Citation
1988-10-20 - Henderson Home News

Material Information

Title:
1988-10-20 - Henderson Home News
Creator:
Szydelko, Paul ( Columnist )
O'Callaghan, Mike ( Columnist )
Scott, Katherine E. ( Columnist )
Cohen, Richard ( Columnist )
Shipler, Guy ( Columnist )
Thomas, Bill ( Columnist )
Bohr, Annette ( Columnist )
Caldwell, Clyde C. ( Columnist )
Blanco, Marta A. ( Columnist )
Smithe, Valerie ( Columnist )
Swinney, Emma ( Columnist )
Bennett, L. Jessie ( Columnist )
McNeill, Lorna ( Columnist )
McDonnell, Pat ( Columnist )
Soehlke, Ruth ( Columnist )
Rice, David K. ( Columnist )
Curtis, Joey ( Columnist )
Goff, James E. ( Columnist )
Earl, Phillip I. ( Columnist )
Bishop, Carolyn D. ( Columnist )
Harbour, Bill ( Columnist )
Fisher, Robert Grove ( Columnist )
Cowen, Jeff ( Photographer )
Scott, Katherine E. ( Photographer )
Publisher:
O'Callaghan, Mike
HBC Publications, Inc.
Creation Date:
1988-10-20
Language:
English
Materials:
Paper ( medium )

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Nevada
Henderson
East Las Vegas
City and town life -- Nevada -- Henderson
Community life -- Nevada -- Henderson
History -- Henderson (Nev.) -- 20th century
Genre:
Newspapers

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Acknowledgments:
Greenspun Media sponsors this collection.
Collection Location:
Greenspun Media retains possession of the bound, original newspapers. Henderson District Public Libraries retains possession of the microfilm and the digital files.

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Source Institution:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Holding Location:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Rights Management:
The items in this collection are provided for non-commercial personal and academic use by Henderson Library patrons and may not be republished in any way. Contact Greenspun Media Group for additional information regarding rights to this material: http://www.greenspunmedia.com
Resource Identifier:
hhn3649 ( Digital Id )

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^^ ttHcBderioBHomeNewi, Henderion, Nevada EVERYBODY ^ 's FSBO Tnwday. Octobw 18,1968 aCLV" REAL ESTATE TWO STORT LEWIS HOME ON RAWHIDE ROAD i4 bdrm, ZVi bath. New carpet, itile. Brick kitchen. Minis thniii>ut. Ceiling fans in every room. Auto Sprinklers. RV parking. py owner. 293-2472. B.C. IJMUBi CITY CONDO 9% assumable, fioor level. 2 bdrm, 2 ba. Fireplace. Many Updates. 2 car covered parking. $61,500. ^y appt. Call 468-7669. pOLL HOUSE-Crisp and neat four bedroom i(oWle home on its own lot with lots of storage and H-V. parUng-A Beat Buy at $56,500. ^ElRMS, TERMS-LOW down and owner will (jury—nice spacious 3 bedroom mobile home on its irwn lot-asking only $42,000. HORSE PROPERTY-2 bedroom mobile home on Vi acre lot—Equestrian neighborhood has a riding (mddock. County location only a minute to freeway inceas. Call Pat for details. 6REAT ASSUMPTION-low down and take over VA loan—seller must sell soon. Call Candace for your appointment. PRICE SLASHED-Brand new custom home on Yt acre-just reduced $6,000 to $118,500-Call Bob for your appointment. ITS A DEAL—inground pool—comer lot, downtown location and an assumable loan for $59,950. OnluiK JR REALTY 204W. Paeffic 564-5142 Put your trust in Number One: 5i' mi and '"Cenlury 21 Real Estate Corporation Equal Housing Opportunity INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED. H Y D E •:^;^: • :m:::i.5S^:i*g^ 293-6014 II ASSOCIATES 1325 Ariaona Street •Boulder City, 89005 H0MES-LAN1>-BUSINESS INVESTMENT CONSULTANTS : PROPERTY MANAGEMENT BOULDER CITY TERRIFIC FAMILY HOME. 3 bdrm, 1% bath. Bonus room. 20X20 family room with fireplace. Separate laundry room and more $108,000. LAKE MEAD CUSTOM has specUcular views. 2,400 aq. ft. with finest appointmenU. 3 bdrm 2'A bath. Tile kitchen includes sub 0 refrigerator and freezer. Indoor BBQ. Thermador dishwasher. Custom cabinets. Barber carpet. Central exterior lighting 1,060 aq. ft. separate garage. Much more. ^ Call to see aU! LEWIS HOME has over 1,600 sq. ft. 3 hdrm 1'/ bath. Pool & spa. RV parking & 2 cw garase.i $127,500. LOCATION FOR FAMILY. Need a Iwge home • Mar Mhooia? How about 3,000 sq. ft. brick wM bdrm 2yi baths, swimming pool of courac! Plus extra large room w/flreplaec, country kitchen &' 7a, formal dining room. AU this plua great location, on comer lot. Only $184,500. GREAT BUY Ovarlwika Lake and mountains, 5 BR, 2'/4 BATH. Over 2.S60 aq. ft. w/huge back yard, complinMntcd w/large pool. Plenty of decking, covered patio, stairs to ex. Irg deck, surround Vi of house w/sliders off large upstairs ^ familjrroom over looking lake. RV parking no. '\ problem. A must to see now! Pricied at only $228,500. ADULT COMMUNITY Lovely Laike Mtn EaUtes 3 BR 1V< BATH 2 car garage w/unobstnicted view of Iski Mtmd tlSIJSOQ. MARINA DRIVE CUSTOM-View lake from aMafthafiMatcraftadhaoMs in town. Over 4,000 ,aqft. iadadaa main Uving aaitaa and gnest or hMHalMipsn qnartata. 3 eaor garagas and RV pnldas. CaD te BMR UO. XARGE HOME ON PINTO 4 bdm. 2H bath, •rat 2400 aq. ft IM^f arwi 103.000. BEADY TO MOVE IMOM praperty 6 oniU. Make offer, trmkl for dncka. hones, motor borne. ot of state praperty, etc. Call Bwt Hyde. LAKE MEAD VIEW Beautiful building lot on liiMaide of Villa Qmde SUMO. RDTTALS AVAILABLE 2 ft 3 BDRM6 Call for FREE MARKET ANALYSIS of mw BY OWNER Lovely La Dolce Vita Condo Private Lush Green Yard. 2 BR Call Now To See 293-6885 BC NEED TO kELL YOUR HOUSE? WE WILL BUY IT NOW? 293-1613 GA. "Cnrly" Smith, Inc. 3 badroom, 2 bath, 2 bloefca to school, larg* malur* trM. Only $88,500. ENERGY EFFICIENT HOME 24bo+ tquart fMt, Lake vlw—4 badroomt— garaga/wofkshop—Custom Inillt-^rlcad roduead to $124,900.00. NEW CUSTOM HOME Spacious home—2,700 square feat livable—three bedrooms—2 Vt baths—ready to occupancy $179,000.00. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Art and framing business. Upgraded bualneaa condo—fixtures and Inventory $165,000.00 DOME REALTY 293-1613 —BY OWNER•2 Story Lewis •2yt Baths •Lots of Upgrades 293'2472.c For SMS: By ownsr. Ssiss offlcs Ml CsRco RIdgs. 2 story, Z.gO C sq. ft. A IMIIIII, 3 Mhs. firsptocs, landscspsd, sprlnkisr systsm. S129.000. Opsn wtss fc snd s 1-5. Or cal SSS,S0Om— 3 bedroom, 2 bath, large rear yard with large trees, shrubs, and ivy. One of Boulder City's best buys. Immediate possession. 293-1613 anytime, 293-1598 nitea. Licensee; NOW OPEN Sunrise Mobile Estate Lots E. Lake Mead Drive at Mohawk FOR SALE CONTACT JENSEN'S REALTY 564-3333 ^^mmm n.*v FRIBNDLY faCPBRIENCEO PRODD GROWING WITH HENDERSON WE ARE HERE FOR YOOl O. "JIM" JKNaCN a 10 WATKR 8T. *'^*" HKNDKNSON. NKVAOA SSOIS 564-3333 RESIDENTIAL DIVISION HMWa BEAUTIFUL 2 Story Colonial Home just built. This home has everything! 3 bdrm, 3 baths, den or master sitting room, beautiful family dining combo, large laundry, parquet floors, wall to wall carpet, view of city lights and moontains. All on one acre with lots of room for horses, pool, or tennis courts. Great your own little piece of heaven!! Call Katie or Len. NEW ON MARKET. Beautiful new Chism Home. 3 bdrm, VU bath. Upgraded carpet. Large covered patio. This home is picture perfect. Too many upgrades to mention. This is really a must see home If you are in the market to buy. Call Katie or Len. MOBILE HOME AT 213 Mojave badt on the market. Over 1,700 sq. ft., 2-3 bdrm., fenced, handicap adapted. S56,000. NICE AND WELL KEPT! Peggy Benedict. SEC. 4—ORLEANS 1 Acre lot on Orleans and Dublin with electric and water, nearby. Nice flat bldg. Lot with view of Vegas. S21.000. Peggy Benedict. 1804 MERZE = $48,000 for this nice 3 bedroom home with ceiling fans, storage, built-in microwave & all appliances. Custom cabinets too. Don't miss this one! GREAT BUY! Peggy Benedict. CUTE STARTER HOME or Rental Home-This eoold be a doU house. 3 bdrm, VA bath. Central air, gas heat, eat fai Utchen, close to school. Call Katie or Len. LAND ON BALBOA. 1.86 Acres dose to Basic High School. Near shopping & businesses. Good prospect for subdivision. Call Len Williams. INVESTORS NOTE! Block garage on Haynes plus 3 BR Townaite on Oklahoma. Lots of potential here. Low sixty's. Zoned R-2. Peggy Benedict. N. HENDERSON PRICE—Pleasant home wHh shelterl patio. Owner leaving state, make offer. Over 1^00 aq. ft. for $66,000. Central air, ceiling fans, carpeting, 3 bdrm \*A bath, large 2 car carport. Call Len ot Katie. TREMENDOUS POTENTIAL 10 AC NW Comer Horizon & CoUege. 210 DOGWOOD Great workshop, ceiling fans, large patio, wallpaper and lots taan. $57,000. Peggy Benedict. FANTASTIC PElCEl $40jm0-414 DaffodU-2 Bedroom, large comor lot, fenced and appUancesI Don't paas this one by! Peggy Benedict. MTN VIEW Congenial reaidence pMrkad with valMa. Fnahly deooratad stucco. ()uiet etraet. 2-00 garage, firaaMe cheer, oeatralair, gaa hast, carpetfaig, fendng, antomatic apriakler aysten, 3 BR/IV4 baths. NEW CARPET. Call Ken Praetor. ARROWHEAD E8TATES-2 badraom Condo adjacnt to pool spa. sad dub honae. Best hteatkw possible. Osva. HOMUT PACT OUIIOULlfft AT SZBBLWGALL M44M SELLING BOULDER CITY! SECLunKH SPLfiNUOii Set ins beaiitlftil Spanish gardCTi,Mdadedattheetid6fainrivattf>hrie Irtie drive. Double door entfv to hi ii a ii itiiit iwf viMir of Mm t vIIsy. HmmiOettlecoutiiirs In kltdien and all bathrooms. Ohfy ^yeiirstrtd. If only the beat Ayjlt Ho... ThJg h ft! Y^r8%$44f ^^ CUSTOM 4 BEDROOM 2 3/4 BATHS Only 2 years new with over 2600 sq.ft. including guest orlm-law quarters plus 2 car garage. The gourmet kitchen features beautiful Alderwood cabinets. Excellent City and mountain view. Call now to see for yourself all the amenities that are included for $197,500. HOMEStTE OF YOUR DREAMS! ONB-mil, Boulder City, Reduced to $49,950 Minimal grading needed on this .68 Acre Lot. Excellent opportunity located at 1401 Highland. — Submit Offers! Speciacuiar Lake View Lot Very Exclusive Area. Ready for your own custom design. LOT SIZE 100' X 133' — Call now for details —— y (OIMIIV HtKX II ll.\KI^:itV Includes All Equipment, Fixtures, Recipes, + Now featuring a \'ar ioty of Sweeney's Gourmot Coffee Beans. 525 Hotel Pla/a S45,000 CafI Now For Your ''Free Market Analyi mmf 2 BtOROOM House In Excellent location with covered petlo. ell appllentes & ever 1,000 sq, ft. of living area $7$,900 CALL MANNY 294-0870 COLDWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY OnluiK^ 1^ nnZI HENDERSON REALTY, INC. Water Straat, Handaraon, NV (702)564-2515 Put your trust in Number One: AWARD NOMINATION—If there was an Oscar given to homes, I am sure this would win several. BEST PRODUCER: Lewis Homes. BEST SET DESINGER: The wife. BEST DIRECTOR: The father. SUPPORTING ROLES: The children. SPECIAL ANNUAL HONORARY AWARD: Mr. Clean. New listing in prestige area. Four good sized bedrooms. LAND YACT—Step aboard serene sundeck to stroll on cool evenings, sun bethe, or enjoy the panoramic view. Gourmet "galley" with microwave. Formal dining room to feast at the Captain's table. NIGHT LIFE! Pool table size family room with superb style or retire in one of the 3 cabins for a restful slumber. Arrive early to catch the morning sun on the deck surrounding the POOL. Cruise on over resort on tht secluded golf course. Parr anyone. PORKY PIG SAYS-Say goodbye to rent with a good bay. Eajoy owning this good buy. Aim your pocketbook at our 2 bedroom, 1 *A bath. It's the bargain buy of the week. BRAND NEW LOOKS WITH A RESALE PRICE TAG-Beantifnl 4 bedroom, I story custom home, comer '/: acre location, RV parking & garage, in addition to 2 car garage, fireplace, formal and informal Uving area, beeutifol customized kitchen, appliances stay, tile and hard wood floors, upgraded carpet, laundry room, lush landscaping, sprinkler system, circular drive, and an unbelievable view!! Pricedf to sell at $125,000 will consider trade for Boulder City home!! Call for details today!!. FIXER UPPER OPPORTUNITY-Own a custom home on Vt men. choice comer location, 3 bedroom, V/t bath plus ^ bath off the kitchen and laundry room 2 car garage, block wall rear and sides, circular drive, RV parking, 2 covered patios, formal living room with fireplace, nice kitchen layout, breakfast nook and a ton of POTENTIAL asking $95,900. SELLER HAS A TIME LIMIT!-Must sell this terrific 4 bedroom, 2 bath quality built U.S. home. It is in excellent condition, attractive open floor plan, master bedroom is down stairs and separate from the other bedrooms, (the perfect effisa/atadyl, covered patio, 2 car garage, landscaped with iprinlMn, block wall rear and sides, aenitral carpet to fit any decor, nice kteatioa, walldag distance to grade school, and easy baying terms!! Call today S814I00. HIGHLAND HILLS LOCATION, LEWIS BUILT!-Nice 4 bedraem, IH bath home situated on a large pie shaped col-de-sac lot, country kitchen with dining area, completely fenced, laundry room, walking distance to grade school NO QUALIFYING LOAN Call for financing detaib $88,419. SALE—SALE—SALE-this fantastic 4 bedroom, 3 bath costoa earthshdtered home mast aell now! It's great, all bedroiMns face an indoor pool with waterfall and tropical surroundingB, view of Las Vegas and mooataiaa. It's a unique one in a million home. To make an offer Jast '^ FAMILY HOME-This 3 bedroom, 2 bath with garage is a perfect starter home in a family neighborhood. It's a 1985 home with maninenred lawa. It's assumable with no qaaiifying. Call today. HENDERSON POOTHILLS-2 story, 4 bMhoom. 2Vi baths, RV pwUag. 2 car garage, maintenance free pool & qw. fireplaoe, family room, extra Sterne fmit treee and everything yoa always wanted. AssaaMbk losa aad awaer will csrry. What mate could yoa ask for. Call today, doa't hesMate. DREAM HOME WITH SPA-Cleaa and aeat throaghoot 3 bedrooai, IV* bath with huge cooaitry UtdMa. Situated bi Highlaad Hilte. lot with aw 2^ a. ft af esf set THIS IS HOM&ShMp caalMa oa % as indodes hvgc Iwely faarfljr raeai, fuD with beaatifal cabiaeU aad excellaat ternM. RV. PARKING GALOBE-TUs 2 atary, 3 yoa want forS78, 2Vi bath ie a siast if S^ 18 Water St. (702) 564-2515 Sm i f'HU^ ^JAY INSIDE Oantlidate'8 flkyMup HErauERSON NFL: Four contenders or Pretenders? See page 19 Silver Springs Park hoses celebration See page 7 Mf. *-l e-^ WEATHER Thotsday. High 90 Low 60 NEVADA'S INOVSTRIAL CENTEfi Volume M, 84th Edition Henderson, Nevada THE COMMUNITY'S NEWSPAPER 25f 22 Water St. 964-1881 Thtmiday. Oct. 20,1988 Group home/day care OK'd By Paol Szydelko Home New Staff Writer Hmfiderson City Council's reaffamation of a tie vote Tuesday night was all JoAnne Worthen needed to be granted a use permit to operate a grouphome/day care facility frwn her Mission Hills home. The council deadlocked Oct. 4 when Mayor Loma Kesteraon abstained because of a conOne Man's VIEW By Mike O'Callaghan A couple of weeks ago this writer, after reviewing a statewide political poll, wrote that if the election had been held the last week of September RepubUcan George Bush would have won Nevada's votes for the presidency and Democrat Richard Bryan would have been elected senator. The same results appeared to be true last week, because both had gained additional strength. Democrat Mike Dukakis put himself in the same bucket as George Bush by reversing a previous stand and now saying he would not reopen the nuclear waste dump site selection which originally picked Nevada. That gave aome of his local supporters leas incentive to press for his election and naturally it has added to Bush's Nevada stTMigth, deqte the fact that the vice president took the same "give Nevada the nuke waste" stand long ago. Bryan's increase in voter approval has so upaet the Chic Hecht 'ftpign that it has faeoad tfaam to opea up a naw drive in an attempt to discredit See Ont Man's View P>y2 flict of interest. She maintained that stance Tuesday night, adding that she thought the appUcant should withdraw the request since several neighbors have protested. Assistant City Attorney Andrew Urban ruled in a fourpage memo to council last week that a tie vote is no action. According to a Nevada Supreme Court ruling and city ordinances, if the council did not act to approve or deny Worthen's use permit request within 30 days, the planning commission's decision becomes final. The commission voted 5-1 at its Sept. 24 meeting to approve Worthen's request. The use permit allows Worthen group-home/day care for seven to 12 children in her R-R (rural residence) district home. In other council business: •Council approved a complex land-exchange agreement with the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power as compensation for placement of highvoltage transmission lines on the eastern edge of Henderson. The agreement, which has abready been approved by the Department of Water and Power, awaits final approval by the Los Angeles City Council. •.Urban and regional planning consultant Michael Dyett presented a draft of a new subdivision and zpning code for the city. The goal was to update the code to reflect the master plan adopted two years ago. In a public hearing, several area developers expressed concern about projects ah-eady on the table when the new code is adopted, the draft of a new zoning map, the need for afforSee Council, Page 2 HOMECOMING HONOREES-The 1988 Basic High School Homecoming Court is pictured looking its best during the Wolves' game with Rancho. Emily NiekerkN J., (^airman of the Hb^ Science, Space and fechook^ Committee, have ptished the compensatkm proposal amoe federal disastor relief was doiied. State officials estimated damage from the mtkmt fuel i:^t explosion at more thsa $70 million. The Federal EnterfOKy ManagenMst Agents reported that more &an 90 percent of the duoiagie was BC librarian resigns to talce Henderson post James Bilbray.D-Nev. tried to covd by private iunuaoee, so include tlw package ia a NASA it rKXMmoendsd that UAeak approprtetiaas bill. Re|. Robirt WaUcor, R-Pa., and other lawmakers have fou^t the proposal in cwfereaoe ooouaittee negotiations. j^ibray sndEep. Robert Roe, diMHrter rdief for Handeavoti In d^ied. BUkay has ^dgad to in* taxxhice the measuts f^tam iMt year if Ccmgreas does not ap^ prove it this yecy. Commentary ByJLaiharine E. Scott Home JVewtr Staff Writer Long-time Boulder City librarian QuToll Gardner, i^ has servied 96 interim Ubrarian for the Henderson hbrary since Aug. 15, has resigned the former position to become the permenant director of the Henderson library effective Nov. 1. Gardner was appointed during the regular meeting of the Henderson District Public Library's Board of Trustees Sept. 28. Ehuring the Board's next meeting, Wednsday morning, Gardner explained the Henderson Home News learned about her appointment through a news release from the Boulder City Library. T asked the board not to say anything about it until I had disengaged myself from Boulder City," she said. Questioned after the meeting why the appointment was made before applicants had time to reqx)nd to advertisements placed in national hbrary pubhcations, Library Board Chairman Leonard Smith said, "We found Carroll was a great leader [and] had the best qualifications." Gardner, who said she did a lot of soul-searching before leaving the Boulder City post she held for 14 years, said there were time constraints due to the upcoming state legislative session and the finalization of the new main library, scheduled to open in January. 'Tn order to get the building open with the level of quality we want, I need enough lead time," Gardner said. '^e put the ads out because One driver's view of new freeway we were not aware that Carroll wanted the position," Smith said. Gardner ^d advertisements were placed in the Oct„ 1 issues of Library Journal and American Libraries. According to an advertising salesperson. Library Journal was distributed on Sept. 26. Gardner said an unauthorized copy of the ad was pubUshed in Library Hot Line which was published Sept. 19. "It explains," she commented to Smith, "why we started receiving those so early. I didn't realize." Smith said the library had received about seven or eight applications before the Sept. 28 meeting when Gardner wasappointed. He said no interviews were conducted. Gardner said she is referring apphcants for the Henderson See Librarian, Page 2 -f By Paul Szydelko Home News Staff Driver So just how much more convenient is the U.S. 95 (Henderson) Freeway now that it has tinaUy reached the heart of Henderson? How many minutes does it cut off typical trips into Las Vegas? Those amra the questions I tried to alliwer in an unscientific, personal survey conducted laat week. Equipped with a stopwatch and note pad, I strapped myself into my car, cranked the stereo, blasted the air conditioning and drove away. I started all my journeys at the intersection of Water Street and Lake Mead Drive. I drove to each destination twice—Hrst without using the freeway, then the second time hopping on it as quickly as I could. I chose landnuurks in thns different areas of town: Scandia Fun Center, the Meadows Mall and Nellis Crossing. Without seriously studying a map to determine exactly the shortest routes in mileage, I tried following the most logical. Fm sure every seasoned driver has quirky habits: secret shortcuts to find and gutwrenching intersections to avoid. That's really the only way to get around. Drivetime Comparison Chart Deatinatkm Usiag Freeway No Freeway Scandia Minutes Miles Total hghto Redhghts 23:37 21.4 0 0 37:45** 18 22 11 Meadows Minutes Mika Ta$ lights Red lights 25:20 20 3 3 38:50* 20.4 38 21 NelUfl CroMung Minutes MUes Total hghU Red lights nM 14J 3 2 i7.-oe* lOifi 10 6 'iMvy tmffie nodmte traflfe Another ground rule: I forced myself to abide every posted speed limit. So buckle up, here we go: Scandia This was the first trip of the whole project, in heavy late afternoon traffic, and I hit the first poeaUe light at Water and Boulder Highway. The first big break waa a green h|^t on the left turn (to Tropicana—an obvious choice at that point to avoid the helliah ni^tmare known as NelHs, BeuUer and FlamiafSw Took Trop all the way p with major atopa at Pecoa and tkn rsslari Wi|h*ii>g the IVomaa 4 Mack Center at 20 minvtsa, I waited one minute, 15 sscenda for a li^ diaage at HwiBwa, •to 9mO$m,hm* Inside 29 ia L. Jessie Bennett Birttts Carolyn Drennsn Bishoo 29 BouMw City News 91 Cslendsr of Events 27 Classified 37 Rtehard Cofisn 4 Camlea. CraaswoRl 38 Joey Curtis 2t DsMKo 30 19,24 Enlsrtslnnisnl 32*34 JknQeff 23 uffOTn vsnvy nvw It m i It 13 4

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Hft I Wt i t w tMi RMM Ntwt, RtnierNn, Nevada Qm mn't VHw from Page 1 Thitajr,Oetobaraa,lgH U 0iv. Bob Millar in hopea that it 4l Wrt Biyui. PoUa in recent weeka IMNI IIMWII that diMlk moves muat teMi4a if Hecht ia to survive the ehiUaBfe of the hard-working and dsfteauc Nevada governor. CompMtoons of th^ aocomplishments in fovsmment have given Bryan the big •d|e with Nevada voters. IS you can't beat Bryan, maybe you can beat up enough pec^le near him hoping their btood will aplatter on Bryan and bring him down; that's the lalaat tactic beiaf used by the Hecht The people of Clark County have already heard and smelled the garbage bainf thrown at Bob Afiller and have elected him district attorney and more raoently lieutenant governor. They reoogniie the smell of the latest garbage attack as being the same as waa unsuccessfully thrown in 1982 and 1986. The stench of the old garbage, long ago dismissed for what it is, will not have a negative effect on the Clait County voters. But what will it do to voters up north who might not know the truth? Will it have a big enough impact to take votes away from Richard Bryan or will the northerners alao rec(^fnize the smell of political gtAaga? A poll to be taken next week should give this columnist some insight for a final column prior to the election in Nevada. Who is Eliot R. Cutler? He must be a local attorney because of his "iateraat" ia the effect a new McCarran Intematioaal Airport runway will have on the people of Headsr s on. Wrong! He's a Washington. D.C.. attoTMy who apedaUaes in lawaoits hivolviag cMea ooooerMd about preblsBia they may expcrlenee because ct nearby afaport operatkma. Right now he's on Henderson's payroll and is challenging the beginning of conBtnKtit off Decatur in just over 8S minutea. Mflris pMple would fat to 1-15 as aoon as or to Sahara or CiMirlaiiton This drmr did up my mind to turn to Tropicana if the hgfat ind, OQStiBua OB if it was green. Of course the superbly synchronized lights on Boulder made the decision. I turned, made my way up Trop, turned right on Eastern, then left on Sahara, which I took all the way to Decatur. Even though 21 of 39 lights were red, I felt I made the 20.4 miles in pretty good time. But the expressway, of course, was a big time-saver: 25 minutes, 20 seconds, and that included hitting all three red lights after getting off the expressway and into the mall. NaUis Croaaing The Hnal destination, facing lunch-hour traffic, was another major shopping mall at Nellis and Charleston. Strai^t down Boulder and right onto Nellis, a trip full of red lights and several school The 10.5 miles took 17 minutes, eight seconds. The expiaavway ronte to CharlflBtoa, 14.2 total mUes, did aot save tiaa m tibii iastance; it also required just over 17 minutes. Conclusions might be obvious. The expressway is a terrific time-saver, especially for longer trips into the valley. It represents easier driving, often safer and far less frustrating. A newcomer would have a hard time imagining the traffic traumas just a few short years ago. Keep in mind also that 55 miles pier hour was the expressway limit to which this survey adhered. In illegal reality, driving the freeway is an even bigger edge. registration services, revising library hours, and other items relating to the smooth running of the faciUty. The board voted Aug. 19 "that Carroll Gardner's [interim] starting date be on Aug. 15," according to the minutes of that meeting. The board also discussed advertising for a permanent director. Minutes show Bonnie Buckley, consultant for the Nevada State Library, advised not to advertise until specific roles were identified. Background material included with the minutes shows the pay range for the director of the Henderson library was between $24,502 and $29,494. A comparison of other Nevada Ubraries shows the Boulder City position pays between $20,800 and $29,266. At the Aug. 29 meeting, minutes show the board voted to increase the Henderson library salary to between $30,000 and $35,000 per year, and "to let Carroll do the advertising for the new director, based on the salary range." The advertisements were discussed at the board's next meeting Sept. 12. At the following meeting, Sept. 28, the board voted to hire Gardner. Her pay was set at $32,000 per year, with the same health care benefits she redeved from Boulder City. "I did not indicate to the board until this [Sept. 28] date," Gardner said Wednesday. She added, "I didn't come down here [as interim director] intending to apply for the position." Gardner, who said she earned her masters degree in Librarianship from the University of Washington, Seattle in 1960, added she worked for the Nevada State Library before taking the Boulder City poaition in 1974. She said she was with the State Library from 1963 to 1972, with a two-year hiatus. She has lived in Las Vegas 11 years. According to a press release from the Boulder City Library, the facility there improved in many ways under Gardner's leadership. "Gardner's achievements include," the release stated, "bringing Boulder City on-line with Clark County's cojaputerized check-out system, upgrading the library's reference selection, coordinating the Oral History Program for Boulder City on video tape [and] creating a comfortable, well-stocked magaxine reading area." A farewell reception for Gardnor is scheduled for 4 p.m. Tuesday at the Boulder City Library, 813 Ariaona St. Council from Page 1 dable housing and the requirement that all new casinos must include 120-room hotels. The code will likely continue to be discussed at the council's November meetings. •The reorganization of the PubUc Works Department was approved. Mark Calhoun will become Pubhc Works Director, a utility services engineer portion was added and the dty engineer position deleted. •City Manager Phil Speight reported prognm in negotiationa with county aviataoa efflcials for an interlocal agreement concerning noise impacts at McCarran International Airport. Speight, Kesterson, Coundhnan Michael Harris and attorney Eliot Cutler met with county aviatkw director Robert Broadbent and County Commiaajonar Bruce Woodbury Tueaday afternoon after Bogatiations had ai^Mrently readied an impaaae. "We are encouraged and hopeful that we've saen • uhatantial movenoBt by both ssrw m awva MMM) All Independent Newspaper Founded June 1, 1951 at 22 Water SM-lMl. CAKOLYN (yCALLAaHAN PabUsiMd every Tawday ami Tkarwbjr Strwt, HmifanoB, Nvvadiu 8WU MIKE O'CALLAGHAN PubUaber ROBEHT GROVE FISHEI MuaglM Editor HJLC. PabUcalfaas Mike O'CaHagiwa. PmMaat: Car^jra 0*CallikM, Vioe Praaideat; Tia O'Calk^haa. Vlea PriiliiH; Rirtha Dadda, Saavtaiy; Bab Marfaa. ^ MaO • ahirriptinaa WaatafMiaaMppi. m( 111 far ala aMotba iMt af Ml li lajl. .124 par yatf MtaraisMatha Commission may reconsider approval for Lai(e at LV project By KathariM B. Scott Home New Staff Writer The Clark County commiaaion may roconaider its pontion on the proposed Lake at Las Vegas project in HenderaoRin a public hearing to be scheduled during its Nov. 1 meeting, according to pubUshed report*. The commission will seek information from the City of Henderson and project developera, to satisfy the body that loose ends will be settled before construction begins. Commissioners were concerned about the effect of water and sewer services provided in Clark County and how the project would effect flood control and the Las Vegaa Wash, according to reports. One commissioner was reportedly worried that the City of Henderson's responsibility to assure maintainance of bypass piplines was too vague. Until the negative response from County Commissioners during an update hi the board's Tueaday meeting. Lake at Laa Vegaa developers ssid the last stumbling block before construction could begin was approval of a variance from the Clark County Flood Control Diatrict. The City of Henderson submitted s request for the variance to the Flood Control Rdattd Editorial, Pagt 4 District on Oct. 14, acting Public Works Director Mark Calhoun said, after the City Council approved an agreement, including eight conditions, reached with TransNeva Properties Inc. on Oct. 11. Calhoun said the variance was one of the concerns brought up by the oonunission. The County Commission had a problem with different interpretations of [certain conditions in] the 208 amendment." He said the city fulfilled the requirement to present the re-, quest to the Flood Control District, which "indicated it did not need an amendment. [Some commissioners felt] we had to have a master plan amendment no matter what." Calhoun said the 208 amendment, approved by the City of Henderson and the State of Nevada, still needs approval from the federal Environmental Protection Agency. "We should receive something before the end of this month," he said, adding, "We don't anticipate a problem with them approving it." Calhoun said other concerns voiced by the County Commission included the bypass pipeline and an easement for wastewatsr. He said the city had agreed previoualy to some items cited by the commission, but they LHASA APSO MIX MALE TILT—A Clark County Fire Department celebration. Northbound Traffic on Oreen ladder truck fell over Tneaday afternoon Valley Parkway, seen In background, waa wMla hdping to string baansrs for the Oreen routed through the parking lot of a shopValley neighborhood's 10th anniversary ping centr on the comer of Sunset Road. Phato by KaUwiB. Seott Beta Sigma Phi sorority meets Laureata Kappa chapter of Beta Sigma Phi, held its regular monthly meeting recently at the home of Georgia Lyona. President Dene Bittle called the meeting to order. A letter of appreciation from Edna Deardorf and Holly Hoitsma from the Senior Citizens Center wu read, thanking the sorority members for their aasistance in selling popcorn at EXPO '88. Grace Shilla, gave a slide presentation of pictures taken while touring France, Switxe^ land, Italy and Germany. Members attending wars Dene Bittle, Shirley Gore, Chrictine Schultie, Dot Swackhamer, Georgia Lyons, Ann Towery, Sandi Sager, Dorothea Vandal, Grace Shiles, Betty Moore, Mary Lou Fielding, Judy Hampton and Barbara Garvey. PlMWfatalmt hofiMandglva ma rtalhaircut I'm quita good looMng undar thaaa frfngad banga. I hava aoulful daap brown ayaa and a awaat natura. I naad a homa badly baoauaa thara ara ae many homalaaa animala waiting and watting. 181 buya a rablaa ahot, a tag, and ma. Oentaot th HINDIRSON ANIMAL SHILTIR MOtIR DR. NIND. Mi-aosa \ \ wx^s^^^^^jss^sa XXX DEMOCRATIC PARTY HEADQUARTERS OPEN HOUSE — 38 8. Wattr St.. Htndtrson 5-6 P.M., MONDAY OCTOBER 24th Stop by ami nwat ^ youp cuilMatM Office Hours: Monday thru Wednesday 10 a.m.-6 p.m. PHONE: 564-8891 i N'^^'^ 'j "cannot be accomplished until the final designs are completed so the proper legal descriptions can be drafted.' Calhoun expecta those concerns will be addressed at the next commission meeting. They also may aeek "to firm up some dates as to when certain milestones would take place," he said. Stricter conditions of approval, and perhaps new conditions, by also be sought, he added. "We're positive," Calhoun said, "that most issues can be answered. Whether thoae answers are acceptable ia iip to the county." There have been extensive studies, planning and investigations, he said. "We've gone through a lot of the hoops [and] we think that all bases are covered." Calhoun mentioned if the procedure "gets bogged down again in hasseling, it certainly may cause some delay." The Lake at Las Vegas development is under s time constraint from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which issued the permit to construct the dam for the project. Calhoun noted the Corps of Engineers haa extended the permit once, and "wants substantial construction under way before the permit expires [again]." He added, "If nothing happens, they will allow the permit to expire." •w eC^Oft AuthorlMd Cataloa 8lM OCM/nrO Merchant in BouMtr city TO OUR PRIINDS IN HINDillSON •HOP lARLY ORMR NOW from our lOM CHIIItTMAt Wim ROOK Ntw Qlft Idoaol Tha Convanlant Way to Shop The aiOOiar LIMI* Stortheus* In louMer CHy or Hande r son BOULOIftCITY ZV9*2717 MONFRI BASIC NATURE CARPET CLEANERS puaria Of tha waali your n t p N J A MAS L N P • 00 p w a • T C L 0 ^ BOA V 0 I oca N 0 N W R P I X T T I nCTIOH NOMnCTKM NOVIL MTSTISY SKMRAPHY HOW-TO MABAaNB CLASSIC SIPCNtNCI Don't to teotsd by eihar oarpsi •dvwUMdprioM. WSa BMC NATUME: carpal daanova wi not fiwaMBO of yw.Wswsmyourwpsabi1n ws.Wfs 1 loinMd. smJ has to May. Al tut Mortniw^ ihip li gm f nW d W uM • diMl eto*io •yMm 1 ntMry noof lonjwSf, 2. asan oxtrsdof. ws • hampoo, rtnoo, dWfSoeli diodofite, md • ppi^ bflsMsnort ai aspsrt o( ouf ing pniMdura. Wt'rt njnning a ipseW a mil Umo: Havo two (2) reenH oisansd tor $30 00, a wt'l dMn your -IUSH; NATUCI Carpet Cleaners' Thank You Handaraon Fira Dapartmant & Paramadica St. Roaa da Lima Hoapltal Your prompt raaponaa and cara* aavad tha Ufa of John Nagri, Sr. Wa ara axtramaly grataful you wara .thara. umm iiowAiu) SOULOin CITY no'xrioN • • ITNONa, tAPI. MlAXiD. FIND VOUMSSU'I HM4 Mr. & Mrs. John Nesri, &r. & Family 5 ___ The Community of Green Valley \s Celebrating It* 10th Anniversary With a Good Old-Faahioncd Picnic In The (Silver Apringft Park (Saturday. October ?2nd 2pm To 6pra Ml Green Valley DeAidcntft Arc Invited To Attend!! Hot Dogfi, 6ofl Drink* & Entertainment Will 5e Provided Ry American Nevada Corporation You Arc Invited To Bring Your Own Picnic 4r BlankcU! '^i,, .ymuMf Al port of tha lOth AnnMKwry c^5[2J2'ii52Jl1LSi^2!5^ ajpacld Craan VoMty ConwmorJh CoJ^ Boo^^ raS to tha Dicnte or drop off crt Tha Amartcon Navodo cocpoionon. SS! RiSa^Smaon ttw locipa end h^ Groan Volty. fOf ntO^

PAGE 3

Hft I Wt i t w tMi RMM Ntwt, RtnierNn, Nevada Qm mn't VHw from Page 1 Thitajr,Oetobaraa,lgH U 0iv. Bob Millar in hopea that it 4l Wrt Biyui. PoUa in recent weeka IMNI IIMWII that diMlk moves muat teMi4a if Hecht ia to survive the ehiUaBfe of the hard-working and dsfteauc Nevada governor. CompMtoons of th^ aocomplishments in fovsmment have given Bryan the big •d|e with Nevada voters. IS you can't beat Bryan, maybe you can beat up enough pec^le near him hoping their btood will aplatter on Bryan and bring him down; that's the lalaat tactic beiaf used by the Hecht The people of Clark County have already heard and smelled the garbage bainf thrown at Bob Afiller and have elected him district attorney and more raoently lieutenant governor. They reoogniie the smell of the latest garbage attack as being the same as waa unsuccessfully thrown in 1982 and 1986. The stench of the old garbage, long ago dismissed for what it is, will not have a negative effect on the Clait County voters. But what will it do to voters up north who might not know the truth? Will it have a big enough impact to take votes away from Richard Bryan or will the northerners alao rec(^fnize the smell of political gtAaga? A poll to be taken next week should give this columnist some insight for a final column prior to the election in Nevada. Who is Eliot R. Cutler? He must be a local attorney because of his "iateraat" ia the effect a new McCarran Intematioaal Airport runway will have on the people of Headsr s on. Wrong! He's a Washington. D.C.. attoTMy who apedaUaes in lawaoits hivolviag cMea ooooerMd about preblsBia they may expcrlenee because ct nearby afaport operatkma. Right now he's on Henderson's payroll and is challenging the beginning of conBtnKtit off Decatur in just over 8S minutea. Mflris pMple would fat to 1-15 as aoon as or to Sahara or CiMirlaiiton This drmr did up my mind to turn to Tropicana if the hgfat ind, OQStiBua OB if it was green. Of course the superbly synchronized lights on Boulder made the decision. I turned, made my way up Trop, turned right on Eastern, then left on Sahara, which I took all the way to Decatur. Even though 21 of 39 lights were red, I felt I made the 20.4 miles in pretty good time. But the expressway, of course, was a big time-saver: 25 minutes, 20 seconds, and that included hitting all three red lights after getting off the expressway and into the mall. NaUis Croaaing The Hnal destination, facing lunch-hour traffic, was another major shopping mall at Nellis and Charleston. Strai^t down Boulder and right onto Nellis, a trip full of red lights and several school The 10.5 miles took 17 minutes, eight seconds. The expiaavway ronte to CharlflBtoa, 14.2 total mUes, did aot save tiaa m tibii iastance; it also required just over 17 minutes. Conclusions might be obvious. The expressway is a terrific time-saver, especially for longer trips into the valley. It represents easier driving, often safer and far less frustrating. A newcomer would have a hard time imagining the traffic traumas just a few short years ago. Keep in mind also that 55 miles pier hour was the expressway limit to which this survey adhered. In illegal reality, driving the freeway is an even bigger edge. registration services, revising library hours, and other items relating to the smooth running of the faciUty. The board voted Aug. 19 "that Carroll Gardner's [interim] starting date be on Aug. 15," according to the minutes of that meeting. The board also discussed advertising for a permanent director. Minutes show Bonnie Buckley, consultant for the Nevada State Library, advised not to advertise until specific roles were identified. Background material included with the minutes shows the pay range for the director of the Henderson library was between $24,502 and $29,494. A comparison of other Nevada Ubraries shows the Boulder City position pays between $20,800 and $29,266. At the Aug. 29 meeting, minutes show the board voted to increase the Henderson library salary to between $30,000 and $35,000 per year, and "to let Carroll do the advertising for the new director, based on the salary range." The advertisements were discussed at the board's next meeting Sept. 12. At the following meeting, Sept. 28, the board voted to hire Gardner. Her pay was set at $32,000 per year, with the same health care benefits she redeved from Boulder City. "I did not indicate to the board until this [Sept. 28] date," Gardner said Wednesday. She added, "I didn't come down here [as interim director] intending to apply for the position." Gardner, who said she earned her masters degree in Librarianship from the University of Washington, Seattle in 1960, added she worked for the Nevada State Library before taking the Boulder City poaition in 1974. She said she was with the State Library from 1963 to 1972, with a two-year hiatus. She has lived in Las Vegas 11 years. According to a press release from the Boulder City Library, the facility there improved in many ways under Gardner's leadership. "Gardner's achievements include," the release stated, "bringing Boulder City on-line with Clark County's cojaputerized check-out system, upgrading the library's reference selection, coordinating the Oral History Program for Boulder City on video tape [and] creating a comfortable, well-stocked magaxine reading area." A farewell reception for Gardnor is scheduled for 4 p.m. Tuesday at the Boulder City Library, 813 Ariaona St. Council from Page 1 dable housing and the requirement that all new casinos must include 120-room hotels. The code will likely continue to be discussed at the council's November meetings. •The reorganization of the PubUc Works Department was approved. Mark Calhoun will become Pubhc Works Director, a utility services engineer portion was added and the dty engineer position deleted. •City Manager Phil Speight reported prognm in negotiationa with county aviataoa efflcials for an interlocal agreement concerning noise impacts at McCarran International Airport. Speight, Kesterson, Coundhnan Michael Harris and attorney Eliot Cutler met with county aviatkw director Robert Broadbent and County Commiaajonar Bruce Woodbury Tueaday afternoon after Bogatiations had ai^Mrently readied an impaaae. "We are encouraged and hopeful that we've saen • uhatantial movenoBt by both ssrw m awva MMM) All Independent Newspaper Founded June 1, 1951 at 22 Water SM-lMl. CAKOLYN (yCALLAaHAN PabUsiMd every Tawday ami Tkarwbjr Strwt, HmifanoB, Nvvadiu 8WU MIKE O'CALLAGHAN PubUaber ROBEHT GROVE FISHEI MuaglM Editor HJLC. PabUcalfaas Mike O'CaHagiwa. PmMaat: Car^jra 0*CallikM, Vioe Praaideat; Tia O'Calk^haa. Vlea PriiliiH; Rirtha Dadda, Saavtaiy; Bab Marfaa. ^ MaO • ahirriptinaa WaatafMiaaMppi. m( 111 far ala aMotba iMt af Ml li lajl. .124 par yatf MtaraisMatha Commission may reconsider approval for Lai(e at LV project By KathariM B. Scott Home New Staff Writer The Clark County commiaaion may roconaider its pontion on the proposed Lake at Las Vegas project in HenderaoRin a public hearing to be scheduled during its Nov. 1 meeting, according to pubUshed report*. The commission will seek information from the City of Henderson and project developera, to satisfy the body that loose ends will be settled before construction begins. Commissioners were concerned about the effect of water and sewer services provided in Clark County and how the project would effect flood control and the Las Vegaa Wash, according to reports. One commissioner was reportedly worried that the City of Henderson's responsibility to assure maintainance of bypass piplines was too vague. Until the negative response from County Commissioners during an update hi the board's Tueaday meeting. Lake at Laa Vegaa developers ssid the last stumbling block before construction could begin was approval of a variance from the Clark County Flood Control Diatrict. The City of Henderson submitted s request for the variance to the Flood Control Rdattd Editorial, Pagt 4 District on Oct. 14, acting Public Works Director Mark Calhoun said, after the City Council approved an agreement, including eight conditions, reached with TransNeva Properties Inc. on Oct. 11. Calhoun said the variance was one of the concerns brought up by the oonunission. The County Commission had a problem with different interpretations of [certain conditions in] the 208 amendment." He said the city fulfilled the requirement to present the re-, quest to the Flood Control District, which "indicated it did not need an amendment. [Some commissioners felt] we had to have a master plan amendment no matter what." Calhoun said the 208 amendment, approved by the City of Henderson and the State of Nevada, still needs approval from the federal Environmental Protection Agency. "We should receive something before the end of this month," he said, adding, "We don't anticipate a problem with them approving it." Calhoun said other concerns voiced by the County Commission included the bypass pipeline and an easement for wastewatsr. He said the city had agreed previoualy to some items cited by the commission, but they LHASA APSO MIX MALE TILT—A Clark County Fire Department celebration. Northbound Traffic on Oreen ladder truck fell over Tneaday afternoon Valley Parkway, seen In background, waa wMla hdping to string baansrs for the Oreen routed through the parking lot of a shopValley neighborhood's 10th anniversary ping centr on the comer of Sunset Road. Phato by KaUwiB. Seott Beta Sigma Phi sorority meets Laureata Kappa chapter of Beta Sigma Phi, held its regular monthly meeting recently at the home of Georgia Lyona. President Dene Bittle called the meeting to order. A letter of appreciation from Edna Deardorf and Holly Hoitsma from the Senior Citizens Center wu read, thanking the sorority members for their aasistance in selling popcorn at EXPO '88. Grace Shilla, gave a slide presentation of pictures taken while touring France, Switxe^ land, Italy and Germany. Members attending wars Dene Bittle, Shirley Gore, Chrictine Schultie, Dot Swackhamer, Georgia Lyons, Ann Towery, Sandi Sager, Dorothea Vandal, Grace Shiles, Betty Moore, Mary Lou Fielding, Judy Hampton and Barbara Garvey. PlMWfatalmt hofiMandglva ma rtalhaircut I'm quita good looMng undar thaaa frfngad banga. I hava aoulful daap brown ayaa and a awaat natura. I naad a homa badly baoauaa thara ara ae many homalaaa animala waiting and watting. 181 buya a rablaa ahot, a tag, and ma. Oentaot th HINDIRSON ANIMAL SHILTIR MOtIR DR. NIND. Mi-aosa \ \ wx^s^^^^^jss^sa XXX DEMOCRATIC PARTY HEADQUARTERS OPEN HOUSE — 38 8. Wattr St.. Htndtrson 5-6 P.M., MONDAY OCTOBER 24th Stop by ami nwat ^ youp cuilMatM Office Hours: Monday thru Wednesday 10 a.m.-6 p.m. PHONE: 564-8891 i N'^^'^ 'j "cannot be accomplished until the final designs are completed so the proper legal descriptions can be drafted.' Calhoun expecta those concerns will be addressed at the next commission meeting. They also may aeek "to firm up some dates as to when certain milestones would take place," he said. Stricter conditions of approval, and perhaps new conditions, by also be sought, he added. "We're positive," Calhoun said, "that most issues can be answered. Whether thoae answers are acceptable ia iip to the county." There have been extensive studies, planning and investigations, he said. "We've gone through a lot of the hoops [and] we think that all bases are covered." Calhoun mentioned if the procedure "gets bogged down again in hasseling, it certainly may cause some delay." The Lake at Las Vegas development is under s time constraint from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which issued the permit to construct the dam for the project. Calhoun noted the Corps of Engineers haa extended the permit once, and "wants substantial construction under way before the permit expires [again]." He added, "If nothing happens, they will allow the permit to expire." •w eC^Oft AuthorlMd Cataloa 8lM OCM/nrO Merchant in BouMtr city TO OUR PRIINDS IN HINDillSON •HOP lARLY ORMR NOW from our lOM CHIIItTMAt Wim ROOK Ntw Qlft Idoaol Tha Convanlant Way to Shop The aiOOiar LIMI* Stortheus* In louMer CHy or Hande r son BOULOIftCITY ZV9*2717 MONFRI BASIC NATURE CARPET CLEANERS puaria Of tha waali your n t p N J A MAS L N P • 00 p w a • T C L 0 ^ BOA V 0 I oca N 0 N W R P I X T T I nCTIOH NOMnCTKM NOVIL MTSTISY SKMRAPHY HOW-TO MABAaNB CLASSIC SIPCNtNCI Don't to teotsd by eihar oarpsi •dvwUMdprioM. WSa BMC NATUME: carpal daanova wi not fiwaMBO of yw.Wswsmyourwpsabi1n ws.Wfs 1 loinMd. smJ has to May. Al tut Mortniw^ ihip li gm f nW d W uM • diMl eto*io •yMm 1 ntMry noof lonjwSf, 2. asan oxtrsdof. ws • hampoo, rtnoo, dWfSoeli diodofite, md • ppi^ bflsMsnort ai aspsrt o( ouf ing pniMdura. Wt'rt njnning a ipseW a mil Umo: Havo two (2) reenH oisansd tor $30 00, a wt'l dMn your -IUSH; NATUCI Carpet Cleaners' Thank You Handaraon Fira Dapartmant & Paramadica St. Roaa da Lima Hoapltal Your prompt raaponaa and cara* aavad tha Ufa of John Nagri, Sr. Wa ara axtramaly grataful you wara .thara. umm iiowAiu) SOULOin CITY no'xrioN • • ITNONa, tAPI. MlAXiD. FIND VOUMSSU'I HM4 Mr. & Mrs. John Nesri, &r. & Family 5 ___ The Community of Green Valley \s Celebrating It* 10th Anniversary With a Good Old-Faahioncd Picnic In The (Silver Apringft Park (Saturday. October ?2nd 2pm To 6pra Ml Green Valley DeAidcntft Arc Invited To Attend!! Hot Dogfi, 6ofl Drink* & Entertainment Will 5e Provided Ry American Nevada Corporation You Arc Invited To Bring Your Own Picnic 4r BlankcU! '^i,, .ymuMf Al port of tha lOth AnnMKwry c^5[2J2'ii52Jl1LSi^2!5^ ajpacld Craan VoMty ConwmorJh CoJ^ Boo^^ raS to tha Dicnte or drop off crt Tha Amartcon Navodo cocpoionon. SS! RiSa^Smaon ttw locipa end h^ Groan Volty. fOf ntO^

PAGE 4

mmm • • • Viewpoint I • HENPERSONFg^ MIKEOCALLAGHAN CAROLYN OCALLAGHAN PubUahar Co-PnWUhar Fag* 4 HandartoR lUma Nawt, Handarton, Navada Thuraday. OctolMr 20. 1988 Back to the drawing board The Dan Doll Clark County oommiamonera pulled up hard on the reins TUMK day vwung. calling for public hearings on the Uke st Las VegM proJMt propoaed fbr Henderson. Queetions have come up concerning what effect a 4,000-foot daiB and a 324-acre lake planned by Trans Neva IVoperties would have on local water and sewer service, as well as what changes the development might have on flood control and the Las Vegaa Waah. In recent weeka, the facing letters page of the Henderson Home Newf has become an open forum for discussions between wateruae (H^ponenta and advocates of The Lake, specifically from hydrologiat Bob Broadbent, a member of the Colorado River Comiaaion, and Steve Ainsworth, a vice president of TranaNeva and chief project engineer for the development. But while both gentlemen have stated their cases eloquently, the tachnology involved is so expansive that is difficult for most of the lay public to comprehend all oi the mtricaciea. Some other queations also anae. la political preaaure being applied behind the scenes to delay the Lake project—or even to kill it altogether? Intereatingly, water facilities for a similar I^as Vegaa development with a similar name—The Lakes—was approved and constructed at the very same time as application for The Lake at Laa Vegas was being disputed. One of the major stumbling bl(x:k8 is the fact that, when complete, the Lake will have a population of aome 12,000 persons and more than 14,000 hotel rooms. Waste water from thoae dwellings and accommodations will have to be treated as it goes through the Las Vegas Wash. As an incentive to gain approval, TranaNeva has committed itself to underwrite the expansion of Henderson's wastewater treatment plant. Another facet comes to mind: Are the hotels, casinos, golf courses and other recreational facilities in Las Vegas concerned about competition that Henderson might create once the I^ke at Las Vegas was complete? Competition? That's what free enterprise is all about, whether a better mousetrap is built, or a better car, a better hotel, a better caaino or a better community. Laa Vegas should welcome competition. Tt keeps competing factiona honest and on their toes and everyone benefits, especially local residents and the vacationing tourists that come to Southern Nevada. It appears that TransNeva Corp., in its understandable enthusiasm, has invested considerable time, funds and effort to get the Lake off and running. In the case of pipeline purchases and issuing of contracts, their speed of action may have been somewhat premature. After all, the Lake has not received either Henderson building peimits or approval from the Environmental Protection Agency. Tlie County Commiasion's action, if not motivated by politics, ia commendable. But it should not dawdle over a decision on the Lake; the project should not become a political football. Another hard look at the Lake deserves to be made and promptly analyzed. Then, once a definitive decision is made, let'a get on with it, so that Henderson can continue to be "Growing Towards Tomorrow." A fitting homily on lotteries Last week nine church leaders said what other Minnesotans have been loathe to admit: A state lottery would be just plain wrong. Good for them. To most proponenets, a lottery is a moral issue only in a limited aenae; they think people should be allowed to exercise their own conaciences in deciding whether to play the number Kunea. Opponents have been reluctant to frame the issue in moral terms, perhaps not wanting to look like bluenoses. But the church leaders' joint declaration raiaes a moral question that cannot be ignored. To be sure, they defined their opposition as a public-policy positin rather than as a campaign againat ain. But in entering the fray, the brought their moral influence to bear against what they consider wrongful pubhc behavior. Or as Roman Catholic Archbishop John Roach put it the reason pubhc opinion polls have shown Minnesotans 2-1 in favor of a lottery is that "they haven't had the benefit of our teaching until now." The appeal of a state lottery," said the paper, "is due largely to the fact that it offers a chance for instant wealth. The most in need are very vulnerable to the persuasion of advertising. Any pubhc policy which directly appeals to and depends on the vulnerabilities of a class of citisens in order to raise money haa to be called into question." Not all religious leaders agree. One who refuaed an invitation to join in the statement aaid it was because he just didn't oonsider the lottery a moral problem that required his intervention. Besides, he said, the invitation came just as he waa getting ready to join a minister of another faith for an outing at Cutertmry Downa. Whether a person engages in Wpd gHobKng should indeed be a matter of peraonal conacieaoe ami preference. But the issue before voters Nov. 8 is not one of personal behavior but •f fwenwiantal behavior, and whether it ia right or wrong to raise rsveoues by burdening those who can least afford it. Hie church leaders aay it's wrong. So do wt. SttrTribmae By Richard Cohen Omaha—Behold the Dan Doll. It has blue eyes and half the color of a wheat field. It has a Midwestern grandmother, a wife and children and, if asked a question about its qualifications, it gives the same programmed response—an answer ao seemingly loaded with false sincerity that if it were cholesterol the Dan Doll's poor heart would stop. "You have been able to see Dan Quayle and I really," the doll said. Lloyd Bentsen could not have put it better. At least four times in the vice-presidential debate here, Quayle used similar, if not identical words, in asserting his relative lack of qualifications for the vice presidency: "You must look at accomplishments, and you must look at experience." It was an obviously programmed response that Quayle must have been saying in his sleep. The viewer could be forgiven if. in his own sleep, he woke the cat yelling the same line. Prom the very beginning of the debate. Lloyd Bentaen took control. You may ask why and the answer ia undoubtedly thia: Bentaen knew his opponent. Once before, on "The MacNeil/Iiehrer Newshour," the two had debated and Quayle had acquitted himself well. But that was only for 15 minutes or so. This debate lasted an hour and a half and Bentaen must have known Quayle has only 15 minutes in him. After that, like summer television, it was all repeats. A false measure is applied to these events: an anticipation of either the knockout blow or the suicidal gaff. But the killer gaffe is a rare occurrence—unaeen in the land since Gerald Ford, on his own, snatched Poland from the Soviet bloc. If that is the stendard-the expectation—then Dan Quayle performed adequately. Given his previous extemporaneous efforts, he more than exceeded his own personal best and expectationa in general. There was a hoUowneas to Quayle—a sense that the Uttle he was saying was all he could aay, that beneath his superficial answers was more superficiality. For instance, frequently Quayle mentioned that he is the author of a job training act. It is a real program, but hardly the Marshall Plan and embarraasingly riim as the sum total of a legislative life. The act's co-author. Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.), would consider the act just another day's work. Ironically, it was the camera that did in Quayle. In more ways than just in age. hia debate with Bentsen hsd a father son quality to it. Like a kid with something to hide, he was clumay when attempting to change the subject or not anawer a question. Every question elicited the same degree of sincerity. He invariably looked into the camera as if it—not Bentsen, not the panel of questioners—would believe him He looked like a mamma's boy at a family showdown searching for a sympathetic face. The sound bite of this debate will surely be the slap Bentsen delivered to Quayle when he told him that he was no John Kennedy. As television, it was vivid, the debate version of a knockout puch. But the more telling blow was landed by Quayle. and hia victim was himself. Asked to clear up some diacrepenciea in his record, asked to put to rest charges that he has embellished his work experience, asked to release his academic record—asked, in the words of his questioner, to clear up queations of "candor and of consistency"-he appealed to the camera for permission to duck the question: "1 am—I atand before you tonight—as the most investigated person ever to seek public office." That is a claim for the Guinness Book bf World Records. It waa not an anawer. Questions about Quayle are really questions about George Buah. Why did he choose such a man as his running mate? Why when there were qualified choices aplenty—Bob Dole, Pete Dominici—did he turn to someone alwut whom, every poll tells us, the American people have great doubts? What was once a mystery has become clearer as the campaign has progressed—as Hush has indulged himself in a campaign of mostly empty symbolism about such iaaues aa the Pledge of Allegiance or the A(^LU. Quayle, too, ia a symbol-a campaign prop, much like the ubiquitous American flags at every Buah event. He is supposed to stand for the coming generation, for that most abused word in the i)olitical lexicon: the future. Experience did not seem to matter to Bush. Maturity did not seem to matter to Hush and, judging by this debate, neither candor nor with mattered either. What mattered was what Quayle seemed to represent. He could be packaged, asked to do no more than the actors on the daytime soaps: Manorixe lines and look swell on camera. Alas, the man himaelf is not up to the script written for him. Asked to come up with a formative experience that shaped his pohtical philosophy, he quoted a bromide uttered by his 97-year-old grandmother: "You can do anything you want to if you just set your mind to it and go to work." Omaha turned out to be a cruel place. It was there Dan Quayle proved his grandmother wrong. Capitol commentary Why voter turnout is decreasing By Guy Shipler Getting Americans out to vote has always been a problem, but it used to be a lot easier that it has become lately. Research by a Ehzabeth Koenig, a member of the League of Women voters in Rochester, N.Y., has found a sharp diffence between the past and the present. In 1892, she discovered, 75 percent of America's eligible voters went to the polls. That was a time "when most people has to depend on a horse and buggy or their own two feet to get them around." And what percentage voted last? "A mere 37.3 percent." says Koenig. "Some 178 million Americans could have voted. Only 66 miUion did." Will we embarrass ourselves even further in the eyes of the world by setting a new low-t\imout record in 1988? Probably. The current fad in politics-bashing centers on the popular belief that all the candidates ae a bunch of bums, and not worthy of out taking the time even to go to the polls. Thoae who hold such a view may think their absence doesn't matter—the standard excuse is that their vote doesn't count. Simple arithmetic says otherwise. Too many electiona, at every level, has been decided by aa little as a single vote and. on a national scale, by a mere handful. For every pers( who goes to the polls, whe^ier he be the president or an une^^)k>yed janitor, has exactly the aame impact—one vote each. Yet even though we have the privilege of driving our expensive sutomobilas to the polls instead of riding in buggies or walking, many of us figure it isn't wwth that tremendous effort. Is this stiU 'government of the people, by the people and for the people?*" aaka Koenig. And if not, why not? Becaose. ahe explains. The coming of age of televiaion as the principal pohtical forum for campaigning candidatea has probably had a greater influence on the voting halnta of Americana that anything else. "One would think that this marvel of technology that brings news about our government and infonnation and poUtical candidates into almost every Amerianhfooie woaldstimdfttt ••test and dtiaen participation, hot jvit tiw raverae ssms to be the "According to Curtis Ganz, director of the Committee for the Study of the American Electorate, 'Voting tends to decUne as the use of television in campaigns increases' 'The commercialization of campaigns by marketing candidatea, like soap, with shck 30-60-8econd commercials, turns many votes off. They aee the candidates as pawns of the special intereats that finance their costly ads. rather than pubUc servants dedicated to promoting the common intereat. and they conclude that they're all alike—so why vote?" That sure is an understandable attitude in 1988. The blatant lying, distortion and dishonesty of the campaign at all levels has been enough to disgust and turn off the most ardent beUever in the system. The argument counter to that, of course, is that our beat means of overcoming this violence to our form of government is for the people to go back to participating in it. Writes Koenig: "Another effect of television has been to turn Americans into observers instead of participanta by aimply watching television polispots and new events, we consider ourselves to be part of the great mass called 'pubhc opinion' (and this gives us] a feeling of participation in the electoral process which makes voting itself seem superfluous "Another pohtical paradox can be seen in the changes in the voting habits of the educated, whiteKx>llar. professional claaa. Whereaa education uaed to be the strongest positive index of voter turnout, duriag the television era thia educated class has dropped-out of voting in such large numbers thst it now has the lowest voter turnout rate of any group in the country." So what's to be done? The first obvious step is to build a big enough fire to get people to register. In Nevsda, Secretary of State Frankie Sue Del Papa has been making s oonoerted effort to get that accomplished. Last week she snnounoed that her new Uotar Voter progrsm has "exceeded our wildett SKpectations." Under that law, pessed by the 1987 innmnn of the Legislature, Nevsdans can registers to vote at Depsrtmsat of Motor Vehicle offices around the state. Del Papa figurad thia would bring in about 50.000 new votea. It actually sigBsd up 73,097. But registtting and voting are two different things. Aa Del Papa notes: "While our registration rate may be up this year, turnout as a percentage of registration will be down." And that doea nobody any good, neither the voter, the nonvoter, nor the nrstem itself. MMH MM Your Views • Thnrsdsy. October 20, 1988 Letters street maintenance isn't apparent To the Editor: It was heartening to note on your letters page our mayor's interest in the concerns of her constituents. Because of her busy achedule. I'm sure ahe relied on her staff to furnish the statistics published in her letter. An article in the Boulder City NewB notified reaidenta that, although their sewer rate would increase $1 monthly, "they still would enjoy the lowest aewer rate in the county." The rates quoted were Henderson $11.21 monthly, $134.52 p/a; North Us Vegas $9.72 monthy. $llfi,64 p/a plus a 15 annual charge; Las Vegas $6.83 monthly. $81.96 p/a. If thoae rates are correct, Menderaon residentado indeed pay the highest sewer charges in the county. By the way. a short walk on Atomic toward Water Street doea indicate to the aenaea that sewer effluent ia overflowing on the atreeta. In the recent 'Tax Distribution" notice received from ('lark County it adviaed my total property taxes were being raised to $610,19 for projwrty assessed at $25,120 which included $17.23 (2.83 percent) for Henderson City; $86.74 (14.22 percent) 1 lender son Debt Service; $2.96 (.5 percent) Henders(m Library for a Henderson total of $106.93, (17.5 percent) of the amount asaesssd, if my calculationa are correct. At the mayor's quoted rate of $9 per thouaand. the market value of my houae would be $67,798. iiaaed on my daughter's (California property taxea $fter Prop. No. 13, the California property tax rate on my home at $10.44 \m thousand amounts to only $97.62 more per year. It ia obvious to California visitora and residents that millions nri* spent on freeways and street maintenance from thia small difference in tax rates, It would have been more informative to concerned citiaiena, if the mayor'a staff had itemized some of the streeta which have l)een repaired, re'Red Ribbon Week' for drug-free nation Dear Editor: The national Red Riblwn Campaign will be celebrated in communities acroaa America during "Red Ribbon Week." Oct. 23-31, 1988. The Governor's Alliance for Thanks Dear Editor: The Negri family wishes U) express its thanks to all medical personnel for acting so fast in aaving my husband's life. Our thanks goes out to the Henderson Fire Department, the paramedica, the ataf f of St. Rose de Lima emergency room and the Intenaive Care Unit. SANDRA NEGRI BRENDA NEGRI JOSEPH NEGRI KATIE NEGRI JUDY NEGRI SAMUEL NEGRI BOBBY NEGRI AND THE DISABLED AMERICAN VETERANS a Drug Free Nevada, the National Fwloration of Parents for Drug Free Youth, and the Drug Free Youth of America are coordinating this visible com -munity program in Nevada with the cooperation of the local representatives of the NFP. The time selected for this cooperative campaign will l^ National Drug Free America Week. Oct. 22-31, 1988. The State of Nevada and the Governor's Alliance for a Drug Free Nevada further commits its resources to ensure the success of the Red Ribbon Campaign and supports Oct. 23-31, 1988 as Red Ribbon Week and Drug Free America Week. I encourage you to participate in drug awareness and drug education activities, making a viaible atatement that we are strongly committed to drug free, healthy lifestyles. Sincerely, RICHARD H. BRYAN Governor Setting sun By Bill Thomas An old man was riding his old horse at a walk, thoy wenmoving slow. In his mind he was remembering a long time ago. When he rode with Sheridan down the Shenadoah, The Rehs they did fight and their colors they did show. M( fought against the Clantons at Tombstone n long timr ago, He rode with the Earps. his gun hand he sold. He had driven cattle on the Salt River range. He rode with good wranglers but can't remember their names. He had driven the Mexican corinne ateers from the border to Tucaon. That was when he and his horse were frisky and young. He remembered the night guard and his favorite tunes, He can stillhear that old coyote serenading the m(X)n, If he could only roll back the calendar to a time he loved so well, "Old horse, this whole country is going to hell." Juat let him ride the old Salt RiVer range once again, Just to smell the cactus blossoms and see the big whirlwind. He will hang up his saddle, spurs, chaps and gun. He is old and he is facing his last setting sun. "Old horse, we have been together for about thirty years, It is time for us to lie down on the desert without tears. We will dream alw ut the grea t ro ududpa and^the^things we have done'. Old horse, we have seen our last setting sun.'' Conserving water would allow larger economy Dear Editor: I hsve reviewed the recent Letter to the Editor by Steven Ainsworth. vice president of TransNeva Corp. defending the Lake at Laa Vegas Project. I have problems with some of the arguments presented in that letter and feel compelled to point out my differencea of opinion. In the letter. TransNeva imphes thst the 360^0% lake will only kise 2,000-Kre feet per year oi water to evaporation and infiltration. Based on my review of information regarding lake l oss e s in Southern Nevada. I believe that k)ss rate is well below reasonssUe scientific estimates. Based on evaporation data frtmi Lake Mead and data on losses to evaporation and aeepage at the 29-acre lake at the Lakes project, I estimate the the Lake at Las Vegaa will loae aomewhere in the range of 2,700-acre feet per year to 4,700-acre-feet per year, with a prahable value in the oppsr ead of thai imnge. HM letter also incorrectly qnotea a atatement that I made in my previous letter to the editor. I had fxevuNisly pointed out that the Lake itaelf (not the project aa a whole) will lose nearly twice aa much water to evaporation and infiltration than ia currently uaed in Laughlin. Therefore, nearly twice the current development in LaughUn could be supported by the water loat in the Lake itself. I think the point is relevant and worth conaideration. TranaNeva waa previously quoted in aeveral newspapers comparing the estimated percapita water uae of the proposed project (baaed on residential and tourist populstion) with the estimated Laa Vegaa Valley Water District estimated per-capita water uae (baaed on the reaidential population alone). Now it denies making the compariaon. In their Letter to the Editor. TranaNeva compares its estimated per-capita use baaed on reaidential and tourist population, with an estimate of 270 to 300-acre feet per year for district par-capita watar use reportedly estimated in the same manner. In my oonversationa with the Water Disrict, staff members have atated that they are not confldent in their eatimate of per-capita water uae baaed on the residential and tourist population, but that their current best estimate is about 215 gallons per person, per day. Furthermore, I believe that the comparsion ia not fair, since the propoaed project estimated water use ia skewed downward in comparsion to the rest of the valley, due to the project's high ratio of hotel rooms to residential population. The ratio in Clark County is on the order of one room per 10 residents as compared to a ratio of one room per leas than one resident in the proposed project. Th%fore, TransNeva is comparing apples and oranges. In the Letter to the Editor and at numerous public meetings. TranaNeva has referred to proposed water conservaticm methods to be used at the project. I have several problems with their oenaerration assumptions and their water budget, which ia baaed on thoae aasumptions. The have stated previoualy that they will install water conservation equipment such aa ahower flow restrictors in hotels becsuse hotel customers will accept that. I And that assumption difHcuIt to beheve and think that the hotel owners will quickly remove those devices to provide their customers with the luxiuy they demand. I also think that much of the other water conservation equipment may be removed or abandoned due to maintenance difficulties. Since there is no effective method of forcing the installation or uae of the propoaed project water conservation methods, I believe that the water budget baaed on thoae methods should be questioned. Finally. TransNeva presented its economic argumenta justifying the project. I believe that argument doea have aome merit. If the project were successful. there would be some short-torn econ on their responding fir units? Thy wanted a mandatory minimum of four poople on 'ach fire truck. That would IKone captain to HU{)ervis(>, one. enginn!r to oiHsrate the truck and do the pumfiing and two fiKblfightitrs to do thn fire fighting, rcs<:u!, evacuation, salvage, overhaul, ventilation arid clean-up. That doesn't He'm to b too much to ask for. does it? Well now, do you rtialize that the Henderson Fire l)!{)armont still has fire trucks with only two men on them? Our fin^i'ighters are not [)i<:keting, and they won't go on strike. Hut the Henderaon firefightjRm nmmia8ion. Since 1973 more than 110 children have died as a result of suffocation involving uninflated balloons or pieces of balloona. Most of the victims were under six years of age, but also several older childreQ.have suffocated on balloons. Accklents involving balloons tend to occur in two waya. apokespersona said. Some children have sucked uninflated balloons into their mouths, ofto^ while attempting to inflaWthem. That can occur when a child who ia blowing up the balloon inhales or takes a breath to prepare for the next blow, and draws the balloon back into the mouth and throat. Some deaths may have resulted when children swallowed uninflated balloona they were sucking or chewing on. It is reconunended that parents or guardians do not allow children under the age of aix to pUiy with uninflated balloona without supervision. If a balloon breaks, however, parents should inunediately ocrflect the piece and dispose of them. The Toy Manufacturers of America have taken the initiative by asking manufacturers and importers to pot the following safety warning message on balloon packagaa: SArmr WARNING YOUNG CHILDRKN OOULO CHOUONOBttSUnOCAnD BY AN UNINPLATCD • ALLOON OR PIBCt OP A BROKIN BAIXOON. ADULTS SHOVLDINPLATB RALL00N8 AM) 8UPA. VISE THEIR USB WITH CHILnuEN uNDBi nx m YEARI.

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mmm • • • Viewpoint I • HENPERSONFg^ MIKEOCALLAGHAN CAROLYN OCALLAGHAN PubUahar Co-PnWUhar Fag* 4 HandartoR lUma Nawt, Handarton, Navada Thuraday. OctolMr 20. 1988 Back to the drawing board The Dan Doll Clark County oommiamonera pulled up hard on the reins TUMK day vwung. calling for public hearings on the Uke st Las VegM proJMt propoaed fbr Henderson. Queetions have come up concerning what effect a 4,000-foot daiB and a 324-acre lake planned by Trans Neva IVoperties would have on local water and sewer service, as well as what changes the development might have on flood control and the Las Vegaa Waah. In recent weeka, the facing letters page of the Henderson Home Newf has become an open forum for discussions between wateruae (H^ponenta and advocates of The Lake, specifically from hydrologiat Bob Broadbent, a member of the Colorado River Comiaaion, and Steve Ainsworth, a vice president of TranaNeva and chief project engineer for the development. But while both gentlemen have stated their cases eloquently, the tachnology involved is so expansive that is difficult for most of the lay public to comprehend all oi the mtricaciea. Some other queations also anae. la political preaaure being applied behind the scenes to delay the Lake project—or even to kill it altogether? Intereatingly, water facilities for a similar I^as Vegaa development with a similar name—The Lakes—was approved and constructed at the very same time as application for The Lake at Laa Vegas was being disputed. One of the major stumbling bl(x:k8 is the fact that, when complete, the Lake will have a population of aome 12,000 persons and more than 14,000 hotel rooms. Waste water from thoae dwellings and accommodations will have to be treated as it goes through the Las Vegas Wash. As an incentive to gain approval, TranaNeva has committed itself to underwrite the expansion of Henderson's wastewater treatment plant. Another facet comes to mind: Are the hotels, casinos, golf courses and other recreational facilities in Las Vegas concerned about competition that Henderson might create once the I^ke at Las Vegas was complete? Competition? That's what free enterprise is all about, whether a better mousetrap is built, or a better car, a better hotel, a better caaino or a better community. Laa Vegas should welcome competition. Tt keeps competing factiona honest and on their toes and everyone benefits, especially local residents and the vacationing tourists that come to Southern Nevada. It appears that TransNeva Corp., in its understandable enthusiasm, has invested considerable time, funds and effort to get the Lake off and running. In the case of pipeline purchases and issuing of contracts, their speed of action may have been somewhat premature. After all, the Lake has not received either Henderson building peimits or approval from the Environmental Protection Agency. Tlie County Commiasion's action, if not motivated by politics, ia commendable. But it should not dawdle over a decision on the Lake; the project should not become a political football. Another hard look at the Lake deserves to be made and promptly analyzed. Then, once a definitive decision is made, let'a get on with it, so that Henderson can continue to be "Growing Towards Tomorrow." A fitting homily on lotteries Last week nine church leaders said what other Minnesotans have been loathe to admit: A state lottery would be just plain wrong. Good for them. To most proponenets, a lottery is a moral issue only in a limited aenae; they think people should be allowed to exercise their own conaciences in deciding whether to play the number Kunea. Opponents have been reluctant to frame the issue in moral terms, perhaps not wanting to look like bluenoses. But the church leaders' joint declaration raiaes a moral question that cannot be ignored. To be sure, they defined their opposition as a public-policy positin rather than as a campaign againat ain. But in entering the fray, the brought their moral influence to bear against what they consider wrongful pubhc behavior. Or as Roman Catholic Archbishop John Roach put it the reason pubhc opinion polls have shown Minnesotans 2-1 in favor of a lottery is that "they haven't had the benefit of our teaching until now." The appeal of a state lottery," said the paper, "is due largely to the fact that it offers a chance for instant wealth. The most in need are very vulnerable to the persuasion of advertising. Any pubhc policy which directly appeals to and depends on the vulnerabilities of a class of citisens in order to raise money haa to be called into question." Not all religious leaders agree. One who refuaed an invitation to join in the statement aaid it was because he just didn't oonsider the lottery a moral problem that required his intervention. Besides, he said, the invitation came just as he waa getting ready to join a minister of another faith for an outing at Cutertmry Downa. Whether a person engages in Wpd gHobKng should indeed be a matter of peraonal conacieaoe ami preference. But the issue before voters Nov. 8 is not one of personal behavior but •f fwenwiantal behavior, and whether it ia right or wrong to raise rsveoues by burdening those who can least afford it. Hie church leaders aay it's wrong. So do wt. SttrTribmae By Richard Cohen Omaha—Behold the Dan Doll. It has blue eyes and half the color of a wheat field. It has a Midwestern grandmother, a wife and children and, if asked a question about its qualifications, it gives the same programmed response—an answer ao seemingly loaded with false sincerity that if it were cholesterol the Dan Doll's poor heart would stop. "You have been able to see Dan Quayle and I really," the doll said. Lloyd Bentsen could not have put it better. At least four times in the vice-presidential debate here, Quayle used similar, if not identical words, in asserting his relative lack of qualifications for the vice presidency: "You must look at accomplishments, and you must look at experience." It was an obviously programmed response that Quayle must have been saying in his sleep. The viewer could be forgiven if. in his own sleep, he woke the cat yelling the same line. Prom the very beginning of the debate. Lloyd Bentaen took control. You may ask why and the answer ia undoubtedly thia: Bentaen knew his opponent. Once before, on "The MacNeil/Iiehrer Newshour," the two had debated and Quayle had acquitted himself well. But that was only for 15 minutes or so. This debate lasted an hour and a half and Bentaen must have known Quayle has only 15 minutes in him. After that, like summer television, it was all repeats. A false measure is applied to these events: an anticipation of either the knockout blow or the suicidal gaff. But the killer gaffe is a rare occurrence—unaeen in the land since Gerald Ford, on his own, snatched Poland from the Soviet bloc. If that is the stendard-the expectation—then Dan Quayle performed adequately. Given his previous extemporaneous efforts, he more than exceeded his own personal best and expectationa in general. There was a hoUowneas to Quayle—a sense that the Uttle he was saying was all he could aay, that beneath his superficial answers was more superficiality. For instance, frequently Quayle mentioned that he is the author of a job training act. It is a real program, but hardly the Marshall Plan and embarraasingly riim as the sum total of a legislative life. The act's co-author. Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.), would consider the act just another day's work. Ironically, it was the camera that did in Quayle. In more ways than just in age. hia debate with Bentsen hsd a father son quality to it. Like a kid with something to hide, he was clumay when attempting to change the subject or not anawer a question. Every question elicited the same degree of sincerity. He invariably looked into the camera as if it—not Bentsen, not the panel of questioners—would believe him He looked like a mamma's boy at a family showdown searching for a sympathetic face. The sound bite of this debate will surely be the slap Bentsen delivered to Quayle when he told him that he was no John Kennedy. As television, it was vivid, the debate version of a knockout puch. But the more telling blow was landed by Quayle. and hia victim was himself. Asked to clear up some diacrepenciea in his record, asked to put to rest charges that he has embellished his work experience, asked to release his academic record—asked, in the words of his questioner, to clear up queations of "candor and of consistency"-he appealed to the camera for permission to duck the question: "1 am—I atand before you tonight—as the most investigated person ever to seek public office." That is a claim for the Guinness Book bf World Records. It waa not an anawer. Questions about Quayle are really questions about George Buah. Why did he choose such a man as his running mate? Why when there were qualified choices aplenty—Bob Dole, Pete Dominici—did he turn to someone alwut whom, every poll tells us, the American people have great doubts? What was once a mystery has become clearer as the campaign has progressed—as Hush has indulged himself in a campaign of mostly empty symbolism about such iaaues aa the Pledge of Allegiance or the A(^LU. Quayle, too, ia a symbol-a campaign prop, much like the ubiquitous American flags at every Buah event. He is supposed to stand for the coming generation, for that most abused word in the i)olitical lexicon: the future. Experience did not seem to matter to Bush. Maturity did not seem to matter to Hush and, judging by this debate, neither candor nor with mattered either. What mattered was what Quayle seemed to represent. He could be packaged, asked to do no more than the actors on the daytime soaps: Manorixe lines and look swell on camera. Alas, the man himaelf is not up to the script written for him. Asked to come up with a formative experience that shaped his pohtical philosophy, he quoted a bromide uttered by his 97-year-old grandmother: "You can do anything you want to if you just set your mind to it and go to work." Omaha turned out to be a cruel place. It was there Dan Quayle proved his grandmother wrong. Capitol commentary Why voter turnout is decreasing By Guy Shipler Getting Americans out to vote has always been a problem, but it used to be a lot easier that it has become lately. Research by a Ehzabeth Koenig, a member of the League of Women voters in Rochester, N.Y., has found a sharp diffence between the past and the present. In 1892, she discovered, 75 percent of America's eligible voters went to the polls. That was a time "when most people has to depend on a horse and buggy or their own two feet to get them around." And what percentage voted last? "A mere 37.3 percent." says Koenig. "Some 178 million Americans could have voted. Only 66 miUion did." Will we embarrass ourselves even further in the eyes of the world by setting a new low-t\imout record in 1988? Probably. The current fad in politics-bashing centers on the popular belief that all the candidates ae a bunch of bums, and not worthy of out taking the time even to go to the polls. Thoae who hold such a view may think their absence doesn't matter—the standard excuse is that their vote doesn't count. Simple arithmetic says otherwise. Too many electiona, at every level, has been decided by aa little as a single vote and. on a national scale, by a mere handful. For every pers( who goes to the polls, whe^ier he be the president or an une^^)k>yed janitor, has exactly the aame impact—one vote each. Yet even though we have the privilege of driving our expensive sutomobilas to the polls instead of riding in buggies or walking, many of us figure it isn't wwth that tremendous effort. Is this stiU 'government of the people, by the people and for the people?*" aaka Koenig. And if not, why not? Becaose. ahe explains. The coming of age of televiaion as the principal pohtical forum for campaigning candidatea has probably had a greater influence on the voting halnta of Americana that anything else. "One would think that this marvel of technology that brings news about our government and infonnation and poUtical candidates into almost every Amerianhfooie woaldstimdfttt ••test and dtiaen participation, hot jvit tiw raverae ssms to be the "According to Curtis Ganz, director of the Committee for the Study of the American Electorate, 'Voting tends to decUne as the use of television in campaigns increases' 'The commercialization of campaigns by marketing candidatea, like soap, with shck 30-60-8econd commercials, turns many votes off. They aee the candidates as pawns of the special intereats that finance their costly ads. rather than pubUc servants dedicated to promoting the common intereat. and they conclude that they're all alike—so why vote?" That sure is an understandable attitude in 1988. The blatant lying, distortion and dishonesty of the campaign at all levels has been enough to disgust and turn off the most ardent beUever in the system. The argument counter to that, of course, is that our beat means of overcoming this violence to our form of government is for the people to go back to participating in it. Writes Koenig: "Another effect of television has been to turn Americans into observers instead of participanta by aimply watching television polispots and new events, we consider ourselves to be part of the great mass called 'pubhc opinion' (and this gives us] a feeling of participation in the electoral process which makes voting itself seem superfluous "Another pohtical paradox can be seen in the changes in the voting habits of the educated, whiteKx>llar. professional claaa. Whereaa education uaed to be the strongest positive index of voter turnout, duriag the television era thia educated class has dropped-out of voting in such large numbers thst it now has the lowest voter turnout rate of any group in the country." So what's to be done? The first obvious step is to build a big enough fire to get people to register. In Nevsda, Secretary of State Frankie Sue Del Papa has been making s oonoerted effort to get that accomplished. Last week she snnounoed that her new Uotar Voter progrsm has "exceeded our wildett SKpectations." Under that law, pessed by the 1987 innmnn of the Legislature, Nevsdans can registers to vote at Depsrtmsat of Motor Vehicle offices around the state. Del Papa figurad thia would bring in about 50.000 new votea. It actually sigBsd up 73,097. But registtting and voting are two different things. Aa Del Papa notes: "While our registration rate may be up this year, turnout as a percentage of registration will be down." And that doea nobody any good, neither the voter, the nonvoter, nor the nrstem itself. MMH MM Your Views • Thnrsdsy. October 20, 1988 Letters street maintenance isn't apparent To the Editor: It was heartening to note on your letters page our mayor's interest in the concerns of her constituents. Because of her busy achedule. I'm sure ahe relied on her staff to furnish the statistics published in her letter. An article in the Boulder City NewB notified reaidenta that, although their sewer rate would increase $1 monthly, "they still would enjoy the lowest aewer rate in the county." The rates quoted were Henderson $11.21 monthly, $134.52 p/a; North Us Vegas $9.72 monthy. $llfi,64 p/a plus a 15 annual charge; Las Vegas $6.83 monthly. $81.96 p/a. If thoae rates are correct, Menderaon residentado indeed pay the highest sewer charges in the county. By the way. a short walk on Atomic toward Water Street doea indicate to the aenaea that sewer effluent ia overflowing on the atreeta. In the recent 'Tax Distribution" notice received from ('lark County it adviaed my total property taxes were being raised to $610,19 for projwrty assessed at $25,120 which included $17.23 (2.83 percent) for Henderson City; $86.74 (14.22 percent) 1 lender son Debt Service; $2.96 (.5 percent) Henders(m Library for a Henderson total of $106.93, (17.5 percent) of the amount asaesssd, if my calculationa are correct. At the mayor's quoted rate of $9 per thouaand. the market value of my houae would be $67,798. iiaaed on my daughter's (California property taxea $fter Prop. No. 13, the California property tax rate on my home at $10.44 \m thousand amounts to only $97.62 more per year. It ia obvious to California visitora and residents that millions nri* spent on freeways and street maintenance from thia small difference in tax rates, It would have been more informative to concerned citiaiena, if the mayor'a staff had itemized some of the streeta which have l)een repaired, re'Red Ribbon Week' for drug-free nation Dear Editor: The national Red Riblwn Campaign will be celebrated in communities acroaa America during "Red Ribbon Week." Oct. 23-31, 1988. The Governor's Alliance for Thanks Dear Editor: The Negri family wishes U) express its thanks to all medical personnel for acting so fast in aaving my husband's life. Our thanks goes out to the Henderson Fire Department, the paramedica, the ataf f of St. Rose de Lima emergency room and the Intenaive Care Unit. SANDRA NEGRI BRENDA NEGRI JOSEPH NEGRI KATIE NEGRI JUDY NEGRI SAMUEL NEGRI BOBBY NEGRI AND THE DISABLED AMERICAN VETERANS a Drug Free Nevada, the National Fwloration of Parents for Drug Free Youth, and the Drug Free Youth of America are coordinating this visible com -munity program in Nevada with the cooperation of the local representatives of the NFP. The time selected for this cooperative campaign will l^ National Drug Free America Week. Oct. 22-31, 1988. The State of Nevada and the Governor's Alliance for a Drug Free Nevada further commits its resources to ensure the success of the Red Ribbon Campaign and supports Oct. 23-31, 1988 as Red Ribbon Week and Drug Free America Week. I encourage you to participate in drug awareness and drug education activities, making a viaible atatement that we are strongly committed to drug free, healthy lifestyles. Sincerely, RICHARD H. BRYAN Governor Setting sun By Bill Thomas An old man was riding his old horse at a walk, thoy wenmoving slow. In his mind he was remembering a long time ago. When he rode with Sheridan down the Shenadoah, The Rehs they did fight and their colors they did show. M( fought against the Clantons at Tombstone n long timr ago, He rode with the Earps. his gun hand he sold. He had driven cattle on the Salt River range. He rode with good wranglers but can't remember their names. He had driven the Mexican corinne ateers from the border to Tucaon. That was when he and his horse were frisky and young. He remembered the night guard and his favorite tunes, He can stillhear that old coyote serenading the m(X)n, If he could only roll back the calendar to a time he loved so well, "Old horse, this whole country is going to hell." Juat let him ride the old Salt RiVer range once again, Just to smell the cactus blossoms and see the big whirlwind. He will hang up his saddle, spurs, chaps and gun. He is old and he is facing his last setting sun. "Old horse, we have been together for about thirty years, It is time for us to lie down on the desert without tears. We will dream alw ut the grea t ro ududpa and^the^things we have done'. Old horse, we have seen our last setting sun.'' Conserving water would allow larger economy Dear Editor: I hsve reviewed the recent Letter to the Editor by Steven Ainsworth. vice president of TransNeva Corp. defending the Lake at Laa Vegas Project. I have problems with some of the arguments presented in that letter and feel compelled to point out my differencea of opinion. In the letter. TransNeva imphes thst the 360^0% lake will only kise 2,000-Kre feet per year oi water to evaporation and infiltration. Based on my review of information regarding lake l oss e s in Southern Nevada. I believe that k)ss rate is well below reasonssUe scientific estimates. Based on evaporation data frtmi Lake Mead and data on losses to evaporation and aeepage at the 29-acre lake at the Lakes project, I estimate the the Lake at Las Vegaa will loae aomewhere in the range of 2,700-acre feet per year to 4,700-acre-feet per year, with a prahable value in the oppsr ead of thai imnge. HM letter also incorrectly qnotea a atatement that I made in my previous letter to the editor. I had fxevuNisly pointed out that the Lake itaelf (not the project aa a whole) will lose nearly twice aa much water to evaporation and infiltration than ia currently uaed in Laughlin. Therefore, nearly twice the current development in LaughUn could be supported by the water loat in the Lake itself. I think the point is relevant and worth conaideration. TranaNeva waa previously quoted in aeveral newspapers comparing the estimated percapita water uae of the proposed project (baaed on residential and tourist populstion) with the estimated Laa Vegaa Valley Water District estimated per-capita water uae (baaed on the reaidential population alone). Now it denies making the compariaon. In their Letter to the Editor. TranaNeva compares its estimated per-capita use baaed on reaidential and tourist population, with an estimate of 270 to 300-acre feet per year for district par-capita watar use reportedly estimated in the same manner. In my oonversationa with the Water Disrict, staff members have atated that they are not confldent in their eatimate of per-capita water uae baaed on the residential and tourist population, but that their current best estimate is about 215 gallons per person, per day. Furthermore, I believe that the comparsion ia not fair, since the propoaed project estimated water use ia skewed downward in comparsion to the rest of the valley, due to the project's high ratio of hotel rooms to residential population. The ratio in Clark County is on the order of one room per 10 residents as compared to a ratio of one room per leas than one resident in the proposed project. Th%fore, TransNeva is comparing apples and oranges. In the Letter to the Editor and at numerous public meetings. TranaNeva has referred to proposed water conservaticm methods to be used at the project. I have several problems with their oenaerration assumptions and their water budget, which ia baaed on thoae aasumptions. The have stated previoualy that they will install water conservation equipment such aa ahower flow restrictors in hotels becsuse hotel customers will accept that. I And that assumption difHcuIt to beheve and think that the hotel owners will quickly remove those devices to provide their customers with the luxiuy they demand. I also think that much of the other water conservation equipment may be removed or abandoned due to maintenance difficulties. Since there is no effective method of forcing the installation or uae of the propoaed project water conservation methods, I believe that the water budget baaed on thoae methods should be questioned. Finally. TransNeva presented its economic argumenta justifying the project. I believe that argument doea have aome merit. If the project were successful. there would be some short-torn econ on their responding fir units? Thy wanted a mandatory minimum of four poople on 'ach fire truck. That would IKone captain to HU{)ervis(>, one. enginn!r to oiHsrate the truck and do the pumfiing and two fiKblfightitrs to do thn fire fighting, rcs<:u!, evacuation, salvage, overhaul, ventilation arid clean-up. That doesn't He'm to b too much to ask for. does it? Well now, do you rtialize that the Henderson Fire l)!{)armont still has fire trucks with only two men on them? Our fin^i'ighters are not [)i<:keting, and they won't go on strike. Hut the Henderaon firefightjRm nmmia8ion. Since 1973 more than 110 children have died as a result of suffocation involving uninflated balloons or pieces of balloona. Most of the victims were under six years of age, but also several older childreQ.have suffocated on balloons. Accklents involving balloons tend to occur in two waya. apokespersona said. Some children have sucked uninflated balloons into their mouths, ofto^ while attempting to inflaWthem. That can occur when a child who ia blowing up the balloon inhales or takes a breath to prepare for the next blow, and draws the balloon back into the mouth and throat. Some deaths may have resulted when children swallowed uninflated balloona they were sucking or chewing on. It is reconunended that parents or guardians do not allow children under the age of aix to pUiy with uninflated balloona without supervision. If a balloon breaks, however, parents should inunediately ocrflect the piece and dispose of them. The Toy Manufacturers of America have taken the initiative by asking manufacturers and importers to pot the following safety warning message on balloon packagaa: SArmr WARNING YOUNG CHILDRKN OOULO CHOUONOBttSUnOCAnD BY AN UNINPLATCD • ALLOON OR PIBCt OP A BROKIN BAIXOON. ADULTS SHOVLDINPLATB RALL00N8 AM) 8UPA. VISE THEIR USB WITH CHILnuEN uNDBi nx m YEARI.

