simple. Compli-lo, dip and mail this transfer request t.i Valley Bank of Nevada, PO. Box <*miO. Las VoRas, Nevada, 8919.V8)IV ATTN IRA Department Valley Bank will do the le^work and process vour transfer It further information is necessary, you will Iw • notified. Once paperwork is completed by Vallev Bank on your behalf, you will need to visit the branch of your choice to confirm and sijlldeposit. Substantial penalty for o.irlv withdraw.il Ratt
PAGE 27

ParM. HMIOII Horn* Ntwt. Bouldf Qty Nwri. Qnn VUy Nwi Thursday, September 28, 1989 ThnrsdUiy, September 28, 1989 Participants in last year's tour prepare to board a bus. Annual City Tour set for Oct. 12 The City ofHenderson and the Henderson Chamber of Commerce are putting the flnal touches on this year's "It's Happening in Henderson" bus tour. The tour is scheduled for Thursday, Oct. 12, and will begin at die new Henderson City Hall, 240 Water St. Itisthe 12thycarthatthcpublic has been offered the opportunity to participate in a narrated tour of all the new developments taking place in the City of Henderson. Because of anticipated attendance, this year's tour has been designed to allow participants the option of selecting a particular departure lime, beginning at 1 p.m. Last year's tour had more than 330 individuals who touted some 183 projects within the city limits. This year's tour will feature close to 200 projects, officials said. As an extra, several of Henderson's major developers have again opted to host complimentary refreshments at the new Henderson City Hall for tour participants at the end of the trip. City staff members also will provide a tour of the new City Hall for this year's bus tourguests. Reservations can be made and tickets, priced at $10 each, can be purchased through Uie Henderson Chamber of Commerce, 100 E. Lake Mead Drive, Henderson. For further information, call 565-8951. Centel looking to students for January 1990 color insert Centel is encouraging area students to take a camera in hand to capture their life at school, work or play, from now through Oct. 4, for the January 1990 color insert section of the Las Vegas telephone directory. Production of the Centel phone book color insert section for January 1990 is currently underway. The insert, which appears in the middle of the directory, is tentatively titled "A Day in the Life of Southern Nevada's Youth." The theme of the section is Southern Nevada through the eyes of a student. The project is open to all children enrolled in a Clark County public or private school from kindergarten through 12th grade. Age catagories are kindergarten to 5th grade, 6th grade to 8th grades and 9th to 12th grade. All entries must be in the form of 35mm slides, officials said. Each participating student may submit up to and only three slides. Entries must be clearly identified with the entrant's name, phone number and age category. The entries must include written permission of the people being photographed to allow publication of their photos. Deadline for entries is Tuesday, Oct. 10. A drop box has been set up in the public relations office at Centel's main office, 330 S. Valley View Blvd. All entries become the property of Centel. For further information on the project, call 382-5202. CATCHUP Don't Let Another Sunday Get Away Without Attending Church Mh 8:30 A.M. WORSHIP SERVICE 9:45 A.M. CHURCH SCHOOL 11:00 A.M. WORSHIP SERVICE HENDERSON PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 601 N. Mlor Av 565-9e84 Special postal cancellation for Nevada's 125th birthday Carson Oty and Las Vegas Post Offices are having a special cancellation commemorating Nevada's 125th anniversary of statehood. Secretary of State Frankie Sue Del Papa, executive director of Nevada's 125th Birthday Commission, commended postal officials for their support of the important occasion in Nevada's history. "It is truly anhonor to receive a cancellation recognition for Nevada's 125th Birthday, since there are very few authorized by die postal service. This an opportunity for Nevadans to collect a piece of our history." she said. Postal officials will have a University Medical Center Foundation booth set up for the Nevada Day Celebration in Southem Nevada at the North Las Vegas 11 th Annual Fairshow, to be held Friday through Sunday, OcL 2729. Other commemorative gifts will be available at the boodi as weU. The Little Stampers Qub of Carson City^4S offering special cachet envelopes for $1 each at the chamber as well. The Little Stampers is a group of postal employee* who are trying to raise money for a day care center for the children of postal workers, which diey hope to open in the spring. Persons wishing to order die special cancellation by mail may do so by sending Uieir request, along with a stamped envelope, to: Nevada Day Postal Cancellation. 1001 East Sunset Road, Las Vegas, Nev. 89199-9996. For more infomiaUon, contact Dcby Panish, Carson City superintendent of window services, at 887-7000. rTTVT-77 The two great RenaisMnce artists MIchaelangelo and Leonardo Da Vinci were both left-handed. HendcraoB Horn* Maws, Bouldtr City Nwra, QrMa VUy Newa Paca 27: 20% OFF ALL GIFT ITEMS THRMGHOUT OCTOBER MBUMM TM • 5^4. ^ Roaring 20*8 Player Pianos •AuttMnUe Aimriean •Rapraa •Muate leiM indlwi jMMiiy •Hand CialMd NMM •WMtam Art •UniqiM OMI ttwrn I Rug* •AnIlquM •COUCCUMM d Oct 2 M F 8:30-4 30 •u u^o> OKM SM 104:30 ^'i:r.ir^ aM-i4M • 294-1M1 Veteran's Assistance? Poison liiloriiialioir! Call St. Rose Dominican Hospital^ Community Resource Service 564-4665 Ask for Kathy Pantnso, R.N. For Information on Where to Get Help. INTRODUCINa 24-HOUR BINGO ATTHE 'BOAT! MORE BINGO MORE OPPORIUNITY TO WIN You're invited to a 24-hour, 7 day-a-week Bingo party! During our multi-million dollar renovation, we're introducing 24-hour Bingo with more games for more chances to win. The 3:00 am, 5:00 am and 7:00 am sessions will be played on paper. On September 11,12 and 13, all players during these sessions will receive free daubers! FREEBREAKMST ,^3:00 am, 5:d(5'am and 7:00 am session players all receive free breakfast! Plus each session will have an odd-even progressive coverall. OUR NEW 24-HOUR SCHEDULE 1:00 am 9:30 am 5:00 pm 3:00 am 11:00 am 7:00 pm 5:00 am 1:00 pm 9:00 pm 7:00 am 3:00 pm 11:00 pm 4/1 Around'The-Clock Bingo Party! SHOWBOAT HOTEL, CASINO & BOWLING CENTER } SAVE • SALE DAYS • SAVE at LOVE FURNITURE •FREE IN HOME DESIGN SERVICE •CUSTOM DRAPES •DESIGER CARPET •WALLCOVERINGS •CUSTOM FURNITURE Professionals coordinating all your design needs Let Us Help You Make Your House A Home comer of eouider Hwy. & Lake Mead Drive I m\iC BEST PRICES IN NEVADA! In Henderson LV V C FURNITURE open seven Days a Week (702) 565-5911 Up With People show to benefit Opportunity Security Pacific Bank Nevada presents the Las Vegas premier of Up With People's ail-new 1989-91 production "Face to Face" at 7:30 p.m. Friday. Oct. 6th at Artemus W. Ham Hall. Thetwo-hourmusical extravaganza, which features a cast of 120 young people from 16 countries, is cosponsored by KLASTV Channel 8, with proceeds benefiting Opportunity Village. All seats are reserved for the exclusive Las Vegas public perlormance by Up With People, tickets are $8. $10 and $12 and are available at Artemus W. Ham Hall Box Office and Opportunity Village, 917 S. First St. Discount coupons for $2 off each ticket are available at any branch of Security Pacific Bank Nevada. ~ The public performance culminates two days of community involvement activities that will take the cast throughout Las Vegas, visiting hospitals, nursing homes, senior citizen centers, schools and Opportunity Village. "Face to Face" is the Silver Celebration Edition of the Up With People show, featuring a striding new set, costuming and lighUng, celebrating Up With People's 25 years of entertaining millions around the worid. The Up With People show is international at heart, with rock "n" roll in tis soul. The beat is contagious, with something for everyone from rock to gospel, folk and traditional to contemporary ballads and international pageantry to be-bopping dance numbers. With Up With People, it's hard to tell where the stage ends and the audience begins, observers say. In a blur of color, the aisles become flooded with dozens of young performers whose faces reveal not only the ethnic diversity of the many countries they represent, but also their genuine excitement to be with the audience. Everyone's a part of the show. But there's more to Up With People than entertainment, spokespersons said. The aim of Up With People is to encourage understanding among people of all nations through a unique program of intercultural education. Up With People recruits local students The intematibrial educational program. Up With People, is actively recniiting smdents in the Las Vegas area from now through Oct. 6 to join their fuUire casts. Young people who enjoy international travel, musical performance, meeting people, learning about different cultures and are between the ages of 18 and 25. should consider a year with Up With People, spokespersons said. During the one-year planned educational program, each cast of 120 young men and women from dozens of countries will travel 32,000 miles on at least two continents, live with host families in each of the 100 cities visited. A,year in Up With People provides extensive opportunities to develop and enhance career skills critical for entry into competidve job maricets. Results can be seen in personal growth as well as specific skill development in the areas of mariccting, communication, business and the performing arts, officials said. College credits are available through the Unlvenlty of Arizona and through independent study programs students create with their own universities. Interviews for interested applicants will be held from 1 p.* until 4 p.m. Wednesday at UNL^ Interviewing will again take plaa| after the cast's performance^ Ham Hall. No musical audition^ are required. ^: For more information aboij^ joining the Up With People ptek gram, call advance recruiter Julib Marehall at 384-8170. Two members of the cast of Up With People musical performance and public community activities and civic ^•^i*^' affairs wherever they go. Eachyearmoretiian600young For more infonnation on the adults, divided among five interUpWithPeoplevisittoLas Vegas, national touring companies, spend call 384-8170. 11 months traveling to many lands, entertaining audiences worldwide, sharing experiences, and involving themselves in Bright brass doorknobs and lanterns will last for the life of your ERA SUNBELT REALTY is proud to announce the association off Sue Nelson. Sue is one of ERA'S top listers — specializing in the Southeast and Green Vaiiey/Henderson area. For any and ail your Real Estate needs, you can depend on Sue Nelson. You may call her at 364-1699. SUNBELT REALTY 3101 Spring MounUin Rd. 1 Ut Megas, NV 89102 ^ October 1-7 IS National Physical Therapy Week In special recognition of the skilled physical therapy staff whose services reflect a commitment to the community and the profession. Congratulations and thanks from St. Rose Dominican Hospital and Green Valley Medical Services! St. Rose Dominican Bill Randall, RPT Department Manager Pat Basta, Secretary Ella Blazzard, Aid Carroll Berghuls, Aid Kimra Cheek, Aid Jean Lopez, RPT Rotwrta Rosa, Aid/Receptionist Green Valley Medical Services Katherine Frei, RPT Department Manager Matt Cheek, Aid St. Rose Dominican HOSPITAL 102 LUkeMndDrive-Henderson. NV89013 At St. Rose Dominican Hospital, the tradition of quality Catholic healthcare continues. George E. Merino MJ). F.A.C.S. F.I.C.S. GREEN VALLEY MEDICAL SERVICES I SPECIALinNG Of — SURGERY OP THE HEART. LUNGS. ARTERIES 4 VEINS LASER VASCULAR SURGERY 6301 Mtn. Vista, Suit* 209 (AeroM Irom EMwl M's) 456-3359 3006 S. Maryland Pkwy. 734-1940 700 Shadow Lana 384-0899 MEDICARE PROVIDER ACTS Vascular l.aboratory Complato nvaalva in-OffIca Evaluation of Circulation Olaordara Two Good Reasons zto Transfer Your IRA to Valley Bank 1. Higher Rates. 2. IfsEasy. One coupon. One step. iBHBBBaamaiBBHBBaaBi IRA Request to Transfer Funds to Valley Bank of Nevada This i notification of my intent to diicctly transfer all or part of my present IRA to an esUbliahed IRA with Valley Bank of Nevada. Mv IRA is now with. Address: City:_j State: Zip My IRA IS in the name of:_ Account No.: '. Address: • City: Home Phone: n Transfer $ Slate: Work Phone: Zip n Transfer Balance of Account Depositors Signature: Transfer at Maturity Transfer Immediately Date It's this simple. Compli-lo, dip and mail this transfer request t.i Valley Bank of Nevada, PO. Box <*miO. Las VoRas, Nevada, 8919.V8)IV ATTN IRA Department Valley Bank will do the le^work and process vour transfer It further information is necessary, you will Iw • notified. Once paperwork is completed by Vallev Bank on your behalf, you will need to visit the branch of your choice to confirm and sijlldeposit. Substantial penalty for o.irlv withdraw.il Ratt
PAGE 28

P.g 28. Henderson Home New.. Boulder City New.. OreenJVaUeyN^ Thursday, September 28, 1989 Thursday, September 28, 1989 Cancer and [the pill •By George D. Malkasian, M.D., •President, The American __f College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Puring thclast year, there have been reports about studies suggesting that there may be a link between the birth control pill and canccrof the breast. Many women arc confused about whether or not the birth control pill docs increase the risk of breast cancer. What is the real story? To find out we look to the very large and well-conducted studies in which the risks to women who look the birth control pill are matched against a control group of women who did not lake the pill. In thescstudies.wc find over and over again that, for the population as a whole, a woman who uses the pill docs not have an increased risk of cancer of the breast. Wc know more about the safety of the birth control pill than any other pill placed in the human mouth. Over the last 30 years, there have been more than 100 separate studies of birth control pills. These studies have established very clcariy that the birth control pill is saving lives. These studies have shown that women who use the pill have a 40 percent reduced risk of cancer of the ovaries or cndomctrium (lining of the womb). The evidence is powerful that it reduces the risk for these cancers. Some recent studies of small subgroups of women have painted a confusing and inconsistent picture when it comes to cancer of the breast. A U.S. Food and Dmg Administration advi.sory panel examined somcof these recent studies and dctcnnined that "there was still no conclusive evidence of a cau.se and effect relationship between the pill and breast cancer.'' That advisory committee also .said that there was no reason for women to change their birth con[fo\ practices or for doctors to change theirprc.scribingpractices. All of the studies about the safciyof the pill looked at women who used the pill in the 1960s and early 1970s, becau.sc it takes about 20 years for breast cancer to develop. The dose of estrogen in those eariy binh control pills was rtjuch higher than it is today. ; 'n the 1960s it was not unusual lor the pill 10 contain between 50 and I (X) micrograms of estrogen. Today, the newer low dose pill inay have as litUc as 35 micrograms. It is still too early to measure the resulLs, but we have every fpason to believe that the newer low dose pills are safer. The important thing for you to do is to talk to your doctor about ihc risks and benefits of taking the pill and make a decision with which you are comfortable. Single, free copies of "Oral Contraceptives'* (AP021) are available by sending a stamped, self-addressed, business sized envelope along with the name of the booklet to: The American CollegeofObsletriciansand Gynecologists, Re.source Center, 40912th Street, SW, Washington, DC 20024-2188. Winston Churchill had twin beds, and when he couldn't fall asleep in one, he would move to the other. WEAR-DATED MONSANTO COMPARE THE QUALITY COMPARE THE PRICE! WEAR-DATED' M \(^ C A R P • Full 5 year wear and stain warranties. • Locked-in stain resistance is the best way to assure that your carpet looks better longer. • Wear-Dated i< Carpet, with exclusive locked-in stain protection looks better longer. • Unsurpassed quality and durability. • Beautiful now and for years to come .4? GUARANTEE: CARPET BARN'S We insUll 1st QUALITY CARPET in your home. InsUllation for as long as J own VO"' home. Largest selection of carpet anywhere. HIGHEST QUALITY carpel for your money. SAVE ON ALL CARPET AS NEVER BEFORE! STARTS AT ONLY AT Carpet Barn! WE DON'T MEET PRICES...WE BEAT EVERYBODY'S PRICES.. CALL TODAY FOR FREE ESTIMATES iMosletCordi 90 DAYS SAME AS CASH^ON APPROVED CREDIT COMPLETE CARPET, PAD AND LABOR FOR 0N£ PRICE SAVE ONALt CARPET AS NEVER BEFORE! CALLTODAYOR COME ON IN! 105 W. Charleston Blvd. 384-8551 OPEN EVENINGS • FREE PARKING MON.-FRI. 9 TO 9 SAT. 9 TO 6 •SUN. 11 TO 5 NO JOB TOO SMALL OR TOO LARGE-ONE ROOM TO A FULL HOUSE OF CARPET Wildlife Department conducts desert tortoise workshop By Mike Donahue Special to the News The Nevada Department of Wildlife recently conducted a mini-workshop at the request of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to enhance that agency's understanding of the desert tortoise. Brad Hardenbrook, NDOW biologist in charge of reptiles, said it was a perfect example of agencies cooperating with one another in an effort to aid a threatened animal. The desert tortoise has recently been placed on the federal list of endangered species. Dave Brown, manager of the —Desert National Wildlife Refuge Complex of the U.SJ Department of Fish and Wildlife, said he requested the four-hour class because of the need to better understand the desert tortoise and its habitat on U.S. refuges in Southem Nevada. "We have land in Southern Nevada and now that the species is listed as endangered, we need Craftworks Market rounds out Arts Festiyal Discover the Arts in Las Vegas during the first KNPR Arts Festival and eighth annual Craftworks Market! L This year's KNPR Craftworks Market will close the Las ^Vegas Arts Festival Friday, Saturday and Sunday, at Jaycee Park, corner of Eastern & St. Louis Avenues. The market, which has expanded to include a half dayfrom noon to dusk-on Friday, is a family-oriented event, open from 10 a.m. to dusk on Saturday and Sunday. With 139 participating juried artist booths, the selection of arts and crafts will far surpass previous years. Among the media represented will be ceramics, wearable art, wood furniture, toys and vessels, hand-done bonsai arrangernehts, blown and stained'glass, handmade paper and other textiles, leather accessories, fine watercolor and oil paintings, photography, jewelry, handmade soaps and cosmetics, and basketry. A broad range of prices in each category of work will be available. Several of the participating artist will be demonstrating their crafts, among them; metal engraving, basketry, needlework, pottery, etched glass, and hand-painted clothing. Del Curtis of TWA will present the winner of the Best of Show award with a round-trip ticket to the destination of choice within the continental United States. There will be three performance stages with continuous live entertainment throughout the weekend. Featured on two stages will be New Wave, classical, jazz, CountryWestern, and Dixieland music. Nevada Dance Theatre will f)erform, as mW the Nevada Opera Theatre, Opus Dance Ensemble, Sign Design Theatre and the Al As Har Belly Dancers certainly something for everyone! Admission to Craftworks Market will be $3, with a special two-day (Saturday and Sunday only) at the gate with children under 12 free when accompanied by an adult. Presale of tickets is being done through Teleguide Ticket offices located at Clark County library branches. Craftworks Market is sponsored by First Interstate Bank, the Las Vegas Sun and Hospital Health Plan, with one of the performance stages sponsored by Prime Cable. | to get a handle on it to better manage our own property," Brown said. Hardenbrook, who taught the class, and three members of the federal service recently traveled to prime desert tortoise habitat on land west of Las Vegas. Once there, the NDOW biologist instructed fish and wildlife personnel on habits, habitats and food of the desert tortoise; what to look for to identify a desert tortoise burrow including tracks and waste and some of the differences between the sexes. "I think the class went very well." Hardenbrook said. "A lot of infonnation was passed along, making it a very worthwhile day. "All [biologists] lend to specialize and we all need to be more aware of other areas," he added. "Field people now will have a better understanding of the desert tortoise." Henderson Home Newe, Boulder City Newe, Oreen Valley New* Puge 29' Free management workshop Offered "Zeroing Out The Competition" will be the focus of a free management workshop offered to small business owners and managers from 9 a.m. to noon, Friday. Sept 29 at HQ Office Supplies Warehouse, 4995 S. Eastern Ave. in Las Vegas. No ple-regisiration is required for the threehourclass, taught by management expert and Fortune 500 consultTORTOISE BURROW—Brad Hydenbrook, center, Nevada Department of Wildlife biologist in charge of reptiles, explains to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service members Dave Brown, right. Desert Complex Project manager, and Bruce Zeller, federal biologist, that large caliche burrows such as this one can be home to more than one desert tortoise. Photo by Mike Donahue ant Sandra Goodwin. Combating the problems th^t cause more than 200.000 nc^ smaU businesses to fail in their first year. HQ's management small businesses "the edge." The workshop is open to the public and will cover topics including advertising. moUvation. mariceting, negotiating and deal making spokespersons said. AMERICAN INDIAN & WESTERN ART SALE ri" Local Dealer ANNOUNCES ACIANTSitoof AullMiMk AiMrtcan Indian It m ttry. Navajo Riigi.lMktts. KsctwiM. Pottofy M • • w • larga fatoctlon of WnaSouthiw M wn paintings. bronM sculpuirt and irtlf acts Green Valley Athletic Club 2100 Olympic Ave. Green Valley 4546000 Tues. Sept. 26 thro Sun. Oct. 1 AL L MAJOR CKEDrr CARDS t PHISONAL CHECKS ACCIPTED FBEE ADMISSIOli' I WHOLESALE TO DEALERT U1CKYU)CALS Meet just a few of our recent Las Vegas winners. Al Cassaro Local Winner $3,564 Quartermania Sheryl L. Dagnese Local Winner $2,340.46 Quartermania Karen Johnson Local Winner $2,888.42 Slots George Fields Local Winner $2,500 Keno Ramon Leyva Local Winner $4,700 Keno Patricia Blanton Local Winner $3,375 Keno Donna Hardy Local Winner $3,855 Keno [ Joe Zaiudek Local Winner $7,080 Keno • • William Clayton, Jr. Barbara Crosson Joe Eric Local Winner Las Vegas Local Winner $4,000 Video Poker' $4,000 Video Poker $10,924 Pick Six Total Slot Payouts for August: $3,236,766. $1,409,366 in Royal Flushes .^ alone! Join the Town Club Challenge. Win a free jacket with first royal flush. Details at the Town Hall. Where locals bring their friends. SAM'S TOWN HOTEL & GAMBLING HALL Boulder Highway & Nellis / 456-7777 / Another fine Boyd Group hotel i ORIGINAL DEFECTIVE

PAGE 29

P.g 28. Henderson Home New.. Boulder City New.. OreenJVaUeyN^ Thursday, September 28, 1989 Thursday, September 28, 1989 Cancer and [the pill •By George D. Malkasian, M.D., •President, The American __f College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Puring thclast year, there have been reports about studies suggesting that there may be a link between the birth control pill and canccrof the breast. Many women arc confused about whether or not the birth control pill docs increase the risk of breast cancer. What is the real story? To find out we look to the very large and well-conducted studies in which the risks to women who look the birth control pill are matched against a control group of women who did not lake the pill. In thescstudies.wc find over and over again that, for the population as a whole, a woman who uses the pill docs not have an increased risk of cancer of the breast. Wc know more about the safety of the birth control pill than any other pill placed in the human mouth. Over the last 30 years, there have been more than 100 separate studies of birth control pills. These studies have established very clcariy that the birth control pill is saving lives. These studies have shown that women who use the pill have a 40 percent reduced risk of cancer of the ovaries or cndomctrium (lining of the womb). The evidence is powerful that it reduces the risk for these cancers. Some recent studies of small subgroups of women have painted a confusing and inconsistent picture when it comes to cancer of the breast. A U.S. Food and Dmg Administration advi.sory panel examined somcof these recent studies and dctcnnined that "there was still no conclusive evidence of a cau.se and effect relationship between the pill and breast cancer.'' That advisory committee also .said that there was no reason for women to change their birth con[fo\ practices or for doctors to change theirprc.scribingpractices. All of the studies about the safciyof the pill looked at women who used the pill in the 1960s and early 1970s, becau.sc it takes about 20 years for breast cancer to develop. The dose of estrogen in those eariy binh control pills was rtjuch higher than it is today. ; 'n the 1960s it was not unusual lor the pill 10 contain between 50 and I (X) micrograms of estrogen. Today, the newer low dose pill inay have as litUc as 35 micrograms. It is still too early to measure the resulLs, but we have every fpason to believe that the newer low dose pills are safer. The important thing for you to do is to talk to your doctor about ihc risks and benefits of taking the pill and make a decision with which you are comfortable. Single, free copies of "Oral Contraceptives'* (AP021) are available by sending a stamped, self-addressed, business sized envelope along with the name of the booklet to: The American CollegeofObsletriciansand Gynecologists, Re.source Center, 40912th Street, SW, Washington, DC 20024-2188. Winston Churchill had twin beds, and when he couldn't fall asleep in one, he would move to the other. WEAR-DATED MONSANTO COMPARE THE QUALITY COMPARE THE PRICE! WEAR-DATED' M \(^ C A R P • Full 5 year wear and stain warranties. • Locked-in stain resistance is the best way to assure that your carpet looks better longer. • Wear-Dated i< Carpet, with exclusive locked-in stain protection looks better longer. • Unsurpassed quality and durability. • Beautiful now and for years to come .4? GUARANTEE: CARPET BARN'S We insUll 1st QUALITY CARPET in your home. InsUllation for as long as J own VO"' home. Largest selection of carpet anywhere. HIGHEST QUALITY carpel for your money. SAVE ON ALL CARPET AS NEVER BEFORE! STARTS AT ONLY AT Carpet Barn! WE DON'T MEET PRICES...WE BEAT EVERYBODY'S PRICES.. CALL TODAY FOR FREE ESTIMATES iMosletCordi 90 DAYS SAME AS CASH^ON APPROVED CREDIT COMPLETE CARPET, PAD AND LABOR FOR 0N£ PRICE SAVE ONALt CARPET AS NEVER BEFORE! CALLTODAYOR COME ON IN! 105 W. Charleston Blvd. 384-8551 OPEN EVENINGS • FREE PARKING MON.-FRI. 9 TO 9 SAT. 9 TO 6 •SUN. 11 TO 5 NO JOB TOO SMALL OR TOO LARGE-ONE ROOM TO A FULL HOUSE OF CARPET Wildlife Department conducts desert tortoise workshop By Mike Donahue Special to the News The Nevada Department of Wildlife recently conducted a mini-workshop at the request of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to enhance that agency's understanding of the desert tortoise. Brad Hardenbrook, NDOW biologist in charge of reptiles, said it was a perfect example of agencies cooperating with one another in an effort to aid a threatened animal. The desert tortoise has recently been placed on the federal list of endangered species. Dave Brown, manager of the —Desert National Wildlife Refuge Complex of the U.SJ Department of Fish and Wildlife, said he requested the four-hour class because of the need to better understand the desert tortoise and its habitat on U.S. refuges in Southem Nevada. "We have land in Southern Nevada and now that the species is listed as endangered, we need Craftworks Market rounds out Arts Festiyal Discover the Arts in Las Vegas during the first KNPR Arts Festival and eighth annual Craftworks Market! L This year's KNPR Craftworks Market will close the Las ^Vegas Arts Festival Friday, Saturday and Sunday, at Jaycee Park, corner of Eastern & St. Louis Avenues. The market, which has expanded to include a half dayfrom noon to dusk-on Friday, is a family-oriented event, open from 10 a.m. to dusk on Saturday and Sunday. With 139 participating juried artist booths, the selection of arts and crafts will far surpass previous years. Among the media represented will be ceramics, wearable art, wood furniture, toys and vessels, hand-done bonsai arrangernehts, blown and stained'glass, handmade paper and other textiles, leather accessories, fine watercolor and oil paintings, photography, jewelry, handmade soaps and cosmetics, and basketry. A broad range of prices in each category of work will be available. Several of the participating artist will be demonstrating their crafts, among them; metal engraving, basketry, needlework, pottery, etched glass, and hand-painted clothing. Del Curtis of TWA will present the winner of the Best of Show award with a round-trip ticket to the destination of choice within the continental United States. There will be three performance stages with continuous live entertainment throughout the weekend. Featured on two stages will be New Wave, classical, jazz, CountryWestern, and Dixieland music. Nevada Dance Theatre will f)erform, as mW the Nevada Opera Theatre, Opus Dance Ensemble, Sign Design Theatre and the Al As Har Belly Dancers certainly something for everyone! Admission to Craftworks Market will be $3, with a special two-day (Saturday and Sunday only) at the gate with children under 12 free when accompanied by an adult. Presale of tickets is being done through Teleguide Ticket offices located at Clark County library branches. Craftworks Market is sponsored by First Interstate Bank, the Las Vegas Sun and Hospital Health Plan, with one of the performance stages sponsored by Prime Cable. | to get a handle on it to better manage our own property," Brown said. Hardenbrook, who taught the class, and three members of the federal service recently traveled to prime desert tortoise habitat on land west of Las Vegas. Once there, the NDOW biologist instructed fish and wildlife personnel on habits, habitats and food of the desert tortoise; what to look for to identify a desert tortoise burrow including tracks and waste and some of the differences between the sexes. "I think the class went very well." Hardenbrook said. "A lot of infonnation was passed along, making it a very worthwhile day. "All [biologists] lend to specialize and we all need to be more aware of other areas," he added. "Field people now will have a better understanding of the desert tortoise." Henderson Home Newe, Boulder City Newe, Oreen Valley New* Puge 29' Free management workshop Offered "Zeroing Out The Competition" will be the focus of a free management workshop offered to small business owners and managers from 9 a.m. to noon, Friday. Sept 29 at HQ Office Supplies Warehouse, 4995 S. Eastern Ave. in Las Vegas. No ple-regisiration is required for the threehourclass, taught by management expert and Fortune 500 consultTORTOISE BURROW—Brad Hydenbrook, center, Nevada Department of Wildlife biologist in charge of reptiles, explains to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service members Dave Brown, right. Desert Complex Project manager, and Bruce Zeller, federal biologist, that large caliche burrows such as this one can be home to more than one desert tortoise. Photo by Mike Donahue ant Sandra Goodwin. Combating the problems th^t cause more than 200.000 nc^ smaU businesses to fail in their first year. HQ's management small businesses "the edge." The workshop is open to the public and will cover topics including advertising. moUvation. mariceting, negotiating and deal making spokespersons said. AMERICAN INDIAN & WESTERN ART SALE ri" Local Dealer ANNOUNCES ACIANTSitoof AullMiMk AiMrtcan Indian It m ttry. Navajo Riigi.lMktts. KsctwiM. Pottofy M • • w • larga fatoctlon of WnaSouthiw M wn paintings. bronM sculpuirt and irtlf acts Green Valley Athletic Club 2100 Olympic Ave. Green Valley 4546000 Tues. Sept. 26 thro Sun. Oct. 1 AL L MAJOR CKEDrr CARDS t PHISONAL CHECKS ACCIPTED FBEE ADMISSIOli' I WHOLESALE TO DEALERT U1CKYU)CALS Meet just a few of our recent Las Vegas winners. Al Cassaro Local Winner $3,564 Quartermania Sheryl L. Dagnese Local Winner $2,340.46 Quartermania Karen Johnson Local Winner $2,888.42 Slots George Fields Local Winner $2,500 Keno Ramon Leyva Local Winner $4,700 Keno Patricia Blanton Local Winner $3,375 Keno Donna Hardy Local Winner $3,855 Keno [ Joe Zaiudek Local Winner $7,080 Keno • • William Clayton, Jr. Barbara Crosson Joe Eric Local Winner Las Vegas Local Winner $4,000 Video Poker' $4,000 Video Poker $10,924 Pick Six Total Slot Payouts for August: $3,236,766. $1,409,366 in Royal Flushes .^ alone! Join the Town Club Challenge. Win a free jacket with first royal flush. Details at the Town Hall. Where locals bring their friends. SAM'S TOWN HOTEL & GAMBLING HALL Boulder Highway & Nellis / 456-7777 / Another fine Boyd Group hotel i ORIGINAL DEFECTIVE

PAGE 30

PWH Page 30, HendereoB Home News, Boulder City New. Green Valley News Thursday, September 28, 1989 iducatlon UNLV center offers counseling Hebrew Academy plans 10th anniversary • Preparations are underway for the 10th Anniversary Gala for the Hebrew Academy, scheduled Saturday. Oct. .28. at Caesars Palace in Coliseum Rooms III apdlV. // The annual event is the major iiindraiscr for the non-profit, nonparochial school, which is the 6nly elementary school in Nevada accredited by the Northwest )issociation of Schools and Colleges. This year's gala celebrates lb years of academic excellence 4 the Academy, as well as the figinning of a new decade and a new campus. Proceeds from the Hebrew Academy's 10th Anniversary Gala will go toward the school's building fund for its new facility in the Summerlin developmentMilton Schwartz, chainnan of the Hebrew Academy board, will be honored as academy's "Man of the Year" for his support of the school since its inception in 1979. He recently donated $500,000 toward the new Summerlin campus. The evening's festivities include dinner, star entertainment. Landscape workshops to begin • New landscape workshops requirements, plant choice and are being offered this fall by a review of edible plants will the Henderson Parks and be covered. Landscape design Recreation Department. examples and assistance with "Energy-Conserving Land^plant placement are also in^apes" will cover stejps eluded in the workshop, offered residents can take to save tune, money, water and energy. Participants will receive a slide presentation, samples of energy-efficient landscape plans, handouts, plant lists and an invitation to the UNLV plant tour. The workshop will be held from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, at the Silver Springs Community Center. "Right Plant, Right Place" will help participants choose the appropriate plants for their personal landscapes. Cultural at the same hours on Saturday Oct. 7, at the Silver Springs community Center. Six other weekly Do-ItYourself Landscape classes will be offered at the Henderson Civic Center and Silver Springs Community Center^beginning Oct. 31. Contact Henderson Parks and Recreation Department at 565-2121 for more information. Additional workshops will be scheduled as interest is generated. Seminar to discuss young people H. Stephen Glen, an internationally acclaimed family therapist, will conduct an all-day seminar, "Developing Capable Young People," from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 6, at the Holiday Casino, Holiday Inn. The gathering is sponsored by HCA Montevista Hospital. Seating is limited, hospital spokesjjersons said, urging that early reservations be made by calling364-llll,Ext. 101,or 251-1202. The hospital has applied for continuing education credits, they said. Glenn is a consultant on training education, alcoholism and drug abuse to agencies throughout the nation. A featured speaker at the White House, where he was honored by Nancy Reagan, he has served as director of the National Drug Abuse Center for Training and Resource Development in Washington. Glenn's seminar, part of Montevista Hospital's Lifespan community and professional education series, is part of more than 20 programs running through 1990 that will serve as a primary source of help and information about family and mental health issues, officials said. Parent pride conference date set An education coalition led by the Nevada State PTA will sponsor the second armual Clark County Parent Pride Conference from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 18. at Western High School. The parenting seminar will be held in conjunction with American Education Week, which will be observed nationally Nov. 12-18. Parents who attend Parent Pride can choose from among 30 workshop sessions. "The seminar is designed to help parents communicate more ef^^tively with their children," said coordinator Janet Coombs Of the Nevada State PTA. Coombs said each parent can register to attend a maximum of thrpe 45-minute workshops during the three-hour conference. "Our main objective is to improve parenting skills by making parents better informed." said Coombs. "The extremely positive resultsof our surveyof parents who attended our first Parent Pride Confernce on April 1 Kave us all the reason to contmue the workshop on an annual basis." Coombs said. "Through the parent survey, we also learned that parents prefer having the conference earlier in the year. For that reason, and to coincide with American Education Week, we've scheduled it in November this school year." A nominal $3 fee will be charged parents who participate. A wide variety of workshops will be available for parents to choose from. General workshop topics incJude.'drugs and students, how to interpret test results, gangs, youth suicide, at-risk children, parenting, parenting for single parents, academically talented students, latchkey programs, and building student self-esteem. "We believe strongly in providing educational opportunities such as this parenting conference to help parents develop better relationships with their children—especially given the conditions in today's world. Our goal is to prepare parents to become more skillful at working with their children in order to maximize their educational potential," Longero said. free child care will be available at Ruth Fyfe Elementary School, located near Western High School, as a convenience for parents who attend the conference. Parent Pride brochures will be distributed throughout the community and will contain details about all 30 workshop sessions. The brochure will also include registration details. Anyone desiring further information about the Parent Pride Conference should contact the Nevada PTA office at 646-KIDS. PTA is the largest advocate group in the world for children's welfare and education. dancing, a silent auction and Uie awards presentations. Prizes to be auctioned off include roundtrip tickets for two to Acapulco, Mexico, jewelry and two pieces of art. Music will be provided by Pini and his Orchestra, a Los Angeles group. The 10th Anniversary Gala committee is comprised of Esther Pokroy, chairwoman, and members Linda Classman, Barbara Green, Janic Kryjier. Roberta Sabbath. Rachel Ventura and Dr. Tamar Lubin, principal of the Hebrew Academy. Tickets are priced at $115 per person and arc tax-deductible. For more information, call the Hebrew Academy at 384-45(K). UNLVs Client Services Center is a unique facility on the university campus Uiat offers lowcost counseling to community members, according to Tom Sexton, practicum coordinator for Uie center and professor of counseling, educational psychology, and foundation. The Client Services Center is operated by graduate students who are working on a master's degree in counseling. Their clients arc community members who need help resolving personal conflicts, such as marital and family problems. Sexton said. The center does not deal with crisis counseling such as Uiat needed for suicide prevention or chronic emotional disorders, but staff members will refer people with these problems to other agencies, according to Sexton. The participating graduate students are in the advanced stages of tiieir training, he said, adding that they are closely supervised by UNLV faculty. "Many smdents have been very successful in their counseling. I have seen students get people back | on the right U-ack," Sexton said, noting that all sessions are kept completely confidential. "In tiie past, students have made tremendous strides in getting their clients to communicate better or to make decisions that were cmcial for tiiem." The center charges $10 per hour, but Sexton said die price is negotiable for those experiencing financial difficulties. For more information about the center or to schedule an appoinunent. call 239-3253. LASER COPIER COMFUIEFiS QUALITY RIBBONS Data • Word Processing 4 Color TONERS For all copiers PAPER Computer • Copiers • Laser • FAX LASER EP & EPS $29'^* APPLE; CANON, HP & so OTHERS COPIER P.C. $29'^* CANON. PC.3/7.10/14, 20/25 •RECHARGABLE CARITODGES SHARP TONER 39'^ 50/70 DRUM 39'^ XEROX TONER 29'^ 1012 DRUM 89^^ *We Stock New Cartridges & Drum* RIBBONS & TONERS GALORE 1304 NEVADA HWY. 294-3106 WE DELIVEK > Interest in our Rate Master CD is running high. And can only run hi^f. Because we are living in a time where interest rates are constantly rising and falling, it's difficult for anyone, including leading economists, to be certain about what the future holds. Unless thc> hold a Rate Master CD from PriMerit Bank. You see, our Rate Master CD guarantees investors that at term, their rate will not go down.'And if interest rates have risen, their rate rises too. Here's how it works. At its first maturity, we'll renew your 6-month Rate Master CD at the same high rateM which you opened it, or at the then current interest rate. Whichever is higher. Fbr one more six-month period. It's guaranteed. When you bank with PriMerit, you have the peace of mind of knowing your deposits are supported by as.sets of over $2.7 billion, insured to $100,000 and backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. PriMerit has earned a profit for 21 consecutive years. To open your Rate Master CD. come into any PriMerit Bank branch today. Then you can bcjcerlain that no matter what interest rates do, yours won't go down. BIG SAFE FRIENDLY PRIMERIT BANK ^ htkral Sn infp Bank NevKta'i UrKMt. (MTIcn loSfr*f Voo Throu||hHil Th Suic IM Vigu HOIM Offla: VKK) W Sahara A*e. K9I02. (702) 362-5535 BmiMcr Clly: 1027 Nevada (llghway • HradCDM: f2() Boulder Highy ARI7i)MA • Pkornh; Sun tily; Sun CH l; l.eiiure Wurid and ScotMalt. Thursday, September 28,1989 MenderMii Home News, Boulder City News. Greea Valley News Pie 31 Booklet describes how to help child use library Children learn many skills and habits they'll keep all their lives by imitating others. They can learn to use the libraiy that way too—if parents take them there. The ability to use a library is oneof life'smost rewarding dulls. "Helping Your ChUd Use the Library" (Item 465V, 500) is a new booklet from the Department of Education packed fiill of ideas on helping toddlers through teenagers learn to find books for reseaich and pleasure, as well as records and assistance with the wealth of other information and programs at the local libraiy. You can get your copy by sending your name, address, and 500 to the Consumer Infonnation Center, Deparunent465V, PueUo. Colo. 81009. Teaching children how useful and fun the library can be starts with getting them interested in books. The most important thing you can do to help young children love books is to read out loud to them. That way you share your enjoymentof books with the child and step into the worid of the book together. And remember the power of examples; when they see you enjoying a book, they'll want to do it too. The materials available for checkout by infants and toddlers vary firom library to library, but they often include books with cardboard pages, cloth books, hard backs, and magazines. There will be picture books, story books, and books on every subject of interest to a curious child. When your toddler tugs on your leg and : asks why the sky is blue, that is a good time to take a trip to the library. You'll surely find a suitable answer there. The library is a wonderful place for children to satisfy curiosity. Children's librarians are trained and eager to help them learn about everything from dinosaurs to the depth of the ocean. Once your jiiild leams to read, help him or her get a library card. Most libraries wiU give cards to any child Viat has an adult to cosign. Chiljjren take great pride in knowing ^ey can find things out on their pwn. having a library card is a Step toward this independence. : Many libraries have faculties fnd trained librarians for special children—those that are handij;apped as well as those that are {particularly talented or advanced. 3\sk at your local library to find Dut what's available. : Exposing children to libraries • jvill open the door to many other ^worids—not only books, but also ^cords, movies, and many services. As children become adolescents, they Have to do research papers and presentations for school. Through interiibrary loan Counsel group expands services Bridge Counseling Associates has expanded its Day Treatment Services. On Oct. 16, Bridge will offer youths 12 to 17 years of age Day Treatment Programming from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. An In; structional Clinic for youths excluded from school will be available. Services include drug and alcohol education, daily group sessions, individual and fam: ily counseling, recreational activities, health education and other related counseling services. Transportation is available to and from the programs. Bridge Counseling is funded by the Bureau of Alcohol and ; Drug Abuse. United Way and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. Fee for services are based on a sliding fee scale. Call 736-6070 for further infonnation. programs.evensmalllibrariescan give them more information than they knew was out there. Many libraries loan computer software. Some offer training in computer programming, word processing, graphics, and more. The library can also help children step into adulthood. As teenagers begin to make serious personal choices, they often listen best to help they've found on their own rather than to what they've been told to do. Whether they're making career choices, applying to college, in need of information on dnigs and alcohol, or just trying to find a part-time job. check the library. To leam more about making the library a valuable part of your child's life, send for "Helping YourChild Use the Library" (Item 465V. 500). You'U also get a free copy of the "Consumer Infonnation Catalog,"Publ|shedquarteriy by the Consumer Information Center of the U.S. General Services Administration, the catalog lists about 200 free and moderately-priced publications on a wide variety of subjects. Ikenobo workshop scheduled Sen'ei Ikenobo. 45 th headmaster of the Ikenobo School of Floral Design of Kyoto. Japan, will present a series of woricshops, lectures and demonstrations Oct. 13-15 at the Union Haza Hotel in Las Vegas. "East Meets West in the Oriental Desert" is the theme of the international event, hosted by the Nevada Chapter of the Ikenobo Ikebana Society which is expected to draw students of ikebana from all over the world. The public is invited to attend Sen'ei Ikenobo's lecture and demonsuation dealing with the ancient and modem aspects of Japanese floral art at 2 p.m.. Sunday, OcL 15. For further infonnation, call 452-1920. UNLV consolidates departments UNLV's College of Education has consolidated two of its departments. Secondary, postsecondary and vocational education and curriculum and instruction have been merged to create the department of instmctional and curricular studies, according to Mark Beals, assistant dean of the college. The consolidation is part of the Cbllege of Education's continuing effort to improve the quality of its offerings, to eliminate duplications in programs, and to improve communication between faculty and students, Beals said. The instmctional and curricular studies department will be divided into faculries by subject matter, such as science education, math education and reading education. Each faculty group will assume responsibility for the review, modification, and developmentof curricularmaterials that cover all grade levels of each subject. Before the consolidation, elementary and secondary teacher educationcuiTiculawcresetiepa"TOa i, not an uiradllklk' ratcly,andthcywereprc8entedln model," Beals said "tt can iwulr a rather autonomous manner at In quality tratatag butitdoMno! each of the two levels, according always cncoungc a sense of total to Beals. involvement with college goals." 1U.1 •af My razor was inventi in 1895. a^\t
PAGE 31

