Citation
1989-08-10 - Henderson Home News

Material Information

Title:
1989-08-10 - Henderson Home News
Creator:
Baker, Ben ( Columnist )
Kesterson, Lorna ( Columnist )
Scott, Katherine E. ( Columnist )
Fisher, Robert Grove ( Columnist )
Cohen, Richard ( Columnist )
Shipler, Guy ( Columnist )
Corbalan, Georgina ( Columnist )
Szydelko, Paul ( Columnist )
Bennett, L. Jessie ( Columnist )
VanDerSys, Helen ( Columnist )
Anderson, Hugh J., III ( Columnist )
Caldwell, Clyde C. ( Columnist )
Flores, Fred ( Columnist )
McDonnell, Pat ( Columnist )
Curtis, Joey ( Columnist )
Goff, James E. ( Columnist )
Bishop, Carolyn D. ( Columnist )
Earl, Phillip I. ( Columnist )
DuBose, Anna M. ( Columnist )
O'Callaghan, Tim ( Columnist )
Smithe, Valerie ( Columnist )
Cowen, Jeff ( Photographer )
Baker, Ben ( Photographer )
Scott, Katherine E. ( Photographer )
Burke, Stephen ( Photographer )
Publisher:
O'Callaghan, Mike
HBC Publications, Inc.
Creation Date:
1989-08-10
Language:
English
Materials:
Paper ( medium )

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Nevada
Henderson
East Las Vegas
City and town life -- Nevada -- Henderson
Community life -- Nevada -- Henderson
History -- Henderson (Nev.) -- 20th century
Genre:
Newspapers

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Acknowledgments:
Greenspun Media sponsors this collection.
Collection Location:
Greenspun Media retains possession of the bound, original newspapers. Henderson District Public Libraries retains possession of the microfilm and the digital files.

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Source Institution:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Holding Location:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Rights Management:
The items in this collection are provided for non-commercial personal and academic use by Henderson Library patrons and may not be republished in any way. Contact Greenspun Media Group for additional information regarding rights to this material: http://www.greenspunmedia.com
Resource Identifier:
hhn3733 ( Digital Id )

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Pa^ 11 Hndtnoa Home News, Henderson, Nevada Tuesday, August 8, 1989 r^ iriciririr^^ir^^ir BOULDER CITY ESTATES 4 BEDROOM 4V^ BATH Beautiful two story Tudor Style home One-year-old, security fenced pool w/spa, and solar panels Approx 3.200 sq ft Country kitchen with island and walk-in pantry, bay window in breakfast area Spacious,utility/bonus room Large master suite with fireplace and French doors to balcony His and her walkin closets 3 car garage with RV parking Beautiful landscaping By owner $292,000 Call 294 1550 THINKING ABOUT MAKING A MOVE? We are currently helping many out of state buyers nnove to our area We are desparate for home to sell them. For a free market evaluation and a complimentary video of your home, call Richard or Cheryl 595-3291 COLDWELL BANKER, REALTORS. UNOBSTRUCTED LAKE VIEW By owner CLAREMONT HEIGHTS 1305 Alpine Dr. 4 BR, 4V> BA, Custom Formal living, formal dming, (amilyroom and additional playroom Spacious rooms, 2 fireplaces Large lot For appointment 294 3875 Unbefieveable Unobstructed View of Lake Mead. See this beautiful, remodeled, custom home on % acres 3,600 sq ft.. 4 bdrm, 3 bth, fantastic great rm & separate master suite w/fireplace & deck $395,000 CeN Murray Blrdman 4S48M LOT FOR SALE Property Address -1,442 San Felipe Dr (B Hill) B C Lot 105, Subdivision #11 l^ap reference 340-832009 Rectangular shaped lot 121X189 approx Adequate drainage Excellent Location F^iWc Utilities Electrcity, water, sanitary sewer Decorative street lights in Excellent resale value Located 25 miles from Las Vegas Ready for building large home Surroundings homes all custom and built Good schools and recreation Excellent community Call owner 293-1235 or 293 1660 anytime day or evening Property values increasing rapidly • Call for sale price Youcanhtip M3-J100 MIMJtNIRt NOTICE: All r*al • • tata MivtrilMd harain U aub|ac1 to tha Fadaral Fair Houalr9 Act, wtMch makaa N lllagal to advartlaa "any prafaranca, llmltatlort, or diKrimlrwtton bocauaa of raca, color, rallglon, aai, handicap, familial atatua, or natlortal origin, or Inlantlon to maka any auch prafaranca, limitation, or diacrlmlnatlon." Wa will not knowlnsly accapt any advafUainfl tor raal aatata wfilch la In violation of tha law. All paraoni ara haraby Inlormad titat all dwalllnga advartiaad ara avallabia on an aqual opportunity batla. r FOR: INDIVIDUAL UNDIVIDED PERSONAL ATTENTION BUYING OR SELLING REAL ESTATE CONTACT: RICHARD QUY OFFICE: (702) 458-8888 PAQER: (702) 389-1973 HOME: (702) 293-4915 Anericona •|]it^t^r A A ami l.ftiriia^ 2551 N. Qrean Valley Pwfcy., Suit* A-400, Qrn Vallay, NV 89014 NEED TO SELL YOUR HOUSE? WE WILL BUY IT NOW! 293-1613 G.A. "Curly" Smith, Inc. HOUSE FOR SALE BY OWNER 136 Continental, Henderson 565-3174 WnEE A CLEAR 3 Bdrm, 1 Bath, 2 Extra Rooms, Garage, Porch, Patio, Storage BIdg., Front & Backyard, 60X125 Fully Fenced Lot, Sprinklers, Air & Heat Pump $62,500 FURNITURE & APPLIANCES AVAILABLE FRIENDLY EXPERIENCED PROUD GROWING WITH HENDERSON WE ARE HERE FOR YOU! p. "Jim Brokar jeoMii 219 Water St. Henderson. Nevada 89015 [Qj 564-3333 *M0l RESIDENTIAL DIVISION mfSBIi ••Sunrise Mobile Estates** Mobile Home Lots for Sale from S25,000. East Lake Mead Drive at Mohawk. GOLF-AREA historic 2 story in country club setting. First ownwer, mountain city views. ALSO *GARDEN *RV PAD. CONVENTIONAL FINANCING available. $266,000. Call Richie. INSIDE LOOKS NEW-Bright residence with real appeal. Cozy fireplace, central air, gas heat, carpeting, family room, fencing, automatic sprinkler system, wood burning fireplace. Call Richie. VERY WELL CARED FOR-Super large rear yard, 3 bedrooms. .New proof and carpet. Call Dave. BUILDING LOT ON TRUFFLES. S25,0OO. Call Katie. PRICE REDUCTION! 3 BDRM/1\ Bath, 1 car carport. Great starter home on rental property. Call Katie. HIGHLAND HILLS-VIEW SITE GEM Desert Modern home with golf close by. Stucco, a sole owner, mountain views. Motherin-law suite, modern kitchen, A BR/2' 2 baths, corner lot, fencing. CONVERTED GARAGE, immediately available. Call Ray. MISSION DRIVE-Sec. .32,1.1 Acres. Only S22,500. CALL NOW! Near proposed freeway off-ramp. Peggy Benedict. VACANT LAND Essex & Orleans, 5 Acres near New Lakes project. Power & water nearby. Price right. Call Don Jensen. HALF ACRE Fully matured lot with 1,800 sq. ft. house. 3 large bedrooms, 2 full baths. 800 sq. ft. workshop. Remember ask for Dave. POOL GORGEOUS-3 BD/2 Bath-i,500 sq ft Low down. Ask for Dave. HURRY! HURRY! DESERT! MAGNIFICENT! Consummate mobile home. Cheery fireplace, central air, walk-in closets, horses OK. 3 BR/2 baths. PLUS *Paddle fans-Large trees. Price reduced can't last! Call Ray. BEAUTIFUL FIREPLACE in large country style family roomkitchen. Newly remodeled with new cabinets, appliances and carpeting, large bdrms on lower level. 2' 2 baths. 2,330 sq ft and two car garage. Jim Moore. 767 HERITAGE VISTA-Very nice condo in excellent conditon 2 BDRM I' < baths fireplace end unit community pool etc. Asking S7I.50O. Call Peggy Benedict or Al. FREE LIST OF BOULDER CITY HOMES, TOWNHOMES/CONOOS, MANUFACTURED HOMES — & BUILDING LOTS! STOP BY OR CALL & WE WILL MAIL!! *FTCR HOURS CALL: LINtTTC BAVIS ill-iOT? ELLEN LAnB STROPBERC..•eiB-bSOft UOOJY KHEELESS ei3-lli12 CARL C COUAN, BKOKER. .213-mn AREA CODT: 705 293*4663 m 404 NEVADA HIGHWAY INTHEBURK PLAZA MIS 293-6014 JLA iiiaas 1S2S AHMM Slraal •Boddar City. MOOS H0ME&LAND4USINESS INVESTMENT CONSULTANTS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT BOULDER CITY BE ON THE GOLF COURSE 3 bedroom, huge main bathroom, has tub and separate shower. Master suite has 4 bath and walk in closet. This tile-roofed beauty has pool w/spa and outdoor shower. 2' z car garage. $259,900. LOW PRICE Drive by 1305 Shenandoah. 3 bdrm. 2 full baths and garage for only 584,750. OVERLOOKING LAKE MEAD 836 IVIarina Drive, Custom 3 bedrm, 2 bath. Pool w/spa, 2 car garage. $187,500. GREATY BUY-GREAT FAMILY HOME 1330 Pinto Rd. 3 bdrm, IV4 bath. Familyroom w/fireplace, pool size lot $110,000. LOW INTEREST LOAN 7% available to quail fied buyer. 648 Ave. M, 2 bdrm, 1 bath. Fixer upper Only $65,000. 1294 BLACK MOUNTAIN COURT Manufac tured home with style, 2 bdrm, 2 full baths. Carport, workshop building. $91,000. GORGEOUS HOME ON GEORGIA AVE. Near golf course. Drive by 1554 Georgia Ave, to see beautiful landscaping. 3 bdrm, P< baths. Over 1,950 sq ft. in this park like setting fur only S 189.500, LAKE .MOUNTAIN ESTATES 2 BR. 2 BA wbeautiful lake and mountain views. Covered and RV parking. $110,000. 2 ACRE LOT in Subdivision 11, Boulder City $47,500. MANUFACTUREDHOMEon4.68acres 2BR. I't BA. Additional buildings "including house trailer" An property. Located in Searchlight. All for-SlOO.OOO. VIEW LAKEANDMOUNTAINSfrom this Uke new 2 bedroom 2'/> bath Spyglass Condo. Only S105.000. LARGE RANCH STYLE HOME 3,000 sq. ft wM or 4 bedrooms & 2' > baths. Country kitchen, super larf^e liviagroom w/fireplace. Huge familyroom loukii out to pool. All on large corner lot. S 169.900. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY ResUurant Sand wich Shop. Fully equipped. Like new. Low, low rent. Health forces sale, $38,000 includes equipment. Call for more info. P4 Beraniifhii Anita Hydr Tony Kordnan Jerry .M/Khl| INrk OIkon BeV Seal Tuoy Wim _!8ilJ .'93-2144 mwtoH 2eautMul landscaping, and a very attractive exterior. Ask for Anne Smittl, S64-e969, Priced at $71,900. Move right in! H:82226. EXPLORE THE POSSIBILITIES... .Cul-de-sac location, 4 bedrooms, 2 lull baths, separate family room. Lots of RV parking with a gate and access from back etreet, large backyard and a storaage area. Call Brenda Bird, 564-6969, she'll be glad to give you the details. A:82492. PAINTED WITH SUNSHINE... .The home and the nelghorhood are {oyeous places to be. You'H love this bright, cheerful 2 story with 4 bedrooms, 2.75 baths, oik pan)uet floor, cathedral celling, nice planned ndghorhood In Green Valley and near excellent schools. Call Brenda Bird right away, 564-6969. M:78473. TIRED OF BEING SQUEEZED? Stretch out in this large, pleasant, comfortable home, iiore than enough room for Ideal family living. S bedrooms, 1.75 baths, family room and a laundry room. A perfect home for an expanding young family, Call Brenda Bird for the details, 564-6969. S:82963. CUTE COUNTRY CUSTOM Located near the golf course snd surrounded by nice custom homes. Two master suites, l .75 baths, bay window, nice porch, cast iron wood burning stove, gazetM snd beautiful pool and a large cormer tot. AasumatMs kun, noqtialifyingt Aak tor Sharon Kozar or Wendy Williams, 54-999. Priced at StO.900. R:8152. HERE'S THE KEY To yoir happinasal Ask us for the sddress to this Im* iiW)ta|a CMaoi, Sonora rmxlal. Three bedroonts, 1.75 bsths, country kitchen sdtt) breakfast bar. Stay warm artd cozy in the living room or family room, with the double flrvplace. Comer tot, aH fenced, RV parking with wrought Iron gates and s covered pstlo. Ask for Sharon Kozar to show you this chsrming home •Ooni 378-1St2 or 564-6999. V:81673. RELAX AND STAY — Warm, friendly atmosphere abounds in this comforlabie 2 bedroom, 2 bath home In one of Green Vally's toveHest toestions. You'tt stay totaOyiNrfaksd in the lovely eunken tub and en|oy the beauty of lueh green plants auOMng In the ganten window. Cell Sharon or Wendy for an appointment. Toe many nice features to mention. 564*6969. Priced al $99,900. A:82672. QOBiMI TMS UPI You'll be thankful for coming to see this fine 2 bedroom. m Nih, Tofwnhousa. Qrsat tor s young eowpto. Priced at $60,900, great no fBMMfylng loan, low down payment. Refrigerator, washer, dryer snd tNUt-ln mtorawavaail stsyl There's also a 2 car gwage. Ask for Sharon Ko2sr or Wendy ; Williams. 594-6999. A:90787. SEE IT TO BELIEVE IT....Unbelievabie back ysrdi Pool, sps, BBQ grill, ot# door bfth, awnings snd new carpott. Tlirse bedrooms, l .75 baths, IsmHy rooMI' wHh wet bsr. Conveniently located. Ask for Srentfa Bird, S4>9$9, V:71002 •E/UlTIFUL BUY Come home to this tovely etntom home, now ofterei <. at -nm9T price. Four b edfooma, separate family room with fireplace, two cwt garage, heated pool and spa, aatelllte dish. Mock wall and located on a half acre to(. Ask for Brenda Bird, 564-6969. M:77401. 160 East Horlxon Drive Henderson, Nevada 89015 Telephone: (702) 9M-6969 THURSDAY INSIDE City gets new park See Page 9 Wolves first game postponed See Page 19 Homeowners merger put on hold See Page 10 WEATHER Thursday, High 103 Low 78 HENDERSON NEVADA'S INDUSTRIAL CENTER Volume 40, 62nd Edition HtuMnOli, Nevada Last City Council meeting in old i&ity Hall set Tuesday nm cotanmrr'S fxwsp^Bi 25* MWar st. 5g<-yast Thuri.y. Augwt 10, i989 By Ben Baker News Staff Writer The Henderson City Council will meet in the old City Hall for the last time at 7 p.m. Tuesday night. City Manager Phil Speight said during the council's last meeting that the next meeting will be in the new City Halleven if the meeting has to be postponed. A tentative first meeting has been set for 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 5. An improved microphone/ speaker has been installed, as well as a new voter-display board. See Meeting, Page 2 City Hall open house planned Saturday By Ben Baker News Staff Writer The new City Hall will be opened for public viewing from One Woman's VIEW Editor's Note: Mayor Lorna Kesterson is guest columnist this week for PubUsher Mike O'CaUaghan, who is on vacation. By Mayor Loma Kesterson For many reasons I have always been proud of Henderson residents. They really take an interest in community affairs and that's what makes for a good city. We, as a community, have always supported school bond issues, we have supported our own bond issues when it meant recreation, beautiAcation, more police and firefighters. My last communication, one that concerned conservation of water, brought more interest than I ever suspected. Most people communicating with me were helpful and nice. Some others were not so kind, but all had good suggestions that we are going to take to heart and about which we will tzy to do something. The City Administration, City Council and 1 thank everyone for their interest. The water letter read: 'Dear Henderson Water Customer, "^ater use and conservation is an imporSee One Woman's View, Pagi2 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, according to City Hall officials. Tours will be self-guided. City hall staffers will be on hand in each department to answer questions those touring might have. "Bring your whole family. It's a real open house," said Linda Wood, the city manager's secretary. Most of the City Hall will be See City Hail, Page 2 PRODUCING MARSHMALLOWS-Kldd and Co. is producing marshmallows again. The plant is getting ready to return to full capacity production. No orders have been taken yet, as the plant is not operating at full capacity. The May 4,1988, Pepcon blast completely destroyed the former plant. The new plant will have a grand opening Wednesday, Aug. 30. Related story. Page 17. Photo by Jeff Cowen Police offer amnesty to purchasers of stolen property By Katherine E. Scott Home News Staff Writer The Henderson Police Department is offering amnesty to people who have purchased property stolen during recent burglaries here. At least 15 people have been arrested and much property was recovered over the past two weeks, police said. More arrests are expected in the continuing investigation. "If you or anyone you know has obtained a'good deal' from anyone in or around your neighborhood," states a flyer that is being mailed to area residents, "you are probably in possession of stolen property." HPD Detective Richard Perkins said such people could be arrested for that crime. He said the flyer is being sent to residents in and around the Valley View and Section 27 neighborhoods, where most of the burglaries occurred. He said those areas are experiencing some eight to 10 burglaries a month. The burglary suspects arrested recently are nearly all under age 18 and most lived in those neighborhoods, police said. Property which recent owners feel may have been stolen should be returned to the HPD Detective Bureau between 6 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, police said. After 5:30 p.m. property may be given to the HPD desk officer. Both are located at 243 Water St. The amnesty will be offered only from Aug. 14 to 25, Perkins said. Perkins said police will "do our best to identify the owners and return [the property]. If it's not identified as stolen then it will be returned to the people [who brought it]," he said. He added if the property is not picked up it will eventually be auctioned. Perkins said poUce hope for a good response to the amnesty program. "All we can offer them is immunity from prosecution," he said, "not reimbursement of the money they spent." He added that any person who buys property on the street is risking a charge of being purchase of stolen goods. Some of the specific items sought include televisions, videocassette recorders, stereos, weapons, jewelry, bicycles and Nintendo games, police said. Stocl( promoter cops piea, Cattle Baron's developer may be implicated By Robert Grove Fisher Managing Editor The ultimate fate of the Cattle Baron casino on Boulder Highway became murkier than ever Tuesday, when records were unsealed in District Court that may have implicated its promoter, penny stock entrepreneur Meyer Blinder of Blinder Robinson and Co., of stock manipulation and investment fraud. Blinder Robinson, located in suburban Denver, is one of the nation's largest penny stock brokerage firms. The records, unsealed in response to a motion filed earlier this month by the Las Vegas SUN, indicated that LIFE^AVING LAMP—This lamp is on Pickens' liver transplant fund. Penona wandisplay at Elegant Cleaners, in the Henderting to bid on the lamp should go by Elegant son Plaza, where Vons store is located. The Cleaners and leave their name, dajrtime lamp will be sold to the highest bidder on telephone number, address and bid anaount. Friday, Aug. 25. Proceeds will go to Charles PIMU bj JM CWM Arnold L. Kimmes, a pivotal witness in a federal probe of international investment fraud, secretly pleaded guilty in March to charges of securities fraud and racketeering. Blinder Robinson reportedly was one of several firms said to be involved in the scheme. It is alleged that fictitious stocks were placed on the raailtet by equally worthless corporations that were controlled by Kimmes and his cohorts. It is further alleged that, after deliberately inflating those stocks in '^Und pools" by sales to nonexistent investors, the stocks were then passed on to stock brokerage houses over which Kimmes had control, including two nowdefunct investment furms— Stoneridge Securities of Las Vegas and Salt Lake City's Chelsea Securities—as well as Binder Robinson and Co., the major promoter of the Cattle Baron casino in Henderson. Blinder Robinson reportedly is the focusof an ongoing grand jury probe that possibly could return indictments by the end of August. Kimmei' background shows a previous r stock fraud conviction and a criminal history spanning nearly four decades, sources said.' Reportedly he is being sought See stock, Page 2 Inside L. JMi Bcnrwtt 12 1 Carolyn Drennan Bishop 241 Calandar of Event* 27 Classified 46 Richard Cohen 4 Comics, CroMword 43 Joy Curtis 20 DarOtot>i 40 Education 28-29 EntoitainnMnt 30-37 JlmGoff 21 Orson Vallsy News 10 Horoscope 4S LtgalNotlcss 44 MINtaryNewt 32-49 Pat McOonntll 10 OMtuariM St Ouizllastsf 22 Religion at Senior Acttvttiss 11 Quy SMplsr 4 Sports 17-21 TMs Wss Nevada 31 Helsn VanOerSyt IS VMwpoini 4 YourVlMir 1

PAGE 2

ff t Hndmon Horn. Newfc Hnim^ Nl, One Woman's View from Page 1 Thnnday. Augiut 10. 1988 tant issue fadng all of us in the Las Vegas Vallqr. "While no one wishes to restrict the quality (tf lifestyle we presently ei^oy. it is important that aU of us be consdentioys ahout how we use our water supply. "As a result of our dry desert environment, lawn irrigation is probably the most important factor affecting water consumption. During the summer months it is particularly important that lawn sprinkling qystems be adjusted properly. An example would be not to water during the heat of the day when much of the water is lost to evaporation. "Enclosed is a water conservation flyer which will provide you with some hints to help prevent water waste. This will not only save water but could reduce your water hill. "If you have any questions about conservation, additional information is available throu0i the Henderson Department of Public Works Utihty Office, phone 565-2110. Tleaae remember! Use all the water you need, but use it wisely." I would just like to go through aome of the soggestioDs that were made to us. I'm sure many others of you have had the same feelngs so at least you will know that they were expressed and we will be working on them. Following are quotes from some of those ideas: "If you would check the intersection of Haren and Tabony, there is a major water waste. There has been water at that intersection 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 52 weeks a year for the past 27 months. I have reported it previously and apparently no one cares." T was pleased to receive the letter from you expressing your concern about water use and conservation in the Las Vegas Valley. The flyer of water-saving tips contained some excellent ideas." "I recently wrote to Sen. Reid and Bryan and Representative Bilbray to urge their support for the proposed national plumbing products efficiency act of 1989. Inefficient plumbing fixtures waste billions of gallons of water each year and millions of taxpayers' dollars in treating excess water. I am hoping that the new City Hall will be installing efficient plumbing fixtures and that water-efficient, drought-resistant landscaping will be installed on the City Hall grounds rather than vast expanses of lawn. If our city officials do not set an example, it becomes a Do as I say, not as I do' situation where nobody wins." "A water conservation guide for residents and communities is available from National Wildlife Federation. It is free. It is obtained by writing to: Citizen's Action Guide for Water Conservation, National Wildlife Federation, 1400 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036." Another frustrated citizen wrote ex* pressing her concern about zoning, devek>pment8, streets, signals and ptMvly marked intersections. She concluded by saying, "Incidentally, there is a great amount of water being wasted by city facilities. Maintenance people should be required to inspect watering schedules at night, or whenever facilities are being watered, to insure water is not running down the streets. Hundreds of gaUons of water are running down Water Street at night from the lavm watering at the Convention Center complex and also from Basic to Water Street. I just can't imderstand why more Hendersonians'aren't interested in helping the city improve our town." My reply: "The dty has recently designated an employee to monitor use and waste of water throughout the dty. When a 'wato^wasting' situation occurs, he informs the individuals involved and, as appropriate, suggests alternative watering practices. In the case of the Convention Center complex, the dty's Parks and Recreation Department has been informed of the conditions you obsove and is evaluating modifications of its watering schedule." Another resident hailed the dty for its water conservation information; however, she was concerned that more stringent measures aren't being taken. "Being new to this area, I was astoiuided and still am, that everyone has lawns, bushes and trees, just as if they lived in a tropical zone. After all, this is desert and even though water hasn't been a problem in the past, use of this predous commodity for things like lawns is wasteful." She questions how close we are to restricting new landscapuig, requiring it to be desert-oriented. She wisely suggests that new developments in the city should encourage desert plants as much as possible. She also suggests comparisons between planting and maintaining lawns versus desert flora. Thorsday, August 10,1989 FUTURE YOUTH CENTER SITE-These Recreation Department Youth Center. "The two houses on West Basic Rd. might the city is considering buying the properties, site of an expanded Henderson Parks and Pboto by BD BWW City plans to buy two lots on Basic, expand Youth Center By Ben Baker and Associates at $46,500 and The houses could be News Staff Writer $49,500, respectively. demolished and the lots The City of Henderson may "[The city may be] buying deared, or the dty could act as purchase lots 151 and 155 on location, not necessarily a landlord and rent the West Basic Rd., possibly to property. The value [could be] properties. expand the Henderson Parks in the property as opposed to the homes," said Gargis. "If the city has a way to rent, Under some circumstances, that's fine with me," Jones said, the lots might be more Renting the properties to appealing if there were no Economic Devlopment Direchouses on them, he said. tor Ann Barren's department "As far as I understand, the was mentioned during the last -city plans to acquire lots all down or left standing. That along the street," said Dundee decision will depend on what Jones, parks and recreation the City Council decides to do director. ^ ^wv. mca. nc auueu uiai with the property. Members of the City Council buying the remaining lots as The lots are listed by said several options were open they became available would be Coldwell Banker/Paul Gargis with regard to the properties, a better idea. and Recreation Youth Center. The lots are at the end of the 150 block. The Youth Center is a block east of the lots. The lots currently have houses, which might be torn council meeting. Councilman Lorin Williams said buying the lots would be a good idea. He added that Galloway Elementary closes doors for day Crash victim identified By Katherine E. Scott motorcycle on which they were Newa Staff Writer driving struck a pickup truck A woman killed in a traffic about 8 p.m., pohce said. Another resident called to suggest that we have a city employee do night checks on water running down streets. Another, who didn't make identification, was upset at water running down Green Valley Parkway and Sunset. These are not all of the letters or calls that we received, but they are representative. The City CouncQ and I appreciate the responses and will try to put them to good use. Sometimes when you write something like the water conservation letter, and the dty's house is not in order, it comes back to jar you, as those letters have. Let's aU see if we can do better. I know one thing for sure—you are all reading your mail Storm not harmful to Henderson accident on Boulder Highway Friday night has been identified as Heidi Critchfield, 37, of East Las Vegas. Critchfield and Gary Erven Olson, 36, who shared the same address, were killed after a The woman's identity was withheld pending notification of next of kin. The Clark County Coroner's Office said See Victim, Page 3 Meeting from Pagel City Hall from Page 1 By Katherine E. Scott News Staff Writer Recent storms in the Las Vegas VaUey dumped water and winds in Henderson, but beyond brief power outages the nighttime rains caused little problems for local residents. Power loss in Henderson was ^t extensive," jaid Nevada By Katherine E. Scott arrived for work about 6:30 "We kept the buses here until iVews Staff Writer a.m. "They were here when I we found out everyone would Some 650 school children arrived at 7:30," Gillies said, be (cared for upon return]," were turned away from class The principal said the Gillies added. He said many Tuesday after Fay Galloway electricians told him stormy parents had to leave their jobs Elementary School suffered a weather conditions caused the or find somebody to pick up power failure. Dark, billowy their children. clouds clung over heavy air in Gillies does not expect the the neighborhood, although no students will need to make up rain or heavy winds were the missed day, although he present as students appeared said that could happen. He at school. added that may be difficult to A few classrooms did briefly handle in a year-round school have lights and air with the 45-15 system, in conditioning, Gillies said, but which classes are constantly in then all electricity failed and session except during the school's staff used weekends and holidays, emergency power. By 8:30 Quad C students at Fay „ a.m., he said teachers started Galloway were on vacation finding the brownout when he calling parents at home and during the brownout, so stopping others from leaving families with students in that their children at the school, quad were not affected. loss of electricity. Principal Burke Gillies said all but five children had been picked up by the time power was returned to the school about 11 a.m. "It did inconvenience some [parents]," he said, "but we couldn't [send children home without supervision]." Gillies said school custodian Pat Mortsen called school district electricians after Power Co. spokeman Murray Westgate. Tuesday night there were "sporadic and in-and-out outages," he said, but none were for extended periods or on major circuits. Motel robbed Monday night the weather a man suspected of robbing a caused a brownout at Fay ^otel clerk at gunpoint Galloway Elementary School Tuesday afternoon, and students were sent home Police described the suspect Tuesday due to the lack of as about 19 to 20 years old, 5 electricity. feet, 6 inches tall with a thin By Katherine E. Scott gju^ and tan pants, pohce said. News Staff Writer According to police reports, Henderson pohce are seeking the suspect used a small-caliber m oMorw.*-^ r.t -^uk;^-. ~ semi-automatic handgun about The current public address on the first two floors will be system has drawn complaints available for inspection. The from some hard-of-hearing third floor will be closed 3:30 p.m. at the Townhouse Motel, 43 Water Street. An undisclosed amount of money was taken during the ZZ open.iUloftheworkingareas so they should be famihar with T^n^Lr^^rtTv J''^ buUd and neatly tnmmed hair robbery, police said. Officers Iress on the first two floors will be it thev added IJepartment said lightmng and mustache. He was wearing were unable to locate the citizens. I^ght said the new P.A. system wiU be more than adequate. The present tally board has several lights which refuse to operate. Councilman Andy Hafen's "yes" hght has not worked during several past meeting!. A "Ves" vote on his part was signified by his "no" and "abstain" hghts being turned off. The "no" and City officials said they encourage everyone to come to the open house. The City Hall is for all Henderson residents. it, they added. Some refreshments will be served. struck a power pole in the desert near Basic High School. Firefighters stood by until NHP workers arrived, but did A by-invitation only, shownot approach the power lines ing of the building will begin which were arcing, according at p.m. Friday night. to the HFD. a green-and-gold striped sport suspect. Stock from Page 1 by Swias authorities for a similar stock swindle. His partner of some yean, Thomas Quinn, was arrested on the _, French Riviera on similar "abstain" Ugfats work pn^jerly. charges in July while Kimmes, IIM new council meeting hall at that very moment, was will be larger than the current eluding French jurisdiction, facility. More seating will also sources said, be available. In several past Federal authorities allege meetingB, when controversial that Kimmes and his associates material was on the agenda, loaned financially weak aome citizens were forced to Stoneridge Securities and •tand and wait in the hall Chelsea Securities sufficient outade the meeting room. funds that would permit them k to continue operations under SEC regulations and then coerced those firms to list inflated stocks in printed information furnished to potential investors. Blinder Robinson, the govenunent alleges, agreed to pay Kinunes and his associates 50 percent above cost for the stock and then offered it for maintain, neglected to advise mvestors that it controlled the stock and that there was no risk involved for Blinder Robinson. Allegedly, thousands of investors worldwide have been bilked of as much as $500 million in the Kimmes scam. A joint U.S.-Swiss investigation reportedly is attempting to analyze the sale to the pubUc in liighmethods used in that alleged pressure boiler room tactics." penny stock scheme, the Los Salespersons for Blinder Angeles Times recently Robinson, federal authorities reported. All iBdependent Newspaper Foimded June 1,1961 PsMiaUd wrmy Twmiuj ami Tkuadby aonlnf at P.O. Box 90490. HMMimoB. Navwia. 89000 Vkoat S64-1881. MIKE O'CALLAGHAN CAROLYN O'CALLAOHAN PaUUMT Co-PubUahw ROBERT GROVE nSHBR Mw^tM Editor PAUL SZYDELKO Aseariite EMmt HBJCrMimtkma Mifa O'Calkghu. PrHMwt: Cmlya O'Cdbgkui. Viet PMIdt;ThiOrilhghw.VlBr • • BobMorgaa.^ SnbacriptloB rataa _^. Siagb ota Wartaf IHI liil||l. Oaajrv 916 Si far Sb'aaatka Sli aaatka.. lOJO Eat aHniiliilijl...04pyar Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Page 3 Secretary of State to address Chamber CORRECTION-Jeff Mann, right, was incorrectly identified in the Tuesday edition of the Henderson Home News as class valedictorian Tim Hartman m a photograph about the graduation of the Henderson Fire Department's training academy. Mann, who was elected class leader by other members of the class, presented a plaque of appreciation to Capt. Don Griffie during graduation ceremonies last week. Hartman, second from left above, addressed the audience as valedictorian. Seated at the head table were, from left, Henderson Mayor Lorna Kesterson, Battalion Chief George Price, Capt. Robert Maroney and Battalion Chief Joe Hill. Photos by Katherine E. Scott By Katherine E. Scott News Staff Writer Nevada Secretary of State Frankie Sue Del Papa is scheduled to address the Henderson Chamber of Commerce at its monthly membership meeting next week. "Del Papa has made numerous changes and improvements intended to serve the business community in a more efficient manner" since taking office in January 1987, the Chamber's monthly newsletter stated. It added, "We believe the Chamber membership will find her remarks to be of great interest." Del Papa was bom in Nevada and graduated high school in Las Vegas, according to the newletter. She has a law degree from George Washington University in Washington, D.C, and has served on the Nevada Board of Regents. Luncheon reservations may be made before noon Wednesday by calling 565-8951. The meeting is scheduled for noon Thursday, Aug. 17, at the Henderson Convention Center. The Chamber also reminds members to submit information regarding address, telephone or other changes in local businesses for an update of the membership Ust. A few booths are still available for the Chamber's Expo '89. The deadline for applications and payments is Sept. 1. The Chamber's annual installation banquet is scheduled Sept. 15. ATTEND CHURCH SUNDAY Sponsored By STOP STRESS! Hear Vemon Howard on RADIO KDWN-AM 720 SATURDAYS 12 midnight & SUNDAYS 7 am Heal hurts! Attract good! Be free! NEW LIFE. BOX 684, BOULDER CITY. NEVADA 89005 (Clip and save) YOUR SHIP HAS COME IN! 2487 E. Tropicana 456-7245 • 456-SAIL is. College, architect seek public input for planned building By Ben Baker News Staff Writer Domingo Cambeiro has been selected as the cheif architect for the new building at the Henderson campus of Clark County Community College. He said he is ready to get started and looks forward to working with the community on the project. Victim from Page 2 Wednesday her family had been informed of the death. Police said Olson ran a red light while speeding southbound on Boulder Highway. They said he did not hit the brakes before striking a pickup truck broadside driving eastbound on Sunset Road. Olson died at the scene and Critchfield died after being taken to University Medical Center by a Henderson Fire Department ambulance, poUce said. "I want to hear from everybody. That's the key," he said. Community involvement in the building will ensure that the structure meets all the needs it should fulfill, he said. Cambeiro has planned to set up a trailer at the construction site to make sure he is close to the community and building. Those having comments or wanting more information should call Dr. Herman Van Batten or Dr. Robin Nelson at Henderson CCCC. Cambeiro said he plans to take the comments he receives and will try to incorporate those suggestions into the building. Some very good ideas come from the community's suggestions, he said. The project has about $3.2 million in hard construction funds. Cambeiro estimates that the building should cost about $70 per square foot, about what the new City Hall cost. The project does not have enough funding to completely furnish the building, Van Betten said. He said he hopes local businesses and private citizens will help furnish the building. Larger businesses could provide furnishings for an entire room, he said. Small businesses and private citizens could or The Post Office Altorn^tiv/c A1>L BOXES ETC US>r donate either money smaller, needed equipment. One option he said he is considering is a "building shower." A building shower is similar to a wedding shower. Invitations are sent out with a Ust of suggested gifts. People attending the shower could contribute money which would go toward the purchase of those gifts. Oity Manager Phil Speight said he has seen such showers before and they worked well. Cambeiro said the building should be complete by the time the Legislature convenes. Construction should begin within six months and a first-draft of the building should be ready within a month, he said. Captain Cruise Want* You to Diacovsr tiie CRUISI HOUDAY Difference •CrulMS Ar Our Only Business •Over One Thousand "Special Sailings" •Fraa Anchor Club Membarship ($20 Vaiua) •BI-llonthly Newsletter •We Can Savs You Money •Charge Your Cruise on Our "SailAway Gold Card *7 Day Mexican lllvlra CnA— as low as $693 par paraon/dM occupancy Cruise Only Limited Availability. Call NOW! The Only Cruise Only AGENCY IN NEVAD A THIS WEEK AT NUTRI/SYSTEM ( PAY FOR JUST 1/3 THE AMOUNT OF WEIGHT YOU NEED TO LOSE & RECEIVE 1 WEEK FREE FOOD "Now Over 1,250 Centers in U.S. & Canada. 'Thanks to Nutri/System, everything is 0f^ beautiful. Especially me." • ilUr llM hMl 7S KM. on Hit NUTRI/SYSTIM WgM Lou ProgrKn Oui comp(Hniy (yogiam wakt nec*.-ia mciudn •Pmonallxtd Wtight Loma FrotUt to identity your personal woighC loss rifoblem. • A variety o( delicious Hu SyMttm Cutlnt meals and snacks •Nutrition and Behavior counseling 'B0havlor Breakthrough program lor longlerm success. nutri/system wwQht losa caiitoi's • IN*. HmiSumm. Xc ^^ ^t^yui our Snlor ciiuan* MlWwy IMwounu PAY FOR JUST 1/3 THE AMOUNT OF WEIGHT YOU ] NEED TO LOSE & RECEIVE 1 WEEK FREE FOOD Special olfor doos not include cost oINUTRISYSTEM foods and starl-up, andcannol bo' combined with other offers. As poopio vary, so doos their rate ol weight loss. Valid only | with the purchase ol a now program at a participating center One discount per person.! WEST SIDE (1 BLOCK OFF 195) EAST SIDE NEW LOCATION DECATUR MEADOWS CTR. E.puesBijai TROPICANA EAST I 354 S. DECATUR 870-3722 4850 S. EASTERN 435-0333 | CALL TODAY FOR YOUR FREE, NO OBLIGATION CONSULTATION I I I I • I Westew Union Services NOTARY SERViCE_ PASSP^OJT PHOTOS; Green Valley Open 2756 Green Valley Pkwy. Every 454-5220 Srt. Henderson 850 S. Boulder Hwy. 565-1235 please adopt this baby manx kitten THIS WONDERFUL KITTEN IS SO LOVEABLE, HE IS PURE MANX (NO TAIL), WITH DELIGHTFUL MARKINGS. PLEASE DONT ALLOW DEATH TO BE THE LAST FEELING HE HAS ON EARTH. INSTEAD, LET IT BE WARM HUGS AND HAPPY TIMES. HE IS ONLY $16 AND THAT INCLUDES RABIES SHOT AND LICENSE. HENDERSON ANIMAL SHELTER MOSER DRIVE 565-2033 Basic High School CLASS OF '59 REUNION Who put the Bop in the Bop-sh-Bop-sh-Bop? Who put he Lang in Lang-a-Lang-a-Lang Ding Dong We did 30 Years Ago!! Now We're Back for '^ 0. Basic Homecoming ^ OCT. 12-13-14, 1989 IIAissing classmates Bob Albert Leonard Bloomgreen Evan Bridgewater Colleen Brooks Butterworth Patricia Burt Shoemaker Blllie Cureton Leany Wayne Deane Esie Gailegoa Crane Larry Giles Carolyn Haynie Bills Sam Hombeck Teddle Ann Lauber Linda Poltock Shamblin Milton Pratt Wanda Reynolds Dinklns Bob Russell Gary Shaw Joyce McKectnie Meivin Means Gary Mears Charles Nason Geraldine Nelson Don Stairs Ronald Weaver Jack Kerkuta Ron Kaylor Judy Eates Wilkes Mason Gebe Charlene Homer Giguiere CALL US IF YOU KNOW WHERE OUR MISSING FRIENDS ARE OR FOR MORE INFORMATION Lm KrtHM Nsur • 685-7988 Frtd RiHiwM ra5?!?5SS^!S?!^SS -^ •T'-,-.'-^r?*r"r'r^w^^; • p?j5r,Ki55!^r''.-*' -rp^firwwi^ fw jw i.W .^' • • • ,-" -:^rsj^S^!i^r-xr^

PAGE 3

ff t Hndmon Horn. Newfc Hnim^ Nl, One Woman's View from Page 1 Thnnday. Augiut 10. 1988 tant issue fadng all of us in the Las Vegas Vallqr. "While no one wishes to restrict the quality (tf lifestyle we presently ei^oy. it is important that aU of us be consdentioys ahout how we use our water supply. "As a result of our dry desert environment, lawn irrigation is probably the most important factor affecting water consumption. During the summer months it is particularly important that lawn sprinkling qystems be adjusted properly. An example would be not to water during the heat of the day when much of the water is lost to evaporation. "Enclosed is a water conservation flyer which will provide you with some hints to help prevent water waste. This will not only save water but could reduce your water hill. "If you have any questions about conservation, additional information is available throu0i the Henderson Department of Public Works Utihty Office, phone 565-2110. Tleaae remember! Use all the water you need, but use it wisely." I would just like to go through aome of the soggestioDs that were made to us. I'm sure many others of you have had the same feelngs so at least you will know that they were expressed and we will be working on them. Following are quotes from some of those ideas: "If you would check the intersection of Haren and Tabony, there is a major water waste. There has been water at that intersection 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 52 weeks a year for the past 27 months. I have reported it previously and apparently no one cares." T was pleased to receive the letter from you expressing your concern about water use and conservation in the Las Vegas Valley. The flyer of water-saving tips contained some excellent ideas." "I recently wrote to Sen. Reid and Bryan and Representative Bilbray to urge their support for the proposed national plumbing products efficiency act of 1989. Inefficient plumbing fixtures waste billions of gallons of water each year and millions of taxpayers' dollars in treating excess water. I am hoping that the new City Hall will be installing efficient plumbing fixtures and that water-efficient, drought-resistant landscaping will be installed on the City Hall grounds rather than vast expanses of lawn. If our city officials do not set an example, it becomes a Do as I say, not as I do' situation where nobody wins." "A water conservation guide for residents and communities is available from National Wildlife Federation. It is free. It is obtained by writing to: Citizen's Action Guide for Water Conservation, National Wildlife Federation, 1400 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036." Another frustrated citizen wrote ex* pressing her concern about zoning, devek>pment8, streets, signals and ptMvly marked intersections. She concluded by saying, "Incidentally, there is a great amount of water being wasted by city facilities. Maintenance people should be required to inspect watering schedules at night, or whenever facilities are being watered, to insure water is not running down the streets. Hundreds of gaUons of water are running down Water Street at night from the lavm watering at the Convention Center complex and also from Basic to Water Street. I just can't imderstand why more Hendersonians'aren't interested in helping the city improve our town." My reply: "The dty has recently designated an employee to monitor use and waste of water throughout the dty. When a 'wato^wasting' situation occurs, he informs the individuals involved and, as appropriate, suggests alternative watering practices. In the case of the Convention Center complex, the dty's Parks and Recreation Department has been informed of the conditions you obsove and is evaluating modifications of its watering schedule." Another resident hailed the dty for its water conservation information; however, she was concerned that more stringent measures aren't being taken. "Being new to this area, I was astoiuided and still am, that everyone has lawns, bushes and trees, just as if they lived in a tropical zone. After all, this is desert and even though water hasn't been a problem in the past, use of this predous commodity for things like lawns is wasteful." She questions how close we are to restricting new landscapuig, requiring it to be desert-oriented. She wisely suggests that new developments in the city should encourage desert plants as much as possible. She also suggests comparisons between planting and maintaining lawns versus desert flora. Thorsday, August 10,1989 FUTURE YOUTH CENTER SITE-These Recreation Department Youth Center. "The two houses on West Basic Rd. might the city is considering buying the properties, site of an expanded Henderson Parks and Pboto by BD BWW City plans to buy two lots on Basic, expand Youth Center By Ben Baker and Associates at $46,500 and The houses could be News Staff Writer $49,500, respectively. demolished and the lots The City of Henderson may "[The city may be] buying deared, or the dty could act as purchase lots 151 and 155 on location, not necessarily a landlord and rent the West Basic Rd., possibly to property. The value [could be] properties. expand the Henderson Parks in the property as opposed to the homes," said Gargis. "If the city has a way to rent, Under some circumstances, that's fine with me," Jones said, the lots might be more Renting the properties to appealing if there were no Economic Devlopment Direchouses on them, he said. tor Ann Barren's department "As far as I understand, the was mentioned during the last -city plans to acquire lots all down or left standing. That along the street," said Dundee decision will depend on what Jones, parks and recreation the City Council decides to do director. ^ ^wv. mca. nc auueu uiai with the property. Members of the City Council buying the remaining lots as The lots are listed by said several options were open they became available would be Coldwell Banker/Paul Gargis with regard to the properties, a better idea. and Recreation Youth Center. The lots are at the end of the 150 block. The Youth Center is a block east of the lots. The lots currently have houses, which might be torn council meeting. Councilman Lorin Williams said buying the lots would be a good idea. He added that Galloway Elementary closes doors for day Crash victim identified By Katherine E. Scott motorcycle on which they were Newa Staff Writer driving struck a pickup truck A woman killed in a traffic about 8 p.m., pohce said. Another resident called to suggest that we have a city employee do night checks on water running down streets. Another, who didn't make identification, was upset at water running down Green Valley Parkway and Sunset. These are not all of the letters or calls that we received, but they are representative. The City CouncQ and I appreciate the responses and will try to put them to good use. Sometimes when you write something like the water conservation letter, and the dty's house is not in order, it comes back to jar you, as those letters have. Let's aU see if we can do better. I know one thing for sure—you are all reading your mail Storm not harmful to Henderson accident on Boulder Highway Friday night has been identified as Heidi Critchfield, 37, of East Las Vegas. Critchfield and Gary Erven Olson, 36, who shared the same address, were killed after a The woman's identity was withheld pending notification of next of kin. The Clark County Coroner's Office said See Victim, Page 3 Meeting from Pagel City Hall from Page 1 By Katherine E. Scott News Staff Writer Recent storms in the Las Vegas VaUey dumped water and winds in Henderson, but beyond brief power outages the nighttime rains caused little problems for local residents. Power loss in Henderson was ^t extensive," jaid Nevada By Katherine E. Scott arrived for work about 6:30 "We kept the buses here until iVews Staff Writer a.m. "They were here when I we found out everyone would Some 650 school children arrived at 7:30," Gillies said, be (cared for upon return]," were turned away from class The principal said the Gillies added. He said many Tuesday after Fay Galloway electricians told him stormy parents had to leave their jobs Elementary School suffered a weather conditions caused the or find somebody to pick up power failure. Dark, billowy their children. clouds clung over heavy air in Gillies does not expect the the neighborhood, although no students will need to make up rain or heavy winds were the missed day, although he present as students appeared said that could happen. He at school. added that may be difficult to A few classrooms did briefly handle in a year-round school have lights and air with the 45-15 system, in conditioning, Gillies said, but which classes are constantly in then all electricity failed and session except during the school's staff used weekends and holidays, emergency power. By 8:30 Quad C students at Fay „ a.m., he said teachers started Galloway were on vacation finding the brownout when he calling parents at home and during the brownout, so stopping others from leaving families with students in that their children at the school, quad were not affected. loss of electricity. Principal Burke Gillies said all but five children had been picked up by the time power was returned to the school about 11 a.m. "It did inconvenience some [parents]," he said, "but we couldn't [send children home without supervision]." Gillies said school custodian Pat Mortsen called school district electricians after Power Co. spokeman Murray Westgate. Tuesday night there were "sporadic and in-and-out outages," he said, but none were for extended periods or on major circuits. Motel robbed Monday night the weather a man suspected of robbing a caused a brownout at Fay ^otel clerk at gunpoint Galloway Elementary School Tuesday afternoon, and students were sent home Police described the suspect Tuesday due to the lack of as about 19 to 20 years old, 5 electricity. feet, 6 inches tall with a thin By Katherine E. Scott gju^ and tan pants, pohce said. News Staff Writer According to police reports, Henderson pohce are seeking the suspect used a small-caliber m oMorw.*-^ r.t -^uk;^-. ~ semi-automatic handgun about The current public address on the first two floors will be system has drawn complaints available for inspection. The from some hard-of-hearing third floor will be closed 3:30 p.m. at the Townhouse Motel, 43 Water Street. An undisclosed amount of money was taken during the ZZ open.iUloftheworkingareas so they should be famihar with T^n^Lr^^rtTv J''^ buUd and neatly tnmmed hair robbery, police said. Officers Iress on the first two floors will be it thev added IJepartment said lightmng and mustache. He was wearing were unable to locate the citizens. I^ght said the new P.A. system wiU be more than adequate. The present tally board has several lights which refuse to operate. Councilman Andy Hafen's "yes" hght has not worked during several past meeting!. A "Ves" vote on his part was signified by his "no" and "abstain" hghts being turned off. The "no" and City officials said they encourage everyone to come to the open house. The City Hall is for all Henderson residents. it, they added. Some refreshments will be served. struck a power pole in the desert near Basic High School. Firefighters stood by until NHP workers arrived, but did A by-invitation only, shownot approach the power lines ing of the building will begin which were arcing, according at p.m. Friday night. to the HFD. a green-and-gold striped sport suspect. Stock from Page 1 by Swias authorities for a similar stock swindle. His partner of some yean, Thomas Quinn, was arrested on the _, French Riviera on similar "abstain" Ugfats work pn^jerly. charges in July while Kimmes, IIM new council meeting hall at that very moment, was will be larger than the current eluding French jurisdiction, facility. More seating will also sources said, be available. In several past Federal authorities allege meetingB, when controversial that Kimmes and his associates material was on the agenda, loaned financially weak aome citizens were forced to Stoneridge Securities and •tand and wait in the hall Chelsea Securities sufficient outade the meeting room. funds that would permit them k to continue operations under SEC regulations and then coerced those firms to list inflated stocks in printed information furnished to potential investors. Blinder Robinson, the govenunent alleges, agreed to pay Kinunes and his associates 50 percent above cost for the stock and then offered it for maintain, neglected to advise mvestors that it controlled the stock and that there was no risk involved for Blinder Robinson. Allegedly, thousands of investors worldwide have been bilked of as much as $500 million in the Kimmes scam. A joint U.S.-Swiss investigation reportedly is attempting to analyze the sale to the pubUc in liighmethods used in that alleged pressure boiler room tactics." penny stock scheme, the Los Salespersons for Blinder Angeles Times recently Robinson, federal authorities reported. All iBdependent Newspaper Foimded June 1,1961 PsMiaUd wrmy Twmiuj ami Tkuadby aonlnf at P.O. Box 90490. HMMimoB. Navwia. 89000 Vkoat S64-1881. MIKE O'CALLAGHAN CAROLYN O'CALLAOHAN PaUUMT Co-PubUahw ROBERT GROVE nSHBR Mw^tM Editor PAUL SZYDELKO Aseariite EMmt HBJCrMimtkma Mifa O'Calkghu. PrHMwt: Cmlya O'Cdbgkui. Viet PMIdt;ThiOrilhghw.VlBr • • BobMorgaa.^ SnbacriptloB rataa _^. Siagb ota Wartaf IHI liil||l. Oaajrv 916 Si far Sb'aaatka Sli aaatka.. lOJO Eat aHniiliilijl...04pyar Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Page 3 Secretary of State to address Chamber CORRECTION-Jeff Mann, right, was incorrectly identified in the Tuesday edition of the Henderson Home News as class valedictorian Tim Hartman m a photograph about the graduation of the Henderson Fire Department's training academy. Mann, who was elected class leader by other members of the class, presented a plaque of appreciation to Capt. Don Griffie during graduation ceremonies last week. Hartman, second from left above, addressed the audience as valedictorian. Seated at the head table were, from left, Henderson Mayor Lorna Kesterson, Battalion Chief George Price, Capt. Robert Maroney and Battalion Chief Joe Hill. Photos by Katherine E. Scott By Katherine E. Scott News Staff Writer Nevada Secretary of State Frankie Sue Del Papa is scheduled to address the Henderson Chamber of Commerce at its monthly membership meeting next week. "Del Papa has made numerous changes and improvements intended to serve the business community in a more efficient manner" since taking office in January 1987, the Chamber's monthly newsletter stated. It added, "We believe the Chamber membership will find her remarks to be of great interest." Del Papa was bom in Nevada and graduated high school in Las Vegas, according to the newletter. She has a law degree from George Washington University in Washington, D.C, and has served on the Nevada Board of Regents. Luncheon reservations may be made before noon Wednesday by calling 565-8951. The meeting is scheduled for noon Thursday, Aug. 17, at the Henderson Convention Center. The Chamber also reminds members to submit information regarding address, telephone or other changes in local businesses for an update of the membership Ust. A few booths are still available for the Chamber's Expo '89. The deadline for applications and payments is Sept. 1. The Chamber's annual installation banquet is scheduled Sept. 15. ATTEND CHURCH SUNDAY Sponsored By STOP STRESS! Hear Vemon Howard on RADIO KDWN-AM 720 SATURDAYS 12 midnight & SUNDAYS 7 am Heal hurts! Attract good! Be free! NEW LIFE. BOX 684, BOULDER CITY. NEVADA 89005 (Clip and save) YOUR SHIP HAS COME IN! 2487 E. Tropicana 456-7245 • 456-SAIL is. College, architect seek public input for planned building By Ben Baker News Staff Writer Domingo Cambeiro has been selected as the cheif architect for the new building at the Henderson campus of Clark County Community College. He said he is ready to get started and looks forward to working with the community on the project. Victim from Page 2 Wednesday her family had been informed of the death. Police said Olson ran a red light while speeding southbound on Boulder Highway. They said he did not hit the brakes before striking a pickup truck broadside driving eastbound on Sunset Road. Olson died at the scene and Critchfield died after being taken to University Medical Center by a Henderson Fire Department ambulance, poUce said. "I want to hear from everybody. That's the key," he said. Community involvement in the building will ensure that the structure meets all the needs it should fulfill, he said. Cambeiro has planned to set up a trailer at the construction site to make sure he is close to the community and building. Those having comments or wanting more information should call Dr. Herman Van Batten or Dr. Robin Nelson at Henderson CCCC. Cambeiro said he plans to take the comments he receives and will try to incorporate those suggestions into the building. Some very good ideas come from the community's suggestions, he said. The project has about $3.2 million in hard construction funds. Cambeiro estimates that the building should cost about $70 per square foot, about what the new City Hall cost. The project does not have enough funding to completely furnish the building, Van Betten said. He said he hopes local businesses and private citizens will help furnish the building. Larger businesses could provide furnishings for an entire room, he said. Small businesses and private citizens could or The Post Office Altorn^tiv/c A1>L BOXES ETC US>r donate either money smaller, needed equipment. One option he said he is considering is a "building shower." A building shower is similar to a wedding shower. Invitations are sent out with a Ust of suggested gifts. People attending the shower could contribute money which would go toward the purchase of those gifts. Oity Manager Phil Speight said he has seen such showers before and they worked well. Cambeiro said the building should be complete by the time the Legislature convenes. Construction should begin within six months and a first-draft of the building should be ready within a month, he said. Captain Cruise Want* You to Diacovsr tiie CRUISI HOUDAY Difference •CrulMS Ar Our Only Business •Over One Thousand "Special Sailings" •Fraa Anchor Club Membarship ($20 Vaiua) •BI-llonthly Newsletter •We Can Savs You Money •Charge Your Cruise on Our "SailAway Gold Card *7 Day Mexican lllvlra CnA— as low as $693 par paraon/dM occupancy Cruise Only Limited Availability. Call NOW! The Only Cruise Only AGENCY IN NEVAD A THIS WEEK AT NUTRI/SYSTEM ( PAY FOR JUST 1/3 THE AMOUNT OF WEIGHT YOU NEED TO LOSE & RECEIVE 1 WEEK FREE FOOD "Now Over 1,250 Centers in U.S. & Canada. 'Thanks to Nutri/System, everything is 0f^ beautiful. Especially me." • ilUr llM hMl 7S KM. on Hit NUTRI/SYSTIM WgM Lou ProgrKn Oui comp(Hniy (yogiam wakt nec*.-ia mciudn •Pmonallxtd Wtight Loma FrotUt to identity your personal woighC loss rifoblem. • A variety o( delicious Hu SyMttm Cutlnt meals and snacks •Nutrition and Behavior counseling 'B0havlor Breakthrough program lor longlerm success. nutri/system wwQht losa caiitoi's • IN*. HmiSumm. Xc ^^ ^t^yui our Snlor ciiuan* MlWwy IMwounu PAY FOR JUST 1/3 THE AMOUNT OF WEIGHT YOU ] NEED TO LOSE & RECEIVE 1 WEEK FREE FOOD Special olfor doos not include cost oINUTRISYSTEM foods and starl-up, andcannol bo' combined with other offers. As poopio vary, so doos their rate ol weight loss. Valid only | with the purchase ol a now program at a participating center One discount per person.! WEST SIDE (1 BLOCK OFF 195) EAST SIDE NEW LOCATION DECATUR MEADOWS CTR. E.puesBijai TROPICANA EAST I 354 S. DECATUR 870-3722 4850 S. EASTERN 435-0333 | CALL TODAY FOR YOUR FREE, NO OBLIGATION CONSULTATION I I I I • I Westew Union Services NOTARY SERViCE_ PASSP^OJT PHOTOS; Green Valley Open 2756 Green Valley Pkwy. Every 454-5220 Srt. Henderson 850 S. Boulder Hwy. 565-1235 please adopt this baby manx kitten THIS WONDERFUL KITTEN IS SO LOVEABLE, HE IS PURE MANX (NO TAIL), WITH DELIGHTFUL MARKINGS. PLEASE DONT ALLOW DEATH TO BE THE LAST FEELING HE HAS ON EARTH. INSTEAD, LET IT BE WARM HUGS AND HAPPY TIMES. HE IS ONLY $16 AND THAT INCLUDES RABIES SHOT AND LICENSE. HENDERSON ANIMAL SHELTER MOSER DRIVE 565-2033 Basic High School CLASS OF '59 REUNION Who put the Bop in the Bop-sh-Bop-sh-Bop? Who put he Lang in Lang-a-Lang-a-Lang Ding Dong We did 30 Years Ago!! Now We're Back for '^ 0. Basic Homecoming ^ OCT. 12-13-14, 1989 IIAissing classmates Bob Albert Leonard Bloomgreen Evan Bridgewater Colleen Brooks Butterworth Patricia Burt Shoemaker Blllie Cureton Leany Wayne Deane Esie Gailegoa Crane Larry Giles Carolyn Haynie Bills Sam Hombeck Teddle Ann Lauber Linda Poltock Shamblin Milton Pratt Wanda Reynolds Dinklns Bob Russell Gary Shaw Joyce McKectnie Meivin Means Gary Mears Charles Nason Geraldine Nelson Don Stairs Ronald Weaver Jack Kerkuta Ron Kaylor Judy Eates Wilkes Mason Gebe Charlene Homer Giguiere CALL US IF YOU KNOW WHERE OUR MISSING FRIENDS ARE OR FOR MORE INFORMATION Lm KrtHM Nsur • 685-7988 Frtd RiHiwM ra5?!?5SS^!S?!^SS -^ •T'-,-.'-^r?*r"r'r^w^^; • p?j5r,Ki55!^r''.-*' -rp^firwwi^ fw jw i.W .^' • • • ,-" -:^rsj^S^!i^r-xr^

PAGE 4

Viewpoint Pag 4 HmdwioB HOBM Ntws. H tndiiwi. Ntvda A darker side of gaming MIKE O'CALLAGHAN CAROLYN O'CALLAOHAN PubUahcr Co-PabUfhv Thunday, August 10, 1989 A Nazi is a Nazi is a. Living in the Gaming state has a few drawbacks which aren't visible on the surface. Some of those faults appear in the most inconvenient places. Lotteries, raffles and drawings are illegal in Nevada. That law even applies to charity organizations, as was discovered this week when a organizers tried to form a lottery to help Charles Pickens, a Henderson resident in need of a liver transplant. They wanted to raffle two paintings, donated by Jennie Coca, a Henderson artist. The organizers were informed that a lottery might be illegal. A quick check with gaming authorities proved that to be the case. An exception was provided. The tickets had to be given away. No charge, not even a request for a donation would be allowed. To have free tickets in an event designed to raise money is, well, rather foolish. Later, other state gaming officials called the organizers and said that while lotteries and such are illegal, those laws are not enforced where charities are concerned. Despite assurances that they probably would not be prosecuted if they picked a drawing to dispose of the paintings, the organizers chose another course of action. Drawings and the like are considered by some to be one of the quicker ways to garner funds. It is a shame that the Gaming State prohibits charity groups from holding lotteries, drawings and raffles. Even though gaming enforcement officials say the law is waived in regard to charities, there remains the specter of law enforcment officials out to "make an example." That charities should engage in illegal activity, even though the law turns away with a wink, is deplorable. It is especially shameful that attempting to raise money with a drawing to help another human being hve is illegal. Something should be done to allow charities to have raffles, drawings and lotteries—legally. While there are other effective ways to raise money, lotteries are among the most popular, simple and fun. They should not be illegal for charities. —End the PLO dialogue? A few things need to be said about Ariel Sharon's call to "eliminate" Yasser Arafat. When the then-Israeli defense minister's forces had the PLO chaimian literally in their gun sights, during the PLO's internationally supervised evacuation of Beirut in 1982, he chose—wisely—to let him go. For Mr. Sharon now to urge his killing is wildly irresponsible, if only forihe effect of this appeal in undercutting Israel's protest against Palestinian terrorism. The impact is more pronounced for the fact that Mr. Sharon is edging in for the political kill of his own party's prime minister, Yitzhak Shamir, whose hedged but perhaps yet usable initiative for West Bank elections quivers under fierce right-wing attack. This is the relevant background to the Shamir government's disconcerting new effort to force an end to the dialogue Washington began with the PLO late last year when the PLO met American tenns for addressing Israel. In his effort, the govemment is using the emotion generated by continuing acts of Palestinian terrorism. It is also using the confusions of American diplomacy: the hesitation to characterize as terrorist the bus incident in which 14 Israelis died, the general erraticism in State Department responses to the volatile Israeli scene. A picture of Palestinian violence and American inconsiitency is being painted in Jerusalem in order to induce the Bush administration to back off the PLO. Voices in Congress echo this demand. The administration badly needs to take this situation in hand lest its whole Middle East policy, such as it is to this point, sags into irrelevance. The Israelis are saying in effect to Americans: if you want us to be serious about the elections proposal, cut your linic to the PLO. What the United States must reply is: the elections proposal is a long shot but still the mo.st valuable diplomatic opportunity going, and the American link to the PLO can help make something of it. At the same time, the United States has to be more careful in its dialogue with the PLO. In some ways the PLO takes a more positive approach to the Israeli elections proposal than does the govemment in Jerusalem. But the PLO's continued equivocation on terrorism— terrorism directed against Israeli Jews and independent-minded West Bank Palestinians alike—corrodes the prospects of bringing Israelis more thoroughly aboard. This effect is only deepened when the United States does not seem to be paying full attention. Washington Pntt Your Views Send Us By Richard Cohen WASHINGTON Returning here from the isolation of Prague, the news junkie pauses at Frankfurt to change lanes and scoop up newspapers—$11 worth, my expense sccount will say. It is then that I \eatn Herbert von KArajan, conductor, impresario and former Nazi, has died. For the Hrst two he is praised and the last—his Nazi Party membership—is hardly mentioned. The man was not given his due. He was a thorough opportunist. Little is nude of that in the newspapers I read—either on the plane or later. Instead, they mention that von Karajan joined the Nazi Party twice—in his native Austria and later in Germany—and that he once lied about being a Nazi. In all, though, that odious chapter in von Karajan's life is given about as much space as his early marriages—perhaps more presimied mistakes of his younger days. To the extent that he commented at all on his Nazi Party membership, von Karajan said that he joined to advance his career. If so, it worked. At a very young age, he became a favorite of the Nazi hierarchy and the arch-rival of the mucholder Wilhelm Furtwangler. As a good Nazi, von Karajan conduicted orchestras that had been purged of Jews and political nonconformists. The conformist with the baton presumably never noticed that some key players were missing. In the various obituaries, von Karajan's Nazi Party membership seems to have been forgiven. Leonard Bernstein himself interrupted a European concert to ask for a moment of silence. Possibly, von Karajan confided his regrets to peers like Bernstein, but th^ublic record is devoid of any regret or any explanation, save careerisra. If that was indeed the case, then the maestro was no different than your ordinary German streetcar conductor. He, too, kept his mouth shut to advance his career. Had von Karajan apologized, explained—used some of his vast wealth (royalties of $6 million a year) to aid the victims of Nazism, his reprehensible past could have been forgiven. But there is no record of that. Arthur Koestler, the late British writer, said it was an intellectual's obligation to use his gifts to protest what is tritely called man's inhumanity to man. Koestler made that statement as a rebuff to a fellow British intellectual who said he had not known what the Nazis were doing. Not good enough, said Koestler. It was the intellectual's duty to know—to know and do something about it. Herbert von Karajan surely knew what the Nazis were doing. But the same could be said for a musical establishmentcritics, impresarios and morally vacuous audiences who cherished von Karajan for his awesome talents—never mind what he did during the war. A lesser figure might have been held accountable, might have been asked why he did not go into exile or otherwise protest tyhe murder of innocents, but not von Karajan. From him nothing was demanded but mighty music. He died an immensely wealthy and acclaimed man. Von Karajan's opportunism, while reprehensible, was at least astute. He would sometimes grant interviews on the condition that he not be asked about his Nazi past and a toadying press, eager for news from the maestro, sometimes agreed. At other times, he threatened to cancel tours if his Nazi past was mentioned. Usually, he was appeased. Von Karajan's genius was not limited to music. He knew something about hiunan nature as well. Everyone has a career to advance. That sort of compartmentalization—separating the person from his work—is done all the time, but not without difficulty. The poetry of Ezra Pound is valued, even though he was a traitor. Richard Wagoner's music is loved, even though he was, politically, a precursor of Nazism. And the works of Andy Warhol fetch high prices at the same time his published diaries reveal him to be a vindictive airhead. He could, however, paint. Reconciling the artist with his work may be an impossible task and no one is suggesting that von Karajan should have been banned for life from the concert haU. But neither should his Nazism have been slighted by critics and obituary writers. They treated his membership as if it were a misstep in an otherwise brilliant career—an off-night, maybe on account of an upset stomach. To his fans and colleagues, his music seemed not to matter most—but entirely. My perspective is a bit different. The day before boarding the plane, I visited a museum in Prague dedicated to the children of the ghetto the Nazis established in the Czechoslovakian city of Terezin—children later shipped to Auschwitz where they were murdered. In Terezin, the children painted pictures. I will mention just one: the wonderful, colorful butterflies of Gabi Freiova, aged 11. She died in Auschwitz, May 18,1944. She, too, could have had a brilliant career. Capitol Commentary A national feeling of helplessness By Guy Shipler Frustration, futility, helplessness. For more than a decade those words have defined the total incapabihty of the United States of America to deal with one hostage situation after another. And from all indications, as of this month, those and others like them will continue to demonstrate the diminishing impact of American influence on the rest of the world. It may seem unfair to make such a harsh judgment, but to do otherwise would be to continue to avoid harsher reahties. The basic reality, which we should be able to recognize by now, is that this great world power lies at the mercy of a relative handful of individuals we regard as cowards and savages. And all we can do is call them names. It wouldn't be so troubling if it hadn't gone on so long, and if we really were right in blaming whoever is president for oiuembarrassing ineptness. In 1980 the voters had figured the hostages were spending 444 days in captivity in Iran because Jimmy Carter couldn't grasp the fact that handling global policies takes more knowhow than handling problems in the State of Georgia or peanut farming. That turned out to be an injustice all the way around. Ronald Reagan could do no better. Indeed, during his eight years in office we witnessed a steady increase in tension and trouble with terrorism. And various shadowy religious groups in Lebanon have collected a nice gaggle of hostages on whom they vent their spleen of brutality and murder. Now George Bush has the problem on his hands and it's tougher than ever. Some cling to the hope that he will be more successful than his two predecessors because he once headed the CIA. Such a backgroimd and the presumed knowledge that goes with it should cause President Bush to fume even more than Carter and Reagan did, haunted by the specter of an inteUigence system that seems impotent. Most laymen find it appalling that our agents, dealing with a relatively small geographical area, can't even Hnd out where the hostages are. (Those same laymen ardently hope their intelligence system works a lot better when it comes to national security)That may also be an unfair judgment. But if it's valid, we might be wise to look for the cause in the current state of the national temper instead of pinning the blame on any president, or even on the Central Intelligence Agency. And when we do take that look, we find the national temper not to be pretty, especially when it comes to an almost ugly suspicion and distrust of govenunent. Contempt for govemment has become such a universal American pastime, in fact, that it's a wonder it works at all. The field of covert intelligence is particularly susceptible to this mahgnant cynicism, because without the public's trust as a buffer against vital security leaks it will fail. A widespread suspicion and questioning of its motives creates a devastating erosion of the confidentiality which is an agent's only protection. What U.S. agent in Lebanon could be successful without it? No one knows how debilitating to the national psyche the current negative cynicism has had. But if it had existed to this degree among Americans 50 years ago, it probably would have made the difference between victory and defeat in World War n. That conflict has become only another chapter in dull history books to the many people who have been bom since then, and has even faded from the memory of those who lived through it. But the Western World—including this countrycame far closer to disaster than most Americans realize today. Most of us realized all too clearly at the time that siuvival depended to a large extent on public support and involvement in the war effort That didn't mean we were a bunch of Pollyanna cheerleaders who daily held pep talks, or that cheats and bellyachers and traitors weren't taking as negative a view as they could. Of course many people howled complaints about everything from rationing to defense plant boondoggles. Of course people dodged the draft by escaping to Canada. Of course people traded in the black market for their own selfish ends. But the majority went out of their way to do whatever their job was. Housewives went to work in defense plants under miserable conditions (my mother worked the graveyard shift in a sweatshop loft factory in Newark, N.J., making muchneeded vaccutun tubes for radio and radar). Those of us in "the essential industry" of the news business were deferred from military service and worked in the much more pleasant environment of offices. But we had the great responsibility of not accidentally revealing what were known then as "military secrets." Even though we fimctioned imder censorship, the govemment trusted us even to a point of informally letting us know of impending troop movements (such as D-Day) so we should not speculate and Uius reveal or even hint at a top secret. Despite the great temptation, with almost no exceptbns, reporters and editors did not violate that trust Could it be done today? / Your Views Thonday, Angnst 10,1989 KaadanM !! • • Newt, Hmdmmm, Nevada Page 5 Letters state must face the real issue of legislative pay A rebuttal Dear Editor In reference to the article from Raymond A. Yeager titled "Ex-firefighter blackballed?", as a Henderson Hrefigbter I feel it deserves a reply. First, Yeager may feel as though he was blackballed, but it is my opinion that all of the personal opinions formed from Yeager's actions are deserved. Fuimy he should write the Henderson Home NewB to air his feelings. Isn't this the same small but growing community that he said was "imfit to raise a family in?" To state facts, Yeager may have had good evaluations on his performance, but that does not reflect his impact on other people. He would belittle and badger certain younger firefighters that were, as Yeager put it, not up to his standards. As for addendums and letters of gratitude, isn't that what Yeager's job was, to serve and protect the citizens of Henderson? Yeager also left this city supposedly in good graces, but whose? He owed a number of shift hours to numerous individuals that upon leaving he never paid back. The general consensus of Yeager's peers is that he was arrogant, individualistic and would pose a morale problem for fellow members of the City of Henderson. In closing, it was not just the opinion of a few battalion chiefs and people in higher places that the decision not to rehire Yeager was made, but by the criteria that all people are judged: his peers! MICHAEL MOSS If Nevada Legislaton are in hot water because of the huge pensions they voted themselves, it is not just becttite of the pensions. It is because the legislators avoided the real issue with a cotton-candy solution. They say they raised theirpensions ^ percent to help make up for their indecently low salaries. But. having recognized the real problem, they fled to the hills like cowards. So they deserve the public ouuvge they have elicited, not just for unbridled egotism, but for abject funk. The main problem stems from an idiotic provision in the Nevada Constitution which limits legislative pay to the first 60 days of a session. After that, legislators receive money for expenses only. That provision may have had some merit years ago. when the state was small and its problems resolvable in a couple of months. It kept citizen lawmakers' eyes focused on the business at hand and sent them home as quickly as possible. But that has long since ceased to be the case. While legislaton may be accused of dawdling and mismanagement upon oaasion, the plain fact is that this state cannot conduct its business in the short time envisaged by an outdated Constitution. The 60-day provision creates another problem as well: a rush toward adjournment toward the end of a session, creating poorly thought-out laws, an increase in the already awesome power of lobbyists and a lessening of input from a conhised public. It is time for Nevada to stop trying to function in a fictional worid and begin functioning in the real worid. In that real worid, legislative sessions will always mn longer than 60 woricing days. And legislators should be paid accordingly. There are two ways to handle this. Either legislaton should be paid for every day they serve, without regard to the length of a session, or they should receive a set salary. Of those two approaches, the latter may be preferable because it would eliminate the connection between pay and woildng days. Presumably legislators would still go home as quickly as possible, because they have their own lives and businesses awaiting them. Of course, the pay should be high enough to fairly compensate lawmakers for the average number of days in service; and the amount would have to be adjusted if sessions grow longer and if inflation grows. But that can be addressed as the need arises. In the meantime, of course, voters should sign the Common Cause petition to eliminate the Legislature's obscene retirement package (unless the IRS and the courts declare it illegal before that lime, which seems to be a possibility). There is no way that a part-time legislator should be eligible for a pension that far exceeds Social Security pensions and many other pensions as well ($12,000 a year after 10 year^ and five sessions, up to $36,000 a year for 30 years). Sign that petition, and then vote down the retirement increase when it appears on the ballot But the public should also be looking at the future of the state in a realistic manner. Voters must recognize that the present pay system is unworicabic and that a better one is needed. We do not want to shower our legislators with largesse. But for legislators as well as for anyone else, we should pay a fair day's wage for a fair day's work. Reno Gazette Journal The Bush Arms Control Initiatives— Proceed with caution Visitor complains Last Week I read an article in the Henderson Home News as to how they are trying to beautify the town and I had to giggle. I have been visiting relatives in Henderson for the past eight years and there is a house close to the 7-Eleven on Water Street that ahnost makes a person want to turn around and leave town. A washing machine is in the yard and the water runs all over, which I'm sure is a good bug breeding ground. 'There are so many old bikes laying around that it resembles a junk yard. All in all, it is a disgrace and doesn't say a lot for Henderson's Beautification Program. DONNA STAMPER Mesa, Ariz. Since it was first unveiled at the May NATO Summit, President Bush's conventional arms control proposal has been warmly received at home and abroad. At home. Congressional leaders, opinion makers and the American public have expressed strong support for Bush's plan. The response among our NATO allies was alsopositive. The Bush announcement, in effect, enlarged the list of items to be addressed in the Conventional Forces in Europe talks which started in Vienna in March. In addition to the relative numbers of main battle tanks, artillery and amiored personnel carriers, which were its initial focus. NATO is now agreeing to consider aircraft, helicopters and total numbers of troops. The overall objective is to achieve equal force capabilities at some reduced level. The most intriguing part of the proposal was the offer to cut 20 percent of U.S. Army and Air Force combat manpower—30.000 people—from our forces in Europe, providing the Soviets would also reduce forces so that each would end up with 275.000. To accomplish this, the Soviets would have to remove approximately 325,000 men. Bush agreed to discussions on short range nuclear weapons, but only after an agreement on conventional force reductions had been made. To lend urgency, the President asked that the conventional force talks be accelerated to reach an agreement in six months to a year and that the reductions be accomplished by 1992 or 1993. While all this has some positive overtones, it also has some serious force implications. A suong word of caution is in order. No U.S. forces should be withdrawn before the agreements are firnily In place. We must constantly emphasize that this process should not be grabbed at as a quick way to cut defense spending. Premature and arbiuary budget cuts will reduce our options and will seriously undennine our negotiating position. Candidly Candid By Georgina Corbalan Should the U.S. use military force to free American hostages in the mid-East? Ruma Jensen Sales clerk "Yes. The U.S. should send our troops to those Arab countries where they hold American hostages. We are currently taking too much from those terrorists; we have to do something!" Barbara White Baker "Only if it is necessary. We haven't been able to talk to them so far. If they use force on us. then we sh(xUd use force on them." Scott Huizenga Warehouse salesman "It's ahnost impossible because you will kill innocent peo|4e. We can't negotiate with those hostage holders because their terms are unfair." Shirley Bearden L4iundrynuin manager "The U.S. needs to use a certain amount of military force at the right time. We need to do something because the U.S. will become a pushover in the eyes of terrorists." i Howard Tindall Retail salesman "Yes. Ifwedon'ttakcmilitary action, they will continue to (take American hostages.) We got their attention when we bombed Libya. If we ignore this problem, like we've been doing. Uiey wiU contimie [with the takitu of hostagei.]" Bob Blair Real estate broker "We have to do something against them. Force is probably tiic only way they will understand. I'm against violence, however. Terrorists appear to have no real value on life. I don't tiiink it would be possible to sit down and talk to them. As long as we continue to ignore [the hostage problem] they will keep on getting away with it" Miriam DeMarco Confectionist "I feel we should take military action; we have to defend our people." Stephan Schwan Computer technkian "In this particular situation, a military operation would be strategically advisable because it would change the opinion Arab countries have about the United States—[that we are weak and not militarily equipped.] If diplomatic negotiations do not succeed in liberating die hostages, dKn we should take military action." Florence Wappd Florist "I don't like the use of violence. Violence would create more bloodshed. I would like to see us get our men back, but [there are oUier ways to deal with terrorist hostage holden.]" v\ ^m;:^!!^!^^;^^?;^:''::^: ^ mm tumilMMlWHIIilH' mm

PAGE 5

Viewpoint Pag 4 HmdwioB HOBM Ntws. H tndiiwi. Ntvda A darker side of gaming MIKE O'CALLAGHAN CAROLYN O'CALLAOHAN PubUahcr Co-PabUfhv Thunday, August 10, 1989 A Nazi is a Nazi is a. Living in the Gaming state has a few drawbacks which aren't visible on the surface. Some of those faults appear in the most inconvenient places. Lotteries, raffles and drawings are illegal in Nevada. That law even applies to charity organizations, as was discovered this week when a organizers tried to form a lottery to help Charles Pickens, a Henderson resident in need of a liver transplant. They wanted to raffle two paintings, donated by Jennie Coca, a Henderson artist. The organizers were informed that a lottery might be illegal. A quick check with gaming authorities proved that to be the case. An exception was provided. The tickets had to be given away. No charge, not even a request for a donation would be allowed. To have free tickets in an event designed to raise money is, well, rather foolish. Later, other state gaming officials called the organizers and said that while lotteries and such are illegal, those laws are not enforced where charities are concerned. Despite assurances that they probably would not be prosecuted if they picked a drawing to dispose of the paintings, the organizers chose another course of action. Drawings and the like are considered by some to be one of the quicker ways to garner funds. It is a shame that the Gaming State prohibits charity groups from holding lotteries, drawings and raffles. Even though gaming enforcement officials say the law is waived in regard to charities, there remains the specter of law enforcment officials out to "make an example." That charities should engage in illegal activity, even though the law turns away with a wink, is deplorable. It is especially shameful that attempting to raise money with a drawing to help another human being hve is illegal. Something should be done to allow charities to have raffles, drawings and lotteries—legally. While there are other effective ways to raise money, lotteries are among the most popular, simple and fun. They should not be illegal for charities. —End the PLO dialogue? A few things need to be said about Ariel Sharon's call to "eliminate" Yasser Arafat. When the then-Israeli defense minister's forces had the PLO chaimian literally in their gun sights, during the PLO's internationally supervised evacuation of Beirut in 1982, he chose—wisely—to let him go. For Mr. Sharon now to urge his killing is wildly irresponsible, if only forihe effect of this appeal in undercutting Israel's protest against Palestinian terrorism. The impact is more pronounced for the fact that Mr. Sharon is edging in for the political kill of his own party's prime minister, Yitzhak Shamir, whose hedged but perhaps yet usable initiative for West Bank elections quivers under fierce right-wing attack. This is the relevant background to the Shamir government's disconcerting new effort to force an end to the dialogue Washington began with the PLO late last year when the PLO met American tenns for addressing Israel. In his effort, the govemment is using the emotion generated by continuing acts of Palestinian terrorism. It is also using the confusions of American diplomacy: the hesitation to characterize as terrorist the bus incident in which 14 Israelis died, the general erraticism in State Department responses to the volatile Israeli scene. A picture of Palestinian violence and American inconsiitency is being painted in Jerusalem in order to induce the Bush administration to back off the PLO. Voices in Congress echo this demand. The administration badly needs to take this situation in hand lest its whole Middle East policy, such as it is to this point, sags into irrelevance. The Israelis are saying in effect to Americans: if you want us to be serious about the elections proposal, cut your linic to the PLO. What the United States must reply is: the elections proposal is a long shot but still the mo.st valuable diplomatic opportunity going, and the American link to the PLO can help make something of it. At the same time, the United States has to be more careful in its dialogue with the PLO. In some ways the PLO takes a more positive approach to the Israeli elections proposal than does the govemment in Jerusalem. But the PLO's continued equivocation on terrorism— terrorism directed against Israeli Jews and independent-minded West Bank Palestinians alike—corrodes the prospects of bringing Israelis more thoroughly aboard. This effect is only deepened when the United States does not seem to be paying full attention. Washington Pntt Your Views Send Us By Richard Cohen WASHINGTON Returning here from the isolation of Prague, the news junkie pauses at Frankfurt to change lanes and scoop up newspapers—$11 worth, my expense sccount will say. It is then that I \eatn Herbert von KArajan, conductor, impresario and former Nazi, has died. For the Hrst two he is praised and the last—his Nazi Party membership—is hardly mentioned. The man was not given his due. He was a thorough opportunist. Little is nude of that in the newspapers I read—either on the plane or later. Instead, they mention that von Karajan joined the Nazi Party twice—in his native Austria and later in Germany—and that he once lied about being a Nazi. In all, though, that odious chapter in von Karajan's life is given about as much space as his early marriages—perhaps more presimied mistakes of his younger days. To the extent that he commented at all on his Nazi Party membership, von Karajan said that he joined to advance his career. If so, it worked. At a very young age, he became a favorite of the Nazi hierarchy and the arch-rival of the mucholder Wilhelm Furtwangler. As a good Nazi, von Karajan conduicted orchestras that had been purged of Jews and political nonconformists. The conformist with the baton presumably never noticed that some key players were missing. In the various obituaries, von Karajan's Nazi Party membership seems to have been forgiven. Leonard Bernstein himself interrupted a European concert to ask for a moment of silence. Possibly, von Karajan confided his regrets to peers like Bernstein, but th^ublic record is devoid of any regret or any explanation, save careerisra. If that was indeed the case, then the maestro was no different than your ordinary German streetcar conductor. He, too, kept his mouth shut to advance his career. Had von Karajan apologized, explained—used some of his vast wealth (royalties of $6 million a year) to aid the victims of Nazism, his reprehensible past could have been forgiven. But there is no record of that. Arthur Koestler, the late British writer, said it was an intellectual's obligation to use his gifts to protest what is tritely called man's inhumanity to man. Koestler made that statement as a rebuff to a fellow British intellectual who said he had not known what the Nazis were doing. Not good enough, said Koestler. It was the intellectual's duty to know—to know and do something about it. Herbert von Karajan surely knew what the Nazis were doing. But the same could be said for a musical establishmentcritics, impresarios and morally vacuous audiences who cherished von Karajan for his awesome talents—never mind what he did during the war. A lesser figure might have been held accountable, might have been asked why he did not go into exile or otherwise protest tyhe murder of innocents, but not von Karajan. From him nothing was demanded but mighty music. He died an immensely wealthy and acclaimed man. Von Karajan's opportunism, while reprehensible, was at least astute. He would sometimes grant interviews on the condition that he not be asked about his Nazi past and a toadying press, eager for news from the maestro, sometimes agreed. At other times, he threatened to cancel tours if his Nazi past was mentioned. Usually, he was appeased. Von Karajan's genius was not limited to music. He knew something about hiunan nature as well. Everyone has a career to advance. That sort of compartmentalization—separating the person from his work—is done all the time, but not without difficulty. The poetry of Ezra Pound is valued, even though he was a traitor. Richard Wagoner's music is loved, even though he was, politically, a precursor of Nazism. And the works of Andy Warhol fetch high prices at the same time his published diaries reveal him to be a vindictive airhead. He could, however, paint. Reconciling the artist with his work may be an impossible task and no one is suggesting that von Karajan should have been banned for life from the concert haU. But neither should his Nazism have been slighted by critics and obituary writers. They treated his membership as if it were a misstep in an otherwise brilliant career—an off-night, maybe on account of an upset stomach. To his fans and colleagues, his music seemed not to matter most—but entirely. My perspective is a bit different. The day before boarding the plane, I visited a museum in Prague dedicated to the children of the ghetto the Nazis established in the Czechoslovakian city of Terezin—children later shipped to Auschwitz where they were murdered. In Terezin, the children painted pictures. I will mention just one: the wonderful, colorful butterflies of Gabi Freiova, aged 11. She died in Auschwitz, May 18,1944. She, too, could have had a brilliant career. Capitol Commentary A national feeling of helplessness By Guy Shipler Frustration, futility, helplessness. For more than a decade those words have defined the total incapabihty of the United States of America to deal with one hostage situation after another. And from all indications, as of this month, those and others like them will continue to demonstrate the diminishing impact of American influence on the rest of the world. It may seem unfair to make such a harsh judgment, but to do otherwise would be to continue to avoid harsher reahties. The basic reality, which we should be able to recognize by now, is that this great world power lies at the mercy of a relative handful of individuals we regard as cowards and savages. And all we can do is call them names. It wouldn't be so troubling if it hadn't gone on so long, and if we really were right in blaming whoever is president for oiuembarrassing ineptness. In 1980 the voters had figured the hostages were spending 444 days in captivity in Iran because Jimmy Carter couldn't grasp the fact that handling global policies takes more knowhow than handling problems in the State of Georgia or peanut farming. That turned out to be an injustice all the way around. Ronald Reagan could do no better. Indeed, during his eight years in office we witnessed a steady increase in tension and trouble with terrorism. And various shadowy religious groups in Lebanon have collected a nice gaggle of hostages on whom they vent their spleen of brutality and murder. Now George Bush has the problem on his hands and it's tougher than ever. Some cling to the hope that he will be more successful than his two predecessors because he once headed the CIA. Such a backgroimd and the presumed knowledge that goes with it should cause President Bush to fume even more than Carter and Reagan did, haunted by the specter of an inteUigence system that seems impotent. Most laymen find it appalling that our agents, dealing with a relatively small geographical area, can't even Hnd out where the hostages are. (Those same laymen ardently hope their intelligence system works a lot better when it comes to national security)That may also be an unfair judgment. But if it's valid, we might be wise to look for the cause in the current state of the national temper instead of pinning the blame on any president, or even on the Central Intelligence Agency. And when we do take that look, we find the national temper not to be pretty, especially when it comes to an almost ugly suspicion and distrust of govenunent. Contempt for govemment has become such a universal American pastime, in fact, that it's a wonder it works at all. The field of covert intelligence is particularly susceptible to this mahgnant cynicism, because without the public's trust as a buffer against vital security leaks it will fail. A widespread suspicion and questioning of its motives creates a devastating erosion of the confidentiality which is an agent's only protection. What U.S. agent in Lebanon could be successful without it? No one knows how debilitating to the national psyche the current negative cynicism has had. But if it had existed to this degree among Americans 50 years ago, it probably would have made the difference between victory and defeat in World War n. That conflict has become only another chapter in dull history books to the many people who have been bom since then, and has even faded from the memory of those who lived through it. But the Western World—including this countrycame far closer to disaster than most Americans realize today. Most of us realized all too clearly at the time that siuvival depended to a large extent on public support and involvement in the war effort That didn't mean we were a bunch of Pollyanna cheerleaders who daily held pep talks, or that cheats and bellyachers and traitors weren't taking as negative a view as they could. Of course many people howled complaints about everything from rationing to defense plant boondoggles. Of course people dodged the draft by escaping to Canada. Of course people traded in the black market for their own selfish ends. But the majority went out of their way to do whatever their job was. Housewives went to work in defense plants under miserable conditions (my mother worked the graveyard shift in a sweatshop loft factory in Newark, N.J., making muchneeded vaccutun tubes for radio and radar). Those of us in "the essential industry" of the news business were deferred from military service and worked in the much more pleasant environment of offices. But we had the great responsibility of not accidentally revealing what were known then as "military secrets." Even though we fimctioned imder censorship, the govemment trusted us even to a point of informally letting us know of impending troop movements (such as D-Day) so we should not speculate and Uius reveal or even hint at a top secret. Despite the great temptation, with almost no exceptbns, reporters and editors did not violate that trust Could it be done today? / Your Views Thonday, Angnst 10,1989 KaadanM !! • • Newt, Hmdmmm, Nevada Page 5 Letters state must face the real issue of legislative pay A rebuttal Dear Editor In reference to the article from Raymond A. Yeager titled "Ex-firefighter blackballed?", as a Henderson Hrefigbter I feel it deserves a reply. First, Yeager may feel as though he was blackballed, but it is my opinion that all of the personal opinions formed from Yeager's actions are deserved. Fuimy he should write the Henderson Home NewB to air his feelings. Isn't this the same small but growing community that he said was "imfit to raise a family in?" To state facts, Yeager may have had good evaluations on his performance, but that does not reflect his impact on other people. He would belittle and badger certain younger firefighters that were, as Yeager put it, not up to his standards. As for addendums and letters of gratitude, isn't that what Yeager's job was, to serve and protect the citizens of Henderson? Yeager also left this city supposedly in good graces, but whose? He owed a number of shift hours to numerous individuals that upon leaving he never paid back. The general consensus of Yeager's peers is that he was arrogant, individualistic and would pose a morale problem for fellow members of the City of Henderson. In closing, it was not just the opinion of a few battalion chiefs and people in higher places that the decision not to rehire Yeager was made, but by the criteria that all people are judged: his peers! MICHAEL MOSS If Nevada Legislaton are in hot water because of the huge pensions they voted themselves, it is not just becttite of the pensions. It is because the legislators avoided the real issue with a cotton-candy solution. They say they raised theirpensions ^ percent to help make up for their indecently low salaries. But. having recognized the real problem, they fled to the hills like cowards. So they deserve the public ouuvge they have elicited, not just for unbridled egotism, but for abject funk. The main problem stems from an idiotic provision in the Nevada Constitution which limits legislative pay to the first 60 days of a session. After that, legislators receive money for expenses only. That provision may have had some merit years ago. when the state was small and its problems resolvable in a couple of months. It kept citizen lawmakers' eyes focused on the business at hand and sent them home as quickly as possible. But that has long since ceased to be the case. While legislaton may be accused of dawdling and mismanagement upon oaasion, the plain fact is that this state cannot conduct its business in the short time envisaged by an outdated Constitution. The 60-day provision creates another problem as well: a rush toward adjournment toward the end of a session, creating poorly thought-out laws, an increase in the already awesome power of lobbyists and a lessening of input from a conhised public. It is time for Nevada to stop trying to function in a fictional worid and begin functioning in the real worid. In that real worid, legislative sessions will always mn longer than 60 woricing days. And legislators should be paid accordingly. There are two ways to handle this. Either legislaton should be paid for every day they serve, without regard to the length of a session, or they should receive a set salary. Of those two approaches, the latter may be preferable because it would eliminate the connection between pay and woildng days. Presumably legislators would still go home as quickly as possible, because they have their own lives and businesses awaiting them. Of course, the pay should be high enough to fairly compensate lawmakers for the average number of days in service; and the amount would have to be adjusted if sessions grow longer and if inflation grows. But that can be addressed as the need arises. In the meantime, of course, voters should sign the Common Cause petition to eliminate the Legislature's obscene retirement package (unless the IRS and the courts declare it illegal before that lime, which seems to be a possibility). There is no way that a part-time legislator should be eligible for a pension that far exceeds Social Security pensions and many other pensions as well ($12,000 a year after 10 year^ and five sessions, up to $36,000 a year for 30 years). Sign that petition, and then vote down the retirement increase when it appears on the ballot But the public should also be looking at the future of the state in a realistic manner. Voters must recognize that the present pay system is unworicabic and that a better one is needed. We do not want to shower our legislators with largesse. But for legislators as well as for anyone else, we should pay a fair day's wage for a fair day's work. Reno Gazette Journal The Bush Arms Control Initiatives— Proceed with caution Visitor complains Last Week I read an article in the Henderson Home News as to how they are trying to beautify the town and I had to giggle. I have been visiting relatives in Henderson for the past eight years and there is a house close to the 7-Eleven on Water Street that ahnost makes a person want to turn around and leave town. A washing machine is in the yard and the water runs all over, which I'm sure is a good bug breeding ground. 'There are so many old bikes laying around that it resembles a junk yard. All in all, it is a disgrace and doesn't say a lot for Henderson's Beautification Program. DONNA STAMPER Mesa, Ariz. Since it was first unveiled at the May NATO Summit, President Bush's conventional arms control proposal has been warmly received at home and abroad. At home. Congressional leaders, opinion makers and the American public have expressed strong support for Bush's plan. The response among our NATO allies was alsopositive. The Bush announcement, in effect, enlarged the list of items to be addressed in the Conventional Forces in Europe talks which started in Vienna in March. In addition to the relative numbers of main battle tanks, artillery and amiored personnel carriers, which were its initial focus. NATO is now agreeing to consider aircraft, helicopters and total numbers of troops. The overall objective is to achieve equal force capabilities at some reduced level. The most intriguing part of the proposal was the offer to cut 20 percent of U.S. Army and Air Force combat manpower—30.000 people—from our forces in Europe, providing the Soviets would also reduce forces so that each would end up with 275.000. To accomplish this, the Soviets would have to remove approximately 325,000 men. Bush agreed to discussions on short range nuclear weapons, but only after an agreement on conventional force reductions had been made. To lend urgency, the President asked that the conventional force talks be accelerated to reach an agreement in six months to a year and that the reductions be accomplished by 1992 or 1993. While all this has some positive overtones, it also has some serious force implications. A suong word of caution is in order. No U.S. forces should be withdrawn before the agreements are firnily In place. We must constantly emphasize that this process should not be grabbed at as a quick way to cut defense spending. Premature and arbiuary budget cuts will reduce our options and will seriously undennine our negotiating position. Candidly Candid By Georgina Corbalan Should the U.S. use military force to free American hostages in the mid-East? Ruma Jensen Sales clerk "Yes. The U.S. should send our troops to those Arab countries where they hold American hostages. We are currently taking too much from those terrorists; we have to do something!" Barbara White Baker "Only if it is necessary. We haven't been able to talk to them so far. If they use force on us. then we sh(xUd use force on them." Scott Huizenga Warehouse salesman "It's ahnost impossible because you will kill innocent peo|4e. We can't negotiate with those hostage holders because their terms are unfair." Shirley Bearden L4iundrynuin manager "The U.S. needs to use a certain amount of military force at the right time. We need to do something because the U.S. will become a pushover in the eyes of terrorists." i Howard Tindall Retail salesman "Yes. Ifwedon'ttakcmilitary action, they will continue to (take American hostages.) We got their attention when we bombed Libya. If we ignore this problem, like we've been doing. Uiey wiU contimie [with the takitu of hostagei.]" Bob Blair Real estate broker "We have to do something against them. Force is probably tiic only way they will understand. I'm against violence, however. Terrorists appear to have no real value on life. I don't tiiink it would be possible to sit down and talk to them. As long as we continue to ignore [the hostage problem] they will keep on getting away with it" Miriam DeMarco Confectionist "I feel we should take military action; we have to defend our people." Stephan Schwan Computer technkian "In this particular situation, a military operation would be strategically advisable because it would change the opinion Arab countries have about the United States—[that we are weak and not militarily equipped.] If diplomatic negotiations do not succeed in liberating die hostages, dKn we should take military action." Florence Wappd Florist "I don't like the use of violence. Violence would create more bloodshed. I would like to see us get our men back, but [there are oUier ways to deal with terrorist hostage holden.]" v\ ^m;:^!!^!^^;^^?;^:''::^: ^ mm tumilMMlWHIIilH' mm

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Pag* 6 Htndenon Homa News, Henderson, Nevada f^^ AUG. GRAVEYARD PAYROLL CHECKS' CASHED Thunday, Augnat 10, 11:9 Thursday, August 10,1989 mm^ Green Valley's newest party place! SUNSET AT VALLE VERDE next to Circle K VIDEO POKER on combined Progressive system. Every machine is a Progressive!! PLAYERS DRINK FREE TOP SHELF INCLUDED lgi\t\v\\vi^. Henderson Home News. Henderson, Nevada Page 7 f/ll^.. .. \;8 >s FOO "•••••I & SPIRITS I • • • OUR DINNER MENU Dinner Served 5 P.M.-1 A.M. All Dinner Entrees served with homemade soup or salad, rolls and butter Pasta Dishes ^ "A touch of Italy" LASAGNA BAKED SHELLS LINGUINI IN CLAM SAUCE (Red or White) SPAGHETTI, RIGATONI, OR LINGUINI FETTUCINE ALFREDO RAVIOLI (CHEESE OR MEAT) MANACOTTI Chicken All chicken dishes are prepared with skinned boneless breasts VcaC CHICKEN CHICKEN CHICKEN CHICKEN BROILED CHICKEN CHICKEN JOSEPH FRANCAISE PARMAGIANA ANGELA V2 CHICKEN CACCIATORA ANGELO PROVHVn-EASTERN MILK FED VEAL VEAL SCALLOPINI VEAL FRANCHAISE VEAL PARMAGIANA VEAL MARSALA VEAL PICCANTE VEAL BRADLEY Be^ NEW YORK STEAK (12 ounce) PORTERHOUSE STEAK (15 ounce) FILET MIGNON (12 ounce) PRIME RIB BEEF BROCHETTE Seafood TROUT ALMONDINE BROILED HALIBUT SHRIMP FRA DLABLO SHRIMP DANIEL SHRIMP SCAMPI SEAFOOD COMBINATION PLATE STEAMED CRAB LEGS AUSTRALIAN LOBSTER TAIL Combinaiion Dinners NEW YORK STEAK AND LOBSTER VEAL AND CHICKEN Side Orders Something to ifiink about MEATBALLS SAUSAGE FRIES BAKED POTATO EGGPLANT PARMAGIANA SAUSAGE AND PEPPERS Desserts HOMEMADE CANOLI HOMEMADE RUM CAKE APPLIE PIE TRY OUR EXTENSIVE SELECTION OF FINE WINES ALL ITEMS ON THIS MENU ARE AVAILABLE "TO GO" AT AN ADDITIONAL .50* PER ITEM *TAKE OUT" HOTLINE 454-9200 i^'^sr 4/ • Jl oo Af 100 3\3 Disc MosteiCod 120 20 Dl BRANDS OF BEER FROM FFERENT COUNTKIES PRIVATE PHONES IN ALL DINING ROOM BOOTHS ^fii ^JV J^o ^On J^T 9J-1 ^fl. s e Cash Advance Machine Reduced Reasonable Fees lfte OUR 24-HR MENU FINGER FOODS CHICKEN WINGS CHICKEN FINGERS BATTER DIPPED ONION RINGS FRIED ZUCCHINI DEEP FRIED BREADED MUSHROOMS BASKET OF FRIES MOZZARELLA CHEESE STICKS SHRIMP COCKTAIL ON THE ITALIAN SIDE VEAL PARMAGUNA SANDWICH MEATBALL SANDWICH SAUSAGE SANDWICH CHICKEN PARMAGIANA PEPPERS AND EGGS GUTBUSTER BURGERS YOUR BASIC BURGER THREE CHEESE BURGER BACON CHEESEBURGER BARBEQUE BACON CHEESEBURGER THE ITALIANO MUSHROOM BURGER GRILLED PATTY MELT CALZONES HOMEMADE DOUGH STUFFED WITH RICOTTA AND MOZZARELLA THEN BAKED TO GOLDEN BROWN PERFECTION!!! PIZZA CHEESE PIZZA SICILIAN PIZZA GUTBUSTERS DELUXE HOT SANDWICHES NEW YORK STEAK SANDWICH PHILLY CHEESE STEAK FRENCH DIP CHICKEN SANDWICH TRIPLE DECKER CLUB MONTE CRISTO BEEF MELT GRILLED CHEESE GRILLED HAM AND CHEESE COLD SANDWICHES TUNA SALAD HAM AND CHEESE TURKEY AND CHEESE ROAST BEEF AND CHEESE ITALIAN SUB SALADS TUNA SALAD CHEF'S SALAD SEAFOOD SALAD ANTIPASTO SMALL DINNER SALAD HOUSE FAVORITES LASAGNA BAKED SHELLS EGGPLANT PARMAGIANA FOR THE GANG BUCKET OF WINGS BUCKET OF FINGERS M V ALL 24HOUR MENU ITEMS AVAILABLE TO GO ADD 25€ PER ITEM "TAKE OUT" HOT LINE 4549200 A UNIQUE TAVERN EXPERIENCE Green Valley's newest party place SUNSET AT VALLE VERDE next to Circle K 454-9200 ORIGINAL DEFECM