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p others' Views ftft I Hanlaraat Ka Nawa, Handarian, Nevada Thnraday. October 20,1908 Subffllnlinum wigi plan an ugly scam Sen, Orrin Hatch of Utah aaya employera should he permitted to pay aubminimum wagea during a 90-day training period. Hia augfaation atinka. Ifa a political huatle, by Republican lawmakera to circumvent what they know ia coming: a aeriea of inrreaaeB for the federal minimum wage. Hatch wanta to eetablish an 80-percent training wage for newly hired workers for up to 90 daya. Hatch ignorea the obvioua when he aaya that entry-level newhiraa need 90 daya to come up to apeed on the job. How much training doea it take to teach a youngster how to drive a wet mop or carry out the traah or slip the houae apeciality between two pieces of brsad? Not much. You're shown one—maybe twice. If you don't have it down it h? first few minutes, you may not even finiah the ahift—forget that part about 90 daya of probation. Sen. Ted Kennedy rightly complaina that the aubminimum wage plan will let employers work new-hires at a big aavings that unfairly burdena the employee. And there would also be the temptation to replace the worker when probaton was completed. Cuatomer aervioe and merrchandiaing are rough-and-tumble buaineaaea. Only the toughest survive. Consequently, altruism has never been induatry'a atrong suit. When it comes to the employee's well-being, employers can't be counted on to do the ri^t thing—it muat be mandated by law. The smokeacreen surrounding this aubminimum wage plan makes it all perfectly clear. Kejio 0a*9tte Jounud Cleaning up the S&Ls Nobody, it aeema, likea the way the federal reguktora are cleaning up the kiaa-ridden. acandal-ridden SftL induatry. True, there'a a lot to make you uneaay about some of the deala that they ara atrildng to put the loaera out of buaineaa. The estimated coata of the cleanup keep growing. Moat of the gueaaea now range from $60 billion upward. But before you blame it all on the regulatora—the embattled Home Loan Bank Board— you have to recognise that they are dealing with a genuine financial emergency, and they are working under impoaaible political conditiona. In the three yeara aince the dimenaiona of the S&L diaaater firat began to be visible to the public, the whole government has practiced what paychiatriata call denial—the adamant refuaal to acknowledge reality. Several hundred SftLa were insolvent, but were still taking depoaita while running huge losaea. The ragulatora couldn't put them out of buaineaa becauae the deposit insurance fund was alao inaolvent and couldn't pay off the depoeitora. The reaction? The adminiatration didn't want the cost of a bailout added to the Reagan budget deficit. And too many membera of Congreaa had frienda and conaituenta whoae Skis were invovled. Aa the loaaea grew, last year the Treaaury puahed through Congreaa a plan to cloae up loeerswithout affecting the budget. At last the regulators had aomc money with which to work. Over the past summer they have rolled up doiena of wrecka. In moat caaea thy have merged the inaolvent S&La into healthy onea. To induce the healthy institutions to cooperate. the home Loan Bank Board haa guaranteed them againat loaaa on the queationable loana that they take over. TUa kind of subsidised takeover uaually involvea only a email outlay of federal money now. But the future liabilitiea are aometimea huge, and often incalculable. Thoee liabilitiea now come to many Ulliona of dollara, a cauae of riaing anxiety in both the adminiatration and Congreaa. The Bank Board could have avoided them by, say, aimply abutting down the inaolventa and paying off the depositora. But payouta count aa federal apending, and any aggreeaive reaort to them wouki have puahed the deficit ovw the Onunm-RudmanHollinga limit, reaulting in automatic cuta in both defenae and social programa. Neither the White Houae nor the congreaaional leaderahip would hae welcomed that. Or th Bank Board could have aat on ita handa thia aummer. WouM that have been better? In the last quarter, Mardi throui^ June, the 497 inaolvent SftLa ran a total loaa of $4.6 billionfive times aa much aa the eaminga of all 2,696 aolvent S&La put together. Thoae ere loaaea that the taxpayers are eventually going to have to meet, and to let them keep running would be crazy. The regulatora' deala aometimea leave a lot to be deaired. But they are working under limits that are the reault of much procraatination at the White Houae, the treaaury and the Capital—procraatination, and an urgent deaire to alide through one more election without talking candidly and realiatically about the SAL diaaater. Illegitimacy rate on the rise in tlie USSR; abortion still primary method of birth control By Annette Bohr While Americans wrestle with conflicting claima of morality that pit the right to life of the unborn against the mother's right of choice, Soviet women practice abortion aa a matter of courae. The unavailability of oontracap* tives coupled with general aexual illiteracy haa led to an abortion rate that ia several timea the oountry'a birthrate, u well as to an increaaa in the number of illegitimate birtha. Publicly expreaaad Soviet concern an ac qante statiatica to back that flonoam ara a few phenomenon pf giaaoo9t .;: Owing to changea in the :pMicy of the USSR State Committee for Statistics, figures for the number of children bom to women who are not legally married have been officially puUiahed for the firat time in Soviet hiatory. Illegitimate birth ia increaaing at twice the rate of legitimate birth in the USSR, with nearly every tenth child bom out of wedlock in 1987. The veteran Soviet demographer Victor Perevedentaev aacribea the riaing trand of bearing children without the benefit of marriage to "ih* liberalization of aexual morality and to the exceptionally poor situation with regard to contraceptives." "Without any doubt," he said. "many illegitimate children were not 'planned' by their mothera." To be sure, a recent article in the magazine Ogonyok by Andni Popov, a medi mate mayor of the District of ColumUa. Waahington waa a total wan! of Coagraaaat the time-legialatively ataflad, teaaed and abuaad by • Houae committee dominated by lawmakera from rural racially aagragatad diatricta in the aouth. A amaller ocnatarpart oonmittae in the Senate waa made up of junior aaamba n w i t h no graait anthuaiaam for their aaa i g nmen t either. So it wu that San. Bibla waa tapped aa chairman of the Senate nMrietConmittaa in 1968. Ha found himaalf in the forafroat of a hona nk itruiiU in which ha tod the dty. thoughtfully ud oeMoiantiefMly, through one of the moat important |rrT"g" in ita Uatocy. Par 11 yaara, San. Bttito pnaided ovw haaiiBga on every ooBoaivabla lagialativa propoial involving thia dty, from fixaa ia oiinor local kwa to tha birth and growth of greater Waahingtcn'a anhway ayatam—hia pride-and to construction of tha Capital Battway, tha BhiaPlaina sewage tnataant plant (a nodal fhoihtgr that bainn a dramatic ctoaaup of tha Potomac Rifv), DttUaa Aiipart. tha Kaaaady Caatar and RFK Stadium. Ow IMlihlkf ladiMttontijtnrhinnnnanMnfrr naiitnti dtic oTfaaiMtioBa aad tha nan who wan appointed by laaiiriantBtnharr rmmmir'^r'^tA.*,yyi^kin/>wM idk ha fBidad aatf-fBvaramaat billa throngh tha Senate thraa teM-aaily • aaa tlMB Uoakad by tha Hovn. Thoogh thaaa idwsaaaayalharBaaatoraofftibaDiitriotCaa' Bibb ooatiaiM to aafBtiato with Honaa manban, niiriBi to maka D.C. lagialataoa man aooaptahla la Iba wlahM pMpl9 H imaM affect After WaaUagloadaaa idk^lBVli.hafBttha8MlatDl0nrtbaYoliBfafBtalS. Neaa of thta MMsd ta ahtthaDfa Ban. BMB** pdMiy ta tha paopb or Nevada, who kapt hia ia tha Nevadans liable for the welfare of wild horses ^_ „hllh.HakftWaihiBftaDhaviBfaanadtha pallladaud nipiet of eMaaoa af tha capital d^. Ha died kalMaodayatthaafaalTI. Wi Some 41 wild horaee were shot to death in a grialy crime discovered in an iaolatad area outaide of Auatin, and the fMeral Bureau of Land Management ia receiving crltioiam—moatly unwarranted—becauae of the way the incident wu handled. A group called Wild Horae Organised Aaaiatanoe oomplaina of delay and confuaion on the part of the BLM. But coaddating the vaat expanaea of territory to be patrolled in Nevada, and the limited number of personnel woriting hara for tha BLM, the ra^Kmae time doea not aaam exoaaaiva or ini^ypcopriato. The BLM haa, in fact, aoond a ooupU of nutjor auooaaaaa in capturing and oonvictiiig gun-wialdiag UUan of wild honaa. One inddant took place at Mount Chariaatoa, near Laa Vagaa, and the other near FaDoo. Ancaymoua tipa and orimaaoana inveatigatian raoultad in tha oonvictiona. Upon examining the BLM*a dilemma, it ia not dear that putting additional agaata in tha fiokl would reduce the auaihar of inddanto. A auapact dairying a gun in tha wild ia not adequate evidence that a crime haa bean ocounittad, and doea not provide adequate grounda for axnat A conviction, whan it cooMa, ia achieved throu^ eyewitneaa raporta, and troax oU-faahionad alauthiaf—finding eridenoe that tiaa a wapoa to the crime and plaoaa tha auapact at the aoane. BLM ampkyaaa have wide and oonaidanbly varied raaponaibilitiaa aa cuatodiana of public landa and public pnqtarty. Caring for tha health and waD4>aing of aooa of tha natioo'a principal wild hone harda ia only one facet Thaj muat alao deal with thiavaa and vandala in Amariran ladian burial grounda, recreation areaa and in varioua mining and grasing allotmanta. BLM spokaaman Bob Stewart, without wiahing to diminiah the gravity of the horae-ahooting inddant, pbinte out that criminal aaaault against wiki horaee ia only one of a long liat of law-enforcement haadachea BLM offldala have to deal with regularly in Nevada. However, killing wild hor a ee ia a federal offanaa puniahaUe with heafty flnaa and two-year priaon tarma. And the moat effective tod for achiaviag cooviotiona, aoooording to Stewart, iathainfanaant anonymonaorotharwiaa.Tothatand,animd righta' groupa an taking affaotiva aotioo by poeting rewards f or inf omatioD laadiBf to tha anaat and ooBvlelioa of paq>la raapondbla for wild horae daatha aaar AuatiB. The violaaoe and brutality of thia lataet inddant, and othan Uka it reflect badly upon Nevada raddaata. Americana living in every part of tha country an intanaaly intaraatad in tha fata, futon and continued wall-being of tha horae herds in Nevada. People a4io have never aat foot in thia atato take a proprietary intarart in tha wiki horae harda. Tliaaa paopla. rii^t encii^, aae Nevadana aa da facto cuatodiana of wild horaaa, and thay fad let down and diaappoiatad whan things go wrong. Raddaata of tha other 49 alataa help pay tha taxaa that pay tha billa for the wiU horaaa. We can protect thia invaatmant— thain and ours—fay kaaping an ya padad whan out and about, and fatting to a jdiona vdion wa aae aooBathing going wnaff on the public landa. OaaaMa tlawaaf Tharaday. Oeteber 30,1968 Henderiea Heme Newa, Haaderaea Nevada Page T, ^ >M GREEN VALLEY NEWS Green Valley celebrates 10th anniversary Citizen's Board to hear GV traffic concerns By Paul Saydeiko Hme ;Vews Staff Writer Green Valley will celebrate ita 10th anniversary with a community picnic from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday at Silver Sprinp Park. TTie American Nevada Corp., founder and main developer of the Green Valley community, will provide hot dogs, drinks, birthday cakes and entertainment. All Green Valley reaidenta are invited to bring their own picnic and blanket. The Basic High School MCJROTC color guard will open the event and the Into the Fire skydiving team will parachute into the park. The UNLV Dixieland band, the Warhurton Family Blue Grass hand and the Las Vegas Chapter of the Sweet Adelines are all scheduled to perform throughout the afternoon. Nate Mack and Estes McDoniel studenta will display a mural which will eventually be put in the Green Valley Library. As part of the celebration, picnic-goers and other reddenta are invited to submit their favorite recipes which will be included in a commemorative Green Valley cookbook, to be available in time for the holidays. An outdoor brunch for invited guests will be held at 11:30 a.m. Monday in a tent set up outaide the new Green Valley Information Center in front of the Athletic Club. Lt. Gov. Bob Miller will proclaim "Green Valley Week" and Henderson Mayor Lorna Americana Group hosts Halloween party Spooks and goblinR will abound this year at the third annual Green Valley Community Hauoween Celebration, hosted by the Americana Group, Realtors from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m, Saturday, Oct. 29. at Americana's Green Valley offiJ*. 2551 North Green Valley Parkway. The celebration, open to all who love Halloween, is sponsored by the Americana Group Realtora, Richmond American Homes, ^Stewart Title of Nevada, City-Fed Mortgage. Valley Mortgage Inc., First American Title (>)., Pacific Firat Mortgage, CitiBank of Nevada and Nevada Title Co. Hot dogs, caramel apples and homemade goodiea will be in abundance to please palates and satisfy everyone's sweet tooth. Regularly scheduled drawings will be held throughout the afternoon and prizes will include, among other things: Better Homee and Gardens rookbookft, dinners at participating restauranta, flowers and and gift certificates from beauty salons, eto. Radio station KRLV 106.5 FM will be on-site broadcasting continuous soft hito live during the party. Parenta and children alike are encouraged to wear costumes. Childran ages 3-12 are also encouraged to enter the pumpkin-carving contest, which will be judged during the celebration. Pumpkins may be picked up at the Americana office from Oct. 23-28. Children may carve them an they wish, then bring them to the party, The best entries will win trophies, ribbons and gift certificates. For more information, call the Americana Group at 458-8888. Kesterson is also expected to attend. The center, which officially opens Wednesday, will display maps showing the progress of Green Valley. Mark Fine, president of the American Nevada Corp., is expected to make an announcement regarding future developmente in Green Valley at the reception. Since its inception in 1978, the master-planned community has grown to a population of approximately 17,000, and will eventually be home to 60.000 to 70.000 residento. The 8,400 acres which make up Green Valley encompass a total of 18 residential projecta built to date, with another 21 currently under development. "This is a milestone in the development of Green Valley," Fine said. "What began as a concept has grown and is continuing to develop with the construction of the Village of Silver Springs. Green Valley will continue to provide an environment that combines a residential setting with culture and education." The Green Valley Community Association will present a number of traffic concerns at the Citizen's Traffic Advisory Board meeting Thursday night. The items include the need for a croesing guard at Warm Springs and Valle Verde, installation of a four-way traffic stop at Nuevo and Valle Verde, and removal of a four -way stop at Navarre and Valle Verde. A four-way stop at Green Valley Parkway and La Meaa, a school-crossing at Highview and Valle Verde, early time signs for Rates McDoniel School and parking on Green Valley Parkway between Sunset and Warm Springs will also be discussed. The meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. in the conference room at Henderson City Hall, 243 Water St. Barbecue, dance to benefit injured fireman A deep-pit barbecue and country dance to benefit injured Sandy Valley Fire Chief Stan Gettle will take place beginning at 4:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 22, at the Kingston Ranch in Sandy Valley. Gettle, a 38-year-old father of five, was critically injured in an auto accident on Sept. 22 and remains in the inter mediate care unit of the University Medical Center. Gettle heads the Sandy Valley Volunteer Fire Department and has donated hundreds of houra of community service. Gettle's wife. Donna, is a part of the Emergency Medical Technician program in the Goodsprings-Sandy Valley area. Thoee who would like to contribute may take donations to the Gettle fund through First Interetate Bank, 112 Water Street, in Henderson. The country party will feature a full barbecue, the Just-Us band, dancing and door prizes. The donation, all of which goes to help pay hospital costs, is just $10. For more information, please call the Kingston Ranch at 723-5330. j COUPON 1 j SICK VACUUM I I OR I SEWING MMHINET I 91.00 Off Vaeuumtenrlee I I Rfl. t14.M) I >•• Dr. Karl at I AZ Vac & Sew i COME TO THE "COUNTRY STORr GRACE COMMUNITY CHURCH 11 so Wyoming Straat, Bouldar City FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21-9 A.M. TO $130 P.M. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22-9 A.M. TO 1 P.M. LUNONION PKIDAY IM Homemade Chicken Noodle Soup ft Oumplinga Fruit Salad, Rolla, Beverage A Fie REPRCSHMENTS STAND OPEN ALL HOURS OOTH DAVS CLOTHING HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES, HAND MADE ITEMS, CflAi^TS. CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS, HOME MADE BAKED GOODS AND MOREI ALL OUR FRIiNDS IN THi COMMUNITY ARE WBLCOMI • RINQ TNI WHOLI FAMILY ^/ tasto J^^Efc^lr^. m^-%% I miiiim ^ m ^WwO^pm^ nimUmimmmSIMillSS • laaaaae* ILOO I CASINO "A RED-HOT THRILLER... ~ New \brk Times iimimiiiHunnnaii • • HI S l SS IM IISli TOUCHSTONE >K)ME MOEO HENDERSON'S VIDEO TYME oninf 836 S. Boulder Hwy. Sf5-SSS4 Safaway Cantor •UM_n-e a. • la-ia PM a SAT la-i i nmiB 14 I You DEB ULDER aiY'S VIDEO TYME 1404 Novada Hwy. aS4>10S7 NawAAW 11-a M-TMio>a raaaATia-ie i I I B • I Rnt 2 MoviesFREE Not good aHTi any nr o"r BOULOER CITY A HENOBRSON STORES ONLY tMpkm 10/31/ai *Miai b* COUIONaaaMai vtkm I I I I BREAKFAST (Daily 11 p.m.-11 t.m.) EGOS w/BACON OR SAUSAGE.... i...' .99 JACKPOT BREAKFAST '1.69 LUNCH (Mon-Fri 11 t.m.O p.m.) BUILD-A-BURGER • .99 CHICKEN OR FISH PLATE '1.79 SALAD BAR '1.95 DINNER (Moa*Thurs 5 p.m.-10 p.in.) mm CHOICE OF ENTREES **> •2.25 mNDAT TDE8DAT Lirer if Onion* Pork Chops Chicken or Fih Heap '0' Shrimp THURSDAY Country Fried Steak Chicken or Hah WEEKENDERS FRIDAY OrovAd Sirloin Chicken or Fish PLUSt MAHPtlMIIII -Sftlad BarQiiaen'3.9$ Kiji& *4.95 O-IO p.m.) POORMANS LOBSTER 3.50 FISH FRY 3.50 (All YoM Can Ei) STEAK b SHRIMP 3.95 SATURDAY (5-10 p.m.) CRAB LEGS 6 CLAWS (1 LB.)... .•5.95 HLETftCRAB 'i.95 THE COMBOS: 2 FOR •3.95 Ribt. Ckicktn 6 Shrimp Some of Each '.4.95 SUNDAY (5-10 p.m.) 16 ox. PORTERHOUSE •4.95 FILET MIGNON '4.95 HOMESTYLE DINNER •3.50 (SUd Bar) ANHIME NEW YORK STEAK 1.95 (BrMkfoai ar DiiUMr) PEEL ii' EAT SHRIMP 1.15 HOT -N SPICY WINGS 1.25 FAMOUS "MUD PIE" n.t

PAGE 7

p others' Views ftft I Hanlaraat Ka Nawa, Handarian, Nevada Thnraday. October 20,1908 Subffllnlinum wigi plan an ugly scam Sen, Orrin Hatch of Utah aaya employera should he permitted to pay aubminimum wagea during a 90-day training period. Hia augfaation atinka. Ifa a political huatle, by Republican lawmakera to circumvent what they know ia coming: a aeriea of inrreaaeB for the federal minimum wage. Hatch wanta to eetablish an 80-percent training wage for newly hired workers for up to 90 daya. Hatch ignorea the obvioua when he aaya that entry-level newhiraa need 90 daya to come up to apeed on the job. How much training doea it take to teach a youngster how to drive a wet mop or carry out the traah or slip the houae apeciality between two pieces of brsad? Not much. You're shown one—maybe twice. If you don't have it down it h? first few minutes, you may not even finiah the ahift—forget that part about 90 daya of probation. Sen. Ted Kennedy rightly complaina that the aubminimum wage plan will let employers work new-hires at a big aavings that unfairly burdena the employee. And there would also be the temptation to replace the worker when probaton was completed. Cuatomer aervioe and merrchandiaing are rough-and-tumble buaineaaea. Only the toughest survive. Consequently, altruism has never been induatry'a atrong suit. When it comes to the employee's well-being, employers can't be counted on to do the ri^t thing—it muat be mandated by law. The smokeacreen surrounding this aubminimum wage plan makes it all perfectly clear. Kejio 0a*9tte Jounud Cleaning up the S&Ls Nobody, it aeema, likea the way the federal reguktora are cleaning up the kiaa-ridden. acandal-ridden SftL induatry. True, there'a a lot to make you uneaay about some of the deala that they ara atrildng to put the loaera out of buaineaa. The estimated coata of the cleanup keep growing. Moat of the gueaaea now range from $60 billion upward. But before you blame it all on the regulatora—the embattled Home Loan Bank Board— you have to recognise that they are dealing with a genuine financial emergency, and they are working under impoaaible political conditiona. In the three yeara aince the dimenaiona of the S&L diaaater firat began to be visible to the public, the whole government has practiced what paychiatriata call denial—the adamant refuaal to acknowledge reality. Several hundred SftLa were insolvent, but were still taking depoaita while running huge losaea. The ragulatora couldn't put them out of buaineaa becauae the deposit insurance fund was alao inaolvent and couldn't pay off the depoeitora. The reaction? The adminiatration didn't want the cost of a bailout added to the Reagan budget deficit. And too many membera of Congreaa had frienda and conaituenta whoae Skis were invovled. Aa the loaaea grew, last year the Treaaury puahed through Congreaa a plan to cloae up loeerswithout affecting the budget. At last the regulators had aomc money with which to work. Over the past summer they have rolled up doiena of wrecka. In moat caaea thy have merged the inaolvent S&La into healthy onea. To induce the healthy institutions to cooperate. the home Loan Bank Board haa guaranteed them againat loaaa on the queationable loana that they take over. TUa kind of subsidised takeover uaually involvea only a email outlay of federal money now. But the future liabilitiea are aometimea huge, and often incalculable. Thoee liabilitiea now come to many Ulliona of dollara, a cauae of riaing anxiety in both the adminiatration and Congreaa. The Bank Board could have avoided them by, say, aimply abutting down the inaolventa and paying off the depositora. But payouta count aa federal apending, and any aggreeaive reaort to them wouki have puahed the deficit ovw the Onunm-RudmanHollinga limit, reaulting in automatic cuta in both defenae and social programa. Neither the White Houae nor the congreaaional leaderahip would hae welcomed that. Or th Bank Board could have aat on ita handa thia aummer. WouM that have been better? In the last quarter, Mardi throui^ June, the 497 inaolvent SftLa ran a total loaa of $4.6 billionfive times aa much aa the eaminga of all 2,696 aolvent S&La put together. Thoae ere loaaea that the taxpayers are eventually going to have to meet, and to let them keep running would be crazy. The regulatora' deala aometimea leave a lot to be deaired. But they are working under limits that are the reault of much procraatination at the White Houae, the treaaury and the Capital—procraatination, and an urgent deaire to alide through one more election without talking candidly and realiatically about the SAL diaaater. Illegitimacy rate on the rise in tlie USSR; abortion still primary method of birth control By Annette Bohr While Americans wrestle with conflicting claima of morality that pit the right to life of the unborn against the mother's right of choice, Soviet women practice abortion aa a matter of courae. The unavailability of oontracap* tives coupled with general aexual illiteracy haa led to an abortion rate that ia several timea the oountry'a birthrate, u well as to an increaaa in the number of illegitimate birtha. Publicly expreaaad Soviet concern an ac qante statiatica to back that flonoam ara a few phenomenon pf giaaoo9t .;: Owing to changea in the :pMicy of the USSR State Committee for Statistics, figures for the number of children bom to women who are not legally married have been officially puUiahed for the firat time in Soviet hiatory. Illegitimate birth ia increaaing at twice the rate of legitimate birth in the USSR, with nearly every tenth child bom out of wedlock in 1987. The veteran Soviet demographer Victor Perevedentaev aacribea the riaing trand of bearing children without the benefit of marriage to "ih* liberalization of aexual morality and to the exceptionally poor situation with regard to contraceptives." "Without any doubt," he said. "many illegitimate children were not 'planned' by their mothera." To be sure, a recent article in the magazine Ogonyok by Andni Popov, a medi mate mayor of the District of ColumUa. Waahington waa a total wan! of Coagraaaat the time-legialatively ataflad, teaaed and abuaad by • Houae committee dominated by lawmakera from rural racially aagragatad diatricta in the aouth. A amaller ocnatarpart oonmittae in the Senate waa made up of junior aaamba n w i t h no graait anthuaiaam for their aaa i g nmen t either. So it wu that San. Bibla waa tapped aa chairman of the Senate nMrietConmittaa in 1968. Ha found himaalf in the forafroat of a hona nk itruiiU in which ha tod the dty. thoughtfully ud oeMoiantiefMly, through one of the moat important |rrT"g" in ita Uatocy. Par 11 yaara, San. Bttito pnaided ovw haaiiBga on every ooBoaivabla lagialativa propoial involving thia dty, from fixaa ia oiinor local kwa to tha birth and growth of greater Waahingtcn'a anhway ayatam—hia pride-and to construction of tha Capital Battway, tha BhiaPlaina sewage tnataant plant (a nodal fhoihtgr that bainn a dramatic ctoaaup of tha Potomac Rifv), DttUaa Aiipart. tha Kaaaady Caatar and RFK Stadium. Ow IMlihlkf ladiMttontijtnrhinnnnanMnfrr naiitnti dtic oTfaaiMtioBa aad tha nan who wan appointed by laaiiriantBtnharr rmmmir'^r'^tA.*,yyi^kin/>wM idk ha fBidad aatf-fBvaramaat billa throngh tha Senate thraa teM-aaily • aaa tlMB Uoakad by tha Hovn. Thoogh thaaa idwsaaaayalharBaaatoraofftibaDiitriotCaa' Bibb ooatiaiM to aafBtiato with Honaa manban, niiriBi to maka D.C. lagialataoa man aooaptahla la Iba wlahM pMpl9 H imaM affect After WaaUagloadaaa idk^lBVli.hafBttha8MlatDl0nrtbaYoliBfafBtalS. Neaa of thta MMsd ta ahtthaDfa Ban. BMB** pdMiy ta tha paopb or Nevada, who kapt hia ia tha Nevadans liable for the welfare of wild horses ^_ „hllh.HakftWaihiBftaDhaviBfaanadtha pallladaud nipiet of eMaaoa af tha capital d^. Ha died kalMaodayatthaafaalTI. Wi Some 41 wild horaee were shot to death in a grialy crime discovered in an iaolatad area outaide of Auatin, and the fMeral Bureau of Land Management ia receiving crltioiam—moatly unwarranted—becauae of the way the incident wu handled. A group called Wild Horae Organised Aaaiatanoe oomplaina of delay and confuaion on the part of the BLM. But coaddating the vaat expanaea of territory to be patrolled in Nevada, and the limited number of personnel woriting hara for tha BLM, the ra^Kmae time doea not aaam exoaaaiva or ini^ypcopriato. The BLM haa, in fact, aoond a ooupU of nutjor auooaaaaa in capturing and oonvictiiig gun-wialdiag UUan of wild honaa. One inddant took place at Mount Chariaatoa, near Laa Vagaa, and the other near FaDoo. Ancaymoua tipa and orimaaoana inveatigatian raoultad in tha oonvictiona. Upon examining the BLM*a dilemma, it ia not dear that putting additional agaata in tha fiokl would reduce the auaihar of inddanto. A auapact dairying a gun in tha wild ia not adequate evidence that a crime haa bean ocounittad, and doea not provide adequate grounda for axnat A conviction, whan it cooMa, ia achieved throu^ eyewitneaa raporta, and troax oU-faahionad alauthiaf—finding eridenoe that tiaa a wapoa to the crime and plaoaa tha auapact at the aoane. BLM ampkyaaa have wide and oonaidanbly varied raaponaibilitiaa aa cuatodiana of public landa and public pnqtarty. Caring for tha health and waD4>aing of aooa of tha natioo'a principal wild hone harda ia only one facet Thaj muat alao deal with thiavaa and vandala in Amariran ladian burial grounda, recreation areaa and in varioua mining and grasing allotmanta. BLM spokaaman Bob Stewart, without wiahing to diminiah the gravity of the horae-ahooting inddant, pbinte out that criminal aaaault against wiki horaee ia only one of a long liat of law-enforcement haadachea BLM offldala have to deal with regularly in Nevada. However, killing wild hor a ee ia a federal offanaa puniahaUe with heafty flnaa and two-year priaon tarma. And the moat effective tod for achiaviag cooviotiona, aoooording to Stewart, iathainfanaant anonymonaorotharwiaa.Tothatand,animd righta' groupa an taking affaotiva aotioo by poeting rewards f or inf omatioD laadiBf to tha anaat and ooBvlelioa of paq>la raapondbla for wild horae daatha aaar AuatiB. The violaaoe and brutality of thia lataet inddant, and othan Uka it reflect badly upon Nevada raddaata. Americana living in every part of tha country an intanaaly intaraatad in tha fata, futon and continued wall-being of tha horae herds in Nevada. People a4io have never aat foot in thia atato take a proprietary intarart in tha wiki horae harda. Tliaaa paopla. rii^t encii^, aae Nevadana aa da facto cuatodiana of wild horaaa, and thay fad let down and diaappoiatad whan things go wrong. Raddaata of tha other 49 alataa help pay tha taxaa that pay tha billa for the wiU horaaa. We can protect thia invaatmant— thain and ours—fay kaaping an ya padad whan out and about, and fatting to a jdiona vdion wa aae aooBathing going wnaff on the public landa. OaaaMa tlawaaf Tharaday. Oeteber 30,1968 Henderiea Heme Newa, Haaderaea Nevada Page T, ^ >M GREEN VALLEY NEWS Green Valley celebrates 10th anniversary Citizen's Board to hear GV traffic concerns By Paul Saydeiko Hme ;Vews Staff Writer Green Valley will celebrate ita 10th anniversary with a community picnic from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday at Silver Sprinp Park. TTie American Nevada Corp., founder and main developer of the Green Valley community, will provide hot dogs, drinks, birthday cakes and entertainment. All Green Valley reaidenta are invited to bring their own picnic and blanket. The Basic High School MCJROTC color guard will open the event and the Into the Fire skydiving team will parachute into the park. The UNLV Dixieland band, the Warhurton Family Blue Grass hand and the Las Vegas Chapter of the Sweet Adelines are all scheduled to perform throughout the afternoon. Nate Mack and Estes McDoniel studenta will display a mural which will eventually be put in the Green Valley Library. As part of the celebration, picnic-goers and other reddenta are invited to submit their favorite recipes which will be included in a commemorative Green Valley cookbook, to be available in time for the holidays. An outdoor brunch for invited guests will be held at 11:30 a.m. Monday in a tent set up outaide the new Green Valley Information Center in front of the Athletic Club. Lt. Gov. Bob Miller will proclaim "Green Valley Week" and Henderson Mayor Lorna Americana Group hosts Halloween party Spooks and goblinR will abound this year at the third annual Green Valley Community Hauoween Celebration, hosted by the Americana Group, Realtors from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m, Saturday, Oct. 29. at Americana's Green Valley offiJ*. 2551 North Green Valley Parkway. The celebration, open to all who love Halloween, is sponsored by the Americana Group Realtora, Richmond American Homes, ^Stewart Title of Nevada, City-Fed Mortgage. Valley Mortgage Inc., First American Title (>)., Pacific Firat Mortgage, CitiBank of Nevada and Nevada Title Co. Hot dogs, caramel apples and homemade goodiea will be in abundance to please palates and satisfy everyone's sweet tooth. Regularly scheduled drawings will be held throughout the afternoon and prizes will include, among other things: Better Homee and Gardens rookbookft, dinners at participating restauranta, flowers and and gift certificates from beauty salons, eto. Radio station KRLV 106.5 FM will be on-site broadcasting continuous soft hito live during the party. Parenta and children alike are encouraged to wear costumes. Childran ages 3-12 are also encouraged to enter the pumpkin-carving contest, which will be judged during the celebration. Pumpkins may be picked up at the Americana office from Oct. 23-28. Children may carve them an they wish, then bring them to the party, The best entries will win trophies, ribbons and gift certificates. For more information, call the Americana Group at 458-8888. Kesterson is also expected to attend. The center, which officially opens Wednesday, will display maps showing the progress of Green Valley. Mark Fine, president of the American Nevada Corp., is expected to make an announcement regarding future developmente in Green Valley at the reception. Since its inception in 1978, the master-planned community has grown to a population of approximately 17,000, and will eventually be home to 60.000 to 70.000 residento. The 8,400 acres which make up Green Valley encompass a total of 18 residential projecta built to date, with another 21 currently under development. "This is a milestone in the development of Green Valley," Fine said. "What began as a concept has grown and is continuing to develop with the construction of the Village of Silver Springs. Green Valley will continue to provide an environment that combines a residential setting with culture and education." The Green Valley Community Association will present a number of traffic concerns at the Citizen's Traffic Advisory Board meeting Thursday night. The items include the need for a croesing guard at Warm Springs and Valle Verde, installation of a four-way traffic stop at Nuevo and Valle Verde, and removal of a four -way stop at Navarre and Valle Verde. A four-way stop at Green Valley Parkway and La Meaa, a school-crossing at Highview and Valle Verde, early time signs for Rates McDoniel School and parking on Green Valley Parkway between Sunset and Warm Springs will also be discussed. The meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. in the conference room at Henderson City Hall, 243 Water St. Barbecue, dance to benefit injured fireman A deep-pit barbecue and country dance to benefit injured Sandy Valley Fire Chief Stan Gettle will take place beginning at 4:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 22, at the Kingston Ranch in Sandy Valley. Gettle, a 38-year-old father of five, was critically injured in an auto accident on Sept. 22 and remains in the inter mediate care unit of the University Medical Center. Gettle heads the Sandy Valley Volunteer Fire Department and has donated hundreds of houra of community service. Gettle's wife. Donna, is a part of the Emergency Medical Technician program in the Goodsprings-Sandy Valley area. Thoee who would like to contribute may take donations to the Gettle fund through First Interetate Bank, 112 Water Street, in Henderson. The country party will feature a full barbecue, the Just-Us band, dancing and door prizes. The donation, all of which goes to help pay hospital costs, is just $10. For more information, please call the Kingston Ranch at 723-5330. j COUPON 1 j SICK VACUUM I I OR I SEWING MMHINET I 91.00 Off Vaeuumtenrlee I I Rfl. t14.M) I >•• Dr. Karl at I AZ Vac & Sew i COME TO THE "COUNTRY STORr GRACE COMMUNITY CHURCH 11 so Wyoming Straat, Bouldar City FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21-9 A.M. TO $130 P.M. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22-9 A.M. TO 1 P.M. LUNONION PKIDAY IM Homemade Chicken Noodle Soup ft Oumplinga Fruit Salad, Rolla, Beverage A Fie REPRCSHMENTS STAND OPEN ALL HOURS OOTH DAVS CLOTHING HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES, HAND MADE ITEMS, CflAi^TS. CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS, HOME MADE BAKED GOODS AND MOREI ALL OUR FRIiNDS IN THi COMMUNITY ARE WBLCOMI • RINQ TNI WHOLI FAMILY ^/ tasto J^^Efc^lr^. m^-%% I miiiim ^ m ^WwO^pm^ nimUmimmmSIMillSS • laaaaae* ILOO I CASINO "A RED-HOT THRILLER... ~ New \brk Times iimimiiiHunnnaii • • HI S l SS IM IISli TOUCHSTONE >K)ME MOEO HENDERSON'S VIDEO TYME oninf 836 S. Boulder Hwy. Sf5-SSS4 Safaway Cantor •UM_n-e a. • la-ia PM a SAT la-i i nmiB 14 I You DEB ULDER aiY'S VIDEO TYME 1404 Novada Hwy. aS4>10S7 NawAAW 11-a M-TMio>a raaaATia-ie i I I B • I Rnt 2 MoviesFREE Not good aHTi any nr o"r BOULOER CITY A HENOBRSON STORES ONLY tMpkm 10/31/ai *Miai b* COUIONaaaMai vtkm I I I I BREAKFAST (Daily 11 p.m.-11 t.m.) EGOS w/BACON OR SAUSAGE.... i...' .99 JACKPOT BREAKFAST '1.69 LUNCH (Mon-Fri 11 t.m.O p.m.) BUILD-A-BURGER • .99 CHICKEN OR FISH PLATE '1.79 SALAD BAR '1.95 DINNER (Moa*Thurs 5 p.m.-10 p.in.) mm CHOICE OF ENTREES **> •2.25 mNDAT TDE8DAT Lirer if Onion* Pork Chops Chicken or Fih Heap '0' Shrimp THURSDAY Country Fried Steak Chicken or Hah WEEKENDERS FRIDAY OrovAd Sirloin Chicken or Fish PLUSt MAHPtlMIIII -Sftlad BarQiiaen'3.9$ Kiji& *4.95 O-IO p.m.) POORMANS LOBSTER 3.50 FISH FRY 3.50 (All YoM Can Ei) STEAK b SHRIMP 3.95 SATURDAY (5-10 p.m.) CRAB LEGS 6 CLAWS (1 LB.)... .•5.95 HLETftCRAB 'i.95 THE COMBOS: 2 FOR •3.95 Ribt. Ckicktn 6 Shrimp Some of Each '.4.95 SUNDAY (5-10 p.m.) 16 ox. PORTERHOUSE •4.95 FILET MIGNON '4.95 HOMESTYLE DINNER •3.50 (SUd Bar) ANHIME NEW YORK STEAK 1.95 (BrMkfoai ar DiiUMr) PEEL ii' EAT SHRIMP 1.15 HOT -N SPICY WINGS 1.25 FAMOUS "MUD PIE" n.t

PAGE 8

m^ Paga t llandarsaa Hema Nawi, Handerion, Navida Tharwlay, October 20, IMS ) Thirtday, Ootober 9n iqgg OLD—A>fD THE NEW—A Pittman area landmark gave way to progreaa last week. Most of the people in Henderson had grown so used to the old Skyline Casino pole sign, above, that, when the casino's bold new sign, right, was erected, the area seemed completely empty without it. The old sign dated to 1964, nearly 26 years ago. Its name was changed briefly from Skyline to Wheel and then back again. The sign has been revamped and relamped and installed just down Boulder Highway at the Sky Motel. 'Smithsonian Worid' fascinating new stories Public television's Emmy Award-winning 'Smithsonian world' entars its fourth season with five new specials. Premiering at 8 p.m., Monday, Oct. 24 on channel 10, the first episode offers an inside look at the Smithsonian and the people involved in its enormous range of activities in Washington, D.C., and around the world. "The Living Smithsonian" celebrates the people committed to creating museums that relect the aspirations and accomplishments of the American people. The program brings the Smithsonian to life with a kaleidoscope of music, science, aviation, lustory, and art—and footage from the colorful Folklife Festival on the Mall in Washington, D.C., which culminates on the Fourth of July. Great American Craft Fair comes to Cashman Field The Second Annual Great American Craft Fair retiuns to Las Vegas tomorrow through Oct. 23 at Cashman Field Center. The works of more than 100 artists and craftspeople from throughout the West will be featured. Hours for the show will be 12 noon to 9 p.m!, Friday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., Saturday, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. The Great American Craft Fair is sponsored by KRLV 106.5 FM. Among the exhibitors for this year's show will be Las Vegas artist Darlene Chino. Chino will display her authentic Acoma pottery in a variety of forms including windbells, animal figurines and Christmas ornaments. Chino, an American Indian, grew up in the Acoma pueblo. a centuries-old village in New Mexico and has been making the Acoma pottery native to that region for over 15 years. Her works are made from highquahty commercial white clay, kiln-fired and then handpainted. A different type of Indian art will be featured in the sandpaintings of San Diego artist Riley Johnston. Johnston bases his work on the ancient sand paintings done by the Navajo Indians as a part of their religious medical rituals. According to Johnston, in the rituals sandpaintings were done on the floor of a medicineman's hogan while the sick person and the medicineman chanted together. The sick person would then sit in the middle of the painting and destroy it thus destroying the "evil spirits" that caused the sickness. In his paintings. Johnston follows the Navajo tradition of making a deliberate mistakes in all of his works, out of rospect for the Navajo belief that "only the Great Spirit is perfect." All of his paintings are done in sands colored by Johnston himself. To add a holiday flavor to the show, the Great American Craft Fair will also feature handmade pine cone, shell and teddy bear wreaths by Sheryl Cecchettini. Cecchettini began making the pine cone wreaths eight years ago. As a hiker and member of the Sierra Club, she found collecting the cones to be "a kind of therapy." Since then. Cecchettini has added a line of shell wreaths and as well as the teddy bear wreaths to her inventory. She also designs an assortment of wooden ornaments and natural cone cornucopias, Call for a quote. Take a minute and compare AUstate for value. You may find we can save you some money on your home or auto insurance. Call me today... it'll only take a minute. ^... Charles Stoebe 62M Mtn. VUU Suite E nreen Vlly iNrit U Ethtl Ml 456-8111 AUilat* Iniurince Comptn] Have you met this Agent? to know him. He hn the answers lo your iniiirance problerrn — Auio. (iff, Bij\irM>ss, Homiv He may save you money, loo. Call him soon. Rieh Baughman Inuuranet Agnl 398^860 299-1008 BOULDER CITY TRAVEL 806 Buchanan Blvd. Suite 107 j^vU ^^ 293-3807 Bouldar City • FREE TICKET DELIVERY • PASSPORT PHOTOS AVAILABLE MOO.Oae Ptighl Inturane* FfKE with any alrMn* tlchal purehtMd Monf-ri 8'am to 5 30 p m • Sat 9 a m to 2 p IT\ ENJOY SUMMER DOWN UNDER!! Australia 16 Day Reef Explorer^ From SSr£!#4 'Par Parton • Ooubl* .^ Includea Roundtrip Air from Los Angeles, 14 Nights Accommodations (Including 2 Nights in Sydney), Most Meals, Luxury Motor Coach Tour from Cairns to Sydney, and Some Wonderful Additional Highlightsl TAHrfrSPEcfAL 7 Day Moorea from S82S*p*rPtrMnDoubi Includes Roundtrip Air from Los Angeles, plus 5 Nights Accommodations at Moorea Lagoon A^I^^P Shannon S584 ^HB^ Dublin S614* ^W ^^^^^r Roundtrip Air Q— Two-For-Onc Companion Tickets for Flrit and Business Cia Travaitars 'TM Extra RnntetlOM Apply TUESDAY IS LADIES NIGHT FREE DRINKS (All Ladles) EVERY TUESDAY NIGHT 7-9 P.M. .il^tlt ct^ ^^ A FREE GIFT FOR EVERY LADY 50's & 60's MUSIC AND POPULAR REQUESTS BY KENNY MULLINEX SILVER SPUR 46 WATER STREET • HENDERSON 56S-3378 VIDEO FLIC o o CO JACKS BACK ELLIOTT KASTNER/ANDRE BLAY In Association With PALISADES PICTURES Present A CASSIAN ELWES PRODUCTION A ROWDY HERRINGTON FILM JACK'S BACK' Starring JAMES SPADER CYNTHIA GIBB Production Designer PIERS PLOWDEN Edited by HARRY B MILLER III N^usic by DAN DiPAOLA Director of Photography SHELLY lOHNSON Produced by TIM MOORE & CASSIAN ELWES Written and Directed by ROWDY HERRINGTON Copynhl cm; b\ PALKVOI S (NlfKTAINMfNI i.KOIJP iNi. • *•. All art M copyngMM and may only b* reproduced M it TM t c igM Pvtmogn) ^lolum Co)f Ml RtgfMt MncrvM One hundred years ago, lack The Ripper slashed his way throuch Londoh% red Flcht district And now. a modern day maniac is honoring the event by mutilating LA's ladies of the evening. So how come lack's Back? The police are stumped The hookers are scared. And the only man with a chance of toMng the crimes has problems of his own—hes the number one suspect. lames Spader [Prtlty In Pink. Bd^y Bam. VMil SirrrtI and CyntMa Cibb {Mpdern Cirfsl are superb as the hunter and the hunted In this exceltent mystery thriller. For The Best Pic Come To Video Flic HeiM Movies • VHS 0ly Low Prices CoMpltte Slction VCR Rcntala 8Se BouktorHwy. (Smithi CmHr) 565-7793 \ Hm^iritn Hgint Ntwi, l1tB4triM, Ntvadi Ptf g • PASSIVE EXERCISE-LMUI Machine Toning Cmtw HMUianr Monies Stewart dmnonatrataa the atretch Uble, one of aU Hadth Tona laomatric Toning TaUaa the fndUty offara. Passive exercise at Lean IVIacliine The Lean Machine Toning Canter, 36 E. Baaic Road, Suite B, introduced six pgeaive exercise machines to the Henderson area earlier this month. Each of the Health Tone Isometric Toning Tables emphasize a different area of the body wliile stimulating circulation, improving flexibility and breaking down fatty cellulite deposits. A circulation table stimulates the entire body and ita circulation system. A 10-minute session on the vibrating table equals three miles jogging in ita effects on the circulation system. A sandbag table works the Sunshine Generation sintffng offered The Henderson Parks and Recreation Department is currently taking registration for the 1988 Suiishine Generation singing program at Silver Springs Center, 1951 Robindale. The Sunshine Generation offers classes for ages three to five years, six to eight years, and nine to 12 years. Classes are held on Wednesday and Thursday. Classes are limited. For more information, call 435-3814. SOUND ADVICE By Jim Carlson Hearing Aid ^ Specialist What causes hearing impairmeBt? Factors other than simple aging may contributa to hearing impairment, including nnige expoeure, injury, medication, disease, and heredity. In today's world there is increased noiae in the workplace and in our environment. Decreased hearing ability may be the price we've paid for progress in an industrialized society. Head injury or stroke may cause permanent damage to our hearing. Antibiotics luch as itreptomycin and erythromycin, diuretics, and large doaagee of aspirin can be ototoxic—a term used to describe medications that can damage the structures of the inner oar. Heart or kidney disease, disbetae, emphysema, or stroke may disrupt blood flow to the inner ear, causing permanent hearing loss. (Continued next week with a series of hearing tests.) Offering servicing ot mast units whether Miracle Ear or Bot, we want you to enjoy this Hobday Seaaon. For your complimentary hmxing evaluation, call us at 293-7946 '% Miracle-Ear* IIOOAMtONAer. ieyt4t \^ CALL TODAY! abdomen and hipa, uiing a 17-pound aandbag for isometric reaiatance. A itratch table tonea everything from the hipbonea up, including the upper back, arms, cheat musclea. midriff and abdomen. A leg table, waiat-trimmer and waist-hip-tummy table conclude the average 60-minute "no sweat" workout. The store, managed by Monica Stewart, offers a free flrat-time visit and a special opening discount. It also selli men's and women's sportswear. Junior Junction Pre-Schooi opens A laati F^ Railroad cabooae is the eanierpiece of the new Junior Junction Pre-Sohool which opened Monday. "I like traina," aaid the ichoora director Jolynne Ba^ num. She aearched more than JUNIOR JUNCTION-A • ante Fe Railroad cabooae la the focal point for the Junior Junction a year for a train to be the focal Preschool, which opeaeii Monday. point for the ichool. The cabooae, purchaaed from a dealer in Barstow, Calif., will be restored and painted. Located at 101 W. Chapa^ ral. the achool was built in a train depot motif. Bamum will introduce threeand four-year-olds to apeciflc units, colon, numbera, the alphabet, food groupa, community helpers and will alao include field tripa as part of the curriculum. The school offers two twoand-a-half hour seasiona five daya a week. Parenta can choose either a twice-a-week or three-times-a-week schedule. A grand opening celebration and walk-through was held last Saturday. Bamum is assisted by teacher Monica McDonald and aide Dawna Gubler. — yc^'Jl' A 11 wed — DEUCES WILD 5C-25C Video Poker Machines THE SKYLINE CASINO & RESTAURANT Sunset & Boulder Hwy. UNIVERSITY REGENT CANDIDATE LONNIE HAMMARGREN Cordially invites ALL THE VOTERS, to his home for an OPEN HOUSE & POTLUCK PICNIC BRING YOUR KIDSI Sunday Afternoon October 23, 1988 1-5 p.nn. Casa del Sol 4318 Ridgecrest Drive t X X e : ; • e e e : : : e Eclectic Ent9rtMlnment Potluck PIcnlcklng^Brlng a DIah An Opportunity to holp Shapo tha Futura of Navada I am honored that the Nevada Faculty Alliance statewide \ has chosen to endorse me in this Regent's race. I am most interested in enlisting your ideas in my planning and your involvement in my race. By having you to my house, I can share with you my enthusiasm for learning, rangng from the space program to archeology. w E Lon'i HomeiB tht 2nd k 3rd houae, South of the only Paradise Great entrance from Sandhill My Home Phone ia 461-8444 ••'-^ No Need to RSVP : AAUP # • Nevada Faculty Alliance ; ••••••••••••••••••••••••••fee

PAGE 9

m^ Paga t llandarsaa Hema Nawi, Handerion, Navida Tharwlay, October 20, IMS ) Thirtday, Ootober 9n iqgg OLD—A>fD THE NEW—A Pittman area landmark gave way to progreaa last week. Most of the people in Henderson had grown so used to the old Skyline Casino pole sign, above, that, when the casino's bold new sign, right, was erected, the area seemed completely empty without it. The old sign dated to 1964, nearly 26 years ago. Its name was changed briefly from Skyline to Wheel and then back again. The sign has been revamped and relamped and installed just down Boulder Highway at the Sky Motel. 'Smithsonian Worid' fascinating new stories Public television's Emmy Award-winning 'Smithsonian world' entars its fourth season with five new specials. Premiering at 8 p.m., Monday, Oct. 24 on channel 10, the first episode offers an inside look at the Smithsonian and the people involved in its enormous range of activities in Washington, D.C., and around the world. "The Living Smithsonian" celebrates the people committed to creating museums that relect the aspirations and accomplishments of the American people. The program brings the Smithsonian to life with a kaleidoscope of music, science, aviation, lustory, and art—and footage from the colorful Folklife Festival on the Mall in Washington, D.C., which culminates on the Fourth of July. Great American Craft Fair comes to Cashman Field The Second Annual Great American Craft Fair retiuns to Las Vegas tomorrow through Oct. 23 at Cashman Field Center. The works of more than 100 artists and craftspeople from throughout the West will be featured. Hours for the show will be 12 noon to 9 p.m!, Friday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., Saturday, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. The Great American Craft Fair is sponsored by KRLV 106.5 FM. Among the exhibitors for this year's show will be Las Vegas artist Darlene Chino. Chino will display her authentic Acoma pottery in a variety of forms including windbells, animal figurines and Christmas ornaments. Chino, an American Indian, grew up in the Acoma pueblo. a centuries-old village in New Mexico and has been making the Acoma pottery native to that region for over 15 years. Her works are made from highquahty commercial white clay, kiln-fired and then handpainted. A different type of Indian art will be featured in the sandpaintings of San Diego artist Riley Johnston. Johnston bases his work on the ancient sand paintings done by the Navajo Indians as a part of their religious medical rituals. According to Johnston, in the rituals sandpaintings were done on the floor of a medicineman's hogan while the sick person and the medicineman chanted together. The sick person would then sit in the middle of the painting and destroy it thus destroying the "evil spirits" that caused the sickness. In his paintings. Johnston follows the Navajo tradition of making a deliberate mistakes in all of his works, out of rospect for the Navajo belief that "only the Great Spirit is perfect." All of his paintings are done in sands colored by Johnston himself. To add a holiday flavor to the show, the Great American Craft Fair will also feature handmade pine cone, shell and teddy bear wreaths by Sheryl Cecchettini. Cecchettini began making the pine cone wreaths eight years ago. As a hiker and member of the Sierra Club, she found collecting the cones to be "a kind of therapy." Since then. Cecchettini has added a line of shell wreaths and as well as the teddy bear wreaths to her inventory. She also designs an assortment of wooden ornaments and natural cone cornucopias, Call for a quote. Take a minute and compare AUstate for value. You may find we can save you some money on your home or auto insurance. Call me today... it'll only take a minute. ^... Charles Stoebe 62M Mtn. VUU Suite E nreen Vlly iNrit U Ethtl Ml 456-8111 AUilat* Iniurince Comptn] Have you met this Agent? to know him. He hn the answers lo your iniiirance problerrn — Auio. (iff, Bij\irM>ss, Homiv He may save you money, loo. Call him soon. Rieh Baughman Inuuranet Agnl 398^860 299-1008 BOULDER CITY TRAVEL 806 Buchanan Blvd. Suite 107 j^vU ^^ 293-3807 Bouldar City • FREE TICKET DELIVERY • PASSPORT PHOTOS AVAILABLE MOO.Oae Ptighl Inturane* FfKE with any alrMn* tlchal purehtMd Monf-ri 8'am to 5 30 p m • Sat 9 a m to 2 p IT\ ENJOY SUMMER DOWN UNDER!! Australia 16 Day Reef Explorer^ From SSr£!#4 'Par Parton • Ooubl* .^ Includea Roundtrip Air from Los Angeles, 14 Nights Accommodations (Including 2 Nights in Sydney), Most Meals, Luxury Motor Coach Tour from Cairns to Sydney, and Some Wonderful Additional Highlightsl TAHrfrSPEcfAL 7 Day Moorea from S82S*p*rPtrMnDoubi Includes Roundtrip Air from Los Angeles, plus 5 Nights Accommodations at Moorea Lagoon A^I^^P Shannon S584 ^HB^ Dublin S614* ^W ^^^^^r Roundtrip Air Q— Two-For-Onc Companion Tickets for Flrit and Business Cia Travaitars 'TM Extra RnntetlOM Apply TUESDAY IS LADIES NIGHT FREE DRINKS (All Ladles) EVERY TUESDAY NIGHT 7-9 P.M. .il^tlt ct^ ^^ A FREE GIFT FOR EVERY LADY 50's & 60's MUSIC AND POPULAR REQUESTS BY KENNY MULLINEX SILVER SPUR 46 WATER STREET • HENDERSON 56S-3378 VIDEO FLIC o o CO JACKS BACK ELLIOTT KASTNER/ANDRE BLAY In Association With PALISADES PICTURES Present A CASSIAN ELWES PRODUCTION A ROWDY HERRINGTON FILM JACK'S BACK' Starring JAMES SPADER CYNTHIA GIBB Production Designer PIERS PLOWDEN Edited by HARRY B MILLER III N^usic by DAN DiPAOLA Director of Photography SHELLY lOHNSON Produced by TIM MOORE & CASSIAN ELWES Written and Directed by ROWDY HERRINGTON Copynhl cm; b\ PALKVOI S (NlfKTAINMfNI i.KOIJP iNi. • *•. All art M copyngMM and may only b* reproduced M it TM t c igM Pvtmogn) ^lolum Co)f Ml RtgfMt MncrvM One hundred years ago, lack The Ripper slashed his way throuch Londoh% red Flcht district And now. a modern day maniac is honoring the event by mutilating LA's ladies of the evening. So how come lack's Back? The police are stumped The hookers are scared. And the only man with a chance of toMng the crimes has problems of his own—hes the number one suspect. lames Spader [Prtlty In Pink. Bd^y Bam. VMil SirrrtI and CyntMa Cibb {Mpdern Cirfsl are superb as the hunter and the hunted In this exceltent mystery thriller. For The Best Pic Come To Video Flic HeiM Movies • VHS 0ly Low Prices CoMpltte Slction VCR Rcntala 8Se BouktorHwy. (Smithi CmHr) 565-7793 \ Hm^iritn Hgint Ntwi, l1tB4triM, Ntvadi Ptf g • PASSIVE EXERCISE-LMUI Machine Toning Cmtw HMUianr Monies Stewart dmnonatrataa the atretch Uble, one of aU Hadth Tona laomatric Toning TaUaa the fndUty offara. Passive exercise at Lean IVIacliine The Lean Machine Toning Canter, 36 E. Baaic Road, Suite B, introduced six pgeaive exercise machines to the Henderson area earlier this month. Each of the Health Tone Isometric Toning Tables emphasize a different area of the body wliile stimulating circulation, improving flexibility and breaking down fatty cellulite deposits. A circulation table stimulates the entire body and ita circulation system. A 10-minute session on the vibrating table equals three miles jogging in ita effects on the circulation system. A sandbag table works the Sunshine Generation sintffng offered The Henderson Parks and Recreation Department is currently taking registration for the 1988 Suiishine Generation singing program at Silver Springs Center, 1951 Robindale. The Sunshine Generation offers classes for ages three to five years, six to eight years, and nine to 12 years. Classes are held on Wednesday and Thursday. Classes are limited. For more information, call 435-3814. SOUND ADVICE By Jim Carlson Hearing Aid ^ Specialist What causes hearing impairmeBt? Factors other than simple aging may contributa to hearing impairment, including nnige expoeure, injury, medication, disease, and heredity. In today's world there is increased noiae in the workplace and in our environment. Decreased hearing ability may be the price we've paid for progress in an industrialized society. Head injury or stroke may cause permanent damage to our hearing. Antibiotics luch as itreptomycin and erythromycin, diuretics, and large doaagee of aspirin can be ototoxic—a term used to describe medications that can damage the structures of the inner oar. Heart or kidney disease, disbetae, emphysema, or stroke may disrupt blood flow to the inner ear, causing permanent hearing loss. (Continued next week with a series of hearing tests.) Offering servicing ot mast units whether Miracle Ear or Bot, we want you to enjoy this Hobday Seaaon. For your complimentary hmxing evaluation, call us at 293-7946 '% Miracle-Ear* IIOOAMtONAer. ieyt4t \^ CALL TODAY! abdomen and hipa, uiing a 17-pound aandbag for isometric reaiatance. A itratch table tonea everything from the hipbonea up, including the upper back, arms, cheat musclea. midriff and abdomen. A leg table, waiat-trimmer and waist-hip-tummy table conclude the average 60-minute "no sweat" workout. The store, managed by Monica Stewart, offers a free flrat-time visit and a special opening discount. It also selli men's and women's sportswear. Junior Junction Pre-Schooi opens A laati F^ Railroad cabooae is the eanierpiece of the new Junior Junction Pre-Sohool which opened Monday. "I like traina," aaid the ichoora director Jolynne Ba^ num. She aearched more than JUNIOR JUNCTION-A • ante Fe Railroad cabooae la the focal point for the Junior Junction a year for a train to be the focal Preschool, which opeaeii Monday. point for the ichool. The cabooae, purchaaed from a dealer in Barstow, Calif., will be restored and painted. Located at 101 W. Chapa^ ral. the achool was built in a train depot motif. Bamum will introduce threeand four-year-olds to apeciflc units, colon, numbera, the alphabet, food groupa, community helpers and will alao include field tripa as part of the curriculum. The school offers two twoand-a-half hour seasiona five daya a week. Parenta can choose either a twice-a-week or three-times-a-week schedule. A grand opening celebration and walk-through was held last Saturday. Bamum is assisted by teacher Monica McDonald and aide Dawna Gubler. — yc^'Jl' A 11 wed — DEUCES WILD 5C-25C Video Poker Machines THE SKYLINE CASINO & RESTAURANT Sunset & Boulder Hwy. UNIVERSITY REGENT CANDIDATE LONNIE HAMMARGREN Cordially invites ALL THE VOTERS, to his home for an OPEN HOUSE & POTLUCK PICNIC BRING YOUR KIDSI Sunday Afternoon October 23, 1988 1-5 p.nn. Casa del Sol 4318 Ridgecrest Drive t X X e : ; • e e e : : : e Eclectic Ent9rtMlnment Potluck PIcnlcklng^Brlng a DIah An Opportunity to holp Shapo tha Futura of Navada I am honored that the Nevada Faculty Alliance statewide \ has chosen to endorse me in this Regent's race. I am most interested in enlisting your ideas in my planning and your involvement in my race. By having you to my house, I can share with you my enthusiasm for learning, rangng from the space program to archeology. w E Lon'i HomeiB tht 2nd k 3rd houae, South of the only Paradise Great entrance from Sandhill My Home Phone ia 461-8444 ••'-^ No Need to RSVP : AAUP # • Nevada Faculty Alliance ; ••••••••••••••••••••••••••fee

PAGE 10

^ew^ Pag* It HM4*rsM HMM Nawi, Haniwaon. N>vda Thnrsday, October 20,1988 WFRE TRYING 10H00KY0IL WITHALinU BUmnNGUR 10 SAVE SOME Bumble Bee Ttrna 6V^ oz. (water or oil) UmH on* coupon wHh $20 purchase, $40 purchaw required to redeem two coupons. SCO purchase required to redeem •!! three Expires October 26.1988 Good only at Us Vegas Food 4 Less Urr* one package per coupon 1030 I t I I I I ——1 Blue Bonnet Margarine lib. Stick Limit one coupon with $20 purchase. $40 purchase required to redeem two coupons. $60 purchase required to redeem all three Expires October 26,1988 Good only at Las Wgas Food 4 Less Limit one package per coupon 1010 T.V. Bread lib. Cello White or Wheat Limit one coupon with $20 purchase. $40 purchase required to redeem iwo coupons. $60 purchase required to redeem aD three Expires October 26. 1988 Good only al Las Wgas Food 4 Less Lmnii one paci It. It simply costs us less to do business. Unlike the other supermarkets, we've eliminated &ncy fixtures and expenshre displays. Pius, we buy many Hems direct and pass the savings on to you. Hoiv It IftMkt. Whh a $20 purchase, use any one coupon. With a $40 purchase, use any two. Witih a $60 purchase, take advantage of dl diree. •M + Wtet Ramingo & Decatur Renaissance Center West fOOD^ilfSS East Flamingo & Pecos Renaissance Center HI OurNameSaYsitAU lllirMUy. October 20.1M8 Htntftrion Hemt Ntwt, Htndtrfon, Ntvtda Pagf 1 $200 cash prize awaits l)est costume at Annual Cliarity Halloween Party Local butineaMB are donating valuable goods and services to be given away as door prizes and contest pnxee at HendersiNi's seventh annual Charity Halloween Party, according to HMderson Rotary officals. Clyde Caldwell, this year's chairman for the event, said that the person couple or group voted best costume will take home $200 cash. KRRI radio will be on hand, dishing up oldies rock'n roll from the 508 and 60s, acting as emcees, costume judges and generally keeping the party hopping, aaid Caldwell. The Henderson Rotary Club's re lated raffle drawing for val uable prizes will be conducted during the evening, he said. A $10 per-person donation at the door entitle partygoers to a free buffet of the proceeds, 60 percent will support local charities and 40 percent will aid international needs, officals noted. This party will be held from 7 p.m. to midnight at the Henderson Convention Center, 200 Water St. The Eldorado and Sam's Town Gold River Casinos are co-sponsoring the event. Halloween treats can be nutritious Giving treats, not sweetk, can make this a more nutritious HaUoween for youthful ghosts, goblins and superheroes, according to a Nevada Cooperative Extension foods and nutrition specialist. "Part of tiie enchantment of Magic Show highlights young people's Halloween Tricky illusions mysteriously performed right before your eyes will make this Halloween a spooktacular event for all school-aged ghosts and goblins. Illusionists Art Johnson and Shim ImSun Johnson will perform feats of magic at 4 p.m. Tuesday at Rainbow Library, 6010 W. Cheyenne and Thursday, Oct. 27, at Clark County Library, 1401E. Flamingo Rd. Further demonstrations of wizardry will follow at 3:30 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 28, at Spring Valley Library, 4280 S. Jones Blvd., with two performances on Saturday, Oct. 29, one at 10:30 a.m. at Green Valley Library, 2797 Green Valley Pkwy., and the other at 1:30 p.m. at West Las Vegas Library, 1402 D Street. The prestidigitators will present their final performances at 10:30 a.m. Monday, Oct. 31 at the Charleston Heights Library. 800 Brush St.: and at 3:30 p.m., at Sunrise Library, 5400 Harris St. A spectacle of color and music, the show features a wide Nightmare comes to Drake Street By Clyde C. Caldwell Freddie Kruger will be waiting for all scaredy cats on Saturday at the Henderson Boys and Girls Club Haunted House. The spooky event will be held from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the club, 401 Drake Street. Admission is $1, spokesmen said. jVisitors to the tour will encounter frightning things, such as the Jungle of Terror, a Torture Chamber, a Tunnel of Horror and of course, Freddie and Jason will be waiting. The Boys Club Monster Keeper mentioned that space monsters have even made reservations to attend the spooky event. A concession stand will be set up for those who would like a last meal before going on the tour, they said. variety of styles, including oriental magic and music by Shim and American-Eiuropean style magic, complete with mental teasers by Art. They finish up with a short comedy routine. The bright costumes worn by the duo are designed by Shim and then hand-made in Korea. The Johnsons have toured extensively throughout the United States, performing at coutless Veterans' Administrations hospitals during the last 14 years. Their goal is to eventually visit every VA hospital where they perform freeThe Johnsons belong to The Academy of Magic Arts, better known as the Magic Castle in Hollywood, Calif., considered to be the mecca of professional magicians. They are also members of the International Brotherhood of Magicians and the Society of American Magicians. All performances are free and open to the public. Halloween is dressing up in a costume and going from house to house for treats," says Martha Harveywebater, adding, "A mouthful of candy does not have to be a part of that enchantment." Harveywebater is the state foods and nutrition specialist for Nevada Cooperative Extension, a component of UNR'S College of Agriculture. Harveywebster reminds all treat lovers that Americans as a whole inlcude too many fats and simple sugars in their diet. U.S. dietary guidelins recommend that the intake of both fat and sugar should be cut. For concerned "treaters," giveaways items other than candy could include: pencils, a plastic bag filled with pennies; colorful peel-off stickers; party favors; boxed fruit fresh fruit for distribut at class pttrties or for famM juices; sticks of sugarless gum or crayons. "I wouMn't advise anyone to members. J spoid time making homemade For adults who would ^^ items or purchasing fresh fruit like to hand out sweets, Hir^ to give away as treats," Harveywebster suggests bi^jj veywebster says. "With the ing hard candies instead p| fears many parents have about goodies that may have bem tampered with, these unwrapped items are often junked." Harveywebster reomnmends saving homemade goodies and chocolafies. \ COUPON SICK VACUUM I SENUK RMCHniET WHh Coupon I $1.00 Off Vaeiium tonrleo I Rag. 114.90 I I I I S Dr. Karl at AZ Vac a Sew I \ SPECIAL SCULPTURED NMLS $20 CALL 565-1200 For Appointment -f • ^ Razia Isani, M.D. Pediatrics for Green Valley Green Valley Medical Services, sponsored by St. Rose de Lima Hospital 2501 N. Green Valley Parkway, Suite 130 Henderson, Nevada 89014 Office hours 1 to 5 p.m. Thursdays Call 458-5113 for appointments Dr. Isani is Board Certified in Pediatrics and has received specialty training in Neonatology and Pediatric Cardiology. She also is a member of the St. Rose de Lima Hospital Medical Staff. ^ '/! i SATURDAY t P.M." POKIR TOURNAMENT M8.00 Buy-In MO.OO Re-Buy ORAVEYAIIO SMCUL Riby Buafc ft Eggs *1.99 —7 DAYS • 24 HOURS— PrIfM Rib *5.50 FREE LIQOURI'S CAP FOR EVERY STRAIGHT FLUSH ON A REGULAR POKER MACHINE SATURDAY POKIR TOURNAMINT Winners 1133 BIdr. Hwy., Hen 1. Rose Ann 2. Black Bart T.RONE $5.95 SERVED 4.10 P.M. 10-oz. NEW YORK M.95 • CHECK OUT OUR NEW ITALIAN MENU SERVED 7 DAYS A WEEK* CHICK OUR (a.SS OAILY LUNCHEON SPECIALS MON-FRI FEATURING HOMEMApE_HAM & BEAN SOUP 4 HOMEMADE CHILI EVERY DAY I THURSDAY CORNED BEEF AND CABBAGE <3.9i SWISS STEAK <3.50 M FRIDAY MATTER DIPPED COD ^2.95 U ORANGE ROUQHY ^3.95 1/ BROILED HALIBUT ^3.95 (^ SATURDAY y SALISBURY STEAK <3.95 ^ PRIME RIB ^4.95 |^ SUNDAY M BAKED Vk OF CHICKEN w^DressIng M.95 MEXICAN FIESTA ^3.95 MONDAY [LIVER & ONIONS $2.95 CHINESE PEPPER STEAK w/Ric ^3.50 FTUESDAY [BEEF STROGANOFF ^3.50 (1LEM0N CHICKEN ^3.95 ^WEDNESDAY IFETTUCCINE ALFREDO $3.95 I VEAL AND EGGPLANT PARM $4.95 STUFFED SHELLS $3.50 NOWATtAR BMRlip
PAGE 11