PWH Page 30, HendereoB Home News, Boulder City New. Green Valley News Thursday, September 28, 1989 iducatlon UNLV center offers counseling Hebrew Academy plans 10th anniversary • Preparations are underway for the 10th Anniversary Gala for the Hebrew Academy, scheduled Saturday. Oct. .28. at Caesars Palace in Coliseum Rooms III apdlV. // The annual event is the major iiindraiscr for the non-profit, nonparochial school, which is the 6nly elementary school in Nevada accredited by the Northwest )issociation of Schools and Colleges. This year's gala celebrates lb years of academic excellence 4 the Academy, as well as the figinning of a new decade and a new campus. Proceeds from the Hebrew Academy's 10th Anniversary Gala will go toward the school's building fund for its new facility in the Summerlin developmentMilton Schwartz, chainnan of the Hebrew Academy board, will be honored as academy's "Man of the Year" for his support of the school since its inception in 1979. He recently donated $500,000 toward the new Summerlin campus. The evening's festivities include dinner, star entertainment. Landscape workshops to begin • New landscape workshops requirements, plant choice and are being offered this fall by a review of edible plants will the Henderson Parks and be covered. Landscape design Recreation Department. examples and assistance with "Energy-Conserving Land^plant placement are also in^apes" will cover stejps eluded in the workshop, offered residents can take to save tune, money, water and energy. Participants will receive a slide presentation, samples of energy-efficient landscape plans, handouts, plant lists and an invitation to the UNLV plant tour. The workshop will be held from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, at the Silver Springs Community Center. "Right Plant, Right Place" will help participants choose the appropriate plants for their personal landscapes. Cultural at the same hours on Saturday Oct. 7, at the Silver Springs community Center. Six other weekly Do-ItYourself Landscape classes will be offered at the Henderson Civic Center and Silver Springs Community Center^beginning Oct. 31. Contact Henderson Parks and Recreation Department at 565-2121 for more information. Additional workshops will be scheduled as interest is generated. Seminar to discuss young people H. Stephen Glen, an internationally acclaimed family therapist, will conduct an all-day seminar, "Developing Capable Young People," from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 6, at the Holiday Casino, Holiday Inn. The gathering is sponsored by HCA Montevista Hospital. Seating is limited, hospital spokesjjersons said, urging that early reservations be made by calling364-llll,Ext. 101,or 251-1202. The hospital has applied for continuing education credits, they said. Glenn is a consultant on training education, alcoholism and drug abuse to agencies throughout the nation. A featured speaker at the White House, where he was honored by Nancy Reagan, he has served as director of the National Drug Abuse Center for Training and Resource Development in Washington. Glenn's seminar, part of Montevista Hospital's Lifespan community and professional education series, is part of more than 20 programs running through 1990 that will serve as a primary source of help and information about family and mental health issues, officials said. Parent pride conference date set An education coalition led by the Nevada State PTA will sponsor the second armual Clark County Parent Pride Conference from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 18. at Western High School. The parenting seminar will be held in conjunction with American Education Week, which will be observed nationally Nov. 12-18. Parents who attend Parent Pride can choose from among 30 workshop sessions. "The seminar is designed to help parents communicate more ef^^tively with their children," said coordinator Janet Coombs Of the Nevada State PTA. Coombs said each parent can register to attend a maximum of thrpe 45-minute workshops during the three-hour conference. "Our main objective is to improve parenting skills by making parents better informed." said Coombs. "The extremely positive resultsof our surveyof parents who attended our first Parent Pride Confernce on April 1 Kave us all the reason to contmue the workshop on an annual basis." Coombs said. "Through the parent survey, we also learned that parents prefer having the conference earlier in the year. For that reason, and to coincide with American Education Week, we've scheduled it in November this school year." A nominal $3 fee will be charged parents who participate. A wide variety of workshops will be available for parents to choose from. General workshop topics incJude.'drugs and students, how to interpret test results, gangs, youth suicide, at-risk children, parenting, parenting for single parents, academically talented students, latchkey programs, and building student self-esteem. "We believe strongly in providing educational opportunities such as this parenting conference to help parents develop better relationships with their children—especially given the conditions in today's world. Our goal is to prepare parents to become more skillful at working with their children in order to maximize their educational potential," Longero said. free child care will be available at Ruth Fyfe Elementary School, located near Western High School, as a convenience for parents who attend the conference. Parent Pride brochures will be distributed throughout the community and will contain details about all 30 workshop sessions. The brochure will also include registration details. Anyone desiring further information about the Parent Pride Conference should contact the Nevada PTA office at 646-KIDS. PTA is the largest advocate group in the world for children's welfare and education. dancing, a silent auction and Uie awards presentations. Prizes to be auctioned off include roundtrip tickets for two to Acapulco, Mexico, jewelry and two pieces of art. Music will be provided by Pini and his Orchestra, a Los Angeles group. The 10th Anniversary Gala committee is comprised of Esther Pokroy, chairwoman, and members Linda Classman, Barbara Green, Janic Kryjier. Roberta Sabbath. Rachel Ventura and Dr. Tamar Lubin, principal of the Hebrew Academy. Tickets are priced at $115 per person and arc tax-deductible. For more information, call the Hebrew Academy at 384-45(K). UNLVs Client Services Center is a unique facility on the university campus Uiat offers lowcost counseling to community members, according to Tom Sexton, practicum coordinator for Uie center and professor of counseling, educational psychology, and foundation. The Client Services Center is operated by graduate students who are working on a master's degree in counseling. Their clients arc community members who need help resolving personal conflicts, such as marital and family problems. Sexton said. The center does not deal with crisis counseling such as Uiat needed for suicide prevention or chronic emotional disorders, but staff members will refer people with these problems to other agencies, according to Sexton. The participating graduate students are in the advanced stages of tiieir training, he said, adding that they are closely supervised by UNLV faculty. "Many smdents have been very successful in their counseling. I have seen students get people back | on the right U-ack," Sexton said, noting that all sessions are kept completely confidential. "In tiie past, students have made tremendous strides in getting their clients to communicate better or to make decisions that were cmcial for tiiem." The center charges $10 per hour, but Sexton said die price is negotiable for those experiencing financial difficulties. For more information about the center or to schedule an appoinunent. call 239-3253. LASER COPIER COMFUIEFiS QUALITY RIBBONS Data • Word Processing 4 Color TONERS For all copiers PAPER Computer • Copiers • Laser • FAX LASER EP & EPS $29'^* APPLE; CANON, HP & so OTHERS COPIER P.C. $29'^* CANON. PC.3/7.10/14, 20/25 •RECHARGABLE CARITODGES SHARP TONER 39'^ 50/70 DRUM 39'^ XEROX TONER 29'^ 1012 DRUM 89^^ *We Stock New Cartridges & Drum* RIBBONS & TONERS GALORE 1304 NEVADA HWY. 294-3106 WE DELIVEK > Interest in our Rate Master CD is running high. And can only run hi^f. Because we are living in a time where interest rates are constantly rising and falling, it's difficult for anyone, including leading economists, to be certain about what the future holds. Unless thc> hold a Rate Master CD from PriMerit Bank. You see, our Rate Master CD guarantees investors that at term, their rate will not go down.'And if interest rates have risen, their rate rises too. Here's how it works. At its first maturity, we'll renew your 6-month Rate Master CD at the same high rateM which you opened it, or at the then current interest rate. Whichever is higher. Fbr one more six-month period. It's guaranteed. When you bank with PriMerit, you have the peace of mind of knowing your deposits are supported by as.sets of over $2.7 billion, insured to $100,000 and backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. PriMerit has earned a profit for 21 consecutive years. To open your Rate Master CD. come into any PriMerit Bank branch today. Then you can bcjcerlain that no matter what interest rates do, yours won't go down. BIG SAFE FRIENDLY PRIMERIT BANK ^ htkral Sn infp Bank NevKta'i UrKMt. (MTIcn loSfr*f Voo Throu||hHil Th Suic IM Vigu HOIM Offla: VKK) W Sahara A*e. K9I02. (702) 362-5535 BmiMcr Clly: 1027 Nevada (llghway • HradCDM: f2() Boulder Highy ARI7i)MA • Pkornh; Sun tily; Sun CH l; l.eiiure Wurid and ScotMalt. Thursday, September 28,1989 MenderMii Home News, Boulder City News. Greea Valley News Pie 31 Booklet describes how to help child use library Children learn many skills and habits they'll keep all their lives by imitating others. They can learn to use the libraiy that way too—if parents take them there. The ability to use a library is oneof life'smost rewarding dulls. "Helping Your ChUd Use the Library" (Item 465V, 500) is a new booklet from the Department of Education packed fiill of ideas on helping toddlers through teenagers learn to find books for reseaich and pleasure, as well as records and assistance with the wealth of other information and programs at the local libraiy. You can get your copy by sending your name, address, and 500 to the Consumer Infonnation Center, Deparunent465V, PueUo. Colo. 81009. Teaching children how useful and fun the library can be starts with getting them interested in books. The most important thing you can do to help young children love books is to read out loud to them. That way you share your enjoymentof books with the child and step into the worid of the book together. And remember the power of examples; when they see you enjoying a book, they'll want to do it too. The materials available for checkout by infants and toddlers vary firom library to library, but they often include books with cardboard pages, cloth books, hard backs, and magazines. There will be picture books, story books, and books on every subject of interest to a curious child. When your toddler tugs on your leg and : asks why the sky is blue, that is a good time to take a trip to the library. You'll surely find a suitable answer there. The library is a wonderful place for children to satisfy curiosity. Children's librarians are trained and eager to help them learn about everything from dinosaurs to the depth of the ocean. Once your jiiild leams to read, help him or her get a library card. Most libraries wiU give cards to any child Viat has an adult to cosign. Chiljjren take great pride in knowing ^ey can find things out on their pwn. having a library card is a Step toward this independence. : Many libraries have faculties fnd trained librarians for special children—those that are handij;apped as well as those that are {particularly talented or advanced. 3\sk at your local library to find Dut what's available. : Exposing children to libraries • jvill open the door to many other ^worids—not only books, but also ^cords, movies, and many services. As children become adolescents, they Have to do research papers and presentations for school. Through interiibrary loan Counsel group expands services Bridge Counseling Associates has expanded its Day Treatment Services. On Oct. 16, Bridge will offer youths 12 to 17 years of age Day Treatment Programming from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. An In; structional Clinic for youths excluded from school will be available. Services include drug and alcohol education, daily group sessions, individual and fam: ily counseling, recreational activities, health education and other related counseling services. Transportation is available to and from the programs. Bridge Counseling is funded by the Bureau of Alcohol and ; Drug Abuse. United Way and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. Fee for services are based on a sliding fee scale. Call 736-6070 for further infonnation. programs.evensmalllibrariescan give them more information than they knew was out there. Many libraries loan computer software. Some offer training in computer programming, word processing, graphics, and more. The library can also help children step into adulthood. As teenagers begin to make serious personal choices, they often listen best to help they've found on their own rather than to what they've been told to do. Whether they're making career choices, applying to college, in need of information on dnigs and alcohol, or just trying to find a part-time job. check the library. To leam more about making the library a valuable part of your child's life, send for "Helping YourChild Use the Library" (Item 465V. 500). You'U also get a free copy of the "Consumer Infonnation Catalog,"Publ|shedquarteriy by the Consumer Information Center of the U.S. General Services Administration, the catalog lists about 200 free and moderately-priced publications on a wide variety of subjects. Ikenobo workshop scheduled Sen'ei Ikenobo. 45 th headmaster of the Ikenobo School of Floral Design of Kyoto. Japan, will present a series of woricshops, lectures and demonstrations Oct. 13-15 at the Union Haza Hotel in Las Vegas. "East Meets West in the Oriental Desert" is the theme of the international event, hosted by the Nevada Chapter of the Ikenobo Ikebana Society which is expected to draw students of ikebana from all over the world. The public is invited to attend Sen'ei Ikenobo's lecture and demonsuation dealing with the ancient and modem aspects of Japanese floral art at 2 p.m.. Sunday, OcL 15. For further infonnation, call 452-1920. UNLV consolidates departments UNLV's College of Education has consolidated two of its departments. Secondary, postsecondary and vocational education and curriculum and instruction have been merged to create the department of instmctional and curricular studies, according to Mark Beals, assistant dean of the college. The consolidation is part of the Cbllege of Education's continuing effort to improve the quality of its offerings, to eliminate duplications in programs, and to improve communication between faculty and students, Beals said. The instmctional and curricular studies department will be divided into faculries by subject matter, such as science education, math education and reading education. Each faculty group will assume responsibility for the review, modification, and developmentof curricularmaterials that cover all grade levels of each subject. Before the consolidation, elementary and secondary teacher educationcuiTiculawcresetiepa"TOa i, not an uiradllklk' ratcly,andthcywereprc8entedln model," Beals said "tt can iwulr a rather autonomous manner at In quality tratatag butitdoMno! each of the two levels, according always cncoungc a sense of total to Beals. involvement with college goals." 1U.1 •af My razor was inventi in 1895. a^\t
PAGE 32

P9 32. HeDda raoB Home Nw. Bouldr City New. Green VnUey Naws Thursday, September 28, 1989 Thnraday. September 28,1989 Hendaraoa Home News. Boulder City Newa. Green Vallay Navs ?•§• SI Nevada ACT student scores above national average COMPUTER SCIENCE GIFT—Dr. Tom Williams, right, president of the Advanced Technology Division of Computer Sciences Corp., presents a donation of $10,000 to UNLV President Robert C. Maxson to support computer science programs in the university's Howard R. Hughes College of Engineering. Based in Falls Church, Va., the company currently has support contracts in Las Vegas with the U.S. Department of Energy and the Environmental Protection Agency. UNLV Architecture Program gets $1.5 million gift UNLV has received a donation of $1.5 million from longtime Las Vegas businessman Paul Sogg, it was announced last week. ~ The gift, which will come to the university through the UNLV Foundation, will fund construction of a new building for the rapidly growing architecture program, officials said. Architect Tony Marnell, president of Marnell Carrao Associates architecture' and construction firm, has been asked to head up a fund raising drive to support the architecture program and the building, they said. Sogg said he believes UNLV's architecture program has great potential. "I wanted to do something notable and long-lasting for the community," he explained. "I think a new architecture building will be a tremendous asset to the university and toall of Nevada." Sogg said he is pleased with the direction in which UNLV President Robert C. Maxson has taken UNLV, adding, "We all know that investing in our university is investing in the future of our state." Maxson said Marnell has agreed to provide all the architectural and engineering services for the architecture building as a donation to the university. "I think a first-rate architecture program is desperately needed in Southern Nevada," Marnell said. Prtmelliners have two times to qualify for FREE COVERAU BINGO. F*llif morning bingo at Sam's Town, October 1 st through October 30th to qualify for our free 7:30 a.m. coverall, free 9:00 a.m. coverall, or both! Sign up in the Bingo Parlour today... just show your PrimeTimers keychain. CARSON CITY—The average American College Test composite scores earned by Nevada smdents who graduated in the spring of 1988 is 19.0, as it was in 1988. education officials announced last week. Nationwide, the 1988-89 average composite score is 18.6. Dr. Eugene T. Paslov. state superintendent of Public tastmction, reviewed the state's results and said, "The results suggest Nevada students continue to demonsu-ate above-average performance. Even in the absence of noteworthy changes compared to the previous year, Nevada students continue to score well above the national average, as they have for the past four consecutive years—while at the same time scores nationally have declined slightly. "Interestingly, for this year, the same numbers of stiidents taking the ACT—4,033—is exactiy the same compared to last year." Paslov went on to say, "The disoibution of Nevada students among the score intervals in the ACT assessment score range of 1 to 36 has remained essentially stable over the past two years: 14 percent of the students scored 26-36; 27 percent scored 21-25; 30 percent scored 16-20 and 29 percent scored 1-15 in 1989. These percentages compare to the 1989 national figures of 14 percent, 26 percent, 28 percent and 32 percent respectively. The average of the four high school grades Nevada students reported when they registered for tiie assessment is 2.96; as it was in 1988. The 1989 national average is 2.90. There have been slight changes in average Nevada scores on all four subject area test in die ACT Assessment 1988 1989 Change English 18.1 18.1 n/c Mathematics 19.0 19.0 n/c Social Studies 18.9 18.5 -.4 Natural Sciences 23.0 22.8 -.2 Composite 19.9 19.7 -.2 English Matiiematics Social Studies Natural Sciences Nevada Total Scores 1988 1989 Change 18.6 18.7 -H.l 17.3 17.6 +.3 17.9 17.7 -.2 21.5 21.4 -.1 Nevada women student's scores have increased in all areas except social studies: Nevada Women's Scores 1988 1989 Change English 19.0 19.3 -f-.3 Mathematics 16.0 16.5 +.5 Social Studies 17.1 17.0 -.1 Natural Sciences 20.2 20.3 +.1 Composite 18.2 18.4 +2 The average of the four high school grades Nevada women reported for 1989 is 3.01, up very slightly from tiie 1988 average of 2.98. Average assessment scores earned by Nevada men remained unchanged in English and matii, but decreased slightly ir) social studies and natural sciences. Nevada Men's Scores 1988 1989 18.1 18.1 19.0 19.0 18.9 18.5 es 23.0 22.8 19.9 19.7 The average of Nevada men's self-reported high school grades for 1989 is 2.91, down very slighUy from die 1988 average of 2.92. Paslov mentions that, "Although Nevada has relatively very few of Uie students who were tested nationally; for example, during 1988-89, more than 1,300,000 students participated in the ACT assessments across the country; of those Nevada had 4,033—only .31 percent — students participating." Nonetiicless, Paslov concluded, "This year's ACT results suggest tiiat Nevada can be proud of it's relatively few biit highly capable college-bound students, who continue to score above the national average on the ACT." Since 1959, the ACT Assessment has included tests in Uie area of English, mathematics, social studies and natural sciences, as well as an interest inventory and a biographical questionnaire. In October 1989. ACT will introduce the Enhanced ACT Assessment, a revised version that consists of tests in English, mathematics, reading and science reasoning. Instead of five scores, students who take die enhanced ACT will receive 12—a score for each of the four subtest areas, a composite score, and seven subscores in specific content areas of English, math and reading. Individuals who are interested in more detailed infomiation regarding Nevada's ACT results should contact the Planning, Research andiEvaluation Branch of die Nevada Department of Education, orficials said. PUY Minimum 20 sessions at 7:30 a.m. Minimum 20 sessions at 9:00 a.m. QUALIFY 7:30 a.m. coverall, October 31 st 9:00 a.m. coverall, October 31st $3 minimum buy-in for qualifying. All payouts aggregate. 6,000.00 GUARANTEED *5.000.00At Each Free Coverall. Tuesday, Oct 31st Games 1 -10: Regular Payouts Basd on money taken in Followed by S-ln-l Coverall Game 11: $500 Hardway followed t>y Game 12: $1,000 Utter "X" followed t>y Game 13: $1,500 Coverall Win game 11,12 or 13 and receive an additional $50 bonus (up to $500) for every seuion played in October over the minimum 20 needed to qualify. Aggregate payouts. Where locals bring their friends. SAM'S TOWN HOTEL & GAMBLING HALL BouWer Highway S Neliis 456-7777 Another line Boyd Group hotel Wednesday, October 4,1989 from 3:30-5:30 p.m. HumanaP Hospital-Sunrise Auditorium Learn the DO's and DONT's of Babysitting, plus steps to take in an emergency. Must be 12 years of age or older. Limit of 23 people. For reservations and information call Volunteer Services at 731-8188. ^lumana Children's Hospital Jn^ 3186 Maryland Parkway • Las Vegas, Nevada 9I09 H()-3Ji-o(M5 Humana^ Children's Hospital is a part of Humana' Hospital-Sunrise 1989 Humana". Int. 9-9 First Interstate Banic opens investments department in LV First Interstate Bank of Nevada's Foiids Management and Investments Division has opened an office in Las Vegas in ttie First Interstate Tower Funds Management and Investments is the largest bankmanaged investments division in the state. Through the effons of the division's staff, First Interstate underwrites more municipal txmds than any other state-based financial institution. "Our Funds Management and Investments Divisicm provides our customers with investments, as well as advice fnxn a veiy experienced staff." said First Interstate Bank Chaimian and Chief Executive Offlcer Donald Snyder. Assistant Vice President Ron^ Sufana and Securities Sales Rcp^: rescntative Bob Rich opeiwd ihA office in May. ; PLATTER SHIPMENT—KUNV General Manager Rob Rosenthal, left, and KNPR Program Director John Stark carry Jazz records to be taken to KUNV. Background—Eric Cooper, KNPR development director, carry more of KNPR'S Jazz collection to be loaned to KUNV. KNPR passes the torch To insure that "mainstream jazz" continues to have a presence on Las Vegas radio, KNPRFM 89.5 public radio and UNLV's station have concluded a gentleman's agreement that will loan substantial elements of the KNPR jazz and blues record libraryplus jazz announcers Eddie Hall, Ed Millar and Steven Charles— toKUNV-FM91.5. Cumentplans callforairingor'JazzTraditions" "Mostiy Folk'' host, Dave Weide, to thank them for their years of service to KNPR. Then the boron KUNV from noon to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday. The ceremonial shifttook place earlier this month after a brief ceremony at KNPR, where Board Chainnan Eric Cooper presented plaques to jazz announcers Hall, Charles, Millar and Alan Grant and blues host Ray Curtis and Securities regs to be examined Securities regulations will be examined for possible adopttion, amendment or repeal during an 11 a.m. meeting Tuesday, in the Commissioner's Meeting Room, fifth floor, McCarran airport. Those wanting to attend the meeting should contact Sherwood Cook at the Nevada Secretary of State's office, 2501E. Sahara, Suite 201. Oral arguments will heard and written arguments presented during the meeting, Sherwood said. A copy of the securities regulations may be obtained at the Secretary of State's offices. rowed recordings were loaded onto a sound-equipped tmck and hauled to UNLV, while playing jazz samples enroute. "Mostly Folk,'' a long-mnning Saturday night folk series hosted by UNLV geology professor Dave Weide, will also be going to college. Previously heard on KNPR on Saturday evenings, Dave's familiar theme song and interesting blend of ethnic music will now be heard on KUNV Sundays at 4 p.m KNPR General Manager Lamar Marehese said "We 're very pleased with the cooperation of KUNV General Manager Rob Rosenthal, who has been instmmental in working with KNPR management to come up with an agreement whereby jazz, folk and blues audiences will still have access to the music they most appreciate. Dorit Miss Our New Daytime line-up Check us out and well check you out! • Mm^ Green Valley Medical Center Open House Saturday, September 30 — 9 a.m.-Noon ^ Blood Pressure Check-Ups Height & Weight Checks Glaucoma Screenings Refreshments Medical Informational Material PLUS LOW COST FLU VACCINES You're invited to tour our facility... meet our medical staff and take advantage of our FREE HEALTH SCREENINGS. Southwest Medical Associates Modem medical care. Old-fashioned values. 2551 North Green Valley Pkwy. (in IhM Qnn Valley Pmft$aional Canter) 454-2666 A Sierra Health Services Company r Caesars Daily Slot Tournaments^ It's unlike anything you'll find on TV today. Or any day. There's non-stop action. Suspense. Thrills. Chills. And best of all, money. Lots of it. introducing Caesars Challenge. The new daily slot tournament where every Monday through Friday, someone walks away with $500 a day. Guaranteed. There's • even prize money for second through fifth place. During the day, you push yourself to the limit in a 30-minute Qualifying Session. Then it's on to the Playoffs at 5pm. So put down the remote control. And bring your SlO entry fee to our Olympic Casino any time after 10 am. Or for any slot information call 731-7485. This is one station break you'll look forward to all day ^>Jt!>-M:^

PAGE 33

P9 32. HeDda raoB Home Nw. Bouldr City New. Green VnUey Naws Thursday, September 28, 1989 Thnraday. September 28,1989 Hendaraoa Home News. Boulder City Newa. Green Vallay Navs ?•§• SI Nevada ACT student scores above national average COMPUTER SCIENCE GIFT—Dr. Tom Williams, right, president of the Advanced Technology Division of Computer Sciences Corp., presents a donation of $10,000 to UNLV President Robert C. Maxson to support computer science programs in the university's Howard R. Hughes College of Engineering. Based in Falls Church, Va., the company currently has support contracts in Las Vegas with the U.S. Department of Energy and the Environmental Protection Agency. UNLV Architecture Program gets $1.5 million gift UNLV has received a donation of $1.5 million from longtime Las Vegas businessman Paul Sogg, it was announced last week. ~ The gift, which will come to the university through the UNLV Foundation, will fund construction of a new building for the rapidly growing architecture program, officials said. Architect Tony Marnell, president of Marnell Carrao Associates architecture' and construction firm, has been asked to head up a fund raising drive to support the architecture program and the building, they said. Sogg said he believes UNLV's architecture program has great potential. "I wanted to do something notable and long-lasting for the community," he explained. "I think a new architecture building will be a tremendous asset to the university and toall of Nevada." Sogg said he is pleased with the direction in which UNLV President Robert C. Maxson has taken UNLV, adding, "We all know that investing in our university is investing in the future of our state." Maxson said Marnell has agreed to provide all the architectural and engineering services for the architecture building as a donation to the university. "I think a first-rate architecture program is desperately needed in Southern Nevada," Marnell said. Prtmelliners have two times to qualify for FREE COVERAU BINGO. F*llif morning bingo at Sam's Town, October 1 st through October 30th to qualify for our free 7:30 a.m. coverall, free 9:00 a.m. coverall, or both! Sign up in the Bingo Parlour today... just show your PrimeTimers keychain. CARSON CITY—The average American College Test composite scores earned by Nevada smdents who graduated in the spring of 1988 is 19.0, as it was in 1988. education officials announced last week. Nationwide, the 1988-89 average composite score is 18.6. Dr. Eugene T. Paslov. state superintendent of Public tastmction, reviewed the state's results and said, "The results suggest Nevada students continue to demonsu-ate above-average performance. Even in the absence of noteworthy changes compared to the previous year, Nevada students continue to score well above the national average, as they have for the past four consecutive years—while at the same time scores nationally have declined slightly. "Interestingly, for this year, the same numbers of stiidents taking the ACT—4,033—is exactiy the same compared to last year." Paslov went on to say, "The disoibution of Nevada students among the score intervals in the ACT assessment score range of 1 to 36 has remained essentially stable over the past two years: 14 percent of the students scored 26-36; 27 percent scored 21-25; 30 percent scored 16-20 and 29 percent scored 1-15 in 1989. These percentages compare to the 1989 national figures of 14 percent, 26 percent, 28 percent and 32 percent respectively. The average of the four high school grades Nevada students reported when they registered for tiie assessment is 2.96; as it was in 1988. The 1989 national average is 2.90. There have been slight changes in average Nevada scores on all four subject area test in die ACT Assessment 1988 1989 Change English 18.1 18.1 n/c Mathematics 19.0 19.0 n/c Social Studies 18.9 18.5 -.4 Natural Sciences 23.0 22.8 -.2 Composite 19.9 19.7 -.2 English Matiiematics Social Studies Natural Sciences Nevada Total Scores 1988 1989 Change 18.6 18.7 -H.l 17.3 17.6 +.3 17.9 17.7 -.2 21.5 21.4 -.1 Nevada women student's scores have increased in all areas except social studies: Nevada Women's Scores 1988 1989 Change English 19.0 19.3 -f-.3 Mathematics 16.0 16.5 +.5 Social Studies 17.1 17.0 -.1 Natural Sciences 20.2 20.3 +.1 Composite 18.2 18.4 +2 The average of the four high school grades Nevada women reported for 1989 is 3.01, up very slightly from tiie 1988 average of 2.98. Average assessment scores earned by Nevada men remained unchanged in English and matii, but decreased slightly ir) social studies and natural sciences. Nevada Men's Scores 1988 1989 18.1 18.1 19.0 19.0 18.9 18.5 es 23.0 22.8 19.9 19.7 The average of Nevada men's self-reported high school grades for 1989 is 2.91, down very slighUy from die 1988 average of 2.92. Paslov mentions that, "Although Nevada has relatively very few of Uie students who were tested nationally; for example, during 1988-89, more than 1,300,000 students participated in the ACT assessments across the country; of those Nevada had 4,033—only .31 percent — students participating." Nonetiicless, Paslov concluded, "This year's ACT results suggest tiiat Nevada can be proud of it's relatively few biit highly capable college-bound students, who continue to score above the national average on the ACT." Since 1959, the ACT Assessment has included tests in Uie area of English, mathematics, social studies and natural sciences, as well as an interest inventory and a biographical questionnaire. In October 1989. ACT will introduce the Enhanced ACT Assessment, a revised version that consists of tests in English, mathematics, reading and science reasoning. Instead of five scores, students who take die enhanced ACT will receive 12—a score for each of the four subtest areas, a composite score, and seven subscores in specific content areas of English, math and reading. Individuals who are interested in more detailed infomiation regarding Nevada's ACT results should contact the Planning, Research andiEvaluation Branch of die Nevada Department of Education, orficials said. PUY Minimum 20 sessions at 7:30 a.m. Minimum 20 sessions at 9:00 a.m. QUALIFY 7:30 a.m. coverall, October 31 st 9:00 a.m. coverall, October 31st $3 minimum buy-in for qualifying. All payouts aggregate. 6,000.00 GUARANTEED *5.000.00At Each Free Coverall. Tuesday, Oct 31st Games 1 -10: Regular Payouts Basd on money taken in Followed by S-ln-l Coverall Game 11: $500 Hardway followed t>y Game 12: $1,000 Utter "X" followed t>y Game 13: $1,500 Coverall Win game 11,12 or 13 and receive an additional $50 bonus (up to $500) for every seuion played in October over the minimum 20 needed to qualify. Aggregate payouts. Where locals bring their friends. SAM'S TOWN HOTEL & GAMBLING HALL BouWer Highway S Neliis 456-7777 Another line Boyd Group hotel Wednesday, October 4,1989 from 3:30-5:30 p.m. HumanaP Hospital-Sunrise Auditorium Learn the DO's and DONT's of Babysitting, plus steps to take in an emergency. Must be 12 years of age or older. Limit of 23 people. For reservations and information call Volunteer Services at 731-8188. ^lumana Children's Hospital Jn^ 3186 Maryland Parkway • Las Vegas, Nevada 9I09 H()-3Ji-o(M5 Humana^ Children's Hospital is a part of Humana' Hospital-Sunrise 1989 Humana". Int. 9-9 First Interstate Banic opens investments department in LV First Interstate Bank of Nevada's Foiids Management and Investments Division has opened an office in Las Vegas in ttie First Interstate Tower Funds Management and Investments is the largest bankmanaged investments division in the state. Through the effons of the division's staff, First Interstate underwrites more municipal txmds than any other state-based financial institution. "Our Funds Management and Investments Divisicm provides our customers with investments, as well as advice fnxn a veiy experienced staff." said First Interstate Bank Chaimian and Chief Executive Offlcer Donald Snyder. Assistant Vice President Ron^ Sufana and Securities Sales Rcp^: rescntative Bob Rich opeiwd ihA office in May. ; PLATTER SHIPMENT—KUNV General Manager Rob Rosenthal, left, and KNPR Program Director John Stark carry Jazz records to be taken to KUNV. Background—Eric Cooper, KNPR development director, carry more of KNPR'S Jazz collection to be loaned to KUNV. KNPR passes the torch To insure that "mainstream jazz" continues to have a presence on Las Vegas radio, KNPRFM 89.5 public radio and UNLV's station have concluded a gentleman's agreement that will loan substantial elements of the KNPR jazz and blues record libraryplus jazz announcers Eddie Hall, Ed Millar and Steven Charles— toKUNV-FM91.5. Cumentplans callforairingor'JazzTraditions" "Mostiy Folk'' host, Dave Weide, to thank them for their years of service to KNPR. Then the boron KUNV from noon to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday. The ceremonial shifttook place earlier this month after a brief ceremony at KNPR, where Board Chainnan Eric Cooper presented plaques to jazz announcers Hall, Charles, Millar and Alan Grant and blues host Ray Curtis and Securities regs to be examined Securities regulations will be examined for possible adopttion, amendment or repeal during an 11 a.m. meeting Tuesday, in the Commissioner's Meeting Room, fifth floor, McCarran airport. Those wanting to attend the meeting should contact Sherwood Cook at the Nevada Secretary of State's office, 2501E. Sahara, Suite 201. Oral arguments will heard and written arguments presented during the meeting, Sherwood said. A copy of the securities regulations may be obtained at the Secretary of State's offices. rowed recordings were loaded onto a sound-equipped tmck and hauled to UNLV, while playing jazz samples enroute. "Mostly Folk,'' a long-mnning Saturday night folk series hosted by UNLV geology professor Dave Weide, will also be going to college. Previously heard on KNPR on Saturday evenings, Dave's familiar theme song and interesting blend of ethnic music will now be heard on KUNV Sundays at 4 p.m KNPR General Manager Lamar Marehese said "We 're very pleased with the cooperation of KUNV General Manager Rob Rosenthal, who has been instmmental in working with KNPR management to come up with an agreement whereby jazz, folk and blues audiences will still have access to the music they most appreciate. Dorit Miss Our New Daytime line-up Check us out and well check you out! • Mm^ Green Valley Medical Center Open House Saturday, September 30 — 9 a.m.-Noon ^ Blood Pressure Check-Ups Height & Weight Checks Glaucoma Screenings Refreshments Medical Informational Material PLUS LOW COST FLU VACCINES You're invited to tour our facility... meet our medical staff and take advantage of our FREE HEALTH SCREENINGS. Southwest Medical Associates Modem medical care. Old-fashioned values. 2551 North Green Valley Pkwy. (in IhM Qnn Valley Pmft$aional Canter) 454-2666 A Sierra Health Services Company r Caesars Daily Slot Tournaments^ It's unlike anything you'll find on TV today. Or any day. There's non-stop action. Suspense. Thrills. Chills. And best of all, money. Lots of it. introducing Caesars Challenge. The new daily slot tournament where every Monday through Friday, someone walks away with $500 a day. Guaranteed. There's • even prize money for second through fifth place. During the day, you push yourself to the limit in a 30-minute Qualifying Session. Then it's on to the Playoffs at 5pm. So put down the remote control. And bring your SlO entry fee to our Olympic Casino any time after 10 am. Or for any slot information call 731-7485. This is one station break you'll look forward to all day ^>Jt!>-M:^

PAGE 34

p;|i^^ ^ UaulateoM Home Newe, Bonldar City New, Qreaa Vallay Newi Thnrsday, September 28,1M8 Thursday. September 28, 1989. hu Mkift 'Ragin' Cajun' returns to Four Queens By Deborah White Dear Debbie: I am shocked and want your opinion on a rather unusual subjea. No( long ago I visited my grandmother in a nursing home where they were having a psrty for the residenu. There were some singers, a magician.butthis woman was at least 60-ye8-old. and there she wu. diesacd up Ukc some harem girt right there on the dance floor doing her thing' To be fair. I have to admit she was reaUy pretty good, but don't you think that a woman of that age should be home knitting taking care of her flowe or something? I am just so shocked. Af Doug Kershaw, The Ragin' said, playing with "such hKi mt it ftom me I knew I had not been fooling around, and he did Cajun," has returned to the delightful vengeance that the or After not get It fixmi me. He then said he must have got it off a toilet seat when my test proved ncgaUvc. I say no way off a toUet seat! It is bad enough that he got syphilis, but trying to put the blame on me is reaUy sick. I have no respect for him. but stiU live in the same house withWm. Is this marriage worth saving? He has never been good to me. NO RESPECT Dear No Respect: I cannot tell you whether or not your marriage can be saved. That is completely up to you and how much both of you would be wiUing shedmced i got into a conversation with her, and she said that she just to try to save it. Of course, there is no way to save any relationship loved to do the beUydancing and loved to entenain people and would unless the partners involved attempt to be honest, open and willing. It do it as long as she could! It seems to me that the whole idea U pretty ig poasible to pick up sexuaUy-transmitted diseases such as syphilis disKusting To be fair, riie was well covered and looked very nice in other than ftom sexual intercourse; however, this is not as common, a orettv costume, but it rcaUy shocks me. If my grandmother, who is if your husband has had an affair and has got the disease diis way. it aliiut that woman's age, was to start wiggling around Uk that, I'd i, tenlble tiiat he would try to blame you. But if he is someone who disown her What do you think of this? cannotfaceuptohismistakes.thisisagoodwaytotiytopassthebuck. T SHOCKED Teu him your suspicions and your complaints. Now is as good a time oiar Shocked: as any to put everything out on the table. I say more power to the woman. If she has the eneisy, talent and Send letters to Dear Debbie, P.O. Box 4367, Orlando, Fla. desire to entertain others in this way, she should feel the fiedom to do 32802-4367. l'*'* Tribune Media Services itilfsnoteasygrowingolder.andexpericncingthefttiatnttlonofnot YOIIR FINA NCI A L FITNESS being able to do the things you could when you were young. Peihaps TVWR n i innvirr ... • vou have a misconception about what senior citizens are reaUy like. MediCdre $1100161116111$ Qiowing old docs not mean suddenly having a great interest in IIIVMIV. rr kitting, or rocking in a chair aU day. Growing old can mean being gy fim O'Callaghan your doctors actually charge, aciivc. dancing, singing and generally enjoying die beauty of life. If southern Nevada Association and the gap made up of items tljc audience enjoys licr performance and she enjoys dancing, tiiat's aU of ufe Underwriters Medicare doesn't cover at all. that matters. Medicare, the federal governMedicare supplements Itear Debbie: ment's health insurance for the You can fill many of these My husband of 32 years told me he had syphilis and he tiiought he elderly, is very helpful. But it gapg^ although not all, with a isn't enough. It stops short, well Medicare supplement. But it's short, of covering health care expenditures. If you're over 65, or have a parent who is over By Joyce Jillson 65^ you may want to consider Weekly tip: Most likely an unstable, unpredicuble and weird supplemental inssurance to Four Queens Hotel and Casino in downtown Las Vegas, where he performs at 9 p.m. and 11 p.m. nightly witix a special added show at 12:30 a.m. Saturday (Sunday morning). The famed fiddler is booked at the Four Queens through Sunday, Oct. 8. Kershaw, also dubbed The Bayou Bandit," is a wizard with the electric fiddle, critics have resulting friction sometimes actually destroys several bows during a show." His appeeranoes indode such high-spirited trademarks as "Diggy, Liggy, Lo," a frenetic woiitout of The Battle of New Orleans" and a unique rendition of Hank Williams' "Jambalaya." For reservations or information, call 385-4011. StValwitlnM day to ttwdayM TIlis Keek's kereiee^ See Finance, Page 35 riiisM's? Alzheimers Disease? Call St Rose Dominican Hospitalls Community Resource Service 564-4665 Ask for Kathy Pantoso, R.N. For Information on Where to Get Help. week. ; Aries (March 21-AprU 19) Try your best to please others this ^k. Unpredictable job conditions on Monday. ; Taurus (April 20-May 20) A long-distance romance could be t^porarily intemipted this week. Wednesday and Thursday find you hiunming right along—material gains. ; Gemini (May 21-June 20) Keep tabs MI your partner's spending habits. Your analytical powers come in handy on Wednesday and Thursday. Cancer (June 22-July 22) You're fullof fiizzy warm feelings this week. Wednesday and Thursday is full of boring but necessary tasks. ; Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Moon in Leo favors you the first two days of the week. Guard against emotional breaks. : Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Get a few extra winks of sleep this v^eckcnd. Tuesday/Thursday arc perfect for you. i^ XJOtn (Sept. Z3-Oct. 13) Friends may not come throu^ for you Suiiday or Moiulay. Mom behtnd-the-scenes stuff to strai^iten out on Wednesday. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21) Do your best to please an unpleasant boss on Monday. Wednesday/Thursday take advantage of excellent social connections. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Long-distance travel plans may have to be postponed. Go for the results not the glory on Wednesday. : Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Your current job could really get to you this week. Wednesday finds your temperament cooling out, mellowing. ; Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Temperamental paitners coukl conIfuse you with their ambivalent messages. Let them work things out on their owrn. ; Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Hold onto your dreams even if you get i bit bruised by life. Keeping a low profile is recommended Tuesday/ Thursday. If you were bom this week : Jupiter in Cancer wiU bring you a wealth of friends this year. Put finances in order in October. Profits come from new ventures^paitner^hips. Traveling is in store for November for both business and pleasure. If creative, put your ideas into form; by December they're accepted. Focus on group activities as much as possible. : Women, looking for a man with the ri^t signs tor you? Learn about astrological compatibility in Joyce Jillson*s til-new dating ^uide. Send $2.25 to Dating Guide for Women, in care of this newspaper, P.O. Box 4406, Orlando, Fla. 32802-4426. Make thecks payable to Newspaperbooks. 01989, Tribune Media Services • M plug the Medicare gaps First, however, you'll want to know just what Medicare itself does and does not do. Medicare Medicare is a two-part program. Part A, which is free to just about everybody, provides hospital benefits; Part B, which is optional and paid by premium, covers medicsd care. Both parts have deductibles and exclusions, so that you must pay in part for some covered items and in full for some items thai aren't covered at all. Part A, for example, covers 60 days of hospitalization. But there is an initial deductible amount ($492 in 1986, and going up each year) that must be paid. Then the patient must pay (in 1986) $123 a day for the next 30 days. This is called co-payment. Right from the outset, too, some charges (such as private-duty nursing or the extra cost of a private room) are not covered at all. Under Medicare Part B, similarly, there is an initial deductible; m 1986, this is $75. Thereafter, Medicare pays 80 percent of allowed expenses. "Allowed" doesn't mean what your doctor charges; it is often far less because it means what Medicare determines is "reasonable." There are, therefore, three gaps in Medicare coverage: the gap caused by deductibles and co-payments, the gap between Medicare allowances and what Rodney G. Handsfield, M.D. -A-,-r^-^.Specializing in Urology ^^=^ Diseases of the kidneys, bladder and genltalia of adults and children Treatment of Impotence; male sexual difficulties Vasectomy and vasectomy reversal Infertility Prostate cancer screening Incontinence; bladder control problems Kidney stones — non-surgical treatment • •'. • • • Serving Henderson, Green Valley and Boulder City Call 564-9599 for appointment. Green Valley Medical Services 67 E. Lake Mead Drive 6301 Mtn. Vista St., Suite 103 Henderson, Nevada 89015 Henderson, NV 89014 V The All New Hairitage Full Family Service (Salon k oov hiring MniyMt & Nanicuri^U Join our Staff of ProTcMionaU Opcaiag •oca 10 Statioiu Available for fi^niyhtU 9f 5 Available Naatcoring SitaUou Henderson' Noftt FabuloaB Nev (&aloa of 4.0CX) q. ft. A PARTS! pABTSl PARTS: p^^^^^ in Boulder City STATE OF THE ART AUTO PARTS LOCATION WITH OUR COAST-TOCOAST COMPUTERIZED SATELUTE SYSTEM NOW ON 2 NATIONAL PARTS LOCATION SERVICES BKJOHN &SON$ 1631 Footliiil Dr., Boulder City 29E-PARr LOCAL HOT LINE TO liOST NEVADA DiSMANTLERS •Need ParU? We've Got'em, New or Used •Used & Rebuilt Engines Installed 311 5 Vttter St. Henderson. Nevada Contact CAROL OTIS, Business Msnager 565-7503 or 565-3450 between 7:30 a.m. A 6:00 p.m. EMISSION EXPRESS (Auto Care) 1400 Nevada Highway, Boulder City BttWMit NAPA and A4W Specialising In Fast and Efficient • SMOG CHECKS • TUNE UPS • DIAGNOSTICS • BRAKES • COMPLETE RADIATOR & COOLING SYSTEM SERVICE • WE SERVICE RV's 293-AIRE (293-2473) Call For Our No Wait Appointments A Place For All Your Automotive Needs Computerized Engine Analysis with Our Stateof-the-Art Alien Smart Scope GET TO KNOW HeadMOB Home Neig, Boulder City New, Grwn V lly Nows Page 36. Poems wanted for contest, anthology A grand prize of $500 is being Anthology purchase may be offered by Sparrowgrass Poetry Forum Inc. in its new "Awards of Poetic Excellence" poetry contest Thiity-fourother cash awards are also being offered. The contest is free to enter. Poets may enter one poem ^Tallahasse? ef^^"**"^' Beach ev ^^^^ FLORIDA TENNGSea GEORGIA NICKNAME: Sunshine State POPULATION: 11,675,000 (Ranks 5th in US) SIZE: 56,560 square miles Ranks 22nd in US OVERVIEW: Most of Florida is a large, flat peninsula bounded on the west by the Gulf of Ivlexico and on the east by the Atlantic Ocean. It's climate, the warmest in the continental United States, has drawn millions of tourists and retirees from colder sections of the country Tourism is the states No. 1 industry Everglades National Park, the Disney World Complex in Orlando, the Kennedy Space Center and of miles of beaches are leading attractions. Many sections of Florida were once marshlands drained to accommodate its housing and agricultural booms. It produces 75 percent of the U.S. citrus crop The area was first explored by Ponce de Leon as he searched for the legendary Fountain.of Youth. Spaniards founded St. Augustine in 1565, now the oldest city in the United States Spam and Great Britain claimed Florida until after the War of 1812 American settlers then defeated the Semmole Indians and statehood followed in 1845 FUN FACT: Florida's highest point is only 345 feet above sea level GEOGRAPHY PUZZLER: What American island chain extends from south Florida into the Gulf of Mexico'' (sAa^ epuoij agj. .ja/wsuy) c 1988 The Ftesno Be rc AtlanUc Ocean NICKNAME: PEACH STATE POPULATION: 5,975,000 (Ranks 11th in US) SIZE: 58,876 square miles (Ranks 21st in US) OVERVIEW: Georgia is one of the original 13 states and has a colorlul history. It was colonized in 1732 by James Oglethorpe who brought in convicts and debtors from England to give them a new start. He named the colony after King George II. It developed as a cotton plantation state and seceded from the Union when the Civil War broke out. The war was particularly hard on Georgia. Union troops burned Atlanta and much of the countryside. Atlanta rebounded after the war to t)ecome transportation and commercial hub of the Southeast. Georgia is now the Soulh's most industrialized state with production of textiles, wood products and steel Savannah Is one of the busiest ports In the South. The Blue Ridge Mountains of northern Georgia give way to rolling hills and plains in the south. The state has a mild, humid climate. FUN FACT: Peanuts are Georgia's most valuable crop, and the state leads the nation In peanut and pecan production. GEOGRAPHY PUZZLER: In terms of size, how does Georgia rank among states east of the Mississippi River? (ejBjs ujeiseg jsaBjei aqi si ii — i ON JSMSUV) c 1988 The Fresno Bee only,"20 lines or less, on any ofstyles and themes," says Wil^ subject, in any style. Contest liamH. Trent, editor. "YouJtenot have to be an experioiced poet to enter or win." i;, Poems should be sent to Spit'' rowgrass Poetiy Forum Inc., Dept L. 203 Diamond St., Box 193, Sistersville, W.Va. 26175. m closes Nov. 30, but poets arc encouraged to send iheir woric as soon as possible, since poems entered in the contest also will be considered for publication in "Poetic Voices of America," a hardcover anthology. • f Sunset Casino plans gala opening Finance from Page 34 A gala public opening for Tom's Sunset Casino in Henderson is planned for Saturday, OcJ^7. The opening is designed to let Henderson and Boulder City see the entire casino and the atmosphere it provides, said Jerry Sun, public relations director. An invitation-only opening was held some time ago for local dignitaries and press, he added. "Most people don't know we're here. • We are very friendly and neighborly. Our meal prices are ridiculously reasonable and our drink prices jire reasonable," he said. • The restaurant and bar continually offer daily specials to patrons. Those specials include a "Bud Time" at the bar during which patrons can drink $.50 Budwiesers beers and enjoy free nachoes and cheese, Sun added. A live-remote broadcast will be held during the affair, featuring Ross Ferraro of KRRI, and Tru Hawkins of KDWN radio stations. Sun added that there will be continous live entertainment for those attending the celebration. Hats, T-shirts, cash and champagne will be given away all during the event. Sun said. The opening will also serve to highlight some unique features of the casino, said Owner Tom Yarbrough. One such feature is the "Sunset Slot Seekers" club. Tom's Sunset Casino is the only Henderson casino to offer such a club for its regular patrons. Those who sign up now can earn 1,000 bonus points, redeemable for prizes from a gift catalog, Sun said. Members can earn double points through Thursday and all during the month of October to help Tom celebrate, Sun added. Currently, the casino is having twice-weekly cash giveaways to casino patrons. Sun plans to add a truck and car giveaway in -the coming months. Tom's is also the place for the "Hall of Fame (And Fortune)," he added. Players winning $2,000 or more earn a place in the hall. Recently, Kathleen Partel, a Las Vegas resident, took home $2,500 on a quarter bet in a keno machine. Yarbrough and Sun invite everyone to come to the opening and see why Tom's Sunset Casino is the place to be, Sun said. important to shop carefully, and to understand what you're buying. A wrap-around policy typically pays the deductibles as well as at least a portion of the co-payments Medicare requires. It may also pay toward the cost of extra coverage, such as a longer stay in a hospital or skilled nursing facility. •A hospital indemnity policy pays cash benefits to you when you are hospitalized. Its benefits are not coordinated with Medicare, nor does it cover other kinds of care. You may want more than one policy, although it's seldom a good idea to be over-insured. Whatever you buy, find out: •When do benefits start? •What about preexisting conditions? Are they excluded? For how long? •WTiat are the terms for renewing the pohcy? •How often, and how much can premiums be raised? If your Senior Citizens group would like a speaker to talk about Social Security, Medicare and Medigap, call the Life Underwriter Association and ask about its Senior Citizen Health Insurance Counseling Program. George jazz Four Queens Hotel/Casino • Downtown UMB VvQen ^ i' i *lk i,, ,i.i. ake It Sally's ForBmndi! The ultimate Sunday Champagne Brunch. Onfy at Balty's! A glorious ^read made from the freshest foods found anwhere — crisp vegetables, plump fruits and oh, so sweet desserts! 10 am.-2 p.m. $12.50 per person ^ Children under 12,1/2 price \ flp ^^ BALLYS CASINO MSORT IAS VICAS w!!r*MWS!SP + I'jf^ Tom's Sunset Casino Through October 1st LQCO Pony Launi Krislopher Gary Paul Show Live from 9 PM, Monday to Saturday Don Holiman fi-^ l) l, l( lH..-.j. l l l ^,.l,>l|| | |PH '4MBllP!>^ ••••••• Where locals bring their friends. SAM'S TOWN HOTEL Si GAMBUNG HALL Btiuiriei HhjnwavJiNpnis 4S6-7777 Another tine BoyO Group nolei t ORIGINAL DEFECTIVE

