Citation
1987-01-01 - Henderson Home News

Material Information

Title:
1987-01-01 - Henderson Home News
Creator:
Dickensheets, Scott ( Columnist )
Scott, Katherine E. ( Columnist )
Cohen, Richard ( Columnist )
Shipler, Guy ( Columnist )
Thomas, Cal ( Columnist )
Babbitt, Bruce ( Columnist )
Hentoff, Nat ( Columnist )
Bennett, L. Jessie ( Columnist )
Swinney, Emma ( Columnist )
Soehlke, Ruth ( Columnist )
Szydelko, Paul ( Columnist )
Curtis, Joey ( Columnist )
Copeland, Ron ( Columnist )
Jones, Jo ( Columnist )
Goff, James E. ( Columnist )
Bishop, Carolyn D. ( Columnist )
Earl, Phillip I. ( Columnist )
Markham, Judith ( Columnist )
Gillis, Steve ( Columnist )
Frana, Tim ( Columnist )
Publisher:
O'Callaghan, Mike
HBC Publications, Inc.
Creation Date:
1987-01-01
Language:
English
Materials:
Paper ( medium )

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Nevada
Henderson
East Las Vegas
City and town life -- Nevada -- Henderson
Community life -- Nevada -- Henderson
History -- Henderson (Nev.) -- 20th century
Genre:
Newspapers

Notes

Acknowledgments:
Greenspun Media sponsors this collection.
Collection Location:
Greenspun Media retains possession of the bound, original newspapers. Henderson District Public Libraries retains possession of the microfilm and the digital files.

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Source Institution:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Holding Location:
Henderson District Public Libraries
Rights Management:
The items in this collection are provided for non-commercial personal and academic use by Henderson Library patrons and may not be republished in any way. Contact Greenspun Media Group for additional information regarding rights to this material: http://www.greenspunmedia.com
Resource Identifier:
hhn3463 ( Digital Id )

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PAGE 1

Hkghs 60ft Lows 308 HENDERSON NEVADA'S INDUSTRIAL CENTER Volume 38, Ist Edition Henderson, Nevada THE COMMUNITY'S NEWSPAPER Ht 22 Water St. 564-1881 Thursday, ju>uary 1.1987 Merchants report better Christmas than last season by Scott Dickensheets Home News Staff Writer Christmas sales were up this season over last, according to local retailers, though most added there were no hot-selling trend items. It was a good hoUday season for Henderson's Thrifty Drug and Discount Store, according to manager Jeanette Acree, who said her store's sales were up 40 percent over last Christmas. "Nothing stands out," she replied when asked about'popular sellers. "We sold a lot of toys and electronics." K-Mart manager Jerry Rudrude said his store's Christmas sales were "pretty good, better than last year's." He noted that major appliances, televisions, video cassette recorders and electronic toys were some of the better-selUng items. Neil Dewing, assistant general manager of Osco Drug also said sales were up. Although he didn't have exact figures at hand, he estimated there was a three or four percent inci^ase in sales. "We really didn't have any hot sellers," he said, though he added that Teddy Ruxpin talking bear dolls and scooters did well for them. One item that was disappointing in sales, Dewing said, was the photon tag guns, which were expected to do well. 1986 a record year for city growth by Scott Dickensheets Home News Staff Writer Explosive growth was the distinctive feature of 1986 for the city of Henderson. Building activity went through the ceiling and a number of new industries decided to locate facilities here. One of the prime indicators of growth is the valuation of building permits issued by the city, and in 1986 the record was shattered. Though final taUies are not yet available, the total valuation of the year's permits is almost certain to be around $150 million. That crushes the previous high, set in 1978, of about $69 million. A huge sUce of that has been in residential growth, the bulk of which has been centered in the Green Valley neighborhood. Industrial growth Much of the growth has been industrial. The Gold Bond Ice Cream plant was substantially completed this year, and began limited production the first week of December. They now produce one line of novelty items, and plan to begin another line in February, accqrding to plant manager Al Brunse. They also plan to begin construction of a six-story cold storage facility in February. Gold Bond currently employs about 35 people. The Gold Bond plant is the result of quiet negotiations that began in January 1985, when company ofHcials cautiously approached the Henderson Chamber of Commerce. According to chamber director Gary Johnson, the Gold Bond execs kept their corporate identity and purpose low-key. Torget we were here," they told him after their "Arst meeting. They came back however, only to have negotiations threatened by an offer of fully-improved land at a lower price by Kingman, Ariz. According to Johnson, eventually the community of Henderson won Gold Bond over. Other new industries also decided to locate here. Greater Buffalo Press approached the city in February, seeking to build a printing plant here. Later, Berry Plastics showed up, and both companies said they required use of the state-owned railroad line running between Henderson and Boulder City. Greater Buffalo will establish Sierra Color Printing near the GTE facility. The ninth plant in the Greater Buffalo family. Sierra Color will print advertising inserts in a 140,000-square foot facility that will employ, at it's peak, around 174 people. Berry Plastics is constructing a pollution-free injection molding plant at the comer of Arrowhead Trail and Horizon Drive. To help lure these companies, an agreement concerning the railroad tracks was worked out between Henderson, Boulder City and the state. Both cities will be responsible for maintaining portions of the track within their boundaries. A study of the tracks later commissioned by the state recommended a number of tourist possibilities, as well as motion picture uses. Kidd Marshmellow company broke ground in March for their new plant in the Gibeon Industrial Park, which is located in unincorporated county land^ See growth panfe 2 HOUSE OF LIGHTS-Jary Babcock of 2452 Marlene Way, in Green Valley, was named best overall in the annual citywide Christmas decorating contest sponsored by the Commemorative Beautincation Commission. Babcock has said that about 18,000 lights were used and a special power line was run to the house to light the display. ^ate of local library shaky as new year begins by Katlierine E. Scott Home News Staff Writer The fate of the new building proposed by the Henderson District fublic Library may be shaky as the board enters the third year of planning for the facility. While the library board foresees a new building to be constructed on the civic center site, city officials have indicated dissatisffiction with the library's fulfillment of their obligation of the leade for the city's land. Bids had been let to contractors for construction of a new Ubrary joined with a new city hall when the library district's board of trustees began raising questions in October. By the end of November the board had fired their architect, terminated their interlocal agreement with the city of Henderson and filed a complaint against the architect with the State Board of Architecture. The only bid for the joint project came in too high. Library officials blamed that, on incompetence of the architect while city officials claimed the controversy of the board's actions was the cause. After the interlocal agree-' ment was ended the city immediately began making revisions to their plans for the