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mi Ff • HMdmoB Horn* Nawt. Hendcraon. Nevada ThoTMlay, Aagnat 10, IMIr Safekey after-school enrichment program set to begin Safekey, an after-school enrichment program, will be held at various elementary schools in Henderson during the coming school year. The Henderaon Parks and Recreation Department will administer the Safekey Program in cooperation with the Clark County School District, officials said. The Safekey Program is held from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Monday Safekey program at Henderson elementary schools School Facility Pre-Registration Dates Start Date Doolie Aug. 16-17, 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Aug. 28 Fay Galloway On-going basis Hinman Aug. 24-25, 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Aug. 28 Nate Mack On-going basis Sewell Sept. 7-8, 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Sept. 11 through Friday and will correspond with the Clark County SchoolDistrict calendar. The program emphasizes homework completion and recreational activities, along with a daily snack. The instructors are qualified teachers from each school. Fees for the Safekey program Hinman Elementary begins registration have had four DPT, four polio, one rubella and one rubeola immunizations, officials said. For children who do not have the required immunizations, a family physician or the St. Rose Dominican Hospital Health Parents are encouraged to Department should be Registration is presently under way at Hinman Elementary School for children who have not previously attended a Clark County School but who will go to classes at Hinman. above; parents of children who attended Hinman last year may call the school office at 799-8990 to update necessary information and obtain the for one child are: $20 for five days a week, $17 for four days a week and $13 for three days a week. Discount fees are available for additional siblings. Registration will be taken at the Safekey Sites only, including all pre-registration on the dates specified. For further information, call the Youth Center at 565-2345. student's teacher's name and room number. Additional information may be obtained by calling the school office as well, they said. register their children early, officials said. The school is open for registration from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. and from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. daily. Kindergarten children must have a birth certificate or other acceptable proof of age and also have their immunization record. All children attending Clark County schools must contacted, they said, Children in grades 1 through 5 who have not attended a Clark County school previously must also show proof of immunization and age at time of registration, they added. Parents of children who have been zoned for Hinman for the first time should register their offspring at the times hsted "4 to 6 monlhs lo a befler jobr Panel to examine transportation of high-level radioactive waste DComputer operations D Microcomputer applications DWord processing DData entry DComputerized bookkeeping DSecurity officer D Front desk receptionist Transportation of high-level radioactive waste will be among the issues examined by members of the presidentiallyappointed Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board at an Aug. 21-23 meeting in Albuquerque, N.M. The Containers and Transportation Panel will be briefed by the US. Department of Energy on its high-level radioactive waste cask development and transportation programs. The meetings will be held at the Holiday Inn-Pyramid Hotel, 5151 San Francisco Road, NE, Albuquerque, N.M. (1-800-544-0623). The meetings will run from 8:3Cr a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day. From 1:15 p.m.-4:30 p.m. on Aug. 22, panel members will tour several facilities at Sandia National Laboratory, site of high-level radioactive waste transportation work. Members of the pubhc are invited to attend the meeting and go on the tour as observers. Persons planning to attend the meeting should call (202) 254-4792 before Wednesday. Persons planning to tour Sandia National Laboratory should call (202) 586^495, to provide security information and proof of U.S. citizenship. The U.S. Congress created t the NWTRB in the Nuclear Waste Pohcy Amendments Act of 1989 to evaluate the U.S. Department of Energy's scientific and technical work exploring the feasibility of burying high-level radioactive waste at the Yucca Mountain Site in Nevada. For further information, call (202) 254-4792. 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Low in calories, it easily mixes in water or juice. It comes in regular and pleasant tasting orange flavors. Tike product usually woHu within 12 to 72 houra. Not only diet, but a profram of regular exerciaa, particularly walliing is impertant to help prevent conatipation. If you have a question about eanatipation, you can call 180(M63-t86S toO-frw. GIANT SHRIMP COCKTAIL ILM DAILY DINNER SPECIALS Served Spin-10pm "ALL YOU CAN EAF SALAD BAR WITH ANY ENTREE Sunday l/2BBQChjcken 3,95 VVtstem Steak 3.95 Baby Back Pork Ribs ....4.75 Moodiy Old-Fashioned Ham Steak 3.95 Porterhouse Steak 4.95 Prime Rib 4.95 Wednetday NY. Steak 4.95 Prime Rib 4.95 ThuBday Pork Chops 3.95 Cornish Hen 4iO Friday N.Y.orT-Bone 4.95 Filet Mignon 7.95 Tnnit Almondine 4J0 Satanlay M.Y.orT-Bone 4.95 Filet Mignon 7.95 Catfish 450 LIVE POKER TUES Through SUN 7 CARD STUD 4PM UNTIL ? CASINO & REST A U R A N T '1IIE2I' llf WED.-SUN FROM 4 P.M. IN THE SLHOUETTE LOfa MUSTBEJIOROVEK ^ Thanday, Angiwt 10,1989 Henderson Home News, Henderaon, Nevada Page 9 Senate committee to investigate HUD NEW PARK-The City of Henderson will develop a six-acre community park at Promontory Point above a new underground water reservoir, according to Dan Shaw, left, chairman of the Henderson Parks and Recreation Board, here meeting with developer Eric Horn, right, president of the Horn Co. Park to be built at Promontory Point A six-acre park will be built at Promontory Point above a 14-million gallon underground water storage reservoir, according to Dan Shaw, chairman of the Henderson Parks and Recreation Board. "Henderson is attempting to make flood control and water storage facilities as attractive as possible for multi-purpose uses," said Shaw. "We have worked with the Horn Co. to accomplish that goal at Promontory Point." Some $4 million in bond funds has been allocated by the City of Henderson for park expansion and remodeling of existing facilities, according to Shaw. In addition to serving the needs of a rapidly growing Green Valley, the new underground reservoir will replace The first residential project to be developed will be Spyglass Ridge—a neighborhood of 172 single-family homes to be built by the Horn Co. "The homes will have a dramatic view of the Las Vegas Valley from Black Mountain to the existing storage tank on Warm Springs Road to provide clear views of the Las Vegas Valley from the Henderson Park. Developer Eric Horn is building Promontory Point along a natural promontory at Green Valley where grading has ab-eady begun for the new master-planned community. Promontory Point is a 70-acre, mixed-use project located in the path of the eastern expansion of Green Valley. Sunrise Mountain," said Horn. "Promontory Point will be one of Southern Nevada's finest living environments, with unique landscaping and architectural control." Gateway Development build 108 townhomes at Promontory Point. The partnership owns seven Group, a Horn Co. a partner in Promontory Point and Nevada Classic neighborhood in northwest Las Vegas, has plans to parcels and will develop three of them. The remaining four parcels will be developed by other developers. This is prime property for single-family, multi-family and commercial devebpment," Horn said. The site is close to the new Gteen Valley High School location, as well as the planned million-square-foot Galleria Mall." WASHINGTON—Acdng on requests from the Committee Chainnan and Nevada's U.S. Sen. Richard Bryan, the U.S. Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs voted recently to conduct a full investigation of mismanagement at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Affairs. Bryan said the Committee will investigate HUD activities in the years 1978-88, including eight years under the Reagan Administration. "The American taxpayer has lost at a minimum of $2-$6 billion from the HUD scandal," Bryan said. "Almost daily, we learn of a new problem. It is a major scandal involving huge amounts of public money. The Senate has an obligation to the public to get to the bottom of this, and then to enact remedial legislation to prevent a recurrence. "The cost to the country of the greed of a few wcU-connccted insiders goes far beyond the dollars and cents," Bryan said. "Sadly, thousands of individuals and families who needed decent, affordable housing have been robbed of a chance for a better standard of living. "To a large extent, the nation's housing programs are on hold," Bryan said. "Fraud, theft, and mismanagement has been revealed in 28 HUD programs, involving 94 percent of HUD's $20 billion budget. The hearings which have been heW have only outlined the problems. Now we must get out all the facts as to how it happened and who was involved. If laws were broken, then those responsible must be punished as criminals." HAIRLOOMS Haircuta $5.00 Parm Wavaa .. .$25 & up CokK* $23 & up Tipa A Ovartaya $22 Manicuraa $7 458-7378 Mon-Sat 9 a.m.-6 p.m. 3720 E. tiinaat Road (K-Mvt Stwppliig Oentcf) NEVADA FIRST BANK I ji.1 1 ip j w i i mup/ Wf ^ :•: x 'STATEWIDE AND STRONG FDIC SUMMER SPECIAL ROSES $19.50 Mon-Fri 9-6 8M-5 ANTIQUE ROSE FLORIST Oidi DibMt Monloy* SM Water St., NMHIMMI 564-5503 lA Different Kind of Financial Newsletter *For Your Information SIDNEY STERN FOUmER-PBESlDENT ASSETS OVER $225,000,000 Your HOMETOWN Bank JTinancial success depends on being infonned today about the challenges and opportunities of tomonrow. That's why we developed "F.Y.I." it's a differenl kind of financial newsletter. Each issue is full of helpful, practical information that people need to know. 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mi Ff • HMdmoB Horn* Nawt. Hendcraon. Nevada ThoTMlay, Aagnat 10, IMIr Safekey after-school enrichment program set to begin Safekey, an after-school enrichment program, will be held at various elementary schools in Henderson during the coming school year. The Henderaon Parks and Recreation Department will administer the Safekey Program in cooperation with the Clark County School District, officials said. The Safekey Program is held from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Monday Safekey program at Henderson elementary schools School Facility Pre-Registration Dates Start Date Doolie Aug. 16-17, 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Aug. 28 Fay Galloway On-going basis Hinman Aug. 24-25, 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Aug. 28 Nate Mack On-going basis Sewell Sept. 7-8, 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Sept. 11 through Friday and will correspond with the Clark County SchoolDistrict calendar. The program emphasizes homework completion and recreational activities, along with a daily snack. The instructors are qualified teachers from each school. Fees for the Safekey program Hinman Elementary begins registration have had four DPT, four polio, one rubella and one rubeola immunizations, officials said. For children who do not have the required immunizations, a family physician or the St. Rose Dominican Hospital Health Parents are encouraged to Department should be Registration is presently under way at Hinman Elementary School for children who have not previously attended a Clark County School but who will go to classes at Hinman. above; parents of children who attended Hinman last year may call the school office at 799-8990 to update necessary information and obtain the for one child are: $20 for five days a week, $17 for four days a week and $13 for three days a week. Discount fees are available for additional siblings. Registration will be taken at the Safekey Sites only, including all pre-registration on the dates specified. For further information, call the Youth Center at 565-2345. student's teacher's name and room number. Additional information may be obtained by calling the school office as well, they said. register their children early, officials said. The school is open for registration from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. and from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. daily. Kindergarten children must have a birth certificate or other acceptable proof of age and also have their immunization record. All children attending Clark County schools must contacted, they said, Children in grades 1 through 5 who have not attended a Clark County school previously must also show proof of immunization and age at time of registration, they added. Parents of children who have been zoned for Hinman for the first time should register their offspring at the times hsted "4 to 6 monlhs lo a befler jobr Panel to examine transportation of high-level radioactive waste DComputer operations D Microcomputer applications DWord processing DData entry DComputerized bookkeeping DSecurity officer D Front desk receptionist Transportation of high-level radioactive waste will be among the issues examined by members of the presidentiallyappointed Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board at an Aug. 21-23 meeting in Albuquerque, N.M. The Containers and Transportation Panel will be briefed by the US. Department of Energy on its high-level radioactive waste cask development and transportation programs. The meetings will be held at the Holiday Inn-Pyramid Hotel, 5151 San Francisco Road, NE, Albuquerque, N.M. (1-800-544-0623). The meetings will run from 8:3Cr a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day. From 1:15 p.m.-4:30 p.m. on Aug. 22, panel members will tour several facilities at Sandia National Laboratory, site of high-level radioactive waste transportation work. Members of the pubhc are invited to attend the meeting and go on the tour as observers. Persons planning to attend the meeting should call (202) 254-4792 before Wednesday. Persons planning to tour Sandia National Laboratory should call (202) 586^495, to provide security information and proof of U.S. citizenship. The U.S. Congress created t the NWTRB in the Nuclear Waste Pohcy Amendments Act of 1989 to evaluate the U.S. Department of Energy's scientific and technical work exploring the feasibility of burying high-level radioactive waste at the Yucca Mountain Site in Nevada. For further information, call (202) 254-4792. OJob placement assistance GDay & evening classes DOne computer to eacli student D Nationally accredited DLk:ensed t^y State of Nevada D Professional & friendly staff DFinancial aid available for those who qualify When you're ready ••• we're here. AND 642-6655 2031 McDoniel (N. of Lake Mead Blvcl.) North Las VegcE.NV 565-3669 39 E. Base. HeiKlerson, NV WE'VE GOT IT ALL F/CTS t FIGURES A medical study showed that 30 grams of wheat and com fiber per day increased bowel frequency by 55 percent. Doctors also report that if you don't eat enough fiber every day, you run a greater riak of becoming constipated. 30ffMi'S Of RKS 65% 9L WE'VE GOT WHERE TWO QUARTERS CAN WIN YOU OVER $200,000! Get your hands on the world's first statewide quarter progressive slot machines. OVER 275 VffiEO & SLOT MACHINES Physiciani have been racommending a product such as Citrucel for constipation. It's a therapeutic fiber for regularity that contains soluble fiber. Low in calories, it easily mixes in water or juice. It comes in regular and pleasant tasting orange flavors. Tike product usually woHu within 12 to 72 houra. Not only diet, but a profram of regular exerciaa, particularly walliing is impertant to help prevent conatipation. If you have a question about eanatipation, you can call 180(M63-t86S toO-frw. GIANT SHRIMP COCKTAIL ILM DAILY DINNER SPECIALS Served Spin-10pm "ALL YOU CAN EAF SALAD BAR WITH ANY ENTREE Sunday l/2BBQChjcken 3,95 VVtstem Steak 3.95 Baby Back Pork Ribs ....4.75 Moodiy Old-Fashioned Ham Steak 3.95 Porterhouse Steak 4.95 Prime Rib 4.95 Wednetday NY. Steak 4.95 Prime Rib 4.95 ThuBday Pork Chops 3.95 Cornish Hen 4iO Friday N.Y.orT-Bone 4.95 Filet Mignon 7.95 Tnnit Almondine 4J0 Satanlay M.Y.orT-Bone 4.95 Filet Mignon 7.95 Catfish 450 LIVE POKER TUES Through SUN 7 CARD STUD 4PM UNTIL ? CASINO & REST A U R A N T '1IIE2I' llf WED.-SUN FROM 4 P.M. IN THE SLHOUETTE LOfa MUSTBEJIOROVEK ^ Thanday, Angiwt 10,1989 Henderson Home News, Henderaon, Nevada Page 9 Senate committee to investigate HUD NEW PARK-The City of Henderson will develop a six-acre community park at Promontory Point above a new underground water reservoir, according to Dan Shaw, left, chairman of the Henderson Parks and Recreation Board, here meeting with developer Eric Horn, right, president of the Horn Co. Park to be built at Promontory Point A six-acre park will be built at Promontory Point above a 14-million gallon underground water storage reservoir, according to Dan Shaw, chairman of the Henderson Parks and Recreation Board. "Henderson is attempting to make flood control and water storage facilities as attractive as possible for multi-purpose uses," said Shaw. "We have worked with the Horn Co. to accomplish that goal at Promontory Point." Some $4 million in bond funds has been allocated by the City of Henderson for park expansion and remodeling of existing facilities, according to Shaw. In addition to serving the needs of a rapidly growing Green Valley, the new underground reservoir will replace The first residential project to be developed will be Spyglass Ridge—a neighborhood of 172 single-family homes to be built by the Horn Co. "The homes will have a dramatic view of the Las Vegas Valley from Black Mountain to the existing storage tank on Warm Springs Road to provide clear views of the Las Vegas Valley from the Henderson Park. Developer Eric Horn is building Promontory Point along a natural promontory at Green Valley where grading has ab-eady begun for the new master-planned community. Promontory Point is a 70-acre, mixed-use project located in the path of the eastern expansion of Green Valley. Sunrise Mountain," said Horn. "Promontory Point will be one of Southern Nevada's finest living environments, with unique landscaping and architectural control." Gateway Development build 108 townhomes at Promontory Point. The partnership owns seven Group, a Horn Co. a partner in Promontory Point and Nevada Classic neighborhood in northwest Las Vegas, has plans to parcels and will develop three of them. The remaining four parcels will be developed by other developers. This is prime property for single-family, multi-family and commercial devebpment," Horn said. The site is close to the new Gteen Valley High School location, as well as the planned million-square-foot Galleria Mall." WASHINGTON—Acdng on requests from the Committee Chainnan and Nevada's U.S. Sen. Richard Bryan, the U.S. Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs voted recently to conduct a full investigation of mismanagement at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Affairs. Bryan said the Committee will investigate HUD activities in the years 1978-88, including eight years under the Reagan Administration. "The American taxpayer has lost at a minimum of $2-$6 billion from the HUD scandal," Bryan said. "Almost daily, we learn of a new problem. It is a major scandal involving huge amounts of public money. The Senate has an obligation to the public to get to the bottom of this, and then to enact remedial legislation to prevent a recurrence. "The cost to the country of the greed of a few wcU-connccted insiders goes far beyond the dollars and cents," Bryan said. "Sadly, thousands of individuals and families who needed decent, affordable housing have been robbed of a chance for a better standard of living. "To a large extent, the nation's housing programs are on hold," Bryan said. "Fraud, theft, and mismanagement has been revealed in 28 HUD programs, involving 94 percent of HUD's $20 billion budget. The hearings which have been heW have only outlined the problems. Now we must get out all the facts as to how it happened and who was involved. If laws were broken, then those responsible must be punished as criminals." HAIRLOOMS Haircuta $5.00 Parm Wavaa .. .$25 & up CokK* $23 & up Tipa A Ovartaya $22 Manicuraa $7 458-7378 Mon-Sat 9 a.m.-6 p.m. 3720 E. tiinaat Road (K-Mvt Stwppliig Oentcf) NEVADA FIRST BANK I ji.1 1 ip j w i i mup/ Wf ^ :•: x 'STATEWIDE AND STRONG FDIC SUMMER SPECIAL ROSES $19.50 Mon-Fri 9-6 8M-5 ANTIQUE ROSE FLORIST Oidi DibMt Monloy* SM Water St., NMHIMMI 564-5503 lA Different Kind of Financial Newsletter *For Your Information SIDNEY STERN FOUmER-PBESlDENT ASSETS OVER $225,000,000 Your HOMETOWN Bank JTinancial success depends on being infonned today about the challenges and opportunities of tomonrow. That's why we developed "F.Y.I." it's a differenl kind of financial newsletter. Each issue is full of helpful, practical information that people need to know. F.Y.I, is exactly the kind of information you can use. AND IT'S FREE. Just call or return this coupon and ask for F.Y.I. — It's FOR YOUR INFORMATION and it's free from Waddcll & Reed. r"^* —— • ^^ —^ —— — — — I Q I want to recdvf F.Y.l^ —\ Name I Address I I City — I Phone — ST. Zip Bus. Phow .J Widdell&Reed 1515 E. Tropieua, SuiU 125 Lu VegM, NV 89119 FINANCIAL SERVICES • 736-3656 CUSTOM DESIGN LANDSCAPING LAWN MAINTENANCE & LANDSCAPING SERVICE WaaMy. Monthly IMntfwnc 'ClMivUpc "SpiMitora OMign a liwtelMton WEAtONABLE ^ lavaaaai • DackingaPatie • Lawn Ranovatlona • Sod a Sood InataUation FREE ESnaiATES a lauwaa I Cowactort Lc WOaiW 294-3084 PERSONAL INJURY FREE CONSULTATION NO RECOVERY NO FEE 565-0473 223 Water Street, Suite A Next to City Hall LAW OFFICE OF JOHN F. MARCHIANO Criminal Law — DUI Former City Attorney

PAGE 9

Pag 10 HoideraoB Home News, Henderson, Nevada Thunday, August 10.19S9 Thursday. August 10.1989 GREEN VALLEY NEWS Artist's rendition of new Green Valley entrance. New GV entryway planned Construction has begun on a grand new entryway with a' water feature that will mark the official gateway to Green Valley at the comer of Green Valley Parkway and Sunset Road. "The new Green Valley main entry feature will serve as a spectacular showplace designed to complement the new Civic Center Plaza," said Donald A. Purdue, the American Nevada Corp.'s director of development. The entry spans some 1,400 square feet and will include a fountain, 24 new palm trees across the corner and median and extensive landscaping including a variety of planters. The fountain will contain lowstanding 12-inch bubblers which will gently spray and Homeowners' groups merger put on hold By Paul Szydelko Associate Editor A Green Valley Community Association proposal to merge with the Green Valley South Homeowners' Association is on hold as negotiations between officials from both organizations continue. GVCA President Hugh Anderson and Green Valley South President Ron Frame have held preliminary' discussions but a formal merging does not appear to be imminent, Frame said. 9oth groups are concerned primarily with housing density in Green Valley. Zone change requests to allow more apartments and condominiums are usually greeted with protest from members of the two groups. Frame, who claimed a string of victories in 1988, is the primary spokesman for homeowners' interests in the south. Jim Arrendale, former president and founder of the GVCA, has been the other outspoken critic of housing density increases at Henderson City Council and Planning Commission meetings. Frame, who said he can rally more than 100 people to appear at public meetings, added that his organization is "very much in limbo." He said he is concerned about how a merged association would be organized. Rallying people to attend public meetings to protest a zone change is difficult if the proposal is not in the immediate neighborhood. Frame said. A recent clash during a July 20 Planning Commission public hearing on a 120-unit condominium project in Cosada Del Mar illustrated Frame's point. Green Valley South resident Sam Kitterman, who noted to the planning commissioners that he was a GVCA boardmember, argued against the project. He said he was concerned about increased traffic and impacts on both utilities and city services in the neighborhood. Rich MacDonald, another GVCA boardmember, told the planners that the assocatiion had not elected to make a formal stand on the matter. The GVCA was satisfied after meeting with project proponents—a meeting Kitterman did not attend, MacDonald said. Planning Commissioner Jim Thomas said he was confused and upset that Kitterman impUed that he was representing the views of the GVCA. The planners voted to recommend the project with a density of RM-16 (multi-family residenNew church begins in Henderson Another church. Why does Henderson need another church? There are almost 40 in the community now. Yes, there is a hew church, but according to spokespersons, the Green Valley Church of Christ has an old idea going back 2,000 years—to the "old time reUgion," as it was in New Testament times. Barney Cargile, minister of the new church, said this week, "We are very conservative and See Church, Page 11 Carl B. Smith, DPM and Kenneth W. Schmutz, DPM are pleased to announce the addition of Roger B. Reed, DPM to their Podiatric Medical practices at HENDERSON FOOT CLINIC speciaiizing in Injuries, Diseases and Surgery of the Foot. Office Hours 9 to 5 Monday-Thursday 223 Water Street C Henderson 565-6641 tial, with no more than 16 units an acre) Frame and Kitterman, irked that MacDonald and the GVCA were not more vocal in their opposition to the project, won the battle Tuesday night when the City Council voted to reduce the density of the project to RM-12 (no more than 12 units an acre). Frame said he is not comfortable with the idea of the merge now, but admits it is inevitable when the communities slowly grow together. Frame has not attended a GVCA regular meeting since the proposal was announced May 31. cool the area. Accenting the entry will be a nine-foot-long, four-foothigh, sand-blasted granite monument bearing the identifying Green Valley logo. The fountain will be the permanent home of a specially commissioned iSeward Johnson sculpture. The sculpture depicts three young boys frolicking in the water. One boy holds a garden hose which he is using to spray his friends. The boys' sneakers, socks and clothing are seen scattered nearby to illustrate' the spontaneity of their adventure in the fountain. "The new entryway epitomizes the Green Valley way of life," said Mark Fine, president of the American Nevada Corp. "Art and culture, children and families, recreation and exceptional landscaping are what Green Valley is all about." The $100,000 project is scheduled for completion by Oct. 1. Christian Center 571 Adams Blvd 293-7773 Boulder City "Only 15 minutes from Henderson — Of Course!" SUNDAY AUGUST 13 8:15 & 10:30 A.M. Pastor Majorie Kitchell "A Future and a Hope" 6 p.m. CARL SWENBERG • 'Beautiful Music—All Services 9:30 a.m. Sunday School Monday 7:00 p.m. — Youth Night WEDNESDAY 9:30 a.m. — Women't Coflae Hour and Bible Study 7.00 p.m. Bible Studies For All Ages HOME OF CHRISTIAN CENTER SCHOOL AND DAY CARE CENTER COCKER MIX FEMALE LCXDK AT THIS SWEETHEART, ISNT SHE ADORABLE? THIS WILL BE A VERY SMALL DOG, WITH A GIANT HEART JUST READY TO LOVE SOMEONE SPECIAL. ARE YOU SPECIAL ENOUGH TO RESCUE THIS WEE UHLE ONE? PLEASE, SHE IS JUST $21 AND THAT INCLUDES RABIES SHOT AND TAG. HENDERSON ANIMAL SHELTER MOSER DRIVE 565-2033 Henderson Home Ncw, Headetsuu. Nevada Page 11 Good 8/1/89-8/31/89 ANTIQUE SLOT-This slot machine, a Roto-Lette, belongs to the iClark County Heritage Museum. Curators there report the machine should work, if they can learn how to play it. '^ Photo by Bn Baker Museum gets antique slot machine By Ben Baker News Staff Writer It's an antique slot machine that should work, once reassembled. That is, it should operate if the people at the Clark County Heritage Museum can decipher how to play it. "I have no idea how it works. It should; all the parts are here," said Dawna Jolliff, curator of exhibits. The machine, a Bally Manufacturing Roto-Lette, suffered heat and water damage before the museum took possession of it. The storage shed in which it was stored caught fire. The machine was not burned. The slot has been taken apart for cleaning and minor repair. Jolliff said the machine should Church from Page 10 work, once reassembled — that is if anyone at the museum can figure out how to play it. The slot does not have a handle or any other obvious mechanisnos which would allow play. It has three quarter slots and three dials. When functioning, writing in the machine says it pays out a $300 maximum jackpot in a threecoin play. The payout was not with coins, but with a ticket which had to be presented to a cashier. Jolliff said the museum would appreciate information on how to play the gaming device. The slot machine is one of the oldest such gaming devices in Nevada museums, according to Mark Ryzdynski, museum curator. The slot may have been constructed in Las Vegas, according to Ryzdynski. The device, donated by Teny Brennan, is valued at $4,900. It will be housed in the museum's new building. Get Your Free Coupons from the Shuttle Bus Drivers seek to speak where the Bible speaks and be silent where the Bible is silent. We don't claim to be better than anyone else. We offer people an alternative where the worship is simple and only the Bible is taught. We have no part in the social/political gospel that seems to be so prevalent today." The Green Valley Church of Christ is not affiliated with any organized religion. It simply started with a few families joining together one month ago. Presently, the congregation meets in the United Steelworkers Union HaU. 42 Water St. Cargile will speak at 10 a.m. Sunday on "True Happiness and Success." At 5 p.m. Sunday, he will begin a series of lessons on Paul's letters to the Philippians, a book he says offers encouragement to all. There are also Bible classes for all ages at the church, spokespersons said, to which the public is in vited to attend. For further information, call 564-4962. Now you have a better way to keep trash in its place...rent a mobile Toter REPLACES £QiiR 20 GALLON TRASH CANS! •Keno Rebate •Free Fruit Waffle Topping 'Second Chance IVIatch Your Paycheck $1 Off Daily Food Specials $1 Lucky Buck for 21 •2 Margaritas for $1 Must be over 21 One Coupon Book Per Person, Per Day Eldorado Casino Employees Not Eligible Silver State Disposal Senfice Inc. 770 E. Sahara Avtnua Lat Vegaa, Navada 89104 732-1001 DOWNTOWN • Mr y

PAGE 10

Pag 10 HoideraoB Home News, Henderson, Nevada Thunday, August 10.19S9 Thursday. August 10.1989 GREEN VALLEY NEWS Artist's rendition of new Green Valley entrance. New GV entryway planned Construction has begun on a grand new entryway with a' water feature that will mark the official gateway to Green Valley at the comer of Green Valley Parkway and Sunset Road. "The new Green Valley main entry feature will serve as a spectacular showplace designed to complement the new Civic Center Plaza," said Donald A. Purdue, the American Nevada Corp.'s director of development. The entry spans some 1,400 square feet and will include a fountain, 24 new palm trees across the corner and median and extensive landscaping including a variety of planters. The fountain will contain lowstanding 12-inch bubblers which will gently spray and Homeowners' groups merger put on hold By Paul Szydelko Associate Editor A Green Valley Community Association proposal to merge with the Green Valley South Homeowners' Association is on hold as negotiations between officials from both organizations continue. GVCA President Hugh Anderson and Green Valley South President Ron Frame have held preliminary' discussions but a formal merging does not appear to be imminent, Frame said. 9oth groups are concerned primarily with housing density in Green Valley. Zone change requests to allow more apartments and condominiums are usually greeted with protest from members of the two groups. Frame, who claimed a string of victories in 1988, is the primary spokesman for homeowners' interests in the south. Jim Arrendale, former president and founder of the GVCA, has been the other outspoken critic of housing density increases at Henderson City Council and Planning Commission meetings. Frame, who said he can rally more than 100 people to appear at public meetings, added that his organization is "very much in limbo." He said he is concerned about how a merged association would be organized. Rallying people to attend public meetings to protest a zone change is difficult if the proposal is not in the immediate neighborhood. Frame said. A recent clash during a July 20 Planning Commission public hearing on a 120-unit condominium project in Cosada Del Mar illustrated Frame's point. Green Valley South resident Sam Kitterman, who noted to the planning commissioners that he was a GVCA boardmember, argued against the project. He said he was concerned about increased traffic and impacts on both utilities and city services in the neighborhood. Rich MacDonald, another GVCA boardmember, told the planners that the assocatiion had not elected to make a formal stand on the matter. The GVCA was satisfied after meeting with project proponents—a meeting Kitterman did not attend, MacDonald said. Planning Commissioner Jim Thomas said he was confused and upset that Kitterman impUed that he was representing the views of the GVCA. The planners voted to recommend the project with a density of RM-16 (multi-family residenNew church begins in Henderson Another church. Why does Henderson need another church? There are almost 40 in the community now. Yes, there is a hew church, but according to spokespersons, the Green Valley Church of Christ has an old idea going back 2,000 years—to the "old time reUgion," as it was in New Testament times. Barney Cargile, minister of the new church, said this week, "We are very conservative and See Church, Page 11 Carl B. Smith, DPM and Kenneth W. Schmutz, DPM are pleased to announce the addition of Roger B. Reed, DPM to their Podiatric Medical practices at HENDERSON FOOT CLINIC speciaiizing in Injuries, Diseases and Surgery of the Foot. Office Hours 9 to 5 Monday-Thursday 223 Water Street C Henderson 565-6641 tial, with no more than 16 units an acre) Frame and Kitterman, irked that MacDonald and the GVCA were not more vocal in their opposition to the project, won the battle Tuesday night when the City Council voted to reduce the density of the project to RM-12 (no more than 12 units an acre). Frame said he is not comfortable with the idea of the merge now, but admits it is inevitable when the communities slowly grow together. Frame has not attended a GVCA regular meeting since the proposal was announced May 31. cool the area. Accenting the entry will be a nine-foot-long, four-foothigh, sand-blasted granite monument bearing the identifying Green Valley logo. The fountain will be the permanent home of a specially commissioned iSeward Johnson sculpture. The sculpture depicts three young boys frolicking in the water. One boy holds a garden hose which he is using to spray his friends. The boys' sneakers, socks and clothing are seen scattered nearby to illustrate' the spontaneity of their adventure in the fountain. "The new entryway epitomizes the Green Valley way of life," said Mark Fine, president of the American Nevada Corp. "Art and culture, children and families, recreation and exceptional landscaping are what Green Valley is all about." The $100,000 project is scheduled for completion by Oct. 1. Christian Center 571 Adams Blvd 293-7773 Boulder City "Only 15 minutes from Henderson — Of Course!" SUNDAY AUGUST 13 8:15 & 10:30 A.M. Pastor Majorie Kitchell "A Future and a Hope" 6 p.m. CARL SWENBERG • 'Beautiful Music—All Services 9:30 a.m. Sunday School Monday 7:00 p.m. — Youth Night WEDNESDAY 9:30 a.m. — Women't Coflae Hour and Bible Study 7.00 p.m. Bible Studies For All Ages HOME OF CHRISTIAN CENTER SCHOOL AND DAY CARE CENTER COCKER MIX FEMALE LCXDK AT THIS SWEETHEART, ISNT SHE ADORABLE? THIS WILL BE A VERY SMALL DOG, WITH A GIANT HEART JUST READY TO LOVE SOMEONE SPECIAL. ARE YOU SPECIAL ENOUGH TO RESCUE THIS WEE UHLE ONE? PLEASE, SHE IS JUST $21 AND THAT INCLUDES RABIES SHOT AND TAG. HENDERSON ANIMAL SHELTER MOSER DRIVE 565-2033 Henderson Home Ncw, Headetsuu. Nevada Page 11 Good 8/1/89-8/31/89 ANTIQUE SLOT-This slot machine, a Roto-Lette, belongs to the iClark County Heritage Museum. Curators there report the machine should work, if they can learn how to play it. '^ Photo by Bn Baker Museum gets antique slot machine By Ben Baker News Staff Writer It's an antique slot machine that should work, once reassembled. That is, it should operate if the people at the Clark County Heritage Museum can decipher how to play it. "I have no idea how it works. It should; all the parts are here," said Dawna Jolliff, curator of exhibits. The machine, a Bally Manufacturing Roto-Lette, suffered heat and water damage before the museum took possession of it. The storage shed in which it was stored caught fire. The machine was not burned. The slot has been taken apart for cleaning and minor repair. Jolliff said the machine should Church from Page 10 work, once reassembled — that is if anyone at the museum can figure out how to play it. The slot does not have a handle or any other obvious mechanisnos which would allow play. It has three quarter slots and three dials. When functioning, writing in the machine says it pays out a $300 maximum jackpot in a threecoin play. The payout was not with coins, but with a ticket which had to be presented to a cashier. Jolliff said the museum would appreciate information on how to play the gaming device. The slot machine is one of the oldest such gaming devices in Nevada museums, according to Mark Ryzdynski, museum curator. The slot may have been constructed in Las Vegas, according to Ryzdynski. The device, donated by Teny Brennan, is valued at $4,900. It will be housed in the museum's new building. Get Your Free Coupons from the Shuttle Bus Drivers seek to speak where the Bible speaks and be silent where the Bible is silent. We don't claim to be better than anyone else. We offer people an alternative where the worship is simple and only the Bible is taught. We have no part in the social/political gospel that seems to be so prevalent today." The Green Valley Church of Christ is not affiliated with any organized religion. It simply started with a few families joining together one month ago. Presently, the congregation meets in the United Steelworkers Union HaU. 42 Water St. Cargile will speak at 10 a.m. Sunday on "True Happiness and Success." At 5 p.m. Sunday, he will begin a series of lessons on Paul's letters to the Philippians, a book he says offers encouragement to all. There are also Bible classes for all ages at the church, spokespersons said, to which the public is in vited to attend. For further information, call 564-4962. Now you have a better way to keep trash in its place...rent a mobile Toter REPLACES £QiiR 20 GALLON TRASH CANS! •Keno Rebate •Free Fruit Waffle Topping 'Second Chance IVIatch Your Paycheck $1 Off Daily Food Specials $1 Lucky Buck for 21 •2 Margaritas for $1 Must be over 21 One Coupon Book Per Person, Per Day Eldorado Casino Employees Not Eligible Silver State Disposal Senfice Inc. 770 E. Sahara Avtnua Lat Vegaa, Navada 89104 732-1001 DOWNTOWN • Mr y

PAGE 11

Pag* 12 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Thunday, Anguat 10,1969 Miscellaneous News Missiles Tknrad^y. Anguat 10,1989 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Aievada if age 13 By L. Jessie Bennett Today Today is Aug. 10,1989. It is the 222nd day of the year, with 143 days left for work and play. It was on this date in 1846, 143 years ago, that the United States Congress gave a charter to the Smithsonian Institute, often called the "Nation's Attic". The institution was named after English scientist Joseph Smithson because he had donated $500,000 to start the project. It has been said that with every rising sun life has just begun.. with that in mind, life began this morning as the sun rose at 5:07 a.m. and will set at 7:03 p.m. Thought for today living a good life is like shaving — no matter how good you do it today you still have to do it again tomorrow." Author unknown (Housekeeping is the same way! jb) Of this and that There's a number of things in our society that are difficult to understand and that seem almost impossible, I r^ad this the other day: "The only way to gain experience is to make mistakes" —Anonymous Now, I don't quite agree 100 percent, but in most ways that is the way it is. The same philosophy is true when it comes to applying for credit for the Hrst time. If you do not have a credit rating (usually earned by paying of a loan, or paying bills promptly, right?) But you've never had a loan and you are just starting out. It does make life interesting. Confusing and frustrating, but interesting. ''" Flashbacks in history Aug. 10 War and acts of war were prominent on this date in history. In 1792, angry mobs in Paris attacked the palace of Louis XVI; in 1809, Ecuador began it's war for independence from Spain; and in 1914 France declared war on Austria-Hungary. 1949 The national military establishment became the Department of Defense in the United States Government. Aug. 11 ; V^TTTDog days end > 776 B.C. The first recorded Olympic games (about this date) celebrated every four years, featuring horse racing wrestling, boxing, pentathlon and ruiming. Women were not admitted to games. It was thought that the games dated as early as 1350 B.C. Cosmonaut Andrian Nikolayev orbited the earth in space flight for more than 94 hours. Pop PRIME RIB $4.95 '^ B-B-QUE SPARE RIBS $3.75 ^ ^ SUNDAY '/ BAKED CHICKEN w/DRESSING $3.95 ^ $3.75 '/ Everyday w* scrva Freth Bakad Braad with avary maai, Soup or Salid with all dtnnort NOWATBAR Ban Soup (bowl) si.OO Shrimp Coclrtali 11.00 Ciill (bowl) ai.os Original Ham Sandwich •2.80 "ot Wings a2.09 Baaf *2.7B Chlcktn Fingars "l.tS SIRLOIN TIPS and NOODLES ^^-'^M MONDAY ^ HAM and LIMAS w/CORNBREAD $2.95 > SWISS STEAK $3.50 • / TUESDAY '^ LIVER and ONIONS $2.95 ^ STUFFED BELL PEPPERS $3.50 / WEDNESDAY ^ i/1 BAKED LASAGNA .$3.50 ^ > CHEESE RAVIOLI $3.50 > H ITALIAN SAUSAGE and PEPPERS $3.50 p The following would like to extend their heartiest congratulations to the City of Henderson on the completion of its Beautiful New City Hall A-Z VAC & SEW CENTER ANTIQUE ROSE FLORIST BEAUTY CORNER BLACK MOUNTAIN GOLF CLUB CREATIONS BY HARRIS CHICAGO TITLE—HENDERSON CP NATIONAL-HENDERSON DUNRITE CONSTRUCTION CO. ELDORADO CASINO FIRST INTERSTATE BANK-HENDERSON GOLDSTRIKE INN & CASINO GREEN VALLEY NEWS THE GREEN VALLEY COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION GEISHA CORP. GREEN VALLEY MEDICAL CENTER HAIR PALACE HAIRITAGE FULL FAMILY SERVICE SALON HENDERSON HOME NEWS HENDERSON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE HENDERSON CONVENTION CENTER HENDERSON DEMOCRATIC CLUB HENDERSON REALTY-CENTURY 21 HENDERSON FLOOR COVERING HENDERSON CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL INDUSTRIAL MEDICAL CENTER JENSEN REALTY 6 JR REALTY-CENTURY 21 KIDD MARSHMALLOW KOFFEEKORNER r^^ KERR MCGEE CHEMC An Equal Opportunity Employer LIGOURI'S LEVI STRAUSS & CO. LGVIS LEGGS PRODUCTS LAPORTA INSURANCE MARKER PLAZA BOAT & MINI STORAGE MAILBOXES ETC. USA OTHENA'S FASHIONS FKSSEKt CHLOR ALKALI COLDWELL BANKER-PAUL GARGIS& ASSOCIATES RAINBOW CLUB RAILROAD PASS HOTEL & CASINO SKYLINE CASINO & RESTAURANT SANDrS OFFICE SUPPLY St.Rose Dominican HOSPITAL SILVER SPUR SALOON ^ TIMET TURF EQUIPMENT SUPPLY CO.

PAGE 12

Pag* 12 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Thunday, Anguat 10,1969 Miscellaneous News Missiles Tknrad^y. Anguat 10,1989 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Aievada if age 13 By L. Jessie Bennett Today Today is Aug. 10,1989. It is the 222nd day of the year, with 143 days left for work and play. It was on this date in 1846, 143 years ago, that the United States Congress gave a charter to the Smithsonian Institute, often called the "Nation's Attic". The institution was named after English scientist Joseph Smithson because he had donated $500,000 to start the project. It has been said that with every rising sun life has just begun.. with that in mind, life began this morning as the sun rose at 5:07 a.m. and will set at 7:03 p.m. Thought for today living a good life is like shaving — no matter how good you do it today you still have to do it again tomorrow." Author unknown (Housekeeping is the same way! jb) Of this and that There's a number of things in our society that are difficult to understand and that seem almost impossible, I r^ad this the other day: "The only way to gain experience is to make mistakes" —Anonymous Now, I don't quite agree 100 percent, but in most ways that is the way it is. The same philosophy is true when it comes to applying for credit for the Hrst time. If you do not have a credit rating (usually earned by paying of a loan, or paying bills promptly, right?) But you've never had a loan and you are just starting out. It does make life interesting. Confusing and frustrating, but interesting. ''" Flashbacks in history Aug. 10 War and acts of war were prominent on this date in history. In 1792, angry mobs in Paris attacked the palace of Louis XVI; in 1809, Ecuador began it's war for independence from Spain; and in 1914 France declared war on Austria-Hungary. 1949 The national military establishment became the Department of Defense in the United States Government. Aug. 11 ; V^TTTDog days end > 776 B.C. The first recorded Olympic games (about this date) celebrated every four years, featuring horse racing wrestling, boxing, pentathlon and ruiming. Women were not admitted to games. It was thought that the games dated as early as 1350 B.C. Cosmonaut Andrian Nikolayev orbited the earth in space flight for more than 94 hours. Pop PRIME RIB $4.95 '^ B-B-QUE SPARE RIBS $3.75 ^ ^ SUNDAY '/ BAKED CHICKEN w/DRESSING $3.95 ^ $3.75 '/ Everyday w* scrva Freth Bakad Braad with avary maai, Soup or Salid with all dtnnort NOWATBAR Ban Soup (bowl) si.OO Shrimp Coclrtali 11.00 Ciill (bowl) ai.os Original Ham Sandwich •2.80 "ot Wings a2.09 Baaf *2.7B Chlcktn Fingars "l.tS SIRLOIN TIPS and NOODLES ^^-'^M MONDAY ^ HAM and LIMAS w/CORNBREAD $2.95 > SWISS STEAK $3.50 • / TUESDAY '^ LIVER and ONIONS $2.95 ^ STUFFED BELL PEPPERS $3.50 / WEDNESDAY ^ i/1 BAKED LASAGNA .$3.50 ^ > CHEESE RAVIOLI $3.50 > H ITALIAN SAUSAGE and PEPPERS $3.50 p The following would like to extend their heartiest congratulations to the City of Henderson on the completion of its Beautiful New City Hall A-Z VAC & SEW CENTER ANTIQUE ROSE FLORIST BEAUTY CORNER BLACK MOUNTAIN GOLF CLUB CREATIONS BY HARRIS CHICAGO TITLE—HENDERSON CP NATIONAL-HENDERSON DUNRITE CONSTRUCTION CO. ELDORADO CASINO FIRST INTERSTATE BANK-HENDERSON GOLDSTRIKE INN & CASINO GREEN VALLEY NEWS THE GREEN VALLEY COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION GEISHA CORP. GREEN VALLEY MEDICAL CENTER HAIR PALACE HAIRITAGE FULL FAMILY SERVICE SALON HENDERSON HOME NEWS HENDERSON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE HENDERSON CONVENTION CENTER HENDERSON DEMOCRATIC CLUB HENDERSON REALTY-CENTURY 21 HENDERSON FLOOR COVERING HENDERSON CONVALESCENT HOSPITAL INDUSTRIAL MEDICAL CENTER JENSEN REALTY 6 JR REALTY-CENTURY 21 KIDD MARSHMALLOW KOFFEEKORNER r^^ KERR MCGEE CHEMC An Equal Opportunity Employer LIGOURI'S LEVI STRAUSS & CO. LGVIS LEGGS PRODUCTS LAPORTA INSURANCE MARKER PLAZA BOAT & MINI STORAGE MAILBOXES ETC. USA OTHENA'S FASHIONS FKSSEKt CHLOR ALKALI COLDWELL BANKER-PAUL GARGIS& ASSOCIATES RAINBOW CLUB RAILROAD PASS HOTEL & CASINO SKYLINE CASINO & RESTAURANT SANDrS OFFICE SUPPLY St.Rose Dominican HOSPITAL SILVER SPUR SALOON ^ TIMET TURF EQUIPMENT SUPPLY CO.

PAGE 13

'^ • ge 14 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Thursday, Anguat 10,1M Missiles from Page 12 well over 20 years, to Overton. She will be closer to several of her children and grandchildren in her new home. Bette has long been active in civic and church functiona, especially in musical activitiea A special farewell party in her honor is scheduled for Friday at the LDS Recreation Center on Palo Verde. Bette will continue at Kolob so we can see her once in awhile, but she will be missed in Henderson. Best of wishes to Bette in her new home. Recipe Firstly a little tip. If you are watching calories and concerned about fat content in food and cholesterol, use non-fat, plain yogurt mixed with a little mustard for potato salad instead of mayonnaise Same with making tuna sandwiches, etc Tomato-Mushroom Pasta 1/3 cup chopped onion 2 tiM butter or margarine 1/4 tp Mlt 1 cup heavy or whipping cream 1 lb. radiatore IrufHed) pasU, cooked. 1/2 lb. freah mushrooma, aliced 1 can (14 oz) plum tomatoa 1/4 tap freahly ground pepper 1/2 cup Julienned freah basil leaves Saute' onion and mushrooms in butter in large skillet over medium heat until tender Add tomatoes, salt and pepper, cook, ^breaking up tomatos until almost all liquid evaporates. Stir in "|basil. Stir in cream; cook just until thickened. Add sauce to ^ pasta and toss to combine, (makes about four servings). Animal facts The African Zebra looks like a striped horse, but certainly ^does not have the temperment of most horses. And it is ahnost ^impossible to domesticate the Zebra. They are considered wild, ^unruly and violent animals, and have injured more people and handlers than any other animal. Their stripes are as in'dividual as human fmgerprints; no two are alike. Self Esteem Think well of yourself and proclaim this to the world, not in loud words, but in deeds. —Author unknown ^ Ramona Spiropoulos to be married [ Ramona Church Spiropoulos and Robert Kellogg Orgain of ; I San Francisco, Calif., will be married at 2 p.m. Saturday. The ^ marriage will be in the Relief Society Room of the LDS Ari rowhead Chapel, with President J. Marian Walker officiating. A vocal number will be presented by Verlene Sullivan. i Ramona, daughter of Rachel Hicks, now of Kanab, Utah, lived f in Henderson some years ago. Many will remember her magnifiI cent voice. She has been an active member of the San Franicsco :^ Opera Company for 25 years. V All of her friends and acquaintances are invited to attend i the wedding ceremony. 1 Please, no gifts, they said. -A. Anniversaries Aug. 10 Arnold and Karen Porter, Chuck and Bonnie Cockrum, Starr and Judy Curtis, Keith and Joyce Berry, Bruce and Jean Anders-son, John and Marie Dissinger, Philip and Karen Lauten and ijiKevin and Deborah Kohl^. I Aug. 11 ^ Mike and Brooke C>)wan, Rock and Cheri Lyn Schofield, Donald ^and Clara Charles, Roland and Janice Phillips, Mr. and Mrs. ;v'Miquel Mendoza and Parley and Sheila Byington. I Aug. 12 :|; Pete and Elaine Peterson 5 Aug 13 < Randall and Brenda Weed, Terry and Linda Heaton, Bryon • and Joyce Jenkins, Clay and Margery Goldston, Clarence and Maureen Mayes and Dyanne and Ivan Schryver. Aug. 14 John and Sharon Williams, Dale and Verla Starr, AGchael and Sally Short, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Swindlehurst, Ward and Susan Twitchell, Edward and Randi Anderson, Amald and Elaine Swindlehurst and Lee and Karen Swindlehurst. Aug. 16 Frank and Shirley Gifford (39), Steve and Amy Kirk, David and Mary Dillard, Tony and Lorna DeRoest, Chu-les and Debbie Williams, Garth and C^armelia Shupe, Bonn Viet and Judy Cheun, Buddy and Victoria Susan Swartzenberg Jr. (2), Robert and Bemette Woodall and David and Brenda Spradlin. Aug. 16 Bob and Tia (15), Chris and Lori Jones, Bob aad Mary Ziegler, Barry and Barbara Hunt, Bruce and Xanne Morris and Matis and Kaylynn Dastrup. Aug. 17 Hank and LaGaye Walters, Danny and Kathy Sanders, (Carles and June Leany, Gordon and Carolyn Stewart, Brent and Lynnae Hill, Barry and Karen Lasko and Dennis and Jolynn Bamum. Birthdays Aug. 10 Donald Gettinger, Lola Barton, Brittany Marie Charles, Clinton Light, Plooy Ellen Ramsey, Johnny Uliberri, Kent Brewster, Teshia Royal, (}rany Holyoak, Janet Chase, Mark A. Graff, Don Weitz Jr., Mary Hamberlin, Jody Marie Scott and Erin Hunt, Celebrities: Actress Rhonda Fleming, 66; singer Eddie Fisher, 61; singer Jimmy Dean, 61; rock musician Ian Anderson, 42; and actress Rosanne Arquette, 29. Aug. 11 Michelle Clark, Brock Smith, Bessie Darrah, Justin Shepherd, Randy Bame, Ailene Abbott, Andrea Nielsen, Boyd Bickmore, Michael Dougherty, Linda Hess, Eric Denning, Dan Jensen, Tbny Jensen, Christopher Easley, Chris Greegerson, Danzel 0. Afah bott, Luren Hill, Katie Pendleton, Christine Crome, David Hammond and Shadd Hammond. Celebrities: Actor Lloyd Nolan, 87; author Alex Haley, 68; TV talk show host Mike Douglas, 64; newsman Carl Rowan, 64; the Rev. Jerry Falwell, 56; and actress Anna Massey, 52. Aug. 12 Elizabeth White, Bob Kesterson, Sandi Denise, Loren Wolfe, Gamett Dawn Sneed, Jacque Brewer, Norma Chadwick, Edward Probert, Bob McKinnis, Pat Famsworth, Laura Church, C^oleen Cbnnelly, Beryl Francis, Adam Prisbrey, John C. Stubbs, Kevin Jensen, Geni Brown, Charles William, Gloria F. Niccum, Bruce Sillitoe, Emma Leavitt, Cory Franks and Nathan Rhees. Celebrities: Comedian/actor Cantinflas. 78; choreographer Michael Kidd, 70; actor George Hamilton, 50; actress Jane Wyatt, 77; actor/director John Derek, 63; and country singer Buck Owens, 60. A io Aug 13 Eric Richard Chelbert is one year today, Mike Rincon, Roy Sneed, Daniel Virden, Crystal Gayle Porter, Ron Huffmgton, Lee HufHngton, William Samuel Isaac Cherry, Marilyn Evea, Darren Famsworth, Telithe Spears, Sarah Schmutz, Michelle Mitchell, Louis G. Sorensen, Judith Hyde, Darrel Smith, Mike Grabhora, Davia Schmidt, Becky Price and Twylla Davis. Celebrities: TV evangelist Rex Humbard, 70; Cuban President Fidel Castro, 63; actor Pat Harrington, 60; singer Don Ho, 59, singer Dan Fogelbert, 38; and actress Quinn Cummings, 22. T57 Aag. U Todd Owens Bennett (9), Don Allan Ruesch (3). Tiaa Peterson, DarUe Dickinson, Loma Killebrew, Bobbie McBride, Ella Dawn Blazzard, Gary Bardlow, Diane Bardlow, Rick Bell, MargueriU Riddle, Marlene Sapp, Tina Close, Teresa J. Godbey, Robin Evans, Deborah Cocks, Sandra SchoenfieU. Gladys Turner, Charlotte Law, Judy Gardner, Brent Nash, Meri Edgel, Brian Stuyer, Earl Smith Albert Lane Jr., Colleen Brimhall, Mary Grace Litchford, Leah Hardy, Keri Voyles, Barrio Rubio, Mike Truadahl, Leann Bowen, Gloria Sapp, Eileen Stiles, Eileen Twitchell and Daiay Louise Shinost. CcMiritieK Newsman Russell Baker, 64; singer Buddy Greco, 53; actreas Alice Ghostley, 63; rock singer David Crosby, 48; Jockey Robyn Smith, 45; actreas Susan Saint James, 43; and baaketball'a Earvin "Magic" Johnaon, 30. Aug. 15 JoAnn Thaip. Jared Owens, Al Jensen, Micah Anderson, John Luder, Bob Laraen, Robert Nelaon, Kathleen Spencer, Ronald Gilger, Kimberly Hamiter, Daniel Swanaon, Kirtley D. Gardner, Kimberly DeBarge, and Marie Allen Lewis. • Cdebrities: Cooking expert Julia Child, 78; actress Wendy Miller. 78; Eag:le Forum Preaident Phyllia Schiafly. 65; comedian Rose Marie, 64; actreaa Janice Rule, 58; actor Mike Connors, 64; Civil Rights activist Vemon Jordan, 54; actor Jim Dale, 54; Oscar Peterson, 64; and Britian's Princess Anne, 37. See Missiles, Page 15 BOULDER CITY TRAVEL i^. 806 Buchanan Blvd. Suite 107 \n/ 2933807 Boulder City FREE TICKET DEUVERY PASSPORT PHOTOS AVAILABLE 11100,000 PlIgM bMuranot FREE wWi any alrllra tiekat purchasMl MON-FRI t AM. TO 530 P. M. SAT 9 AM. TO 2 P.M. THE ULTIMATE COUPLES ONLY VACATION SUMUU Ocho RkM $1,159 ChooM from: Sudab Moatto Bay $1 189 Saadala Royal Caribbean K^my SuUnb Umrt ladniM: • Aceoa. with Uaaiiw bed* aad amraitiM • FiiU nnrfe* dt-tkwB (Uaatn witk cMc* af MM • S^Miai cudMit gminmt dlaiag • Oaly #1 pr v rUm tptdal wUU glovad dfaitafl by rwirvatioa HOLIDAY INN Right OD the beach and minuta from verything. Enjoy awimmlag, tannia, nearby golf, horaebadi riding, wataraporU & more. Private wUte Mnd beach, goif, lighted tenaia courU, poola, wateraporta, reaUnranta, ioongaa d>/1 er "^*'* "'Sktiy entMtalnmaat, daily ;^10 activitlaa program. ALL PAClLAUIfai INCLUOB: VTtklnmLm Aagtte. HoUl A Truuftn. Prien baaad • • 6 Nifhia, Pw Pia% Doable OccapaMy. aaltaa OUMTWIM aoUd. Moat rataa oflaoU*. Ihra 12/I4M. JAMAICA #1 ALL INCLUSIVE RESORTS IN JAMAICA TRELAWNY $849 At Trclaway Beach Hotel we offer more thaa you'd expect to do for leaa tkaa you'd expect to WYNDHAM ROSE HALL $709 WE SELL AMERICA WEST NEVADA PACKS! $534 BUYS YOU 3 ROUND-TRIPS TO RENO CALL TODAY FOR DETAII Froozing changas somo flavors: the potoncy of onion flavor dacraasoa; that of (pices and gariic increases. IPS ON • RIPS Hiking? Bring A Map >i Whether your hilie laeta a few Incurs or a few weeks, it's always a 'ptep in the right direction if you bring '^long a map. >* *••*• 1051/2 pm IS-ROCKnPvOLl OLDIES good map wrill not only datarinitf direction, but describe the hapa of the land. ; A good topographic map, for ex^pie, will not only show you the liistance between any two places, it will describe the shape of the land. This is done by contour lines, Report experts at the U.S Geological purvey. These sre imaginary lines ^at follow the ground surface at a i^OBStant elevation. You can tell if I hill is steep when the contour Inea are close together. These maps will also deflne and ; ocate natural and man-made feaj uras such as woodlands, waterways, : mportant buildings and bridges. nterestingiy, maps not only help 'Wi find your way, they're nice to tave around after your trip so you %an remember it. i It's not hard to And maps, either. 9liey are as close as your nearest 1map dealer. S ELVIS CONTEST NOWI # nn TUP TO 8RACBLAND rOR TWO ON AMBUCAN # 0 AIRUNES. SOMETHINO 8PBC14L W THE AOL X m PR8E nCKETS TO 'V.VUI AND FRIBNir ^ ^ PROM LAS VUAS ULTON 2 ^/sausa^ or bacon...... WJ Bisquits & Gravy '^ • 11 am 7 days a iwe^ **•••••• mmm^m^^ / Thursday, August 10, 1989 f County set for Apex sale C3aik County will be finalizing its land sale plans of the Apex Industrial Site within the next few weeks, following President George Bush's signature earlier tMs week granting Qark County the authority to purchase the land from the federal government. The County has 90 days to finalize its plans forthe saleof the 22,000-acre site between the Bureau of Land Management, Kerr-McGee and Clark County. The three groups have been working on those plans for the past several months, in anticipation of Congressional approval. "It looks as if it will be smooth sailing from here, although, as with any project of this magnitude, it likely will be somewhat time-consuming," said Commission Chairman Bruce L. Woodbury, who began working on acquiring the Apex site shortly after the May 4, 1988, Pcpcon explosion in Henderson. He and Commissioner Manuel Cortez has spearheaded Clark County's campaign to acquire the site and construct a complex for heavy and industrial businesses. Commissioner Woodbury's involvement in the project has centered mainly on Southern Nevada, in meeting wUh other local goveniment officials and area businesses^^-Cemmissioner Cortez's involvement has focused primarily in Washington, where he has testified several times before Congressional committees regarding the importance of Apexrelated legislation. In addition, all seven members of the Board of County Commissioners have been instrumental in acquiring and developing the site. They have met with state legislators and other state officials to gamer their support, directed county staff to place Apex as a top priority and woilced in the areas of economic development to attract industrial businesses to the future Apex Industrial Site. "Without a doubt, our biggest boost in getting this legislatioi^ approved—and getting it approved so quickly—has been the members of our congressional delegation," said Cortez. "Without them, we still would have been plugging away on getting the legislation passed thrceor four years after the Pepcon explosion, instead of only a year later. The residents of Qark County are extremely indebted to them." Once the land sale agreement is finalized, the County's next step entails formation of a development plan and an environmental assessment, a process that should take about a year. Those accompanying studies and plans include Clari( County's options for selling or leasing additional parcels of the site and determining the environmental impacts of locating an industrial site in that location, officials said. Senior Activities Senior Center Highlights Center relocation nears completioi^ Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Page 15 \ Missiles from Page 14 Aug. 16 Anita Littlefield, Shane Lamb, Lucie Manning, Mary Cassidy, Katherine Swartzlander, Angela Rasmussen, Wendy Rasmussen, Terry Jean Curtis, Bonnie Haring, Caria Jean Clothier, Elizabeath Clements, April Harmer, Jeff Meyer, Patil Morley and Gar N. HaU. Celebrities: Israel's Menachem Begin, 76; actor Fess Parker, 64; actress Ann Blyth, 61; sportscaster Frank Gifford, 59; actor Robert Gulp, 59; singer Eydie Gorme, 57; actress Julie Newmar, 54, actress Anita Gillette, 53; actress Carole Shelley, 50; actress Lesley Anne Warren, 43; singer Madorma, 31; and actor Timothy Mutton, 29. Aug. 17 R. L. Scow, Ryan G. Taylor, Kelly Leavitt, NaDeen Chappell, Harold Lere Barrell, Dean Roundy, Marie Stuver, Maurine Swartz, Paul 0. Clark, Aaron Braithwaite, Hazel Redman, Valoy Heki, Terri Baldwin, Patrick Cassedy, Artie Macy Reece, Mark Davis, Natascha Sawyer and Kimble Han. Celebrities: Actress Maureen O'Hara, 69; actor Robert DeNiro, 46; and actor Sean Penn, 29. By Helen VanDerSys All activities at the Henderson Senior Center will be closed both Friday and Monday while the final move of the center from the old to the new location at 27 East Texas is completed. Seniors who normally are picked up by the center bus driven by Sam Laskaris are advised that no bus will be operated on Friday or Monday. The staff at the center, with the assistance of individual voltmteers and those from veurious local organizations, is busy moving furnishings and equipment this week and the center will re-open at the new location Tuesday. A potluck luncheon is being held at 11 a.m. today, followed by bingo at 12:30 p.m. The regular meal program has been shut down this week while kitchen equipment is being moved to the new center; however, home-bound seniors are being delivered regular meals, which had been pre-frozen. Wednesday afternoon bridge games have been discontinued for the present. Bridge on Tuesdays at 12:30 p.m., Thursdays at 7 p.m. and Fridays at 12:30 p.m. will be played; however, this Friday's game has been canceled for this week only. Sign-ups for begiimner's bridge classes—scheduled to start Thursday, Sept. 7—are still being accepted. For details and/or registration, call 565-6990. Blood pressure checks are held at the center every second Tuesday of each month, beginning at 10 a.m. Officials said that, because of delays caused by heavy storms early Wednesday morning, no meals will be served at the Senior Center next week, contrary to previous announcements that the first lunch would be served Tuesday. The Sunshine bus will take seniors to the Boulevard MaU for a shopping trip, leaving the S\XX\M Carpet Sale a1# FREE! Every 7th Yard of DU PONT STAINMASTER: CARPET HENDERSON FLOOR COVERINGS BLINDS, VERTICALS, SHADES 75% OFF ALL WALLCOVERINGS 25% OFF 334 Water St. 565-1441 'DupoM RagialMM Cartificatlon Iterft center at 9 a.m. and retiiming about 1 p.m., Monday, k ug. 21. Seniors must sign up f nr the trip in advance, as only 14 persons can be accommod! ted. Regularly scheduler. 1 activities next week: Monday: Center clost^d all day. Tuesday: Needlecrafi:, 9 a.m.;exerciseclass, 11:15 I'.m.; pinochle, 12:30 p.m.; brirlge, 12:30 p.m. Wednesday: No activiities scheduled. Thursday: Exercise cliiss, 11:15 a.m.; bingo, 12:30 p. in.; arthritis therapy group, 1 p./.n.; party bridge and pinochle, 7 p.m. Friday: Party bridge, 12:30 p.m.; door prize drawing, 12:30 p.m. Because of the re-location of the center and confusion in getting settled, the above schedule may not be accurate and some activites may not be held at times named or even held at all. Call 565-6990 next week for up-to-date information. Legal Aide Millie Hart is at the center fropT^.m. until 11:30 a.m. every first)and third Tuesday of every month. Your Amazing Brain and Alzheimer's Disease Brain cells can undergo changes, 38 in Alzheimer's disease, an insidious, progressive brain disorder that afTects up to 5 percent of those age 65 ^nd over, and 20 percent of those over 85. The disease is caused by the destruction of brain cells, and leads to memory loss, changes in personality, impaired reasoning ability and deterioration in personal care. Diagnosis of the disease is difficult and no effective treatment is known. Recent research at The Upjohn Company has looked at cell death and a protein called nerve growth factor (NGF). In Alzheimer's disease, neurons that produce a neurotransmitter called acetylcholine (ACh) wither and die. Because ACh regulates the process of learning and memory, a treatment that could prevent the death of those neurons might theoretically reduce the memory loss associated with the disease. IMII til/IK 11^1 ^i^Theatms BOULDER TH^TRE 293-3145 1225 Arizona St. Monday thru SaturdMy-Adult .. M.50 Junlora *iM Seniors A Children .*2.50 STARTS FRIDAY, AUG. 11 MON.-FRI. 6:30-8:30 SAT.-SUN. 2:30 4:30 6:30 6:30 NIGHTMARE ON ELM SL PART V The Dream Child RATED R IzCONOMY SEATING (1st SHOW ONLY) MATINEES $2.50 ALL SEATS JUST $3ONSUNDAY 111 We Feel We Have The BEST PIZZA IN TOWN amd also the LOWItzST PRICES LARGE 1 ITEM PIZZ $6.99 LARGE 3 ITEM PIZZ. $8.99 LARGE 2 ITEM PIZZA $7.99 ON PICK UP ONLY RECEIVE A 32-oz. PEPSI FREE! FAST DELIVE RY OR PICK-UP 564-2121 CMD VERIE RESnUIUNT 842 S. Bouldler Highway Henderson

PAGE 14

'^ • ge 14 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Thursday, Anguat 10,1M Missiles from Page 12 well over 20 years, to Overton. She will be closer to several of her children and grandchildren in her new home. Bette has long been active in civic and church functiona, especially in musical activitiea A special farewell party in her honor is scheduled for Friday at the LDS Recreation Center on Palo Verde. Bette will continue at Kolob so we can see her once in awhile, but she will be missed in Henderson. Best of wishes to Bette in her new home. Recipe Firstly a little tip. If you are watching calories and concerned about fat content in food and cholesterol, use non-fat, plain yogurt mixed with a little mustard for potato salad instead of mayonnaise Same with making tuna sandwiches, etc Tomato-Mushroom Pasta 1/3 cup chopped onion 2 tiM butter or margarine 1/4 tp Mlt 1 cup heavy or whipping cream 1 lb. radiatore IrufHed) pasU, cooked. 1/2 lb. freah mushrooma, aliced 1 can (14 oz) plum tomatoa 1/4 tap freahly ground pepper 1/2 cup Julienned freah basil leaves Saute' onion and mushrooms in butter in large skillet over medium heat until tender Add tomatoes, salt and pepper, cook, ^breaking up tomatos until almost all liquid evaporates. Stir in "|basil. Stir in cream; cook just until thickened. Add sauce to ^ pasta and toss to combine, (makes about four servings). Animal facts The African Zebra looks like a striped horse, but certainly ^does not have the temperment of most horses. And it is ahnost ^impossible to domesticate the Zebra. They are considered wild, ^unruly and violent animals, and have injured more people and handlers than any other animal. Their stripes are as in'dividual as human fmgerprints; no two are alike. Self Esteem Think well of yourself and proclaim this to the world, not in loud words, but in deeds. —Author unknown ^ Ramona Spiropoulos to be married [ Ramona Church Spiropoulos and Robert Kellogg Orgain of ; I San Francisco, Calif., will be married at 2 p.m. Saturday. The ^ marriage will be in the Relief Society Room of the LDS Ari rowhead Chapel, with President J. Marian Walker officiating. A vocal number will be presented by Verlene Sullivan. i Ramona, daughter of Rachel Hicks, now of Kanab, Utah, lived f in Henderson some years ago. Many will remember her magnifiI cent voice. She has been an active member of the San Franicsco :^ Opera Company for 25 years. V All of her friends and acquaintances are invited to attend i the wedding ceremony. 1 Please, no gifts, they said. -A. Anniversaries Aug. 10 Arnold and Karen Porter, Chuck and Bonnie Cockrum, Starr and Judy Curtis, Keith and Joyce Berry, Bruce and Jean Anders-son, John and Marie Dissinger, Philip and Karen Lauten and ijiKevin and Deborah Kohl^. I Aug. 11 ^ Mike and Brooke C>)wan, Rock and Cheri Lyn Schofield, Donald ^and Clara Charles, Roland and Janice Phillips, Mr. and Mrs. ;v'Miquel Mendoza and Parley and Sheila Byington. I Aug. 12 :|; Pete and Elaine Peterson 5 Aug 13 < Randall and Brenda Weed, Terry and Linda Heaton, Bryon • and Joyce Jenkins, Clay and Margery Goldston, Clarence and Maureen Mayes and Dyanne and Ivan Schryver. Aug. 14 John and Sharon Williams, Dale and Verla Starr, AGchael and Sally Short, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Swindlehurst, Ward and Susan Twitchell, Edward and Randi Anderson, Amald and Elaine Swindlehurst and Lee and Karen Swindlehurst. Aug. 16 Frank and Shirley Gifford (39), Steve and Amy Kirk, David and Mary Dillard, Tony and Lorna DeRoest, Chu-les and Debbie Williams, Garth and C^armelia Shupe, Bonn Viet and Judy Cheun, Buddy and Victoria Susan Swartzenberg Jr. (2), Robert and Bemette Woodall and David and Brenda Spradlin. Aug. 16 Bob and Tia (15), Chris and Lori Jones, Bob aad Mary Ziegler, Barry and Barbara Hunt, Bruce and Xanne Morris and Matis and Kaylynn Dastrup. Aug. 17 Hank and LaGaye Walters, Danny and Kathy Sanders, (Carles and June Leany, Gordon and Carolyn Stewart, Brent and Lynnae Hill, Barry and Karen Lasko and Dennis and Jolynn Bamum. Birthdays Aug. 10 Donald Gettinger, Lola Barton, Brittany Marie Charles, Clinton Light, Plooy Ellen Ramsey, Johnny Uliberri, Kent Brewster, Teshia Royal, (}rany Holyoak, Janet Chase, Mark A. Graff, Don Weitz Jr., Mary Hamberlin, Jody Marie Scott and Erin Hunt, Celebrities: Actress Rhonda Fleming, 66; singer Eddie Fisher, 61; singer Jimmy Dean, 61; rock musician Ian Anderson, 42; and actress Rosanne Arquette, 29. Aug. 11 Michelle Clark, Brock Smith, Bessie Darrah, Justin Shepherd, Randy Bame, Ailene Abbott, Andrea Nielsen, Boyd Bickmore, Michael Dougherty, Linda Hess, Eric Denning, Dan Jensen, Tbny Jensen, Christopher Easley, Chris Greegerson, Danzel 0. Afah bott, Luren Hill, Katie Pendleton, Christine Crome, David Hammond and Shadd Hammond. Celebrities: Actor Lloyd Nolan, 87; author Alex Haley, 68; TV talk show host Mike Douglas, 64; newsman Carl Rowan, 64; the Rev. Jerry Falwell, 56; and actress Anna Massey, 52. Aug. 12 Elizabeth White, Bob Kesterson, Sandi Denise, Loren Wolfe, Gamett Dawn Sneed, Jacque Brewer, Norma Chadwick, Edward Probert, Bob McKinnis, Pat Famsworth, Laura Church, C^oleen Cbnnelly, Beryl Francis, Adam Prisbrey, John C. Stubbs, Kevin Jensen, Geni Brown, Charles William, Gloria F. Niccum, Bruce Sillitoe, Emma Leavitt, Cory Franks and Nathan Rhees. Celebrities: Comedian/actor Cantinflas. 78; choreographer Michael Kidd, 70; actor George Hamilton, 50; actress Jane Wyatt, 77; actor/director John Derek, 63; and country singer Buck Owens, 60. A io Aug 13 Eric Richard Chelbert is one year today, Mike Rincon, Roy Sneed, Daniel Virden, Crystal Gayle Porter, Ron Huffmgton, Lee HufHngton, William Samuel Isaac Cherry, Marilyn Evea, Darren Famsworth, Telithe Spears, Sarah Schmutz, Michelle Mitchell, Louis G. Sorensen, Judith Hyde, Darrel Smith, Mike Grabhora, Davia Schmidt, Becky Price and Twylla Davis. Celebrities: TV evangelist Rex Humbard, 70; Cuban President Fidel Castro, 63; actor Pat Harrington, 60; singer Don Ho, 59, singer Dan Fogelbert, 38; and actress Quinn Cummings, 22. T57 Aag. U Todd Owens Bennett (9), Don Allan Ruesch (3). Tiaa Peterson, DarUe Dickinson, Loma Killebrew, Bobbie McBride, Ella Dawn Blazzard, Gary Bardlow, Diane Bardlow, Rick Bell, MargueriU Riddle, Marlene Sapp, Tina Close, Teresa J. Godbey, Robin Evans, Deborah Cocks, Sandra SchoenfieU. Gladys Turner, Charlotte Law, Judy Gardner, Brent Nash, Meri Edgel, Brian Stuyer, Earl Smith Albert Lane Jr., Colleen Brimhall, Mary Grace Litchford, Leah Hardy, Keri Voyles, Barrio Rubio, Mike Truadahl, Leann Bowen, Gloria Sapp, Eileen Stiles, Eileen Twitchell and Daiay Louise Shinost. CcMiritieK Newsman Russell Baker, 64; singer Buddy Greco, 53; actreas Alice Ghostley, 63; rock singer David Crosby, 48; Jockey Robyn Smith, 45; actreas Susan Saint James, 43; and baaketball'a Earvin "Magic" Johnaon, 30. Aug. 15 JoAnn Thaip. Jared Owens, Al Jensen, Micah Anderson, John Luder, Bob Laraen, Robert Nelaon, Kathleen Spencer, Ronald Gilger, Kimberly Hamiter, Daniel Swanaon, Kirtley D. Gardner, Kimberly DeBarge, and Marie Allen Lewis. • Cdebrities: Cooking expert Julia Child, 78; actress Wendy Miller. 78; Eag:le Forum Preaident Phyllia Schiafly. 65; comedian Rose Marie, 64; actreaa Janice Rule, 58; actor Mike Connors, 64; Civil Rights activist Vemon Jordan, 54; actor Jim Dale, 54; Oscar Peterson, 64; and Britian's Princess Anne, 37. See Missiles, Page 15 BOULDER CITY TRAVEL i^. 806 Buchanan Blvd. Suite 107 \n/ 2933807 Boulder City FREE TICKET DEUVERY PASSPORT PHOTOS AVAILABLE 11100,000 PlIgM bMuranot FREE wWi any alrllra tiekat purchasMl MON-FRI t AM. TO 530 P. M. SAT 9 AM. TO 2 P.M. THE ULTIMATE COUPLES ONLY VACATION SUMUU Ocho RkM $1,159 ChooM from: Sudab Moatto Bay $1 189 Saadala Royal Caribbean K^my SuUnb Umrt ladniM: • Aceoa. with Uaaiiw bed* aad amraitiM • FiiU nnrfe* dt-tkwB (Uaatn witk cMc* af MM • S^Miai cudMit gminmt dlaiag • Oaly #1 pr v rUm tptdal wUU glovad dfaitafl by rwirvatioa HOLIDAY INN Right OD the beach and minuta from verything. Enjoy awimmlag, tannia, nearby golf, horaebadi riding, wataraporU & more. Private wUte Mnd beach, goif, lighted tenaia courU, poola, wateraporta, reaUnranta, ioongaa d>/1 er "^*'* "'Sktiy entMtalnmaat, daily ;^10 activitlaa program. ALL PAClLAUIfai INCLUOB: VTtklnmLm Aagtte. HoUl A Truuftn. Prien baaad • • 6 Nifhia, Pw Pia% Doable OccapaMy. aaltaa OUMTWIM aoUd. Moat rataa oflaoU*. Ihra 12/I4M. JAMAICA #1 ALL INCLUSIVE RESORTS IN JAMAICA TRELAWNY $849 At Trclaway Beach Hotel we offer more thaa you'd expect to do for leaa tkaa you'd expect to WYNDHAM ROSE HALL $709 WE SELL AMERICA WEST NEVADA PACKS! $534 BUYS YOU 3 ROUND-TRIPS TO RENO CALL TODAY FOR DETAII Froozing changas somo flavors: the potoncy of onion flavor dacraasoa; that of (pices and gariic increases. IPS ON • RIPS Hiking? Bring A Map >i Whether your hilie laeta a few Incurs or a few weeks, it's always a 'ptep in the right direction if you bring '^long a map. >* *••*• 1051/2 pm IS-ROCKnPvOLl OLDIES good map wrill not only datarinitf direction, but describe the hapa of the land. ; A good topographic map, for ex^pie, will not only show you the liistance between any two places, it will describe the shape of the land. This is done by contour lines, Report experts at the U.S Geological purvey. These sre imaginary lines ^at follow the ground surface at a i^OBStant elevation. You can tell if I hill is steep when the contour Inea are close together. These maps will also deflne and ; ocate natural and man-made feaj uras such as woodlands, waterways, : mportant buildings and bridges. nterestingiy, maps not only help 'Wi find your way, they're nice to tave around after your trip so you %an remember it. i It's not hard to And maps, either. 9liey are as close as your nearest 1map dealer. S ELVIS CONTEST NOWI # nn TUP TO 8RACBLAND rOR TWO ON AMBUCAN # 0 AIRUNES. SOMETHINO 8PBC14L W THE AOL X m PR8E nCKETS TO 'V.VUI AND FRIBNir ^ ^ PROM LAS VUAS ULTON 2 ^/sausa^ or bacon...... WJ Bisquits & Gravy '^ • 11 am 7 days a iwe^ **•••••• mmm^m^^ / Thursday, August 10, 1989 f County set for Apex sale C3aik County will be finalizing its land sale plans of the Apex Industrial Site within the next few weeks, following President George Bush's signature earlier tMs week granting Qark County the authority to purchase the land from the federal government. The County has 90 days to finalize its plans forthe saleof the 22,000-acre site between the Bureau of Land Management, Kerr-McGee and Clark County. The three groups have been working on those plans for the past several months, in anticipation of Congressional approval. "It looks as if it will be smooth sailing from here, although, as with any project of this magnitude, it likely will be somewhat time-consuming," said Commission Chairman Bruce L. Woodbury, who began working on acquiring the Apex site shortly after the May 4, 1988, Pcpcon explosion in Henderson. He and Commissioner Manuel Cortez has spearheaded Clark County's campaign to acquire the site and construct a complex for heavy and industrial businesses. Commissioner Woodbury's involvement in the project has centered mainly on Southern Nevada, in meeting wUh other local goveniment officials and area businesses^^-Cemmissioner Cortez's involvement has focused primarily in Washington, where he has testified several times before Congressional committees regarding the importance of Apexrelated legislation. In addition, all seven members of the Board of County Commissioners have been instrumental in acquiring and developing the site. They have met with state legislators and other state officials to gamer their support, directed county staff to place Apex as a top priority and woilced in the areas of economic development to attract industrial businesses to the future Apex Industrial Site. "Without a doubt, our biggest boost in getting this legislatioi^ approved—and getting it approved so quickly—has been the members of our congressional delegation," said Cortez. "Without them, we still would have been plugging away on getting the legislation passed thrceor four years after the Pepcon explosion, instead of only a year later. The residents of Qark County are extremely indebted to them." Once the land sale agreement is finalized, the County's next step entails formation of a development plan and an environmental assessment, a process that should take about a year. Those accompanying studies and plans include Clari( County's options for selling or leasing additional parcels of the site and determining the environmental impacts of locating an industrial site in that location, officials said. Senior Activities Senior Center Highlights Center relocation nears completioi^ Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Page 15 \ Missiles from Page 14 Aug. 16 Anita Littlefield, Shane Lamb, Lucie Manning, Mary Cassidy, Katherine Swartzlander, Angela Rasmussen, Wendy Rasmussen, Terry Jean Curtis, Bonnie Haring, Caria Jean Clothier, Elizabeath Clements, April Harmer, Jeff Meyer, Patil Morley and Gar N. HaU. Celebrities: Israel's Menachem Begin, 76; actor Fess Parker, 64; actress Ann Blyth, 61; sportscaster Frank Gifford, 59; actor Robert Gulp, 59; singer Eydie Gorme, 57; actress Julie Newmar, 54, actress Anita Gillette, 53; actress Carole Shelley, 50; actress Lesley Anne Warren, 43; singer Madorma, 31; and actor Timothy Mutton, 29. Aug. 17 R. L. Scow, Ryan G. Taylor, Kelly Leavitt, NaDeen Chappell, Harold Lere Barrell, Dean Roundy, Marie Stuver, Maurine Swartz, Paul 0. Clark, Aaron Braithwaite, Hazel Redman, Valoy Heki, Terri Baldwin, Patrick Cassedy, Artie Macy Reece, Mark Davis, Natascha Sawyer and Kimble Han. Celebrities: Actress Maureen O'Hara, 69; actor Robert DeNiro, 46; and actor Sean Penn, 29. By Helen VanDerSys All activities at the Henderson Senior Center will be closed both Friday and Monday while the final move of the center from the old to the new location at 27 East Texas is completed. Seniors who normally are picked up by the center bus driven by Sam Laskaris are advised that no bus will be operated on Friday or Monday. The staff at the center, with the assistance of individual voltmteers and those from veurious local organizations, is busy moving furnishings and equipment this week and the center will re-open at the new location Tuesday. A potluck luncheon is being held at 11 a.m. today, followed by bingo at 12:30 p.m. The regular meal program has been shut down this week while kitchen equipment is being moved to the new center; however, home-bound seniors are being delivered regular meals, which had been pre-frozen. Wednesday afternoon bridge games have been discontinued for the present. Bridge on Tuesdays at 12:30 p.m., Thursdays at 7 p.m. and Fridays at 12:30 p.m. will be played; however, this Friday's game has been canceled for this week only. Sign-ups for begiimner's bridge classes—scheduled to start Thursday, Sept. 7—are still being accepted. For details and/or registration, call 565-6990. Blood pressure checks are held at the center every second Tuesday of each month, beginning at 10 a.m. Officials said that, because of delays caused by heavy storms early Wednesday morning, no meals will be served at the Senior Center next week, contrary to previous announcements that the first lunch would be served Tuesday. The Sunshine bus will take seniors to the Boulevard MaU for a shopping trip, leaving the S\XX\M Carpet Sale a1# FREE! Every 7th Yard of DU PONT STAINMASTER: CARPET HENDERSON FLOOR COVERINGS BLINDS, VERTICALS, SHADES 75% OFF ALL WALLCOVERINGS 25% OFF 334 Water St. 565-1441 'DupoM RagialMM Cartificatlon Iterft center at 9 a.m. and retiiming about 1 p.m., Monday, k ug. 21. Seniors must sign up f nr the trip in advance, as only 14 persons can be accommod! ted. Regularly scheduler. 1 activities next week: Monday: Center clost^d all day. Tuesday: Needlecrafi:, 9 a.m.;exerciseclass, 11:15 I'.m.; pinochle, 12:30 p.m.; brirlge, 12:30 p.m. Wednesday: No activiities scheduled. Thursday: Exercise cliiss, 11:15 a.m.; bingo, 12:30 p. in.; arthritis therapy group, 1 p./.n.; party bridge and pinochle, 7 p.m. Friday: Party bridge, 12:30 p.m.; door prize drawing, 12:30 p.m. Because of the re-location of the center and confusion in getting settled, the above schedule may not be accurate and some activites may not be held at times named or even held at all. Call 565-6990 next week for up-to-date information. Legal Aide Millie Hart is at the center fropT^.m. until 11:30 a.m. every first)and third Tuesday of every month. Your Amazing Brain and Alzheimer's Disease Brain cells can undergo changes, 38 in Alzheimer's disease, an insidious, progressive brain disorder that afTects up to 5 percent of those age 65 ^nd over, and 20 percent of those over 85. The disease is caused by the destruction of brain cells, and leads to memory loss, changes in personality, impaired reasoning ability and deterioration in personal care. Diagnosis of the disease is difficult and no effective treatment is known. Recent research at The Upjohn Company has looked at cell death and a protein called nerve growth factor (NGF). In Alzheimer's disease, neurons that produce a neurotransmitter called acetylcholine (ACh) wither and die. Because ACh regulates the process of learning and memory, a treatment that could prevent the death of those neurons might theoretically reduce the memory loss associated with the disease. IMII til/IK 11^1 ^i^Theatms BOULDER TH^TRE 293-3145 1225 Arizona St. Monday thru SaturdMy-Adult .. M.50 Junlora *iM Seniors A Children .*2.50 STARTS FRIDAY, AUG. 11 MON.-FRI. 6:30-8:30 SAT.-SUN. 2:30 4:30 6:30 6:30 NIGHTMARE ON ELM SL PART V The Dream Child RATED R IzCONOMY SEATING (1st SHOW ONLY) MATINEES $2.50 ALL SEATS JUST $3ONSUNDAY 111 We Feel We Have The BEST PIZZA IN TOWN amd also the LOWItzST PRICES LARGE 1 ITEM PIZZ $6.99 LARGE 3 ITEM PIZZ. $8.99 LARGE 2 ITEM PIZZA $7.99 ON PICK UP ONLY RECEIVE A 32-oz. PEPSI FREE! FAST DELIVE RY OR PICK-UP 564-2121 CMD VERIE RESnUIUNT 842 S. Bouldler Highway Henderson

PAGE 15

Page 16 Hmderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Thursday, August 10, 1989 Thursday, August 10, 1989 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Page 17 Soldo to Ipfld cultural activities wilderness BIN OK'CJ by Senate panel, 16-3 ^VI\Jw IV IvQM WlJIIIJIWI WVllwHIWW WASHINGTON—Nevada Introduced in the Hna of RenredevieMe!Miriflltnmlti>rHn0Hat> By Hugh J. Anderson III President, GVCA The GVCA receives numerous inquiries about its position on various issues concerning the community. Recently a call was received from a man asking if the GVCA was always anti-apartment. The response he was given may be a surprise for some; it was "No." It is understood that since inception a certain amount of property was allocated to multi-family housing. The main concern arises when rezoning is attempted that appears to conflict with the immediate siuTounding area. The GVCA attempts to understand the logic of any given project brought to its attention. If that project does not conform to the quality of Ufe agenda that has been set for the GVCA, then that opinion will certainly be voiced. When the term homeowners association is used, visions of families with strollers picketing something comes to mind. The name Green Valley Community Association (my italics) was not chosen haphazardly. It was chosen to conjure up visions of families with strollers enjoying Shakespeare in the Park, getting out on a Saturday morning and giving a wall a much needed painting, organizing a teen dance, investigating available health services, understanding the impact on Green Valley of McCarran airport expansion, and yes, sometimes getting out and protesting. As the GVCA grows and matures it will hopefully become apparent that the organization stands for only one thing: the quahty of Ufe in Green Valley shall be the best available in the entire valley. Marie Soldo is chairman of GVCA's Shakespeare in the Park Committee. She explained that for three consecutive nights—Sept. 15-17—Green Valley will be host to a production of "As You Like It" at the Fox Ridge Park. Under the auspices of the Arts Advisory Council of Green Valley and in conjunction with the GVCA, the City of Henderson Department of Parks and Recreation and Clark County Community College, the actors of Jester Productions of Los Angeles will provide area residents with its interpretation of the bard's comedy about romantic love. Contributions are needed to make the festival a success again this year. Tax deductible contributions should be made to: Arts Advisory Council of Green Valley, c/o Judi Steele, 2501 N. Green Valley Parkway, Suite 111, Henderson, Nev. 89014. The telephone is 898-0544. Soldo is also vice president of government affairs for Sierra Health Services, where she has worked since September 1984. Through Soldo's community activities, Sierra Heatlh Services will again take part in helping to underwrite the cost of Shakespeare in the Park. Sierra Health Services is the parent company of Health Plan of Nevada, Southwest Medical Associates, Seirra Health and Life Insurance Co. and Family Health Care Services. In additk>n to its financial support. Sierra will provide first aid care through Southwest Medical Associates for all three nights of the performance. 'T. am extremely pleased that hiy organization has chosen Shakespeare in the Park as one of the many charitable and community activities that it supports," she said. "Our corporation is committed to enhancing the quality and cultural life of Southern Nevada." Soldo has resided in Green Valley since 1984 and is active in several other conmiunity organizations in the area. Soldo is a GVCA charter board member and immediate past secretary and treasurer. Additionally, Soldo will lend her talents to bringing other cultural events to the community! Although her job requires extensive travel. Soldo manages to offer her considerable talents to the GVCA and for that the Association has expressed its gratitude. WASHINGTON—Nevada wilderness legislation was sent last week to the floor of the U.S. Senate. It maiked the very flrst time a wilderness bill for Nevada had been approved by a Senate committee and sent to the floor for action. Sea Harry ReW praised the development accordingly: "This is an historic day for Nevada. Never before has wilderness legislation gotten so far. We have reached today's milestone because of what has gone into this legislatkm: years of investigation, research, compromise and hard work. Because of the overwhelming support, we hope to get the full Senate to pass this legislation by the end of this year." The historic moment came when the Senate Interior Committee voted 16-3 to approve S.974. the "Wilderness Protection Act" of 1989. The biU now goes before the fijll Senate. The Wilderness Protectron Act was introduced eariier this year by Sens. Harry Reid and Richard Bryan. Identical legislation was introduced in the House of Representative by Congressman James Bilbray. The InteriorCommittee's Subcommittee on Public Lands, National Parks and Forests held a hearing on tiw bill on July 24. The Reid-Biyan-Bilbray legislation sets aside 733,400 acres in Nevada as wilderness. That's approximately 1.03 percent of the 71 million acres of land in Nevada. The proposal of 733,400 acres contrasts with Arizona (1.4 million acres) and California (3.9 million acres), The Wilderness Protection Act preserves Nevada wilderness for various recreations, including hunting, hiking, back packing, fishing and camping. It also allows livestock grazing at current levels. Underthe legislation, 2.46 million acres are released for nonwildemess,multiple-usepuqx)se. Under the legislation, Nevada will continue to have jurisdiction or responsibility with respect to wildlife and flsh in Nevada's national forests. The bill also allows continued access to facilities and devices essential to collecting data with regard to flood warning, flood control and water reservoir c^ eration purposes. The Secretary of Agricultiire will administer the wilderness areas, subject to valid existing rights, in accordance with the Wilderness Act. Furthermore, the legislation prohibits the creation of protective perimeters or buffer zones around wilderness areas. It also receives sufficient water for wilderness purposes and fully protects water ri^ts by making tiie federal water right secondary to all existing water rights. The Reid-Bryan-Bilbray Wilderness Protection Act comes precisely 25 years after passage of the Wilderness Act of 1964, the first federal legislation to mandate review and protection of wilderness areas across country. Nevada is the only state never to have fulfilled that mandate in the 25 years since tiie 1964 legislation was passed by Congress and sighed by the President GV to be home of new sculpture Begiiming at 7 a.m. today a new sculpture will be positioned into its perinanent location at Green Valley Parkway and Sunset Road between the Green Valley Library and the Civic Center Professional Building. The sculpture is a 36-foothigh, Egyptian obelisk dc;signed by artist Lita Albuquerque to cast shadows on th,e plaza below indicating the suramer and winter solstice and tlie autumnal and vernal equinoxes. The Sierra white grani.te sculpture sits on a three-foot square base which rises to a pyramid shaped point and resembles the Washing^^on Monument. Albuquerque is known nationally as a painter, sculptor, enviroimiental artist and a collaborator in multi-media .arts. She is best known for her outdoor "terrestrial paintings" in the Mojave Desert and at the Washington Monument and for works exhibited at The Hirshhom Museum in Wash.ington, the San Francisco Museum of Modem Art and the Museum of Contemporary Art, • Los Angeles. In 1988, she traveled to New Delhi, India, as an exhibtor in the National Gallery of Art's exhibit, "Visions of Inner Space." She is currently involved in various public art projects, including the Grand Hope Park project in Los Angeles. A major survey of her career, sponsored by the Los Angeles Fellows of Contemporary Art, is scheduled for exhibition at the Santa Monica Museum of Art in 1990, and will subsequently tour museums throughout the United States. s Just a fiiictkm of our time nsrtcliiii& movies couH help bring many ha|i|iyenaiiig& It^ so ea^ to hdp your communit); when you think about it. f five hours of volunteer time per week the standard of giving in America. helped make five percent vfH^JTllIC* causes you care about of their incomes and wimyoiti^bm* isimmtasunbif. and give five. Nfillions of people have/^ 'ii Get involved with the If starch sicks to the bottom of the iron, let the iron cool and apply paste silver polish. 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COMPLETE SALAD BAR including • seafood salad • fresh fruit • pasta salads Rent 2 Movies Get 1 Free* BOULDER CITY A HENDERSON STORES ONLY Not good wllh any olhar oiler EXPIRE!: 8/31/89 • • COUPON • 'Musi be equal or lesser value • • • I I I I Kidd and Co. online, plan grand opening for Aug. 30 By Ben Baker New9 Staff Writer The Kidd and Co. marshmallow plant has opened and is producing candies, but the plant is not operating at full capacity, Wally Cox, assistant plant manager, said last week. The plant was completely destroyed by the May 4,1988 Pepcon explosion. Workers are getting accustomed to the new plant and new machinery, said Cox. "We're producing, but not on order. We're making a product that is saleable. We're still getting adjusted in [the new plant]," he said. Cox said he expects the plant to begin full operation within the next few days. Now, the plant is working eight to nine hours per day. Cox said that depending on orders the plant may go to 24-hour, seven-day per week operation. He is more certain that the plant will begin a 24-hour six-day work week as soon as the plant begins accepting orders. "We're making products. When we get orders, we'll have it ready," he said. Running part-time, the plant is producing 8.000 pounds of product on one good shift, Cox said. A grand-opening has been set. for Wednesday, Aug. 30. MIXING—Thorough mixing is needed to make sure the ingredients combine. Improper mixing can result in a less than satisfactory product. MMMMMMMM GOOD-Kimberly MiUer samples a marshmallow to make sure the product meets her exacting standards. She reported the candy was flawless. She was part of a "Parents 'N' Tots" tour from Boulder City. PACKAGED—Workers put the finished marslimallows in bags. Once bagged, the product is stored until an order is received. IPhofawyjeffCtiwil QUALITY CONTROL-The marshmallows, looking more like the product on supermarket shelves, are given a final inspection before packaging. ^ INTERMEDIATE STEP—The marshmallows are checked often during the manufacturing process. ADJUSTMENTS-Adjustments to the machinery are necessary during the manufacturing process. Larger adjustments to the machinery, getting the machines in top working order, are being completed. READY TO COOK—The mixed product enters cooking machines. A careful eye is kept on the machinery to make sure the nncooked marshmallowa are consistent. Specializing in "GLASS GLAZE NAILS the rmrolutlonary new non-acrylic proctse for creating beutiful naile. GISM Glue nails look sensational. Wafer thin yet 5 time* stronger than acrylics. More fitxiblell More lllie natuft's own nail. Antl-bscterial agents are formulattd Into every step of the process. Mold and fungus problems are virtually eliminated. No cross-contamination. No damaging filing of the natural nail. No harsh stripping. No contact with the cuticle. The GlaM Glaze process actually encourages growth of your own natural nails and take* half the time of acrylic*. MIRROR MIRAGE 1312 Nevada Highway FrI.-Sat.-Sun. Only Glass QIaze $25 Rsg. $35 Glass GIsze with Tips $35 Reg. $4S Nail Bonding (Gels) $25 Rsg. $35 Jhm ma mmm 1 Aufftm • I ajiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin I GOLDCASTERS JEWELRY i ITAUAN 19 WATER ST DIAMONDS SAPHIRES GOLD CUSTOM JEWELRY RINGS RUBIES EARPIERONG EMERALD CHAINS w X A w A T E R S T L J N 0 B L S c D U P B G R Q T L H S A P H 1 R E S S N P S 1 Z E R 1 N Q S Q T R U A L E J R M W R K K Y M G D Y N T A R J T S A R U B 1 E S J T P R L H F P V A F 1 A M R T K 0 1 M G L K S P 1 Y C X S H T A H P N T L H E R T J E V 1 J E C G C L Y 0 OF V W M 0 F R F F z L M T E 1 J M K X Z E S N X C K 1 K S F X L A H A D K J R E J 1 W T Q D F G E N K 1 S Y Z M 0 8 P N X R N Y M H T W X D P T D ONTO G W E Z F W E D D 1 N G S E T S R H K V C Q E M E R A L D F K N S D Y M V X T D S Y J 1 N F 0 U R X U K P T H F F H X W R N K P Y Y U 0 C H A 1 N S 1 P 0 L 0 G U R 1 A P E R W J N M Q 1 F T S 8 F T P E N D ANTS Z J = REPAIR S BIRTH STONES = APPRAISALS S SIZE RINGS S WEDDING SETS = GIFTS S BRACELET S SILVER S GIFT CERTIFICATES S PENDANTS S CHARMS I New liicatiM 19 S. Water St., i Hendepson iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiin • wwi"rrJ
PAGE 16

Page 16 Hmderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Thursday, August 10, 1989 Thursday, August 10, 1989 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Page 17 Soldo to Ipfld cultural activities wilderness BIN OK'CJ by Senate panel, 16-3 ^VI\Jw IV IvQM WlJIIIJIWI WVllwHIWW WASHINGTON—Nevada Introduced in the Hna of RenredevieMe!Miriflltnmlti>rHn0Hat> By Hugh J. Anderson III President, GVCA The GVCA receives numerous inquiries about its position on various issues concerning the community. Recently a call was received from a man asking if the GVCA was always anti-apartment. The response he was given may be a surprise for some; it was "No." It is understood that since inception a certain amount of property was allocated to multi-family housing. The main concern arises when rezoning is attempted that appears to conflict with the immediate siuTounding area. The GVCA attempts to understand the logic of any given project brought to its attention. If that project does not conform to the quality of Ufe agenda that has been set for the GVCA, then that opinion will certainly be voiced. When the term homeowners association is used, visions of families with strollers picketing something comes to mind. The name Green Valley Community Association (my italics) was not chosen haphazardly. It was chosen to conjure up visions of families with strollers enjoying Shakespeare in the Park, getting out on a Saturday morning and giving a wall a much needed painting, organizing a teen dance, investigating available health services, understanding the impact on Green Valley of McCarran airport expansion, and yes, sometimes getting out and protesting. As the GVCA grows and matures it will hopefully become apparent that the organization stands for only one thing: the quahty of Ufe in Green Valley shall be the best available in the entire valley. Marie Soldo is chairman of GVCA's Shakespeare in the Park Committee. She explained that for three consecutive nights—Sept. 15-17—Green Valley will be host to a production of "As You Like It" at the Fox Ridge Park. Under the auspices of the Arts Advisory Council of Green Valley and in conjunction with the GVCA, the City of Henderson Department of Parks and Recreation and Clark County Community College, the actors of Jester Productions of Los Angeles will provide area residents with its interpretation of the bard's comedy about romantic love. Contributions are needed to make the festival a success again this year. Tax deductible contributions should be made to: Arts Advisory Council of Green Valley, c/o Judi Steele, 2501 N. Green Valley Parkway, Suite 111, Henderson, Nev. 89014. The telephone is 898-0544. Soldo is also vice president of government affairs for Sierra Health Services, where she has worked since September 1984. Through Soldo's community activities, Sierra Heatlh Services will again take part in helping to underwrite the cost of Shakespeare in the Park. Sierra Health Services is the parent company of Health Plan of Nevada, Southwest Medical Associates, Seirra Health and Life Insurance Co. and Family Health Care Services. In additk>n to its financial support. Sierra will provide first aid care through Southwest Medical Associates for all three nights of the performance. 'T. am extremely pleased that hiy organization has chosen Shakespeare in the Park as one of the many charitable and community activities that it supports," she said. "Our corporation is committed to enhancing the quality and cultural life of Southern Nevada." Soldo has resided in Green Valley since 1984 and is active in several other conmiunity organizations in the area. Soldo is a GVCA charter board member and immediate past secretary and treasurer. Additionally, Soldo will lend her talents to bringing other cultural events to the community! Although her job requires extensive travel. Soldo manages to offer her considerable talents to the GVCA and for that the Association has expressed its gratitude. WASHINGTON—Nevada wilderness legislation was sent last week to the floor of the U.S. Senate. It maiked the very flrst time a wilderness bill for Nevada had been approved by a Senate committee and sent to the floor for action. Sea Harry ReW praised the development accordingly: "This is an historic day for Nevada. Never before has wilderness legislation gotten so far. We have reached today's milestone because of what has gone into this legislatkm: years of investigation, research, compromise and hard work. Because of the overwhelming support, we hope to get the full Senate to pass this legislation by the end of this year." The historic moment came when the Senate Interior Committee voted 16-3 to approve S.974. the "Wilderness Protection Act" of 1989. The biU now goes before the fijll Senate. The Wilderness Protectron Act was introduced eariier this year by Sens. Harry Reid and Richard Bryan. Identical legislation was introduced in the House of Representative by Congressman James Bilbray. The InteriorCommittee's Subcommittee on Public Lands, National Parks and Forests held a hearing on tiw bill on July 24. The Reid-Biyan-Bilbray legislation sets aside 733,400 acres in Nevada as wilderness. That's approximately 1.03 percent of the 71 million acres of land in Nevada. The proposal of 733,400 acres contrasts with Arizona (1.4 million acres) and California (3.9 million acres), The Wilderness Protection Act preserves Nevada wilderness for various recreations, including hunting, hiking, back packing, fishing and camping. It also allows livestock grazing at current levels. Underthe legislation, 2.46 million acres are released for nonwildemess,multiple-usepuqx)se. Under the legislation, Nevada will continue to have jurisdiction or responsibility with respect to wildlife and flsh in Nevada's national forests. The bill also allows continued access to facilities and devices essential to collecting data with regard to flood warning, flood control and water reservoir c^ eration purposes. The Secretary of Agricultiire will administer the wilderness areas, subject to valid existing rights, in accordance with the Wilderness Act. Furthermore, the legislation prohibits the creation of protective perimeters or buffer zones around wilderness areas. It also receives sufficient water for wilderness purposes and fully protects water ri^ts by making tiie federal water right secondary to all existing water rights. The Reid-Bryan-Bilbray Wilderness Protection Act comes precisely 25 years after passage of the Wilderness Act of 1964, the first federal legislation to mandate review and protection of wilderness areas across country. Nevada is the only state never to have fulfilled that mandate in the 25 years since tiie 1964 legislation was passed by Congress and sighed by the President GV to be home of new sculpture Begiiming at 7 a.m. today a new sculpture will be positioned into its perinanent location at Green Valley Parkway and Sunset Road between the Green Valley Library and the Civic Center Professional Building. The sculpture is a 36-foothigh, Egyptian obelisk dc;signed by artist Lita Albuquerque to cast shadows on th,e plaza below indicating the suramer and winter solstice and tlie autumnal and vernal equinoxes. The Sierra white grani.te sculpture sits on a three-foot square base which rises to a pyramid shaped point and resembles the Washing^^on Monument. Albuquerque is known nationally as a painter, sculptor, enviroimiental artist and a collaborator in multi-media .arts. She is best known for her outdoor "terrestrial paintings" in the Mojave Desert and at the Washington Monument and for works exhibited at The Hirshhom Museum in Wash.ington, the San Francisco Museum of Modem Art and the Museum of Contemporary Art, • Los Angeles. In 1988, she traveled to New Delhi, India, as an exhibtor in the National Gallery of Art's exhibit, "Visions of Inner Space." She is currently involved in various public art projects, including the Grand Hope Park project in Los Angeles. A major survey of her career, sponsored by the Los Angeles Fellows of Contemporary Art, is scheduled for exhibition at the Santa Monica Museum of Art in 1990, and will subsequently tour museums throughout the United States. s Just a fiiictkm of our time nsrtcliiii& movies couH help bring many ha|i|iyenaiiig& It^ so ea^ to hdp your communit); when you think about it. f five hours of volunteer time per week the standard of giving in America. helped make five percent vfH^JTllIC* causes you care about of their incomes and wimyoiti^bm* isimmtasunbif. and give five. Nfillions of people have/^ 'ii Get involved with the If starch sicks to the bottom of the iron, let the iron cool and apply paste silver polish. Then wipe with a damp cloth and dry. j_ I • I i~r~i I I I I I I I I • I • T-T-i f~r • i I I I I VideoTu me I i.:i_jji_i I I irzizxii-j • • • I j_i 1 11BAMBI $239^ *""" Rebate WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT $1999 S3 Rebate ORDER YOUR COPY NOW! m I • I I • I I -Ll1.1 1 I I I BOULDER CITY'S VIDEO TYME 1404 Nevada Hwy. 294-1007 MON-SAT10-10 NearA&W SUN 11-0 I • I I I r-i~i I I f~i I I i-r :^: I • I I I I I r ri I I I IJLI .L. UOm Locf'llona HENDERSON'S VIDEO TYME 536 S. Boulder Hwy. 565-5854 "Vons Center" f'**** <='* I I MON-THURS 10-10 *"**'• *" "[FRIASATIO-11 SUN 11-10 ETI I I I JLI-lIl I I l-l n • I • ^OTSL & CASING 8 A.M. TO 2 P.li ALL NEW SUNDAY BRUNCH $3.95 Watph our chef prepare your omelette or eggs to order. COMPLETE SALAD BAR including • seafood salad • fresh fruit • pasta salads Rent 2 Movies Get 1 Free* BOULDER CITY A HENDERSON STORES ONLY Not good wllh any olhar oiler EXPIRE!: 8/31/89 • • COUPON • 'Musi be equal or lesser value • • • I I I I Kidd and Co. online, plan grand opening for Aug. 30 By Ben Baker New9 Staff Writer The Kidd and Co. marshmallow plant has opened and is producing candies, but the plant is not operating at full capacity, Wally Cox, assistant plant manager, said last week. The plant was completely destroyed by the May 4,1988 Pepcon explosion. Workers are getting accustomed to the new plant and new machinery, said Cox. "We're producing, but not on order. We're making a product that is saleable. We're still getting adjusted in [the new plant]," he said. Cox said he expects the plant to begin full operation within the next few days. Now, the plant is working eight to nine hours per day. Cox said that depending on orders the plant may go to 24-hour, seven-day per week operation. He is more certain that the plant will begin a 24-hour six-day work week as soon as the plant begins accepting orders. "We're making products. When we get orders, we'll have it ready," he said. Running part-time, the plant is producing 8.000 pounds of product on one good shift, Cox said. A grand-opening has been set. for Wednesday, Aug. 30. MIXING—Thorough mixing is needed to make sure the ingredients combine. Improper mixing can result in a less than satisfactory product. MMMMMMMM GOOD-Kimberly MiUer samples a marshmallow to make sure the product meets her exacting standards. She reported the candy was flawless. She was part of a "Parents 'N' Tots" tour from Boulder City. PACKAGED—Workers put the finished marslimallows in bags. Once bagged, the product is stored until an order is received. IPhofawyjeffCtiwil QUALITY CONTROL-The marshmallows, looking more like the product on supermarket shelves, are given a final inspection before packaging. ^ INTERMEDIATE STEP—The marshmallows are checked often during the manufacturing process. ADJUSTMENTS-Adjustments to the machinery are necessary during the manufacturing process. Larger adjustments to the machinery, getting the machines in top working order, are being completed. READY TO COOK—The mixed product enters cooking machines. A careful eye is kept on the machinery to make sure the nncooked marshmallowa are consistent. Specializing in "GLASS GLAZE NAILS the rmrolutlonary new non-acrylic proctse for creating beutiful naile. GISM Glue nails look sensational. Wafer thin yet 5 time* stronger than acrylics. More fitxiblell More lllie natuft's own nail. Antl-bscterial agents are formulattd Into every step of the process. Mold and fungus problems are virtually eliminated. No cross-contamination. No damaging filing of the natural nail. No harsh stripping. No contact with the cuticle. The GlaM Glaze process actually encourages growth of your own natural nails and take* half the time of acrylic*. MIRROR MIRAGE 1312 Nevada Highway FrI.-Sat.-Sun. Only Glass QIaze $25 Rsg. $35 Glass GIsze with Tips $35 Reg. $4S Nail Bonding (Gels) $25 Rsg. $35 Jhm ma mmm 1 Aufftm • I ajiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin I GOLDCASTERS JEWELRY i ITAUAN 19 WATER ST DIAMONDS SAPHIRES GOLD CUSTOM JEWELRY RINGS RUBIES EARPIERONG EMERALD CHAINS w X A w A T E R S T L J N 0 B L S c D U P B G R Q T L H S A P H 1 R E S S N P S 1 Z E R 1 N Q S Q T R U A L E J R M W R K K Y M G D Y N T A R J T S A R U B 1 E S J T P R L H F P V A F 1 A M R T K 0 1 M G L K S P 1 Y C X S H T A H P N T L H E R T J E V 1 J E C G C L Y 0 OF V W M 0 F R F F z L M T E 1 J M K X Z E S N X C K 1 K S F X L A H A D K J R E J 1 W T Q D F G E N K 1 S Y Z M 0 8 P N X R N Y M H T W X D P T D ONTO G W E Z F W E D D 1 N G S E T S R H K V C Q E M E R A L D F K N S D Y M V X T D S Y J 1 N F 0 U R X U K P T H F F H X W R N K P Y Y U 0 C H A 1 N S 1 P 0 L 0 G U R 1 A P E R W J N M Q 1 F T S 8 F T P E N D ANTS Z J = REPAIR S BIRTH STONES = APPRAISALS S SIZE RINGS S WEDDING SETS = GIFTS S BRACELET S SILVER S GIFT CERTIFICATES S PENDANTS S CHARMS I New liicatiM 19 S. Water St., i Hendepson iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiin • wwi"rrJ
PAGE 17