PAGE 35

p;|i^^ ^ UaulateoM Home Newe, Bonldar City New, Qreaa Vallay Newi Thnrsday, September 28,1M8 Thursday. September 28, 1989. hu Mkift 'Ragin' Cajun' returns to Four Queens By Deborah White Dear Debbie: I am shocked and want your opinion on a rather unusual subjea. No( long ago I visited my grandmother in a nursing home where they were having a psrty for the residenu. There were some singers, a magician.butthis woman was at least 60-ye8-old. and there she wu. diesacd up Ukc some harem girt right there on the dance floor doing her thing' To be fair. I have to admit she was reaUy pretty good, but don't you think that a woman of that age should be home knitting taking care of her flowe or something? I am just so shocked. Af Doug Kershaw, The Ragin' said, playing with "such hKi mt it ftom me I knew I had not been fooling around, and he did Cajun," has returned to the delightful vengeance that the or After not get It fixmi me. He then said he must have got it off a toilet seat when my test proved ncgaUvc. I say no way off a toUet seat! It is bad enough that he got syphilis, but trying to put the blame on me is reaUy sick. I have no respect for him. but stiU live in the same house withWm. Is this marriage worth saving? He has never been good to me. NO RESPECT Dear No Respect: I cannot tell you whether or not your marriage can be saved. That is completely up to you and how much both of you would be wiUing shedmced i got into a conversation with her, and she said that she just to try to save it. Of course, there is no way to save any relationship loved to do the beUydancing and loved to entenain people and would unless the partners involved attempt to be honest, open and willing. It do it as long as she could! It seems to me that the whole idea U pretty ig poasible to pick up sexuaUy-transmitted diseases such as syphilis disKusting To be fair, riie was well covered and looked very nice in other than ftom sexual intercourse; however, this is not as common, a orettv costume, but it rcaUy shocks me. If my grandmother, who is if your husband has had an affair and has got the disease diis way. it aliiut that woman's age, was to start wiggling around Uk that, I'd i, tenlble tiiat he would try to blame you. But if he is someone who disown her What do you think of this? cannotfaceuptohismistakes.thisisagoodwaytotiytopassthebuck. T SHOCKED Teu him your suspicions and your complaints. Now is as good a time oiar Shocked: as any to put everything out on the table. I say more power to the woman. If she has the eneisy, talent and Send letters to Dear Debbie, P.O. Box 4367, Orlando, Fla. desire to entertain others in this way, she should feel the fiedom to do 32802-4367. l'*'* Tribune Media Services itilfsnoteasygrowingolder.andexpericncingthefttiatnttlonofnot YOIIR FINA NCI A L FITNESS being able to do the things you could when you were young. Peihaps TVWR n i innvirr ... • vou have a misconception about what senior citizens are reaUy like. MediCdre $1100161116111$ Qiowing old docs not mean suddenly having a great interest in IIIVMIV. rr kitting, or rocking in a chair aU day. Growing old can mean being gy fim O'Callaghan your doctors actually charge, aciivc. dancing, singing and generally enjoying die beauty of life. If southern Nevada Association and the gap made up of items tljc audience enjoys licr performance and she enjoys dancing, tiiat's aU of ufe Underwriters Medicare doesn't cover at all. that matters. Medicare, the federal governMedicare supplements Itear Debbie: ment's health insurance for the You can fill many of these My husband of 32 years told me he had syphilis and he tiiought he elderly, is very helpful. But it gapg^ although not all, with a isn't enough. It stops short, well Medicare supplement. But it's short, of covering health care expenditures. If you're over 65, or have a parent who is over By Joyce Jillson 65^ you may want to consider Weekly tip: Most likely an unstable, unpredicuble and weird supplemental inssurance to Four Queens Hotel and Casino in downtown Las Vegas, where he performs at 9 p.m. and 11 p.m. nightly witix a special added show at 12:30 a.m. Saturday (Sunday morning). The famed fiddler is booked at the Four Queens through Sunday, Oct. 8. Kershaw, also dubbed The Bayou Bandit," is a wizard with the electric fiddle, critics have resulting friction sometimes actually destroys several bows during a show." His appeeranoes indode such high-spirited trademarks as "Diggy, Liggy, Lo," a frenetic woiitout of The Battle of New Orleans" and a unique rendition of Hank Williams' "Jambalaya." For reservations or information, call 385-4011. StValwitlnM day to ttwdayM TIlis Keek's kereiee^ See Finance, Page 35 riiisM's? Alzheimers Disease? Call St Rose Dominican Hospitalls Community Resource Service 564-4665 Ask for Kathy Pantoso, R.N. For Information on Where to Get Help. week. ; Aries (March 21-AprU 19) Try your best to please others this ^k. Unpredictable job conditions on Monday. ; Taurus (April 20-May 20) A long-distance romance could be t^porarily intemipted this week. Wednesday and Thursday find you hiunming right along—material gains. ; Gemini (May 21-June 20) Keep tabs MI your partner's spending habits. Your analytical powers come in handy on Wednesday and Thursday. Cancer (June 22-July 22) You're fullof fiizzy warm feelings this week. Wednesday and Thursday is full of boring but necessary tasks. ; Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Moon in Leo favors you the first two days of the week. Guard against emotional breaks. : Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Get a few extra winks of sleep this v^eckcnd. Tuesday/Thursday arc perfect for you. i^ XJOtn (Sept. Z3-Oct. 13) Friends may not come throu^ for you Suiiday or Moiulay. Mom behtnd-the-scenes stuff to strai^iten out on Wednesday. Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21) Do your best to please an unpleasant boss on Monday. Wednesday/Thursday take advantage of excellent social connections. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Long-distance travel plans may have to be postponed. Go for the results not the glory on Wednesday. : Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Your current job could really get to you this week. Wednesday finds your temperament cooling out, mellowing. ; Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Temperamental paitners coukl conIfuse you with their ambivalent messages. Let them work things out on their owrn. ; Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Hold onto your dreams even if you get i bit bruised by life. Keeping a low profile is recommended Tuesday/ Thursday. If you were bom this week : Jupiter in Cancer wiU bring you a wealth of friends this year. Put finances in order in October. Profits come from new ventures^paitner^hips. Traveling is in store for November for both business and pleasure. If creative, put your ideas into form; by December they're accepted. Focus on group activities as much as possible. : Women, looking for a man with the ri^t signs tor you? Learn about astrological compatibility in Joyce Jillson*s til-new dating ^uide. Send $2.25 to Dating Guide for Women, in care of this newspaper, P.O. Box 4406, Orlando, Fla. 32802-4426. Make thecks payable to Newspaperbooks. 01989, Tribune Media Services • M plug the Medicare gaps First, however, you'll want to know just what Medicare itself does and does not do. Medicare Medicare is a two-part program. Part A, which is free to just about everybody, provides hospital benefits; Part B, which is optional and paid by premium, covers medicsd care. Both parts have deductibles and exclusions, so that you must pay in part for some covered items and in full for some items thai aren't covered at all. Part A, for example, covers 60 days of hospitalization. But there is an initial deductible amount ($492 in 1986, and going up each year) that must be paid. Then the patient must pay (in 1986) $123 a day for the next 30 days. This is called co-payment. Right from the outset, too, some charges (such as private-duty nursing or the extra cost of a private room) are not covered at all. Under Medicare Part B, similarly, there is an initial deductible; m 1986, this is $75. Thereafter, Medicare pays 80 percent of allowed expenses. "Allowed" doesn't mean what your doctor charges; it is often far less because it means what Medicare determines is "reasonable." There are, therefore, three gaps in Medicare coverage: the gap caused by deductibles and co-payments, the gap between Medicare allowances and what Rodney G. Handsfield, M.D. -A-,-r^-^.Specializing in Urology ^^=^ Diseases of the kidneys, bladder and genltalia of adults and children Treatment of Impotence; male sexual difficulties Vasectomy and vasectomy reversal Infertility Prostate cancer screening Incontinence; bladder control problems Kidney stones — non-surgical treatment • •'. • • • Serving Henderson, Green Valley and Boulder City Call 564-9599 for appointment. Green Valley Medical Services 67 E. Lake Mead Drive 6301 Mtn. Vista St., Suite 103 Henderson, Nevada 89015 Henderson, NV 89014 V The All New Hairitage Full Family Service (Salon k oov hiring MniyMt & Nanicuri^U Join our Staff of ProTcMionaU Opcaiag •oca 10 Statioiu Available for fi^niyhtU 9f 5 Available Naatcoring SitaUou Henderson' Noftt FabuloaB Nev (&aloa of 4.0CX) q. ft. A PARTS! pABTSl PARTS: p^^^^^ in Boulder City STATE OF THE ART AUTO PARTS LOCATION WITH OUR COAST-TOCOAST COMPUTERIZED SATELUTE SYSTEM NOW ON 2 NATIONAL PARTS LOCATION SERVICES BKJOHN &SON$ 1631 Footliiil Dr., Boulder City 29E-PARr LOCAL HOT LINE TO liOST NEVADA DiSMANTLERS •Need ParU? We've Got'em, New or Used •Used & Rebuilt Engines Installed 311 5 Vttter St. Henderson. Nevada Contact CAROL OTIS, Business Msnager 565-7503 or 565-3450 between 7:30 a.m. A 6:00 p.m. EMISSION EXPRESS (Auto Care) 1400 Nevada Highway, Boulder City BttWMit NAPA and A4W Specialising In Fast and Efficient • SMOG CHECKS • TUNE UPS • DIAGNOSTICS • BRAKES • COMPLETE RADIATOR & COOLING SYSTEM SERVICE • WE SERVICE RV's 293-AIRE (293-2473) Call For Our No Wait Appointments A Place For All Your Automotive Needs Computerized Engine Analysis with Our Stateof-the-Art Alien Smart Scope GET TO KNOW HeadMOB Home Neig, Boulder City New, Grwn V lly Nows Page 36. Poems wanted for contest, anthology A grand prize of $500 is being Anthology purchase may be offered by Sparrowgrass Poetry Forum Inc. in its new "Awards of Poetic Excellence" poetry contest Thiity-fourother cash awards are also being offered. The contest is free to enter. Poets may enter one poem ^Tallahasse? ef^^"**"^' Beach ev ^^^^ FLORIDA TENNGSea GEORGIA NICKNAME: Sunshine State POPULATION: 11,675,000 (Ranks 5th in US) SIZE: 56,560 square miles Ranks 22nd in US OVERVIEW: Most of Florida is a large, flat peninsula bounded on the west by the Gulf of Ivlexico and on the east by the Atlantic Ocean. It's climate, the warmest in the continental United States, has drawn millions of tourists and retirees from colder sections of the country Tourism is the states No. 1 industry Everglades National Park, the Disney World Complex in Orlando, the Kennedy Space Center and of miles of beaches are leading attractions. Many sections of Florida were once marshlands drained to accommodate its housing and agricultural booms. It produces 75 percent of the U.S. citrus crop The area was first explored by Ponce de Leon as he searched for the legendary Fountain.of Youth. Spaniards founded St. Augustine in 1565, now the oldest city in the United States Spam and Great Britain claimed Florida until after the War of 1812 American settlers then defeated the Semmole Indians and statehood followed in 1845 FUN FACT: Florida's highest point is only 345 feet above sea level GEOGRAPHY PUZZLER: What American island chain extends from south Florida into the Gulf of Mexico'' (sAa^ epuoij agj. .ja/wsuy) c 1988 The Ftesno Be rc AtlanUc Ocean NICKNAME: PEACH STATE POPULATION: 5,975,000 (Ranks 11th in US) SIZE: 58,876 square miles (Ranks 21st in US) OVERVIEW: Georgia is one of the original 13 states and has a colorlul history. It was colonized in 1732 by James Oglethorpe who brought in convicts and debtors from England to give them a new start. He named the colony after King George II. It developed as a cotton plantation state and seceded from the Union when the Civil War broke out. The war was particularly hard on Georgia. Union troops burned Atlanta and much of the countryside. Atlanta rebounded after the war to t)ecome transportation and commercial hub of the Southeast. Georgia is now the Soulh's most industrialized state with production of textiles, wood products and steel Savannah Is one of the busiest ports In the South. The Blue Ridge Mountains of northern Georgia give way to rolling hills and plains in the south. The state has a mild, humid climate. FUN FACT: Peanuts are Georgia's most valuable crop, and the state leads the nation In peanut and pecan production. GEOGRAPHY PUZZLER: In terms of size, how does Georgia rank among states east of the Mississippi River? (ejBjs ujeiseg jsaBjei aqi si ii — i ON JSMSUV) c 1988 The Fresno Bee only,"20 lines or less, on any ofstyles and themes," says Wil^ subject, in any style. Contest liamH. Trent, editor. "YouJtenot have to be an experioiced poet to enter or win." i;, Poems should be sent to Spit'' rowgrass Poetiy Forum Inc., Dept L. 203 Diamond St., Box 193, Sistersville, W.Va. 26175. m closes Nov. 30, but poets arc encouraged to send iheir woric as soon as possible, since poems entered in the contest also will be considered for publication in "Poetic Voices of America," a hardcover anthology. • f Sunset Casino plans gala opening Finance from Page 34 A gala public opening for Tom's Sunset Casino in Henderson is planned for Saturday, OcJ^7. The opening is designed to let Henderson and Boulder City see the entire casino and the atmosphere it provides, said Jerry Sun, public relations director. An invitation-only opening was held some time ago for local dignitaries and press, he added. "Most people don't know we're here. • We are very friendly and neighborly. Our meal prices are ridiculously reasonable and our drink prices jire reasonable," he said. • The restaurant and bar continually offer daily specials to patrons. Those specials include a "Bud Time" at the bar during which patrons can drink $.50 Budwiesers beers and enjoy free nachoes and cheese, Sun added. A live-remote broadcast will be held during the affair, featuring Ross Ferraro of KRRI, and Tru Hawkins of KDWN radio stations. Sun added that there will be continous live entertainment for those attending the celebration. Hats, T-shirts, cash and champagne will be given away all during the event. Sun said. The opening will also serve to highlight some unique features of the casino, said Owner Tom Yarbrough. One such feature is the "Sunset Slot Seekers" club. Tom's Sunset Casino is the only Henderson casino to offer such a club for its regular patrons. Those who sign up now can earn 1,000 bonus points, redeemable for prizes from a gift catalog, Sun said. Members can earn double points through Thursday and all during the month of October to help Tom celebrate, Sun added. Currently, the casino is having twice-weekly cash giveaways to casino patrons. Sun plans to add a truck and car giveaway in -the coming months. Tom's is also the place for the "Hall of Fame (And Fortune)," he added. Players winning $2,000 or more earn a place in the hall. Recently, Kathleen Partel, a Las Vegas resident, took home $2,500 on a quarter bet in a keno machine. Yarbrough and Sun invite everyone to come to the opening and see why Tom's Sunset Casino is the place to be, Sun said. important to shop carefully, and to understand what you're buying. A wrap-around policy typically pays the deductibles as well as at least a portion of the co-payments Medicare requires. It may also pay toward the cost of extra coverage, such as a longer stay in a hospital or skilled nursing facility. •A hospital indemnity policy pays cash benefits to you when you are hospitalized. Its benefits are not coordinated with Medicare, nor does it cover other kinds of care. You may want more than one policy, although it's seldom a good idea to be over-insured. Whatever you buy, find out: •When do benefits start? •What about preexisting conditions? Are they excluded? For how long? •WTiat are the terms for renewing the pohcy? •How often, and how much can premiums be raised? If your Senior Citizens group would like a speaker to talk about Social Security, Medicare and Medigap, call the Life Underwriter Association and ask about its Senior Citizen Health Insurance Counseling Program. George jazz Four Queens Hotel/Casino • Downtown UMB VvQen ^ i' i *lk i,, ,i.i. ake It Sally's ForBmndi! The ultimate Sunday Champagne Brunch. Onfy at Balty's! A glorious ^read made from the freshest foods found anwhere — crisp vegetables, plump fruits and oh, so sweet desserts! 10 am.-2 p.m. $12.50 per person ^ Children under 12,1/2 price \ flp ^^ BALLYS CASINO MSORT IAS VICAS w!!r*MWS!SP + I'jf^ Tom's Sunset Casino Through October 1st LQCO Pony Launi Krislopher Gary Paul Show Live from 9 PM, Monday to Saturday Don Holiman fi-^ l) l, l( lH..-.j. l l l ^,.l,>l|| | |PH '4MBllP!>^ ••••••• Where locals bring their friends. SAM'S TOWN HOTEL Si GAMBUNG HALL Btiuiriei HhjnwavJiNpnis 4S6-7777 Another tine BoyO Group nolei t ORIGINAL DEFECTIVE

PAGE 36

^if n, H f d OT o a Home News. Boaldcr Oty News. Orera VaUey Newa Thunday, ScptemlMr 28, |M Physical therapists honored by ienderson, St. Rose Hospital ^ Mayor Loroa Kesienon has the Nadonil and Nevada chapters ^^dared the week of Oct 1-7 as of the American Physicil Therfliyiical Thenpy Week through apyAssociation. Hiscommiiment ^slgningofaproclamadoaThai to his profession is equaled by his jipopiidon is an observance of commitment to the Henderson pt condnnous eflbcts of die {((ysical dwnpy staff at St Rose pominican Hospital sod its satelm fittility. Green VaUey Medifb Services. ID serve and educaus n community. ^Physical dKiipy is profcsmn dedicated to improve movedwnt and function, relieve pain HVl expand movemem potential. IQuoufh penKHudized consulu£in. each patient is prescribed a ^iogram specific to thdr ciicumiAnot and need. • • • The Physical Therapy Department at St. Rose Dominican Hospital consists of more than just gizmos and gadgets made of cold, had steel, spokespersons said. It is staffed widi warm, caring individuals, they added. The head of the Physical Therapy Department at St Rose Dominican Hospital, BiU imdall, a registered physical dierapist, is a prime example of the type of individuals that make up the PT staff, they said. Randall is a member of both community. That is apparent by his involvemem in die Henderson Rotary, memberahip hi the Henderson Chamber of Commerce and die Boy Scouts. Widi more dian 14 years of hands-on experience, backed by a master's degree from Brigham Young University hi analysis of human motion, Randall shares his enthusiasm and commitment to physical tbenpy widi his staff, spokespersons said. Kadierine Fid is committed notonly to the professionof physical therapy, but to the suirounding community of Green Valley, where she has recentiy been appointed department manager. Frei. a 1977 graduate of Basic High School, received her B.S. in physical therapy at die University of Utah in 1984. She also has a B.S. in psychology from SouUicm Utah State College. "1 wanted to come back to Henderson to help people in die community I grew up in," she said. Frei came to St. Rose DoObituaries Leroy Holliday : Leroy Holliday, 59, a Henderson resident since 1953, died Sept. 24 in Las Vegas. Bom in Start, La., on Oct. 12, 1029, he was a U.S. Air Force yeteran and a crane operator tor Timet. He was employed with Timet for 30 years. : He is survived by his wife, Geraldine Holliday of Henderson, two sons Leroy Holliday, 3T. of Laa Vegas and Michael E. Holliday of Henderson, three daughters Cheryl Holliday of Henderson, Teresa Littleton of Lake Jackson, Tx., and JacGermany, Alzenia Hasley, Mary Jewel Scott, Laverne Wyatt and Bobbie Wells all of El Centro, Ca. Viewing services will be at Palm Mortuary in Henderson Friday, Sept. 29,4:00 p.m. thru 7:00 p.m. and on Saturday, Sept. 30, 9:00 a.m. thru 7:00 p.m. and at Palm Valley Mortuary Sunday, Oct. 1, 11:00 a.m. thru 2:00 p.m. Servicea will be at Palm Valley View Chapel Sunday, Oct. 1, at 2:00 p.m. Interment will be at Palm Valley View Memorial Park, Garden of Honor. queline Howard of Hyattsville, ^., three brothers WiUie R. gbUiday, Porter Holliday of i i.. OAAUAAL |^Vega8.andTerryHoUiday JOlin W. OGGDOCK f El Centro, Ca., seven sisters John W. Seebock, 42, a resiiLessie Sue polUns and Annie dent for four and one-half ^HoUiday of Las Vegas, Lorjmne Holliday of Frankfort, Maria Arredondo ^'Maria Arredondo, 66, a resijPpit of 30 years of Henderson, died Friday. ; • Bom in Actic, Mexico, on ^vAugust 10,1923,shcwasahouse'wife. ^ She is survived by her husijband, Pedro Arredondo and a kaagltucr, Michela Lucero, bodi of Henderson. Services were held. Pahn Mortuary handled arrangements. years, died Sunday, Sept. 24 in Henderson. Bom in Berlin, Germany, ori April 17,1947, he was a furniture refinisher. He is survived by his wife, Marilynn Seebock; two sons, Christopher Seebock and James Seebock; a daughter Victoria Seebock, all of Henderson; parents, Louis and Martha Seebock of Spring Hill, Fla. Memorial services were held. Palm JMortuary handled arrangements. I AS VEGAS '. Drivo-lns HACKUMdD JMip^iaW. CMy • IMw U niU UMM* ftoM k-tollMM;* lOUHICK(N) SUOPLOVKR) MTlMNfraur £!5* 13.25 Msa?ssK:aa£5 MoralMP.H ttiloniaiPMj > CENTURY 2L DESERT (fa I 1^21641-2500 ^^^^^--X OTLOVim I MTMMKra-IS) IMlrtSIM ltlUI> IMP I 7ao W A6K irt4d 1:ll4d0 10:11 IttlilllM TiMMiWIiao RI^DROCK(JJi 1i10l:M|.lb J*^^J>mMiuSrt\ (M)1tdflM IMi %U •eSiMLr JS imoim (M.n)i 1M1:1( J14L KAOfLOVKN) IM4!11I ti41 ll!ia 'AHENTHBOO M423 aaoi S3 7IWM0 iMt nMSonam | PAMNTHOOQ advisor / Religion World Communion Sunday at Presbyterian Church WorldCommunion Sunday will be celebrated Sunday at Henderson Presbyterian Oiurch. Pastor Dr. R. Dixon Jennings will preach a sermon entitled "Wealth ani Worth" at both the 8:30 ajn. and 11 a.m. wordiip MTvices. His message is basW on Luke 16:19-31. Jesus' stoiy of tbt rich man and Lazanu. New officeis will also be or(bdned and installed Sunday at the 11 ajn. senrice. DidL Gelbiugh and Bonnie Merrill will be insudled as elders on the church session. Sunday church school for all ages begins at 9:45 a.m. There is anursery for preschool children at the 11 a.m. seivice. Following the poastor's tallc with the children at die 11 a.m. service, those who are in kindergarten through second grade may go to anodier part of the buUding for Cherub Church, acdvides under adult supervision. The dmrch's youdi gioup for Junior high and senior high young people will meetSunday at 6 pjn. The Daydmes eighth annual Patio and Bake Sale wiU be heU finom 8 ajn. to 4 p.m. Saturday, October 7. at the church. On sale will be househod items, yard supplies, clothing, collector's items, jewelry, homemade baked goods, hot dogs and cold drinks. The church is k)cated at 601N. Major Ave.. just beyond Morrell atyParic Fbr ftinher hifonnatian, caU the church office at 365-9684. Residents of Soudiem Nevada are hivited to discover the magic of canceling inner beartadK, sponsors said, by attending friendly, uplifting talks by Vernon Howard on "Come, Suut Life All Over," widi Ublical reference to Psalms 37:27, diis week at New Ufe Foundatkm. 700 Wyoming St, tf die comer of Utah Street tai Boulder aty. Classes, cmiducted at 7 p.m. each Wednesday and Friday, and at 9 ajn. eadi Satunlay and Sun'Come start life all over,' Howard Invites 'I Concert at Fait!) Contonporary Christian artist Melimie Gibbona will be perfonnng at 7 p.m., Sunday at Faith Baptist Church. Faith Baptist Church, 421 Pacific St. All are invited to listen to Gibbons in word and song. A love offering will be taken during the concert. For more information, call 565-7308 or 454-4186. Worldwide dommunion rite at Community Church Sunday The Hrst Sunday in October is world wide communion Sunday and the Community Church of Henderson, United Church of Christ, has invited all who wish to participate to the celebration of Holy Communion. Dr. Ed Swain, minister, will • speak on "The Universal Church Gathered at a Common Table." Scripture will be taken from Luke 22:14-20. Community Church is located at 360 E. Horizon Drive, at the comer of Greenway Road in Henderson. Worship services are held at 8 a.m. for an informal service for early risers and travelers; the traditional service with the chancel choir and Junior Sermon for the young people, is held at 10:30 a.m. Sunday Schoolclasses start at 9 a.m. Kindergarten through adult classes are held. Dr. Swam conducts the adult Bible study. The choir is also now rehearMorning Agiow meets The Las Vegas Morning Aglow Fellowship will meet at 9:30 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 5, at Montara Meadows, 3150 E. Tropicana. Cost of the breakfast gathering is $3.25, spokespersons said. Jeanne Mohr is the featured speaker. Once a missionary in the Highlands of New Guinea, Mohr now has a full-time ministry which includes teaching, counseling, healing and deliverance. She has written a book, "Battle Plan", which contains a series of powerful lessons concerning ddiverance and spiritual warfare. Mohr is a wife, mother and grandmother from Hillsboro, MO. Deadline for reservation is Tuesday. Call 736-6658 or 362-3858. Briefly ... Choking prevention seminar offered A two-hour educational seminar, "Keep Your Child from Choking," sponsored by the American Lung Association, will be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m, Wednesday, Oct. 18, at the University Medical Health Education Building, 2040 W. Charieston Blvd. Preventive measures as well as emergency techniques will be taught, officials said. To register, call the American Lung Association at 454-2500. Bluegrass concert Saturday at Winctiester The Warburton Family Band will be featured in a bluegrass music concert from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday at the Winchester Community Center, 3130 S. McLeod Drive. The concert is being sponsored in conjunction with KNPR's Las Vegas Arts Festival and Craftworks Mafket, which takes place all day Saturday and Sunday at Jaycee Ptsk, just two miles northwest of Winchester Center. For more infomution, call 455-7340. sing Sunday mornings, starting at 9:30 a.m. Members and those who wish to join with them are urged to arrive on time for the rehearsals. Regular Wednesday rehearsals are also held, starting at 7 p.m. During the worship service this Sunday, a Neighbors In Need offering, an ongoing program of the United Church of Christ funded by all the local churches through their conferences, will be taken to assist others throughout the nation. The program helps those disabled, works to reduce illiteracy and homelessness and provides funds to American Indian Ministries and others. The ladies of Joy Fellowship will meet 7 p.m. today at the church. Interested friends and members are invited to join with them as they make plans for the fall and Holiday seasons. The church office is open from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. ruesdays through Fridays. Call 566-8563 for further information. "--X Lutheran Churcii announces annuai rummage sale Christ the Servam Lutheran Church officials diis week announced the date of the coogregation'sthirdannualRummageSale, scheduled from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday' Location for this year's event is 12 Commerce Center Drive in the Green Valley Busmess Paik. next to the Ethel M chocolate factory. Thousands of items will be featured, spokesperson said, including furniture, housewares, sporting goods, baby items, clothing, books, jewelry, yam, toys and plants. I • EYE INSTITUTE OF NEVADA 1 JOSEPH SHALEV MD LTD Dipkunate American Board olOphtlialinology Fallow American Colltga of Surgeons SURGERY OF THE EYE • • CATARACT OinPATIENT IMPLANT MICROSURGERY • LASBR GLAUCOMA SURGERY e COSMEnC EYELID SURGERY e COBfPUBTE EYE CARE ; 564-2539 293-0551 732-3255 • Hmdaraon Offloa • SuKi 303 10IE.UkallaadOrivt BoutdarOlyOfllot-SuMIOI fltSAdamiBM. LAS VEGAS OFFICE-Suits 204 3201S. Maryland Parkway MEDICARE ASSIGNMENT ACCEPTED • ORiONAL DEFECTIVE :, j day, are attended by sincere men and women who warn to preserve the old-iWiioned principles of decency and good maraien. They findoutwhatitmeanstolivealife of inward Mcurity at a dme when things aeem to be getting WOTK, spoDson added. AU who attend the daises are encouraged to anivean hour early for importam and interesdng discusriom before class. "The classes hi nearby Boulder Qty provide a unique opportunity for everyone to find out for themselves, not from others, all about theauthenticChrisdan principles discussed here, which are die most pleasam and bright inspiration a person couki have in his orherlifiB," spoke^rson Joan Philips said. Call 293-4444. Methodist singles plan trip to Mount Charleston Single adults of First Henderson United Methodist Church will go on a picnic Saturday at Mount Charleston. They will meet at 9 a,m. at the church parking lot, 609 E. Horizon Drive in the Highland Hills section of Henderson. Those wishing too meet the group at Mount Charleston should be at the Mt. Charleston Lodge parking lot at 1:30 p.m., Spokespersons said. The rest of the congregation on that Saturday will meet at 8 a.m. at the church with all kinds of scrubbing materials for a Church Work Day. The morning of cleaning will be followed by a potluck limch in celebration of a job well done. Sunday services are held at 8:15 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. The scheduled message by the Rev. Beth Carey at both morning services is entitled, In Remembrance of Me," based on Ephesians 2:11-16. The congregation will celebrate World Communion Sunday with the serving of the Lord's Supper. Sunday School classes for all children and adults is held at 9:20 a.m. Childcare for infants and pre-school children is available for all Sunday morning activities. On Tuesday there will be a Bible Study at 10 a.m., concentrating on the book of Psalms. Further information may be obtained by calling 566-6049. RELAnONSHIP MAGIC-Piychologlst Dr. Ellca Dickstcfak will discuss "Secrets of Successftil Relationships" at • ajn: Saturday at the New Life Foundation, 700 Wyoming St^ ia Boulder City. Dr. Dickstein, who received her doctoral defree in psychology ft-om Johns Hopkins Uaivcrsity and earned tenure at Southern Methodist University In Dallas, directs the New Life Women's Speakers Bureau, which gives talks at no charge to women's community and church groups througliOHt Southern Nevada. For more infomntion on tlw bureau or classes and other activities, call 293-4444. PiMtbri MUKmo 451-8608 5690twldsrHwy.Nf.Trop. HENDERSON BJP.O. ELKS LODGE #1956 •Weddbigi ^Banqnett •DaneM OPOI lUULT 11 AJLIO PJL CAU US • 86S.9989 631 East Lak Itoad Drive Handsrson Nevada 8M1S GREEN VALLEY CHURCH OF CHRIST (United Steelworkers Union Hall) 47 Water Street Sunday: Wednesday. Bible Classes Worship Worship Bible 9:00 a.m. 9:45 a.m. 5:00 p.m. 7-.ao p.m. You Ar€ Always Welcome For more infonnation: Barney Car^e 564-4962 or P.O. Box 90493 Henderson 89009 ? ConnseliDg^ Sinolo Pairiil? Call St Rose Dominicui Hospital^ Commimity Resooite Service 56M665 Ask for KMOV FlurtMO, R.N. For Infonnadon on Wkere to Get Help. HENDERSON FIRST BAPnST CHURCH 47 E. Atlutic Airenne PASTOR JOHN OSKOi 565-9511 "ACTIVE PARTNERSHIP WITH GOD" PASTOR OSKO'S MESSAGE THIS SUNDAY J Rev. John Osko, Paator of First Baptist Church, has chosen for the title of his message this Sunday "ACTIVE PARTNERSHIP WITH GOD." His Scripture text is I Corinthians 3:9. £ Special music wiU include John W. Poterson's "He's the One!", sung in duet by Bettye Han^ and Cari Heodv^^ son; and selections by the First Baptist Church Chorale. The celebration of the Lord's Supper wiU be a part of this Worship Hour. The Worriiip Hour begins at 11:00 a.m. First Baptist Church is located st 47 East Atlantic Avenue, Hendans^Jg Sundsy School daaaee for aU ages begin st 9:30 a.m. Sunday School teachers' meeting is at 9:06 a.m. Children's Church Time, for children 2 years of age through Kindergarten, is held during the Moraing WanhiprlE Hour. A Nursery is provided for infanta and children up to 2 years of age. Junior High and Senior High Youth meetings are at 5:00 p.m. oo Sundays, under the leaderahip
PAGE 37

^if n, H f d OT o a Home News. Boaldcr Oty News. Orera VaUey Newa Thunday, ScptemlMr 28, |M Physical therapists honored by ienderson, St. Rose Hospital ^ Mayor Loroa Kesienon has the Nadonil and Nevada chapters ^^dared the week of Oct 1-7 as of the American Physicil Therfliyiical Thenpy Week through apyAssociation. Hiscommiiment ^slgningofaproclamadoaThai to his profession is equaled by his jipopiidon is an observance of commitment to the Henderson pt condnnous eflbcts of die {((ysical dwnpy staff at St Rose pominican Hospital sod its satelm fittility. Green VaUey Medifb Services. ID serve and educaus n community. ^Physical dKiipy is profcsmn dedicated to improve movedwnt and function, relieve pain HVl expand movemem potential. IQuoufh penKHudized consulu£in. each patient is prescribed a ^iogram specific to thdr ciicumiAnot and need. • • • The Physical Therapy Department at St. Rose Dominican Hospital consists of more than just gizmos and gadgets made of cold, had steel, spokespersons said. It is staffed widi warm, caring individuals, they added. The head of the Physical Therapy Department at St Rose Dominican Hospital, BiU imdall, a registered physical dierapist, is a prime example of the type of individuals that make up the PT staff, they said. Randall is a member of both community. That is apparent by his involvemem in die Henderson Rotary, memberahip hi the Henderson Chamber of Commerce and die Boy Scouts. Widi more dian 14 years of hands-on experience, backed by a master's degree from Brigham Young University hi analysis of human motion, Randall shares his enthusiasm and commitment to physical tbenpy widi his staff, spokespersons said. Kadierine Fid is committed notonly to the professionof physical therapy, but to the suirounding community of Green Valley, where she has recentiy been appointed department manager. Frei. a 1977 graduate of Basic High School, received her B.S. in physical therapy at die University of Utah in 1984. She also has a B.S. in psychology from SouUicm Utah State College. "1 wanted to come back to Henderson to help people in die community I grew up in," she said. Frei came to St. Rose DoObituaries Leroy Holliday : Leroy Holliday, 59, a Henderson resident since 1953, died Sept. 24 in Las Vegas. Bom in Start, La., on Oct. 12, 1029, he was a U.S. Air Force yeteran and a crane operator tor Timet. He was employed with Timet for 30 years. : He is survived by his wife, Geraldine Holliday of Henderson, two sons Leroy Holliday, 3T. of Laa Vegas and Michael E. Holliday of Henderson, three daughters Cheryl Holliday of Henderson, Teresa Littleton of Lake Jackson, Tx., and JacGermany, Alzenia Hasley, Mary Jewel Scott, Laverne Wyatt and Bobbie Wells all of El Centro, Ca. Viewing services will be at Palm Mortuary in Henderson Friday, Sept. 29,4:00 p.m. thru 7:00 p.m. and on Saturday, Sept. 30, 9:00 a.m. thru 7:00 p.m. and at Palm Valley Mortuary Sunday, Oct. 1, 11:00 a.m. thru 2:00 p.m. Servicea will be at Palm Valley View Chapel Sunday, Oct. 1, at 2:00 p.m. Interment will be at Palm Valley View Memorial Park, Garden of Honor. queline Howard of Hyattsville, ^., three brothers WiUie R. gbUiday, Porter Holliday of i i.. OAAUAAL |^Vega8.andTerryHoUiday JOlin W. OGGDOCK f El Centro, Ca., seven sisters John W. Seebock, 42, a resiiLessie Sue polUns and Annie dent for four and one-half ^HoUiday of Las Vegas, Lorjmne Holliday of Frankfort, Maria Arredondo ^'Maria Arredondo, 66, a resijPpit of 30 years of Henderson, died Friday. ; • Bom in Actic, Mexico, on ^vAugust 10,1923,shcwasahouse'wife. ^ She is survived by her husijband, Pedro Arredondo and a kaagltucr, Michela Lucero, bodi of Henderson. Services were held. Pahn Mortuary handled arrangements. years, died Sunday, Sept. 24 in Henderson. Bom in Berlin, Germany, ori April 17,1947, he was a furniture refinisher. He is survived by his wife, Marilynn Seebock; two sons, Christopher Seebock and James Seebock; a daughter Victoria Seebock, all of Henderson; parents, Louis and Martha Seebock of Spring Hill, Fla. Memorial services were held. Palm JMortuary handled arrangements. I AS VEGAS '. Drivo-lns HACKUMdD JMip^iaW. CMy • IMw U niU UMM* ftoM k-tollMM;* lOUHICK(N) SUOPLOVKR) MTlMNfraur £!5* 13.25 Msa?ssK:aa£5 MoralMP.H ttiloniaiPMj > CENTURY 2L DESERT (fa I 1^21641-2500 ^^^^^--X OTLOVim I MTMMKra-IS) IMlrtSIM ltlUI> IMP I 7ao W A6K irt4d 1:ll4d0 10:11 IttlilllM TiMMiWIiao RI^DROCK(JJi 1i10l:M|.lb J*^^J>mMiuSrt\ (M)1tdflM IMi %U •eSiMLr JS imoim (M.n)i 1M1:1( J14L KAOfLOVKN) IM4!11I ti41 ll!ia 'AHENTHBOO M423 aaoi S3 7IWM0 iMt nMSonam | PAMNTHOOQ advisor / Religion World Communion Sunday at Presbyterian Church WorldCommunion Sunday will be celebrated Sunday at Henderson Presbyterian Oiurch. Pastor Dr. R. Dixon Jennings will preach a sermon entitled "Wealth ani Worth" at both the 8:30 ajn. and 11 a.m. wordiip MTvices. His message is basW on Luke 16:19-31. Jesus' stoiy of tbt rich man and Lazanu. New officeis will also be or(bdned and installed Sunday at the 11 ajn. senrice. DidL Gelbiugh and Bonnie Merrill will be insudled as elders on the church session. Sunday church school for all ages begins at 9:45 a.m. There is anursery for preschool children at the 11 a.m. seivice. Following the poastor's tallc with the children at die 11 a.m. service, those who are in kindergarten through second grade may go to anodier part of the buUding for Cherub Church, acdvides under adult supervision. The dmrch's youdi gioup for Junior high and senior high young people will meetSunday at 6 pjn. The Daydmes eighth annual Patio and Bake Sale wiU be heU finom 8 ajn. to 4 p.m. Saturday, October 7. at the church. On sale will be househod items, yard supplies, clothing, collector's items, jewelry, homemade baked goods, hot dogs and cold drinks. The church is k)cated at 601N. Major Ave.. just beyond Morrell atyParic Fbr ftinher hifonnatian, caU the church office at 365-9684. Residents of Soudiem Nevada are hivited to discover the magic of canceling inner beartadK, sponsors said, by attending friendly, uplifting talks by Vernon Howard on "Come, Suut Life All Over," widi Ublical reference to Psalms 37:27, diis week at New Ufe Foundatkm. 700 Wyoming St, tf die comer of Utah Street tai Boulder aty. Classes, cmiducted at 7 p.m. each Wednesday and Friday, and at 9 ajn. eadi Satunlay and Sun'Come start life all over,' Howard Invites 'I Concert at Fait!) Contonporary Christian artist Melimie Gibbona will be perfonnng at 7 p.m., Sunday at Faith Baptist Church. Faith Baptist Church, 421 Pacific St. All are invited to listen to Gibbons in word and song. A love offering will be taken during the concert. For more information, call 565-7308 or 454-4186. Worldwide dommunion rite at Community Church Sunday The Hrst Sunday in October is world wide communion Sunday and the Community Church of Henderson, United Church of Christ, has invited all who wish to participate to the celebration of Holy Communion. Dr. Ed Swain, minister, will • speak on "The Universal Church Gathered at a Common Table." Scripture will be taken from Luke 22:14-20. Community Church is located at 360 E. Horizon Drive, at the comer of Greenway Road in Henderson. Worship services are held at 8 a.m. for an informal service for early risers and travelers; the traditional service with the chancel choir and Junior Sermon for the young people, is held at 10:30 a.m. Sunday Schoolclasses start at 9 a.m. Kindergarten through adult classes are held. Dr. Swam conducts the adult Bible study. The choir is also now rehearMorning Agiow meets The Las Vegas Morning Aglow Fellowship will meet at 9:30 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 5, at Montara Meadows, 3150 E. Tropicana. Cost of the breakfast gathering is $3.25, spokespersons said. Jeanne Mohr is the featured speaker. Once a missionary in the Highlands of New Guinea, Mohr now has a full-time ministry which includes teaching, counseling, healing and deliverance. She has written a book, "Battle Plan", which contains a series of powerful lessons concerning ddiverance and spiritual warfare. Mohr is a wife, mother and grandmother from Hillsboro, MO. Deadline for reservation is Tuesday. Call 736-6658 or 362-3858. Briefly ... Choking prevention seminar offered A two-hour educational seminar, "Keep Your Child from Choking," sponsored by the American Lung Association, will be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m, Wednesday, Oct. 18, at the University Medical Health Education Building, 2040 W. Charieston Blvd. Preventive measures as well as emergency techniques will be taught, officials said. To register, call the American Lung Association at 454-2500. Bluegrass concert Saturday at Winctiester The Warburton Family Band will be featured in a bluegrass music concert from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday at the Winchester Community Center, 3130 S. McLeod Drive. The concert is being sponsored in conjunction with KNPR's Las Vegas Arts Festival and Craftworks Mafket, which takes place all day Saturday and Sunday at Jaycee Ptsk, just two miles northwest of Winchester Center. For more infomution, call 455-7340. sing Sunday mornings, starting at 9:30 a.m. Members and those who wish to join with them are urged to arrive on time for the rehearsals. Regular Wednesday rehearsals are also held, starting at 7 p.m. During the worship service this Sunday, a Neighbors In Need offering, an ongoing program of the United Church of Christ funded by all the local churches through their conferences, will be taken to assist others throughout the nation. The program helps those disabled, works to reduce illiteracy and homelessness and provides funds to American Indian Ministries and others. The ladies of Joy Fellowship will meet 7 p.m. today at the church. Interested friends and members are invited to join with them as they make plans for the fall and Holiday seasons. The church office is open from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. ruesdays through Fridays. Call 566-8563 for further information. "--X Lutheran Churcii announces annuai rummage sale Christ the Servam Lutheran Church officials diis week announced the date of the coogregation'sthirdannualRummageSale, scheduled from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday' Location for this year's event is 12 Commerce Center Drive in the Green Valley Busmess Paik. next to the Ethel M chocolate factory. Thousands of items will be featured, spokesperson said, including furniture, housewares, sporting goods, baby items, clothing, books, jewelry, yam, toys and plants. I • EYE INSTITUTE OF NEVADA 1 JOSEPH SHALEV MD LTD Dipkunate American Board olOphtlialinology Fallow American Colltga of Surgeons SURGERY OF THE EYE • • CATARACT OinPATIENT IMPLANT MICROSURGERY • LASBR GLAUCOMA SURGERY e COSMEnC EYELID SURGERY e COBfPUBTE EYE CARE ; 564-2539 293-0551 732-3255 • Hmdaraon Offloa • SuKi 303 10IE.UkallaadOrivt BoutdarOlyOfllot-SuMIOI fltSAdamiBM. LAS VEGAS OFFICE-Suits 204 3201S. Maryland Parkway MEDICARE ASSIGNMENT ACCEPTED • ORiONAL DEFECTIVE :, j day, are attended by sincere men and women who warn to preserve the old-iWiioned principles of decency and good maraien. They findoutwhatitmeanstolivealife of inward Mcurity at a dme when things aeem to be getting WOTK, spoDson added. AU who attend the daises are encouraged to anivean hour early for importam and interesdng discusriom before class. "The classes hi nearby Boulder Qty provide a unique opportunity for everyone to find out for themselves, not from others, all about theauthenticChrisdan principles discussed here, which are die most pleasam and bright inspiration a person couki have in his orherlifiB," spoke^rson Joan Philips said. Call 293-4444. Methodist singles plan trip to Mount Charleston Single adults of First Henderson United Methodist Church will go on a picnic Saturday at Mount Charleston. They will meet at 9 a,m. at the church parking lot, 609 E. Horizon Drive in the Highland Hills section of Henderson. Those wishing too meet the group at Mount Charleston should be at the Mt. Charleston Lodge parking lot at 1:30 p.m., Spokespersons said. The rest of the congregation on that Saturday will meet at 8 a.m. at the church with all kinds of scrubbing materials for a Church Work Day. The morning of cleaning will be followed by a potluck limch in celebration of a job well done. Sunday services are held at 8:15 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. The scheduled message by the Rev. Beth Carey at both morning services is entitled, In Remembrance of Me," based on Ephesians 2:11-16. The congregation will celebrate World Communion Sunday with the serving of the Lord's Supper. Sunday School classes for all children and adults is held at 9:20 a.m. Childcare for infants and pre-school children is available for all Sunday morning activities. On Tuesday there will be a Bible Study at 10 a.m., concentrating on the book of Psalms. Further information may be obtained by calling 566-6049. RELAnONSHIP MAGIC-Piychologlst Dr. Ellca Dickstcfak will discuss "Secrets of Successftil Relationships" at • ajn: Saturday at the New Life Foundation, 700 Wyoming St^ ia Boulder City. Dr. Dickstein, who received her doctoral defree in psychology ft-om Johns Hopkins Uaivcrsity and earned tenure at Southern Methodist University In Dallas, directs the New Life Women's Speakers Bureau, which gives talks at no charge to women's community and church groups througliOHt Southern Nevada. For more infomntion on tlw bureau or classes and other activities, call 293-4444. PiMtbri MUKmo 451-8608 5690twldsrHwy.Nf.Trop. HENDERSON BJP.O. ELKS LODGE #1956 •Weddbigi ^Banqnett •DaneM OPOI lUULT 11 AJLIO PJL CAU US • 86S.9989 631 East Lak Itoad Drive Handsrson Nevada 8M1S GREEN VALLEY CHURCH OF CHRIST (United Steelworkers Union Hall) 47 Water Street Sunday: Wednesday. Bible Classes Worship Worship Bible 9:00 a.m. 9:45 a.m. 5:00 p.m. 7-.ao p.m. You Ar€ Always Welcome For more infonnation: Barney Car^e 564-4962 or P.O. Box 90493 Henderson 89009 ? ConnseliDg^ Sinolo Pairiil? Call St Rose Dominicui Hospital^ Commimity Resooite Service 56M665 Ask for KMOV FlurtMO, R.N. For Infonnadon on Wkere to Get Help. HENDERSON FIRST BAPnST CHURCH 47 E. Atlutic Airenne PASTOR JOHN OSKOi 565-9511 "ACTIVE PARTNERSHIP WITH GOD" PASTOR OSKO'S MESSAGE THIS SUNDAY J Rev. John Osko, Paator of First Baptist Church, has chosen for the title of his message this Sunday "ACTIVE PARTNERSHIP WITH GOD." His Scripture text is I Corinthians 3:9. £ Special music wiU include John W. Poterson's "He's the One!", sung in duet by Bettye Han^ and Cari Heodv^^ son; and selections by the First Baptist Church Chorale. The celebration of the Lord's Supper wiU be a part of this Worship Hour. The Worriiip Hour begins at 11:00 a.m. First Baptist Church is located st 47 East Atlantic Avenue, Hendans^Jg Sundsy School daaaee for aU ages begin st 9:30 a.m. Sunday School teachers' meeting is at 9:06 a.m. Children's Church Time, for children 2 years of age through Kindergarten, is held during the Moraing WanhiprlE Hour. A Nursery is provided for infanta and children up to 2 years of age. Junior High and Senior High Youth meetings are at 5:00 p.m. oo Sundays, under the leaderahip
PAGE 38

