Citation
1988-03-03 - Henderson Home News

Material Information

Title:
1988-03-03 - Henderson Home News
Creator:
Dickensheets, Scott ( Columnist )
O'Callaghan, Mike ( Columnist )
Dailey, John ( Columnist )
Scott, Katherine E. ( Columnist )
Cohen, Richard ( Columnist )
Shipler, Guy ( Columnist )
Kropp, Arthur J. ( Columnist )
Bennett, L. Jessie ( Columnist )
Swinney, Emma ( Columnist )
Moreno, Richard ( Columnist )
Grogan, Barbara ( Columnist )
Sager, Sandi ( Columnist )
Szydelko, Paul ( Columnist )
Soehlke, Ruth ( Columnist )
Curtis, Joey ( Columnist )
Schneider, Geoff ( Columnist )
Goff, James E. ( Columnist )
Rice, David K. ( Columnist )
Blanco, Marta A. ( Columnist )
Bishop, Carolyn D. ( Columnist )
Earl, Phillip I. ( Columnist )
Fenton, Teddy ( Columnist )
Davenport, Loraine ( Columnist )
Scott, Katherine E. ( Photographer )
Publisher:
O'Callaghan, Mike
HBC Publications, Inc.
Creation Date:
1988-03-03
Language:
English
Materials:
Paper ( medium )

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Nevada
Henderson
East Las Vegas
City and town life -- Nevada -- Henderson
Community life -- Nevada -- Henderson
History -- Henderson (Nev.) -- 20th century
Genre:
Newspapers

Notes

Acknowledgments:
Greenspun Media sponsors this collection.
Collection Location:
Greenspun Media retains possession of the bound, original newspapers. Henderson District Public Libraries retains possession of the microfilm and the digital files.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Holding Location:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Rights Management:
The items in this collection are provided for non-commercial personal and academic use by Henderson Library patrons and may not be republished in any way. Contact Greenspun Media Group for additional information regarding rights to this material: http://www.greenspunmedia.com
Resource Identifier:
hhn3584 ( Digital Id )

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

HP TPtge 14 Henderion Home News, Henderson, Nevada Toesday, 1988 FOR^Esunpofch3bdrTTV new patnt, carpet and lineoteum. Priced to sell' Laureen REALTY WORLD DESERT SUN REALTY 2932151 CUSTOM HOME ON THE GOLF COURSE!! Near 4th tee, 3 bdrm, 2 t)ath, family room, formal living room. Below market a| $142,500. DOME REALTY 293-1613 1 CORNER LOT-NewiT developed wea. HUlcreat area. Fantaatic Vegaa viewl By owner. Ph 564-1881 or 566-1480 aak for Sandral STOPI ONLY $89,900 SPACIOUS 3 ilDROOM 2 MIN wHh Italian Tile In Family Room. Woodburnlng Fireplace. Hardwood Floors In Kitchen & Dining Room. Custom Landscaping In rear yard plus much, more. Ask for 048047 TO START IN OR RETIRE IN. this 2 bdrm. home is a real deal location good and price is right. SUPER MOBILE HOME, doable wide, well landscaped and fpnced. ^3 bdrm.-Z bath. S49,000. So Nice!! YOU ARE #1 WITH US E R N E S A 219 E L Water N T Henderso? 'S Y 564-3333 VAIMDGOVT ACQUIRED PMfERTIES HAVE KEYS, SHOW ANYTIME ALL AREAS, PRICES REASONABLE DOWN PYMTS UP TO DATE LISTS SAVE TIME AND MONEY JENSENS REALTY CALL RAY CURRIER 5644333 BOULDER CITY BAKERY $29,500 GOURMET SAKERY with All Equip., Fixtures & Recipes Included In Sales Price. "Sweet Treats" Is located at 525 Hotel Plaza. 032174 MUST SEE INSIDE! mw SHARP 2 KO MM. 2 RAIM with LAKE VliW, Includes Fireplace, Plush Carpets, Tiled Kitchen Floors, A Patio Deck for OHLY $90,000 *43610 CALL MANNY 294-0870 iMt' b ^gLDWgy^ANKERAIICHgRREALTJ^ FRESa)ENT8 CLUB MILLION DOLLAR CLUB Joaie Olson. G.R.I. REALTOR RESIDENTIAL SPECIALIST RES. (702) 4644400 JACK MATTHEWS REALTY For Your.. .FREE Market Analysis, Call The Henderson Specialist, Specializing in Henderson Properties For Nine Years GARRETT GREATER NEVADA PROPERTIES, INC 293-3333 554 Nevada Hwy. Q iiMr> ^ SERVING BOULDER CITY SINCE 1947 Custom home for sale, by owner. 3 bdrm, 2 bth, spacious. Fam rm, laundry rm, breakfast rm, country kitchen. 2 fireplaces, landscaped. f\/lany extras. On V2 acre view lot. $85,500. Please call 565-5321, FOR SALE 3 BR hprne w/Lake View m Boulder tity. Large kitchen, separate laundry, sunken Whirlpool tub. F/S fireplace, single story, pool and spa. Assumable VA loan. Weekdays 602 757-7727 weekends 702 294-0802 for appointment 3C • BY OWNER Unique (Histom design overlooking Lake Mead, 1.627 sq. ft. living space. 2 bdr & 2 full baths. Fireplace in living room with view of lake. Heated pool—desert landscaping. Call 293-7121. BC. • B HILL CUSTOM HOME w/gorgeous ev.'s. 3 BR 2 BA Den .'. ''replace. Oversize 2 car garage Pool, and mature landscaplag.-.Qri...yj2. acre. 293 3426 after 5 PM. DUPLEX— 636-638 Ave M. Two 1 bedroom 1 bath units plus garage. A great buy at $64,000. Call Jim 293-3996. Green Valley 7-Eleven is looking for more great employees, full or jiiart time. Apply at 690 N Valle Verde. NEED TO SELL YOUR HOUSE? WE WILL BUY IT NOW? 293.1613 GA "Curly" Smith. Inc. r # HANDS TIED FOR LACK OF CASH? INSTANT CASH 1st., 2nd., 3rd MORTGAGES-TRUST DEEDS Cradn Prototoms? RMI Ertat* Problem*? Location Probtoms Trust D*d Problem* Family ProMam*? WE RESOLVE n ** onabli Rat** t lntM*t Aak your Mtghbor. h* knows KOZAL's 736-7006 or 870-6456 FOR SALE: $45,000. 1820 Bearden. 2 bdrm, 1 bth, cute little home w/all appliances. Possible lease option. Call Peggy Benedict, 565-1481 or Jensen's Realty 564-3333. WOULD YOU Over 4,000 square feet of building in the heart of downtown Boulder City. Fixtures included for $235,000. Call DOME REALTY 293-1613 anytime Nancy Murphy 293-3292 nites By owner: Highland Hills area, 3 bdrm, 2Vz bath, auto garage door opener. Auto sprinklers. Driveway access to oversized backyard. Storage shed. 564-1886 FREE AND CLEAR 4 BRTrilevel Va acre lot $98,000. Very good area in Denver metro. Trade for similar value house in Boulder City 1-303-771-1858. Darwin Bible is now assocjoted with Gorgis Reolty, specializing in Boulder City and Henderson Properties. Call Darwin for any real estote needs at: Darwin's Auctions 293-3996 or Gargis Realty 564-6969 Highland Hills sharp 4 bdrm Chism Vallejo model. 2 car garage, lush landscaping, $110,000. Many, many extras. Desparate seller! Must sell 3 bdrm, 2 bth home on corner lot. Upgraded to almost a. custom home, for only $80,000. Gov't owner 3 bdrm, 2 bth home, tile roof, completely fencedd. Good condition. $72,000. 10 acres in Section 16, right in the path of progress. AU or >/2. $90,00a Owners will carry paper. TROPICANA REALTY. RiALTORS Call Dale 565-3272 or 456-4040 • :^ISii^^iX^ 293-601 & ASSOCIATES 132S Arizona Street 'Boulder City, 89005 HOMES-LAND-BUSINESS INVESTMENT CONSULTANTS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT BOULDER CITY RESTAURANT BUSINESS FOR SALE OR LEASE. Located in Downtown Boulder City. CaJl for details. NEW MEXICO HOME here in BC 3 BR 2 BA 1,700 84|. ft. of h'viog area. 3 car garage $99,500. CORONADO ESTATES Adult section 2 BR 2 BA 2 car garage. $76,500. EXTRA SPACE is what this 4 BR VA BA family home has. $107400. DEL FRADO LUXURY 2 story 3-4 BR 2V2 BA with pool & spa, covered patio & built in bar. $145,000. INCOME PROPERTY 5 umU all rented. Only $175,000. LAKE MTN ESTATES over 1.700 sq. feet. Overlooking Lake Mead. Comer lot.' $125,000. LARGE HOME ON PINTO 4 bfrm, 2'/i, bath, over 2,100 sq. ft. Imug area. $105,000. GORGEOUS LEWIS Lovtly 2 hr on Christina Drive. IV4 both. 2 car garage. Low Maintenance. $96,500. PERFECT STARTER OR RETIREMENT HOME. 3 b/> Bath 3 Bath 3 Bath 2'/> Bath 1 Bath 2 Bath VA Bath 1 Bath V/i Bath 1 Bath 1 Bath VA Bath 2 Bath 2 Bath 1 Bath 1 Bath 1 Bath Pat Boratcart Aniu Hyde h Linda Korfman Bob Langovi* Jerry iMorahaU Aatbo^ Whta rte Hyde. B 29340M 293-2144 2934M10S. 293^31 294-1M8 22M4 1486 Athol 1101 N. Nelli* Boulder Highway BoukUr Highway Atbol8t. Bmdder Highway 36 W FalmSt COMMERCIAL DIVISION lOA AC Wreddag Yard Sboppiog Crtr 2.16 AC. .76 AC. 1.S2 AC. irxi2' Vid>BMn 54X136 IB RUltO* $225,000 $188,000 $165,000 $155,000 $90,600 $84,900 $79300 $69,900 $65,000 $55,000 $56,000 $51,900 $49,900 $48,000 $45,000 $42,000 $25,000 Sl.SOO/100 S80O,OOO S360AIO t2104W0 $150,000 $26,000 Henderson Realty offering 1$ years of professional service to Henderson residents SELLER DESPERATE—Zoned for horses, fantastic custom on >/i acre. Central vac, cedar lined closets, dual fireplace and at a tract price! What a viewl YES YOU CAN—Own in Green Valley. 3 bedroom with cathedral ceilings. Lush home on a comer lot tooti SPRINGTIME SPECIAL-$15,000 down and you own 1940 square feet of wide open floor plan with 3 bedroom^. 2 story witl| extra large lot. What a deal! SAY GOODBYE TO RENT WITH A GOOD BUY-This 4 bedroom is spacious well maintained, close to schools. Perfect for your family. ASSUME THIS FHA LOAN-I^w down and this adorable 2 bedroom is yours. Lots of extras done. You'll love it. MUST SELL!!—Great starter or retired couple. 2 bedroom home, owner must move today. Minimum down, assumble, no qualifying and great deal. Take this one today. ISLAND PARADISE—Luxury earth sheltered home. Indoor pool and tropical surroundings adjoin 4 large bedrooms. Enjoy this Qarden of Eden. PERFECT OPPORTUNITY-4 bedrooms, VA baths, terrific fixer upper. 1 large country kitchen, lots of additional parking for $59,900. CONDOMINIUM LIVING-Hardly been Uved m. AU appliances will stay. Covered parking, patio, and storage area. Seller nets $0.00. MOTIVATED SELLERS SAY SELLI! 1-3 bedroom, 2 door garage, block wall, storage shed, and cul-deac location. Easy assumption or new financing. COMMERCIAL PROPERTY—At a "give away price" 4 rooms with bathroom and kitchen facilities. Plenty of parking, room to expand with basement area. Excellent location! Reduced to $59,900. IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY-Rent prior to close with approved credit. 3 bedroom, fenced back yard, covered parking and well kept. $62,900. BE THE PROUD OWNER—Of this luxurious 4 bedroom plus family room and extra large master bedroom. Located on Vi acre with 1977 square feet of living space. Sweeping view of the valley. You must see this home. Call for appointment today. LAS VEGAS LOCATION-3 bedroom, 2 bath home priced for a quick sale. Great starter or rental home. ON THE lOTH FAIRWAY-Black Mtn. Golf course, 4 bedroom, 2^4 bath, and 2695 square feet of living space. Beautiful pool overlooking the golf course. Large spacious living room with a beautiful fireplace. This is a large home for a large family. Call for appointment to see today.. DON'T MISS THIS CHANCE-For this lovely decorated 3 bedroom, VA bath with a patio. HIGHLAND HILLS-Great location!! Reasonable pricel! 3 bedroom, VA bath home. Call today for more information. GARDNERS DELIGHT—This well maintained 4 bedroom home has its own garden plot with sprinklers. Spanish style with a fireplace and the roof. AT A MOST HAPPY PRICE-With interest rates down you can wwa this 3 bedroom. 2 full bath home. Freshly painted and looks like new. Seller motivated to sell this one. Vacant and ready to move uto. Completely fenced, can to see today. — PLANNED FOR THE LARGE FAMILY-4 bedroom with a large family room and a utility room with working space. DON'T DREAM TOO LONG-Or this very nice 4 bedroom, VA bath home will be gone. Completely fenced, nice kitchen and separate family room or formal dining room. Has a separate workshop. A large family will enjoy this home. Priced to sell today. LAND LOOKING FOR A LOT-With electricity and pubUc sewer at the property then this is it. Only $16,000. PARADISE HILLS-Section 132, on this comer of Greeawoy and Dufort. 4.68 gross acres with seller offering termsl! Utilities within easy access, terrific view lot, and good location for $76,000. CORNER OF STIRRUP AND ROAN-Section 127 new Old Vegas, corner view lot with custom homes established in the area. Priced at $16300. WITHIN MINUTES FROM LAKE MEAD-Sectioa #4 on aiM of inenaaIng value. Beauitf ul view lot approximately *A of an acre. Water to ptopsrty. Owner will carry paper. Priced at $20J)00. ADJACENT LOTS FOR SALEIt-gM^tlon #27 near Old Vegas. A^iroxfanately Vt acre k>ts with flexible baying terms. Zoned for horses taot $17^00 P^ lot. ^-| ,1 ,1, &S& 18 Water St. (702) 564-2515 iSi and tn(lTMrk<>(Cimiry21RMlF..tolrCorpotjhon F.qu4l HuuMn)( OppurtWHtv (ft EACH OFFICl 19 INDtPtNDENTlY OWNED AND OPERATED. THURSDA Y INSIDE XEIVED "iAR 7 1988 iVADA STATE LIBRAE City to disciiss airport noise in G see page 7 ^ PERIODICALS DESK NW ST. LIB. CAPITOL COMPLEX CARSON CITY NV 89710 23 305280 01-31-83 03-03-88 •alL^ Seniors' leader ceiebrates '19th' birthday see page 3 WEATHER Thursday. High 70 Low 40 HENDERSON NEVADA'S INDUSTRIAL CENTER Volume 39,18th Edition Hcnderson, Nevada THE COMMUNITY'S NEWSPAPER 250 22 Water St. 564-1881 Thursday. March 3. 1988 Opening planned for 1990 .:.....^^,^^^ Developers plan new Boulder Highway casino by Scott Dickensheets Home News Staff Writer A Las Vegas finn has purchased several acres north of Old Vegas, with an eye toward developing a hotel-casino there. Magna Leisure Partnership bought the land in late February, and is tentatively planning a 112-room hotel and a casino. The project will be called the Wagon Wheel Hotel and Casino, and will be developed along a western theme. Aside from the hotel and the casino, the building will house several restaurants, a theater lounge and meeting rooms. The Wagon Wheel site occupies 15.5 acres immediately north of Old Vegas, which the new owners plan to tear down to make way fora hotel-casinoRV park. "1 beUeve this area of Boulder Highway in the near future will be the hub of a 'Henderson Strip' of four or five hotelcasinos," said Magna Leisure president Walter Weiss. Weiss added that he will begin filing for city approval for the building by the week of March 14. He predicted the operation will open in early 1990. ^^:^==U* _Financing for the $15 million project hasn't yet been finalized. What's so funny about President Reagan saying that the Palestinian unrest in Israeloccupied territory has been caused by "outsiders coming in'7 The White House press has jumped on this remark by saying even Secretary of State George Shultz disagrees with this statement. Evidently many members of the Washington press corps have already decided that the Palestine Liberation Organization, Syria and Jordan are all distressed with the problems the rioters are causing Israel and have nothing to do with the bloodshed and strikes. Baloney! This kind of reasoning shows a complete lack of historical knowledge and very little knowledge about what is now going on in the occupied territories The PLO has always made it perfectly clear that Israel must be destroyed and has no right to exist. This is one of the main reasons that organization has always been left out of any reasonable peace conference in wh^ch the U.S. has participated. You can't have a reasonable conSet One Man's View page 2 SUMMER DREAMS?-During a lunch break, Henderson Parks and Recreation Department employee Linda Utterback suns herself in front of department offices at 201 Lead Street in Henderson. Mild weather in recent weeks has led tO'S]}ring fever ameng some reudents. Planners to rehasii Woodridge Estates apartments ^ -< *„ ^„ 4-v by Scott Dickensheets Home News Staff Writer Tonight the Henderson Planning Commission will face a problem they thought had ahready passed from theirhands. On tonight's commission meeting agenda is a zone change request for two acres at the northwest comer of Palo Verde and Malibu Drives, near Woodridge Estates. The proposal has drawn heated fire from residents who say it is an inappropriate devel opment for the predominately single family neighborhood. This may seem like deja vu to the commissioners. A previous proposal in early February for the site called for 40 apartment units to be built on the site. The conunission narrowly voted to deny the request, but the applicants, Jeanne Burgwardt and Barbara Weier, withdrew the request before the Henderson City Council could take final action on it. enough apartments on this side of town, and we don't need Now its back. Burgwardt and unhappy Weier have shaved the proposal This is not the proper locadown to 32 units, in compUance tion for it," said Vaughn Crane, with a planning department rea Woodridge Drive resident op$66 apartments page 13 quest, but residents are still posed to the plan. There's Council restores GV commercial land by John Dailey Home News Editor Henderson City Council restored conmiercial areas to a comprehensive plan amendment Tuesday, in an apparent compromise with residents of the area. Henderson's Planning Commission Feb. 18 trimmed commercial designations at the northeast and southwest corners of Mgwam Parkway and Pecos Road from Green Valley Investments request for a See council page 10 Jeffrey announces reelection plans • n i pt T^ .i^*!!^ Jack Jeffrey Jack Jeffrey, majority leader of the Assembly and a 14-year member of the Nevada legislature, announced he will seek reelection to an eighth term as representative of District 22. District 22. Jeffrey has served during three sessions of the legislature as chairman of the Commerce Committee. He was Democratic majority leader in 1983 and 1987. The district includes portions of Henderson, all of Boulder City, Searchlight, Nelson and Laughlin. Jeffrey, 49, said priorities during the 1989 session will include "improving education programs, increasing economic development and diversification programs, giving thorough study to Nevada's tax structure and continued fiscal integrity and accountability." He said he would also press for legislation to control telephone "boiler room" operations in the state. Jeffrey is the fourth tnost senior member of the Asembly. He has compiled a 99 percent voting record during seven regular sessions and two special sessions of the legislature. Jeffrey was co-sponsor of successful legislation last year /to create a veterans cemetery in Boulder City and currently serves on an oversight committee to review the planning and development of the cemetery. He also supported strengthening teacher certification and hcensing standards, tougher child support law, legislation to address the high cost and lack of availabihty of liability insiurance, and a law making it illegal for insurance companies to cancel a Nevada drivers policy or raise rates if the driver was involved in an accident which was not the fault of the driver. During the 1987 legislature, Jeffrey served on the Ways and Means Committee and the Committee on Labor and Management. He presently serves on eight interim committees including the Interim Finance Committee, High Level Nuclear Waste Committee and the Prison Industries Committee. He also serves as chairman of the Occupational Education Study and of the committee to study Nevada's incorporation laws. Jeffrey has authored successful legislation to expand the Public Service Conumssion from three td five members and supported legislation increasing penalties for crimes against the elderly, tougher child pornography laws and punishment for participation in criminal syndicates. He was chairman of the subconMnittee which developed Nevada's strong fire safety and retrofitting law during the 1981 session, following fires at the MOM and Hilton Hotels. During the 1979 session, Jeffrey was successful in efforts to secure $1.9 miUbn to establish the Henderw Community College. He also supported repeal of See Jeffrey page 2 f ^^!ijsg;!5^ ''lfP^P!f?^:.^"^ ^ ^^^t>r;'::i;^^ ^f;,ga^^ mfmimmm

PAGE 2

Pag* t Hendtnon HOM NWS, Henderson, Nevada Thursday, March 3, 1988 Thursday, March 3, 1988 llendarion Home News, Henderson, Nevada Page S 1 One Man's View from page 1 ference of any kind when one participant insists another participant must die and has no right to exist. The PLO's long history of kiUing and terrorism has even upset Jordan and other neighboring states which have had to crack down on that organiza^on in their own countries. But as long as the PLO is causing trouble in the home of their enemy, they are more than happy to watch the action and encourage the demonstrations. Several times during the past year terrorists have entered Israel from Jori{aft^ Syria and Lebanon to slaughter Jewislh settlers and soldiers. This is no secret to the world even if it isn't understood by some Washington press corps members. It's evident that President Reagan hasn't overlooked these weU publicized incidents. Many observers have forgotten how the recent riots were triggered. It all started in early December when a Palestinian knifed a Jewish merchant to death. A few days later a highway accident killing four Palestinians was used as the trigger. Word was spread that the Jewish truck driver had caused the accident to get even for the death of the merchant. Despite no relationship between the two incidents the fire was lighted by Palestinian antagonists. When Israeli Arabs joined the strike by shutting their shops it became clear that Palestinian terrorists had Ihreatened the lives of those who didnt close their shops. Less than two ^eeks ago the Arabs in one village ianged an Arab they believed was too friendly with Israeli Jews. Although deadly fire bombs have been used on Israeli buses and cars for months, the use of automatic weapons and deadly expbsives is now being used by Arabs in some villages. These weapons of war haven't been provided by some farmers from a nearby kibbutz. Why do the nearby Arab countries take pleasure in Israel's agony and encourage the PLO to continue their bloody assaults? Remember it was Jordan and Egypt that moved into Gaza and the West Bank in 1948. Until 1967 the Jordanians held East Jerusalem and desecrated the Jewish burial grounds and kept them from 'praying at the Western Wall of the Second Temple (Wailing \^ll), one of the Jews' holiest places of worship. Then in 1967 both countries, along, with other Arab countries, boldly attacked Israel and were driven out of Gaza and the West Bank. Powerful Syria 4ia8 also felt the sting of Israeli warriors despite the naodem weapons and airplanes provided by the USSR. Remember in Lebanon 80 of Syria's MIG-23 fighter planes bit the dust and only one Israeli plane crash landed following an encounter. Nothing but hate pours from the mouths of the Syrians who want to reclaim the Golan Heights so they can again train their guns on Israeli farmers. President Reagan appears to have a much better grasp of history than do the Washington television and writing experts who evidently believe the riots and kiUings in Israel are all happening in a vaccum. Sec. of State George Shultz has found little success during his meetings in Syria and Jordan. However, Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak showed signs of accepting and adding to Shultz's peace package. This took personal courage for Mubarak who succeeds a man killed by extremists for the role he played in the Camp David Peace Agreement. Muslim fundamentalists continually pressure Mubarak to back away from peaceful contacts with Israel. During my stay in Cairo last year the power of the fundamentalists was addressed time and again by educated Egyptians. Several times reference to the killing of President Sadat was made when discussing Mubarak's ability to stand up to the Muslim fundamentalists. What happened to the U.S. Olympic Team at the Winter Games in Calgary? We got splattered by superior performances of the USSR and several other teams. We won a total of six medals and came close t^^ winning|^ a seventh. This is two less' than we Won in 1984 during a disastrous perfor, mance at Sarajevo, Yugoslavia. No doubt it is tough for a nation such as ours that only spent $140 million preparing our teams during the past four years while some Eastern Bloc countries spent close to a billion dollars. Amateurism went out of the window several decades ago in East Germany and Russia. But there are possibly other reasons for our lackluster showing. Maybe the economic death of the iron range of upper Michigan and Minnesota has also contributed to our lack of winter winners. But will this be an acceptable excuse if we fall dowftVduring the Summer Games in Seoul? The Wall Street Journal ran a special section on sports last week and one article by Karin DeVenuta brought some other matters of concern. She wrote, // "Better training may help the MS, do well in the 1988 Olympics, but considering the crummy condition of the athletes of tomorrow, don't bet the mortgage on the games in the year 2000. "American children are getting fatter and more and more out of shape, in large part because of cultural changes and technological developments that have turned them Into watchers instead of doers. "Surprisingly, the fitness craze that sent their parent; into the streets in jogging ahoee and into health clubs in leotards has passed them by. Some items of interest: "—Almost one third of American children between six and 11 are fat, according to the Center for Adolescent Obesity at the University of California. That's -B4% increase in the past 15 years. "—In tests of children five to eight-years-old, 40% displayed at least one risk factor for heart disease, according to j^he President's Council on Physical Fitness. "—Many U.S. children perform abysmally on various physical tests. Of 200 Californians who recently took a 30-meter Soviet swim test, more than half couldn't finish." Maybe our wealthy nation is spending dollars in the wrong places for the wrong things. Possibly we are spending it on a lifestyle which produces physical slobs rather than dedicated athletes. Proposed city hall fnching over budget by Scott Dickensheets Home News Staff Writer The Henderson city hall committee wrestled Monday night with the difficult task of fitting a round building into a square budget. Architect Harry Campbell's figures indicate it will cost about $4,611 miUion to erect the original 57,400 square foot city hall. The Henderson City Council has set aside $4.3 million. Despite the overage, the committee endorsed both the 4.611 million dollars and the 57,400 square feet, directing a reluctant Campbell to proceed on his present course. Committee members felt confident there is enough padding in Campbell's estimate that the actual construction cost will drop into the acceptable range. And they recoil at the prospect of reducing the square footage. Campbell appeared uncomfortable about working with a higher budget than stipulated by city leaders, but the committee put him at ease by recognizing that the project may have to be scaled back in the future. The committee kicked around several notions on reducing the cost of the building, in case the cost figures don't drop. One idea involves slicing a 24-foot swath out of the building, reducing it by about 4,000 square feet. Another proposal called for eliminating a small third floor cupola, which current plans show as unfinished empty space for city offices to grow into. The committee and the arSee building page 3 Kenney files for Regent seat Regent Joan Kenney recently field for re-election to the University of Nevada System Board of Regents from district "D." District "D" encompasses Henderson, Boulder City and East Las Vegas. Prior to her present six year term on the Board of Regents, Kenney served for two terms on the State Board of Education. As a regent, she was elected vice chairman of the board and served on almost every board committee. "Because a superior system of higher education is the key to new business to our area, I will fight for Clark County's fair share of the educational tax dollars that we are now exporting to other countries," Kenney said. "Enrolhnent at UNLV and Clark Covmty Community College is skyrocketing and we must make sure that there is sufficient funding to serve our young people," she added. "The Henderson area in par See Kenney page 12 Jeffrey from page 1 the sales tax on food and personal property, and is a longtime opponent of any legislation which would consolidate local governments without vote of the people. Jeffery is a former Henderson city councilman and mayor pro-tem. He served on the St. Rose de Lima Hospital Board, Eldorado Valley Advisory group. Regional Streets and Highways Commission and the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority. Jeffrey and his wife, Betty, live at 340 Chaparral Drive. They have three children. Pittman Library, bookmobile provide volumes of reading by Katherine E. Scott Home Newe Staff Writer About 250 books were checked out in the first day of operation for the Pittman branch of the Henderson District Public library, according to library director Janet Clark. The branch library, which will be open three days a week, was crowded much of Tuesday, Clark said. "At one time we had about 45 children," she commented. "It was busy until we closed the library at 6:00." She expects the library to get a lot of use. Nearly all of the children at nearby Hinman Elementary School live in the area, she noted. Also on Tuesday, Clark went to the weekly Rotary Club luncheon for the members to see the new bookmobile they are sponsoring. The library and the Rotary Club shared costs to paint the bus, donated by the librarian's husband. Jack Clark. He is a member of the Rotary Club. Members of the club will learn how to handle the bus to take turns driving it on its weekly rounds. The bookmobile will be driven each Saturday to three locations, Clark explained. It will be taken to the senior housing areas on Van Wagenen and on Palos Verde, and the Boys', and Girls' Club on Drake Street. The Pittman branch of the library will be open Tuesdays and liiursdays from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturdays from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. BUIANG CONVERTEDFormerly a wamm't dub. thai Ike Iwal Beya' Clb, the new Pf ttaa Ubrary ia NEW LIBRARY BUS-Henderson Rotary Club president David Metayer looka through a book on the Henderson District Library's new bookmobile. Rotarian Jack Clark donated the bua and the Rotary Club and Ubrary worked and pdd to refnrfaiah it It wiU travel to senior dtiaen raeidential areaa and the B
PAGE 3

Pag* t Hendtnon HOM NWS, Henderson, Nevada Thursday, March 3, 1988 Thursday, March 3, 1988 llendarion Home News, Henderson, Nevada Page S 1 One Man's View from page 1 ference of any kind when one participant insists another participant must die and has no right to exist. The PLO's long history of kiUing and terrorism has even upset Jordan and other neighboring states which have had to crack down on that organiza^on in their own countries. But as long as the PLO is causing trouble in the home of their enemy, they are more than happy to watch the action and encourage the demonstrations. Several times during the past year terrorists have entered Israel from Jori{aft^ Syria and Lebanon to slaughter Jewislh settlers and soldiers. This is no secret to the world even if it isn't understood by some Washington press corps members. It's evident that President Reagan hasn't overlooked these weU publicized incidents. Many observers have forgotten how the recent riots were triggered. It all started in early December when a Palestinian knifed a Jewish merchant to death. A few days later a highway accident killing four Palestinians was used as the trigger. Word was spread that the Jewish truck driver had caused the accident to get even for the death of the merchant. Despite no relationship between the two incidents the fire was lighted by Palestinian antagonists. When Israeli Arabs joined the strike by shutting their shops it became clear that Palestinian terrorists had Ihreatened the lives of those who didnt close their shops. Less than two ^eeks ago the Arabs in one village ianged an Arab they believed was too friendly with Israeli Jews. Although deadly fire bombs have been used on Israeli buses and cars for months, the use of automatic weapons and deadly expbsives is now being used by Arabs in some villages. These weapons of war haven't been provided by some farmers from a nearby kibbutz. Why do the nearby Arab countries take pleasure in Israel's agony and encourage the PLO to continue their bloody assaults? Remember it was Jordan and Egypt that moved into Gaza and the West Bank in 1948. Until 1967 the Jordanians held East Jerusalem and desecrated the Jewish burial grounds and kept them from 'praying at the Western Wall of the Second Temple (Wailing \^ll), one of the Jews' holiest places of worship. Then in 1967 both countries, along, with other Arab countries, boldly attacked Israel and were driven out of Gaza and the West Bank. Powerful Syria 4ia8 also felt the sting of Israeli warriors despite the naodem weapons and airplanes provided by the USSR. Remember in Lebanon 80 of Syria's MIG-23 fighter planes bit the dust and only one Israeli plane crash landed following an encounter. Nothing but hate pours from the mouths of the Syrians who want to reclaim the Golan Heights so they can again train their guns on Israeli farmers. President Reagan appears to have a much better grasp of history than do the Washington television and writing experts who evidently believe the riots and kiUings in Israel are all happening in a vaccum. Sec. of State George Shultz has found little success during his meetings in Syria and Jordan. However, Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak showed signs of accepting and adding to Shultz's peace package. This took personal courage for Mubarak who succeeds a man killed by extremists for the role he played in the Camp David Peace Agreement. Muslim fundamentalists continually pressure Mubarak to back away from peaceful contacts with Israel. During my stay in Cairo last year the power of the fundamentalists was addressed time and again by educated Egyptians. Several times reference to the killing of President Sadat was made when discussing Mubarak's ability to stand up to the Muslim fundamentalists. What happened to the U.S. Olympic Team at the Winter Games in Calgary? We got splattered by superior performances of the USSR and several other teams. We won a total of six medals and came close t^^ winning|^ a seventh. This is two less' than we Won in 1984 during a disastrous perfor, mance at Sarajevo, Yugoslavia. No doubt it is tough for a nation such as ours that only spent $140 million preparing our teams during the past four years while some Eastern Bloc countries spent close to a billion dollars. Amateurism went out of the window several decades ago in East Germany and Russia. But there are possibly other reasons for our lackluster showing. Maybe the economic death of the iron range of upper Michigan and Minnesota has also contributed to our lack of winter winners. But will this be an acceptable excuse if we fall dowftVduring the Summer Games in Seoul? The Wall Street Journal ran a special section on sports last week and one article by Karin DeVenuta brought some other matters of concern. She wrote, // "Better training may help the MS, do well in the 1988 Olympics, but considering the crummy condition of the athletes of tomorrow, don't bet the mortgage on the games in the year 2000. "American children are getting fatter and more and more out of shape, in large part because of cultural changes and technological developments that have turned them Into watchers instead of doers. "Surprisingly, the fitness craze that sent their parent; into the streets in jogging ahoee and into health clubs in leotards has passed them by. Some items of interest: "—Almost one third of American children between six and 11 are fat, according to the Center for Adolescent Obesity at the University of California. That's -B4% increase in the past 15 years. "—In tests of children five to eight-years-old, 40% displayed at least one risk factor for heart disease, according to j^he President's Council on Physical Fitness. "—Many U.S. children perform abysmally on various physical tests. Of 200 Californians who recently took a 30-meter Soviet swim test, more than half couldn't finish." Maybe our wealthy nation is spending dollars in the wrong places for the wrong things. Possibly we are spending it on a lifestyle which produces physical slobs rather than dedicated athletes. Proposed city hall fnching over budget by Scott Dickensheets Home News Staff Writer The Henderson city hall committee wrestled Monday night with the difficult task of fitting a round building into a square budget. Architect Harry Campbell's figures indicate it will cost about $4,611 miUion to erect the original 57,400 square foot city hall. The Henderson City Council has set aside $4.3 million. Despite the overage, the committee endorsed both the 4.611 million dollars and the 57,400 square feet, directing a reluctant Campbell to proceed on his present course. Committee members felt confident there is enough padding in Campbell's estimate that the actual construction cost will drop into the acceptable range. And they recoil at the prospect of reducing the square footage. Campbell appeared uncomfortable about working with a higher budget than stipulated by city leaders, but the committee put him at ease by recognizing that the project may have to be scaled back in the future. The committee kicked around several notions on reducing the cost of the building, in case the cost figures don't drop. One idea involves slicing a 24-foot swath out of the building, reducing it by about 4,000 square feet. Another proposal called for eliminating a small third floor cupola, which current plans show as unfinished empty space for city offices to grow into. The committee and the arSee building page 3 Kenney files for Regent seat Regent Joan Kenney recently field for re-election to the University of Nevada System Board of Regents from district "D." District "D" encompasses Henderson, Boulder City and East Las Vegas. Prior to her present six year term on the Board of Regents, Kenney served for two terms on the State Board of Education. As a regent, she was elected vice chairman of the board and served on almost every board committee. "Because a superior system of higher education is the key to new business to our area, I will fight for Clark County's fair share of the educational tax dollars that we are now exporting to other countries," Kenney said. "Enrolhnent at UNLV and Clark Covmty Community College is skyrocketing and we must make sure that there is sufficient funding to serve our young people," she added. "The Henderson area in par See Kenney page 12 Jeffrey from page 1 the sales tax on food and personal property, and is a longtime opponent of any legislation which would consolidate local governments without vote of the people. Jeffery is a former Henderson city councilman and mayor pro-tem. He served on the St. Rose de Lima Hospital Board, Eldorado Valley Advisory group. Regional Streets and Highways Commission and the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority. Jeffrey and his wife, Betty, live at 340 Chaparral Drive. They have three children. Pittman Library, bookmobile provide volumes of reading by Katherine E. Scott Home Newe Staff Writer About 250 books were checked out in the first day of operation for the Pittman branch of the Henderson District Public library, according to library director Janet Clark. The branch library, which will be open three days a week, was crowded much of Tuesday, Clark said. "At one time we had about 45 children," she commented. "It was busy until we closed the library at 6:00." She expects the library to get a lot of use. Nearly all of the children at nearby Hinman Elementary School live in the area, she noted. Also on Tuesday, Clark went to the weekly Rotary Club luncheon for the members to see the new bookmobile they are sponsoring. The library and the Rotary Club shared costs to paint the bus, donated by the librarian's husband. Jack Clark. He is a member of the Rotary Club. Members of the club will learn how to handle the bus to take turns driving it on its weekly rounds. The bookmobile will be driven each Saturday to three locations, Clark explained. It will be taken to the senior housing areas on Van Wagenen and on Palos Verde, and the Boys', and Girls' Club on Drake Street. The Pittman branch of the library will be open Tuesdays and liiursdays from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturdays from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. BUIANG CONVERTEDFormerly a wamm't dub. thai Ike Iwal Beya' Clb, the new Pf ttaa Ubrary ia NEW LIBRARY BUS-Henderson Rotary Club president David Metayer looka through a book on the Henderson District Library's new bookmobile. Rotarian Jack Clark donated the bua and the Rotary Club and Ubrary worked and pdd to refnrfaiah it It wiU travel to senior dtiaen raeidential areaa and the B
PAGE 4

^^i^^mmm *' yieuipeml .HENDERSON NfnOa I MOvfrawi cmttm [HOIVIE ME^VSI I MIKE O'CALLAGHAN Publisher CAROLYN O'CALLAOHAN* Co-Publiaher Paf t 4 Henderson Home Newt, Henderson, Nevada Caucused may energize political parties With Republicans saying they have never had more participation in local precinct meetings and Democrats expecting record numbers Tuesday for their presidential preference poll and precinct meeting, political activity in Nevada has reached new heights. The task of the parties has been difficult in the last decades given the lack of discipline among partisans and the emergence of the candidate's organization as the chief method to ensure a successful election. No longer in need of party volunteers and support, candidates regularly proclaim themselves as "independent" or "his own kind of man" or "free from the special interests." There's only one thing wrong with that. It is usually the support of special interests that is integral to a successful candidate. Moving away from political parties has forced candidates and elected officials into the waiting arms of political action committees, whose interests are certainly more narrow. Instead of appealing to a substantial portion of a party's agenda and ignoring other party provisos, candidates now may seek the support of the usually one-issue political action committees they agree with. Others are not sought for contributions, still others are avoided for any association with the candidate. So, in effect, you have as many political parties as there are candidates, each one with their own agenda that may or may not conform to one or the other leading parties' aggregate views, usually called the platform. This system works for national, federal and most state-wide candidates; they command the importance, resources and support from special interests and the public that allows them to create and fund an organization for every candidate. It often breaks down for candidates seeking seats in the.state legislatures and other partisan posts that only have small constituencies. But often, these office seekers have had to disassociate themselves from party politics because what the activists enacted. Republican and Democrat, no one in the public would support. Caucuses offer an opportunity for the parties to return to main-stream issues traditional in both parties and avoid those that splinter even the most like-minded of souls. By attracting the pubUc via a presidential preference poll, voters are shown there is no secrecy or mystique to party poUtica, it just takes a little investment of time and concern. They also see the only way to impress poUticians with their views is to do so with others in support, coalition politics it is now called; it used to be the old "party pressure." Many often complain about government, yet foryears precinct meetings, local, county and state political conventions have not been struggles among the many but fights among the few. Politics involves conflict and those who are resigned to be right and above the fighting, well, they'll continue to complain. Caucuses, however, give the average Joe a taste of the partisan poUtical system, a flavor that may not at first appeal but may be savored with time and experience. It's been our impression that most persons like being asked their opinions on the issues of the day. The caucuses afford this opportunity along with a chance to become involved in the process of politics that has worked well here for more than 200 years. Our appreciation goes to the Republicans who attend their caucuses Feb. 18 and we encourage Democrats to attend their precinct meetings Tuesday. Vetoing a sham At last a prominent conservative has given some careful thought to the proposed presidential, line-item veto, and has ezpoeed it for the sham that it is. 'This is an idea whose time hasn't come," columnist James J. Kilpatrick writes noting that the gimmick originated in the Confederate States of America, which had a notably weak and impotent governing structure, and has been sought unsuccessfully by U.S. Presidents dating back to Ulysses S. Grant. The line-item veto was embraced by President Reagan early on, and has been adopted by all of the Republican presidential candidates as part of conservative GOP gospel. As do they, Kilpatrick decries Congress' spend-happy ways, but says that the hne-item veto is not the answer. Presidents have a number of tactics at hand for keeping Congresses in check, including deferral and recision of spending items and the power to veto entire appropriations bills. Furthermore, Kilpatrick notes, major portions of the budget would be immune from the line-item veto—including Social Security, other entitlement programs and interest on the debt. But his major objection is the fundamental one that the veto would dnwtically alter the delicate balance of power that has existed in government for the past 200 years. To grant the Iine-itm veto would tilt the balance by giving Presidents more power than Presidents ought to have," he said. In fact, the framers of the Constitution deliberately gave ^ Congress the authority for making decisions about spending federal revenues as well as setting the course of policy. The line-item veto effectively would turn a basic clause of the Constitatkm on its ear The veto would not just give Presidents control over spending levels, but would also allow them to arbitrarily alter the entire nature and purpose of federal programs. This is not what the framers wanted. If supporters of the line-item veto gave some careful thought to it, they might see the inherent dangw in that, too. Lo9 Amgelea TImea Thursday, March 3, 1988 Americans killing Americans by Richard Cohen Here's how it happened: Foiu* men ran up to a car at a traffic light and, gangland style, emptied automatic and semiautomatic weapons into it. The driver of the car, age 23, was killed—shot ten times—while panicked pedestrians dove for cover. Beirut, 1988? Chicago, 1933? No sireee. Washington, D.C.—about a week ago. In the poor areas of Washington, a large part of the city, .„ young men are killing each other at a record pace—usually over drugs. The city has recorded 46 homicides, 35 drug-related, some preceded by torture and many carried out with the urban equivalant of heavy weaponry. In response, the police have been issued 9mm semiautomatic weapons and shotguns. This is war. Two summers ago, Len Bias, an extraordinarily gifted basketball player, died after using cocaine. His death stunned the nation and, for all that summer and part of the fall, both cocaine and its potent derivative, crack, were a national obsession. The networks indulged themselves in harrowing reports about the menace of crack. News magazines outdid themselves in sounding the alarm—sometimes using the word "epidemic"— and politicians responded, as they often do, by proposing legislation, some siUy, some dangerous, all ineffective. At the time, some drug experts predicted that coke, once the fashionable drug of the young and affluent, would, like water, seek its own leve]—in this case, the poor. Then, like herion before it, the problem would sink from sight. It would become just another destructive element in the ghetto, and white America, just recently obsessed with drugs, would pay it no heed when suburbia seemed safe. In our more reflective nioments, journalists sometimes find the vast and carnival-like presidential campaign detached from reality, often unrelated to the issues and problems the next President will have to handle. In Iowa, for instance, few of the candidates said anything meaningful about events in the West Bank and Gaza. Third World debt was hardly mentioned, no one had anything worthwhile to say about education or nuclear proliferation, and AIDS was discussed as if it could be eradicated by shouting the word "values" at it. Similarly, not once did I hear any of the candidates mention what was happening in Washington and the ghettos of other AmericanVities-the menace of youth gangs in Los Angeles, for instance. Worse, as kids were kilUng kids and Washington cops were confiscating 400 guns this year alone (many automatic or semiautomatic), Republican candidates in hunting-crazy New Hampshire proclaimed their courageous opposition to guncontrol. As for the news media, aside from local newspaperrs such as the Washington Post the Beruitization of Washington has hardly been noticed. After all, white America no longerfeels threatened. To an extent, the poUtical process is to blame for this neglect. Iowa is the first caucus state of any importance, but it's among the last in number of black people-about one percent of the population. New Hampshire, too, is a white enclave. For the moment, the candidates care only about the farm problem or the threat posed by the Seabrook nuclear-power plant. The rot of the nation's cities, the plight of the underclass, the appalling condition of schools .... well, who cares? In Iowa, the concern, understandably enough, is the corn surplus. But regional concerns aside, white America has little tolerance—and ahnost no sympathy—for the problems of black America, particularly its underclass. Possibly it's weary of the story and thinks, wrongly, that it's of no relevance—a conclusion that would be far different if the victims were white. But white America can neglect the black inner city only at its peril, not to mention expense. If only for humanitarian reasons, this problem will have to be dealt with. After all, the dead, addicted, ruined and terrorized are all human beings. All the presidential candidates have, at one time or another, proclaimed their leadership abilities. Like kids in a schoolyard, they have quarreled about who is the better leader, the biggest leader, the one with the most guts, courage and integrity. But leadership entails actually leading, getting out ahead of the pack and distinguishing between the important and the trivial. Yet while Washington was rolling up a homicide record, not one of the candidates had the guts to address the problems of the inner-city-to talk to New Hampshire and Iowa voters about what was happening over the horizon of their immediate self-interest. That would be leadership. The inner-city has yet to see it. Capitol commentary Pollsters miss the vote by Guy Shipler Only two things keep the lengthening political campaigns from being a total bore—the pollsters and the pundits. The two come together, like Jack and Jill; the pundits base their crystal-ball gazing and subsequent pontificating on the figures the pollsters track. And like Jack and Jill, they both sometimes come tumbling down. For which we should all be grateful. The world has become computerized to a point where almost everything ordinary humans do can be measured, predicted an analyzed precisely. High tech has reduced us in most of our daily pursuits to faceless, binary blips on phosphorescent screens. But happily for all of us, it does not yet have a stranglehold on the most vital element of our society—that mysterious entity called the Electorate. It's getting close, to be sure. The awesome technology of our day has given the political pollsters a remarkable degree of accuracy. But they still have to warn us that their margin of error runs in the three-percent to five-percent range (somethings larger in a close race). They have long since learned that when you let human beings loose in the voting booth, they act like human beings instead of like numbers on a chart. And once there, out of range of microchips and mysterious code words, they are likely to do God knows what. That's why polling and punditing stiU shape up as a sort of political Racing Form. (insider the latest example of last week's New Hampshire primary. Right up until the last minute you could get as many predictions on the GOP outcome as there were polls and pundits. While at least one count had Dole leading by eight points, another had the race dead even or "too cloee to call." But almost every pundit advised us that his or her crystal ball promised that if George Bush didn't lose he would win by such a small margin that it would come cloee to dooming his presidential chances. Bet on it. And so Bush won by nine points. Not bad for a sure loser. But the real winners are the American people. Despite the great progress in polling techniques, they still have the upper hand whea left to their own devices—aiKl about the only place that happens nowadays is in the voting booth. Despite all the foofooraw, hooplah and courting by candidates, they quietly do what they damn well please. They have done so even since polling and pontificating became a serious business, and in the process they have usually clttnged a lot more than the course of history. Example: Back in 1936 the Literary Digest magazine loudly trumpeted that Alf Landon was going to beat incumbent President Franklin Roosevelt. After Landon carried only Maine and Vermont for a total of eight electoral votes, the lAtersry Digest folded. It didn't make a lasting impression on the pundits—or the pollsters. Just 12 years later, everybody had Thomas E. Dewey trouncing another incumbent president, Harry Truman. Newspapers wrote about the presumed victory as a foregone conclusion. So did virtually every magazine: lAte had a cover picture of Dewey on a San Francisco ferry boat with a caption referring to him ai^ 'The Next President." Business Week magazine, where I was a staff writer in New York, ran a cover painting with the presidential seal behind Dewey's head. That had a challenging result for me. The day after the election Ed Grunwald, the managing editor, called me into his office and said he was assigning me to write the week's lead story about Truman's victory. "We want the pitch to be that we knew it all the time," Ed Grunwald told me. "You will have plenty to work with. All 22 members of the editorial staff in the Washington Bureau of McGraw-Hill are assigned to give you background on what it means, including a list of Truman's new cabinet members. Well contribute bits and pieces of information as they come in, otherwise you won't be interrupted." Then came the bombshell: "We will go to press on our regular schedule, day after tomorrow." At deadline time about 6 p.m. Friday, I stumbled into Grunwald's office with my story. It was indeed my story. I had virtually no help from anybody. The Washington Bureau has absolutely nothing to offer about a Truman cabinet, for instance, because the pollsters and the pundits had made it clear that there wasn't going to be any such thing. Nobody had the remotest idea about relationships between president and (ingress because there was supposed to be a different president dealing with Congress. And so on and on. The resulting story was more shadow then substance. The next week Grunwald sent me down to Princeton to interview George Gallup Sr. I expected him to slam the door in my face, since his poll was in those days highly respected for its accuracy and it had missed badly. Instead, he graciously explained that he had simply quit polling the Truman-Dewey race too early. That pitfall has so far been avoided in 1988. Yet even though the polling (and subsequent punditing) went on right up until prinaary day last week, they stiU missed the boat. So the voters still have at least some control over their lives. May it so remain. • \> Your Vieiii Thursday, March 3, 1988 Noise offencis resident Editor: Help! Is there anybody else out there who is being driven crazy by the" noise from the plant site? r^ like I called the Titanium plant and they sent three experts out to my home. They listened and agreed that the noise was loud and irritating. So far I've only talked with three of my neighbors, and they are also disgusted by the constant whining sound. Also, between 6 and 6:30 a.m. Henderson looks beautiful and the air is clear except for the large, white clouds spewing from the plant site. By 8 a.m. Henderson looks downtown Los Angeles. Although the Titanium plant claims I'm the only one who has complained, they say they are planning to put mufflers on their offensive sound system. I fmd it hard to believe that just one complaint would cause them to go to such extremes, there must be some others out there who have voiced their dissatisfaction. For those of you who haven't, it's time to speak up. Post script: Since composing the above letter to the editor, I've talked with people who admit to hearing the noise from the plant site, but have tried to "tune it out" as they felt nothing could be done to stop it. Sylvia Bowman Supreme Court and Congress Dear Editor: There was a definite point to Virgil McKinney's letter regarding Representative James Bilbray's questionnaire discussing "the Supreme Court couljd change the laws governing tibortion." It is not the duty or even the right of the Supreme Court to make laws. (Congress is to enact the laws. The Supreme Court can only rule whether or not the laws passed by-Congress are constitutional. In many of its rulings, the Supreme Cowrt has made decisions that have had the effect of a new law, even though it is only a regulatory authority. But it is up to Congressmen, such as Bilbray, to change or write laws that are constitutional. I sincerely hope that our Congressman and our Editor know that it is Congress, not the Supreme Court, that writes and changes the, laws. Let's abide by the Constitution. Merrill K. Molsberry I LOVE MY PEOPLE, LIKE A BROTHER... Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Page S SS5SSS55^BS&SSS5S5S5SBBi We the People This is one of a series of columns celebrating the 200th anniversary of the U.S. Constitution. Anyone who studies the history of the U.S. Constitution discovers that one individual emerges as the most important force for constitutional government. At times on center stage and on other occasions behind the scenes, James Madison was the prime mover in the drafting of the Constitution in 1787 and in the ratification process that followed. Even then, his work was not completed, for it was Madison who wrote the first 10 amendments to the Constitution, better known as The Bill of Rights, and pushed them through the first Congress in 1789. Opponents of the Constitution used the absence of a Bill of Rights as their best argument against ratification. Virginia was a critical state, and the debate was intense. In order to bring Virginia into the fold, Madison pledged that immediately following ratification he would push through "the most satisfactory provisions for all essential rights, particularly the rights of Conscience in the fullest latitude, the freedom of the press, trials by jury, security against general warrants etc." Madison was doing more than fulfilling a poUtical promise, for his later life demonstates how strongly he belived in fundamental rights. He began the First Amendment with the words "congress shall make no laws" believing they guarded against any encroachment on a free press, free speech,rehgious freedom and the right to assemble. When as president Madison was vilified by the press, he was urged by supporters to silence his critics through passage of laws or through violence. He refused to violate his own principles. The blunt words of the First Amendment were not Ughtly chosen as Madison wrote that he wanted "every government disarmed of powers which trench upon those particular rights." Madison biographer Irving Brant spoke out against reinter— preting the meaning of The Bill of Rights. "The men who placed the guarantee of free speech in the Constitution were not authorizing Congress to choose between its protection and its suppression by a comparison of values," Brant wrote. 'Their concern was with the fundamental basis of all self-governing societies, the right of people to think, speak, write, publish and assemble without the menacing shadow of government over them." Americans owe a debt to James Madison, a debt that can be paid by safeguarding his legacy for future generations. 1988, PM Editorial Services The CISPES investigation Documents obtained as a result of a Freedom of Information lawsuit show a picture of intense investigation by the FBI of an organization dedicated to opposing the administration's policies in Central America. The Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador (CISPES) was the subject of probes in 1981-82 and 1983-85. The nationwide investigation included surveillance of members, use of undercover agents and the accumulation of files that included photographs and other personal data on those who had attended organization meetings or pubUc demonstrations. In connection with this inquiry, the FBI also looked into politically active organizations as diverse as the MaryknoU Sisters and the United Auto Workers. It was a wide-ranging and intrusive investigation, and it produced not a single charge of wrongdoing. Members of CISPES charge that the entire effort was pohtically motivated and designed to intimidate those who oppose administration policies abroad. The FBI cites national security in refusing to discuss the case in detail, but does claim that its investigations were based on "alleged criminal activity" by group members. But if that activity included allegations of terrorism or national security breaches involving a foreign power, different FBI guidelines apply to initiating an investigation, and those guidelines are secret. Current law also provides that certain investigative techniques, such as breaking and entering and searching without warrants, can be undertaken if the attorney general finds that the target of an investigation is an agent of a foreign power. No one knows whether that special power was invoked here, but CISPES members believe it was. Last summer, the House Judiciary Committee and both the House and Senate intelligence committees looked into charges that the FBI investigation of CISPES was a case of egregious harassment of legitimate political opponents of U.S. policy. Nothing came of these inquiries, but with the release of 1,20(7 documents detailing the extent of the FBI investigation and raising questions about its justification, it is time for a new look by Congress. The House Judiciary C!ommittee is expected to question Director William Sessions about the case in March, but he will probably refuse to give public testimony in that forum. The intelligence committees should,ask him to explain and defend this massive effort and to demonstrate, if he can, that this was not a case of political harassment. The committees also ought to consider legislation to set standards for cbunterintelligence and terrorism investigations and assume an oversight responsibility for these cases. As it is now, the Dotential for violating the civil Uberties of political dissidents mder the guise of national security is too great. Waabington Post Opening eyes to extremism: exposing white supremacist liate groups __ '_ ^y Arthur J. Kropp ^s Jimmy the Greek and Al Campania can attest, it's risky to make remarks on national television that can be construed as racist—even if the remarks are not intended maliciously. From the experiences of these two "transgressors," it appears that Americans have reached a consensus on the evils of racism. With that in mind, I had expected that the national media would snap to attention after the name-calling battle that took place recently on the Oprah Winfrey talk show. The show featured "skinheads"—young people who are serving as the youth group of the white supremacist movement in this country. Among other inflammatory remarks, one of the "skinhead" panelists-called Winfrey, who is black, a "monkey." But so far, Fve read nothing about the racial slurs and hatred that filled this program—which leads me to wonder how seriously Americans are taking the growth of the white supremacist movement in our country. After all, it's much easier to ignore groups who are so extreme as to border on the unbelievabls than it is to ignore Jimmy the Greek. And it's hard to take seriously young people who sobnquent refers to their hairdo. But the "skinheads" and their adult counterparts, who form groups such as the Aryan nation, The Order, and the White Aryan Resistance, threaten the values that support and nourish this country, from equality and tolerance to a willingness to abide by the law. What's mors, thase hate groups—which boast 16,000-20,000 activiits and another 160,000 followers-are beccMming more and mors active. For example: Outside San Francisco, "skinheads" threw a teenage boy through a plate-glass window when he tried to stop them from pasting up anti-semitic posters, and in Sacramento, a former gang member "gone soft" was nailed, crucinxion-style, to an eight-foot board. • The leader of the White Aryan Resistance, Tom Metzger, produces a cable television program entitled, "Race and Reason" aired in some 16 markets around the country. One typical remark on this interview-style program is "we can start gassing all these niggers and get rid of them because there's no need to keep paying taxes on their worthless lives." FBI tapes show that an "underground" of racist and antisemitic leaders coordinated bank robberies, commando-stype raids on armored cars, counterfeiting, and other crimesincluding the murder of Denver talk-show host Alan Berg. Moreover, radally-motivated violence is not confined to the "organized" hate groups, but is a growing problem among many populations, particularly inner city youth. Just recently, the center for Democratic Renewal, which monitors incidents of racial violence, released a report entitled, They Don't All We Sheets.'The report provides a chr(iok)gy of radally-motiYiated incidents nationwide, which shows that few states are immune from this kind of activity and counts a total of 2,919 raciallymotivated incidents between 1980 and 1986. Examples include: a crossbuming on a University of Alabama campus; the hazing of a black cadet at the Citadel in South Carolina; and the fatal shooting of a rabbinical student in Pittsburgh, Penn. What is to be done sbout this problem? Taking our heads out of the sand is an important first stp. For example, several members of Congress have called on the Department of Justice to provide a breakdown in their crime reports of those incidents motivated by prejudice and bigotry. Awareness is critical; however, it is not sufficient to stem the tide. One part of the solution is "hate-crime" legislation, which establishes special sanctions against numerous types of crimes when they are shown to have been motivated by prejudice oi bigotry. Such legislation has been passed in several states, and has now been introduced at the federal level. But although legislation is important, it alone cannot eradicate racism. The problem is rooted in people's feelings and attitudes, and the solution requires a deeper commitment. The media must go beyond their coverage of "mainstream intolerance" to expose in the daylgiht the work hate groups do in the shadows. Schools must do a better job of teaching civic values to their students, including the value of pluralism. Most important, the pubUc must take these hate groups seriously. We must realise that these extremist elements represent the tangible manifestation of prejudice and ignorance. During the Oprah Winfrey Show, one member of the audience said, "White supremacy, since it comes from white people, must be fought by white people." I would go further. The dangers posed by this vunilent bigotry must be fought by every one of us—white and black, Christian and Jewish, rich and poor. Only by working together can we defeat those who seek to divide us. Editor's note: Arthur J. Kropp is president of People For the Amwism Way, a nonpartiaan 270,00(^member coaatlta* tionel liberties orgaolaation. ...--^-..s...,.^..:.

PAGE 5

^^i^^mmm *' yieuipeml .HENDERSON NfnOa I MOvfrawi cmttm [HOIVIE ME^VSI I MIKE O'CALLAGHAN Publisher CAROLYN O'CALLAOHAN* Co-Publiaher Paf t 4 Henderson Home Newt, Henderson, Nevada Caucused may energize political parties With Republicans saying they have never had more participation in local precinct meetings and Democrats expecting record numbers Tuesday for their presidential preference poll and precinct meeting, political activity in Nevada has reached new heights. The task of the parties has been difficult in the last decades given the lack of discipline among partisans and the emergence of the candidate's organization as the chief method to ensure a successful election. No longer in need of party volunteers and support, candidates regularly proclaim themselves as "independent" or "his own kind of man" or "free from the special interests." There's only one thing wrong with that. It is usually the support of special interests that is integral to a successful candidate. Moving away from political parties has forced candidates and elected officials into the waiting arms of political action committees, whose interests are certainly more narrow. Instead of appealing to a substantial portion of a party's agenda and ignoring other party provisos, candidates now may seek the support of the usually one-issue political action committees they agree with. Others are not sought for contributions, still others are avoided for any association with the candidate. So, in effect, you have as many political parties as there are candidates, each one with their own agenda that may or may not conform to one or the other leading parties' aggregate views, usually called the platform. This system works for national, federal and most state-wide candidates; they command the importance, resources and support from special interests and the public that allows them to create and fund an organization for every candidate. It often breaks down for candidates seeking seats in the.state legislatures and other partisan posts that only have small constituencies. But often, these office seekers have had to disassociate themselves from party politics because what the activists enacted. Republican and Democrat, no one in the public would support. Caucuses offer an opportunity for the parties to return to main-stream issues traditional in both parties and avoid those that splinter even the most like-minded of souls. By attracting the pubUc via a presidential preference poll, voters are shown there is no secrecy or mystique to party poUtica, it just takes a little investment of time and concern. They also see the only way to impress poUticians with their views is to do so with others in support, coalition politics it is now called; it used to be the old "party pressure." Many often complain about government, yet foryears precinct meetings, local, county and state political conventions have not been struggles among the many but fights among the few. Politics involves conflict and those who are resigned to be right and above the fighting, well, they'll continue to complain. Caucuses, however, give the average Joe a taste of the partisan poUtical system, a flavor that may not at first appeal but may be savored with time and experience. It's been our impression that most persons like being asked their opinions on the issues of the day. The caucuses afford this opportunity along with a chance to become involved in the process of politics that has worked well here for more than 200 years. Our appreciation goes to the Republicans who attend their caucuses Feb. 18 and we encourage Democrats to attend their precinct meetings Tuesday. Vetoing a sham At last a prominent conservative has given some careful thought to the proposed presidential, line-item veto, and has ezpoeed it for the sham that it is. 'This is an idea whose time hasn't come," columnist James J. Kilpatrick writes noting that the gimmick originated in the Confederate States of America, which had a notably weak and impotent governing structure, and has been sought unsuccessfully by U.S. Presidents dating back to Ulysses S. Grant. The line-item veto was embraced by President Reagan early on, and has been adopted by all of the Republican presidential candidates as part of conservative GOP gospel. As do they, Kilpatrick decries Congress' spend-happy ways, but says that the hne-item veto is not the answer. Presidents have a number of tactics at hand for keeping Congresses in check, including deferral and recision of spending items and the power to veto entire appropriations bills. Furthermore, Kilpatrick notes, major portions of the budget would be immune from the line-item veto—including Social Security, other entitlement programs and interest on the debt. But his major objection is the fundamental one that the veto would dnwtically alter the delicate balance of power that has existed in government for the past 200 years. To grant the Iine-itm veto would tilt the balance by giving Presidents more power than Presidents ought to have," he said. In fact, the framers of the Constitution deliberately gave ^ Congress the authority for making decisions about spending federal revenues as well as setting the course of policy. The line-item veto effectively would turn a basic clause of the Constitatkm on its ear The veto would not just give Presidents control over spending levels, but would also allow them to arbitrarily alter the entire nature and purpose of federal programs. This is not what the framers wanted. If supporters of the line-item veto gave some careful thought to it, they might see the inherent dangw in that, too. Lo9 Amgelea TImea Thursday, March 3, 1988 Americans killing Americans by Richard Cohen Here's how it happened: Foiu* men ran up to a car at a traffic light and, gangland style, emptied automatic and semiautomatic weapons into it. The driver of the car, age 23, was killed—shot ten times—while panicked pedestrians dove for cover. Beirut, 1988? Chicago, 1933? No sireee. Washington, D.C.—about a week ago. In the poor areas of Washington, a large part of the city, .„ young men are killing each other at a record pace—usually over drugs. The city has recorded 46 homicides, 35 drug-related, some preceded by torture and many carried out with the urban equivalant of heavy weaponry. In response, the police have been issued 9mm semiautomatic weapons and shotguns. This is war. Two summers ago, Len Bias, an extraordinarily gifted basketball player, died after using cocaine. His death stunned the nation and, for all that summer and part of the fall, both cocaine and its potent derivative, crack, were a national obsession. The networks indulged themselves in harrowing reports about the menace of crack. News magazines outdid themselves in sounding the alarm—sometimes using the word "epidemic"— and politicians responded, as they often do, by proposing legislation, some siUy, some dangerous, all ineffective. At the time, some drug experts predicted that coke, once the fashionable drug of the young and affluent, would, like water, seek its own leve]—in this case, the poor. Then, like herion before it, the problem would sink from sight. It would become just another destructive element in the ghetto, and white America, just recently obsessed with drugs, would pay it no heed when suburbia seemed safe. In our more reflective nioments, journalists sometimes find the vast and carnival-like presidential campaign detached from reality, often unrelated to the issues and problems the next President will have to handle. In Iowa, for instance, few of the candidates said anything meaningful about events in the West Bank and Gaza. Third World debt was hardly mentioned, no one had anything worthwhile to say about education or nuclear proliferation, and AIDS was discussed as if it could be eradicated by shouting the word "values" at it. Similarly, not once did I hear any of the candidates mention what was happening in Washington and the ghettos of other AmericanVities-the menace of youth gangs in Los Angeles, for instance. Worse, as kids were kilUng kids and Washington cops were confiscating 400 guns this year alone (many automatic or semiautomatic), Republican candidates in hunting-crazy New Hampshire proclaimed their courageous opposition to guncontrol. As for the news media, aside from local newspaperrs such as the Washington Post the Beruitization of Washington has hardly been noticed. After all, white America no longerfeels threatened. To an extent, the poUtical process is to blame for this neglect. Iowa is the first caucus state of any importance, but it's among the last in number of black people-about one percent of the population. New Hampshire, too, is a white enclave. For the moment, the candidates care only about the farm problem or the threat posed by the Seabrook nuclear-power plant. The rot of the nation's cities, the plight of the underclass, the appalling condition of schools .... well, who cares? In Iowa, the concern, understandably enough, is the corn surplus. But regional concerns aside, white America has little tolerance—and ahnost no sympathy—for the problems of black America, particularly its underclass. Possibly it's weary of the story and thinks, wrongly, that it's of no relevance—a conclusion that would be far different if the victims were white. But white America can neglect the black inner city only at its peril, not to mention expense. If only for humanitarian reasons, this problem will have to be dealt with. After all, the dead, addicted, ruined and terrorized are all human beings. All the presidential candidates have, at one time or another, proclaimed their leadership abilities. Like kids in a schoolyard, they have quarreled about who is the better leader, the biggest leader, the one with the most guts, courage and integrity. But leadership entails actually leading, getting out ahead of the pack and distinguishing between the important and the trivial. Yet while Washington was rolling up a homicide record, not one of the candidates had the guts to address the problems of the inner-city-to talk to New Hampshire and Iowa voters about what was happening over the horizon of their immediate self-interest. That would be leadership. The inner-city has yet to see it. Capitol commentary Pollsters miss the vote by Guy Shipler Only two things keep the lengthening political campaigns from being a total bore—the pollsters and the pundits. The two come together, like Jack and Jill; the pundits base their crystal-ball gazing and subsequent pontificating on the figures the pollsters track. And like Jack and Jill, they both sometimes come tumbling down. For which we should all be grateful. The world has become computerized to a point where almost everything ordinary humans do can be measured, predicted an analyzed precisely. High tech has reduced us in most of our daily pursuits to faceless, binary blips on phosphorescent screens. But happily for all of us, it does not yet have a stranglehold on the most vital element of our society—that mysterious entity called the Electorate. It's getting close, to be sure. The awesome technology of our day has given the political pollsters a remarkable degree of accuracy. But they still have to warn us that their margin of error runs in the three-percent to five-percent range (somethings larger in a close race). They have long since learned that when you let human beings loose in the voting booth, they act like human beings instead of like numbers on a chart. And once there, out of range of microchips and mysterious code words, they are likely to do God knows what. That's why polling and punditing stiU shape up as a sort of political Racing Form. (insider the latest example of last week's New Hampshire primary. Right up until the last minute you could get as many predictions on the GOP outcome as there were polls and pundits. While at least one count had Dole leading by eight points, another had the race dead even or "too cloee to call." But almost every pundit advised us that his or her crystal ball promised that if George Bush didn't lose he would win by such a small margin that it would come cloee to dooming his presidential chances. Bet on it. And so Bush won by nine points. Not bad for a sure loser. But the real winners are the American people. Despite the great progress in polling techniques, they still have the upper hand whea left to their own devices—aiKl about the only place that happens nowadays is in the voting booth. Despite all the foofooraw, hooplah and courting by candidates, they quietly do what they damn well please. They have done so even since polling and pontificating became a serious business, and in the process they have usually clttnged a lot more than the course of history. Example: Back in 1936 the Literary Digest magazine loudly trumpeted that Alf Landon was going to beat incumbent President Franklin Roosevelt. After Landon carried only Maine and Vermont for a total of eight electoral votes, the lAtersry Digest folded. It didn't make a lasting impression on the pundits—or the pollsters. Just 12 years later, everybody had Thomas E. Dewey trouncing another incumbent president, Harry Truman. Newspapers wrote about the presumed victory as a foregone conclusion. So did virtually every magazine: lAte had a cover picture of Dewey on a San Francisco ferry boat with a caption referring to him ai^ 'The Next President." Business Week magazine, where I was a staff writer in New York, ran a cover painting with the presidential seal behind Dewey's head. That had a challenging result for me. The day after the election Ed Grunwald, the managing editor, called me into his office and said he was assigning me to write the week's lead story about Truman's victory. "We want the pitch to be that we knew it all the time," Ed Grunwald told me. "You will have plenty to work with. All 22 members of the editorial staff in the Washington Bureau of McGraw-Hill are assigned to give you background on what it means, including a list of Truman's new cabinet members. Well contribute bits and pieces of information as they come in, otherwise you won't be interrupted." Then came the bombshell: "We will go to press on our regular schedule, day after tomorrow." At deadline time about 6 p.m. Friday, I stumbled into Grunwald's office with my story. It was indeed my story. I had virtually no help from anybody. The Washington Bureau has absolutely nothing to offer about a Truman cabinet, for instance, because the pollsters and the pundits had made it clear that there wasn't going to be any such thing. Nobody had the remotest idea about relationships between president and (ingress because there was supposed to be a different president dealing with Congress. And so on and on. The resulting story was more shadow then substance. The next week Grunwald sent me down to Princeton to interview George Gallup Sr. I expected him to slam the door in my face, since his poll was in those days highly respected for its accuracy and it had missed badly. Instead, he graciously explained that he had simply quit polling the Truman-Dewey race too early. That pitfall has so far been avoided in 1988. Yet even though the polling (and subsequent punditing) went on right up until prinaary day last week, they stiU missed the boat. So the voters still have at least some control over their lives. May it so remain. • \> Your Vieiii Thursday, March 3, 1988 Noise offencis resident Editor: Help! Is there anybody else out there who is being driven crazy by the" noise from the plant site? r^ like I called the Titanium plant and they sent three experts out to my home. They listened and agreed that the noise was loud and irritating. So far I've only talked with three of my neighbors, and they are also disgusted by the constant whining sound. Also, between 6 and 6:30 a.m. Henderson looks beautiful and the air is clear except for the large, white clouds spewing from the plant site. By 8 a.m. Henderson looks downtown Los Angeles. Although the Titanium plant claims I'm the only one who has complained, they say they are planning to put mufflers on their offensive sound system. I fmd it hard to believe that just one complaint would cause them to go to such extremes, there must be some others out there who have voiced their dissatisfaction. For those of you who haven't, it's time to speak up. Post script: Since composing the above letter to the editor, I've talked with people who admit to hearing the noise from the plant site, but have tried to "tune it out" as they felt nothing could be done to stop it. Sylvia Bowman Supreme Court and Congress Dear Editor: There was a definite point to Virgil McKinney's letter regarding Representative James Bilbray's questionnaire discussing "the Supreme Court couljd change the laws governing tibortion." It is not the duty or even the right of the Supreme Court to make laws. (Congress is to enact the laws. The Supreme Court can only rule whether or not the laws passed by-Congress are constitutional. In many of its rulings, the Supreme Cowrt has made decisions that have had the effect of a new law, even though it is only a regulatory authority. But it is up to Congressmen, such as Bilbray, to change or write laws that are constitutional. I sincerely hope that our Congressman and our Editor know that it is Congress, not the Supreme Court, that writes and changes the, laws. Let's abide by the Constitution. Merrill K. Molsberry I LOVE MY PEOPLE, LIKE A BROTHER... Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Page S SS5SSS55^BS&SSS5S5S5SBBi We the People This is one of a series of columns celebrating the 200th anniversary of the U.S. Constitution. Anyone who studies the history of the U.S. Constitution discovers that one individual emerges as the most important force for constitutional government. At times on center stage and on other occasions behind the scenes, James Madison was the prime mover in the drafting of the Constitution in 1787 and in the ratification process that followed. Even then, his work was not completed, for it was Madison who wrote the first 10 amendments to the Constitution, better known as The Bill of Rights, and pushed them through the first Congress in 1789. Opponents of the Constitution used the absence of a Bill of Rights as their best argument against ratification. Virginia was a critical state, and the debate was intense. In order to bring Virginia into the fold, Madison pledged that immediately following ratification he would push through "the most satisfactory provisions for all essential rights, particularly the rights of Conscience in the fullest latitude, the freedom of the press, trials by jury, security against general warrants etc." Madison was doing more than fulfilling a poUtical promise, for his later life demonstates how strongly he belived in fundamental rights. He began the First Amendment with the words "congress shall make no laws" believing they guarded against any encroachment on a free press, free speech,rehgious freedom and the right to assemble. When as president Madison was vilified by the press, he was urged by supporters to silence his critics through passage of laws or through violence. He refused to violate his own principles. The blunt words of the First Amendment were not Ughtly chosen as Madison wrote that he wanted "every government disarmed of powers which trench upon those particular rights." Madison biographer Irving Brant spoke out against reinter— preting the meaning of The Bill of Rights. "The men who placed the guarantee of free speech in the Constitution were not authorizing Congress to choose between its protection and its suppression by a comparison of values," Brant wrote. 'Their concern was with the fundamental basis of all self-governing societies, the right of people to think, speak, write, publish and assemble without the menacing shadow of government over them." Americans owe a debt to James Madison, a debt that can be paid by safeguarding his legacy for future generations. 1988, PM Editorial Services The CISPES investigation Documents obtained as a result of a Freedom of Information lawsuit show a picture of intense investigation by the FBI of an organization dedicated to opposing the administration's policies in Central America. The Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador (CISPES) was the subject of probes in 1981-82 and 1983-85. The nationwide investigation included surveillance of members, use of undercover agents and the accumulation of files that included photographs and other personal data on those who had attended organization meetings or pubUc demonstrations. In connection with this inquiry, the FBI also looked into politically active organizations as diverse as the MaryknoU Sisters and the United Auto Workers. It was a wide-ranging and intrusive investigation, and it produced not a single charge of wrongdoing. Members of CISPES charge that the entire effort was pohtically motivated and designed to intimidate those who oppose administration policies abroad. The FBI cites national security in refusing to discuss the case in detail, but does claim that its investigations were based on "alleged criminal activity" by group members. But if that activity included allegations of terrorism or national security breaches involving a foreign power, different FBI guidelines apply to initiating an investigation, and those guidelines are secret. Current law also provides that certain investigative techniques, such as breaking and entering and searching without warrants, can be undertaken if the attorney general finds that the target of an investigation is an agent of a foreign power. No one knows whether that special power was invoked here, but CISPES members believe it was. Last summer, the House Judiciary Committee and both the House and Senate intelligence committees looked into charges that the FBI investigation of CISPES was a case of egregious harassment of legitimate political opponents of U.S. policy. Nothing came of these inquiries, but with the release of 1,20(7 documents detailing the extent of the FBI investigation and raising questions about its justification, it is time for a new look by Congress. The House Judiciary C!ommittee is expected to question Director William Sessions about the case in March, but he will probably refuse to give public testimony in that forum. The intelligence committees should,ask him to explain and defend this massive effort and to demonstrate, if he can, that this was not a case of political harassment. The committees also ought to consider legislation to set standards for cbunterintelligence and terrorism investigations and assume an oversight responsibility for these cases. As it is now, the Dotential for violating the civil Uberties of political dissidents mder the guise of national security is too great. Waabington Post Opening eyes to extremism: exposing white supremacist liate groups __ '_ ^y Arthur J. Kropp ^s Jimmy the Greek and Al Campania can attest, it's risky to make remarks on national television that can be construed as racist—even if the remarks are not intended maliciously. From the experiences of these two "transgressors," it appears that Americans have reached a consensus on the evils of racism. With that in mind, I had expected that the national media would snap to attention after the name-calling battle that took place recently on the Oprah Winfrey talk show. The show featured "skinheads"—young people who are serving as the youth group of the white supremacist movement in this country. Among other inflammatory remarks, one of the "skinhead" panelists-called Winfrey, who is black, a "monkey." But so far, Fve read nothing about the racial slurs and hatred that filled this program—which leads me to wonder how seriously Americans are taking the growth of the white supremacist movement in our country. After all, it's much easier to ignore groups who are so extreme as to border on the unbelievabls than it is to ignore Jimmy the Greek. And it's hard to take seriously young people who sobnquent refers to their hairdo. But the "skinheads" and their adult counterparts, who form groups such as the Aryan nation, The Order, and the White Aryan Resistance, threaten the values that support and nourish this country, from equality and tolerance to a willingness to abide by the law. What's mors, thase hate groups—which boast 16,000-20,000 activiits and another 160,000 followers-are beccMming more and mors active. For example: Outside San Francisco, "skinheads" threw a teenage boy through a plate-glass window when he tried to stop them from pasting up anti-semitic posters, and in Sacramento, a former gang member "gone soft" was nailed, crucinxion-style, to an eight-foot board. • The leader of the White Aryan Resistance, Tom Metzger, produces a cable television program entitled, "Race and Reason" aired in some 16 markets around the country. One typical remark on this interview-style program is "we can start gassing all these niggers and get rid of them because there's no need to keep paying taxes on their worthless lives." FBI tapes show that an "underground" of racist and antisemitic leaders coordinated bank robberies, commando-stype raids on armored cars, counterfeiting, and other crimesincluding the murder of Denver talk-show host Alan Berg. Moreover, radally-motivated violence is not confined to the "organized" hate groups, but is a growing problem among many populations, particularly inner city youth. Just recently, the center for Democratic Renewal, which monitors incidents of racial violence, released a report entitled, They Don't All We Sheets.'The report provides a chr(iok)gy of radally-motiYiated incidents nationwide, which shows that few states are immune from this kind of activity and counts a total of 2,919 raciallymotivated incidents between 1980 and 1986. Examples include: a crossbuming on a University of Alabama campus; the hazing of a black cadet at the Citadel in South Carolina; and the fatal shooting of a rabbinical student in Pittsburgh, Penn. What is to be done sbout this problem? Taking our heads out of the sand is an important first stp. For example, several members of Congress have called on the Department of Justice to provide a breakdown in their crime reports of those incidents motivated by prejudice and bigotry. Awareness is critical; however, it is not sufficient to stem the tide. One part of the solution is "hate-crime" legislation, which establishes special sanctions against numerous types of crimes when they are shown to have been motivated by prejudice oi bigotry. Such legislation has been passed in several states, and has now been introduced at the federal level. But although legislation is important, it alone cannot eradicate racism. The problem is rooted in people's feelings and attitudes, and the solution requires a deeper commitment. The media must go beyond their coverage of "mainstream intolerance" to expose in the daylgiht the work hate groups do in the shadows. Schools must do a better job of teaching civic values to their students, including the value of pluralism. Most important, the pubUc must take these hate groups seriously. We must realise that these extremist elements represent the tangible manifestation of prejudice and ignorance. During the Oprah Winfrey Show, one member of the audience said, "White supremacy, since it comes from white people, must be fought by white people." I would go further. The dangers posed by this vunilent bigotry must be fought by every one of us—white and black, Christian and Jewish, rich and poor. Only by working together can we defeat those who seek to divide us. Editor's note: Arthur J. Kropp is president of People For the Amwism Way, a nonpartiaan 270,00(^member coaatlta* tionel liberties orgaolaation. ...--^-..s...,.^..:.

PAGE 6

Fti* I Henderson Home Newt, Henderson, Nevada Thursday, March 3. 1988 Methodists to serve Lords supper Sunday Hyman Gold Hyman Gold, Beverly Hills Ensemble concert slated Hyman Gold and the Beverly Hills Ensemble will perform a free concert of Irish music on Sunday, March 6 at 2:30 p.m. at the Henderson Civic Center, 201 Lead Street. The "Echos of Erin" concert will be dedicated to the memory of their friend, Frank Russell, who passed away in December. He was a long time member of the Sons of Erin and led the St. Patricks' Day Parade very year for -j-tiie past 21 years. • The ensemble featuring directory Hyman Gold on cello, Howard Zuegner on piano, Nat Brown on woodwinds and Ginger Smock on violin will play such beloved melodies as "The Minstrel Boy," 'The Irish Washerwoman," 'The Kerry Dancer,' and "Danny Boy." Audience participation will be part of the program. This concert marks the fifth anniversary of the Beverly Hills Ensembles participation in the Sunday concert series. This and all Sunday concerts are provided by the Henderson Parks and Recreation Department with matching funds provided by the Music Perfor manc e Tru stj'ttflda, ioeaLNo.569. For additional information please contact the civic Center at 565-2121. All in the community are invited to worship this Sunday at First Henderson United Methodist Church (UMC) The Lord's Supper will be served at both the 8:15 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. services. At First Henderson all persons are invited to partake of the Lord's Supper. Pastor, the Rev. Louie Lyon, will bring the message and it is entitled, "The true and final sacrifice" based on the gospel of John 2:13-22. During the worship service there is a time for all the children of the congregation to come forward for their own message. A nursery is provided at the 10:30 a.m. service. This Sunday morning Lois Force will share with the congregation in music with a solo entitled "We Worship You" at both morning services. The adult choir under the direction of Dorothy Vondenbrink will sing "His Love Poured Out" at the 10:30 a.m. service. The youth group will leave church at 1:45 p.m. for an afternoon at Iceland Skate Center. The cost is $4.75 per person. Don't forget parent permission forms. This Sunday evening at 7 p.m. lay leader EUie Knapp will bring the message for the vesper service. Ellie's message is entitled "Do we really trust God?" based on Deuteronomy 6:4-5. The women of First Henderson UMC are hosting this year's world day of prayer service on Friday, March 4 at 10:30 a.m. All women of Henderson are invited to join with women from throughout the world in this Lenten prayer service. Additional opportunities this remind everyone of the fun club meeting and outing on Saturday, March 12. The group is going to Scandia Family Fun Center and Leatherby's for ice cream. Meet at the church parking lot by 5:30 p.m. The First Henderson United Methodist Church is located in the Highland Hills section of Henderson at 609 East Horizon Drive. Call 565-6049 for further information on church programs. ^ Baptists list activities Thursday. March 3, 1988 Everyone is invited to attend the Bible study and worship services at the First Southern Baptist Church, 240 ChoUa Street. Simday school begins at 9:30 a.m. each Sunday morning. Bible study is provided for all ages, preschool through senior adult. Worship services are at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. each Sunday. The pubUc is invited to attend the Pastor's Bible study, verse by verse, and prayer service each Wednesday evening at 7 p.m. Choir practice is scheduled for Wednesday evening at 8 p.m. A home Bible study is conducted each Friday evening at 7 p.m. at the home of Bob and Evelyn Tallent, 513 Pueblo. For further information call Pastor Robert Holmes at 565-6072. LDS women's conference scheduled The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS) Henderson stake will sponsor a special Women's Conference on Saturday, March 12, starting at 11 a.m. in the Cholla Street Chapel, 303 ChoUa Street. The conference, with the theme "Silhouette of womanhood," will be under the direction of stake Relief Society presidency, Lola Irons, LeAn Jensen and Bette Stearraan. A program will be presented with the keynote speaker author Blaipe Ybrgason. The women of the area are invited to attend thg^ c onference. World Day of Prayer Friday week include the United Methodist Women's Faith Circle meeting at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, the adult choir practice at 6:30 p.m., Wednesday and the youth choir practice which meets at 6 p.m. on Wednesday. The congregation also wishes to World Day of Prayer begins a second century Friday, March 4. It began 101 years ago in the United States as a day of prayer for mission. It has now expanded until today it is celebrated in 170 countries and regions of the world. The theme of this 1988 World Day of Prayer is "Open doors." Written by both Protestant and Roman Catholic women from Bra"zil it reflects the concerns of South American women who are struggling to achieve greater freedom and elevate the quality of life. In Henderson, World Day of Prayer obeervances will be conducted at the United Methodist See prayer page 8 ATTEND CHURCH SUNDAY 5P0NS0RDIT In Honor of National Nutrition Month Diet Center Offers You a Way to Tastefully Improve Your Health! m^ BOULDER THEATRE BOULDER CITY • 293-3145 Monday thru Saturday—Adult .. .M.OO Juniors *3.00 Sanlora ft Children •2.S0 STARTS FRIDAY MARCH 4 SHOWTIMES MON-FRI 6 & 8:45 SAT & SUN 3:00-5:45-8:15 SAT MATINEE $2.50 SUNDAY ALL SEATS $3 STEVEN SPIELBERG^.!. EMPIRE OF THE SUN oooo ELDORADO CASINO DOWNTOWN HENDERSON 564-1811 '.' You Are Invited to DIET CENTER'S OPEN HOUSE and FREE COOKING CLASS "High-Fiber, LowFat Cooking'* Thursday, March 10: 5 to 7 p.m. Class 7-8 Saturday, March 12: 10 to 12 p.m. Class 12-1 Refreshments Drawing for "Diet Center Cookbook" CALL TO REGISTER FOR CLASSES .r 43S0474 Green Valley Diet Center 2746 N. Green Valley Parkvray ELDORADO CLASSIC BINGO GAME SATURDAY MARCH 5, 1988 9:00 P.M. I.LEHERX $600.00 7. SMALL PICTURE FRAME $500.00 2. HARDWAY $200.00 8. HARDWAY $200.00 3. HARDWAY $200.00 9. HARDWAY $200.00 4. TOP OR BOnOM LINE $200.00 10. TOP OR BOTTOM LINE $200.00 5. HARDWAY $200.00 11. HARDWAY $200.00 6. HARDWAY $200.00 12. COVERALL $1,199.00 WIN.. .$4,099.00T0TAL PAID-OUT... $4.00 Per board~$16.00 per person rninlmum—One seat per person aggregate pay. Reservations & buy-ins suggested^lf a minimum of 160 people have not purchased their ticket by March 4, 1988 — The game will be cancelled and all money refunded. No refunds unless game is cancelled. Anyone purchasing their buy-in by February 29, 1988—Will receive a $3.00 Free Play Coupon for the 4^^30 p.m. Mini-Session. L FREE COCKTAILS AND HORS D'OEUVRES I IF WE HAVE 250 OR MORE PEOPLE—WE WILL ADD A SPECIAL DOUBLE BINQO GAME FOR $200—(TO BE PLAYED AFTER COVERALL) Henderson Home News, Henderson Nevada Page 7 City sets meeting to discuss impact of airport noise ^^.. by Scott Dickensheets Home News Staff Writer Henderson city officials are planning to meet with Green Valley residents Wednesday to discuss proposed changes at McCarran International Airport, and how they will affect the neighborhood. According to city manager Gary Bloomquist, Green Valley residents are concerned that changes in flight patterns and the addition of an east-west runway will increase the noise impact there. "Are there legitimate ways to reduce the impact in Green Valley?" Bloomquist asked. 'That's what we want to talk about." Airport officials are considering a plan to have aircraft take off to the east more than they do now. Their flight path would lead them over the northern portions of Green Valley, and if pilots bank quickly to slip into the flight pattern, the noise problems in Green Valley will increase. "In an su^a where the prevailing winds are north-south, should the east-west runways be heavily used," asked Bloomquist. "From what I know, it's best to take off into the wind." Airport officials are also planning to add another eastweat runway, which will increase the air traffic above Green Valley. An airport consultant liired by McCarran, Ron Tulis of San Francisco, has been critical of Henderson for allowing residential development in the path of, the runway, even though previous sound studies indicated there was no conflict as far away as Green Valley. Those studies are being revised, and the sound impact area is being extended to Green Valley and beyond, through Whitney Ranch"He can be critical if he wants," Bloomquist said, "but they're the ones changing the sound contours." "Sound contours" indicate areas around an airport impacted by the noise. Some local developers agree that the normal climate insulation procedures protect against sound as well. The meeting will be held at 7:30 a.m. in the city of Henderson's Green Valley office. Green Valley's representative to the Henderson City Council, Andy Hafen, wiU also attend. GV library features Purcell series A series of the works of arst Roy Purcell will be f eatiured hi the Green Valley Library and Cultural Center beginning Tuesday, March 8. The first presentation will be "The Journey; An Inward Search For Self," from 8:30 to 9 p.m. "Painting Demonstration, Techniques in Watercolor and Pastel," will be held Tuesday, March 15, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. "The Chloride Mural, What Are They, and What Do They Mean,?" will be presented Tuesday, March 29 from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. And the final exhibition will be Toetry Reading, Selected Readings From Original Portfolios," Tuesday, April 5 from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. In conjunction with its grand opening Tuesday, Feb. 23, the Green Valley Library and Cultural Center also opened Purcell's restrospective exhibit, which explores the development of his artistry, including early works in oil and enamel from the '60s never before exhibited. Green Valley opens second village American Nevada Corporation, the mjwter developer for Green Valley, is opening its second major phase of development, the Village of Silver Springs. • N Vice president of community developmeiit at American Nevada Brad Nelson said that the popularity of the area's original village necessitated the evolution of Siher Springs. "The original vilage in Green Valley is rapidly reaching buildout," said Nlson. "The Village of Silver Springs will not only carry on Green Valley's strong tradition of family living, but vill actually expand upon its original theme." Located south of the mginal village, Silver Springs his been planned with a versatile mix of housing, special parks, ncreational facilities, school and church sites and a neiglborhood convenience shopping center with office space ^or community services. It will encompass approximately 420 acres upon completion. "The initial land-devel* opment phase is nearly complete," said Nelson. "The first model homes, however, are currently under construction and will be open for public inspection in the near future." Besides the unique visual beauty of the area's plateaus, canyons and rolling hills, one of its primary amenities will be its central recreation complex. A complex of parks, tennis courts, swimming pool, clubhoiise and ballfields will be available to Silver Springs residents, as well as to the general public as a result of an agreement between American Nevada and the city of Henderson. American Nevada also has an agreement with the Clark County School District to provide a site for a prototype, earth-shelted school. "We're putting special effort into building a complete comInuiiity, viDage by village, with schools, recreation and services which are the esential elements of a true master-planned compiunity," said Nelson. GV student grabs top spelling honors For the second straight year. Dusty Cornwall has proven his superiority in spelling. Cornwall clinched the top eighth grade spot in the Feb. 24 Clark County division of the Nevada State Spelling Bee. Last year Cornwall reigned as seventh grade champ. Cornwall, who lives in Green Valley and attends Cannon Junior High School, topped the competition by successfuUy spelling "niche" and "saboteur" during the competition, which was televised on KLVX Channel 10. Cornwall and Clark County's sixth and seventh grade champs will journey to Reno in April to compete with other statewide winners. Cornwall and fellow winners each received a $100 savings bond and a set of dictionaries. Send us your Green Valley news ( i. 'The City has agreed to provide maintenance, as well as recreational programs for the facility," said Nelson. "Not only does this allow more people to enjoy our community, but it also eliminates homeowner's dues for Silver Springs residents." Another unique amenity is the villages' Rim Trail Park, which will be accessible for both day and night use. This pedestrian and biking trail system will make every part of the village easily accessible and will eventually connect to other areas of the city's regional trail system. "Complimenting, yet contrasting with the groomed park area, is the extensive natural open space system within Silver Springs," said Nelson. "Adjacent to the Rim Trail Park, the rugged natural beauty of thfcdesert is being preserved." Rivers' subject 'Tlie official inheritance of the kingdom of God' Clarenda Busch, song evangelist and minister of music in Arizona, will be presenting a sacred concert at 9:15 a.m. at Southside Christian Church at the new location, 1631 East Sunset Road, between Eastern Avenue and Las Vegas Boulevard, South. The location is one-half mile west of Sunset Park on Sunset serving the Green Valley area of Las Vegas. Pastor Joel Rivers will be speaking on the topic of "The official inheritance of the kingdom of God". The Lord's Supper will be lead by Bob Kaiser with prayers and devotion. He will be assisted by Glen McConnell, John Terry, Ron Gordon andWilliam Vogel. The organ and piano will be played by Terry Chitwood, pianist with the senior citizen's band. For more information, please call 458-2731. Our agent has a new extension!' Jim Tnny QREEN VALLEY PLAZA (On Sunt Rd) 2748 N. OrMn Valtoy Pkwy. HmidarMii, Nv. 89014 (702) 451-9800 Your agent at Farmers Insurance Group of Compa nies has just extended their famous 30^ auto insurance program. Now drivers between 30 and 69 years FARMERS 4lNSURANCEk. GROUP ?of age could sav^ on their auto insurance if they qualify. Call your local Farmers agent today. And when you do, make sure you ask for the new extension. America can depend on Fanners ^S^ ^ A Complete Travel Service TRAVEL TOUR SERVICE NARFE slates meeting The National Association of Retired Federal Employees (NARFE), Chapter 2031 of Henderson will conduct its monthly meeting, Monday, March 7 in room three of the Civic Center. All members are urged to attend. • AIRLIKE TIQKETS AT AIRPORT PRICES • AIR-RAIL-SEA PACKAGES • AMTRAK-EURAIL TICKETS • PASSPORT INFORMATION HOTEL & AIR RESERVATIONS VISAS OBTAINED 11 1 WATER STREET, HDN. 565-6431 2620 GREEN VALLEY PKWY. 458-8674 ALL NEW MOVIES Why Pay More? per day CALICO RIDGE UNIT 2 30 29 20 27 26 25 24 i Portuloca Court ? Building sites ih Unit II at Calico Ridge art { now for sale. These lots (averaging over V4 acre) are priced from $22,500 with terms or 10% off for cash. Drive 3 miles east from Bouktor Highway on Lake Mead Drive and take a look for yourself or give me a call at 564-6060 and I will personally sliow you wliat L we fiave to offer. ^. 10 ^: MJ Bagley 23 Ow^nMMiDnv* ^ .6 11 22 21 12 13 14 10 1 1 ONE STORY MOtlCS OMlt HB TWO STORY HOnCS fERHITTEO 15 20 19 CALICO RIDGE 61 E. Lalce Mead Dr. (702) 8<4 eOtO IT^^^^S^JT • 'S^J!^^ wpjmmiui'JiyTJt-wjtww'.'i'^. 1!!rT!7TT! "•VTTVrrr^t^rfP^mfm r "Y*it^ • 'T^"TT;rii • n,a. -wptr-^

PAGE 7

Fti* I Henderson Home Newt, Henderson, Nevada Thursday, March 3. 1988 Methodists to serve Lords supper Sunday Hyman Gold Hyman Gold, Beverly Hills Ensemble concert slated Hyman Gold and the Beverly Hills Ensemble will perform a free concert of Irish music on Sunday, March 6 at 2:30 p.m. at the Henderson Civic Center, 201 Lead Street. The "Echos of Erin" concert will be dedicated to the memory of their friend, Frank Russell, who passed away in December. He was a long time member of the Sons of Erin and led the St. Patricks' Day Parade very year for -j-tiie past 21 years. • The ensemble featuring directory Hyman Gold on cello, Howard Zuegner on piano, Nat Brown on woodwinds and Ginger Smock on violin will play such beloved melodies as "The Minstrel Boy," 'The Irish Washerwoman," 'The Kerry Dancer,' and "Danny Boy." Audience participation will be part of the program. This concert marks the fifth anniversary of the Beverly Hills Ensembles participation in the Sunday concert series. This and all Sunday concerts are provided by the Henderson Parks and Recreation Department with matching funds provided by the Music Perfor manc e Tru stj'ttflda, ioeaLNo.569. For additional information please contact the civic Center at 565-2121. All in the community are invited to worship this Sunday at First Henderson United Methodist Church (UMC) The Lord's Supper will be served at both the 8:15 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. services. At First Henderson all persons are invited to partake of the Lord's Supper. Pastor, the Rev. Louie Lyon, will bring the message and it is entitled, "The true and final sacrifice" based on the gospel of John 2:13-22. During the worship service there is a time for all the children of the congregation to come forward for their own message. A nursery is provided at the 10:30 a.m. service. This Sunday morning Lois Force will share with the congregation in music with a solo entitled "We Worship You" at both morning services. The adult choir under the direction of Dorothy Vondenbrink will sing "His Love Poured Out" at the 10:30 a.m. service. The youth group will leave church at 1:45 p.m. for an afternoon at Iceland Skate Center. The cost is $4.75 per person. Don't forget parent permission forms. This Sunday evening at 7 p.m. lay leader EUie Knapp will bring the message for the vesper service. Ellie's message is entitled "Do we really trust God?" based on Deuteronomy 6:4-5. The women of First Henderson UMC are hosting this year's world day of prayer service on Friday, March 4 at 10:30 a.m. All women of Henderson are invited to join with women from throughout the world in this Lenten prayer service. Additional opportunities this remind everyone of the fun club meeting and outing on Saturday, March 12. The group is going to Scandia Family Fun Center and Leatherby's for ice cream. Meet at the church parking lot by 5:30 p.m. The First Henderson United Methodist Church is located in the Highland Hills section of Henderson at 609 East Horizon Drive. Call 565-6049 for further information on church programs. ^ Baptists list activities Thursday. March 3, 1988 Everyone is invited to attend the Bible study and worship services at the First Southern Baptist Church, 240 ChoUa Street. Simday school begins at 9:30 a.m. each Sunday morning. Bible study is provided for all ages, preschool through senior adult. Worship services are at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. each Sunday. The pubUc is invited to attend the Pastor's Bible study, verse by verse, and prayer service each Wednesday evening at 7 p.m. Choir practice is scheduled for Wednesday evening at 8 p.m. A home Bible study is conducted each Friday evening at 7 p.m. at the home of Bob and Evelyn Tallent, 513 Pueblo. For further information call Pastor Robert Holmes at 565-6072. LDS women's conference scheduled The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS) Henderson stake will sponsor a special Women's Conference on Saturday, March 12, starting at 11 a.m. in the Cholla Street Chapel, 303 ChoUa Street. The conference, with the theme "Silhouette of womanhood," will be under the direction of stake Relief Society presidency, Lola Irons, LeAn Jensen and Bette Stearraan. A program will be presented with the keynote speaker author Blaipe Ybrgason. The women of the area are invited to attend thg^ c onference. World Day of Prayer Friday week include the United Methodist Women's Faith Circle meeting at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, the adult choir practice at 6:30 p.m., Wednesday and the youth choir practice which meets at 6 p.m. on Wednesday. The congregation also wishes to World Day of Prayer begins a second century Friday, March 4. It began 101 years ago in the United States as a day of prayer for mission. It has now expanded until today it is celebrated in 170 countries and regions of the world. The theme of this 1988 World Day of Prayer is "Open doors." Written by both Protestant and Roman Catholic women from Bra"zil it reflects the concerns of South American women who are struggling to achieve greater freedom and elevate the quality of life. In Henderson, World Day of Prayer obeervances will be conducted at the United Methodist See prayer page 8 ATTEND CHURCH SUNDAY 5P0NS0RDIT In Honor of National Nutrition Month Diet Center Offers You a Way to Tastefully Improve Your Health! m^ BOULDER THEATRE BOULDER CITY • 293-3145 Monday thru Saturday—Adult .. .M.OO Juniors *3.00 Sanlora ft Children •2.S0 STARTS FRIDAY MARCH 4 SHOWTIMES MON-FRI 6 & 8:45 SAT & SUN 3:00-5:45-8:15 SAT MATINEE $2.50 SUNDAY ALL SEATS $3 STEVEN SPIELBERG^.!. EMPIRE OF THE SUN oooo ELDORADO CASINO DOWNTOWN HENDERSON 564-1811 '.' You Are Invited to DIET CENTER'S OPEN HOUSE and FREE COOKING CLASS "High-Fiber, LowFat Cooking'* Thursday, March 10: 5 to 7 p.m. Class 7-8 Saturday, March 12: 10 to 12 p.m. Class 12-1 Refreshments Drawing for "Diet Center Cookbook" CALL TO REGISTER FOR CLASSES .r 43S0474 Green Valley Diet Center 2746 N. Green Valley Parkvray ELDORADO CLASSIC BINGO GAME SATURDAY MARCH 5, 1988 9:00 P.M. I.LEHERX $600.00 7. SMALL PICTURE FRAME $500.00 2. HARDWAY $200.00 8. HARDWAY $200.00 3. HARDWAY $200.00 9. HARDWAY $200.00 4. TOP OR BOnOM LINE $200.00 10. TOP OR BOTTOM LINE $200.00 5. HARDWAY $200.00 11. HARDWAY $200.00 6. HARDWAY $200.00 12. COVERALL $1,199.00 WIN.. .$4,099.00T0TAL PAID-OUT... $4.00 Per board~$16.00 per person rninlmum—One seat per person aggregate pay. Reservations & buy-ins suggested^lf a minimum of 160 people have not purchased their ticket by March 4, 1988 — The game will be cancelled and all money refunded. No refunds unless game is cancelled. Anyone purchasing their buy-in by February 29, 1988—Will receive a $3.00 Free Play Coupon for the 4^^30 p.m. Mini-Session. L FREE COCKTAILS AND HORS D'OEUVRES I IF WE HAVE 250 OR MORE PEOPLE—WE WILL ADD A SPECIAL DOUBLE BINQO GAME FOR $200—(TO BE PLAYED AFTER COVERALL) Henderson Home News, Henderson Nevada Page 7 City sets meeting to discuss impact of airport noise ^^.. by Scott Dickensheets Home News Staff Writer Henderson city officials are planning to meet with Green Valley residents Wednesday to discuss proposed changes at McCarran International Airport, and how they will affect the neighborhood. According to city manager Gary Bloomquist, Green Valley residents are concerned that changes in flight patterns and the addition of an east-west runway will increase the noise impact there. "Are there legitimate ways to reduce the impact in Green Valley?" Bloomquist asked. 'That's what we want to talk about." Airport officials are considering a plan to have aircraft take off to the east more than they do now. Their flight path would lead them over the northern portions of Green Valley, and if pilots bank quickly to slip into the flight pattern, the noise problems in Green Valley will increase. "In an su^a where the prevailing winds are north-south, should the east-west runways be heavily used," asked Bloomquist. "From what I know, it's best to take off into the wind." Airport officials are also planning to add another eastweat runway, which will increase the air traffic above Green Valley. An airport consultant liired by McCarran, Ron Tulis of San Francisco, has been critical of Henderson for allowing residential development in the path of, the runway, even though previous sound studies indicated there was no conflict as far away as Green Valley. Those studies are being revised, and the sound impact area is being extended to Green Valley and beyond, through Whitney Ranch"He can be critical if he wants," Bloomquist said, "but they're the ones changing the sound contours." "Sound contours" indicate areas around an airport impacted by the noise. Some local developers agree that the normal climate insulation procedures protect against sound as well. The meeting will be held at 7:30 a.m. in the city of Henderson's Green Valley office. Green Valley's representative to the Henderson City Council, Andy Hafen, wiU also attend. GV library features Purcell series A series of the works of arst Roy Purcell will be f eatiured hi the Green Valley Library and Cultural Center beginning Tuesday, March 8. The first presentation will be "The Journey; An Inward Search For Self," from 8:30 to 9 p.m. "Painting Demonstration, Techniques in Watercolor and Pastel," will be held Tuesday, March 15, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. "The Chloride Mural, What Are They, and What Do They Mean,?" will be presented Tuesday, March 29 from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. And the final exhibition will be Toetry Reading, Selected Readings From Original Portfolios," Tuesday, April 5 from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. In conjunction with its grand opening Tuesday, Feb. 23, the Green Valley Library and Cultural Center also opened Purcell's restrospective exhibit, which explores the development of his artistry, including early works in oil and enamel from the '60s never before exhibited. Green Valley opens second village American Nevada Corporation, the mjwter developer for Green Valley, is opening its second major phase of development, the Village of Silver Springs. • N Vice president of community developmeiit at American Nevada Brad Nelson said that the popularity of the area's original village necessitated the evolution of Siher Springs. "The original vilage in Green Valley is rapidly reaching buildout," said Nlson. "The Village of Silver Springs will not only carry on Green Valley's strong tradition of family living, but vill actually expand upon its original theme." Located south of the mginal village, Silver Springs his been planned with a versatile mix of housing, special parks, ncreational facilities, school and church sites and a neiglborhood convenience shopping center with office space ^or community services. It will encompass approximately 420 acres upon completion. "The initial land-devel* opment phase is nearly complete," said Nelson. "The first model homes, however, are currently under construction and will be open for public inspection in the near future." Besides the unique visual beauty of the area's plateaus, canyons and rolling hills, one of its primary amenities will be its central recreation complex. A complex of parks, tennis courts, swimming pool, clubhoiise and ballfields will be available to Silver Springs residents, as well as to the general public as a result of an agreement between American Nevada and the city of Henderson. American Nevada also has an agreement with the Clark County School District to provide a site for a prototype, earth-shelted school. "We're putting special effort into building a complete comInuiiity, viDage by village, with schools, recreation and services which are the esential elements of a true master-planned compiunity," said Nelson. GV student grabs top spelling honors For the second straight year. Dusty Cornwall has proven his superiority in spelling. Cornwall clinched the top eighth grade spot in the Feb. 24 Clark County division of the Nevada State Spelling Bee. Last year Cornwall reigned as seventh grade champ. Cornwall, who lives in Green Valley and attends Cannon Junior High School, topped the competition by successfuUy spelling "niche" and "saboteur" during the competition, which was televised on KLVX Channel 10. Cornwall and Clark County's sixth and seventh grade champs will journey to Reno in April to compete with other statewide winners. Cornwall and fellow winners each received a $100 savings bond and a set of dictionaries. Send us your Green Valley news ( i. 'The City has agreed to provide maintenance, as well as recreational programs for the facility," said Nelson. "Not only does this allow more people to enjoy our community, but it also eliminates homeowner's dues for Silver Springs residents." Another unique amenity is the villages' Rim Trail Park, which will be accessible for both day and night use. This pedestrian and biking trail system will make every part of the village easily accessible and will eventually connect to other areas of the city's regional trail system. "Complimenting, yet contrasting with the groomed park area, is the extensive natural open space system within Silver Springs," said Nelson. "Adjacent to the Rim Trail Park, the rugged natural beauty of thfcdesert is being preserved." Rivers' subject 'Tlie official inheritance of the kingdom of God' Clarenda Busch, song evangelist and minister of music in Arizona, will be presenting a sacred concert at 9:15 a.m. at Southside Christian Church at the new location, 1631 East Sunset Road, between Eastern Avenue and Las Vegas Boulevard, South. The location is one-half mile west of Sunset Park on Sunset serving the Green Valley area of Las Vegas. Pastor Joel Rivers will be speaking on the topic of "The official inheritance of the kingdom of God". The Lord's Supper will be lead by Bob Kaiser with prayers and devotion. He will be assisted by Glen McConnell, John Terry, Ron Gordon andWilliam Vogel. The organ and piano will be played by Terry Chitwood, pianist with the senior citizen's band. For more information, please call 458-2731. Our agent has a new extension!' Jim Tnny QREEN VALLEY PLAZA (On Sunt Rd) 2748 N. OrMn Valtoy Pkwy. HmidarMii, Nv. 89014 (702) 451-9800 Your agent at Farmers Insurance Group of Compa nies has just extended their famous 30^ auto insurance program. Now drivers between 30 and 69 years FARMERS 4lNSURANCEk. GROUP ?of age could sav^ on their auto insurance if they qualify. Call your local Farmers agent today. And when you do, make sure you ask for the new extension. America can depend on Fanners ^S^ ^ A Complete Travel Service TRAVEL TOUR SERVICE NARFE slates meeting The National Association of Retired Federal Employees (NARFE), Chapter 2031 of Henderson will conduct its monthly meeting, Monday, March 7 in room three of the Civic Center. All members are urged to attend. • AIRLIKE TIQKETS AT AIRPORT PRICES • AIR-RAIL-SEA PACKAGES • AMTRAK-EURAIL TICKETS • PASSPORT INFORMATION HOTEL & AIR RESERVATIONS VISAS OBTAINED 11 1 WATER STREET, HDN. 565-6431 2620 GREEN VALLEY PKWY. 458-8674 ALL NEW MOVIES Why Pay More? per day CALICO RIDGE UNIT 2 30 29 20 27 26 25 24 i Portuloca Court ? Building sites ih Unit II at Calico Ridge art { now for sale. These lots (averaging over V4 acre) are priced from $22,500 with terms or 10% off for cash. Drive 3 miles east from Bouktor Highway on Lake Mead Drive and take a look for yourself or give me a call at 564-6060 and I will personally sliow you wliat L we fiave to offer. ^. 10 ^: MJ Bagley 23 Ow^nMMiDnv* ^ .6 11 22 21 12 13 14 10 1 1 ONE STORY MOtlCS OMlt HB TWO STORY HOnCS fERHITTEO 15 20 19 CALICO RIDGE 61 E. Lalce Mead Dr. (702) 8<4 eOtO IT^^^^S^JT • 'S^J!^^ wpjmmiui'JiyTJt-wjtww'.'i'^. 1!!rT!7TT! "•VTTVrrr^t^rfP^mfm r "Y*it^ • 'T^"TT;rii • n,a. -wptr-^