city hall while the library board decided to start from scrateh with a new architect and design. Original plans On June 17,1985 the Ubrary board, of which only one member sits on the present board, unanimously awarded the contract to build the Ubrary to Dennis Rusk. JMA Associates was the only other bidder. The Ubrary subsequently invited the city to entwine their plans for a new city haU and interlocal agreement was entered with the city of Henderson to build both on a new civic center complex on downtown land. The city, which had approved construction of a new city hall, selected the same architect and chose their design to mateh that of the Ubrary. The completed project was designed to include a common cooling pond and a plaza connecting the two buildings over the parking lot. In order to receive stete bond money for funds to build the Ubrary, the board had to produce matching funds. The city of Henderson provided a 99-year land lease with the Ubrary for that purpose. The lease was signed April 22, 1986 and provided the building be completed within two years of that date. Also according to the lease, the Ubrary is required to have some 18,000 square feet and be two-and-a-half stories high. Other requirements caU for exhibit space, a pubUc auditorium, parking and landscaping. State funding Problems began in October after groundbreaking ceremo-. nies were held. The Ubrary board began taking action in response to pressure from the stete Ubrarian who told them, among other issues, that stete bond money would not provide coste for landscaping or the plaza. See library page 2 Year In review Deaths mar first quarter of 1986 by Katherine E. Scott Hane News Staff Writer T%e deaths of five people including a man killed by poUce wen maoig the mAjor evnito in the Gxst thie months of 1^6. Two died from shotgun kkuAB, ooB saoctBDtbed to inJQi^MMifltoined ina^iristmas night bitand^rin. another drownedand the 1985 murder eaM of the fifth ended with a ity j^ea. Robert "Bobby" ,3$, of Henderacm was byaiitnleiwn rv^en local po' to serve an out-oit on him Jan. 17. ihesr men, including It's brother, were in the Pittman neighborhood apartment when poUce en1Snd> Wheeler threw an (^n-bllde knife at tile oUGows befoie hb was hit by a alMJt^nrblaat fired by HPD officer Benedict *Dick' Trettel. A coroner's jury ruled Feb. 6 that WheeW'g death was justifiable homicide. The fiveW(Hnan, two-man jury delibera^ about one-half ham after hearing from 14 witnesses. The year began with the rlMifH nf fThrifltmjw niffht hitThe 43-yenrm. nixie days after was struck H)fls fedtdthya on Booldfir (fighway near Wdls Street. He fustaiiied massive head i^urie$ after heiag tfamown abpe 30 feet. WilSam Jefi|(so&iigbt, 04, of Las Vegas vms aittistedl at his home af tr tiie lioeiise ntu&bsrofhisvshidewastMed. £fe was cfattTfed with felony Dtn, kMimag the soeneof an acddent, fiiUbxe to iwA aid at an aoddeat atxl failure to report an acddeot. On Jan. 10 Edward Thaudeti-Cdiso Komaro, 19, -of Henderson, olealiled inH^ 'nsteonfleri desert near h home Also in January, Henderson District PubUc Librai tor Tom OuroUo eodea louye years with the l^^ritry^ become acting director N^rada State Museum Historical Society in Janet Claric was terim director aftw Jan. 2 departunt. TheHaadersoaCity on Jan. 7 an;)n>ved a con with Archtec Inc. tobu t:ityhpU,TheilM>ti— th
PAGE 2

Thundiky, January 1,1987 Page X Henderson Home Newt, Headerion, Nevada Thnniday, January 1, 1987 Hendcrion Homt Nawi, Handaraan, Navada Faga I St. Rose de Lima names Coats CEO KestersoM appointed to NDA group David Coats has been named the ditionally. he hu been Uw direc• V^ ^ 1^ David Coots has been named the BOW president and chief executive officer at St. Roee de Lima Hoapital in Henderson according to hoapital board chairman Lou LaPortt. "David brings extensive health care management and experience to St. Rose," said LaPorta. Coats, who. has a Masters De-' gree in Health Services Adminiatrttion, will assume his duties at the hospital oh Jan. 19. Prior to coming to St. Rose de Lima, Coats served in the Mercy Health Care Organisation of CaUfomia as the administrator of Mercy Modac Medical Center. AdHospltal schedules volunteer orientation ditionally, he has been the direc tor of operations and corporate projects director within the Mercy CaUfomis system. Other hospital experience Coats brings to St. Rose de Linui includes serving as director of business services at several CaUfomia hospitals including Rideout Memorial Hospital in Marysville, Childrens Hospital Medical Center in Oakland and San Jose Hospital and Health Center in San Joee. Coats also was the director of data processing at Jdhn Muir Memorial Hospital in Wakut Creole, Calif. He and his wife Annette have two children. Orientation for prospective volunteers 18 and older will be held :at St. Roee de Lima Hospital Wednesday, Jan. 7 from 9 a.m. _untLl noon in conference room I "according to director of volunteer services Sister Noreen McKeough. Although the hospital needs vol.jmteers with all types of skills. especially needed, are those with some clerical background and those wanting to work with the Lifeline program. For more information about the meeting or the volunteer program, contact Sister Noreen at 564-2622 extension 119 between 9 a.m and 3 p.m. Ilrowth from page 1 :: Railroad Pass added a new ;tive story hotel addition as part :vt an ovorall remodelling effort. ^: On the downside... r: Not all the news was good, however. There .was a notable kck of response to a letter sent by dty officials to various hotel companies soliciting interest in :i civic center hotel. '.', Developer Chris Paimos stirTed up discussion on the subject with his proposal to build II hotel next to the convention center, but hopes faded when Pannos failed to supply an adequate financial statement to the city. Another snag in the deal was indecision by city leaders over whether or not to pass a resolution concerning the lease or sale of the hotel site. Some city leaders and staff members said no resolution could be passed until a concrete proposal was in hand, while others sided with Pannos, who claimed he could do no more without a resolution. The Pannos proposal seems to have come to a dead end. City Hall sources, however, say that a couple of hotel companies are monitoring the tangle between the city and the Henderson District Public Library over the library that will share the civic center site. In the primary election, Henderson residents voted down a bond proposal to fund ttie Boulder Highway beautification effort. It lost by a slim, 99-vote margin, and supporters say the failure resulted at least in part because the project was marketed solely as a beautification effort, with little emphasis on its functional aspects, such as flood control. They are working to get it back on a ballot in 1987. Looking ahead City officials are predicting another explosive year in 1987. Several seeds planted in 1986 will come to full bloom. The long-awaited Lake at Las Vegas project appears to gathering steam. Developers say they will begin construction in February, though they also predicted progress last February. By most accounts, however, the latest assertions have more substance. City manager Gary Bloomquist pointed out that the developers have hired an expensive consultant, a move interpreted by some as an indication of forward movement. Old Vegas, sold recently to local developer Maurice Threinen, is scheduled to open its doors again in March. A Threinen representative has said they will stick with the Old West theme of the park, but Chamber of Commerce director Johnson said he expects them to do things differently. "They'll have to try some new things," he said. 