• mm tm More Boulder City news Thursday, September 28, 1969 ThwWHUy, Septeiiwr 28,1989 Page 38, Henderson Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News of Fortune' 7 p.m. Friday on Channel 3 m iiHiiinr II •'•%# • ^*^mM iiS^f"^' s:mmmmmmmm • • • -• •> ^ #'"' • • • ^f^i^Pi ^s^wisasj^by Bill Harbour There used to be a saying that •the human brain was a wonderful thing; it begins functioning the moment we are born and •never stops until we appear on a quiz program. Well, that wasn't the case with local resident John .Eugster when he had the opJohn in action portunity to appear on Wheel of Fortune, though he does admit that some of the details of the actual taping kind of escaped his ability to recall them later. What he does remember is that when it was all over, he had won $39,250 and that his feet didn't touch the ground again for several days. When this interview was done a week or so later, his remembrance of the event sent him off into another state of euphoria as though he were winning the game all over again. It will probably be the same again tomorrow when his appearance on the game show airs on Channel 3 at 7 p.m. At that time, you'll discover that John was a winner and appeared on a second show which will air Monday night and that hell triumph still again to appear for a third time on Tuesday's show. Of course the time sequence wasn't quite the same during the actual taping. Five shows -one week's worth-were taped in a single day. So John actually played three shows worth of games back-to-back as it were, with a brief break between bouts to change clothing, etc. It all started back in February when an announcement was flashed on the TV tube during the game show inviting people to audition in Las Vegas to be contestants on the show. John's wife, Linda, encouraged John to try out. She made repeated phone calls before getting through and booked times for both of them to attend auditions to be held at Bally's Grand. On the appointed day, they both went for tryouts. Linda doesn't comment too much on her attempts other than to say she didn't survive the cuts. John went later that day. There was a questionnaire to fill out, a written test to be completed and 15 puzzles to solve puzzles with consonants but no vowels included. A five minute time limit was imposed; John passed the hurdle. Then came a break and the group was asked who would like to play Pat Sajak, the MC of the evening show. John volunteered and ran a raffle for the other contestants. "I kind of hammed it up," he remembers with a wide grin. It was time for the cuts; John survived and joined the other successful applicants in playing mock Wheel games. Another cut and still John was in the running. He returned the following day to play more mock games, then was sent home with the message "We'U call you." Well, in a week or so a letter arrived conHrming his selection and requesting contact as to what months he would be available for taping. Being a school teacher, he chose June, July and August. Then time passed by. It would be in July when he received a call telling him -to report to CBS-T% in Hollywood on Aug. 13. The moment of truth wafi drawing near. The Eugsters taped Wheel of Fortune shows and John says he had dreams about appearing. Finally the appointed day arrived and he and his family headed for California. John says it could have been called a Heartbreak Trip as it turned out. He was taken upstairs in the studio building and told there was good news and bad news. The good news was that contestants winning on a particular show could now return again; the bad news was this meant fewer new contestants would be needed. Of the 11 contestants summoned, only two or perhaps one would be used. They were offered round-trip tickets for two back to their point of origin and a guarantee of appearing at some later date. John opted to sweat it out. Meanwhile, Linda and relatives were patiently waiting downstairs, knowing nothing of this change in plans. So John was taken to makeup, treated to a lunch and then taken to the taping studio. His family sat in the special section reserved for famiUes of contestants, still not knowing if John would be selected. Four shows were taped and John had not had a chance to draw for inclusion as a contestant. Then it finally happened—and he was selected for the last taping. He drew first position, played the games but can't remember the details. He was the winner for the day with $1,800. "If nothing else, I was content. It had been neat," he recalls. And then the production stopped. The Eugsters went on vacation and on their return had a message to return to the game show on Aug. 26. John won that show, too, including a bonus round. Linda and daughter Jennifer will appear on the end of that taping which will be aired Monday, After a break for a change of clothing, John appeared for a third show and, in his words, didn't do so well. But it was far from a total loss. He walked away with cash and prizes totaling $39,250. He says he was told he must wait up to 120 days to receive MS^ payment. Of course there's the matter of income tax; California takes ten percent off the top and the total amoimt is considered as income. "Taxes wilt be quite extensive," John notes, but the smile and euphoria t^. main strong. "It was such a unique experience," he continues. "It ranks right up there with ge^ ting married or returning from Vietnam." The obUgatory question from this reporter: did he get to chat with Vanna White? Yes indeed£ and with Sajak, too—both very down-to-earth people according to John. "There's a lot of the actual taping that I don't remember details about," he frankly admits. 'The jitters set in after solving the puzzles." With this admitted, he and Linda are: eager to see the taping to fill in the blanks associated with' the experience and to reUve those exciting moments f fame and—yes, fortune as well. Art-in-the-Park welcomes volunteers Thank you for the response to our call for baked goods and food booth volunteers. We still have more openings for volunteers and of course we can uise all the delicious baked goods we can get. Remember that the homemade baked goods sale is 100 percent profit for our hospital. There will be a drive-up drop-off table at the comer of Utah and Colorado Streets from? a.m. to 10 a.m. both days for your convenience. Any questions, call Jan or Dahiene, 293-6322 or 293-0651. Local resident seeks assistance There's at least one resident living in Boulder City who hasn't found the community to be responsive to her plea for assistance. Mrs. Allen is confined to her mobile home in Gingerwood. Unable to get out to shop, etc., she has been seeking a companion to live in her mobile home at no cost in return for assistance in running errands, ete — Though she has contacted organizations, individuals and run an ad in the News, nothing to date has proved successful. She is urgently in need of such help and asks anyone interested in accepting her offer to please phone her ait 293-4258. y.. Anne Passmore celeBrates 101st birthday Happy Birthday with Mariellyn and Dave Potnar HAPPY 101 TO ANNE PASSMORE-Yesterday marked the lOlst birthday for local resident Anne Passmore. As in recent years, a birthday celebration in her honor was held at McDonald's on Nevada Highway in Boulder City where friends wished Anne a most pleasant day. New owners of the local McDonald's, Dave and Mariellyn Potnar hosted the event begun by former owners Ernie and Joy Reyna. Another birthday party will be held today at St. Jude's Ranch in her honor. • CROSSWORD PUZZLE 1 10 "Trw-" 14 On a Mi It 47 n kiMoo^ I? np i 20 tkmUpen • -" 82'M* 24 SoMvy 80 LMHito 21 uom M LMMOtll 00 MMktta •ueior 60 ttrakwd m Plntnoa^ •1 13 21 as Mm dtduettoM as ei OUgwdMt ai r at 2t ofoM 91 EuohMMie 33 Otfw 34 AmM 36 3t Sy goo at AwMT 40 Pufeoltar •: kigt 41 Ctwno* 42 Ttanm • wb 44 OfMoy 46 Elooalor 4a om a Oovtdola gnup 3 ftfwH •My 4 CMtlNtr rtthtO t EmpttMiM t DMOWUI 7 PMnI •unto t Typnwa t to* 40 10 ChofiM hom40 11 Sla 12 ThougM 32 Atlaryouno yd old 34 RmwwOi In piMino 37 "NaugWy -" 41 War god 43 Conaumad rup 41 47 Soltdrtnk 4t Mtiaoal ajrt-lOordsof lOisdom aa tduettha eftb$htut. Itkbta$riosl^wiiite /bot tbMB w/tt the toagoe. 0 0* Ifyov wouM go to tk top. IMK, §o to tkt bo tt on, 0 0 0 00 61 Offlyino: praf. 62 HaMll'a •talabhd 63 TrMnpM at aun growth IM it bat aa arrow. Xaowwkataurtloaimat, bom tomoAo bow, tbca draw H aad kt k go. 0 0 0 If you dea't kaow, aak. Yoa taay bo a fool for a raoaimu, bat a wimraaafor the rtit of yoar Mfe. 0 0 0 Otat arabUoB It the pattha ofagrmtebaractar. 0 0 0 To Mve It Bot oaly to hara, bat to apply. Bvatymatter of propor tiilatitam appacatha. Lead oaly what yoa caa afford to hee. Lott oolony, aa BaiUah (157) off tlM of North CvoUna, diMppMNd without a tnot. It wti fouadod to 117 Nttkn tod by John White and tpoQiorad by Sir Walter lul^dt. SuppHai ran out and WUte vititad Bngland for haip. When he rtnmed in 1S90, the oolony had diiappoarad. • • Maimottidat was a foremoct medieval Jewiih philoaopher. He wu bora in Muuiai Spain, but penecution drove hie famlhr to leave the country. They eventually settled near Caiix> in Btypt, where Maimonidei became renowned at a court phytidan to Saladin. • • • Mandarin wai the name of nine gradei of important dvil lervantt or military offldali in Imperial China. Mandarin Chmete, formerly an upper-claie hmguafe, it now the ofndal national tonguate of China, though many dialecu itill eidtt. Q. I have Juit started my lophomore year of coUeie, and have alwayi wondered what the word lophomwk meaniT The adjective lophomoric ii an interceting word. It it used to deacribe the overconfldence and intellectual pretensions that are typical of someone who hat a Uttk bit of knowtodre. but not quite enough to be eontidend an authority. The word it a combination of two Greek words tophos (wisw, and moroe (fooUsh). from which we get the word moron. In other words, a sophomore to a wite fool. • IStS, Tribun* kMI* tiwt^n HMideraott HOOM News. BmUder City News, Oreaa Val^y Nawa Pag* ^ MflQICWORD jNwIieiiewal ilheMllelMtMMMrtafi \ IHIa VIMIIlMltIV OT Ml I ywr MMMWONB. ALL ELICnONICS (aal.t 11 Mtaia) A—Adaptor. Audio; B—Battery; C—Cabk. Chip. Circuit. Oarnp, Coaxtol. Ciyital: D—Data, Digital, Dinuncr, Diode; F-Pute; G—Gain, Oaufe; H—Hookup; I—Impcdaaoe; J—Jack, Juice; K~Knob; L-Labd, Link; M—Meter, MiUiampt; N-Notoe; O-Ohmt, Output; P-PUer, Phii; l—Ractinar. ReUy, Reaittor; t~Socket. Solder, SpUtter, Syttem; T-T^w. Tanninalt, Toggto; V-Velocity, Voltage; W-Watt. Wire Thto Weak'B Aaaww: TRANMSTOK • iHUrthwwl MDI O BI EL TMLE EMI L REPL ERRI I VEE ESD LI O OSI CTD I OT RTRE S YST AYRE F I T C E I TALT OOOTT BALNS ATS YR I EREA LAP J L UI MBS ATASO TCLMU ORCOP AES UF UPTUO OATLO EMS LA TTABR I UCR A WOE I KAL CCXA EHI Y NI AO TPLP LDBR NOI 8 UKOO S SMH ROLI VJ UI NI MR ETPA I C MR PE ET DT AI NL CP BS HO OC NK CE BT DA > tMli f MV WWilf #M lafem DEGEWD n • IMt. TrttMMM MtOla twylcM Print NOWanangene craeoMBtra s tMm ttie eivpiiee anewefi at auQ* gaeteoDy ate above cartoon. Ni:"rrTTTT Antwar VIPER f^vEN PLOWED WEDQED Aneww: Whatalongharddaymnlatanudlsleanv to not Iha^ be-"AFIINQ'' I Juu wi w mtond I dMn't Amah my drink." I'l^|[>)i;i I'IMIIIUi NPIIIJ I'liMiii MUini" i;iiiriH \'\t\x\\i iiiiti 'X itii.ii'i iii.'iuiiiiii'iiiiri (iMrirK-ihi kit Kill illiM(>l MI.IMMIIIl lIMI'iril liil.lil l'lt:|MkUi IIMklU .IMMril MftlikI Hllll'ltl.l riMiiri Miillli IKIMI'I Ullll'lkiri nrii']i:iiikh'i.i Mi.'iri.u'iki MMIIIO Ml ll'lli kU'iMI'll llil (:|l'IMMti.l kUII'K'l rilH'iklHI fliillkl MOUiki HI HUH) liFllh'J PMII'III I'lMMfU-i [irililt
PAGE 39

• mm tm More Boulder City news Thursday, September 28, 1969 ThwWHUy, Septeiiwr 28,1989 Page 38, Henderson Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News of Fortune' 7 p.m. Friday on Channel 3 m iiHiiinr II •'•%# • ^*^mM iiS^f"^' s:mmmmmmmm • • • -• •> ^ #'"' • • • ^f^i^Pi ^s^wisasj^by Bill Harbour There used to be a saying that •the human brain was a wonderful thing; it begins functioning the moment we are born and •never stops until we appear on a quiz program. Well, that wasn't the case with local resident John .Eugster when he had the opJohn in action portunity to appear on Wheel of Fortune, though he does admit that some of the details of the actual taping kind of escaped his ability to recall them later. What he does remember is that when it was all over, he had won $39,250 and that his feet didn't touch the ground again for several days. When this interview was done a week or so later, his remembrance of the event sent him off into another state of euphoria as though he were winning the game all over again. It will probably be the same again tomorrow when his appearance on the game show airs on Channel 3 at 7 p.m. At that time, you'll discover that John was a winner and appeared on a second show which will air Monday night and that hell triumph still again to appear for a third time on Tuesday's show. Of course the time sequence wasn't quite the same during the actual taping. Five shows -one week's worth-were taped in a single day. So John actually played three shows worth of games back-to-back as it were, with a brief break between bouts to change clothing, etc. It all started back in February when an announcement was flashed on the TV tube during the game show inviting people to audition in Las Vegas to be contestants on the show. John's wife, Linda, encouraged John to try out. She made repeated phone calls before getting through and booked times for both of them to attend auditions to be held at Bally's Grand. On the appointed day, they both went for tryouts. Linda doesn't comment too much on her attempts other than to say she didn't survive the cuts. John went later that day. There was a questionnaire to fill out, a written test to be completed and 15 puzzles to solve puzzles with consonants but no vowels included. A five minute time limit was imposed; John passed the hurdle. Then came a break and the group was asked who would like to play Pat Sajak, the MC of the evening show. John volunteered and ran a raffle for the other contestants. "I kind of hammed it up," he remembers with a wide grin. It was time for the cuts; John survived and joined the other successful applicants in playing mock Wheel games. Another cut and still John was in the running. He returned the following day to play more mock games, then was sent home with the message "We'U call you." Well, in a week or so a letter arrived conHrming his selection and requesting contact as to what months he would be available for taping. Being a school teacher, he chose June, July and August. Then time passed by. It would be in July when he received a call telling him -to report to CBS-T% in Hollywood on Aug. 13. The moment of truth wafi drawing near. The Eugsters taped Wheel of Fortune shows and John says he had dreams about appearing. Finally the appointed day arrived and he and his family headed for California. John says it could have been called a Heartbreak Trip as it turned out. He was taken upstairs in the studio building and told there was good news and bad news. The good news was that contestants winning on a particular show could now return again; the bad news was this meant fewer new contestants would be needed. Of the 11 contestants summoned, only two or perhaps one would be used. They were offered round-trip tickets for two back to their point of origin and a guarantee of appearing at some later date. John opted to sweat it out. Meanwhile, Linda and relatives were patiently waiting downstairs, knowing nothing of this change in plans. So John was taken to makeup, treated to a lunch and then taken to the taping studio. His family sat in the special section reserved for famiUes of contestants, still not knowing if John would be selected. Four shows were taped and John had not had a chance to draw for inclusion as a contestant. Then it finally happened—and he was selected for the last taping. He drew first position, played the games but can't remember the details. He was the winner for the day with $1,800. "If nothing else, I was content. It had been neat," he recalls. And then the production stopped. The Eugsters went on vacation and on their return had a message to return to the game show on Aug. 26. John won that show, too, including a bonus round. Linda and daughter Jennifer will appear on the end of that taping which will be aired Monday, After a break for a change of clothing, John appeared for a third show and, in his words, didn't do so well. But it was far from a total loss. He walked away with cash and prizes totaling $39,250. He says he was told he must wait up to 120 days to receive MS^ payment. Of course there's the matter of income tax; California takes ten percent off the top and the total amoimt is considered as income. "Taxes wilt be quite extensive," John notes, but the smile and euphoria t^. main strong. "It was such a unique experience," he continues. "It ranks right up there with ge^ ting married or returning from Vietnam." The obUgatory question from this reporter: did he get to chat with Vanna White? Yes indeed£ and with Sajak, too—both very down-to-earth people according to John. "There's a lot of the actual taping that I don't remember details about," he frankly admits. 'The jitters set in after solving the puzzles." With this admitted, he and Linda are: eager to see the taping to fill in the blanks associated with' the experience and to reUve those exciting moments f fame and—yes, fortune as well. Art-in-the-Park welcomes volunteers Thank you for the response to our call for baked goods and food booth volunteers. We still have more openings for volunteers and of course we can uise all the delicious baked goods we can get. Remember that the homemade baked goods sale is 100 percent profit for our hospital. There will be a drive-up drop-off table at the comer of Utah and Colorado Streets from? a.m. to 10 a.m. both days for your convenience. Any questions, call Jan or Dahiene, 293-6322 or 293-0651. Local resident seeks assistance There's at least one resident living in Boulder City who hasn't found the community to be responsive to her plea for assistance. Mrs. Allen is confined to her mobile home in Gingerwood. Unable to get out to shop, etc., she has been seeking a companion to live in her mobile home at no cost in return for assistance in running errands, ete — Though she has contacted organizations, individuals and run an ad in the News, nothing to date has proved successful. She is urgently in need of such help and asks anyone interested in accepting her offer to please phone her ait 293-4258. y.. Anne Passmore celeBrates 101st birthday Happy Birthday with Mariellyn and Dave Potnar HAPPY 101 TO ANNE PASSMORE-Yesterday marked the lOlst birthday for local resident Anne Passmore. As in recent years, a birthday celebration in her honor was held at McDonald's on Nevada Highway in Boulder City where friends wished Anne a most pleasant day. New owners of the local McDonald's, Dave and Mariellyn Potnar hosted the event begun by former owners Ernie and Joy Reyna. Another birthday party will be held today at St. Jude's Ranch in her honor. • CROSSWORD PUZZLE 1 10 "Trw-" 14 On a Mi It 47 n kiMoo^ I? np i 20 tkmUpen • -" 82'M* 24 SoMvy 80 LMHito 21 uom M LMMOtll 00 MMktta •ueior 60 ttrakwd m Plntnoa^ •1 13 21 as Mm dtduettoM as ei OUgwdMt ai r at 2t ofoM 91 EuohMMie 33 Otfw 34 AmM 36 3t Sy goo at AwMT 40 Pufeoltar •: kigt 41 Ctwno* 42 Ttanm • wb 44 OfMoy 46 Elooalor 4a om a Oovtdola gnup 3 ftfwH •My 4 CMtlNtr rtthtO t EmpttMiM t DMOWUI 7 PMnI •unto t Typnwa t to* 40 10 ChofiM hom40 11 Sla 12 ThougM 32 Atlaryouno yd old 34 RmwwOi In piMino 37 "NaugWy -" 41 War god 43 Conaumad rup 41 47 Soltdrtnk 4t Mtiaoal ajrt-lOordsof lOisdom aa tduettha eftb$htut. Itkbta$riosl^wiiite /bot tbMB w/tt the toagoe. 0 0* Ifyov wouM go to tk top. IMK, §o to tkt bo tt on, 0 0 0 00 61 Offlyino: praf. 62 HaMll'a •talabhd 63 TrMnpM at aun growth IM it bat aa arrow. Xaowwkataurtloaimat, bom tomoAo bow, tbca draw H aad kt k go. 0 0 0 If you dea't kaow, aak. Yoa taay bo a fool for a raoaimu, bat a wimraaafor the rtit of yoar Mfe. 0 0 0 Otat arabUoB It the pattha ofagrmtebaractar. 0 0 0 To Mve It Bot oaly to hara, bat to apply. Bvatymatter of propor tiilatitam appacatha. Lead oaly what yoa caa afford to hee. Lott oolony, aa BaiUah (157) off tlM of North CvoUna, diMppMNd without a tnot. It wti fouadod to 117 Nttkn tod by John White and tpoQiorad by Sir Walter lul^dt. SuppHai ran out and WUte vititad Bngland for haip. When he rtnmed in 1S90, the oolony had diiappoarad. • • Maimottidat was a foremoct medieval Jewiih philoaopher. He wu bora in Muuiai Spain, but penecution drove hie famlhr to leave the country. They eventually settled near Caiix> in Btypt, where Maimonidei became renowned at a court phytidan to Saladin. • • • Mandarin wai the name of nine gradei of important dvil lervantt or military offldali in Imperial China. Mandarin Chmete, formerly an upper-claie hmguafe, it now the ofndal national tonguate of China, though many dialecu itill eidtt. Q. I have Juit started my lophomore year of coUeie, and have alwayi wondered what the word lophomwk meaniT The adjective lophomoric ii an interceting word. It it used to deacribe the overconfldence and intellectual pretensions that are typical of someone who hat a Uttk bit of knowtodre. but not quite enough to be eontidend an authority. The word it a combination of two Greek words tophos (wisw, and moroe (fooUsh). from which we get the word moron. In other words, a sophomore to a wite fool. • IStS, Tribun* kMI* tiwt^n HMideraott HOOM News. BmUder City News, Oreaa Val^y Nawa Pag* ^ MflQICWORD jNwIieiiewal ilheMllelMtMMMrtafi \ IHIa VIMIIlMltIV OT Ml I ywr MMMWONB. ALL ELICnONICS (aal.t 11 Mtaia) A—Adaptor. Audio; B—Battery; C—Cabk. Chip. Circuit. Oarnp, Coaxtol. Ciyital: D—Data, Digital, Dinuncr, Diode; F-Pute; G—Gain, Oaufe; H—Hookup; I—Impcdaaoe; J—Jack, Juice; K~Knob; L-Labd, Link; M—Meter, MiUiampt; N-Notoe; O-Ohmt, Output; P-PUer, Phii; l—Ractinar. ReUy, Reaittor; t~Socket. Solder, SpUtter, Syttem; T-T^w. Tanninalt, Toggto; V-Velocity, Voltage; W-Watt. Wire Thto Weak'B Aaaww: TRANMSTOK • iHUrthwwl MDI O BI EL TMLE EMI L REPL ERRI I VEE ESD LI O OSI CTD I OT RTRE S YST AYRE F I T C E I TALT OOOTT BALNS ATS YR I EREA LAP J L UI MBS ATASO TCLMU ORCOP AES UF UPTUO OATLO EMS LA TTABR I UCR A WOE I KAL CCXA EHI Y NI AO TPLP LDBR NOI 8 UKOO S SMH ROLI VJ UI NI MR ETPA I C MR PE ET DT AI NL CP BS HO OC NK CE BT DA > tMli f MV WWilf #M lafem DEGEWD n • IMt. TrttMMM MtOla twylcM Print NOWanangene craeoMBtra s tMm ttie eivpiiee anewefi at auQ* gaeteoDy ate above cartoon. Ni:"rrTTTT Antwar VIPER f^vEN PLOWED WEDQED Aneww: Whatalongharddaymnlatanudlsleanv to not Iha^ be-"AFIINQ'' I Juu wi w mtond I dMn't Amah my drink." I'l^|[>)i;i I'IMIIIUi NPIIIJ I'liMiii MUini" i;iiiriH \'\t\x\\i iiiiti 'X itii.ii'i iii.'iuiiiiii'iiiiri (iMrirK-ihi kit Kill illiM(>l MI.IMMIIIl lIMI'iril liil.lil l'lt:|MkUi IIMklU .IMMril MftlikI Hllll'ltl.l riMiiri Miillli IKIMI'I Ullll'lkiri nrii']i:iiikh'i.i Mi.'iri.u'iki MMIIIO Ml ll'lli kU'iMI'll llil (:|l'IMMti.l kUII'K'l rilH'iklHI fliillkl MOUiki HI HUH) liFllh'J PMII'III I'lMMfU-i [irililt
PAGE 40

mi P'm* ^, Hcndanon Home News, Boulder City News, Green VeUe y New v^^nri Thvnday. September 28,1989 Legal Notices Mm^NVIMIlM tmn • mam IWr TaMa, ,NVIMIUS I Raftara, 1M Cbasl,NVUMI1MC T .NVUakUM IIM Mi^ M nw ,NVUBme 'fteM^^o^^ B^^^B eu4 AldM lihMMalpaMk MM Msi^^ M CB^ "-• •MfV CASH ONLY H—iegt 1, 26^. Oct. 3,1X9 ^ITY or BOULDER CITY A Maaidpal Corporation 900 AHnna Street BMUST City, Nevada 89005 NOTICE INVITING BIDS The City of Boulder City. Nevada will rMeive bids for the following: 24 Tone of Tarf Grass Fertilizer Specifications and bid forms may be obtained at tbe Pinaace Departmeat, City Hall, 900 Arizona Street, Boulder City, Nevada 89005. Sealed bids for such will be received at the office of the Finance Director until 2:30 p.m. on October 12,1989 when they will be opeaed and read aloud in the City Council Chambers. Boulder City retains the right to reject any and all bids, to waive any informality in bidding, and to accept any bid deemed most advantageous to the City. Robert E. Boyer Finance Director PubUshed: Boujder City News September 28, 1989 B-9/28/89 BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA NOTICE OF APPLICATION An appUcaUon, Menlifled as Docket No, 89-864, has been filed with the Public Service Commission of Nevada ("Commission") bj Clark County, Department of Public Works ("Applicant") for authority to construct an "atgrade" crossing for the re-allgnmenl of Sunset Road to accommodate for the expansion of the McCarran International Airport. Tlie appllcaUon was filed puraaiwt U Nevada Rcvtssd Statutes 704JOO • 704JOS and Nevada Admlnislriilvc Code ("NAC") 703.455. NAC 703.475 gives tlieCommlssloatheaulhorIty to deny the appMcatlon or to grant It In whole or in part and to hold a hearing If necessary. The application Is on file and available for public viewing at the offices of the Commission, 727 Falrvlcw Drive, Carson City, Nevada 89710 and the Alexander Dawson Building, 4045 South Spencer, Suite A-44, Las Vegas, Nevada 89158. Interested and affected persons may commenl In writing to the Commission and file appropriate Protests and/or Petitions for Leave to Intervene at either of the Commission's offices on or before Wednesday, Octoiwr 11, 1989. \ ^ By the Commission, WILLIAM H. VANCE, Commiadon Secretary Dated: Carson City, Nevada 9/19/89 (SEAL) H—Sept ]>, 1989 The boM flats his or har titla from the Dutch baas meaning the hea d of the household, chief of overseer. BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA NOTICE OF APPLICATION BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA, NOTICE OF APPLICATION An applicalion, Menlifled as Docket No. 89-841, has been filed with the Public Service Commission of Nevada ("Commission") by Yellow/Checker Package Delivery for a change In rates u well as the number of zones Involved snd services offered. Applicant seeks revisions to Its existing tariffs to reflect the addition of new services, a reduction In the number of zones and a revision of lb rates. The revised Uriff Is filed pursuant to Nevada Revised Statutes ("NRS") 704J21 and Nevada Administrative Code ("NAC") 703.215. The application te on flic and available for public viewing at the offices of the Commission, 727 Falrview Drive, Carson City, Nevada 8971tf and the Alexander Dawson Building,4045 South Speaccr, SulU A-44, Las Vegas, Nevada 89158. Interested and affected persons may comment In writing to the Commission and file appro' priau ProtesU and/or Petitions for Leave to Intervene at either of the Commission's ofTlces on or btfA-e Wednesday, October 11, 1989. By Uic Commission, HILLIAM H. VANCE, Commission Secretary Dated: Carson City, Nevada 9/18/89 (SEAL) H—Sept 28, ljg9 BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA NOTICE OF APPLICATION An application, identified as Docket No. 89-865, has been filed with the Public Service Commission of Nevada ("Commission") by Clark County, Department of Publk Works ("Applicant") for authority to construct an"at-grade"crassingon Warm Springs Roads to accommodate for the re-constructlon of Warm Springs Road to a 100 foot rightof-way street.. The application was filed pursuant to Nevada Revised SUtutes 704300 • 704J05 and Nevada Administrative Code ("NACmO.460. NAC 703.475 gives the Commission the authority to deny the application or to grant It In whole or In part and to hold a hearing if necessary. The application Is on file and available for public viewing at the offices of the Commission, 727Falrvlew Drive,Carson City, Nevada 89710 and the Alexander Dawson Building, 4045 South Spencer, Suite A-44, Las Vegas, Nevada 89158. Interested and affected persons may comment in writing to Ihe Commission and file appropriate Protests and/or Petitions for lycave to Intervene at either of the Commission's offices on or before Wednesday, October II, 1989 By tlic Commission, WILLIAM H. VANCE, Commission Secretary Dated: Carson City, Nevada 9/19/89 (SEAL) H-Sept 28,1989 Nevada Power Company ("NPC^ has filed an appiicaUon, designated ii Docket No. 89-917, with the Public Service Commission of Nevada ("Commission"). In lU applkation, NPC seeks an order fTom the Commission authorizing the issuance of up to 100,000 shares of commonstock $i 00 par value shares under a 401 (k) savings plan for all employets of NPC effective January I, 1990. The application was (lied pursuant to NRS 704J22 to 704J28. The application is on file and available for public viewing at die offices of the Commission, 727FalrvlewDrive,CareonCity, Nevada 89710 and the Alexander Dawson Building, 4045 South Spencer, Suite A-44, Las Vegas, Nevada 89158. Interested and affected persons may comment In writing to the Commission and file appropriate Protests and/or PeUtlons for Leave to Intervene at either of the Commission's offices on or before Wednesday, October II, 1989 By the Comml.lon, WILLIAM H. VANCE, Commission Secretary Dated: Carson City, Nevada September 18,1989 (SEAL) H—Sept 28,1989 BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA NOTICE OF APPLICATION An application. Identified as Docket No. 89-866 has been filed with the Public Service Commission of Nevada ("Commission") by Clark County, Department of Public Works ("Applicant") for authority to re-construct an existing "at-grade" crossing on I^stern Avenue to accommodate for the re-cunstruction of iCastem Avenue In a 100 foot right-of-way street. The application was filed pursuant to Nevada Revised Statutes 704J00 704J0S and Nevada Administrative Code ("NAC") 703.460. NAC 703.475 gives Ihe Commission Ihe au' tborlty to deny the application or to grant it In whole or In part and to hold a hearing if necessary. The application is on file and available for public viewing at the oflices of the Commission, 727 Fairvlew Drive, Carson City, Nevada 89710 and the Alexander Dawson Building,4045 South Spencer, Suite A-44, Las Vegas, Nevada 89158. Interested and affected persons may comment in writing to the Commission and file appropriate Protests and/or Petitions for Leave to Intervene at either of the Commission's offices on or before Wednesday, Octol>er II, 1989 By the Commission, WILLL\M H. VANCE, Commission Secretary Dated: Canon City, Nevada 9/19/89 (SEAL) H—Sept 28,1989 SOUTHERN SEGMENT. LAS VEGAS BELTWAY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STUDY AREA AND INFORMATIONAL MEETING LOCATIONS HEhTDERSON 5^ CONVENTION CENTER OCTOBER 12,1989 200 W/DERSTTRANSPORTATION NOTICE INFORMATIONAL MEETINGS of Tr.--J?!.''**!!!^il!l*'^' AdaUaistratloa (FHWAX hi coopcrathM with the Nevada Department /PKw^^ .^ ''^^ • "" "•^ <^**"'y' • • ''" • • • work oe aa EavlronUi Impact SUiement (t; ror UN soathcra segment of the Las Vcgu Beltway. Thb EIS wlB conMer alternative ft-eeway •NgnmenU and other traasparution altemaUres between US WBimUtr Highway oa the east and uuraago Road on the west ia aa area between Tropicaaa Aveaiie oa OM aorth and Cactus Road on the A series of InformaUonal Mcctiagi wUI be held on Ihe datas aad ia the locations shown on the accompanying location sketch. ^^ The purpose of these meetings will be to brief bilcreatcd iadhiduals, grwips, and agencies cwKemln g proposal aliernaUves and to receive Input on their pcrceptioa at the scope of issues to be aeertsM la Iha savb^menUI study. Members of the public arc iavlted to attend the meeting at their €• anyitoie during Ihe meeting boars (3 to > p.m.) aad sebmil UMir commente in writing on a csmsM sai provided at the meeting or la persaa to a pubUc steaograpber who will be avaihibic MrMgaoui the meeliag. This meeting format will tecrease the opportanity for pabHc commenl and prnvlde feroneMia-oae discussioa with staff bivelvcd wMi tbe project „J** ^ • • B>Mon Asdsuacc aad Keal Property Aefaliitioa Policies Act of 1970 will SirJ^-^r^lL"'.!:!"'*"^*'' "•••'^ '* •*• • f^i^ W^it-afway acquUUon cannot ^l^!^Tr m Ji^ '•'•<• i right-sTway acquisltioa aad relocation assisUnce can be ^^ r""."" *""" "•• Nevada Deparimenl at Tyaasportatlon, Blght-of-Way Office, 123 Washiagton Street, Us Vegai. Nevada, Phone (702) 385.6540. '^"""^'^ "•"*' _-. w. • "f *** • "7 **eats received at the Informational MeeClis, written commeaU also c !!?^ • '*'*'*•*•'^*"'*^'''^"^ 26,1989. Such comme.to*oald be sent to WaH Wagner Sapervlsor, Ea<4roamcaUI Services divWoa. Nevada Dcpartnent of TrsasportaUoa, U63 South SlawartStrsat. Carson City, Nevada 89712. -r"—. -> H-Sept.l4. 21. 28. 1989. Focas ON SENIORS by Meradltli Cameron Advanced Technology Omtrary to popular bebef, older Americans are not generally resistant to new or advanced technology. The reason they have not adopted such new technologies is because much of it is not geared to their specific needs. For example, let's take the automated bank teller. Wliile it is designed for the convenience and time saving sought by many, these technologies simply do not apply to older people's lives. Instead, older Americans have a tiesire to stay active and to fill time in a way that helps keep them in touch with others. They enjoy the personal encounter with the teller, and they certainly have plenty of time for it. The difference in interest is related to the direct benefits the products offer the aging. Some report a strong need to keep up with technological developments, while others prefer the safer and surer methods. The main preoccupation with the older generation, and rightfully so. is with their health, and their determination to avoid becoming burdens to their families and friends. There is no question that older persons wish to maintain their social ties and preserve their inidependence. Healthy, elderly individuals may require assistance with the tasks of daily living, tasks which often become difficult, but not impossible, to {jerform. There is a wide array of services which can be customized to suit the needs of older persons, allowing them to maintain their independence and remain as active as possible. CI rowing old does not mean that you cannot still stay in charge. It does not mean that your memor>', your .sense of pride, and your zest for life are gone. Many simply refuse to surrender their independence. They may need assistance, but they are not totally helpless. Retirement, or aging, does not mean pulling back from life. It is discovering new ways to grow old with grac-e and dignity. Religion Henderaon Home New, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Page 41 • •^i "•& Active partnership with God' message Rev. John Osko, Pastor of First Baptist Church, has chosen for the title of his message this Sunday morning "Active Partnership With God." His Scripture text is I Corinthians 3:9. Special music will include John W. Peterson's "He's the One!", sung in duet by Bettye Hansen and Carl Henderson; and selections by the First Baptist Church Chorale. The celebration of the Lord's Supper will be a part of this Worship Hour. The Worship Hour begins at 11:00 a.m. First Baptist Church is located at 47 East Atlantic Avenue, Henderson, Sunday School classes for all ages begin at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School teachers' meeting is at 9:05 a.m. Children's Churftli time, for children 2 years of age through Kindergarten, is held during the Morning Worship Hour. A Nursery is provided for infants and children up to 2 years of age. Junior High and Senior High Youth meetings are at 5:00 p.m. on Sundays, under the leadership of Don and Amanda Blondeaux and Jon and Joanne Bradley, This week, First Baptist Church launches a church-wide program for achieving excellence in Bible study. It combines three disciplines and three dimensions in Bible study: (1) expository teacing of the book of I John this Sunday evening at 6:00 p.m. Introductory Group studies also begin this week on,Tuesday and Thursday evenings at 7:00-8:00 p.m. Tuesday Study Group meets in the home of Henry and Linda Beaston, under the leadership of Jay Henderson. Thursday Study Group meets in the home of Bob and Mary Morris, vmder the leadership of Dan Young. Study books are available for self-study at the group meetings or at the church. 'Tree to Be Thin" Bible study group meets on Thursday evenings at the home of Don and Amanda Blondeaux. This is a study applying biblical princliples of thinking and eating for weight control. "One Year Bible Reading" group meets on Wednesday evenings from 6:00 to 6:30 p.m. at the church. Chorale rehearsals are on Sunday eveningsioUowing theEvening Service and on Wednesday evenings at 6:30 p.m. Pastor Osko and congregation invite you to worshjp and study with them this week. For additional information, please call 565-9511. CONGRATULATIONS-Mayor Loma Kesterson congratulates Christine Johnson on her recent selection as Miss Nevada Pre-Teen. Johnson was chosen from a field of 10 applicants and will go to Bradenton, Fla., next week to represent the state in national competition. Photo by Bn Baker DAVID L. HOLDEN David L. Holden, 62, a resident of Henderson since 1945, died Tuesday. He was bom June 4, 1927, in Litchfield, lU. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and a meat cutter for a^ grocery store. He was a member of Amalgamated Meat Cutters Union & Butchers Local #457, V.F.W. Post Boulder City. Survivors included his wife, Wilma Holden of Henderson; two sons, Jim Holden of Henderson and David Holden of Las Vegas; his sister, Audrey Wallace of 111. and one grandchild. Private Services are scheduled for 11 a.m. Saturday at Palm Chapel in Henderson. Basic High Sciiool CLASS OF '59 REUNION Who put the Bop In the Bop-sh-Bop-sh-Bop? Who put the Lang in Lang-a-Lang-a-Lang Ding Dong We did 30 Years Ago!! Now We're Back ^ 9| for our 30th reunion ^ OCT. 12-1344, 1989 Missing classmates Legal Notices V ~ > Bob Albert Leonard Bloomgreen Evan Bridgewater Colleen Brooks Butterworth Patricia Burt Shoemal(er Billie Cureton Leany Wayne Deane Esle Gallegos Crane Larry Giles Mason Gebe Linda Pollock Shamblin Fay Long Williams Bob Russell Gary Shaw Joyce McKectnie IMelvin Means Gary Mears Charles Nason Wanda Reynolds Dinkins Ronald Weaver Jack Kerkuta Ron Kaylor BASIC HIGH ALUMNI & TEACHERS INVITED TO NO HOST COCKTAIL PARTY OCT. 14 AT BLACK MOUNTAIN COUNTRY CLUB. CALL US IF YOU KNOW WHERE OUR MISSING FRIENDS ARE OR FOR MORE INFORMATION Lois Korthius Foster • 585-7983 Fred Rottiwell • 564-5683 • j I ; 'A .\ i PUBLIC HEARING CITY COUNCIL OF BOULDER CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS. 900 ARIZONA STREET BOULDER CITY, NEVADA TUESDAY, OCTOBER 10,1960-7:00 P.M. TO CONSIDER BIU NO. 949. TO VACATE SAN SIMEON WAY, AND OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELATING THERETO. A COPY OP BILL NO. 949 MAY BE OBTAINED IN THE CITY CLERK'S OFFICE. B-Sept. 28,1989 A 1978 Alfa-RoHiM Via: llM1770003584,aMiOMlMU wHI be wM to dM hlgliMt bidder for iMM pajMcnl of itar• • rent. Lkciii* platar MMM, RtgitUrad OWMT: IWIWOWII, Lt|al owMr: UakMwn. PlKcd • Morift &j Lo Muicjr, 909 WilMl, BovMcr cMy, NV 89005 Noilcc It htnbj givM thi( I, Pirfc Plaza, of 1553 rootMl Drive, Boulder City, Nevada 89005 will Mil ihe abmrc menllMiad aHiamobilc and contenii on Salnrda;, October li, 1989 at 2 pjn., at Park Plaxa, 1553 FooUin Drive, Boulder Ckj, Nevada 89005. Wc reaerve Ihe right to bid. B-Sept. 21,28, Get 5,1989 BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA In Re Application of Nevada Power Company for Order Authorizing Recovery of Expenaes for aixtfa reaoarce plan. Docket No. 89467 NOTICE OF HEARING Nevada Power Company ("Applicant") haa filed an application with the Public Service Commimion of Nevada f'Commiai") for an order authorizing the recovery of expenses incurred in developing its sixth Resource Plan. The application has been designated as Docltet No. 89-867. Applicant seeks authority to adjust its base tariff general rate to include a base cost rate for the recovery of ongoing costs incurred in developing its plan for resources and to amortize the accumulated coats incurred in developing its plan for resources. The net effect of the application, if approved by the Commission, would be to increaae biUlngs for electricity used during the twelve months beginning June 1,1990 by $2,107,624, assuming the same consumption by applicant's customers as in the twelve months from July 1, 1988 to June 30, 1989.The apUcation ia on file and available for viewing by the public at the offices of the Commission, 727 Fairview Drive, Carson City. Nevada 89710 and the Alexander Dawson Building, 4045 South Spencer, Suite A-44, Las Vegas, Nevada 89158. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing in this matter will commence as follows: TUESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1989 10:00 a.iii. Offices of the Public Service Commission 4045 S. Spencer Street. Suite A-44 Las Vegas, Nevada 89158 when and where all interested parties may appear and be heard. If necessary, the hearing will continue on Wednesday, October 25, 1989 at the same time and place. The Commission has authority to hold a hearing on this matter pursuant to Nevada Revised Statutes ("NRS") 704.110. Issues to be considered at the hearing will include, but are not limited to, whether the Commission should find the expenses resulting from various activities conducted by NPC as part of its resource planning process are prudent and reasonable pursuant to Nevada Administrtive Code ("NAC") 704.94857(3) and whether the accounting procedures NPC utilized in ita cost recovery docket are consistent vrith the accounting procedures delineated in NAC 704.9485. By the Commission, William H. Vance, Commission Secretary Dated: Carson City, Nevada 9'22/89 (SEAL) H-Sept. 28,1989 NOTICE OF FILING Notice ia hereby given that Bill No. 949, a proposed or dinaace entitled "AN ORDINANCE VACATING SAN SIMEON WAY AND OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELATING THERETO," haa been proponed to the City Council of Boulder City, Nevada, by Councilman Ferraro, and that a copy of auch ordinance waa filed with the City Clerk on the 26th day of September, 1989, for public examination. Notice ia hereby further given that action on the proposed ordinance, or the ordinance aa amended, will be taken at a regular meeting of the City Council of Boulder City, Nevada, oa the lOtb day of October, 1989, at the hour of 7K)0 P.M., in the Council Chamber, City Hall, Boulder City, Nevada. Dated this 26th day of September, 1989. DeUa H. Estes, City Clerk (Seal) B-9/28/89 NOTICE OF FILING Notice is hereby given that Bill No. 946, a proposed ordinance entitled "AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF BOULDER CITY, NEVADA, FOR A FIXED BASE OPERATOR'S LEASE TO R.F.I.N.C., INC. AT THE BOULDER CITY MUNICIPAL AIRPORT; AND OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELATING THERETO," has been proposed to the City Council of Boulder City, Nevada, by Councilman Pilgrim, and that a copy of such ordinance was filed with the City Clerk on the 26th day of September, 1989, for public examination. Notice ia hereby further given that action on the proposed ordinance, or the ordinance as amended, will be taken at a regular meeting of the City Council of Boulder City, Nevada, on the 24th day of October. 1989, at the hour of 7:00 P.M., in the Council Chamber, City Hall, Boulder City, Nevada. Dated this 26th day of September, 1989. DeUa H. Estes, City Clerk (Seal) B-9/28/89 Legal Notkt A40roolMa7fk>wfr house trailer and-contents will be sold to the highest bidder for non payment of storage rent. License plates: none, Registered owner: unknown. Legal owner: Unknown. Maaufaclorf unit auMbcr: unkown. Placed In storage by Eari Barlley, 573 Shoshone, Boulder CItjr, Nevada 89005. Notice la hereby given that 1, Park Plaza, of 1553 FoothUI Drive, Boulder City, Nevada 89005 will sell the above mentioned House Trailer and contents on Saturday, October 21,1969 at 2 p.m., at Park Plaza, 1553 FooUiill Drive, Boulder City, Nevada 89005. We reserve the right to bid. B—S*ft. 28, Oct. 5 12,1969 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CKy Council of the CMj of Henderson will hold a publk hearing on October 17, 1989 at 7:00 pjn. in the City Council Chambers, City Hall, 240 Water Street, In Ihe City of Henderson, to consider the application of Cooper aad Brain for anAmendment to Ihe Land Use Polky Plan of the City of Henderaon to change the recommended land use from Reaidcniial to Highway Commercial on 4.80 acres more or len, generally ktcaled northeast ofOlsen Sireetand East Lake Mead Drive. ANY AND ALL Interested persons may ippear before the City Council, either In person or by counsel, and may object or express approval of ihe proposed Amendment to the Land Use Policy Plan Map uf the City of Henderson Comprehensive Plan, or may prior to the Public Hear, ing, file with the City Clerk, written objection thereto or approval thereof. THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANT to aa order made by Ihe City Council of tbe City of Henderson, Nevada, at a Regular Meeting, hcM September 19, 1989. DATED this 20th day of September, 1989 and published In the Henderson Home News 9/28/89 & 1IV5/89. DOROTHY A. VONDENBRINK, CMC, CITY CLERK H-Sept 28, Oct. 5,1989 LEGAL NOTICE INVITATION TO BID NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Ihe City Council, CMy of Hewlerson, Slate of NavMa, will receive sealed bids from qualified suppllan for the supplies or services Indicated below, at the OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK, 240WATER STREET, HENDERSON, NEVADA S9011 unUI the hour of 3:00 pjn. on Ihe 10th day of October, 1969, and said offers will be opened and publicly read at that Umc In the CMy Clerk's Conference Room, at the above address for: BID NO. 105-89*90 -FIRE nCHTlNG EQUIPMENT which must oonform to tpcdflaUfcms to be secured at the Office of the Purchasing Agent, at the above address, prior to the dale set for the bid opening. All bids must be submitted in a sealed envelope plainly marked, BID NO. 105-89*90 -FIRE nCHTlNG EQUIPMENT, with Ihe name of the bidder In the upper left hand corner and accompanied by complete spcclflcalions for the Items offered, marked to the ATTENTION OF THE CITY CLERK. AWARDS will be made on the basis of the kiwest responsive and responsible bidder, unit price, conformance to speclfkatkMis, bidder'tquallflcaiionsand bid judged to be In Uie best Interest of the public, each factor being consMered. THE CITY RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY AND/OR ALL BIDS, OR TO WAIVE ANY INFORMALITY OR IRREGULARITIES. BY ORDER OF THE CITY COUNCIL, HENDERSON, NEVADA. DOROTHY A. VONDENBRINK, CMC, CITY CLERK PUBLISHED IN THE HENDERSON HOME NEWS September 28,1989 H—Sept. 28; 1989 LEGAL NOTICE INYITA-nONTOBID NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the CHy COUMN, CMy of Henderson, StoteoTNevada, will recelva stakd bids from quallIM SMppUers for Ihe supplies or services Indicated bdow, at Ihe OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK, 240 WATER STREET, HENDERSON, NEVADA89015, uMillhehour of 3:00 pjn. on the 10th day of October, 1989, and said off^ will be opened and publicly read at that tfane In tbe City Clerfc'i Conference Room, at Ihe above sddrtas for: BID NO. 10449*90 • TRAILER MOUNTED AIR COMPRESSOR which mast conform to ipeclflcaUona to be secured at the Offlea of Ihe Purchasing Agent, at Ihe above address, prior to Ihe date set for the bM opening. An bids must be wbmltted in a sealed envelope phlnly marked, BID NO. 104-89*90 TRAILER MOUNTED AIR COMPRESSOR, with the name of the bidder In the upper left hand corner and accompanied by complete specifications for the Items offered, marked to Uie ATTENTION OF THE CITY CLERK. AWARDS will be made on the basis of Ihe towest responsive and responsible bidder, nnll price, conformance to spedflca. Uons, bidder'squsliflcation) and bM Judged to be in Ihe best Interest of ihe public, each factor being considered. THE Crrv RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY AND/OR ALL BIDS, OR TO WAIVE ANY INTORMALFFY OR IRREGULARTTIES. BY ORDER OF THE CTTY COUNCIL, HENDERSON, NEVADA. DOROTHY A. VONDENBRINK, CMC, CTTY CLERK PUBLISHED IN THE HENDERSON HOME NEWS September 28,1989 H-Sept. 2Sm9 LEGAL NOTICE INVTTATION TO BID NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the CMy Couadi, CMy of Henderson, State of Nevada, wHI receive sealed bids fhim qualified suppliers for the supplies or servlcea Indicated bdow, at die OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK, 240WATERSTREEr, HENDERSON, NEVADA 89015, until ike hour of 3:00 pjn. on the lOtb day of October, 1989, and saM offers will be opeaed and publkly read at that Ume to the CHy Clerk's Conference Room, at the above address for: BID NO. 106-89*90. ELEC"TROSTATIC PLOTTER whkh must conform to specifications to be secured at the Of. flee of the Purchasing Agent, at the above addreas, prior to the date set for the bM opening. AU bidrmust be subniltted krt sealed envelope ptehiiy marked, BID NO. 106-89*90 ELECTROSTATIC PLOTTER, with the name of the bidder In Ihe upper left hand comer and accompanied by coropleU speclflcatlons for the items offered, marked to the ATTENTION OF THE CTTY CLERK. AWARDS will be made on Ihe bails of the towest responsive and responsible bklder, unit price, conformance to speclflcations, bidder's quallflcallons and bid Judged to be In the best interest of Ihe public, each factor being considered. THE CTTY RESERVES THE RIGHTTO REJECT ANY A.VD/ OH ALL BIDS, OR TO WAIVE ANY INFORMALITY OR IRREGULARrriES. BY ORDER OF THE CTTY COVNCIL, HENDERSON, NEVADA. DOROTHY A. VONDEN. BRINK, CMC, CTTY CLERK PUBLISHED IN THE HEN. DERSON HOME NEWS September 28,1989 H—Sept. 28,1989 NOnCK OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN ttettte CMy Conndlec the City •fHwderson will hold a public bearing on October 17,1989 at !> • In Ihe CMy Council J*^>ri, aty Hal, 240 Wa•Slreet,hitkeCMyarHender•oij. toeonaJdenheappikation of Las VegMj^ Venter, for •jA-eiNhnenttolheLaadUse • • Wky Plan to chaate the rsc"" • eaded bad BSH f^ai 1^ -"ttal wMh Lh.kl Servk, Area OverUy to ResldnUiL rwte. commerdsi, cm,. PhfcaadPwNkaadSeaU-pubt^*?jr*-'-^^to flirther designate the eaU„KU M an Area of Special Master noa 2,245 acres aweerkst lMrally kwated hi Ihe aorth*^n portion of Ihe City er '^"*lTlB|soulhwt ^he North Shore Ro^iBri^ • '^"" >f IJ, 22, uiO, rw*lp 21 South, R„ge a ANT AND ALL Interested per. •< "tey appear before the City Council, either hi person or hy counsH, and may object or eipress approval of the proposed Amendneat to the Land Use Policy Plan Map of ihe City of Henderson Comprehensive Plan, or may prior to the PuMk Hearing, file with theClty Clerk, •vrluen objection thereto or approval thereof. THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN I'URSUAVT io an order made by Ihe Cily Coundl of Ihe City lit Henderson, Nevada, at a Regular .MceUng, heM Scptemtier 19,1989. DATED this 20th day of itptember, 1989 and oublished in (he Henderson Home News W28/89 & 10/5/89. JOROTHY A. VONDEN3RINK, CMC, CTTY CLERK H-^ept 28, Oct. 5.1989 Toy music boxes were first made about 1835. The eariiest tvnA. ui;.r.\^. 7 7TT~ — Z tune and were operated by a crank. ^^P** ^•''' '"""•* "'•* • '''•. They played a single Henderson City Council Agenda AGENDA Tuesday, October 3,1989 6:45 P.M. COMMITTEE MEETING HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL IS COUNCIL CHAMBER 240 WATER STREET NOTE: ALL ITEMS ARE ACTION ITEMS UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED l. CALL TO ORDER U. CONFIRMATION OF POSTING, ROLL CALL -^ ^ '" ACCEPTANCE OF AGENDA ITEMS OF BUSINESS: 16. 17. 19. m. IV. 1. BILL NO. 736 DESERT TORTOISE AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA, ESTABLISHING A NEW SECTION IN CHAPTER 18.04 ENTITLED "DESERT TORTOISE HABITAT CONSERVA-nON", AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. BILL NO. 737 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON TO REPEAL ORDINANCE NOS. 263 AND 995, DESIGNATED AS CHAPTER 2 J4 IN THE HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE, IN ITS ENTIRETY, AND CREATE A NEW CHAPTER 2.24 ENTITLED 'EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT' AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. ADJOURNMENT. AGENDA ITEMS RECEIVED AFTER 11:00 ON TUESDA, SEPTEMBER 26, 1989 WILL NOT BE SEEN ON THE AGENDA AS PUBLISHED, BUT MAY APPEAR ON THE AGENDA AS ADDED ITEMS OR ADDENDA. 20. 21 AGENDA Tuesday, October 3,1989 7:00 P.M. REGULAR MEETING HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL 22. COUNHL CHAMBER 240 WATER STREET NOTE: ALL ITEMS ARE ACTION ITEMS UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED L CALL TO ORDER n. CONFIRMA'nON OF POSTING, ROLL CALL, INVOCA-HON, PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE in. ACCEPTANCE OF AGENDA IV. PUBLIC HEARING: 1. VAC-6-89 GREEN VALLEY PKWY. Petition to Vacate Portioii of Green Valley Parkway froin Ramrod north to Duck Creek • Richard MacDonald. (NOTE: MAYOR KESTERSON WILL CALL THIS ITEM TO ORDER AND RESET THE PUBLIC HEARING). 2. VAC-7-89 DUNBAR DRIVE Petition to Vacate • Portion of Dunbar Drive • Clark County School DIstrkt CONSENT AGENDA Mayor Kesterson to Introduce the Consent Agenda offering anyone present an opportunity to remove any Items for diacusston. RECOMMENDATION MINUTES • Committee and Regular Meeting of September 5,1989; and Spcdal Meeting of September 14,1989. PAVEMENT REFUNDING AGREEMENT Green Valley Parkway C. M. Properties. AMENDMENT to Blackburn Water Main Refunding Agreement RTC Cooperative Agreement No. 161 providing funds for engineering, right-of-way, and construction of roadway improvements oo Washington Avenue, between Rancho Drive and Martin Lather Kkig Blvd. 5. SET PUBLIC HEARING Amendment to Clark County Flood Control District Master Plan. 6. SET SHOW CAUSE HEARING on License Revocation Lucky John's SakxHi and Lucky John's Pawnshop. 7. SET SHOW CAUSE HEARING on LkcMc Revocation Look laa Lounge. 8. BUDGET AUGMENTATION fran Clark CouBty/DOE Nuclear Waste sub-gnat fkiadtaig for equipment, activities, and training. 9. AWARD CONTRACT Na 89-90*07 for LorinL.Winiams Pool Renovatkw to lowest, reapoBsibie bidder. 10. AWARD BID NO. 101-a9*90 for two commercial ridli lawnmowers to ShnpaoB Nortoa Corponith. IL AWARDBIDNO.103-89*90ror22Bew and one used vehicle to the fowcst, responsible bidder. 12. AWARD BID NO. 102-89*90 for five copy machines. 13. AWARD OF CONTRACT NO. 89-90*05 for Rapid Innitratkm Basins Modincadons to Wayne's Trucking. 14. APPUCAHON flt>m Arthur S. Plunkett for ResUurant Beer aad Wlac Liccttie, dba Artic't Plzia and Wings, 4401 E. Sansct Road, 7. V. 1. 3. 4. APPLICATION from Rkhard Thurmond, Gary Thurmond and George Miller for Limiting Gaming/185 machines and Limited Gamhig Liquor Lkense, dba Royal Flush casino, 120 Market St. APPLICATION from Jerry Stotko for Package Liquor Lkense for Key Employee (DIstrkt Manager), dba Von's Companies, Inc. APPLICATION from O.B. Sports, Inc., et. al. for Recreation Club Liquor Lkense, dba Legacy Golf Club, 130 Par Excellence Dr. APPLICATION from United Coin Machine Company for Restrkted Gaming Lkensc/3 slots, dba Las Vegas Wash Laundromat, 208 No. BouMer Highway. PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDATIONS SEPTEMBER 21, 1989 • ITEMS 19 30 19. ROW-38-89 CLARK COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT Dedication of two easements for the construction of two water vaults ak>ng Leisure clrck, Sectfon 8, Township 22, Range 62 East from Clark County School DIstrkt Z-I8.80 MACK, JEROME & AMERICAN NEVADA CORP. Request from Jerome mack, et aL, and Amerkan Nevada Corp. for an Extension ofTlme on Resolution of Intent No. 725 to rezone 90 acres more or less from R-1 (One Family ResMence) District, CV (Civic) District, and M (Industrial) District to R-2 (Two Family Residence) DIstrkt and R-3 (Limited Multi-Residence) Distrkt kxated west ofGreen Valky Parkway at Warm Springs Road and tbe Union Paclfk Railroad crossing. (Fifth Extension). Z-20-87MACDONALD,RICHARD. Requestfrom Rkhard C.MacDonald for an Extenskm of Tfane on ResoIutk>n of Intent No. 1254 to rezone 68 acres more or less rh>m R-R (Rural ResMence) Distrkt and C-2 (General Commeivial) Distrkt to R3 (Limited Multi-residence) distrkt focated on top of Whitney Mesa, northwest of MounUIn VIsU Street and Sunset Rd. Z-24-89 MACDONALD, RICHARD. Request from MacDonald Properties for Zone Change from RR (Rural Residence) DIstrkt to RS-2 and RS-4 (Single Family ResMential) distrkts to alk)w the development of PALISADES AT MACDONALD RANCH consisting of 43 lots on 34.9 acres more or kss, generally located southwest of Stephanie St. and West Lake Mead Drive. AR-S3-89 D.K.S. DEVELOPMENT Request from D.K.S Devetopment for Architectural Review of a proposed 180 unit apartment complex at 360 Arroyo Grande Blvd. in an R-3 (Limited Multi-residence) Distrkt on 9.8 acres more or leas, generally located southeast of Arroyo Grande Blvd. and Warm Springs Rd. Z-26-89 VENTURA, SAMUEIWENTURA ENTERPRISES Request fk-om Samuel Ventura, Ventura enterprises for a Zone Change from M (Industrial) Distrkt to IP (Industrial Park) DIstrkt to construct a three-story commercial recreation facility known as Galaxy consisting of 160,560 square feet on 1032 acres more or kss at 750 Gibson Road, generally located north of W. Sunset Rd. U-20-89 VENTURA, SAMUEL/VENTURA ENTERPRISES Request fh>m Samuel Ventura, Ventura Enterprises for a Use Permit to alkm the operation of a proposed three-story commercial recreation facility known as GALAXY consisting of 160,560 square feet on 10.52 acres more or less and Including bowling lanes, roller skating, outdoor miniature golf, bat ting cages, electronk games, theaters, dining, and oRke bi a proposed IP (Industrial Park) District at 750 Gibson Road, generally kxated north of W. Sunset Rd. la the PIttman neighborhood. V-15-89 VENTURA, SAMUEL/VENTURA ENTERPRISES Request rirom Samuel Ventura, Ventura enterprises for a Variance to allow a 75foot building height where 50 feet Is tbe maximum In a proposed IP (Industrial Park) DIstrkt to allow the construcdoo of a three-story commercial recreation facility known as GALAXY consistfaig of 160,560 square feet on 10,52 acres more or kss at 750 Gibson Road, generally focatcd north of W. Sunset Rd. U-17-89 THURMOND, RICHARD Request fk-om Rkhard E. Thurmond for a Use Permit to alfow the construction andopcraikmofapubUc parkii lot In a C-2 (General Commercial) DIstrkt at 146 W. Atlantic' Avenue, the northwest comer of Atlantk Avenue and Marine Street V-16-89 BRAVO-COOK, SHELLEY Request fhrn SheUey Bravo-Cooke to allow the coostructfon of a room additfon hi aa R-1 (One Family Residence) Distrkt at 380 Papaya Pl%:c, generally kicated between Palo Verde Drive and Puebfo Blvd. TM-29-89 RA HOMES Request tnm RA Homes for Tentative Map Review of SANDALWOOD (REVISED) consisting of 226 lots on 46.63 acres more or less in an R-1 (One Family ResMence) Distrkt by Resolution of latent 1326, generally focated southeast of Robindale and Jcssup Road. TM-3a-S9 AMERICAN WEST DEVELOPMENT Request trom Amerlcaa West Devcfopment for Tentative Map Review of CANDLE CREEK UNIT 15 coHMng of 99 fots on 23i acres In an RS-6 (Shigle Family Residential) and RS-8 (Medium density Residential) Dbtrids by RctohiVI. vn. 1. 2. 5. 6. 23. 24. Vffl 1. 25 26, 27. 28. 29. 30. 3. IX. X. tion of Intent No. 1385, generally kxated south and west of Galleria Drive. CITIZEN'S CONCERNS: Items discussed ci innot be acted upon at this meeting, but can be referred by Council to ttt • next Regular Meeting for consMeration. UNFINISHED BUSINESS: SOLICITATIONS REVIEW BOARD Four (4) reappointments. DISCUSSION/ACTION Alarm System Cha ges Fred Bush. Request fk-om Stantoo Construction for a Vi riance request (V-17-89) to waive the maximum number of subdlviskind evelopment signs permitted and to waive the required setback of 10-feet f rom street property line for the purpose of allowhig 12 existing, non-pen iiitted signs advertising La Mancha Townhomes II to remain as installed i long Valk Verde Drive and Aldonza Drive. (NOTE: PLANNING COMM ISSION AND STAFF RECOMMEND DENIAL). RESOLUTION Z-24-89 MACDONALD, R ICHARD A RESOLUTION OF THE CHY COUNCIL OF THE CITY 01 <' HENDERSON COMMITTING THE CITY COUNCIL TO REZON l£ CERTAIN PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF THE Cn Y OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 3 !8, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 62 EAST, M J).B. & M., CLARK CI JUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RR (RURAL RESIDENCE) DISTRICT TC RS-2 AND RS-4 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTL^L. RESOLUTION Z-13-89 AMERICAN W EST DEVELOPMENT A RESOLUTION OF THE CTFY COUNQl.OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON CGMMnTING THE CFFY CO UNCIL TO REZONE CERTAIN PROPERTY WITHIN THE Cm' LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A FDRTION OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 21 SOUTH, RANGE 62 EAS' T, M. D. B. & M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RR (RURA L RESIDENCE) DISTRICT AND RE (RANCH ESTATES) DISTRICT 1 O OS (OPEN SPACE) DISTRICT. BILL NO. 736 DESERT TORTOISE AN OF :DINANCE OF THE CFTY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSO N, NEVADA, ESTABLISH ING A NEW SECTION IN CHAPTER 18 .04 ENTITLED "DESERT TORTOISE HABITAT CONSERVATION" AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. (HNAL ACTION). BILL NO 737 EMERGENCY MANAGEM l'>IT AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF I lENDERSON TO REPEAL ORDINANCE NOS. 263 AND 995, DESIG> lATED AS CHAPTER 2M IN THE HENDERSON MUMClPAL CODl P., IN ITS ENTIRETY, AND CREATE A NEW CHAPTER 124 ENTITLED 'EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT' AND OTHER MATTEItS RELATED THERETO. (FINAL ACTION). NEW BUSINESS: BILL NO 738 PLANTVED UNTT DEVELO I'MENTS AN ORDINANCE OFTHE CITY COUNCIL OFTHE CITY OF HENDERSON,TO AMEND HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE CHAI TER19JO (RESIDENTIAL DISTRICTS) BY DELETING THEREFF OM THE RS-8 RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT AND ALL ACCOMPANYING RS-S RESTRICTIONS, BY AMENDING CHAPTER 19.62 (PUD PI. ANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENTS) BY AMENDING CHAPTER 19.62 (PUD PLANNED UNTT DE VELOPMENTS) BY ADDING RESTRICTK 'NS FOR COM PACT LOTS, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THE RETO. (REFER TO COMMITTEE). BILLNO 739 Z-26-89 VENTURA ENTERP USES AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OFTHBCITYOF HENDERSON TP AMEND ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY AMENDING' I HE ZONING MAP TO RE CLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTI' WITHIN THE CFTY LIMITS OF SHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 62 EAST, M.D3.&M., CLARK COUNTY NEVADA, FROM M (INDUSTK :IAL) DISTRICT TO IP (INDUSTRIAL PARK) DISTRICT. (REFER 1 0 COMMnTEE). BILL NO 740 GAMING ENTERPRISE OVERLAY DISTRICT AN ORDI NANCE OF THE CFTY COUNQL C F THE CITY OF HENDERSON TO AMEND HENDERSON MUNIC IPAL CODE TITLE 19 BY ADOPTING A GAMING ENTERPRISE < IVERLAY DISTRICT, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERE TO. (REFER TO COMMITTE£)a SET COMMITTEE MEETING. ADJOURNMENT. Agemla Deadlbic All items for tachislon on the Council Agenda for the IfcctlngarOctobarl7,1989 must be submitted, bi writing, no later than Thus lay, October 5,1989 at 4:M fM. to tbe City Ckrk's Offke. Any Items received after the above date will autOBi ticaly be placed oa tbe next City Councli Agenda. K ORIGINAL DEFECTIVE A