PAGE 8

• ^^ ^^^^ • • ^ / A i r|t • HndtrMn Homt Ntwi, Hindtrion. Ntvtda Thunday. Marck 3, 1968 Miscellaneous news missiles by L. Jeasie Bennett Home NewB ColumniBt This is the first Thursday in March. Datawiae it is March 3,1988 and with the 29th day of February added to the calendar it is the 63rd day of the year with 304 days left in the year. On this day there were two worW famous men bom. In 1847 (141 years ago) the American inventor Alexander Graham Bell, who invented the telephone was bom in Edinburgh, Scodand. In 1863.135 years ago. that great painter, Vincent van Gogh waa bom. March sun rose at 6:30 a.m. and will set at 5:66 p.m. Thought for today J. Gilchrist Lawson, an American editor and author, once wrote, "Happiness is the supreme object of existence." So it follows that we should practice what another great thinker said. "As we are now Uving an eternity, the time to be happy is today." (Greaville Kleiser, American author) Of this and that Last Monday waa Feb. 29. the extra day that give this year the title of "Leap Year." What did you do with your extra 24 hours? Couple of Henderson folks celebrated their birthday Jim Hartzel and Marge Nelson. Now even after so many, I am not one to want to misa a birthday! So If I had one only every four year I'd aolve that by having two every year one on Feb. 28 and one on March 1! The writer Tom Parker did some research and found the following proving that in may areas an extra 24 hours can make quite a difference. In the USA here are some things that happen in 24 hours.: Soft drinks guzzled 33 miUion gallons Champagne sipped 104.8 gallons. Rock music listened to by teenagers 103 miUion hours Number of new milhonaires 105 Sneakers sold 569,000 pairs Miles traveled by people riding in elevators 5.5 million Rolls-Royce autos purchased in U.S. 3 Hot dogs downed 60 miUion Coins popped into vending machines 4.4 milUon Peanut butter eaten 1.6 milUffla Flashbacks in history March 3 Bizet's famous opera. "Carmen" premiered in Paris. France. Belva Ann Bennett Lockwood became the first woman to practice before the U.S. Supjeme Court as a lawyer. "The Star-Spangled BanAer" officially became the national anthem of the United State of America. March 4 King Charles U of England granted a charter to Mr. William Peon for an area of land that later became Pennsylvania. 1862 1946 The ironclad boats, "Monitor" and "Virginia" (formerly the tonhole was not invented until the 13th century (1200*8). Up ("Merrimac") of American Civil War fame, fought a five hour to that time the button was an omanaent to compliment battle at Hampton Roada, Virgina. Neither vessel won. clothing. U.S. Bombers launched incendiary bomb attacks on Japan durBaby girl born 1875 1879 1931 1681 ing World War II, causing wide-spread devastation. It was estimated that in Tokyo alone, about 120.00 people lost their lives. Baby boy for Croat family Richter said, "The smallest children are nearest to God, as the smallest planets are nearest the sun." One of those bright rays of sunshine 80 near to God now shines in the home of April and Calvin Croae. Their second son. Matthew Thomaa LeRoy Croee, waa bom at 6:30 a.m. on Jan. 27,1988 in the Humana Sunrise Hospital in Las Vegaa. He weighed in at seven-pounds and two-ounces and was 19V inches long. He has a big brother, Nathaniel who is realy anxious to have him as a companion playing cars and ball games. Lucky little boy has a living family tree hving close to him to keep him special company. His grandaparents, all of Henderson are Rosemary and Carl Carlson and Pauhne and John Crose. His great-grandmother. Mable Croae also Uves in Henderson and his other great-grandparents, Nina and Cal Keele.live in Boulder City. We welcome Matthew Thomas and congratulations to his family. American War Mothers meet The American War Mothers. Chapter II, of Henderson will rtieet on Monday. March 7 starting at noon at the local Eldorado Club. Any mother of a past or present member of the U.S. Armed forces is invited to attend and join the chapter. Number one When Nov. 2, 1987 dawned, the sun shown bright on tiny Danielle Joan Spencer born that day. She is the first child of Scott and Honey Spencer. Weighing seven-pounds IbVa ounces, and 21 inches long at birth, Danielle is grwoing rapidly and makes her comer of the world a happy, bubbling place. Welcome to this little girl and congratulations to her family. Hospitalized JoAnn Burr (Mrs. Lynn) recently spent a few days in St. Rose de Lima Hospital. Now living in Las Vegas, JoAnn and Lynn lived in Henderson for many years and raised their family here. Family members, friends and old neighbors on Joshua Street send out sincere wishes for a quick and complete recovery for JoAnn. Did you know? Buttons date back to before the time of Christ, but the butSherry Ann and Curtis Levon McCarty of Henderson are the proud parents of a baby girl bom at Vall^ey Hospital on Feb. 15, 198S. Earthquake Monday, Feb. 22 was George Washington's birthday. It was also an earth-shaking day for this area! Whre were you and what were you doing at that time? Well, darn it! I didn't feel a thing! Now if it will really be 100 years imtil the next one well, an earthquake is something I'd just as soon read about anyway. • DUP county convention ^ -a;^^ The Clarl County Convention of the Daughters of Utah Pioneers was held on Saturday, Feb. 27 in Las Vegaa, conducted by county captain LaRue Worthen of Las Vegas. A special guest from the National Camp in Salt Lake City, Utah was Edith Menne who* gave a report an this year's accomplishments and future plans as well. A colorful program was presneted followed by a special luncheon prepared and served by the Henderson members of DUP. Seventy-seven women attended the convention. The women from the Desert Sunrise Camp of Henderson were: Maxine Buckles, Rhea Johnson, Winnie Prince, Merna Dennison, Nancy Huffington, Carol Marshall and Laura Jean Miller. Boy for Bushman family Gary and Teresia Bushman became the excited parents of their first baby boy on Nov. 27,1987. Tiny boy who weighed six-pounds 11 ounces, and was 19 inches long, was named Adam Bushman. He will be well taken care of by his two big sisters, six-year old twins, Samantha and Sabrina. Now three months old, Adam will soon grow into an active young man hard to keep up with. We lcome, Adam. School friends visit Rhea Johnson (Mrs. Alvin) had some great gueats recently from old home town, Heber City, Utah. Joe and Eutene Hicken, See missiles page 9 1917 RepubUcan Jeannette Rankin of Montana took her seat as the ^^^rst woman elected to the U.S. House ofTlepresenlairvMr 1977 More than 1,500 people were lost their lives in an earthquake — in southern and eastern Europe. March 5 1770 The Boston Massacre spilled first blood in the American Revolution. 1947 A four-day blizzard ended and set records at Readsboro, Vt. and Peru. Ma. 1980 Joe Silverheels, actor, who played Tonto" on Lone Ranger show died. 1982 Comedian John Belushi was foimd dead of a drug overdose. March 6 ; 1836 The Alamo in San Antonio. Texas fell to the Mexican, Santa Ana, after a desperate 13-day battle. All 187 defenders of the mission, including Jim Bowie and Davy Crocket were killed. 1857 U.S. Supreme Court handed down Dred Scott Dacision, holding that a slave was not a citizen. 1912 Itahan army first used dirigible balloons in warfare. 1973 Famous writer. Pearl S. Buck, who wrote The Good Earth." died. March 7 1638 Providence, Rhode Island, was founded. 1912 Monoplane flown from London to Paris in two hours and 57 minutes. 1926 The first successful trans-Atlantic radio-telephone conversation took place between New York and London, England. March 8 1855 Suspension bridge over Niagara Falls opened to pubUc. 1874 Millard Fillmore, 13th President of USA died in Buffalo, NY. 1956 The US landed a force of about 3,500 Marines in South Vietnam. March 9 1796 Nspoleon Bonaparte of France married Josephine de Beauharnais. 1822 Charles M. Graham was granted a patent for artificial teeth. Trayerffom page 6 Church at Horizon and Truffles. Doors open at 10 a.m. with the service at 10:30 a.m. Friday, March 4. The same theme is used worldwide translated into hundreds of languages and dialects. Other churches participating are Henderson Presbyterian Church, the Untied Church of Christ, (Community Church, the Salvation Army and Our Savior's Lutheran Church, Missouri Synod. The banana plant it not a tree. It It an harb. The stalk it mada of leavn that overlap each other, lika a calary stalk. f AMPLE, BIG BONED, SHORT WAISTED, STURDY STOCK...WHAT THEY'RE TRYING TO SAY IS... "YOU ARE FAT!" _YOU DON'T HAVE TO BE FAT! CALL THE MEDICAL CENTER FOR OVERVI/EIGHT NEAREST YOU 731 North Nellis Blvd. Las Vegas, Ntvada 89110 452-SLIM WILLIAM K. NOEL, D.O. 893 Adams Blvd. Boulder City, Nevada 89005 294-1919 THEODORI P. LEON, D.O. 893 Adanis Blvd. Boulder dty, Nevada 89005 293-4421 j F'
PAGE 9

• ^^ ^^^^ • • ^ / A i r|t • HndtrMn Homt Ntwi, Hindtrion. Ntvtda Thunday. Marck 3, 1968 Miscellaneous news missiles by L. Jeasie Bennett Home NewB ColumniBt This is the first Thursday in March. Datawiae it is March 3,1988 and with the 29th day of February added to the calendar it is the 63rd day of the year with 304 days left in the year. On this day there were two worW famous men bom. In 1847 (141 years ago) the American inventor Alexander Graham Bell, who invented the telephone was bom in Edinburgh, Scodand. In 1863.135 years ago. that great painter, Vincent van Gogh waa bom. March sun rose at 6:30 a.m. and will set at 5:66 p.m. Thought for today J. Gilchrist Lawson, an American editor and author, once wrote, "Happiness is the supreme object of existence." So it follows that we should practice what another great thinker said. "As we are now Uving an eternity, the time to be happy is today." (Greaville Kleiser, American author) Of this and that Last Monday waa Feb. 29. the extra day that give this year the title of "Leap Year." What did you do with your extra 24 hours? Couple of Henderson folks celebrated their birthday Jim Hartzel and Marge Nelson. Now even after so many, I am not one to want to misa a birthday! So If I had one only every four year I'd aolve that by having two every year one on Feb. 28 and one on March 1! The writer Tom Parker did some research and found the following proving that in may areas an extra 24 hours can make quite a difference. In the USA here are some things that happen in 24 hours.: Soft drinks guzzled 33 miUion gallons Champagne sipped 104.8 gallons. Rock music listened to by teenagers 103 miUion hours Number of new milhonaires 105 Sneakers sold 569,000 pairs Miles traveled by people riding in elevators 5.5 million Rolls-Royce autos purchased in U.S. 3 Hot dogs downed 60 miUion Coins popped into vending machines 4.4 milUon Peanut butter eaten 1.6 milUffla Flashbacks in history March 3 Bizet's famous opera. "Carmen" premiered in Paris. France. Belva Ann Bennett Lockwood became the first woman to practice before the U.S. Supjeme Court as a lawyer. "The Star-Spangled BanAer" officially became the national anthem of the United State of America. March 4 King Charles U of England granted a charter to Mr. William Peon for an area of land that later became Pennsylvania. 1862 1946 The ironclad boats, "Monitor" and "Virginia" (formerly the tonhole was not invented until the 13th century (1200*8). Up ("Merrimac") of American Civil War fame, fought a five hour to that time the button was an omanaent to compliment battle at Hampton Roada, Virgina. Neither vessel won. clothing. U.S. Bombers launched incendiary bomb attacks on Japan durBaby girl born 1875 1879 1931 1681 ing World War II, causing wide-spread devastation. It was estimated that in Tokyo alone, about 120.00 people lost their lives. Baby boy for Croat family Richter said, "The smallest children are nearest to God, as the smallest planets are nearest the sun." One of those bright rays of sunshine 80 near to God now shines in the home of April and Calvin Croae. Their second son. Matthew Thomaa LeRoy Croee, waa bom at 6:30 a.m. on Jan. 27,1988 in the Humana Sunrise Hospital in Las Vegaa. He weighed in at seven-pounds and two-ounces and was 19V inches long. He has a big brother, Nathaniel who is realy anxious to have him as a companion playing cars and ball games. Lucky little boy has a living family tree hving close to him to keep him special company. His grandaparents, all of Henderson are Rosemary and Carl Carlson and Pauhne and John Crose. His great-grandmother. Mable Croae also Uves in Henderson and his other great-grandparents, Nina and Cal Keele.live in Boulder City. We welcome Matthew Thomas and congratulations to his family. American War Mothers meet The American War Mothers. Chapter II, of Henderson will rtieet on Monday. March 7 starting at noon at the local Eldorado Club. Any mother of a past or present member of the U.S. Armed forces is invited to attend and join the chapter. Number one When Nov. 2, 1987 dawned, the sun shown bright on tiny Danielle Joan Spencer born that day. She is the first child of Scott and Honey Spencer. Weighing seven-pounds IbVa ounces, and 21 inches long at birth, Danielle is grwoing rapidly and makes her comer of the world a happy, bubbling place. Welcome to this little girl and congratulations to her family. Hospitalized JoAnn Burr (Mrs. Lynn) recently spent a few days in St. Rose de Lima Hospital. Now living in Las Vegas, JoAnn and Lynn lived in Henderson for many years and raised their family here. Family members, friends and old neighbors on Joshua Street send out sincere wishes for a quick and complete recovery for JoAnn. Did you know? Buttons date back to before the time of Christ, but the butSherry Ann and Curtis Levon McCarty of Henderson are the proud parents of a baby girl bom at Vall^ey Hospital on Feb. 15, 198S. Earthquake Monday, Feb. 22 was George Washington's birthday. It was also an earth-shaking day for this area! Whre were you and what were you doing at that time? Well, darn it! I didn't feel a thing! Now if it will really be 100 years imtil the next one well, an earthquake is something I'd just as soon read about anyway. • DUP county convention ^ -a;^^ The Clarl County Convention of the Daughters of Utah Pioneers was held on Saturday, Feb. 27 in Las Vegaa, conducted by county captain LaRue Worthen of Las Vegas. A special guest from the National Camp in Salt Lake City, Utah was Edith Menne who* gave a report an this year's accomplishments and future plans as well. A colorful program was presneted followed by a special luncheon prepared and served by the Henderson members of DUP. Seventy-seven women attended the convention. The women from the Desert Sunrise Camp of Henderson were: Maxine Buckles, Rhea Johnson, Winnie Prince, Merna Dennison, Nancy Huffington, Carol Marshall and Laura Jean Miller. Boy for Bushman family Gary and Teresia Bushman became the excited parents of their first baby boy on Nov. 27,1987. Tiny boy who weighed six-pounds 11 ounces, and was 19 inches long, was named Adam Bushman. He will be well taken care of by his two big sisters, six-year old twins, Samantha and Sabrina. Now three months old, Adam will soon grow into an active young man hard to keep up with. We lcome, Adam. School friends visit Rhea Johnson (Mrs. Alvin) had some great gueats recently from old home town, Heber City, Utah. Joe and Eutene Hicken, See missiles page 9 1917 RepubUcan Jeannette Rankin of Montana took her seat as the ^^^rst woman elected to the U.S. House ofTlepresenlairvMr 1977 More than 1,500 people were lost their lives in an earthquake — in southern and eastern Europe. March 5 1770 The Boston Massacre spilled first blood in the American Revolution. 1947 A four-day blizzard ended and set records at Readsboro, Vt. and Peru. Ma. 1980 Joe Silverheels, actor, who played Tonto" on Lone Ranger show died. 1982 Comedian John Belushi was foimd dead of a drug overdose. March 6 ; 1836 The Alamo in San Antonio. Texas fell to the Mexican, Santa Ana, after a desperate 13-day battle. All 187 defenders of the mission, including Jim Bowie and Davy Crocket were killed. 1857 U.S. Supreme Court handed down Dred Scott Dacision, holding that a slave was not a citizen. 1912 Itahan army first used dirigible balloons in warfare. 1973 Famous writer. Pearl S. Buck, who wrote The Good Earth." died. March 7 1638 Providence, Rhode Island, was founded. 1912 Monoplane flown from London to Paris in two hours and 57 minutes. 1926 The first successful trans-Atlantic radio-telephone conversation took place between New York and London, England. March 8 1855 Suspension bridge over Niagara Falls opened to pubUc. 1874 Millard Fillmore, 13th President of USA died in Buffalo, NY. 1956 The US landed a force of about 3,500 Marines in South Vietnam. March 9 1796 Nspoleon Bonaparte of France married Josephine de Beauharnais. 1822 Charles M. Graham was granted a patent for artificial teeth. Trayerffom page 6 Church at Horizon and Truffles. Doors open at 10 a.m. with the service at 10:30 a.m. Friday, March 4. The same theme is used worldwide translated into hundreds of languages and dialects. Other churches participating are Henderson Presbyterian Church, the Untied Church of Christ, (Community Church, the Salvation Army and Our Savior's Lutheran Church, Missouri Synod. The banana plant it not a tree. It It an harb. The stalk it mada of leavn that overlap each other, lika a calary stalk. f AMPLE, BIG BONED, SHORT WAISTED, STURDY STOCK...WHAT THEY'RE TRYING TO SAY IS... "YOU ARE FAT!" _YOU DON'T HAVE TO BE FAT! CALL THE MEDICAL CENTER FOR OVERVI/EIGHT NEAREST YOU 731 North Nellis Blvd. Las Vegas, Ntvada 89110 452-SLIM WILLIAM K. NOEL, D.O. 893 Adams Blvd. Boulder City, Nevada 89005 294-1919 THEODORI P. LEON, D.O. 893 Adanis Blvd. Boulder dty, Nevada 89005 293-4421 j F'
PAGE 10

Pat* 10 Headsrson Home News. Henderioa. Nevada Thursday, March 3, 1988 Thursday, Mardi 3, 1988 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Page 11 Council from page 1 NEW DIRECTORS-MeUssa Ebright (left) and U'Chelle Mudd (right) of Basic High School took over as executvie directors of the Henderson Campus for one day in the Boss for a Day program sponsored by the Henderson Chamber of Commerce. Herman Van Betten (center), deposed for one day, seems relieved with having turned over the campus to the apparently capable hands of the two young women. Planners to hear garage request by Scott Dick^nsheets Home News Staff Writer Owners of the Eldorado Casino will make their first official move toward building a downtown parking garage and' expanding the casino when the Henderson Planning Commission meets Thursday at 7 p.m. in city hall. The Eldorado has filed a request to vacate Market Street, between Atomic and Atlantic Streets. According to documents at the Henderson BuildandPlanning Department, casino owners are planning to. build a five-story parking garage, with approximately 630 spaces. Also, the casino itself will be expanded to more than double its ciurent 30,000 square feet. Also on Thursday's agenda is an architectural review of a shopping center proposed for the southeast comer of the Boulder Highway-Major Avenue intersection. The site was targeted by previous developers for a shopping center anchored by a Lucky supermarket. The new plan calls for 129,000 square feet of comning department sources, the proposal includes a 49,650 square foot supermarket, a 38,(XX) sqioare foot drug store, and several thousand more mercial floor area on the 11-acre site. According to plansquare feet of miscellaneous retail area. It is unclear what supermarket will anchor the development. The planners will also discuss a fliury of zone changes requested by preen Valley Investments in connection with their propnised golf courseresidential development in Green Valley. The move will change 771 acres of land variously zoned RR (rural residential), R-1 (single family), R-2 (two famil y), R-4 (ap ar tment distri ct). C-1 (neighborhood conunercial) and CV (civic) to a mixture of C-1, R-2, R-3 (limited multiresidential) and CV. The planners two weeks ago approved the master plan for the golf course subdivision, but eliminated two commercial sites and lowered the total residential density to 8,000 dwelling units. St. Thomas More Catholic Church, in Green Valley, will seek a use permit and an architectural review for a new worship facility at 120 N. Pecos. Although plans eventually call for a church, offices, rectory and several other facilities, at first they will construct only the multi-purpose building. The city of Henderson is requesting the annexation of 40 acres near the intersection of Wigwam Parkway and Stephanie Street, in order to build a ballfield complex there. City manager Gary Bloomquist pointed out that funding for the park still has to be found before the complex can be built. massive master plan change. As approved Tuesday, the plan now allows for the development of a golf course and 8,000 residential units in an 1,000 acre project between Eastern Avenue and Valle Verde Drive in the Green Valley neighborhood. Commercial areas were restored near the intersection of Wigwam Parkway and Pecos Road in an apparent compromise with area residents. Developer Al Colhns said he would ask if a church would swap sites so they may act as a better buffer along the southwest comer of Wigwam-Pepos. Collins donated the church's land, but an architectural review is set for their church building tonight before the Planning (Commission. Moreover, the chief compromise of the evening had httle to do with the master planning process. Collins said he would agree to commercial designation of land along Pecos Road that abuts to single-family homes, dropping a requested multiple dwelling zoning he had sought. The remainder of the land west of Pecoa and near homeowners would be zoned commercial or two-family residential, according to the Tuesday agreements. Commercial property will be on three of the four comers of the Wigwam-Pecos intersection with this approval, a condition the master plan opposes, according to Development Services director Rich Heckendorf. He said traffic on such commercial comers frustrate proper flows and master planning is designed to avoid such situations. Heckendorf was countered by Collins who contended the small size of commercial areas would keep traffic problems to a minhnum. Collins said his firm and American Nevada Corporation plan to spend $10 million in development of the project. Senior highlights listed Galloway lists students The students and teachers listed below were selected as "Panthers of the Week" at Fay Galloway Elementary School. Fay Galloway is a year-round school with four quads. Each week citizenship awards are given to a student in each class of a particuiar quad, plus one staff Toecober. OocaseMMially the awards are given to students in specialized daaaes, such as physical education, safety patrol, academically talented, speech, art, library, main stream, music, kitchen and ice cream stand workers. The citizneship aawrds are announced over the loud speaker each Friday morning. The students come to the principal's office for a talk and congratulations. Each gets a "Panther of the Week" botton, which gets them to the head of any line during the following week. They also get a See students page 13 by Emma Swinney Senior Center Publicist Monday, Leap Day was an important and wonderful day for the center, and our director, Edna Deardoff. It was her 19th birthday, as she says, and when you have only onevery four years, it is right that your friends help you celebrate. As we did .^Congratulations, dear Friend. Coming in March are many interesting events, such as next Tuesday, on March 8, at 11 a.m. the tax assessor will be here to help with the applications for the excemptions for veterans and widows, and the rebates for home owner's and renters. If you don't know aobut this program, call 565-6990 for information as to the income levels. You could be eligible for these savings. The income tax assistance continues until April 15, but if you could use some help before then with the forms, call RSVP for a good time to come in and what to bring. That number is 565-0669. The Senior Center will be closed, Friday, March 11, all day. This is for our staff to meet with others in Las Vegas. Please plan for lunch at home or one of the fine eating establishments in Henderson. Over in the gymnasium building, room three, Civic C!enter there will be a special concert of Irish music, March 6, this Sunday at 2:30 a.m. Hyman Gold and the Beverly Hills Ensemble will play many of our favorite tunes from Ireland. Everyone is welcome, and it is free! Then, on March 17, we will have a real St. Patrick's Day party, in the center. It will be during and after the lunch hour. There will be a special menu, and lots of See seniors page 12 RADIO WORLD CB SPECIAL THIS WEEK ONLY! nlfMKy IT DMMR CB ONLY $40.95 REG. *14.9S ONLY 30.96 with radio purchM* MaxM IM)-1 RHar DttKttP $00.05 ONLY nf|tKy VNF MlFlM 56 CkM. Hani ItaM Tfmtctivtr SALE PRICE 9200.05 2 WAY RADIO SALES & SERVICE 1656 Nevada Highway Marshall Plaza DAVE FLOYD W9MPD 294-2666 BOB THOMPSON'S SERVICE CO. 1702A Western FOR YOUR TV & VCR REPAIR NEEDS CALL 456-6634^ All Makes & Models Service Call $25.00 SSS BEA UTY BU CKS $$$ SB^SB9999999BaS9CLIP OUT & PRESENT COUPON SSSSBBSSSBSSSSSS^^^^S 565-6844 COUPON 1 coupon ptrvtiM CLIP OUT & PRESENT COUPON 565-6844 COUPON 303 Water St Christian Center 571 Adams Blvd 293-7773 Pastors: Jim and Marjorle Kitchell AMOCIata Ministers: Barry and Laurie Irvin SUN. MAR. 6 8:15 AND 10:30 A.M. Pastor Mariorie Krtchetl "Becoming a Spiritual Olympic Champion" 6 p.m. Pastor Jim "What God Forgets" M Mutic—AH Services' vs3e M>Mf Swieey ScHo oi Moneay JUt •.n.—Voulh MgM WCONtSOAY t'.M •.m.—Woman'* CoflM Hour and BtM* Study IMp.m. W m t StuM For AM Ago* Nurtery AtMiMtanto—Free Transportation 'CANKCfl OI CI—T IAW tCMOOt AMD DAY I CfNrtM •OXYGEN WESTERN HEALTH CARE Products Inc. •IMEDICAL •DIABETIC •OSTOMY Supplies & Equipment Insuranco and Medicare DIABETIC Billing Available EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES FREE DELIVERY (During Normal Business Hours) To Homo & Offlc FREE PATIENT TRAINING WITH PURCHASE OF ANY ^^ DIABETIC MONITOR ^ CERTIFIED DIABETES EDUCATOR BY APPOINTMENT 1433 N. Boulder Hwy. Henderson, NV 89015 24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE AVAILABLE (702)735-1183 GLUCOSE MONITORS Tracer AccoSk CLIP OUT & PRESENT COUPON INSULIN INJECTORS Syringes Medijector II + EZ

PAGE 11

Pat* 10 Headsrson Home News. Henderioa. Nevada Thursday, March 3, 1988 Thursday, Mardi 3, 1988 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Page 11 Council from page 1 NEW DIRECTORS-MeUssa Ebright (left) and U'Chelle Mudd (right) of Basic High School took over as executvie directors of the Henderson Campus for one day in the Boss for a Day program sponsored by the Henderson Chamber of Commerce. Herman Van Betten (center), deposed for one day, seems relieved with having turned over the campus to the apparently capable hands of the two young women. Planners to hear garage request by Scott Dick^nsheets Home News Staff Writer Owners of the Eldorado Casino will make their first official move toward building a downtown parking garage and' expanding the casino when the Henderson Planning Commission meets Thursday at 7 p.m. in city hall. The Eldorado has filed a request to vacate Market Street, between Atomic and Atlantic Streets. According to documents at the Henderson BuildandPlanning Department, casino owners are planning to. build a five-story parking garage, with approximately 630 spaces. Also, the casino itself will be expanded to more than double its ciurent 30,000 square feet. Also on Thursday's agenda is an architectural review of a shopping center proposed for the southeast comer of the Boulder Highway-Major Avenue intersection. The site was targeted by previous developers for a shopping center anchored by a Lucky supermarket. The new plan calls for 129,000 square feet of comning department sources, the proposal includes a 49,650 square foot supermarket, a 38,(XX) sqioare foot drug store, and several thousand more mercial floor area on the 11-acre site. According to plansquare feet of miscellaneous retail area. It is unclear what supermarket will anchor the development. The planners will also discuss a fliury of zone changes requested by preen Valley Investments in connection with their propnised golf courseresidential development in Green Valley. The move will change 771 acres of land variously zoned RR (rural residential), R-1 (single family), R-2 (two famil y), R-4 (ap ar tment distri ct). C-1 (neighborhood conunercial) and CV (civic) to a mixture of C-1, R-2, R-3 (limited multiresidential) and CV. The planners two weeks ago approved the master plan for the golf course subdivision, but eliminated two commercial sites and lowered the total residential density to 8,000 dwelling units. St. Thomas More Catholic Church, in Green Valley, will seek a use permit and an architectural review for a new worship facility at 120 N. Pecos. Although plans eventually call for a church, offices, rectory and several other facilities, at first they will construct only the multi-purpose building. The city of Henderson is requesting the annexation of 40 acres near the intersection of Wigwam Parkway and Stephanie Street, in order to build a ballfield complex there. City manager Gary Bloomquist pointed out that funding for the park still has to be found before the complex can be built. massive master plan change. As approved Tuesday, the plan now allows for the development of a golf course and 8,000 residential units in an 1,000 acre project between Eastern Avenue and Valle Verde Drive in the Green Valley neighborhood. Commercial areas were restored near the intersection of Wigwam Parkway and Pecos Road in an apparent compromise with area residents. Developer Al Colhns said he would ask if a church would swap sites so they may act as a better buffer along the southwest comer of Wigwam-Pepos. Collins donated the church's land, but an architectural review is set for their church building tonight before the Planning (Commission. Moreover, the chief compromise of the evening had httle to do with the master planning process. Collins said he would agree to commercial designation of land along Pecos Road that abuts to single-family homes, dropping a requested multiple dwelling zoning he had sought. The remainder of the land west of Pecoa and near homeowners would be zoned commercial or two-family residential, according to the Tuesday agreements. Commercial property will be on three of the four comers of the Wigwam-Pecos intersection with this approval, a condition the master plan opposes, according to Development Services director Rich Heckendorf. He said traffic on such commercial comers frustrate proper flows and master planning is designed to avoid such situations. Heckendorf was countered by Collins who contended the small size of commercial areas would keep traffic problems to a minhnum. Collins said his firm and American Nevada Corporation plan to spend $10 million in development of the project. Senior highlights listed Galloway lists students The students and teachers listed below were selected as "Panthers of the Week" at Fay Galloway Elementary School. Fay Galloway is a year-round school with four quads. Each week citizenship awards are given to a student in each class of a particuiar quad, plus one staff Toecober. OocaseMMially the awards are given to students in specialized daaaes, such as physical education, safety patrol, academically talented, speech, art, library, main stream, music, kitchen and ice cream stand workers. The citizneship aawrds are announced over the loud speaker each Friday morning. The students come to the principal's office for a talk and congratulations. Each gets a "Panther of the Week" botton, which gets them to the head of any line during the following week. They also get a See students page 13 by Emma Swinney Senior Center Publicist Monday, Leap Day was an important and wonderful day for the center, and our director, Edna Deardoff. It was her 19th birthday, as she says, and when you have only onevery four years, it is right that your friends help you celebrate. As we did .^Congratulations, dear Friend. Coming in March are many interesting events, such as next Tuesday, on March 8, at 11 a.m. the tax assessor will be here to help with the applications for the excemptions for veterans and widows, and the rebates for home owner's and renters. If you don't know aobut this program, call 565-6990 for information as to the income levels. You could be eligible for these savings. The income tax assistance continues until April 15, but if you could use some help before then with the forms, call RSVP for a good time to come in and what to bring. That number is 565-0669. The Senior Center will be closed, Friday, March 11, all day. This is for our staff to meet with others in Las Vegas. Please plan for lunch at home or one of the fine eating establishments in Henderson. Over in the gymnasium building, room three, Civic C!enter there will be a special concert of Irish music, March 6, this Sunday at 2:30 a.m. Hyman Gold and the Beverly Hills Ensemble will play many of our favorite tunes from Ireland. Everyone is welcome, and it is free! Then, on March 17, we will have a real St. Patrick's Day party, in the center. It will be during and after the lunch hour. There will be a special menu, and lots of See seniors page 12 RADIO WORLD CB SPECIAL THIS WEEK ONLY! nlfMKy IT DMMR CB ONLY $40.95 REG. *14.9S ONLY 30.96 with radio purchM* MaxM IM)-1 RHar DttKttP $00.05 ONLY nf|tKy VNF MlFlM 56 CkM. Hani ItaM Tfmtctivtr SALE PRICE 9200.05 2 WAY RADIO SALES & SERVICE 1656 Nevada Highway Marshall Plaza DAVE FLOYD W9MPD 294-2666 BOB THOMPSON'S SERVICE CO. 1702A Western FOR YOUR TV & VCR REPAIR NEEDS CALL 456-6634^ All Makes & Models Service Call $25.00 SSS BEA UTY BU CKS $$$ SB^SB9999999BaS9CLIP OUT & PRESENT COUPON SSSSBBSSSBSSSSSS^^^^S 565-6844 COUPON 1 coupon ptrvtiM CLIP OUT & PRESENT COUPON 565-6844 COUPON 303 Water St Christian Center 571 Adams Blvd 293-7773 Pastors: Jim and Marjorle Kitchell AMOCIata Ministers: Barry and Laurie Irvin SUN. MAR. 6 8:15 AND 10:30 A.M. Pastor Mariorie Krtchetl "Becoming a Spiritual Olympic Champion" 6 p.m. Pastor Jim "What God Forgets" M Mutic—AH Services' vs3e M>Mf Swieey ScHo oi Moneay JUt •.n.—Voulh MgM WCONtSOAY t'.M •.m.—Woman'* CoflM Hour and BtM* Study IMp.m. W m t StuM For AM Ago* Nurtery AtMiMtanto—Free Transportation 'CANKCfl OI CI—T IAW tCMOOt AMD DAY I CfNrtM •OXYGEN WESTERN HEALTH CARE Products Inc. •IMEDICAL •DIABETIC •OSTOMY Supplies & Equipment Insuranco and Medicare DIABETIC Billing Available EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES FREE DELIVERY (During Normal Business Hours) To Homo & Offlc FREE PATIENT TRAINING WITH PURCHASE OF ANY ^^ DIABETIC MONITOR ^ CERTIFIED DIABETES EDUCATOR BY APPOINTMENT 1433 N. Boulder Hwy. Henderson, NV 89015 24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE AVAILABLE (702)735-1183 GLUCOSE MONITORS Tracer AccoSk CLIP OUT & PRESENT COUPON INSULIN INJECTORS Syringes Medijector II + EZ

PAGE 12

Ml "^ rf • 1> Henderson Home News. Henderion, Nevada Thursday, March 3, 1988 Thonday, March 3. 1988 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Page 11 Seniors from page 10 BOYS CLUB HONORS-Channel 3 news anchor Dave Courvoisier and Man of the Year John Kish flank Woman of the Year Laura McGee following the Henderson Boys and Girls Club Awards banquet Thursday night at the Henderson Convention Center. music and singing. Be sure to mark your calendar for this, as it will take the place of our usual potluck this month. This ii'riday, March 4, Ken Bell will be here to sharpen scissors for you. So try to remember to bring those dull ones. He is here during the lunch hour.r Our daily schedule for every week's activities: Monday at 12:30 p.m.: Art class with Dian Gianos and bridge. Tuesday, 9 a.m.: Plastic needlecraft 10:30 a.m.: Walking Club 11:00 a.m.: Physical fitness 12:30 p.m: Movie Wednesday 12:30 p.m.: bridge. Thursday .9:30 a.m.: Pinochle 10:30 a.m.: Walking Club 11:00 a.m.: Physical fitness 12:30 p.m.: Bingo Friday 12:30 p.m.: Drawing for door-price and bridge 12:45 p.m.: Movie Last week the bridge winners were Fiori Rios, "Frenchy" Tessier, Marie Arey and Clara Holt. Thursday's bingo winners were Sam Laskaris, Hazel Devilbiss, Wanda Schimbeck, Millie Stenklyft, Eva Lentz, (who won the fourcomers), Geneva Dolphin, Alice Gerling, Madlyn Thomas, Joe Sanchez, and then Betty Morris took the cover-all. Madlyn Thomas was the winner of the drawwing, Friday. The Social Security representive is here in room seven every Wednesday from 9:30 a.m. until 4 p.m. and Thursday until noon. Millie Hart, the Senior Law Project representive is here twice a month to help you with wills and legal problems. Call for an appointment. Menu for next week, March 7 through March 10: Monday: Spaghetti with meat sauce, green beans, garUc bread, orange juice and peaches. Tuesday: Hot turkey sandwich, broccoU, carrot and raisin salad, mashed potatoes, cranberry juice and chocolate pudding. Wednesday: Lasagna, beets, cabbage salad, apple sUce, jello with fruit. Thursday: Chili with beans, spinach, mixed fruit compote, celery sticks and fresh fruit. Center closed Friday. Coffee, tea and low-fat milk available daily. Thought for the week: "Man is so made that he can only find relaxation from one kind of labor by taking up another." Anatole France 'When Thomas missed church' Pastor Osko's topic Kenney from page 2 I ticular is undergoing rapid growth, which is reflected in the 25 percent annual increase in enrollment at the Henderson Campus." Kenney said. "Economic diversification in Nevada depends on our universities and community colleges which will train the work force and provide excellent educational programs for executives, employees and their families," Kenney said. Kenney stated that during these past six years she has seen at least two of her dreams come true for education in Nevada. • ^Ibnong her many achievements in her six years in office Kenney lists hex work with commimity leaders, legislators and faculty to increase teaching positioDS and salaries for faculty and the start of a new engineering achool at UNLV. She also supported increased student housing on that campus. Kenney was a member of the search committee that recommended Dr. Robert Maxson to be President of UNLV; Dr. Paul Meacham to be President of Clark County Community College; and Dr. John Gwaltny to be President of Truckee Meadows Conmiunity College, and Dr. Jim Taranik to be President of the Desert Research Institute. Kenney and her husband reside at 2330 Abarth, Las Vegas, Nevada. She has a grown son, Michael and two schck)l-age grandchildren, 13 and eight years old. announcing Ramakant D. Raut, M.D. Specializing in •Internal Medicine •Nonlnvasive Cardiology •Rheumatology SEEING PATIENTS IN HENDERSON... MONDAY-FRIDAY 2551 N. Green Valley Pkwy., Building C Suite 305 PHONE 458-1515 FOR AN APPOINTMENT NOW SEEING PATIENTS IN BOULDER CITY.. .TUESDAY & WEDNESDAT2-5 p^m. 1100 Arizona Street PHONE 294-1750 FOR AN APPOINTMENT ^ Accepts MEDI and SAMI Assignment PROTESTERS-Opponents of a zone change on Palo Verde Drive in Henderson gathered to protest recently before our Home News photographer. In the photo from left to right are Bud C. Williams, Edith Alf ama. Flora Rector, Frank Alf ama and Jess Rector is kneeling. The Rev. John Osko, pastor of First Baptist Church will speak this Sunday on the subject, "When Thomas missed church," with scripture text being John 20:24. Music will include David Clydesdale's arrangement of "Lead me to Calvary" from the musical "The highest place", sung by John Bradley and Don Marsh's "When two or three are gathered" (medley) by the First Baptist Church chorale. Celebrating the Lord's supper will be a part of the worship hour. The worship hour begins at 11 a.m. First Baptist Church is located at 47 East Atlantic Avenue in Henderson. Children's church time is held during the worship hour for children two years of age through kindergarten. A nursery is provided during the worship hour for children under two years of age. Sunday school classes for all ages begin at 9:30 a.m. 'Shepherds" challenge and prayer items is 9:05 a.m. The adult Sunday school lesson is given for Sunday school teachers at 8 a.m. by adult teacher Jay Henderson. Sunday school teachers' "Bfest friends" study is on Monday evenings at 6:30 p.m. at the pastor's home under the leadership of Yvonne Osko. Junior high and senior high youth groups meets at 5 p.iQ. on Sunday evenings at the church. The last segment of the four-part video series, "How to get along with your parents" by Dawson McAllister will be the discussion topic for this meeting. Chorale rehearsals are on Sunday evenings at 6 p.m. and Wednesday evenings at 6:30 p.m. Ladies participating as angels in the Easter musical will have a rehearsal this Sunday following the worship hour. Rev. Osko and church family invites everyone to worship with., them this week. For additional in-^ formation call 565-9511. Apartments from page 1 98% of these isats never get a^ home—please consider an older cat—they are "dying" to be loved. Call now. Contact the HENDERSON ANIMAL SHELTER MOSER DR. MEND. 56S-2033 anymore. The situation may seem like deja vu to Crane, as well. He says he bought his Woodridge Estates home after fleeing his Townsite neighborhood house when developers built apartments near him. Groups of restless teenagers plagued his property and finally drove him out. fle, like many of the several dozen others fighting the plan, fear increased traffic and parking snarls, as well as the introduction of two story homes into a one story area. Crane also voiced concern about the lack of recreational facilities for children living there. Woodridge Estates resident Dennis Rhine is also resisting the proposal. "This is supposed to be a single family residential area. I don't want to sit around and look at some apartments. Had I known they were going to build apartments here, I probably wouldn't have bought here." He said he wants to protect his investment in his home from the declining property values that accompany apartment complexes. Rhine also said he desires the security of a single family neighborhood, where everyone knows their neighbors, a situation difficult to achieve with a transient apartment population. • The planning commission meets tonight at 7 p.m. in the Henderson City Hall. students from page 10 ^ • ^' Joan Kenney VIDEO FLIC ^R RKHAKDDONNtK -.. KXI SC (ILMA< HtR..ifJMAN \AMI(,fKry, (ORFVIMIM EDWARD HkRRMANN • • rrWATIlil mffV< nifRlANI),... DIANNtWIPST )BtRT SA' MiCHAH ( HAWAN M-.R • : K lAMf.S /fRhMIAS • HlRtlAMtiil jK-FRfYBOAM l(AR\i:y BUNHARIJ I— ,„,.. ICJU iCHIJMAtHlR MM, r7 wwrnHOMit • iMnnC maaHwrnmimnmumii manflMMMuiMUii orssus. For the Best Pic Come To Video Flic Home Movie^ • VHS Only 'lie Low Prices Compute Selection VCR Rentals 882 Bouklr Hwy. (Smith's Cmtr) 565-7793 See your friendly Branch Manager fbraioan. OUR BRANCHmmdBKS L0VB7O UNV MONBi, V' pass for a free ice cream, and an Smith, Danyelle Mortensen, Branstudents are from Quad A this award certificate. don Worthen, Kevin Conway, week. The teacher panther was Panthers for the week of Feb.25 Shawn Baldwin, Corby Shaw, Debbie Weller, fifth grade are: Christopher Dockins, Sheri Jaimie Hall, Marcia McHugh. The teacher. I C2.-'&-^ Now a loan from First Federal is as close as your neighborhood branch. Just ask your friendly neighborhood branch manager how easy it is. First Federal branch managers are lending money (or roofs or rooms. Prof)eny improvement or personal improvement. Loans to float a boat, take a cruise, buy a new car or get your mobile home on the road. In short, anything you can imagine. See how First Federal can help you feather your nest.. at a great competitive rate. Talk lo your neighborhood banker today Ihe Friendly Lenders at.. First Federal Savings oNvadt Bank on Ntvada'i old$l. ONoMilalawKl* For information phone Barbara Archer at 794-4965 2790 Green Valley Parkway Henderson. Nevada ^ -^l^5 3 MILES WEST OF HOOVER DAM 293-5000 Ciiaiic Board Specials'' PORTERHOUSE STEAK $8.95 ^ STEAK DIANE $15.95 FLAMING TIPS $14.95 —VEAL ALMONDINE $12.95 SHRIMP MACAO $14.95 Dr. James V. Meli, Jr. Family Medicine and Osteopathic Medicine Green Valley Medical Services 2501 N. Green Valley Parkway, Suite 130 Henderson, Nevada 89014 Office hours Monday through Friday and alternate Saturdays Evening hours available Monday and Thursday Call 458-1211 for appointments Dr. Meli is Board Certified in Family Practice and is a member of the St. Rose de Lima Hospital Medical Staff ; • • • • : • • % • • • • < • ./i SCALLOPS NEWBURG $12.95 rx ^i A •"•. Elegant Living... Lake Front Views \ .i • I / ri'i .." .^^^ U I' E,:^i • ^ • ^p^^' .•'jc.i".-> .condominium homes TN BEAUTIFUL BOULDER CITY. ENJOY ELEGANT LIVING BY THE LAKE IN A SPACIOUS TWO BEDROOM. TWO BATH HOME. FROM $94,500 MANY HOMES WITH LAKE FRONT VIEWS UMEI i>V • VECAS ETROPICANA HENDERSON ^,. BOULDER OTY AMONG OUR MANY FEATURES: Dramatic Vaulted Ceilings with Plant Shelves Wood Burning Fireplaces with Gas Outlets Ceramic Tile Countertops Deep Garden Tubs with Separate Showers Spacious Walk-in Closets ...era!v> Telephone (702) 294-0177 K rAT rc\^ TTnxrrc DEVELOPMENT M. tSri 1

PAGE 13

Ml "^ rf • 1> Henderson Home News. Henderion, Nevada Thursday, March 3, 1988 Thonday, March 3. 1988 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Page 11 Seniors from page 10 BOYS CLUB HONORS-Channel 3 news anchor Dave Courvoisier and Man of the Year John Kish flank Woman of the Year Laura McGee following the Henderson Boys and Girls Club Awards banquet Thursday night at the Henderson Convention Center. music and singing. Be sure to mark your calendar for this, as it will take the place of our usual potluck this month. This ii'riday, March 4, Ken Bell will be here to sharpen scissors for you. So try to remember to bring those dull ones. He is here during the lunch hour.r Our daily schedule for every week's activities: Monday at 12:30 p.m.: Art class with Dian Gianos and bridge. Tuesday, 9 a.m.: Plastic needlecraft 10:30 a.m.: Walking Club 11:00 a.m.: Physical fitness 12:30 p.m: Movie Wednesday 12:30 p.m.: bridge. Thursday .9:30 a.m.: Pinochle 10:30 a.m.: Walking Club 11:00 a.m.: Physical fitness 12:30 p.m.: Bingo Friday 12:30 p.m.: Drawing for door-price and bridge 12:45 p.m.: Movie Last week the bridge winners were Fiori Rios, "Frenchy" Tessier, Marie Arey and Clara Holt. Thursday's bingo winners were Sam Laskaris, Hazel Devilbiss, Wanda Schimbeck, Millie Stenklyft, Eva Lentz, (who won the fourcomers), Geneva Dolphin, Alice Gerling, Madlyn Thomas, Joe Sanchez, and then Betty Morris took the cover-all. Madlyn Thomas was the winner of the drawwing, Friday. The Social Security representive is here in room seven every Wednesday from 9:30 a.m. until 4 p.m. and Thursday until noon. Millie Hart, the Senior Law Project representive is here twice a month to help you with wills and legal problems. Call for an appointment. Menu for next week, March 7 through March 10: Monday: Spaghetti with meat sauce, green beans, garUc bread, orange juice and peaches. Tuesday: Hot turkey sandwich, broccoU, carrot and raisin salad, mashed potatoes, cranberry juice and chocolate pudding. Wednesday: Lasagna, beets, cabbage salad, apple sUce, jello with fruit. Thursday: Chili with beans, spinach, mixed fruit compote, celery sticks and fresh fruit. Center closed Friday. Coffee, tea and low-fat milk available daily. Thought for the week: "Man is so made that he can only find relaxation from one kind of labor by taking up another." Anatole France 'When Thomas missed church' Pastor Osko's topic Kenney from page 2 I ticular is undergoing rapid growth, which is reflected in the 25 percent annual increase in enrollment at the Henderson Campus." Kenney said. "Economic diversification in Nevada depends on our universities and community colleges which will train the work force and provide excellent educational programs for executives, employees and their families," Kenney said. Kenney stated that during these past six years she has seen at least two of her dreams come true for education in Nevada. • ^Ibnong her many achievements in her six years in office Kenney lists hex work with commimity leaders, legislators and faculty to increase teaching positioDS and salaries for faculty and the start of a new engineering achool at UNLV. She also supported increased student housing on that campus. Kenney was a member of the search committee that recommended Dr. Robert Maxson to be President of UNLV; Dr. Paul Meacham to be President of Clark County Community College; and Dr. John Gwaltny to be President of Truckee Meadows Conmiunity College, and Dr. Jim Taranik to be President of the Desert Research Institute. Kenney and her husband reside at 2330 Abarth, Las Vegas, Nevada. She has a grown son, Michael and two schck)l-age grandchildren, 13 and eight years old. announcing Ramakant D. Raut, M.D. Specializing in •Internal Medicine •Nonlnvasive Cardiology •Rheumatology SEEING PATIENTS IN HENDERSON... MONDAY-FRIDAY 2551 N. Green Valley Pkwy., Building C Suite 305 PHONE 458-1515 FOR AN APPOINTMENT NOW SEEING PATIENTS IN BOULDER CITY.. .TUESDAY & WEDNESDAT2-5 p^m. 1100 Arizona Street PHONE 294-1750 FOR AN APPOINTMENT ^ Accepts MEDI and SAMI Assignment PROTESTERS-Opponents of a zone change on Palo Verde Drive in Henderson gathered to protest recently before our Home News photographer. In the photo from left to right are Bud C. Williams, Edith Alf ama. Flora Rector, Frank Alf ama and Jess Rector is kneeling. The Rev. John Osko, pastor of First Baptist Church will speak this Sunday on the subject, "When Thomas missed church," with scripture text being John 20:24. Music will include David Clydesdale's arrangement of "Lead me to Calvary" from the musical "The highest place", sung by John Bradley and Don Marsh's "When two or three are gathered" (medley) by the First Baptist Church chorale. Celebrating the Lord's supper will be a part of the worship hour. The worship hour begins at 11 a.m. First Baptist Church is located at 47 East Atlantic Avenue in Henderson. Children's church time is held during the worship hour for children two years of age through kindergarten. A nursery is provided during the worship hour for children under two years of age. Sunday school classes for all ages begin at 9:30 a.m. 'Shepherds" challenge and prayer items is 9:05 a.m. The adult Sunday school lesson is given for Sunday school teachers at 8 a.m. by adult teacher Jay Henderson. Sunday school teachers' "Bfest friends" study is on Monday evenings at 6:30 p.m. at the pastor's home under the leadership of Yvonne Osko. Junior high and senior high youth groups meets at 5 p.iQ. on Sunday evenings at the church. The last segment of the four-part video series, "How to get along with your parents" by Dawson McAllister will be the discussion topic for this meeting. Chorale rehearsals are on Sunday evenings at 6 p.m. and Wednesday evenings at 6:30 p.m. Ladies participating as angels in the Easter musical will have a rehearsal this Sunday following the worship hour. Rev. Osko and church family invites everyone to worship with., them this week. For additional in-^ formation call 565-9511. Apartments from page 1 98% of these isats never get a^ home—please consider an older cat—they are "dying" to be loved. Call now. Contact the HENDERSON ANIMAL SHELTER MOSER DR. MEND. 56S-2033 anymore. The situation may seem like deja vu to Crane, as well. He says he bought his Woodridge Estates home after fleeing his Townsite neighborhood house when developers built apartments near him. Groups of restless teenagers plagued his property and finally drove him out. fle, like many of the several dozen others fighting the plan, fear increased traffic and parking snarls, as well as the introduction of two story homes into a one story area. Crane also voiced concern about the lack of recreational facilities for children living there. Woodridge Estates resident Dennis Rhine is also resisting the proposal. "This is supposed to be a single family residential area. I don't want to sit around and look at some apartments. Had I known they were going to build apartments here, I probably wouldn't have bought here." He said he wants to protect his investment in his home from the declining property values that accompany apartment complexes. Rhine also said he desires the security of a single family neighborhood, where everyone knows their neighbors, a situation difficult to achieve with a transient apartment population. • The planning commission meets tonight at 7 p.m. in the Henderson City Hall. students from page 10 ^ • ^' Joan Kenney VIDEO FLIC ^R RKHAKDDONNtK -.. KXI SC (ILMA< HtR..ifJMAN \AMI(,fKry, (ORFVIMIM EDWARD HkRRMANN • • rrWATIlil mffV< nifRlANI),... DIANNtWIPST )BtRT SA' MiCHAH ( HAWAN M-.R • : K lAMf.S /fRhMIAS • HlRtlAMtiil jK-FRfYBOAM l(AR\i:y BUNHARIJ I— ,„,.. ICJU iCHIJMAtHlR MM, r7 wwrnHOMit • iMnnC maaHwrnmimnmumii manflMMMuiMUii orssus. For the Best Pic Come To Video Flic Home Movie^ • VHS Only 'lie Low Prices Compute Selection VCR Rentals 882 Bouklr Hwy. (Smith's Cmtr) 565-7793 See your friendly Branch Manager fbraioan. OUR BRANCHmmdBKS L0VB7O UNV MONBi, V' pass for a free ice cream, and an Smith, Danyelle Mortensen, Branstudents are from Quad A this award certificate. don Worthen, Kevin Conway, week. The teacher panther was Panthers for the week of Feb.25 Shawn Baldwin, Corby Shaw, Debbie Weller, fifth grade are: Christopher Dockins, Sheri Jaimie Hall, Marcia McHugh. The teacher. I C2.-'&-^ Now a loan from First Federal is as close as your neighborhood branch. Just ask your friendly neighborhood branch manager how easy it is. First Federal branch managers are lending money (or roofs or rooms. Prof)eny improvement or personal improvement. Loans to float a boat, take a cruise, buy a new car or get your mobile home on the road. In short, anything you can imagine. See how First Federal can help you feather your nest.. at a great competitive rate. Talk lo your neighborhood banker today Ihe Friendly Lenders at.. First Federal Savings oNvadt Bank on Ntvada'i old$l. ONoMilalawKl* For information phone Barbara Archer at 794-4965 2790 Green Valley Parkway Henderson. Nevada ^ -^l^5 3 MILES WEST OF HOOVER DAM 293-5000 Ciiaiic Board Specials'' PORTERHOUSE STEAK $8.95 ^ STEAK DIANE $15.95 FLAMING TIPS $14.95 —VEAL ALMONDINE $12.95 SHRIMP MACAO $14.95 Dr. James V. Meli, Jr. Family Medicine and Osteopathic Medicine Green Valley Medical Services 2501 N. Green Valley Parkway, Suite 130 Henderson, Nevada 89014 Office hours Monday through Friday and alternate Saturdays Evening hours available Monday and Thursday Call 458-1211 for appointments Dr. Meli is Board Certified in Family Practice and is a member of the St. Rose de Lima Hospital Medical Staff ; • • • • : • • % • • • • < • ./i SCALLOPS NEWBURG $12.95 rx ^i A •"•. Elegant Living... Lake Front Views \ .i • I / ri'i .." .^^^ U I' E,:^i • ^ • ^p^^' .•'jc.i".-> .condominium homes TN BEAUTIFUL BOULDER CITY. ENJOY ELEGANT LIVING BY THE LAKE IN A SPACIOUS TWO BEDROOM. TWO BATH HOME. FROM $94,500 MANY HOMES WITH LAKE FRONT VIEWS UMEI i>V • VECAS ETROPICANA HENDERSON ^,. BOULDER OTY AMONG OUR MANY FEATURES: Dramatic Vaulted Ceilings with Plant Shelves Wood Burning Fireplaces with Gas Outlets Ceramic Tile Countertops Deep Garden Tubs with Separate Showers Spacious Walk-in Closets ...era!v> Telephone (702) 294-0177 K rAT rc\^ TTnxrrc DEVELOPMENT M. tSri 1

PAGE 14

^^ • • ^ • • • • • • • • • • • • • • a 14 HeBdenom HBM Newt. Hradcrtqn, Nevtda Thandaj. Much 9, 1968 I ANYBODY HOME?—HendCTSon policemen prepare to enter a room at the Sky Motel while seeking suspects during a widespread drug dragnet last week. Monty Dean Kendall, wanted on two counts of sales of a controlled substances, was not in when police arrived Thursday. Just two weeks earlier, the suspect's stepfather was shot in a nearby room by a man who cl|umed he was actually after Kendall. Police officers preparing to enter are, from left, Gary Urbantke and his canine partner Apollo, Geoffrey Nestor, detective Robert Lindsey and Sgt. James J. Avery. ^ Photo by Katherine E. Scott Raid from page 3 WITH THE CUFFS-Henderson poUceman Charles Johnson slips temporary restraining cuffs on a drug suspect Bted during a widespread raid last week. Other suspects from a different location wait in the van to be taken to jail. Photo by Katheriac E. Scott officers surrounded the house at 1660 Quarterhorse and banged on the front door. It took a while for the suspect, wanted on three counts of sales of a controlled substance, to answer. Clad only in a pair of long pants, he came out as ordered and submitted his wrists for the handcuffs. Polite and cooperative—and denying any wrongdoing—he shivered occassionally and commented to the officer watching him about the cold cement under his feet. After the other officers "cleared" the house, locating any possible occupants and guaranteeing their own safety, he was permitted to stand inside. The officers knew this man, as many other suspects they were seeking, had weapons. Throughout the day the unspoken threat of attack caused a tension that probably didn't end until the wind-down party that night at the home of a Henderson poUceman. On the covers at the foot of the suspect's bed, below a row of rifles and a crossbow mounted on the wall, police found a shotgun with an ejected shell by its side. Another loaded weapon, cocked and ready to fire, was found inside the next home Team B raided. The trailer at B20 Easy Street in Trailer Haven was the only residence for which police had a search warrant. While Team A attempted to serve ah arrest warrant across the street, Team B tore down the _door of their targeted residence when there was no immediate answer to their knock. Throughout the day, other suspects were slow to answer their doors. One skeptic even called the police station, to verify whether they were tj/^ly outside. ^ As the day continued, fdB^r 1 3SSee raid page 15i^ SMALL CHANGE—A pile of nlckles and dimes were found next to a scale in a home in Trails Haven last week. A white, cryatalliiic substance was found in a baggie behind the scale. Photo by KathwlM E. SMM SAFE CRACKING-TW yage of a haiamadt safe Uarm wUU nadar the blaze from am aeetjleaa tordi as Haadersoa police dstaethre Sargaaat Howard Avcry opcas it 4mria§ a large acaie drag raid last wttk. Tha §£• waa fmmd in tlia garage of a [ la 9 t k im ft. nmm ^ Eatkote* C. I LOADED QUESTION-Sgt. Janaa J. Avwy ahaefcs the chamber of a ahotgua found OB the bad bf a suapect poBea awahwad aarljr Tharsday mondBg. The chamber waa. bat a shell waa lytag neat to the wa^aa i the bed Phot by KMbviM B. awtt Thuraday, March % 1988 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Page IS ,J|L -VRaid from page 14 suspects could be found at home. Team B located one young man at work, but elsewhere had less luck finding another who had quit the day before. One elderly lady appeared shaken as poUce searched her home for two suspects listed at her address. She stood nervously, refusing to sit-until poUce gave her the ntmie of the male half of the couple. "Oh!" She exclaimed as she headed for a rocking chair. "He's the (expletive deleted) that used to Kve. here..." By 1 p.m. most members of the three teams had returned to the poUce department. Other officers had remained during the day, helping in the jail and with evidence and paperwork. More than half of the suspects they were looking for had been arrested, and five others were picked up along the way. Police said in a press release the raids last week "were the culmination of undercover activities which started in April 1987." Detectives, with agents from State of Nevada Investigations and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, had purchased drugs including heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine (speed). PoUce added more arrests are planned in the continuing narcotics investigation. RUDE AWAKENING—Police search a suspect called out of bed at dawn Thursday during a large-scale drug raid throughout Henderson. Officer Geoffrey Nestor prepares to pat down Tony Radford prior to putting on handcuffs. Photo by Katherine E. Scott Now you have a better way to keep trash in its place...rent a mobileToter REPLACES £QUR 20 GALLON TRASH CANS! DISPOSAL SILVER STATE CLARK INVESTMENTS INC. DISPOSAL SANITATION 77a E. Sahara Avenue Las Vegaa, Nevada 8d104 732-1001 UNDER ARREST—PoUce detective Robert Lindsey shows the arrest warrant to Robert Franco, one of 30 suspected drug dealers sought in a widespread raid Thursday. Officer Geoffrey Nestor stands by The squad car in the Pittman neighborhood. Photo by KatheriM E. Scott I S 3 MILES WIST OF HOOVER DAM i 293-5000 3 p.m. to ^1 p.m. RESTAURANT SPECIALS MONDAY — Spaghetti Night large portion of Spaghetti and IVIeatballs"" Served with Garlic Rolls and Salad ^ ^ adS plus tax TUESDAY "Chiclcen Kiev" Two delicious Chicken Kiev's Bursting with Butter and Baked to perfection. Served with Salad, Rice, vegetable $5.95 plus tax WEDNESDAY — baby Bacic B.BXI. Ribs A tender, tender portion of Baby Bacic Ribs Simmered in our own special sauce. ^O 04 Served with Cole Slaw and Corn on the Cob ^WaSrw plus tax THURSDAY — Roast N.Y. Strip Loin Served with Bearhaise Sauce: ATso^^^^^ ^R C|S Soup or Salad, Potato and Corn-on-the-Cob ^^B^ML FRIDAY — Deep Fried Lobster South African Lobster Meat Deep fried to perfection. ^ ^R 04 Served with French Fries and Drawn Butter ^^B ww plus tax plus tax H. x?^

PAGE 15

^^ • • ^ • • • • • • • • • • • • • • a 14 HeBdenom HBM Newt. Hradcrtqn, Nevtda Thandaj. Much 9, 1968 I ANYBODY HOME?—HendCTSon policemen prepare to enter a room at the Sky Motel while seeking suspects during a widespread drug dragnet last week. Monty Dean Kendall, wanted on two counts of sales of a controlled substances, was not in when police arrived Thursday. Just two weeks earlier, the suspect's stepfather was shot in a nearby room by a man who cl|umed he was actually after Kendall. Police officers preparing to enter are, from left, Gary Urbantke and his canine partner Apollo, Geoffrey Nestor, detective Robert Lindsey and Sgt. James J. Avery. ^ Photo by Katherine E. Scott Raid from page 3 WITH THE CUFFS-Henderson poUceman Charles Johnson slips temporary restraining cuffs on a drug suspect Bted during a widespread raid last week. Other suspects from a different location wait in the van to be taken to jail. Photo by Katheriac E. Scott officers surrounded the house at 1660 Quarterhorse and banged on the front door. It took a while for the suspect, wanted on three counts of sales of a controlled substance, to answer. Clad only in a pair of long pants, he came out as ordered and submitted his wrists for the handcuffs. Polite and cooperative—and denying any wrongdoing—he shivered occassionally and commented to the officer watching him about the cold cement under his feet. After the other officers "cleared" the house, locating any possible occupants and guaranteeing their own safety, he was permitted to stand inside. The officers knew this man, as many other suspects they were seeking, had weapons. Throughout the day the unspoken threat of attack caused a tension that probably didn't end until the wind-down party that night at the home of a Henderson poUceman. On the covers at the foot of the suspect's bed, below a row of rifles and a crossbow mounted on the wall, police found a shotgun with an ejected shell by its side. Another loaded weapon, cocked and ready to fire, was found inside the next home Team B raided. The trailer at B20 Easy Street in Trailer Haven was the only residence for which police had a search warrant. While Team A attempted to serve ah arrest warrant across the street, Team B tore down the _door of their targeted residence when there was no immediate answer to their knock. Throughout the day, other suspects were slow to answer their doors. One skeptic even called the police station, to verify whether they were tj/^ly outside. ^ As the day continued, fdB^r 1 3SSee raid page 15i^ SMALL CHANGE—A pile of nlckles and dimes were found next to a scale in a home in Trails Haven last week. A white, cryatalliiic substance was found in a baggie behind the scale. Photo by KathwlM E. SMM SAFE CRACKING-TW yage of a haiamadt safe Uarm wUU nadar the blaze from am aeetjleaa tordi as Haadersoa police dstaethre Sargaaat Howard Avcry opcas it 4mria§ a large acaie drag raid last wttk. Tha §£• waa fmmd in tlia garage of a [ la 9 t k im ft. nmm ^ Eatkote* C. I LOADED QUESTION-Sgt. Janaa J. Avwy ahaefcs the chamber of a ahotgua found OB the bad bf a suapect poBea awahwad aarljr Tharsday mondBg. The chamber waa. bat a shell waa lytag neat to the wa^aa i the bed Phot by KMbviM B. awtt Thuraday, March % 1988 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Page IS ,J|L -VRaid from page 14 suspects could be found at home. Team B located one young man at work, but elsewhere had less luck finding another who had quit the day before. One elderly lady appeared shaken as poUce searched her home for two suspects listed at her address. She stood nervously, refusing to sit-until poUce gave her the ntmie of the male half of the couple. "Oh!" She exclaimed as she headed for a rocking chair. "He's the (expletive deleted) that used to Kve. here..." By 1 p.m. most members of the three teams had returned to the poUce department. Other officers had remained during the day, helping in the jail and with evidence and paperwork. More than half of the suspects they were looking for had been arrested, and five others were picked up along the way. Police said in a press release the raids last week "were the culmination of undercover activities which started in April 1987." Detectives, with agents from State of Nevada Investigations and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, had purchased drugs including heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine (speed). PoUce added more arrests are planned in the continuing narcotics investigation. RUDE AWAKENING—Police search a suspect called out of bed at dawn Thursday during a large-scale drug raid throughout Henderson. Officer Geoffrey Nestor prepares to pat down Tony Radford prior to putting on handcuffs. Photo by Katherine E. Scott Now you have a better way to keep trash in its place...rent a mobileToter REPLACES £QUR 20 GALLON TRASH CANS! DISPOSAL SILVER STATE CLARK INVESTMENTS INC. DISPOSAL SANITATION 77a E. Sahara Avenue Las Vegaa, Nevada 8d104 732-1001 UNDER ARREST—PoUce detective Robert Lindsey shows the arrest warrant to Robert Franco, one of 30 suspected drug dealers sought in a widespread raid Thursday. Officer Geoffrey Nestor stands by The squad car in the Pittman neighborhood. Photo by KatheriM E. Scott I S 3 MILES WIST OF HOOVER DAM i 293-5000 3 p.m. to ^1 p.m. RESTAURANT SPECIALS MONDAY — Spaghetti Night large portion of Spaghetti and IVIeatballs"" Served with Garlic Rolls and Salad ^ ^ adS plus tax TUESDAY "Chiclcen Kiev" Two delicious Chicken Kiev's Bursting with Butter and Baked to perfection. Served with Salad, Rice, vegetable $5.95 plus tax WEDNESDAY — baby Bacic B.BXI. Ribs A tender, tender portion of Baby Bacic Ribs Simmered in our own special sauce. ^O 04 Served with Cole Slaw and Corn on the Cob ^WaSrw plus tax THURSDAY — Roast N.Y. Strip Loin Served with Bearhaise Sauce: ATso^^^^^ ^R C|S Soup or Salad, Potato and Corn-on-the-Cob ^^B^ML FRIDAY — Deep Fried Lobster South African Lobster Meat Deep fried to perfection. ^ ^R 04 Served with French Fries and Drawn Butter ^^B ww plus tax plus tax H. x?^

PAGE 16

fftge If HBdrsoii Hom News, Henderson, N^evada Thnndy. Much 3, 1968 \ Resort city of Laughlin blooms in Nevada desert ThuTMlay, March 3, 198^ Htndirson Home News, Mandtnon, Navsda Fsg IL&!^ by Richard Moreno Nevada Commission on Toarism Publicist Twenty years ago, Laughlin consisted of little more than a gas station and biit shop with a few slot machines and lots of sagebrush. Since then you might say the slot machines have multiplied. The resort community of Laughlin has seemingly sprouted overnight on the banks of the Colorado River. From its humble roots, only five years ago it had 90 permanent residents, Laughlin has LAUGHLIN—One of Nevada's fastest growing resort communities is Laughlin, located on the banks of the Colorado River. Photo courtesy of the Colorado Belle grown into a town of 3,000 people with five major hotel-casinos offering 3,135 rooms. The main reasons for Laughlin's success are, as they say in the real estate business, location, location and location. The town is located at the triangular southernmost tip of Nevada, across the Colorado River from Arizona and a half hour from the California border. As a result of its locale, Laughlin taps tourists from the PhoenixTucson areas and southern California, particularly the growing San Bernardino area. Additionally, Laughlin has carved its own niche in the gaming market. Rather than cater to the "high rollers," who traditionally favor Las Vegas and Atlantic City, Laughlin has sought the middle class gambler. Laughlin puts a premium on Beta Sigma Phi sororities iist recent events XI Alpha XI by Barbara Grogan > 'fhe new year started out with a bang with our fist meeting of 1988 at Laura Mcgee's new home in Las Vegas. A welcome ritual was given to ^ne of our new members, Trina Warreell. Laura's program on popular miisic was entertaining and interesting. She played excerpts from recterds that were popular in the past. We had to guess which decade it was from, and tell how we felt about the different types of music. It was fun to get back together again after almost a month. Our Jan. 19 meeting was a busy one. We met at Mary Perry's, and aftjer our regular meeting we had a surprise baby shower for Mary Artn Cluff. She got to open a big basket of darling baby gifts, and w^ very pleased. Guests visiting from Alpha Beta were Susan Oakley, Kelly Tthomas an^ her baby Brian, and Mrs. B. Helen Laubach, Mary Ann's mother, wap also there. Visiting transferees, LeRai Frank and Earlene Schuke, were also welcomed. When it comes to service projects, Mary Perry is a real go getter! We brought her our religious Christmas cards to send to the St. Jude's Ranch. She is always thinking up different things to do. We are having a contest to see who can pick the date and closest time when Mary Ann's baby arrives. We always enjoy the City Council Brunch, which was held on Jan. 3Q at thfe Henderson Presbyterian Church. The theme this year was "Girls Just Want to Have Fun!" Each sorority makes name tags following the theme. This year we had miniature shopping bags filled with goiodies, and won first prize! Girls in Beta Sigma Phi are notoriously gC|od cooks, and anyone who sampled the delicious food at the brunch cah attest to that! pur first meeting in February on the first was also our Valentine celebration. Because Mary Perry is our Valentine's Queen, she got to-liost another meeting—lucky her! A large basket had been decorated with ribbons and hearts, and contained gifts from all of us to her. SKe was presented with her crown by last year's queen, Xanie Deerrick. Secret sister Valentine gifts wre also exchanged. It seemd like all we did was eat and watch people open presents. What fun! Our future plans for the month of February include an outside speaker.a nd a progressive dinner for a couples' social Laureate Kappa Chapter by Saudi Sager The February meeting of Laureate Kappa Chapter was held at the home of Dene Bittle. Guests for thee evening were Ilene's mother, Florence Ravlin, visiting from Iowa. Also, Evelyn Woolston from New York. She and Ann Towery have been friends since collegee days. President Mary Lou annouced a new degree has been created by the Interantional Office of Beta Sigma Phi. The Master Degree can be achieved after serving ten years active membership in a Luareate degree chapter. We have several years yet before anyone will be eligible. In other chapter business paper products were again collected for the Senior Citizens groups bingo prizes and a contribution was made to the Beta Sigma Phi Endowment Fund. And plans were announced for a members and guests dinner on Feb. 20 in honor of our Valentine queen, Shirley Gove. ^ The program portion of the meeting was the first part of a movie titled "Love Is Never Silent." The story starts out in the early thirties. The main character is a young girl whose parents are both deaft. Her young brother is killed in a fall and she grows up trying to hide her parents deafness from her friends. We are looking forward to the second part to see if she accepts a proposal of marraige from a young man who is about to leave to join forces to defend his country. being comfortable and casual, you'll find few dinner jackets and evening gowns here. There are usually only a handful of big name entertainers in the showrooms and the hotel-casinos compete by offering reasonably-priced meals and rooms. The formula has worked. In 1986, Laughlin surpassed Lake Tahoe in gaming revenues (with $186 miUion and in Nevada ranks behind only Las Vegas and Reno. In recent years, Laughlin's revenues have increased a healthy 17 percent annually, making it the fastest growing gaming community in the country. The booming Laughlin market hasn't been ignored, particularly by other hotel-casinos in Nevada. Circus Circus, which owns properties in Reno and Las Vegas, recently opened the $80 million Colorado Belle, a massive 1,238-room hotel-casino built to resemble a Mississippi River boat. In addition, Harrah's, a subsidiary of Holiday Inns, which owns hotel-casinos in Reno, Lake Tahoe and Atlantic City, has broken ground for a new 468room hotel-casino. Likewise, Ramada, which owns hotelcasinos in Las Vegas, Reno and Atlantic City, plans to build a highrise hotel-casino in Laughlin. Visitors can also stay at the hotel-casino that started it all, the Riverside. Owner Don LaughUn is credited with opening the first motel-casino in the area as well as naming the town (he originally wanted to name it "Casino" but the U.S. Postal Service objected). Today, the Riverside has grown into a major hotel-casino with 661 rooms. It is joined on the "Riverwalk" by the Colorado Belle, the Ekigewater Hotel and Casino (also owned by Cu-cns Circus) with 602 rooms, the Pioneer Hotel with 414 rooms, Sam's Town Gold River Hotel with 225 rooms and Del Webb's Nevada Club with 88 rooms. Of course, there are other reasons why visitors are attracted to Laughlin. In addition to offering moderately-priced vacations, it is a relaxing, pleasant destination on the C!olorado River. One of the cheapest, actually it's free, and most fun experiences is riding on the small ferries that taxi people 24-hours a day between the hotels lining the river or to parking areas in the Arizona side of the river. In fact, a good way to get an overview of LaughUn is to begin with a ferry ride from Sam's Town Gold River (the southernmost hotel) to the^ Riverside (the northernmost). Despite its rapid growth, Laughlin has begun to acquire the businesses and services needed by a town of 3,000 residents, including new shopping centers. FREMONT COIN CO. INC. GOLD, SILVER AND PMUNUM HOTLINE 384-1909 4t00 BeuMar HN|f INMrOMMIiN44 382-1469 It's out of this worid—a nebula, that It. These masses of glowing gas, millions of miles across, are visible from 900,000 light years away. Each Is as large as an entire galaxy like our own. MARCH BLOW-OUT SALE! THURSDAY MARCH 17th Celebrate St. Patrick's Day With Corned Beef & Cabbage NEW General Instrument's 2400R IRD Receiver with VideoCipher Module 65o LNB, PRIE Rotor and 10'C/KV Mesh Antenna Tax Not Included INSTALLED $2,155 NEW UNIDEN VST 9900 IRD Receiver With VideoCipher Module 65 LNB, PRIE Rotor and 10' C/KV Mesh Antenna $2,345 Tax Not Included INSTALLED Bonus Savings Coupon Present This Coupon and SAVE $200 OFF VaNdTMSto Only On Above item* FREE Programming Coupon Present This Coupon And Get 1 VR. PAID HtO, CINIMAX, WON, WWOR, KXTV, WFIX, IS^N Valid ThtoSal* BDBB Only On Abov* Itenw rWEB THE SATELLITE CLINIC CALL NOW 565-3200 WE COME TO YOU (|4tei*NATlOli4^ ^ ffl lu cJBTCrz>aii KOTSL& CASXirO J: D S2.79 A DIFFERENT NATIONAUTY EVERY NIGHT H'A^ M SUN Cajun (Southern) Night MON Oriental Cuisine Night TUES Mexican Culalne Night WED Italian Cuisine Night THURS Irish Cuisine Night FRI Seafood Fish Fry Night SAT Steak & Shrimp Night Includes • Beverage 3 P.M.-10 P.M. SUN-THURS 3 P.M.-11 P.M. FRI A SAT tiii. lorn Monday Night DInncrr includes a Beverage • 3L Timet-Boys Club wrestlers roll In RIaltQ tourney The Timet Henderson Boys Club wrestling team boasted three first place finishes at Sunday's Rialto Wrestling Tournament in San Bemadino, CaUf." Jeremy Richter at 160 pounds, Ryan English at 86, and Anthony Hair at 140 all won championships. Finishing second were Brian Valdez (95), Jamie Knoblock (90), John Paul ^lartinez (105), Randy Rome (148) and Kenny Ely (120). In third place: King Chan (148), Jackie Tran (120), Richard Tran (100), Jerry Ely (95) and Eddie Owens (119). Fourth place: Steven Bach (130), Eddie Duncan (148) and Johnny Martinez (95). Though no team standings wei-e kept, coach Leo Hernandez said Timet and the Canyon Wrestling Club of San Bemadino cont^ted closely for first. Timet also placed 11 of 14 wrestlers in a tournament at Cal-State FuUerton Feb. 14. Richter was the only Timet champion. Timet dominated while completing its second consecutive undefeated season against Clark County opponents. The feeder program for Basic High School, Timet defeated Las Vegas 69-15, Western 59-12, Valley 93-0, Chaparral 69-9, Rancho 69-21 and Eldorado 73-18. Timet will compete in the zone tournament Saturday at Rancho High School. First round matches are 9 a.m. Golfers will find it tough to repeat by Paul Szydelko Home News Sports Editor The Basic High School boys golf team returns a solid group of four, but defei^ding its southern zone championship will be all but impossible, says coach Dennis Smuskiewicz. The Wolves have won zone two years in a row and were runner-ups in state last year after winning it all two years a^. Matching those feat will b^f f icult since the strong trio o^Shane Flowers, Eric Eu• ft b^&ks and Jerry Heard all lasic wrestling awards dinner set for Thursday The Basic High School wrestling team will hold its aimual awards banquet Thursday, March 10, at 6:30 p.m. in the Activities Center. Awards will be given after the potluck dinner. graduated after last year. Flowers was the individual state champ in 1986, and last year Eubanks won zone and Heard won state. Seniors Luke Vincent and John Wooldridge, junior Todd Carducci and sophomore Craig Barlow are the four returning lettermen. "Those four will be a pretty good nucleus at home," Smuskiewicz said. "It will keep us competitive with most teams but until we get a fifth and sixth man, we're not going to challenge Valley or Chaparral." Sophomores Doug Beavers and Dan Bondourant, freshmen Ricky Freels and Brian Curry will battle for the final spots on the team. Smuskiewicz expects Valley, Chaparral and Bishop Gorman to be the strongest teams in the south. Sunrise teams Western and Las Vegas should be competitive as well. Rebels win HPRD tourneys The Rebels in all three divisions won season-ending tournaments last week in the Henderson Parks and Recreation Department youth basketball league. In the Silver Division championship Thursday at the Youth Center, the Rebels defeated the Lakers 39-29. Jason O'Connor scored 17 points and Steve Bentz had 15 for the Rebels. David King had 13 in a losing effort for the Lakers. The Rebels edged the Lakers in the Gold division, 47-46, with Mike Snuth scoring 18. Andy Dent, David Huffaker, Jacob Lambom and Jeremy Brandon all had six for the Rebels. Danny Delespinasse had 26 and Brenon Jones nine for the Lakers. In the Diamond division final Friday, the Rebels overcame a 24-22 halftime deficit to defeat the Thunderbirds 48-39. Matt Kilar and Lee Chandler each scored 16 for the Rebels. Erik Oliver had 21 to lead the Thunderbirds. Basic varsity boys basketball statistics BASIC VARSITY BASKETBALL—Bottom row (photoGrant, Mike Petersen, Scott Wright, Troy McLwni, Brook graphed left to right): Phil Wallen, Mike Arrasate, Warren England, John Wooldridge, Robby Horn, team manager Dan Guinn, Bruce Schneider, Eddie Fischmann and Paul Doering and head coach John Williams. Neumiller. Second row: Assistant coach Tom Crine, Andre 1987-88 Basic Boys Basl(etbail Season Gorman 95, Basic 58 Valley 86, Basic 79 Bonanza 73, Basic 71 Clark 77, Basic 64 Basic 65, Chaparral 62 Eldorado Gold Tourney Simi VaUey 87, Basic.69 West Humber 72, Basic 53 Aztec-Rohr Classic Basic 62, Coronado 43 Basic 68, Mar Vista 60 Basic 68, Montebello 65 Rancho 85, Basic 76 Gorman 75, Basic 67 Basic 47, Dixie 43 Basic 65, Eldorado 57 Las Vegas 81, Basic 80 Western 118, Basic 77 Valley 65, Basic 60 Bonanza 71, Basic 59 Clark 67, Basic 63 Basic 68, Chaparral 56 Rancho 83, Basic 71 Basic 70, Vo-Tech 65 Basic 66, Eldorado 59 Las Vegas 79, Basic 73 Western 107, Basic 87 Zone tournament Clark 60, Basic 67 Player(Games) FT/FTA FT% 3PT TOT. PTS 1 AVE.| 1 Mike Petersen(26) 97/154 63% 1 398 15.311 1 John Wooldridge(26) 94/139 1 68% 24 1 373 j 14.341 1 Robby Hom(26) 58/101 57% 21 303 •11.651 Brook England(26) 37/66 56% 31 282 losj Andre Grant(26) 43/64 67% 0 175 6.731 Bruce Schneider(26) 24/44 55Va% 0 144 5.54 L 1 Phil Wallen(19) 14/23 61% 0 52 2.731 1 Warren Guinn(18) 1/4 25% 0 3 .1661 1 Troy McLeod(4) 5/7 71% 1 14 1 ^•^1 1 Mike Arra8ate<10) 0/2 0% 0 4 4| 1 Scott Wright(3> O/O 0% 0 4 1.331 Eddie Fi8chmann(5) 0/0 0% 0 0 01 1 Paul Neumiller(4) 0/0 0% 0 0 ol Basic 380/606 63% 78 1743 67.041 |0pp. 362/579 63% 75 1881 72.34 [ Season-at-a-Glance Petersen named all-conference I Basic High School senior Mike Petersen was named to the aU-southem conference team. The 6*4" center, who averaged 15.3 points per game to lead the Wolves, joined Western's Corey Cole, Gorman's Matt Othick and Kevin Scares, Rancho's Cliff Reed, Valley's Derrick Ross and Las Vegas's Eerie White. Selected to the All-Sunrise team were Petersen, Cole, Reed, White and Pappy Brown and James Stewart of Rancho. 1 Irlkes Lights should stay out at Wrigley BasebaU is back and all is right with the world. The bats are cracking, the gloves are oiled and the arms are limbering. Every team is a pennant contender on the third day ^of March. But something is amiss. Something doesn't quite seem right. And no, it's not that George and Billy are still friendly. No, it's the prospect of night baseball at Wrigley Field. The Chicago City Council last week voted to JMtaiit lights and night ball at the ancient park. ^rhe light! will coat $6 million and will be installed in the next four to six months. The first night game ever at Wrigley has been scheduled for July 18, a Monday night engagement with the San Francisco Giants. As many as eight night games will be played this year. Nothing is sadder. A big part of what makes baseball special is its distinctive ballparks and Wrigley is known for its ivy walls, wind and daytime action. What's next for Wrigley? Artificial turf, padded fences and A scoreboard that explodes with computerized graphics to instigate "spontaneous" cheering and celebrate home runs? Turning on lights at Wrigley is like moving back the leftfield waU in Fenway Park and reducing it to eight feet high; like painting Dodger Stadium a navy blue; like Don Zimmer losing weight. It would begin to turn Wrigley into any other modern stadium in the country. Look at those ugly early-708 stadiums in Cincinnati, Philadelphia, Pittsburghthey look alike, inside and out. Round, multi-purpose, plastic bowls. There are practical as well philosophical and aesthetic reasons against lights at Wrigley. The neighbors of Wrigley are concerned about the noise that might occasionally eminate from the park when a Cub does something well. Granted, that won't happen too often but still when 35,000 people gaUier, there's bound to be some uproar. The stormy, husky, brawling Hog Butchers, Tool Makers and Stockers of Wheat who comprise the Bleacher Bums will spill out into the streets after 10 p.m. 8uid even Carl Sandburg wouldn't want to Uve there. Wrigley's neighbors have fought the Cubs against installing the lights for years. They will contdnua the fight to limit the number of gmmes but now that the club will have the capability, expect the Cubs to gradually increase the number of night games each year. Sooner than we think, young sports fans wiHi be asking us old-timers, incredulously: '^ou mean to say the Colts played aomewhere btfore Indianapolis?" "UCLA was a col basketball power?""The Chicago Cubs pla; baseball under the sun on weekdays?" Theyll look at us strangely as we nod '*yet,' and remember fondly the not-wniistant

PAGE 17

fftge If HBdrsoii Hom News, Henderson, N^evada Thnndy. Much 3, 1968 \ Resort city of Laughlin blooms in Nevada desert ThuTMlay, March 3, 198^ Htndirson Home News, Mandtnon, Navsda Fsg IL&!^ by Richard Moreno Nevada Commission on Toarism Publicist Twenty years ago, Laughlin consisted of little more than a gas station and biit shop with a few slot machines and lots of sagebrush. Since then you might say the slot machines have multiplied. The resort community of Laughlin has seemingly sprouted overnight on the banks of the Colorado River. From its humble roots, only five years ago it had 90 permanent residents, Laughlin has LAUGHLIN—One of Nevada's fastest growing resort communities is Laughlin, located on the banks of the Colorado River. Photo courtesy of the Colorado Belle grown into a town of 3,000 people with five major hotel-casinos offering 3,135 rooms. The main reasons for Laughlin's success are, as they say in the real estate business, location, location and location. The town is located at the triangular southernmost tip of Nevada, across the Colorado River from Arizona and a half hour from the California border. As a result of its locale, Laughlin taps tourists from the PhoenixTucson areas and southern California, particularly the growing San Bernardino area. Additionally, Laughlin has carved its own niche in the gaming market. Rather than cater to the "high rollers," who traditionally favor Las Vegas and Atlantic City, Laughlin has sought the middle class gambler. Laughlin puts a premium on Beta Sigma Phi sororities iist recent events XI Alpha XI by Barbara Grogan > 'fhe new year started out with a bang with our fist meeting of 1988 at Laura Mcgee's new home in Las Vegas. A welcome ritual was given to ^ne of our new members, Trina Warreell. Laura's program on popular miisic was entertaining and interesting. She played excerpts from recterds that were popular in the past. We had to guess which decade it was from, and tell how we felt about the different types of music. It was fun to get back together again after almost a month. Our Jan. 19 meeting was a busy one. We met at Mary Perry's, and aftjer our regular meeting we had a surprise baby shower for Mary Artn Cluff. She got to open a big basket of darling baby gifts, and w^ very pleased. Guests visiting from Alpha Beta were Susan Oakley, Kelly Tthomas an^ her baby Brian, and Mrs. B. Helen Laubach, Mary Ann's mother, wap also there. Visiting transferees, LeRai Frank and Earlene Schuke, were also welcomed. When it comes to service projects, Mary Perry is a real go getter! We brought her our religious Christmas cards to send to the St. Jude's Ranch. She is always thinking up different things to do. We are having a contest to see who can pick the date and closest time when Mary Ann's baby arrives. We always enjoy the City Council Brunch, which was held on Jan. 3Q at thfe Henderson Presbyterian Church. The theme this year was "Girls Just Want to Have Fun!" Each sorority makes name tags following the theme. This year we had miniature shopping bags filled with goiodies, and won first prize! Girls in Beta Sigma Phi are notoriously gC|od cooks, and anyone who sampled the delicious food at the brunch cah attest to that! pur first meeting in February on the first was also our Valentine celebration. Because Mary Perry is our Valentine's Queen, she got to-liost another meeting—lucky her! A large basket had been decorated with ribbons and hearts, and contained gifts from all of us to her. SKe was presented with her crown by last year's queen, Xanie Deerrick. Secret sister Valentine gifts wre also exchanged. It seemd like all we did was eat and watch people open presents. What fun! Our future plans for the month of February include an outside speaker.a nd a progressive dinner for a couples' social Laureate Kappa Chapter by Saudi Sager The February meeting of Laureate Kappa Chapter was held at the home of Dene Bittle. Guests for thee evening were Ilene's mother, Florence Ravlin, visiting from Iowa. Also, Evelyn Woolston from New York. She and Ann Towery have been friends since collegee days. President Mary Lou annouced a new degree has been created by the Interantional Office of Beta Sigma Phi. The Master Degree can be achieved after serving ten years active membership in a Luareate degree chapter. We have several years yet before anyone will be eligible. In other chapter business paper products were again collected for the Senior Citizens groups bingo prizes and a contribution was made to the Beta Sigma Phi Endowment Fund. And plans were announced for a members and guests dinner on Feb. 20 in honor of our Valentine queen, Shirley Gove. ^ The program portion of the meeting was the first part of a movie titled "Love Is Never Silent." The story starts out in the early thirties. The main character is a young girl whose parents are both deaft. Her young brother is killed in a fall and she grows up trying to hide her parents deafness from her friends. We are looking forward to the second part to see if she accepts a proposal of marraige from a young man who is about to leave to join forces to defend his country. being comfortable and casual, you'll find few dinner jackets and evening gowns here. There are usually only a handful of big name entertainers in the showrooms and the hotel-casinos compete by offering reasonably-priced meals and rooms. The formula has worked. In 1986, Laughlin surpassed Lake Tahoe in gaming revenues (with $186 miUion and in Nevada ranks behind only Las Vegas and Reno. In recent years, Laughlin's revenues have increased a healthy 17 percent annually, making it the fastest growing gaming community in the country. The booming Laughlin market hasn't been ignored, particularly by other hotel-casinos in Nevada. Circus Circus, which owns properties in Reno and Las Vegas, recently opened the $80 million Colorado Belle, a massive 1,238-room hotel-casino built to resemble a Mississippi River boat. In addition, Harrah's, a subsidiary of Holiday Inns, which owns hotel-casinos in Reno, Lake Tahoe and Atlantic City, has broken ground for a new 468room hotel-casino. Likewise, Ramada, which owns hotelcasinos in Las Vegas, Reno and Atlantic City, plans to build a highrise hotel-casino in Laughlin. Visitors can also stay at the hotel-casino that started it all, the Riverside. Owner Don LaughUn is credited with opening the first motel-casino in the area as well as naming the town (he originally wanted to name it "Casino" but the U.S. Postal Service objected). Today, the Riverside has grown into a major hotel-casino with 661 rooms. It is joined on the "Riverwalk" by the Colorado Belle, the Ekigewater Hotel and Casino (also owned by Cu-cns Circus) with 602 rooms, the Pioneer Hotel with 414 rooms, Sam's Town Gold River Hotel with 225 rooms and Del Webb's Nevada Club with 88 rooms. Of course, there are other reasons why visitors are attracted to Laughlin. In addition to offering moderately-priced vacations, it is a relaxing, pleasant destination on the C!olorado River. One of the cheapest, actually it's free, and most fun experiences is riding on the small ferries that taxi people 24-hours a day between the hotels lining the river or to parking areas in the Arizona side of the river. In fact, a good way to get an overview of LaughUn is to begin with a ferry ride from Sam's Town Gold River (the southernmost hotel) to the^ Riverside (the northernmost). Despite its rapid growth, Laughlin has begun to acquire the businesses and services needed by a town of 3,000 residents, including new shopping centers. FREMONT COIN CO. INC. GOLD, SILVER AND PMUNUM HOTLINE 384-1909 4t00 BeuMar HN|f INMrOMMIiN44 382-1469 It's out of this worid—a nebula, that It. These masses of glowing gas, millions of miles across, are visible from 900,000 light years away. Each Is as large as an entire galaxy like our own. MARCH BLOW-OUT SALE! THURSDAY MARCH 17th Celebrate St. Patrick's Day With Corned Beef & Cabbage NEW General Instrument's 2400R IRD Receiver with VideoCipher Module 65o LNB, PRIE Rotor and 10'C/KV Mesh Antenna Tax Not Included INSTALLED $2,155 NEW UNIDEN VST 9900 IRD Receiver With VideoCipher Module 65 LNB, PRIE Rotor and 10' C/KV Mesh Antenna $2,345 Tax Not Included INSTALLED Bonus Savings Coupon Present This Coupon and SAVE $200 OFF VaNdTMSto Only On Above item* FREE Programming Coupon Present This Coupon And Get 1 VR. PAID HtO, CINIMAX, WON, WWOR, KXTV, WFIX, IS^N Valid ThtoSal* BDBB Only On Abov* Itenw rWEB THE SATELLITE CLINIC CALL NOW 565-3200 WE COME TO YOU (|4tei*NATlOli4^ ^ ffl lu cJBTCrz>aii KOTSL& CASXirO J: D S2.79 A DIFFERENT NATIONAUTY EVERY NIGHT H'A^ M SUN Cajun (Southern) Night MON Oriental Cuisine Night TUES Mexican Culalne Night WED Italian Cuisine Night THURS Irish Cuisine Night FRI Seafood Fish Fry Night SAT Steak & Shrimp Night Includes • Beverage 3 P.M.-10 P.M. SUN-THURS 3 P.M.-11 P.M. FRI A SAT tiii. lorn Monday Night DInncrr includes a Beverage • 3L Timet-Boys Club wrestlers roll In RIaltQ tourney The Timet Henderson Boys Club wrestling team boasted three first place finishes at Sunday's Rialto Wrestling Tournament in San Bemadino, CaUf." Jeremy Richter at 160 pounds, Ryan English at 86, and Anthony Hair at 140 all won championships. Finishing second were Brian Valdez (95), Jamie Knoblock (90), John Paul ^lartinez (105), Randy Rome (148) and Kenny Ely (120). In third place: King Chan (148), Jackie Tran (120), Richard Tran (100), Jerry Ely (95) and Eddie Owens (119). Fourth place: Steven Bach (130), Eddie Duncan (148) and Johnny Martinez (95). Though no team standings wei-e kept, coach Leo Hernandez said Timet and the Canyon Wrestling Club of San Bemadino cont^ted closely for first. Timet also placed 11 of 14 wrestlers in a tournament at Cal-State FuUerton Feb. 14. Richter was the only Timet champion. Timet dominated while completing its second consecutive undefeated season against Clark County opponents. The feeder program for Basic High School, Timet defeated Las Vegas 69-15, Western 59-12, Valley 93-0, Chaparral 69-9, Rancho 69-21 and Eldorado 73-18. Timet will compete in the zone tournament Saturday at Rancho High School. First round matches are 9 a.m. Golfers will find it tough to repeat by Paul Szydelko Home News Sports Editor The Basic High School boys golf team returns a solid group of four, but defei^ding its southern zone championship will be all but impossible, says coach Dennis Smuskiewicz. The Wolves have won zone two years in a row and were runner-ups in state last year after winning it all two years a^. Matching those feat will b^f f icult since the strong trio o^Shane Flowers, Eric Eu• ft b^&ks and Jerry Heard all lasic wrestling awards dinner set for Thursday The Basic High School wrestling team will hold its aimual awards banquet Thursday, March 10, at 6:30 p.m. in the Activities Center. Awards will be given after the potluck dinner. graduated after last year. Flowers was the individual state champ in 1986, and last year Eubanks won zone and Heard won state. Seniors Luke Vincent and John Wooldridge, junior Todd Carducci and sophomore Craig Barlow are the four returning lettermen. "Those four will be a pretty good nucleus at home," Smuskiewicz said. "It will keep us competitive with most teams but until we get a fifth and sixth man, we're not going to challenge Valley or Chaparral." Sophomores Doug Beavers and Dan Bondourant, freshmen Ricky Freels and Brian Curry will battle for the final spots on the team. Smuskiewicz expects Valley, Chaparral and Bishop Gorman to be the strongest teams in the south. Sunrise teams Western and Las Vegas should be competitive as well. Rebels win HPRD tourneys The Rebels in all three divisions won season-ending tournaments last week in the Henderson Parks and Recreation Department youth basketball league. In the Silver Division championship Thursday at the Youth Center, the Rebels defeated the Lakers 39-29. Jason O'Connor scored 17 points and Steve Bentz had 15 for the Rebels. David King had 13 in a losing effort for the Lakers. The Rebels edged the Lakers in the Gold division, 47-46, with Mike Snuth scoring 18. Andy Dent, David Huffaker, Jacob Lambom and Jeremy Brandon all had six for the Rebels. Danny Delespinasse had 26 and Brenon Jones nine for the Lakers. In the Diamond division final Friday, the Rebels overcame a 24-22 halftime deficit to defeat the Thunderbirds 48-39. Matt Kilar and Lee Chandler each scored 16 for the Rebels. Erik Oliver had 21 to lead the Thunderbirds. Basic varsity boys basketball statistics BASIC VARSITY BASKETBALL—Bottom row (photoGrant, Mike Petersen, Scott Wright, Troy McLwni, Brook graphed left to right): Phil Wallen, Mike Arrasate, Warren England, John Wooldridge, Robby Horn, team manager Dan Guinn, Bruce Schneider, Eddie Fischmann and Paul Doering and head coach John Williams. Neumiller. Second row: Assistant coach Tom Crine, Andre 1987-88 Basic Boys Basl(etbail Season Gorman 95, Basic 58 Valley 86, Basic 79 Bonanza 73, Basic 71 Clark 77, Basic 64 Basic 65, Chaparral 62 Eldorado Gold Tourney Simi VaUey 87, Basic.69 West Humber 72, Basic 53 Aztec-Rohr Classic Basic 62, Coronado 43 Basic 68, Mar Vista 60 Basic 68, Montebello 65 Rancho 85, Basic 76 Gorman 75, Basic 67 Basic 47, Dixie 43 Basic 65, Eldorado 57 Las Vegas 81, Basic 80 Western 118, Basic 77 Valley 65, Basic 60 Bonanza 71, Basic 59 Clark 67, Basic 63 Basic 68, Chaparral 56 Rancho 83, Basic 71 Basic 70, Vo-Tech 65 Basic 66, Eldorado 59 Las Vegas 79, Basic 73 Western 107, Basic 87 Zone tournament Clark 60, Basic 67 Player(Games) FT/FTA FT% 3PT TOT. PTS 1 AVE.| 1 Mike Petersen(26) 97/154 63% 1 398 15.311 1 John Wooldridge(26) 94/139 1 68% 24 1 373 j 14.341 1 Robby Hom(26) 58/101 57% 21 303 •11.651 Brook England(26) 37/66 56% 31 282 losj Andre Grant(26) 43/64 67% 0 175 6.731 Bruce Schneider(26) 24/44 55Va% 0 144 5.54 L 1 Phil Wallen(19) 14/23 61% 0 52 2.731 1 Warren Guinn(18) 1/4 25% 0 3 .1661 1 Troy McLeod(4) 5/7 71% 1 14 1 ^•^1 1 Mike Arra8ate<10) 0/2 0% 0 4 4| 1 Scott Wright(3> O/O 0% 0 4 1.331 Eddie Fi8chmann(5) 0/0 0% 0 0 01 1 Paul Neumiller(4) 0/0 0% 0 0 ol Basic 380/606 63% 78 1743 67.041 |0pp. 362/579 63% 75 1881 72.34 [ Season-at-a-Glance Petersen named all-conference I Basic High School senior Mike Petersen was named to the aU-southem conference team. The 6*4" center, who averaged 15.3 points per game to lead the Wolves, joined Western's Corey Cole, Gorman's Matt Othick and Kevin Scares, Rancho's Cliff Reed, Valley's Derrick Ross and Las Vegas's Eerie White. Selected to the All-Sunrise team were Petersen, Cole, Reed, White and Pappy Brown and James Stewart of Rancho. 1 Irlkes Lights should stay out at Wrigley BasebaU is back and all is right with the world. The bats are cracking, the gloves are oiled and the arms are limbering. Every team is a pennant contender on the third day ^of March. But something is amiss. Something doesn't quite seem right. And no, it's not that George and Billy are still friendly. No, it's the prospect of night baseball at Wrigley Field. The Chicago City Council last week voted to JMtaiit lights and night ball at the ancient park. ^rhe light! will coat $6 million and will be installed in the next four to six months. The first night game ever at Wrigley has been scheduled for July 18, a Monday night engagement with the San Francisco Giants. As many as eight night games will be played this year. Nothing is sadder. A big part of what makes baseball special is its distinctive ballparks and Wrigley is known for its ivy walls, wind and daytime action. What's next for Wrigley? Artificial turf, padded fences and A scoreboard that explodes with computerized graphics to instigate "spontaneous" cheering and celebrate home runs? Turning on lights at Wrigley is like moving back the leftfield waU in Fenway Park and reducing it to eight feet high; like painting Dodger Stadium a navy blue; like Don Zimmer losing weight. It would begin to turn Wrigley into any other modern stadium in the country. Look at those ugly early-708 stadiums in Cincinnati, Philadelphia, Pittsburghthey look alike, inside and out. Round, multi-purpose, plastic bowls. There are practical as well philosophical and aesthetic reasons against lights at Wrigley. The neighbors of Wrigley are concerned about the noise that might occasionally eminate from the park when a Cub does something well. Granted, that won't happen too often but still when 35,000 people gaUier, there's bound to be some uproar. The stormy, husky, brawling Hog Butchers, Tool Makers and Stockers of Wheat who comprise the Bleacher Bums will spill out into the streets after 10 p.m. 8uid even Carl Sandburg wouldn't want to Uve there. Wrigley's neighbors have fought the Cubs against installing the lights for years. They will contdnua the fight to limit the number of gmmes but now that the club will have the capability, expect the Cubs to gradually increase the number of night games each year. Sooner than we think, young sports fans wiHi be asking us old-timers, incredulously: '^ou mean to say the Colts played aomewhere btfore Indianapolis?" "UCLA was a col basketball power?""The Chicago Cubs pla; baseball under the sun on weekdays?" Theyll look at us strangely as we nod '*yet,' and remember fondly the not-wniistant