^ew^ Pag* It HM4*rsM HMM Nawi, Haniwaon. N>vda Thnrsday, October 20,1988 WFRE TRYING 10H00KY0IL WITHALinU BUmnNGUR 10 SAVE SOME Bumble Bee Ttrna 6V^ oz. (water or oil) UmH on* coupon wHh $20 purchase, $40 purchaw required to redeem two coupons. SCO purchase required to redeem •!! three Expires October 26.1988 Good only at Us Vegas Food 4 Less Urr* one package per coupon 1030 I t I I I I ——1 Blue Bonnet Margarine lib. Stick Limit one coupon with $20 purchase. $40 purchase required to redeem two coupons. $60 purchase required to redeem all three Expires October 26,1988 Good only at Las Wgas Food 4 Less Limit one package per coupon 1010 T.V. Bread lib. Cello White or Wheat Limit one coupon with $20 purchase. $40 purchase required to redeem iwo coupons. $60 purchase required to redeem aD three Expires October 26. 1988 Good only al Las Wgas Food 4 Less Lmnii one paci It. It simply costs us less to do business. Unlike the other supermarkets, we've eliminated &ncy fixtures and expenshre displays. Pius, we buy many Hems direct and pass the savings on to you. Hoiv It IftMkt. Whh a $20 purchase, use any one coupon. With a $40 purchase, use any two. Witih a $60 purchase, take advantage of dl diree. •M + Wtet Ramingo & Decatur Renaissance Center West fOOD^ilfSS East Flamingo & Pecos Renaissance Center HI OurNameSaYsitAU lllirMUy. October 20.1M8 Htntftrion Hemt Ntwt, Htndtrfon, Ntvtda Pagf 1 $200 cash prize awaits l)est costume at Annual Cliarity Halloween Party Local butineaMB are donating valuable goods and services to be given away as door prizes and contest pnxee at HendersiNi's seventh annual Charity Halloween Party, according to HMderson Rotary officals. Clyde Caldwell, this year's chairman for the event, said that the person couple or group voted best costume will take home $200 cash. KRRI radio will be on hand, dishing up oldies rock'n roll from the 508 and 60s, acting as emcees, costume judges and generally keeping the party hopping, aaid Caldwell. The Henderson Rotary Club's re lated raffle drawing for val uable prizes will be conducted during the evening, he said. A $10 per-person donation at the door entitle partygoers to a free buffet of the proceeds, 60 percent will support local charities and 40 percent will aid international needs, officals noted. This party will be held from 7 p.m. to midnight at the Henderson Convention Center, 200 Water St. The Eldorado and Sam's Town Gold River Casinos are co-sponsoring the event. Halloween treats can be nutritious Giving treats, not sweetk, can make this a more nutritious HaUoween for youthful ghosts, goblins and superheroes, according to a Nevada Cooperative Extension foods and nutrition specialist. "Part of tiie enchantment of Magic Show highlights young people's Halloween Tricky illusions mysteriously performed right before your eyes will make this Halloween a spooktacular event for all school-aged ghosts and goblins. Illusionists Art Johnson and Shim ImSun Johnson will perform feats of magic at 4 p.m. Tuesday at Rainbow Library, 6010 W. Cheyenne and Thursday, Oct. 27, at Clark County Library, 1401E. Flamingo Rd. Further demonstrations of wizardry will follow at 3:30 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 28, at Spring Valley Library, 4280 S. Jones Blvd., with two performances on Saturday, Oct. 29, one at 10:30 a.m. at Green Valley Library, 2797 Green Valley Pkwy., and the other at 1:30 p.m. at West Las Vegas Library, 1402 D Street. The prestidigitators will present their final performances at 10:30 a.m. Monday, Oct. 31 at the Charleston Heights Library. 800 Brush St.: and at 3:30 p.m., at Sunrise Library, 5400 Harris St. A spectacle of color and music, the show features a wide Nightmare comes to Drake Street By Clyde C. Caldwell Freddie Kruger will be waiting for all scaredy cats on Saturday at the Henderson Boys and Girls Club Haunted House. The spooky event will be held from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the club, 401 Drake Street. Admission is $1, spokesmen said. jVisitors to the tour will encounter frightning things, such as the Jungle of Terror, a Torture Chamber, a Tunnel of Horror and of course, Freddie and Jason will be waiting. The Boys Club Monster Keeper mentioned that space monsters have even made reservations to attend the spooky event. A concession stand will be set up for those who would like a last meal before going on the tour, they said. variety of styles, including oriental magic and music by Shim and American-Eiuropean style magic, complete with mental teasers by Art. They finish up with a short comedy routine. The bright costumes worn by the duo are designed by Shim and then hand-made in Korea. The Johnsons have toured extensively throughout the United States, performing at coutless Veterans' Administrations hospitals during the last 14 years. Their goal is to eventually visit every VA hospital where they perform freeThe Johnsons belong to The Academy of Magic Arts, better known as the Magic Castle in Hollywood, Calif., considered to be the mecca of professional magicians. They are also members of the International Brotherhood of Magicians and the Society of American Magicians. All performances are free and open to the public. Halloween is dressing up in a costume and going from house to house for treats," says Martha Harveywebater, adding, "A mouthful of candy does not have to be a part of that enchantment." Harveywebater is the state foods and nutrition specialist for Nevada Cooperative Extension, a component of UNR'S College of Agriculture. Harveywebster reminds all treat lovers that Americans as a whole inlcude too many fats and simple sugars in their diet. U.S. dietary guidelins recommend that the intake of both fat and sugar should be cut. For concerned "treaters," giveaways items other than candy could include: pencils, a plastic bag filled with pennies; colorful peel-off stickers; party favors; boxed fruit fresh fruit for distribut at class pttrties or for famM juices; sticks of sugarless gum or crayons. "I wouMn't advise anyone to members. J spoid time making homemade For adults who would ^^ items or purchasing fresh fruit like to hand out sweets, Hir^ to give away as treats," Harveywebster suggests bi^jj veywebster says. "With the ing hard candies instead p| fears many parents have about goodies that may have bem tampered with, these unwrapped items are often junked." Harveywebster reomnmends saving homemade goodies and chocolafies. \ COUPON SICK VACUUM I SENUK RMCHniET WHh Coupon I $1.00 Off Vaeiium tonrleo I Rag. 114.90 I I I I S Dr. Karl at AZ Vac a Sew I \ SPECIAL SCULPTURED NMLS $20 CALL 565-1200 For Appointment -f • ^ Razia Isani, M.D. Pediatrics for Green Valley Green Valley Medical Services, sponsored by St. Rose de Lima Hospital 2501 N. Green Valley Parkway, Suite 130 Henderson, Nevada 89014 Office hours 1 to 5 p.m. Thursdays Call 458-5113 for appointments Dr. Isani is Board Certified in Pediatrics and has received specialty training in Neonatology and Pediatric Cardiology. She also is a member of the St. Rose de Lima Hospital Medical Staff. ^ '/! i SATURDAY t P.M." POKIR TOURNAMENT M8.00 Buy-In MO.OO Re-Buy ORAVEYAIIO SMCUL Riby Buafc ft Eggs *1.99 —7 DAYS • 24 HOURS— PrIfM Rib *5.50 FREE LIQOURI'S CAP FOR EVERY STRAIGHT FLUSH ON A REGULAR POKER MACHINE SATURDAY POKIR TOURNAMINT Winners 1133 BIdr. Hwy., Hen 1. Rose Ann 2. Black Bart T.RONE $5.95 SERVED 4.10 P.M. 10-oz. NEW YORK M.95 • CHECK OUT OUR NEW ITALIAN MENU SERVED 7 DAYS A WEEK* CHICK OUR (a.SS OAILY LUNCHEON SPECIALS MON-FRI FEATURING HOMEMApE_HAM & BEAN SOUP 4 HOMEMADE CHILI EVERY DAY I THURSDAY CORNED BEEF AND CABBAGE <3.9i SWISS STEAK <3.50 M FRIDAY MATTER DIPPED COD ^2.95 U ORANGE ROUQHY ^3.95 1/ BROILED HALIBUT ^3.95 (^ SATURDAY y SALISBURY STEAK <3.95 ^ PRIME RIB ^4.95 |^ SUNDAY M BAKED Vk OF CHICKEN w^DressIng M.95 MEXICAN FIESTA ^3.95 MONDAY [LIVER & ONIONS $2.95 CHINESE PEPPER STEAK w/Ric ^3.50 FTUESDAY [BEEF STROGANOFF ^3.50 (1LEM0N CHICKEN ^3.95 ^WEDNESDAY IFETTUCCINE ALFREDO $3.95 I VEAL AND EGGPLANT PARM $4.95 STUFFED SHELLS $3.50 NOWATtAR BMRlip
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m wmm n Hit II HtadtrMK Hooit Nws, Htndcnen. Ntvadi Thnnaiiy. Oetobw iO. IMI llttraday, October 20, 1968 KBdertB Homt Newt, Rmllerteo, Nevtdt Page It' VFW plans bake sale to aid cancer research The Ladies Auxiliary of yPW Basic Post 3848 in Henderton, will have a special Wke sale at Von's Store in Henderson on Saturday. The sale starts at 9 a.m., spokespersons said, and will continue until all items sre sold. Proceeds flrom the project will go the Cancer Aid and Research program of the National Ladies Auxiliary, which donates many thousands of dollars each year to selected Obituaries Robert Maynard Stock, 63, a resident of Henderson for 34 years died Sunday, Oct. 9 in iullhead City, Ariz. Bom in Camionville, Utah on Ian. 27,1925, he was a retired iroduction worker after 31 •rears for the Titanium Plant. ,-^le was a U.S. Army veteran ^f World War 11 and was a n|f ormer member of Steel Workers Union, Local No. 4866. ^ He is survived by his wife le Stock of Henderson; sons loe Robert Stock of Boulder !)ity; John Douglas Stock of )olan Springs, Ariz.; and laughters Jannet Helms, Jenlie Kern and Susan Sattley all )f Henderson and Dale Taylor pf Las Vegas; one brother John Btock and sisters Juanita Stratton, Alice Pizza, Joy Nelson and Gelene Paxman all of St. George, Utah; 23 grand1: Christian John I Pecce I; Christian John Pecce, four ^inonth two day resident of Ipenderson died Monday, Oct. 17 in Henderson. He was bom June 15,1988. • He is survived by parents jlohn and Delia Pecce and sister jphrystal Pecce all of Henderiion; grandparents Marcos and vella Aguirre of Henderson -and Johnny and Joyce Pecce of West Covina, Calif. Mass was held Wednesday, 19 in St. Peter's Catholic lurch with Father Tom Long siding. Interment was in Palm Memtrial Park in Henderson. Aobert Maynard Stock and three grandLDS Chapel. Officiating was Bishop Foy Seegmiller children children. Funeral services were held Oct. 12 at East Ocean Street Interment was in Palm Memorial Parks in Henderson. Bert Chesley Bert Chesley, 90, a Boulder City resident since 1943 died Oct. 12 in Boulder City. Bom in Pima, Ariz, on April 8, he was a retail clerk. He was a member of the First Ward Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He is survived by his wife Opal T. of Boulder City; daughters Janella Chandler of La Nita R. Sledge L Nita R. Sledge, 33, died Thursday, Oct. 13 in Henderson and was a 33 year resident. She was bom in Henderson, Nev., on Sept. 21, 1965 and was a assembler for Prima Golf Club Manfacturing. She is survivied by her sons, Shawn and Aaron Sledge of Las Vegas; daughter Erica Sledge of Las Vegas; fiance S.T. Brown of Las Vegas; sisters Gladys Reed, Dorothy Green, Barbara Sledge and Viola McCoy all of Las Vegas, and Rosie Gaines, Wash., DC; and brothers Willie Sledge Jr and Melvin Sledge of Las Vegas. Funeral service were held Tuesday, Oct. 18 at Palm Chapel in Henderson, with Jimmy Green of the Church of Christ officiating. Interment was in Palm Memorial Park in Henderson. Henderson and Velda Ilene Rusch of Boulder City; son Dale of IJBS Vegas and sister Alice Davis of Safford, Ariz.; 11 grandchildren and nine greatgrandchildren. Graveside services were held Monday, Oct. 17 in the Boulder City Cemetery. Bishop Fred Lasko from the LDS First Ward officiated. Interment was in Boulder City Cemetery. Alice Ruth Fiscus Alice Ruth Fiscus, age 49, died Thursday, Oct. 13 in Beverly Manor and was a resident of Boulder City since 1941. She was bom on Sept. 6, 1939 in Clovis, New Mexico and belonged to the Grace Community Church of Boulder City. She is survived by her mother Mildred Fiscus of Boulder City; sister Frances Mayfield of Boulder City; brothers Lee Conine of Kingman, Ariz., John Fiscus of Boulder City and Floyd Fiscus of North Las Vegas. Memorial services were held at the Grace Community Church in Boulder City and burial was private. Palm Mortuary of Henderson handled the arrangements. 'i' m Ut BO'S DANCE PARTY KftIM LIVE BROADCASTI THIS SATURDAY 4-7 P.M. AT THE PADDLEWHEEL HOTEL & CASINO 308 Convention Conlor Drivo • Hula Hoop Contest •50's Dance Contests •Twist & Limbo Contest •Best 50's Dressed Couple Contest •Car & Motorcycle Clubs Invited 9^ FROM THE NEW SHOW SHABOOM cancer research laboratories throughout the United States. Chairman for the project is Unnie Davis, currently junior vice president of the Auxiliary. It is expected that there will be several special items featuring Halloween themes and some homemade candy for sale. For further information, call 564-2114. Dramatic writing workshop offered Playwright Sam Smiley will conduct a two-hour workshop on dramatic writing pt 3 p.m. Wednesday in UNLV's Alta Ham Fine Arts Acting Studio. He will focus on story development for both playwrights and screenwriters. The presentation, which is free and open to the public, is part of the Southwest Gas Distinguished Artists Series. Space is limited to 12 participants and 40 observers; reservations can be made by calling UNLV's department of theatre arts at 739-3666. A prolific writer, Smiley has written and produced 26 plays and has been head writer for several television series. The Southwest Gas Distinguished Artists Series is sponsored each semester by UNLV's CoUege of Arts and Letters and a grant from the Southwest Gas Foundation. Births at St. Rose de Lima announced Sept. 27 Oct. S Claudia and Timothy SimpKaren and Jeffrey Hoyt, boy; son, boy; Jeannette and Jacqueline and Marc Cram, Thomas Price, girl. girl; Patricia and James Sept. 29 Crayne, girl. Patricia and Randy Mauier, Oct. 6 boy; Angela and Bjarne Raquel and Terry Pyne, girl; Moberg, girl; Jana and Michael Alisa and James Spence, boy; Johnson, girl. Susan and David Garbarino, Sept. 30 girl. Judy and Michael Bond, girl; Oct. 9 Lisa and Freddie Olige Jr., girl. Ruth and Richard Hietbrink, Oct. 2 Jr., girl; Lome and Frederick Nanci and James Bowen, Rentrioe, girl; Susan and Bruce giri. Bums, girl. LAND PIVILOPINO Ik HOUSINO We want to thank thoat naw frianda wa hava mada rabullding homaa ainca May 4th. To t>attar aarva you in the futura, wa hava a naw offica and phona numt>ar. REMODELING CUSTOM HOMES INSURANCE WORK 362-3004 3300 S. Dacatur St., #9, Laa Vegas 89102 Contractor'a LIcenae #0014188 Can Chiropractic Help Me? HOW MUCH WILL IT COST? We are often asked "What's the best way of finding out whether or not a doctor of chiropractic can help my problem? We beheve the answer can be found in a complete chiropractic consultation and examination, including x-rays. And to help you find out for sure, we will do a complete chiropractic consultation and examination, including x-rays (procedures that normally cost $130.00 or more) for $25.00. We will make this special program available for the next 30 days. The only exception to the offer involves personal injury cases (workers' compensation and auto accidents) in which there is no charge billed directly to the patient for the first visit. $2500 Reg. $130.00 program Expires Nov. 30, 1988 YOUR INITIAL VISIT WILL INCLUDE: tS'A private consultation with the doctor 0'X-rays, if considered necessary 0A thorough spinal examination including orthopedic & neurological tests B'A confidential report of our findings 0An explanation of our treatment procedure if we determine chiropractic can help you 0A referral to the proper specialist if we determine chiropractic can't help you THESE CONDITIONS ARE THE DANGER SIGNALS OP A PINCHED NERVE 0^Headache &Vmtigat E^Arthritic Pain by Stiff Neck QTension ES'Lofls of Sleep BBackache SScolioeie (Curvature of the Spine) B'Ann Pain & Numbneas B'Leg Pain & Numbness ^Whiplash Injury If you are experiendng any of these symptomB, call our office today for an appointment 565-0377 Dr. "Jim" Cock> HENDERSON CHIROPRACTIC CENTER Social Security needs to l(now vvlien beneficiaries die By Marta A. Blanco Social Security Administatioa Although Social Security learns about deaths of people getting Social Security in timely fashion in most cases from relatives, friends, funeral directors, for example, in a few cases they are not reported. If a death ie reported but checks continue to arrive, it means Social Security's system has not yet been corrected. The person who made the initial report should take the check to any Social Security office or just write "deceased" on the check envelope and give ito the postman or drop it in the mail box When the check is returned to the Treasury Department, Socia I Security will automatically be notified of the death. Sometimes the failure to report is intentional because someone is trying to defraud the Social Security Administration. However, Social Security is making an intense effort to prevent this from happening. To assure that checks are stopped after a person has died. Social Security has been matching its records against those of other Federal agencies in an effort to identify those on the rolls who have died. In addition. Social Security also matches its records against State death-certificate records. The quickest way to notify Social Security is to call a Social Security office or write "deceased" on the check envelope and give it to the postman. For more information, contact the Social Security office in Las Vegas. If you write, the address is P.O. Box 15568, Las Vegas, Nevada 89114. The local telephone number is 388-4360. Adult Health Center offers actvlties for seniors, handicapped By Valerie Smithe Bumper bowling, bingo, buffets, and beauty time, are some of the activities regularly scheduled for clients attending the Salvation Army Adult Health Day Care Center in Henderson. Bumper bowling? The Gold Coast Hotel and Casino recently donated free games for the Day Care CUents. A field trip is scheduled every Thursday, giving clients an opportunity to enjoy trips throughout the Las Vegas Valley are. Museums have been visited, shopping trips and factory tours have been enjoyed by Day Care clients. Many local businesses have donated admissions so that no extra cost is incurred by for those activities. The Day Care Center is open Monday through Friday, except holidays, from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Attendance can be on a daily basis, several days a week, or on an hourly drop-in basis. The center is an affordable alternative so long-term 24-hour nursing home care, and enables loved ones to remain with their families while receiving custodial care and protection during the day from trained health personnel when family members are away. Fees are based on the client's ability to pay and funds may be available through Federal and State programs for those needing financial assistance. Medicaid assistance may also be available for those quaUfying. sion recently donated by the Sam Boyd Corp. In one comer of the large, pleasant room, aA area is set aside for three hospital beds for any clients If you know who may need needing rest or a nap during this type of care, we welcome the day. you to visit the Day Care Center, located 830 East Lake Mead Drive. The Center's cheerful atmosphere and pleasant furnishings make the clients feel at home. There are several lounge areas, and a large screen televiCenter director, Darlentf Nassau, or any staff member will be glad to answer your questions regarding the center, or yOu may telephone for an appointment or information by calling 565-9578, and asking for "Day Care." Free services for recipients offered Senior Center Highlights "Octo-beer-fest" a-readying Free employment services and career counseling is being offered for individuals receiving Social Security Disability who are interested in returning to work. The two-week job-seeking I By Emma Swinney Henderson Seniior Center The friends and members of the Henderson Senior Center have been preparing for weeks for Saturdays big day. They are now ready to give the community a wonderful chance to have a good time, find some great bargains, enjoy a rootbeer party with music and win some fabulous prizes. The Center will open at 9 a.m. so that those who are early weekend shoppers can get the very best of the sales, vv^ch will consist of Christmas craft gifts, homebaked goodies, beautiful and useful decorations, appliances, jewehy, toys and games. In the afternoon, there will be family fun, songs, food and the drawings. Everyone in the community is inviteed. It is the best time to get acquainted with the Henderson Senior Center and its many volunteers and members. The October potluck will begin at 1 p.m. Sunday. All seniors are welcome to bring a casserole, salad or dessert to share. Plates, service and drinks will be fxumished. The regular activities at the Center include Bingo at 11 a.m. on Mondays and at 12:30 p.m. Thursdays. A week ago the winners were Bemioe Stott and Josephine Thomburg. Physical fitness, low-impact movements are led by Mercy and are especially beneficial for seniors at 10:45 a.m. every Tufpday and Thursday. A door-prize drawing is held at 12:30 p.m. Friday every week. Last week Lela Buescher was the winner. Special services next week: Dt. Haven's eye Clinic frm 10 a.m. until 11:30 a.m. Monday. Speaker Dr. Shaleve will talking on "Aging Eye" during lunch hour Wednesday. Then, beginning on Nov. 1, appUcations will be taken for Energy Assistance, a program for lowincome families or seniors to help on big winter utility bills. Regular services: Social Security from 9:30 a.m. until 4 p.m. every Wednesday. Senior Law Project, is available on the first and third Tuesdays of each month; call 5656990 for appointment. RSVP office, enrolls and assigns volunteers daily; their number is 565-0669. Lunch is served from 11:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. daily, Monday through Friday. For only a $1 donation, a balanced, nutritious and delicious meal is provided for all those over 60 or married to one that age. The menau for Oct. 24 through Oct. 28 follows: Monday: Liver and onions, tossed salad, stewed tomatoes, apple sauce and bran muffins. Tuesday: Meatloaf, cabbage salad, carrots, mashed potatoes and fresh fruit. Wednesday: Chicken chow mein, jello with cottage cheese and pineapple, green beans, rice, cranberry juice and peanut butter bars. Thursday: Lasagna, tossed salad, broccoh and fresh fruit Friday: Tuna loaf, beet and onion salad, yellow squash, orange juice, applesauce cake and ice cream. Coffee, tea and low-fat nulk are available daily. There will be a concert in the Civic Citer at 3:30 p.m. Simday, Oct. 30. The Sound Impressions will be presented by the Parks and Recreation D^iartment. There is no admission charge. The Senira: Center will be open Monday, Oct. 31, and will celebrate both Nevada Day and Halloween. Thought for the week: life is no "brief candlee' to me. It is a sort of splendid torch whkh I have got hdd of for a moment, and 1 want to make it bum as brightly as possible before handing it on to future generations." George Bernard Shaw Christian Center 571 Adams Blvd 293-7773 Boulder Qty "Only 15 minutes from Henderson — Of Course!" Pastors: Jim ar>d Marjorie Kitchell SUNDAY OCT. 23-8:15 & 10:30 A.M. r • OTOr mmptnm KIICnMI "One Plus God is a Majority" 6 p.m. Pastor Jim "Beautiful Muse—All Servces" 9:30 a.m. Sunday School Monday 7:00 p.m. — Youth MgM WEDNESDAY 9:30 a.m. Wwnan'a Coffaa Hour and BtMa Study 7KW p.m. BMa SiudiM For All Agaa Nursery Attendants — Free Transportation HOIK OF CHMtTIAN CEfrren SCHOOL AND DAY CARE CENTER i: DEUCES WILD 50-25$ Video Poker Machines THE SKYLINE CASINO & RESTAURANT SWBosMgHlghwy NV 89015 m skills workshop begins Monday, Oct. 31. Enrollment is being done this week. Free placement aasistance will be available after completing the workshop. To qualify, individuals must be on Social Security Disability, spokespersons, said. For more information call Paula Phillips at 388-0393. Vertical Blinds Pleated Shades 10 Years Mini Blinds 55% off Experience g^ Sale RENIERSON BLINDS 565-1530 Le lA Menm For Yaa Pn/mmeailly Dm Free Estimates Free Installation Sunring Hmdarwa, Lu Veyn. Gnm VtUtf uti BouMar City Faat Friendly Service Vou Can Trust At Low Cost Nevada Licensed VISA BUI Bunker Henderson's Choice :f. '^ •I ^ ^ Bill believes that construction of the freeway to Railroad Pass is a vital part of the growth and prosperity of Henderson. As your next State Senator, BUI Bunlrer plans to see to it that the freeway is funded and completed as soon as possible. Bill believes the growing population of Henderson should have more classes and expanded facilities at the Henderson campus of Clark County Community College. He will work to see that legislation is passed to bring a new level of higher education to Henderson. / ^ ^ ^ /Mtf/orftvlto Piease Call Me Anytime: 366-7715 ^ t0 iKt BiU Bunktr Stoto Smaf DiaMet #1. RndH Waller, Tnaaunr. Vote Bill Bunker For State Senate /, V

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m wmm n Hit II HtadtrMK Hooit Nws, Htndcnen. Ntvadi Thnnaiiy. Oetobw iO. IMI llttraday, October 20, 1968 KBdertB Homt Newt, Rmllerteo, Nevtdt Page It' VFW plans bake sale to aid cancer research The Ladies Auxiliary of yPW Basic Post 3848 in Henderton, will have a special Wke sale at Von's Store in Henderson on Saturday. The sale starts at 9 a.m., spokespersons said, and will continue until all items sre sold. Proceeds flrom the project will go the Cancer Aid and Research program of the National Ladies Auxiliary, which donates many thousands of dollars each year to selected Obituaries Robert Maynard Stock, 63, a resident of Henderson for 34 years died Sunday, Oct. 9 in iullhead City, Ariz. Bom in Camionville, Utah on Ian. 27,1925, he was a retired iroduction worker after 31 •rears for the Titanium Plant. ,-^le was a U.S. Army veteran ^f World War 11 and was a n|f ormer member of Steel Workers Union, Local No. 4866. ^ He is survived by his wife le Stock of Henderson; sons loe Robert Stock of Boulder !)ity; John Douglas Stock of )olan Springs, Ariz.; and laughters Jannet Helms, Jenlie Kern and Susan Sattley all )f Henderson and Dale Taylor pf Las Vegas; one brother John Btock and sisters Juanita Stratton, Alice Pizza, Joy Nelson and Gelene Paxman all of St. George, Utah; 23 grand1: Christian John I Pecce I; Christian John Pecce, four ^inonth two day resident of Ipenderson died Monday, Oct. 17 in Henderson. He was bom June 15,1988. • He is survived by parents jlohn and Delia Pecce and sister jphrystal Pecce all of Henderiion; grandparents Marcos and vella Aguirre of Henderson -and Johnny and Joyce Pecce of West Covina, Calif. Mass was held Wednesday, 19 in St. Peter's Catholic lurch with Father Tom Long siding. Interment was in Palm Memtrial Park in Henderson. Aobert Maynard Stock and three grandLDS Chapel. Officiating was Bishop Foy Seegmiller children children. Funeral services were held Oct. 12 at East Ocean Street Interment was in Palm Memorial Parks in Henderson. Bert Chesley Bert Chesley, 90, a Boulder City resident since 1943 died Oct. 12 in Boulder City. Bom in Pima, Ariz, on April 8, he was a retail clerk. He was a member of the First Ward Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He is survived by his wife Opal T. of Boulder City; daughters Janella Chandler of La Nita R. Sledge L Nita R. Sledge, 33, died Thursday, Oct. 13 in Henderson and was a 33 year resident. She was bom in Henderson, Nev., on Sept. 21, 1965 and was a assembler for Prima Golf Club Manfacturing. She is survivied by her sons, Shawn and Aaron Sledge of Las Vegas; daughter Erica Sledge of Las Vegas; fiance S.T. Brown of Las Vegas; sisters Gladys Reed, Dorothy Green, Barbara Sledge and Viola McCoy all of Las Vegas, and Rosie Gaines, Wash., DC; and brothers Willie Sledge Jr and Melvin Sledge of Las Vegas. Funeral service were held Tuesday, Oct. 18 at Palm Chapel in Henderson, with Jimmy Green of the Church of Christ officiating. Interment was in Palm Memorial Park in Henderson. Henderson and Velda Ilene Rusch of Boulder City; son Dale of IJBS Vegas and sister Alice Davis of Safford, Ariz.; 11 grandchildren and nine greatgrandchildren. Graveside services were held Monday, Oct. 17 in the Boulder City Cemetery. Bishop Fred Lasko from the LDS First Ward officiated. Interment was in Boulder City Cemetery. Alice Ruth Fiscus Alice Ruth Fiscus, age 49, died Thursday, Oct. 13 in Beverly Manor and was a resident of Boulder City since 1941. She was bom on Sept. 6, 1939 in Clovis, New Mexico and belonged to the Grace Community Church of Boulder City. She is survived by her mother Mildred Fiscus of Boulder City; sister Frances Mayfield of Boulder City; brothers Lee Conine of Kingman, Ariz., John Fiscus of Boulder City and Floyd Fiscus of North Las Vegas. Memorial services were held at the Grace Community Church in Boulder City and burial was private. Palm Mortuary of Henderson handled the arrangements. 'i' m Ut BO'S DANCE PARTY KftIM LIVE BROADCASTI THIS SATURDAY 4-7 P.M. AT THE PADDLEWHEEL HOTEL & CASINO 308 Convention Conlor Drivo • Hula Hoop Contest •50's Dance Contests •Twist & Limbo Contest •Best 50's Dressed Couple Contest •Car & Motorcycle Clubs Invited 9^ FROM THE NEW SHOW SHABOOM cancer research laboratories throughout the United States. Chairman for the project is Unnie Davis, currently junior vice president of the Auxiliary. It is expected that there will be several special items featuring Halloween themes and some homemade candy for sale. For further information, call 564-2114. Dramatic writing workshop offered Playwright Sam Smiley will conduct a two-hour workshop on dramatic writing pt 3 p.m. Wednesday in UNLV's Alta Ham Fine Arts Acting Studio. He will focus on story development for both playwrights and screenwriters. The presentation, which is free and open to the public, is part of the Southwest Gas Distinguished Artists Series. Space is limited to 12 participants and 40 observers; reservations can be made by calling UNLV's department of theatre arts at 739-3666. A prolific writer, Smiley has written and produced 26 plays and has been head writer for several television series. The Southwest Gas Distinguished Artists Series is sponsored each semester by UNLV's CoUege of Arts and Letters and a grant from the Southwest Gas Foundation. Births at St. Rose de Lima announced Sept. 27 Oct. S Claudia and Timothy SimpKaren and Jeffrey Hoyt, boy; son, boy; Jeannette and Jacqueline and Marc Cram, Thomas Price, girl. girl; Patricia and James Sept. 29 Crayne, girl. Patricia and Randy Mauier, Oct. 6 boy; Angela and Bjarne Raquel and Terry Pyne, girl; Moberg, girl; Jana and Michael Alisa and James Spence, boy; Johnson, girl. Susan and David Garbarino, Sept. 30 girl. Judy and Michael Bond, girl; Oct. 9 Lisa and Freddie Olige Jr., girl. Ruth and Richard Hietbrink, Oct. 2 Jr., girl; Lome and Frederick Nanci and James Bowen, Rentrioe, girl; Susan and Bruce giri. Bums, girl. LAND PIVILOPINO Ik HOUSINO We want to thank thoat naw frianda wa hava mada rabullding homaa ainca May 4th. To t>attar aarva you in the futura, wa hava a naw offica and phona numt>ar. REMODELING CUSTOM HOMES INSURANCE WORK 362-3004 3300 S. Dacatur St., #9, Laa Vegas 89102 Contractor'a LIcenae #0014188 Can Chiropractic Help Me? HOW MUCH WILL IT COST? We are often asked "What's the best way of finding out whether or not a doctor of chiropractic can help my problem? We beheve the answer can be found in a complete chiropractic consultation and examination, including x-rays. And to help you find out for sure, we will do a complete chiropractic consultation and examination, including x-rays (procedures that normally cost $130.00 or more) for $25.00. We will make this special program available for the next 30 days. The only exception to the offer involves personal injury cases (workers' compensation and auto accidents) in which there is no charge billed directly to the patient for the first visit. $2500 Reg. $130.00 program Expires Nov. 30, 1988 YOUR INITIAL VISIT WILL INCLUDE: tS'A private consultation with the doctor 0'X-rays, if considered necessary 0A thorough spinal examination including orthopedic & neurological tests B'A confidential report of our findings 0An explanation of our treatment procedure if we determine chiropractic can help you 0A referral to the proper specialist if we determine chiropractic can't help you THESE CONDITIONS ARE THE DANGER SIGNALS OP A PINCHED NERVE 0^Headache &Vmtigat E^Arthritic Pain by Stiff Neck QTension ES'Lofls of Sleep BBackache SScolioeie (Curvature of the Spine) B'Ann Pain & Numbneas B'Leg Pain & Numbness ^Whiplash Injury If you are experiendng any of these symptomB, call our office today for an appointment 565-0377 Dr. "Jim" Cock> HENDERSON CHIROPRACTIC CENTER Social Security needs to l(now vvlien beneficiaries die By Marta A. Blanco Social Security Administatioa Although Social Security learns about deaths of people getting Social Security in timely fashion in most cases from relatives, friends, funeral directors, for example, in a few cases they are not reported. If a death ie reported but checks continue to arrive, it means Social Security's system has not yet been corrected. The person who made the initial report should take the check to any Social Security office or just write "deceased" on the check envelope and give ito the postman or drop it in the mail box When the check is returned to the Treasury Department, Socia I Security will automatically be notified of the death. Sometimes the failure to report is intentional because someone is trying to defraud the Social Security Administration. However, Social Security is making an intense effort to prevent this from happening. To assure that checks are stopped after a person has died. Social Security has been matching its records against those of other Federal agencies in an effort to identify those on the rolls who have died. In addition. Social Security also matches its records against State death-certificate records. The quickest way to notify Social Security is to call a Social Security office or write "deceased" on the check envelope and give it to the postman. For more information, contact the Social Security office in Las Vegas. If you write, the address is P.O. Box 15568, Las Vegas, Nevada 89114. The local telephone number is 388-4360. Adult Health Center offers actvlties for seniors, handicapped By Valerie Smithe Bumper bowling, bingo, buffets, and beauty time, are some of the activities regularly scheduled for clients attending the Salvation Army Adult Health Day Care Center in Henderson. Bumper bowling? The Gold Coast Hotel and Casino recently donated free games for the Day Care CUents. A field trip is scheduled every Thursday, giving clients an opportunity to enjoy trips throughout the Las Vegas Valley are. Museums have been visited, shopping trips and factory tours have been enjoyed by Day Care clients. Many local businesses have donated admissions so that no extra cost is incurred by for those activities. The Day Care Center is open Monday through Friday, except holidays, from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Attendance can be on a daily basis, several days a week, or on an hourly drop-in basis. The center is an affordable alternative so long-term 24-hour nursing home care, and enables loved ones to remain with their families while receiving custodial care and protection during the day from trained health personnel when family members are away. Fees are based on the client's ability to pay and funds may be available through Federal and State programs for those needing financial assistance. Medicaid assistance may also be available for those quaUfying. sion recently donated by the Sam Boyd Corp. In one comer of the large, pleasant room, aA area is set aside for three hospital beds for any clients If you know who may need needing rest or a nap during this type of care, we welcome the day. you to visit the Day Care Center, located 830 East Lake Mead Drive. The Center's cheerful atmosphere and pleasant furnishings make the clients feel at home. There are several lounge areas, and a large screen televiCenter director, Darlentf Nassau, or any staff member will be glad to answer your questions regarding the center, or yOu may telephone for an appointment or information by calling 565-9578, and asking for "Day Care." Free services for recipients offered Senior Center Highlights "Octo-beer-fest" a-readying Free employment services and career counseling is being offered for individuals receiving Social Security Disability who are interested in returning to work. The two-week job-seeking I By Emma Swinney Henderson Seniior Center The friends and members of the Henderson Senior Center have been preparing for weeks for Saturdays big day. They are now ready to give the community a wonderful chance to have a good time, find some great bargains, enjoy a rootbeer party with music and win some fabulous prizes. The Center will open at 9 a.m. so that those who are early weekend shoppers can get the very best of the sales, vv^ch will consist of Christmas craft gifts, homebaked goodies, beautiful and useful decorations, appliances, jewehy, toys and games. In the afternoon, there will be family fun, songs, food and the drawings. Everyone in the community is inviteed. It is the best time to get acquainted with the Henderson Senior Center and its many volunteers and members. The October potluck will begin at 1 p.m. Sunday. All seniors are welcome to bring a casserole, salad or dessert to share. Plates, service and drinks will be fxumished. The regular activities at the Center include Bingo at 11 a.m. on Mondays and at 12:30 p.m. Thursdays. A week ago the winners were Bemioe Stott and Josephine Thomburg. Physical fitness, low-impact movements are led by Mercy and are especially beneficial for seniors at 10:45 a.m. every Tufpday and Thursday. A door-prize drawing is held at 12:30 p.m. Friday every week. Last week Lela Buescher was the winner. Special services next week: Dt. Haven's eye Clinic frm 10 a.m. until 11:30 a.m. Monday. Speaker Dr. Shaleve will talking on "Aging Eye" during lunch hour Wednesday. Then, beginning on Nov. 1, appUcations will be taken for Energy Assistance, a program for lowincome families or seniors to help on big winter utility bills. Regular services: Social Security from 9:30 a.m. until 4 p.m. every Wednesday. Senior Law Project, is available on the first and third Tuesdays of each month; call 5656990 for appointment. RSVP office, enrolls and assigns volunteers daily; their number is 565-0669. Lunch is served from 11:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. daily, Monday through Friday. For only a $1 donation, a balanced, nutritious and delicious meal is provided for all those over 60 or married to one that age. The menau for Oct. 24 through Oct. 28 follows: Monday: Liver and onions, tossed salad, stewed tomatoes, apple sauce and bran muffins. Tuesday: Meatloaf, cabbage salad, carrots, mashed potatoes and fresh fruit. Wednesday: Chicken chow mein, jello with cottage cheese and pineapple, green beans, rice, cranberry juice and peanut butter bars. Thursday: Lasagna, tossed salad, broccoh and fresh fruit Friday: Tuna loaf, beet and onion salad, yellow squash, orange juice, applesauce cake and ice cream. Coffee, tea and low-fat nulk are available daily. There will be a concert in the Civic Citer at 3:30 p.m. Simday, Oct. 30. The Sound Impressions will be presented by the Parks and Recreation D^iartment. There is no admission charge. The Senira: Center will be open Monday, Oct. 31, and will celebrate both Nevada Day and Halloween. Thought for the week: life is no "brief candlee' to me. It is a sort of splendid torch whkh I have got hdd of for a moment, and 1 want to make it bum as brightly as possible before handing it on to future generations." George Bernard Shaw Christian Center 571 Adams Blvd 293-7773 Boulder Qty "Only 15 minutes from Henderson — Of Course!" Pastors: Jim ar>d Marjorie Kitchell SUNDAY OCT. 23-8:15 & 10:30 A.M. r • OTOr mmptnm KIICnMI "One Plus God is a Majority" 6 p.m. Pastor Jim "Beautiful Muse—All Servces" 9:30 a.m. Sunday School Monday 7:00 p.m. — Youth MgM WEDNESDAY 9:30 a.m. Wwnan'a Coffaa Hour and BtMa Study 7KW p.m. BMa SiudiM For All Agaa Nursery Attendants — Free Transportation HOIK OF CHMtTIAN CEfrren SCHOOL AND DAY CARE CENTER i: DEUCES WILD 50-25$ Video Poker Machines THE SKYLINE CASINO & RESTAURANT SWBosMgHlghwy NV 89015 m skills workshop begins Monday, Oct. 31. Enrollment is being done this week. Free placement aasistance will be available after completing the workshop. To qualify, individuals must be on Social Security Disability, spokespersons, said. For more information call Paula Phillips at 388-0393. Vertical Blinds Pleated Shades 10 Years Mini Blinds 55% off Experience g^ Sale RENIERSON BLINDS 565-1530 Le lA Menm For Yaa Pn/mmeailly Dm Free Estimates Free Installation Sunring Hmdarwa, Lu Veyn. Gnm VtUtf uti BouMar City Faat Friendly Service Vou Can Trust At Low Cost Nevada Licensed VISA BUI Bunker Henderson's Choice :f. '^ •I ^ ^ Bill believes that construction of the freeway to Railroad Pass is a vital part of the growth and prosperity of Henderson. As your next State Senator, BUI Bunlrer plans to see to it that the freeway is funded and completed as soon as possible. Bill believes the growing population of Henderson should have more classes and expanded facilities at the Henderson campus of Clark County Community College. He will work to see that legislation is passed to bring a new level of higher education to Henderson. / ^ ^ ^ /Mtf/orftvlto Piease Call Me Anytime: 366-7715 ^ t0 iKt BiU Bunktr Stoto Smaf DiaMet #1. RndH Waller, Tnaaunr. Vote Bill Bunker For State Senate /, V

PAGE 14

14 Ntwa, llaaiaraqn, Nevada Thursday. October 20, IMS 1WMW* a^aiereea MeaM News, • Miaraei, Navada Pift II Miscellaneous newsmissiles By L. Jesrie BenMtt Today Oct. 20 is the 294th day of 1988, leaving a total of 72 days in the year. It was 186 years ago in 1803 that the United States Senate ratified the Louiaiana Purchase, more than doubling the size of the nation. The sun rose at 6:16 a.m. today and will set at 5:13 p.m. Thought for today "When you reach for the stars you may not quite get one, but you won't come up with a handfal of mud either." (Leo Burnett). or this and that I guess Pm on the oid band wagon again. It lasts while the national and international games that depend upon athletic ability, either individual or on a team basis have taken up much of our time. It is also phenomenal how much influence the athletes have on adults and childien alike. Team meana two mr more persons wwking together towaids a common goal. And team members have or should have the good of the team uppermost in mind. You know that old cliche is all too true "team work" is, more often than not, important to success. So I've been at a loss thinking of individuals and other team members who are cau^t up in the problem of cheating or breaking the rules of the game. It certainly was cheating before the act was discovered and the cheater caught. It was very wrong to plan to cheat and therefore jeopardize the team or one's self. We've certainly had some prime examples placed before us lately. Could ftarly and strong teaching override the plainly fanatic desire to win, no matter what? Repeat Mr. Cbilton's statement, Prefer a loss to a dishonest gain; the one brings pain for the moment, the other for all time." The consequences of cheating affects far more than the offending individual. Historic^ flashbacks Oct. 20 1820 Spain ceded Florida to the United States. 1890 Railway up Pike's Peak in Colorado was completed. 1M4 Gen. Douglas MacArthur returned to the Phillappine Islands after those islands were occupied by Japan for 2V years in World War H. Oct. 21 1590 Explorer Magellan entered the straits at the aouthem tip of South America, now named for him. 1945 Women of France were allowed to vote for first time. 1966 Tragic coal waste landslide in South Wales took the bves of 140, the majority being school children. Oct. 22 1836 Sam Houston became first president of the Republic of Texas. 1939 First professional football game was televised. 1981 Air Traffic Control union decertified by U.S. government agency. 0t. 23 First woman to make solo flight in public airplane was Blanche S. Scott at Fort Wayne, bid. 241 U.S. Marines and sailors with 58 French service men kwt t^eir bves when terrorists launched a suicide attack in Lebanon. Oct. 24 IMe Cual opsBwl to poblic. Utka to Home, N.Y. First transcontinental telegraph message sent. Oct. 25 Fremont's party reached the great Columbia River. The famous "Charge of the Light Brigade" took place in Crimean War (England vs. Russia). U.S. and six Caribbean nations invaded the Island of Granada. Oct. 26 The now famous "Gunfight at the OK Corral" took place in Tombstone, Ariz. Nylon was first introduced by DuPont. >: Halloweend Safety i; We are fast approaching the Halloween Holiday. Safety is impor•:tant at all times, but especially at this holiday because the little munch;d north. They joined grandparents. Buck and Molly Hohnan at the beautiful Cave Lake area near Eh, Nev. Jan, Buck and Brett were all successful, bagging a deer each. It was a first for Brett, it's getting cokier in Nevada's north country. (Did you go deer hunting, bird hunting. .? If so, let us know, call 565-7541). RememlMr Most banks or credit unions will not open an account for anyone not having a Social Security number. Children cannot register at school without their Social Security number. Therefore, it is important to be reminded again to see that you and your children are registered and givot a Social Security number. Be sure that you have at least two forms of identification to register. Condolenees Wish to extend condolences to Hank and Arlene Rubeck and Ken and Donna Newttm. Family monber, Dennis Rubeck, died Oct. 4,1968 as a result of a heart attack in Greenriver, Wyo. Over the years, Dennis and his wife. Patsy were frequent visitors to Henderson to see his brother and his family, as well as cousin Donna (Hansen) Newton. Hank and Arloie with Ken and Donna made the bng trip to Greenriver to attend the funeral services for Dennis on Oct. 7. Nevada Day Oct. 31 is "Nevada Day" at the popular vacation and fun spot. Disneyland, which gives special attention to the people from Nevada on that day. Surgery Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Maeetas have Uved in their beautiful home here in Henderson for many, many yean. Marshall worked at TMCA and the Mrs. is a familiar figure at local First Interstate Bank having, worked there for many years. All their children have been active in See Missiles, Page 16 About newspapers 'tet the people know fhe facts, and the amiry will be sak. Atnhtn Unooti rpBgdotw fci Our Hainfc T||E sn^icuT Witt W*'' COUPON$1.00 Off Va Rsg. t14 JO SM Dr. Kari at AZ Vac & Sew Now you have a better way to keep trash in its place...rent a mobile Toter REPLACES £SUR 20 GAUON TRASH CANS! DtSPOSAL SILVER STATE CLARK INVESTMENTS INC. DISPOSAL SANITATION 770 E. Sahara Avenue Las Vegas, Nevada 89104 ''BEFORE YOU BOY GIVE US EdMiUon McCiir ttudmti view safety flim FfatgnJaiiMwaflfOatdoB McCaw actod raeiB^ gathered to 861 "flafaty nuoai^ Songa^fUo. The filmatrlp UgMlghtad Buch itema m not talking to Rtrangera, UoUiig bodi ways before croaa^ tnffic Hglita. seat belta aid otker aafety meaaagea. Each child maived their own coloring bookand a eaaaette recording of tbe aonga. The community aervioe Stvdanta MeCaw watch "Safety throogh Songa." aponaorad by the Las Vegaa Board of Realtws and Century 21 JR RMhy. Jackie Wooldridge and Roaa Berwick, coowners of Century 21 JR Realty, preaented the program. School board to recognize Basic High's l\Aarine JROTC llie Basic High School Bfoine Corpa Junior Reaetve Offioen Training Corpa unit, nomtiy selected as the top ^CJROTC unit in the country, has again been dted, moat recently fay the Clark County School Board at its meeting last weak. The unit, the only one of ita kind in Nevada, is conpriaed of more than 180 cadets. A full-blown honors oeremoqy will be heU at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28, during half-time activitiae of the scheduled football game between Baaic and Eldorado High School. Ilw game wiD be played at Baaic officials noted. They added that all of the MCJROTC alumnae are enoour aged to attend and sit in a qJadal reaervedarea aet aaida for them. Tb tribute will include participation by senior Marine Conx ofHciala, the Marint CotpaDrum andBog^Corpe from Twentynina Palms, Calif., and atate and kioal dignitahee. Under the leadership of lenior inatructor Lt. Col. Bob Ott, USMC (Ret.), the Baaic High School MCJROTC unit received aeveral meritorious citiations in recent years for oqtitwnding service and accomiriiahmenta. Ott ia aaaiatad in the program by Master Gunnery Sgt. Richard Swank and Sgt. Maj. Gerald Ogle. In an activity summary aubmittad with an application for the award, tlia Baw MCJROTC unit WM noted for participation during 1967-88 in 13 vu^ fund and blood drivea, 59 pubUc affairs eventa, and aevsral riftery and phyacal fitnaas oon^ietitiaaa. T^ unit captorad fSrat-pUoe hao0s aawsnl yama iaa xow iiidffllmaatoaiBpatitkiiahdd a^the local, atate and regioaal larela, and placed first in oaerall and invididnal phyaical MCJROTC color guards available by Cadet/Gunnery Sgt. Loma McNeill Baaic High School MCJROTC The Baaic High School Marine Corps Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps continues to provide color guards to various civic organizations throughout the community, offidala noted. )^thin the last three weeks they have performed at BuriKholdo' and Brown Junior High Schools open houaea, as well as for the National Convention of the Soldiers of Fortune Magazine, the National Competition of the ASA at the Las Vegaa Softball Center, the Desert Inn Hotel, and, as alwajrs, at the home football games for the Baaic Wolvaa at Don Taylor Stadium. The JROTC program ia available to provide opening oaramoniea for many activitiea. For more information, call 564-1427. fhaieaa competitions at the local and districtwide levels. For the sixth and seventh years of the Clark Coimty School District Y outh P hyaical Fltneaa Team (YPFT) Meet competition, the MCJROTC imit took top honors againat all fiva of the JBOTCa in the diatrict. Cadata in the program have oonsisrtently shown hif^ schol* aatic achievemnt. Eleven cadtta in the 1987-88 graduating daaa ware awarded college achcdarahqia or awarda, 11 cadeta earned atraight Aa for the yaar, and 31 cadeta were placed on the A-B honor roll. In addition, ODe cadet received an appointoMBt to the Air Faroe Acadany, one cHlat raoeived an Air Fans ROTO scholarahip and two cadets rsoeived Army ROTC srhnto-ahipa. Noted for outstanding service and oonmonity partidaption in just about every majw HendersoD-arsa duritable activity, the unit aasisted in generatiiiff men than $87,000 for charity daring 1987-88. Cadata from tka unit ara known for their outatanding leaderahip throng partidaptin in a wide range of activitiea at Baaic Hi^ School, including: Honor Society, Business Club, Key Club, Interact Club, Student Council. S.A.D.D., PEER Group Counselors, School Band, School Yearbook, Varsity Quiz, Creative Writing Gub aJod Future Homemakars of America. Alao, French Club, German aub. Spanish Club. Cheas Club. Men's Choir, Drama Gub. Theapian Gub, Loa Latinos Club, Ambuology Club, Ski Gub, Wrestling Mat Maids and the Trackettea. Ott saya top recognition for hia unit did not come overni^t. According to Ott, it took persistence, hard work and a concerted team effort over a period of seveal yaara. The selection of our unit as the beat in the U.S. for 1987^ comea aa no real surprise to those of us who have wox^tad closest to the program, including our outstanding student cadeta." he aaid. '^eVa been cka before to hoDor far our andaavoci. I^ gratified aU the hard work these kids put into making our unit the very beat finally got the notice it rif^tfully deaervea." lL-\ BOULDER THEATRE BOULDER CITY • 293-3145 i m wNMMfl STARTS FRIDAY OCT. 21 SHOWTIMiS SAT-tUN 2i00 • 4i1S 6i30 • •i4S MON-nil •i90-ti4§ 8I\1EN OUT IRATEDPQI I < ^miiMMMtfMi t^m Scholarship deadline nears High school students who are interested in applying for $1,000 college scholarships should request applicationa by Dec. 1 from the Educational Communicationa Scholarahip Foundation. 721N. McKinley Road, Lake Foraat. Dl. 60046. To receive an applicatiro, students should send a note stating their name, addreaa, city, state and zip code, approximate grade-point average and year of graduation. Sixty-flve winners will bt selected, on the basil of academic performance, itt volvement in extracurricular activities and need for financial aid. UNLV engineering program accredited UNL Vs electrical engineering program in the Howard R. Hughes College of Engineering has been accredited by the national Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), President Robert C. Maxaon haa announced. '^e are pleaaed to announce that our engineering programa are now fully accredited," Maxson said, explaining that the college'a civil and mechanical engineering programs received ABET accreditation in 1987. Iliis is a significant moment for this university," the president said. "As we received word that our electrical engineering program haa achieved the same high standards aa those met by our civil and mechanical engineering programa. we kwk forward with great anticipation to the completion of the Thomaa T. Beam Enginaaring Complex. By the end of thia year, our engineering and computer acience programs will be moving into thst statof-the art teaching and reaearch facility." Dean William R. Wella of the engineering college explained that although the computer science progam is part of the college, the accredited programa in electrical, dvil, and mechanical engineering are the the three baaic programa in diadpline. "^udenta can pursue thaaa degrem with the aasuranoa that no job opportunitiaa, nor aooaf^tanoe to graduata programa, nor credit tranafar privilagaa, nor fallowahipa will be denied them because they have graduated from a non-aocreditad engineering program," Wella aaid. The Laa Vegaa community and the atate of Nevada can take pride in therapid development of engineering st UNLV," said Dean David W. Emerson of the College of Science and Mathenutios. R. G. Handsfield, M.D. Adult and Pediatric Urology Medical Arts Building (Across the street from St. Rose de Lima Hospital) 67 E. Lake Mead Drive,. Henderson, Nevada 89015 Office ho\ua Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. • 5 p.m. Call 564-9599 for appointments Dr. Handsfield is Board Certified in Urology and is a n\ember of the St. Rose de Linia Hospital Medical Staff. hM Each Night A Gourmet Delight! ^^^ 'i7:/ XOTB&A oAsxira 1%^ ^ // $2.99 A MFraiMNT NATIONAUry lA/M IVIIIY IIMttIT •UN Clun (Southern) NIgtit I MON Ortontal Cutoln* NigM I TUES Mtxioan Cutoln* NlgM | WID ItalUm Cutoint Night TNUR8 .Iriih CuMn NlgM | FfU tMfood Fish Fry NlgM SAT ttMk i Shrimp-NlgM meludaa a itvtragt I r.M.-10 F.M. •UN>TMUIIt „iot*o^^ 01^0730, *^'**'^'Monday Night Dinner Bufffot $1.69 ONLY DV09 .ptpp-^*::?. A tour M MMMaaMBiaa J

PAGE 15

14 Ntwa, llaaiaraqn, Nevada Thursday. October 20, IMS 1WMW* a^aiereea MeaM News, • Miaraei, Navada Pift II Miscellaneous newsmissiles By L. Jesrie BenMtt Today Oct. 20 is the 294th day of 1988, leaving a total of 72 days in the year. It was 186 years ago in 1803 that the United States Senate ratified the Louiaiana Purchase, more than doubling the size of the nation. The sun rose at 6:16 a.m. today and will set at 5:13 p.m. Thought for today "When you reach for the stars you may not quite get one, but you won't come up with a handfal of mud either." (Leo Burnett). or this and that I guess Pm on the oid band wagon again. It lasts while the national and international games that depend upon athletic ability, either individual or on a team basis have taken up much of our time. It is also phenomenal how much influence the athletes have on adults and childien alike. Team meana two mr more persons wwking together towaids a common goal. And team members have or should have the good of the team uppermost in mind. You know that old cliche is all too true "team work" is, more often than not, important to success. So I've been at a loss thinking of individuals and other team members who are cau^t up in the problem of cheating or breaking the rules of the game. It certainly was cheating before the act was discovered and the cheater caught. It was very wrong to plan to cheat and therefore jeopardize the team or one's self. We've certainly had some prime examples placed before us lately. Could ftarly and strong teaching override the plainly fanatic desire to win, no matter what? Repeat Mr. Cbilton's statement, Prefer a loss to a dishonest gain; the one brings pain for the moment, the other for all time." The consequences of cheating affects far more than the offending individual. Historic^ flashbacks Oct. 20 1820 Spain ceded Florida to the United States. 1890 Railway up Pike's Peak in Colorado was completed. 1M4 Gen. Douglas MacArthur returned to the Phillappine Islands after those islands were occupied by Japan for 2V years in World War H. Oct. 21 1590 Explorer Magellan entered the straits at the aouthem tip of South America, now named for him. 1945 Women of France were allowed to vote for first time. 1966 Tragic coal waste landslide in South Wales took the bves of 140, the majority being school children. Oct. 22 1836 Sam Houston became first president of the Republic of Texas. 1939 First professional football game was televised. 1981 Air Traffic Control union decertified by U.S. government agency. 0t. 23 First woman to make solo flight in public airplane was Blanche S. Scott at Fort Wayne, bid. 241 U.S. Marines and sailors with 58 French service men kwt t^eir bves when terrorists launched a suicide attack in Lebanon. Oct. 24 IMe Cual opsBwl to poblic. Utka to Home, N.Y. First transcontinental telegraph message sent. Oct. 25 Fremont's party reached the great Columbia River. The famous "Charge of the Light Brigade" took place in Crimean War (England vs. Russia). U.S. and six Caribbean nations invaded the Island of Granada. Oct. 26 The now famous "Gunfight at the OK Corral" took place in Tombstone, Ariz. Nylon was first introduced by DuPont. >: Halloweend Safety i; We are fast approaching the Halloween Holiday. Safety is impor•:tant at all times, but especially at this holiday because the little munch;d north. They joined grandparents. Buck and Molly Hohnan at the beautiful Cave Lake area near Eh, Nev. Jan, Buck and Brett were all successful, bagging a deer each. It was a first for Brett, it's getting cokier in Nevada's north country. (Did you go deer hunting, bird hunting. .? If so, let us know, call 565-7541). RememlMr Most banks or credit unions will not open an account for anyone not having a Social Security number. Children cannot register at school without their Social Security number. Therefore, it is important to be reminded again to see that you and your children are registered and givot a Social Security number. Be sure that you have at least two forms of identification to register. Condolenees Wish to extend condolences to Hank and Arlene Rubeck and Ken and Donna Newttm. Family monber, Dennis Rubeck, died Oct. 4,1968 as a result of a heart attack in Greenriver, Wyo. Over the years, Dennis and his wife. Patsy were frequent visitors to Henderson to see his brother and his family, as well as cousin Donna (Hansen) Newton. Hank and Arloie with Ken and Donna made the bng trip to Greenriver to attend the funeral services for Dennis on Oct. 7. Nevada Day Oct. 31 is "Nevada Day" at the popular vacation and fun spot. Disneyland, which gives special attention to the people from Nevada on that day. Surgery Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Maeetas have Uved in their beautiful home here in Henderson for many, many yean. Marshall worked at TMCA and the Mrs. is a familiar figure at local First Interstate Bank having, worked there for many years. All their children have been active in See Missiles, Page 16 About newspapers 'tet the people know fhe facts, and the amiry will be sak. Atnhtn Unooti rpBgdotw fci Our Hainfc T||E sn^icuT Witt W*'' COUPON$1.00 Off Va Rsg. t14 JO SM Dr. Kari at AZ Vac & Sew Now you have a better way to keep trash in its place...rent a mobile Toter REPLACES £SUR 20 GAUON TRASH CANS! DtSPOSAL SILVER STATE CLARK INVESTMENTS INC. DISPOSAL SANITATION 770 E. Sahara Avenue Las Vegas, Nevada 89104 ''BEFORE YOU BOY GIVE US EdMiUon McCiir ttudmti view safety flim FfatgnJaiiMwaflfOatdoB McCaw actod raeiB^ gathered to 861 "flafaty nuoai^ Songa^fUo. The filmatrlp UgMlghtad Buch itema m not talking to Rtrangera, UoUiig bodi ways before croaa^ tnffic Hglita. seat belta aid otker aafety meaaagea. Each child maived their own coloring bookand a eaaaette recording of tbe aonga. The community aervioe Stvdanta MeCaw watch "Safety throogh Songa." aponaorad by the Las Vegaa Board of Realtws and Century 21 JR RMhy. Jackie Wooldridge and Roaa Berwick, coowners of Century 21 JR Realty, preaented the program. School board to recognize Basic High's l\Aarine JROTC llie Basic High School Bfoine Corpa Junior Reaetve Offioen Training Corpa unit, nomtiy selected as the top ^CJROTC unit in the country, has again been dted, moat recently fay the Clark County School Board at its meeting last weak. The unit, the only one of ita kind in Nevada, is conpriaed of more than 180 cadets. A full-blown honors oeremoqy will be heU at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28, during half-time activitiae of the scheduled football game between Baaic and Eldorado High School. Ilw game wiD be played at Baaic officials noted. They added that all of the MCJROTC alumnae are enoour aged to attend and sit in a qJadal reaervedarea aet aaida for them. Tb tribute will include participation by senior Marine Conx ofHciala, the Marint CotpaDrum andBog^Corpe from Twentynina Palms, Calif., and atate and kioal dignitahee. Under the leadership of lenior inatructor Lt. Col. Bob Ott, USMC (Ret.), the Baaic High School MCJROTC unit received aeveral meritorious citiations in recent years for oqtitwnding service and accomiriiahmenta. Ott ia aaaiatad in the program by Master Gunnery Sgt. Richard Swank and Sgt. Maj. Gerald Ogle. In an activity summary aubmittad with an application for the award, tlia Baw MCJROTC unit WM noted for participation during 1967-88 in 13 vu^ fund and blood drivea, 59 pubUc affairs eventa, and aevsral riftery and phyacal fitnaas oon^ietitiaaa. T^ unit captorad fSrat-pUoe hao0s aawsnl yama iaa xow iiidffllmaatoaiBpatitkiiahdd a^the local, atate and regioaal larela, and placed first in oaerall and invididnal phyaical MCJROTC color guards available by Cadet/Gunnery Sgt. Loma McNeill Baaic High School MCJROTC The Baaic High School Marine Corps Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps continues to provide color guards to various civic organizations throughout the community, offidala noted. )^thin the last three weeks they have performed at BuriKholdo' and Brown Junior High Schools open houaea, as well as for the National Convention of the Soldiers of Fortune Magazine, the National Competition of the ASA at the Las Vegaa Softball Center, the Desert Inn Hotel, and, as alwajrs, at the home football games for the Baaic Wolvaa at Don Taylor Stadium. The JROTC program ia available to provide opening oaramoniea for many activitiea. For more information, call 564-1427. fhaieaa competitions at the local and districtwide levels. For the sixth and seventh years of the Clark Coimty School District Y outh P hyaical Fltneaa Team (YPFT) Meet competition, the MCJROTC imit took top honors againat all fiva of the JBOTCa in the diatrict. Cadata in the program have oonsisrtently shown hif^ schol* aatic achievemnt. Eleven cadtta in the 1987-88 graduating daaa ware awarded college achcdarahqia or awarda, 11 cadeta earned atraight Aa for the yaar, and 31 cadeta were placed on the A-B honor roll. In addition, ODe cadet received an appointoMBt to the Air Faroe Acadany, one cHlat raoeived an Air Fans ROTO scholarahip and two cadets rsoeived Army ROTC srhnto-ahipa. Noted for outstanding service and oonmonity partidaption in just about every majw HendersoD-arsa duritable activity, the unit aasisted in generatiiiff men than $87,000 for charity daring 1987-88. Cadata from tka unit ara known for their outatanding leaderahip throng partidaptin in a wide range of activitiea at Baaic Hi^ School, including: Honor Society, Business Club, Key Club, Interact Club, Student Council. S.A.D.D., PEER Group Counselors, School Band, School Yearbook, Varsity Quiz, Creative Writing Gub aJod Future Homemakars of America. Alao, French Club, German aub. Spanish Club. Cheas Club. Men's Choir, Drama Gub. Theapian Gub, Loa Latinos Club, Ambuology Club, Ski Gub, Wrestling Mat Maids and the Trackettea. Ott saya top recognition for hia unit did not come overni^t. According to Ott, it took persistence, hard work and a concerted team effort over a period of seveal yaara. The selection of our unit as the beat in the U.S. for 1987^ comea aa no real surprise to those of us who have wox^tad closest to the program, including our outstanding student cadeta." he aaid. '^eVa been cka before to hoDor far our andaavoci. I^ gratified aU the hard work these kids put into making our unit the very beat finally got the notice it rif^tfully deaervea." lL-\ BOULDER THEATRE BOULDER CITY • 293-3145 i m wNMMfl STARTS FRIDAY OCT. 21 SHOWTIMiS SAT-tUN 2i00 • 4i1S 6i30 • •i4S MON-nil •i90-ti4§ 8I\1EN OUT IRATEDPQI I < ^miiMMMtfMi t^m Scholarship deadline nears High school students who are interested in applying for $1,000 college scholarships should request applicationa by Dec. 1 from the Educational Communicationa Scholarahip Foundation. 721N. McKinley Road, Lake Foraat. Dl. 60046. To receive an applicatiro, students should send a note stating their name, addreaa, city, state and zip code, approximate grade-point average and year of graduation. Sixty-flve winners will bt selected, on the basil of academic performance, itt volvement in extracurricular activities and need for financial aid. UNLV engineering program accredited UNL Vs electrical engineering program in the Howard R. Hughes College of Engineering has been accredited by the national Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), President Robert C. Maxaon haa announced. '^e are pleaaed to announce that our engineering programa are now fully accredited," Maxson said, explaining that the college'a civil and mechanical engineering programs received ABET accreditation in 1987. Iliis is a significant moment for this university," the president said. "As we received word that our electrical engineering program haa achieved the same high standards aa those met by our civil and mechanical engineering programa. we kwk forward with great anticipation to the completion of the Thomaa T. Beam Enginaaring Complex. By the end of thia year, our engineering and computer acience programs will be moving into thst statof-the art teaching and reaearch facility." Dean William R. Wella of the engineering college explained that although the computer science progam is part of the college, the accredited programa in electrical, dvil, and mechanical engineering are the the three baaic programa in diadpline. "^udenta can pursue thaaa degrem with the aasuranoa that no job opportunitiaa, nor aooaf^tanoe to graduata programa, nor credit tranafar privilagaa, nor fallowahipa will be denied them because they have graduated from a non-aocreditad engineering program," Wella aaid. The Laa Vegaa community and the atate of Nevada can take pride in therapid development of engineering st UNLV," said Dean David W. Emerson of the College of Science and Mathenutios. R. G. Handsfield, M.D. Adult and Pediatric Urology Medical Arts Building (Across the street from St. Rose de Lima Hospital) 67 E. Lake Mead Drive,. Henderson, Nevada 89015 Office ho\ua Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. • 5 p.m. Call 564-9599 for appointments Dr. Handsfield is Board Certified in Urology and is a n\ember of the St. Rose de Linia Hospital Medical Staff. hM Each Night A Gourmet Delight! ^^^ 'i7:/ XOTB&A oAsxira 1%^ ^ // $2.99 A MFraiMNT NATIONAUry lA/M IVIIIY IIMttIT •UN Clun (Southern) NIgtit I MON Ortontal Cutoln* NigM I TUES Mtxioan Cutoln* NlgM | WID ItalUm Cutoint Night TNUR8 .Iriih CuMn NlgM | FfU tMfood Fish Fry NlgM SAT ttMk i Shrimp-NlgM meludaa a itvtragt I r.M.-10 F.M. •UN>TMUIIt „iot*o^^ 01^0730, *^'**'^'Monday Night Dinner Bufffot $1.69 ONLY DV09 .ptpp-^*::?. A tour M MMMaaMBiaa J

PAGE 16

/ ^> PN It HMdtnM HMM Ntwi, Hendtrion, Nevadi Tlindiur, Oetobtf K IMS IHuwky. October 20,1968 HtBdtrsta H*aw Ntwt, Htadtriea, Ntvada Pagt 11 Missiles from Page 14 1^1. 11 •chool and gndvalsd from Basic High School. They have been great dtbnt and aghbon. Thair many fUanda and neighbors share their concern for oldest aon, Marahdl. who raoently had some very serious heart surgery at the Daaert Springs Hospital in Las Vegas. We add sincere prayers for Manhall's apeady and complete recovery. OM Mexico School atudenta in our achool systems have many good opportunities in divardfied fields to enhance their education. We heard recently from grandson Matt Bennett about a recent trip to Old Mexico by the Spaniah students. In the class of Dr. Marian Walker. Dr. Walker has taught and made the trip to Mexico with many of the parenta of the students just making the trip this year. New dance studio Congratulatioos to Kathy^ Kline on the opening of 'Studio K', an aerobic dance studio. We well remember when Kathy and Lisa Carducci McDonald, along with several others, were champion twirlers, not only in our area and California, but in the East. They took honors at Notre Dame in competition. Beet of luck and much succees to Kathy. If Kathy and Studio K succeed, then all who seek for excellence in exercise will also benefit and succeed. Hoapitaliced A longtime resident of Henderson, Edna Crapsey, was hospitalized at St. Roae de Lima last week. Husband Albert reports that she is doing quite well. Fxlna's family and her many friends wish her a very speedy recovery. Seneca wrote "He who would arrive at the appointed end must follow a single ^ road and not wander through many ways." [Lucius Annaeus Seneca was a Roman stoic philosopher who lived from 4 B.C. to 65 B.C.) Anniversaries Oct. 20: Ronald and Helen Gilger; Floyd and Ruth Weir and; and Clay and Kim Uhls. Robin and Karen Smith. Paul and Lottie Brimley and David and Aleta Bondurant. Earl and Leslie Leavitt; Don and Kim Ellis; and Dwayne and May Parker. Oct. 24: Ivins and Thuru Jones. 21: 22: 2S: Oct. 26: Tim and Deanna Parker; John and Susan Harris; James and Beverly Grosscurth; Mr. and Mrs. Ed Payne; Michael and Debra King; and Ross and Susan Johnson. Oct. 27: Kevin and Denice Hamilton and Howard and Elaine Heklerlein. Birthdaya Oct. 20 Elizabeth Diane Hatch is one-year-old today; Jeannie Benoit, Michael Christopher Coplin, Jerry Goodman, Murray Snow, Kendall Braithwaite. Karen Blazeard Martinez, Beth Anderson, Richard J. Hunt, Annette Dawson, Ijsurie Sullivan, Diane Rhees Van Etten, Joey Gatlin, Opal Farnsworth, Suaanne Nelson, and RandaU W. Stearman. Celebrities; Radio/televsion personality Arlone Francis, 80; actor Herschel Bemardi, 66; columinist Art Buchwald, 63; baseball great Mickey Mantle, 67; actor William Christopher, 66. Oct. 21 Ray Huguea, Rochelle Benoit, Gail Scow, Howard L. Scow, Lola Balzen. Owen LiUywhite, Jim Lillywhite, Florence Baird, Randal K. Tobler, Jane Tanksley, Rachel Dawn Miller, Judy Massey. Gary L. Steward, Sr., Mark Jacob Wadsworth, Patty Foster, Gary Murphy, Marian Miller, Karen Mathewson, Patrick Grossardt, Belinda Workman, Heather Anderson and Lamon Turner. Celebrities: Jazz muscian Dizzy Gillespie, 71; baseball great Whitey Ford, 60; rock singer Manfred Mann, 48; and actress Carrie Fisher, 32. Oct. 22 David James Blazzard, Janet Sanders. Tom Carter, Heather Names, Michael Call, Vickie Cottam, Mike Ulibarri, Henry Ramsay, Marni Duey, Suzy Cole, George Lundahl, William S. Potter, Michael Gill, Barry Lasko, Donna Harper, Bret Anderson, Emily Hardy, and Gary Alexander. Celebrities: Actress Joan Fontaine, 71; actor Christopher Lloyd, 50; actor Derek Jacobi, 50; actor Tony Roberts, 49; actress Annette Funicello, 46; and actress Catherine Deneuve, 45. Oct. 23 Marian Doucette, 80; Dale Ward, Jill Dodd, Russell Cassedy, Ken Gatlin. Margaret R. Excell, Stephen Hedland, Robert England, Robert DeCaesare, Roy Dransfield, Lores Reeves, Richard Wright, Glenda Jackson, Trisha Lynn Blake, Dolores Bradshaw, Maud LaRae Clark, Glen DeVoge, Susan Wimmer, Kristine Bennett, Trevor Mur^ihy, Mary Gregeraon, Dewain Coil, and Vickie Ruaaell Celebrities: Talk show host Johnny Carson, 63; soccer p-eat Pele, 48; and author/movie director Michael Crichton, 46. Oct. 24 i Keith N. Roylance, Terry Lee Scoble, Ranna Willitms, Mark Williams, Janalyn Parmenter, Gary Isom, Myron Settj€ Kimberly Butrymowici, Helen Troy Meeks, Joni Noel, Dale Scott Aijiby, Shelly Stock, Grant Turner, Russell Bickle, Jodie Baldwin, Bill UtrroU, Barbara Hein, Michad Shearin, Jeri Shearin, Kody Stephens/iud^th Morris, Aaron Reece, Roy Morris, Ross Johnson, and DawJ Petty. Celebrities: Baaeball executive Dr. Bobby Brown, 63; |otball great Y.A. Tittle, 62; actor David Nelson, 62; rock muBician|till Wyman, 47; and actw Kevin Kline, 41. ./ Oct. 25 i Kindra Marie Twitchell, Lies McBride Kight, Arlo lyde. Spencer Dean, Oleen Heas, Johnny Harrah, Donald Freeman, liicinda Oliver, Dorothy Brown, Trevor Rowland, Lori Darrow, andBert Coe. Celebrities: Actor Whit Bissell, 79; country star Mtmie Pearl, 76; baseball's Bobby Thomson, 66; actor Tony Franriosa, 6(ij actreas Marion Roas, 60; singer Helen Reddy, 46; and actor BrianKerwin, 39. Oct. 26 Tori Kae Nelaon is one-year-old today; Danny liee MoaherrLurleene Mein, Helga Green, Nikki Anderson, Minda Lee srickaon, Daniel Weisbarth, Suzette McCall, Callie Rae Patterson, Kay Gheen, Mike D. Gardner, Sheila Chediiter, Shawn W. Clark, Kent Stuver, and ShaUla Lillywhite Hymas, Celebrities: Archbishop of Philadelphia Cardial John Krol, 78; France's Francois Mitterrand, 72; actreas Jaclyn Snith, 41; and former child star Jackie Coogen, 74. Oct. 27 Josephine Inness, Artoise Griffin, Scott J. Mosher, Jerilyn Bennett, Amy Sawyer Lomprey, Mary Zeigler, Mai^aret Nelson, George Blanchard, Renee Gubler, John A. Henrie, MW Sapp, Ashley Woodbury, l/>rnn Purcell. Thomas L Keele, Thelna L. Wolsey, Cherrill Murphy, ,Ianet Ludlow, and Ben Langeliers. Celebrities:: Television producer Frederick OeCordove, 78; actreas Nanette Fabray, 68; sportacaster Ralph Kine/-, 66. Caesars palace executives to be auctioned for cfiarlty mm. People use more than twice at much msrgarine at butter In the United States. UP FOR AUCTION—Caesars Palace executives, from left, Lloyd Wenttell III, room service managor; Brian Menzel, vice president of human resources; and Art Torcello (right), director of employee development, can be bid on at aa Arthritis Foundation fundraiser on Tuesday. Three of Caesars' best centurians are placing themselves up for bid at the Second An* nual Bachelor Auction, to beriefit the Arthritis Foundation. Brian Menzel, vice president of human resources, Art Torcello, director of employee development and Lloyd Wentzell III, room service manager, will be for sale to the highest bidder beginning at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 1, in the Aladdin Hotel Showroom. The event, themed "A Knifl^t to Remember," features 30 potential "knights" in tuxedos, including celebrities, and entertainment before the auction. A number of alluring date packages are being offered, such as fine dining and entertainment, sporting events, and a trip to Lake Tahoe. For the program, each bachelor must answer the question, "Why wouW a woman find me interesting? Here's what Torcello said about hioiBelf, "Because I'm a good listener. I listen with my eyes, ears and heart." Wentzell stated, "I am easygoing with a nice sense of humor. I lead an active life and enjoy sharing." ^'m a warm and enthuaiaatic person who loves life and am sincerely interested in other people," answered Menzel. For single ladies who are tired of boring guys and yawning dates and who need some excitement in their lives, the occasion is a chance to make a change. Tickets to attend the auction may be purchased at the door for $10. All are welcome to bid or come just for the entertainment. Movie star to marshal Nevada Day parade UNLV seeks Hazardous Substance Research Center UNLVs Environmental Research Center, along with research facilities at two other major universities, is a finalist for funding as a national Hazardous Substance Research Center. UNLV has joined with the University of California, Ix)8 Angeles, and the University of Washington, Seattle, in a consortium that has appUed to the Environmental Protection Agency for funding for the center, according to Dr. David McNelia, director of the Environmental Research Center. The consortium is now tied with a group led by Stanford University, having beat out UC-Berkeley, UC-Davis, and other applicants for the funding. A decision from EPA is expected before the end of October, said McNeils, a codirector of the consortium. EPA is funding five of the centers across the country at $1 million annually for eight years. If the TJNLV-UCLAWashington consortium receives the funding, it will form a nationsfi center focusing on hazardous substance issues in EPA Regions IX and X, which include the western states from Arizona north to Idaho and west to Alaska and Hawaii. Each member institution of the consortium submitted a number of projects in the prbposal. UNLVs projects include one dealing with the transportation of Selenium (a metal) in soil-platLt-water systems conducted by Dr. Dale Debitt; development of a model to trace the transport of hazardous substances in ground water by Dr. Klaus Stetzenbach; integration of surface and bore-hole geophysical sensing techniques, a study conducted by Dr. Dennis Weber; and development and maintenance of analytical reference materials by Dr. Mark Peters. The ERC would also be involved with the sub-centers at the other institutions in the consortium to provide training and technical information to EPA and state and local government agencies. McNelis said being part of the Ha^rdous Substance Research Center would bring the ERC national recognition and would involve it with some of the nation's leading research institutions. Hecht to address SCACA Sen. Chic Hecht, R-Nev. will be a featured speaker at the Senior Citizens Against the Catastrophic Act (SCACA) townhall meeting at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 25, in Carpenter's Hall, 501 N. Lamb. Toothbruth brIttiM wan the firtt commercial product made of nylon, which wu patented in 1937. The TrieN^s of tKt Htt^da\rsou ^ RUDY R. MANTHEI, D.O. Ey Physician & Surgeon Ophthalmic Plastic Surgary Announces the opening o^ hie office In Green Valley 2501 N. Green Valley Parkway, Suite 130 (Green Valley Medical Sertrlces) for appointment call 399*9960 Montie Montana, a show business name that's been meaningful to the western world of entertainment for more than half a century, will be the "celebrity marshall" at the Nevada Day parade to be held at 10 a.m. Monday, Oct. 31, at the Cashman Field Complex. University Medical Center of southern Nevada Foundation Inc. will sponsor the celebration which conunences with the parade, followed by opening ceremonies, a western style barbecue, exhibits, a petting zoo, and continuous free entertainment. Babies four and under have been invited to particiapte. It is the first time the Nevada Day Parade has had a category composed of Nevada's new generation officials said. Hopefully, in will become a tradition, they added all proceeds go to University Medical Center. KOTSL& CASXSrO xKBXwr>M*oMr. iwaj-A. Hitting a Mega-Mini can get you into a lot of good clubSs A living, mpsical diorama added to the atmosphere of Nevada Day 1987. A Western barbecue will immediately follow the parade. There will be dancing, entertainment, cultural and historical exhibits, waterfights among the Clark County Fire Departments and much more to enjoy during this fun-filled day, they said. All proceeds go to University Medical Center. For further information, please call ;i83-6022. In the parade Montie Montana will once again ride his horse Rex No. 9. Montie rode Rex into a Miles City, Mont., arena on July 4,1925, for his frist professional paid performance. Parades are part of Montie's colorful life. Montie rides in many across the nation during each year. Montie has ridden in the Pasadena Tournament of Roses Parade each New Year's Day for over 54 years. For more than 20 years, during winter months and when not on tour, Montie entertained more than 400,000 California school children by visiting their schools with Rex and his .125 Oct. ax Civiic Ccwttw^ i-CoJf"BhktSkl ?fof 6£ White ElepUtrts"'**^^ Bro^Hl>oHKtysjfe':j^Vi. (" snruc coiur K uiirds are scheduled to parade during Nevada Day 1988 fertivitiea. 2800 South Boulder Hwy. 294-5000 If 4DEUCES WILD 5C-25C Video Poker Machines THE SKYLINE CASINO & RESTAURANT : im iriiiiUMWirii year old stagecoach, educating and entertaining the youngsters in the way of the early west. BOULDIR CITY HOSPITAL 901 Adams llvd. Bouldar City, NV 89008 *> CHECK OUR SERVICESI DIAQNOSTIC X-RAYS — Cat Scan Nuclear Medicine Ultraeound Mammography Special Procedures LABORATORY — Cholesterol & Complete Llpld Panel Complete Blood Count Complete Chemistry Panel Thyroid Screening For Information Call 293-4111 J the Manicurist Who Makes a Difference Deja Vu Halpstyling Located In Green Valley Corner of Sunset and Valle Verde Just 5 Minutes from the Freeway 458-0898 Jo „„ ,^,^fflCOUP0N Tips w/Overlays reg. $40 NOW ISOJ Fills reg. $20 HOW $17| Tips w/Flber Weave Wraps .reg. $40 mOMf ISO' Fiber Weave Floaters j On Natural Nail reg. $40 NOW $301 Price* good with Karen Lynn only TuesSat 10 a m 7 pm • =^ The Secret's Out We've made it easier for you to call us. A new telephone system at St. Rose de Lima Hospital now lets you direct-dial to many dcpartmenu of your hometown hospital — without going through the switchboard. To take advantage of this new convenience, make note of the following new phone numbers. We'll also help if you need assistance Hnding a doctor. Just call our special Physician Referral line, 564-4508. ^ Account Information Industrial Health Last name A-Mc 564^593 Network 564-4509 Last name M-Z S64-4S94 Laboratory 564-4566 Administration 564-4501 Lifeline 564-4516 Admitting 564^560 Medical Record* 564-4644 Business Office Mgr. 564-4592 Personnel Dept. 564-4656 Community Education 564-4542 Pharmacy 564-4540 Dietary Dept. 564-4530 Physical Therapy 564-4576 564-4600 Radiology Dept. 564-4515 Family Planning 564-4554 Social Services Dept. 564-4582 Gift Shop 564-4605 Volunteer Program Information 564-4543 For all other departments not listed above, call 564-2622 -QSt.Rosc deUma ^ HOSPITAL \0Z L Lake Mead Drive • Hendersorv NV 89015 AiSt.Rot0diUmHetpiuU,thitniilkmefi ORIGINAL

PAGE 17

/ ^> PN It HMdtnM HMM Ntwi, Hendtrion, Nevadi Tlindiur, Oetobtf K IMS IHuwky. October 20,1968 HtBdtrsta H*aw Ntwt, Htadtriea, Ntvada Pagt 11 Missiles from Page 14 1^1. 11 •chool and gndvalsd from Basic High School. They have been great dtbnt and aghbon. Thair many fUanda and neighbors share their concern for oldest aon, Marahdl. who raoently had some very serious heart surgery at the Daaert Springs Hospital in Las Vegas. We add sincere prayers for Manhall's apeady and complete recovery. OM Mexico School atudenta in our achool systems have many good opportunities in divardfied fields to enhance their education. We heard recently from grandson Matt Bennett about a recent trip to Old Mexico by the Spaniah students. In the class of Dr. Marian Walker. Dr. Walker has taught and made the trip to Mexico with many of the parenta of the students just making the trip this year. New dance studio Congratulatioos to Kathy^ Kline on the opening of 'Studio K', an aerobic dance studio. We well remember when Kathy and Lisa Carducci McDonald, along with several others, were champion twirlers, not only in our area and California, but in the East. They took honors at Notre Dame in competition. Beet of luck and much succees to Kathy. If Kathy and Studio K succeed, then all who seek for excellence in exercise will also benefit and succeed. Hoapitaliced A longtime resident of Henderson, Edna Crapsey, was hospitalized at St. Roae de Lima last week. Husband Albert reports that she is doing quite well. Fxlna's family and her many friends wish her a very speedy recovery. Seneca wrote "He who would arrive at the appointed end must follow a single ^ road and not wander through many ways." [Lucius Annaeus Seneca was a Roman stoic philosopher who lived from 4 B.C. to 65 B.C.) Anniversaries Oct. 20: Ronald and Helen Gilger; Floyd and Ruth Weir and; and Clay and Kim Uhls. Robin and Karen Smith. Paul and Lottie Brimley and David and Aleta Bondurant. Earl and Leslie Leavitt; Don and Kim Ellis; and Dwayne and May Parker. Oct. 24: Ivins and Thuru Jones. 21: 22: 2S: Oct. 26: Tim and Deanna Parker; John and Susan Harris; James and Beverly Grosscurth; Mr. and Mrs. Ed Payne; Michael and Debra King; and Ross and Susan Johnson. Oct. 27: Kevin and Denice Hamilton and Howard and Elaine Heklerlein. Birthdaya Oct. 20 Elizabeth Diane Hatch is one-year-old today; Jeannie Benoit, Michael Christopher Coplin, Jerry Goodman, Murray Snow, Kendall Braithwaite. Karen Blazeard Martinez, Beth Anderson, Richard J. Hunt, Annette Dawson, Ijsurie Sullivan, Diane Rhees Van Etten, Joey Gatlin, Opal Farnsworth, Suaanne Nelson, and RandaU W. Stearman. Celebrities; Radio/televsion personality Arlone Francis, 80; actor Herschel Bemardi, 66; columinist Art Buchwald, 63; baseball great Mickey Mantle, 67; actor William Christopher, 66. Oct. 21 Ray Huguea, Rochelle Benoit, Gail Scow, Howard L. Scow, Lola Balzen. Owen LiUywhite, Jim Lillywhite, Florence Baird, Randal K. Tobler, Jane Tanksley, Rachel Dawn Miller, Judy Massey. Gary L. Steward, Sr., Mark Jacob Wadsworth, Patty Foster, Gary Murphy, Marian Miller, Karen Mathewson, Patrick Grossardt, Belinda Workman, Heather Anderson and Lamon Turner. Celebrities: Jazz muscian Dizzy Gillespie, 71; baseball great Whitey Ford, 60; rock singer Manfred Mann, 48; and actress Carrie Fisher, 32. Oct. 22 David James Blazzard, Janet Sanders. Tom Carter, Heather Names, Michael Call, Vickie Cottam, Mike Ulibarri, Henry Ramsay, Marni Duey, Suzy Cole, George Lundahl, William S. Potter, Michael Gill, Barry Lasko, Donna Harper, Bret Anderson, Emily Hardy, and Gary Alexander. Celebrities: Actress Joan Fontaine, 71; actor Christopher Lloyd, 50; actor Derek Jacobi, 50; actor Tony Roberts, 49; actress Annette Funicello, 46; and actress Catherine Deneuve, 45. Oct. 23 Marian Doucette, 80; Dale Ward, Jill Dodd, Russell Cassedy, Ken Gatlin. Margaret R. Excell, Stephen Hedland, Robert England, Robert DeCaesare, Roy Dransfield, Lores Reeves, Richard Wright, Glenda Jackson, Trisha Lynn Blake, Dolores Bradshaw, Maud LaRae Clark, Glen DeVoge, Susan Wimmer, Kristine Bennett, Trevor Mur^ihy, Mary Gregeraon, Dewain Coil, and Vickie Ruaaell Celebrities: Talk show host Johnny Carson, 63; soccer p-eat Pele, 48; and author/movie director Michael Crichton, 46. Oct. 24 i Keith N. Roylance, Terry Lee Scoble, Ranna Willitms, Mark Williams, Janalyn Parmenter, Gary Isom, Myron Settj€ Kimberly Butrymowici, Helen Troy Meeks, Joni Noel, Dale Scott Aijiby, Shelly Stock, Grant Turner, Russell Bickle, Jodie Baldwin, Bill UtrroU, Barbara Hein, Michad Shearin, Jeri Shearin, Kody Stephens/iud^th Morris, Aaron Reece, Roy Morris, Ross Johnson, and DawJ Petty. Celebrities: Baaeball executive Dr. Bobby Brown, 63; |otball great Y.A. Tittle, 62; actor David Nelson, 62; rock muBician|till Wyman, 47; and actw Kevin Kline, 41. ./ Oct. 25 i Kindra Marie Twitchell, Lies McBride Kight, Arlo lyde. Spencer Dean, Oleen Heas, Johnny Harrah, Donald Freeman, liicinda Oliver, Dorothy Brown, Trevor Rowland, Lori Darrow, andBert Coe. Celebrities: Actor Whit Bissell, 79; country star Mtmie Pearl, 76; baseball's Bobby Thomson, 66; actor Tony Franriosa, 6(ij actreas Marion Roas, 60; singer Helen Reddy, 46; and actor BrianKerwin, 39. Oct. 26 Tori Kae Nelaon is one-year-old today; Danny liee MoaherrLurleene Mein, Helga Green, Nikki Anderson, Minda Lee srickaon, Daniel Weisbarth, Suzette McCall, Callie Rae Patterson, Kay Gheen, Mike D. Gardner, Sheila Chediiter, Shawn W. Clark, Kent Stuver, and ShaUla Lillywhite Hymas, Celebrities: Archbishop of Philadelphia Cardial John Krol, 78; France's Francois Mitterrand, 72; actreas Jaclyn Snith, 41; and former child star Jackie Coogen, 74. Oct. 27 Josephine Inness, Artoise Griffin, Scott J. Mosher, Jerilyn Bennett, Amy Sawyer Lomprey, Mary Zeigler, Mai^aret Nelson, George Blanchard, Renee Gubler, John A. Henrie, MW Sapp, Ashley Woodbury, l/>rnn Purcell. Thomas L Keele, Thelna L. Wolsey, Cherrill Murphy, ,Ianet Ludlow, and Ben Langeliers. Celebrities:: Television producer Frederick OeCordove, 78; actreas Nanette Fabray, 68; sportacaster Ralph Kine/-, 66. Caesars palace executives to be auctioned for cfiarlty mm. People use more than twice at much msrgarine at butter In the United States. UP FOR AUCTION—Caesars Palace executives, from left, Lloyd Wenttell III, room service managor; Brian Menzel, vice president of human resources; and Art Torcello (right), director of employee development, can be bid on at aa Arthritis Foundation fundraiser on Tuesday. Three of Caesars' best centurians are placing themselves up for bid at the Second An* nual Bachelor Auction, to beriefit the Arthritis Foundation. Brian Menzel, vice president of human resources, Art Torcello, director of employee development and Lloyd Wentzell III, room service manager, will be for sale to the highest bidder beginning at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 1, in the Aladdin Hotel Showroom. The event, themed "A Knifl^t to Remember," features 30 potential "knights" in tuxedos, including celebrities, and entertainment before the auction. A number of alluring date packages are being offered, such as fine dining and entertainment, sporting events, and a trip to Lake Tahoe. For the program, each bachelor must answer the question, "Why wouW a woman find me interesting? Here's what Torcello said about hioiBelf, "Because I'm a good listener. I listen with my eyes, ears and heart." Wentzell stated, "I am easygoing with a nice sense of humor. I lead an active life and enjoy sharing." ^'m a warm and enthuaiaatic person who loves life and am sincerely interested in other people," answered Menzel. For single ladies who are tired of boring guys and yawning dates and who need some excitement in their lives, the occasion is a chance to make a change. Tickets to attend the auction may be purchased at the door for $10. All are welcome to bid or come just for the entertainment. Movie star to marshal Nevada Day parade UNLV seeks Hazardous Substance Research Center UNLVs Environmental Research Center, along with research facilities at two other major universities, is a finalist for funding as a national Hazardous Substance Research Center. UNLV has joined with the University of California, Ix)8 Angeles, and the University of Washington, Seattle, in a consortium that has appUed to the Environmental Protection Agency for funding for the center, according to Dr. David McNelia, director of the Environmental Research Center. The consortium is now tied with a group led by Stanford University, having beat out UC-Berkeley, UC-Davis, and other applicants for the funding. A decision from EPA is expected before the end of October, said McNeils, a codirector of the consortium. EPA is funding five of the centers across the country at $1 million annually for eight years. If the TJNLV-UCLAWashington consortium receives the funding, it will form a nationsfi center focusing on hazardous substance issues in EPA Regions IX and X, which include the western states from Arizona north to Idaho and west to Alaska and Hawaii. Each member institution of the consortium submitted a number of projects in the prbposal. UNLVs projects include one dealing with the transportation of Selenium (a metal) in soil-platLt-water systems conducted by Dr. Dale Debitt; development of a model to trace the transport of hazardous substances in ground water by Dr. Klaus Stetzenbach; integration of surface and bore-hole geophysical sensing techniques, a study conducted by Dr. Dennis Weber; and development and maintenance of analytical reference materials by Dr. Mark Peters. The ERC would also be involved with the sub-centers at the other institutions in the consortium to provide training and technical information to EPA and state and local government agencies. McNelis said being part of the Ha^rdous Substance Research Center would bring the ERC national recognition and would involve it with some of the nation's leading research institutions. Hecht to address SCACA Sen. Chic Hecht, R-Nev. will be a featured speaker at the Senior Citizens Against the Catastrophic Act (SCACA) townhall meeting at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 25, in Carpenter's Hall, 501 N. Lamb. Toothbruth brIttiM wan the firtt commercial product made of nylon, which wu patented in 1937. The TrieN^s of tKt Htt^da\rsou ^ RUDY R. MANTHEI, D.O. Ey Physician & Surgeon Ophthalmic Plastic Surgary Announces the opening o^ hie office In Green Valley 2501 N. Green Valley Parkway, Suite 130 (Green Valley Medical Sertrlces) for appointment call 399*9960 Montie Montana, a show business name that's been meaningful to the western world of entertainment for more than half a century, will be the "celebrity marshall" at the Nevada Day parade to be held at 10 a.m. Monday, Oct. 31, at the Cashman Field Complex. University Medical Center of southern Nevada Foundation Inc. will sponsor the celebration which conunences with the parade, followed by opening ceremonies, a western style barbecue, exhibits, a petting zoo, and continuous free entertainment. Babies four and under have been invited to particiapte. It is the first time the Nevada Day Parade has had a category composed of Nevada's new generation officials said. Hopefully, in will become a tradition, they added all proceeds go to University Medical Center. KOTSL& CASXSrO xKBXwr>M*oMr. iwaj-A. Hitting a Mega-Mini can get you into a lot of good clubSs A living, mpsical diorama added to the atmosphere of Nevada Day 1987. A Western barbecue will immediately follow the parade. There will be dancing, entertainment, cultural and historical exhibits, waterfights among the Clark County Fire Departments and much more to enjoy during this fun-filled day, they said. All proceeds go to University Medical Center. For further information, please call ;i83-6022. In the parade Montie Montana will once again ride his horse Rex No. 9. Montie rode Rex into a Miles City, Mont., arena on July 4,1925, for his frist professional paid performance. Parades are part of Montie's colorful life. Montie rides in many across the nation during each year. Montie has ridden in the Pasadena Tournament of Roses Parade each New Year's Day for over 54 years. For more than 20 years, during winter months and when not on tour, Montie entertained more than 400,000 California school children by visiting their schools with Rex and his .125 Oct. ax Civiic Ccwttw^ i-CoJf"BhktSkl ?fof 6£ White ElepUtrts"'**^^ Bro^Hl>oHKtysjfe':j^Vi. (" snruc coiur K uiirds are scheduled to parade during Nevada Day 1988 fertivitiea. 2800 South Boulder Hwy. 294-5000 If 4DEUCES WILD 5C-25C Video Poker Machines THE SKYLINE CASINO & RESTAURANT : im iriiiiUMWirii year old stagecoach, educating and entertaining the youngsters in the way of the early west. BOULDIR CITY HOSPITAL 901 Adams llvd. Bouldar City, NV 89008 *> CHECK OUR SERVICESI DIAQNOSTIC X-RAYS — Cat Scan Nuclear Medicine Ultraeound Mammography Special Procedures LABORATORY — Cholesterol & Complete Llpld Panel Complete Blood Count Complete Chemistry Panel Thyroid Screening For Information Call 293-4111 J the Manicurist Who Makes a Difference Deja Vu Halpstyling Located In Green Valley Corner of Sunset and Valle Verde Just 5 Minutes from the Freeway 458-0898 Jo „„ ,^,^fflCOUP0N Tips w/Overlays reg. $40 NOW ISOJ Fills reg. $20 HOW $17| Tips w/Flber Weave Wraps .reg. $40 mOMf ISO' Fiber Weave Floaters j On Natural Nail reg. $40 NOW $301 Price* good with Karen Lynn only TuesSat 10 a m 7 pm • =^ The Secret's Out We've made it easier for you to call us. A new telephone system at St. Rose de Lima Hospital now lets you direct-dial to many dcpartmenu of your hometown hospital — without going through the switchboard. To take advantage of this new convenience, make note of the following new phone numbers. We'll also help if you need assistance Hnding a doctor. Just call our special Physician Referral line, 564-4508. ^ Account Information Industrial Health Last name A-Mc 564^593 Network 564-4509 Last name M-Z S64-4S94 Laboratory 564-4566 Administration 564-4501 Lifeline 564-4516 Admitting 564^560 Medical Record* 564-4644 Business Office Mgr. 564-4592 Personnel Dept. 564-4656 Community Education 564-4542 Pharmacy 564-4540 Dietary Dept. 564-4530 Physical Therapy 564-4576 564-4600 Radiology Dept. 564-4515 Family Planning 564-4554 Social Services Dept. 564-4582 Gift Shop 564-4605 Volunteer Program Information 564-4543 For all other departments not listed above, call 564-2622 -QSt.Rosc deUma ^ HOSPITAL \0Z L Lake Mead Drive • Hendersorv NV 89015 AiSt.Rot0diUmHetpiuU,thitniilkmefi ORIGINAL