Pagt 18 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Thundny, August 10, 1989 Youth Activities Exercise a nd Pregnancy ThuTMlay, August 10.1989 Heachnoa Home News, Hiderson. Nevada Pit 19 Today's youth beg for attention By Clyde C. Caldwell Henderson Boys and Girls Club For more than 15 years I have been working with youth and there is one thing about today's youth that everyone needs to understand: the youth of today are going to be actively involved in something, wehther it is a good activity or a bad activity. It's up to a parent or guardian to know what their children participate in. They should know where their children are and who their children are running around with. It's the parents' responsibility to sign their children up for good and healthy activities and to make sure their children stay involved in those activities. We are all aware of the bad activities youth can be involved in such as gangs, drugs, theft and vandalism to mention just a few. Parents need to take more time to get their children involved in the many activities offered through youth organizations such as the Boys and Girls Clubs, Parks and Recreation Programs, YMCA, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts and the many other programs offered to today's youth. Its not that there is a shortage of programs offered, its the lack of time parents are taking to make sure their children are growing up in the right atmosphere. When a youth gets in trouble, many times you hear people say how that child has always been a problem and how he or she will never amount to very much. WTien community service and/or probation is given to such a youth, the parents are many times the first ones to say it's what he had coming to him or her. Are we forgetting that our children are an example of what the parents allow them to be? In today's society, with more single-parent families or both parents working, it is tough for the parent to know where their children are while they are at work. As parents, we are still responsible for our children's actions. What if every time your child got in trouble you as a parent had to do community service along with the child? Maybe the parents would take more time to see what activities their children are participating in if they were to suffer along with the child for bad behavior. Today's children beg for attention. They need someone, whether it's their parents, aunts, uncles, grandparents oi;friends to give them some kind of affection. Here at the Boys and Girls Club of Henderson, 70 percent of the members come from a single-parent family. Many of the members come to the club just to be around some of the foster grandparents that work for the club. All they want sometimes is for a grandmother to reach down and give them a warm hug. The lack of compassion for today's youth is truly one of the great downfalls of today's society. Programs for the youth are available through many organizations, but the first step in helping a child become a good child starts at square one and that is the home. The least a parent can do after reading this, I would hope is tell their children they love them and give them a hug. After all, they are part of the parent and also tomorrow's future. By George D. Malkaxian, MS)., Prciident, The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists During the last 25 years or so, attitudes toward exercise during pregnancy have changed, and mosdy for the better. Today moderate exercise of many kinds is considered safe for a healthy woman throughout her entire pregnancy. If you are going to exercise when you are prcgnant, follow some basic guidelines to help protect both your health and that of your baby. First, discuss your exercise habits with your doctor when you have your first pregnancy visit. While most women who had a regular exercise program before pregnancy are safe in continuing il, some pregnancy-related medical conditions such as hypertension or carrying more than one baby may make exercise risky. Second, listen to yourbody. Pregnancy is not the lime to set records but to adjust your workout to fit your changing body. General guidelines for exercise are doubly important during pregnancy. A balanced diet including 300-500 ext^ calories is a must. When exercising, drink plenty of water and never exercise to the point of exhaustion. If at any time you feel faint, in pain, or develop bleeding, stop immediately and call your doctor. Your heartrate (number of heart beats per minute) should not go over 140, and you shouldn't exercise strenuously—reaching your maximum heartrate—longer than IS minutes at a time. What will exercise do for your pregnancy? Right now there is no good evidence to show that it will shorten labor or make it less painful, or affect the baby's health. But exercise does improve circulation, helps your mental wellbeing, and can relieve fatigue. Many also feel that a regular exercise program during pregnancy makes it easier to get back into shape once the baby is twm. All of us have read of professional athletes who have mn marathons or won medals during pregnancy. But for the majority of women, exericse during pregnancy is not a goal but a means for fun, well-being, and a more comfortable nine months. This week Drug-free schools panel named By Fred Flores On the road to drug-free schools. Education Secretary Lauro F. Cavazos and William J. Bennett, director of national drug control policy, have announced the appointment of 16 members to the newly-established National Conmiission on Drug-Free Schools. Authorized by the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988 (Public Law 100-690), the commission will advise the president and the Congress on drug prevention in schools and strategies and criteria for achieving drug-free schools. The commission consists of 26 members: 16 appointed by Cavazos emd Bennett, eight members of Congress, and Cavazos and Bennett themselves, who serve as co-chairs. A review of the list of commission members shows one Hispanic—Camehno M. Lopez Jr., principal of Garfield, Ariz.. Elementary School. 'The key to drug prevention is education," said Cavazos, "and the war on drugs will be won—or lost—in the schools. The commission will play a major role in identifying model programs other promising projects that will help keep our school safe and our young people healthy and drug-free." On the road looking for an ethical Housing Director. A movement has started to discredit Gus Ramos, acting Las Vegas housing director. We will take a good look at the pros and cons of his credibility to run the Housing Authority. Some observers point to the allegations of his failure to be an effective president for LULAC Council 11081, which has a contract with the Nevada Department of Aging Service to operate the LULAC Senior Citizens Center at 13th and Stewart Streets in Las Vegas. There are also serious allegations that, as LULAC president, he continued to violate the LULAC National Constitution regarding membership and a recent council election. K these gross allegations are true, then the question would follow: If RAMOS does violate his club's constitution, then how can he be expected to follow federal rules and regulations governing the Las Vegas Housing Authority? More on this later. On the road to Hispanic Heritage Week: Hispanic Heritage Week will be celebrated Sept. 10-16 and will be marked by fiestas across the Western Hemisphere. President George Bush will sign the ^annual Presidential Hispanic Heritage Week Proclamation on the White House lawn. The event is scheduled to be attended by invited Hispanics from across the country. The Show Capital of the World is not to be left out. This year's fiestas will be celebrated by top Hispanic Recording Stars headlining shows at several Strip resorts; Juan Gabriel, with a possible fourday stint at the Tropicana; Rocia Durcal at Caesars; and Yuri at the Desert Iim. The Vegas Hispanic community. On Friday, Sept. 15, Josie Solis, local fiesta promoter, will hold a Fiesta Queen Pageant at the California Club's Ghana Room. The musical group Penas and Revelacion 6 and another group—to be announced—will fiumish the Salsa and the Rumba. Jorge Herrador Lozada will present the Cadetes de Linares at a yet to be announced location. Ramon Sanchez of Bravo's Restaurant will host the Mariachi Juventil from the Orphanage of Monterrey, Mexico. On the road to the Full Count. The House rejected an attempt to curtail federal funding for the Commerce Department's Bureau of the Census, which would disallow counting of the undocumented during the 1990 Census Count. Congressman James Bilbray, (unlike Sens. Harry Reid and Richard Bryan) voted for the $800 million package, according to a spokesperson for his Las Vegas office. The bill was passed by a vote of 258 to 165. This week is waiting to hear from our two Senators to explain their vote in favor of disallowing the counting of the undocumented. CARLINO SILVER CO. 24 HR. HOTLINE FOR PRICES 384-1909 E. Fremont St. "InsM* TIffanys" 382-1469 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I t^lbl l^lej t^/jja 2LanetaiieniiiiPi&a$li ( Or Any 2 Large 1-Item Pizzas) I I I I \ HENDERSON Boulder Kwj. ft Lake BCead 565-5757 • SiM (Mx • ami Oah WMk TWi Cmfm • NM VmU* Wkk Amf OlWr Off* • AM Tai • • • ^Ta*__ _^'^_^J^ • Boulder City Resident and Hearing Aid Specialist JIM CARLSON Is Starting a Collection of Hearing Aids from the 1920's and 1930's. Body Aids, Pocket Aids, etc. Feel free to call Jim at the '^Miracle-Ear CENTERS •Boulder City iVIon & Tues 9-5 1100 Arizona St. 293-7945 •Henderson Wed & Thurs 565-6656 8 W. Pacific, in Henderson Drug Enjoy: 293-5000 Fresh Fruit, Garden & Pasta Salads, Country Biscuits & Gravy, Bacon, Sausage, Desserts, and More Our Chef Will Prepare Your Eggs or Omelette to Order! SPORTS stormy weatlier postpones Wolves' Legion playoff opener By Pat McDonnell News Sports Editor A swirling rain cloud postponed ^he Timet Wolves' opening game in the American Legion state playoffs Tuesday afternoon at Bamson Field. The Wolves trailed Sparks 1-0 with one out in the top of the second inning when heavy rain and winds of more than 90 miles per hour created large puddles in the infield. When the rains stopped just before 6:30 p.m., imipires ruled the field^ was unplayable. The Timet-Sparks game was rescheduled for last night after Home News deadline. It was to be followed by the Darling's 7-Eleven (VaUey) and Rancho Merchants game, also at UNLV. The TimetnSparks winner was to meet the Darling'sRancho victor today at Bamson Field. Two other opening round playoff games at Fountain Park were completed Tuesday despite the rain. Laughlin defeated Post 8 (Las Vegas)* 10-4 and Bonanza knocked off second-seeded Domavila (Biah(^ Gorman), 6-2. Laughlin was to play Bonanza in a winner's bracket game and Post 8 was to meet Domavila in a loser's bracket contest Wednesday at Fountain. The inclement weather Tuesday pushed remaining tourney games back one day. State chairman Edi Gomez said the championship would be played Sunday instead of Saturday. Timet Manager Gary Chaires said the rain may prove to be beneficial to the Wolves, allowing the team another off day to get settled. "We can get over our opening day jitters," Chaires said Wethiesday. The Wolves left the bases loaded in the bottom of the first iiming against Sparks and committed an error, leading to the Silver Sox run in th^ second. Despite his team's failure to cash in its only scoring chance Tuesday, Chaires said he felt the Wolves were ready for Sparks. 1 was impressed with our intensity," he said. THROW TOO HIGH-Timet second baseman Eddie Bustamante jumps for a high throw to second base in the first inning of Tuesday's Legion playoff opener against Sparks. Silver Sox centerf ielder John Turn was safe on this steal attempt as Wolves shortstop Mike Abbs backs up the throw. Photo by Jeff Cowen Green Valley Majors win state; open regional play Saturday BEFORE THE RAINS CAME-Timet Manager Gary Chaires looks on from the third base coach's box Tuesday at Bamson Field. The Wolves had to wait for their first The Green Valley Major Little League All-Stars defeated Yerington 12-2 last Thursday in Reno to win the state championship. With the Nevada title, the team qualified for the Major Western Regionals set to begin at 7 p.m. Saturday in San Bemadino, Calif.. Pitcher Kevin Eberwein, a key figure throughout the playoffs for Green Valley, gained the complete game victory against Yerington. Green Valley will battle teams from 12 other states for the regional championship and a berth in the Little League World Series in Williamsport, Pa.. regional play against the state champion from Washington at 8 p.m. Saturday. If Green Valley wins its first game, the team will play Arizona's state champ Wednesday. A firstround loss would move Green Valley into a Monday game versus the loser of the New Mexico-Utah contest. The 14-team tournament is single-elimination for the championship bracket and double-elimination for the consolation bracket. The final game will be played Saturday, Aug. 19. Green Valley would have to win four consecutive games to win the Western region. Registration for fall softball begins game in the Legion state playoffs in a situation similar to the 1988 AAA state After winning four straight championships, when the Pepcon explosion ^u*""^" ^?' ^^^ .''^"'^ delayed the start of that tournament. championship and breezmg through three games in the Photo by Mt Cow., gtate finals. Green Valley opens Registration for the fall adult softball season is underway. Both the Co-Rec and Men's divisions are recreational slow pitch softball leagues for individuals 18 years and older. The registration fee for each team is $250. Registration deadline is Sept. 1. Beginning next month, all season games will be held at Wells Park, located at Holick Avenue and Price Street. The Co-Rec League will play on Monday and Wednesday, and Men's League on Tuesday and Thursday. Game times for both leagues will be from 6-9 p.m. There will be a coaches meeting held on Wednesday, Sept. 6 at the Sports Office, upstairs in the Civic Center gymnasium. The Co-Rec League meeting will be at 6:30 p.m. and Men's League meeting will be at 7 p.m. For registration information, call the Civic Center Sports Office at 565-2116. • i\n r /'rP^ N THE BALL By Pat McDonnell News Sports Editor Qualities like humility and sacrifice are getting to be a rare attribute in the world of sports these days— particularly in the sometimes brutal and undsrhanded sport of iboidng. But occasionally, a ^hter who carries a virtual breath of fresh air with him in the ring makes his presence fslt and serves to remind sports fans that the punuit of victory involves more honor and haxd work than the accumiilation of money. Since he signed a professional boxing ^tract in September of 1986, Henderson's £ngtla Pedroza has left a bold mark on the Hffikt game. The 22-year-old Venezuela native jiM punched his way to a 26-2 record, stopping ;26 of his 28 opponents by knockout. The 147-poundr's immediate goal is to knocjKjW' World Boxing Association wltsrwsig^ champion Mark Bieland. World Boxing Council welterweight titleholder Marlon Starling and International Boxing Federation champ Simon Brown are next on the agenda. Although he has set his sights very high, what makes Pedroza unique among young fighters is his realization that the pedestal he seeks is a shaky one, full of potential traps and troubles. He knows that with every victory he gains, another figh^r lurks around the comer, ready to make a name for himself by beating a glittering prospect and crowd favorite. The fights I have had are not important to me." Pedroza said from his home 'Tuesday night. "If I lose my next fight, the 26 wins are nothing, the 26 knockouts are nothing. The next fight is my first fight." Awaiting a Saturday marriage in Las Vegas, Pedroia said he has a lot to look forward to. But his expectations most defintely do not include late night jaunts on the town or after hours altercations with other fighters-bad habits that can keep boxers from rssliang their potential. He credits his father, Luciano, and mother, Mirian, for helping him understand the value Pedroza wants to work his way to greatness Engels Pedross of self-discipline. They emphasized that Pedroza would never reach his goal to become a world champion nor reach half the stature of his boyhood idol Roberto Duran if he kept late hours and stopped working in the gym. "He told me to sacrifice and sacrifice," Pedroza said of his father. "You have to make your body sore. If my body is sore, then I know I am working." Asked to pinpoint which of his 26 victories was the most important to him, Pedroza, who will turn 23 on Sept. 26, fell silent and then said "the one (great) fight has not been there yet." Pedroza said he won five straight Venezuelan national boxing titles between 1981 and 1985 and compiled an amateur record of 115-10 with 59 knockouts. That accomplishment gave him a lot of satisfaction, he said, and taking two world championships at the Goodwin Games was another source of pride. It is clearly evident, however, that Pedroza needs to gain a pro title to really feel that he is progressing at a rapid pace. "When I win the title fight, then 111 say Tm here,'" he said. "Then my dream will come true." In December, Pedroza hopes to meet faceto-face with Duran for the first time, in what he knows will be a cherished experience. At that time, he might compare notes i^ithaJLatin legend, a true world champion, who willpe preparing for a title bout at The Mirage with Sugar Ray Leonard. In his heart, Pedroza says he believes sacrifice will allow him to reach Duran's prominent position in boxing history. Hs knows he is on the right rosd to such stature. • nFyC-'^-^-;--*;'^' '^'

PAGE 18

Pagt 18 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Thundny, August 10, 1989 Youth Activities Exercise a nd Pregnancy ThuTMlay, August 10.1989 Heachnoa Home News, Hiderson. Nevada Pit 19 Today's youth beg for attention By Clyde C. Caldwell Henderson Boys and Girls Club For more than 15 years I have been working with youth and there is one thing about today's youth that everyone needs to understand: the youth of today are going to be actively involved in something, wehther it is a good activity or a bad activity. It's up to a parent or guardian to know what their children participate in. They should know where their children are and who their children are running around with. It's the parents' responsibility to sign their children up for good and healthy activities and to make sure their children stay involved in those activities. We are all aware of the bad activities youth can be involved in such as gangs, drugs, theft and vandalism to mention just a few. Parents need to take more time to get their children involved in the many activities offered through youth organizations such as the Boys and Girls Clubs, Parks and Recreation Programs, YMCA, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts and the many other programs offered to today's youth. Its not that there is a shortage of programs offered, its the lack of time parents are taking to make sure their children are growing up in the right atmosphere. When a youth gets in trouble, many times you hear people say how that child has always been a problem and how he or she will never amount to very much. WTien community service and/or probation is given to such a youth, the parents are many times the first ones to say it's what he had coming to him or her. Are we forgetting that our children are an example of what the parents allow them to be? In today's society, with more single-parent families or both parents working, it is tough for the parent to know where their children are while they are at work. As parents, we are still responsible for our children's actions. What if every time your child got in trouble you as a parent had to do community service along with the child? Maybe the parents would take more time to see what activities their children are participating in if they were to suffer along with the child for bad behavior. Today's children beg for attention. They need someone, whether it's their parents, aunts, uncles, grandparents oi;friends to give them some kind of affection. Here at the Boys and Girls Club of Henderson, 70 percent of the members come from a single-parent family. Many of the members come to the club just to be around some of the foster grandparents that work for the club. All they want sometimes is for a grandmother to reach down and give them a warm hug. The lack of compassion for today's youth is truly one of the great downfalls of today's society. Programs for the youth are available through many organizations, but the first step in helping a child become a good child starts at square one and that is the home. The least a parent can do after reading this, I would hope is tell their children they love them and give them a hug. After all, they are part of the parent and also tomorrow's future. By George D. Malkaxian, MS)., Prciident, The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists During the last 25 years or so, attitudes toward exercise during pregnancy have changed, and mosdy for the better. Today moderate exercise of many kinds is considered safe for a healthy woman throughout her entire pregnancy. If you are going to exercise when you are prcgnant, follow some basic guidelines to help protect both your health and that of your baby. First, discuss your exercise habits with your doctor when you have your first pregnancy visit. While most women who had a regular exercise program before pregnancy are safe in continuing il, some pregnancy-related medical conditions such as hypertension or carrying more than one baby may make exercise risky. Second, listen to yourbody. Pregnancy is not the lime to set records but to adjust your workout to fit your changing body. General guidelines for exercise are doubly important during pregnancy. A balanced diet including 300-500 ext^ calories is a must. When exercising, drink plenty of water and never exercise to the point of exhaustion. If at any time you feel faint, in pain, or develop bleeding, stop immediately and call your doctor. Your heartrate (number of heart beats per minute) should not go over 140, and you shouldn't exercise strenuously—reaching your maximum heartrate—longer than IS minutes at a time. What will exercise do for your pregnancy? Right now there is no good evidence to show that it will shorten labor or make it less painful, or affect the baby's health. But exercise does improve circulation, helps your mental wellbeing, and can relieve fatigue. Many also feel that a regular exercise program during pregnancy makes it easier to get back into shape once the baby is twm. All of us have read of professional athletes who have mn marathons or won medals during pregnancy. But for the majority of women, exericse during pregnancy is not a goal but a means for fun, well-being, and a more comfortable nine months. This week Drug-free schools panel named By Fred Flores On the road to drug-free schools. Education Secretary Lauro F. Cavazos and William J. Bennett, director of national drug control policy, have announced the appointment of 16 members to the newly-established National Conmiission on Drug-Free Schools. Authorized by the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988 (Public Law 100-690), the commission will advise the president and the Congress on drug prevention in schools and strategies and criteria for achieving drug-free schools. The commission consists of 26 members: 16 appointed by Cavazos emd Bennett, eight members of Congress, and Cavazos and Bennett themselves, who serve as co-chairs. A review of the list of commission members shows one Hispanic—Camehno M. Lopez Jr., principal of Garfield, Ariz.. Elementary School. 'The key to drug prevention is education," said Cavazos, "and the war on drugs will be won—or lost—in the schools. The commission will play a major role in identifying model programs other promising projects that will help keep our school safe and our young people healthy and drug-free." On the road looking for an ethical Housing Director. A movement has started to discredit Gus Ramos, acting Las Vegas housing director. We will take a good look at the pros and cons of his credibility to run the Housing Authority. Some observers point to the allegations of his failure to be an effective president for LULAC Council 11081, which has a contract with the Nevada Department of Aging Service to operate the LULAC Senior Citizens Center at 13th and Stewart Streets in Las Vegas. There are also serious allegations that, as LULAC president, he continued to violate the LULAC National Constitution regarding membership and a recent council election. K these gross allegations are true, then the question would follow: If RAMOS does violate his club's constitution, then how can he be expected to follow federal rules and regulations governing the Las Vegas Housing Authority? More on this later. On the road to Hispanic Heritage Week: Hispanic Heritage Week will be celebrated Sept. 10-16 and will be marked by fiestas across the Western Hemisphere. President George Bush will sign the ^annual Presidential Hispanic Heritage Week Proclamation on the White House lawn. The event is scheduled to be attended by invited Hispanics from across the country. The Show Capital of the World is not to be left out. This year's fiestas will be celebrated by top Hispanic Recording Stars headlining shows at several Strip resorts; Juan Gabriel, with a possible fourday stint at the Tropicana; Rocia Durcal at Caesars; and Yuri at the Desert Iim. The Vegas Hispanic community. On Friday, Sept. 15, Josie Solis, local fiesta promoter, will hold a Fiesta Queen Pageant at the California Club's Ghana Room. The musical group Penas and Revelacion 6 and another group—to be announced—will fiumish the Salsa and the Rumba. Jorge Herrador Lozada will present the Cadetes de Linares at a yet to be announced location. Ramon Sanchez of Bravo's Restaurant will host the Mariachi Juventil from the Orphanage of Monterrey, Mexico. On the road to the Full Count. The House rejected an attempt to curtail federal funding for the Commerce Department's Bureau of the Census, which would disallow counting of the undocumented during the 1990 Census Count. Congressman James Bilbray, (unlike Sens. Harry Reid and Richard Bryan) voted for the $800 million package, according to a spokesperson for his Las Vegas office. The bill was passed by a vote of 258 to 165. This week is waiting to hear from our two Senators to explain their vote in favor of disallowing the counting of the undocumented. CARLINO SILVER CO. 24 HR. HOTLINE FOR PRICES 384-1909 E. Fremont St. "InsM* TIffanys" 382-1469 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I t^lbl l^lej t^/jja 2LanetaiieniiiiPi&a$li ( Or Any 2 Large 1-Item Pizzas) I I I I \ HENDERSON Boulder Kwj. ft Lake BCead 565-5757 • SiM (Mx • ami Oah WMk TWi Cmfm • NM VmU* Wkk Amf OlWr Off* • AM Tai • • • ^Ta*__ _^'^_^J^ • Boulder City Resident and Hearing Aid Specialist JIM CARLSON Is Starting a Collection of Hearing Aids from the 1920's and 1930's. Body Aids, Pocket Aids, etc. Feel free to call Jim at the '^Miracle-Ear CENTERS •Boulder City iVIon & Tues 9-5 1100 Arizona St. 293-7945 •Henderson Wed & Thurs 565-6656 8 W. Pacific, in Henderson Drug Enjoy: 293-5000 Fresh Fruit, Garden & Pasta Salads, Country Biscuits & Gravy, Bacon, Sausage, Desserts, and More Our Chef Will Prepare Your Eggs or Omelette to Order! SPORTS stormy weatlier postpones Wolves' Legion playoff opener By Pat McDonnell News Sports Editor A swirling rain cloud postponed ^he Timet Wolves' opening game in the American Legion state playoffs Tuesday afternoon at Bamson Field. The Wolves trailed Sparks 1-0 with one out in the top of the second inning when heavy rain and winds of more than 90 miles per hour created large puddles in the infield. When the rains stopped just before 6:30 p.m., imipires ruled the field^ was unplayable. The Timet-Sparks game was rescheduled for last night after Home News deadline. It was to be followed by the Darling's 7-Eleven (VaUey) and Rancho Merchants game, also at UNLV. The TimetnSparks winner was to meet the Darling'sRancho victor today at Bamson Field. Two other opening round playoff games at Fountain Park were completed Tuesday despite the rain. Laughlin defeated Post 8 (Las Vegas)* 10-4 and Bonanza knocked off second-seeded Domavila (Biah(^ Gorman), 6-2. Laughlin was to play Bonanza in a winner's bracket game and Post 8 was to meet Domavila in a loser's bracket contest Wednesday at Fountain. The inclement weather Tuesday pushed remaining tourney games back one day. State chairman Edi Gomez said the championship would be played Sunday instead of Saturday. Timet Manager Gary Chaires said the rain may prove to be beneficial to the Wolves, allowing the team another off day to get settled. "We can get over our opening day jitters," Chaires said Wethiesday. The Wolves left the bases loaded in the bottom of the first iiming against Sparks and committed an error, leading to the Silver Sox run in th^ second. Despite his team's failure to cash in its only scoring chance Tuesday, Chaires said he felt the Wolves were ready for Sparks. 1 was impressed with our intensity," he said. THROW TOO HIGH-Timet second baseman Eddie Bustamante jumps for a high throw to second base in the first inning of Tuesday's Legion playoff opener against Sparks. Silver Sox centerf ielder John Turn was safe on this steal attempt as Wolves shortstop Mike Abbs backs up the throw. Photo by Jeff Cowen Green Valley Majors win state; open regional play Saturday BEFORE THE RAINS CAME-Timet Manager Gary Chaires looks on from the third base coach's box Tuesday at Bamson Field. The Wolves had to wait for their first The Green Valley Major Little League All-Stars defeated Yerington 12-2 last Thursday in Reno to win the state championship. With the Nevada title, the team qualified for the Major Western Regionals set to begin at 7 p.m. Saturday in San Bemadino, Calif.. Pitcher Kevin Eberwein, a key figure throughout the playoffs for Green Valley, gained the complete game victory against Yerington. Green Valley will battle teams from 12 other states for the regional championship and a berth in the Little League World Series in Williamsport, Pa.. regional play against the state champion from Washington at 8 p.m. Saturday. If Green Valley wins its first game, the team will play Arizona's state champ Wednesday. A firstround loss would move Green Valley into a Monday game versus the loser of the New Mexico-Utah contest. The 14-team tournament is single-elimination for the championship bracket and double-elimination for the consolation bracket. The final game will be played Saturday, Aug. 19. Green Valley would have to win four consecutive games to win the Western region. Registration for fall softball begins game in the Legion state playoffs in a situation similar to the 1988 AAA state After winning four straight championships, when the Pepcon explosion ^u*""^" ^?' ^^^ .''^"'^ delayed the start of that tournament. championship and breezmg through three games in the Photo by Mt Cow., gtate finals. Green Valley opens Registration for the fall adult softball season is underway. Both the Co-Rec and Men's divisions are recreational slow pitch softball leagues for individuals 18 years and older. The registration fee for each team is $250. Registration deadline is Sept. 1. Beginning next month, all season games will be held at Wells Park, located at Holick Avenue and Price Street. The Co-Rec League will play on Monday and Wednesday, and Men's League on Tuesday and Thursday. Game times for both leagues will be from 6-9 p.m. There will be a coaches meeting held on Wednesday, Sept. 6 at the Sports Office, upstairs in the Civic Center gymnasium. The Co-Rec League meeting will be at 6:30 p.m. and Men's League meeting will be at 7 p.m. For registration information, call the Civic Center Sports Office at 565-2116. • i\n r /'rP^ N THE BALL By Pat McDonnell News Sports Editor Qualities like humility and sacrifice are getting to be a rare attribute in the world of sports these days— particularly in the sometimes brutal and undsrhanded sport of iboidng. But occasionally, a ^hter who carries a virtual breath of fresh air with him in the ring makes his presence fslt and serves to remind sports fans that the punuit of victory involves more honor and haxd work than the accumiilation of money. Since he signed a professional boxing ^tract in September of 1986, Henderson's £ngtla Pedroza has left a bold mark on the Hffikt game. The 22-year-old Venezuela native jiM punched his way to a 26-2 record, stopping ;26 of his 28 opponents by knockout. The 147-poundr's immediate goal is to knocjKjW' World Boxing Association wltsrwsig^ champion Mark Bieland. World Boxing Council welterweight titleholder Marlon Starling and International Boxing Federation champ Simon Brown are next on the agenda. Although he has set his sights very high, what makes Pedroza unique among young fighters is his realization that the pedestal he seeks is a shaky one, full of potential traps and troubles. He knows that with every victory he gains, another figh^r lurks around the comer, ready to make a name for himself by beating a glittering prospect and crowd favorite. The fights I have had are not important to me." Pedroza said from his home 'Tuesday night. "If I lose my next fight, the 26 wins are nothing, the 26 knockouts are nothing. The next fight is my first fight." Awaiting a Saturday marriage in Las Vegas, Pedroia said he has a lot to look forward to. But his expectations most defintely do not include late night jaunts on the town or after hours altercations with other fighters-bad habits that can keep boxers from rssliang their potential. He credits his father, Luciano, and mother, Mirian, for helping him understand the value Pedroza wants to work his way to greatness Engels Pedross of self-discipline. They emphasized that Pedroza would never reach his goal to become a world champion nor reach half the stature of his boyhood idol Roberto Duran if he kept late hours and stopped working in the gym. "He told me to sacrifice and sacrifice," Pedroza said of his father. "You have to make your body sore. If my body is sore, then I know I am working." Asked to pinpoint which of his 26 victories was the most important to him, Pedroza, who will turn 23 on Sept. 26, fell silent and then said "the one (great) fight has not been there yet." Pedroza said he won five straight Venezuelan national boxing titles between 1981 and 1985 and compiled an amateur record of 115-10 with 59 knockouts. That accomplishment gave him a lot of satisfaction, he said, and taking two world championships at the Goodwin Games was another source of pride. It is clearly evident, however, that Pedroza needs to gain a pro title to really feel that he is progressing at a rapid pace. "When I win the title fight, then 111 say Tm here,'" he said. "Then my dream will come true." In December, Pedroza hopes to meet faceto-face with Duran for the first time, in what he knows will be a cherished experience. At that time, he might compare notes i^ithaJLatin legend, a true world champion, who willpe preparing for a title bout at The Mirage with Sugar Ray Leonard. In his heart, Pedroza says he believes sacrifice will allow him to reach Duran's prominent position in boxing history. Hs knows he is on the right rosd to such stature. • nFyC-'^-^-;--*;'^' '^'

PAGE 19

fL NVB, HdM, Nada Thursday, August 10,1989 New classes added to Lake Havasu Classic line-up For the 1989 running of the Lake Hvan Oassic World Outboard Championships, the Board of Directors of the Havasu Sporu Federation has approved the addition cf two new superstock orSST classes ofTcring fans some of (he best racing in the nation. The championships will be run Nov. 24-25 in Thompson Bay at Lake Havasu. In addition to adding the new classes, the Oassic will be part of Outboard Marine Corporations year-long • SST-45 and SST-60 series race. OMCmanufactureres Johnson and Evinrude outboard engines. Over the past several yean, most of the growth in outboard power boat racing has come in the mfaii-boat and superstock or SST classes. It is in response to that growth that the board added the classes. "We know that a number of races in these classes are iruerested in running in the Oassic, but before this year, they were excluded because we did not have a class or division for them. With the addition of the SST-60 and SST-90classes. we hope that those racers who have expressed their desire to race here will enter." Curtis' Corner By Joey Curtis Three world championship flghts are set in the next week, including the biggest bout of the batch, ri^t here in Nevada. This weekend in Italy, WBC Cruiserweight Champion Carloa DeLeon piits his crown up for grabs against Angelo Rottoll. On Tuesday in "njuana, WBC Bantamweight Champion Raul Perez puts his crown on the line against Cardona Ulloa. This Monday in Reno, IBF Middleweight Champion Michael Nunn goes up against exWBC Middleweight Champion Iran Barkley. The Hght offers a giant contrast in styles. Nunn is a boxer/ puncher and Barkley is a definite slugger. Nunn is tall, quick and shck. He is improving his punching power every time out. But Barkley has devastating power as well, shown in his one-punch knockout of Thomas Hearns in Las Vegas last year. Nunn may be unbeaten, but a slugger always has a "puncher's chance." If you are not planning on a trip to the La wlor Events Center in Reno to watch the fight, you can see it live on HBO. The boxing action continues this simuner and into the fall, as well. The fight between WBC Super Bantamweight Champion Daniel Zaragoza and Seung Hoon Lee in Inglewood, Calif., will be held Aug. 31. Other fights down the line are IBF Super Featherweight Champion Tony Lopez's title defense against Jim McDonnell in Sacramento on Oct. 7 and WBC Light Flyweight Champion Humberto Gonzalez's defense against Jung-Koo Chang in Korea on Oct. 29. New WBA Lightweight Champion Edwin Rosario is also slated to fight Korean opponent, Chun Chil-Sung. In the future, look for WBA Junior Featherweight Champion Juan Jose Estrada to defend his championship against ex-WBC Bantamweight Champion Happy Lora, who was dethroned in Las Vegas by Raul Perez. A combination WBC-IBF hghtweight championship bout for world champion Azumah Nelson is in the cards. Nelson moves up in weight class to challenge the winner of next week's Meldrick Taybr (IBF lightweight champ) and Jose Luis Ramirez (WBC lightweight king) tilt. More on the Taylor-Ramirez fight on Aug. 20 in Norfolk, Va., in next week's column. said federation president Jim Comer. A number of mini-boat classes were added to the event three years ago. bi 1988. the SST-45 class for small tunnel boats powered by engines of 45-cubic-inch displacement or less was added to the lineup, with a great deal of enthusiasm. The SST-4S boats, which run in the mini-boat division because their hulls are less than 12 feet long, thrilled race fans in the 1988 race with the closest finish in the Classic's history. SST-46. SST-60 and SST-90 classes offer racen an opportunity to travel at almost 100 miles per hour with limited expense and because of the strict controls placed on modification in the class, offer the fan close, sponson-to-sponson racing. Thursday. August 10.1989 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News. Green Valley News, Page 21 ROUGH SLIDE-Wolves shortstop Mike Abbs, right, beats the throw to Sparks second baseman Mike Lewis in this first Finnish team ready to battle Silver Streaks inning steal attempt. Abbs was stranded at third base as Timet left the bases loaded in the inning. Photo by Jeff Cowen ORANGE. Conn. You might call them the "Saab Convertibles," since they are sponsored by Saab Valmet AB of Uusikaupunkki, Finland, maker of the Saab 900 Turbo Convertible, but in the World Basketball League, the Finnish hoopeters are known as the "Saab Team." The team will complete a two-week road trip against American teams with a twogame set against the Las Vegas Silver Streaks, Aug. 15-16. WBL's 11-team professional venture is meant to promote quality basketball competition HPRD Soiftball Summer League (Monday-Wednesday) N W L T GB 6 2 0 Second Ward 5 3 0 1 Los Camalea 4 4 0 2 Pegasua Lounge 4 4 0 2 Lomprey Invest. 3 5 0 3 Gold Bond 2 6 0 4 Results Lomprey 17, Second Ward 11 Gold Bond 19, Gonzales 8 Los Canudes 11, Pegasus 6 Tuesday-Thursday) TeamGaMe W L T GB The Felt Forum in New York, the smaller arena next to Madison Square Garden, holds its last fight until 1992 next month. The Felt Forum will undergo a massive remodeling starting in September. Matchmaker Bobby Goodman will move his monthly fight cards to a 2,000-8eat theater uptown until the renovation is complete. Finally former World Middleweight Champion Carlos Monzon, one of the best 160-pounder8 ever, was sentenced to 11 years in prison in his native Argentina for murdering his girlfriend. Monzon will not be up for parole until 1995. Chenwtar 8 0 0ColoMeumGold 6 2 0 2 Gara'a SJoon 5 3 0 3 Stewart ft Sundell 2 6 0 6 RedRocken 2 6 0 6 OutUwt 17 0 7 Results Chemstar 7, Colosseum Gold 6 Outlaws 15, Red Rockers 0 Gara's Sakton 17, Stew. & Sun. 8 A-J's AUTO REPAIR 350 E. Basic Rd. 564-9008 (Across f roin KMart) COMPLETE FOREIQM A DOMESTIC AITTOMOTIVE SERVICC •Brakes •Tune-Up •Electrical •Cooling Systems •General Service •Air Conditioning •Oil, Lube and Filter •Front Wheel Alignment •Charging Systems Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. IMon thru Fri. PHASE CALL PON APPOMTMOfTB worldwide. In addition to the Finnish Saab Teamn, this year's schedule includes teams from Canada, Holland, Norway, Italy, Greece, The Soviet Union and five teams from the United States, including the Las Vegas Silver Streaks. In their drop-top Saab convertibles, the Finnish basketbailers won't have to worry about headroom, but athletes cannot exceed the 6 foot, 5 inch height Umit the league is stipulating. The Saab Team schedule began Aug. 1 and 2 against the Worcester Counts, in Worcester, Mass. On Aug. 4 and 6, they played the Youngstown Pride in Youngstown, Ohio. This Tuesday and Wednesday they faced the Illinois Express in Springfield, 111. This weekend the Saab team battles the Calgary 88's, in Calgary, Canda and Tuesday and Wednesday, the team faces the Las Vegas Silver Streaks at the Thomas and Mack Center. Basic Higir gives physicals Physical examinations for athletes at Basic High School will be given on Tuesday, Aug. 15. Girls are to report to Room 144 at 6 p.m. and boys should report to Room 144 at 7. All students who plan to pardcipate in athletics during the 1989-90 school year should receive their frfiysical exams at this time. This is the only time that physical exams will be given by the school. iV\0^ p^ 3i£i/€/iState '*i sSSUK''^^ 293-4950 1108 Nevada Hwy. COUPON HEiMDERSOM AUHTO TRUCK REPAOR lOTOOOQANORIVE 564-9555 Smog Cortificato — WrtH COUPON ^2 OFF • • 9 BASMIAU CARD SHOP 916 Nevsds HIghwsy Suite 3 (Boulder Station) FOR FURTHER INFORIMATION 294-1012 Monday-Saturday 10-6 Sunday 12-6 Closed Tuosday FREE AUTOGRAPHS Joey Cora • Las Vegas Stars at the Boulder City Dugout Baseball Card Shop — FRIDAY, AUGUST 11 FR0M11 A.M.-1P.M. FEATURINQ A FULL LINE OF CARDS A SUPPUES FOR THE HOBBY COLLECTOR A SERIOUS INVESTOR.! • •••••• •• •••.•.•-. '•••••••••••••• • •BUY* SELL* TRADE r Local firms to bowl in l\/luscular Dystrophy fundraiser Muscular Dystrophy Association and Corporate Games of Las Vegas have announced that the second annual MDA Corporate Bowling Challenge will be held in September. The event, held at Sam's Town, pits corporations against the companies they compete with Chip Hanauer in the Miss Circus Circus Hydroplane Hanauer set for battle at Sliver Cup With more than half of 10 races on the 1989 HFC Unlimited Hydroplane Series completed, veteran driver Chip Hanauer and his Miss Circus Circus appear ready to challenge Tom D'Eath and Miss Bud weiser forthe championship of this year's fourth annual Budweiser Las Vegas Silver Cup. Despite a bone-jarring, boatcracking blowover at the July 16 race in Syracuse, N.Y., Hanauer and the Las Vegas-based Miss Circus Circus appear headed for a showdown on the waters of Lake Mead on Sept. 21-23. Leading the final heat of the Syracuse event after winning two heats and finishing second in the third, strong winds proved to be too much as Hanauer and Circus Circus blew over. Hanauer appeared to be running away with the race as he rocketed down the back chute on the first lap when he blew over, creating a fury of executive vice-president of Cirspray as the boat impacted the ^us Circus Enterprise, Lie. Hanauer removed himself from the sinking craft and stood on the deck waving his arms, signalling that he had survived the dramatic event without injury. He walked away with a minor facial cut and a slightly bruised knee. "Miss Circus Circus was basically destroyed as a result of the blowover," said Mel Larson, water, cracked in half, and landed right-side up. (aiMnts By Jim Goff Will the wind ever quit blowing? Winds have limited angler success considerably this past week. Almost every day anglers have found winds to be more than 20 mph sometimes up to 40 mph. Last year the Lake Mead Boat Owners Association financially assisted the Park Service in installing wind warning devices around the lower basin. The devices are located on Boulder Island, Black Island and near Callville Bay Point. When winds reach 17 mph or higher, a white blinking warning light is activated, alerting boaters to the wind hazard. Lake Mead can be treacherous to the unwary boater as winds can increase rapidly near storm fronts. Another danger few boaters and anglers are aware of is the danger of lightning. A boat on the lake during a severe lightning storm can easily be struck. Many anglers not aware of the danger continue to fish. Graphite and boron rods in hand or held in the air by rod holders, can and will act as lightning rods, attracting hghtning. If you're ever on the lake during a severe electrical storm, lower your radio anterma, lay all rods down and sit in the lowest point in your vessel. If the hair on the back of your neck starts standing up, then lightning is about to strike nearby and your body is picking up static electricity from the atmosphere. Remain calm and get off the water as soon as possible or get into a sheltered cove if unable to get back to yoiu: marina or launch ramp. Reports of spotty topwater action continue. One day you can go out and find topwater action and the next day, it's impossible to find. Baitfishing is still excellent throughout the lake and should continue until the fish tiurn their attention completely to the shad schools. With the late spawn and small shad, baitfishing may continue to be excellent into the fall. During the past several weeks, some skinny stripers have been noted in many catches. This normally occurs when the stripers cannot find the bait or they expend more energy chasing the bait than they can gain feeding on small bait. The larger stripers taken this year have come from aroundthe marinas. Apparently, these fish are smart enough to conserve energy and let the marina hghts attract the shad and feed primarily at night. Bass fishing continues to be very slow with those anglers who are able to catch them putting in many long hours per fish. Small grubs and leeches are still the best baits during the day, with some topwater action the first hour of daylight and at sundowm on Pop Rs and Zara Spooks. During the past two weeks, I've talked to 50 or so anglers who fish Lake Mead regularly. None have seen any large bull shad. It appears the only shad around the lower basin at all are two-inch shad fry from this year's spawn. Unless those shad grow rapidly, we will be seeing more and more skinny stripers the rest of the year. It appears this year will be a bad year, bait-wise. As the bait goes, so goes the fish condition. Many of you may remember five years ago when you couldn't get a fillet off a striper, they were so skinny. Let's prtty that doesn't happen again. Keep your hooks sharp and good fishing! The team planned to enter a back-up boat in races before the final pair of hydroplane events in San Diego and Las Vegas. Hanauer is the winningest active driver in unlimited hydroplane racing with 28 victories. He has won one event so far this year, the Budweiser "Thunder in the Sun" race in Detroit on July 11. After six events this season, Hanauer was the leading driver in the point's race widi 6,234. Miss Budweiser, which had won three times this year, was the leading boat with 6,402 points. Miss Circus Circus placed a close second with 6,234 points Hanauer, 34, of Seattle, Wash., has won the national driver's title three times, won the Budweiser Las Vegas Silver Cup in 1987 and has won seven consecutive Gold Cup titles. This year's Gold Cup race is on Sept. 17 at Mission Bay in San Diego. The Budweiser Las Vegas Silver Cup, the largest spectator event in Nevada, is presented by Las Vegas Events. Information regarding the Budweiser Las Vegas Silver Cup is available by calling Las Vegas Events at 731-2115. everyday in the business worid in head-to-yead competition on the bowling lanes. Teams may enter one of eight divisions which consist of: hospitality, services/government, manufacturing/high tech, con-' struction/development, wholesale/retail, finance/insurance. Knights hold golf tourney Newly elected state deputy Raymond Barozzi of the Nevada State Council of the Knights of Colombus announced that during his term of office, the International Knights of Colombus Golf Tbumament will come to Nevada on June 20 through June 22, 1990, with the tournament headquartering at the Tropicana Hotel in Las Vegas More than 400 golfers are expected, officials said. The annual Knights of Columbus Tbotsie Roll Drive will also take place during the last weekend of October. Monies raised with the function, a statewide event of the Knights of Coliunbus and their families, is given to the Special Olympics and various other charities for the handicapped. More than 2,300 Nevada members of the Knights of Columbus work closely with the Catholic Bishop of the Diocese of Reno-Las Vegas. transportation/communication/ public utilities and open (all other businesses). Each team will consist of two men and two women. Qualifying tournaments will be held on Sept. 3 and finals will be Sept. 4. This year's qualifier winners will be invited to bowl in the Southwest Bowling Challenge scheduled for Sept. 23, also at Sams Town. There will be winners in all divisions and an overall top team. Those teams registering by Aug. 18 will pay $50; the fee is $60 after that date, spokespersons said. Net proceeds will go to MDA. Each bowler is asked to obtain pledges either by flat amount or on a per-pin basis. A trip to Hawaii, a color TV, a VCR, gift certificates, medals, trophies and m any other prizes will be awarded to winning and top pledge teams. For more information, call 456-GAME (4263). < f^'^^ The Pro/College Football Handicapping Contest! >. • You Play Against the PolntspreacL OVER $100,000 IN CASH & PRIZES $20,000 Grand Prize $5,000 2nd Place $3,000 3rd Place 2 Superbowl Party Tickets 4th-28th Place $4,000 for Most Winners Weekly $500 for Most Losers Weekly ALL CASH PRIZES AGGREGATE $50 PER ENTRY 4 entry limit per customer Buy 3 entries before August 27th and get the 4th FREE! Choose 4 college and 4 pro games. Then select 6 additional games of your choice. It's the game to play in Las Vegas. 385-9123 SHOWBOAT HOTEL, CASINO. COUNTRY CLUB BOWUNG CENTER FAN AiANAGERS, FREE TRIPS 81 FLY BALLS! STARS VS. TUCSON, AUGUST 11 • 81 12 • ^'our Las Vegas Stars try to take it downtown against the Toros. Friday, August 11th, 7 p.m. US VEGAS SUN FAN MANAGER NIGHT Some lucky fan will be Stars Fan Manager for a Night Also KREL honors Sandy Alomar Saturday, August 12th, 6 p.m. 7-UP/VITA HEALTH/STARS FAN APPRECIATION/DOUBLE-HEADER NIGHT Free gifts galore, including trips to Hawaii. Mexico and the Caribbean. First 5.000 fans get a team photo compliments of 7-Up. Free neon sunglasses to the first 1.500 fans from Vita Health. Tickets available at Gtshman Pield Box Office • All Tickelron Outlets To charge by phone 800-992-2128* For information call 386-7200

PAGE 20

fL NVB, HdM, Nada Thursday, August 10,1989 New classes added to Lake Havasu Classic line-up For the 1989 running of the Lake Hvan Oassic World Outboard Championships, the Board of Directors of the Havasu Sporu Federation has approved the addition cf two new superstock orSST classes ofTcring fans some of (he best racing in the nation. The championships will be run Nov. 24-25 in Thompson Bay at Lake Havasu. In addition to adding the new classes, the Oassic will be part of Outboard Marine Corporations year-long • SST-45 and SST-60 series race. OMCmanufactureres Johnson and Evinrude outboard engines. Over the past several yean, most of the growth in outboard power boat racing has come in the mfaii-boat and superstock or SST classes. It is in response to that growth that the board added the classes. "We know that a number of races in these classes are iruerested in running in the Oassic, but before this year, they were excluded because we did not have a class or division for them. With the addition of the SST-60 and SST-90classes. we hope that those racers who have expressed their desire to race here will enter." Curtis' Corner By Joey Curtis Three world championship flghts are set in the next week, including the biggest bout of the batch, ri^t here in Nevada. This weekend in Italy, WBC Cruiserweight Champion Carloa DeLeon piits his crown up for grabs against Angelo Rottoll. On Tuesday in "njuana, WBC Bantamweight Champion Raul Perez puts his crown on the line against Cardona Ulloa. This Monday in Reno, IBF Middleweight Champion Michael Nunn goes up against exWBC Middleweight Champion Iran Barkley. The Hght offers a giant contrast in styles. Nunn is a boxer/ puncher and Barkley is a definite slugger. Nunn is tall, quick and shck. He is improving his punching power every time out. But Barkley has devastating power as well, shown in his one-punch knockout of Thomas Hearns in Las Vegas last year. Nunn may be unbeaten, but a slugger always has a "puncher's chance." If you are not planning on a trip to the La wlor Events Center in Reno to watch the fight, you can see it live on HBO. The boxing action continues this simuner and into the fall, as well. The fight between WBC Super Bantamweight Champion Daniel Zaragoza and Seung Hoon Lee in Inglewood, Calif., will be held Aug. 31. Other fights down the line are IBF Super Featherweight Champion Tony Lopez's title defense against Jim McDonnell in Sacramento on Oct. 7 and WBC Light Flyweight Champion Humberto Gonzalez's defense against Jung-Koo Chang in Korea on Oct. 29. New WBA Lightweight Champion Edwin Rosario is also slated to fight Korean opponent, Chun Chil-Sung. In the future, look for WBA Junior Featherweight Champion Juan Jose Estrada to defend his championship against ex-WBC Bantamweight Champion Happy Lora, who was dethroned in Las Vegas by Raul Perez. A combination WBC-IBF hghtweight championship bout for world champion Azumah Nelson is in the cards. Nelson moves up in weight class to challenge the winner of next week's Meldrick Taybr (IBF lightweight champ) and Jose Luis Ramirez (WBC lightweight king) tilt. More on the Taylor-Ramirez fight on Aug. 20 in Norfolk, Va., in next week's column. said federation president Jim Comer. A number of mini-boat classes were added to the event three years ago. bi 1988. the SST-45 class for small tunnel boats powered by engines of 45-cubic-inch displacement or less was added to the lineup, with a great deal of enthusiasm. The SST-4S boats, which run in the mini-boat division because their hulls are less than 12 feet long, thrilled race fans in the 1988 race with the closest finish in the Classic's history. SST-46. SST-60 and SST-90 classes offer racen an opportunity to travel at almost 100 miles per hour with limited expense and because of the strict controls placed on modification in the class, offer the fan close, sponson-to-sponson racing. Thursday. August 10.1989 Henderson Home News, Boulder City News. Green Valley News, Page 21 ROUGH SLIDE-Wolves shortstop Mike Abbs, right, beats the throw to Sparks second baseman Mike Lewis in this first Finnish team ready to battle Silver Streaks inning steal attempt. Abbs was stranded at third base as Timet left the bases loaded in the inning. Photo by Jeff Cowen ORANGE. Conn. You might call them the "Saab Convertibles," since they are sponsored by Saab Valmet AB of Uusikaupunkki, Finland, maker of the Saab 900 Turbo Convertible, but in the World Basketball League, the Finnish hoopeters are known as the "Saab Team." The team will complete a two-week road trip against American teams with a twogame set against the Las Vegas Silver Streaks, Aug. 15-16. WBL's 11-team professional venture is meant to promote quality basketball competition HPRD Soiftball Summer League (Monday-Wednesday) N W L T GB 6 2 0 Second Ward 5 3 0 1 Los Camalea 4 4 0 2 Pegasua Lounge 4 4 0 2 Lomprey Invest. 3 5 0 3 Gold Bond 2 6 0 4 Results Lomprey 17, Second Ward 11 Gold Bond 19, Gonzales 8 Los Canudes 11, Pegasus 6 Tuesday-Thursday) TeamGaMe W L T GB The Felt Forum in New York, the smaller arena next to Madison Square Garden, holds its last fight until 1992 next month. The Felt Forum will undergo a massive remodeling starting in September. Matchmaker Bobby Goodman will move his monthly fight cards to a 2,000-8eat theater uptown until the renovation is complete. Finally former World Middleweight Champion Carlos Monzon, one of the best 160-pounder8 ever, was sentenced to 11 years in prison in his native Argentina for murdering his girlfriend. Monzon will not be up for parole until 1995. Chenwtar 8 0 0ColoMeumGold 6 2 0 2 Gara'a SJoon 5 3 0 3 Stewart ft Sundell 2 6 0 6 RedRocken 2 6 0 6 OutUwt 17 0 7 Results Chemstar 7, Colosseum Gold 6 Outlaws 15, Red Rockers 0 Gara's Sakton 17, Stew. & Sun. 8 A-J's AUTO REPAIR 350 E. Basic Rd. 564-9008 (Across f roin KMart) COMPLETE FOREIQM A DOMESTIC AITTOMOTIVE SERVICC •Brakes •Tune-Up •Electrical •Cooling Systems •General Service •Air Conditioning •Oil, Lube and Filter •Front Wheel Alignment •Charging Systems Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. IMon thru Fri. PHASE CALL PON APPOMTMOfTB worldwide. In addition to the Finnish Saab Teamn, this year's schedule includes teams from Canada, Holland, Norway, Italy, Greece, The Soviet Union and five teams from the United States, including the Las Vegas Silver Streaks. In their drop-top Saab convertibles, the Finnish basketbailers won't have to worry about headroom, but athletes cannot exceed the 6 foot, 5 inch height Umit the league is stipulating. The Saab Team schedule began Aug. 1 and 2 against the Worcester Counts, in Worcester, Mass. On Aug. 4 and 6, they played the Youngstown Pride in Youngstown, Ohio. This Tuesday and Wednesday they faced the Illinois Express in Springfield, 111. This weekend the Saab team battles the Calgary 88's, in Calgary, Canda and Tuesday and Wednesday, the team faces the Las Vegas Silver Streaks at the Thomas and Mack Center. Basic Higir gives physicals Physical examinations for athletes at Basic High School will be given on Tuesday, Aug. 15. Girls are to report to Room 144 at 6 p.m. and boys should report to Room 144 at 7. All students who plan to pardcipate in athletics during the 1989-90 school year should receive their frfiysical exams at this time. This is the only time that physical exams will be given by the school. iV\0^ p^ 3i£i/€/iState '*i sSSUK''^^ 293-4950 1108 Nevada Hwy. COUPON HEiMDERSOM AUHTO TRUCK REPAOR lOTOOOQANORIVE 564-9555 Smog Cortificato — WrtH COUPON ^2 OFF • • 9 BASMIAU CARD SHOP 916 Nevsds HIghwsy Suite 3 (Boulder Station) FOR FURTHER INFORIMATION 294-1012 Monday-Saturday 10-6 Sunday 12-6 Closed Tuosday FREE AUTOGRAPHS Joey Cora • Las Vegas Stars at the Boulder City Dugout Baseball Card Shop — FRIDAY, AUGUST 11 FR0M11 A.M.-1P.M. FEATURINQ A FULL LINE OF CARDS A SUPPUES FOR THE HOBBY COLLECTOR A SERIOUS INVESTOR.! • •••••• •• •••.•.•-. '•••••••••••••• • •BUY* SELL* TRADE r Local firms to bowl in l\/luscular Dystrophy fundraiser Muscular Dystrophy Association and Corporate Games of Las Vegas have announced that the second annual MDA Corporate Bowling Challenge will be held in September. The event, held at Sam's Town, pits corporations against the companies they compete with Chip Hanauer in the Miss Circus Circus Hydroplane Hanauer set for battle at Sliver Cup With more than half of 10 races on the 1989 HFC Unlimited Hydroplane Series completed, veteran driver Chip Hanauer and his Miss Circus Circus appear ready to challenge Tom D'Eath and Miss Bud weiser forthe championship of this year's fourth annual Budweiser Las Vegas Silver Cup. Despite a bone-jarring, boatcracking blowover at the July 16 race in Syracuse, N.Y., Hanauer and the Las Vegas-based Miss Circus Circus appear headed for a showdown on the waters of Lake Mead on Sept. 21-23. Leading the final heat of the Syracuse event after winning two heats and finishing second in the third, strong winds proved to be too much as Hanauer and Circus Circus blew over. Hanauer appeared to be running away with the race as he rocketed down the back chute on the first lap when he blew over, creating a fury of executive vice-president of Cirspray as the boat impacted the ^us Circus Enterprise, Lie. Hanauer removed himself from the sinking craft and stood on the deck waving his arms, signalling that he had survived the dramatic event without injury. He walked away with a minor facial cut and a slightly bruised knee. "Miss Circus Circus was basically destroyed as a result of the blowover," said Mel Larson, water, cracked in half, and landed right-side up. (aiMnts By Jim Goff Will the wind ever quit blowing? Winds have limited angler success considerably this past week. Almost every day anglers have found winds to be more than 20 mph sometimes up to 40 mph. Last year the Lake Mead Boat Owners Association financially assisted the Park Service in installing wind warning devices around the lower basin. The devices are located on Boulder Island, Black Island and near Callville Bay Point. When winds reach 17 mph or higher, a white blinking warning light is activated, alerting boaters to the wind hazard. Lake Mead can be treacherous to the unwary boater as winds can increase rapidly near storm fronts. Another danger few boaters and anglers are aware of is the danger of lightning. A boat on the lake during a severe lightning storm can easily be struck. Many anglers not aware of the danger continue to fish. Graphite and boron rods in hand or held in the air by rod holders, can and will act as lightning rods, attracting hghtning. If you're ever on the lake during a severe electrical storm, lower your radio anterma, lay all rods down and sit in the lowest point in your vessel. If the hair on the back of your neck starts standing up, then lightning is about to strike nearby and your body is picking up static electricity from the atmosphere. Remain calm and get off the water as soon as possible or get into a sheltered cove if unable to get back to yoiu: marina or launch ramp. Reports of spotty topwater action continue. One day you can go out and find topwater action and the next day, it's impossible to find. Baitfishing is still excellent throughout the lake and should continue until the fish tiurn their attention completely to the shad schools. With the late spawn and small shad, baitfishing may continue to be excellent into the fall. During the past several weeks, some skinny stripers have been noted in many catches. This normally occurs when the stripers cannot find the bait or they expend more energy chasing the bait than they can gain feeding on small bait. The larger stripers taken this year have come from aroundthe marinas. Apparently, these fish are smart enough to conserve energy and let the marina hghts attract the shad and feed primarily at night. Bass fishing continues to be very slow with those anglers who are able to catch them putting in many long hours per fish. Small grubs and leeches are still the best baits during the day, with some topwater action the first hour of daylight and at sundowm on Pop Rs and Zara Spooks. During the past two weeks, I've talked to 50 or so anglers who fish Lake Mead regularly. None have seen any large bull shad. It appears the only shad around the lower basin at all are two-inch shad fry from this year's spawn. Unless those shad grow rapidly, we will be seeing more and more skinny stripers the rest of the year. It appears this year will be a bad year, bait-wise. As the bait goes, so goes the fish condition. Many of you may remember five years ago when you couldn't get a fillet off a striper, they were so skinny. Let's prtty that doesn't happen again. Keep your hooks sharp and good fishing! The team planned to enter a back-up boat in races before the final pair of hydroplane events in San Diego and Las Vegas. Hanauer is the winningest active driver in unlimited hydroplane racing with 28 victories. He has won one event so far this year, the Budweiser "Thunder in the Sun" race in Detroit on July 11. After six events this season, Hanauer was the leading driver in the point's race widi 6,234. Miss Budweiser, which had won three times this year, was the leading boat with 6,402 points. Miss Circus Circus placed a close second with 6,234 points Hanauer, 34, of Seattle, Wash., has won the national driver's title three times, won the Budweiser Las Vegas Silver Cup in 1987 and has won seven consecutive Gold Cup titles. This year's Gold Cup race is on Sept. 17 at Mission Bay in San Diego. The Budweiser Las Vegas Silver Cup, the largest spectator event in Nevada, is presented by Las Vegas Events. Information regarding the Budweiser Las Vegas Silver Cup is available by calling Las Vegas Events at 731-2115. everyday in the business worid in head-to-yead competition on the bowling lanes. Teams may enter one of eight divisions which consist of: hospitality, services/government, manufacturing/high tech, con-' struction/development, wholesale/retail, finance/insurance. Knights hold golf tourney Newly elected state deputy Raymond Barozzi of the Nevada State Council of the Knights of Colombus announced that during his term of office, the International Knights of Colombus Golf Tbumament will come to Nevada on June 20 through June 22, 1990, with the tournament headquartering at the Tropicana Hotel in Las Vegas More than 400 golfers are expected, officials said. The annual Knights of Columbus Tbotsie Roll Drive will also take place during the last weekend of October. Monies raised with the function, a statewide event of the Knights of Coliunbus and their families, is given to the Special Olympics and various other charities for the handicapped. More than 2,300 Nevada members of the Knights of Columbus work closely with the Catholic Bishop of the Diocese of Reno-Las Vegas. transportation/communication/ public utilities and open (all other businesses). Each team will consist of two men and two women. Qualifying tournaments will be held on Sept. 3 and finals will be Sept. 4. This year's qualifier winners will be invited to bowl in the Southwest Bowling Challenge scheduled for Sept. 23, also at Sams Town. There will be winners in all divisions and an overall top team. Those teams registering by Aug. 18 will pay $50; the fee is $60 after that date, spokespersons said. Net proceeds will go to MDA. Each bowler is asked to obtain pledges either by flat amount or on a per-pin basis. A trip to Hawaii, a color TV, a VCR, gift certificates, medals, trophies and m any other prizes will be awarded to winning and top pledge teams. For more information, call 456-GAME (4263). < f^'^^ The Pro/College Football Handicapping Contest! >. • You Play Against the PolntspreacL OVER $100,000 IN CASH & PRIZES $20,000 Grand Prize $5,000 2nd Place $3,000 3rd Place 2 Superbowl Party Tickets 4th-28th Place $4,000 for Most Winners Weekly $500 for Most Losers Weekly ALL CASH PRIZES AGGREGATE $50 PER ENTRY 4 entry limit per customer Buy 3 entries before August 27th and get the 4th FREE! Choose 4 college and 4 pro games. Then select 6 additional games of your choice. It's the game to play in Las Vegas. 385-9123 SHOWBOAT HOTEL, CASINO. COUNTRY CLUB BOWUNG CENTER FAN AiANAGERS, FREE TRIPS 81 FLY BALLS! STARS VS. TUCSON, AUGUST 11 • 81 12 • ^'our Las Vegas Stars try to take it downtown against the Toros. Friday, August 11th, 7 p.m. US VEGAS SUN FAN MANAGER NIGHT Some lucky fan will be Stars Fan Manager for a Night Also KREL honors Sandy Alomar Saturday, August 12th, 6 p.m. 7-UP/VITA HEALTH/STARS FAN APPRECIATION/DOUBLE-HEADER NIGHT Free gifts galore, including trips to Hawaii. Mexico and the Caribbean. First 5.000 fans get a team photo compliments of 7-Up. Free neon sunglasses to the first 1.500 fans from Vita Health. Tickets available at Gtshman Pield Box Office • All Tickelron Outlets To charge by phone 800-992-2128* For information call 386-7200

PAGE 21

Pag* 22. HndvMNi Hom Ntws, Booldar City News, Oreen Valley New* ThoTMlay, August 10,196d I Tkvndigf, Aogiwt 10,1M9 Midby Hendanon Home Ntws, Bouldr Qty Ntwa, OTMB Valley News Pi 2S NEW CCC FACILITY-Daniel F. Byron, left, president and vice chairman of John H. Midby and Associates; Dr. Paul Meecham, center, president of the Clark County Community College and John H. Midby, chairman of the board of John H. Midby and Associates, sign papers that will open a satellite campus of CCCC in Laughlin. The Quiz Master Quiz Master, Inc^ By Fred Weeks POLITY Political Systems and Governments of the World Have you ever been asked if you have a ruler? Now you can say something besides, "my wife." Here are a few of the 113 different types of governments there are in the world. Government by Cracy this time but government by ArcAy next time. |\Iatch the following governments to the coh-ect definition. 1. Thalassocracy Kleptocracy Chrysocracy 4. Boobocracy 5. Hagiocracy 6. Meritocracy 7. Timocracy 8. Nomocracy 9. Androcracy 10. Stratocracy A. Government in which the ownership of property is a requirement for holding office. Also a government in which love of honor is the dominant motive of the rulers. B. Government at Sea. C. Government by stupid people. D. Government by men or males only. E. Government established and carried out in accordance with a code of laws. F. Government by the army or military. G. Government by thieves. H. Government by the wealthy. I. Government by Saints or Priests. J. Government by the most talented or highly intellectual. Answers 01 "6 "8 • 'L "9 a 9~ I P~ 0 £~ H Z~ 0 T a campus will be located in a portion of the El Mirage Shopping Center, a part of the master-planned community of El Mirage. John H. Midby and Associates, a nationally prominent, award-winning Las Vegasbased fhrm, is developer of El Mirage. The first semester of classes at the CCCC's Laughlin campus start Sept. 5. Reid takes on excessive mail WASHINGTON — Sen. Harry Reid has taken on a monster: Congressional mail. "We have to get this mail monster back under conuol,'' declared Reid, chairman of the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on the Legislative Branch. "If we don't, it's going to cat us out of house and home." Reid's proposal to slash the Congressional mail budget by $44.5 million was approved unanimously by the fiill Senate Appropriations Committee. The reduction effectively cuts in half the money available for mail. The committee also approved a Reid amendment that would put a lid on how much mail can be sent out each year. At the present time, members of Congress regularly spend more tax dollars on mail than they are allowed in the budget. Reid's ammendment would prohibit the Postal Service from sending that mail if Congress goes over its allowance. In addition. Reid proposed and the committee unanimously accepted a proposal requiring all members of Congress to reveal their annual mailings. Such public disclosure has been required of the Senate since 1985. House members are under no such obUgation at the present time. Higher education has come to Laughlin, thanks to the Clark County Community College and the generosity of John H. Midby and Associates. The Clark County Community College will open a satellite campus in Laughlin in September. Classes will start Sept. 5 in the El Mirage Shopping Center. Registration will be from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., Aug. 28-29 at the Laughlin School. Nine courses will be offered at the Laughlin campus of the Clark Coxmty Community College. They will be held in a 2,000-8quare-foot facility donated by John H. Midby and Associates, developers of the master-planned community El Mirage, which also includes the El Mirage Shopping Center. Courses offered the first semester include elementary accounting, emergency medical training I, food and beverage control, hotel computer application, hotel-motel security, hotel-restaurant-casino law, hotel restaurant casino marketing, introduction to hotel-restaurant-casino and oral communication. "I'm pleased at the generosity of John H. Midby and Daniel F. Byron," said Dr. Paul Meecham, president of the Clark C6unty Community College. "With the contribution of this facility, the residents of Laughlin can more conveniently avail themselves of the opportunity to further their education. "Midby and Byron have been staunch supporters of higher education. Their unselfish act is just one more example of the commitment and involvement by the private sector which results in an improved lifestyle for the citizens of Laughlin and all Southern Nevadans." Midby is chairman of the board of John H. Midby and Associates and Byron is president and vice chairman of the nationally prominent, awardwinning Las Vegas-based development firm. "Education is the foundation on which our communities are built," said Midby. "A strong commitment to education is both essential and vital for a vibrant, growing conmiunity." Byron added, "Education is a strengthening factor, one that solidifies our families and communities. The importance of furthering one's education can not be overemphasized." The Laughlin campus is the 13th satellite facility run by the Clark County Community College. Other satellite campuses are in Alamo, Beatty, Bunkerville, Caliente, Logancble, Mesquite, Moapa, Overron, Pahrump, Panaca, Pioche and Tonopah. The CCCC's other facilities are located in the cities of North Las Vegas, Henderson and Las Vegas. Contract awarded Hoover Dam Secretary of the Interior Manuel Lujan announced last week that the Bureau of Reclamation has awarded a $1,191,038 contract for replacement of a turbine runnerforgencratorNB at Hoover Dam powetplant on the Arizona and Nevada border. The contract was awarded to American Hydro of Yoric, Pa., which will have 22 months to deliver the nirbine mnner. Work under the contract includes furnishing a stainless steel turbine runner and related pans to conform to hydraulic designs developed from model testing. The turbine mnner will provide additional horsepower needed for uprating the generator. Unit N8 was the last of the 17 main generators to be installed at Hoover Dam PDwerplant and went on-line in 1961. Uprating of the po wcri^ant will result in an increase of nameplate capacity from 1.344,800 to 2,039,000 kilowatts. BOWUNG LEAGUE PIAY Youth Program Registration: 10 a.m. to 12 noon, August 26 League Begins: 9a.m., September9 Sam's Town Bowling shirt Three games of bowling each week (Two games for Pee ^ y /;>. A^^^ Wees & Bantams) /Cjlf^kr ^f" use of shoes I ^^^'^^ during league play \^^>^^a Entry in the Sam's ^V Town LPBT Invitational ^^k Junior Pro-Am & ^^^^ Yaba City Tournament y^r ^^r% Team Event C3J ^^^' Yaba sanction card and high score awards • Christmas party • Trophies • ERd-of-season Wet N' Wild party • Magic Mountain Trip (Junior & Senior Divisions only) SPECIAL PEE WEE BUMPER BOWLING DIVISION: 3 YRS-7YRS Pee Wees-Bantams: Sa.SO/week; Preps: $4.50/week; Juniors-Seniors: SS/week League Bowlers Club Become a member by signing up for any men's, ladies, seniors, or mixed league today League Bowlers Club Card entitles you to: • Specially discounted open play rates • Pro Shop discounts • Special LBC Tournaments • And much more For more information, call Betty or Mike at 454-8022. Where locals bring their friends. SAM'S TOWN HOTEL & QAIVIBUIMO HALL Bouldei Hwy & Nellis 4S6-7777 Anolher (ma Boyd Group hotel )ISCOUNT TIRE CO. INC. DISCOUNT TIRE CO DISCOUNT TIRE CO. INC. VACATION SPECIAL W discount cvsrytMng but your Mfaty 4 for MIS"" P155/80R13 46,000 MILE WARRANTY DISCOUNT TIRE CO. INC. DISCOUN I TiRt CO INC. PREMIUM ALL SEASON : ilSCOUNT TIRE CO. INC. METRIC RADIALS *2 Italia 155HI3 165R13 175RM 165ni5 175,70R13 185/70H13 186/70fll4 I96/70W14 • CONOMV •23" 7*M7V M31" 33" 3" 30" 34" 3" 3" 3t40" 42" ^^^^^. -i.*. .^.r^^^^H FIBERGLASS BELTS • 9pf/eoei3 P16S/80B13 •21HH P195/75BU M P205/75B14 M" P215/75B14 2t" P215/75815 32" P225/75B15 33" P235/75B15 34 •6 00-15 • PotywWr 2" STEEL RADIAL WHITEWALL P165/80R13 P175/eOR13 P185/eoni3 P185/75R14 P195/75ni4 P205/75R14 P205/75R15 P215/75R15 P225/75R15 P235/75R15 STEEL RADIAL WHITEWALL tor for (Of (or (or (or for 135" 143" 147" 151" 159" 13" 167" 183" 191" 195" B*cau$e So Much 1$ Riding On Your Tir*s ULTRA PREMIUM A S P165/80R13 P175/80ni3 P185/75R14 P195/75R14 P205/75R14 P215/75R15 P225/75R15 P235/75R15 "•^tPiM/e 165R13 175R14 185R14 165R15 175/70R13 185/70R14 195/70R14 195/65R15 XZX MXL •39m •44" 81" 56" 62" 52" 82" 68" 72" P185/80R13 •56" P205/75R14 68" P205/75R15 70" P215/75R15 73" P235/75R15 79" PERFORMANCE RADIALS P1B5/70B13 P205/70H14 P215/70ft14 P1S/6R14 P225'0B14 PT96/60P15 pa3s/)ftis P2lS/tMF YOKOHAMA DISCOUNT TIRE CO. INC. ^IPGoodrich \ Govefflment Pentagon warned of unsafe fasteners Congressmui Junes Bilbrey has Ixen unanimously joined by Democratic and Republican members of the House Amied Services SubcommitteeonReadincss in urging Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney to investigate defective fasteners creeping into the military stockpile. Some of the defective nuts and bolts have been traced to the National Test Facility of the Strategic Defense Initiative, the so-called Star Wars program. In the letter members warned that, "Every soldier who flies an aircraft, drives a tank, navigates a submarine or wotks at a nuclear facility may be placing himself and his fellow colleagues in danger as a result of the use of substandard bolts imponed into this country." Said Bilbray. "The fasteners can find their way into the nation's most advanced, front-line military hardware, doing more damage than any spy or enemy on the battlefield. They render our front-line equipment useless and sometimes even dangerous for training in peace time." The Justice Department is eliminating several of the companies importing the inferior nuts and bolts, recently indicting Aircorn Fasteners Inc. of Ariington, Texas. A Japanese manufacturer, Yamaguchi-Seisakusho Co. of Shizouka, is also facing chaiges for dumping defective fasteners which were used in construction of military vehicles and nuclear plants. U.S. officials admit they Bilbray to tour Soviet bases Congressman Jim Bilbray is scheduled to travel with members of the House Armed Services Committee to inspect a number of previously secret Soviet military installations. Said Bilbray of the trip, "These are among the most important areas of Soviet defense strategy. We have been informed that we will be visiting their forward positions in Eastern Europe, the positions from which any conventional forces would advance." Soviet officials are billing their invitation for the trip as a prime example of the new openness of their country. Bilbray will join committee Chairman Les Aspin, other members of Armed Services and other govenmient and private sector defense experts on the trip. The Soviet government is picking up the bulk of the costs for the visit. The itinerary, which has not yet been finalized, includes visits to Soviet Army rifle units in Eastern Germany and the Soviet General Staff Academy, where Eastern Bloc intermediate rtmge nuclear weapons are being destroyed. The group also expects to visit the Baikonur Space Launch Facility, the Black Sea Fleet at Odessa and several other military locations. Said Bilbray, "Soviet military officials have made themselves available to the House Armed Services ComJim Bilbray mittee in the past. However, there has always been some reservations about answering technical questions. Soviet officials say they will 'get back to us,' now we will see if they are forthcoming or simply stalling. It is difficult to tell from a distance how closely Soviets are living up to their promises." Bilbray added, "Of course we will see only what they want us to see, no one has any illusions about their motives. This much is certain: we will be visiting sites that no one from the Western world—or even Soviet Citizens—have ever been allowed to see before." The delegation intends to meet with members of the Committee for Defense and State Security. The panel was recently formed by the Supreme Soviet to deal with military matters. Miller named to national justice panel DISCOUNT TIRE CO INC DISCOUNT TIRE CO INC DISCOUNT TIRE CO INC. DISCOUNT TIRE CO INC DISCOUNT TIRE CO INC Gov. Bob Miller last week was named to a key position on a National Governors' Association committee studying law en&rcement. Uwa Gov. Terry E. Branstad named Miller vice chairman of the Committee on Justice and Public Safety, one of only seven permanent NGA committees. "Gov. Miller has an outstanding national reputation as a leader in law enforcement and is one of the country's foremost authorities on the protection of crime victims," Branstad said. "His experience will be extremely valuable in helping shape national law enforcement policy." Tlie Iowa Republican, recently installed as chairman of the NGA, appointed Miller during the association's meeting this week in Chicago. "Gov. Miller has taken the lead on issues that affect the entire nation: anti-drug campaigns, child abuse, victims compensation, and much more," Branstad uid. "His will be a strong voice on the committee." Miller said, "I conatder it an honor, having only attended one prior NGA meeting, that I was selected vice chairman of a committee that gives law enforcement and pubUc safety top priority." Miller's service in law enforcement began in the late 60s when he worked part-time as a deputy sheriff in Las Vegas and Los Angeles while attending law school. He worked as a deputy district attorney from 1971 to 1973, then as first legal advisor for the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department from 1973 to 1975. Miller became Las Vegas Township Justice of the Peace in 1975 and served in that capacity until winning election in 1979 as Clark County District Attorney. In 1982. Miller became the first district attorney in modem Clark County history to win re-election. Among other law enforcement honors. Miller was elected president of the national District Attorneys Association in 1979 and in 1983. President Ronald Reagan choee Miller in 1982 as the only Democrat on a nine-membr President's Task Force on Victims of Crime. do not know of the precise locations of the defective components. Said Bilbray, "These actions are unconscionable. It would cost millions of U.S. taxpayer dollan to tear down this equipment if we could locate the defeoive fasteners. Unfoitunately, the military cannot trace them directly. As a result, the costs may be increased a thousand fold in early retirement of equipment, delays in construction and out and out failure. V(ost importantly, there is great potential for loss of life." U.S Customs officials last month served warrants on 11 distributors and importers in four states, alleging the importation of counterfeit and mismarked fastenere. Five of the companies were located in Colorado, four were located in Utah, one in Wyoming and one in Illinois. The word "caricatur*" oomM from th ttaiian caricare maaning "to load," and carlcaturaa can ba exaggerated,"overloadad" drawing*. TERRIBLE'S we are "Iht Proftlonil" ^m WE FEATURE PENN20H. AIR AND OIL aTERSM LUBE •CHANGE THE OH. •CHANGE THE FILTER •COMPLETE CHASSIS LUBE [ "CHECK AND FILL THE BATTERY •CHECK AND FILL TME BRAKE au •CHECK AND FlU POWER STECRWG •CHECK AND FlU DIFFERENTIAL •iCHECK AND RLL TRANSMBSON •CHECK AND Fia TIRES r— •CHECK ANO Fia WINDSHIELD WASHER •CHECK ANO CLEAN AIR FILTER •WASH WINDSHIELDS. $1995 Wc Do DeMMDc • FofW|n Can ,-.^\ -COUPON— 306 N. Bouldtr Highwiy 6484 Annit OtMey (Sunset ft Annie Oakley) 2718 E. Troplcant (Comer E. Trop. ft Harrison $300 OFF FULL SERVICE OIL CHANGE WE FEATURE PENNZON. AIR ANO OIL FILTEM Expire* Auguet 31,1 N9 j FREECAR WAjSH WITH nn4s,8E5VI^^ lJ&& $ 202,500 IN GASH... GUARANTEED Buy 3 entries, get 2 free! $ 10,000 In weekly prizes! Purchase three entries, prior to September 3rd, and receive two entries FREE when you show your Sam's "Town" Club card. Without a Town" Club card, receive one free entry when you purchase three. Maximum 10 free enlries, per person, with TovimClub card; maximum 5 free entries without "Town" Club card. Cash prizes will be awarded each week for 16 weeks. • $7,500 to the entrant with the most wins • $1,000 to the entrant with the most losses • $1,500 progressive weekly cash prize for the entrant selecting all the winning teams $25 single entry fee for the entire season. Free baseball cap with entry...while supplies last. $42,500 in grand prizes for the entrants with the most winners for the entire season. Sign up today In the Race & Sports Book. All entries must be lecelved by 10 a.m., Sunday, September 10,1989. Where locals bring their friends. SAM'S TOWN HC3TEL & GAIVIBUNG HAUL Boulder Highway & Nellis / 456-7777 / Another fine Boyd Group hotel All prize money is aggregate and will be divided amongst ties. Complete rules are posted.

PAGE 22

Pag* 22. HndvMNi Hom Ntws, Booldar City News, Oreen Valley New* ThoTMlay, August 10,196d I Tkvndigf, Aogiwt 10,1M9 Midby Hendanon Home Ntws, Bouldr Qty Ntwa, OTMB Valley News Pi 2S NEW CCC FACILITY-Daniel F. Byron, left, president and vice chairman of John H. Midby and Associates; Dr. Paul Meecham, center, president of the Clark County Community College and John H. Midby, chairman of the board of John H. Midby and Associates, sign papers that will open a satellite campus of CCCC in Laughlin. The Quiz Master Quiz Master, Inc^ By Fred Weeks POLITY Political Systems and Governments of the World Have you ever been asked if you have a ruler? Now you can say something besides, "my wife." Here are a few of the 113 different types of governments there are in the world. Government by Cracy this time but government by ArcAy next time. |\Iatch the following governments to the coh-ect definition. 1. Thalassocracy Kleptocracy Chrysocracy 4. Boobocracy 5. Hagiocracy 6. Meritocracy 7. Timocracy 8. Nomocracy 9. Androcracy 10. Stratocracy A. Government in which the ownership of property is a requirement for holding office. Also a government in which love of honor is the dominant motive of the rulers. B. Government at Sea. C. Government by stupid people. D. Government by men or males only. E. Government established and carried out in accordance with a code of laws. F. Government by the army or military. G. Government by thieves. H. Government by the wealthy. I. Government by Saints or Priests. J. Government by the most talented or highly intellectual. Answers 01 "6 "8 • 'L "9 a 9~ I P~ 0 £~ H Z~ 0 T a campus will be located in a portion of the El Mirage Shopping Center, a part of the master-planned community of El Mirage. John H. Midby and Associates, a nationally prominent, award-winning Las Vegasbased fhrm, is developer of El Mirage. The first semester of classes at the CCCC's Laughlin campus start Sept. 5. Reid takes on excessive mail WASHINGTON — Sen. Harry Reid has taken on a monster: Congressional mail. "We have to get this mail monster back under conuol,'' declared Reid, chairman of the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on the Legislative Branch. "If we don't, it's going to cat us out of house and home." Reid's proposal to slash the Congressional mail budget by $44.5 million was approved unanimously by the fiill Senate Appropriations Committee. The reduction effectively cuts in half the money available for mail. The committee also approved a Reid amendment that would put a lid on how much mail can be sent out each year. At the present time, members of Congress regularly spend more tax dollars on mail than they are allowed in the budget. Reid's ammendment would prohibit the Postal Service from sending that mail if Congress goes over its allowance. In addition. Reid proposed and the committee unanimously accepted a proposal requiring all members of Congress to reveal their annual mailings. Such public disclosure has been required of the Senate since 1985. House members are under no such obUgation at the present time. Higher education has come to Laughlin, thanks to the Clark County Community College and the generosity of John H. Midby and Associates. The Clark County Community College will open a satellite campus in Laughlin in September. Classes will start Sept. 5 in the El Mirage Shopping Center. Registration will be from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., Aug. 28-29 at the Laughlin School. Nine courses will be offered at the Laughlin campus of the Clark Coxmty Community College. They will be held in a 2,000-8quare-foot facility donated by John H. Midby and Associates, developers of the master-planned community El Mirage, which also includes the El Mirage Shopping Center. Courses offered the first semester include elementary accounting, emergency medical training I, food and beverage control, hotel computer application, hotel-motel security, hotel-restaurant-casino law, hotel restaurant casino marketing, introduction to hotel-restaurant-casino and oral communication. "I'm pleased at the generosity of John H. Midby and Daniel F. Byron," said Dr. Paul Meecham, president of the Clark C6unty Community College. "With the contribution of this facility, the residents of Laughlin can more conveniently avail themselves of the opportunity to further their education. "Midby and Byron have been staunch supporters of higher education. Their unselfish act is just one more example of the commitment and involvement by the private sector which results in an improved lifestyle for the citizens of Laughlin and all Southern Nevadans." Midby is chairman of the board of John H. Midby and Associates and Byron is president and vice chairman of the nationally prominent, awardwinning Las Vegas-based development firm. "Education is the foundation on which our communities are built," said Midby. "A strong commitment to education is both essential and vital for a vibrant, growing conmiunity." Byron added, "Education is a strengthening factor, one that solidifies our families and communities. The importance of furthering one's education can not be overemphasized." The Laughlin campus is the 13th satellite facility run by the Clark County Community College. Other satellite campuses are in Alamo, Beatty, Bunkerville, Caliente, Logancble, Mesquite, Moapa, Overron, Pahrump, Panaca, Pioche and Tonopah. The CCCC's other facilities are located in the cities of North Las Vegas, Henderson and Las Vegas. Contract awarded Hoover Dam Secretary of the Interior Manuel Lujan announced last week that the Bureau of Reclamation has awarded a $1,191,038 contract for replacement of a turbine runnerforgencratorNB at Hoover Dam powetplant on the Arizona and Nevada border. The contract was awarded to American Hydro of Yoric, Pa., which will have 22 months to deliver the nirbine mnner. Work under the contract includes furnishing a stainless steel turbine runner and related pans to conform to hydraulic designs developed from model testing. The turbine mnner will provide additional horsepower needed for uprating the generator. Unit N8 was the last of the 17 main generators to be installed at Hoover Dam PDwerplant and went on-line in 1961. Uprating of the po wcri^ant will result in an increase of nameplate capacity from 1.344,800 to 2,039,000 kilowatts. BOWUNG LEAGUE PIAY Youth Program Registration: 10 a.m. to 12 noon, August 26 League Begins: 9a.m., September9 Sam's Town Bowling shirt Three games of bowling each week (Two games for Pee ^ y /;>. A^^^ Wees & Bantams) /Cjlf^kr ^f" use of shoes I ^^^'^^ during league play \^^>^^a Entry in the Sam's ^V Town LPBT Invitational ^^k Junior Pro-Am & ^^^^ Yaba City Tournament y^r ^^r% Team Event C3J ^^^' Yaba sanction card and high score awards • Christmas party • Trophies • ERd-of-season Wet N' Wild party • Magic Mountain Trip (Junior & Senior Divisions only) SPECIAL PEE WEE BUMPER BOWLING DIVISION: 3 YRS-7YRS Pee Wees-Bantams: Sa.SO/week; Preps: $4.50/week; Juniors-Seniors: SS/week League Bowlers Club Become a member by signing up for any men's, ladies, seniors, or mixed league today League Bowlers Club Card entitles you to: • Specially discounted open play rates • Pro Shop discounts • Special LBC Tournaments • And much more For more information, call Betty or Mike at 454-8022. Where locals bring their friends. SAM'S TOWN HOTEL & QAIVIBUIMO HALL Bouldei Hwy & Nellis 4S6-7777 Anolher (ma Boyd Group hotel )ISCOUNT TIRE CO. INC. DISCOUNT TIRE CO DISCOUNT TIRE CO. INC. VACATION SPECIAL W discount cvsrytMng but your Mfaty 4 for MIS"" P155/80R13 46,000 MILE WARRANTY DISCOUNT TIRE CO. INC. DISCOUN I TiRt CO INC. PREMIUM ALL SEASON : ilSCOUNT TIRE CO. INC. METRIC RADIALS *2 Italia 155HI3 165R13 175RM 165ni5 175,70R13 185/70H13 186/70fll4 I96/70W14 • CONOMV •23" 7*M7V M31" 33" 3" 30" 34" 3" 3" 3t40" 42" ^^^^^. -i.*. .^.r^^^^H FIBERGLASS BELTS • 9pf/eoei3 P16S/80B13 •21HH P195/75BU M P205/75B14 M" P215/75B14 2t" P215/75815 32" P225/75B15 33" P235/75B15 34 •6 00-15 • PotywWr 2" STEEL RADIAL WHITEWALL P165/80R13 P175/eOR13 P185/eoni3 P185/75R14 P195/75ni4 P205/75R14 P205/75R15 P215/75R15 P225/75R15 P235/75R15 STEEL RADIAL WHITEWALL tor for (Of (or (or (or for 135" 143" 147" 151" 159" 13" 167" 183" 191" 195" B*cau$e So Much 1$ Riding On Your Tir*s ULTRA PREMIUM A S P165/80R13 P175/80ni3 P185/75R14 P195/75R14 P205/75R14 P215/75R15 P225/75R15 P235/75R15 "•^tPiM/e 165R13 175R14 185R14 165R15 175/70R13 185/70R14 195/70R14 195/65R15 XZX MXL •39m •44" 81" 56" 62" 52" 82" 68" 72" P185/80R13 •56" P205/75R14 68" P205/75R15 70" P215/75R15 73" P235/75R15 79" PERFORMANCE RADIALS P1B5/70B13 P205/70H14 P215/70ft14 P1S/6R14 P225'0B14 PT96/60P15 pa3s/)ftis P2lS/tMF YOKOHAMA DISCOUNT TIRE CO. INC. ^IPGoodrich \ Govefflment Pentagon warned of unsafe fasteners Congressmui Junes Bilbrey has Ixen unanimously joined by Democratic and Republican members of the House Amied Services SubcommitteeonReadincss in urging Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney to investigate defective fasteners creeping into the military stockpile. Some of the defective nuts and bolts have been traced to the National Test Facility of the Strategic Defense Initiative, the so-called Star Wars program. In the letter members warned that, "Every soldier who flies an aircraft, drives a tank, navigates a submarine or wotks at a nuclear facility may be placing himself and his fellow colleagues in danger as a result of the use of substandard bolts imponed into this country." Said Bilbray. "The fasteners can find their way into the nation's most advanced, front-line military hardware, doing more damage than any spy or enemy on the battlefield. They render our front-line equipment useless and sometimes even dangerous for training in peace time." The Justice Department is eliminating several of the companies importing the inferior nuts and bolts, recently indicting Aircorn Fasteners Inc. of Ariington, Texas. A Japanese manufacturer, Yamaguchi-Seisakusho Co. of Shizouka, is also facing chaiges for dumping defective fasteners which were used in construction of military vehicles and nuclear plants. U.S. officials admit they Bilbray to tour Soviet bases Congressman Jim Bilbray is scheduled to travel with members of the House Armed Services Committee to inspect a number of previously secret Soviet military installations. Said Bilbray of the trip, "These are among the most important areas of Soviet defense strategy. We have been informed that we will be visiting their forward positions in Eastern Europe, the positions from which any conventional forces would advance." Soviet officials are billing their invitation for the trip as a prime example of the new openness of their country. Bilbray will join committee Chairman Les Aspin, other members of Armed Services and other govenmient and private sector defense experts on the trip. The Soviet government is picking up the bulk of the costs for the visit. The itinerary, which has not yet been finalized, includes visits to Soviet Army rifle units in Eastern Germany and the Soviet General Staff Academy, where Eastern Bloc intermediate rtmge nuclear weapons are being destroyed. The group also expects to visit the Baikonur Space Launch Facility, the Black Sea Fleet at Odessa and several other military locations. Said Bilbray, "Soviet military officials have made themselves available to the House Armed Services ComJim Bilbray mittee in the past. However, there has always been some reservations about answering technical questions. Soviet officials say they will 'get back to us,' now we will see if they are forthcoming or simply stalling. It is difficult to tell from a distance how closely Soviets are living up to their promises." Bilbray added, "Of course we will see only what they want us to see, no one has any illusions about their motives. This much is certain: we will be visiting sites that no one from the Western world—or even Soviet Citizens—have ever been allowed to see before." The delegation intends to meet with members of the Committee for Defense and State Security. The panel was recently formed by the Supreme Soviet to deal with military matters. Miller named to national justice panel DISCOUNT TIRE CO INC DISCOUNT TIRE CO INC DISCOUNT TIRE CO INC. DISCOUNT TIRE CO INC DISCOUNT TIRE CO INC Gov. Bob Miller last week was named to a key position on a National Governors' Association committee studying law en&rcement. Uwa Gov. Terry E. Branstad named Miller vice chairman of the Committee on Justice and Public Safety, one of only seven permanent NGA committees. "Gov. Miller has an outstanding national reputation as a leader in law enforcement and is one of the country's foremost authorities on the protection of crime victims," Branstad said. "His experience will be extremely valuable in helping shape national law enforcement policy." Tlie Iowa Republican, recently installed as chairman of the NGA, appointed Miller during the association's meeting this week in Chicago. "Gov. Miller has taken the lead on issues that affect the entire nation: anti-drug campaigns, child abuse, victims compensation, and much more," Branstad uid. "His will be a strong voice on the committee." Miller said, "I conatder it an honor, having only attended one prior NGA meeting, that I was selected vice chairman of a committee that gives law enforcement and pubUc safety top priority." Miller's service in law enforcement began in the late 60s when he worked part-time as a deputy sheriff in Las Vegas and Los Angeles while attending law school. He worked as a deputy district attorney from 1971 to 1973, then as first legal advisor for the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department from 1973 to 1975. Miller became Las Vegas Township Justice of the Peace in 1975 and served in that capacity until winning election in 1979 as Clark County District Attorney. In 1982. Miller became the first district attorney in modem Clark County history to win re-election. Among other law enforcement honors. Miller was elected president of the national District Attorneys Association in 1979 and in 1983. President Ronald Reagan choee Miller in 1982 as the only Democrat on a nine-membr President's Task Force on Victims of Crime. do not know of the precise locations of the defective components. Said Bilbray, "These actions are unconscionable. It would cost millions of U.S. taxpayer dollan to tear down this equipment if we could locate the defeoive fasteners. Unfoitunately, the military cannot trace them directly. As a result, the costs may be increased a thousand fold in early retirement of equipment, delays in construction and out and out failure. V(ost importantly, there is great potential for loss of life." U.S Customs officials last month served warrants on 11 distributors and importers in four states, alleging the importation of counterfeit and mismarked fastenere. Five of the companies were located in Colorado, four were located in Utah, one in Wyoming and one in Illinois. The word "caricatur*" oomM from th ttaiian caricare maaning "to load," and carlcaturaa can ba exaggerated,"overloadad" drawing*. TERRIBLE'S we are "Iht Proftlonil" ^m WE FEATURE PENN20H. AIR AND OIL aTERSM LUBE •CHANGE THE OH. •CHANGE THE FILTER •COMPLETE CHASSIS LUBE [ "CHECK AND FILL THE BATTERY •CHECK AND FILL TME BRAKE au •CHECK AND FlU POWER STECRWG •CHECK AND FlU DIFFERENTIAL •iCHECK AND RLL TRANSMBSON •CHECK AND Fia TIRES r— •CHECK ANO Fia WINDSHIELD WASHER •CHECK ANO CLEAN AIR FILTER •WASH WINDSHIELDS. $1995 Wc Do DeMMDc • FofW|n Can ,-.^\ -COUPON— 306 N. Bouldtr Highwiy 6484 Annit OtMey (Sunset ft Annie Oakley) 2718 E. Troplcant (Comer E. Trop. ft Harrison $300 OFF FULL SERVICE OIL CHANGE WE FEATURE PENNZON. AIR ANO OIL FILTEM Expire* Auguet 31,1 N9 j FREECAR WAjSH WITH nn4s,8E5VI^^ lJ&& $ 202,500 IN GASH... GUARANTEED Buy 3 entries, get 2 free! $ 10,000 In weekly prizes! Purchase three entries, prior to September 3rd, and receive two entries FREE when you show your Sam's "Town" Club card. Without a Town" Club card, receive one free entry when you purchase three. Maximum 10 free enlries, per person, with TovimClub card; maximum 5 free entries without "Town" Club card. Cash prizes will be awarded each week for 16 weeks. • $7,500 to the entrant with the most wins • $1,000 to the entrant with the most losses • $1,500 progressive weekly cash prize for the entrant selecting all the winning teams $25 single entry fee for the entire season. Free baseball cap with entry...while supplies last. $42,500 in grand prizes for the entrants with the most winners for the entire season. Sign up today In the Race & Sports Book. All entries must be lecelved by 10 a.m., Sunday, September 10,1989. Where locals bring their friends. SAM'S TOWN HC3TEL & GAIVIBUNG HAUL Boulder Highway & Nellis / 456-7777 / Another fine Boyd Group hotel All prize money is aggregate and will be divided amongst ties. Complete rules are posted.

PAGE 23

iw / \,l Pf U, HadMoa Home News, Boulder City News, Gntn Vally NWB Thunday, August 10, 1989 Thursday, August 10, 1989 Hendaraon Homa Nwi, Boulder City News, Green Vall^ News Page 2S Baldlzan named assistant to VP Elizabeth Baldizan was recently named assistant to the vice president for student services at UNLV. Raldizan's duties will cover a variety of supervisory and administrative tasks, including public relations and student development. She will also assist other university depadmertts that woric with students. Baldizan received her master of arts degree in education {Tom,^ the University of New Mexico. She is currently working on her doctorate degree in educational administration. Elizabeth Baldizan August evening programs at Lake Mead listed Campground Road. off Lakeshore Lake Mead National Recreation Area will present several free information programs this month, officials announced this week. Each program begins at 8:30 p.m. and lasts approximately Boulder Beach Amphitheater 45 minutes, they said. prior to the regularly scheduled The programs, on a variety programs, of topics, will be held in the Boulder Beach Amphitheater The programs include "A located in the Boulder Beach Worker on the Dam," Friday, Children's activities are scheduled at 7 p.m., each Friday and Saturday in the Aug. 11; *t;acti of the Southwest," Saturday, Aug. 12; "Indian Folklore," Friday, Aug. 18; "Flash Floods," Saturday, Aug. 19; "Desert Adaptations of Plants and Animals," Friday, Aug. 25; "Desert's Maligned Creatures. Ohh! Ick! Ahh!," Saturday, Aug. 26. For further information, call the Alan Bible Visitor Center at 702/293-8906. iMfa Volunteer drivers needed"^ Volunteer drivers are desperately needed by the Clark County unit of the American Cancer Society to take cancer patients to and from their treatments. Volunteers, spokespersons said, should be good listeners and have a desire to help duninish the suffering caused by cancer. The unit is also looking for someone to coordinate its transportation department. Such a person should have good phone skills and be able to give four to five volunteer hours per week to help cancer patients. Anyone interested in volunteering for the American Cancer Society is urged to call 798-6877. • — 'How to Start A Business* workshop offered An all-day workshop on how to start a small business will be offered from 9 ^.m. to 4 p.in. Friday, Aug. 18, at the Spring Valley Library, 4280 So. Jones. To pre-registcr for the worlcshop. call 368-4411. Co-sponsors with the library are the Small Business Association and the Service Corps of Retired Executives. Nomi Schroeder will moderate the workshop which begins with Joe Treat of SCORE covering business license requirements. David Wells, head of reference at the Qarlc County Library, will discuss library resources for starting a business, followed by Laird Sanders, an insurance agent for New York Life, who will cover insurance for businesses. Banking officers of First Interstate Bank Russ Barker, who is Store provides postal services The U.S. Postal Service, to meet community needs, has contracted with Susan's HaUmark, 3335 E. Russell Road at Pecos Road, to provide domestic mail window services Monday through Saturday. In addition to stamp sales, services will include certified, insured, registered and express mail, plus domestic parcel post and money orders, officials said. Weekday hours of operation will be from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. except for a postal audit from 3 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Saturday hours will be from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Once over lijMy By Carolyn Drennan Bishop I was sitting around the other day watching my fingernails grow when my husband said, "What we need is a vacation." I couldn't believe my ears. This is a man whose idea of a trip is a cruise through the mall with a pitstop at a garage sale. "Now, don't get excited," he said, as I jumped to my feet. "I'm not talking Europe. I'm figuring something close by. I've made reservations at a quaint little inn in Coronado, outside of San Diego." The next morning, we were on the early morning flight to San Diego. At least, that's where we, and I assume, the pilot thought we were going. A few hundred feet into the air, the plane suddenly lurched to the left. I looked out of the window. "I think we're going to Las Vegas," I .said shakily. I was right. After a few circles we landed right back where we'd started. "Surprise!" said the pilot. "We left something flapping outside the rear door. As soon as we check that out, we'll depart." "Good heavens!" 1 shouted, "1 hope it's not a passenger." "Calm down," said my husband. "Everyone is looking at you." I looked around. He was right. Not only that, the stewardesses were glaring at me. When we finally arrived at our quaint little irm, 1 was not in a good mood. Especially when the antiquated elevator jammed between floors. With me in it. My husband was downstairs visiting with the pixiesh inn keeper who wore granny glasses and I swear, high bunon shoes. Eventually. Mrs. Pixie heard my calls for help. She toddled up the stairs where she unearthed Mr, Pixie who, after uttering a few un-pixie-like words, managed to free me and my baggage from the elevator. Worse was yet to come. Let me put it this way: The quaint room was so tiny that if I had weighed an ounce over 110 pounds, my husband and I would have spent the night in separate rooms. "Look at it this way," said my husband as I balanced on one leg In the comer, "Thirty year^ ago, we would have been thrilled to be this close together." You don't want to know my Itfiswer. I will tell you this. If I'd known 30 years ago that he was foing to be into "quaint." I would never have complained about jaunts to a garage sale. also a memberof the Active Corps of Executives, will present ways that a bank can help a business get started. Vito Neviackas of SCORE will discuss the legal aspects of a business and CPA Jean Fn^nksen will cover essentials of accounting and recordkeeping. Finally. Marie Papille of SB A will present SB A programs and resources available for staning a business. Vons More Bui^ And Double Coupons. ^^^^ _——\ __-c-cTe*v^ %^ I ^^g~~^^fc *IMaik ia Stan. Reg. or Diet-Assl Varieties 12 Oz. Cuns (6 ?ack RC-Diei RC or Chevry RC-12 Oz. Cans-IA9) Vons Everyday Low Price. B.B.Q. Style The Sweetest Corn Grown Save 1.00 on 6 f—-^. Fresh Broccoli Tighl Green Henth l.b.^ Grown in (he (J.S.A. o ^ r t Save .20 Lb. RipeHoneydewi Melons Peak of the Season California Grown Lb. I Save .14 Lb. Nutritious Bananas Ripe and Flavorful Save .48 on 3 Lbs. LIQUOR 12 Pack Miller Beer] Higli Life. Gtuiuine Droft orLite-)20z..Vfl.B. g^jy^ ^^Q PaulMassonWhileGrenache 3^^ 1.5 Llltr Hodlf Gallo Premium Blush 4^ ^ 3 Liter Bottle Bel Arbors Chanlomiay 2'J^^ 7'M MiHi/ilcr Hi:tlr Frajizia While Zinf^del Cooler 969 GROCERY/BAKERY SqueezIt Pn 199 Fruit Drinks Selected Varieties 6 Pack/6.75 Oz. BottJes Arm & Hammer Caipet Deodorizer 137 WFnpsh. Floral or.Scpiiled.2I()z.Cont Lindsay Ex-Large Olives Q Q Pitied s Ounce Coti • v# ^ Pillsbury Cake Mixes 99 • •' Seleclal VdrietieslB to laS Oz. Box ^ Vons Variety Buns ,75 Country Hearth Cookies 119 Selected Vamtiat12 Ounce Bag Tone Bath Bars flejorCreaniI90z.PI(R Buv 3 Bars-GCT I BAfl FREE 269 LibbysComed Beef Hash 119 155 Ounce Can Velveeta Cheese Spread 2 ^^ fl. MiW Of Hoi Mexican I Lb Pl|i Ralston Kitten Chow 2^^ 3.5 Pound Bog Wesson Com Oil 166 32 Ounce BotlJe Apple Tune Apple juice 169 64 Ounce BottJe DAIRY/DELI Vons Wisconsin Longhom Cheese Lb 2^^ Nfjdmil Cheddar C/icPsc-Mure Pack Q Land'0 Frost Thin Sliced Meats 125 ^ • ^ Scieclcd Vunebrs-ti Ounce Piiokuge ^ Tropicana Orange Juice 199 ^"^ Hi>gular or /tomesl> /. Ounce Carton }erseymaJd HA Nonfat Yogurt ..ijl (CA Seleclf^f V'drieties f ^^ W 8 Oz. Container Save.14 ^ Kraft Sliced Jack Cheese 179 1^ Delicieux Cheese Spread 119 ^ • IkirlirS-Herb-.'i.'i Ounce Pocloge Q 1 Can't Believe It's Not Butter 143 ^•^ Quurtf rs I Pound Packa^ ^ Brown Covy Farms Yogurts 125 ^ • Plain-32 Ounce Container IT,' 119 ^**'Apple Juice I ** I'n.stveetened 64 Ounce BottJe Save.30 ll;4 Lb. Eountiy Hearth Bread 109 169 IVhite or VWieot Rifz Bits Crackers ilnjimil IJIW Sail or Oieisi^ 10 to 11 (k Btu Chicken of the Sea Albacore Tuna 119 Solid W'hile-Porlred ;n W'alfr*5 (h. Can Macaroni & Cheddar Dion Golden GraJn-6 25 Ounce Box Macaroni & Cheddar Dinner 3^100 3 Pk. Brawny Paper Towels 2 ^ ^ 2 Ply-More Pacl Granny Smith • Apples Crop Zealand Groivn B on 2 Lbs. FROZEN ^lerseymaidftFl ^^ Ice Cream /fi Old FoshionedSel Bill' Voricties-v! Gallon Round Save 1.18 on 2 Carnation Bon Bons 195 .Milk or Dark Chocolote-y Ounce Pkg. Banquet Pot Pies .49 Oiifkm Vffrtobla •'Beef or lurkey.7 Oi Pkj Lenders Bagels .39 Plain. Egg or Onion 12 Ounce Package Swanson Great Starts Breakfast 179 Sousoge 6' Biscuil-A Ounce Package Dreyer's Grand QQQ Ught Ice Cream ,15*' Seiecled Flavors \M M Gallon Round 1 Pound Package SOVe UD TO 1.39 Great on the Grill Porterhouse or T-Bone Steaks Vons Lean Beef V4" Thin Trimmed Save 1.51 Lb. Boneless Filet MimonSteaks ._ ,^ \M Lb. Save .29 Lb. Vans Lean Beef W Thin Trimmed Boneless Shoulder Clod Roast Vons Lean Beef W Thin Trimmed Lb. Save. 30 Lb. Wilson Sausage Smoked or Poiish Save.60 Lb. U.S.D.C Q2Q Bay Shrimp f "f f Cooked and Peeled ^^ L D. Federally Inspected ,-, ^r. r t Save .90 Lb. Boneless Top Sirloin Steaks hours' 'Most Von* Are Portidpatini^ OMCIC Vour Local Stores AD PUCES EmcnVI 2 niU WEEKS Vons Lean Beef 'A' Thin Trimmed Save 1.00 Lb. 9mi^ **--^ TM*itr mw^m^ TW^ tMmt iitaf^ An• • • II t] 11 14 il (• 17 II II 11 ua |fIi M-TI iw VaM bttlna MMnH tm. I^M • > nIMl MMato Mir HM Mw •MaMtowiiM T*ria .eA lUIA M itoM H^M M aotifMri IWi Ml *Mou m Au COM imiwo fux wMUk PMM HUT AawnwB MH. Finally^ a store that mH(s, FULL SER\'1CE BAKERY (All Butter Pound Cake HABA/G.IVI. SJiced-Plain, Choc, or Marble-10 Ounce Save.20 Eat *J\J French Bread I Pound Loaf Picnic Favorite A Oat Bran Muffins n,2^^ ^ • ^ or Rice Bran-Ail V'arieties-( (ijunt Af, ^ Chocolate or Peanul Butter Brownies 2 ^9 '•^ Rich and Oiewyl4 Oz. Pockoge Cloths .99 SERVICi: DFIJ With This Coupon No. 842 1.50 OFF The Purchase of 1 Pound or More Wilson Lite Porl( Roast at 5.99 Lb. Limit I Coupon Ptr Fmmlly. Efftctivt Au|. 9 liiru 22. IMS. Redeemobte Only at Vont H'ilh a Service Dll. AllCotlon 3 Count Package Close-lIp or Aim Toothpaste 2^3 H.2 Ounce Tulx! ^ Sinarest Tablets 2^^ ^mt^ flpg^ ^j, ^jj Drowsiness FormuIas-ZO Ci ^ Aapri Fadal Scrub 3 ^ ^ ^•^ 2 Ounce Pockoge Aapri Facial Scrub 4^^ 4 OuRa Pockoju Babe Deodorant 199 lUi-Oli'} 0:. Spny-iS Ota Super Dry Solid-ZS (k LIBRARY This Week's feature VOLUME 8 From Whales To Snails $2.79 VOLUME 1 .99 • ANTAMMOK*.^ Asthma group to gather The Qark County Asthma Support Group, sponsored by the American Lung Association, will hold its monthly meeting at 7 p.m. Aug. 24, at the Lung Association Office, 4100 Boulder Highway. A nurse from the Clark County School District will be available for questions regarding school policies on medications and other needs of asthmatic children attending classes this fall. Parents of asthmatic children are encouraged to attend. For more information, contact the American Lung Association at 454-2500. Quilt competition announced The Clark County Heritage Museum is sponsoring a juried quilt competition and exhibit to be held in January 1990. The exhibit will be displayed at two locations: the Museum in Henderson, and at Winchester Community Center in Las Vegaa According to Museum Curator Mark Ryzdynski, the quilt competition is planned as an annual event, "guilts are both an important part of our nation's history, and an exciting, contemporary art form," said Ryzdynski. The museum hopes to encourage quiltmaking and the appreciation of quilts as cultural artifacts." A unique aspect of the competition is the Nevada theme category. Original quilts, limited to crib-size and which use a Nevada theme in their design, will be eligible for the Nevada purchase award. The museum will purchase the winning quilt in that category for $400 and make it part of the Museum's permanent collection. There are several other categories, and prizes will be awarded in all categories In addition, every entrant juried into the show will be awarded a certificate. Deadline for entries is Dec 1. The competition is open to anyone who submits a color photo or slide, entry form and $5 entry charge. Limit is five entries per person. Entrants will be notified by Dec. 15. Tb obtain a brochure detailing categories and entry rules, call the Clark County Cultural Division, Department of Parks and Recreation, 455-7340. Mine report available The Nevada Department of Minerals has announced that its 1988 Preliminary Report of A''tive Mines is now available. The directory lists information which includes the location, commodity type, mine status, production and numbers of employees for more than 150 operations throughout the state. Information is obtained from the mining industry through annual reporting of mineral resource data. The department has deveK oped the directory to serve as a source of information to the mineral industry and other interested parties. The document can be obtained at no charge by calling the Nevada Department of Minerals at 885-5050 oiwriting to 400 W. King Street, Suite 106, Carson City, Nev. 89710. 88ij{pSa'lil!IWi|i.M^-^.ilill^ki'l^i^l;^^ ipr