PAGE 18

#•(• II HtftdnoB HMM Newi, Huideuon, Nevida> -.Thursday, March 3, 1988 \ Unes from the lanes by Rath Soehlke Home News CmrMpondent HWBA TouniaiBeat opens: Following presentation of the -American flag by the Basic High School ROTC color guard the ladies 'were greeted with a few witty words of welcome by president of the 'Chamber of Commerce Gary Johnson to opm the Henderson Women's Bowling Association 28th annual champioiiahip tournament last Friday evening. He also commended the Basic High School ROTC program, wminding those present that they put up the flag aroimd town and takit them down on special holidays. Each year a special "someone" is invited to throw out the first ball to officially begin the tournament. This year Bob Connor was so honored because he is always pleasant in handling problems and comjdaints on the lanes (they have been numerous this year). Bob has made a special effort to know each bowler by name and offer encouragement at times. He brings music from home to play before and after the leagues which helps to liven up the bowlers and get the adrenalin flowing. So, we were proud to have Bob deliver that first ball. Ladies Longevity on the lanes acknowledged: With rumors flying around that we may not have any lanes here for leagues next^ear, ,ihe HWBA board members decided to acknowledge the women bowlers ; who have been here for 20 years and more with a special pin. Those j receiving 20 year pins were Ruby Hawkins, Helen Hedland, Lola Kirk, ; Rosalie Munford, Bette Pilon, Leila Stoker. Ora Norris, Barbara 'Resales, Ruth Soehlke and Bunny Wikock were presented 25 year ipins and Elizabeth Bondurant was awarded the only 30 year pin for ; continuous membership in the Henderson Women's Bowling ; Association. t' Haf en's OK lire wins tournament: On the last squad of the toumaI ment a few girls who got together, some now even knowing the others, HPRD baseball still open came on strong to win the team event in the HWBA tournament with 2536 total pins. Betty Ward, Kathy Hafen (sponsor) Brooke Martin and Kay Sistad will be receiving the first place team award. Doubles partners (Hara Holt and Ila Sutherlin won the event with 1322. Loma KiQebrew earned a 175 game pin for her 189 and took the singles event with a 714 total. All events was won by Chon Madderra with 2051. Sonday Night Mixed: C.P. National has the lead with 114 wins. John Shifflett led with 233-623, Hank Rubeck 542, Joe MacMillan 201-532, Bob Ck>nkhn 521, Russell Stroud 20u-503, Deick Weller 501. Betty Wages was high for the ladies with a 568, Shirlee Reese 203-537, Barbara Jager 532, Linda Stroud 203-525, Linda Bender 200-522. Henderson Seniors: Iieading by ten games is Sookee Kookees with 110 wins. Charlie Thomps(m 5^8, Harvey Spittell 501, Art McClain 501, Art Clodfelter 224-500, Abe Steinberg 214, Marty Martinez 210. Henderson E^agles: Team No. 8 leads by one game with 24'>4 wins. Ricky Roundy was high man with 567, Larry Lopan 542, Rupert Chandler 203-539, Brad Clark high game 208-526, Tim Clark 202-525, Joe Pilon 515, Pete Meadows 512, John Koper 505, Kelley Roundy 504. Maud Clark put the ladies on the sheet with a 539. Powder Puff: El Torito Cafe in the lead with 69Vi games won. Ben Stepman Motor led in series with 2191, Beauty Comer bowled high team game of 791. Ruth Soehlke high aeries 200-546, Patsy Prestwpod 533, Bev MacMillan 514, Christa Haldie 506. Kay Sims rolled high game of 206 and Esther Swoboda rolled her very first 200 game to take handicap highs 245-628. Ben Ward League: Quickie Quickie No. 1 leads with 28 wins. Bob Howard was hot on the lanes with 222-213-201 for 636. Frances Frank 225-586, Joe Pilon high game 229-578, John Selby 209-574, Art Pappas 216-570, Lawrence Bradley 226-563, Rudy Medrano 208-561, Gary Bondurant 558, John Mize 546, Paula Montoya 544, Ron English 543, Mike Bergemeyer 542, Lou Roelfs 542, Ivan Beavor 540, David Bondurant 202-39, Marv Radley 203-536, Bruce Tull 532, Jack Stafford 530, Claude Mein 526, Chink Clark 204-523, Mel Collier 526, Boyd Alexander 522, Ron Benoit 522, Jeff Rinker 200-520, Harv Spittell 518, Clair Jolley 207-517, Mark Carlton 517, Fred Stanford 202-515, Eric Getz 511, Hank Rubeck 511, Billy Haas 509, Keith Farmer, Sr., 507, Lyle Thomas 200-505, Arshel Lang 505, Mark Fitton 503, Chuck Sullivan 502, Mike Wages 501, Rich Walsh 500, Bill Blackford 200. Henderson Housewives: Othena's Fashions lead with 59Vt wins. Eldorado Casino and McKenzie-Nall tied for team series with 1806, McKenzie-Nall took high game with 655. Ruth Soehlke led with 220-566, 248-650 hep highs, Pat Nail 202-503. Mary Brandon converted the difficult 7-9 split. Sundowners: Bargain Boutique in the lead with 54 wins. They also took scratch highs with 706-2059, Coe's Texaco Stars 2465 hep series and Yam Bam 848 hep games. Karen C!onklin was high bowler with 224-575,258-677 hep. Candy Payne 208-553, Betty Wages 544, Barbara Grogan 215-543, Linda Bender 531, Carol Farmer 525, Lesley Haskell 521, Linda Stroud 208-516. Anita Cook converted the 6-7-10. Thursday Fun League: The Unholy Rollers lead with 75 wins. Hank Rubeck was high with 543, Bob Mitchell 508, Jim Byme 518. Henderson teachers: Grot Cha leads with 17 games won. Mary Magnuson led the league with a 228-600, Rae Smalley 538, Ruth Uhls 504. Ray Wilke was high man with 217-573, Bruce Momsen 215-563, Les Anderson 514, Dennis Smuskiewicz 507, Dennis Russell 201, Reid Wilke 510. Thanks for your league highlights. Complete list of tournament prize wiimers next week. And that's bowling. The Henderson Parks and j Recreation Department will accept late sign-ups for its I baseball program through •Monday, March 7. I The mini, junior and Softball I leagues have unlimited openI ings, and there are still a few ;^sIot8 available in pee wee and midget. Tryouts were held last Saturday and Little League team assignments were made Tuesday night. HPRD team assignments are next week, with practices to begin March 14. Opening day is April 9; games begin April 11. [ poys and Girls Club auction March 26 li^ The ninth annual "Swing f !^to Springtime" charity auc*' •:kion to benefit the Henderson •;; > -Boys and Girls Qub will be con•^^uded at the club site at 401 fvif^rake Street this year. if The auction is set for Satmrl^y, March 26. J^ The doors are scheduled to j^pen at 5 p.m. with the sflent j"^ Auction and the live auction to i-?3)egin at 8 p.m. -^i;;; There will be free hors j ^ jd'oeuvres donated by area • l^lipasino restaurants served prior i'ip) the live auction and no-host f^^ocktails will be available ^;{lilhroughout the evening. The entrance donation will be $5 per person at the door. Auctioneer G. Robert Diero has once again donated his time to handle the live auction duties. Qub staff and directors have been soliciting donations of auction items from Henderson and Las Vegas area businesses for several months now, and the response has been tremendous, according to the club's executive director Clyde Claldwell. Caldwell is anticipating a good turnout in support of the auction, and is looking forward to showing the club to many area residents who probably would not otherwise be able to see it. From Curtis' Corner by Joey Curtis A most interesting and important fight is coming up on the horizon on March 5 way over in Italy where the WBA middleweight championship is up for grabs. The foes are champion but little known Sumbu Kalambay and the challengeer but better knovm because of his WBA junior middlewieght championship Mike McCallum. McCallum isn't the most colorful fighter around but he's one of the most complete and one of the most accomplished.. He's done well first as a welterweight and then, obviously based on his title, as a 154 pounder. Now he's moving up to the more popular (and profitable) middleweight division and already, even before he's enters the ring to win or lose, there's talk that if he is victorious his first defense will be against none other than ageless three timie exworld champion Roberto Duran. Regardless if McCallum does defend against Duran a win would make the middleweight division all the more interesting since he's better known than Kalambay and would be a talked about addition to the other two middleweight world champions, IBF king and Olympic Gold Medal winner Frank Tate and WBC champ and the only four time world champion in boxing history Thomas Heams. There's also a fight set for March 4 in Colombia and that's Happy Lora defending his WBC bantamweight championship against Lucio Lopez. Two well known but little heard lately names may be back in the news. One is John "The Beast" Mugabi who its said is being considered for a title shot against the winner of the WBC super welterweight championship bout between champion Gianfranco Rossi and Donald Curry and the other is ex three time world champion Wilf redo Gomez who is said is now training in hopes of making a comeback attempt. Congratulations to Julio Cesar Chavez who was elected the "Fighter of the Year" by the Boxing Writers of America Association, the official group for boxing writers and boxing broadcasters in these United States. Chavez won in the closet voting ever, beating Sugar Ray Leonard by just one vote and Mike Tyson by just three votes. All three had great credentials and did big things in 1987. Chavez beat Edwin Rosario for the WBA lightweight champion, Leonard upset world middleweight champion Marvelous Marvin Hagler, and Tyson became the first undisputed world heavyweight champion since Leon Spinks was the same thing in 1978. Congratulations to the newest member of the Nevada State Athletic Commission, Dr. James Nave from here in Las Vegas. Dr. Nave is a long time boxing fan and I know hell do a solid and conscientious job with his new and iiimportant duty! Don forget the big fights at Bailey's Friday night. NDOW research, conservation projects pay dividends for hunters s. by Geoff Schneider NDOW Publicist Work now being done by game f'.i biologists at the Nevada Depart; ment of Wildlife (NDOW) will, to ''^. a large degree, determine if 5 southern Nevadans enjoy quality ?Sr.hunting in the fall. S • Bob Turner, NDOW supervising Sp.game biologist, said there are 3-three major activities the departJST'. DMnt's game biologists are now doPC-ing to help assure hunters they ^:will have a good availabihty of ^ ^. game in the fall. These include the ^^ongoing processs of surveying ^<' game species, transplanting birds and animals to desirable habitat, and the construction of wildlife watering devices. Surveying game animals and birds is one of the more significant and time consuming tasks done by NDOW biologists. It's also one of the more necesary, because date gathered from aerial and ground surveys is used to establish season and quota reconmiendations. "During the spring, well be looking at big game herda to see how they've wintered," Turner said. This information is fed into our computers and the product is provided to the Nevada Board of Wildlife Commissioners who then determine how many tags will be issued." Game animals aren't the only species that are counted and surveyed by NDOW biologists. Also in the spring, biologists monitor southern Nevada's waterfowl to see what nesting and breeding patterns are taking place. Non-game species are counted and studied as well. In April and May biologists will be doing helicopter surveys to look at nesting and territories of raptors. During the summer these territories will again be tlown to see how many juveniles, called eyesis, are in the nests. Plans are also being developed for yet another active year of animal trappings and releases. Highlighting htis activity will be more of the well-publicized trappings of desert bighorn sheep. Turner said the department's objective has long been to return the sheep to their native ranges. In addition, the NDOW has been striving to introduce bighorn sheep to areas that have suitable habitat but have, for various reasons, never had sheep populations. §; Robert Turner continues winning tradition in super bowl of polcer Caesars Robert Turner of Huntsville, Ala won $38,000 and the first place trophy in the $525 buy-in limit Hold-'em toiomament event in Amarillo Slim's Super Bowl of Poker at Caesars Place, besting a field of 178 entrants. A Gardens, Calif, card room host and profeMional poker player, Turner made poker history last year by winning two events and placmg second in two events at the Super Bowl of poker, giviBf him totals tournament prize of 1125,300 jB The first tin S^oatsstMill ^bMaiidtiM The first time in history that kali won two first first place in he woo the 7-Card Stud Himit), 7-Card Stud High-Low SpUt (8 or better), and was runnerup in the limit Hold'me and Ace-5 Lo-Ball (limit) games. Unmarried and 39years-okl. Turner also placed Mcond in the 1987 Grand Prix brish Sweepstakes tournament and the 1987 Work! Series Omaha event. He plays all forms of poker, and plans to enter other events in this tenth annual Super Bowl of Poker, which continues at Caesars Place through Feb. 18. Eric Treichel of Carney, Mich, was runner-up in the Limit Hold'en gams, vinainf $16,200. A boilar msksr snd ChrMmss tne growwr, Trsiehsl had nsver sotersd a poker toomamaot before. An amateur poksr player since his college years, the 36-year-old plans to buy his wife a car with the winnings. The $7,600 third place prize went to Earl Kim of Honolulu, Hawaii. A travel consultsnt, Kim hsd only entered one tournament previously, but had never placed in the money. Generally an Omaha player, he plans to enter the Pot Limit Omaha tournament event on Feb. 8. Manager of J&J Counter Repair in Las Vegas Mike Hslford won the $3,800 fourth place Originally from Memphis, Tenn., the 33^ear-
PAGE 19

#•(• II HtftdnoB HMM Newi, Huideuon, Nevida> -.Thursday, March 3, 1988 \ Unes from the lanes by Rath Soehlke Home News CmrMpondent HWBA TouniaiBeat opens: Following presentation of the -American flag by the Basic High School ROTC color guard the ladies 'were greeted with a few witty words of welcome by president of the 'Chamber of Commerce Gary Johnson to opm the Henderson Women's Bowling Association 28th annual champioiiahip tournament last Friday evening. He also commended the Basic High School ROTC program, wminding those present that they put up the flag aroimd town and takit them down on special holidays. Each year a special "someone" is invited to throw out the first ball to officially begin the tournament. This year Bob Connor was so honored because he is always pleasant in handling problems and comjdaints on the lanes (they have been numerous this year). Bob has made a special effort to know each bowler by name and offer encouragement at times. He brings music from home to play before and after the leagues which helps to liven up the bowlers and get the adrenalin flowing. So, we were proud to have Bob deliver that first ball. Ladies Longevity on the lanes acknowledged: With rumors flying around that we may not have any lanes here for leagues next^ear, ,ihe HWBA board members decided to acknowledge the women bowlers ; who have been here for 20 years and more with a special pin. Those j receiving 20 year pins were Ruby Hawkins, Helen Hedland, Lola Kirk, ; Rosalie Munford, Bette Pilon, Leila Stoker. Ora Norris, Barbara 'Resales, Ruth Soehlke and Bunny Wikock were presented 25 year ipins and Elizabeth Bondurant was awarded the only 30 year pin for ; continuous membership in the Henderson Women's Bowling ; Association. t' Haf en's OK lire wins tournament: On the last squad of the toumaI ment a few girls who got together, some now even knowing the others, HPRD baseball still open came on strong to win the team event in the HWBA tournament with 2536 total pins. Betty Ward, Kathy Hafen (sponsor) Brooke Martin and Kay Sistad will be receiving the first place team award. Doubles partners (Hara Holt and Ila Sutherlin won the event with 1322. Loma KiQebrew earned a 175 game pin for her 189 and took the singles event with a 714 total. All events was won by Chon Madderra with 2051. Sonday Night Mixed: C.P. National has the lead with 114 wins. John Shifflett led with 233-623, Hank Rubeck 542, Joe MacMillan 201-532, Bob Ck>nkhn 521, Russell Stroud 20u-503, Deick Weller 501. Betty Wages was high for the ladies with a 568, Shirlee Reese 203-537, Barbara Jager 532, Linda Stroud 203-525, Linda Bender 200-522. Henderson Seniors: Iieading by ten games is Sookee Kookees with 110 wins. Charlie Thomps(m 5^8, Harvey Spittell 501, Art McClain 501, Art Clodfelter 224-500, Abe Steinberg 214, Marty Martinez 210. Henderson E^agles: Team No. 8 leads by one game with 24'>4 wins. Ricky Roundy was high man with 567, Larry Lopan 542, Rupert Chandler 203-539, Brad Clark high game 208-526, Tim Clark 202-525, Joe Pilon 515, Pete Meadows 512, John Koper 505, Kelley Roundy 504. Maud Clark put the ladies on the sheet with a 539. Powder Puff: El Torito Cafe in the lead with 69Vi games won. Ben Stepman Motor led in series with 2191, Beauty Comer bowled high team game of 791. Ruth Soehlke high aeries 200-546, Patsy Prestwpod 533, Bev MacMillan 514, Christa Haldie 506. Kay Sims rolled high game of 206 and Esther Swoboda rolled her very first 200 game to take handicap highs 245-628. Ben Ward League: Quickie Quickie No. 1 leads with 28 wins. Bob Howard was hot on the lanes with 222-213-201 for 636. Frances Frank 225-586, Joe Pilon high game 229-578, John Selby 209-574, Art Pappas 216-570, Lawrence Bradley 226-563, Rudy Medrano 208-561, Gary Bondurant 558, John Mize 546, Paula Montoya 544, Ron English 543, Mike Bergemeyer 542, Lou Roelfs 542, Ivan Beavor 540, David Bondurant 202-39, Marv Radley 203-536, Bruce Tull 532, Jack Stafford 530, Claude Mein 526, Chink Clark 204-523, Mel Collier 526, Boyd Alexander 522, Ron Benoit 522, Jeff Rinker 200-520, Harv Spittell 518, Clair Jolley 207-517, Mark Carlton 517, Fred Stanford 202-515, Eric Getz 511, Hank Rubeck 511, Billy Haas 509, Keith Farmer, Sr., 507, Lyle Thomas 200-505, Arshel Lang 505, Mark Fitton 503, Chuck Sullivan 502, Mike Wages 501, Rich Walsh 500, Bill Blackford 200. Henderson Housewives: Othena's Fashions lead with 59Vt wins. Eldorado Casino and McKenzie-Nall tied for team series with 1806, McKenzie-Nall took high game with 655. Ruth Soehlke led with 220-566, 248-650 hep highs, Pat Nail 202-503. Mary Brandon converted the difficult 7-9 split. Sundowners: Bargain Boutique in the lead with 54 wins. They also took scratch highs with 706-2059, Coe's Texaco Stars 2465 hep series and Yam Bam 848 hep games. Karen C!onklin was high bowler with 224-575,258-677 hep. Candy Payne 208-553, Betty Wages 544, Barbara Grogan 215-543, Linda Bender 531, Carol Farmer 525, Lesley Haskell 521, Linda Stroud 208-516. Anita Cook converted the 6-7-10. Thursday Fun League: The Unholy Rollers lead with 75 wins. Hank Rubeck was high with 543, Bob Mitchell 508, Jim Byme 518. Henderson teachers: Grot Cha leads with 17 games won. Mary Magnuson led the league with a 228-600, Rae Smalley 538, Ruth Uhls 504. Ray Wilke was high man with 217-573, Bruce Momsen 215-563, Les Anderson 514, Dennis Smuskiewicz 507, Dennis Russell 201, Reid Wilke 510. Thanks for your league highlights. Complete list of tournament prize wiimers next week. And that's bowling. The Henderson Parks and j Recreation Department will accept late sign-ups for its I baseball program through •Monday, March 7. I The mini, junior and Softball I leagues have unlimited openI ings, and there are still a few ;^sIot8 available in pee wee and midget. Tryouts were held last Saturday and Little League team assignments were made Tuesday night. HPRD team assignments are next week, with practices to begin March 14. Opening day is April 9; games begin April 11. [ poys and Girls Club auction March 26 li^ The ninth annual "Swing f !^to Springtime" charity auc*' •:kion to benefit the Henderson •;; > -Boys and Girls Qub will be con•^^uded at the club site at 401 fvif^rake Street this year. if The auction is set for Satmrl^y, March 26. J^ The doors are scheduled to j^pen at 5 p.m. with the sflent j"^ Auction and the live auction to i-?3)egin at 8 p.m. -^i;;; There will be free hors j ^ jd'oeuvres donated by area • l^lipasino restaurants served prior i'ip) the live auction and no-host f^^ocktails will be available ^;{lilhroughout the evening. The entrance donation will be $5 per person at the door. Auctioneer G. Robert Diero has once again donated his time to handle the live auction duties. Qub staff and directors have been soliciting donations of auction items from Henderson and Las Vegas area businesses for several months now, and the response has been tremendous, according to the club's executive director Clyde Claldwell. Caldwell is anticipating a good turnout in support of the auction, and is looking forward to showing the club to many area residents who probably would not otherwise be able to see it. From Curtis' Corner by Joey Curtis A most interesting and important fight is coming up on the horizon on March 5 way over in Italy where the WBA middleweight championship is up for grabs. The foes are champion but little known Sumbu Kalambay and the challengeer but better knovm because of his WBA junior middlewieght championship Mike McCallum. McCallum isn't the most colorful fighter around but he's one of the most complete and one of the most accomplished.. He's done well first as a welterweight and then, obviously based on his title, as a 154 pounder. Now he's moving up to the more popular (and profitable) middleweight division and already, even before he's enters the ring to win or lose, there's talk that if he is victorious his first defense will be against none other than ageless three timie exworld champion Roberto Duran. Regardless if McCallum does defend against Duran a win would make the middleweight division all the more interesting since he's better known than Kalambay and would be a talked about addition to the other two middleweight world champions, IBF king and Olympic Gold Medal winner Frank Tate and WBC champ and the only four time world champion in boxing history Thomas Heams. There's also a fight set for March 4 in Colombia and that's Happy Lora defending his WBC bantamweight championship against Lucio Lopez. Two well known but little heard lately names may be back in the news. One is John "The Beast" Mugabi who its said is being considered for a title shot against the winner of the WBC super welterweight championship bout between champion Gianfranco Rossi and Donald Curry and the other is ex three time world champion Wilf redo Gomez who is said is now training in hopes of making a comeback attempt. Congratulations to Julio Cesar Chavez who was elected the "Fighter of the Year" by the Boxing Writers of America Association, the official group for boxing writers and boxing broadcasters in these United States. Chavez won in the closet voting ever, beating Sugar Ray Leonard by just one vote and Mike Tyson by just three votes. All three had great credentials and did big things in 1987. Chavez beat Edwin Rosario for the WBA lightweight champion, Leonard upset world middleweight champion Marvelous Marvin Hagler, and Tyson became the first undisputed world heavyweight champion since Leon Spinks was the same thing in 1978. Congratulations to the newest member of the Nevada State Athletic Commission, Dr. James Nave from here in Las Vegas. Dr. Nave is a long time boxing fan and I know hell do a solid and conscientious job with his new and iiimportant duty! Don forget the big fights at Bailey's Friday night. NDOW research, conservation projects pay dividends for hunters s. by Geoff Schneider NDOW Publicist Work now being done by game f'.i biologists at the Nevada Depart; ment of Wildlife (NDOW) will, to ''^. a large degree, determine if 5 southern Nevadans enjoy quality ?Sr.hunting in the fall. S • Bob Turner, NDOW supervising Sp.game biologist, said there are 3-three major activities the departJST'. DMnt's game biologists are now doPC-ing to help assure hunters they ^:will have a good availabihty of ^ ^. game in the fall. These include the ^^ongoing processs of surveying ^<' game species, transplanting birds and animals to desirable habitat, and the construction of wildlife watering devices. Surveying game animals and birds is one of the more significant and time consuming tasks done by NDOW biologists. It's also one of the more necesary, because date gathered from aerial and ground surveys is used to establish season and quota reconmiendations. "During the spring, well be looking at big game herda to see how they've wintered," Turner said. This information is fed into our computers and the product is provided to the Nevada Board of Wildlife Commissioners who then determine how many tags will be issued." Game animals aren't the only species that are counted and surveyed by NDOW biologists. Also in the spring, biologists monitor southern Nevada's waterfowl to see what nesting and breeding patterns are taking place. Non-game species are counted and studied as well. In April and May biologists will be doing helicopter surveys to look at nesting and territories of raptors. During the summer these territories will again be tlown to see how many juveniles, called eyesis, are in the nests. Plans are also being developed for yet another active year of animal trappings and releases. Highlighting htis activity will be more of the well-publicized trappings of desert bighorn sheep. Turner said the department's objective has long been to return the sheep to their native ranges. In addition, the NDOW has been striving to introduce bighorn sheep to areas that have suitable habitat but have, for various reasons, never had sheep populations. §; Robert Turner continues winning tradition in super bowl of polcer Caesars Robert Turner of Huntsville, Ala won $38,000 and the first place trophy in the $525 buy-in limit Hold-'em toiomament event in Amarillo Slim's Super Bowl of Poker at Caesars Place, besting a field of 178 entrants. A Gardens, Calif, card room host and profeMional poker player, Turner made poker history last year by winning two events and placmg second in two events at the Super Bowl of poker, giviBf him totals tournament prize of 1125,300 jB The first tin S^oatsstMill ^bMaiidtiM The first time in history that kali won two first first place in he woo the 7-Card Stud Himit), 7-Card Stud High-Low SpUt (8 or better), and was runnerup in the limit Hold'me and Ace-5 Lo-Ball (limit) games. Unmarried and 39years-okl. Turner also placed Mcond in the 1987 Grand Prix brish Sweepstakes tournament and the 1987 Work! Series Omaha event. He plays all forms of poker, and plans to enter other events in this tenth annual Super Bowl of Poker, which continues at Caesars Place through Feb. 18. Eric Treichel of Carney, Mich, was runner-up in the Limit Hold'en gams, vinainf $16,200. A boilar msksr snd ChrMmss tne growwr, Trsiehsl had nsver sotersd a poker toomamaot before. An amateur poksr player since his college years, the 36-year-old plans to buy his wife a car with the winnings. The $7,600 third place prize went to Earl Kim of Honolulu, Hawaii. A travel consultsnt, Kim hsd only entered one tournament previously, but had never placed in the money. Generally an Omaha player, he plans to enter the Pot Limit Omaha tournament event on Feb. 8. Manager of J&J Counter Repair in Las Vegas Mike Hslford won the $3,800 fourth place Originally from Memphis, Tenn., the 33^ear-
PAGE 20

• ^^ • ^^"^^^^^^^ • ^ • ^^^ • • • • ^ • • • • • PVa^^niVPPVVliMPVVWVIIiPVVi^iV^niiVMaHBVVBPP ^ • ^^• • ^^ fage 20 Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Thursday. March 3, 1988 Tharaday, March 3, 1988 HOME & GARDEN CARE Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Page 2f HOME & GARDEN CARE + + Decorating with flowers: Mixing, matching for the loolc yoii want Tips offered regarding spring-time houseliold chores \ 1 I Special to the News Now that spring is here, it's time [to clean and spruce up the house. {The makers of Arm and Hammer S Baking Soda have developed some ipractical tips for spring cleaning using what's contained in their familiar yellow box. u^ Baking soda will clean soap :9cum off shower stalls, removed '^embedded juice stains from kitiicheD countertops and will help to ^get berbeque grills in shape for the ^^commg season. '^ Baking soda is pure, natural :::8odium bicarbonate; its unique .^chemical and physical properties Sallow it to neutralize household ^o^rs, dissolve grease and dirt and -icfean kitchen and bathroom sur^faces without scratching. ^ r Kitchen s jlf the winter has left the kitchen ^f^rs ridden with black heel -:ii^ks, it's easy to remove them '"^th a bit of baking soda. Sprinkle Sthe soda on a damp sponge and ^rub into the affected areas. The >baking soda crystals are strong T^enough to remove the marks, but ^to soft to scratch or harm the 'ffeor. Rinse and buff dry. For food spills which have stained the countertop apply a past of three parts baking soda to one part water. Let it stand for half an hour and wipe with a damp sponge and rinse. To remove heavy food odors from countertops or wooden chopping boards, sprinkle dry baking soda on a damp sponge and rub it in. Rinse with water and dry. Bathroom To remove any mildew from a shower curtain, as well as cleaning and deoderizing it, sprinkle baking soda on a damp sponge and rub gently. Sponge clean and wipe dry. If the fiberglass shower stall has become cloudy and dull with soap, scum sprinkle baking soda on a damp sponge and gently scour it clean without scratdiing. lliis same method will also work for chrome fixtures (XI sinks, tubs and showers. living room, dining room Baking soda can also be used to remove built up tarnish on Hne silver ware. By observing the following methods tarnish can be removed with Uttle difficulty. FSl a non-aluminum pan with hot \ Winter care for cyclamen water and place a small, five inch, square of aluminum foil in the pan. Add baking soda, one teaspoon per quart of water, and bring to a boil. Drop silver in briefly. Remove silver with tongs and wash with soapy water. Rinse and buff to a shiny gloss. Another tarnish removing alternative is to apply baking soda with a damp sponge (xsoft cloth. Rinse and buff until shiny. Outdoors For oil spills on the driveway or on the floor of the porch or garage, pour baking soda generously on the spill. Let it stand overnight and, the next day, sweep it up and throw it all awayr A free booklet is offered from Arm and Hammer company detailing the uses of baking soda throughout the house. If a flowering cyclamen was a gift received around holiday time, there are several things that can be done to help it flower again. While the cyclamen continues to bloom, keep it in a cool bright location out of sunlight if possible. A windowsill where there are no drafts, with enough room to prevent leaves from touching the cold glass panes, and where sun is Altered or shaded is ideal. Water frequently to keep the soil moist, but water lightly each time so the potting medium is never waterlogged; When blossoms have waned entirely, reduce water over time so that the soil becomes slowly and steadily drier, then very dry. At this point, foilage will begin to turn yellow. Remove the yellowed leaves carefully, one by one, until the plant is bare. In a cool spot, free of frost (insulated basement, attice or garage), place the pot on its side for storing over the next few months. In early spring, begin watering gradually with a weak solution of water-soluable fertilizer. As the plant begins to show new leaves, change to regular Weekly waterings to keep soil moist; feed the plant monthly. Return it to a cool spot where some sunlight will help leaf and bud development. Even given the best of care, the cyclamen will only flower for a m&nth or so each year. The plant grows from a corm which must be given proper growth and dormancy cycles to continue growing and forming flowers. Even with the best care, however, cyclamen conns are generally not expected to last for more than two or three years. (^rnset 9^U)in^ ^^P^ Kitchen & Bath Showroom Elegant but still affordable Sf 739 Sunset Road •564-2660 Alsons Shower Accessories American & State Water Heaters Bemis Toilet Seats Commercial Enameling Cast Iron Rxtures Crane Fixtures Oetta Faucets Hallmack Bath Accessories Hydro-Systems Whiripoo) Baths ISE Dishwashers & Disposals Moen Faucet & Stainless Steel Sinks Price Plister Faucets Swan Tub & Shower Walls Universal Rundle Fixtures Kimstock Fiberglass Tub & Sink Enclosures Complete Line Of Repair Parts JT 15%-30% See the Newest Spring Line in Patio Furniture SaniM* Action givM comfort a nw twtet Ease into summer with beautiful Saniber action furniture. Sanibel action offers a unique 360 swivet, so you can tilt back smoothly and freely. Matchir>g ottomans make it easy to put your feet up. Sleekly siyted and corrtoured for extra comfort, Sanibel action comes in two styles, sling and cushion. Whaf s nrxxe, Samsonite's special open weave fabrics stay cool to the touch even on the hottest days. So turn your summers around with durable SanilDel action furniture. Another fine Samsonite product. There's not better way to bring the feeling of springtime indoors than with an arrangement of cut flowers. Flowers can change the mood and look of any room and can blend in to any style decor. "How you select a floral arrangement for a roqm depends a lot on your own personaUty and individual style," says president of Florists' Transworld Delivery Association (FTD) Robert McNamara. According the McNamara the first step is to consider the room setting to be enhanced. And, he adds, there's no reason to restrict floral arrangements to dining rooms or living rooms. The first question to be asked is "does the room have a dominant color? How large is the room and V how much space is available to work with?" Other questions concern the type of vase or container to be used and whether or not the arrangement will be viewed from more than one angle. "Flowers should complement a room's color scheme but they don't have to match it exactly," says McNamara. "It's more important to make sure your flowers and container work together, a vase should suite the flowers and the environment." With regard to containers, a narrow neck vase allows a few long stems to support one another. Wide neck containers, on the other hand, cause stems to fall freely away from one another and a greater number of flowers or additional foilage becomes necessary for a full look. Whatever arrangement is chosen, remember that the goal is for the flowers to last. If flowers are arranged in floral foam, they will draw moisture naturally, as they would if they were in the ground. Check the moisture level daily and add water as needed. If some flowers wilt before others, remove them so they don't spoil the appearance of the bouquet or adversely affect the other blooms. Some wilting flowers can be revived by diagonally cutting the stem and reinserting it into the foam. An arrangement in a vase of water however, is presented with an unnatural environment. In order to keep these flowers looking their best observing the followingtips will add to their Ufe. •Always recut the stems under wai:m water and on an angle so as not to restrict water uptake. -^3. When cut in the air, stems may suck up a small amount of air, causing the base of the stem to be blocked, and restricting water flow. •Remove all foUage that rests below the water line. Fohage left under water tends to rot, releasing harmful bacteria and ethylene gas, which can cause flo\yer8 to die prematurely. •Ideally, vase water should be changed every two or three days, at which time the flower stems should be recut. "Although principles are important, there are really no hard and fast rules when it comes to arranging flowers," adds McNamara. "Just experiment, using your eye as a ermde—and have fun." Alcoves have many uses Many old homes have alcoves, niches and recesses which seem useless. Actually there are many uses for an alcove. Depending on the style of the house, an alcove can serve as an area for a bookcase, a cabinet, a bar, stereo equipment, a vanity, a home office, a dressing table or just a nook for a loveseat, plants or shelves. An unattractive window dormer can make a charming vanity in a bedroom. If you can do without the Kght from the window, it would be a good idea to close up the window and install a mirror within the whole nich, including the side walls. Good makeup hghting overhead and alongside the mirror is a necessity. Another idea is to build shelves into an alcove to house extra books which have a way of accumulating. CEILING CLEANING Yellow — Dingy • Dirty Vents DON'T PAINT OR RESPRAY CALL ADVANCE CEILING CARE WE'LL CLEAN THAT CEILING FOR LESS 565-4877 Oil 1 ^ stop Bleaching Your Kids! itop putting toxic chem< • • ^^^fr/! ^ i Widen Door Openings Without Wrecking Walls y. JFolding Door Hardware Converts Bi-fold Doors For Full Access To Space BOULDER CITY'S GARDEN CENTER (Formerly M&H Oasis) 'Tour Partner In Keeping Everything Clean & Green" Now is the time to plant your garden VEGETABLE & BEDDING FLOWERS 1674 Nevada Highway (Marshall piaza) Boulder City 293-4987 Perfect for food pantries, utility rooms, clothes closets, beverage bars, any place where folding doors must swing out completely to allow full access to the opening. NOW APPEARING THROUGH MARCH CALL THE Hnclrson Horn* News Advvflitlng 804-1881 QARMNINQAHOME IMPR0VIMINT8 ^When to plant? ^ Latest in lawn equipment ^ Newest patio furniture ^Pool aids & accessories 1^ Remodeling Items *^and much more Bouldr City Newt Advertltlng 283-2302 ADVmTISmt, CAU NOW TO mtiiivi YOUR tFACI The best things in life are ten to My percent off. With Coldwell Banker, you can plan on O the most out of life. Thanks to our uyer Plan! Ifs a room-by room decorating guide packed full of savings from 10 to 50 percent on selected Se^ home improvement items and services. As well as on home fashions, furnishings and the appliances new home buyers need most. „ ColdvOdl Banker Expect the best. c a •f> COLDWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY 501 Nevada Hwy. CALL 24 HOURS BOULDER CITY (702) 293-5757 An IndipwidwMy Owfwd and OpvMd Mmbar ol Coldwsl Bwyitt on proper atlon ol our 1114011 MM S. laSHUIID PW. H^S. Meii-fH. 74, lat. N m Hi

PAGE 21

• ^^ • ^^"^^^^^^^ • ^ • ^^^ • • • • ^ • • • • • PVa^^niVPPVVliMPVVWVIIiPVVi^iV^niiVMaHBVVBPP ^ • ^^• • ^^ fage 20 Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Thursday. March 3, 1988 Tharaday, March 3, 1988 HOME & GARDEN CARE Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Page 2f HOME & GARDEN CARE + + Decorating with flowers: Mixing, matching for the loolc yoii want Tips offered regarding spring-time houseliold chores \ 1 I Special to the News Now that spring is here, it's time [to clean and spruce up the house. {The makers of Arm and Hammer S Baking Soda have developed some ipractical tips for spring cleaning using what's contained in their familiar yellow box. u^ Baking soda will clean soap :9cum off shower stalls, removed '^embedded juice stains from kitiicheD countertops and will help to ^get berbeque grills in shape for the ^^commg season. '^ Baking soda is pure, natural :::8odium bicarbonate; its unique .^chemical and physical properties Sallow it to neutralize household ^o^rs, dissolve grease and dirt and -icfean kitchen and bathroom sur^faces without scratching. ^ r Kitchen s jlf the winter has left the kitchen ^f^rs ridden with black heel -:ii^ks, it's easy to remove them '"^th a bit of baking soda. Sprinkle Sthe soda on a damp sponge and ^rub into the affected areas. The >baking soda crystals are strong T^enough to remove the marks, but ^to soft to scratch or harm the 'ffeor. Rinse and buff dry. For food spills which have stained the countertop apply a past of three parts baking soda to one part water. Let it stand for half an hour and wipe with a damp sponge and rinse. To remove heavy food odors from countertops or wooden chopping boards, sprinkle dry baking soda on a damp sponge and rub it in. Rinse with water and dry. Bathroom To remove any mildew from a shower curtain, as well as cleaning and deoderizing it, sprinkle baking soda on a damp sponge and rub gently. Sponge clean and wipe dry. If the fiberglass shower stall has become cloudy and dull with soap, scum sprinkle baking soda on a damp sponge and gently scour it clean without scratdiing. lliis same method will also work for chrome fixtures (XI sinks, tubs and showers. living room, dining room Baking soda can also be used to remove built up tarnish on Hne silver ware. By observing the following methods tarnish can be removed with Uttle difficulty. FSl a non-aluminum pan with hot \ Winter care for cyclamen water and place a small, five inch, square of aluminum foil in the pan. Add baking soda, one teaspoon per quart of water, and bring to a boil. Drop silver in briefly. Remove silver with tongs and wash with soapy water. Rinse and buff to a shiny gloss. Another tarnish removing alternative is to apply baking soda with a damp sponge (xsoft cloth. Rinse and buff until shiny. Outdoors For oil spills on the driveway or on the floor of the porch or garage, pour baking soda generously on the spill. Let it stand overnight and, the next day, sweep it up and throw it all awayr A free booklet is offered from Arm and Hammer company detailing the uses of baking soda throughout the house. If a flowering cyclamen was a gift received around holiday time, there are several things that can be done to help it flower again. While the cyclamen continues to bloom, keep it in a cool bright location out of sunlight if possible. A windowsill where there are no drafts, with enough room to prevent leaves from touching the cold glass panes, and where sun is Altered or shaded is ideal. Water frequently to keep the soil moist, but water lightly each time so the potting medium is never waterlogged; When blossoms have waned entirely, reduce water over time so that the soil becomes slowly and steadily drier, then very dry. At this point, foilage will begin to turn yellow. Remove the yellowed leaves carefully, one by one, until the plant is bare. In a cool spot, free of frost (insulated basement, attice or garage), place the pot on its side for storing over the next few months. In early spring, begin watering gradually with a weak solution of water-soluable fertilizer. As the plant begins to show new leaves, change to regular Weekly waterings to keep soil moist; feed the plant monthly. Return it to a cool spot where some sunlight will help leaf and bud development. Even given the best of care, the cyclamen will only flower for a m&nth or so each year. The plant grows from a corm which must be given proper growth and dormancy cycles to continue growing and forming flowers. Even with the best care, however, cyclamen conns are generally not expected to last for more than two or three years. (^rnset 9^U)in^ ^^P^ Kitchen & Bath Showroom Elegant but still affordable Sf 739 Sunset Road •564-2660 Alsons Shower Accessories American & State Water Heaters Bemis Toilet Seats Commercial Enameling Cast Iron Rxtures Crane Fixtures Oetta Faucets Hallmack Bath Accessories Hydro-Systems Whiripoo) Baths ISE Dishwashers & Disposals Moen Faucet & Stainless Steel Sinks Price Plister Faucets Swan Tub & Shower Walls Universal Rundle Fixtures Kimstock Fiberglass Tub & Sink Enclosures Complete Line Of Repair Parts JT 15%-30% See the Newest Spring Line in Patio Furniture SaniM* Action givM comfort a nw twtet Ease into summer with beautiful Saniber action furniture. Sanibel action offers a unique 360 swivet, so you can tilt back smoothly and freely. Matchir>g ottomans make it easy to put your feet up. Sleekly siyted and corrtoured for extra comfort, Sanibel action comes in two styles, sling and cushion. Whaf s nrxxe, Samsonite's special open weave fabrics stay cool to the touch even on the hottest days. So turn your summers around with durable SanilDel action furniture. Another fine Samsonite product. There's not better way to bring the feeling of springtime indoors than with an arrangement of cut flowers. Flowers can change the mood and look of any room and can blend in to any style decor. "How you select a floral arrangement for a roqm depends a lot on your own personaUty and individual style," says president of Florists' Transworld Delivery Association (FTD) Robert McNamara. According the McNamara the first step is to consider the room setting to be enhanced. And, he adds, there's no reason to restrict floral arrangements to dining rooms or living rooms. The first question to be asked is "does the room have a dominant color? How large is the room and V how much space is available to work with?" Other questions concern the type of vase or container to be used and whether or not the arrangement will be viewed from more than one angle. "Flowers should complement a room's color scheme but they don't have to match it exactly," says McNamara. "It's more important to make sure your flowers and container work together, a vase should suite the flowers and the environment." With regard to containers, a narrow neck vase allows a few long stems to support one another. Wide neck containers, on the other hand, cause stems to fall freely away from one another and a greater number of flowers or additional foilage becomes necessary for a full look. Whatever arrangement is chosen, remember that the goal is for the flowers to last. If flowers are arranged in floral foam, they will draw moisture naturally, as they would if they were in the ground. Check the moisture level daily and add water as needed. If some flowers wilt before others, remove them so they don't spoil the appearance of the bouquet or adversely affect the other blooms. Some wilting flowers can be revived by diagonally cutting the stem and reinserting it into the foam. An arrangement in a vase of water however, is presented with an unnatural environment. In order to keep these flowers looking their best observing the followingtips will add to their Ufe. •Always recut the stems under wai:m water and on an angle so as not to restrict water uptake. -^3. When cut in the air, stems may suck up a small amount of air, causing the base of the stem to be blocked, and restricting water flow. •Remove all foUage that rests below the water line. Fohage left under water tends to rot, releasing harmful bacteria and ethylene gas, which can cause flo\yer8 to die prematurely. •Ideally, vase water should be changed every two or three days, at which time the flower stems should be recut. "Although principles are important, there are really no hard and fast rules when it comes to arranging flowers," adds McNamara. "Just experiment, using your eye as a ermde—and have fun." Alcoves have many uses Many old homes have alcoves, niches and recesses which seem useless. Actually there are many uses for an alcove. Depending on the style of the house, an alcove can serve as an area for a bookcase, a cabinet, a bar, stereo equipment, a vanity, a home office, a dressing table or just a nook for a loveseat, plants or shelves. An unattractive window dormer can make a charming vanity in a bedroom. If you can do without the Kght from the window, it would be a good idea to close up the window and install a mirror within the whole nich, including the side walls. Good makeup hghting overhead and alongside the mirror is a necessity. Another idea is to build shelves into an alcove to house extra books which have a way of accumulating. CEILING CLEANING Yellow — Dingy • Dirty Vents DON'T PAINT OR RESPRAY CALL ADVANCE CEILING CARE WE'LL CLEAN THAT CEILING FOR LESS 565-4877 Oil 1 ^ stop Bleaching Your Kids! itop putting toxic chem< • • ^^^fr/! ^ i Widen Door Openings Without Wrecking Walls y. JFolding Door Hardware Converts Bi-fold Doors For Full Access To Space BOULDER CITY'S GARDEN CENTER (Formerly M&H Oasis) 'Tour Partner In Keeping Everything Clean & Green" Now is the time to plant your garden VEGETABLE & BEDDING FLOWERS 1674 Nevada Highway (Marshall piaza) Boulder City 293-4987 Perfect for food pantries, utility rooms, clothes closets, beverage bars, any place where folding doors must swing out completely to allow full access to the opening. NOW APPEARING THROUGH MARCH CALL THE Hnclrson Horn* News Advvflitlng 804-1881 QARMNINQAHOME IMPR0VIMINT8 ^When to plant? ^ Latest in lawn equipment ^ Newest patio furniture ^Pool aids & accessories 1^ Remodeling Items *^and much more Bouldr City Newt Advertltlng 283-2302 ADVmTISmt, CAU NOW TO mtiiivi YOUR tFACI The best things in life are ten to My percent off. With Coldwell Banker, you can plan on O the most out of life. Thanks to our uyer Plan! Ifs a room-by room decorating guide packed full of savings from 10 to 50 percent on selected Se^ home improvement items and services. As well as on home fashions, furnishings and the appliances new home buyers need most. „ ColdvOdl Banker Expect the best. c a •f> COLDWELL BANKER ANCHOR REALTY 501 Nevada Hwy. CALL 24 HOURS BOULDER CITY (702) 293-5757 An IndipwidwMy Owfwd and OpvMd Mmbar ol Coldwsl Bwyitt on proper atlon ol our 1114011 MM S. laSHUIID PW. H^S. Meii-fH. 74, lat. N m Hi

PAGE 22

mmmmmm mmmmtmmmmmmmmmmmmf^ • • ^ Pag* tt Htadf rton Home Newi and Boulder City Newi Thnnday, Mtfch 3, 1968 Arcata turns l i ab ility of sewage i nto ^n asset o f wildlife by WildUfa Manfegtment InsUtuto Town grows wildlife with sewaga Deftly turning a liability into an asset, the City of Arcata, Cahfornia is using its sewage to create Tiah and wildlife habitat and nurture city parka, the Wildlife Management Institute reporta. "••; The city's innovative sewage treatment facility begina like most others, with waste flowing into a mechanical plant where solids are removed and disinfected. However, similarities to standard treatment jystema end there. -r -. Arcata mulches the separated solid waste into organic fertilizer and applies the nutrient-rich material to vegetation in city parks. The re"maining waatewater from the town's 15,(X)0 residents then is filtered -^irough 154 acres of ponds, lagoons and marshes before being pumped, 'dear as a crystal, into Jumbolt Bay. : The treatment system is baaed on a fundamental knowledge of how wetlands work, rather than on sophisticated mechanical technology. :$ince th£ solids are removed, the waatewater flows into oxidation ppnds where it is aerated and serves as fertilizer to grow algae and "other aquatic plant*. The plants, in turn, are eaten by waterfowl and ahorebirds. After a montla in the ponds, the water is released into marahee and lagoons where bullruahes, cattails and other marsh vegetation strain out more nutrients and any small soUds that mayn remain, ^mall aquatic animals feed on the vegetation, staring a food cbain that moves the energy from detritus through aquatic insects into fish, ducks, geese, shorebirds, muskrata, mice and other marsh '.inhabitants. Then predators—such as osprey, owls and falcons—feed "ianagement Institute reporta. Recently submitted for public review X<^y the U.S. Fiah and Wildlife Service, the document was written by £ a large group of flahery experts from government, industry and con-sservation organizations. 5 The policy outlines the national economic and social importance of X recreational fisheries and offers long-term common goals for conservf ^ ing those resources. "We want this policy to establish guiding principles, goals and ob. jectives for the conservation and improvement of this nation's recrea5 tional fish populations and the habitats upon which they depend," T said Fish and Wildlife Service director Frank Dunke. "As the number 1 of anglers continues to grow, so too does the need to acknowledge ^ the deepening value of recreational fisheries." Dunkle added that he J hoped tiie final policy statement would provide "a blueprint for godd £ fishing that local, state, tribal, and federal fisheries agencies can build X on well into the 2l8t century." Swampbaster not enforced, Kasten says • Z Wetland protection directed by the 1985 Farm Act is being "cir; cumvented and in many cases wholly ignored in the northcentral U.S.." \ says Senator Bob Kasten (WI). Known as the swampbuster provision, i the protective legislation is supposed to withhold farm subsidies from •; landowners who convert wetlands into cropland. Kasten is an author i of the provision. ^ There are those who do not think wetlands are a national priority." £ Kasten said at a hearing held on swampbuster by the Senate Agriculture > Appropriations Subcommittee. "By including swampbuster in the farm ? bill, Congress indicated clearly that it does not share this view." X The hearing was conducted by Senator Quentin Burdick (ND), apX, parently to allow some of his constituents who oppose swampbuster r to blow off steam. However, the hearing seems to have backfired when ; Kasten and Senators Dale Bumpers (AR) and Charles Grassley (LA) X offered strong support for the wetland provision. • ^vrSwampbuster is being enforced in a lax and irregular manner in C^Mme of the states where the most important wetlands are located," Kasten charged. "It appears as if swampbuater is simply being ig2 nored, especially in North Dakota." t. Kasten added: "Anyone who is counting on repeal of any of the : proviaions in the conservation title (of the Farm Act) will be disappointed. That is not just a prediction—that is a promise." r^'^nator Bumpers aaid that his sympathies are against anything but strictest implementation of the law. He added that the swampbuster may need strengthening, not weakening. Senator Grassley also expressed concern that swampbuster was not being enforced properly and that agriculture officials ar6 more lenient with the law in some states than in others. For his strong efforts in developing conservation provisions of the farm program, getting funding for implementing the North American Waterfowl Management Plan, and for other conservation achievements, Kasten has been lauded by the Wiaconsin Chapter of The Wildlife Society and other groups. Conservationists say that he is fast becoming a leading voice for natural resource conservation in the U.S. Senate. ANWR Legislation gets Senate attention The Senate Committe on Energy and Natural Resources tentatively has approved bill language that would dictate how oil and gas revenues from the Artie National Wildlife Reefuge (ANWR) would be distributed. Many conservationists are not please with the outcome and may try to improve the provision either in committee or on the Senate floor, according to the Wildlife Management Institute. The Committee held a series of hearings on ANWR oil and gas development last year. Some conservation groups with a protectionist bent opposed all energy exploration or production on the refuge. More moderate organizations, including those representing professional resource managers, did not oppose thee development, but offered their support only if oil and gas extraction was completed in a sensitive manner and if a significant portion of the revenues was invested in wildlife and fish conservation programs that support purposes of the National Wildlife Refuge System. The Committee began deliberations with a proposal to direct most of the ANWR oil and gas revenues into the Land and Water Conservation Fund. Conservationsist opposed this arguing that LWCF already had a source of funds from offshore oil and gas leaaing receipts and did not need the ANWR money. Futhermore, they said, LWCF funds are spent primarily on parks, not wildlife and fiah. In fact, LWCF is divided among the National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management for landacquistion purposes. Since ANWR revenues would be coming from development and disrupting of a national wildlife refuge, the conservationists said, revenues shold not go to parks, but to wildlife. The groups suggested that the Committee establish a national endowment for wildlife in the National Fiah and Wildlife Foundation and the Migratory Bird Conservation Fund to provide long-range financing for implementing the North American Waterfowl Management Plan and the Federal Nongame Wildlife Management Act. Committee Chariman, Senator Bennett Johsnton (LA), seems committed to the idea of padding LWCF with ANWR funds. Conservationists find this difficult to understand since Louisiana has only one small park areat yet it depends heavily on economic benefits provided by waterfowl, waterfowl hunting and waterfowl habitat, including the largest fur industry in the nation. Sportsman in the state are beginning to wonder why most of the oil money derived from a wildlife refuge should be used to buy urban parks instead of ensuring a future for waterfowl and other migratory and nongame species, which the refuge system is supposed to produce and protect. ^ In a vote last week, Johnston's Committee approved language that would give fiO percent of the ANWR oil and gaa revenues to the State of Alaska, 25 percent to LWCF, 10 percent to the general treasury and only 15 percent to the Migratory Bird Conservation Fund (to be used for waterfowl and other fish and wildlife programs). Conservationaists are uging the Committee to reconaider this provision before the entire ANWR bill is completed and sent to the Senate floor. They are aaking simply that the 25 percent that would go to LWCF be deposited in the Migratory Bird C!onservation Fund and/or the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation instead. The ANWR bill still is in draft form and does not have a number. However, conservationists report that they are writing committee members requesting that funds currently assigned to LWCF be redirected to the Migratory Bird Conservation Fund or the Foundation. Members of the committee include: Senators Bennett John8tott-~-~~j (chairman), Dale Bumpers (AR), Wendell Ford (K Y), Howard Metzenw—. I baum (OH), John Melcher (MT), Bill Bradley (NJ), Jeff Bingaman (NM), Timothy Wirth (CO), Wychee Fowler (G A), Kent Conrad (ND), James McClure (ID) (ranking minority member), Mark Hatfield (OR), Malcolm Wallop (WY), Frank Murkowski (AK). Don Nicklea (OK), Chic Hecht (NV), and Daniel Evans (WA). Their address is Committee on Ener^ and Natural Resources, Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20510. fSKATE FOR ? SAT. • ^ At Playland 1110 E. Lake Maad. Hand. I [GOOD SAT, MAR. 5 ONLY I I I I I AlAflTImM • nOAT IVnDIS TDBDAT IVDIim 6:S0-9 P.M. 6:30-9 P.M. SKATE FOR *2 SKATE FOR M FRI & SAT EVE. 6:30-10 P.M. SAT 1. SUN AFT. 2-8 P.M. SpMMWnfl In Church, Sohool S rthdy ^trtl** ^mt^^^ Z W oany nw tkaiM t MOMMftM S64'27T0 Thief from page 19 Fred Measman were dispatched to the scene. The informants had recorded the license number of the vehicle which ultimately led to the apprehension of the two suspects aa they returned to their home. Evidence at the scene of the killing included a dead robin which is also a protected species. The investigation continues at this time, and the case may be proseuted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The illegal killing of eagles involves fines up to S5,000 and jail sentences up to one year under federal law. If prosecuted under state law (Nevada Revised Statute 503.610 "Protection of American bald eagle and golden eagle") the suspects face fines up to $500, jail sentences up to six months, and a civil penalty of $200. They also face possible charges for the killing of the robin and trespaasing An Ounce of Prevention Avoid future problems with Preventive Maintenance now. Routine care and maintenance of your hearing aid can extend its life. Henderson Hearing Associates will throughly clean and inspect your hearing aid to make sure it is living up to your exp'fectations. Call Today! Battery Sale: Buy Three Get One Free HENDERSON HEARING ASSOCIATES (Located in the ofnce of Burlin H. Acldei HI M.D.) 108 Lake Mead Dr. Suite 306 564-6434 Avoid Waiting • Call For An Appointment li join W/ur • '/'7V'/''v'//' li(itiiriii:> i hiitllt-hrl lillii I'liiin • Ihiiiii] If you're looking for a fight, then come to Caesars Palace every Tuesday night in March. That's when ESPN's resident boxing guru Al Bernstein presents "Boxing By The Book" in the Olympiad. The world's most spectacular Race and Sports Book. Featuring championship bouts, expert commentary, special guests, trivia contests and prize givea^ways, "Boxing By The Book" is yours to enjoy with our compliments. So come to Caesars. And get into a fight withAl Bemsteiai OLYMPIAU RACE AND SPORTS BOOK MMUItlliniliinUUI ITIELIUBULWNITmLl miLMDIAlULIUIOR ILTMPMMIIMAUtUIIII 19' 99 PISi/808U PIIMOei) tlJ* RK/7SI14 ILH P1M/7WI4 IMI mniUM •H.N ntumu ttM nim\i •UM *25 PWIOfll] Pirs/KIRt3 P1KJMI13 99 M,IN PIS/0H1J WAMANTT •tlM PXt/rwu •tUf •ft.M nwyt\t tut •MM l>}\in\i •N.H tt-H P2%/7W1I tT.H tl.N (>23&/7WI( •M.N IOfi99 IIS AU PISS/80HI3 WANIIANTV PIIMWil tU* l>f 7Sflt4 •M.H pi7Mi3 iiM mumM flM PIVMRtl tlM nm\i >H.H P\UnU •W.N P2/'W1J HiM '39 Plti/80R13 pitvrsflu PI9S/7Sfl14 99 H.ON MU PiW/|0i3 WMRMTT •4I.M P:I9/7SR1S IMI HIM nl\i •MN • 4I.N nam\i ft-H • MJt P1I6/70R14 <4M tt-M P2/70R14 IM* METRIC RAOIALI 19 •• mm • • MU iJSNi: WARNANTT U.M t7i(713 tut lUAIl >UM W7WI3 mm I7U •tT.M mim\* tiM IMKIi •|f.M I7t4 >UM 1 PREMIUM MTKICS Alto ON UlE | MICHIUN 9 M itmHIJMX W 1*4 Ptl|/7W14 •fUt PIH/rSRU tlM noumn itH pmimt TMI pjiV7ij ^J^M nw\i •?M* p7u iiM mnmi tiM UltHIHTEUmiUIUU Zi NOAO mMOM nwmu ttM pnMMis 7 liM ua niM CHROMC 8P0NI lSi7 •MM I4>6 WHITB SPOKE CHROME MOD lia7 1U* isiawiP>W .',M ni |I IJ JJ i n i |i l JlJ|PUIUIJP I I ll J.l.,.J, ii .' '| ll,-lH. i L1j !p i5l1?^)i wmm^,

PAGE 23

mmmmmm mmmmtmmmmmmmmmmmmf^ • • ^ Pag* tt Htadf rton Home Newi and Boulder City Newi Thnnday, Mtfch 3, 1968 Arcata turns l i ab ility of sewage i nto ^n asset o f wildlife by WildUfa Manfegtment InsUtuto Town grows wildlife with sewaga Deftly turning a liability into an asset, the City of Arcata, Cahfornia is using its sewage to create Tiah and wildlife habitat and nurture city parka, the Wildlife Management Institute reporta. "••; The city's innovative sewage treatment facility begina like most others, with waste flowing into a mechanical plant where solids are removed and disinfected. However, similarities to standard treatment jystema end there. -r -. Arcata mulches the separated solid waste into organic fertilizer and applies the nutrient-rich material to vegetation in city parks. The re"maining waatewater from the town's 15,(X)0 residents then is filtered -^irough 154 acres of ponds, lagoons and marshes before being pumped, 'dear as a crystal, into Jumbolt Bay. : The treatment system is baaed on a fundamental knowledge of how wetlands work, rather than on sophisticated mechanical technology. :$ince th£ solids are removed, the waatewater flows into oxidation ppnds where it is aerated and serves as fertilizer to grow algae and "other aquatic plant*. The plants, in turn, are eaten by waterfowl and ahorebirds. After a montla in the ponds, the water is released into marahee and lagoons where bullruahes, cattails and other marsh vegetation strain out more nutrients and any small soUds that mayn remain, ^mall aquatic animals feed on the vegetation, staring a food cbain that moves the energy from detritus through aquatic insects into fish, ducks, geese, shorebirds, muskrata, mice and other marsh '.inhabitants. Then predators—such as osprey, owls and falcons—feed "ianagement Institute reporta. Recently submitted for public review X<^y the U.S. Fiah and Wildlife Service, the document was written by £ a large group of flahery experts from government, industry and con-sservation organizations. 5 The policy outlines the national economic and social importance of X recreational fisheries and offers long-term common goals for conservf ^ ing those resources. "We want this policy to establish guiding principles, goals and ob. jectives for the conservation and improvement of this nation's recrea5 tional fish populations and the habitats upon which they depend," T said Fish and Wildlife Service director Frank Dunke. "As the number 1 of anglers continues to grow, so too does the need to acknowledge ^ the deepening value of recreational fisheries." Dunkle added that he J hoped tiie final policy statement would provide "a blueprint for godd £ fishing that local, state, tribal, and federal fisheries agencies can build X on well into the 2l8t century." Swampbaster not enforced, Kasten says • Z Wetland protection directed by the 1985 Farm Act is being "cir; cumvented and in many cases wholly ignored in the northcentral U.S.." \ says Senator Bob Kasten (WI). Known as the swampbuster provision, i the protective legislation is supposed to withhold farm subsidies from •; landowners who convert wetlands into cropland. Kasten is an author i of the provision. ^ There are those who do not think wetlands are a national priority." £ Kasten said at a hearing held on swampbuster by the Senate Agriculture > Appropriations Subcommittee. "By including swampbuster in the farm ? bill, Congress indicated clearly that it does not share this view." X The hearing was conducted by Senator Quentin Burdick (ND), apX, parently to allow some of his constituents who oppose swampbuster r to blow off steam. However, the hearing seems to have backfired when ; Kasten and Senators Dale Bumpers (AR) and Charles Grassley (LA) X offered strong support for the wetland provision. • ^vrSwampbuster is being enforced in a lax and irregular manner in C^Mme of the states where the most important wetlands are located," Kasten charged. "It appears as if swampbuater is simply being ig2 nored, especially in North Dakota." t. Kasten added: "Anyone who is counting on repeal of any of the : proviaions in the conservation title (of the Farm Act) will be disappointed. That is not just a prediction—that is a promise." r^'^nator Bumpers aaid that his sympathies are against anything but strictest implementation of the law. He added that the swampbuster may need strengthening, not weakening. Senator Grassley also expressed concern that swampbuster was not being enforced properly and that agriculture officials ar6 more lenient with the law in some states than in others. For his strong efforts in developing conservation provisions of the farm program, getting funding for implementing the North American Waterfowl Management Plan, and for other conservation achievements, Kasten has been lauded by the Wiaconsin Chapter of The Wildlife Society and other groups. Conservationists say that he is fast becoming a leading voice for natural resource conservation in the U.S. Senate. ANWR Legislation gets Senate attention The Senate Committe on Energy and Natural Resources tentatively has approved bill language that would dictate how oil and gas revenues from the Artie National Wildlife Reefuge (ANWR) would be distributed. Many conservationists are not please with the outcome and may try to improve the provision either in committee or on the Senate floor, according to the Wildlife Management Institute. The Committee held a series of hearings on ANWR oil and gas development last year. Some conservation groups with a protectionist bent opposed all energy exploration or production on the refuge. More moderate organizations, including those representing professional resource managers, did not oppose thee development, but offered their support only if oil and gas extraction was completed in a sensitive manner and if a significant portion of the revenues was invested in wildlife and fish conservation programs that support purposes of the National Wildlife Refuge System. The Committee began deliberations with a proposal to direct most of the ANWR oil and gas revenues into the Land and Water Conservation Fund. Conservationsist opposed this arguing that LWCF already had a source of funds from offshore oil and gas leaaing receipts and did not need the ANWR money. Futhermore, they said, LWCF funds are spent primarily on parks, not wildlife and fiah. In fact, LWCF is divided among the National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management for landacquistion purposes. Since ANWR revenues would be coming from development and disrupting of a national wildlife refuge, the conservationists said, revenues shold not go to parks, but to wildlife. The groups suggested that the Committee establish a national endowment for wildlife in the National Fiah and Wildlife Foundation and the Migratory Bird Conservation Fund to provide long-range financing for implementing the North American Waterfowl Management Plan and the Federal Nongame Wildlife Management Act. Committee Chariman, Senator Bennett Johsnton (LA), seems committed to the idea of padding LWCF with ANWR funds. Conservationists find this difficult to understand since Louisiana has only one small park areat yet it depends heavily on economic benefits provided by waterfowl, waterfowl hunting and waterfowl habitat, including the largest fur industry in the nation. Sportsman in the state are beginning to wonder why most of the oil money derived from a wildlife refuge should be used to buy urban parks instead of ensuring a future for waterfowl and other migratory and nongame species, which the refuge system is supposed to produce and protect. ^ In a vote last week, Johnston's Committee approved language that would give fiO percent of the ANWR oil and gaa revenues to the State of Alaska, 25 percent to LWCF, 10 percent to the general treasury and only 15 percent to the Migratory Bird Conservation Fund (to be used for waterfowl and other fish and wildlife programs). Conservationaists are uging the Committee to reconaider this provision before the entire ANWR bill is completed and sent to the Senate floor. They are aaking simply that the 25 percent that would go to LWCF be deposited in the Migratory Bird C!onservation Fund and/or the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation instead. The ANWR bill still is in draft form and does not have a number. However, conservationists report that they are writing committee members requesting that funds currently assigned to LWCF be redirected to the Migratory Bird Conservation Fund or the Foundation. Members of the committee include: Senators Bennett John8tott-~-~~j (chairman), Dale Bumpers (AR), Wendell Ford (K Y), Howard Metzenw—. I baum (OH), John Melcher (MT), Bill Bradley (NJ), Jeff Bingaman (NM), Timothy Wirth (CO), Wychee Fowler (G A), Kent Conrad (ND), James McClure (ID) (ranking minority member), Mark Hatfield (OR), Malcolm Wallop (WY), Frank Murkowski (AK). Don Nicklea (OK), Chic Hecht (NV), and Daniel Evans (WA). Their address is Committee on Ener^ and Natural Resources, Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20510. fSKATE FOR ? SAT. • ^ At Playland 1110 E. Lake Maad. Hand. I [GOOD SAT, MAR. 5 ONLY I I I I I AlAflTImM • nOAT IVnDIS TDBDAT IVDIim 6:S0-9 P.M. 6:30-9 P.M. SKATE FOR *2 SKATE FOR M FRI & SAT EVE. 6:30-10 P.M. SAT 1. SUN AFT. 2-8 P.M. SpMMWnfl In Church, Sohool S rthdy ^trtl** ^mt^^^ Z W oany nw tkaiM t MOMMftM S64'27T0 Thief from page 19 Fred Measman were dispatched to the scene. The informants had recorded the license number of the vehicle which ultimately led to the apprehension of the two suspects aa they returned to their home. Evidence at the scene of the killing included a dead robin which is also a protected species. The investigation continues at this time, and the case may be proseuted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The illegal killing of eagles involves fines up to S5,000 and jail sentences up to one year under federal law. If prosecuted under state law (Nevada Revised Statute 503.610 "Protection of American bald eagle and golden eagle") the suspects face fines up to $500, jail sentences up to six months, and a civil penalty of $200. They also face possible charges for the killing of the robin and trespaasing An Ounce of Prevention Avoid future problems with Preventive Maintenance now. Routine care and maintenance of your hearing aid can extend its life. Henderson Hearing Associates will throughly clean and inspect your hearing aid to make sure it is living up to your exp'fectations. Call Today! Battery Sale: Buy Three Get One Free HENDERSON HEARING ASSOCIATES (Located in the ofnce of Burlin H. Acldei HI M.D.) 108 Lake Mead Dr. Suite 306 564-6434 Avoid Waiting • Call For An Appointment li join W/ur • '/'7V'/''v'//' li(itiiriii:> i hiitllt-hrl lillii I'liiin • Ihiiiii] If you're looking for a fight, then come to Caesars Palace every Tuesday night in March. That's when ESPN's resident boxing guru Al Bernstein presents "Boxing By The Book" in the Olympiad. The world's most spectacular Race and Sports Book. Featuring championship bouts, expert commentary, special guests, trivia contests and prize givea^ways, "Boxing By The Book" is yours to enjoy with our compliments. So come to Caesars. And get into a fight withAl Bemsteiai OLYMPIAU RACE AND SPORTS BOOK MMUItlliniliinUUI ITIELIUBULWNITmLl miLMDIAlULIUIOR ILTMPMMIIMAUtUIIII 19' 99 PISi/808U PIIMOei) tlJ* RK/7SI14 ILH P1M/7WI4 IMI mniUM •H.N ntumu ttM nim\i •UM *25 PWIOfll] Pirs/KIRt3 P1KJMI13 99 M,IN PIS/0H1J WAMANTT •tlM PXt/rwu •tUf •ft.M nwyt\t tut •MM l>}\in\i •N.H tt-H P2%/7W1I tT.H tl.N (>23&/7WI( •M.N IOfi99 IIS AU PISS/80HI3 WANIIANTV PIIMWil tU* l>f 7Sflt4 •M.H pi7Mi3 iiM mumM flM PIVMRtl tlM nm\i >H.H P\UnU •W.N P2/'W1J HiM '39 Plti/80R13 pitvrsflu PI9S/7Sfl14 99 H.ON MU PiW/|0i3 WMRMTT •4I.M P:I9/7SR1S IMI HIM nl\i •MN • 4I.N nam\i ft-H • MJt P1I6/70R14 <4M tt-M P2/70R14 IM* METRIC RAOIALI 19 •• mm • • MU iJSNi: WARNANTT U.M t7i(713 tut lUAIl >UM W7WI3 mm I7U •tT.M mim\* tiM IMKIi •|f.M I7t4 >UM 1 PREMIUM MTKICS Alto ON UlE | MICHIUN 9 M itmHIJMX W 1*4 Ptl|/7W14 •fUt PIH/rSRU tlM noumn itH pmimt TMI pjiV7ij ^J^M nw\i •?M* p7u iiM mnmi tiM UltHIHTEUmiUIUU Zi NOAO mMOM nwmu ttM pnMMis 7 liM ua niM CHROMC 8P0NI lSi7 •MM I4>6 WHITB SPOKE CHROME MOD lia7 1U* isiawiP>W .',M ni |I IJ JJ i n i |i l JlJ|PUIUIJP I I ll J.l.,.J, ii .' '| ll,-lH. i L1j !p i5l1?^)i wmm^,

PAGE 24

• • • • nw VPP ^l m^ • • Page 24 Henderson Home News and ^oiilder City News Thunday. March 3, IMS Three photographers to exhibit at county iibrary J^IED PHOTO SHOW AT LmRARY-Showin the photo, frain left to right are Frank Porter, Dennis Gershick and Tim Fogliani. The Three will present the photographic exhibit "Windows: Three Different Views," through April 8 at the Cliirk County Library. Frank Porter, Tim Fogliania and Dennis Gersheck will present their photographic work in a show entitled "Windows: Three Different Views," at the UpstairsDownstairs Gallery of the Clark County Library at 1401 E. Flamingo Road, beginning with a reception at 3 p.m., Sunday, March 6 and continuing through April 8. The exhibit includes a coUection of color, black and white and toned prints by the photo artists. Frank Porter makes his living as a landscape architect, on such pubUc projects as five of UNLV's buildings, city hall, the transportation center, hotel RV parks and two of the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District's new libraries among many others. However he works just as hard on photography, was voted Photo^hakepearean Festival performance to benefit WE CAN X^e Utah Shakespearean Festiva^Eoetmne cavalcade will appear in 4<>ng with the Youth Chamber Orchestra of the Nevada School of the Arts, on Saturday, March 12 Hn a production of "An evening forflhe love of a child" to benefit VV^AN, Inc., (Working to EhminaSfe Child Abuse and Neglect). T^e festivities will begin at 7 p.i^ at the Artemus Ham Hall on the "UNLV campus. The show will be hosted by Steve Schorr and Barbara Mulholland. "It's an evening the entire family can enjoy and we are especially-delighted to feature these out^anding performers." Mullholland said. •'What a pleasnie it is to have the bpportunity to contribute to the prevention of child abuse in our community," she added. "Southern Nevada is privileged to have an organization like WE CAN that is doing such an exceptional job to keep our children safe. The internationally acclaimed Utah Shakespearean Fesitval is now in its 27th year and is located on the campus of Southern Utah State College in Cedar City. The show introduced the audience to the history of clothing from the dark ages to the death of Queen Elizabeth I. Narration is provided by founding direction of the festival and a professor of theatre arts Fred C. Adams. The Nevada School of the Arts Chamber Orchestra is made up of students who study strings, brass, winds and percussion privately at the Nevada School of the Arts. These young people range in age from nine to eighteen. This orchestra has performed at Caesars' Palace, St. George, Utah, as well as joint concerts with the Nevada Dance Theatre Youth Company. This orchestra also performs regularly in concert on the UNLV campus where the Nevada School of the Arts is in residence. The NSA chamber orchestra is conducted by Mary Straub, however, for this event, the orchestra will be under the baton of guest conductor, chairman of the UNLV music department Dr. James Stivers. Tickets can be obtained through the Artemus Ham box office and at Bullocks Department Store. Prices range from $30 to $100 per pair. Tickets are sold individually also. For more information call the WE CAN office at 384-0713. 101PR to help make broadcasting history NPR, 89.5 FM, will help make broadcasting history on Thursday, A|arch 17, by carrying the "World's Largest Concert" broadcast. lAt 10 a.m. Las Vegas time, hundreds of performing groups aiross the country, linked by satellite, will perform the same concert program simultaneously. Last year, nearly half a million s^dents, teachers and ^ other citizens took part in the WLC, and njore are expected to do so this y^r. JThe WLC broadcast will be emr^ from Washington, DC by nj>ted puppeteer and musician Sbari Lewis and her companion "tambchop." The United States PJ^T Force Band and Singing Sergiants, under the direction of Lt. dpi James M. Bankheafl, wiU lead the live audience of 3500 Washington-area school children and the radio and television audience around the country in this year's program. PubUc television station KLVX (Channel 10) in Las Vegas will also carry the concert. Locally, children in many Clark County schools are expected to tune in and play along with the World's Largest Concert. This fourth annual WLC is sponsored by the Music Educators National Conference, a nonprofit organization. with 55,000 members dedicated to the advancement of music education at the national and local levels. KNPR program director John Stark said, "We decided to take part in broadcasting the World's Largest Concert this year for several reasons. We know that a large number of music educators and parents with children studying music in the schools hsten to KNPR. "They use our concert music on the air, to reinforce what the students are being taught in the local music classrooms. We also wanted to demonstrate that KNPR is dedicated to the south"em Nevada fine arts and education communities, and what better way to show that dedication than to broadcast a concert that emphasises both music and education?" KNPR programs concert music from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and from 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. weekdays, and from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturdays and 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Sundays. Smith elected new president of NAA ^ohn A. Smith of Las V^as was elected president of the Nevada Alliance for the Arts (NAA) at a nAeting February 10, during the statewide OASIS cultural confetence. NAA is the advocacy arm i(k artists and arts organizations in; Nevada. I^e are planning an intensive effort to build our membership add get organized over the next yqar, so that we will be ready to make the best possible case for the arts at the next legislative session," said Smith, who is also executive director of the Nevada School of the Arts. Local resident Alice Isenberg was elected treasurer. Since their election, the new officers have decided to start an organization newsletter to keep members apprised of NAA's progress and of the status of arts issues $rst Saharchluvenile Diabetes lioundation charity golf tourney slated frhe first annual Saharajivenile Diabetes Chanty Golf Invitational will take place at the P^ted Desert Cobntry Club the 4ekend of March 26 and 27. ?The Celebrity Tournament will consist of five-man teams each having a former player from the I^tionai Football League as the ciptain ;A chance to meet the celebrity t4am captains at both the receptipa on Saturday night, March 26 • td at the awards beoqaeiCD SunAy night, March 27 will add to tie fun of the weekend The golf tournament will take place oo .Hkmday While only 100 can play, the reception is open to the public. The pl|yer fee of $300 inclodea the celebrity renptioo, Sunday hmcfa, the awards buffet, golf, cart and the selection of gift items. Those chcising to attend the reception only may do so for just $50 per person. A silent auction featuring NFL memorabilia will also take place at the reception. Former NLF players already committed to play are George Blanda, Sid Gillan, Billy Kilmer Sonny Jurgenaon, Kenny Houaton, Babe Parilli, John Hadl, Myron Pattioa, Donny Anderaon, Ollie Matson, Marion Motley and Elroy Hirach. Other names will be announced aa commitmenta are received. Anyone wanting further information on this event can caU the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation office at (702) 732-4795 in the state. The new board has also changed NAA's dues structure to help raise funds to pay off debts fropi its last statewide advocacy effort and to buikl funding for its presentations to the next legislature. Individuals may still join NAA for $15 a year and families for $25; and both individuals and business are encouraged to provide patronage support at higher levels. The most important change in dues structure involves dues for arts organizations. Organizations with an annual budget under $ 100,000 may join for $30 a year. Medium-sized organizations, with annual budgets begveen $100,000 and $250,000, may join for $50. Annual dues for large organizations, with dues over $250,000, will be $100. The membership drive has begun, and any individual, business organization with an interest in supporting the growth of the arts and culture in Nevada ia invited to join. The organization's address is Nevada AUiance for the Arts, P.O. Box 94318-30E, Las Vegu, NV 89193-4318. President Smith can be reached at 739-3602. grapher of the Year in 1985 and 1986 and is currently serving his third term as president of the Nevada Camera Club (NCC). He has won awards for his photography since 1985 in the library district's annual Art-AFair, best of show in the Jaycees State Fair for two year and best of show in 1987 in the Southern Nevada Museum Shoot Out. Originally from Los Angeles, he attended public schools in Las Vegas and is active in the community with the Las Vegas MetropoUtan Beautification Committee, the Clark County Parks and Recreation Board and the Paradise Town Board. Dennis Gershick, a Clark County resident for ten years, is a member of the Nevada Camera Club and has served on the Board of Directors for eight years, as well as in various offices of the organization. He has also served as the Southem Nevada Area Representative for the Photographic Society of America (PSA) since 1982 and has judged photo competitions for PSA member clubs.— H —' He also teaches photograiJhy Nevada rates 46th on class size Only four states in the nation now have class sizes larger than those in Nevada, according to statistics released recently by the U.S. Department of Education. According to the Education Department's "wall chart," ranking the states on a number of education issues, Nevada now ranks 46th on pupil-teacher ratio, tying with Idaho. Only California, Hawaii, Utah and Washington have larger class sizes. In addition, Nevada ranks 33rd in the nation on current expenditures per pupil, 44th on expenditwrea as a percent of per capita income, and 19th on average teacher salary. do not get a very attractive picture of Uie quality of education in Nevada," Giunchigliani went on to say. "What they see instead is a state unwilling to make a meaningful and sustained commitment to improving the quality of education." NSEA is currently circulating a petition asking the 1989 Legislature to approve a corporate profits tax to raise additional revenue for education. classes for the city of Las Vegas Cultural and Community Affairs Division. Gerahick has exhibited in UlNrary galleries, Reed Whipple Cultural Center and the Oz Gallery, as well as having work published in magazine feature illustration and on magazine covers. Tim Foghani is a native of Nevada, bom and raised in Pioche. He became interested in photography while stationed in Naples, Italy. "I was impressed with the beauty of Europe," he aaid. When he returned to Las Vegas, he began photographing old landmarks, mines and randies around the~ Pioche area. Fogliani has been active in the NCC, having served in various offices and presently is serving his fifth term as treasuer. He has coordinated four of the annual dty-wide print competitions of the NCC which are exhibited in local shopping malls. He has alo been juried into the Art> A-Fair exhibit sponsored by the library district, as well as exhibiting in group photo shows in the hbrary galleries. Workshop scheduled March 8 The Clark County ChUd Care Association will have a one credit "Child care workers stress and "Nevada's ranking varies someburn-out" workshop on March 8. what from year to year and ac"Riere will be a $5 charge for cording to the criteria used by the group calculating the rankings," said president of the Nevada State Education Association Chris GiunchigUani. "But over the years, Nevada has ranked embarrassingly low on many important comparisons." "When outsiders, particularly businesses considering relocating here, look at these statistics, they members and $7.50 charge for non-members. Program director Laura Aird of Working to Eliminate Child Abuse and Neglect WECAN will be guest speaker. Following the workshop Deborah Van Natta from Metropolitan Life Insurance will speak on a life insurance and retirement plan. The meeting will be held at 7:30 p.m. at Montessori Academy at 6000 West Oakey Boulevard. LIGHTING SHOWROOM Now open for the (jiscriminating homeowner. •Sales •Design •Engineering We solve your lighting needs SHOWROOM HOURS; '"< Mon-Frl 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 401 E. SUNSET RD. #6 PHONE 564-2829 HENDERSON, NV. 89015 The tastiest buffet bargain inLas\^as! Breakfast Lunch Dinner 7 a.m. 10 a.m. 11 a.m. — 2 p.m. 4 p.m. — 10 p.m. $2.49 $3.49 $5.95 Saturday Brunch & Sunday Champagne Brunch 7 a.m.—2 p.m. $3.95 SAM'S TOWN hOTEL & QAMBUNO HALL Boulder Highway & Nellis / 456-7777 Another fine Boyd Group hotel Features TC*! ThoTMiiiy, March 3. 1988 Henderson Home News and Boulder City Newi Page 25 &^:3^ CASIMOIMTRI (ear (eUie Letters to Deborah White Dear Debbie: Before my daughter's wedding, I had tucked $600 into the breast pocket of my tuxedo. It was intended as a surprise gift for the honeymooners. But at the end of the reception the money was gone. At flrst I thought I had lost the money. But when we watched the videotape of the wedding and, just as plain Ss day, I saw the father of the groom reach into the pocket of my tux, wUch I have left on the back of a chair at the reception hall. He took the money out' Should I confront this guy tell my so n-in-law or keep it t o myself? — > • •'.:"-, • • • -^ — ^^ O utraged Father Dear Outraged: You should invite your daughter's in-laws over for dinner and a viewing oTthe videotape. After looking at it together, take the fatiter of the gnipm aside and tell him you know it was he who took the money, and you'd like to know why. Try keeping the nutter quiet, yet be straightforward. This will be very embarrassing for your daughter Sieial StMrilf MiM Important to emphasize pre-retirement planning by Marta A. Blamco Social Security Publicist Pre-retirement planning Pre-retirement planning is an idea whose time has come. With people living and remaining healthier longer than ever, social plaimers as well as lay counselors are emphasizing the need to plan for the later years. Social Security plays a major role in the retirement income of most people, and it should play a major role in retirement planning. People need to know such information as how much they can expect from Social Security, what family benefits are provided, and how Social Security relates to other sources of retirement income. Jt's^pecially a good idea to call Social Seciu-ity when one gets involved in formal retirement planning on a group level. We have a number of informational services available that can help. These include films, slides, charts, leaflets, posters, and speakers. While most of the informational materials cover the various aspects of Social Seciuity, supplemental security income (SSI), and Medicare, we also have materials that give tips on retirement planning. Pre-retirement seminars are designed to provide one-stop shopping to people whoo should be thinking about retirement. It brings together experts in health planning, insurance, investments, housing, budgeting, taxes, estate planning, and any other subject important to a man or woman considering retirement. While the recent trend has heea. toward younger and younger people, generally the pre-retirement seminar is aimed at people 55 and over. The older the audience, the more immediate the need for the information, of course. But younger people have more time to act on the information and thus may Hnd it even more useful in the long run. Generally, we also suggest showing the fdm, Tre-retirement planning it makes a difference." The film informs workers of the need to plan ahead in order to have a successful retirement. It's a good idea to call well ahead of the date you plan your preretirement activity to insure that the informational materials will be available on that date. Fur more information, contact the Social Security office in Las Vegas. If you write, the address is P.O. Box 16668, Las Vegas, Nevada 89114. The local telephone number is 388-6314. In The Holiday Theatre • Rocky Sennes* npHNQ ? Sue Kim and The Kim Brothers DUni Bitch ckwr The Pink People Wij md Stron AND THE HOUDAar DANCERS IWo Shows Nightly 8 & 10:30 p.m. Euipt Sander $ 95 tar Ptrwn Phislkx iMMtaglWDriabt 101 For Rcicrvitioiu Call 3694222 HOUBATCASINO 3473 LM VigM BM. SMA A Hafiel^ HHii • CMIM and her new husband if it gets out-of-hand.You don't know for sure why he. took the money. He could have been unknowingly sei-up-by someone else. The only way you'll know for sure is by asking him. Dear Ddbbie: I am single and whenever I go out to dinner with two couples who are very dear freinds, the check is divided in thirds. I don't think this is fair since I am only eating for one. Not only that, I never order the most expensive meal on the menu, as the men sometimes do, yet I always end up paying almost twice what my meal cost. Do you think this is right? Shigle Diner Deair Single Diner: No. The cost should be divided in fifths if there are five people eating. But you need to speak up. Married people often think of their money coming from one source and they are insensitive to singles who pay more than their fair share. In the future, ask for a separate check or tell them in advance that you can only afford to pay for yourself. Dear Debbie:. • • '~' • r~^ ~ nience. It is easier to get away with a lie than to tell the truth and get in trouble for it. It your first imyfriend lied, you mi^t assume that was his problem. But the fact that your present boyfriend lies might lead you to believe you are causing the problem. Do you ask for the truth but then can't handle it? Do you make people pay over and over again for past mistakes? Do you recognize the truth when you hear it. Are you able to face up to your own true feelings. Truth and honesty need to be valued in a relationship. If you can't handle the truth, ypur future relationships might continue to follow the same pattern. Send you questions to: Dear Debbie c/o The McNaught Syndicate, \ Inc.. 637 Steamboat Road. Greenwich, CT 06830. 1988. McNaught Syndicate j • S-f '.1 I split up with my boyfriend of four years because he lied too much. Now I have a new boyfriend and Fm afraid I'm going to lose him for the same reason. What should I do? ~ Deceived Dear Deceived: People lie for many reason, the most conomon of which is conveCMMH) ^vMlions aMitr§4 Q. How can I prevent meringue on cream pies from becoming watery? Mrs. F. H., Mercersburg, PA. A. The secret to moist, not weepy, meringues lines in dissolving sugar thoroughly and baking meringue completely. Add sugar gradually as soon as egg whites are frothy. Then, beat until meringue holds stiff peaks. Place meringue on a hot filling and bake at 400 degrees for 8 to 10 minutes. Q. Is there a test to determine if baking powder is still active? A.S., NcHrthmp, MN. A. Stir one teaspoon of baking powder into Vs cup of hot water. Baking powder is fit to use if it bubbles abundantly. Q. What's the secret to stop cooldes from spreading too much? Mrs. J.G., Evergreen Park, IL. A. You may need to add more flour to batter. If recipe calls for solid shortening, don't substitute butter or margarine because they have more water than shortening and may make dough too soft. Cookies may spread because the oven isn't hot enough. Or you may be over-greasing the cookie sheets. Except for low-shortening cookies, cookie sheets rarely need to be greased. Do you have a question? Write Dear Betty Crocker, Box 1113, Dept. Betty, Mumeapolis. MN 66440. Tip of the Week. Place marinades in stainless steel, porcelain, plastic or glass cookware. FRIDAY & WEEKEND MOVIES lAS Vf GAS Drue Ins Q I hwH^wc^q,. i>t >... • 's'.-j:rr,'!Vfr,'j;..^ MOVMOm SMfllWdD OMMlfOl • PMIN) COOO M0RMIH6 VIITHAM (R) tMkNai IRI THRIEMIMtAaAinrci RACmi ATTN ACTION (11)1 vttMtmtmtMy CINEDOMEn ^ l • — WMtmttmttllt swrrcHMo CMANNLeS(Ml) IM(l:M7:t NOM • GLOflYfPC xtnrMtmrntmxtm IRONWEEO(R) IROAOCAST NEWS mmm ATTRACTION IRI HMai.IIMiiMlttH I VM *m S'M • M:M J JIMMY MAROON (") 11 tllMt II >• I • • MIIIIM '"'Vff GOOD MORNING VIETNAM (R It IWMtniMIIH REDROCKCmemasQ] swiTCHma CMANNCLS (^O) |l4ll:lM*;:fr.*ll:N MOVING RT (R) IMIlHIMrMftM 11:11 niANTIC(S) IMtllkMMIMiltM OOOCHATBWOMMn llcM|:M7.)>lEIIJi THSU MtN • A BASV (M| 1:10 l:lt • :• IM Mt 1M • .;r,l rI I I I I I I I I. I I OFFER EXPIRES MARCH 31st. 1988 FLAMINQO RD. & VALLEY VIEW BLVD. afi>@s^ DARYL S 10 / 10 SPECIAL *Buy $3.00 get $3 FREE your choice Good at 10:00 a.m and 10:00 p.m. sessions ONLY. 'NO QREEN BOARDS Be a REEL winner visit Rainbow Ciub's new REEL slot machine the HOTTEST slots with the MOST liberal pays. You to can be a REEL winner. "WhM N Pavs To Ptav" \ v \ x^ •Z40> i I i '• J -'S.^ \'^: v.—

PAGE 25

• • • • nw VPP ^l m^ • • Page 24 Henderson Home News and ^oiilder City News Thunday. March 3, IMS Three photographers to exhibit at county iibrary J^IED PHOTO SHOW AT LmRARY-Showin the photo, frain left to right are Frank Porter, Dennis Gershick and Tim Fogliani. The Three will present the photographic exhibit "Windows: Three Different Views," through April 8 at the Cliirk County Library. Frank Porter, Tim Fogliania and Dennis Gersheck will present their photographic work in a show entitled "Windows: Three Different Views," at the UpstairsDownstairs Gallery of the Clark County Library at 1401 E. Flamingo Road, beginning with a reception at 3 p.m., Sunday, March 6 and continuing through April 8. The exhibit includes a coUection of color, black and white and toned prints by the photo artists. Frank Porter makes his living as a landscape architect, on such pubUc projects as five of UNLV's buildings, city hall, the transportation center, hotel RV parks and two of the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District's new libraries among many others. However he works just as hard on photography, was voted Photo^hakepearean Festival performance to benefit WE CAN X^e Utah Shakespearean Festiva^Eoetmne cavalcade will appear in 4<>ng with the Youth Chamber Orchestra of the Nevada School of the Arts, on Saturday, March 12 Hn a production of "An evening forflhe love of a child" to benefit VV^AN, Inc., (Working to EhminaSfe Child Abuse and Neglect). T^e festivities will begin at 7 p.i^ at the Artemus Ham Hall on the "UNLV campus. The show will be hosted by Steve Schorr and Barbara Mulholland. "It's an evening the entire family can enjoy and we are especially-delighted to feature these out^anding performers." Mullholland said. •'What a pleasnie it is to have the bpportunity to contribute to the prevention of child abuse in our community," she added. "Southern Nevada is privileged to have an organization like WE CAN that is doing such an exceptional job to keep our children safe. The internationally acclaimed Utah Shakespearean Fesitval is now in its 27th year and is located on the campus of Southern Utah State College in Cedar City. The show introduced the audience to the history of clothing from the dark ages to the death of Queen Elizabeth I. Narration is provided by founding direction of the festival and a professor of theatre arts Fred C. Adams. The Nevada School of the Arts Chamber Orchestra is made up of students who study strings, brass, winds and percussion privately at the Nevada School of the Arts. These young people range in age from nine to eighteen. This orchestra has performed at Caesars' Palace, St. George, Utah, as well as joint concerts with the Nevada Dance Theatre Youth Company. This orchestra also performs regularly in concert on the UNLV campus where the Nevada School of the Arts is in residence. The NSA chamber orchestra is conducted by Mary Straub, however, for this event, the orchestra will be under the baton of guest conductor, chairman of the UNLV music department Dr. James Stivers. Tickets can be obtained through the Artemus Ham box office and at Bullocks Department Store. Prices range from $30 to $100 per pair. Tickets are sold individually also. For more information call the WE CAN office at 384-0713. 101PR to help make broadcasting history NPR, 89.5 FM, will help make broadcasting history on Thursday, A|arch 17, by carrying the "World's Largest Concert" broadcast. lAt 10 a.m. Las Vegas time, hundreds of performing groups aiross the country, linked by satellite, will perform the same concert program simultaneously. Last year, nearly half a million s^dents, teachers and ^ other citizens took part in the WLC, and njore are expected to do so this y^r. JThe WLC broadcast will be emr^ from Washington, DC by nj>ted puppeteer and musician Sbari Lewis and her companion "tambchop." The United States PJ^T Force Band and Singing Sergiants, under the direction of Lt. dpi James M. Bankheafl, wiU lead the live audience of 3500 Washington-area school children and the radio and television audience around the country in this year's program. PubUc television station KLVX (Channel 10) in Las Vegas will also carry the concert. Locally, children in many Clark County schools are expected to tune in and play along with the World's Largest Concert. This fourth annual WLC is sponsored by the Music Educators National Conference, a nonprofit organization. with 55,000 members dedicated to the advancement of music education at the national and local levels. KNPR program director John Stark said, "We decided to take part in broadcasting the World's Largest Concert this year for several reasons. We know that a large number of music educators and parents with children studying music in the schools hsten to KNPR. "They use our concert music on the air, to reinforce what the students are being taught in the local music classrooms. We also wanted to demonstrate that KNPR is dedicated to the south"em Nevada fine arts and education communities, and what better way to show that dedication than to broadcast a concert that emphasises both music and education?" KNPR programs concert music from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and from 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. weekdays, and from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturdays and 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Sundays. Smith elected new president of NAA ^ohn A. Smith of Las V^as was elected president of the Nevada Alliance for the Arts (NAA) at a nAeting February 10, during the statewide OASIS cultural confetence. NAA is the advocacy arm i(k artists and arts organizations in; Nevada. I^e are planning an intensive effort to build our membership add get organized over the next yqar, so that we will be ready to make the best possible case for the arts at the next legislative session," said Smith, who is also executive director of the Nevada School of the Arts. Local resident Alice Isenberg was elected treasurer. Since their election, the new officers have decided to start an organization newsletter to keep members apprised of NAA's progress and of the status of arts issues $rst Saharchluvenile Diabetes lioundation charity golf tourney slated frhe first annual Saharajivenile Diabetes Chanty Golf Invitational will take place at the P^ted Desert Cobntry Club the 4ekend of March 26 and 27. ?The Celebrity Tournament will consist of five-man teams each having a former player from the I^tionai Football League as the ciptain ;A chance to meet the celebrity t4am captains at both the receptipa on Saturday night, March 26 • td at the awards beoqaeiCD SunAy night, March 27 will add to tie fun of the weekend The golf tournament will take place oo .Hkmday While only 100 can play, the reception is open to the public. The pl|yer fee of $300 inclodea the celebrity renptioo, Sunday hmcfa, the awards buffet, golf, cart and the selection of gift items. Those chcising to attend the reception only may do so for just $50 per person. A silent auction featuring NFL memorabilia will also take place at the reception. Former NLF players already committed to play are George Blanda, Sid Gillan, Billy Kilmer Sonny Jurgenaon, Kenny Houaton, Babe Parilli, John Hadl, Myron Pattioa, Donny Anderaon, Ollie Matson, Marion Motley and Elroy Hirach. Other names will be announced aa commitmenta are received. Anyone wanting further information on this event can caU the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation office at (702) 732-4795 in the state. The new board has also changed NAA's dues structure to help raise funds to pay off debts fropi its last statewide advocacy effort and to buikl funding for its presentations to the next legislature. Individuals may still join NAA for $15 a year and families for $25; and both individuals and business are encouraged to provide patronage support at higher levels. The most important change in dues structure involves dues for arts organizations. Organizations with an annual budget under $ 100,000 may join for $30 a year. Medium-sized organizations, with annual budgets begveen $100,000 and $250,000, may join for $50. Annual dues for large organizations, with dues over $250,000, will be $100. The membership drive has begun, and any individual, business organization with an interest in supporting the growth of the arts and culture in Nevada ia invited to join. The organization's address is Nevada AUiance for the Arts, P.O. Box 94318-30E, Las Vegu, NV 89193-4318. President Smith can be reached at 739-3602. grapher of the Year in 1985 and 1986 and is currently serving his third term as president of the Nevada Camera Club (NCC). He has won awards for his photography since 1985 in the library district's annual Art-AFair, best of show in the Jaycees State Fair for two year and best of show in 1987 in the Southern Nevada Museum Shoot Out. Originally from Los Angeles, he attended public schools in Las Vegas and is active in the community with the Las Vegas MetropoUtan Beautification Committee, the Clark County Parks and Recreation Board and the Paradise Town Board. Dennis Gershick, a Clark County resident for ten years, is a member of the Nevada Camera Club and has served on the Board of Directors for eight years, as well as in various offices of the organization. He has also served as the Southem Nevada Area Representative for the Photographic Society of America (PSA) since 1982 and has judged photo competitions for PSA member clubs.— H —' He also teaches photograiJhy Nevada rates 46th on class size Only four states in the nation now have class sizes larger than those in Nevada, according to statistics released recently by the U.S. Department of Education. According to the Education Department's "wall chart," ranking the states on a number of education issues, Nevada now ranks 46th on pupil-teacher ratio, tying with Idaho. Only California, Hawaii, Utah and Washington have larger class sizes. In addition, Nevada ranks 33rd in the nation on current expenditures per pupil, 44th on expenditwrea as a percent of per capita income, and 19th on average teacher salary. do not get a very attractive picture of Uie quality of education in Nevada," Giunchigliani went on to say. "What they see instead is a state unwilling to make a meaningful and sustained commitment to improving the quality of education." NSEA is currently circulating a petition asking the 1989 Legislature to approve a corporate profits tax to raise additional revenue for education. classes for the city of Las Vegas Cultural and Community Affairs Division. Gerahick has exhibited in UlNrary galleries, Reed Whipple Cultural Center and the Oz Gallery, as well as having work published in magazine feature illustration and on magazine covers. Tim Foghani is a native of Nevada, bom and raised in Pioche. He became interested in photography while stationed in Naples, Italy. "I was impressed with the beauty of Europe," he aaid. When he returned to Las Vegas, he began photographing old landmarks, mines and randies around the~ Pioche area. Fogliani has been active in the NCC, having served in various offices and presently is serving his fifth term as treasuer. He has coordinated four of the annual dty-wide print competitions of the NCC which are exhibited in local shopping malls. He has alo been juried into the Art> A-Fair exhibit sponsored by the library district, as well as exhibiting in group photo shows in the hbrary galleries. Workshop scheduled March 8 The Clark County ChUd Care Association will have a one credit "Child care workers stress and "Nevada's ranking varies someburn-out" workshop on March 8. what from year to year and ac"Riere will be a $5 charge for cording to the criteria used by the group calculating the rankings," said president of the Nevada State Education Association Chris GiunchigUani. "But over the years, Nevada has ranked embarrassingly low on many important comparisons." "When outsiders, particularly businesses considering relocating here, look at these statistics, they members and $7.50 charge for non-members. Program director Laura Aird of Working to Eliminate Child Abuse and Neglect WECAN will be guest speaker. Following the workshop Deborah Van Natta from Metropolitan Life Insurance will speak on a life insurance and retirement plan. The meeting will be held at 7:30 p.m. at Montessori Academy at 6000 West Oakey Boulevard. LIGHTING SHOWROOM Now open for the (jiscriminating homeowner. •Sales •Design •Engineering We solve your lighting needs SHOWROOM HOURS; '"< Mon-Frl 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 401 E. SUNSET RD. #6 PHONE 564-2829 HENDERSON, NV. 89015 The tastiest buffet bargain inLas\^as! Breakfast Lunch Dinner 7 a.m. 10 a.m. 11 a.m. — 2 p.m. 4 p.m. — 10 p.m. $2.49 $3.49 $5.95 Saturday Brunch & Sunday Champagne Brunch 7 a.m.—2 p.m. $3.95 SAM'S TOWN hOTEL & QAMBUNO HALL Boulder Highway & Nellis / 456-7777 Another fine Boyd Group hotel Features TC*! ThoTMiiiy, March 3. 1988 Henderson Home News and Boulder City Newi Page 25 &^:3^ CASIMOIMTRI (ear (eUie Letters to Deborah White Dear Debbie: Before my daughter's wedding, I had tucked $600 into the breast pocket of my tuxedo. It was intended as a surprise gift for the honeymooners. But at the end of the reception the money was gone. At flrst I thought I had lost the money. But when we watched the videotape of the wedding and, just as plain Ss day, I saw the father of the groom reach into the pocket of my tux, wUch I have left on the back of a chair at the reception hall. He took the money out' Should I confront this guy tell my so n-in-law or keep it t o myself? — > • •'.:"-, • • • -^ — ^^ O utraged Father Dear Outraged: You should invite your daughter's in-laws over for dinner and a viewing oTthe videotape. After looking at it together, take the fatiter of the gnipm aside and tell him you know it was he who took the money, and you'd like to know why. Try keeping the nutter quiet, yet be straightforward. This will be very embarrassing for your daughter Sieial StMrilf MiM Important to emphasize pre-retirement planning by Marta A. Blamco Social Security Publicist Pre-retirement planning Pre-retirement planning is an idea whose time has come. With people living and remaining healthier longer than ever, social plaimers as well as lay counselors are emphasizing the need to plan for the later years. Social Security plays a major role in the retirement income of most people, and it should play a major role in retirement planning. People need to know such information as how much they can expect from Social Security, what family benefits are provided, and how Social Security relates to other sources of retirement income. Jt's^pecially a good idea to call Social Seciu-ity when one gets involved in formal retirement planning on a group level. We have a number of informational services available that can help. These include films, slides, charts, leaflets, posters, and speakers. While most of the informational materials cover the various aspects of Social Seciuity, supplemental security income (SSI), and Medicare, we also have materials that give tips on retirement planning. Pre-retirement seminars are designed to provide one-stop shopping to people whoo should be thinking about retirement. It brings together experts in health planning, insurance, investments, housing, budgeting, taxes, estate planning, and any other subject important to a man or woman considering retirement. While the recent trend has heea. toward younger and younger people, generally the pre-retirement seminar is aimed at people 55 and over. The older the audience, the more immediate the need for the information, of course. But younger people have more time to act on the information and thus may Hnd it even more useful in the long run. Generally, we also suggest showing the fdm, Tre-retirement planning it makes a difference." The film informs workers of the need to plan ahead in order to have a successful retirement. It's a good idea to call well ahead of the date you plan your preretirement activity to insure that the informational materials will be available on that date. Fur more information, contact the Social Security office in Las Vegas. If you write, the address is P.O. Box 16668, Las Vegas, Nevada 89114. The local telephone number is 388-6314. In The Holiday Theatre • Rocky Sennes* npHNQ ? Sue Kim and The Kim Brothers DUni Bitch ckwr The Pink People Wij md Stron AND THE HOUDAar DANCERS IWo Shows Nightly 8 & 10:30 p.m. Euipt Sander $ 95 tar Ptrwn Phislkx iMMtaglWDriabt 101 For Rcicrvitioiu Call 3694222 HOUBATCASINO 3473 LM VigM BM. SMA A Hafiel^ HHii • CMIM and her new husband if it gets out-of-hand.You don't know for sure why he. took the money. He could have been unknowingly sei-up-by someone else. The only way you'll know for sure is by asking him. Dear Ddbbie: I am single and whenever I go out to dinner with two couples who are very dear freinds, the check is divided in thirds. I don't think this is fair since I am only eating for one. Not only that, I never order the most expensive meal on the menu, as the men sometimes do, yet I always end up paying almost twice what my meal cost. Do you think this is right? Shigle Diner Deair Single Diner: No. The cost should be divided in fifths if there are five people eating. But you need to speak up. Married people often think of their money coming from one source and they are insensitive to singles who pay more than their fair share. In the future, ask for a separate check or tell them in advance that you can only afford to pay for yourself. Dear Debbie:. • • '~' • r~^ ~ nience. It is easier to get away with a lie than to tell the truth and get in trouble for it. It your first imyfriend lied, you mi^t assume that was his problem. But the fact that your present boyfriend lies might lead you to believe you are causing the problem. Do you ask for the truth but then can't handle it? Do you make people pay over and over again for past mistakes? Do you recognize the truth when you hear it. Are you able to face up to your own true feelings. Truth and honesty need to be valued in a relationship. If you can't handle the truth, ypur future relationships might continue to follow the same pattern. Send you questions to: Dear Debbie c/o The McNaught Syndicate, \ Inc.. 637 Steamboat Road. Greenwich, CT 06830. 1988. McNaught Syndicate j • S-f '.1 I split up with my boyfriend of four years because he lied too much. Now I have a new boyfriend and Fm afraid I'm going to lose him for the same reason. What should I do? ~ Deceived Dear Deceived: People lie for many reason, the most conomon of which is conveCMMH) ^vMlions aMitr§4 Q. How can I prevent meringue on cream pies from becoming watery? Mrs. F. H., Mercersburg, PA. A. The secret to moist, not weepy, meringues lines in dissolving sugar thoroughly and baking meringue completely. Add sugar gradually as soon as egg whites are frothy. Then, beat until meringue holds stiff peaks. Place meringue on a hot filling and bake at 400 degrees for 8 to 10 minutes. Q. Is there a test to determine if baking powder is still active? A.S., NcHrthmp, MN. A. Stir one teaspoon of baking powder into Vs cup of hot water. Baking powder is fit to use if it bubbles abundantly. Q. What's the secret to stop cooldes from spreading too much? Mrs. J.G., Evergreen Park, IL. A. You may need to add more flour to batter. If recipe calls for solid shortening, don't substitute butter or margarine because they have more water than shortening and may make dough too soft. Cookies may spread because the oven isn't hot enough. Or you may be over-greasing the cookie sheets. Except for low-shortening cookies, cookie sheets rarely need to be greased. Do you have a question? Write Dear Betty Crocker, Box 1113, Dept. Betty, Mumeapolis. MN 66440. Tip of the Week. Place marinades in stainless steel, porcelain, plastic or glass cookware. FRIDAY & WEEKEND MOVIES lAS Vf GAS Drue Ins Q I hwH^wc^q,. i>t >... • 's'.-j:rr,'!Vfr,'j;..^ MOVMOm SMfllWdD OMMlfOl • PMIN) COOO M0RMIH6 VIITHAM (R) tMkNai IRI THRIEMIMtAaAinrci RACmi ATTN ACTION (11)1 vttMtmtmtMy CINEDOMEn ^ l • — WMtmttmttllt swrrcHMo CMANNLeS(Ml) IM(l:M7:t NOM • GLOflYfPC xtnrMtmrntmxtm IRONWEEO(R) IROAOCAST NEWS mmm ATTRACTION IRI HMai.IIMiiMlttH I VM *m S'M • M:M J JIMMY MAROON (") 11 tllMt II >• I • • MIIIIM '"'Vff GOOD MORNING VIETNAM (R It IWMtniMIIH REDROCKCmemasQ] swiTCHma CMANNCLS (^O) |l4ll:lM*;:fr.*ll:N MOVING RT (R) IMIlHIMrMftM 11:11 niANTIC(S) IMtllkMMIMiltM OOOCHATBWOMMn llcM|:M7.)>lEIIJi THSU MtN • A BASV (M| 1:10 l:lt • :• IM Mt 1M • .;r,l rI I I I I I I I I. I I OFFER EXPIRES MARCH 31st. 1988 FLAMINQO RD. & VALLEY VIEW BLVD. afi>@s^ DARYL S 10 / 10 SPECIAL *Buy $3.00 get $3 FREE your choice Good at 10:00 a.m and 10:00 p.m. sessions ONLY. 'NO QREEN BOARDS Be a REEL winner visit Rainbow Ciub's new REEL slot machine the HOTTEST slots with the MOST liberal pays. You to can be a REEL winner. "WhM N Pavs To Ptav" \ v \ x^ •Z40> i I i '• J -'S.^ \'^: v.—