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rM01* RMitnM KMM Ntwi, HMitrNn. Ntvada Thmdaj, OeColMr 20,1N8 ThM*qr, Oetobw 20, lOM Headirton HBw Wtwt, VUnUt—t Nir4a fH \%^ > ^ ..? J N"i^ • ) t .;:' league. The Bengals also are the .Southern AAA's stingiest defense in ysrds allowed, giving up about 175 yards per game. The highest scoring team in the area, coached by former Western grid leader Horace Smith, Bonanza is on a roll now after getting off to a somewhat shaky start. The Bengals knocked off perennial league powers Bishop Gorman and Valley in their last two games to erase the memory of losses to Rancho and Clark, Now 5-2 overall, and a half game behind Sunset Division leader Chaparral at 2-1, the Bengals appear to be in perfect shape for the season's last two weeks and the playoffs. What can Basic Coach Rich Whitehead, whose team was outplayed by Rancho 20-6 last week, do to solve the Bonanza playoff express and gets his team's playoff hopes back on track? "It's gonna reslly be a great challenge for our defense," the (oach said Tuesday. The Wolves handled such defensive challenges for three weeks against Chaparral, Western and IJSB Vegas, teams ranked in the league's top five offensively, before faltering in the first half last week against the Rams. Basic rebounded against Rancho's offense in the second half, allowing just 79 total yards aftor giving up IBl yards in the first two quarters. "We came out and played well," Whitehead said. "We got beat on the first drive of the game and some third down plays." Basic has proven it can buckle down when it has to face a strong ground game. Leagueleading rusher Tony Johnson of Western managed only 72 yards against the Wolves, \AR Vegas' Sherman ('berry, the No. 2 man, ran for 81 yards and third-rated .Steve Millr of C-lark picked up 73 yards on the ground versus Basic:. Bonanza's Woodford, who gained 1,099 yards and scored a zone-leading 12 touchdowns last year, comes calling tomorrow as the fourth-ranked runner in the league. "WfKxlford has the speed. He's a slashing type of running Division loss last week, head said holding onto the I has to be a high priority:! Basic, currently ranked UM(I| fensively among teams i zone. "We didn't handle Randii back and he can hurt you on pressure weU. When you'vtpi a strong defensive team ii^\ not too strong of an offeni| team, turnovers are crucijC Senior wide receiver Daliir Hranscuni will surely HfttflfiBl, the Wolves' offensive plani, Ht>) caught four passes agai0| pass plays," Whitehead said liengal backfield mate Mike Kawlings is no slouch either. He has gained over 400 yards and run for four touchdowns to bolster the Bonanza offense. "1 don't think anybody can shut them down," the coach said. Five turnovers figured heavily in the Wolves' first Sunrise 'Worst performance of the season' does in Lady Wolves Volleyball An uninspired Basic varsity volleyball team lost a quick 16-3, 15-1 decision to Las Vegas Tuesday on the I^ady Gate' court. Tlie thrashing dropped the Lady Wolves' season mark to 212. Las Vegas, which fell in three sete to Basic earlier this year, picked up only ita second win in 15 matohes. In the funt game, Felicia Rivera and Becky Virdon scored all the l^ady Wolves' pointe. Rivera, a senior, had a pair of strong serves. Virden garnered a Basic point on a spike. The second game was a mismateh from the stert. Las Vegas capitelized on a wide variety of Lady Wolves' errors to teke an 8-0 advantege. Tanya Blackburn's spike, which cut the lisdy Cate' edge to 8-1, was the only Basic pomt. The mstoh ended as Shonna Wicklund was called for crossing the center line on a hit at the net. Rivera had five assiste for the mateh. "I'm embarrassed. It was the worst performance of the entire season," Basic Coach Barbara Chilson said. During a timeout in the second game, Chilson said she told her frustrated players "I don't know how much humiliation you want to take getting beaten by a team which has won only one mateh." The 14-year veteran coach said she could not figure out why the Lady Wolves practice so well, but as of late, play so poorly. 'This team is one of the top two teams I've had, but they don't know it. It's like the difference between night and day." Chilaon said Baaic, a half game in front of Las Vegas with four matches left on the schedule, must avoid last place in the Sunrise Division The Lady Cate have just three games remaining because Basic must play n make-up game at Western on Nov. 1. The fifth place team in the Sunrise will fa( the second place Sunset team, either Clark or Bonanza. The I^ady Wolves junior varsity also fell in straight games to Las Vegas, 15-3, 15-7. Basic's B team took the l^ady ('ate to three sete, but lost by scores of 15-12, 10-15, 15-5. The Lady Wolves attempt to make a comeback in a 4 p.m. home match today with the Rancho Hams. Bowling The Basic varsity boys bowling team opened the 1988 season by blanking Western 4-0 Tuesday at the Showboat lanes. The Warriors are considered one of the league favorites this fall. The Lady Wolves' varsity fell to Western by the same 4 0 score. The Wolves junior varsity scored a 3-1 victory over the Warriors and the Lady Wolves' JV dropped a 4-0 decision to the Lady Warriors. Jay Froh, a social studies teacher at Basic, coaches the teams. The Wolves face the Rancho Rams this afternoon at 3 in a mateh at the Showboat. Girls golf Basic's Stecey James, the Lady Wolves' entrant in the girls golf stete championship, will compete Saturday at the Eagle Valley East course in Carson City. The Home News had reported Tuesday that the stete tournament would be held in Reno. HPRD Soccer standings Diamond League Silver League (Youth Center) Silver I^eague (Silver Springs) Team Name ShiH-kem (.'oHmfMI ^uirk flilvHra Hometj* SirikBni Hullctii W L T rJB : 2 2 1 I 1 0 1 2 1 1 1 0 0 Results Hornete 4, Bullete 2 Quick Silvers 7, Flames '/I 1 V^ 2 2 3Vt 1 Team Name Red llnwrs Rliminalnrff Silver .Streakm Thunder W)die<)o' •Striknni iStreakfl Rebels W I, :i 2 2 2 2 1 0 .0 0 1 1 1 1 : 2 a T 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 u (iB 1 1 1 1 2V, 2V, 3 Team Name Steeiem RnhcaU (:* '^ "It gives us a choiijg;*' Whitehead noted. 'That's ^pj we'd like to be able to nnw,\ ball, so we see some sii coverage." Basic's secondary sufferiip^ key loss last week, as ooriwii back Craig Grisnianauskaal|ia|! lost for the season with] t', broken thumb. He interceji^Mil^ passes against Bishop GornuHi', and Rancho this year and IwM' up a number of other pasi'il^_[ tempts. Ray Frederickaen i move over from his safety ] tion to fill the hole or jui Dorian McAllister nuy reptoo^' (jrismanauskas. V*^Comerback Jamie Schi is still sidelined with a kr jury. He may play in the i finale against Eldorado. The Wolves, 3-4 on the: need a victory over honuo^fi register their second winnik^ record in four seasons. B^jj^'; stends a half game behind^' 12-0 Sundevils in the SuivHli' Division. The two teams mtP square off in a game w\a^'. c^uld decide a playoff bflftll; Oct. 2K at Don Taylor Stadim. I GOT IT, NO YOU GOT IT-It's a mad scramble for the ball in HPRD youth soccer action Tuesday at Morrell Park as the Quicksilvers (light Jerseys) and the Skyhawks compete. No scores are kept in the kindergarten-first grade league. PlM>to by Jff Cowen RACING FOR THE OOAL-Joah Jiven of the Skyt (dark Jersey) scimiea to beat Michael Yoat of the Qoicksihrllitf (far left) to the ball in HPRD kindergarten-first grade t action Tuesday. FoUowlng the play for the Qiiickailveraf Joey Ditto (left) and Rastan Deea. Phu bj MI Cmr^ 0^N THE BALL Last half of NFL season worth watching By Pat McDonnell Home JVawa Sporta Editor Although it's not yet | Halloween, this weekend marks the halfway point of the National Football League season. In the two months since pass rushers have been crushing quarterbacks, no solid favorite has developed among the loop's 28 teams. Four teams are 6-1, but neither the Buffalo Bills, Chicago Bears, Cincinatti Bengals or New Orleans Saints has caught the attention of the football maaaaa, like the San Frandaco 49ers dtdfbratime last year and the New YockOtanta and Bears aooompliahed in 1986 and 1986. New Orleans is the hottost team in the qwrtet, winning six stnd^t gamea ainoe kiaing to San Franciaco by a point in the season opener. The Crescent City team may have the toughest streteh drive of the four division leaders. The Saints face seven games against teams which qualified for the playoffs last year or look capable of contending for a post-season berth this December. Starting Oct. 30, the slate reads: Los Angeles Rams, at Waahington, at Rams, Denver, Giante, at Minnesota, and fuudly. at San Frandaco. Such a schedule is not condudve to an NFC West title or even a playoff spot with just a slim, onegame lead over the Rams and 49er8. Cincinatti is also looking at a challenging schedule as the year winds down. HM Bengals, who have had most everything go their way for tiM first MVSB Weeks, will try to pad their one game edgis ovw the AFC Central in oonteata against Houston (twice), CTlevdLand, Buffalo and Waahington. Three of thoae five games are at Riverfront Stedium, including the potentially pivotal mateh-up with the Bills on the Sunday foUowing Thanksgiving. Beakies the clash with Cindnatti, AFC East leader Buffalo has two other key road tests— Nov. 6 against Seattle and a tusale with hardcharging Miami the following Monday. The Bears get their best test since a one-sided win over the Bills this Monday at home against the 49erB. The game promises to be a vengeful affair for Chicago because of the 41 -0 shellacking the navy blue and orange boys took on national TV in San Frandaco last year. If the Bears can get by the Niners, they will hustle off to Washington Nov. 13 for a big game with the defanding Snper Bowl champion Radakins. Ulan it'a off to Lo0 Anfelea, three weeks later, to hook op with tbe Rams before the cfaanoe for nwnnge oomea again for Ghieafo •< final week showdown with the Vikings iiv,aj|i MetTodome. Don't remind a Bears fan whati^^t pened the last time thoae two teama mM^: Chicago will line up against five divisieaii opponente in the final nine weeks of ^ seaaon—more than any of the other thre^
PAGE 19

rM01* RMitnM KMM Ntwi, HMitrNn. Ntvada Thmdaj, OeColMr 20,1N8 ThM*qr, Oetobw 20, lOM Headirton HBw Wtwt, VUnUt—t Nir4a fH \%^ > ^ ..? J N"i^ • ) t .;:' league. The Bengals also are the .Southern AAA's stingiest defense in ysrds allowed, giving up about 175 yards per game. The highest scoring team in the area, coached by former Western grid leader Horace Smith, Bonanza is on a roll now after getting off to a somewhat shaky start. The Bengals knocked off perennial league powers Bishop Gorman and Valley in their last two games to erase the memory of losses to Rancho and Clark, Now 5-2 overall, and a half game behind Sunset Division leader Chaparral at 2-1, the Bengals appear to be in perfect shape for the season's last two weeks and the playoffs. What can Basic Coach Rich Whitehead, whose team was outplayed by Rancho 20-6 last week, do to solve the Bonanza playoff express and gets his team's playoff hopes back on track? "It's gonna reslly be a great challenge for our defense," the (oach said Tuesday. The Wolves handled such defensive challenges for three weeks against Chaparral, Western and IJSB Vegas, teams ranked in the league's top five offensively, before faltering in the first half last week against the Rams. Basic rebounded against Rancho's offense in the second half, allowing just 79 total yards aftor giving up IBl yards in the first two quarters. "We came out and played well," Whitehead said. "We got beat on the first drive of the game and some third down plays." Basic has proven it can buckle down when it has to face a strong ground game. Leagueleading rusher Tony Johnson of Western managed only 72 yards against the Wolves, \AR Vegas' Sherman ('berry, the No. 2 man, ran for 81 yards and third-rated .Steve Millr of C-lark picked up 73 yards on the ground versus Basic:. Bonanza's Woodford, who gained 1,099 yards and scored a zone-leading 12 touchdowns last year, comes calling tomorrow as the fourth-ranked runner in the league. "WfKxlford has the speed. He's a slashing type of running Division loss last week, head said holding onto the I has to be a high priority:! Basic, currently ranked UM(I| fensively among teams i zone. "We didn't handle Randii back and he can hurt you on pressure weU. When you'vtpi a strong defensive team ii^\ not too strong of an offeni| team, turnovers are crucijC Senior wide receiver Daliir Hranscuni will surely HfttflfiBl, the Wolves' offensive plani, Ht>) caught four passes agai0| pass plays," Whitehead said liengal backfield mate Mike Kawlings is no slouch either. He has gained over 400 yards and run for four touchdowns to bolster the Bonanza offense. "1 don't think anybody can shut them down," the coach said. Five turnovers figured heavily in the Wolves' first Sunrise 'Worst performance of the season' does in Lady Wolves Volleyball An uninspired Basic varsity volleyball team lost a quick 16-3, 15-1 decision to Las Vegas Tuesday on the I^ady Gate' court. Tlie thrashing dropped the Lady Wolves' season mark to 212. Las Vegas, which fell in three sete to Basic earlier this year, picked up only ita second win in 15 matohes. In the funt game, Felicia Rivera and Becky Virdon scored all the l^ady Wolves' pointe. Rivera, a senior, had a pair of strong serves. Virden garnered a Basic point on a spike. The second game was a mismateh from the stert. Las Vegas capitelized on a wide variety of Lady Wolves' errors to teke an 8-0 advantege. Tanya Blackburn's spike, which cut the lisdy Cate' edge to 8-1, was the only Basic pomt. The mstoh ended as Shonna Wicklund was called for crossing the center line on a hit at the net. Rivera had five assiste for the mateh. "I'm embarrassed. It was the worst performance of the entire season," Basic Coach Barbara Chilson said. During a timeout in the second game, Chilson said she told her frustrated players "I don't know how much humiliation you want to take getting beaten by a team which has won only one mateh." The 14-year veteran coach said she could not figure out why the Lady Wolves practice so well, but as of late, play so poorly. 'This team is one of the top two teams I've had, but they don't know it. It's like the difference between night and day." Chilaon said Baaic, a half game in front of Las Vegas with four matches left on the schedule, must avoid last place in the Sunrise Division The Lady Cate have just three games remaining because Basic must play n make-up game at Western on Nov. 1. The fifth place team in the Sunrise will fa( the second place Sunset team, either Clark or Bonanza. The I^ady Wolves junior varsity also fell in straight games to Las Vegas, 15-3, 15-7. Basic's B team took the l^ady ('ate to three sete, but lost by scores of 15-12, 10-15, 15-5. The Lady Wolves attempt to make a comeback in a 4 p.m. home match today with the Rancho Hams. Bowling The Basic varsity boys bowling team opened the 1988 season by blanking Western 4-0 Tuesday at the Showboat lanes. The Warriors are considered one of the league favorites this fall. The Lady Wolves' varsity fell to Western by the same 4 0 score. The Wolves junior varsity scored a 3-1 victory over the Warriors and the Lady Wolves' JV dropped a 4-0 decision to the Lady Warriors. Jay Froh, a social studies teacher at Basic, coaches the teams. The Wolves face the Rancho Rams this afternoon at 3 in a mateh at the Showboat. Girls golf Basic's Stecey James, the Lady Wolves' entrant in the girls golf stete championship, will compete Saturday at the Eagle Valley East course in Carson City. The Home News had reported Tuesday that the stete tournament would be held in Reno. HPRD Soccer standings Diamond League Silver League (Youth Center) Silver I^eague (Silver Springs) Team Name ShiH-kem (.'oHmfMI ^uirk flilvHra Hometj* SirikBni Hullctii W L T rJB : 2 2 1 I 1 0 1 2 1 1 1 0 0 Results Hornete 4, Bullete 2 Quick Silvers 7, Flames '/I 1 V^ 2 2 3Vt 1 Team Name Red llnwrs Rliminalnrff Silver .Streakm Thunder W)die<)o' •Striknni iStreakfl Rebels W I, :i 2 2 2 2 1 0 .0 0 1 1 1 1 : 2 a T 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 u (iB 1 1 1 1 2V, 2V, 3 Team Name Steeiem RnhcaU (:* '^ "It gives us a choiijg;*' Whitehead noted. 'That's ^pj we'd like to be able to nnw,\ ball, so we see some sii coverage." Basic's secondary sufferiip^ key loss last week, as ooriwii back Craig Grisnianauskaal|ia|! lost for the season with] t', broken thumb. He interceji^Mil^ passes against Bishop GornuHi', and Rancho this year and IwM' up a number of other pasi'il^_[ tempts. Ray Frederickaen i move over from his safety ] tion to fill the hole or jui Dorian McAllister nuy reptoo^' (jrismanauskas. V*^Comerback Jamie Schi is still sidelined with a kr jury. He may play in the i finale against Eldorado. The Wolves, 3-4 on the: need a victory over honuo^fi register their second winnik^ record in four seasons. B^jj^'; stends a half game behind^' 12-0 Sundevils in the SuivHli' Division. The two teams mtP square off in a game w\a^'. c^uld decide a playoff bflftll; Oct. 2K at Don Taylor Stadim. I GOT IT, NO YOU GOT IT-It's a mad scramble for the ball in HPRD youth soccer action Tuesday at Morrell Park as the Quicksilvers (light Jerseys) and the Skyhawks compete. No scores are kept in the kindergarten-first grade league. PlM>to by Jff Cowen RACING FOR THE OOAL-Joah Jiven of the Skyt (dark Jersey) scimiea to beat Michael Yoat of the Qoicksihrllitf (far left) to the ball in HPRD kindergarten-first grade t action Tuesday. FoUowlng the play for the Qiiickailveraf Joey Ditto (left) and Rastan Deea. Phu bj MI Cmr^ 0^N THE BALL Last half of NFL season worth watching By Pat McDonnell Home JVawa Sporta Editor Although it's not yet | Halloween, this weekend marks the halfway point of the National Football League season. In the two months since pass rushers have been crushing quarterbacks, no solid favorite has developed among the loop's 28 teams. Four teams are 6-1, but neither the Buffalo Bills, Chicago Bears, Cincinatti Bengals or New Orleans Saints has caught the attention of the football maaaaa, like the San Frandaco 49ers dtdfbratime last year and the New YockOtanta and Bears aooompliahed in 1986 and 1986. New Orleans is the hottost team in the qwrtet, winning six stnd^t gamea ainoe kiaing to San Franciaco by a point in the season opener. The Crescent City team may have the toughest streteh drive of the four division leaders. The Saints face seven games against teams which qualified for the playoffs last year or look capable of contending for a post-season berth this December. Starting Oct. 30, the slate reads: Los Angeles Rams, at Waahington, at Rams, Denver, Giante, at Minnesota, and fuudly. at San Frandaco. Such a schedule is not condudve to an NFC West title or even a playoff spot with just a slim, onegame lead over the Rams and 49er8. Cincinatti is also looking at a challenging schedule as the year winds down. HM Bengals, who have had most everything go their way for tiM first MVSB Weeks, will try to pad their one game edgis ovw the AFC Central in oonteata against Houston (twice), CTlevdLand, Buffalo and Waahington. Three of thoae five games are at Riverfront Stedium, including the potentially pivotal mateh-up with the Bills on the Sunday foUowing Thanksgiving. Beakies the clash with Cindnatti, AFC East leader Buffalo has two other key road tests— Nov. 6 against Seattle and a tusale with hardcharging Miami the following Monday. The Bears get their best test since a one-sided win over the Bills this Monday at home against the 49erB. The game promises to be a vengeful affair for Chicago because of the 41 -0 shellacking the navy blue and orange boys took on national TV in San Frandaco last year. If the Bears can get by the Niners, they will hustle off to Washington Nov. 13 for a big game with the defanding Snper Bowl champion Radakins. Ulan it'a off to Lo0 Anfelea, three weeks later, to hook op with tbe Rams before the cfaanoe for nwnnge oomea again for Ghieafo •< final week showdown with the Vikings iiv,aj|i MetTodome. Don't remind a Bears fan whati^^t pened the last time thoae two teama mM^: Chicago will line up against five divisieaii opponente in the final nine weeks of ^ seaaon—more than any of the other thre^
PAGE 20

^^^ ^^ M Htndtrion Hm Ncwi, Hsndsrion, Nsvids ThoMday, October 20, 19M Unes from the lanes *'*. by Ruth Soehike $Ut 500 Club bowling tournament at Boulder Oty: The I^jfVada State 5(X) Club will hold a tournament on Nov. 12 atlkmlder Bowl with squads at 9 a.m.. noon and 3 p.m. Entry fe* is $10 for this No-Tap fun tournament and closing date is'Oct. 31. Entries can be obtained from Barbara Jager at Barbara's Boutique, 320 South Boulder Highway, or at Hendertf^Bowl. TABA championship tournament at Neilis: Thf> Nellis Li&n'es are hosting the YABA flhampionship Tournament this y^r and entries close Oct. 27. Call Helen Robison at 735-4270 fbidetails. .''Moonlight Madness" moves up: The winning combina tioh of colored pins did not set up last Saturday for the "Moonlight Madness" session so the big pots move up to $320 and $70. Just $6tret8 you on the lanes for your chance at winding money for strikes with colored headpins each Saturday jjltTp.m. 5; J^HBchool bowling program continues: In 1986-87 season {Wren's International Bowling dongress mpmhers were asked .5^0 contribute one penny, per game, through their leagues to .flielp fund the In-School Bowling Program. The drive is called ?Be a Penny Pal for Youth Bowling" and is being continued (n the 1988-89 season. HPRD plans karate class k I With these contributions and those from the ABC the proJjpram is helping to expose children to bowling through a bowlifng awareness and exposure program to acquaint elementary Ifchool-age children with the sport. Top quality equipment and Itorofeesionally prepared support materials were needed to make ipe program a success; materials which make it easy for anybody Jto teach the basics of the game. As a result, the In-School program targets four age groups |B0XING AT BALLY'S Boxing action returns to Bally's iCkwino Resort on Saturday, with the third in a series of "Veung Fighters On The Rise" events. In the main event, Etagels Pedroza (22-1. 22 KOs) of Long Beach, Calif., will face Eric Martin (21-11-2, 7 KOs) of San Francisco in a lO-round junior welterweight bout. The semi-main event : features Maurice Blocker (25 1,14 KOs) of Washington. D.C. vs. Ruben Villamon (25-9, 3 KOsf of Mexico. Tickets for jthe 7:30 p.m. card in Bally's Grand Ballroom are priced at $20 and $12 and are available at a ticket booth in Bally's : lobby and at the door on fight night. The Banner Promo• tions card will be nationally televised live on the PNN/SCORE cable network. Ray "Boom Boom" Mandni : does the commentary on the telecast and in shown above : interviewing Joe Lasisi after his Sept. 24 victory at Bally's. jFremont edges Burkholder in junior tennis • A^weep in boys singles play • helped Fremont Junior High Scholl defeat Burkholder 5-4 jpecently in the Nevada Tennis TiMMciation's /junior tennis league. I. fieno Lee outscored Burk. lM(er's((>reg Tassi 6-1 in first \ siJMrls* to lead Fremont's vict#y. Wade Kreitlow of Frenimt posted a 6-2 win over A^jUlie McMulUn to win second sagles and Leo Murrieta took I Llnny Lazlo of Burkholder by aiB-2 score to wrap up boys' Fremont netter Ebony Riiemniele defeated Burkhf Ider's Andrea Fontenot' 6-2 iiC girls first singles, but the r-H Henderson team came back behind Jenny Campbell, who outfought Sara Lee 6-4, and Gina Bloom, who dominated Fremont's Dawn Bemhard, 6-1. The Burkholder doubles team of Jena AugspurgerElizabeth Clark beat Amy Anderson and Kimberly Panchavinin by a 6-2 score. Teammates Kyle Kerwin and Jeni Edinger blanked Cbris Sim-' mons and Melinda Hennessy of Fremont, 6-0. Angle Edinger and Daphne Fisher, Burkholder's first doubles team, lost to Roger Faught and Ryan Perry, 6-4. reflecting children diversity in abilities and interests. The groups are pre-school (ages 2-5), lower elementary (ages 5-9), upper elementary (9-12), and junior high (ages 12-15). Two books explaining the program are mailed free-of-charge to educators and others upon request. "The In-School Book" is a complete overview of the program and discusses success stories. The "Fun Starts Here" brochure provides a synopsis of the program and the items necessary to enable bowling to be added to a school's physical education curriculum. Powder Puff League: Bill's Lawn Maintenance and Ben Stepman Motors are tied for the lead with 14 games won. Billie Stepman rolled high hep series of 584 and Christa Haldie hep game of 207. Henderson Housewives: Video Flic moved up four games ynih 17 wins. Ruth Soehike led with 210-503, Ruth Famsworth took high handicap game and series with 247-627. Donna Newton converted the 6-7 split. Sundowners League: Barbara's Boutique in the lead with 24 wins and all the highs last week with 698-1903. 842-2335 hep. Sandy Coe led with 210-574,238-658 hep highs. Barbara Jager 202-527 and Christa Haldie 504. Friday Nite Mixed Four: The Renegades tied with the Tillerys at 18 wins. Team No. 8 deserves a name when they took all the highs 670-1905,870-2505 hep. Sly Massa led the men with 526, 239-702 hep, and Rich Sanchez scratch game of 2(X)-508. Joyce Massa took ladies scratch series with a 497, Betty Tillery game with 187, Mary Tilman the handicap highs with 240-679. All league secretaries: Please call or bring your league news to me at 105 Joshua or 565-8398. We have a lot of Henderson bowlers who deserve recognition. Errant outdoorsmen pay for wildlife violations The Henderson Parks and Re<;reation Department is offering a karate class at Silver Springs Recreation Center, 1951 Robindale. The center is located in the (ireen Valley area of Henderscm. The class is scheduled on Mondays and Wednesdays from 6 to 7 p.m. Participants seven and older are welcome to register. The next session will begin the week of Oct. 31. Registration is currently being taken. For more information, call the Silver Springs Center at 435-3814. Low impact aerobics scheduied The Henderson Parks and Recreation Department is currently taking regisstration at the Silver Springs Recreation Onter, 1951 Robindale, for its low impact aerobic classess. Classes are scheduled Monday. Wednesday and Friday from 10 to 11 a.m. and Tuesday and Thursday from 6 to 7 p.m. Participants 13 and older are welcome to register. The next session will begin the week of Oct. 31. Register now, classes are limited. For more information, call 435-3814. By David K. Rice Nevada Department of WildUfe One hundred-ninety seven errant outdoorsmen paid in excess of $11,400 in fines and forfeited bail during August, for infractions of Nevada fish, game and boating laws, according to the Nevada Department of Wildlife. The Department's most recent summary of citations processed through State Justice Courts shows that 62 individuals were apprehended while fishing without a valid license. Forty-six forfeited $2,880 in bail, with 16 opting to pay a total of $920 in fines. Twenty-seven anglers paid a total of citations processed through State Justice Courts shows that 62 individuals were apprehended while fishing without a valid license. Fortysix forfeited $2,880 in bail, with 16 opting to pay a total of $920 in fines. Twenty-seven anglers paid a total of $1,755 in fines and bail for fishing in a prohibited manner, such as fishing with more than one rod and reel, or using bait in an area open to the use of artificial lures only. Three individuals were apprehended by state game wardens for possessing more than the legal limit. One of the anglers paid a $75 fine, with two others paying a total $285 in forfeited bail for the same offense. With the boating season in full swing, 100 errant boaters paid $5,197 in fines and bail for infractions of the Nevada Boat Act. Speeding in a restricted area was the most common violation with 33 individuals apprehended by boating safety officers. Five boaters were also cited for reckless operation of the watercraft, with each paying an average $145 penalty assessment. Seven others paid a total of $795 for the towing of a skier without an observer on board. Bail assessments averaging $100 each were forfeited by three operators for overloading their boat. Fines assessed and collected by state courts for infractions of state fish, game, boating and litter laws are deposited in the state school fund. / ^^MLtRAVIL TOUR A Compute Travel Strvica •envici • AIRLINE TICKETS AT AIRPORT PRICES • AIR-RAIL-SEA PACKAGES • AMTRAK-EURAIL TICKETS • PASSPORT INFORMATION • HOTEL a AIR RESERVATIONS VISAS OBTAINED 111 WATIRiniEIT, HDN. M(l"6431 2700 QREIN VALLEY PKWY. StE. H.3 468^74 DEUCES WILD 5C-250 Video Poker Machines THE SKYLINE CASINO & RESTAURANT Sunset & Boulder Hwy. ME, HELP ME! sjeaA s uosjapuaH BujAjas f "^ Alll3Ma su3isvoaio AdwartMmart run upiUi AMm m par ntquMoli GENTLE GREY TIGER-STRIPED KITTEN I hav lM than • wk toft to live and I'm bagging you to coma and raacua ma from a cailain daatfi. $16 Includaa rablaa ahot, a tag and ma. Contact tha HENDERSON ANIMAL SHELTER MOSCR DR. HEND. S68-20S3 Thondigr, Octobw 20. 1988 HcndtrMB Hm Ncwi, HtatfarMa, NavUt Fag%||fa From Curtis' Comtr By Joty Cnrtli One world chftmpioiuhip fiffht originally lat for this month and then awitch^ to Novwnbar, now haa a dflnit data. It'a Nov. 8 and it matchea WBA Middleweight Champion Sumbu Kalambay againat Doug DeWitt in Italy. inch paintings of the 10 finalists will be on display at NDOWs Reno offjce, 1100 Valley Road, through Nov. 18. Coming up faat on Nov. 5 is the WBA'a annual salute, which this year honors not one but two boxing greats of the paat, namely Lou Nova and exworld middleweight champion Gene Fullmer of Utah. Alao in attendance at this entertaining event will be ex-light heavyweight world champions Bob Foster and Joey Maxim, ex-middleweight world champions Carmen Baailio and Rocky Graziano, and ex-world lightweight champion Paddy Oemarco. This attraction begins at 7:30 p.m: in the Americana Room of the Maxim Hotel. Ticketa coat $10 for the evening. Finally! it strikes me that heavyweight Mitch "Blood" Green is finding funny ways of keeping his name in the press and television and in front of the public in his attempt to get popular opinion to force a fight with heavyweight champion Mike TVson. California artist wins Nevada's fourth trout stamp art contest By David K. Rice Nevada Department of WildUfe California artist Tak Nakamura has captured first place in the Nevada Wildlife Federation's Trout Stamp Art Contest, according to Federation President Paula Del Guidice. The 57-year-old artiht from Loe Angeles placed first among 41 entrants in Nevada's fourth Trout Stamp Art Contest. The competition is held annually to solicit artwork to adorn the Department of Wildlife's troup stamp. Nakamura's painting depicts a finely detailed mackinaw, or lake trout, in an underwater setting, about to make a meal of two minnows. The painting, which will be featured in full color on Nevada's 1989-90 trout stamp, is required of anglers more than 12 years old who take or poaaess trout in the state. The new stamp will on on sale in February. Nakamura is a freelance com* mercial artist and illustrator who works in the Los Angeles area. He has entered the federal duck stamp contest in recent yeara ad has placed in the top 10 several times. The native Californian has entered one other trout stamp contaat, but entered Nevada'a competition this year for the firat time. "Nevada's contest was my firat win in wildlife art competition," Nakamrua aaid, "and I hope the publicity and recognition will aid in furthering my goal towards a career in wildUfa art." The mackinaw trout is native to the extreme northern United Stataa, including the Great region, and north to He'a doing it not by fighting contandari>-or anybody for that matter, but by getting arrattad. In on* 11-day pariod, he waa arreetd three timea. But then Tyaon haa been buay with is own proUama of lata too. There is plenty of world championahip bosing oomlnf up in the future weeks with Julio Caaar Chavai va. Joae Luia Ramirea (WBA-WBC lightweight championahip) and Happy Lora vs. Raul Peres (WBA bantamweight championahip) on Oct. 29 at the Hilton, "FuUy Obel" va. Thomaa Haama (WBA super middleweight championahip), Michael Nunn va. Juan Domingo Roldan (IBF middleweight championahip), and Matthew Hilton vs. Robert Hinea (IBF Junior middleweight championship) on Nov. 4 at the Hilton, and Sugar Ray Leonard vs. Don Lalonde (WBC super middleweight and WBC light heavyweight championships) on the Nov. 7 at Caaaara Palace. But there's alao a fight card Saturday at Bally's, in the from of the monthly Banner promotions card. Tha main event featurea young world-rated slugger Engela Pedroaa againat Abraham Mieaea of the Dominican Republic. Alao alated for the card will be unbeaten Laa Vegan Jeff Maywaather, a lightweight, and welterweight Maurice Blocker from Philadelphia, who is world-ranked by two organizations. The action starts at 7:30 p.m. in the Grand Ballroom at Bally's with ticketa priced at $12 and $20. There's another world championahip fight tomorrow in Colombia matching WBC auper flyweight champion Qilberto Roman against Sugar Ba^ Rojas. Wrattilng signups bagin at Boys and Girls Cluo I by Clyde C. Caldwall The coat for tha prograiJVj HandararaBoyaAOIriaClttb $6 for tha Intarmural PlU|l iP< The Henderaon Boya and and $83 for tha USA WrMtlj Oirla Club is now taking aigning Program. The USA upa for ita wreatling program. All boya bttwean tha agea of 6 and 14 yvara old can aignup at tha club, locatad at 401 Drake Street. Tom Harria will coach tha 12-yeara>and-under wreatlera and Lao Hamandet gram competea count: againat other teama out Southern Nevada tannural Team competea ^QI^! the club level only. „|! Junior high-level prog^|[|i^ practicea atart at 6 p^i' will coach tha Junior high-age Wedneaday, in tha chib'a gyn.. wreatlera. The coat ia $33. Tha progn||i The 12-and-undar aga group ia part dl tha USA Wraatfinj^' will start practice at 9 a.m. League. Saturday, Oct. 29, in tha Boys For further information, call n\,.\^ i. • Club gymnasium. 66o-66o9. Canada and Alaska. The first successful release of mackinaw in Nevada came in 1889, with fish from Northville, Mich. The fish were released into Lake Tahoe. According to NDOW, the mackinaw was chosen as the designated subject of this year's competition to commemorate the 100-year (1989) history of this fish in Nevada. The population is well established in Lake Tahoe where it, along with other species, provides an estimated 36,000 angler days each year. The 1985 Nevada State l^egislature authorized the issuance of a trout stamp by NDOW for the purpose of generating funds for construction of a new trout hatchery on the Mason Valley Wildlife Management Area near Yerington. Construction of the hatchery should begin early in 1989. Cost of the annual stamp is $6. Of the 41 entries received this year, seven were submitted by Nevada artists. Jani Lamoreux-Kreutzjans of Reno placed fifth in this year's contest. The six and one-half by nineL AHIND CHURCH SUNDAY SpensorsdSy !i^-| — ATTENTION— ,„ DERRILL PRIORI \ Is Back and Cutting Hair a^ 31 Army Strait • H would Ilk* to welcome back all of hi* old f rienda and cuatomera •565-8075 FREMONT COIN CO. INC. 4lUm ^S %>^ 60LD, SaVER AND PUHNUM PERSONAL INJURY FREE CONSULTATION NO RECOVERY NO FEE ^5 565-0473 223 Water Street, Suite A Next to City Hall LAW OFFICE OF V-\l'/^ }| JOHN F. MARCHIANO Criminal Law — DUI • J r I •Jir '''. • I**! Former Henderson city Attorney :,'[ wm .•V.r ELECT JUDGE JOE BONAVENTURE HOTLINE 384-1909 317 Frinont Si 302-1469 10 Years Experience "The demands of the District Court insist that its' judges have the necessary judicial experience to get the job done. We cannot afford the delays of having an inexperienced person learn through 'on the job training.' It is neither cost effective nor practical. The 10 years that Tve served the public on the Justice Court bench, coupled with my 8 years of public and private practice, give me th e experience to get the job done with the highest degree of tiFfldency without sacrificing the quality of justice." DISTRICT COURT 6 Dedicate^ to the People 'Tm proud of the reputation that I've earned in my public service. I'm known as the 'people's judge' and that means one thing to me, that I've earned the people's trust by taking a firm stand against crime without neglecting the need to be fair. A judge has to be careful to tem()er the awesome responsibility of the judiciary with the fairness that defines justice. I think that the public recognizes that need fo r fairness on the bench and I proud that as a "paopWa fridg e" ttiey recognize my dedication to that goal." Courage and Integrity ;. i; ^ In my 20 years as a Nevada resident, I have seen the growth of Soudn; em Nevada. Unfortunatdy with growth also comet aii increase in crime. I beUcvii^ we have to stand tou^ f, against crime in our communities For 10 years as your Judge in Justice Court, I'^ have been strenthening our first line of defense against crime. Now I want to take a stand for a stronger Criminal Justice System as your District Court Judge in Departmoit 6." GIVE ME YOUR VOTE NOV. idk •1 • • ->^r"-T?y<-^-, • '" • ."*" jVf't'-V^'

PAGE 21

^^^ ^^ M Htndtrion Hm Ncwi, Hsndsrion, Nsvids ThoMday, October 20, 19M Unes from the lanes *'*. by Ruth Soehike $Ut 500 Club bowling tournament at Boulder Oty: The I^jfVada State 5(X) Club will hold a tournament on Nov. 12 atlkmlder Bowl with squads at 9 a.m.. noon and 3 p.m. Entry fe* is $10 for this No-Tap fun tournament and closing date is'Oct. 31. Entries can be obtained from Barbara Jager at Barbara's Boutique, 320 South Boulder Highway, or at Hendertf^Bowl. TABA championship tournament at Neilis: Thf> Nellis Li&n'es are hosting the YABA flhampionship Tournament this y^r and entries close Oct. 27. Call Helen Robison at 735-4270 fbidetails. .''Moonlight Madness" moves up: The winning combina tioh of colored pins did not set up last Saturday for the "Moonlight Madness" session so the big pots move up to $320 and $70. Just $6tret8 you on the lanes for your chance at winding money for strikes with colored headpins each Saturday jjltTp.m. 5; J^HBchool bowling program continues: In 1986-87 season {Wren's International Bowling dongress mpmhers were asked .5^0 contribute one penny, per game, through their leagues to .flielp fund the In-School Bowling Program. The drive is called ?Be a Penny Pal for Youth Bowling" and is being continued (n the 1988-89 season. HPRD plans karate class k I With these contributions and those from the ABC the proJjpram is helping to expose children to bowling through a bowlifng awareness and exposure program to acquaint elementary Ifchool-age children with the sport. Top quality equipment and Itorofeesionally prepared support materials were needed to make ipe program a success; materials which make it easy for anybody Jto teach the basics of the game. As a result, the In-School program targets four age groups |B0XING AT BALLY'S Boxing action returns to Bally's iCkwino Resort on Saturday, with the third in a series of "Veung Fighters On The Rise" events. In the main event, Etagels Pedroza (22-1. 22 KOs) of Long Beach, Calif., will face Eric Martin (21-11-2, 7 KOs) of San Francisco in a lO-round junior welterweight bout. The semi-main event : features Maurice Blocker (25 1,14 KOs) of Washington. D.C. vs. Ruben Villamon (25-9, 3 KOsf of Mexico. Tickets for jthe 7:30 p.m. card in Bally's Grand Ballroom are priced at $20 and $12 and are available at a ticket booth in Bally's : lobby and at the door on fight night. The Banner Promo• tions card will be nationally televised live on the PNN/SCORE cable network. Ray "Boom Boom" Mandni : does the commentary on the telecast and in shown above : interviewing Joe Lasisi after his Sept. 24 victory at Bally's. jFremont edges Burkholder in junior tennis • A^weep in boys singles play • helped Fremont Junior High Scholl defeat Burkholder 5-4 jpecently in the Nevada Tennis TiMMciation's /junior tennis league. I. fieno Lee outscored Burk. lM(er's((>reg Tassi 6-1 in first \ siJMrls* to lead Fremont's vict#y. Wade Kreitlow of Frenimt posted a 6-2 win over A^jUlie McMulUn to win second sagles and Leo Murrieta took I Llnny Lazlo of Burkholder by aiB-2 score to wrap up boys' Fremont netter Ebony Riiemniele defeated Burkhf Ider's Andrea Fontenot' 6-2 iiC girls first singles, but the r-H Henderson team came back behind Jenny Campbell, who outfought Sara Lee 6-4, and Gina Bloom, who dominated Fremont's Dawn Bemhard, 6-1. The Burkholder doubles team of Jena AugspurgerElizabeth Clark beat Amy Anderson and Kimberly Panchavinin by a 6-2 score. Teammates Kyle Kerwin and Jeni Edinger blanked Cbris Sim-' mons and Melinda Hennessy of Fremont, 6-0. Angle Edinger and Daphne Fisher, Burkholder's first doubles team, lost to Roger Faught and Ryan Perry, 6-4. reflecting children diversity in abilities and interests. The groups are pre-school (ages 2-5), lower elementary (ages 5-9), upper elementary (9-12), and junior high (ages 12-15). Two books explaining the program are mailed free-of-charge to educators and others upon request. "The In-School Book" is a complete overview of the program and discusses success stories. The "Fun Starts Here" brochure provides a synopsis of the program and the items necessary to enable bowling to be added to a school's physical education curriculum. Powder Puff League: Bill's Lawn Maintenance and Ben Stepman Motors are tied for the lead with 14 games won. Billie Stepman rolled high hep series of 584 and Christa Haldie hep game of 207. Henderson Housewives: Video Flic moved up four games ynih 17 wins. Ruth Soehike led with 210-503, Ruth Famsworth took high handicap game and series with 247-627. Donna Newton converted the 6-7 split. Sundowners League: Barbara's Boutique in the lead with 24 wins and all the highs last week with 698-1903. 842-2335 hep. Sandy Coe led with 210-574,238-658 hep highs. Barbara Jager 202-527 and Christa Haldie 504. Friday Nite Mixed Four: The Renegades tied with the Tillerys at 18 wins. Team No. 8 deserves a name when they took all the highs 670-1905,870-2505 hep. Sly Massa led the men with 526, 239-702 hep, and Rich Sanchez scratch game of 2(X)-508. Joyce Massa took ladies scratch series with a 497, Betty Tillery game with 187, Mary Tilman the handicap highs with 240-679. All league secretaries: Please call or bring your league news to me at 105 Joshua or 565-8398. We have a lot of Henderson bowlers who deserve recognition. Errant outdoorsmen pay for wildlife violations The Henderson Parks and Re<;reation Department is offering a karate class at Silver Springs Recreation Center, 1951 Robindale. The center is located in the (ireen Valley area of Henderscm. The class is scheduled on Mondays and Wednesdays from 6 to 7 p.m. Participants seven and older are welcome to register. The next session will begin the week of Oct. 31. Registration is currently being taken. For more information, call the Silver Springs Center at 435-3814. Low impact aerobics scheduied The Henderson Parks and Recreation Department is currently taking regisstration at the Silver Springs Recreation Onter, 1951 Robindale, for its low impact aerobic classess. Classes are scheduled Monday. Wednesday and Friday from 10 to 11 a.m. and Tuesday and Thursday from 6 to 7 p.m. Participants 13 and older are welcome to register. The next session will begin the week of Oct. 31. Register now, classes are limited. For more information, call 435-3814. By David K. Rice Nevada Department of WildUfe One hundred-ninety seven errant outdoorsmen paid in excess of $11,400 in fines and forfeited bail during August, for infractions of Nevada fish, game and boating laws, according to the Nevada Department of Wildlife. The Department's most recent summary of citations processed through State Justice Courts shows that 62 individuals were apprehended while fishing without a valid license. Forty-six forfeited $2,880 in bail, with 16 opting to pay a total of $920 in fines. Twenty-seven anglers paid a total of citations processed through State Justice Courts shows that 62 individuals were apprehended while fishing without a valid license. Fortysix forfeited $2,880 in bail, with 16 opting to pay a total of $920 in fines. Twenty-seven anglers paid a total of $1,755 in fines and bail for fishing in a prohibited manner, such as fishing with more than one rod and reel, or using bait in an area open to the use of artificial lures only. Three individuals were apprehended by state game wardens for possessing more than the legal limit. One of the anglers paid a $75 fine, with two others paying a total $285 in forfeited bail for the same offense. With the boating season in full swing, 100 errant boaters paid $5,197 in fines and bail for infractions of the Nevada Boat Act. Speeding in a restricted area was the most common violation with 33 individuals apprehended by boating safety officers. Five boaters were also cited for reckless operation of the watercraft, with each paying an average $145 penalty assessment. Seven others paid a total of $795 for the towing of a skier without an observer on board. Bail assessments averaging $100 each were forfeited by three operators for overloading their boat. Fines assessed and collected by state courts for infractions of state fish, game, boating and litter laws are deposited in the state school fund. / ^^MLtRAVIL TOUR A Compute Travel Strvica •envici • AIRLINE TICKETS AT AIRPORT PRICES • AIR-RAIL-SEA PACKAGES • AMTRAK-EURAIL TICKETS • PASSPORT INFORMATION • HOTEL a AIR RESERVATIONS VISAS OBTAINED 111 WATIRiniEIT, HDN. M(l"6431 2700 QREIN VALLEY PKWY. StE. H.3 468^74 DEUCES WILD 5C-250 Video Poker Machines THE SKYLINE CASINO & RESTAURANT Sunset & Boulder Hwy. ME, HELP ME! sjeaA s uosjapuaH BujAjas f "^ Alll3Ma su3isvoaio AdwartMmart run upiUi AMm m par ntquMoli GENTLE GREY TIGER-STRIPED KITTEN I hav lM than • wk toft to live and I'm bagging you to coma and raacua ma from a cailain daatfi. $16 Includaa rablaa ahot, a tag and ma. Contact tha HENDERSON ANIMAL SHELTER MOSCR DR. HEND. S68-20S3 Thondigr, Octobw 20. 1988 HcndtrMB Hm Ncwi, HtatfarMa, NavUt Fag%||fa From Curtis' Comtr By Joty Cnrtli One world chftmpioiuhip fiffht originally lat for this month and then awitch^ to Novwnbar, now haa a dflnit data. It'a Nov. 8 and it matchea WBA Middleweight Champion Sumbu Kalambay againat Doug DeWitt in Italy. inch paintings of the 10 finalists will be on display at NDOWs Reno offjce, 1100 Valley Road, through Nov. 18. Coming up faat on Nov. 5 is the WBA'a annual salute, which this year honors not one but two boxing greats of the paat, namely Lou Nova and exworld middleweight champion Gene Fullmer of Utah. Alao in attendance at this entertaining event will be ex-light heavyweight world champions Bob Foster and Joey Maxim, ex-middleweight world champions Carmen Baailio and Rocky Graziano, and ex-world lightweight champion Paddy Oemarco. This attraction begins at 7:30 p.m: in the Americana Room of the Maxim Hotel. Ticketa coat $10 for the evening. Finally! it strikes me that heavyweight Mitch "Blood" Green is finding funny ways of keeping his name in the press and television and in front of the public in his attempt to get popular opinion to force a fight with heavyweight champion Mike TVson. California artist wins Nevada's fourth trout stamp art contest By David K. Rice Nevada Department of WildUfe California artist Tak Nakamura has captured first place in the Nevada Wildlife Federation's Trout Stamp Art Contest, according to Federation President Paula Del Guidice. The 57-year-old artiht from Loe Angeles placed first among 41 entrants in Nevada's fourth Trout Stamp Art Contest. The competition is held annually to solicit artwork to adorn the Department of Wildlife's troup stamp. Nakamura's painting depicts a finely detailed mackinaw, or lake trout, in an underwater setting, about to make a meal of two minnows. The painting, which will be featured in full color on Nevada's 1989-90 trout stamp, is required of anglers more than 12 years old who take or poaaess trout in the state. The new stamp will on on sale in February. Nakamura is a freelance com* mercial artist and illustrator who works in the Los Angeles area. He has entered the federal duck stamp contest in recent yeara ad has placed in the top 10 several times. The native Californian has entered one other trout stamp contaat, but entered Nevada'a competition this year for the firat time. "Nevada's contest was my firat win in wildlife art competition," Nakamrua aaid, "and I hope the publicity and recognition will aid in furthering my goal towards a career in wildUfa art." The mackinaw trout is native to the extreme northern United Stataa, including the Great region, and north to He'a doing it not by fighting contandari>-or anybody for that matter, but by getting arrattad. In on* 11-day pariod, he waa arreetd three timea. But then Tyaon haa been buay with is own proUama of lata too. There is plenty of world championahip bosing oomlnf up in the future weeks with Julio Caaar Chavai va. Joae Luia Ramirea (WBA-WBC lightweight championahip) and Happy Lora vs. Raul Peres (WBA bantamweight championahip) on Oct. 29 at the Hilton, "FuUy Obel" va. Thomaa Haama (WBA super middleweight championahip), Michael Nunn va. Juan Domingo Roldan (IBF middleweight championahip), and Matthew Hilton vs. Robert Hinea (IBF Junior middleweight championship) on Nov. 4 at the Hilton, and Sugar Ray Leonard vs. Don Lalonde (WBC super middleweight and WBC light heavyweight championships) on the Nov. 7 at Caaaara Palace. But there's alao a fight card Saturday at Bally's, in the from of the monthly Banner promotions card. Tha main event featurea young world-rated slugger Engela Pedroaa againat Abraham Mieaea of the Dominican Republic. Alao alated for the card will be unbeaten Laa Vegan Jeff Maywaather, a lightweight, and welterweight Maurice Blocker from Philadelphia, who is world-ranked by two organizations. The action starts at 7:30 p.m. in the Grand Ballroom at Bally's with ticketa priced at $12 and $20. There's another world championahip fight tomorrow in Colombia matching WBC auper flyweight champion Qilberto Roman against Sugar Ba^ Rojas. Wrattilng signups bagin at Boys and Girls Cluo I by Clyde C. Caldwall The coat for tha prograiJVj HandararaBoyaAOIriaClttb $6 for tha Intarmural PlU|l iP< The Henderaon Boya and and $83 for tha USA WrMtlj Oirla Club is now taking aigning Program. The USA upa for ita wreatling program. All boya bttwean tha agea of 6 and 14 yvara old can aignup at tha club, locatad at 401 Drake Street. Tom Harria will coach tha 12-yeara>and-under wreatlera and Lao Hamandet gram competea count: againat other teama out Southern Nevada tannural Team competea ^QI^! the club level only. „|! Junior high-level prog^|[|i^ practicea atart at 6 p^i' will coach tha Junior high-age Wedneaday, in tha chib'a gyn.. wreatlera. The coat ia $33. Tha progn||i The 12-and-undar aga group ia part dl tha USA Wraatfinj^' will start practice at 9 a.m. League. Saturday, Oct. 29, in tha Boys For further information, call n\,.\^ i. • Club gymnasium. 66o-66o9. Canada and Alaska. The first successful release of mackinaw in Nevada came in 1889, with fish from Northville, Mich. The fish were released into Lake Tahoe. According to NDOW, the mackinaw was chosen as the designated subject of this year's competition to commemorate the 100-year (1989) history of this fish in Nevada. The population is well established in Lake Tahoe where it, along with other species, provides an estimated 36,000 angler days each year. The 1985 Nevada State l^egislature authorized the issuance of a trout stamp by NDOW for the purpose of generating funds for construction of a new trout hatchery on the Mason Valley Wildlife Management Area near Yerington. Construction of the hatchery should begin early in 1989. Cost of the annual stamp is $6. Of the 41 entries received this year, seven were submitted by Nevada artists. Jani Lamoreux-Kreutzjans of Reno placed fifth in this year's contest. The six and one-half by nineL AHIND CHURCH SUNDAY SpensorsdSy !i^-| — ATTENTION— ,„ DERRILL PRIORI \ Is Back and Cutting Hair a^ 31 Army Strait • H would Ilk* to welcome back all of hi* old f rienda and cuatomera •565-8075 FREMONT COIN CO. INC. 4lUm ^S %>^ 60LD, SaVER AND PUHNUM PERSONAL INJURY FREE CONSULTATION NO RECOVERY NO FEE ^5 565-0473 223 Water Street, Suite A Next to City Hall LAW OFFICE OF V-\l'/^ }| JOHN F. MARCHIANO Criminal Law — DUI • J r I •Jir '''. • I**! Former Henderson city Attorney :,'[ wm .•V.r ELECT JUDGE JOE BONAVENTURE HOTLINE 384-1909 317 Frinont Si 302-1469 10 Years Experience "The demands of the District Court insist that its' judges have the necessary judicial experience to get the job done. We cannot afford the delays of having an inexperienced person learn through 'on the job training.' It is neither cost effective nor practical. The 10 years that Tve served the public on the Justice Court bench, coupled with my 8 years of public and private practice, give me th e experience to get the job done with the highest degree of tiFfldency without sacrificing the quality of justice." DISTRICT COURT 6 Dedicate^ to the People 'Tm proud of the reputation that I've earned in my public service. I'm known as the 'people's judge' and that means one thing to me, that I've earned the people's trust by taking a firm stand against crime without neglecting the need to be fair. A judge has to be careful to tem()er the awesome responsibility of the judiciary with the fairness that defines justice. I think that the public recognizes that need fo r fairness on the bench and I proud that as a "paopWa fridg e" ttiey recognize my dedication to that goal." Courage and Integrity ;. i; ^ In my 20 years as a Nevada resident, I have seen the growth of Soudn; em Nevada. Unfortunatdy with growth also comet aii increase in crime. I beUcvii^ we have to stand tou^ f, against crime in our communities For 10 years as your Judge in Justice Court, I'^ have been strenthening our first line of defense against crime. Now I want to take a stand for a stronger Criminal Justice System as your District Court Judge in Departmoit 6." GIVE ME YOUR VOTE NOV. idk •1 • • ->^r"-T?y<-^-, • '" • ."*" jVf't'-V^'

PAGE 22

>rf^' !'• I i*U n Haaderion Hemt Newt and Boulder City Newt Thursday, Octobet ^w, i-^^ I 1 Sports Three world title fights feature Hearns, Nunn, Hilton Three world championship fifhti—Thomas Hearns going for in unprecedented fifth worid title against World BoxiOf Aaeociation super middleweight champ Fulgencio Qblemejias, undefeated International Boxing Federation middleweight king Michael Nunn defending against Juan Domingo Roldan and unbeaten IBF junior middlewight champion Matthew Hilton defending against No. 1 ^contender Robert Hines—will be held Nov. 4, at the Las Vegas Hilton. ..The card, promoted by the Las Vegas Hilton in association with Top Rank Inc., will be held ii\ the indoor Hilton Center. Doors to the Hilton Center open at 4 p.m. with the card starting at 5. The first of the three world championship fights begins at approximately (r Tickets, priced at $50 are sold out. Tickets costing $100, $150, $250 and $400, are still on sale fmm 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week at the Las Vegas Hilton Special Events Ticekt Office located in the Las Vejfas Hilton Race and Sports SuperBook. Tickets also may be ordered from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week by calling 702-732-5320 OF 1-800-222-5361. The bouts will be the 22nd. 23rd and 24th world championship fights held at the Las Vegas Hilton since December, 1985, more than at any site in the world during this period. Hearns, the former WBA welterweight, WBA and World Boxing Coimcil 154-pound and WBC middleweight and light heavyweight champion has a .record of 45-3 with 38 itnockouts while Obelmejias has a mark of 49-4 with 39 knockouts. Nunn, making his first title defense, has a record of 31-0 with 21 knockouts while Roldan has a mark of 65-3-2 with 43 knockouts. Hilton, in his second title defense, has a record of 29-0 with 23 knockouts while Hines, ranked No. 1 by the IBF, has a mark of 23-1-1 with 16 knockouts. The 35-year-old Oblemejias, from Venezuela, is defending his 170-pound crown for the first time since winning the title in his most recent outing on May 29 in Suambo, South Korea, with a 12-round decision over Chong-Pal Park. Obelmejias twice fought Marvelous Marvin Hagler for the world middleweight ebampionship, on Jan. 17, 1181 in Boston and on Oct. 30, 1982, in San Remo, Italy. The 30-year-old Hearns, from Detroit, is Hghting for the first tune since his stunning upset loss to current WBC middleweight champion Iran Barkley, June 6 at the Hilton. Hearns won the WBA welterweight title Aug. 2, 1980, with a a second-round knockout of Jose PipinoCuevas. Hearns captured the WBC super welterweight crown on Dec. 3, 1982, by beating Wilfredo Benitez and added the WBA jonior middeweight cfaampion•hip OB June 15,1984, by stoppuf Roberto Duran in the second round. Hearns won the WBC hght he avy we i i^t title on March 7, 1967, by halting Dennis Andrea in the 10th round than made histtuy as the first and •nly parson to win worid cfaamI in four weii^t divi[the WBC Midlit crown by stoi^nng HoJdan io the fourth on Oct SM Boxing, Pa9t23 Thomas Reams Fulgencio Obelmejias Michael 'Second to* Nunn Juan Domingo Roldan Matthew Hilton Robert Hines 5KPM to 9:30 PM In The Race ft Shorts Book • • • I FREE PIGSKIN T-SHIRTS Present this coupon when you make a minimum $10 half time wager and receive a FREE t-shirt.. .while supplies last. 75 HOT DOG & BEER While you watch the ganne, enjoy a quarter-pound hot dog and glass of draft beer .. .just 75(1:. Ask about our spoclol liondoy Night Pigskin Farlay Caid. SAM^TOWN HOTEL & GAMBUIMG HAU. BouWer Highway & Nells / 456-7777 / Another fine Boyd Group hOtei One coupon par pMSonMjumuitte 2110 pwticapM ^^ World Series Sales! Strike ^Out! High Prices!!! Every Deal's A Steal!!! Hit A Home Run With Allstate's Low Prices ^ uu 3-Day Free Trail Exchange" "rr purcntif o' vBhife 48 months No mony down OAC riyiMflt IU '87 FORD ESCORT WGN. #1392 Auto, air Cash price $6499 aaies tax $399 81 OOC lee &smos $164 50. total $7063 31. sales tax down. bal. $666350 at 15'/. x 48 mos No money down OAC Piyniirt*185" SAVE MORELEASE USED Lube, Oil & Filter M5.95 '85 FORD LTD Auto air. Caah price $4999. sales tax $309 81 OOC lee i smo g $164 50. total $5473 31 sales lax down, bal $5163 50 at 15'/, 48 months '88 FORD MUSTANG sour SiCMl rM iTins MUST SEE AiitoDttaHng Octobar Special ^49.95 'SH^ftftH-.tAfj oolMoimil NOW *5995 *88 CHIVY cnMe Miiii MaaM. irim MUST SEE '84 FORD LTD GfMI Family Fum 3S4] NOW *5899 CUHKHMMMM tmt0tmmmkpin. NOW'"•6,599 '85 TOYOTA 4X4 P/U NOW '7995 •aaPORD im.m. MtwakiwHM. '88 BRONCO XLT NOW *13,399 •BTBUICK SKYLARK NOW *8990 '88 FORD TAURUS OL *uWr.thc 11' p wn)n t MM! Mi crwm ffT'Mfll NOW M 1,999 N0W*18,6W • wcMwrag AM anX tw top f TBA THiSCOULOIIYOUt WIOIOS CUTLMSCAIAIS NOW 76t9 'AoeniMO caa are cwfliai trom m special oner ol iH luee o
PAGE 23

>rf^' !'• I i*U n Haaderion Hemt Newt and Boulder City Newt Thursday, Octobet ^w, i-^^ I 1 Sports Three world title fights feature Hearns, Nunn, Hilton Three world championship fifhti—Thomas Hearns going for in unprecedented fifth worid title against World BoxiOf Aaeociation super middleweight champ Fulgencio Qblemejias, undefeated International Boxing Federation middleweight king Michael Nunn defending against Juan Domingo Roldan and unbeaten IBF junior middlewight champion Matthew Hilton defending against No. 1 ^contender Robert Hines—will be held Nov. 4, at the Las Vegas Hilton. ..The card, promoted by the Las Vegas Hilton in association with Top Rank Inc., will be held ii\ the indoor Hilton Center. Doors to the Hilton Center open at 4 p.m. with the card starting at 5. The first of the three world championship fights begins at approximately (r Tickets, priced at $50 are sold out. Tickets costing $100, $150, $250 and $400, are still on sale fmm 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week at the Las Vegas Hilton Special Events Ticekt Office located in the Las Vejfas Hilton Race and Sports SuperBook. Tickets also may be ordered from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week by calling 702-732-5320 OF 1-800-222-5361. The bouts will be the 22nd. 23rd and 24th world championship fights held at the Las Vegas Hilton since December, 1985, more than at any site in the world during this period. Hearns, the former WBA welterweight, WBA and World Boxing Coimcil 154-pound and WBC middleweight and light heavyweight champion has a .record of 45-3 with 38 itnockouts while Obelmejias has a mark of 49-4 with 39 knockouts. Nunn, making his first title defense, has a record of 31-0 with 21 knockouts while Roldan has a mark of 65-3-2 with 43 knockouts. Hilton, in his second title defense, has a record of 29-0 with 23 knockouts while Hines, ranked No. 1 by the IBF, has a mark of 23-1-1 with 16 knockouts. The 35-year-old Oblemejias, from Venezuela, is defending his 170-pound crown for the first time since winning the title in his most recent outing on May 29 in Suambo, South Korea, with a 12-round decision over Chong-Pal Park. Obelmejias twice fought Marvelous Marvin Hagler for the world middleweight ebampionship, on Jan. 17, 1181 in Boston and on Oct. 30, 1982, in San Remo, Italy. The 30-year-old Hearns, from Detroit, is Hghting for the first tune since his stunning upset loss to current WBC middleweight champion Iran Barkley, June 6 at the Hilton. Hearns won the WBA welterweight title Aug. 2, 1980, with a a second-round knockout of Jose PipinoCuevas. Hearns captured the WBC super welterweight crown on Dec. 3, 1982, by beating Wilfredo Benitez and added the WBA jonior middeweight cfaampion•hip OB June 15,1984, by stoppuf Roberto Duran in the second round. Hearns won the WBC hght he avy we i i^t title on March 7, 1967, by halting Dennis Andrea in the 10th round than made histtuy as the first and •nly parson to win worid cfaamI in four weii^t divi[the WBC Midlit crown by stoi^nng HoJdan io the fourth on Oct SM Boxing, Pa9t23 Thomas Reams Fulgencio Obelmejias Michael 'Second to* Nunn Juan Domingo Roldan Matthew Hilton Robert Hines 5KPM to 9:30 PM In The Race ft Shorts Book • • • I FREE PIGSKIN T-SHIRTS Present this coupon when you make a minimum $10 half time wager and receive a FREE t-shirt.. .while supplies last. 75 HOT DOG & BEER While you watch the ganne, enjoy a quarter-pound hot dog and glass of draft beer .. .just 75(1:. Ask about our spoclol liondoy Night Pigskin Farlay Caid. SAM^TOWN HOTEL & GAMBUIMG HAU. BouWer Highway & Nells / 456-7777 / Another fine Boyd Group hOtei One coupon par pMSonMjumuitte 2110 pwticapM ^^ World Series Sales! Strike ^Out! High Prices!!! Every Deal's A Steal!!! Hit A Home Run With Allstate's Low Prices ^ uu 3-Day Free Trail Exchange" "rr purcntif o' vBhife
48 months No mony down OAC riyiMflt IU '87 FORD ESCORT WGN. #1392 Auto, air Cash price $6499 aaies tax $399 81 OOC lee &smos $164 50. total $7063 31. sales tax down. bal. $666350 at 15'/. x 48 mos No money down OAC Piyniirt*185" SAVE MORELEASE USED Lube, Oil & Filter M5.95 '85 FORD LTD Auto air. Caah price $4999. sales tax $309 81 OOC lee i smo g $164 50. total $5473 31 sales lax down, bal $5163 50 at 15'/, 48 months '88 FORD MUSTANG sour SiCMl rM iTins MUST SEE AiitoDttaHng Octobar Special ^49.95 'SH^ftftH-.tAfj oolMoimil NOW *5995 *88 CHIVY cnMe Miiii MaaM. irim MUST SEE '84 FORD LTD GfMI Family Fum 3S4] NOW *5899 CUHKHMMMM tmt0tmmmkpin. NOW'"•6,599 '85 TOYOTA 4X4 P/U NOW '7995 •aaPORD im.m. MtwakiwHM. '88 BRONCO XLT NOW *13,399 •BTBUICK SKYLARK NOW *8990 '88 FORD TAURUS OL *uWr.thc 11' p wn)n t MM! Mi crwm ffT'Mfll NOW M 1,999 N0W*18,6W • wcMwrag AM anX tw top f TBA THiSCOULOIIYOUt WIOIOS CUTLMSCAIAIS NOW 76t9 'AoeniMO caa are cwfliai trom m special oner ol iH luee o
PAGE 24

\'' Pit t4 HrtMi Homt Ntwt aai Balir aty Nws ThmtiKj, Oetobir 10, im Education Five area high school seniors compete for merit scholarships Fiv tocal ara high school ssnion airs )kinong the more than 16,000 semifinalists fh)m acroaa the nation who are vying in the 1989 competition for scholarsKqw from the National Mmit Scholarship Corp. la Henderson, three Baaic High School seniora—Kayann Black, Mark A. Ferch and FhilUp D. Gamer—were among thoee namee announced by NMSC. At Boulder Gty High School, David C. Bennett and Jeramie W. Rinne are also among the semifinalists. Interestingly, both Bennett and Rinne have declared their intended college majors to be in philosophy and religion and reportedly want to enter the ministry following graduation from college. NMSC said that Black intends to become an engineer, Ferch wants to pursue psychology and Gamer wishes to study mathematics and statistics preparatory to becoming a physicist. Final selection will be announced in the spring of 1989, NMSC spokespersons said. By publicly recognizing semifinalists, NMSC hopes to enhance their higher education opportunities while encouraging increased pubUc interest in young men and women who have exceptional potential for scholarly contributions and leadership that will benefit the nation in the future. The nationwide pool of acadonicaUy talented semifinalists includes less than half of one percent of each state's seniors; they entered the 1969 oanpetition for some 6,000 Merit Scholarships worth about $23 milbcrn by taking a qualifying test in 1987, when they were juniors. The PSAT/NMSQT served as an initial screen of nearly 1J2 miUiw students frran 19,000 U.S. high schools who are participants in the 34th annual Merit Program. Semifinalists are the top scoTBW in thdr respective states, and to advance to the finalist level of the competition, they must fulfill additional requirements. TTiey must have outstanding academic records throughout secondaryschool, be endorsed and recommended by their schools, confinn their qualifying pf(Hmance on a second test, and complete an application that includes detailed infwroatkai about their scholastic and extracurricular accomplishments. All merit scholarship winners will be chosen from the group of about 14,000 semifinalists who distinguished themselves by becoming finalists. The 6,000 mmt schorars wiU be selected by committees who will analyze detailed information about the finalists' acadonic and extracurricular accomplishments. Committee decisions will be based on an evaluation of high school course had and difficulty level of subject matter as well as grades earned, two sets of test scores, the student's demon* strated leadership ^nd and contributions to the school and community, the written recommendations and characterizati(ni fay 'the school principal, and the finalist's self^description of interests, plans, and goals. Winners will be the finalists who are judged to have the strongest record of attainment. The merit scholarships to be awarded are of several types. Eveiy finalist will be considered for a National Merit $2000 Scholarship, one of 1,800 awards that are prorated on a state representational basis in relation to each state's percentage of the U.S. high school senior class. Corporations, foundations, and other business organizations will underwrite approximately 1,400 Merit Scholarships for finalists who meet their preferential criteria. Nearly all corporate-sponsored awards are designated for finalists in the Merit Program ^i^ are children of the grantor organization's David Bennett Jeramie Rinne NOW OPEN TO PUBLIC Monday thru Friday 9 a.in.-4 p.in. Warahouse Prices on Silks, Trtss, Plants and Decorative Items S6S-0596 PhancI Planta 051 Putblo BM. Henderaon (Mwtr Pina) M SCARY BEARY, Humana Hospital-Sunrise In Celetxation of the 14th Anniversary of the Southwestern NeoNatal Unit. Saturday, October 22,1988 2p.m.4p.m. Drcus Tent, NortHMt Parking Lot Costume Optional Baaic High School Merit Scholarship competitors tnclvde, from left, Phillip Gamer, Marie Ferch and Kayann Blade. PbM* by Ml O^MM employees; some sponsors pro,— vide scholarships for residents of an area the company serves, or for finalsist with career goals the company wishes to encourage. More than 2,800 four-year merit scholarships will be funded by colleges and universitiee. Only finalists who will attend a sponsor institution can receive one of these awards. NMSC is a not-for-profit organization ^idioee scholarship activitiee are financed, without federal or state funds, by over 600 independent sponsors. The Merit Scholar Class of 1989 will join some 109,000 other academic champions who have received merit kholarships worth $334 million since the first Merit Program was completed in 1966. Don't Miss The Boat "Get into the Swing" THE NIQHT-LiQHTED DRIVING RANGE NOW OPEN UNTIL 10 P.M. 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PAGE 25

\'' Pit t4 HrtMi Homt Ntwt aai Balir aty Nws ThmtiKj, Oetobir 10, im Education Five area high school seniors compete for merit scholarships Fiv tocal ara high school ssnion airs )kinong the more than 16,000 semifinalists fh)m acroaa the nation who are vying in the 1989 competition for scholarsKqw from the National Mmit Scholarship Corp. la Henderson, three Baaic High School seniora—Kayann Black, Mark A. Ferch and FhilUp D. Gamer—were among thoee namee announced by NMSC. At Boulder Gty High School, David C. Bennett and Jeramie W. Rinne are also among the semifinalists. Interestingly, both Bennett and Rinne have declared their intended college majors to be in philosophy and religion and reportedly want to enter the ministry following graduation from college. NMSC said that Black intends to become an engineer, Ferch wants to pursue psychology and Gamer wishes to study mathematics and statistics preparatory to becoming a physicist. Final selection will be announced in the spring of 1989, NMSC spokespersons said. By publicly recognizing semifinalists, NMSC hopes to enhance their higher education opportunities while encouraging increased pubUc interest in young men and women who have exceptional potential for scholarly contributions and leadership that will benefit the nation in the future. The nationwide pool of acadonicaUy talented semifinalists includes less than half of one percent of each state's seniors; they entered the 1969 oanpetition for some 6,000 Merit Scholarships worth about $23 milbcrn by taking a qualifying test in 1987, when they were juniors. The PSAT/NMSQT served as an initial screen of nearly 1J2 miUiw students frran 19,000 U.S. high schools who are participants in the 34th annual Merit Program. Semifinalists are the top scoTBW in thdr respective states, and to advance to the finalist level of the competition, they must fulfill additional requirements. TTiey must have outstanding academic records throughout secondaryschool, be endorsed and recommended by their schools, confinn their qualifying pf(Hmance on a second test, and complete an application that includes detailed infwroatkai about their scholastic and extracurricular accomplishments. All merit scholarship winners will be chosen from the group of about 14,000 semifinalists who distinguished themselves by becoming finalists. The 6,000 mmt schorars wiU be selected by committees who will analyze detailed information about the finalists' acadonic and extracurricular accomplishments. Committee decisions will be based on an evaluation of high school course had and difficulty level of subject matter as well as grades earned, two sets of test scores, the student's demon* strated leadership ^nd and contributions to the school and community, the written recommendations and characterizati(ni fay 'the school principal, and the finalist's self^description of interests, plans, and goals. Winners will be the finalists who are judged to have the strongest record of attainment. The merit scholarships to be awarded are of several types. Eveiy finalist will be considered for a National Merit $2000 Scholarship, one of 1,800 awards that are prorated on a state representational basis in relation to each state's percentage of the U.S. high school senior class. Corporations, foundations, and other business organizations will underwrite approximately 1,400 Merit Scholarships for finalists who meet their preferential criteria. Nearly all corporate-sponsored awards are designated for finalists in the Merit Program ^i^ are children of the grantor organization's David Bennett Jeramie Rinne NOW OPEN TO PUBLIC Monday thru Friday 9 a.in.-4 p.in. Warahouse Prices on Silks, Trtss, Plants and Decorative Items S6S-0596 PhancI Planta 051 Putblo BM. Henderaon (Mwtr Pina) M SCARY BEARY, Humana Hospital-Sunrise In Celetxation of the 14th Anniversary of the Southwestern NeoNatal Unit. Saturday, October 22,1988 2p.m.4p.m. Drcus Tent, NortHMt Parking Lot Costume Optional Baaic High School Merit Scholarship competitors tnclvde, from left, Phillip Gamer, Marie Ferch and Kayann Blade. PbM* by Ml O^MM employees; some sponsors pro,— vide scholarships for residents of an area the company serves, or for finalsist with career goals the company wishes to encourage. More than 2,800 four-year merit scholarships will be funded by colleges and universitiee. Only finalists who will attend a sponsor institution can receive one of these awards. NMSC is a not-for-profit organization ^idioee scholarship activitiee are financed, without federal or state funds, by over 600 independent sponsors. The Merit Scholar Class of 1989 will join some 109,000 other academic champions who have received merit kholarships worth $334 million since the first Merit Program was completed in 1966. Don't Miss The Boat "Get into the Swing" THE NIQHT-LiQHTED DRIVING RANGE NOW OPEN UNTIL 10 P.M. EVERY NIGHT iCpUNTRVaUB LMVCQM located In QrMn Vally For mori Information 451-2106 Our phone vAre maintenance plan is liandy around your liouse. Now vou can be assuiHl that >'our inside wiring and telcn^^ will always be in woridng order for onlv a small monthly fee that shows up on your phone bill. It's Centa's Inaide Wre Maintenance Vadaga. With this plan, your inside telephone wires are covered for standard r^Mir jobs. Our plan can hd|> you avoid costly "pav-aa-ytxi-so*'rapain if and when you and them. tb be sure your phone wirinff wiD ahm bt in woridng ordv at an oideriy price, caU Gentel about our Inadt Win Mattitanance PkiasB, available to reakkntial and ringMlMbuiinMacuatam^ It% a handy tool to have around. 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PAGE 26

Fg M Henderson Home Newi and Boulder City Newi This Was Nevada Thursday, October 20,1988 TlwMkqr. October 20,1968 Ernie May: Martyred Las Vegas police officer By Phillip I. Earl Nevada Historical Society This coming Saturday, a memorial to Nevada law enforcement offlcers who have lost their lives in the line of duty will be dedicated at Reno's Idlewild Park. Among those to be remembered that day is Ernest James May—"Ernie" to his many friends—a Las Vegas police officer killed in a shootout on June 8,1933, the first city officer to be slain in the course of his work. Thirty-eight years of age and the father of six children, he was a native of Marysvale, Utah, and the son of Las Vegas pioneer Rose Warren. He had moved to the desert community • when just a boy and had later become a railroader—first a call boy at the depot and then a locamotive fireman—but his heart was in law enforcement. His older brother Joe, had become ft member of the police department in 1911 and young Ernie '^ften made rounds with him after his shift at the railyards. Ernie also served with the Boulder City department for a time before joining the Las Vegas force in 1931. About 7:30 that fateful evening, a call came in that a man was drunk and firing a weapon at the Clark Auto Court on South Fifth Street. Officer May took the call, but a resident pf the court, Richard Morris, showed up before he left and rode out with him. Morris said that it was the owner of the facility, William H. Clark, who was causing the trouble. Clark had been drinking for several days, he said, and was in an insane rage, having fired a shot at the woman who was hving with him, Mabel Winters. May reached the scene at 7:45 p.m., parking near the east end of the court some 15 feet from Clark's apartment. What happened next later became the subject of considerable controversy. First reports had it that Clark was standing in an open doorway holding a gun on Dorris Hayden. "I'm going to take you or someone with me," he reportedly said to her just as May drove up, and took two shots at the woman, but missed. She fell, feignign death so he would not shoot agian, and Clark turned his attention to May, firing one shot which hit the officer in the right breast as he tried to crouch behind another car. May, his Iveapon drawn, fired six times at Clark. Four bullets hit their mark, but Clark staggered to his feet and made his way to the west side, where he fell. May apparently followed him. After making sure he was dead, he walked around to the southeast comer and collapsed. The residents of the court did not notify police headquarters for 20 minutes. Among those officers who responded was Joe May, a Las Vegas Constable at that time, who found both his brother's body and that of Clark. Five residents were taken into custody as witnesses, but the exact sequence of events was never resolved, since they told conflicting stories at a subsequent hearing. An investigation revealed that Clark had died from a bullet which had entered beneath his right ear and emerged from the left temple. Powder bums around the wound seemed to indicate that May had finished him off execution style at close range, but Mabel Winters, hiding in the bmsh nearby, testified that Clark ended his own life after being shot by the officer. There was also a subsequent rumor that someone else on the scene that night had killed Clark to keep him from revealing details of the prostitution and illegal liquor operations being conducted at the auto court. At May's funeral three days later. Bishop Bryan L. Bunker of the Latter Day Saints Church presided. The ceremonies drew the largest crowd in memory. May's brother officers serving as pfdlbearers and members of the railroad union acting in an honorary capacity. Bishop Bunker and others who spoke used the occasion to urge their fellow citizens to take a stand against Las Vegas' "criminal element," but the plight of the slain officer's family was largely ignored. Church members helped for a time and he carried a railroad insurance police in the amount of $3,000. He was also covered by a policy adLounge lizards so he could never reveal what he knew of the plot to kill the young officer. Witnesses to the killing of May and Clark scattered to the winds as soon as they could and the slayings remain a mystery. A plaque in honor of the courageous officer was placed in Las Vegas City Hall a few weeks after his death and a street intersecting the Tonopah Highway north of town, Emie May Boulevard, was named in his honor in recent years. That was some consolation to the family, but it came very late and most ministered by the Nevada Industrial Commission and his widow received a small pension to take care of herself and the children. Times were tough for the family, however, and there is still much bitterness on the part of those who remember the killing. As it happens, Ernie May was a second cousin of this writer. To this day, the surviving family members believe that he was "set up" because of his part in previous investigations of criminal activity at the auto court. They also believe that Clark himself was killed by someone who emerged from the brush that night Las Vegans' today probably know little of the man behind the name of the street. The dedication of the memorial will take place at noon Saturday just east of the Rose Garden in Idlewild Park. A scholarship fund is also being raised for criminal justice students at the University of Nevada and Truckee Meadows Community College. Those interested in attending the dedication or contributing to the scholarship fund should call Dick Hintz in Reno at 972-0101. Don't Miss The Boat ''Get into the Swing" THE NIGHT-LIGHTED DRIVING RANGE NOW OPEN UNTIL 10 P.M. EVERY NIGHT SHOWBOAT COUNTRY CLUB LAS VEGAS located in Green Valley For more information 451-2106 Ernie May, killed in a 1933 shootout, the first Las Vegas officer to die in the line of duty .Nevada HUtorical Society photograph ATTENTION! FATHER & SON TEAM 50 YEARS EXPERIENCE TRANSMISSION SERVICE SPECIAL *19 Chang* fluid Clean pan Replace pan gasket Change trans-filter Adjust bands & linlcage •Road test (Front wtiaa) drive, 4i4, R.Vj Extra) Some 100 species of animals at the San Diego Zoo are luxuriating on the latest innovation in Zoo habitat waterbeds. According to International Wildlife magazine, the zoo models are basically the same as human waterbeds, except they are covered with claw-proof almninum. 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OECATUR 870-3722 EfiST SIDE MISSOH CEMTEfl 4020 S MARYLANn 369-6611 tavonte part)i The (XynqMcloumainent of Sots Odober23-2d Whois the best candidate to win the race for $S0ClO00? It could be you when you enter the Olympic Tournament of Slots at Caesars Palace Because the reel winners in this campaign can take home $100,000 for first. $50,000 for second. $20,000 for third. Along with many other valuable cash prizes. All voH need to jump on the bandv^gon is a $2000 totry fe Good fw overnight acoommodatioM. SU meals. Special gift And a gala victory ceiebratJOB hosted by AmerioB favorite write-in for President, Pat Paulsen. To join the party, call Caesars VIP Services at 732-731-7777. But do it now. Becawe eariy returoi indicate you could be a wmno: Henderson Home News and Bsnider City News Page t7 Saturday, Oct. 22 The Name Game: An exhibit of authentic Family Coats of Arms, handpainted by heraldy expert and artist, Donna Rittenhouse, runs through Oct. 31, Clark County, Main Gallery Annex. Call 733-3613. Illaminations: Things aren't always what they seem during Halloween. Cibachrome and black and white creative figurative photographs by Cathie Magar, ranging from the beautiful to the macabre, runs through Nov. 4, Clark County, Photographic Gallery. Call 733-3613. Prints of the 80's: Includes lithographs, etchings and monotypes on loan from the Smith Andersen Gallery. Cosponsored by the Green Valley Arts Advisory Council with funding provided by the American Nevada Corporation, runs through Nov. 12, Grean Valley, Call 435-1840. People through the Eyes of Del Hoy: People from all walks of life as captured in oils by Helen del Hoy. Runs through Nov. 8, Sunrise. Call 453-1104. To Serve Man: Large, empathetic portraits by Maryanna Latham of domestic animals, runs through Nov. 28, Lull Gallary. Call 368-4411. KIDS: Aggie Roberts shows how to start from seed and create a "Garden In Your Window." A series of programs deaigned to help schooiage children who must spend time alone make informed decision and to build their self esteem through development of aelf-managMnent skills. Presented by the Nevada Cooperative Extension Services, 4-H Department. Preregistration is requested, 10:30 a.m.. Green Valley. Call 435-1840. Classic Images: PoUtics and PoUticians: "The Best Man," starring Henry Fonda and Cliff Robertson, depicts conflict between integrity and opportunistic deception at a national political party convention, 1 p.m., Clark County, Auditorium. Call 733-3613. This week's Horoscope By Salome Weekly Tip: Reach better understanding for stronger foundations. Aries (March 21-April 19) A lot of decisions are facing the Ram as we head into fall. Aspects may carry a heavy emotional weight as well as a physical one. Be prepared for change. Taurus April 20-May 20) Fast-moving situations may upset your carefully planned schedules. Be flexible. Rewards come to you which aren't slowed by sudden change. Be direct. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Two situations will require honest thought before decisions can be made. Avoid being influenced by those who seek to satisfy their needs through you. Cancer (June 21-July 20) A newcomer leaves a message for you through a friend. Part of the past is re-examined through this new relationship. Friends prove trustworthy. Leo (July 21-Aug. 22) Perfect mates can be found in Virgoe who want to tie up loose nuptial knots. Passion is all the rage for you now. Social obligations will take lots of time. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Glamorous Virgos are certainly in demand these day's. Family situations may become sticky, but stick with kin. They need you. Business can wait. libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Bide your time when accepting social bids. ( rowding your calendar nowcan mean being out of time when later and better offers arrive. Be patient. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Memories will be a little bittersweet. A clue to the future can be found in a look at the recent past. Re-examine that person's real motivators. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) A streak of unusual stubbomess impedes the progress of those who insist on sticking to old methods. C!)onsider making worthwhile changes. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Who can blame you for feehng you've triumphed over that pesky matter—finally?! An old foe, however, may demand further explanations. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Long-estranged friends will attempt to get in touch with you. Be gracious, even if others don't encourage a reunion. Follow a happy, healthy note. Piscea (Feb. 19-March 20) Family xaaitben are taking up much of your time. Tend to problems as they arise. Don't allow prolonged grudge-bearing to bear bitter fruits now. If you were bom this week, you are the type which pays heed to unnecessary message. Certainly you should listen for input from those around you (family and friends), but final decisions are ultimately yours. And, undoubtedly, you are capable of making very wise choices. Learn how to be gracious in declining the help of others. 1988, McNaught Syndicates OLD MUSICIANS NEVER DIE THEY JUST DECOMPOSE Calendar of Events Movie Monatars: Humongous Creatures: After the suffers an "Attack of the 50 Foot Woman," this husband is really sorry he aggravated his wife, 2 p.m., Spring Valley Call 368-4411. Monday, Oct. 24 KIDS: Create a wonderous, tiny world—plant a terrarium 3:30 a.m.. Green Valley. Call 435-1840. Gallery opening and reception: Paper and Acrylic on Canvas, "Papyrtrypa" by Charleen GagUardi, displays the influence of from the simplicity, form and colors found in Japanese culture, runs through Nov. 17,5:30p.m., Clark County, Main Gallery. Call 733-3613. Tuesday, Oct. 25 Halloween Magic Show: Spooky illusions magically performed right before your eyes by prestidigitator Robert Zinga include a haunted house with dancing handkerchiefs. Claaaic Imagea: PoUtics and PoUticians: "The Best Man" 6:30, Sunrise. Call 435-1104. Adult captioned fibn for the deaf (with sound): "Chariots of Fire," a true story celebrating the courage of two natural bom runners competing in the 1924 Paris Olympics., 6:30p.m., Clark County, Aud. Call 733-3613. Great books discussion group: Topics; "My Father: Leslie Stephens" by V. Woolf and "The Veldt" by R. Bradbury, 7 p.m., Clark County, Conf. Rm. Call 733-3613. Wednesday, Oct. 26 Family Storytime: Halloween Puppetry: Monsterous pttppets bring to life favorite storytime goblins and ghosts. After the stories, make a puppet of your own. For all ages. Preregistration is requested, 6:30 p.m., Clark County. Call 733-3618. Silk flower arranging: Learn basic arranging steps, quick tips for hoUday ideas, and how to pick the right colors and styles from Gloria Gasser of Sunset Garden Florists. 7 n.m Green Valley. Call 435-1840. Green thumb gardeners Nevada Cooperative Extension Services horticulturists Aggie Roberts and Linn MiUs present a seriesof programsonplantcare. Topic: Lawns, Trees & Shrubs. Pre-registration is requfa^, 7 p.m.. Sunrise. Call 453-1104. Thursday, Oct. 27 Halloween Magic Show: 4 p.m., Clark County, YPL Aud Call 733-3616. Magic Show highlights Halloween Spooky illusions mysteriously performed rightt before your eyes will make this Halloween a spooktacular event for all school-aged ghosts and goblins. Illusionist Robert Zinga will perform feats of magic at 4 p.m. Tuesday at Rainbow Library, 6010 W. Cheyenne and Thursday at Clark County Library, 1401 E. Flamingo. Further demonstrations of vrizardry, including a unique, black box theatre "haunted house" equipped with creepy characters and dancing handerchiefs, will follow at 3:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28, at Spring Valley Library, 4280 S. Jones Blvd., with two performances at 10:30 a.m., at Green Valley Library, 2797 Green Valley Pkwy., and 1:30 p.m. at West Us Vegas Library, 1402 "D" St., on Saturday, Oct. 29. Zinga will present his final performances at 10:30 a.m. at Charleston Heights Library, 800 Brush St. and at 3:30 p.m., at Suiu*ise Library, 5400 Harris St., Monday, October 31. Zinga has toured extensively thoughout the Northwest, including a performance at the Magic Castle in Hollywood, Calif., considered to be the mecca of magicians. AU performances are free and open to the public. Annual Moose Lodge bathtub races set The Henderson Moose Lodge No. 1924 is holding it's annual bathtub races at noon on Sunday, Oct. 16. The event will take place at 18 Army Street. Race chairman Bob Busch has invited all those interested in participating in or watching the races to come out and enjoy the fun. Refreshments will be served, he said. •Louis LaPoita •Marvin Roae •BIH Psymar F.Q. RtMrty HMnmond (HMMI ft Ufa)