'It's obvious the old things don't work." City officials have high hopes for the Sky Harbor Airport master plan and have applied for federal funding to complete the plan. An improved Sky Harbor, along with a local improvement district that would bring utihties to the area, might stimulate development in what city manager Gary Bloomquist has called "some of the prime industrial land in the valley." The p:t)wth isn't all industrial, however. A pair of major residential developments are creeping closer to reality. One of them is American Nevada Corp.'s River Run project, a 567-acre proposed village south of the Union Pacific railroad tracks. The other is local developer Rich McDonald's ambitious McDonald Ranch, which is currently slated for more than 3,000 acres south of Lakis Mead Drive. McDonald has several items before the Henderson Planning Conmiiaaion's next meeting concerning the proposal. IEN0ERS0N~<~~s==; IHOMENEWSI :sa AD Independent Newspaper Founded June 1,1951 PobUshad avery TuMdoy oad Thnraday moraiBg at 22 Watw StTMt. HMknoa, Navada, 88015 plioaa S64-1881. I MIKE O'CALLAQHAN CAROLYN O'CALLAQHAN Co-PnUtohw JOHN DAILEY MoMgiag Editor HAG. PabUoatteaa Mlln O'CaUafkoa, PriiidMt; Cotoiya O'CaUogkaa. Vie* PMldMt: Tbi O'Callackaa. Vlea Proaldaat; Hatha DoaUa. ; Bate Mofgaa, Traaaanr. SahacripUaa ratoa 8iik 2SeMU OM7W SIS teaBMMks...l7 MaU aabaeriptioaa Wwt of Miaaiaaippi S20 par yaar 116 for oU OKtatha East of Miaoioaipd t24 par year So far rix aaatka Clark County Comndssioner Thalia Dondero was recently elected chairman and Henderson Mayor Loma Kesterson was elected vice chairman for Nevada Development Authority's new Interagency Coordinating Conunittee. The conmiittee is comprised of 13 elected officials and volunteer leaders representing both public and private economic development entities within Las Vegas, North Las Vegas, Henderson, Boulder City, Clark County, including all Southern Nevada Chambers of Commerce; and Valley Bank of Nevada and Stunma Corporation, Its purpose is to reduce dupUcation of effort and expenditures on behalf of communities working to attract new business and industry to the area. "We see the formation of this new Committee as a great boon," states, Dondero. 'The Interagency Coordinating Committee will direct its efforts to equal representation of all participants. We expect to be politically active, lobbying for the collective interests of Southern Nevada Communities in the months ahead. Additionally, it will take a close look at funding allocated on a statewide basis for economic development to see that money is put to good use and benefits the entire group. The Unes of communication are, wide open and our spirit of cooperation is high," Dondero adds. Both Kesterson and Dondero, in their new expanded capacities, are voting members of Nevada Development Authority's executive board. Library from page 1 On Oct. 15 the library board voted to lower the elevation of the library by nine feet to avoid costs including retaining walls and landscaping. A week later the board rescinded that vote after hearing from project architects and city officials. State Librarian Joan Kerschner had helped draft the interlocal agreement, which was signed Sept. 4, 1986. The interlocal agreement specifically stated that '^n addition to the two buildings the' project includes all the necessary on-site parking for each building, landscaping, a joint plaza area, and a jointly operated and maintained heating and cooling system." Current plans During library board meetings trustees have said they need to renegotiate their lease with the city before continuing their project. In the meantime, they already began soliciting bids from architects. In a legal notice run in the Dec. 16 issue of the Henderson Home News the library stated, "This new building is expected to be more than 12,000 square feet and at least one story in height." Henderson city manager Gary Bloomquist remarked Monday, "They don't have a lease if they make significant changes without coming back and asking for legal revisions to the lease." He added, "People should not be playing word games vrith it. 18,000 square feet more or less is something near 18,000 square feet. The intent was ;8,000 square feet." After receiving no official action or requests from the library board the Henderson City Council put an item on their agenda for their Dec. 16 meeting. Bloomquist informed the board and requested they be represented. Dming their Dec. 10 meeting the library board noted they would be represented by their attorney and also indicated at least one member would represent them at the council meeting. However, the council tabled any discussion when nobody from the library board appeared at the meeting. Board chairman Rosa Herwick mentioned later they did not attend because the council's agenda was not specific and they did know know the council was planning to make any decisions. Members of the city council did speak with library board trustees in two separate meetings Monday evening. Herwick noted she and board member Leonard Smith met with Councihnen Ron Hubel and Michael Harris, and board members Dorothy Coroneos and Patricia Geuder met with Mayor Lorna Kesterson and Councihnan Carlton Lawrence. "We're talking, nothing's been particularly accomplished at this point," she mentioned Tuesday. She said they are trying to work things out. Herwick mentioned she thinks both sides came to understand the other better. Arcliitect's response In December architect Dennis Rusk officially requested the library board to rescind their recent actions and allow him to complete his contract with them. He has also challenged the validity of the board's complaint to the State Board of Archtiecture and questioned the legitimacy of minutes kept by the library board. In particular. Rusk claims library minutes do not coincide with people's memories of the meetings. His attorney wrote to the attorney general's office that they have "documentation showing that some of the action which they did allegedly take was never discussed dur-. ing the open meetings." The AG's office is currently investigating a Home News inquiry regarding a possible violation of the state's Open Meeting Law by the library board involving a meeting allegedly held 7 a.m. Nov. 7. Review from page 1 His move to amend the motion to include a performance bond died for lack of a second. A jellybean-sized capsule of radioactive material dislodged from testing equipment at Kerr-McGee chemical plant Jan. 8, causing evacuation of some 20 workers. An employee of Eagle Intermountain Testing was exposed to a dose of gamma rays, which officials determined to be within "acceptable limits." Telephone equipment at city hall malfunctioned Jan. 10. The 911 emergency number for police, fire and medical personnel was unavailable forjnore than an hour. People calling in to any number at city hall either received a busy signal or heard the phone ring with no answer. Those in city hall were unable to call out. On Jan. 14 the city council received a comprehensive budget with a five-year forecast from finance director Steven Hanson. Theiirst such detailed budget ever completed for the city revealed a franchise tax the city pays itself for use of utilities. • : At their Jan. 21 meeting, the council approved adding 20 employees to city staff. The positions were mostly in public safety departments, including seven new police officers. On Jan. 28 the city council ended legal battles when the voted unanimously to purchase nearly 