PAGE 26

If-^l^"^^^ mmmmmmmmmmm mm mmmm Pag tt Henderson Home I^ew >nd Boulder City News Th nrsday, March 3. 1989 SAVINGS* S iCO z > CO o z > < CO CO o INGS • SAVINGS • SAVINGS SAVINGS • SAVI SAVINGS -SA O CO t'OR < CO CO < CO CO z > < CO • CO o GARPET-PAD-LABOR YOU CAN AFFORD THE BEST OF SALES "BUY ONE COMPLETCjeaiCH AND VENUS BY GALAXY MADE BY AMERICA'S LEADING CARPET MILL! 3 FOR 1 COMPLETE SQ.YD. ^.SSI^GUARANTEE:; I We install 1st QUALITY CARPET In your home, installation for as long as vou own jyour home. Largest selection of carpet 1 anywhere. HIGHEST QUALITY carpet for jyour money. iV A-"*,^'V ificiudes pail A labor COIMPARABLE PRICE *24.99 SQ. YD. 100% NYLON • BUY TODAY' WE INSTALL IRROI CABIN CRAFT CONTINUOUS HEAT SET YARD FOR EXTENDED APPEARANCE 3 FOR 1 COMPLETE [99 i'ii/ij < CO CO < (0 CO o z > < CO o z > < CO CALL TODAY FOR FREE ESTI MATES md','<" ', 1"! L^ J 90 DAYS SAME AS CASH—ON APPROVED CREDIT COMPLETE CARPET, PAD AND LABOR FOR ONE PRICE SAVE ON ALL CARPET NEVER BEFOi CALL TODAY— OR GOME ON IN! 105 W. Charleston Blvd 384-8551 CO > < V CO > < OPEN EVENINGS •FREE PARKING MON.-FRL 9 TO 9 •SAT. 9 TO 9 ^SUN. 11 TO 5. NCLJ06T00 SMAU OR TOO LARGE-ONE ROOMTOA^ULL HOUSE OF CARPT SAVINGS SAVINGS • SAVINGS • SAVINGS > 5AVINGS> SAVINGS' SAVINGS • SAVINGS ^ Thursday, March 3, 1988 Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Page 27 A GRAND OPENING FORTHE LOWEST PRICES I Uonzoni At Food 4 Less smart shoppers find the absolute lowest prices on the finest selection ofmeat, produce and groceries anywhere. Why? \Afe buy most items direct from the manufacturer. ^Afe don't have fancy fixtures or displays. -^\Afe buy in tremendous volume. VJe don't have expensive promotions and give-aways \Afe save labor costs by using the newest innovations in the grocery business. By the case or the can, it's the same low price. i GRAND OPENING OF OUR ^-, SECOND LAS VEGAS LOCATION! Finally a grocery store Grand Opening that gives you something that lasts all year long. Lower prices. And that's something to celebrate. Wsst Flamingo & Decatur Renaissance Center \Afest Spring Mountain Rd. I Flamingo Rd. FOOD41IISS, NEW LOCATION East Flamingo & Pecos Renaissance Center III tropicana Av. Otir Name Says it All. -^iP^s^ ^'! i i !!BW>*w Wy^ i. '' i i ;!i y,!iW ii ^

PAGE 27

If-^l^"^^^ mmmmmmmmmmm mm mmmm Pag tt Henderson Home I^ew >nd Boulder City News Th nrsday, March 3. 1989 SAVINGS* S iCO z > CO o z > < CO CO o INGS • SAVINGS • SAVINGS SAVINGS • SAVI SAVINGS -SA O CO t'OR < CO CO < CO CO z > < CO • CO o GARPET-PAD-LABOR YOU CAN AFFORD THE BEST OF SALES "BUY ONE COMPLETCjeaiCH AND VENUS BY GALAXY MADE BY AMERICA'S LEADING CARPET MILL! 3 FOR 1 COMPLETE SQ.YD. ^.SSI^GUARANTEE:; I We install 1st QUALITY CARPET In your home, installation for as long as vou own jyour home. Largest selection of carpet 1 anywhere. HIGHEST QUALITY carpet for jyour money. iV A-"*,^'V ificiudes pail A labor COIMPARABLE PRICE *24.99 SQ. YD. 100% NYLON • BUY TODAY' WE INSTALL IRROI CABIN CRAFT CONTINUOUS HEAT SET YARD FOR EXTENDED APPEARANCE 3 FOR 1 COMPLETE [99 i'ii/ij < CO CO < (0 CO o z > < CO o z > < CO CALL TODAY FOR FREE ESTI MATES md','<" ', 1"! L^ J 90 DAYS SAME AS CASH—ON APPROVED CREDIT COMPLETE CARPET, PAD AND LABOR FOR ONE PRICE SAVE ON ALL CARPET NEVER BEFOi CALL TODAY— OR GOME ON IN! 105 W. Charleston Blvd 384-8551 CO > < V CO > < OPEN EVENINGS •FREE PARKING MON.-FRL 9 TO 9 •SAT. 9 TO 9 ^SUN. 11 TO 5. NCLJ06T00 SMAU OR TOO LARGE-ONE ROOMTOA^ULL HOUSE OF CARPT SAVINGS SAVINGS • SAVINGS • SAVINGS > 5AVINGS> SAVINGS' SAVINGS • SAVINGS ^ Thursday, March 3, 1988 Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Page 27 A GRAND OPENING FORTHE LOWEST PRICES I Uonzoni At Food 4 Less smart shoppers find the absolute lowest prices on the finest selection ofmeat, produce and groceries anywhere. Why? \Afe buy most items direct from the manufacturer. ^Afe don't have fancy fixtures or displays. -^\Afe buy in tremendous volume. VJe don't have expensive promotions and give-aways \Afe save labor costs by using the newest innovations in the grocery business. By the case or the can, it's the same low price. i GRAND OPENING OF OUR ^-, SECOND LAS VEGAS LOCATION! Finally a grocery store Grand Opening that gives you something that lasts all year long. Lower prices. And that's something to celebrate. Wsst Flamingo & Decatur Renaissance Center \Afest Spring Mountain Rd. I Flamingo Rd. FOOD41IISS, NEW LOCATION East Flamingo & Pecos Renaissance Center III tropicana Av. Otir Name Says it All. -^iP^s^ ^'! i i !!BW>*w Wy^ i. '' i i ;!i y,!iW ii ^

PAGE 28

f*f* tt iIeB4rton H^me Nws and Boulder City News Thnraday. Mardi S, 1M8 HMHUII M Loving leftovers Editar's aott: Healthful hiata is provided by the American In^ethato for CaMer Reaearch. Waahington. D.C. 20068. Redpee are ^ roviewed by Karen Collins. M.D., R.D. from the American Institute for Cancer Research The next time you go to the refrigerator and are faced with a crwod 'of half-empty jars of tomato paste and water chestnuts, leftover broccoli and com, and picked-over roast chicken, remember this: leftovers 'don't have to be a problem. They can be turned into the solution for adding (nzxasz to future meals. Here are some ideas: 'Toast and cube stale bread for salad croutons. ^ 'WBx leftover cottage cheeee in a blendw with leftover seafood or ^tegetables and use as a base for dips; season to taste. *Spo(Xi warmed-over baked beans on a lean hamburger patty. •Marinate leftover vegetables in a lowfat dressing for appetizers. *Add leftover vegetables to soups or scrambled eggs. 'Stirfry vegetables with bits of seafood, chicken or meat. *Add leftover fruit to fruit flavored gelatins. •Mix leftover fruit in a Mender with skim milk, honey and vanilla extract for a fruit milk shake. For safe and nutritious use of leftovers, always store food correctly and use promptly Refrigerate perishable foods right away; don't allow cooked foods to cool to room temperature before storing; and don't L store food in cans, transfer them to clean, covered glass or plastic containers. Keep track of foods that need to be used, but "when in doubt, throw it out'" This recipe uses leftover rice, a great way to use last night's leftovers for a breakfast treat with a nutty taste and chewy flavor. Leftover rice muffins IVi caps whole wheat floor 2 tbsp. packed brown sugar 2 tap. baking powder 2eggs % cup skim milk >/4 vegetable oil Vi tsp. almond extract 1 cup cooked brown rice Heat oven to 400 degrees and grease muffln pans. Sift flour, sugar and baking powder into a large bowl, stirring in any bran that remains in sifter. Beat the eggs, milk, oil and ahnond extract in separate bowl; stir in rice. Stir the west ingredients into the flour mixture, just until the flour is moist and mixtures are blended, ^poon batter into muffin pans. Bake until lightly browned and inserted toothpick comes out clean, about 20 mintues. Serve warm or cool on a rack. This recipes yields 12 muffins, each with 127 calories and 6 grams of fat. ; Once Mir KaMif This mHi ktroset^ by Salome Editor'a note: This weeks horoscope is from Feb. 28 through March 6. Weekly Tip: Keep your wits about you. Aries (March 21-April 19) There may be some newcomers in your life who are tying to deceive you, so be ready for them. Take precautions when considering fmancial matters. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Your love life has gone a bit sour as of late, but be ready for it to spruce up as we head into spring. Don't let your stubborn nature hold you back now. Gemini (May 21-June 20) If you can't make up your mind about those pressing issues hanging over your head, discuss them with someone with an uncompromised point of view. Cancer (June 21-July 20) Hold your ground when debating the importance of a fmancial affair. Your mate will come to see your righteousness in the very near future. Leo (July 21-Aug. 22) Let loose now, Leo, and make sure you take your deareet friends along for the ride. If you have time between the fun, go on a deserved shopping spree. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You won't get the answers to those pressing problems by keeping your head in the clouds. Come down to earth where you can get the advice you really need. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Don't let anyone sway you from your most r precious ambition now; things will be coming to a boil fcoon. If things get tough at home, make sure you talk it out. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Let the little things in life roll off your back more. This will take the stress off you a bit. Family and money matters are good, as are romantic possibilites. Sagittariua (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Shoot straight for the heart on this big project, and you could come up a winner! That dark cloud hanging around will be vanishing soon. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) If someone needs your help, be sure you're there for them. A Sagittarius could figure prominently in a fmancial matter. Your stars are clearing now. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) If you get involved with a shady character-, take it as an object lesson and move on: immediately! You should distance yourself from the crowd. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Lay low for a while, Pisces, and get your head together. After some deep thought, you will be able to tackle anything thrown in your direction. If you were bom this week, you should have a smooth life; you are gifted with wisdeom and diplomacy. Always go after things with your heart and soul. Your integrity will bring you your just desserts, and these should be many. 1988, McNaught Syndicate by Caroljm Drennan Bishop Home News Columnist It's not only humans that do it. Dogs do it. Cats do it. And Francis the Mule did it. Talk that is. And can we ever forget the sitcom, "My Mother The Carr You'll recall that some poor fellow's mother departed this earth and returned as a car. That luckless woman, er—car, h#d plenty to say. The most unusual conversationalist was David Hasselhofs car in the televisiofr series "Knight Rider. Not only did that car talk a mile a minute, it obviously had an IQ of 190. Fm not certain how bright my new car is. But it talks. And just my luck, it's a busybody. The instant the key is turned in the ignition it starts blabbing. "Fasten your seat belt," it commands. Tour door is ajar," it complains. I tell you, that beastly car doesn't care a % that my skirt is caught in the door, or that Fve ripped off my thumb nail on the seat belt. The voice raves on. lieleaae your hand iM'ake! Shift into gearT FinaUy its appeased. Thank you, it murmurs sweetly. All tytems are now go." Just as I begin to feel fm in command, more advice is offered. "Your gas tanks is low. The right window* is open. Check your radiator." The payoff was the other night. I'd returned home from a late party and snuggled blissfully into bed. Through the open window drifted an ominous voice. "Your headlights are on, your headlights are on," it chanted. For a minute, I was tempted to ignore the persistent voice in the night. If I didn't respond I wondered, was it possible laryngitis woukl set in by morning? Workplace an unknown to many high school seniors The only exposure many high school studente have to the business world is what they get from their textbooks," according to director of the partnership program for the Clark CJounty School District Dr. Linda Littell. 'Tou have to have the theory. But when a a student has the opportunity to see and experience first-hand what the textbook is saying, all of a sudden it becomes real," Littell said. For the 18th consecutive year Clark C!ounty high school students' will have that opportunity. Career Day 1988, conducted under the auspices of 7-Eleven and the Clark County School District, will take place Feb. 11. "Career Day increases the relevancy of what the textbook says by extending the classroom and the student's learning experience into the real world," Littell added. Director of Occupational Education for the CCSD agrees Ward Gubler. "Career day is an extension of what we ought to be offering in our xurriculae for all students, not just those participating in the program. "This on-site opportunity for studente to see first-hand, by workinjg alongside in a shadowing kind of activity, the actual operation of businesses in our community is invaluable. Through the Career Day program, high school students looking at possible career choices have the unique opportunity of discussing with their hoste the range of choices within a career field, including those requiring a college degree or technical training," Gubler said. The success of C!areer Day depends on the support we received from area businesses," said 7-Eleven franchisee and chairman of Career Day 1988 Bob Hitehcock. The entire cost to a host business is $50 per student. This includes a breakfast at the Alexis Park Resort Hotel for studente and sponsors." Arrangemente can be made by calling the Career Day office at 386-7016," Hitehcock said. The money raised by the 7-Eleven-Clark C!ounty School District Career Day effort benefite UNLV. Since 7-Eleven began the program in 1970 more than $95,000 has been contributed to the UNLV Career Day Scholarship Fund. Only local high school students seeking nonathletic financial assistance at UNLV are eUgible. GOURMET COFFEE By Sweeney's FINE TEAS SPICES GIFTS AND ACCESSORY ITEMS 1t ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL Try On of Our 23 European Water Procata Oacafa That Kept Their Qood Flavor For Your Qood Health. 564-9303 •1.00 ran LB. OFF mouum FfUCI DmUNOIIAIieN OPEN 0:004:00 MON.-SAT. ^5^ CELEBRATE ST. PATRICK'S DAY IN STYLE! '• PARTYWARE & DECORATIONS • STREAMERS • BALLOONS • BANNERS • PLATES • CUPS • NAPKINS EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO BRING OUT THE IRISH IN YOU. /JIPIJ ^ PARTY SHOP W 030 t. Boulder Hry. 500-1052 ^^N /i**.^-^^' jutictiort Daily Four Queens ^Thnraday. March 3. 1988 / Henderson Home Newi and Boalder City Newt Paf c tt \ Muscial Arts Society celebrates silver anniversary Anniversary celebrated with commissioned work's presentation The Southern Nevada Musical Arts Society will highlight the celebration of its 25th anniversary season with the premiere of a new choralorchestra work by California composer J.A.C. Redford on Sunday, March 20 in Artemus W. Ham Concert Hall at 3 p.m. Redford has written an Easter choral symphony "A Paschal Feast" on commission ftem the society. The Musical Arts Chorus and the Musical Arts Orchestra will perform the new work under the direction of the composer. Solo roles in "A Paschal Feast" will be taken by soprano Pat Dawson and baritone George Skipworth. The 25th anniversary concert will also include the performance of the Requiem, Op. 48 by the French composer Gabriel Faure under the direction of the society's resident conductor Dr. Douglas R. Peterson. —u. AA-C. Redford, bom in Los Angeles in 1953, is best known, for • his work in fihn arid television. His feature film credits include The Trip to Bountiful" and "Extremities." He has composed the scores for the television series "St. Elsewhere," since its premiere, receiving Emmy nominations for his work in 1984 and 1985. He is currently scoring the Disney animated feature, "OUver and Company." This concert is made possible by grants from the Recording Company of America thorugh the Musicians Performance Trust Fund and through the cooperation of Musicians Union Local 369 and First Interstate Bank Foundation. The Southern Nevada Musical Arts Society is celebrating 25 years of bringing great choral-orchestra masterworks to audiences of southern Nevada. Las Vegas Musical Arts Workshop was formed in 1963 and was led initially by several conductors including Joyce Goodman, Ruth t-t^'enor, Keith Moon and Ed Brahams. Ruth Julian was the first president of the \j'orkshop, at a time when it successfully featured popular productions such as Oklahoma and Carousel In the five years that followed, Raricho High School choral director Ed Brahams became the main conductor of the workshop and also of a select group of singers known as the "chorale." In 1968, Dr. Douglas R. Peterson, the new choral director at UNLV, became music director of the workshop, novy known as the Southern Nevada Musical Arts Society. In the late 60s the group performed with the newly formed Las Vegas Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of the late Maestro Leo Damiani. Such classic works as the Ninth Symphony by Beethoven, A German Requiem by Johannes Brahams, and A Song of Democracy by Howard Hanson were featured. The first independent choral-orchestra work directed by Dr. Peterson was Mendelssohn's oratorio, EUjah, in 1971, a work which the Musical Arts Chorus and Orchestra again presented with great success during fall 1986. Under Peterson's direction for the past 20 years, the Musical Arts Society has flourished with performances of large choral-orchestra masterworks such as King David by Honneger, the St. Matthew Passion by J.S. Bach, the Creation and a number of the great masses by Haydn, theRequieuia by Mozart and the Mass in FMinor by Anton Bruckner. The society has performed virtually the entire spectrum of choral literature during the past two decades. Appearances have been made by internationally and nationally renowned guest conductors such as Atlanta Symphony Orchestra conductor Robert Shaw, music director Hebnuth of the famed Gachinger Kantorei of Stuttgart, West Germany, Mormon Tabernacle choir director Jerald Ottley and composer Jester Hairston, one of America's premiere arrangers of folk songs and spirituals. The Musical Arts Chorus has also premiered a number of important choral works including Mendelssohn's Vom Himmel hoch, the first U.S. performance of the work in the new Cams edition and the western premiere of the Te Deum by Johann Nepomuk Hummel. The Musical Arts Chorus Slso assisted the University Chorus at UNLV in the premiere of David Fanshawe's African Sanctus in 1977. In 1980, the Musical Arts Singers, a select semi-professionsal vocal ensemble, was formed with seed money from the Nevada State Council on the Arts. Within five years the group received national recognition and was invited to perform at the eighth national convention of the American Choral Directors Association, and the western division convention of the American Choral Directors Association in 1986. Opera productions by the society have included Ama/i7 and the Night Visitors, Molly SinchdianA Trial by Jury. In recent years, the Musical Arts Singers have featured the music of Victor Herbert and Sigmund Romberg. Last spring, the singers presented "Our Heritage of Musical Theatre" highlighting the great music of the Vagabond King, Roberta, The Most Happy Fella and Song of Norway. The Musical Arts Orchestra has presented selections on its own including "The Farewell Symphony of Joseph Haydn, and the "Sinfonic Concertante" also by Haydn. Steller local soloists in Musical Arts Society productions have included through the years Helen Maynard, Heidi Dixon, Diane Manetyti, Roberta Zito, Sandra Cameron, Pat Dawson, Sidra Kain, Ruth Julian, Edgar Harris, Gary Golbert, Jerry Seiler, Robert Peterson and George Skipworth. Accompanists who have contributed greatly to the success of countless programs in the 25 years include Louis Cameron, Debbie Beckman, Robert Ball, Arthur Mancini, Douglas C. Wilson, George Skipworth and Donna Klopfensteih. ;T' • The Musical Arts Society is a non-profit community organization whose sole purpose is to promote choral and orchestra masterworks, musical productions, and related ventures in southern Nevada. Support for the society comes from the public and private sector, as well as through grants from the Nevada State Council on the Arts, the Music Performance Trust fund and the National Endowment on the Arts. The Musical Arts Society has been awarded grants from the National Endowment on four occasions during the 1980'8. Under the umbrella of the Musical Arts Society is the Musical Arta Chorus, a community chorus of 100 or more talented singers frodi all walks of life, the Musical Arta Singers, an ensemble of 25 semiprofesisonal singers and the 40-piece Musical Arts Orchestra, a group of Las Vegas' finest professional musicians. In addition to the regular season schedule, these groups provide programs for numerous civic functions throughout the year. ._ The society is governed by a board of directors elected from^e membersship. Presidents of the society since its beginning have included Ruth Julian, Gerald Moffit, Leah Murphy, Bill Bowman, Susan Lierman, Ron Dixon, Roy L. Colllins and current president Jeri Rhodes. One of the guiding forces of the society from 1968 until her death in 1984 was Martha Peterson, who often served as both executive and program director. Peterson has estabUshed a tradition of excellence in choral singing and uniqueness in programming. Dr. Peterson received the GoverSee annlvefBary page 30 NOWTHEREIS ^ NO WAIT FOR YOUR INTEREST TO GO BUT UP. ^^— NOW THERE IS NO WHY FOR YOUR INTERESTTO GO BUT UP Now you can master your savings because we've mastered the rate! At maturity Nevada Savings will renew your 6-month Rate Master CD at the same high rote at which you opened it, or at the then current interest rate. Whichever is hi g her For one more 6-month term It's guaranteed. The minimum balance required to open a Rate Master CD Account is $2,500. Higher interest rates are paid on higher balances. Of course, your fur>ds are safe in one of the west's largest, strongest financial Institutions. With over $2.3 billion In assets. And a net worth substantially higher than federal requirements. So whether you're transferring a maturing CD account or opening one for the first time, it makes sense to glo it here. At Big, Safe, Friendly Nevada Savings. Master your savings. Come in and open your insured 6-month Rate Master CD Account today BIG* SAFE •FRIENDLY AND LOAN ASSOCIATION MEMBER Of T FED6RAL HOME ION BANK ^ffVAOra LAMEST. OFnC ID SSNE )rou THROUOHCXn TW SME • LAS VEGAS HOME OFFICE: 3300 W Sohcra AM^ CITY: 1027 NwQda Highway HB0ERSON: 320 S Boutclw HlgrMay. federal regukjiionsftqulraiubikVTtlalperxittY lor •orVwIlh^^ aesMStFrr-.' X.

PAGE 29

f*f* tt iIeB4rton H^me Nws and Boulder City News Thnraday. Mardi S, 1M8 HMHUII M Loving leftovers Editar's aott: Healthful hiata is provided by the American In^ethato for CaMer Reaearch. Waahington. D.C. 20068. Redpee are ^ roviewed by Karen Collins. M.D., R.D. from the American Institute for Cancer Research The next time you go to the refrigerator and are faced with a crwod 'of half-empty jars of tomato paste and water chestnuts, leftover broccoli and com, and picked-over roast chicken, remember this: leftovers 'don't have to be a problem. They can be turned into the solution for adding (nzxasz to future meals. Here are some ideas: 'Toast and cube stale bread for salad croutons. ^ 'WBx leftover cottage cheeee in a blendw with leftover seafood or ^tegetables and use as a base for dips; season to taste. *Spo(Xi warmed-over baked beans on a lean hamburger patty. •Marinate leftover vegetables in a lowfat dressing for appetizers. *Add leftover vegetables to soups or scrambled eggs. 'Stirfry vegetables with bits of seafood, chicken or meat. *Add leftover fruit to fruit flavored gelatins. •Mix leftover fruit in a Mender with skim milk, honey and vanilla extract for a fruit milk shake. For safe and nutritious use of leftovers, always store food correctly and use promptly Refrigerate perishable foods right away; don't allow cooked foods to cool to room temperature before storing; and don't L store food in cans, transfer them to clean, covered glass or plastic containers. Keep track of foods that need to be used, but "when in doubt, throw it out'" This recipe uses leftover rice, a great way to use last night's leftovers for a breakfast treat with a nutty taste and chewy flavor. Leftover rice muffins IVi caps whole wheat floor 2 tbsp. packed brown sugar 2 tap. baking powder 2eggs % cup skim milk >/4 vegetable oil Vi tsp. almond extract 1 cup cooked brown rice Heat oven to 400 degrees and grease muffln pans. Sift flour, sugar and baking powder into a large bowl, stirring in any bran that remains in sifter. Beat the eggs, milk, oil and ahnond extract in separate bowl; stir in rice. Stir the west ingredients into the flour mixture, just until the flour is moist and mixtures are blended, ^poon batter into muffin pans. Bake until lightly browned and inserted toothpick comes out clean, about 20 mintues. Serve warm or cool on a rack. This recipes yields 12 muffins, each with 127 calories and 6 grams of fat. ; Once Mir KaMif This mHi ktroset^ by Salome Editor'a note: This weeks horoscope is from Feb. 28 through March 6. Weekly Tip: Keep your wits about you. Aries (March 21-April 19) There may be some newcomers in your life who are tying to deceive you, so be ready for them. Take precautions when considering fmancial matters. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Your love life has gone a bit sour as of late, but be ready for it to spruce up as we head into spring. Don't let your stubborn nature hold you back now. Gemini (May 21-June 20) If you can't make up your mind about those pressing issues hanging over your head, discuss them with someone with an uncompromised point of view. Cancer (June 21-July 20) Hold your ground when debating the importance of a fmancial affair. Your mate will come to see your righteousness in the very near future. Leo (July 21-Aug. 22) Let loose now, Leo, and make sure you take your deareet friends along for the ride. If you have time between the fun, go on a deserved shopping spree. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You won't get the answers to those pressing problems by keeping your head in the clouds. Come down to earth where you can get the advice you really need. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Don't let anyone sway you from your most r precious ambition now; things will be coming to a boil fcoon. If things get tough at home, make sure you talk it out. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Let the little things in life roll off your back more. This will take the stress off you a bit. Family and money matters are good, as are romantic possibilites. Sagittariua (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Shoot straight for the heart on this big project, and you could come up a winner! That dark cloud hanging around will be vanishing soon. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) If someone needs your help, be sure you're there for them. A Sagittarius could figure prominently in a fmancial matter. Your stars are clearing now. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) If you get involved with a shady character-, take it as an object lesson and move on: immediately! You should distance yourself from the crowd. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Lay low for a while, Pisces, and get your head together. After some deep thought, you will be able to tackle anything thrown in your direction. If you were bom this week, you should have a smooth life; you are gifted with wisdeom and diplomacy. Always go after things with your heart and soul. Your integrity will bring you your just desserts, and these should be many. 1988, McNaught Syndicate by Caroljm Drennan Bishop Home News Columnist It's not only humans that do it. Dogs do it. Cats do it. And Francis the Mule did it. Talk that is. And can we ever forget the sitcom, "My Mother The Carr You'll recall that some poor fellow's mother departed this earth and returned as a car. That luckless woman, er—car, h#d plenty to say. The most unusual conversationalist was David Hasselhofs car in the televisiofr series "Knight Rider. Not only did that car talk a mile a minute, it obviously had an IQ of 190. Fm not certain how bright my new car is. But it talks. And just my luck, it's a busybody. The instant the key is turned in the ignition it starts blabbing. "Fasten your seat belt," it commands. Tour door is ajar," it complains. I tell you, that beastly car doesn't care a % that my skirt is caught in the door, or that Fve ripped off my thumb nail on the seat belt. The voice raves on. lieleaae your hand iM'ake! Shift into gearT FinaUy its appeased. Thank you, it murmurs sweetly. All tytems are now go." Just as I begin to feel fm in command, more advice is offered. "Your gas tanks is low. The right window* is open. Check your radiator." The payoff was the other night. I'd returned home from a late party and snuggled blissfully into bed. Through the open window drifted an ominous voice. "Your headlights are on, your headlights are on," it chanted. For a minute, I was tempted to ignore the persistent voice in the night. If I didn't respond I wondered, was it possible laryngitis woukl set in by morning? Workplace an unknown to many high school seniors The only exposure many high school studente have to the business world is what they get from their textbooks," according to director of the partnership program for the Clark CJounty School District Dr. Linda Littell. 'Tou have to have the theory. But when a a student has the opportunity to see and experience first-hand what the textbook is saying, all of a sudden it becomes real," Littell said. For the 18th consecutive year Clark C!ounty high school students' will have that opportunity. Career Day 1988, conducted under the auspices of 7-Eleven and the Clark County School District, will take place Feb. 11. "Career Day increases the relevancy of what the textbook says by extending the classroom and the student's learning experience into the real world," Littell added. Director of Occupational Education for the CCSD agrees Ward Gubler. "Career day is an extension of what we ought to be offering in our xurriculae for all students, not just those participating in the program. "This on-site opportunity for studente to see first-hand, by workinjg alongside in a shadowing kind of activity, the actual operation of businesses in our community is invaluable. Through the Career Day program, high school students looking at possible career choices have the unique opportunity of discussing with their hoste the range of choices within a career field, including those requiring a college degree or technical training," Gubler said. The success of C!areer Day depends on the support we received from area businesses," said 7-Eleven franchisee and chairman of Career Day 1988 Bob Hitehcock. The entire cost to a host business is $50 per student. This includes a breakfast at the Alexis Park Resort Hotel for studente and sponsors." Arrangemente can be made by calling the Career Day office at 386-7016," Hitehcock said. The money raised by the 7-Eleven-Clark C!ounty School District Career Day effort benefite UNLV. Since 7-Eleven began the program in 1970 more than $95,000 has been contributed to the UNLV Career Day Scholarship Fund. Only local high school students seeking nonathletic financial assistance at UNLV are eUgible. GOURMET COFFEE By Sweeney's FINE TEAS SPICES GIFTS AND ACCESSORY ITEMS 1t ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL Try On of Our 23 European Water Procata Oacafa That Kept Their Qood Flavor For Your Qood Health. 564-9303 •1.00 ran LB. OFF mouum FfUCI DmUNOIIAIieN OPEN 0:004:00 MON.-SAT. ^5^ CELEBRATE ST. PATRICK'S DAY IN STYLE! '• PARTYWARE & DECORATIONS • STREAMERS • BALLOONS • BANNERS • PLATES • CUPS • NAPKINS EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO BRING OUT THE IRISH IN YOU. /JIPIJ ^ PARTY SHOP W 030 t. Boulder Hry. 500-1052 ^^N /i**.^-^^' jutictiort Daily Four Queens ^Thnraday. March 3. 1988 / Henderson Home Newi and Boalder City Newt Paf c tt \ Muscial Arts Society celebrates silver anniversary Anniversary celebrated with commissioned work's presentation The Southern Nevada Musical Arts Society will highlight the celebration of its 25th anniversary season with the premiere of a new choralorchestra work by California composer J.A.C. Redford on Sunday, March 20 in Artemus W. Ham Concert Hall at 3 p.m. Redford has written an Easter choral symphony "A Paschal Feast" on commission ftem the society. The Musical Arts Chorus and the Musical Arts Orchestra will perform the new work under the direction of the composer. Solo roles in "A Paschal Feast" will be taken by soprano Pat Dawson and baritone George Skipworth. The 25th anniversary concert will also include the performance of the Requiem, Op. 48 by the French composer Gabriel Faure under the direction of the society's resident conductor Dr. Douglas R. Peterson. —u. AA-C. Redford, bom in Los Angeles in 1953, is best known, for • his work in fihn arid television. His feature film credits include The Trip to Bountiful" and "Extremities." He has composed the scores for the television series "St. Elsewhere," since its premiere, receiving Emmy nominations for his work in 1984 and 1985. He is currently scoring the Disney animated feature, "OUver and Company." This concert is made possible by grants from the Recording Company of America thorugh the Musicians Performance Trust Fund and through the cooperation of Musicians Union Local 369 and First Interstate Bank Foundation. The Southern Nevada Musical Arts Society is celebrating 25 years of bringing great choral-orchestra masterworks to audiences of southern Nevada. Las Vegas Musical Arts Workshop was formed in 1963 and was led initially by several conductors including Joyce Goodman, Ruth t-t^'enor, Keith Moon and Ed Brahams. Ruth Julian was the first president of the \j'orkshop, at a time when it successfully featured popular productions such as Oklahoma and Carousel In the five years that followed, Raricho High School choral director Ed Brahams became the main conductor of the workshop and also of a select group of singers known as the "chorale." In 1968, Dr. Douglas R. Peterson, the new choral director at UNLV, became music director of the workshop, novy known as the Southern Nevada Musical Arts Society. In the late 60s the group performed with the newly formed Las Vegas Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of the late Maestro Leo Damiani. Such classic works as the Ninth Symphony by Beethoven, A German Requiem by Johannes Brahams, and A Song of Democracy by Howard Hanson were featured. The first independent choral-orchestra work directed by Dr. Peterson was Mendelssohn's oratorio, EUjah, in 1971, a work which the Musical Arts Chorus and Orchestra again presented with great success during fall 1986. Under Peterson's direction for the past 20 years, the Musical Arts Society has flourished with performances of large choral-orchestra masterworks such as King David by Honneger, the St. Matthew Passion by J.S. Bach, the Creation and a number of the great masses by Haydn, theRequieuia by Mozart and the Mass in FMinor by Anton Bruckner. The society has performed virtually the entire spectrum of choral literature during the past two decades. Appearances have been made by internationally and nationally renowned guest conductors such as Atlanta Symphony Orchestra conductor Robert Shaw, music director Hebnuth of the famed Gachinger Kantorei of Stuttgart, West Germany, Mormon Tabernacle choir director Jerald Ottley and composer Jester Hairston, one of America's premiere arrangers of folk songs and spirituals. The Musical Arts Chorus has also premiered a number of important choral works including Mendelssohn's Vom Himmel hoch, the first U.S. performance of the work in the new Cams edition and the western premiere of the Te Deum by Johann Nepomuk Hummel. The Musical Arts Chorus Slso assisted the University Chorus at UNLV in the premiere of David Fanshawe's African Sanctus in 1977. In 1980, the Musical Arts Singers, a select semi-professionsal vocal ensemble, was formed with seed money from the Nevada State Council on the Arts. Within five years the group received national recognition and was invited to perform at the eighth national convention of the American Choral Directors Association, and the western division convention of the American Choral Directors Association in 1986. Opera productions by the society have included Ama/i7 and the Night Visitors, Molly SinchdianA Trial by Jury. In recent years, the Musical Arts Singers have featured the music of Victor Herbert and Sigmund Romberg. Last spring, the singers presented "Our Heritage of Musical Theatre" highlighting the great music of the Vagabond King, Roberta, The Most Happy Fella and Song of Norway. The Musical Arts Orchestra has presented selections on its own including "The Farewell Symphony of Joseph Haydn, and the "Sinfonic Concertante" also by Haydn. Steller local soloists in Musical Arts Society productions have included through the years Helen Maynard, Heidi Dixon, Diane Manetyti, Roberta Zito, Sandra Cameron, Pat Dawson, Sidra Kain, Ruth Julian, Edgar Harris, Gary Golbert, Jerry Seiler, Robert Peterson and George Skipworth. Accompanists who have contributed greatly to the success of countless programs in the 25 years include Louis Cameron, Debbie Beckman, Robert Ball, Arthur Mancini, Douglas C. Wilson, George Skipworth and Donna Klopfensteih. ;T' • The Musical Arts Society is a non-profit community organization whose sole purpose is to promote choral and orchestra masterworks, musical productions, and related ventures in southern Nevada. Support for the society comes from the public and private sector, as well as through grants from the Nevada State Council on the Arts, the Music Performance Trust fund and the National Endowment on the Arts. The Musical Arts Society has been awarded grants from the National Endowment on four occasions during the 1980'8. Under the umbrella of the Musical Arts Society is the Musical Arta Chorus, a community chorus of 100 or more talented singers frodi all walks of life, the Musical Arta Singers, an ensemble of 25 semiprofesisonal singers and the 40-piece Musical Arts Orchestra, a group of Las Vegas' finest professional musicians. In addition to the regular season schedule, these groups provide programs for numerous civic functions throughout the year. ._ The society is governed by a board of directors elected from^e membersship. Presidents of the society since its beginning have included Ruth Julian, Gerald Moffit, Leah Murphy, Bill Bowman, Susan Lierman, Ron Dixon, Roy L. Colllins and current president Jeri Rhodes. One of the guiding forces of the society from 1968 until her death in 1984 was Martha Peterson, who often served as both executive and program director. Peterson has estabUshed a tradition of excellence in choral singing and uniqueness in programming. Dr. Peterson received the GoverSee annlvefBary page 30 NOWTHEREIS ^ NO WAIT FOR YOUR INTEREST TO GO BUT UP. ^^— NOW THERE IS NO WHY FOR YOUR INTERESTTO GO BUT UP Now you can master your savings because we've mastered the rate! At maturity Nevada Savings will renew your 6-month Rate Master CD at the same high rote at which you opened it, or at the then current interest rate. Whichever is hi g her For one more 6-month term It's guaranteed. The minimum balance required to open a Rate Master CD Account is $2,500. Higher interest rates are paid on higher balances. Of course, your fur>ds are safe in one of the west's largest, strongest financial Institutions. With over $2.3 billion In assets. And a net worth substantially higher than federal requirements. So whether you're transferring a maturing CD account or opening one for the first time, it makes sense to glo it here. At Big, Safe, Friendly Nevada Savings. Master your savings. Come in and open your insured 6-month Rate Master CD Account today BIG* SAFE •FRIENDLY AND LOAN ASSOCIATION MEMBER Of T FED6RAL HOME ION BANK ^ffVAOra LAMEST. OFnC ID SSNE )rou THROUOHCXn TW SME • LAS VEGAS HOME OFFICE: 3300 W Sohcra AM^ CITY: 1027 NwQda Highway HB0ERSON: 320 S Boutclw HlgrMay. federal regukjiionsftqulraiubikVTtlalperxittY lor •orVwIlh^^ aesMStFrr-.' X.

PAGE 30

Pag* M Henderson Hone New and Boulder City News Thnnday. March 8, 1968 Nevada Historical Society's 'This was Nevada' series Elinor Glyn comes to Rawhide the underground workings of the Mohawk Mine. In an interview with a Goldfield Tribune reporter the next day, she positively effused over the country and the people, "particularly the fact that you hear nothing about the Mayflower. Everything back east is about the Mayflower and about one's antecedents. I care nothing for that. This is my first time in any mining camp, and beUeve me, I am agreeabley surprised. It is most interesting. It is like nature itself." She also spoke of her visit to the Mohawk—calling it a "wonder"—and told the newsman of her impressions of the citizens of Gcrfdfield—"very civilized. In fact, way above my expectation of what a mining camp should be." The next evening, May 26, Mrs. Casey McDaniel of the Casey Hotel put on a reception in her honor. Novelist Elinor Glyn flanked by two miners at Rawhide, May, 1908. Nevada Hiatorical Society photograph. by Phillip I. Earl Nevada Historical Society Publidst Phillip I. Earl's book This Was Nevada, is available from the Nevada Historical Society at a cost of $9.95 plus $1.50 postage and handling. Promotion of Nevada mining stock has taken many forms over the years. Mine owners sometimes locked their crews underground for days at a time either to conceal a rich strike until insiders could comer stocks or to give substance to rumors of such a strike and bid up prices. Other promoters circulated stories of chickens found with gold nUggets in their gizzards, men who found nuggets on the roots of beets pulled ttom their gardens, barbers who panned the whiskery leavings of their customers and grave diggers who encountered veins of rich ore when excavating burial plots, but the most memorable caper in the history of the state was the visit of novelist Elinor Glynn to Rawhide in May, 1908. An English writer of aristocratic lineage, she was the toast of the literary world at that time having just published Three Weeks, a novel so risque that it had become a scandal of sorts. Mrs. Glyn happened to be in San Francisco in the spring of 1908. Reports had it that she was seeking "local color" for her next literary venture and was considering a visit to the mining camps of the West. Among those Nevadans who saw some promotional possibiUties in her presence were Nat Goodwin and George Graham Rice, mining promoters par excellence. Learning that she was the guest of mining millionaire Sam Newhouse, Rice contacted Renoite Ray Baker, a friend of NewhouBe's, about making an introduction. "Please suggest to Mr. Newhouse and Mrs. Glynn the advisability of visiting Rawhide," his telegram read. The Lady can get much local color for a new book. If you bag the game you will be a hero." Baker did as he was asked, and Mrs. Glyn and Newhouse departed for Salt Lake City on May 21. They continued on south to Las Vegas the next day and arrived in Goldfleld on the Las Vegas and Tonopah Railroad on Sunday, May 24. Registering at the Goldfield Hotel with Newhofi^. Baker and two of Newhouse's nieces, Mrs. Glyn spent the next day looking around town. She also accepted an invitation to tour George Graham Rice, Tex Richard, Goodwin and Baker had meanwhile prepared a proper welcome at Rawhide. That first evening, Mky 27, Newhouse and Mrs. Glyn visited Richard's Northern Saloon on the edge of Stingaree Gulch, the red-light district. They arranged for a mock poker game featuring six "mining camp characters" playing with $1,000 chips and a staged shoot-out in which two of them "bit the dust." Mrs. Glym, not realizing that she w%s being "joshed," beUeved the "murders" to be an everyday part of life in Rawhide. She also took a turn at the faro table, winning $1,000 through the connivance of Richard and the dealer, and toured the dance halls and cribs where Rice had armed the girls with pistols and daggers. He also arranged a fire which spread to several deserted shacks on the edge of town so as to give her the opportunity to observe the heroics of the volunteer firemen. The men themselves were in on the joke, but Mrs. Glyn was suitably impressed. ^ They took a tour of the mines on McLeod Hill and the leases on Grutt Hill the next day where she was introduced to the fine art of gold panning. At a banquet in her honor that night, she granted an interview to the editor of the Rawhide Press-Times in which she spoke of "the stiutly manhood and dominant spirit of conquest" of the men she had met and the "vigor and determination of purpoee" they showed. Asked about the depiction of Rawhide in future hterary works, she mad no commitments, asserting only that she would "take away many pleasant impressions and ideas." Joepeh Hutchinson, a mine owner, was also on hand that night. On behalf of his fellows, he presented her with a gun and a deputy constable's badge. "We give you this gun because we like yer darned pluck," he said. "You ain't afraid and we ain't neither." When he told her she could arrest any man in the camp, she replied "I want to arrest 'em aU! I love 'em." Mrs. Glyn, Newhouse and the others left by auto the next day, and she was back in New York City three days later. In an articlee in the New York American which appeared on June 10, she wrote of the magniHcance of Nevada's high desert country and of "those brave fellows fighting nature to obtain from her legitimate wealth, Hghting hardships, cold and great heat, difficulties in obtaining food and water, and each day the chance of death." She also described the courteous manner of the men, "not one soul in the streets or gambling saloons stared or committed a single action in bad taste." Indeed, she attributed to them "that fine quality of good taste which in England we associate with the highest breeding." She also described the dance-halls she visited and how respectful the men were toward their dancing partners, "nothing rude or suggestive in any of it, only perfect motion." This was just the sort of publicity that Rice had initially envisioned, but editors around the state and elsewhere were soon skaking a finger at Mrs. Glyn for her visit to Rawhide's tenderloin. The editor of the New York Mail took her to task for her brazenness, observing that American women usually visited such places only in Europe and commenting that "the writing of Hction is an emancipation proposition." The aggrieved writer admitted the veracity of the stories, but reproached the editors for their inabiUty "to separat^ art from common depravity." Denying that the scenes in the dancehalls'in any way shocked her, she asserted that any woman could have much the same experience in any large city. "And the wagers we laid were nothing," she added. "Women do that sort of thing at Monte Carlo." Tex Richard was a bit concerned with the belated bad pubUcity, but not Rice. "Every knock's a boost," he told his partner. "Just the fact that we could get anyone as prominent and Elinor Glyn to visit us will impress people with Rawhide's grovring importance." And so it was. Boulder Dam area Boy Scout Council received quality council award Dan Gasparo, Scout Executive for thee Boulder Dam Area Council of the Boy Scouts of America, announced that the Boulder Dam Area Council has received the Quality Council Award from the National Boy Scouts of America. This is the first time that the Council has received the award. The Quality Council Award is Levinthal to exhibit given to local area councils that have demonstrated excellence in their respective scouting programs. Only 43 of 70 Western Region Councils qualified for the award. Nationally, only 48 of the total 408 councils received this recognition in 1987. The Boulder Dam council is composed of three division. Over 50 percent of the individual units in two of the divisions, the Club Scout division for boys age six through 10, and the Exploring division for boys and girls age 14 through 20, met the national standards and were recognized as quality divisions, which distinguished the Boulder Dam Area Council as a quality council. In recognition of its achievement the Boulder Dam Area Council received a plaque from area flve director of the Boy Scouts of America Eugene Richey at the councils recognition dinner, on Tuesday, Feb. 23, at the Sahara Hotel. Over 16,000 youth participate in 607 units comprise the difIMarch 11 Amiversaty from page 29 David Levinthal, said to be "a precursor of today's fascination with ambiguous, simulated imagery" >y New York Times critic Andy Grundberg, will exhibit his 'simulated' polaroids and handcolored photographs at the Allied Arts Gallery from March 11 through April 15. A reception is planned for March 11 between 5 and 7. Levinthal will present a slidelecture, sponsored by the UNLV Art Department on March 10, at 2:30 p.m. in Alts Ham Fine Arts, room 229. The public is invited. Part of the exhibit will be a series of stylized war photographs from a 1977 book called Hitler Move East: A Graphic Chronicle, 1941-43, a collabfvation between Levinthal and Garry "Doooesbury" Tnideau for their fraduate thesis at Yale. Levinthal's "documentary" photographs were made with hobby-shop plastic aokber* and model tanks incorporated into ubletop dioramas and shot' with a macro Isos. Levinthal uses s shaUow depthoffieU. which obscures both the foregro u nd and backfrownd and adds "atmoaphere' to the oompoaitions. nor's Award for Excellence in the Arts from Governor Richard Bryan in February 1987. He holds a doctor of musical arts in choral performance and vocal pedagogy from the University of Iowa. He has studied choral music with Robert Shaw, Helmuth Rilling and Don Moaes to name a few. This past August, he attended^the first World Choral Symposium, held in Vienna, Austia. He is an associate professor of music at the University of Nevada Las Vegas. For further information about the society's programs call 451-6672. ferent divisions of the Boulder Dam Area Council. About 26 percent of the Scout-aged youth in southern Nevada take part in Boulder Dam Area Council programs, signiticantiy higher than the national average of 16 percent. The Boulder Dam Area Council is also distinguished as having one of the highest percents of Scouts in the Eagle Scout program that actually compelte the requirements for Eagle Scout. The Boulder Dam Area Council of the Boy Scouts is a United Way Agency. For more information about the quality council award, or the Boulder Dam Area Council, call Dan Gasparo at 736-4366. CYNTHIA R. FOLLIS ATTORNEY AT LAW 878-5544 2810 W. Charleston, #G-67 Practice Limited to Personal Injury Auto Accidents — Slip & Fall Accidents Insurance Claims — Motorcycle Accidents Death and Injury __ Uninsured l\otorist Claims Claims TAX SERVICE Able BookkeeplBg & Tax Sendee CONFUSED BY NEW TAX LAWS?!? Wa'vt got tha profaaaional training to sat your mind at aaaa! 153 W. Uke Mead Henderwn BIdg #2. Ste. 1205 564-3070 HENDERSON PROFESSIONAL PARK Houre^sSat^^^^^^^^^Evenlngabyappo^ ELECTROLYSIS "PERMANENT HAIR REMOVAL" MEN AND WOMEN IN ISIONS FACE BODY LEGS MEDICALLY APPROVED • TAX DEDUCTIBLE COMPLIMENTARY CONSULTATION • DAY & EVE HOURS Maria Atklnson-Sandars, L.E. • 369-1234 • Andraa'a Plaza on Pacos-McLeod A S. Mohava Just Off East Flamingo Road MANPOWER" •LIGHT FACTORY WORK •HEAVY INDUSTRIAL •SECRETARIES •TYPISTS |FOA? INTERESTING TEMPORARY ASSIGNMENTS IN THE HENDERSON AND BOULDER CITY AREAS MANPOWER TEMPORAmr SERVICES U 30.A Water St. HENDERSON, NEVADA I CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT 565-5554 Complete Skin Care Programs For MOLES, WARTS, ACNE SKIN DISEASES & ^ SKIN CANCER ^ Dr. R. Maldii ft Dr. J. Dilat Madcara Aaaignmeni And Moti Othor Insurancaa Accaplad 106 E. Lake Mead Ste. 105. Henderson 4700 W. Spring Mtn. (near DecatuO lAri-v-Mi ECONO LUBE N* TUNE DR/Vc THRU SERVICE A\V ANU !,AVt Si) 00 ZQ MIMUTi DRIVE'THRU I TUME'UP MCLUOU: • CMcang Haaig aidciwgng tym • CMciwig tun iM amMan •/•Mnw • tfmn .Mautl imioni • MMmglugi • MpKIMvi MUtPCV • Oack au M) mng wbimamd d. tpOTd • Mxdva ran aK aMkma pnt • '.LIP ArjD ;,AVt lommmLUBE, OIL i FILTER MCUmt: • CM Chang* up to 5 qU 30w PennzDH or oltw brands avaMbla • CW filler • LutM cfiasais \ • ChcK fluM level* • Check fitter belts id hoses 34 4Cyt. •MJM EXPinCS MAM R.g ii8 as Mo.1 V.t.cJ.. EXPIRES 2IXIW ii' AND sAvi s^n on sstf/Mi/n BRAKE SPECIAL mCLUOU: • kiMI pnMun pM. or mtgl •TKTirMonvtfiin tamorm turn vmttmd—mamntn^mO • F1M) aid Mm-mMiec ilgnty hgiw 49 n.g taesa MoilVWolN EXPIRES 2;20/M DESERT INN 1 ^ 1 -i \—i 1 < H SPRINO MTN FLAMINOO 4350 Sprtng Mtn. 4101 toutti Pacoa 454-4100 MEADOWS LANE SMOG CHECK AVAILABLE NOAPMINTMENTl NECESSARY HOUM: Mon.-Ut iwaun. 10-41 4701 Maadowa Lana 870-0513 •• HM Etiwnol BONANZA NO • • • •12 North NaMa 4}0-0200 • • • • • • I More Boulder City news TIntfMtoy, Marak 8. 1988 Hendei-ion Home Newi and Boulder City Newi Page SI Square Dance Festival this weekend Dancers from all over the southwest are expected to arrive here tomorrrow to participate in the 15th annual Hoover Dam Squarel Dance Festival. Three to four hundred perThe festival will include a *" appreciative audience, aona are expected to attend the traditional dance by the statues Events include workshops festivities which will be at Hoover Dam on Saturday Saturday afternoon and a mixcentered at the Garrett Junior morning at 9 a.m. This colorf ""^ ^ square and round dancHigh School. ful presentation always draws infif Saturday night. Dewitt Tracht considered a shining example ~-hy Teddy FentoB There is seldom a business man who can compare to the late Dewitt Tracht, who owned the Central Market on Arizona St. Clerks worked for him years on end. All ei\)oyed the long tenure of faithfuUy serving a man who was always smiling during the years he loved and managed the first store to serve Boulder City aa a fhiit market. The Manix Dept. store proceeded this Cenbtral market Fruit Store by only a few months. Somewhere in our files is the picture taken when DeWitt and Violet sold the store. But today, using the Art See "Boulder Builder" mention we list the dates. "Dewitt was bom in Ohio, came west with his mother when he was 12 years old, they joined his father who had bought stocks in the mines at Carrara, Nev., Dewitt finished his grade schooling there. He went on to Las Vegas and graduated from high school. There is so much history. Violet was born in Searchlight. Their marriage was blessed with two sons. Kenneth, a dentist in Las Vegas and Lawrence, an electronics engineer, who works for Boeing Airlines located in Seattle. There are several grandchildren. DeWitt started int he grocery business about 1936. His store in Las Vegas was sold to buy Central Market while it was located on Wyoming St. The Trachts built a home on G Street and moved into it in 1941. -^ In DeWitt's own words. They took the "big step" in 1947. For they built the present Central Market at that time. Because of his winning smile and the friendly atmoaphere it quickly became Uie (home owned family store) and remains that way to this day. Evui the tragic fire did not change the way it welcomes every single customer. In spite of a crowded schedule DeWitt was a volunteer who donated hours, days, weeks to the Charter Committee when Boulder City incorporated. Records show the hard work and planning began in 1947. Lasten then until Jan. 4, 1960 when we were freed from government rule. A proud Mason, he served in several lodges filling the chairs in every caae. He also belonged to the Rotary Club. Ha died in June 1979. Boulder City will not forget him. Xi Zeta attends Preferential Tea Obituaries Helen C. Coffin wamn Robert Bunting Helen C. Coffin, 91 died Wednesday, Feb. 24 in Boulder City. She had been a resident of the Nevada area since 1919 residing in Boulder City since 1932. She was bom in Providence, R.I. on Dec. 16, 1896 and was an owner and operator of a gift shop. Survivors include son Dim fielding. Boulder City; four grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Visitation began Thursday, Feb. 25 at 2 p.m. at Palm Mortuary in Henderson. Rosary was recited at 6 p.m. Thursday and Mass was said on Friday, Feb. 26 at 10 a.m. both at St. Andrew's CathoUc Church in Boulder City. Father Joe Annese of St. Andrew's Cathohc Church officiated. Interment was in the Boulder City Cemetery, Boulder City. Lola B. Dunlap Lola B. Dunlap, 80, passed away Feb. 29 in Boulder City. Resident of the community for 38 years, she was bom on July 30, 1907. — She was a long-time member of the Doea Drove 34 in Boulder City and was active in many Senior Center activities. Survivors include a daughter, Dorothy Cleveland; a granddaughter MeUssa Higginbotham; a grandson Buri Cleveland; also two great-grandsons; all of Ventura, Calif. Pahn Mortuary is in charge of arrangements. Viewing will be at Palm Chapel, Henderson, today from 2 to 9 p.m. Services will be at Palm Chapel, Henderson, Friday at 10 a.m. Burial will follow in Boulder City cemetery. In lieu of ftowers, the family requesta that donations may be made to the Boulder City Elks fund for new chairs in the lodge room. Warren Robert Bunting, 59 died Friday, Feb. 26 at Orem, Utah. He had been a resident of the Boulder City area since 1984. He was born in Hollywood, Calif, on July 16, 1928 and was the co-owner of a drive-in theater in Orem, Utah. He was a U.S. Army veteran. Survivors include wife LaRue Bunting, Orn, Utah; sons L. Don Bunting, Phoenix Ariz. Anthony Robert Bunting, Morro Bay, Calif.; daughters LuAnna Rae Anderson, Springville, Utah and Sandra Lee Bunting, San Luis Obispo, Calif; brothers Gordon P. Bunting, Morro Bay, Calif, and Roger C. Bunting, Monterrey, Calif.; 3 grandchildren. Funeral services were held Wednesday, March 1 at 1 p.m. in the Boulder City Cemetery. Officiating were the BPOE and VFW. Interment was in the Boulder City Cemetery, Boulder City. Robert C. Basinger Jr. Robert C. Basinger Jr., 49 died Friday, Feb. 26 in Las Vegas. He had been a resident of the Las Vegas area for the past 15 years. He was bora in Salem, Ohio on Feb. 2,1939 and was a dealer in gaming. He was a member of the AM Bowling, Showboat Super Score Trio and a former police officer at the Flamingo and Hilton. Survivors include wife Nancy and son Tom Basinger both Las Vegas; brother Tom and parents Robert and Ruth Basinger all Boulder City. Viewing began at 11 a.m. March 1 and funeral services were held March 2 at 2 p.m. in Palm Chapel with the Rev. Melvin Da Krul officiating. Interment was in Palm Memorial Park in Henderson. A salad supper was held at the home of Judy Vogel on Jan. 25. A delicious variety of salads were served to all members after a short business meeting. Pam Witt hosted our Valentine social at her home on Feb. 8. We exchanged rosie gifts and enjoyed a dessert of Plantation Pride cake. Plans were made for a spring social. A cocktail party was hosted at Suzie Wolfmger's home on Feb. 13 at 7 p.m. Following the party, we attended a 50*8 dance at St. Via tor's from 8 p.m. to midnight Awards were given for best cos tume and a fashion show was held Pizza and hot dogs were served Proceeds from the dance were donated to Marion House. Suzie Wolfmger hostad our next regular meeting at her home on Feb. 22. At a business meeting, we voted to donate $100 to Sheila Fava for her participation in the Special Olympics. A dessert of angel food cake topped with cherries and cool whip was served. A preferential tea was held at the Water and Power Building on Feb. 27 at 10 a.m. It was hosted by Lambda. A gourmet champagne breakfast was served. Egg dishes, potato and cheese, fruit salads and various breads and muffins were served along with champagne punch, fruit punch, coffee and tea. A silent auction was held with various home made items including decorated Easter eggs, baskets and home made sugar eggs containing Easter scenes. A raffle was also held. Among the winners were Nancy Noble who won a knitted sweater, Denise JohnsonWilliams who won a wall hanging and Jean Keeney who won a grape vine wreath. All chapters attended the tea. Our first meeting for March will be at the home of Gretchen Wilbora on March 14. WHEN A FELLA NEEDS A FRIEND-Thla poor Uttla five-month old male is urgently in need of lots and lota of TLC to make him feel secure once more. A mixed Pomeranian-Norfolk Terrier, he's only a tiny thing and won't get much bigger. He needs a family to adopt him, one who will give liim lots of loving, a faimly preferably without small children and where someone will be home most of the time to provide badly needed companionship and reassurance. In return, this young fella will give love and loyalty far beyond his miniscule size. For information on adopting this cutie, call theBC Animal Shelter at 293-9224. Art Guild Doings by Loraine Davenport Art Guild Publicist The featured artist for March is Karla Demiel. Karla was a fine arts major in college and worked in drawing, wood sculpture, acrylics and watercolor. She is an expreesionist-realiat artist. Her interest in art began in childhood. A reception for Karla will be at the Art Guild Gallery, 1495 Nevada Highway, Sunday, March 6 from noon to 4 p.m. For more details call 294-9982. The Art Guild board meeting is scheduled for Thursday, March 10 at 2:30 p.m. at the Gallery. The Lake Mead Marina Art Show is on for the weekend of March 19 and 20. Please be there to help set up by 8:30 a.m. on Saturday. The hours are from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days. The February membership meeting had a large turnout. Dottie had promised us a surprise guest for that evening. Fred Hudson is a landscape artist who paints in acrylics. He does beautiful work. Anyone interested in his classes should contact the Gallery. Hudson's demo painting was won by Evelyn Cushman. The Guild wishes to thank Hudson for his time and talent. Saturday, March 12 will be a work day at the Gallery to spmce up the landscape. We wiU begin at 9 a.m. Please be there in work cbthes and with lots of enthusiasm. Library News from the Boulder City Library Check out the magazines at the Boulder City Library. You can do just that with ovw 170 titles found in our library. Except for the most current isue, our magazinas can be checked out for two weeks. We have a good cross section of titles covering the many interests of Boulder City residents. In the current affairs area, our newer titles include World Press Review which excerpts nuiterial from the press outside the U.S., and UNESCO Courier whkh carries a variety of articles about cultures and events all around the world. Sputnik deals with life in tha USSR. Collectors can find valuaUe inf(-mation in the Antique Tradar, Qun WwU, Linn's Stamp News, and Old Car Price Ouide. (k the traveler then ia European TravdAUfe, This Australia, Transitions Abroad and Coasumer R^xais Travel Letter. We have several naw subacriptiona dealing with haalth and nutrition—Mi^v Clink: Health Letter, Nutrition Action Health Lett&r, and Vegetarian Thaea. For you electronic buffs there is Amateur Radio, Radio-Electronics and Video Review. Home^iriented magazines are numerous and include such titles aa Metropolitan Homes, Fine HomebuiUing, Home, Homeowtuf, and Workbench for the do-ityourselfers. For the hobbyists our newer magazines include Fineecale Modeler, Lapidary Journal, Rock & Gem, McCall'a Needlework & Crafts and an abundance of donated magazinee with patterns and ideas for crafts and needlework. AutomobUe enthusiasts and those kxtldng to buy new and used cars wiU be heklping by browsing through our collection of Consumer Guide books on cars. They are many good tips on what to kx)k for in the various makes and models of cars. Kdly Blue Books cover prices for new cars, used cars, okier used cars and RVs. An excellent aid for the beginner wanting to trace his heritage ia the Gmsalogical Heiper. Best's Review deals with insurance and comes in conjunction with Sast'sZoMinmaslJefMrte whkh can be found on our Reference Shelf. Two magazines are received each month-one deals with life and health insurance and the other with property and casualty insurance. And don't forget the children's magazines. We have aver a dozen titles for kids from preschool age and lip. Please come by the library and enjoy our relocate magazine section. We think the area ia quieter, Uj^ter and more conducive to your eryoyment of our many magazines and newspapers. You are welcome to read in our comfortable armchairs or checkout the magazines and take them home with you. ilHuir completes training Airman Sheldon A. Muir, son of William H. and Lavonne Muir of Boulder City has graduated from Air Force basic training at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas according to the Army and Air Force Hometown News Service. During the six weeks of training the airman studied the Air Force mission, organization and customs and received special training in human relations. In addition, airmen who complete baaic training earn credita toward an associate degree through the community college of the Air Force. Sheldon Muir He ia a 1987 graduate of Boulder City High School. Police caution residents on new robbery scam A aenioc resdent of the community waa the victim of a robbery icam laat weak after a man gained entrance to her home on the pretext of being • city employee. Once inaide, he misdirected iktt occupant's attention and pM off with the victim's 1 T >/ The man reportedly gained admission to the house by telliM the occupant he waa • city Mi^n'ii and that ht MMM WMk tha hww'a tlectrloal htmktt box dua to alaetHQll priMiiM to tha area. ,v This is the third time in recent months that con artiita have BucceasfuUy preyed on senior reaidenta here. In the prior two incidents, a man poaed aa a policeman in plain clothes and flashed an ap> parent phony badge to gain entrance to the homea. Once inaide, he relieved his victima of jewelry on the pretext of having to confiscate it as evidence in a caae. Polioe aay they have identiflad thia man and thaj^an ar tm^ la ponding. Attthorititi caution all residenta, but eapecially aeniora, to not admit anyone to their home without first viewing proper identification. All oi^ amployeaa carry luch identification. Moat emplojreea of private firms alao carry idantification, eapecially if thay are in contact with the public in private homea. Capt. Mike Murphy of the BC Police Department is one who ia concerned about the growing number of incidanta of thia type here. He caya he cannot atraoa too strongly that no reaidant should admit a stranger to their home without first identifying the person. He alao streaaea that residenta ahould call the police department if there ia any question u to a person's identity, whether or not this person profeasea to be a city employee. Sankn are often targeted for Beams such aa have been ptdled here in recent montha. Other well-known swindles include poaing aa a bank examiner and asking a senior to withdraw monay form the bank under a prataxt of attampting to catch an allegedly dishonest employee of the institution. Still another scam involvea a peraon who "finds" a large amount of caah and offers to aplit it with an intended victim. The acheme involvea many variations but alwaya includes having the victim put up a large amount of caah aa good faith. Needless to say, the victim never sees the cash again. Murphy aays he doean't wish to scare people into not trusting anyone on any occaaion, yet he is eager to expoaa the clever scams being applied hart. "These people are good at what they do," he saya. They attempt to gain a victim's truat and are glib in their pitch to the victim to gain truat." '?
PAGE 31

Pag* M Henderson Hone New and Boulder City News Thnnday. March 8, 1968 Nevada Historical Society's 'This was Nevada' series Elinor Glyn comes to Rawhide the underground workings of the Mohawk Mine. In an interview with a Goldfield Tribune reporter the next day, she positively effused over the country and the people, "particularly the fact that you hear nothing about the Mayflower. Everything back east is about the Mayflower and about one's antecedents. I care nothing for that. This is my first time in any mining camp, and beUeve me, I am agreeabley surprised. It is most interesting. It is like nature itself." She also spoke of her visit to the Mohawk—calling it a "wonder"—and told the newsman of her impressions of the citizens of Gcrfdfield—"very civilized. In fact, way above my expectation of what a mining camp should be." The next evening, May 26, Mrs. Casey McDaniel of the Casey Hotel put on a reception in her honor. Novelist Elinor Glyn flanked by two miners at Rawhide, May, 1908. Nevada Hiatorical Society photograph. by Phillip I. Earl Nevada Historical Society Publidst Phillip I. Earl's book This Was Nevada, is available from the Nevada Historical Society at a cost of $9.95 plus $1.50 postage and handling. Promotion of Nevada mining stock has taken many forms over the years. Mine owners sometimes locked their crews underground for days at a time either to conceal a rich strike until insiders could comer stocks or to give substance to rumors of such a strike and bid up prices. Other promoters circulated stories of chickens found with gold nUggets in their gizzards, men who found nuggets on the roots of beets pulled ttom their gardens, barbers who panned the whiskery leavings of their customers and grave diggers who encountered veins of rich ore when excavating burial plots, but the most memorable caper in the history of the state was the visit of novelist Elinor Glynn to Rawhide in May, 1908. An English writer of aristocratic lineage, she was the toast of the literary world at that time having just published Three Weeks, a novel so risque that it had become a scandal of sorts. Mrs. Glyn happened to be in San Francisco in the spring of 1908. Reports had it that she was seeking "local color" for her next literary venture and was considering a visit to the mining camps of the West. Among those Nevadans who saw some promotional possibiUties in her presence were Nat Goodwin and George Graham Rice, mining promoters par excellence. Learning that she was the guest of mining millionaire Sam Newhouse, Rice contacted Renoite Ray Baker, a friend of NewhouBe's, about making an introduction. "Please suggest to Mr. Newhouse and Mrs. Glynn the advisability of visiting Rawhide," his telegram read. The Lady can get much local color for a new book. If you bag the game you will be a hero." Baker did as he was asked, and Mrs. Glyn and Newhouse departed for Salt Lake City on May 21. They continued on south to Las Vegas the next day and arrived in Goldfleld on the Las Vegas and Tonopah Railroad on Sunday, May 24. Registering at the Goldfield Hotel with Newhofi^. Baker and two of Newhouse's nieces, Mrs. Glyn spent the next day looking around town. She also accepted an invitation to tour George Graham Rice, Tex Richard, Goodwin and Baker had meanwhile prepared a proper welcome at Rawhide. That first evening, Mky 27, Newhouse and Mrs. Glyn visited Richard's Northern Saloon on the edge of Stingaree Gulch, the red-light district. They arranged for a mock poker game featuring six "mining camp characters" playing with $1,000 chips and a staged shoot-out in which two of them "bit the dust." Mrs. Glym, not realizing that she w%s being "joshed," beUeved the "murders" to be an everyday part of life in Rawhide. She also took a turn at the faro table, winning $1,000 through the connivance of Richard and the dealer, and toured the dance halls and cribs where Rice had armed the girls with pistols and daggers. He also arranged a fire which spread to several deserted shacks on the edge of town so as to give her the opportunity to observe the heroics of the volunteer firemen. The men themselves were in on the joke, but Mrs. Glyn was suitably impressed. ^ They took a tour of the mines on McLeod Hill and the leases on Grutt Hill the next day where she was introduced to the fine art of gold panning. At a banquet in her honor that night, she granted an interview to the editor of the Rawhide Press-Times in which she spoke of "the stiutly manhood and dominant spirit of conquest" of the men she had met and the "vigor and determination of purpoee" they showed. Asked about the depiction of Rawhide in future hterary works, she mad no commitments, asserting only that she would "take away many pleasant impressions and ideas." Joepeh Hutchinson, a mine owner, was also on hand that night. On behalf of his fellows, he presented her with a gun and a deputy constable's badge. "We give you this gun because we like yer darned pluck," he said. "You ain't afraid and we ain't neither." When he told her she could arrest any man in the camp, she replied "I want to arrest 'em aU! I love 'em." Mrs. Glyn, Newhouse and the others left by auto the next day, and she was back in New York City three days later. In an articlee in the New York American which appeared on June 10, she wrote of the magniHcance of Nevada's high desert country and of "those brave fellows fighting nature to obtain from her legitimate wealth, Hghting hardships, cold and great heat, difficulties in obtaining food and water, and each day the chance of death." She also described the courteous manner of the men, "not one soul in the streets or gambling saloons stared or committed a single action in bad taste." Indeed, she attributed to them "that fine quality of good taste which in England we associate with the highest breeding." She also described the dance-halls she visited and how respectful the men were toward their dancing partners, "nothing rude or suggestive in any of it, only perfect motion." This was just the sort of publicity that Rice had initially envisioned, but editors around the state and elsewhere were soon skaking a finger at Mrs. Glyn for her visit to Rawhide's tenderloin. The editor of the New York Mail took her to task for her brazenness, observing that American women usually visited such places only in Europe and commenting that "the writing of Hction is an emancipation proposition." The aggrieved writer admitted the veracity of the stories, but reproached the editors for their inabiUty "to separat^ art from common depravity." Denying that the scenes in the dancehalls'in any way shocked her, she asserted that any woman could have much the same experience in any large city. "And the wagers we laid were nothing," she added. "Women do that sort of thing at Monte Carlo." Tex Richard was a bit concerned with the belated bad pubUcity, but not Rice. "Every knock's a boost," he told his partner. "Just the fact that we could get anyone as prominent and Elinor Glyn to visit us will impress people with Rawhide's grovring importance." And so it was. Boulder Dam area Boy Scout Council received quality council award Dan Gasparo, Scout Executive for thee Boulder Dam Area Council of the Boy Scouts of America, announced that the Boulder Dam Area Council has received the Quality Council Award from the National Boy Scouts of America. This is the first time that the Council has received the award. The Quality Council Award is Levinthal to exhibit given to local area councils that have demonstrated excellence in their respective scouting programs. Only 43 of 70 Western Region Councils qualified for the award. Nationally, only 48 of the total 408 councils received this recognition in 1987. The Boulder Dam council is composed of three division. Over 50 percent of the individual units in two of the divisions, the Club Scout division for boys age six through 10, and the Exploring division for boys and girls age 14 through 20, met the national standards and were recognized as quality divisions, which distinguished the Boulder Dam Area Council as a quality council. In recognition of its achievement the Boulder Dam Area Council received a plaque from area flve director of the Boy Scouts of America Eugene Richey at the councils recognition dinner, on Tuesday, Feb. 23, at the Sahara Hotel. Over 16,000 youth participate in 607 units comprise the difIMarch 11 Amiversaty from page 29 David Levinthal, said to be "a precursor of today's fascination with ambiguous, simulated imagery" >y New York Times critic Andy Grundberg, will exhibit his 'simulated' polaroids and handcolored photographs at the Allied Arts Gallery from March 11 through April 15. A reception is planned for March 11 between 5 and 7. Levinthal will present a slidelecture, sponsored by the UNLV Art Department on March 10, at 2:30 p.m. in Alts Ham Fine Arts, room 229. The public is invited. Part of the exhibit will be a series of stylized war photographs from a 1977 book called Hitler Move East: A Graphic Chronicle, 1941-43, a collabfvation between Levinthal and Garry "Doooesbury" Tnideau for their fraduate thesis at Yale. Levinthal's "documentary" photographs were made with hobby-shop plastic aokber* and model tanks incorporated into ubletop dioramas and shot' with a macro Isos. Levinthal uses s shaUow depthoffieU. which obscures both the foregro u nd and backfrownd and adds "atmoaphere' to the oompoaitions. nor's Award for Excellence in the Arts from Governor Richard Bryan in February 1987. He holds a doctor of musical arts in choral performance and vocal pedagogy from the University of Iowa. He has studied choral music with Robert Shaw, Helmuth Rilling and Don Moaes to name a few. This past August, he attended^the first World Choral Symposium, held in Vienna, Austia. He is an associate professor of music at the University of Nevada Las Vegas. For further information about the society's programs call 451-6672. ferent divisions of the Boulder Dam Area Council. About 26 percent of the Scout-aged youth in southern Nevada take part in Boulder Dam Area Council programs, signiticantiy higher than the national average of 16 percent. The Boulder Dam Area Council is also distinguished as having one of the highest percents of Scouts in the Eagle Scout program that actually compelte the requirements for Eagle Scout. The Boulder Dam Area Council of the Boy Scouts is a United Way Agency. For more information about the quality council award, or the Boulder Dam Area Council, call Dan Gasparo at 736-4366. CYNTHIA R. FOLLIS ATTORNEY AT LAW 878-5544 2810 W. Charleston, #G-67 Practice Limited to Personal Injury Auto Accidents — Slip & Fall Accidents Insurance Claims — Motorcycle Accidents Death and Injury __ Uninsured l\otorist Claims Claims TAX SERVICE Able BookkeeplBg & Tax Sendee CONFUSED BY NEW TAX LAWS?!? Wa'vt got tha profaaaional training to sat your mind at aaaa! 153 W. Uke Mead Henderwn BIdg #2. Ste. 1205 564-3070 HENDERSON PROFESSIONAL PARK Houre^sSat^^^^^^^^^Evenlngabyappo^ ELECTROLYSIS "PERMANENT HAIR REMOVAL" MEN AND WOMEN IN ISIONS FACE BODY LEGS MEDICALLY APPROVED • TAX DEDUCTIBLE COMPLIMENTARY CONSULTATION • DAY & EVE HOURS Maria Atklnson-Sandars, L.E. • 369-1234 • Andraa'a Plaza on Pacos-McLeod A S. Mohava Just Off East Flamingo Road MANPOWER" •LIGHT FACTORY WORK •HEAVY INDUSTRIAL •SECRETARIES •TYPISTS |FOA? INTERESTING TEMPORARY ASSIGNMENTS IN THE HENDERSON AND BOULDER CITY AREAS MANPOWER TEMPORAmr SERVICES U 30.A Water St. HENDERSON, NEVADA I CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT 565-5554 Complete Skin Care Programs For MOLES, WARTS, ACNE SKIN DISEASES & ^ SKIN CANCER ^ Dr. R. Maldii ft Dr. J. Dilat Madcara Aaaignmeni And Moti Othor Insurancaa Accaplad 106 E. Lake Mead Ste. 105. Henderson 4700 W. Spring Mtn. (near DecatuO lAri-v-Mi ECONO LUBE N* TUNE DR/Vc THRU SERVICE A\V ANU !,AVt Si) 00 ZQ MIMUTi DRIVE'THRU I TUME'UP MCLUOU: • CMcang Haaig aidciwgng tym • CMciwig tun iM amMan •/•Mnw • tfmn .Mautl imioni • MMmglugi • MpKIMvi MUtPCV • Oack au M) mng wbimamd d. tpOTd • Mxdva ran aK aMkma pnt • '.LIP ArjD ;,AVt lommmLUBE, OIL i FILTER MCUmt: • CM Chang* up to 5 qU 30w PennzDH or oltw brands avaMbla • CW filler • LutM cfiasais \ • ChcK fluM level* • Check fitter belts id hoses 34 4Cyt. •MJM EXPinCS MAM R.g ii8 as Mo.1 V.t.cJ.. EXPIRES 2IXIW ii' AND sAvi s^n on sstf/Mi/n BRAKE SPECIAL mCLUOU: • kiMI pnMun pM. or mtgl •TKTirMonvtfiin tamorm turn vmttmd—mamntn^mO • F1M) aid Mm-mMiec ilgnty hgiw 49 n.g taesa MoilVWolN EXPIRES 2;20/M DESERT INN 1 ^ 1 -i \—i 1 < H SPRINO MTN FLAMINOO 4350 Sprtng Mtn. 4101 toutti Pacoa 454-4100 MEADOWS LANE SMOG CHECK AVAILABLE NOAPMINTMENTl NECESSARY HOUM: Mon.-Ut iwaun. 10-41 4701 Maadowa Lana 870-0513 •• HM Etiwnol BONANZA NO • • • •12 North NaMa 4}0-0200 • • • • • • I More Boulder City news TIntfMtoy, Marak 8. 1988 Hendei-ion Home Newi and Boulder City Newi Page SI Square Dance Festival this weekend Dancers from all over the southwest are expected to arrive here tomorrrow to participate in the 15th annual Hoover Dam Squarel Dance Festival. Three to four hundred perThe festival will include a *" appreciative audience, aona are expected to attend the traditional dance by the statues Events include workshops festivities which will be at Hoover Dam on Saturday Saturday afternoon and a mixcentered at the Garrett Junior morning at 9 a.m. This colorf ""^ ^ square and round dancHigh School. ful presentation always draws infif Saturday night. Dewitt Tracht considered a shining example ~-hy Teddy FentoB There is seldom a business man who can compare to the late Dewitt Tracht, who owned the Central Market on Arizona St. Clerks worked for him years on end. All ei\)oyed the long tenure of faithfuUy serving a man who was always smiling during the years he loved and managed the first store to serve Boulder City aa a fhiit market. The Manix Dept. store proceeded this Cenbtral market Fruit Store by only a few months. Somewhere in our files is the picture taken when DeWitt and Violet sold the store. But today, using the Art See "Boulder Builder" mention we list the dates. "Dewitt was bom in Ohio, came west with his mother when he was 12 years old, they joined his father who had bought stocks in the mines at Carrara, Nev., Dewitt finished his grade schooling there. He went on to Las Vegas and graduated from high school. There is so much history. Violet was born in Searchlight. Their marriage was blessed with two sons. Kenneth, a dentist in Las Vegas and Lawrence, an electronics engineer, who works for Boeing Airlines located in Seattle. There are several grandchildren. DeWitt started int he grocery business about 1936. His store in Las Vegas was sold to buy Central Market while it was located on Wyoming St. The Trachts built a home on G Street and moved into it in 1941. -^ In DeWitt's own words. They took the "big step" in 1947. For they built the present Central Market at that time. Because of his winning smile and the friendly atmoaphere it quickly became Uie (home owned family store) and remains that way to this day. Evui the tragic fire did not change the way it welcomes every single customer. In spite of a crowded schedule DeWitt was a volunteer who donated hours, days, weeks to the Charter Committee when Boulder City incorporated. Records show the hard work and planning began in 1947. Lasten then until Jan. 4, 1960 when we were freed from government rule. A proud Mason, he served in several lodges filling the chairs in every caae. He also belonged to the Rotary Club. Ha died in June 1979. Boulder City will not forget him. Xi Zeta attends Preferential Tea Obituaries Helen C. Coffin wamn Robert Bunting Helen C. Coffin, 91 died Wednesday, Feb. 24 in Boulder City. She had been a resident of the Nevada area since 1919 residing in Boulder City since 1932. She was bom in Providence, R.I. on Dec. 16, 1896 and was an owner and operator of a gift shop. Survivors include son Dim fielding. Boulder City; four grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Visitation began Thursday, Feb. 25 at 2 p.m. at Palm Mortuary in Henderson. Rosary was recited at 6 p.m. Thursday and Mass was said on Friday, Feb. 26 at 10 a.m. both at St. Andrew's CathoUc Church in Boulder City. Father Joe Annese of St. Andrew's Cathohc Church officiated. Interment was in the Boulder City Cemetery, Boulder City. Lola B. Dunlap Lola B. Dunlap, 80, passed away Feb. 29 in Boulder City. Resident of the community for 38 years, she was bom on July 30, 1907. — She was a long-time member of the Doea Drove 34 in Boulder City and was active in many Senior Center activities. Survivors include a daughter, Dorothy Cleveland; a granddaughter MeUssa Higginbotham; a grandson Buri Cleveland; also two great-grandsons; all of Ventura, Calif. Pahn Mortuary is in charge of arrangements. Viewing will be at Palm Chapel, Henderson, today from 2 to 9 p.m. Services will be at Palm Chapel, Henderson, Friday at 10 a.m. Burial will follow in Boulder City cemetery. In lieu of ftowers, the family requesta that donations may be made to the Boulder City Elks fund for new chairs in the lodge room. Warren Robert Bunting, 59 died Friday, Feb. 26 at Orem, Utah. He had been a resident of the Boulder City area since 1984. He was born in Hollywood, Calif, on July 16, 1928 and was the co-owner of a drive-in theater in Orem, Utah. He was a U.S. Army veteran. Survivors include wife LaRue Bunting, Orn, Utah; sons L. Don Bunting, Phoenix Ariz. Anthony Robert Bunting, Morro Bay, Calif.; daughters LuAnna Rae Anderson, Springville, Utah and Sandra Lee Bunting, San Luis Obispo, Calif; brothers Gordon P. Bunting, Morro Bay, Calif, and Roger C. Bunting, Monterrey, Calif.; 3 grandchildren. Funeral services were held Wednesday, March 1 at 1 p.m. in the Boulder City Cemetery. Officiating were the BPOE and VFW. Interment was in the Boulder City Cemetery, Boulder City. Robert C. Basinger Jr. Robert C. Basinger Jr., 49 died Friday, Feb. 26 in Las Vegas. He had been a resident of the Las Vegas area for the past 15 years. He was bora in Salem, Ohio on Feb. 2,1939 and was a dealer in gaming. He was a member of the AM Bowling, Showboat Super Score Trio and a former police officer at the Flamingo and Hilton. Survivors include wife Nancy and son Tom Basinger both Las Vegas; brother Tom and parents Robert and Ruth Basinger all Boulder City. Viewing began at 11 a.m. March 1 and funeral services were held March 2 at 2 p.m. in Palm Chapel with the Rev. Melvin Da Krul officiating. Interment was in Palm Memorial Park in Henderson. A salad supper was held at the home of Judy Vogel on Jan. 25. A delicious variety of salads were served to all members after a short business meeting. Pam Witt hosted our Valentine social at her home on Feb. 8. We exchanged rosie gifts and enjoyed a dessert of Plantation Pride cake. Plans were made for a spring social. A cocktail party was hosted at Suzie Wolfmger's home on Feb. 13 at 7 p.m. Following the party, we attended a 50*8 dance at St. Via tor's from 8 p.m. to midnight Awards were given for best cos tume and a fashion show was held Pizza and hot dogs were served Proceeds from the dance were donated to Marion House. Suzie Wolfmger hostad our next regular meeting at her home on Feb. 22. At a business meeting, we voted to donate $100 to Sheila Fava for her participation in the Special Olympics. A dessert of angel food cake topped with cherries and cool whip was served. A preferential tea was held at the Water and Power Building on Feb. 27 at 10 a.m. It was hosted by Lambda. A gourmet champagne breakfast was served. Egg dishes, potato and cheese, fruit salads and various breads and muffins were served along with champagne punch, fruit punch, coffee and tea. A silent auction was held with various home made items including decorated Easter eggs, baskets and home made sugar eggs containing Easter scenes. A raffle was also held. Among the winners were Nancy Noble who won a knitted sweater, Denise JohnsonWilliams who won a wall hanging and Jean Keeney who won a grape vine wreath. All chapters attended the tea. Our first meeting for March will be at the home of Gretchen Wilbora on March 14. WHEN A FELLA NEEDS A FRIEND-Thla poor Uttla five-month old male is urgently in need of lots and lota of TLC to make him feel secure once more. A mixed Pomeranian-Norfolk Terrier, he's only a tiny thing and won't get much bigger. He needs a family to adopt him, one who will give liim lots of loving, a faimly preferably without small children and where someone will be home most of the time to provide badly needed companionship and reassurance. In return, this young fella will give love and loyalty far beyond his miniscule size. For information on adopting this cutie, call theBC Animal Shelter at 293-9224. Art Guild Doings by Loraine Davenport Art Guild Publicist The featured artist for March is Karla Demiel. Karla was a fine arts major in college and worked in drawing, wood sculpture, acrylics and watercolor. She is an expreesionist-realiat artist. Her interest in art began in childhood. A reception for Karla will be at the Art Guild Gallery, 1495 Nevada Highway, Sunday, March 6 from noon to 4 p.m. For more details call 294-9982. The Art Guild board meeting is scheduled for Thursday, March 10 at 2:30 p.m. at the Gallery. The Lake Mead Marina Art Show is on for the weekend of March 19 and 20. Please be there to help set up by 8:30 a.m. on Saturday. The hours are from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days. The February membership meeting had a large turnout. Dottie had promised us a surprise guest for that evening. Fred Hudson is a landscape artist who paints in acrylics. He does beautiful work. Anyone interested in his classes should contact the Gallery. Hudson's demo painting was won by Evelyn Cushman. The Guild wishes to thank Hudson for his time and talent. Saturday, March 12 will be a work day at the Gallery to spmce up the landscape. We wiU begin at 9 a.m. Please be there in work cbthes and with lots of enthusiasm. Library News from the Boulder City Library Check out the magazines at the Boulder City Library. You can do just that with ovw 170 titles found in our library. Except for the most current isue, our magazinas can be checked out for two weeks. We have a good cross section of titles covering the many interests of Boulder City residents. In the current affairs area, our newer titles include World Press Review which excerpts nuiterial from the press outside the U.S., and UNESCO Courier whkh carries a variety of articles about cultures and events all around the world. Sputnik deals with life in tha USSR. Collectors can find valuaUe inf(-mation in the Antique Tradar, Qun WwU, Linn's Stamp News, and Old Car Price Ouide. (k the traveler then ia European TravdAUfe, This Australia, Transitions Abroad and Coasumer R^xais Travel Letter. We have several naw subacriptiona dealing with haalth and nutrition—Mi^v Clink: Health Letter, Nutrition Action Health Lett&r, and Vegetarian Thaea. For you electronic buffs there is Amateur Radio, Radio-Electronics and Video Review. Home^iriented magazines are numerous and include such titles aa Metropolitan Homes, Fine HomebuiUing, Home, Homeowtuf, and Workbench for the do-ityourselfers. For the hobbyists our newer magazines include Fineecale Modeler, Lapidary Journal, Rock & Gem, McCall'a Needlework & Crafts and an abundance of donated magazinee with patterns and ideas for crafts and needlework. AutomobUe enthusiasts and those kxtldng to buy new and used cars wiU be heklping by browsing through our collection of Consumer Guide books on cars. They are many good tips on what to kx)k for in the various makes and models of cars. Kdly Blue Books cover prices for new cars, used cars, okier used cars and RVs. An excellent aid for the beginner wanting to trace his heritage ia the Gmsalogical Heiper. Best's Review deals with insurance and comes in conjunction with Sast'sZoMinmaslJefMrte whkh can be found on our Reference Shelf. Two magazines are received each month-one deals with life and health insurance and the other with property and casualty insurance. And don't forget the children's magazines. We have aver a dozen titles for kids from preschool age and lip. Please come by the library and enjoy our relocate magazine section. We think the area ia quieter, Uj^ter and more conducive to your eryoyment of our many magazines and newspapers. You are welcome to read in our comfortable armchairs or checkout the magazines and take them home with you. ilHuir completes training Airman Sheldon A. Muir, son of William H. and Lavonne Muir of Boulder City has graduated from Air Force basic training at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas according to the Army and Air Force Hometown News Service. During the six weeks of training the airman studied the Air Force mission, organization and customs and received special training in human relations. In addition, airmen who complete baaic training earn credita toward an associate degree through the community college of the Air Force. Sheldon Muir He ia a 1987 graduate of Boulder City High School. Police caution residents on new robbery scam A aenioc resdent of the community waa the victim of a robbery icam laat weak after a man gained entrance to her home on the pretext of being • city employee. Once inaide, he misdirected iktt occupant's attention and pM off with the victim's 1 T >/ The man reportedly gained admission to the house by telliM the occupant he waa • city Mi^n'ii and that ht MMM WMk tha hww'a tlectrloal htmktt box dua to alaetHQll priMiiM to tha area. ,v This is the third time in recent months that con artiita have BucceasfuUy preyed on senior reaidenta here. In the prior two incidents, a man poaed aa a policeman in plain clothes and flashed an ap> parent phony badge to gain entrance to the homea. Once inaide, he relieved his victima of jewelry on the pretext of having to confiscate it as evidence in a caae. Polioe aay they have identiflad thia man and thaj^an ar tm^ la ponding. Attthorititi caution all residenta, but eapecially aeniora, to not admit anyone to their home without first viewing proper identification. All oi^ amployeaa carry luch identification. Moat emplojreea of private firms alao carry idantification, eapecially if thay are in contact with the public in private homea. Capt. Mike Murphy of the BC Police Department is one who ia concerned about the growing number of incidanta of thia type here. He caya he cannot atraoa too strongly that no reaidant should admit a stranger to their home without first identifying the person. He alao streaaea that residenta ahould call the police department if there ia any question u to a person's identity, whether or not this person profeasea to be a city employee. Sankn are often targeted for Beams such aa have been ptdled here in recent montha. Other well-known swindles include poaing aa a bank examiner and asking a senior to withdraw monay form the bank under a prataxt of attampting to catch an allegedly dishonest employee of the institution. Still another scam involvea a peraon who "finds" a large amount of caah and offers to aplit it with an intended victim. The acheme involvea many variations but alwaya includes having the victim put up a large amount of caah aa good faith. Needless to say, the victim never sees the cash again. Murphy aays he doean't wish to scare people into not trusting anyone on any occaaion, yet he is eager to expoaa the clever scams being applied hart. "These people are good at what they do," he saya. They attempt to gain a victim's truat and are glib in their pitch to the victim to gain truat." '?
PAGE 32