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PAGE 27

Fg M Henderson Home Newi and Boulder City Newi This Was Nevada Thursday, October 20,1988 TlwMkqr. October 20,1968 Ernie May: Martyred Las Vegas police officer By Phillip I. Earl Nevada Historical Society This coming Saturday, a memorial to Nevada law enforcement offlcers who have lost their lives in the line of duty will be dedicated at Reno's Idlewild Park. Among those to be remembered that day is Ernest James May—"Ernie" to his many friends—a Las Vegas police officer killed in a shootout on June 8,1933, the first city officer to be slain in the course of his work. Thirty-eight years of age and the father of six children, he was a native of Marysvale, Utah, and the son of Las Vegas pioneer Rose Warren. He had moved to the desert community • when just a boy and had later become a railroader—first a call boy at the depot and then a locamotive fireman—but his heart was in law enforcement. His older brother Joe, had become ft member of the police department in 1911 and young Ernie '^ften made rounds with him after his shift at the railyards. Ernie also served with the Boulder City department for a time before joining the Las Vegas force in 1931. About 7:30 that fateful evening, a call came in that a man was drunk and firing a weapon at the Clark Auto Court on South Fifth Street. Officer May took the call, but a resident pf the court, Richard Morris, showed up before he left and rode out with him. Morris said that it was the owner of the facility, William H. Clark, who was causing the trouble. Clark had been drinking for several days, he said, and was in an insane rage, having fired a shot at the woman who was hving with him, Mabel Winters. May reached the scene at 7:45 p.m., parking near the east end of the court some 15 feet from Clark's apartment. What happened next later became the subject of considerable controversy. First reports had it that Clark was standing in an open doorway holding a gun on Dorris Hayden. "I'm going to take you or someone with me," he reportedly said to her just as May drove up, and took two shots at the woman, but missed. She fell, feignign death so he would not shoot agian, and Clark turned his attention to May, firing one shot which hit the officer in the right breast as he tried to crouch behind another car. May, his Iveapon drawn, fired six times at Clark. Four bullets hit their mark, but Clark staggered to his feet and made his way to the west side, where he fell. May apparently followed him. After making sure he was dead, he walked around to the southeast comer and collapsed. The residents of the court did not notify police headquarters for 20 minutes. Among those officers who responded was Joe May, a Las Vegas Constable at that time, who found both his brother's body and that of Clark. Five residents were taken into custody as witnesses, but the exact sequence of events was never resolved, since they told conflicting stories at a subsequent hearing. An investigation revealed that Clark had died from a bullet which had entered beneath his right ear and emerged from the left temple. Powder bums around the wound seemed to indicate that May had finished him off execution style at close range, but Mabel Winters, hiding in the bmsh nearby, testified that Clark ended his own life after being shot by the officer. There was also a subsequent rumor that someone else on the scene that night had killed Clark to keep him from revealing details of the prostitution and illegal liquor operations being conducted at the auto court. At May's funeral three days later. Bishop Bryan L. Bunker of the Latter Day Saints Church presided. The ceremonies drew the largest crowd in memory. May's brother officers serving as pfdlbearers and members of the railroad union acting in an honorary capacity. Bishop Bunker and others who spoke used the occasion to urge their fellow citizens to take a stand against Las Vegas' "criminal element," but the plight of the slain officer's family was largely ignored. Church members helped for a time and he carried a railroad insurance police in the amount of $3,000. He was also covered by a policy adLounge lizards so he could never reveal what he knew of the plot to kill the young officer. Witnesses to the killing of May and Clark scattered to the winds as soon as they could and the slayings remain a mystery. A plaque in honor of the courageous officer was placed in Las Vegas City Hall a few weeks after his death and a street intersecting the Tonopah Highway north of town, Emie May Boulevard, was named in his honor in recent years. That was some consolation to the family, but it came very late and most ministered by the Nevada Industrial Commission and his widow received a small pension to take care of herself and the children. Times were tough for the family, however, and there is still much bitterness on the part of those who remember the killing. As it happens, Ernie May was a second cousin of this writer. To this day, the surviving family members believe that he was "set up" because of his part in previous investigations of criminal activity at the auto court. They also believe that Clark himself was killed by someone who emerged from the brush that night Las Vegans' today probably know little of the man behind the name of the street. The dedication of the memorial will take place at noon Saturday just east of the Rose Garden in Idlewild Park. A scholarship fund is also being raised for criminal justice students at the University of Nevada and Truckee Meadows Community College. Those interested in attending the dedication or contributing to the scholarship fund should call Dick Hintz in Reno at 972-0101. Don't Miss The Boat ''Get into the Swing" THE NIGHT-LIGHTED DRIVING RANGE NOW OPEN UNTIL 10 P.M. EVERY NIGHT SHOWBOAT COUNTRY CLUB LAS VEGAS located in Green Valley For more information 451-2106 Ernie May, killed in a 1933 shootout, the first Las Vegas officer to die in the line of duty .Nevada HUtorical Society photograph ATTENTION! FATHER & SON TEAM 50 YEARS EXPERIENCE TRANSMISSION SERVICE SPECIAL *19 Chang* fluid Clean pan Replace pan gasket Change trans-filter Adjust bands & linlcage •Road test (Front wtiaa) drive, 4i4, R.Vj Extra) Some 100 species of animals at the San Diego Zoo are luxuriating on the latest innovation in Zoo habitat waterbeds. According to International Wildlife magazine, the zoo models are basically the same as human waterbeds, except they are covered with claw-proof almninum. Unlike heat lamps, they provide an even temperature similar to warm rocks or beds of leaves where animals A-Z Vac Sew & Fabric GRSN VAUEY • HENDERSON • BOULDER OH MOTORISTS! try EXPERT TRANSMISSIONStMS'ie ciossr than you IMnkl >.<:;;^;^m 1554N.BouldrHwy Hsnderson APPmmuim 565-6458 JACKIE WARREN OF LAS VEGAS LOST 31 LBS. WITH NUTRI-SYSTEM '^Nutrl/System; s h ow e d me why I was overweight.'* The NUTRI/SYSTEM Peraonaliied Waighl Lois ProW* helps you discovaf what keaps you frofn loainq vvalght **Rsult? I lost 31 lbs.l" The NUTRl/SYSTFM compf#h^5iv^ f^vor S9l-Point' Wttflhi LOSS PrografTi md'.KJes Onl i*re<9M lOU p*oW*fT. • A vne^ of dshciout "teals andtnectu • Oe o^ ooe oe^vonei COtif>S*WH) f Piogrant Vn ior^ Mrm FalVMk nutri system THIS WEEK AT NUTRI-SYSTEM LOSE ALL THE WEIGHT YOU WANT FOR $199 WEST SIOF OECSTUR-MEflDOWSCR. 354 S. OECATUR 870-3722 EfiST SIDE MISSOH CEMTEfl 4020 S MARYLANn 369-6611 tavonte part)i The (XynqMcloumainent of Sots Odober23-2d Whois the best candidate to win the race for $S0ClO00? It could be you when you enter the Olympic Tournament of Slots at Caesars Palace Because the reel winners in this campaign can take home $100,000 for first. $50,000 for second. $20,000 for third. Along with many other valuable cash prizes. All voH need to jump on the bandv^gon is a $2000 totry fe Good fw overnight acoommodatioM. SU meals. Special gift And a gala victory ceiebratJOB hosted by AmerioB favorite write-in for President, Pat Paulsen. To join the party, call Caesars VIP Services at 732-731-7777. But do it now. Becawe eariy returoi indicate you could be a wmno: Henderson Home News and Bsnider City News Page t7 Saturday, Oct. 22 The Name Game: An exhibit of authentic Family Coats of Arms, handpainted by heraldy expert and artist, Donna Rittenhouse, runs through Oct. 31, Clark County, Main Gallery Annex. Call 733-3613. Illaminations: Things aren't always what they seem during Halloween. Cibachrome and black and white creative figurative photographs by Cathie Magar, ranging from the beautiful to the macabre, runs through Nov. 4, Clark County, Photographic Gallery. Call 733-3613. Prints of the 80's: Includes lithographs, etchings and monotypes on loan from the Smith Andersen Gallery. Cosponsored by the Green Valley Arts Advisory Council with funding provided by the American Nevada Corporation, runs through Nov. 12, Grean Valley, Call 435-1840. People through the Eyes of Del Hoy: People from all walks of life as captured in oils by Helen del Hoy. Runs through Nov. 8, Sunrise. Call 453-1104. To Serve Man: Large, empathetic portraits by Maryanna Latham of domestic animals, runs through Nov. 28, Lull Gallary. Call 368-4411. KIDS: Aggie Roberts shows how to start from seed and create a "Garden In Your Window." A series of programs deaigned to help schooiage children who must spend time alone make informed decision and to build their self esteem through development of aelf-managMnent skills. Presented by the Nevada Cooperative Extension Services, 4-H Department. Preregistration is requested, 10:30 a.m.. Green Valley. Call 435-1840. Classic Images: PoUtics and PoUticians: "The Best Man," starring Henry Fonda and Cliff Robertson, depicts conflict between integrity and opportunistic deception at a national political party convention, 1 p.m., Clark County, Auditorium. Call 733-3613. This week's Horoscope By Salome Weekly Tip: Reach better understanding for stronger foundations. Aries (March 21-April 19) A lot of decisions are facing the Ram as we head into fall. Aspects may carry a heavy emotional weight as well as a physical one. Be prepared for change. Taurus April 20-May 20) Fast-moving situations may upset your carefully planned schedules. Be flexible. Rewards come to you which aren't slowed by sudden change. Be direct. Gemini (May 21-June 20) Two situations will require honest thought before decisions can be made. Avoid being influenced by those who seek to satisfy their needs through you. Cancer (June 21-July 20) A newcomer leaves a message for you through a friend. Part of the past is re-examined through this new relationship. Friends prove trustworthy. Leo (July 21-Aug. 22) Perfect mates can be found in Virgoe who want to tie up loose nuptial knots. Passion is all the rage for you now. Social obligations will take lots of time. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Glamorous Virgos are certainly in demand these day's. Family situations may become sticky, but stick with kin. They need you. Business can wait. libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Bide your time when accepting social bids. ( rowding your calendar nowcan mean being out of time when later and better offers arrive. Be patient. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Memories will be a little bittersweet. A clue to the future can be found in a look at the recent past. Re-examine that person's real motivators. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) A streak of unusual stubbomess impedes the progress of those who insist on sticking to old methods. C!)onsider making worthwhile changes. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Who can blame you for feehng you've triumphed over that pesky matter—finally?! An old foe, however, may demand further explanations. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Long-estranged friends will attempt to get in touch with you. Be gracious, even if others don't encourage a reunion. Follow a happy, healthy note. Piscea (Feb. 19-March 20) Family xaaitben are taking up much of your time. Tend to problems as they arise. Don't allow prolonged grudge-bearing to bear bitter fruits now. If you were bom this week, you are the type which pays heed to unnecessary message. Certainly you should listen for input from those around you (family and friends), but final decisions are ultimately yours. And, undoubtedly, you are capable of making very wise choices. Learn how to be gracious in declining the help of others. 1988, McNaught Syndicates OLD MUSICIANS NEVER DIE THEY JUST DECOMPOSE Calendar of Events Movie Monatars: Humongous Creatures: After the suffers an "Attack of the 50 Foot Woman," this husband is really sorry he aggravated his wife, 2 p.m., Spring Valley Call 368-4411. Monday, Oct. 24 KIDS: Create a wonderous, tiny world—plant a terrarium 3:30 a.m.. Green Valley. Call 435-1840. Gallery opening and reception: Paper and Acrylic on Canvas, "Papyrtrypa" by Charleen GagUardi, displays the influence of from the simplicity, form and colors found in Japanese culture, runs through Nov. 17,5:30p.m., Clark County, Main Gallery. Call 733-3613. Tuesday, Oct. 25 Halloween Magic Show: Spooky illusions magically performed right before your eyes by prestidigitator Robert Zinga include a haunted house with dancing handkerchiefs. Claaaic Imagea: PoUtics and PoUticians: "The Best Man" 6:30, Sunrise. Call 435-1104. Adult captioned fibn for the deaf (with sound): "Chariots of Fire," a true story celebrating the courage of two natural bom runners competing in the 1924 Paris Olympics., 6:30p.m., Clark County, Aud. Call 733-3613. Great books discussion group: Topics; "My Father: Leslie Stephens" by V. Woolf and "The Veldt" by R. Bradbury, 7 p.m., Clark County, Conf. Rm. Call 733-3613. Wednesday, Oct. 26 Family Storytime: Halloween Puppetry: Monsterous pttppets bring to life favorite storytime goblins and ghosts. After the stories, make a puppet of your own. For all ages. Preregistration is requested, 6:30 p.m., Clark County. Call 733-3618. Silk flower arranging: Learn basic arranging steps, quick tips for hoUday ideas, and how to pick the right colors and styles from Gloria Gasser of Sunset Garden Florists. 7 n.m Green Valley. Call 435-1840. Green thumb gardeners Nevada Cooperative Extension Services horticulturists Aggie Roberts and Linn MiUs present a seriesof programsonplantcare. Topic: Lawns, Trees & Shrubs. Pre-registration is requfa^, 7 p.m.. Sunrise. Call 453-1104. Thursday, Oct. 27 Halloween Magic Show: 4 p.m., Clark County, YPL Aud Call 733-3616. Magic Show highlights Halloween Spooky illusions mysteriously performed rightt before your eyes will make this Halloween a spooktacular event for all school-aged ghosts and goblins. Illusionist Robert Zinga will perform feats of magic at 4 p.m. Tuesday at Rainbow Library, 6010 W. Cheyenne and Thursday at Clark County Library, 1401 E. Flamingo. Further demonstrations of vrizardry, including a unique, black box theatre "haunted house" equipped with creepy characters and dancing handerchiefs, will follow at 3:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28, at Spring Valley Library, 4280 S. Jones Blvd., with two performances at 10:30 a.m., at Green Valley Library, 2797 Green Valley Pkwy., and 1:30 p.m. at West Us Vegas Library, 1402 "D" St., on Saturday, Oct. 29. Zinga will present his final performances at 10:30 a.m. at Charleston Heights Library, 800 Brush St. and at 3:30 p.m., at Suiu*ise Library, 5400 Harris St., Monday, October 31. Zinga has toured extensively thoughout the Northwest, including a performance at the Magic Castle in Hollywood, Calif., considered to be the mecca of magicians. AU performances are free and open to the public. Annual Moose Lodge bathtub races set The Henderson Moose Lodge No. 1924 is holding it's annual bathtub races at noon on Sunday, Oct. 16. The event will take place at 18 Army Street. Race chairman Bob Busch has invited all those interested in participating in or watching the races to come out and enjoy the fun. Refreshments will be served, he said. •Louis LaPoita •Marvin Roae •BIH Psymar F.Q. RtMrty HMnmond (HMMI ft Ufa)

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Pgt M RMterMa HOSM NWI ind Boulder qty Ntwt Thmday, Oetobw 20.1968 Business Book outlines tomorrow's jobs ^Do you want to get a job? nt, lawyers, nurses, manaXhink about supply and degers, and technicians will also l^nd. If you can supply a skill be in great demand, t^t lomeone needs, you will "Tomorrow's Jobs" offers 4p(i a job. But if you're still in tips on interviewing and rel^hool, how can you know what sums writing to help you get ikilk to train for? What will ^ in demand when you're fin4ty out looking for a career? A'booklet firom the Bureau of G^r Statistics in the U.S. diipartment of Labor can help. •Tomorrow's Jobs" (Item U IT, |1.26) considers population growth and change, new technologies, and the current the edge on job competition. The booklet also lists career information sources and places to look for job openings Poetry contest begins A $ 1,000 grand prise ia being offered in World of Poetry's Free Poetry Contest, open to all poets, liiere are 200 prizes in all, totaUng over $16,000. The deadUne for entering is Oct. 31. Winners will be notified on or before Dec. 16. Says Poetry Editor Mrs. EddieLou Cole: '^ven for those who have never entered t poetry oonteat before, this is the contest to enter. I expect it to produce some exciting discoveries," To enter, send one poem only, 21 lines or leae, to: World of Poetry, Dept. PR, 2431 Stockton Blvd., Sacramento, Calif. 95817. ValnabU Coupon CASCAM CAR WASH NOW OPIN 7 DAYS A WHK Bob McMonlgle, president of sales for International Oams Technology, presents a donation of 118,000 to the Nevada To get your copy of "TomorUamlng Foundation for Educatioiiid Excellence. Accepting row's Jobs," send a check or the check on behalf of the foondatfam is board membcriyauie money order, along with the Wynn. IGT is one of 33 prominent gaadng establishments item number, to the Consumer belonging to the foundation. Information Center, Pueblo, Colo. 81009. When your bookFREE POUSH WAX WITH COUPON 106 1. Lak* MMd Driv* availability of certain skills to lets arrive you'll also get a free l^redict where job opportunities copy of the "Consumer Information Catalog." Published quarterly by the Consumer Information Center of the U.S. General Services Administration, the catalog lists over 200 free and reasonably priced booklets on a wide variety of subjects. will be in the next 10 to 15 years. For your copy, send a check or money order and the item number, to the Consumer Information Center, Pueblo, Colo. 81009. Changes in the population and work force affect employisent more than any other factors. Due to the current low birth rate and the aging of the baby boom generation the fastest growing segment of the population is the middle-aged and elderly. These people will eat out more, buy more insurance, and need more health care M they get older, so those fields should offer lots of employment opportunities. liie number of workers between 16 and 24 years of age will decline into the mid-90's, so jobs traditionally held by this age group should be easy to find. As people retire earlier, the number of older workers will alao fkIL By the year 2,000, three out of four workers will be between 26 and 54 years of age. The aging and growth of our population will cause a need for more housing and health f adl, Itiaa. The eoMtnictian industry will probably reapond by hiring about 900,000 more work-. era between now and the year 2,000. But construction will probably be the only goodsproducing industry that grows. Technological improvements, such as more efficient harvesting equipment for farmers or robot assembly lines in auto plants, will probably cause mining, agricultural, and manufacturing fields to employ fewer people. Just 12 years from now, four out of five jobs will be in service producing industries. This expansion may call to mind inukgea of a worii force dominated by waitan, cashiers, and ratail aakaparsons. There will, of couna, be millions of theae jofaa. But the faataat growing oocupations will be the ones that require more education. We will empby 46 percent more natural, computer, and mathematical scientists than we do now. Enginsers, accountIGT donates $13,000 to Gaming Foundation International Game Technology recently donated a check for $13,000 to the Nevada Gaming Foundation for Educational Excellence, marking the companv's STUDIED, PASSED—June Koslk of Gargia Realty, w( reoently awarded the designation of Graduate Realtors InaUtute. The GRI deaignation, awarded by the Nevada Aaaoeiation of Realtors, Is given to individuals who complete 90 classroom hours of real estate education and pass a comprehenaive examinatlnn after each oourae. The couraea in the series cover all aapeets of the real eatate industry from reaidential to commercial real eatate. There are cur^ rently 681 realtors in Nevada who hold the nationally recognized designation. PUU 74f Soli. Oct. IMl Savings on most of your office supply needs... FREE DELIVERY ANYWHERE CALL 382-3910 For Your Office Supply Prioritieal Everything For The Office lie tamulai tasaliy avallaM* In MM U.t., SM mVhmt flM ptMfiMolM In your ,t: AL m C^Mitaf. A KM to iilto>li m MM ttmm • iM^ MN M IM-IMW. INDUSTRIAL MEDICAL GROUP OF HENDDISDN WkM JoHnlurfes OccHP r 1. Roport your accident to your supervisor. 2. Go directly to i.M.G. for medical care. *Specialzing in Industrial Medicine. *S.I.I.S. paperworic reported dally. Saves patient and company time and money. Insures quality care and prompt benefits. Pre^mployment, D.O.T. Physicals • Minor Surgery • X-ray • Physical Therapy • Specialist Referrals When Necessary • Safety Consuitlng. 222 Lead St. 564-2488 M.D. F.I.C.I. U. M.I. Ron Hubtl IndustrW RsisUons Oksctor $5.00 OFF A D.O.T. PHYSICAL WITH THIS COUPON TlHN*sl Ts Tks HeaisptM CiWBMity rSP HBP eaPPSPII HOURS: SUN.THURS 11 A.M.-9 P.M. FRI&SAT 11 A.M.-10 P.M. THE HENDERSON 8IZZLER 110 N. BLDR HWY. choice of HICKEN FRIED STEAK] OR BURGER LUNCH $2.99 or $4.99 includes Platter and AH-YouCan-Eat Freah Fruit. Salad, TosUdo & Pasta Bar; Bvaf! Luncheon Hours: Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Oftar Qood Thru Oot. 20lh, 'M ^i| A Z **nwlV. Otitkm 19i8 HsBdersen Hsnie News sad Bsvlier City News Pegs M OHM Mir lifMf Religion Sunday sermon: "Finding God Interesting" By Carolyn Drennan Bishop Home iVews Columnist The other day I became so unhinged after a fruitless attempt to pry an antihistamine taUet from its multi-wrapped foil, I began to wonder if others had similar difficulties with "the little things" that drive me round the bend. Below is a sampling from my unofficial PoU. One very organized business man kept me pinned to my chair for half an hour as he apprised me of the nefarious system the Post Office employs in posting pick up times on mail boxes for outgoing mail. A perusal of the detailed charts drawn up by Mr. Business Man reveals that indeed pickup times change faster than Clark Kent can dodge into a phone booth and put on his Superman outfit' while we're on the subject of mail service, I read an article the other day concerning a postal carrier who obviously has a colossal pet peeve—junk mail! His solution? He simply grabbed his shovel and buried it! Alas, after a few blissful months of carrying less than half the usual load on his shoulders, he was caught. Another common pet peeve is chewing gum. Not only does it often show up on the bottoms of shoes, in toddler's hair and under theater seats, I learned that it's the bane of job interviewers and, would you bebeve, talk-show hosts! One irate interviewer, graphically likened the sound of a dedicated gum chewer to that of a drunken cow plunging across a muddy field. The there are those people who are bedeviled by labelmania." I can identify with that. The cheaper the article, I've discovered, the more the price tag adheres to it. I once bought an inexpensive set of cocktail glasses as a wedding gift, and then was faced with the dilemma of removing the price stickers from eight glasses. The bride never saw them. I broke three in the process and became so unhinged, I dumped the rest in the trash. Afterwards, I had a headache you wouldn't believe. Speaking of headaches, the next time you let the "little things" get to you, think about this. Unraveling the iritricades of a tamper-proof aspirin bottle may be the last little thing" that gotcha! Arnaz Jr. to speak at Happiness classes Actor Desi Arnaz Jr. will be q)ecial guest speaker fcHtonight's program in the ongoing, free New Life Happiness classes in Las Vegas conducted at 7 p.m. each Thursday at the Realthe subject of talks by Howard tors Professional Centra*, 1750 this week at noi^jrofit New life E. Sahara Ave., between EastFoundation, 700 Wyoming St., answer period, spokeq)erson said. There is lifted parking "bnagining you are saved still leaves you scared," with BiMical reference to Matthew 15:8, is hnhce, and invites the public to participate in its fellowship Using scripture from the Book of Job 11:6-9, Dr. Ed Swain, minister of the Community Church of Henderson, will speak on "Finding God Interesting." Worship service starts at 10:30 a.m., Community Church is affiliated with the United Church of Christ, Southern California Conticles for a planned Christmas Bazaar to be held in November. For further information, caD the church office at 565-8563. the church's choir director has announced that the chancel choir will start preparing special Christmas music at regular rehearals, at 7 p.m., Wednesdays, also at the church. All interested person who like to sing, are invited to participate. Sunday em and Maryland Parkway, next to Las Vegas Honda. Each class features a different panel of stopHstress experts and includes a helpful question-and1n God We Trust' sermon at Presbyterian Pastor Dr. R. Dixon Jennings will preach a sermon, "In God We Trust," at both the 8:30 a.m. and the 11 a.m. services Sunday at the Henderson Presbyterian Church. The message is based on Hebrews 5:1-6, in which the author interprets the meaning of Jesus' high priesthood. Sunday Church School for all ages begins at 9:45 a.m., officials noted. There is a nursery for preschool children at the 11 a.m. service, they said. Following the pastor's talk with the children at the 11 a.m. service, those who are in kindergarten through second grade may attend Cherub Church activities under adult sup>ervision. Youth group for junior high and senior high youngsters will meet at 6 p.m. Sunday. The church is located at 601 N. Major Ave., just beyond Morrell City Park. For further information, call the church office at 665-9684. at the comer of Utah Street in Boulder City. Newcwners are invited to attend the nondenominational meetings conducted on a donation basis at 7 p.m. Wednesday and Fridays and at 9 a.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Each class is unique, offering a wholesOTie blend of humor and true Christian principles with an emphasis on old-fashioned virtues, sponsors said. The local church is at 360 East Horizon Drive at Greenway Road, Henderson. Sunday school classes are held at 9 a.m. There is always a junior sermon at the worship service, after which there is a supervised area for young children who do not stoy for the entire service. The Women's Association is currently meeting for special workdays at 10 a.m. each Thursday morning at the church, when they make ar'Do We Have All the Evidence?' is Sunday question for Methodists The Rev. Louis Lyons' message for Sunday will be "Do We have All The Evidencer based on scripture found win the gospel of Mark 10:46-52, at both the 8:15 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. worship services. The pastor has a short sermonette at each service for the children. At the 10:30 a.m. service, the Trinity Tinnabulators, a fme hand bell choir, will idiare their talents with the congregation. The adult choir will sing at the 8:15 am. service. A nursery is provide for the 10:30 a.m. service. A fellowship time is held on the outeide patio after the service. At 9:20 a.m., Sunday school classes meet for all ages. The UMYF group will leave the church at 1:15 p.m. to go to the Ham Concert Hall at MOTORS UNLIMITED 1700 Boulder Highway OpMi Sunday 12:004:00 P.M. 564-5344 • WEEKLY SPECIAL • 1§83 PONTIAC WAQON Auto Tnms A/C • AM/FM Casa. THt • Crulee • roof rack • Wire WhMis • Llka Newt LMe^ Cap. t3,tM • Res f 7M Stock #0153 OM. Pay 36 mo. @ $124.t7 + tax 1tMmW73 1 AriSitll Stock #0157 ItT* OAINUAC eouniMviua NoCrMN Siool(#0i4t IMS NIStAN aOOSX tjc • t ft • utmi Ha* • tl.00 OM bi Co OAC OCk 10104 1tT7 OUt OMIOA 0>Mi TfwwMMMiMi Can SMOiioiar im i m i iiK 1M4MMICHIM4Mhr iMriM ine. Alar Oal in Oaai Cap lil,in HM. tiM M me. # Un + tax StocK 0132 1t79 LTD PORD 4 Or • Oood FaMNy Car • Nima QraatI I AMI • A • SMMH DawmnmaH PyiM. Stock f0143 1M1 FORD • tCORTWAOON • Aim • A • tl,M4 + lav Law Law Paymanll Stock f014& 1M1 MIRCURY CAPRI AM. • AK • Moon Noa( Cuat. Whaal* 01.00 aat m Ceat O.AC. Stock 0l5al UNLV to attend the Las Vegas Symphony Orchestra. At 7 p.m. there will be an evening vesper service an informal meeting to enjoy the fellowship and choose hymns. At 10 a.m. each Tuesday, the Bible study class meets in room 7 for discussions on the Gospel of Mark. At 4 p.m. Wednesday the iSouthem Nevada U.M. Foundation will meet at Griffith UMC and at 6:30 p.m. the adult choir will practice. A Christian Education Seminar with Doris Shipp, Nev. educator of the year as its keynote speaker, will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday at Griffith U.M. church. Fen: information about the church program, call the church office at 565-6049. ^/t68toi'8 CCass (Ad (Formerly Green Valley Dance & Gymnastics) Has expanded and relocated in the new S250 Mt. Vista • BIdg. D Offering • BALLET • TAP • JAZZ • ADULT CLASSES Also PrMchool Combination CiMses OPEN 6 DAYS A WEEK 451-3939 Unique & Impressive That's you. Make sure your business papers and^tationery say the same thing about you! With quality Sfrathmore Legacy* papers, your messages stand out from the crowd — with fine finishes and elegant colors, all the most popular sizes, and matching envelopes, too. Strathmore Legacy papers — when you want to make a good impression. DICK BLICK ART STORE 1f1 Ramrod Av*. (
PAGE 29

Pgt M RMterMa HOSM NWI ind Boulder qty Ntwt Thmday, Oetobw 20.1968 Business Book outlines tomorrow's jobs ^Do you want to get a job? nt, lawyers, nurses, manaXhink about supply and degers, and technicians will also l^nd. If you can supply a skill be in great demand, t^t lomeone needs, you will "Tomorrow's Jobs" offers 4p(i a job. But if you're still in tips on interviewing and rel^hool, how can you know what sums writing to help you get ikilk to train for? What will ^ in demand when you're fin4ty out looking for a career? A'booklet firom the Bureau of G^r Statistics in the U.S. diipartment of Labor can help. •Tomorrow's Jobs" (Item U IT, |1.26) considers population growth and change, new technologies, and the current the edge on job competition. The booklet also lists career information sources and places to look for job openings Poetry contest begins A $ 1,000 grand prise ia being offered in World of Poetry's Free Poetry Contest, open to all poets, liiere are 200 prizes in all, totaUng over $16,000. The deadUne for entering is Oct. 31. Winners will be notified on or before Dec. 16. Says Poetry Editor Mrs. EddieLou Cole: '^ven for those who have never entered t poetry oonteat before, this is the contest to enter. I expect it to produce some exciting discoveries," To enter, send one poem only, 21 lines or leae, to: World of Poetry, Dept. PR, 2431 Stockton Blvd., Sacramento, Calif. 95817. ValnabU Coupon CASCAM CAR WASH NOW OPIN 7 DAYS A WHK Bob McMonlgle, president of sales for International Oams Technology, presents a donation of 118,000 to the Nevada To get your copy of "TomorUamlng Foundation for Educatioiiid Excellence. Accepting row's Jobs," send a check or the check on behalf of the foondatfam is board membcriyauie money order, along with the Wynn. IGT is one of 33 prominent gaadng establishments item number, to the Consumer belonging to the foundation. Information Center, Pueblo, Colo. 81009. When your bookFREE POUSH WAX WITH COUPON 106 1. Lak* MMd Driv* availability of certain skills to lets arrive you'll also get a free l^redict where job opportunities copy of the "Consumer Information Catalog." Published quarterly by the Consumer Information Center of the U.S. General Services Administration, the catalog lists over 200 free and reasonably priced booklets on a wide variety of subjects. will be in the next 10 to 15 years. For your copy, send a check or money order and the item number, to the Consumer Information Center, Pueblo, Colo. 81009. Changes in the population and work force affect employisent more than any other factors. Due to the current low birth rate and the aging of the baby boom generation the fastest growing segment of the population is the middle-aged and elderly. These people will eat out more, buy more insurance, and need more health care M they get older, so those fields should offer lots of employment opportunities. liie number of workers between 16 and 24 years of age will decline into the mid-90's, so jobs traditionally held by this age group should be easy to find. As people retire earlier, the number of older workers will alao fkIL By the year 2,000, three out of four workers will be between 26 and 54 years of age. The aging and growth of our population will cause a need for more housing and health f adl, Itiaa. The eoMtnictian industry will probably reapond by hiring about 900,000 more work-. era between now and the year 2,000. But construction will probably be the only goodsproducing industry that grows. Technological improvements, such as more efficient harvesting equipment for farmers or robot assembly lines in auto plants, will probably cause mining, agricultural, and manufacturing fields to employ fewer people. Just 12 years from now, four out of five jobs will be in service producing industries. This expansion may call to mind inukgea of a worii force dominated by waitan, cashiers, and ratail aakaparsons. There will, of couna, be millions of theae jofaa. But the faataat growing oocupations will be the ones that require more education. We will empby 46 percent more natural, computer, and mathematical scientists than we do now. Enginsers, accountIGT donates $13,000 to Gaming Foundation International Game Technology recently donated a check for $13,000 to the Nevada Gaming Foundation for Educational Excellence, marking the companv's STUDIED, PASSED—June Koslk of Gargia Realty, w( reoently awarded the designation of Graduate Realtors InaUtute. The GRI deaignation, awarded by the Nevada Aaaoeiation of Realtors, Is given to individuals who complete 90 classroom hours of real estate education and pass a comprehenaive examinatlnn after each oourae. The couraea in the series cover all aapeets of the real eatate industry from reaidential to commercial real eatate. There are cur^ rently 681 realtors in Nevada who hold the nationally recognized designation. PUU 74f Soli. Oct. IMl Savings on most of your office supply needs... FREE DELIVERY ANYWHERE CALL 382-3910 For Your Office Supply Prioritieal Everything For The Office lie tamulai tasaliy avallaM* In MM U.t., SM mVhmt flM ptMfiMolM In your ,t: AL m C^Mitaf. A KM to iilto>li m MM ttmm • iM^ MN M IM-IMW. INDUSTRIAL MEDICAL GROUP OF HENDDISDN WkM JoHnlurfes OccHP r 1. Roport your accident to your supervisor. 2. Go directly to i.M.G. for medical care. *Specialzing in Industrial Medicine. *S.I.I.S. paperworic reported dally. Saves patient and company time and money. Insures quality care and prompt benefits. Pre^mployment, D.O.T. Physicals • Minor Surgery • X-ray • Physical Therapy • Specialist Referrals When Necessary • Safety Consuitlng. 222 Lead St. 564-2488 M.D. F.I.C.I. U. M.I. Ron Hubtl IndustrW RsisUons Oksctor $5.00 OFF A D.O.T. PHYSICAL WITH THIS COUPON TlHN*sl Ts Tks HeaisptM CiWBMity rSP HBP eaPPSPII HOURS: SUN.THURS 11 A.M.-9 P.M. FRI&SAT 11 A.M.-10 P.M. THE HENDERSON 8IZZLER 110 N. BLDR HWY. choice of HICKEN FRIED STEAK] OR BURGER LUNCH $2.99 or $4.99 includes Platter and AH-YouCan-Eat Freah Fruit. Salad, TosUdo & Pasta Bar; Bvaf! Luncheon Hours: Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Oftar Qood Thru Oot. 20lh, 'M ^i| A Z **nwlV. Otitkm 19i8 HsBdersen Hsnie News sad Bsvlier City News Pegs M OHM Mir lifMf Religion Sunday sermon: "Finding God Interesting" By Carolyn Drennan Bishop Home iVews Columnist The other day I became so unhinged after a fruitless attempt to pry an antihistamine taUet from its multi-wrapped foil, I began to wonder if others had similar difficulties with "the little things" that drive me round the bend. Below is a sampling from my unofficial PoU. One very organized business man kept me pinned to my chair for half an hour as he apprised me of the nefarious system the Post Office employs in posting pick up times on mail boxes for outgoing mail. A perusal of the detailed charts drawn up by Mr. Business Man reveals that indeed pickup times change faster than Clark Kent can dodge into a phone booth and put on his Superman outfit' while we're on the subject of mail service, I read an article the other day concerning a postal carrier who obviously has a colossal pet peeve—junk mail! His solution? He simply grabbed his shovel and buried it! Alas, after a few blissful months of carrying less than half the usual load on his shoulders, he was caught. Another common pet peeve is chewing gum. Not only does it often show up on the bottoms of shoes, in toddler's hair and under theater seats, I learned that it's the bane of job interviewers and, would you bebeve, talk-show hosts! One irate interviewer, graphically likened the sound of a dedicated gum chewer to that of a drunken cow plunging across a muddy field. The there are those people who are bedeviled by labelmania." I can identify with that. The cheaper the article, I've discovered, the more the price tag adheres to it. I once bought an inexpensive set of cocktail glasses as a wedding gift, and then was faced with the dilemma of removing the price stickers from eight glasses. The bride never saw them. I broke three in the process and became so unhinged, I dumped the rest in the trash. Afterwards, I had a headache you wouldn't believe. Speaking of headaches, the next time you let the "little things" get to you, think about this. Unraveling the iritricades of a tamper-proof aspirin bottle may be the last little thing" that gotcha! Arnaz Jr. to speak at Happiness classes Actor Desi Arnaz Jr. will be q)ecial guest speaker fcHtonight's program in the ongoing, free New Life Happiness classes in Las Vegas conducted at 7 p.m. each Thursday at the Realthe subject of talks by Howard tors Professional Centra*, 1750 this week at noi^jrofit New life E. Sahara Ave., between EastFoundation, 700 Wyoming St., answer period, spokeq)erson said. There is lifted parking "bnagining you are saved still leaves you scared," with BiMical reference to Matthew 15:8, is hnhce, and invites the public to participate in its fellowship Using scripture from the Book of Job 11:6-9, Dr. Ed Swain, minister of the Community Church of Henderson, will speak on "Finding God Interesting." Worship service starts at 10:30 a.m., Community Church is affiliated with the United Church of Christ, Southern California Conticles for a planned Christmas Bazaar to be held in November. For further information, caD the church office at 565-8563. the church's choir director has announced that the chancel choir will start preparing special Christmas music at regular rehearals, at 7 p.m., Wednesdays, also at the church. All interested person who like to sing, are invited to participate. Sunday em and Maryland Parkway, next to Las Vegas Honda. Each class features a different panel of stopHstress experts and includes a helpful question-and1n God We Trust' sermon at Presbyterian Pastor Dr. R. Dixon Jennings will preach a sermon, "In God We Trust," at both the 8:30 a.m. and the 11 a.m. services Sunday at the Henderson Presbyterian Church. The message is based on Hebrews 5:1-6, in which the author interprets the meaning of Jesus' high priesthood. Sunday Church School for all ages begins at 9:45 a.m., officials noted. There is a nursery for preschool children at the 11 a.m. service, they said. Following the pastor's talk with the children at the 11 a.m. service, those who are in kindergarten through second grade may attend Cherub Church activities under adult sup>ervision. Youth group for junior high and senior high youngsters will meet at 6 p.m. Sunday. The church is located at 601 N. Major Ave., just beyond Morrell City Park. For further information, call the church office at 665-9684. at the comer of Utah Street in Boulder City. Newcwners are invited to attend the nondenominational meetings conducted on a donation basis at 7 p.m. Wednesday and Fridays and at 9 a.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Each class is unique, offering a wholesOTie blend of humor and true Christian principles with an emphasis on old-fashioned virtues, sponsors said. The local church is at 360 East Horizon Drive at Greenway Road, Henderson. Sunday school classes are held at 9 a.m. There is always a junior sermon at the worship service, after which there is a supervised area for young children who do not stoy for the entire service. The Women's Association is currently meeting for special workdays at 10 a.m. each Thursday morning at the church, when they make ar'Do We Have All the Evidence?' is Sunday question for Methodists The Rev. Louis Lyons' message for Sunday will be "Do We have All The Evidencer based on scripture found win the gospel of Mark 10:46-52, at both the 8:15 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. worship services. The pastor has a short sermonette at each service for the children. At the 10:30 a.m. service, the Trinity Tinnabulators, a fme hand bell choir, will idiare their talents with the congregation. The adult choir will sing at the 8:15 am. service. A nursery is provide for the 10:30 a.m. service. A fellowship time is held on the outeide patio after the service. At 9:20 a.m., Sunday school classes meet for all ages. The UMYF group will leave the church at 1:15 p.m. to go to the Ham Concert Hall at MOTORS UNLIMITED 1700 Boulder Highway OpMi Sunday 12:004:00 P.M. 564-5344 • WEEKLY SPECIAL • 1§83 PONTIAC WAQON Auto Tnms A/C • AM/FM Casa. THt • Crulee • roof rack • Wire WhMis • Llka Newt LMe^ Cap. t3,tM • Res f 7M Stock #0153 OM. Pay 36 mo. @ $124.t7 + tax 1tMmW73 1 AriSitll Stock #0157 ItT* OAINUAC eouniMviua NoCrMN Siool(#0i4t IMS NIStAN aOOSX tjc • t ft • utmi Ha* • tl.00 OM bi Co OAC OCk 10104 1tT7 OUt OMIOA 0>Mi TfwwMMMiMi Can SMOiioiar im i m i iiK 1M4MMICHIM4Mhr iMriM ine. Alar Oal in Oaai Cap lil,in HM. tiM M me. # Un + tax StocK 0132 1t79 LTD PORD 4 Or • Oood FaMNy Car • Nima QraatI I AMI • A • SMMH DawmnmaH PyiM. Stock f0143 1M1 FORD • tCORTWAOON • Aim • A • tl,M4 + lav Law Law Paymanll Stock f014& 1M1 MIRCURY CAPRI AM. • AK • Moon Noa( Cuat. Whaal* 01.00 aat m Ceat O.AC. Stock 0l5al UNLV to attend the Las Vegas Symphony Orchestra. At 7 p.m. there will be an evening vesper service an informal meeting to enjoy the fellowship and choose hymns. At 10 a.m. each Tuesday, the Bible study class meets in room 7 for discussions on the Gospel of Mark. At 4 p.m. Wednesday the iSouthem Nevada U.M. Foundation will meet at Griffith UMC and at 6:30 p.m. the adult choir will practice. A Christian Education Seminar with Doris Shipp, Nev. educator of the year as its keynote speaker, will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday at Griffith U.M. church. Fen: information about the church program, call the church office at 565-6049. ^/t68toi'8 CCass (Ad (Formerly Green Valley Dance & Gymnastics) Has expanded and relocated in the new S250 Mt. Vista • BIdg. D Offering • BALLET • TAP • JAZZ • ADULT CLASSES Also PrMchool Combination CiMses OPEN 6 DAYS A WEEK 451-3939 Unique & Impressive That's you. Make sure your business papers and^tationery say the same thing about you! With quality Sfrathmore Legacy* papers, your messages stand out from the crowd — with fine finishes and elegant colors, all the most popular sizes, and matching envelopes, too. Strathmore Legacy papers — when you want to make a good impression. DICK BLICK ART STORE 1f1 Ramrod Av*. (
PAGE 30

Fftge M HenderuB Home Newi aad Boulder City News Thnroday, Oetdber 20, 1968 lure of a Sure Treasure' Pastor Rivers' topic Pastor Joel Rivers will speak at the 10 a.m. worship service on the topic of "The Lure of a Sure Treasure" at Southside Christian Church, 1631 East Sunset Road, one-half mile west of Eastern Avenue, near the now U.S. Post Office, in the Sundance Plaza. The Adult Class is studying the book of Romans under the miniater's leadership while Sunday school classes are available for all ages during the 9 a.m. Bible school hour. The Lord's Supper is served each Sunday at the 10 a.m. service with servants Ron Gordon, William Vogel, John Terry and Mary Bacus helping. Kitty Rivers, the minister's wife, leads the Children's Church during the worship hour with educational activities for youngsters so that adults can enjoy worship. For more information about the independent Christian Church, call 458-2731. Dear PeUie "Big Chick Dear Debbie: / People in my office are trying to organize a company-wide blood drive. But I'm telling you right here and now, there is no way I'm ever going to let a bunch of strangers stick needles tended the opening night of the 1,000 attend Lundstrom crusade More than 1,000 people atim*ifc^.y^^ m me. not with all these drug addicts and homos spreading AIDS all over the place. I watch the news like everybody else, and I know you can get AIDS from blood. Why don't they get their blood from people who have nothing to lose, like from people in jail or something? Why should healthy, decent, lawabiding citizens have to risk catching all kinds of diseases? No Blood Here Dear Biood: Your letter is very disturbing because it is a perfect example of the kind of dangerous misinformation which has resulted from the AIDS scare. I bet you'll think differently when you are in a life-threatening situation and need blood in a hurry. And the chances of that happening are very bkely. 1 spoke to the folks at The New York Blood Center, which is one of the largest blood collection agencies in the country. According to Dr. Aaron Kellner, by age 72 most Americans will have needed at least one transfusion of blood. Somebody, somewhere, in this nation needs blood every 3.75 seconds, and while 40 percent of the American population is eligible to give blood, only four percent actually donates. You can't get blood from a turnip. Blood has no substitute, and there is only once source for it: healthy human donors. Furthermore, there is no change of getting AIDS by giving blood.' Blood donations used to come primarily from derelics, as you have suggested. But would you feel comfortable knowing that's where your blood supply was coming from? Since the threat of AIDS and dwindling blood supphes, there are many companies now doing what your company intends to do; they have taken an active role in securing an adequate blood supply by organizating donor recruitment programs among employees. If the fear of AIDS is your only excuse for not giving blood, you'll have to come up with a better one. Dear Debbie: I read your response to Helpless and Mad about the woman whose car broke down and didn't have a man around when she needed one. I am a 48-year-old mechanic and hear of this wherever 1 go. I feel sorry for these people. I think everyone who takes a driver's education course should take 20 hours of emergency car repairs. States should make this a mandatory part of their programs, required before anyone gets behind the wheel of a car. It could save thousands of lives and money if everyone did it. Fathers are too busy, and most don't know much about car repair anyway. Besides lots of kids think their dads are duds and wouldn't listen anyway. Yes, the lady who wrote to you did get ripped off, but she got off easily compared to some other incidents. Something needs to change just for the safety of all females and males alike. The answer is in driver's ed programs and no place else. I've tried for years to start a class, but got no response; finally I gave up. Maybe you will have some luck convincing your readers to provide a little extra protection for drivers. Smart Mechanic Dear Mechanic: Thank you for your letter. Your suggestion is a good one, and I hope to Departments of Motor Vehicles across the country take notice, as well as driver education directors. Write to Debbie c/o The McNaught Syndicate, 537 Steamboat Road, Greenwich, CT 06830. 1988. McNaught Syndicate liowell Lundstrom evangelistic crusade, in mid-October at the lias Vegas Convention Center. Some 200 counseters were available, representing 40 area churches officials said. Meadowlark Lemon, former Harlem Globetrotter, will be the crusade's featured guest at Family Night, today. Big Chick Hunfcsberry, former bodyguard to rock musicians Prince, Madonna and AC-DC, will appear Friday night. Youth Night. Lundstorm and wife, Connie, will conduct a free "Love for Debbie Voss^ McDonald's names new manager McDonald's of Las Vegas recently announced the appointment of Debbie Voss as operations manager for McDonald's Restaurants. New to the Las Vegas area, Voss was a McDonald's field consultant in the St. Louis area. Previous to her position as field consultant, she was an area supervisor after being promoted from store manager. During her career with McDonald's, Voss has received "Dean's List," "Gold Hat," and "Outstanding Contributor" awards from the McDonald's Corp. "I am looking forward to becoming a member of the Las Vegas community. I am really proud to be part of the McDonald's Management Team in Las Vegas." said Voss. Meadowlark Lemon Life" seminar for couples, from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday. Reservations are required. Admission to the crusade is free. For additional information, call 731-0888. Crime safety subject of church event A Program of "Citizens Against Crime" will be held at 7 p.m.. Thursday, Oct. 27 at the Community Church on 360 East Horizon Drive. "Citizens Against Crime" is a national crime safety awareness organization that presents the classes on crime prevention. Leslie Taylor will be the speaker and anyone who has ever attended these classes have come out of them with a wealth of ideas for selfprotection, spokespersons said. The speaker's presentation will last 45 minutes, including questions and answers. The church has extended an invitation to everyone who would like to learn about selfprotection to attend. The Joy Fellowship will host the gathering; refreshments will be served. Echo Farma Dairy Co. of Nmv York introducod tha milk bottia in 1879. Baptist Church lists activities Sunday services at the First Southern Baptist Church, 240 Cholla Street, begin at 11 a.m.; the evening worship service begins at 7 o'clock. Sunday school hour Bible study begins at 9:30 a.m. Departments and classes are provided for all ages, nursery through senior adults. At 7 p.m., Wednesdav. the pastor's Bible study, verse by verse is presented, followed by a time for prayer. Choir practice begins at 8 p.m. Wedneeday. Junior choir for grades first through sixth is scheduled for 6 p.m. on Sundays. For additional information call pastor R<4)ert Holmes at 565-6072. MANPOWER' •LIGHT FACTORY WORK •HEAVY INDUSTRIAL • SECRETARIES • TYPISTS FOR INTERESTING TEMPORARY ASSIGNMENTS IN THE HENDERSON AND BOULDER CITY AREAS MANPOWER TEMPORARY SERVICES 30-A Water St. HINOCRSOI^NEVADA CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT 565-5554 A Lasting Impression Your Papers Say A Lot About You! That's why we carry the complete line of quality StrathmorR Legary" papers: bu.siness stationery and personal stationery, copier papers, computer papers, typing papors. Matching envelopes to complete your coordinated look. When what you have to say is important enough for a second Ifjok. DICK BLICK ART STORE 1951 Ramrod Av. C/i mi So o( Rusaall Rd lusl East o( Mouniam VWa) 4S1-7662 >::: •-•-•-•'•"•>: :'x<->x-A-:' .••KWS :•:• i m GOING OUT OF BUSINESS SALE 50 TO 30% OFF ON MUCH OF OUR MERCHANDISE Do not includ* film proceMing and special orders Studio customers may liave their negatives for s small search fee BASIC PHOTO 19 S. Water St., Henderson 565-7627 t !,*** ake It Ball/s FbrBdmdbi! The ultimate Sunday Champagne Eroncfa. Onfy at 9tOift A gbrtous spread made from the kshest foods found anyvte — crisp vegetables, plump fruits and ^, so sweet deafier&l # BALLYS CAtWOtOOKT LA&\Ui ^"•"WS! r^'llip!^"' More Boulder City news Tbundigr, October 10. IMS Heaiersen Home News and Bsuldsr City Ntwi Ptgt 11 Riw 30 WWII combat mliiloni 'Southwind' crew enjoys reunion THE SOUTHWIND CREW THEN-TUa WM the SoMthwlnd crew in Septembw, 1943, when they obtain* ed their B-24 at Harrington, Kansas. KnceUag from left: Captain Fred Feshareli, pilot; First Lieutenant Marion Charbonneau, co-pilot; First Lieutenant John "Jaeh" Bieker, navigator; First Lieutenant Joe South, bonbar diar. Standing: S/Sgt. Vivian J. Outtieres, gunner, T/Sgt Hendry "Ray" Steinkamp, radio opsratorgunnsr; S/Sgt. Will Gray, assistant engineer and gunner; S/Sgt. Harry Belangee, armament gunner; S/Sgt Carl 8. Grigg, assistant radio operator aad gunner; T/Sgt. FVan A. Fnignito, chief engineer and gunner. By BiU Haribour It's been a long time since these four men shared the cramped space in a B-24 bomber. It's been a long time since those days of World War n and the harrowing 30 combat miasions over the continent from England. Yet the experiences of those days as crew members of the plane known as the Southwind formed a bond that has lasted to this day. Five of the original 10 crewmen are still alive; four gathered here at the Railroad Pass Casino and Hotel last weekend to share their lives and relive a bit of nostalgia from the great war. One, Frank Belangee, livea in Boulder City. He and his wife Dorothy acted as host and hostess for this reunion. It's not the first time the men have touched bases. The reunions began in 1971. Since then, they've attempted to hold a reunion every two years or ao at various kwstions around the country. The last reunion was in Birmingham, Alabama in 1986. It was obvious that the crew of the Southwind were in good spirits. Thsy spoke with pride of being part of the first three daylight raids over Berlin. Itiey reminisced about ths time ths target was a ball bearing factory on the Swiss border and of how the squadron split up on the return flight to Englaiid—and because of flying throu^ a dense ckwd deck, planes would suddenly appear aad diaiqipear off their wing. Ihars was a tiflM whan they ran out (tf fuel aad made a fsraad laadiag on tha White Chfla of Dover. They and the Southwind both escaped injury. Tho plane was refueled aad took back to the air the following day. So who are thoaa four vetoraaa? Frank Balaagee wu the younfMt of tha fhght crew. He aoUated in the Army on Nov. U. 1942 and was asiifMd lo thi Amqr Air Corps • • ho hod ro^Milad. 1 waan't dry behind the earo yet," he recaUa with a laugh. They trained him to be a noee turret gunner. Following the war, Harry got out of the service. He went to work for General Motors in Indiana, left them to work in Salt Lake City but returned to OM again. He also hsd his own business in Idaho—two servkx stations, a bowling alley and a fourplex. Frank wu in the reso n rea and served some time on active duty during the Korean conflict. He's been retired for soma 17 years now. He and Dorothy had a Fifth Wheat; thay visited a daughter in Las Vogas, Ukad what they saw itt Boulder City and decided to call it home. This wu in 1976. Carl Origg tnm Shalby, North Caro^na, was prsosot He served u a tail gunner aboard the Southwind, a fact he jokes sbout now. Hs's put on soms weight during the years and the others note he wouldn't fit in that tiny turret now. Cari hu made all tha reunions since the first one in 1971 in St. Louis. Ho, too, got out of the ssrvios following tho war and went back to his homo town of Shelby whore he became an electrician. He, too, is now retired. He's boon to Las Vegu many timu and eqjoyo it. Frank Fragnito is fhan Loog Island.He was an anginoar guansr on die Soutiiwind. He left the ssnrkM foUowiag the war and bsoaaM involvod in heavy duty oonstruction and is now retirsd. Jack Bieker hails from Hamilton, Ohio. He oervod u the plane's navigator, a ikUl ha says is now largely outdatsd by tho electronic ago. He rsmsmbera thodayiof tlMooKtHitand rudng oas'i pooitioo by tha stars. Afksr tha war ha wont to worii for aa alfttao m a navigator. Uho Jack, ho wm callod back into activo sanrioa iwhriBg orow 1W • -'.I. \i ir''it. ...IN 1971— Kneeling from left: Fred Fesharek; Marion Charbonneau, John Bieker, Joe South. Standing: lUy Steinkamp, Harry Belangee, Carl Grigg, Frank Fragnito. r WITH PANDA MASCOTS-From left, Renee and Frank Fragnito, Dorothy aad Harry Belangee, Jack Bieker. Wthna and Carl Origg diaplay the panda mascots made by IXUma Brigg and presented at the reunion. manbsr. Joo South, wu unable to attend this roonion due to recant surgory. Joe served u the hombardiar. It wu a plaaaant three days St Railniad Pau. Ths TV snd a doM football gams competed with stofiu of tho war related for tha intsrviow. Thru of the OMB had thsir wivoB wiA thsm; tha ladiu ipant moch of ths tiao sqtoyiBg tho dsUghta of tho caifaM) downotairs. Caift ntfi, WitaM, had s SIB' prias for tho gnmp. Shs aad i Carl produced four delightful home-made panda flgurines, each embellished with the nsmes of the crew of the Southwind. It seems the panda wu the plane's insignia. Ihs group hu dwindled from the original 10 but the bond of camaraderie ia itill there and still strong. To s man, they are proud of the roles they served andofthapsrilithayfaosddor ing what wu suppoasd to bs tha war to and all wart. First daylight raids over Berlin '<

PAGE 31

Fftge M HenderuB Home Newi aad Boulder City News Thnroday, Oetdber 20, 1968 lure of a Sure Treasure' Pastor Rivers' topic Pastor Joel Rivers will speak at the 10 a.m. worship service on the topic of "The Lure of a Sure Treasure" at Southside Christian Church, 1631 East Sunset Road, one-half mile west of Eastern Avenue, near the now U.S. Post Office, in the Sundance Plaza. The Adult Class is studying the book of Romans under the miniater's leadership while Sunday school classes are available for all ages during the 9 a.m. Bible school hour. The Lord's Supper is served each Sunday at the 10 a.m. service with servants Ron Gordon, William Vogel, John Terry and Mary Bacus helping. Kitty Rivers, the minister's wife, leads the Children's Church during the worship hour with educational activities for youngsters so that adults can enjoy worship. For more information about the independent Christian Church, call 458-2731. Dear PeUie "Big Chick Dear Debbie: / People in my office are trying to organize a company-wide blood drive. But I'm telling you right here and now, there is no way I'm ever going to let a bunch of strangers stick needles tended the opening night of the 1,000 attend Lundstrom crusade More than 1,000 people atim*ifc^.y^^ m me. not with all these drug addicts and homos spreading AIDS all over the place. I watch the news like everybody else, and I know you can get AIDS from blood. Why don't they get their blood from people who have nothing to lose, like from people in jail or something? Why should healthy, decent, lawabiding citizens have to risk catching all kinds of diseases? No Blood Here Dear Biood: Your letter is very disturbing because it is a perfect example of the kind of dangerous misinformation which has resulted from the AIDS scare. I bet you'll think differently when you are in a life-threatening situation and need blood in a hurry. And the chances of that happening are very bkely. 1 spoke to the folks at The New York Blood Center, which is one of the largest blood collection agencies in the country. According to Dr. Aaron Kellner, by age 72 most Americans will have needed at least one transfusion of blood. Somebody, somewhere, in this nation needs blood every 3.75 seconds, and while 40 percent of the American population is eligible to give blood, only four percent actually donates. You can't get blood from a turnip. Blood has no substitute, and there is only once source for it: healthy human donors. Furthermore, there is no change of getting AIDS by giving blood.' Blood donations used to come primarily from derelics, as you have suggested. But would you feel comfortable knowing that's where your blood supply was coming from? Since the threat of AIDS and dwindling blood supphes, there are many companies now doing what your company intends to do; they have taken an active role in securing an adequate blood supply by organizating donor recruitment programs among employees. If the fear of AIDS is your only excuse for not giving blood, you'll have to come up with a better one. Dear Debbie: I read your response to Helpless and Mad about the woman whose car broke down and didn't have a man around when she needed one. I am a 48-year-old mechanic and hear of this wherever 1 go. I feel sorry for these people. I think everyone who takes a driver's education course should take 20 hours of emergency car repairs. States should make this a mandatory part of their programs, required before anyone gets behind the wheel of a car. It could save thousands of lives and money if everyone did it. Fathers are too busy, and most don't know much about car repair anyway. Besides lots of kids think their dads are duds and wouldn't listen anyway. Yes, the lady who wrote to you did get ripped off, but she got off easily compared to some other incidents. Something needs to change just for the safety of all females and males alike. The answer is in driver's ed programs and no place else. I've tried for years to start a class, but got no response; finally I gave up. Maybe you will have some luck convincing your readers to provide a little extra protection for drivers. Smart Mechanic Dear Mechanic: Thank you for your letter. Your suggestion is a good one, and I hope to Departments of Motor Vehicles across the country take notice, as well as driver education directors. Write to Debbie c/o The McNaught Syndicate, 537 Steamboat Road, Greenwich, CT 06830. 1988. McNaught Syndicate liowell Lundstrom evangelistic crusade, in mid-October at the lias Vegas Convention Center. Some 200 counseters were available, representing 40 area churches officials said. Meadowlark Lemon, former Harlem Globetrotter, will be the crusade's featured guest at Family Night, today. Big Chick Hunfcsberry, former bodyguard to rock musicians Prince, Madonna and AC-DC, will appear Friday night. Youth Night. Lundstorm and wife, Connie, will conduct a free "Love for Debbie Voss^ McDonald's names new manager McDonald's of Las Vegas recently announced the appointment of Debbie Voss as operations manager for McDonald's Restaurants. New to the Las Vegas area, Voss was a McDonald's field consultant in the St. Louis area. Previous to her position as field consultant, she was an area supervisor after being promoted from store manager. During her career with McDonald's, Voss has received "Dean's List," "Gold Hat," and "Outstanding Contributor" awards from the McDonald's Corp. "I am looking forward to becoming a member of the Las Vegas community. I am really proud to be part of the McDonald's Management Team in Las Vegas." said Voss. Meadowlark Lemon Life" seminar for couples, from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday. Reservations are required. Admission to the crusade is free. For additional information, call 731-0888. Crime safety subject of church event A Program of "Citizens Against Crime" will be held at 7 p.m.. Thursday, Oct. 27 at the Community Church on 360 East Horizon Drive. "Citizens Against Crime" is a national crime safety awareness organization that presents the classes on crime prevention. Leslie Taylor will be the speaker and anyone who has ever attended these classes have come out of them with a wealth of ideas for selfprotection, spokespersons said. The speaker's presentation will last 45 minutes, including questions and answers. The church has extended an invitation to everyone who would like to learn about selfprotection to attend. The Joy Fellowship will host the gathering; refreshments will be served. Echo Farma Dairy Co. of Nmv York introducod tha milk bottia in 1879. Baptist Church lists activities Sunday services at the First Southern Baptist Church, 240 Cholla Street, begin at 11 a.m.; the evening worship service begins at 7 o'clock. Sunday school hour Bible study begins at 9:30 a.m. Departments and classes are provided for all ages, nursery through senior adults. At 7 p.m., Wednesdav. the pastor's Bible study, verse by verse is presented, followed by a time for prayer. Choir practice begins at 8 p.m. Wedneeday. Junior choir for grades first through sixth is scheduled for 6 p.m. on Sundays. For additional information call pastor R<4)ert Holmes at 565-6072. MANPOWER' •LIGHT FACTORY WORK •HEAVY INDUSTRIAL • SECRETARIES • TYPISTS FOR INTERESTING TEMPORARY ASSIGNMENTS IN THE HENDERSON AND BOULDER CITY AREAS MANPOWER TEMPORARY SERVICES 30-A Water St. HINOCRSOI^NEVADA CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT 565-5554 A Lasting Impression Your Papers Say A Lot About You! That's why we carry the complete line of quality StrathmorR Legary" papers: bu.siness stationery and personal stationery, copier papers, computer papers, typing papors. Matching envelopes to complete your coordinated look. When what you have to say is important enough for a second Ifjok. DICK BLICK ART STORE 1951 Ramrod Av. C/i mi So o( Rusaall Rd lusl East o( Mouniam VWa) 4S1-7662 >::: •-•-•-•'•"•>: :'x<->x-A-:' .••KWS :•:• i m GOING OUT OF BUSINESS SALE 50 TO 30% OFF ON MUCH OF OUR MERCHANDISE Do not includ* film proceMing and special orders Studio customers may liave their negatives for s small search fee BASIC PHOTO 19 S. Water St., Henderson 565-7627 t !,*** ake It Ball/s FbrBdmdbi! The ultimate Sunday Champagne Eroncfa. Onfy at 9tOift A gbrtous spread made from the kshest foods found anyvte — crisp vegetables, plump fruits and ^, so sweet deafier&l # BALLYS CAtWOtOOKT LA&\Ui ^"•"WS! r^'llip!^"' More Boulder City news Tbundigr, October 10. IMS Heaiersen Home News and Bsuldsr City Ntwi Ptgt 11 Riw 30 WWII combat mliiloni 'Southwind' crew enjoys reunion THE SOUTHWIND CREW THEN-TUa WM the SoMthwlnd crew in Septembw, 1943, when they obtain* ed their B-24 at Harrington, Kansas. KnceUag from left: Captain Fred Feshareli, pilot; First Lieutenant Marion Charbonneau, co-pilot; First Lieutenant John "Jaeh" Bieker, navigator; First Lieutenant Joe South, bonbar diar. Standing: S/Sgt. Vivian J. Outtieres, gunner, T/Sgt Hendry "Ray" Steinkamp, radio opsratorgunnsr; S/Sgt. Will Gray, assistant engineer and gunner; S/Sgt. Harry Belangee, armament gunner; S/Sgt Carl 8. Grigg, assistant radio operator aad gunner; T/Sgt. FVan A. Fnignito, chief engineer and gunner. By BiU Haribour It's been a long time since these four men shared the cramped space in a B-24 bomber. It's been a long time since those days of World War n and the harrowing 30 combat miasions over the continent from England. Yet the experiences of those days as crew members of the plane known as the Southwind formed a bond that has lasted to this day. Five of the original 10 crewmen are still alive; four gathered here at the Railroad Pass Casino and Hotel last weekend to share their lives and relive a bit of nostalgia from the great war. One, Frank Belangee, livea in Boulder City. He and his wife Dorothy acted as host and hostess for this reunion. It's not the first time the men have touched bases. The reunions began in 1971. Since then, they've attempted to hold a reunion every two years or ao at various kwstions around the country. The last reunion was in Birmingham, Alabama in 1986. It was obvious that the crew of the Southwind were in good spirits. Thsy spoke with pride of being part of the first three daylight raids over Berlin. Itiey reminisced about ths time ths target was a ball bearing factory on the Swiss border and of how the squadron split up on the return flight to Englaiid—and because of flying throu^ a dense ckwd deck, planes would suddenly appear aad diaiqipear off their wing. Ihars was a tiflM whan they ran out (tf fuel aad made a fsraad laadiag on tha White Chfla of Dover. They and the Southwind both escaped injury. Tho plane was refueled aad took back to the air the following day. So who are thoaa four vetoraaa? Frank Balaagee wu the younfMt of tha fhght crew. He aoUated in the Army on Nov. U. 1942 and was asiifMd lo thi Amqr Air Corps • • ho hod ro^Milad. 1 waan't dry behind the earo yet," he recaUa with a laugh. They trained him to be a noee turret gunner. Following the war, Harry got out of the service. He went to work for General Motors in Indiana, left them to work in Salt Lake City but returned to OM again. He also hsd his own business in Idaho—two servkx stations, a bowling alley and a fourplex. Frank wu in the reso n rea and served some time on active duty during the Korean conflict. He's been retired for soma 17 years now. He and Dorothy had a Fifth Wheat; thay visited a daughter in Las Vogas, Ukad what they saw itt Boulder City and decided to call it home. This wu in 1976. Carl Origg tnm Shalby, North Caro^na, was prsosot He served u a tail gunner aboard the Southwind, a fact he jokes sbout now. Hs's put on soms weight during the years and the others note he wouldn't fit in that tiny turret now. Cari hu made all tha reunions since the first one in 1971 in St. Louis. Ho, too, got out of the ssrvios following tho war and went back to his homo town of Shelby whore he became an electrician. He, too, is now retired. He's boon to Las Vegu many timu and eqjoyo it. Frank Fragnito is fhan Loog Island.He was an anginoar guansr on die Soutiiwind. He left the ssnrkM foUowiag the war and bsoaaM involvod in heavy duty oonstruction and is now retirsd. Jack Bieker hails from Hamilton, Ohio. He oervod u the plane's navigator, a ikUl ha says is now largely outdatsd by tho electronic ago. He rsmsmbera thodayiof tlMooKtHitand rudng oas'i pooitioo by tha stars. Afksr tha war ha wont to worii for aa alfttao m a navigator. Uho Jack, ho wm callod back into activo sanrioa iwhriBg orow 1W • -'.I. \i ir''it. ...IN 1971— Kneeling from left: Fred Fesharek; Marion Charbonneau, John Bieker, Joe South. Standing: lUy Steinkamp, Harry Belangee, Carl Grigg, Frank Fragnito. r WITH PANDA MASCOTS-From left, Renee and Frank Fragnito, Dorothy aad Harry Belangee, Jack Bieker. Wthna and Carl Origg diaplay the panda mascots made by IXUma Brigg and presented at the reunion. manbsr. Joo South, wu unable to attend this roonion due to recant surgory. Joe served u the hombardiar. It wu a plaaaant three days St Railniad Pau. Ths TV snd a doM football gams competed with stofiu of tho war related for tha intsrviow. Thru of the OMB had thsir wivoB wiA thsm; tha ladiu ipant moch of ths tiao sqtoyiBg tho dsUghta of tho caifaM) downotairs. Caift ntfi, WitaM, had s SIB' prias for tho gnmp. Shs aad i Carl produced four delightful home-made panda flgurines, each embellished with the nsmes of the crew of the Southwind. It seems the panda wu the plane's insignia. Ihs group hu dwindled from the original 10 but the bond of camaraderie ia itill there and still strong. To s man, they are proud of the roles they served andofthapsrilithayfaosddor ing what wu suppoasd to bs tha war to and all wart. First daylight raids over Berlin '<

PAGE 32

a HendttMn HMM New* and Boulder City Newa ThuTMiay. October 20,19S8 TbuTMlay, October 20,19M EirtertalimwHt Henderaen Hama Newa and Beuldor City Nf Pag* H Anderson 'A regular guy a superb entertainer' Kevin DeSanctia, aenior vice preaident of caaino operations and entertainment at the Dttnea Hotel Caaino and Country Club ia "pleated and excited" at the reaponaa of the reopningof tkeTopof the Dunea Nightclub! "^e feel we have aomething to offer that filla a great need to the locala and towiata alike." aaid DeSanctia. In an environment that is raludag, the moot beautiful viar of the Strip, we wanted to bring back a part of the golden daya, the vintage Vegaa...a place where per formers could "hang out" and even ahare their talenta on atage if they wanted to...a place for that apecial evening of dancing and the best in entertainment. "And who elae could fit the bill any better than an entertainer that ainga the song of yesterday bke you know the oompoaer wanted them sung, with expreaaion and aenaitivity...an entertainer who can capture the hkea o( Sammy Davia Jr., FVank Sinatra and Tony BsMMtt like no other ...and an entertainer who is all daas and yet, the minute he waika on atage, hia charm and warmth eqxwe him as ^ruat a regular guy'. His name ia Bob Anderson, a multi-talented flinger^impreaaionist whose name ia aynonomoua with the Top of the Dunes." Back in 1977, a two-week engagement by Anderaon extended into 166 wedu, a record of continuoua perfor mancea for the Dunea. Tony Bennett. Jimmie Rodgera, Prankie Avalon, Sonny King, Pat Cooper, Bemie Allen. Gianni Ruaao and Dora Liberaoe are among the hundreda who have atopped by to welcome Bob back and lend their aupport to bringing bark the true Vegaa entertainment. Loving to aing even aa a little boy, Anderaon dooa not let hia audience down. He knows how to get to the guts of a song, and he uaea hia warm aenae of humor and hia uncanny ability to re-create a myriad of aome of the best aingers in the buaineaa to captivate his audiencea. And how do they reapond? Pirat, with enthuaiastic ai^lauae and standing ovationa and secondly, by coming back and bringing their friends. Althoufl^ Bob Anderaon has performed around the globe, is one of today'a premier convention performers and has appeared on national television, he is happy to be a "Vegas" performer. Being at the Top of the Dunes is like home to Anderaon and he enjoys the challenge of bringing back a part of the old Las Vegaa. "I will do whatever it takes to make this a successful Sound Impressions perform in Henderson The Sound Impressions, led by professional singer-guitarist Al Franky. will perform in concert at 3 p.m. Sunday. Oct. 30, at the HendMwm Civic Center, 201 Lead Street. Fraadcy was a former student of the Peabody Conservatory of Music. He began his professional career at the age of nine in South America. Al has appeared at major hotels and clube in South America and the East Cost, including New York's Plaza Hotel, American Hotel and Chateau Madrid. In South America he was signed with Columbia Records and alao performed on radio and television. Franky has performed on the Las Vegas Strip in engagements at the Tropicana, Frontier, MGM Grand and Sanda hotels. The Henderaon concert and iA Sunday Concert aeries are part of an ongoing cultural program of monthly concerts sponsored by Henderaon Parks and Recreation Department and made possible by matching funda available by the Music Performance Trust Fund and the American Federation of Musicians, Local 369. For additional information, call the Civic Center at 565-2121. SERVICES HENDERSON— FASTEST GROWING BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES Many Job Openlngsl We need you to fill them! Earn while you train and wori(. All services provided at no cost to you. Apply at our new location. 117 NatiP Stpsst MtmUnm 565-0065 'EQUAL OPPORTUNrTY EMPLOYER" venture," aaid Anderaon. "becauee I believe in it very strongly and 1 think it's what the people want." Anderaon continues, 1 couldn't be happier right now, I have a beautiful wife, Karen (celebrated 10 yean of marriage this month), a aon, Matthew, and a daughter, Carrie. I spend as much time with them aa I can, aa family haa always been important to me. To thia day, I can't ever remember any disaenaion between any of our family members." And Anderson's friends are countless and laating. He atill has aome 30 frienda that were hia achool chums and when he seea them it'a like picking up where they left off. The "regular guy" wanta to leave a laating impreaaion, not juat with hia imperaonationa, but with that of himaelf, a ainger in hia own right. A singer with hia own diatinctive style and, as another writer, Charlea Supin. ao aptly put it. "Had Bob Andereon started out in another era, he'd probably be up there with the Vic Damonee and Tony Bennetta." Showtimes are 10 p.m., 11:30 p.m. and 1 a.m., dark on Sundaya and Mondays; reaervationa are auggeated + Bob AnderaoB, left, with Tony Bennett. Marlena Shaw sings with UNLV Jazz Ensemble The UNLV Jau Enaemble will perform with the brassy lOunHa of aoeoial guest star ainger Marlena Shaw at 2 p.m., Sunday. Oct .) at UNLVs Judy Bayley Theatre. (flowing and vibranl, at the top of a form shaped through 20 yeera of club dates and a four-year stint with the Count Baaie Orcheatra touring the U.S. and Europe, Shaw is a (n summate live performer. The New York TVmea has said that "she has a blunt, sflssy personality and R pleflflingly rough-hewn timbre. But her outstanding skill is nn ability to interpolate amusing semiimprovised commentary within songs, in a variety of Marlena Shaw musiofll styles, thflt turns them into personal testitnony." This is not Shaw's first time fwrforming with the UNLV .laRz Rnsemhle. Frank (lagiiflr di, director of the UNLV .law Rnnemble, said he was honored Heraldry expert to discuss coats-of-arms at to invite her back and expressed his appreciation that she haa made time for the engngement, despite her extremely busy touring schedule that ia taking her to ('alifornia, Oregon, Florida, South Carolina, Illinois and Japan. The award-winning UNLV Jazz Ensemble has also tx>ured all over the world, In fact, aome of the members have just returned from a five month engagement in Japan, playing in the ialanda of Hokkaido and Kyushu. Ticketfl for the Oct. 30 concert are priced at $6, with discounts for children, ntudents and Bpniors. They are svailnble in Advance through the Music Department office located on the aecond floor of the Alta Hma Fine Arta building on tha UNLV campus. They Will liao be available at the door befon the concert. For more informa* tion. call 739-3332. Xipe Toltec Aa tec dancers were featured at laat yeara'a Laa Vegns Indian Daya and Pow Wow. Indian Days event returns to Henderson Native American entertainers, artists and craftsmen from all over the Southwest will participate in the sixth antuwl Las VegBH Indian Days on Nov. 4 -() at the 1 lendcrflon ('onv;mtion Outer. The cultural t'4.sti '^1 if sponsored by the Pow Wow of the Four WindH. anon-profit group formed by IVlaine Spilsbury. a Shoshone from Northern Nevada, to encourage the continuance of the Native American cultural heritUBfy^f Song, dance, nuiHic, st^ry telling and skilled arta ani^afts. A $3 donation for Saturday or Sunday, with a special rate of $5 for a weekend pass will be requested from adults to cover the coat of this exciting event. Friday there will be a special program for school children, which ia free to the public. Fancy and traditional dancera will be among the featured entertainers, aa will flutiata and storytellers during the three-day festival. The arta and crafta at the featival exhibit the wide range of creative talenta of Native American artisans. Paintings, carving, pottery, weavioK, basketry, jewelry, Kachina dolls, bead work, featherwork and leatherwork are among those on display. Many of the craftsmen will demonstrate their akills by creating original works of art at the festival. Alao, visitora can enjoy a variety of Indian footis cooked to order. Traditional delicacies such as Indian fi7 bread, Navijo tacoa, homemade tamalea, buffalo jerky. Pueblo pie and piki bread provide an unuaual and taaty meal or snack. The festival of Native American entertainment, arta and crafts and ethnic foods ia planned for the enjoyment of all ages, while offering an opportunity to learn something of the traditions of the earliest Americana. Kaf flea of aome of the fine crafta will be held daily. For more information, contact the Henderaon Convention Center at 665-2171. Donna Rittenhouae. heraldry expert and artist wil) give n lecture entitled "The Name Game," discussing the history of family coats-of-annB. at 7 p.m., Thursday, in the Clark County Library auditorium, 1401 East Flamingo Road. Rittenhouse will talk about what a family roat-of-arms is. what it means and how it came about. She also dist^usses her theory of why name research is important to (leople in this age who are often only a nunil)er in a computer and not a name. In conjunction with the lecture, a collection of the artist's hand drawn and painted coataof-arms will l)eon display in the main gallery annex throu(;h Oct. Ml. Rittenhouse first dabbled with heraldry when her parents opened a coats of arnia shopin 19H2 in California. She helped to make wall hangin^H and plnst(!r of Paris casts. "I was bitten by the bug." said Rittenhouse. And she began to library study the subje<;t. Since that time, she had collected thousands of family names, order ing research volumes from Kurope which ••ontain family names and coats of armi. Uittenhouse's nrtist experience includes drawinK. painting and framing the coats (f Bnns she researches somel.imPH working in jjetit-ixiintor nepdlepoinl.. FRIDAY & WEEKEND MOVIES >m,„ hHm.A,>, M i tm M*lLOWMNIV() Thf Unholy (W) rr 3 vouNO auMs (ni • tfjra) rmN C/U.LID WANOA (Nil ilMINIiimtMlfN DIE HAno (S) • I NIHtM rttioil BAT }l (Ri IKUUIMMIIIIIIMI CNOumo NUHciY irai I wmtwiNiiiiiiit ACCUSED (N) If HtietwrNiwiK PUNCHLINE (S) laMHIIIirMIMIIN NioMt or 1HE DEMONS (S) IMIMINININ OW HASO (HI IIMI>WINriltil| ^ • teuH*Mm<|^a.tl) t>oiMlioritto REDROCKCmmA iMAomi tMlil4l Biu|ru|< • uiaiiii uiuu irai l*JINm0ONIITTIN)IB IOIM>4l
PAGE 33

a HendttMn HMM New* and Boulder City Newa ThuTMiay. October 20,19S8 TbuTMlay, October 20,19M EirtertalimwHt Henderaen Hama Newa and Beuldor City Nf Pag* H Anderson 'A regular guy a superb entertainer' Kevin DeSanctia, aenior vice preaident of caaino operations and entertainment at the Dttnea Hotel Caaino and Country Club ia "pleated and excited" at the reaponaa of the reopningof tkeTopof the Dunea Nightclub! "^e feel we have aomething to offer that filla a great need to the locala and towiata alike." aaid DeSanctia. In an environment that is raludag, the moot beautiful viar of the Strip, we wanted to bring back a part of the golden daya, the vintage Vegaa...a place where per formers could "hang out" and even ahare their talenta on atage if they wanted to...a place for that apecial evening of dancing and the best in entertainment. "And who elae could fit the bill any better than an entertainer that ainga the song of yesterday bke you know the oompoaer wanted them sung, with expreaaion and aenaitivity...an entertainer who can capture the hkea o( Sammy Davia Jr., FVank Sinatra and Tony BsMMtt like no other ...and an entertainer who is all daas and yet, the minute he waika on atage, hia charm and warmth eqxwe him as ^ruat a regular guy'. His name ia Bob Anderson, a multi-talented flinger^impreaaionist whose name ia aynonomoua with the Top of the Dunes." Back in 1977, a two-week engagement by Anderaon extended into 166 wedu, a record of continuoua perfor mancea for the Dunea. Tony Bennett. Jimmie Rodgera, Prankie Avalon, Sonny King, Pat Cooper, Bemie Allen. Gianni Ruaao and Dora Liberaoe are among the hundreda who have atopped by to welcome Bob back and lend their aupport to bringing bark the true Vegaa entertainment. Loving to aing even aa a little boy, Anderaon dooa not let hia audience down. He knows how to get to the guts of a song, and he uaea hia warm aenae of humor and hia uncanny ability to re-create a myriad of aome of the best aingers in the buaineaa to captivate his audiencea. And how do they reapond? Pirat, with enthuaiastic ai^lauae and standing ovationa and secondly, by coming back and bringing their friends. Althoufl^ Bob Anderaon has performed around the globe, is one of today'a premier convention performers and has appeared on national television, he is happy to be a "Vegas" performer. Being at the Top of the Dunes is like home to Anderaon and he enjoys the challenge of bringing back a part of the old Las Vegaa. "I will do whatever it takes to make this a successful Sound Impressions perform in Henderson The Sound Impressions, led by professional singer-guitarist Al Franky. will perform in concert at 3 p.m. Sunday. Oct. 30, at the HendMwm Civic Center, 201 Lead Street. Fraadcy was a former student of the Peabody Conservatory of Music. He began his professional career at the age of nine in South America. Al has appeared at major hotels and clube in South America and the East Cost, including New York's Plaza Hotel, American Hotel and Chateau Madrid. In South America he was signed with Columbia Records and alao performed on radio and television. Franky has performed on the Las Vegas Strip in engagements at the Tropicana, Frontier, MGM Grand and Sanda hotels. The Henderaon concert and iA Sunday Concert aeries are part of an ongoing cultural program of monthly concerts sponsored by Henderaon Parks and Recreation Department and made possible by matching funda available by the Music Performance Trust Fund and the American Federation of Musicians, Local 369. For additional information, call the Civic Center at 565-2121. SERVICES HENDERSON— FASTEST GROWING BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES Many Job Openlngsl We need you to fill them! Earn while you train and wori(. All services provided at no cost to you. Apply at our new location. 117 NatiP Stpsst MtmUnm 565-0065 'EQUAL OPPORTUNrTY EMPLOYER" venture," aaid Anderaon. "becauee I believe in it very strongly and 1 think it's what the people want." Anderaon continues, 1 couldn't be happier right now, I have a beautiful wife, Karen (celebrated 10 yean of marriage this month), a aon, Matthew, and a daughter, Carrie. I spend as much time with them aa I can, aa family haa always been important to me. To thia day, I can't ever remember any disaenaion between any of our family members." And Anderson's friends are countless and laating. He atill has aome 30 frienda that were hia achool chums and when he seea them it'a like picking up where they left off. The "regular guy" wanta to leave a laating impreaaion, not juat with hia imperaonationa, but with that of himaelf, a ainger in hia own right. A singer with hia own diatinctive style and, as another writer, Charlea Supin. ao aptly put it. "Had Bob Andereon started out in another era, he'd probably be up there with the Vic Damonee and Tony Bennetta." Showtimes are 10 p.m., 11:30 p.m. and 1 a.m., dark on Sundaya and Mondays; reaervationa are auggeated + Bob AnderaoB, left, with Tony Bennett. Marlena Shaw sings with UNLV Jazz Ensemble The UNLV Jau Enaemble will perform with the brassy lOunHa of aoeoial guest star ainger Marlena Shaw at 2 p.m., Sunday. Oct .) at UNLVs Judy Bayley Theatre. (flowing and vibranl, at the top of a form shaped through 20 yeera of club dates and a four-year stint with the Count Baaie Orcheatra touring the U.S. and Europe, Shaw is a (n summate live performer. The New York TVmea has said that "she has a blunt, sflssy personality and R pleflflingly rough-hewn timbre. But her outstanding skill is nn ability to interpolate amusing semiimprovised commentary within songs, in a variety of Marlena Shaw musiofll styles, thflt turns them into personal testitnony." This is not Shaw's first time fwrforming with the UNLV .laRz Rnsemhle. Frank (lagiiflr di, director of the UNLV .law Rnnemble, said he was honored Heraldry expert to discuss coats-of-arms at to invite her back and expressed his appreciation that she haa made time for the engngement, despite her extremely busy touring schedule that ia taking her to ('alifornia, Oregon, Florida, South Carolina, Illinois and Japan. The award-winning UNLV Jazz Ensemble has also tx>ured all over the world, In fact, aome of the members have just returned from a five month engagement in Japan, playing in the ialanda of Hokkaido and Kyushu. Ticketfl for the Oct. 30 concert are priced at $6, with discounts for children, ntudents and Bpniors. They are svailnble in Advance through the Music Department office located on the aecond floor of the Alta Hma Fine Arta building on tha UNLV campus. They Will liao be available at the door befon the concert. For more informa* tion. call 739-3332. Xipe Toltec Aa tec dancers were featured at laat yeara'a Laa Vegns Indian Daya and Pow Wow. Indian Days event returns to Henderson Native American entertainers, artists and craftsmen from all over the Southwest will participate in the sixth antuwl Las VegBH Indian Days on Nov. 4 -() at the 1 lendcrflon ('onv;mtion Outer. The cultural t'4.sti '^1 if sponsored by the Pow Wow of the Four WindH. anon-profit group formed by IVlaine Spilsbury. a Shoshone from Northern Nevada, to encourage the continuance of the Native American cultural heritUBfy^f Song, dance, nuiHic, st^ry telling and skilled arta ani^afts. A $3 donation for Saturday or Sunday, with a special rate of $5 for a weekend pass will be requested from adults to cover the coat of this exciting event. Friday there will be a special program for school children, which ia free to the public. Fancy and traditional dancera will be among the featured entertainers, aa will flutiata and storytellers during the three-day festival. The arta and crafta at the featival exhibit the wide range of creative talenta of Native American artisans. Paintings, carving, pottery, weavioK, basketry, jewelry, Kachina dolls, bead work, featherwork and leatherwork are among those on display. Many of the craftsmen will demonstrate their akills by creating original works of art at the festival. Alao, visitora can enjoy a variety of Indian footis cooked to order. Traditional delicacies such as Indian fi7 bread, Navijo tacoa, homemade tamalea, buffalo jerky. Pueblo pie and piki bread provide an unuaual and taaty meal or snack. The festival of Native American entertainment, arta and crafts and ethnic foods ia planned for the enjoyment of all ages, while offering an opportunity to learn something of the traditions of the earliest Americana. Kaf flea of aome of the fine crafta will be held daily. For more information, contact the Henderaon Convention Center at 665-2171. Donna Rittenhouae. heraldry expert and artist wil) give n lecture entitled "The Name Game," discussing the history of family coats-of-annB. at 7 p.m., Thursday, in the Clark County Library auditorium, 1401 East Flamingo Road. Rittenhouse will talk about what a family roat-of-arms is. what it means and how it came about. She also dist^usses her theory of why name research is important to (leople in this age who are often only a nunil)er in a computer and not a name. In conjunction with the lecture, a collection of the artist's hand drawn and painted coataof-arms will l)eon display in the main gallery annex throu(;h Oct. Ml. Rittenhouse first dabbled with heraldry when her parents opened a coats of arnia shopin 19H2 in California. She helped to make wall hangin^H and plnst(!r of Paris casts. "I was bitten by the bug." said Rittenhouse. And she began to library study the subje<;t. Since that time, she had collected thousands of family names, order ing research volumes from Kurope which ••ontain family names and coats of armi. Uittenhouse's nrtist experience includes drawinK. painting and framing the coats (f Bnns she researches somel.imPH working in jjetit-ixiintor nepdlepoinl.. FRIDAY & WEEKEND MOVIES >m,„ hHm.A,>, M i tm M*lLOWMNIV() Thf Unholy (W) rr 3 vouNO auMs (ni • tfjra) rmN C/U.LID WANOA (Nil ilMINIiimtMlfN DIE HAno (S) • I NIHtM rttioil BAT }l (Ri IKUUIMMIIIIIIMI CNOumo NUHciY irai I wmtwiNiiiiiiit ACCUSED (N) If HtietwrNiwiK PUNCHLINE (S) laMHIIIirMIMIIN NioMt or 1HE DEMONS (S) IMIMINININ OW HASO (HI IIMI>WINriltil| ^ • teuH*Mm<|^a.tl) t>oiMlioritto REDROCKCmmA iMAomi tMlil4l Biu|ru|< • uiaiiii uiuu irai l*JINm0ONIITTIN)IB IOIM>4l
PAGE 34