PAGE 24

iw / \,l Pf U, HadMoa Home News, Boulder City News, Gntn Vally NWB Thunday, August 10, 1989 Thursday, August 10, 1989 Hendaraon Homa Nwi, Boulder City News, Green Vall^ News Page 2S Baldlzan named assistant to VP Elizabeth Baldizan was recently named assistant to the vice president for student services at UNLV. Raldizan's duties will cover a variety of supervisory and administrative tasks, including public relations and student development. She will also assist other university depadmertts that woric with students. Baldizan received her master of arts degree in education {Tom,^ the University of New Mexico. She is currently working on her doctorate degree in educational administration. Elizabeth Baldizan August evening programs at Lake Mead listed Campground Road. off Lakeshore Lake Mead National Recreation Area will present several free information programs this month, officials announced this week. Each program begins at 8:30 p.m. and lasts approximately Boulder Beach Amphitheater 45 minutes, they said. prior to the regularly scheduled The programs, on a variety programs, of topics, will be held in the Boulder Beach Amphitheater The programs include "A located in the Boulder Beach Worker on the Dam," Friday, Children's activities are scheduled at 7 p.m., each Friday and Saturday in the Aug. 11; *t;acti of the Southwest," Saturday, Aug. 12; "Indian Folklore," Friday, Aug. 18; "Flash Floods," Saturday, Aug. 19; "Desert Adaptations of Plants and Animals," Friday, Aug. 25; "Desert's Maligned Creatures. Ohh! Ick! Ahh!," Saturday, Aug. 26. For further information, call the Alan Bible Visitor Center at 702/293-8906. iMfa Volunteer drivers needed"^ Volunteer drivers are desperately needed by the Clark County unit of the American Cancer Society to take cancer patients to and from their treatments. Volunteers, spokespersons said, should be good listeners and have a desire to help duninish the suffering caused by cancer. The unit is also looking for someone to coordinate its transportation department. Such a person should have good phone skills and be able to give four to five volunteer hours per week to help cancer patients. Anyone interested in volunteering for the American Cancer Society is urged to call 798-6877. • — 'How to Start A Business* workshop offered An all-day workshop on how to start a small business will be offered from 9 ^.m. to 4 p.in. Friday, Aug. 18, at the Spring Valley Library, 4280 So. Jones. To pre-registcr for the worlcshop. call 368-4411. Co-sponsors with the library are the Small Business Association and the Service Corps of Retired Executives. Nomi Schroeder will moderate the workshop which begins with Joe Treat of SCORE covering business license requirements. David Wells, head of reference at the Qarlc County Library, will discuss library resources for starting a business, followed by Laird Sanders, an insurance agent for New York Life, who will cover insurance for businesses. Banking officers of First Interstate Bank Russ Barker, who is Store provides postal services The U.S. Postal Service, to meet community needs, has contracted with Susan's HaUmark, 3335 E. Russell Road at Pecos Road, to provide domestic mail window services Monday through Saturday. In addition to stamp sales, services will include certified, insured, registered and express mail, plus domestic parcel post and money orders, officials said. Weekday hours of operation will be from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. except for a postal audit from 3 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Saturday hours will be from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Once over lijMy By Carolyn Drennan Bishop I was sitting around the other day watching my fingernails grow when my husband said, "What we need is a vacation." I couldn't believe my ears. This is a man whose idea of a trip is a cruise through the mall with a pitstop at a garage sale. "Now, don't get excited," he said, as I jumped to my feet. "I'm not talking Europe. I'm figuring something close by. I've made reservations at a quaint little inn in Coronado, outside of San Diego." The next morning, we were on the early morning flight to San Diego. At least, that's where we, and I assume, the pilot thought we were going. A few hundred feet into the air, the plane suddenly lurched to the left. I looked out of the window. "I think we're going to Las Vegas," I .said shakily. I was right. After a few circles we landed right back where we'd started. "Surprise!" said the pilot. "We left something flapping outside the rear door. As soon as we check that out, we'll depart." "Good heavens!" 1 shouted, "1 hope it's not a passenger." "Calm down," said my husband. "Everyone is looking at you." I looked around. He was right. Not only that, the stewardesses were glaring at me. When we finally arrived at our quaint little irm, 1 was not in a good mood. Especially when the antiquated elevator jammed between floors. With me in it. My husband was downstairs visiting with the pixiesh inn keeper who wore granny glasses and I swear, high bunon shoes. Eventually. Mrs. Pixie heard my calls for help. She toddled up the stairs where she unearthed Mr, Pixie who, after uttering a few un-pixie-like words, managed to free me and my baggage from the elevator. Worse was yet to come. Let me put it this way: The quaint room was so tiny that if I had weighed an ounce over 110 pounds, my husband and I would have spent the night in separate rooms. "Look at it this way," said my husband as I balanced on one leg In the comer, "Thirty year^ ago, we would have been thrilled to be this close together." You don't want to know my Itfiswer. I will tell you this. If I'd known 30 years ago that he was foing to be into "quaint." I would never have complained about jaunts to a garage sale. also a memberof the Active Corps of Executives, will present ways that a bank can help a business get started. Vito Neviackas of SCORE will discuss the legal aspects of a business and CPA Jean Fn^nksen will cover essentials of accounting and recordkeeping. Finally. Marie Papille of SB A will present SB A programs and resources available for staning a business. Vons More Bui^ And Double Coupons. ^^^^ _——\ __-c-cTe*v^ %^ I ^^g~~^^fc *IMaik ia Stan. Reg. or Diet-Assl Varieties 12 Oz. Cuns (6 ?ack RC-Diei RC or Chevry RC-12 Oz. Cans-IA9) Vons Everyday Low Price. B.B.Q. Style The Sweetest Corn Grown Save 1.00 on 6 f—-^. Fresh Broccoli Tighl Green Henth l.b.^ Grown in (he (J.S.A. o ^ r t Save .20 Lb. RipeHoneydewi Melons Peak of the Season California Grown Lb. I Save .14 Lb. Nutritious Bananas Ripe and Flavorful Save .48 on 3 Lbs. LIQUOR 12 Pack Miller Beer] Higli Life. Gtuiuine Droft orLite-)20z..Vfl.B. g^jy^ ^^Q PaulMassonWhileGrenache 3^^ 1.5 Llltr Hodlf Gallo Premium Blush 4^ ^ 3 Liter Bottle Bel Arbors Chanlomiay 2'J^^ 7'M MiHi/ilcr Hi:tlr Frajizia While Zinf^del Cooler 969 GROCERY/BAKERY SqueezIt Pn 199 Fruit Drinks Selected Varieties 6 Pack/6.75 Oz. BottJes Arm & Hammer Caipet Deodorizer 137 WFnpsh. Floral or.Scpiiled.2I()z.Cont Lindsay Ex-Large Olives Q Q Pitied s Ounce Coti • v# ^ Pillsbury Cake Mixes 99 • •' Seleclal VdrietieslB to laS Oz. Box ^ Vons Variety Buns ,75 Country Hearth Cookies 119 Selected Vamtiat12 Ounce Bag Tone Bath Bars flejorCreaniI90z.PI(R Buv 3 Bars-GCT I BAfl FREE 269 LibbysComed Beef Hash 119 155 Ounce Can Velveeta Cheese Spread 2 ^^ fl. MiW Of Hoi Mexican I Lb Pl|i Ralston Kitten Chow 2^^ 3.5 Pound Bog Wesson Com Oil 166 32 Ounce BotlJe Apple Tune Apple juice 169 64 Ounce BottJe DAIRY/DELI Vons Wisconsin Longhom Cheese Lb 2^^ Nfjdmil Cheddar C/icPsc-Mure Pack Q Land'0 Frost Thin Sliced Meats 125 ^ • ^ Scieclcd Vunebrs-ti Ounce Piiokuge ^ Tropicana Orange Juice 199 ^"^ Hi>gular or /tomesl> /. Ounce Carton }erseymaJd HA Nonfat Yogurt ..ijl (CA Seleclf^f V'drieties f ^^ W 8 Oz. Container Save.14 ^ Kraft Sliced Jack Cheese 179 1^ Delicieux Cheese Spread 119 ^ • IkirlirS-Herb-.'i.'i Ounce Pocloge Q 1 Can't Believe It's Not Butter 143 ^•^ Quurtf rs I Pound Packa^ ^ Brown Covy Farms Yogurts 125 ^ • Plain-32 Ounce Container IT,' 119 ^**'Apple Juice I ** I'n.stveetened 64 Ounce BottJe Save.30 ll;4 Lb. Eountiy Hearth Bread 109 169 IVhite or VWieot Rifz Bits Crackers ilnjimil IJIW Sail or Oieisi^ 10 to 11 (k Btu Chicken of the Sea Albacore Tuna 119 Solid W'hile-Porlred ;n W'alfr*5 (h. Can Macaroni & Cheddar Dion Golden GraJn-6 25 Ounce Box Macaroni & Cheddar Dinner 3^100 3 Pk. Brawny Paper Towels 2 ^ ^ 2 Ply-More Pacl Granny Smith • Apples Crop Zealand Groivn B on 2 Lbs. FROZEN ^lerseymaidftFl ^^ Ice Cream /fi Old FoshionedSel Bill' Voricties-v! Gallon Round Save 1.18 on 2 Carnation Bon Bons 195 .Milk or Dark Chocolote-y Ounce Pkg. Banquet Pot Pies .49 Oiifkm Vffrtobla •'Beef or lurkey.7 Oi Pkj Lenders Bagels .39 Plain. Egg or Onion 12 Ounce Package Swanson Great Starts Breakfast 179 Sousoge 6' Biscuil-A Ounce Package Dreyer's Grand QQQ Ught Ice Cream ,15*' Seiecled Flavors \M M Gallon Round 1 Pound Package SOVe UD TO 1.39 Great on the Grill Porterhouse or T-Bone Steaks Vons Lean Beef V4" Thin Trimmed Save 1.51 Lb. Boneless Filet MimonSteaks ._ ,^ \M Lb. Save .29 Lb. Vans Lean Beef W Thin Trimmed Boneless Shoulder Clod Roast Vons Lean Beef W Thin Trimmed Lb. Save. 30 Lb. Wilson Sausage Smoked or Poiish Save.60 Lb. U.S.D.C Q2Q Bay Shrimp f "f f Cooked and Peeled ^^ L D. Federally Inspected ,-, ^r. r t Save .90 Lb. Boneless Top Sirloin Steaks hours' 'Most Von* Are Portidpatini^ OMCIC Vour Local Stores AD PUCES EmcnVI 2 niU WEEKS Vons Lean Beef 'A' Thin Trimmed Save 1.00 Lb. 9mi^ **--^ TM*itr mw^m^ TW^ tMmt iitaf^ An• • • II t] 11 14 il (• 17 II II 11 ua |fIi M-TI iw VaM bttlna MMnH tm. I^M • > nIMl MMato Mir HM Mw •MaMtowiiM T*ria .eA lUIA M itoM H^M M aotifMri IWi Ml *Mou m Au COM imiwo fux wMUk PMM HUT AawnwB MH. Finally^ a store that mH(s, FULL SER\'1CE BAKERY (All Butter Pound Cake HABA/G.IVI. SJiced-Plain, Choc, or Marble-10 Ounce Save.20 Eat *J\J French Bread I Pound Loaf Picnic Favorite A Oat Bran Muffins n,2^^ ^ • ^ or Rice Bran-Ail V'arieties-( (ijunt Af, ^ Chocolate or Peanul Butter Brownies 2 ^9 '•^ Rich and Oiewyl4 Oz. Pockoge Cloths .99 SERVICi: DFIJ With This Coupon No. 842 1.50 OFF The Purchase of 1 Pound or More Wilson Lite Porl( Roast at 5.99 Lb. Limit I Coupon Ptr Fmmlly. Efftctivt Au|. 9 liiru 22. IMS. Redeemobte Only at Vont H'ilh a Service Dll. AllCotlon 3 Count Package Close-lIp or Aim Toothpaste 2^3 H.2 Ounce Tulx! ^ Sinarest Tablets 2^^ ^mt^ flpg^ ^j, ^jj Drowsiness FormuIas-ZO Ci ^ Aapri Fadal Scrub 3 ^ ^ ^•^ 2 Ounce Pockoge Aapri Facial Scrub 4^^ 4 OuRa Pockoju Babe Deodorant 199 lUi-Oli'} 0:. Spny-iS Ota Super Dry Solid-ZS (k LIBRARY This Week's feature VOLUME 8 From Whales To Snails $2.79 VOLUME 1 .99 • ANTAMMOK*.^ Asthma group to gather The Qark County Asthma Support Group, sponsored by the American Lung Association, will hold its monthly meeting at 7 p.m. Aug. 24, at the Lung Association Office, 4100 Boulder Highway. A nurse from the Clark County School District will be available for questions regarding school policies on medications and other needs of asthmatic children attending classes this fall. Parents of asthmatic children are encouraged to attend. For more information, contact the American Lung Association at 454-2500. Quilt competition announced The Clark County Heritage Museum is sponsoring a juried quilt competition and exhibit to be held in January 1990. The exhibit will be displayed at two locations: the Museum in Henderson, and at Winchester Community Center in Las Vegaa According to Museum Curator Mark Ryzdynski, the quilt competition is planned as an annual event, "guilts are both an important part of our nation's history, and an exciting, contemporary art form," said Ryzdynski. The museum hopes to encourage quiltmaking and the appreciation of quilts as cultural artifacts." A unique aspect of the competition is the Nevada theme category. Original quilts, limited to crib-size and which use a Nevada theme in their design, will be eligible for the Nevada purchase award. The museum will purchase the winning quilt in that category for $400 and make it part of the Museum's permanent collection. There are several other categories, and prizes will be awarded in all categories In addition, every entrant juried into the show will be awarded a certificate. Deadline for entries is Dec 1. The competition is open to anyone who submits a color photo or slide, entry form and $5 entry charge. Limit is five entries per person. Entrants will be notified by Dec. 15. Tb obtain a brochure detailing categories and entry rules, call the Clark County Cultural Division, Department of Parks and Recreation, 455-7340. Mine report available The Nevada Department of Minerals has announced that its 1988 Preliminary Report of A''tive Mines is now available. The directory lists information which includes the location, commodity type, mine status, production and numbers of employees for more than 150 operations throughout the state. Information is obtained from the mining industry through annual reporting of mineral resource data. The department has deveK oped the directory to serve as a source of information to the mineral industry and other interested parties. The document can be obtained at no charge by calling the Nevada Department of Minerals at 885-5050 oiwriting to 400 W. King Street, Suite 106, Carson City, Nev. 89710. 88ij{pSa'lil!IWi|i.M^-^.ilill^ki'l^i^l;^^ ipr

PAGE 25

wmmmtm Pf 26, Headeraon Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Thuraday, August 10, 1989 Exxon wins 'Globerotter Award' of 1989 WASHINGTON Exxon has *a brand new distinction: the "Globerotter Award" of 1989. The Globerotter Award was announced last week by Sen. Harry Reid and Congressman Mel Levine. Exxon won the award in recognition of its role in this year's Alaska oil spill. The Globerotter Award recognizes organizations that have shown a callous disregard for the environment and the global quality of life. The only previous winner is the U.S. Department of Energy, which was honored last year for leaking deadly plutonium into the ground at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Exxon Chairman Lawrence ^j. Rawl also received special mention for his many controverial public statements regarding the Alaska oil spill. Reid and Levine also presented last year's Globerotter Award. In announcing the Exxon award. Sen. Reid said: • 'The real horror story of 1989 isn't 'Friday the 13th: Jason Takes Manhatten,' it's "March the 24th: Exxon Rapes Alaska.. and then, the world.' "The • Alaska oil spill has destroyed a \yay of hfe, killed thousands of animals, ruined 730 miles of coasthne, devastated an ecosystem, pushed gas prices up and wiU cost the American taxpayer at least $300 milhon. "Exxon has put pubhc relations — and bad P.R. at that — above the environment. It has consistently underestimated the damage to the enviroimient and dodged responsibility for its poor performance. Just two weeks ago, it issued a memo saying that it was done for this year and that it wouldn't make any promises for next year. "That disgraceful performance is the environmental horror story of the year. By any standard, Exxon's conduct is a runaway winner for the Globerotter Award of 1989." The estimated environmental damage to Alaska because of the oil spill is: 730 miles of danlaged coastline; 27,548 birds killed: 872 otters killed; and 108 eagles killed. It is also estimated that Exxon will get a $300 million tax deduction for its clean-up expenses — without any assurance that the clean-up was thorough, complete or in good faith. Reid is the author of the Oil Spill Bill, which would prevent polluters like Exxon from getting an automatic tax deduction for cleaning up an environmental disaster they caused in the first place. The Oil Spill Bill is in the Senate Finance Committee. In response to stockholder protests regarding the oil spill in May, Exxon Chariman Lawrence G. Rawl has complained: "What do you want me to say, that I'm going to make it disappear? I can't." Chairman Rawl also offered this advice to companies and chief executive officers confronting an environmental disaster: "You ought to have a pubhc relations plan." By his sayings. Chairman Rawl consistently minimized the Alaska oil spill and its damage to the environment, government officials said. Cogently capturing the "callous disregard" for the enviroimient and the global quahty of hfe, as embodied by the Globerotter Award. Secretaries to meet The Oasis Chapter of Professional Secretaries International will hold a summer get-acquainted open house in heu of its monthly meeting from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday, Aug. 21 at the home of member Carol Turner. For more information, call 791-4231 or 365-6020. / Whan your cleaning aupplles are acceaaibia and naatly atored, your choraa will aaam aaaiar. Ninth cellular site completed Centel Cellular Co. announced today that it has completed construction of its ninth cell site located on the comer of Desert Inn Road and Swenson Road. The site includes a 150-foot monopole tower and is one of three new cell sites constructed within the last year. Total construction cost of the new site is estimated at more than $750,000. The new facility will provide added channel availabihty for cellular users, especially in the downtown and southeast eu-eas of Las Vegas. "We are experiencing a phenomenal surge of cellular use in the Las Vegas area," said Linda McLeod, general manager of Centel Cellular Coijipany. "Centel is keeping pace with the increasing number of cellular users by continually upgrading the quality of its system." • In addition to its Las Vegas expansion, earlier this month Centel signed definitive agreements to acquire majority interest in Sioux City, Iowa, Petersburg/Colonial Heights, Va., and Laredo, Texas, cellular systems, pending Federal Communications Commission approval. When Centel begins service in those new areas, the company will have operating control in 44 markets, with a total population of more than 13.3 million persons. Centel is ranked second in total number of cellular markets served in the country. In addition to its cellular properties, Chicago-based Centel Corp., which had 1988 revenues of $1.09 biUion, provides local exchange telephone service in nine states through more than 1.5 milhon access hnes and provides electric power to 135,000 customers in two states. The company recently announced definitive agreements to sell its cable television operations, which serve more than 578,000 customers in six states, and is seeking bids for its business systems operations, facilities which market, design and install advanced telecommunications and data systems to more than 18,000 customers across the nation. A New Rose Has Blossomed, .. ^ t. Hose de Lima Hospital has a new name. The hospital is dedicated to the memory of St. Rose of Lima, Peru, a selfless woman who devoted her life to caring for the poor and outcast of her city. The new name promotes St. Rose's religious order, Dominican, as a stronger way of identifying with our heritage. So, you see, the change will instill a greater appreciation for the Dominican spirit, one of compassion and truth, which has made the hospital what it is today. It is, indeed, a very special place to receive medical care. At St. Rose Dominican Hospital, the tradition of quality Catholic healthcare continues. 102 E. Lake Mead Drive • Henderson, NV 89015 (702} 564-2622 MAIL BOX RENTALS S5 mo & up MAIL MESSAGES & Mora. PfWHINQ, COPIES A FAX 564-5574 In Van' Shopping CanMf IS YOUR WA TERSAFE TO DRINK? Enioy UNLIMITED Sparkling Clear Water FRESH From Your Tap FOR LESS THAN •3.00 A MONTH AMTECH FREE f Air & Water Systems Famous Royal Doulton Fitters Est. 1827 EPA Reg. #43434-3 •FrM liwtaltotlon •Fr Water Saftty CiMck •Fr (Mlvcfy •FrscCanwra Cmll Today 873'9001 3111 So. Valley View VilUABU COUPON ^ SpMial UmHsd Offer Y^ FREE 35nim CAMERA with FREE Wat0rT0t CAMERA Includes CaseA Carrying Strap Absolutely No PurclMM t*e9tMary FREE tmda omfma STARTING AT $9000 Car or Truck With Lifetime Warranty o CAR CARE MEANS NO GLARE 4625 E. Tropicana 898-0012 iZSIc l^ r A CUI6INE • COCKTAIL EAPEDIENO; Green Valley'<§ Newest And Finest Dining And Cocktail Establisnment Breakfast (3' Lunch 10 A.M. 2:30 P.M. + Dinner 6 P.M. -11 P.M Cocktail Lounge 10 A.M. Thru Midnight 4451 E. SUNSET DOAD 1/4 MILE WMT or MOlWrMN VldTA 4354000 Thorsdey, Aagnst 10.1988 Hendsrsoo Home Newe, BouMsr City News, Oreee Vslley News Page 27 Continniiig gallery ezhiUte: Ancient Oceans—Marine Fossils of Clarlc County Exhibit at the Clark County Heritage Museum. Sea creatures in stone from a time when the local desert was beach front property. Rare mineral specimens and fossils from the museum collection and the collections of the Cahfomia Federation of Mineralogical Societies and the Great Basin Chapter of the Friends of Mineralogy. The exhibit to run through Oct. 1. Museum open 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily. Admissions $1 adults, 50 cents seniors and children. 1830 So. Boulder Highway, Henderson. Tfelephone 455-7955. Saturday, Aug. 12 15th Annual Art-A-Fair Touring Exhibition (through Aug. 13). West Las Vegas, Cassell Gallery. Landscape Imagery: Oil and mixed media paintings by Vic Jones and Duncan McKerracher utilize architectural and landscape imagery (through Aug. 20). Clark Ck)unty, Main Gallery. Large Format Photography: Ldrge format black and white studies of light and shadow by Joy Prendergast incorporate objects and people-as-objects (through Aug. 20). Clark County, Photography Gallery. Cnmned Head—with the splendors of Tonsorial Prowress: An exhibit by Dennie Pasion of hairpieces and photographs that utilize different concepts in hair design (through Aug. 15). Green Valley GaUery. Silent Orators: Encaustic, mixed media sculptures by Gary Szymanski (through Aug. 14). Spring Valley, Lull Gallery. Desert Quilters: A selection of quilts, featuring traditional and original designs, handmade by members of Desert Quilters of Nevada (through Sept. 5). Sunrise, Gallery. Programs: (YPL = Young People's Ubrary) Saturday, Aug. 12 Family FiUns: 'Tap Dance Kid" & "Special Trade" 2 p.m. West Las Vegas, 647-2117. The Reel Thing: In "The Land Before Time," lost and alone, Littlefoot and his friends are about to embark on the journey of a lifetime. Check with your local branch for ticket information. Children under 7 must be accompanied by an adult. Preregistration is requested. 10 a.m. Charleston Heights, 878-3682 and 10:30 a.m. Clark County, 733-3616. The Finishing Touch: Chef Les Kincaid demonstrates unique ideas and recipes on how to make outdoor dining an unforgettable and enjoyable experience. Preregistration requested. 11 a.m. West Las Vegas, Patio, 647-2117. Classic Images Film Series: It's simple and about as heavy as a handful of cotton candy, but everyone has such a good time at the "State Fair," starring Jeanne Grain, Dana Andrews, Dick Haymes and Harry Morgan. 1 p.m. Clark County, Aud., 733-3613. Monday, Aug. 14 Classic Images Film Series: "State Fair" (See Aug. 11). 11 a.m. West Las Vegas, 647-2117. Golden Spike Celebration: Stories, tihns, participant honors and festivities such as a Morse Code contest mark the end of the line for Tasha and her reading program passengers. 3 p.m. Clark County, 733-3616. K.I.D.S. An eight-part series designed to help school-aged children who must spend time alone. Presented by the Nevada C!ooperative Extension Services. Pre-registration is requested. 3:30 p.m. Clark County, 733-3613. The Reel Thing: (See Aug. 11) Children tmder seven must be accompanied by an adult. 6:30 p.m. Sunrise, 453-1104. Tuesday, Aug. 15 Gallery Opening: Limited edition "Prints by Black Artists," such as Ernie Barnes, Romare Bearden and Joseph Holston, who represent a new wave of painters, portray positive black lifestyles (through Sept. 12). West Las Vegas, Beni Casselle GaUery, 435-0919. K.I.D.S. (See Aug. 14). 3:30 p.m. Clark County, 733-3616. The Reel Thing (See Aug. 11) Pre-registration is requested. 3:30 p.m. Green Valley, 435-1840 and 6:30 p.m. Spring Valley, 368-4411. Classic Images Film Series: "State Fair" (see Aug. 11). 7 p.m. Green Valley, 435-1840. Storytellers of Las Vegas: Open to adults. 7:30 p.m. Charleston Heights, 878-3682. Wednesday, Aug. 16 Become user friendly with the library: Volunteer docents invite you to take behind-the-scenes toiu-s of the library, 10 a.m., Clark County, Main Gallery. 733-3622. The Reel Thing: (See Aug. 14) Children under seven must be accompanied by an adult. 6:30 p.m. Rainbow, 645-7500. FOR SALE OR LEASE Completely Equipped Doctors Office. 5,000 sq. ft. Facility includes Complete X-Ray with Fiuoroscopy. Complete DuPont Chemistry Laboratory with Blood Gas Analysis and Endoscopy Equipment. All Six Exams Rooms are Fully Furnished and there are 3 Large Special Procedure Rooms. This property is located In Boulder City. 366-0640 Calendar of Events Gallery Opening: "15th Annual Art-A-Fair Touring Exhibition (see Aug. 1; through Sept. 17). Spring Valley, Dana Marie Lull Gallery, 368-4411. K.I.D.S.(See Aug. 14)at 3:30 p.m. Clark County, 733-3616. Las Vegas Poetry Group: Open to the public. 7 p.m. Clark County, (joxd. Rm., 733-3613. Thursday, Aug. 17 K.I.D.S. (See Aug. 14) 3:30 p.m. Clark County, 733-3616. Gallery Opening and Reception: Handwoven tapestries by Kim Kennedy, of original southwestern, figurative and abstract designs that utilize 45 colors of hand-dyes wool (through Sept 19). 5 p.m. Green Valley, 435-1840. Driver education program for seniors scheduled Friday, Aug. 18 How to Start a Small Business Workshop: An all day workshop, sponsored by S.C.O.R.E. and SBA, covers such topics as costs of starting a business, banking, record keeping, planning, legal aspects and resources. Pre-registration is required. From 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Spring Valley, 368-4411. K.I.D.S. (see Aug. 14) 3:30 p.m. Clark County, 733-3616. The American Association of Retired Persons will conduct its acclaimed 55 Alive/Mature Driving course for all area citizens age 50 and older on Thursday and Friday, Aug. 17-18, at Sierra Visu retirement community. Instnjcted by Jack Meyers, the eight-hourdrivereducation course offers senior citizens refresher classes in safe driving and will lead to lower insurance rates. The course is split into two sessions, both from noon to 4 p.m. All sessions must be attended to receive certification. Reservations are required and should be made by Aug. 14 by calling 7322800. Cost for the course is $7. All checks should be made payable to AARP, officials said. The national 55 Alive program has been in existence since* 1969 and has graduated more than 650,000 motorists age 50 and older. In addition to dealing with age-related physical and perceptual changes that affect driving, the course can save insurance costs for participants.. For more 732-2800. infonnation call. House of Emeralds 14 kt. Ladies Hniald $19.95 ;in(l up Diamond Sliid Karrinys .15 tw $99.95 .20 tw $109.95 14 kt. lialn Hoop F;arrmjis....$ 19.95 4 ^ The Blrtbitoac for Auguct li ^ PERIDOT Cone ID tat jrour FREE STONE (vWltMiU) We buy gold, silver, diamonds and coins OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK JEWERL Y REPAIR WHILE YOU WAIT OR WITHIN 24 HOURS CUSTOM WORK: WHOLESALE GEMSTONES-LAYAWAY PLAN 3315E. Russell, Suite A-1 Riaiell k Pecoe in ihe Von'f Shopping Center 458-0800 VUi MC AmEx • • \ Ring Ring Ring Ring Ring Ring Ring Ring Ring 4 Advertise in our ^llow Pages and you'll never hear the end of it If you want your phone to ring all year long, then place your ad in the Centel Yellow Pages. No other directory reaches more potential customers. That's because ours is the only directory from your local phone company that's delivered to eveiy home and business in the area with phone service. Around the clock, around the calendar, your message is ready to reach customers who are ready to buy. Fact is, almost 8 out of 10 people use the Yellow Pages each month. Again and again. So if you want to get the most out of your advertising dollars, put your ad where it does the most good. In the Centel Yellow Pages. The ringing will be music to your ears. Where people connect GH

PAGE 26

wmmmtm Pf 26, Headeraon Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Thuraday, August 10, 1989 Exxon wins 'Globerotter Award' of 1989 WASHINGTON Exxon has *a brand new distinction: the "Globerotter Award" of 1989. The Globerotter Award was announced last week by Sen. Harry Reid and Congressman Mel Levine. Exxon won the award in recognition of its role in this year's Alaska oil spill. The Globerotter Award recognizes organizations that have shown a callous disregard for the environment and the global quality of life. The only previous winner is the U.S. Department of Energy, which was honored last year for leaking deadly plutonium into the ground at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Exxon Chairman Lawrence ^j. Rawl also received special mention for his many controverial public statements regarding the Alaska oil spill. Reid and Levine also presented last year's Globerotter Award. In announcing the Exxon award. Sen. Reid said: • 'The real horror story of 1989 isn't 'Friday the 13th: Jason Takes Manhatten,' it's "March the 24th: Exxon Rapes Alaska.. and then, the world.' "The • Alaska oil spill has destroyed a \yay of hfe, killed thousands of animals, ruined 730 miles of coasthne, devastated an ecosystem, pushed gas prices up and wiU cost the American taxpayer at least $300 milhon. "Exxon has put pubhc relations — and bad P.R. at that — above the environment. It has consistently underestimated the damage to the enviroimient and dodged responsibility for its poor performance. Just two weeks ago, it issued a memo saying that it was done for this year and that it wouldn't make any promises for next year. "That disgraceful performance is the environmental horror story of the year. By any standard, Exxon's conduct is a runaway winner for the Globerotter Award of 1989." The estimated environmental damage to Alaska because of the oil spill is: 730 miles of danlaged coastline; 27,548 birds killed: 872 otters killed; and 108 eagles killed. It is also estimated that Exxon will get a $300 million tax deduction for its clean-up expenses — without any assurance that the clean-up was thorough, complete or in good faith. Reid is the author of the Oil Spill Bill, which would prevent polluters like Exxon from getting an automatic tax deduction for cleaning up an environmental disaster they caused in the first place. The Oil Spill Bill is in the Senate Finance Committee. In response to stockholder protests regarding the oil spill in May, Exxon Chariman Lawrence G. Rawl has complained: "What do you want me to say, that I'm going to make it disappear? I can't." Chairman Rawl also offered this advice to companies and chief executive officers confronting an environmental disaster: "You ought to have a pubhc relations plan." By his sayings. Chairman Rawl consistently minimized the Alaska oil spill and its damage to the environment, government officials said. Cogently capturing the "callous disregard" for the enviroimient and the global quahty of hfe, as embodied by the Globerotter Award. Secretaries to meet The Oasis Chapter of Professional Secretaries International will hold a summer get-acquainted open house in heu of its monthly meeting from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday, Aug. 21 at the home of member Carol Turner. For more information, call 791-4231 or 365-6020. / Whan your cleaning aupplles are acceaaibia and naatly atored, your choraa will aaam aaaiar. Ninth cellular site completed Centel Cellular Co. announced today that it has completed construction of its ninth cell site located on the comer of Desert Inn Road and Swenson Road. The site includes a 150-foot monopole tower and is one of three new cell sites constructed within the last year. Total construction cost of the new site is estimated at more than $750,000. The new facility will provide added channel availabihty for cellular users, especially in the downtown and southeast eu-eas of Las Vegas. "We are experiencing a phenomenal surge of cellular use in the Las Vegas area," said Linda McLeod, general manager of Centel Cellular Coijipany. "Centel is keeping pace with the increasing number of cellular users by continually upgrading the quality of its system." • In addition to its Las Vegas expansion, earlier this month Centel signed definitive agreements to acquire majority interest in Sioux City, Iowa, Petersburg/Colonial Heights, Va., and Laredo, Texas, cellular systems, pending Federal Communications Commission approval. When Centel begins service in those new areas, the company will have operating control in 44 markets, with a total population of more than 13.3 million persons. Centel is ranked second in total number of cellular markets served in the country. In addition to its cellular properties, Chicago-based Centel Corp., which had 1988 revenues of $1.09 biUion, provides local exchange telephone service in nine states through more than 1.5 milhon access hnes and provides electric power to 135,000 customers in two states. The company recently announced definitive agreements to sell its cable television operations, which serve more than 578,000 customers in six states, and is seeking bids for its business systems operations, facilities which market, design and install advanced telecommunications and data systems to more than 18,000 customers across the nation. A New Rose Has Blossomed, .. ^ t. Hose de Lima Hospital has a new name. The hospital is dedicated to the memory of St. Rose of Lima, Peru, a selfless woman who devoted her life to caring for the poor and outcast of her city. The new name promotes St. Rose's religious order, Dominican, as a stronger way of identifying with our heritage. So, you see, the change will instill a greater appreciation for the Dominican spirit, one of compassion and truth, which has made the hospital what it is today. It is, indeed, a very special place to receive medical care. At St. Rose Dominican Hospital, the tradition of quality Catholic healthcare continues. 102 E. Lake Mead Drive • Henderson, NV 89015 (702} 564-2622 MAIL BOX RENTALS S5 mo & up MAIL MESSAGES & Mora. PfWHINQ, COPIES A FAX 564-5574 In Van' Shopping CanMf IS YOUR WA TERSAFE TO DRINK? Enioy UNLIMITED Sparkling Clear Water FRESH From Your Tap FOR LESS THAN •3.00 A MONTH AMTECH FREE f Air & Water Systems Famous Royal Doulton Fitters Est. 1827 EPA Reg. #43434-3 •FrM liwtaltotlon •Fr Water Saftty CiMck •Fr (Mlvcfy •FrscCanwra Cmll Today 873'9001 3111 So. Valley View VilUABU COUPON ^ SpMial UmHsd Offer Y^ FREE 35nim CAMERA with FREE Wat0rT0t CAMERA Includes CaseA Carrying Strap Absolutely No PurclMM t*e9tMary FREE tmda omfma STARTING AT $9000 Car or Truck With Lifetime Warranty o CAR CARE MEANS NO GLARE 4625 E. Tropicana 898-0012 iZSIc l^ r A CUI6INE • COCKTAIL EAPEDIENO; Green Valley'<§ Newest And Finest Dining And Cocktail Establisnment Breakfast (3' Lunch 10 A.M. 2:30 P.M. + Dinner 6 P.M. -11 P.M Cocktail Lounge 10 A.M. Thru Midnight 4451 E. SUNSET DOAD 1/4 MILE WMT or MOlWrMN VldTA 4354000 Thorsdey, Aagnst 10.1988 Hendsrsoo Home Newe, BouMsr City News, Oreee Vslley News Page 27 Continniiig gallery ezhiUte: Ancient Oceans—Marine Fossils of Clarlc County Exhibit at the Clark County Heritage Museum. Sea creatures in stone from a time when the local desert was beach front property. Rare mineral specimens and fossils from the museum collection and the collections of the Cahfomia Federation of Mineralogical Societies and the Great Basin Chapter of the Friends of Mineralogy. The exhibit to run through Oct. 1. Museum open 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily. Admissions $1 adults, 50 cents seniors and children. 1830 So. Boulder Highway, Henderson. Tfelephone 455-7955. Saturday, Aug. 12 15th Annual Art-A-Fair Touring Exhibition (through Aug. 13). West Las Vegas, Cassell Gallery. Landscape Imagery: Oil and mixed media paintings by Vic Jones and Duncan McKerracher utilize architectural and landscape imagery (through Aug. 20). Clark Ck)unty, Main Gallery. Large Format Photography: Ldrge format black and white studies of light and shadow by Joy Prendergast incorporate objects and people-as-objects (through Aug. 20). Clark County, Photography Gallery. Cnmned Head—with the splendors of Tonsorial Prowress: An exhibit by Dennie Pasion of hairpieces and photographs that utilize different concepts in hair design (through Aug. 15). Green Valley GaUery. Silent Orators: Encaustic, mixed media sculptures by Gary Szymanski (through Aug. 14). Spring Valley, Lull Gallery. Desert Quilters: A selection of quilts, featuring traditional and original designs, handmade by members of Desert Quilters of Nevada (through Sept. 5). Sunrise, Gallery. Programs: (YPL = Young People's Ubrary) Saturday, Aug. 12 Family FiUns: 'Tap Dance Kid" & "Special Trade" 2 p.m. West Las Vegas, 647-2117. The Reel Thing: In "The Land Before Time," lost and alone, Littlefoot and his friends are about to embark on the journey of a lifetime. Check with your local branch for ticket information. Children under 7 must be accompanied by an adult. Preregistration is requested. 10 a.m. Charleston Heights, 878-3682 and 10:30 a.m. Clark County, 733-3616. The Finishing Touch: Chef Les Kincaid demonstrates unique ideas and recipes on how to make outdoor dining an unforgettable and enjoyable experience. Preregistration requested. 11 a.m. West Las Vegas, Patio, 647-2117. Classic Images Film Series: It's simple and about as heavy as a handful of cotton candy, but everyone has such a good time at the "State Fair," starring Jeanne Grain, Dana Andrews, Dick Haymes and Harry Morgan. 1 p.m. Clark County, Aud., 733-3613. Monday, Aug. 14 Classic Images Film Series: "State Fair" (See Aug. 11). 11 a.m. West Las Vegas, 647-2117. Golden Spike Celebration: Stories, tihns, participant honors and festivities such as a Morse Code contest mark the end of the line for Tasha and her reading program passengers. 3 p.m. Clark County, 733-3616. K.I.D.S. An eight-part series designed to help school-aged children who must spend time alone. Presented by the Nevada C!ooperative Extension Services. Pre-registration is requested. 3:30 p.m. Clark County, 733-3613. The Reel Thing: (See Aug. 11) Children tmder seven must be accompanied by an adult. 6:30 p.m. Sunrise, 453-1104. Tuesday, Aug. 15 Gallery Opening: Limited edition "Prints by Black Artists," such as Ernie Barnes, Romare Bearden and Joseph Holston, who represent a new wave of painters, portray positive black lifestyles (through Sept. 12). West Las Vegas, Beni Casselle GaUery, 435-0919. K.I.D.S. (See Aug. 14). 3:30 p.m. Clark County, 733-3616. The Reel Thing (See Aug. 11) Pre-registration is requested. 3:30 p.m. Green Valley, 435-1840 and 6:30 p.m. Spring Valley, 368-4411. Classic Images Film Series: "State Fair" (see Aug. 11). 7 p.m. Green Valley, 435-1840. Storytellers of Las Vegas: Open to adults. 7:30 p.m. Charleston Heights, 878-3682. Wednesday, Aug. 16 Become user friendly with the library: Volunteer docents invite you to take behind-the-scenes toiu-s of the library, 10 a.m., Clark County, Main Gallery. 733-3622. The Reel Thing: (See Aug. 14) Children under seven must be accompanied by an adult. 6:30 p.m. Rainbow, 645-7500. FOR SALE OR LEASE Completely Equipped Doctors Office. 5,000 sq. ft. Facility includes Complete X-Ray with Fiuoroscopy. Complete DuPont Chemistry Laboratory with Blood Gas Analysis and Endoscopy Equipment. All Six Exams Rooms are Fully Furnished and there are 3 Large Special Procedure Rooms. This property is located In Boulder City. 366-0640 Calendar of Events Gallery Opening: "15th Annual Art-A-Fair Touring Exhibition (see Aug. 1; through Sept. 17). Spring Valley, Dana Marie Lull Gallery, 368-4411. K.I.D.S.(See Aug. 14)at 3:30 p.m. Clark County, 733-3616. Las Vegas Poetry Group: Open to the public. 7 p.m. Clark County, (joxd. Rm., 733-3613. Thursday, Aug. 17 K.I.D.S. (See Aug. 14) 3:30 p.m. Clark County, 733-3616. Gallery Opening and Reception: Handwoven tapestries by Kim Kennedy, of original southwestern, figurative and abstract designs that utilize 45 colors of hand-dyes wool (through Sept 19). 5 p.m. Green Valley, 435-1840. Driver education program for seniors scheduled Friday, Aug. 18 How to Start a Small Business Workshop: An all day workshop, sponsored by S.C.O.R.E. and SBA, covers such topics as costs of starting a business, banking, record keeping, planning, legal aspects and resources. Pre-registration is required. From 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Spring Valley, 368-4411. K.I.D.S. (see Aug. 14) 3:30 p.m. Clark County, 733-3616. The American Association of Retired Persons will conduct its acclaimed 55 Alive/Mature Driving course for all area citizens age 50 and older on Thursday and Friday, Aug. 17-18, at Sierra Visu retirement community. Instnjcted by Jack Meyers, the eight-hourdrivereducation course offers senior citizens refresher classes in safe driving and will lead to lower insurance rates. The course is split into two sessions, both from noon to 4 p.m. All sessions must be attended to receive certification. Reservations are required and should be made by Aug. 14 by calling 7322800. Cost for the course is $7. All checks should be made payable to AARP, officials said. The national 55 Alive program has been in existence since* 1969 and has graduated more than 650,000 motorists age 50 and older. In addition to dealing with age-related physical and perceptual changes that affect driving, the course can save insurance costs for participants.. For more 732-2800. infonnation call. House of Emeralds 14 kt. Ladies Hniald $19.95 ;in(l up Diamond Sliid Karrinys .15 tw $99.95 .20 tw $109.95 14 kt. lialn Hoop F;arrmjis....$ 19.95 4 ^ The Blrtbitoac for Auguct li ^ PERIDOT Cone ID tat jrour FREE STONE (vWltMiU) We buy gold, silver, diamonds and coins OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK JEWERL Y REPAIR WHILE YOU WAIT OR WITHIN 24 HOURS CUSTOM WORK: WHOLESALE GEMSTONES-LAYAWAY PLAN 3315E. Russell, Suite A-1 Riaiell k Pecoe in ihe Von'f Shopping Center 458-0800 VUi MC AmEx • • \ Ring Ring Ring Ring Ring Ring Ring Ring Ring 4 Advertise in our ^llow Pages and you'll never hear the end of it If you want your phone to ring all year long, then place your ad in the Centel Yellow Pages. No other directory reaches more potential customers. That's because ours is the only directory from your local phone company that's delivered to eveiy home and business in the area with phone service. Around the clock, around the calendar, your message is ready to reach customers who are ready to buy. Fact is, almost 8 out of 10 people use the Yellow Pages each month. Again and again. So if you want to get the most out of your advertising dollars, put your ad where it does the most good. In the Centel Yellow Pages. The ringing will be music to your ears. Where people connect GH

PAGE 27

Pt> Htndfo, Hain Ntw. BooMf CUj Nw. Gwta Vdly Ntwi ucation Sunset High School registration under way Registration for students who ing will be permitted on campus were enrolled during second seduring registration and they tiiust mester 88-89 it Sunset is schedbe properly attired according to Bacl( to Sctiool Nights set at Gailoway Eiementary Thnrsflay, Aagast 10. 1989 uled for Thursday, Aug. 24. Seniors will register from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sophomores and Juniors will registerfrom 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m.. Registration for new students to Sunset will be held from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 25, in the cafeteria. All students who wish to register must bring a copy of their school transcript and proof of immunization school district dress code requirements. Enrolling students shduld be prepared to pay any required lab fees when they register for an, cooking, crafts, drafting or shop classes, spokespersons said. Sunset High School offers evening classes for Clark County School District residents under the age of 21 who wish to earn a traditional high school diploma. Classes are held from 3:30 p.m. Back to School Nights have been set for Fay Galloway Elementary School. Quads A, B and D will meet at 7 p.m., today in the multipurpose room. Quad C's Back to School Night will be at 7 p.m., Tuesday, Aug. 29. Back to School Nights proCDmpleteregistrationinfonnatolOp.m.altheHydeParkJunior QIV6n Q13111 tion and student packets can be High School Campus, 950 Hinvide parents with an opportunity to meet with their children's teacher, see the classroom and meet the schools' administration staff. The Schools' Parent Teacher Organization will provide refreshments and a special ^._ slide presentation, officials ^ ^#%e/*IAtn/^A ^^^' ^^"^''y memberships for OcOSCIcnCw the Parent Teacher Organization will be available, as will information about the P.T.O. activities for the 1989-90 school year. professor ANOTHER COM ^plon€4. MEXICAN RESTAURANT OPENING This month In Green Valley! son Street. There is an evenin g child care program available for a nominal fee on a first-come, first-serve basts for parents who require child care services in order to attend classes. obtained by calling the Sunset High School Office at 799-4160 from 7:30 a.m. to 3 a.m. prior to the registration dates. Office hours will change to the evening schedule of 2 p.m. to 10 p.m. Aug. 24. Only persons actually enrollBrown Junior High to test new students Brown Junior High's counseluntil noon Tuesday in the school ing staff will be administering library. placement test to students new to For proper placement and Qark County School District and scheduling it is important for the Brown Junior High. new sttideots to be tested, officials Testing will be ftom 9 a.m. said. Chinese students apply to UNLV UNLV has received 28 applications for admission from students from the Peoples Republic of China, announced President Robert C. Maxson. Over the summer, 13 graduate students and 15 undergraduate students applied for fomial admission to the university. Of those, 21 had been accepted by Aug. 1, according to university records. "Unfortunately, we have no idea how many students from the Peoples Republic of China will actually be here in the fall," Maxson said. "The university opened its arms to Chinese students and made every effort to facilitate their admission in the wake of the pro-democracy movement by students in Beijing. But after the Chinese government crushed the demonstration, the country was virtually shut down. We don't know how many students will be able to get ouL" Eugene Smith, a professor of geosciencc at UNLV, has received a $110,000 grant from the Nevada Nuclear Waste Projects Office. The grant will be used to study very young volcanic activities around Yucca Mountain, sard Smith, adding that the results from the studies will show whether Yucca Mountain is safe as a designated nuclear waste dump site. "We're uying to find out the history of volcanoes around Yucca to predict if and when an eruption will occur." said Smith. Basic High gives physicais Physical examinations for athletes at Basic High School will be given on Tuesday. Giris are to report to Room 144 at 6 p.m. and boys should report to Room 144 at 7. All students who plan to participate in athletics during the 1989-90 school year should receive their physical exams at this time. This is the only time that physical exams will be given by the school. FAX-Instant Mail %2 ppr p.ige lo Send $1 ppr p.iqp lo Roroivp MAIL, MESSAGES &Mor.. PRINTING, CORES* FAX 5645574 a a i^^^'vj) (702)294-1937 r\ -ff^^Zy"^ 930 Nevada Hwy. \^ MEXICAN RESTAURANT Bouldcr City, Ncv. 1 WEEK EARLIER THAN EXPECTEDI o ^ We wish to apologize for any inconvenience to our customers ^^'4, PARTY SHOP and so much more 530 S. Boulder Hwy. Henderson Plaza Mall Shirley Williams Wichita, Kansas $16,000.00 Keno players catch more cash atSam'sTown. Congratulations to aK our winners! BamonLeytra Local Winner $4,700.00 George Fields Local Winner $2,500.00 Donna Hardy Local Winner $3,855.00 Patricia Blanton Local Winner $3,375.00 loelle Mitchell Palm Desert. California $2,001.00 Ted Browne Lancaster. California $5,000.00 $4,159,196 Total Slot Payouts for June! $1,594,958 in Royal FIushes...alone! Where locals bring their friends. SAM'S TOWN HOTEL a GAMBUNG HALL Boulder Highway & Nellis / 456-7777 / Another fine Boyd Group hotel Thursday, August 10. 1989 New science, math dean appointed Dr. Ernest J. Peck Jr., a biochemist and former program director for tlie National Science Foundation, has been appointed dean of UNLV's College of Science and Mathematics, announced President Robert C. • Maxson. Pccic, who was selected from more than 40 candidates in a national search, will assume the post SepL 1 He succeeds Dr. David Emerson, who has served as dean of the College of Science and Mathematics since July 1981. Emerson will resume teaching on the faculty of the UNLV chemistry depanment. "AVe arc proud to have Dr. Peck join the university to lead our College of Science and Mathematics," Max.son said. "He has outstanding acadcmiccredcntials, as well as a keen administrative sense. He will be a fine addition to the college and to the university." Peck, who hold a bachelor's degree and doctorate from Rice University, formerly served as directory of the Phy.siological Processes Program of the Cellular Biosciences Division of the National Science Foundation. Previous to his work with the NSF, Peck served as professor and chairman of the biochemistry and molecularbiology department at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock. He was also an adjunct professor with the School of Agriculture. Home Economics, and Technology at the University of Arkansas. Pine Bluff. Peck, 48, served on the faculty of Baylor College of Medicine from 1973 to 1982 in the departments of cell biology and ncuroscience graduate studies. He was a memberof the biological sciences faculty of Purdue University from 1966 to 1973. Credited with more'than 50 scholarly articles. Peck is the author of two books and more than 30 book chapters and reviews. His research interests include the interactionof endocrine, immune, and neural systems with emphasis on the control of growth and reproductive functions. During the past two decades, Peck has received research grants for 10 different projects totaling more than $1.5 million. He is affiliated with a number of professional orgranizations, including the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Chemical Society, the American Society for Biochemistry/MolecularBiology, the American Society for Cell Biology, and the Society for Neuroscience. He is an editorial board mem-* ber for the Journal of Neuroscience Research and associate editor of the Proceedings cf the Arkansas Academy of Science. He also serves as a reviewer for several journals, including Biology of Reproduction, Endocrinology, Clinical Chemistry, and Science. Peck has also accomplished extensive committee work within the university setting and with several national organizations, such as the National Institute on Mental Health and the National Cancer Institute. He has been awarded an NSF Fellowship, an NIH Predoctoral Fellowship, American Cancer Society Fellowship, and an NIH Research Career Development Award. Henderaon Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Page 29 1989 UNLV sorority rush set The national sorori ties that will be .rushing this fall are Alpha Gamma Delu, Ali^a Delta Pi, Alpha Kappa Alpha, Delta Zeta, Sigma Kappa and Zeta Tau Alpha. All six organizations stress scholastic achievement, philanthropic endeavors, and campus involvement. UNLV's six national sororities will conduct their fall membership drive Sept. 1-4 on campus. Female university students who are* interested in joining a sorority can contact the Student Activities Office at 739-3221. The early registration deadline is Aug. 25. Dr. Ernest Peck Registration underway at Sewell OfHcials at C.T. Sewell EleSewell is on the year-round, 60mentary School this week re minded all parents of kindergarten age students and those ne\v to the area that registration is being held daily. Birth certiflcates and proof of immunizations are required. Registration should be completed as soon as poss ible. C.T. 15 schedule, they noted. There's Something New at the'Boat! BUSINESS CARDS begin S19 per 1.000 at MAIL, MESSAGES & More. PRINTING, COPIES & FAX 564-5574 In Von' Shopping Canlar r UNLV Fall registration announced Registration for Fall Semester classes at UNLV is set for Aug. 23-24 in the Thomas and Mack Center. Fall classes begin Aug. 28 and run through Dec. 8, officials said. Distribution of registration forms to admitted students will be made at specific times, according to each student's year ;freshman through gradute), listed alphabetically by last name. The schedule appears on page 5 of the Fall Semester 1989 Schedule of Classes, available in the Registrar's Office, Maude Frazier Hall. Distribution to undergraduate and graduate special students — those not formally admitted — is scheduled from 1 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. Aug. 24 in the Thomas and Mack Center. Students who carmot register Free clinic for overweight Icids offered A free fitness chnic for overweight children wiU be presented at 3 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 19, at the Fern Adair Conservatory of the Arts, 3265 E. Patrick Lane. The positive reinforcement program for overweight children combines positive selfimage encouragement with an aerobics and strengthening exercise routine, spokespersons said. The clinic will concentrate on testing and reviewing exercise programs for children who are overweight, they said. For more information, call 458-7575. during their scheduled time may register during late registration, Aug. 28 through Sept. 1, at the Registrar's Office. Registration fees are $40 per credit hour for .undergraduate classes, $50 per credit hour for graduate classes. For registration information, call the Registrar's Office at 739-337L To apply for admission to the university, call the Admissions Office at 739-3443. OPEN HOUSE • MEET REVA SCHWARTZ PrM. A Foundtf WtigM WitdMn ofLu Vagat, Inc. • FREE DESSERTS • FREE DOOR PRIZES 14J1 C CtwricMon #F TUE8.. AUG. 1 WEO.. AUO. i iMcaiur WMppMg cwiHr 1401 N. OMaiHr TUCa.. AUO. t MW pM. WEO.. AOO. 30 ,„ MO pm. iMilorCWiMl CMMT 100 Artaena tt. WEO. AUQ. • MO pja JOIN Vi PRICE $av0 $12.00 Whn you join at one of these special Open House meetings listed below: Cww#tot Snopptng CcfitVf fOOS S. MtaiylandPtiwy. #• TUES.. AUO. tS $: p.m. 200 8. Water tt, Rm. #1 THUm.. AUO. 17 f:00 p.m. Canter TOES.. AUO. 22 7.00 pm. WEO., AUO. 23 :00 p.ffl For furtlMr 'TMRMOMMmrat 736-6683 >i>aaia PAPER BINGO SPECIALS SATURDAY AUGUSTS, 12,19,26 9 P.M. SESSIONS $5 minimum buy-in 10 games total $5 6-onPack $1,000 Guaranteed Coverall $10 6-onPack $2,000 Guaranteed Coverall FREE DAUBERS Augusts, 12,19 SHOWBOAT HOTEL, CASINO, COUNTRY CLUB A B0WUN6 CENTER yMMjfe^^ Y Medical ServicGs plf^C^fta^ iiiiSlSi^ 6301 Mountain Vista Street • Henderson t^V ^onu m0M^^mM^mm& n you tMid to mlaptoc* door keys, put a hook right noar tho door or katp a tmall bowl on a tabia near the entrance. Drop the keys there as soon as you conta in. GREEN VAILEY Medical Services 6301 Mountain Vista Street • Henderson. NV 89014 A Division of St. Rose Dominican Hospital Multi-Specialt y Private Physician Offices Cardiology Physical Therapy Laboratory Pulmonology Benson Optical Radiology Pharmacy Urgent Care Outpatient Surgery iL,i ^^J fiiiyiiTifft iiiiii' n WeMhere to Quality Healthcare d.^ 6301 Mountain Vista St. | N— > ? it Mountain Visla St. i INFO: 458^113 URGENT CARE: 451-3636 Burlin H. Ackles, III, M.D. Ears, Nose & Throat Inhalant Allergies Ste.^207, Ph. 451-1161 Edward C. Barrera, M.D. Family Practice Ste. 202, Ph. 564-2628 Mahendra De Fonseka, M.D. Joseph B. Fayad, M.D. Gastroenterology Ste. 202, Ph. 733-0731 Gilles M.K. Desmarais, M.D. Psychiatry Ste. 204, Ph. 877-0692 Richard S. Diskin, D.O. Dermatology Ste. 206, Ph. 564-9444 Green Valley Family & Uisent Care Michael F. Schlaack, M.D ,ltd. Ste. 100, Ph. 451-3636 Rodney G. Handsfield, M.D. Adult & Pediatric Urologv Ste. 207, Ph. 564-9599 Heart Institute of Nevada Cardiology Services John A. Bowers, M.D., FACC, Ltd. Ste. 104, Ph. 458-1^77 Manthei Eye Center Rudy R. Manthei, D.O. Ste. 206, Ph. 456-8389 James V. Meli, Jr., D.O. Family Practice Ste. 208, Ph. 458-1211 Geoi]ge E. Merino, M.D. Cardiac, Vascular, & Thoracic Surgery Ste. 209, Ph. 456-3359 Robert C. Nelson, M.D. Adult & I\;diatric Urology Ste. 204, Ph 451-7998 Pulmonary Associates Paul A. Stewart, M.D. Bvroh E. Brown, M D. Kusum D. Desai. M D. Cvriac K. Chemplavil, M.D. Ste. 104, Ph. 4,S8-0677 Donald G. de Quevedo, M.D. Obstetrics/Gvnecology Ste. 201, Ph. 435-39(W Ramakant D. Raut, M.D. Internal Medicine/Cardiology/ Rheumatology Ste. 104, Ph. 458-1515 Southern Nevada Suigeiy Specialists Green Valley Breast Center Gregg Ripplinger, M.D Stephen K. Jones, M.D. Ste. 204, Ph 456-0070 Douglas S. SUcey, DPM Bxliatric Surgery & Medicine Ste. 209, Ph 456-3668

PAGE 28

Pt> Htndfo, Hain Ntw. BooMf CUj Nw. Gwta Vdly Ntwi ucation Sunset High School registration under way Registration for students who ing will be permitted on campus were enrolled during second seduring registration and they tiiust mester 88-89 it Sunset is schedbe properly attired according to Bacl( to Sctiool Nights set at Gailoway Eiementary Thnrsflay, Aagast 10. 1989 uled for Thursday, Aug. 24. Seniors will register from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sophomores and Juniors will registerfrom 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m.. Registration for new students to Sunset will be held from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 25, in the cafeteria. All students who wish to register must bring a copy of their school transcript and proof of immunization school district dress code requirements. Enrolling students shduld be prepared to pay any required lab fees when they register for an, cooking, crafts, drafting or shop classes, spokespersons said. Sunset High School offers evening classes for Clark County School District residents under the age of 21 who wish to earn a traditional high school diploma. Classes are held from 3:30 p.m. Back to School Nights have been set for Fay Galloway Elementary School. Quads A, B and D will meet at 7 p.m., today in the multipurpose room. Quad C's Back to School Night will be at 7 p.m., Tuesday, Aug. 29. Back to School Nights proCDmpleteregistrationinfonnatolOp.m.altheHydeParkJunior QIV6n Q13111 tion and student packets can be High School Campus, 950 Hinvide parents with an opportunity to meet with their children's teacher, see the classroom and meet the schools' administration staff. The Schools' Parent Teacher Organization will provide refreshments and a special ^._ slide presentation, officials ^ ^#%e/*IAtn/^A ^^^' ^^"^''y memberships for OcOSCIcnCw the Parent Teacher Organization will be available, as will information about the P.T.O. activities for the 1989-90 school year. professor ANOTHER COM ^plon€4. MEXICAN RESTAURANT OPENING This month In Green Valley! son Street. There is an evenin g child care program available for a nominal fee on a first-come, first-serve basts for parents who require child care services in order to attend classes. obtained by calling the Sunset High School Office at 799-4160 from 7:30 a.m. to 3 a.m. prior to the registration dates. Office hours will change to the evening schedule of 2 p.m. to 10 p.m. Aug. 24. Only persons actually enrollBrown Junior High to test new students Brown Junior High's counseluntil noon Tuesday in the school ing staff will be administering library. placement test to students new to For proper placement and Qark County School District and scheduling it is important for the Brown Junior High. new sttideots to be tested, officials Testing will be ftom 9 a.m. said. Chinese students apply to UNLV UNLV has received 28 applications for admission from students from the Peoples Republic of China, announced President Robert C. Maxson. Over the summer, 13 graduate students and 15 undergraduate students applied for fomial admission to the university. Of those, 21 had been accepted by Aug. 1, according to university records. "Unfortunately, we have no idea how many students from the Peoples Republic of China will actually be here in the fall," Maxson said. "The university opened its arms to Chinese students and made every effort to facilitate their admission in the wake of the pro-democracy movement by students in Beijing. But after the Chinese government crushed the demonstration, the country was virtually shut down. We don't know how many students will be able to get ouL" Eugene Smith, a professor of geosciencc at UNLV, has received a $110,000 grant from the Nevada Nuclear Waste Projects Office. The grant will be used to study very young volcanic activities around Yucca Mountain, sard Smith, adding that the results from the studies will show whether Yucca Mountain is safe as a designated nuclear waste dump site. "We're uying to find out the history of volcanoes around Yucca to predict if and when an eruption will occur." said Smith. Basic High gives physicais Physical examinations for athletes at Basic High School will be given on Tuesday. Giris are to report to Room 144 at 6 p.m. and boys should report to Room 144 at 7. All students who plan to participate in athletics during the 1989-90 school year should receive their physical exams at this time. This is the only time that physical exams will be given by the school. FAX-Instant Mail %2 ppr p.ige lo Send $1 ppr p.iqp lo Roroivp MAIL, MESSAGES &Mor.. PRINTING, CORES* FAX 5645574 a a i^^^'vj) (702)294-1937 r\ -ff^^Zy"^ 930 Nevada Hwy. \^ MEXICAN RESTAURANT Bouldcr City, Ncv. 1 WEEK EARLIER THAN EXPECTEDI o ^ We wish to apologize for any inconvenience to our customers ^^'4, PARTY SHOP and so much more 530 S. Boulder Hwy. Henderson Plaza Mall Shirley Williams Wichita, Kansas $16,000.00 Keno players catch more cash atSam'sTown. Congratulations to aK our winners! BamonLeytra Local Winner $4,700.00 George Fields Local Winner $2,500.00 Donna Hardy Local Winner $3,855.00 Patricia Blanton Local Winner $3,375.00 loelle Mitchell Palm Desert. California $2,001.00 Ted Browne Lancaster. California $5,000.00 $4,159,196 Total Slot Payouts for June! $1,594,958 in Royal FIushes...alone! Where locals bring their friends. SAM'S TOWN HOTEL a GAMBUNG HALL Boulder Highway & Nellis / 456-7777 / Another fine Boyd Group hotel Thursday, August 10. 1989 New science, math dean appointed Dr. Ernest J. Peck Jr., a biochemist and former program director for tlie National Science Foundation, has been appointed dean of UNLV's College of Science and Mathematics, announced President Robert C. • Maxson. Pccic, who was selected from more than 40 candidates in a national search, will assume the post SepL 1 He succeeds Dr. David Emerson, who has served as dean of the College of Science and Mathematics since July 1981. Emerson will resume teaching on the faculty of the UNLV chemistry depanment. "AVe arc proud to have Dr. Peck join the university to lead our College of Science and Mathematics," Max.son said. "He has outstanding acadcmiccredcntials, as well as a keen administrative sense. He will be a fine addition to the college and to the university." Peck, who hold a bachelor's degree and doctorate from Rice University, formerly served as directory of the Phy.siological Processes Program of the Cellular Biosciences Division of the National Science Foundation. Previous to his work with the NSF, Peck served as professor and chairman of the biochemistry and molecularbiology department at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock. He was also an adjunct professor with the School of Agriculture. Home Economics, and Technology at the University of Arkansas. Pine Bluff. Peck, 48, served on the faculty of Baylor College of Medicine from 1973 to 1982 in the departments of cell biology and ncuroscience graduate studies. He was a memberof the biological sciences faculty of Purdue University from 1966 to 1973. Credited with more'than 50 scholarly articles. Peck is the author of two books and more than 30 book chapters and reviews. His research interests include the interactionof endocrine, immune, and neural systems with emphasis on the control of growth and reproductive functions. During the past two decades, Peck has received research grants for 10 different projects totaling more than $1.5 million. He is affiliated with a number of professional orgranizations, including the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Chemical Society, the American Society for Biochemistry/MolecularBiology, the American Society for Cell Biology, and the Society for Neuroscience. He is an editorial board mem-* ber for the Journal of Neuroscience Research and associate editor of the Proceedings cf the Arkansas Academy of Science. He also serves as a reviewer for several journals, including Biology of Reproduction, Endocrinology, Clinical Chemistry, and Science. Peck has also accomplished extensive committee work within the university setting and with several national organizations, such as the National Institute on Mental Health and the National Cancer Institute. He has been awarded an NSF Fellowship, an NIH Predoctoral Fellowship, American Cancer Society Fellowship, and an NIH Research Career Development Award. Henderaon Home News, Boulder City News, Green Valley News Page 29 1989 UNLV sorority rush set The national sorori ties that will be .rushing this fall are Alpha Gamma Delu, Ali^a Delta Pi, Alpha Kappa Alpha, Delta Zeta, Sigma Kappa and Zeta Tau Alpha. All six organizations stress scholastic achievement, philanthropic endeavors, and campus involvement. UNLV's six national sororities will conduct their fall membership drive Sept. 1-4 on campus. Female university students who are* interested in joining a sorority can contact the Student Activities Office at 739-3221. The early registration deadline is Aug. 25. Dr. Ernest Peck Registration underway at Sewell OfHcials at C.T. Sewell EleSewell is on the year-round, 60mentary School this week re minded all parents of kindergarten age students and those ne\v to the area that registration is being held daily. Birth certiflcates and proof of immunizations are required. Registration should be completed as soon as poss ible. C.T. 15 schedule, they noted. There's Something New at the'Boat! BUSINESS CARDS begin S19 per 1.000 at MAIL, MESSAGES & More. PRINTING, COPIES & FAX 564-5574 In Von' Shopping Canlar r UNLV Fall registration announced Registration for Fall Semester classes at UNLV is set for Aug. 23-24 in the Thomas and Mack Center. Fall classes begin Aug. 28 and run through Dec. 8, officials said. Distribution of registration forms to admitted students will be made at specific times, according to each student's year ;freshman through gradute), listed alphabetically by last name. The schedule appears on page 5 of the Fall Semester 1989 Schedule of Classes, available in the Registrar's Office, Maude Frazier Hall. Distribution to undergraduate and graduate special students — those not formally admitted — is scheduled from 1 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. Aug. 24 in the Thomas and Mack Center. Students who carmot register Free clinic for overweight Icids offered A free fitness chnic for overweight children wiU be presented at 3 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 19, at the Fern Adair Conservatory of the Arts, 3265 E. Patrick Lane. The positive reinforcement program for overweight children combines positive selfimage encouragement with an aerobics and strengthening exercise routine, spokespersons said. The clinic will concentrate on testing and reviewing exercise programs for children who are overweight, they said. For more information, call 458-7575. during their scheduled time may register during late registration, Aug. 28 through Sept. 1, at the Registrar's Office. Registration fees are $40 per credit hour for .undergraduate classes, $50 per credit hour for graduate classes. For registration information, call the Registrar's Office at 739-337L To apply for admission to the university, call the Admissions Office at 739-3443. OPEN HOUSE • MEET REVA SCHWARTZ PrM. A Foundtf WtigM WitdMn ofLu Vagat, Inc. • FREE DESSERTS • FREE DOOR PRIZES 14J1 C CtwricMon #F TUE8.. AUG. 1 WEO.. AUO. i iMcaiur WMppMg cwiHr 1401 N. OMaiHr TUCa.. AUO. t MW pM. WEO.. AOO. 30 ,„ MO pm. iMilorCWiMl CMMT 100 Artaena tt. WEO. AUQ. • MO pja JOIN Vi PRICE $av0 $12.00 Whn you join at one of these special Open House meetings listed below: Cww#tot Snopptng CcfitVf fOOS S. MtaiylandPtiwy. #• TUES.. AUO. tS $: p.m. 200 8. Water tt, Rm. #1 THUm.. AUO. 17 f:00 p.m. Canter TOES.. AUO. 22 7.00 pm. WEO., AUO. 23 :00 p.ffl For furtlMr 'TMRMOMMmrat 736-6683 >i>aaia PAPER BINGO SPECIALS SATURDAY AUGUSTS, 12,19,26 9 P.M. SESSIONS $5 minimum buy-in 10 games total $5 6-onPack $1,000 Guaranteed Coverall $10 6-onPack $2,000 Guaranteed Coverall FREE DAUBERS Augusts, 12,19 SHOWBOAT HOTEL, CASINO, COUNTRY CLUB A B0WUN6 CENTER yMMjfe^^ Y Medical ServicGs plf^C^fta^ iiiiSlSi^ 6301 Mountain Vista Street • Henderson t^V ^onu m0M^^mM^mm& n you tMid to mlaptoc* door keys, put a hook right noar tho door or katp a tmall bowl on a tabia near the entrance. Drop the keys there as soon as you conta in. GREEN VAILEY Medical Services 6301 Mountain Vista Street • Henderson. NV 89014 A Division of St. Rose Dominican Hospital Multi-Specialt y Private Physician Offices Cardiology Physical Therapy Laboratory Pulmonology Benson Optical Radiology Pharmacy Urgent Care Outpatient Surgery iL,i ^^J fiiiyiiTifft iiiiii' n WeMhere to Quality Healthcare d.^ 6301 Mountain Vista St. | N— > ? it Mountain Visla St. i INFO: 458^113 URGENT CARE: 451-3636 Burlin H. Ackles, III, M.D. Ears, Nose & Throat Inhalant Allergies Ste.^207, Ph. 451-1161 Edward C. Barrera, M.D. Family Practice Ste. 202, Ph. 564-2628 Mahendra De Fonseka, M.D. Joseph B. Fayad, M.D. Gastroenterology Ste. 202, Ph. 733-0731 Gilles M.K. Desmarais, M.D. Psychiatry Ste. 204, Ph. 877-0692 Richard S. Diskin, D.O. Dermatology Ste. 206, Ph. 564-9444 Green Valley Family & Uisent Care Michael F. Schlaack, M.D ,ltd. Ste. 100, Ph. 451-3636 Rodney G. Handsfield, M.D. Adult & Pediatric Urologv Ste. 207, Ph. 564-9599 Heart Institute of Nevada Cardiology Services John A. Bowers, M.D., FACC, Ltd. Ste. 104, Ph. 458-1^77 Manthei Eye Center Rudy R. Manthei, D.O. Ste. 206, Ph. 456-8389 James V. Meli, Jr., D.O. Family Practice Ste. 208, Ph. 458-1211 Geoi]ge E. Merino, M.D. Cardiac, Vascular, & Thoracic Surgery Ste. 209, Ph. 456-3359 Robert C. Nelson, M.D. Adult & I\;diatric Urology Ste. 204, Ph 451-7998 Pulmonary Associates Paul A. Stewart, M.D. Bvroh E. Brown, M D. Kusum D. Desai. M D. Cvriac K. Chemplavil, M.D. Ste. 104, Ph. 4,S8-0677 Donald G. de Quevedo, M.D. Obstetrics/Gvnecology Ste. 201, Ph. 435-39(W Ramakant D. Raut, M.D. Internal Medicine/Cardiology/ Rheumatology Ste. 104, Ph. 458-1515 Southern Nevada Suigeiy Specialists Green Valley Breast Center Gregg Ripplinger, M.D Stephen K. Jones, M.D. Ste. 204, Ph 456-0070 Douglas S. SUcey, DPM Bxliatric Surgery & Medicine Ste. 209, Ph 456-3668

PAGE 29

Pag* 80, HttiderMn Home News, Boulder Gty News, Green Valley News Thursday. August 10, 1989 ThundKf, August 10,1960 HendarMm Home News, Boulder Gltj Nsws, Greea VaUy News P^s 81 Tracy and Robert Bynum Tracy Venable weds Robert Bynum Tracy Venable, daughter of Paulette and Kerry Blake of Henderson, recently became the bride of Robert Bynura, son of Lula and Oscar Bynum of Las Vegas. The ceremony was performed at the First Baptist Church in Green Valley and was followed by a reception at the Eagles Lodge in Henderson. International chefs Las Vegas is preparing for the third annual Culinary Arts Salon. The public is invited to view the salone from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19. at Bailey's Casino Resort. Expert chefs from across the counuy will compete for the coveted gold, silver and bron/c medals. On display will be the most delicate hors d'oeuvers to the most stately buffets. Other members of the wedding party included: John Brazil, best man; Greg Armijo, Mark Whitehead and Randy Sollie, groomsmen; the bride's sister. Holly Oakley, maid of honor; Shelley Moser, Chris Bondurant and Patty Aiken, bridesmaids; Blake Larson, ring bearer; and Daria Moser, flower girl. The bride, office manager of the Panama Jack store in Las Vegas, attended Basic High School for three years, but graduated from Rancho Cordova, Calif., High School in 1981. The groom is employed* by Art Goldstrom Enterprises. The couple now resides in the Green Valley neighborhood. to convene at Hospitality Expo The Culinary Salon is co-sponsored by the Fraternity of Executive Chefs of Las Vegas, the nevada Restaurant Association and the Nevada Hotel and Motel Association, in conjunction with the Nevada Hospitality Exposition'89. Sept. 19-21. Criteria includes; presentation, creativity, workmanship and composition. Winners are awarded gold, silver and bronze medals and will be recognized at the Industry Awards Luncheon on Wednesday, Sept. 20. Formore information conceming the Culinary Salon or the Nevada Hospitality Exposition, conract the NR A offi cc. 878-2313, or the NHMA office 878-9272. TEEN FITNESS DAYS Friday, August 18,1989 • 10:00-3:00 p. Humana Hospital-Sunrise Auditorium How Fit Are You? Attend And Find Out. FITNESS SCHEDULE 10:0011:00 a.m. During this session, teens will have tiielr height, weight and blood pressure talten, and then go through posture, coordination, strength and athletic aptitude testing. A computerized assessment of health rislts will also be given to each participant. ?^ 11:00 a.m.This session contains a series 12No<)n of discussions on exercise, body building, stress, relaxation, mental health, smoking and nutrition. Skin care for males and females will also be discussed. 12 NoonThe hospital will provide a 1:00 p.m. nutritional lunch of milk, juice, pizza and frozen fruit bars for dessert. 1:00The continuation of the 3:00 p.m. morning seminar*. Another program of Health hitrol. Limited to teens ages 13 thru 18. For reservations call 731-8188. HHumana* Hosfrital Sunrise 3185 Maryland Parkway • Las Vegas, Nevada 89109 University theatre audition dates set I TMs WaS Nevada UNLV's Theatre Arts Department will hold auditions for three upcoming plays from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Aug. 23-24 in the Judy Bayley theatre. • Auditions for "Celebration," "Crooked River" and "Love's Labour's Lost" will be held during the two-night session. "Celebration," which will open the 1989-90 University TTieatre season Sept. 28, is a highly stylized musical written by Harvey Schmidt and Tom Jones. "Celebration" has a company of 15 to 24 dancers who can sing or singers who can move well. Principals include a male baritone between 24 and 45 with a "good comic sense and agility"; an "energetic, innocent-looking baritone/ tenor" between 15 and 23; a "bouncy, adorable, ambitious female," who is an excellent soprano; and an "older-looking" male, 35-60, who is big, boisterous, tired-looking and a good bass/baritone. Those auditioning for the musical will need to have one up-tempo song and a comic monologue prepared. Those wishing to audition for nonprinciptd roles need to prepare 3nly an up-tempo song that is not in the show. Any Broadway musical since the 60s with a rock feel is preferred. An accompanist will be provided, but sheet music in the singer's key must be provided, spokespersons said. The script calls for six actors — two men and two women in the 25-35 age range, one 45-year-old male, and one 60-year-old male. Those auditioning for "Crooked River" will need to prepare a one-totwo minute monologue from a non-realistic play. Callbacks will be Aug. 27. Shakespeare's popular comedy, 'love's Labour's Lost," is being directed by Roderick Horn and will open Nov. 30 in the Judy Bayley Theatre. Rehearsals will begin Oct. 23. There are several roles for young men and women, several for oldel* characters, and one for a 12vyear-old boy. Thoae auditioning for "Love's Labour's Lost" will need to prepare a monologue from any of Shakespeare's works. Callbacks will be Aug. 25. For more information, call 739-3666. HENDERSON B.P.O. ELKS LODGE #1956 i^ Weddings •Receptions •Banquets •Dances OPEN OAILT 11 AJLIO PJL Can Of •565-9960 631 East Lake Maad Drive Henderson NevadI 89015 ,n, ^) TUFF SHED /, 3000 S. Hiqhiand Dr. I TUFF SHED Las Vegas, 367 TUFF TUFF SHED I I *' i^ AUGUST SPECIAL FREE* WITH THIS COUPON TURBINE VENT OR WINDOW with purchase of any painted shed. Free Delivery Built on Site or Delivered We Custom Build on Request 20 Year Shingles Large 4'x6'8" Door Complete witti Floor No Need for Concrete 90 0ys 8im Aa Ctih O.A.C. .. 'orders must be in by August 3l8t HENDERSON'S NEWEST G MOST EXCITING SLOT CLUB IS HERE! Over 240 new slot machines including QUARTERMANIAI! ED EC 2000 POINTS WITH riVEiEi NEW MEMBERSHIP Henderson's 1st Slot Club Where The Slot Seekers Like To Ployll ^ wfS .^n PW^E ^^ WNNER W rta^lfl^ onlyS4.95 > l/^ BREAKFAST ^Cu* ^ from 11 pm ro 11 am just 69^ /^Ol^ "And ny Tom's Sunset Casino (/^ FABULOUS SALAD BAR! Come & Cosh Your Paycheck at Tom i Lots of Free, Lighted Parking. SUMKTKB TOM'S SUNSET CASINO The Place Thar You'll Call Home 444 SUNSn ROAD • 564^B55i T JBSES: Goldfield citizens, 1908, liars alll Nevada Hiitoric*! Sodety photograph Miners' Liars Contest featured at Goldfield's Treasure Days By PhiUip I. Earl Coming up this weekend is GoIdHeld's seventh annual "Treasure Days," a celebration of the community's mining heritage. A mountain bike race, sponsored by Nevada Mountain Tours kicks off the festivities at 7 a.m., Saturday morning, and a parade follows at 9:30 a.m. The remainder of the day will be taken up with arts and crafts shows, a saddle and tack auction, homy toad races, a miners' liars contest, a shoot-out; the World Championship Barstool-Sitting Contest, an old-fashioned melodrama and a street dance at 9 p.m. Sunday will feature a miners' breakfast at &a.m., cross-country races, contest finals and a raffle. Accommodations are available in nearby Tonopah, but there are limited camping facilities in GoldHeld. For information, call (702) 485-6365 or write Goldfield Treasure Day Committee, P.O. Box 37, Goldfield, Nev., 89013. The miners' liars contest is a new feature for Treasure Days, so we will just have to see how it goes. Tonopah had a successful one during Jim Butler Days in May, and those who competed there will probably be back next week. Nevada's mines and mining camps were particularly fertile grounds for hoaxes, scams, tall tales and falsehoods of the wildest sort, Some were perpetuated by newspaper reporters who had nothing else to write about on a slow news day. Dan DeQuille's famed 'filing Stones of Pahranagat" and Mark Twain's "Petrified Man" are perhaps the best examples from the early years, but there are others. A Eureka editor once circulated the tale of a barber who paimed the whiskery leavings of his customers for whatever small amounts of gold might be found. There are also stories of men panning the dirt at the bottom of a bathtub where the camp's dog was washed, gardners who found gold nuggets on the roots of their beets and meat cutters who discovered small flakes of the precious metal in the gizzards of chickens and turkeys. And then there is the case of John Capura of Virginia City^ who found a cow's jaw in his soup which had gold-coated teeth. The animal had been raised on a tributary to the Truckee River, Students sought for cafeteria work at Basic Basic High School has openings for early bird and fifth-hour class cafeteria work, offidalfl announced this week. Students who participate in the program are paid $3.10 an hour and earn a class credit, they said. Individual schedules can be modified to include the cafeteria work, they added. To apply, call the school at 799-8000 and leave a name. Mastectomy group to meet The August meetinf of the Mastectomy Association of Nevada will be at 7 p.m. Monday in the Activity Room of the Nathan Adekm Hospice. 4141 S. Swenaon St. in Lss Vegas. For move infonnation, call 668-1994 or 644-6008. *i but those who followed up were unable to find the source of the metal coating. Hardrock miners were also a source of tall tales in the early days. The best known of these concern Tommyknockers—elfish, bewhiskered little men who would hide tools, jam drills, tamper with fuses and otherwise make the lives of the miners miserable. The miners also told tales of the ghosts of dead comrades who remained in the shafts and tunnels, ghostly spectres of mules who spent their working Uves down below and men who came to a tragic end because they violated some taboo—wearing more than one item of new clohting at a time, for example, or taking off a shirt that had somehow been put on backwards, killing a rat or announcing in advance the day of a "fmal shift." Considering the great number of stories which concern petrification, there has to be more to it than tall tales. In May 1891, miners in Tuolumne Coimty, Cahf. reportedly unearthed a petrified woman. Those who spread the tale supposedly saw it—300 pounds of what had been a comely yoimg lady who might have weighed 125 when living. Local editors milked the story for all it was worth. Sam Davis of the Carson Appeal decribed the find as "hard as marble and of a light grayish color." He also told his readers that scientists had dated the body at 1,000 years of age. An arm had been broken off during the moving of the body, he claimed, and a Carson upholsterer had been sent for to repair it. In May, 1881, a report circulated of a petrified seal found in a mine near Wadsworth. Petrified clams were found on Peavine Mountain by Charhe Mickell of Reno in December 1902, and a "Professor" Thomas Coleman unearthed two petrified human toes from a mining claim at Gold Mountain, Nye County, in November 1903. He suspended mining and set a crew to work searching out the remaining body parts, but found nothing. Prospectors have also been the source of much folklore. "Chuckawalla" Jones, a Death Valley old-timer, once related See Goldfield, Page 32 AttenHpn Seniors Citizens! $1.00 Hearing Tett Now Available A Cotified Audiok>gist at Henderson Hesring Associates can lest your hearing using the latest electronic equipment, pinpoint your pardcular heariitf loss and recommend the omect liearing aid. Ifyou suspect that you migiit have a liearing k)ss. don't wait, have your heanng checked lodayl HKNDBB80N HKAKING ASSOCIATES (I^oeaiad fat HM offln of BwUa H. Aokkt m M J).) lOS LriB Mud Dr. Svila 30( 3644434 Avoid Waitiaf • CU Per Aa Appoiataaat E|wAug 1. HW A-Z Vac ^^w&Fabrlc IFAMILY OPERATED 123 WATER ST. (across from F.I.B.) 565-7170: (Eilra Parking In RMO JSI^I coupon (^ Thurt, Frl, Sat Only Nttxt T4Mrt Class Aug. 29 • Uv% Up Early oats & Clark THREAD & FLOSS • t IOTI) Off APPLE BARREL PAINTS buy 3 get 1 FREE CRAFT BOOKS 10% OFF Stretch & Sew, Kwik Sew & Butterick Patterns 50% Off Limit 4 TULIPS PAINTS $2.79 1 each req. $3^19 III 'i •-•*.•*•*• *^* j j*. •. • .;;••.' • /<. • •.••. ;ioppiN< m • :^mf, !\iV} 'm\ 1634 Nevada Hwy. FINE ITALIAN AND AMERICAN DINING SUNDAY DINNER "See you there!' OPEN TUES-SUN 4 TO 10 PM *.

PAGE 30

Pag* 80, HttiderMn Home News, Boulder Gty News, Green Valley News Thursday. August 10, 1989 ThundKf, August 10,1960 HendarMm Home News, Boulder Gltj Nsws, Greea VaUy News P^s 81 Tracy and Robert Bynum Tracy Venable weds Robert Bynum Tracy Venable, daughter of Paulette and Kerry Blake of Henderson, recently became the bride of Robert Bynura, son of Lula and Oscar Bynum of Las Vegas. The ceremony was performed at the First Baptist Church in Green Valley and was followed by a reception at the Eagles Lodge in Henderson. International chefs Las Vegas is preparing for the third annual Culinary Arts Salon. The public is invited to view the salone from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19. at Bailey's Casino Resort. Expert chefs from across the counuy will compete for the coveted gold, silver and bron/c medals. On display will be the most delicate hors d'oeuvers to the most stately buffets. Other members of the wedding party included: John Brazil, best man; Greg Armijo, Mark Whitehead and Randy Sollie, groomsmen; the bride's sister. Holly Oakley, maid of honor; Shelley Moser, Chris Bondurant and Patty Aiken, bridesmaids; Blake Larson, ring bearer; and Daria Moser, flower girl. The bride, office manager of the Panama Jack store in Las Vegas, attended Basic High School for three years, but graduated from Rancho Cordova, Calif., High School in 1981. The groom is employed* by Art Goldstrom Enterprises. The couple now resides in the Green Valley neighborhood. to convene at Hospitality Expo The Culinary Salon is co-sponsored by the Fraternity of Executive Chefs of Las Vegas, the nevada Restaurant Association and the Nevada Hotel and Motel Association, in conjunction with the Nevada Hospitality Exposition'89. Sept. 19-21. Criteria includes; presentation, creativity, workmanship and composition. Winners are awarded gold, silver and bronze medals and will be recognized at the Industry Awards Luncheon on Wednesday, Sept. 20. Formore information conceming the Culinary Salon or the Nevada Hospitality Exposition, conract the NR A offi cc. 878-2313, or the NHMA office 878-9272. TEEN FITNESS DAYS Friday, August 18,1989 • 10:00-3:00 p. Humana Hospital-Sunrise Auditorium How Fit Are You? Attend And Find Out. FITNESS SCHEDULE 10:0011:00 a.m. During this session, teens will have tiielr height, weight and blood pressure talten, and then go through posture, coordination, strength and athletic aptitude testing. A computerized assessment of health rislts will also be given to each participant. ?^ 11:00 a.m.This session contains a series 12No<)n of discussions on exercise, body building, stress, relaxation, mental health, smoking and nutrition. Skin care for males and females will also be discussed. 12 NoonThe hospital will provide a 1:00 p.m. nutritional lunch of milk, juice, pizza and frozen fruit bars for dessert. 1:00The continuation of the 3:00 p.m. morning seminar*. Another program of Health hitrol. Limited to teens ages 13 thru 18. For reservations call 731-8188. HHumana* Hosfrital Sunrise 3185 Maryland Parkway • Las Vegas, Nevada 89109 University theatre audition dates set I TMs WaS Nevada UNLV's Theatre Arts Department will hold auditions for three upcoming plays from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Aug. 23-24 in the Judy Bayley theatre. • Auditions for "Celebration," "Crooked River" and "Love's Labour's Lost" will be held during the two-night session. "Celebration," which will open the 1989-90 University TTieatre season Sept. 28, is a highly stylized musical written by Harvey Schmidt and Tom Jones. "Celebration" has a company of 15 to 24 dancers who can sing or singers who can move well. Principals include a male baritone between 24 and 45 with a "good comic sense and agility"; an "energetic, innocent-looking baritone/ tenor" between 15 and 23; a "bouncy, adorable, ambitious female," who is an excellent soprano; and an "older-looking" male, 35-60, who is big, boisterous, tired-looking and a good bass/baritone. Those auditioning for the musical will need to have one up-tempo song and a comic monologue prepared. Those wishing to audition for nonprinciptd roles need to prepare 3nly an up-tempo song that is not in the show. Any Broadway musical since the 60s with a rock feel is preferred. An accompanist will be provided, but sheet music in the singer's key must be provided, spokespersons said. The script calls for six actors — two men and two women in the 25-35 age range, one 45-year-old male, and one 60-year-old male. Those auditioning for "Crooked River" will need to prepare a one-totwo minute monologue from a non-realistic play. Callbacks will be Aug. 27. Shakespeare's popular comedy, 'love's Labour's Lost," is being directed by Roderick Horn and will open Nov. 30 in the Judy Bayley Theatre. Rehearsals will begin Oct. 23. There are several roles for young men and women, several for oldel* characters, and one for a 12vyear-old boy. Thoae auditioning for "Love's Labour's Lost" will need to prepare a monologue from any of Shakespeare's works. Callbacks will be Aug. 25. For more information, call 739-3666. HENDERSON B.P.O. ELKS LODGE #1956 i^ Weddings •Receptions •Banquets •Dances OPEN OAILT 11 AJLIO PJL Can Of •565-9960 631 East Lake Maad Drive Henderson NevadI 89015 ,n, ^) TUFF SHED /, 3000 S. Hiqhiand Dr. I TUFF SHED Las Vegas, 367 TUFF TUFF SHED I I *' i^ AUGUST SPECIAL FREE* WITH THIS COUPON TURBINE VENT OR WINDOW with purchase of any painted shed. Free Delivery Built on Site or Delivered We Custom Build on Request 20 Year Shingles Large 4'x6'8" Door Complete witti Floor No Need for Concrete 90 0ys 8im Aa Ctih O.A.C. .. 'orders must be in by August 3l8t HENDERSON'S NEWEST G MOST EXCITING SLOT CLUB IS HERE! Over 240 new slot machines including QUARTERMANIAI! ED EC 2000 POINTS WITH riVEiEi NEW MEMBERSHIP Henderson's 1st Slot Club Where The Slot Seekers Like To Ployll ^ wfS .^n PW^E ^^ WNNER W rta^lfl^ onlyS4.95 > l/^ BREAKFAST ^Cu* ^ from 11 pm ro 11 am just 69^ /^Ol^ "And ny Tom's Sunset Casino (/^ FABULOUS SALAD BAR! Come & Cosh Your Paycheck at Tom i Lots of Free, Lighted Parking. SUMKTKB TOM'S SUNSET CASINO The Place Thar You'll Call Home 444 SUNSn ROAD • 564^B55i T JBSES: Goldfield citizens, 1908, liars alll Nevada Hiitoric*! Sodety photograph Miners' Liars Contest featured at Goldfield's Treasure Days By PhiUip I. Earl Coming up this weekend is GoIdHeld's seventh annual "Treasure Days," a celebration of the community's mining heritage. A mountain bike race, sponsored by Nevada Mountain Tours kicks off the festivities at 7 a.m., Saturday morning, and a parade follows at 9:30 a.m. The remainder of the day will be taken up with arts and crafts shows, a saddle and tack auction, homy toad races, a miners' liars contest, a shoot-out; the World Championship Barstool-Sitting Contest, an old-fashioned melodrama and a street dance at 9 p.m. Sunday will feature a miners' breakfast at &a.m., cross-country races, contest finals and a raffle. Accommodations are available in nearby Tonopah, but there are limited camping facilities in GoldHeld. For information, call (702) 485-6365 or write Goldfield Treasure Day Committee, P.O. Box 37, Goldfield, Nev., 89013. The miners' liars contest is a new feature for Treasure Days, so we will just have to see how it goes. Tonopah had a successful one during Jim Butler Days in May, and those who competed there will probably be back next week. Nevada's mines and mining camps were particularly fertile grounds for hoaxes, scams, tall tales and falsehoods of the wildest sort, Some were perpetuated by newspaper reporters who had nothing else to write about on a slow news day. Dan DeQuille's famed 'filing Stones of Pahranagat" and Mark Twain's "Petrified Man" are perhaps the best examples from the early years, but there are others. A Eureka editor once circulated the tale of a barber who paimed the whiskery leavings of his customers for whatever small amounts of gold might be found. There are also stories of men panning the dirt at the bottom of a bathtub where the camp's dog was washed, gardners who found gold nuggets on the roots of their beets and meat cutters who discovered small flakes of the precious metal in the gizzards of chickens and turkeys. And then there is the case of John Capura of Virginia City^ who found a cow's jaw in his soup which had gold-coated teeth. The animal had been raised on a tributary to the Truckee River, Students sought for cafeteria work at Basic Basic High School has openings for early bird and fifth-hour class cafeteria work, offidalfl announced this week. Students who participate in the program are paid $3.10 an hour and earn a class credit, they said. Individual schedules can be modified to include the cafeteria work, they added. To apply, call the school at 799-8000 and leave a name. Mastectomy group to meet The August meetinf of the Mastectomy Association of Nevada will be at 7 p.m. Monday in the Activity Room of the Nathan Adekm Hospice. 4141 S. Swenaon St. in Lss Vegas. For move infonnation, call 668-1994 or 644-6008. *i but those who followed up were unable to find the source of the metal coating. Hardrock miners were also a source of tall tales in the early days. The best known of these concern Tommyknockers—elfish, bewhiskered little men who would hide tools, jam drills, tamper with fuses and otherwise make the lives of the miners miserable. The miners also told tales of the ghosts of dead comrades who remained in the shafts and tunnels, ghostly spectres of mules who spent their working Uves down below and men who came to a tragic end because they violated some taboo—wearing more than one item of new clohting at a time, for example, or taking off a shirt that had somehow been put on backwards, killing a rat or announcing in advance the day of a "fmal shift." Considering the great number of stories which concern petrification, there has to be more to it than tall tales. In May 1891, miners in Tuolumne Coimty, Cahf. reportedly unearthed a petrified woman. Those who spread the tale supposedly saw it—300 pounds of what had been a comely yoimg lady who might have weighed 125 when living. Local editors milked the story for all it was worth. Sam Davis of the Carson Appeal decribed the find as "hard as marble and of a light grayish color." He also told his readers that scientists had dated the body at 1,000 years of age. An arm had been broken off during the moving of the body, he claimed, and a Carson upholsterer had been sent for to repair it. In May, 1881, a report circulated of a petrified seal found in a mine near Wadsworth. Petrified clams were found on Peavine Mountain by Charhe Mickell of Reno in December 1902, and a "Professor" Thomas Coleman unearthed two petrified human toes from a mining claim at Gold Mountain, Nye County, in November 1903. He suspended mining and set a crew to work searching out the remaining body parts, but found nothing. Prospectors have also been the source of much folklore. "Chuckawalla" Jones, a Death Valley old-timer, once related See Goldfield, Page 32 AttenHpn Seniors Citizens! $1.00 Hearing Tett Now Available A Cotified Audiok>gist at Henderson Hesring Associates can lest your hearing using the latest electronic equipment, pinpoint your pardcular heariitf loss and recommend the omect liearing aid. Ifyou suspect that you migiit have a liearing k)ss. don't wait, have your heanng checked lodayl HKNDBB80N HKAKING ASSOCIATES (I^oeaiad fat HM offln of BwUa H. Aokkt m M J).) lOS LriB Mud Dr. Svila 30( 3644434 Avoid Waitiaf • CU Per Aa Appoiataaat E|wAug 1. HW A-Z Vac ^^w&Fabrlc IFAMILY OPERATED 123 WATER ST. (across from F.I.B.) 565-7170: (Eilra Parking In RMO JSI^I coupon (^ Thurt, Frl, Sat Only Nttxt T4Mrt Class Aug. 29 • Uv% Up Early oats & Clark THREAD & FLOSS • t IOTI) Off APPLE BARREL PAINTS buy 3 get 1 FREE CRAFT BOOKS 10% OFF Stretch & Sew, Kwik Sew & Butterick Patterns 50% Off Limit 4 TULIPS PAINTS $2.79 1 each req. $3^19 III 'i •-•*.•*•*• *^* j j*. •. • .;;••.' • /<. • •.••. ;ioppiN< m • :^mf, !\iV} 'm\ 1634 Nevada Hwy. FINE ITALIAN AND AMERICAN DINING SUNDAY DINNER "See you there!' OPEN TUES-SUN 4 TO 10 PM *.

PAGE 31

Pag* SSL Hndenon Home News, Boulder City Newi. Green Valley News Thursday. August 10,1989 Military News Korean War Veteran elected DAV National Commander Vemon V. Cardosi, a serviceconnected, disabled veteran of the Korean War period, was elected national commander of the one-million-member Disabled American Veterans by delegates to the orgaruzation's national convention held in Las Vegas. In accepting the post, the Saugus, Mass., man pledged to battle the crisis in health care facing veterans in the Department of Veterans Affairs medical system. Gf particular concern to Cardosi is the continuing budget cuts, a growing older veteran population and skyrocketing health care costs that are conspiring to jeopardize veterans access to quality health care. Cardosi, who was a DAV national officer for four years prior to his election to the organization's highest post, urged members to the DAV and its Auxihary to focus their energy and devotion to meet the growing needs in the veteran population. A member of the 43rd Infantry Division, Cardosi began acthe American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. He has been adjutant, treasurer and commander of DAV tive duty in the U.S. Army in Chapter 115. In addition, he 1952. Two years later in 1954, has held numerous positions at he was discharged with the rank of Corporal due to a service-connected disability. A hfe member of the DAV Chapter 115 in Saugus, Cardosi, is a municipal employee of the Town of Saugus, and is past president of Local 262 of the state level of the DAV, including commander of the DAV Department of Massachusetts in 1983-84. Cardosi and his wife, Camille, are the parents of three sons, Vincent, Richard and Christopher. American War Mothers volunteer service The Veterans Clinics of both Henderson and Las Vegas recently were given much valued help from the members of the American War Mothers chapters of both Henderson and North Las Vegas. The volunteer program, the Veterans Administration Volunteer Service, was organized in August of 1975, Goidfield from Page 31 that he had come upon a deposit of magnetized iron which riveted his ironshod burros to the spot and trapped him because of the iron nails in his boots. "The only way I could get loose was to shp my feet out of my boots, which I did," he claimed. "I then walked to the valley in my stocking feet. There, I heard of a new discovery about, five miles away and joined in the stampede. It was two years before I returned to the place where I had left my burros and there I found them still standing—ossified." Perhaps they are still out there somewhere, but its a good story anyway. Dr. Douglas Stacey Diplomat*, Amarlcan Beard of Podatric Surgary Board Cartlflad In Foot and Ankia Surgary is pleased to announce the opening of the FAMILY PODIATRY CENTER in Two New Locations GREEN VALLEY FAMILY PODIATRY 6301 Mountain Vista 11203. Henderson In Henderson 456-FOOT (456-3668) BOULDER CITY FAMILY PODIATRY 1100 Ariiona Street Boulder City In Boulder City 294-FOOT I294-3668) CALL TODAY FOR AN APPOINTMENT Dr. Stacey Specializes in Corrective Procedures for: BUNIONS • CORNS • SPURS • ARTHRITIC FEET • HEEL & ARCH PAIN • INGROWN & FUNGAL NAILS • CHILDRENSFOOT PROBLEMS soon after the Veteran's Clinic was opened at St. Rose de Lima Hospital in Henderson. One of the groups that gave valuable service was the American War Mothers. The work the ladies performed was enhanced by serving coffee and cookies and giving special attention to veterans, creating a warm and friendly atmosphere. The volunteers at the Henderson Clinic were instructed in their work activities by Kennethf Luck of Reno. Quarterly meetings were held to maintain the high standard of service "/ *", '*^ni of anything new offered by veteran organizations. In August of 1975, Julia Haberkem was director of volunteers. Some of the ladies from the Henderson group included Olive Melton, Jeanette Daniels, Doris Pritchard, Evelyn Mazrimas, Thelma Stokes, Irma Struthers and Marion Lindesmith. From North Las Vegas there were Evelyn Hartwell, Goldie Speigler, Naomi Charleton, Margaret Stone and Rilda Dattage. In January 1980, the Veteran's Clinic was opened in Las Vegas. Regular volunteers were Rilda Dattage, Naomi Charleton, Margaret Stone and Roberta Gibrick. Present director of volunteers at the Las Vegas Chnic is Greg St^lhammer, head of the pharmacy at the chnic. Of special note is the fact that Marion Lindesmith, a pioneer of Henderson, volunteered more than 1,500 hours. Vemon V. Cardosi Robert C. Nelson COPIES 5' lAIL. MESSAGES PRINTING. COPIES 564-5574 Marine PvL Robert C. Nelson of Boulder City has completed recniit training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego. During the 13-week training cycle, Nelson was taught the basics of battlefield survival. He was introduced to the typical daily routine that he will experience during his enlisunent and studied the personal and professional standards traditionally exhibited by Marines. He panicipated in an active physical conditioning program and gained proficiency in a variety of military skills, including first aid, rifle marksmanship and close order drill. Teamworic and self-discipline were emphasized throughout the training cycle. Kathryn D. Rehkop AirNational Guard Ainnan 1st Class Kathryn D. Rehkop has graduated from the U.S. AirForce security police specialist course at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. Graduates of the course studied systems security operations, tactics and weapons training and earned credits toward an associate degree in applied science through the Community College of the Air Force. Rehkop is the daughter of Marvin L. Rehkop of Henderson and Carol A Rehkop of Las Vegas. She is a 1976 graduate of Cabrillo High School at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. HOTNEWVDEOS The years hottest new videos are here. And not only do we have more of your screen favorites, we've got all the best deals, too. Including the very popular six nine poker payback schedule. They're the most exciting videos you've ever seen. Don't miss them. Or you could miss the year's biggest hits. ALA<< RELIVE THE LEGENDA 1987 graduate of Boulder City High School, he joined the Marine Corps Reserves in February 1989. John D. Johnson John D. Johnson has been promoted to the rank of staff sergeant in the U.S. Air Force. Johnson is an administration specialist with the 34th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. He is the son of Charles E. and Patricia A. Johnson of Henderson. The sergeant is a 1981 graduate of Theodore High School, Ala. Steven J. Murphy Navy Seaman Steven J. Murphy, a resident of Henderson, recently returned to San Diego from deployment to the Western Pacific Ocean while serving aboard the dock landing ship USS Germantown, homeported in San Diego. During the five-month deployment, Murphy participated in numerous military exercises and visited several foreign ports including Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines; Pohang, Korea; Hong Kong; and Sydney and Brisbane, AusU'alia. A 1986 graduate of Basic High School, Henderson, he joined the Navy Reserves in May 1987. Thursday, Angait 10, 1969 Henderson Home News, Boalder City News, Green Valley News Page 33 Jesse R. Home Marine Pvt. Jesse R. Home, son of Joan H. and Jesse R. Home Sr. of Henderson, has completed recruit training at the Marine Corps Recmit Depot, San Diego. Vincent W. Brown Marine Cpl. Vincent W. Brown, a 1985 graduate of Basic High School, recently reported for duty with 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing, Marine Corps Air Station, Cherry Point, N.C. He joined the Marine Corps in May 1985. Troy L. Phelps Troy L. Phelps, assigned to RAF Greenham Conunon, England,, has been promoted in the U.S. Air Force to the rank of senior airman. Phelps, son of Wallace A. and Sharon K. Phelps of Henderson, is a ground radio communications specialist for the SOlst Tactical Missile Wing. He is a 1986 graduate of Basic High School. Michael J. Lindenbusch Army Sgt Michael J. Lindenbusch, son of John H. and Rona M. Lindenbusch of Chicago, has arrived forduty in West Gennany. Lindenbusch is a cavalry scout with the 63rd Annor Regiment His wife. Lisa, is the daughter of Charies and Rose Thom of Hendenon. The leigeant is a 1982 graduate of University Gty High School. Mo. CARUNO SILVER CO. 4 %m Ifm ^ 7t4^ 24 HR. HOTLINE FOR PRICES 384-1909 317 E. Fremont Si "bisMa Hffanys" During the 13-week U^aining cycle, Home was taught the basics of battlefield survival. He was introduced to the typical daily routine that he will experience during his enlisunent and studied the personal and professional standards traditionally exhibited by Marines. He participated in an active physical conditioning program and gained proficiency in a variety of military skills, including first aid, rifie marksmanship and close order drill. Teamwork and self-discipline were emphasized throughout the training cycle. A1988 graduate of Basic High School, he joined the Marine Corps in Febmary 1989. Rodney L. Harris Seaman Rodney L. Harris, son of Paul C. and Janice E. Harris of Henderson, recently received the U.S. Navy's Meritorious Unit Commendation. He was awarded the commendation in recognition of his unit's superior perfonnance of duty. Harris is currently stationed aboard the gi^ided missile frigate USS Sides, homeported in Long Beach, Calif. He joined the Navy in December 1987. LaBaron E. Royiance Air Force Staff Sgt. LaBaron E. Roylancek son of Keith N. arul Betty E. Royiance of Henderson, has arrived for duty in England. Royiance is a conununications-computer systems operations operator with the 2130th Communications Group. He is a 1978 graduate of Basic High School. USS Enterprise crew searches for other 36,000-plus shipmates By Anna M. DuBose Frorh the laying of the keel in Febiiiary 1958, its launch in September 1960, commissioning in November of 1961 to the present day, approximately 38,000 men have served a tour of duty aboard the USS Enterprise CVN 65. The USS Enterprise (CVAN/ CVN 65) Association, formed in 1985 by Jesse Cannon of Kentwood, La., and Billy R. Cook of DeSoto. Texas, both USN-Retircd. many times have asked the question, "Where are our fornier shipmates and what are they doing now?" Jesse Caruion's idea in 1984 was to locate fornier shipmates from the Engineering and Reactor Departments for the possibility of a reunion. He published notices in various military magazines and newspapers. From his inquiries hereceived45 responses. Eddie R. Cook contacted him about getting together. The first reunion was held in 1985 at the William.sburg, Va„ Inn, with 35 shipmates and wives attending. The Association was officially formed with the reunion held at the Holiday Inn in Norfolk, Va., on Aug 27-30.1986. The group's William G. MacMlllan Navy Ensign William G. MacMillan. son of Joseph H. and Bevery A. MacMillan of Henderson, was recently commissioned in his present rank upon completion of Aviation Officer Candidate School. During the 13-week course at the Naval Air Station Pcnsacola, Fla., MacMillan was prepared for .future duties and responsibilities as a commissioned officer and to prepare him toentcrprimary flight training. Robert L. Clifton Airnian 1st Qass Robert L. Clifton has graduated from Air Force basic uaining at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. During the six weeks of training the airman studied the Air Force mission, organization and customs and received special training in human relations. In addition, aimien who complete basic training eam credits toward an associate degree through the community college of the AirForce. Clifton is the son of Shirley R. Clifton of Citnis Heights, Calif, and William L. Clifton of Henderson. During the course. MacMillan received general military, academic, physical fitness and leadership U-aining, including military justice, mathematics and physics. He also received prcflight U^ining which centered" around aerodynamics, navigation, sea and land survival, aviation physiology and basic aircraft engineering. He is a 1988 graduate of Embry-Riddle Aemautical University, Daytona Beach, Fla.. with a bachelor of science degree. He is a 1987 graduate of San Juan High School. Citrus Heists. Two Henderson residents graduate from AF Academy Karen E. Tilley and John R. Thayer, both Henderson residents, recently were graduated from the U.S. Air Force Academy at Colorado Springs, Colo. Immediately upon being awarded bachelor of science degrees, they were commissioned as second lieutenants in the Air Force. Tilley, scheduled for pilot training at T aughlin Air Force Base, Texas, is the daughter of Air Force Lt. Col. and Mrs. James Tilley of Henderson. Thayer, a 1985 graduate of Basic High School, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Thayer of Henderson. The academy is a four-year educational institution charged with the task of training young Americans to become professional Air Force officers. Karen E. Tilley John R. Thayer I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I DPlaase check box If this tsyoof" I fi^rst visit to Subway in the last 30 I I FEED YOUR FAMILY FOR JUST $9^99 Our Family Picnic Pack feeds a family of four for lew ihn $10*. G two regular footlong and two regular 6" subs in your choice of nun and dieese, turkey, tuna or cold cut combo, plus four 22 oz. sodas for just $9.99 Unit One coupon per oiMomer per vit. Tht offer ii noi good in cocnbiiwuon wUh uy wher ofhr. Good only u psnicipaung Moraa Olfcr cxpiic* 9/7/V9. "Saks tsx not Inchjided days. ll"(r(r'""T'BUYASUB I BUY ONE • • AND 22 02. I FOOTLONG, DRINK, GET } GET THE {ANOTHER SUB I SECOND FOR • FOR ONLY I $1 00 OFF ANY FOOTLONG SUB! 99< Get SI
PAGE 32