PAGE 41

mi P'm* ^, Hcndanon Home News, Boulder City News, Green VeUe y New v^^nri Thvnday. September 28,1989 Legal Notices Mm^NVIMIlM tmn • mam IWr TaMa, ,NVIMIUS I Raftara, 1M Cbasl,NVUMI1MC T .NVUakUM IIM Mi^ M nw ,NVUBme 'fteM^^o^^ B^^^B eu4 AldM lihMMalpaMk MM Msi^^ M CB^ "-• •MfV CASH ONLY H—iegt 1, 26^. Oct. 3,1X9 ^ITY or BOULDER CITY A Maaidpal Corporation 900 AHnna Street BMUST City, Nevada 89005 NOTICE INVITING BIDS The City of Boulder City. Nevada will rMeive bids for the following: 24 Tone of Tarf Grass Fertilizer Specifications and bid forms may be obtained at tbe Pinaace Departmeat, City Hall, 900 Arizona Street, Boulder City, Nevada 89005. Sealed bids for such will be received at the office of the Finance Director until 2:30 p.m. on October 12,1989 when they will be opeaed and read aloud in the City Council Chambers. Boulder City retains the right to reject any and all bids, to waive any informality in bidding, and to accept any bid deemed most advantageous to the City. Robert E. Boyer Finance Director PubUshed: Boujder City News September 28, 1989 B-9/28/89 BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA NOTICE OF APPLICATION An appUcaUon, Menlifled as Docket No, 89-864, has been filed with the Public Service Commission of Nevada ("Commission") bj Clark County, Department of Public Works ("Applicant") for authority to construct an "atgrade" crossing for the re-allgnmenl of Sunset Road to accommodate for the expansion of the McCarran International Airport. Tlie appllcaUon was filed puraaiwt U Nevada Rcvtssd Statutes 704JOO • 704JOS and Nevada Admlnislriilvc Code ("NAC") 703.455. NAC 703.475 gives tlieCommlssloatheaulhorIty to deny the appMcatlon or to grant It In whole or in part and to hold a hearing If necessary. The application Is on file and available for public viewing at the offices of the Commission, 727 Falrvlcw Drive, Carson City, Nevada 89710 and the Alexander Dawson Building, 4045 South Spencer, Suite A-44, Las Vegas, Nevada 89158. Interested and affected persons may commenl In writing to the Commission and file appropriate Protests and/or Petitions for Leave to Intervene at either of the Commission's offices on or before Wednesday, Octoiwr 11, 1989. \ ^ By the Commission, WILLIAM H. VANCE, Commiadon Secretary Dated: Carson City, Nevada 9/19/89 (SEAL) H—Sept ]>, 1989 The boM flats his or har titla from the Dutch baas meaning the hea d of the household, chief of overseer. BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA NOTICE OF APPLICATION BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA, NOTICE OF APPLICATION An applicalion, Menlifled as Docket No. 89-841, has been filed with the Public Service Commission of Nevada ("Commission") by Yellow/Checker Package Delivery for a change In rates u well as the number of zones Involved snd services offered. Applicant seeks revisions to Its existing tariffs to reflect the addition of new services, a reduction In the number of zones and a revision of lb rates. The revised Uriff Is filed pursuant to Nevada Revised Statutes ("NRS") 704J21 and Nevada Administrative Code ("NAC") 703.215. The application te on flic and available for public viewing at the offices of the Commission, 727 Falrview Drive, Carson City, Nevada 8971tf and the Alexander Dawson Building,4045 South Speaccr, SulU A-44, Las Vegas, Nevada 89158. Interested and affected persons may comment In writing to the Commission and file appro' priau ProtesU and/or Petitions for Leave to Intervene at either of the Commission's ofTlces on or btfA-e Wednesday, October 11, 1989. By Uic Commission, HILLIAM H. VANCE, Commission Secretary Dated: Carson City, Nevada 9/18/89 (SEAL) H—Sept 28, ljg9 BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA NOTICE OF APPLICATION An application, identified as Docket No. 89-865, has been filed with the Public Service Commission of Nevada ("Commission") by Clark County, Department of Publk Works ("Applicant") for authority to construct an"at-grade"crassingon Warm Springs Roads to accommodate for the re-constructlon of Warm Springs Road to a 100 foot rightof-way street.. The application was filed pursuant to Nevada Revised SUtutes 704300 • 704J05 and Nevada Administrative Code ("NACmO.460. NAC 703.475 gives the Commission the authority to deny the application or to grant It In whole or In part and to hold a hearing if necessary. The application Is on file and available for public viewing at the offices of the Commission, 727Falrvlew Drive,Carson City, Nevada 89710 and the Alexander Dawson Building, 4045 South Spencer, Suite A-44, Las Vegas, Nevada 89158. Interested and affected persons may comment in writing to Ihe Commission and file appropriate Protests and/or Petitions for lycave to Intervene at either of the Commission's offices on or before Wednesday, October II, 1989 By tlic Commission, WILLIAM H. VANCE, Commission Secretary Dated: Carson City, Nevada 9/19/89 (SEAL) H-Sept 28,1989 Nevada Power Company ("NPC^ has filed an appiicaUon, designated ii Docket No. 89-917, with the Public Service Commission of Nevada ("Commission"). In lU applkation, NPC seeks an order fTom the Commission authorizing the issuance of up to 100,000 shares of commonstock $i 00 par value shares under a 401 (k) savings plan for all employets of NPC effective January I, 1990. The application was (lied pursuant to NRS 704J22 to 704J28. The application is on file and available for public viewing at die offices of the Commission, 727FalrvlewDrive,CareonCity, Nevada 89710 and the Alexander Dawson Building, 4045 South Spencer, Suite A-44, Las Vegas, Nevada 89158. Interested and affected persons may comment In writing to the Commission and file appropriate Protests and/or PeUtlons for Leave to Intervene at either of the Commission's offices on or before Wednesday, October II, 1989 By the Comml.lon, WILLIAM H. VANCE, Commission Secretary Dated: Carson City, Nevada September 18,1989 (SEAL) H—Sept 28,1989 BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA NOTICE OF APPLICATION An application. Identified as Docket No. 89-866 has been filed with the Public Service Commission of Nevada ("Commission") by Clark County, Department of Public Works ("Applicant") for authority to re-construct an existing "at-grade" crossing on I^stern Avenue to accommodate for the re-cunstruction of iCastem Avenue In a 100 foot right-of-way street. The application was filed pursuant to Nevada Revised Statutes 704J00 704J0S and Nevada Administrative Code ("NAC") 703.460. NAC 703.475 gives Ihe Commission Ihe au' tborlty to deny the application or to grant it In whole or In part and to hold a hearing if necessary. The application is on file and available for public viewing at the oflices of the Commission, 727 Fairvlew Drive, Carson City, Nevada 89710 and the Alexander Dawson Building,4045 South Spencer, Suite A-44, Las Vegas, Nevada 89158. Interested and affected persons may comment in writing to the Commission and file appropriate Protests and/or Petitions for Leave to Intervene at either of the Commission's offices on or before Wednesday, Octol>er II, 1989 By the Commission, WILLL\M H. VANCE, Commission Secretary Dated: Canon City, Nevada 9/19/89 (SEAL) H—Sept 28,1989 SOUTHERN SEGMENT. LAS VEGAS BELTWAY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STUDY AREA AND INFORMATIONAL MEETING LOCATIONS HEhTDERSON 5^ CONVENTION CENTER OCTOBER 12,1989 200 W/DERSTTRANSPORTATION NOTICE INFORMATIONAL MEETINGS of Tr.--J?!.''**!!!^il!l*'^' AdaUaistratloa (FHWAX hi coopcrathM with the Nevada Department /PKw^^ .^ ''^^ • "" "•^ <^**"'y' • • ''" • • • work oe aa EavlronUi Impact SUiement (t; ror UN soathcra segment of the Las Vcgu Beltway. Thb EIS wlB conMer alternative ft-eeway •NgnmenU and other traasparution altemaUres between US WBimUtr Highway oa the east and uuraago Road on the west ia aa area between Tropicaaa Aveaiie oa OM aorth and Cactus Road on the A series of InformaUonal Mcctiagi wUI be held on Ihe datas aad ia the locations shown on the accompanying location sketch. ^^ The purpose of these meetings will be to brief bilcreatcd iadhiduals, grwips, and agencies cwKemln g proposal aliernaUves and to receive Input on their pcrceptioa at the scope of issues to be aeertsM la Iha savb^menUI study. Members of the public arc iavlted to attend the meeting at their €• anyitoie during Ihe meeting boars (3 to > p.m.) aad sebmil UMir commente in writing on a csmsM sai provided at the meeting or la persaa to a pubUc steaograpber who will be avaihibic MrMgaoui the meeliag. This meeting format will tecrease the opportanity for pabHc commenl and prnvlde feroneMia-oae discussioa with staff bivelvcd wMi tbe project „J** ^ • • B>Mon Asdsuacc aad Keal Property Aefaliitioa Policies Act of 1970 will SirJ^-^r^lL"'.!:!"'*"^*'' "•••'^ '* •*• • f^i^ W^it-afway acquUUon cannot ^l^!^Tr m Ji^ '•'•<• i right-sTway acquisltioa aad relocation assisUnce can be ^^ r""."" *""" "•• Nevada Deparimenl at Tyaasportatlon, Blght-of-Way Office, 123 Washiagton Street, Us Vegai. Nevada, Phone (702) 385.6540. '^"""^'^ "•"*' _-. w. • "f *** • "7 **eats received at the Informational MeeClis, written commeaU also c !!?^ • '*'*'*•*•'^*"'*^'''^"^ 26,1989. Such comme.to*oald be sent to WaH Wagner Sapervlsor, Ea<4roamcaUI Services divWoa. Nevada Dcpartnent of TrsasportaUoa, U63 South SlawartStrsat. Carson City, Nevada 89712. -r"—. -> H-Sept.l4. 21. 28. 1989. Focas ON SENIORS by Meradltli Cameron Advanced Technology Omtrary to popular bebef, older Americans are not generally resistant to new or advanced technology. The reason they have not adopted such new technologies is because much of it is not geared to their specific needs. For example, let's take the automated bank teller. Wliile it is designed for the convenience and time saving sought by many, these technologies simply do not apply to older people's lives. Instead, older Americans have a tiesire to stay active and to fill time in a way that helps keep them in touch with others. They enjoy the personal encounter with the teller, and they certainly have plenty of time for it. The difference in interest is related to the direct benefits the products offer the aging. Some report a strong need to keep up with technological developments, while others prefer the safer and surer methods. The main preoccupation with the older generation, and rightfully so. is with their health, and their determination to avoid becoming burdens to their families and friends. There is no question that older persons wish to maintain their social ties and preserve their inidependence. Healthy, elderly individuals may require assistance with the tasks of daily living, tasks which often become difficult, but not impossible, to {jerform. There is a wide array of services which can be customized to suit the needs of older persons, allowing them to maintain their independence and remain as active as possible. CI rowing old does not mean that you cannot still stay in charge. It does not mean that your memor>', your .sense of pride, and your zest for life are gone. Many simply refuse to surrender their independence. They may need assistance, but they are not totally helpless. Retirement, or aging, does not mean pulling back from life. It is discovering new ways to grow old with grac-e and dignity. Religion Henderaon Home New, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Page 41 • •^i "•& Active partnership with God' message Rev. John Osko, Pastor of First Baptist Church, has chosen for the title of his message this Sunday morning "Active Partnership With God." His Scripture text is I Corinthians 3:9. Special music will include John W. Peterson's "He's the One!", sung in duet by Bettye Hansen and Carl Henderson; and selections by the First Baptist Church Chorale. The celebration of the Lord's Supper will be a part of this Worship Hour. The Worship Hour begins at 11:00 a.m. First Baptist Church is located at 47 East Atlantic Avenue, Henderson, Sunday School classes for all ages begin at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School teachers' meeting is at 9:05 a.m. Children's Churftli time, for children 2 years of age through Kindergarten, is held during the Morning Worship Hour. A Nursery is provided for infants and children up to 2 years of age. Junior High and Senior High Youth meetings are at 5:00 p.m. on Sundays, under the leadership of Don and Amanda Blondeaux and Jon and Joanne Bradley, This week, First Baptist Church launches a church-wide program for achieving excellence in Bible study. It combines three disciplines and three dimensions in Bible study: (1) expository teacing of the book of I John this Sunday evening at 6:00 p.m. Introductory Group studies also begin this week on,Tuesday and Thursday evenings at 7:00-8:00 p.m. Tuesday Study Group meets in the home of Henry and Linda Beaston, under the leadership of Jay Henderson. Thursday Study Group meets in the home of Bob and Mary Morris, vmder the leadership of Dan Young. Study books are available for self-study at the group meetings or at the church. 'Tree to Be Thin" Bible study group meets on Thursday evenings at the home of Don and Amanda Blondeaux. This is a study applying biblical princliples of thinking and eating for weight control. "One Year Bible Reading" group meets on Wednesday evenings from 6:00 to 6:30 p.m. at the church. Chorale rehearsals are on Sunday eveningsioUowing theEvening Service and on Wednesday evenings at 6:30 p.m. Pastor Osko and congregation invite you to worshjp and study with them this week. For additional information, please call 565-9511. CONGRATULATIONS-Mayor Loma Kesterson congratulates Christine Johnson on her recent selection as Miss Nevada Pre-Teen. Johnson was chosen from a field of 10 applicants and will go to Bradenton, Fla., next week to represent the state in national competition. Photo by Bn Baker DAVID L. HOLDEN David L. Holden, 62, a resident of Henderson since 1945, died Tuesday. He was bom June 4, 1927, in Litchfield, lU. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and a meat cutter for a^ grocery store. He was a member of Amalgamated Meat Cutters Union & Butchers Local #457, V.F.W. Post Boulder City. Survivors included his wife, Wilma Holden of Henderson; two sons, Jim Holden of Henderson and David Holden of Las Vegas; his sister, Audrey Wallace of 111. and one grandchild. Private Services are scheduled for 11 a.m. Saturday at Palm Chapel in Henderson. Basic High Sciiool CLASS OF '59 REUNION Who put the Bop In the Bop-sh-Bop-sh-Bop? Who put the Lang in Lang-a-Lang-a-Lang Ding Dong We did 30 Years Ago!! Now We're Back ^ 9| for our 30th reunion ^ OCT. 12-1344, 1989 Missing classmates Legal Notices V ~ > Bob Albert Leonard Bloomgreen Evan Bridgewater Colleen Brooks Butterworth Patricia Burt Shoemal(er Billie Cureton Leany Wayne Deane Esle Gallegos Crane Larry Giles Mason Gebe Linda Pollock Shamblin Fay Long Williams Bob Russell Gary Shaw Joyce McKectnie IMelvin Means Gary Mears Charles Nason Wanda Reynolds Dinkins Ronald Weaver Jack Kerkuta Ron Kaylor BASIC HIGH ALUMNI & TEACHERS INVITED TO NO HOST COCKTAIL PARTY OCT. 14 AT BLACK MOUNTAIN COUNTRY CLUB. CALL US IF YOU KNOW WHERE OUR MISSING FRIENDS ARE OR FOR MORE INFORMATION Lois Korthius Foster • 585-7983 Fred Rottiwell • 564-5683 • j I ; 'A .\ i PUBLIC HEARING CITY COUNCIL OF BOULDER CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS. 900 ARIZONA STREET BOULDER CITY, NEVADA TUESDAY, OCTOBER 10,1960-7:00 P.M. TO CONSIDER BIU NO. 949. TO VACATE SAN SIMEON WAY, AND OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELATING THERETO. A COPY OP BILL NO. 949 MAY BE OBTAINED IN THE CITY CLERK'S OFFICE. B-Sept. 28,1989 A 1978 Alfa-RoHiM Via: llM1770003584,aMiOMlMU wHI be wM to dM hlgliMt bidder for iMM pajMcnl of itar• • rent. Lkciii* platar MMM, RtgitUrad OWMT: IWIWOWII, Lt|al owMr: UakMwn. PlKcd • Morift &j Lo Muicjr, 909 WilMl, BovMcr cMy, NV 89005 Noilcc It htnbj givM thi( I, Pirfc Plaza, of 1553 rootMl Drive, Boulder City, Nevada 89005 will Mil ihe abmrc menllMiad aHiamobilc and contenii on Salnrda;, October li, 1989 at 2 pjn., at Park Plaxa, 1553 FooUin Drive, Boulder Ckj, Nevada 89005. Wc reaerve Ihe right to bid. B-Sept. 21,28, Get 5,1989 BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA In Re Application of Nevada Power Company for Order Authorizing Recovery of Expenaes for aixtfa reaoarce plan. Docket No. 89467 NOTICE OF HEARING Nevada Power Company ("Applicant") haa filed an application with the Public Service Commimion of Nevada f'Commiai") for an order authorizing the recovery of expenses incurred in developing its sixth Resource Plan. The application has been designated as Docltet No. 89-867. Applicant seeks authority to adjust its base tariff general rate to include a base cost rate for the recovery of ongoing costs incurred in developing its plan for resources and to amortize the accumulated coats incurred in developing its plan for resources. The net effect of the application, if approved by the Commission, would be to increaae biUlngs for electricity used during the twelve months beginning June 1,1990 by $2,107,624, assuming the same consumption by applicant's customers as in the twelve months from July 1, 1988 to June 30, 1989.The apUcation ia on file and available for viewing by the public at the offices of the Commission, 727 Fairview Drive, Carson City. Nevada 89710 and the Alexander Dawson Building, 4045 South Spencer, Suite A-44, Las Vegas, Nevada 89158. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing in this matter will commence as follows: TUESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1989 10:00 a.iii. Offices of the Public Service Commission 4045 S. Spencer Street. Suite A-44 Las Vegas, Nevada 89158 when and where all interested parties may appear and be heard. If necessary, the hearing will continue on Wednesday, October 25, 1989 at the same time and place. The Commission has authority to hold a hearing on this matter pursuant to Nevada Revised Statutes ("NRS") 704.110. Issues to be considered at the hearing will include, but are not limited to, whether the Commission should find the expenses resulting from various activities conducted by NPC as part of its resource planning process are prudent and reasonable pursuant to Nevada Administrtive Code ("NAC") 704.94857(3) and whether the accounting procedures NPC utilized in ita cost recovery docket are consistent vrith the accounting procedures delineated in NAC 704.9485. By the Commission, William H. Vance, Commission Secretary Dated: Carson City, Nevada 9'22/89 (SEAL) H-Sept. 28,1989 NOTICE OF FILING Notice ia hereby given that Bill No. 949, a proposed or dinaace entitled "AN ORDINANCE VACATING SAN SIMEON WAY AND OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELATING THERETO," haa been proponed to the City Council of Boulder City, Nevada, by Councilman Ferraro, and that a copy of auch ordinance waa filed with the City Clerk on the 26th day of September, 1989, for public examination. Notice ia hereby further given that action on the proposed ordinance, or the ordinance aa amended, will be taken at a regular meeting of the City Council of Boulder City, Nevada, oa the lOtb day of October, 1989, at the hour of 7K)0 P.M., in the Council Chamber, City Hall, Boulder City, Nevada. Dated this 26th day of September, 1989. DeUa H. Estes, City Clerk (Seal) B-9/28/89 NOTICE OF FILING Notice is hereby given that Bill No. 946, a proposed ordinance entitled "AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF BOULDER CITY, NEVADA, FOR A FIXED BASE OPERATOR'S LEASE TO R.F.I.N.C., INC. AT THE BOULDER CITY MUNICIPAL AIRPORT; AND OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELATING THERETO," has been proposed to the City Council of Boulder City, Nevada, by Councilman Pilgrim, and that a copy of such ordinance was filed with the City Clerk on the 26th day of September, 1989, for public examination. Notice ia hereby further given that action on the proposed ordinance, or the ordinance as amended, will be taken at a regular meeting of the City Council of Boulder City, Nevada, on the 24th day of October. 1989, at the hour of 7:00 P.M., in the Council Chamber, City Hall, Boulder City, Nevada. Dated this 26th day of September, 1989. DeUa H. Estes, City Clerk (Seal) B-9/28/89 Legal Notkt A40roolMa7fk>wfr house trailer and-contents will be sold to the highest bidder for non payment of storage rent. License plates: none, Registered owner: unknown. Legal owner: Unknown. Maaufaclorf unit auMbcr: unkown. Placed In storage by Eari Barlley, 573 Shoshone, Boulder CItjr, Nevada 89005. Notice la hereby given that 1, Park Plaza, of 1553 FoothUI Drive, Boulder City, Nevada 89005 will sell the above mentioned House Trailer and contents on Saturday, October 21,1969 at 2 p.m., at Park Plaza, 1553 FooUiill Drive, Boulder City, Nevada 89005. We reserve the right to bid. B—S*ft. 28, Oct. 5 12,1969 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the CKy Council of the CMj of Henderson will hold a publk hearing on October 17, 1989 at 7:00 pjn. in the City Council Chambers, City Hall, 240 Water Street, In Ihe City of Henderson, to consider the application of Cooper aad Brain for anAmendment to Ihe Land Use Polky Plan of the City of Henderaon to change the recommended land use from Reaidcniial to Highway Commercial on 4.80 acres more or len, generally ktcaled northeast ofOlsen Sireetand East Lake Mead Drive. ANY AND ALL Interested persons may ippear before the City Council, either In person or by counsel, and may object or express approval of ihe proposed Amendment to the Land Use Policy Plan Map uf the City of Henderson Comprehensive Plan, or may prior to the Public Hear, ing, file with the City Clerk, written objection thereto or approval thereof. THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANT to aa order made by Ihe City Council of tbe City of Henderson, Nevada, at a Regular Meeting, hcM September 19, 1989. DATED this 20th day of September, 1989 and published In the Henderson Home News 9/28/89 & 1IV5/89. DOROTHY A. VONDENBRINK, CMC, CITY CLERK H-Sept 28, Oct. 5,1989 LEGAL NOTICE INVITATION TO BID NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Ihe City Council, CMy of Hewlerson, Slate of NavMa, will receive sealed bids from qualified suppllan for the supplies or services Indicated below, at the OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK, 240WATER STREET, HENDERSON, NEVADA S9011 unUI the hour of 3:00 pjn. on Ihe 10th day of October, 1969, and said offers will be opened and publicly read at that Umc In the CMy Clerk's Conference Room, at the above address for: BID NO. 105-89*90 -FIRE nCHTlNG EQUIPMENT which must oonform to tpcdflaUfcms to be secured at the Office of the Purchasing Agent, at the above address, prior to the dale set for the bid opening. All bids must be submitted in a sealed envelope plainly marked, BID NO. 105-89*90 -FIRE nCHTlNG EQUIPMENT, with Ihe name of the bidder In the upper left hand corner and accompanied by complete spcclflcalions for the Items offered, marked to the ATTENTION OF THE CITY CLERK. AWARDS will be made on the basis of the kiwest responsive and responsible bidder, unit price, conformance to speclfkatkMis, bidder'tquallflcaiionsand bid judged to be In Uie best Interest of the public, each factor being consMered. THE CITY RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY AND/OR ALL BIDS, OR TO WAIVE ANY INFORMALITY OR IRREGULARITIES. BY ORDER OF THE CITY COUNCIL, HENDERSON, NEVADA. DOROTHY A. VONDENBRINK, CMC, CITY CLERK PUBLISHED IN THE HENDERSON HOME NEWS September 28,1989 H—Sept. 28; 1989 LEGAL NOTICE INYITA-nONTOBID NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the CHy COUMN, CMy of Henderson, StoteoTNevada, will recelva stakd bids from quallIM SMppUers for Ihe supplies or services Indicated bdow, at Ihe OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK, 240 WATER STREET, HENDERSON, NEVADA89015, uMillhehour of 3:00 pjn. on the 10th day of October, 1989, and said off^ will be opened and publicly read at that tfane In tbe City Clerfc'i Conference Room, at Ihe above sddrtas for: BID NO. 10449*90 • TRAILER MOUNTED AIR COMPRESSOR which mast conform to ipeclflcaUona to be secured at the Offlea of Ihe Purchasing Agent, at Ihe above address, prior to Ihe date set for the bM opening. An bids must be wbmltted in a sealed envelope phlnly marked, BID NO. 104-89*90 TRAILER MOUNTED AIR COMPRESSOR, with the name of the bidder In the upper left hand corner and accompanied by complete specifications for the Items offered, marked to Uie ATTENTION OF THE CITY CLERK. AWARDS will be made on the basis of Ihe towest responsive and responsible bidder, nnll price, conformance to spedflca. Uons, bidder'squsliflcation) and bM Judged to be in Ihe best Interest of ihe public, each factor being considered. THE Crrv RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY AND/OR ALL BIDS, OR TO WAIVE ANY INTORMALFFY OR IRREGULARTTIES. BY ORDER OF THE CTTY COUNCIL, HENDERSON, NEVADA. DOROTHY A. VONDENBRINK, CMC, CTTY CLERK PUBLISHED IN THE HENDERSON HOME NEWS September 28,1989 H-Sept. 2Sm9 LEGAL NOTICE INVTTATION TO BID NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the CMy Couadi, CMy of Henderson, State of Nevada, wHI receive sealed bids fhim qualified suppliers for the supplies or servlcea Indicated bdow, at die OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK, 240WATERSTREEr, HENDERSON, NEVADA 89015, until ike hour of 3:00 pjn. on the lOtb day of October, 1989, and saM offers will be opeaed and publkly read at that Ume to the CHy Clerk's Conference Room, at the above address for: BID NO. 106-89*90. ELEC"TROSTATIC PLOTTER whkh must conform to specifications to be secured at the Of. flee of the Purchasing Agent, at the above addreas, prior to the date set for the bM opening. AU bidrmust be subniltted krt sealed envelope ptehiiy marked, BID NO. 106-89*90 ELECTROSTATIC PLOTTER, with the name of the bidder In Ihe upper left hand comer and accompanied by coropleU speclflcatlons for the items offered, marked to the ATTENTION OF THE CTTY CLERK. AWARDS will be made on Ihe bails of the towest responsive and responsible bklder, unit price, conformance to speclflcations, bidder's quallflcallons and bid Judged to be In the best interest of Ihe public, each factor being considered. THE CTTY RESERVES THE RIGHTTO REJECT ANY A.VD/ OH ALL BIDS, OR TO WAIVE ANY INFORMALITY OR IRREGULARrriES. BY ORDER OF THE CTTY COVNCIL, HENDERSON, NEVADA. DOROTHY A. VONDEN. BRINK, CMC, CTTY CLERK PUBLISHED IN THE HEN. DERSON HOME NEWS September 28,1989 H—Sept. 28,1989 NOnCK OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN ttettte CMy Conndlec the City •fHwderson will hold a public bearing on October 17,1989 at !> • In Ihe CMy Council J*^>ri, aty Hal, 240 Wa•Slreet,hitkeCMyarHender•oij. toeonaJdenheappikation of Las VegMj^ Venter, for •jA-eiNhnenttolheLaadUse • • Wky Plan to chaate the rsc"" • eaded bad BSH f^ai 1^ -"ttal wMh Lh.kl Servk, Area OverUy to ResldnUiL rwte. commerdsi, cm,. PhfcaadPwNkaadSeaU-pubt^*?jr*-'-^^to flirther designate the eaU„KU M an Area of Special Master noa 2,245 acres aweerkst lMrally kwated hi Ihe aorth*^n portion of Ihe City er '^"*lTlB|soulhwt ^he North Shore Ro^iBri^ • '^"" >f IJ, 22, uiO, rw*lp 21 South, R„ge a ANT AND ALL Interested per. •< "tey appear before the City Council, either hi person or hy counsH, and may object or eipress approval of the proposed Amendneat to the Land Use Policy Plan Map of ihe City of Henderson Comprehensive Plan, or may prior to the PuMk Hearing, file with theClty Clerk, •vrluen objection thereto or approval thereof. THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN I'URSUAVT io an order made by Ihe Cily Coundl of Ihe City lit Henderson, Nevada, at a Regular .MceUng, heM Scptemtier 19,1989. DATED this 20th day of itptember, 1989 and oublished in (he Henderson Home News W28/89 & 10/5/89. JOROTHY A. VONDEN3RINK, CMC, CTTY CLERK H-^ept 28, Oct. 5.1989 Toy music boxes were first made about 1835. The eariiest tvnA. ui;.r.\^. 7 7TT~ — Z tune and were operated by a crank. ^^P** ^•''' '"""•* "'•* • '''•. They played a single Henderson City Council Agenda AGENDA Tuesday, October 3,1989 6:45 P.M. COMMITTEE MEETING HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL IS COUNCIL CHAMBER 240 WATER STREET NOTE: ALL ITEMS ARE ACTION ITEMS UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED l. CALL TO ORDER U. CONFIRMATION OF POSTING, ROLL CALL -^ ^ '" ACCEPTANCE OF AGENDA ITEMS OF BUSINESS: 16. 17. 19. m. IV. 1. BILL NO. 736 DESERT TORTOISE AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA, ESTABLISHING A NEW SECTION IN CHAPTER 18.04 ENTITLED "DESERT TORTOISE HABITAT CONSERVA-nON", AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. BILL NO. 737 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON TO REPEAL ORDINANCE NOS. 263 AND 995, DESIGNATED AS CHAPTER 2 J4 IN THE HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE, IN ITS ENTIRETY, AND CREATE A NEW CHAPTER 2.24 ENTITLED 'EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT' AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. ADJOURNMENT. AGENDA ITEMS RECEIVED AFTER 11:00 ON TUESDA, SEPTEMBER 26, 1989 WILL NOT BE SEEN ON THE AGENDA AS PUBLISHED, BUT MAY APPEAR ON THE AGENDA AS ADDED ITEMS OR ADDENDA. 20. 21 AGENDA Tuesday, October 3,1989 7:00 P.M. REGULAR MEETING HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL 22. COUNHL CHAMBER 240 WATER STREET NOTE: ALL ITEMS ARE ACTION ITEMS UNLESS OTHERWISE INDICATED L CALL TO ORDER n. CONFIRMA'nON OF POSTING, ROLL CALL, INVOCA-HON, PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE in. ACCEPTANCE OF AGENDA IV. PUBLIC HEARING: 1. VAC-6-89 GREEN VALLEY PKWY. Petition to Vacate Portioii of Green Valley Parkway froin Ramrod north to Duck Creek • Richard MacDonald. (NOTE: MAYOR KESTERSON WILL CALL THIS ITEM TO ORDER AND RESET THE PUBLIC HEARING). 2. VAC-7-89 DUNBAR DRIVE Petition to Vacate • Portion of Dunbar Drive • Clark County School DIstrkt CONSENT AGENDA Mayor Kesterson to Introduce the Consent Agenda offering anyone present an opportunity to remove any Items for diacusston. RECOMMENDATION MINUTES • Committee and Regular Meeting of September 5,1989; and Spcdal Meeting of September 14,1989. PAVEMENT REFUNDING AGREEMENT Green Valley Parkway C. M. Properties. AMENDMENT to Blackburn Water Main Refunding Agreement RTC Cooperative Agreement No. 161 providing funds for engineering, right-of-way, and construction of roadway improvements oo Washington Avenue, between Rancho Drive and Martin Lather Kkig Blvd. 5. SET PUBLIC HEARING Amendment to Clark County Flood Control District Master Plan. 6. SET SHOW CAUSE HEARING on License Revocation Lucky John's SakxHi and Lucky John's Pawnshop. 7. SET SHOW CAUSE HEARING on LkcMc Revocation Look laa Lounge. 8. BUDGET AUGMENTATION fran Clark CouBty/DOE Nuclear Waste sub-gnat fkiadtaig for equipment, activities, and training. 9. AWARD CONTRACT Na 89-90*07 for LorinL.Winiams Pool Renovatkw to lowest, reapoBsibie bidder. 10. AWARD BID NO. 101-a9*90 for two commercial ridli lawnmowers to ShnpaoB Nortoa Corponith. IL AWARDBIDNO.103-89*90ror22Bew and one used vehicle to the fowcst, responsible bidder. 12. AWARD BID NO. 102-89*90 for five copy machines. 13. AWARD OF CONTRACT NO. 89-90*05 for Rapid Innitratkm Basins Modincadons to Wayne's Trucking. 14. APPUCAHON flt>m Arthur S. Plunkett for ResUurant Beer aad Wlac Liccttie, dba Artic't Plzia and Wings, 4401 E. Sansct Road, 7. V. 1. 3. 4. APPLICATION from Rkhard Thurmond, Gary Thurmond and George Miller for Limiting Gaming/185 machines and Limited Gamhig Liquor Lkense, dba Royal Flush casino, 120 Market St. APPLICATION from Jerry Stotko for Package Liquor Lkense for Key Employee (DIstrkt Manager), dba Von's Companies, Inc. APPLICATION from O.B. Sports, Inc., et. al. for Recreation Club Liquor Lkense, dba Legacy Golf Club, 130 Par Excellence Dr. APPLICATION from United Coin Machine Company for Restrkted Gaming Lkensc/3 slots, dba Las Vegas Wash Laundromat, 208 No. BouMer Highway. PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDATIONS SEPTEMBER 21, 1989 • ITEMS 19 30 19. ROW-38-89 CLARK COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT Dedication of two easements for the construction of two water vaults ak>ng Leisure clrck, Sectfon 8, Township 22, Range 62 East from Clark County School DIstrkt Z-I8.80 MACK, JEROME & AMERICAN NEVADA CORP. Request from Jerome mack, et aL, and Amerkan Nevada Corp. for an Extension ofTlme on Resolution of Intent No. 725 to rezone 90 acres more or less from R-1 (One Family ResMence) District, CV (Civic) District, and M (Industrial) District to R-2 (Two Family Residence) DIstrkt and R-3 (Limited Multi-Residence) Distrkt kxated west ofGreen Valky Parkway at Warm Springs Road and tbe Union Paclfk Railroad crossing. (Fifth Extension). Z-20-87MACDONALD,RICHARD. Requestfrom Rkhard C.MacDonald for an Extenskm of Tfane on ResoIutk>n of Intent No. 1254 to rezone 68 acres more or less rh>m R-R (Rural ResMence) Distrkt and C-2 (General Commeivial) Distrkt to R3 (Limited Multi-residence) distrkt focated on top of Whitney Mesa, northwest of MounUIn VIsU Street and Sunset Rd. Z-24-89 MACDONALD, RICHARD. Request from MacDonald Properties for Zone Change from RR (Rural Residence) DIstrkt to RS-2 and RS-4 (Single Family ResMential) distrkts to alk)w the development of PALISADES AT MACDONALD RANCH consisting of 43 lots on 34.9 acres more or kss, generally located southwest of Stephanie St. and West Lake Mead Drive. AR-S3-89 D.K.S. DEVELOPMENT Request from D.K.S Devetopment for Architectural Review of a proposed 180 unit apartment complex at 360 Arroyo Grande Blvd. in an R-3 (Limited Multi-residence) Distrkt on 9.8 acres more or leas, generally located southeast of Arroyo Grande Blvd. and Warm Springs Rd. Z-26-89 VENTURA, SAMUEIWENTURA ENTERPRISES Request fk-om Samuel Ventura, Ventura enterprises for a Zone Change from M (Industrial) Distrkt to IP (Industrial Park) DIstrkt to construct a three-story commercial recreation facility known as Galaxy consisting of 160,560 square feet on 1032 acres more or kss at 750 Gibson Road, generally located north of W. Sunset Rd. U-20-89 VENTURA, SAMUEL/VENTURA ENTERPRISES Request fh>m Samuel Ventura, Ventura Enterprises for a Use Permit to alkm the operation of a proposed three-story commercial recreation facility known as GALAXY consisting of 160,560 square feet on 10.52 acres more or less and Including bowling lanes, roller skating, outdoor miniature golf, bat ting cages, electronk games, theaters, dining, and oRke bi a proposed IP (Industrial Park) District at 750 Gibson Road, generally kxated north of W. Sunset Rd. la the PIttman neighborhood. V-15-89 VENTURA, SAMUEL/VENTURA ENTERPRISES Request rirom Samuel Ventura, Ventura enterprises for a Variance to allow a 75foot building height where 50 feet Is tbe maximum In a proposed IP (Industrial Park) DIstrkt to allow the construcdoo of a three-story commercial recreation facility known as GALAXY consistfaig of 160,560 square feet on 10,52 acres more or kss at 750 Gibson Road, generally focatcd north of W. Sunset Rd. U-17-89 THURMOND, RICHARD Request fk-om Rkhard E. Thurmond for a Use Permit to alfow the construction andopcraikmofapubUc parkii lot In a C-2 (General Commercial) DIstrkt at 146 W. Atlantic' Avenue, the northwest comer of Atlantk Avenue and Marine Street V-16-89 BRAVO-COOK, SHELLEY Request fhrn SheUey Bravo-Cooke to allow the coostructfon of a room additfon hi aa R-1 (One Family Residence) Distrkt at 380 Papaya Pl%:c, generally kicated between Palo Verde Drive and Puebfo Blvd. TM-29-89 RA HOMES Request tnm RA Homes for Tentative Map Review of SANDALWOOD (REVISED) consisting of 226 lots on 46.63 acres more or less in an R-1 (One Family ResMence) Distrkt by Resolution of latent 1326, generally focated southeast of Robindale and Jcssup Road. TM-3a-S9 AMERICAN WEST DEVELOPMENT Request trom Amerlcaa West Devcfopment for Tentative Map Review of CANDLE CREEK UNIT 15 coHMng of 99 fots on 23i acres In an RS-6 (Shigle Family Residential) and RS-8 (Medium density Residential) Dbtrids by RctohiVI. vn. 1. 2. 5. 6. 23. 24. Vffl 1. 25 26, 27. 28. 29. 30. 3. IX. X. tion of Intent No. 1385, generally kxated south and west of Galleria Drive. CITIZEN'S CONCERNS: Items discussed ci innot be acted upon at this meeting, but can be referred by Council to ttt • next Regular Meeting for consMeration. UNFINISHED BUSINESS: SOLICITATIONS REVIEW BOARD Four (4) reappointments. DISCUSSION/ACTION Alarm System Cha ges Fred Bush. Request fk-om Stantoo Construction for a Vi riance request (V-17-89) to waive the maximum number of subdlviskind evelopment signs permitted and to waive the required setback of 10-feet f rom street property line for the purpose of allowhig 12 existing, non-pen iiitted signs advertising La Mancha Townhomes II to remain as installed i long Valk Verde Drive and Aldonza Drive. (NOTE: PLANNING COMM ISSION AND STAFF RECOMMEND DENIAL). RESOLUTION Z-24-89 MACDONALD, R ICHARD A RESOLUTION OF THE CHY COUNCIL OF THE CITY 01 <' HENDERSON COMMITTING THE CITY COUNCIL TO REZON l£ CERTAIN PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF THE Cn Y OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 3 !8, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 62 EAST, M J).B. & M., CLARK CI JUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RR (RURAL RESIDENCE) DISTRICT TC RS-2 AND RS-4 (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTL^L. RESOLUTION Z-13-89 AMERICAN W EST DEVELOPMENT A RESOLUTION OF THE CTFY COUNQl.OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON CGMMnTING THE CFFY CO UNCIL TO REZONE CERTAIN PROPERTY WITHIN THE Cm' LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A FDRTION OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP 21 SOUTH, RANGE 62 EAS' T, M. D. B. & M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM RR (RURA L RESIDENCE) DISTRICT AND RE (RANCH ESTATES) DISTRICT 1 O OS (OPEN SPACE) DISTRICT. BILL NO. 736 DESERT TORTOISE AN OF :DINANCE OF THE CFTY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSO N, NEVADA, ESTABLISH ING A NEW SECTION IN CHAPTER 18 .04 ENTITLED "DESERT TORTOISE HABITAT CONSERVATION" AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. (HNAL ACTION). BILL NO 737 EMERGENCY MANAGEM l'>IT AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF I lENDERSON TO REPEAL ORDINANCE NOS. 263 AND 995, DESIG> lATED AS CHAPTER 2M IN THE HENDERSON MUMClPAL CODl P., IN ITS ENTIRETY, AND CREATE A NEW CHAPTER 124 ENTITLED 'EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT' AND OTHER MATTEItS RELATED THERETO. (FINAL ACTION). NEW BUSINESS: BILL NO 738 PLANTVED UNTT DEVELO I'MENTS AN ORDINANCE OFTHE CITY COUNCIL OFTHE CITY OF HENDERSON,TO AMEND HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE CHAI TER19JO (RESIDENTIAL DISTRICTS) BY DELETING THEREFF OM THE RS-8 RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT AND ALL ACCOMPANYING RS-S RESTRICTIONS, BY AMENDING CHAPTER 19.62 (PUD PI. ANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENTS) BY AMENDING CHAPTER 19.62 (PUD PLANNED UNTT DE VELOPMENTS) BY ADDING RESTRICTK 'NS FOR COM PACT LOTS, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THE RETO. (REFER TO COMMITTEE). BILLNO 739 Z-26-89 VENTURA ENTERP USES AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OFTHBCITYOF HENDERSON TP AMEND ORDINANCE NO. 1120 BY AMENDING' I HE ZONING MAP TO RE CLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTI' WITHIN THE CFTY LIMITS OF SHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 62 EAST, M.D3.&M., CLARK COUNTY NEVADA, FROM M (INDUSTK :IAL) DISTRICT TO IP (INDUSTRIAL PARK) DISTRICT. (REFER 1 0 COMMnTEE). BILL NO 740 GAMING ENTERPRISE OVERLAY DISTRICT AN ORDI NANCE OF THE CFTY COUNQL C F THE CITY OF HENDERSON TO AMEND HENDERSON MUNIC IPAL CODE TITLE 19 BY ADOPTING A GAMING ENTERPRISE < IVERLAY DISTRICT, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERE TO. (REFER TO COMMITTE£)a SET COMMITTEE MEETING. ADJOURNMENT. Agemla Deadlbic All items for tachislon on the Council Agenda for the IfcctlngarOctobarl7,1989 must be submitted, bi writing, no later than Thus lay, October 5,1989 at 4:M fM. to tbe City Ckrk's Offke. Any Items received after the above date will autOBi ticaly be placed oa tbe next City Councli Agenda. K ORIGINAL DEFECTIVE A