Ptgt U HtBdertoa Home Ntwi and tloulder City Newt Thundbgr, OctolMr 20, 1969 I The DeCaatro Slaters Good Old Days' brings back memories of mucli liappier times By Robert Grove Fisher Home N0w Editor The Silver Slipper's Hnai production is, at least as far as a particular kind of audience is concerned, undoubtedly one its all-time best. "The Good Old Days," starring the famed DeCastro Sisters, magician-comedian Johnny Aladdin and, as a special added attraction, Peggy Ryan ;.and the TNT Dancers, opened [''to packed houses at the end of i "September. : And it's understandable why • the show continues to draw full \ hfCMiaea, even if those audiences ; are. for the most pert, more ; than 40 years of age—the ;* Geritol set, so to speak. ;, Perhaps one of the most appealing aspects of "The Good Old Days" is the fact that, while both lively and laughable, it is extremely clean--8omething comparatively rare for Las Vegas. There is not a bare breast, smutty remark or a four-letter word seen or heard from the show's opening until the final curtain. airline Hostess. Hypnotist-magician-mystic Johnny Aladdin intrigues his viewers with a series of "howdid-he-do-that?" tricks and chain and lock escapes, closing with s demonstration of hypnosis in which he literally sticks several members of the audience to the floor, unable to get up. Headhning the show are the famed DeCastro SistersPeggy, Olgita and Cherie—who nightly bring the crowds to their feet with shouts of "Ole!*, "Bravo!" and "More, more!' Their cloae-harmony rendition of their major hit. Teach Me Tonight," brings back fond memories and even some tears to the eyes of those who remember them from the '408 and '50s. Peggy, the comedian and obvious leader of the trio, keeps the audience laughing with an endless routine of humourous chatter, which she rattles off with the speed of a machine gun. TGOD. directed by Cookie TGOD opens with an oldRay, was produced by enter' Tashioned chorus line made up tainer-musidan-booking agent T)f the TNT Dancers, a local ; group of twinkletoes taught : and headed by film star of j'esteryear Peggy Ryan, who, %t 60>mething. hasn't lost one '^bit of her tapdandng talent and still has great the great-looking legs that made her famous. • : With their dynamic style, I (iazzling smiles and clockwork Ir^redsion, Ryan and the TNT ; Danoeraoould make the Radio City Music Hall Rockettes eni vious. During the daytime, < some members of the TNT ; chorus line hold down such incongruous full-time jobs as real e state afent, aecrvtary and Bobby Morris, assisted by associate producers Jerry Newton and Lee Maynard. Coryell, Mulidore to perform Monday TIME 4 FUN Thursday, October 20,1968 MendersoB Home News and Boulder City Newt Page SB World-renowned guitarist Larry Coryell, one of the acknowledged pioneers of the jaa-rock f\uion movement, will perform in concert with saxophone expert and flute virtuoso James Mulidore beginning at 9 p.m. Monday at Calamity Jsyne's Nashville Nevada, 3016 Boulder Highway. Coryell was bom to be a musician; both of his parents played piano, which he too studied, beginning at age 4. In hia teens he switched to electric guitar. Classically trained, CoryeU has been labeled s'fusioidst"—rock, ian and clasaical—and is often considered an interpolator of all three. Hia recent album, Toku Do," with Stanley Cowell, Buster Williams and Beaver Harris, is a popular and critical succees. Mulidore, musical director for both the Las Vegu and Flamingo Hilton Hotels for more than 18 years, is no stranger to the entertainment industry. In his early years, he toured with Woody Hermsn and Billy May, attended the Julliard School of Music in New York and Uter studied st Ohio State University before setting out to follow his own career in Jsss. He has arranged, conducted and performed with such notablee as Elvis Presley, AnnMargret, Ella Fitcgerald, Lou Rawls, Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr., OUvia Newton-John, James Brown, Nat "King" Cole and Louis Armstrong, among others. He has also produced two albums. "Invitation" and LtfryCbryell The Gripper," both of which were received with acclaim. Tickets for the CoryellMuUdore perfonnanoee are $12 in advance and $13.60 at the door. Advance tickets are available at Nellis Air Force Multi-talented Roche' makes playboy girls debut at Maxim Nancy Roche', a Los Angelesbased singer/songwriter, makes her debut this month in Tlayboy'sOirlsof Rock ft RoH" at the Maxim Hotel/Casino, with a soulful blend of contemporary music presented in a sophisticated, artistic style. The former lead singer of "ZonkanuE," an L.A. band, Roche' stars through Oct. 23 with original Playboy's girl Michelle Rohl and long-time favorite Robyn Lewis in the resort's Caboiret Showroom. Showtimes are 8 and 10:15 nightly except Mondays, with a special 12:30 a.m. performance on Saturdays only. Admission is $9.96 per person, plus tax, and that includes two drinks. Roche', who has studied with Boston's Berklee School of Music, in addition to three years of classical training with Sidra Cohn (Boston), and one year with Robert Edwards (L.A.), sings NataUe Cole's "I Live For Your Love," and Whitney Houston's 'Xove Will Save The Day" in the show. Her previous experience includes background vocals and Th# SVWl#flt OfMM b#H#V#d th#t CNinlcifi9 froffn owtwti springs or wvifv wouio yfw uiwii propnvnc NEEDED •SCHOOL aOTHES IN 0000 CONDfTION •USED USABLE FURNITURE •LARQE APPLANCES Qratofuly WE PICKUP M • OULOCM CmrONFWOAYt CMP Out 4 Preeent MilOOFF ST. vmciNrs THIUPr STOM 7:30. 9:30' Xl3fi^^ l^H sasss Four Queens HoMCaamo • Omvmoivn Lsi Vsgaa demo work, and solo performances on the L.A. nightclub circuit (Rusty Pelican, Hyatt Hotels, Madame Wong's). She formed her own band—"Nancy Roche"—for one year and wrote material and was lead singer/guitarist out front. Roche', a spokesman for Ovation Guitars, has also played in Bermuda and St. Thomas (Virgin Islands), and had two minor movie roles ("Space Mutiny" and 'Tortress of Amerikka— The Mercenaries"). The multi-talented performer is an accomphshed horse trainer, riding die "A" circuit back East and earning ribbons at the Washington International and Madison Square Garden shows (open jumping). Specialty acts for the month are comedians Kirby St. Romain (sound effects), and David Cree, backed by the Beverly Hills Dancers and Rodeo Drive Band. The show, now in its fourth hit year, features rock-era Nancy Roche* songs, fast-paced singing and dancing, and adult-oriented themes offered in a style consistent with the glamorous world of Playboy. For ticket information, contact the Maxim at 731-4300. Jamea MvUdors Baae, Mail 'N More, Accent Music (locsted in Conunercial Center and in the SaharaDecatur Plaza complex) and at Calamity Jayne's. For more information, call 873-2671 or 384-4691. Orchestra applications being taken The Henderson Parks and Recreation is now accepting applications for the Hendersoh Civic Orchestra. All members will be asked to attend rehearsals which are held from 7 p.m. to 9p.m. Tuesday evenings at the Basic High School band room. Members are expected to remain in the orchestra for anen tire season. For additional information, call the Civic Center at 665-2121. Would Too Believe All thn>ugti the country of (1ri^> ctm be fmind I he Ntttle plant whirh, if touched or hrunhed againnl. can caune extn>m(> itching to the skin. However, ftrowinK "Hjacent to the Nettie i.i the Hollycock plant, the leaver of which, when rubbed on the .ikin, im mediately relieve thtirritation catiaed by the Nettle. It 9 true! nnilDB Bora (3110 PINnH EJIclMnM Hucin aoatan no QQQ UUa blUliJlIU AReorrano* lnn of (ha '^foor Kramblad wofd b low to form lour simplit words R A ITN D I S M U U C TT A H S Y r f 7 Trivia treat R E V S T Y j • f Business must really he slow Last week a salesman made a big fuss over me lor buying something on a ^% (!ompl,>((j Ilia 'h'.'U* nunlnH ^^ hv MImg in tfm rTi(\'.inq worrit yuu tJ8yli)p I'orti tp No 3 helnw HOW CAM YCO TELL ELEPHANT6 APART? A PRINT NUMftfD ^^ It I UPS IN SQUARES 1 1 3 4 i r~ 7— fr • A IIMSC PAMBir IFTTH?', FUP AtiSWlR 1| Ui !121i ANSWERS AVaSHOHL uo BuiMieuios OujAnq JO| eiit IBAO tsn) fiirj e apaiu ueiiiqeie^ e i^aaM isei mo\* aq Anaat isnui ssauisng To dt-eam that you are adopted indiraten thai you will make a channe in your abiMle. 19ft,,M(NauKht Synd •CROSSWORD PUZZLE "HYSO lOUKLD EUROPE AS PF':ESiPENT CALVIN C00LIP6B'6 'AM/^A59AP(9/^HAU0WB1N PARTY' rOH INrORMATfON CALL. 293-1808 MflGrCWORD HOW TO HAY: Read m list ol words Look tt iht pufzia You II find Ihete words m ill directions hnrironUiiy vartictlly. dltoonally bacHwir(t Orw c>rri around aacfi lal' lar of • word ro'ind m Iht puula. thar> sinka II ort tha iiat Circlmg it will show • latlar has baan usad but will laava H viaibia Should n aiso lorm part oi another word Find tha big words first Whan lattarso'aii lisiarl words rcircld you H Hva the given number ol iettefs left over Thay li spell out your MAQICWOBO Thin Old flouneJaol: 10 lellerN) A-Altic; BHHsement. Rob, Mrirk, BudKel, Hiiild: C-Carpenter, (Vmenl, Chimney. Closet .s, Concrete. Construct, Cost; D-neck: F Floor. I'rame; (i (Jirdor; H Home; K-Kitthi'n, I, Land, Location. Lumber; M Mone.\; N—NHiJH, Norm; 0 Owner; I* Paint. Pipes Plan, PlaMer. Porch; R Roof. Kooriis; S .Sliinglp. Si/p. .Soliii. .Sparf. Stiiirs. Slyle, Snpplie*: T-T(K>1cHxMi2 0nnki lUOOflllOMAN't AN IVENINO AT THI IMPROV tM. 10:30 It 12 (vldnight NigNtv $9.60mctudMlOrmia (EKMpttai HeMDVI* •OMOQUMNWIPWON \\tnom I TWATSTME BE5T JELLY POU6HN0T I EVER TASTEPl JELLY P0U6HNUT6 MAKE YOU FEEL 600P ALL OVER lUHEM NOTHING 15 GOOP FOR YOU, YOU MAve TO PRETENP THAT EVERYTHING I5 60OPF0R YOU! IF TMI5 HAP BEEN A REAL SUPPER YOUR PISH UIOOLP HAVE BEEN FULL.. ''WE'LL BE BACK U)ITM THE REST OP OOR CHEAP 5H0T5 IN A MOMENT JiM*-ci One Hundred Reasons \ To Hate Cats I PONTKNOU) I'M NOT 50 SURE ABOUT m ii rt ii ii ii ii i|i ,, iiiiiii I l "ffw,'.m'.i.r, Make thai hundred, b two k ^ I jjji GARFIELD by Jim Davis COAtON,/V\R.0RU/WPV, RI5E ANP*>HINt.' <55)„ 6E.CAU6E ^£AKFA*)T ie THE most IMPORTANT /W£AL Of THE PAH w//*x/.^,-wW:* /0-2Z I'M NOT SURE I'P WANT TO 5EE MIS FILIN6 5V5TEM.. L CONOa/WLATIONi.JiAfVieLP/ CH0P51 VOO'VC MA*fI'R£P THe" MICK

PAGE 35

Ptgt U HtBdertoa Home Ntwi and tloulder City Newt Thundbgr, OctolMr 20, 1969 I The DeCaatro Slaters Good Old Days' brings back memories of mucli liappier times By Robert Grove Fisher Home N0w Editor The Silver Slipper's Hnai production is, at least as far as a particular kind of audience is concerned, undoubtedly one its all-time best. "The Good Old Days," starring the famed DeCastro Sisters, magician-comedian Johnny Aladdin and, as a special added attraction, Peggy Ryan ;.and the TNT Dancers, opened [''to packed houses at the end of i "September. : And it's understandable why • the show continues to draw full \ hfCMiaea, even if those audiences ; are. for the most pert, more ; than 40 years of age—the ;* Geritol set, so to speak. ;, Perhaps one of the most appealing aspects of "The Good Old Days" is the fact that, while both lively and laughable, it is extremely clean--8omething comparatively rare for Las Vegas. There is not a bare breast, smutty remark or a four-letter word seen or heard from the show's opening until the final curtain. airline Hostess. Hypnotist-magician-mystic Johnny Aladdin intrigues his viewers with a series of "howdid-he-do-that?" tricks and chain and lock escapes, closing with s demonstration of hypnosis in which he literally sticks several members of the audience to the floor, unable to get up. Headhning the show are the famed DeCastro SistersPeggy, Olgita and Cherie—who nightly bring the crowds to their feet with shouts of "Ole!*, "Bravo!" and "More, more!' Their cloae-harmony rendition of their major hit. Teach Me Tonight," brings back fond memories and even some tears to the eyes of those who remember them from the '408 and '50s. Peggy, the comedian and obvious leader of the trio, keeps the audience laughing with an endless routine of humourous chatter, which she rattles off with the speed of a machine gun. TGOD. directed by Cookie TGOD opens with an oldRay, was produced by enter' Tashioned chorus line made up tainer-musidan-booking agent T)f the TNT Dancers, a local ; group of twinkletoes taught : and headed by film star of j'esteryear Peggy Ryan, who, %t 60>mething. hasn't lost one '^bit of her tapdandng talent and still has great the great-looking legs that made her famous. • : With their dynamic style, I (iazzling smiles and clockwork Ir^redsion, Ryan and the TNT ; Danoeraoould make the Radio City Music Hall Rockettes eni vious. During the daytime, < some members of the TNT ; chorus line hold down such incongruous full-time jobs as real e state afent, aecrvtary and Bobby Morris, assisted by associate producers Jerry Newton and Lee Maynard. Coryell, Mulidore to perform Monday TIME 4 FUN Thursday, October 20,1968 MendersoB Home News and Boulder City Newt Page SB World-renowned guitarist Larry Coryell, one of the acknowledged pioneers of the jaa-rock f\uion movement, will perform in concert with saxophone expert and flute virtuoso James Mulidore beginning at 9 p.m. Monday at Calamity Jsyne's Nashville Nevada, 3016 Boulder Highway. Coryell was bom to be a musician; both of his parents played piano, which he too studied, beginning at age 4. In hia teens he switched to electric guitar. Classically trained, CoryeU has been labeled s'fusioidst"—rock, ian and clasaical—and is often considered an interpolator of all three. Hia recent album, Toku Do," with Stanley Cowell, Buster Williams and Beaver Harris, is a popular and critical succees. Mulidore, musical director for both the Las Vegu and Flamingo Hilton Hotels for more than 18 years, is no stranger to the entertainment industry. In his early years, he toured with Woody Hermsn and Billy May, attended the Julliard School of Music in New York and Uter studied st Ohio State University before setting out to follow his own career in Jsss. He has arranged, conducted and performed with such notablee as Elvis Presley, AnnMargret, Ella Fitcgerald, Lou Rawls, Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr., OUvia Newton-John, James Brown, Nat "King" Cole and Louis Armstrong, among others. He has also produced two albums. "Invitation" and LtfryCbryell The Gripper," both of which were received with acclaim. Tickets for the CoryellMuUdore perfonnanoee are $12 in advance and $13.60 at the door. Advance tickets are available at Nellis Air Force Multi-talented Roche' makes playboy girls debut at Maxim Nancy Roche', a Los Angelesbased singer/songwriter, makes her debut this month in Tlayboy'sOirlsof Rock ft RoH" at the Maxim Hotel/Casino, with a soulful blend of contemporary music presented in a sophisticated, artistic style. The former lead singer of "ZonkanuE," an L.A. band, Roche' stars through Oct. 23 with original Playboy's girl Michelle Rohl and long-time favorite Robyn Lewis in the resort's Caboiret Showroom. Showtimes are 8 and 10:15 nightly except Mondays, with a special 12:30 a.m. performance on Saturdays only. Admission is $9.96 per person, plus tax, and that includes two drinks. Roche', who has studied with Boston's Berklee School of Music, in addition to three years of classical training with Sidra Cohn (Boston), and one year with Robert Edwards (L.A.), sings NataUe Cole's "I Live For Your Love," and Whitney Houston's 'Xove Will Save The Day" in the show. Her previous experience includes background vocals and Th# SVWl#flt OfMM b#H#V#d th#t CNinlcifi9 froffn owtwti springs or wvifv wouio yfw uiwii propnvnc NEEDED •SCHOOL aOTHES IN 0000 CONDfTION •USED USABLE FURNITURE •LARQE APPLANCES Qratofuly WE PICKUP M • OULOCM CmrONFWOAYt CMP Out 4 Preeent MilOOFF ST. vmciNrs THIUPr STOM 7:30. 9:30' Xl3fi^^ l^H sasss Four Queens HoMCaamo • Omvmoivn Lsi Vsgaa demo work, and solo performances on the L.A. nightclub circuit (Rusty Pelican, Hyatt Hotels, Madame Wong's). She formed her own band—"Nancy Roche"—for one year and wrote material and was lead singer/guitarist out front. Roche', a spokesman for Ovation Guitars, has also played in Bermuda and St. Thomas (Virgin Islands), and had two minor movie roles ("Space Mutiny" and 'Tortress of Amerikka— The Mercenaries"). The multi-talented performer is an accomphshed horse trainer, riding die "A" circuit back East and earning ribbons at the Washington International and Madison Square Garden shows (open jumping). Specialty acts for the month are comedians Kirby St. Romain (sound effects), and David Cree, backed by the Beverly Hills Dancers and Rodeo Drive Band. The show, now in its fourth hit year, features rock-era Nancy Roche* songs, fast-paced singing and dancing, and adult-oriented themes offered in a style consistent with the glamorous world of Playboy. For ticket information, contact the Maxim at 731-4300. Jamea MvUdors Baae, Mail 'N More, Accent Music (locsted in Conunercial Center and in the SaharaDecatur Plaza complex) and at Calamity Jayne's. For more information, call 873-2671 or 384-4691. Orchestra applications being taken The Henderson Parks and Recreation is now accepting applications for the Hendersoh Civic Orchestra. All members will be asked to attend rehearsals which are held from 7 p.m. to 9p.m. Tuesday evenings at the Basic High School band room. Members are expected to remain in the orchestra for anen tire season. For additional information, call the Civic Center at 665-2121. Would Too Believe All thn>ugti the country of (1ri^> ctm be fmind I he Ntttle plant whirh, if touched or hrunhed againnl. can caune extn>m(> itching to the skin. However, ftrowinK "Hjacent to the Nettie i.i the Hollycock plant, the leaver of which, when rubbed on the .ikin, im mediately relieve thtirritation catiaed by the Nettle. It 9 true! nnilDB Bora (3110 PINnH EJIclMnM Hucin aoatan no QQQ UUa blUliJlIU AReorrano* lnn of (ha '^foor Kramblad wofd b low to form lour simplit words R A ITN D I S M U U C TT A H S Y r f 7 Trivia treat R E V S T Y j • f Business must really he slow Last week a salesman made a big fuss over me lor buying something on a ^% (!ompl,>((j Ilia 'h'.'U* nunlnH ^^ hv MImg in tfm rTi(\'.inq worrit yuu tJ8yli)p I'orti tp No 3 helnw HOW CAM YCO TELL ELEPHANT6 APART? A PRINT NUMftfD ^^ It I UPS IN SQUARES 1 1 3 4 i r~ 7— fr • A IIMSC PAMBir IFTTH?', FUP AtiSWlR 1| Ui !121i ANSWERS AVaSHOHL uo BuiMieuios OujAnq JO| eiit IBAO tsn) fiirj e apaiu ueiiiqeie^ e i^aaM isei mo\* aq Anaat isnui ssauisng To dt-eam that you are adopted indiraten thai you will make a channe in your abiMle. 19ft,,M(NauKht Synd •CROSSWORD PUZZLE "HYSO lOUKLD EUROPE AS PF':ESiPENT CALVIN C00LIP6B'6 'AM/^A59AP(9/^HAU0WB1N PARTY' rOH INrORMATfON CALL. 293-1808 MflGrCWORD HOW TO HAY: Read m list ol words Look tt iht pufzia You II find Ihete words m ill directions hnrironUiiy vartictlly. dltoonally bacHwir(t Orw c>rri around aacfi lal' lar of • word ro'ind m Iht puula. thar> sinka II ort tha iiat Circlmg it will show • latlar has baan usad but will laava H viaibia Should n aiso lorm part oi another word Find tha big words first Whan lattarso'aii lisiarl words rcircld you H Hva the given number ol iettefs left over Thay li spell out your MAQICWOBO Thin Old flouneJaol: 10 lellerN) A-Altic; BHHsement. Rob, Mrirk, BudKel, Hiiild: C-Carpenter, (Vmenl, Chimney. Closet .s, Concrete. Construct, Cost; D-neck: F Floor. I'rame; (i (Jirdor; H Home; K-Kitthi'n, I, Land, Location. Lumber; M Mone.\; N—NHiJH, Norm; 0 Owner; I* Paint. Pipes Plan, PlaMer. Porch; R Roof. Kooriis; S .Sliinglp. Si/p. .Soliii. .Sparf. Stiiirs. Slyle, Snpplie*: T-T(K>1cHxMi2 0nnki lUOOflllOMAN't AN IVENINO AT THI IMPROV tM. 10:30 It 12 (vldnight NigNtv $9.60mctudMlOrmia (EKMpttai HeMDVI* •OMOQUMNWIPWON \\tnom I TWATSTME BE5T JELLY POU6HN0T I EVER TASTEPl JELLY P0U6HNUT6 MAKE YOU FEEL 600P ALL OVER lUHEM NOTHING 15 GOOP FOR YOU, YOU MAve TO PRETENP THAT EVERYTHING I5 60OPF0R YOU! IF TMI5 HAP BEEN A REAL SUPPER YOUR PISH UIOOLP HAVE BEEN FULL.. ''WE'LL BE BACK U)ITM THE REST OP OOR CHEAP 5H0T5 IN A MOMENT JiM*-ci One Hundred Reasons \ To Hate Cats I PONTKNOU) I'M NOT 50 SURE ABOUT m ii rt ii ii ii ii i|i ,, iiiiiii I l "ffw,'.m'.i.r, Make thai hundred, b two k ^ I jjji GARFIELD by Jim Davis COAtON,/V\R.0RU/WPV, RI5E ANP*>HINt.' <55)„ 6E.CAU6E ^£AKFA*)T ie THE most IMPORTANT /W£AL Of THE PAH w//*x/.^,-wW:* /0-2Z I'M NOT SURE I'P WANT TO 5EE MIS FILIN6 5V5TEM.. L CONOa/WLATIONi.JiAfVieLP/ CH0P51 VOO'VC MA*fI'R£P THe" MICK

PAGE 36

^ • 'n'^^i^^mimmmmmmmmmmmi^mr'mmm ^mi^mmmmm Legal notices Thonday, October 20. 1988 Paft M Henderion Heme Newt and Bevlder City Nwi tM4 Do4g* Vm lB7rDUWXBSMia24t TIMH AB RO. Dmt B^ SMMT vMif or OvaM. ut L.0 atiivM WMtmi BMk •! SM MM*, CA. ini MMn Vhi jrUM43BB4a8M)LA3 aiX7S4 K.O. Jowph R. CMl BrMMk Blair •! Sw(pta. LA 7 lOTl. Mf JMM T*tag. )S77 PMtMnDr.BMMwCky.nrV Iim06. W* rtMTvt the rigtit t bM. N --o^. >!. 7 i*<^. >jaaa PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICB IS HBRBBY 01VEN UM MM City CMMWN MtktCHyti H w aw w prcpnaMl hjr riiahn > • title tlM MImrtH ONMeMC* at Ht tUfOmt MMII. MtltM: BILL NO. aas AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY or HENDERSON. NEVADA AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 108*, CODIFIED AS SECTION lUMJMOF CHAPTER IS.M OF THE HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE BY REMOVING THE TIME LIMIT FOR OBTAINING TEMPORARY WATER SERVICE. wliiek ku bcn rf aired te • Connittw or the CoMdl M • Whole far etwljt aMl nommmeaaatloa tmi • ean^ af aaM OHMMMC haa heaa IIM with tkeOtjr Cliih far gaMnI IMHC aaratiay. The CaHittec MaetiM will be baM Nov. 1. IM MM6M>. at Ml Water Tfce MM CNy CoMcM ae Ika firat AQT af Nn*Mkar. inSi Mlila aay aaaa will adap t ar ro|act tkh OHhMMa wkMi 30 diQre. DATED tU( IStk day afOetobar ia8 aiad y aM laliad October M. 1988. la tbcHeadlar •oa Hoaae Nwwa. DOROTHY A. VONDENBRINK. CMC. CITY CLERK H-Oet. M, IMS. Country Store opens tomorrow The 4lBt annual one-of-akind marketplace presented by Grace Community Church, 1 ISO Wyoming Street, Boukler City will take place from 9a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Friday, and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. All in one kication will be found furniture, household appliance*, hardware, curtaina, books, jewelry, shoes, purses, plants and experienced clothing that will dehght all bargain hunters. The boutique will offer handmade gifts, aprons, pillowcases, Christmas gifts, Christmas decorations and other handmade articles. A bakery will feature honiemade breads, pastries, cakes, bar cookies and other delecttable goodies. On Friday, a gourmet luncheon will be served from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. The menu will include homemade chicken soup with dumplings, fresh fruit salad, rolls with butter, beverage and homemade pie. A refreshment stand will be open all hours on both dasrs. Members of the Women's Aasocation have been working for months to gather and to create the items offered for sale, spokespersons said. ANNUAL STATEMENT OF THE Lady Mardaae lar. Far the year Eadtag Jaly SI. 1988 Laeatkm of PriaHpal Office. 120 W. Mala St. Meea. Atiaaaa 86201. LeeotioB or locatioaii af boaiBaae ia Nevada. 3861 S. MarvlaiHl Parkway Laa Vegaa. Nevada 89100 Cahealiaad 4U40.10 Date Jaly 31. 1088 8 BSO.231.02 8 8S8JS1.02 8 tlO4320 .. OljOOT.TOO Profit or Loee t 1.743 I, Laroy BraaafieW Offka Maa§m (Naaie) OfHcial Poaltioa do hereby eartify that the roregaiag ia a trar aad acrarate atatemeat of tha buaiaeaa traaaactod by aaid oorparation doriag Aagnat 1. 19e7-Jal> .^1. 1088 iSigaedl Leray Braeafleld 10/l>8 (Sigaetare) (Data! Please type or print sigaatarr A title H Oct. 20. 27. 1988 AGENDA REGULAR MEETING CITY HALL, 900 ARIZONA STREET. BOULDER CITY. NEVADA TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25. ltW-7 P.M. fFk Salete) 1 APPROVAL OF REGULAR AGENDA: 2 APPROVAL OF CONSENT AGENDA; (Itema narked w/*; if ranoved for diacuMion, aabjoct will ba Ukea la niuBaricd order OBlaaa oUMTwiea atated.) •S. BID AWARDS: A. nrRF GRASS FERTILIZER: (Bid opoidBf 10-30^) bMa reed.) •4. CITY MANAGER'S REPORT; A. FINANCIAL REPORT-SEPTEMBER, IMS: B. CLAIMS PAID U8T1945-SEPTEMBER. 1968: •6. COUNCIL MINUTES: A. REGULAR MEEnNO 10^1148: B. WORKSHOP 10-18M REGULAR AGENDA: 6. RES. NO. 1616. AGREEMENT IM-AM, WITH OPTIMA SCORING SYSTEMS, INC., FOR GOLF COURSE SCOREBOARD SYSTEM FOR B.C. MUNICIPAL OOLP COURSE: 7. BILL rOB. ORDINANCB: A. ADOPTION OP BILL NO. • TO ADD A NEW CRAPTB 4 TO TITLE t OP THE CITY CODE POt THE MUNICIPAL AIBPORT: B. ADOPTION OP BILL NO. MS TO AMEND OKD. NO. t41 AND CITY CODE 8BCTION il-4M, "UNIFORM RBGfULATIONS FOR THE CONTROL OF DRAIN AGE IN THE CLARK COUNTY REGIONAL FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT," TO INCLUDE PROPER ADMINISTRATIVE REFERENCE THERETO: S. ADDENDUM TO B.C. TAP TRANSFORMBR REPAIR BID. AUTHORinNG NEW DESIGN WITH INCRBAOD CAPACITY RAHNG AND DASH-POT INSTALLATION: t. MISCBLLANBCHTS CORRESPONDENCE: A. REQUEST FROM MR. AND MRS. C. SHAUBELL TO PURCHASE APPROXIMATELY .4 ACRE AT REAR OF SM LAKIVIEW DRIVE: B. RBQUIST FROM MR. AND MRS. L HASKETT TO PUKCiiASB APPROXIMATELY .4 ACRE AT REAR or Ut LAKEVBW DRIVE: lePBRBONinL: A. CIVIL OSVICB amiMWlON; a) MDOBl CLOWY TERM BXPIRB1M7-M: (WeHaiglf MMIIer Hill i il B. CLARK OOUNTT OOMMUNITy MSNT COMmmX CDKK APPOINTEE AND ALTEKNATK C A0VAN(3 NOnCB OP EXPIRING FOR AFPOmTMBUT U-U4B: (V CHABTat OOMMIflBlON MEMBER NKAL JOM TiBM nmn uj BOARD? • PAID AMD M PLAMNDW MaCLAIKN AND mnVRI IL IBKMtn PDOM COUNCIL, B-ootm Tune in on Toastmasters Network What is the strategy? The clubs are based on the dual benefits of Toastmasters training and networking, or sharing business information. They are experiencing success because they are both education oriented and business based. Toastmasters combined the benefits of an educational program with the business generation techniques of a 'tips' or 'leads' club. Speeches given by members are business related. This accomplishes two things: First, it gives the entire group a better idea of what kind of leads the member could use; second, these speeches give members an opportunity to give group presentations. Benefits One unexpected benefit of evaluations in the networking club was discovered by a new Toastmaster who pointed out. "While I am evaluating, I am forced to practice the listening skills I don't use enough on sales calls." Another member puts it this way: "If I give a poor or disorganised presentation to a customer, she may simply dismiss me with 'thanks-well be in tough.' But here 1 can get an evaluation from another professional." A aaleaperson pointed out that toastmasten timing requirements force her to "organise my thoughts to speak more clearly and succmctly. Tm certain that customera appreciate that and view me as being more professional. I know the discipline and practice are making me feel more confident." Networking and ToastBiastera: a concept whose time has come; an idea which stimulates memberehip and promotes business. BC Toastmasters will meet at 11:30am Monday,Oct.24 at the Vale Hotel. For more information call Walter Stocker at 293-4269. Adult high school of the Clark County School District is now accepting enrollment in free classes lesding to a high school diploma or GRD. The classes meet Mondsys through Fridays from 8 a.m. to noon at the Clark County Community College campus in Henderson and at the Boulder City Parks and Recreation Free high school class meets Building. Students are not reavailable from 8tat<.rtifled quired to attend every day or instructora. Free counseling is ) LtgahMttcM Thursday, October 20. 1068 HsnAsTMB llsms Nswo sod BsuMsr City Nswi Fagt W stay the full class time because the courses are arranged as selfapced instruction. Class size is small to allow more help for each student. All sulqects leading to a high school diploma from the ('lark County School District are alao available to help eligible students who are non-high .school graduates, over 17 and not currently enrolled in another high school in Nevaa. Register in person at the Boulder City class or phone 799-8509 for more information. BEST IN SHOW, FINE ART-The works of artist Beverly Hoebel were selected by Judges as best of show In the fine arts category during the recent Art in the Park festival. Her works were favorably received by all who viewed them. LBGAL NOTICE BEFORE THE PUBUC SERVICE COMMISSION OF \EVADA NOTICE OF AMENDED APPLICATION AND HEARING Aa apHieatiaa. idaatlfled aa Docket No. 88-813. haa been fil ed with the PabHe Service Coatadaaioe of Nevada C Coaimiaaloe") by CP Natioaal Carperatioa I" Applicaat") for aathority to eferate espaad Ma aarvlee territory to provide gaa aarvicc to tke Sky Hwbor Raaeh aaar tbc Sky Harbar Airport ia tbe City of Headaraaa, Nevada. Tka • • eaded appSta rt ea aMre fally de e c ri be a tbe propoaed aa t eaali a aad aaaadatad oeMtracUaa. tbe pabMc ca a ve a ieace aad aaeaaa fty baael H aaf tbeaKtaalaa.tbecaataf tbeprepoeod aa taaaiea, flaaadiW far tbe prapaaaJ eoaatructloa. aad otbar Tka appSaaUaa ia oa file aad available for pubNc vlawi^ at tbe ameaa af tbe Ciiiwliiiia, 727 Falfview Dtiva. Caraoa Oty. Nevada 8t7I0 aad tbe Alaaaader Dawaaa Baildiag. 4046 S. S paaea r SlMat, Sahe A-44, Laa Vegaa, Nevada 89158. ay eoMaeat h writi^ at BEST FINE ARTS DISPLAY-Frank Oikiu was the Judges' choice to receive the blue ribboa for bast fine arts display in the recent Art in the Park festival. His attractive grouping of Us !! • • art waa warmly received at during the successful festival LBGAL NOTICE tLaaa r af Ita eflkaa aa ar bafON Wo 111 WILLIAM H. VANCE, Dated: Caaaaa Oky, M,I9SI • tba H-Oet. 10,1901 af tbe NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Ibat tka CKy City af HaadMoa wM bald a PabSe Hoart^ I. MO at 740 PJM. la tbe Oty CaaadI Ckaabara, CKy Hal, 241 Wal BiNat, Hwdiraw. ta eaaaidar the i^pltitiia of Ibe Oky af Haadnaa far aa AMiidBMBt to tbe Laad Uae Nhy PlaaaftbaCltyofHiadiMiaCBaipMliiaiiiiPhafartbepigpaoe of ad^l^ oevenl laad aMdifleatloaa: 1 af Oraaa VaSay Pritway (MarOaaald Raac 2. RoaHgaaaat af WIgwaa Parkway (Gfoaa VaSay laatv Pbod: 1 Rod^Maat af Wbidadi Pwfcw^ Mhar Maate PiMk 4. Raal^aaaeat ef RoWadale Read 0r iaalar PlMk k Croatiaa af WhMaay RMeh Oriva af Afiaya Gtaada Blvd.) tnm Saaaat to Raaaafl (WWtaey RaMh Maotar Phail; S Bitaarfaa of Greea VaSay Parkway aartb fia Saaaot aad tbe Greea Valloy PUBUC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. 10S6 AN ORDINANCK OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA. AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON. NEVADA TO AMEND ORDINANCE NO. I0S4, SECTION 4, BY ESTABLISHING A DATE CERTAIN FOR THE IM PLBMENTATION OF THE NEW SYSTEM DEVELOP MENT CHARGES FOR WATB AND8BWER, AND TO FURTHER PBOVIDB FORTHRRiaATROP ANY EXCESS CHARGES THAT MAY HAVE BBBN OOLLBCTBD. TkadhavoBaNaOOKaad aadiaadhytMita tbeCkyCoaaaSofttaOKyaf Nevada, aa Oa4. 1000, wMdh waa a ^ aftbeCah "OOUNCTL AS A WHOLE" far rm—iaiitlia PUBUC NOTICE la I tbe afd by aU partiaaattbaOHkaaftbaaty CMi.SaWalarStioat.HaaLEQAL NOTICE PUBUC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. lOSO AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON. NEVADA. AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE CHAP TBR 4J2 IN ITS ENTIRTTY AND TO AMEND HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE CHAPTER 4.06 BY PROVIDING FOR LICENSE FEES FOR PRIVATE PATROLS, PRIVATE INVESTIGATORS. PROCESS SERVBRB. REPOBSBSSOBS, DOG HANDLBR8, POLYQRAPHIC EXAMINERS, OR CONSULTANTS ORINTRRNB. TkadlavaBniNa.OSOaad tbaOhy aadiaadhytMata oltbaCMyaf NaraAk aa 0 waa a CaaacU aad raiamd ta tba foBawlag CoaMlttaa: "COUNCIL AS A WHOLT' teriiuiwwiadallu bf aS partiMatBMORIeaaflhaCky ClaA.iaWal Vi NA CI HARRn. ANDY CARLTOHD.LAWRBNCI, LORDf L. WnjLUMB. Vatf^NAT: NONR LORNA MAYOR DOROVVT A VAGE Gil OtondB. LST^SSSS^^^ Found: Gray A whSs cat 89 f^Jif^CtHSK^xmot w L*ta Maad. Fem^. Ph 4ST-eS61. 564-3S83 bar. out 3 MONTH OLD KITTENS Black with white mittena Very Loving Call 864-5282 SPAY OR NBJTBt YOUR PET FOR HALF PRICE SHOTS 25% OF CALL VALLEY SAVE A PET 384-6049 CRul>/) or 642-8843 Privaia. Voice Muaical oomarty' scheduled (Voice-Actino) ProfaeeK)nal pamtlng, irv tenor^aMonor. eva vacM MBor for anything of equai volua orlmeAmatonel ISyn FraaaMimatos. (Syrsexp 368-8379 Agas7AupAI ages Adults iwaioomad. Ph noHaymond. Oireotor, (Corg COM Producoono) 8664468 Hvdworking twnily doas yard work, odd job CaN Ean. 564-34M. Vocal. Ptano or Organ Muaio available for sM ava msHigh Siarxlard mtjBc. ForMSmv Iton ph Coral CwMusto Sludto ProckioSona^oRor mond, Oiraolor-BwBar) Vooai CoooNnq. omaH oraupa. aduls.. ThufBday 4 I f Baaaaaaaaaa

PAGE 37

^ • 'n'^^i^^mimmmmmmmmmmmi^mr'mmm ^mi^mmmmm Legal notices Thonday, October 20. 1988 Paft M Henderion Heme Newt and Bevlder City Nwi tM4 Do4g* Vm lB7rDUWXBSMia24t TIMH AB RO. Dmt B^ SMMT vMif or OvaM. ut L.0 atiivM WMtmi BMk •! SM MM*, CA. ini MMn Vhi jrUM43BB4a8M)LA3 aiX7S4 K.O. Jowph R. CMl BrMMk Blair •! Sw(pta. LA 7 lOTl. Mf JMM T*tag. )S77 PMtMnDr.BMMwCky.nrV Iim06. W* rtMTvt the rigtit t bM. N --o^. >!. 7 i*<^. >jaaa PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICB IS HBRBBY 01VEN UM MM City CMMWN MtktCHyti H w aw w prcpnaMl hjr riiahn > • title tlM MImrtH ONMeMC* at Ht tUfOmt MMII. MtltM: BILL NO. aas AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY or HENDERSON. NEVADA AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 108*, CODIFIED AS SECTION lUMJMOF CHAPTER IS.M OF THE HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE BY REMOVING THE TIME LIMIT FOR OBTAINING TEMPORARY WATER SERVICE. wliiek ku bcn rf aired te • Connittw or the CoMdl M • Whole far etwljt aMl nommmeaaatloa tmi • ean^ af aaM OHMMMC haa heaa IIM with tkeOtjr Cliih far gaMnI IMHC aaratiay. The CaHittec MaetiM will be baM Nov. 1. IM MM6M>. at Ml Water Tfce MM CNy CoMcM ae Ika firat AQT af Nn*Mkar. inSi Mlila aay aaaa will adap t ar ro|act tkh OHhMMa wkMi 30 diQre. DATED tU( IStk day afOetobar ia8 aiad y aM laliad October M. 1988. la tbcHeadlar •oa Hoaae Nwwa. DOROTHY A. VONDENBRINK. CMC. CITY CLERK H-Oet. M, IMS. Country Store opens tomorrow The 4lBt annual one-of-akind marketplace presented by Grace Community Church, 1 ISO Wyoming Street, Boukler City will take place from 9a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Friday, and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. All in one kication will be found furniture, household appliance*, hardware, curtaina, books, jewelry, shoes, purses, plants and experienced clothing that will dehght all bargain hunters. The boutique will offer handmade gifts, aprons, pillowcases, Christmas gifts, Christmas decorations and other handmade articles. A bakery will feature honiemade breads, pastries, cakes, bar cookies and other delecttable goodies. On Friday, a gourmet luncheon will be served from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. The menu will include homemade chicken soup with dumplings, fresh fruit salad, rolls with butter, beverage and homemade pie. A refreshment stand will be open all hours on both dasrs. Members of the Women's Aasocation have been working for months to gather and to create the items offered for sale, spokespersons said. ANNUAL STATEMENT OF THE Lady Mardaae lar. Far the year Eadtag Jaly SI. 1988 Laeatkm of PriaHpal Office. 120 W. Mala St. Meea. Atiaaaa 86201. LeeotioB or locatioaii af boaiBaae ia Nevada. 3861 S. MarvlaiHl Parkway Laa Vegaa. Nevada 89100 Cahealiaad 4U40.10 Date Jaly 31. 1088 8 BSO.231.02 8 8S8JS1.02 8 tlO4320 .. OljOOT.TOO Profit or Loee t 1.743 I, Laroy BraaafieW Offka Maa§m (Naaie) OfHcial Poaltioa do hereby eartify that the roregaiag ia a trar aad acrarate atatemeat of tha buaiaeaa traaaactod by aaid oorparation doriag Aagnat 1. 19e7-Jal> .^1. 1088 iSigaedl Leray Braeafleld 10/l>8 (Sigaetare) (Data! Please type or print sigaatarr A title H Oct. 20. 27. 1988 AGENDA REGULAR MEETING CITY HALL, 900 ARIZONA STREET. BOULDER CITY. NEVADA TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25. ltW-7 P.M. fFk Salete) 1 APPROVAL OF REGULAR AGENDA: 2 APPROVAL OF CONSENT AGENDA; (Itema narked w/*; if ranoved for diacuMion, aabjoct will ba Ukea la niuBaricd order OBlaaa oUMTwiea atated.) •S. BID AWARDS: A. nrRF GRASS FERTILIZER: (Bid opoidBf 10-30^) bMa reed.) •4. CITY MANAGER'S REPORT; A. FINANCIAL REPORT-SEPTEMBER, IMS: B. CLAIMS PAID U8T1945-SEPTEMBER. 1968: •6. COUNCIL MINUTES: A. REGULAR MEEnNO 10^1148: B. WORKSHOP 10-18M REGULAR AGENDA: 6. RES. NO. 1616. AGREEMENT IM-AM, WITH OPTIMA SCORING SYSTEMS, INC., FOR GOLF COURSE SCOREBOARD SYSTEM FOR B.C. MUNICIPAL OOLP COURSE: 7. BILL rOB. ORDINANCB: A. ADOPTION OP BILL NO. • TO ADD A NEW CRAPTB 4 TO TITLE t OP THE CITY CODE POt THE MUNICIPAL AIBPORT: B. ADOPTION OP BILL NO. MS TO AMEND OKD. NO. t41 AND CITY CODE 8BCTION il-4M, "UNIFORM RBGfULATIONS FOR THE CONTROL OF DRAIN AGE IN THE CLARK COUNTY REGIONAL FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT," TO INCLUDE PROPER ADMINISTRATIVE REFERENCE THERETO: S. ADDENDUM TO B.C. TAP TRANSFORMBR REPAIR BID. AUTHORinNG NEW DESIGN WITH INCRBAOD CAPACITY RAHNG AND DASH-POT INSTALLATION: t. MISCBLLANBCHTS CORRESPONDENCE: A. REQUEST FROM MR. AND MRS. C. SHAUBELL TO PURCHASE APPROXIMATELY .4 ACRE AT REAR OF SM LAKIVIEW DRIVE: B. RBQUIST FROM MR. AND MRS. L HASKETT TO PUKCiiASB APPROXIMATELY .4 ACRE AT REAR or Ut LAKEVBW DRIVE: lePBRBONinL: A. CIVIL OSVICB amiMWlON; a) MDOBl CLOWY TERM BXPIRB1M7-M: (WeHaiglf MMIIer Hill i il B. CLARK OOUNTT OOMMUNITy MSNT COMmmX CDKK APPOINTEE AND ALTEKNATK C A0VAN(3 NOnCB OP EXPIRING FOR AFPOmTMBUT U-U4B: (V CHABTat OOMMIflBlON MEMBER NKAL JOM TiBM nmn uj BOARD? • PAID AMD M PLAMNDW MaCLAIKN AND mnVRI IL IBKMtn PDOM COUNCIL, B-ootm Tune in on Toastmasters Network What is the strategy? The clubs are based on the dual benefits of Toastmasters training and networking, or sharing business information. They are experiencing success because they are both education oriented and business based. Toastmasters combined the benefits of an educational program with the business generation techniques of a 'tips' or 'leads' club. Speeches given by members are business related. This accomplishes two things: First, it gives the entire group a better idea of what kind of leads the member could use; second, these speeches give members an opportunity to give group presentations. Benefits One unexpected benefit of evaluations in the networking club was discovered by a new Toastmaster who pointed out. "While I am evaluating, I am forced to practice the listening skills I don't use enough on sales calls." Another member puts it this way: "If I give a poor or disorganised presentation to a customer, she may simply dismiss me with 'thanks-well be in tough.' But here 1 can get an evaluation from another professional." A aaleaperson pointed out that toastmasten timing requirements force her to "organise my thoughts to speak more clearly and succmctly. Tm certain that customera appreciate that and view me as being more professional. I know the discipline and practice are making me feel more confident." Networking and ToastBiastera: a concept whose time has come; an idea which stimulates memberehip and promotes business. BC Toastmasters will meet at 11:30am Monday,Oct.24 at the Vale Hotel. For more information call Walter Stocker at 293-4269. Adult high school of the Clark County School District is now accepting enrollment in free classes lesding to a high school diploma or GRD. The classes meet Mondsys through Fridays from 8 a.m. to noon at the Clark County Community College campus in Henderson and at the Boulder City Parks and Recreation Free high school class meets Building. Students are not reavailable from 8tat<.rtifled quired to attend every day or instructora. Free counseling is ) LtgahMttcM Thursday, October 20. 1068 HsnAsTMB llsms Nswo sod BsuMsr City Nswi Fagt W stay the full class time because the courses are arranged as selfapced instruction. Class size is small to allow more help for each student. All sulqects leading to a high school diploma from the ('lark County School District are alao available to help eligible students who are non-high .school graduates, over 17 and not currently enrolled in another high school in Nevaa. Register in person at the Boulder City class or phone 799-8509 for more information. BEST IN SHOW, FINE ART-The works of artist Beverly Hoebel were selected by Judges as best of show In the fine arts category during the recent Art in the Park festival. Her works were favorably received by all who viewed them. LBGAL NOTICE BEFORE THE PUBUC SERVICE COMMISSION OF \EVADA NOTICE OF AMENDED APPLICATION AND HEARING Aa apHieatiaa. idaatlfled aa Docket No. 88-813. haa been fil ed with the PabHe Service Coatadaaioe of Nevada C Coaimiaaloe") by CP Natioaal Carperatioa I" Applicaat") for aathority to eferate espaad Ma aarvlee territory to provide gaa aarvicc to tke Sky Hwbor Raaeh aaar tbc Sky Harbar Airport ia tbe City of Headaraaa, Nevada. Tka • • eaded appSta rt ea aMre fally de e c ri be a tbe propoaed aa t eaali a aad aaaadatad oeMtracUaa. tbe pabMc ca a ve a ieace aad aaeaaa fty baael H aaf tbeaKtaalaa.tbecaataf tbeprepoeod aa taaaiea, flaaadiW far tbe prapaaaJ eoaatructloa. aad otbar Tka appSaaUaa ia oa file aad available for pubNc vlawi^ at tbe ameaa af tbe Ciiiwliiiia, 727 Falfview Dtiva. Caraoa Oty. Nevada 8t7I0 aad tbe Alaaaader Dawaaa Baildiag. 4046 S. S paaea r SlMat, Sahe A-44, Laa Vegaa, Nevada 89158. ay eoMaeat h writi^ at BEST FINE ARTS DISPLAY-Frank Oikiu was the Judges' choice to receive the blue ribboa for bast fine arts display in the recent Art in the Park festival. His attractive grouping of Us !! • • art waa warmly received at during the successful festival LBGAL NOTICE tLaaa r af Ita eflkaa aa ar bafON Wo 111 WILLIAM H. VANCE, Dated: Caaaaa Oky, M,I9SI • tba H-Oet. 10,1901 af tbe NOTICE OF PUBUC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Ibat tka CKy City af HaadMoa wM bald a PabSe Hoart^ I. MO at 740 PJM. la tbe Oty CaaadI Ckaabara, CKy Hal, 241 Wal BiNat, Hwdiraw. ta eaaaidar the i^pltitiia of Ibe Oky af Haadnaa far aa AMiidBMBt to tbe Laad Uae Nhy PlaaaftbaCltyofHiadiMiaCBaipMliiaiiiiPhafartbepigpaoe of ad^l^ oevenl laad aMdifleatloaa: 1 af Oraaa VaSay Pritway (MarOaaald Raac 2. RoaHgaaaat af WIgwaa Parkway (Gfoaa VaSay laatv Pbod: 1 Rod^Maat af Wbidadi Pwfcw^ Mhar Maate PiMk 4. Raal^aaaeat ef RoWadale Read 0r iaalar PlMk k Croatiaa af WhMaay RMeh Oriva af Afiaya Gtaada Blvd.) tnm Saaaat to Raaaafl (WWtaey RaMh Maotar Phail; S Bitaarfaa of Greea VaSay Parkway aartb fia Saaaot aad tbe Greea Valloy PUBUC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. 10S6 AN ORDINANCK OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA. AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON. NEVADA TO AMEND ORDINANCE NO. I0S4, SECTION 4, BY ESTABLISHING A DATE CERTAIN FOR THE IM PLBMENTATION OF THE NEW SYSTEM DEVELOP MENT CHARGES FOR WATB AND8BWER, AND TO FURTHER PBOVIDB FORTHRRiaATROP ANY EXCESS CHARGES THAT MAY HAVE BBBN OOLLBCTBD. TkadhavoBaNaOOKaad aadiaadhytMita tbeCkyCoaaaSofttaOKyaf Nevada, aa Oa4. 1000, wMdh waa a ^ aftbeCah "OOUNCTL AS A WHOLE" far rm—iaiitlia PUBUC NOTICE la I tbe afd by aU partiaaattbaOHkaaftbaaty CMi.SaWalarStioat.HaaLEQAL NOTICE PUBUC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. lOSO AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON. NEVADA. AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE CHAP TBR 4J2 IN ITS ENTIRTTY AND TO AMEND HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE CHAPTER 4.06 BY PROVIDING FOR LICENSE FEES FOR PRIVATE PATROLS, PRIVATE INVESTIGATORS. PROCESS SERVBRB. REPOBSBSSOBS, DOG HANDLBR8, POLYQRAPHIC EXAMINERS, OR CONSULTANTS ORINTRRNB. TkadlavaBniNa.OSOaad tbaOhy aadiaadhytMata oltbaCMyaf NaraAk aa 0 waa a CaaacU aad raiamd ta tba foBawlag CoaMlttaa: "COUNCIL AS A WHOLT' teriiuiwwiadallu bf aS partiMatBMORIeaaflhaCky ClaA.iaWal Vi NA CI HARRn. ANDY CARLTOHD.LAWRBNCI, LORDf L. WnjLUMB. Vatf^NAT: NONR LORNA MAYOR DOROVVT A VAGE Gil OtondB. LST^SSSS^^^ Found: Gray A whSs cat 89 f^Jif^CtHSK^xmot w L*ta Maad. Fem^. Ph 4ST-eS61. 564-3S83 bar. out 3 MONTH OLD KITTENS Black with white mittena Very Loving Call 864-5282 SPAY OR NBJTBt YOUR PET FOR HALF PRICE SHOTS 25% OF CALL VALLEY SAVE A PET 384-6049 CRul>/) or 642-8843 Privaia. Voice Muaical oomarty' scheduled (Voice-Actino) ProfaeeK)nal pamtlng, irv tenor^aMonor. eva vacM MBor for anything of equai volua orlmeAmatonel ISyn FraaaMimatos. (Syrsexp 368-8379 Agas7AupAI ages Adults iwaioomad. Ph noHaymond. Oireotor, (Corg COM Producoono) 8664468 Hvdworking twnily doas yard work, odd job CaN Ean. 564-34M. Vocal. Ptano or Organ Muaio available for sM ava msHigh Siarxlard mtjBc. ForMSmv Iton ph Coral CwMusto Sludto ProckioSona^oRor mond, Oiraolor-BwBar) Vooai CoooNnq. omaH oraupa. aduls.. ThufBday 4 I f Baaaaaaaaaa

PAGE 38

PMP • e>: ^.OM S^ • <• rtflt tl llmiirtwi HMM Newt fend Boulder City News Thvndaj. Ocob M, 1988 TMT WHave you been wanting to team karate, but couldn't find the time? Now you can. Private lessons, $25 mo. 16 yrs exp You schedule ttie hours M Mon^n. 458-1226 GROUND QROOMERS Lawn Maintenance, Henderson Wekame. Minimum $15 641-8501, caH anytime PAINTING: Interior, exterior. Accoustical ceilings, QUALITY WORK Reasonably priced Reference. Call Troy. 435-0871 CERTAIN TEES MOBILE SERVICE TShirts, Hats. Jackets. Sweatshirts Call564-8441 We wiW come to you. • BMlVflUPfcV: *Chi^r13 'ISO** DIVORCES •1W EUMmLY CAM Private room available In eetabUahed group care home. Spaeioue and dean PN 84-2417 REE 9ERVICES ^All Varitis ^M\ Photos Quality Work Free Eatlmatea 386-5592 HOMESTCADS I "IS* JZ*l#i^7>pft^finffcf *-fiH(MiitiNi 9WVV4** Canli,BD. GUITAR LESSONS MILAN'S PAINTING and DECORATINQ Remodeling • Wallpapering • Plastenng ALL WORK GUARANTEED FREE ESTIMATES Reasonable Rales • Senior Citizens Discount • Small Business Estinnates • Very neat and reliable 733-7752 DRVWAU Boulder City Paint Center Contracting Service Acoustig Respray Servicing Clark County •COMMERCIAL PRESIDENTIAL •INDUSTRIAL On SHa Colour ConauMng CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATES Omp&ima PrMng Uaing 'Quamy Ouaramaad" Bot^mln Moora Produeta Prolael Your Homa Proportf With Atfordatth Quamy 1638 NovMla Hwy. (MarslMll Plan) Lie No 0025690 Insured and Bonded 293-2906 RE) YOURSaF OF UNWANTED HAIR with ELECTROLYSIS By, Nanqr Murphy, L.E., C.P.E. Free ConaulMion—Tai DoductMe—Permanent M^ N*i. Sle. 110 SS4-HAIR BRICK^LOCK CUSTOM WORK NevMh Lte J4144 14 jra expOTWBee PhMMtTTM brakedraoii A roten raarfacd. Caaton hv*aalklMMW.S08W FMtw,HdB.Mr.Hoa. 66M11I. Is your home busted up' From ttie t)last? Stucco repair and painting Remodeling, patio & concrete work Call Nolan Bloom, 565-3196 NEW in HENDERSON •ALL BREEDS LARGE A SMALL •CATS WELCOME •564-7772* 58 E. Basic Rd. (Basic & Boulder Hwy) mSTA CLEAN MAD/ JANITOiUAL SERVICE ProfMional cleaning arvier for reaidential and commercial. AU phaaes of general cleaning covered including carpet cleaning, wall/ ceiling! washed. Vinyl k linoleum floor care. 293-3316 HMRe of Travel 1 We honor all advertised special air, cruise and package /ares. For information, Phone — 111 W. IMn Mntfip. Ree's Lamp Repair Rewiring O Aaaembly 564-5262 Uc. #01O071M TIE TRIMIMING Now is the time. .. palms, fruits, mulberrys, all trees. Clean up & hauling, plantirfQ, dethatching. Free Estimates. neUABLE LAWN CARK NAUUNQ TREES TRIMMED • TREES REMOVED Rubbish HauM • BIdgs Tom Down AMYrmHQ HAUiMD FrooEaHmatoa DICK'S TRUCKIMO 5e4-SS01 m SlUBByS AUTO ft MARINE BEASONABLE & PHOFESSIONAL Wm. •564-9116 862 E. UICMMMI BETTlNCnOOSB CONSTRDCnON CO. •Comrr)rcial •Residential •Additions 294-7703 Lie f(Xtt7156 JEFPS ELECTRIC AND MAINTENANCE •Houaohold Repaira •Eloctrlcol • Plumbing •Roaldontial •Commorclal •Evaporatlvo Coolero •Major Minor Joba Phone 565-0947 FRANK*S TV & APPLIANCES SALES & SERVICES For in home service call 385-9959 MAGNAVOX MGA SYLVANIA PHILCO PHILLIPS WARRANTY STATION •oj •:•' INSURANCE TOO HIGH? Too Many Tickets? SR-22 Needed? CallMoRow Inauranoe Agency Green Valley 451-5533 vou NAME rr. wru oorr.piniDarnAL AOOMMBICML *Addlliont, •Remodel or •Repair Uc.No.144ta. Ptt.242M i eoNeEcn QuaUty work that wOl beaatity .yor hoBMLic.' ft Bonded. Free EatimatM. RaaidcDtial Artis4a^93481& PAINT AVERAGE HOUSE $200.21 yraazperiaac*. Work CaU JfaB Vinyl Tch GORDY HANNA / Manager Uemac • 010-07236 O Bomicd 47 Lowerr Sum O HnKlcnon. Nevada 8901S O 70'2/965-S987 B&RLAWN and Janitorial Service Call 363-2159 Ask for Bob SI:'iVING MACHINES & VACUUM CLEANERS RfEPAIREOSorenson's 1664 Nev. Hwy. 293-3770 BC. 'BlaKeley Construction Lie No 0025913, Will repair any damage. $15 tee tor bid. Relundabte if awarded job. 565-9043 '-K CUSTD.M rAlNTINQ. TUiTINQ, WALLTAPBUNCAND CABINET uarmmiNG Mac Users Coma and visit land uaa our HENDERSON TREE & YARD SERVICE, 18 yrs pro fessional exp. Trimming removals, yard work Very reasonable rates. Free estimates. 565-1806. REPLACE" THAT OLD SWAMP COOLER-Wlth a brand new 4600 CFM Down dralt, $450. Side draft. $475. Indudae al labor & materials. 565^3947 THOMPSON'S COOLER SEKVICB A HOME MAINTDIANCE.>ne aotihaaloa. 5aM6<2. BACtCHOE SERVICE Footings, septic tanks, basements, trenching, leveling, dirt moving, lot dean-up. Reasonable & reliatile Pti 456-3447, days or eveni ngs. AAAA CLEANING, PAINTING, YARD WORK Very reasonable rates & good work Call Richard at 435-6024 or Tonie at 565-6425. BLAKELEY EXCAVATION 665-9077 I caa dig it! I can naove it I Bylkaa r Iwthajob. licfBltt4515 SECOND HAND STORE, Bilmar's, 27 Army St. Furniture & brass & tools. Miac. We repair aN makes models dt appliances. $20 service call Guaranteed 30 days Buy & sell all merchandise Henderson. 564-7367, or 641-6058. gonpotaeeme Licensed-Bonded-Insured Call 293-4899 Lie. No. 1S187 MUFFLERS INSTALLED As low aa SSO.QS Inotaltod Most DonMstic Imports • MIdsiza TAILPIPES EXHAUST PIPES Custom Banding start $126 moat cara A PU's BOULDER MUFFLERS ''"'JS!^"^ AR-NE-CA 1-800-343-3410 A RADIATOR SERVICE MOR-fUNSON LANDBCAmNO ORAND OPBNINO SMCIAL YARD MOWED, EOOa), WEED EATMG, AND BELOW AU FOR $20.00 SENIOR OTIZENS $S.OO. All Nsw Equipmwit, TRY US YOU'LL LIKE OUR WOMCII! •• • BASIC RD. CALL •••-3700 mmn •453-1809 BOULDER CITY BLDG & ROOFING OCT. REROOF SPECIAL Houses and Mobile Homes 10% OFF 15% SENIORS Call for Free Estimates Jim 293-2179 BOULDER CONCRETE WANTS TO MEET YOUR CONCRETE NEEDS FOR FREE ESTWATES AMD QUALITY WORKMANSHIP CALL KICK CASEY BOULDER CITY 293-1S71 209 Fotttr AvB. HerKtoraon, Nev. 89015 115538 GARDENER WIN cut your lawn for $10 FrwEBUmaias licensed Ph565'7449 SiltM/i S*^ ItwA Svudu 'Com* SM our toolbox showroom display" • Platforms in stock-all sizes • Utility and van bodies—in stock • PortaiMe welding • Complete mechanical Phone 435-0244 Open 6 days • 7 a.m. • 5 p.m. 2980 Sandhill Rd. LV, Nv. (BouMsr Hwy and Exprsaswsy) HOWARD HELDERLEIN CONSTRUCTION Conunerdai—Residential. and Additiona Lkowe 021013 56&0874 -Remodela FRANK'S TV & APPLIANCE SALES fr SBIVKX For In nofiM sMVto# cdl MAOMAIWJr SYtVAMUk PmLCO wMmuunr tTATtoM MIKE MORRISON ELECTRK: Licensed-Bonded -Insured Lie No 27971 Call 564-2145 EAGER BEAVER Landnaps & Lawn Msinlsnanos CompMs Landacapo Rsnovabona BOQAM aaBMNB WmiTOU 564-5374-454-9042 THE SALVATION ARMY IS IN DESPERATE NEED OF FURNITURE AND CLOTHES. PLEASE CALL THE SALVATION ARMY PICKUP AT 649-2374-6S JIFFY ^^RHI LAWN CARE "W Wmk WkOt Ycm Fltf" 565-1593 Cd STEVE HEDLAND CAREY'S CARPET ft FURNITURE wA^i Makes Into Twin Beds •T •smset UvhMNasM^^snsGS rVT ik $74800 WE DELIVEP NO EXTRA CHARGE' A.rJLtl.S1 69-b906 384-6781 2305 1 L.iks WsM] 1?'7r M!n St 'irx"ri', RVAnS •NEVGONBIllUenON OMi Jitiv run M MWMB cmr 293-1613 CREATIVE SIFTS CERTIFIED GENERAL WELDING METAL SCULPTURING FENCES & GATES Call RURiRT 565-0119 Desk Space Rentals Whstfior you art runnino as(nallbunsHor)ust nasd • pises 10 set your Waiosn. OsskTsp it for you LoosM yourMM In DsskToa. Nsvsdst Largssl PmiOBtl OsfVKSB C#fllBr, BfM COflVBflMflO^ft Off S Isrio oerporstfsn wHhout • v.. I K. ( ,'Sl'Tn 739-0111 BAW MAINTENANCE Complete JanitorisI Service Carpets • FloorsOffice Cleaning Licensed-Bonded-Insured No Nonsense We even do windows 565-0728 ELECTROLUX SALES AND SERVICE FVee delivery for all supplies and repairs. Also new sales. Cannisters A uprights. No down pymt required on sales. 565-982 snytisae. H A 1 —Lowest Ratescall 564-3927 EARL'S TYPEWRITER REPAIR Spedaliiiiiff ia IBM and Smith/Corona Typewritert Fret in gbop etHnute* Uged typewriten for Bh 565^230 ucMiaaiTM REASONABLE PRICED PICTURE FRAMING AND ART—Quality work—repair, restore frames and artwork. Buy, sell, trade Pick up and deliver ART EXCHANGE BC 293-7263 HENDERSON'S Licensed handyman Ben Depue. Hire one man to tielp you repair it tn. Plumbing, walls, paint, electric, cement, carpentry, aecurity systems, txirgtar alarms. Long time local references Not a state licensed contractor 565-7468 HAUUNO-CLEANING YABDWOHK ODD JOBS Free Bstimates CaU TONY 566^>358 RUQ SHAMPOO $10.00 par rm. Minlmurfl 9 roo m a CaH Franft i anythne MISCfllANEOUS tlDE.ER HUNTERSli We hf.ve Freezers, both chest end upright. 1101 Industrie Unit #1 Wright-Way Fum.&Appl. 293-6416 BC WANTED PariBCt hood for'78 Chavrolet Pickup truck. 2930610 BC COPi< MACHINE Xerox brao'jcompact Model 1020, with Xerox stand cabneL For han- or olica Takes Mar and taol size. S300. Cal 283:aS6ai BC > and leave mawga. Ilefrig. FPiOEVMRE ELITE wi*) lop fiaee (5 y!| I Aimond. 1250. Cal (ttar4pm. g l3-12S0.BC PORSAL£TrinlaaMw)d Manrsaaai. Nearly naw. $75, 393^726 BC 9RDGELeS80^6M.O0l 26lPliMI>MinBoiaiCity 10 iHaona ior OO. Crt 298-KS 7 or 2aS-lSlB BC FOR ing S300. Ph For Spinal inodWiBe Ph 564-1972 SALE Wood haaS ] B minFtanlina|le.Mt ^ OOO. Ph 564-1033 Tbuwdaj, October 20,19W HendtrMB Home Newi tad Boulder City Ntwo Pan St !^ FOR THE OOLLECTORPrice negotiable Antique singar teadte sewng machine w/onginal buttonhole attachment & bot)bins Exc. condition! Call between 4 4 8 pm. 564-7560 Dining rm set, long glass top w/4 chairs, good cond. $125. Sewing machine. Singer cabinet, $60 565 9243 Magnavox Stereo FM/AM radio & record player Oc tagon light wood end table Exc condition $60. 564-9393 For sale! Odds & ends, oak turn. Honda ATC $855. radio controlled plane. Can non AEI Camera w/300 mm len s twinbed,Ph 564 1711 Regulation sized pool table. $250 Ph 565 4502 Household furmahings odds & ends Ph 565-7882 GENTLEMAN that bought IBM PC JUNKOR a few months ago from person on Sorrel Rd. please call 293^79 BC 15cuft Refngerator$100or best offer 293 3708 BC TWO SCHWINN VARSITY lOsp BICYCLES One man's, one woman's $50 each. 293 3772 BC CUSTOM CHROME WHEELS w/mounted wide 14 tires from Toyota $140 takes all four Small walnut open arm couch and chair earth tone cushions, exc cond $50 293-1240 BC FURNITURE livmgroom chairs dinette set. lamp tables, clothing and misc 512 Cherry St, BC, USED CARPET Very good cond Brown Shag Approx 1500sq ft, $200 293-2063 BC NATURAL CHILDBIRTH CLASSES—organzing now If yoa are in your fifth or tieginmng of sixth month of pregnancy and are interested in unmedicated natural childbirth, CALL NOWi Classes are kept at 4-5 couples Phone Peggy at 294-0744 BC Beautiful blonde Mmk Stole Ph 564-1063 7 ft sofa & k>veseal, Chooolato vekxjr plush $175 Sda^sectional. while, $180 566884 2 REFRIGERATOR Hotpoint $250, WASHER GE $150 294-1679 BC Square cut aquamanne ring with SIX ride diamonds in white gold setting Apprais edat $5,575 Asking $4,475 Oval Lavender Jadeite ring, surrounded by 1B diamonds in heavy yellow gokj setting Appraised at $2,465 Asking $1,965 Call 294 3861 lor into to see BC RCA 25 CONSOLE COL OR TV $70 00 294 5036 BC Excellent condition, open to offer Mostly Oak Grand lather clock, cunol cabinet, sofa sets, sectional, coffee & end tables entertainment center, large rolltop desk, 2 pc Secretary flat top desk, wall mirrors, wall clocks, Lawyer s bookcases, txjrm sets, dinette sets, dining rm set, China hutch. Everything must to for renovation 367 3916 DOLLS, DOLLS, and MORE DOOLS Antique collectible and reprod,uction Toys, Miniatures andTelated Items Las Vegas Doll Show and Sale Las Vegas Convention Center. 3150 Pardise Road (South Hall)Ocl29.30,19 88 Doll Artist of Today Create Tommorrows Treasures To see these beuatitui dolls visit the Las Vegas Doll Club Show and Sale Las Vegas Convention Center, 3150 Paradise Road (South Hall) Oct 29. 30, 1988 WANTED Mothers, daughters & Grandma too enjoy a day together at the Las Vegas Doll Show & Sale, Las Vegas Convention Center 3150 Paradise Road (South Hall) Oct 29,30 1988 ARE YOU LIVING WITH A DRINKING PROBLEM'' If so. why not try AlAnon'' Meeting are Tues 10 am at St Timothys Episcopal Church Tues, 8:30 pm Club 51. Wed,. 8 pm, St Rose de Lima Hospital, Fnday pm 7 30 Water & Power BIdg Nevada Highway, Boulder City, For more information call 565-9963 Hdn. Watertjed for sale, Super single, w/drawers Good cond $80 or tiest offer 565-1479. afer 6 lo the Holy Spirit You who solve all prot)lems. provide all roads so I can otMain my goal you who give me divine gifts to forgive & forget all evil against me and m all instances ol my lile. You are with me I want, in this short prayer, to thank You for all things and confirm orKe again that I never want to be separated from You even in spite of all material illusions I wish to be with you in eternal Glory Thank you tor your mercy towards me & mine The person must say this prayer for three days The tavor will be granted even il il may appear difficult This prayer must tie published im mediately after the prayer is answered wlt^'Ollt mentioning the favor CH STORAGE -FOR RENT All sisss—Fmccd ResidsBt MsBsser Nasr Saaset i Moantaia Vista 458-3990 INDEPENDENT MOVERS ^One Room or Houseful • • Pianos or Any Heavy Load • •Specializing m Henderson and Boulder City Frse Estftnatas and ffaasomMMs llatss Refarsncos Avallsbis 293-7911 Beautiful Brand Naw Storia Cook Wood-burning Stove. Brass Trim — Must See To Appreciate. 565-1888 CHRISTIAN CENTER DAY CARE (CMLO CARE-PfK-SCNOOL-KINOERQARTEN BCPOnE AND AFTER SCHOOL CARE FOR ELEMENTARY AOE-FREE TRANSPORTATION. •2 YEARS THROUGH 5TH GRADE •OPEN MO AM-)!4) P.M. •STATE UCENSED •HIGH STAFF RATIO, Al TEACHERS •LITTLE PEOPLES WORKSHOP CURRICULUM •LOTSOFT.L.C Phofw 293-2360 571 Adams Blvd. HOME OF CHRISTIAN CENTER SCHOOL (KlndsrgsrtcB through 6th grsdel >; r>,. •o** •^""•a 0OO0M4N The goblins of CENTURY 21 HENDERSON REALTY are on the prowl for your USTINQS. If you are thinking of merchandising your home and you need a free property analysis call S64-2515. "The Property People" of CENTURY 21 HENDERSON REALTY, INC. todayl We get resultsi HENDERSON REALTY, INC. 18 Water Street Henderson, Nevada 89015 (702) 564-2515 QatxYr m New Knitting Machine, Toyota Modd KS901 T stand, super changer, lace carriage, video tape instructions, Pd $700, Sell for $500 Ph 565 7772 REASONABLE PRICED PICTURE FRAMING AND ART—Quality work—repair, restore frames and artwork Buy, sell, trade Pick up and deliver, ART EXCHANGE BC 293 7263 1 TOP GUN This was my license plate before it was stolen from my house at 889 El Camino Way If you have any info please call 293-7618 CUSTOM MAIilOXII (FlaMng Werma) Can RURIRT 568^119 ThsBsstcWtssa Afis Vsrs Jaies. 1M% aataral A naTsrsd. 584-lMI Quick Caih-wi buy your urLiKe new. Treadwind fiber niture & miac items Yoor 0la88 400GFMtporalive trash is my treasure Ph cooter. t350. W HP motor 565-6467 Ph 565-71M. i< WOMIN't BIBLE STUDY INTERDENOMINATIONAL Evwjr Wadswdsy at 9:M • JiLS71AdMMBM.|i^ iMbjrilttiac Md lafnahants. It jTM an a nawM>nar to Basldn City, caaaa asd make acw Maiida. Phoaa tnm%. SUN REALTY %t \^ "THE REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS" I i= a 1*1 1 MwKto Hwy.. Bouldtr Clt|f, NavMta MOOS I ffflnig 24 HOURS (702) 293-2151 YOUR ONE-STOP REAL ESTATE COMPANY LASGS CUSTOM + POOL + Sth FAIRWAY: B.C. Vumj boow has it sll, $1W.960, sse tUs today, by aypoiat msa t. AFFOSDABU 44EDR00B1: over 2.100 sq. a. wtna. aast ssO aow. oolx $120,060. ON THE aC. GOLF COUB8B-7TH FAIRWAY-tl40.000-8UPBB-COLO88AL VIBWI Boat valM bar MMl' LAKETREE CONDO. $83388: Qidst. affordable, two bsdhoon, two bath, garage, doaa sMi SYsilabis aow, tsnns. ses todsy. DUAL MASTER SUITES: modifisd Lswk HoaM hss 2M baths. 4 bocbooou, brgo fonud diaiag rssai, doabls gsrage, sad BMCS, oaly $118,000, ass todaj. CAREFREE LUXURY LIVINQ: BwglaBasw btfcasw oaada. VAjm. m BY OUR OFWCiAWe LOOK OVlWTMe MANY OTHER USTm WEHAVlAVAILAaLSi Radio World 2 Way Radio Sales 81 Sarvice 1656 Nevada Hwy. BC. 294-2666 Cheri fgtfs NEW FALL ARRIVALS Domizi Jumpsuits and Warm Dps • Ciaosport Silk Blouses and Pants •Liz Claiborne Dresses and Jumpsuits •Counterparts Pants, Skirts, and Sweaters •California Girl Dresses • Anthony Sicari Dresses SALE Sleepwear 30-40% off Swimwear 1 pc values to $59.99 your choice $25 2 pc values to $57 99 — your choice $20 Located in the First Western Plaza 1000 Nevada Hwy. 293-1408 Mastercard — Vita Lay-A*Way ^ AUCTION ic Saturday Oct. 22 1 p.m. 19 CHURCH ST., HENDERSON, NEVADA (From BouUmr Hwy. turn Wmat on Lako Mmad to Wator St. turn right on Wator St, and right again ono block lator to Church St.j TOTAL CONTENTS OF THE HOME OF LEEROY AND HAZEL ZIKE WHO HAVE BEEN COLLECTORS AND RESIDENTS HERE FOR 25 YEARS. Furniture, Antiques, Appliances, Bottle Collection, Sporting Goods, Tools, Collectibles and much more. The following is a partial list of hundreds of quality items to be sold in their entirety with no minimum bids. Blacl( and white oriental bedroom set. Queen size book case headboard, box spring and mattress, 2 nite stands, 2 his and hers chests, dressing table w/chair, white fur bedspread, glass enclosed book case, 2 desks, 2 reciiners, end tables, occassional tablea, love seat, lots of misc. bedroom furniture pieces, queen size hide-a-bed, console TV and stereo, reclinding love seat, dinette with six chairs, file cabinet and hutch, twelve pc. collection of mother of pearl lustraware, onyx book-ends, floor lamps, table lamps, pewter lamps, swag lamps, sun lamp. Regulator wail clock porcelain figures, brass plates, flo-blue plates, large roaster with cabinet, frost free upright freezer, poker/gsme table with five chairs, 7 ft sofa, glass top table with four chairs, several clocks, tea carts, hall trees, black oriental table, one color and two black and white portable televisions, four large ash tray stands, swag beer lights, four ft. by six ft. wall tapestry, two console stereos, book cases, metal shelves, paintings and wall hangings, Zenith color television in like new condition, wet dry Shop Vac, extension and step type ladders, chain saw, like new 18 in. gasolone power mower, two vacuum cleaners, collectors plates, Bar-B-Ques, twelve volt battery charger, three burner butane camp stove, hat racks, bar size refrigerator, pots & pans, Elvis Presley musical liquor bottles. Large Jim Beam bottle collection, also Cryrus Noble, Gamier, Ezra Brooks, McCormic and otiter rare arKl collectible bottle. Hundreds of nice misc. items, no minimum bids and no buyer registration deposit. Come on out and bring a friend. Our auctions are fun. DARWIN'S AUCTIONS 1400 Colorado, Boulder City 89005 or, ocI ICKBLAIR REALTY 833 NEVADA HWY.. BOULDER CITY 293-2171 rmtmimtAUL Bob Blalr. Brok 2n-20 p..! Rya. nUM Patty Oaffay-Spaar .aOM07 Awlraa Asdarsas SMSIS CHatiM Aatoalo 2SM1II Dok Condit 2M-in4 Rich M.oyslhM 2W-H0I FOUR BEDROOMS ELEGANT CUSTOM HOME-oear GOLF COURSE 2Vi ba., 3,160 sq. feat of luxury, pool, fireplacs, control air/heat in 744 sq. ft. gar. SatolUte dish AND MUCH MORE $315,000. SPECTACULAR SPACIOUS 3,600 sq. ft. home ON THE GOLF COURSE! 2 ba., fam. rm, DEN, both with wet bars, see thru fireplace, SWM. POOL 4 car gar A MORE $296,000. THREE BEDROOMS SEMI-CUSTOM TC^^LY UPGRADED with Spa & >^m orkshop. Tile roof, fireplace, ^^J^ & MUCH MORE $186,000 \g^*^ PRICE JUST REDUCED ON REALLY 8HARP-2 ba., FAM. RM., SW. POOL A SPA. R.V. PARKG. EXCELLENT CONDITION, Boaottfally laadscsped WAITING FOR YOU AT $1484W0. QUIET CVlAiKSAC CUSTOM HOME, szoaUsat eooditioa 1^4 ba. 2 car gar., SWM. POOL. Owaar audow-PRICED BELOW APPRAISAL AT $14S,000. CUSTOM HOBfE WfrH VIEW OF LAKE IN PRESIGIOUS AREA OF BOULDER CITY. Maay opgradss sad booattfnl custom work. Two fall bstha, thias car garags. $212,000. COMMERCIAL RENTAL 1,060 sq. ft CoauBordal Property. ZoMd CM for isase $800 par mo. CaU for mars iBformattea. "PRIME LOCATION." COMMERCIAL SALES SUCCESSFUL FOOD BUSINESS-oa NEVADA HWY. Heavy tourist trads, OiiSH nM^fnthisHlimi nxtssaa A iavsatary $644100. MOBILE HOMES 12'X60'-S bdmm 1 ba. Central air/boat. Storage shod, lO'XSO' oovered patio in f smily section $17,960.00 VERY CLEAN. VERY NICE DOUBLE WIDE-IN GINOERWOOD Ezcelleat coad. Owner snxiaus to Join fsmily. SEE IT TODAY $35,000. TOWNHOUSES A CONDOMINIUMS SPLIT LEVEL TWNH8. EXCELLENT CONDITION 2 bedrm. 1 '/< ba. 2 care gar EXC. view Mtns $78,500. LAND COMMERCIAL PROPERTY NEXT TO PIZZA HUT-BRING ALL OFFERS owner very motivated $146,000. UNOBSTRUCTED VIEW LAKE MEAD JMt the lot for YOU. $1104100. (Met Cal de Sac hw atlaa. View Lake Mead. IDEAL FOR YOUR DREAM H(HIIESI740a REIfTAUB 1 bedrm, 1 bsgr-d n;ADS"" ?J! LY ia Booldsr Sqaarc $460J0 AVAIL Nov. 7 2 ba*m, 1 ba. ear. lot-^eMsd. loU of shMie cUld/pet OK $676il0 svaO NEW HOBIE-3 bedrm. 2 ba. 2 car gar. pstia. RV parkg. Child OK pstT AVAIL NOW $800.00 3bs*m,lV4ba..2cargai NO PETS, tnSM avaB CHILD OK. CALL WO W fPBDCTAliJAWPAH^PjTAMW ^^ ^,„^ 3LL FREEfl 1-800-52S10 ExL E41 SINCERITY AND INTEGRITY IS OUR SPBCIALI 0. srrT^'''r"V • ^irTr^?'^^''''p??ii^--i