Pag* SSL Hndenon Home News, Boulder City Newi. Green Valley News Thursday. August 10,1989 Military News Korean War Veteran elected DAV National Commander Vemon V. Cardosi, a serviceconnected, disabled veteran of the Korean War period, was elected national commander of the one-million-member Disabled American Veterans by delegates to the orgaruzation's national convention held in Las Vegas. In accepting the post, the Saugus, Mass., man pledged to battle the crisis in health care facing veterans in the Department of Veterans Affairs medical system. Gf particular concern to Cardosi is the continuing budget cuts, a growing older veteran population and skyrocketing health care costs that are conspiring to jeopardize veterans access to quality health care. Cardosi, who was a DAV national officer for four years prior to his election to the organization's highest post, urged members to the DAV and its Auxihary to focus their energy and devotion to meet the growing needs in the veteran population. A member of the 43rd Infantry Division, Cardosi began acthe American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. He has been adjutant, treasurer and commander of DAV tive duty in the U.S. Army in Chapter 115. In addition, he 1952. Two years later in 1954, has held numerous positions at he was discharged with the rank of Corporal due to a service-connected disability. A hfe member of the DAV Chapter 115 in Saugus, Cardosi, is a municipal employee of the Town of Saugus, and is past president of Local 262 of the state level of the DAV, including commander of the DAV Department of Massachusetts in 1983-84. Cardosi and his wife, Camille, are the parents of three sons, Vincent, Richard and Christopher. American War Mothers volunteer service The Veterans Clinics of both Henderson and Las Vegas recently were given much valued help from the members of the American War Mothers chapters of both Henderson and North Las Vegas. The volunteer program, the Veterans Administration Volunteer Service, was organized in August of 1975, Goidfield from Page 31 that he had come upon a deposit of magnetized iron which riveted his ironshod burros to the spot and trapped him because of the iron nails in his boots. "The only way I could get loose was to shp my feet out of my boots, which I did," he claimed. "I then walked to the valley in my stocking feet. There, I heard of a new discovery about, five miles away and joined in the stampede. It was two years before I returned to the place where I had left my burros and there I found them still standing—ossified." Perhaps they are still out there somewhere, but its a good story anyway. Dr. Douglas Stacey Diplomat*, Amarlcan Beard of Podatric Surgary Board Cartlflad In Foot and Ankia Surgary is pleased to announce the opening of the FAMILY PODIATRY CENTER in Two New Locations GREEN VALLEY FAMILY PODIATRY 6301 Mountain Vista 11203. Henderson In Henderson 456-FOOT (456-3668) BOULDER CITY FAMILY PODIATRY 1100 Ariiona Street Boulder City In Boulder City 294-FOOT I294-3668) CALL TODAY FOR AN APPOINTMENT Dr. Stacey Specializes in Corrective Procedures for: BUNIONS • CORNS • SPURS • ARTHRITIC FEET • HEEL & ARCH PAIN • INGROWN & FUNGAL NAILS • CHILDRENSFOOT PROBLEMS soon after the Veteran's Clinic was opened at St. Rose de Lima Hospital in Henderson. One of the groups that gave valuable service was the American War Mothers. The work the ladies performed was enhanced by serving coffee and cookies and giving special attention to veterans, creating a warm and friendly atmosphere. The volunteers at the Henderson Clinic were instructed in their work activities by Kennethf Luck of Reno. Quarterly meetings were held to maintain the high standard of service "/ *", '*^ni of anything new offered by veteran organizations. In August of 1975, Julia Haberkem was director of volunteers. Some of the ladies from the Henderson group included Olive Melton, Jeanette Daniels, Doris Pritchard, Evelyn Mazrimas, Thelma Stokes, Irma Struthers and Marion Lindesmith. From North Las Vegas there were Evelyn Hartwell, Goldie Speigler, Naomi Charleton, Margaret Stone and Rilda Dattage. In January 1980, the Veteran's Clinic was opened in Las Vegas. Regular volunteers were Rilda Dattage, Naomi Charleton, Margaret Stone and Roberta Gibrick. Present director of volunteers at the Las Vegas Chnic is Greg St^lhammer, head of the pharmacy at the chnic. Of special note is the fact that Marion Lindesmith, a pioneer of Henderson, volunteered more than 1,500 hours. Vemon V. Cardosi Robert C. Nelson COPIES 5' lAIL. MESSAGES PRINTING. COPIES 564-5574 Marine PvL Robert C. Nelson of Boulder City has completed recniit training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego. During the 13-week training cycle, Nelson was taught the basics of battlefield survival. He was introduced to the typical daily routine that he will experience during his enlisunent and studied the personal and professional standards traditionally exhibited by Marines. He panicipated in an active physical conditioning program and gained proficiency in a variety of military skills, including first aid, rifle marksmanship and close order drill. Teamworic and self-discipline were emphasized throughout the training cycle. Kathryn D. Rehkop AirNational Guard Ainnan 1st Class Kathryn D. Rehkop has graduated from the U.S. AirForce security police specialist course at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. Graduates of the course studied systems security operations, tactics and weapons training and earned credits toward an associate degree in applied science through the Community College of the Air Force. Rehkop is the daughter of Marvin L. Rehkop of Henderson and Carol A Rehkop of Las Vegas. She is a 1976 graduate of Cabrillo High School at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. HOTNEWVDEOS The years hottest new videos are here. And not only do we have more of your screen favorites, we've got all the best deals, too. Including the very popular six nine poker payback schedule. They're the most exciting videos you've ever seen. Don't miss them. Or you could miss the year's biggest hits. ALA<< RELIVE THE LEGENDA 1987 graduate of Boulder City High School, he joined the Marine Corps Reserves in February 1989. John D. Johnson John D. Johnson has been promoted to the rank of staff sergeant in the U.S. Air Force. Johnson is an administration specialist with the 34th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. He is the son of Charles E. and Patricia A. Johnson of Henderson. The sergeant is a 1981 graduate of Theodore High School, Ala. Steven J. Murphy Navy Seaman Steven J. Murphy, a resident of Henderson, recently returned to San Diego from deployment to the Western Pacific Ocean while serving aboard the dock landing ship USS Germantown, homeported in San Diego. During the five-month deployment, Murphy participated in numerous military exercises and visited several foreign ports including Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines; Pohang, Korea; Hong Kong; and Sydney and Brisbane, AusU'alia. A 1986 graduate of Basic High School, Henderson, he joined the Navy Reserves in May 1987. Thursday, Angait 10, 1969 Henderson Home News, Boalder City News, Green Valley News Page 33 Jesse R. Home Marine Pvt. Jesse R. Home, son of Joan H. and Jesse R. Home Sr. of Henderson, has completed recruit training at the Marine Corps Recmit Depot, San Diego. Vincent W. Brown Marine Cpl. Vincent W. Brown, a 1985 graduate of Basic High School, recently reported for duty with 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing, Marine Corps Air Station, Cherry Point, N.C. He joined the Marine Corps in May 1985. Troy L. Phelps Troy L. Phelps, assigned to RAF Greenham Conunon, England,, has been promoted in the U.S. Air Force to the rank of senior airman. Phelps, son of Wallace A. and Sharon K. Phelps of Henderson, is a ground radio communications specialist for the SOlst Tactical Missile Wing. He is a 1986 graduate of Basic High School. Michael J. Lindenbusch Army Sgt Michael J. Lindenbusch, son of John H. and Rona M. Lindenbusch of Chicago, has arrived forduty in West Gennany. Lindenbusch is a cavalry scout with the 63rd Annor Regiment His wife. Lisa, is the daughter of Charies and Rose Thom of Hendenon. The leigeant is a 1982 graduate of University Gty High School. Mo. CARUNO SILVER CO. 4 %m Ifm ^ 7t4^ 24 HR. HOTLINE FOR PRICES 384-1909 317 E. Fremont Si "bisMa Hffanys" During the 13-week U^aining cycle, Home was taught the basics of battlefield survival. He was introduced to the typical daily routine that he will experience during his enlisunent and studied the personal and professional standards traditionally exhibited by Marines. He participated in an active physical conditioning program and gained proficiency in a variety of military skills, including first aid, rifie marksmanship and close order drill. Teamwork and self-discipline were emphasized throughout the training cycle. A1988 graduate of Basic High School, he joined the Marine Corps in Febmary 1989. Rodney L. Harris Seaman Rodney L. Harris, son of Paul C. and Janice E. Harris of Henderson, recently received the U.S. Navy's Meritorious Unit Commendation. He was awarded the commendation in recognition of his unit's superior perfonnance of duty. Harris is currently stationed aboard the gi^ided missile frigate USS Sides, homeported in Long Beach, Calif. He joined the Navy in December 1987. LaBaron E. Royiance Air Force Staff Sgt. LaBaron E. Roylancek son of Keith N. arul Betty E. Royiance of Henderson, has arrived for duty in England. Royiance is a conununications-computer systems operations operator with the 2130th Communications Group. He is a 1978 graduate of Basic High School. USS Enterprise crew searches for other 36,000-plus shipmates By Anna M. DuBose Frorh the laying of the keel in Febiiiary 1958, its launch in September 1960, commissioning in November of 1961 to the present day, approximately 38,000 men have served a tour of duty aboard the USS Enterprise CVN 65. The USS Enterprise (CVAN/ CVN 65) Association, formed in 1985 by Jesse Cannon of Kentwood, La., and Billy R. Cook of DeSoto. Texas, both USN-Retircd. many times have asked the question, "Where are our fornier shipmates and what are they doing now?" Jesse Caruion's idea in 1984 was to locate fornier shipmates from the Engineering and Reactor Departments for the possibility of a reunion. He published notices in various military magazines and newspapers. From his inquiries hereceived45 responses. Eddie R. Cook contacted him about getting together. The first reunion was held in 1985 at the William.sburg, Va„ Inn, with 35 shipmates and wives attending. The Association was officially formed with the reunion held at the Holiday Inn in Norfolk, Va., on Aug 27-30.1986. The group's William G. MacMlllan Navy Ensign William G. MacMillan. son of Joseph H. and Bevery A. MacMillan of Henderson, was recently commissioned in his present rank upon completion of Aviation Officer Candidate School. During the 13-week course at the Naval Air Station Pcnsacola, Fla., MacMillan was prepared for .future duties and responsibilities as a commissioned officer and to prepare him toentcrprimary flight training. Robert L. Clifton Airnian 1st Qass Robert L. Clifton has graduated from Air Force basic uaining at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. During the six weeks of training the airman studied the Air Force mission, organization and customs and received special training in human relations. In addition, aimien who complete basic training eam credits toward an associate degree through the community college of the AirForce. Clifton is the son of Shirley R. Clifton of Citnis Heights, Calif, and William L. Clifton of Henderson. During the course. MacMillan received general military, academic, physical fitness and leadership U-aining, including military justice, mathematics and physics. He also received prcflight U^ining which centered" around aerodynamics, navigation, sea and land survival, aviation physiology and basic aircraft engineering. He is a 1988 graduate of Embry-Riddle Aemautical University, Daytona Beach, Fla.. with a bachelor of science degree. He is a 1987 graduate of San Juan High School. Citrus Heists. Two Henderson residents graduate from AF Academy Karen E. Tilley and John R. Thayer, both Henderson residents, recently were graduated from the U.S. Air Force Academy at Colorado Springs, Colo. Immediately upon being awarded bachelor of science degrees, they were commissioned as second lieutenants in the Air Force. Tilley, scheduled for pilot training at T aughlin Air Force Base, Texas, is the daughter of Air Force Lt. Col. and Mrs. James Tilley of Henderson. Thayer, a 1985 graduate of Basic High School, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Thayer of Henderson. The academy is a four-year educational institution charged with the task of training young Americans to become professional Air Force officers. Karen E. Tilley John R. Thayer I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I DPlaase check box If this tsyoof" I fi^rst visit to Subway in the last 30 I I FEED YOUR FAMILY FOR JUST $9^99 Our Family Picnic Pack feeds a family of four for lew ihn $10*. G two regular footlong and two regular 6" subs in your choice of nun and dieese, turkey, tuna or cold cut combo, plus four 22 oz. sodas for just $9.99 Unit One coupon per oiMomer per vit. Tht offer ii noi good in cocnbiiwuon wUh uy wher ofhr. Good only u psnicipaung Moraa Olfcr cxpiic* 9/7/V9. "Saks tsx not Inchjided days. ll"(r(r'""T'BUYASUB I BUY ONE • • AND 22 02. I FOOTLONG, DRINK, GET } GET THE {ANOTHER SUB I SECOND FOR • FOR ONLY I $1 00 OFF ANY FOOTLONG SUB! 99< Get SI
PAGE 33

^m* H HabdanoB Horn* Nawa, Boulder City News, Gren VaUey News Thuraday. Augnat 10,1089 Humana HospitalAnew chapter in Nevada health cait was written lasf week, as officials ftom Humana HospitalSunrise announced the creation of Humana Children's Ho^talLaa Vegas, exclusively for the treatment of children. Humana Children's, which will be officially dedicated in September, is the culm ination of yean of work by medical and administrative personnel from Humana Hospital-Sunrise. Though the Children's Hospital will occupy Sunrise's South Tower, the new facility will have its own independent medical staff, said Donald Stewart, president of Humana Hospital-Sunrise. "What Humana Children's Hospital-Las Vegas represents is a quantum leap for the Health care of children in Nevada, as well as those in neighbortiing states," Stewart said. "Never before in our area has such a group of pediatric medical specialists— independent doctors and nurses, technicians, therapists and support personnel—been brought together the way they are being brought together now." On staff at Humana Children's Hospital-Las Vegas will be dozens of independent physicians, who form the most comprehensive, experienced pediatric team ever brought together in Nevada. Pediatric specialties include intensive care, cardiology, neonatology, neurology and ophthalmology, among many others. The hospital also will feature a specially uained pediauic nursing staff; special pediatric equipment and uained pediatric staff in ancillary departments; specially prepared mei^us; a play therapist; a complete playroom; a resource Eye clinic offered to senior citizens Area senior citizens can have their vision tested and eye glasses adjusted at a free eye clinic to be held at Sierra Vista on Friday. Shearing Eye Institute will be at the reti rement community from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. to provide vision testing and glaucoma and cataract screening. They will also adjust eyeglasses and make any minor repairs necessary. All services at the eye clinic are free. No appointment is necessary. Sierra Vista, a 151-unit community for active senior citizens, is located at 6650 W. Flamingo Road in Las Vegas. For more information, call 732-2800. Sunrise announces Children's Hospital library; and an orienudon program for children and parents. To meet its goal of developing a research and education program, Humana Children's Hospital-Las Vegas has initiated a discussion to pursue a fonnal afRliation with the University of Nevada School of Medicine. Humana Children's HospitalLas Vegas will be a 140-bed facility, including 93 pediatric beds, 37 neonatal beds and 10 pediatric intensive care beds. Though Humana Children's Hospital-Las Vegas will occupy the South Tower of Humana Hospital-Sunrise, Stewart View of cosmetic surgery changes Peojrfehave changed theirview of cosmetic sui:gery dramatically in the last decade. Facelifts, breast implants, and Hposuction arc no longer considerations solely for the wealthy or famous. People from all walks of life are now taking a look in the mirrorand contemplating changes that would have, only a short time ago, been almost unimaginable. As a result, they are also taking a closer look at where to fVilflil these options. That is where uncertainty sets in. Most people use the terms cosmetic surgeon and plastic surgeon interchangeably. In fact, there is a difference. Each group is represented by a separate entity. The inception of the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery in 1983 came about because many suigeons felt that education and training in the field of cosmetic surgery needed to be more accessible to all licensed physicians in different specialties. Plastic surgeons, long united under the American Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, viewed this as an infringement of the cxclusi veness of their field and have attempted to denigrate physicians from other specialty areas ever since, touting moreextensivc training and board certification as "proof' of their "superior" qualifications. AACS members would like the public to take a closer look at these claims. While plastic surgeons do take an additional two year plastic surgery residency, only 10 percent of that is devoted to cosmetic surgery. The rest involves training in reconstructive techniques such as bum victims and birth defects. And, according to their own survey, only 50 percent of what the American Society of Plastic and Reconstnictive Surgery perfonns is cosmetic in nature, as compared with most cosmetic surgeons, who perform cosmetic procedures up to 90 percent of the time. Board certification is the other Cental offers discounts on connection charges trumpet that plastic surgeons sound in their attempt to discredit other surgeons doing cosmetic surgery. They contend that recognition by the American Board of Medical Special ties proves that only their sugeons are qualified to perfonn cosmetic surgery. They fail to mention, however, that due to its policy of recognizing only one board per specialty, board cenifiedcosmeticsurgeons are effectively left out becaue they are considered part of the plastic surgery field. In addition. ABMS recognition does not guarantee surgical competence. It only indicates that academic knowledge of a core curriculum was obtained by a candidate during residency. The American Board of Cosmetic Surgery, in contrast, has stringent criteria to fiilfill in order to become certified in cosmetic surgery. Among them, the applicant must: be board certified in an original discipline or specialty recognized by the ABMS, have been in the practice of, primarily, cosmetic surgery for the past five years, have performed no less than one thousand cosmetic operalions; and be currently performing ho less than two hundred documented cosmetic procedures per year, providing proof of ongoing proficiency in cosmetic surgery. Congressional hearings are currently being held to determine legislation which would set minimum standards for doctors who perform cosmetic surgery in office surgical facilities. The AACS endoreses this wholeheartedly. Providing the public with answers to the many questions surrounding whether or not a doctor has current knowledge and ability to perfonn cosmetic procedures is an AACS priority. For further information on board certification and cosmetic surgery, call the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery's tollfree Public Service Line at I -800221-9808 or write: American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery, 159 E. Live Oak AVe. Suite 204, Arcadia, Calif. 91006. to open in LV stressed that it will be a separate medical entity solely for children. "Humana Children's HospitalLas Vegas underscores the fact that treating the medical problems of children is a vastly different matter than treating those of adults," Stewart said. "Children have very different physical, emotional and psychological needs than do their adult counterparts. The specially trained staff at HUmana Children's Hospital-Las Vegas will address these needs, leading to our goal of providing the best health care that we possibly can, for the Las Vegas community and the state of Nevada." Meal management classes begin Another session of Heartee Meal Management classes is slated to begin. The four-week class will be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. on successive Wednesday nights, Sept. 13, 20 and 27 and concluding on Oct.4 at the Humana Hospital Sunrise Auditorium. Each two-hour session will discuss a different aspect of basic good nutrition and meal planning to help alleviate the risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Topics will include introducing new ways of eating and cooking defining cardiovascular disease and risk factors; shopping and label reading; preparation of lean meats^ poultry and fish as well asmeatless meals, vegetables and soup; baking and desserts; and eating out. Qasses will be taught by two registered dietitians, Carolyn Leontos, M.S., R.D., and Lisa Sherman, M.Ed., R.N. Dr. Robert A Shiroff will lead the discussion on cardiovascular disease and risk factors. For further information and rcgisuction about the free classes, contact the American Heart Association at 367-1366. Centel is introducing a program to provide a 50 percent discount on new service connection charges for qualified low-income customers. Known as "Link Up America," the program, approved by the Nevada Public Service Commission, will give discounts up to $30 for new service installation. Currently, typical installation charges for Centel customers are $18.75. Under'the proposal, qualified customers will pay $9.38. The program does not provide assistance for the monthly local basic phone service or federal chaises. Service installation charges cover preparing the service order and connecting the line to the local telephone network. "Making telephone 'service available to as many people as possible is our goal," said Gordon M. Iliomton, Centel (^rations vice president. In order to qualify for Link Up America, a customer must be receiving or be eligible to receive benefits from a public asBiatanoe program. If the applicant ia under 60 yara old, he or the must certify they are not a dependent for federal income tax purposes. For information, customers may call 877-7400 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays. Some 6.S million Americans play tennis at least twice a week. the dream that wont come true... Hundreds of needy youngsters are waiting word tliat they can go to camp in August. But the SUN Camp Fund hasnt mt its goal of $100,000. That means disappointment for some disadvantaged or liandlcapped boys and girls. THEY NEED YOUR HELP Please Join others who tiave l>estowed a bit of happiness for a cliiid, by donating to the SUN Camp Fund today. Las\^sO Suh ere is my contribution to SUN Camp Fund to help needy and handicapped boys and girls go to summer camp. Name Please list my gift in the SUN as follows ijftjl AnonynriousD '^ *' Donations are tax deductible. Your entire fllft gow directly to help a needy child. Operating expenses of the fund are absorbed by the Las Vegas SUN. L" Mail tot SUN Camp Fund, P.O. Box 427S, In Vga% 80127 W VMV m. -m a, Symptoms, Causes and TVeatment mm&.^'^^ K. FREE ^^mA '' LECTURE Thureday, August 17,1989* 7:00 PM HumanSHospital — Sunrise Auditorium GUEST SPEAKERS Sheldon J. Fir-edman, M.D., EA.C.S. Chief of I 'rology at Humana Hospital-Sunrise, (' • ertifitd by Ike American Board ofL'nhgy, Jeffrey V. Katz. M.D., EA.C.S. Assistant (MefafUmiogy at Humana Hospilat-Sunrise. Certified by the .4 merican Board of I 'rology. Urinary Incontinence is the inability to maintain bladder control, and it affects many men and women. During this informative lecture. Dr. Freedman and Dr. Katz will discuss the Symptoms, Causes and Treatment of Urinary Incontinence. Come and learn more about this problem, and what can be done about it. Limited Seating • Please call for Resenations. 731-8188'9 am to 4:30 pm 4lumaiia*Ho8pital Sunrise 3186 MaiyUnd ftrfcwiy Las Vent, Newda 89109 • % -^ V 'Thunday, August 10,1969 HooM N9W, Bookkr CKj Ntira, Qnm Vallay Newi Paft 36 Kim Davis and Chalice Beagley 'West Side Story' opens today The curtain rises tonight on "West Side Story," the third production this summer sponsored by the State Parks Cultural Arts Board and the Nevada Division of State Parks. Performances, at Spring Moimtain Ranch State Park, are scheduled for Thursdays through Saturdays through Aug. 26 with an extra performance on Wednesday, Aug. 23 and a special stage benefit show Aug. 20. Tickets for that event are $25 and feature a New York block party including dinner, New York City street games and other entertainment. Director Erin Breen said that, overall, the cast of "Westside Story" is beyond compare. The cast includes; Lane Blaylock as Tony and Joyce Wehrmeister as Maria, plus Kim Davis, Chalice Beagley and Darret Hart. They perform Bernstein-Sondheim songs that range from the Jazzy and feverish "Cool" to the lyrical "Maria" and 'Tonight." Breen added that the production with its moods and characters, has retained its innocence—even though its theme is about gang rivalry. Breen's goal for "Westside Story" is to make it enjoyable for all ages. Spring Mountain Ranch State Park is located in the Red Rock Recreation Land, 15 miles west of Las Vegas on West Charleston Boulevard. Spectators will need lawn chairs or blankets to sit on and can bring a picnic if they care to. Sweaters are usually needed, spokespersons said, and asked that attendees not bring pets or lounge chairs. Gates open at 6 p.m. and close at 8 p.m. sharp, or when the park is full, they said. SPCAB and Nevada Division of State Parks tickeys are $5 general admission, $3 for seniors, youth and handicapped on Friday and Saturday; Wednesday and Thursday prices are $4 and $1. Advanced tickets assure admittance to the park until 7:30 p.m. and are available for all performances at Teleguide. The Teleguide machine provides a receipt when the transaction is made. Teleguide reminds people to place a separate ticket order for each carload and to make sure each car in the party has its own receipt when arriving at the Park. There is 30-cent handling charge and a Visa or Master Charge is required. For Teleguide locations and further information, call 594-PLAY. Bullock's credit office has Friday and Saturday night tickets only. To find out if a night is sold out, call 594-5555. Southeast Exchange Club to be chartered tonight A charter meeting of the Southeast Valley Exchange Club, a community-oriented service group primarily targeted at helping youth in the Henderson, Green Valley and Boulder City areas, will be held this evening at the Chinese Gardens, 5485 W. Sahara Ave. The gathering will begin with cocktails at 6:30 p.m. followed by a dinner meeting at 7 p.m., spokespersons said. Two officers of the National Exchange Club will present the charter to the existing founding group of some 25 local members. District offtcials are expected to attend as well. The Southeast Valley Exchange Club, the third Exchange Club to be organized in the Southern Nevada area, consists of local residents from diverse community areas, each bringing a special expertise to the organization. "SVEC is especially involved," said Rhonda DuPre, a spokesperson, "in areas of child abuse, educationincluding scholarship programs—controlled substance abuse and crime prevention among youth, and is considering undertaking other projects as well. The group meets at 7 a.m. on the first and third Thursday of each month at the Green Valley Athletic Club. Interested persons may contact DuPre at 382-2211. SIDS group to meet ^ The Clark County Chapter of the National Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Foundation will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday in sixth floor conference rooms C and D of the Medical Professional Building, 2040 W. Charleston Ave., adjacent to the University Medical Center. Interested parents, family members and friends are invited to attend, spokespersons said. For additional information, caU 455-4344 or 455-4218. ThA Welsh national flower Is the lk—a vegetable that closely resembles the onion ATTENTION! FATHER & SON TEAM 50 YEARS EXPERIENCE TRANSMISSION • Chsng. fluid SERVICE SPECIAL :^rj:;^g..*.^ C ^ ^%<|S Chang* trns-fllt*r • Adjust bands A llnkaga • Road tsst (Front wtmt drtw. ***. WVJ EtfS> QREEN VAUEY • HENDERSON • BOULDER CITY MOTORiSTSI try EXPERT TRANSMISSIONS • vM'rsdossrttiMiyoulhtakl EXPERT c^SQ 1854N.BouldfrHwy. Hsndsrson j^tSSiiSZn 565-6458 Stationary, Business Forms, Bulk Mailings The BCSI For Less Call for quote at MAIL, MESSAGES A Mors., PRINTINa, COPIES FAX 564-5574 SILVER SPUR 6/UIIBUMG HJIU and SALOON ALL NEW!! _?UPER LIBERAL SLOTS $200,000 QUARTERMANM VIDEO POKBI—JOKERS WILD-DEUCES WILD 5 CENT KENO ft POKER HELEN & MARY'S FAMILY STYLE RESTAURANT Great Food at Reasonable Prices BREAKf AST $eRVEP ALL PAY Homemade Soups and Desserts "At Its Best" Biscuits and Gravy with Hashbrowns, Sausage $1 ^^ 14-oz. T-Bone Complete Dinner ^5* "FRI. SPECIAL" HALIBUT STEAK $3.95 "SAT. SPECIALPRIME RIB $4.50 "SUN. SPECIAL" CHICKEN & BUMPLINGS $3.95 AH Comptota with Soup or Salad Chelea of Potato Deaaart of ttta Day SAVE • S ALE DAYS • SA VE LirVE FURNITURE I'With LOVE your house becomes a home irfTERIOR DESIGN CUSTOM FUrtJITURE CUSOM DRAPERIES DESIGNER CARPETS WALL COVERINGS ^ Best Prices in Nevada I Comer of Boulder Highway A Lake Mead Drive in Henderson^ (702) 565-5911 T *i
PAGE 34

^m* H HabdanoB Horn* Nawa, Boulder City News, Gren VaUey News Thuraday. Augnat 10,1089 Humana HospitalAnew chapter in Nevada health cait was written lasf week, as officials ftom Humana HospitalSunrise announced the creation of Humana Children's Ho^talLaa Vegas, exclusively for the treatment of children. Humana Children's, which will be officially dedicated in September, is the culm ination of yean of work by medical and administrative personnel from Humana Hospital-Sunrise. Though the Children's Hospital will occupy Sunrise's South Tower, the new facility will have its own independent medical staff, said Donald Stewart, president of Humana Hospital-Sunrise. "What Humana Children's Hospital-Las Vegas represents is a quantum leap for the Health care of children in Nevada, as well as those in neighbortiing states," Stewart said. "Never before in our area has such a group of pediatric medical specialists— independent doctors and nurses, technicians, therapists and support personnel—been brought together the way they are being brought together now." On staff at Humana Children's Hospital-Las Vegas will be dozens of independent physicians, who form the most comprehensive, experienced pediatric team ever brought together in Nevada. Pediatric specialties include intensive care, cardiology, neonatology, neurology and ophthalmology, among many others. The hospital also will feature a specially uained pediauic nursing staff; special pediatric equipment and uained pediatric staff in ancillary departments; specially prepared mei^us; a play therapist; a complete playroom; a resource Eye clinic offered to senior citizens Area senior citizens can have their vision tested and eye glasses adjusted at a free eye clinic to be held at Sierra Vista on Friday. Shearing Eye Institute will be at the reti rement community from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. to provide vision testing and glaucoma and cataract screening. They will also adjust eyeglasses and make any minor repairs necessary. All services at the eye clinic are free. No appointment is necessary. Sierra Vista, a 151-unit community for active senior citizens, is located at 6650 W. Flamingo Road in Las Vegas. For more information, call 732-2800. Sunrise announces Children's Hospital library; and an orienudon program for children and parents. To meet its goal of developing a research and education program, Humana Children's Hospital-Las Vegas has initiated a discussion to pursue a fonnal afRliation with the University of Nevada School of Medicine. Humana Children's HospitalLas Vegas will be a 140-bed facility, including 93 pediatric beds, 37 neonatal beds and 10 pediatric intensive care beds. Though Humana Children's Hospital-Las Vegas will occupy the South Tower of Humana Hospital-Sunrise, Stewart View of cosmetic surgery changes Peojrfehave changed theirview of cosmetic sui:gery dramatically in the last decade. Facelifts, breast implants, and Hposuction arc no longer considerations solely for the wealthy or famous. People from all walks of life are now taking a look in the mirrorand contemplating changes that would have, only a short time ago, been almost unimaginable. As a result, they are also taking a closer look at where to fVilflil these options. That is where uncertainty sets in. Most people use the terms cosmetic surgeon and plastic surgeon interchangeably. In fact, there is a difference. Each group is represented by a separate entity. The inception of the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery in 1983 came about because many suigeons felt that education and training in the field of cosmetic surgery needed to be more accessible to all licensed physicians in different specialties. Plastic surgeons, long united under the American Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, viewed this as an infringement of the cxclusi veness of their field and have attempted to denigrate physicians from other specialty areas ever since, touting moreextensivc training and board certification as "proof' of their "superior" qualifications. AACS members would like the public to take a closer look at these claims. While plastic surgeons do take an additional two year plastic surgery residency, only 10 percent of that is devoted to cosmetic surgery. The rest involves training in reconstructive techniques such as bum victims and birth defects. And, according to their own survey, only 50 percent of what the American Society of Plastic and Reconstnictive Surgery perfonns is cosmetic in nature, as compared with most cosmetic surgeons, who perform cosmetic procedures up to 90 percent of the time. Board certification is the other Cental offers discounts on connection charges trumpet that plastic surgeons sound in their attempt to discredit other surgeons doing cosmetic surgery. They contend that recognition by the American Board of Medical Special ties proves that only their sugeons are qualified to perfonn cosmetic surgery. They fail to mention, however, that due to its policy of recognizing only one board per specialty, board cenifiedcosmeticsurgeons are effectively left out becaue they are considered part of the plastic surgery field. In addition. ABMS recognition does not guarantee surgical competence. It only indicates that academic knowledge of a core curriculum was obtained by a candidate during residency. The American Board of Cosmetic Surgery, in contrast, has stringent criteria to fiilfill in order to become certified in cosmetic surgery. Among them, the applicant must: be board certified in an original discipline or specialty recognized by the ABMS, have been in the practice of, primarily, cosmetic surgery for the past five years, have performed no less than one thousand cosmetic operalions; and be currently performing ho less than two hundred documented cosmetic procedures per year, providing proof of ongoing proficiency in cosmetic surgery. Congressional hearings are currently being held to determine legislation which would set minimum standards for doctors who perform cosmetic surgery in office surgical facilities. The AACS endoreses this wholeheartedly. Providing the public with answers to the many questions surrounding whether or not a doctor has current knowledge and ability to perfonn cosmetic procedures is an AACS priority. For further information on board certification and cosmetic surgery, call the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery's tollfree Public Service Line at I -800221-9808 or write: American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery, 159 E. Live Oak AVe. Suite 204, Arcadia, Calif. 91006. to open in LV stressed that it will be a separate medical entity solely for children. "Humana Children's HospitalLas Vegas underscores the fact that treating the medical problems of children is a vastly different matter than treating those of adults," Stewart said. "Children have very different physical, emotional and psychological needs than do their adult counterparts. The specially trained staff at HUmana Children's Hospital-Las Vegas will address these needs, leading to our goal of providing the best health care that we possibly can, for the Las Vegas community and the state of Nevada." Meal management classes begin Another session of Heartee Meal Management classes is slated to begin. The four-week class will be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. on successive Wednesday nights, Sept. 13, 20 and 27 and concluding on Oct.4 at the Humana Hospital Sunrise Auditorium. Each two-hour session will discuss a different aspect of basic good nutrition and meal planning to help alleviate the risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Topics will include introducing new ways of eating and cooking defining cardiovascular disease and risk factors; shopping and label reading; preparation of lean meats^ poultry and fish as well asmeatless meals, vegetables and soup; baking and desserts; and eating out. Qasses will be taught by two registered dietitians, Carolyn Leontos, M.S., R.D., and Lisa Sherman, M.Ed., R.N. Dr. Robert A Shiroff will lead the discussion on cardiovascular disease and risk factors. For further information and rcgisuction about the free classes, contact the American Heart Association at 367-1366. Centel is introducing a program to provide a 50 percent discount on new service connection charges for qualified low-income customers. Known as "Link Up America," the program, approved by the Nevada Public Service Commission, will give discounts up to $30 for new service installation. Currently, typical installation charges for Centel customers are $18.75. Under'the proposal, qualified customers will pay $9.38. The program does not provide assistance for the monthly local basic phone service or federal chaises. Service installation charges cover preparing the service order and connecting the line to the local telephone network. "Making telephone 'service available to as many people as possible is our goal," said Gordon M. Iliomton, Centel (^rations vice president. In order to qualify for Link Up America, a customer must be receiving or be eligible to receive benefits from a public asBiatanoe program. If the applicant ia under 60 yara old, he or the must certify they are not a dependent for federal income tax purposes. For information, customers may call 877-7400 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays. Some 6.S million Americans play tennis at least twice a week. the dream that wont come true... Hundreds of needy youngsters are waiting word tliat they can go to camp in August. But the SUN Camp Fund hasnt mt its goal of $100,000. That means disappointment for some disadvantaged or liandlcapped boys and girls. THEY NEED YOUR HELP Please Join others who tiave l>estowed a bit of happiness for a cliiid, by donating to the SUN Camp Fund today. Las\^sO Suh ere is my contribution to SUN Camp Fund to help needy and handicapped boys and girls go to summer camp. Name Please list my gift in the SUN as follows ijftjl AnonynriousD '^ *' Donations are tax deductible. Your entire fllft gow directly to help a needy child. Operating expenses of the fund are absorbed by the Las Vegas SUN. L" Mail tot SUN Camp Fund, P.O. Box 427S, In Vga% 80127 W VMV m. -m a, Symptoms, Causes and TVeatment mm&.^'^^ K. FREE ^^mA '' LECTURE Thureday, August 17,1989* 7:00 PM HumanSHospital — Sunrise Auditorium GUEST SPEAKERS Sheldon J. Fir-edman, M.D., EA.C.S. Chief of I 'rology at Humana Hospital-Sunrise, (' • ertifitd by Ike American Board ofL'nhgy, Jeffrey V. Katz. M.D., EA.C.S. Assistant (MefafUmiogy at Humana Hospilat-Sunrise. Certified by the .4 merican Board of I 'rology. Urinary Incontinence is the inability to maintain bladder control, and it affects many men and women. During this informative lecture. Dr. Freedman and Dr. Katz will discuss the Symptoms, Causes and Treatment of Urinary Incontinence. Come and learn more about this problem, and what can be done about it. Limited Seating • Please call for Resenations. 731-8188'9 am to 4:30 pm 4lumaiia*Ho8pital Sunrise 3186 MaiyUnd ftrfcwiy Las Vent, Newda 89109 • % -^ V 'Thunday, August 10,1969 HooM N9W, Bookkr CKj Ntira, Qnm Vallay Newi Paft 36 Kim Davis and Chalice Beagley 'West Side Story' opens today The curtain rises tonight on "West Side Story," the third production this summer sponsored by the State Parks Cultural Arts Board and the Nevada Division of State Parks. Performances, at Spring Moimtain Ranch State Park, are scheduled for Thursdays through Saturdays through Aug. 26 with an extra performance on Wednesday, Aug. 23 and a special stage benefit show Aug. 20. Tickets for that event are $25 and feature a New York block party including dinner, New York City street games and other entertainment. Director Erin Breen said that, overall, the cast of "Westside Story" is beyond compare. The cast includes; Lane Blaylock as Tony and Joyce Wehrmeister as Maria, plus Kim Davis, Chalice Beagley and Darret Hart. They perform Bernstein-Sondheim songs that range from the Jazzy and feverish "Cool" to the lyrical "Maria" and 'Tonight." Breen added that the production with its moods and characters, has retained its innocence—even though its theme is about gang rivalry. Breen's goal for "Westside Story" is to make it enjoyable for all ages. Spring Mountain Ranch State Park is located in the Red Rock Recreation Land, 15 miles west of Las Vegas on West Charleston Boulevard. Spectators will need lawn chairs or blankets to sit on and can bring a picnic if they care to. Sweaters are usually needed, spokespersons said, and asked that attendees not bring pets or lounge chairs. Gates open at 6 p.m. and close at 8 p.m. sharp, or when the park is full, they said. SPCAB and Nevada Division of State Parks tickeys are $5 general admission, $3 for seniors, youth and handicapped on Friday and Saturday; Wednesday and Thursday prices are $4 and $1. Advanced tickets assure admittance to the park until 7:30 p.m. and are available for all performances at Teleguide. The Teleguide machine provides a receipt when the transaction is made. Teleguide reminds people to place a separate ticket order for each carload and to make sure each car in the party has its own receipt when arriving at the Park. There is 30-cent handling charge and a Visa or Master Charge is required. For Teleguide locations and further information, call 594-PLAY. Bullock's credit office has Friday and Saturday night tickets only. To find out if a night is sold out, call 594-5555. Southeast Exchange Club to be chartered tonight A charter meeting of the Southeast Valley Exchange Club, a community-oriented service group primarily targeted at helping youth in the Henderson, Green Valley and Boulder City areas, will be held this evening at the Chinese Gardens, 5485 W. Sahara Ave. The gathering will begin with cocktails at 6:30 p.m. followed by a dinner meeting at 7 p.m., spokespersons said. Two officers of the National Exchange Club will present the charter to the existing founding group of some 25 local members. District offtcials are expected to attend as well. The Southeast Valley Exchange Club, the third Exchange Club to be organized in the Southern Nevada area, consists of local residents from diverse community areas, each bringing a special expertise to the organization. "SVEC is especially involved," said Rhonda DuPre, a spokesperson, "in areas of child abuse, educationincluding scholarship programs—controlled substance abuse and crime prevention among youth, and is considering undertaking other projects as well. The group meets at 7 a.m. on the first and third Thursday of each month at the Green Valley Athletic Club. Interested persons may contact DuPre at 382-2211. SIDS group to meet ^ The Clark County Chapter of the National Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Foundation will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday in sixth floor conference rooms C and D of the Medical Professional Building, 2040 W. Charleston Ave., adjacent to the University Medical Center. Interested parents, family members and friends are invited to attend, spokespersons said. For additional information, caU 455-4344 or 455-4218. ThA Welsh national flower Is the lk—a vegetable that closely resembles the onion ATTENTION! FATHER & SON TEAM 50 YEARS EXPERIENCE TRANSMISSION • Chsng. fluid SERVICE SPECIAL :^rj:;^g..*.^ C ^ ^%<|S Chang* trns-fllt*r • Adjust bands A llnkaga • Road tsst (Front wtmt drtw. ***. WVJ EtfS> QREEN VAUEY • HENDERSON • BOULDER CITY MOTORiSTSI try EXPERT TRANSMISSIONS • vM'rsdossrttiMiyoulhtakl EXPERT c^SQ 1854N.BouldfrHwy. Hsndsrson j^tSSiiSZn 565-6458 Stationary, Business Forms, Bulk Mailings The BCSI For Less Call for quote at MAIL, MESSAGES A Mors., PRINTINa, COPIES FAX 564-5574 SILVER SPUR 6/UIIBUMG HJIU and SALOON ALL NEW!! _?UPER LIBERAL SLOTS $200,000 QUARTERMANM VIDEO POKBI—JOKERS WILD-DEUCES WILD 5 CENT KENO ft POKER HELEN & MARY'S FAMILY STYLE RESTAURANT Great Food at Reasonable Prices BREAKf AST $eRVEP ALL PAY Homemade Soups and Desserts "At Its Best" Biscuits and Gravy with Hashbrowns, Sausage $1 ^^ 14-oz. T-Bone Complete Dinner ^5* "FRI. SPECIAL" HALIBUT STEAK $3.95 "SAT. SPECIALPRIME RIB $4.50 "SUN. SPECIAL" CHICKEN & BUMPLINGS $3.95 AH Comptota with Soup or Salad Chelea of Potato Deaaart of ttta Day SAVE • S ALE DAYS • SA VE LirVE FURNITURE I'With LOVE your house becomes a home irfTERIOR DESIGN CUSTOM FUrtJITURE CUSOM DRAPERIES DESIGNER CARPETS WALL COVERINGS ^ Best Prices in Nevada I Comer of Boulder Highway A Lake Mead Drive in Henderson^ (702) 565-5911 T *i
PAGE 35

4 Pag* 38, HMdwMNi Home News, BoaMer Oty News, Green Vslley News Thursday, August 10, 1989 Entertainment NWSC's season tickets now available Season subscriptions are now available for New West Stage Company's fourth season by calling 876-NWSC(6972). Subscribers will enjoy four vibrant pro• ductions from the best seats in the house at discounted savings, spokespersons said. "NWSC has csublished itself as one of Nevada's premier arts organizations," explains Robert D. Dunkeriy, artistic director of NWSC. "and this 1989-90 season promises to be one of Southem Nevada's most elecuifying theatrical experiences yet." Noel Coward's dazzling comedy, "Private Lives," will open on Sept. 23 for eight performances only. Presented by the City of Las Vegas and co-sponsored by KVBC-TV Channel 3. "Private Lives" will be directed by Robert D. Dunkeriy. Patrick Page and Liisaa Ivary of the Utah Shakespearean Festival will be featured as special guests of Actors' Equity Association in the roles of Elyot and Amanda. Page, the 1988 recipient of the Princess Grace Foundation Fellowship in Theatre, is currently performing the title role in "Macbeth" and "Nothing Like The Sun" at the Festival. His performances in Las Vegas have played to standing-room-only audiences and standing ovations. In celebration of the 100th anniversary of Anton Chekhov's one-act farces, NWSC will present "Chekhove-A Night of Comedy?" on Nov. 17 and 18. Dr. Herman Van Bcttcn will narrate "The Harmfulness of Tobacco" and"Wedding."The program will be funded in part by a grant from the Nevada Humanities Committee. Opening Jan. 26 with perfomiances through Feb. 3, will be Hctb Gardner's comedy, "I'm Not Rappaport," to be directed by Barbara M. Brcnnan. Joseph Bernard and Walter Mason wiU be featured as special guests of Actors' Equity A-ssocialion in the roles of Nat and Midge. Cosponsored by First Interstate Bank, "I'm Not Rappaport" captures the essence of aging with comic rage and piercing realism. R. Scott Phillips of the Utah Shakespearean Festival will direct NWSCs final offering of the season, "A Walk hi The Woods." Lee Blessing's powerful and provocative drama probes the very survival of civilization in the nuclear age. All NWSC productions will be presented at the Charieston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. finish SL NWSCs opening for gala season subscribers will feature a champagne reception, Patrick Page and Liisa Ivary in "Private Lives," priority seating and tickets for the end-of-season celebration in June 1990, plus NWSC's quarterly newsletter, "Stage Notes." Regular subscribers wiU receive the best seats available, and "Stage Notes." "NWSC productions has provided quality theatrical experiences rich in production and artistic values," says Dunkeriy. "The upcoming season will be even more challenging, but the company will continue to emphasize quality and professionalism in its presentations." New West Stage Company is a non-profit theatre cosponsored by the City of Las Vegas, and fijnded in part by a grant from the Nevada State Council on the Arts and the National Endowment of the Arts, a federal agency. 'One Night of Romance' at Starlight Pavilion The Sercnata Chamber Orchestra, conducted by Rodolfo Fernandez, will present "One Night of Romance," featuring a selection of favorite love songs and romantic melodies, at 8 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 19, in the Starlight Pavilion, the outdoor perfonning arts theater located directly behind die Claric County Library, 1401 E. Flamingo Rd. Guest vocalists for the evening are Georgia Neu of Actors Repertory Theatre and Christy Kleusner, who sings with the jazz band. Standard Arrangement. The program is free and open to the public, but audience members are asked to bring their own blankets and chairs for die lawn surrounding the pavilion, as seating is not provided. Fossil exhibit showing at museum An exhibit of the Marine Fossils of Southern Nevada, "Ancient Oceans,' is now on display at the Clark County Heritage Museum. Clark County was once under a vast, warm saltwater inland sea, and that ocean teamed with plant and animal hfe forma Where today casinos rise from the desert, coral gardens were home to the ancestors of the future oceans of the world. Southern Nevada landmarks like Frenchman's Mountain, Yucca Gap, Indian Spring's Hills, Arrow Canyon, Gunnery Range and Blue Diamond Fossil Hill are treasure troves of fossil marine life The museumk "Ancient Oceants' exhibit takes visitors on an expedition with the paleontologists of the Clark County Heritage Museum. Rare mineral specimens complement the fossil collection. The Great Basin Chapter of the Friends of Mineralology and the California Federation of Mineralogical Societies display outstanding examples of jade, crystalized copper, garnets, carved opal, massive turquoise nuggets, meteorites and an exceptional specimen of lave tube, purple amethyst. The Clark County Heritage Museum, 1830 So. Boulder Highway in Henderson will host 'Ancient Oceans" through Oct. 1. The musemn is open from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily. Admission is $1 for adults, 50 cents ^ for seniors and children. For information, call 455-7955. Poetry reading to be held AreaseniorciUzensare invited to attend a special poetry reading at 7 p.m. Monday at Sierra Vista, a ISl-unit community for active senior citizens, located at 6650 W. Flamingo Road in Las Vegas. The poetry reading, which will feamre a wide variety of poems, will be given by the Las Vegas Poets Society. Representing the society will be Blake Gruntham, society cochairman; Evie Kinney, authorof the poetry periodical Calliope; and Frank Viviet, the 1988 recipient of the American Poetry Association's Golden Poetiy Award. The poetry reading is free to all area senior citizens; no reservations are necessary. $16,000 KENO WINNER—Shirley Williams, Wichita, Kan,, played a $10 eight-spot keno ticket at Sam's Town Hotel & Gambling Hall and hit seven-out-of-eight numbers for $16,000. Shown presenting the cash, left, keno writer Ina Ulibarri, and right, keno manager Karen Renfro. Williams said, "I'm thrilled, but where was No. 63?" Patrick Page 'State Fair* current featured film "State Fair," starring Jeanne Crain, Dana Andrews, Dick Haymes and Harry Morgan, is the current featured film for the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District's Gassic Images film series. The next in a scries of multiple viewing will begin at 7 p.m. today at Spring Valley Library, 4280 S. Jones Blvd. Additional vicwings arc .scheduled for 3 p.m .Friday and 1 p.m. Saturday at Claric County Library. 1401 E. Flamingo Rd.; 11 a.m. Monday at West Las Vegas Library. 951 W. Lake Mead Blvd. and repeating at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Green Valley Library, 2797 Green Valley Parkway. A celebration of the homespun, mstic ways of past country life, "State Fair" was directed by Walter Lang. Oscar Hanimcrstcin wrote the .screenplay, based on an eariicr movie and novel of the same name by Phil Stong. Rodgers and Hammcrstcin wrote the words and music for die charming yet simple film set in Iowa in the middle of aplea.sant summer. Songs include "It Might as Well Be Spring" performed by Crain with her vocal being looped by Louanne Hogan. The song won the Oscar as Best Song of the Year for 1945. Other favorite productions include "It's a Grand Night for Singing." "Isn 't It Kinda Fun?" and "Our State Fair." The nest scheduled Qassic Image film will be "There's No Business Like Show Business," starring Donald O'Connor, Ediel Merman, Marilyn Monroe, Dan Dailev, and Mitzi Gaynor. A critique by movie reviewer Carol Cling as well as a bibliography of books related to the movies will be available with die library film programs. The programs are free and open to the public. Opera auditions Saturday Auditions forthe 1989-90 season of Nevada Opera Theau-c will behcldfrom lOa.m.io4:30p.m.,Saturday inRoom 132,AltaHam Fine Arts Building, UNLV. Supporting roles and chorus are available for "Opera Gala," Oct. 7; "Amahl and The Night Visitors," Dec. 15-23; "La Traviata," Feb. 18,1990. and "Carmen." June 3,1990. Each person auditioning will have an accompanist provided. Singers are asked to prepare an aria from an opera or operetta and a musical dieatre selection. General Director Eileen Hayes will also consider artists for die 1990-91 and 1991-92 seasons that will include "La Bohcme," "The Merry Widow," "Kismet," "Tosca," "Rigolelto," "Magic Flute" and "Show Boat." To anange an audirion, call 451-6331, spokespersons said. Thursday, August 10. 1989 Hendaraon Horns Nsws. kiue rAS' CASi59h FREEDMYDRAWm TO WIN RAINBOW SATIN JACKETS 5 COACHPS JACKETS A-DAYGIVEAWAY Mail Forwarding For Travelers as Low as$25 Year • t MAIL, IMESSAGES & Mort. PWNTINQ, COPIES ft FAX 565-7468 In Von' Shopping CwHf DRAWINGS EACH DAY AT 1 P.M 48 HOURS TO CLAIM FREE DAILY REGISTRATION WITH SOCIAL SECURITY CARD FREE COUPONS WITH COIN BUY & JACKPOTS WHERE IT PAYS TO PLAY One Prize Per Person Per Day — Maximum 2 Jackets Per Week Per Person New Color Tickets Each Week — Employees & Immediate Family are not Eligible Color & Sizes Subject to Availability Offer Subject to Cancellation or Change by Management At Any Time .: Planning a Wedding? 30-50% off ALL WEDDING DRESSES SAVE ON MOTHER OF THE BRIDE DRESSES LONG GOWNS & FORMALS Coming Soon Gowns from Bridal Originals as seen in Modern Bride Barbara's Boutique 320 So. Boulder Hwy. (Nod to Arfoys) Uyewtyi MC a Vtoe 564-5354 Oty News, Green VaBqr News Page 97 By Robert Grove Fisher Managing Editor Business was so brisk in the days immediately following the opening of the new Thirstbusters lounge-restaurant in Green Valley last week that extra kitchen help had to be brought in to handle the crowd. Owners Ron Coury and Dan Hughes said they were totally unprepared for the immediate interest shown by local residents. They said they optimistically had expected initial business to be good, of course, and felt that it would gradually grow even larger. However, the instant success of the lounge both surprised and amazed them, they said. "We had rushes that were not anticipated and occasionally it took a little more time than it should have to get the food out. We're learning from the first two weeks and have made accommodations to make certain that it will not happen again," ijaid Coury. ; Thirstbusters sports a number of traditional lounge ^ames and activities, including darts, shuffleboard and pool tables, as well as a battery of slot machines — standard $xtures for Nevada. ; Two satellite dishes power four giant television screens ^nd no less than nine other 26-inch TV monitors at the thirstbusters. To that system, Coury and Hughes have added a new twist: 10 wireless headsets are available for patrons to listen to sporting events anywhere in the building without being disturbed by talk from other clientele or music pla3ang on the jukebox. The giant TV screens in the 7,700-square-foot Thirstbusters dining room can be raised and lowered as needed, as can 4 series of electronically controlled partitions that provide privacy to the dining area, which will seat upwards df 60 persons, said Art Coury and Mike Roberts, managers of Thirstbusters. ; Additionally, private telephones have been installed in dining room booths so that businessmen and women can qonduct negotiations even while at lunch. ; Also, Coury pointed out that a Visa/Master Charge cash advance machine is available, along with an automatic teller machine linked to eight popular banking networks. In the case of the Visa/Master Charge device, Coury said, the Ipunge, as an incentive, has agreed to waive its commissions to make the process of obtaining cash advances cheaper for its customers. Coury said that the Thirstbusters features fine Italian Patrons overwhelm new Green Valley lounge GrmOurExperts With Vktur Pood Sa/bry Questions Caf/(he USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline for food safety facts 1-800-535-4555 Wastiington. DC 44 7-3333 10:00 am-4:00pm Eastern Time Professional home economists will answer vour questions about proper handling of meat and poultry, how lo tell if it is safe to eat. and hovv to better understand meat and poultry labels. A puUic Sfrvice of ihis out)K3iion and ihe U S Deoarimem ol AgncultuK ^^ Ron Coury at bar of Green Valley's new Thirstbusters lounge. food, but noted that "While we have an extensive dinner menu, we also have an even more extensive 24-hour menu. We do not want people to get the impression that Thirstbusters is exclusively a dinner house. "Thirstbusters is a very comfortable, upscale tavern that also happens to serve a wide variety of food at all hours," he stressed. "When people walk in they see a bright and cheery atmosphere. And for their refreshment, we serve 120 beers from 20 different countries," he added. The Thirstbusters dinner menu, explained kitchen manager Arthur Charles, features a wide variety of dishes, including pastas, veal, beef, chicken and seafood, alorfg with several combination meals. Round-the-clock fare includes finger food, hot and cold sandwiches, Italian specialties, various selections of hamburgers and salads, calzones, pizza and chicken wings and Hngers. Charles was employed for many years by the Tower of Pizza in Las Vegas. "The general motif and decor of Thirstbusters is futuristic," said Coury, pointing to three strips of rose-colored neon around the perimeter of the bar area. One long wall sports a series of illuminated beer advertisemente. Decorating another wall is a full-color mural painting of the tavern's wide-grinned mascot, Buster. Nearly 20 feet above the floor, the Thirstbuster office is suspended over the bar, permittiug observation of all areas — bar, dining room, pool table and lounge. Photographer Tafolla to exhibit work Photographer Leo D. Tafolla will exhibit a collection of his color and black-and-white printe in the Photo Gallery of the Clark County Library, 1401 E. Flamingo Rd., Aug. 22-Sept. 30. "My formats range from 35 mm to 8 by 10, and I print my own photos, except those needing an 8 by 10 enlarger," said Tafolla. Tve taken photos both in a natural landscape and in the studio, using all kinds of lighting, including macro, artificial and natural Ughting." Most of the work Tafolla is showing came from photography classes he took at UNLV and Clark County Community CoUege. "Tve found that learning photography, like any disciplined'subject, is a lifetime endeavor," he said. "I consider myself a photo-hobbyist, enjoying this scientific art as I learn it." A resident since 1962, and now retired, Tafolla was a civil engineer at the Nevade Test Site, a structural inspector of the City of Las Vegas and a real estate broker. Taking an active interest in photography in 1985, Tafolla has siace entered competions locally, winning awards for his work. One landscape of the Red Rock area was published recently. Baking aoda mixed with water can remove coffee and tea stains from china and plastic dishes. ake It Bally's For ftirnch! The ultimate Sunday Champagne Brunch. Only at Sally's! A glorious spread made from the freshest foods found anywhere — crisp vegetables, plump fruits and oh, so sweet desserts! 10am.-2p.m. ll2.50pcrpcrKMi Children under 12,1/2 price BALLY^ CA9N0ES0T US VEGAS "i, i i i .mi i jw i I' Photo by Jeff Cowen 'During construction, it was mentioned that the office looked like the bridge of Star Trek's Starship Enterprise," said Coury. "So many people made that remark that I had a sign painter come in and had hira write the identifying number of the Enterprise on it — NCC 1701. "It's amazing how many people look up and recognize that number for what it is," he smiled. Entrepreneurs Coury, originally from Brooklyn, N.Y., and Hughes, a Philadelphia native, are involved in six local businesses, including the Suburban Lounge chain — two in current operation and two more in the planning stages — and Suburban Graphics, a sign manufacturing firm. They met in the early 1970s while lx)th were serving with the U.S. Marine Corps in San Diego. They relocated to Southern Nevada following their return to civilian lifp arlts Az!/";^z TWO August 14 at 9:30 ?^^'^'"Four Queens Hotel/Casino • Downtown Las Vegas WITH ^^%lS-^ WILLIAMS Saturday September 16 10:00 pm ALADDIiy THEATRE FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS 820 ft $25 Tickets available at the Aladdin Box Office, at all TiacTWjN outlets, or charge by phone through (g^ETOOiv by calling 1 -800-992-2128 (Visa or MasterCard). Call 736-0250 for ticket information. Box Office Hours: Monday through Saturday, 10 am 6 pm. H<;Tl.i ^-CAMV,^ DOUBLE EACLE TOUR '89

PAGE 36

4 Pag* 38, HMdwMNi Home News, BoaMer Oty News, Green Vslley News Thursday, August 10, 1989 Entertainment NWSC's season tickets now available Season subscriptions are now available for New West Stage Company's fourth season by calling 876-NWSC(6972). Subscribers will enjoy four vibrant pro• ductions from the best seats in the house at discounted savings, spokespersons said. "NWSC has csublished itself as one of Nevada's premier arts organizations," explains Robert D. Dunkeriy, artistic director of NWSC. "and this 1989-90 season promises to be one of Southem Nevada's most elecuifying theatrical experiences yet." Noel Coward's dazzling comedy, "Private Lives," will open on Sept. 23 for eight performances only. Presented by the City of Las Vegas and co-sponsored by KVBC-TV Channel 3. "Private Lives" will be directed by Robert D. Dunkeriy. Patrick Page and Liisaa Ivary of the Utah Shakespearean Festival will be featured as special guests of Actors' Equity Association in the roles of Elyot and Amanda. Page, the 1988 recipient of the Princess Grace Foundation Fellowship in Theatre, is currently performing the title role in "Macbeth" and "Nothing Like The Sun" at the Festival. His performances in Las Vegas have played to standing-room-only audiences and standing ovations. In celebration of the 100th anniversary of Anton Chekhov's one-act farces, NWSC will present "Chekhove-A Night of Comedy?" on Nov. 17 and 18. Dr. Herman Van Bcttcn will narrate "The Harmfulness of Tobacco" and"Wedding."The program will be funded in part by a grant from the Nevada Humanities Committee. Opening Jan. 26 with perfomiances through Feb. 3, will be Hctb Gardner's comedy, "I'm Not Rappaport," to be directed by Barbara M. Brcnnan. Joseph Bernard and Walter Mason wiU be featured as special guests of Actors' Equity A-ssocialion in the roles of Nat and Midge. Cosponsored by First Interstate Bank, "I'm Not Rappaport" captures the essence of aging with comic rage and piercing realism. R. Scott Phillips of the Utah Shakespearean Festival will direct NWSCs final offering of the season, "A Walk hi The Woods." Lee Blessing's powerful and provocative drama probes the very survival of civilization in the nuclear age. All NWSC productions will be presented at the Charieston Heights Arts Center, 800 S. finish SL NWSCs opening for gala season subscribers will feature a champagne reception, Patrick Page and Liisa Ivary in "Private Lives," priority seating and tickets for the end-of-season celebration in June 1990, plus NWSC's quarterly newsletter, "Stage Notes." Regular subscribers wiU receive the best seats available, and "Stage Notes." "NWSC productions has provided quality theatrical experiences rich in production and artistic values," says Dunkeriy. "The upcoming season will be even more challenging, but the company will continue to emphasize quality and professionalism in its presentations." New West Stage Company is a non-profit theatre cosponsored by the City of Las Vegas, and fijnded in part by a grant from the Nevada State Council on the Arts and the National Endowment of the Arts, a federal agency. 'One Night of Romance' at Starlight Pavilion The Sercnata Chamber Orchestra, conducted by Rodolfo Fernandez, will present "One Night of Romance," featuring a selection of favorite love songs and romantic melodies, at 8 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 19, in the Starlight Pavilion, the outdoor perfonning arts theater located directly behind die Claric County Library, 1401 E. Flamingo Rd. Guest vocalists for the evening are Georgia Neu of Actors Repertory Theatre and Christy Kleusner, who sings with the jazz band. Standard Arrangement. The program is free and open to the public, but audience members are asked to bring their own blankets and chairs for die lawn surrounding the pavilion, as seating is not provided. Fossil exhibit showing at museum An exhibit of the Marine Fossils of Southern Nevada, "Ancient Oceans,' is now on display at the Clark County Heritage Museum. Clark County was once under a vast, warm saltwater inland sea, and that ocean teamed with plant and animal hfe forma Where today casinos rise from the desert, coral gardens were home to the ancestors of the future oceans of the world. Southern Nevada landmarks like Frenchman's Mountain, Yucca Gap, Indian Spring's Hills, Arrow Canyon, Gunnery Range and Blue Diamond Fossil Hill are treasure troves of fossil marine life The museumk "Ancient Oceants' exhibit takes visitors on an expedition with the paleontologists of the Clark County Heritage Museum. Rare mineral specimens complement the fossil collection. The Great Basin Chapter of the Friends of Mineralology and the California Federation of Mineralogical Societies display outstanding examples of jade, crystalized copper, garnets, carved opal, massive turquoise nuggets, meteorites and an exceptional specimen of lave tube, purple amethyst. The Clark County Heritage Museum, 1830 So. Boulder Highway in Henderson will host 'Ancient Oceans" through Oct. 1. The musemn is open from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily. Admission is $1 for adults, 50 cents ^ for seniors and children. For information, call 455-7955. Poetry reading to be held AreaseniorciUzensare invited to attend a special poetry reading at 7 p.m. Monday at Sierra Vista, a ISl-unit community for active senior citizens, located at 6650 W. Flamingo Road in Las Vegas. The poetry reading, which will feamre a wide variety of poems, will be given by the Las Vegas Poets Society. Representing the society will be Blake Gruntham, society cochairman; Evie Kinney, authorof the poetry periodical Calliope; and Frank Viviet, the 1988 recipient of the American Poetry Association's Golden Poetiy Award. The poetry reading is free to all area senior citizens; no reservations are necessary. $16,000 KENO WINNER—Shirley Williams, Wichita, Kan,, played a $10 eight-spot keno ticket at Sam's Town Hotel & Gambling Hall and hit seven-out-of-eight numbers for $16,000. Shown presenting the cash, left, keno writer Ina Ulibarri, and right, keno manager Karen Renfro. Williams said, "I'm thrilled, but where was No. 63?" Patrick Page 'State Fair* current featured film "State Fair," starring Jeanne Crain, Dana Andrews, Dick Haymes and Harry Morgan, is the current featured film for the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District's Gassic Images film series. The next in a scries of multiple viewing will begin at 7 p.m. today at Spring Valley Library, 4280 S. Jones Blvd. Additional vicwings arc .scheduled for 3 p.m .Friday and 1 p.m. Saturday at Claric County Library. 1401 E. Flamingo Rd.; 11 a.m. Monday at West Las Vegas Library. 951 W. Lake Mead Blvd. and repeating at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Green Valley Library, 2797 Green Valley Parkway. A celebration of the homespun, mstic ways of past country life, "State Fair" was directed by Walter Lang. Oscar Hanimcrstcin wrote the .screenplay, based on an eariicr movie and novel of the same name by Phil Stong. Rodgers and Hammcrstcin wrote the words and music for die charming yet simple film set in Iowa in the middle of aplea.sant summer. Songs include "It Might as Well Be Spring" performed by Crain with her vocal being looped by Louanne Hogan. The song won the Oscar as Best Song of the Year for 1945. Other favorite productions include "It's a Grand Night for Singing." "Isn 't It Kinda Fun?" and "Our State Fair." The nest scheduled Qassic Image film will be "There's No Business Like Show Business," starring Donald O'Connor, Ediel Merman, Marilyn Monroe, Dan Dailev, and Mitzi Gaynor. A critique by movie reviewer Carol Cling as well as a bibliography of books related to the movies will be available with die library film programs. The programs are free and open to the public. Opera auditions Saturday Auditions forthe 1989-90 season of Nevada Opera Theau-c will behcldfrom lOa.m.io4:30p.m.,Saturday inRoom 132,AltaHam Fine Arts Building, UNLV. Supporting roles and chorus are available for "Opera Gala," Oct. 7; "Amahl and The Night Visitors," Dec. 15-23; "La Traviata," Feb. 18,1990. and "Carmen." June 3,1990. Each person auditioning will have an accompanist provided. Singers are asked to prepare an aria from an opera or operetta and a musical dieatre selection. General Director Eileen Hayes will also consider artists for die 1990-91 and 1991-92 seasons that will include "La Bohcme," "The Merry Widow," "Kismet," "Tosca," "Rigolelto," "Magic Flute" and "Show Boat." To anange an audirion, call 451-6331, spokespersons said. Thursday, August 10. 1989 Hendaraon Horns Nsws. kiue rAS' CASi59h FREEDMYDRAWm TO WIN RAINBOW SATIN JACKETS 5 COACHPS JACKETS A-DAYGIVEAWAY Mail Forwarding For Travelers as Low as$25 Year • t MAIL, IMESSAGES & Mort. PWNTINQ, COPIES ft FAX 565-7468 In Von' Shopping CwHf DRAWINGS EACH DAY AT 1 P.M 48 HOURS TO CLAIM FREE DAILY REGISTRATION WITH SOCIAL SECURITY CARD FREE COUPONS WITH COIN BUY & JACKPOTS WHERE IT PAYS TO PLAY One Prize Per Person Per Day — Maximum 2 Jackets Per Week Per Person New Color Tickets Each Week — Employees & Immediate Family are not Eligible Color & Sizes Subject to Availability Offer Subject to Cancellation or Change by Management At Any Time .: Planning a Wedding? 30-50% off ALL WEDDING DRESSES SAVE ON MOTHER OF THE BRIDE DRESSES LONG GOWNS & FORMALS Coming Soon Gowns from Bridal Originals as seen in Modern Bride Barbara's Boutique 320 So. Boulder Hwy. (Nod to Arfoys) Uyewtyi MC a Vtoe 564-5354 Oty News, Green VaBqr News Page 97 By Robert Grove Fisher Managing Editor Business was so brisk in the days immediately following the opening of the new Thirstbusters lounge-restaurant in Green Valley last week that extra kitchen help had to be brought in to handle the crowd. Owners Ron Coury and Dan Hughes said they were totally unprepared for the immediate interest shown by local residents. They said they optimistically had expected initial business to be good, of course, and felt that it would gradually grow even larger. However, the instant success of the lounge both surprised and amazed them, they said. "We had rushes that were not anticipated and occasionally it took a little more time than it should have to get the food out. We're learning from the first two weeks and have made accommodations to make certain that it will not happen again," ijaid Coury. ; Thirstbusters sports a number of traditional lounge ^ames and activities, including darts, shuffleboard and pool tables, as well as a battery of slot machines — standard $xtures for Nevada. ; Two satellite dishes power four giant television screens ^nd no less than nine other 26-inch TV monitors at the thirstbusters. To that system, Coury and Hughes have added a new twist: 10 wireless headsets are available for patrons to listen to sporting events anywhere in the building without being disturbed by talk from other clientele or music pla3ang on the jukebox. The giant TV screens in the 7,700-square-foot Thirstbusters dining room can be raised and lowered as needed, as can 4 series of electronically controlled partitions that provide privacy to the dining area, which will seat upwards df 60 persons, said Art Coury and Mike Roberts, managers of Thirstbusters. ; Additionally, private telephones have been installed in dining room booths so that businessmen and women can qonduct negotiations even while at lunch. ; Also, Coury pointed out that a Visa/Master Charge cash advance machine is available, along with an automatic teller machine linked to eight popular banking networks. In the case of the Visa/Master Charge device, Coury said, the Ipunge, as an incentive, has agreed to waive its commissions to make the process of obtaining cash advances cheaper for its customers. Coury said that the Thirstbusters features fine Italian Patrons overwhelm new Green Valley lounge GrmOurExperts With Vktur Pood Sa/bry Questions Caf/(he USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline for food safety facts 1-800-535-4555 Wastiington. DC 44 7-3333 10:00 am-4:00pm Eastern Time Professional home economists will answer vour questions about proper handling of meat and poultry, how lo tell if it is safe to eat. and hovv to better understand meat and poultry labels. A puUic Sfrvice of ihis out)K3iion and ihe U S Deoarimem ol AgncultuK ^^ Ron Coury at bar of Green Valley's new Thirstbusters lounge. food, but noted that "While we have an extensive dinner menu, we also have an even more extensive 24-hour menu. We do not want people to get the impression that Thirstbusters is exclusively a dinner house. "Thirstbusters is a very comfortable, upscale tavern that also happens to serve a wide variety of food at all hours," he stressed. "When people walk in they see a bright and cheery atmosphere. And for their refreshment, we serve 120 beers from 20 different countries," he added. The Thirstbusters dinner menu, explained kitchen manager Arthur Charles, features a wide variety of dishes, including pastas, veal, beef, chicken and seafood, alorfg with several combination meals. Round-the-clock fare includes finger food, hot and cold sandwiches, Italian specialties, various selections of hamburgers and salads, calzones, pizza and chicken wings and Hngers. Charles was employed for many years by the Tower of Pizza in Las Vegas. "The general motif and decor of Thirstbusters is futuristic," said Coury, pointing to three strips of rose-colored neon around the perimeter of the bar area. One long wall sports a series of illuminated beer advertisemente. Decorating another wall is a full-color mural painting of the tavern's wide-grinned mascot, Buster. Nearly 20 feet above the floor, the Thirstbuster office is suspended over the bar, permittiug observation of all areas — bar, dining room, pool table and lounge. Photographer Tafolla to exhibit work Photographer Leo D. Tafolla will exhibit a collection of his color and black-and-white printe in the Photo Gallery of the Clark County Library, 1401 E. Flamingo Rd., Aug. 22-Sept. 30. "My formats range from 35 mm to 8 by 10, and I print my own photos, except those needing an 8 by 10 enlarger," said Tafolla. Tve taken photos both in a natural landscape and in the studio, using all kinds of lighting, including macro, artificial and natural Ughting." Most of the work Tafolla is showing came from photography classes he took at UNLV and Clark County Community CoUege. "Tve found that learning photography, like any disciplined'subject, is a lifetime endeavor," he said. "I consider myself a photo-hobbyist, enjoying this scientific art as I learn it." A resident since 1962, and now retired, Tafolla was a civil engineer at the Nevade Test Site, a structural inspector of the City of Las Vegas and a real estate broker. Taking an active interest in photography in 1985, Tafolla has siace entered competions locally, winning awards for his work. One landscape of the Red Rock area was published recently. Baking aoda mixed with water can remove coffee and tea stains from china and plastic dishes. ake It Bally's For ftirnch! The ultimate Sunday Champagne Brunch. Only at Sally's! A glorious spread made from the freshest foods found anywhere — crisp vegetables, plump fruits and oh, so sweet desserts! 10am.-2p.m. ll2.50pcrpcrKMi Children under 12,1/2 price BALLY^ CA9N0ES0T US VEGAS "i, i i i .mi i jw i I' Photo by Jeff Cowen 'During construction, it was mentioned that the office looked like the bridge of Star Trek's Starship Enterprise," said Coury. "So many people made that remark that I had a sign painter come in and had hira write the identifying number of the Enterprise on it — NCC 1701. "It's amazing how many people look up and recognize that number for what it is," he smiled. Entrepreneurs Coury, originally from Brooklyn, N.Y., and Hughes, a Philadelphia native, are involved in six local businesses, including the Suburban Lounge chain — two in current operation and two more in the planning stages — and Suburban Graphics, a sign manufacturing firm. They met in the early 1970s while lx)th were serving with the U.S. Marine Corps in San Diego. They relocated to Southern Nevada following their return to civilian lifp arlts Az!/";^z TWO August 14 at 9:30 ?^^'^'"Four Queens Hotel/Casino • Downtown Las Vegas WITH ^^%lS-^ WILLIAMS Saturday September 16 10:00 pm ALADDIiy THEATRE FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS 820 ft $25 Tickets available at the Aladdin Box Office, at all TiacTWjN outlets, or charge by phone through (g^ETOOiv by calling 1 -800-992-2128 (Visa or MasterCard). Call 736-0250 for ticket information. Box Office Hours: Monday through Saturday, 10 am 6 pm. H<;Tl.i ^-CAMV,^ DOUBLE EACLE TOUR '89

PAGE 37

38, HMlnoa Horn* News, Booldbr City hltwu, OIMO VUey News Obituaries Louella Fowler Louella Fowler. 79. of Henderson, died Aug. 1. in Henderson. She w.Ts bom Feb. 6.1910. in Grand Pass. Mo."^A-ix-year resident, she was a housekeeper. She is survived by her daughter. Annabelle Estes of Henderson; three sisters. Dorothy Singleton. Carrie Richart. both of Grand Pass and Isabellc Longstreet of Kansas City, Mo.; one brother. Roger Singleton of Kansas City; four grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. Services were held Saturday in Palm Chapel-Hcndcrson. Burial was in Palm Memorial ParkHenderson. Robert Cecil Jayet Marvin Robert Cecil Jayes Marvin, 73. died Aug. 2 in Henderson. He was bom Aug. 30.1915. in England. A nine-year resident, he was a retired dairyman and a veteran of the British Forces. He was formerly and originally from England. He is survived by his wife, Winifred A. Marvin of Henderson; two daughters, Jennifer CritesofHonolulu and Rosemary Nolan of Long Beach, Calif.; and two grandchildren. Services were private. Palm Mortuary handled arrangements. Lenna V. Foehner Lenna V. Foehner, 84, of Henderson, died Aug. 3 in Henderson. She was bom July 28,1905, in Portland, Tenn. A 20-year resident, she was a housewife. She is survived by her son, Marshall Wayland of Cypress, Calif.; and one daughter, Judith Harper of Bullhead City, Ariz. Private services were held. Burial was in Palm Memorial Paric. Memorial donations may be made to the Alzheimer's Association. Joe McMillin Joe McMillin, 48, a Henderson resident, died July 24. McMillin was bom on July 27, 1940 in Reno. His family moved to Henderson shortly thereafter. He attended Basic High School and UNLV. He is survived by his daughter, Jody McMillin, of Las Vegas; and parents Grover Wilson and Alvera McMillin and a brother. Barton, all of Henderson. Services were held. Davis Funeral Home handled arrangements. Robert Cecil Jayes Marvin Robert Cecil Jayes Marvin. 73. died Aug. 2 in Henderson. He was bom Aug. 30,1915, in England. A nine-year resident, he was a retired dairyman and a veteran of the British Forces. He was formeriy and originally from England. He is survived by his wife, Winifred A of Henderson; two daughters, Jennifer Crites of Honolulu and Rosemary Nolan of Long Beach, Calif.; and two grandchildren. Services were private. Palm Mortuary handled arrangements. r 1HE IlinU Wn MED A PBFKT PIACE... PMTTNOSEIMIIUniBU; EVBiYraraMinnwaupop AM Mi lUMB MB WVB mUJ) SUPPOn TNER srauss MM DOS ID SM mm TKiMnMiaMMiMiianL m. na AGM1I1K wou MIBE • A ram ?[ja..M wnurr KNIT nfiAnaMiaMRiAiiiKSBivL Thur8dy, Angnat 10,1989 AT THE CARPET BARN THE ONLY THING WE CANT RESIST ISASALE. Now you can get soil-, stainand wear-resistance at an irresistible price. Worry Free carpet is on sale. But see us soon. Because while Worry Free will last, the sale won't. $099 ^ sq. V sq. yd. IT'S MORE THAN JUST STAIN RESISTANT IT'S TOTALLY WORRY FREE WIE-: DON'T MEET PRICES...WE BEAT EVERYBODY'S PRICES.. CALL TODAY FOR FREE ESTIMATES MostpfCoid 90 DAYS SAME AS CASH—ON APPROVED CREDIT ^m COMPLETE CARPET, PAD AND LABOR FOR ONE PRICE CALL TODAYOR COME ON IN! ^ SAVE ON ALL CARPET AS NEVER BEFORE 384-8551 105 W. Charleston Blvd. OPEN EVENINGS • FREE PARKING MON.-FRI. 9 TO 9 t SAT. 9 TO 6 • SUN. 11 TO 5 NO JOB TOO SMALL OR TOO LARGE-ONE ROOM TO A FULL HOUSE OF CARPET Thnwday, August 10,1989 Community Church asks, 'Why Bother To Pray?' Dr. Ed Swain, minister of the Community Church of Henderson. United Church of Christ, has been speaking on a series of parables from the Bible for the last several Sundays. He will continue the series with his sermon for Sunday, "Why ^ Bother To Pray?" Scripture is taken from Luke 11:5-13. Everyone is invited to share in the worship services, spokespersons said. An eariy service is held at 8 a.m. for the convenience of travelers; a regular service is held at 9:30 a.m. during the summer months. The chancel choir always prepares a special anthem for the regular services. There is a junior sermon for the youngsters. There is also a supervised nursery for very young children during the later service. Community Church is located at 360 East Horizon Drive, at the comer of Greenway Road and Horizon. The office is open from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday. When the office is closed, calls are forwarded to the minister's phone. The Women's Association of the church meets on the second Tuesday of each month foranoon potluck lunch, followed by a business and devotional meeting. The group is woricing on an afghan and otherideas for a "Christmas" Bazaar to be held in November. The evening group of ladies, Joy Fellowship, will meet on the fourth Thursday of each month starting in Septmeber. For further inforaiation,' call the church office at 565-8563. The church council will hold its regular monthly meeting at 7 p.m. Monday at the church. Members are urged to attend as there are impoitant projects to discuss, officials said. Hoidenon Horn* Newt, Boulder City Newt, Qnm VaOtf Nfwt Pag* 39 Baptist Church to build school By Georgina Coriialan a quality education supiriemented Ntm Staff Writer by the religious studies. Pastor Paul Gine of the HenInconvenience was one of the derson Baptist Church will break motivating factors that urged ground for a multipurpose school PastorOineandfoUoweniobuikl building on Taylor Street this fall, a church. Not only were the Churchgoers pray during servicwltHSrsonBaptist Howard reveals 'How to Enjoy Your Own Mind' --r — —-•^-HV WM\t Methodists expand Sunday nursery care Childcare for infants and preworship at 10:30 a.m. Both worschool children will now be availship services include a special able for all Sunday morning ac tivities at First Henderson United Methodist Church, officials announced this week. The Sunday morning schedule includes worhship at 8:15 a.m., church school for adults, youth and children at 9:20 a.m. and Parable series continues at time for the children to hear a message prepared just for them. The Rev. Beth Carey, pastorof the church, Sunday Will bring the message based on Luke 12:3240, entitled: "The Kingdom of God: Seeking with Cbnfidcnce." The fii^st of two membership orientation classes will also be The new 10,000-square-foot facility will provide extra classrooms for the already existing Henderson Christian Schools, which have been operating for one year. In addition, the new school will enable First Bible Baptist Church administrators to commence a high school education program, officials said. As the only private religious education offered in the city, Henderson Christian Schools is planning on registering students from kindergarten through the 12thgrad. Unlike public schools, however, Henderson Christian Schools will use an insuiictional method unique to Southern Nevada. ABCA, a videotaped curriculum of required and elective courses, has been developed for 25 years in Florida. The Qark Country School District strongly supports ABCA, said Gine. In addition to videotaped lessons, in which a normal class full of students and a teacher are shown, a full time insuiictors will be availaUetofiirtherexplaineach lesson. This fall, the private school ... „.v vuu(.uinuicu wiui me enure year, they added FOLKS FROM DOWN UNDER—Carol Farrell, left, of Perth, ^ •, held at 9:20 a.m. Sunday. Australia, recently visited her sister Jeanette Marcoaldi in Boulder PreSbVterian tOpiC: 'WhOre IS OUF TreaSUfe? Mid-week acuvitics include a City, making the 10,000 mile trip especially to attend classes taught BiblestudyfocusedonthePsalms h„ „„..ij •„— .^—.r^ .. .. ...vi .,viiciiciTtu(.iMiiaiin oouiaer r^ -A fsi. I. '^""-^^•^3<="^'"''"<='"<'* City, making the 10,000 mile trip especially to attend classes taught Community Cnurcn BiWesmdy focusedonthePsalms ^y world-famous author Vcrnon Howard at the New Life FoundaCommunity Church of HenthatmeetsfromIOa.m.to 11a.m. :„-:-o„...-.— ^• that meets from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Tuesday in Room 7. First Henderson United Methodist Church is located at 609 E. Horizon Drive in the Highland Hills section of Henderson. Further information can be obtained by calling 565-6049. Church of Christ hosts Vacation Bible School A Vacation Bible School will be conducted from 7 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. Monday through Friday next week at the Church of Christ, 104 Victory Road. Theme of the school this year, officials said, is "Jesus Called Them, One by One," and the study will concentrate on the lives of the Apostles. In addition to the study, other activities for young students will include crafts, puppets, games and songs, plus tion in Boulder City Methods to attain authentic relaxation and enjoyment of life arc offered in inner-development talks by Vemon Howard on "How to Enjoy Your Own Mind," with Biblical reference to Riilippians 720 radio at midnight, Saturday 4:8. The talks will be given at New life Foundation, a large ings for clear and practical anwhite building with bright yelSWers to problems in relationships low trim located at 700 Wyoand in work siniations. Pastor Dr. R. Dixon Jennings will preach a sermon entitled "Where Is Our Treasure?" at both the 8:30 a.m. and the 11 a.m. worship services Stmday at Henderson Presbyterian Church. His message will be ^ __, based on Luke 12:32-40, in nights and at 7 a.m., Sunday momwhich people are urged to be ;„„o f —1 • • • prepared for the coming of God's dominion. Photo by SlephM Burko Howard's books have recently been translated into East Indian by a publisher in Bombay, bidia. Listeners are invited to hear Vemon Howaid on KDWN-AM Sunday church school for all ages is at 9:45 a.m. There is a nursery for preschool children at the 11 a.m. service. Following the pastor's talk with the children at the 11 a.m. service, those who are in See Treasure, Page 42 East Horizon Drive, at the comer of Greenway Road. Office hours are 10 a.m. until 2 ^.^^f^ w, ^axu^o auu ouu^t p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays, refreshments, they said For further infonnation, call 565 The choir is always looking and stay for an adult class, for people who like to sing and There will be a different evening, they ming SL, at the comer of Utah Sueet in Boulder City. Meetings are held at 7 p.m. each Wednesday and Friday and at 9 a.m each Saturday and Sunday. Sponsors invite Southern Nevadans to attend the classes, which bring authentic Bible teachings to life and bring higher meaning to everyday living. New Lifers come from many states, including Colorado, Maryland. Utah. Pennsylvania. Minnesota. Rhode Island. Ohio. Nonh For directions, or more information about New Life classes and activities, call 293-4444. ..ucjTKuu. Dakota, Connecticut, Wyoming Parents are invited to bring 3^^ vviscnnsin their children for the school would like to join them, spokes persons said, they rehearse at the church at 8:30 a.m. during the summer. Call the church office for more information. speaker each said. Persons who need a ride should call 565-8186 or 565-7235. and Wisconsin, A woman from Sacramento, Calif., recently wrote: "I purchased one of your books, which is delightful as well as timely and very helpful. 1 would also like to order tapes. Life is getting less scary and hopeless no w." Four of We liave along raaelit Our CLASSIFIEDS reach ^BOULDER crnr •HENDERSON 1^ GREEN VALLEY CaU today 293-2302 or 564-1881 GREEN VALLEY CHURCH OF CHRIST (United Steelworkers Union Hall) 47 Water Street We invite you to attend our worship & Bible studies Sunday: Bible Classes 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Worship 5:00 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Classes 7:30 p.m. You Are Always Welcome For more information: Barney Cor^e 564-4962 or P.O. Box 90493 Hendwaon 89009 The All New Ilairitage Full Familj Service (Salon It lov hifioj Mnly^uU 9f NaoioirUta Joii onr dtaff of Profcafioaalf Opcttfl^aooi 10 dUtioae AvaJlable for flairetjrliiU if 3 Available Naoiciirieg ^tioat Hcidcnoo'e Noat AdMlooa Hew Saba of 4.000 aq. a. 311 5 Water 6t. Hcndcron. Nevada ^ Contact CAROL OTIS, Buainasa Managar 56S-7S03 or 565-3480 batwaan 7:30 a.m. A 6:00 p.m. HENDERSON FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 47 E. Atlaatie PASTOR JOHN OSKO 565-9511 "THE SEARCH FOR HAPPINESS* PASTOR OSKO'S MESSAGE THIS SUNDAY "THE SEARCH FOR HAPPINESS" is the title Rev. John Osko has chosen for his message this Sunday morning at First Baptist Church. His Scripture text is Psalm 16:6-9. Special music for this Worship Hour will include Carlton C. Buck and John W. Peterson's, "I Believe In Miracles," sung by soloist Bettye Hansen, and selections by the First Baptist Church Chorale. The Worship Hour begins at 11:00 a.m. First Baptist Church is located at 47 East Atlantic Avenue, Henderson. ^ Sunday School classes for all ages begin at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School teacher's meeting is at 9:05 a.m. Children's Church Time for children 2 years of age throu^ Kindergarten, is held during the Morning Worship Hour. Leaders for August are Martie and Carl Henderson. A Nursery is provided for infants and children up to 2 years of age. Pastor Osko and congregation invite you to warship with them this Sunday. For additional information, please call 565-9511. ^*

PAGE 38

38, HMlnoa Horn* News, Booldbr City hltwu, OIMO VUey News Obituaries Louella Fowler Louella Fowler. 79. of Henderson, died Aug. 1. in Henderson. She w.Ts bom Feb. 6.1910. in Grand Pass. Mo."^A-ix-year resident, she was a housekeeper. She is survived by her daughter. Annabelle Estes of Henderson; three sisters. Dorothy Singleton. Carrie Richart. both of Grand Pass and Isabellc Longstreet of Kansas City, Mo.; one brother. Roger Singleton of Kansas City; four grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. Services were held Saturday in Palm Chapel-Hcndcrson. Burial was in Palm Memorial ParkHenderson. Robert Cecil Jayet Marvin Robert Cecil Jayes Marvin, 73. died Aug. 2 in Henderson. He was bom Aug. 30.1915. in England. A nine-year resident, he was a retired dairyman and a veteran of the British Forces. He was formerly and originally from England. He is survived by his wife, Winifred A. Marvin of Henderson; two daughters, Jennifer CritesofHonolulu and Rosemary Nolan of Long Beach, Calif.; and two grandchildren. Services were private. Palm Mortuary handled arrangements. Lenna V. Foehner Lenna V. Foehner, 84, of Henderson, died Aug. 3 in Henderson. She was bom July 28,1905, in Portland, Tenn. A 20-year resident, she was a housewife. She is survived by her son, Marshall Wayland of Cypress, Calif.; and one daughter, Judith Harper of Bullhead City, Ariz. Private services were held. Burial was in Palm Memorial Paric. Memorial donations may be made to the Alzheimer's Association. Joe McMillin Joe McMillin, 48, a Henderson resident, died July 24. McMillin was bom on July 27, 1940 in Reno. His family moved to Henderson shortly thereafter. He attended Basic High School and UNLV. He is survived by his daughter, Jody McMillin, of Las Vegas; and parents Grover Wilson and Alvera McMillin and a brother. Barton, all of Henderson. Services were held. Davis Funeral Home handled arrangements. Robert Cecil Jayes Marvin Robert Cecil Jayes Marvin. 73. died Aug. 2 in Henderson. He was bom Aug. 30,1915, in England. A nine-year resident, he was a retired dairyman and a veteran of the British Forces. He was formeriy and originally from England. He is survived by his wife, Winifred A of Henderson; two daughters, Jennifer Crites of Honolulu and Rosemary Nolan of Long Beach, Calif.; and two grandchildren. Services were private. Palm Mortuary handled arrangements. r 1HE IlinU Wn MED A PBFKT PIACE... PMTTNOSEIMIIUniBU; EVBiYraraMinnwaupop AM Mi lUMB MB WVB mUJ) SUPPOn TNER srauss MM DOS ID SM mm TKiMnMiaMMiMiianL m. na AGM1I1K wou MIBE • A ram ?[ja..M wnurr KNIT nfiAnaMiaMRiAiiiKSBivL Thur8dy, Angnat 10,1989 AT THE CARPET BARN THE ONLY THING WE CANT RESIST ISASALE. Now you can get soil-, stainand wear-resistance at an irresistible price. Worry Free carpet is on sale. But see us soon. Because while Worry Free will last, the sale won't. $099 ^ sq. V sq. yd. IT'S MORE THAN JUST STAIN RESISTANT IT'S TOTALLY WORRY FREE WIE-: DON'T MEET PRICES...WE BEAT EVERYBODY'S PRICES.. CALL TODAY FOR FREE ESTIMATES MostpfCoid 90 DAYS SAME AS CASH—ON APPROVED CREDIT ^m COMPLETE CARPET, PAD AND LABOR FOR ONE PRICE CALL TODAYOR COME ON IN! ^ SAVE ON ALL CARPET AS NEVER BEFORE 384-8551 105 W. Charleston Blvd. OPEN EVENINGS • FREE PARKING MON.-FRI. 9 TO 9 t SAT. 9 TO 6 • SUN. 11 TO 5 NO JOB TOO SMALL OR TOO LARGE-ONE ROOM TO A FULL HOUSE OF CARPET Thnwday, August 10,1989 Community Church asks, 'Why Bother To Pray?' Dr. Ed Swain, minister of the Community Church of Henderson. United Church of Christ, has been speaking on a series of parables from the Bible for the last several Sundays. He will continue the series with his sermon for Sunday, "Why ^ Bother To Pray?" Scripture is taken from Luke 11:5-13. Everyone is invited to share in the worship services, spokespersons said. An eariy service is held at 8 a.m. for the convenience of travelers; a regular service is held at 9:30 a.m. during the summer months. The chancel choir always prepares a special anthem for the regular services. There is a junior sermon for the youngsters. There is also a supervised nursery for very young children during the later service. Community Church is located at 360 East Horizon Drive, at the comer of Greenway Road and Horizon. The office is open from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday. When the office is closed, calls are forwarded to the minister's phone. The Women's Association of the church meets on the second Tuesday of each month foranoon potluck lunch, followed by a business and devotional meeting. The group is woricing on an afghan and otherideas for a "Christmas" Bazaar to be held in November. The evening group of ladies, Joy Fellowship, will meet on the fourth Thursday of each month starting in Septmeber. For further inforaiation,' call the church office at 565-8563. The church council will hold its regular monthly meeting at 7 p.m. Monday at the church. Members are urged to attend as there are impoitant projects to discuss, officials said. Hoidenon Horn* Newt, Boulder City Newt, Qnm VaOtf Nfwt Pag* 39 Baptist Church to build school By Georgina Coriialan a quality education supiriemented Ntm Staff Writer by the religious studies. Pastor Paul Gine of the HenInconvenience was one of the derson Baptist Church will break motivating factors that urged ground for a multipurpose school PastorOineandfoUoweniobuikl building on Taylor Street this fall, a church. Not only were the Churchgoers pray during servicwltHSrsonBaptist Howard reveals 'How to Enjoy Your Own Mind' --r — —-•^-HV WM\t Methodists expand Sunday nursery care Childcare for infants and preworship at 10:30 a.m. Both worschool children will now be availship services include a special able for all Sunday morning ac tivities at First Henderson United Methodist Church, officials announced this week. The Sunday morning schedule includes worhship at 8:15 a.m., church school for adults, youth and children at 9:20 a.m. and Parable series continues at time for the children to hear a message prepared just for them. The Rev. Beth Carey, pastorof the church, Sunday Will bring the message based on Luke 12:3240, entitled: "The Kingdom of God: Seeking with Cbnfidcnce." The fii^st of two membership orientation classes will also be The new 10,000-square-foot facility will provide extra classrooms for the already existing Henderson Christian Schools, which have been operating for one year. In addition, the new school will enable First Bible Baptist Church administrators to commence a high school education program, officials said. As the only private religious education offered in the city, Henderson Christian Schools is planning on registering students from kindergarten through the 12thgrad. Unlike public schools, however, Henderson Christian Schools will use an insuiictional method unique to Southern Nevada. ABCA, a videotaped curriculum of required and elective courses, has been developed for 25 years in Florida. The Qark Country School District strongly supports ABCA, said Gine. In addition to videotaped lessons, in which a normal class full of students and a teacher are shown, a full time insuiictors will be availaUetofiirtherexplaineach lesson. This fall, the private school ... „.v vuu(.uinuicu wiui me enure year, they added FOLKS FROM DOWN UNDER—Carol Farrell, left, of Perth, ^ •, held at 9:20 a.m. Sunday. Australia, recently visited her sister Jeanette Marcoaldi in Boulder PreSbVterian tOpiC: 'WhOre IS OUF TreaSUfe? Mid-week acuvitics include a City, making the 10,000 mile trip especially to attend classes taught BiblestudyfocusedonthePsalms h„ „„..ij •„— .^—.r^ .. .. ...vi .,viiciiciTtu(.iMiiaiin oouiaer r^ -A fsi. I. '^""-^^•^3<="^'"''"<='"<'* City, making the 10,000 mile trip especially to attend classes taught Community Cnurcn BiWesmdy focusedonthePsalms ^y world-famous author Vcrnon Howard at the New Life FoundaCommunity Church of HenthatmeetsfromIOa.m.to 11a.m. :„-:-o„...-.— ^• that meets from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Tuesday in Room 7. First Henderson United Methodist Church is located at 609 E. Horizon Drive in the Highland Hills section of Henderson. Further information can be obtained by calling 565-6049. Church of Christ hosts Vacation Bible School A Vacation Bible School will be conducted from 7 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. Monday through Friday next week at the Church of Christ, 104 Victory Road. Theme of the school this year, officials said, is "Jesus Called Them, One by One," and the study will concentrate on the lives of the Apostles. In addition to the study, other activities for young students will include crafts, puppets, games and songs, plus tion in Boulder City Methods to attain authentic relaxation and enjoyment of life arc offered in inner-development talks by Vemon Howard on "How to Enjoy Your Own Mind," with Biblical reference to Riilippians 720 radio at midnight, Saturday 4:8. The talks will be given at New life Foundation, a large ings for clear and practical anwhite building with bright yelSWers to problems in relationships low trim located at 700 Wyoand in work siniations. Pastor Dr. R. Dixon Jennings will preach a sermon entitled "Where Is Our Treasure?" at both the 8:30 a.m. and the 11 a.m. worship services Stmday at Henderson Presbyterian Church. His message will be ^ __, based on Luke 12:32-40, in nights and at 7 a.m., Sunday momwhich people are urged to be ;„„o f —1 • • • prepared for the coming of God's dominion. Photo by SlephM Burko Howard's books have recently been translated into East Indian by a publisher in Bombay, bidia. Listeners are invited to hear Vemon Howaid on KDWN-AM Sunday church school for all ages is at 9:45 a.m. There is a nursery for preschool children at the 11 a.m. service. Following the pastor's talk with the children at the 11 a.m. service, those who are in See Treasure, Page 42 East Horizon Drive, at the comer of Greenway Road. Office hours are 10 a.m. until 2 ^.^^f^ w, ^axu^o auu ouu^t p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays, refreshments, they said For further infonnation, call 565 The choir is always looking and stay for an adult class, for people who like to sing and There will be a different evening, they ming SL, at the comer of Utah Sueet in Boulder City. Meetings are held at 7 p.m. each Wednesday and Friday and at 9 a.m each Saturday and Sunday. Sponsors invite Southern Nevadans to attend the classes, which bring authentic Bible teachings to life and bring higher meaning to everyday living. New Lifers come from many states, including Colorado, Maryland. Utah. Pennsylvania. Minnesota. Rhode Island. Ohio. Nonh For directions, or more information about New Life classes and activities, call 293-4444. ..ucjTKuu. Dakota, Connecticut, Wyoming Parents are invited to bring 3^^ vviscnnsin their children for the school would like to join them, spokes persons said, they rehearse at the church at 8:30 a.m. during the summer. Call the church office for more information. speaker each said. Persons who need a ride should call 565-8186 or 565-7235. and Wisconsin, A woman from Sacramento, Calif., recently wrote: "I purchased one of your books, which is delightful as well as timely and very helpful. 1 would also like to order tapes. Life is getting less scary and hopeless no w." Four of We liave along raaelit Our CLASSIFIEDS reach ^BOULDER crnr •HENDERSON 1^ GREEN VALLEY CaU today 293-2302 or 564-1881 GREEN VALLEY CHURCH OF CHRIST (United Steelworkers Union Hall) 47 Water Street We invite you to attend our worship & Bible studies Sunday: Bible Classes 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Worship 5:00 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Classes 7:30 p.m. You Are Always Welcome For more information: Barney Cor^e 564-4962 or P.O. Box 90493 Hendwaon 89009 The All New Ilairitage Full Familj Service (Salon It lov hifioj Mnly^uU 9f NaoioirUta Joii onr dtaff of Profcafioaalf Opcttfl^aooi 10 dUtioae AvaJlable for flairetjrliiU if 3 Available Naoiciirieg ^tioat Hcidcnoo'e Noat AdMlooa Hew Saba of 4.000 aq. a. 311 5 Water 6t. Hcndcron. Nevada ^ Contact CAROL OTIS, Buainasa Managar 56S-7S03 or 565-3480 batwaan 7:30 a.m. A 6:00 p.m. HENDERSON FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 47 E. Atlaatie PASTOR JOHN OSKO 565-9511 "THE SEARCH FOR HAPPINESS* PASTOR OSKO'S MESSAGE THIS SUNDAY "THE SEARCH FOR HAPPINESS" is the title Rev. John Osko has chosen for his message this Sunday morning at First Baptist Church. His Scripture text is Psalm 16:6-9. Special music for this Worship Hour will include Carlton C. Buck and John W. Peterson's, "I Believe In Miracles," sung by soloist Bettye Hansen, and selections by the First Baptist Church Chorale. The Worship Hour begins at 11:00 a.m. First Baptist Church is located at 47 East Atlantic Avenue, Henderson. ^ Sunday School classes for all ages begin at 9:30 a.m. Sunday School teacher's meeting is at 9:05 a.m. Children's Church Time for children 2 years of age throu^ Kindergarten, is held during the Morning Worship Hour. Leaders for August are Martie and Carl Henderson. A Nursery is provided for infants and children up to 2 years of age. Pastor Osko and congregation invite you to warship with them this Sunday. For additional information, please call 565-9511. ^*

PAGE 39

Thonday, August 10, 1969 Hmdmon Home News, Boulder City News, Ortsn VaUsj Nsws Pag• 41 Pg 40, HMMknoa Home Newit, Bouidtr aty News, Onaa VaUmj Nsws Thursday, August 10, 19^ Thk u/PPk' HnrnQrnno' $500,ooo donated to UNLV dorms I Ship from Page 33 11119 ft VVl\ V llwlVQvVpV Oaudlnc WiUiams, chairman liams has given of both her re• vokeofthcchangesthaiappcared Adult Health Day Care Program available for handicapped By Silomc Weekly tip: It is a favorable time to make peace within those relationships that need reconciliation. Aries (March 21 to April 19) A new budget is called fbr, along with a commitment to stick to it FamUy members need to share and contribute to household situations. Taurus (April 20 to May 20) Discard old kleas that do not woifc Dear Debbie: My wife and I dated each other for two years in college, were engaged for two and one-half years, and have now been married for ,^0 years. Our friends always said we were the perfect couple. But 'obviously we weren't My wife has made her career a priority. She ^ A i *.•. A ^ i. ^ .. ,^^ .,,u^. „u,u„... ,„„,„„L^:„h CK. as you develop a new view of the future. Be prqmred fbr suipri makes more money than I do, although I have a very good job. She „,!>,i„ ,. .-„ travels aU the Ume and would prefer to go out with her friends than "^T^;"PJ? "Si" I w a ^ .^ MUTi^u. wi u, U...V. K e Gemini (May 21 to June 21) An examination of your financial balances may show that you are further ahead than expected. Avoid giving out confidential infonnatlon. spend time with me. We never have sex—she's too tired. She doesn't like to go out with our friends anymore, instead, she visits her parents on the weekends, without me. She tells me she thought she loved me, but realizes now she only wanted to get married because her friends j: were getting married. She thought that aitcr we were married, I would 1: "change" to be something she wanted me to be, and since I haven't 1: she isn't even sure she likes me anymore. I thought she was going |: through a phase, but now she tells me she has gotten an apartment and Iis moving out of the house we bought together. It's all so final, and it |. happened so fast. We were a storybook couple in a storybook mar* riagc, and suddenly our entire future has disappeared into thin air. ;• What can I do? Do I beg her to say, if that's what she wants to hear? |. Do I let her go without a fight? This is all such a huge slap in my face, Ijust don't know how to deal with iL How could it all have happened? ; LONESOME LOSER ; Dear Lonesome Loser: I Based only on your side of the story, it sounds as if you have been i badly burned. Your wife has not been honest with you or herself until I now. and right now she is being brutally honest. That's very unfair, but I it happens. Storybook marriages don't exist, except in fairytales. I People are always shocked when a "perfect couple" ends up in I divorce. But perhaps what led to that divorce was maintaining a • perfect image, both tg outsiders and to one another. When you don't ; face basic problems within a marriage, the problems begin to pile up I inside of you and turn into deep resentment, and one day the problems are just too insurmountable to deal with anymore. At that point, it is i: just easier to bale out than work it out. ;; • Your wife may have been very immature beforfe you were married, and maybe was uncertain of who she really was. Pertiaps her career has bolstered her self-confidence and ego. and she now feels as if she wants something more and has the self-confidence to admit that. For the sake of salvaging the marriage, don't let your pride stand in the way of expressing your desire to woric it all out If that doesn't 5 work, however, you must consider yourself lucky that she is at least being honest with you, 1989, McNaught Syndicate yvOUR RNANCIAL FITNESS Personal finances: Keeping track ^'r By TimO'Callaghan L_ Southern Nevada Association of Life Underwriters Getting organized and staying those relating to taxes or property able (deeds, securities) or hard to organized are the twin watchwords of personal finance. Both ^ involve keeping track of all the pieces of paper that float through ;your life. Do you keep track? Or -^do you find yourself, at tax time, T^ frantically sorting through piles It of papers to find the ones you 1: need? ^•: The key to getting organized ^as knowing what to keep, how ^long to keep it, and where. What to keep The basic mle of thumb in this department is this: Keep papers you will need to document facts. |Throw everything else away. Keep proof of property you own: real estate deeds, automotitles, securities purchase !: ^slips, jewelry receipts and appraisL^als, and so forth. Keep evidence l^of what you're entitled to receive: "^ insurance policies, warranties, etc. Keep supporting evidence for tax deductions; medical bills, mortgage receipts, and the like. Throw out bills, once they're paid and your account is prDperly credited. Discard returned checks, after a year, unless they document a tax payment or deduction or establisfi the cost of valuable property. This task will be easier if you sort returned checks by category as you balance your statement each month, keeping Cancer (June 22 to July 21) Understand another's limitations and make allowances for his behavior. An easygoing attihide helps in relationships which can be difficult Leo (July 22 to Aug. 21) Speak up and express youiwlf. but control your temper. Postpone difficult decisions. Stick to your current objectives. Be steadfast in your approach. Virgo (Aug. 22 to Sept 22) If you feel hemmed in, this cycle is favorable for flexing your social attitudes. Prepare fbr next week, as it will be one of your best this season. Libra (Sept 23 to Oct. 22) You could be in a mood to oiganize everyone but yourself. Your efforts meet with resistance. Divert excess energy into creative projects. Scorpio (Oct 23 to Nov. 21) Keep in the background when the boss is grouchy. A down-to-earth approach will win The financial picture brightens. Remain practical and steady. Sagittarius (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Put financial mattera on solid footing. Some unexpected expenses occur, but tiie income to cover them is found. The future brightens for you. Capricorn (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) You may be easily distracted just when there is so much to be accomplished. Stick with any job that you have started, and gain recognition thusly. Aquarius (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) If otiiers are dependent upon you. teach them self-reliance. You have a choice of social activities this weekend if you so choose, but choose wisely. Pisces (Feb. 20 to March 20) Added responsibilities seem to creep up on you. Don't assume obligations Uuit are not yours. Ask others to share tile load to make things fair. If you were bom this week You are exceedingly gracious, refined, and diplomatic. You possess an artisU7 that can be applied to writing and acting. For greatest success, respect the value of money, and use your given ingenuity and intutition as a guide through life. 01989, McNaught Synd. daudine Williams, chainnan of the board of tiie Holiday Casino-Holiday Inn in Las Vegas has given $500/)00 to support the new student residence halls at tiie Univerrity of Nevada, Las Vegas, announced UNLV President Robert C. Maxson. Williams, a long-time UNLV supporter and fbrmer chair of tiie UNLV Foundation, said, "I love UNLV and I wanted to help witii dUs project in some way. My own son, Michael, is a graduate of tills university. "I'm ver> pleased witii President Maxson's efforts to develop a sense of community at tiie university," she continued. "I tiiink tills is exactiy tiie direction UNLV should go, because residence halls—and tiie students who live in tiiem—are cxuemely important to campus life." Maxson said, "aaudine Williams is one of Nevada's most successful businesswomen and one of UNLV's finest supporters." Noting tiiat Williams has been among his steadiest advisers during his five years as president of UNLV, Maxson said, "Mi^. Williams has given of both her resources and hertimetohdpmake this a great university." Maxson said he would lecommend to ttw UNS Board of Regents at its next meeting that one of tiie new residence halls be named tiie Qaudine Wiiliams Residence HalL The university will break ground laterthis summeron a $10 million student-housing projea and $2 million snident dining commons. Three new residence halls will provide living space for some 500 students, bringing tiie touQ number of students living on the university campus to nearly 1,200. The state-of-tiie-art dining commons will serve botii donnitory snidents and the rest of the student body. "This is a very exciting time in the life of tiiis young univeisity," Maxson said. "Our academic strength has never been greater. We are experiencing record enrollments. We are receiving more and larger donations tiian ever before. Truly, we are witnessing the mahiring of our public university." Tlic first fathar and ton to sarva at th Mint tima in tlia U.S. Sanita wara Hanry Oodga of Wlaeontin and hit aon, Augustus Caatar Dodge of Iowa. Thay tarvad from 1841 to IMS. ^:bile in a separate file. How long to keep it The key question here is: How long will Uncle Sam be interested? Backup for ordinary tax deductions, such as medical bills and finance charges, should be kept for a minimum of tiiree years from tiie date you file tiie tax rcmm on which tiie deductions are claimed: 1990 would be tiie "discard year" for papers backing ordinary deductions claimed for tiic 1986 tax year. Of course, if you are being audited, you'll want to keep all relevant materials until tiie matter is resolved. Be selective in your tossing, in any case, because some records have a longer life span. If you own a house, for instance, you should keep records on tiie payments of taxes and tiie cost of home improvements while you own tiie house and for at least four years after you sell tiie house: such costs reduce any tax tfuit might be due on tiie sale. If you own stocks and bonds, similarly, keep purchase records for at least four years after tiie date of sale. Where to keep it Once you tiirow out all tiie junk, you'll have less to file. But tiicre are still four major categories: 1. Papers tiiat are eitiier valureplace (birth certificates, military records) should be kept in a bank safe deposit box or in a fireproof box at home. 2. Cunent pricing papers (bills to be paid, premium notices, bank statements, etc.) might be kept at hand in an accordion file witii pockets organized by category or by montii. 3. Otiier current records (insurance polices, warranties, etc.) might go in a metid box on a closet shelf. 4. Backup files, such as federal income tax returns for previous years, may be tucked away in an attic or closet out of tiie way yet accessible. Sunshine Generation to perform at spaghetti dinner The Henderson Paifcs and Recreation Department's Sunshine Generation youtii perfonnance group will host a spaghetti dinner and perfonnanoe at 6:30 p.m., Friday at FayGalloway Elementary Sdiool. Tickett priced at $12 fbr a family fb six, $3.S0 fbr adults and $2 for children, will be sold at ite door. Fbr additional infonnationcall tiie Ovic Center, 563-2121 registration underway The Henderson Christian School has announced that registrationfortiie 1989-90 school year will continue through tiie montii of August. Parents planning to enroll students are urged to do so as soon as possible. Several grade levels are nearly ftill. Admissions per grade are limited to assure a good teacher-pupil ratio, officials said. Henderson rhriiian .School is recognized for tiie Nevada Department of Education as a private school offering equivalent education for kindergarten Uirough grade 12. The school is Henderson's only private school offering all grade levels. The school is a ministiy of Henderson Bible Baptist Church, located at 210 Taylor St Individuals interested in more infomiation should call tiie office at 564-7304. tP. REGAIN CONTROL OF YOUR LIFE t •Lf am th SuptrlMmlng Taehnique developed In Europe •Enhance Learning and Memory •Lasting Results Not a Momentary "Feel Good" Effect Maimtitm. Chflalltii IMt • CraoMy • BtlMmait • autaa MantganMnl FREE INTRODUCTDRY SEMINAR ON AU0UST14,7:30 P.M. ^ THE CIVIC CENTER 201 Laad St.. Off Water 8t In Htndaraon ELAINE IMUS Supartaaming Seminars 435-7947 ^^^^ Pan, a Graak god, waa baWavad to dalight in Hghtaning t ra valar i Tha word "panic" d9n"m from hia i-nama. VOICF MAIL MFSSAC.f: SEfWICE ':'""" pi".'.'I''. MAIL, MESSAGES ft Moie. pflirrnNo. COMES i FAX vStWSm BODY 2000 Arthritis Sufferers WK CAN RELIEVE YOUR PAIN o Relieve Bacit, Necit, Shoulder and Arthritis Pain o Enhance Your Muscular Endurance o Faster Recovery From Sports Related Injuries • Treatment of Choice For Ail Soft Tissue Injuries • We Can Assist You With Your Own Physical Goals Private traatmant rooms tuparvisad by licensed practltlonera. • i||l)iii)tiitiiliiilliila m l|lriii#Jllajlll*| • F.D.A. APPROVED FOR ARTHRITIS • MEDICARE e HEALTH INSURANCE • WORKMAN'S COMP., MEDICAL LIENS ACCEPTED AS 100% PAYMENT 367-3311 FLAMINGO ROAD & ARVILLE BACK TO SCHOOL SALE Auffust 10th • 26th All Children's Clothing, Shoes, and School Supplies 25% off Come in and see our Senior Craft Show on Saturday. There are tome great gift ideas here. Shop early for handmade Christmas gifts. OPPORTUNITY VILLAGE Whore your donattono stay local and help 800 handicapped adolte each day. 10 W. Pacific 22 W. Padfic nirift Store Boutique 664.7128 666.0009 ^ Rodney G. Handsfield, M.D. Specializing in Urology • Diseases of the kidneys, bitdder and genltalla of adults snd children • Treatment of Impotence; mate sexuti difficulties • Vssectomy and vasectomy reversal • Infertility • Proatata cancer scretntng • Incontinence; bladder control problems • Kidney atones — non^urgical treatment Serving Henderson, Green Valley and Boulder City Call 564-9599 for appointment Qmn Valley Medical Canttr $7 E. Lake Mead Drive 6301 Mtn. Vlata St., Suite 103 Henderson. Nevada 89015 Henderson, NV 89014 qIce of the changes tluu,appeared daily as the Newpon News ShipiHiilding Co.. put her together. He spoke of the ffrst sea trials, the deployments to the Mediterranean and of the many records set that have never been equaled or surA goodbye coffee was held the next morning, with an agreement tomeetinOaldand.Califin 1988. The reunion in Oakland coincided with the operating schedule of the USS Enterprise home ported at Alameda. They met at the Oakland Airport Hilton on Oct. 5-8,1988. By that time, the mailing list had grown to 432, with 238 being members of the association. In all. 130 members and wives attended the Oakland Reunion After the business of the association was taken care of. and the get-acquainted coffees were over, plenty of time was allowed for leisure activities, with visits to San Francisco, rides on the cable cars, walks around Fisherman's Wharf, tours of the wine country and golfing for those who were interested. On Saturday morning Oct. 8, 1988 a tour of the Enterprise was arranged. At the dinner-dance, the guest .speaker was Capt. Robert J. Spane. the Enterprises's commanding officer, who presented an impressive slide show, starting with the changes that occurred from the "Big E's" overhaul in Bremerton, to seeing her once again in action on the seas. Memories of exciting times of the past were brought back. Once again goodbyes were said, with plans to meet in Las Vegas in 1989. Las Vegas plans are well under way. The reunion will be at the Flamingo Hilton on Sunday, Sept. 10-14 with Adm. Frederick H. Michaelis. USN-retired, the second captain of the Enteiprise, u the guest speaker. The association is kx)king for all fonner shipmates who have at any time served aboard the USS Enteiprise. All officers and enlisted men. including marines. Air Groups and Flag Staff are invited to join. In 1986 the name was changed from USS Enteiprise Plank Owners to the USS Enterprise Association, thus opening the membership to all personnel who have served aboard the ship either prior to or after commissioning. Any widows of former shipmates are invited to join. At the current time thare are 14 members who are widows. Since the search began in 198S more than 500 fonner shipmates have been found. The goal is to locate aU 38.000. Bud Owens of New Yoric is the ofTicial historian of the association. He collects, catalogues and stores the memorabilia display that is set up at each reunion. The collection is very impressive and, observers say, second to none. The association continues to maintain contact with USS Enterprise to help perpetuate a name famous throughout the history of the Navy. Jesse Cannon and Eddie R. Cook staned the group acting as the first chairmen, with Bob Spooner as the next chairman, then Bill Faschall as the current chairman. They organized the association, set up the reunions and located their shipmates. But it could not have lieen done without the help of many others who are members of the association, and especially the help of their wives, spokespersons said. The association has planned ahead for fuUrrc reunions, 1990 will find the gix)up in Norfolkof choking, MiAuuttiH|ffotfiK IF ONLY THEY CAME WITH INSTRUCTIONS American Red Cross •ITidewater area, and 19Si| will sec them in New Orieans. !>.; 1992 is yet to be decided. \ Persons who are fomnijr Enterprise shipmates or wiil'lpws of former shipmates and u i^uld be interested in joining the association, should write to H.L. Ijeigh, P.O. Box 8153. Fort Collins ;Colc. 80526 or call (612) 732-63.'S0 and the information will be forw ardcd to the chairman. 1 Cacti to be sold The Las Vegas Cactus and Succulent Society will hold the "Hottest Day of the Year" plant sale from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Saturday, at 414 Sari Drive. Novelty items, dish gardi;ns. golden and fire barrels. Joshua trees, and other indoor and outdoor succulents will be availab le. Members receive 25 percent off selected plants, spokespersons said. For more infonnation,, cai'l 644-5091 or 452-1935.' There are three things you should do before buying a hearing aid, suggest the experts at the Beltone Hearing Aid Company. First, have your hearing tested by a qualified specialist such as a certified hearing aid dispenser. Sudden hearing loss should be discussed with a physician. Next, ask if there's a trial period or return policy. Third, discuss the manufacturer's warranty and service plan. By Valerie Smithe Adult Health Day Care Center Although the clientele at the Salvation Anny Adult Health Day Care Center in Henderson is predominantly elderiy, the number of physically ormentally disabled adults attending the day-care facility has increased during the last year. One of the reasons for the increase is public awareness that such care is available, and the completion, approximately one year ago, of handicapped restrooms for the use of the daycare clients. That has made it possible to accommodate those having special needs. When the center first opened, one of the high priorities was the need for additional handicapped facilities. Estimates indicated the cost was quite prohibitive but through the work of many volunteers both private individuals and See Day Care, Page 42 GOURMET COFFEE By Sweeney's FINE TEAS SPICES GIFTS AND ACCESSORY ITEMS 564-9303 Wliy SMP for GoupiiMt CoffeesT Gourmet coffeesp-epresent the finest coffees ^own in the world. Coffee beans are divided into two broad categories: robusta (roboo-sta) and arabica (a-ra-bee-ka). Many supermarkets carry blends of robusta, while gourmet stores carry only arabicas. Arabica coffee beans are selected os gourmet coffees because of their unique full-bodied flavor and rich aroma. Gourmet coffee beans are known for their density, even roast, and balanced flavor. People who buy gourmet coffees are willing to pay more for their quality. It may interest you to know that the world's finest coffees, selling for about $7.50 a pound, actually cost only obout 10 cents per cup. Compare thot cost per cup to another beverage such as wine or soda and you can see that the world's most elite and flavorful coffees ar a bargain. OPEN MONDAY THRU SATURDAY 9:00-6 00 Andrea Pabon holds a lot of titles. She's an Air Force safe way to invest in our future." Savings Bonds come in a staff sergeant. A single mother. And, because sh e buys U.S. variety of denominations, are free from state and local income Savings Bonds, a Great American Investor. "With Savings Bonds, I'm really taking advantage of a smart, affordable investment," she says. What makes them so attractive? "It's not easy raising two kids on a seiigeant's pay Bonds are a Ui. SAVINGS BONDS .SEAT AMERlCANItMVf STMtNT tax, and you can buy them at work-like Andrea -or where you bank. Become the next Great American Investor. For more information, call us, or write U.S. Savings Bonds, Dept. 892-N, Washington, D.C. 20226. 1-£IOO-US-BONDS public servke o( ihis publication v t^--vf'--