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Page ^ HendersM Wiiia Neirt, Boulder City New, Green Valley Newt Thnwdiy, September 28,19ea Heflderaon Hom e New, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Page 43 WANT ADS Bring Buyers andSellers Together WANT AD RATES.. .RUNS TUES, THURS & FRi, HENDERSON, BOULDER CITY & GREEN VALLEY alines $4.00 wk 4lnes M.45wk 5Ines .v.. $4.90 wk 6 fcies $5.35 wk 7 lines .... .... .$5.80 wk 8 lines $6.25 wk 9 lines $6.70 wk 10 lines ..: $7.15 wk up to 3 lines (23 characters per tine) 45

in, a refreshing cooler, to fat content, from 130 to iind a good bet for dieters 280, for each little one-half Jri limited quantities. (Eat cup, barely enough to fill atiore than one cup of the top of a cone. !iiozen yogurt, and the Ice milk takes a lot off ^iioriea quickly add up.) 4^^^^^^^^^^* We ktft t lonf meU Oir SITUATIONS WANTED I CAN HELP! Am responsible friendly man for small/big jobs. Handyman, yard work, exc refs. Veiy reasonable rate. 293-2907 BC fssdi ^MULDBRGIIT •niDfVAUIT GaOttday BB4-18i1 JOB TRAINING Computer Clasi StI-366S •^ iHhHn A TMIMM Sctool TRAINin NKEDBD TRAM ran NlirWPLOYIIfNT NOW YIM.OCATIT0 POR •>1t MONTHi GARAGE SALE, Fri & Sat, Piano, aquarium w/fish, dishes, excellent quality girls clothes, plus lots more. Wagonwheel to Thoroughbred to 1631 Strrup. GARAGE SALE 532 Bastanchury. Sat. & Sun. 9 am to dark. GREATGARAGE SALE. Sal. 8 am to ?? Furniture, kids clothes, all kinds of good stuff. Up BIdr Hwy, right on Horizon, left to 623 Mosswood. YARD SALE 9/30 Sam. Camping equip, boys clothing sizes 8-12 exc cond, other misc items. 1310 Elsa Way BC YARD SALE Sat 9/30, 7am to 12. 5 DC Homestead dinina set, like new, reg $325 sell for $125. Lots of curtains, lamps, wood country knick knacks, bathroom access, clothes, mens3 spd, trundle pop up unit. 656 8th St. BC GARAGE SALE Sat 9/30 9am-2pm. Do-Boy pool, filter/pump, aquarium, ladies size 7 clothing.-dishes, hshid items, lots more! 1324 Appaloosa Rd. BC IVIQVING SALE Sat 9/30 9am-5pm. Couch, TV, roll top desk, and misc furniture. 523 Fir St. Apt D 293-6053 BC YARD SALE 540 Elm. Fri and Sat. Sept 29,30 8 to 12 noon. BC GARAGE SALE Sat Sept 30 7am to noon. Decorator chair, wicker chair, tools, clothes. Other misc. 1306 Ramona B.C. FANTASTIC MOVE-IN SALE Antique dressers, microwave, clothes (infant to adult) 5'X 5' oak mirror, hshId items, antiques, furniture, exHome Interior displayer $5,000 inventory, pool solar blanket, much, much more. All must go. 9/30, 10/1 7am-2pm801 MaritaPr. BC YARD SALE Furniture and misc. 409 Ave. B 7am-10am. Sat 9/30 BC YARD SALE Sept 29 and 30. 579 Shoshone, 8am. NO DEALERS. BC TWELVE FAMILY GARAGE SALE Sat 9/30 8am-2pm. Baby items, furniture, TVs, hshId items, clothes, satellite dish. 1126 Seno Crt, BC GARAGE SALE 8am-12pm. 1306 Esther. Sat 9/30. BC YARD SALE. Sept. 30,7 am til noon. 64 l^allory St. (The Triangle) Exercise bike, motorcycle, lamp, pictures, shoes, some clothing, purses, stereo, encyclopedia set, odds & ends. 115 Ash, Loveseat, deacon bench, floor to ceiling shutters, maple end & cofle tables, air compressor, nice clothes, and Misc. Fri. & Sat. 9 to?. HUGE SIX FAMILY YARD SALE: Sat. Sept. 30,211 W. Basic Rd., Includes dishwasher, baby clothes, vacuum, shell camper for pickup, books, furniture, toys, Italian Provincial China Cabinet, bi-fold closet doors, to much to list. 8 am to 3 pm. 565-6376. 3 Family Garage Sale, Fn. Sept 29 & Sat, Sept. 30, 9-5 1007 &1010 Driftwood Ct. Off Warmsprings Rd. Tent Trailer, furniture, baseball & football cards, stationary bike & everything from soup to nuts Church Rummage SaleFurn., plants, yarn, clothes, toys, books, appliances, housewares, much more. Christ, the Servant Lutheran Church, 12 Commerce Dr. in GV Business pk. by Ethel M Choc. Fri & Sat. 8-5pm. 564-2307. GARAGE SALE: Fri. & Sat., 29th & 30th. 8 to 4. 1520 Rawhide Dr., Hdn. Behind Old Vegas. Camper shell, kids clothes, dresser, shower doors & lots of misc. GARAGE SALE: Sat & Sun. Sept. 30, Oct 1.8am til? Lots of misc, furniture, clothing. Take Sunset east. Flight on Pabco, Right to 557 Liverpool. Yard Sale: Girls and boys • clothes, baby items—car seat, strollef, walker, maternity clothes, material & patterns, TV, doll house kit, & much more. Fri. & Sat. from 8 to ?. (Off Horizon and Arrowhead) 831 Cherry Drive. MOVING SALE: Must sell, furn. recliner, $50, couch $35, loveseat, $45, lamps $10, bar stools, $5, much much more. Brick-r-brack, lawn mower $60, sheets S queen) $8 per set, fencing )10 much much more. Fri, Sat. & Sun., at 1109 Pawnee. (Behind playland) 564-1835. Inside and Outside sale. GARAGE SALE, Misc items, some furniture. Sat. Sept. 30, 7:30 am. to 4 p.m. 414 Scenic Dr., Hdn. Neighborhood Yard Sales. Sat. 9/30 from 7 am to ? 900 BIk Major. Ave. Boats, auto parts, guns, ammo, clothing, swimming pool, etc. YARD SALE Saturday, September 29 8:00-12:00 501 Federal Street Henderson Sponsored by; Chapter R, P.E.O. 8th Annual Patio & Bake Sale Henderson Presbyterian Church eoi N. Malor, Henderson, NV Set., Oct. 7, a s.ni. to 4 p.ni. HousowaresI Fumlturol Clothing! Jowolry! Much Morel Donuts, Coffee, Hot Dog, Cold Drinks Rain or Shine ICAUTION! Contents extremely volatile! Want adi Have been known to work in as little as one day. Knew the facts t>efore Its too late. 564-1881 EMPLOYMENT TELL 'EM YOU SAW IT IN THE WANT ADSII A proven seller can be yours. Call 564-1881 to find out how to make them work. PART TIME MAID Great hours and good pay for extra income. Approx 20 hrs per wk. Character refs required. INSTA-CLEAN 293-3316 BC ELECTRIC METER READER City of Boulder City has an opening for a permanent, part-time position as an Electric Meter Reader. Following brief training penod to familiarize individual with meter routes, individual will be required to read electric meters and use hand-held electronic input device to record readings. Meter reading experience required. Must have a knowledge of basic arithmetic and ability to interact and communicate with the public in a tactful and courteous manner. Work schedule will vary. Pay rate $9.41 per hour. A written examination will be held at 8:30 A.M.. October 11,1989. Applicants must appear prior to the designated starting time, or they will not be allowed to test. Filing closes 5:00 P.M., October 9, 1989. Applications are available at the Personnel Office between the hours of 7:00 A.M. and 6:00 P.M., Monday through Thursday, at City Hall, 900 Arizona Street, P.O. Box 367, Boulder City, NV 89005. Telephone 293-9202. Equal Opportunity Employer. HELP WANTED Clerk/ Cashier. Wages at $5 per hr and tjenefits for the Hoover Dam Snacketeria at the Hoover Dam. 293-4364 BC NARRATORS AND RAFT DRIVERS needed for rafting. BLACK CANYON Call 293-6721 after 5pm. BC WAITRESSES NOW BEING HIRED Vale Hotel, Boulder City. Experience preferred. Apply in person. 293-1463 BC DISHWASHERS NOW BEING HIRED Vale Hotel, Boulder City. Apply in person. 293-1463 BC DRIVERS WANTED Must be 18 yrs old. Earn up to $10 hr. MANAGERn"RAINEES Experience preferred. PHONE HELP Must be 18 yrs old. DOMINOS PIZZA 293-3030 BC AHENTION: EXCELLENT INCOME FOR HOME ASSEMBLY WORK. INFO. CALL 504-646-1700 DEPT P2310 BE ON T.V. Many needed lor commercials. Now hiring all ages. For casting info. Call (615)779-7111 ExtT-1151 MASTERS DEGREE WILL TUTOR PUBLIC OR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS in Boulder City. 293-2907 B C HELP WANTED Saleslady to work in Health Club Pro Shop evenings and weekends. Call 293-2875 or 456-5628 BC PART TIME STOCK CLERK Must be 21 yrs old. Apply at Thrifty Drug 800 Buchanan, Boulder City. BC HAIRDRESSER WANTED Boulder Beauty Salon. Ask lor Joanne or Donna 293-2075 BC • VISA/MASTERCARD US CHARGE Guaranteed. Regardless of Credit Rating Call Now! (213) 925-9906 Ext. U5263. Restaurant hostesses, bus persons. Apply in person Gold Strike Inn. BC. EARN MONEY Reading books! $30,000/yr. income potential. Details. (1) 805-687-6000 Ext Y-5695. NOW HIRING Full and part time help. All shifts. Inquire in person Jack in the Box. 1101 Nev Hwy BC Help Wanted, Cooks, waitresses, cashiers. Experience necessary. Apply in person Casa Verde, 1 to 4 p.m. 842 S. Boulder Hwy. Teacher for two-year-olds class. Call 564-2201. Children's Garden Daycare Center. PICK'N PACK '' Kelly Service'^ has openings lor people who want to work 40 hrs/wk plus overtime in Henderson. No expereience necessary. Must be over 18 and have acces3loft|ihone and reliable transponatidii Call 564 1561 EOE/M/F/HNo'fee .PNI NEEDED parttime 11-7 ijr Boulder CJty Hospital Long Term Care Unit. Conl acl Alice at 293-4111 BC Help Wanted in lawn maintenance. 21 yr old. Clean driving record preferred. Call leave message 565-1593 DESK CLERK Graveyard smft. Apply in person Boulder Dam Hotel 1305 Arizona BC EXPERIENCED KENO WRITER NEEDED. Apply in person Gold Strike Inn and Casino BC Clerks needed. Must be 21. Apply in person. All Shifts needed. 2630 Green Valley Parkway. Part time/full time dishwasher/cook. Apply at Sizzler Steak House, 110 N. BIdr. Hwy. anytime. 1:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. EARN MONEY typing at home, $30,000/year income potential. Details, (1) 'J05-687-6000 Ext. B-5695. HELP WANTED. WINDOW WASHER. At least 6 mos. prior new construction exp. 791-1024, 9 am-4 pm. Mon-Fn. Easy Work "Excellent Pay" Assemble products at home. Call for information. 504-641-8003 Ext. 1311. • RNs Oii.Call • n|ey the ehallenae • nd rewards aflMated wMi worldng with a leiie*tenii ewe faoHKyT We offer a compreheiMlve benefits iMiefc. ae and cemiie tltl Ms salary. Contacti Beuidw CKy Cars Center Attni INreetor af Nursing, C01 Adama, eoulder City, NV •eooe (7oai ses^isi. 101 LPNs All Shifts Boulder City Cars Center • seks sxpsrioncsd profssalonals to join our kingterm cars facllltyl Ws offsr sxcellent starting salarlss and bsnsfKs up to 13,500 Including: •SI, 000 slgn^n bonus! •Child care assistance •Educstlon program assistance •Msdical/hsatth insursncs •And much morsi Contact: BouMsr City Cars Csntsr, Attn: DIrsctor of Nursing, 601 Adams, Bouldsr City, NV S900S, (702) 293-5151. EOE Counter Help NOW HIRINQ *AII Shift* AvallaM* Start ImiMdlattly *FIxlt>l Hour* AdvancMMnt Opportunity Discount on MMI* No ExporlwKo NMdtd WENDY'S Apply In parson at your local Wondy's DIETARY ASSISTANTS Individuals needed to sssist with food servics snd nutrition support. Excsllsnt communicstlon snd intsrpsrsonsi skills a must. Apply in psrson st: Bouldsr City Cars Csntsr, Attn: Administrator, 601 Adams, Bouldsr City, NV •sees. EOE Beauty Crafters has openings for hairstylists snd manicurist. Call 564-3885 or Apply In person at 320 S. Boulder Hwy. SENIORS WANTED Cashier, part time, flexible hours. 7-11 849 Nev Hwy BC MACHINIST OR TOOL MAKER. Experienced, full or part time. Fisher Pen Co, Boulder City 2933011 BC RNjSUPERVISORS needeo ateoulder City Hospital for LTC Unit ('7-3). Med/Surg unit (11-7) and ICU (7-3) Cdrttact Alice at 293-4111. PRODUCTION WORK Full' and part time positions avillable in production work wi|i industrial laundry. Hours vaiy, no weekends or experience needed Apply at Work Clothes Rental. 568 Parkson, Henderson Monday thru Fnday. ROUTE DRIVER AND MISCELLANEOUS HELP Young man, must be physically fit, heavy work. Call 294-0004 BC — -^ Outgoing person with car, to assist with Misc. protects— Sales computer, real estate, print layout expenence is helpful. Ask for Radean 454-1050 or 564-9768 MAID SERVICE NEEDS PEOPLE INTERESTED IN ADVANCEMENT. Work with a crew. Grime Busters Maid Servk;e. 798-1002 _^ TOW TRUCK DRIVER WANTED Must be over 21 years old. Have valid Nevada Drivers License in good standing. Must live in Boulder City. Salary plus benefits. Apply 705 Juniper Way BC RAILROAD PASS HOTEL AND CASINO IS NOW HIRING. Full or part time maids Apply in person. See hotel manager 7 days a week 2800 S Boulder Hwy., Henderson. Drapery cleaner assistant, Part time weekdays. Sewing machine knowledge helpful.' Will tram. 565-6200 Easy Woek "Excellent Pay Assemble products at home Call for information. 504641-8003 Ext. 1311. Need mature person for Church Nursery. Positive, helpful, can interact with children, $6 per hour, Sundays 9:30 am til 11:30a.m Wednesdays 645 pm to 8 45 pm Call 565-8563 or 564-2114, SECRETARIAL POSITION callable at Boulder City Hospital. This s a shared position for Nursing Ad m.nistration and Community Relations Departments, Previous hospital. Media/ ^^jblic relations experience oquired, M ,st have e/.:ellentclenca ^nd computer skills. Contact Alice at 293-4111 BC • OWN YOUR OWN APPREL OR SHOE STORE. CHOOSE FROM: JEAN/SPORTSWEAR, LADIES, MEN'S. CHILDREN/MATERNITY, LARGE SIZES, PETITE. DANCEWfAR/AEROBIC, BRIDAL. LINGERIE OR ACCESSORIES STORE ADD COLOR ANALYSIS BRAND NAMES: LIZ CLAIBORNE, HEALTHTEX, BONNIE & BILL. ST MICHELE, FORENZA, BUGLE BOY, LEVI, CAMP BEVERLY HILLS. LESLIE FAYE LUCIA, OVER 2,000 OTHERS, OR $1399 ONE PRICE DESIGNER MULTI TIER PRICING DISCOUNT OR FAMILY SHOE STORE RETAIL PRICES UNBELIEVABLE FOR TOP QUALITY SHEOS NORMALLY PRICED FROM $19 TO $60 OVER 250 BRANDS 2 600 STYLES, $18,900 to $29,900: INVENTORY. TRAINING. FIXTURES. AIRFARE. GRANDOPENINGS, ETC, CAN OPEN 15 DAYS MR. SCHNEIDER (407) 366-8606 NEED EXTRA $$$$ 7? AVON To Buy or To Sell... No Money Down! 565-e060 CASA FLORES RESTAURANT In B.C. and Green Valley is now taking applications for waitresses, waiters, hostesses, dishwastiers, and busboys. Apply in person at 930 Nev Hwy., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. BC. ••••• • ••••* EARN MONEY typing at home. $30,000/year income potential. Details, (1) 805-687-6000 Ext B-22033 • • • BOBS ALL FAMILY RESTAURANT now accepiing applications for rt shwashers. cooks, .vaitresses Apply m person ^6 1 Nev Hwy BC Barmaid part time, must have bartender, server & health card Hdn Elks Lodge, Ask for John, 565-9959 after 11 am. Hours negotiable Combination Counter girl & laundromat attendant Evening shift. Apply at 67 W. Lake Mead t)etween 7 & 2. HOME HEALTH ATDE" Put your homemaking and personal care skills to work. We can give you -a flexible schedule to meet your needs Assignments are available in the Henderson/Boulder City area Call Medi Visit Extended Care 871-1031. Older lady "needed, my home, 2 hrs day fvlon, Tues. & Fn For 3 kids $10 day Prefer nurses aide background. Call 564-4808. Now accepting applications for lull time & part time car hops, day shift & evening shifts available. Apply in person Sonic Drive Inn 300 S Boulder Hwy Hdn. MEDICALLY TRAINED INDIVIDUAL can earn $12-$30/hr Part or lull-time, performing paramedical exams for insurance companies industrial accounts and drug screening in your area. Blood drawing and EKG experience a plus For info write: LIFEDATA MEDICAL SERVICES. Inc PO Box 11350. Shawnee Mission, KS 66207-1350. WANTED: Carpet Cleaner. Ph 564-6716, Part time housekkeeper, Experienced nurses aides, and part time dietary aide Apply in person Glen Halla Nu'^sing Home or call 565-8748 Hdn, Security Guard needed Sunset & Eiger Ra, area. Start at $4 25 per hr. Merit raise after 30 days 5 days a week. 8 hr. shifts, responsible adults only Holman Security, 2300 E Patrick Lane. Suite 7, las Vegas. 739-5858. Earn up to $339 per wk Assemble our products at home. Amazing recorded message reveals details, Ph 382-7848 Experienced home care aides to work m Hend & BC, Must have own car. Hours vary Call 368-2411 HELP WANTED. CASHIER Apply Opportunity Village Thrift Store. 10 W Pacific, Hdn, 564-7128 Baker needed, Winchells, Hdn. Starting $4. to $5. depending on exp. Will tram. 565-0360. ask for Mgr $5000 mo. Process phone orders at home. People call you, -^ee details. Call Jan. 1-318-922-3275. "Ext K-28. Earn money at home assembling jewelry, toys, automotive parts or othersat home. Call Jan. 1-318-3275 Ext B-28 RESUMES' Composed, edited and typed. Also Contracts, Letters, and Wills. Bee's Business Service, 527 Hotel Plaza (The Village) 293-526B BC. IMAGES COMMERCIAL FLOOR MAINTENANCE Now Hiring Full & Part Time Positions for state approved apprenticeship program Earn while you learn. Salaries up to $450 week. Call 564-8580 GENERAL LABORS/PRODUCTION WORKERS & CLERICAL Immediate Openings Good Pay — No Fee MANPOWER TEMPORARY SERVICES 30 A Water Street Henderson, NV 565-5554 Copies 10ne to me and you are in all inetancea ol my life with me. I, in thia ahort diak>gue want to thank you for everything and confirm once more that I never want to be leparated from you, no matter how great material deeirea may be. I want to be with you end my Loved ones In your perpetual gtory. Amen. Thank you lor your tove towarda me and my Lovee onee. Peraona must soy this prayer 3 consecutive days asking your wiah. After the 3fd day, your wish wW be granted, no master how dlfflcult H may be. Promise to publish this dielogue as soon as your favor has been granted. Mine was. Thank you Irom my heart. A.M. Dena Buys & Sells Collectibles. Museum quality authentic American Indian place All tribes represented and welcome, traditional one of a kind collection. Jewelry, carvings, oils, sandpaintings, Ksttchinas, pottery, rugs, FOSSILS & ARTIFACTS Indians know abKJut good healthy feelings from stones Dena has more than 250 varieties of RADIANT CRYSTALS, gems, minerals and rocks for collectors Visit Dena at GLIHER GULCH DENA'S, on Boulder Hwy. off Sunset Rd Henderson She had objects for all ages & custom, work GLITTER GULCH'S DENAS, A VERY SPECIAL PLACE 565-0711, VOICE-PIANODRAMA, Private Lessons by Professional Teacher & Entertainer. Openings available. Weddings, organization shows, .receptions, clubs. Performance available. Sin?)erPianist, organist, show director. For lessons & performance information calf Flo Raymond, Coral Cove Music Studio Productions 565-8469. bottle fed baby pigs. b-t>-aue pigs 361-2484 • For Sale: Kenmore Wash6r & Dryer, $160 Queen Size Bed & Frame $20 Ph 564-0920 All steel storage building 3-sided shed 40X40 for $5,200 40X100 w/door for $11.600 Never erected will deliver (303) 757-3107 GE Refrigerator/freezer 2 door. $75. Ph 565-9208 GE Heavy duty electric dryer $75 Cali565-1118after5 30 p m Commercial limb shreader $295 A Foxy Moped $350 Kirby Vacuum w/all attachments $50 Misc Norman Rockwell collectors • plates 565-9435. Simmons hide-a-bed couch $150 Living rm chair. Call after 5 pm 565-7960 10 Speed bike, weights baby items. (Off Boulder & Magic Way) 564-0700 Lots more, 10 sp. bike, weights, baby Items and lots more (Off BIdr Hwy & Magic Way 564-0700 For Sate: Portable cement mixer $275 293-3 340 2 all steel arch buildings Will tlJ^ *'" '^'^e *4,600. 50X100 costs $18,500, list *1O,700 taknc i( 303-757-3107 Octagon table, dark wood Jhle^^sAlsoother^a^s FORSALE20"la"^^?;S3^ Reel, front throw 3 HP 7 blade $125 293-1360 BC FOR SALE Bii^Ti^ rocker with ottoman Hi low table Low coffee table hi dining. Both new Don't need in our RV 293 373 0Rr SMALL ARM CHAiR;^;;^ sleeper. 2 high back swivel chairs, tables, footstools floor humidifier, old low 3 drawer chest and ladder chair, woven seat Good cond. reasonable 293-2524 BC tlHAN ALLEN T^RipT? DRESSER dark p,ne. Pa,d $900 Triple dresser, antique white, paid $900 askmo $250 293-6537 BC ^ FRIGIDAIRE 30 ^iSTiJ^ range $135 FngidaireMcu ft freezer $150 Maytag dishwasher $135 294-0642 BC BROWN ADMIRAL FR|(3 FREEZER works fine. $125 19" portable TV w/wireless remote $100 294-0501 BC MOVING China cabinet,' table, w/4 chairs $225, King size bed $100 Washer and dryer $150 Glass sheets 34 X 76 $3 00 ea Belt sender $25 Coffee table, old mirror misc 293-7154 BC FOR SALE 7 ft sofa, excel cond $150 293-3708 BC 25 CU FT SIDE BY SIDE REFRIGERATOR Harvest gold $450 293-4826 BC PRAYER TO HOLY SPIRIT Holy Spnf, you are the only one who ctearseverything for me, you who brighten all paes in your glory forever. Thank you for the mercy you have had lor me and my loved ones Thank you for the received favor (The person should say this prayer tor ttireeconsecutive days, witTtout rnentioning it>€ favor. Within three days, the Grace ww be rocenved no matter how difficult it may seem. Publish when the grace is received) ,il^^UYUEisthefinit ccrKtact lens you never have to clean. • WithACUVUEyou'ir always wear clean, fresh, comtortahle lenses. ,A(:U\'l!H The Convenience of disposability and the comfort of NEW, sterile lenses on the eyes every week appeal to the majority of contact lens patients. No longer are connplicated lens care regimens necessary. You wear your lenses 1 week and throw them away!! Come in for an eye exam and if ypur prescription qualifies you to be an appropriate candidate, we wili let you try the new disposable contact lenses FREE for 1 week. Dr. Bruce Conroy, optometrist, 899 Adams Blvd., Boulder City, NV. 294-0030. Office hours Monday through Friday, 9-12, 1-5. VISTAKON, INC.. a ^ofcwtm-^cWtcM company. > X A /' ORIGINAL DEFECTIVE i

PAGE 43

Page ^ HendersM Wiiia Neirt, Boulder City New, Green Valley Newt Thnwdiy, September 28,19ea Heflderaon Hom e New, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Page 43 WANT ADS Bring Buyers andSellers Together WANT AD RATES.. .RUNS TUES, THURS & FRi, HENDERSON, BOULDER CITY & GREEN VALLEY alines $4.00 wk 4lnes M.45wk 5Ines .v.. $4.90 wk 6 fcies $5.35 wk 7 lines .... .... .$5.80 wk 8 lines $6.25 wk 9 lines $6.70 wk 10 lines ..: $7.15 wk up to 3 lines (23 characters per tine) 45

in, a refreshing cooler, to fat content, from 130 to iind a good bet for dieters 280, for each little one-half Jri limited quantities. (Eat cup, barely enough to fill atiore than one cup of the top of a cone. !iiozen yogurt, and the Ice milk takes a lot off ^iioriea quickly add up.) 4^^^^^^^^^^* We ktft t lonf meU Oir SITUATIONS WANTED I CAN HELP! Am responsible friendly man for small/big jobs. Handyman, yard work, exc refs. Veiy reasonable rate. 293-2907 BC fssdi ^MULDBRGIIT •niDfVAUIT GaOttday BB4-18i1 JOB TRAINING Computer Clasi StI-366S •^ iHhHn A TMIMM Sctool TRAINin NKEDBD TRAM ran NlirWPLOYIIfNT NOW YIM.OCATIT0 POR •>1t MONTHi GARAGE SALE, Fri & Sat, Piano, aquarium w/fish, dishes, excellent quality girls clothes, plus lots more. Wagonwheel to Thoroughbred to 1631 Strrup. GARAGE SALE 532 Bastanchury. Sat. & Sun. 9 am to dark. GREATGARAGE SALE. Sal. 8 am to ?? Furniture, kids clothes, all kinds of good stuff. Up BIdr Hwy, right on Horizon, left to 623 Mosswood. YARD SALE 9/30 Sam. Camping equip, boys clothing sizes 8-12 exc cond, other misc items. 1310 Elsa Way BC YARD SALE Sat 9/30, 7am to 12. 5 DC Homestead dinina set, like new, reg $325 sell for $125. Lots of curtains, lamps, wood country knick knacks, bathroom access, clothes, mens3 spd, trundle pop up unit. 656 8th St. BC GARAGE SALE Sat 9/30 9am-2pm. Do-Boy pool, filter/pump, aquarium, ladies size 7 clothing.-dishes, hshid items, lots more! 1324 Appaloosa Rd. BC IVIQVING SALE Sat 9/30 9am-5pm. Couch, TV, roll top desk, and misc furniture. 523 Fir St. Apt D 293-6053 BC YARD SALE 540 Elm. Fri and Sat. Sept 29,30 8 to 12 noon. BC GARAGE SALE Sat Sept 30 7am to noon. Decorator chair, wicker chair, tools, clothes. Other misc. 1306 Ramona B.C. FANTASTIC MOVE-IN SALE Antique dressers, microwave, clothes (infant to adult) 5'X 5' oak mirror, hshId items, antiques, furniture, exHome Interior displayer $5,000 inventory, pool solar blanket, much, much more. All must go. 9/30, 10/1 7am-2pm801 MaritaPr. BC YARD SALE Furniture and misc. 409 Ave. B 7am-10am. Sat 9/30 BC YARD SALE Sept 29 and 30. 579 Shoshone, 8am. NO DEALERS. BC TWELVE FAMILY GARAGE SALE Sat 9/30 8am-2pm. Baby items, furniture, TVs, hshId items, clothes, satellite dish. 1126 Seno Crt, BC GARAGE SALE 8am-12pm. 1306 Esther. Sat 9/30. BC YARD SALE. Sept. 30,7 am til noon. 64 l^allory St. (The Triangle) Exercise bike, motorcycle, lamp, pictures, shoes, some clothing, purses, stereo, encyclopedia set, odds & ends. 115 Ash, Loveseat, deacon bench, floor to ceiling shutters, maple end & cofle tables, air compressor, nice clothes, and Misc. Fri. & Sat. 9 to?. HUGE SIX FAMILY YARD SALE: Sat. Sept. 30,211 W. Basic Rd., Includes dishwasher, baby clothes, vacuum, shell camper for pickup, books, furniture, toys, Italian Provincial China Cabinet, bi-fold closet doors, to much to list. 8 am to 3 pm. 565-6376. 3 Family Garage Sale, Fn. Sept 29 & Sat, Sept. 30, 9-5 1007 &1010 Driftwood Ct. Off Warmsprings Rd. Tent Trailer, furniture, baseball & football cards, stationary bike & everything from soup to nuts Church Rummage SaleFurn., plants, yarn, clothes, toys, books, appliances, housewares, much more. Christ, the Servant Lutheran Church, 12 Commerce Dr. in GV Business pk. by Ethel M Choc. Fri & Sat. 8-5pm. 564-2307. GARAGE SALE: Fri. & Sat., 29th & 30th. 8 to 4. 1520 Rawhide Dr., Hdn. Behind Old Vegas. Camper shell, kids clothes, dresser, shower doors & lots of misc. GARAGE SALE: Sat & Sun. Sept. 30, Oct 1.8am til? Lots of misc, furniture, clothing. Take Sunset east. Flight on Pabco, Right to 557 Liverpool. Yard Sale: Girls and boys • clothes, baby items—car seat, strollef, walker, maternity clothes, material & patterns, TV, doll house kit, & much more. Fri. & Sat. from 8 to ?. (Off Horizon and Arrowhead) 831 Cherry Drive. MOVING SALE: Must sell, furn. recliner, $50, couch $35, loveseat, $45, lamps $10, bar stools, $5, much much more. Brick-r-brack, lawn mower $60, sheets S queen) $8 per set, fencing )10 much much more. Fri, Sat. & Sun., at 1109 Pawnee. (Behind playland) 564-1835. Inside and Outside sale. GARAGE SALE, Misc items, some furniture. Sat. Sept. 30, 7:30 am. to 4 p.m. 414 Scenic Dr., Hdn. Neighborhood Yard Sales. Sat. 9/30 from 7 am to ? 900 BIk Major. Ave. Boats, auto parts, guns, ammo, clothing, swimming pool, etc. YARD SALE Saturday, September 29 8:00-12:00 501 Federal Street Henderson Sponsored by; Chapter R, P.E.O. 8th Annual Patio & Bake Sale Henderson Presbyterian Church eoi N. Malor, Henderson, NV Set., Oct. 7, a s.ni. to 4 p.ni. HousowaresI Fumlturol Clothing! Jowolry! Much Morel Donuts, Coffee, Hot Dog, Cold Drinks Rain or Shine ICAUTION! Contents extremely volatile! Want adi Have been known to work in as little as one day. Knew the facts t>efore Its too late. 564-1881 EMPLOYMENT TELL 'EM YOU SAW IT IN THE WANT ADSII A proven seller can be yours. Call 564-1881 to find out how to make them work. PART TIME MAID Great hours and good pay for extra income. Approx 20 hrs per wk. Character refs required. INSTA-CLEAN 293-3316 BC ELECTRIC METER READER City of Boulder City has an opening for a permanent, part-time position as an Electric Meter Reader. Following brief training penod to familiarize individual with meter routes, individual will be required to read electric meters and use hand-held electronic input device to record readings. Meter reading experience required. Must have a knowledge of basic arithmetic and ability to interact and communicate with the public in a tactful and courteous manner. Work schedule will vary. Pay rate $9.41 per hour. A written examination will be held at 8:30 A.M.. October 11,1989. Applicants must appear prior to the designated starting time, or they will not be allowed to test. Filing closes 5:00 P.M., October 9, 1989. Applications are available at the Personnel Office between the hours of 7:00 A.M. and 6:00 P.M., Monday through Thursday, at City Hall, 900 Arizona Street, P.O. Box 367, Boulder City, NV 89005. Telephone 293-9202. Equal Opportunity Employer. HELP WANTED Clerk/ Cashier. Wages at $5 per hr and tjenefits for the Hoover Dam Snacketeria at the Hoover Dam. 293-4364 BC NARRATORS AND RAFT DRIVERS needed for rafting. BLACK CANYON Call 293-6721 after 5pm. BC WAITRESSES NOW BEING HIRED Vale Hotel, Boulder City. Experience preferred. Apply in person. 293-1463 BC DISHWASHERS NOW BEING HIRED Vale Hotel, Boulder City. Apply in person. 293-1463 BC DRIVERS WANTED Must be 18 yrs old. Earn up to $10 hr. MANAGERn"RAINEES Experience preferred. PHONE HELP Must be 18 yrs old. DOMINOS PIZZA 293-3030 BC AHENTION: EXCELLENT INCOME FOR HOME ASSEMBLY WORK. INFO. CALL 504-646-1700 DEPT P2310 BE ON T.V. Many needed lor commercials. Now hiring all ages. For casting info. Call (615)779-7111 ExtT-1151 MASTERS DEGREE WILL TUTOR PUBLIC OR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS in Boulder City. 293-2907 B C HELP WANTED Saleslady to work in Health Club Pro Shop evenings and weekends. Call 293-2875 or 456-5628 BC PART TIME STOCK CLERK Must be 21 yrs old. Apply at Thrifty Drug 800 Buchanan, Boulder City. BC HAIRDRESSER WANTED Boulder Beauty Salon. Ask lor Joanne or Donna 293-2075 BC • VISA/MASTERCARD US CHARGE Guaranteed. Regardless of Credit Rating Call Now! (213) 925-9906 Ext. U5263. Restaurant hostesses, bus persons. Apply in person Gold Strike Inn. BC. EARN MONEY Reading books! $30,000/yr. income potential. Details. (1) 805-687-6000 Ext Y-5695. NOW HIRING Full and part time help. All shifts. Inquire in person Jack in the Box. 1101 Nev Hwy BC Help Wanted, Cooks, waitresses, cashiers. Experience necessary. Apply in person Casa Verde, 1 to 4 p.m. 842 S. Boulder Hwy. Teacher for two-year-olds class. Call 564-2201. Children's Garden Daycare Center. PICK'N PACK '' Kelly Service'^ has openings lor people who want to work 40 hrs/wk plus overtime in Henderson. No expereience necessary. Must be over 18 and have acces3loft|ihone and reliable transponatidii Call 564 1561 EOE/M/F/HNo'fee .PNI NEEDED parttime 11-7 ijr Boulder CJty Hospital Long Term Care Unit. Conl acl Alice at 293-4111 BC Help Wanted in lawn maintenance. 21 yr old. Clean driving record preferred. Call leave message 565-1593 DESK CLERK Graveyard smft. Apply in person Boulder Dam Hotel 1305 Arizona BC EXPERIENCED KENO WRITER NEEDED. Apply in person Gold Strike Inn and Casino BC Clerks needed. Must be 21. Apply in person. All Shifts needed. 2630 Green Valley Parkway. Part time/full time dishwasher/cook. Apply at Sizzler Steak House, 110 N. BIdr. Hwy. anytime. 1:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. EARN MONEY typing at home, $30,000/year income potential. Details, (1) 'J05-687-6000 Ext. B-5695. HELP WANTED. WINDOW WASHER. At least 6 mos. prior new construction exp. 791-1024, 9 am-4 pm. Mon-Fn. Easy Work "Excellent Pay" Assemble products at home. Call for information. 504-641-8003 Ext. 1311. • RNs Oii.Call • n|ey the ehallenae • nd rewards aflMated wMi worldng with a leiie*tenii ewe faoHKyT We offer a compreheiMlve benefits iMiefc. ae and cemiie tltl Ms salary. Contacti Beuidw CKy Cars Center Attni INreetor af Nursing, C01 Adama, eoulder City, NV •eooe (7oai ses^isi. 101 LPNs All Shifts Boulder City Cars Center • seks sxpsrioncsd profssalonals to join our kingterm cars facllltyl Ws offsr sxcellent starting salarlss and bsnsfKs up to 13,500 Including: •SI, 000 slgn^n bonus! •Child care assistance •Educstlon program assistance •Msdical/hsatth insursncs •And much morsi Contact: BouMsr City Cars Csntsr, Attn: DIrsctor of Nursing, 601 Adams, Bouldsr City, NV S900S, (702) 293-5151. EOE Counter Help NOW HIRINQ *AII Shift* AvallaM* Start ImiMdlattly *FIxlt>l Hour* AdvancMMnt Opportunity Discount on MMI* No ExporlwKo NMdtd WENDY'S Apply In parson at your local Wondy's DIETARY ASSISTANTS Individuals needed to sssist with food servics snd nutrition support. Excsllsnt communicstlon snd intsrpsrsonsi skills a must. Apply in psrson st: Bouldsr City Cars Csntsr, Attn: Administrator, 601 Adams, Bouldsr City, NV •sees. EOE Beauty Crafters has openings for hairstylists snd manicurist. Call 564-3885 or Apply In person at 320 S. Boulder Hwy. SENIORS WANTED Cashier, part time, flexible hours. 7-11 849 Nev Hwy BC MACHINIST OR TOOL MAKER. Experienced, full or part time. Fisher Pen Co, Boulder City 2933011 BC RNjSUPERVISORS needeo ateoulder City Hospital for LTC Unit ('7-3). Med/Surg unit (11-7) and ICU (7-3) Cdrttact Alice at 293-4111. PRODUCTION WORK Full' and part time positions avillable in production work wi|i industrial laundry. Hours vaiy, no weekends or experience needed Apply at Work Clothes Rental. 568 Parkson, Henderson Monday thru Fnday. ROUTE DRIVER AND MISCELLANEOUS HELP Young man, must be physically fit, heavy work. Call 294-0004 BC — -^ Outgoing person with car, to assist with Misc. protects— Sales computer, real estate, print layout expenence is helpful. Ask for Radean 454-1050 or 564-9768 MAID SERVICE NEEDS PEOPLE INTERESTED IN ADVANCEMENT. Work with a crew. Grime Busters Maid Servk;e. 798-1002 _^ TOW TRUCK DRIVER WANTED Must be over 21 years old. Have valid Nevada Drivers License in good standing. Must live in Boulder City. Salary plus benefits. Apply 705 Juniper Way BC RAILROAD PASS HOTEL AND CASINO IS NOW HIRING. Full or part time maids Apply in person. See hotel manager 7 days a week 2800 S Boulder Hwy., Henderson. Drapery cleaner assistant, Part time weekdays. Sewing machine knowledge helpful.' Will tram. 565-6200 Easy Woek "Excellent Pay Assemble products at home Call for information. 504641-8003 Ext. 1311. Need mature person for Church Nursery. Positive, helpful, can interact with children, $6 per hour, Sundays 9:30 am til 11:30a.m Wednesdays 645 pm to 8 45 pm Call 565-8563 or 564-2114, SECRETARIAL POSITION callable at Boulder City Hospital. This s a shared position for Nursing Ad m.nistration and Community Relations Departments, Previous hospital. Media/ ^^jblic relations experience oquired, M ,st have e/.:ellentclenca ^nd computer skills. Contact Alice at 293-4111 BC • OWN YOUR OWN APPREL OR SHOE STORE. CHOOSE FROM: JEAN/SPORTSWEAR, LADIES, MEN'S. CHILDREN/MATERNITY, LARGE SIZES, PETITE. DANCEWfAR/AEROBIC, BRIDAL. LINGERIE OR ACCESSORIES STORE ADD COLOR ANALYSIS BRAND NAMES: LIZ CLAIBORNE, HEALTHTEX, BONNIE & BILL. ST MICHELE, FORENZA, BUGLE BOY, LEVI, CAMP BEVERLY HILLS. LESLIE FAYE LUCIA, OVER 2,000 OTHERS, OR $1399 ONE PRICE DESIGNER MULTI TIER PRICING DISCOUNT OR FAMILY SHOE STORE RETAIL PRICES UNBELIEVABLE FOR TOP QUALITY SHEOS NORMALLY PRICED FROM $19 TO $60 OVER 250 BRANDS 2 600 STYLES, $18,900 to $29,900: INVENTORY. TRAINING. FIXTURES. AIRFARE. GRANDOPENINGS, ETC, CAN OPEN 15 DAYS MR. SCHNEIDER (407) 366-8606 NEED EXTRA $$$$ 7? AVON To Buy or To Sell... No Money Down! 565-e060 CASA FLORES RESTAURANT In B.C. and Green Valley is now taking applications for waitresses, waiters, hostesses, dishwastiers, and busboys. Apply in person at 930 Nev Hwy., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. BC. ••••• • ••••* EARN MONEY typing at home. $30,000/year income potential. Details, (1) 805-687-6000 Ext B-22033 • • • BOBS ALL FAMILY RESTAURANT now accepiing applications for rt shwashers. cooks, .vaitresses Apply m person ^6 1 Nev Hwy BC Barmaid part time, must have bartender, server & health card Hdn Elks Lodge, Ask for John, 565-9959 after 11 am. Hours negotiable Combination Counter girl & laundromat attendant Evening shift. Apply at 67 W. Lake Mead t)etween 7 & 2. HOME HEALTH ATDE" Put your homemaking and personal care skills to work. We can give you -a flexible schedule to meet your needs Assignments are available in the Henderson/Boulder City area Call Medi Visit Extended Care 871-1031. Older lady "needed, my home, 2 hrs day fvlon, Tues. & Fn For 3 kids $10 day Prefer nurses aide background. Call 564-4808. Now accepting applications for lull time & part time car hops, day shift & evening shifts available. Apply in person Sonic Drive Inn 300 S Boulder Hwy Hdn. MEDICALLY TRAINED INDIVIDUAL can earn $12-$30/hr Part or lull-time, performing paramedical exams for insurance companies industrial accounts and drug screening in your area. Blood drawing and EKG experience a plus For info write: LIFEDATA MEDICAL SERVICES. Inc PO Box 11350. Shawnee Mission, KS 66207-1350. WANTED: Carpet Cleaner. Ph 564-6716, Part time housekkeeper, Experienced nurses aides, and part time dietary aide Apply in person Glen Halla Nu'^sing Home or call 565-8748 Hdn, Security Guard needed Sunset & Eiger Ra, area. Start at $4 25 per hr. Merit raise after 30 days 5 days a week. 8 hr. shifts, responsible adults only Holman Security, 2300 E Patrick Lane. Suite 7, las Vegas. 739-5858. Earn up to $339 per wk Assemble our products at home. Amazing recorded message reveals details, Ph 382-7848 Experienced home care aides to work m Hend & BC, Must have own car. Hours vary Call 368-2411 HELP WANTED. CASHIER Apply Opportunity Village Thrift Store. 10 W Pacific, Hdn, 564-7128 Baker needed, Winchells, Hdn. Starting $4. to $5. depending on exp. Will tram. 565-0360. ask for Mgr $5000 mo. Process phone orders at home. People call you, -^ee details. Call Jan. 1-318-922-3275. "Ext K-28. Earn money at home assembling jewelry, toys, automotive parts or othersat home. Call Jan. 1-318-3275 Ext B-28 RESUMES' Composed, edited and typed. Also Contracts, Letters, and Wills. Bee's Business Service, 527 Hotel Plaza (The Village) 293-526B BC. IMAGES COMMERCIAL FLOOR MAINTENANCE Now Hiring Full & Part Time Positions for state approved apprenticeship program Earn while you learn. Salaries up to $450 week. Call 564-8580 GENERAL LABORS/PRODUCTION WORKERS & CLERICAL Immediate Openings Good Pay — No Fee MANPOWER TEMPORARY SERVICES 30 A Water Street Henderson, NV 565-5554 Copies 10ne to me and you are in all inetancea ol my life with me. I, in thia ahort diak>gue want to thank you for everything and confirm once more that I never want to be leparated from you, no matter how great material deeirea may be. I want to be with you end my Loved ones In your perpetual gtory. Amen. Thank you lor your tove towarda me and my Lovee onee. Peraona must soy this prayer 3 consecutive days asking your wiah. After the 3fd day, your wish wW be granted, no master how dlfflcult H may be. Promise to publish this dielogue as soon as your favor has been granted. Mine was. Thank you Irom my heart. A.M. Dena Buys & Sells Collectibles. Museum quality authentic American Indian place All tribes represented and welcome, traditional one of a kind collection. Jewelry, carvings, oils, sandpaintings, Ksttchinas, pottery, rugs, FOSSILS & ARTIFACTS Indians know abKJut good healthy feelings from stones Dena has more than 250 varieties of RADIANT CRYSTALS, gems, minerals and rocks for collectors Visit Dena at GLIHER GULCH DENA'S, on Boulder Hwy. off Sunset Rd Henderson She had objects for all ages & custom, work GLITTER GULCH'S DENAS, A VERY SPECIAL PLACE 565-0711, VOICE-PIANODRAMA, Private Lessons by Professional Teacher & Entertainer. Openings available. Weddings, organization shows, .receptions, clubs. Performance available. Sin?)erPianist, organist, show director. For lessons & performance information calf Flo Raymond, Coral Cove Music Studio Productions 565-8469. bottle fed baby pigs. b-t>-aue pigs 361-2484 • For Sale: Kenmore Wash6r & Dryer, $160 Queen Size Bed & Frame $20 Ph 564-0920 All steel storage building 3-sided shed 40X40 for $5,200 40X100 w/door for $11.600 Never erected will deliver (303) 757-3107 GE Refrigerator/freezer 2 door. $75. Ph 565-9208 GE Heavy duty electric dryer $75 Cali565-1118after5 30 p m Commercial limb shreader $295 A Foxy Moped $350 Kirby Vacuum w/all attachments $50 Misc Norman Rockwell collectors • plates 565-9435. Simmons hide-a-bed couch $150 Living rm chair. Call after 5 pm 565-7960 10 Speed bike, weights baby items. (Off Boulder & Magic Way) 564-0700 Lots more, 10 sp. bike, weights, baby Items and lots more (Off BIdr Hwy & Magic Way 564-0700 For Sate: Portable cement mixer $275 293-3 340 2 all steel arch buildings Will tlJ^ *'" '^'^e *4,600. 50X100 costs $18,500, list *1O,700 taknc i( 303-757-3107 Octagon table, dark wood Jhle^^sAlsoother^a^s FORSALE20"la"^^?;S3^ Reel, front throw 3 HP 7 blade $125 293-1360 BC FOR SALE Bii^Ti^ rocker with ottoman Hi low table Low coffee table hi dining. Both new Don't need in our RV 293 373 0Rr SMALL ARM CHAiR;^;;^ sleeper. 2 high back swivel chairs, tables, footstools floor humidifier, old low 3 drawer chest and ladder chair, woven seat Good cond. reasonable 293-2524 BC tlHAN ALLEN T^RipT? DRESSER dark p,ne. Pa,d $900 Triple dresser, antique white, paid $900 askmo $250 293-6537 BC ^ FRIGIDAIRE 30 ^iSTiJ^ range $135 FngidaireMcu ft freezer $150 Maytag dishwasher $135 294-0642 BC BROWN ADMIRAL FR|(3 FREEZER works fine. $125 19" portable TV w/wireless remote $100 294-0501 BC MOVING China cabinet,' table, w/4 chairs $225, King size bed $100 Washer and dryer $150 Glass sheets 34 X 76 $3 00 ea Belt sender $25 Coffee table, old mirror misc 293-7154 BC FOR SALE 7 ft sofa, excel cond $150 293-3708 BC 25 CU FT SIDE BY SIDE REFRIGERATOR Harvest gold $450 293-4826 BC PRAYER TO HOLY SPIRIT Holy Spnf, you are the only one who ctearseverything for me, you who brighten all paes in your glory forever. Thank you for the mercy you have had lor me and my loved ones Thank you for the received favor (The person should say this prayer tor ttireeconsecutive days, witTtout rnentioning it>€ favor. Within three days, the Grace ww be rocenved no matter how difficult it may seem. Publish when the grace is received) ,il^^UYUEisthefinit ccrKtact lens you never have to clean. • WithACUVUEyou'ir always wear clean, fresh, comtortahle lenses. ,A(:U\'l!H The Convenience of disposability and the comfort of NEW, sterile lenses on the eyes every week appeal to the majority of contact lens patients. No longer are connplicated lens care regimens necessary. You wear your lenses 1 week and throw them away!! Come in for an eye exam and if ypur prescription qualifies you to be an appropriate candidate, we wili let you try the new disposable contact lenses FREE for 1 week. Dr. Bruce Conroy, optometrist, 899 Adams Blvd., Boulder City, NV. 294-0030. Office hours Monday through Friday, 9-12, 1-5. VISTAKON, INC.. a ^ofcwtm-^cWtcM company. > X A /' ORIGINAL DEFECTIVE i