Page 32 Henderson Home News snd Boulder City News ThorMlay. March 3, 1968 "WHERE THERE'S A WILLDEN THERE'S A WAY!" MUCH INVENTORY BLOWOUT StPaStLB Value wagon discount package. Automatic, sunscreen glass, A/C. #8182. Retail $14,687. SAVE $2692 11.995 ^ f ....LOWEST PRICE EVER! 40 Caravans 20 Dynasties 35 Colts 28 Aries 22 Full Size 4x4'& 22 Dakotas 25 D-50 Rams 52 Full Size Pickups ALL READY FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY UP TO 84 MO. FINANCING AVAILARLE* Cars subject to prior sale PRIDE'S PROUD i .W USED CAR SPECIALS DODGE MAXI CONVERSIOtt VAN -cacec Must see '2298 M 2,895 '85 TOYOTA VAN LE WAGON passenger eyfy opuo" avaiiaiM w 2 sjn roo's i XX maker' #12398 M 0,095 WE BUY CARS & TRUCKS FOR CASH '76 FORD WAGON 55 000 0"g "-. Pe''ect tratie' towe'• 12387 ^2288 '82 DODGE ARIES WAGON Autc a" 12386 SI 995 '84 PLYMOUTH CONQUEST Loass'S' Must see' M>s' 3'h/e ,•12402 ^6995 '84 RENAULT ALLIANCE O'eat ta' • 5031 $3688 '87 DODGE D250 ROYAL LE P/U 360 er-g Loaaec On:/ 3700 f^i •5374 512,995 '85 DODGE W100 PICKUP Super truck! Super clean' #12407 57495 ''86 SUBARU GL WAGON Every conceivable option' #12395 57495 '83 TOYOTA CELICA GT '74 INTERNATl TRAVELALL 4X4 Air, 6-psngr Great shape' #12287 $2488 Loaded' White #12321 $6888 '86 VW GOLF 4 Ir air cass #12392 $6488 '87 PLYMOUTH SUNDANCE Auto FM stereo #5291 $ 8995 '84 DODGE VAN 15 PASSENGER Royal 350 Dual air FM stereo cruise lovi/ rni #5312 57995 TT '83 NISSAN SENTRA 3 DR. Hatchback, air. stereo #12289 $3288 '86 FORD AEROSTAR 5 sp air, immaculate' #12370 $8995 '82 BUiCK CENTURY Loaded' 2 door #12310 53995 '86 OLDS CUTLASS 9777 '81 FORD PICKUP 1-ton #12323 $4495 '86 CHEVY CAMARO A lean mean clean n'lachine! #12377 57995 '87 PLYMOUTH VOYAGER 7-passenger. ve. wire wheels #5257 M 2,688 '85 DODGE RAM 150 4 sp. air. am/(m. low mi #12191 $6988 '84 JEEP 4X4 Air. am/tm/cass #5028 $ '86 DODGE RAM D150 Lovi( mi Air #5137P S7995 '84 FORD XLT BRONCO II Air. am/fm/cass wh tilt, cruise #12346 57995 '83 DODGE 0150 PICKUP Nice truck! #12376 $3995 '84 FORD TEMPO 4 DR. Air. pwr steering Stereo + more' #12373 $4488 WE BUY CARS & TRUCKS FOR CASH OVER 25 FULL SIZE USED TRUCKS IN STOCK SERVICE DEPT. HRS. 7-6 Mon.-Fri 564-2177 BODY SHOP FREE ESTIMATES FREE SHUTTLE SERVICE TO LAS VEGAS & BOULDER CITY ^6ti^ "pni^ ^ ^ti*^' 'BuMiY'' pB*'; (' t^^!^^ ViH|^ GOOD ISt.^' O^ .^'^^oe norA fftrsr^sDw^ ^-Q null. i I Tkondaj. Marefa S. 1968 Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Page 3S WANT ADS Bring Buyers and Sellers together WANT AD RATES.. .RUNS TUES, THURS a FRI, HENDERSON, BOULDER CITY & GREEN VALLEY 3 lines 4 lines 5 lines 6 lines $4.00 wk .M.50iwk $4.90 Wk $5.35 Wk Our Ad Rates Are REASONABLE Call for details 293-2302 or 564-1881 GARAGE SALE GARAGE SALE-1518 SANDRA-Fn,-Sat, 8 30 to 1—No earlybirds—King waterbed, sheets, boys bike, water skis, fan, light fixtures, Weber gnll, king bed rails, tires, a/c, too much to mention BC — MOVING SALE — Sat 7 A.II.4 P.M. S02 RaM Mac* BC (Cloaa to Hwnmlngway Park) Have VCR, antiques, furniture, toys, clothes, truck mirrors, luggage, new GE Elec. stove & many more other Items. 4 FAtVllLY YD SALE: 853 Center St, Fri, Sat, iVIar 25 & 26, Go carts & parts, dune buggy, construction moisture barrier, Kenmore elec, dryer, exc, condition IVIetal storage cabinets, 8' truck rack. Clothing, household items. Too much to list! Call early about large items. Day, Charlene -564-6776. Eves Besty 565-9633. GARAGE SALE; Sat. 3/5 8 til ? Antiques & collectibles, Ghost Town Bottles, Old paper items, dueling pistols, 12 Guage Shotgun, Antique chairs, insulators, wood Hichair. Oak cradle, car seat, stereo, clothes. Lots of misc. 207 Valley Forge, Hend. Ph 564-3240. Toshiba color TV, Kenmore Solid State microware cart, Barca-lounger, rocker/ recliner, chest of drawers, dbl dresser. Glass top coffee & end tables, 4 ladder back Maple chairs. Maple end table, Craftsman rear bag mower, Torogasweedeater, JVC turntable, Sony stereo/cassette receiver, 2 large speakers, four and five string banjos.: Bentwood Rocker Maple Rocker. Ph 564-0630. YARD SALE Sat. only. 8 'AM-2 PM. 3 wheel bike w/elec. motor, chest freezer,pool filter, sail boat, lots of misc. 721 Arizona BC. PATIO SALE BCTrailerPark Sp. 59 Yucca entrance. Fri & Sat 8 AM til. GIGANTIC YARD SALE TO BENEFIT ARTHRITIS FOUNDATION. Clothes (non over 50 cents) furniture, lamps, baby items, microwave oven, heater, stereos, shoes, blankets, curtains, and much more. BC Care Center 601 Adams Blvd. Sat. only. 3/5 from 9-? All proceeds go to the Arthritis Foundation. YARD SALE Lots of furniture, 634 Arrayo BC Sat 3/5 8 AM. PATIO SALES in the Eldorado Park 700 Elm St. Fri & Sat. 3/4 3/5 from 8 AM-3 PM. BC. GARAGE SALE Camper, girl's clothes, Tupperware, and misc. Fri 9-3 1400 Highland Dr. BC. YARD SALE: Mule PalleT gun cabinet, fishing gear, dolls, TV stand, misc. electrical, clothes. Lots of misc. 564-3388 or 564-6583. 256 Navajo Dr. Hdn Fri & Sat. tvlar 4th & 5th, 8 to 3. GARAGE SALE: Sat & Sun., 124 Alemdio Lane, (Wigwam & Eastern—Pheasant Run Development.) Misc items, Dbl bed w/brass headboard, sewing machine. 9 am til 5 pm. YARD SALE: Electric dryer, lots of misc. 1845 Ward Dr. Fri & Sat. 564-1398. 3 family yd sale: Sunday Mar 6,9 am til ?? Stereo, clothing, kitchen items, etc. 200 W Sherwood Dr, 1 block west of Pacific. NEW HORIZONS/LAKE MEAD BRANCH SCHOOL in Boulder City seeking unwanted items for yard sale Apr. 1, 22, 23. All donations are tax deductible. For pickup please call 294-2436 or 293-5940. BC. YARD SALE: Mar 5 Another good one! Silver items, and much more. Wheelchair, washer/dryer, 238 Shoshone.. (Trailer Estates) GARAGE SALE: Sat, Sun. til noon Baby furniture. Apply computer. Trash trailer, misc. 326 Kansas 565-0445. 10 FAMILY YARD SLE Fri and Sat. 3/4 and 3/5. 8 AM 629 Northndge BC. MOVING SALE-Furnrture, tools, lawnmower, lawn furnrture-564-4204. YARD SALE Sat. Sun 9 to?. 604 KendricK. BC. RUMMAGE AND HOME BAKED SALE Sat. Mar. 5, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. WOMENS CLUB HOUSE 7th and Utah Sts. B.C. Empress Eugenie, the daughter of a Spanish noble, was a major influence on her husband. Napoleon III, and was three times regent in his absence. After his downfall, she escaped to England. VEHICLES 85 Ford Temport, low mileage, full warranty. $4,900 Negotiable. 565-7812. For sale: 1975 Buick. 255 Electra. Fully equipped. Good condition. 1979 Cadillac, exc condition, fully equipped. Ph 564-6801. 1963 Thunderbird. Exc. condition. PS, PB, electric windows, etc. Ph 564-6801. 1986 PACE ARROW Model 34L Showroom cond. Loaded w/luxury options. Only 8,500 miles. Sharp matching 1987 Ford Ranger 4X4 tow vehicles. Also avail. 294-3850 BC. 1976 Plymouth Duster, 62,000 mi. Air, PS, automatic. $1,900 or best. Exc shape. 293-5332. 83 Mercury Marquis. Loaded. 4 dr, new battery, 1ires, exhaust. 53,000 mi. $4,000. Ph 564-2638. 86 Camaro, red w/red interior, V8, $9,000.565-1118. PAINniMG— BODYWORK Reafionable rates. Free pick up and delivery. 12 yrs exp. Ask for Mark 293-7878 BC. CASH We will pay caah for your car, truck or motorhome. 868-S980 IMnW AUTO SALES 1620 N' BouMer Hwy Henderson, Nev Emmisslon Control Smog Test,. 7 days wk Mechanica on duty 7 days wk VERN'S HENDERSON TEXACO 3 E. Lak* Mtad (M Water) 565^220 1974 DATSUN PICKUP roll bar. KC lights. Am Fm tape Pioneer speakers. Big tires. Excel cond. Call 293-7416. BC. 75 TOYOTA LANDCRUISER 400 CU Chevy 4 sp, 2 fuel tanks, roll bar, p.s. $4,000 or best offer. Call 293-7709 BC. 1982 MUSTANG Hatchack GLX Runs great Good cond Auto, cruise, A/C. AM/FM Cassette $3,995. 564-1644 after 4 PM. BC. '82 DODGE RAM 50 pickup, Exc. cond. Very reliable trans, A/C, new tires, new paint $3,000. See at 1145 Wyoming. 293-0052 BC. MOST FAITHFUL 1984 VW Rabbit Great mileage Must se Day 294-1766 eventnos and/Of msg. 293-0528 BC. RADIATOR-SALES AND REPAIR 293-7278 Big John & Sons Foothill Dr. BC. FOR SALE 5th WHEEL 34' Eidorado 1978 beige/ brown Very nice. Call 565-2645. 71 Dodge Charger body, good shape Radiator, drive shaft. $300 or best offer. Ph 565-1828. 1979 Fiat Strade. 5 sp, under 21,000 mi. Runs dandy $800 Ph 564-3056 81 Crown Victoria, like new, 52,000 mi. White, loaded, $3,400. Ph 564-9276. 1979 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme 2 dr, automatic, air, PS, $1,400. Ph 293-6497 or 294-1473 after 5:30 pm. FOR SALE 1977 Chevy Caprice, fully loaded, 73,000 niiles. Good cond $1,750 neg. Call 564-1881 ask for Sandra or 565-1480. 1978 SEARAY 18' EZ load trailer, stereo. Excel, cond 294-2693. BC 1986 Yamaha Vurago 700 less than 1,700 miles, excellant condtion. Burgundy color. $2,500 phone 5644170 after 6 p.m. or leave m essage in recorder. 1976 FORD VAN ECONOLINE. Excel, cond. $2.000 293-5784. BC 1978 Datsun, rebuilt eng, custom wheels, $950. Ph 564-3965 eves, weekends 77 F150 Truck 6cyl, 4 sp. Asking $1,700. Call between 6 am & 9 pm. 565-7998. ,NEED A CAR? New in town? Old in town? No Oedit? Short time on the job? Only $100, $200, $300.or$)0downmeed an • ntomobile tJk get around? Contact u^ We ipprove our own contracts. Instant delivery. We wQl pick you .up,& bring you to our car lot. Just telmbone 564-6809, NEVADA AUTO SALES, 1813 N. Bldr. Hwy., Henderson, Nev. One block south of Sunset Blvd. & Bldr. Hwy. For sale: 77 LTD Ford. 4 brand new tires, Runs good Asking $500. Ph. 564-0908. 85 LANCE CABOVER CAMPER 8'3 ". Queen bed, like new. Loaded. $4,500. 293-6908. BC CHEVY TRUCK SILVERADO 1977. Excel, cond. Treated with TLC since new. 350 CU in. engine. $3,500. 293-3095. BC 1970 Maverick, 6 cyl. automatic, AC, radio, good transportation car. $600. Ph. 565-0044 after 6 p.m. All day weekends. MOTOR HOME 78 Allegro, 23' Low mileage, super clean, fully loaded. $10,500. See at 216 W Foster. Ph 564-0147. EMMiSSION CONTROL CHECK STATION. 29S-7278. Big John and Sena. FootMU Dr. BC. BOAT 20' Starlire 78 New canvas and int. Excel, cond. $6,000 293-1870 or 294-7703. BC TRUCKSTRUCKS-TRUCKS Large selection to choose from—'/2 ton, '/< ton, 3'/i ton, 4X4'B & vans. We buy sell trade cars, trucks, vans, campers & motorhomes. EMPIRE AUTO SALES,1620 N Boulder Hwy, Hdn. Ph 565-S950 USED AUTO PARTS 299-7278. Let aa do ths calliBS on oar New SatelUto oooipater aO states sad Cuwda. BIG JOHN a SONS, Foothill Dr. BC. Buick LeSabre, cellent condition 564-5888. '70. Ex$885. Ph 81 CHEVEHE Diesel, 5 speed, 4 dr hatchback, air. am/fm. custom interior, 2 tone exterior. Excel cond. S2100. 363-1557. 1976 GMC MOTOR HOME mint cond. Trade or $3,500 and take over payments. 293-7579 eves BC. 81 CHEVY CITATION. Clean Good mileage, $2,750. Ph 293-1372 BC 87 Ford FI-50 Takeover lease pymts. $299.07 mo. Must qualify. Call 4351293 79 DATSUN B210, 2 dr, 4 sp. new brakes, paint. Ideal for teenager or work Good mijg^ 29 33695. B.C. 7 lines $5.80 wk 8 lines $6.25 wk 9 lines $6.70 wk 10 lines $7.15 wk up to 3 lines (23 character* per line) 45^ each additional line DtfADUNE FOR WANT ADS...4 P.M. TUES. FOR THURS. ISSUE SAIL AWAY FOR -ONLY $1,200 17', sail boat, sleeps 2 in cabin Trailer & motor 293-7454 BC, 73 Toyota Celica. Sell for parts 564-7805 1983 Pontoon houseboat, 36', 70 HP Evinrude Sleeps 6 Moored at LVBH Call after 4 pm, 564-702 7, 68 Mustang for sale: Ph 565-0138 eves, 1980 Pontiac LeMans, 4 dr. AC, PS, PB $2000 or best offer, Ph 565-5333 Deck Entrance for Mobile Home complete with steps and railing. Dim: 4' X 4'/2' $75 293-0371 BC 84 PONTIAC FIREBIRD all extras. $6300 47,000 miles Perfect cond, 293-1473 after 6, all day weekends. BC 1986 MAZDA SE5 Cab plus. 5 sp, shell, liner, a'c, AM/FM, more. 13,000 miles $8450 294-1801 BC Acura Legend. 1987, 4 dr, V-6 Luxury model Full power. Automatic. Sunroof, Extra Warranty $19,500. Ph 565-4076 1984 KAWASAKI 550 LTD $1,000 13.000 miles. Call 294-1584 after 6 or 293-6377 during days, BC. 1977 DODGE VAN, nice family car. $2500. Call 294-1584 after 6 or 293-6377 during days. B C 1975 MONTE CARLO good cond $950. 293-1473, B.C. 149 Aluminum Bass Boat w/heavy duty trailer. 9 HP Mercury motor, trolling motor, new battery, fish finder. $1400 invested. Will cohsider trade for economy car of equal value. Call 294-3834 BC MUST SELL 1985 Audi 4000 GT Coupe Sun roof, 5 sp. 30,000 miles. Call 294-3834 BC Our Ad Rates Are REASONABLE Call For Details A-1\ Truck & Equipment Repair % Ton & bigger & Motdr Homea 1105 Industrial Rd. BC Accross from.RV Park StfUtttteUon tiihrmtlt^d 293-7^5 LOST AND FOUND REWARD: Lost or. stolen: Mobile telephone from Backhoe on Chestnut St. Walkie-Talkie type. Ph 565-0216. Lost: Liver, Brown & White Springer Spaniel Pup. Still has tail. Call Dave Lumley 565-4756 or 565-8987, Vic. Holick Ave. Lost: Feb 24, small, white longhaired male dog. Seen on Tungsten St Wed afternoon. If found please call 564-0890 Lost: Small female Pekepoo. W/black & dark brown shaggy hair. Missing from Cholla & Money St area. Ph 565-7158. REWARD. Female Akita, 11-yrs-old, black/silver gray. Last seen 2/20, Henderson, Center & Burkholder. Has had hysterectomy. We miss our "Jade." Please call 5647785 Reward! Please mail all cash or check donations to Betty Honn's Animal Adoption, P.O. Box C, Henderson, Nv 89015. AKC Registered Cocker Spaniel puppies. Only $250 ea. Born on Valentine's Day 6 males and 4 females. $50 deposit required. Cal 56 5-0930 Leave message. Female Siamese Manx Kittens. 5-mos-old $75. Ph 565-1118. Escape to the Jungle. Joiii the biggest little Safari in the desert. See Lions, tigers, bears, wolves, cougars, monkeys & men. Guided tonrs daily. CaU 361-2484. The Cat's Meow—Give a^ home to a beautiful cat or kittens. Over 75 to choose from. Long & short hair, multitude of colors 361-2484. MAY'! HELP YOU GET YOUR DOG OR CAT SPAYED OR NEUTERED FOR A GRACIOUS DISCOUNT? 283 ^3. BC. Anytime. Homeless animals, Betty Honn's Animal Adoption, Now acoeptiag all species of animals for adoption. By app't only, wayed, nenterad not required for scception for adoption. Call 361-2484. Tax time—Put unwanted items to work, helping animals. Tax write off for 1987. Betty Honn's Animal Adoption IS in desparate need of vehicles, horse trailers, fencing & bidg materials of all kinds. 361-2484 Free to good home: Black male Retriever. 3 mos old. Has shots up to date. Ph 565-5102 For adoption: Dobies, Airedale, Boxer, Lots of pups, fviost mixed breed dogs, $6 ea. Ph 361-2484 FEMALE AIRDALE 2 yrs. Papers. $100 to good home. After 5 p.m. 293-7124 BC FREE KITTENS AND PUPPIES NEED GOOD HOME. Call 2SMSn anytJBM. AKC Registered Bnttany Spaniel Puppies. For Sale. 565-6685. Bett Honn's Animal adoption accepting unwanted pets of all kinds. By app't only, homes are found. 361 -2484. Desparately needed—Older 3/4 or 1 ton pickup or flat bed truck, util trailer, horse trailer. Must be reasonable, Or can be donated to Betty Honn's Animal Adoption 1988 Charitable Tax Deduction. 361-2484. Donate unwanted Cyclone fencing. Gate, pipe, any amount or size. Betty Honn's Animal Adoption. 1988 Tax deductible. 361-2484. Wanted: Large parrott. Macaw, etc. Must be reasonable or can be donated to Betty Honn's Animal Adoption. 1988 Tax Deductible for today's fair market value. For complete info, Ph 361-2484. PETS W ME Lorreine'M Pel Sitting Service, Loving care while you're away I'll care for your pels in their familiar home surroundings while you vacation or work. Bonded. Call Lorraine McLean 293-3431 Locally eupported. BC SPAY OR NBJTER YOUR PET FOR HALF PRICE SHOTS 25% OFF CALL VALLEY SAVE A PET 384-6049 (Ruby) or 642-8543 I PRIVATE DUTY NURSE needs position Exc. cook Good at all phases of diets Flexible hours. Reasonable. 293-4247 AM 871-1410 P M Ask for Kay. LDS Woman will babysit 1 child who is potti-trained but not yet in school. Loving home, fenced yd. Call Karren, 564-6302 There la juat ONE question you should ssk before you select your airline achool: "Can your school DOCUMENT Ita placement with AIRLINES?" WE CANI OVER 95% (7,352 or our 7,742 placementa) era with AIRLINESI In 1987 we placed 1,700 graduates with EVERY major airline as well as with International, regional and commuter eirllnea Discover why the airlines respect our excellent 12-waek treining and call us firsti Attend free 2-hour seminar! MONDAY — MARCH 7 ALIXiS PARK mSORT HOTIL S7. HARMON AVI. LAt VIOAS, NV lOiOO A.M., 2i00 OR 7i00 P.M. Where Airline Careers Beginl INTERNATIONAL AIR ACADEMY VANCOUVER SI LOUIS ONTARIO COLUMBIA WASHINGTON MISSOURI CALIFORNIA MARYLANO PARTTIME SALES OPPORTUNITY for Henderson or Boulder City resident to sell Television advertising in these communities. Have you had any experience selling yourself or a product? KLAS-TV is looking for an individual with a desire to t)ecome a professional. To be truly successful a sales person must stand for things like hard work, dedication, honesty, integrity, dependability, creativity & loyalty. Commission sales. We will train the right individual. Please mail a one page essay on why you think you may be that individual to KLAS-TV, Personnel Dept P.O. Box 15047, Las Vegas, NV 89114. Interviews will be scheduled at the sole discretion of KLAS-TV. EOE/MF OWN YOUR OWN AP^ PAREL OR SHOE STORE, CHOOSE FROM: JEAN/ SPORTSWEAR, LADIE'S APPAREL, MEN'S, CHILDREN/MATERNITY, LARGE SIZES, PETITE, DANCEWEAR/AEROBIC, BRIDAL, LINGERIE OR ACCESSORIES STORE. ADD COLOR ANALYSIS. BRANDS: LIZ CLAIBORNE, GASOLINE, HEALTHTEX, LEVI, LEE, CAMP BEVERLY HILLS, ST. MICHELE, CHAUS, OUTBACK RED, GENESIS, FORENZA, ORGANICALLY GROWN, OVER 2,000 OTHERS. OR $13,99 dNE PRICE DESIGNER, MULTI TIER PRICING DISCOUNT OR FAMILY SHOE STORE. RETAIL PRICES UNBELIEVABLE FOR QUALITY SHOES NORMALLY PRICED FROM $19 TO $60. OVER 250 BRANDS 2,600 STYLES, $17,900 TO $29,900: INVENTORY, TRAINING, FIXTURES, GRAND OPENING, AIRFARE, ETC. CAN OPEN 15 DAYS. MR. SIDNEY (612) 888-6389. Venture Capital & Business 'loans. Ph 734-8508. HOUSESITTING-With summer coming do you need weekend housesitting? Call 293-d912 after 5 BC, Babysitting—my home. 24 hrs. 7 days wk. Two mothers will care for your child, any age. Hot meals. 564-8358. Will babysit, my home, Robert Taylor area. Ph 565-2635. Babysitting in my home, days. Mother of 2. Located off Sunset Avfi Ph ^R4-7.S.?fl Mature nurses aide/Com panion. Local references. 457-5935 46 yr old lady w/good references will cook, clean, give care & companionship to elderly lady or gentlemen. Ph 564-50.47 HOUSECLEANING-I do hottsedeanlng. I am reliable and dependable with references. C^M NANCY at 56441103. Hend. Area. MAGICAL MAlois Quality work at reasonable prices. 293-1917 BC. QUALITY CLEANING Experienced-Dependable Reasonable 565-4892 RMfLE KLEMIERS Quality MousecleanIng at reasonable rates. 'Rentals too* L CaN S3-T4T m 9-741 Phone sales: Immediate part time openings available. W/nationwide company. Short PM shift. Sat. AM shift makes this ideal for students & homemakers. No exp. necessary, as we train. EARN AS YOU LEARN. Guarantee $4. hr. Also advancement opportunities. Call after 3, 451-4426. Equal Opportunity Employer If you're interested in a rewarding, exciting career in Real Estate, Call Paul Gargis, Gargis Realty 564-6969 Pet Shop, Illness forces sale. Make offer. 458-1704 Partnerships & Corporation f ormed. Ph 734-8508. $15 to $25 anhr. Full time, part time. Work your own hours-be your own Ixss. Call after 12 rwon, 565-2609 IN8TA-CLEAN MAID/ JANITORIAL SERVICE Professional cleaning service for reskJentieil and commercial All phases of general cleaning covered including carpet cleaning, wall/ ceilings washed. Acoustical tiles cleaned. 293-3916 Home Laundry & Hoosecleuiiiig Service —Lowest Rttee^ edi 564-3927 Housedeaning, we dean it all! Ovens, windows, floors, wate. Guaranteed "Motherin-law" Cl ean. Call Judy 564-7163 I WILL BABYSIT IN MY HOME Call 293-5462 BC If you're looking for TLC, I will watch your chiWren anytime. All meals ink;uded. Reliat)le references, reasonatile rMes. Call 293-5848. Will do residential or commercial cleaning "Call Debbie, 5650866 • HOUSEWORK • IRONING Reasonable rates Call Carol 293-7715 • J^;s-r*i:fir-f "Soul Travel is a personal way to see heaven here and now. Once we see it, then we arrange our lives to taetter advantage both now and in eternity." SRI Harold Klemp, The Book of Wisdom, P. 10 For Further information on ECKANKAH write to P.O. Box 2654 or Ph: 565-9365 for a recorded message. MISCELLANEOUS COUMPUTER IBM PC Jr. upgraded. .256K Wireless keyboard, parallel and serial port Color monitor. Extensive software, games, word processing, files, accounting, etc. $450 Call 293-6079 BC 17V2' General Elec. Refrigerator, frost free, ice maker, dbl door. Brown swivel rocker, new full sized bed w/hard mattress & headboard, 3 hanging chain lamps, 565-8605. 19" Color TV. Remote control $50 or 7> Ph 565-6858. Many thanks for favors received due to intercession of St. Jude, Saint of the impossible. CLA. FREE: Doutjie wide wooden garage door. (2 car) Call • 564-3029, For sale: Sony Color projections TV. Model KP-5020. $400. Call 451-3666. 5 Ton Swamp Cooler, $100 6 you remove it, 500 Burton St. Hdn. before noon. Gaffer & Sattler 36" Gas Range, 4 burner. Center Gnll $100. Ph 565-8567. Sears Gold Fngidaire/ref, runs good. Pretty good cond. $100. Ph 565-9379 to see. ^_ Baby crib, $25. Swing, $15. Rocking carrier, $10. Johnny Jump Up, $10. Snuggly earner, $15. Infant headrest. $5, Boys bike, $20. Ph 565-3671. For sale: 5 pc Eariy American dinette set, China cabinet w/hutch. Maple finish. Ph 565-5503. FURNITURE FOR SALE Refrig, dinette set, liv rm, Bdrm set, queen tjeds, nite stands, end table, divider table, coffee table, recliner, girls 26" bike. 564-2371. Gardening equipment, everything you neied, for lawn care & gardening. Make offer. Ask for Maxine, 565-8614. WANTED-DUPLICATE BRIDGE PARTNER Wednesdays 7:30 at Senior Center. Call 293-1405 before 12, 1 to 5 & after 9. BC. FOR SALE 4 bar stools. Adjustable $10 ea, 293-4816. BC^ Paying $20 men's $10 women's class nngs. Any condition. Paying $4.25 oz. scrap sterling Will pickup. 293-1847 BC. GET BIG MONEY for your idle gold & silver We buy class rings, wedding bands, silver & gold coins, diamonds, pocket watches, sterling silver, old eyeglass frames & dental gold. fflEE evakjation while you wait. Irv slant cash if you decide to sell. Open Mon-Fn 9-4. Anthony's Coins & Gifts, 525 • Hotel Plaza. Stop in our call 2931847 BC FURNITURE ETC: Oak entertaiment center $200. Lg. steamship trunk (60 yrs old) $50 Sofa (green/white) $100. Living rm chairs (2, yellow) $75.1iving rm tables (2 pecan) SSO. lad ski boots, 8V% $10 sewing machtnef cab. $25. Ph. 564-4144. • i; ^-^v ^ • • j^T^---. ^-yr'^ Trrf ,• • —arm iiBwi^m'j--'• • ^

PAGE 33

Page 32 Henderson Home News snd Boulder City News ThorMlay. March 3, 1968 "WHERE THERE'S A WILLDEN THERE'S A WAY!" MUCH INVENTORY BLOWOUT StPaStLB Value wagon discount package. Automatic, sunscreen glass, A/C. #8182. Retail $14,687. SAVE $2692 11.995 ^ f ....LOWEST PRICE EVER! 40 Caravans 20 Dynasties 35 Colts 28 Aries 22 Full Size 4x4'& 22 Dakotas 25 D-50 Rams 52 Full Size Pickups ALL READY FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY UP TO 84 MO. FINANCING AVAILARLE* Cars subject to prior sale PRIDE'S PROUD i .W USED CAR SPECIALS DODGE MAXI CONVERSIOtt VAN -cacec Must see '2298 M 2,895 '85 TOYOTA VAN LE WAGON passenger eyfy opuo" avaiiaiM w 2 sjn roo's i XX maker' #12398 M 0,095 WE BUY CARS & TRUCKS FOR CASH '76 FORD WAGON 55 000 0"g "-. Pe''ect tratie' towe'• 12387 ^2288 '82 DODGE ARIES WAGON Autc a" 12386 SI 995 '84 PLYMOUTH CONQUEST Loass'S' Must see' M>s' 3'h/e ,•12402 ^6995 '84 RENAULT ALLIANCE O'eat ta' • 5031 $3688 '87 DODGE D250 ROYAL LE P/U 360 er-g Loaaec On:/ 3700 f^i •5374 512,995 '85 DODGE W100 PICKUP Super truck! Super clean' #12407 57495 ''86 SUBARU GL WAGON Every conceivable option' #12395 57495 '83 TOYOTA CELICA GT '74 INTERNATl TRAVELALL 4X4 Air, 6-psngr Great shape' #12287 $2488 Loaded' White #12321 $6888 '86 VW GOLF 4 Ir air cass #12392 $6488 '87 PLYMOUTH SUNDANCE Auto FM stereo #5291 $ 8995 '84 DODGE VAN 15 PASSENGER Royal 350 Dual air FM stereo cruise lovi/ rni #5312 57995 TT '83 NISSAN SENTRA 3 DR. Hatchback, air. stereo #12289 $3288 '86 FORD AEROSTAR 5 sp air, immaculate' #12370 $8995 '82 BUiCK CENTURY Loaded' 2 door #12310 53995 '86 OLDS CUTLASS 9777 '81 FORD PICKUP 1-ton #12323 $4495 '86 CHEVY CAMARO A lean mean clean n'lachine! #12377 57995 '87 PLYMOUTH VOYAGER 7-passenger. ve. wire wheels #5257 M 2,688 '85 DODGE RAM 150 4 sp. air. am/(m. low mi #12191 $6988 '84 JEEP 4X4 Air. am/tm/cass #5028 $ '86 DODGE RAM D150 Lovi( mi Air #5137P S7995 '84 FORD XLT BRONCO II Air. am/fm/cass wh tilt, cruise #12346 57995 '83 DODGE 0150 PICKUP Nice truck! #12376 $3995 '84 FORD TEMPO 4 DR. Air. pwr steering Stereo + more' #12373 $4488 WE BUY CARS & TRUCKS FOR CASH OVER 25 FULL SIZE USED TRUCKS IN STOCK SERVICE DEPT. HRS. 7-6 Mon.-Fri 564-2177 BODY SHOP FREE ESTIMATES FREE SHUTTLE SERVICE TO LAS VEGAS & BOULDER CITY ^6ti^ "pni^ ^ ^ti*^' 'BuMiY'' pB*'; (' t^^!^^ ViH|^ GOOD ISt.^' O^ .^'^^oe norA fftrsr^sDw^ ^-Q null. i I Tkondaj. Marefa S. 1968 Henderson Home News and Boulder City News Page 3S WANT ADS Bring Buyers and Sellers together WANT AD RATES.. .RUNS TUES, THURS a FRI, HENDERSON, BOULDER CITY & GREEN VALLEY 3 lines 4 lines 5 lines 6 lines $4.00 wk .M.50iwk $4.90 Wk $5.35 Wk Our Ad Rates Are REASONABLE Call for details 293-2302 or 564-1881 GARAGE SALE GARAGE SALE-1518 SANDRA-Fn,-Sat, 8 30 to 1—No earlybirds—King waterbed, sheets, boys bike, water skis, fan, light fixtures, Weber gnll, king bed rails, tires, a/c, too much to mention BC — MOVING SALE — Sat 7 A.II.4 P.M. S02 RaM Mac* BC (Cloaa to Hwnmlngway Park) Have VCR, antiques, furniture, toys, clothes, truck mirrors, luggage, new GE Elec. stove & many more other Items. 4 FAtVllLY YD SALE: 853 Center St, Fri, Sat, iVIar 25 & 26, Go carts & parts, dune buggy, construction moisture barrier, Kenmore elec, dryer, exc, condition IVIetal storage cabinets, 8' truck rack. Clothing, household items. Too much to list! Call early about large items. Day, Charlene -564-6776. Eves Besty 565-9633. GARAGE SALE; Sat. 3/5 8 til ? Antiques & collectibles, Ghost Town Bottles, Old paper items, dueling pistols, 12 Guage Shotgun, Antique chairs, insulators, wood Hichair. Oak cradle, car seat, stereo, clothes. Lots of misc. 207 Valley Forge, Hend. Ph 564-3240. Toshiba color TV, Kenmore Solid State microware cart, Barca-lounger, rocker/ recliner, chest of drawers, dbl dresser. Glass top coffee & end tables, 4 ladder back Maple chairs. Maple end table, Craftsman rear bag mower, Torogasweedeater, JVC turntable, Sony stereo/cassette receiver, 2 large speakers, four and five string banjos.: Bentwood Rocker Maple Rocker. Ph 564-0630. YARD SALE Sat. only. 8 'AM-2 PM. 3 wheel bike w/elec. motor, chest freezer,pool filter, sail boat, lots of misc. 721 Arizona BC. PATIO SALE BCTrailerPark Sp. 59 Yucca entrance. Fri & Sat 8 AM til. GIGANTIC YARD SALE TO BENEFIT ARTHRITIS FOUNDATION. Clothes (non over 50 cents) furniture, lamps, baby items, microwave oven, heater, stereos, shoes, blankets, curtains, and much more. BC Care Center 601 Adams Blvd. Sat. only. 3/5 from 9-? All proceeds go to the Arthritis Foundation. YARD SALE Lots of furniture, 634 Arrayo BC Sat 3/5 8 AM. PATIO SALES in the Eldorado Park 700 Elm St. Fri & Sat. 3/4 3/5 from 8 AM-3 PM. BC. GARAGE SALE Camper, girl's clothes, Tupperware, and misc. Fri 9-3 1400 Highland Dr. BC. YARD SALE: Mule PalleT gun cabinet, fishing gear, dolls, TV stand, misc. electrical, clothes. Lots of misc. 564-3388 or 564-6583. 256 Navajo Dr. Hdn Fri & Sat. tvlar 4th & 5th, 8 to 3. GARAGE SALE: Sat & Sun., 124 Alemdio Lane, (Wigwam & Eastern—Pheasant Run Development.) Misc items, Dbl bed w/brass headboard, sewing machine. 9 am til 5 pm. YARD SALE: Electric dryer, lots of misc. 1845 Ward Dr. Fri & Sat. 564-1398. 3 family yd sale: Sunday Mar 6,9 am til ?? Stereo, clothing, kitchen items, etc. 200 W Sherwood Dr, 1 block west of Pacific. NEW HORIZONS/LAKE MEAD BRANCH SCHOOL in Boulder City seeking unwanted items for yard sale Apr. 1, 22, 23. All donations are tax deductible. For pickup please call 294-2436 or 293-5940. BC. YARD SALE: Mar 5 Another good one! Silver items, and much more. Wheelchair, washer/dryer, 238 Shoshone.. (Trailer Estates) GARAGE SALE: Sat, Sun. til noon Baby furniture. Apply computer. Trash trailer, misc. 326 Kansas 565-0445. 10 FAMILY YARD SLE Fri and Sat. 3/4 and 3/5. 8 AM 629 Northndge BC. MOVING SALE-Furnrture, tools, lawnmower, lawn furnrture-564-4204. YARD SALE Sat. Sun 9 to?. 604 KendricK. BC. RUMMAGE AND HOME BAKED SALE Sat. Mar. 5, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. WOMENS CLUB HOUSE 7th and Utah Sts. B.C. Empress Eugenie, the daughter of a Spanish noble, was a major influence on her husband. Napoleon III, and was three times regent in his absence. After his downfall, she escaped to England. VEHICLES 85 Ford Temport, low mileage, full warranty. $4,900 Negotiable. 565-7812. For sale: 1975 Buick. 255 Electra. Fully equipped. Good condition. 1979 Cadillac, exc condition, fully equipped. Ph 564-6801. 1963 Thunderbird. Exc. condition. PS, PB, electric windows, etc. Ph 564-6801. 1986 PACE ARROW Model 34L Showroom cond. Loaded w/luxury options. Only 8,500 miles. Sharp matching 1987 Ford Ranger 4X4 tow vehicles. Also avail. 294-3850 BC. 1976 Plymouth Duster, 62,000 mi. Air, PS, automatic. $1,900 or best. Exc shape. 293-5332. 83 Mercury Marquis. Loaded. 4 dr, new battery, 1ires, exhaust. 53,000 mi. $4,000. Ph 564-2638. 86 Camaro, red w/red interior, V8, $9,000.565-1118. PAINniMG— BODYWORK Reafionable rates. Free pick up and delivery. 12 yrs exp. Ask for Mark 293-7878 BC. CASH We will pay caah for your car, truck or motorhome. 868-S980 IMnW AUTO SALES 1620 N' BouMer Hwy Henderson, Nev Emmisslon Control Smog Test,. 7 days wk Mechanica on duty 7 days wk VERN'S HENDERSON TEXACO 3 E. Lak* Mtad (M Water) 565^220 1974 DATSUN PICKUP roll bar. KC lights. Am Fm tape Pioneer speakers. Big tires. Excel cond. Call 293-7416. BC. 75 TOYOTA LANDCRUISER 400 CU Chevy 4 sp, 2 fuel tanks, roll bar, p.s. $4,000 or best offer. Call 293-7709 BC. 1982 MUSTANG Hatchack GLX Runs great Good cond Auto, cruise, A/C. AM/FM Cassette $3,995. 564-1644 after 4 PM. BC. '82 DODGE RAM 50 pickup, Exc. cond. Very reliable trans, A/C, new tires, new paint $3,000. See at 1145 Wyoming. 293-0052 BC. MOST FAITHFUL 1984 VW Rabbit Great mileage Must se Day 294-1766 eventnos and/Of msg. 293-0528 BC. RADIATOR-SALES AND REPAIR 293-7278 Big John & Sons Foothill Dr. BC. FOR SALE 5th WHEEL 34' Eidorado 1978 beige/ brown Very nice. Call 565-2645. 71 Dodge Charger body, good shape Radiator, drive shaft. $300 or best offer. Ph 565-1828. 1979 Fiat Strade. 5 sp, under 21,000 mi. Runs dandy $800 Ph 564-3056 81 Crown Victoria, like new, 52,000 mi. White, loaded, $3,400. Ph 564-9276. 1979 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme 2 dr, automatic, air, PS, $1,400. Ph 293-6497 or 294-1473 after 5:30 pm. FOR SALE 1977 Chevy Caprice, fully loaded, 73,000 niiles. Good cond $1,750 neg. Call 564-1881 ask for Sandra or 565-1480. 1978 SEARAY 18' EZ load trailer, stereo. Excel, cond 294-2693. BC 1986 Yamaha Vurago 700 less than 1,700 miles, excellant condtion. Burgundy color. $2,500 phone 5644170 after 6 p.m. or leave m essage in recorder. 1976 FORD VAN ECONOLINE. Excel, cond. $2.000 293-5784. BC 1978 Datsun, rebuilt eng, custom wheels, $950. Ph 564-3965 eves, weekends 77 F150 Truck 6cyl, 4 sp. Asking $1,700. Call between 6 am & 9 pm. 565-7998. ,NEED A CAR? New in town? Old in town? No Oedit? Short time on the job? Only $100, $200, $300.or$)0downmeed an • ntomobile tJk get around? Contact u^ We ipprove our own contracts. Instant delivery. We wQl pick you .up,& bring you to our car lot. Just telmbone 564-6809, NEVADA AUTO SALES, 1813 N. Bldr. Hwy., Henderson, Nev. One block south of Sunset Blvd. & Bldr. Hwy. For sale: 77 LTD Ford. 4 brand new tires, Runs good Asking $500. Ph. 564-0908. 85 LANCE CABOVER CAMPER 8'3 ". Queen bed, like new. Loaded. $4,500. 293-6908. BC CHEVY TRUCK SILVERADO 1977. Excel, cond. Treated with TLC since new. 350 CU in. engine. $3,500. 293-3095. BC 1970 Maverick, 6 cyl. automatic, AC, radio, good transportation car. $600. Ph. 565-0044 after 6 p.m. All day weekends. MOTOR HOME 78 Allegro, 23' Low mileage, super clean, fully loaded. $10,500. See at 216 W Foster. Ph 564-0147. EMMiSSION CONTROL CHECK STATION. 29S-7278. Big John and Sena. FootMU Dr. BC. BOAT 20' Starlire 78 New canvas and int. Excel, cond. $6,000 293-1870 or 294-7703. BC TRUCKSTRUCKS-TRUCKS Large selection to choose from—'/2 ton, '/< ton, 3'/i ton, 4X4'B & vans. We buy sell trade cars, trucks, vans, campers & motorhomes. EMPIRE AUTO SALES,1620 N Boulder Hwy, Hdn. Ph 565-S950 USED AUTO PARTS 299-7278. Let aa do ths calliBS on oar New SatelUto oooipater aO states sad Cuwda. BIG JOHN a SONS, Foothill Dr. BC. Buick LeSabre, cellent condition 564-5888. '70. Ex$885. Ph 81 CHEVEHE Diesel, 5 speed, 4 dr hatchback, air. am/fm. custom interior, 2 tone exterior. Excel cond. S2100. 363-1557. 1976 GMC MOTOR HOME mint cond. Trade or $3,500 and take over payments. 293-7579 eves BC. 81 CHEVY CITATION. Clean Good mileage, $2,750. Ph 293-1372 BC 87 Ford FI-50 Takeover lease pymts. $299.07 mo. Must qualify. Call 4351293 79 DATSUN B210, 2 dr, 4 sp. new brakes, paint. Ideal for teenager or work Good mijg^ 29 33695. B.C. 7 lines $5.80 wk 8 lines $6.25 wk 9 lines $6.70 wk 10 lines $7.15 wk up to 3 lines (23 character* per line) 45^ each additional line DtfADUNE FOR WANT ADS...4 P.M. TUES. FOR THURS. ISSUE SAIL AWAY FOR -ONLY $1,200 17', sail boat, sleeps 2 in cabin Trailer & motor 293-7454 BC, 73 Toyota Celica. Sell for parts 564-7805 1983 Pontoon houseboat, 36', 70 HP Evinrude Sleeps 6 Moored at LVBH Call after 4 pm, 564-702 7, 68 Mustang for sale: Ph 565-0138 eves, 1980 Pontiac LeMans, 4 dr. AC, PS, PB $2000 or best offer, Ph 565-5333 Deck Entrance for Mobile Home complete with steps and railing. Dim: 4' X 4'/2' $75 293-0371 BC 84 PONTIAC FIREBIRD all extras. $6300 47,000 miles Perfect cond, 293-1473 after 6, all day weekends. BC 1986 MAZDA SE5 Cab plus. 5 sp, shell, liner, a'c, AM/FM, more. 13,000 miles $8450 294-1801 BC Acura Legend. 1987, 4 dr, V-6 Luxury model Full power. Automatic. Sunroof, Extra Warranty $19,500. Ph 565-4076 1984 KAWASAKI 550 LTD $1,000 13.000 miles. Call 294-1584 after 6 or 293-6377 during days, BC. 1977 DODGE VAN, nice family car. $2500. Call 294-1584 after 6 or 293-6377 during days. B C 1975 MONTE CARLO good cond $950. 293-1473, B.C. 149 Aluminum Bass Boat w/heavy duty trailer. 9 HP Mercury motor, trolling motor, new battery, fish finder. $1400 invested. Will cohsider trade for economy car of equal value. Call 294-3834 BC MUST SELL 1985 Audi 4000 GT Coupe Sun roof, 5 sp. 30,000 miles. Call 294-3834 BC Our Ad Rates Are REASONABLE Call For Details A-1\ Truck & Equipment Repair % Ton & bigger & Motdr Homea 1105 Industrial Rd. BC Accross from.RV Park StfUtttteUon tiihrmtlt^d 293-7^5 LOST AND FOUND REWARD: Lost or. stolen: Mobile telephone from Backhoe on Chestnut St. Walkie-Talkie type. Ph 565-0216. Lost: Liver, Brown & White Springer Spaniel Pup. Still has tail. Call Dave Lumley 565-4756 or 565-8987, Vic. Holick Ave. Lost: Feb 24, small, white longhaired male dog. Seen on Tungsten St Wed afternoon. If found please call 564-0890 Lost: Small female Pekepoo. W/black & dark brown shaggy hair. Missing from Cholla & Money St area. Ph 565-7158. REWARD. Female Akita, 11-yrs-old, black/silver gray. Last seen 2/20, Henderson, Center & Burkholder. Has had hysterectomy. We miss our "Jade." Please call 5647785 Reward! Please mail all cash or check donations to Betty Honn's Animal Adoption, P.O. Box C, Henderson, Nv 89015. AKC Registered Cocker Spaniel puppies. Only $250 ea. Born on Valentine's Day 6 males and 4 females. $50 deposit required. Cal 56 5-0930 Leave message. Female Siamese Manx Kittens. 5-mos-old $75. Ph 565-1118. Escape to the Jungle. Joiii the biggest little Safari in the desert. See Lions, tigers, bears, wolves, cougars, monkeys & men. Guided tonrs daily. CaU 361-2484. The Cat's Meow—Give a^ home to a beautiful cat or kittens. Over 75 to choose from. Long & short hair, multitude of colors 361-2484. MAY'! HELP YOU GET YOUR DOG OR CAT SPAYED OR NEUTERED FOR A GRACIOUS DISCOUNT? 283 ^3. BC. Anytime. Homeless animals, Betty Honn's Animal Adoption, Now acoeptiag all species of animals for adoption. By app't only, wayed, nenterad not required for scception for adoption. Call 361-2484. Tax time—Put unwanted items to work, helping animals. Tax write off for 1987. Betty Honn's Animal Adoption IS in desparate need of vehicles, horse trailers, fencing & bidg materials of all kinds. 361-2484 Free to good home: Black male Retriever. 3 mos old. Has shots up to date. Ph 565-5102 For adoption: Dobies, Airedale, Boxer, Lots of pups, fviost mixed breed dogs, $6 ea. Ph 361-2484 FEMALE AIRDALE 2 yrs. Papers. $100 to good home. After 5 p.m. 293-7124 BC FREE KITTENS AND PUPPIES NEED GOOD HOME. Call 2SMSn anytJBM. AKC Registered Bnttany Spaniel Puppies. For Sale. 565-6685. Bett Honn's Animal adoption accepting unwanted pets of all kinds. By app't only, homes are found. 361 -2484. Desparately needed—Older 3/4 or 1 ton pickup or flat bed truck, util trailer, horse trailer. Must be reasonable, Or can be donated to Betty Honn's Animal Adoption 1988 Charitable Tax Deduction. 361-2484. Donate unwanted Cyclone fencing. Gate, pipe, any amount or size. Betty Honn's Animal Adoption. 1988 Tax deductible. 361-2484. Wanted: Large parrott. Macaw, etc. Must be reasonable or can be donated to Betty Honn's Animal Adoption. 1988 Tax Deductible for today's fair market value. For complete info, Ph 361-2484. PETS W ME Lorreine'M Pel Sitting Service, Loving care while you're away I'll care for your pels in their familiar home surroundings while you vacation or work. Bonded. Call Lorraine McLean 293-3431 Locally eupported. BC SPAY OR NBJTER YOUR PET FOR HALF PRICE SHOTS 25% OFF CALL VALLEY SAVE A PET 384-6049 (Ruby) or 642-8543 I PRIVATE DUTY NURSE needs position Exc. cook Good at all phases of diets Flexible hours. Reasonable. 293-4247 AM 871-1410 P M Ask for Kay. LDS Woman will babysit 1 child who is potti-trained but not yet in school. Loving home, fenced yd. Call Karren, 564-6302 There la juat ONE question you should ssk before you select your airline achool: "Can your school DOCUMENT Ita placement with AIRLINES?" WE CANI OVER 95% (7,352 or our 7,742 placementa) era with AIRLINESI In 1987 we placed 1,700 graduates with EVERY major airline as well as with International, regional and commuter eirllnea Discover why the airlines respect our excellent 12-waek treining and call us firsti Attend free 2-hour seminar! MONDAY — MARCH 7 ALIXiS PARK mSORT HOTIL S7. HARMON AVI. LAt VIOAS, NV lOiOO A.M., 2i00 OR 7i00 P.M. Where Airline Careers Beginl INTERNATIONAL AIR ACADEMY VANCOUVER SI LOUIS ONTARIO COLUMBIA WASHINGTON MISSOURI CALIFORNIA MARYLANO PARTTIME SALES OPPORTUNITY for Henderson or Boulder City resident to sell Television advertising in these communities. Have you had any experience selling yourself or a product? KLAS-TV is looking for an individual with a desire to t)ecome a professional. To be truly successful a sales person must stand for things like hard work, dedication, honesty, integrity, dependability, creativity & loyalty. Commission sales. We will train the right individual. Please mail a one page essay on why you think you may be that individual to KLAS-TV, Personnel Dept P.O. Box 15047, Las Vegas, NV 89114. Interviews will be scheduled at the sole discretion of KLAS-TV. EOE/MF OWN YOUR OWN AP^ PAREL OR SHOE STORE, CHOOSE FROM: JEAN/ SPORTSWEAR, LADIE'S APPAREL, MEN'S, CHILDREN/MATERNITY, LARGE SIZES, PETITE, DANCEWEAR/AEROBIC, BRIDAL, LINGERIE OR ACCESSORIES STORE. ADD COLOR ANALYSIS. BRANDS: LIZ CLAIBORNE, GASOLINE, HEALTHTEX, LEVI, LEE, CAMP BEVERLY HILLS, ST. MICHELE, CHAUS, OUTBACK RED, GENESIS, FORENZA, ORGANICALLY GROWN, OVER 2,000 OTHERS. OR $13,99 dNE PRICE DESIGNER, MULTI TIER PRICING DISCOUNT OR FAMILY SHOE STORE. RETAIL PRICES UNBELIEVABLE FOR QUALITY SHOES NORMALLY PRICED FROM $19 TO $60. OVER 250 BRANDS 2,600 STYLES, $17,900 TO $29,900: INVENTORY, TRAINING, FIXTURES, GRAND OPENING, AIRFARE, ETC. CAN OPEN 15 DAYS. MR. SIDNEY (612) 888-6389. Venture Capital & Business 'loans. Ph 734-8508. HOUSESITTING-With summer coming do you need weekend housesitting? Call 293-d912 after 5 BC, Babysitting—my home. 24 hrs. 7 days wk. Two mothers will care for your child, any age. Hot meals. 564-8358. Will babysit, my home, Robert Taylor area. Ph 565-2635. Babysitting in my home, days. Mother of 2. Located off Sunset Avfi Ph ^R4-7.S.?fl Mature nurses aide/Com panion. Local references. 457-5935 46 yr old lady w/good references will cook, clean, give care & companionship to elderly lady or gentlemen. Ph 564-50.47 HOUSECLEANING-I do hottsedeanlng. I am reliable and dependable with references. C^M NANCY at 56441103. Hend. Area. MAGICAL MAlois Quality work at reasonable prices. 293-1917 BC. QUALITY CLEANING Experienced-Dependable Reasonable 565-4892 RMfLE KLEMIERS Quality MousecleanIng at reasonable rates. 'Rentals too* L CaN S3-T4T m 9-741 Phone sales: Immediate part time openings available. W/nationwide company. Short PM shift. Sat. AM shift makes this ideal for students & homemakers. No exp. necessary, as we train. EARN AS YOU LEARN. Guarantee $4. hr. Also advancement opportunities. Call after 3, 451-4426. Equal Opportunity Employer If you're interested in a rewarding, exciting career in Real Estate, Call Paul Gargis, Gargis Realty 564-6969 Pet Shop, Illness forces sale. Make offer. 458-1704 Partnerships & Corporation f ormed. Ph 734-8508. $15 to $25 anhr. Full time, part time. Work your own hours-be your own Ixss. Call after 12 rwon, 565-2609 IN8TA-CLEAN MAID/ JANITORIAL SERVICE Professional cleaning service for reskJentieil and commercial All phases of general cleaning covered including carpet cleaning, wall/ ceilings washed. Acoustical tiles cleaned. 293-3916 Home Laundry & Hoosecleuiiiig Service —Lowest Rttee^ edi 564-3927 Housedeaning, we dean it all! Ovens, windows, floors, wate. Guaranteed "Motherin-law" Cl ean. Call Judy 564-7163 I WILL BABYSIT IN MY HOME Call 293-5462 BC If you're looking for TLC, I will watch your chiWren anytime. All meals ink;uded. Reliat)le references, reasonatile rMes. Call 293-5848. Will do residential or commercial cleaning "Call Debbie, 5650866 • HOUSEWORK • IRONING Reasonable rates Call Carol 293-7715 • J^;s-r*i:fir-f "Soul Travel is a personal way to see heaven here and now. Once we see it, then we arrange our lives to taetter advantage both now and in eternity." SRI Harold Klemp, The Book of Wisdom, P. 10 For Further information on ECKANKAH write to P.O. Box 2654 or Ph: 565-9365 for a recorded message. MISCELLANEOUS COUMPUTER IBM PC Jr. upgraded. .256K Wireless keyboard, parallel and serial port Color monitor. Extensive software, games, word processing, files, accounting, etc. $450 Call 293-6079 BC 17V2' General Elec. Refrigerator, frost free, ice maker, dbl door. Brown swivel rocker, new full sized bed w/hard mattress & headboard, 3 hanging chain lamps, 565-8605. 19" Color TV. Remote control $50 or 7> Ph 565-6858. Many thanks for favors received due to intercession of St. Jude, Saint of the impossible. CLA. FREE: Doutjie wide wooden garage door. (2 car) Call • 564-3029, For sale: Sony Color projections TV. Model KP-5020. $400. Call 451-3666. 5 Ton Swamp Cooler, $100 6 you remove it, 500 Burton St. Hdn. before noon. Gaffer & Sattler 36" Gas Range, 4 burner. Center Gnll $100. Ph 565-8567. Sears Gold Fngidaire/ref, runs good. Pretty good cond. $100. Ph 565-9379 to see. ^_ Baby crib, $25. Swing, $15. Rocking carrier, $10. Johnny Jump Up, $10. Snuggly earner, $15. Infant headrest. $5, Boys bike, $20. Ph 565-3671. For sale: 5 pc Eariy American dinette set, China cabinet w/hutch. Maple finish. Ph 565-5503. FURNITURE FOR SALE Refrig, dinette set, liv rm, Bdrm set, queen tjeds, nite stands, end table, divider table, coffee table, recliner, girls 26" bike. 564-2371. Gardening equipment, everything you neied, for lawn care & gardening. Make offer. Ask for Maxine, 565-8614. WANTED-DUPLICATE BRIDGE PARTNER Wednesdays 7:30 at Senior Center. Call 293-1405 before 12, 1 to 5 & after 9. BC. FOR SALE 4 bar stools. Adjustable $10 ea, 293-4816. BC^ Paying $20 men's $10 women's class nngs. Any condition. Paying $4.25 oz. scrap sterling Will pickup. 293-1847 BC. GET BIG MONEY for your idle gold & silver We buy class rings, wedding bands, silver & gold coins, diamonds, pocket watches, sterling silver, old eyeglass frames & dental gold. fflEE evakjation while you wait. Irv slant cash if you decide to sell. Open Mon-Fn 9-4. Anthony's Coins & Gifts, 525 • Hotel Plaza. Stop in our call 2931847 BC FURNITURE ETC: Oak entertaiment center $200. Lg. steamship trunk (60 yrs old) $50 Sofa (green/white) $100. Living rm chairs (2, yellow) $75.1iving rm tables (2 pecan) SSO. lad ski boots, 8V% $10 sewing machtnef cab. $25. Ph. 564-4144. • i; ^-^v ^ • • j^T^---. ^-yr'^ Trrf ,• • —arm iiBwi^m'j--'• • ^

PAGE 34

Pi| M Handtrton Horn* Ntwt and Bouldtr City Nwi Ttan*qr. Mrch S. IfSS TkvMUy. March 3, 1988 CollectorBuys old mag'i (pre '60): ^ signed documents autographs first issues Special interest in Hollywood, scientists & gov't. Also, old U.S. coins. Can between lOi PM dailv 565-0161. Wood Items Will build to suite Children's cart)eds a soecialtv Ph 564-3927 Electric stove like new Gold color $190 Also clothes vvasher white $95 Ph 457-9433 or 565-8760 The Best Coat Leao-AJoe Vera Jnict. 100% aatoral A flavored. 564-1648 Wutod: DMd, dying or Juat uBwaatad ap-, pUaMM. Call Max for fioa ^a p. 5aM68. WASHEITDRYER good cond 30 day warranty $125 ea 293 4447 BC HEIGHT LOSS THE EASY WAY (Be yourseit again) Money bacK guarantee 564 1648 BEAUTIFUL PIANO Must se(l locally Low payrrient tjaiance to credit worthy Ex ten 245 1 800-234 5587 NEW CARPET PAD, Matris Prime Poiy Vk inch 40 Q yd8$2 75aq.yd 2W-1352 WANTED I need free decorative rocitt tor landscaping Will pick up 293 5752 BC STOfUQI POR HINT All aiaoa-raMod NoarSuMtT' Moutaia Vlata Cher! to CLOCK REPAIR •Antique & Other •Qrandtather •Wall •Modern SaMsAwNoff OMWrtoatf •uK, UH, Tnd9 • •4-111 THE PLACE TO SHOP FOR SOMETHING SPECIAL The following are some of tlie brand names we carry Leslie Faye, Anthony Sicari, California Girl, Liz Claiborne, Alexandria, Peter N Ashley, Sunday Comics, Whispers, Counterparts, Jax Slax, Lucie Ann, Kayser, Wacoal, Carnlva^, Jantzen, DeWweese, Catallna, 1928 Jewelry Company, Christian Dior, Glamour,, Ted Latdus Sunglasses, Debby Stevens, AND MORE Cfieck our sales racks for savings from 20%-dO% Items added daily Located In the First Western Plaza 1000 Nevada Hwy. 293-1408 Maif rcsrd ~ Visa Lay-A-Way MOWER REPAIR Spriai SpacWI! I9S.M •Shaipen A btlaacc Made •Service Ignition Syitetn •Clean & fiU fule Unit ^ •Clean k adjust caitnirai •.Service air cleaner •Chaniife oil •Service & adj throttl •Lubricate all moving parts Pickup and delivery $15 in BC Old mowem Purchased $5.00 A-11105lMlatrialRd. BClAwMifMMaRVPwkl ^ 166. Oi • •'• • •• ev unc ,_ rtniratoQ rottle^ Photography & video taping. Parties, weddings, or anything Call Scott for prices, arrangements 8 to 5, •Men through Fn 454-5009, eves, weekends. 361-5544 293-7335 SAVi ALUMINUM ITIMB, eaaa. etc. Senp Copper, BattorUa.i Motota ate. to raiae • oaoy for watnuitad aataMlo. Tax Mediaetibia. UforaatioB asi-MM. ARE YOU LIVING WITH A DRINKING PROBLEM? If so, why not try AlAnon"' Meeting are Tues.. 10 am at St. Timothys Episcopal Church Tues,830pmClub 51 Wed 8 pm. St Rose de Lima Hospital Friday pm 7 30 Water & Power Bidg Nevada Highway. Boulder City Flof more infofmation '• call 565-9963 Hdn iMi^M^i—aw^—a^M I 11 Baby Crib Excellent shape. Includes mattress bumiDer pad & sheets $50 Car seat $10 Ph564-066latter7pm Railroad ties $5 $6 50 and $8 Ph 565-1791 FOR SALE Used Kirby Vacuum Cleaner—all attachments • plus floor polisher—good condition 504 Cherry St 293-1603 BC • ^Rl-CHEiyi liquid emb'oidery Paints on fabric Great gift fun hobby 293-0060 BC and Hend FOR SALE Twin waterbed Extra long 83" Exc cond $150 Call after 6 pm 293-3518 BC BEAUTIFUL PIANO-must sell locally Low payment balance to credit worthy Exten 245 1-800-234 5587 Waterbed A-1 Condition $100 ,Ph 565-9359 a Gold Couch Very good condition $85 Ph 565-9359 PORTABLE GENERATOR 650 Watt Honda Battery charger 15 AMP Charge 30 AMP Boost 100 AMP Car starter Ph 565-1373 after 5 pm Washers dryers, ranges refngerators Guaranteed A 1 Appliances 564-9000 520 W Sunset Hdn OmaiNAL ART By Local Artists BOULDER CITY ART QALLERY Open Daily Noon-4 p m. 1495 Boulder Higfiway |Nei 10 C^^aTitw ol Cocin^'cel IXPimiNCID HANDYMAN •Plumbing •Rooting 'Repiirj •CarpwHry •FREE ESTIMATES OaHSiovo 293-tMtBe HaSLMWHCMHl Complete lawn service, tree & shrub care, automatic sprinklers. Lie #4490-0 i MM GHtoup 294-6200 INDEPENDENT MOVERS >'One Room or Houaeful • 'Pianoa or Any Heavy Load •'Spodaliciiig in Hendereon and Boulder City ^VM Btttmatet mad JUMaM Jtatea 293-7t11 NoforanM^vaNabja Learn to play for profit Blacl< lack & craps Approx 85% wi n '34 37 74 HORTICTJLTURIST Consultant Landscape Sprinkler Plans Mclntyre 565-0133 VOICE PIANO LESSONS Private, Specialist teacher Coral Cove Music Studio Productions Director, Teacher. Entertainer Flo Raymond Family rates available j^^ info, Ph 5658469 ——-^ Muled oBtertahaawtVoool piuwi w m%tm. For yoor ekwcb, 0(gaaintloB, chib, or apMiol fMctioa. FfoRayiaoMi TiRRY'S CLOCK SIRVICi Cuckoo Special $24 50 plus parts K4-i301 PIANO instructions in my Green VaHey Home Professional & experienced 4582585 WHOLESALE TOPUBUC •Guns •Ammo •Acceworiea ProArmi Company 732-4907 CHRISTIAN CENTER DAY CARE (CHILD eAM-Mia4CH00L~iNDINaA(rrEN NFOM ANO Arrin SCHOOL CAM POfI BLUMNTAHY AOI-FHU TMNIPORTATION. tt YEAM THIOUOH )TH ORAOE •OKNMPAM-MJP.M. •STATIUCENSU) 'Jf •mORSTAIT lATIO. Al TEACHERS 'l"' •LlrrrLE PEOPLES WORKSHOP CURRICULUM \j^"j •LOT8 0PT.LC >a^i# Phoiw 2S3-2SS0 571 Adam* Blvd. HOMI OF CNRitTIAN CENTER SCHOOL (Klndorgrtn through tth grade) • ••• • • ?• • ma WOMEN'S BIBLE STUDY INTERDENOMINATIONAL JCvwy Wiilaiiiay at 9-JO •JO. 871 AdMM Blvd. FVM babjwlttloc ud rifrMli• MU. If ]ro HO • • •to-im to BoeMw City, COM* tad aakc otw friMida. PhoM MS-TTTS. CoUoctor'a ittma: 4 Dec 7, 1941 Newapapert— "War Declared.'' XWI Britiah oewapapor of EUaaboth'a oonmatioB. Old mnole booka, 0rmaa laaMla Horaar Acwdlan, tvrm of the Coatunr. Other itaina from WWILBictarw.etc.Ph 566>3999. FOR SALE Bicycle, book shelves, bed, sofa, weights, books, appliances, lamps, sports equipment, and many other things. Please call David at 293-5331. Frae Color Analysis S9t Ihmdy for SprtngI Enioy thie life-changing benefits of BoautiControl's connpuier aM8d Personal Image Profile servico, free color analysts, color coded cosmetics and fashions, and siale-of-the-art skin care' Call today and find out how you can receive your Personal Image Profile FREE' Call Iharen MeComb, Imago Consultant 283-2720 ARTHRITIS-PaopU treat yoaraelf. No mediolBe. Get rtUef or money back. Coot la aoiaU. 5§41648. MUSIC A ART GIFT CERTIFICATESavaili abU for the Now Year. Vote A Piano laaaons & orlfinal art by Flo. MARKER BOAT AND MINI STORAGE HAS ^^ EXPANDED' Open and under cover storage for Boats, RV's, Trailers, etc. •Block Walled Fencing •Lighted •7 Day Access •Resident Manager Super Low Monthly Rates MARKER BOAT AND MINI STORAGE 807 Cadli 'HMdmnon'M flMMt' W^ SUN REALTY %t iN "THE REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS" 1)11 Navadi Hwy.. Bouldtr CHy, Navidi IMOI. 24 HOURS (702) 293-2151 Vs^ Ll YOUR ONE-STOP REAL ESTATE COMPANY LARGE RETJREATIO.N R0OM;"IhiraKbol" •dditioa to thin .'Vbedroom Lnria Hone ia graat for the kida PrirH for quick MU at MM^MOgTMt for the porat Doo't wait oa thia oao. CUSrrOM BUILDING LGTS: Lak* Maod vieira or Valky vtowa or Moootaia view*? Now is the time to BMhe year oo l e ct ie a See M today. ADULTB ONLY-COOL AND GREEN; CartfrM Booldw HUla Coado for adalU oaly aad prleMl t MU I,9M. Call aow. READY FOR SPRING Hatd pool + SPA SATELLITE DISH + -bedroom Uwia llltJM TOTAL CaO BOW. POTENTIAL DUPLEX? W.ll-maioulaod i p wekaa caetoai kmrne eoaveaiwiUy locaud. n collMt family pUa. or pooaibU coovertea vta '• • ala g U a daplox. Mak appoiatoMBt today. ADULT GETAWAY-IB6,000: Largoae4MdrooiB. beoutif ally leeaied for view aad privacy, "Boaldor Square." lea tMley. NEW CUSTOM HOMB ON HALF-ACRE: Buikhr ready te baeak grsaad. pii* YOUR plea • ew. LAKE MEAD VUEW-CARE PREI LIVtNO: Laxary IMafl wHk all the aaealtioo, two badroaBM, two aad eaa half baths, plas man. Oaly 1119,800. See tUe eae today. MASTER SUITE •POOL A gPA • OFFICE >• OARAGE: phw Mro. All tMa aad Bealdsr CHy teef Aad aadar tlOI,m COMS oa, we'U dhow yea—call aow. HARDWOOD FLO0R-BEAUTI FULLY RCPINIUfED: plaa three boAooais, aewly aatpalad mi fridiij rofwbWmd B.C CLAflf IC caa be yeara. oaly ITVJOO. See today. >JYOUflOf FICf AND LOOK OVIR TNt MANY I A-1 APPLIANCE SERVICE SALES umvice PAATS •Wathart •Dryart •Rafrlgaratora R9eon TOWNHOUSE 'fl^r!ally laadaeaped 2 RENTALS 4 bedra. 2 ha. Lewla heoae t ear garMaate aprtaUar*. 1 year leaee repaired 1800.00 FURNISHED OPFICB-oxoaUoat loea. tloa A Secy. avaU dallv after liOO P.M. UOO/Bo. CAU FOR DITAILi. Stadio apartmeat ONE Adalt oaly doee ia vacaat 9286.00 IN GINGERW"^' 2 bdrm 1 bath. 14X60. Excel QOLV gda. Covered patio and carport. t(i,500. MobUe home-EXCELLENT CONDITION 3 bednn, 2 bath SSS.OOO alaofuraiture could be purcbaaed—coll for detaila. 14X66' TWO LARGE BEDRMS. new carpet, aide/aide Refer, w/icemaker Covered Patio & Carport READY FOR IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY $23,000 MAM MOBILE HOME PARK-SUPER LOCATION-1 bedrm, 1 ba., CENTRAL AIR/HEAT, aU appUaaoaa. covered patio ADULT ONLY PARK $11,000.00 2 bedrm, t ba. 14X06' mobile home in Oiagerwood Covered carport. 2 porchea EXCELLENT CONDITION $27,900. GREAT VIEW OF GOLF COURSE1986 24X00' Lovely Uadaoapiag COR. LOT, HAS SPA, VERY SHARP $85,000.00 EXCEPTIONAL BUY! Ia Glagerwood Adult park-12'XeO' plaa 7X18' Add-ARoom 1 bedrm. 1 be. Caatral AC/Heat Prioed to SelL $18,500. COMMERCIAL-FOR SALE Local PIZZERIAnVino A Beer BarGREAT LOCATION CALL FOR DETAILS $82,000. LAND "B" Hill-1.36 acre CUSTOM SITE let. Owner willing to trade for home or land In Laa Vegaa Am. $86,000. QUIET SECLUDED LOT IN SUB 11 Partial vUw of valley. ONLY $27,680. EXCELLENT VIEW LOT PRICED TO SILL 171.880. I.S4 UNOBSTRUCTED VIEW-LAKE MBADtt SEE IT NOW-$126.000. Vi ACRE lot overloeka Lake MeadSnltable for your owe pareooal eaatk8BE IT NOW $68,800. moNi NS5^:A£g^^ i 8PBCIAL1 77k# imptnonal hand of a govtmm^nt can nevtr replact the helping hand of a friend For Bialnaw Carda. Ele. CaiMaiayn 5S4.1881 Do you need your house, trailer, apt, or condo clean ed'' Very reliable, reasonable rates Call Patti. 564-1303 LAWN CARE LANDSCAPING SPRINKLERS Ph 564-3280 —I • • -^ — k CUSTOM PAINTING. TINTING, WALLPAPERING. AND CABINET REFINISHINO IntOTiw Extarior. RoaidoatialAcommardaLDiywall rtpalis. Aooouotical coiling* A textured walla. Over SO yrp cip. ia Chicago area. Nevada Ue. ^3. Boqded^4 iaaured. George C. Bruefito ASMOIS HcBderion Home Newi and Boulder City Newt Page 85 Al cnsTOM urn SERVItl ReiideatialiComaeniMl Mow, dfe, trim, clan-up. Tbatch, Vacuum, Fertilize & Reaeed. Tree TrimmtitK, Sprinkler Repair. fVee Eetimate 293-4556 B.C. AARON FENCINQ Frao Eatbnatea Chain Link ft Wood Fertcing 20 Yeara Exp. Ph. 451-8190 State Lie. 15332 MCS MROeNINO Liceaeed Laws Can ^ Reaidential ft Ckxnmerdal Landacaping ^Sprinkler Repair and Inatallation. • Gean up. Thatch, Fertiliw ft Re-aeed. FREE ESTIMATES SAVi SSSSSSSSf on your next horn*, add-on, or npaki lAVE SSHISf SS on your cuatom horn* 6.A. "Curly" Smith ComtrucMon M02-I tM-1C1i SIncalMI FATHER-SON TEAM PAINTING a Experienced a Equipped a Reliable In & Out 796-8104 Also Mobile Homes and Grafitti Sand Blasting LAWN SERVICE 1 time cut, weekly or monthly. Free estimates. 565-3612 YOU NAME IT. WEXL DO IT. RESIOCNTIAL a c om nwcu L •Addittona. •Remodel or 'Repair Uc. No. 14482. Ph. a8m2i4 EMIL'S SpacMsng in IBM Typewriters 807 Federal Henderson N6-8280 Lie. 010-06786 Licensed. 564-6724 LOCOS DCSWNB) For Buaineae Carda, Elo. HENDERSON HANDYMAN Licensad 22 yrs. exp Painting, die, Mal^japer. etc. Very reasonat3ie. 595-ian U-NAME-IT Handyman Service We fix & build most anything. Carpentry, electrical, plumbing, washers/dryers/ refrigerators/ coolers. Reasonable rates Discounts to Seniors & disabled 565-1285 or 565-3298 M ft M LANDSCAPE NEEDS WORK Lawns—Trees—Gardens 5654204 Scott AIR CONDITIONINQ SERVICE Call H.T.C. 293-2599 Lie. 113494 SECOND HAND STORE, Bilmar's, 27 Army St, Furniture & brass & tools, t^isc. We repair all makes models of appliances. $20 service call Guaranteed 30 days. Buy & sell all merchandise. Henderson. 564-7367, or 641-6058. Torn Vinyl, or worn leather. Call New Life Vinyl and Leather. For professinal repair & restoration on any vinyl or leather or velour. 10 yrs exp and Mobile service. We come to you. 565-3929. t HOUSE DOCTORI x Painting WE DO IT ALL ^ Roofing 293-3061 ALDERSON ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION SERVICES, INC. A Full Service Electrician •New Work •Service & Repair •Qplck Service •Quality Work 435-5282 Llemwed—Bondtd—lnaunti State Lie. #2438 AARON UPHOLSERY RECOVER NOW CHAim $48 Labor SOFAS $7S Labor Plua Fabric Suppllae •AU work guerenteed •Free In home eetlmate •Free Pickup A Delivery 9 to 9 PhOM 565-8543 state Uc. 10022567 Bonded and Imurad 30 Yrs. Exparience in Nevada Morrison EkeirkttI CoHt Lea Montaon IMwIiontaon H0IM5M4I34 421 SunwnH Henderson. NV NOIS Oflica 514411$ INTERIOR DESIGNS FURNITURE CARPETS DRAPERIES WALLPAPER Sett prices in Nevada SLEEP SHOP '5730 Boulder Hwy., LAS VEGAS 220 N. Boulder Hwy.. HENDERSON 565-5911 PRyWAU PAINTING^ & Boulder City Paint Center Contracting Service Serving Boulder City. Henderson & Surrounding Areas •COMMERCIAL > •RESIDENTIAL •INDUSTRIAL On Site Colour Conaultlng CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATES eoneftm Quality work that willi beautify your home Uc. h Bonded. Free Batimatee. Reaidentiall ArtleU.293^816. _, I'LL FIX IT WELDING METAL SCULPTURING Call Rupert 565-0119 BRICK-BLOCK CUSTOM WORK Nevada Uc. 24144 14 yrs experience Ph56m64 Patio covers & redwood decl<, for backyard Pool & Spa All types remodeling. Free estimates. Call Erie, 293-6497 Competitive Prteing Ueing "Quality Quannteed" Benfamin Moore Producta Protect Your Home a Property With Affordable Quality Lie No. 0025690 ^09.90AiL ^^^^ Nevada Hwy. ier.MdandBond.d ^W^ JbTVv (Marahall Plaza) I Brakedmma A rotors resurfaced. Custom hydrauUc howw. 308 W Foster, Hdn. Mr. Hose. 5654)111. BLAKELEY EXCAVATION 565-9077 I can dig it! I can move it I By the hour—by the job. Uc 10024515 PAINT AVERAGE HOUSE $200.21 yrs ex. perience. Worl( guaranteed. Call Jim &6-2092. HAULINaCLEANUP. & YARD WORK. ODD JOBS. Free estimates. Call Tony 565-0358. THOMPSON'S COOLER SERVICE & HOME MAINTENANCE-lFree Mtimates. 565-5642. HOUSEPAINTING Interior & exterior, over 20 yrs exp. Republicans 10% Disc20unl Ph 435-3151 DRAIN THAT POOL FOR SUMMER CALL THE PUMPER 564-2606 LMS MINI STORAGE. 1601 Athol Ave. Hdn. 1' block south of Bldr Hwy, I blocli east of. Skyline Casino. Newly expuided. 5x10,' 10x10, 10x20 See Century Steel, Men. through FVi. 564-2555. Weekends caU 5654800. Emergencies call 361-' 2831 o r 367-3079. HENDERSON'S Ucenaed Handyman. Ben DePne. Hire one man to help vou repair it alL Plumbing, walls, paint, electric, cement, carpentry, aecurity systema, burglar alarnu, long time local refer-' ences. Not a state contractor, 566-7468. CARING HANDS OFFERS in home health care services. Live in—hourly. Licensed, bonded, insured. 24 houron call. Companion aides or home makers available. 384-6974. KIN*t 293-004B All Typs of Maliitnane fRsldiitll •Commarclai I Can Fix Or Maka Most MYTMIMO Home Laundnr A I Hoosecleaniiig [ Service —Loweat Ratea— caU 564-3927 LOGOS DESI6NE0 For Buiir)oas Cards. Etc. CaaUmWfn 564-1881 MOSSER MASONRY Bricic, Blocicwalls, Stone SPECIALIZING IN Custom Brick A FIreplecot BMPW sea-SlSd Ivanlngt only 8eS-8200 Uc1478 8e4-0e4f BouuBR eiEcnic Licensed-Bonded-lnsured Lie. No. 15187 Call 293-4899 DEAN'S BODY A PAINT RMMoabl* a Prolaulonal Work 8S2 E. Laka Maad •565-8200 Now Featuring DUZ-MOR-COLLISION REPAIR SYSTEM The Latesi Systetn on the Market EXPERT BODY WORK & FRONT END ALIGNMENT tKOZAL'S TRAVELJ ^ CONNECTIONS • I F.ee Ofllivpfy Vacation Trivei A Eitzaoem Koui ~ I Manager • I 7oa-m-ioo4 I I Lin Tickets Always Accurala Elizabeth Kozal MOMIE MECHMIC •24 hr Road Service •Home Calls •Cars, Trucks, Diesel, Boats, RV's m-S26l IT 177-4601 f ROOF DOCTOR >^ Roofing PATCHING SPECIALISTS ,^ Painting j 293-3061 SmSfi AUTO & MARINE REASONABLE & PROFESSIONAL WORK •564-9116 ^T^ 852 E. Lake Mead FEffiSON MASOM 453-1869 4925 E. Mohave Ave. Lae Vegaa, Nev. 89104 IS YOm GARAGE OVERFLOWING? Phone 293-2302 or 564-1881 TO PLACE WANTS ADS ALL-BRITE CLEANING Carpet, Furniture, & Drapery Cleaning Free Estimates 734-8969 it Satisfaction Guaranteed Licensed, Bonded, & Insured UONMISSW Fw jrovr eaaipbU laa car* eail PONDEROSA LAWN SERVICE 294-7715 UM*IPI Mimrv IMUk >Md|0aMmrnir )|^ infl. Server BouUm CHy. H endeno n. Oiemi Vileir \ ^ '*!• OSS*" —— -EAGER BEAVER Landscape & Lawn Maintenance Residential Commercial Complete Landscape Renovations Log Edgings—Drip Watenng Systerrw Roto-THIing & Baclthoe Service Mwn arm vou AND vouR warnvr m 564-5374 • ^ JOHNS HANDYMAN SERVICE If n neede fixing, I iW/f ffx H Carpentry, MIeetrlpal, Painting, Plumblng,^lKtc... p^Quaranteed Work CmllJohn 369'8417 BOULDER CONCRETE WANTS TO MEET YOUR CONCRETE NEEDS FOR FREE ESTIMATES AND QUAUTY WORKMANSHIP CALL MICK CASEY BOULDER CITY 293-1571 HOWARD HELDERLEIN CONSTRUCTION Commercial—Residential—Remodels and Additions Licenae 021013 565-0874 PAINTING ft PAPERHANGING Just came out of retirement and need ttie work. No job too small or too large. Commercied & residential. nnto MchMl Tharp Ph 702-1-372-5353 Uc. No. 0025741 369-8377 THE SALVATION ARMY IS IN DESPERATE NEED OF FURNITURE AND CLOTHES. PLEASE CALL THE SALVATION ARMY PICKUP AT 649-2374'5^ FRANK'S TV & APPLIANCE SALES & SERVICE For In homo Mrvico call 565-0060 or 365-9050 MAOMAVOX SYLVAMIA PMILCO WARNANrY MTAnOM Free Eatlmatoa JIFFY ^RIM LAWN CARE "We Weik WhUe Yoa FIv" 565-1593 Call STEVE HEDLAND CAREY'S CARPET & FURNITURE i^n i 22 PIECESI •7 Piece Living Room •S Pleoe Betfraom •! t Piaca DirMte •Frame BM SpHng •Mattreaa S698W rjy\^ WEFINANClA/fDiti WE DELIVER NO EXTRA CHARGE! 6495905 384-6781 2305 E. Luke MeeO 1217 S Main Si Open Oelly 'tat -S 30 •CIOSEU SUN I e.C. CANVAS OPECIALTirS Specializing in Custom Ooat Canvas Cuotein Convas *tt. wuppnme Canvas Produola ac Cmvaa Spoetemaa Co llOi NmrMto Hwy. M .200-4500 CARPET YOUR WHOLE HOUSEII WRh No Down Pafmont Up to 00 Montko To Pay 21.09 A.P.IL Complete Home Needs The FURNITURE WAREHOUSE KRVINQ THI COMMUNITY tINCt 14 2540 Bi Charleston Boulevard 382-7953 PnHMOy Serving Boulder aty and Henderaon Stale Coractor Lie 20970 Froteaatonal Landeeepe and SpriiMer... •De^gn •OoMfrueMon •Hepek •and ol oowee Mal n t eno nee INSTACLEAN MAID/ JANITORIAL SERVICE Professional cleaning servce for residential and conv mercial All phases ol general cleaning covered including carpet cleaning, wall/ ceilings washed Acoustical tiles cleaned 293-3316 EMPLOYMENT Babysitter wanted to sit in my home for 1-yrold. Call 383 1737 or 564-3072 after 5"pm • CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE On-line sports database service • needs individual to assist customers in logglng-on, answer simple billing questions and help sales dept w/clerical duties. Person selected will have some computer experience, basic knowledge of sports, pleasant telephone voice, and 8ood communicatins skills 811294-0191 BC weekdays between 2 PM and 4 PM. BC, FEDERAL, STATE & CIVIL SERVICE Jobs $19,646 to $69,891/year. Now Hinngll CALL JOB LINE 1-518349-3611 Ext FJ128 for into. 24 HR. HELP WANTED lady for counter sales. Light cooking and stocking shelves. Apply at HOOVER DAM SNACKETERIA BC. ENGRAVING TRAINEE NEEDED. Will tram Some general office Prefer non smoker. Part time. Phone for appt. 293-5532. BC. Hairstylist, Aesthetician, & Manicurist needed for Salon located m Green Valley. Station rental. Exc. working conditions. 458-0898 or 5653980, ask for Sharon, Deja Vu Halrstyllng. Pre School teacher. Full time position available. Modern facility. Competitive pay scale. Excellent resource materials available. Teacher's supplies provided Call for appt., 565-0007 Math Tutor. High school, college. Algebra. Certified High School Mathematics teacher Call 564-3029. Care for infant in Green > Valley Home.'8 am to 4 30 pm. Mon through Fri. Non smoker. Call after 6 pm. 458-7894. • COMMUNICATIONS OPERATOR" SALARY RANGE; $20,135,83-$22,954 90/year REQUIREMENTS: High school education with one year of put)lic contact work involving receiving and referring information, preferably through the use of a switch, board and/or two-way radio and/or equivalent combination of education and experierKie. Typing: 45 wpm without errors WHERE TO APPLY: City Hall, Personnel Department, 243 Water Street, Henderson, NV89015 Phone: (702) 565-2070. Applications must be submitted no later than 5:30 pm.. Monday. March 7 1988 HOURS OF OPERATION; 7:30a.mto5;30 p.m., Monday thru Thursday • AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER. AIRLINES NOW HIRING. Right Attendants, Traval ^ Agerrts, Mechanics, Cuitoy mer Servica. Listingt. Sal*> ariat to S50K Entry lavel •; poMiona. Call 1-605-687I6000. Ext A-5695. is i % •i 1 ( lr-^^ ". ^I-^Wl" fVJi*''^iJBflyil.l,^ P>IflJ';!l^f!r?S7^:CT

PAGE 35

Pi| M Handtrton Horn* Ntwt and Bouldtr City Nwi Ttan*qr. Mrch S. IfSS TkvMUy. March 3, 1988 CollectorBuys old mag'i (pre '60): ^ signed documents autographs first issues Special interest in Hollywood, scientists & gov't. Also, old U.S. coins. Can between lOi PM dailv 565-0161. Wood Items Will build to suite Children's cart)eds a soecialtv Ph 564-3927 Electric stove like new Gold color $190 Also clothes vvasher white $95 Ph 457-9433 or 565-8760 The Best Coat Leao-AJoe Vera Jnict. 100% aatoral A flavored. 564-1648 Wutod: DMd, dying or Juat uBwaatad ap-, pUaMM. Call Max for fioa ^a p. 5aM68. WASHEITDRYER good cond 30 day warranty $125 ea 293 4447 BC HEIGHT LOSS THE EASY WAY (Be yourseit again) Money bacK guarantee 564 1648 BEAUTIFUL PIANO Must se(l locally Low payrrient tjaiance to credit worthy Ex ten 245 1 800-234 5587 NEW CARPET PAD, Matris Prime Poiy Vk inch 40 Q yd8$2 75aq.yd 2W-1352 WANTED I need free decorative rocitt tor landscaping Will pick up 293 5752 BC STOfUQI POR HINT All aiaoa-raMod NoarSuMtT' Moutaia Vlata Cher! to CLOCK REPAIR •Antique & Other •Qrandtather •Wall •Modern SaMsAwNoff OMWrtoatf •uK, UH, Tnd9 • •4-111 THE PLACE TO SHOP FOR SOMETHING SPECIAL The following are some of tlie brand names we carry Leslie Faye, Anthony Sicari, California Girl, Liz Claiborne, Alexandria, Peter N Ashley, Sunday Comics, Whispers, Counterparts, Jax Slax, Lucie Ann, Kayser, Wacoal, Carnlva^, Jantzen, DeWweese, Catallna, 1928 Jewelry Company, Christian Dior, Glamour,, Ted Latdus Sunglasses, Debby Stevens, AND MORE Cfieck our sales racks for savings from 20%-dO% Items added daily Located In the First Western Plaza 1000 Nevada Hwy. 293-1408 Maif rcsrd ~ Visa Lay-A-Way MOWER REPAIR Spriai SpacWI! I9S.M •Shaipen A btlaacc Made •Service Ignition Syitetn •Clean & fiU fule Unit ^ •Clean k adjust caitnirai •.Service air cleaner •Chaniife oil •Service & adj throttl •Lubricate all moving parts Pickup and delivery $15 in BC Old mowem Purchased $5.00 A-11105lMlatrialRd. BClAwMifMMaRVPwkl ^ 166. Oi • •'• • •• ev unc ,_ rtniratoQ rottle^ Photography & video taping. Parties, weddings, or anything Call Scott for prices, arrangements 8 to 5, •Men through Fn 454-5009, eves, weekends. 361-5544 293-7335 SAVi ALUMINUM ITIMB, eaaa. etc. Senp Copper, BattorUa.i Motota ate. to raiae • oaoy for watnuitad aataMlo. Tax Mediaetibia. UforaatioB asi-MM. ARE YOU LIVING WITH A DRINKING PROBLEM? If so, why not try AlAnon"' Meeting are Tues.. 10 am at St. Timothys Episcopal Church Tues,830pmClub 51 Wed 8 pm. St Rose de Lima Hospital Friday pm 7 30 Water & Power Bidg Nevada Highway. Boulder City Flof more infofmation '• call 565-9963 Hdn iMi^M^i—aw^—a^M I 11 Baby Crib Excellent shape. Includes mattress bumiDer pad & sheets $50 Car seat $10 Ph564-066latter7pm Railroad ties $5 $6 50 and $8 Ph 565-1791 FOR SALE Used Kirby Vacuum Cleaner—all attachments • plus floor polisher—good condition 504 Cherry St 293-1603 BC • ^Rl-CHEiyi liquid emb'oidery Paints on fabric Great gift fun hobby 293-0060 BC and Hend FOR SALE Twin waterbed Extra long 83" Exc cond $150 Call after 6 pm 293-3518 BC BEAUTIFUL PIANO-must sell locally Low payment balance to credit worthy Exten 245 1-800-234 5587 Waterbed A-1 Condition $100 ,Ph 565-9359 a Gold Couch Very good condition $85 Ph 565-9359 PORTABLE GENERATOR 650 Watt Honda Battery charger 15 AMP Charge 30 AMP Boost 100 AMP Car starter Ph 565-1373 after 5 pm Washers dryers, ranges refngerators Guaranteed A 1 Appliances 564-9000 520 W Sunset Hdn OmaiNAL ART By Local Artists BOULDER CITY ART QALLERY Open Daily Noon-4 p m. 1495 Boulder Higfiway |Nei 10 C^^aTitw ol Cocin^'cel IXPimiNCID HANDYMAN •Plumbing •Rooting 'Repiirj •CarpwHry •FREE ESTIMATES OaHSiovo 293-tMtBe HaSLMWHCMHl Complete lawn service, tree & shrub care, automatic sprinklers. Lie #4490-0 i MM GHtoup 294-6200 INDEPENDENT MOVERS >'One Room or Houaeful • 'Pianoa or Any Heavy Load •'Spodaliciiig in Hendereon and Boulder City ^VM Btttmatet mad JUMaM Jtatea 293-7t11 NoforanM^vaNabja Learn to play for profit Blacl< lack & craps Approx 85% wi n '34 37 74 HORTICTJLTURIST Consultant Landscape Sprinkler Plans Mclntyre 565-0133 VOICE PIANO LESSONS Private, Specialist teacher Coral Cove Music Studio Productions Director, Teacher. Entertainer Flo Raymond Family rates available j^^ info, Ph 5658469 ——-^ Muled oBtertahaawtVoool piuwi w m%tm. For yoor ekwcb, 0(gaaintloB, chib, or apMiol fMctioa. FfoRayiaoMi TiRRY'S CLOCK SIRVICi Cuckoo Special $24 50 plus parts K4-i301 PIANO instructions in my Green VaHey Home Professional & experienced 4582585 WHOLESALE TOPUBUC •Guns •Ammo •Acceworiea ProArmi Company 732-4907 CHRISTIAN CENTER DAY CARE (CHILD eAM-Mia4CH00L~iNDINaA(rrEN NFOM ANO Arrin SCHOOL CAM POfI BLUMNTAHY AOI-FHU TMNIPORTATION. tt YEAM THIOUOH )TH ORAOE •OKNMPAM-MJP.M. •STATIUCENSU) 'Jf •mORSTAIT lATIO. Al TEACHERS 'l"' •LlrrrLE PEOPLES WORKSHOP CURRICULUM \j^"j •LOT8 0PT.LC >a^i# Phoiw 2S3-2SS0 571 Adam* Blvd. HOMI OF CNRitTIAN CENTER SCHOOL (Klndorgrtn through tth grade) • ••• • • ?• • ma WOMEN'S BIBLE STUDY INTERDENOMINATIONAL JCvwy Wiilaiiiay at 9-JO •JO. 871 AdMM Blvd. FVM babjwlttloc ud rifrMli• MU. If ]ro HO • • •to-im to BoeMw City, COM* tad aakc otw friMida. PhoM MS-TTTS. CoUoctor'a ittma: 4 Dec 7, 1941 Newapapert— "War Declared.'' XWI Britiah oewapapor of EUaaboth'a oonmatioB. Old mnole booka, 0rmaa laaMla Horaar Acwdlan, tvrm of the Coatunr. Other itaina from WWILBictarw.etc.Ph 566>3999. FOR SALE Bicycle, book shelves, bed, sofa, weights, books, appliances, lamps, sports equipment, and many other things. Please call David at 293-5331. Frae Color Analysis S9t Ihmdy for SprtngI Enioy thie life-changing benefits of BoautiControl's connpuier aM8d Personal Image Profile servico, free color analysts, color coded cosmetics and fashions, and siale-of-the-art skin care' Call today and find out how you can receive your Personal Image Profile FREE' Call Iharen MeComb, Imago Consultant 283-2720 ARTHRITIS-PaopU treat yoaraelf. No mediolBe. Get rtUef or money back. Coot la aoiaU. 5§41648. MUSIC A ART GIFT CERTIFICATESavaili abU for the Now Year. Vote A Piano laaaons & orlfinal art by Flo. MARKER BOAT AND MINI STORAGE HAS ^^ EXPANDED' Open and under cover storage for Boats, RV's, Trailers, etc. •Block Walled Fencing •Lighted •7 Day Access •Resident Manager Super Low Monthly Rates MARKER BOAT AND MINI STORAGE 807 Cadli 'HMdmnon'M flMMt' W^ SUN REALTY %t iN "THE REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS" 1)11 Navadi Hwy.. Bouldtr CHy, Navidi IMOI. 24 HOURS (702) 293-2151 Vs^ Ll YOUR ONE-STOP REAL ESTATE COMPANY LARGE RETJREATIO.N R0OM;"IhiraKbol" •dditioa to thin .'Vbedroom Lnria Hone ia graat for the kida PrirH for quick MU at MM^MOgTMt for the porat Doo't wait oa thia oao. CUSrrOM BUILDING LGTS: Lak* Maod vieira or Valky vtowa or Moootaia view*? Now is the time to BMhe year oo l e ct ie a See M today. ADULTB ONLY-COOL AND GREEN; CartfrM Booldw HUla Coado for adalU oaly aad prleMl t MU I,9M. Call aow. READY FOR SPRING Hatd pool + SPA SATELLITE DISH + -bedroom Uwia llltJM TOTAL CaO BOW. POTENTIAL DUPLEX? W.ll-maioulaod i p wekaa caetoai kmrne eoaveaiwiUy locaud. n collMt family pUa. or pooaibU coovertea vta '• • ala g U a daplox. Mak appoiatoMBt today. ADULT GETAWAY-IB6,000: Largoae4MdrooiB. beoutif ally leeaied for view aad privacy, "Boaldor Square." lea tMley. NEW CUSTOM HOMB ON HALF-ACRE: Buikhr ready te baeak grsaad. pii* YOUR plea • ew. LAKE MEAD VUEW-CARE PREI LIVtNO: Laxary IMafl wHk all the aaealtioo, two badroaBM, two aad eaa half baths, plas man. Oaly 1119,800. See tUe eae today. MASTER SUITE •POOL A gPA • OFFICE >• OARAGE: phw Mro. All tMa aad Bealdsr CHy teef Aad aadar tlOI,m COMS oa, we'U dhow yea—call aow. HARDWOOD FLO0R-BEAUTI FULLY RCPINIUfED: plaa three boAooais, aewly aatpalad mi fridiij rofwbWmd B.C CLAflf IC caa be yeara. oaly ITVJOO. See today. >JYOUflOf FICf AND LOOK OVIR TNt MANY I A-1 APPLIANCE SERVICE SALES umvice PAATS •Wathart •Dryart •Rafrlgaratora R9eon TOWNHOUSE 'fl^r!ally laadaeaped 2 RENTALS 4 bedra. 2 ha. Lewla heoae t ear garMaate aprtaUar*. 1 year leaee repaired 1800.00 FURNISHED OPFICB-oxoaUoat loea. tloa A Secy. avaU dallv after liOO P.M. UOO/Bo. CAU FOR DITAILi. Stadio apartmeat ONE Adalt oaly doee ia vacaat 9286.00 IN GINGERW"^' 2 bdrm 1 bath. 14X60. Excel QOLV gda. Covered patio and carport. t(i,500. MobUe home-EXCELLENT CONDITION 3 bednn, 2 bath SSS.OOO alaofuraiture could be purcbaaed—coll for detaila. 14X66' TWO LARGE BEDRMS. new carpet, aide/aide Refer, w/icemaker Covered Patio & Carport READY FOR IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY $23,000 MAM MOBILE HOME PARK-SUPER LOCATION-1 bedrm, 1 ba., CENTRAL AIR/HEAT, aU appUaaoaa. covered patio ADULT ONLY PARK $11,000.00 2 bedrm, t ba. 14X06' mobile home in Oiagerwood Covered carport. 2 porchea EXCELLENT CONDITION $27,900. GREAT VIEW OF GOLF COURSE1986 24X00' Lovely Uadaoapiag COR. LOT, HAS SPA, VERY SHARP $85,000.00 EXCEPTIONAL BUY! Ia Glagerwood Adult park-12'XeO' plaa 7X18' Add-ARoom 1 bedrm. 1 be. Caatral AC/Heat Prioed to SelL $18,500. COMMERCIAL-FOR SALE Local PIZZERIAnVino A Beer BarGREAT LOCATION CALL FOR DETAILS $82,000. LAND "B" Hill-1.36 acre CUSTOM SITE let. Owner willing to trade for home or land In Laa Vegaa Am. $86,000. QUIET SECLUDED LOT IN SUB 11 Partial vUw of valley. ONLY $27,680. EXCELLENT VIEW LOT PRICED TO SILL 171.880. I.S4 UNOBSTRUCTED VIEW-LAKE MBADtt SEE IT NOW-$126.000. Vi ACRE lot overloeka Lake MeadSnltable for your owe pareooal eaatk8BE IT NOW $68,800. moNi NS5^:A£g^^ i 8PBCIAL1 77k# imptnonal hand of a govtmm^nt can nevtr replact the helping hand of a friend For Bialnaw Carda. Ele. CaiMaiayn 5S4.1881 Do you need your house, trailer, apt, or condo clean ed'' Very reliable, reasonable rates Call Patti. 564-1303 LAWN CARE LANDSCAPING SPRINKLERS Ph 564-3280 —I • • -^ — k CUSTOM PAINTING. TINTING, WALLPAPERING. AND CABINET REFINISHINO IntOTiw Extarior. RoaidoatialAcommardaLDiywall rtpalis. Aooouotical coiling* A textured walla. Over SO yrp cip. ia Chicago area. Nevada Ue. ^3. Boqded^4 iaaured. George C. Bruefito ASMOIS HcBderion Home Newi and Boulder City Newt Page 85 Al cnsTOM urn SERVItl ReiideatialiComaeniMl Mow, dfe, trim, clan-up. Tbatch, Vacuum, Fertilize & Reaeed. Tree TrimmtitK, Sprinkler Repair. fVee Eetimate 293-4556 B.C. AARON FENCINQ Frao Eatbnatea Chain Link ft Wood Fertcing 20 Yeara Exp. Ph. 451-8190 State Lie. 15332 MCS MROeNINO Liceaeed Laws Can ^ Reaidential ft Ckxnmerdal Landacaping ^Sprinkler Repair and Inatallation. • Gean up. Thatch, Fertiliw ft Re-aeed. FREE ESTIMATES SAVi SSSSSSSSf on your next horn*, add-on, or npaki lAVE SSHISf SS on your cuatom horn* 6.A. "Curly" Smith ComtrucMon M02-I tM-1C1i SIncalMI FATHER-SON TEAM PAINTING a Experienced a Equipped a Reliable In & Out 796-8104 Also Mobile Homes and Grafitti Sand Blasting LAWN SERVICE 1 time cut, weekly or monthly. Free estimates. 565-3612 YOU NAME IT. WEXL DO IT. RESIOCNTIAL a c om nwcu L •Addittona. •Remodel or 'Repair Uc. No. 14482. Ph. a8m2i4 EMIL'S SpacMsng in IBM Typewriters 807 Federal Henderson N6-8280 Lie. 010-06786 Licensed. 564-6724 LOCOS DCSWNB) For Buaineae Carda, Elo. HENDERSON HANDYMAN Licensad 22 yrs. exp Painting, die, Mal^japer. etc. Very reasonat3ie. 595-ian U-NAME-IT Handyman Service We fix & build most anything. Carpentry, electrical, plumbing, washers/dryers/ refrigerators/ coolers. Reasonable rates Discounts to Seniors & disabled 565-1285 or 565-3298 M ft M LANDSCAPE NEEDS WORK Lawns—Trees—Gardens 5654204 Scott AIR CONDITIONINQ SERVICE Call H.T.C. 293-2599 Lie. 113494 SECOND HAND STORE, Bilmar's, 27 Army St, Furniture & brass & tools, t^isc. We repair all makes models of appliances. $20 service call Guaranteed 30 days. Buy & sell all merchandise. Henderson. 564-7367, or 641-6058. Torn Vinyl, or worn leather. Call New Life Vinyl and Leather. For professinal repair & restoration on any vinyl or leather or velour. 10 yrs exp and Mobile service. We come to you. 565-3929. t HOUSE DOCTORI x Painting WE DO IT ALL ^ Roofing 293-3061 ALDERSON ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION SERVICES, INC. A Full Service Electrician •New Work •Service & Repair •Qplck Service •Quality Work 435-5282 Llemwed—Bondtd—lnaunti State Lie. #2438 AARON UPHOLSERY RECOVER NOW CHAim $48 Labor SOFAS $7S Labor Plua Fabric Suppllae •AU work guerenteed •Free In home eetlmate •Free Pickup A Delivery 9 to 9 PhOM 565-8543 state Uc. 10022567 Bonded and Imurad 30 Yrs. Exparience in Nevada Morrison EkeirkttI CoHt Lea Montaon IMwIiontaon H0IM5M4I34 421 SunwnH Henderson. NV NOIS Oflica 514411$ INTERIOR DESIGNS FURNITURE CARPETS DRAPERIES WALLPAPER Sett prices in Nevada SLEEP SHOP '5730 Boulder Hwy., LAS VEGAS 220 N. Boulder Hwy.. HENDERSON 565-5911 PRyWAU PAINTING^ & Boulder City Paint Center Contracting Service Serving Boulder City. Henderson & Surrounding Areas •COMMERCIAL > •RESIDENTIAL •INDUSTRIAL On Site Colour Conaultlng CALL FOR FREE ESTIMATES eoneftm Quality work that willi beautify your home Uc. h Bonded. Free Batimatee. Reaidentiall ArtleU.293^816. _, I'LL FIX IT WELDING METAL SCULPTURING Call Rupert 565-0119 BRICK-BLOCK CUSTOM WORK Nevada Uc. 24144 14 yrs experience Ph56m64 Patio covers & redwood decl<, for backyard Pool & Spa All types remodeling. Free estimates. Call Erie, 293-6497 Competitive Prteing Ueing "Quality Quannteed" Benfamin Moore Producta Protect Your Home a Property With Affordable Quality Lie No. 0025690 ^09.90AiL ^^^^ Nevada Hwy. ier.MdandBond.d ^W^ JbTVv (Marahall Plaza) I Brakedmma A rotors resurfaced. Custom hydrauUc howw. 308 W Foster, Hdn. Mr. Hose. 5654)111. BLAKELEY EXCAVATION 565-9077 I can dig it! I can move it I By the hour—by the job. Uc 10024515 PAINT AVERAGE HOUSE $200.21 yrs ex. perience. Worl( guaranteed. Call Jim &6-2092. HAULINaCLEANUP. & YARD WORK. ODD JOBS. Free estimates. Call Tony 565-0358. THOMPSON'S COOLER SERVICE & HOME MAINTENANCE-lFree Mtimates. 565-5642. HOUSEPAINTING Interior & exterior, over 20 yrs exp. Republicans 10% Disc20unl Ph 435-3151 DRAIN THAT POOL FOR SUMMER CALL THE PUMPER 564-2606 LMS MINI STORAGE. 1601 Athol Ave. Hdn. 1' block south of Bldr Hwy, I blocli east of. Skyline Casino. Newly expuided. 5x10,' 10x10, 10x20 See Century Steel, Men. through FVi. 564-2555. Weekends caU 5654800. Emergencies call 361-' 2831 o r 367-3079. HENDERSON'S Ucenaed Handyman. Ben DePne. Hire one man to help vou repair it alL Plumbing, walls, paint, electric, cement, carpentry, aecurity systema, burglar alarnu, long time local refer-' ences. Not a state contractor, 566-7468. CARING HANDS OFFERS in home health care services. Live in—hourly. Licensed, bonded, insured. 24 houron call. Companion aides or home makers available. 384-6974. KIN*t 293-004B All Typs of Maliitnane fRsldiitll •Commarclai I Can Fix Or Maka Most MYTMIMO Home Laundnr A I Hoosecleaniiig [ Service —Loweat Ratea— caU 564-3927 LOGOS DESI6NE0 For Buiir)oas Cards. Etc. CaaUmWfn 564-1881 MOSSER MASONRY Bricic, Blocicwalls, Stone SPECIALIZING IN Custom Brick A FIreplecot BMPW sea-SlSd Ivanlngt only 8eS-8200 Uc1478 8e4-0e4f BouuBR eiEcnic Licensed-Bonded-lnsured Lie. No. 15187 Call 293-4899 DEAN'S BODY A PAINT RMMoabl* a Prolaulonal Work 8S2 E. Laka Maad •565-8200 Now Featuring DUZ-MOR-COLLISION REPAIR SYSTEM The Latesi Systetn on the Market EXPERT BODY WORK & FRONT END ALIGNMENT tKOZAL'S TRAVELJ ^ CONNECTIONS • I F.ee Ofllivpfy Vacation Trivei A Eitzaoem Koui ~ I Manager • I 7oa-m-ioo4 I I Lin Tickets Always Accurala Elizabeth Kozal MOMIE MECHMIC •24 hr Road Service •Home Calls •Cars, Trucks, Diesel, Boats, RV's m-S26l IT 177-4601 f ROOF DOCTOR >^ Roofing PATCHING SPECIALISTS ,^ Painting j 293-3061 SmSfi AUTO & MARINE REASONABLE & PROFESSIONAL WORK •564-9116 ^T^ 852 E. Lake Mead FEffiSON MASOM 453-1869 4925 E. Mohave Ave. Lae Vegaa, Nev. 89104 IS YOm GARAGE OVERFLOWING? Phone 293-2302 or 564-1881 TO PLACE WANTS ADS ALL-BRITE CLEANING Carpet, Furniture, & Drapery Cleaning Free Estimates 734-8969 it Satisfaction Guaranteed Licensed, Bonded, & Insured UONMISSW Fw jrovr eaaipbU laa car* eail PONDEROSA LAWN SERVICE 294-7715 UM*IPI Mimrv IMUk >Md|0aMmrnir )|^ infl. Server BouUm CHy. H endeno n. Oiemi Vileir \ ^ '*!• OSS*" —— -EAGER BEAVER Landscape & Lawn Maintenance Residential Commercial Complete Landscape Renovations Log Edgings—Drip Watenng Systerrw Roto-THIing & Baclthoe Service Mwn arm vou AND vouR warnvr m 564-5374 • ^ JOHNS HANDYMAN SERVICE If n neede fixing, I iW/f ffx H Carpentry, MIeetrlpal, Painting, Plumblng,^lKtc... p^Quaranteed Work CmllJohn 369'8417 BOULDER CONCRETE WANTS TO MEET YOUR CONCRETE NEEDS FOR FREE ESTIMATES AND QUAUTY WORKMANSHIP CALL MICK CASEY BOULDER CITY 293-1571 HOWARD HELDERLEIN CONSTRUCTION Commercial—Residential—Remodels and Additions Licenae 021013 565-0874 PAINTING ft PAPERHANGING Just came out of retirement and need ttie work. No job too small or too large. Commercied & residential. nnto MchMl Tharp Ph 702-1-372-5353 Uc. No. 0025741 369-8377 THE SALVATION ARMY IS IN DESPERATE NEED OF FURNITURE AND CLOTHES. PLEASE CALL THE SALVATION ARMY PICKUP AT 649-2374'5^ FRANK'S TV & APPLIANCE SALES & SERVICE For In homo Mrvico call 565-0060 or 365-9050 MAOMAVOX SYLVAMIA PMILCO WARNANrY MTAnOM Free Eatlmatoa JIFFY ^RIM LAWN CARE "We Weik WhUe Yoa FIv" 565-1593 Call STEVE HEDLAND CAREY'S CARPET & FURNITURE i^n i 22 PIECESI •7 Piece Living Room •S Pleoe Betfraom •! t Piaca DirMte •Frame BM SpHng •Mattreaa S698W rjy\^ WEFINANClA/fDiti WE DELIVER NO EXTRA CHARGE! 6495905 384-6781 2305 E. Luke MeeO 1217 S Main Si Open Oelly 'tat -S 30 •CIOSEU SUN I e.C. CANVAS OPECIALTirS Specializing in Custom Ooat Canvas Cuotein Convas *tt. wuppnme Canvas Produola ac Cmvaa Spoetemaa Co llOi NmrMto Hwy. M .200-4500 CARPET YOUR WHOLE HOUSEII WRh No Down Pafmont Up to 00 Montko To Pay 21.09 A.P.IL Complete Home Needs The FURNITURE WAREHOUSE KRVINQ THI COMMUNITY tINCt 14 2540 Bi Charleston Boulevard 382-7953 PnHMOy Serving Boulder aty and Henderaon Stale Coractor Lie 20970 Froteaatonal Landeeepe and SpriiMer... •De^gn •OoMfrueMon •Hepek •and ol oowee Mal n t eno nee INSTACLEAN MAID/ JANITORIAL SERVICE Professional cleaning servce for residential and conv mercial All phases ol general cleaning covered including carpet cleaning, wall/ ceilings washed Acoustical tiles cleaned 293-3316 EMPLOYMENT Babysitter wanted to sit in my home for 1-yrold. Call 383 1737 or 564-3072 after 5"pm • CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE On-line sports database service • needs individual to assist customers in logglng-on, answer simple billing questions and help sales dept w/clerical duties. Person selected will have some computer experience, basic knowledge of sports, pleasant telephone voice, and 8ood communicatins skills 811294-0191 BC weekdays between 2 PM and 4 PM. BC, FEDERAL, STATE & CIVIL SERVICE Jobs $19,646 to $69,891/year. Now Hinngll CALL JOB LINE 1-518349-3611 Ext FJ128 for into. 24 HR. HELP WANTED lady for counter sales. Light cooking and stocking shelves. Apply at HOOVER DAM SNACKETERIA BC. ENGRAVING TRAINEE NEEDED. Will tram Some general office Prefer non smoker. Part time. Phone for appt. 293-5532. BC. Hairstylist, Aesthetician, & Manicurist needed for Salon located m Green Valley. Station rental. Exc. working conditions. 458-0898 or 5653980, ask for Sharon, Deja Vu Halrstyllng. Pre School teacher. Full time position available. Modern facility. Competitive pay scale. Excellent resource materials available. Teacher's supplies provided Call for appt., 565-0007 Math Tutor. High school, college. Algebra. Certified High School Mathematics teacher Call 564-3029. Care for infant in Green > Valley Home.'8 am to 4 30 pm. Mon through Fri. Non smoker. Call after 6 pm. 458-7894. • COMMUNICATIONS OPERATOR" SALARY RANGE; $20,135,83-$22,954 90/year REQUIREMENTS: High school education with one year of put)lic contact work involving receiving and referring information, preferably through the use of a switch, board and/or two-way radio and/or equivalent combination of education and experierKie. Typing: 45 wpm without errors WHERE TO APPLY: City Hall, Personnel Department, 243 Water Street, Henderson, NV89015 Phone: (702) 565-2070. Applications must be submitted no later than 5:30 pm.. Monday. March 7 1988 HOURS OF OPERATION; 7:30a.mto5;30 p.m., Monday thru Thursday • AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER. AIRLINES NOW HIRING. Right Attendants, Traval ^ Agerrts, Mechanics, Cuitoy mer Servica. Listingt. Sal*> ariat to S50K Entry lavel •; poMiona. Call 1-605-687I6000. Ext A-5695. is i % •i 1 ( lr-^^ ". ^I-^Wl" fVJi*''^iJBflyil.l,^ P>IflJ';!l^f!r?S7^:CT