PAGE 40

Thonday, August 10, 1969 Hmdmon Home News, Boulder City News, Ortsn VaUsj Nsws Pag• 41 Pg 40, HMMknoa Home Newit, Bouidtr aty News, Onaa VaUmj Nsws Thursday, August 10, 19^ Thk u/PPk' HnrnQrnno' $500,ooo donated to UNLV dorms I Ship from Page 33 11119 ft VVl\ V llwlVQvVpV Oaudlnc WiUiams, chairman liams has given of both her re• vokeofthcchangesthaiappcared Adult Health Day Care Program available for handicapped By Silomc Weekly tip: It is a favorable time to make peace within those relationships that need reconciliation. Aries (March 21 to April 19) A new budget is called fbr, along with a commitment to stick to it FamUy members need to share and contribute to household situations. Taurus (April 20 to May 20) Discard old kleas that do not woifc Dear Debbie: My wife and I dated each other for two years in college, were engaged for two and one-half years, and have now been married for ,^0 years. Our friends always said we were the perfect couple. But 'obviously we weren't My wife has made her career a priority. She ^ A i *.•. A ^ i. ^ .. ,^^ .,,u^. „u,u„... ,„„,„„L^:„h CK. as you develop a new view of the future. Be prqmred fbr suipri makes more money than I do, although I have a very good job. She „,!>,i„ ,. .-„ travels aU the Ume and would prefer to go out with her friends than "^T^;"PJ? "Si" I w a ^ .^ MUTi^u. wi u, U...V. K e Gemini (May 21 to June 21) An examination of your financial balances may show that you are further ahead than expected. Avoid giving out confidential infonnatlon. spend time with me. We never have sex—she's too tired. She doesn't like to go out with our friends anymore, instead, she visits her parents on the weekends, without me. She tells me she thought she loved me, but realizes now she only wanted to get married because her friends j: were getting married. She thought that aitcr we were married, I would 1: "change" to be something she wanted me to be, and since I haven't 1: she isn't even sure she likes me anymore. I thought she was going |: through a phase, but now she tells me she has gotten an apartment and Iis moving out of the house we bought together. It's all so final, and it |. happened so fast. We were a storybook couple in a storybook mar* riagc, and suddenly our entire future has disappeared into thin air. ;• What can I do? Do I beg her to say, if that's what she wants to hear? |. Do I let her go without a fight? This is all such a huge slap in my face, Ijust don't know how to deal with iL How could it all have happened? ; LONESOME LOSER ; Dear Lonesome Loser: I Based only on your side of the story, it sounds as if you have been i badly burned. Your wife has not been honest with you or herself until I now. and right now she is being brutally honest. That's very unfair, but I it happens. Storybook marriages don't exist, except in fairytales. I People are always shocked when a "perfect couple" ends up in I divorce. But perhaps what led to that divorce was maintaining a • perfect image, both tg outsiders and to one another. When you don't ; face basic problems within a marriage, the problems begin to pile up I inside of you and turn into deep resentment, and one day the problems are just too insurmountable to deal with anymore. At that point, it is i: just easier to bale out than work it out. ;; • Your wife may have been very immature beforfe you were married, and maybe was uncertain of who she really was. Pertiaps her career has bolstered her self-confidence and ego. and she now feels as if she wants something more and has the self-confidence to admit that. For the sake of salvaging the marriage, don't let your pride stand in the way of expressing your desire to woric it all out If that doesn't 5 work, however, you must consider yourself lucky that she is at least being honest with you, 1989, McNaught Syndicate yvOUR RNANCIAL FITNESS Personal finances: Keeping track ^'r By TimO'Callaghan L_ Southern Nevada Association of Life Underwriters Getting organized and staying those relating to taxes or property able (deeds, securities) or hard to organized are the twin watchwords of personal finance. Both ^ involve keeping track of all the pieces of paper that float through ;your life. Do you keep track? Or -^do you find yourself, at tax time, T^ frantically sorting through piles It of papers to find the ones you 1: need? ^•: The key to getting organized ^as knowing what to keep, how ^long to keep it, and where. What to keep The basic mle of thumb in this department is this: Keep papers you will need to document facts. |Throw everything else away. Keep proof of property you own: real estate deeds, automotitles, securities purchase !: ^slips, jewelry receipts and appraisL^als, and so forth. Keep evidence l^of what you're entitled to receive: "^ insurance policies, warranties, etc. Keep supporting evidence for tax deductions; medical bills, mortgage receipts, and the like. Throw out bills, once they're paid and your account is prDperly credited. Discard returned checks, after a year, unless they document a tax payment or deduction or establisfi the cost of valuable property. This task will be easier if you sort returned checks by category as you balance your statement each month, keeping Cancer (June 22 to July 21) Understand another's limitations and make allowances for his behavior. An easygoing attihide helps in relationships which can be difficult Leo (July 22 to Aug. 21) Speak up and express youiwlf. but control your temper. Postpone difficult decisions. Stick to your current objectives. Be steadfast in your approach. Virgo (Aug. 22 to Sept 22) If you feel hemmed in, this cycle is favorable for flexing your social attitudes. Prepare fbr next week, as it will be one of your best this season. Libra (Sept 23 to Oct. 22) You could be in a mood to oiganize everyone but yourself. Your efforts meet with resistance. Divert excess energy into creative projects. Scorpio (Oct 23 to Nov. 21) Keep in the background when the boss is grouchy. A down-to-earth approach will win The financial picture brightens. Remain practical and steady. Sagittarius (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) Put financial mattera on solid footing. Some unexpected expenses occur, but tiie income to cover them is found. The future brightens for you. Capricorn (Dec. 22 to Jan. 20) You may be easily distracted just when there is so much to be accomplished. Stick with any job that you have started, and gain recognition thusly. Aquarius (Jan. 21 to Feb. 19) If otiiers are dependent upon you. teach them self-reliance. You have a choice of social activities this weekend if you so choose, but choose wisely. Pisces (Feb. 20 to March 20) Added responsibilities seem to creep up on you. Don't assume obligations Uuit are not yours. Ask others to share tile load to make things fair. If you were bom this week You are exceedingly gracious, refined, and diplomatic. You possess an artisU7 that can be applied to writing and acting. For greatest success, respect the value of money, and use your given ingenuity and intutition as a guide through life. 01989, McNaught Synd. daudine Williams, chainnan of the board of tiie Holiday Casino-Holiday Inn in Las Vegas has given $500/)00 to support the new student residence halls at tiie Univerrity of Nevada, Las Vegas, announced UNLV President Robert C. Maxson. Williams, a long-time UNLV supporter and fbrmer chair of tiie UNLV Foundation, said, "I love UNLV and I wanted to help witii dUs project in some way. My own son, Michael, is a graduate of tills university. "I'm ver> pleased witii President Maxson's efforts to develop a sense of community at tiie university," she continued. "I tiiink tills is exactiy tiie direction UNLV should go, because residence halls—and tiie students who live in tiiem—are cxuemely important to campus life." Maxson said, "aaudine Williams is one of Nevada's most successful businesswomen and one of UNLV's finest supporters." Noting tiiat Williams has been among his steadiest advisers during his five years as president of UNLV, Maxson said, "Mi^. Williams has given of both her resources and hertimetohdpmake this a great university." Maxson said he would lecommend to ttw UNS Board of Regents at its next meeting that one of tiie new residence halls be named tiie Qaudine Wiiliams Residence HalL The university will break ground laterthis summeron a $10 million student-housing projea and $2 million snident dining commons. Three new residence halls will provide living space for some 500 students, bringing tiie touQ number of students living on the university campus to nearly 1,200. The state-of-tiie-art dining commons will serve botii donnitory snidents and the rest of the student body. "This is a very exciting time in the life of tiiis young univeisity," Maxson said. "Our academic strength has never been greater. We are experiencing record enrollments. We are receiving more and larger donations tiian ever before. Truly, we are witnessing the mahiring of our public university." Tlic first fathar and ton to sarva at th Mint tima in tlia U.S. Sanita wara Hanry Oodga of Wlaeontin and hit aon, Augustus Caatar Dodge of Iowa. Thay tarvad from 1841 to IMS. ^:bile in a separate file. How long to keep it The key question here is: How long will Uncle Sam be interested? Backup for ordinary tax deductions, such as medical bills and finance charges, should be kept for a minimum of tiiree years from tiie date you file tiie tax rcmm on which tiie deductions are claimed: 1990 would be tiie "discard year" for papers backing ordinary deductions claimed for tiic 1986 tax year. Of course, if you are being audited, you'll want to keep all relevant materials until tiie matter is resolved. Be selective in your tossing, in any case, because some records have a longer life span. If you own a house, for instance, you should keep records on tiie payments of taxes and tiie cost of home improvements while you own tiie house and for at least four years after you sell tiie house: such costs reduce any tax tfuit might be due on tiie sale. If you own stocks and bonds, similarly, keep purchase records for at least four years after tiie date of sale. Where to keep it Once you tiirow out all tiie junk, you'll have less to file. But tiicre are still four major categories: 1. Papers tiiat are eitiier valureplace (birth certificates, military records) should be kept in a bank safe deposit box or in a fireproof box at home. 2. Cunent pricing papers (bills to be paid, premium notices, bank statements, etc.) might be kept at hand in an accordion file witii pockets organized by category or by montii. 3. Otiier current records (insurance polices, warranties, etc.) might go in a metid box on a closet shelf. 4. Backup files, such as federal income tax returns for previous years, may be tucked away in an attic or closet out of tiie way yet accessible. Sunshine Generation to perform at spaghetti dinner The Henderson Paifcs and Recreation Department's Sunshine Generation youtii perfonnance group will host a spaghetti dinner and perfonnanoe at 6:30 p.m., Friday at FayGalloway Elementary Sdiool. Tickett priced at $12 fbr a family fb six, $3.S0 fbr adults and $2 for children, will be sold at ite door. Fbr additional infonnationcall tiie Ovic Center, 563-2121 registration underway The Henderson Christian School has announced that registrationfortiie 1989-90 school year will continue through tiie montii of August. Parents planning to enroll students are urged to do so as soon as possible. Several grade levels are nearly ftill. Admissions per grade are limited to assure a good teacher-pupil ratio, officials said. Henderson rhriiian .School is recognized for tiie Nevada Department of Education as a private school offering equivalent education for kindergarten Uirough grade 12. The school is Henderson's only private school offering all grade levels. The school is a ministiy of Henderson Bible Baptist Church, located at 210 Taylor St Individuals interested in more infomiation should call tiie office at 564-7304. tP. REGAIN CONTROL OF YOUR LIFE t •Lf am th SuptrlMmlng Taehnique developed In Europe •Enhance Learning and Memory •Lasting Results Not a Momentary "Feel Good" Effect Maimtitm. Chflalltii IMt • CraoMy • BtlMmait • autaa MantganMnl FREE INTRODUCTDRY SEMINAR ON AU0UST14,7:30 P.M. ^ THE CIVIC CENTER 201 Laad St.. Off Water 8t In Htndaraon ELAINE IMUS Supartaaming Seminars 435-7947 ^^^^ Pan, a Graak god, waa baWavad to dalight in Hghtaning t ra valar i Tha word "panic" d9n"m from hia i-nama. VOICF MAIL MFSSAC.f: SEfWICE ':'""" pi".'.'I''. MAIL, MESSAGES ft Moie. pflirrnNo. COMES i FAX vStWSm BODY 2000 Arthritis Sufferers WK CAN RELIEVE YOUR PAIN o Relieve Bacit, Necit, Shoulder and Arthritis Pain o Enhance Your Muscular Endurance o Faster Recovery From Sports Related Injuries • Treatment of Choice For Ail Soft Tissue Injuries • We Can Assist You With Your Own Physical Goals Private traatmant rooms tuparvisad by licensed practltlonera. • i||l)iii)tiitiiliiilliila m l|lriii#Jllajlll*| • F.D.A. APPROVED FOR ARTHRITIS • MEDICARE e HEALTH INSURANCE • WORKMAN'S COMP., MEDICAL LIENS ACCEPTED AS 100% PAYMENT 367-3311 FLAMINGO ROAD & ARVILLE BACK TO SCHOOL SALE Auffust 10th • 26th All Children's Clothing, Shoes, and School Supplies 25% off Come in and see our Senior Craft Show on Saturday. There are tome great gift ideas here. Shop early for handmade Christmas gifts. OPPORTUNITY VILLAGE Whore your donattono stay local and help 800 handicapped adolte each day. 10 W. Pacific 22 W. Padfic nirift Store Boutique 664.7128 666.0009 ^ Rodney G. Handsfield, M.D. Specializing in Urology • Diseases of the kidneys, bitdder and genltalla of adults snd children • Treatment of Impotence; mate sexuti difficulties • Vssectomy and vasectomy reversal • Infertility • Proatata cancer scretntng • Incontinence; bladder control problems • Kidney atones — non^urgical treatment Serving Henderson, Green Valley and Boulder City Call 564-9599 for appointment Qmn Valley Medical Canttr $7 E. Lake Mead Drive 6301 Mtn. Vlata St., Suite 103 Henderson. Nevada 89015 Henderson, NV 89014 qIce of the changes tluu,appeared daily as the Newpon News ShipiHiilding Co.. put her together. He spoke of the ffrst sea trials, the deployments to the Mediterranean and of the many records set that have never been equaled or surA goodbye coffee was held the next morning, with an agreement tomeetinOaldand.Califin 1988. The reunion in Oakland coincided with the operating schedule of the USS Enterprise home ported at Alameda. They met at the Oakland Airport Hilton on Oct. 5-8,1988. By that time, the mailing list had grown to 432, with 238 being members of the association. In all. 130 members and wives attended the Oakland Reunion After the business of the association was taken care of. and the get-acquainted coffees were over, plenty of time was allowed for leisure activities, with visits to San Francisco, rides on the cable cars, walks around Fisherman's Wharf, tours of the wine country and golfing for those who were interested. On Saturday morning Oct. 8, 1988 a tour of the Enterprise was arranged. At the dinner-dance, the guest .speaker was Capt. Robert J. Spane. the Enterprises's commanding officer, who presented an impressive slide show, starting with the changes that occurred from the "Big E's" overhaul in Bremerton, to seeing her once again in action on the seas. Memories of exciting times of the past were brought back. Once again goodbyes were said, with plans to meet in Las Vegas in 1989. Las Vegas plans are well under way. The reunion will be at the Flamingo Hilton on Sunday, Sept. 10-14 with Adm. Frederick H. Michaelis. USN-retired, the second captain of the Enteiprise, u the guest speaker. The association is kx)king for all fonner shipmates who have at any time served aboard the USS Enteiprise. All officers and enlisted men. including marines. Air Groups and Flag Staff are invited to join. In 1986 the name was changed from USS Enteiprise Plank Owners to the USS Enterprise Association, thus opening the membership to all personnel who have served aboard the ship either prior to or after commissioning. Any widows of former shipmates are invited to join. At the current time thare are 14 members who are widows. Since the search began in 198S more than 500 fonner shipmates have been found. The goal is to locate aU 38.000. Bud Owens of New Yoric is the ofTicial historian of the association. He collects, catalogues and stores the memorabilia display that is set up at each reunion. The collection is very impressive and, observers say, second to none. The association continues to maintain contact with USS Enterprise to help perpetuate a name famous throughout the history of the Navy. Jesse Cannon and Eddie R. Cook staned the group acting as the first chairmen, with Bob Spooner as the next chairman, then Bill Faschall as the current chairman. They organized the association, set up the reunions and located their shipmates. But it could not have lieen done without the help of many others who are members of the association, and especially the help of their wives, spokespersons said. The association has planned ahead for fuUrrc reunions, 1990 will find the gix)up in Norfolkof choking, MiAuuttiH|ffotfiK IF ONLY THEY CAME WITH INSTRUCTIONS American Red Cross •ITidewater area, and 19Si| will sec them in New Orieans. !>.; 1992 is yet to be decided. \ Persons who are fomnijr Enterprise shipmates or wiil'lpws of former shipmates and u i^uld be interested in joining the association, should write to H.L. Ijeigh, P.O. Box 8153. Fort Collins ;Colc. 80526 or call (612) 732-63.'S0 and the information will be forw ardcd to the chairman. 1 Cacti to be sold The Las Vegas Cactus and Succulent Society will hold the "Hottest Day of the Year" plant sale from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Saturday, at 414 Sari Drive. Novelty items, dish gardi;ns. golden and fire barrels. Joshua trees, and other indoor and outdoor succulents will be availab le. Members receive 25 percent off selected plants, spokespersons said. For more infonnation,, cai'l 644-5091 or 452-1935.' There are three things you should do before buying a hearing aid, suggest the experts at the Beltone Hearing Aid Company. First, have your hearing tested by a qualified specialist such as a certified hearing aid dispenser. Sudden hearing loss should be discussed with a physician. Next, ask if there's a trial period or return policy. Third, discuss the manufacturer's warranty and service plan. By Valerie Smithe Adult Health Day Care Center Although the clientele at the Salvation Anny Adult Health Day Care Center in Henderson is predominantly elderiy, the number of physically ormentally disabled adults attending the day-care facility has increased during the last year. One of the reasons for the increase is public awareness that such care is available, and the completion, approximately one year ago, of handicapped restrooms for the use of the daycare clients. That has made it possible to accommodate those having special needs. When the center first opened, one of the high priorities was the need for additional handicapped facilities. Estimates indicated the cost was quite prohibitive but through the work of many volunteers both private individuals and See Day Care, Page 42 GOURMET COFFEE By Sweeney's FINE TEAS SPICES GIFTS AND ACCESSORY ITEMS 564-9303 Wliy SMP for GoupiiMt CoffeesT Gourmet coffeesp-epresent the finest coffees ^own in the world. Coffee beans are divided into two broad categories: robusta (roboo-sta) and arabica (a-ra-bee-ka). Many supermarkets carry blends of robusta, while gourmet stores carry only arabicas. Arabica coffee beans are selected os gourmet coffees because of their unique full-bodied flavor and rich aroma. Gourmet coffee beans are known for their density, even roast, and balanced flavor. People who buy gourmet coffees are willing to pay more for their quality. It may interest you to know that the world's finest coffees, selling for about $7.50 a pound, actually cost only obout 10 cents per cup. Compare thot cost per cup to another beverage such as wine or soda and you can see that the world's most elite and flavorful coffees ar a bargain. OPEN MONDAY THRU SATURDAY 9:00-6 00 Andrea Pabon holds a lot of titles. She's an Air Force safe way to invest in our future." Savings Bonds come in a staff sergeant. A single mother. And, because sh e buys U.S. variety of denominations, are free from state and local income Savings Bonds, a Great American Investor. "With Savings Bonds, I'm really taking advantage of a smart, affordable investment," she says. What makes them so attractive? "It's not easy raising two kids on a seiigeant's pay Bonds are a Ui. SAVINGS BONDS .SEAT AMERlCANItMVf STMtNT tax, and you can buy them at work-like Andrea -or where you bank. Become the next Great American Investor. For more information, call us, or write U.S. Savings Bonds, Dept. 892-N, Washington, D.C. 20226. 1-£IOO-US-BONDS public servke o( ihis publication v t^--vf'--

PAGE 41

mm Pft 42, HMMIWMA Home News, Boakler Qtgr Nin, Giwa VaDqr fhmm Thnnday, August 10,1969 Thnnday, Auguat 10, 1989 H Exercise can help reduce unhealthy trigiyceride levels ()R| Scientist featured jfi national magazlne Besides dietary changes and weight loss, regular aerobic exercise is one of the most effective ways to lower dangerous levels of triglycerides (one of the blood fats), according to The National Exercise For Life Institute, "New data shows that triglycerides are an independent risk factor for heart disease," said William Casielli, M.D., director of the Framingham Heart Study. "Anyone who has high blood lipids—cholesterol or triglycerides—should be considered a high-risk coronary patient." Triglycerides are lipids orfatty molecules, the largest of the blood's oily particles. Formed in the liver from the fats you eat, or from your body's synthesis of intemal fat, they're composed of three long strings of fatly acids attached to a sugar molecule. Triglycerides are also known as very low-density lipoprotcins (VLDL) which, along with lowdensity lipoproteins (LDL), make up the "bad" cholesterol in the blood. Recent research has shown that these are the blood fats that cause the most damage to the circulatory system. Triglycerides have two main functions in the body; they're the major source of energy from fat, and they're the most imponant way of storing energy. "Just as we get fat under the layers of our skin and in our bodies, wc can have fat in our blood," and Don Manncrbcrg, M.D. in his book, "Aerobic Nutrition." "The main cause of an abnormally high iriglyceridc level is excessive i ntake o f carbchyd raics and alcohol," said Minneapolis internist, Douglas A. Godfrey, M.D. Excess consumption ofboth simple and complex carbohydrates tend toelevate triglycerides levels. Trigiyceride blood levels can also vary widely depending on recent food intake. For example, levels can rise dramatically and stay high for hours after a meal that's high in saturated fats. "Studies have shown that trigiyceride levels rise by as much as 120 points after a typical American meal of 40 percent fat, and stay elevated fora long as nine hours," said Dr. Mannctberg. Most physicians agree that a normal trigiyceride level ranges from 85 up to 250 mg/dl. Mildly to moderately elevated levels are between 250 to 500 mg/dl, and dangerously high levels are 500 mg/dl and above. "Recent studies have indicated that regardless of diet or weight loss, aerobic exercise reduces levels of fat in the blood stream and may help prevent heart disease," said Diane DeMarco, executive director of the Twin Qtics-based institute. Exerci.se reduces triglycerides According to Kenneth H. Cooper, M.D., M.P.H., there are three main steps in controlling triglycerides. First, lose weight. Abnormal triglycerides tend to be related to increases in body weight, particularly body fat. Second, reduce the carbohydrates in your diet. Third, get started on an aerobic exercise program. Triglycerides respond positively to physical conditioning—especially endurance exercises, such as walking, jogging, swimming and cross-countiy skiing. The military in the drug war—truly a valid mission When Congress last year appropriated $308 million for miUtary assistance to civilian drug intervention efforts, there was no intent to have the 82nd Airborne Division patrol the i)ack streets of America with fixed bayonets. What the legislators sought was to expand the authority of the Armed Forces to support and assist civihan lawenforcement agencies in fighting the importation of illegal drugs into the United States. For the most part, there wasn't anything leally new in that le;,^islation. Over the last several years, Congress has gradually approved a step-by-step increase in military participation in drug intervention activities—almost invariably with the stipulation that there should be no diminution or the primary missions uf the military services. Such activities as using som' naval ve.ssels to back up the Coast Guard's Caribbean patrols, volunteer National Guardsmen searching trucks crossing the Mexican border, using reconnaisance and tracking aircraft to patrol the southMTi skies, and a whole range of intelligence and surveillance activities, are assignments that are well within the capabilities of trained soldiers, sailors, marines and airmen. Those kinds of assignments when c&rried out in close coordination with the Coast Guard, U.S. Customs Service, Drug Enforcement Administration and civilian law enforcement agencies, can help iaise the ante on the illegal imi)ort to drugs without putting the mihtary in the position of directly enforcing civihan laws. Of the $308 milhon voted last fall for military assistance to the anti-drug effort, over $40 million will be alloted to the National Guard for its use in aiding state law enforcement officials to detect and dstroy sources of illegal drugs. Another large portion of the Defense Department funds ($130 million) will be used to establish balloon-mounted radar screen across the Southern U.S. from CaUfornia to the East coast of Florida. There are many addi tional ways to use the valuable resources < if the Armed Forces t o combat t he scourge of drugs v^fitbout their direct mvolvement in law enforcement and without detracting from military readiness The issue is so crucial that it demands the very best efforts of us all. Day Care from Page 41 organizations such as the Kiwanjis Club of Henderson, facilities Were constructed at moderate cost, and thus allowing the expansion ofcare at the center. Other physical changes during die past year, under the leadership of Director Dariene Nassau, have made the facility more conducive in caring forthe handicapped. For persons who are caregivers for physically or mentally disabled persons over the age of i 8 years, day care m ay be the answer for that person's needs, as opposed to institutional custody, spokespersons said. ; The cost for Day Care is far less than long-tenn nursing care fni, in some cases, assistance may be available to help with the cost of such care. Trained nursing personnel arc on staff from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday, except holidays. Hot lunches and siucks are served. There is a fiill program of social activity, including field trips, adapted to the level of the client's ability to paiticipate. For more infomriation, call 565-9578 and ask for"DayCarc." The trained personnel at the Center will be glad to answer any questions or arrange for a visit to discuss any special requirements for a dependent family member who may be in need of a supervised environment during the day. Extra energy that's not used by Uie body is transformed into triglycerides. 'XjeneraUy, if in individual exercises, they bum more calories and m tiun this contributes to reducing their trigiyceride levd," explakwd Dr. Godfrey. Highcaloriebumingexetcises, such as cross-ooontry sldii^ can be especially effective. NoidicTrack, the in-home exerciser that simulates the motion of ODSScountry skiing (which experts agree is the world's best aerotnc exercise), is becoming popular because it burru more calmies than other in-home exercisers. In a test conducted at the Oregon Health Sciences University, Human Perfornimoe LaboraKuy, NordicTrack test subjects burned 1,100 calories per hour. One of the reasons it's so efficient is that itexercises all of thebody'smajor muscle groups—arms, shoulders, legs, buttocks, and abdomea According to a new study conducted by Dr. Jan Bneslow of Rockefeller University in New York, exerx:ise increases the activity of the lipoprotein lipase enzyme, which breaks down triglycerides in tiie bloodstream. "Check widi your physidm before startit^ on an exeidse program to reduce trigiyceride levels," said DeMarco. The purpose of The National Exercise For Life Institute is to collect and disseminate information about the many benefits of regular aeit^NC exercise, in order to convince more Americans to start and maintain a personal exercise program. For more information on the benefits of regular aerobic exercise, call The National Exercise For Life Institute, 612/448-3094 or write Box I, Chaska, MN 55318. Desert Research Institute (DRI)microbiologist Dr. Robert Wliarton is featured in the suoimer issue of the national maganne EHacover for his research in Antarctica that seeks to establish the possibility of life on early Mars. la the 19608 the interior of Antarctica was declared — like the planet Mars — a lifeless Hoe. But scientists have since discovered a rich array of organisms tuched away in isobtted habitats. In a decade-long study of Lake Hoare, located in a moimtamous region 800 miles from the souh Pole, DRTs Dr. Wharton has found Ufe at the bottom of that perpetually ioe-covered lake. Wharton is ciurently studying that ecosystem with an eye. toward directing future Mars expeditions to areas of the planet where hfe may have clung in its early planetary history. Early Mars — some four and a half billion years ago — was considerably warmer and wetter with environmental conditions similar to those of early Earth. Beneath Lake Hoare's 20foot ice crust, Wharton has discovered microbial mats — thin blankets of Uving microorganisms that are pigmented green, red and purple to catch the limited Ught that filters through the ice. These microbial mats are built by the same type of microorganism that formed stromatolies, the oldest fossils on Earth formed as long as 3.5 billion years ago. "It's a fairly advance missing words you davaiop from step No. 3 below. e PRINT NUMBERED LETTERS IN THESE SQUARES UNSCRAMBLE LETTERS TO GET ANSWER lHa*toB,k> ANSWERS aadVOSa.. vq Pinoa eg II pe)|s eq 'XiaiijOd seAiieiej Xiiapie MI|M ino Ou|U|p eiiuM pejoq se/w iaieOunoA y a3dV0S3 — pumag — iAON — lianjQ — puad3 m^UU BCJEJ uuuu UtJlJLi UQE] UULiU LJEIEJB GBDEJBUkiU yUU dUQ liiUUQB uyLiu ubu uuuucj QQB you tuQD DBEi Dooaa E9QB QDQQ GARFIELD by Jim Davis PEANUTS by Charles U. Schuiz J

PAGE 42

mm Pft 42, HMMIWMA Home News, Boakler Qtgr Nin, Giwa VaDqr fhmm Thnnday, August 10,1969 Thnnday, Auguat 10, 1989 H Exercise can help reduce unhealthy trigiyceride levels ()R| Scientist featured jfi national magazlne Besides dietary changes and weight loss, regular aerobic exercise is one of the most effective ways to lower dangerous levels of triglycerides (one of the blood fats), according to The National Exercise For Life Institute, "New data shows that triglycerides are an independent risk factor for heart disease," said William Casielli, M.D., director of the Framingham Heart Study. "Anyone who has high blood lipids—cholesterol or triglycerides—should be considered a high-risk coronary patient." Triglycerides are lipids orfatty molecules, the largest of the blood's oily particles. Formed in the liver from the fats you eat, or from your body's synthesis of intemal fat, they're composed of three long strings of fatly acids attached to a sugar molecule. Triglycerides are also known as very low-density lipoprotcins (VLDL) which, along with lowdensity lipoproteins (LDL), make up the "bad" cholesterol in the blood. Recent research has shown that these are the blood fats that cause the most damage to the circulatory system. Triglycerides have two main functions in the body; they're the major source of energy from fat, and they're the most imponant way of storing energy. "Just as we get fat under the layers of our skin and in our bodies, wc can have fat in our blood," and Don Manncrbcrg, M.D. in his book, "Aerobic Nutrition." "The main cause of an abnormally high iriglyceridc level is excessive i ntake o f carbchyd raics and alcohol," said Minneapolis internist, Douglas A. Godfrey, M.D. Excess consumption ofboth simple and complex carbohydrates tend toelevate triglycerides levels. Trigiyceride blood levels can also vary widely depending on recent food intake. For example, levels can rise dramatically and stay high for hours after a meal that's high in saturated fats. "Studies have shown that trigiyceride levels rise by as much as 120 points after a typical American meal of 40 percent fat, and stay elevated fora long as nine hours," said Dr. Mannctberg. Most physicians agree that a normal trigiyceride level ranges from 85 up to 250 mg/dl. Mildly to moderately elevated levels are between 250 to 500 mg/dl, and dangerously high levels are 500 mg/dl and above. "Recent studies have indicated that regardless of diet or weight loss, aerobic exercise reduces levels of fat in the blood stream and may help prevent heart disease," said Diane DeMarco, executive director of the Twin Qtics-based institute. Exerci.se reduces triglycerides According to Kenneth H. Cooper, M.D., M.P.H., there are three main steps in controlling triglycerides. First, lose weight. Abnormal triglycerides tend to be related to increases in body weight, particularly body fat. Second, reduce the carbohydrates in your diet. Third, get started on an aerobic exercise program. Triglycerides respond positively to physical conditioning—especially endurance exercises, such as walking, jogging, swimming and cross-countiy skiing. The military in the drug war—truly a valid mission When Congress last year appropriated $308 million for miUtary assistance to civilian drug intervention efforts, there was no intent to have the 82nd Airborne Division patrol the i)ack streets of America with fixed bayonets. What the legislators sought was to expand the authority of the Armed Forces to support and assist civihan lawenforcement agencies in fighting the importation of illegal drugs into the United States. For the most part, there wasn't anything leally new in that le;,^islation. Over the last several years, Congress has gradually approved a step-by-step increase in military participation in drug intervention activities—almost invariably with the stipulation that there should be no diminution or the primary missions uf the military services. Such activities as using som' naval ve.ssels to back up the Coast Guard's Caribbean patrols, volunteer National Guardsmen searching trucks crossing the Mexican border, using reconnaisance and tracking aircraft to patrol the southMTi skies, and a whole range of intelligence and surveillance activities, are assignments that are well within the capabilities of trained soldiers, sailors, marines and airmen. Those kinds of assignments when c&rried out in close coordination with the Coast Guard, U.S. Customs Service, Drug Enforcement Administration and civilian law enforcement agencies, can help iaise the ante on the illegal imi)ort to drugs without putting the mihtary in the position of directly enforcing civihan laws. Of the $308 milhon voted last fall for military assistance to the anti-drug effort, over $40 million will be alloted to the National Guard for its use in aiding state law enforcement officials to detect and dstroy sources of illegal drugs. Another large portion of the Defense Department funds ($130 million) will be used to establish balloon-mounted radar screen across the Southern U.S. from CaUfornia to the East coast of Florida. There are many addi tional ways to use the valuable resources < if the Armed Forces t o combat t he scourge of drugs v^fitbout their direct mvolvement in law enforcement and without detracting from military readiness The issue is so crucial that it demands the very best efforts of us all. Day Care from Page 41 organizations such as the Kiwanjis Club of Henderson, facilities Were constructed at moderate cost, and thus allowing the expansion ofcare at the center. Other physical changes during die past year, under the leadership of Director Dariene Nassau, have made the facility more conducive in caring forthe handicapped. For persons who are caregivers for physically or mentally disabled persons over the age of i 8 years, day care m ay be the answer for that person's needs, as opposed to institutional custody, spokespersons said. ; The cost for Day Care is far less than long-tenn nursing care fni, in some cases, assistance may be available to help with the cost of such care. Trained nursing personnel arc on staff from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday, except holidays. Hot lunches and siucks are served. There is a fiill program of social activity, including field trips, adapted to the level of the client's ability to paiticipate. For more infomriation, call 565-9578 and ask for"DayCarc." The trained personnel at the Center will be glad to answer any questions or arrange for a visit to discuss any special requirements for a dependent family member who may be in need of a supervised environment during the day. Extra energy that's not used by Uie body is transformed into triglycerides. 'XjeneraUy, if in individual exercises, they bum more calories and m tiun this contributes to reducing their trigiyceride levd," explakwd Dr. Godfrey. Highcaloriebumingexetcises, such as cross-ooontry sldii^ can be especially effective. NoidicTrack, the in-home exerciser that simulates the motion of ODSScountry skiing (which experts agree is the world's best aerotnc exercise), is becoming popular because it burru more calmies than other in-home exercisers. In a test conducted at the Oregon Health Sciences University, Human Perfornimoe LaboraKuy, NordicTrack test subjects burned 1,100 calories per hour. One of the reasons it's so efficient is that itexercises all of thebody'smajor muscle groups—arms, shoulders, legs, buttocks, and abdomea According to a new study conducted by Dr. Jan Bneslow of Rockefeller University in New York, exerx:ise increases the activity of the lipoprotein lipase enzyme, which breaks down triglycerides in tiie bloodstream. "Check widi your physidm before startit^ on an exeidse program to reduce trigiyceride levels," said DeMarco. The purpose of The National Exercise For Life Institute is to collect and disseminate information about the many benefits of regular aeit^NC exercise, in order to convince more Americans to start and maintain a personal exercise program. For more information on the benefits of regular aerobic exercise, call The National Exercise For Life Institute, 612/448-3094 or write Box I, Chaska, MN 55318. Desert Research Institute (DRI)microbiologist Dr. Robert Wliarton is featured in the suoimer issue of the national maganne EHacover for his research in Antarctica that seeks to establish the possibility of life on early Mars. la the 19608 the interior of Antarctica was declared — like the planet Mars — a lifeless Hoe. But scientists have since discovered a rich array of organisms tuched away in isobtted habitats. In a decade-long study of Lake Hoare, located in a moimtamous region 800 miles from the souh Pole, DRTs Dr. Wharton has found Ufe at the bottom of that perpetually ioe-covered lake. Wharton is ciurently studying that ecosystem with an eye. toward directing future Mars expeditions to areas of the planet where hfe may have clung in its early planetary history. Early Mars — some four and a half billion years ago — was considerably warmer and wetter with environmental conditions similar to those of early Earth. Beneath Lake Hoare's 20foot ice crust, Wharton has discovered microbial mats — thin blankets of Uving microorganisms that are pigmented green, red and purple to catch the limited Ught that filters through the ice. These microbial mats are built by the same type of microorganism that formed stromatolies, the oldest fossils on Earth formed as long as 3.5 billion years ago. "It's a fairly advance missing words you davaiop from step No. 3 below. e PRINT NUMBERED LETTERS IN THESE SQUARES UNSCRAMBLE LETTERS TO GET ANSWER lHa*toB,k> ANSWERS aadVOSa.. vq Pinoa eg II pe)|s eq 'XiaiijOd seAiieiej Xiiapie MI|M ino Ou|U|p eiiuM pejoq se/w iaieOunoA y a3dV0S3 — pumag — iAON — lianjQ — puad3 m^UU BCJEJ uuuu UtJlJLi UQE] UULiU LJEIEJB GBDEJBUkiU yUU dUQ liiUUQB uyLiu ubu uuuucj QQB you tuQD DBEi Dooaa E9QB QDQQ GARFIELD by Jim Davis PEANUTS by Charles U. Schuiz J

PAGE 43

Pat 44, HMIM HOB* News. Bouldw Oty Ntwt. Onm Valkgr News For the third sucoessi ve year, employees of Titanium Metals Corp. took part in a Health Fair, a joint program between the company and St. Rose Dominican Hospital. Workers from all TIMET departments underwent preventative health maintenance checkups to insure, according to company spokespersons, "good health in the years ahead." St. Rose health experts in a wide variety of disciplines tested and counseled participants in TIMET's "Well Awareness Program," a project that has its goal the promotion TIMET, St. Rose Hospital team up for third annual Health Fair TkvMUqr. Amgtui 10,1969 HM Nm, BoM City Nwt, GNM Vilky Hmn Pl* 41 of wellness among employees and their families. TIMET officials explained the program awards points to employees who record healthful practices and exercises they do on a regular basis. Those that participated in the Health Fair—more than 230 in all-earned 500 life points, plus a commemorative cap and a shirt. Coordinators reported they ran out of shirts because of the response. Company officials said that additional shirts have been ordered and more Well Awareness Program prizes will be forthcoming. TAKING PART-Employees attending the third annual Health Fair, a joint project of Titanium Metals Corp. and St. Rose Dominican Hospital, stand in line for their turn at the event's next health check station. More than 230 workers took part in the event, which TIMET has called its Well Awareness Program. Paul Caballero, a Henderson Technical Laboratory technician with TIMET, checks into the program. Norm Gelger of TIMET security signs up for the Well Jim Allen of TIMET's melt shop has a sample of his blood Awareness Program. taken. Bob Eckel, a TIMET painter, discusses his health record with a technician. TIMET Purchasing Manager Margaret Bolding waits to have her Well Awareness record reviewed. the dream that won't come true... Sponge Plant Foreman Ron English undergoes an eye examinstioii. TIMET Photos Hundreds of needy youngsters are waiting word that they can go to camp in August. But the SUN Camp Fund hasn't met its goal of $100,000. That means disappointment for some disadvantaged or handicapped t>oys and girls. THEY NEED YOUR HELP Please Join others who hove bestowed o bit of happiness for a child, by donating to the SUN Camp Fund today. sm Here is my contribution to SUN Camp Fund to help needy"' ,1 and handicapped boys and girls go to summer camp. I •^ I Name ^ | -'I Address .__ | m. I Please list my gift in the SUN as follows Anonymous D Donations are tax daductiMa. Your entira'gift goes directly to help a needy I child. Operating sxpinses of the fund are absort>d by the Lu Vegas SUN. I iMaltCf SUN CMnphM4 FA lox 4275, LMVefM, 80127 Legal Notices PUBLISHED: August 10, 1989 HENDERSON HOME NEWS AGENDA Tuesday, August 15, 1989 6:46 P.M. COMMITTEE MEETING COUNCIL CHAMBER HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL 243 WATER STREET I CALL TO ORDER li. CONFIRMATION OF POSTING. ROLL CALL III. ACCEPTANCE OF AGENDA IV. ITEMS OF BUSINESS: 1. BILL NO. 732 Z-21-89 BAGLEY, MELVIN-AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE NO. 404 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY UMITS OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 33; TOWNSHIP 21 SOUTH. RANGE 63 EAST. M.D.B. & M.. CLARK COUNTY. NEVADA. FROM R-R (RURAL RESIDENCE) DISTRICT TO RS^ (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL) DISTRICT. V. ADJOURNMENT. AGENDA ITEMS RECEIVED AFTER UKIOON TUESDAY. AUGUST 8. 1989 WILL NOT BE SEEN ON THE AGENDA AS PUBLISHED. BUT MAY APPEAR ON THE AGENDA AS ADDED ITEMS OR ADDENDA. AGENDA Tuesday. August 15, 1989 7:00 P.M. REGULAR MEETING COUNCIL CHAMBER HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL 243 WATER STREET I CALL TO ORDER li. CONFIRMATION OF POSTING. ROLL CALL. INVOCATION. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE III. ACCEPTANCE OF AGENDA IV. PRESENTATION-TWENTY YEAR SERVICE AWARDS V. CONSENT AGENDA-Mayor Kesterson to introduce the Consent Agenda offering anyone present an opportunity to remove any items for discussion. 1. CASH REQUIREMENTS REGISTER. 2. MINUTES-Committee and Regular MeeUng of ^une 20, 1989. 3. APPROVAL of HUD Agreement. 4. WATER MAIN OVERSIZING AGREEMENT-PIaster Development. 5.REV0CABLE PERMIT for reconstruction of sidewalk on Southwest comer of Green Valley Parlcway and Sunset. 6. PAVEMENT CUT—Jessup Road. 7. PERSONNEL-Approve job description and wage schedule for "Utility Planning Elngineer." 8. PERSONNEL-Amcnd staff complement-Public Works. 9. PERSONNEL-Amend staff complement-City Attorney's Office. 10. PETITION TO VACATE-Portioa of aUey behind Silver Spur Casino. 11. PETITION TO VACATE a portion of Green Valley Parkway, from Ramrod north to Duck Creek. 12. AUTHORIZATION TO GO TO BID for replacement ambnlance. 13. AUTHORIZATION TO GO TO BID for FY 88-90 budget approved vehicles. 14. AUTHORIZATION TO GO TO BIO-Lorin L. Williams Pool. 15. PERMISSION to auction old vehicles and equipment. 16. DISBRUSEMENT OF CDBG FUNDS for Deferred Payment Loaa No. HRF 5-894I1. 17. BUDGET AUGMENTATION for goods and sviees—FY 89-90. 18. PERSONNEL-Amend staff complement-City Clerk's Office. 19. TRANSFER OF FUNDS-City Clerk's Office. 20. AWAROOFCONTRACTNO. 889*42 for Gibson Road/HoriBon Drive Interconnect to lowest, respoaaible Bidder. 21. APPLICA'nON froB Eleuteria. Gloria and Laora Flores for Service Bar Liquor Ltoewe, dba C^aaa Flores II. 22. APPLICATION from Soiy M. Abwijian for additional to ROMAC,' Inc., dba Pawnabopa I and II. PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDATIONS-AUGUST 1 igeo-iTiais 2S-27 2S. ZrlMfl ARROYO GRANDE DEVELOPMENT-Requeat from Ar^: royo Orude Devekipment Co.. for ExtMsioa of Time of TttiaitatiuM of Legal Moflces latent No. 1249 for Zone Change from RR (Rural Reaideaco) Diatriet. a portlaa of whleh waa Mmed TE (Trailer EaUtoa ResidaMe) Diatriet by RMohrtioa of iMaat No. 1117, to R4 (Lbnited MaM-ReakhMe), R-4 (Apartmaat RerfdsMe). and 0-1 (Linitad/Nelfkborfaood Commercial) Dtatricta, to parmk the devalofUBeat of rMidaatial aad neighborhood commercial • aaa oa 37.4 acno naoft or bsa, geaarally located northwest of Arroyo Oraada Blvd. aad WladmUl Laaa. (First sxteaaioa). 34. V-ft JENKINS. DENNIS A JUUE-Raqaeat fimn Deaais aad Julie JoaUaa for a Variaace to raduee the raar yard setback from 10 feet to I foat for the purpose of coastruetiag a patio cover in aa R-1 (Oaa Family B sa i daaas ) Dlatikt, geaarally located eouth of Tamarack Dr. betweaa SkyHaa Road aad W. Padfic Aveaue. 25. TM-22 U.S. HOME CORP.-Raqueat from U.S. Home Corp. for Taatativ* Map Review of RIVER MOUNTAIN RIDGE coaaiaUng of 66 lata OB 19.7 aeraa more or laaa la aa R-1 (One Faadly Residence) District by Rooolttthia of Intaat No. 1238, aad R-2 (Two Family Reaidence) OUtrict by Raaolatioa of latent No. 961, gaaerally located aorthwest of Raoatraek Rd. aad the Drake Flood Control Chaanel. 26. TM-2S BAGLEY, MELVIN J.-Requeat from Melvia J. Bagtoy for Teatative Mtp Review of CALICO TERRACE coasistiag of 101 htta OB 27 acres more or laas la a propoaad RS4 (Siagle Faadly Raaidaatial) Diatriet, generally located aorthweat of East Lake Mead Drive. 27. TM-2M9 MCDONIEL. ESTES JOANN-Reqneat1rom Bates M. k JoAaa McDoniel for TenUtive Map Review of LATIGO RANCHES coaalat lB g of 10 lots 00 6 acree more or leaa in aa RE (Raaeh Eatates) District, geaerally located northeast of Boulder Hwy. and Wagoawheal Dr. betweaa Roaa Rd. aad Pinto Road. 28. FINAL MAP/THE BLUFFS (AMENDED)-7 kita total of 384 lota OB 81 acroa more or lass-FM-28l. 29. FINAL MAP/PARKSIDE PARCEL H. PHASE 1,19 h>ts oa 4.319 acres more or less—FM-35^. 30. FINAL MAP/PARKSIDE PARCEL H, PHASE 2,19 tots oa 3.877 aeraa more or leaa-FM-3649. 31. FINAL MAP/PARKSIDE PARCEL H. PHASE 3. 20 lots oa 4.060 acres more or laaa—FM-37-88. 32. FINAL MAP/PARKSIDE PARCEL H. PHASE 4. 20 Iota oa 4.015 acres more or leea—FM-38-89. VI. CITIZEN'S CONCERNS: Itema diacosaed caaaot be acted upon at this meetiag, but can be referred by Couadl to the next Regular Meetiag for coaaideratioB. VII. UNFINISHED BUSINESS: 1. REPORT/DISCUSSION/ACTION-aty Hall. 2. REQUEST from Robert J. Glaaabuni for a Zoae Change (Z-18-89) from RE (Raach Estates) District to CN (Nsighborhood Commercial) District to coastract profsaahMul of fleas on 16,9M sq. ft. (.366 acres more or less), generally located northeast of Horiwa Drive and Pacific Aveaue. (NOTE: PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDS DENIAL). 3. REQUEST from Robert J. Olaasbnra for Architectural Review (AR-39^ of propoeed profeaaioaal offices on 15.956 sq. ft. (.366 acrea more or Isaa) hi a proposed CN (Neighbarhood Commercial) District, geaarally located aorthaast of Horisoa Drive and Padfic Aveaue. (NOTE: PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDS DENIAL). 4. PETITION FOR ANNEXATION-Las Vegas Buildiag Materiala. IBC. (RECOMMENDATION: ACCEPT PETITION; REFER TO DEVELOPMENT SERVICES FOR REVIEW; SET PUBLIC HEARING FOR SEPTEMBER 19. 1989. 5. REVIEW/ACTION-Land Sale-48 acres more or less located oa the coraer of Heather Drive and College Drive. 6. AWARD OF CONTRACT NO. 88^*26 for Wastewater Treatment Plant Third Train Lagoon Expaasioa to lowest, reapoasible bidder. 7. BILL NO. 732 Z-21^ BAGLEY. MELVIN-AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE NO. 404 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY UMITS OF HENDERSON. DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 33. TOWNSHIP 21 SOUTH, RANGE 63 EAST, MJ>3 & M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM R-R (RURAL RESIDENCE) DISTRICT TO ESS (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL) DISTRICT. (FINAL ACTION). VIII NEW BUSINESS' 1. DISCUSSION/ACTION-Donation of vehiclee to Clark Country Traffic School. 2. RESOLUTION THE AMERICAN FLAO-A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY HENDERSON EXPRE8SIN0S ITS SUPPORT OF THE WOMEN'S AUXILIARY OF THE VETERANS OF FOREIGN WARS IN THEIR CAMPAIGN TO PREVAIL UPON THE CONGRESS TO ENACT LEGISLATION PROHIBITING THE DESECRATION OF THE AMERICAN FLAG, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO. 3. RESOLUTION AD VALOREM TAX INCREASE-A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA. REQUESTING THAT THE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION OF THE STATE OF NEVADA INCLUDE THE ALLOWED AD VALOREM INCREASE. PURSUANT TO NRS 354.5967, IN THE BASIS FOR THE CALCULATION OF THE ALLOWED REVENUE FROM TAXES AD VALOREM IN ALL FUTURE YEARS. 4. BILL NO. 733 8-1-89 REFUNDING BOND ORDINANCE-AN ORDINANCE DESIGNATED AS THE '8-1-89 REFUNDING BOND ORDINANCE"; PROVIDING FOR THE ISSUANCE BY THE CITY OF HENDERSON, IN CLARK COUNTY. NEVADA OF ITS FULLY REGISTERED GENERAL OBLIGATION (LIMITED TAX) FLOOD CONTROL REFUNDING BONDS. SERIES AUGUST. 1969 IN VARIOUS DENOMINATIONS; PROVIDING THAT THE BONDS MAY BE EVIDENCED BY SERIAL REGISTERED BONDS OR BY A SINGLE REGISTERED BOND; STATING THE PURPOSE FOR WHICH THE BONDS ARE ISSUED TO REFUND. PAY AND DISCHARGE A PORTION OF THE CmrS GENERAL OBUQATION (LIMITED TAX) FLOOD CONTROL BONDS, SERIES MARCH 1,1985; PROVIDING THE FORMS. TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF THE BONDS. THE MANNER AND TERMS OF THEIR ISSUANCE. THE MANNER OF THEIR EXECUTION. THE METHOD OF PAYING THEM. THE SECURITY THEREFOR AND PROVIDING FOR THE SALE THEREOF TO THE MUNICIPAL BOND BANK OF THE STATE OF NEVADA; PROVIDING FOR THE LEVY AND COLLECTION OF ANNUAL GENERAL (AD VALOREM) TAXES FOR THE PAYMENT OF THE BONDS; PROVIDING OTHER DETAILS CONCERNING THE BONDS; RATIFYING ACTION PREVIOUSLY TAKEN BY THE CITY AND ITS OFFICERS: AND BY DECLARING THAT THIS ORDINANCE PERTAINS TO THE SALE. ISSUANCE AND PAYMENT OF THE BONDS, PROVIDINO FOR ITS ADOPTION AS IF AN EMERGENCY EXISTS. (FINAL ACTION). 5. BILL NO. 734 ANNEX S.36. T.21S R.61E-AN ORDINANCE EXTENDING THE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON BY ANNEXING THERETO THAT PORTION OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 21 SOUTH, RANGE 61 EAST. M J.M.. IN THE COUNTY OF CLARK STATE OF NEVADA. CONTAINING 202J9 ACRES. MORE OR LESS. AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. (REFER TO COMMITTEE). IX SET COMMITTEE MEETING X. ADJOURNMENT. Agenda Deadline AH itaau for iaduaioa on the Couadl Ageada for the Meetiag of September 5. 1069 amst be submitted, in writing, BO later thaa Thuraday, August 2i 1989 at 4.-00 P.M. to the City aerk's Offioa. fsedvad after the above dato will antoaiatkally be plaead on the next City Couadl Agaada. Aar Feelin Fit! Do aot add bakiag aoda to own VBgatablaa to praithdreolor. This will I to loaa aasiBtiai I aad vitanin C. AGENDA CITY COUNCIL SPECIAL MEETING COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY HALL 90O ARIZONA STREET BOULDER CITY, NEVADA 88006 TUESDAY, AUGUST 15,198-7HI0 A.M. 1. REVIEW OF BOULDER CITY AIRPORT FIXED BASE OPERATOR CONTRACT WITH R.FJJif.C.. INC.: 1 INTRODUCTION OF BILL NO. M6 ENTERING INTO A LEASE AGREEMENT FOR A FIXED BASE OPERATOR AT THE BOULDER CITY AIRPORT: BBPORB IHE PUBUC SERVICE COMMISSION OPNIVADA NOTICE or TARIFF riUNO A tariff fliiag, idnitined as DodMt No. S-7B, hM bMa flM with the Public Swie Onm^edoa of Nevada rCoo• isdoa") by SoathwMt Gas Corporatioa r'SouthwMt"). The tariff eeaalate of rvlsiooa to iU NavMia Gai Tariff No. 6, reflectiag ehaagee ID cempUaacc wHh the Cmtomtr'e BID of RlghU (Docket No. 84411). Tho rovlMd tariff WM fllad purmiaot to NAG 703 JW et Mti. The parpoao of tho flUag la to eoeaply with tho CnotOBMr'o BUI of Righto Mioptod by the CoaiBiloeloa oa Jaauary 5, 1908. Soatkwaot has iadodod aa ladoz which eroso retw aaooe tho • arieM ooctioaa of tho CeoteoMr'i BiU of RighU to tho tariff reviaioas mode by Sonthwoet la compHaaeo with suck BIU of RighU. A more dotaJM doacriptioB of tho prapoaod revlaioBa oro ooataiaod la tho Advko Lottar aad tariff ohoets. TUa motwfal la on fib and avrilaUo for vlewfa by thopahlkat tho afflcoo of tho Commloelnn, 727 Pairvlow Drive, Carooa City. Nevada 80710 oad the Alox•ader Daweoa Building, 404S S. Spencer. SaiU A-44. Los Vegas. Nevada NISS-MO. latoreatod aad affected par ties auy eooiBNat ia writing aad file approfriato PrateeU aad/or PotitieM for Loeve to iotervoao ot eithv of the CentndesioB'o offlceo oa or before Wodaooday, Aagoat 23,196B. By the Coaamieeian. WILUAM H. VANCE. Commleeloa Secretary Dated: Careon City, Nevada I8BAU HAug. 10.1969 BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA NOTICE OF TARIFF FILING A tariff filiag,idontifledM Docket No. flO-749. haa bMo filed with the Public Service Ce ma t le rioa of Nevada f'Commissioa") by Ray ft Roee Transport, Inc. Tho fiUiv coiMifU of the 6th Revised Pago 4 to Charter aad SpMJal Sorvicoe Tariff No. 1, P.S.C.N. No. 7, iacreooiag Charter Servleoo Mileage Ratea. both Live aad Deadhead Miles, to 11.87 per mile; Inereeeing the S-Hour Mlaimum Fore from $160.00 to 1170.00; aad faicroasing the charge for Each Additional Hoar from 136.00 to S39.60. The rovleed tariff was filed punaaat to NRS 706.321 aad NRS TOILSZI HM rate iacMaoe bocootoe effective Auguet 18, 1969. The revised tariff is oa file and available for Wowing by tho pahUc at the of fioee of the Commieelea, 727 Fairriew Drive. Carooa City, Nevada 89710 and the Alozendor Daweoa Buildiag, 4046 South Sponeer, Sulto A-44, Lae Vagoo, Nevada 88158-3920. Any protect agoiaat the revieed tariff mut be filed with the Commiaeion at ite of • fieoo oa or before Wodaeeday, Aagust 2S, 1960. Tho protaet mnot allege foeta enffident to Bupport a finding that the revised tariffs wooU violate thaprovleioasorNR8708.15L By the Coauniedon, WILLIAM H. VANCE, Coaualsaion Secretary Dated: Caraoa City. Nevada (SEAU HAug. 10. 1969 BEFORE THE PUBLIC SiaiVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA la Re laveetigatloo of the Ac4 ddeat at Nevada Power Ccoi-) paay's Mohavo Qeaeratiagl BtotloB. Docket No. 88402 NOTICEOFPREHEARING CONFERENCE Pursuant to Nevada AdmlaUtrativo Code CNAC") 703465, tho preakUag officer, oa her own aiotion, has oehodaled a prehooriag conf ereaeo for all partlea of roeord ia this docket lor the parpoee of eetobliahlag a proeedural eehedule. and aeeoanpliahlBg any ether puipoaod aatheriied by NAC 703.686, rogordiag Phaoo II of the procoodlnge, aamolywlMahonUpay tito naaaticipatod fuel eooto aaeodatod with the Mohavo Goaerating Stotioo outage tlroaa Jaae to Decomlier of 1966. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the prohaariag wlU be heU la Docket No. 86 ee foUowa: TUESDAY, AUGUST tt, 1909 lOAOajB. PabBe Sorvloe Commioaloa Alozaadsr Daweoa BaiUUng 4045 South Spoaeer Street SaltoA-44 Loo Vegaa, Nevada I0IS8 Docket No. 86403 is oatOe aad available for pahUc view faig at the of fleea af tho Coei• i idia at 717 Palrvlew Drlvo, Coraea City. Nevada 80710 aad at tho Alasaader Daweoa BuOdiag, 4046 Sauth keacer Street, Sulto A-44. Lea Vegas. Nevada 60168. By the Commloaioa. WILUAlf H. VANCE. Ce m ari eel e a Seere t ar y DATED: Carooa City." iiCALl HAi^. 10.10 • k-kir BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OP NEVADA la tho Matter of the Tariff F1H fam by Ceatral Telepheai Com- pony of Nevoda reflecting re-l vWooo to ite Goaerol Cuat) mer Serricee Tariff ia eonH phaace with the Cemmleelow'e) CoBBamer BiU of Rights. Ad^ vice Letter No. 167. ) Docket No. 8IM68 NOTICE OF HEARING Central TeiephoaeCanpaay of Nevada fCeatrol") hoe lUed Advica Letter No. 1S7 with the PabHc Service ConmlaaioB of Nevada T'CommieekM"). The tariff flHag leflecte rcvirioaa to Ccntrol'e General Cuotomer Service Tariff wUch wwe made in conpUance with the Commieoion'a Coneumer Bill of Righte. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing ia thio matter will eommence ao follows: THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14.1969 10K)0a.m. Offlceo of the Public Service Commieeioa Alexander Daweoa BaiUhig 4046 Sooth Spencer. Suite A-44 Loa Vegoo, Nevada 80188 whea and where the Coaunia• ioB will recelva evldeaee per tfaient to thie matter. The tariff woe filed pnrauant to Nevada Adminietrative Code fNAC") 703 J86. Fnrthermore, tlM Cam-• misiioa has legal authority and juriediction to hold e haariog in this matter purcuant to Nevada Revieed Statntoe r'NRS"! 704.110. The materials reteted to tliie doekM are on flie with tho Cooamiasion and may be viewed by the public at dthor of the offloM of the Public Service Comniaaion, 727 Fairview Drive, CorwH Qty, Nevada 80710 and tlie Alexander Daweon Building, 404S South Spencer, Suite A-44. Loa Vegao, Nevada 89158. By the CommiaaioB, WILLIAM H. VANCE Commiaaion Secretary Dated: Caraoo Oty, Nevada (SEAU H-Ang. 10, 1989 DISTRICT COURT CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA CARMEN A. BEECHER. Phdatiff. -vaJAMES 0. BEECHER, Defoadoat. Coaa No. D118701 Dopt. No. Ill DockH No. E SUMMONS NOTICEI YOU HAVE BEEN SUED. THE COURT MAY DECIDE AGAINST YOU WITHOUT YOUR BEING HEARD UNUBSS YOU RESPOND WITHIN 20 DAYS. READ THE INFORMATION BELOW. TO THE DEFENDANT: A dvil Complalat hoe heea fllod by the pfarintifr i^aiast yon for the relief eet forth in tlio Complaint. THIS IS AN ACTION TO DISSOLVE THE BONDS OP MATRIMONY EXISTING BETWEEN YOU AND THE PLAINTIFF. 1. If you intend to defend thia bwanit, witliin 20 dayo after thia Summona ia aerved on you exduaive of the day of aervice, you moat do the foUowiag: a. File with the Clerk of this Court, whoee eddrsoa ie ahown liehiiw, a formal written reaponee to tlM Complaint la acwrdaaee with the rulee of the Court. b. Serve a copy of your responoe upon the attorney whoee name and add r oae la ahown below. 2. Unleoe yon reapond, jrour default will be entered upon appUcatioe of the phdntif f and this Court may enter a Judgement egaiaot you for the relief demanded in the Complaint, which could reeult in the taking of money or property or other relief requeeted in the Complaint. 3. If you intend to seeh tho advice of an attomoy in this matter, you ohonld do ao pr mptly ao that your roeponee may be filed on time, leaned at direction of: JAMES A. WAGNER Attorney for Plaintiff 333 No. Rancbo. Suite 600 Lao Veg00. NV 89106 LORETTA BOWMAN, CLERK OF COURT By: Margo Crook DEPUTY CLERK Date: Jul 05, 1969 County Courthouaa 200 South Third Street Loe Vegao, Nevada 89166 H-Jnly 13,20,27.Aug 3,10,1969 •••*** INVrrATKWALTOilD Sealed Mde will to racelvod by Me SUM of Ntvads Eaiplo;Meal Security DepartMeol (NnO), SCO EM TMN Street, Caraoa CHy, Nevada, fkr MN Jooltwlal serrices al me Doportmeat'i ofllcii sti 119 Water Sl^ Headersoa NV, MOO 1^ ft, 40M710; Md epee Ans. 11,1N lOOl Ne^ A SI., LaiVi|BaNV.3,0Oei.rL,4SM4I;bMepiABf. 11.1909. mt t. Lake Mead llvd. No. Laa Ve|a% NV, U7I iq. IL, 4SI-S7U, bM epoa Aug. 12, 1M9. 135 So. Ml St., Loa Vegei. NV. IMlliq. ft, 4M-3300. bid opoa Aug. 23.1N9. 2127 Laa Vega* Blvd. No.. No. Lai Vegai, NV. 9,4S0 eq. ft. 484-5400, bid open Aug. 24, 1989. Coniracta are for one year commencing October 1,19S9, and terminating September 30, 1990. Sealed Mdi aa received will be opened end read pubHdy 2:00 p.m. bi CarMM City oa tho above dalea by a repre•enteUveofllMNESD. GENERAL SCOPE OF WORKS AS FOLLOWS: General eleanlni of the NESD ofllcc tolldlngo—work io be accomplished aflcr working houri and on weekendi. IT IS MANDATORY THAT ALL BIDDERS MUST CONTACT THE LOCAL OFFICE MANAGERS FOR A REQUIRED WALKTHROUGH OF THE OFFICES. Inaiructiona to bidden may be obtained by contacting the Manager of Facillly Service*. Employment Socurily Department, 500 East Third Street, Careon City, Nevada, MS-4654, or the Local Office Manager* al Ibe phone number* lilted above. The right li rocrvcd by the SUI* of Nevada Employment Socurily Departnml to reject any or all bidi, or to accept the bid deemed best for the intcreit of the Sute oT Nevada. COMtracti will not became crfcctlve unlll approved b; the Nevada Slate Board of Examiners. Contractor ihall rurnlsh bus!nem rcfcrcncca ind a Hit of current work dte*,conlracljfor Job*. Also proof of Induitrial biiurince covcri|c, bonding. and buslneas llcenM at Ihe contractor'* sole cost and expcne. H-iMii.?.MM DISTRICT COURT CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA CELESTINA CECILIA LUCIDO URREA PUatiff. ROMEO URREA Defoadaat. Caae No. D11S600 Dspt.No.VI Docket NAB NOTICE! YOU HAVE BEEN SUED. THE COURT MAY DECIDE AGAINST YOU WITHOUT YOUR BEING HEARD UNLESS YOU RESPOND WITHIN 30 DAYS. READ THE INFORMATION BELOW. TO THE DEFENDANT: A dvil Complaiat has heea filed by tho phdatiff Mdaat you for the relief eet forth hi tho Comphdat Thie ia ea aeUon to obtato a divowc. 1. If you latead to defead tU* hnrault, within 20 daya after this Susamoa* is served oa you exduaive of tho day of eerriee, you mast do the following: a. nie with the Clerk of thia Court, whose addreeo ie ahown below, a foraMl writtoa reopoaao to the Complelnt la accordaaee with the mlea of the Court. h. Serve a copy of your reopoaee upon the attoraoy whoee name and addreeo la 2. Unhwe you respond, your defealt will he enterad npoa appSeathw of the phdatiff and this Court may eater a Judgemeat agaiaet y ou for tlie relief dooMBded la the Complaint, which could result In the taking of money or property or other relief requested in tho Complaint. 3. If you Intond to eeek the advice of on attorney in thie matter, you ibouid do ao pr mptly eo that your reoponoo may he filed oa time, leouod at direction of EDWARD WEINSTEIN Attoraoy for Plaintiff 2306 Las Vegaa Boulevard South Lao Vegoo, Nevada 89104 LORETTA BOWMAN. CLERK OF COURT By: CONNIE AVILA DEPUTY CLERK Diatriet Court Seal Date: June 30 1989 County Courthouae 200 South Third Street Laa Vegoa, Nevada 89156 H-July 13,20,27, Aug. 3,10.1 1239 BOULDER HIGHWAY P.O. BOX 91210 HENDERSON, NEVADA 89009 6664796 The vehiclee lioted hereto wiU be oold at Public Auctioa oa September 8.1980 at lOKW A.M. on the premiaoo at 1239 N. Boulder Highway, Hendersoa, NV. Vehides may bo inapectod on tlM day prior to tlio aale aad up to lOKW A.M. tlM day of the oole. SNAP tow resoryee the right to oet minlmam bida and/or bid on any vehicle to the oale. rear Hake "odl W/O or L/t) Ot>ening td VTM 1976 AHC Crowlin Dora Loe TflpRpp 1980 Bulck Century Harjorie C HBPrLgir Ananda J DOWLBR ShAC 643.90 A7A465E158544 1,400.00 4He9AAHl76369 1871 BuicK Ctnturiin 1988 Chevrolet 8-10 PO PnKn9''o 1979 Chevrolet Brian R HALL CflAC "7CT75D73.3S .46647lcil4aga lGCBS14lt9JS191079 HC 1979 Chevrolet 1977 Chovrilor PU Theroaa aBPKBM t.^ura ZUBICK 836.10 1Z37H9K452634 SN ynknown • 674.35, m Chevrolet nr Deu9lae K or Donna MACBS Hotor credit 626.75 CCL448alp024r ID35L7Z45l5 Chevrolet iic nthonv POLLIO 1973 Chovrclet Van 1973 Chevrolet 1973 Chevrolet Nova tfnHngfn 682.10 lHS707i4a6<29 ?9B. Chtvt^t gandv SANPOHATO 883.30 lQe7H5H535756 Cay253Ull8366 Arvel or Ka ren H KELLAMeS 1969 Chevrolet 4dr Nancy J or Keith C HIATT • HgfwiBt rintncjgl 784.40 lD37H3B^2iOBU 363.80 1X27F3L1222633 Robert A BBOBEB 745-4S Unknovn 19^9 Chevrolet 61 OlllillO VnXRiW 1977 Chrvaler 2dr ^^75 Chrvaler NY 1977 pgdq an 1971 Dodge Van 778.7? •1843§auio773;~' l3id0dz3'O3835 547.60 gS22H7ai028Br ttfvtp tjhttmytf flhitlfY S YtACB 781.6!^ C323Mei72410 NH4S(S7§479406 1987 Ford 1BS4 ford BXP 1981 Cord LTD Bar! NEBSTBR Autoa unllalted Daryl oe Bllaabeth HEANS 888.88 B21JB91X104383 Dave L or Maureen H COTNER Meifada lit Thrift Lota V JONB fiftfl fflLIiIftH. Moo.ocr 1.671. So • irAaE.U97BM?'>71.^fi irABP3939BG232104 491.10 1PABP22A9BK121869 1979 Ford Van John Bdward HOUON ford HatQg Craatt 197? fprd .197? r9rd 1978 Ford fVT gfttY BBftUg' 3,412.SO 773.75 gcni(i Hal Vin B CAROUTTB 1976 Ford Pinto Unknoyn E14HHBP8882 3GTWD954t>g~ i5Smg!^ 1978 Ford m Ford ToT JM. Carol or Robert D KENNBOV TTT Flnaneiel Service* 967.09 8Rl0yi50803 Pinto Muatang AUue BOWIE TftCiit BgafiL 368.75 585.70 fgiLan??? ^xlflYMS^'^l Joaie N BERLANOA 628.50 5R02Y1O3701 i>7? tori 1974 Ford 74 feed Flnto JEinlfi. ynKntvn 878-W 1974 raril Jldc Debbie BTEVIWS rhrT raan A M: 5110X121763 4R12X13354T' ;973 Ford 1973 ford FintB .Jidc John HAMLiaO Pinta Don B IIMCB 327.78 4g30ri.74ai3: mixai MfihiiB miuut 6W.H -iuatuu & 1973 ford mwjua li**^* 1^ Paaali lix^fMIMQO mt 1976 Me rcury 1977 bljaaobilo :sL lennla O'Dell .1. M. VALBNTINB Neatern Pontiac Firdt atata Bank of Mvlia JM 3ttl221740qa iniainm 1,609.05 ftfifidxiMaaa. • • ^ lGTDCl4H9BS2e288 Onega ffgrgu.rtf. BOMATQ 698.2^, 1978 Plvaout 78 fiYMuth ic iSlMSSParley LBAVITT PfffTY' P liegRLLA gUPhtnlt WBITK 1,085.65 3B17U7L114759 Oli.ttfl 1974 Pontiac I9BB Alia Soaeo Xilii OP -tar iMOit;^}\tlord euBinr BubY J PLAUCK JM Bu^.y J PI,AMCI Dean N HARD! 793.30 BL41BBBKOI 7a vB3kSol623 mnuan -fiJUCu 1976 Dataun 280Z 1976 Dataun X974 Dataun Jlfi. Richard Alan RIBSia Car eradit Canter 1.491.80 8Lfl303O46O8 8N Unknown Charlaa MIBMBTBR 753.30 jnti?m PL10>38340 1977 NOB David OR Thertaaa a OARDIIHR 2,393.75 891150843524210 mn mrvw iMMMOru.. • Rebhtt Uftfcnpvn rm^iMi-MiTsi!ir ro W9 BubifM Cheater L or gliiebeeh A lll6aD01S7GN126130 lli:it i.'nSi !S!18j;S F 2,318 .85 1980 rrluaph BMt TR8 Larry R CASaiDY imjfuoo HIT John 8 BURNS Sherry Lane Mafl Bank ^ A6L0i37ft — 'ipibVftJhfSlUei 19B4 KaCaaakl OV Juptin BRAHDBtBTTEB 1979 iUBuhT" "wnr pnltnoun Lonny t Lynda or Laaar KRDITBOiCR Craditgritt ot Aaarica 116633772 ?atigilj | 8i3y5 e9 0 cr a42Q0MB HA^. 10, IT, H 1080

PAGE 44

Pat 44, HMIM HOB* News. Bouldw Oty Ntwt. Onm Valkgr News For the third sucoessi ve year, employees of Titanium Metals Corp. took part in a Health Fair, a joint program between the company and St. Rose Dominican Hospital. Workers from all TIMET departments underwent preventative health maintenance checkups to insure, according to company spokespersons, "good health in the years ahead." St. Rose health experts in a wide variety of disciplines tested and counseled participants in TIMET's "Well Awareness Program," a project that has its goal the promotion TIMET, St. Rose Hospital team up for third annual Health Fair TkvMUqr. Amgtui 10,1969 HM Nm, BoM City Nwt, GNM Vilky Hmn Pl* 41 of wellness among employees and their families. TIMET officials explained the program awards points to employees who record healthful practices and exercises they do on a regular basis. Those that participated in the Health Fair—more than 230 in all-earned 500 life points, plus a commemorative cap and a shirt. Coordinators reported they ran out of shirts because of the response. Company officials said that additional shirts have been ordered and more Well Awareness Program prizes will be forthcoming. TAKING PART-Employees attending the third annual Health Fair, a joint project of Titanium Metals Corp. and St. Rose Dominican Hospital, stand in line for their turn at the event's next health check station. More than 230 workers took part in the event, which TIMET has called its Well Awareness Program. Paul Caballero, a Henderson Technical Laboratory technician with TIMET, checks into the program. Norm Gelger of TIMET security signs up for the Well Jim Allen of TIMET's melt shop has a sample of his blood Awareness Program. taken. Bob Eckel, a TIMET painter, discusses his health record with a technician. TIMET Purchasing Manager Margaret Bolding waits to have her Well Awareness record reviewed. the dream that won't come true... Sponge Plant Foreman Ron English undergoes an eye examinstioii. TIMET Photos Hundreds of needy youngsters are waiting word that they can go to camp in August. But the SUN Camp Fund hasn't met its goal of $100,000. That means disappointment for some disadvantaged or handicapped t>oys and girls. THEY NEED YOUR HELP Please Join others who hove bestowed o bit of happiness for a child, by donating to the SUN Camp Fund today. sm Here is my contribution to SUN Camp Fund to help needy"' ,1 and handicapped boys and girls go to summer camp. I •^ I Name ^ | -'I Address .__ | m. I Please list my gift in the SUN as follows Anonymous D Donations are tax daductiMa. Your entira'gift goes directly to help a needy I child. Operating sxpinses of the fund are absort>d by the Lu Vegas SUN. I iMaltCf SUN CMnphM4 FA lox 4275, LMVefM, 80127 Legal Notices PUBLISHED: August 10, 1989 HENDERSON HOME NEWS AGENDA Tuesday, August 15, 1989 6:46 P.M. COMMITTEE MEETING COUNCIL CHAMBER HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL 243 WATER STREET I CALL TO ORDER li. CONFIRMATION OF POSTING. ROLL CALL III. ACCEPTANCE OF AGENDA IV. ITEMS OF BUSINESS: 1. BILL NO. 732 Z-21-89 BAGLEY, MELVIN-AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE NO. 404 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY UMITS OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 33; TOWNSHIP 21 SOUTH. RANGE 63 EAST. M.D.B. & M.. CLARK COUNTY. NEVADA. FROM R-R (RURAL RESIDENCE) DISTRICT TO RS^ (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL) DISTRICT. V. ADJOURNMENT. AGENDA ITEMS RECEIVED AFTER UKIOON TUESDAY. AUGUST 8. 1989 WILL NOT BE SEEN ON THE AGENDA AS PUBLISHED. BUT MAY APPEAR ON THE AGENDA AS ADDED ITEMS OR ADDENDA. AGENDA Tuesday. August 15, 1989 7:00 P.M. REGULAR MEETING COUNCIL CHAMBER HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL 243 WATER STREET I CALL TO ORDER li. CONFIRMATION OF POSTING. ROLL CALL. INVOCATION. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE III. ACCEPTANCE OF AGENDA IV. PRESENTATION-TWENTY YEAR SERVICE AWARDS V. CONSENT AGENDA-Mayor Kesterson to introduce the Consent Agenda offering anyone present an opportunity to remove any items for discussion. 1. CASH REQUIREMENTS REGISTER. 2. MINUTES-Committee and Regular MeeUng of ^une 20, 1989. 3. APPROVAL of HUD Agreement. 4. WATER MAIN OVERSIZING AGREEMENT-PIaster Development. 5.REV0CABLE PERMIT for reconstruction of sidewalk on Southwest comer of Green Valley Parlcway and Sunset. 6. PAVEMENT CUT—Jessup Road. 7. PERSONNEL-Approve job description and wage schedule for "Utility Planning Elngineer." 8. PERSONNEL-Amcnd staff complement-Public Works. 9. PERSONNEL-Amend staff complement-City Attorney's Office. 10. PETITION TO VACATE-Portioa of aUey behind Silver Spur Casino. 11. PETITION TO VACATE a portion of Green Valley Parkway, from Ramrod north to Duck Creek. 12. AUTHORIZATION TO GO TO BID for replacement ambnlance. 13. AUTHORIZATION TO GO TO BID for FY 88-90 budget approved vehicles. 14. AUTHORIZATION TO GO TO BIO-Lorin L. Williams Pool. 15. PERMISSION to auction old vehicles and equipment. 16. DISBRUSEMENT OF CDBG FUNDS for Deferred Payment Loaa No. HRF 5-894I1. 17. BUDGET AUGMENTATION for goods and sviees—FY 89-90. 18. PERSONNEL-Amend staff complement-City Clerk's Office. 19. TRANSFER OF FUNDS-City Clerk's Office. 20. AWAROOFCONTRACTNO. 889*42 for Gibson Road/HoriBon Drive Interconnect to lowest, respoaaible Bidder. 21. APPLICA'nON froB Eleuteria. Gloria and Laora Flores for Service Bar Liquor Ltoewe, dba C^aaa Flores II. 22. APPLICATION from Soiy M. Abwijian for additional to ROMAC,' Inc., dba Pawnabopa I and II. PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDATIONS-AUGUST 1 igeo-iTiais 2S-27 2S. ZrlMfl ARROYO GRANDE DEVELOPMENT-Requeat from Ar^: royo Orude Devekipment Co.. for ExtMsioa of Time of TttiaitatiuM of Legal Moflces latent No. 1249 for Zone Change from RR (Rural Reaideaco) Diatriet. a portlaa of whleh waa Mmed TE (Trailer EaUtoa ResidaMe) Diatriet by RMohrtioa of iMaat No. 1117, to R4 (Lbnited MaM-ReakhMe), R-4 (Apartmaat RerfdsMe). and 0-1 (Linitad/Nelfkborfaood Commercial) Dtatricta, to parmk the devalofUBeat of rMidaatial aad neighborhood commercial • aaa oa 37.4 acno naoft or bsa, geaarally located northwest of Arroyo Oraada Blvd. aad WladmUl Laaa. (First sxteaaioa). 34. V-ft JENKINS. DENNIS A JUUE-Raqaeat fimn Deaais aad Julie JoaUaa for a Variaace to raduee the raar yard setback from 10 feet to I foat for the purpose of coastruetiag a patio cover in aa R-1 (Oaa Family B sa i daaas ) Dlatikt, geaarally located eouth of Tamarack Dr. betweaa SkyHaa Road aad W. Padfic Aveaue. 25. TM-22 U.S. HOME CORP.-Raqueat from U.S. Home Corp. for Taatativ* Map Review of RIVER MOUNTAIN RIDGE coaaiaUng of 66 lata OB 19.7 aeraa more or laaa la aa R-1 (One Faadly Residence) District by Rooolttthia of Intaat No. 1238, aad R-2 (Two Family Reaidence) OUtrict by Raaolatioa of latent No. 961, gaaerally located aorthwest of Raoatraek Rd. aad the Drake Flood Control Chaanel. 26. TM-2S BAGLEY, MELVIN J.-Requeat from Melvia J. Bagtoy for Teatative Mtp Review of CALICO TERRACE coasistiag of 101 htta OB 27 acres more or laas la a propoaad RS4 (Siagle Faadly Raaidaatial) Diatriet, generally located aorthweat of East Lake Mead Drive. 27. TM-2M9 MCDONIEL. ESTES JOANN-Reqneat1rom Bates M. k JoAaa McDoniel for TenUtive Map Review of LATIGO RANCHES coaalat lB g of 10 lots 00 6 acree more or leaa in aa RE (Raaeh Eatates) District, geaerally located northeast of Boulder Hwy. and Wagoawheal Dr. betweaa Roaa Rd. aad Pinto Road. 28. FINAL MAP/THE BLUFFS (AMENDED)-7 kita total of 384 lota OB 81 acroa more or lass-FM-28l. 29. FINAL MAP/PARKSIDE PARCEL H. PHASE 1,19 h>ts oa 4.319 acres more or less—FM-35^. 30. FINAL MAP/PARKSIDE PARCEL H, PHASE 2,19 tots oa 3.877 aeraa more or leaa-FM-3649. 31. FINAL MAP/PARKSIDE PARCEL H. PHASE 3. 20 lots oa 4.060 acres more or laaa—FM-37-88. 32. FINAL MAP/PARKSIDE PARCEL H. PHASE 4. 20 Iota oa 4.015 acres more or leea—FM-38-89. VI. CITIZEN'S CONCERNS: Itema diacosaed caaaot be acted upon at this meetiag, but can be referred by Couadl to the next Regular Meetiag for coaaideratioB. VII. UNFINISHED BUSINESS: 1. REPORT/DISCUSSION/ACTION-aty Hall. 2. REQUEST from Robert J. Glaaabuni for a Zoae Change (Z-18-89) from RE (Raach Estates) District to CN (Nsighborhood Commercial) District to coastract profsaahMul of fleas on 16,9M sq. ft. (.366 acres more or less), generally located northeast of Horiwa Drive and Pacific Aveaue. (NOTE: PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDS DENIAL). 3. REQUEST from Robert J. Olaasbnra for Architectural Review (AR-39^ of propoeed profeaaioaal offices on 15.956 sq. ft. (.366 acrea more or Isaa) hi a proposed CN (Neighbarhood Commercial) District, geaarally located aorthaast of Horisoa Drive and Padfic Aveaue. (NOTE: PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDS DENIAL). 4. PETITION FOR ANNEXATION-Las Vegas Buildiag Materiala. IBC. (RECOMMENDATION: ACCEPT PETITION; REFER TO DEVELOPMENT SERVICES FOR REVIEW; SET PUBLIC HEARING FOR SEPTEMBER 19. 1989. 5. REVIEW/ACTION-Land Sale-48 acres more or less located oa the coraer of Heather Drive and College Drive. 6. AWARD OF CONTRACT NO. 88^*26 for Wastewater Treatment Plant Third Train Lagoon Expaasioa to lowest, reapoasible bidder. 7. BILL NO. 732 Z-21^ BAGLEY. MELVIN-AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE NO. 404 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY UMITS OF HENDERSON. DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 33. TOWNSHIP 21 SOUTH, RANGE 63 EAST, MJ>3 & M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM R-R (RURAL RESIDENCE) DISTRICT TO ESS (SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL) DISTRICT. (FINAL ACTION). VIII NEW BUSINESS' 1. DISCUSSION/ACTION-Donation of vehiclee to Clark Country Traffic School. 2. RESOLUTION THE AMERICAN FLAO-A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY HENDERSON EXPRE8SIN0S ITS SUPPORT OF THE WOMEN'S AUXILIARY OF THE VETERANS OF FOREIGN WARS IN THEIR CAMPAIGN TO PREVAIL UPON THE CONGRESS TO ENACT LEGISLATION PROHIBITING THE DESECRATION OF THE AMERICAN FLAG, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO. 3. RESOLUTION AD VALOREM TAX INCREASE-A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA. REQUESTING THAT THE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION OF THE STATE OF NEVADA INCLUDE THE ALLOWED AD VALOREM INCREASE. PURSUANT TO NRS 354.5967, IN THE BASIS FOR THE CALCULATION OF THE ALLOWED REVENUE FROM TAXES AD VALOREM IN ALL FUTURE YEARS. 4. BILL NO. 733 8-1-89 REFUNDING BOND ORDINANCE-AN ORDINANCE DESIGNATED AS THE '8-1-89 REFUNDING BOND ORDINANCE"; PROVIDING FOR THE ISSUANCE BY THE CITY OF HENDERSON, IN CLARK COUNTY. NEVADA OF ITS FULLY REGISTERED GENERAL OBLIGATION (LIMITED TAX) FLOOD CONTROL REFUNDING BONDS. SERIES AUGUST. 1969 IN VARIOUS DENOMINATIONS; PROVIDING THAT THE BONDS MAY BE EVIDENCED BY SERIAL REGISTERED BONDS OR BY A SINGLE REGISTERED BOND; STATING THE PURPOSE FOR WHICH THE BONDS ARE ISSUED TO REFUND. PAY AND DISCHARGE A PORTION OF THE CmrS GENERAL OBUQATION (LIMITED TAX) FLOOD CONTROL BONDS, SERIES MARCH 1,1985; PROVIDING THE FORMS. TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF THE BONDS. THE MANNER AND TERMS OF THEIR ISSUANCE. THE MANNER OF THEIR EXECUTION. THE METHOD OF PAYING THEM. THE SECURITY THEREFOR AND PROVIDING FOR THE SALE THEREOF TO THE MUNICIPAL BOND BANK OF THE STATE OF NEVADA; PROVIDING FOR THE LEVY AND COLLECTION OF ANNUAL GENERAL (AD VALOREM) TAXES FOR THE PAYMENT OF THE BONDS; PROVIDING OTHER DETAILS CONCERNING THE BONDS; RATIFYING ACTION PREVIOUSLY TAKEN BY THE CITY AND ITS OFFICERS: AND BY DECLARING THAT THIS ORDINANCE PERTAINS TO THE SALE. ISSUANCE AND PAYMENT OF THE BONDS, PROVIDINO FOR ITS ADOPTION AS IF AN EMERGENCY EXISTS. (FINAL ACTION). 5. BILL NO. 734 ANNEX S.36. T.21S R.61E-AN ORDINANCE EXTENDING THE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON BY ANNEXING THERETO THAT PORTION OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 21 SOUTH, RANGE 61 EAST. M J.M.. IN THE COUNTY OF CLARK STATE OF NEVADA. CONTAINING 202J9 ACRES. MORE OR LESS. AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO. (REFER TO COMMITTEE). IX SET COMMITTEE MEETING X. ADJOURNMENT. Agenda Deadline AH itaau for iaduaioa on the Couadl Ageada for the Meetiag of September 5. 1069 amst be submitted, in writing, BO later thaa Thuraday, August 2i 1989 at 4.-00 P.M. to the City aerk's Offioa. fsedvad after the above dato will antoaiatkally be plaead on the next City Couadl Agaada. Aar Feelin Fit! Do aot add bakiag aoda to own VBgatablaa to praithdreolor. This will I to loaa aasiBtiai I aad vitanin C. AGENDA CITY COUNCIL SPECIAL MEETING COUNCIL CHAMBER, CITY HALL 90O ARIZONA STREET BOULDER CITY, NEVADA 88006 TUESDAY, AUGUST 15,198-7HI0 A.M. 1. REVIEW OF BOULDER CITY AIRPORT FIXED BASE OPERATOR CONTRACT WITH R.FJJif.C.. INC.: 1 INTRODUCTION OF BILL NO. M6 ENTERING INTO A LEASE AGREEMENT FOR A FIXED BASE OPERATOR AT THE BOULDER CITY AIRPORT: BBPORB IHE PUBUC SERVICE COMMISSION OPNIVADA NOTICE or TARIFF riUNO A tariff fliiag, idnitined as DodMt No. S-7B, hM bMa flM with the Public Swie Onm^edoa of Nevada rCoo• isdoa") by SoathwMt Gas Corporatioa r'SouthwMt"). The tariff eeaalate of rvlsiooa to iU NavMia Gai Tariff No. 6, reflectiag ehaagee ID cempUaacc wHh the Cmtomtr'e BID of RlghU (Docket No. 84411). Tho rovlMd tariff WM fllad purmiaot to NAG 703 JW et Mti. The parpoao of tho flUag la to eoeaply with tho CnotOBMr'o BUI of Righto Mioptod by the CoaiBiloeloa oa Jaauary 5, 1908. Soatkwaot has iadodod aa ladoz which eroso retw aaooe tho • arieM ooctioaa of tho CeoteoMr'i BiU of RighU to tho tariff reviaioas mode by Sonthwoet la compHaaeo with suck BIU of RighU. A more dotaJM doacriptioB of tho prapoaod revlaioBa oro ooataiaod la tho Advko Lottar aad tariff ohoets. TUa motwfal la on fib and avrilaUo for vlewfa by thopahlkat tho afflcoo of tho Commloelnn, 727 Pairvlow Drive, Carooa City. Nevada 80710 oad the Alox•ader Daweoa Building, 404S S. Spencer. SaiU A-44. Los Vegas. Nevada NISS-MO. latoreatod aad affected par ties auy eooiBNat ia writing aad file approfriato PrateeU aad/or PotitieM for Loeve to iotervoao ot eithv of the CentndesioB'o offlceo oa or before Wodaooday, Aagoat 23,196B. By the Coaamieeian. WILUAM H. VANCE. Commleeloa Secretary Dated: Careon City, Nevada I8BAU HAug. 10.1969 BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA NOTICE OF TARIFF FILING A tariff filiag,idontifledM Docket No. flO-749. haa bMo filed with the Public Service Ce ma t le rioa of Nevada f'Commissioa") by Ray ft Roee Transport, Inc. Tho fiUiv coiMifU of the 6th Revised Pago 4 to Charter aad SpMJal Sorvicoe Tariff No. 1, P.S.C.N. No. 7, iacreooiag Charter Servleoo Mileage Ratea. both Live aad Deadhead Miles, to 11.87 per mile; Inereeeing the S-Hour Mlaimum Fore from $160.00 to 1170.00; aad faicroasing the charge for Each Additional Hoar from 136.00 to S39.60. The rovleed tariff was filed punaaat to NRS 706.321 aad NRS TOILSZI HM rate iacMaoe bocootoe effective Auguet 18, 1969. The revised tariff is oa file and available for Wowing by tho pahUc at the of fioee of the Commieelea, 727 Fairriew Drive. Carooa City, Nevada 89710 and the Alozendor Daweoa Buildiag, 4046 South Sponeer, Sulto A-44, Lae Vagoo, Nevada 88158-3920. Any protect agoiaat the revieed tariff mut be filed with the Commiaeion at ite of • fieoo oa or before Wodaeeday, Aagust 2S, 1960. Tho protaet mnot allege foeta enffident to Bupport a finding that the revised tariffs wooU violate thaprovleioasorNR8708.15L By the Coauniedon, WILLIAM H. VANCE, Coaualsaion Secretary Dated: Caraoa City. Nevada (SEAU HAug. 10. 1969 BEFORE THE PUBLIC SiaiVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA la Re laveetigatloo of the Ac4 ddeat at Nevada Power Ccoi-) paay's Mohavo Qeaeratiagl BtotloB. Docket No. 88402 NOTICEOFPREHEARING CONFERENCE Pursuant to Nevada AdmlaUtrativo Code CNAC") 703465, tho preakUag officer, oa her own aiotion, has oehodaled a prehooriag conf ereaeo for all partlea of roeord ia this docket lor the parpoee of eetobliahlag a proeedural eehedule. and aeeoanpliahlBg any ether puipoaod aatheriied by NAC 703.686, rogordiag Phaoo II of the procoodlnge, aamolywlMahonUpay tito naaaticipatod fuel eooto aaeodatod with the Mohavo Goaerating Stotioo outage tlroaa Jaae to Decomlier of 1966. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the prohaariag wlU be heU la Docket No. 86 ee foUowa: TUESDAY, AUGUST tt, 1909 lOAOajB. PabBe Sorvloe Commioaloa Alozaadsr Daweoa BaiUUng 4045 South Spoaeer Street SaltoA-44 Loo Vegaa, Nevada I0IS8 Docket No. 86403 is oatOe aad available for pahUc view faig at the of fleea af tho Coei• i idia at 717 Palrvlew Drlvo, Coraea City. Nevada 80710 aad at tho Alasaader Daweoa BuOdiag, 4046 Sauth keacer Street, Sulto A-44. Lea Vegas. Nevada 60168. By the Commloaioa. WILUAlf H. VANCE. Ce m ari eel e a Seere t ar y DATED: Carooa City." iiCALl HAi^. 10.10 • k-kir BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OP NEVADA la tho Matter of the Tariff F1H fam by Ceatral Telepheai Com- pony of Nevoda reflecting re-l vWooo to ite Goaerol Cuat) mer Serricee Tariff ia eonH phaace with the Cemmleelow'e) CoBBamer BiU of Rights. Ad^ vice Letter No. 167. ) Docket No. 8IM68 NOTICE OF HEARING Central TeiephoaeCanpaay of Nevada fCeatrol") hoe lUed Advica Letter No. 1S7 with the PabHc Service ConmlaaioB of Nevada T'CommieekM"). The tariff flHag leflecte rcvirioaa to Ccntrol'e General Cuotomer Service Tariff wUch wwe made in conpUance with the Commieoion'a Coneumer Bill of Righte. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing ia thio matter will eommence ao follows: THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14.1969 10K)0a.m. Offlceo of the Public Service Commieeioa Alexander Daweoa BaiUhig 4046 Sooth Spencer. Suite A-44 Loa Vegoo, Nevada 80188 whea and where the Coaunia• ioB will recelva evldeaee per tfaient to thie matter. The tariff woe filed pnrauant to Nevada Adminietrative Code fNAC") 703 J86. Fnrthermore, tlM Cam-• misiioa has legal authority and juriediction to hold e haariog in this matter purcuant to Nevada Revieed Statntoe r'NRS"! 704.110. The materials reteted to tliie doekM are on flie with tho Cooamiasion and may be viewed by the public at dthor of the offloM of the Public Service Comniaaion, 727 Fairview Drive, CorwH Qty, Nevada 80710 and tlie Alexander Daweon Building, 404S South Spencer, Suite A-44. Loa Vegao, Nevada 89158. By the CommiaaioB, WILLIAM H. VANCE Commiaaion Secretary Dated: Caraoo Oty, Nevada (SEAU H-Ang. 10, 1989 DISTRICT COURT CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA CARMEN A. BEECHER. Phdatiff. -vaJAMES 0. BEECHER, Defoadoat. Coaa No. D118701 Dopt. No. Ill DockH No. E SUMMONS NOTICEI YOU HAVE BEEN SUED. THE COURT MAY DECIDE AGAINST YOU WITHOUT YOUR BEING HEARD UNUBSS YOU RESPOND WITHIN 20 DAYS. READ THE INFORMATION BELOW. TO THE DEFENDANT: A dvil Complalat hoe heea fllod by the pfarintifr i^aiast yon for the relief eet forth in tlio Complaint. THIS IS AN ACTION TO DISSOLVE THE BONDS OP MATRIMONY EXISTING BETWEEN YOU AND THE PLAINTIFF. 1. If you intend to defend thia bwanit, witliin 20 dayo after thia Summona ia aerved on you exduaive of the day of aervice, you moat do the foUowiag: a. File with the Clerk of this Court, whoee eddrsoa ie ahown liehiiw, a formal written reaponee to tlM Complaint la acwrdaaee with the rulee of the Court. b. Serve a copy of your responoe upon the attorney whoee name and add r oae la ahown below. 2. Unleoe yon reapond, jrour default will be entered upon appUcatioe of the phdntif f and this Court may enter a Judgement egaiaot you for the relief demanded in the Complaint, which could reeult in the taking of money or property or other relief requeeted in the Complaint. 3. If you intend to seeh tho advice of an attomoy in this matter, you ohonld do ao pr mptly ao that your roeponee may be filed on time, leaned at direction of: JAMES A. WAGNER Attorney for Plaintiff 333 No. Rancbo. Suite 600 Lao Veg00. NV 89106 LORETTA BOWMAN, CLERK OF COURT By: Margo Crook DEPUTY CLERK Date: Jul 05, 1969 County Courthouaa 200 South Third Street Loe Vegao, Nevada 89166 H-Jnly 13,20,27.Aug 3,10,1969 •••*** INVrrATKWALTOilD Sealed Mde will to racelvod by Me SUM of Ntvads Eaiplo;Meal Security DepartMeol (NnO), SCO EM TMN Street, Caraoa CHy, Nevada, fkr MN Jooltwlal serrices al me Doportmeat'i ofllcii sti 119 Water Sl^ Headersoa NV, MOO 1^ ft, 40M710; Md epee Ans. 11,1N lOOl Ne^ A SI., LaiVi|BaNV.3,0Oei.rL,4SM4I;bMepiABf. 11.1909. mt t. Lake Mead llvd. No. Laa Ve|a% NV, U7I iq. IL, 4SI-S7U, bM epoa Aug. 12, 1M9. 135 So. Ml St., Loa Vegei. NV. IMlliq. ft, 4M-3300. bid opoa Aug. 23.1N9. 2127 Laa Vega* Blvd. No.. No. Lai Vegai, NV. 9,4S0 eq. ft. 484-5400, bid open Aug. 24, 1989. Coniracta are for one year commencing October 1,19S9, and terminating September 30, 1990. Sealed Mdi aa received will be opened end read pubHdy 2:00 p.m. bi CarMM City oa tho above dalea by a repre•enteUveofllMNESD. GENERAL SCOPE OF WORKS AS FOLLOWS: General eleanlni of the NESD ofllcc tolldlngo—work io be accomplished aflcr working houri and on weekendi. IT IS MANDATORY THAT ALL BIDDERS MUST CONTACT THE LOCAL OFFICE MANAGERS FOR A REQUIRED WALKTHROUGH OF THE OFFICES. Inaiructiona to bidden may be obtained by contacting the Manager of Facillly Service*. Employment Socurily Department, 500 East Third Street, Careon City, Nevada, MS-4654, or the Local Office Manager* al Ibe phone number* lilted above. The right li rocrvcd by the SUI* of Nevada Employment Socurily Departnml to reject any or all bidi, or to accept the bid deemed best for the intcreit of the Sute oT Nevada. COMtracti will not became crfcctlve unlll approved b; the Nevada Slate Board of Examiners. Contractor ihall rurnlsh bus!nem rcfcrcncca ind a Hit of current work dte*,conlracljfor Job*. Also proof of Induitrial biiurince covcri|c, bonding. and buslneas llcenM at Ihe contractor'* sole cost and expcne. H-iMii.?.MM DISTRICT COURT CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA CELESTINA CECILIA LUCIDO URREA PUatiff. ROMEO URREA Defoadaat. Caae No. D11S600 Dspt.No.VI Docket NAB NOTICE! YOU HAVE BEEN SUED. THE COURT MAY DECIDE AGAINST YOU WITHOUT YOUR BEING HEARD UNLESS YOU RESPOND WITHIN 30 DAYS. READ THE INFORMATION BELOW. TO THE DEFENDANT: A dvil Complaiat has heea filed by tho phdatiff Mdaat you for the relief eet forth hi tho Comphdat Thie ia ea aeUon to obtato a divowc. 1. If you latead to defead tU* hnrault, within 20 daya after this Susamoa* is served oa you exduaive of tho day of eerriee, you mast do the following: a. nie with the Clerk of thia Court, whose addreeo ie ahown below, a foraMl writtoa reopoaao to the Complelnt la accordaaee with the mlea of the Court. h. Serve a copy of your reopoaee upon the attoraoy whoee name and addreeo la 2. Unhwe you respond, your defealt will he enterad npoa appSeathw of the phdatiff and this Court may eater a Judgemeat agaiaet y ou for tlie relief dooMBded la the Complaint, which could result In the taking of money or property or other relief requested in tho Complaint. 3. If you Intond to eeek the advice of on attorney in thie matter, you ibouid do ao pr mptly eo that your reoponoo may he filed oa time, leouod at direction of EDWARD WEINSTEIN Attoraoy for Plaintiff 2306 Las Vegaa Boulevard South Lao Vegoo, Nevada 89104 LORETTA BOWMAN. CLERK OF COURT By: CONNIE AVILA DEPUTY CLERK Diatriet Court Seal Date: June 30 1989 County Courthouae 200 South Third Street Laa Vegoa, Nevada 89156 H-July 13,20,27, Aug. 3,10.1 1239 BOULDER HIGHWAY P.O. BOX 91210 HENDERSON, NEVADA 89009 6664796 The vehiclee lioted hereto wiU be oold at Public Auctioa oa September 8.1980 at lOKW A.M. on the premiaoo at 1239 N. Boulder Highway, Hendersoa, NV. Vehides may bo inapectod on tlM day prior to tlio aale aad up to lOKW A.M. tlM day of the oole. SNAP tow resoryee the right to oet minlmam bida and/or bid on any vehicle to the oale. rear Hake "odl W/O or L/t) Ot>ening td VTM 1976 AHC Crowlin Dora Loe TflpRpp 1980 Bulck Century Harjorie C HBPrLgir Ananda J DOWLBR ShAC 643.90 A7A465E158544 1,400.00 4He9AAHl76369 1871 BuicK Ctnturiin 1988 Chevrolet 8-10 PO PnKn9''o 1979 Chevrolet Brian R HALL CflAC "7CT75D73.3S .46647lcil4aga lGCBS14lt9JS191079 HC 1979 Chevrolet 1977 Chovrilor PU Theroaa aBPKBM t.^ura ZUBICK 836.10 1Z37H9K452634 SN ynknown • 674.35, m Chevrolet nr Deu9lae K or Donna MACBS Hotor credit 626.75 CCL448alp024r ID35L7Z45l5 Chevrolet iic nthonv POLLIO 1973 Chovrclet Van 1973 Chevrolet 1973 Chevrolet Nova tfnHngfn 682.10 lHS707i4a6<29 ?9B. Chtvt^t gandv SANPOHATO 883.30 lQe7H5H535756 Cay253Ull8366 Arvel or Ka ren H KELLAMeS 1969 Chevrolet 4dr Nancy J or Keith C HIATT • HgfwiBt rintncjgl 784.40 lD37H3B^2iOBU 363.80 1X27F3L1222633 Robert A BBOBEB 745-4S Unknovn 19^9 Chevrolet 61 OlllillO VnXRiW 1977 Chrvaler 2dr ^^75 Chrvaler NY 1977 pgdq an 1971 Dodge Van 778.7? •1843§auio773;~' l3id0dz3'O3835 547.60 gS22H7ai028Br ttfvtp tjhttmytf flhitlfY S YtACB 781.6!^ C323Mei72410 NH4S(S7§479406 1987 Ford 1BS4 ford BXP 1981 Cord LTD Bar! NEBSTBR Autoa unllalted Daryl oe Bllaabeth HEANS 888.88 B21JB91X104383 Dave L or Maureen H COTNER Meifada lit Thrift Lota V JONB fiftfl fflLIiIftH. Moo.ocr 1.671. So • irAaE.U97BM?'>71.^fi irABP3939BG232104 491.10 1PABP22A9BK121869 1979 Ford Van John Bdward HOUON ford HatQg Craatt 197? fprd .197? r9rd 1978 Ford fVT gfttY BBftUg' 3,412.SO 773.75 gcni(i Hal Vin B CAROUTTB 1976 Ford Pinto Unknoyn E14HHBP8882 3GTWD954t>g~ i5Smg!^ 1978 Ford m Ford ToT JM. Carol or Robert D KENNBOV TTT Flnaneiel Service* 967.09 8Rl0yi50803 Pinto Muatang AUue BOWIE TftCiit BgafiL 368.75 585.70 fgiLan??? ^xlflYMS^'^l Joaie N BERLANOA 628.50 5R02Y1O3701 i>7? tori 1974 Ford 74 feed Flnto JEinlfi. ynKntvn 878-W 1974 raril Jldc Debbie BTEVIWS rhrT raan A M: 5110X121763 4R12X13354T' ;973 Ford 1973 ford FintB .Jidc John HAMLiaO Pinta Don B IIMCB 327.78 4g30ri.74ai3: mixai MfihiiB miuut 6W.H -iuatuu & 1973 ford mwjua li**^* 1^ Paaali lix^fMIMQO mt 1976 Me rcury 1977 bljaaobilo :sL lennla O'Dell .1. M. VALBNTINB Neatern Pontiac Firdt atata Bank of Mvlia JM 3ttl221740qa iniainm 1,609.05 ftfifidxiMaaa. • • ^ lGTDCl4H9BS2e288 Onega ffgrgu.rtf. BOMATQ 698.2^, 1978 Plvaout 78 fiYMuth ic iSlMSSParley LBAVITT PfffTY' P liegRLLA gUPhtnlt WBITK 1,085.65 3B17U7L114759 Oli.ttfl 1974 Pontiac I9BB Alia Soaeo Xilii OP -tar iMOit;^}\tlord euBinr BubY J PLAUCK JM Bu^.y J PI,AMCI Dean N HARD! 793.30 BL41BBBKOI 7a vB3kSol623 mnuan -fiJUCu 1976 Dataun 280Z 1976 Dataun X974 Dataun Jlfi. Richard Alan RIBSia Car eradit Canter 1.491.80 8Lfl303O46O8 8N Unknown Charlaa MIBMBTBR 753.30 jnti?m PL10>38340 1977 NOB David OR Thertaaa a OARDIIHR 2,393.75 891150843524210 mn mrvw iMMMOru.. • Rebhtt Uftfcnpvn rm^iMi-MiTsi!ir ro W9 BubifM Cheater L or gliiebeeh A lll6aD01S7GN126130 lli:it i.'nSi !S!18j;S F 2,318 .85 1980 rrluaph BMt TR8 Larry R CASaiDY imjfuoo HIT John 8 BURNS Sherry Lane Mafl Bank ^ A6L0i37ft — 'ipibVftJhfSlUei 19B4 KaCaaakl OV Juptin BRAHDBtBTTEB 1979 iUBuhT" "wnr pnltnoun Lonny t Lynda or Laaar KRDITBOiCR Craditgritt ot Aaarica 116633772 ?atigilj | 8i3y5 e9 0 cr a42Q0MB HA^. 10, IT, H 1080