100 acres in the Camarlo Valley Neighborhood. In the summer of 1985 Preferred Equities won a $366,525 judgment against the city for their refusal to approve a tentative map to put fourplexea on the property. The dty bought the land to prevent such units from being built and with the intent to change the zoning there. Kelly Danielson, 27, of Henderson died Jan. 31 in a boating accident below Hoover Dam on the Colorado River. His body was found the following day in 32 feet of water near Ringbolt Rapids. Also in January, former Henderson resident Mel Hume of Lompoc, CaUf., rode on horseback through Henderson on a ride to New York to raise money for the Statue of Liberty restoration project. The Henderson Chamber of Commerce announced the theme for the 1986 Industrial Days would be "Henderson Salutes Miss Liberty." Industrial Days was scheduled to run April 12-20. February Police surrounded the Henderson District Public Library for more than an hour Feb. 4 after a patron was threatened with a gun. The still unknown suspect labelled the "pistol-packing potty pervert" hid under the floor of the library and pointed a gun at a man sitting on the toilet. No one was injured and the library was evacuated for more than an hour. Dozens of preschool children had their storyhour interrupted. United States Congressman Harry Reid ended a state-wide tour announcing his candidacy for the United States Senate with a reception and party at the Henderson Convention Center Feb. 14. On Feb. 18 Robert Broadbent, a Nevadan serving as the United States Department of Interior Assistant Secretary for Water and Science, was appointed director of McCarron International Airport by the Clark County Commission. Police arrested two Henderson men Feb. 22 for conspiracy to manufacture and distribute methamphetamine (speed). Robert Fausto, 25, and James Michael Turner, 30, were arrested after police served a search warrant on a van used as a mobile drug lab. A 14-year-old runaway girl was also taken into custody. Also in February, Basic High School senior Frank Zimmerman was nominated to the West Point Military Academy where he planp^ • "ntdv
PAGE 3

Thundiky, January 1,1987 Page X Henderson Home Newt, Headerion, Nevada Thnniday, January 1, 1987 Hendcrion Homt Nawi, Handaraan, Navada Faga I St. Rose de Lima names Coats CEO KestersoM appointed to NDA group David Coats has been named the ditionally. he hu been Uw direc• V^ ^ 1^ David Coots has been named the BOW president and chief executive officer at St. Roee de Lima Hoapital in Henderson according to hoapital board chairman Lou LaPortt. "David brings extensive health care management and experience to St. Rose," said LaPorta. Coats, who. has a Masters De-' gree in Health Services Adminiatrttion, will assume his duties at the hospital oh Jan. 19. Prior to coming to St. Rose de Lima, Coats served in the Mercy Health Care Organisation of CaUfomia as the administrator of Mercy Modac Medical Center. AdHospltal schedules volunteer orientation ditionally, he has been the direc tor of operations and corporate projects director within the Mercy CaUfomis system. Other hospital experience Coats brings to St. Rose de Linui includes serving as director of business services at several CaUfomia hospitals including Rideout Memorial Hospital in Marysville, Childrens Hospital Medical Center in Oakland and San Jose Hospital and Health Center in San Joee. Coats also was the director of data processing at Jdhn Muir Memorial Hospital in Wakut Creole, Calif. He and his wife Annette have two children. Orientation for prospective volunteers 18 and older will be held :at St. Roee de Lima Hospital Wednesday, Jan. 7 from 9 a.m. _untLl noon in conference room I "according to director of volunteer services Sister Noreen McKeough. Although the hospital needs vol.jmteers with all types of skills. especially needed, are those with some clerical background and those wanting to work with the Lifeline program. For more information about the meeting or the volunteer program, contact Sister Noreen at 564-2622 extension 119 between 9 a.m and 3 p.m. Ilrowth from page 1 :: Railroad Pass added a new ;tive story hotel addition as part :vt an ovorall remodelling effort. ^: On the downside... r: Not all the news was good, however. There .was a notable kck of response to a letter sent by dty officials to various hotel companies soliciting interest in :i civic center hotel. '.', Developer Chris Paimos stirTed up discussion on the subject with his proposal to build II hotel next to the convention center, but hopes faded when Pannos failed to supply an adequate financial statement to the city. Another snag in the deal was indecision by city leaders over whether or not to pass a resolution concerning the lease or sale of the hotel site. Some city leaders and staff members said no resolution could be passed until a concrete proposal was in hand, while others sided with Pannos, who claimed he could do no more without a resolution. The Pannos proposal seems to have come to a dead end. City Hall sources, however, say that a couple of hotel companies are monitoring the tangle between the city and the Henderson District Public Library over the library that will share the civic center site. In the primary election, Henderson residents voted down a bond proposal to fund ttie Boulder Highway beautification effort. It lost by a slim, 99-vote margin, and supporters say the failure resulted at least in part because the project was marketed solely as a beautification effort, with little emphasis on its functional aspects, such as flood control. They are working to get it back on a ballot in 1987. Looking ahead City officials are predicting another explosive year in 1987. Several seeds planted in 1986 will come to full bloom. The long-awaited Lake at Las Vegas project appears to gathering steam. Developers say they will begin construction in February, though they also predicted progress last February. By most accounts, however, the latest assertions have more substance. City manager Gary Bloomquist pointed out that the developers have hired an expensive consultant, a move interpreted by some as an indication of forward movement. Old Vegas, sold recently to local developer Maurice Threinen, is scheduled to open its doors again in March. A Threinen representative has said they will stick with the Old West theme of the park, but Chamber of Commerce director Johnson said he expects them to do things differently. "They'll have to try some new things," he said. 'It's obvious the old things don't work." City officials have high hopes for the Sky Harbor Airport master plan and have applied for federal funding to complete the plan. An improved Sky Harbor, along with a local improvement district that would bring utihties to the area, might stimulate development in what city manager Gary Bloomquist has called "some of the prime industrial land in the valley." The p:t)wth isn't all industrial, however. A pair of major residential developments are creeping closer to reality. One of them is American Nevada Corp.'s River Run project, a 567-acre proposed village south of the Union Pacific railroad tracks. The other is local developer Rich McDonald's ambitious McDonald Ranch, which is currently slated for more than 3,000 acres south of Lakis Mead Drive. McDonald has several items before the Henderson Planning Conmiiaaion's next meeting concerning the proposal. IEN0ERS0N~<~~s==; IHOMENEWSI :sa AD Independent Newspaper Founded June 1,1951 PobUshad avery TuMdoy oad Thnraday moraiBg at 22 Watw StTMt. HMknoa, Navada, 88015 plioaa S64-1881. I MIKE O'CALLAQHAN CAROLYN O'CALLAQHAN Co-PnUtohw JOHN DAILEY MoMgiag Editor HAG. PabUoatteaa Mlln O'CaUafkoa, PriiidMt; Cotoiya O'CaUogkaa. Vie* PMldMt: Tbi O'Callackaa. Vlea Proaldaat; Hatha DoaUa. ; Bate Mofgaa, Traaaanr. SahacripUaa ratoa 8iik 2SeMU OM7W SIS teaBMMks...l7 MaU aabaeriptioaa Wwt of Miaaiaaippi S20 par yaar 116 for oU OKtatha East of Miaoioaipd t24 par year So far rix aaatka Clark County Comndssioner Thalia Dondero was recently elected chairman and Henderson Mayor Loma Kesterson was elected vice chairman for Nevada Development Authority's new Interagency Coordinating Conunittee. The conmiittee is comprised of 13 elected officials and volunteer leaders representing both public and private economic development entities within Las Vegas, North Las Vegas, Henderson, Boulder City, Clark County, including all Southern Nevada Chambers of Commerce; and Valley Bank of Nevada and Stunma Corporation, Its purpose is to reduce dupUcation of effort and expenditures on behalf of communities working to attract new business and industry to the area. "We see the formation of this new Committee as a great boon," states, Dondero. 