PAGE 36

• P Page M HendertOB Home Newt and Boulder tUy New9 Thmday. March 3. 1988 tWndny. Blttch S. 1981 HenderMo Home Newi and Boulder City Newt Page t7 tMPLOYMENr PAINTER'S HELPER (female) Part/tu time. 293-3061 BC IMMEDIATE OPENINGS in our HOUSEKEEPING DEPT Apply in person GOLD STRIKE INN EARN EXCELLENT MONEY in Home Assembly work Jewelry. Toys & others FT & PT Avail CALL TODAYi 1 518 459-3535 (TollRefundable) Ext B5128. 24 HRS Dental receptionist, exp required Full time Salary DOE Call 565 5662 Maids wanted, apply m person Lake Mead Lodge 8 am to 4 Dm Retail Store clerk'cashier *ull or part time Exp preferred Lake Mead Manna, contact Barbara 293-3484 Expenerwed cocktail waitress wanted. Apply m person 2 pm—5 pm at Nick's Supper Club. 15 E Lake Mead, Hdn LAUNDRY PERSON 24 hours per week BOULDER CITY CARE CENTER 293 5151 EOE.MF.HVBC Green Valley 7-Eleven is looking for more great employees, full or part time. Apply at 690 N Vaile Verde. SALE & IMAGE CONSULTING Help o'^er women look & teei good about tfiemseives through color analysis skin care & makeup techniques. Flexible schedule and great income Comprehsensive trainng provided Call Sharon 293-2720 lor tntarviaw. CASA FLORES RESTAURANT 930 Nev. Hwy. BC. WAITERS, WAITRESSES, & HOSTESSES needed Day & Night Shifts Experience preferred Aobly in person FARMERS";NS GROUP Currently seeking 2 above average individuals .n the Henderson a'ea for the position of ageyit. This is an opDortuhity to own your own business, determine your own fu'ur4and work with the fsnesf molt^e iinescpmpan/ m the coonrr/ We offer excellent training andat yr income guaranteea after training :s compieie Currently employed w'solid work histofy please Send resume to Farmers Ins 2950 E Flamingo #K. Las VEgas, Ne-J 89121 or Call J. Staples at 796-1191 HERE WE GROW AGAIN Oyr newest Wendy's location at 4450 E Sunset in Green Valley is looking for full time or part time day personnel We need homemakers, Sr Citizens, Students, YOU. to work 7 am til 3 pm (hrs may vary) Apply in person 9 am til 5 pm Monday thru Fn or call 642-8622, We are also looking for Jr Managers w/one plus yr management exp & a high school diploma to |oin that same Wendy's team Call or stop by today EARN $$$ ALL YEAR LONG WITH MERRIMAC." We need 3 good sales representatives in your area. Great Hostess and Demonstrator program FREE kit program Car & phone needed CALL FREE NOW 1-800-992-1072 FOUR SEASONS POOL SERVICE now taking applications for Service Man, Minimum age 21 years Must have good dnving record 293-4465 BC RNs NEEDED 3-11 shift (3art-time relief house nursing supervisor 7-3 shift full-time positions for Med Surg One kitchen worker needed to assist in all phases of kitchen duties, part-time Apply Boulder City Hospital 901 Adams Blvd BC Ask for Alice EOE H/V M/F ADULT CARRIERS WANTED to deliver morning newspaper m Boulder City Must nave dependable auto Call Bart 798-0188 BC SANDWICH SHOP Wanted part time help Mon through Fn 10 to 2:30 $3 50 hr to start Please call after 2 pm, for app't 564-0777 MAIDS Apply in person Best Western take Mead Motel, 85 W Lake Mead Dr. Henderson Will tram if necessary Help wanted 7-Eleven Full or pan time Must be 21 yrs. Apply m person 710 Center St BOBS ALL FAMILY RESTAURANT now accepting applications for COOK 761 Nev Hwy BC. No phone calls niease GOVERNMENT JOBS $15,400-572.500 NOW HIRING Excellent lienefits Call 504-649-7922. Ext J-1311 : EIMVIROIMS : VREALTY=^ S93'HaME 4 BDRM CUSTOM HOME ON B-HILL! :ijin}+ SQ FT.2': BATH. 2 CAR GARAGE. STONE FIREPLACE! BIG LOT!: 4 BDRM 1\ BATH CENTRALLY LOCATED AVENL E.S HOME! BIG LOT W ALLEY ACCESS & FENCED YARD! BEFORE YOU BUY DRIVE BY" STARTER/RETIREMENT 2 BDRM 2 BATH BLOCK CONST. FIREPLACE S69.000!! 3 BDRM + IN-LAW^ SUITE FAMILY R.M. 2,000+ Sr^ftW' '•OBSTRUCTED LAKE VIEW! (P.uL TODAY!!. 3 BpRM CUSTOM IN LAKE VIEW SITES FIREPLACE, POOL & SPA! 3 BDRM I' 2 BATH i:OME W CARPORT & LAUNDRYeOtVZAR SCHOOLS & PARK. ASKL', .i82,000 THE ULTIMATE CUSTOM HO.ME! 3 BDRMS + DENTV RM, SECLUDED LfX:ATION. 6+ CAR GARAGE + RV. 2 BDRM. 1'. BATH, 17X20 GARAGE, MANUFACTURED HOME IN LAKE MTN ONE-YEAR HOME WARRANTY INCLUDED! GREAT RENTALS: 2 BDRM, 1' 2 OVERLA.NDTERRACECONFX) ^S-W.-SOO AND .' BDRM, 2 BATH BOULDER HILLS (GROUND LEVEL) ^STLiiOO*! FOR SALE/RENT'LEASE^PTION!! 3 BDRM. 2 BATH, 2 CAR GARAGE SINGLE LEVEL LAKE TERRACE" OWNER WILL HELP FINANCE THIS 3 BDRM, 2 BATH. 2 CAR GARAGE SPLIT LEVEL LAKE TERRACE W INCREDIBLE LAKE VIEW! WE HAVE RENTALS AVAILABLE CALL TODAY FOR DETAILS!! nSTOM HOME BUILDING LOTS IN ALL AREAS OF CITY! CALL FOR LIST! 404 NL-VADA HIGHWAY INTHE-BURK PLAZA 702-2-l63 CALL 24 HRS. Cart Cowan. Broker Max Aabbanifh Mary Bowd Roae Galparia Files Lamb Atnabarf ff^ 293-1499 293-S4M 29S-72S4 2934S37 29&46M AIRLINBCRUISE SHIP JOBS (ALL POSITIONS) Amazing recorded message reveals information guaranteed to get you hired or no fee (702) 382 9064 ext 102 Days, eves, weekends NURSES AIDES espcrienoa daaired but will traia full or part time. Boalder CUy Carr Ceotw S4.50 per hour to fiart. 293-5151. EOEflWF/HVN. it JOBS ir Attar mehool tor Junior mghKId: Timtportatkut tumMmd.Um$40to$$0 w—k and moro. Call S$4-$3S1. MAID SERVICE needa people interested in advancement. Wrk with a crew; Grimebustera Maid Service. 798-1002. EXCELLENT INCOME FOR HOME ASSEMBLY WORK FOR INFO CALL 5 P4-646-1700 Depi P-554 MALE OR FEMALE Companion aides with nurses aide skills needed to work in Boulder City/Henderson area. Private duty, live m or hourly. $5 00 per hour Call for appt 384-6974^ Clerk positions available. Great benefits. Excel. lent pay D.O.E.. Apply at Stop N Go, 850 Horizon Dr. in Henderson, of course^ HAIRSTYLIST Expressions Total Image Salon has one station avail for rent For more inlormaion about )Oining our staff of upwardly mobile stylists please contact Janet Mon-Fn 9 AM-5 PM, 293-5176 BC CASHIER PART TIME HELP NEEDED 30 hours per week Phone 564-3844 or 379-8504 RN or LPN Full time or parttime Boulder City Care Center 293-5151 EOE MF HV __ MAIDS Trainees accepted Apply mornings Best Western Lighthouse Inn, 110 Ville Dr Boulder City. Nv, EASY WORK EXCELLENT PAY Assemble products at home Call lof information 312 741 -8400 EX'T A-JI3n Nufses aides, l yr exp (3ood benefits Call Henderson, Convalescent Hospital at 56 58555 McDonald's of Green Valley now hiring for position for Janitorial service. Hrs are from 10 pm to 6 am Apply in person any day 10 am to 6 pm, at 2550 E Sunset Rd, RAFLROAD PASS HOTEL AND CASINO IS now accep .tng applications, for MAID positions. Apply at Hotel Desk EXPERIENCED FOOD SERVERS needed. Muat have a tray experience, acme knowledge of wines, evening shift. Apply in person HAIRSTYLIST NEEDED Dondino's Hair & Nail Design 3985 E Sunset Road 435-1744 Ask for Janet Phone sales trainees. Earn an to $5 to $10 per hr. wnile you learn. Exciting opportunity in the telemarketing field. Super working coaditioBS. Part time, working 5 days per weak. Selling subacriptiona to tbe Laa VMaa Sun. Call 734-3130 Mon through Fri. 1 pm to 4 pm. • HOUSECLEANING Our residential team cleaning service needs you!! Become fully trained in this rewarding trade as an Annie the Maid nousehadtechncian, and BE PAID TO LEARNi' $4 50 hr to start. It you recently lost your job at State Stove, COME & TALK TO US For information call 739"8888 or come in to apply at 2565 Chandler #3, Park 2000 at Sunset & Eastern. We're close to Henderson EOE, MAIDS WANTED Sands AVON EARN EXTRA MONEY YOUR WAY Just us* your bauty and fashion sons* to supplomont your Incoma. Soli whoro you work, whoro you play or whoro you Ihr*. ^ Your customers are already your friends and corworkers > • Receive Invaluable sales training *' Every Avon product is unconditionally guaranteed To find out mor* about this oxclting now way to oam axtra monoy without a lot of axtra work, call Avon to today at 564-1521 Hendsrson—Grtan Valley—Bouidar City Las Vagas Wash — Bouidar Baaeh Sharon Avery, Dist. Mgr. XIL Boulder Realty 416 NEVADA HIGHWAY, BOULDER CITY. NEVADA [702) 293-3232 I l^m^^Li CHARMING, bright & clean 2 bedroom, 1 bath home, w/partial baaement, private IMCII yard, close to everything. $76,000. LIGHT, BRIGHT bedrm, 2 bath, w/in-ground pool, covered patio, 2 fireplaces, family neighborhood. $105,000. BOULOER CITY CUSTOM HOME-LA MANCHA GOLF COURSE SUBDIVISION: 5 bedroom, 2 foil baths plaa 2 powder rooaaa, formal dining room, playroom, atllity rooai, faaOy room, pooL spa, off-strcct parUag to accomodate 8 vehides and much, mach more in ths hvge Gaorgiaa style home $219,600. PHASE 11 Lake Mountain Estates, 2 Bdrm. 2 Bath, Cathedral ceiling, dry. wall interior, GREAT price at $86,000. CONDO—furnished and ready to move into. TOTALLY upgraded throughout. MUST SELL-Price Reduced. CORONADO ESTATES. Double wide with extra room and fireplace, must see: $72,772.50. ONE FOR THE INVESTOR, a DUPLEX with 3 bdrm, 2 bath units, fireplaces, newly painted and inspected. IDEAL location. VIEW OF Lake Mead from this double wide modular home with -nice finished storage room. $100,000. OVER 3,700 sq. ft. home, overlooking Boulder City and the Valley, needs some attention but the posKibiiities are outstanding. Two fireplaces, oversized 2 car garage, privacy, large planted atrium opening onto inground pool, CALL TO SEE. $186,500. OLDER 2 Bedroom HOME, with Guest House, fenced yard and OFF STREET parking, centrally located, ONLY $75,000. 1,800 -f sq. ft. MODULAR with carport, wet bar, 2 full baths, lovely Undscaping, in Lake Mtn. Eats. $100,990. ON THE GOLF COURSE, 3 bedroom, RV ParUng w/sewer hookup, fireplace in GREAT room, putting green in yard, CUSTOM, well-built home $160,000. LAKE MOUNTAIN ESTATES, mobile home with VIEW of LAKE MEAD, many upgrades, 2 bdrm, 1 *A bath, carport. Price REDUCED, must seU $95,000. A HOME for the Beginning OR the Retiring—A petite home close to everything at a price that's affordable. ONLY $74,500. EXCELLENT LOT w/older mobUe home. $40,000. LAKE MT. ESTATES, Uke New, lived in approximately SIX months, covered deck, walk around sun porch, workshop or storage room. RV Parking. $90,000. THE FLOWERS are BLOOMING at thia BEAUTIFUL 3 bedroom home, NEAR Basic High School, asaumable loan, in quiet cul-desac. Appraised by FHA at $84,000—will sell for $79,500. BOULDER CITY BUILDING LOTS Baild your dream hoiiae overlooUag Lake Maad • tMa priaM OHtam buiidiag let $108,000. 2.19 Acre custom home building lot on eomer of Saa Felipe A Vaqaara price acgotiaMc and owner will carry. Approximately 2 acrea, locatad M "B" kill, Lyaa Drive, IllO^IOO. LCVEL LOT->ady t baild. Ukaifkw Cul-de^ac $106,K '/, atn priiM CmaUm Home Baildiafl Let $45,000.00 WE GET RESULTS! PUT NO. 1 TO WORK FOR YOUl Mch olflea Independantty owned A operatad JANICE CRAWFORD, Owaer MEL DUNAWAY, Broker LINETTE DAVIS DIANNE VANASM RICE LOWELL 293-2Z7S 293-2438 29S-10I7 29M2S4 2M-liM BHONDA BECK ZU-TVJi BLUE JEAN JOBS opaaiaga for packara and • • awablara. Good K iy. Flazibia hoora. oat ham talapkooa & raliabla traanortatka. CaU today. 7W-v COMMERCIAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT RELOCATOMT ^/ 55? CMl ua W Mat MOMMV M ma — flnMawiwca itfi iu3 OPEN 7 DAYS 564-6969 iiai.li GREAT STARTER HOME-This 3 bedroom, 1 bath home hSs recently been remodeled in the kitchen and bathroom. Elementary School is very near by. It has nice lawns in front and back and also a covered porch and covered patio. Freshly painted inaide. Owner needs to sell soon. Call Richard Eddings at 5644969 T:52046. GREAT PRICE REDUCTIONII-Travel when you like but come home to thia quiet location, '/i bedroom townhouse, 2 car garage with opener, private yard with maintenance done for you. Ref ergerator and washer/dryer could stay. 1,300-iaquare footage at thia reduced price is a must for you to aee and buy. Don't miss out, coll Anne. H:50820. PRICED TO SELL—Three bedrooms, 1.75 baths, RV parking in back. Has large living room with connecting dining area, laundry room right outside back door. Nice yards, must see to appreciate. Call Richard Eddings at 5644969. T:51884. CHECK THIS HOME OUT! t-Highland hilla 3 bedroom. Perfect for family. Landscaped, sprinklers, block enclosed back yard, office, covered patio and morell Under $80,000. Call Dean Moorman at 564-6969. H:52680. LOOKING FOR A YARD?-Nice Highland Hills home. Large back yard. Thia 2 bedroom cutie aits on a quiet street in a good neighborhood. Priced to sell. CaU Dean Moorman at 5644969. F:45334. BUY OF THE MONTH-Bring your hammer & nails, paint brushea & paint! This 3 bedroom home already has a new heating system & swamp cooler—just needs some TLC. Listed at $44,500—bring an offer. Ask for Fred or Ellie Knapp, 664-1568 or 5644969. A52794. TRY THIS von SIGHS-A heart-warming, eyeppealing 2 bedroom jewel. Stady could abo be 3rd bedroom. This 1,316 aq. ft. Heritage Vista condo la highly upgraded A beautiful. Lota of atorage, 2-car garage and private patio are jnat some of the apedal features. Priced right to aell. Aak for Fred or ElUe Knopp, 664-1568 or 6644960. H47706. AN ANSWER TO A PRAYER-Ovcr 2,700 aq. ft. of Uving space on a half-acre lot! 4 bedrooma and 3 fall batha, PLUS a large apa/entertaining room. Great location, great price. Aak for Fred or Ellie Knapp, 564-1568 or 5644969. R38935. HAPPY DAYS will be apent in this charming 3-bedroom Montara home on a quiet atreet in Highland Hilla. Patio dowa in Uving room open onto redwood dackiag and a lovely yard. A 14X20 andooad patio odds to your Uving arw. Aak for Fred or ElUe Koapp, 664-1568 or 6644969. W60795. PAY MORE! WHAT FOR-4 bodroom, 3 bathroom home ia the area of Roiabow oBd Chariaotoa. E asr g y affldoat with 2 flrepUoaa. Joat mods aUttla TLC. Lou of potaadaL Ploooaeill BraadaBM at 5644889 or .'l huk. MMM S* Nk>l! 1 1 "^ 1 J ^^ VOU ABK l 1 ^^ wrm ui 1 1 E 1 N 1 s 1 'S A 219 N. 1 T Hendarao^^ 1 Y5644333 ^ Unf. 3 t)drm, 2 btti, like new. Near grammer school. $525' mo plus $200 deposit, i 4584688. ADULT APARTMINTS As Low At I2S0 Mo. Fumlshod 564-6952 FREE AND CLEAR 4 BRTrilevel '/*j acre lot $98,000. Very good area in Denver metro. Trade for similar value house in Boulder^^City 1-303-771-1658. By owner: Highland Hills area. 3 bdrm, 2Vi twth, auto garage door opener. Auto sprinklers. Driveway access to oversized backyard Storage shed. 564-1886 Custom home for sale, by owner. 3 bdrm, 2 bth, spacious. Fam. rm, laundry rm, breakfast rm, country kitchen. 2 fireplaces, landscaped. Many extras. On Vz acre view lot. $85,500 Please call 565-5321. FOR SALE sun porch 3 bdrm, new paint, carpet and lineoleum. Priced to sell! Laureen REALTY WORLD DESERT SUN REALTY 293-2151. FANTASTIC-BY OWNER. 4 bdrm home. Beautiful pool and spa. 3 car garage. 2160 sq. ft. Assumable FHA loan. $135,000. 1514 Irene 294-0026 by appointment only, B.C. Residential bidg lot, corner Fullerton & Valley Forge, $15.000. Ph 4542009 BEHER THAN A DUPLEX. Two attached patio homes. Owner will sell separately or together. For only, $10,000 down for both or $5,000 dn for 1. No qualifying, 3 bdrm, 2 bth, plus study. Asking $62,500. 2 bdrm, 2 bth, garage, energy efficient only 7 yrs old. Good condition. Asking $55,000. Make an offer. Must seM Call Glona, Champion Realty, Realtors 733-3882 or 736-0070 OWNER Win finance. 1470 sq. ft, 3 bdrm, 2 bth, 2Vz car garage. $77,900. Ph 565-5012 GOVERNMENT HOMES from $1.00 (U Repair) Foreclosures. Repos. Tax Delinquent properties. Now selling your area. Call 1-315-736-7375 Ext HNVH1 for current list. 24 HRS LA DOLCE VITA CONDO FOR SALE 1,200 sq. ft. $63,500 Can 565-6618 BC. BY OWNER 4 large BR large closets, 2 BA, fireplace, spa, large covered patio, auto sprinklers, RV parking. ^,500 After 4:30 p.m. 293-3036. BC River Landing, 3 bdrm, loft, 2% bth. Comes w/solar screens, fan, Jennaire, auto sprinklers, garage door opener and blinds. Lived in only 7 months. $87,750. Rh 56S7166. FOR SALE BY OWNER 3 BR 1 Vt BA Lewis Home, Ooae to school. Qood assurrrable loan, $87.500293-406180. $4,000 Down No qualifying, 3-yrs-old, 2 bdrm, m bth. 1 |)lock from new eiemantary & park. Large comer kA. S629 mo. Ph 565-7350. FOR SALE "C0ND6~IN OVERLAND ESTATES. ALL ADULT2BDRM,1^BATH, NICELY DECORATED LISTED AT ONLY $53,500, SELLER WILL CONSIDER OFFERS 293-4663 OR 293-7254 ASK FOR MARY BOARD, REALTOR, ENVIRONS REALTY. 4SALE-Beautirul Poothilla Eatatea— Take over paymenta, no qualifying — 4 bedrooma—apadoua noor plan, aak for Jean. LOW LOW DOWN and ita youra— roomy 2 bedrooma great area aak for Jean. BACHELORS & BACHELORETTES two bedroom condo priced in the SO'a or a patib home you chooae. Aak for Jean. COLLECT MONEY when you've improved thia R-4 lot-^priced at a negotiable 34,900. ASK FOR JEAN KESTER80N CENTURY 21 JR REALTY 564-5142 or 565-7159 J IMAL* IMAL mtr "V, > k*. t ktk. M —ailn, kaga IM. aat; ir BOOMTOIOAMIaUMH h kMM m I* tmm. BMWMH. I • • Ir. nllaa. aaaj iin* A ItaoA |AWiil BM* fauto l.u7> E N E S A 219^ E LWatar^ N T 'S Y5M^333 NEED TO SELL YOUR HOUSE? WE WILL BUY IT NOW? (^044 293*1613 GA. "Carly" Siritk. IBI|!. CUSTOM HOME ON THE GOLF COURSE!! Near 4th tee. 3 bdrm, 2 bath, family room, formaliiving room-Below market at $142,500. DOME REALTY 293-1613 FOR SALE BY OWNER llOt MtMT Drive. K (Drive by and aee. itMn cal 194-0SS1 for sppointinant) $89,900 3 BR IV4 BA approx 1,154 sq ft 2 car garage, drapes, mini-blinds, ceiling fans, stove, ref, wastier/ dryer, dishwasher, water softener, auto door opener, concrete RV parking, 12X27 covered patio, 6X10 storage shed, t)lock wall, auto sprinklers BEST LAND BUY -BY A DAM SnWI4 6 acres across tfie street from Dome Realty Development. Plans included 345' Frontage!' $450,000 DOME REALTY 1S10 Navada Hwy.. ISS-1S1I anytlma FANTASTIC VIEWII High atxjve Lake Mead Romantic custom txiilt villa. Dramatic gate entry 2 story, 3 tsedrriom, 2'/? t)atti. Pool overlooking tfie lake Owner motivated to sell Sfiown by appointment only DOME REALTY — 293-1613 OPEN HOUSE 541 Shoahone Way BC Sunday March 6 1-4 P.M. 3 BR 2 BA Inground pool CENTURY 21 BOULDER REALTY 293-3232 REDUCED TO SELL $99,900 3 BR 2 BA New kitchen. Family room w/fireplace, 2 car garage, spa, large lot, near schools & hospital. 861 Armada PI. BC. Call 293-2893 293-7777 ask for Lillian. 4 SALE: 3 bdrm fiome, fireplace, dining rm. $48,000. Call 565-9453, Owner/ licensee FOR SALE 2 BR 2 BA older home in Boulder City. $57,500. If interested phone 293-7060 BC. WANT TO KNOW what your property is worth? Free market analysis. Call ROGER 293-2939, Realtor Cold well Banker/Anchor Realty. WILL TRADE 2 bIdg lots. Near Burkholder Jr High for one bIdg lot near BM Golf Course. Call 564-1806. For sale: 2 txirm Condo, quiet, comfy & cozy. 351 Van Wagenen. 565-0117 $57,500, 3 bdrm, 2 bth, fireplace, 2 story Condo, across from Edna Hinman Elem. Ph 565-0463 Baak Repoe & COBriguMota. Ut oa ffaid, yoa a hoBM today. CaU OBeWnMoUkHooM; ; SahaMMOSft WANT TO SELL YOUR' HOME? Call for a free market analysis to know what your home is worth on todays market. Call Evelyn Plumb 564-5142 or 565-3723 or stop by CENTURY 21 JR REALTY, 204 W. Pacific, Henderson. COfVlMERCIAL CONDU hOR | SALE 600 sq. ft. Owner will carry. Ask for Laureen! 293-2151 REALY WORLD] DESERT SUN REALTY. 2 bdrm, 1 3/4 bth, fireplace, dbl car garage, corner lot. Large kitchen. Principals only. $64,000. Ph 564-3808 after 3 pm. FOR SALE BY OWNER Uke ] Terrace Townhouse. One level model. 3 BR 2 BAJ 1,500+ sq. ft. 2 car garage. Large covered patio. Excellent Lake view. Pool andj tennis court. Price includes 1 $2 000 carpet allowance. Askino S111.000.293-5096 1 NOTICE OF SALE OF SURPLUS REAL PROPERTY Notice is heret}y given that the Henderson Dtstrict Public Library will receive sealed bids for purchase of tfie larxj and building located at Pacifk; Avenue and Water Street in Henderson, Nevada described as Lot Seventylour (74) of the HENDERSON TOWNSITE as show on the map recorded in Book 3 of Plats, page 42, in the Office of the County Recorder of Clark County, Nevada. The minimum purchase price Is $145.000 cash, with the purchaaer to arrange its.i ownfinncir>g. The prtmerty'J will be sold as is. The Library will continue to occupy the property until compleition o(i| construction of its new building or until December 31,19. whichever is aooner. Bids wiN be recaivad at' 55 Water Street, Henderson Nevada until close ofHA.I ralOU
PAGE 37

• P Page M HendertOB Home Newt and Boulder tUy New9 Thmday. March 3. 1988 tWndny. Blttch S. 1981 HenderMo Home Newi and Boulder City Newt Page t7 tMPLOYMENr PAINTER'S HELPER (female) Part/tu time. 293-3061 BC IMMEDIATE OPENINGS in our HOUSEKEEPING DEPT Apply in person GOLD STRIKE INN EARN EXCELLENT MONEY in Home Assembly work Jewelry. Toys & others FT & PT Avail CALL TODAYi 1 518 459-3535 (TollRefundable) Ext B5128. 24 HRS Dental receptionist, exp required Full time Salary DOE Call 565 5662 Maids wanted, apply m person Lake Mead Lodge 8 am to 4 Dm Retail Store clerk'cashier *ull or part time Exp preferred Lake Mead Manna, contact Barbara 293-3484 Expenerwed cocktail waitress wanted. Apply m person 2 pm—5 pm at Nick's Supper Club. 15 E Lake Mead, Hdn LAUNDRY PERSON 24 hours per week BOULDER CITY CARE CENTER 293 5151 EOE.MF.HVBC Green Valley 7-Eleven is looking for more great employees, full or part time. Apply at 690 N Vaile Verde. SALE & IMAGE CONSULTING Help o'^er women look & teei good about tfiemseives through color analysis skin care & makeup techniques. Flexible schedule and great income Comprehsensive trainng provided Call Sharon 293-2720 lor tntarviaw. CASA FLORES RESTAURANT 930 Nev. Hwy. BC. WAITERS, WAITRESSES, & HOSTESSES needed Day & Night Shifts Experience preferred Aobly in person FARMERS";NS GROUP Currently seeking 2 above average individuals .n the Henderson a'ea for the position of ageyit. This is an opDortuhity to own your own business, determine your own fu'ur4and work with the fsnesf molt^e iinescpmpan/ m the coonrr/ We offer excellent training andat yr income guaranteea after training :s compieie Currently employed w'solid work histofy please Send resume to Farmers Ins 2950 E Flamingo #K. Las VEgas, Ne-J 89121 or Call J. Staples at 796-1191 HERE WE GROW AGAIN Oyr newest Wendy's location at 4450 E Sunset in Green Valley is looking for full time or part time day personnel We need homemakers, Sr Citizens, Students, YOU. to work 7 am til 3 pm (hrs may vary) Apply in person 9 am til 5 pm Monday thru Fn or call 642-8622, We are also looking for Jr Managers w/one plus yr management exp & a high school diploma to |oin that same Wendy's team Call or stop by today EARN $$$ ALL YEAR LONG WITH MERRIMAC." We need 3 good sales representatives in your area. Great Hostess and Demonstrator program FREE kit program Car & phone needed CALL FREE NOW 1-800-992-1072 FOUR SEASONS POOL SERVICE now taking applications for Service Man, Minimum age 21 years Must have good dnving record 293-4465 BC RNs NEEDED 3-11 shift (3art-time relief house nursing supervisor 7-3 shift full-time positions for Med Surg One kitchen worker needed to assist in all phases of kitchen duties, part-time Apply Boulder City Hospital 901 Adams Blvd BC Ask for Alice EOE H/V M/F ADULT CARRIERS WANTED to deliver morning newspaper m Boulder City Must nave dependable auto Call Bart 798-0188 BC SANDWICH SHOP Wanted part time help Mon through Fn 10 to 2:30 $3 50 hr to start Please call after 2 pm, for app't 564-0777 MAIDS Apply in person Best Western take Mead Motel, 85 W Lake Mead Dr. Henderson Will tram if necessary Help wanted 7-Eleven Full or pan time Must be 21 yrs. Apply m person 710 Center St BOBS ALL FAMILY RESTAURANT now accepting applications for COOK 761 Nev Hwy BC. No phone calls niease GOVERNMENT JOBS $15,400-572.500 NOW HIRING Excellent lienefits Call 504-649-7922. Ext J-1311 : EIMVIROIMS : VREALTY=^ S93'HaME 4 BDRM CUSTOM HOME ON B-HILL! :ijin}+ SQ FT.2': BATH. 2 CAR GARAGE. STONE FIREPLACE! BIG LOT!: 4 BDRM 1\ BATH CENTRALLY LOCATED AVENL E.S HOME! BIG LOT W ALLEY ACCESS & FENCED YARD! BEFORE YOU BUY DRIVE BY" STARTER/RETIREMENT 2 BDRM 2 BATH BLOCK CONST. FIREPLACE S69.000!! 3 BDRM + IN-LAW^ SUITE FAMILY R.M. 2,000+ Sr^ftW' '•OBSTRUCTED LAKE VIEW! (P.uL TODAY!!. 3 BpRM CUSTOM IN LAKE VIEW SITES FIREPLACE, POOL & SPA! 3 BDRM I' 2 BATH i:OME W CARPORT & LAUNDRYeOtVZAR SCHOOLS & PARK. ASKL', .i82,000 THE ULTIMATE CUSTOM HO.ME! 3 BDRMS + DENTV RM, SECLUDED LfX:ATION. 6+ CAR GARAGE + RV. 2 BDRM. 1'. BATH, 17X20 GARAGE, MANUFACTURED HOME IN LAKE MTN ONE-YEAR HOME WARRANTY INCLUDED! GREAT RENTALS: 2 BDRM, 1' 2 OVERLA.NDTERRACECONFX) ^S-W.-SOO AND .' BDRM, 2 BATH BOULDER HILLS (GROUND LEVEL) ^STLiiOO*! FOR SALE/RENT'LEASE^PTION!! 3 BDRM. 2 BATH, 2 CAR GARAGE SINGLE LEVEL LAKE TERRACE" OWNER WILL HELP FINANCE THIS 3 BDRM, 2 BATH. 2 CAR GARAGE SPLIT LEVEL LAKE TERRACE W INCREDIBLE LAKE VIEW! WE HAVE RENTALS AVAILABLE CALL TODAY FOR DETAILS!! nSTOM HOME BUILDING LOTS IN ALL AREAS OF CITY! CALL FOR LIST! 404 NL-VADA HIGHWAY INTHE-BURK PLAZA 702-2-l63 CALL 24 HRS. Cart Cowan. Broker Max Aabbanifh Mary Bowd Roae Galparia Files Lamb Atnabarf ff^ 293-1499 293-S4M 29S-72S4 2934S37 29&46M AIRLINBCRUISE SHIP JOBS (ALL POSITIONS) Amazing recorded message reveals information guaranteed to get you hired or no fee (702) 382 9064 ext 102 Days, eves, weekends NURSES AIDES espcrienoa daaired but will traia full or part time. Boalder CUy Carr Ceotw S4.50 per hour to fiart. 293-5151. EOEflWF/HVN. it JOBS ir Attar mehool tor Junior mghKId: Timtportatkut tumMmd.Um$40to$$0 w—k and moro. Call S$4-$3S1. MAID SERVICE needa people interested in advancement. Wrk with a crew; Grimebustera Maid Service. 798-1002. EXCELLENT INCOME FOR HOME ASSEMBLY WORK FOR INFO CALL 5 P4-646-1700 Depi P-554 MALE OR FEMALE Companion aides with nurses aide skills needed to work in Boulder City/Henderson area. Private duty, live m or hourly. $5 00 per hour Call for appt 384-6974^ Clerk positions available. Great benefits. Excel. lent pay D.O.E.. Apply at Stop N Go, 850 Horizon Dr. in Henderson, of course^ HAIRSTYLIST Expressions Total Image Salon has one station avail for rent For more inlormaion about )Oining our staff of upwardly mobile stylists please contact Janet Mon-Fn 9 AM-5 PM, 293-5176 BC CASHIER PART TIME HELP NEEDED 30 hours per week Phone 564-3844 or 379-8504 RN or LPN Full time or parttime Boulder City Care Center 293-5151 EOE MF HV __ MAIDS Trainees accepted Apply mornings Best Western Lighthouse Inn, 110 Ville Dr Boulder City. Nv, EASY WORK EXCELLENT PAY Assemble products at home Call lof information 312 741 -8400 EX'T A-JI3n Nufses aides, l yr exp (3ood benefits Call Henderson, Convalescent Hospital at 56 58555 McDonald's of Green Valley now hiring for position for Janitorial service. Hrs are from 10 pm to 6 am Apply in person any day 10 am to 6 pm, at 2550 E Sunset Rd, RAFLROAD PASS HOTEL AND CASINO IS now accep .tng applications, for MAID positions. Apply at Hotel Desk EXPERIENCED FOOD SERVERS needed. Muat have a tray experience, acme knowledge of wines, evening shift. Apply in person HAIRSTYLIST NEEDED Dondino's Hair & Nail Design 3985 E Sunset Road 435-1744 Ask for Janet Phone sales trainees. Earn an to $5 to $10 per hr. wnile you learn. Exciting opportunity in the telemarketing field. Super working coaditioBS. Part time, working 5 days per weak. Selling subacriptiona to tbe Laa VMaa Sun. Call 734-3130 Mon through Fri. 1 pm to 4 pm. • HOUSECLEANING Our residential team cleaning service needs you!! Become fully trained in this rewarding trade as an Annie the Maid nousehadtechncian, and BE PAID TO LEARNi' $4 50 hr to start. It you recently lost your job at State Stove, COME & TALK TO US For information call 739"8888 or come in to apply at 2565 Chandler #3, Park 2000 at Sunset & Eastern. We're close to Henderson EOE, MAIDS WANTED Sands AVON EARN EXTRA MONEY YOUR WAY Just us* your bauty and fashion sons* to supplomont your Incoma. Soli whoro you work, whoro you play or whoro you Ihr*. ^ Your customers are already your friends and corworkers > • Receive Invaluable sales training *' Every Avon product is unconditionally guaranteed To find out mor* about this oxclting now way to oam axtra monoy without a lot of axtra work, call Avon to today at 564-1521 Hendsrson—Grtan Valley—Bouidar City Las Vagas Wash — Bouidar Baaeh Sharon Avery, Dist. Mgr. XIL Boulder Realty 416 NEVADA HIGHWAY, BOULDER CITY. NEVADA [702) 293-3232 I l^m^^Li CHARMING, bright & clean 2 bedroom, 1 bath home, w/partial baaement, private IMCII yard, close to everything. $76,000. LIGHT, BRIGHT bedrm, 2 bath, w/in-ground pool, covered patio, 2 fireplaces, family neighborhood. $105,000. BOULOER CITY CUSTOM HOME-LA MANCHA GOLF COURSE SUBDIVISION: 5 bedroom, 2 foil baths plaa 2 powder rooaaa, formal dining room, playroom, atllity rooai, faaOy room, pooL spa, off-strcct parUag to accomodate 8 vehides and much, mach more in ths hvge Gaorgiaa style home $219,600. PHASE 11 Lake Mountain Estates, 2 Bdrm. 2 Bath, Cathedral ceiling, dry. wall interior, GREAT price at $86,000. CONDO—furnished and ready to move into. TOTALLY upgraded throughout. MUST SELL-Price Reduced. CORONADO ESTATES. Double wide with extra room and fireplace, must see: $72,772.50. ONE FOR THE INVESTOR, a DUPLEX with 3 bdrm, 2 bath units, fireplaces, newly painted and inspected. IDEAL location. VIEW OF Lake Mead from this double wide modular home with -nice finished storage room. $100,000. OVER 3,700 sq. ft. home, overlooking Boulder City and the Valley, needs some attention but the posKibiiities are outstanding. Two fireplaces, oversized 2 car garage, privacy, large planted atrium opening onto inground pool, CALL TO SEE. $186,500. OLDER 2 Bedroom HOME, with Guest House, fenced yard and OFF STREET parking, centrally located, ONLY $75,000. 1,800 -f sq. ft. MODULAR with carport, wet bar, 2 full baths, lovely Undscaping, in Lake Mtn. Eats. $100,990. ON THE GOLF COURSE, 3 bedroom, RV ParUng w/sewer hookup, fireplace in GREAT room, putting green in yard, CUSTOM, well-built home $160,000. LAKE MOUNTAIN ESTATES, mobile home with VIEW of LAKE MEAD, many upgrades, 2 bdrm, 1 *A bath, carport. Price REDUCED, must seU $95,000. A HOME for the Beginning OR the Retiring—A petite home close to everything at a price that's affordable. ONLY $74,500. EXCELLENT LOT w/older mobUe home. $40,000. LAKE MT. ESTATES, Uke New, lived in approximately SIX months, covered deck, walk around sun porch, workshop or storage room. RV Parking. $90,000. THE FLOWERS are BLOOMING at thia BEAUTIFUL 3 bedroom home, NEAR Basic High School, asaumable loan, in quiet cul-desac. Appraised by FHA at $84,000—will sell for $79,500. BOULDER CITY BUILDING LOTS Baild your dream hoiiae overlooUag Lake Maad • tMa priaM OHtam buiidiag let $108,000. 2.19 Acre custom home building lot on eomer of Saa Felipe A Vaqaara price acgotiaMc and owner will carry. Approximately 2 acrea, locatad M "B" kill, Lyaa Drive, IllO^IOO. LCVEL LOT->ady t baild. Ukaifkw Cul-de^ac $106,K '/, atn priiM CmaUm Home Baildiafl Let $45,000.00 WE GET RESULTS! PUT NO. 1 TO WORK FOR YOUl Mch olflea Independantty owned A operatad JANICE CRAWFORD, Owaer MEL DUNAWAY, Broker LINETTE DAVIS DIANNE VANASM RICE LOWELL 293-2Z7S 293-2438 29S-10I7 29M2S4 2M-liM BHONDA BECK ZU-TVJi BLUE JEAN JOBS opaaiaga for packara and • • awablara. Good K iy. Flazibia hoora. oat ham talapkooa & raliabla traanortatka. CaU today. 7W-v COMMERCIAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT RELOCATOMT ^/ 55? CMl ua W Mat MOMMV M ma — flnMawiwca itfi iu3 OPEN 7 DAYS 564-6969 iiai.li GREAT STARTER HOME-This 3 bedroom, 1 bath home hSs recently been remodeled in the kitchen and bathroom. Elementary School is very near by. It has nice lawns in front and back and also a covered porch and covered patio. Freshly painted inaide. Owner needs to sell soon. Call Richard Eddings at 5644969 T:52046. GREAT PRICE REDUCTIONII-Travel when you like but come home to thia quiet location, '/i bedroom townhouse, 2 car garage with opener, private yard with maintenance done for you. Ref ergerator and washer/dryer could stay. 1,300-iaquare footage at thia reduced price is a must for you to aee and buy. Don't miss out, coll Anne. H:50820. PRICED TO SELL—Three bedrooms, 1.75 baths, RV parking in back. Has large living room with connecting dining area, laundry room right outside back door. Nice yards, must see to appreciate. Call Richard Eddings at 5644969. T:51884. CHECK THIS HOME OUT! t-Highland hilla 3 bedroom. Perfect for family. Landscaped, sprinklers, block enclosed back yard, office, covered patio and morell Under $80,000. Call Dean Moorman at 564-6969. H:52680. LOOKING FOR A YARD?-Nice Highland Hills home. Large back yard. Thia 2 bedroom cutie aits on a quiet street in a good neighborhood. Priced to sell. CaU Dean Moorman at 5644969. F:45334. BUY OF THE MONTH-Bring your hammer & nails, paint brushea & paint! This 3 bedroom home already has a new heating system & swamp cooler—just needs some TLC. Listed at $44,500—bring an offer. Ask for Fred or Ellie Knapp, 664-1568 or 5644969. A52794. TRY THIS von SIGHS-A heart-warming, eyeppealing 2 bedroom jewel. Stady could abo be 3rd bedroom. This 1,316 aq. ft. Heritage Vista condo la highly upgraded A beautiful. Lota of atorage, 2-car garage and private patio are jnat some of the apedal features. Priced right to aell. Aak for Fred or ElUe Knopp, 664-1568 or 6644960. H47706. AN ANSWER TO A PRAYER-Ovcr 2,700 aq. ft. of Uving space on a half-acre lot! 4 bedrooma and 3 fall batha, PLUS a large apa/entertaining room. Great location, great price. Aak for Fred or Ellie Knapp, 564-1568 or 5644969. R38935. HAPPY DAYS will be apent in this charming 3-bedroom Montara home on a quiet atreet in Highland Hilla. Patio dowa in Uving room open onto redwood dackiag and a lovely yard. A 14X20 andooad patio odds to your Uving arw. Aak for Fred or ElUe Koapp, 664-1568 or 6644969. W60795. PAY MORE! WHAT FOR-4 bodroom, 3 bathroom home ia the area of Roiabow oBd Chariaotoa. E asr g y affldoat with 2 flrepUoaa. Joat mods aUttla TLC. Lou of potaadaL Ploooaeill BraadaBM at 5644889 or .'l huk. MMM S* Nk>l! 1 1 "^ 1 J ^^ VOU ABK l 1 ^^ wrm ui 1 1 E 1 N 1 s 1 'S A 219 N. 1 T Hendarao^^ 1 Y5644333 ^ Unf. 3 t)drm, 2 btti, like new. Near grammer school. $525' mo plus $200 deposit, i 4584688. ADULT APARTMINTS As Low At I2S0 Mo. Fumlshod 564-6952 FREE AND CLEAR 4 BRTrilevel '/*j acre lot $98,000. Very good area in Denver metro. Trade for similar value house in Boulder^^City 1-303-771-1658. By owner: Highland Hills area. 3 bdrm, 2Vi twth, auto garage door opener. Auto sprinklers. Driveway access to oversized backyard Storage shed. 564-1886 Custom home for sale, by owner. 3 bdrm, 2 bth, spacious. Fam. rm, laundry rm, breakfast rm, country kitchen. 2 fireplaces, landscaped. Many extras. On Vz acre view lot. $85,500 Please call 565-5321. FOR SALE sun porch 3 bdrm, new paint, carpet and lineoleum. Priced to sell! Laureen REALTY WORLD DESERT SUN REALTY 293-2151. FANTASTIC-BY OWNER. 4 bdrm home. Beautiful pool and spa. 3 car garage. 2160 sq. ft. Assumable FHA loan. $135,000. 1514 Irene 294-0026 by appointment only, B.C. Residential bidg lot, corner Fullerton & Valley Forge, $15.000. Ph 4542009 BEHER THAN A DUPLEX. Two attached patio homes. Owner will sell separately or together. For only, $10,000 down for both or $5,000 dn for 1. No qualifying, 3 bdrm, 2 bth, plus study. Asking $62,500. 2 bdrm, 2 bth, garage, energy efficient only 7 yrs old. Good condition. Asking $55,000. Make an offer. Must seM Call Glona, Champion Realty, Realtors 733-3882 or 736-0070 OWNER Win finance. 1470 sq. ft, 3 bdrm, 2 bth, 2Vz car garage. $77,900. Ph 565-5012 GOVERNMENT HOMES from $1.00 (U Repair) Foreclosures. Repos. Tax Delinquent properties. Now selling your area. Call 1-315-736-7375 Ext HNVH1 for current list. 24 HRS LA DOLCE VITA CONDO FOR SALE 1,200 sq. ft. $63,500 Can 565-6618 BC. BY OWNER 4 large BR large closets, 2 BA, fireplace, spa, large covered patio, auto sprinklers, RV parking. ^,500 After 4:30 p.m. 293-3036. BC River Landing, 3 bdrm, loft, 2% bth. Comes w/solar screens, fan, Jennaire, auto sprinklers, garage door opener and blinds. Lived in only 7 months. $87,750. Rh 56S7166. FOR SALE BY OWNER 3 BR 1 Vt BA Lewis Home, Ooae to school. Qood assurrrable loan, $87.500293-406180. $4,000 Down No qualifying, 3-yrs-old, 2 bdrm, m bth. 1 |)lock from new eiemantary & park. Large comer kA. S629 mo. Ph 565-7350. FOR SALE "C0ND6~IN OVERLAND ESTATES. ALL ADULT2BDRM,1^BATH, NICELY DECORATED LISTED AT ONLY $53,500, SELLER WILL CONSIDER OFFERS 293-4663 OR 293-7254 ASK FOR MARY BOARD, REALTOR, ENVIRONS REALTY. 4SALE-Beautirul Poothilla Eatatea— Take over paymenta, no qualifying — 4 bedrooma—apadoua noor plan, aak for Jean. LOW LOW DOWN and ita youra— roomy 2 bedrooma great area aak for Jean. BACHELORS & BACHELORETTES two bedroom condo priced in the SO'a or a patib home you chooae. Aak for Jean. COLLECT MONEY when you've improved thia R-4 lot-^priced at a negotiable 34,900. ASK FOR JEAN KESTER80N CENTURY 21 JR REALTY 564-5142 or 565-7159 J IMAL* IMAL mtr "V, > k*. t ktk. M —ailn, kaga IM. aat; ir BOOMTOIOAMIaUMH h kMM m I* tmm. BMWMH. I • • Ir. nllaa. aaaj iin* A ItaoA |AWiil BM* fauto l.u7> E N E S A 219^ E LWatar^ N T 'S Y5M^333 NEED TO SELL YOUR HOUSE? WE WILL BUY IT NOW? (^044 293*1613 GA. "Carly" Siritk. IBI|!. CUSTOM HOME ON THE GOLF COURSE!! Near 4th tee. 3 bdrm, 2 bath, family room, formaliiving room-Below market at $142,500. DOME REALTY 293-1613 FOR SALE BY OWNER llOt MtMT Drive. K (Drive by and aee. itMn cal 194-0SS1 for sppointinant) $89,900 3 BR IV4 BA approx 1,154 sq ft 2 car garage, drapes, mini-blinds, ceiling fans, stove, ref, wastier/ dryer, dishwasher, water softener, auto door opener, concrete RV parking, 12X27 covered patio, 6X10 storage shed, t)lock wall, auto sprinklers BEST LAND BUY -BY A DAM SnWI4 6 acres across tfie street from Dome Realty Development. Plans included 345' Frontage!' $450,000 DOME REALTY 1S10 Navada Hwy.. ISS-1S1I anytlma FANTASTIC VIEWII High atxjve Lake Mead Romantic custom txiilt villa. Dramatic gate entry 2 story, 3 tsedrriom, 2'/? t)atti. Pool overlooking tfie lake Owner motivated to sell Sfiown by appointment only DOME REALTY — 293-1613 OPEN HOUSE 541 Shoahone Way BC Sunday March 6 1-4 P.M. 3 BR 2 BA Inground pool CENTURY 21 BOULDER REALTY 293-3232 REDUCED TO SELL $99,900 3 BR 2 BA New kitchen. Family room w/fireplace, 2 car garage, spa, large lot, near schools & hospital. 861 Armada PI. BC. Call 293-2893 293-7777 ask for Lillian. 4 SALE: 3 bdrm fiome, fireplace, dining rm. $48,000. Call 565-9453, Owner/ licensee FOR SALE 2 BR 2 BA older home in Boulder City. $57,500. If interested phone 293-7060 BC. WANT TO KNOW what your property is worth? Free market analysis. Call ROGER 293-2939, Realtor Cold well Banker/Anchor Realty. WILL TRADE 2 bIdg lots. Near Burkholder Jr High for one bIdg lot near BM Golf Course. Call 564-1806. For sale: 2 txirm Condo, quiet, comfy & cozy. 351 Van Wagenen. 565-0117 $57,500, 3 bdrm, 2 bth, fireplace, 2 story Condo, across from Edna Hinman Elem. Ph 565-0463 Baak Repoe & COBriguMota. Ut oa ffaid, yoa a hoBM today. CaU OBeWnMoUkHooM; ; SahaMMOSft WANT TO SELL YOUR' HOME? Call for a free market analysis to know what your home is worth on todays market. Call Evelyn Plumb 564-5142 or 565-3723 or stop by CENTURY 21 JR REALTY, 204 W. Pacific, Henderson. COfVlMERCIAL CONDU hOR | SALE 600 sq. ft. Owner will carry. Ask for Laureen! 293-2151 REALY WORLD] DESERT SUN REALTY. 2 bdrm, 1 3/4 bth, fireplace, dbl car garage, corner lot. Large kitchen. Principals only. $64,000. Ph 564-3808 after 3 pm. FOR SALE BY OWNER Uke ] Terrace Townhouse. One level model. 3 BR 2 BAJ 1,500+ sq. ft. 2 car garage. Large covered patio. Excellent Lake view. Pool andj tennis court. Price includes 1 $2 000 carpet allowance. Askino S111.000.293-5096 1 NOTICE OF SALE OF SURPLUS REAL PROPERTY Notice is heret}y given that the Henderson Dtstrict Public Library will receive sealed bids for purchase of tfie larxj and building located at Pacifk; Avenue and Water Street in Henderson, Nevada described as Lot Seventylour (74) of the HENDERSON TOWNSITE as show on the map recorded in Book 3 of Plats, page 42, in the Office of the County Recorder of Clark County, Nevada. The minimum purchase price Is $145.000 cash, with the purchaaer to arrange its.i ownfinncir>g. The prtmerty'J will be sold as is. The Library will continue to occupy the property until compleition o(i| construction of its new building or until December 31,19. whichever is aooner. Bids wiN be recaivad at' 55 Water Street, Henderson Nevada until close ofHA.I ralOU
PAGE 38

T^ Page S8 Henderson Hom^ews aiid Boulder City News Tkmwimj, Blareh S, iNt .d: BY OWNER Unique custom design overlooking Lake Mead. 1,627 sq. ft. living space. 2 bdr & 2 full baths. Fireplace in living room with view of lake. Heated pool-. Sd $S6,000. 293-3696 or 299-2367 BC. FOR SALE BY OWNER— nice 3 bed room, 2 bath home. Cul-de-sac, Aluminum siding, new paint and appliances inside. Ready for move in. Price reducetl to $85,000. 293-5898. BC. .**i • .**( • *'/> • • y^B? u.n^iii'' .-.---. • • ^^ n'mm'.^t FOR SALE: $45,000. 1820 Bearden. 2 bdrm, 1 bth, cute little home w/all appliances. Possible lease option. Call Peggy Benedict, 566-1481 or Jensen's Realty 564-3333. ic OPEN HOUSE SHOWCASE • SATURDAY, MARCH 5TH 624 HIDDEN VALLEY 626 APOLLO 608 MOSSWOOD 720 ARROWHEAD TRAIL SUNDAY, MARCH 6TH 238 MEYERS AVE. 210 KIRK 242 CONCHO 248 TONALEA CORNER LOT-Newlv developed area. Hillcrest area. Fantastic fi!.sm=^ CENTURY 21-HENDERSON REALTY 18 WATER STREET 564-2515 PREVIEW THESE CHOICE HOMES FROM 12:00-3:00 P.M. Vegas viewl By owner. Ph 564-1881 or 566-1480 ask for Sandra I VAANDQOVT ACQUIRED raOfERTIES HAVE KEYS, SNOWANYTHIE ALL AREAS, PMCES REASONAilEDOmPYIiTS UPTODATEUSn SAVE TIME AND HONEY JENSENt REALTY CALL RAY CURRIER S644333 WOULD YOU Over 4,000 square feet of building in the heart of downtown Boulder City. Fixtures included for $235,000. Call DOME REALTY 293-1613 anytime Nancy Murphy 293-3292 nites H Y D E Ay. • • :;.V: 293-6014 & ASSOCIATES 1325 Arisona Street •Boulder City. 89005 HOMES-LAND-BUSINESS INVESTMENT CONSULTANTS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT I BOULDER CITY TWO STORY GOLF COURSE 4 BR 2' 2 BA Over 2,300 sq. ft. Won't last at $149,500. CORNER LEWIS W/POOL 3 BR V, batb. 2 car garage. Move-in condition. $109,000. RESTAURANT BUSINESS FOR SALE OR LEASE. Located in Downtown Boulder City. Call for details. .NEW MEXICO HOME here in BC 3 BR 2 BA 1,700 sq. ft. of living area. 3 car garage $99,500. CORO.NADO ESTATES Adult section 2 BR 2 BA 2 car garage. $76,500. EXTRA SPACE is wliat this 4 BR Vt BA family home has. $107,500. DEL PRADO LUXURY 2 story 3^ BR 2' 2 BA with pool & spa, covered patio & built in bar. $145,000. I.NCOME PROPERTY 5 units all rented. Only $175,000. LAKE MTN ESTATES over 1.700 sq. feet. Overlooking Lake Mead. Comer lot. $125,000. LARGE HOME ON PINTO 4 bdrm, 2'/: bath, over 2,100 sq. ft. living area. $105,000. GORGEOUS LEWIS Lovely 2 br on Christina Drive. 1*4 bath, 2 car garage. Low Maintenance. $96,500. PERFECT STARTER OR RETIRE .MENT HOME. 3 bdrm, I >/ bath, sereeoed ^ patio and RV parking. $97,500. BOULDER SQUARE CONDO. Beau tif ully redecorated 1 BR on ground floor. Call office for details. REDUCED GROUND FLOOR CONDO—Boakler Square, 2 bdrm condo, newly carpeted, coveaiently located. Priced at $67,500. ON MARINA DRIVE-lovely 3 bdrm 2 bath. Fireplace in kitchen, large yard with lake view. Full Storage Cellar. Reduced to $132,500 COMMERCIAL LOT Dowatowa location Oaly $21,000. RENTALS AVAILABLE 2 A 3 BDRMS Call for FREE MARKET ANALYSIS of yow home. Pat Baratcart AniU Hyde Linda Karfoua Bob Laagevin Jerry .Marshall Aatboay Wirti Bartoa Hyde, Broker h 2934040 293-2144 2930006. 2884166 294-1566 299-7969 293-2144 THIS HOME NEEDS A FAMILY-just reduced $2,000—quiet neighborhood near schools—drive by 142 Elm & then call Pat for details 564-5142 or 293-4393. NEW ON THE MARKET-Paradise Hills-two bedroom beauty with 1,368 sq. ft. on a beautifully landscaped corner lot with R.V. parking. Call Eva for your appointment 564-5142. EASY ASSUMPTION-Highland Hills, three bedrooms, 2 car garage—fenced back yard—remodeled kitchen, fireplace—it has it all. Jackie can give you all the details 564-5142. UNBELIEVABLE PRICE-for golf coursesmaller home with potential for enlargement—large lot with great view of the Valley. Don't miss this sleeper. VERY BEST BUY-Four bedroom Highland Hills home with easy care landscaping & attractive terraced back yard for only $80,000. PLEASANT FAMILY HOME-with large back yard, plus room for R.V.—well located in the Sewell School District—a bargain at $62,900. FREE INFORMATION ON HOW YOU CAN BUY A "FHA" OR "VA" REPOSSESSION! Pu| Number 1 to Miork for you.* 1^ T TTZt JR REALTY 294 W. Pacific 564-5142 ana "Century 21 Real Esfate Corporation mZ'm'Jf Equal Housing Opportunity mm mm WDEFENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED Q GARRETT GREATER NEVADA PROPERTIES, INC 293-3333 554 Nevada Hwy. riuri ^ SERVING BOULDER CITY SINCE 1947 Highland Hills sharp 4 bdrm Chism Vallejo model. 2 car garage, lush landscaping, $110,000. Many, many extras. Desparate seller! Must sell 3 bdrm, 2 bth home on comer lot. Upgraded to almost a custom home, for only $80,000. Gov't owner 3 bdrm, 2 bth home, tile roof, completely fencedd. Good condition. $72,000. 10 acres in Section 16, right in the path of progress. All or'/>, $90,000. Owners will carry paper. TROPICANA REALTY. REALTORS Call Dale 565-3272 or 456-4040 JENSEN'S REALTY O. -JIM-JCNSCN 219 WATER 8T. HKNDERSON. NEVADA SftOtS Mir OFn 7 OILTS A NBn Bus. 804-3333 RESIDENTIAL DIVISION 1124 S. Greenway 471 Ridgeway 527 N. Canyon 331 E. Country Club 75 Oklahoma Dr 501 E. Roily 617 W Greenway Rd. 25 Mallory 4.36 Burton 213 E. Mojave 461 Rooeway 241 S. Carson Way 226 Navajo Dr 218 W: AtUntic 1820 N. Bearden 19 W. Victory Rd. 357 Van Wageaca 4Bed 4Bed 4Bed 4Bed 3Bcd 3Bed 3Bed 3Bed 4Bed 2BMI Bed Bed Bed Bed 2Bed 2Bed IBed 2>/i Bath 3 Bath 3 Bath 2'/i Bath 1 Bath 2 Bath l'/4 Bath 1 Bath I'/t Bath 1 Bath IBath I'/4 Bath 2 Bath 2 Bath 1 Bath 1 Bath 1 Bath IB •lAltO* $225,000 $188,000 $166,000 $155,000 $90,000 $84,900 $79,800 $69,900 $66,000 $56,000 $55,000 $51,900 $49,900 $48,000 $45,000 $42,000 $25,000 COMMERCIAL DIVISION I486 AtlMl 1101 N. Nellis Booldw Highway Booldar Higkway AdholSt. Boddw Higlnray 36 W. PalaSi 10.5 AC Wrwidag Yard $l,900jOOO Shopping Center $000,000 2.16 AC. $3604)00 .75 AC. 1210,000 1.62 AC. $160J0O 10O'X12S' 186,000 VIdaa Store MijOOO soxias msM ONE ONLY!!! Over 8,000 sq ft lot only. Fantastic view of Lake Mead. Reduced to $64,500. Owner Licensee 293-1613 anytime. Terms. BOULDER CITY HOfvIE 3 BR 1 SA basement, garage apt. tile floors, fans, fireplace. Asking $83,000 876-5719 leave message. Will answer all calls. CUSTOM TWO STORY, 4 bdrm, 3 ba. 2,500 sq. ft. '/i acre lot. Priced below appraisal, will carry paper 293-3582. BC. 'mU TO WORK • ^0R YOr' Henderson Kealty offering 18 years of professional service to Henderson residents K SELLER DESPERATE—Zoned for horses, fantastic custom on Vi acre. Central vac, cedar lined closets, dual fireplace and at a tract price! What a view! YES YOU CAN—Own in Green Valley. 3 bedroom with cathedral ceilings. Lush home on a comer lot too!! SPRINGTIME SPECIAL-$15,000 down and you own 1940 square feet of wide open floor plan with 3 bedrooms. 2 story with extra large lot. What a deal! SAY GOODBYE TO RENT WITH A GOOD BUY-This 4 bedroom is spacious well maintained, close to schools. Perfect for your family. ASSUME THIS FHA LOAN-Low down and this adorable 2 bedroom is yours. Lots of extras done. You'll love it. MUST SELL!!—Great starter or retired couple. 2 bedroom home, owner must move today. Minimum down, assumble, no qualifying and great deal. Take this one today. ISLAND PARADISE—Luxury earth sheltered home. Indoor pool and tropical surroundings adjoin 4 large bedrooms. Enjoy this Garden of Eden. PERFECT OPPORTUNITY-4 bedrooms, IV* baths, terrific fixer upper. 1 large country kitchen, lots of additional parking for $59,900. CONDOMINIUM LI VING-Hardly been Uved in. All appliances will stay. Covered parking, patio, and storage area. Seller nets $0.00. MOTIVATED SELLERS SAY SELL!!!-3 bedroom, 2 door garage, block wall, storage shed, and cul-de-sac location. Easy assumption or new financing. COMMERCIAL PROPERTY-At a "give away price' 4 rooms with bathroom and kitchen facilities. Plenty of parking, room to expand with basement area. Excellent location! Reduced to $59,900. IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY-Rent prior to close with approved credit. 3 bedroom, fenced back yard, covered parking and well kept. $62,900. BE THE PROUD OWNER—Of this luxurious 4 bedroom plus family room and extra large master bedroom. Located on Vi acre with 1977 square feet of living space. Sweeping view of the valley. You must see this home. Call for appointment today. LAS VEGAS LOCATION-3 bedroom, 2 bath home priced for a quick sale. Great starter or rental home. ON THE lOTH FAIRWAY-Black Mtn. Golf course, 4 bedroom, 2VA bath, and 2695 square feet of living space. Beautiful pool overlooking the golfcourse. Large spacious living room with a beautiful fireplace. This is a large home for a large family. Call for appointment to see today. DON'T MISS THIS CHANCE-For this lovely decorated 3 bedroom, V/A bath with a patio. HIGHLAND HILLS—Great location!! Reasonable price!! 3 bedroom, \V* bath home. Call today for more information. GARDNERS DELIGHT—This well maintained 4 bedroom home has its own garden plot with sprinklers. Spanish style with a fireplace and the roof. AT A MOST HAPPY PRICE-With interest rates down you can own this 3 bedroom, 2 full bath home. Freshly painted and looks like new. Seller motivated to sell this one. Vacant and ready to move into. Completely fenced, call to see today. PLANNED FOR THE LARGE FAMILY-4 bedroom with a large famUy roomand a utility room with working apace. DON'T DREAM TOO LONG-Or this very nice 4 bedroom, l*/ bath home will be gone. Completely fenced, nice kitchen and separate family room or formal dining room. Has a separate workshop. A large family will enjoy this home. Priced to sell today. LAND LOOKING FOR A LOT-With electricity and pnbUc aewer at the property then this is it. Only $16,000. PARADISE HILLS—Section #32, on this comer of Greenway and Dufort. 4.68 gross acres with seller offering terms! I Utilities within easy access, terrific view lot, and good location for $75,000. CORNER OF STIRRUP AND ROAN-Sction #27 near Old Vegas, corner view lot with custom homes established in the area. PHCMI at $16,800. WITHIN MINUTES FROM LAKE MEAD-SecUon #4an araaof faicreaaing value. Beauitf ul view lot approximately *A of an acre. Watar to property. Owner will carry paper. Priced at $20,000. ADJACENT LOTS FOR SALEll-Saction #27 near Old Vegas. Approximately Vt acre k>ta with flexible boyiag tcrma. Zooad for honoa tool $17,000 par k>t. ^..,......,i._i^_i....._.ii___..._—.—— SSst 18 Water St. (702) 564-2515 ^ jnd ludrnmi M, • ,„„,> .,,..-,,^ .rpi>ralii>n f qui) t(nf(OppurlUfiiv I EACH OFFICt IS INDEPENDf NTIY OWNEO AND OPERATED Ws % U > Boulder City proposed zoning and subdivisions onlinance riiZT Bill No. 930 OS a bsMDMBt ualces sach fkior qaaUAaa as a first story g, sargieal on, or far qaaraatiae parpooM. as or* cnitomorily provkUd bi saaltoriaaM aad bospltala. l a to od u eed by: Ferraro •• drflaed hwria. ^ — • • ——Mr1TCIIEN-A rooaa or portton tharMif, aowi-far thr Par theparpoiMof theTltte.rsst heBH tacludcs anrslag ORDINANCE NO. Ml 19. BOARD OF APPEALS-Th appoiatMl member* of prepwatioa aad ewiUaf of food. baaie, rMidentitl cvstodlal care fadUty, sapcrviMry can AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL ORDINANCES NO. 92 AND the Planning Commisaioa or othor body • • ia eatabUshed M. LOADING SPACE-Aa offrstrMt spaca or bwth on f odUty and ambulatory haolth care eeatar. NO. 176, AND CITY CODE TITLE 11, ZONING AND SUBby Charter or ordinaace. tha aame k>t with a boildiag, or eonticaou to a group of 89. SIGN-All the deflnlUoaa as act forth ia SwitfcM 11-340 DIVISIONS, REPLACING THOSE WITH A NEW TITLE 14. BOARDING or ROOMING HOUSE-A buildiag. or buildinga, for the temporary parking of a ooamereial vehi of tUa Title. Hi AND OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELATING portion thereof, in which lodging, mcala or both (or thrp cle while loading or unloading merchandite or materials. 90. STORY—That portion of a building included between THERETO (AM-87-161) (3) or more penona are provided for compenaation, but shall and which abuU upon a street, alley or other appropriate the upper surface of the floorocxt above, except that the The City Council of Boulder City do ordain: not include rest homes, hotels nor motels. mcAia of access. topmost story shall be that portion of a building included SECTION 1. Title 11, "Zoaing and Subdiviaions," ia hereby 15. BUILDING—Any atructure used or intended for snp55. LOT—Any lot, parcel, tract of land, or combination between the upper surface of the topmoat floor and the ceil. repealed in its entirety aad raplaced with the following: porting or Sheltering any use or occupancy. thereof, shown on a plat of record or recorded by metea and ing or roof above. If the finished floor level directly above TITLE 11 '16. BUILDING ACCESSORY—Any building, the lise of bounds that is occupied of intended for occupancy by a UNe a baoement or unused under-floor space is more than oix ZONING AND SUBDIVISIONS which is subordinate to and/or incidental to the uac of the ; permitted in the Title, including the yards, open spaces and feet (6*) above grade as defined herein for more than fifty SUBJECT jCHAPTEH principal building, and which ia on the same lot. parking apace* required by this Title, and having its prinpercent 150%) of the total perimeter or ia more than twelve Purpose; Definitions (currently Chapter 1) I 17. BUILDING HEIGHT-The vertical distance above H dpal fronUge upon a atreet or upon an officially approved feet (12') above grade as defined herein at any point, auch Zones and Boundariaa Thereof (currently Chapter 2, entitled reference datum meaaurcd to the highest point of the cop place. basement or unused uDder-floor apace shall be considerad "Land Use Zones") 2 ing of a flat roof or to the deck line of a mansard roof or 8-27-87 as a story. "Rl" Single-family Residential Zone (currently ^ to the average height of the higheat gable of a pitched or 56. LOT AREA-The total horizontal area included within 91. STORY, FIRST—The loweatatory in a building which Chapters) h hipped roof. The reference datum ahall be selected by either the bouadariea of s lot qualifiss aa a story, as defined herein, except that a floor "R3" Multiple-family Residential Zone (combines current of the following, whichever yields a greatel height of 57. LOT, CORNER-A lot which haa an interior angle of level in a building having only one floor level shall be Chapter 4, R2" Two-family Residential Zone and current building. one hundred thirty five degrees (135) or less at the interaccclassified as a first atory, provided such floor level is not Chapter 5, "R3" Multiple-family Reaidential Zone -I 1The elevation of the highest adjoinng sidewalk or tion of two (2) street lines. A lot abutting upon a carved more than four feet (41 below grade aa defined herein, for Reserved ^ __ ground aurface within a five (ST horizontal distance or ,treet ia considered a corner lot if the tangents to the curve more than fifty percent (50%) of the total perimeter, or mot* "MP" Mobile Home Pork Zone (currently Chapter 6) rrTW"^ the exterior wall of the building when such sidewalk or at the points of intersection of the side lot lines interest than eight feet (ST below grade, aa dcfiiied herein, for more "ME" Mobile Home EsUte Zone (currently Chapter 7 7 ground surface is not more than ten feet (100 above the at an interior angleof one hundred tlurty-fivedegres(135) than forty percent (40%) of the toUl perimeter. "RV" Recreatinal Vehicle Zone (currently Chapter 8) 8 lowest grade. or lesa. 92. STREET—A public thoroughfare, which affords the pri Reserved y 2. An elevation ten feet (10') higher than the lowest grade 58. LOT COVERAGE—The percentage of the area of a lot dpal meana of access to abutting property, other than an "Cl" Neighborhood Commerdol Zone (combines current Chapter when the sidewalk or ground surface described in subwhich ia occupied by all buildings or other covered structures. alley or walk. 9, "CP" Commerdal Profesaional Zone, and current Chapter paragraph laboveia more than ten feet (lO')above lowest 59. LOT DEPTH-For loU having front and rear lot lines 93. STREET LINE—The boundary line between a street 11, "01" Ndghborhood Commerdal Zone 10 grade. The height of a atepped or terraced building is which are parallel, the shortest horizontal distance between and the abutting lot or parcel. "C2" General Commerdal Zone (replacea current Chapter 13. the maximum height of any segment of the building. guch lines: (or lots having front and rear lot lines which 94. STRUCTURAL ALTERATION—Any change in the "IP" Industrial Park Zone 12 18. BUILDING OFFICIAL-The Building Oflidai o( are not parallel, the shortest horizontal disUnce between supporting members o( a building, auch as bearing walls "CM" Commerdal Manu(acturing Zone (combines current Boulder City, Nevada. the midpoint o( the (ront lot line and the midpoint o( the or partitions, columns, beams or girders, or any complete Chapter 18, "CM" Commerdal Manufacturing Zone, and cur19. BUILDING SITE—The ground area occupied by a rear lot line; and for triangular abaped Iota, the ahortest rebuilding of the roof or exterior walla. rent Chapter 19, "M" Maanfacturing Zone 13 building, or goup of buildinga, together with all open apaces horizontal diatanoe between the front lot line and a line within 95. STRUCTURE—Anything conatnicted or erected which Reserved 14 as required by this Title. the lot, parallel to and at a maximum diatance from the require* location on the ground or which ia attached to "H" Hospital Zone (currently Chapter 14) 15 20. BUSINESS or COMMERCE-Any activity or uoe of (ront lot Una, having a length of not leoa than ten (eet (10). something having a locatioB on the gnmnd, but not iBdmlinc "G" Government Zone (currently Chapter 21) 16 land which involve* the buying, selling, processing or Im60. LOT, INTERIOR—A lot other than a comer lot. tents, vehicles, travel trailers or mobile hones. "S" Interim Study Zone (currently Chapter 22( 18 proving o( things not produced on said land and having 61. LOT, KEY—A lot adjacent to a comer lot having its 96. TRAVEL TRAILER—A portable atructure mounted Reserved 19 finandal gain or livelihood as the primary aim of the activiajde lot Uae In common with the rear lot line of the corner on wheels, oonaiiting o( a vehicular chaaoia primarily designGeneral Uses; Conditions; Exceptions (currently ty or use. whether or not such activity or use be for hire lot and fronting on the street which forms the side bouned as temporary living quarters for recreational, camping Chapter 24) 20 or on account of the buyer, seller, processor or improver. dary of the comer lot. or travel uae and designed to be drawn by another vehicle. Substandard Lots of Records (currently Chapter 26) 21 21. CABANAS—A roofed structure, attached or immediate62. LOT LINE—Any line bounding a lot. and designated by the manufacturer as a travel trailer. A Reserved 22 ly adjacent to a mobile home, having two (21 sided complete63. LOT LINE, FRONT—A boundary of a lot which vehicle is not a travel trailer if, when equipped for highway Off-Street Parking and Loading Requirements (currently ly unobstmcted. separates the lot from the street; and in the cose of the coruae, it is more than eight feet (80 wide. Chapter 23) 23 22. CARPORT-A building wth not more than two (2) comner lot, the front lot line is the shorter of the two (2) lot 97. USE—The purpose for which land or a building is arSigns and Advertising Structures (currently pletely enclosed sides which is used for automobile shelter |jes separating the lot from the street. ranged, designed or intended or for which either land or Chapter 31) 24 or storage. 64. LOT LINE,lREAR— The boundary of a k)t which is building is, or may be, occupied or maintained. Landscaping (currently Chapter 17) 25 23. CITY-Boulder City, Clark County, Nevada. most distant from, and is. or is most nearly, parallel to the 98. USE-ACCESSORY—Any use which ia subordinate to Planned Unit Developments (currently Chiipter 30) 26 24. CITY ATTORNEY—The City Attorney of Boulder dty, front lot line; except that in the absence of a rear lot line and/or inddental to the use of the land and/or building or Reserved 27 Nevada. as is the case of the triangular shaped lot, the rear lot line stracture thereon. Reserved 27 25. CITY CLERK—The City Clerk of Boulder City, Nevada. may be considerd as a line within the lot, parallel to and 99. YARD—An open space on the some lot with a building. Home Occupantiong (currently Chapter 29) 29 26. CITY COUNCIL or COUNCIL—The legislative body at maximum distance from the front lot lipe, having a length unoccupied and unobstructed from the ground upward, exConditional Uses (currently Chapter 28) ^ .30 of Boulder City, Clark County, Nevada. of not less than ten feet (100. cept as other wise provided herein. Nonconf orming buildings and Uses (currently 27. CITY ENGINEER-The City Engineer of Boulder City, 65. LOT LINE, SIDE-The boundary of a lot which is not 100. YARD, FRONT-An open and unobstructed space betChapter 25) 31 Nevada. a front lot line or a rear lot line. ween a building and the front lot line, being parallel to and Variances (currently Chapter 27) 32 28. CITY MANAGER—The City Manager of Boulder City, 66. LOT THROUGH—A lot having a pair of opposite lot along the front lot line, to be measured horizontally from Amendments (cccccccccccurrently Chapter 32) 33 Nevada. lines abutting two (2) streets, and which is not a corner lot. the nearest line of any building, or enclosed or covered porAppeals (currently Chapter 34) 34 29. CITY PLAIVNING COMMISSION, PLANNING COMOn such lot, both lot lines are front lot lines. tion or the extension of the latter line, to the nearest point Fees, Notices and Hearing (currently Chapter 33) .^ 35 MISSlONorCOMMISSION—The City Planning Commis67. LOT WIDTH-The average horizontal distance between of the front lot line. In cases where the majority of lots Enforcement (currently Chapter 35) • .,..> • ... 10 ^ 'on of Boulder City, Clark County, Nevada. the side lot lines, measured at right angles to the lot depth. located on one aide of a street between two (2) interesting Reserved 7 37 30. COMMON OPEN SPACE—A parcel or parcels of land 68. MOBILE HOME—A structure which is built on a perstreets have been occupied by buildings having a front Reserved 38 or an area of water or combination of land and water within manent chassis; designedto be used with out without a perbuilding line different from the one stipulated in this Title, Subdivision Regulations (currently Chapter 36) 39 the site designated for a planned unit development which manent foundation: more than eight feet (80 in body width any building or addition to an existing building hereafter Flood Hazard Reductions (currently Chapter 38) 40 • designed and intended for the uoe or enjoyment of the and forty feet (4O0 in body length: and containing a minimum erected shall conform to the line previouly established by Dwelling and Hotel-Motel Development Control Pkn (currently residents or owners of the developement. living space of four hundred fifth (450) square feet." Mobile these buildings. Chapter 37 41 31. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR-The Home" does not include a recreational vehicle or travel 101. YARD. REAR—An open an unobstructed spare betResidential Construction Tax (currently Chapter Community Development Director of Boulder City, Clark trailer. ween a building and the rear lot line, being parallel to and Chapter 39) 42 County, Nevada. 69. MOBILE HOME PARK—Any parcel of land upon which along the rear lot line, to the measured horizontally from 32. CONDITIONAL USE—A use of land for which a conditwo (2) or more mobile homes occupied for dwelling or sleepthe nearest line of any buildings, or enclosed or covered tioncti use permit is required. jng purposeg, are located regardless of whether or not a portion of the extension of the latter line, to the nearest piiDDTkc? niprpiMwTi.t<:, 33. COMOMlNIUM-AnesUte in real property consisting charge is made for such accommodations. point of the rear lot Une. fUKhVM!,; UtI-INITIQNS o( nn undivided interest in common in portions of a parcel 70. MOBILE HOME SPACE-A plot of ground within a 102. YARD, REQUIRED-A minimum open space as SECTION: or real property together with: mobile home park designed for the accommodation of one spedfied by the regulations of the Title for front, rear and 11-1-1: Purpose of Ordinance 1. A separate interest in space in a residential, industrial mobile home together with its accessory structures induding side yards, as distinguished from any yard area in excess 11-1-2: Short Title or commerdal building or industrial and commerdal carports or other off-street parking areas, storage lockers, of the minimum required. 11-1-3: Definitions building on such real property, such as, butnotrsstlkted ramadaa, cabanas, patios, patio covers, awnings and similar 103. YARD, SIDE—An open and unobstructed space bet11-1-1: PU RPOSE OF URmNAlNt^t.! IBt pni B 8 le guiatiw w • 1^ p— -/K~ ~. .t.o^ -_,_.„ V aoaurUnances. ween a building and the side lot line, being parallel to and and zone as set for herein have been established in accordance 2. A separate interest in air space, without any building 71. MOBILE HOIVlk SUBDIVISIUIN—A iubdivlsion a io n g rae s i tie iui Um. li VK. • mmiiuuj !iri i; a; aii j fr— — with the Comprehensive Plan and are intended to guide the structure, to be used for a mobile home. A condominium designed and inUnded for reaidential use where residence the nearest line of any building, or enclosed or covered pordevelopment of land in a manner consistent with the commay include in addition a separate interest in other poris in mobile homes exclusively. *'>" or the exteiuion of the latter line, to the nearest point munlty goals. poUdes, and objectives as set forth in the Comtions of auch real property. 72. MOTEL—A building or group of buildings containing of the side lot line, prehensive Plan, andd ore designed to: 34. DWELLING—A building, or portion thereof, designed guest rooms, some or all of which have a separate entrance 104. ZONE—The various land use zones as established by (A) Lessen congestion in the streets. or intended to be used exclusively for residential purposes, leading diredty from the outside of the building with garage this Title aadJor as shown and delineated on the "Zoning (B) Secure safety from fire, panic and other dangers. including one-family, two-family and multiple-family, but or parking apace located on the lot and designed, used, or Map." (C) Provide adequate light and air. Bot including boarding or rooming houses, hotels, motels, intended wholly or in part for the accommodation of CHAPTER 2 (D) Prevent the overcrowding of land and otherwise protect rest homes or any other commerdal uses. automobile transients. Motel includes motor courts, motor ZONES AND BOUDARIES THEREOF natural resources from impairment. 35. DWELLING GROUP—A group of two (2) or more lodges and tourist courts, but not mobile home parks or SECTION: (E) Protect life and property in areas subject to floods, landdetached buildings designed or intended to be used as onetravel trailer parks. 11-2-1: Zones Established sUdes and other natural disasters. family, two-family or multiple-family dwelUngs located on 73. NONCONFORMING BUILDING OR STRUCTURE11.2-2: Zoning Map IF) Conserve the value of the buildings and Btractures. a single lot, together with all open spaces as required by A lawfully constracted building or structure existing at the 11-2-3: Changes in Boundaries (G) Protect property and promote the health, safety and general this Title, but not including boarding or rooming houses. time thia Title, or amendmenU thereto, became effective 11.2-4: Zone Boundary Uncertainties welfare. hotels, moUls, rest homes or any other conunerical uses. which does not conform with the regulations for the zone 11-2-5: Zone Boundaries and Regulations Adopted These reguUtions ore made with reasonable consideration, 36. DWELLING. MULTIPLE-FAMILY-A building, or in which it is located. 11-2* Conformity Required among other things, to the character of the zone and ito peculiar portion thereof, designed or hitended to be used for occupan74. NONCONFORMING LOT—A legally esUbUshed lot 11.2-7: PubUc Utility Fadlities suiubility for particular uses, and with a view to conserving cy by three (3) or more families living independently of each or parcel existing at the time this Title, or parcel existing 11-1-1: ZONES ESTABLISHED: For the purpose and provithe value of buildings and encouraging the most appropriate other and containing three (31 or more dwelling units. at the time tliis Title, or amendments thereto, became efgions of this Title, the City is hereby divided into the following use of land throughout the City. 37. DWELLING, SINGLE-FAMILY—A building designfective which does not conform with the minimum lot area, zones: 11-1-2: SHORT TITLE: The Title shall be known as the "ZONed or intended to be used for occupancy by one family and width or depth requiremenU for the cone in which it is Rl Single-Family Residential Zone ING ORDINANCE OF BOULDER CITY." containing one dwelUng unit. located. R3 MulUple-Family Residential Zone :\ 11-1-3: DEFINITIONS: 38. DWELLING, TWO-FAMILY-A building designed or 75. NONCONFORMING USE-The lawful use of any MP Mobile Home Park Zone (A) General Terminology: For the purpose of carrying out the intended to be used for occupancy by not more than two building or land existing at the time this Title, or amendME Mobile Home Estate Zone intent of the Title, the following words, phrases and terms <2) families living independently of each other and containments thereto, became effective which does not conform RV Recreational Vehicle Zone shall have the meaning ascribed to them in this Section: '"g two (2) dwelling units. with the use regulations for the zone in which it is located. Cl Neighborhood Commerdal Zone 1. Words used in the present tense include the future. 39. DWELLING UNIT-A building or portion of a building 76. PARKING SPACE-An area, other than a street or C2 General Commerdal Zone 2. Words in the singular number include the plural. planned, designed or used as a residence for one fsmily onalley, reserved for the parking of vehicles, adjacent to such BP Business Park Zone 3. Worda in the plural number include the singular. ly, living independently or other families or person, and ha vadditional area as is necessary to afford adequate and unimCM Commercial Manufacturing Zone 4. The word "shall" is mandatory. '"S oa'y one kitchen and its own sanitary fadlities included paired ingress and egress, and is legally and permanently G Governmental Zone 5. The term "may" is permioaive. '" *•>• "•>*. available for such use. CO Corral Zone (B) Spedfic DefiniUons: 40. EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION-A school college, 77. PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT-An area of land S Interim Study Zone 1. AIRPORT—A landing area used regularly by aircraft or university, either public or private, giving general controlled by a property owner, which is to be developed Hospital Zone for receiving or discharging passengers or cargo. academic instruction as prescribed by SUte laws. as a single entity for one or more planned unit residential 11-2-2: ZONING MAP: The zones listed above and the boonA. HELIPAD-An area or an airport or heliport establish41. FAMILY-One or more persons related by blood, mardevelopmenU, one or more public, qnaoi-public, commerdariesof said zones are shown on the "Zoning Map for Boulder ed for the landing or take-off of helicopters. riage or other legal bond, or a group of not more than five cialarhidustiialareas,orbath,withhiprapartioasof resklenCity Townsite," and the "Zoning Map for Boulder City OatB. HELIPORT—A landing area solely for the use of (5) persons (excluding servants) not necessarily reUted by tial uses to nonreddential uses specified in this Title. side the Townsite," dated and adopted by this City helkwptera. A heiipart may iadude more than one helipad. blood, marriage or other legal bond, living together as a 78. PLANNED UNIT RESIDENTIAL Code, hereby by references mode an integral part of the Title. C. LANDING—Any locality, including airports, and Iansingle, nonprofit housekeeping unit in a dwelling unit, as DEVELOPMENT-An area of land controlled by a properAll the noUtions. references and other information shown on ding fields, which is used or intended to be used for the distinguished from a group occupying a boarding or roomty owner, which is to be devehiped as single entity for number the maps shall be as much as part of this Title as if the mattera landing and takeoff of aircraft, whether or not fadlities 'ug house, dub, fraternity, smMrity, hotel or motel. of dwelling units, the plan for which does not correspond and information were fully described herein, and all amendmeata are provided for the shelter, serviciag or repair of air42. FIRE WALL-An unpierced wall mode of at leaat one in lot size, bulk or type of dwelling, density, lot coverage and additions thereto are hereby adopted by reference, craft, or for receiving or discharging paooengers or cargo. hour fire-resistant conatracthm. and required open space to the regulations establisehd in 11-2-3: CHANGES IN BOUNDARIES: Changes in the boimD. LANDING AREA—Any locality, including airports, 43. GARAGE, PRIVATE—An accesoory building, or porany one residential zone created, from time to time, under daries of the zones shall be made by ordinance, adopting and and laadiag fielda, which ia used or intended to be used tion of the prindpal building, used for the shelter or storsge the provisions of the Title. amended zoning map or part of said zoning map or unit of a for the landing and toke^if f of aircraft, whether or not of vehicles of the occupants of the prindpal building. 79. PUBLIC USE—A uae operated cxclasively by a public part of said zoning map, as provided ia Chapter 33 of this Title. • facilities are provided for the shelter, servidng or repair 44. GARAGE. PUBLIC-A building, or portion thereof, body; said use having the purpose of serving the public 11.2-4: ZONE BOUNDARY UNCERTAINTIES: Where unearof aircraft, or for recciviag or discharging passengers other than a private garage, used for the care, maintenance, health, safety or general welfare; and induding uses such tainty exists aa to the boundaries of aay soae shown on the or cargo. storage or equipping of vehides or where vehicles are kept as puhUc schools, parks, hospitala, administrative and ser"Zoning Map," the following rulca shall apply: 2. ALLEY—A public way, primarily for vehicular use, which for remuneration, hire or sale. vice fadlities. (A) Where auch boundariea ate indicated aa approximately f oUonraf forda a aecoadary meaaa of accsas to abutting properties 45. GRADE-The lowest point of elevation of the finished 80. QUASI—PUBLIC USE—A use operated by a private ing street and alley ccnterlines or lot Unea, such lines shall and ia not intended for general traffic circulation. surface of the ground, paving or oidewalk within the area educational, religiona, recreational, charitable or medical be construed to be such boundaries. 3. ALLEY LINE—The boundary line between an alley and between the building aad the property Uae or, when the inatitution; said uoe having the primary purpose of serving (B) In nnsubdivided property and where a z the building and a line five feet (50 from the building. private ochoola and unlversitica, rscreational facilities, by use of the scale apeoring on said zoning map. Buhstaaoe of the Title, or a chaage la the sone boundaries ^HOME OCCUPATION-An occupatkm carried on by privaU hoopitala and like uoes. (C) Where a pubUc street or alley, or any portions of a public at use classification upon the Zoning Map, when adopted the occupanU of a dwelling which ia dearly iaddental and 81. R-ZONE—A reoideatial zone aa eatabliohed by the Title street or alley are vacated or ahondaoed, the soae and regalaby ofdiaaaoe of the City Coaadl ia the manner prescribed secondary to the use of the building for dwelling purposes and/or as shown; sad delineated on the "Zoning Map." An tions applicable to the property to which it reverts shall by law aad this Title. *'*' which does not change the character thweof; doM not "R" zone iadndes the Rl, R3, MP, ME and RV zones. apply to such vacated or ahaadonod street or alley. 5. ANIMAL H08PITAL-A place where aaimala or pets adversely affect the uaea permitted in the zone of which 82. RECREATIONAL, COMMERCIAL—A recreational (D) Where any uncertainty exiato, the Plaaaing Commissioa arc givea cars and/or surgical treatment, indodli^ the boar it is s part; where no aign are displayed except as permitted facility operated as a buoiBeaa aad open to the general public ahall determine the lecatioa of bouadariea. dina of aaimala or peU for remuaeration only as aainddenin the zone of which it is a port, and no peraon are employed for a fee. 11-2-6: ZONE BOUNDARIES AND REGULATIONS taluae to the Animal Hoopital. other than domesUc help. 83. RECRATION, PRIVATE, NON-COMMERCIALADOPTED: The boundwiea of the zones shown upon the" Lawl 6. ARCADE—Aay sstabUahment which maintaina aix (6) 47. HOSPITAL—A building, or portion thereof, used for Clubs or recreational fadlities operated by a aoaprofit Use Zoning Map" are hereby adopted, aad the qiecific regidaor more eoia operated amusement machines. the accommodation and medical care of aick, injured or inorganization and open only to hona fide monbers and their tions aa hereiaaf tr set forth for each soae and the gMcral regrila7 AREA OF JURISDICTION—The area withia the corfirm persons, inlcuding saaitariums, alcoholic aanitariums, guests of such aoaprofit organisatioa. tioas applicable therein are hereby e sta b l i s h ed aiMi dedarad poratc UmiU of the Qty. institutioaa far the core of chronic drug addicU aad menUl 84. RECREATIONAL VEHICLE-A vehicular type unit to be in effect upon all landa indndsd within the boandorfes 8 AUTOMOBILE BODY AND FENDER SHOP—A patienta, but not Induding rest homes. primarily dssigwed as temporary living quarters for recroaof each and every soae as altowa oa aaid "Zoaiag Map." b^kiiMhit,arpartkathaf haldsatorasedfarstonwe 48. HOTEL-A buUdiag or portioa thereof, ia which k>dg tkiaal,eaaqiii or travel use, which dther haa ito own motive lI-2-6:CONFORMmrREQUIRED:NolaadahaUb*uaed,a#d aadropafr f thaanniaafhsnifal parta of vehicles iag or hoarding and hidgii are provMed and offered to power or ia Booatad oa or drawa by another vehicle. The no buiUhig or stmetars shall be erscted, eoatraetad, ealargaA a AU1^0BILEREPAUGARAOE-Ahaikliag,arpor the puhlfc for compeaaatfcia aad ia which iagreaa and egress basic typos ar* travel trailer, oampiagtrailar, track eanpar, structmlly altaaed, moved or osod ia aay soae as ahowa apa tioatkanof hsMoatarasedforthahonaiaaaervlciaaand ot aad from oU gueat rooaM are made through aa iaaide aad OMrtor koaM. the "Zoalag Map." except ia aooordanee with the iagulatiaa t^^r^m2^jM^h^^at^A3Lmtktttoniit tobby or offkse. 88. RECREATIONAL VEHICLE PARK-A parcel of laad asUbUshed by the Titla. ^l^u^\>^Aml^Mm^X^ IN8TITUTI0N-Aao^pwIK ^MiArmmt maiatabed upoawhichreoeaUo^^veUdaaito.arek>eatd.-tahliah11-2.7 PUBLIC UTILITY FACILITIES: Aay pabUc uUitty aamarwncaeaBirvwHa..,|p-r and operated by a persoa, sodoty, foaadatkw or public ed or maiatalaod for 4^paacy by retreatkawl vehicle* of fadUtie* (hKdndini hot not Uadtod to eiactric, wator, sewor, 10 AUTOMOBILE SERVICE STATION-A bnikUng or aagency for the purpooe of providiag charitable, sodal, the geaeral puhUc as temporary Uving quarters for recrea gaa, telephoa* awl eahl* taievtaioa) may be meted, OHMtructad. letaraartiaathoMaf haviaastaraaetaakaaadmmpsat edocattoaa or similar oarviee to p*rins or pabBc group*. tion or vacatkm porpasas. enlarged, altered, moved r ased ia aay SOM aa shown upon whU faahTTllarrNi nT MM 11 .VM!!.;^ aVTllanaaaBrt 80. JUNK-Aay wora oat, wrwdtsd, eaat off, or discarded 86. RECREATIONAL VEHICLE PARK CONVENIENCE this "Zooiag Mo*" hi accordaaoe with regaUtia* •stabUaM *oMarofnrodfsairtM!^ article or material whidhi.r.ady for destnMtioa or has been STORE-Aa •stahMihmsatproridiag food sad aa.*yitMB-^ by the Boakhr City Code aad CKy standard* aad sp:iflcatioM. ascwaah*r gr**asrack*aadtkolik*,bataotiaduding collected or stored for aaWafe or eoaversion to soase use. iateaded for sal* to th* accapaaU of the rscroatioaal vehiCHAPTERS ia'..n;:S:iS:iSSir:?l^^ i"t]:r2^":::S.:lX'^ri::i"fSX'^ Si'SSREATIONALVEHICLESITE-Apk^ofgromKl -HrSINGLE-FAlHILY RESIDENTIAL ZONE IL AUTOMOBILE WRECKING YARD-A bnikyag or purpooe as readily a* wheaaew ahall aot be eoM ldwd junk. withia a ravaatioaai vahide park to be uoed f or the aecoaiSECTION: .^^ Int. nt aartloa thas*of used far th^ ^-— "-— —.^'5L JUNKYARD—Aaylaadarstnictur*.arpartloathweof. modatioa of aot SMW* thaa oae rscreational vehicle. 11-3-1: Scope • :J^ iaf *f assd wot at vddcl**, tndlara or heats, artb* starage. asad for th* ohaadoamoat, atorage, keeplBg, coUsetlag or 88. REST.HOMB-A haikii^ wher* kidging aad meaU, 11-3^2: Paipoaa ';; aabsadamphmefdbmaatMLohaoMssrwrsckiafl motor oaWogiag of jaak. nuraiag, diatary aad othr ptraoaal sorvieta are readored 11-U: Patiaittad Uaea vdUdaa, trailar* or boato, sr thoir awto. 52. KENNEL-AayesUbHshsMat at which dogs aad cates to eoavalsaceata, iavaUda, or aged paraoa* for enaapeass11-34: Coaditioaal Uaea 12. BASEMENT-Aay fk*r Isval bdvw ths first story ia are h*l or raisad for sal*, or heaid^ carMi for, eaasaMrtlan. hat aaskidlng eaasa of eoatagkma ar eeauiaaicahle 11-34: Mlafaaaa Space Reqaireaaeato a baUdi^ havi^ only aa* flssr lavsl shall he classified dally troa a aot^orproflt basis, ndaaiv* of dsataLaiadioal dboasM, aad tuMlagsargtry or primary treatateaU sach Il-M: VehicIa Parkiag :;^ ^* T "''^'^'^^. K ^