PAGE 45

H9 M, H md mom HOOM News, fiouldw City Nnra, Qtmm Vlly News Legal Notices YOU CAN MAKE THEIR WISH COME TRUE PLEASE GIVE TO THE SUN CAMP FUND Send Contributions to: SUN Camp Fund PO. Box 4275 Las Vegas. NV 89127 CITY OF BOULDER CITY A Muiidpid Corporation MO Ariaona Strwi Boalder aty. NoirMia 88005 NOTICE INVITING BIDS The dtj of BOOMOT CHJ, Ntvada wiU rocoive bids for the foUowiag: BC Project No. 8258-MC. This work con•iete of f • raiahiog and ereeting appfajdnuitely SjSOO Une* feet of 8-foot chain Unli fence incladiag 3 etraade of bari>ed wire. Worli ihaU alM include footing, gatco and all oeceasary item to complete the project. SpMificationa and Ud farmi may be obtained at the Engineering Office, aty Hall, 900 Ariiona Street, Boulder City. Nevada 88005. Sealed bid* for auch wiU be received at the offioa of the Finance Director naUl 2:30 P.M. on August 10.1889 when they will be opened and read aloud in the City Council Chambers. Boulder City retains the right to reject any and fU bida. to waive any iaformality in bidding, and to accept any bid deemed most advantageons to the City. Robert E. Boyer Finance Director HAug. 10. 1969 CITY OF BOULDER CITY SECTION B ^ ^ A Monidpal Corporation 900 Arisona Street Boulder City, Nevada 89006 NOTICE INVITING BIDS The City of Boulder City. Nevada will receive bids for the foUowing: Steel Transmisahm Poles; Aluminum Conductor; & Insulators. Specifications and bid forms may be obtained at the Finance Department, City Hall, 900 Ariiona Street. Bonlder City. Nevada 89005. Sealed bids for such will be received at the office of the Finance Director unUI 2:30 P.M. P.D.T. on August 31. 1989 wheu they will be opened and read aloud in the City Council Chambers. Boulder City retains the right to reject sny and all bids, to waive and informality in bidding, and to accept any bid deemed moat advantageous to the City. Robert E. Boyer Finance Director PnbUshed: BouUa^ aty NewB August 10, 1989 B-Aug. 10, 1989 Thunday. Aofpst 10. 1989 Thureday. August 10,1989 HoidwMii Home Ntws. Boulder City News, Green Valley News Pie 47 SECTIONS ANNOUNCEMENT THE HOUSING AUniORITH OF THE COUNTY OF CLARK, NEVADA, is crwUng an appUcailon pool for the Section B HoaAig Aaliiancc Propsmi. These programi are for PWMM of limited meam and provMss aarisUncc toward their ^wt ApplkalioM for TWO BEDROOM UNITS ONLY will ^ opaied on Monday, Aiua( 21,1N9 aad will My open unM Airtbsr aoUc*. ToplaceaaappllcaUonyoHmaM coma is our offkc at SOM E naaiaio Road. Our rign up ihnas arc a:30 AM to 11:30 AM, Monday through Wednesday and Tuesday anernoons fh>m 1:00 PMlo 2:30 PM. nae bring Itlrth certificates and aadal aecnrity cards on all IkmBj • embers as well as photo MenUflcailon, proof at incoiM and lait yean Income tax returns on all adult rimlly members. In addition, please provide a copy of your lease, rent receipts or renui agrccmenL LEGAL NOTICE Notice ia hereby given that I, LM8 Stonte wiU seU contents of below mentioned units to aatiafy storage liens. Unit 147, Unda BayaH, 10634 Beechnut St., Apt 424, Houston, Teae, 77072. Unit #236, Brian Daugherty. 2050 Magic Way. 1290. Henderaon, NV 89015. Unit #238, Randall Pansier. 2000 N. Commerce, North Las Vegas, NV 89030. Unit #221. Marda DilU. 2306 E. Sahara. Snite F, Las Vegas, NV 89104. Auction will be held at 10 a.m. at 1648 Athol. Henderson, on Friday. August 25, 1989. We reaerve the right to bid. This sale subject .tp^ prior cancellation in the event all monies paid and goods removed prior to this date. H-Aug. 10, 17, 24, 1989 wUb <.npu ur rcniai agreement. H-Aug. 8,10,11.1989 A A A Legal Nallca Tb Mtowli fUd HMta*ah||habMd tWaawasbtalaadby towinga itor a gi llwa an Manday Angnal llill8. SIg JakMTawkft 1577 FaatMB Dr. Bonid* aty, NV mOS. Wa reserve the right to Md. 1979 Chcv via CKL189F112995 st a pi, N/A LO a RO Urry D Davla, Sue A. Davis, Las Vegas, NV 89109 1970 Cbev vin CF140J1092W st a pi MN MPH 590 RO a LO UNK 1982 Hy via JP3BE3435CU70669g st & pi N/ A RO a LO UNK 1958 Alaikan Camper vin DA 14270 RO a LO UNK Abindon US 95 ^\ HomcmadeTRLR vlnDR771121TRO& LOUNK Abandon In alley Denver a Colorado Boulder City NV Homemade TRLR vin 94M74 RO a LO UNK Abandon it 1 lOI Industrial Boulder City NV Auction will be hdd on Mondsj August 21st 1989 8 AM. We reserve the right to bid. B-July 27, Aug. 3,10,1989. WANT AD RATES.. .RUNS TUES, THURS & FRL HENDERSON, BOULDER CITY & GREEN VALLEY 3 lines $4.00 wk 4 lines <4.45 wk 5 lines ..-. .$4.90 wk 6 lines .... .. $5.35 wk 7 lines $5.80 wk 8 lines $6.25 wk 9 lines $6.70 wk 10 lines $7.15 wk up to 3 lines (23 characters per line) 45$ each additional line OIADUNE FOR WANT ADS a • 4 FJi. TUESDAY FOR THURSDAY ISSUE 4 P.M. FRIDAY FOR TUESDAY ISSUE BOXED ADS $6.00 per column Inch per week H.aa PUBLICATIONS, mc. BOULDER aVf NEWS HENDERSON HOME NEWS • GREEN VALLEY NEWS • IMallbtg Addreas — P.O. Box 90430 Handcrson, Nevada 89009 (702) 564-1881 WANT ADS Bring Buyers andSellers Together ••• WHATS NEWS? The Henderson Home Boulder City & Green Valley ^^iciciticititif "A"A"A"Ar"^'^'^i It's Ihat lime of year You can help 383-7209 '•••••• PETS/ANIMALS NEWS Free to good home 1 yr old, AKC. registered Golden Retriever, good w/kids. Call 565-7745. AKC Shelties, puppies, young adults and stud service. 452-3034. FREE PUPPY Black female lab 12 weeks old. 293-3116 BC AKC COCKER SPANIEL PUPPIES buff, females $250 Males $200 293-7068 BC. TROPICAL FISH 33 beautiful specimens and plants. Entire group below wholesale. Green Amazon parrot Tame and affectionate. Cage and maple T-stand $425 Beautifully marked Cockatiel. Tame and talking Cage and stand $85. Must find good homes. 293-4947 BC MAY I HELP Y(X) GET YOUR DOG OR CAT SPAYED OR NEUTERED FOR A GRACIOUS OSOOUNT? 2a3-5673 B.C. Anytime. FREE KITTENS AND PUPPIES NEED GOOD HOME Call 293-5673 "Mac's Wonderband" Registered Thoroughbred quarterhorse. 16'3". Beautiful black thoroughbred, 5 yrs. old. Perfect for hunter, jumper or English. Call anytime 293-5848. [^ The Animal Foundation Cow Cost Spay/Neu'er Clinic. Ca' 384-3333 for appointment. Dogs for adoption: Miniature Pincher, AKC Doberman, Whippet, Dachsund, Blue healer, Bassett hound, Samoyed, Springer Spaniel, Irish Setters, Poodles and lots moce 361-2484 FOUND: Aug. Lake Mead & Water Street. Mix bred hunting dog. Female 6 to 12 months. White/brown spots. Has Collar'' name is Bandit'' 564-3153 or 293-8209 Ask for Bonnie Lost: 7 week old puppie Golden Lab. Male Magnesium area, on Aug. 1 89. Please call 564-5637 or 5645299 LOST: Large grey tiger striped neutral male. Lost Sunday night vicinity of National and Lincoln. 564-7027 Please leave message. Garage Sale: Furn., sm. appliances, clothing, much more. Boulder Hwy, Lake East Follow signs 565-5149. Sat. & Sun. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. MOVING SALE Couch, chairs, tables, TV, plants, chest, nite stands, many household items. Thurs Fn Sat Sam 890 Del Sol No 11 BC AA AAA'A'i^^ifc' Huge Yard Sale Friday and Sat. 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. fools. Yard 5alP Ann 11 A 19 n ••• •••• '— '1 SITUATIONS WANTED • ••••• JOB OPPORTUNITIES •••••• GARAGE SALES Dogs, cats, kittens and puppies, All ages, colors and kinds. For adoption Also jther pets. Call 361 -2484 for directions. SPAY OR NEUTER YOUR PET FOR HALF PRICE SHOTS 25% OFF — VALLEY SAVE A PET 384-6049 (Ruby) or 642-8543 n •••••• LOST & FOUND J LOST Vicinity of Vons, Sunday Aug 6 REWARD for the return of Mobile phone. No questions asked. 293-6902 BC Lost: Miniature shorthair red Dashshund. Answers to Name of Heidi. Reward. 565-0459. Garage Sale: 89 & 101 W. Lake Mead Drive, weekdays, 7 a.m. to 3, Sat & Sun, 8 to 4 p.m. 813 Major Apt No. B, Thurs., Furn & household items, clothes. 564-0561. Plus 79 Olds Garage Sale: Sat. Aug. 12, 7 am. 836 San Bruno. Books, rocking chair, crib, 4 wheels, 5 lugs, 9.50X16.5 lamps, tools, stroUer, nick nacks and lots of misc. Yard Sale: Yamaha Jog 87 $600 080 Dishes, brick-rbrack and other items. 1109 Pawnee Behind Playiand Skating Rink. Fn. & Sat 8 am to ? 564-1835. MOVING SALE Floor scrubber and polisher $15. Two wood stepladders 4ft, 6ft. Desk. Chest of drawers $100. 16 cu ft Kenmore upright freezer $200. 293-3093 BC MOVING SALE Formal French Country dining room set, lighted hutch, pads, from Garretts $1,000 Decorator co-ordinated French Country living room furn. King headboard. Lazy Boy, twin bed sets, reasonable, must see 293-2777 eves. BC GARAGE SALE Life time of collecting. Must sell, we're moving. Antiques-furniture, tods, glassware. Collectibles-toys, traps, and memorabilia. We have it all Aug 12-13 7am-7pm. No early arnvals. 1450 San Felipe BC MOVING SALE Lots of books. 401 Ave. I Sat, Sun 9-5 293-2079 BC MOVING SALE: Green Valley South, Sat. Aug. 12, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Misc. items. 2828 Preciso Lane. Nursemaid, home and convalescent care for sick and elderly. Mornings 4 hr. shifts daily. Ask for Joan 454-9468 I LADIES HAVE HUSBAND WILL RENT An all around nice guy, who doesn't smoke, drink, or complain. He'll do your household chores, maintenance, cleaning, laundry including listen. And he's reasonable. Call 294-1376. /Vow you can have the beef without buying into the bull (Thi IS not an escort service) Retail Sales. Shepler's Western Wear is expanding & we would like you to become a part of the worlds i largest western store &i catalogue. We are openings in early SepL a new store inj Las Vegas at the Sahara Pavillion. We have openings for sales associates &: cashiers. Previous exp.' preferred. Full & part time pos. available featuring an excellent starting salary & benefits package. Applies-: tions are accepted at our' temporary offices located at 3939W.SaharaAve,Ste5,> between 3-8 p.m. or call 258-2000 for appt. Sheplers Inc EOE. •••••• PERSONALS TRAINEES NEEDED TRAIN FOR NEW EMPLOYMENT NOW METRIN Want to look S-10 yMra youngw? For ITM facial • ppt.calBator8tw.Doll Ml tht dmwMoel 234268 ELECTRONICS/ROBOTICS TECHNICIANS AUTO 4 DIESEL TECHWICIAMJ MUST BE ABLE TO TEMPORARILY RELOCATE TO SUNNY TUCSON. ARIZONA FOR 6-12 MONTHS •TM^onry NoMbig •RMndal AM ProgrM •PMt-TbM Jok Wp>t cm w>K •EmpioynMnt Aflw Irtitimton tNTERVIEWINQ NOW IN VOOR AREA CALL NOW FOR YOUR INTERVIEW DATE AND TIME 1-800-333.TECH MtG TICHWICAL TRAM SCNOOU ^PET CORNER You might find it surprising to learn that both newts and salamanders are popular house pets. One explanation is that, in general, they are pretty undemanding creatures. There are three main families found in captivity: mole salamanders, woodland salamanders and "true" salamanders. And they all taste pretty good (just kidding!!). These interesting amphibians can be kept together in a large aquarium with a cover to prevent escape. Land-type salamanders, however, need dark, moist homes with plenty of places to hide, (e.g. under plants or rocka). Half fill your aquarium with pond water from the original habitat, if at dl possible. Using floating rafts of thin cork will allow the amphibians to leave the water if they so desire. Be sure to keep the aquarium cool and out of direct sunlight. Also, the water must be changed once weekly. However, in order to avoid contracting salmonella from the dirty water, wash your hands thoroughly once this task is completed. Worms, small insects, small spiders and chopped lean beef or liver once a week is an excellent diet. You could also use slugs, caterpilars and woodlice as part of a "balanced" diet. Large salamanders or newts will eat a small mouse, and they love brineshrimp, white worm, tubifex and small earthworms. These can be purchased at your local pet store. •••••• DOMESTIC HELP Will care for your children in my home, Mon-Fri. Children with special needs are welcome. 564-1088. (VIOTHER WILL BABYSIT: Infants and toddlers. Debbie 293-5099 BC COIVIPANION WANTED Looking for senior, retired mature woman to act as livein companion. Must be nonsmoker, non-dnnker, and drive w/own transportation. Will provide private bedroom and bath in spacious mobile home in Boulder City. Will also pay $ 100 per week and will pay for all food, l^inimum housekeeping and help w/cooking. Local references required Please call 564-7503 leave message, or 295-1743 BC Win do housecleaning. Good .quality work. Reasonable rates. Experianced & references. Call Rosa 565-^70 or Anna 29301 2Q. I WILL BABYSIT IN MY HOME. Good references. Call Kitty 293-5462 BC BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES OWN YOUR OWN APPAREL OR SHOE STORE, CHOOSE FROM: JEAN/ SPORTSWEAR, LADIES, MEN'S, CHILDREN/ MATERNITY, LARGE SIZES, PETITE, DANCEWEAR/ AEROBIC, BRIDAL, LINGERIE OR ACCESSORIES STORE. ADD COLOR ANALYSIS. BRAND NAMES: LIZ CLAIBORNE, HEALTHTEX, BONNIE AND BILL,STMICHELE. FORENZA, BUGLE BOY, LEVI, CAMP BEVERLY HILLS. LESLIE FAYE, LUCIA OVER 2,000 OTHERS. OR $13.99 ONE PRICE DESIGNER, MULTI TIER PRICING DISCOUNT OR FAMILY SHOE STORE RETAIL PRICES UNBELIEVABLE FOR TOP OUALITY SHOES NORMALLY PRICED FROM $19 to $60, OVER 250 BRANDS 2,600 STYLES. $18,900 TO $29,900:INVENTORY, TRAINING, FIXTURES, AIRFARE, GRAND OPENING, ETC. CAN OPEN 15 DAYS. MR. MCCOMB (404) 859-0229. Clean, Clean deanlll No jot) is too big or too small. We're fast & eniciant. We do It all. In Hdn for 20 yr. 565-8107 before 8 p.m. plaaae. Babysitting in my Henderson Home all hours. 7 days a week. Peaceful neighborhood. Hot meals inlcuded. Excellent references. Call 565-4446 ask tor Kim, Babysitting in my home 24_ hrs a day Loving care ex-' cellent references. Call 565-5426 anytime. CNIdcare Immediate opening for 0-5 years. Hot lunch ,&%nacks. Ph 565-7412. Childcare my home, fenced yard, meals & snacks, lots of tl C. 565-3423. Childcare in my home, 7 days a week, any shift. Lots of TLC 565-2255. Will care for two children in my home. Fenced yard MonFri CTSewell area. Reasonable. 564-7510. In home childcare. Reliable, responsible, reasonable Mon-Fn. Days, Next door to Dooley Elem School 564-7545, SUPER SITTER-Personal attention, fantastic program, reasonable rates, any hours, Lon 564-1626, Mother of one will watch your Gordon McCaw student (jefore and after school. Call 565-5562. Christian mother of two would enjoy having your little one while you work. Call Kelly 564-4402 Will babysit in my home MonFn any age child. 565-9739. INSTA-CLEAN MAID/ JANITORIAL SERVICE ProfeBsional cleaning service for residential and commercial. All phases of general cleaning covered including carpet cleaning, wall/ceilings washed. Vinyl & linoleum floor care. 293-3316 I WILL DO HOUSECLEANING-Reasonable 564-7666. A k k A t A A EMPLOYMENT We haye a lone raac falOur CLASSIFIEDS reach •BOULDER CUT •HENDEHSON • GREEN VALLET CaU today 293-2302 UNLV STUDENT NEEDED for overnight sitter for 8 year old. Sunday through Wednesday 9pm to 7am. Must be B.C. resident with own transportation. $50 wk plus other benefits References required. Begin the end of August 293-6184 after 6pm. BC HELP WANTED (college students leaving) Gift shop/ice cream counter sales, food prep, janitonal. $4 to start. Benefits. No exp nee. Apply In person. HOOVER DAM SNACKETERIA BC TEACHERS Preachool Full/Part Tim* and SubatHut* opanlnga. Larga modam facility with •xcallant curriculum. Competitive aalary and banaflts. Call 565-0007 or 456-7008. Caps Sandwich Shop NEEDED •Delivery Person •Mature Counter Help Call 293-7070 AREA DEMONSTRATORS Fun job. Earn those extra $'s. Set yoiuown hours. FVee kit, no collecting, no delivering. Excellent pay, bonuses! Hurry, oOl today 451-5026. SALES AOENT ^, WANTED Nio • ily known catandar rrunilactuw and SpacwKy Aavwtwng company ofltts •n oppo(1uny lor an induMnoua i-itai1ai lor Kin or part lime wort Th is Na a f?***!.'!!?!""'**'*" •***'*'•''••*" w< PW" 10 (•• our aduaw CalaixJaia, Buainaaa QilU and Exianan* A*(tiaino Spiaally Asi^^ lokrmawiltwihabMtnaaicannunilyTliaTNM D MurptiyCo apionaet mma aflvartiamgriaBainca laje H you can otganue you own wna and daMrmna your own auccaaa. wma Scfiard Fmw The Thoa D Murphy Co Box 382. Red Oak. Iowa, oread lTt23.5S3, ,fl 1,2 WORKING BUSY MOM NEEDS HELP Pick up kids from Christian Center two or three days by 6PM til 8:30 PM. My house or yours. Provide dinner. 364-4041 beeper, 293-5156 home. BC COOK Experience not necessary-will train. Apply 4 to 9pm. Villa Capn.Marshall Plaza, Boulder City WAITRESS Part time-two eves a week, sometimes three. Apply 4 to 7 pm. Villa Capri, Marshall Plaza, Boulder City DISHWASHER WANTED apply in person Vale Hotel 704 Nev Hwy BC WAITRESS NEEDED apply in person Vale Hotel 704 Nev Hwy BC Earn up to $339 wk. Assemble our products at home. Amazing recorded message reveals details Call 382-7848 LPN NEEDED for 3-11 shift, fulltimeLPN, part tinne 11-7 shift for Boulder City Hospital Long Term Care Unit. Contact Alice_at_293-4111 BC MUSTARD SEED NOW HIRING Must have flexible hours. Apply in person BC DIET CENTER COUNSELOR Must have Diet Center exper'ence. Part time only. $5 per hr Call 293-1109 for ap pointment. BC VISTA VOLUNTEERS needed for E;(tended Care Unit at Boulder City Hospital (limited income position). Please contact Sandy Chnstensen 293-4111 for more information. BC RETAIL SALES BC. Shop looking for Sales Manager. Experience preferred Send resume to 501 Hotel Plaza, Suite A. Boulder City, Nv. 89005 PICKN PACK Kelly Servee^ has openings (or people who want to work 40 hr:3/wk plus overtime in Hendiarson. No expereience necessary. Must be over 18 and have access to a phone and reliable transportation Call 564 1581 F;0E/M/F/H No fee HOUSEKEEPER Full-time position with excellent working corxlitiofts. FLOOR PERSON Hard working individual needed to work full-time, evenings. DIETARY ASSISTANTS DISHWASHERS Excellent position with flexible scheduling available. Must be able to work weekenda, 32 hrs/week. Students encouraged to applyl LAUNDRY PERSON Part-time, 3-11 p.m., relief position. Apply in person to: Boulder City Care Center, 601 Adams, Boulder City, NV 89005. (No phones calls pleaae). EOE. COST ACCOUNTANT/ MANAGER TRAINEE Strong cost accounting experience, especially job order costing Standard cost and variance analysis, inventory movement accounting, physical inventory, computer bases accounting will be a plus. Call Joan or Lee at NBS 565-0065 AHENTION: EARN MONEY READING BOOKS! $32,000/year income potential Details (1)602-838-8885 Ext Bk10.002 MAIDS part time. Trainees acceptable. PORTER for daily work, some stairs. FRONT DESK CLERK, some experience desired. NIGHT AUDITOR experi•rwed in restaurant and hotel atJditing. Should be able to cover front desk. Apply 9 am to noon, Monday thru Friday at front desk. BEST WESTERN LIGHTHOUSE INN 110 Ville Dr. BCFor sale. Stereo, sewing machine, planter pole/macrama, lamp, end table, sm. & med. ladies ctothes 564-5223. DENTAL' ASSlSTANTCHAIRSIDE for busy general practice. Two yrs previous exp required. We offer a challenging career opportunity In a team ohented office. Health benefits and iDonus. Salary negotiable. Call 293-0373 ask for Debbie. BC • Restaurant hostesses, bus persons. Apply in person Gold Stnke Inn. BC. Casa Flores now accepting applications for bartenders, hostess & busboys. Apply in person. 930 Nevada Hwy. FOUR SEASONS POOL SERVICE now taking applications for serviceman. Min. age 21, must have good dnving record. 293-^465. GOVERNMENT JOBS! Now hinng in your area, both skilled and unskilled. For a current list of jobs and applications, call 1-615-383-2627 Ext. P290. EARN MONEY Reading books! $30,000/yr income potential. Details. (1y 805-687-6000 Ext Y-5695 Help Wanted: 7-11, Full or part time. Must be 21 years old Starting pay $4.50 per hr w/experience. Apply m person, 710 Center Street. MEDICAL Back OfficeNew Family Practitioner in Henderson needs Medical Assitant or LPN. Office hours 8 am to 5 pm. No holidays or weekends. Salary DOE. Experience preferred. 565-8066. Help Wanted in lawn maintenance. 21 yr old. Clean driving record preferred. Call leave message 565-1593. BOB'S ALL FAMILY RESTAURANT now accepting applications for dishwashers, cooks, waitresses. Apply in person 761 Nev Hwy BC $350.00 A DAYi Processing Phone Orders. People Call You! No experience Necessary. Call (Refundable) 518-459-8697 Ext. 5128 RESUMES' Composed, edited and typed. Also Contracts, Letters, and Wills. BM'S Business Service, 527 Hotel Plaza (The Village) 293-526a BC. CANVASSER/SURVEYOR Part-time, fun job,.20 hrs a week. Flexible hrs. Do survey for school. Guaranteed $5 per hr. Our people do earn $10 per hr. & more with DQnuses. Transportation needed. Henderson applicants welcome. Call 565-3669. EOE. EASTRIDQE TEMPS. Taking applications now for: •Secretaries •Receptionists •Pacicers •Production •Warehouseman NEVER A FEE Register Today & No Appointment Necessary 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday-Friday 565-3118 1S3 Water St. 12 TEACHER ELEMENTARY EDUCATION — SECONDARY EDUCATION SUBSTITUTE TEACHER or Teacher with Child Development Training NAME OWN HOURS Call Oaidane Praachod Academy 1308 Wyoming St., B.C. 293-5188 RNs/LPNs up to $1,000 Sign-on Bonus! RNa needed for fulland part-time, nights and relief, days! LPNt needed for fulMlme, rttghts and part-time, daya! Enfoy excellent wage* and iMneflts Including: •ChlM care astlatance •Education program aaaiitanee •Health Insurance •Up to 4 wesks vacation the first yearl Contact Boulder City Cars Center, Attn: Director of Nursing, 601 Adsms, Boulder City, NV 89005, (702)293-5151. EOE. GENERAL LABORS/PRODUCTION WORKERS & CLERICAL Immediate Openings Good Pay — No Fee MANPOWER TEMPORARY SERVICES 30 A Water Street Henderson, NV 565-5554 Copies IOC each Cook for authentic Mexican food needed Apply at Coyotes' Cantina at 2801 Athenian. 458-3739. MUNICIPAL COURT MARSHALL Salary: $25,235.88 30,661.59/year Requirements: Graduation from high school or equivalent, with three (3) years of law enforcement or related work, two (2) of which involved dealing with the public, or any equivalent combination of education and expenence. Special Requirements: Possession of, or the ability to obtain, a Class III Nevada driver's license, and maintenance of an excellent driving record Must possess a certificate for Peace Officer II or complete the Nevada Peace Officer Standard Training (POST) within one year of appointment. Must pass City approved physical examination. Must qualify with a firearm every two (2) months. Must not have been convicted of any cnme for which registration is required under N.R.S. 207.090 and 207.152, and must not have been convicted of two or more offenses of larceny WHERE TO APPLY: City application form and personal resume must tie submitted to the Personnel Department, City Hall, 243 Water Street, Henderson. Nevada 89015, and must be filed no later than Monday, August 14, 1989, at 5:30 pm HOURS OF OPERATION: 7:30 am -5:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday. AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER SURVEYAND PROPERTIES MANAGER Salary: $42,361.03 51,481.66/year Requirements: Graduation from a four year college or university with major emphasis in civil engineenng, mathematics, or related Held, plus five (5) years' progressively responsible surveying experience, ineluding or supplemented by three (3) years of administrative experience and some specialized experience in right-of-way and acquisition, or any equivalent combination of education and experience Special Requirements: Possession of, or the ability to obtain, a Class III Nevada driver's license, and maintenance of an excellent driving record. Must possess or be able to obtain registration as a Land Surveyor in the slate of Nevada, and specialization in right-of-way, and an acquisition certificate, WHERE TO APPLY: City application form and personal resume must be submitted to the Personnel Department. City Hall, 243 Water Street, Henderson, Nevada89015, and must l3e filed no later than Thursday, August 17, 1989, at 5:30 pm HOURS OF OPERATION: 7:30 am. 5:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER WAITRESS NEEDED Expenence preferred, will tram. Apply at Front Desk, VALE HOTEL 704 Nev Hwy BC EARN MONEY Reading books' $30,000/yr income potential. Details. (1) 805687-6000 Ext. Y-5695 McDonald Kearney the creata and designer of MD3D portrait lamps is in need of sales people for the Nevada area Commission only Pleas e call 919-596-9755 EXPERIENCED KENO WRITER NEEDED, Apply in person Gold Strike Inn and Casino BC PART TIME MAID NEEDED Good pay for responsible worker. INSTA CLEAN .^ 93-3316 BC PART TIME WORK AVAILABLE in Gift and Souvenir Shop at the 1 mile marker on the Arizona side of Dam Call 564-3844 and ask for Gene BC MAID SERVICE NEEDS PEOPLE INTERESTED IN ADVANCEMENT Work with a crew. Grime Busters Maid Servi ce, 79 8 1002. RAILROAD PASS HOTEL AND CASINO IS NOW HIRING. Full or part lime maids. Apply in person. See hotel manager 7 days a week. ? 800 S. Boulder Hwy. Hdn. • MAINTENANCE ?UPERVISOR needed for Boulder City Hospital. General maintenance skills required Previous hospital experience preferred. Supervisor skills a plus. Contact Alice at 293-4111 BC TELEMARKETING SURVEY part time. Your home. No sales. 294-3106 BC AUTO PARTS COUNTER PERSON Full time. Experience necessary Health tienefits, paid vacation Apply in person. Auto Specialists. Inc. 705 Juniper Way BC Easy Work! Excellent Pay! Assemble products at home. Call for information 504-641-8003 Ext. 1311 NOW HIRING Full and part time help. All shifts. Inquire in person Jack in the Box. 1101 Nev Hwy BC ROUTE DRIVER AND MISCELLANEOUS HELP Young man, must be physically fit, heavy work. Call 294-0004 BC BOAT DOCK ATTENDANT Willow Beach Resorts is now accepting applications lor Boat Dock Attendant. Part time and full time help' needed Apply in person 293-3776 BC FRONT DESK CLERK Willow Beach Resorts is now accepting applications for Front Desk Clerk, Apply in person 293-3776 BC INTERIM DIRECTOR OF NURSING Enjoy the pluses of worlcIng with a nationwide corporation! The successful candidate will assist In the overall organization and management of the Nursing Department. Qualifications include RN licensure, rehab and care delivery system experience, survey knowledge, as well as strong clink^l and personnel sidlls. Opportunity to develop into permanent position posslblel For Immediate consideration, please send your resume or call: Boulder City Care Canter, Attn: Administrator, 601 Adams, Boulder City, NV 89005, (702)293-5151. EOE. i MAIDS NEEDED. No experience necessary Apply in person Vale Hotel BC EARN EXCELLENT MONEY at home. Assembly work Jewelry, toys, others. Call 1-619-565-1522 Ext. TA3102NV 24 hrs. WANTEDPERSONAL COMPUTER TECHNICIAN Small Boulder city Computer wholesaler needs expenenced trout)leshooter for IBM and compatible 8088 and 80286 systems Responsible for configuring hardware and software in store, and troutile shooting over phone. Nonsmoker preferred Full time $6 per hour 2940204 ask for Mark. WANTEDPERSONAL COMPUTER SALESMAN Small Boulder City Computer wholesaler needs knowledgeable IBM and compatible systems sales person Retail and phone order tak ing Non-smoker preferred. $5 per hour Full time 294-0204 ask for Joanne. BC Janitorial help neeaed in Henderson area Full time days & swing. Dependable and reliable. Will tram Beeper 795-6878 or office 736-0091. EXCELLENT WAGES for spare time assembly. Easy work at home. No experience needed. Call 1-504-641-7778 Ext. 4480 Open 24 hrs. including Sunday Hardfloor position for Henderson area Starts at $4.50 hr Call 457-4224. Delivery driver days. Apply in person. Artie's Pizza and Wings. 4401 E. Sunset Rd., Green Valley. Must have own car and insurance Wanted, Tow truck driver with experience—Live in the • Henderson area—Must have phone—Willing to work all hours—Apply at 1239 North BIdr Hwy Henderson, NV 564-1180 SNAP TOW HELP WANTED Female 18 or older. Simple cooking and cleaning in my home 3 to 8 hrs per day Mon-Fn Must enjoy children. Call 564-8580. Responsible person to stay at our home in Green Valley M-F 1:30 to 4:30 pm to watch 9 yr old boy. Must have own transportation $4 per hr, beg. Aug, 28. Mobile No 595-6074 after 7 pm. 456-1554 Green Valley Resident full or part time advertising saies Great commission, daily pay. Call 7 98-6426. EAFW EXCELLENT MONEY at home Assembly work. Jewelry, toys, others Call 1-619 565-1522 Ext T3107NV 24 hrs. Delivery drivers needed. Apply between 9 & 6 pm Pickart's Auto Parts. 31 E, Basic Henderson. Clerical office help. Construction site, maintenance office, typing, filing, computer experience w/D Base and Lotus 1 2 3 helpful. Full time 564-8791. JEANINE'S SWBET TREAT BAKB SHOP Now taking applications. We have 2 positions open beginning in Sept. Work hrs. 7 a.m. til 12:30 Mon thru Fri. or 11:30 til 3:00 Tue., Wed., Thurs $ 4 per hr. Light tasks along with selling muffins/serving coffee •Common sense a must!! 'Neat & Personable •Can make change •Enjoys a country atmosphere Apply in person 525 Hotel Plaza, B.C. DOMINOS PIZZA NEEDED IMMEDIATELY 20 DEUVERY PERSONNEL We are now hiring for days and evenings, full or part time shifts. If you'd like to work in a fast paced and highly profitable environment, then come see me Tracy Taylor at Domino's Pizza, located at 3981 Sunset Rd. near Annie Oakley, between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. daily, or call me at 45t-^030. You must be 18 yrs of age and have own auto w/insurance. We're opening a new store soon so I need you today. Management opportunities available. Equal Opportunity Emptoyer. Applicatons are being accepted at ail stores. NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS FOR PERSON 21 or older Must be responsiljle Apply in person For appt call Joe 293-1891, Boulder Beach Store 290 Lakeshore, BC Restau rant cashier and food servers Swing shift and some days. Clerk lor retail store, part time, possible full time. 11 am to7pm shift. $4 50 hr Lake Mead Resort 322 Lake Shore Rd Boulder City MISCELLANEOUS CLOCK REPAIR •Antique & Other •GrandfatherA/Vall Buying Antique and Estate Clocks 294-1133 BC AVON Buy or Sell (Only $8 to Start) Kathy Van Llew 293-2934 CLOCKS & LOCKS Formerly Terry'a Clock Service has moved to 5020 E. Tropicana Ave. A8 454-9230 Radio World 2 Way Radio Sales & Service 1656 Nevada Hwy. BC 294-2666 WOMEN'S BIBLE STUDY INTERDENOMINATIONAL Every Wednesday at 9 30 am. 571 Adams Blvd Free babysitting and refreshments If you are a new comer to Boulder City come and make new friends Phone 293 7773 Fresh New Mexico Green Chili—will be available Aug. 21. Place your order now. 564-1033. PURE WATER REVERSE OSMOSIS Brand new in factory carton, 3 cartridge unit w/chrome faucet. Best made w/factory guarantee. Costs $625, sacrifice $288; also new water conditioner, & softener, costs $995, will sell for $415. 361-5785. MEDICAL OFFICE CLOSING Harold E. Dittemore M.D. announces closing of medical office at 106 E. Lake Mead Drive. Henderson, Nevada, effective Aug. 9, 1989. Send medical record release from physician of your choice to above address. ^^ TANNER'S FLEA MARKET 20'X10' Selling Space Only $40 Sunday, Aug. 13, 1989 La* Vgas Convantlon Cantar Coooooolmt PImem In Town Call 382-8355 REFRIGERATOR & FREEZER SERVICE Day or Night • NO SERVICE CHARGE* With Repair *AU Major Brands • Licensed RKZSERVICE '451-4080 EMISSION CONTROL BOULDER CITY TEXACO 567 Nev. Hwy., B.C. 294-1971 INDEPENDENT MOVERS • One Room of Houseful • Pianos or Any Heavy Load • Specializing in Henderson and Boulder City Free Estlmatee and Reasonable Rate* Referencee Available 293-7911 CUSTOM DESIGN GARDENING & LANDSCAPE Weekly, Monthly Maintenance, Sprinklers, Sod & Seed Installation. Lie. #0028869 294-3084 anytime CHRISTIAN CENTER DAY CARE (CHILD CARE • PRE-SCHOOL • KINDERGARTEN BEFORE AND AFTER SCHOOL CARE FOR ELEMENTARY AQE • FREE TRANSPORTATION •2 Years through 5lh Grade •Open 6:00 a.m.-5:45 p.m. •State Licensed •High Staff Radio, A1 Teachers •Little Peoples Workshop Curriculum •Lots of T.L.C. Phone 293-7773 571 Adam* Blvd. HOME OF CHRISTIAN CENTER SCHOOL (Kindergarten through 6th grade)

PAGE 46

H9 M, H md mom HOOM News, fiouldw City Nnra, Qtmm Vlly News Legal Notices YOU CAN MAKE THEIR WISH COME TRUE PLEASE GIVE TO THE SUN CAMP FUND Send Contributions to: SUN Camp Fund PO. Box 4275 Las Vegas. NV 89127 CITY OF BOULDER CITY A Muiidpid Corporation MO Ariaona Strwi Boalder aty. NoirMia 88005 NOTICE INVITING BIDS The dtj of BOOMOT CHJ, Ntvada wiU rocoive bids for the foUowiag: BC Project No. 8258-MC. This work con•iete of f • raiahiog and ereeting appfajdnuitely SjSOO Une* feet of 8-foot chain Unli fence incladiag 3 etraade of bari>ed wire. Worli ihaU alM include footing, gatco and all oeceasary item to complete the project. SpMificationa and Ud farmi may be obtained at the Engineering Office, aty Hall, 900 Ariiona Street, Boulder City. Nevada 88005. Sealed bid* for auch wiU be received at the offioa of the Finance Director naUl 2:30 P.M. on August 10.1889 when they will be opened and read aloud in the City Council Chambers. Boulder City retains the right to reject any and fU bida. to waive any iaformality in bidding, and to accept any bid deemed most advantageons to the City. Robert E. Boyer Finance Director HAug. 10. 1969 CITY OF BOULDER CITY SECTION B ^ ^ A Monidpal Corporation 900 Arisona Street Boulder City, Nevada 89006 NOTICE INVITING BIDS The City of Boulder City. Nevada will receive bids for the foUowing: Steel Transmisahm Poles; Aluminum Conductor; & Insulators. Specifications and bid forms may be obtained at the Finance Department, City Hall, 900 Ariiona Street. Bonlder City. Nevada 89005. Sealed bids for such will be received at the office of the Finance Director unUI 2:30 P.M. P.D.T. on August 31. 1989 wheu they will be opened and read aloud in the City Council Chambers. Boulder City retains the right to reject sny and all bids, to waive and informality in bidding, and to accept any bid deemed moat advantageous to the City. Robert E. Boyer Finance Director PnbUshed: BouUa^ aty NewB August 10, 1989 B-Aug. 10, 1989 Thunday. Aofpst 10. 1989 Thureday. August 10,1989 HoidwMii Home Ntws. Boulder City News, Green Valley News Pie 47 SECTIONS ANNOUNCEMENT THE HOUSING AUniORITH OF THE COUNTY OF CLARK, NEVADA, is crwUng an appUcailon pool for the Section B HoaAig Aaliiancc Propsmi. These programi are for PWMM of limited meam and provMss aarisUncc toward their ^wt ApplkalioM for TWO BEDROOM UNITS ONLY will ^ opaied on Monday, Aiua( 21,1N9 aad will My open unM Airtbsr aoUc*. ToplaceaaappllcaUonyoHmaM coma is our offkc at SOM E naaiaio Road. Our rign up ihnas arc a:30 AM to 11:30 AM, Monday through Wednesday and Tuesday anernoons fh>m 1:00 PMlo 2:30 PM. nae bring Itlrth certificates and aadal aecnrity cards on all IkmBj • embers as well as photo MenUflcailon, proof at incoiM and lait yean Income tax returns on all adult rimlly members. In addition, please provide a copy of your lease, rent receipts or renui agrccmenL LEGAL NOTICE Notice ia hereby given that I, LM8 Stonte wiU seU contents of below mentioned units to aatiafy storage liens. Unit 147, Unda BayaH, 10634 Beechnut St., Apt 424, Houston, Teae, 77072. Unit #236, Brian Daugherty. 2050 Magic Way. 1290. Henderaon, NV 89015. Unit #238, Randall Pansier. 2000 N. Commerce, North Las Vegas, NV 89030. Unit #221. Marda DilU. 2306 E. Sahara. Snite F, Las Vegas, NV 89104. Auction will be held at 10 a.m. at 1648 Athol. Henderson, on Friday. August 25, 1989. We reaerve the right to bid. This sale subject .tp^ prior cancellation in the event all monies paid and goods removed prior to this date. H-Aug. 10, 17, 24, 1989 wUb <.npu ur rcniai agreement. H-Aug. 8,10,11.1989 A A A Legal Nallca Tb Mtowli fUd HMta*ah||habMd tWaawasbtalaadby towinga itor a gi llwa an Manday Angnal llill8. SIg JakMTawkft 1577 FaatMB Dr. Bonid* aty, NV mOS. Wa reserve the right to Md. 1979 Chcv via CKL189F112995 st a pi, N/A LO a RO Urry D Davla, Sue A. Davis, Las Vegas, NV 89109 1970 Cbev vin CF140J1092W st a pi MN MPH 590 RO a LO UNK 1982 Hy via JP3BE3435CU70669g st & pi N/ A RO a LO UNK 1958 Alaikan Camper vin DA 14270 RO a LO UNK Abindon US 95 ^\ HomcmadeTRLR vlnDR771121TRO& LOUNK Abandon In alley Denver a Colorado Boulder City NV Homemade TRLR vin 94M74 RO a LO UNK Abandon it 1 lOI Industrial Boulder City NV Auction will be hdd on Mondsj August 21st 1989 8 AM. We reserve the right to bid. B-July 27, Aug. 3,10,1989. WANT AD RATES.. .RUNS TUES, THURS & FRL HENDERSON, BOULDER CITY & GREEN VALLEY 3 lines $4.00 wk 4 lines <4.45 wk 5 lines ..-. .$4.90 wk 6 lines .... .. $5.35 wk 7 lines $5.80 wk 8 lines $6.25 wk 9 lines $6.70 wk 10 lines $7.15 wk up to 3 lines (23 characters per line) 45$ each additional line OIADUNE FOR WANT ADS a • 4 FJi. TUESDAY FOR THURSDAY ISSUE 4 P.M. FRIDAY FOR TUESDAY ISSUE BOXED ADS $6.00 per column Inch per week H.aa PUBLICATIONS, mc. BOULDER aVf NEWS HENDERSON HOME NEWS • GREEN VALLEY NEWS • IMallbtg Addreas — P.O. Box 90430 Handcrson, Nevada 89009 (702) 564-1881 WANT ADS Bring Buyers andSellers Together ••• WHATS NEWS? The Henderson Home Boulder City & Green Valley ^^iciciticititif "A"A"A"Ar"^'^'^i It's Ihat lime of year You can help 383-7209 '•••••• PETS/ANIMALS NEWS Free to good home 1 yr old, AKC. registered Golden Retriever, good w/kids. Call 565-7745. AKC Shelties, puppies, young adults and stud service. 452-3034. FREE PUPPY Black female lab 12 weeks old. 293-3116 BC AKC COCKER SPANIEL PUPPIES buff, females $250 Males $200 293-7068 BC. TROPICAL FISH 33 beautiful specimens and plants. Entire group below wholesale. Green Amazon parrot Tame and affectionate. Cage and maple T-stand $425 Beautifully marked Cockatiel. Tame and talking Cage and stand $85. Must find good homes. 293-4947 BC MAY I HELP Y(X) GET YOUR DOG OR CAT SPAYED OR NEUTERED FOR A GRACIOUS OSOOUNT? 2a3-5673 B.C. Anytime. FREE KITTENS AND PUPPIES NEED GOOD HOME Call 293-5673 "Mac's Wonderband" Registered Thoroughbred quarterhorse. 16'3". Beautiful black thoroughbred, 5 yrs. old. Perfect for hunter, jumper or English. Call anytime 293-5848. [^ The Animal Foundation Cow Cost Spay/Neu'er Clinic. Ca' 384-3333 for appointment. Dogs for adoption: Miniature Pincher, AKC Doberman, Whippet, Dachsund, Blue healer, Bassett hound, Samoyed, Springer Spaniel, Irish Setters, Poodles and lots moce 361-2484 FOUND: Aug. Lake Mead & Water Street. Mix bred hunting dog. Female 6 to 12 months. White/brown spots. Has Collar'' name is Bandit'' 564-3153 or 293-8209 Ask for Bonnie Lost: 7 week old puppie Golden Lab. Male Magnesium area, on Aug. 1 89. Please call 564-5637 or 5645299 LOST: Large grey tiger striped neutral male. Lost Sunday night vicinity of National and Lincoln. 564-7027 Please leave message. Garage Sale: Furn., sm. appliances, clothing, much more. Boulder Hwy, Lake East Follow signs 565-5149. Sat. & Sun. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. MOVING SALE Couch, chairs, tables, TV, plants, chest, nite stands, many household items. Thurs Fn Sat Sam 890 Del Sol No 11 BC AA AAA'A'i^^ifc' Huge Yard Sale Friday and Sat. 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. fools. Yard 5alP Ann 11 A 19 n ••• •••• '— '1 SITUATIONS WANTED • ••••• JOB OPPORTUNITIES •••••• GARAGE SALES Dogs, cats, kittens and puppies, All ages, colors and kinds. For adoption Also jther pets. Call 361 -2484 for directions. SPAY OR NEUTER YOUR PET FOR HALF PRICE SHOTS 25% OFF — VALLEY SAVE A PET 384-6049 (Ruby) or 642-8543 n •••••• LOST & FOUND J LOST Vicinity of Vons, Sunday Aug 6 REWARD for the return of Mobile phone. No questions asked. 293-6902 BC Lost: Miniature shorthair red Dashshund. Answers to Name of Heidi. Reward. 565-0459. Garage Sale: 89 & 101 W. Lake Mead Drive, weekdays, 7 a.m. to 3, Sat & Sun, 8 to 4 p.m. 813 Major Apt No. B, Thurs., Furn & household items, clothes. 564-0561. Plus 79 Olds Garage Sale: Sat. Aug. 12, 7 am. 836 San Bruno. Books, rocking chair, crib, 4 wheels, 5 lugs, 9.50X16.5 lamps, tools, stroUer, nick nacks and lots of misc. Yard Sale: Yamaha Jog 87 $600 080 Dishes, brick-rbrack and other items. 1109 Pawnee Behind Playiand Skating Rink. Fn. & Sat 8 am to ? 564-1835. MOVING SALE Floor scrubber and polisher $15. Two wood stepladders 4ft, 6ft. Desk. Chest of drawers $100. 16 cu ft Kenmore upright freezer $200. 293-3093 BC MOVING SALE Formal French Country dining room set, lighted hutch, pads, from Garretts $1,000 Decorator co-ordinated French Country living room furn. King headboard. Lazy Boy, twin bed sets, reasonable, must see 293-2777 eves. BC GARAGE SALE Life time of collecting. Must sell, we're moving. Antiques-furniture, tods, glassware. Collectibles-toys, traps, and memorabilia. We have it all Aug 12-13 7am-7pm. No early arnvals. 1450 San Felipe BC MOVING SALE Lots of books. 401 Ave. I Sat, Sun 9-5 293-2079 BC MOVING SALE: Green Valley South, Sat. Aug. 12, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Misc. items. 2828 Preciso Lane. Nursemaid, home and convalescent care for sick and elderly. Mornings 4 hr. shifts daily. Ask for Joan 454-9468 I LADIES HAVE HUSBAND WILL RENT An all around nice guy, who doesn't smoke, drink, or complain. He'll do your household chores, maintenance, cleaning, laundry including listen. And he's reasonable. Call 294-1376. /Vow you can have the beef without buying into the bull (Thi IS not an escort service) Retail Sales. Shepler's Western Wear is expanding & we would like you to become a part of the worlds i largest western store &i catalogue. We are openings in early SepL a new store inj Las Vegas at the Sahara Pavillion. We have openings for sales associates &: cashiers. Previous exp.' preferred. Full & part time pos. available featuring an excellent starting salary & benefits package. Applies-: tions are accepted at our' temporary offices located at 3939W.SaharaAve,Ste5,> between 3-8 p.m. or call 258-2000 for appt. Sheplers Inc EOE. •••••• PERSONALS TRAINEES NEEDED TRAIN FOR NEW EMPLOYMENT NOW METRIN Want to look S-10 yMra youngw? For ITM facial • ppt.calBator8tw.Doll Ml tht dmwMoel 234268 ELECTRONICS/ROBOTICS TECHNICIANS AUTO 4 DIESEL TECHWICIAMJ MUST BE ABLE TO TEMPORARILY RELOCATE TO SUNNY TUCSON. ARIZONA FOR 6-12 MONTHS •TM^onry NoMbig •RMndal AM ProgrM •PMt-TbM Jok Wp>t cm w>K •EmpioynMnt Aflw Irtitimton tNTERVIEWINQ NOW IN VOOR AREA CALL NOW FOR YOUR INTERVIEW DATE AND TIME 1-800-333.TECH MtG TICHWICAL TRAM SCNOOU ^PET CORNER You might find it surprising to learn that both newts and salamanders are popular house pets. One explanation is that, in general, they are pretty undemanding creatures. There are three main families found in captivity: mole salamanders, woodland salamanders and "true" salamanders. And they all taste pretty good (just kidding!!). These interesting amphibians can be kept together in a large aquarium with a cover to prevent escape. Land-type salamanders, however, need dark, moist homes with plenty of places to hide, (e.g. under plants or rocka). Half fill your aquarium with pond water from the original habitat, if at dl possible. Using floating rafts of thin cork will allow the amphibians to leave the water if they so desire. Be sure to keep the aquarium cool and out of direct sunlight. Also, the water must be changed once weekly. However, in order to avoid contracting salmonella from the dirty water, wash your hands thoroughly once this task is completed. Worms, small insects, small spiders and chopped lean beef or liver once a week is an excellent diet. You could also use slugs, caterpilars and woodlice as part of a "balanced" diet. Large salamanders or newts will eat a small mouse, and they love brineshrimp, white worm, tubifex and small earthworms. These can be purchased at your local pet store. •••••• DOMESTIC HELP Will care for your children in my home, Mon-Fri. Children with special needs are welcome. 564-1088. (VIOTHER WILL BABYSIT: Infants and toddlers. Debbie 293-5099 BC COIVIPANION WANTED Looking for senior, retired mature woman to act as livein companion. Must be nonsmoker, non-dnnker, and drive w/own transportation. Will provide private bedroom and bath in spacious mobile home in Boulder City. Will also pay $ 100 per week and will pay for all food, l^inimum housekeeping and help w/cooking. Local references required Please call 564-7503 leave message, or 295-1743 BC Win do housecleaning. Good .quality work. Reasonable rates. Experianced & references. Call Rosa 565-^70 or Anna 29301 2Q. I WILL BABYSIT IN MY HOME. Good references. Call Kitty 293-5462 BC BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES OWN YOUR OWN APPAREL OR SHOE STORE, CHOOSE FROM: JEAN/ SPORTSWEAR, LADIES, MEN'S, CHILDREN/ MATERNITY, LARGE SIZES, PETITE, DANCEWEAR/ AEROBIC, BRIDAL, LINGERIE OR ACCESSORIES STORE. ADD COLOR ANALYSIS. BRAND NAMES: LIZ CLAIBORNE, HEALTHTEX, BONNIE AND BILL,STMICHELE. FORENZA, BUGLE BOY, LEVI, CAMP BEVERLY HILLS. LESLIE FAYE, LUCIA OVER 2,000 OTHERS. OR $13.99 ONE PRICE DESIGNER, MULTI TIER PRICING DISCOUNT OR FAMILY SHOE STORE RETAIL PRICES UNBELIEVABLE FOR TOP OUALITY SHOES NORMALLY PRICED FROM $19 to $60, OVER 250 BRANDS 2,600 STYLES. $18,900 TO $29,900:INVENTORY, TRAINING, FIXTURES, AIRFARE, GRAND OPENING, ETC. CAN OPEN 15 DAYS. MR. MCCOMB (404) 859-0229. Clean, Clean deanlll No jot) is too big or too small. We're fast & eniciant. We do It all. In Hdn for 20 yr. 565-8107 before 8 p.m. plaaae. Babysitting in my Henderson Home all hours. 7 days a week. Peaceful neighborhood. Hot meals inlcuded. Excellent references. Call 565-4446 ask tor Kim, Babysitting in my home 24_ hrs a day Loving care ex-' cellent references. Call 565-5426 anytime. CNIdcare Immediate opening for 0-5 years. Hot lunch ,&%nacks. Ph 565-7412. Childcare my home, fenced yard, meals & snacks, lots of tl C. 565-3423. Childcare in my home, 7 days a week, any shift. Lots of TLC 565-2255. Will care for two children in my home. Fenced yard MonFri CTSewell area. Reasonable. 564-7510. In home childcare. Reliable, responsible, reasonable Mon-Fn. Days, Next door to Dooley Elem School 564-7545, SUPER SITTER-Personal attention, fantastic program, reasonable rates, any hours, Lon 564-1626, Mother of one will watch your Gordon McCaw student (jefore and after school. Call 565-5562. Christian mother of two would enjoy having your little one while you work. Call Kelly 564-4402 Will babysit in my home MonFn any age child. 565-9739. INSTA-CLEAN MAID/ JANITORIAL SERVICE ProfeBsional cleaning service for residential and commercial. All phases of general cleaning covered including carpet cleaning, wall/ceilings washed. Vinyl & linoleum floor care. 293-3316 I WILL DO HOUSECLEANING-Reasonable 564-7666. A k k A t A A EMPLOYMENT We haye a lone raac falOur CLASSIFIEDS reach •BOULDER CUT •HENDEHSON • GREEN VALLET CaU today 293-2302 UNLV STUDENT NEEDED for overnight sitter for 8 year old. Sunday through Wednesday 9pm to 7am. Must be B.C. resident with own transportation. $50 wk plus other benefits References required. Begin the end of August 293-6184 after 6pm. BC HELP WANTED (college students leaving) Gift shop/ice cream counter sales, food prep, janitonal. $4 to start. Benefits. No exp nee. Apply In person. HOOVER DAM SNACKETERIA BC TEACHERS Preachool Full/Part Tim* and SubatHut* opanlnga. Larga modam facility with •xcallant curriculum. Competitive aalary and banaflts. Call 565-0007 or 456-7008. Caps Sandwich Shop NEEDED •Delivery Person •Mature Counter Help Call 293-7070 AREA DEMONSTRATORS Fun job. Earn those extra $'s. Set yoiuown hours. FVee kit, no collecting, no delivering. Excellent pay, bonuses! Hurry, oOl today 451-5026. SALES AOENT ^, WANTED Nio • ily known catandar rrunilactuw and SpacwKy Aavwtwng company ofltts •n oppo(1uny lor an induMnoua i-itai1ai lor Kin or part lime wort Th is Na a f?***!.'!!?!""'**'*" •***'*'•''••*" w< PW" 10 (•• our aduaw CalaixJaia, Buainaaa QilU and Exianan* A*(tiaino Spiaally Asi^^ lokrmawiltwihabMtnaaicannunilyTliaTNM D MurptiyCo apionaet mma aflvartiamgriaBainca laje H you can otganue you own wna and daMrmna your own auccaaa. wma Scfiard Fmw The Thoa D Murphy Co Box 382. Red Oak. Iowa, oread lTt23.5S3, ,fl 1,2 WORKING BUSY MOM NEEDS HELP Pick up kids from Christian Center two or three days by 6PM til 8:30 PM. My house or yours. Provide dinner. 364-4041 beeper, 293-5156 home. BC COOK Experience not necessary-will train. Apply 4 to 9pm. Villa Capn.Marshall Plaza, Boulder City WAITRESS Part time-two eves a week, sometimes three. Apply 4 to 7 pm. Villa Capri, Marshall Plaza, Boulder City DISHWASHER WANTED apply in person Vale Hotel 704 Nev Hwy BC WAITRESS NEEDED apply in person Vale Hotel 704 Nev Hwy BC Earn up to $339 wk. Assemble our products at home. Amazing recorded message reveals details Call 382-7848 LPN NEEDED for 3-11 shift, fulltimeLPN, part tinne 11-7 shift for Boulder City Hospital Long Term Care Unit. Contact Alice_at_293-4111 BC MUSTARD SEED NOW HIRING Must have flexible hours. Apply in person BC DIET CENTER COUNSELOR Must have Diet Center exper'ence. Part time only. $5 per hr Call 293-1109 for ap pointment. BC VISTA VOLUNTEERS needed for E;(tended Care Unit at Boulder City Hospital (limited income position). Please contact Sandy Chnstensen 293-4111 for more information. BC RETAIL SALES BC. Shop looking for Sales Manager. Experience preferred Send resume to 501 Hotel Plaza, Suite A. Boulder City, Nv. 89005 PICKN PACK Kelly Servee^ has openings (or people who want to work 40 hr:3/wk plus overtime in Hendiarson. No expereience necessary. Must be over 18 and have access to a phone and reliable transportation Call 564 1581 F;0E/M/F/H No fee HOUSEKEEPER Full-time position with excellent working corxlitiofts. FLOOR PERSON Hard working individual needed to work full-time, evenings. DIETARY ASSISTANTS DISHWASHERS Excellent position with flexible scheduling available. Must be able to work weekenda, 32 hrs/week. Students encouraged to applyl LAUNDRY PERSON Part-time, 3-11 p.m., relief position. Apply in person to: Boulder City Care Center, 601 Adams, Boulder City, NV 89005. (No phones calls pleaae). EOE. COST ACCOUNTANT/ MANAGER TRAINEE Strong cost accounting experience, especially job order costing Standard cost and variance analysis, inventory movement accounting, physical inventory, computer bases accounting will be a plus. Call Joan or Lee at NBS 565-0065 AHENTION: EARN MONEY READING BOOKS! $32,000/year income potential Details (1)602-838-8885 Ext Bk10.002 MAIDS part time. Trainees acceptable. PORTER for daily work, some stairs. FRONT DESK CLERK, some experience desired. NIGHT AUDITOR experi•rwed in restaurant and hotel atJditing. Should be able to cover front desk. Apply 9 am to noon, Monday thru Friday at front desk. BEST WESTERN LIGHTHOUSE INN 110 Ville Dr. BCFor sale. Stereo, sewing machine, planter pole/macrama, lamp, end table, sm. & med. ladies ctothes 564-5223. DENTAL' ASSlSTANTCHAIRSIDE for busy general practice. Two yrs previous exp required. We offer a challenging career opportunity In a team ohented office. Health benefits and iDonus. Salary negotiable. Call 293-0373 ask for Debbie. BC • Restaurant hostesses, bus persons. Apply in person Gold Stnke Inn. BC. Casa Flores now accepting applications for bartenders, hostess & busboys. Apply in person. 930 Nevada Hwy. FOUR SEASONS POOL SERVICE now taking applications for serviceman. Min. age 21, must have good dnving record. 293-^465. GOVERNMENT JOBS! Now hinng in your area, both skilled and unskilled. For a current list of jobs and applications, call 1-615-383-2627 Ext. P290. EARN MONEY Reading books! $30,000/yr income potential. Details. (1y 805-687-6000 Ext Y-5695 Help Wanted: 7-11, Full or part time. Must be 21 years old Starting pay $4.50 per hr w/experience. Apply m person, 710 Center Street. MEDICAL Back OfficeNew Family Practitioner in Henderson needs Medical Assitant or LPN. Office hours 8 am to 5 pm. No holidays or weekends. Salary DOE. Experience preferred. 565-8066. Help Wanted in lawn maintenance. 21 yr old. Clean driving record preferred. Call leave message 565-1593. BOB'S ALL FAMILY RESTAURANT now accepting applications for dishwashers, cooks, waitresses. Apply in person 761 Nev Hwy BC $350.00 A DAYi Processing Phone Orders. People Call You! No experience Necessary. Call (Refundable) 518-459-8697 Ext. 5128 RESUMES' Composed, edited and typed. Also Contracts, Letters, and Wills. BM'S Business Service, 527 Hotel Plaza (The Village) 293-526a BC. CANVASSER/SURVEYOR Part-time, fun job,.20 hrs a week. Flexible hrs. Do survey for school. Guaranteed $5 per hr. Our people do earn $10 per hr. & more with DQnuses. Transportation needed. Henderson applicants welcome. Call 565-3669. EOE. EASTRIDQE TEMPS. Taking applications now for: •Secretaries •Receptionists •Pacicers •Production •Warehouseman NEVER A FEE Register Today & No Appointment Necessary 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday-Friday 565-3118 1S3 Water St. 12 TEACHER ELEMENTARY EDUCATION — SECONDARY EDUCATION SUBSTITUTE TEACHER or Teacher with Child Development Training NAME OWN HOURS Call Oaidane Praachod Academy 1308 Wyoming St., B.C. 293-5188 RNs/LPNs up to $1,000 Sign-on Bonus! RNa needed for fulland part-time, nights and relief, days! LPNt needed for fulMlme, rttghts and part-time, daya! Enfoy excellent wage* and iMneflts Including: •ChlM care astlatance •Education program aaaiitanee •Health Insurance •Up to 4 wesks vacation the first yearl Contact Boulder City Cars Center, Attn: Director of Nursing, 601 Adsms, Boulder City, NV 89005, (702)293-5151. EOE. GENERAL LABORS/PRODUCTION WORKERS & CLERICAL Immediate Openings Good Pay — No Fee MANPOWER TEMPORARY SERVICES 30 A Water Street Henderson, NV 565-5554 Copies IOC each Cook for authentic Mexican food needed Apply at Coyotes' Cantina at 2801 Athenian. 458-3739. MUNICIPAL COURT MARSHALL Salary: $25,235.88 30,661.59/year Requirements: Graduation from high school or equivalent, with three (3) years of law enforcement or related work, two (2) of which involved dealing with the public, or any equivalent combination of education and expenence. Special Requirements: Possession of, or the ability to obtain, a Class III Nevada driver's license, and maintenance of an excellent driving record Must possess a certificate for Peace Officer II or complete the Nevada Peace Officer Standard Training (POST) within one year of appointment. Must pass City approved physical examination. Must qualify with a firearm every two (2) months. Must not have been convicted of any cnme for which registration is required under N.R.S. 207.090 and 207.152, and must not have been convicted of two or more offenses of larceny WHERE TO APPLY: City application form and personal resume must tie submitted to the Personnel Department, City Hall, 243 Water Street, Henderson. Nevada 89015, and must be filed no later than Monday, August 14, 1989, at 5:30 pm HOURS OF OPERATION: 7:30 am -5:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday. AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER SURVEYAND PROPERTIES MANAGER Salary: $42,361.03 51,481.66/year Requirements: Graduation from a four year college or university with major emphasis in civil engineenng, mathematics, or related Held, plus five (5) years' progressively responsible surveying experience, ineluding or supplemented by three (3) years of administrative experience and some specialized experience in right-of-way and acquisition, or any equivalent combination of education and experience Special Requirements: Possession of, or the ability to obtain, a Class III Nevada driver's license, and maintenance of an excellent driving record. Must possess or be able to obtain registration as a Land Surveyor in the slate of Nevada, and specialization in right-of-way, and an acquisition certificate, WHERE TO APPLY: City application form and personal resume must be submitted to the Personnel Department. City Hall, 243 Water Street, Henderson, Nevada89015, and must l3e filed no later than Thursday, August 17, 1989, at 5:30 pm HOURS OF OPERATION: 7:30 am. 5:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER WAITRESS NEEDED Expenence preferred, will tram. Apply at Front Desk, VALE HOTEL 704 Nev Hwy BC EARN MONEY Reading books' $30,000/yr income potential. Details. (1) 805687-6000 Ext. Y-5695 McDonald Kearney the creata and designer of MD3D portrait lamps is in need of sales people for the Nevada area Commission only Pleas e call 919-596-9755 EXPERIENCED KENO WRITER NEEDED, Apply in person Gold Strike Inn and Casino BC PART TIME MAID NEEDED Good pay for responsible worker. INSTA CLEAN .^ 93-3316 BC PART TIME WORK AVAILABLE in Gift and Souvenir Shop at the 1 mile marker on the Arizona side of Dam Call 564-3844 and ask for Gene BC MAID SERVICE NEEDS PEOPLE INTERESTED IN ADVANCEMENT Work with a crew. Grime Busters Maid Servi ce, 79 8 1002. RAILROAD PASS HOTEL AND CASINO IS NOW HIRING. Full or part lime maids. Apply in person. See hotel manager 7 days a week. ? 800 S. Boulder Hwy. Hdn. • MAINTENANCE ?UPERVISOR needed for Boulder City Hospital. General maintenance skills required Previous hospital experience preferred. Supervisor skills a plus. Contact Alice at 293-4111 BC TELEMARKETING SURVEY part time. Your home. No sales. 294-3106 BC AUTO PARTS COUNTER PERSON Full time. Experience necessary Health tienefits, paid vacation Apply in person. Auto Specialists. Inc. 705 Juniper Way BC Easy Work! Excellent Pay! Assemble products at home. Call for information 504-641-8003 Ext. 1311 NOW HIRING Full and part time help. All shifts. Inquire in person Jack in the Box. 1101 Nev Hwy BC ROUTE DRIVER AND MISCELLANEOUS HELP Young man, must be physically fit, heavy work. Call 294-0004 BC BOAT DOCK ATTENDANT Willow Beach Resorts is now accepting applications lor Boat Dock Attendant. Part time and full time help' needed Apply in person 293-3776 BC FRONT DESK CLERK Willow Beach Resorts is now accepting applications for Front Desk Clerk, Apply in person 293-3776 BC INTERIM DIRECTOR OF NURSING Enjoy the pluses of worlcIng with a nationwide corporation! The successful candidate will assist In the overall organization and management of the Nursing Department. Qualifications include RN licensure, rehab and care delivery system experience, survey knowledge, as well as strong clink^l and personnel sidlls. Opportunity to develop into permanent position posslblel For Immediate consideration, please send your resume or call: Boulder City Care Canter, Attn: Administrator, 601 Adams, Boulder City, NV 89005, (702)293-5151. EOE. i MAIDS NEEDED. No experience necessary Apply in person Vale Hotel BC EARN EXCELLENT MONEY at home. Assembly work Jewelry, toys, others. Call 1-619-565-1522 Ext. TA3102NV 24 hrs. WANTEDPERSONAL COMPUTER TECHNICIAN Small Boulder city Computer wholesaler needs expenenced trout)leshooter for IBM and compatible 8088 and 80286 systems Responsible for configuring hardware and software in store, and troutile shooting over phone. Nonsmoker preferred Full time $6 per hour 2940204 ask for Mark. WANTEDPERSONAL COMPUTER SALESMAN Small Boulder City Computer wholesaler needs knowledgeable IBM and compatible systems sales person Retail and phone order tak ing Non-smoker preferred. $5 per hour Full time 294-0204 ask for Joanne. BC Janitorial help neeaed in Henderson area Full time days & swing. Dependable and reliable. Will tram Beeper 795-6878 or office 736-0091. EXCELLENT WAGES for spare time assembly. Easy work at home. No experience needed. Call 1-504-641-7778 Ext. 4480 Open 24 hrs. including Sunday Hardfloor position for Henderson area Starts at $4.50 hr Call 457-4224. Delivery driver days. Apply in person. Artie's Pizza and Wings. 4401 E. Sunset Rd., Green Valley. Must have own car and insurance Wanted, Tow truck driver with experience—Live in the • Henderson area—Must have phone—Willing to work all hours—Apply at 1239 North BIdr Hwy Henderson, NV 564-1180 SNAP TOW HELP WANTED Female 18 or older. Simple cooking and cleaning in my home 3 to 8 hrs per day Mon-Fn Must enjoy children. Call 564-8580. Responsible person to stay at our home in Green Valley M-F 1:30 to 4:30 pm to watch 9 yr old boy. Must have own transportation $4 per hr, beg. Aug, 28. Mobile No 595-6074 after 7 pm. 456-1554 Green Valley Resident full or part time advertising saies Great commission, daily pay. Call 7 98-6426. EAFW EXCELLENT MONEY at home Assembly work. Jewelry, toys, others Call 1-619 565-1522 Ext T3107NV 24 hrs. Delivery drivers needed. Apply between 9 & 6 pm Pickart's Auto Parts. 31 E, Basic Henderson. Clerical office help. Construction site, maintenance office, typing, filing, computer experience w/D Base and Lotus 1 2 3 helpful. Full time 564-8791. JEANINE'S SWBET TREAT BAKB SHOP Now taking applications. We have 2 positions open beginning in Sept. Work hrs. 7 a.m. til 12:30 Mon thru Fri. or 11:30 til 3:00 Tue., Wed., Thurs $ 4 per hr. Light tasks along with selling muffins/serving coffee •Common sense a must!! 'Neat & Personable •Can make change •Enjoys a country atmosphere Apply in person 525 Hotel Plaza, B.C. DOMINOS PIZZA NEEDED IMMEDIATELY 20 DEUVERY PERSONNEL We are now hiring for days and evenings, full or part time shifts. If you'd like to work in a fast paced and highly profitable environment, then come see me Tracy Taylor at Domino's Pizza, located at 3981 Sunset Rd. near Annie Oakley, between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. daily, or call me at 45t-^030. You must be 18 yrs of age and have own auto w/insurance. We're opening a new store soon so I need you today. Management opportunities available. Equal Opportunity Emptoyer. Applicatons are being accepted at ail stores. NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS FOR PERSON 21 or older Must be responsiljle Apply in person For appt call Joe 293-1891, Boulder Beach Store 290 Lakeshore, BC Restau rant cashier and food servers Swing shift and some days. Clerk lor retail store, part time, possible full time. 11 am to7pm shift. $4 50 hr Lake Mead Resort 322 Lake Shore Rd Boulder City MISCELLANEOUS CLOCK REPAIR •Antique & Other •GrandfatherA/Vall Buying Antique and Estate Clocks 294-1133 BC AVON Buy or Sell (Only $8 to Start) Kathy Van Llew 293-2934 CLOCKS & LOCKS Formerly Terry'a Clock Service has moved to 5020 E. Tropicana Ave. A8 454-9230 Radio World 2 Way Radio Sales & Service 1656 Nevada Hwy. BC 294-2666 WOMEN'S BIBLE STUDY INTERDENOMINATIONAL Every Wednesday at 9 30 am. 571 Adams Blvd Free babysitting and refreshments If you are a new comer to Boulder City come and make new friends Phone 293 7773 Fresh New Mexico Green Chili—will be available Aug. 21. Place your order now. 564-1033. PURE WATER REVERSE OSMOSIS Brand new in factory carton, 3 cartridge unit w/chrome faucet. Best made w/factory guarantee. Costs $625, sacrifice $288; also new water conditioner, & softener, costs $995, will sell for $415. 361-5785. MEDICAL OFFICE CLOSING Harold E. Dittemore M.D. announces closing of medical office at 106 E. Lake Mead Drive. Henderson, Nevada, effective Aug. 9, 1989. Send medical record release from physician of your choice to above address. ^^ TANNER'S FLEA MARKET 20'X10' Selling Space Only $40 Sunday, Aug. 13, 1989 La* Vgas Convantlon Cantar Coooooolmt PImem In Town Call 382-8355 REFRIGERATOR & FREEZER SERVICE Day or Night • NO SERVICE CHARGE* With Repair *AU Major Brands • Licensed RKZSERVICE '451-4080 EMISSION CONTROL BOULDER CITY TEXACO 567 Nev. Hwy., B.C. 294-1971 INDEPENDENT MOVERS • One Room of Houseful • Pianos or Any Heavy Load • Specializing in Henderson and Boulder City Free Estlmatee and Reasonable Rate* Referencee Available 293-7911 CUSTOM DESIGN GARDENING & LANDSCAPE Weekly, Monthly Maintenance, Sprinklers, Sod & Seed Installation. Lie. #0028869 294-3084 anytime CHRISTIAN CENTER DAY CARE (CHILD CARE • PRE-SCHOOL • KINDERGARTEN BEFORE AND AFTER SCHOOL CARE FOR ELEMENTARY AQE • FREE TRANSPORTATION •2 Years through 5lh Grade •Open 6:00 a.m.-5:45 p.m. •State Licensed •High Staff Radio, A1 Teachers •Little Peoples Workshop Curriculum •Lots of T.L.C. Phone 293-7773 571 Adam* Blvd. HOME OF CHRISTIAN CENTER SCHOOL (Kindergarten through 6th grade)

PAGE 47

Pl4l. Homt News, Boaldw aty Nws, GNU Valley News •• • # iOQAgsBholwMerhMlar' Like new. 2Mr yrs. old $5(L VERNt BOUU)ER CITY TEXACO A.S.E. Certified Mectianic on duty Mon.-Sat. Quick S0rvie Lube, Oil A FiKer Tune Upe, Brekee 87 Nev. Hwy. BC Over 200 gently used desks in stock (wood and metal). Prices start at $39 ALWAYS DISCOUNT OFRCE FURNISHINGS 3300 S. Highland Dr. Las Vegas, Nv 791-3355 CARPORTS Double... $1,895 Single ...$1,495 Protect Your Cars, Vans, Boats Boulder City BuikHnf and Roofing 293-2179 For aale. Stereo, machine, planter poleAnacrame. lamp, end table, sm. A med. ladies dothee 5645223. Super Capacity Imperial Whirlpool gas dryer, extra Irg capacity,, Used 10 times $350 Firm, Ph 734-0051 ask (or Chen, New carpet and vinyl. Various sizes and colors. Values to $20 sq yd Now $3 to $6 a yard 565-7472. For Sale Garage door 2 cr 16 ft wide X 7 ft f Good cond 736-3439 For Sale: 1 36" Benjamin Franklin Wood Stove in good condition 564-1033, Are you livirm with a drinking problem? If so, why rxSt try Al Anon? Meetings are Tues 10 am at St Timothy's Episcopal Church Tues, 8 30 pm Club 51 Wed 8 p.m. St, Rose de Lima Hospital Fnday 7:30 p m Water & Power BIdg, Nev Hwy BC For more info. Call 565-9963 Hdn, TROTTBR CONSTRUCTION Cuetom Remodel Conlrector •PtloCov*r •Carports •Room AddmoM •Battiroenw KHchon nmose weight. No matter age, sex or weight-loss desire, we csn supply the support to meet your goala. Our yearly membership fee Is $15. Send stamped aelfaddressed evelope to. SUM CONnOANTS 850 S. BouMer Hwy. Ste. 206 Henderson, NV 89018 or can (702) 868-1817 z House of Travoi We honor all advertised special air, cruise and package fares. For information, Phone — 564-3681 122 Industrial Park Rd. Sta. 205 Mon. thni Frt. 94 Sat. M FRANK'S TV & APPLIANCES SALES & SERVICES For in home service call 385-9959 MAGNAVOX • MGA • SYLVAMA • PHILCO PHILLIPS WARRANTY STATION (702) 564-9329 Bonded Uc. #27S1t HARD AS CONCRETE Backhoe Servicea, alao WHAT'S NEWS? The Henderson Home Boulder City & Green Valley N^W? STORAGE FOR RENT AH 8lu~Fnoed RaeManI Manager Naar Sunaai Mountain VItU 458-3990 Specializing In PAUI TREES Buy Fresh Trees and Plam Materials direct from Arizona, California and Texas. Delivered directly to your planning pHe. 702-647-7448 AU TYPES ROOFING AND REPAIRS You buy material, I do the labor, You save 30% Call Don at 564-8519 If DO anawer, call after 5 p.m. Fnt Estimatea BETTINGHOUSE CONSTRUCTION CO. •Comnnercial •Residential •Additions 294-7703 Uc. #0027156 SWAMP COOLER (Evap Cooler) SERVICE Can nebuild or Replace Also $28 Special "Pads, Oil. Beanngs. Change Pumphltef. Cteai Oip Lines Set Floal 565-0947 RED MOUNTAIN GARDENING Complete Yard Services •Lawns •Clean Up •Rejuvanation •Sprinklers Free Estimates 293-7072 INSTA-CLEAN MAID/ JANITORIAL SERVICE Professional cleaning service for residential and commercial. All phases of general carpet covered including carpet cleaning, wall/ceilings washed. Vinyl & linoleunn floor ca^e 293-3316 KEN'S MiUNTENANCE A HANDYMAN SERVICE An Types of HMn^nmce •RBMntlrt ICan FIxor MtkBMogt Anything 293-0045 GREG'S SUPER CLEAN since 1964. Specials. S45 super steam, dining, livino rm, & tiall cpt. or average sofa Safe and mosteffective mettiod used. Window cleaning. Owner operated. Certified, licensed, bonded. Satisfaction guaranteed. 456-6632 Beeper 3a9-9649. SECOND HAND STORE: Bilmar's, 27 Army St. Buy and sell brass, tools and small appliances. All merchandise. If you have anything tor sale please come in. We repair tig appliances, all mattes and models $20 service ca/l. 564 7367,30 day guarantee BRICK-BLOCK CUSTOM WORK Nevada Lie 24144 > 14 yrs experience .Sf4-77fi MAIL, MESSAGES & MORE.Printing Copies & FAX "The Best for Less" 516 S Boulder Hwy (Von'sStioppng Center) 564-5574 Want to buy late model major appliances needing repair Refngerators etc. Call Harwood's Appliance 564-2210. Appliance parts for dont-yourselfers. Hanvood's Appliances 118 E. Lake Mead. Henderson. 564-2210 Falisha's Appliance Service We service all nnajor brands appliance, washer/dryers, refngerators. Seniof Citizen discount, free sen-ice call w/repair. 24 hour service. 736-2463. • HANDYI^AN Cant Get Your Kids to Do It? Affordable help IS here! Loren (David) 294-3071 Messages 293-5268 BC. Lie No. 48700 BC. Thiyaday. Aogiiat 10, ItW ^ B yhereday, Aegeat 10,1969 Home Newa. Beeldar CHj News, GMSS ViOlaj Neva f^ PAINT AVERAGE HOUSE. $250. 24 yrs. experience. Work guaranteed. Call Jim 435-9S2 A CUSTOM PAINTING, TUmNG. WALLPAPERINa AND CABINBT MEHNISHINO 4Mtmkt 4 Estate. RMUMtial a CMMMfdaL DrTmU jwptk*. AeeamHieti tiOm^ A "Itcxtwtd walla. Ovar 30 jrra. •xp. ia CkicMgo araa. Navada Uc 22tS73. BMdd A laaond. Qaoffa C. Bneato 46X018 REPAIR AND REPLACE ROOFING Free estimates. Reasonable rates. Beeper 599-3072 294-1140 BC BLAKELEY EXCAVATION 565-9077 I can dig it! I can move it! By the hour — by the job. Lie No 0024515 Custom Homes, remodeling,, additions, patios, concrete work, stucco repair & painting For free estimate call NoTan Bloom 565-3196 Henderson's Licensed Handyman Ben Dupue. Hire one man to help you repair it all. Plumbing, wall, paint, electric, cement, carpentr.y, sGcunty systems, burglar alarms. Longtime local references. Not a state licensed contractor 565-7468. Piano lessons available. Ouaiity piano teacher. Will teach any ages, t)eginners or advanced students Please call 565-5961. Backhoe 943 Bobcat, trenching & grading $50 a houralso forks. 565-7725 ••• A-1 CUSTOM LAWN SERVICE Residential & Commercial Complete Lawn Service & Spnnkler Repair Frae EsKmslts 293-4556 BC HAULIN&CLEANING YARD WORK ODD JOBS Free Estimatee Call TONY 54^t70 CUSTOM HOME BUILDER "Building M Bettr BouUer City mace 1963" CaU 299-1613 or 293.32S7 0~A. "Curiy" Smith Cooatmctioa #80O2-B WEATHERIZATION SAViaNMMnr In taiNTlR AND SUMMfR Stop tiMW air iMrfcs WIndoin, iloort, outlata, ate. Avariga houa $65 e4i-e32a GENE'S CARPET CLEANING SERVICE Steam Extract or Shampoo-Waxing and Stripping 564-8055 BOOlPERRBCmC Licensed • Bonded • Insured Lie. No. 15187 Call 293-4899 SAVE $$$$$$$$$$$$$ on your next home, add-on or repairs SAVE $$$$$$$$$$$$$ on /our custom nome G.A. "Curly" Smith Conetruction 9802-B 293-1613 Since 1963 DEAN'S BODY & PAINT EXPERT BODY WORK AUTO GLASS MSTALLEO mSUfUNCE MfORK FOREIGN t DOMESTIC Y/K. exnmENce E roi na onautTa -i 565 8200 I U2E. LAKEMEAODR. HENOEHSON.NV. S9015 Boulder City Paint Center Contracting Service Acoustic Respray Servicing Clark County •COMMERCIAL •RESIDENTIAL •INDUSTRIAL On 8M$ Celeur Conaultlng CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATES CompeUtNe FrMng Ueing "QueHty Quenmeed" Benlemln Moore Producte Protect Your Home Property With Affordal)h Quamy 409 40Ail 1638 Nevada Hwy. ^T9"*TvQ (Merahall Plaza) Lie. No 0025690 Insured and Bonded CAREY'S CARPET & FURNITURE 22 PIECES! 7 Piece Uvlng Room • 5 Piece Bedroom • Lamps • 5 PIsce Dinette 8 Frame Box Spring • Mattrass _#*t O WE FINANCE A.FJI MI CARPET YOUR WHOLE HOUSE!! With No Down Payment Up to 60 Months To Pay 21.93 A.P.R. Complete Home Needs The FURNITURE WAREHOUSE SERVING THE COMMUNITY SINCE 1948 2540 E. Charleston Boulevard 382-7953 NEVADA HOUSE OF HOSE 745 West Suiwet HefMtonon, NV 89015 2912 S. HlgMwid Im Vagas, NV 89109 731-3136 HYDRAULIC HOSE & FiTTINGS HOSE AND FITTINGS FOR ALL PURPOSES 20% DISCOUNT WITH AD ON ALL POWER STEERING, AIR CONDITIONING LINES FABRICATED THIS MONTH OUTBOARD LINES AVAILABLE $16 HAPPINESS S A GOOD HOSE JOB AARON FBtfONG Free Estimates Chain Link a Wood 20 Years Exp. Ph. 4i1-ieo Ststs Uc. 1S332 MUMUY MAINTINANCI Carpentry, Palntlno Oiaaa Repaira All HouaehoM Nepelre Roof RepeirB aes^iio SWAMP COOLERS Serviced and Repaired Work & Parts Guaranteed! FRANK HAROWOOO'S COOLER REPAIR 565-7107 GUrfAR LESSONS Call Bud Miclcla 564-9220 564-9221 ROOFING Use Licensed Contractor •Reroof 'Repairs •Tile •Shingles •Shakes All Your Roofing Needs 564-6947 VAN THE HANDYMAN DOAU Ph 564477 MIKE MORRISON ELECTRIC Licensed-Bonded -Insured Lie. No. 27971 Can 564-2145 Custom stenciling •Walls •Floors •Furniture Free Estunates Allaae 294-1422 YOU NAME IT, WE*LL DO IT Realdentlal & Commercial i •Additiona •Remodel •Repair Uc. No. 14492 Ph 293-4284 U -.— TII.K TJU SPKCIAl I yy 3 W;ill!i, 5'High I IncI L.ibiii & T'lr B.ilh Floors .. S250 Don'l Rpglj.'i' NPVV Tub S500 PAUL BENTON 898-0051 EDWARD'S HOME MAINTENANCE HANDYMAN SERVICE Any type of maintenanoa •BendeaM •Apartmant Comi^aiaa •Fraa Eatimata •Sanior CMaan Diacouata 565^42 SPECIALIZING IN POLYURETHANE FOAM ROOFING •Light Weight Excellent on Flat Roof • Adds Structural Support •Reduces Utility Cost (Summer & Winter) •Seals Old Leaks & Isolates New Ones •Great Durability, Easily Repaired •Fast & Economical •Wide Variety of Applications SO. NEVADA ROOF VAC LC 128915 1409 Cheetnut Street Bonded (702) 565-SOOO 15 Years Experience BOULDER CONCRETE WANTS TO MEET YOUR CONCRETE NEEDS FOR FREE ESTIMATES AND QUAUTYWORKHUNSHIP CAU MICK CASEY BOULDER CITY .2t3.1l|1 •ADD-ONS •GARAGE CONVERSIONS •REPAIRS 'NEW CONSTRUCTION COMPETITIVE RATES OUR 25th YEAR IN BOULDER CITY Q.A. "CURLY" SMITH CONSTRUCTION IN THE DOME 293-1613 BURROUGHS GLASS 69 E. BASIC ROAD HENOERSON, NV 564-5050 UC.#022SS2 '^ SPECIALIZING IN •Repairing Brolcen Windows & Doors •Solar Sun Screen New & Repaired •Screens New & Repaired Custom Windows ft Patio Doors Mirror Wsrdrobe Doora Tub a Shower Ertciosure Olsss Tsbis Tops a Wsii Mirrors ALL YOUR GUSS .l2!?4^ • FROM YOUR LOCAL RETAILER ^J^ZHSSIL BAW MAINTENANCE Whtn the Pride Showa Complete Janitorial Service Carpets • Floors • Offices Licensed • Bonded • Insured No Nonsense We even do windows 565-0728 HENOERSON DAY CARE CENTER Now rsgistsring for kindergarten program. QualMad teacher and program. Small tescher /student ratio. Extended day care, meals Included. Opan 6:30 a.m. til 6HX> p.m. For Information call 5658384. Registration Aug. 7 thru Aug. 25. •••••• VEHICLES iTeel,rOeyalilL TOayeWk. VERN'S HENDERSON TEXACO BASIC NATURE CARPET CLEANERS Henderson's Finest 564-6716 1984 Honda CR125, Excellent Condition. $400. Ask for Bret Nash at 565-7964. 79 Mercury Zephyr, Runs good, needs work. $1,300 or best offer. 565-3414. 1980 Dodge 564-4167. Omni. Call ACOUSTIC &DRTWALL •Beautify with New •Respray Old Acoustic •Complete Drywall Repair •No Mess • Guaranteed GARRY ABBS 564-6380 Beeper 381-2760 Lie. #21803 THOMPSON'S HOME MAINTENANCE & COOLER SERVICE & REMODELS 565-5542 LOGOS DESIGNED For Bualnsae Card*, Etc. Cal Mlarilyn 564-1881 LEON PRESSURE CLEANING Tired of a grimy driveway? Tired of that greasy garage floor? Do you want that NEW look your driveway and garage once had? If ao, then call LEON PRESSURE CLEANING 564-6292 Wall Itava that drtvaway or garaga lodclno Nka naw in no timal You woni bailtvt your ayaa! Motorcycle for sale. 1981 Yamaha 850 special. Full Fairing, Shaft drive, cruise control, low mileage, excellent cond. $1,250 otx). 564-5541 leave message. For Sale: 1979 Ford LTD Good condition. Under 100,000 miles w/air $1,000 OBO. 564-3409. TOYOTA CELICA SUPRA 1979 Mechanics special. $1100 or best offer. 294-0119 BC 65 CHEVY PK-UP 350 eng. 4 sp. Ex cond. $1,500 or best. 598-5598 leave msg. BC 1971 CHRYSLER NEWPORT runs good. $500 or best. Call after 4pm 293-3708 BC RARE 1986 DODGE QOH OMNI 210 HP, turbo charged 5 sp, air, PS, PB, am/fm cass, mags, plus many extras. Very fast. $5,000 OBO 384-4362 leave msg. BC 1983 FORD LTD 4 dr sedan. Low mileage, A/C. Tilt wheel. Cruise control. $2,500 293-4491 BC 1980 FORD FAIRMONT 4 dr. sedan. AC. Runs great. $1,200 293-4491 BC AIRSTREAM 31'All options, awnings, elec jack, twin beds, a/c, clean, good cond $6,950. 78 SUBURBAN avail. $3,000 Call 294-0929 BC 16' 1969 TAHITI RUNABOUT I/O New interior, new paint job, cute and sporty, engine needs work. Price reduced-must sell. $2,000 or best. 293-5359 BC 1973 Imp. 24' lnl)oard/Outl)oard 188 Hp. Mer. Cutty Cabin, Toilet, EZ Loader Trailer Ml 568-9483 Is It True.. .Jeeps for $44 through the Government? Call for factsi 1-312742-1142 ext 9346 1968 Motorhome for sale. 20'. Fully equipped. Auto Trans., Air, Good Tires. $5.700. 564-6801. 1958 Chevy Pickup. FRESHLY REBUILT 350 sm block, 4 sp trans. AM/FM Cass Stereo, wide tire w/chronne rinns. Looks good, RUNS EXTREMELY WELL! $2,750 OBO. 5659478. FOR SALE 1984 Toyota 4X4 longbed with shell. 5 sp 48,000 miles. New brakes and tires, air, exc cond. $6,000 293-6049 after 5 BC 1964ISUZU Long bed deiael pickup. 61,000 miles. Air, cruise, canopy w/comfort pkg. $3,500 2936467 BC TRAVEL TRAILER 1980 Prowler 19' Lightweight, selfcontained, excellent cond. Pull it w/any compact car. $3,950 565-3174. 1984 Renault Encore, runs great, asking $2,000 OBO. Ask for Al at 565-9340 1965 ECamino V8, Auto, air, pS. $1500080.1974 Chevy stepside V8,4 sp., air, $1500 OBO. 1976 Cadillac Coupe DeVille, loaded, excellent cond., $2000 OBO. 1976 Chevy shortljed fleetside $500 J65-3688. 75 Chevy Nova, 4 dr, auto, V-8,350 motor, 4 barrel carb. Needs cam/lifter vwxk, needs tires and 2 windows repaired. $300. 564-6911, please ^ leave message. Used Auto Parts. 293-7278. Let us do the calling on our new satellite computer. All states and Canada. Big John & Sons, Foothill Dr. For Rent 1988 Alleoro motorhome 27" call 293-4161 BC Can you txiy Jeeps, Cars, 4X4's Seized in dnjg raids for under $100.00? Call for facts today, 805-644-9533 Dept 561 Good fixer upper, 78 Mazda station wagon. $350 or best offer. Ph. 565-5759. Attention Hunters: 15' Camp Trailer--Very clean, new tires—Must see $650 or offer. 564-1964. 1977 CHEVY CAPRICE 4 dr, a/c,loaded/all options. New brakes, water pump, ale comp, plugs, etc. Drives very well, good work/2nd car/yrs of service Must sell due to familytragedy. $1,275. Call 293-5570 ask for Marc. BC Under Blue Book 86 Jeep Comanche XLS w/matching Brahma shell. 5 new Michelin XCH tires 30,000 miles $7,000. Call Jack 798-1959 Leave m FOR SALE Lovely 2 & 3 bdrm, in beautiful park, tennis, pool, Jacuzzi, club house etc. S85-S811 wwwititwitwincfrKWfrwK 'iriritirkicif MOBILE HOMES 10 X 50 ONE BDRM Awning, skirting, a/c, lot rent $175 mo. Adult section. No pets. Quiet park in Boulder City $7,500 293-1463 ask for Cathy. BC Mobile Home For Sale 1960 10 X 60, 2 bdrm, good condition in Boulder City trailer park $6,900 564-5999 1309 CORONADO Mobile Home — Adult Section 2 BR 2 BA Corner Lot — RV Parlung Very WeU Kept New Pitdied Roof — Eaay Maintenance $91,500 871-0223 GREAT NEVADA PR0PEBTIE8 CO. 29M498 FOR SALE BY OWNER 24X64 3 bdrm. 2 bth, new carpet, insulated drapes, fireplace, air conditioning, 2 swamp coolers. See in Villa Heimosa Trailer Court, Henderson Space 92. $26,000 firm. 565-9842. -A?. T1990 Mobile Home ^ ^ ••••".••:•!> ectacul the New 19go Canyon Greet Mobile Home ^ Vegas! Don't mles jotir chance to see the mos SPECTACULAR MOBILE HOMES EVER BUH^T Canyon Crest Introduces Homes With Features 8 Designs NFVER BEFORE SEEN! • Ceramic Tile Counter Tope • Solid Oak Cabinetry • Spacious Country Kitchens • Starlight Dormers • Inverted Vaulted Ceilings • Innovative Pantry Designs • Tape & Textured Drywall • New, Exciting Floorplans • Diamond Windowi 86FORDF1506cylauto.air, power, am/fm cassette. 43,000 $7,500 293-3770 or 293-4489 BC BUY GOVERNMENT Seized and Surplus Vehicles from $100. Fords, Chevys, Corvettes, etc., in your area. For info call (602) 842-1051 ext A5263. Let's Make a Deal; 81 Mercury Lynx Wagon and 76 Jeep Honcho Pickup. Make otter. 565-1026 FREE AIRFARE FOR 2 TO HAWAII! ( Hurry! This Offer Is Limited To The FIRST 50 PEOPLE To Tour Our Dealership! ) Don't Bliss This Exclusive Showing At: Diamond Mobile Homes Country Ctu6 VUlage Greenway Road And Mona Lane, Henderson 564-6949 HIGHEST PRICES PAID FOR OLD CARS WRECKED OR RUNNING We'iv the chespest on parts Try Usill All Amsrican Auto Wreckers ••• OFFIHENHUltalliiNP^a^aa>altjMw Emission Control Station '^xi Emission Express and Auto >; Care. 1400 Nevada Hwy. No ;^i) wait appoirments. 293-2473' .BO Radiator—Sales and Repair 293-7278 BlQ John & Sons, Foothill Dr. BC 17'FIBERFORM1976lx>at.' 130 Horse Volvo $2,500 293-1523 after 5pm. BC •79 CHEVY BLAZER New' motor, 10M miles. Removatde top. Diamond plate running boards,' radio/heater/ac. Good tires, slide side windows, fuel tank shield, 31 gal tank, real roll' bar, folding rear seat, tow hooks front and back, trailer hitch. Needs, some body work; motor and parts for electric tailgate and TLC! $2,250 cash (firm) 293-4391 BC 84PONTIACBONNEVILLE Good shape, new trans, new tires, now cooling system. $3,900 293-1008 293-6352 BC 82 ISUZU Fiberglass mini MM. Lift top. Sspd. 36 mpg. One owner. $2,000 under Blue. 58,000 miles. Top cond Garageable. $8,420. 293-1786 BC 1988 Firebird, low mileage. 2.8 V-6 Fuel injection AM-FM Radio, Auto-Trans. $9,800. 565-3742. '69 Mustang parting out. CaN 565-0704 I. k k k k k k k rAAAwKWUrl 12 X 64 2 BR New carpeting. Awning, skirting, a/c, adult section. Space rent $175 mo. Boulder City Trailer Park $15,000 293-1463 ask for Cathy BC FOR SALE 2 BR 1 BA Small double wide mobile home in M and M B.C. park. Recently updated to all electric New appliances and equipment, drapes, carpeting, and flooring. Adult park. Buyer must be 55 yrs old. Shown by aopt. Ph 293-6861 BC 12X60 TWO BDRM, 1982. 1 Awning, skirting, swamp cooler $15,000, Family section. BOULDER CITY TRAILER PARK. Lot rental $207 mo. Ask lor Cathy 293-1463 BC — B.C. Mobile Home Sales — 1610 Nevada Highway 12X60— 2 bedroom, 1'/z bath—partially furnished -$17,500. 12X56—2 bedroom, 1 bath-$19,950. 24X40—2 bedroom, 2 bath-$28,950. 14X80—2 bedroom, 2 bath-$24,950. 293-1613 or 293-3267 k k k k k k k RENTALS mmfim WNtFB Olii II. tnHil] •fr'jt*'!-!-''^* -k-kir pueutNiirtNOTicii An real estate advertiaed herein It subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, wtileh makes It Illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sax, tiandlcsp, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, llmltallon, or discrimination." We will not knowingly •ccaol anv adwertiaina lor real estate which le In violation of the Isw. All persons are hereby Informed that all dweUlnga advertised are available on sn squat opportunity basis. Amall child nesds you paoMnent ^ ^^ ••<• ifOtkr ^^Vf< begim. You can help 363-7209 EVERYTHING IMAGINABLE ON DISPLAY TWICE WEEKLY Horn* NtWS want adt All you really naad to LIVINGROOM QUARTERS FOR RENT Spacious, furnished, laundry facilities, cleaning service. $79 wk Boulder City 294-3006 BC 1 BDRM BC cottage. Stove, frig, single adult only $250 plus sec depo 1 yr lease No pets. Call 293-6375 for appt. BC "Quality Roommates" No cost to list 735-5996 Need to move / 735-5877 $125 to Estates — 7 DAYS. 2 BR 1 BATH HOME for rent in BC A/ C No Pets 294-1444 For Rent: 2 txlrm, house on Merlayne Dr. $550 per mo. Gas & elec. Call 565-1945. Need a place to hang your business license? Call 565-1228 after 5:30 p.m. For Rent: 1 bdrm apt. All utilities paid except electnc $275 mo. 565-9848. Roommate Wanted: Share 2 bdrm, 1 bth and yard House conscious professional or student. $300 plus utility Available Sept. 1.294-0119. 2 bdrm, apt Henderson. Refng, stove, laundry rm. $395 per mo. Deposit $300. No Pets. Secbon 8 Accepted Call 564-3656 LA DOLCE VITA CONDO $525 per mo. For info call 293-0892 and leave message. BC For Rent: 2 bdrm, 1 Mh, downtown $400 mo. No Pets. 564-2377 Furnished 1 bdrm mot)ile home. First month and security 565-0728. For Rent: 1 -23 bdrm trileri S75lo$120Mak. se&47e4 Of 565-7141. For Rent: Kilcheneee. $46 week Utiiities paid. Shady Rest Motel 56^7686. Hdn. Pnme commercial space for lease on Water St 2 unite. Approximately 900 square leet each. 72 square leal w/off street parking in front. CaH Don Krwner 5&5-3742 between 9 am arxJ 2:30 p.m. WEEKLY KITCHEr4£TTES 565^792 9 WEEKLY KITCHENETTES Adults only No pets. Western Inn 294 0393 or 293 2044 BC D eeert Inn Motel nica dean rooms starting al $00 weak. Maid Sarvioa. color TV Alao Kitchanattas avaiiabla. 2S3-2e27. SOO Nav. BC.