PAGE 44

Tbuwdayy September 28,1989 Page 44, Henderson Home News, Boulder City NewB, Green Valley Newe^ TELL 'EM YOU SAW IT IN THE WANT ADSl! A proven teller can be yours. Call 564-1881 to find out how to make them work Jf^^^^JfJf ^J^JfJflfJfJf PROFESSIONAL SERVICES w p lint average house $250, 1 yrs. E xp., work 1 laranteed Call Jinn .54460. 'lEED NEW CLOTHES? fifed alterations or reparcs? il can do it for you. Children [an: J adults clothing. Will also Jo weddings Please call BoDbi at 293-4920 BC W have t long reac h! Our CLASSIFIEDS' retch •BOIOER CITT •BENDEHSON • GREEN VALLET Gall today 293-2302 or 864-1881 (tM f\r\ TILE TUB SPECIAL • *iyy 3 Walls, 5'High liicl Labor & TIIB B.ith Floors $250 Don'l ReglazeNow Tub $500 PAUL BENTON 898-0054 Hiilhtooms Bciulilul Lie K24123 ELECTRIC EXPRESS For All Your Electrical Needs When You Want Help Fast! Lie #29452 452-0420 UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP Not responsible for pre.''ous owner. Wright Way Appliance Repair. Buy-Sei' Trade-Repair 293-4447 $30SVC. BC EARL'S TYPEWRITER REPAIR Specialzing in IBM and Smith/Corona Typewriters Free in shop estimates WE DO HOUSECALLS L'.s<'d typewriter for sale 565-8230 607 Federal l.ir #(Hi)-,5786 Tender Loving Clean We are Bonded & Dependable We Clean To Your Personal Satisfaction • Offices •Homes Call 454-9116 MASONERY WORK •Brickwork ^ •Block Work •Block Walls •Planter Boxes All Types of Masonery Work Lie. 11020977 Free Estimates 477-7428 A-J's AUTO REPAIR 350 E. Basic Rd. 564-9008 camMit fomxm > OOHUTC wrouorivt unnci •BrakM ~s^ •Tun-Up •Electrical •Cooling Syalami •General Service •Air Conditioning •Oil, Lube and Filler •Front Wheel Alignment •Charging Syslemt Open 8 a.m.-S p.m. Men thru FrI. IVEVM HOUSE OF HOSE 2912 S. Highland Las Vegas, NV 89109 731-3136 745 West Sunset Henderson, NV 89015 565-1288 HOSES AND FITTINGS FOR ALL PURPOSES HAPPINESS IS A GOOD HOSE JOB* JAWS DRAIN & SEWER SERVICE $29.95, any drain cleared Main, $40 & up • Flat rate 7 days • No extra charge Senior Discount • No service charge All work guaranteed Ph 792-3739 Lie #000029-725-4 Piano Lessons, beginner 8mm home movie transferand Intermediate. Pat 'ed to VHS video tape. G&G Caldwerwood. 564-1840. Tra nsfer 451-1349 LEON PRESSURE CLEANING Tired of a grimy driveway? Tired of that greasy garage floor? Do you want that NEW look your driveway and garage once had? if so, then call LEON PRESSURE CLEANING 564-6292 We'll have that driveway or garage looking like new In no tinwl You won't believe your eyes! MIKE MORRISON ELECTRIC Licensed-Bonded -Insured Lie. No. 27971 Call 564-2145 VAN THE HANDYMAN DO ALL Ph 564-6477 J&J Quality Landscape COMPLETE LAWN CARE LIGHT TREE & SHRUB TRIMMING Bus. (702) 294-1424 FREE ESTIMATES Ret. (702) 293-1503 BOULDER CONCRETE WANTS TO MEET YOUR CONCRETE NEEDS FOR FREE ESTIMATES AND QUALITY WORKMANSHIP CALL MICK CASEY BOULDER ^'TV ^93.1571 BACKHOE and BOBCAT SERVICE •Lots Graded •Ditching 30 Years Experience — Hourly Rates Carl W. Ford 293-0593 BOULDER SAND & GRAVEL, INC. e24 YUCCA ST., BOULDER CITY, NV 89005 OFFERING THE FOLLOWING CONSTRUCTION AND LANDSCAPING SUPPLIES •DESERT ROSE LANDSCAPE ROCK •TYPE 11, REJECT SAND DELIVERY AVAILABLE M-F 7-3 P.M. • • NOW AVAILABLE • READY MIX CONCRETE 294-1156 Jfln Preschool Music Classes Accepting New Students (or Fall Semester NOW Please Leave Name and Phone Number at 565-95U — HAULING — •Construction Cleanup •Trees Removed •Rubbish Hauled •BIdgs Torn Down LOW LOW PRICES Free Estimates DICK'S TRUCKING 564-8501 MCS GARDENINC Licensed Lawn Maintenance Residential & Commercial •Tree Trimming -Thatch Reseed • Lawn Clean-Up & Haul Ofis -Sprinkler & Timer Clock FOR A FREE ESTIMATE Ad,ustments CALL 564-6742 S9nlor Olteounts /\s THE CAVANAUGH'S XJ\.l PAINTING ^^ Interior / Exterior Free Estimates Licensed 294-1422 INSURANCE TO HIGH? Too Many Tickets? SR-22 Needed? Call Morrow Insurance Agency Green Valley 451-5533 HOLMAN'S PAINTING CO. Licensed • Bonded • Insured Interior • Exterior Residential • Commercial Uc. No. 2S710 FREE ESTIMATES 564-7554 THE SALVATION ARMY IS IN DESPERATE NEED OF FURNITURE AND CLOTHES. PLEASE CALL THE SALVATION ARMY PICKUP AT 649-2374-5-e HOWARD HELDERLEIN CONSTRUCTION Commercial • Residential • Remodels and Additons License #021013 565^74 • ^ House of Travel We honor all advertised special air, cruise and paclacea available! Move-in prices start at 37,000. Bath • Air Conditioning • Awnings • Washer & Dryer Sales by: Diamond Mobile Homes Greenway Road and Moa Lane, Hendenon 564-6949 MOBILE HOME FOR SALE VERY NICE 3 bdrm, 2 bth in Villa Hermosa 565-5511 RENTALS TWO BDRM one bath $650 mo. 1 yr lease. First, last, depo. Avail Oct 1. 293-5268. No pets BC B/ Basic High School Studio ^,^\ All utilites included /\.ail. Immed $285 plus ileposit. Gentle outside dog allowed., Call after noon 564-0811 THREE BDRM Boulder City home for rent .Call Bart or Anita at Hyde and Assoc Re altors. 293-6014 BC ROOMS FOR SINGLE OCCUPANCY $100 wk plus tax Rooms double occupany $110 per wk plus tax. Single room and breaklast $125 wkly plus tax Double occupancy room and breakfast $150 weekly plus fax' Boulder Dam Hotel 1305 Arizona 293-1808 BC .VEEKLY KITCHENETTES. • 10 pets. A'estern Inn • '^ 94-0393 or 293-2044 BC Room for rent, partial-bath kitchen privileges 565-986£ 4 BR 2 BA familyroom, RV parking $775 mo. First, last and depo No pets. 293-4630 BC For Rent: 1-2-3 bdrm trailers $75 to $120 week. 565-6784 or 565-7141. For Rent: Kitchenettes. $45 week Utilities paid Shady Rest Motel 565 7688 Hdn. Prime commercial space for lease on Water St 2 units Approximately 900 square leet each. 72 square feet w/ofl street parking in front. Call Don Kramer 565-3742 between 9 am and 2 30 p.m. House for Rent like new. partly furnished $595 mo. Spacious and clean. 293-1716. TWO BDKM 1 bath for rent. BC $600 mo. plus sec. and cleaning. Call after4p.in. 2933 171. BC Apt for rent, Clean, quiet. 1 bdrm, 1 bth. $254 mo. Call 564-6805. Teddy's Kitchenettes Just bring your toothbrush Everything furnished. Phone 293-1716 • Quality Roommates" No cost to list; 735-5996 Need to move / 735-5877 $125 to Estates7 DAYS. LANDLORDS Free Listing Service 1-2-3-4 Bdrm Homes Sun Realty 735-1244 Need a place to stay in beautiful Boulder City? We have lovely 3 room suites with kitchen, living room, king bedroom, Smal' pets OK. Weekly rates. Call Nevada Inn. 702-293-2044. BC BOULDER HILLS CONDO for rent. 2 BR 1 1/2 baths. $550 plus assoc fee. Completely furnished. 293-7551 BC Unf 2 bdrm, 1 bth, new carpet, fresh pant, most util, paid, $390 plus deposit. Call 565-0340, leave message For rent; 2 bdrm unf duplex apt Clean & roomy. Section 8 welcome. 564-2524. FOR RENT Small 2 BR house in downtown B.C. Ideal for retired couple. $475 mo. 1st and last plus $200 cleaning deposit. Avail 10/5. Contact J;m 870-9196 after 7pm or all day Fn and Sat. BC REGAHA POINTE CONDO Avail for 4 months $800 mo. Call Ellen, Boulder Dam Realty 293-4663 BC STILL AVAILABLE FOR RENT 2 br house. New floors and paint. No utility deposits. $600 mo plus $350 depo for security and cleaning. Call eves 294-2393 BC LUXURY GOLF COURSE HOME AVAILABLE NOW lor 12 month lease, $1,575 month, call DESERT SUN REALTY 293-2151 ask for Bob Boston BC CONDO FOR RENT Avail 10/1 2BR 2 BA. Fireplace Call 293-6377 before 6pm, 294-1584 atter 6pm BC 2 BR 1 BA City center Boulder City $500 mo 1st, last, and sec dep No animals. Avail 10/3 565-3198 BC FOR RENT Small 1 BR 1 BA house. $300 mo Limited storage. Ideal for 1 or 2 Deposits required. 293-4517 BC FOR RENT Available no\ $525 per mo with $276 depo. 2 bdrm 1 1/2 baths. All kitchen appliances, carpets and home just been cleaned Ready for immediate occupancy. Second level Covered parking for 1 unit Swimming pool DESERT SUN REALTY, "EALTQRS 293 2151 Dert Inn Motel nc clew) rooms starting at $90 week. Mad Swvice, color TV Also x.Q^?"!^ available g3-2827, 800 Nev Hwy 4 BR 2 BA Lewis home $825 P^^^P $500 security Children and pet OK 293-3339 BC FOR RENT 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Fenced Yard, Cul De Sac 293-1897 20X20 GARAGE 294-0501 DETACHED FOR RENT $50 BC AVAIL 11/1 Beautiful, clean 3BR 1 3/4 ba Cul de sac Lewis Home $900 mo $900 sec dep 293-6125 BC 2BRCondo 2ndfloor Avaif 10/10 Rent $475 Deposit $475 293-7105 BC FOR RENT Duplex, unf, 1 bdrm, nght for single or couple. Range, ref, w/dhookup. No pets. $375 Avail 10/5 294-3013 BC 4 BR 2 BA house w/2car garage and fireplace $825 per mo plus sec depo. Avail 10/4 293-2511 BC 2 BR 2 BA condo w/ fireplace on Darlene. Covered parking. $550 mo Avail immediately. 293-2511 BC STUDIO for rent AVAILABLE NOW Newly painted and upgraded Call 293-0116 or 293-3402 ask for Cristina $295 mo rent. $250 sec dep. BC 4 bedrms. 1 Ba Lge fam rm and L.R.. workshop-ALL NEW CARPETING AND PAINTED THROUGHOUT Children OK, AVAIL NOW $875 Call Dick Blair Realty 293-2171 BC 3 bedrm. 2 ba, 2 car gar Nice neighborhood CHILDREN OK $850. Avail now. Call Dick Blair Realty 293-2171 BC BUSINESS SPACE for rent Approximately 720 sq ft in professional plaza 293-0251 BC VON'S CENTER RETAIL FOR LEASE in Boulder City •Good Parking •Good Visibility NEAL SINIAKIN 294-1444 Broker COMMERCIAL BUILDING With Yard and Office For Rent 294-0686 Want a Condo'' We have 2-avail NOW, Call Dick Blair Realty 293-2171 for details BC A A A A A^A" BOULDER HILLS CONDO 2 bdrm 1 1/2 baths Complete, ly furnished Washer/dryer, Oishwasher, great pool Refs requ 293-6815 BC B C HOUSE FOR RENT 3 BR 2 BA 1319 Appaioosa S875 mo plus dep. Children OK Pets maybe Call 293-4357 or Jeff (213) 592-2348 (collect) STUDIO FOR RENT $85 wk plus dep. Util paid. Share washer/dryer. Call 294-0792 BC KITCHENETTES $89 wk. 293-7673 BC HENDERSON PLAZA ARTS. T30 Center m. Henderson, Nevada, 565-7512 2 bdrm., unfurnished, pool & play yard. Near schools & shopping. Free Cable TV. from $315 month PROFESSIONAL OFFICE SPACE Available for rent October 1 500 sq. ft. located at 916 Nev. Hwy. Bouldar Station 294-0225 FOR RENT 5650 Per Mo. Boulder City MOBILE HOME | 2 Bdrm. 2 Bath, Fam. Rin.,Nw Carpet. 1300* sq.ft. a MANNY 294-0870 ANCHOR REALTY • • • • ^m ^m 1^ ^. • • ^ ^B ^B • • BIB ^a-^B • • § m^ ^m APARTMENTS AVAILABLE 1, 2, 3 Bedroom Units For Info call 293-1615 or 294-0577 HOURS: 9 to 5 Daily CASA DE ALICIA APTS. M & M II APTS. Professioflally managed by Equinox Psvelopmant, Inc. ATLANTIC CITY APARTMENTS Clean, Quality Apartments In Henderson • Central Air • Appliances • Drapes 'Carpets • Water Paid • Washer/Dryer Available $415 up to $430 a month. Newly remodeled, spacious 2 bedroom apartments. Convenient location. Available Now. 565-7028 HOMES FOR RESALE AT LAKE MOUNTAIN ESTATES DRASnCAIXY REDUCED TO$l70;D00.14IOiqn,3Br.2kfcO iKMse. Real oak wood paacHai throi|tML Gan|c RV parkia, block waB, Bcsatlfi^Vicw. BRA W NEW uyriNG. Owkit fcy SWmmsl.. 2JI0p iq. ft^lesl vtew or Lakt ar^Ubk at Uke Moeauia Estates. Largt larafc. Nkcsl near f^laa. Fcalarcs CanaiaUtttttm.9mm%ra9PLeaij.CmUktMtt.tmn. $I,S00(lil0s^ft03iR2iA,Si|jg3|'illialteweflikfrollrt 1 aa4parch.r8acM.Virjaktlaa*^g; araitsiMd. laasltr kalk. BsaotlTal S1S.N0 (1 J3t sq. nj OvsrslMd Miltr • oaauia sad lake wkm. Urft tack tfccki slorac* OPEN HOUSE SATUIOAY AND SUNDAY 120 tM. ake ountain S REALTY 513 Lake Superior Lane Boulder Ciiy, Nev. 8900J 293-2263

PAGE 45

Tbuwdayy September 28,1989 Page 44, Henderson Home News, Boulder City NewB, Green Valley Newe^ TELL 'EM YOU SAW IT IN THE WANT ADSl! A proven teller can be yours. Call 564-1881 to find out how to make them work Jf^^^^JfJf ^J^JfJflfJfJf PROFESSIONAL SERVICES w p lint average house $250, 1 yrs. E xp., work 1 laranteed Call Jinn .54460. 'lEED NEW CLOTHES? fifed alterations or reparcs? il can do it for you. Children [an: J adults clothing. Will also Jo weddings Please call BoDbi at 293-4920 BC W have t long reac h! Our CLASSIFIEDS' retch •BOIOER CITT •BENDEHSON • GREEN VALLET Gall today 293-2302 or 864-1881 (tM f\r\ TILE TUB SPECIAL • *iyy 3 Walls, 5'High liicl Labor & TIIB B.ith Floors $250 Don'l ReglazeNow Tub $500 PAUL BENTON 898-0054 Hiilhtooms Bciulilul Lie K24123 ELECTRIC EXPRESS For All Your Electrical Needs When You Want Help Fast! Lie #29452 452-0420 UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP Not responsible for pre.''ous owner. Wright Way Appliance Repair. Buy-Sei' Trade-Repair 293-4447 $30SVC. BC EARL'S TYPEWRITER REPAIR Specialzing in IBM and Smith/Corona Typewriters Free in shop estimates WE DO HOUSECALLS L'.s<'d typewriter for sale 565-8230 607 Federal l.ir #(Hi)-,5786 Tender Loving Clean We are Bonded & Dependable We Clean To Your Personal Satisfaction • Offices •Homes Call 454-9116 MASONERY WORK •Brickwork ^ •Block Work •Block Walls •Planter Boxes All Types of Masonery Work Lie. 11020977 Free Estimates 477-7428 A-J's AUTO REPAIR 350 E. Basic Rd. 564-9008 camMit fomxm > OOHUTC wrouorivt unnci •BrakM ~s^ •Tun-Up •Electrical •Cooling Syalami •General Service •Air Conditioning •Oil, Lube and Filler •Front Wheel Alignment •Charging Syslemt Open 8 a.m.-S p.m. Men thru FrI. IVEVM HOUSE OF HOSE 2912 S. Highland Las Vegas, NV 89109 731-3136 745 West Sunset Henderson, NV 89015 565-1288 HOSES AND FITTINGS FOR ALL PURPOSES HAPPINESS IS A GOOD HOSE JOB* JAWS DRAIN & SEWER SERVICE $29.95, any drain cleared Main, $40 & up • Flat rate 7 days • No extra charge Senior Discount • No service charge All work guaranteed Ph 792-3739 Lie #000029-725-4 Piano Lessons, beginner 8mm home movie transferand Intermediate. Pat 'ed to VHS video tape. G&G Caldwerwood. 564-1840. Tra nsfer 451-1349 LEON PRESSURE CLEANING Tired of a grimy driveway? Tired of that greasy garage floor? Do you want that NEW look your driveway and garage once had? if so, then call LEON PRESSURE CLEANING 564-6292 We'll have that driveway or garage looking like new In no tinwl You won't believe your eyes! MIKE MORRISON ELECTRIC Licensed-Bonded -Insured Lie. No. 27971 Call 564-2145 VAN THE HANDYMAN DO ALL Ph 564-6477 J&J Quality Landscape COMPLETE LAWN CARE LIGHT TREE & SHRUB TRIMMING Bus. (702) 294-1424 FREE ESTIMATES Ret. (702) 293-1503 BOULDER CONCRETE WANTS TO MEET YOUR CONCRETE NEEDS FOR FREE ESTIMATES AND QUALITY WORKMANSHIP CALL MICK CASEY BOULDER ^'TV ^93.1571 BACKHOE and BOBCAT SERVICE •Lots Graded •Ditching 30 Years Experience — Hourly Rates Carl W. Ford 293-0593 BOULDER SAND & GRAVEL, INC. e24 YUCCA ST., BOULDER CITY, NV 89005 OFFERING THE FOLLOWING CONSTRUCTION AND LANDSCAPING SUPPLIES •DESERT ROSE LANDSCAPE ROCK •TYPE 11, REJECT SAND DELIVERY AVAILABLE M-F 7-3 P.M. • • NOW AVAILABLE • READY MIX CONCRETE 294-1156 Jfln Preschool Music Classes Accepting New Students (or Fall Semester NOW Please Leave Name and Phone Number at 565-95U — HAULING — •Construction Cleanup •Trees Removed •Rubbish Hauled •BIdgs Torn Down LOW LOW PRICES Free Estimates DICK'S TRUCKING 564-8501 MCS GARDENINC Licensed Lawn Maintenance Residential & Commercial •Tree Trimming -Thatch Reseed • Lawn Clean-Up & Haul Ofis -Sprinkler & Timer Clock FOR A FREE ESTIMATE Ad,ustments CALL 564-6742 S9nlor Olteounts /\s THE CAVANAUGH'S XJ\.l PAINTING ^^ Interior / Exterior Free Estimates Licensed 294-1422 INSURANCE TO HIGH? Too Many Tickets? SR-22 Needed? Call Morrow Insurance Agency Green Valley 451-5533 HOLMAN'S PAINTING CO. Licensed • Bonded • Insured Interior • Exterior Residential • Commercial Uc. No. 2S710 FREE ESTIMATES 564-7554 THE SALVATION ARMY IS IN DESPERATE NEED OF FURNITURE AND CLOTHES. PLEASE CALL THE SALVATION ARMY PICKUP AT 649-2374-5-e HOWARD HELDERLEIN CONSTRUCTION Commercial • Residential • Remodels and Additons License #021013 565^74 • ^ House of Travel We honor all advertised special air, cruise and paclacea available! Move-in prices start at 37,000. Bath • Air Conditioning • Awnings • Washer & Dryer Sales by: Diamond Mobile Homes Greenway Road and Moa Lane, Hendenon 564-6949 MOBILE HOME FOR SALE VERY NICE 3 bdrm, 2 bth in Villa Hermosa 565-5511 RENTALS TWO BDRM one bath $650 mo. 1 yr lease. First, last, depo. Avail Oct 1. 293-5268. No pets BC B/ Basic High School Studio ^,^\ All utilites included /\.ail. Immed $285 plus ileposit. Gentle outside dog allowed., Call after noon 564-0811 THREE BDRM Boulder City home for rent .Call Bart or Anita at Hyde and Assoc Re altors. 293-6014 BC ROOMS FOR SINGLE OCCUPANCY $100 wk plus tax Rooms double occupany $110 per wk plus tax. Single room and breaklast $125 wkly plus tax Double occupancy room and breakfast $150 weekly plus fax' Boulder Dam Hotel 1305 Arizona 293-1808 BC .VEEKLY KITCHENETTES. • 10 pets. A'estern Inn • '^ 94-0393 or 293-2044 BC Room for rent, partial-bath kitchen privileges 565-986£ 4 BR 2 BA familyroom, RV parking $775 mo. First, last and depo No pets. 293-4630 BC For Rent: 1-2-3 bdrm trailers $75 to $120 week. 565-6784 or 565-7141. For Rent: Kitchenettes. $45 week Utilities paid Shady Rest Motel 565 7688 Hdn. Prime commercial space for lease on Water St 2 units Approximately 900 square leet each. 72 square feet w/ofl street parking in front. Call Don Kramer 565-3742 between 9 am and 2 30 p.m. House for Rent like new. partly furnished $595 mo. Spacious and clean. 293-1716. TWO BDKM 1 bath for rent. BC $600 mo. plus sec. and cleaning. Call after4p.in. 2933 171. BC Apt for rent, Clean, quiet. 1 bdrm, 1 bth. $254 mo. Call 564-6805. Teddy's Kitchenettes Just bring your toothbrush Everything furnished. Phone 293-1716 • Quality Roommates" No cost to list; 735-5996 Need to move / 735-5877 $125 to Estates7 DAYS. LANDLORDS Free Listing Service 1-2-3-4 Bdrm Homes Sun Realty 735-1244 Need a place to stay in beautiful Boulder City? We have lovely 3 room suites with kitchen, living room, king bedroom, Smal' pets OK. Weekly rates. Call Nevada Inn. 702-293-2044. BC BOULDER HILLS CONDO for rent. 2 BR 1 1/2 baths. $550 plus assoc fee. Completely furnished. 293-7551 BC Unf 2 bdrm, 1 bth, new carpet, fresh pant, most util, paid, $390 plus deposit. Call 565-0340, leave message For rent; 2 bdrm unf duplex apt Clean & roomy. Section 8 welcome. 564-2524. FOR RENT Small 2 BR house in downtown B.C. Ideal for retired couple. $475 mo. 1st and last plus $200 cleaning deposit. Avail 10/5. Contact J;m 870-9196 after 7pm or all day Fn and Sat. BC REGAHA POINTE CONDO Avail for 4 months $800 mo. Call Ellen, Boulder Dam Realty 293-4663 BC STILL AVAILABLE FOR RENT 2 br house. New floors and paint. No utility deposits. $600 mo plus $350 depo for security and cleaning. Call eves 294-2393 BC LUXURY GOLF COURSE HOME AVAILABLE NOW lor 12 month lease, $1,575 month, call DESERT SUN REALTY 293-2151 ask for Bob Boston BC CONDO FOR RENT Avail 10/1 2BR 2 BA. Fireplace Call 293-6377 before 6pm, 294-1584 atter 6pm BC 2 BR 1 BA City center Boulder City $500 mo 1st, last, and sec dep No animals. Avail 10/3 565-3198 BC FOR RENT Small 1 BR 1 BA house. $300 mo Limited storage. Ideal for 1 or 2 Deposits required. 293-4517 BC FOR RENT Available no\ $525 per mo with $276 depo. 2 bdrm 1 1/2 baths. All kitchen appliances, carpets and home just been cleaned Ready for immediate occupancy. Second level Covered parking for 1 unit Swimming pool DESERT SUN REALTY, "EALTQRS 293 2151 Dert Inn Motel nc clew) rooms starting at $90 week. Mad Swvice, color TV Also x.Q^?"!^ available g3-2827, 800 Nev Hwy 4 BR 2 BA Lewis home $825 P^^^P $500 security Children and pet OK 293-3339 BC FOR RENT 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Fenced Yard, Cul De Sac 293-1897 20X20 GARAGE 294-0501 DETACHED FOR RENT $50 BC AVAIL 11/1 Beautiful, clean 3BR 1 3/4 ba Cul de sac Lewis Home $900 mo $900 sec dep 293-6125 BC 2BRCondo 2ndfloor Avaif 10/10 Rent $475 Deposit $475 293-7105 BC FOR RENT Duplex, unf, 1 bdrm, nght for single or couple. Range, ref, w/dhookup. No pets. $375 Avail 10/5 294-3013 BC 4 BR 2 BA house w/2car garage and fireplace $825 per mo plus sec depo. Avail 10/4 293-2511 BC 2 BR 2 BA condo w/ fireplace on Darlene. Covered parking. $550 mo Avail immediately. 293-2511 BC STUDIO for rent AVAILABLE NOW Newly painted and upgraded Call 293-0116 or 293-3402 ask for Cristina $295 mo rent. $250 sec dep. BC 4 bedrms. 1 Ba Lge fam rm and L.R.. workshop-ALL NEW CARPETING AND PAINTED THROUGHOUT Children OK, AVAIL NOW $875 Call Dick Blair Realty 293-2171 BC 3 bedrm. 2 ba, 2 car gar Nice neighborhood CHILDREN OK $850. Avail now. Call Dick Blair Realty 293-2171 BC BUSINESS SPACE for rent Approximately 720 sq ft in professional plaza 293-0251 BC VON'S CENTER RETAIL FOR LEASE in Boulder City •Good Parking •Good Visibility NEAL SINIAKIN 294-1444 Broker COMMERCIAL BUILDING With Yard and Office For Rent 294-0686 Want a Condo'' We have 2-avail NOW, Call Dick Blair Realty 293-2171 for details BC A A A A A^A" BOULDER HILLS CONDO 2 bdrm 1 1/2 baths Complete, ly furnished Washer/dryer, Oishwasher, great pool Refs requ 293-6815 BC B C HOUSE FOR RENT 3 BR 2 BA 1319 Appaioosa S875 mo plus dep. Children OK Pets maybe Call 293-4357 or Jeff (213) 592-2348 (collect) STUDIO FOR RENT $85 wk plus dep. Util paid. Share washer/dryer. Call 294-0792 BC KITCHENETTES $89 wk. 293-7673 BC HENDERSON PLAZA ARTS. T30 Center m. Henderson, Nevada, 565-7512 2 bdrm., unfurnished, pool & play yard. Near schools & shopping. Free Cable TV. from $315 month PROFESSIONAL OFFICE SPACE Available for rent October 1 500 sq. ft. located at 916 Nev. Hwy. Bouldar Station 294-0225 FOR RENT 5650 Per Mo. Boulder City MOBILE HOME | 2 Bdrm. 2 Bath, Fam. Rin.,Nw Carpet. 1300* sq.ft. a MANNY 294-0870 ANCHOR REALTY • • • • ^m ^m 1^ ^. • • ^ ^B ^B • • BIB ^a-^B • • § m^ ^m APARTMENTS AVAILABLE 1, 2, 3 Bedroom Units For Info call 293-1615 or 294-0577 HOURS: 9 to 5 Daily CASA DE ALICIA APTS. M & M II APTS. Professioflally managed by Equinox Psvelopmant, Inc. ATLANTIC CITY APARTMENTS Clean, Quality Apartments In Henderson • Central Air • Appliances • Drapes 'Carpets • Water Paid • Washer/Dryer Available $415 up to $430 a month. Newly remodeled, spacious 2 bedroom apartments. Convenient location. Available Now. 565-7028 HOMES FOR RESALE AT LAKE MOUNTAIN ESTATES DRASnCAIXY REDUCED TO$l70;D00.14IOiqn,3Br.2kfcO iKMse. Real oak wood paacHai throi|tML Gan|c RV parkia, block waB, Bcsatlfi^Vicw. BRA W NEW uyriNG. Owkit fcy SWmmsl.. 2JI0p iq. ft^lesl vtew or Lakt ar^Ubk at Uke Moeauia Estates. Largt larafc. Nkcsl near f^laa. Fcalarcs CanaiaUtttttm.9mm%ra9PLeaij.CmUktMtt.tmn. $I,S00(lil0s^ft03iR2iA,Si|jg3|'illialteweflikfrollrt 1 aa4parch.r8acM.Virjaktlaa*^g; araitsiMd. laasltr kalk. BsaotlTal S1S.N0 (1 J3t sq. nj OvsrslMd Miltr • oaauia sad lake wkm. Urft tack tfccki slorac* OPEN HOUSE SATUIOAY AND SUNDAY 120 tM. ake ountain S REALTY 513 Lake Superior Lane Boulder Ciiy, Nev. 8900J 293-2263

PAGE 46

^ m. V. ^W^R Page 46 Handwaon Home News. Boulder City News, Green Valley News Thnrsday, September 28. 1989 High(8.nd HiUs house for rent. 3 bdmn, 2 btti, garage, ferwed yd. ExcelE Condition. Near school $780 mo. $400 deposit Avail Nov. 5. Ph 5 64-2145 Unfurnished house for rent Newly remodeled $575 mo. Deposit of $575 No Pets 564 58 71 or 564-2888. WEEKLY 56S7929 KITCHENEHES APARTMKMTS AB LOW 4 $250 month Fuml9h0d 864^952 RETAIL OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE Approx 840-3,100 sq ft First Western Plaza 1000 Nev Hwy Boulder City M3-2367 or 2S34344 Trailer for Rent: UtlHtlee and Cable TV included. Near Skyline Caaino. $110 per week pkis deposit for Single person. 564-0984. OFFICES FOR RENT From 2S0 sq. ft. Very Rsaaonable Boulder Theatre BIdg. 2M-iaM BC. REAL ESTATE ASSUf^ABLE Lake Tree Condo for sale $86,000 ERA, The Realty Center, Laureen 293-7551 BC RESibENTIALrOTResiden"ai lot. 2 2 acres tor sale by owner Sub Div 11 Unobstructed view. Appraised 125t\^. Owner will carry cifter 20 percent down. Ea&y^ terms $110,000 Call 29 3-0434 BC HERE IT IS' THREE TII^E AWARD WINNING HOtVIE. Drive by 1506 Irene Dr. Phone for appt only and full, information Owner occupied with large dog Selling at FHA, VA appraisal. SI 76 000 ?Q 3-323Q BC Highland Hills area. 3 kxirm, 2'/? bth, 2 story home. Ig Assumable 9'/?% loan $83,000 565-1121 or 564-7536 FOR SALE 3 BR 1 BA dng rm, country kitchen. Me roof garage, auto sprkirs $98,500 BY APPT ONLY 540 Birch 2 94 1983 BC riRSTTIME HOME BUYERS Plan now to spend Christmas in a home of your own FREE counciling includes prequalifications and purchasng guidance by buyers igents HUD&VARepom 'ormation also available Call • lowlorapp't, 564 5142 ask 'or Candace oi Mary Century 21 .'R Reaily f^lNING COUNTRY: Molel 93 miles east of Reno off I 80. 12 units with 7 ktchs $195000 Write Lou Boxx 778 Lovelock. Nevada 89419 phone 7022 73 74_33 2B, 1 1/2B, nice furn appi w/d $69900 $3 000 dn owner help finance 293-6815, 293 0533 _BC__ ESTABLISHED PET SUPP LY BUSINESS Thousands of $ in inventory for dogs cats birds, and other animals Also dog grooming, PLUS Horse feed and supplies Good cash flow Priced to sell quick at |ust $19 500 Call Dick Blair Realty 293 2171 IMMACULATE HOME AND YARD This popular LEWIS MODEL has many, many e* tras. Pool and spa with Malibu lights 4 bedrm wlh 2 tile baths upgraded carpet, firepiace. trench doors to patio ceiling fans T/0 and much more for )ust $149,000. Call Dick Blair Realty 293-2171 BC LOTS FOR SALE'Lots for sale in Boulder City starting at $35.000 293-1897 BC REDUCED TO $185,000 By owner 3 BR 2 BA 2,100 sq f1 on golf course. Sngle story, 3 car garage. 293 7608 BC THREE BEDROOM 2 bath. 5 month old Ville del Prado for sale by owner Drive by 1124 Olmo then call for appt 294 3020 BC EASY LIVING IN BOULDER CITY 1322 Darlene Way Custom ceranrti tile m entry, kitchen, and hallway 3 BR (extended master tjedroom) 1 3/4 bath. 2 car garage, large covered patio Low maintenance landscaping. Only $102,900 Call Realty USA to see 454-6454 WANT TO Kfsi0W~WHAT YOUR PROPERTY IS WORTH? Free market analysis. Call Roger 293-2939. Realtor, Coldwell Banker/Ancho r Realty HOUSE FOR SALE Boulder Estates. 4 BR 3 BA, JaCQzzi ,tub in master bedroom Familyroom w/fireplace. Large country kitchen Beautiful view on golf course 4 car garage Shown by appt 294-0303 BC By owner—Chism Sonora 3 bdrm. Highland Hills, 1% bth. ceiling fans, RV park, auto sprinklers Assume w'$ 19,000 or new loan. $97 500 564-7357. Save your credit let me assume your home loan. 564-5913. Boulder Hwy/Lake Mead office space 950 sq. ft. Ready for ocGupancy. Low" rates. r.;.IIHAI Ralt^ •^fl^.-^Pgfi Thonday. Sqitambar 28, 1989 V.V.V.)|.l|*l|*)^.)|*Va^ w/////////^^^^^ Bob Olsen Realty & Insurance Inc. MLS 6 Water St., Henderson 564-1831 5 Acres in Sec. 9, plus 2-flve sdjacent acres. Ail or part. Beautiful view of the Valley. 1/2 Acre lot sec. 9, close to Brown Jr. High. Ntoe & level. Boulder City lot, overlooking Lake Mead on Woodacre Or, Ready to Build with all utilities. Owner licensee. 21/2 Acres off the old LA Hwy. nssr Paradise Spa. Only $45,000-Good Terms. 21/2 Acres Sec. 4. Only $35,000. Custom Home on Paradise Country Club. 4 Br., 4 baths, 3 fireplaces, covered patio deck overlooking Golf Course and pool area. Call for appointment to see. Owner Iteensee. REALTORS KRVWO THE HENDERSON AREA FOT YEARS i /X "EALTORS KRVWO THE HENDE RSON AREA FCn:iJ YEARS YA FREE LIST OF BOULDER CITY HOMES, TOWNHOMES/CONDOS, MANUFACTURED HOMES & BUILDING LOTS! STOP BY OR CALL & WE WILL MAIL!! AFTER HOURS CALLI riARY BOARD 5T3-75SM LINETTE DAVIS ai3-10t7 ELLEN LAHB STROHBERG • •-e^i-iiSOa UOOPy HHEELESS 513-lt12 CARL C COMANBKOKERAREA COE: 702 •eia-XMii 293*4663 nS sajiwi 1664 NEVADA HWY. I—' mS I IN MARSHALL PLAZA j FOR SALE BY OWNER 4 BDRM HOME Beautiful cusumi interior. Ceramic tile, plush carpet, new country kitchen, new tile IMUIU, many custom features. Pool/spa, yIg RV parking. Very private yard, desert view. Located in one of the best ncighlxirhoods ^ BC. Call for appointment. 2935428 DARWIN BIBLE Million OoNar Club Mmbr 22 YMr Rtldent MM or TMI UMt PWMCiaL HiTIKMM COLOUJeLL BANKeRQ PAUL GARGIS & ASSOCIATES RESIDfcNTlAL REAL ESTATE All hH|i.,i,„..i,iti Jrxfl I tli.^.tl.il M.111I" ••I CoHfwH HJIIII • A -.Mb'DijI AdilLih". !••' EXPECT THE BEST ALWAYS READY TO SERVE YOU LAKE MEAD LEVEL BUILDING LOT with partial lake view. $56,000. BOULDER CITY MANSION-Exquisite custom home on large, beautifully landscaped lot, with orchard, out building, pool and spa, covered patios & balconys, garden shop^ huge garage, six bedrooms, four baths, libary, exercise room, formal dining room, family room, formal entrance and so much more. This home is not listed and must be shown by appointment only. $750,000. BOULDER ( ITY'S BEST BUY Lovely family style dome home with breathtaking view of Lake Mead and surrounding mountains. 4 bdrm,^ bath. Approx. 3,000 S.Q. for $187,000. BOULDER CITY OFFICES 3 offices with bathrooms In historical area. Lovely used brick building. 814,400 annual income. Owner will carry. $130,000. 2 ACRE LOT ZONED COMMERCIAL at Desert Inn and Pecos McLeod. Great potential. Owener will carry. $169,000. RESTAURANT, living quarters and RV park. Lovely mountain setting surronded by several of Utah's finest fishing lakes. Great year round business. Once in a lifetime opportunity for only $85,000. Won't last. LARGE GENERAL STORE. Forty years in business. Due to great Utah fishing and new construction in area business has increased over 50% in last five years. Also includes adjacent 3 bdrm, 2 bth home w/large garage. S250.000. Excellent terms. < • 14,500 ACRES. Nevada and California state line property. $22,000,000. GOVERNMENT OWNED HOMES bank repos-foreclosures-Real Estate Auctions. Up to date lists and help on how to finance. Some with very low down payment. Call Darwin Bible or Don Estes today. COLOUIGLL ANCHOR REALTY, INC. REALTORS 293-5757 • • • • • • Expect the best." LAKE TERRACE TOWNHOUSE-3 bedroom, 2 full baths, 2 car garage, use of tennis courts, spa, pool, clubhouse nearing completion. Natural woodwork and neutral colors throughout. $139,900. EXECUTIVE MOBILE HOME with over 2,000 s.f. Large porch in front for entertaining or looking at the lake. Great view from living & dining rooms plus kitchen. Two car garage and extra off street parking, lush landscaping that is E-Z maintenance. Family room has wood-burning fireplace and the list goes on! Call for appt to see today. $239,500. NEW ON THE MARKET! Four bedroom one level on the golf course and a pleasure to show. Has 2 car garage completely finished. Lush landscaping and fully sprinklered. Priced for quick sale sale! $165,000. NEW LISTING! THI^i^WONt LAST AT $87.5001 Established area, 2 ^^JLSVS"" bath, 1 car garage oversized with workshop area and 8tM^vL^.*d yard, room for RV, manicured lawns with auto sprinklers t'i^Tore. SEE TODAY! LAKE MOUNTAIN ESTAtES 2 bedroom. 2 bath with view of lake. Cathedral ceilings in living areas, cooled workshop, louvred awnings for privacy and sun protection. Large master bedroom with full bath. 8117,500. LOCATED IN CUL-DE-SAC 3 bedrm, 2 bath, 2 car carport, storage area, newly remodeled and a pleasure to show. Reduced to $110,500. COMMERCIAL BLDG. AND APT. great income potential, located on busy corner. Shown by appt. Reduced to $130,000. CUSTOM THREE BEDROOM with master separate from others, open floor plan, RV area, lap pool and E-Z maintenance yard, view of lake and more! $195,000. BOULDER HILLS CONDO starting at $70,900, furnished and unfurnished. ESTABLISHED AREA—3 or could be 4 bedroom home, indoor spa, side gate for boat or RV, all appliances, assumable loan. $124,900. CLAREMONT HEIGHTS custom home with a view of the lake that is unbelieveable from almost every room in the house. Features 4 bedrms, Vi baths, master bath has whirlpool bathtub, formal dining with open and airy kitchen with cooking island, large pantry and the list goes on! $395,000. IMMACULATE THREE BDRM in established area, 2 year old roof, newer appliances, custom window coverings. $115,000. RESTAURANT BUSINESS—established 9 years located in shopping center. Good established history of growth in income. Shown by appt, $48,500. HAVING A GARAGE SALE? PICK UP A FREE GARAGE SALE SIGN, NO OBLIGATION! STOP BY THE OFFICE AND PICK UP AVAILABLE LIST OF ALL HOMES FOR SALE IN B.C. BY ALL REALTORS. LIST IS UP DATED FREQUENTLY! 0PEN7DAYSA WEEK! COLDWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY ^01 Nev. Hwy., B.C. Call (702) 293-5757 WE ARE PLEASE TO ANNOUNCE THAT WE HAVE MOVED TO 1664 NEVADA HWY. (MARSHALL PLAZA) AS WE OUTGREW OUR FORMER OFFICE SPACE. PLEASE STOP IN AND SEE US AT OUR NEW LOCATION!! 293-4663 D ifl I — ..^. I LSJ ^I OmuK r\ r\ 21 HENDERSON REALTY, INC. 18 Water St., Hmderson, NV (702) S64.2515 Put your trust in Number One: CHILDREN WILL LOVE THIS NEIGHBORHOOD-and this house. 1 acre zoned for horses, large 4 bdrs., 2'/2 bath with family room/game room, separate in-law quarters and master bdr., upstairs with private entrance. Plenty of room to keep everyone happy. HAS YOUR FAMILY GROWN SMALLER?-Examine this quality built custom home located close to the golf course. 1,247 square foot well planned living space in this 3 bdr., I'A bath home priced at $87,900. HOME WITH CHARACTER-Excellent for young family or retiree. Well decorated 3 bdr., Vt bath with lush green lawn, block fence and separate area for the pets. Come and see. LESS THAN $45,000-To become a homeowner or condo owner. Very nice 2 bdr., 1 bath floor plan with fireplace. Downstair location and no qualifying loan. Call today. LESSONS IN LUXURY-Describes this lovely custom home in Section #19, 4 bdrs., 2Vi baths separate game room and 3 car garage. Excellent terms offered by seller. Call to see today. BACK ON THE MARKET-3 bdr., home for under $45,000. Needs T.L.C-. but lots of potential! Call now to see as it won't last long. HAVE I GOT A HOME FOR YOUI-This lovely home has a bar in the den, a spacious kitchen, separate dining area and a laundry room. Fruit trees in back and mature landscaping throughout! You've got to see this home. You'll love it. Call today! NEED AN OFFICE AT HOME?-Beautiful 4 bdr,, 2 full bath home with over 2400 square feet. Extra 11 X 15 study and great room, tool Many, many amenities, nice price toot INVESTORS ONLY!!-New construction 3 bdr,, V/t bath, quaUty throughout includes a 50 square foot laundry room. CRAMPED? NEED MORE ROOM?-You can have it with this 2 story, 4 bdr,, home with separate master bdr., has a huge bath with a garden tub. Family and living room share a two way fireplace. ENJOY CUSTOM FEATURES AT A REASONABLE PRICE-2 story, 3 bdrs., home is loaded with special care and all the appliances are included! has a 2 car garage, 2 full baths, etc. CAN'T QUALIFY?-Assume this one! 4 drs., 1% baths, country kitchen, dishwasher and an extra large fenced in yard for the children and pets. Please call now! A FAMILY POINT OF VIEW-Over 1800 square feet, 4 bdr.. 1 V bath, coun-^ try kitchen with breakfast bar and pantry, poasible in-law quarters. 4th bedroom could be used as a large family room, nice comer lot with backyard access, 14 X 22 workshop, RV parking, aU offers will be considered.. $91,900. WINNING ALL THE WAY-Superb planning in this attractive 3 bdr., 1 V* bath, 2 car garage. Lewis home in Highland Hills. Beautiful customized kitchen is expanded by french doors onto full length covered patio. Tastefully decorated to suit all decors, upgraded throughout. RV parking, nuture shaded landscaping $86,900. DARING. DIFFERENT. AND DELIGHTUFL-Floor plan that allows yoa to take full advantage of this 2160 square foot custom 4 bdr.. home on a Vi acre view lot, full basement includes family room, 2 bdrs., and workshop. Bonus inground pool, lovely heated spa, impressive view from front patio all of this for $125,000. 0m ^ 8 Water St. (702) 564-2515 1st •••••••••••••• MULDER CITY ThtaONAMIIIIO C^ Cod In OMof • .C.t fliiMt iwnHBOt n OOO i VIM owiMr 4 DwinMNn wiigw • tofy IfMO M|i ft. noiM hM K Mil PrefMdoiMlly dMMMMli pool, ^M, jMuni tub, upgrMM doom and moMngo. Orlw by 1821 Owltnt Way. and ctf for appl. today! 293-2949. This one won't laatl •••••••••••••• RELAXING IS EASY-in this custom siumpstone coortyaH with lovely landscaping plus exceptional BUck Monntdn View. Cute two bedrooms plus den can be yonra for only S69.000. NICE. NICE. NICE-Dont judge a book by its cover. Three bedrooms. VA bath, large back yard, ^^S^iT"^ • "'* "eparate laundry room. AU for only SeafiOO. CaU June or Elaine. HIGHLAND HILLS-three bedrooms, VA bath, family room with fireplace, formal dining room, decorated in warm tones with lots of natural Ught. park like back yard. A beauty for only $91,500. Ask for Elaine or June. GORGEOUS CUSTOM HOME IN SECTION 19-Three bedrooms, two bath home with attractive great room. Two car carport plus detached garage and workshop. SpedaUy priced at $144,900. caU June for your appointment, NEAR NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE-Four bedroom, two bath, family room with fireplace. Just minutes from the base. Call June for all the details. FIXERUPPER-Four bedroom, two bath, double garage, loU of square footage plus R-2 zoning. LeU make this owner an offer. Call Candace for details. GREAT VALUE—Conveniently located Valley View home. Three bedrooms with fireplace, central heat and storm windows. All for only $59,900. Call Jean to see. SPLISH-SPLASH A POOL-for only $66,900 plus cute three bedroom home on a comer lot. Walking distance form downtown. GREEN VALLEY DELIGHT-Cute tile roofed three bedrooms, VA bath home near everything. Assumable no qualifying loan. Asking only $89,500. NEATEST, TRIMEST HOME-in the Triangle neighborhood. Well kept ^three bedroom with remodeled kitchen and a bonus room started in the back." Freshly painted exterior. Asking only $67,500. INVESTOR SPECIAL-Duplex downtown Hendei^ son. Owner will carry. Only $69,900. HIGHLAND HILLS-Popular Sonora with inground pool and corner lot. Lots of ceramic tile. Seller has moved and home is lonely. Call Rosa for details. HAWAIIAN VACATION Buy a home through me by October 15, 1989 and receive 4 nights, 5 days vacation in Hawaii. For details call 396-6385, leave message. Deborah or Lisa, Realtors Jack Matthews & Co. Member of MLS Hendenon Home Newt, Boulder City News, Greea Valley Newa Page 47 T HILLTOP ESTATES New custom homes from $123,900. Choose your floor plan and lot today. Contact Dome Realty 293-1613 BC SAVE $$$-By Owner! 2 bdrm, 2 bth mobile home and lot $39,950. See at 216 Mohawk or call Don ")64-9283 UNDER CONSTRUCTION!! In Henderson. Choose your colors now 3 bedroom. 2 bath. Large lot. $104,500 DOIVIE REALTY 293-1613 BC FOR SALE Small tidy older home w/atlractive yard. Only $51,000, Ideal for retiree or first home buyer. Convenient location. By appt only. Call Fred Dunham, Garrett Realty ?91.13n RC JR REALTY 204 W. Pacific 564-5142 I^V Put your tru st in Number One: mi9 J • and 'HIenlury 21 Heal Eaate Oxpofalion. I • Equal Housing Opportunity ) tMDEPENOENTLY OWNEp AND OPCIIATeO> SUN REALTY BovLDEt an GEl AWAY! GET AWAY AND RELAX in this Boulder Hills Condo^ Just bring your suitcase and toothbrush. Furniture la Included, 2 Bedroom 1.5 bath unit. With Lush Landscapina plus refrigerator, stove/oven. dishwasher-Kwasher & dryer Exercise in the sparlding pool. Reduced to $69 500 Call Now and Relajrwlth Low Maintenance Living. v^Hin YOUR ONE-STOP Real Estate Company LH CALL24HRS „!?11 NEVADA HIGHWAY fcS (702) BOULDER CITY, NV 89005 TSfflS 293-2181 Hours: 9:00-5:00 MON-SAT m^tS and By Appointment FREE! The best deal in town. 2 bdrms, 1 ba. with extra room for nursery, den, etc. Desert landscaping in front yd. Garage with RV sized back yard. Only 73,500!!!! Assumable 12% FHA loan. LARGE FAMILY HOME-EVEN ROOM FOR THE IN-LAWS: 3,900 square feet of custom split level charm and extra features, perfect for inhome professional office, etc. on Black Mtn Golf Course, Pool, roses, formal dining room seats large party. By appointment please. Asking $199,950. HOME TOWN SPECIALISTS: We can help you sell your property or to buy property by acting as YOUR AGENT, either SELLERS AGENT or as BUYERS AGENT. Why is this better for you? Stop by and ask. "KING OF THE HILL," Easy curved drive leads to spectacular LAKE MEAD VIEW lot. Partially excavated for charming home — Seller's heart attack forces quick sale — below market at $99,950. Don't wait, SPECTACULAR LAKE MEAD VIEWS: Yours in this luxury home, private rear entrance with no stairs, 4-bedroom8 each with private bath, more only 8345,000. WHY START FROM SCRATCH? Your own thriving Boulder City business may be easier than you dreamed. Call Bob Branch for confidential interview. RAILROAD PASS INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY: Back on the market. 10'/: acres with great view of Las Vegas Valley, Zoned for over 200 units. Call now. RENTALS • RENTALS Call us with your needs, never a charge to you. ',MS!^ "THE REAL ESTATI PROFESSIONALS'' KAY.KIMBERLIN BRET RUNION BOB BRANCH, Business Opportun'tles CLAUDE SMITH LANE MOLSBERRY ERLOW KELLEY IRIS BLETSCH, QRI, CRB BOB BOSTON, QRI, OWNER-BROKER, Property Management STOP BY OUR OFFIGM AMD LOOK OVKR TMB MANY OTHKR PROPKHTItB AVAILABU COOL POOL Complimented by waterfall by waterfall and extra cool decking. Mt./Cify view, block fencing, RV parking, fireplace coziness, family room, % iDedrms, 2 bth, .2 car garage. Built In 1987 FHA & Conventional $89,900 Coldwell Banker. Call Roswell 458-7070 or 451-2777. For Sale—Seller motivated will carry w/reasonable down, double wide mobile fiome on 60X100 lot w/fencediyard. Quiet area, view near Sunrise Mobile Estates. Priced to sell today. Call Don 564-9283. GOVERNf^^ENT HOMES $1.00 (U Repair) Foreclosures, Tax Delinquent Property. Now Selling, this area! Call (Refundable) 1-518-459-3546 Ext. H5128 for listing. HOME WANTED to buy in B.C. Need assumable FHA, VA, or owner financing. Large down. 293-0520 BC For Sale by Owner; 3 bdrm, 2 bth, 2 car garage, fenced backyard. Huge family rm w/fireplace and built in bar. Also tias pool and spa. VA assumable 9.5. No qualifying. $106,500. Payments are $900 a month and $12,500 down. 565-610 4. Hdn, overlooking Las Vegas, near Blad( Mtn GoH Coursa. park & school. FHA 91/2%. Living room, formal dining room, family room, 4 bdnn, 2 bth, 2 car garage, vaulted ceilings, pool & spa, solar gas heater, $40,000 down, assume $78,000. $802.71 mo. includes principal, interest. PITI. By appt 564-6950 DICK BLAIR REALTV 833 NEVADA HWY.. BOULDER CITY (702) 293-2 171 mm Houifl VETERANS And Active Military Own Youirowii NOHM A benefit you hive earned! *No Down Peymeni to t144,000 • NoEtcrawFae *Fr*e Qualifying *Fre List ol Homes fromt30,000, Nen-VeU WetemiM with PHA Low Down! 4S9-8387 Veteran Housing Center SOOO E, Bonanza Rd, at Notlla next to K-Mart ; lT*aOVMHTMBKf taMMCav.EMli AWY UNTAL INfOKMATIOMI TOLL FREEf 11-8002M910 Ext E41 SINCERITY AND INTEGRITY IS OUR SPECIALTT^ Comparative Market Analysis i"n, aarv'i-:: • • • T.-VH-2 M,„-^-,jSi^ W OJUil "Jeanine's Sweet Treats As Featured in Country Living Magazine! For Sale Now, Owner Operated, Includes )l!(' All Equipment, Fixtures. & Recipes, j Come Buv a Delicious Sweet Treat for yourself or a friend,. 525 Hotel Plata. Boulder City. CALL MANNY 294-0870 COLDWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY Ei i BQULDER REALTY Mis Put your trust n in Number One. "H 19H9 and Cintury 21 Real E.si;uv Corp4.raii.m. hqual Housing Opportunity \ ^ORIGINAL DEFECfiVE I