PAGE 39

PMP • e>: ^.OM S^ • <• rtflt tl llmiirtwi HMM Newt fend Boulder City News Thvndaj. Ocob M, 1988 TMT WHave you been wanting to team karate, but couldn't find the time? Now you can. Private lessons, $25 mo. 16 yrs exp You schedule ttie hours M Mon^n. 458-1226 GROUND QROOMERS Lawn Maintenance, Henderson Wekame. Minimum $15 641-8501, caH anytime PAINTING: Interior, exterior. Accoustical ceilings, QUALITY WORK Reasonably priced Reference. Call Troy. 435-0871 CERTAIN TEES MOBILE SERVICE TShirts, Hats. Jackets. Sweatshirts Call564-8441 We wiW come to you. • BMlVflUPfcV: *Chi^r13 'ISO** DIVORCES •1W EUMmLY CAM Private room available In eetabUahed group care home. Spaeioue and dean PN 84-2417 REE 9ERVICES ^All Varitis ^M\ Photos Quality Work Free Eatlmatea 386-5592 HOMESTCADS I "IS* JZ*l#i^7>pft^finffcf *-fiH(MiitiNi 9WVV4** Canli,BD. GUITAR LESSONS MILAN'S PAINTING and DECORATINQ Remodeling • Wallpapering • Plastenng ALL WORK GUARANTEED FREE ESTIMATES Reasonable Rales • Senior Citizens Discount • Small Business Estinnates • Very neat and reliable 733-7752 DRVWAU Boulder City Paint Center Contracting Service Acoustig Respray Servicing Clark County •COMMERCIAL PRESIDENTIAL •INDUSTRIAL On SHa Colour ConauMng CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATES Omp&ima PrMng Uaing 'Quamy Ouaramaad" Bot^mln Moora Produeta Prolael Your Homa Proportf With Atfordatth Quamy 1638 NovMla Hwy. (MarslMll Plan) Lie No 0025690 Insured and Bonded 293-2906 RE) YOURSaF OF UNWANTED HAIR with ELECTROLYSIS By, Nanqr Murphy, L.E., C.P.E. Free ConaulMion—Tai DoductMe—Permanent M^ N*i. Sle. 110 SS4-HAIR BRICK^LOCK CUSTOM WORK NevMh Lte J4144 14 jra expOTWBee PhMMtTTM brakedraoii A roten raarfacd. Caaton hv*aalklMMW.S08W FMtw,HdB.Mr.Hoa. 66M11I. Is your home busted up' From ttie t)last? Stucco repair and painting Remodeling, patio & concrete work Call Nolan Bloom, 565-3196 NEW in HENDERSON •ALL BREEDS LARGE A SMALL •CATS WELCOME •564-7772* 58 E. Basic Rd. (Basic & Boulder Hwy) mSTA CLEAN MAD/ JANITOiUAL SERVICE ProfMional cleaning arvier for reaidential and commercial. AU phaaes of general cleaning covered including carpet cleaning, wall/ ceiling! washed. Vinyl k linoleum floor care. 293-3316 HMRe of Travel 1 We honor all advertised special air, cruise and package /ares. For information, Phone — 111 W. IMn Mntfip. Ree's Lamp Repair Rewiring O Aaaembly 564-5262 Uc. #01O071M TIE TRIMIMING Now is the time. .. palms, fruits, mulberrys, all trees. Clean up & hauling, plantirfQ, dethatching. Free Estimates. neUABLE LAWN CARK NAUUNQ TREES TRIMMED • TREES REMOVED Rubbish HauM • BIdgs Tom Down AMYrmHQ HAUiMD FrooEaHmatoa DICK'S TRUCKIMO 5e4-SS01 m SlUBByS AUTO ft MARINE BEASONABLE & PHOFESSIONAL Wm. •564-9116 862 E. UICMMMI BETTlNCnOOSB CONSTRDCnON CO. •Comrr)rcial •Residential •Additions 294-7703 Lie f(Xtt7156 JEFPS ELECTRIC AND MAINTENANCE •Houaohold Repaira •Eloctrlcol • Plumbing •Roaldontial •Commorclal •Evaporatlvo Coolero •Major Minor Joba Phone 565-0947 FRANK*S TV & APPLIANCES SALES & SERVICES For in home service call 385-9959 MAGNAVOX MGA SYLVANIA PHILCO PHILLIPS WARRANTY STATION •oj •:•' INSURANCE TOO HIGH? Too Many Tickets? SR-22 Needed? CallMoRow Inauranoe Agency Green Valley 451-5533 vou NAME rr. wru oorr.piniDarnAL AOOMMBICML *Addlliont, •Remodel or •Repair Uc.No.144ta. Ptt.242M i eoNeEcn QuaUty work that wOl beaatity .yor hoBMLic.' ft Bonded. Free EatimatM. RaaidcDtial Artis4a^93481& PAINT AVERAGE HOUSE $200.21 yraazperiaac*. Work CaU JfaB Vinyl Tch GORDY HANNA / Manager Uemac • 010-07236 O Bomicd 47 Lowerr Sum O HnKlcnon. Nevada 8901S O 70'2/965-S987 B&RLAWN and Janitorial Service Call 363-2159 Ask for Bob SI:'iVING MACHINES & VACUUM CLEANERS RfEPAIREOSorenson's 1664 Nev. Hwy. 293-3770 BC. 'BlaKeley Construction Lie No 0025913, Will repair any damage. $15 tee tor bid. Relundabte if awarded job. 565-9043 '-K CUSTD.M rAlNTINQ. TUiTINQ, WALLTAPBUNCAND CABINET uarmmiNG Mac Users Coma and visit land uaa our HENDERSON TREE & YARD SERVICE, 18 yrs pro fessional exp. Trimming removals, yard work Very reasonable rates. Free estimates. 565-1806. REPLACE" THAT OLD SWAMP COOLER-Wlth a brand new 4600 CFM Down dralt, $450. Side draft. $475. Indudae al labor & materials. 565^3947 THOMPSON'S COOLER SEKVICB A HOME MAINTDIANCE.>ne aotihaaloa. 5aM6<2. BACtCHOE SERVICE Footings, septic tanks, basements, trenching, leveling, dirt moving, lot dean-up. Reasonable & reliatile Pti 456-3447, days or eveni ngs. AAAA CLEANING, PAINTING, YARD WORK Very reasonable rates & good work Call Richard at 435-6024 or Tonie at 565-6425. BLAKELEY EXCAVATION 665-9077 I caa dig it! I can naove it I Bylkaa r Iwthajob. licfBltt4515 SECOND HAND STORE, Bilmar's, 27 Army St. Furniture & brass & tools. Miac. We repair aN makes models dt appliances. $20 service call Guaranteed 30 days Buy & sell all merchandise Henderson. 564-7367, or 641-6058. gonpotaeeme Licensed-Bonded-Insured Call 293-4899 Lie. No. 1S187 MUFFLERS INSTALLED As low aa SSO.QS Inotaltod Most DonMstic Imports • MIdsiza TAILPIPES EXHAUST PIPES Custom Banding start $126 moat cara A PU's BOULDER MUFFLERS ''"'JS!^"^ AR-NE-CA 1-800-343-3410 A RADIATOR SERVICE MOR-fUNSON LANDBCAmNO ORAND OPBNINO SMCIAL YARD MOWED, EOOa), WEED EATMG, AND BELOW AU FOR $20.00 SENIOR OTIZENS $S.OO. All Nsw Equipmwit, TRY US YOU'LL LIKE OUR WOMCII! •• • BASIC RD. CALL •••-3700 mmn •453-1809 BOULDER CITY BLDG & ROOFING OCT. REROOF SPECIAL Houses and Mobile Homes 10% OFF 15% SENIORS Call for Free Estimates Jim 293-2179 BOULDER CONCRETE WANTS TO MEET YOUR CONCRETE NEEDS FOR FREE ESTWATES AMD QUALITY WORKMANSHIP CALL KICK CASEY BOULDER CITY 293-1S71 209 Fotttr AvB. HerKtoraon, Nev. 89015 115538 GARDENER WIN cut your lawn for $10 FrwEBUmaias licensed Ph565'7449 SiltM/i S*^ ItwA Svudu 'Com* SM our toolbox showroom display" • Platforms in stock-all sizes • Utility and van bodies—in stock • PortaiMe welding • Complete mechanical Phone 435-0244 Open 6 days • 7 a.m. • 5 p.m. 2980 Sandhill Rd. LV, Nv. (BouMsr Hwy and Exprsaswsy) HOWARD HELDERLEIN CONSTRUCTION Conunerdai—Residential. and Additiona Lkowe 021013 56&0874 -Remodela FRANK'S TV & APPLIANCE SALES fr SBIVKX For In nofiM sMVto# cdl MAOMAIWJr SYtVAMUk PmLCO wMmuunr tTATtoM MIKE MORRISON ELECTRK: Licensed-Bonded -Insured Lie No 27971 Call 564-2145 EAGER BEAVER Landnaps & Lawn Msinlsnanos CompMs Landacapo Rsnovabona BOQAM aaBMNB WmiTOU 564-5374-454-9042 THE SALVATION ARMY IS IN DESPERATE NEED OF FURNITURE AND CLOTHES. PLEASE CALL THE SALVATION ARMY PICKUP AT 649-2374-6S JIFFY ^^RHI LAWN CARE "W Wmk WkOt Ycm Fltf" 565-1593 Cd STEVE HEDLAND CAREY'S CARPET ft FURNITURE wA^i Makes Into Twin Beds •T •smset UvhMNasM^^snsGS rVT ik $74800 WE DELIVEP NO EXTRA CHARGE' A.rJLtl.S1 69-b906 384-6781 2305 1 L.iks WsM] 1?'7r M!n St 'irx"ri', RVAnS •NEVGONBIllUenON OMi Jitiv run M MWMB cmr 293-1613 CREATIVE SIFTS CERTIFIED GENERAL WELDING METAL SCULPTURING FENCES & GATES Call RURiRT 565-0119 Desk Space Rentals Whstfior you art runnino as(nallbunsHor)ust nasd • pises 10 set your Waiosn. OsskTsp it for you LoosM yourMM In DsskToa. Nsvsdst Largssl PmiOBtl OsfVKSB C#fllBr, BfM COflVBflMflO^ft Off S Isrio oerporstfsn wHhout • v.. I K. ( ,'Sl'Tn 739-0111 BAW MAINTENANCE Complete JanitorisI Service Carpets • FloorsOffice Cleaning Licensed-Bonded-Insured No Nonsense We even do windows 565-0728 ELECTROLUX SALES AND SERVICE FVee delivery for all supplies and repairs. Also new sales. Cannisters A uprights. No down pymt required on sales. 565-982 snytisae. H A 1 —Lowest Ratescall 564-3927 EARL'S TYPEWRITER REPAIR Spedaliiiiiff ia IBM and Smith/Corona Typewritert Fret in gbop etHnute* Uged typewriten for Bh 565^230 ucMiaaiTM REASONABLE PRICED PICTURE FRAMING AND ART—Quality work—repair, restore frames and artwork. Buy, sell, trade Pick up and deliver ART EXCHANGE BC 293-7263 HENDERSON'S Licensed handyman Ben Depue. Hire one man to tielp you repair it tn. Plumbing, walls, paint, electric, cement, carpentry, aecurity systems, txirgtar alarms. Long time local references Not a state licensed contractor 565-7468 HAUUNO-CLEANING YABDWOHK ODD JOBS Free Bstimates CaU TONY 566^>358 RUQ SHAMPOO $10.00 par rm. Minlmurfl 9 roo m a CaH Franft i anythne MISCfllANEOUS tlDE.ER HUNTERSli We hf.ve Freezers, both chest end upright. 1101 Industrie Unit #1 Wright-Way Fum.&Appl. 293-6416 BC WANTED PariBCt hood for'78 Chavrolet Pickup truck. 2930610 BC COPi< MACHINE Xerox brao'jcompact Model 1020, with Xerox stand cabneL For han- or olica Takes Mar and taol size. S300. Cal 283:aS6ai BC > and leave mawga. Ilefrig. FPiOEVMRE ELITE wi*) lop fiaee (5 y!| I Aimond. 1250. Cal (ttar4pm. g l3-12S0.BC PORSAL£TrinlaaMw)d Manrsaaai. Nearly naw. $75, 393^726 BC 9RDGELeS80^6M.O0l 26lPliMI>MinBoiaiCity 10 iHaona ior OO. Crt 298-KS 7 or 2aS-lSlB BC FOR ing S300. Ph For Spinal inodWiBe Ph 564-1972 SALE Wood haaS ] B minFtanlina|le.Mt ^ OOO. Ph 564-1033 Tbuwdaj, October 20,19W HendtrMB Home Newi tad Boulder City Ntwo Pan St !^ FOR THE OOLLECTORPrice negotiable Antique singar teadte sewng machine w/onginal buttonhole attachment & bot)bins Exc. condition! Call between 4 4 8 pm. 564-7560 Dining rm set, long glass top w/4 chairs, good cond. $125. Sewing machine. Singer cabinet, $60 565 9243 Magnavox Stereo FM/AM radio & record player Oc tagon light wood end table Exc condition $60. 564-9393 For sale! Odds & ends, oak turn. Honda ATC $855. radio controlled plane. Can non AEI Camera w/300 mm len s twinbed,Ph 564 1711 Regulation sized pool table. $250 Ph 565 4502 Household furmahings odds & ends Ph 565-7882 GENTLEMAN that bought IBM PC JUNKOR a few months ago from person on Sorrel Rd. please call 293^79 BC 15cuft Refngerator$100or best offer 293 3708 BC TWO SCHWINN VARSITY lOsp BICYCLES One man's, one woman's $50 each. 293 3772 BC CUSTOM CHROME WHEELS w/mounted wide 14 tires from Toyota $140 takes all four Small walnut open arm couch and chair earth tone cushions, exc cond $50 293-1240 BC FURNITURE livmgroom chairs dinette set. lamp tables, clothing and misc 512 Cherry St, BC, USED CARPET Very good cond Brown Shag Approx 1500sq ft, $200 293-2063 BC NATURAL CHILDBIRTH CLASSES—organzing now If yoa are in your fifth or tieginmng of sixth month of pregnancy and are interested in unmedicated natural childbirth, CALL NOWi Classes are kept at 4-5 couples Phone Peggy at 294-0744 BC Beautiful blonde Mmk Stole Ph 564-1063 7 ft sofa & k>veseal, Chooolato vekxjr plush $175 Sda^sectional. while, $180 566884 2 REFRIGERATOR Hotpoint $250, WASHER GE $150 294-1679 BC Square cut aquamanne ring with SIX ride diamonds in white gold setting Apprais edat $5,575 Asking $4,475 Oval Lavender Jadeite ring, surrounded by 1B diamonds in heavy yellow gokj setting Appraised at $2,465 Asking $1,965 Call 294 3861 lor into to see BC RCA 25 CONSOLE COL OR TV $70 00 294 5036 BC Excellent condition, open to offer Mostly Oak Grand lather clock, cunol cabinet, sofa sets, sectional, coffee & end tables entertainment center, large rolltop desk, 2 pc Secretary flat top desk, wall mirrors, wall clocks, Lawyer s bookcases, txjrm sets, dinette sets, dining rm set, China hutch. Everything must to for renovation 367 3916 DOLLS, DOLLS, and MORE DOOLS Antique collectible and reprod,uction Toys, Miniatures andTelated Items Las Vegas Doll Show and Sale Las Vegas Convention Center. 3150 Pardise Road (South Hall)Ocl29.30,19 88 Doll Artist of Today Create Tommorrows Treasures To see these beuatitui dolls visit the Las Vegas Doll Club Show and Sale Las Vegas Convention Center, 3150 Paradise Road (South Hall) Oct 29. 30, 1988 WANTED Mothers, daughters & Grandma too enjoy a day together at the Las Vegas Doll Show & Sale, Las Vegas Convention Center 3150 Paradise Road (South Hall) Oct 29,30 1988 ARE YOU LIVING WITH A DRINKING PROBLEM'' If so. why not try AlAnon'' Meeting are Tues 10 am at St Timothys Episcopal Church Tues, 8:30 pm Club 51. Wed,. 8 pm, St Rose de Lima Hospital, Fnday pm 7 30 Water & Power BIdg Nevada Highway, Boulder City, For more information call 565-9963 Hdn. Watertjed for sale, Super single, w/drawers Good cond $80 or tiest offer 565-1479. afer 6 lo the Holy Spirit You who solve all prot)lems. provide all roads so I can otMain my goal you who give me divine gifts to forgive & forget all evil against me and m all instances ol my lile. You are with me I want, in this short prayer, to thank You for all things and confirm orKe again that I never want to be separated from You even in spite of all material illusions I wish to be with you in eternal Glory Thank you tor your mercy towards me & mine The person must say this prayer for three days The tavor will be granted even il il may appear difficult This prayer must tie published im mediately after the prayer is answered wlt^'Ollt mentioning the favor CH STORAGE -FOR RENT All sisss—Fmccd ResidsBt MsBsser Nasr Saaset i Moantaia Vista 458-3990 INDEPENDENT MOVERS ^One Room or Houseful • • Pianos or Any Heavy Load • •Specializing m Henderson and Boulder City Frse Estftnatas and ffaasomMMs llatss Refarsncos Avallsbis 293-7911 Beautiful Brand Naw Storia Cook Wood-burning Stove. Brass Trim — Must See To Appreciate. 565-1888 CHRISTIAN CENTER DAY CARE (CMLO CARE-PfK-SCNOOL-KINOERQARTEN BCPOnE AND AFTER SCHOOL CARE FOR ELEMENTARY AOE-FREE TRANSPORTATION. •2 YEARS THROUGH 5TH GRADE •OPEN MO AM-)!4) P.M. •STATE UCENSED •HIGH STAFF RATIO, Al TEACHERS •LITTLE PEOPLES WORKSHOP CURRICULUM •LOTSOFT.L.C Phofw 293-2360 571 Adams Blvd. HOME OF CHRISTIAN CENTER SCHOOL (KlndsrgsrtcB through 6th grsdel >; r>,. •o** •^""•a 0OO0M4N The goblins of CENTURY 21 HENDERSON REALTY are on the prowl for your USTINQS. If you are thinking of merchandising your home and you need a free property analysis call S64-2515. "The Property People" of CENTURY 21 HENDERSON REALTY, INC. todayl We get resultsi HENDERSON REALTY, INC. 18 Water Street Henderson, Nevada 89015 (702) 564-2515 QatxYr m New Knitting Machine, Toyota Modd KS901 T stand, super changer, lace carriage, video tape instructions, Pd $700, Sell for $500 Ph 565 7772 REASONABLE PRICED PICTURE FRAMING AND ART—Quality work—repair, restore frames and artwork Buy, sell, trade Pick up and deliver, ART EXCHANGE BC 293 7263 1 TOP GUN This was my license plate before it was stolen from my house at 889 El Camino Way If you have any info please call 293-7618 CUSTOM MAIilOXII (FlaMng Werma) Can RURIRT 568^119 ThsBsstcWtssa Afis Vsrs Jaies. 1M% aataral A naTsrsd. 584-lMI Quick Caih-wi buy your urLiKe new. Treadwind fiber niture & miac items Yoor 0la88 400GFMtporalive trash is my treasure Ph cooter. t350. W HP motor 565-6467 Ph 565-71M. i< WOMIN't BIBLE STUDY INTERDENOMINATIONAL Evwjr Wadswdsy at 9:M • JiLS71AdMMBM.|i^ iMbjrilttiac Md lafnahants. It jTM an a nawM>nar to Basldn City, caaaa asd make acw Maiida. Phoaa tnm%. SUN REALTY %t \^ "THE REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS" I i= a 1*1 1 MwKto Hwy.. Bouldtr Clt|f, NavMta MOOS I ffflnig 24 HOURS (702) 293-2151 YOUR ONE-STOP REAL ESTATE COMPANY LASGS CUSTOM + POOL + Sth FAIRWAY: B.C. Vumj boow has it sll, $1W.960, sse tUs today, by aypoiat msa t. AFFOSDABU 44EDR00B1: over 2.100 sq. a. wtna. aast ssO aow. oolx $120,060. ON THE aC. GOLF COUB8B-7TH FAIRWAY-tl40.000-8UPBB-COLO88AL VIBWI Boat valM bar MMl' LAKETREE CONDO. $83388: Qidst. affordable, two bsdhoon, two bath, garage, doaa sMi SYsilabis aow, tsnns. ses todsy. DUAL MASTER SUITES: modifisd Lswk HoaM hss 2M baths. 4 bocbooou, brgo fonud diaiag rssai, doabls gsrage, sad BMCS, oaly $118,000, ass todaj. CAREFREE LUXURY LIVINQ: BwglaBasw btfcasw oaada. VAjm. m BY OUR OFWCiAWe LOOK OVlWTMe MANY OTHER USTm WEHAVlAVAILAaLSi Radio World 2 Way Radio Sales 81 Sarvice 1656 Nevada Hwy. BC. 294-2666 Cheri fgtfs NEW FALL ARRIVALS Domizi Jumpsuits and Warm Dps • Ciaosport Silk Blouses and Pants •Liz Claiborne Dresses and Jumpsuits •Counterparts Pants, Skirts, and Sweaters •California Girl Dresses • Anthony Sicari Dresses SALE Sleepwear 30-40% off Swimwear 1 pc values to $59.99 your choice $25 2 pc values to $57 99 — your choice $20 Located in the First Western Plaza 1000 Nevada Hwy. 293-1408 Mastercard — Vita Lay-A*Way ^ AUCTION ic Saturday Oct. 22 1 p.m. 19 CHURCH ST., HENDERSON, NEVADA (From BouUmr Hwy. turn Wmat on Lako Mmad to Wator St. turn right on Wator St, and right again ono block lator to Church St.j TOTAL CONTENTS OF THE HOME OF LEEROY AND HAZEL ZIKE WHO HAVE BEEN COLLECTORS AND RESIDENTS HERE FOR 25 YEARS. Furniture, Antiques, Appliances, Bottle Collection, Sporting Goods, Tools, Collectibles and much more. The following is a partial list of hundreds of quality items to be sold in their entirety with no minimum bids. Blacl( and white oriental bedroom set. Queen size book case headboard, box spring and mattress, 2 nite stands, 2 his and hers chests, dressing table w/chair, white fur bedspread, glass enclosed book case, 2 desks, 2 reciiners, end tables, occassional tablea, love seat, lots of misc. bedroom furniture pieces, queen size hide-a-bed, console TV and stereo, reclinding love seat, dinette with six chairs, file cabinet and hutch, twelve pc. collection of mother of pearl lustraware, onyx book-ends, floor lamps, table lamps, pewter lamps, swag lamps, sun lamp. Regulator wail clock porcelain figures, brass plates, flo-blue plates, large roaster with cabinet, frost free upright freezer, poker/gsme table with five chairs, 7 ft sofa, glass top table with four chairs, several clocks, tea carts, hall trees, black oriental table, one color and two black and white portable televisions, four large ash tray stands, swag beer lights, four ft. by six ft. wall tapestry, two console stereos, book cases, metal shelves, paintings and wall hangings, Zenith color television in like new condition, wet dry Shop Vac, extension and step type ladders, chain saw, like new 18 in. gasolone power mower, two vacuum cleaners, collectors plates, Bar-B-Ques, twelve volt battery charger, three burner butane camp stove, hat racks, bar size refrigerator, pots & pans, Elvis Presley musical liquor bottles. Large Jim Beam bottle collection, also Cryrus Noble, Gamier, Ezra Brooks, McCormic and otiter rare arKl collectible bottle. Hundreds of nice misc. items, no minimum bids and no buyer registration deposit. Come on out and bring a friend. Our auctions are fun. DARWIN'S AUCTIONS 1400 Colorado, Boulder City 89005 or, ocI ICKBLAIR REALTY 833 NEVADA HWY.. BOULDER CITY 293-2171 rmtmimtAUL Bob Blalr. Brok 2n-20 p..! Rya. nUM Patty Oaffay-Spaar .aOM07 Awlraa Asdarsas SMSIS CHatiM Aatoalo 2SM1II Dok Condit 2M-in4 Rich M.oyslhM 2W-H0I FOUR BEDROOMS ELEGANT CUSTOM HOME-oear GOLF COURSE 2Vi ba., 3,160 sq. feat of luxury, pool, fireplacs, control air/heat in 744 sq. ft. gar. SatolUte dish AND MUCH MORE $315,000. SPECTACULAR SPACIOUS 3,600 sq. ft. home ON THE GOLF COURSE! 2 ba., fam. rm, DEN, both with wet bars, see thru fireplace, SWM. POOL 4 car gar A MORE $296,000. THREE BEDROOMS SEMI-CUSTOM TC^^LY UPGRADED with Spa & >^m orkshop. Tile roof, fireplace, ^^J^ & MUCH MORE $186,000 \g^*^ PRICE JUST REDUCED ON REALLY 8HARP-2 ba., FAM. RM., SW. POOL A SPA. R.V. PARKG. EXCELLENT CONDITION, Boaottfally laadscsped WAITING FOR YOU AT $1484W0. QUIET CVlAiKSAC CUSTOM HOME, szoaUsat eooditioa 1^4 ba. 2 car gar., SWM. POOL. Owaar audow-PRICED BELOW APPRAISAL AT $14S,000. CUSTOM HOBfE WfrH VIEW OF LAKE IN PRESIGIOUS AREA OF BOULDER CITY. Maay opgradss sad booattfnl custom work. Two fall bstha, thias car garags. $212,000. COMMERCIAL RENTAL 1,060 sq. ft CoauBordal Property. ZoMd CM for isase $800 par mo. CaU for mars iBformattea. "PRIME LOCATION." COMMERCIAL SALES SUCCESSFUL FOOD BUSINESS-oa NEVADA HWY. Heavy tourist trads, OiiSH nM^fnthisHlimi nxtssaa A iavsatary $644100. MOBILE HOMES 12'X60'-S bdmm 1 ba. Central air/boat. Storage shod, lO'XSO' oovered patio in f smily section $17,960.00 VERY CLEAN. VERY NICE DOUBLE WIDE-IN GINOERWOOD Ezcelleat coad. Owner snxiaus to Join fsmily. SEE IT TODAY $35,000. TOWNHOUSES A CONDOMINIUMS SPLIT LEVEL TWNH8. EXCELLENT CONDITION 2 bedrm. 1 '/< ba. 2 care gar EXC. view Mtns $78,500. LAND COMMERCIAL PROPERTY NEXT TO PIZZA HUT-BRING ALL OFFERS owner very motivated $146,000. UNOBSTRUCTED VIEW LAKE MEAD JMt the lot for YOU. $1104100. (Met Cal de Sac hw atlaa. View Lake Mead. IDEAL FOR YOUR DREAM H(HIIESI740a REIfTAUB 1 bedrm, 1 bsgr-d n;ADS"" ?J! LY ia Booldsr Sqaarc $460J0 AVAIL Nov. 7 2 ba*m, 1 ba. ear. lot-^eMsd. loU of shMie cUld/pet OK $676il0 svaO NEW HOBIE-3 bedrm. 2 ba. 2 car gar. pstia. RV parkg. Child OK pstT AVAIL NOW $800.00 3bs*m,lV4ba..2cargai NO PETS, tnSM avaB CHILD OK. CALL WO W fPBDCTAliJAWPAH^PjTAMW ^^ ^,„^ 3LL FREEfl 1-800-52S10 ExL E41 SINCERITY AND INTEGRITY IS OUR SPBCIALI 0. srrT^'''r"V • ^irTr^?'^^''''p??ii^--i

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£se 41 lltUw— • Howe Ntm and Balder City Newt ^or Mte: 18 glMS 1 geNorT Qreen Jugs ExceKent for Tkmwiy, (kMm 1968 MBCELLANECX^ OHyTMi A.S.I. CertHIM ion*ily Ouleii 9#fVioe Lub, OM*nNer TUfM Up9t VffllCM IST iwVa Hwy BC IT'S TIME TO REST! Have your own personal GO-FER — I will shop for birthdays, anniversaries, Christmas, any special occasion. I will gift wrap and deliver. K) a^ to S pjiL For mora Mo oi 293-409S Mk COMOmONIMG SERVICE Uc. •IMM Call H.T.C. EMISSION CONTROL Bould*r City Texaco 567 Nev. Hwy., B.C. 294-1971 I EWOOD ftdl cord. Iflili^f coiS' $l((jllivered — Green \^ey or Hendenon tit to Vegas or BC IRii/lND'S WOOD BIN iS: 565-9694 -H* THE aS^ALCAvem n^M^Hlf VMH^af v^^^W^Bf !§ I.Ti I CoH^otor — Buys Old mag't (pr '60) signed documents, autographs, firat iasuaa. Spsdal Intaraat In Hollywood, sclsntlsta & gov't. Also, old U.S. coins 895-0161_ Cil Afty 8 p.m. 5e6-1480| AR-n^lTIS-People treat youftdf. No meaicine Get -' -^ money back. Cost is HB64-1648 fa yrd oW I have one too.Wt's Stan a playgroup for aihi Valley View area, call 3g)gie, 565-1541 THROW AWAY OLD BICYCLES. I'll iu$5to SlOdepenon condition. Ph 89 anytime. CLOCK RBAHt •Antique & Other •Qrandfather •Wall •Modern miy. Ml. Tnrft i63RSALE Jbxico Ground EhUe Medium Hot lust right for Bchilades, etc. 564-1033 CLOCK SIRVICB YMBrOoekRMiilfH flMnki lvy Two Yarn 664-8802 Mc TEH lesi $8J le tifia OF? Wil l-mut sell, king sized 1150 Full size bed. • -1173 IS LESSONS Pnvate $16.00 per hour I per '/2 hour Group i $6.00 per hour. CercherUSTA COACH • IE YEAR 293-0267 THE JEWELRY BOX •AU Jtwdby Rptin •Waiek Ra^wb•AppMiaaU *Ca(on Jawalry Hwt 10AJi.'6 VM. Utm-ftl WAM.-4rM.at. UAHr.tlmy.WCOItttmTm 294-OB77 For eale: Dowadraft 864.7BK. HT LOSS THE EASY (Be yourelf again) back guarantee. i J i ifli wempcoolef, iCFM.oompMetieS 0ne2whaaltrler w/brea, f10O. Pti • 2 or 564-7630. I^ash Garde-WMh 11 get one free Aik at fter Roy's Sparkle irs & Laundromat. 67 Mead, Hdn Open 7|it>to 10 pm, Lrffig rm furniture, 8' couch, $9)&. Loveaeat, $100. High b^li chair, $50 Vinyl ra4l|K/reciiner, $50 2 (g $50 Miac imported iish wall items All in Jcondton.Ph 451-7707 JI7-7074 2^Unana lamps, other tidi.piclura6,BWportiUe ryJ^^SM/FM alereo radio, ,21/Blackjari(ttble itoiet, VMNW& Hag^PhM6' oak chandelier $17VCeN 451-4142 Brgg? COMMIIICIAL UPE 56X39X27 565-1588 SvjRi!:!5'£5 iiiaaiiaiaii •toring iulcc, 564-1648 25C ea I NEED A USED CAR OR TRUCK Price range $5010 $600 Fixer upper OK Call 4 58-0137 78 Buick Regal Exc cond Actual miles Full pov^er. $28 00, 293-7326 BC 1967 Corvair 500 Sport Coupe $1.000 or best offer. 564 9116 Can you buy Jeeps, Cars, 4 X 4's setzed in drug raids for under $1OO'' Call lor facts foday. 602-837-3401 Ext 561 62 NISSANPATROL4X4 Small block V-8, new hard top. lots of extra goodies Runs Great $1600 BOON DOCKERS DELIGHT 293-4727 BC BUY GOVERNMENT Seized and SijrpkJS Vehicles from $100 Fords, Chevys. Cor vettes, etc., in your area for info call (602) 842-1051 Ext 5263 1974Fr)rdF-350,1 tonPU XLT $3,200 Ph 564-8299. ; H & S LAWN CARE Cfmptota lawn aarvlc*, tra* li shrub cart, •moiMtic •prInMtrs. Lie #4400-0 HfroM fr SiMron CrNclMr 294-S200 2 SCOOTERS Honda Spree $450, Yamaha $350 Both run great! 293-6079 BC 1980 Datsun 310 4 door, radio, a/c $1,375293-1357 or 293-4660 BC 1980 Dodge 440 Kary-Van 1V4 T Dual rear wheels. Low miles Very roomy work horee $4,350299-7320 BC '85 Subaru GL wagon, 5 speed. 4 WH, air, cruise control, tilt wheel, AM/FM stereo. Exc Cond $5.490203-6311 BC 84 PONTIAC FIERO very sharp with low mileage New 14 inch wheels and tires. $5,500. 1-291-0054. Afters and weekends. FOR SALE 1984 Toyota Dolphin Mtr Home. Air, full tMth, stove, refng, furnace, clean. No. 10 Church, Henderson 565-7753 1978 Lancia Beta Sports Coupe. Air, new tires, low mileage, one owner. Excellent Condition. $1,500 293-6503 BC 1974,18 ft Travel Trrter. AC, Shower, $2000. Ph 565-8842 BOAT FOR SALE Large 17 ft front runner 1963. 90 HP Johneon VRC w/power lilt & tilt. 150 hrs. 10 HP Johnson iroino motor. Full Canvas. CB Radk). Depth finder. Compass. Like new. Must sell. Don Mace 1122 Gnllo Way, B.C. 293-7536 1970 EL CAMINO Call after 4:30 PM 293-2627 BC 1979 Pinto. 2 dr station wg. Good cond. Power, '63 Thunderbird, full power, automatic. 564-6801, 1950 GMC pickup, reslorable 16' Marlin Boat, 140 HP, in/out. Good condition $3500 or best oHer. Ph 56M724 1966 Dodge Caravan, air. new tires, all extras. Super condition. $12,500 RRM, or $500 & aaeume lease pymts of $309 per mo" Ph 565-9438 For8ale:74lmpala,$950.76 Datsun 610, $1200. Ph 564-3014 For sale: 1963 Thunderbird. Fully equipped. Automatic. PBJPS. Ph 564-6601 USB) AUTO PAars.. l-TmiLstaadetko New aU LBIO JOHN a iONS, PMyUDt.BC. 1985 CHEVY ASTftO VAN Tinted windows. Loaded SHver 43 Auto V-6 S9.S00. 293 5612 BC 1978 Thunderbird. new paint Full power $1600 or best oile r 435-2092 Previously approved Emmision Control machines Manufactured by Surt Good condition Vern's Texaco. Hdr/B.C 56 S0 220 1979 & 1977 Ford Fairmonts 6cyl&4cyl By the part or whole car Ph 5 65-8486 78 Honda Accord LX $b00 or best offer 564-4510 days .565-5362 eves Enunlaelon Control Smog Teel, 7 daya wfc Maehanica on duly Tdayawfc VERN'S TEXACO t E. Lake Mewl (at Watw) ses^nao 70 VOLVO 144 S-Exc cond. air. stereo. Call eves & weekends only 293-2794 BC Factory Direct Qalaxia Boata 18 (130 10) $8,995 19 (175 10)59,950 20 (170 10) $12,950 21 (305 10) $15 950 0 Dawn (OAC) ae4-0730 1M7 Plynioiith Raasni S7.000 or Bnrt B64-i540 S.OOO TIUVILTIUILIR 1M6,2t',l>erryTaunia. Aknoct n5w, BOMitlfiil matdeSout.ANextraa. t7,9W or tm offer. BOAT 20' Bayliner 1974 351 Ford engine. All new upholstery and floonng New cover Appraised at $7,755 Asking $6,990. 293-3616 after 5:30 P.M. and on weekends 1500 New Mexico, BC 1975 Camaro, $1750 Ph 564-3336 Olds Cutlass Supreme, 1983. Brown/cream Loaded. $3700. Ph 565-7609 or 456-1303 85 LTD 4 dr, exc condition 40,000 mi. $5400. Ph 564-7498 1976 Chevy Pinto, Air, stereo. Great truck! $2000 Ph 293-5332. For Sale: 1980 Ford Granada Good shape, $600 FIRM 565 7379 For sale, 1967 Ford Truck 3/4 ton, $800 565-7379 72 Chevy. 8 cylinder Runs. Good transportation car $600. Ph Joe EsposHo, 565-1193 For Sale 1972 Chevrolet Caprice 400 cu m engine. Ong. owner. Driven 13,000 miles since complete overhaul. $1000 Call 293-3330 BC BOAT FOR SALE '78 Starfire 20' Exc cond 294-7703 or 2931870 BC RADIATOR-SALES AND REPAIR 293-7278 810 John 4 Sons Foothill Dr K. HI6HKT PRICES PAID FOR OLD CARS WRECKED OR RUNNING We're the cheapest on parts Try uslll All Amerlcwi Auto Wreckers PERSONALS AIRLINES NOW HIR1NQ. ,'Flight Attendants, Travel Agents, Mechanics, Customer Service, Listings Salaries to $105K. Entry level positions Call 1-805687-6000, Ext A-569S Over 35 and Single? Find love/companionship on new romance hotline Listen to recorded messages from exciting singles. 1-900-909-8000 $2 phone charge, 45. additional minutes. Woman does housecleaning—weekly or bi-monthly Honest, dependable, r eferences. Call^ 5154-4225 A Christian lady would like to do your house Weekly or biweekly. Neat & thorough. Hdn, Boulder City. Green Valle y 564-698 7 JOB OPPORTUNmES ARE YOU INTERESTED IN A REWARDING AND INTERESTING CAREER IN REAL ESTATE"? If you're licensed or Interested in going to real estate school please call and ask for Paul In office training session starting soon Call 564-6969 BUSINESS IS BOOMINGUrgently need distributors for new water filter system Ground floor opportunity Pan time or full time Only $200 in investment required to start to your own business and be your own boss Ph 458-4319 COOLER BUSINESS FOR SALE $2,500 or best offer Parts & Phone number In business 6 yrs Frank 565-7107 Teacher aide, day care center 5 days Ph 564-5777 DIETARY TRAY AIDE, Boulder City Care Center, 293-5151 EOEMFHVBC. PART TIME CASHIER NEEDED at Hoover (5am. Phone 564-3844 or 3798504 BC SECURITY/CARETAKER/HANDYMAN. 75 yrs full of energy & looking for work in exchange for apt Have pk:k up truck 734-0941 'BOB'S ALL FAWILY RES TAURANT now accepting applications for WAIT^ RESSES Apply in person 761 Nev Hwy, BC HIRING COOKS, BAKERS, DISHWASHERS, AND FRONT HELP For Mane Callendar's-Boulder City Apply at Best Western Lighthouse Inn. 110 Ville Dr Mori-Sat 11 AM-5PM BC Sandwich Shop needs part time kitchen help & delivery. $3 50 hr to start Hrs 10-2:30. MonthruFn. Call for app't between 2 & 5 pm 5640777 MAIDS Trainees accepted Apply mornings. Best Western Lighthouse Inn. 110 Ville Dr Boulder City Nv. Management trainee. Busy vocational trade school needs sharp self starter to recruit student prospects through public survey. Salary plus commission Bonus, overrides Excellent earning potential Call Mr. Rizzi, 565-3778. PARTS ROOM PERSON: Seeking experienced maintenance stores clerk Must have working knowledge of computerized parts inventory. Preventabve maintenance and lubrication program and purchasing/accounts payable system. Apply in penn or mail resume to Gold Bond ice Cream, 1001 OlsenSt., Henderson. AIRLINES NOW HIRING Flight Attendents, Travel Agents, Mechanics, Customer Service Lightings Saianesto$105K Entry level position. Call (1) 806-8876000 Ext A-56&S. EXPERIENCED FOOD SERVERS seeded. Meet ha^ a trajr exMAID SERVICE people latsnstedia advaaoMMBtWrkwltiia crew. Oriaebaeters _BfaM8wTlM.7M-iaK. Earn money at home-making crafts. Assembly work. Write to S Olson, P 0 Box 118, Fort Lefton, CO 80621. Enclose SAE SALES ENTREPRENEUR $50K $150K Last month over 600 peofjle in our company got checks for over $10K, I need three key people who would like to have a real opportunity to earn some senous money Call Bruce Lutt, 734-1588 EMPLOYMENT MATURE LOVING PERSON wanted to work m Nursery, Would prefer retired person or mother who loves working with children. Only 6-8 hrs' per week Please call 2931912 for ap p't BC RAILROAD PASS now acceptmo applications for Cage Cashiers change persons Please apply at casino cage Secretary & assistant. Kan time, flexitJie hours. Good for student For semi-handicapped business person. Must dnve Have good appearance, and like working w/people. Salary $5 to $6 per hr. Ph 734-2551 Railroad Pass now acoepting applications for cage cashiers & changepersone. Pleaae apply at Casino Cape. GOLD STRIKE INN AND CASINO in BouUer Qly is WH Wofig appkcattons lor BUS PERSOfeT WAITRESSES. Part lime and full tinne. Apply inparaon. Cortact Ra^aurart Managr. BC Nlek's iJ!t^^^ CENTRAL SUPPLY CLERK w/nursing or medical terminology background. 4 hrs per day. BOULDER CITY CARE CENTER 293-5151 EOE MF HV B C. Use your homemaking care skills to earn money. Flexible hours, good pay. Wo will match your personal schedule. All shifts available. Etablished nationally respected company. Call or write Medi-visit Extensive Care, 3601 W Sahara, Ste 201, Las Vegas, Nev 89102. Ph 871-1031 EOE. ARCHITECT Salary: $37,629.36 45,738.00/year* Requirements: Must be Kcensed as an architect in state of origin, and must obtain Nevada license within one (1) year of appointment. Must possess, or have the ability to obtain, a Class 3 Nevada dnver's license Must have, and maintain, a satisfactory driving record Where to Apply: City application form and resume should be submitted to the Personnel Department, City of Henderson, 243 Water Street, Henderson. Nevada, 89015, by 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday, October 26. 1988 Hours Of Operation: Monday through Thursday, 7:30 am 5:30 pm, Subject to PERS reduction AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER ^ WAITER OR WAITRESS Ex penenoed only. Mu be over 21. Apply in peraon only. Quys Via Capri 1634 Nev. Hwy. DISHWASHER/DELIVERY PERSON Must have dependable automobile. Apply in peraon only Quy's Via Capri 1634 f^ev. Hwy. BC FOR RENT 1988 ANMTO Motorhome 27' (Tall 293-4161 BC 82 ATC 200 Uke new. 565-7034. after 5 pm EMMISSION CONTROL CHECK STATION 29{}-7278, Big John and Sona. Foothill m Dr., B.C. 81 Subaru waoon, 5 sp, AC. AM/FM. Qaugas&tach, low mi Aaking $2,460. Ph 298^663.676 Fainwiy,BC 1964 \Maicrift Boat, 180 American w/140 Merc caHoer. Took swim dedi. / TnjMatrgtar.AaMnQiejiSo/ 'SV-y^^ or beet. Ph 9Ogf2. TRAVEL TRAILER. 1973,18 ft Mh whoa. $2000. Ph 6644036 Ph QuaonasMii' • H372BC SELL Dlrwnfoom •hairs-ICSMHO moaald.\MMdrviry tBoo.m'im thiir bow) maaoi karaiaprivato k aomi private Only 126 TO) You yra aap 4^1 MB. 1IS6, 2S' self conlnad Komfort trailer. Utad 4 wta. New awnino a AC, Aaiting egu;^ pu m mo m py n tt i 26 X 30. ihlla. KMm anK.lauoiprayir.Cil safroeie. 78 0.0 *to9a^.giektmk rooioto USSS Muolsooto LHto new QARRETT^IREATER NIVADA PROPERTIES. INC. 554 Nevada Hlfiiway |m 293-3333 ^ LAKB4I0UNTAIN-VALLEY VKW HOKIB PledUe flasr phM fer iMBiljr atarb IMM. fMv BR. 1^ be. EXTBNBIVB VnW or LalM Msad aad • BaaMsr CHy ftaai hrm. aad lew tedareed ONLY SITMR. CORNER LOT vaDiy.Alslliresi^ EltoalL CALL ISBWABDINQ IN BmCT ATTBi i LIST WITH us fOR ACnOM Cook wanted, Henderson Day Cera. 56584. HOOVER DAM SNACKETERIA Counter Sales, Kitchen Help, Maintenance Apply in per son at Hoover Dam EOE BC^ Room Attendants Laundry Attendants Housemen FuH time positions, start $4 50 per hr Apply in person, Best Weatem McCarran Inn. 4970 Paradise Rd Las Vegas. RN-LPN full time or part time for long term care Extra orientation for those who have been out of nursing recently Your professional expertise and judgement can be fully developed and utilized in our quaNty-concerned tacility Competitive pay and benefits. Boulder City Care Center Boulder Ci^, NV 293-5151 An Equal (5pportunity Emptoyer Baaiiiliiiii|iiii.Bwa aBelltoiaipstkB. iMs yoB IsnT^ tieao. Pavt naMi 6 to ths Lae Vans I Call 784-SlSO Moa tkvihN.lpao4 Are your children currently in school'' l^eed immaculate housecleaner to virork between the hours of 9 to 1, approximately Prefer Christian women to work in Henderson area. Call 454-9116 NURSES RN's Charge Nune ArtTCSSi St-RosedcUma HOSPITAL is now recruiting R.N.8 & L.P.N.S who believe in treating patients with dignity and respect NEW COMPETETIVE SALARY SCALE Growing, progrtMlve h(MpiUl 30 paid day* off (he nrttycar FIxlbltKhoduUng4-, B-, and 12-hour shifts PuU-Hme, part-time and per diem poaitlons Friendly staff, rMponaive managaoient Sand nawnw, or call: SL Ron de Uaia Hospllal Penoontl DcparliiMat 102E.UkeMaadDr. HndersoD,NV 8MIS (702) S<4-457 •iriiMiii.Ma.'a LPN' MedicationVHH ftfN nr LMri OTSI Iw^^vin ^tes4sis& MnMMtav *M. SMW WMU YOU LiAM. sxcBUfNT nuNSi mwin Dietary Help-Dishwasher/ kitchen help $6 hr to start Good benefit & working conditions Casada Del Mar, 2501 Wigwam Pkwy. Hdn Ph 361-61 11. Contact Ellen Saluzo. Food Servers, immediate opening at Lake Mead Restaurant $3 50 hr Apply in person at Lake Mead Marina. Also Cashier. $4 50 hr See B Musselman, 293-2900 EOE Concessionaire of NPS Help Wanted HOOVER DAM SNACKETERIA Counter Salaa • Kitchen Help •Maintenance Apply In peraon An Equal Opportun ity Bmployer AVON l CmlUng YOUl WHY? *To Offer YOU the Opportunity to Earn • To Earn Thooo Extra Odlara Noedod for a Chrlotmaa Spondlitg Sproe i^To Do Your Own Poraonal Chrtotmaa Shopping With AVON at Coot To Set PloxiMe Working Houro That PH YOUR SohedtHo M Avoirs firdUFif GMftiMi ii/i *Te Your Prlenda, Nelgbhora A Rolatlvea *To Your Ce-Workora at Worfc *Te Your Organlntlona, Cluba A Church To Catch nm MM Spirit.. Ciril Pam, 648-2689 MOW! a. •, • • :; :•; ;•;:*: ir Bob OUen Really & Insurance Inc. e Watte 8L, Htod* 664-1831 S Br 2 BatlM Oarage, Carport and Workahop with extra atorefe. Large corner lot. Old lew latenat loaa with anudl cash ont. ENLARGEDSBr. hwRaeawith I flreplaee. Mwitk 20X21 Uv Iheplaw. formaJ dlalag eoai with fraaataadlBg le patla, autoaiatic a.. • Ready (or yoor ocSPACIOU8 Contnr Qob LMag, hem* OS the Gatf C ea r ee Br, 4 Bathe. S Flnplaeae. Peel aad Jaeaasi. Lwge walkIB sleeaSe. Cewed leer daek evarlookii^t peel aad gelf eearee. Shewn by LAKE VIEW LOT-all atUMss-ready to haffld. Good tsrasa. H Aoe let raedjr to bdld ONLY $12,000. 1 Aan Lot with Water aad Poww $26,000. LeveM. laady to baihL INDUSTRIAL ACREAGE Ovsr S7 AMee-Uqps er aasall. part ar aU-All UtOMee avaUaMt-Iadaatrial water. 11 Aeaefr LA. Hw]r.$JiO wlthfo^ UMHBARDOP PRICB-Oaiy 648J0Oto asa tUa t k. heaM la View. ket. Si ^Tfcaady October 20.19m HeBderaea Home Newt tmi Bealier City Newt Page 41 ^^^. EMPLOYMOIT HIRING' Government jobsyour area $15,000 $68,000 Call 838-6885 Ext B 2075 TEACHERS AIDE (DEEDED Part time mornings Only the loving and tenderhearted need apply Must tDeover 18 293-7773 BC HOUSEKEEPERS WANTED AT SANDS MOTEL 809 Nev Hviry BC NURSES AIDES Experience preferred, but on the job taining available Bouder City Care Center 293-5151 EOE MF HV BC HOUSEKEEPERS NEEDED Apply at NEVADA INN 1009 Nev. Hwy. BC. PART TIME STOCK MAN Must be 21 THRIFTY DRUG 2930540 BC YOU'RE INVITED to b#COfll5 5 ffl5ffflD5f of OUf OyAOflUC lOOfH Of dedlealed haaNh eere prefeeaienelB. A rewording cereer eweila you In long term eere al SeuMarCHy Care Center. We ere proud of our employees—eiemplary people who ere committed and enthuetestie. We're seeking Rfis end LPNa el our Boulder CHy l^kaarfa ^Aaw^ ^a^M^ Si^MkUIS^ ^uk^i^^ aaAA Ik^M^A ^^A ^hMd^^^^MlS fa*fy iwrm ifVv TBCfinyi wnvfv wv nww wn VM^wwfn wonting onvwofwtoni oiMl 8 wio8 fm58 of oofiofiio whicfi include •up to 12,000 sign up bonus •tt.SO per hour start ^w LPNs •$12.7S per hour start tor RNe • •90 dey Increeees •Up to tS.OOO worth o( benefHs for you to cfiooee from •Weekend end shfft differential Here at Boulder City Care Center our goals n to empkiy an enthuelesHc staff who reepects the in* dividual dignity of eech reeldent and who wIN ahare In our euecess. Please apply in person et BouMer City Care Center, tOI Adems Bhrd., Boulder City. 293-S1S1 aak tor Ann or Suaan. M positlone nOKIZON HEAI.THCAKE COKI'ORATION' HOfHZON HBALTN CARS YOU'RE INVITED Our BouMor Health Care faoHlty located at 601 Adems Blvd. la aeeking Indhriduala who wieh to change thek caroora and go Into the Health Care fMd. Wo offer In-faoMty oortlflcation daaaaa. Eem while you loam... No experience noeeeaary. We offer a good atarting wage, excellent working onvironnient, and a wide range of benefita which Include. •Medical and Dental Insurance •ChHd Care Aaelatance •Shift and Weekend differential •Retention bonus up to $250 •Attendance bonus •$5.00 per hour to start, with a 90 day increase •Paid time off •Pay in Hau of benefits Pleaae apply in peraon. Boulder City Care Center 601 Adama Blvd. BouMer CHy EOE MF HV. CLEAN, CLEAN. CLEANIH No |0b too big or too small Werefast&oflicient We do It all In Henderson lor 20 yrs. 565 8107 before fl pm Please ; BABYSITTII^ My home. All meals included Very reasonable Anytime 293 5848 BC MULTI-FAMILY SALE SAT 22,7 50AM TILL 230 PM 1113 MARIPOSA BC. Babysitting in hny Henderson Home, flexible hours & days. Meals provided, plus sleep ing area w/crib. and fenced yd 19 yrs in area Exc references. Call 564 0895 or leave message at 564-0770 Babysitting m my home. Pay Galloway area. Mon through Fri, days Please call 564-9015 Qualified aide companion for elderly 3 yrs exp Consider live in Leave message 438 7496 or 648-2281 EXPERIENCED CHILDCARE-CHRISTIAN ATMOSPHERE Preschoolers, before/after school, drop-ins (check availability), one full time infant Infants $1.40 per hr Older children $1 20 per hr Call Peggy 294-0744 BC ADULT CARE Private room available in Boulder City Small group care home Supervisory care m family atmosphere References provideo Telephone 293-4100 ,or leave recorded message at 293-2471 BC CLEANING-OFFICE OR" HOME Low hourly or monthly rates. Locrt references Call Leslie al 293-2338 BC If you're lookmo for TLCiwiii watch your chikJren arv/^me All aieals inlcuded. Relialsle references, reasonatile rates Call 293 5848 ^ Mousecleaning. we clean li all' Ovens, windows, floor walls. Guaranteed Mothc in-Law Clean Call Judy 564_7163 Will tMibysit, before & after schrxjl My home, in Green Valley, 6 houses before Viewcrest 1 st grade & up, lor Track I Ph 454 -1360 __ Experienced Mom will babysit, age 3 & up. Mon through Fri. Green Valley area Ph 458 7 101 Babysitting in my home, Mon through Fn Days only. 564-8255 Do you need a babysitter? For $2 hr I will care for your child in my home. 6 am to 6 pm Mon through Fri Ages 0 to 5 yrs. Have 23 years caring for normal and handicapped children Call 564-3560 Babysitting in my Hervjerson Home, reasonable rates. Loving care. Call 564-9335 anytime Babysitlino. my home. 24 hrs • day. Any age. Hot meafa. Ca>665-e47l Ironing, Green Valley Area 60C per Item Free pickup & delivery Minimum 10 pieces Call Glona, 454 7827 ; I oo nouseaeaning, i am reliable and dependable with references. Call Nancy 5 6401Q3 ivMNiliiU-I^AtURE PERSON TO STAY WITH ELDERLYLADY 2pmto11 pm Mon-Tues off Mm duties Call 293 2870. BC ATTKNTMMi HKNDBRBON— OMIB J VAULBV RBSIDCNTS I For Sale by Owner in Qinnrwood Upgraded OU v^ mdb^ home wMh al ap phances 2 BR 2 BA At Electric Landscaped and tow utility btKs 293-6428 BC For sale: Via HannoaalMl WoodMe Mobile Home, m bth 3 bdnn. Ph a6S-13at LA8T ONE! New 14 x Sfr MOBILE HOME for sale Very Nice 14x70 2 bdrm. 2 baths In Excellent Bark Only $14,950 665-3677 front kitcfven with bey wirv^. dow. 2 bedroom home. Only $15,995 Mo pey rrr $159 Champions, Hwy 50, Carson City2^;<| 702 883 4242 news la bach. L( ua olv* yw houra el lalaure Sme. Our cleenInQ teen to thofeuQn haneal a raSMa. Ovw M yra aip. t.oeal rafaiwteaa. O— awyWiiio BB< OTTO 10 X 55 2 BR Motiile Home $5900 2 rooms or sheds 14 X 16 and 14 X 14 Ca 3616367 LISTINGS WANTED Let 08" sell your motjile home fof*;* you Call One Way Mobile Home Sales 565 5050 FOR SALE lOXSOMoWfcinB.C Trailer Park 1 BW l^:BA New stove new carpiii^ ; $6800 293 6026 M < 293-4495 BC ^ : PICKN PACK Kelly Services has openings for people who want to work 40 hrs/wk plus overtime in Henderson No experience necessary Must be over 18 and have access to a phone and reliable transportation CALL 796 0203 EOE/M/F/H No Fee Vina Hennose 3 bdrm, dbl wide. Solar aoraena, 4 ton AC, Total salea price, $16,700. 14X80 Century 3 bdrm, 2 Mh w/slMIng, shingle roof, moved A set to your hM, $11,900. AduN sectkMi, Villa Hennoae, 14X70 Tamarack, 2 i largo bdnns a 2 hill Mhe. 3 borm, 2 Mn, 1960 on WNW ropo in Vlllo Hofmooo Family Soctlon. One Wey Mobile Home Seles 565-5050 Help wanted Experienced parts man Apply in person, between 8 & 4. full time Pickart's Auto Parts. 31 E Basic Rd FULL TIME DENTAL ASSISTANT Experience required. Salary Negotiable Call Debbie 293-0373 BC Assemblers. Mini Blinds. Expenence desired or will tram. Ph 739-8100 for apD't. Mobile Home Salee Person wanted. Opportunity for aggreaeive individual w/emell office. 86S-M77 Home La adry & Hotuecleaning Service —Lowest Ratea— can 564^927 Childcare: Immediate opening for 0-5 years Hot lunch A snacks Ph 565-7412 WILL BABYSIT IN MY HOME. Full time. Call 294-2464_ B C. I will care for your child while you work. Sunset & Bldr area Ph 564 1233 WILL BABYSli IN MT HOME. Call 294-0216ask for Vicky M37 StroariMff 2834606 293*4663 4M NEVADA UfWWAY 416 NEVADA HIGHWAY. BOULDCR aXY. NEVADA. (702) 293-3232 MIS M SMALL SANDWICH SHOP-ExceUent BHSIIMSII Opportunitycall for details. THREE BEDROOM Lewis hone, VA bath, 2 car garage, LARGE covered patio, room to create RV Parking, Tastef nlly wallpapered, EXCELLENT Location. $102,500. SUPER older bom*, 5 building has Urge garage, must ace tiH ; (nil hath, partial baacment, aepcrate i, plus one full bath and one car •2,500. CLOSE IN-CORNER LOT, 2 bedrooma, I bath, large Utchenupatairs, 1 bedroom, 1 bath, kitchen downstairs, older renovated home, a mnat sec at: $96,000. Call for detaOs. 4 BEDROOM SVi baths, a custom delight complete with pool and view of valley. Coaie and smell the roaea, yon'U Urvt it $163,000. TRANSFER forcaa aale-4 bdrm, 2 f nU baths, 2 car garage-needa TLC and some imagination to make perfect. Only $103,000. TWO bedroom. 1 bath, STARTER home. New large, detached. 2-1car garage, Coraar lot. $09,900. TWO BEDROOM, 2 Bath C0:< $67,500. naod aa rental, just LARGE CORNER LOT, 4 bdrm, 1V< bath, 2 car garage, FamOy room. Price reduced to $116,000. Lake Mta. EaUtea 3 Bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car carport PLUS large RV pky, coraer lot. $82,400. CUSTOM HOME ON 5th FAIRWAY, Boulder City Golf Ctwrae—4 bdnaa. 2 fail batha, 2 car garage w/RV Pkg, eackwed patio, 2,400 aq. ft., $168,000. SpBt Level Cnatom Home Laxoriens featnrea through-oat 3.200 •q. ft of living ploa large 2 car garage, RV parking aad mnck more. 4 bedrooms, family roaa, 2 Vi batha plus formal Uving and dining room. iUdaced to $248,000. BOULDER CITY BUILDING LOTS Approznnately 2 acres, kieated OB "B" hiU. Lju Drive, $110,000. DOUBLE BUILDING LOT oastaBdii view potaatiaL BOTH kite aa aw ONLY $6SJ00. LEVEL LOT $1004100. -Ready t^ boiki, LAaview Cnl-dt^ae. Rsdootd to OVERLOOKING Lake Mead, prime custem buUdiag kiC LOG ANDALE. Large 2 staiy hsBM wHh 2 plM tally faacad acreae. has its awa wdL rest "esUar." well plaaairl aad EXTREMELY. weU built, eaU tke affkx for a fall Mat ef aaeaitiaa. 172.900. WE QET RESULTS! PUT NO. 1T0 WOfK Km YOM CMNiaifti JANICE ClAWFORD. OvMt. MEL DUNAWAY.Aekar LINETTE DAVIS OIANNB VANAE8E EICE LOWELL RHONDA BBCK lOSBGALPBIN BABEYEOMANO .m^tm mm* 3S5SS. Highland. Suite 14 Lat Vegas, NV 69106 & -B.C. Mobile Nome SaltsItIO Nevada Highway Price Reduced 1980 TAMARCK-3 bedroom IV4 bath Was.l $26,500-Now $24,500—Anxious owner. 1877 QIBRALTOR-2 bedroom, 1 bath-view of desert -$26,500 ie7CHAMPION-14X44-furnished-1 bedroom, 1 hath $18 900 187S 8KYLINE-2 bedroom 1 bath-Some furni ture-$25.90O 293-1613 or 293-3267 RJBiAJLTY RESIDBNTIAL COMMERCIAL PROPBRTY MANAGEMENT RELOCATWOT OPENTDAYt 564-6969 DREAMCOMETRUEFORTHEMANOFTHEHOUSE.Largeworhabop I w/220 power A plenty of storace. Mother A kiddies not left out Complotiriy I remodeled Utchan. 4 bdrm, 176 bth, ceiling fans, mini bUnds, large feacsd I back yd, lota of RV parking. Great family area, good assumsble losa—aa qaaUfying. Call Tina Williams, 6644808. I44S16. ONLY 2 YEARS OLD!! Lovely Chlsm built home hss 4 bedroom, 2 baths sad has a grest locstkni, close to the bast achools. Priced right, it woa't last long. Ask for BiU Clonte, 6644068. V.-67327. CRITICAL CONNISSEURS Can appreciate the painstakfaig atteatlea | to detail of this highly upgraded 4 bedroom hooie. The kkto will k>ve this park Uke huge back yard. This home is outetaadiag an is just waiting for | your family. Ask for Steve Coleman, 664-6968. W:67381. Vi ACRE LOT IN THE LOT AREA OF SECTION 18. Nicl view of valley I with custom homes all around. Owner will carryl Please call Breads Bird for details. T:51921. HORSE AROUND WITH A GREAT VIEW of Valley and nice custom homes all around. Vi sere lot in Section 27. Just waitiag for you to build I your new home on. Owner will carryl Call Breads Bird, 664-6968. T-.36096. SUNRISE MOUNTAIN >, acre lot with bresth taking view of the VaUsy. Gorgeous custom homes sU around. Please call Brenda Krd for more detafla. 6640968. T:55786. ^ PAY MORE, WHAT FOR? Upgraded 3 bedroom. 1 Vt bath. 2 story CoMla. Close to downtown, park, and community pool Call Brenda Bird for detaHa,.] 6664868. V:60136. MILUON $ VIEW! From this 1,600 sqaars foot home on J(71 1V4 bath, liviag room with fireplace, and a 2 car garage. Please caU BrsMh 1 Bird for sn sppoiatmsat. 56441968. T:65718. PROFESSINALLY LANDSCAPED. This 4 bedroom 1'/. bath famfly hone I is Just darling inside and out. New carpet and fresh paint ready for you to move in. Call Brenda Bird for details. 6644969. T:66363. ABSOLUTELY BEAUTIFUL. 3 bdrm. 1.76 bth. 2 car garage. Maaicnred I lawn, fruit trees, A Must To See. Ask for BUI Ck>nte, 66441969. ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A DOLL HOUSE? WeU, hare it is. Three 1 bedroom, 2 fuU baths, 2 car garage, jast painted and newly carpeted, aew | garage door on the way. Nice famUy area. Ask for June KosUi, 6644866. C:66063. COME HOME AND PAMPER YOURSELF-In the Jacusii bath tab la I the master bedroom. Three bedrooms, 2 baths, detschcd 2 car garage, fireplace in the famUy room, custom window covering thru out. Ask far Jane Kodk, 5644968. C42430. ^ ASSUMABLE. NO QU ALIFYING-Four bedntom, 1.75 bath, remsdslsd I Utchan, dining ares and laundry room. Sprinkler system aad lawa bstag put la front yard. Lots of RV parUag aad stsrags arse. Ask far TIM | Williams, 6644868. 1:64316. RBCENTPRICEREDUCTION-Oasstory towakeMe,2l ^^ ckiee to down towa and park. Country Utchen aad paatry area. Ask ferK] Tiaa WUliams. 6644868. V*4807. ^^ NO CARES. NO WORRIES G ood s eca i l t y. ontalds malataBaaci ova of, iadadhig the roof. Priaas locatloa ia Haadersaa. Two car tmW\ aad the refrigsrator steys. Ask for Aaae Smith, 6644868. R: 6SMI. ] JUST BRING THE BUBBLE BATH! Lovely gardsa tab ia the 1 aaite, largs 3 badreom, 2 bath cnatom heoM kteatad oa Vi acre lot. faifyj leaoad. 2 cer detached garage has it's own bath. Aak far BIU CloBts. 664486i.i WA4S90. GREAT BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY-Wark far 8 maaths a year ^ yon ewB thte aaen^ maUag metal ia Watts, Nevada. There are 14 aakal wkleh are raatad oa a weskfy baais aU throat the aaamscr. CaU Stave I CelswaBi 664—0888. T40SS8. RANCH STYLE WITH A VIEW OF THE ENTIRE VALLBY-Tkraal bedraaai haaa. leeated ea H ecN aaMd tor hafaw 11 yea wtih ta have > a B aa t lialvleweliwveiliraadleaei ri fh ia n aJli ya. Aak hr Mas er Laey fer aeee detdb ead a leek. 8M4M8 GOVERNMENT AOQUISBD PBOPBRTIES-If ym'm i fi^^lewiag thaea ptuMftiaa, we have tke Ma. tke have aad tki Qril Ger2 Realty.Il448. Wo'ia ayea 7 iqre a aah le I L iia m < i < fiii I • • • m. jf. A 1

PAGE 41

£se 41 lltUw— • Howe Ntm and Balder City Newt ^or Mte: 18 glMS 1 geNorT Qreen Jugs ExceKent for Tkmwiy, (kMm 1968 MBCELLANECX^ OHyTMi A.S.I. CertHIM ion*ily Ouleii 9#fVioe Lub, OM*nNer TUfM Up9t VffllCM IST iwVa Hwy BC IT'S TIME TO REST! Have your own personal GO-FER — I will shop for birthdays, anniversaries, Christmas, any special occasion. I will gift wrap and deliver. K) a^ to S pjiL For mora Mo oi 293-409S Mk COMOmONIMG SERVICE Uc. •IMM Call H.T.C. EMISSION CONTROL Bould*r City Texaco 567 Nev. Hwy., B.C. 294-1971 I EWOOD ftdl cord. Iflili^f coiS' $l((jllivered — Green \^ey or Hendenon tit to Vegas or BC IRii/lND'S WOOD BIN iS: 565-9694 -H* THE aS^ALCAvem n^M^Hlf VMH^af v^^^W^Bf !§ I.Ti I CoH^otor — Buys Old mag't (pr '60) signed documents, autographs, firat iasuaa. Spsdal Intaraat In Hollywood, sclsntlsta & gov't. Also, old U.S. coins 895-0161_ Cil Afty 8 p.m. 5e6-1480| AR-n^lTIS-People treat youftdf. No meaicine Get -' -^ money back. Cost is HB64-1648 fa yrd oW I have one too.Wt's Stan a playgroup for aihi Valley View area, call 3g)gie, 565-1541 THROW AWAY OLD BICYCLES. I'll iu$5to SlOdepenon condition. Ph 89 anytime. CLOCK RBAHt •Antique & Other •Qrandfather •Wall •Modern miy. Ml. Tnrft i63RSALE Jbxico Ground EhUe Medium Hot lust right for Bchilades, etc. 564-1033 CLOCK SIRVICB YMBrOoekRMiilfH flMnki lvy Two Yarn 664-8802 Mc TEH lesi $8J le tifia OF? Wil l-mut sell, king sized 1150 Full size bed. • -1173 IS LESSONS Pnvate $16.00 per hour I per '/2 hour Group i $6.00 per hour. CercherUSTA COACH • IE YEAR 293-0267 THE JEWELRY BOX •AU Jtwdby Rptin •Waiek Ra^wb•AppMiaaU *Ca(on Jawalry Hwt 10AJi.'6 VM. Utm-ftl WAM.-4rM.at. UAHr.tlmy.WCOItttmTm 294-OB77 For eale: Dowadraft 864.7BK. HT LOSS THE EASY (Be yourelf again) back guarantee. i J i ifli wempcoolef, iCFM.oompMetieS 0ne2whaaltrler w/brea, f10O. Pti • 2 or 564-7630. I^ash Garde-WMh 11 get one free Aik at fter Roy's Sparkle irs & Laundromat. 67 Mead, Hdn Open 7|it>to 10 pm, Lrffig rm furniture, 8' couch, $9)&. Loveaeat, $100. High b^li chair, $50 Vinyl ra4l|K/reciiner, $50 2 (g $50 Miac imported iish wall items All in Jcondton.Ph 451-7707 JI7-7074 2^Unana lamps, other tidi.piclura6,BWportiUe ryJ^^SM/FM alereo radio, ,21/Blackjari(ttble itoiet, VMNW& Hag^PhM6' oak chandelier $17VCeN 451-4142 Brgg? COMMIIICIAL UPE 56X39X27 565-1588 SvjRi!:!5'£5 iiiaaiiaiaii •toring iulcc, 564-1648 25C ea I NEED A USED CAR OR TRUCK Price range $5010 $600 Fixer upper OK Call 4 58-0137 78 Buick Regal Exc cond Actual miles Full pov^er. $28 00, 293-7326 BC 1967 Corvair 500 Sport Coupe $1.000 or best offer. 564 9116 Can you buy Jeeps, Cars, 4 X 4's setzed in drug raids for under $1OO'' Call lor facts foday. 602-837-3401 Ext 561 62 NISSANPATROL4X4 Small block V-8, new hard top. lots of extra goodies Runs Great $1600 BOON DOCKERS DELIGHT 293-4727 BC BUY GOVERNMENT Seized and SijrpkJS Vehicles from $100 Fords, Chevys. Cor vettes, etc., in your area for info call (602) 842-1051 Ext 5263 1974Fr)rdF-350,1 tonPU XLT $3,200 Ph 564-8299. ; H & S LAWN CARE Cfmptota lawn aarvlc*, tra* li shrub cart, •moiMtic •prInMtrs. Lie #4400-0 HfroM fr SiMron CrNclMr 294-S200 2 SCOOTERS Honda Spree $450, Yamaha $350 Both run great! 293-6079 BC 1980 Datsun 310 4 door, radio, a/c $1,375293-1357 or 293-4660 BC 1980 Dodge 440 Kary-Van 1V4 T Dual rear wheels. Low miles Very roomy work horee $4,350299-7320 BC '85 Subaru GL wagon, 5 speed. 4 WH, air, cruise control, tilt wheel, AM/FM stereo. Exc Cond $5.490203-6311 BC 84 PONTIAC FIERO very sharp with low mileage New 14 inch wheels and tires. $5,500. 1-291-0054. Afters and weekends. FOR SALE 1984 Toyota Dolphin Mtr Home. Air, full tMth, stove, refng, furnace, clean. No. 10 Church, Henderson 565-7753 1978 Lancia Beta Sports Coupe. Air, new tires, low mileage, one owner. Excellent Condition. $1,500 293-6503 BC 1974,18 ft Travel Trrter. AC, Shower, $2000. Ph 565-8842 BOAT FOR SALE Large 17 ft front runner 1963. 90 HP Johneon VRC w/power lilt & tilt. 150 hrs. 10 HP Johnson iroino motor. Full Canvas. CB Radk). Depth finder. Compass. Like new. Must sell. Don Mace 1122 Gnllo Way, B.C. 293-7536 1970 EL CAMINO Call after 4:30 PM 293-2627 BC 1979 Pinto. 2 dr station wg. Good cond. Power, '63 Thunderbird, full power, automatic. 564-6801, 1950 GMC pickup, reslorable 16' Marlin Boat, 140 HP, in/out. Good condition $3500 or best oHer. Ph 56M724 1966 Dodge Caravan, air. new tires, all extras. Super condition. $12,500 RRM, or $500 & aaeume lease pymts of $309 per mo" Ph 565-9438 For8ale:74lmpala,$950.76 Datsun 610, $1200. Ph 564-3014 For sale: 1963 Thunderbird. Fully equipped. Automatic. PBJPS. Ph 564-6601 USB) AUTO PAars.. l-TmiLstaadetko New aU LBIO JOHN a iONS, PMyUDt.BC. 1985 CHEVY ASTftO VAN Tinted windows. Loaded SHver 43 Auto V-6 S9.S00. 293 5612 BC 1978 Thunderbird. new paint Full power $1600 or best oile r 435-2092 Previously approved Emmision Control machines Manufactured by Surt Good condition Vern's Texaco. Hdr/B.C 56 S0 220 1979 & 1977 Ford Fairmonts 6cyl&4cyl By the part or whole car Ph 5 65-8486 78 Honda Accord LX $b00 or best offer 564-4510 days .565-5362 eves Enunlaelon Control Smog Teel, 7 daya wfc Maehanica on duly Tdayawfc VERN'S TEXACO t E. Lake Mewl (at Watw) ses^nao 70 VOLVO 144 S-Exc cond. air. stereo. Call eves & weekends only 293-2794 BC Factory Direct Qalaxia Boata 18 (130 10) $8,995 19 (175 10)59,950 20 (170 10) $12,950 21 (305 10) $15 950 0 Dawn (OAC) ae4-0730 1M7 Plynioiith Raasni S7.000 or Bnrt B64-i540 S.OOO TIUVILTIUILIR 1M6,2t',l>erryTaunia. Aknoct n5w, BOMitlfiil matdeSout.ANextraa. t7,9W or tm offer. BOAT 20' Bayliner 1974 351 Ford engine. All new upholstery and floonng New cover Appraised at $7,755 Asking $6,990. 293-3616 after 5:30 P.M. and on weekends 1500 New Mexico, BC 1975 Camaro, $1750 Ph 564-3336 Olds Cutlass Supreme, 1983. Brown/cream Loaded. $3700. Ph 565-7609 or 456-1303 85 LTD 4 dr, exc condition 40,000 mi. $5400. Ph 564-7498 1976 Chevy Pinto, Air, stereo. Great truck! $2000 Ph 293-5332. For Sale: 1980 Ford Granada Good shape, $600 FIRM 565 7379 For sale, 1967 Ford Truck 3/4 ton, $800 565-7379 72 Chevy. 8 cylinder Runs. Good transportation car $600. Ph Joe EsposHo, 565-1193 For Sale 1972 Chevrolet Caprice 400 cu m engine. Ong. owner. Driven 13,000 miles since complete overhaul. $1000 Call 293-3330 BC BOAT FOR SALE '78 Starfire 20' Exc cond 294-7703 or 2931870 BC RADIATOR-SALES AND REPAIR 293-7278 810 John 4 Sons Foothill Dr K. HI6HKT PRICES PAID FOR OLD CARS WRECKED OR RUNNING We're the cheapest on parts Try uslll All Amerlcwi Auto Wreckers PERSONALS AIRLINES NOW HIR1NQ. ,'Flight Attendants, Travel Agents, Mechanics, Customer Service, Listings Salaries to $105K. Entry level positions Call 1-805687-6000, Ext A-569S Over 35 and Single? Find love/companionship on new romance hotline Listen to recorded messages from exciting singles. 1-900-909-8000 $2 phone charge, 45. additional minutes. Woman does housecleaning—weekly or bi-monthly Honest, dependable, r eferences. Call^ 5154-4225 A Christian lady would like to do your house Weekly or biweekly. Neat & thorough. Hdn, Boulder City. Green Valle y 564-698 7 JOB OPPORTUNmES ARE YOU INTERESTED IN A REWARDING AND INTERESTING CAREER IN REAL ESTATE"? If you're licensed or Interested in going to real estate school please call and ask for Paul In office training session starting soon Call 564-6969 BUSINESS IS BOOMINGUrgently need distributors for new water filter system Ground floor opportunity Pan time or full time Only $200 in investment required to start to your own business and be your own boss Ph 458-4319 COOLER BUSINESS FOR SALE $2,500 or best offer Parts & Phone number In business 6 yrs Frank 565-7107 Teacher aide, day care center 5 days Ph 564-5777 DIETARY TRAY AIDE, Boulder City Care Center, 293-5151 EOEMFHVBC. PART TIME CASHIER NEEDED at Hoover (5am. Phone 564-3844 or 3798504 BC SECURITY/CARETAKER/HANDYMAN. 75 yrs full of energy & looking for work in exchange for apt Have pk:k up truck 734-0941 'BOB'S ALL FAWILY RES TAURANT now accepting applications for WAIT^ RESSES Apply in person 761 Nev Hwy, BC HIRING COOKS, BAKERS, DISHWASHERS, AND FRONT HELP For Mane Callendar's-Boulder City Apply at Best Western Lighthouse Inn. 110 Ville Dr Mori-Sat 11 AM-5PM BC Sandwich Shop needs part time kitchen help & delivery. $3 50 hr to start Hrs 10-2:30. MonthruFn. Call for app't between 2 & 5 pm 5640777 MAIDS Trainees accepted Apply mornings. Best Western Lighthouse Inn. 110 Ville Dr Boulder City Nv. Management trainee. Busy vocational trade school needs sharp self starter to recruit student prospects through public survey. Salary plus commission Bonus, overrides Excellent earning potential Call Mr. Rizzi, 565-3778. PARTS ROOM PERSON: Seeking experienced maintenance stores clerk Must have working knowledge of computerized parts inventory. Preventabve maintenance and lubrication program and purchasing/accounts payable system. Apply in penn or mail resume to Gold Bond ice Cream, 1001 OlsenSt., Henderson. AIRLINES NOW HIRING Flight Attendents, Travel Agents, Mechanics, Customer Service Lightings Saianesto$105K Entry level position. Call (1) 806-8876000 Ext A-56&S. EXPERIENCED FOOD SERVERS seeded. Meet ha^ a trajr exMAID SERVICE people latsnstedia advaaoMMBtWrkwltiia crew. Oriaebaeters _BfaM8wTlM.7M-iaK. Earn money at home-making crafts. Assembly work. Write to S Olson, P 0 Box 118, Fort Lefton, CO 80621. Enclose SAE SALES ENTREPRENEUR $50K $150K Last month over 600 peofjle in our company got checks for over $10K, I need three key people who would like to have a real opportunity to earn some senous money Call Bruce Lutt, 734-1588 EMPLOYMENT MATURE LOVING PERSON wanted to work m Nursery, Would prefer retired person or mother who loves working with children. Only 6-8 hrs' per week Please call 2931912 for ap p't BC RAILROAD PASS now acceptmo applications for Cage Cashiers change persons Please apply at casino cage Secretary & assistant. Kan time, flexitJie hours. Good for student For semi-handicapped business person. Must dnve Have good appearance, and like working w/people. Salary $5 to $6 per hr. Ph 734-2551 Railroad Pass now acoepting applications for cage cashiers & changepersone. Pleaae apply at Casino Cape. GOLD STRIKE INN AND CASINO in BouUer Qly is WH Wofig appkcattons lor BUS PERSOfeT WAITRESSES. Part lime and full tinne. Apply inparaon. Cortact Ra^aurart Managr. BC Nlek's iJ!t^^^ CENTRAL SUPPLY CLERK w/nursing or medical terminology background. 4 hrs per day. BOULDER CITY CARE CENTER 293-5151 EOE MF HV B C. Use your homemaking care skills to earn money. Flexible hours, good pay. Wo will match your personal schedule. All shifts available. Etablished nationally respected company. Call or write Medi-visit Extensive Care, 3601 W Sahara, Ste 201, Las Vegas, Nev 89102. Ph 871-1031 EOE. ARCHITECT Salary: $37,629.36 45,738.00/year* Requirements: Must be Kcensed as an architect in state of origin, and must obtain Nevada license within one (1) year of appointment. Must possess, or have the ability to obtain, a Class 3 Nevada dnver's license Must have, and maintain, a satisfactory driving record Where to Apply: City application form and resume should be submitted to the Personnel Department, City of Henderson, 243 Water Street, Henderson. Nevada, 89015, by 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday, October 26. 1988 Hours Of Operation: Monday through Thursday, 7:30 am 5:30 pm, Subject to PERS reduction AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER ^ WAITER OR WAITRESS Ex penenoed only. Mu be over 21. Apply in peraon only. Quys Via Capri 1634 Nev. Hwy. DISHWASHER/DELIVERY PERSON Must have dependable automobile. Apply in peraon only Quy's Via Capri 1634 f^ev. Hwy. BC FOR RENT 1988 ANMTO Motorhome 27' (Tall 293-4161 BC 82 ATC 200 Uke new. 565-7034. after 5 pm EMMISSION CONTROL CHECK STATION 29{}-7278, Big John and Sona. Foothill m Dr., B.C. 81 Subaru waoon, 5 sp, AC. AM/FM. Qaugas&tach, low mi Aaking $2,460. Ph 298^663.676 Fainwiy,BC 1964 \Maicrift Boat, 180 American w/140 Merc caHoer. Took swim dedi. / TnjMatrgtar.AaMnQiejiSo/ 'SV-y^^ or beet. Ph 9Ogf2. TRAVEL TRAILER. 1973,18 ft Mh whoa. $2000. Ph 6644036 Ph QuaonasMii' • H372BC SELL Dlrwnfoom •hairs-ICSMHO moaald.\MMdrviry tBoo.m'im thiir bow) maaoi karaiaprivato k aomi private Only 126 TO) You yra aap 4^1 MB. 1IS6, 2S' self conlnad Komfort trailer. Utad 4 wta. New awnino a AC, Aaiting egu;^ pu m mo m py n tt i 26 X 30. ihlla. KMm anK.lauoiprayir.Cil safroeie. 78 0.0 *to9a^.giektmk rooioto USSS Muolsooto LHto new QARRETT^IREATER NIVADA PROPERTIES. INC. 554 Nevada Hlfiiway |m 293-3333 ^ LAKB4I0UNTAIN-VALLEY VKW HOKIB PledUe flasr phM fer iMBiljr atarb IMM. fMv BR. 1^ be. EXTBNBIVB VnW or LalM Msad aad • BaaMsr CHy ftaai hrm. aad lew tedareed ONLY SITMR. CORNER LOT vaDiy.Alslliresi^ EltoalL CALL ISBWABDINQ IN BmCT ATTBi i LIST WITH us fOR ACnOM Cook wanted, Henderson Day Cera. 56584. HOOVER DAM SNACKETERIA Counter Sales, Kitchen Help, Maintenance Apply in per son at Hoover Dam EOE BC^ Room Attendants Laundry Attendants Housemen FuH time positions, start $4 50 per hr Apply in person, Best Weatem McCarran Inn. 4970 Paradise Rd Las Vegas. RN-LPN full time or part time for long term care Extra orientation for those who have been out of nursing recently Your professional expertise and judgement can be fully developed and utilized in our quaNty-concerned tacility Competitive pay and benefits. Boulder City Care Center Boulder Ci^, NV 293-5151 An Equal (5pportunity Emptoyer Baaiiiliiiii|iiii.Bwa aBelltoiaipstkB. iMs yoB IsnT^ tieao. Pavt naMi 6 to ths Lae Vans I Call 784-SlSO Moa tkvihN.lpao4 Are your children currently in school'' l^eed immaculate housecleaner to virork between the hours of 9 to 1, approximately Prefer Christian women to work in Henderson area. Call 454-9116 NURSES RN's Charge Nune ArtTCSSi St-RosedcUma HOSPITAL is now recruiting R.N.8 & L.P.N.S who believe in treating patients with dignity and respect NEW COMPETETIVE SALARY SCALE Growing, progrtMlve h(MpiUl 30 paid day* off (he nrttycar FIxlbltKhoduUng4-, B-, and 12-hour shifts PuU-Hme, part-time and per diem poaitlons Friendly staff, rMponaive managaoient Sand nawnw, or call: SL Ron de Uaia Hospllal Penoontl DcparliiMat 102E.UkeMaadDr. HndersoD,NV 8MIS (702) S<4-457 •iriiMiii.Ma.'a LPN' MedicationVHH ftfN nr LMri OTSI Iw^^vin ^tes4sis& MnMMtav *M. SMW WMU YOU LiAM. sxcBUfNT nuNSi mwin Dietary Help-Dishwasher/ kitchen help $6 hr to start Good benefit & working conditions Casada Del Mar, 2501 Wigwam Pkwy. Hdn Ph 361-61 11. Contact Ellen Saluzo. Food Servers, immediate opening at Lake Mead Restaurant $3 50 hr Apply in person at Lake Mead Marina. Also Cashier. $4 50 hr See B Musselman, 293-2900 EOE Concessionaire of NPS Help Wanted HOOVER DAM SNACKETERIA Counter Salaa • Kitchen Help •Maintenance Apply In peraon An Equal Opportun ity Bmployer AVON l CmlUng YOUl WHY? *To Offer YOU the Opportunity to Earn • To Earn Thooo Extra Odlara Noedod for a Chrlotmaa Spondlitg Sproe i^To Do Your Own Poraonal Chrtotmaa Shopping With AVON at Coot To Set PloxiMe Working Houro That PH YOUR SohedtHo M Avoirs firdUFif GMftiMi ii/i *Te Your Prlenda, Nelgbhora A Rolatlvea *To Your Ce-Workora at Worfc *Te Your Organlntlona, Cluba A Church To Catch nm MM Spirit.. Ciril Pam, 648-2689 MOW! a. •, • • :; :•; ;•;:*: ir Bob OUen Really & Insurance Inc. e Watte 8L, Htod* 664-1831 S Br 2 BatlM Oarage, Carport and Workahop with extra atorefe. Large corner lot. Old lew latenat loaa with anudl cash ont. ENLARGEDSBr. hwRaeawith I flreplaee. Mwitk 20X21 Uv Iheplaw. formaJ dlalag eoai with fraaataadlBg le patla, autoaiatic a.. • Ready (or yoor ocSPACIOU8 Contnr Qob LMag, hem* OS the Gatf C ea r ee Br, 4 Bathe. S Flnplaeae. Peel aad Jaeaasi. Lwge walkIB sleeaSe. Cewed leer daek evarlookii^t peel aad gelf eearee. Shewn by LAKE VIEW LOT-all atUMss-ready to haffld. Good tsrasa. H Aoe let raedjr to bdld ONLY $12,000. 1 Aan Lot with Water aad Poww $26,000. LeveM. laady to baihL INDUSTRIAL ACREAGE Ovsr S7 AMee-Uqps er aasall. part ar aU-All UtOMee avaUaMt-Iadaatrial water. 11 Aeaefr LA. Hw]r.$JiO wlthfo^ UMHBARDOP PRICB-Oaiy 648J0Oto asa tUa t k. heaM la View. ket. Si ^Tfcaady October 20.19m HeBderaea Home Newt tmi Bealier City Newt Page 41 ^^^. EMPLOYMOIT HIRING' Government jobsyour area $15,000 $68,000 Call 838-6885 Ext B 2075 TEACHERS AIDE (DEEDED Part time mornings Only the loving and tenderhearted need apply Must tDeover 18 293-7773 BC HOUSEKEEPERS WANTED AT SANDS MOTEL 809 Nev Hviry BC NURSES AIDES Experience preferred, but on the job taining available Bouder City Care Center 293-5151 EOE MF HV BC HOUSEKEEPERS NEEDED Apply at NEVADA INN 1009 Nev. Hwy. BC. PART TIME STOCK MAN Must be 21 THRIFTY DRUG 2930540 BC YOU'RE INVITED to b#COfll5 5 ffl5ffflD5f of OUf OyAOflUC lOOfH Of dedlealed haaNh eere prefeeaienelB. A rewording cereer eweila you In long term eere al SeuMarCHy Care Center. We ere proud of our employees—eiemplary people who ere committed and enthuetestie. We're seeking Rfis end LPNa el our Boulder CHy l^kaarfa ^Aaw^ ^a^M^ Si^MkUIS^ ^uk^i^^ aaAA Ik^M^A ^^A ^hMd^^^^MlS fa*fy iwrm ifVv TBCfinyi wnvfv wv nww wn VM^wwfn wonting onvwofwtoni oiMl 8 wio8 fm58 of oofiofiio whicfi include •up to 12,000 sign up bonus •tt.SO per hour start ^w LPNs •$12.7S per hour start tor RNe • •90 dey Increeees •Up to tS.OOO worth o( benefHs for you to cfiooee from •Weekend end shfft differential Here at Boulder City Care Center our goals n to empkiy an enthuelesHc staff who reepects the in* dividual dignity of eech reeldent and who wIN ahare In our euecess. Please apply in person et BouMer City Care Center, tOI Adems Bhrd., Boulder City. 293-S1S1 aak tor Ann or Suaan. M positlone nOKIZON HEAI.THCAKE COKI'ORATION' HOfHZON HBALTN CARS YOU'RE INVITED Our BouMor Health Care faoHlty located at 601 Adems Blvd. la aeeking Indhriduala who wieh to change thek caroora and go Into the Health Care fMd. Wo offer In-faoMty oortlflcation daaaaa. Eem while you loam... No experience noeeeaary. We offer a good atarting wage, excellent working onvironnient, and a wide range of benefita which Include. •Medical and Dental Insurance •ChHd Care Aaelatance •Shift and Weekend differential •Retention bonus up to $250 •Attendance bonus •$5.00 per hour to start, with a 90 day increase •Paid time off •Pay in Hau of benefits Pleaae apply in peraon. Boulder City Care Center 601 Adama Blvd. BouMer CHy EOE MF HV. CLEAN, CLEAN. CLEANIH No |0b too big or too small Werefast&oflicient We do It all In Henderson lor 20 yrs. 565 8107 before fl pm Please ; BABYSITTII^ My home. All meals included Very reasonable Anytime 293 5848 BC MULTI-FAMILY SALE SAT 22,7 50AM TILL 230 PM 1113 MARIPOSA BC. Babysitting in hny Henderson Home, flexible hours & days. Meals provided, plus sleep ing area w/crib. and fenced yd 19 yrs in area Exc references. Call 564 0895 or leave message at 564-0770 Babysitting m my home. Pay Galloway area. Mon through Fri, days Please call 564-9015 Qualified aide companion for elderly 3 yrs exp Consider live in Leave message 438 7496 or 648-2281 EXPERIENCED CHILDCARE-CHRISTIAN ATMOSPHERE Preschoolers, before/after school, drop-ins (check availability), one full time infant Infants $1.40 per hr Older children $1 20 per hr Call Peggy 294-0744 BC ADULT CARE Private room available in Boulder City Small group care home Supervisory care m family atmosphere References provideo Telephone 293-4100 ,or leave recorded message at 293-2471 BC CLEANING-OFFICE OR" HOME Low hourly or monthly rates. Locrt references Call Leslie al 293-2338 BC If you're lookmo for TLCiwiii watch your chikJren arv/^me All aieals inlcuded. Relialsle references, reasonatile rates Call 293 5848 ^ Mousecleaning. we clean li all' Ovens, windows, floor walls. Guaranteed Mothc in-Law Clean Call Judy 564_7163 Will tMibysit, before & after schrxjl My home, in Green Valley, 6 houses before Viewcrest 1 st grade & up, lor Track I Ph 454 -1360 __ Experienced Mom will babysit, age 3 & up. Mon through Fri. Green Valley area Ph 458 7 101 Babysitting in my home, Mon through Fn Days only. 564-8255 Do you need a babysitter? For $2 hr I will care for your child in my home. 6 am to 6 pm Mon through Fri Ages 0 to 5 yrs. Have 23 years caring for normal and handicapped children Call 564-3560 Babysitting in my Hervjerson Home, reasonable rates. Loving care. Call 564-9335 anytime Babysitlino. my home. 24 hrs • day. Any age. Hot meafa. Ca>665-e47l Ironing, Green Valley Area 60C per Item Free pickup & delivery Minimum 10 pieces Call Glona, 454 7827 ; I oo nouseaeaning, i am reliable and dependable with references. Call Nancy 5 6401Q3 ivMNiliiU-I^AtURE PERSON TO STAY WITH ELDERLYLADY 2pmto11 pm Mon-Tues off Mm duties Call 293 2870. BC ATTKNTMMi HKNDBRBON— OMIB J VAULBV RBSIDCNTS I For Sale by Owner in Qinnrwood Upgraded OU v^ mdb^ home wMh al ap phances 2 BR 2 BA At Electric Landscaped and tow utility btKs 293-6428 BC For sale: Via HannoaalMl WoodMe Mobile Home, m bth 3 bdnn. Ph a6S-13at LA8T ONE! New 14 x Sfr MOBILE HOME for sale Very Nice 14x70 2 bdrm. 2 baths In Excellent Bark Only $14,950 665-3677 front kitcfven with bey wirv^. dow. 2 bedroom home. Only $15,995 Mo pey rrr $159 Champions, Hwy 50, Carson City2^;<| 702 883 4242 news la bach. L( ua olv* yw houra el lalaure Sme. Our cleenInQ teen to thofeuQn haneal a raSMa. Ovw M yra aip. t.oeal rafaiwteaa. O— awyWiiio BB< OTTO 10 X 55 2 BR Motiile Home $5900 2 rooms or sheds 14 X 16 and 14 X 14 Ca 3616367 LISTINGS WANTED Let 08" sell your motjile home fof*;* you Call One Way Mobile Home Sales 565 5050 FOR SALE lOXSOMoWfcinB.C Trailer Park 1 BW l^:BA New stove new carpiii^ ; $6800 293 6026 M < 293-4495 BC ^ : PICKN PACK Kelly Services has openings for people who want to work 40 hrs/wk plus overtime in Henderson No experience necessary Must be over 18 and have access to a phone and reliable transportation CALL 796 0203 EOE/M/F/H No Fee Vina Hennose 3 bdrm, dbl wide. Solar aoraena, 4 ton AC, Total salea price, $16,700. 14X80 Century 3 bdrm, 2 Mh w/slMIng, shingle roof, moved A set to your hM, $11,900. AduN sectkMi, Villa Hennoae, 14X70 Tamarack, 2 i largo bdnns a 2 hill Mhe. 3 borm, 2 Mn, 1960 on WNW ropo in Vlllo Hofmooo Family Soctlon. One Wey Mobile Home Seles 565-5050 Help wanted Experienced parts man Apply in person, between 8 & 4. full time Pickart's Auto Parts. 31 E Basic Rd FULL TIME DENTAL ASSISTANT Experience required. Salary Negotiable Call Debbie 293-0373 BC Assemblers. Mini Blinds. Expenence desired or will tram. Ph 739-8100 for apD't. Mobile Home Salee Person wanted. Opportunity for aggreaeive individual w/emell office. 86S-M77 Home La adry & Hotuecleaning Service —Lowest Ratea— can 564^927 Childcare: Immediate opening for 0-5 years Hot lunch A snacks Ph 565-7412 WILL BABYSIT IN MY HOME. Full time. Call 294-2464_ B C. I will care for your child while you work. Sunset & Bldr area Ph 564 1233 WILL BABYSli IN MT HOME. Call 294-0216ask for Vicky M37 StroariMff 2834606 293*4663 4M NEVADA UfWWAY 416 NEVADA HIGHWAY. BOULDCR aXY. NEVADA. (702) 293-3232 MIS M SMALL SANDWICH SHOP-ExceUent BHSIIMSII Opportunitycall for details. THREE BEDROOM Lewis hone, VA bath, 2 car garage, LARGE covered patio, room to create RV Parking, Tastef nlly wallpapered, EXCELLENT Location. $102,500. SUPER older bom*, 5 building has Urge garage, must ace tiH ; (nil hath, partial baacment, aepcrate i, plus one full bath and one car •2,500. CLOSE IN-CORNER LOT, 2 bedrooma, I bath, large Utchenupatairs, 1 bedroom, 1 bath, kitchen downstairs, older renovated home, a mnat sec at: $96,000. Call for detaOs. 4 BEDROOM SVi baths, a custom delight complete with pool and view of valley. Coaie and smell the roaea, yon'U Urvt it $163,000. TRANSFER forcaa aale-4 bdrm, 2 f nU baths, 2 car garage-needa TLC and some imagination to make perfect. Only $103,000. TWO bedroom. 1 bath, STARTER home. New large, detached. 2-1car garage, Coraar lot. $09,900. TWO BEDROOM, 2 Bath C0:< $67,500. naod aa rental, just LARGE CORNER LOT, 4 bdrm, 1V< bath, 2 car garage, FamOy room. Price reduced to $116,000. Lake Mta. EaUtea 3 Bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car carport PLUS large RV pky, coraer lot. $82,400. CUSTOM HOME ON 5th FAIRWAY, Boulder City Golf Ctwrae—4 bdnaa. 2 fail batha, 2 car garage w/RV Pkg, eackwed patio, 2,400 aq. ft., $168,000. SpBt Level Cnatom Home Laxoriens featnrea through-oat 3.200 •q. ft of living ploa large 2 car garage, RV parking aad mnck more. 4 bedrooms, family roaa, 2 Vi batha plus formal Uving and dining room. iUdaced to $248,000. BOULDER CITY BUILDING LOTS Approznnately 2 acres, kieated OB "B" hiU. Lju Drive, $110,000. DOUBLE BUILDING LOT oastaBdii view potaatiaL BOTH kite aa aw ONLY $6SJ00. LEVEL LOT $1004100. -Ready t^ boiki, LAaview Cnl-dt^ae. Rsdootd to OVERLOOKING Lake Mead, prime custem buUdiag kiC LOG ANDALE. Large 2 staiy hsBM wHh 2 plM tally faacad acreae. has its awa wdL rest "esUar." well plaaairl aad EXTREMELY. weU built, eaU tke affkx for a fall Mat ef aaeaitiaa. 172.900. WE QET RESULTS! PUT NO. 1T0 WOfK Km YOM CMNiaifti JANICE ClAWFORD. OvMt. MEL DUNAWAY.Aekar LINETTE DAVIS OIANNB VANAE8E EICE LOWELL RHONDA BBCK lOSBGALPBIN BABEYEOMANO .m^tm mm* 3S5SS. Highland. Suite 14 Lat Vegas, NV 69106 & -B.C. Mobile Nome SaltsItIO Nevada Highway Price Reduced 1980 TAMARCK-3 bedroom IV4 bath Was.l $26,500-Now $24,500—Anxious owner. 1877 QIBRALTOR-2 bedroom, 1 bath-view of desert -$26,500 ie7CHAMPION-14X44-furnished-1 bedroom, 1 hath $18 900 187S 8KYLINE-2 bedroom 1 bath-Some furni ture-$25.90O 293-1613 or 293-3267 RJBiAJLTY RESIDBNTIAL COMMERCIAL PROPBRTY MANAGEMENT RELOCATWOT OPENTDAYt 564-6969 DREAMCOMETRUEFORTHEMANOFTHEHOUSE.Largeworhabop I w/220 power A plenty of storace. Mother A kiddies not left out Complotiriy I remodeled Utchan. 4 bdrm, 176 bth, ceiling fans, mini bUnds, large feacsd I back yd, lota of RV parking. Great family area, good assumsble losa—aa qaaUfying. Call Tina Williams, 6644808. I44S16. ONLY 2 YEARS OLD!! Lovely Chlsm built home hss 4 bedroom, 2 baths sad has a grest locstkni, close to the bast achools. Priced right, it woa't last long. Ask for BiU Clonte, 6644068. V.-67327. CRITICAL CONNISSEURS Can appreciate the painstakfaig atteatlea | to detail of this highly upgraded 4 bedroom hooie. The kkto will k>ve this park Uke huge back yard. This home is outetaadiag an is just waiting for | your family. Ask for Steve Coleman, 664-6968. W:67381. Vi ACRE LOT IN THE LOT AREA OF SECTION 18. Nicl view of valley I with custom homes all around. Owner will carryl Please call Breads Bird for details. T:51921. HORSE AROUND WITH A GREAT VIEW of Valley and nice custom homes all around. Vi sere lot in Section 27. Just waitiag for you to build I your new home on. Owner will carryl Call Breads Bird, 664-6968. T-.36096. SUNRISE MOUNTAIN >, acre lot with bresth taking view of the VaUsy. Gorgeous custom homes sU around. Please call Brenda Krd for more detafla. 6640968. T:55786. ^ PAY MORE, WHAT FOR? Upgraded 3 bedroom. 1 Vt bath. 2 story CoMla. Close to downtown, park, and community pool Call Brenda Bird for detaHa,.] 6664868. V:60136. MILUON $ VIEW! From this 1,600 sqaars foot home on J(71 1V4 bath, liviag room with fireplace, and a 2 car garage. Please caU BrsMh 1 Bird for sn sppoiatmsat. 56441968. T:65718. PROFESSINALLY LANDSCAPED. This 4 bedroom 1'/. bath famfly hone I is Just darling inside and out. New carpet and fresh paint ready for you to move in. Call Brenda Bird for details. 6644969. T:66363. ABSOLUTELY BEAUTIFUL. 3 bdrm. 1.76 bth. 2 car garage. Maaicnred I lawn, fruit trees, A Must To See. Ask for BUI Ck>nte, 66441969. ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A DOLL HOUSE? WeU, hare it is. Three 1 bedroom, 2 fuU baths, 2 car garage, jast painted and newly carpeted, aew | garage door on the way. Nice famUy area. Ask for June KosUi, 6644866. C:66063. COME HOME AND PAMPER YOURSELF-In the Jacusii bath tab la I the master bedroom. Three bedrooms, 2 baths, detschcd 2 car garage, fireplace in the famUy room, custom window covering thru out. Ask far Jane Kodk, 5644968. C42430. ^ ASSUMABLE. NO QU ALIFYING-Four bedntom, 1.75 bath, remsdslsd I Utchan, dining ares and laundry room. Sprinkler system aad lawa bstag put la front yard. Lots of RV parUag aad stsrags arse. Ask far TIM | Williams, 6644868. 1:64316. RBCENTPRICEREDUCTION-Oasstory towakeMe,2l ^^ ckiee to down towa and park. Country Utchen aad paatry area. Ask ferK] Tiaa WUliams. 6644868. V*4807. ^^ NO CARES. NO WORRIES G ood s eca i l t y. ontalds malataBaaci ova of, iadadhig the roof. Priaas locatloa ia Haadersaa. Two car tmW\ aad the refrigsrator steys. Ask for Aaae Smith, 6644868. R: 6SMI. ] JUST BRING THE BUBBLE BATH! Lovely gardsa tab ia the 1 aaite, largs 3 badreom, 2 bath cnatom heoM kteatad oa Vi acre lot. faifyj leaoad. 2 cer detached garage has it's own bath. Aak far BIU CloBts. 664486i.i WA4S90. GREAT BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY-Wark far 8 maaths a year ^ yon ewB thte aaen^ maUag metal ia Watts, Nevada. There are 14 aakal wkleh are raatad oa a weskfy baais aU throat the aaamscr. CaU Stave I CelswaBi 664—0888. T40SS8. RANCH STYLE WITH A VIEW OF THE ENTIRE VALLBY-Tkraal bedraaai haaa. leeated ea H ecN aaMd tor hafaw 11 yea wtih ta have > a B aa t lialvleweliwveiliraadleaei ri fh ia n aJli ya. Aak hr Mas er Laey fer aeee detdb ead a leek. 8M4M8 GOVERNMENT AOQUISBD PBOPBRTIES-If ym'm i fi^^lewiag thaea ptuMftiaa, we have tke Ma. tke have aad tki Qril Ger2 Realty.Il448. Wo'ia ayea 7 iqre a aah le I L iia m < i < fiii I • • • m. jf. A 1