'The Interagency Coordinating Committee will direct its efforts to equal representation of all participants. We expect to be politically active, lobbying for the collective interests of Southern Nevada Communities in the months ahead. Additionally, it will take a close look at funding allocated on a statewide basis for economic development to see that money is put to good use and benefits the entire group. The Unes of communication are, wide open and our spirit of cooperation is high," Dondero adds. Both Kesterson and Dondero, in their new expanded capacities, are voting members of Nevada Development Authority's executive board. Library from page 1 On Oct. 15 the library board voted to lower the elevation of the library by nine feet to avoid costs including retaining walls and landscaping. A week later the board rescinded that vote after hearing from project architects and city officials. State Librarian Joan Kerschner had helped draft the interlocal agreement, which was signed Sept. 4, 1986. The interlocal agreement specifically stated that '^n addition to the two buildings the' project includes all the necessary on-site parking for each building, landscaping, a joint plaza area, and a jointly operated and maintained heating and cooling system." Current plans During library board meetings trustees have said they need to renegotiate their lease with the city before continuing their project. In the meantime, they already began soliciting bids from architects. In a legal notice run in the Dec. 16 issue of the Henderson Home News the library stated, "This new building is expected to be more than 12,000 square feet and at least one story in height." Henderson city manager Gary Bloomquist remarked Monday, "They don't have a lease if they make significant changes without coming back and asking for legal revisions to the lease." He added, "People should not be playing word games vrith it. 18,000 square feet more or less is something near 18,000 square feet. The intent was ;8,000 square feet." After receiving no official action or requests from the library board the Henderson City Council put an item on their agenda for their Dec. 16 meeting. Bloomquist informed the board and requested they be represented. Dming their Dec. 10 meeting the library board noted they would be represented by their attorney and also indicated at least one member would represent them at the council meeting. However, the council tabled any discussion when nobody from the library board appeared at the meeting. Board chairman Rosa Herwick mentioned later they did not attend because the council's agenda was not specific and they did know know the council was planning to make any decisions. Members of the city council did speak with library board trustees in two separate meetings Monday evening. Herwick noted she and board member Leonard Smith met with Councihnen Ron Hubel and Michael Harris, and board members Dorothy Coroneos and Patricia Geuder met with Mayor Lorna Kesterson and Councihnan Carlton Lawrence. "We're talking, nothing's been particularly accomplished at this point," she mentioned Tuesday. She said they are trying to work things out. Herwick mentioned she thinks both sides came to understand the other better. Arcliitect's response In December architect Dennis Rusk officially requested the library board to rescind their recent actions and allow him to complete his contract with them. He has also challenged the validity of the board's complaint to the State Board of Archtiecture and questioned the legitimacy of minutes kept by the library board. In particular. Rusk claims library minutes do not coincide with people's memories of the meetings. His attorney wrote to the attorney general's office that they have "documentation showing that some of the action which they did allegedly take was never discussed dur-. ing the open meetings." The AG's office is currently investigating a Home News inquiry regarding a possible violation of the state's Open Meeting Law by the library board involving a meeting allegedly held 7 a.m. Nov. 7. Review from page 1 His move to amend the motion to include a performance bond died for lack of a second. A jellybean-sized capsule of radioactive material dislodged from testing equipment at Kerr-McGee chemical plant Jan. 8, causing evacuation of some 20 workers. An employee of Eagle Intermountain Testing was exposed to a dose of gamma rays, which officials determined to be within "acceptable limits." Telephone equipment at city hall malfunctioned Jan. 10. The 911 emergency number for police, fire and medical personnel was unavailable forjnore than an hour. People calling in to any number at city hall either received a busy signal or heard the phone ring with no answer. Those in city hall were unable to call out. On Jan. 14 the city council received a comprehensive budget with a five-year forecast from finance director Steven Hanson. Theiirst such detailed budget ever completed for the city revealed a franchise tax the city pays itself for use of utilities. • : At their Jan. 21 meeting, the council approved adding 20 employees to city staff. The positions were mostly in public safety departments, including seven new police officers. On Jan. 28 the city council ended legal battles when the voted unanimously to purchase nearly 100 acres in the Camarlo Valley Neighborhood. In the summer of 1985 Preferred Equities won a $366,525 judgment against the city for their refusal to approve a tentative map to put fourplexea on the property. The dty bought the land to prevent such units from being built and with the intent to change the zoning there. Kelly Danielson, 27, of Henderson died Jan. 31 in a boating accident below Hoover Dam on the Colorado River. His body was found the following day in 32 feet of water near Ringbolt Rapids. Also in January, former Henderson resident Mel Hume of Lompoc, CaUf., rode on horseback through Henderson on a ride to New York to raise money for the Statue of Liberty restoration project. The Henderson Chamber of Commerce announced the theme for the 1986 Industrial Days would be "Henderson Salutes Miss Liberty." Industrial Days was scheduled to run April 12-20. February Police surrounded the Henderson District Public Library for more than an hour Feb. 4 after a patron was threatened with a gun. The still unknown suspect labelled the "pistol-packing potty pervert" hid under the floor of the library and pointed a gun at a man sitting on the toilet. No one was injured and the library was evacuated for more than an hour. Dozens of preschool children had their storyhour interrupted. United States Congressman Harry Reid ended a state-wide tour announcing his candidacy for the United States Senate with a reception and party at the Henderson Convention Center Feb. 14. On Feb. 18 Robert Broadbent, a Nevadan serving as the United States Department of Interior Assistant Secretary for Water and Science, was appointed director of McCarron International Airport by the Clark County Commission. Police arrested two Henderson men Feb. 22 for conspiracy to manufacture and distribute methamphetamine (speed). Robert Fausto, 25, and James Michael Turner, 30, were arrested after police served a search warrant on a van used as a mobile drug lab. A 14-year-old runaway girl was also taken into custody. Also in February, Basic High School senior Frank Zimmerman was nominated to the West Point Military Academy where he planp^ • "ntdv