PAGE 47

^ m. V. ^W^R Page 46 Handwaon Home News. Boulder City News, Green Valley News Thnrsday, September 28. 1989 High(8.nd HiUs house for rent. 3 bdmn, 2 btti, garage, ferwed yd. ExcelE Condition. Near school $780 mo. $400 deposit Avail Nov. 5. Ph 5 64-2145 Unfurnished house for rent Newly remodeled $575 mo. Deposit of $575 No Pets 564 58 71 or 564-2888. WEEKLY 56S7929 KITCHENEHES APARTMKMTS AB LOW 4 $250 month Fuml9h0d 864^952 RETAIL OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE Approx 840-3,100 sq ft First Western Plaza 1000 Nev Hwy Boulder City M3-2367 or 2S34344 Trailer for Rent: UtlHtlee and Cable TV included. Near Skyline Caaino. $110 per week pkis deposit for Single person. 564-0984. OFFICES FOR RENT From 2S0 sq. ft. Very Rsaaonable Boulder Theatre BIdg. 2M-iaM BC. REAL ESTATE ASSUf^ABLE Lake Tree Condo for sale $86,000 ERA, The Realty Center, Laureen 293-7551 BC RESibENTIALrOTResiden"ai lot. 2 2 acres tor sale by owner Sub Div 11 Unobstructed view. Appraised 125t\^. Owner will carry cifter 20 percent down. Ea&y^ terms $110,000 Call 29 3-0434 BC HERE IT IS' THREE TII^E AWARD WINNING HOtVIE. Drive by 1506 Irene Dr. Phone for appt only and full, information Owner occupied with large dog Selling at FHA, VA appraisal. SI 76 000 ?Q 3-323Q BC Highland Hills area. 3 kxirm, 2'/? bth, 2 story home. Ig Assumable 9'/?% loan $83,000 565-1121 or 564-7536 FOR SALE 3 BR 1 BA dng rm, country kitchen. Me roof garage, auto sprkirs $98,500 BY APPT ONLY 540 Birch 2 94 1983 BC riRSTTIME HOME BUYERS Plan now to spend Christmas in a home of your own FREE counciling includes prequalifications and purchasng guidance by buyers igents HUD&VARepom 'ormation also available Call • lowlorapp't, 564 5142 ask 'or Candace oi Mary Century 21 .'R Reaily f^lNING COUNTRY: Molel 93 miles east of Reno off I 80. 12 units with 7 ktchs $195000 Write Lou Boxx 778 Lovelock. Nevada 89419 phone 7022 73 74_33 2B, 1 1/2B, nice furn appi w/d $69900 $3 000 dn owner help finance 293-6815, 293 0533 _BC__ ESTABLISHED PET SUPP LY BUSINESS Thousands of $ in inventory for dogs cats birds, and other animals Also dog grooming, PLUS Horse feed and supplies Good cash flow Priced to sell quick at |ust $19 500 Call Dick Blair Realty 293 2171 IMMACULATE HOME AND YARD This popular LEWIS MODEL has many, many e* tras. Pool and spa with Malibu lights 4 bedrm wlh 2 tile baths upgraded carpet, firepiace. trench doors to patio ceiling fans T/0 and much more for )ust $149,000. Call Dick Blair Realty 293-2171 BC LOTS FOR SALE'Lots for sale in Boulder City starting at $35.000 293-1897 BC REDUCED TO $185,000 By owner 3 BR 2 BA 2,100 sq f1 on golf course. Sngle story, 3 car garage. 293 7608 BC THREE BEDROOM 2 bath. 5 month old Ville del Prado for sale by owner Drive by 1124 Olmo then call for appt 294 3020 BC EASY LIVING IN BOULDER CITY 1322 Darlene Way Custom ceranrti tile m entry, kitchen, and hallway 3 BR (extended master tjedroom) 1 3/4 bath. 2 car garage, large covered patio Low maintenance landscaping. Only $102,900 Call Realty USA to see 454-6454 WANT TO Kfsi0W~WHAT YOUR PROPERTY IS WORTH? Free market analysis. Call Roger 293-2939. Realtor, Coldwell Banker/Ancho r Realty HOUSE FOR SALE Boulder Estates. 4 BR 3 BA, JaCQzzi ,tub in master bedroom Familyroom w/fireplace. Large country kitchen Beautiful view on golf course 4 car garage Shown by appt 294-0303 BC By owner—Chism Sonora 3 bdrm. Highland Hills, 1% bth. ceiling fans, RV park, auto sprinklers Assume w'$ 19,000 or new loan. $97 500 564-7357. Save your credit let me assume your home loan. 564-5913. Boulder Hwy/Lake Mead office space 950 sq. ft. Ready for ocGupancy. Low" rates. r.;.IIHAI Ralt^ •^fl^.-^Pgfi Thonday. Sqitambar 28, 1989 V.V.V.)|.l|*l|*)^.)|*Va^ w/////////^^^^^ Bob Olsen Realty & Insurance Inc. MLS 6 Water St., Henderson 564-1831 5 Acres in Sec. 9, plus 2-flve sdjacent acres. Ail or part. Beautiful view of the Valley. 1/2 Acre lot sec. 9, close to Brown Jr. High. Ntoe & level. Boulder City lot, overlooking Lake Mead on Woodacre Or, Ready to Build with all utilities. Owner licensee. 21/2 Acres off the old LA Hwy. nssr Paradise Spa. Only $45,000-Good Terms. 21/2 Acres Sec. 4. Only $35,000. Custom Home on Paradise Country Club. 4 Br., 4 baths, 3 fireplaces, covered patio deck overlooking Golf Course and pool area. Call for appointment to see. Owner Iteensee. REALTORS KRVWO THE HENDERSON AREA FOT YEARS i /X "EALTORS KRVWO THE HENDE RSON AREA FCn:iJ YEARS YA FREE LIST OF BOULDER CITY HOMES, TOWNHOMES/CONDOS, MANUFACTURED HOMES & BUILDING LOTS! STOP BY OR CALL & WE WILL MAIL!! AFTER HOURS CALLI riARY BOARD 5T3-75SM LINETTE DAVIS ai3-10t7 ELLEN LAHB STROHBERG • •-e^i-iiSOa UOOPy HHEELESS 513-lt12 CARL C COMANBKOKERAREA COE: 702 •eia-XMii 293*4663 nS sajiwi 1664 NEVADA HWY. I—' mS I IN MARSHALL PLAZA j FOR SALE BY OWNER 4 BDRM HOME Beautiful cusumi interior. Ceramic tile, plush carpet, new country kitchen, new tile IMUIU, many custom features. Pool/spa, yIg RV parking. Very private yard, desert view. Located in one of the best ncighlxirhoods ^ BC. Call for appointment. 2935428 DARWIN BIBLE Million OoNar Club Mmbr 22 YMr Rtldent MM or TMI UMt PWMCiaL HiTIKMM COLOUJeLL BANKeRQ PAUL GARGIS & ASSOCIATES RESIDfcNTlAL REAL ESTATE All hH|i.,i,„..i,iti Jrxfl I tli.^.tl.il M.111I" ••I CoHfwH HJIIII • A -.Mb'DijI AdilLih". !••' EXPECT THE BEST ALWAYS READY TO SERVE YOU LAKE MEAD LEVEL BUILDING LOT with partial lake view. $56,000. BOULDER CITY MANSION-Exquisite custom home on large, beautifully landscaped lot, with orchard, out building, pool and spa, covered patios & balconys, garden shop^ huge garage, six bedrooms, four baths, libary, exercise room, formal dining room, family room, formal entrance and so much more. This home is not listed and must be shown by appointment only. $750,000. BOULDER ( ITY'S BEST BUY Lovely family style dome home with breathtaking view of Lake Mead and surrounding mountains. 4 bdrm,^ bath. Approx. 3,000 S.Q. for $187,000. BOULDER CITY OFFICES 3 offices with bathrooms In historical area. Lovely used brick building. 814,400 annual income. Owner will carry. $130,000. 2 ACRE LOT ZONED COMMERCIAL at Desert Inn and Pecos McLeod. Great potential. Owener will carry. $169,000. RESTAURANT, living quarters and RV park. Lovely mountain setting surronded by several of Utah's finest fishing lakes. Great year round business. Once in a lifetime opportunity for only $85,000. Won't last. LARGE GENERAL STORE. Forty years in business. Due to great Utah fishing and new construction in area business has increased over 50% in last five years. Also includes adjacent 3 bdrm, 2 bth home w/large garage. S250.000. Excellent terms. < • 14,500 ACRES. Nevada and California state line property. $22,000,000. GOVERNMENT OWNED HOMES bank repos-foreclosures-Real Estate Auctions. Up to date lists and help on how to finance. Some with very low down payment. Call Darwin Bible or Don Estes today. COLOUIGLL ANCHOR REALTY, INC. REALTORS 293-5757 • • • • • • Expect the best." LAKE TERRACE TOWNHOUSE-3 bedroom, 2 full baths, 2 car garage, use of tennis courts, spa, pool, clubhouse nearing completion. Natural woodwork and neutral colors throughout. $139,900. EXECUTIVE MOBILE HOME with over 2,000 s.f. Large porch in front for entertaining or looking at the lake. Great view from living & dining rooms plus kitchen. Two car garage and extra off street parking, lush landscaping that is E-Z maintenance. Family room has wood-burning fireplace and the list goes on! Call for appt to see today. $239,500. NEW ON THE MARKET! Four bedroom one level on the golf course and a pleasure to show. Has 2 car garage completely finished. Lush landscaping and fully sprinklered. Priced for quick sale sale! $165,000. NEW LISTING! THI^i^WONt LAST AT $87.5001 Established area, 2 ^^JLSVS"" bath, 1 car garage oversized with workshop area and 8tM^vL^.*d yard, room for RV, manicured lawns with auto sprinklers t'i^Tore. SEE TODAY! LAKE MOUNTAIN ESTAtES 2 bedroom. 2 bath with view of lake. Cathedral ceilings in living areas, cooled workshop, louvred awnings for privacy and sun protection. Large master bedroom with full bath. 8117,500. LOCATED IN CUL-DE-SAC 3 bedrm, 2 bath, 2 car carport, storage area, newly remodeled and a pleasure to show. Reduced to $110,500. COMMERCIAL BLDG. AND APT. great income potential, located on busy corner. Shown by appt. Reduced to $130,000. CUSTOM THREE BEDROOM with master separate from others, open floor plan, RV area, lap pool and E-Z maintenance yard, view of lake and more! $195,000. BOULDER HILLS CONDO starting at $70,900, furnished and unfurnished. ESTABLISHED AREA—3 or could be 4 bedroom home, indoor spa, side gate for boat or RV, all appliances, assumable loan. $124,900. CLAREMONT HEIGHTS custom home with a view of the lake that is unbelieveable from almost every room in the house. Features 4 bedrms, Vi baths, master bath has whirlpool bathtub, formal dining with open and airy kitchen with cooking island, large pantry and the list goes on! $395,000. IMMACULATE THREE BDRM in established area, 2 year old roof, newer appliances, custom window coverings. $115,000. RESTAURANT BUSINESS—established 9 years located in shopping center. Good established history of growth in income. Shown by appt, $48,500. HAVING A GARAGE SALE? PICK UP A FREE GARAGE SALE SIGN, NO OBLIGATION! STOP BY THE OFFICE AND PICK UP AVAILABLE LIST OF ALL HOMES FOR SALE IN B.C. BY ALL REALTORS. LIST IS UP DATED FREQUENTLY! 0PEN7DAYSA WEEK! COLDWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY ^01 Nev. Hwy., B.C. Call (702) 293-5757 WE ARE PLEASE TO ANNOUNCE THAT WE HAVE MOVED TO 1664 NEVADA HWY. (MARSHALL PLAZA) AS WE OUTGREW OUR FORMER OFFICE SPACE. PLEASE STOP IN AND SEE US AT OUR NEW LOCATION!! 293-4663 D ifl I — ..^. I LSJ ^I OmuK r\ r\ 21 HENDERSON REALTY, INC. 18 Water St., Hmderson, NV (702) S64.2515 Put your trust in Number One: CHILDREN WILL LOVE THIS NEIGHBORHOOD-and this house. 1 acre zoned for horses, large 4 bdrs., 2'/2 bath with family room/game room, separate in-law quarters and master bdr., upstairs with private entrance. Plenty of room to keep everyone happy. HAS YOUR FAMILY GROWN SMALLER?-Examine this quality built custom home located close to the golf course. 1,247 square foot well planned living space in this 3 bdr., I'A bath home priced at $87,900. HOME WITH CHARACTER-Excellent for young family or retiree. Well decorated 3 bdr., Vt bath with lush green lawn, block fence and separate area for the pets. Come and see. LESS THAN $45,000-To become a homeowner or condo owner. Very nice 2 bdr., 1 bath floor plan with fireplace. Downstair location and no qualifying loan. Call today. LESSONS IN LUXURY-Describes this lovely custom home in Section #19, 4 bdrs., 2Vi baths separate game room and 3 car garage. Excellent terms offered by seller. Call to see today. BACK ON THE MARKET-3 bdr., home for under $45,000. Needs T.L.C-. but lots of potential! Call now to see as it won't last long. HAVE I GOT A HOME FOR YOUI-This lovely home has a bar in the den, a spacious kitchen, separate dining area and a laundry room. Fruit trees in back and mature landscaping throughout! You've got to see this home. You'll love it. Call today! NEED AN OFFICE AT HOME?-Beautiful 4 bdr,, 2 full bath home with over 2400 square feet. Extra 11 X 15 study and great room, tool Many, many amenities, nice price toot INVESTORS ONLY!!-New construction 3 bdr,, V/t bath, quaUty throughout includes a 50 square foot laundry room. CRAMPED? NEED MORE ROOM?-You can have it with this 2 story, 4 bdr,, home with separate master bdr., has a huge bath with a garden tub. Family and living room share a two way fireplace. ENJOY CUSTOM FEATURES AT A REASONABLE PRICE-2 story, 3 bdrs., home is loaded with special care and all the appliances are included! has a 2 car garage, 2 full baths, etc. CAN'T QUALIFY?-Assume this one! 4 drs., 1% baths, country kitchen, dishwasher and an extra large fenced in yard for the children and pets. Please call now! A FAMILY POINT OF VIEW-Over 1800 square feet, 4 bdr.. 1 V bath, coun-^ try kitchen with breakfast bar and pantry, poasible in-law quarters. 4th bedroom could be used as a large family room, nice comer lot with backyard access, 14 X 22 workshop, RV parking, aU offers will be considered.. $91,900. WINNING ALL THE WAY-Superb planning in this attractive 3 bdr., 1 V* bath, 2 car garage. Lewis home in Highland Hills. Beautiful customized kitchen is expanded by french doors onto full length covered patio. Tastefully decorated to suit all decors, upgraded throughout. RV parking, nuture shaded landscaping $86,900. DARING. DIFFERENT. AND DELIGHTUFL-Floor plan that allows yoa to take full advantage of this 2160 square foot custom 4 bdr.. home on a Vi acre view lot, full basement includes family room, 2 bdrs., and workshop. Bonus inground pool, lovely heated spa, impressive view from front patio all of this for $125,000. 0m ^ 8 Water St. (702) 564-2515 1st •••••••••••••• MULDER CITY ThtaONAMIIIIO C^ Cod In OMof • .C.t fliiMt iwnHBOt n OOO i VIM owiMr 4 DwinMNn wiigw • tofy IfMO M|i ft. noiM hM K Mil PrefMdoiMlly dMMMMli pool, ^M, jMuni tub, upgrMM doom and moMngo. Orlw by 1821 Owltnt Way. and ctf for appl. today! 293-2949. This one won't laatl •••••••••••••• RELAXING IS EASY-in this custom siumpstone coortyaH with lovely landscaping plus exceptional BUck Monntdn View. Cute two bedrooms plus den can be yonra for only S69.000. NICE. NICE. NICE-Dont judge a book by its cover. Three bedrooms. VA bath, large back yard, ^^S^iT"^ • "'* "eparate laundry room. AU for only SeafiOO. CaU June or Elaine. HIGHLAND HILLS-three bedrooms, VA bath, family room with fireplace, formal dining room, decorated in warm tones with lots of natural Ught. park like back yard. A beauty for only $91,500. Ask for Elaine or June. GORGEOUS CUSTOM HOME IN SECTION 19-Three bedrooms, two bath home with attractive great room. Two car carport plus detached garage and workshop. SpedaUy priced at $144,900. caU June for your appointment, NEAR NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE-Four bedroom, two bath, family room with fireplace. Just minutes from the base. Call June for all the details. FIXERUPPER-Four bedroom, two bath, double garage, loU of square footage plus R-2 zoning. LeU make this owner an offer. Call Candace for details. GREAT VALUE—Conveniently located Valley View home. Three bedrooms with fireplace, central heat and storm windows. All for only $59,900. Call Jean to see. SPLISH-SPLASH A POOL-for only $66,900 plus cute three bedroom home on a comer lot. Walking distance form downtown. GREEN VALLEY DELIGHT-Cute tile roofed three bedrooms, VA bath home near everything. Assumable no qualifying loan. Asking only $89,500. NEATEST, TRIMEST HOME-in the Triangle neighborhood. Well kept ^three bedroom with remodeled kitchen and a bonus room started in the back." Freshly painted exterior. Asking only $67,500. INVESTOR SPECIAL-Duplex downtown Hendei^ son. Owner will carry. Only $69,900. HIGHLAND HILLS-Popular Sonora with inground pool and corner lot. Lots of ceramic tile. Seller has moved and home is lonely. Call Rosa for details. HAWAIIAN VACATION Buy a home through me by October 15, 1989 and receive 4 nights, 5 days vacation in Hawaii. For details call 396-6385, leave message. Deborah or Lisa, Realtors Jack Matthews & Co. Member of MLS Hendenon Home Newt, Boulder City News, Greea Valley Newa Page 47 T HILLTOP ESTATES New custom homes from $123,900. Choose your floor plan and lot today. Contact Dome Realty 293-1613 BC SAVE $$$-By Owner! 2 bdrm, 2 bth mobile home and lot $39,950. See at 216 Mohawk or call Don ")64-9283 UNDER CONSTRUCTION!! In Henderson. Choose your colors now 3 bedroom. 2 bath. Large lot. $104,500 DOIVIE REALTY 293-1613 BC FOR SALE Small tidy older home w/atlractive yard. Only $51,000, Ideal for retiree or first home buyer. Convenient location. By appt only. Call Fred Dunham, Garrett Realty ?91.13n RC JR REALTY 204 W. Pacific 564-5142 I^V Put your tru st in Number One: mi9 J • and 'HIenlury 21 Heal Eaate Oxpofalion. I • Equal Housing Opportunity ) tMDEPENOENTLY OWNEp AND OPCIIATeO> SUN REALTY BovLDEt an GEl AWAY! GET AWAY AND RELAX in this Boulder Hills Condo^ Just bring your suitcase and toothbrush. Furniture la Included, 2 Bedroom 1.5 bath unit. With Lush Landscapina plus refrigerator, stove/oven. dishwasher-Kwasher & dryer Exercise in the sparlding pool. Reduced to $69 500 Call Now and Relajrwlth Low Maintenance Living. v^Hin YOUR ONE-STOP Real Estate Company LH CALL24HRS „!?11 NEVADA HIGHWAY fcS (702) BOULDER CITY, NV 89005 TSfflS 293-2181 Hours: 9:00-5:00 MON-SAT m^tS and By Appointment FREE! The best deal in town. 2 bdrms, 1 ba. with extra room for nursery, den, etc. Desert landscaping in front yd. Garage with RV sized back yard. Only 73,500!!!! Assumable 12% FHA loan. LARGE FAMILY HOME-EVEN ROOM FOR THE IN-LAWS: 3,900 square feet of custom split level charm and extra features, perfect for inhome professional office, etc. on Black Mtn Golf Course, Pool, roses, formal dining room seats large party. By appointment please. Asking $199,950. HOME TOWN SPECIALISTS: We can help you sell your property or to buy property by acting as YOUR AGENT, either SELLERS AGENT or as BUYERS AGENT. Why is this better for you? Stop by and ask. "KING OF THE HILL," Easy curved drive leads to spectacular LAKE MEAD VIEW lot. Partially excavated for charming home — Seller's heart attack forces quick sale — below market at $99,950. Don't wait, SPECTACULAR LAKE MEAD VIEWS: Yours in this luxury home, private rear entrance with no stairs, 4-bedroom8 each with private bath, more only 8345,000. WHY START FROM SCRATCH? Your own thriving Boulder City business may be easier than you dreamed. Call Bob Branch for confidential interview. RAILROAD PASS INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY: Back on the market. 10'/: acres with great view of Las Vegas Valley, Zoned for over 200 units. Call now. RENTALS • RENTALS Call us with your needs, never a charge to you. ',MS!^ "THE REAL ESTATI PROFESSIONALS'' KAY.KIMBERLIN BRET RUNION BOB BRANCH, Business Opportun'tles CLAUDE SMITH LANE MOLSBERRY ERLOW KELLEY IRIS BLETSCH, QRI, CRB BOB BOSTON, QRI, OWNER-BROKER, Property Management STOP BY OUR OFFIGM AMD LOOK OVKR TMB MANY OTHKR PROPKHTItB AVAILABU COOL POOL Complimented by waterfall by waterfall and extra cool decking. Mt./Cify view, block fencing, RV parking, fireplace coziness, family room, % iDedrms, 2 bth, .2 car garage. Built In 1987 FHA & Conventional $89,900 Coldwell Banker. Call Roswell 458-7070 or 451-2777. For Sale—Seller motivated will carry w/reasonable down, double wide mobile fiome on 60X100 lot w/fencediyard. Quiet area, view near Sunrise Mobile Estates. Priced to sell today. Call Don 564-9283. GOVERNf^^ENT HOMES $1.00 (U Repair) Foreclosures, Tax Delinquent Property. Now Selling, this area! Call (Refundable) 1-518-459-3546 Ext. H5128 for listing. HOME WANTED to buy in B.C. Need assumable FHA, VA, or owner financing. Large down. 293-0520 BC For Sale by Owner; 3 bdrm, 2 bth, 2 car garage, fenced backyard. Huge family rm w/fireplace and built in bar. Also tias pool and spa. VA assumable 9.5. No qualifying. $106,500. Payments are $900 a month and $12,500 down. 565-610 4. Hdn, overlooking Las Vegas, near Blad( Mtn GoH Coursa. park & school. FHA 91/2%. Living room, formal dining room, family room, 4 bdnn, 2 bth, 2 car garage, vaulted ceilings, pool & spa, solar gas heater, $40,000 down, assume $78,000. $802.71 mo. includes principal, interest. PITI. By appt 564-6950 DICK BLAIR REALTV 833 NEVADA HWY.. BOULDER CITY (702) 293-2 171 mm Houifl VETERANS And Active Military Own Youirowii NOHM A benefit you hive earned! *No Down Peymeni to t144,000 • NoEtcrawFae *Fr*e Qualifying *Fre List ol Homes fromt30,000, Nen-VeU WetemiM with PHA Low Down! 4S9-8387 Veteran Housing Center SOOO E, Bonanza Rd, at Notlla next to K-Mart ; lT*aOVMHTMBKf taMMCav.EMli AWY UNTAL INfOKMATIOMI TOLL FREEf 11-8002M910 Ext E41 SINCERITY AND INTEGRITY IS OUR SPECIALTT^ Comparative Market Analysis i"n, aarv'i-:: • • • T.-VH-2 M,„-^-,jSi^ W OJUil "Jeanine's Sweet Treats As Featured in Country Living Magazine! For Sale Now, Owner Operated, Includes )l!(' All Equipment, Fixtures. & Recipes, j Come Buv a Delicious Sweet Treat for yourself or a friend,. 525 Hotel Plata. Boulder City. CALL MANNY 294-0870 COLDWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY Ei i BQULDER REALTY Mis Put your trust n in Number One. "H 19H9 and Cintury 21 Real E.si;uv Corp4.raii.m. hqual Housing Opportunity
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PAGE 48

ie48 Henderson Home News. Boulder City News. Green Valley Neye Thursday, September 28, 1968! 1 !i COMMERCIAL BUILDINQ FOR SALE 3,000 9q. ft. Zoned CM Uses: Professional, RetiV* Auto Sales or Repairs, Plumbing, Bottling, Laboratories. Building materials. Mobile Home Equipment and Rapf8. $127,400. Also Commeraal Condo. 600 sq ft. $29,900. Owner wHI carry. $5,000 down ERA, The Realty Ce ler. Cal^Laureen 293-7851 any i^J^j^Jf)$.}fif.Jf^^ifi^ifif.Jf THINKING ABOUT MAKING A MOVE? "We are currently helping many out of state buyers move to our area. We are desparate for home to sell them. For a free market evaluation and a comDlimentary •video of your home, call Richard or Cheryl 595-3291 pOLDWELL BANKER, REALTORS. BOULDER CITY $74,600 Conveniently located between schools and shopping, this 2 BR1 BA home Is Ideal for a small family or retired persons. Urge backyard has a 14X20 garage/shsd and is bscked by s private alley. QARRETT REALTY 293-3333 • HORSES O.K.I • • • New 3 bedroom, 2 bath in Henderson, cathedral ceiling. Finished double garage. Take older home in trade. $114,950. 293-1613 Licensee. B.C. JENSEN'S REALTY Ig^jJJj'J^*^ 219WatorSt. 'V Henderson. Nevada 8901 5 LH 564-3333 *** RESIDENTIAL DIVISION 8M!?] **Suiiri8e Mobile Estates** Mobile Home Lots for &ile from $25,000. East Lake Mead Drive at Mohawk. ^ 1950 ARABIAN ST. Drive by & take a look at how beautiful I am! 3 BD, super area. Buy me now for $82,000. Call Dave. ABSOLUTELY THE BEST 3 BD Sonora model in Henderson. $93,500. That's all. Call me v m. Ask for Dave. GREEN VALLEY Beautiful upgraded home with a park like setting. 4 BR, 2/4 BA, 3 car garage. Good Loan. $139,500. Ask for Don. HIGHLAND HILLS BEAUTY. A must to see, 2 story, 4 BR, 2Vt BA, 2 Car Garage. Priced Right. Ask for Don. FOSTER/COOGAN/CHESTNUT One building lot with curbs and gutters. Level lot and ready to build on. PRICE REDUCED!!! $11,500. Call Randy. GOLF-AREA historic 2 story in country club setting. First owner, mountain/city views. ALSO *GAIIDEN • RV PAD. CONVENTIONAL FINANCING available. $226,000. Call Richie. 349 W. LAKE MEAD DR COMMERCIAL soning. 3 BDRM, 1 bath, comer lot super location, $75,000. Call Peggy Benedict. HIGH ON A HILL, in SEC 4, custom ranch style home with beautiful view of the Valley, grounds are equipped with bam and arena & fully landscaped. Ask for Richie or Don. Las Vegas—Lamb & Stewart, low down & assume cute metropolitan 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath, 1 car garage, F/P priced at $58,000. Ask for Don or Richie. FOR THAT LARGE FAMILY! Custom home in SEC. 27, 5 BR, 3'/2 Bath, 2 F/P. fully landscaped front and rear. SEE THIS ONE! Ask for Richie or Don. MODEL HOME 3 BDRM, 2 BTH, 1,500 S.F. RV parking, intercom in every room, pool, view of valley. Low Down!!!! Call Dave. B\3ll.DlNG LOT ON TRUFFLES. $25,000. Call Rich. SECTION 9-2 half acre lots located within one block Jr High School. Call Randy. HALF ACRE fully matured lot with 1,800 sq. ft. house. 3 large bedrooms, 2 full baths. 800 sq. ft. workshop. Remember ask for Dave. VIEW-SITE PARADISE Fantastic tri-level modern. Newly built. Fireside warmth, central air, 4 br/2 baths, large view deck. ALSO Mountain/City views Family room. Call Richie. FULL POTENTI AL-Bright Traditional home promising happy days. Quiet street, great family area, central air, electric heat, eatin kitchen. 3 BR/1.75 Baths, storm windows. Possession now! Call Richie. DESERT! MAGNIFICENT! Consummate mobile home. Cheery fireplace central air, walk-in closets, horses OK. 3 BR/2 baths. Plus *paddle fans-large trees. Price reduced can't last! Call Ray. PRICE REDUCED! 3 BR/P/4 BATH, 1 car carport. Great starter home or rental property. Call Katie. 1804 MERZE. .Back on the market. Appraisal is in at $48,500. Nice 3 bedroom with custom cabinets, ceiling fans, appliances and more. Call Peggy Benedict. SUPER RANCH HOME! 2300 sq ft, 380 sq ft in spa rm, dual air & heat, half acre. $138,500. Priced to sell!! Call Dave. HIGHLAND HILLS. Tastefully decorated 2 story home with a 4 bdrm, 2Vt baths, fireplace, 2 car garage, and lots of RV parking Call Ken. GREAT POTENTIAL! For professional office townsite home zoned. C-1. Call Don. MISSION DRIVE-Sec. 32,1.1 Acres. Only $22,500. CALL NOW! Near proposed freeway off-ramp. Peggy Benedict. VACANT LAND Essex & Orleans, 5 Acres near New Lakes project. Power & water nearby. Price right. Call Don Jensen. COMMERICAL DIVISION FOR LEASE 2,000 sq. ft. of retail space on Water St. 113 W. Lake IVIead, 1,050 sq. ft. Commercial Building—Dynamite Location. High Traffic. FOR SALE STRIP CENTER-10 Stores plus 18 Storage Units on Sunset Road. All units are leased. Owner wants to trade equity for vacant land. Call Ken. BEAUTY SHOP-Active buainess in Boulder City on Nevada Hwy. 8 hair dressers and one manicurist. Call Ken. BOULDER HWY. LOT-100'X126' Lot on Boulder Hwy. $8S,000. Call Ken. ladustrial Acreage—10.46 Acres Currently being used as wrecking yard. Prime location. Call Ken. Industrial Warehouse—4,800 sq. ft.—other storage on Vt Acre. Call Rex Newell or Peggy Cole. Industrial Warehouse—14,400 sq. ft. with office on approx. '/> acre. Call Peggy Cole or Rex Newell. 84 ladustrial Acres an Gibaon & 1-616. Call Peggy Cole or Rex NeweU. BOULDER HILLS CONDO End unN, overiooking pool. Extensively upgraded-lmmsculately malntaned. Assumable loan. • OULDtR DAM REALTY 293-4063 For Sal* By Ownr 3 bdrm, 1 % Itath home. Approx. 1,700 sq. ft. Vslley View sres. Call for appolntmont. 565.9S34 ^-^-^^-^44^ For sale by owner, Deautiful 2 story home. 4 bclrnn, swimming pool & spa. Much more. Asking $119,500. Call 564-7091. COMMERCIAL BUILDING Offices, Warehouse, Outside Security Storage. 4,000 sq ft total. 294-0686 NEED TO SELL' YOUR HOUSE? WE WILL BUY IT NOW! 293-1613 Q.A. "Curly" Smith, Inc. Mone great news on the home front YxiteinvitedtDColdwellBanker PAUL GAR61S & ASSOCIATES first QDen House Celdxatioi SATURDAY SEPTEMBeR 30,1989 FROM: IsOO P.M. TO 4i00 P.M. (1) 972 CANDY TUFT, HENDERSON, NV (2) 159 EMDEN, HENDERSON, NV (3) 506 E. FAIRWAY, HENDERSON, NV (4) 817 FiREWEED, HENDERSON, NV (5) 716 GREENWAY, HENDERSON, NV (6) 507 HOUCK, HENDERSON, NV v(7) 331 Pi^BLO BLVD., HENDERSON, NV (8) 915 SANTA YNEZ, HENDERSON, NV (9) 744 E. WILLOW, HENDERSON, NV HOSTESS: LOIS BEAVOR HOSTESS: ANNE SMITH HOSTESS: FAYE SWOBODA HOSTESS: LINDA LEWIS HOSTESS: SHARON KOZAR HOST: DEAN MOORMAN HOST: RICK JOHNSTON HOSTESS: WENDY WILLIAMS HOSTESS: TINA WILLIAMS 160 EAST HORIZON DRIVE, HENDERSON, NV 89015 PHONE: (702) 564-6969 Americ^LaigestM-ServiceReal Estate Compaiiyp ll.ilrnMMwHI)niir.liic .4urnai*,La lllillllill l, ciiw|(U | < M i> caaiMl m llirllillll i.lllMIIIII lac. ^J^feW coLoiueu. BANKGRU PAUL GARGIS AASSOaATES EXECUTIVE HOUSE for sale by owner on 5/8 acre. Splendid view, possible 5 bdrm, 4 bth, central vac, intercom w/cassette player, sprinkler control and garage control, two fireplaces, conversation pit. Many more extras. Shown by appointment only. Call 564-1806 293-6014 JL REK4ai]t. ISSS Artaona StrMi •Boddar Oty, 8900S HOME&LAND-BUSINESS INVESTMENT CONSULTANTS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT BOll MOBILE HOMi section. 2 bdrm, !< fJITY / sac in town. Adult \ji. cond. $77,500. LAKE TAHOE IN BOULDER CITY? Yes, Lake Mountain Estates. Drive by 504 Lake Tahoe, 2 bdrm, 2 ba. 2 car carport. Storage, workshop. Fruit trees. All for $119,500. 686 MT. BON A, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths. Lake Mountain Estates $99,900. BE ON THE GOLF COURSE 3 bedroom, huge main bathroom, has tub and separate shower. Master suite lias '/i bath and walk in closet. This tile-roofed beauty has pool w/spa and outdoor shower. 2'/i car garage. $259,900. LOW PRICE Drive by 1305 Shenandoah, 3 bdrm, 2 full baths and garage. Reduced to $80,900. LOW INTEREST LOAN 7% available to qualified buyer. 648 Ave. M, 2 bdrm, 1 bath. Fixer upper. Reduced to $59,900. 1294 BLACK MOUNTAIN COURT Manufactured home with style, 2 bdrm, 2 full baths. Carport, workshop building. $89,000. GORGEOUS HOME ON GEORGIA AVE. Near golf course. Drive by 1544 Georgia Ave. to see beautiful landscaping. 3 bdrm, W\ baths. Over 1,950 sq. ft. in this park like setting for only $189,500. • /> ACRE LOT in Subdivlaioo 11, Boulder City $47,500. MANUFACTURED HOME on 4.68 acres. 2 BR, l*/4 BA. Additional buildings "including house trailer" on property. Located in Searchlight. All for $100,000. JlWiiBI 01' THt SaAWt WWAMCUL MEmWW COLDUieUL BANKeRQ PAUL GARGIS & ASSOCIATES RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE An Indepefldently Owned and Operated Member oi Coldiii^. Banker Residential Atfiliates, Inc. VIEW LAKE new 2 bedroon' $106,000. AINS from this like Spyglass Condo. Only BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Reataurant/Sandwich Shop. Fully equipped. Like new. Low, low rent. Health forces aale. $38,000 indudea equipment. Call for more info. bartUyd. '" Pat BemateiB 29S4379 Anita Hyde -. 293-2144 Tony Korfman ,.. 293-0006 Jerry Marshall 294-1568 Dick Olsoa 29M371 BvSed 2i379 Tooy Wirtz 293-79S9 SPECTACULAR VIEW & PRIME LOCATION are yours. Popular custom home area, new construction going on all around you. Four acres, bam and 16 horae corrals are Included. Priced at $225,000, owner witi carry with a substantial amount down. Call Branda Bird, 564-6969. Ask for property number T:78361. PRESTIGIOUS CAUCO RIDGE—Stunning custom home wHh a view of the entire valley that will take your breath awayl Featuring custom marble entry, eunken living room, formal dining, separate family room, three bedrooms, one la a loftl Three full batha and beautiful mauve decor. Call Lola Beavor or Rick' Johnston, 564-6969 and ask about property C:85fi03. Priced at $144,900. {HEAUTIFUL MISSION HILLS-One acre lot and paved streeto! Country custom has 4 bedrooms, 2.75 baths, features two master suites, two fireplacea, sunken living room, vaulted ceillnga, country kitchen features custom cabinets and ceramic tile counter tops. Call Wendy Williams, 564-969 and ask for property S:86742. Priced at $134,950. CUSTOM ON AN ACRE—Spend your winter evenings curled up next to the warm fireplace In the family room or the one In your master bedroom! Four/possible five bedroom home, 2 full baths, too many extras to list, freshly painted exterkir and lote of concrete, unbelievable viewl Aak Rick or Lois about property P:8062. Priced for $129,900. PRICE REDUCED + BONUS—Three bedroom custom home on Country Club. Circular drive and a pool add to the value. Aasumabte and waiting for you, $128,900. To see, call Dean Moorman, 564-6969 andask for property C:78601. HIGHLAND HILLS BEAUTY—Fomter model home, master bath haa been eN redone, new roof, deiux storm windows, freshly painted. Spend the coot winter nijifite eurted up in front of the fireplaee or the hot summer days in your pool, Cli Anne Smith about property C:84$80. Priced at $112,000. GREAT ASSUMPTION AT 6.5%—Great floor plan, formal living room, fornial dining, s(q>erate family room, wet bar, vaulted ceHlngs, extra large tot, plenty of RV paridng, quiet cul-^de-sac location, three bedroonu, 2 full baths. Call Sharon Kozar or Wendy Wiillama, S64^S069 about property A:880S2. Priced at $109,900. FANTASTIC—Highland NIUs location, Vista model with many upgrades, two atory three bedrooma, 21^ baths, firoplace In fan^ room, 2 car garage, covered petlo. Call Tina Williams, 564-6969 and ask her about property W:8743S. $106,900. ZONED COMMERCIAL-Water Street tocatlon, all utHltiee are avaHAIe. and owner M cany with $25,000 dowm. Priced Id $100,000. Ask Brenda Bhd about fMlgiperty W:77S36. LOOK NO FURTHER—Spaeioua floor ptan, maater bedroom Is aoparate from the olier three and features sRoman tub, double sinks, and walk-in oftoeM. Separate living room and family room sham a two-way fir^taeef Four bectooms MMI 2V^ batha, priced at $97,950. Aak Rtok or Lois abmit property 0:88767. NZYQLBOHafI Now that I have your atlentlen. ene see Ms three bedroom, 1.7S tMth home k>eated near Faye QaHoway in HigMwid HiNs. This eomfortable eude is only $85,900! To eee pkMse oM Dean Mowman, 664-6969. Ask about S:8613. MQHLAIW lLiS AiH> TOWmotl8E---Used on the week ends only, owner Rvee outof elflet Chrteiloeaflon. private yard and garage. Priced at $71,906. Can Ann* Smilii. 864*666 and aak ibout property H:62226. TASTEFUiXY OECORATED-Three twdroom, 1.75 bath, 1 ear oarage, waHpapeeand paneling, extra hftauiaMon, beautiful landaeaping, garden area and euto gaiebo. CeN ma WMianis, 584-6989 and aak about property H:7634S. Priced at $87,000. 100 East Horiton DHvs Hamlerson, Nevada 89015 Taiaplione! (702) 5e4-6M9 liaiie I i' ORIGINAL DEFECTIVE \ ^atmmmmatM