PAGE 39

T^ Page S8 Henderson Hom^ews aiid Boulder City News Tkmwimj, Blareh S, iNt .d: BY OWNER Unique custom design overlooking Lake Mead. 1,627 sq. ft. living space. 2 bdr & 2 full baths. Fireplace in living room with view of lake. Heated pool-. Sd $S6,000. 293-3696 or 299-2367 BC. FOR SALE BY OWNER— nice 3 bed room, 2 bath home. Cul-de-sac, Aluminum siding, new paint and appliances inside. Ready for move in. Price reducetl to $85,000. 293-5898. BC. .**i • .**( • *'/> • • y^B? u.n^iii'' .-.---. • • ^^ n'mm'.^t FOR SALE: $45,000. 1820 Bearden. 2 bdrm, 1 bth, cute little home w/all appliances. Possible lease option. Call Peggy Benedict, 566-1481 or Jensen's Realty 564-3333. ic OPEN HOUSE SHOWCASE • SATURDAY, MARCH 5TH 624 HIDDEN VALLEY 626 APOLLO 608 MOSSWOOD 720 ARROWHEAD TRAIL SUNDAY, MARCH 6TH 238 MEYERS AVE. 210 KIRK 242 CONCHO 248 TONALEA CORNER LOT-Newlv developed area. Hillcrest area. Fantastic fi!.sm=^ CENTURY 21-HENDERSON REALTY 18 WATER STREET 564-2515 PREVIEW THESE CHOICE HOMES FROM 12:00-3:00 P.M. Vegas viewl By owner. Ph 564-1881 or 566-1480 ask for Sandra I VAANDQOVT ACQUIRED raOfERTIES HAVE KEYS, SNOWANYTHIE ALL AREAS, PMCES REASONAilEDOmPYIiTS UPTODATEUSn SAVE TIME AND HONEY JENSENt REALTY CALL RAY CURRIER S644333 WOULD YOU Over 4,000 square feet of building in the heart of downtown Boulder City. Fixtures included for $235,000. Call DOME REALTY 293-1613 anytime Nancy Murphy 293-3292 nites H Y D E Ay. • • :;.V: 293-6014 & ASSOCIATES 1325 Arisona Street •Boulder City. 89005 HOMES-LAND-BUSINESS INVESTMENT CONSULTANTS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT I BOULDER CITY TWO STORY GOLF COURSE 4 BR 2' 2 BA Over 2,300 sq. ft. Won't last at $149,500. CORNER LEWIS W/POOL 3 BR V, batb. 2 car garage. Move-in condition. $109,000. RESTAURANT BUSINESS FOR SALE OR LEASE. Located in Downtown Boulder City. Call for details. .NEW MEXICO HOME here in BC 3 BR 2 BA 1,700 sq. ft. of living area. 3 car garage $99,500. CORO.NADO ESTATES Adult section 2 BR 2 BA 2 car garage. $76,500. EXTRA SPACE is wliat this 4 BR Vt BA family home has. $107,500. DEL PRADO LUXURY 2 story 3^ BR 2' 2 BA with pool & spa, covered patio & built in bar. $145,000. I.NCOME PROPERTY 5 units all rented. Only $175,000. LAKE MTN ESTATES over 1.700 sq. feet. Overlooking Lake Mead. Comer lot. $125,000. LARGE HOME ON PINTO 4 bdrm, 2'/: bath, over 2,100 sq. ft. living area. $105,000. GORGEOUS LEWIS Lovely 2 br on Christina Drive. 1*4 bath, 2 car garage. Low Maintenance. $96,500. PERFECT STARTER OR RETIRE .MENT HOME. 3 bdrm, I >/ bath, sereeoed ^ patio and RV parking. $97,500. BOULDER SQUARE CONDO. Beau tif ully redecorated 1 BR on ground floor. Call office for details. REDUCED GROUND FLOOR CONDO—Boakler Square, 2 bdrm condo, newly carpeted, coveaiently located. Priced at $67,500. ON MARINA DRIVE-lovely 3 bdrm 2 bath. Fireplace in kitchen, large yard with lake view. Full Storage Cellar. Reduced to $132,500 COMMERCIAL LOT Dowatowa location Oaly $21,000. RENTALS AVAILABLE 2 A 3 BDRMS Call for FREE MARKET ANALYSIS of yow home. Pat Baratcart AniU Hyde Linda Karfoua Bob Laagevin Jerry .Marshall Aatboay Wirti Bartoa Hyde, Broker h 2934040 293-2144 2930006. 2884166 294-1566 299-7969 293-2144 THIS HOME NEEDS A FAMILY-just reduced $2,000—quiet neighborhood near schools—drive by 142 Elm & then call Pat for details 564-5142 or 293-4393. NEW ON THE MARKET-Paradise Hills-two bedroom beauty with 1,368 sq. ft. on a beautifully landscaped corner lot with R.V. parking. Call Eva for your appointment 564-5142. EASY ASSUMPTION-Highland Hills, three bedrooms, 2 car garage—fenced back yard—remodeled kitchen, fireplace—it has it all. Jackie can give you all the details 564-5142. UNBELIEVABLE PRICE-for golf coursesmaller home with potential for enlargement—large lot with great view of the Valley. Don't miss this sleeper. VERY BEST BUY-Four bedroom Highland Hills home with easy care landscaping & attractive terraced back yard for only $80,000. PLEASANT FAMILY HOME-with large back yard, plus room for R.V.—well located in the Sewell School District—a bargain at $62,900. FREE INFORMATION ON HOW YOU CAN BUY A "FHA" OR "VA" REPOSSESSION! Pu| Number 1 to Miork for you.* 1^ T TTZt JR REALTY 294 W. Pacific 564-5142 ana "Century 21 Real Esfate Corporation mZ'm'Jf Equal Housing Opportunity mm mm WDEFENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED Q GARRETT GREATER NEVADA PROPERTIES, INC 293-3333 554 Nevada Hwy. riuri ^ SERVING BOULDER CITY SINCE 1947 Highland Hills sharp 4 bdrm Chism Vallejo model. 2 car garage, lush landscaping, $110,000. Many, many extras. Desparate seller! Must sell 3 bdrm, 2 bth home on comer lot. Upgraded to almost a custom home, for only $80,000. Gov't owner 3 bdrm, 2 bth home, tile roof, completely fencedd. Good condition. $72,000. 10 acres in Section 16, right in the path of progress. All or'/>, $90,000. Owners will carry paper. TROPICANA REALTY. REALTORS Call Dale 565-3272 or 456-4040 JENSEN'S REALTY O. -JIM-JCNSCN 219 WATER 8T. HKNDERSON. NEVADA SftOtS Mir OFn 7 OILTS A NBn Bus. 804-3333 RESIDENTIAL DIVISION 1124 S. Greenway 471 Ridgeway 527 N. Canyon 331 E. Country Club 75 Oklahoma Dr 501 E. Roily 617 W Greenway Rd. 25 Mallory 4.36 Burton 213 E. Mojave 461 Rooeway 241 S. Carson Way 226 Navajo Dr 218 W: AtUntic 1820 N. Bearden 19 W. Victory Rd. 357 Van Wageaca 4Bed 4Bed 4Bed 4Bed 3Bcd 3Bed 3Bed 3Bed 4Bed 2BMI Bed Bed Bed Bed 2Bed 2Bed IBed 2>/i Bath 3 Bath 3 Bath 2'/i Bath 1 Bath 2 Bath l'/4 Bath 1 Bath I'/t Bath 1 Bath IBath I'/4 Bath 2 Bath 2 Bath 1 Bath 1 Bath 1 Bath IB •lAltO* $225,000 $188,000 $166,000 $155,000 $90,000 $84,900 $79,800 $69,900 $66,000 $56,000 $55,000 $51,900 $49,900 $48,000 $45,000 $42,000 $25,000 COMMERCIAL DIVISION I486 AtlMl 1101 N. Nellis Booldw Highway Booldar Higkway AdholSt. Boddw Higlnray 36 W. PalaSi 10.5 AC Wrwidag Yard $l,900jOOO Shopping Center $000,000 2.16 AC. $3604)00 .75 AC. 1210,000 1.62 AC. $160J0O 10O'X12S' 186,000 VIdaa Store MijOOO soxias msM ONE ONLY!!! Over 8,000 sq ft lot only. Fantastic view of Lake Mead. Reduced to $64,500. Owner Licensee 293-1613 anytime. Terms. BOULDER CITY HOfvIE 3 BR 1 SA basement, garage apt. tile floors, fans, fireplace. Asking $83,000 876-5719 leave message. Will answer all calls. CUSTOM TWO STORY, 4 bdrm, 3 ba. 2,500 sq. ft. '/i acre lot. Priced below appraisal, will carry paper 293-3582. BC. 'mU TO WORK • ^0R YOr' Henderson Kealty offering 18 years of professional service to Henderson residents K SELLER DESPERATE—Zoned for horses, fantastic custom on Vi acre. Central vac, cedar lined closets, dual fireplace and at a tract price! What a view! YES YOU CAN—Own in Green Valley. 3 bedroom with cathedral ceilings. Lush home on a comer lot too!! SPRINGTIME SPECIAL-$15,000 down and you own 1940 square feet of wide open floor plan with 3 bedrooms. 2 story with extra large lot. What a deal! SAY GOODBYE TO RENT WITH A GOOD BUY-This 4 bedroom is spacious well maintained, close to schools. Perfect for your family. ASSUME THIS FHA LOAN-Low down and this adorable 2 bedroom is yours. Lots of extras done. You'll love it. MUST SELL!!—Great starter or retired couple. 2 bedroom home, owner must move today. Minimum down, assumble, no qualifying and great deal. Take this one today. ISLAND PARADISE—Luxury earth sheltered home. Indoor pool and tropical surroundings adjoin 4 large bedrooms. Enjoy this Garden of Eden. PERFECT OPPORTUNITY-4 bedrooms, IV* baths, terrific fixer upper. 1 large country kitchen, lots of additional parking for $59,900. CONDOMINIUM LI VING-Hardly been Uved in. All appliances will stay. Covered parking, patio, and storage area. Seller nets $0.00. MOTIVATED SELLERS SAY SELL!!!-3 bedroom, 2 door garage, block wall, storage shed, and cul-de-sac location. Easy assumption or new financing. COMMERCIAL PROPERTY-At a "give away price' 4 rooms with bathroom and kitchen facilities. Plenty of parking, room to expand with basement area. Excellent location! Reduced to $59,900. IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY-Rent prior to close with approved credit. 3 bedroom, fenced back yard, covered parking and well kept. $62,900. BE THE PROUD OWNER—Of this luxurious 4 bedroom plus family room and extra large master bedroom. Located on Vi acre with 1977 square feet of living space. Sweeping view of the valley. You must see this home. Call for appointment today. LAS VEGAS LOCATION-3 bedroom, 2 bath home priced for a quick sale. Great starter or rental home. ON THE lOTH FAIRWAY-Black Mtn. Golf course, 4 bedroom, 2VA bath, and 2695 square feet of living space. Beautiful pool overlooking the golfcourse. Large spacious living room with a beautiful fireplace. This is a large home for a large family. Call for appointment to see today. DON'T MISS THIS CHANCE-For this lovely decorated 3 bedroom, V/A bath with a patio. HIGHLAND HILLS—Great location!! Reasonable price!! 3 bedroom, \V* bath home. Call today for more information. GARDNERS DELIGHT—This well maintained 4 bedroom home has its own garden plot with sprinklers. Spanish style with a fireplace and the roof. AT A MOST HAPPY PRICE-With interest rates down you can own this 3 bedroom, 2 full bath home. Freshly painted and looks like new. Seller motivated to sell this one. Vacant and ready to move into. Completely fenced, call to see today. PLANNED FOR THE LARGE FAMILY-4 bedroom with a large famUy roomand a utility room with working apace. DON'T DREAM TOO LONG-Or this very nice 4 bedroom, l*/ bath home will be gone. Completely fenced, nice kitchen and separate family room or formal dining room. Has a separate workshop. A large family will enjoy this home. Priced to sell today. LAND LOOKING FOR A LOT-With electricity and pnbUc aewer at the property then this is it. Only $16,000. PARADISE HILLS—Section #32, on this comer of Greenway and Dufort. 4.68 gross acres with seller offering terms! I Utilities within easy access, terrific view lot, and good location for $75,000. CORNER OF STIRRUP AND ROAN-Sction #27 near Old Vegas, corner view lot with custom homes established in the area. PHCMI at $16,800. WITHIN MINUTES FROM LAKE MEAD-SecUon #4an araaof faicreaaing value. Beauitf ul view lot approximately *A of an acre. Watar to property. Owner will carry paper. Priced at $20,000. ADJACENT LOTS FOR SALEll-Saction #27 near Old Vegas. Approximately Vt acre k>ta with flexible boyiag tcrma. Zooad for honoa tool $17,000 par k>t. ^..,......,i._i^_i....._.ii___..._—.—— SSst 18 Water St. (702) 564-2515 ^ jnd ludrnmi M, • ,„„,> .,,..-,,^ .rpi>ralii>n f qui) t(nf(OppurlUfiiv I EACH OFFICt IS INDEPENDf NTIY OWNEO AND OPERATED Ws % U > Boulder City proposed zoning and subdivisions onlinance riiZT Bill No. 930 OS a bsMDMBt ualces sach fkior qaaUAaa as a first story g, sargieal on, or far qaaraatiae parpooM. as or* cnitomorily provkUd bi saaltoriaaM aad bospltala. l a to od u eed by: Ferraro •• drflaed hwria. ^ — • • ——Mr1TCIIEN-A rooaa or portton tharMif, aowi-far thr Par theparpoiMof theTltte.rsst heBH tacludcs anrslag ORDINANCE NO. Ml 19. BOARD OF APPEALS-Th appoiatMl member* of prepwatioa aad ewiUaf of food. baaie, rMidentitl cvstodlal care fadUty, sapcrviMry can AN ORDINANCE TO REPEAL ORDINANCES NO. 92 AND the Planning Commisaioa or othor body • • ia eatabUshed M. LOADING SPACE-Aa offrstrMt spaca or bwth on f odUty and ambulatory haolth care eeatar. NO. 176, AND CITY CODE TITLE 11, ZONING AND SUBby Charter or ordinaace. tha aame k>t with a boildiag, or eonticaou to a group of 89. SIGN-All the deflnlUoaa as act forth ia SwitfcM 11-340 DIVISIONS, REPLACING THOSE WITH A NEW TITLE 14. BOARDING or ROOMING HOUSE-A buildiag. or buildinga, for the temporary parking of a ooamereial vehi of tUa Title. Hi AND OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELATING portion thereof, in which lodging, mcala or both (or thrp cle while loading or unloading merchandite or materials. 90. STORY—That portion of a building included between THERETO (AM-87-161) (3) or more penona are provided for compenaation, but shall and which abuU upon a street, alley or other appropriate the upper surface of the floorocxt above, except that the The City Council of Boulder City do ordain: not include rest homes, hotels nor motels. mcAia of access. topmost story shall be that portion of a building included SECTION 1. Title 11, "Zoaing and Subdiviaions," ia hereby 15. BUILDING—Any atructure used or intended for snp55. LOT—Any lot, parcel, tract of land, or combination between the upper surface of the topmoat floor and the ceil. repealed in its entirety aad raplaced with the following: porting or Sheltering any use or occupancy. thereof, shown on a plat of record or recorded by metea and ing or roof above. If the finished floor level directly above TITLE 11 '16. BUILDING ACCESSORY—Any building, the lise of bounds that is occupied of intended for occupancy by a UNe a baoement or unused under-floor space is more than oix ZONING AND SUBDIVISIONS which is subordinate to and/or incidental to the uac of the ; permitted in the Title, including the yards, open spaces and feet (6*) above grade as defined herein for more than fifty SUBJECT jCHAPTEH principal building, and which ia on the same lot. parking apace* required by this Title, and having its prinpercent 150%) of the total perimeter or ia more than twelve Purpose; Definitions (currently Chapter 1) I 17. BUILDING HEIGHT-The vertical distance above H dpal fronUge upon a atreet or upon an officially approved feet (12') above grade as defined herein at any point, auch Zones and Boundariaa Thereof (currently Chapter 2, entitled reference datum meaaurcd to the highest point of the cop place. basement or unused uDder-floor apace shall be considerad "Land Use Zones") 2 ing of a flat roof or to the deck line of a mansard roof or 8-27-87 as a story. "Rl" Single-family Residential Zone (currently ^ to the average height of the higheat gable of a pitched or 56. LOT AREA-The total horizontal area included within 91. STORY, FIRST—The loweatatory in a building which Chapters) h hipped roof. The reference datum ahall be selected by either the bouadariea of s lot qualifiss aa a story, as defined herein, except that a floor "R3" Multiple-family Residential Zone (combines current of the following, whichever yields a greatel height of 57. LOT, CORNER-A lot which haa an interior angle of level in a building having only one floor level shall be Chapter 4, R2" Two-family Residential Zone and current building. one hundred thirty five degrees (135) or less at the interaccclassified as a first atory, provided such floor level is not Chapter 5, "R3" Multiple-family Reaidential Zone -I 1The elevation of the highest adjoinng sidewalk or tion of two (2) street lines. A lot abutting upon a carved more than four feet (41 below grade aa defined herein, for Reserved ^ __ ground aurface within a five (ST horizontal distance or ,treet ia considered a corner lot if the tangents to the curve more than fifty percent (50%) of the total perimeter, or mot* "MP" Mobile Home Pork Zone (currently Chapter 6) rrTW"^ the exterior wall of the building when such sidewalk or at the points of intersection of the side lot lines interest than eight feet (ST below grade, aa dcfiiied herein, for more "ME" Mobile Home EsUte Zone (currently Chapter 7 7 ground surface is not more than ten feet (100 above the at an interior angleof one hundred tlurty-fivedegres(135) than forty percent (40%) of the toUl perimeter. "RV" Recreatinal Vehicle Zone (currently Chapter 8) 8 lowest grade. or lesa. 92. STREET—A public thoroughfare, which affords the pri Reserved y 2. An elevation ten feet (10') higher than the lowest grade 58. LOT COVERAGE—The percentage of the area of a lot dpal meana of access to abutting property, other than an "Cl" Neighborhood Commerdol Zone (combines current Chapter when the sidewalk or ground surface described in subwhich ia occupied by all buildings or other covered structures. alley or walk. 9, "CP" Commerdal Profesaional Zone, and current Chapter paragraph laboveia more than ten feet (lO')above lowest 59. LOT DEPTH-For loU having front and rear lot lines 93. STREET LINE—The boundary line between a street 11, "01" Ndghborhood Commerdal Zone 10 grade. The height of a atepped or terraced building is which are parallel, the shortest horizontal distance between and the abutting lot or parcel. "C2" General Commerdal Zone (replacea current Chapter 13. the maximum height of any segment of the building. guch lines: (or lots having front and rear lot lines which 94. STRUCTURAL ALTERATION—Any change in the "IP" Industrial Park Zone 12 18. BUILDING OFFICIAL-The Building Oflidai o( are not parallel, the shortest horizontal disUnce between supporting members o( a building, auch as bearing walls "CM" Commerdal Manu(acturing Zone (combines current Boulder City, Nevada. the midpoint o( the (ront lot line and the midpoint o( the or partitions, columns, beams or girders, or any complete Chapter 18, "CM" Commerdal Manufacturing Zone, and cur19. BUILDING SITE—The ground area occupied by a rear lot line; and for triangular abaped Iota, the ahortest rebuilding of the roof or exterior walla. rent Chapter 19, "M" Maanfacturing Zone 13 building, or goup of buildinga, together with all open apaces horizontal diatanoe between the front lot line and a line within 95. STRUCTURE—Anything conatnicted or erected which Reserved 14 as required by this Title. the lot, parallel to and at a maximum diatance from the require* location on the ground or which ia attached to "H" Hospital Zone (currently Chapter 14) 15 20. BUSINESS or COMMERCE-Any activity or uoe of (ront lot Una, having a length of not leoa than ten (eet (10). something having a locatioB on the gnmnd, but not iBdmlinc "G" Government Zone (currently Chapter 21) 16 land which involve* the buying, selling, processing or Im60. LOT, INTERIOR—A lot other than a comer lot. tents, vehicles, travel trailers or mobile hones. "S" Interim Study Zone (currently Chapter 22( 18 proving o( things not produced on said land and having 61. LOT, KEY—A lot adjacent to a comer lot having its 96. TRAVEL TRAILER—A portable atructure mounted Reserved 19 finandal gain or livelihood as the primary aim of the activiajde lot Uae In common with the rear lot line of the corner on wheels, oonaiiting o( a vehicular chaaoia primarily designGeneral Uses; Conditions; Exceptions (currently ty or use. whether or not such activity or use be for hire lot and fronting on the street which forms the side bouned as temporary living quarters for recreational, camping Chapter 24) 20 or on account of the buyer, seller, processor or improver. dary of the comer lot. or travel uae and designed to be drawn by another vehicle. Substandard Lots of Records (currently Chapter 26) 21 21. CABANAS—A roofed structure, attached or immediate62. LOT LINE—Any line bounding a lot. and designated by the manufacturer as a travel trailer. A Reserved 22 ly adjacent to a mobile home, having two (21 sided complete63. LOT LINE, FRONT—A boundary of a lot which vehicle is not a travel trailer if, when equipped for highway Off-Street Parking and Loading Requirements (currently ly unobstmcted. separates the lot from the street; and in the cose of the coruae, it is more than eight feet (80 wide. Chapter 23) 23 22. CARPORT-A building wth not more than two (2) comner lot, the front lot line is the shorter of the two (2) lot 97. USE—The purpose for which land or a building is arSigns and Advertising Structures (currently pletely enclosed sides which is used for automobile shelter |jes separating the lot from the street. ranged, designed or intended or for which either land or Chapter 31) 24 or storage. 64. LOT LINE,lREAR— The boundary of a k)t which is building is, or may be, occupied or maintained. Landscaping (currently Chapter 17) 25 23. CITY-Boulder City, Clark County, Nevada. most distant from, and is. or is most nearly, parallel to the 98. USE-ACCESSORY—Any use which ia subordinate to Planned Unit Developments (currently Chiipter 30) 26 24. CITY ATTORNEY—The City Attorney of Boulder dty, front lot line; except that in the absence of a rear lot line and/or inddental to the use of the land and/or building or Reserved 27 Nevada. as is the case of the triangular shaped lot, the rear lot line stracture thereon. Reserved 27 25. CITY CLERK—The City Clerk of Boulder City, Nevada. may be considerd as a line within the lot, parallel to and 99. YARD—An open space on the some lot with a building. Home Occupantiong (currently Chapter 29) 29 26. CITY COUNCIL or COUNCIL—The legislative body at maximum distance from the front lot lipe, having a length unoccupied and unobstructed from the ground upward, exConditional Uses (currently Chapter 28) ^ .30 of Boulder City, Clark County, Nevada. of not less than ten feet (100. cept as other wise provided herein. Nonconf orming buildings and Uses (currently 27. CITY ENGINEER-The City Engineer of Boulder City, 65. LOT LINE, SIDE-The boundary of a lot which is not 100. YARD, FRONT-An open and unobstructed space betChapter 25) 31 Nevada. a front lot line or a rear lot line. ween a building and the front lot line, being parallel to and Variances (currently Chapter 27) 32 28. CITY MANAGER—The City Manager of Boulder City, 66. LOT THROUGH—A lot having a pair of opposite lot along the front lot line, to be measured horizontally from Amendments (cccccccccccurrently Chapter 32) 33 Nevada. lines abutting two (2) streets, and which is not a corner lot. the nearest line of any building, or enclosed or covered porAppeals (currently Chapter 34) 34 29. CITY PLAIVNING COMMISSION, PLANNING COMOn such lot, both lot lines are front lot lines. tion or the extension of the latter line, to the nearest point Fees, Notices and Hearing (currently Chapter 33) .^ 35 MISSlONorCOMMISSION—The City Planning Commis67. LOT WIDTH-The average horizontal distance between of the front lot line. In cases where the majority of lots Enforcement (currently Chapter 35) • .,..> • ... 10 ^ 'on of Boulder City, Clark County, Nevada. the side lot lines, measured at right angles to the lot depth. located on one aide of a street between two (2) interesting Reserved 7 37 30. COMMON OPEN SPACE—A parcel or parcels of land 68. MOBILE HOME—A structure which is built on a perstreets have been occupied by buildings having a front Reserved 38 or an area of water or combination of land and water within manent chassis; designedto be used with out without a perbuilding line different from the one stipulated in this Title, Subdivision Regulations (currently Chapter 36) 39 the site designated for a planned unit development which manent foundation: more than eight feet (80 in body width any building or addition to an existing building hereafter Flood Hazard Reductions (currently Chapter 38) 40 • designed and intended for the uoe or enjoyment of the and forty feet (4O0 in body length: and containing a minimum erected shall conform to the line previouly established by Dwelling and Hotel-Motel Development Control Pkn (currently residents or owners of the developement. living space of four hundred fifth (450) square feet." Mobile these buildings. Chapter 37 41 31. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR-The Home" does not include a recreational vehicle or travel 101. YARD. REAR—An open an unobstructed spare betResidential Construction Tax (currently Chapter Community Development Director of Boulder City, Clark trailer. ween a building and the rear lot line, being parallel to and Chapter 39) 42 County, Nevada. 69. MOBILE HOME PARK—Any parcel of land upon which along the rear lot line, to the measured horizontally from 32. CONDITIONAL USE—A use of land for which a conditwo (2) or more mobile homes occupied for dwelling or sleepthe nearest line of any buildings, or enclosed or covered tioncti use permit is required. jng purposeg, are located regardless of whether or not a portion of the extension of the latter line, to the nearest piiDDTkc? niprpiMwTi.t<:, 33. COMOMlNIUM-AnesUte in real property consisting charge is made for such accommodations. point of the rear lot Une. fUKhVM!,; UtI-INITIQNS o( nn undivided interest in common in portions of a parcel 70. MOBILE HOME SPACE-A plot of ground within a 102. YARD, REQUIRED-A minimum open space as SECTION: or real property together with: mobile home park designed for the accommodation of one spedfied by the regulations of the Title for front, rear and 11-1-1: Purpose of Ordinance 1. A separate interest in space in a residential, industrial mobile home together with its accessory structures induding side yards, as distinguished from any yard area in excess 11-1-2: Short Title or commerdal building or industrial and commerdal carports or other off-street parking areas, storage lockers, of the minimum required. 11-1-3: Definitions building on such real property, such as, butnotrsstlkted ramadaa, cabanas, patios, patio covers, awnings and similar 103. YARD, SIDE—An open and unobstructed space bet11-1-1: PU RPOSE OF URmNAlNt^t.! IBt pni B 8 le guiatiw w • 1^ p— -/K~ ~. .t.o^ -_,_.„ V aoaurUnances. ween a building and the side lot line, being parallel to and and zone as set for herein have been established in accordance 2. A separate interest in air space, without any building 71. MOBILE HOIVlk SUBDIVISIUIN—A iubdivlsion a io n g rae s i tie iui Um. li VK. • mmiiuuj !iri i; a; aii j fr— — with the Comprehensive Plan and are intended to guide the structure, to be used for a mobile home. A condominium designed and inUnded for reaidential use where residence the nearest line of any building, or enclosed or covered pordevelopment of land in a manner consistent with the commay include in addition a separate interest in other poris in mobile homes exclusively. *'>" or the exteiuion of the latter line, to the nearest point munlty goals. poUdes, and objectives as set forth in the Comtions of auch real property. 72. MOTEL—A building or group of buildings containing of the side lot line, prehensive Plan, andd ore designed to: 34. DWELLING—A building, or portion thereof, designed guest rooms, some or all of which have a separate entrance 104. ZONE—The various land use zones as established by (A) Lessen congestion in the streets. or intended to be used exclusively for residential purposes, leading diredty from the outside of the building with garage this Title aadJor as shown and delineated on the "Zoning (B) Secure safety from fire, panic and other dangers. including one-family, two-family and multiple-family, but or parking apace located on the lot and designed, used, or Map." (C) Provide adequate light and air. Bot including boarding or rooming houses, hotels, motels, intended wholly or in part for the accommodation of CHAPTER 2 (D) Prevent the overcrowding of land and otherwise protect rest homes or any other commerdal uses. automobile transients. Motel includes motor courts, motor ZONES AND BOUDARIES THEREOF natural resources from impairment. 35. DWELLING GROUP—A group of two (2) or more lodges and tourist courts, but not mobile home parks or SECTION: (E) Protect life and property in areas subject to floods, landdetached buildings designed or intended to be used as onetravel trailer parks. 11-2-1: Zones Established sUdes and other natural disasters. family, two-family or multiple-family dwelUngs located on 73. NONCONFORMING BUILDING OR STRUCTURE11.2-2: Zoning Map IF) Conserve the value of the buildings and Btractures. a single lot, together with all open spaces as required by A lawfully constracted building or structure existing at the 11-2-3: Changes in Boundaries (G) Protect property and promote the health, safety and general this Title, but not including boarding or rooming houses. time thia Title, or amendmenU thereto, became effective 11.2-4: Zone Boundary Uncertainties welfare. hotels, moUls, rest homes or any other conunerical uses. which does not conform with the regulations for the zone 11-2-5: Zone Boundaries and Regulations Adopted These reguUtions ore made with reasonable consideration, 36. DWELLING. MULTIPLE-FAMILY-A building, or in which it is located. 11-2* Conformity Required among other things, to the character of the zone and ito peculiar portion thereof, designed or hitended to be used for occupan74. NONCONFORMING LOT—A legally esUbUshed lot 11.2-7: PubUc Utility Fadlities suiubility for particular uses, and with a view to conserving cy by three (3) or more families living independently of each or parcel existing at the time this Title, or parcel existing 11-1-1: ZONES ESTABLISHED: For the purpose and provithe value of buildings and encouraging the most appropriate other and containing three (31 or more dwelling units. at the time tliis Title, or amendments thereto, became efgions of this Title, the City is hereby divided into the following use of land throughout the City. 37. DWELLING, SINGLE-FAMILY—A building designfective which does not conform with the minimum lot area, zones: 11-1-2: SHORT TITLE: The Title shall be known as the "ZONed or intended to be used for occupancy by one family and width or depth requiremenU for the cone in which it is Rl Single-Family Residential Zone ING ORDINANCE OF BOULDER CITY." containing one dwelUng unit. located. R3 MulUple-Family Residential Zone :\ 11-1-3: DEFINITIONS: 38. DWELLING, TWO-FAMILY-A building designed or 75. NONCONFORMING USE-The lawful use of any MP Mobile Home Park Zone (A) General Terminology: For the purpose of carrying out the intended to be used for occupancy by not more than two building or land existing at the time this Title, or amendME Mobile Home Estate Zone intent of the Title, the following words, phrases and terms <2) families living independently of each other and containments thereto, became effective which does not conform RV Recreational Vehicle Zone shall have the meaning ascribed to them in this Section: '"g two (2) dwelling units. with the use regulations for the zone in which it is located. Cl Neighborhood Commerdal Zone 1. Words used in the present tense include the future. 39. DWELLING UNIT-A building or portion of a building 76. PARKING SPACE-An area, other than a street or C2 General Commerdal Zone 2. Words in the singular number include the plural. planned, designed or used as a residence for one fsmily onalley, reserved for the parking of vehicles, adjacent to such BP Business Park Zone 3. Worda in the plural number include the singular. ly, living independently or other families or person, and ha vadditional area as is necessary to afford adequate and unimCM Commercial Manufacturing Zone 4. The word "shall" is mandatory. '"S oa'y one kitchen and its own sanitary fadlities included paired ingress and egress, and is legally and permanently G Governmental Zone 5. The term "may" is permioaive. '" *•>• "•>*. available for such use. CO Corral Zone (B) Spedfic DefiniUons: 40. EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION-A school college, 77. PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT-An area of land S Interim Study Zone 1. AIRPORT—A landing area used regularly by aircraft or university, either public or private, giving general controlled by a property owner, which is to be developed Hospital Zone for receiving or discharging passengers or cargo. academic instruction as prescribed by SUte laws. as a single entity for one or more planned unit residential 11-2-2: ZONING MAP: The zones listed above and the boonA. HELIPAD-An area or an airport or heliport establish41. FAMILY-One or more persons related by blood, mardevelopmenU, one or more public, qnaoi-public, commerdariesof said zones are shown on the "Zoning Map for Boulder ed for the landing or take-off of helicopters. riage or other legal bond, or a group of not more than five cialarhidustiialareas,orbath,withhiprapartioasof resklenCity Townsite," and the "Zoning Map for Boulder City OatB. HELIPORT—A landing area solely for the use of (5) persons (excluding servants) not necessarily reUted by tial uses to nonreddential uses specified in this Title. side the Townsite," dated and adopted by this City helkwptera. A heiipart may iadude more than one helipad. blood, marriage or other legal bond, living together as a 78. PLANNED UNIT RESIDENTIAL Code, hereby by references mode an integral part of the Title. C. LANDING—Any locality, including airports, and Iansingle, nonprofit housekeeping unit in a dwelling unit, as DEVELOPMENT-An area of land controlled by a properAll the noUtions. references and other information shown on ding fields, which is used or intended to be used for the distinguished from a group occupying a boarding or roomty owner, which is to be devehiped as single entity for number the maps shall be as much as part of this Title as if the mattera landing and takeoff of aircraft, whether or not fadlities 'ug house, dub, fraternity, smMrity, hotel or motel. of dwelling units, the plan for which does not correspond and information were fully described herein, and all amendmeata are provided for the shelter, serviciag or repair of air42. FIRE WALL-An unpierced wall mode of at leaat one in lot size, bulk or type of dwelling, density, lot coverage and additions thereto are hereby adopted by reference, craft, or for receiving or discharging paooengers or cargo. hour fire-resistant conatracthm. and required open space to the regulations establisehd in 11-2-3: CHANGES IN BOUNDARIES: Changes in the boimD. LANDING AREA—Any locality, including airports, 43. GARAGE, PRIVATE—An accesoory building, or porany one residential zone created, from time to time, under daries of the zones shall be made by ordinance, adopting and and laadiag fielda, which ia used or intended to be used tion of the prindpal building, used for the shelter or storsge the provisions of the Title. amended zoning map or part of said zoning map or unit of a for the landing and toke^if f of aircraft, whether or not of vehicles of the occupants of the prindpal building. 79. PUBLIC USE—A uae operated cxclasively by a public part of said zoning map, as provided ia Chapter 33 of this Title. • facilities are provided for the shelter, servidng or repair 44. GARAGE. PUBLIC-A building, or portion thereof, body; said use having the purpose of serving the public 11.2-4: ZONE BOUNDARY UNCERTAINTIES: Where unearof aircraft, or for recciviag or discharging passengers other than a private garage, used for the care, maintenance, health, safety or general welfare; and induding uses such tainty exists aa to the boundaries of aay soae shown on the or cargo. storage or equipping of vehides or where vehicles are kept as puhUc schools, parks, hospitala, administrative and ser"Zoning Map," the following rulca shall apply: 2. ALLEY—A public way, primarily for vehicular use, which for remuneration, hire or sale. vice fadlities. (A) Where auch boundariea ate indicated aa approximately f oUonraf forda a aecoadary meaaa of accsas to abutting properties 45. GRADE-The lowest point of elevation of the finished 80. QUASI—PUBLIC USE—A use operated by a private ing street and alley ccnterlines or lot Unea, such lines shall and ia not intended for general traffic circulation. surface of the ground, paving or oidewalk within the area educational, religiona, recreational, charitable or medical be construed to be such boundaries. 3. ALLEY LINE—The boundary line between an alley and between the building aad the property Uae or, when the inatitution; said uoe having the primary purpose of serving (B) In nnsubdivided property and where a z the building and a line five feet (50 from the building. private ochoola and unlversitica, rscreational facilities, by use of the scale apeoring on said zoning map. Buhstaaoe of the Title, or a chaage la the sone boundaries ^HOME OCCUPATION-An occupatkm carried on by privaU hoopitala and like uoes. (C) Where a pubUc street or alley, or any portions of a public at use classification upon the Zoning Map, when adopted the occupanU of a dwelling which ia dearly iaddental and 81. R-ZONE—A reoideatial zone aa eatabliohed by the Title street or alley are vacated or ahondaoed, the soae and regalaby ofdiaaaoe of the City Coaadl ia the manner prescribed secondary to the use of the building for dwelling purposes and/or as shown; sad delineated on the "Zoning Map." An tions applicable to the property to which it reverts shall by law aad this Title. *'*' which does not change the character thweof; doM not "R" zone iadndes the Rl, R3, MP, ME and RV zones. apply to such vacated or ahaadonod street or alley. 5. ANIMAL H08PITAL-A place where aaimala or pets adversely affect the uaea permitted in the zone of which 82. RECREATIONAL, COMMERCIAL—A recreational (D) Where any uncertainty exiato, the Plaaaing Commissioa arc givea cars and/or surgical treatment, indodli^ the boar it is s part; where no aign are displayed except as permitted facility operated as a buoiBeaa aad open to the general public ahall determine the lecatioa of bouadariea. dina of aaimala or peU for remuaeration only as aainddenin the zone of which it is a port, and no peraon are employed for a fee. 11-2-6: ZONE BOUNDARIES AND REGULATIONS taluae to the Animal Hoopital. other than domesUc help. 83. RECRATION, PRIVATE, NON-COMMERCIALADOPTED: The boundwiea of the zones shown upon the" Lawl 6. ARCADE—Aay sstabUahment which maintaina aix (6) 47. HOSPITAL—A building, or portion thereof, used for Clubs or recreational fadlities operated by a aoaprofit Use Zoning Map" are hereby adopted, aad the qiecific regidaor more eoia operated amusement machines. the accommodation and medical care of aick, injured or inorganization and open only to hona fide monbers and their tions aa hereiaaf tr set forth for each soae and the gMcral regrila7 AREA OF JURISDICTION—The area withia the corfirm persons, inlcuding saaitariums, alcoholic aanitariums, guests of such aoaprofit organisatioa. tioas applicable therein are hereby e sta b l i s h ed aiMi dedarad poratc UmiU of the Qty. institutioaa far the core of chronic drug addicU aad menUl 84. RECREATIONAL VEHICLE-A vehicular type unit to be in effect upon all landa indndsd within the boandorfes 8 AUTOMOBILE BODY AND FENDER SHOP—A patienta, but not Induding rest homes. primarily dssigwed as temporary living quarters for recroaof each and every soae as altowa oa aaid "Zoaiag Map." b^kiiMhit,arpartkathaf haldsatorasedfarstonwe 48. HOTEL-A buUdiag or portioa thereof, ia which k>dg tkiaal,eaaqiii or travel use, which dther haa ito own motive lI-2-6:CONFORMmrREQUIRED:NolaadahaUb*uaed,a#d aadropafr f thaanniaafhsnifal parta of vehicles iag or hoarding and hidgii are provMed and offered to power or ia Booatad oa or drawa by another vehicle. The no buiUhig or stmetars shall be erscted, eoatraetad, ealargaA a AU1^0BILEREPAUGARAOE-Ahaikliag,arpor the puhlfc for compeaaatfcia aad ia which iagreaa and egress basic typos ar* travel trailer, oampiagtrailar, track eanpar, structmlly altaaed, moved or osod ia aay soae as ahowa apa tioatkanof hsMoatarasedforthahonaiaaaervlciaaand ot aad from oU gueat rooaM are made through aa iaaide aad OMrtor koaM. the "Zoalag Map." except ia aooordanee with the iagulatiaa t^^r^m2^jM^h^^at^A3Lmtktttoniit tobby or offkse. 88. RECREATIONAL VEHICLE PARK-A parcel of laad asUbUshed by the Titla. ^l^u^\>^Aml^Mm^X^ IN8TITUTI0N-Aao^pwIK ^MiArmmt maiatabed upoawhichreoeaUo^^veUdaaito.arek>eatd.-tahliah11-2.7 PUBLIC UTILITY FACILITIES: Aay pabUc uUitty aamarwncaeaBirvwHa..,|p-r and operated by a persoa, sodoty, foaadatkw or public ed or maiatalaod for 4^paacy by retreatkawl vehicle* of fadUtie* (hKdndini hot not Uadtod to eiactric, wator, sewor, 10 AUTOMOBILE SERVICE STATION-A bnikUng or aagency for the purpooe of providiag charitable, sodal, the geaeral puhUc as temporary Uving quarters for recrea gaa, telephoa* awl eahl* taievtaioa) may be meted, OHMtructad. letaraartiaathoMaf haviaastaraaetaakaaadmmpsat edocattoaa or similar oarviee to p*rins or pabBc group*. tion or vacatkm porpasas. enlarged, altered, moved r ased ia aay SOM aa shown upon whU faahTTllarrNi nT MM 11 .VM!!.;^ aVTllanaaaBrt 80. JUNK-Aay wora oat, wrwdtsd, eaat off, or discarded 86. RECREATIONAL VEHICLE PARK CONVENIENCE this "Zooiag Mo*" hi accordaaoe with regaUtia* •stabUaM *oMarofnrodfsairtM!^ article or material whidhi.r.ady for destnMtioa or has been STORE-Aa •stahMihmsatproridiag food sad aa.*yitMB-^ by the Boakhr City Code aad CKy standard* aad sp:iflcatioM. ascwaah*r gr**asrack*aadtkolik*,bataotiaduding collected or stored for aaWafe or eoaversion to soase use. iateaded for sal* to th* accapaaU of the rscroatioaal vehiCHAPTERS ia'..n;:S:iS:iSSir:?l^^ i"t]:r2^":::S.:lX'^ri::i"fSX'^ Si'SSREATIONALVEHICLESITE-Apk^ofgromKl -HrSINGLE-FAlHILY RESIDENTIAL ZONE IL AUTOMOBILE WRECKING YARD-A bnikyag or purpooe as readily a* wheaaew ahall aot be eoM ldwd junk. withia a ravaatioaai vahide park to be uoed f or the aecoaiSECTION: .^^ Int. nt aartloa thas*of used far th^ ^-— "-— —.^'5L JUNKYARD—Aaylaadarstnictur*.arpartloathweof. modatioa of aot SMW* thaa oae rscreational vehicle. 11-3-1: Scope • :J^ iaf *f assd wot at vddcl**, tndlara or heats, artb* starage. asad for th* ohaadoamoat, atorage, keeplBg, coUsetlag or 88. REST.HOMB-A haikii^ wher* kidging aad meaU, 11-3^2: Paipoaa ';; aabsadamphmefdbmaatMLohaoMssrwrsckiafl motor oaWogiag of jaak. nuraiag, diatary aad othr ptraoaal sorvieta are readored 11-U: Patiaittad Uaea vdUdaa, trailar* or boato, sr thoir awto. 52. KENNEL-AayesUbHshsMat at which dogs aad cates to eoavalsaceata, iavaUda, or aged paraoa* for enaapeass11-34: Coaditioaal Uaea 12. BASEMENT-Aay fk*r Isval bdvw ths first story ia are h*l or raisad for sal*, or heaid^ carMi for, eaasaMrtlan. hat aaskidlng eaasa of eoatagkma ar eeauiaaicahle 11-34: Mlafaaaa Space Reqaireaaeato a baUdi^ havi^ only aa* flssr lavsl shall he classified dally troa a aot^orproflt basis, ndaaiv* of dsataLaiadioal dboasM, aad tuMlagsargtry or primary treatateaU sach Il-M: VehicIa Parkiag :;^ ^* T "''^'^'^^. K ^

PAGE 40

ll^ l A Hfdtewoa Home New. Bonldf City Nwrt Thwndmj, Marc h 8. 1968 Ha^Mt^WaUa rafatettoM ahall apply to UM •ataaa ottowiaa provM114* 1140lte 114-1: BOOrC: tka "11•AtetathtoTMa. 1141: nmrOSB: Tha "Rl" Stack-Faiiil; Raakkatlal Zone I^HrtaaAad to waa t a. itaWMii m&d pratact tha raaidcntial al iiacMMrily ataw tar atbaa faaily Uviag: to tfcii Mii wMrfc w—Id ha —taaipatftlt or tlatrimep Ml. tha aaw; ta gaMt tha davdopaaaaat ttf Uad umA limit tha pa>riatia daMltjr la ttmmam coMiatent with the gmeral ^MMMMty abJaeUvaa m aat forth • the Coaprchenaivr Plan. IA*-Ta praaya. is low-daMity raaidaatial aaca. landa which by loeatiaa aad dMnetar arc pticidM]r aoitad for anrh U8e. (B) Ta patairit tha aaro Hbaral taaa ol hMd for Haaitad agricultural pMpiaiato caaaMaatlew withali^la-faJ|y raaldaBcaii that -.'Ja ^praiviata aa ivJIar lata. IM* PERMITTED USES: UOaa laaaily dwalUaf of a paraiaiMat character ia a perma01 Aeeaaaary aaaa aad atraetaraa caatMaarUy iaeidoiital to any p aia d ttad raaWaatlal aae, aach aa garagaa, groeohovBeii or wHihahipa; p ra v Mad that BOM ahall be raMad^or occupied far gala, aad that aa aeeaaaory baildiaga ahaO ba iahabi ted. O Tha hieldMtal kaaplag af aaa-traaalaat bo^dara or lodger. v,V-y a-riddiatial faarily. ha* aat aaara th— twa g> hoardara mmilmt ladgara • additiaa to aiawbari of tha faaaily occupyiag a aM^aaidty raaidaaca. (Ol Cato aad daga, aat to ezcaad the kaapiag of thraa 13) cata aad/ar doga bat azeiadi^ UttaM or pappiaa aadar aix (6) • aaatha of ago. (Q HaMa oecapaatiaaa ia accordaaec with prooadnroa as set forth ia Chapter 29 of the Title. mOUHT aaaa aOawad oaly to tha "Rl-20". "Rl-40" aad "Rl-W" 1. Agricaharal oaaa, ezcpt the raiaiog of fowl for oommeroal p a rpaaaa. or the aaW of any produeto at retail oo the prtaiian athar than thoaa prodacad thcraoa. AU fowl must be ceaflaad to the premiaea. 2. Tha graaiag, raiaiag or training of animals, ezdndinR Bwiaa, bat aot todudiag riding sUbIca or academiea, providad that aot oaorc than a total of two (2) of any of the f aUawiag, or a total of two (2) of any combinatioa of horsra, • lalaa, poaiaa, goata. aheep, eowa or animak of geaaral like eharaetar, awy be kept oa aay lot with aa araa of twenty thaaaMd OOOOOI aqaara faet; Md that OM addMoMl aaimal --aaay be k^ for cac^ addltioMi twenty thoaaaad 00,000) ...'ovaara faot oa aay each lot, pravMad that aodairlaa or feed lato ahall be parmittod. X Aeeaaaary aaaa aad atr ac t araa castooiarily ioddeatol to aay parMittad reaideatial aad agrkohnral nae. 1 1;M: COf4DITIONAL USES: The foUowiag usea are subject to a coaditioaal Vmt Permit aa provided ia Chapter 30 of this Title. (A) Pablic aad qoasi-poblic baifaiiaga. private aekoola aad uses of aa adacational, recreatioaaL rcUgioaa, cultural or public Servian .type, aot including corporatioa yarda, atorage or repair yarda aad warihoaaaa aad vocatioaal aehoola that require wirhaalrai opcratioaa. (B) Tawparary aubdivision tract offices. (C) P ah Ut aad private non-caouaccrtol recroatioaal areaa and fa to a waM p W f aarily dwaUag ar dwalliag graap ahaD ba twa thoaaaad five haadNd OAMK iVHn f aat. eidwMag that aiaa wilUa aay B ai h aad atUHy aaaatoaai. 11-4-7: MINIMUM DWELUNO UNIT SIZE: (AlOaatkaoaaat llMHaqaara faat far aach ilacMaBdly dwalliag, ozdaaiva af garagaa, pw ch aa, Mvas or aiadlar faatarta. (Bl Eight haadrad 1800) aqawa feat tar aadi dwalUag nait to a two-family dweiUag, Mdaaiva of garagaa, porchea, eaves or aindlar faataraa. (Q Sii huadrad M aqnara feat tor aadi dwalUag aait in a • nltlpla-faadly dwalliag or d^ralliag groap azdnaiva af garagaa, por d iaa. advto ar dtoilar faataraa. ll- MINIMUM YARD SPACE REQUIREMENTS (A) Ptoat Yd: Tha adatama fnat yd ahaD ba fif loan faat tm (BlSMaYard: 1. latarior Loto: There ahall ba two (2) sida yarda totalling twenty feat OOT) with a six foof (Ot oUaiaiam oa one aide. 2. Coraar Loto: The aide yard ahattiag tha atreet shaU be aat laaa ttea twaaty faat (301; the latariar aida yard aale be aot tsaa thaa aix fact AT (C) Rear Yard: Tkaca ahall be a mlaimaa >ew yard f twaaty faetfMT. ll-4 HEIGHT AND BULK REQUIREMENTS: (A) Stractara Height: Tha hdght of a stractore ahall not eieoed twaatyflv* iMt OST > NaaAto f Stariaa: Tha aatober of atoHaa to a baildlRR shall aot a>aad two CD atoriaa. O Lat Covaraga : Tha wa riai a to lot covarage ahall va fifty per ceat (80%) of tha lot area. (D) Diataace Between BaiUinga: The mlaimnai dtotaace bet ween baildiaga oa tha aatte lot ahaU be twelve feet (12). 11-4-10; VEHICLE PARKING: (A) Off-street parkiag apacaa ahall be providod in accordance with the proviatona of Chapter 23 of tUa Title. (B) Private garagaa aad earporto opening into a atreet from either tha front yard or the aide yard on a comer lot shall be aat back a minimam of twenty feet (201. 11-4-11: (A) One naaMpkto ahaU be permUted, aot exeaoding two (2) aqaara faat to area for each dwalliag unit. Indicating the naaM and addrwa of the oecapaat. The occspatioa of the oocapaat ahaU aot be permitted oa the aign. ca, far aecapaaey by high^aaaity, muU-family 11-44: PERMITTED USES: (A) A^ we parmittad to tiM' K R,l" Stagic-Faadly Reaidaatial (B)Tfatoay( IQ (Dll 1-44: CONDITIONAL USES: Tha faOawtag aaea are aabjaet a Coaditioaal Uae Permit, as provided to Chapter 30 of thia Title (A1 Pabiic aad ^aaai pahHr haMdIagi, private schools aad aaaa af aa sda laH ihai, ratraatiaaal, tailgiaaa. caltaral or pablie ue r pB ia tto a yards, atsrage or vocatioaal aehoola that aeeda of the mobile hooM reaidaata: paevidad, however, that aaid aam ahall not iadnde ooBuaerdal aad other nonresidential aaea. IC) Permanent living qnartera tor the atrfa nae of the owner or manager of the naofaile home park. (D) Accaasory baildiaga, aach as atorage. grecnbonaa or workahop, provided tkat no accaasory building ahall be iakabitad. (El Cato and doga: Not to exoaad the kac|iii f three 13) cato and/or dogs, bat exdadiag kHteaa or puppiea ander aix 16) months pineat. A oapy af the proposed park ralea aad ragubttoaa ahaU ba filed with the dto plan. IQ The Planning Commiaaioa, npoa raeeipt af tha reqaeat aad aite plan, ahall aaake the aeeaaaary laapartiaa aad review of the propoaed devdopaaeat ia ordsr to dateraaine tkat the proviaioaa of tha Title, are baiag rimpMiil with. (D) Any paraoM daairii toidtar, dtoia, madtfy or vary a ambile home park, wkieh was la axiateaca at tha tinac the "Lead Use Zoaiag Ordiaaaea af BoaMar City" ww adoptad C all Athar ITha ha aat rfUflaatin lOI Tamparwy sabdMalaa tract afflew. U-i* MINmUM LOT SPACE RBQUIRBMXfCn: (A)Lat Araac 1. Magto-Faadly P iWagi 7 2. Twe-FMily D • g I. Other Paradttad Uaaa ai Lat Width: L latodar Lot 71 tCaraarLat 71 (Cl Lat Depth: MR ba laaa MO faat ITha iddMiinpyihniiitoidose 11-7-3: Permitted Uam 11-7-4: Coaditiond Uaea il-7-S: Devekipaieat Staadarde 11-7-6: Minimam Space Reqnireniento 11-7-7: Other Requiremento 11-7-8: InataUatioa and Inapectto of Mobile Homea. 11-7-1: SCOPE: The foUowmg regntotioaa ahall apply to tha "ME" Mobile Home Estete Zone. 1I-7-2; PURPOSE: To create a zone which is intended to aUow the nae of mobile homca of residential purpoaee oo individually owned lots, and to provide certain minimum Htandarda of development in order to inaore a suitable environment for the reaidente and familiea of mobile home subdivision dwellera withm the "ME" Zone. 11-7-3: PERMITTED USES: • (A) Single-family mobile homea on an individually owned tot tor residential uae together with the cuatomery accessory uacs such as cabanas, pstio slabs, carport or garage and storage buildings. In no event shall more than one mobile home be uaed for rendcntial parpoaes on a lot. (B) Community recreation fadUtica for the uae of individual tot owners within the sabdivdoa. The naaiatenance of the commaaity reertaUon and service areaa ahall be aaaared ^^^gyidoaa to the deeds, such as: Covenaate ninaiag with i rf i a aits t 1144 af Recroatioaal VaMda Pb II-M: ParmHtad Uaaa 114c lW4cP( 1147: 114*8lgiw Oparattoa—^ T Oaeapaaey PnUbM itStaadarda owaers ia the reapoadbility and cost thereof. IC) Cate and dogs, not to exceed the keeping of three (3) cato and/or doga. but excluding kittena or puppies under six (6) montbn of age. (D) Home occupationa in accordaiK* with the procednraa aa aot forth in Chapter 29 of this Title. 11-7-t: CONDITIONAL USES: The following uses sre subject to a conditioad use ptnait aa provUad by Chapter 30 of thia TItla: (A) Temporary subdivaioB tract offices. 11-64: DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS: The Mobile Home Estate ahall be devckiped to the ataadards of sobdiviaiaa ragutotions of Cb^>tcr 39 of tkto Title. (A) Site: Minimam site are for each "ME" aabdivisioa ahall be fifteen (15) acraa. 11-74: MINIMUM SPACE REQUIREMENTS: (A) Lot Area: Minimum aevea thooaand (7,000) square feat. (B) Lot Width: Minimum aeveaty feet VV). IC) Lot Depth: Minimam ntoety fast (90% (D) Froat Yard: Fifteen feet 1151. (E) Side Yard: 1. Interior Let: There ahall be two (2) aide yards totalling fifteea feat US') with a five foot (6*) miaimum on one aide. 2. Coraer Lot: (a) Side YaH abutting the atreet: Ten feet {W). (b) Interior side yard: Five feet (51. IF) Rear Yard: Ten feet (10') (Gl Dwelling Uut Sbe: Minimam nine haadrad (9001 aquare feet. (H) Lot Coverage: Maximam kM eaverage ahaU be fifty percent 150%) of the tot area. II) Structure Height: The hdgbt of a atructnre ahaU not exceed twenty l^ (201. IJI Number of Storiea: The number of atoriaa in a boilding ahaU not exeaad oac (1) atory. 117-7: OTHER REQUIREMENTS: (A) VcUeto Parktar-Off-etred paridag apacaa ahall be provUed to aeeardaaea with the previdoaa d Chapter 23 of thto TUIe. (B) Wall Faaead. Badges: 1. A aix fad (01 Ugh amaoary wall ahall be constracted Md watolaiaad aa a acroaa adjoidag aU pafalk atraeto and allpraparty Ham ^d J-^-t-g dl athar loaaa. Z. AH athar wala. f aaea^ aad hadlgaa ara ab)ad to the provWaMasad farth to Saetkma 11404 aad ll-20af tUa Title. (Q Garagaa aad earporto with opsaiaga vmi the aide atraet r lat ahaU ba at leaat tea fed (101 from tha dda lI41:SC0PE:ThardtowtogfigaiatioBarfi^B^nilbrJiniii^^ RauaaHaari VaMda Zaaa. 1143: PURPOSE: 1lMparpooadtha"Rr'RacnatloaalVddda Zaaa ia to create a aaaa for acoommodatkm of ahort-tarm recroatioaal vaklelaa. Ia addition, it ia to provide cartda aiidronm atoadarda to ardar to eaaure and provMa a adtabia environment for tha tonriat ndag tha fadUtiaa aad tha aiaaagemeat thered. A raereationd vdiicla park la ad for hmg-tarm oecupancy, and raqnirea convenient accaaa to major traffic routes and aaarby commerdd fadUtiea. whkh aerve the needs of the travellag pubUe. 11-84 ESTABLISHMENT OF RECREATIONAL VEHICLE PARKS: (A) It ahall be aniawfd for aay peraon to eatabUah, enlarge, convert, conatmct or mdntain a raereationd vehide pairh upon any property, owned or controlled by that peraon, except In an "RV" Recreational Vehicle Zone so estoblished by thia Chapter. (B) Aay paraoa deairiag to eatabUah or enlmrga aa adattog reoreatioad vahlcto park ahaU first obtda approvd of a dte plan by the Planning Commiadoa. The aite plan ahall ahow all detaila of the propoaed development aatf ito fadOtiea, laeluding the pattern of toterad drculatioa; tha tocation and dfaaatoioaa of dl permaneat bdUiaga aad atractaraa, recreattoad vehida dtea. parking f adUtiee, landaeaping, drdnage plan and other anch informatton and eagiaearing data aa may be nacaaaary to properly evdnate the propoaed devekipBent. (C) The Plaadng Commiaaion, upon recdpt of a reqneet and dte plan, ahall make the necessary review of the proposed development in order to determine that the providons of thia Chapter. (D) In the event the developer ia dissatisfied with the dedsion made by the Planning Commission, an apped nuy be made to tha City Coandl to accordance with proviaioaa of Chapter 34 of tUa Title. ll-M: PERMITTED USES: (A) Recraatioad vehlclea for abort-term living purpoaee. (B) Permaaaatly conatnicted livtog quartera for the aole uae of the fnll-Ume manager of the recreational vehicle park. (O Complimentary Uaes: Recreationd fadlities. restrooms, damping atotkma, showera. toundry fadUtiea and other usea and atructnros complimentary to the normd operation of a recreationd vehicle park. In adciition, a recreationd vehicle park convenience atore may be permitted subject to the following criteria: 1. Such complimentary uaes primarily related to the R.V. Park operationa shall not occupy more than four percent (4%) of the groaa area of the R.V. Park. 2. The convenience store and any other complimentary uses ahall preaent no viaible evidence from any atreet outside of the park of ite commerdal character which would attract cuatomers other than occupants of the park. 3. The coavenience atore and any other complimentary uses ahdl not be directly acceaaible from any public atreet, but ahall be aoeaadble ody from a street within the park., 114: MANAGEMENT OPERATION: (A) Each recreationd vehicle park, while in operaUon, ahdl hava^ In attendance d all times, one who shall be raspondbte with the Bcensee snd/or owner for the compliance with the providon of this Chapter and who shdl mdntdo the park in a clean and aadtary condition. (B) Tha attendant shall keep at all times a register of all vehicles atoying in the park, which register shall, at all times, be open to the officers of Bodder City. The register shall record the name and home address of each vehicle operator staying in the recreational vehicle park, date of arrivd, date of departure, the license number and stete of all motor vehicles and the make and model of dl motor vehicles and the recreationd dte in the park on which each is located. U-a* PERMANENT OCCUPANCY PROHIBITED: (A) Occnpaacy limited: 1. No racrmtiond vehicle ahall be used aa a permanent dwelling, or bndneaa, or for an indefidte period of time. Continuooa occupancy ahall not extend more than one hundred eighty daya (180) b any three hundred dxty 060) day period. • • <• Hmitatioa ahall be for *.*~ • atfsd praparty Haa. (D) Signs: 1. Oaa nameplate ahall be permitted, on exceeding two (2) aqnara feet in area, for aucfa dwelling adt. to indicate the aamc aad addrsas of the occupaat. The occupatioa of the oecapaat ahaU aet be permitted oo the dgn. X SigM to accontoaee with proviaioaa of Chapter 24 of thia Title. 11-74 INSTALLATION AND INSPECTION OF MOBILE mniES: (AlWawaWihimidfciHhaptoradiyaaadtoaatilaBaaeaiiao pandto have baa* Iaaaad by tha Baildtog DMdaa. (B) Tha MiMikaBiihaH ha laddtod la aeeardaaea whh the Butm af Nevada aaahila heaaa ragakttoaa. 4C) No aMhOa haam ahdl be oeeaptod aatfl eaaiptotloa d the Stato iaipirtlaa aad tha Stato laapartiaa aad la affixed ^ the awMk haaae. (Dt^oaadattoar. L A aaoUto hame aaay be lacatad a a f oaadattoa, ar other wiaa paraaaaaaUy dt ached to tha groaad. pr avided that piaaa far aach la c atl aa are a p p i e i 'ad hy tha CoaaaMaity Devetopaaaat Dapartmaat aad tha PaWfe Warfca Depart meat. The foOewiag MaaM aha! he aabndttid la ooajanctiaa with any aach ptoaa: WAdaadtolheprapwtyidaiamaafardaadaiiawlag wea m aita Md righto af • mt^. (W Twa ( eapiaa d a pid an byaNavadadvfli .Idi af bdldtog pad, i f igi, light vehicle to the ground for stabilizing purposes is hereby prohibited. 114-7: DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS: (A) Development StandaHs: The dandards as herdn aet forth are anpplemental to the minimum atandards for all conatruction and samtotion fadlities and other neceasary fadUtiea for tha addy, hedth and welfare of the occupanto; aaid ataadards ahall be in accordance with adopted City aad appUcnbk Stoto atandarda. (B) Park Size and Dandty: 1. The miiMMniM dte area per recreationd vehicle park devdopment ahall be ten (10) acres. 2. The overall maximum denaity per recreationd vehicle park acre ahall be fifteen (IS) recreationd vehicle sitea. 3. Racraattoad Vehide Site Size: The minimum die of a recreattoad vehide dte ahdl be one thouaand five hundred (IJWO) square feet. 4. Required separation between recreationd vehicles: A midmum setback of five feet (5') shall be mdntdned between any vehicle on the aite and any aite line of the recreationd vehicle space and/or internal street. Any attachment to the recreationd vehicle shdl be considered a part of auch vehkle when determidng the clearance bdween recreaUond vehidee. 5. Setbadu: (d Mldmnm front aetback-twenty-five feet 1251. (b) Midmum side setback—When abutting residential zonea, the ride setback shall be fifty feet ISO'): when abutting aay other zone or a dedicated public right of way, the aide aetback ahaU be twenty-five feet 125). If the rear bonadary abate a raaidaatid zone, the midmum rear aetback ahall be fifty faat (SOI or if any other zone, twentyfive fad (261. (d Scraaalag: Laadacaptog: (1) Every ncraatload vehicle park ahdl be endoaed by a aix foot (61 high aoUd maaoary wdl doeg all exterior property Uaaa. (2) Along aay exterior property line that adjoias a raaidentid aoaa, the maaoary wall ahdl be sd back a miaimum of ten feet (10*) with landaeaping provkled bdweea the reddeatid lene aad wdl. (3) AddlUondly. landscaping ahdl be provided at tha offk^e and recreattoad buildl^ areaa aad at each recreatfamd vehicle dto 6. Open Space and Raereatioed Areaa: A miaimum of dght percent (8%) of tha groaa araa for the reeraattoad vahida park, exdudve d iadivkhml recreattoad vehicle dtaa, roadwaya, complimentary aaaa aad parkiag areaa, ahall ba aet adda for opaa space aad tacraatioad fadUtiaa. Sdharfc areas may be eondderad in datandniag thia pareaatoge raqdremaat. 7. Recreattoad Vahida Park Stiaata: Strada ia laeraatiaad vahkk parha dwU he private, bat duOl be eoMtractad with aa aaphdt or eoaerato roadway approved by tha City Eagineer. Raadway wMtha ahdl mad tha foUowiag ndaiaiuB raqdremeata: One^way, no parkiag 14 fad Two-way, ao parktog 26 fed 8. Aeeeaa to Recreationd VeUde Park: Bnteaaeas aad axIto to recreattoad vahida parks akaU ba daaigaed far aafb aad eawaniaat movemaat of traffic toto and oat af tha ptrk, and to nldmixe margind f rictloa with free mavamaat of traffic on adjaeaat atreete. All tedfic toto or aat af the park akdl be thraagh each eatraacea aad adto. No aatraaea or axh ahall raqdra a tarn at aa acate angle for vaMelaa —vlag to tha diraettaa totoMiad. aad rtott of cwha aad I aa to f adMato aaay Bto far vahldaa with trailar dtachad. No d to daihiHty ahaU ba craatod or I the daw. 9. W AS dtaa shaU ha pavad with MphaH. ( padad chat far tha araa that the racraatioMi TiUflit 8 eaglM. with a twaW* faat 021 addmoi wMlh. AIM, aaa aff-otiad pathk^ ipaoa. M ad fartk la Mhaaetiaa ll-aMtA) af thto Tkla, ahdl ha preddad at aadi dto—d ahaU ba paved M atatad harate. Thara ahaU he pravidad a etatraHy htoatad pwUiw araa pavad with aaphdt. eaacNto ar aaavadad chat far additioaaloecapaat vahida aad ddtor paridag at aiala d a^ apaea far every faar (4) laaradlaaal vaUda dtaa. 10. Reaatoad Vdrida l*k Li^ti^ Tha 9ka dtoU ha hapt ad u a rt ily Mghtod a* dl tkat M thM the g I be aaf e f ar < Tbuwdaj. Mareh 3. 1968 Henderson Home News, Boulder City Newo Page 3i^ 11. Sarvke Bnildinga: (d AU aervice bdldiags ahdl be d permaaaat eoaatruetioa aad ahall conrorm to appUcabto^rovldoaa of curreat oodm aa adopted by ordinaace. (b) AU aervice bdldinga ahaU be witUa five bnadred feet (5001 from the R.V. vehicle dtaa which it aervoe. _^, (c) Separate rooms containing required plumbing fixtiwM ahaU be provided for each acz and diatinctly marked aniT iaolated by aound-resistant walla. The rooma ahdl be screened by meana of a vestibule or wdl to prevent direct view of the interior when the exterior doors are open, tdl Service buildings shall have the following minimum plumbing facilities for up to fifty (50) R.V. aites served: Toilets Urinals Lavatoriee Showers Men Women Men Men Women Men Women 4 4 14 4 2 2 For each additional twenty-five (25) R.V. aites served within the five hundred feet 1500'), one additional toilet, lavatory and shower shall be provided for each sex. 12. Underground Utilities: Each recreationd vehicle dte shall be prorided with water, aewer and electrical hookup. Facilities shall be placed underground in accordance with adopted Boulder City codes and any appUcablr Stale atandarda. 13. Fire Protection: Every recreational vehicle park shall provide adequate fire protection as required by Title 6, :j;hapter 1, "Fire Prevention Code' of this City Code. 14. Refuse Areas: Every recreational vehicle park shall provide an adequate number of refuse receptobles located within a centralized refuse area. The centraUzed refuse area shall be sreened from pubUc view. 15. There shall be no storage of fuela on the premises. 16. Placement of Recreational Vehicles: Each recreational • vehicle must be located on a recreational vehicle site. 11-6-*: SIGNS: (A) A sign advertising recreationd vehide park m*y be estabUsbed on the|>reroi8e8; provided, that the maximum area 'ahall be limited to thirty two (32) square feet. IB) Signs in accwdance with provisions of Chapter 24 of this Title. 11-8-9: LANDSCAPING: Undscaping in accordance with proviaioaa of Chapter 25 of this Title. CHAPTER 9 RESERVED CHAPTER 10 "Cl" NEIGHBORHOOD COMMERCIAL ZONE SECTION: n-IO-1: Scope 11-10-2: Purpose lMO-3: Permitted Uses ll-lO-t: Conditional Uses 11-10-5: Limitations 11-104: Hdgbt, Bulk and Spuce Requirements 11-10-7: Vehicle Parking and Loadin|t 11-104: Signs 11-10-9: l.,and8caping 1110-1: SCOPE: The following regulationa shall apply in the "Cl" Neighborhood Commerdal Zone. 11-10-2: PURPOSE: This zone is intended to serve a neighborhood area and to provide for the necessary neighborhood needs of limited goods and services. The zone is intended to provide the necessary commerdd space which will fit into the residentid pattern of development and to minimize or eliminate nther architecturd or traffic confUcte. The uses and regutotions as herein set forth are intended to protect the residentid environment and character of the neighborhood area. 1110-3; PERMITTED USES: (Al Business and Professiond 1. Business and professional offices. IB) Retdl Sdes (Not exceeding three thousand (3,000) square feet in floor area). 1. Bakeries. 2. Book, stationery or gift stores. 3. Camera stores. 4. Candy shops, excluding the making of candy. 5. Clothing stores. 6. Delicatessens. 7. Drug stores. ^ 8. Grocery stores. ^ 9. Other similar retdl sales. IC) Services (Not exceeding three thousand (3,000) square feet in floor area). Banke 2. Barber and lieauty shops. 3. Cleaning agendes or pressing estobUshments, provided there is no cleaning of clothes on the premises. 4. Day nurseries, nursery schools or private kindergartens. 5. Laundry i;gendes and self-service laundries. ID) Residential 1. A residence of the family of the owner or caretaker of a commercial estebUshroent located on the same premises, 11-10-4: CONDITIONAL USES: The following uses are subject to a Conditionid Use Permit as provided for in Chapter 30 hereof. IA) Accessory buildings and uses. IB) PnbUc and quasi-public buildings, private schools and uses of an educational, recreational, religious, cultural or public service type. (C) Public and private recreational areas and fadlities such as country clubs, golf courses and swimming pools. (D) Restaurants and cdes, but not including those having dancing or entertdnment, or drive-in car service. (E) Residential uses, subject to all the provisions specified by the "R3" regulations for such residentid uses. (F) Sodal hdls, lodges, fraternal organizationa and clubs. 11-10-5: LIMITATIONS: Every use in the "Cl" Zone shall be subject to the following conditions and limitations: IA) All uses shall be conducted wholly within s building except parking lots and similar uses which are customarily conducted in the open. (B) Gouds for sale shall consist primarily of new merchandise. (C) Products produced, inddent to a permitted use, shall be sold only at retdl on the premises. (D) The floor area for retdl and services sales shdl not exceed three thousand (3,000) square feet, exdusive of atornge, unless approved by the Planning Commission in accordance with the conditiond use review procedures of Chapter 30 of this Title. (E) When a lot in the "Cl" Zone is developed and when add lot ia adjacent to any "R" Residential Zone, there ahaU be a minimum six foot 16') soUd block wdl erected and mdntdned dong the lot lines adjacent to the R" Zone. However, such wall shdl be only four feet 14') high within the required front or street dde aetback area of add "R" Zone. 11-104: HEIGHT, BULK AND SPACE REQUIREMENTS: (A) Structure Bright: The verticd bright at any pdnt of the Btructure shdl not exceed by more than fifteen feet (151, the horizontal disUnce between that point in the atnicture and the front lot line, but in no caae ahall the bright of any atmctare exceed twenty-flve 1251. The structure bright ahaU conform with the criteria shown on Chart 1 aa foUowa: / <—ts'aiaiiMua M • / f • M' • / / _. IT • / • -•' • r a ^^ a H ^^^ '* I •r ^^.ia CNRMT X STIWCTURE HEIGHT IN C-l ZONE A ItoiMihil Ront I • AoNTUtUM (B) Nuadw d Staciea: The anmber of atoriaa in a bdMiag dwU B0( iic—d two stoiiM, (Q Fraat Yd: No froat yard ia raqaited unleaa a block ia part (y to tha "Cl" Zoaa, aad partly In an "R Eoae. In wkicb •vaM tha froat yard roqniremeate of the "R" Zoaa akdl apply; ar aalaaa required to meet the laadacapiag ra^ aiwmaato af Sadiaa ll-lMfO d thia Title. (Dl da Yard: No dda yard ia taqairsd except wbara the dde af tha Id ii adjaeaat to aa "R" Zaaa. to whidi avaat tha dde yard reqairemaate of tha "R" Zoaa ahdl apply, whether or aot aeparatad therefrom by aa allay; or ualeaa required to atad tha laadacapiag reqdremanto d SecUon 1 l-25>: (A) BuainesB and Professional 1. Budness and profesdoiul uses permitted in the "d" Zone 2. Hospitsis for snimsls including boarding and lodging; provided that there shall be no open kennels mdntdned and provided that all fadUties will be in soundproof buildings. 3. Medical, dental or reserach laboratory. (B) Retail Sales 1. Retdl sales permitted in the "C2" Zone. .1 2. Automobiel sales, new and/or used. 3. Automobile aervice stations, including indden taljre pair '"' wbrk. 4. Boat sdeia, including service and repdr. (C) Wholesale Sales 1. Automobile sales, new and'or used. 2 Mid-storage faciUties. 3. Wholesale and jobbing estabUshments. (D) Services 1. Service estabUshments permitted in the "C2" Zone, except hotels and motels. 2. Body and fender shops. 3. Mediamcal automobile washes. 4. Plumbing shops. 5. Repdr garages and shops. 6. Sheet metal shops. IE) Residential 1. A resid^ce of the family of the owner or caretaker of a commercial estabUshment located on the same premises. IF) Other 1. Accessory building and uses. 11 13-4: CONDITIONAL USES: The following are subject to a Conditional Use Permit as provided for in Chapter .'10 hereof: (A) All conditional uaes permitted in the "C2" Zone (Section 11) 1-4) unless Usted OH a permitted uae in this Zone. (B) Asphdt and concrete and gravel and sand mixing. (C) Beverage manufacturing or bottling. ^— (D) Cadne andfor feUne Itoarding places and kennela. (E) Cold storage plant. (F) Commercial laundry, steam or wet. (G) Draying, freighting or trucking yard or terminal. (H) Experimental, testing, and industrid laboratories. (I) Lumber and building materials, including miU and sash work. IJ) Machine shops or other metd work shops. iKl PubUc utiUty service or storage yards. • the provision of Chapter 23 of this Title. 11-134: SIGNS: Signs in accordance with providons of Chaptier 24 of this Tide. 11-13-9: LANDSCAPING: Landscaping in accordance withKovisiona of Chapter 25 of this Title. .; CHAPTER 14 RESERVED CHAPTER 15 "H" HOSPITAL ZONE SECTION: 1115-1: Scope 11-15-2: Purpoee 11-154: Permitted Uses 11-15-4: Conditiond Usea .',^ 11-15-5: Hdght, Bulk and Space Requlremente ..^ 11 154: Signs 11-15-7: Vehicle Parking and Loading 11-154: Landaeaping .. 11-15^1: SCOPE: The foUowing regutotions shdl apply to the "H" Hoapitd Zone. 11 15-2: PURPOSE: the purpoe of the "H" Hoepitd Zope is to foster and perpetuate the development of centers for efficient human hedth care, matotenance and auperviaioo together with related and compatible activities. The "H" Hoepitd Zone must be for the general benefit and welfare of the totoi commudty. 1115-3: PERMITTED USES: (A) Medicd and Hedth Care 1. Hoapitala with less than forty (40) bade. 2. Convalescent hospitals. 3. Home hedth care agencies. 4. Hoapicea. 5. Medicd, dentd aad other human hedth care dficea or cUdca. 6. Nnrdng homea. 7. Outpatient ceaters. 8. Pharmadaa. 9. Red homoa. 10. Aeeaaaary bdkfinga aad uaaa. (B) Other 1. Acceaaory buildings and uaea. 2. Complementary naea, aach aa gift ahopa, cafeterias aad oth^aaaa rad a m a ri ly tocida atd tothapanrittadaaea,subjcct to the following: (d Ceaopleaieatary nae moat be dedgned to attract caatoaMrs, aad ahaU be aabordlBato to the hoepitd or

PAGE 41

ll^ l A Hfdtewoa Home New. Bonldf City Nwrt Thwndmj, Marc h 8. 1968 Ha^Mt^WaUa rafatettoM ahall apply to UM •ataaa ottowiaa provM114* 1140lte 114-1: BOOrC: tka "11•AtetathtoTMa. 1141: nmrOSB: Tha "Rl" Stack-Faiiil; Raakkatlal Zone I^HrtaaAad to waa t a. itaWMii m&d pratact tha raaidcntial al iiacMMrily ataw tar atbaa faaily Uviag: to tfcii Mii wMrfc w—Id ha —taaipatftlt or tlatrimep Ml. tha aaw; ta gaMt tha davdopaaaaat ttf Uad umA limit tha pa>riatia daMltjr la ttmmam coMiatent with the gmeral ^MMMMty abJaeUvaa m aat forth • the Coaprchenaivr Plan. IA*-Ta praaya. is low-daMity raaidaatial aaca. landa which by loeatiaa aad dMnetar arc pticidM]r aoitad for anrh U8e. (B) Ta patairit tha aaro Hbaral taaa ol hMd for Haaitad agricultural pMpiaiato caaaMaatlew withali^la-faJ|y raaldaBcaii that -.'Ja ^praiviata aa ivJIar lata. IM* PERMITTED USES: UOaa laaaily dwalUaf of a paraiaiMat character ia a perma01 Aeeaaaary aaaa aad atraetaraa caatMaarUy iaeidoiital to any p aia d ttad raaWaatlal aae, aach aa garagaa, groeohovBeii or wHihahipa; p ra v Mad that BOM ahall be raMad^or occupied far gala, aad that aa aeeaaaory baildiaga ahaO ba iahabi ted. O Tha hieldMtal kaaplag af aaa-traaalaat bo^dara or lodger. v,V-y a-riddiatial faarily. ha* aat aaara th— twa g> hoardara mmilmt ladgara • additiaa to aiawbari of tha faaaily occupyiag a aM^aaidty raaidaaca. (Ol Cato aad daga, aat to ezcaad the kaapiag of thraa 13) cata aad/ar doga bat azeiadi^ UttaM or pappiaa aadar aix (6) • aaatha of ago. (Q HaMa oecapaatiaaa ia accordaaec with prooadnroa as set forth ia Chapter 29 of the Title. mOUHT aaaa aOawad oaly to tha "Rl-20". "Rl-40" aad "Rl-W" 1. Agricaharal oaaa, ezcpt the raiaiog of fowl for oommeroal p a rpaaaa. or the aaW of any produeto at retail oo the prtaiian athar than thoaa prodacad thcraoa. AU fowl must be ceaflaad to the premiaea. 2. Tha graaiag, raiaiag or training of animals, ezdndinR Bwiaa, bat aot todudiag riding sUbIca or academiea, providad that aot oaorc than a total of two (2) of any of the f aUawiag, or a total of two (2) of any combinatioa of horsra, • lalaa, poaiaa, goata. aheep, eowa or animak of geaaral like eharaetar, awy be kept oa aay lot with aa araa of twenty thaaaMd OOOOOI aqaara faet; Md that OM addMoMl aaimal --aaay be k^ for cac^ addltioMi twenty thoaaaad 00,000) ...'ovaara faot oa aay each lot, pravMad that aodairlaa or feed lato ahall be parmittod. X Aeeaaaary aaaa aad atr ac t araa castooiarily ioddeatol to aay parMittad reaideatial aad agrkohnral nae. 1 1;M: COf4DITIONAL USES: The foUowiag usea are subject to a coaditioaal Vmt Permit aa provided ia Chapter 30 of this Title. (A) Pablic aad qoasi-poblic baifaiiaga. private aekoola aad uses of aa adacational, recreatioaaL rcUgioaa, cultural or public Servian .type, aot including corporatioa yarda, atorage or repair yarda aad warihoaaaa aad vocatioaal aehoola that require wirhaalrai opcratioaa. (B) Tawparary aubdivision tract offices. (C) P ah Ut aad private non-caouaccrtol recroatioaal areaa and fa to a waM p W f aarily dwaUag ar dwalliag graap ahaD ba twa thoaaaad five haadNd OAMK iVHn f aat. eidwMag that aiaa wilUa aay B ai h aad atUHy aaaatoaai. 11-4-7: MINIMUM DWELUNO UNIT SIZE: (AlOaatkaoaaat llMHaqaara faat far aach ilacMaBdly dwalliag, ozdaaiva af garagaa, pw ch aa, Mvas or aiadlar faatarta. (Bl Eight haadrad 1800) aqawa feat tar aadi dwalUag nait to a two-family dweiUag, Mdaaiva of garagaa, porchea, eaves or aindlar faataraa. (Q Sii huadrad M aqnara feat tor aadi dwalUag aait in a • nltlpla-faadly dwalliag or d^ralliag groap azdnaiva af garagaa, por d iaa. advto ar dtoilar faataraa. ll- MINIMUM YARD SPACE REQUIREMENTS (A) Ptoat Yd: Tha adatama fnat yd ahaD ba fif loan faat tm (BlSMaYard: 1. latarior Loto: There ahall ba two (2) sida yarda totalling twenty feat OOT) with a six foof (Ot oUaiaiam oa one aide. 2. Coraar Loto: The aide yard ahattiag tha atreet shaU be aat laaa ttea twaaty faat (301; the latariar aida yard aale be aot tsaa thaa aix fact AT (C) Rear Yard: Tkaca ahall be a mlaimaa >ew yard f twaaty faetfMT. ll-4 HEIGHT AND BULK REQUIREMENTS: (A) Stractara Height: Tha hdght of a stractore ahall not eieoed twaatyflv* iMt OST > NaaAto f Stariaa: Tha aatober of atoHaa to a baildlRR shall aot a>aad two CD atoriaa. O Lat Covaraga : Tha wa riai a to lot covarage ahall va fifty per ceat (80%) of tha lot area. (D) Diataace Between BaiUinga: The mlaimnai dtotaace bet ween baildiaga oa tha aatte lot ahaU be twelve feet (12). 11-4-10; VEHICLE PARKING: (A) Off-street parkiag apacaa ahall be providod in accordance with the proviatona of Chapter 23 of tUa Title. (B) Private garagaa aad earporto opening into a atreet from either tha front yard or the aide yard on a comer lot shall be aat back a minimam of twenty feet (201. 11-4-11: (A) One naaMpkto ahaU be permUted, aot exeaoding two (2) aqaara faat to area for each dwalliag unit. Indicating the naaM and addrwa of the oecapaat. The occspatioa of the oocapaat ahaU aot be permitted oa the aign. ca, far aecapaaey by high^aaaity, muU-family 11-44: PERMITTED USES: (A) A^ we parmittad to tiM' K R,l" Stagic-Faadly Reaidaatial (B)Tfatoay( IQ (Dll 1-44: CONDITIONAL USES: Tha faOawtag aaea are aabjaet a Coaditioaal Uae Permit, as provided to Chapter 30 of thia Title (A1 Pabiic aad ^aaai pahHr haMdIagi, private schools aad aaaa af aa sda laH ihai, ratraatiaaal, tailgiaaa. caltaral or pablie ue r pB ia tto a yards, atsrage or vocatioaal aehoola that aeeda of the mobile hooM reaidaata: paevidad, however, that aaid aam ahall not iadnde ooBuaerdal aad other nonresidential aaea. IC) Permanent living qnartera tor the atrfa nae of the owner or manager of the naofaile home park. (D) Accaasory baildiaga, aach as atorage. grecnbonaa or workahop, provided tkat no accaasory building ahall be iakabitad. (El Cato and doga: Not to exoaad the kac|iii f three 13) cato and/or dogs, bat exdadiag kHteaa or puppiea ander aix 16) months pineat. A oapy af the proposed park ralea aad ragubttoaa ahaU ba filed with the dto plan. IQ The Planning Commiaaioa, npoa raeeipt af tha reqaeat aad aite plan, ahall aaake the aeeaaaary laapartiaa aad review of the propoaed devdopaaeat ia ordsr to dateraaine tkat the proviaioaa of tha Title, are baiag rimpMiil with. (D) Any paraoM daairii toidtar, dtoia, madtfy or vary a ambile home park, wkieh was la axiateaca at tha tinac the "Lead Use Zoaiag Ordiaaaea af BoaMar City" ww adoptad C all Athar ITha ha aat rfUflaatin lOI Tamparwy sabdMalaa tract afflew. U-i* MINmUM LOT SPACE RBQUIRBMXfCn: (A)Lat Araac 1. Magto-Faadly P iWagi 7 2. Twe-FMily D • g I. Other Paradttad Uaaa ai Lat Width: L latodar Lot 71 tCaraarLat 71 (Cl Lat Depth: MR ba laaa MO faat ITha iddMiinpyihniiitoidose 11-7-3: Permitted Uam 11-7-4: Coaditiond Uaea il-7-S: Devekipaieat Staadarde 11-7-6: Minimam Space Reqnireniento 11-7-7: Other Requiremento 11-7-8: InataUatioa and Inapectto of Mobile Homea. 11-7-1: SCOPE: The foUowmg regntotioaa ahall apply to tha "ME" Mobile Home Estete Zone. 1I-7-2; PURPOSE: To create a zone which is intended to aUow the nae of mobile homca of residential purpoaee oo individually owned lots, and to provide certain minimum Htandarda of development in order to inaore a suitable environment for the reaidente and familiea of mobile home subdivision dwellera withm the "ME" Zone. 11-7-3: PERMITTED USES: • (A) Single-family mobile homea on an individually owned tot tor residential uae together with the cuatomery accessory uacs such as cabanas, pstio slabs, carport or garage and storage buildings. In no event shall more than one mobile home be uaed for rendcntial parpoaes on a lot. (B) Community recreation fadUtica for the uae of individual tot owners within the sabdivdoa. The naaiatenance of the commaaity reertaUon and service areaa ahall be aaaared ^^^gyidoaa to the deeds, such as: Covenaate ninaiag with i rf i a aits t 1144 af Recroatioaal VaMda Pb II-M: ParmHtad Uaaa 114c lW4cP( 1147: 114*8lgiw Oparattoa—^ T Oaeapaaey PnUbM itStaadarda owaers ia the reapoadbility and cost thereof. IC) Cate and dogs, not to exceed the keeping of three (3) cato and/or doga. but excluding kittena or puppies under six (6) montbn of age. (D) Home occupationa in accordaiK* with the procednraa aa aot forth in Chapter 29 of this Title. 11-7-t: CONDITIONAL USES: The following uses sre subject to a conditioad use ptnait aa provUad by Chapter 30 of thia TItla: (A) Temporary subdivaioB tract offices. 11-64: DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS: The Mobile Home Estate ahall be devckiped to the ataadards of sobdiviaiaa ragutotions of Cb^>tcr 39 of tkto Title. (A) Site: Minimam site are for each "ME" aabdivisioa ahall be fifteen (15) acraa. 11-74: MINIMUM SPACE REQUIREMENTS: (A) Lot Area: Minimum aevea thooaand (7,000) square feat. (B) Lot Width: Minimum aeveaty feet VV). IC) Lot Depth: Minimam ntoety fast (90% (D) Froat Yard: Fifteen feet 1151. (E) Side Yard: 1. Interior Let: There ahall be two (2) aide yards totalling fifteea feat US') with a five foot (6*) miaimum on one aide. 2. Coraer Lot: (a) Side YaH abutting the atreet: Ten feet {W). (b) Interior side yard: Five feet (51. IF) Rear Yard: Ten feet (10') (Gl Dwelling Uut Sbe: Minimam nine haadrad (9001 aquare feet. (H) Lot Coverage: Maximam kM eaverage ahaU be fifty percent 150%) of the tot area. II) Structure Height: The hdgbt of a atructnre ahaU not exceed twenty l^ (201. IJI Number of Storiea: The number of atoriaa in a boilding ahaU not exeaad oac (1) atory. 117-7: OTHER REQUIREMENTS: (A) VcUeto Parktar-Off-etred paridag apacaa ahall be provUed to aeeardaaea with the previdoaa d Chapter 23 of thto TUIe. (B) Wall Faaead. Badges: 1. A aix fad (01 Ugh amaoary wall ahall be constracted Md watolaiaad aa a acroaa adjoidag aU pafalk atraeto and allpraparty Ham ^d J-^-t-g dl athar loaaa. Z. AH athar wala. f aaea^ aad hadlgaa ara ab)ad to the provWaMasad farth to Saetkma 11404 aad ll-20af tUa Title. (Q Garagaa aad earporto with opsaiaga vmi the aide atraet r lat ahaU ba at leaat tea fed (101 from tha dda lI41:SC0PE:ThardtowtogfigaiatioBarfi^B^nilbrJiniii^^ RauaaHaari VaMda Zaaa. 1143: PURPOSE: 1lMparpooadtha"Rr'RacnatloaalVddda Zaaa ia to create a aaaa for acoommodatkm of ahort-tarm recroatioaal vaklelaa. Ia addition, it ia to provide cartda aiidronm atoadarda to ardar to eaaure and provMa a adtabia environment for tha tonriat ndag tha fadUtiaa aad tha aiaaagemeat thered. A raereationd vdiicla park la ad for hmg-tarm oecupancy, and raqnirea convenient accaaa to major traffic routes and aaarby commerdd fadUtiea. whkh aerve the needs of the travellag pubUe. 11-84 ESTABLISHMENT OF RECREATIONAL VEHICLE PARKS: (A) It ahall be aniawfd for aay peraon to eatabUah, enlarge, convert, conatmct or mdntain a raereationd vehide pairh upon any property, owned or controlled by that peraon, except In an "RV" Recreational Vehicle Zone so estoblished by thia Chapter. (B) Aay paraoa deairiag to eatabUah or enlmrga aa adattog reoreatioad vahlcto park ahaU first obtda approvd of a dte plan by the Planning Commiadoa. The aite plan ahall ahow all detaila of the propoaed development aatf ito fadOtiea, laeluding the pattern of toterad drculatioa; tha tocation and dfaaatoioaa of dl permaneat bdUiaga aad atractaraa, recreattoad vehida dtea. parking f adUtiee, landaeaping, drdnage plan and other anch informatton and eagiaearing data aa may be nacaaaary to properly evdnate the propoaed devekipBent. (C) The Plaadng Commiaaion, upon recdpt of a reqneet and dte plan, ahall make the necessary review of the proposed development in order to determine that the providons of thia Chapter. (D) In the event the developer ia dissatisfied with the dedsion made by the Planning Commission, an apped nuy be made to tha City Coandl to accordance with proviaioaa of Chapter 34 of tUa Title. ll-M: PERMITTED USES: (A) Recraatioad vehlclea for abort-term living purpoaee. (B) Permaaaatly conatnicted livtog quartera for the aole uae of the fnll-Ume manager of the recreational vehicle park. (O Complimentary Uaes: Recreationd fadlities. restrooms, damping atotkma, showera. toundry fadUtiea and other usea and atructnros complimentary to the normd operation of a recreationd vehicle park. In adciition, a recreationd vehicle park convenience atore may be permitted subject to the following criteria: 1. Such complimentary uaes primarily related to the R.V. Park operationa shall not occupy more than four percent (4%) of the groaa area of the R.V. Park. 2. The convenience store and any other complimentary uses ahall preaent no viaible evidence from any atreet outside of the park of ite commerdal character which would attract cuatomers other than occupants of the park. 3. The coavenience atore and any other complimentary uses ahdl not be directly acceaaible from any public atreet, but ahall be aoeaadble ody from a street within the park., 114: MANAGEMENT OPERATION: (A) Each recreationd vehicle park, while in operaUon, ahdl hava^ In attendance d all times, one who shall be raspondbte with the Bcensee snd/or owner for the compliance with the providon of this Chapter and who shdl mdntdo the park in a clean and aadtary condition. (B) Tha attendant shall keep at all times a register of all vehicles atoying in the park, which register shall, at all times, be open to the officers of Bodder City. The register shall record the name and home address of each vehicle operator staying in the recreational vehicle park, date of arrivd, date of departure, the license number and stete of all motor vehicles and the make and model of dl motor vehicles and the recreationd dte in the park on which each is located. U-a* PERMANENT OCCUPANCY PROHIBITED: (A) Occnpaacy limited: 1. No racrmtiond vehicle ahall be used aa a permanent dwelling, or bndneaa, or for an indefidte period of time. Continuooa occupancy ahall not extend more than one hundred eighty daya (180) b any three hundred dxty 060) day period. • • <• Hmitatioa ahall be for *.*~ • atfsd praparty Haa. (D) Signs: 1. Oaa nameplate ahall be permitted, on exceeding two (2) aqnara feet in area, for aucfa dwelling adt. to indicate the aamc aad addrsas of the occupaat. The occupatioa of the oecapaat ahaU aet be permitted oo the dgn. X SigM to accontoaee with proviaioaa of Chapter 24 of thia Title. 11-74 INSTALLATION AND INSPECTION OF MOBILE mniES: (AlWawaWihimidfciHhaptoradiyaaadtoaatilaBaaeaiiao pandto have baa* Iaaaad by tha Baildtog DMdaa. (B) Tha MiMikaBiihaH ha laddtod la aeeardaaea whh the Butm af Nevada aaahila heaaa ragakttoaa. 4C) No aMhOa haam ahdl be oeeaptod aatfl eaaiptotloa d the Stato iaipirtlaa aad tha Stato laapartiaa aad la affixed ^ the awMk haaae. (Dt^oaadattoar. L A aaoUto hame aaay be lacatad a a f oaadattoa, ar other wiaa paraaaaaaUy dt ached to tha groaad. pr avided that piaaa far aach la c atl aa are a p p i e i 'ad hy tha CoaaaMaity Devetopaaaat Dapartmaat aad tha PaWfe Warfca Depart meat. The foOewiag MaaM aha! he aabndttid la ooajanctiaa with any aach ptoaa: WAdaadtolheprapwtyidaiamaafardaadaiiawlag wea m aita Md righto af • mt^. (W Twa ( eapiaa d a pid an byaNavadadvfli .Idi af bdldtog pad, i f igi, light vehicle to the ground for stabilizing purposes is hereby prohibited. 114-7: DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS: (A) Development StandaHs: The dandards as herdn aet forth are anpplemental to the minimum atandards for all conatruction and samtotion fadlities and other neceasary fadUtiea for tha addy, hedth and welfare of the occupanto; aaid ataadards ahall be in accordance with adopted City aad appUcnbk Stoto atandarda. (B) Park Size and Dandty: 1. The miiMMniM dte area per recreationd vehicle park devdopment ahall be ten (10) acres. 2. The overall maximum denaity per recreationd vehicle park acre ahall be fifteen (IS) recreationd vehicle sitea. 3. Racraattoad Vehide Site Size: The minimum die of a recreattoad vehide dte ahdl be one thouaand five hundred (IJWO) square feet. 4. Required separation between recreationd vehicles: A midmum setback of five feet (5') shall be mdntdned between any vehicle on the aite and any aite line of the recreationd vehicle space and/or internal street. Any attachment to the recreationd vehicle shdl be considered a part of auch vehkle when determidng the clearance bdween recreaUond vehidee. 5. Setbadu: (d Mldmnm front aetback-twenty-five feet 1251. (b) Midmum side setback—When abutting residential zonea, the ride setback shall be fifty feet ISO'): when abutting aay other zone or a dedicated public right of way, the aide aetback ahaU be twenty-five feet 125). If the rear bonadary abate a raaidaatid zone, the midmum rear aetback ahall be fifty faat (SOI or if any other zone, twentyfive fad (261. (d Scraaalag: Laadacaptog: (1) Every ncraatload vehicle park ahdl be endoaed by a aix foot (61 high aoUd maaoary wdl doeg all exterior property Uaaa. (2) Along aay exterior property line that adjoias a raaidentid aoaa, the maaoary wall ahdl be sd back a miaimum of ten feet (10*) with landaeaping provkled bdweea the reddeatid lene aad wdl. (3) AddlUondly. landscaping ahdl be provided at tha offk^e and recreattoad buildl^ areaa aad at each recreatfamd vehicle dto 6. Open Space and Raereatioed Areaa: A miaimum of dght percent (8%) of tha groaa araa for the reeraattoad vahida park, exdudve d iadivkhml recreattoad vehicle dtaa, roadwaya, complimentary aaaa aad parkiag areaa, ahall ba aet adda for opaa space aad tacraatioad fadUtiaa. Sdharfc areas may be eondderad in datandniag thia pareaatoge raqdremaat. 7. Recreattoad Vahida Park Stiaata: Strada ia laeraatiaad vahkk parha dwU he private, bat duOl be eoMtractad with aa aaphdt or eoaerato roadway approved by tha City Eagineer. Raadway wMtha ahdl mad tha foUowiag ndaiaiuB raqdremeata: One^way, no parkiag 14 fad Two-way, ao parktog 26 fed 8. Aeeeaa to Recreationd VeUde Park: Bnteaaeas aad axIto to recreattoad vahida parks akaU ba daaigaed far aafb aad eawaniaat movemaat of traffic toto and oat af tha ptrk, and to nldmixe margind f rictloa with free mavamaat of traffic on adjaeaat atreete. All tedfic toto or aat af the park akdl be thraagh each eatraacea aad adto. No aatraaea or axh ahall raqdra a tarn at aa acate angle for vaMelaa —vlag to tha diraettaa totoMiad. aad rtott of cwha aad I aa to f adMato aaay Bto far vahldaa with trailar dtachad. No d to daihiHty ahaU ba craatod or I the daw. 9. W AS dtaa shaU ha pavad with MphaH. ( padad chat far tha araa that the racraatioMi TiUflit 8 eaglM. with a twaW* faat 021 addmoi wMlh. AIM, aaa aff-otiad pathk^ ipaoa. M ad fartk la Mhaaetiaa ll-aMtA) af thto Tkla, ahdl ha preddad at aadi dto—d ahaU ba paved M atatad harate. Thara ahaU he pravidad a etatraHy htoatad pwUiw araa pavad with aaphdt. eaacNto ar aaavadad chat far additioaaloecapaat vahida aad ddtor paridag at aiala d a^ apaea far every faar (4) laaradlaaal vaUda dtaa. 10. Reaatoad Vdrida l*k Li^ti^ Tha 9ka dtoU ha hapt ad u a rt ily Mghtod a* dl tkat M thM the g I be aaf e f ar < Tbuwdaj. Mareh 3. 1968 Henderson Home News, Boulder City Newo Page 3i^ 11. Sarvke Bnildinga: (d AU aervice bdldiags ahdl be d permaaaat eoaatruetioa aad ahall conrorm to appUcabto^rovldoaa of curreat oodm aa adopted by ordinaace. (b) AU aervice bdldinga ahaU be witUa five bnadred feet (5001 from the R.V. vehicle dtaa which it aervoe. _^, (c) Separate rooms containing required plumbing fixtiwM ahaU be provided for each acz and diatinctly marked aniT iaolated by aound-resistant walla. The rooma ahdl be screened by meana of a vestibule or wdl to prevent direct view of the interior when the exterior doors are open, tdl Service buildings shall have the following minimum plumbing facilities for up to fifty (50) R.V. aites served: Toilets Urinals Lavatoriee Showers Men Women Men Men Women Men Women 4 4 14 4 2 2 For each additional twenty-five (25) R.V. aites served within the five hundred feet 1500'), one additional toilet, lavatory and shower shall be provided for each sex. 12. Underground Utilities: Each recreationd vehicle dte shall be prorided with water, aewer and electrical hookup. Facilities shall be placed underground in accordance with adopted Boulder City codes and any appUcablr Stale atandarda. 13. Fire Protection: Every recreational vehicle park shall provide adequate fire protection as required by Title 6, :j;hapter 1, "Fire Prevention Code' of this City Code. 14. Refuse Areas: Every recreational vehicle park shall provide an adequate number of refuse receptobles located within a centralized refuse area. The centraUzed refuse area shall be sreened from pubUc view. 15. There shall be no storage of fuela on the premises. 16. Placement of Recreational Vehicles: Each recreational • vehicle must be located on a recreational vehicle site. 11-6-*: SIGNS: (A) A sign advertising recreationd vehide park m*y be estabUsbed on the|>reroi8e8; provided, that the maximum area 'ahall be limited to thirty two (32) square feet. IB) Signs in accwdance with provisions of Chapter 24 of this Title. 11-8-9: LANDSCAPING: Undscaping in accordance with proviaioaa of Chapter 25 of this Title. CHAPTER 9 RESERVED CHAPTER 10 "Cl" NEIGHBORHOOD COMMERCIAL ZONE SECTION: n-IO-1: Scope 11-10-2: Purpose lMO-3: Permitted Uses ll-lO-t: Conditional Uses 11-10-5: Limitations 11-104: Hdgbt, Bulk and Spuce Requirements 11-10-7: Vehicle Parking and Loadin|t 11-104: Signs 11-10-9: l.,and8caping 1110-1: SCOPE: The following regulationa shall apply in the "Cl" Neighborhood Commerdal Zone. 11-10-2: PURPOSE: This zone is intended to serve a neighborhood area and to provide for the necessary neighborhood needs of limited goods and services. The zone is intended to provide the necessary commerdd space which will fit into the residentid pattern of development and to minimize or eliminate nther architecturd or traffic confUcte. The uses and regutotions as herein set forth are intended to protect the residentid environment and character of the neighborhood area. 1110-3; PERMITTED USES: (Al Business and Professiond 1. Business and professional offices. IB) Retdl Sdes (Not exceeding three thousand (3,000) square feet in floor area). 1. Bakeries. 2. Book, stationery or gift stores. 3. Camera stores. 4. Candy shops, excluding the making of candy. 5. Clothing stores. 6. Delicatessens. 7. Drug stores. ^ 8. Grocery stores. ^ 9. Other similar retdl sales. IC) Services (Not exceeding three thousand (3,000) square feet in floor area). Banke 2. Barber and lieauty shops. 3. Cleaning agendes or pressing estobUshments, provided there is no cleaning of clothes on the premises. 4. Day nurseries, nursery schools or private kindergartens. 5. Laundry i;gendes and self-service laundries. ID) Residential 1. A residence of the family of the owner or caretaker of a commercial estebUshroent located on the same premises, 11-10-4: CONDITIONAL USES: The following uses are subject to a Conditionid Use Permit as provided for in Chapter 30 hereof. IA) Accessory buildings and uses. IB) PnbUc and quasi-public buildings, private schools and uses of an educational, recreational, religious, cultural or public service type. (C) Public and private recreational areas and fadlities such as country clubs, golf courses and swimming pools. (D) Restaurants and cdes, but not including those having dancing or entertdnment, or drive-in car service. (E) Residential uses, subject to all the provisions specified by the "R3" regulations for such residentid uses. (F) Sodal hdls, lodges, fraternal organizationa and clubs. 11-10-5: LIMITATIONS: Every use in the "Cl" Zone shall be subject to the following conditions and limitations: IA) All uses shall be conducted wholly within s building except parking lots and similar uses which are customarily conducted in the open. (B) Gouds for sale shall consist primarily of new merchandise. (C) Products produced, inddent to a permitted use, shall be sold only at retdl on the premises. (D) The floor area for retdl and services sales shdl not exceed three thousand (3,000) square feet, exdusive of atornge, unless approved by the Planning Commission in accordance with the conditiond use review procedures of Chapter 30 of this Title. (E) When a lot in the "Cl" Zone is developed and when add lot ia adjacent to any "R" Residential Zone, there ahaU be a minimum six foot 16') soUd block wdl erected and mdntdned dong the lot lines adjacent to the R" Zone. However, such wall shdl be only four feet 14') high within the required front or street dde aetback area of add "R" Zone. 11-104: HEIGHT, BULK AND SPACE REQUIREMENTS: (A) Structure Bright: The verticd bright at any pdnt of the Btructure shdl not exceed by more than fifteen feet (151, the horizontal disUnce between that point in the atnicture and the front lot line, but in no caae ahall the bright of any atmctare exceed twenty-flve 1251. The structure bright ahaU conform with the criteria shown on Chart 1 aa foUowa: / <—ts'aiaiiMua M • / f • M' • / / _. IT • / • -•' • r a ^^ a H ^^^ '* I •r ^^.ia CNRMT X STIWCTURE HEIGHT IN C-l ZONE A ItoiMihil Ront I • AoNTUtUM (B) Nuadw d Staciea: The anmber of atoriaa in a bdMiag dwU B0( iic—d two stoiiM, (Q Fraat Yd: No froat yard ia raqaited unleaa a block ia part (y to tha "Cl" Zoaa, aad partly In an "R Eoae. In wkicb •vaM tha froat yard roqniremeate of the "R" Zoaa akdl apply; ar aalaaa required to meet the laadacapiag ra^ aiwmaato af Sadiaa ll-lMfO d thia Title. (Dl da Yard: No dda yard ia taqairsd except wbara the dde af tha Id ii adjaeaat to aa "R" Zaaa. to whidi avaat tha dde yard reqairemaate of tha "R" Zoaa ahdl apply, whether or aot aeparatad therefrom by aa allay; or ualeaa required to atad tha laadacapiag reqdremanto d SecUon 1 l-25>: (A) BuainesB and Professional 1. Budness and profesdoiul uses permitted in the "d" Zone 2. Hospitsis for snimsls including boarding and lodging; provided that there shall be no open kennels mdntdned and provided that all fadUties will be in soundproof buildings. 3. Medical, dental or reserach laboratory. (B) Retail Sales 1. Retdl sales permitted in the "C2" Zone. .1 2. Automobiel sales, new and/or used. 3. Automobile aervice stations, including indden taljre pair '"' wbrk. 4. Boat sdeia, including service and repdr. (C) Wholesale Sales 1. Automobile sales, new and'or used. 2 Mid-storage faciUties. 3. Wholesale and jobbing estabUshments. (D) Services 1. Service estabUshments permitted in the "C2" Zone, except hotels and motels. 2. Body and fender shops. 3. Mediamcal automobile washes. 4. Plumbing shops. 5. Repdr garages and shops. 6. Sheet metal shops. IE) Residential 1. A resid^ce of the family of the owner or caretaker of a commercial estabUshment located on the same premises. IF) Other 1. Accessory building and uses. 11 13-4: CONDITIONAL USES: The following are subject to a Conditional Use Permit as provided for in Chapter .'10 hereof: (A) All conditional uaes permitted in the "C2" Zone (Section 11) 1-4) unless Usted OH a permitted uae in this Zone. (B) Asphdt and concrete and gravel and sand mixing. (C) Beverage manufacturing or bottling. ^— (D) Cadne andfor feUne Itoarding places and kennela. (E) Cold storage plant. (F) Commercial laundry, steam or wet. (G) Draying, freighting or trucking yard or terminal. (H) Experimental, testing, and industrid laboratories. (I) Lumber and building materials, including miU and sash work. IJ) Machine shops or other metd work shops. iKl PubUc utiUty service or storage yards. • the provision of Chapter 23 of this Title. 11-134: SIGNS: Signs in accordance with providons of Chaptier 24 of this Tide. 11-13-9: LANDSCAPING: Landscaping in accordance withKovisiona of Chapter 25 of this Title. .; CHAPTER 14 RESERVED CHAPTER 15 "H" HOSPITAL ZONE SECTION: 1115-1: Scope 11-15-2: Purpoee 11-154: Permitted Uses 11-15-4: Conditiond Usea .',^ 11-15-5: Hdght, Bulk and Space Requlremente ..^ 11 154: Signs 11-15-7: Vehicle Parking and Loading 11-154: Landaeaping .. 11-15^1: SCOPE: The foUowing regutotions shdl apply to the "H" Hoapitd Zone. 11 15-2: PURPOSE: the purpoe of the "H" Hoepitd Zope is to foster and perpetuate the development of centers for efficient human hedth care, matotenance and auperviaioo together with related and compatible activities. The "H" Hoepitd Zone must be for the general benefit and welfare of the totoi commudty. 1115-3: PERMITTED USES: (A) Medicd and Hedth Care 1. Hoapitala with less than forty (40) bade. 2. Convalescent hospitals. 3. Home hedth care agencies. 4. Hoapicea. 5. Medicd, dentd aad other human hedth care dficea or cUdca. 6. Nnrdng homea. 7. Outpatient ceaters. 8. Pharmadaa. 9. Red homoa. 10. Aeeaaaary bdkfinga aad uaaa. (B) Other 1. Acceaaory buildings and uaea. 2. Complementary naea, aach aa gift ahopa, cafeterias aad oth^aaaa rad a m a ri ly tocida atd tothapanrittadaaea,subjcct to the following: (d Ceaopleaieatary nae moat be dedgned to attract caatoaMrs, aad ahaU be aabordlBato to the hoepitd or