PAGE 4

• • • • • • w ei' Yieuipeinl Page 4 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada I .HENDERSON MMMI MDusrwM crwrr* [H0I\/IE NEl/lfS ^wmtm^ mt>^wi mr*m tm COmmymTr $ mwtPM^H i% 2t mmm* *t uamt MIKE O'CALLAGHAN Publisher PAROLYN O'CALLAGHAN Co-PublUher Thursday, January 1, 1987 Support sober driving A bad case of cynicism T y;-i^.. ...;'Happy New Year. For moat of us, today will be a happy occasion. It's the beginning of a new year. Many will take this time to vow to do things differently in 1987. Such vows are conmionly called New Year's Resolutions. There will be those who are not as fortunate as most of us. For some, the day will dawn in agony and misery; for others, it will not dawn at all. We're speaking of those who were involved in traffic accidents over the holiday period. The news reports this morning will rather coldly present statistics on the numbers of persons injured or killed in accidents on New Year's Eve. It's safe to say that alcohol will be related as a contributing factor in the majority of incidents reported. When will we have had enough? It's true th^l|uch organizations as Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) and Students Against Drunk Driving (SADD) have raised the level of pubhc consciousness concerning the problem. Overall, flgures indicate that deaths due to driving under the influence are down this year. Are we fmally beginning to come to our senses? Are we finally reaUzing that the jovial drunk behind the wheel is no longer the life of the party? Perhaps we are at last beginning to admit that there is a problem with those who drink and drive. Perhaps-rbut it will need constant reinforcement if it is to be a success. Teenagers lead the Held in traffic deaths and injuries caused by alcohol. The popular Friday night kegger parties in the desert do nothing to teach responsibiUty. Even worse eu-e the parents who allow such kegger parties in their homes. While their own child may not have to drive home, the others do. Such parties give teenagers the tacit signal that it's O.K. to drink and drivejust don't have an accident. Poppycpck! There isn't a drunk on the road that wishes to have an accident. Many do make it home in safety. The true figures would probably amaze most of us. But it's a numbers game and for some, the numbers run out. The result is tragedy for not only the driver and family but for victims and their families as well. Nevada can be proud of its tough drunk driving laws. The slap on the wrist punishment is now largely a thing of the past here. Those who play alcohol roulette must be prepared to pay the price if detected. Some say the present law is too tough. They argue that those who are arrested for drinking and driving without causing an accident shouldn't be so severely punished. Again, poppycock. ^._-i What would th^ey recommend to make believers out of those who tempted cruel fate and fortunately escaped? As for New Year's resolutions, we would recommend a vow to support the drive against drinking drivers aU year long. Experience shows it can bring good results. ~"" by Richard Cohen Washington—On April 14, U.S. warplanes bombed Libya, killing 37 persons, among th^m a 15-month-oId girl named Hana, reportedly Moammar Gadhafi's adopted daughter. The attack was in reprisal for the bombing days earlier of a West German discotheque frequented by U.S. servicemen. One was killed. — Following the disco bombing, Bob Woodward of the Washington Post reported what the President had alluded to: The United States had intercepted messages from the Libyan Embassy in East Germany telling Libyan authorities that they "will be very happy when you see the headUnes tommorrow." Case closed. But is it? At the time, President Reagan seemed to personify the American rage at Gadhafi. The Libyan leader had exulted in the deaths of innocents in massacres at the Rome and Vienna airports and had reportedly financed several terrorist operations. The administration's case seemed convincing and its reprisal, really an act of war, seemed above moral reproach. Few quibbled when the President called Gadhafi the "mad dog of Uie Middle East." Since the spring, though, much .has changed. Libya, no matter what its sins, seems abnost inconsequential compared to the real thugs of the Middle East. In two separate trails—one in London, the other in West BerUn—Syria was imphcated in two terrorist incidents. The first was the attempt to place a bomb on an El Al plane heading to Israel by way of London. The second was the bombing of the German-Arab Friendship Society in Berlin that injured 14 persons. No mention of Libya was made at either trial. The American people now know, also, that some of the case against Libya consisted of "disinformation" leaked by the administration and unwittingly pubUshed by the press. We know, too, that it was not Libya that controlled the fate of American hostages in Lebanon, but Iran. We were also told in a report by.the Miami Herald, that U.S. officials held Iran responsible for the bombing of both the Marine barracks and the U.S. Embassy in Beirut. In both incidents, the loss of hfe was horrendous. Cynicism is the rust of democracy. One of the truly awfiil impUcations of the current Iran/contra scandal is that we can Sound, honest work in government not exception by Guy Shipler The end of every year brings an end to eras as well. The most visible ending eras are those in government. They usually stop at the request of voters who, for one of a number of reasons, have decided ^not always gentiy) on a fateful November Tuesday that it's time for a change. For most defeated elected officials that change takes place in conjunction with the new year. A mere handful of poUticians can service the electorate's unnerving change of mood and serve for as long as they want. In fact, those who can decide voluntarily to hang it up are so few in number that they could form a club which would be notable for being among the most exclusive of all. And if such a club were formed for Nevada's elected officials who decided to call it quits, its president should be WiUiam Swackhamer. For the retiring secretary of state has been a pubUc servant for Nevada for 40 years—a period of time which is one for the record books in anybody's poUtical diary. But it started almost by accident. Young Bill Swackhamer grew up in Battie Mountain, where his family owned and operated a grocery store. "My father was a well-known, wellliked and well-respected citizen," he said in an interview the other day. "So when Ihe leader of the local Democratic Party asked me to be a candidate for the state assembly in 1946, I figured it was because of my father, not me. And when I got