PAGE 42

iii PiitiiS HenderMB Home News and Boulder City News Thunday, October 20, 1988 ( TbwMbgr, Oetobv 20,1988 LA comet to you one \momtnt at a Hme. a the \grak of Md dropping t iy ofW* in an hotirgfass. \4n^. McNaughl Synd. X • • • ^k* tk* bst U9e of u-h^t •• it your power, and taki tk* rest as it happens. 2 Bfl HOUSE IN HENDERSON $400 tTK) Can Bart or Nite 293-6014 Realtor Room (or rent Kitchen • pnviteges, prfvate bath & entrance Prefer Seny Citizen Ph 565-9668 2 bdrm Townhouse, very •clean. No pets. Fireplace $475 Call 565 7812 ADULT APARTMENTS At Low As $250 Mo. Fumishod 564-6952 DESERT GARDEN APARTMENTS 205 Randy Way #2 2 bdrms, 1 bth unfurn. $;U0 mo $175 depooit Discount for Military and Senior Citiwna Children Welcome No peta Washer Hookups 2 Swimming Pools 565-9051 s^jicnfc Forwent Nice hor>e m qmet ne>borhood 2 BR 1 Be w/ffeilyroom Enclosed yard w/|ftvacv Shed and covered pai|ing $650 nno -• • utilities Cs*: Beth 293-5532 or 2^5969 BC fd^ RENT Small studio rson $50 wk 294BC OFFICE/RETAIL SPACE For lease Approx 846 sq ft ea First Western Plaza. tOOO Nevada Hiwy. BC $480-$550 mo 293-3596 or 293-2367 WANT TO SELL YOUR HOfvIE? Call for a free market analysis to know what your home rs worth on todays market Call Evelyn Plumb 564-5142 or 565-3723 or Stop by CENTURY 21 JR REALTY, 204 W Pacific. Henderson BBiiMaMMMMBHaMM rCHENETTE 2^-7673 BC $99 wk NEW INDUSTRIAL BUIUNNC 2,000 q. ft. bay & yard Leaac 294-0686 FotSale 1975 Cfievy Van N^ds work Asking $500 or b# offer 293 5848 BC c5fE 2 BR 1 BA HOI^E A^^itable Nov 15 Rent $95. $350 dep Call 2^29 BC Hfcjee for rent 215 Valley F^ge, 3 bdrm. IV? bth. tirfplace single car garage, fejwed back yd. spnnker system patio $475 mo SlOO cleaning deposit, $200 S^urity, Immediate occJpancy 737-5828. FRIENDLY, professional wt)fnan, out-doorsy semiotlpnic looking for same to pe rent m my house stians welcome 2 tC:1705 BC it BEDRM APT FOR RPItlT. $475 mo 294-0648 For'rent; Small 1 bdrm cottage. $225 pel mo plus defsosit. Call ^-0816, leave message OFFICES FOR RENT From 250 sq. ft. Very Reasonable. Boulder Theatre BIdg. 293-1283 BC. Apartments, 2 bedroom, for rent. Adutta Can 564-0853 CASTIUAN APT8. Very Nice 2 Bedrooms $430-$45b Monthly 294-1220 821 Ave. A Boulder City ATUUmC CITY APARTKENTS CiMn, Quality Apartments In Handanon • Cantral AC • Appllaneaa • Drapaa • Carpata • WatarPakt • Waahar/Dryar Avallabia $385 per mo. 1 txlrm, brand new. Well Inaulated ft soundproof. Low util costs. Near Skyl'"* Casino. $405 per mo. SpackHia 2 bdrm apts newly remodeled. In quiet, convenient locations. Avail now. 565-7028 WANT TO KNOW what your property is worth' Free market analysis CaH ROGER 293-2939. Realtor CoMwell Banker/Anchor Reidty New custom home on V: acre, near Black Min Golf Course Only $118,000 Yoq must see this 1800 plus sq ft custom w/3 bcirm, 2/5 Bth Huge family rm, w/fireplace and separate sunken living rm w/formal dining rm Conn try kitchen, w/bay window breakfast rm. Interior finish ed w/rounded corners and textured ceilings Excep tional quality throjghout Call Americana Group Realtors ask for Bill Berning, 796-7777 or 641-5555 $3000 DOWN Horse property, '/? acre custom txxne, 4 bdrm, 3 bihs GorgeousH Approx $900 mo. Your Real Estate Company, Realtors 454-8671 $2500 down for patio home 542 Chelsea Dr Near Green Valley, 2 bdrm, IV4 bth. tear garage corner lot. Fenced yd, Pymts approx $700 mo Call Bobbie, Century. 21 ACT 1 Realty, 451-260.^ E ves, 459-6402 Repossessions: Before you buy, you owe it to yourself to find out about some of the best deals m town One call could save you thousands Free information booklet on Repossessions and free prequalification by qualified lender. No obligation. Ask for Mary, Century 21, JR Real ty, 564-5142 or 564-7908 •BY OWNER* l^odel material-La Dolce Vita Cond Enchanting lush green private yd. Exceptional quality in this 2 bdrm plus den Condo •Sparkling pool and 2 car garage. •The loveliness you long for in this 3 bdrm, 2 bth Sonora m Horizon Hills. Call Laureen at 293-7551 or 736-8045 Division of The Realty Center HISTORIC BC HOME 3 BR plus sunporch, oak floors $6,000 Iselow appraisal $69,500 for immediate sale. 294-0184 H^ust sell-Custom 3 bdrm, 2bth, 1116sf, 2cargarage Near Elm School ByOvymer After 5, 454-3038 LOT FOR SALE 910 Del Sol View of valley Prime location Readyto build. Oversized lot. $49,500 Call 294^ 534 BC DEL PRADO b7owrier At tractive 4 BR 2 BA in fnendly neightwrhood Nicely land scaped with fruit trees, red wood deck and built-in spa $110,900 FHA loan assum able at 10'/?% 293 246 3 SPECTACULAR SUNS'ETS can be yours to en)oy from this beautiful 3 BR 2 BA home in a quiet, well-kept, nearly new neighborhood Conveniently close to Sewell Elementary and Brown Junior High Schools Near Warm Springs and Timberline m Henderson. $74,000 Call Glenn at ROBERTS REALTY, REALTORS 384-9111 or eveni ngs 2933325 MONEY POR SALE; Secured by Real Estate, $5000 to $5 Million Call 643-8410, ask for Shane V2 acre lot for sale in Section 27, all utilities plus sewer $18,000 CASH ONLY 565-9035 or 565-9467 Custom home, 2 yrs old w/2,700 sq ft living space 4 bdrm, 2 bth. masonary fireplace, sunken living rm, Ig family rm spnnklers in front Custom quality throughout $125,000 Ph 565-9035 or 565-9467 ^i^acres, start at $5,990 Owner financed, w/low down Power & water Write P O Box 1637, Cedar City U"!". 84720, or call owner 801-586-0320 Want to get away from it all? FOR SALE 40acresofpnme Northern Nevada wilder ness: on state highway, 10 .milesfrom nearest town, five miles from nearest naghtxir•hood Beautiful view, lots of wild game fjerlect location for vacation home or camp, site FSBO $6,000 or best of' ter For information, call Bob FiSher 564 1881 dunng business hours or 363-5900 alter 6 p m If no answer leave messaae APARTMENTS AVAILABLE 1, 2, 3 bedroom units For Info call 2*3-1615 or 24-077 8 a.m. to • p.m. 7 Days CASA DC AUCIA APTS M > M n APTS ProfMetoMMy manaved by WansrtiSMsar I I. HENDERSON PLAZA APTS. 730 Center St. Hsnderson. Nevada, 565-7512 2 bdrm., unfumiahedi pool A play yard. Naar schooto A shopplrtg^ FMO Cable TV. from $355 month WE LOVE "SNOWBIRDS!!" Beat the cold cUmatel Stay in a 3 room apartment motel, in "clean, green Boulder City." Kitchen, living room, King bedroom, central heat. Small pets OK Weekly winter rates. Better reserve early, only a few openings left. CaH NEVADA INN (7021 293-2044 today. DESERT INN MOTEL nice clean rooms, starting at $75 wk. Maid sen/ice, color TV Also kitchenettes available. 293-2827 800 Nevada Highway BC. REAL ESTATE $20,000 gets you access to the tjest hunting & fishing ground in Idaho Located on an acre lot. this 2 bdrm, 1 bth house has it all. Lots of privacy plenty of RV parking and even a garden spot For more information call 702-565-3196 t-or sale by owner. 3 bdrm, 2 bth, garage, new carpet, mini (Dlinds, covered patio, 'enced. RV parking, corner k3t. $68,000 451 Chesapeake Way Ph 565-6000 SPECIAL PURCHASE MUST SELU 4 BDR. 1V4 BATHS, LARGE COUNTRY KITCHEN, CLEAN & NEAT, MANICURED YARD, LARGE PATIO A MUST FOR THE MOST PARTICULAR BUYERS $87,000o CALL: ROSEMARIE RITCHIE 564-2515 CENTURY 21 — HENDERSON REALTY, INC. ^21 OPEN HOUSE Sat. and Sun. Oct. 22, 23 12 Noon-4 P.M. 1330 Pinto Road, B.C. HYDE AND ASSOCIATES Hoetass, Pat 293<'6014 WEEKLY KITCHENETTES: 165-7929 4vi DOLCE VITA CONDO M bath Stove refng yard li. $575 mo $250 sec depo (Jalllor appt to see after 530 I yn;293-6177 B.C f'or rent 4 br, 2% bath Hdn home. Nice area $850 mo Avail Nov 1 Call 602t63-1411 Mon through Fn, $ to 5 Eves 298-0640 Jfor rent: Nov. 1, 6 rooms, lerVtae porch Well insulated gng cooling 293-1618 or rent Commercial Suite, IIODsq ft Sunset Commercial Ptaza. near freeway. Ph te4-2009 f^ahtad— Roommate to insre very nice apt. ta&2239 TOURISTS & LOCALS Itudk) rooms in lo/ely pnvate (in Walking distance to all K G cooking. Daily $25 ieskly$100 Monthly rates kvaHable Deposit required ^64-5888 OFFICE SPACE FROM 400 iq ft to 1600 sq ft, or any Combination. Darwin ^3-3996, BC COVERED BOAT STORAGE, complete fenced eecurrty $37.00 month Call 293-77638to4 30Mon thru f n BC Hreddy's Kitchenettes, $175 fno. Just bnng your tooth push Everything furnished fh'i93-1716. 'aths. Custom drapes in living room and dining room. Ceiling fans in every room. Had lots of TLC (owner will miss). Drive by 1452 Rawhide Rd. then^call 293-2472 eves and weekends. BC. FOR SALE OR LEASE CEDAR WEST PLAZA COMMERCIAL CONDOS For more information call PEGGY COLE, REX NEWELL OR GREG COLE JENSEN'S REALTY 564-3333 coLOUieu. ANCHOR REALTY, mC REALTORS 293-S757 GET ON OUR BEST I SELLERUST LARGE TWO BEDROOM located in cul-de-sac. Custom built, two full baths, 2 car garage, sporting a new roof, RV parking, 12X12 block storage building. $104,500. great investments and are sellQ 1 living room, yard with block LA DOLCE VITA C0ND0-ting fast! Two bedroom, VA i wall. $66,000. SEE THIS 24X48 on carefree landscaped lot. Perfect size for retired couple or that vacation home for weekends. Adult only, pool, spa, rec room and view of mountains. $87,500. PICTURESQUE THREE BEDROOM, 2'/i baths, garage, red tiled roof, view of lake, swimnung pool and spa plumbed for propane, covered patio. $219,900. Call for appt to see! CUSTOM FOUR BEDROOM, 2'/, baths, family room, 3 car garage plus large carport, 2X6 construction, lots of privacy and great view. $259,900. SECLUDED SPANISH STYLE T\^'0 BEDROOM at the end of private pine tree drive, lake view, tiled floors, enclosed courtyard, call for appt to see. $449,500. COMFORTABLE LIVING in this 2 bedroom. 1'* bath mobile, one car garage plus carports, lots of upgrades and is immaculate. $82,500. CUSTOM HOME AREA near schooU, hospital and shopping. 2X6 construction, 4 bedims. 2Vi baths, 1,792 s.f. $129,900. THIS IS ONE TO SEE—2 yrs new custom 4 bedrm, 2% baths with private gnest quarters. Vaulted ceilings, solarium, RV parking, circle drive and more. $197,500. CENTRALLY LOCATED) 2 bedroom perfect for retirees or Ist time buyers. Lovely patio, RV parking, nice aise living room & kitchen. Priced to seU $76,900. WHEN SPACIOUS LIVING MATTERS-large 4 bedroom, 5 bath, formal dining, family room, two wet bars, game room, work out and laundry room and more. $450,000. WELL MAINTAINED MOBILE HOME on spadons lot on cul-desac in adult area, 3 bedrms, V/* baths. Reduced! $61,000. LAKE MOUNTAIN ESTATES-npgradwl Silvercrcst. Spacious 2 bdrms, 1 % bath with mtcrior walls in drywall, plus a workshop. $91,500. ON THE GOLF COURSE! 4 bedrma, 1>/, baths, one level 1,780 B.f., outstanding view. 10X20 covered patio, slab for RV parking, open floor plan with neutral colors. $157,500. BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM HOME ON GOLF COURSE. 3 BR, 2 BA Mexican tile thmont. Covered patio and backyard with ontdwir living in mind. Redaoedl $220,000. DONT MISS SEEING THIS CUSTOM HOME. A paat wy for a family to live. 4 ML 2Vt Bath haaM. Exaraae poal ami spa. $165,000. COLOWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY 501 Ntv. Hwy., B.C. Call 24 hrs 293-5757 TOLL FREE 1-800-453-1860 Ext. 310 N .t. i Hendorsoa Home Newi aad Bouldar CItjr Nawt Pagt EVERYBODY ^ 's FSBO REAL ESTATE TWO STORY LEWIS HOME ON RAWHIDE ROAD '4 bdrm, 2y2 bath. New carpet, tile. Brick kitchen. Minis thruout. Ceiling fans in every room. Auto Sprinklers. RV parking. By owner. 293-2472. B.C. BOULDBI CITY CONOO 9% asBumable, ifloor level. 2 bdrm, 2 ba. Fireplace. Many updates. 2 car covered parldng. $61,500. By appt. Call 458-7559. Sll TNI TNRH BIDROOM 1% bath homa that haa adequate atoraga space & finlahad 2 car garage. Lota of upgradaa. For aale by owner. 293-2959 call avenlnga. CLEAN AS A WHISTLE-Tlireebadroom, 1/, bath home with garage-large yard with RV parkingReady for quick move in-only $62,900. DREAM COTTAGE-Two bedroom home with Spanish tiled roof nestled at the end of quiet cul-desac. Home has over 1,700 sq. ft. of living space ineluding a encloocd patio room. Best Buy at $81,500. WHY PAY RENT-when you can own this lovely 2 story, 3 bedoom home for only $65,000. Custom cabiaeU enhance the large country kitchen. Don't look unless yon are ready to buy, you won't be able to resist this one. ITS A DEAL—Extra large mobile home lot with "AS IS" mobile home for only $32,000-Owner will carry. Drive by 230 Shoshone and caU Pat for details. BACK ON THE MARKET-Sale feU thru-attractive 3 bedroom home with double garage on private street. Inground pool and stay easy care landscaping lakes this home a bargain at $82,500. Call Eva to see. JR REALTY 204 W. PaeMIe 664-5142 Put your trust in Number One: mi9 • aiXl 'Century 21 Real Estate Cofporatioo Equal Housing OpfXJrturMty MOCKNDBITLV OWNED AND OKHATIO 293-6014 ILM 5HESB; 1S2S Ariaomi StrMt •Boulder City, 89005 HOMES-LAND^BUSINESS INVESTMENT CONSULTANTS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT BOULDER CITY TERRIFIC FAMILY HOME. 3 bdrm, IV4 bath. Bonus room. 20X20 family roB with fircplaee. Separate laundry room aad more $108,000. LEWIS HOME baa over 1,600 sq. ft. 3 bdrm 1 Vi bath. Pool a apa. RV parldag 4 2 car garage. 8127.600. LOCATION FOR FAMILY. Nood a latfe home aaar adwobT How about 3.000 aq. ft. brick w/4 bdrm 2H batka, swimmiaf pool at oouraol Plus •Ktra large room w/fireplaee. country Utchau 4 yea, formal diaing room. All tUa plua gnat locatioo. 00 anm lot. Oaly $184,500. GREAT BUY Overlooks Lake and mountains. 6 BR. 2V4 BATH. Over 2.S60 sq. ft. w/huge back yard, eompHmsated w/latge pool Pleatjr of docklag. oovarad patio, stain to ax. Irg dock, sHRoiud M of hooaa w/aUden off large upatairs f amilyrooai over looldag lake. RV pacing BO ^arohlMi A auat to aoo BOWI Prieod at oaly iproUoB. A auat to aoo &U,600. Outtanding buy! 3 bdnn, 8 yra old. New ranga 4 diahwaahar. Sparkling citan. la raady for quick movo-in. Only 152, 500. JDC Invaat* mants. 451-9100. NEED TO SELL YOUR HOUSE? WE WILL BUY IT NOW? 293-1613 OA "Cariy" Sadth. lac. 3 badrao m 2 bath, 8 Mookato aehod, largt matura trM*. Only $8S.800. ENEROY EFFICIENT HOME 2400-1tquart fkat, Lafca vlaw—4 badrooma— garagt/workahop—Cuaiem built—Prioad raduead to 8124,900.00. NEW CU8T0M HOME Spacious homa—2,700 aquara faat llvaMt—thraa badrooma—2Vt batha—raady to eeeupaney $179,900.00. BUSINESS OPPONTUNITY Art and framing bualnaaa. Upgradad bualnaas condo—fixturas and Invantory $168,000.00 DOME REALTY 283-1813 -BY OWNER•2 Story Lawta •2\ batha •Lola of Upgradaa 293-2472^ RIdM. I.IOO • y In 1 atory. aq. ft. A 3 Mha. flraplaca. landacapad, aprlnklar ayatom. Slia.OOO. Opan 1-8. Oral aaa,a00in—3 bedroom, 2 bath, large rear yard with large trees, ehrulte, and Ivy. One of BouMor City's best buy*. Immediate possaaelen. 2t3-1613 anytime, 293-189S nttee. jystsstti NOW OPEN Sunrlae Moblla Eatate Lota E. Lake Maad Drive at Mohawk FOR SALE CONTACT JENSEN'S REALTY 564.3333 ADULT COMMUNITY Lovdy EaUtea 3 BB IH BATH 2 ear garage strwstad view of Lake Mead 8117,500. Lake Mta w/naobMARINA nUVI CUSTOM-View lake traa aaaaf the flaaat outtad koaMo ia towa. Oem iM9 aq. ft iailadaa auia Uvi^ enitaa aad g4at kiaiifciiiiri qaartara. S ear ganaa nA 1 paiU^. CaO for mon iafo. LARGE HOME ON PINTO 4 bdrm. Vh bath, over 2,100 aq. ft. living area $91,600. ARROWHEAD E8TATB8-2 badww Caiida ad|aaat td paal. apa. and dub hoaaa. Beat locatioa poaaftla. Dara. INTERI8TED IN OOVIRNIIINT AOQUIBED HOmsr CONTACT OUR SPRCIALUTS AT 219 WATm STREET OW ^^"M4M FRIBHDLT BXPERIBMCBO PROOD GRONIMG NITH BBHDBR80H NB ARB HERB POR YOOl o.-JIM" JBN8BN ai9 WATCR ST. • "*^ HKNOBfiaON. NKVADA aOOie 564-3339 RESIDENTIAL DIVISION BEAUTIFUL 2 Story Colonial Home juat built. Thia home haa everything! 3 bdrm, 3 batha, den or maatar aitting room, beautif al family dining combo, large laundry, parquet floora, wall to wall earpat, view of city lighta and mountaina. All on one acra with lota of room for hotaea, pool, or tennia courts. Croat your own littla place of haavanll Call Katia or Ln. NEW ON MARKET. BMiaUful new Chiam Home. 3 bdrm, 1V bath. Upgraded carpet. Large covared patio. Thia home la plctora parfaet. Too many upgradaa to mention. Thia la raally a muat aat homa if you an in the market to buy. Call Katie or Len. MOBILE HOME AT 213 Mojave back on the market. Over 1.700 aq. ft.. 2^ bdrm., fenced, handicap adapted. $66,000. NICE AND WELL KEPTI Peggy Benedict. SEC. 4-ORLEANS1 Acra lot on Orleaaa aad OnbUa with aleetric and water, nearby. Nice flat bidg. Lot with view of Vegaa. 121.000. Peggy Benedict. 1804 MERZE ^ $48,000 for thia nice 3 bedroom home with oeillBg faaa, atoraga, buOt4n microwave A all appliancaa. Cuatom eaUaata too. Doa't miaa thia onel GREAT BUY! Peggy Benedict CUTE STARTER HOME or Reatal Home-Thia could be a doU home. 3 bdrm, IV4 bath. Ceatral air, gaa heat, eat la Utchen, doaa to aehoaL CaU Katie or Len. LAND ON BALBOA. 1J6 Acree cloee to Baaic High SchoaL Near abopplag A buaineeeee. Good proepect for eubdiviaion. CaU Lea Wttliaau. INVESTORS NOTE! Block garage on Hajraea ploa 3 BR TownaiU oo Oklahoma. Lota of potential here. Low aisty'a. Zoned R-2. Peggy Benedict. N. HENDERSON PRICE-Pleeaaat hone whh ahelterad patla. Omwm leaving atate, make offer. Over 1.300 eq. ft for Mft^NMl Cwtral air, eaUlBg faaa, carpetlag, 3 bdrm IV4 bath, large 2 ear catpart. CaU Laa ot Katie. TREMENDOUS POTENTIAL 10 AC NW Cener Hariaoa A Collage. 210 DOGWOOD Great workahop, eaiUag faaa, large patio, waUpaper aad lota more. $67,000. Peggy Beaedkt FANTASTIC PRICE! $48,900-414 Daffodil-2Bedraai lot. feaced aad appUaaeaa! Doa't paea thia aae hyl Peggy MTN VIEW Ceogeaial reaidaaee packed with vahMa. P^raahly daeorated Btoeoo. Quiet etreet, 2ar garage, flraalda dhe, aaa tr al a^, gaa heat, earpate 'vBdM, aatoaurtfe apriakler ayatem, t BR/1^ bathe. NEW CARPET. CaU Ken Proctor. Sj[^ SELLING BOULDER CITY! THE BEST FOIt YOU! Sef In i beautmii iitettish gardtti, iccitided it thi end oft pritattfiitii tret (iirivi ^nuble door entry to braotfitaklng vlaiM* il tiki i imlkrJli^ intfidf fhd^ m tountetn itt kltcheti and til bitfiroonH. Otilf ^yelHoiilfoiilythabHtiHHdo... TTittiUtt Youft fbr $449,50^ CUSTOM 4 lEDROOM 2 3/4 BATHS Only 2 years new with over 2600 sq.ft. including guest orlH'kw quarters plus 2 car garige. The nurmet kUehin faaiures beautiful AUerwood cabtneu. Excellent City and mountain view. Call now to see for yourself all the amenities that are Included for $197^00. HOMEStTB OF YOUR DREAMS! •NB-miL, B^midmr Citg, mm^me9d U $49,989 Minimal grading needed on this M kcrt Lot Excellent opportunity located at 1401 Highland. — Submit Offlers! • ::' Spectacular Lake View Lot Very Exclusive Area. Ready for your own custom design. LOT SIZE 100' X 133' — Bring Offers Now! nil >iit> iiir > II iMKiii^ Itu ludps All F.quipmont, fixturi^s, Honpes, • flow iPiilurmrj n V.ir iply of Swfcney's Gourmet COKPP Qnjins • • ". Motil \'\.\/:\ $4^ 000 'A9k Abeut N9W UUlmgm fit <,? f L J \ 1^ :> M 1 5HAJIP 2 BtDKOOM H0UM9 In Excwimtioentton wifit cov0r§d path, $11 appllaneis it ovar 1,000 aq.ft, of living araa $70^900 CALL MANNY 294 0870 COLDWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY OnluwL, HENDERSON REALTY, INCa WaUr StrMt, Hendmon, NV (702)564-2515 Put your trust in Number One: AWARD NOMINATION-If there waa an Oaear giveu to homeo, I am euro thia would win eeveral. BjBST PRODUCER: Lewie Homee. BEST SET DESINGER: The wife. BEST DIRECTOR: The father. SUPPORTING ROLES: The children. SPECIAL ANNUAL HONORARY AWARD: Mr.' Clean. New lieting in preatige area. Poor good eized bodrooma. LAND YACT—Step aboard aerenc aundeck to atroll on cool eveniaga. ana bathe, or enjoy the panoramic view. Gourmet "galley" wfth nderowave. Per-' mal dining room to feaat at the Captain'e table. NIGHT LIFE! Pool taMe aize family room with auperb atyle or retire in one of the 3 caMna for a reatfat alumber. Arrive early to catch the morning ann on the dock aaiiiiaa^g the POOL. Cmiae on over reaort on the aeduded golf courae. Parr aayoae. PORKY PIG SAYS-Say goodbye to rent with a good buy. Enjoy owalag thie good buy. Aim your pocketbook at our 2 bedroom, 1 */4 bath. It'a the bargakH buy of the week. BRAND NEW LOOKS WITH A RESALE PRICE TAO-Beantlfnl 4 bedroom. 1 atory cuatom home, comer Vt acre location, RV parldag A garage, in addition to 2 car garage, fireplace, formal aad Informal Uvlag ana. baaattfal ewtaadaad kitchen, appUoMea etay, tile and hard wood floora, apgradad eaepat, laaadry room, luah laadacaptag. aprlaklar ayatem, drenlar drive, aad an unbelievable vlawll Pricedf to eeU at 1125,000 wUl conalder trade for f aty hometl Call for dataila todayll. FIXER UPPER OPPORTUNITY-Own a eaatom home oa Vi comer kwattoa. S bedroom. 1V< bath phM Vi bath off the Utehaa aad laaadry room 2 ear garage, bloek wall rear aad aMea, drealar drive, RV parkiag. 2 covered patioo, formal Hviag room with fireplan, alee Utchaa hqroet, braakf aat nook aad a ton of POTENTIAL. SELLER HAS A TIME UMITl-Maot aaU tUa tarriffe 4 qaaUty bailt UJS. homo. It la la asealleat eaadMoa, attraetlve apaa flaar plaa*. maater bedroom la dowa ataka aad aapar at e fram the eth badraama, Itha-;; perfect olflea/atudyl, eovarad patio, 2 car garage, hadaoaped with I bloch waU rear ami aidea, aootrai earpet to flt aay deoor, diataaee to grade aehool, aad aaay bayfaig termall CaO today. .iSlJII. HIGHLAND HILLS LOCATION. LEWIS BUILT!-Nim 4 bedrooaa. l%bath home aitnated oa a large pie ahapad euMe-eac lot. eonatry Utehea wMT; diaiag area, completely feaeed, laaadry rooaa. walldag dle t aa e e le NOQUAUFYINGLOAN. CaOfo ~ SAUj-SALE-SALE-thia laataatic 4 riiiltarad haoM meat aaU aowl It'a great. aO with waterfall aad tnpkal aamaadlMB, view of Laa Vi It'a a amiqm amatma mffliea haaae. To make m FAMILY HOME-TMe t kifcaom. 2 bath |4lh i ) la a faadly aaighbathaod. It'a a IMS hime 1 I wHh ao ^aalifyfav. CaU today. HENIWRSON FOOTHILLS-2 atary. 4 hifciap. IH 2 B B i ga r ag e maJ at aaaaJ B a fr ei p aai A ipa. iTnlt traea aad evwythiag yen ahrajf wOl carry. What aaore eeaid yea aak far. Ci^ today, daa't DREAM HOME WITH SPA-Cleaa aad neat Ifcii^hail I hath with large eaaatry khchaa. Skaatad la fflghlaad mb. RV 1% 'eT. THIS ISHOMKShvp caata iaaiadm latia l ea l| famfly wHhIiiallfal riUmli aad I.V. PARKING QALORB-TMa 2 ferlTBiMI. aaH acre let with • aa.frilwaBhtldi 2^IWa%ftef jffi-^ 18 Water St. ^^^ (702) 564-2S15 It' r^ --i "V^^l^fTW^"-^'''

PAGE 43

iii PiitiiS HenderMB Home News and Boulder City News Thunday, October 20, 1988 ( TbwMbgr, Oetobv 20,1988 LA comet to you one \momtnt at a Hme. a the \grak of Md dropping t iy ofW* in an hotirgfass. \4n^. McNaughl Synd. X • • • ^k* tk* bst U9e of u-h^t •• it your power, and taki tk* rest as it happens. 2 Bfl HOUSE IN HENDERSON $400 tTK) Can Bart or Nite 293-6014 Realtor Room (or rent Kitchen • pnviteges, prfvate bath & entrance Prefer Seny Citizen Ph 565-9668 2 bdrm Townhouse, very •clean. No pets. Fireplace $475 Call 565 7812 ADULT APARTMENTS At Low As $250 Mo. Fumishod 564-6952 DESERT GARDEN APARTMENTS 205 Randy Way #2 2 bdrms, 1 bth unfurn. $;U0 mo $175 depooit Discount for Military and Senior Citiwna Children Welcome No peta Washer Hookups 2 Swimming Pools 565-9051 s^jicnfc Forwent Nice hor>e m qmet ne>borhood 2 BR 1 Be w/ffeilyroom Enclosed yard w/|ftvacv Shed and covered pai|ing $650 nno -• • utilities Cs*: Beth 293-5532 or 2^5969 BC fd^ RENT Small studio rson $50 wk 294BC OFFICE/RETAIL SPACE For lease Approx 846 sq ft ea First Western Plaza. tOOO Nevada Hiwy. BC $480-$550 mo 293-3596 or 293-2367 WANT TO SELL YOUR HOfvIE? Call for a free market analysis to know what your home rs worth on todays market Call Evelyn Plumb 564-5142 or 565-3723 or Stop by CENTURY 21 JR REALTY, 204 W Pacific. Henderson BBiiMaMMMMBHaMM rCHENETTE 2^-7673 BC $99 wk NEW INDUSTRIAL BUIUNNC 2,000 q. ft. bay & yard Leaac 294-0686 FotSale 1975 Cfievy Van N^ds work Asking $500 or b# offer 293 5848 BC c5fE 2 BR 1 BA HOI^E A^^itable Nov 15 Rent $95. $350 dep Call 2^29 BC Hfcjee for rent 215 Valley F^ge, 3 bdrm. IV? bth. tirfplace single car garage, fejwed back yd. spnnker system patio $475 mo SlOO cleaning deposit, $200 S^urity, Immediate occJpancy 737-5828. FRIENDLY, professional wt)fnan, out-doorsy semiotlpnic looking for same to pe rent m my house stians welcome 2 tC:1705 BC it BEDRM APT FOR RPItlT. $475 mo 294-0648 For'rent; Small 1 bdrm cottage. $225 pel mo plus defsosit. Call ^-0816, leave message OFFICES FOR RENT From 250 sq. ft. Very Reasonable. Boulder Theatre BIdg. 293-1283 BC. Apartments, 2 bedroom, for rent. Adutta Can 564-0853 CASTIUAN APT8. Very Nice 2 Bedrooms $430-$45b Monthly 294-1220 821 Ave. A Boulder City ATUUmC CITY APARTKENTS CiMn, Quality Apartments In Handanon • Cantral AC • Appllaneaa • Drapaa • Carpata • WatarPakt • Waahar/Dryar Avallabia $385 per mo. 1 txlrm, brand new. Well Inaulated ft soundproof. Low util costs. Near Skyl'"* Casino. $405 per mo. SpackHia 2 bdrm apts newly remodeled. In quiet, convenient locations. Avail now. 565-7028 WANT TO KNOW what your property is worth' Free market analysis CaH ROGER 293-2939. Realtor CoMwell Banker/Anchor Reidty New custom home on V: acre, near Black Min Golf Course Only $118,000 Yoq must see this 1800 plus sq ft custom w/3 bcirm, 2/5 Bth Huge family rm, w/fireplace and separate sunken living rm w/formal dining rm Conn try kitchen, w/bay window breakfast rm. Interior finish ed w/rounded corners and textured ceilings Excep tional quality throjghout Call Americana Group Realtors ask for Bill Berning, 796-7777 or 641-5555 $3000 DOWN Horse property, '/? acre custom txxne, 4 bdrm, 3 bihs GorgeousH Approx $900 mo. Your Real Estate Company, Realtors 454-8671 $2500 down for patio home 542 Chelsea Dr Near Green Valley, 2 bdrm, IV4 bth. tear garage corner lot. Fenced yd, Pymts approx $700 mo Call Bobbie, Century. 21 ACT 1 Realty, 451-260.^ E ves, 459-6402 Repossessions: Before you buy, you owe it to yourself to find out about some of the best deals m town One call could save you thousands Free information booklet on Repossessions and free prequalification by qualified lender. No obligation. Ask for Mary, Century 21, JR Real ty, 564-5142 or 564-7908 •BY OWNER* l^odel material-La Dolce Vita Cond Enchanting lush green private yd. Exceptional quality in this 2 bdrm plus den Condo •Sparkling pool and 2 car garage. •The loveliness you long for in this 3 bdrm, 2 bth Sonora m Horizon Hills. Call Laureen at 293-7551 or 736-8045 Division of The Realty Center HISTORIC BC HOME 3 BR plus sunporch, oak floors $6,000 Iselow appraisal $69,500 for immediate sale. 294-0184 H^ust sell-Custom 3 bdrm, 2bth, 1116sf, 2cargarage Near Elm School ByOvymer After 5, 454-3038 LOT FOR SALE 910 Del Sol View of valley Prime location Readyto build. Oversized lot. $49,500 Call 294^ 534 BC DEL PRADO b7owrier At tractive 4 BR 2 BA in fnendly neightwrhood Nicely land scaped with fruit trees, red wood deck and built-in spa $110,900 FHA loan assum able at 10'/?% 293 246 3 SPECTACULAR SUNS'ETS can be yours to en)oy from this beautiful 3 BR 2 BA home in a quiet, well-kept, nearly new neighborhood Conveniently close to Sewell Elementary and Brown Junior High Schools Near Warm Springs and Timberline m Henderson. $74,000 Call Glenn at ROBERTS REALTY, REALTORS 384-9111 or eveni ngs 2933325 MONEY POR SALE; Secured by Real Estate, $5000 to $5 Million Call 643-8410, ask for Shane V2 acre lot for sale in Section 27, all utilities plus sewer $18,000 CASH ONLY 565-9035 or 565-9467 Custom home, 2 yrs old w/2,700 sq ft living space 4 bdrm, 2 bth. masonary fireplace, sunken living rm, Ig family rm spnnklers in front Custom quality throughout $125,000 Ph 565-9035 or 565-9467 ^i^acres, start at $5,990 Owner financed, w/low down Power & water Write P O Box 1637, Cedar City U"!". 84720, or call owner 801-586-0320 Want to get away from it all? FOR SALE 40acresofpnme Northern Nevada wilder ness: on state highway, 10 .milesfrom nearest town, five miles from nearest naghtxir•hood Beautiful view, lots of wild game fjerlect location for vacation home or camp, site FSBO $6,000 or best of' ter For information, call Bob FiSher 564 1881 dunng business hours or 363-5900 alter 6 p m If no answer leave messaae APARTMENTS AVAILABLE 1, 2, 3 bedroom units For Info call 2*3-1615 or 24-077 8 a.m. to • p.m. 7 Days CASA DC AUCIA APTS M > M n APTS ProfMetoMMy manaved by WansrtiSMsar I I. HENDERSON PLAZA APTS. 730 Center St. Hsnderson. Nevada, 565-7512 2 bdrm., unfumiahedi pool A play yard. Naar schooto A shopplrtg^ FMO Cable TV. from $355 month WE LOVE "SNOWBIRDS!!" Beat the cold cUmatel Stay in a 3 room apartment motel, in "clean, green Boulder City." Kitchen, living room, King bedroom, central heat. Small pets OK Weekly winter rates. Better reserve early, only a few openings left. CaH NEVADA INN (7021 293-2044 today. DESERT INN MOTEL nice clean rooms, starting at $75 wk. Maid sen/ice, color TV Also kitchenettes available. 293-2827 800 Nevada Highway BC. REAL ESTATE $20,000 gets you access to the tjest hunting & fishing ground in Idaho Located on an acre lot. this 2 bdrm, 1 bth house has it all. Lots of privacy plenty of RV parking and even a garden spot For more information call 702-565-3196 t-or sale by owner. 3 bdrm, 2 bth, garage, new carpet, mini (Dlinds, covered patio, 'enced. RV parking, corner k3t. $68,000 451 Chesapeake Way Ph 565-6000 SPECIAL PURCHASE MUST SELU 4 BDR. 1V4 BATHS, LARGE COUNTRY KITCHEN, CLEAN & NEAT, MANICURED YARD, LARGE PATIO A MUST FOR THE MOST PARTICULAR BUYERS $87,000o CALL: ROSEMARIE RITCHIE 564-2515 CENTURY 21 — HENDERSON REALTY, INC. ^21 OPEN HOUSE Sat. and Sun. Oct. 22, 23 12 Noon-4 P.M. 1330 Pinto Road, B.C. HYDE AND ASSOCIATES Hoetass, Pat 293<'6014 WEEKLY KITCHENETTES: 165-7929 4vi DOLCE VITA CONDO M bath Stove refng yard li. $575 mo $250 sec depo (Jalllor appt to see after 530 I yn;293-6177 B.C f'or rent 4 br, 2% bath Hdn home. Nice area $850 mo Avail Nov 1 Call 602t63-1411 Mon through Fn, $ to 5 Eves 298-0640 Jfor rent: Nov. 1, 6 rooms, lerVtae porch Well insulated gng cooling 293-1618 or rent Commercial Suite, IIODsq ft Sunset Commercial Ptaza. near freeway. Ph te4-2009 f^ahtad— Roommate to insre very nice apt. ta&2239 TOURISTS & LOCALS Itudk) rooms in lo/ely pnvate (in Walking distance to all K G cooking. Daily $25 ieskly$100 Monthly rates kvaHable Deposit required ^64-5888 OFFICE SPACE FROM 400 iq ft to 1600 sq ft, or any Combination. Darwin ^3-3996, BC COVERED BOAT STORAGE, complete fenced eecurrty $37.00 month Call 293-77638to4 30Mon thru f n BC Hreddy's Kitchenettes, $175 fno. Just bnng your tooth push Everything furnished fh'i93-1716. 'aths. Custom drapes in living room and dining room. Ceiling fans in every room. Had lots of TLC (owner will miss). Drive by 1452 Rawhide Rd. then^call 293-2472 eves and weekends. BC. FOR SALE OR LEASE CEDAR WEST PLAZA COMMERCIAL CONDOS For more information call PEGGY COLE, REX NEWELL OR GREG COLE JENSEN'S REALTY 564-3333 coLOUieu. ANCHOR REALTY, mC REALTORS 293-S757 GET ON OUR BEST I SELLERUST LARGE TWO BEDROOM located in cul-de-sac. Custom built, two full baths, 2 car garage, sporting a new roof, RV parking, 12X12 block storage building. $104,500. great investments and are sellQ 1 living room, yard with block LA DOLCE VITA C0ND0-ting fast! Two bedroom, VA i wall. $66,000. SEE THIS 24X48 on carefree landscaped lot. Perfect size for retired couple or that vacation home for weekends. Adult only, pool, spa, rec room and view of mountains. $87,500. PICTURESQUE THREE BEDROOM, 2'/i baths, garage, red tiled roof, view of lake, swimnung pool and spa plumbed for propane, covered patio. $219,900. Call for appt to see! CUSTOM FOUR BEDROOM, 2'/, baths, family room, 3 car garage plus large carport, 2X6 construction, lots of privacy and great view. $259,900. SECLUDED SPANISH STYLE T\^'0 BEDROOM at the end of private pine tree drive, lake view, tiled floors, enclosed courtyard, call for appt to see. $449,500. COMFORTABLE LIVING in this 2 bedroom. 1'* bath mobile, one car garage plus carports, lots of upgrades and is immaculate. $82,500. CUSTOM HOME AREA near schooU, hospital and shopping. 2X6 construction, 4 bedims. 2Vi baths, 1,792 s.f. $129,900. THIS IS ONE TO SEE—2 yrs new custom 4 bedrm, 2% baths with private gnest quarters. Vaulted ceilings, solarium, RV parking, circle drive and more. $197,500. CENTRALLY LOCATED) 2 bedroom perfect for retirees or Ist time buyers. Lovely patio, RV parking, nice aise living room & kitchen. Priced to seU $76,900. WHEN SPACIOUS LIVING MATTERS-large 4 bedroom, 5 bath, formal dining, family room, two wet bars, game room, work out and laundry room and more. $450,000. WELL MAINTAINED MOBILE HOME on spadons lot on cul-desac in adult area, 3 bedrms, V/* baths. Reduced! $61,000. LAKE MOUNTAIN ESTATES-npgradwl Silvercrcst. Spacious 2 bdrms, 1 % bath with mtcrior walls in drywall, plus a workshop. $91,500. ON THE GOLF COURSE! 4 bedrma, 1>/, baths, one level 1,780 B.f., outstanding view. 10X20 covered patio, slab for RV parking, open floor plan with neutral colors. $157,500. BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM HOME ON GOLF COURSE. 3 BR, 2 BA Mexican tile thmont. Covered patio and backyard with ontdwir living in mind. Redaoedl $220,000. DONT MISS SEEING THIS CUSTOM HOME. A paat wy for a family to live. 4 ML 2Vt Bath haaM. Exaraae poal ami spa. $165,000. COLOWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY 501 Ntv. Hwy., B.C. Call 24 hrs 293-5757 TOLL FREE 1-800-453-1860 Ext. 310 N .t. i Hendorsoa Home Newi aad Bouldar CItjr Nawt Pagt EVERYBODY ^ 's FSBO REAL ESTATE TWO STORY LEWIS HOME ON RAWHIDE ROAD '4 bdrm, 2y2 bath. New carpet, tile. Brick kitchen. Minis thruout. Ceiling fans in every room. Auto Sprinklers. RV parking. By owner. 293-2472. B.C. BOULDBI CITY CONOO 9% asBumable, ifloor level. 2 bdrm, 2 ba. Fireplace. Many updates. 2 car covered parldng. $61,500. By appt. Call 458-7559. Sll TNI TNRH BIDROOM 1% bath homa that haa adequate atoraga space & finlahad 2 car garage. Lota of upgradaa. For aale by owner. 293-2959 call avenlnga. CLEAN AS A WHISTLE-Tlireebadroom, 1/, bath home with garage-large yard with RV parkingReady for quick move in-only $62,900. DREAM COTTAGE-Two bedroom home with Spanish tiled roof nestled at the end of quiet cul-desac. Home has over 1,700 sq. ft. of living space ineluding a encloocd patio room. Best Buy at $81,500. WHY PAY RENT-when you can own this lovely 2 story, 3 bedoom home for only $65,000. Custom cabiaeU enhance the large country kitchen. Don't look unless yon are ready to buy, you won't be able to resist this one. ITS A DEAL—Extra large mobile home lot with "AS IS" mobile home for only $32,000-Owner will carry. Drive by 230 Shoshone and caU Pat for details. BACK ON THE MARKET-Sale feU thru-attractive 3 bedroom home with double garage on private street. Inground pool and stay easy care landscaping lakes this home a bargain at $82,500. Call Eva to see. JR REALTY 204 W. PaeMIe 664-5142 Put your trust in Number One: mi9 • aiXl 'Century 21 Real Estate Cofporatioo Equal Housing OpfXJrturMty MOCKNDBITLV OWNED AND OKHATIO 293-6014 ILM 5HESB; 1S2S Ariaomi StrMt •Boulder City, 89005 HOMES-LAND^BUSINESS INVESTMENT CONSULTANTS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT BOULDER CITY TERRIFIC FAMILY HOME. 3 bdrm, IV4 bath. Bonus room. 20X20 family roB with fircplaee. Separate laundry room aad more $108,000. LEWIS HOME baa over 1,600 sq. ft. 3 bdrm 1 Vi bath. Pool a apa. RV parldag 4 2 car garage. 8127.600. LOCATION FOR FAMILY. Nood a latfe home aaar adwobT How about 3.000 aq. ft. brick w/4 bdrm 2H batka, swimmiaf pool at oouraol Plus •Ktra large room w/fireplaee. country Utchau 4 yea, formal diaing room. All tUa plua gnat locatioo. 00 anm lot. Oaly $184,500. GREAT BUY Overlooks Lake and mountains. 6 BR. 2V4 BATH. Over 2.S60 sq. ft. w/huge back yard, eompHmsated w/latge pool Pleatjr of docklag. oovarad patio, stain to ax. Irg dock, sHRoiud M of hooaa w/aUden off large upatairs f amilyrooai over looldag lake. RV pacing BO ^arohlMi A auat to aoo BOWI Prieod at oaly iproUoB. A auat to aoo &U,600. Outtanding buy! 3 bdnn, 8 yra old. New ranga 4 diahwaahar. Sparkling citan. la raady for quick movo-in. Only 152, 500. JDC Invaat* mants. 451-9100. NEED TO SELL YOUR HOUSE? WE WILL BUY IT NOW? 293-1613 OA "Cariy" Sadth. lac. 3 badrao m 2 bath, 8 Mookato aehod, largt matura trM*. Only $8S.800. ENEROY EFFICIENT HOME 2400-1tquart fkat, Lafca vlaw—4 badrooma— garagt/workahop—Cuaiem built—Prioad raduead to 8124,900.00. NEW CU8T0M HOME Spacious homa—2,700 aquara faat llvaMt—thraa badrooma—2Vt batha—raady to eeeupaney $179,900.00. BUSINESS OPPONTUNITY Art and framing bualnaaa. Upgradad bualnaas condo—fixturas and Invantory $168,000.00 DOME REALTY 283-1813 -BY OWNER•2 Story Lawta •2\ batha •Lola of Upgradaa 293-2472^ RIdM. I.IOO • y In 1 atory. aq. ft. A 3 Mha. flraplaca. landacapad, aprlnklar ayatom. Slia.OOO. Opan 1-8. Oral aaa,a00in—3 bedroom, 2 bath, large rear yard with large trees, ehrulte, and Ivy. One of BouMor City's best buy*. Immediate possaaelen. 2t3-1613 anytime, 293-189S nttee. jystsstti NOW OPEN Sunrlae Moblla Eatate Lota E. Lake Maad Drive at Mohawk FOR SALE CONTACT JENSEN'S REALTY 564.3333 ADULT COMMUNITY Lovdy EaUtea 3 BB IH BATH 2 ear garage strwstad view of Lake Mead 8117,500. Lake Mta w/naobMARINA nUVI CUSTOM-View lake traa aaaaf the flaaat outtad koaMo ia towa. Oem iM9 aq. ft iailadaa auia Uvi^ enitaa aad g4at kiaiifciiiiri qaartara. S ear ganaa nA 1 paiU^. CaO for mon iafo. LARGE HOME ON PINTO 4 bdrm. Vh bath, over 2,100 aq. ft. living area $91,600. ARROWHEAD E8TATB8-2 badww Caiida ad|aaat td paal. apa. and dub hoaaa. Beat locatioa poaaftla. Dara. INTERI8TED IN OOVIRNIIINT AOQUIBED HOmsr CONTACT OUR SPRCIALUTS AT 219 WATm STREET OW ^^"M4M FRIBHDLT BXPERIBMCBO PROOD GRONIMG NITH BBHDBR80H NB ARB HERB POR YOOl o.-JIM" JBN8BN ai9 WATCR ST. • "*^ HKNOBfiaON. NKVADA aOOie 564-3339 RESIDENTIAL DIVISION BEAUTIFUL 2 Story Colonial Home juat built. Thia home haa everything! 3 bdrm, 3 batha, den or maatar aitting room, beautif al family dining combo, large laundry, parquet floora, wall to wall earpat, view of city lighta and mountaina. All on one acra with lota of room for hotaea, pool, or tennia courts. Croat your own littla place of haavanll Call Katia or Ln. NEW ON MARKET. BMiaUful new Chiam Home. 3 bdrm, 1V bath. Upgraded carpet. Large covared patio. Thia home la plctora parfaet. Too many upgradaa to mention. Thia la raally a muat aat homa if you an in the market to buy. Call Katie or Len. MOBILE HOME AT 213 Mojave back on the market. Over 1.700 aq. ft.. 2^ bdrm., fenced, handicap adapted. $66,000. NICE AND WELL KEPTI Peggy Benedict. SEC. 4-ORLEANS1 Acra lot on Orleaaa aad OnbUa with aleetric and water, nearby. Nice flat bidg. Lot with view of Vegaa. 121.000. Peggy Benedict. 1804 MERZE ^ $48,000 for thia nice 3 bedroom home with oeillBg faaa, atoraga, buOt4n microwave A all appliancaa. Cuatom eaUaata too. Doa't miaa thia onel GREAT BUY! Peggy Benedict CUTE STARTER HOME or Reatal Home-Thia could be a doU home. 3 bdrm, IV4 bath. Ceatral air, gaa heat, eat la Utchen, doaa to aehoaL CaU Katie or Len. LAND ON BALBOA. 1J6 Acree cloee to Baaic High SchoaL Near abopplag A buaineeeee. Good proepect for eubdiviaion. CaU Lea Wttliaau. INVESTORS NOTE! Block garage on Hajraea ploa 3 BR TownaiU oo Oklahoma. Lota of potential here. Low aisty'a. Zoned R-2. Peggy Benedict. N. HENDERSON PRICE-Pleeaaat hone whh ahelterad patla. Omwm leaving atate, make offer. Over 1.300 eq. ft for Mft^NMl Cwtral air, eaUlBg faaa, carpetlag, 3 bdrm IV4 bath, large 2 ear catpart. CaU Laa ot Katie. TREMENDOUS POTENTIAL 10 AC NW Cener Hariaoa A Collage. 210 DOGWOOD Great workahop, eaiUag faaa, large patio, waUpaper aad lota more. $67,000. Peggy Beaedkt FANTASTIC PRICE! $48,900-414 Daffodil-2Bedraai lot. feaced aad appUaaeaa! Doa't paea thia aae hyl Peggy MTN VIEW Ceogeaial reaidaaee packed with vahMa. P^raahly daeorated Btoeoo. Quiet etreet, 2ar garage, flraalda dhe, aaa tr al a^, gaa heat, earpate 'vBdM, aatoaurtfe apriakler ayatem, t BR/1^ bathe. NEW CARPET. CaU Ken Proctor. Sj[^ SELLING BOULDER CITY! THE BEST FOIt YOU! Sef In i beautmii iitettish gardtti, iccitided it thi end oft pritattfiitii tret (iirivi ^nuble door entry to braotfitaklng vlaiM* il tiki i imlkrJli^ intfidf fhd^ m tountetn itt kltcheti and til bitfiroonH. Otilf ^yelHoiilfoiilythabHtiHHdo... TTittiUtt Youft fbr $449,50^ CUSTOM 4 lEDROOM 2 3/4 BATHS Only 2 years new with over 2600 sq.ft. including guest orlH'kw quarters plus 2 car garige. The nurmet kUehin faaiures beautiful AUerwood cabtneu. Excellent City and mountain view. Call now to see for yourself all the amenities that are Included for $197^00. HOMEStTB OF YOUR DREAMS! •NB-miL, B^midmr Citg, mm^me9d U $49,989 Minimal grading needed on this M kcrt Lot Excellent opportunity located at 1401 Highland. — Submit Offlers! • ::' Spectacular Lake View Lot Very Exclusive Area. Ready for your own custom design. LOT SIZE 100' X 133' — Bring Offers Now! nil >iit> iiir > II iMKiii^ Itu ludps All F.quipmont, fixturi^s, Honpes, • flow iPiilurmrj n V.ir iply of Swfcney's Gourmet COKPP Qnjins • • ". Motil \'\.\/:\ $4^ 000 'A9k Abeut N9W UUlmgm fit <,? f L J \ 1^ :> M 1 5HAJIP 2 BtDKOOM H0UM9 In Excwimtioentton wifit cov0r§d path, $11 appllaneis it ovar 1,000 aq.ft, of living araa $70^900 CALL MANNY 294 0870 COLDWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY OnluwL, HENDERSON REALTY, INCa WaUr StrMt, Hendmon, NV (702)564-2515 Put your trust in Number One: AWARD NOMINATION-If there waa an Oaear giveu to homeo, I am euro thia would win eeveral. BjBST PRODUCER: Lewie Homee. BEST SET DESINGER: The wife. BEST DIRECTOR: The father. SUPPORTING ROLES: The children. SPECIAL ANNUAL HONORARY AWARD: Mr.' Clean. New lieting in preatige area. Poor good eized bodrooma. LAND YACT—Step aboard aerenc aundeck to atroll on cool eveniaga. ana bathe, or enjoy the panoramic view. Gourmet "galley" wfth nderowave. Per-' mal dining room to feaat at the Captain'e table. NIGHT LIFE! Pool taMe aize family room with auperb atyle or retire in one of the 3 caMna for a reatfat alumber. Arrive early to catch the morning ann on the dock aaiiiiaa^g the POOL. Cmiae on over reaort on the aeduded golf courae. Parr aayoae. PORKY PIG SAYS-Say goodbye to rent with a good buy. Enjoy owalag thie good buy. Aim your pocketbook at our 2 bedroom, 1 */4 bath. It'a the bargakH buy of the week. BRAND NEW LOOKS WITH A RESALE PRICE TAO-Beantlfnl 4 bedroom. 1 atory cuatom home, comer Vt acre location, RV parldag A garage, in addition to 2 car garage, fireplace, formal aad Informal Uvlag ana. baaattfal ewtaadaad kitchen, appUoMea etay, tile and hard wood floora, apgradad eaepat, laaadry room, luah laadacaptag. aprlaklar ayatem, drenlar drive, aad an unbelievable vlawll Pricedf to eeU at 1125,000 wUl conalder trade for f aty hometl Call for dataila todayll. FIXER UPPER OPPORTUNITY-Own a eaatom home oa Vi comer kwattoa. S bedroom. 1V< bath phM Vi bath off the Utehaa aad laaadry room 2 ear garage, bloek wall rear aad aMea, drealar drive, RV parkiag. 2 covered patioo, formal Hviag room with fireplan, alee Utchaa hqroet, braakf aat nook aad a ton of POTENTIAL. SELLER HAS A TIME UMITl-Maot aaU tUa tarriffe 4 qaaUty bailt UJS. homo. It la la asealleat eaadMoa, attraetlve apaa flaar plaa*. maater bedroom la dowa ataka aad aapar at e fram the eth badraama, Itha-;; perfect olflea/atudyl, eovarad patio, 2 car garage, hadaoaped with I bloch waU rear ami aidea, aootrai earpet to flt aay deoor, diataaee to grade aehool, aad aaay bayfaig termall CaO today. .iSlJII. HIGHLAND HILLS LOCATION. LEWIS BUILT!-Nim 4 bedrooaa. l%bath home aitnated oa a large pie ahapad euMe-eac lot. eonatry Utehea wMT; diaiag area, completely feaeed, laaadry rooaa. walldag dle t aa e e le NOQUAUFYINGLOAN. CaOfo ~ SAUj-SALE-SALE-thia laataatic 4 riiiltarad haoM meat aaU aowl It'a great. aO with waterfall aad tnpkal aamaadlMB, view of Laa Vi It'a a amiqm amatma mffliea haaae. To make m FAMILY HOME-TMe t kifcaom. 2 bath |4lh i ) la a faadly aaighbathaod. It'a a IMS hime 1 I wHh ao ^aalifyfav. CaU today. HENIWRSON FOOTHILLS-2 atary. 4 hifciap. IH 2 B B i ga r ag e maJ at aaaaJ B a fr ei p aai A ipa. iTnlt traea aad evwythiag yen ahrajf wOl carry. What aaore eeaid yea aak far. Ci^ today, daa't DREAM HOME WITH SPA-Cleaa aad neat Ifcii^hail I hath with large eaaatry khchaa. Skaatad la fflghlaad mb. RV 1% 'eT. THIS ISHOMKShvp caata iaaiadm latia l ea l| famfly wHhIiiallfal riUmli aad I.V. PARKING QALORB-TMa 2 ferlTBiMI. aaH acre let with • aa.frilwaBhtldi 2^IWa%ftef jffi-^ 18 Water St. ^^^ (702) 564-2S15 It' r^ --i "V^^l^fTW^"-^'''

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vpp* wmmmmt mmmmmmK^mmt • wfi A-Ma 44 • ••i^rsoa Hom News and BoHldtr City News Thursday, October 20, 1968 )kttam \ mm mnK tttm THE CARPET BARNiia ^ Hew stain resistant AnsolT Worry-Ree carpet. BnsaJF } FOR CARPET If you're looking for irresistable new carpet beauty and stain resistance protection that will last, this luxurious Anso Y. Worry-Free carpet is for you. Revolutionary Anso Y has a permanent stain resistance barrier and built-in soil resistance barrier. Plus this Anso 2! Worry-Free carpet has a 5 year warranty. But what's best of all, all this "Worry-Free" beauty and performance comes in a magnificent array of designer colors for only... Starting At 12 CARPET PAD LABOR GIGANTIC SAVINGS! CARPET BARN'S FAMOUS GUARANTEE Padding and installation included. 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FBI. 9 TO 9 •SAT. 9 TO 6 • SUN. 11-5 NO JOB TOO SMALL OR TOO URGE-ONE ROOM TO A FULL HOUSE OF CARPET i 4 HENDERSON NeVADA'i INOMtmAL ctNTen mmmmm km 8"! b9/.T0/h0 n9?5DE L? AV ^3np>JV •! sill viw 39, SM mtkm Hcndtiton, Ntvtitai THE COfiMUNITY '8 NeW'A4fi iaV ^ •> Water St. 864-1S81 Tnwday. Oct. 25, im TROPHY PRESENTED-Lt. General James Moore Jr., left. Sixth Army commander, congratulates Sgt. Maj. James Hennington and Lt. Col. Karl Ritterby at the awards ceremony in Henderson Sunday. The Nevada Army's National Guard's 1st Battalion, 221st Armor, won the "Goodrich Riding Trophy" award three years in a row. Local unit wins 'Goodrich Riding Trophy > Gov. Richard Bryan, commander of the Nevada National Guard, presented the Sixth U.S. Army's prestigious "Goodrich Riding Trophy" award to the Nevada Army National Guard's Ist Battalion, 22l8t Armor, during ceremonies at the National Guard Armory in Henderson Sunday. Because the battalion won the award three consecutive years, it earned the right to keep the trophy. Lt. Col. Karl Ritterby, battalion commander, accepted the bronze statue of a calvaryman riding on a horse. The 221st Armor lat Battalion competed with all units within the Sixth Army's 12-state region to win the award. The Ist Battalion's headquarters are in Las Vegas; mechanized units are based at the National Guard Armory in Henderson. Airport noise negotiations progress By Paul Szydelko Home News Staff Writer Both county and city officials reported progress last week on an interlocal agreement which would Umit noise impacts at McCarran International Airport. Skeptical about an environmental assessment that showed a new east-west runway would decrease noise at the airport, city officials have since sought written assurances from the county. After negotiations hit a snag, the two sides met last week in County Commissioner Bruce Woodbury's office. "Substantial progress was made," reported Woodbury during a special commission meeting Wednesday. The conunissioners voted 5-1 to give the airport 30 more days to negotiate an agreement between Clark County and Henderson. "I think we've agreed upon the principles of an agreement. Everybody's hopeful," said City Manager Phil Speight. "We're waiting for some information from them they promised to provide us," said county Aviation Director Robert Broadbent, whose office will prepare a new draft agreement this week. Broadbent said the city will provide information on how many homes are located in the 65Ldn (a 24-hour noise level in decibels the FAA deems "significant") contour and the number of building permits in the area issued before Sept. 1, 1987. Whitney Ranch has begun construction in the 66Ldn contour and developers of MacDonald Ranch have been issued permits. Residential development is not a prefered use in those sound corriders but is acceptable if attenuation is built into the construction, according to county ordinances. A compropiise agreement would likely strengthen runway use requirements and provide insulation measures if the new runway is found to increase noise. Two elements of Henderson's last interlocal agreement proposal drew sharp responses from both Commission Chairman Paul Christensen and Broadbent. Criticized were provisions that would limit air csu*rier operations through a 'noise budget" and that the county would buy all development righUi to land within the 66Ldn contour. Broadbent said the proposals were outside the county's legal and financial means and would stifle the airport's growth. See Noise, Page 2 OVERVIEW By Robert Grove Fisher During more than 28 years of military service, I never met a general who did not deserve to be one. Clearly, generals are quite unusual, superior individuals, and it is readily understandable, on analysis, how they got to be so high on the military ladder. Even those brilliant generals who win battles and later lose wars are ofttimes to be admired; Michel Ney, one of Napoleon's marshals, and, of course, Robart E. Lee come to mind. Most generals have their own style of command. In World War II, Omar Bradley earned the sobriquet, "a soldier's soldier." His comrade-inarms, the flamboyant George S. Patton, had a much more direct, as he put it, 'Hold 'em by the nose and kick "tm in the —" approach. Both men wen ioitrumental in bringing the irar in Europe to an end. Bradley was admired by Itis •otdiers. Patton was feared—but mpected—fay his troops. He is quoted See Oviiview, Pige 2 Congress denies aid for blast damage By Paul Szydelko Home Newa Staff Writer Local residents and businesses hoping to be compensated for damage suffered in the May 4 Pepcon explosion were denied again last week by the federal government. The House of Representatives Wednesday approved a billion-dollar NASA appropriations bill without a $2.8 million package that would have relieved uninsured leases and covered deductiblea paid by residents whose homes and businesses were damaged. "^e were hopeful and when it didn't pass, it was disappointing," said City Manager Phil Speight. Speight said he will meet-with his staff Monday afternoon to disCTiss what the city's next move might be. Rep. Robert Roe, D-N.J., wrote the compensation plan and tried to ioaert it into the NASA bill with the support of the Nevada delegation. Rep. James Bilbray, D-Nev., said he will re-intxoduce the measure in Congress next year. Critics of the plan said there were no congressional hearings on the compensation bill and feared it would set a precendent of forcing the government to cover damages from accidents on private plants. The opponents said P^xxm should be held responsible to pay for the damage, not the federal government. See Deny, Page 2 I ^ih. Car Country ready to drive By Paul Szydelko Home News Staff Writer The Henderson Planning Commission Thursday night unanimously approved a change in land-uae policy to accomodate Car Country, a proposed 120-acre automobile theme park on Boulder Highway at Foothills Drive. "A development of this magnitude would create a tremendoun komi to the economic base tor the city, including providing new business, jobs and a greater tax base," said city planner Bill Smith. The project, which would employ more than 1,000 people, includes 17 auto dealerships, supporting retail businesses, a hotel and fun park. Original plans for an auto test track and some man-made lakes have been deleted, project officials said. Barry Stubbs of Minnesota Title Holding Co., the Las Vegas firm behind the project, said construction could begin in February and would take up to two years to complete. The conuniarfton's recommendation goes to City Council Nov. 1 for final approval In other business, MiiMion Hills residents packed council chambers t protest the proposed Paradise Village Estates, 'Mi condominiums located between Arrowhead Trail and San Jacinto St. south of Cherry. The planners were to discuss the planned unit residential development and tentative map review, but City Attorney Shauna Hughes said a zone change might be required for the project. The 49.45-acre developmisiit would be a senior citizani retirement community and would include a swimthihf pool, a community building, tennis courts and a nine-hole pitch-and-putt course, tha developer said. Several residents ipoke vehocnently against the pr^^, citini jdocnased traffic pctMtltai( and aeorsaeed property values After ck)eing the public hearing, the planners tabled th^ matter until Hughes could further study whether a zone change is needed. The commission also approved a zone change from R-R (rural residence) to M (Industrial) to allow development of an 80-acre industrial business park at the intersection of Gibson Road and Warm Springs Road, south of Warm Springs Drive. Chamber hears auto parl( outline By Katherine E. Scott Home News Staff Writer Developers of "Car Country" plan to build an automobile mall "totally dedicated to the ease of shopping" that will set a national standard in the industry, developer Barry Stubbs said Thursday during the monthly Henderson Chamber of Commerce luncheon. fitubfaa and othiir principab in the Car Country project described conceptual plans and economic impact for the Henderson area after the mall is built. Car Country will be located on 117 acres in southeast Henderson, on Boulder Highway near the intersection of the future extension of the U.S. 95 (Henderson) Freeway. Bill Thicker said Car Country will contain "essentially three plazas: amusement auto and exhibition." By having "megadeifers" share service and storage, they can "put the retail sales areas closer together," Thicker said. "Automobile malls are not great traffic generators," he admitted, but with the other planned attractions, "we think that this site could be a focal point for the entire region." An amusement park with typical rides will be emphasized by one, dramatic, roller-coaster style feature called the 'fihuttle-Loop," which Thicker mi will |)e visible fMM^tke road and help to attract visitors. At another end of the park, developers plan a hotel where they will feature seminars on subjects including retailing, advertising and other matters of interest to the automotive and other business industries. Thicker explained it would not be a convention hotel, "Ynxi a small exposition center that could operate on a national He said automobile malls have existed'ijiVce 1965, when one was built in Riverside, Calif. There are several in the United States, Stubbs said, with most having between four and 10 dealerships. He said Car Country will have 15 to 20 Car Country will also be set apart by a landscaped, parklike atmosphere, he said. "W# will use extensive landscaping [to create) a softer mode." When completed, he said Car Country will provide more than 1,000 jobs. Ground-breaking is scheduled in the spring, and the project will take 18 months to two years to complete, George Schwartz told Chamber members. 'Tax and license revenues to the City of Henderson will be significant," he said, noting auto sales are predicted at some $25U million per year. Schwartz added the in^ vestments to build the project will run about $100 million Although the final concept is still being completed, Thicker said Car Country "will take automobile merchandn^ ing into the 21st century.** Astronauts of Nevada honor Burkholder student Michelle Mangum, a seventh grader at Burkholder Junior High School, has been selected by the Young Astronauts of Nevada as the first recipient of the Young Astronaut of the Month award. Michelle was presented a framed certificate and spacerelated pictxure and photographs in an assembly held at the school on Friday. Marion Angell, chapter leader for ^e Burkholder Jiinior High School Young Astronaut program, said "Selecting Michelle as Young Astronaut of the Month was one of the easiest decisions Fve ever had to make. Michelle is always excelling at everything she does and she is always the flrstone to volunAer to help," he a^fed. Michelle, the daughtw ef Daryl and Teri Mangum is the second of seven children. An "A" averafe student, Michelle ia very active in school activities, particq>ating in the National Junior Honor Society, dance oommittee and Young Astronaut chapter. 9ie also hopes to be a part of the school driUl lady is an active church member and assists in the church's Young Women program. According to her mother, Michelle gets along well with her peers and enjoys attending school. "As for Michelle's future goal, she hopM to See Honor, Page 4 INTEBESTED IN SPACE-MkMk a eartifieate uiaiiig kcr as tke first rw^ipie^ of tka YMBI Astroaant of the Moatk award Staadbg witk h MKt to a SMM af a spaee shuttle is Dr. 1—is HaisiMgna. fMMdar and chairmaB of the Yaug AstfwumU sf N^VMia aad HaMicrsoa MiQrar Lena Ksstsrsoa^ wka pririsJwii PrUiy as Yang AstroMvt 1%. n^^tme^mm f ""^T tfT' /?'"T--^ -, • • • • ,, -li' !^S• • • • :