PAGE 42

u i.ii) pypikiwi, "TTW W*, .'I • • ^. ^^^^^m P— 4A HiHhraon HOBW News. Boulder Qty New Thuwday. March 8. HW8 ptrarittad w.. Tht CM^^HMatafy M* WMt not b. UM filwiij M. h th atM a^ ikdl b* ralatwl to M4 • • • • f •* • • • .• wiht thk ZMM. M EMh IMH^MMI eMphMMtary • •• Uck repair.. iMt BM IM* than t* pwcat (10%) of the I fMt of flaar arM •( tke pwndttwi BM aU (Al for the 'IW Zone, and all other uses shall comply with the provisions of Section U-15IC) for the '-C2" Zone. CHAPTER 16 "G" GOVERNMENT ZONE SECTION '^ 11 16-1: Purpoac 11 16-2: Uses 11-16-3: Deaignstion of Use Zone. 11-16-1: PURPOSE: To permit control over areas needed for public or quaai-polilic BM. and to preaerve open space real property. 11 16-2: USES: The BM. in the -G" Zone ahall be Umited to public porpoaes. including but not nt ct a.a r ily limited to the following: Electrical distribution facilitiea, water system facilities, new Municipal facilities for police, fire and other functions as needed, drainage control, scenic drives, dedicated and or dcagaMad park area., rMTcatiaaal uac and similar related uses. 1116^: DESIGNATION OF USE ZONES: The variou. uses allowed in the "G" Government Zone ahali be deaignatcd as follows: (A) "GP'-All dedicatMl and/or designated park and recraa(O' (D)' (B) "GM"—Areas reaerved for Municipal electriciU distribution facilities, wster system facilitie., new fadlitie. for police, fve and oth function. M needed, sehoola aad siaular relatad goveramental aaea. -GPC-Areas that ahould not be included for land sale beeauM they ve or will be needed by the City for drainage channels or areas needed to provide for drainage controls. 'GO"—.Areas which should not be included for land sale becaaae they are or will be needed by the City for public w qiUMi-puliiic UM. and to prmerve open Hpaoe real property. CHAPTER 17 •CO"CORRAL ZONE SECTION: 1117 1: Scope 11 17 2: Parpow 11 174: Uses 1117-4: Miaimum Lot .Space Requiremcnta 11-17-6: Other ReqniremeaU 11-17-6: Development .Staadarda 11-17-7: Bsaponmhility of Bonldar Qty HorMoieB'. AawMiatiaa 1M7-S: Sigas 11 IT-* CoitfHcting Proviaioa. 11-17-1: SCOPE: The foUowiag regulations shall apply ia the •CO" ZsM. l^i-17-2: PURPOSE: The ••CO" Canal Zone is Mse iateaded for the kaepi^. reWag ud traiaiag of certaiB animals, but Dot iacludiag riding stabl e s or a c a d em ies or the raising of any animala for fammercial as., sad appropriate iacidental BM. related to the eoavenisnca or r. m a ti ea. l ai sd. of the Boaldes City Horsemen's Aaaociatisa m.mhsrs and their gneMa, aad (urtlMr subject to the rcotrietisa m set forth ia that csrtaia quitclaim deed between Boaldv City, Nevada, aad the Boalder City Horscaaen'R Association, recorded aa instmmeat No. 577482. Book 718. Offidal Recorda. Clark Coaaty, Nevada and the ArUdes of Incorporation of the Boaidar City HorMmea's AaaodatioB. 11 17-3: USES: (Ai Corral kMs for hornM, colu, burro., poaie. ud other equiae animals, steers, goata, sheep, cows, calves or animaU of a general like character, etludiag awia*. DoMcs and fMd loU shall be prohibited The 4^H and other edacatioaal projecu are permittsd if spoaaorMi. certified or approved by the Board of UntXm of the Boalder Oty HorMmea's Aaabdatioa. iBl Dwelhag faattcr. fw the MI* BM aad occupancy of two (2) watchman v earstalMr. M dwigaated by the Boald Chy Hm^emaa's AsMciatioa. Sack .rrapaarim ahall athwwfM eoaform to all other City Code rs^dreaasau. tC) The iaeideatai keepiag of caU. dog., fowl aad aaimal. of • gsasral hhe eharaetar providiag MMb -r'"**** ara aat a paMie aaiaaaee All Mdi a^aaab a4all ba kapt wHUa the m e mbsr'. ewral area aad shall he th. aale rupiatihility sf the ms m hsr. II 17-4: MINIMUM LOT SPACE REQUIREMENTS: lAl NM matt thaa a total of rix ar a total eomWaatioa af aay rix (• horacs. eoiu. barroa. poaiM aad sthor sqaia. • im ri a. Msara, goau. dnep. eows, eatva. ar aalMala af g sa sral MM character may be kept aa aay 1st with aa area sf foar ths aaaad 440 .qave fast. No mm* than two (2) f tbe fsregoiag ofaaal. asay hs oCh thaa hsTMa. 'BiAnesrraHsuahaymastthsina'iiw lipatoliiiatha Bylarw. .( the BaaMw Ottj Haessassa'. AaaadaUoa. II 17* OTHER REQUIBCMCNTS: (A) ii*ai hs aai^rfal far aay psrssa ts iilihtit Mtef., savrsrt. saaMract r amiatala aay "CO" Zaa. lat awaad ar 8 i. t r If i< by him except ia th. CO" Zsas it ^ tklkkii ~ r Ctty HsrsMM Aaaaeiatisa daaiTM U salai iU site ia the "CO" Zone, It ahaU first obtain approval bjr the Plaaaiag ConmlMioa. A requeat for approval shall he BUMIC to the Commonity Of valopmaat Dirsctor en form, provided by the City aad ahall be accompaaied by a aite plaa. Tbs dU plaa ahall ahow all the dataila of the propoaed development and its fsdlities, including strsats, water and electrical ayatems, structures and any other information u Buy be neceaaary tor the Planning Commladon to evaluate the propoaed development. iC) The Planning Commiadon, upon receipt of an application and site plan, shall make the necessary inspection and review of the proposed davelopment In order to determine that the provisions of this Chapter as well as other spplicable ordinances and laws are being complied with. The Planning Commisaioa, ia granting approval, may establish reasonable conditions and such evidence and gunrantees as it deems neceaaary to iaaure tha the conditions w)ll be complied with, which in the opinion of the Planning Commisdonahall maure the intent and purpose of this Chspter. (D) It shall be unlawful for any person to operate any motor bike or motorcycle within the "CO" Zone. 11-17-6: DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS: The standards ss herein Mt forth are supplementsl to the minimum standards for all construction, sanitation fadlites and other utilities and necessary fadlitin for the safety, health and welfare of the occupants. Said atandarda shall be in accordance wiht the City Codes and Standards Ad appUcable Sute of Nevada laws. All existing improvements except the underground electrical system ahall be in compliance with the foregoing requirements not later than two (2) years from the effedive date hereof or within a reasonable length of time after the water and sewer utilities are made svailable to the "CO^' Zone. (A) Area Requirements: The site and lot requirement shall meet the requirements set forth io the Boulder City Horsemen's Assodstion Bylaws, aa approved by the Boulder City Planning Commission and the City Coundl. (B) Roadway.: 1. ••CO" Zone roadways shall be a minimum of thirty feet (300 in width. AU roadway, shall be kept clear except tor temporary parking. 2. Where exceptional conditions will not logically permit roadway, of thirty feet 1300 in width, the Planning Commisnon ouy allow a deviation from said standvds providing th.t adequate parking areas are provided. Such designs shall be subject to the spproval of the Planning Commisaion. (C) Buildinga and Fadlities: 1. Definitions: (a) Agricultural Buildings: A building located on the property and used to shelter fvm implements, hay, grain, poultry, livestock or other farm products in which there is no htunan habitation and which is not used by the public. (b) Service Buildings: A building located on the property ^_ and used for public convenience snd necessity, and shall indude but not be limited to grandstands, judging stands, conccsaionaire stands and buildings, and building* of a similar nature. 2. Requirements: la) All service building, and fadlities shall be located a minimum of forty feet (40') from any corral or agricultural building and shall be maintained in a safe, dean condition, and shall be construded in accordance with all appUcable codes or any other law or ordinance. (b) Toilet fadlities shall be provided for both women and men. Toilets may be of the outdoor type constructed to standards approved by the Community Development Diredor. Additional porUble fadiiteis shall be provided for all public events. 11-17-7: RESPONSIBILITY OF BOULDER CITY HORSEMEN'S ASSOCIATION: (A) The Boulder City Horsemen's Assodstion shall be responsible for compliance with the provisions of this Chapter reUting to the 'CO" Zone. (Bl The Boulder City Horseman's AaMKiatioa shall be responsible for providing the portable toilet fadlities for all public events and (or the proper disposal from these units. (C) The Boulder City Horsemen's Assodstion shall pay all coata in connection with the coUedion and removal of garbage, waate material, and for the disposal of all dead animals to an area designated by the City. (D) The Boulder City Horsemen's AMOciation .hall be solely responsible for the installation and maintenance of all utilities within the "CO" Zone, including but not limited to upgrading the present utility systems to comply with City Codes and standarda and appUcable SUte of Nevada — laws, except that the existing corral area shall not be required to install sn underground electrical system until such time u ordered to do so by the concurrent action of the City Engineering Department, the Planning Commission and the City Couodl. This determination shaU be based upon the development in the surrounding area, and in the event the Horsemen's Assodstion ia required to install an undrground electrical system in the existing "CO" Zone, they shall be given at least eighteen (18) months in which to complete the work. 11-174: SIGNS: Signs and advertising strurture. may be permitted .nhjed to the following condition.: (A) A nameplate shall be permitted not exceeding two (2) square feet for esch corral lot to indicate the name and address of the occupant. (B) Signs sad advertiaing stmdnres not exceeding thirty-two (32) square feet may be permitted in other areas in the "CO" Zone providing the Boulder City Horsemen's Assodation aMumM full responsibility tor the erection, maintenance and safety of said signs and strudures. (C) AU Mgns and advertising atrndure* .haU be subject to the general dgn provision, a. Mt forth fai Chapter 24 of this Title. 1117-9: CONFLICTING PROVISIONS: In the event the reqoiremenU of the Uniform Standard Specification* for PubUc Work. Conatructioo Off-Site Improvements, Clark County Area, Nevada or any other ordinance, standard or apedfication, M they now exist or may hereafter be amended or adopted, are in confUd with the provisions of this Chapter, such sperific requirenaenU sre hereby repealed to the extent of such confUd hat no further, and the proviaioa. of this Chapter ahall prevail. CHAPTER 18 "S* INTERIM STUDY ZONE SECTION: 11 18-1: PurpoM 11-18-2: Use. 11-18-1: PURPOSE: To pwmit aome oontroi in thoM sreas which are at present premature for arbaa development, and where future land usea are andetemainable at the preMnt time. The "S" Zone ia intended primarily M a 'holding" zone, and furthw iateadsd to permit thoae control* which would prevent aay cfcaagM in the existing land UM. which may be incoaeisteat with the Cooprebaadve Plan. TUa Zone is created, rscogniziag that aa th* ef fKUv* date of adoption of thi. Title, atudie.. plane aad predM soniag UBM wiU not be complete for all the area of the City. II 18-2: USES: The aac. in the "8" Zoaa ahaU b. Umited to temporary, ops. dr type BM. which rMinire no permanent structurM or bidUHags. AU BBM sstaUishsd within this dinrid duOl be subject to the approval of the Planning Commision, aa well M being subject to such eoaditioaa s may be stipulated by the Plaaniag Commission. CHAPTER 19 RESERVED CHAPTER 20 GENERAL USES; CONDITIONS: EXCEPTIONS SECTION: 11-20.1: Scope 11 20^2: General ProvisioM ReUting te Uses 11-204: Yvd RcguUtien* 11 2(M: Walk, Fenes. and HedgM II-20 Viaion, CoraarLote lI-2IMi: Lot Araa Radaetioa 11-20-7: StradBTM Prmittd Above Height Limit 11-20-1: SCOPE: Tbs rasnlatioaa spedfied in thU Title shaU he suhjsd te the foHowiag geaaral provisions. 11 2fr2: GENERAL PROVISIONS RELATING TO USES: (A) UMS Nat Uated: Tha PlMBJagCiaiilidna. after hoidiag pubUc heariag ia acrtrdaar* with tbs r.aUd maMnry wall six feet (6') in hdght, provided that sdd waU ahaU not exceed tour feet (4) in hdght where it is in the front yard area of an abutting zone which requires a front setback area. 4. Where no waU ia required, a concrete curb barrier shaU be installed as per City standards. 11 20-3: YARD REGULATIONS: (A) Front, Side and Rear Ywda: 1. Except as provided in thi. Chapter, every required front, side snd rear yard shall he open and unobstructed from the ground to the sky. 2. No yard or open space provided around any building for the purpose of complying with the provisions of this Title shall be considered as providing a yard or open space tor any other building; and no yard or open apace on any adjoining property shall be considered as providing a yard or open space on a building site whereon a building is to be erected. 3. When the common boundary Une separating two (2) contiguous lote is coverMi by a building or permitted group of buildings, such lote .hall constitute a single building site and teh yard spsces as rsquired by this Title shaU then not apply to such common botuidary line. A "Record of Survey" shall be required to merge such lots into a single parcel. (B) Comioea, Eaves: Cornices, esves, belt courses. siUs, buttres ses or other similar architectural features may extend or project into a aids, front or rear yard not more than thirty six inche. (36'l. (C) Fire EMape.: A fire eacape may extend or project into any front, side or rear yard not more than four feet (40. (D). Stairwsys and Balconies: An open unenclosed stairway or balcony not covered by a roof or canopy may extend or project into a required rear yard not more than four feet (40 and into a required front or aide yard not more than thirty six inches (36'). (E) Uncovered Porches and Platforms: An uocoverwl pofch, pbitj form or landing place which doe. not extend above the level of the first floor of the building may extend or project into any required front, side or rear yard not more than ttix feet (60, provided auch strudure in a side yard shall not reduce to less than three feet (30 the unobstructed pedestrian way or sidewalk on ground level on the same lot. 11-2(M: WALLS, FENCES AND HEDGES: (A) A waU, fence or hedge may occupy any portion of a front yard except within the clear vision triangle as provided in Section 11-20-5 hereof, provided that such walls, fences or hedge, do not exceed the foUowing hdghte as messured dther above the finished grade along th* fence Une or shove the curb grade, or the nearest edge of the street pavement in the sbMnce of a curb atrudure along the street right of way Une and above the finished lot grade along the side property Une. Distrid :^ —T Maximum Height Rl-20, Rl-40, Rl-0 6' All other Distrids 4' If the front waU, hedge or fence is not located at the street right of way Uae, the wall. hMige or fence shall be measured from the finished grade from the side of the wall, fence or hedge with greatest vertical exposure. (B| A wall or fence not exceeding six feet (60 in height above th. finished grade may be located or occupy any portion of a side or rear yard except within the clear vision triangle na provided in Sedion 11-20-5 hereof. (O Planted hedgM projecting beyond the front yard Une bhall not exceed the maximimi height pmitti tor fences or walls as spedfied under suhsedions (A) and (B) above. Planted hedges, shrub, or trees shaU not obstruct any pubUc way. (D| Notwithstending any other provisions of this Sedion, spedal topographic exceptional or extraordinary circumstances or condition, may be submitted to the Planning Commission for review aad approval of the proposed fence, waU or hedge. 11-20-5: VISION, CORNER LOTS: The foUowing Umitetions shall apply to the hdght of fences, walls, gsteways, ornamental stradnrM, hedgM, shrubbery and other fixture., construction and planting on comer lote in all zones where front yards are required: (A) Such barrier, to dear unobatnicted vision at comers of intersecting streete shaU be limited to a height of not over three feet (3') above the esUbUshed elevstion of the nearest street Une, for a distance of twenty five feet (25') along both the front and dde lot Unra, meuured from the point of intersection, of the said interseding lot Une.. (B) Within the iMMcle. triangle formed by measuring slong both the front and side lot Une. a distance of twenty five fed (25') from their point of intersedion and by connecting the end. of the req>edive twenty five feet (25') distances, such barris diaU be Umited to hdght of not over three fMt (30 above the elevation of the atrMt Une level at the .aid interseding strMte. (Cl Within the said triangle, and in cases where front yard. are terraced, the ground elevation of such yards shall not excsMl thrM feet (3') above the MtabUshed street Uae elevation at aaid intcrMcting .trsete. 1120* LOT AREA REDUCTION: No lot area shall, by deed, dedication, grant or by any other means whatsoever, be M reduced or diminahed that the lot area, width, yarda or other open spacM of auch lot or any lot formed therefrom shdl be smaller thaa prescribed by this Title. 1120-7: STRUCTURES PERMITTED ABOVE HEIGHT LIMIT: Chimnsy*, radio/td*visioa traasmiaaion or recdving towcrWaatanaa*, aad flagpolM may hs aredsd to a hdght exosMiing th* bdght Umit oth*rwiM permitted hi the zone in which the strudurs is located, but in no CBM shaU auch structure exceed the height Umit by more thaa tea fMt (100 unleM approved by the Planning CommiMioa In accordance with th. conditional UM review procedurM of Chapter 30 of this Title. No portion of an utenna array shaU extend beyond th* property Une or into any front yard arra in any reddential ton*. Church staspUa, refrigeratioa eoolar. or veatilating fans, elevator bulkhead., fire tower, ud medtadeal appnrtenanoM necessary to operate and maiatain the bdlding, ahaU not exceed the height Umit permittsd ia the zone in which the atractore is located, unless approved by the Planning CommlMion in accordance with the conditiond UM review procedures of Chapter 30 of this TitU. 10 no CBM aliaU atrudures ao exceeding the permitted hdght Umit be dlowed for the purpoM of providing sdditiond floor spacs. 7/21/87 CHAPTER 21 SUBSTANDARD LOTS OF RECORDS SECTION: 112I-I: PBrpese 11-21 2: Excsption 11 21 3: RsductioB of Lot ATM II 21-4: Locstion of AccesMry Building. 11-21-6: VsWde Psrfciag 11-21-1: PURPOSE: Ths iatsnt of this Chapter is to allow tha aa* of existing racordsd sabstaadard lots which. bMxuM of thdr axiatiaf Moa. width aad depth, fall eompUaacc with certda Ngalatioaa of tb* laas woald erwrt* nada* hardship and radar maay sacb lote naasaaU*. It baa bssa dseaasd deairsbl* to MtabUah adaimam modlfiad apaea racalatioas, which would apply saly to thoM aiaas with adatiHI SBbataadard hits, ia ordM to IBMV. the eaatlMM^ r fatar* BM of said loto aad to praaarr* tha prapwty rifkt of thdr wa*ra. 1121-2: eXCErnON: Whm a 1st bas aa araa, width ar dsptb l*M thaa that rsqairsd by tUa TItk, aad wbaa add lat was I aadar ssparate owaarahip ar was of rseard at tha tlm* tbla THls hsemas dfsetive, sach lot may be oeeapisd by aay BM peradttod ia tha MB*. mAjm to tha foUowiag ragalatieaa: (A) All "Rl" Raddsatid ZaasK AD tha ragnUtloaa of tha ton* ia which lb* lot k loeatod ahall apply to aU Mbataadard Ma ol laexd, axMpt aa foOowa: —— I. Miafaaaai Yard RaqalraMata: ThowdRy. March 8, 186 (dFioat Yard: Twaaty pniHit (20%) of lot depth, but aasd BOt aie*sd twaaty f**t (') • (bl Rsar Ysrd: Twsaty ptrcsat (20%) of lot depth, hut aaad aot sxcsad twsaty fMt (200. (d Sid* Yard: Tea pwesat (10%) of h>t width ia each dde yard, but diaU aot be I*M thaa three feet (30 and need not •xo*ed flv* teat (60. 2. Miaimam DwdUng Udt SIM for AU Single-FamUy ZOOM: New mdn building. ahaU have an area of not less thsn eight hundred (800) square fmt. exclusive of garages, porches, eavea or dmilar fMturM. (B| AU "R3" RMidmUd Zone.: All the regulations of the zone in which the tot is locsted shall apply to dl substandard lote of rseord, except M foUowa: 1. Minimum Yard Raquiremente: (a) Front Yard: PlftMn percent (15%) of lot depth but need not excMd flfteea fMt (15*). (b) RMT Yard: FiftMn perpatad on the same lot or pared or on an adjdmng lot or parcel aa the strudure or UM they are intsndad to Mrve. TheOwimkaionmayaUowtheeatablkhmsntoftheoff-rtred parking area to be located within flv* huadrsd fMt (5OO0 of the premiaM to which th* parking rsquirsmsnte pvtdn. and may be located in a reddentid nae V th* land UM adjacent to any buiUing or UM hdng dahliah*d in a oonmMrdd zone. 2. Space for required of f-atrMt paridag aad loading ahaU not occupy any part of the dear viaion triangk, hut may be induded u part of a required open apow for a rear or side yard. (C) Mixed OccupandM: In the caM of mixed USM hi a building or on a kt, the tod reqdrenMnte f or of f-steed paridi f adUtks shaU be the aum of the requiremente for the various uses, computed Mparately. Off-strMt parking fadUtlM provided for one uw shaU not be caoddd as providing required parking fadUties for any other UM. (D) Reduction in Area: No off-strMt parking area shaU be encroached upon by buildings, vehicle storage or any other UM, ass shaU auch apace be reduced in area except by recommendation of the Planning Commkaiati and approvd by the City Council; and then ody after proof that, by reason of reduc^ tion in flbor area, aMting area or other factora oootroUlng the regulation of such parking f adUtica. the propoMd reduction in off-stred parking k reasonable. AppUcation for such reduction or encroachment diall he made in aooordance with the providona of Chapter 30, Conditiond Uasa, of thk Title. (E) Off-StrMt Loadkg Spans Required: la aay distrid in connedion with every bdlding or part thereof, heredter erected and having a grou floor arM of five thousand (6.000) square feet or more, which is to be occupied tor any office, commercial, manufacturing or industrid purpoM or for any other purpoM similarly requiring the racdpt or dktribution by vehicles of materid or msrchandlM, there diaU ha provided and mdntdned on the .am* tot with such building at least one off-stred kading apace not 1M. than twelve fMt (120 in width, thirty five fMt (360 in length and fourtMn fed (140 dearance hi hdght, plua one additiond auch toading space for Mch additiond twenty thousand (20,000) aquare fMt of floor area. 11-234: IMPROVEMENTS REQUIRED: (A) ParUng Pkn: A pkn of any propoMd parking arM ahaU be submitted to the Commudty Development Director or Bdhttng Offidd, at the time of fiUng an appUoation for a bdlding permit for the building to which tha parking area k aocsasory. No buUdhig ptmit ahaU be iaaued unloM th* parking pkn has bMn approved by the Community Devekpment Director or BuUding Offidd. The parking plan didl ckarly faidicate the prapoMd devaiopment, indnding loeatian, da*. diape, dedgn, entruoM and cxita, curb cuts, Ughting, landscaping. scrMning, paving qMdficatlons, induding bumper curbs aad such other date faaturM and appurtsnanoM M the Commudty Development DlrMtor or Buildhig Offidd may dMm pertinent. If any parking requiremente are haawi oa a UM, such M reateuranta, hningM. cafaa, where Mating k the criteria, a Mating pkn ahall be .uhnittwl with the construction drawings. A temporary oartiflcate of oocupaacy may b. iMued by the BuUding Offidd for ths UM of a portion or portiona of a bdMlng or strudure prior to ths oomplstion of the entire devekpmsnt a* proposod oa ths psrUng plan when, in the judgment of th* Bdlding Offidd. tiie delay in Uie completion of tha hnprovamante ar* dn* to eircnmatanoM beyond the eontfd of th* owner. 1. The parking pkn ahaU conform to the minimaw dedgn standards oontdaad to Tabk 1 whidi foUows: Curb Angk of Langth Akk Parking (A) WMth (B)" DspUi (Q per Cat (D) Wtdtii (E) 70 60 46 30" 0" V V V V V V W-O' 21'-0' 21'-0' \VV 17'-0' 24-0' VT VfV vav W'-O* 24'-0' 24'4 •21'-0' •IS'-O" M3'-0' •ir-0' •12-0' Akl(li'diaU be of oneway opmtioa if dagk widtiii twway op*niaoa p*rBiittad oaly if dd* k doiibk width ibowa. "Parking apacM ipadfleally naarvad for poopk who UM whMleUdn or waUdag aids shdl bs at kad 13' wide. N^tij LLUli CHART m IHaadleappod Drivara! Evwjt parUi lot dadmad for UM bjr tb* gaMTd pobik to wbok to pwt dull bo providad with pUiw opoMs for tb* miadvo M* if baadlMppod Mi. PUi ipasM M imrvad nd dMigMtod f or haadli^pid PUN • iMl bo toHtod lUa Iha pwhtog tot to itolbtMolhopatU^ tot k n to. Th* wamkm tt y tm hiidioippid dttvtrt abU bo M toltowK NnariwdPatkkf SpacM D*dgaatsd tor riaadiMpp*d Driv. Mhdmum of 1 d*dgaatsd apaeo (ExeqiUaa: No ipao* assd b* dsdgaatod fv th* haadlcapptd drivw to off-*tt*d parUag fadUtiM witii 12 or tswtrapae**. which k rsquiiBd for lashkatid uses, iadudhig mobik home aatetM and reddentkl oondomiduma, hotek and motels) Midmum of 2 dsdgaated spaces Midmum of 3 dedgnated apsres Midmum of 4 daaignatad spares Midmum of 4 dedgnated apaces, plus 2 spacM for each 100 parking spaces over 100, in the off-strret parking fadUty 3. Marking and Signs: AU Parking stdk shdl bs marked on the pavement for Mch vehicle t he parked. Operational — restrictions such as one-way akks ahaU bs ckarly indicated with appropriate aigna or pavement markinga. (d Handicapped parking apacM ahaU b* marked in blue. The intemationd Symhd of AcoesdhiUty ahaU be pdnted in Mch handicapped apacs. (h) Handicapped parking (paoM ahaU hav* a dgn identifying '•Handicapped Parking" and the pcndty AM as required by NRS 484.408. 4. EnXrancM aad Edte: Bach parking lot shdl have not mor* than two (2) entrancM and one common edt for each atrMt frontage. ConsUuction of driveways shaU comply with the 'Mulder City Udform Standard Orswings." 6. Aiy deviation or modification of the parUag requirements M herein Mt forth must Iw approved by th* Planiiing Commkaibn. No find inspedion or occupancy permit ahdl be iHued by th* Building Offidd until aU the hnprovements u shown on the psrklng plan have bMU properly InataUcd. 6. Granting of Minor Plan Modifications: Notwithstanding aay oth provUoaia of thk Chapter, UM Commudty Devekpment Director may aUow for ccrtdn minor paridng plan modifleatlona without pubUc hearing M rsquirsd by (Chapter 27, VarianoM. aubjad to the foUowing Umitetions: (a) Permit minor modiflcattons u may be nseaaaary to achieve an appropriate dedgn to the propoaed paridng area, (b) Permit minor modlficationa in the midmum parking dedgn standarda where, in the particular instance, .uch modification wiU not be inconsistent with the purpoM of tills Chapter. (c) For the purpoM of thk Section, idnor modifications shaU be construed to be modlficationa amounting to ten percent (10%) or less of any requiremente for achkving the midmum paridng design standards. (B) Pavement: 1. AU off-atred parking arsM ahaU he paved with an aaphdtic or concrete surface contatoed by perimetM curbing matarid. aU subjed to the approvd of the City Engtoeer and shaU be so graded and drdned M to dispoM of dl surface water in a manner that wiU not cauM erodon or damage outdde of the parking area. Persona operating parking lots shdl malntato auch lote to proWde smooth and durabk surface, adequately draiacd and trM from duat. (C) Border BarricadM: 1. Every parking arM that ia not Mparated by a wall from any atrMt or aUey upon which it abute shaU be provided with bumper curb.. Mid curb instalktion ahaU be aa per Boulder City Standards. 2. Every parking aisa located m a zone other thaa "Rl" abutting property located in "Rl" lonM ahaU be Mparated from such property by a soUd masonry wall six feet (6'l in hdght, measured from the fidshed surface grade of auch parking area cloeeat to the contiguoua ••Rl" zoned property, provided that that masonry waU shaU not exceed four fMt (4') in hdght within fiftMn fMt (15') of any strMt Une. (D) Landscaping and ScrMning: The landscaping requiremente for df-stred psridng arM edabUahed to ad dde ampk open apaem to totsgato tondsraping, Ughting, and pedestrian dsdgn fMturM toto th* dte plan to osate an off-atred parkhig arM aMthetieaUy complimentary to the urban envitonmant. Innovative dedgna and fledfaiUty m tiie appUcatkn and atiueturing of landscaping and atreening of parking aroM ate to beeacourged. In the event of practicd difficultlM and hankhip. rMuIting from strid enforcement of the foUowing standards due to existing buUdings or an irregularly shaped parcel, an administrative vaiianoe by the Cooimudty Development Director may be given tor standard, not to exosed tea p(ro*nt (10%). L The .tandard. for areas to be landscaped wUl bs M in Ssction 11-2M. 2. AU vehiculsr Ipatldng and loading ZOOM wiU be screened from pubUc strMte with a ten foot (IC) plantar bed which may indude the parkway, permanentiy landacaped with trcM at a minimum of one per thirty (1 per 30) Unsd fad exnpt aa required for vtoud dcarann punuant to Section 11-206 herMt. 3. A MTMning waU. three feet (3'l high, masonry wall, berm. or other sdtabk materid (i.e., denM shrub plantings) will separate the parUag arM from th* priphrd plantar bed, excepting ingrsM and egrcM lanM. 4. Six inch (6") corfaa and gutters wiUito tiie parking area shaU be installed at a minimum of four fMt (40 from the facM of exterior walk, henna, hedges, feno*., building, or other atruduTM, except area, of ingreM or egtess and pedMttian walkways.. Concrete bumper stops or othv acceptebk materid may be used with approvd of ths City EngtooM If no dralnsge problems exkt. Thk four foot (40 STM todde dl periphard wdk, fenoM hwIgM fadng pubUc streete or building wUl b. fully landMaped M par Section 11-254. 5. Planter klands wiU be crested witiiin the parking arsa. one for every ten (10) spaoM. The foUowing minimum deaign standards apply: (d Ske: A mhiimum width of four fMt (40 at aay point and totd Mtuare footag* of twenty tour (24 aqnara fed (not Induding ths curbing). (h) The ktoad ahaU contdn at kMt one shads ttM.and two (2) ahnibs, and be dadgnsd to accommodate the dtimate sk* of th* ttM. To fadUtete nutotenanoa, th* grouad can bs kf t bars atound th* ptonting*. (c) TypM of tiwM udUssd to such pkatsr klands abould hsvs dMp rooting and midmum kaf ahtdding charactsrktics. (d) Th* Istoad shsU be aurroundsd by curbing M notwl to *ubparagrapb (D)4 abov*. (•) In the aggregate, tha sqnara footag* of plantar islands wUI b* no kM than two paromt (2%) of th* pwhUy and akk qiOM. & Parking tote of IOH than tour thousand (4.000) square f sd of psving are excluded from the requiremente of subpsragraph. (D)4 and (D)6 abov* if It k til* *ok off-strod parking fadlity for a rsddenttol or oonunwcUl sntity. A paridBg tot deaignsd to aarvc mdtipk and eontigoona biuinsosM, auch M dMpptog oontcrs, wUl b* trwtsd as a dngk entity for th* porposM of thi. Chaptar ragatdkos of fragmaatsd owaerahip. (E) lighting: 1. What* dl night paridng k parmHted, potUng toto ahdl bs Ughtsd fh • unad to noffke, Wbmparidac k CMtaaaari|y ptradttod for • ooM kaaar portioa of ths boBta of dka*as, parktof lote ahdl bo Hgbtod lor thoM hoots tb* pMrtdiW >• onstonatUy panaittod. Th* Ughte shall b* ao atraagod ao to rsflset tba Ught away from adjdntog lote and ahdl provid* a dktributioa of Ught whidi k ampk to dtotingokh sUhondtM. 2. Any Ughte provided to iUuminate aay paridng atM ahaU bs atrangad ao M to r*fkd til* Ught away from any prMBi*M upon which a dwdUng ndt k looatod. Opon hdha ahdl aot ba prmitt*d. Propar ahadM ahall ba naad to ooattd such toatdtotiona to provsat gtor* aad Ught ItoBi tofriagiag upon adjoining proporlioa. (F) Fir* Aeoaaat AU vslddaa duOl ba ao dr*d that tbay may baiMobad nadOjr to eaM of fit* or otbar awMtgaaay. (0) Coafllottoc PtovWoaot la tha avaat tb* raqdtaMato af tba "VwUam Mndwd • padltoattoBo far PubUa Warki Oowtraotka 0(r<(Mto I ptovMNato. Ctotk Comty AIM, Navada", or tmf otbar ebapter, ataadatda aad apadfloattoa, aa tbajr • > odat or • Hgr bavaaftar ba aaMadad ar adop ta d. ato to oaalltot with tba ptniiiduaa af tbk Chaptar. anak Maeifk t iiid t i i aato ara haraby tapadad to tba octant of aaA aoalUot bat ao hu^ that, aad UM providona of tbto Cbastir ahaU arovaO. 11-2M: OFF-STREBT PARKING AND LDADINQ MiQUIREMBNTS IN THE "CBD" CENTRAL BUSf DISTRICT: TIM CBD" Cwttd Badaw Dtotriat k a I td apadd dtotiiet which, whaa *npwiipaaad tw Migr "O" G aawsl Cnaiiai dal Utm. laipti tba aia laaatai tba ptovktoaa of Saettoaa U-IMIDI, 11-IM Md 11-04,1 itotbofoltowiHalNttoatj yhhji i • at bo aiipM to ip u aid a i • aay otb*r aaaa la t abltobad by I (A) Aa adating bdUtog, or ebaag* of BM within aa sxkUng bnUdtog which doM not raqdra an sntorgoaMnt of that boUdtog, Bcad aot provid* of f-drad parUag aad/or toadtoc .pan to aa aaMtuat that k addiUoad to tb* off-sttoat parktag aad kadiag (paoM cziatlng at tiM tlm. of ooataoipiatod chaag* d BM wiUda an adating buildiag. DM coaddamtioa, howevar, must b* given to the UM of any existing opsa apsMia on tha same pramisM for tlw purpoM of of f-atrsd parking sad losdlng. (B) Thsr. ahsU be no rsduetioa d existi^ parUag or Henderson Home News, Boulder City News P>ge 5A aftar tho ovsat. Tanaparatr algao may bs omploysd oa^ dariatfthaM apadd ovsate aad most hs rsBBoved sftr tbs CHAPTER 24 SIGNS AND ADVERTISING STRUCTURES SECTION: 11-24-1: Scope 11-24-2: Purpoaa 11-24-3: Definitions 11-24-4: General Regulations; All Zones 11-24-5: Sign Regulations Relating to Zoning Distrids 11-244: Permit for Sign Erection 11-24-7: Permit for Sign Erection; Appeal 11-214: Nonconforming Signs 11-24-1: SCOPE: Outdoor advertidng atrudurm and dgna may he permitted subject to the limitetiona as Mt forth for th* tone In which located, and further aubject to the provialona a* Mt forth in this Chapter. 11:24-2: PURPOSE: The purpoM of this Chapter k to promote and proted the pubUc health, welare and aafety by regulating the aize, height, dsdgn, construction, location, illumination and mdntenancc of aigns within the City. This Chapter provides for the admidatration of thcM regulationa and providm admidstrative reUef for those desiring to exceed theM minimum requirements. 11-24-3: DEFINITIONS: For the purpoM of applying the requiremente of thia Chapter, the following terms are defined: (A) All the defidUon* aa Mt forth in Section 1114 of thk Title. (B) ADVERTISING SIGN: A aign attached to or plaesd on th* outaid* of a bdlding upon which any poster, bill, printing, pdnting, dsviM or advertidng or any kind may he plac*d, pMt*d, futened or affixed. (C) ADVERTISING STRUCTURE: Any freestanding outdoor atrndure or device erected for advertiaing purposM, or to sttrad the attention of the pubUc, and which 1. vi.ible from any pubUc atrMt or alley or pubUc place. (D) CHANGE PANEL: Any advertising dgn or advertidng atmctora dMigned to permit Immediate change of copy. (E) INDIRECT LIGHTING: A source of exterad Illumination entirely within the sign which makea the aign vi.lhic at dght by mean* of Ughting the background upon which the freeatanding charaders are mounted, but wherein th* aourcc of iUumination ii not vidbk. (F) INTERNAL LIGHTING: A source of illumination entirely within the sign which makes the contents of the sign visible at night by means of the Ught being transmitted through a translucent materid, but wherein the aourc* of the IUumination is not visible. (H) NONCONFORMING SIGN: A lawfuUy constructed sign adating at the time thia Title, or ameadmenta thereto, become effective, which doM not conform with the aign regulation for the zone in which the sign ia located. (I) ROOF LINE: The highest point of the mdn roof atrudure or higheot pdnt on a parapet, but not iaclucUng eupoks, pylons, projectioDi or minor rdsed portion, of the roof. (J) SHOPPING CENTER: An integrated shopping complex comprised of five (5) or more ratdl stores. (K) SHOPPING CENTER ADVERTISING STRUCTURE: Any free-standing outdoor strudure or device erected for advertidng purposes which denote, or identifies a shopping center. (L) SIGN: Any device for visual commudcation, including any structure or natural object or part thereof, that is used for the purpose of bringing the subject thereof to the attention of the pubUc, but not including any flag, badge or inalgda of any government or govemmentd agency, or of any dvie, chariteble. reUgious, pstriotic. fraternd or similar orgadzation. (M) SIGN AREA: The sign area ia measured as follows: 1. For sign copy mounted or pdnted on the background panal or area distinctively pdnted, textured or construded as a background for the sign copy, the dgn area is measured as that area contdned within the outaide dimendons of the badtground panel or surface. 2. For sign copy mounted a. individud ktten and/or gr^ihica against a wall or f asda of a bdlding or other atnicture that ha. not been pdnted. textured or otherwiM dtered to provide a distinctive background for the sign copy, the sign area k measured ss the area enclosed by the smdiest single rectangle that wiU encloM dl the sign copy. 3. For dgn copy mounted or printed on an illuminated sign or illuminated archltecturd element of a bdlding the entire iUuminatsd aurf ace of iUuminated archltecturd ekment which contdns the dgn copy, shdl be counted a. a sign. 4. Number of sign facM: (a) Single Face: The sign area is the area of the single face ody. (b) Two FacM: The sign area of any two (2) faced dgn with parallel face.; or "V" type dgn* having an interior angle of forty five degrees (46) or IMB, k the area of the aingle face; if the angle betwMn the two (2) aign faces is gTMter than forty five degrMa I4S), the aign area ia the sum of the arMs of the two (2) faces. (c) ThrM or More Facea: The aign araa ia tha aum of tho areM of the thrM (3) or more facM. (d) Spherical, Free-Form. Sculpturd, or Other Non-plaoer Signs: Tbs sign srM is the sum of the areas of ths amaUet oix (6) ddM aoUd form that wiU encompsM the sign structure. 5. For a sign having more than one component, the sign area k tlie smallat rectangle that will encompam the Mverd component, of the .ign. 11-244: GENERAL REGULATIONS: ALL ZONES (A) Maximum dgn hdght ahall be twenty fMt (200 above grade aad no dimendon ahaU exceed fiftMn (15) Unear fMt In hortoontd or ten feet (100 in vertiod direction. (B) Signs erected or atUched to the wdl of a bdlding'ahdl have the expoMd face of th* dgn in a plan* pardkl to the face of the wsU and ahdl not project above cordce or roof Une. (C) No advertidng atrudures are permitted on a bdldtog roof, top or mansard, parapet or marquM. (D) Signs ahaU not be attached or pdntsd on a roof surface. (E) No sign or advartidng atrndure shsU IM toatallcd ao aa to rotate, gyrate, bUnk, flaah, move or bs audihk ia sny admatsd fashion. (F) AU dgna, toduding the framM, bracM or supporte thsrMf. shall be adequately bdit and *reded in compUnce with th* building, •l*ctricd and other appUcable codM of Boulder aty. AU IUuminated dgns must use dther indirect Ughting or intend Ughting. A-frame and aimikr freestanding aigna are not permittsd. (G) No dgns or portion thereof shaU occupy any area at an elevation loM than eight feet dx inches (8'6") abov* th* fidshtd or propoaed grade of any pedMtrian walk. (H) Th* Ughting and odor of dgns ahall not imlteta or rsMmbk offidd tnffle control davicM, rdlroad signa or signak. (I) lUuaainatioB of aay aign thaU ba of aueb nature that wh*n Ught 00 gsasntsd sxteads toto any roddoatial cons, auch aataadad Ulamiaatioa shaU not axcoad oaa foot-oandk malntatood at aay potot on a vrticd plaaa asteadad from Mdi proporty Uaa aepatating tba Ught *oate* from adjaoaat raddoatid SOBM. V (J) NodUnadnatad dir*etiond or Inf ermationd dgna Indudla^ dgna lor apsdd *vsate, of pubUc or quad-pubUc aatur*. but not todnding diroctiona to commerdd MtabUdimanta, an pormittad snhjaet to th. approvd of the Bdlding Offidd a. to keation. Inf onnaUoad dgna inataUod on or ov*r puhUc proparty at* aabj*d to th* apptovd of the Diredor of PubUc Works. (K) Location to High Voltage Condudora: No aign disll ha aractod ia aucb a manner that any part wUI bs eloosr to high voltage conductor* thaa tha foUowiag Ubl* aUowsi Vdtag* Horiaoatd Ptodmlty Varticd Proximity 8 foot 9 foot lOfaat 10 faat ptoa Vi" par RV ovar 80,000 Up to 6,900 f*d eioO to 18,000 Bfwt 18,000 to 60,000 10 fMt Ovar 80,000 10 laat pina Vi" pot KV ov 80.000 ThiBoddK aty EktiicdDtotribatiaBDIvidBa ahdl ddir mtoa tba Uaa vdtago far aajr givoa looatioa. (L) Motor vabteko aaad to a baaiaaM and bavlag dgu pdatM oa tbo *Btf aea of tba body may ba parkad to a taddantid aoaa, providad tha owBr or drivar Uvoo to tba iamadiatf Btaa aad k adag th* vdilck tot traaapotteUoa putposaa, but tba y^iiil^ abaU not be uaed primarily for advertiaim putpooaa. No ajgaawiMb* permittsd OB any noaaalf-propsUed voUck or portabl* • tnidure stored on say property. (M) Spacid Attraetion Sign: Baeb badaaaa flna. ia addition to th* aMudmiun aUowabk patmaaaat atoa aroa. may bav* tamporary algaa. No mora thM M apatial attraetlaa aiiaat pot Boatk. • • toagar thaa aaaa (T) dan'Amttoa k panahtod. oMipt dBilig DaaaadNT wbaa all of tbo aaatk najr ba aaod for taaportry aigaa. AU toBporary aigM shall ba ramovod tba fitat warUag day tomporary liga period aspirM, (N) FoHtleal Sigaw PolHkd algaa may bo dtowod to aay aeao. AD poHtkd dgas ahall bs plaesd witiito tito property UBM aad shall asaform to tba aiigB taqaltaaioate of tbs aoas aakas aotod otbarwtoo. AU poU tkal dggj. nginUoM of ibl. ahaU bo ptooid to eoafornMaeo to aU tsqokanMate of tb* govaraiag codM aad ordlaaacM. 1. SIga parmlte ahall be required for dl poUticd dgn* ov*r' thirty two (32) *qnare fMt in arM. 2. In dl zonM. th* dgn *hall be *o placed aa to not conatltute a traffic hazard. No poUtiesI sign esn he pisced on any pubUc property or right of way or poated on any utility pole or device. 3. For dl poUtical aigns thirty two (32) square fMt or less in arM. no sign permit will be required; however. Mch candidate shall pay sn admidatration permit fM, M determin ed by resolution of the City Coundl, to plscc sny auch Nigns within the dty Umita. 4. Alt poUtical aigns ahdl bs removed within Mven (7) days after the primary aledlon, except the succcMfut candidatN may leave them la their premnt location until after the geasrd eledion; th*M sign* muat then be removed within Mven (7) days after that election date. 6. PoUtical aigna ahdl not be erected more than dxty (001 daya before a primary, general election or apedd election. (0) UnUghted real Mtete dgna not exceeding twelve (12) square fMt ia aggregate area partddng ody to the sale or leaM of land or building upon which diaplayed shall be permitted. In th* case of commerdal property, only one real estate aign, not to exceed thirty two (32) aquare fMt, will be parmittad. (P) All dgna ahall conform with the regulationa for aigns for the zone In which they are located with the followinR excsptioaa: 1. Had Mtete development dgna may be allowed In any zodng diatrid undsr the following conditions: (a) Each sppUcatiOn shaU be • ubjad to the approvd of tha Building Offidd and ahall be aubjed to revocation for eauM. (b) Tha madmum permit tim* ahaU bs one y*sr with extenstons thereof subjed to review and approvd of the Bdlding Offidal. (c) Ths appUcant muat have obf dned writton permission from property owner of site of propoadl sign location. (d) Warding ahdl partdn to red Mtete development only, (a) A temporary red eatete development dgn may be placed on the site of the subdivision development under construction, provided that It doM not exceed aixty four (64) aquare fMt in area. Temporary aigns must he removed in thrM (3) years. (f) In addition, there may be one rMl Mtate development dgn not on the dte, of not more than dxty tour (64) aquare fMt in area, that I. not doMr th.n fifty fMt (5O0 to any rsddentlal arM. (g) A madmum of four (4) direetiond dgna, Mch of which ahdl not exceed sIxtMn (161 square fMt in arM, may be dlowed. The purpoae of add signs is to give directions to a r*d Mtete devdopm*nt and not intended for advertising purpoBM. (h) AU rsd Mtate development dgna shdl be removed ten (10) daya after the on-dte Mies office ia closed or the tiuM (3) year Umitation of Section 11-24-4 (P)l.(e) is imposed, whichever occurs first. 2. Construction Signs: Constnidion signs msy be permitted in any zone provided that sdd sign is located upon the construction site and the projed ia aduaUy under construction and as further provided herein: (a) Each appUcation shdl be subject (6 the approval of the Bdlding Offidal and ahdl be subject to revocation for cauM. (b) Maximum sign arM shaU be thirty two (32) aquare fMt. (c) The dgn may contdn ody the name of the construction firm, article being constructed, addresa, phone and contractor's Ueense number. 3. Signa need exclusively tor the following are permitted In dl IOUM: (d For the diaplay of offidal noticM iMued by any pubUe officer in the performance of a puhUc duty, or by any person in giving legd notira. (b) For diredion, warning or information purposes of a pubUc or MmipubUc nature, when instdled and mdntdned by an offidd body. (Q) A Sign No Longer Idoititytog a Bona Fide Exkting BuaineH. Any dgn erected, hung, rehung, placed, replaced, painted or mdntdned as Mt forth herewith, now or hereaifter exkting, wUeh has ceased for dnety (90) days to identify a bona fide budness conduded on the premisM, will be prohlbitad and shdl, upon notification of the Building Offidal (who k spsdneally authorized to proceed) be taken down, removed or obliterated within five (5) daya of recdpt of auch notiflcation. and f aUure to so comply on the part of the owner, occupant, agent or person having the benefidd UM of the bdldtog or prsmiaM upon which such dgn may be found f ahaU oonatitute a vloktion of thsM regutotiona. For the purpoaMof thia auboection, the term "dgn" ahaU include •' any cahinets, Ughte. okctricd connections, supporting strue• tiuos, indnding polM or other appurtenances. Provided, however, that the Building Offidal may grant a reasonable axtsnaion of time, not to excesd 120 dsys, for the removsl of any portion of a dgn other than the sign face if he deter.(' • miiMS that th* owner or occupant of the premisM hss made proper appUcation for s new sign. 11-244: SIGN REGULATIONS RELATING TO ZONES (A) Zones: "R140". "Rl-40", "Rl^O", "RM6", •'Rl-10", "R14", : •'Rl-7". and "ME". 1. One name plate shall be permitted, not exceeding two (2) square feet in area, for such dweUing udt, to indicate th* nam* and addrsM of the occupant. The occupation of the occupant ahaU not b* pMmltted on the dgn. (B) "R3" Zone: 1. On* nam* ptote abaU be pwadttsd, aot sxcssding two (2) squara fMt to area, for such dwelUng udt, to indicate >.' th* nam* aad addr*M of th* occupant. The occupation of • the occupaat shaU not be permitted on ths dgn. 2. Ons indirset. Ulnmlnatad sign, not sxcssding twdv* (12) '' squara fast to stsa for Mch apartmsnt bdlding, providsd thst such sign contdns ao sdvertldag msttsr szcspt tha nams and sttMt addrsH of th* apartment building. (C) "MP" Zoae: A sign advertidng mobile home park* may be Mtebliabsd oa the premisM, provided thst the madmum arsa shall ba Umited to thirty two (32) aquare fMt. (D) "Cl" ZoBo: 1. Ona advortislag dgn or change pand dgn for Mch lot or occupancy, ratoting to the UM and occupancy therdn, :. •haU ba pemittad. P^ 2. Madmum dgn arM ahaU not excsMl dxtMn (16) aquaro ^" • if faat to araa. _ii!Uu S. Advsrttotoi atrudutM ahdl not b* permitt*d. (E) "C2" aad "CM" ZOOM: On • f. 1. Signa abaU ba parmittad to tha above toaM aubjad ta Uia foUowiag eoadltiona: (d Advartialag StradotM: (1) Oaly OBO advartialag atrudura tatotiag to BM or oeeapaacy tbtroin. Madmum aign araa ahaU aot taeaad oaa huadrod (100) squara fMt. (2) AU advartialag atrnctuioa wiU prsssnt a plaadng aad prafisdoBslly eoaatnietod appaaraan aad ahall ba matotdaod to good eoadltioa. (b) Tbtoo (3) advertidng aigaa aad oaa change pand dgn par aotabUahmaat ahdl b* parmittad. (d In aggtsgato, tha dgn arsa for dl of th* shovs abaU aot aseaad oaa haadtsd fifty (190) sqnara fMt. 2. Signs abaU bs panrittsd to Ct aad CM ZoaM for abopplag esataro aubjad to tii* fdlowing condiUoaa; (d Advartialag StrndutM: (1) Only oaa advartiai^ atructnra par ahoppiag eaatar. Madt— aiga araa abdl aot oxeasd oa* haai k ad (100) AU advartklag atmatana wUI praaaat a ptoadM aad prafiaalwaaUy aeaatrudad appaataaoa ud akaU ba aMtatdaad to good eaadltioa. (S) Aa aiivartiatog atmetvra atay eoatata tba aaaoo of bMlaaaa aatabUakaMato witkto a akonlH aaatar. (b) Oaly oaa ckaaga paad alga par a*tabllataaat to pandttod. (e) Oaly thiaa (S) aitarior aigM ara pararittad par \t
PAGE 43

u i.ii) pypikiwi, "TTW W*, .'I • • ^. ^^^^^m P— 4A HiHhraon HOBW News. Boulder Qty New Thuwday. March 8. HW8 ptrarittad w.. Tht CM^^HMatafy M* WMt not b. UM filwiij M. h th atM a^ ikdl b* ralatwl to M4 • • • • f •* • • • .• wiht thk ZMM. M EMh IMH^MMI eMphMMtary • •• Uck repair.. iMt BM IM* than t* pwcat (10%) of the I fMt of flaar arM •( tke pwndttwi BM aU (Al for the 'IW Zone, and all other uses shall comply with the provisions of Section U-15IC) for the '-C2" Zone. CHAPTER 16 "G" GOVERNMENT ZONE SECTION '^ 11 16-1: Purpoac 11 16-2: Uses 11-16-3: Deaignstion of Use Zone. 11-16-1: PURPOSE: To permit control over areas needed for public or quaai-polilic BM. and to preaerve open space real property. 11 16-2: USES: The BM. in the -G" Zone ahall be Umited to public porpoaes. including but not nt ct a.a r ily limited to the following: Electrical distribution facilitiea, water system facilities, new Municipal facilities for police, fire and other functions as needed, drainage control, scenic drives, dedicated and or dcagaMad park area., rMTcatiaaal uac and similar related uses. 1116^: DESIGNATION OF USE ZONES: The variou. uses allowed in the "G" Government Zone ahali be deaignatcd as follows: (A) "GP'-All dedicatMl and/or designated park and recraa(O' (D)' (B) "GM"—Areas reaerved for Municipal electriciU distribution facilities, wster system facilitie., new fadlitie. for police, fve and oth function. M needed, sehoola aad siaular relatad goveramental aaea. -GPC-Areas that ahould not be included for land sale beeauM they ve or will be needed by the City for drainage channels or areas needed to provide for drainage controls. 'GO"—.Areas which should not be included for land sale becaaae they are or will be needed by the City for public w qiUMi-puliiic UM. and to prmerve open Hpaoe real property. CHAPTER 17 •CO"CORRAL ZONE SECTION: 1117 1: Scope 11 17 2: Parpow 11 174: Uses 1117-4: Miaimum Lot .Space Requiremcnta 11-17-6: Other ReqniremeaU 11-17-6: Development .Staadarda 11-17-7: Bsaponmhility of Bonldar Qty HorMoieB'. AawMiatiaa 1M7-S: Sigas 11 IT-* CoitfHcting Proviaioa. 11-17-1: SCOPE: The foUowiag regulations shall apply ia the •CO" ZsM. l^i-17-2: PURPOSE: The ••CO" Canal Zone is Mse iateaded for the kaepi^. reWag ud traiaiag of certaiB animals, but Dot iacludiag riding stabl e s or a c a d em ies or the raising of any animala for fammercial as., sad appropriate iacidental BM. related to the eoavenisnca or r. m a ti ea. l ai sd. of the Boaldes City Horsemen's Aaaociatisa m.mhsrs and their gneMa, aad (urtlMr subject to the rcotrietisa m set forth ia that csrtaia quitclaim deed between Boaldv City, Nevada, aad the Boalder City Horscaaen'R Association, recorded aa instmmeat No. 577482. Book 718. Offidal Recorda. Clark Coaaty, Nevada and the ArUdes of Incorporation of the Boaidar City HorMmea's AaaodatioB. 11 17-3: USES: (Ai Corral kMs for hornM, colu, burro., poaie. ud other equiae animals, steers, goata, sheep, cows, calves or animaU of a general like character, etludiag awia*. DoMcs and fMd loU shall be prohibited The 4^H and other edacatioaal projecu are permittsd if spoaaorMi. certified or approved by the Board of UntXm of the Boalder Oty HorMmea's Aaabdatioa. iBl Dwelhag faattcr. fw the MI* BM aad occupancy of two (2) watchman v earstalMr. M dwigaated by the Boald Chy Hm^emaa's AsMciatioa. Sack .rrapaarim ahall athwwfM eoaform to all other City Code rs^dreaasau. tC) The iaeideatai keepiag of caU. dog., fowl aad aaimal. of • gsasral hhe eharaetar providiag MMb -r'"**** ara aat a paMie aaiaaaee All Mdi a^aaab a4all ba kapt wHUa the m e mbsr'. ewral area aad shall he th. aale rupiatihility sf the ms m hsr. II 17-4: MINIMUM LOT SPACE REQUIREMENTS: lAl NM matt thaa a total of rix ar a total eomWaatioa af aay rix (• horacs. eoiu. barroa. poaiM aad sthor sqaia. • im ri a. Msara, goau. dnep. eows, eatva. ar aalMala af g sa sral MM character may be kept aa aay 1st with aa area sf foar ths aaaad 440 .qave fast. No mm* than two (2) f tbe fsregoiag ofaaal. asay hs oCh thaa hsTMa. 'BiAnesrraHsuahaymastthsina'iiw lipatoliiiatha Bylarw. .( the BaaMw Ottj Haessassa'. AaaadaUoa. II 17* OTHER REQUIBCMCNTS: (A) ii*ai hs aai^rfal far aay psrssa ts iilihtit Mtef., savrsrt. saaMract r amiatala aay "CO" Zaa. lat awaad ar 8 i. t r If i< by him except ia th. CO" Zsas it ^ tklkkii ~ r Ctty HsrsMM Aaaaeiatisa daaiTM U salai iU site ia the "CO" Zone, It ahaU first obtain approval bjr the Plaaaiag ConmlMioa. A requeat for approval shall he BUMIC to the Commonity Of valopmaat Dirsctor en form, provided by the City aad ahall be accompaaied by a aite plaa. Tbs dU plaa ahall ahow all the dataila of the propoaed development and its fsdlities, including strsats, water and electrical ayatems, structures and any other information u Buy be neceaaary tor the Planning Commladon to evaluate the propoaed development. iC) The Planning Commiadon, upon receipt of an application and site plan, shall make the necessary inspection and review of the proposed davelopment In order to determine that the provisions of this Chapter as well as other spplicable ordinances and laws are being complied with. The Planning Commisaioa, ia granting approval, may establish reasonable conditions and such evidence and gunrantees as it deems neceaaary to iaaure tha the conditions w)ll be complied with, which in the opinion of the Planning Commisdonahall maure the intent and purpose of this Chspter. (D) It shall be unlawful for any person to operate any motor bike or motorcycle within the "CO" Zone. 11-17-6: DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS: The standards ss herein Mt forth are supplementsl to the minimum standards for all construction, sanitation fadlites and other utilities and necessary fadlitin for the safety, health and welfare of the occupants. Said atandarda shall be in accordance wiht the City Codes and Standards Ad appUcable Sute of Nevada laws. All existing improvements except the underground electrical system ahall be in compliance with the foregoing requirements not later than two (2) years from the effedive date hereof or within a reasonable length of time after the water and sewer utilities are made svailable to the "CO^' Zone. (A) Area Requirements: The site and lot requirement shall meet the requirements set forth io the Boulder City Horsemen's Assodstion Bylaws, aa approved by the Boulder City Planning Commission and the City Coundl. (B) Roadway.: 1. ••CO" Zone roadways shall be a minimum of thirty feet (300 in width. AU roadway, shall be kept clear except tor temporary parking. 2. Where exceptional conditions will not logically permit roadway, of thirty feet 1300 in width, the Planning Commisnon ouy allow a deviation from said standvds providing th.t adequate parking areas are provided. Such designs shall be subject to the spproval of the Planning Commisaion. (C) Buildinga and Fadlities: 1. Definitions: (a) Agricultural Buildings: A building located on the property and used to shelter fvm implements, hay, grain, poultry, livestock or other farm products in which there is no htunan habitation and which is not used by the public. (b) Service Buildings: A building located on the property ^_ and used for public convenience snd necessity, and shall indude but not be limited to grandstands, judging stands, conccsaionaire stands and buildings, and building* of a similar nature. 2. Requirements: la) All service building, and fadlities shall be located a minimum of forty feet (40') from any corral or agricultural building and shall be maintained in a safe, dean condition, and shall be construded in accordance with all appUcable codes or any other law or ordinance. (b) Toilet fadlities shall be provided for both women and men. Toilets may be of the outdoor type constructed to standards approved by the Community Development Diredor. Additional porUble fadiiteis shall be provided for all public events. 11-17-7: RESPONSIBILITY OF BOULDER CITY HORSEMEN'S ASSOCIATION: (A) The Boulder City Horsemen's Assodstion shall be responsible for compliance with the provisions of this Chapter reUting to the 'CO" Zone. (Bl The Boulder City Horseman's AaMKiatioa shall be responsible for providing the portable toilet fadlities for all public events and (or the proper disposal from these units. (C) The Boulder City Horsemen's Assodstion shall pay all coata in connection with the coUedion and removal of garbage, waate material, and for the disposal of all dead animals to an area designated by the City. (D) The Boulder City Horsemen's AMOciation .hall be solely responsible for the installation and maintenance of all utilities within the "CO" Zone, including but not limited to upgrading the present utility systems to comply with City Codes and standarda and appUcable SUte of Nevada — laws, except that the existing corral area shall not be required to install sn underground electrical system until such time u ordered to do so by the concurrent action of the City Engineering Department, the Planning Commission and the City Couodl. This determination shaU be based upon the development in the surrounding area, and in the event the Horsemen's Assodstion ia required to install an undrground electrical system in the existing "CO" Zone, they shall be given at least eighteen (18) months in which to complete the work. 11-174: SIGNS: Signs and advertising strurture. may be permitted .nhjed to the following condition.: (A) A nameplate shall be permitted not exceeding two (2) square feet for esch corral lot to indicate the name and address of the occupant. (B) Signs sad advertiaing stmdnres not exceeding thirty-two (32) square feet may be permitted in other areas in the "CO" Zone providing the Boulder City Horsemen's Assodation aMumM full responsibility tor the erection, maintenance and safety of said signs and strudures. (C) AU Mgns and advertising atrndure* .haU be subject to the general dgn provision, a. Mt forth fai Chapter 24 of this Title. 1117-9: CONFLICTING PROVISIONS: In the event the reqoiremenU of the Uniform Standard Specification* for PubUc Work. Conatructioo Off-Site Improvements, Clark County Area, Nevada or any other ordinance, standard or apedfication, M they now exist or may hereafter be amended or adopted, are in confUd with the provisions of this Chapter, such sperific requirenaenU sre hereby repealed to the extent of such confUd hat no further, and the proviaioa. of this Chapter ahall prevail. CHAPTER 18 "S* INTERIM STUDY ZONE SECTION: 11 18-1: PurpoM 11-18-2: Use. 11-18-1: PURPOSE: To pwmit aome oontroi in thoM sreas which are at present premature for arbaa development, and where future land usea are andetemainable at the preMnt time. The "S" Zone ia intended primarily M a 'holding" zone, and furthw iateadsd to permit thoae control* which would prevent aay cfcaagM in the existing land UM. which may be incoaeisteat with the Cooprebaadve Plan. TUa Zone is created, rscogniziag that aa th* ef fKUv* date of adoption of thi. Title, atudie.. plane aad predM soniag UBM wiU not be complete for all the area of the City. II 18-2: USES: The aac. in the "8" Zoaa ahaU b. Umited to temporary, ops. dr type BM. which rMinire no permanent structurM or bidUHags. AU BBM sstaUishsd within this dinrid duOl be subject to the approval of the Planning Commision, aa well M being subject to such eoaditioaa s may be stipulated by the Plaaniag Commission. CHAPTER 19 RESERVED CHAPTER 20 GENERAL USES; CONDITIONS: EXCEPTIONS SECTION: 11-20.1: Scope 11 20^2: General ProvisioM ReUting te Uses 11-204: Yvd RcguUtien* 11 2(M: Walk, Fenes. and HedgM II-20 Viaion, CoraarLote lI-2IMi: Lot Araa Radaetioa 11-20-7: StradBTM Prmittd Above Height Limit 11-20-1: SCOPE: Tbs rasnlatioaa spedfied in thU Title shaU he suhjsd te the foHowiag geaaral provisions. 11 2fr2: GENERAL PROVISIONS RELATING TO USES: (A) UMS Nat Uated: Tha PlMBJagCiaiilidna. after hoidiag pubUc heariag ia acrtrdaar* with tbs r.aUd maMnry wall six feet (6') in hdght, provided that sdd waU ahaU not exceed tour feet (4) in hdght where it is in the front yard area of an abutting zone which requires a front setback area. 4. Where no waU ia required, a concrete curb barrier shaU be installed as per City standards. 11 20-3: YARD REGULATIONS: (A) Front, Side and Rear Ywda: 1. Except as provided in thi. Chapter, every required front, side snd rear yard shall he open and unobstructed from the ground to the sky. 2. No yard or open space provided around any building for the purpose of complying with the provisions of this Title shall be considered as providing a yard or open space tor any other building; and no yard or open apace on any adjoining property shall be considered as providing a yard or open space on a building site whereon a building is to be erected. 3. When the common boundary Une separating two (2) contiguous lote is coverMi by a building or permitted group of buildings, such lote .hall constitute a single building site and teh yard spsces as rsquired by this Title shaU then not apply to such common botuidary line. A "Record of Survey" shall be required to merge such lots into a single parcel. (B) Comioea, Eaves: Cornices, esves, belt courses. siUs, buttres ses or other similar architectural features may extend or project into a aids, front or rear yard not more than thirty six inche. (36'l. (C) Fire EMape.: A fire eacape may extend or project into any front, side or rear yard not more than four feet (40. (D). Stairwsys and Balconies: An open unenclosed stairway or balcony not covered by a roof or canopy may extend or project into a required rear yard not more than four feet (40 and into a required front or aide yard not more than thirty six inches (36'). (E) Uncovered Porches and Platforms: An uocoverwl pofch, pbitj form or landing place which doe. not extend above the level of the first floor of the building may extend or project into any required front, side or rear yard not more than ttix feet (60, provided auch strudure in a side yard shall not reduce to less than three feet (30 the unobstructed pedestrian way or sidewalk on ground level on the same lot. 11-2(M: WALLS, FENCES AND HEDGES: (A) A waU, fence or hedge may occupy any portion of a front yard except within the clear vision triangle as provided in Section 11-20-5 hereof, provided that such walls, fences or hedge, do not exceed the foUowing hdghte as messured dther above the finished grade along th* fence Une or shove the curb grade, or the nearest edge of the street pavement in the sbMnce of a curb atrudure along the street right of way Une and above the finished lot grade along the side property Une. Distrid :^ —T Maximum Height Rl-20, Rl-40, Rl-0 6' All other Distrids 4' If the front waU, hedge or fence is not located at the street right of way Uae, the wall. hMige or fence shall be measured from the finished grade from the side of the wall, fence or hedge with greatest vertical exposure. (B| A wall or fence not exceeding six feet (60 in height above th. finished grade may be located or occupy any portion of a side or rear yard except within the clear vision triangle na provided in Sedion 11-20-5 hereof. (O Planted hedgM projecting beyond the front yard Une bhall not exceed the maximimi height pmitti tor fences or walls as spedfied under suhsedions (A) and (B) above. Planted hedges, shrub, or trees shaU not obstruct any pubUc way. (D| Notwithstending any other provisions of this Sedion, spedal topographic exceptional or extraordinary circumstances or condition, may be submitted to the Planning Commission for review aad approval of the proposed fence, waU or hedge. 11-20-5: VISION, CORNER LOTS: The foUowing Umitetions shall apply to the hdght of fences, walls, gsteways, ornamental stradnrM, hedgM, shrubbery and other fixture., construction and planting on comer lote in all zones where front yards are required: (A) Such barrier, to dear unobatnicted vision at comers of intersecting streete shaU be limited to a height of not over three feet (3') above the esUbUshed elevstion of the nearest street Une, for a distance of twenty five feet (25') along both the front and dde lot Unra, meuured from the point of intersection, of the said interseding lot Une.. (B) Within the iMMcle. triangle formed by measuring slong both the front and side lot Une. a distance of twenty five fed (25') from their point of intersedion and by connecting the end. of the req>edive twenty five feet (25') distances, such barris diaU be Umited to hdght of not over three fMt (30 above the elevation of the atrMt Une level at the .aid interseding strMte. (Cl Within the said triangle, and in cases where front yard. are terraced, the ground elevation of such yards shall not excsMl thrM feet (3') above the MtabUshed street Uae elevation at aaid intcrMcting .trsete. 1120* LOT AREA REDUCTION: No lot area shall, by deed, dedication, grant or by any other means whatsoever, be M reduced or diminahed that the lot area, width, yarda or other open spacM of auch lot or any lot formed therefrom shdl be smaller thaa prescribed by this Title. 1120-7: STRUCTURES PERMITTED ABOVE HEIGHT LIMIT: Chimnsy*, radio/td*visioa traasmiaaion or recdving towcrWaatanaa*, aad flagpolM may hs aredsd to a hdght exosMiing th* bdght Umit oth*rwiM permitted hi the zone in which the strudurs is located, but in no CBM shaU auch structure exceed the height Umit by more thaa tea fMt (100 unleM approved by the Planning CommiMioa In accordance with th. conditional UM review procedurM of Chapter 30 of this Title. No portion of an utenna array shaU extend beyond th* property Une or into any front yard arra in any reddential ton*. Church staspUa, refrigeratioa eoolar. or veatilating fans, elevator bulkhead., fire tower, ud medtadeal appnrtenanoM necessary to operate and maiatain the bdlding, ahaU not exceed the height Umit permittsd ia the zone in which the atractore is located, unless approved by the Planning CommlMion in accordance with the conditiond UM review procedures of Chapter 30 of this TitU. 10 no CBM aliaU atrudures ao exceeding the permitted hdght Umit be dlowed for the purpoM of providing sdditiond floor spacs. 7/21/87 CHAPTER 21 SUBSTANDARD LOTS OF RECORDS SECTION: 112I-I: PBrpese 11-21 2: Excsption 11 21 3: RsductioB of Lot ATM II 21-4: Locstion of AccesMry Building. 11-21-6: VsWde Psrfciag 11-21-1: PURPOSE: Ths iatsnt of this Chapter is to allow tha aa* of existing racordsd sabstaadard lots which. bMxuM of thdr axiatiaf Moa. width aad depth, fall eompUaacc with certda Ngalatioaa of tb* laas woald erwrt* nada* hardship and radar maay sacb lote naasaaU*. It baa bssa dseaasd deairsbl* to MtabUah adaimam modlfiad apaea racalatioas, which would apply saly to thoM aiaas with adatiHI SBbataadard hits, ia ordM to IBMV. the eaatlMM^ r fatar* BM of said loto aad to praaarr* tha prapwty rifkt of thdr wa*ra. 1121-2: eXCErnON: Whm a 1st bas aa araa, width ar dsptb l*M thaa that rsqairsd by tUa TItk, aad wbaa add lat was I aadar ssparate owaarahip ar was of rseard at tha tlm* tbla THls hsemas dfsetive, sach lot may be oeeapisd by aay BM peradttod ia tha MB*. mAjm to tha foUowiag ragalatieaa: (A) All "Rl" Raddsatid ZaasK AD tha ragnUtloaa of tha ton* ia which lb* lot k loeatod ahall apply to aU Mbataadard Ma ol laexd, axMpt aa foOowa: —— I. Miafaaaai Yard RaqalraMata: ThowdRy. March 8, 186 (dFioat Yard: Twaaty pniHit (20%) of lot depth, but aasd BOt aie*sd twaaty f**t (') • (bl Rsar Ysrd: Twsaty ptrcsat (20%) of lot depth, hut aaad aot sxcsad twsaty fMt (200. (d Sid* Yard: Tea pwesat (10%) of h>t width ia each dde yard, but diaU aot be I*M thaa three feet (30 and need not •xo*ed flv* teat (60. 2. Miaimam DwdUng Udt SIM for AU Single-FamUy ZOOM: New mdn building. ahaU have an area of not less thsn eight hundred (800) square fmt. exclusive of garages, porches, eavea or dmilar fMturM. (B| AU "R3" RMidmUd Zone.: All the regulations of the zone in which the tot is locsted shall apply to dl substandard lote of rseord, except M foUowa: 1. Minimum Yard Raquiremente: (a) Front Yard: PlftMn percent (15%) of lot depth but need not excMd flfteea fMt (15*). (b) RMT Yard: FiftMn perpatad on the same lot or pared or on an adjdmng lot or parcel aa the strudure or UM they are intsndad to Mrve. TheOwimkaionmayaUowtheeatablkhmsntoftheoff-rtred parking area to be located within flv* huadrsd fMt (5OO0 of the premiaM to which th* parking rsquirsmsnte pvtdn. and may be located in a reddentid nae V th* land UM adjacent to any buiUing or UM hdng dahliah*d in a oonmMrdd zone. 2. Space for required of f-atrMt paridag aad loading ahaU not occupy any part of the dear viaion triangk, hut may be induded u part of a required open apow for a rear or side yard. (C) Mixed OccupandM: In the caM of mixed USM hi a building or on a kt, the tod reqdrenMnte f or of f-steed paridi f adUtks shaU be the aum of the requiremente for the various uses, computed Mparately. Off-strMt parking fadUtlM provided for one uw shaU not be caoddd as providing required parking fadUties for any other UM. (D) Reduction in Area: No off-strMt parking area shaU be encroached upon by buildings, vehicle storage or any other UM, ass shaU auch apace be reduced in area except by recommendation of the Planning Commkaiati and approvd by the City Council; and then ody after proof that, by reason of reduc^ tion in flbor area, aMting area or other factora oootroUlng the regulation of such parking f adUtica. the propoMd reduction in off-stred parking k reasonable. AppUcation for such reduction or encroachment diall he made in aooordance with the providona of Chapter 30, Conditiond Uasa, of thk Title. (E) Off-StrMt Loadkg Spans Required: la aay distrid in connedion with every bdlding or part thereof, heredter erected and having a grou floor arM of five thousand (6.000) square feet or more, which is to be occupied tor any office, commercial, manufacturing or industrid purpoM or for any other purpoM similarly requiring the racdpt or dktribution by vehicles of materid or msrchandlM, there diaU ha provided and mdntdned on the .am* tot with such building at least one off-stred kading apace not 1M. than twelve fMt (120 in width, thirty five fMt (360 in length and fourtMn fed (140 dearance hi hdght, plua one additiond auch toading space for Mch additiond twenty thousand (20,000) aquare fMt of floor area. 11-234: IMPROVEMENTS REQUIRED: (A) ParUng Pkn: A pkn of any propoMd parking arM ahaU be submitted to the Commudty Development Director or Bdhttng Offidd, at the time of fiUng an appUoation for a bdlding permit for the building to which tha parking area k aocsasory. No buUdhig ptmit ahaU be iaaued unloM th* parking pkn has bMn approved by the Community Devekpment Director or BuUding Offidd. The parking plan didl ckarly faidicate the prapoMd devaiopment, indnding loeatian, da*. diape, dedgn, entruoM and cxita, curb cuts, Ughting, landscaping. scrMning, paving qMdficatlons, induding bumper curbs aad such other date faaturM and appurtsnanoM M the Commudty Development DlrMtor or Buildhig Offidd may dMm pertinent. If any parking requiremente are haawi oa a UM, such M reateuranta, hningM. cafaa, where Mating k the criteria, a Mating pkn ahall be .uhnittwl with the construction drawings. A temporary oartiflcate of oocupaacy may b. iMued by the BuUding Offidd for ths UM of a portion or portiona of a bdMlng or strudure prior to ths oomplstion of the entire devekpmsnt a* proposod oa ths psrUng plan when, in the judgment of th* Bdlding Offidd. tiie delay in Uie completion of tha hnprovamante ar* dn* to eircnmatanoM beyond the eontfd of th* owner. 1. The parking pkn ahaU conform to the minimaw dedgn standards oontdaad to Tabk 1 whidi foUows: Curb Angk of Langth Akk Parking (A) WMth (B)" DspUi (Q per Cat (D) Wtdtii (E) 70 60 46 30" 0" V V V V V V W-O' 21'-0' 21'-0' \VV 17'-0' 24-0' VT VfV vav W'-O* 24'-0' 24'4 •21'-0' •IS'-O" M3'-0' •ir-0' •12-0' Akl(li'diaU be of oneway opmtioa if dagk widtiii twway op*niaoa p*rBiittad oaly if dd* k doiibk width ibowa. "Parking apacM ipadfleally naarvad for poopk who UM whMleUdn or waUdag aids shdl bs at kad 13' wide. N^tij LLUli CHART m IHaadleappod Drivara! Evwjt parUi lot dadmad for UM bjr tb* gaMTd pobik to wbok to pwt dull bo providad with pUiw opoMs for tb* miadvo M* if baadlMppod Mi. PUi ipasM M imrvad nd dMigMtod f or haadli^pid PUN • iMl bo toHtod lUa Iha pwhtog tot to itolbtMolhopatU^ tot k n to. Th* wamkm tt y tm hiidioippid dttvtrt abU bo M toltowK NnariwdPatkkf SpacM D*dgaatsd tor riaadiMpp*d Driv. Mhdmum of 1 d*dgaatsd apaeo (ExeqiUaa: No ipao* assd b* dsdgaatod fv th* haadlcapptd drivw to off-*tt*d parUag fadUtiM witii 12 or tswtrapae**. which k rsquiiBd for lashkatid uses, iadudhig mobik home aatetM and reddentkl oondomiduma, hotek and motels) Midmum of 2 dsdgaated spaces Midmum of 3 dedgnated apsres Midmum of 4 daaignatad spares Midmum of 4 dedgnated apaces, plus 2 spacM for each 100 parking spaces over 100, in the off-strret parking fadUty 3. Marking and Signs: AU Parking stdk shdl bs marked on the pavement for Mch vehicle t he parked. Operational — restrictions such as one-way akks ahaU bs ckarly indicated with appropriate aigna or pavement markinga. (d Handicapped parking apacM ahaU b* marked in blue. The intemationd Symhd of AcoesdhiUty ahaU be pdnted in Mch handicapped apacs. (h) Handicapped parking (paoM ahaU hav* a dgn identifying '•Handicapped Parking" and the pcndty AM as required by NRS 484.408. 4. EnXrancM aad Edte: Bach parking lot shdl have not mor* than two (2) entrancM and one common edt for each atrMt frontage. ConsUuction of driveways shaU comply with the 'Mulder City Udform Standard Orswings." 6. Aiy deviation or modification of the parUag requirements M herein Mt forth must Iw approved by th* Planiiing Commkaibn. No find inspedion or occupancy permit ahdl be iHued by th* Building Offidd until aU the hnprovements u shown on the psrklng plan have bMU properly InataUcd. 6. Granting of Minor Plan Modifications: Notwithstanding aay oth provUoaia of thk Chapter, UM Commudty Devekpment Director may aUow for ccrtdn minor paridng plan modifleatlona without pubUc hearing M rsquirsd by (Chapter 27, VarianoM. aubjad to the foUowing Umitetions: (a) Permit minor modiflcattons u may be nseaaaary to achieve an appropriate dedgn to the propoaed paridng area, (b) Permit minor modlficationa in the midmum parking dedgn standarda where, in the particular instance, .uch modification wiU not be inconsistent with the purpoM of tills Chapter. (c) For the purpoM of thk Section, idnor modifications shaU be construed to be modlficationa amounting to ten percent (10%) or less of any requiremente for achkving the midmum paridng design standards. (B) Pavement: 1. AU off-atred parking arsM ahaU he paved with an aaphdtic or concrete surface contatoed by perimetM curbing matarid. aU subjed to the approvd of the City Engtoeer and shaU be so graded and drdned M to dispoM of dl surface water in a manner that wiU not cauM erodon or damage outdde of the parking area. Persona operating parking lots shdl malntato auch lote to proWde smooth and durabk surface, adequately draiacd and trM from duat. (C) Border BarricadM: 1. Every parking arM that ia not Mparated by a wall from any atrMt or aUey upon which it abute shaU be provided with bumper curb.. Mid curb instalktion ahaU be aa per Boulder City Standards. 2. Every parking aisa located m a zone other thaa "Rl" abutting property located in "Rl" lonM ahaU be Mparated from such property by a soUd masonry wall six feet (6'l in hdght, measured from the fidshed surface grade of auch parking area cloeeat to the contiguoua ••Rl" zoned property, provided that that masonry waU shaU not exceed four fMt (4') in hdght within fiftMn fMt (15') of any strMt Une. (D) Landscaping and ScrMning: The landscaping requiremente for df-stred psridng arM edabUahed to ad dde ampk open apaem to totsgato tondsraping, Ughting, and pedestrian dsdgn fMturM toto th* dte plan to osate an off-atred parkhig arM aMthetieaUy complimentary to the urban envitonmant. Innovative dedgna and fledfaiUty m tiie appUcatkn and atiueturing of landscaping and atreening of parking aroM ate to beeacourged. In the event of practicd difficultlM and hankhip. rMuIting from strid enforcement of the foUowing standards due to existing buUdings or an irregularly shaped parcel, an administrative vaiianoe by the Cooimudty Development Director may be given tor standard, not to exosed tea p(ro*nt (10%). L The .tandard. for areas to be landscaped wUl bs M in Ssction 11-2M. 2. AU vehiculsr Ipatldng and loading ZOOM wiU be screened from pubUc strMte with a ten foot (IC) plantar bed which may indude the parkway, permanentiy landacaped with trcM at a minimum of one per thirty (1 per 30) Unsd fad exnpt aa required for vtoud dcarann punuant to Section 11-206 herMt. 3. A MTMning waU. three feet (3'l high, masonry wall, berm. or other sdtabk materid (i.e., denM shrub plantings) will separate the parUag arM from th* priphrd plantar bed, excepting ingrsM and egrcM lanM. 4. Six inch (6") corfaa and gutters wiUito tiie parking area shaU be installed at a minimum of four fMt (40 from the facM of exterior walk, henna, hedges, feno*., building, or other atruduTM, except area, of ingreM or egtess and pedMttian walkways.. Concrete bumper stops or othv acceptebk materid may be used with approvd of ths City EngtooM If no dralnsge problems exkt. Thk four foot (40 STM todde dl periphard wdk, fenoM hwIgM fadng pubUc streete or building wUl b. fully landMaped M par Section 11-254. 5. Planter klands wiU be crested witiiin the parking arsa. one for every ten (10) spaoM. The foUowing minimum deaign standards apply: (d Ske: A mhiimum width of four fMt (40 at aay point and totd Mtuare footag* of twenty tour (24 aqnara fed (not Induding ths curbing). (h) The ktoad ahaU contdn at kMt one shads ttM.and two (2) ahnibs, and be dadgnsd to accommodate the dtimate sk* of th* ttM. To fadUtete nutotenanoa, th* grouad can bs kf t bars atound th* ptonting*. (c) TypM of tiwM udUssd to such pkatsr klands abould hsvs dMp rooting and midmum kaf ahtdding charactsrktics. (d) Th* Istoad shsU be aurroundsd by curbing M notwl to *ubparagrapb (D)4 abov*. (•) In the aggregate, tha sqnara footag* of plantar islands wUI b* no kM than two paromt (2%) of th* pwhUy and akk qiOM. & Parking tote of IOH than tour thousand (4.000) square f sd of psving are excluded from the requiremente of subpsragraph. (D)4 and (D)6 abov* if It k til* *ok off-strod parking fadlity for a rsddenttol or oonunwcUl sntity. A paridBg tot deaignsd to aarvc mdtipk and eontigoona biuinsosM, auch M dMpptog oontcrs, wUl b* trwtsd as a dngk entity for th* porposM of thi. Chaptar ragatdkos of fragmaatsd owaerahip. (E) lighting: 1. What* dl night paridng k parmHted, potUng toto ahdl bs Ughtsd fh • unad to noffke, Wbmparidac k CMtaaaari|y ptradttod for • ooM kaaar portioa of ths boBta of dka*as, parktof lote ahdl bo Hgbtod lor thoM hoots tb* pMrtdiW >• onstonatUy panaittod. Th* Ughte shall b* ao atraagod ao to rsflset tba Ught away from adjdntog lote and ahdl provid* a dktributioa of Ught whidi k ampk to dtotingokh sUhondtM. 2. Any Ughte provided to iUuminate aay paridng atM ahaU bs atrangad ao M to r*fkd til* Ught away from any prMBi*M upon which a dwdUng ndt k looatod. Opon hdha ahdl aot ba prmitt*d. Propar ahadM ahall ba naad to ooattd such toatdtotiona to provsat gtor* aad Ught ItoBi tofriagiag upon adjoining proporlioa. (F) Fir* Aeoaaat AU vslddaa duOl ba ao dr*d that tbay may baiMobad nadOjr to eaM of fit* or otbar awMtgaaay. (0) Coafllottoc PtovWoaot la tha avaat tb* raqdtaMato af tba "VwUam Mndwd • padltoattoBo far PubUa Warki Oowtraotka 0(r<(Mto I ptovMNato. Ctotk Comty AIM, Navada", or tmf otbar ebapter, ataadatda aad apadfloattoa, aa tbajr • > odat or • Hgr bavaaftar ba aaMadad ar adop ta d. ato to oaalltot with tba ptniiiduaa af tbk Chaptar. anak Maeifk t iiid t i i aato ara haraby tapadad to tba octant of aaA aoalUot bat ao hu^ that, aad UM providona of tbto Cbastir ahaU arovaO. 11-2M: OFF-STREBT PARKING AND LDADINQ MiQUIREMBNTS IN THE "CBD" CENTRAL BUSf DISTRICT: TIM CBD" Cwttd Badaw Dtotriat k a I td apadd dtotiiet which, whaa *npwiipaaad tw Migr "O" G aawsl Cnaiiai dal Utm. laipti tba aia laaatai tba ptovktoaa of Saettoaa U-IMIDI, 11-IM Md 11-04,1 itotbofoltowiHalNttoatj yhhji i • at bo aiipM to ip u aid a i • aay otb*r aaaa la t abltobad by I (A) Aa adating bdUtog, or ebaag* of BM within aa sxkUng bnUdtog which doM not raqdra an sntorgoaMnt of that boUdtog, Bcad aot provid* of f-drad parUag aad/or toadtoc .pan to aa aaMtuat that k addiUoad to tb* off-sttoat parktag aad kadiag (paoM cziatlng at tiM tlm. of ooataoipiatod chaag* d BM wiUda an adating buildiag. DM coaddamtioa, howevar, must b* given to the UM of any existing opsa apsMia on tha same pramisM for tlw purpoM of of f-atrsd parking sad losdlng. (B) Thsr. ahsU be no rsduetioa d existi^ parUag or Henderson Home News, Boulder City News P>ge 5A aftar tho ovsat. Tanaparatr algao may bs omploysd oa^ dariatfthaM apadd ovsate aad most hs rsBBoved sftr tbs CHAPTER 24 SIGNS AND ADVERTISING STRUCTURES SECTION: 11-24-1: Scope 11-24-2: Purpoaa 11-24-3: Definitions 11-24-4: General Regulations; All Zones 11-24-5: Sign Regulations Relating to Zoning Distrids 11-244: Permit for Sign Erection 11-24-7: Permit for Sign Erection; Appeal 11-214: Nonconforming Signs 11-24-1: SCOPE: Outdoor advertidng atrudurm and dgna may he permitted subject to the limitetiona as Mt forth for th* tone In which located, and further aubject to the provialona a* Mt forth in this Chapter. 11:24-2: PURPOSE: The purpoM of this Chapter k to promote and proted the pubUc health, welare and aafety by regulating the aize, height, dsdgn, construction, location, illumination and mdntenancc of aigns within the City. This Chapter provides for the admidatration of thcM regulationa and providm admidstrative reUef for those desiring to exceed theM minimum requirements. 11-24-3: DEFINITIONS: For the purpoM of applying the requiremente of thia Chapter, the following terms are defined: (A) All the defidUon* aa Mt forth in Section 1114 of thk Title. (B) ADVERTISING SIGN: A aign attached to or plaesd on th* outaid* of a bdlding upon which any poster, bill, printing, pdnting, dsviM or advertidng or any kind may he plac*d, pMt*d, futened or affixed. (C) ADVERTISING STRUCTURE: Any freestanding outdoor atrndure or device erected for advertiaing purposM, or to sttrad the attention of the pubUc, and which 1. vi.ible from any pubUc atrMt or alley or pubUc place. (D) CHANGE PANEL: Any advertising dgn or advertidng atmctora dMigned to permit Immediate change of copy. (E) INDIRECT LIGHTING: A source of exterad Illumination entirely within the sign which makea the aign vi.lhic at dght by mean* of Ughting the background upon which the freeatanding charaders are mounted, but wherein th* aourcc of iUumination ii not vidbk. (F) INTERNAL LIGHTING: A source of illumination entirely within the sign which makes the contents of the sign visible at night by means of the Ught being transmitted through a translucent materid, but wherein the aourc* of the IUumination is not visible. (H) NONCONFORMING SIGN: A lawfuUy constructed sign adating at the time thia Title, or ameadmenta thereto, become effective, which doM not conform with the aign regulation for the zone in which the sign ia located. (I) ROOF LINE: The highest point of the mdn roof atrudure or higheot pdnt on a parapet, but not iaclucUng eupoks, pylons, projectioDi or minor rdsed portion, of the roof. (J) SHOPPING CENTER: An integrated shopping complex comprised of five (5) or more ratdl stores. (K) SHOPPING CENTER ADVERTISING STRUCTURE: Any free-standing outdoor strudure or device erected for advertidng purposes which denote, or identifies a shopping center. (L) SIGN: Any device for visual commudcation, including any structure or natural object or part thereof, that is used for the purpose of bringing the subject thereof to the attention of the pubUc, but not including any flag, badge or inalgda of any government or govemmentd agency, or of any dvie, chariteble. reUgious, pstriotic. fraternd or similar orgadzation. (M) SIGN AREA: The sign area ia measured as follows: 1. For sign copy mounted or pdnted on the background panal or area distinctively pdnted, textured or construded as a background for the sign copy, the dgn area is measured as that area contdned within the outaide dimendons of the badtground panel or surface. 2. For sign copy mounted a. individud ktten and/or gr^ihica against a wall or f asda of a bdlding or other atnicture that ha. not been pdnted. textured or otherwiM dtered to provide a distinctive background for the sign copy, the sign area k measured ss the area enclosed by the smdiest single rectangle that wiU encloM dl the sign copy. 3. For dgn copy mounted or printed on an illuminated sign or illuminated archltecturd element of a bdlding the entire iUuminatsd aurf ace of iUuminated archltecturd ekment which contdns the dgn copy, shdl be counted a. a sign. 4. Number of sign facM: (a) Single Face: The sign area is the area of the single face ody. (b) Two FacM: The sign area of any two (2) faced dgn with parallel face.; or "V" type dgn* having an interior angle of forty five degrees (46) or IMB, k the area of the aingle face; if the angle betwMn the two (2) aign faces is gTMter than forty five degrMa I4S), the aign area ia the sum of the arMs of the two (2) faces. (c) ThrM or More Facea: The aign araa ia tha aum of tho areM of the thrM (3) or more facM. (d) Spherical, Free-Form. Sculpturd, or Other Non-plaoer Signs: Tbs sign srM is the sum of the areas of ths amaUet oix (6) ddM aoUd form that wiU encompsM the sign structure. 5. For a sign having more than one component, the sign area k tlie smallat rectangle that will encompam the Mverd component, of the .ign. 11-244: GENERAL REGULATIONS: ALL ZONES (A) Maximum dgn hdght ahall be twenty fMt (200 above grade aad no dimendon ahaU exceed fiftMn (15) Unear fMt In hortoontd or ten feet (100 in vertiod direction. (B) Signs erected or atUched to the wdl of a bdlding'ahdl have the expoMd face of th* dgn in a plan* pardkl to the face of the wsU and ahdl not project above cordce or roof Une. (C) No advertidng atrudures are permitted on a bdldtog roof, top or mansard, parapet or marquM. (D) Signs ahaU not be attached or pdntsd on a roof surface. (E) No sign or advartidng atrndure shsU IM toatallcd ao aa to rotate, gyrate, bUnk, flaah, move or bs audihk ia sny admatsd fashion. (F) AU dgna, toduding the framM, bracM or supporte thsrMf. shall be adequately bdit and *reded in compUnce with th* building, •l*ctricd and other appUcable codM of Boulder aty. AU IUuminated dgns must use dther indirect Ughting or intend Ughting. A-frame and aimikr freestanding aigna are not permittsd. (G) No dgns or portion thereof shaU occupy any area at an elevation loM than eight feet dx inches (8'6") abov* th* fidshtd or propoaed grade of any pedMtrian walk. (H) Th* Ughting and odor of dgns ahall not imlteta or rsMmbk offidd tnffle control davicM, rdlroad signa or signak. (I) lUuaainatioB of aay aign thaU ba of aueb nature that wh*n Ught 00 gsasntsd sxteads toto any roddoatial cons, auch aataadad Ulamiaatioa shaU not axcoad oaa foot-oandk malntatood at aay potot on a vrticd plaaa asteadad from Mdi proporty Uaa aepatating tba Ught *oate* from adjaoaat raddoatid SOBM. V (J) NodUnadnatad dir*etiond or Inf ermationd dgna Indudla^ dgna lor apsdd *vsate, of pubUc or quad-pubUc aatur*. but not todnding diroctiona to commerdd MtabUdimanta, an pormittad snhjaet to th. approvd of the Bdlding Offidd a. to keation. Inf onnaUoad dgna inataUod on or ov*r puhUc proparty at* aabj*d to th* apptovd of the Diredor of PubUc Works. (K) Location to High Voltage Condudora: No aign disll ha aractod ia aucb a manner that any part wUI bs eloosr to high voltage conductor* thaa tha foUowiag Ubl* aUowsi Vdtag* Horiaoatd Ptodmlty Varticd Proximity 8 foot 9 foot lOfaat 10 faat ptoa Vi" par RV ovar 80,000 Up to 6,900 f*d eioO to 18,000 Bfwt 18,000 to 60,000 10 fMt Ovar 80,000 10 laat pina Vi" pot KV ov 80.000 ThiBoddK aty EktiicdDtotribatiaBDIvidBa ahdl ddir mtoa tba Uaa vdtago far aajr givoa looatioa. (L) Motor vabteko aaad to a baaiaaM and bavlag dgu pdatM oa tbo *Btf aea of tba body may ba parkad to a taddantid aoaa, providad tha owBr or drivar Uvoo to tba iamadiatf Btaa aad k adag th* vdilck tot traaapotteUoa putposaa, but tba y^iiil^ abaU not be uaed primarily for advertiaim putpooaa. No ajgaawiMb* permittsd OB any noaaalf-propsUed voUck or portabl* • tnidure stored on say property. (M) Spacid Attraetion Sign: Baeb badaaaa flna. ia addition to th* aMudmiun aUowabk patmaaaat atoa aroa. may bav* tamporary algaa. No mora thM M apatial attraetlaa aiiaat pot Boatk. • • toagar thaa aaaa (T) dan'Amttoa k panahtod. oMipt dBilig DaaaadNT wbaa all of tbo aaatk najr ba aaod for taaportry aigaa. AU toBporary aigM shall ba ramovod tba fitat warUag day tomporary liga period aspirM, (N) FoHtleal Sigaw PolHkd algaa may bo dtowod to aay aeao. AD poHtkd dgas ahall bs plaesd witiito tito property UBM aad shall asaform to tba aiigB taqaltaaioate of tbs aoas aakas aotod otbarwtoo. AU poU tkal dggj. nginUoM of ibl. ahaU bo ptooid to eoafornMaeo to aU tsqokanMate of tb* govaraiag codM aad ordlaaacM. 1. SIga parmlte ahall be required for dl poUticd dgn* ov*r' thirty two (32) *qnare fMt in arM. 2. In dl zonM. th* dgn *hall be *o placed aa to not conatltute a traffic hazard. No poUtiesI sign esn he pisced on any pubUc property or right of way or poated on any utility pole or device. 3. For dl poUtical aigns thirty two (32) square fMt or less in arM. no sign permit will be required; however. Mch candidate shall pay sn admidatration permit fM, M determin ed by resolution of the City Coundl, to plscc sny auch Nigns within the dty Umita. 4. Alt poUtical aigns ahdl bs removed within Mven (7) days after the primary aledlon, except the succcMfut candidatN may leave them la their premnt location until after the geasrd eledion; th*M sign* muat then be removed within Mven (7) days after that election date. 6. PoUtical aigna ahdl not be erected more than dxty (001 daya before a primary, general election or apedd election. (0) UnUghted real Mtete dgna not exceeding twelve (12) square fMt ia aggregate area partddng ody to the sale or leaM of land or building upon which diaplayed shall be permitted. In th* case of commerdal property, only one real estate aign, not to exceed thirty two (32) aquare fMt, will be parmittad. (P) All dgna ahall conform with the regulationa for aigns for the zone In which they are located with the followinR excsptioaa: 1. Had Mtete development dgna may be allowed In any zodng diatrid undsr the following conditions: (a) Each sppUcatiOn shaU be • ubjad to the approvd of tha Building Offidd and ahall be aubjed to revocation for eauM. (b) Tha madmum permit tim* ahaU bs one y*sr with extenstons thereof subjed to review and approvd of the Bdlding Offidal. (c) Ths appUcant muat have obf dned writton permission from property owner of site of propoadl sign location. (d) Warding ahdl partdn to red Mtete development only, (a) A temporary red eatete development dgn may be placed on the site of the subdivision development under construction, provided that It doM not exceed aixty four (64) aquare fMt in area. Temporary aigns must he removed in thrM (3) years. (f) In addition, there may be one rMl Mtate development dgn not on the dte, of not more than dxty tour (64) aquare fMt in area, that I. not doMr th.n fifty fMt (5O0 to any rsddentlal arM. (g) A madmum of four (4) direetiond dgna, Mch of which ahdl not exceed sIxtMn (161 square fMt in arM, may be dlowed. The purpoae of add signs is to give directions to a r*d Mtete devdopm*nt and not intended for advertising purpoBM. (h) AU rsd Mtate development dgna shdl be removed ten (10) daya after the on-dte Mies office ia closed or the tiuM (3) year Umitation of Section 11-24-4 (P)l.(e) is imposed, whichever occurs first. 2. Construction Signs: Constnidion signs msy be permitted in any zone provided that sdd sign is located upon the construction site and the projed ia aduaUy under construction and as further provided herein: (a) Each appUcation shdl be subject (6 the approval of the Bdlding Offidal and ahdl be subject to revocation for cauM. (b) Maximum sign arM shaU be thirty two (32) aquare fMt. (c) The dgn may contdn ody the name of the construction firm, article being constructed, addresa, phone and contractor's Ueense number. 3. Signa need exclusively tor the following are permitted In dl IOUM: (d For the diaplay of offidal noticM iMued by any pubUe officer in the performance of a puhUc duty, or by any person in giving legd notira. (b) For diredion, warning or information purposes of a pubUc or MmipubUc nature, when instdled and mdntdned by an offidd body. (Q) A Sign No Longer Idoititytog a Bona Fide Exkting BuaineH. Any dgn erected, hung, rehung, placed, replaced, painted or mdntdned as Mt forth herewith, now or hereaifter exkting, wUeh has ceased for dnety (90) days to identify a bona fide budness conduded on the premisM, will be prohlbitad and shdl, upon notification of the Building Offidal (who k spsdneally authorized to proceed) be taken down, removed or obliterated within five (5) daya of recdpt of auch notiflcation. and f aUure to so comply on the part of the owner, occupant, agent or person having the benefidd UM of the bdldtog or prsmiaM upon which such dgn may be found f ahaU oonatitute a vloktion of thsM regutotiona. For the purpoaMof thia auboection, the term "dgn" ahaU include •' any cahinets, Ughte. okctricd connections, supporting strue• tiuos, indnding polM or other appurtenances. Provided, however, that the Building Offidal may grant a reasonable axtsnaion of time, not to excesd 120 dsys, for the removsl of any portion of a dgn other than the sign face if he deter.(' • miiMS that th* owner or occupant of the premisM hss made proper appUcation for s new sign. 11-244: SIGN REGULATIONS RELATING TO ZONES (A) Zones: "R140". "Rl-40", "Rl^O", "RM6", •'Rl-10", "R14", : •'Rl-7". and "ME". 1. One name plate shall be permitted, not exceeding two (2) square feet in area, for such dweUing udt, to indicate th* nam* and addrsM of the occupant. The occupation of the occupant ahaU not b* pMmltted on the dgn. (B) "R3" Zone: 1. On* nam* ptote abaU be pwadttsd, aot sxcssding two (2) squara fMt to area, for such dwelUng udt, to indicate >.' th* nam* aad addr*M of th* occupant. The occupation of • the occupaat shaU not be permitted on ths dgn. 2. Ons indirset. Ulnmlnatad sign, not sxcssding twdv* (12) '' squara fast to stsa for Mch apartmsnt bdlding, providsd thst such sign contdns ao sdvertldag msttsr szcspt tha nams and sttMt addrsH of th* apartment building. (C) "MP" Zoae: A sign advertidng mobile home park* may be Mtebliabsd oa the premisM, provided thst the madmum arsa shall ba Umited to thirty two (32) aquare fMt. (D) "Cl" ZoBo: 1. Ona advortislag dgn or change pand dgn for Mch lot or occupancy, ratoting to the UM and occupancy therdn, :. •haU ba pemittad. P^ 2. Madmum dgn arM ahaU not excsMl dxtMn (16) aquaro ^" • if faat to araa. _ii!Uu S. Advsrttotoi atrudutM ahdl not b* permitt*d. (E) "C2" aad "CM" ZOOM: On • f. 1. Signa abaU ba parmittad to tha above toaM aubjad ta Uia foUowiag eoadltiona: (d Advartialag StradotM: (1) Oaly OBO advartialag atrudura tatotiag to BM or oeeapaacy tbtroin. Madmum aign araa ahaU aot taeaad oaa huadrod (100) squara fMt. (2) AU advartialag atrnctuioa wiU prsssnt a plaadng aad prafisdoBslly eoaatnietod appaaraan aad ahall ba matotdaod to good eoadltioa. (b) Tbtoo (3) advertidng aigaa aad oaa change pand dgn par aotabUahmaat ahdl b* parmittad. (d In aggtsgato, tha dgn arsa for dl of th* shovs abaU aot aseaad oaa haadtsd fifty (190) sqnara fMt. 2. Signs abaU bs panrittsd to Ct aad CM ZoaM for abopplag esataro aubjad to tii* fdlowing condiUoaa; (d Advartialag StrndutM: (1) Only oaa advartiai^ atructnra par ahoppiag eaatar. Madt— aiga araa abdl aot oxeasd oa* haai k ad (100) AU advartklag atmatana wUI praaaat a ptoadM aad prafiaalwaaUy aeaatrudad appaataaoa ud akaU ba aMtatdaad to good eaadltioa. (S) Aa aiivartiatog atmetvra atay eoatata tba aaaoo of bMlaaaa aatabUakaMato witkto a akonlH aaatar. (b) Oaly oaa ckaaga paad alga par a*tabllataaat to pandttod. (e) Oaly thiaa (S) aitarior aigM ara pararittad par \t
PAGE 44

• • Hi mmm VPP Vm >A Hpes of grsater than one to four (Ml shall be terraced or replaced by a retaining wall if higher than three feet 13') and landacaped 4.