elected," he added with a chuckle," I felt that my assumption had been correct." Still, since he managed to convince the voters in his area to keep him in the assembly for the next quarter of a century, it couldn't have been entirely due to the reputation qf his father. Moreover, in Canon City Swackhamer became an increasingly influential political force, not only for his constituency but for the state as a whole. Hia Assembly colleagues in both parties respected his legislative abilities and his fair approach to the increasingly difficult problems that arose with the state's growth during the years of his service. And his own party twice elected him speaker of the Anembly, a post he held for two regular and three special sessions of the Legislature. It became clear that only something beyond the control of anybody would finally defeat Bill Swackhamer. That something turned out to be the wrenching impact of reapportionment. As a result of the change in the size and scope of his district, he lost his bid for reelection in the 1972 election. But for Swack, that was just the end of one era. Another began the next year when Governor Mike O'Callaghan appointed him to fill the job of secretary of state, vacated by the retirement of another longtime Democratic record-holder, John Koontz. Since that is an elective office, Swack had to run statewide in the next election. He didn't have his father^ reputation to help him, but it was hardly necessary. His own reputation as a distinguished public servant had become so strong throughout Nevada that neither reapportionment nor poUtical opposition could stay him. Not only did he never again taste defeat; he always won big. As a matter of fact, in 1974 he had a larger plurahty than any other elected official—including Nevada's popular governor, Mike O'Callaghan. He won by the same kind of formidable landshdes the next two times around. The most encouraging thing about these victories lies in the fact that they came about as a result of sound, honest work rather than the kinds>€^f show-biz personality glamor so effective in the case of Ronald Reagan. Surely there's nothing wrong with the latter, especially since it works like the charm it inherentiy is. But sometimes that bright light overshadows the substance, and the average person may be unaware of the great value a dedicated political figure has to his constituency. More than praise for politicians we hear derision, contempt, and charges that all they do is feed at the pubhc trough. And so when a man like William Swackhamer sets the kinds of records he has for honesty, hard work, knowledge of government and contributions to the common weal, we say that he's the exception. We complain that Swack represents and endangered species in politics, that others in government with such qualities don't exist in enough numbers to count. Wrong. We think that way because most good people, as Swack has done, rely on their competency and have not time or inclination to become exhibitionists. We don't see much from those who quietly try to do their job, so we don't know that such exist, and mentally write off all politicians as deadbeats. But the fact is that most who get into the unrewarding field of government are anything but deadbeats. They may not attain the prominence or acheive as much as Swack, but they deserve far more credit than they ever get. Being of them, so does Swack. not beUeve our own government. The list of lies—and they are that—is getting longer and longer, and foremost among them was the repeated declaration that the United States would never pay ransom for hostages. We did just that and did it repeatedly. Another lie was that if the United States possessed hard information that other countries were engaged in terrorism, they would get a dose of what Libya got. "We have made it plain that if we have the same kind of irrefutable evidence with regard to other countries, they'll be subject to the same treatment," the President said on May 7. The information Unking Iran to the kidnappers of American hostages'was so irrefutable that we tra4ed arms for their release. When it comes to information—irrefutable or otherwise—I have none to contradict what the President said following the bombing of Libya. But as one who approved of that raid, I have the sinking feeUng that I was in some sense taken—that the administration arbitrarily substituted Libya for Iran when, • foUowing the hijacking of a TWA flight to Beirut, it realized that Tehran and not Tripoli was the real paymaster of Middle East terrorists. Maybe we bombed Libya because it, almost alone among terrorist nations, was not holding American hostages. Or maybe Gadhafi lost a daughter because we were attempting to send a message not tb him—but to the AyatoUah: In violation of our own laws, we might try to assassinate a foreign lead(er. I don't know. I do know that I no longer have the confidence in our government I once had. And I have to tell you that I had to ask Woodward, an extremely careful and savvy reporter, if his story about the BerUn to TripoU intercepts was not itself the rotten fruit of a disinformation campaign. He did not think so. He said he had confidence in his sources, but acknowledged that the Iran disclosures had to raise some doubts. No ore has the same confidence in administration statements they once had. Cynicism—not any foreign-poUcy setback—may well be the worst consequence of the current scandal. By playing cute with the American people, by saying one thing and doing another and by using "disinformation," the Reagan administration has weakened the fiber of the very democracy it was trying to protect. On April 14, the United States kiUed a child named Hana. Once I thought the bombing that caused her death was justified. Now I am not so sure. Are you? Second-hand smoice Good reasons to tighten restrictions on smoking to protect nonsmokers have been marshaled in th^||nnual smoking report of Surgeon General C. Everett Koop. For the first time since smoking was made an issue by a surgeon general in 1964, the new report focuses on the effect of passive smoke on non-smokers. The f indings*which are supported by extensive scientific research, are appalling. The National Academy of Sciences estimates that 2,400 new cases of lung cancer each year among nonsmokers can be attributed to environmental smoke—a greater number than aU the new cancer cases that can be attributed to other dangerous pollutants in the general environment, Koop reported. The report also confirmed an earUer finding of the National Academy of Sciences that there is an elevated risk of respiratory infections among children Uving in a home where tobacco smoke is present. "It is now clear that disease risk due to inhalation of tobacco smoke is not solely Umiled to the individual Who is smoking, but can also extend to those individuals who inhale tobacco smoke in room air," Koop said. "Involimtary smoking can cause lung cancer in nonsmokers." Worse, the research has found that many carcinogens and toxins are present in greater quantities in so-called "sidestream" smoke from a burning cigarette than in the "mainstream" smoke that is actuaUy inhaled by the smoker. The report confirms the wisdom of regulations already in effect to protect nonsmokers, but also demonstrates the inadequacy of many existing protections. "I'd like bans wherever bans are possible," Koop said, and he is right. There are three obvious areas for priority attention. All smoking should be prohibited from: —Enclosed pubUc places, including maUs, lobbies, corridors, shops, terminals, bars and restaurants, unless the