PAGE 48

Pl4l. Homt News, Boaldw aty Nws, GNU Valley News •• • # iOQAgsBholwMerhMlar' Like new. 2Mr yrs. old $5(L VERNt BOUU)ER CITY TEXACO A.S.E. Certified Mectianic on duty Mon.-Sat. Quick S0rvie Lube, Oil A FiKer Tune Upe, Brekee 87 Nev. Hwy. BC Over 200 gently used desks in stock (wood and metal). Prices start at $39 ALWAYS DISCOUNT OFRCE FURNISHINGS 3300 S. Highland Dr. Las Vegas, Nv 791-3355 CARPORTS Double... $1,895 Single ...$1,495 Protect Your Cars, Vans, Boats Boulder City BuikHnf and Roofing 293-2179 For aale. Stereo, machine, planter poleAnacrame. lamp, end table, sm. A med. ladies dothee 5645223. Super Capacity Imperial Whirlpool gas dryer, extra Irg capacity,, Used 10 times $350 Firm, Ph 734-0051 ask (or Chen, New carpet and vinyl. Various sizes and colors. Values to $20 sq yd Now $3 to $6 a yard 565-7472. For Sale Garage door 2 cr 16 ft wide X 7 ft f Good cond 736-3439 For Sale: 1 36" Benjamin Franklin Wood Stove in good condition 564-1033, Are you livirm with a drinking problem? If so, why rxSt try Al Anon? Meetings are Tues 10 am at St Timothy's Episcopal Church Tues, 8 30 pm Club 51 Wed 8 p.m. St, Rose de Lima Hospital Fnday 7:30 p m Water & Power BIdg, Nev Hwy BC For more info. Call 565-9963 Hdn, TROTTBR CONSTRUCTION Cuetom Remodel Conlrector •PtloCov*r •Carports •Room AddmoM •Battiroenw KHchon nmose weight. No matter age, sex or weight-loss desire, we csn supply the support to meet your goala. Our yearly membership fee Is $15. Send stamped aelfaddressed evelope to. SUM CONnOANTS 850 S. BouMer Hwy. Ste. 206 Henderson, NV 89018 or can (702) 868-1817 z House of Travoi We honor all advertised special air, cruise and package fares. For information, Phone — 564-3681 122 Industrial Park Rd. Sta. 205 Mon. thni Frt. 94 Sat. M FRANK'S TV & APPLIANCES SALES & SERVICES For in home service call 385-9959 MAGNAVOX • MGA • SYLVAMA • PHILCO PHILLIPS WARRANTY STATION (702) 564-9329 Bonded Uc. #27S1t HARD AS CONCRETE Backhoe Servicea, alao WHAT'S NEWS? The Henderson Home Boulder City & Green Valley N^W? STORAGE FOR RENT AH 8lu~Fnoed RaeManI Manager Naar Sunaai Mountain VItU 458-3990 Specializing In PAUI TREES Buy Fresh Trees and Plam Materials direct from Arizona, California and Texas. Delivered directly to your planning pHe. 702-647-7448 AU TYPES ROOFING AND REPAIRS You buy material, I do the labor, You save 30% Call Don at 564-8519 If DO anawer, call after 5 p.m. Fnt Estimatea BETTINGHOUSE CONSTRUCTION CO. •Comnnercial •Residential •Additions 294-7703 Uc. #0027156 SWAMP COOLER (Evap Cooler) SERVICE Can nebuild or Replace Also $28 Special "Pads, Oil. Beanngs. Change Pumphltef. Cteai Oip Lines Set Floal 565-0947 RED MOUNTAIN GARDENING Complete Yard Services •Lawns •Clean Up •Rejuvanation •Sprinklers Free Estimates 293-7072 INSTA-CLEAN MAID/ JANITORIAL SERVICE Professional cleaning service for residential and commercial. All phases of general carpet covered including carpet cleaning, wall/ceilings washed. Vinyl & linoleunn floor ca^e 293-3316 KEN'S MiUNTENANCE A HANDYMAN SERVICE An Types of HMn^nmce •RBMntlrt ICan FIxor MtkBMogt Anything 293-0045 GREG'S SUPER CLEAN since 1964. Specials. S45 super steam, dining, livino rm, & tiall cpt. or average sofa Safe and mosteffective mettiod used. Window cleaning. Owner operated. Certified, licensed, bonded. Satisfaction guaranteed. 456-6632 Beeper 3a9-9649. SECOND HAND STORE: Bilmar's, 27 Army St. Buy and sell brass, tools and small appliances. All merchandise. If you have anything tor sale please come in. We repair tig appliances, all mattes and models $20 service ca/l. 564 7367,30 day guarantee BRICK-BLOCK CUSTOM WORK Nevada Lie 24144 > 14 yrs experience .Sf4-77fi MAIL, MESSAGES & MORE.Printing Copies & FAX "The Best for Less" 516 S Boulder Hwy (Von'sStioppng Center) 564-5574 Want to buy late model major appliances needing repair Refngerators etc. Call Harwood's Appliance 564-2210. Appliance parts for dont-yourselfers. Hanvood's Appliances 118 E. Lake Mead. Henderson. 564-2210 Falisha's Appliance Service We service all nnajor brands appliance, washer/dryers, refngerators. Seniof Citizen discount, free sen-ice call w/repair. 24 hour service. 736-2463. • HANDYI^AN Cant Get Your Kids to Do It? Affordable help IS here! Loren (David) 294-3071 Messages 293-5268 BC. Lie No. 48700 BC. Thiyaday. Aogiiat 10, ItW ^ B yhereday, Aegeat 10,1969 Home Newa. Beeldar CHj News, GMSS ViOlaj Neva f^ PAINT AVERAGE HOUSE. $250. 24 yrs. experience. Work guaranteed. Call Jim 435-9S2 A CUSTOM PAINTING, TUmNG. WALLPAPERINa AND CABINBT MEHNISHINO 4Mtmkt 4 Estate. RMUMtial a CMMMfdaL DrTmU jwptk*. AeeamHieti tiOm^ A "Itcxtwtd walla. Ovar 30 jrra. •xp. ia CkicMgo araa. Navada Uc 22tS73. BMdd A laaond. Qaoffa C. Bneato 46X018 REPAIR AND REPLACE ROOFING Free estimates. Reasonable rates. Beeper 599-3072 294-1140 BC BLAKELEY EXCAVATION 565-9077 I can dig it! I can move it! By the hour — by the job. Lie No 0024515 Custom Homes, remodeling,, additions, patios, concrete work, stucco repair & painting For free estimate call NoTan Bloom 565-3196 Henderson's Licensed Handyman Ben Dupue. Hire one man to help you repair it all. Plumbing, wall, paint, electric, cement, carpentr.y, sGcunty systems, burglar alarms. Longtime local references. Not a state licensed contractor 565-7468. Piano lessons available. Ouaiity piano teacher. Will teach any ages, t)eginners or advanced students Please call 565-5961. Backhoe 943 Bobcat, trenching & grading $50 a houralso forks. 565-7725 ••• A-1 CUSTOM LAWN SERVICE Residential & Commercial Complete Lawn Service & Spnnkler Repair Frae EsKmslts 293-4556 BC HAULIN&CLEANING YARD WORK ODD JOBS Free Estimatee Call TONY 54^t70 CUSTOM HOME BUILDER "Building M Bettr BouUer City mace 1963" CaU 299-1613 or 293.32S7 0~A. "Curiy" Smith Cooatmctioa #80O2-B WEATHERIZATION SAViaNMMnr In taiNTlR AND SUMMfR Stop tiMW air iMrfcs WIndoin, iloort, outlata, ate. Avariga houa $65 e4i-e32a GENE'S CARPET CLEANING SERVICE Steam Extract or Shampoo-Waxing and Stripping 564-8055 BOOlPERRBCmC Licensed • Bonded • Insured Lie. No. 15187 Call 293-4899 SAVE $$$$$$$$$$$$$ on your next home, add-on or repairs SAVE $$$$$$$$$$$$$ on /our custom nome G.A. "Curly" Smith Conetruction 9802-B 293-1613 Since 1963 DEAN'S BODY & PAINT EXPERT BODY WORK AUTO GLASS MSTALLEO mSUfUNCE MfORK FOREIGN t DOMESTIC Y/K. exnmENce E roi na onautTa -i 565 8200 I U2E. LAKEMEAODR. HENOEHSON.NV. S9015 Boulder City Paint Center Contracting Service Acoustic Respray Servicing Clark County •COMMERCIAL •RESIDENTIAL •INDUSTRIAL On 8M$ Celeur Conaultlng CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATES CompeUtNe FrMng Ueing "QueHty Quenmeed" Benlemln Moore Producte Protect Your Home Property With Affordal)h Quamy 409 40Ail 1638 Nevada Hwy. ^T9"*TvQ (Merahall Plaza) Lie. No 0025690 Insured and Bonded CAREY'S CARPET & FURNITURE 22 PIECES! 7 Piece Uvlng Room • 5 Piece Bedroom • Lamps • 5 PIsce Dinette 8 Frame Box Spring • Mattrass _#*t O WE FINANCE A.FJI MI CARPET YOUR WHOLE HOUSE!! With No Down Payment Up to 60 Months To Pay 21.93 A.P.R. Complete Home Needs The FURNITURE WAREHOUSE SERVING THE COMMUNITY SINCE 1948 2540 E. Charleston Boulevard 382-7953 NEVADA HOUSE OF HOSE 745 West Suiwet HefMtonon, NV 89015 2912 S. HlgMwid Im Vagas, NV 89109 731-3136 HYDRAULIC HOSE & FiTTINGS HOSE AND FITTINGS FOR ALL PURPOSES 20% DISCOUNT WITH AD ON ALL POWER STEERING, AIR CONDITIONING LINES FABRICATED THIS MONTH OUTBOARD LINES AVAILABLE $16 HAPPINESS S A GOOD HOSE JOB AARON FBtfONG Free Estimates Chain Link a Wood 20 Years Exp. Ph. 4i1-ieo Ststs Uc. 1S332 MUMUY MAINTINANCI Carpentry, Palntlno Oiaaa Repaira All HouaehoM Nepelre Roof RepeirB aes^iio SWAMP COOLERS Serviced and Repaired Work & Parts Guaranteed! FRANK HAROWOOO'S COOLER REPAIR 565-7107 GUrfAR LESSONS Call Bud Miclcla 564-9220 564-9221 ROOFING Use Licensed Contractor •Reroof 'Repairs •Tile •Shingles •Shakes All Your Roofing Needs 564-6947 VAN THE HANDYMAN DOAU Ph 564477 MIKE MORRISON ELECTRIC Licensed-Bonded -Insured Lie. No. 27971 Can 564-2145 Custom stenciling •Walls •Floors •Furniture Free Estunates Allaae 294-1422 YOU NAME IT, WE*LL DO IT Realdentlal & Commercial i •Additiona •Remodel •Repair Uc. No. 14492 Ph 293-4284 U -.— TII.K TJU SPKCIAl I yy 3 W;ill!i, 5'High I IncI L.ibiii & T'lr B.ilh Floors .. S250 Don'l Rpglj.'i' NPVV Tub S500 PAUL BENTON 898-0051 EDWARD'S HOME MAINTENANCE HANDYMAN SERVICE Any type of maintenanoa •BendeaM •Apartmant Comi^aiaa •Fraa Eatimata •Sanior CMaan Diacouata 565^42 SPECIALIZING IN POLYURETHANE FOAM ROOFING •Light Weight Excellent on Flat Roof • Adds Structural Support •Reduces Utility Cost (Summer & Winter) •Seals Old Leaks & Isolates New Ones •Great Durability, Easily Repaired •Fast & Economical •Wide Variety of Applications SO. NEVADA ROOF VAC LC 128915 1409 Cheetnut Street Bonded (702) 565-SOOO 15 Years Experience BOULDER CONCRETE WANTS TO MEET YOUR CONCRETE NEEDS FOR FREE ESTIMATES AND QUAUTYWORKHUNSHIP CAU MICK CASEY BOULDER CITY .2t3.1l|1 •ADD-ONS •GARAGE CONVERSIONS •REPAIRS 'NEW CONSTRUCTION COMPETITIVE RATES OUR 25th YEAR IN BOULDER CITY Q.A. "CURLY" SMITH CONSTRUCTION IN THE DOME 293-1613 BURROUGHS GLASS 69 E. BASIC ROAD HENOERSON, NV 564-5050 UC.#022SS2 '^ SPECIALIZING IN •Repairing Brolcen Windows & Doors •Solar Sun Screen New & Repaired •Screens New & Repaired Custom Windows ft Patio Doors Mirror Wsrdrobe Doora Tub a Shower Ertciosure Olsss Tsbis Tops a Wsii Mirrors ALL YOUR GUSS .l2!?4^ • FROM YOUR LOCAL RETAILER ^J^ZHSSIL BAW MAINTENANCE Whtn the Pride Showa Complete Janitorial Service Carpets • Floors • Offices Licensed • Bonded • Insured No Nonsense We even do windows 565-0728 HENOERSON DAY CARE CENTER Now rsgistsring for kindergarten program. QualMad teacher and program. Small tescher /student ratio. Extended day care, meals Included. Opan 6:30 a.m. til 6HX> p.m. For Information call 5658384. Registration Aug. 7 thru Aug. 25. •••••• VEHICLES iTeel,rOeyalilL TOayeWk. VERN'S HENDERSON TEXACO BASIC NATURE CARPET CLEANERS Henderson's Finest 564-6716 1984 Honda CR125, Excellent Condition. $400. Ask for Bret Nash at 565-7964. 79 Mercury Zephyr, Runs good, needs work. $1,300 or best offer. 565-3414. 1980 Dodge 564-4167. Omni. Call ACOUSTIC &DRTWALL •Beautify with New •Respray Old Acoustic •Complete Drywall Repair •No Mess • Guaranteed GARRY ABBS 564-6380 Beeper 381-2760 Lie. #21803 THOMPSON'S HOME MAINTENANCE & COOLER SERVICE & REMODELS 565-5542 LOGOS DESIGNED For Bualnsae Card*, Etc. Cal Mlarilyn 564-1881 LEON PRESSURE CLEANING Tired of a grimy driveway? Tired of that greasy garage floor? Do you want that NEW look your driveway and garage once had? If ao, then call LEON PRESSURE CLEANING 564-6292 Wall Itava that drtvaway or garaga lodclno Nka naw in no timal You woni bailtvt your ayaa! Motorcycle for sale. 1981 Yamaha 850 special. Full Fairing, Shaft drive, cruise control, low mileage, excellent cond. $1,250 otx). 564-5541 leave message. For Sale: 1979 Ford LTD Good condition. Under 100,000 miles w/air $1,000 OBO. 564-3409. TOYOTA CELICA SUPRA 1979 Mechanics special. $1100 or best offer. 294-0119 BC 65 CHEVY PK-UP 350 eng. 4 sp. Ex cond. $1,500 or best. 598-5598 leave msg. BC 1971 CHRYSLER NEWPORT runs good. $500 or best. Call after 4pm 293-3708 BC RARE 1986 DODGE QOH OMNI 210 HP, turbo charged 5 sp, air, PS, PB, am/fm cass, mags, plus many extras. Very fast. $5,000 OBO 384-4362 leave msg. BC 1983 FORD LTD 4 dr sedan. Low mileage, A/C. Tilt wheel. Cruise control. $2,500 293-4491 BC 1980 FORD FAIRMONT 4 dr. sedan. AC. Runs great. $1,200 293-4491 BC AIRSTREAM 31'All options, awnings, elec jack, twin beds, a/c, clean, good cond $6,950. 78 SUBURBAN avail. $3,000 Call 294-0929 BC 16' 1969 TAHITI RUNABOUT I/O New interior, new paint job, cute and sporty, engine needs work. Price reduced-must sell. $2,000 or best. 293-5359 BC 1973 Imp. 24' lnl)oard/Outl)oard 188 Hp. Mer. Cutty Cabin, Toilet, EZ Loader Trailer Ml 568-9483 Is It True.. .Jeeps for $44 through the Government? Call for factsi 1-312742-1142 ext 9346 1968 Motorhome for sale. 20'. Fully equipped. Auto Trans., Air, Good Tires. $5.700. 564-6801. 1958 Chevy Pickup. FRESHLY REBUILT 350 sm block, 4 sp trans. AM/FM Cass Stereo, wide tire w/chronne rinns. Looks good, RUNS EXTREMELY WELL! $2,750 OBO. 5659478. FOR SALE 1984 Toyota 4X4 longbed with shell. 5 sp 48,000 miles. New brakes and tires, air, exc cond. $6,000 293-6049 after 5 BC 1964ISUZU Long bed deiael pickup. 61,000 miles. Air, cruise, canopy w/comfort pkg. $3,500 2936467 BC TRAVEL TRAILER 1980 Prowler 19' Lightweight, selfcontained, excellent cond. Pull it w/any compact car. $3,950 565-3174. 1984 Renault Encore, runs great, asking $2,000 OBO. Ask for Al at 565-9340 1965 ECamino V8, Auto, air, pS. $1500080.1974 Chevy stepside V8,4 sp., air, $1500 OBO. 1976 Cadillac Coupe DeVille, loaded, excellent cond., $2000 OBO. 1976 Chevy shortljed fleetside $500 J65-3688. 75 Chevy Nova, 4 dr, auto, V-8,350 motor, 4 barrel carb. Needs cam/lifter vwxk, needs tires and 2 windows repaired. $300. 564-6911, please ^ leave message. Used Auto Parts. 293-7278. Let us do the calling on our new satellite computer. All states and Canada. Big John & Sons, Foothill Dr. For Rent 1988 Alleoro motorhome 27" call 293-4161 BC Can you txiy Jeeps, Cars, 4X4's Seized in dnjg raids for under $100.00? Call for facts today, 805-644-9533 Dept 561 Good fixer upper, 78 Mazda station wagon. $350 or best offer. Ph. 565-5759. Attention Hunters: 15' Camp Trailer--Very clean, new tires—Must see $650 or offer. 564-1964. 1977 CHEVY CAPRICE 4 dr, a/c,loaded/all options. New brakes, water pump, ale comp, plugs, etc. Drives very well, good work/2nd car/yrs of service Must sell due to familytragedy. $1,275. Call 293-5570 ask for Marc. BC Under Blue Book 86 Jeep Comanche XLS w/matching Brahma shell. 5 new Michelin XCH tires 30,000 miles $7,000. Call Jack 798-1959 Leave m FOR SALE Lovely 2 & 3 bdrm, in beautiful park, tennis, pool, Jacuzzi, club house etc. S85-S811 wwwititwitwincfrKWfrwK 'iriritirkicif MOBILE HOMES 10 X 50 ONE BDRM Awning, skirting, a/c, lot rent $175 mo. Adult section. No pets. Quiet park in Boulder City $7,500 293-1463 ask for Cathy. BC Mobile Home For Sale 1960 10 X 60, 2 bdrm, good condition in Boulder City trailer park $6,900 564-5999 1309 CORONADO Mobile Home — Adult Section 2 BR 2 BA Corner Lot — RV Parlung Very WeU Kept New Pitdied Roof — Eaay Maintenance $91,500 871-0223 GREAT NEVADA PR0PEBTIE8 CO. 29M498 FOR SALE BY OWNER 24X64 3 bdrm. 2 bth, new carpet, insulated drapes, fireplace, air conditioning, 2 swamp coolers. See in Villa Heimosa Trailer Court, Henderson Space 92. $26,000 firm. 565-9842. -A?. T1990 Mobile Home ^ ^ ••••".••:•!> ectacul the New 19go Canyon Greet Mobile Home ^ Vegas! Don't mles jotir chance to see the mos SPECTACULAR MOBILE HOMES EVER BUH^T Canyon Crest Introduces Homes With Features 8 Designs NFVER BEFORE SEEN! • Ceramic Tile Counter Tope • Solid Oak Cabinetry • Spacious Country Kitchens • Starlight Dormers • Inverted Vaulted Ceilings • Innovative Pantry Designs • Tape & Textured Drywall • New, Exciting Floorplans • Diamond Windowi 86FORDF1506cylauto.air, power, am/fm cassette. 43,000 $7,500 293-3770 or 293-4489 BC BUY GOVERNMENT Seized and Surplus Vehicles from $100. Fords, Chevys, Corvettes, etc., in your area. For info call (602) 842-1051 ext A5263. Let's Make a Deal; 81 Mercury Lynx Wagon and 76 Jeep Honcho Pickup. Make otter. 565-1026 FREE AIRFARE FOR 2 TO HAWAII! ( Hurry! This Offer Is Limited To The FIRST 50 PEOPLE To Tour Our Dealership! ) Don't Bliss This Exclusive Showing At: Diamond Mobile Homes Country Ctu6 VUlage Greenway Road And Mona Lane, Henderson 564-6949 HIGHEST PRICES PAID FOR OLD CARS WRECKED OR RUNNING We'iv the chespest on parts Try Usill All Amsrican Auto Wreckers ••• OFFIHENHUltalliiNP^a^aa>altjMw Emission Control Station '^xi Emission Express and Auto >; Care. 1400 Nevada Hwy. No ;^i) wait appoirments. 293-2473' .BO Radiator—Sales and Repair 293-7278 BlQ John & Sons, Foothill Dr. BC 17'FIBERFORM1976lx>at.' 130 Horse Volvo $2,500 293-1523 after 5pm. BC •79 CHEVY BLAZER New' motor, 10M miles. Removatde top. Diamond plate running boards,' radio/heater/ac. Good tires, slide side windows, fuel tank shield, 31 gal tank, real roll' bar, folding rear seat, tow hooks front and back, trailer hitch. Needs, some body work; motor and parts for electric tailgate and TLC! $2,250 cash (firm) 293-4391 BC 84PONTIACBONNEVILLE Good shape, new trans, new tires, now cooling system. $3,900 293-1008 293-6352 BC 82 ISUZU Fiberglass mini MM. Lift top. Sspd. 36 mpg. One owner. $2,000 under Blue. 58,000 miles. Top cond Garageable. $8,420. 293-1786 BC 1988 Firebird, low mileage. 2.8 V-6 Fuel injection AM-FM Radio, Auto-Trans. $9,800. 565-3742. '69 Mustang parting out. CaN 565-0704 I. k k k k k k k rAAAwKWUrl 12 X 64 2 BR New carpeting. Awning, skirting, a/c, adult section. Space rent $175 mo. Boulder City Trailer Park $15,000 293-1463 ask for Cathy BC FOR SALE 2 BR 1 BA Small double wide mobile home in M and M B.C. park. Recently updated to all electric New appliances and equipment, drapes, carpeting, and flooring. Adult park. Buyer must be 55 yrs old. Shown by aopt. Ph 293-6861 BC 12X60 TWO BDRM, 1982. 1 Awning, skirting, swamp cooler $15,000, Family section. BOULDER CITY TRAILER PARK. Lot rental $207 mo. Ask lor Cathy 293-1463 BC — B.C. Mobile Home Sales — 1610 Nevada Highway 12X60— 2 bedroom, 1'/z bath—partially furnished -$17,500. 12X56—2 bedroom, 1 bath-$19,950. 24X40—2 bedroom, 2 bath-$28,950. 14X80—2 bedroom, 2 bath-$24,950. 293-1613 or 293-3267 k k k k k k k RENTALS mmfim WNtFB Olii II. tnHil] •fr'jt*'!-!-''^* -k-kir pueutNiirtNOTicii An real estate advertiaed herein It subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, wtileh makes It Illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sax, tiandlcsp, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, llmltallon, or discrimination." We will not knowingly •ccaol anv adwertiaina lor real estate which le In violation of the Isw. All persons are hereby Informed that all dweUlnga advertised are available on sn squat opportunity basis. Amall child nesds you paoMnent ^ ^^ ••<• ifOtkr ^^Vf< begim. You can help 363-7209 EVERYTHING IMAGINABLE ON DISPLAY TWICE WEEKLY Horn* NtWS want adt All you really naad to LIVINGROOM QUARTERS FOR RENT Spacious, furnished, laundry facilities, cleaning service. $79 wk Boulder City 294-3006 BC 1 BDRM BC cottage. Stove, frig, single adult only $250 plus sec depo 1 yr lease No pets. Call 293-6375 for appt. BC "Quality Roommates" No cost to list 735-5996 Need to move / 735-5877 $125 to Estates — 7 DAYS. 2 BR 1 BATH HOME for rent in BC A/ C No Pets 294-1444 For Rent: 2 txlrm, house on Merlayne Dr. $550 per mo. Gas & elec. Call 565-1945. Need a place to hang your business license? Call 565-1228 after 5:30 p.m. For Rent: 1 bdrm apt. All utilities paid except electnc $275 mo. 565-9848. Roommate Wanted: Share 2 bdrm, 1 bth and yard House conscious professional or student. $300 plus utility Available Sept. 1.294-0119. 2 bdrm, apt Henderson. Refng, stove, laundry rm. $395 per mo. Deposit $300. No Pets. Secbon 8 Accepted Call 564-3656 LA DOLCE VITA CONDO $525 per mo. For info call 293-0892 and leave message. BC For Rent: 2 bdrm, 1 Mh, downtown $400 mo. No Pets. 564-2377 Furnished 1 bdrm mot)ile home. First month and security 565-0728. For Rent: 1 -23 bdrm trileri S75lo$120Mak. se&47e4 Of 565-7141. For Rent: Kilcheneee. $46 week Utiiities paid. Shady Rest Motel 56^7686. Hdn. Pnme commercial space for lease on Water St 2 unite. Approximately 900 square leet each. 72 square leal w/off street parking in front. CaH Don Krwner 5&5-3742 between 9 am arxJ 2:30 p.m. WEEKLY KITCHEr4£TTES 565^792 9 WEEKLY KITCHENETTES Adults only No pets. Western Inn 294 0393 or 293 2044 BC D eeert Inn Motel nica dean rooms starting al $00 weak. Maid Sarvioa. color TV Alao Kitchanattas avaiiabla. 2S3-2e27. SOO Nav. BC.

PAGE 49

^m Newt, Boaklcr Qty News. OfMO Valkj News APT FOR RENT 1 BR $340 mo plus dep No pets 294-0404 AvaH 9/1 BC bETACHED GARAGE FOR RENT 20' X 20' Alley access Roll up (joor $50 per mo. 2940501 BC 4 BR 3 BA. den, 2 story, fenced yrd. 850 Mcxitera 1 st, last. 293-3478 BC WANT TO RENT Garage for boat in B.C. Need 24'lengtfi Call/write F Elliott 8762 Baywood Dr. Hut Boh CA 92646 714-964-1975 2 BD HM $600 mo; 1 bd apt. furnunfurn-pool $425 mo 293-0533 BC Thursday, Angnst 10.1989 KITCHENETTE 293-7673 BC $89 wk OFFICE OR STORE 1319 8 Nevada Hyyy BC next to 76 gas station. Off street parki ng$210mo 293 3646BC Teddy's KHcfienettes Just bhr>o your tootfibrush Everytning furnished. Phone 293-1716 Trailer space lor rent, Henderson area Up to 8 x 40. 564 1398^ F(3R RENT 2 bdrm, 2 bath, manufactured fiome overlooking tfie lake Adult community No pets $850 293-6014 ask for Bev. BC Office Warehouse for lease. 1200 sq. ft. $600 per mo 520 W. Sunset Rd. -4, Henderson. Call Diana 382-0423 or 876-1925. NEW APARTMENTS on Georgia Ave Have 2 sizes of 2 bedrm & 2 bath. 984-1193 sq. ft Prices start at SS50 plus deposits Washer/dryer in each unit. 293-0686 BC CLEAN private 2 bedroom un-furnished apartment. 1 full bath, modern kitchen. Central air and heating. Fully carpeted Laundry hook ups. $600 per month includes all utilities 1st, last, and security deposit. Prefer non-smokers Evenings 293-4480 BC FOR RENT" 1 storage unit" 8X20 with circulating vent on top $50 per mo 293-7763 s FOR RENT 2,500 sq ft Shop Space. For light manufacturing. 2 baths. Ample parking with awning in rear. Approx 1,200 sq ft Ample 3 phase power Will arrange office fac for tenants needs. $900 mo 293-7763 BC Need a place to stay in beautiful Boulder City'' We have lovely 3 room suites with kitchen, living room, king bedroom Smal' pets OK Weekly rates Call Nevada Inn 702-293-2044 BC 2 bdrms, condo's for rent in Henderson $550 to $645 a month Call for more into American Family Realty 454-2878 2 bdrm, apt. for rent $425 • -./no, plus $200 deposit. No Pets. 564-0811 Room for rent, partial-bath kitchen pnvileges 565-986£ BOULDER CITY 1 bdrrh house for rent $495 No pets References • required 1-291-0054 after 5 pm. BOULDER HILLS CONDO 2 bdmn, 1 1/2 taths, completely furnished. $149 per wk, 293-7551 BC ROOMS FOR SINGLE OCCUPANCY $100 wk plus tax. Rcx)ms doutde occupany $110 p6r wk plus tax. Single room and breakfast $125 wkly plus tax Double occupancy room and breakfast $150 weekly plus tax. Boulder Dam Hotel 1305 Arizona 293-1808 BC Apartments, 2 bdroom for rent Apt. Mgr.218Merlayne #a 2 bdrm, apt Henderson Refrig, stove, laundry rm $395 per mo. Deposit $300 No Pets. Section 8 Accepted Call 564-3656 Townhouse, 1 bdrm, partially furnished, available now. $375plusdepostt.564 7117. BC FOR RENT Small 1 bdrm house. Close in to town. Fenced backyard w/patio, storage shed, laundry rm $350 mo. plus $300 move in 733-0686, John. 2 BDRM 2 bath 2nd floor apt Fireplace, carpeted and draped Newly painted. $500 mo. Security dep $500 and 1st mo rent in advance Available immed 293-6078 BC BC. TWO BDRM FURN APT Carport, adult section. $460 per month 293-4832 BC LARGE UPPER 2 BR All appl. Carpeting and drapes. Good location. No pets $475 Avail 9/1 293-3821 BC LARGE 3BR 2 BA All appl Carpeting, drapes, ground floor. Good lcx:ation No pets $600 mo Now avail 29 3-3821 BC FOR RENT 3 bdrm 1 bath house in Boulder City Has fireplace and fenced side ancj back yards $700 mo, 1st, last and dep. Call 294-0159 after 5.30 or on weekend. BC MATURE LADY TO SHARE APT Prefer non-smoker $300 per mo. 293-5140 after 4 30 PM. BC BOULDER CITY Bouldei Hills Condo 2 601 1/2 Baths All appliances, covered parking and pool Avail Sept 1. 367-6760 days, 877-0702 eves VERY NICE QUIET 2 bdrm apt Unfurn off street parking. Balcony/patio. DW. sep storage rm, laundry rm, no pool. $450 mo plus elec. CASTILIAN APTS 831 Ave A See manager in apt 4. 9am to 5:30 pm BC APARTMENTS As Low As $250 month Furnished 564-6952 OFFICE/RETAIL SPACE For lease Approx, 846 sq ft ea First Western Plaza, 1000 Nevada Hwy,, BC $480$550 mo 293-2367 or 293-6344 ATUNTIC CITY APARTMENTS Clean, Quality Apartments In Henderson • Cantral Air • AppHsnces • Drapes •Carpets • Water Paid • Washer/Dryer Available From S375 per mo. New Spacious 1 bdrm, near Skyline with low utility cost. $410 mo. up to $430. Newly remodeled, spacious 2 bdrm apts. Near School and Shopping and Morrell Park. Available Now. 565-7028 FOR RENT 155 sq. ft. Office, Retail, or Shop Excellent location. 294-0887 or 2937766. 8C OFFICES FOR RENT From 250 sq. ft. Very Reasonable Boulder Theatre BIdg. 293-1283 BC. HENDERSON PLAZA APTS. 730 Center St. Henderson, Nevada, 565-7512 2 bdrm., unfurnished, pool & play yard. Near schools & shopping. Free Cable TV. Irom $365 month • APARTMENTS AVAILABLE 1, 2, 3 Bedroom Units For info call 293-1615 or 294-0577 S aJK^S p.ffl. Moduli Set 10 z. n.-3 pm ClOMd Sunday CASA DE ALICIA APTS. M A M II APTS. Professionally managed by Equinox Oavelopnwnt, Inc. BOULDER STATION has professional office space for rent in prime Boulder City location 916 Nevada Hwy., Boulder City 294-0225 RENTAL/LEASE 1.400 Sq. Ft Office or Store Rental 559 sq. ft. Ample Parking 129 Water St 56&411 •••••• REAL ESTATE BY OWNER Semi-custom, Large Boulder City home with 40 ft heated pod. Perfect for large family or mother/daughter. 4 Ixlrm with 2 1/2 bath, Jacuzzi tub in master bdrm, sunken living room, formal dining and large family room plus complete 1 bedroom handicap apartment with separate entrance. Extensive use of Italian tile thruouf. All this and more for only $169,500 For Dt call 293-6079 BC • 1/2 acre lot, Section 27 $23,000 566-8345, Call after • 5 p.m. OWNER Perfect golf course location. Custom home. Single story. Lrg 3 BR 2 BA, 3 car garage. Many extras Exc cond. $199,500 Ph 293-7808 BC HENDERSON By owner. Immaculate 3 bdrm, 2 t)th, (JouWe car g arage, spa. Near Sunset & oulder Hwy. $653 monthly payments. No qualifying, cash to loan negotiable w/min. $12,000 down. Call 564-3647 • •• Vedent SUN REALTY YOUR ONE-STOP Real Estate Company 13 • IMM< Ms CALL 24 HRS (702) 293-2151 18 YOUR GARAGE OVERFLOWINGT Phone 293-2302 or 564-1881 TO PLACE WANTS ADS 1311 NEVADA HIGHWAY BOULDER CITY, NV 89005 Summer Hours: Mon.-Frl. 9:00-5:00 and By Appointment TWO STORY CUSTOI\ overlooking Lake Mead. Four bedroom, 2% baths, formal dining room, open and airy kitchen with cooking island & large pantry. Central vacuum, wet bar, laundry with V2 bath and many more custom features. Shown by appt. $395,000 COLDWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY, 293-5757. BC. • • • • • $2,000 DOWN 4 Mrm, 2 bth, 2 car Oarege. fenced yard. Need TLC. Warm Springs/Lake Mead. About $600 monthly. $2,100 DOWN Large 2 bdrm, 2 bth, 2 car garage, Green Valley home. About $650 monthly. $2,200 DOWN Heritage Vlata, 2 bdrm, 2 bth, townhome w/gerage. About $700 monthly. Herlta0 Homes Inc. 435-8188 • • • • • EVEN THE HOT WATER HEATER SHINES: Immaculate 3-bedroom newer Lewis Home low maintenance yard, ready to move in. Only $102,600. Call now. y LARGE FAMILY HOME-EVEN ROOM FOR THE IN-LAWS: 3,900 square feet of custom split level charm and extra features, perfect for inhome professional office, etc. on Black Mtn Golf Course. Pool, roses, formal dining room seats large party. By appointment please. Asking $199,950. ASSUME THIS FHA LOAN: An easy way to move into this 1,900 square foot custom near B.C. Golf Course, lots of RV parking, covered patio, and more. $140,000 full price. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY? We have several exclusives now available, as well as other; if you are thinking of buying or selling call our Specialist. Bob Branch, for confidential appointment. HOME TOWN SPECIALISTS: We can help you sell your property or to buy property by acting as YOUR AGENT, either SELLERS AGENT or as BUYERS AGENT. Why is this better for you? Stop by and ask. "KING OF THE HILL," Easy curved drive leads to spectacular LAKE MEAD VIEW lot. Partially excavated for charming home — Seller's heart attack forces quick sale — below market at $99,950. Don't wait. OLDER 2 BEDROOM PLUS DEN. SUPER GARAGE, $78,500. See today. SPYGLASS CONDO: Unobstructable LAKE MEAD VIEW, extras. 2-bedroom plus 2i baths, by appointment please $105,000. WHAT A VIEW! Of LAKE MEAD FROM THIS IMMACULATE 2-bedroom home, full length carport and full length covered porch, balanced power, adult community, perfect for retirement or second home. $117,500, see today. "THE REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS" KAYKIMBERLIN BRET RUNION BOB BRANCH, Business Opportunitiea CLAUDE SMITH LANE MOLSBERRY ERLOW KELLEY IRIS BLETSCH, GRI, CRB BOB BOSTON, GRI, OWNER-BROKER, Property Management 12) STOP BY OUR OFFICE AND LOOK OVER THE MANY OTHER PROPERTIES AVAILABLE COLOUieU. BANKena ANCHOR REALTY, INC, REALTORS 293-5757 Expect the best." LAKE MEAD VIEW subdivisiom—custom 3 bedrm, 2% baths, 2 car garage plus a den off eating area in kitchen. Room for pool and RV also. $245,000. SEE THIS TWO BEDRM in estabUshed area. Just reduced to $109,000. New carpeting and verticals, desert landscaping in front, RV gate. VACANT AND READY FOR FAMILY-Close to schools, pool and shopping. New vinyl in kitchen and eating area, new carpeting in two bedrms, one car garage with laundry and storage, plus carport. $109,500. CALL TO SEE THIS 4 bedrm, 1 '/< bath Del Prado home with 1,62T s.f. 2 car garage, desert landscaping front and back. RV parking area. Home has been well maintained. $134,900. IMMACULATE THREE BDRM in established area. 2 year old roof, newer appliances, custom window coverings. $115,000. GREAT PRICE for this 3 bedrm mobile home in Mtn View Estates. Large covered carport, storage shed, darkroom separate from mobile and heated and cooled. $89,550. RESTAURANT BUSINESS-established 9 years located in shopping center. Good established history of growth in income. Shown by appt. $48,500. ENGRAVING BUSINESS-with room for expansion into trophies and tee shirts. Gifts items, ceramic tile and house number and some tee shirts included in inventory. Business established 7 years. Seller will stay and train as necessary. $38,500. NEW LISTING! 3 bedrm, 2 full baths, converted garage plus enclosed spa room, RV parking, assumable loan. $124,900. LAKE MTN ESTATES mobile home on comer lot with view of lake forever. I'/i car garage plus carport. Lots of upgrades. $132,500. CENTRALLY LOCATED older 3 bedrm home with many improvements, central a/c and heat, fireplace, 22X28 detached rec room or could be a garage with Vt bath. $104,900. BOULDER HILLS CONDO-1303 Darlene I102C overlooking the pool. Lots of upgradea and ownerd transferred. Assumable VA. $74,500. HAVING A GARAGE SALE? PICK UP A FREE GARAGE SALE SIGN, NO OBLIGATION! STOP BY THE OFFICE AND PICK UP AVAILABLE UST OF ALL HOMES FOR SALE IN B.C. BY ALL REALTORS. LIST IS UPDATED FREQUENTLY! OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK! COLDWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY ^501 Nev. Hwy., B.C. Call (702) 293-5757 TELL 'EM YOU SAW IT IN THE WANT AOSf! A proven seller can be yours. Call 564-1881 to,find out how to make them work. K HOUSING^ yyy/y//y//^^^^^ PnvMUig ttK NglwM qiaMy Indng lo honw •inwnNp, aTsuoh VA NO DOWN a FHA LOW DOWN gownnTMnt programs Veterans & Active Duty STOP RENTING! Own Your Own Home • No down poymont to (144,000 • No ourow IM • Fro* qtuuilying • FfM Htl of homo* 459-8387 24 hrt, Optn 7 dayt Bf okw A FnncNM* ol Volaf ui Rent Ealtl* FrancNM Corporallon. Eodi oNlea U indtpondtnlly ownod tnd optrtlod, IvaT IJi-.l.lil.llUl.l iT!a*tiiiQ]] 5000 E. Bonanza at Nellls next to KMART Bob Olsen Realty & Insurance Inc. 6 Water St., Henderson 564-1831 5 Acres in Sec. 9, plus 2-fiva adjacent acres. All or part Beautiful view of the Valley. 1/2 Acre lot sec. 9, ctosa to Brown Jr. High. Nice & level. BoukJer City lot, overlooking Lake Mead on Woodacra Dr. Ready to Build with all utilities. Owner llcsnsae. 21/2 Acres off the old LA Hwy. near Paradise Spa. Only $45,000-Good Terms. 2 1/2 Acres Sec. 4. Only $35,000. Custom Home on Paradise Country Club. 4 Br., 4 baths, 3 llreplaces, covered patio deck overlooking Golf Course and pool area. Call y} for appointment to see. Owner licensee. A REALTORS SERVING THE HENDERSON AREA FOR 30 YEARS OnlulK no 21 HENDERSON REALTY, INC. 18 Wat^r St., Hmdarson, NV (702) S64-2515 Put your trust in Number One." JUST LISTED! FOR INVESTORS ONLY! Newly constructed quality home with 1250 square feet, 3 bdrms and \% baths. Call for more info! DO YOU NEED TERMS!!! We have them, on an affordable 3 bdrm. 2 bath, and a 2 car garage home, with many custom built-in features, wallpaper, paneling, mirrors, fireplace, and shutters. Please don't hesitate, give me a call today! PERFECT FOR THE NEWLYWEDS!!! 1 bdrm condo, with breakfast bar, exra storage space, walk-in closet, entity foyer, and 2 car carport, comes with dishwasher and disposal and very affordable, with low down payment. Call today! REDUCED AGAIN AND NO QUALIFYING!!! Fenced in yard, 4 bdrms, 2 car garage, country kitchen, with dishwasher and disposal and a home warranty policy, all you need to do is call for an appointment, today! VIEW LAKE MEAD AND THE IMOUNTAINS! Beautiful Silvercrest mobile home, fully landscaped front & rear, extra large living room with wet bar, 2 large bdrms, bonus room, sitting room, dining room, 2 baths and a kitchen a woman dreams of. Relax out in the covered patio, parking galore, and amenities galore, call today! OWNER SACRIFICES!!! Below appraisal, 30" wide mobile home, boasts of 3 bdrms, mirrored wardrobe, built in vanities, formal dinign, with built in hutch, office area with built in bookshelves, and a sunken tub to relax in., Please call! JUST IVIOVE IN AND ENJOY!!! Beautiful well kept home has 3 bdrms. 2 full baths, vertical blinds, auto sprinklers, 2 car garage with bench area, fantastic landscaping and a list that goes on and on. Owner has reduced the price and offers home protecton policy, don't miss this one, call now! LOCATION PLUS Excellent 4 bdrm, VA bath with large fenced backyard. Plenty of room for RV parking, garden, whatever you want! $83,400. ) FOR THE ROOMING PROPERTY OWNER Like new 3 bdrm 2Vi bath, townhouse. Has "no care" private yard. Community pool, 2 car garage, all of this and still have freedom to go! $67,000. LARGE LOT LOW TAXES Can't beat the convenience and affordability in this attractive 3 bdrm, 2 bath mobile home & lot, no maintenance fenced lot with outstanding city & mountain view! Covered parking, oversized storage shed, covered patio and more... $55,000 with seller financing available. LOOKING FOR A HOUSE UNDER $40,000? Then do not overlook this 3 bdrm. l'/4 bath mobile home and lot. Huge storage/work shop included too! This lot is 50x100 and landscaped, the property is within minutes from Lake Mead. AddiUonal RV parking too! $37,500. PRICE AND TERMS TO SUIT YOUR BUDGET In this great 3 bdnn home. Terrific kitchen with eating area, energy saving evaporative cooling, completely fenced and landscaped for child safety, cheaper than rent payments too! Call for details! $63,500. THIS HOME HAS IT ALL! LookiDg for a 2 story. 2023 aq. ft. custom home with a large yard and fruit treea. Do yon want a stove, fireplace w/a heatalator, 3 bdrm, 2'/i baths, a Master bedrm with a large bath and walkin closet. How about ceramic tile io the kitchen, a pantry, etc. Call today! $110,000. m 18 Water St. (702) 564-2515 lat Thursday, August 10. 1989 • A A A A A A A A A A A* 'kiK'ki^if In Henderson. Choose your colors now. 3 bedroom, 2 bath. Large Lot. $104,500 DOME REALTY 293-1613 BC_ FOR SALE Small tidy older home w/attractive yard. Only 551,000 Ideal tor retiree or 'rst home buyer Ceyivenient location. By ippt only. Call Fred Dunham GarrettReal;v 293-3333 BC Hilltop estates. New custom homes from $129,900, Choose your floor plan and lot today. Contact Oome Realty 293-1613 Move up to Green Valley 3,000 plus sq. ft. custom home. 4 bdrm, all w/walk-in closets. 2% baths 3 car garage. Will trade for part ol $60,000 equity, $225,000. American Family Realty 454-2878 For Sale By Ov(ner; 3 bdr, 2 bth, 2 car garage, fenced back yard. Huge family rm w/fireplace and built in bar. Also has pool and spa VA assumable no qualifying. $94,000. Payments are $900 mo and $10,000 Down, 565-6104. WANT TO KNOW WHAT YOUR PROPERTY IS WORTH? Free market analysis. Call Roger 293-2939. Realtor, Coldwell Banker/Anchor Realty. SAVE $$$ By owner. 3 bdrm 2 ba $93,500 See at 713 Ave A after 10am. BC ASSUMABLE Lake Tree Condo for sale. $86,000 ERA, The Realty Center, Laureen 293-7551 BC FOR SALE BY OWNER 3BR 1 BA Lrg kitchen, tile roof, garage, auto sprklrs. $98,500 540 Birch by appt only. 294-1983 BC COMMERCIAL BUILDING FOR SALE 3,000 sq ft Zoned CM Uses: Professional, Retail, Auto Sales or Repairs, Plumbing, Bottling, Laboratories, Building materials. Mobile Home Equipment and Repairs, $127,400. Also Commercial Condo, 600 sq. ft. $29,900 Owner will carry. $5,000 down, ERA, The Reelty Ce ler. Cell Laureen 293-7551 anytime. ^ ^ ____^ Henderson Home News, Boulder Qt y N ews. G reen VaUy N ewe Page 51' ••••A'A'A'A'A'A'A'A'A'A'A'**************** l.^.|{.(). is lORSAIi: |{\ OWM.k (I't't on (uir list ol 'lor .Snlc My Owiuis' Htndersoii ^S. (irct'ii \;illcv Anas ••A'****A'A'*A'A'*******A'******ArA'**Ar BACK YARD STORE-You can have your own. Beat high food prices by planting and picking your own fruit, vegetables and herbs in the spadoua back yard. Also included are four bedrooms, 1 Vt bath plus a two car garage. Just reduced to $68,500. WANTED LARGE FAMILY-Downtown area home with four bedrooms, l'^4 baths, garage and storage basement. Approximately 1,600 sq. ft. — priced to sell in the 60'8. Call Candace for details. NEARLY NEW—two story home with circular stair^ case, three bedrooms, 24 baths, open floor plan, two car garage, and beautiful back yard. Call Elaine or June for your appointment. ASSUMABLE, ASSUMABLE-NO QUALIFYING—Take over the 9>/2% APR loan on this neat three bedroom home with two baths, double garage, comer lot. Call June or Elaine for information. GREAT RIVER LANDING ASSUMPTIONDon't wait to see this lovely home — single story — spacious floor plan with formal dining and family room. Tastefully decorated throughout. Call now for your appointment. NESTLED IN A WARM FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD—Manicured front yard — huge fenced backyard. Four bedrooms and V/t baths for only $65,000. BEST LAS VEGAS LOCATION-near the Strip, Boulevard MUl — just about everything — Lovely Fran Park two story with pool and spa. Many, many amenities are included in this fine home. Call Candace for your appointment. BACK ON THE MARKET-Charming older home with three bedrooms, 2l\ baths, indoor laundry room, and lovely private yard in a tree shaded neighborhood. Now only $66,500. LAND 2.5 Acres $48,950 .85 acres College and Lomprey $25,000. Building Lot $15,000. Section 4 1 acre $18,500. i& \ JR REALTY 204 W. Pacific 564-5142 Put your trust in Number One: J • and "Century 21 Real Eaale Corporalion I Equal Housing Opportumfy i IMOEPENOENTLY j>WNEp AND OPEMTEoV DARWIIf BIBLE Million Dollar Club Mtmbor 22 Yoar RMMMM > oe w HAW w wen c iii mnwom COLDUjeiX BANKeRO PAUL GARGIS & ASSOCIATES RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE ol li'hiwii l**n Hi--rtnlu) km\*'. IIM DARWIN'S HELP! LISTINGS DESPERATELY NEEDED Call Darwin BOULDER CITY, This hoi patio, with Mexican tile. S| 1503 Darlene $129,000. all. 3 bdrm, 2 bath. 600 sq. ft. covered ^nd covered boat parking. Much more. DOLL HOUSE in quiet area of Hdn. Great Won't last. Only $60,000. 106 Cholla. 'on. 3 bdrm, large yard. Boulder Gty 4 bdrm hi custom upgrades. Lovi 1 and spa. Ceramic tile thru-out. Many iborhood. $148,000. Large general store and 3 bdrm, 2 bth house in Junction, Utah. Fantastic volume., Unlimited potential. Business and home for $250,000 w9th terms. Store did $257,000 last year and increases each year. '/: acre lot zbned commercial. Lot is level and ready to build on. Desert Inn Road at Pecos McLeod. Location location location. Owner will finance with excellent terms. Super investment at $159,000. $5,000 price reduction on this magnificent 2,400 SF Section 19 custom home. 3 bedroom. 2 bath, large family room with fireplace, giant country kitchen, '/i acre lot with lovely landscaping. Reduced taonly $109,000. Owner bought another and must sell QUICK. Approximately 14,250 acres completely surrounded by government lands. Hidden Hills Ranch—Cathedral Canyon area—Nevada and California state line. Ample water for development. Magnificent property. First time ever Usted, $22,000,000. Mini ranch in section 27. New 3 bedroom, 2 bath, fireplace, 2 car garage, country kitchen, custom home on 118'X135' with 2 stall bam and tack room, fenced. Only $92,000. 10-160 acres of beautiful mountain view forest land 45 miles west of Las Vegas near Sky Mountain Preserve. $6,000 per acre or exchange for Boulder City Property. Boulder City family style dome home, with unobstructed view of Lake Mead. 3,145 SF, 4 bedroom, 3 bath, large family room, fireplace, guest master suite, balcony, and so much more. $192,000. Best buy in Henderson 11 Lovely 2 bedroom, 1 bath with possible guest house at rear, in SAFE SA SF, large family room, s trees and grapes. This hu' mediately. Only $59,950. f^ established older neighborhood. 1,456 iree patios, huge RV parking area, fruit been reduced $17,000 and must sell imBoulder City professional building. Owner will finance. Three offices with baths. Lovely brick building in historical area. $130,000. Restaurant, RV Park, hunting-fishing lodge, or private living quarters. Located in one of Utah's finest fishing and hunting areas. Roads open yearround. Otter Creek Reservoir, Puffer Lake, Paiute Reservoir, and seven other great fishing lakes within 15 miles. Fantastic retirement opportunity. Restaurant, RV park, living quarters, and over a full acre. Excellent condition. All for only $95,000. RESIDENTIAL LOT Residential lot, 2,2 acres for sale by owner. Sub Div 11. Unobstructed view. Appraised 125M. Owner will carry after 20% down. Easy terms, $110,000 Call 293-0434 BC GOVERNMENT HOMES! $1.00 (U-Repair) Foreclosures, Tax Delinquent Property Now Selling. This area! Call (Refundable) 1-518-459-3546 EXT. H512B for listings. For sale by owner, Lewis Home on Golden Sfiadow, Somi-custom. Was 4 bdrm, now 3, Absolutely beautiful. Open kitchen, leaded glass ceiling light & matching leaded glass breakfast bar (builtin), 2 bths, 3 bdrm, formal dining room or can use as family room. Liv. rm., 2 car f arage, fenced yard. 78,000. Pnncipals only Ph 737-3383 or 383-0611 or 564-7016 Semi-custom home, Establisfied neighborhood, partial basement, 3 large bdrms, 3 bths, 4 storage rooms, 2 covered patios, Jacuzzi, all landscaped w/sprinklers. See at 120 Kola. 565-9309 A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS and your home or mobile home clear could make you owner of a money making permanent mobile home park and 3 bdrm home w/carport. 20 X 30 metal txiilding on Trout River in second largest lake in Colorado. Center of big game herd. 1-303-882-4032. Pool Season: 3 bdrm, 2 bth, ISOOsq. ft. Beautiful home throughout. Very tastefully decorated Every room has intercom. RV parking with gate. Low down payment Assume 9 75 APR interest. Call DAVE at Jensen's Realty 564-3333. Approved VA & FHA and unrt, 2 bdrm, 1 bth. Reduced. Now $65,500 Manan Crane Anchor Realty 293-5757 or 294-1767. Boulder Hwy/Lake Mead offk space 950 sq ft. Ready for occupancy Low rates. Call H & L Realty 385-3226. DICK BLAIR REALTY 833 NEVADA HWYn BOULDER CITY (702) 2932171 AFRmQDXff Bob Blair. Broker 293-2049 Patty Guffey-Speer 2934075 Cristina Antonio 2934116 Rich Moynihaa 293-1802 TKsr Paul Ryan 293-5406 Andrea Anderson 293-3228 DaleCondit 294-1014 Rhonda Beck 293-7975 FOUR BEDROOMS B.C. ESTATE HOME with fantastic view Lake Mead & surrounding Mts. THIS HOME COMMANDS comfort and spacious living. Over 575 sq. ft. Master BEDRM, 3'/> ba. oversize 2 car gar. CALL FOR APT. $650,000. THREE BEDROOMS OWNER HAS JUST REDUCED THE PRICE ON THIS exceptionally beautiful CUSTOM HOME with pool VA ba. 2 car gar. many extras $139,900. LAND .360 acre lot with beautiful view—Lake Mead. Just right for your castle. SEE IT TOEWVY. $135,000. 2 lots—Overlooking Lake Mead & surrounding MU.. .79 Acre. $225,000. LAKEVIEW from this cul de sac lot in custom home area owner wants to sell. A Bargain at only $44,500. RENTALS 2 bed. 2 ba. Condo child OK, no pU Avail NOW. $525. req. 6 mo lease. CONDOMINIUMS / TOWNHOUSES FULLY FURNISHED DELUXE REGATTA POINTE TOWNHOUSE-2 bedrm, 2 ba., 2 car gar. Upgraded throughout—beautiful view of Lake and Mtns. SEE TODAY ONLY $160,000. LAKE VIEW-IMMACULATE 2 bedrm, 2'/> ba. CONDO with many UPGRADES, Custom drapes T/O. INCL. all appliances F.P., better than new, w/assumable loan, A MUST SEE AT JUST $108,000. REGATTA POINTE MODEL Beautiful end unit w/LAKE VIEW. Over 1,800 sq. ft., 2 bedrm, 2 ba., den, 2 car gar. private patio, Atrium, Thousands of $ in upgraded carpet, tile, window coverings, & model home furniture, TOP OF THE LINE QUALITY $212,500. MOBILE HOMES DONT DELAY ON THIS BEAUTIFUL SUPER SHARP 24'X52' GOLDEN WEST Mobile home-2 Bedrm, 2 Ba. FULL FURNISHED-in excellent condition. $35,000. Lovely 2 bedrm, l'/< *>Mobile Home in Mtn. VisU Est.. ^"^ "o^, desert landscaping. Covert \t0^^ inced rear, central air/beat. Ml VSK^nE $85,000. SEE TODAXIII BUSINESS FOR SALE PRICE JUST REDUCED-BRING OFFER—established business in good location—shopping plaza. SEE IT TODAY-CALL FOR DETAILS. $19,900. CALL WOW roil prrAILg AND ANY MWAL INPpMJATIOMI TOLL FREEIi 1.800-62S4910 Ext E41 SINCERITY AND INTEGRITY IS OUR SPECIALTt^ Hefresiling Pool! This Boulder Hills Condo is thie perfect place to Cool Off this Summer. Just bring your suitcase andtoothbrush \o\t\is Comfortably Furnished, 2 Bedroom 1.5 bath unit. Includes Lush Landscaping plus refrigerator, stove/oven, dishwasher.washer & dryer. Yours for $70,900 Call Now for iow maintenance living. 294-0870 Don't Just sit back and watch Prices for Boulder City Homes & Lots Go OUT OF SIGHT! CALL MANNY NOW at 294-0870. and find out about owning Your Own Boulder City Home. P.S. Ask for your Free List of Current B.C. Homes For Sale. Veanine's Sweet Treats As Featured in Country Living Magazine! For Sale Now, Owner Operated. Includes All Equipment, Fixtures, & Recipes. Come Buy a Delicious Sweet Treat for yourself or a friend, 525 Hotel Plaza, Boulder City. >> FREE Comparative Market Analysis Smilmra Mmrkmt Bringm Top Dollar lor Bouldor City Houmom A Lota, Call Mow! CALL MANNY 294-0870 COLDWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY BQULDER REALTY Mis Put your trust m in Number One. • 19K9 and "• CVniury 21 Real LsiauCorporali<.n. Kqual Mousing Opportunity INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATER 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 2 car gar., new carpeting, new paint, very clean. $110,000. LEWIS HOME Better th RV parking, highly upgri bedroom, Vt baths. Finished garage, nust see! $149,900. COUNTRY LIVING New 2 and 3 bedroom homes in Overton, NV. Top of Lake Mead. Ideal for retirement. Under $70,000. ON HOPI Clean n 2 bdrm doll house. Great starter. TWO BEDROOM. "A oath. Uriveway Parking. $73,500. LEWIS HOME. New pool with springb Cathedral ceilings. Large master bedrooi' decor features. Large lot. $134,900. uzzi. 4 bdrm, 1^4 bath. st room and many nice BEAUTIFUL HOME WITH LAKE VIEW 4 years new and immaculate. Large two car garage, boat and RV parking. All adult community. Clubhouse and pool, with low $20 monthly association dues. Many, many nice features including ramp access. $184,950. BOULDER H ILLS CONDO Overlooking pool, 2 BR. 1 Vi BA. All appliances included. $69,500. EVERY INCH EXQUISITE-A MUST SEE FOR THE DISCRIMINATE BUYER I Custom through-out and beautiful—Large 3 bedroom, 2 bath, hand plastered walls & ceilings, custom oak flooring from the Black Forest, rose garden, atrium, custom heated pool-automatic cover, Jacuzzi bath, large 2 car garage plus RV parking & many more, many more amenities in this designer owned home—call today for details and appointment to see—pleaseno smoking & no children on showing $209,900 THIS IS A ONE OF A KIND!!! OVERLOOKING THE CITY & ELDORADO VALLEY-3,253 square feet of custom home on Vi acre. 4 bedroom, 2'/: bath custom home with secluded master bedroom—bath wing, split level with many, many features to be viewed $249,000 PICTURE THIS! Great Neighborhood in golf course area-short walk to schools & shops. 4 bedroom, 2 bath, fireplace, 2 car garage, single story and can be yours for $97,500. OLDER UPGRADED 2 level—2 unit home. 2 bedroom, 1 bath upstairs, 1 bedroom, 1 bath, with utility room lower level. Currently rented. Separate electrical meters on both units a must see at $99,900. CONDO-NO STEPS-ALL ONE LEVEL In Boulder Hills, 2 bedroom, 2 full baths, full kitchen with laundry built-in plus family room with wet bar, micro-wave and countertop cooking. Motivated seller S71,000. LAKE TERRACE LOT Corner lot—look for Century 21 sign. Priced to sell at $59,000 py^ ^^ ^^ ^^^^ p^^ y^y FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS It! WE UST — WE SELL CAU THE CENTURY 21 PROFESSIONALS TODAY •aeli offic* liMlpiMtontly owiMd A epratd WE GET RESULTS JANICE CRAWFORD, Owner 293-4942 MEL DUNAWAY, Brolier 293-2438DIANNE VANASSE 293-4284 DON TAPSON 293-1660 NELLIE PETERSON 294-1241 ROSE GALPERIN T 293^937 STEVE McCUTCHEON 293^942 I7A0I 90^ ^019 416 NEVADA HIGHWAY \ I M£\ i,V^'^M^ BOULDER CITY. NEVADA

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^m Newt, Boaklcr Qty News. OfMO Valkj News APT FOR RENT 1 BR $340 mo plus dep No pets 294-0404 AvaH 9/1 BC bETACHED GARAGE FOR RENT 20' X 20' Alley access Roll up (joor $50 per mo. 2940501 BC 4 BR 3 BA. den, 2 story, fenced yrd. 850 Mcxitera 1 st, last. 293-3478 BC WANT TO RENT Garage for boat in B.C. Need 24'lengtfi Call/write F Elliott 8762 Baywood Dr. Hut Boh CA 92646 714-964-1975 2 BD HM $600 mo; 1 bd apt. furnunfurn-pool $425 mo 293-0533 BC Thursday, Angnst 10.1989 KITCHENETTE 293-7673 BC $89 wk OFFICE OR STORE 1319 8 Nevada Hyyy BC next to 76 gas station. Off street parki ng$210mo 293 3646BC Teddy's KHcfienettes Just bhr>o your tootfibrush Everytning furnished. Phone 293-1716 Trailer space lor rent, Henderson area Up to 8 x 40. 564 1398^ F(3R RENT 2 bdrm, 2 bath, manufactured fiome overlooking tfie lake Adult community No pets $850 293-6014 ask for Bev. BC Office Warehouse for lease. 1200 sq. ft. $600 per mo 520 W. Sunset Rd. -4, Henderson. Call Diana 382-0423 or 876-1925. NEW APARTMENTS on Georgia Ave Have 2 sizes of 2 bedrm & 2 bath. 984-1193 sq. ft Prices start at SS50 plus deposits Washer/dryer in each unit. 293-0686 BC CLEAN private 2 bedroom un-furnished apartment. 1 full bath, modern kitchen. Central air and heating. Fully carpeted Laundry hook ups. $600 per month includes all utilities 1st, last, and security deposit. Prefer non-smokers Evenings 293-4480 BC FOR RENT" 1 storage unit" 8X20 with circulating vent on top $50 per mo 293-7763 s FOR RENT 2,500 sq ft Shop Space. For light manufacturing. 2 baths. Ample parking with awning in rear. Approx 1,200 sq ft Ample 3 phase power Will arrange office fac for tenants needs. $900 mo 293-7763 BC Need a place to stay in beautiful Boulder City'' We have lovely 3 room suites with kitchen, living room, king bedroom Smal' pets OK Weekly rates Call Nevada Inn 702-293-2044 BC 2 bdrms, condo's for rent in Henderson $550 to $645 a month Call for more into American Family Realty 454-2878 2 bdrm, apt. for rent $425 • -./no, plus $200 deposit. No Pets. 564-0811 Room for rent, partial-bath kitchen pnvileges 565-986£ BOULDER CITY 1 bdrrh house for rent $495 No pets References • required 1-291-0054 after 5 pm. BOULDER HILLS CONDO 2 bdmn, 1 1/2 taths, completely furnished. $149 per wk, 293-7551 BC ROOMS FOR SINGLE OCCUPANCY $100 wk plus tax. Rcx)ms doutde occupany $110 p6r wk plus tax. Single room and breakfast $125 wkly plus tax Double occupancy room and breakfast $150 weekly plus tax. Boulder Dam Hotel 1305 Arizona 293-1808 BC Apartments, 2 bdroom for rent Apt. Mgr.218Merlayne #a 2 bdrm, apt Henderson Refrig, stove, laundry rm $395 per mo. Deposit $300 No Pets. Section 8 Accepted Call 564-3656 Townhouse, 1 bdrm, partially furnished, available now. $375plusdepostt.564 7117. BC FOR RENT Small 1 bdrm house. Close in to town. Fenced backyard w/patio, storage shed, laundry rm $350 mo. plus $300 move in 733-0686, John. 2 BDRM 2 bath 2nd floor apt Fireplace, carpeted and draped Newly painted. $500 mo. Security dep $500 and 1st mo rent in advance Available immed 293-6078 BC BC. TWO BDRM FURN APT Carport, adult section. $460 per month 293-4832 BC LARGE UPPER 2 BR All appl. Carpeting and drapes. Good location. No pets $475 Avail 9/1 293-3821 BC LARGE 3BR 2 BA All appl Carpeting, drapes, ground floor. Good lcx:ation No pets $600 mo Now avail 29 3-3821 BC FOR RENT 3 bdrm 1 bath house in Boulder City Has fireplace and fenced side ancj back yards $700 mo, 1st, last and dep. Call 294-0159 after 5.30 or on weekend. BC MATURE LADY TO SHARE APT Prefer non-smoker $300 per mo. 293-5140 after 4 30 PM. BC BOULDER CITY Bouldei Hills Condo 2 601 1/2 Baths All appliances, covered parking and pool Avail Sept 1. 367-6760 days, 877-0702 eves VERY NICE QUIET 2 bdrm apt Unfurn off street parking. Balcony/patio. DW. sep storage rm, laundry rm, no pool. $450 mo plus elec. CASTILIAN APTS 831 Ave A See manager in apt 4. 9am to 5:30 pm BC APARTMENTS As Low As $250 month Furnished 564-6952 OFFICE/RETAIL SPACE For lease Approx, 846 sq ft ea First Western Plaza, 1000 Nevada Hwy,, BC $480$550 mo 293-2367 or 293-6344 ATUNTIC CITY APARTMENTS Clean, Quality Apartments In Henderson • Cantral Air • AppHsnces • Drapes •Carpets • Water Paid • Washer/Dryer Available From S375 per mo. New Spacious 1 bdrm, near Skyline with low utility cost. $410 mo. up to $430. Newly remodeled, spacious 2 bdrm apts. Near School and Shopping and Morrell Park. Available Now. 565-7028 FOR RENT 155 sq. ft. Office, Retail, or Shop Excellent location. 294-0887 or 2937766. 8C OFFICES FOR RENT From 250 sq. ft. Very Reasonable Boulder Theatre BIdg. 293-1283 BC. HENDERSON PLAZA APTS. 730 Center St. Henderson, Nevada, 565-7512 2 bdrm., unfurnished, pool & play yard. Near schools & shopping. Free Cable TV. Irom $365 month • APARTMENTS AVAILABLE 1, 2, 3 Bedroom Units For info call 293-1615 or 294-0577 S aJK^S p.ffl. Moduli Set 10 z. n.-3 pm ClOMd Sunday CASA DE ALICIA APTS. M A M II APTS. Professionally managed by Equinox Oavelopnwnt, Inc. BOULDER STATION has professional office space for rent in prime Boulder City location 916 Nevada Hwy., Boulder City 294-0225 RENTAL/LEASE 1.400 Sq. Ft Office or Store Rental 559 sq. ft. Ample Parking 129 Water St 56&411 •••••• REAL ESTATE BY OWNER Semi-custom, Large Boulder City home with 40 ft heated pod. Perfect for large family or mother/daughter. 4 Ixlrm with 2 1/2 bath, Jacuzzi tub in master bdrm, sunken living room, formal dining and large family room plus complete 1 bedroom handicap apartment with separate entrance. Extensive use of Italian tile thruouf. All this and more for only $169,500 For Dt call 293-6079 BC • 1/2 acre lot, Section 27 $23,000 566-8345, Call after • 5 p.m. OWNER Perfect golf course location. Custom home. Single story. Lrg 3 BR 2 BA, 3 car garage. Many extras Exc cond. $199,500 Ph 293-7808 BC HENDERSON By owner. Immaculate 3 bdrm, 2 t)th, (JouWe car g arage, spa. Near Sunset & oulder Hwy. $653 monthly payments. No qualifying, cash to loan negotiable w/min. $12,000 down. Call 564-3647 • •• Vedent SUN REALTY YOUR ONE-STOP Real Estate Company 13 • IMM< Ms CALL 24 HRS (702) 293-2151 18 YOUR GARAGE OVERFLOWINGT Phone 293-2302 or 564-1881 TO PLACE WANTS ADS 1311 NEVADA HIGHWAY BOULDER CITY, NV 89005 Summer Hours: Mon.-Frl. 9:00-5:00 and By Appointment TWO STORY CUSTOI\ overlooking Lake Mead. Four bedroom, 2% baths, formal dining room, open and airy kitchen with cooking island & large pantry. Central vacuum, wet bar, laundry with V2 bath and many more custom features. Shown by appt. $395,000 COLDWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY, 293-5757. BC. • • • • • $2,000 DOWN 4 Mrm, 2 bth, 2 car Oarege. fenced yard. Need TLC. Warm Springs/Lake Mead. About $600 monthly. $2,100 DOWN Large 2 bdrm, 2 bth, 2 car garage, Green Valley home. About $650 monthly. $2,200 DOWN Heritage Vlata, 2 bdrm, 2 bth, townhome w/gerage. About $700 monthly. Herlta0 Homes Inc. 435-8188 • • • • • EVEN THE HOT WATER HEATER SHINES: Immaculate 3-bedroom newer Lewis Home low maintenance yard, ready to move in. Only $102,600. Call now. y LARGE FAMILY HOME-EVEN ROOM FOR THE IN-LAWS: 3,900 square feet of custom split level charm and extra features, perfect for inhome professional office, etc. on Black Mtn Golf Course. Pool, roses, formal dining room seats large party. By appointment please. Asking $199,950. ASSUME THIS FHA LOAN: An easy way to move into this 1,900 square foot custom near B.C. Golf Course, lots of RV parking, covered patio, and more. $140,000 full price. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY? We have several exclusives now available, as well as other; if you are thinking of buying or selling call our Specialist. Bob Branch, for confidential appointment. HOME TOWN SPECIALISTS: We can help you sell your property or to buy property by acting as YOUR AGENT, either SELLERS AGENT or as BUYERS AGENT. Why is this better for you? Stop by and ask. "KING OF THE HILL," Easy curved drive leads to spectacular LAKE MEAD VIEW lot. Partially excavated for charming home — Seller's heart attack forces quick sale — below market at $99,950. Don't wait. OLDER 2 BEDROOM PLUS DEN. SUPER GARAGE, $78,500. See today. SPYGLASS CONDO: Unobstructable LAKE MEAD VIEW, extras. 2-bedroom plus 2i baths, by appointment please $105,000. WHAT A VIEW! Of LAKE MEAD FROM THIS IMMACULATE 2-bedroom home, full length carport and full length covered porch, balanced power, adult community, perfect for retirement or second home. $117,500, see today. "THE REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS" KAYKIMBERLIN BRET RUNION BOB BRANCH, Business Opportunitiea CLAUDE SMITH LANE MOLSBERRY ERLOW KELLEY IRIS BLETSCH, GRI, CRB BOB BOSTON, GRI, OWNER-BROKER, Property Management 12) STOP BY OUR OFFICE AND LOOK OVER THE MANY OTHER PROPERTIES AVAILABLE COLOUieU. BANKena ANCHOR REALTY, INC, REALTORS 293-5757 Expect the best." LAKE MEAD VIEW subdivisiom—custom 3 bedrm, 2% baths, 2 car garage plus a den off eating area in kitchen. Room for pool and RV also. $245,000. SEE THIS TWO BEDRM in estabUshed area. Just reduced to $109,000. New carpeting and verticals, desert landscaping in front, RV gate. VACANT AND READY FOR FAMILY-Close to schools, pool and shopping. New vinyl in kitchen and eating area, new carpeting in two bedrms, one car garage with laundry and storage, plus carport. $109,500. CALL TO SEE THIS 4 bedrm, 1 '/< bath Del Prado home with 1,62T s.f. 2 car garage, desert landscaping front and back. RV parking area. Home has been well maintained. $134,900. IMMACULATE THREE BDRM in established area. 2 year old roof, newer appliances, custom window coverings. $115,000. GREAT PRICE for this 3 bedrm mobile home in Mtn View Estates. Large covered carport, storage shed, darkroom separate from mobile and heated and cooled. $89,550. RESTAURANT BUSINESS-established 9 years located in shopping center. Good established history of growth in income. Shown by appt. $48,500. ENGRAVING BUSINESS-with room for expansion into trophies and tee shirts. Gifts items, ceramic tile and house number and some tee shirts included in inventory. Business established 7 years. Seller will stay and train as necessary. $38,500. NEW LISTING! 3 bedrm, 2 full baths, converted garage plus enclosed spa room, RV parking, assumable loan. $124,900. LAKE MTN ESTATES mobile home on comer lot with view of lake forever. I'/i car garage plus carport. Lots of upgrades. $132,500. CENTRALLY LOCATED older 3 bedrm home with many improvements, central a/c and heat, fireplace, 22X28 detached rec room or could be a garage with Vt bath. $104,900. BOULDER HILLS CONDO-1303 Darlene I102C overlooking the pool. Lots of upgradea and ownerd transferred. Assumable VA. $74,500. HAVING A GARAGE SALE? PICK UP A FREE GARAGE SALE SIGN, NO OBLIGATION! STOP BY THE OFFICE AND PICK UP AVAILABLE UST OF ALL HOMES FOR SALE IN B.C. BY ALL REALTORS. LIST IS UPDATED FREQUENTLY! OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK! COLDWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY ^501 Nev. Hwy., B.C. Call (702) 293-5757 TELL 'EM YOU SAW IT IN THE WANT AOSf! A proven seller can be yours. Call 564-1881 to,find out how to make them work. K HOUSING^ yyy/y//y//^^^^^ PnvMUig ttK NglwM qiaMy Indng lo honw •inwnNp, aTsuoh VA NO DOWN a FHA LOW DOWN gownnTMnt programs Veterans & Active Duty STOP RENTING! Own Your Own Home • No down poymont to (144,000 • No ourow IM • Fro* qtuuilying • FfM Htl of homo* 459-8387 24 hrt, Optn 7 dayt Bf okw A FnncNM* ol Volaf ui Rent Ealtl* FrancNM Corporallon. Eodi oNlea U indtpondtnlly ownod tnd optrtlod, IvaT IJi-.l.lil.llUl.l iT!a*tiiiQ]] 5000 E. Bonanza at Nellls next to KMART Bob Olsen Realty & Insurance Inc. 6 Water St., Henderson 564-1831 5 Acres in Sec. 9, plus 2-fiva adjacent acres. All or part Beautiful view of the Valley. 1/2 Acre lot sec. 9, ctosa to Brown Jr. High. Nice & level. BoukJer City lot, overlooking Lake Mead on Woodacra Dr. Ready to Build with all utilities. Owner llcsnsae. 21/2 Acres off the old LA Hwy. near Paradise Spa. Only $45,000-Good Terms. 2 1/2 Acres Sec. 4. Only $35,000. Custom Home on Paradise Country Club. 4 Br., 4 baths, 3 llreplaces, covered patio deck overlooking Golf Course and pool area. Call y} for appointment to see. Owner licensee. A REALTORS SERVING THE HENDERSON AREA FOR 30 YEARS OnlulK no 21 HENDERSON REALTY, INC. 18 Wat^r St., Hmdarson, NV (702) S64-2515 Put your trust in Number One." JUST LISTED! FOR INVESTORS ONLY! Newly constructed quality home with 1250 square feet, 3 bdrms and \% baths. Call for more info! DO YOU NEED TERMS!!! We have them, on an affordable 3 bdrm. 2 bath, and a 2 car garage home, with many custom built-in features, wallpaper, paneling, mirrors, fireplace, and shutters. Please don't hesitate, give me a call today! PERFECT FOR THE NEWLYWEDS!!! 1 bdrm condo, with breakfast bar, exra storage space, walk-in closet, entity foyer, and 2 car carport, comes with dishwasher and disposal and very affordable, with low down payment. Call today! REDUCED AGAIN AND NO QUALIFYING!!! Fenced in yard, 4 bdrms, 2 car garage, country kitchen, with dishwasher and disposal and a home warranty policy, all you need to do is call for an appointment, today! VIEW LAKE MEAD AND THE IMOUNTAINS! Beautiful Silvercrest mobile home, fully landscaped front & rear, extra large living room with wet bar, 2 large bdrms, bonus room, sitting room, dining room, 2 baths and a kitchen a woman dreams of. Relax out in the covered patio, parking galore, and amenities galore, call today! OWNER SACRIFICES!!! Below appraisal, 30" wide mobile home, boasts of 3 bdrms, mirrored wardrobe, built in vanities, formal dinign, with built in hutch, office area with built in bookshelves, and a sunken tub to relax in., Please call! JUST IVIOVE IN AND ENJOY!!! Beautiful well kept home has 3 bdrms. 2 full baths, vertical blinds, auto sprinklers, 2 car garage with bench area, fantastic landscaping and a list that goes on and on. Owner has reduced the price and offers home protecton policy, don't miss this one, call now! LOCATION PLUS Excellent 4 bdrm, VA bath with large fenced backyard. Plenty of room for RV parking, garden, whatever you want! $83,400. ) FOR THE ROOMING PROPERTY OWNER Like new 3 bdrm 2Vi bath, townhouse. Has "no care" private yard. Community pool, 2 car garage, all of this and still have freedom to go! $67,000. LARGE LOT LOW TAXES Can't beat the convenience and affordability in this attractive 3 bdrm, 2 bath mobile home & lot, no maintenance fenced lot with outstanding city & mountain view! Covered parking, oversized storage shed, covered patio and more... $55,000 with seller financing available. LOOKING FOR A HOUSE UNDER $40,000? Then do not overlook this 3 bdrm. l'/4 bath mobile home and lot. Huge storage/work shop included too! This lot is 50x100 and landscaped, the property is within minutes from Lake Mead. AddiUonal RV parking too! $37,500. PRICE AND TERMS TO SUIT YOUR BUDGET In this great 3 bdnn home. Terrific kitchen with eating area, energy saving evaporative cooling, completely fenced and landscaped for child safety, cheaper than rent payments too! Call for details! $63,500. THIS HOME HAS IT ALL! LookiDg for a 2 story. 2023 aq. ft. custom home with a large yard and fruit treea. Do yon want a stove, fireplace w/a heatalator, 3 bdrm, 2'/i baths, a Master bedrm with a large bath and walkin closet. How about ceramic tile io the kitchen, a pantry, etc. Call today! $110,000. m 18 Water St. (702) 564-2515 lat Thursday, August 10. 1989 • A A A A A A A A A A A* 'kiK'ki^if In Henderson. Choose your colors now. 3 bedroom, 2 bath. Large Lot. $104,500 DOME REALTY 293-1613 BC_ FOR SALE Small tidy older home w/attractive yard. Only 551,000 Ideal tor retiree or 'rst home buyer Ceyivenient location. By ippt only. Call Fred Dunham GarrettReal;v 293-3333 BC Hilltop estates. New custom homes from $129,900, Choose your floor plan and lot today. Contact Oome Realty 293-1613 Move up to Green Valley 3,000 plus sq. ft. custom home. 4 bdrm, all w/walk-in closets. 2% baths 3 car garage. Will trade for part ol $60,000 equity, $225,000. American Family Realty 454-2878 For Sale By Ov(ner; 3 bdr, 2 bth, 2 car garage, fenced back yard. Huge family rm w/fireplace and built in bar. Also has pool and spa VA assumable no qualifying. $94,000. Payments are $900 mo and $10,000 Down, 565-6104. WANT TO KNOW WHAT YOUR PROPERTY IS WORTH? Free market analysis. Call Roger 293-2939. Realtor, Coldwell Banker/Anchor Realty. SAVE $$$ By owner. 3 bdrm 2 ba $93,500 See at 713 Ave A after 10am. BC ASSUMABLE Lake Tree Condo for sale. $86,000 ERA, The Realty Center, Laureen 293-7551 BC FOR SALE BY OWNER 3BR 1 BA Lrg kitchen, tile roof, garage, auto sprklrs. $98,500 540 Birch by appt only. 294-1983 BC COMMERCIAL BUILDING FOR SALE 3,000 sq ft Zoned CM Uses: Professional, Retail, Auto Sales or Repairs, Plumbing, Bottling, Laboratories, Building materials. Mobile Home Equipment and Repairs, $127,400. Also Commercial Condo, 600 sq. ft. $29,900 Owner will carry. $5,000 down, ERA, The Reelty Ce ler. Cell Laureen 293-7551 anytime. ^ ^ ____^ Henderson Home News, Boulder Qt y N ews. G reen VaUy N ewe Page 51' ••••A'A'A'A'A'A'A'A'A'A'A'**************** l.^.|{.(). is lORSAIi: |{\ OWM.k (I't't on (uir list ol 'lor .Snlc My Owiuis' Htndersoii ^S. (irct'ii \;illcv Anas ••A'****A'A'*A'A'*******A'******ArA'**Ar BACK YARD STORE-You can have your own. Beat high food prices by planting and picking your own fruit, vegetables and herbs in the spadoua back yard. Also included are four bedrooms, 1 Vt bath plus a two car garage. Just reduced to $68,500. WANTED LARGE FAMILY-Downtown area home with four bedrooms, l'^4 baths, garage and storage basement. Approximately 1,600 sq. ft. — priced to sell in the 60'8. Call Candace for details. NEARLY NEW—two story home with circular stair^ case, three bedrooms, 24 baths, open floor plan, two car garage, and beautiful back yard. Call Elaine or June for your appointment. ASSUMABLE, ASSUMABLE-NO QUALIFYING—Take over the 9>/2% APR loan on this neat three bedroom home with two baths, double garage, comer lot. Call June or Elaine for information. GREAT RIVER LANDING ASSUMPTIONDon't wait to see this lovely home — single story — spacious floor plan with formal dining and family room. Tastefully decorated throughout. Call now for your appointment. NESTLED IN A WARM FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD—Manicured front yard — huge fenced backyard. Four bedrooms and V/t baths for only $65,000. BEST LAS VEGAS LOCATION-near the Strip, Boulevard MUl — just about everything — Lovely Fran Park two story with pool and spa. Many, many amenities are included in this fine home. Call Candace for your appointment. BACK ON THE MARKET-Charming older home with three bedrooms, 2l\ baths, indoor laundry room, and lovely private yard in a tree shaded neighborhood. Now only $66,500. LAND 2.5 Acres $48,950 .85 acres College and Lomprey $25,000. Building Lot $15,000. Section 4 1 acre $18,500. i& \ JR REALTY 204 W. Pacific 564-5142 Put your trust in Number One: J • and "Century 21 Real Eaale Corporalion I Equal Housing Opportumfy i IMOEPENOENTLY j>WNEp AND OPEMTEoV DARWIIf BIBLE Million Dollar Club Mtmbor 22 Yoar RMMMM > oe w HAW w wen c iii mnwom COLDUjeiX BANKeRO PAUL GARGIS & ASSOCIATES RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE ol li'hiwii l**n Hi--rtnlu) km\*'. IIM DARWIN'S HELP! LISTINGS DESPERATELY NEEDED Call Darwin BOULDER CITY, This hoi patio, with Mexican tile. S| 1503 Darlene $129,000. all. 3 bdrm, 2 bath. 600 sq. ft. covered ^nd covered boat parking. Much more. DOLL HOUSE in quiet area of Hdn. Great Won't last. Only $60,000. 106 Cholla. 'on. 3 bdrm, large yard. Boulder Gty 4 bdrm hi custom upgrades. Lovi 1 and spa. Ceramic tile thru-out. Many iborhood. $148,000. Large general store and 3 bdrm, 2 bth house in Junction, Utah. Fantastic volume., Unlimited potential. Business and home for $250,000 w9th terms. Store did $257,000 last year and increases each year. '/: acre lot zbned commercial. Lot is level and ready to build on. Desert Inn Road at Pecos McLeod. Location location location. Owner will finance with excellent terms. Super investment at $159,000. $5,000 price reduction on this magnificent 2,400 SF Section 19 custom home. 3 bedroom. 2 bath, large family room with fireplace, giant country kitchen, '/i acre lot with lovely landscaping. Reduced taonly $109,000. Owner bought another and must sell QUICK. Approximately 14,250 acres completely surrounded by government lands. Hidden Hills Ranch—Cathedral Canyon area—Nevada and California state line. Ample water for development. Magnificent property. First time ever Usted, $22,000,000. Mini ranch in section 27. New 3 bedroom, 2 bath, fireplace, 2 car garage, country kitchen, custom home on 118'X135' with 2 stall bam and tack room, fenced. Only $92,000. 10-160 acres of beautiful mountain view forest land 45 miles west of Las Vegas near Sky Mountain Preserve. $6,000 per acre or exchange for Boulder City Property. Boulder City family style dome home, with unobstructed view of Lake Mead. 3,145 SF, 4 bedroom, 3 bath, large family room, fireplace, guest master suite, balcony, and so much more. $192,000. Best buy in Henderson 11 Lovely 2 bedroom, 1 bath with possible guest house at rear, in SAFE SA SF, large family room, s trees and grapes. This hu' mediately. Only $59,950. f^ established older neighborhood. 1,456 iree patios, huge RV parking area, fruit been reduced $17,000 and must sell imBoulder City professional building. Owner will finance. Three offices with baths. Lovely brick building in historical area. $130,000. Restaurant, RV Park, hunting-fishing lodge, or private living quarters. Located in one of Utah's finest fishing and hunting areas. Roads open yearround. Otter Creek Reservoir, Puffer Lake, Paiute Reservoir, and seven other great fishing lakes within 15 miles. Fantastic retirement opportunity. Restaurant, RV park, living quarters, and over a full acre. Excellent condition. All for only $95,000. RESIDENTIAL LOT Residential lot, 2,2 acres for sale by owner. Sub Div 11. Unobstructed view. Appraised 125M. Owner will carry after 20% down. Easy terms, $110,000 Call 293-0434 BC GOVERNMENT HOMES! $1.00 (U-Repair) Foreclosures, Tax Delinquent Property Now Selling. This area! Call (Refundable) 1-518-459-3546 EXT. H512B for listings. For sale by owner, Lewis Home on Golden Sfiadow, Somi-custom. Was 4 bdrm, now 3, Absolutely beautiful. Open kitchen, leaded glass ceiling light & matching leaded glass breakfast bar (builtin), 2 bths, 3 bdrm, formal dining room or can use as family room. Liv. rm., 2 car f arage, fenced yard. 78,000. Pnncipals only Ph 737-3383 or 383-0611 or 564-7016 Semi-custom home, Establisfied neighborhood, partial basement, 3 large bdrms, 3 bths, 4 storage rooms, 2 covered patios, Jacuzzi, all landscaped w/sprinklers. See at 120 Kola. 565-9309 A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS and your home or mobile home clear could make you owner of a money making permanent mobile home park and 3 bdrm home w/carport. 20 X 30 metal txiilding on Trout River in second largest lake in Colorado. Center of big game herd. 1-303-882-4032. Pool Season: 3 bdrm, 2 bth, ISOOsq. ft. Beautiful home throughout. Very tastefully decorated Every room has intercom. RV parking with gate. Low down payment Assume 9 75 APR interest. Call DAVE at Jensen's Realty 564-3333. Approved VA & FHA and unrt, 2 bdrm, 1 bth. Reduced. Now $65,500 Manan Crane Anchor Realty 293-5757 or 294-1767. Boulder Hwy/Lake Mead offk space 950 sq ft. Ready for occupancy Low rates. Call H & L Realty 385-3226. DICK BLAIR REALTY 833 NEVADA HWYn BOULDER CITY (702) 2932171 AFRmQDXff Bob Blair. Broker 293-2049 Patty Guffey-Speer 2934075 Cristina Antonio 2934116 Rich Moynihaa 293-1802 TKsr Paul Ryan 293-5406 Andrea Anderson 293-3228 DaleCondit 294-1014 Rhonda Beck 293-7975 FOUR BEDROOMS B.C. ESTATE HOME with fantastic view Lake Mead & surrounding Mts. THIS HOME COMMANDS comfort and spacious living. Over 575 sq. ft. Master BEDRM, 3'/> ba. oversize 2 car gar. CALL FOR APT. $650,000. THREE BEDROOMS OWNER HAS JUST REDUCED THE PRICE ON THIS exceptionally beautiful CUSTOM HOME with pool VA ba. 2 car gar. many extras $139,900. LAND .360 acre lot with beautiful view—Lake Mead. Just right for your castle. SEE IT TOEWVY. $135,000. 2 lots—Overlooking Lake Mead & surrounding MU.. .79 Acre. $225,000. LAKEVIEW from this cul de sac lot in custom home area owner wants to sell. A Bargain at only $44,500. RENTALS 2 bed. 2 ba. Condo child OK, no pU Avail NOW. $525. req. 6 mo lease. CONDOMINIUMS / TOWNHOUSES FULLY FURNISHED DELUXE REGATTA POINTE TOWNHOUSE-2 bedrm, 2 ba., 2 car gar. Upgraded throughout—beautiful view of Lake and Mtns. SEE TODAY ONLY $160,000. LAKE VIEW-IMMACULATE 2 bedrm, 2'/> ba. CONDO with many UPGRADES, Custom drapes T/O. INCL. all appliances F.P., better than new, w/assumable loan, A MUST SEE AT JUST $108,000. REGATTA POINTE MODEL Beautiful end unit w/LAKE VIEW. Over 1,800 sq. ft., 2 bedrm, 2 ba., den, 2 car gar. private patio, Atrium, Thousands of $ in upgraded carpet, tile, window coverings, & model home furniture, TOP OF THE LINE QUALITY $212,500. MOBILE HOMES DONT DELAY ON THIS BEAUTIFUL SUPER SHARP 24'X52' GOLDEN WEST Mobile home-2 Bedrm, 2 Ba. FULL FURNISHED-in excellent condition. $35,000. Lovely 2 bedrm, l'/< *>Mobile Home in Mtn. VisU Est.. ^"^ "o^, desert landscaping. Covert \t0^^ inced rear, central air/beat. Ml VSK^nE $85,000. SEE TODAXIII BUSINESS FOR SALE PRICE JUST REDUCED-BRING OFFER—established business in good location—shopping plaza. SEE IT TODAY-CALL FOR DETAILS. $19,900. CALL WOW roil prrAILg AND ANY MWAL INPpMJATIOMI TOLL FREEIi 1.800-62S4910 Ext E41 SINCERITY AND INTEGRITY IS OUR SPECIALTt^ Hefresiling Pool! This Boulder Hills Condo is thie perfect place to Cool Off this Summer. Just bring your suitcase andtoothbrush \o\t\is Comfortably Furnished, 2 Bedroom 1.5 bath unit. Includes Lush Landscaping plus refrigerator, stove/oven, dishwasher.washer & dryer. Yours for $70,900 Call Now for iow maintenance living. 294-0870 Don't Just sit back and watch Prices for Boulder City Homes & Lots Go OUT OF SIGHT! CALL MANNY NOW at 294-0870. and find out about owning Your Own Boulder City Home. P.S. Ask for your Free List of Current B.C. Homes For Sale. Veanine's Sweet Treats As Featured in Country Living Magazine! For Sale Now, Owner Operated. Includes All Equipment, Fixtures, & Recipes. Come Buy a Delicious Sweet Treat for yourself or a friend, 525 Hotel Plaza, Boulder City. >> FREE Comparative Market Analysis Smilmra Mmrkmt Bringm Top Dollar lor Bouldor City Houmom A Lota, Call Mow! CALL MANNY 294-0870 COLDWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY BQULDER REALTY Mis Put your trust m in Number One. • 19K9 and "• CVniury 21 Real LsiauCorporali<.n. Kqual Mousing Opportunity INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATER 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 2 car gar., new carpeting, new paint, very clean. $110,000. LEWIS HOME Better th RV parking, highly upgri bedroom, Vt baths. Finished garage, nust see! $149,900. COUNTRY LIVING New 2 and 3 bedroom homes in Overton, NV. Top of Lake Mead. Ideal for retirement. Under $70,000. ON HOPI Clean n 2 bdrm doll house. Great starter. TWO BEDROOM. "A oath. Uriveway Parking. $73,500. LEWIS HOME. New pool with springb Cathedral ceilings. Large master bedrooi' decor features. Large lot. $134,900. uzzi. 4 bdrm, 1^4 bath. st room and many nice BEAUTIFUL HOME WITH LAKE VIEW 4 years new and immaculate. Large two car garage, boat and RV parking. All adult community. Clubhouse and pool, with low $20 monthly association dues. Many, many nice features including ramp access. $184,950. BOULDER H ILLS CONDO Overlooking pool, 2 BR. 1 Vi BA. All appliances included. $69,500. EVERY INCH EXQUISITE-A MUST SEE FOR THE DISCRIMINATE BUYER I Custom through-out and beautiful—Large 3 bedroom, 2 bath, hand plastered walls & ceilings, custom oak flooring from the Black Forest, rose garden, atrium, custom heated pool-automatic cover, Jacuzzi bath, large 2 car garage plus RV parking & many more, many more amenities in this designer owned home—call today for details and appointment to see—pleaseno smoking & no children on showing $209,900 THIS IS A ONE OF A KIND!!! OVERLOOKING THE CITY & ELDORADO VALLEY-3,253 square feet of custom home on Vi acre. 4 bedroom, 2'/: bath custom home with secluded master bedroom—bath wing, split level with many, many features to be viewed $249,000 PICTURE THIS! Great Neighborhood in golf course area-short walk to schools & shops. 4 bedroom, 2 bath, fireplace, 2 car garage, single story and can be yours for $97,500. OLDER UPGRADED 2 level—2 unit home. 2 bedroom, 1 bath upstairs, 1 bedroom, 1 bath, with utility room lower level. Currently rented. Separate electrical meters on both units a must see at $99,900. CONDO-NO STEPS-ALL ONE LEVEL In Boulder Hills, 2 bedroom, 2 full baths, full kitchen with laundry built-in plus family room with wet bar, micro-wave and countertop cooking. Motivated seller S71,000. LAKE TERRACE LOT Corner lot—look for Century 21 sign. Priced to sell at $59,000 py^ ^^ ^^ ^^^^ p^^ y^y FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS It! WE UST — WE SELL CAU THE CENTURY 21 PROFESSIONALS TODAY •aeli offic* liMlpiMtontly owiMd A epratd WE GET RESULTS JANICE CRAWFORD, Owner 293-4942 MEL DUNAWAY, Brolier 293-2438DIANNE VANASSE 293-4284 DON TAPSON 293-1660 NELLIE PETERSON 294-1241 ROSE GALPERIN T 293^937 STEVE McCUTCHEON 293^942 I7A0I 90^ ^019 416 NEVADA HIGHWAY \ I M£\ i,V^'^M^ BOULDER CITY. NEVADA

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fiy n, H wd — on HoBM Newa, Booldar City Ntwa, OrMn Vall^j Newa '^^\''^^^' ^' ^ ^^ EASY LIVING IN BOULDER CITY 1322 Darlene Wy Custom ceramic tile in entry, kitchen, and hallway. 3 BR (extended master bedroom), 1'/ bath, 2 car garage, large covered patio. Low maintenance landscaping. Only I1Q2.900. CU Realty USA to see 454-5454. UNOBSTRUCTED LAKE VIEW By owner CLAREMONT HEIGHTS 1305 Alpina Dr. 4 BR. 4'/2 BA, Custom Formal living, formal dining, 'amilyroom, and additional playroom Spacious rooms, 2 fireplaces Large lot. For appointment 294-3875 NEWII IN HIDB?SON Baing finWMd— raady for occupancy soon. 1.544 • quara faat of living araa. 3 bdrma. 2 bath. Larga lot. SIIB.OOO. Ownor licanaad raal 9Mtmtm brofcar. DOME REALTY293-1619. BOULDER CITY ESTATES 4 BEDROOM 4V> BATH Beautiful tvw) story Tudor Style home. One-year-old, security fenced pool w/spa, and solar panels. Approx 3,200 sq. ft. Country kitchen with island and walk-in pantry, bay window in breakfast area. Spacious utility/tx)nus room. Large master suite with fireplace and French doors to bakxxiy His and her walk-tn ctosets 3 car garage with RV parking. Beautiful landscaping. By owner $292,000. Call 294-1550. ThoTBday, Angnat 10, 19S0 ••••• A AiA AAiAr^ '^'^'irk'it'^'^ THINKING ABOUT MAKING A MOVE? We are currently helping many out of state buyers move to our area. We are desparate for home to sell them. For a free market evaluation and a complimentary video of your home, call Richard or Cheryl 595-3291 COLDWELL BANKER, REALTORS. LOT FOR SALE Property Address 1,442 San Felipe Or (B HI) B C Lo 105. Subdivi8K)n #11. Map reference 340-832-009 Rectangular shaped lot 121X189 approx. Adequate drainage. Excellent Location. PuWc Utilities Electnafy, water, sanitary sewer Decorative street lights in Excellert resale value Located 25 miles from Las Vegas. Ready for buiWing large home Surroundings homes all custom and built Good schools and recreation Excellent community. Can owner 293-1235 of 293-1660 anytime day or evening. Property values increasing rapidly • Call for s^e price. Voucanhtlp 383-7209 **• nfMJSHM'S NOTICE] AH raal ••tat* advartlaad harain la aub|act to Ma Fadaral Fair Houaing Act, ivMch makaa N Hiagal to advartlaa "any prafaranea, limitation, of diacflffllnatlon bacauaa of raca, color, rallglon, aai, handicap, familial atatua, or national origin, or Intanlion to maka any auch prafaranea, limitation, or diacrlmlnatlon." Wa will not knowingly accapt any advarUaing for raal aalata which la In vtolatlon of tha law. All paraona ara haraby Informad that all dwallinga advartlaod ara avallabia on an aqual opportunity t>aala. FOR: INDIVIDUAL UNDIVIDED PERSONAL ATTENTION BUYING OR SELLING REAL ESTATE CONTACT: RICHARD QUY OFFICE; (702) 488-8888 PAQER: (702) 389-1973 HOME: (702) 293-4915 • r*M,oa lTi#IIHOJ?l]!S§a 2551 N. Qrn Vally Pwky., ^Sr Suit* A-400, Qrn Vally, HV 89014 NEED TO SELL YOUR HOUSE? WE WILL BUY IT NOW! 293-1613 G.A. "Curly" Smith, Inc. HOUSE FOR SALE BY OWNER 136 Continental, Henderson 565-3174 Fff££ A CLEAH 3 Bdrm, 1 Bath, 2 Extra Rooms, Garage, Porch, Patio, Storage BIdg., Front & Backyard, 60X125 Fully Fenced Lot, Sprinklers, Air & Heat Pump $62,500 FURNITURE & APPLIANCES AVAILABLE ieNS^yy. p. "Jim" Broker mft-^off FRIENDLY EXPERIENCED PROUD GROWING WITH HENDERSON WE ARE HERE FOR YOU! J- 219 Water St. Henderson. Nevada 89015 ^^1 564-3333 | S 1 1 RESIDENTIAL DIVISION mSSSfii "Sunrise Mobile Estates** Mobile Home Lots for Sale from $25,000. East Lake Mead Drive at Mohawk. The lowet low down in Henderson! 3 BDRM, Large yard, block wall. MOVE IN NOW! CaU Dave. GOLF-AREA historic 2 story in country club setting. First owner, mountain/city views. ALSO *GARDEN 'RV PAD. CONVENTIONAL FINANCING available. $266,000. Call Richie. INSIDE LOOKS NEW—Bright residence with real appeal. Cozy fireplace, central air, gas heat, carpeting, family room, fencing, automatic sprinkler system, wood burning fireplace. Call Richie. BUILDING LOT ON TRUFFLES. $25,000. Call Katie. PRICE REDUCTION! 3 BDRM/l/4 Bath, 1 car carport. Great starter home on rental property. Call Katie. HIGHLAND HILLS-VIEW-SITE GEM Desert Modem home with golf close by. Stucco, a sole owner, mountain views. Motherin-law suite, modem kitchen, 4 BR/2y2 baths, corner lot, fencing. CONVERTED GARAGE, immediately available. Call Ray. MISSION DRIVE-Sec. 32,1.1 Acres. Only $22,500. CALL NOW! Near proposed freeway off-ramp. Peggy Benedict. VACANT LAND Essex & Orleans, 5 Acres near New Lakes project. Power & water nearby. Price right. Call Don Jensen. HALF ACRE Fully matured lot with 1,800 sq. ft. house. 3 large bedrooms, 2 full baths. 800 sq. ft. workshop. Remember ask for Dave. POOL GORGEOUS-3 BD/2 Bath-^SOO sq. ft. Low down. Ask for Dave. HURRY! HURRYI DESERT! MAGNIFICENT! Consummate mobile home. Cheery fireplace, central air, walk-b closets, horses OK. 3 BR/2 baths. PLUS *Paddle fans—Large trees. Price reduced can't last! Call Ray. BEAUTIFUL FIREPLACE in large country style family roomIdtchen. Newly remodeled with new cabinets, appliances and carpeting, large bdrma on lower level. 2Vt baths. 2,330 sq ft and two car garage. Jim Moore. 767 HERITAGE VISTA-Very nice condo b excellent conditon 2 BDRM 1% baths fireplace end unit community pool etc. Aaking S71,500. Call Peggy Benedict or Al 4' FREE LIST OF BOULDER CITY HOMES, TOWNHOMES/CONDOS, MANUFACTURED HOMES & BUILDING LOTS! STOP BY OR CALL & WE WILL MAIL!! AFTER HOURS CALL: HARY BOARD 2*13-7aSM LINCTTE DAVIS ?13-im7 ELLEN LAHB STROHBCRC • • • fIB-kSOA UOOBY HHECLESS 213-lte CARL C COUAN, BROKER .. .213-mn ARE* CODE: 702 293*4663 JCBI .U.UU I 404NEVADAHIOHWAY J T"^ Mk9} INTHEBURK PLAZA ^ Y D E 293-6014 Bi'i^mi: ISSS Af4aaMi Sifwl • • —Her Ckf, 89005 HOMES-LAND-BUSINESS INVESTBfENT CONSULTANTS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT BOULDER CITY BE ON THE GOLF COURSE 3 bedroom, huge main bathroom, has tub and separate shower. Master suite has */ bath and walk in closet. This tile-roofed beauty has pool w/spa and outdoor shower. 2>/2 car garage. $259,900. LOW PRICE Drive by 1305 Shenandoah, 3 bdrm, 2 full baths and garage for only $84,750. OVERLOOKING LAKE MEAD 836 Marina Drive, Custom 3 bedrm, 2 bath. Pool w/spa, 2 car garage. $187,500. GREATY BUY-GREAT FAMILY HOME 1330 Pinto Rd. 3 bdrm, 1*4 bath. Familyroom w/fireplace, pool size lot $110,000. LOW INTEREST LOAN 7% available to qualified buyer. 648 Ave. M, 2 bdrm, 1 bath. Fixer upper. Only $65,000. 1294 BLACK MOUNTAIN COURT Manufactured home with style, 2 bdrm, 2 full baths. Carport, workshop building. $91,000. GORGEOUS HOME ON GEORGIA AVE. Near golf course. Drive by 1554 Georgia Ave. to see beautiful landscaping. 3 bdrnt l'/ baths. Over 1,950 sq. ft. in this park liktsetting for only $189,500. ^ LAKE MOUNTAIN ESTATES 2 BR, 2 BA w/beautiful lake and mountain views. Covered and RV parking. $110,000. • /2 ACRE LOT in Subdivision II, Boulder City $47,500. MANUFACTURED HOME on 4.68 acres. 2 BR, V/i BA. Additional buildings "including houae trailer" on property. Located in Searchlight. All for $100,000. VIEW LAKE AND MOUNTAINS from thia like new 2 bedroom 2'/i bath Spyglass Condo. Only $106,000. LARGE RANCH STYLE HOME 3,000 sq. ft. w/3 or 4 bedrooms & 2'/i baths. Country kitchen, super large livingroom w/fireplace. Huge familyroom looks out to pool. All on large comer lot. $169,900. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Restaurant/Sandwich Shop. Fully equipped. Like new. Low, low rent. Health forces sale. $38,000 includes equipment. Call for more info. Gi Pat Banwtcia 2ai379 AaiU Hydt 2*S-2I44 Toay Karfaiaa TSMOM Jsrry MarshaU 294-1668 Dick OIMM 2934071 BevScal 29M379 Tony WIfte 289-78M niBMDLY SXPBRIEMCEO PROOO GKOWIHG NITB BEHDBRSOM HE ARE HERB FOR YOOI -jim-j, 219WaterSt. Henderson. Nevada 89015 ^/^ 564-3333 fsT COMMERCIAL DIVISION ^^ FOR LEASE 12,000 sq. ft. of retail space on Water St. FOR SALE 113 W LaJie Mead 1,050 sq. ft. Commercial Building-Dynamite Location. High traffic. 110.46 ac Industrial land just off Boulder Hwy. on Athol. IM,TCM* A MEMBER Of THE SEAMS FINANCUL NETWOim COLDUieLL BANKeRQ PAUL GARGIS & ASSOCIATES RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE An Independenlly Owned and Operated Memb^ ot Coldwell Banker Residential Affiliates, Inc. RARE OPPOHTUNITY... Recent $5,000 price reduction on this magnlficant 2400 SF custom home locatad in popular Section 19. Three bedroom, 2 bath, large family room wKh fireplace, giant country kitchen, Vi acre lot with lovely landscaping. Reduced to only $109,000. Owner has purchased another home and must sell QUICKI Ask for Darwin Bible, 564-6969 or 293-3996. EXCEPTIONAL $$$$ VALUE... Lovely 2 bedroom, 1 bath with possible guest house at rear, In an extremely safe and secure older neighborhood. 1456 SF, large family room, sunroof, three patios and huge RV parking area. Fruit trees and grapes tool Priced st $59,950. Ask for Osrwin Bible, 564-6969 or 293-3996. PEACE AND PRIVACY ARE YOURS... .There's s private ysrd and wrought iron gate to insure your privacy. Two bedroom, 2 full bath, single story Townhouse, beautiful iandacaping, and a very attractive exterior. Ask for Anne Smith, 564-6969, Priced at $71,900. Move right Inl H:82226. EXPLORE THE POSSIBILITIES... Cul-de-ssc locatkm, 4 bedrooms, 2 full baths, separate family room. Lots of RV parking with a gate and access from back street, Isrge backyard and a storaage area. Call Brenda Bird, 564-6969, she'll be glad to give you the detaila. A:82492. PAINTED WITH SUNSHINE .... The home and the neighorhood are Joyeous places to be. You'll love this bright, cheerful 2 story with 4 bedrooms, 2.75 baths, osfc parquet ftoor, cathedral ceiling, nice planned neighortM>od In Qreen Valley and near excellent schools. Call Brenda Bird right away, 564-6969. M:78473. TIRED OF BEING SQUEEZED? Stretch out in this large, pleasant, comfortable home. More than enough room for Meal family living. 5 bedrooma, 1.75 batha, family room and • laundry room. A perfect home for an expanding young family. Call Brenda Bird for the detaila, 564-6969. S:82963. CUTE COUNTRY CUSTOM .... Located near the goH course and sun'ounded by nice custom homes. Two master suKse, 1.75 baths, bay window, nice porch, caat iron wood burning stove, gazebo and beautiful pool and a large cormer lot. Assumable loan, no quallfylngi Ask for Sharon Kozar or Wendy Williams, 564-6969. Priced at $109,900. R:81526. HERE'S THE KEY .... To your happinesci Ask us for the addreaa to tMs Immaculate Chiam, Sonora model. Three bedrooms, 1.75 baths, country kitchen with breskfast bar. Stay warm and cozy In the living room or family room, with the double fbeplace. Comer M, all fenced, RV parking with wrought Iron gatoa and a covered patto. Aak for Sharon Kozar to show you this charming home soon! 378-1692 or 564-6969. V:81673. RELAX AND STAY Warm, friendly atmosphere abounds In this comfortable 2 bedroom, 2 bath home In one of Qreen Vslly's k>veNea k)eatk>ns. You'll stay totaNy relaxod In ttie kMrely sunken tub and enjoy the beauty of lush green plants sunning In the garden window. Call Sharon or Wendy for an appointment. Too many nice featurea to mention. 564-6969. Priced at $89,900. A:82672. GOBBLE THIS UPI You'll be thankful for coming to aee this fine 2 bedroom, 1 Vi bath, TowntKNise. Great for s young couple. Priced at $60,900, great no qualifying loan, low down payment. Refrigerator, washer, dryer and bunt-toi microwave aN stayf There's also a 2 car garage. Aak for Sharon Kosar or Wendy Williams. 564-6969. A:80787. SEE IT TO BELIEVE IT. ... UnbeNevaMe back yardi Pool, apa, IB0 grin, outdoor bath, awnings and new carport. Three bedrooms, 1.75 baths, family room with wet bar. Conveniently located. Aak for Brenda Bird, 564-6969. V:71002 BEAUTIFUL BUY — Come home to tMs lovely custom home, now offered at a kMver price. Four bedrooma, eeparate family room with firepiaee, hivo car garage, heated pool and spa, sateMte dMi, Mock waN and kiestad on a half acre lot. Ask for Brenda BM, 564-6969. M:77401. 160 last Horizon Drivo Hondorson, Nevada 89018 Taiophono: (702) 884-8869 .HENDERSON "'^^(v. NEVADA'S INDUSTRIAL CEMTLr. ''^'^r ,^^v,,^ _^ 1 1 Volume 40,63rd Edition Hendenon, Nevadt THE COMMUNITY'S NEWSPAPER 2S€ 22 Water St. 564-1881 Tuesday. Augurt 15,198lf: (IRAND OPENING—From left, Coundlmen Andy Hafen, Lorin Williams, Mayor Loma Kesterson, Coundlmen Carlton Lawrence and H Mike Harris cut a ribbon to officially open the new Henderson City Hail. Kesterson dedicated the building to the people of Henderson Fholokj JcirCawca PACKED HOUSE—More people than expected attended the opening of the City Hall Friday night The City Council Chambers was filled to capacity. The event was very successful according to organizers. The Saturday open house also drew more than expected. Pholo by Jeff Cowen By Ben Baker News Staff Writer Both City Hall openings drew more people than was expected, said Linda Wood, city manager secretary. The gala opening Friday night was a success, according to City Hall officials. More than 250 show up for City Hall opening "We had about 250 people. Some people showed up who didn't RSVP and some who RSVP'd didn't show up," she said. The Saturday afternoon public showing was also a success. Wood reported. "We weren't expecting this many people," she said Saturday. Those attending the openings were allowed to see the new City Hall with self-guided tours. Maps were provided at the entrance to help with the tour. The overall reaction of those attending was "impressive," according to more than one person. Mayor Loma Kesterson dedicated the facility to the people of Henderson during Friday night's services. Congressional and legislative spokespersons were on hand with letters of commendation to the city from elected officials. Also on hand were officials from Boulder City and North Las Vegas. The facility will be open for business Monday, according to Mayor Kesterson. City Hall staffers will move to the new facility Thursday and Friday. The Mayor asked the people of Henderson to be patient during the next week because there will be "a lot of confusion." No cause found for 'boom' By Katherine E. Scott Newa Staff Writer A mysterious, explosive sound reported by dozens of Henderson residents sent police and fire units scurrying all over town Thursday night, but no cause was ever located. About 9:30 p.m. Thursday the departments' control center became "swamped with calls," Acting Lead Dispatcher Terri Campbell said Monday. "It's understandable," she added. "People around here are still a little touchy about loud noises." Police said calls came from citizens many miles apart, with most feeling the sound came either from the Railroad Pass area or from the "donut hole," site of local industrial plants. Most of the calls came from in between the two locations. Firefighters who traveled to investigate the Lake at Las Vegas development at the northeastern edge of Henderson reported seeing residents of the Calico Ridge neighborhood peering through binoculars toward the industrial area. "We searched the town, checked with all the plants, checked the airports," HPD Chief James Goff said Monday. "I heard it; it shook the windows at my house in Section 27." He said he thought the noise came from Railroad Pass at the city's southeastern border, "But everybody I've talked to (who heard it] thinks it came from a different direction." He said there was "just one loud boom; that's all I know." Possible theories proposed since the noise was heard include a sonic boom or a lightning ball. The latter is a rare occurance, but was said to be possible in the stormy weather that covered the vicinity last week. Staff to recommend denial of Highland Hills apartment plan By Paul Szydelko Associate EWtor The City's planning staff iwli recommend denial for a proposed zone change to allow construction of a 288-unit apartment complex northwest of College Drive and the Union Pacific Railroad tracks at Thursday's Henderson Planning Commission meeting. The planners meet at 7 p.m. in City Council Chambers; their reconmiendations will be forwarded to the Henderson City Council next month. TTie zone change request for the nearly 16 acres is from RR (rural residential) to RM-18 (medium density residential, with no more than 18 imits per acre). The applicants John Sara and Ingrid Magdenko, who initially proposed 344 units on 20 acres, requested a continuance in June. City Planner Bill Smith said he is "not ready to recommend approval," citing traffic and sewer concerns and the total qumber of apartments already zckieA for the area. Las Vegas Resorts' proposal to renovate and expand the Silver Spur Casino, to be renamed the Golden Spur, is also on the planners' agenda but is expected to be tabled until Sept. 7. The applicant requested a variance to reduce the required off-street parking spaces at the Water Street casino from 148 to five to construct the addition, and to waive the maximum total sign area requirement from 960 to 1,874 to allow signage around the entire bmlding." In other business, the commission is scheduled to discuss proposed routes for two overhead power lines in Green VaUey. Nevada Power has requested approval to begin a new route at the existing overhead lines near Eastern Avenue and Nevada State Route 146 and run it along the southern right-ofway on Route 146 east to Gibson Road. The second proposed route will depart from the first route as it crosses Green Valley Parkway and continue north within the median to the Nevada Power substation at Wigwam Parkway. The panel will also conduct a public hearing to adopt the proposed realignment of Windmill Parkway located along the northern edge of the Pittman Wash west of Green Valley Parkway and to reduce the street cross section of Windmill to a five-lane section without parking lanes. Local man critical after falling in deserted mine By Katherine E. Scott News Staff Writer A 34-year-old Henderson man was critically injured after falling in a deserted mine about six miles southwest of the National Guard Armory Friday afternoon. Lee Jessop remained in critical condition Monday and had not gained consciousness since arriving at University Medical Center on Friday, a nursing supervisor said. Overview Editor's note: Much of this column has been dramatized for effect. It should not be taken too seriously. By Ben Baker News Staff Writer Upon leaving the gala opening of the new Henderson City' Hall Friday night, I was concerned and worried. There was no place for me to sit. To explain, the council chambers, where the City C!ouncil meets on Tuesday nights, had no press area. Without a table to spread a council packet and legal pad for taking notes, covering City Ouncil can be difficult. "You can sit anywhere you want to, as long as its not in my chair. I've got a specially braced chair; won't hold people like you," said Councilman Carlton Lawrence. Councilman Mike Harris said he wanted to see an architectural review and map before he conunitted to anything. "Be sure you check with the flood control people as well," he added. City Manager Phil Speight had other ideas. "You! Sit out in the courtyard under a palm tree. You never pay attention during the meetings anyway," he said. Later, pressured by threats of adverse publicity and hostile editorials from Paul Syzdelko and myself, he said. "Well get something in here. Well put you to the side where you won't be in the way of the podium, but can still see the council members. What if we dig a pit in front and throw some chairs down it?" After being assured by the lady who knows everything (and Authorities said Jessop and his wife were dune-buggy riding in the desert before exploring an open mine shaft there. He led the way inside, using a cigarette lighter to see, according to reports. He lost his footing and slipped into an unseen, vertical mine shaft, falling some 40 feet to the bottom. Jessop was unconscious when a search and rescue team pulled him from the shaft more than an hour later, authorities reported. He was flown by Flight for Life to UMC. See Overview, Page 2 ROLLOVER-HsiKierson and Boulder aty Fire Departments responded to a one-ear rollover sooth of Ridlroad Pass Sonday aftsnoon. Reports indicated four women saffsred various iajuries after a rear tire blew oat and the car rolled one and a half times on the waat aide of the aortUbound lanes. A ia a Back brace ia sacorted to a Booldflr City ambulance, left, as another woman in a neck brace has ber arm wrapped near the rear of • pickup trudk at the roadside. Other rescue workers prepare to lift another woman to a gomey to the right of the second woman. Further information was unavailable from BouMer City Police as of presstime Monday. PkMo kg KatkwiM E. Sc^t Eclipse due Wednesday Weather permitting. Southern Nevadans will be treated to a lunar eclipse Wednesday evening. Planetarium astronomers at Clark County (Community College say that the ecUpse will already be in progress at moonrise, which will be at 7:25 p.m. Midpoint of the eclipse will be at 8:08 p.m. they said, adding that the totality phase will begin to end at 8:56 p.m. The ending of the partial phase will be at 9:56 p.m. The Planetarium and the Las Vegas Astronomical Society will provide f* • telescopes for public viewing during the eclipse, spokespersons said. They will be located on the CCCC campus near the south end of the building where the. Planetarium is located. 1' — I —r^_ ORIGINAL