separation of smokers assures a completely smoke-free area for nonsmokers. —Work places where it is not possible in any other way to assure a smoke-free environment for nonsmokers. —Commercial airplanes and buses, because it has already been demonstrated that mere segregation of smoking passengers does not adequately protect nonsmokers. Notwithstanding the fact that 11 of 13 recent studies of the dangers of tobacco smoke showed the risk also to be shared by nonsmokers, the Tobacco Institute dismissed the surgeon generals findings as lacking a scientific basis. That sort of posturing is persuading fewer and fewer Americans, who appear more impressed by the statistics; 300,000 amoking-related deaths each year, 15 percent of the total deaths ill the nation. Loe Aageles limes Your Yieui Thursday, January 1, 1987 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Page 5 VFW honors seniors Editor On Friday, Dec. 26, the VFW Post 3848 in Henderson wished local seniors a warm hoUday by sponsoring "Senior Citizen Day." In honor of the seniors, the post held a shrimp dinner with all the trimmings. There was no charge for the feast which was followed by dancing to the accompaniment of the "Sensational Memrys Easy Listenin' Country Music Band." The event was brought to Ufe by the VFW Post .3848 who wished to express their sincere appreciation to the entire community of Henderson for their generous support which had been shown throughout 1986. Mike Scarpelli Editors note: The Home News would like to take this opportunity to apologize to the members of Post 3848 and to the senior citizens who missed the event. The release sent in was misplaced and was not printed. Truth is an American weapon Good deed penalized Dear Editor Happy holidays to me: This morning, Dec. 20,1986, I took an elderly lady, who is in her late seventies, to the airport to fly to Reno so she could spend the hoUdays with relatives. She told me which airline, at which we arrived, going inside only to discover it wasn't the one her ticket was for. So we loaded up and away to the right one. We arrived at 11:22 her plane is to leave at 11:30. There are no checkers outside to receive her, the only people, are two poUceman standing near, so I carry her suitcases inside, then show her the escalator. I returned to my vehicle at 11:28 only to find a $20 parking ticket which was written at 11:25. Has chivalry and the act of the "Good Samaritan," become illegal? Leon Bell by Cal Thomas The Reagan administration shot itself in the mouth when it tried to explain that a Ue by another name is no he at all. ~^ The administration appeared to be getting off the hook by persuading the public that a proposal to launch a disinformation program campaign through the press against Libya's Muammar Quaddafi was merely the suggestion of a low-level operative. But then it made the mistake of trying to justify the idea of using the press to spead untruths, even while denying it had done so. First, Secretary of State George Shultz appeared to confirm press reports that the administration had tried to unsettle Col. Quaddafi, even to the point of creating a cUmate for a miUtary coup, by pL nting false accounts of planned terrorists acts and a possible U.S. miUtary response. While Shultz said he knew of no decision to Ue to the press—a reassuring statement—he went on to say, "I think that if there are ways in which we can make Quaddafi nervous, why shouldn't we? That is not deceiving you, but using your predictable tendencies to report things that we try to keep secret, so we'U label it a big secret and you'U find out about it and you'll report it." Send us your views A later and not so noble stretching of the truth occurred during the Vie^am War. In 1971, the Nixon administration, in the Pentagon Papers case, went to court in an attempt to block pubUcation by The New York Times and The Washington Post of government documents which, among other things, proved the American people had on more than one occasion been deceived by their own government concerning-the conduct of the war. In his opinion concurring with the Supreme Court majority that freed the newspapers to pubhsh the documents. Justice Hugo Black said, "Only a free and unrestrained press can effectively expose deception in government. And paramount among the responsibiUties of a free press is the duty to prevent any part of the government from deceiving the people ..." The sometimes arrogant press occasionaUy deserves a comeuppance that forces it to drink from the weU of humility, but not in this case. At stake here is the credibiUty of both the press and government. Consider this. The omsbudsman for The Washington Post, in writing about this incident, reported that the newspaper received more complaints for challenging the government with the story about deception than it did for having been guUible in the first place. Truth has always been America's greatest weapon, and honor her strongest shield. Attempts to get Col. Quaddafi manipulating the press is the stuff of the Third Reich and the Soviet Union. Rotten as Col. Quaddafi is, a disinformation campaign only makes us smeU like him. It isn't worth it. (Cal Thomas is a nationaUy syndicated columnist. This article, which appeared in The Washington Times, was distributed by the Washington First Amendment Center of the Sigma Delta Chi Foundation.) He needs room to clean up the foreign-policy mess he made Don't shackle the President by Bruce Babbitt With its usual sense of theater, Washington has set the stage for a riveting national drama. Heroes and vilUans have been cast and their scripts made ready, even as the curtains rise on the first of a long succession of hearings. This prolonged self-flageUation may turn out to be almost as damaging to the national interest as the remarkable events that brought it on. The Iran-contra story has what insiders call "legs"—the incremental disclosures could well go on for months, demor^zing our aUies and detracting from the President's capacity to govern. Tp what end? The main point of the exercise, so far as Congress is concerned, cannot be the discovery and punishment of crime. We wiU have an independent counsel for that. The congressional agenda appears instead to be a reassertion of legislative primacy in the conduct of foreign-affairs; Some want to subject the President's national-security adviser to congressional confirmation. Others want new disclosure laws or a larger congressional role in foreign initiatives. These are not, I submit, appropriate answers to our troubles. We do "not need new shackles on the presidency. Compared to any Western Equivalent, it is shackled quite enough. And no new Umitation can prevent a President from getting into mischief; it can only weaken his conduct of government, for good or ill. What we do need is a clear vision of what we stand for in the world. Only the President can provide it. One thing that we stood for, or so we thought, was an unyielding refusal to compromise with hostage-takers. It turns out that this was too good to be true. We must make it true again. As Americans, we must accept a difficult reaUty. There are times when the national interest is undermined by the compassionate instinct to spring hostages at any price. It happened in the case of Nicholas Danilof f, used by the Soviets to stampede an unprepared President into a premature summit that broke up in confusion and acrimony. It has now happened again in the case of Americans held hostage in Lebanon by forces sympathetic to Iran. Henceforth the head must rule the heart. No matter how much we feel for our hostages, we must be prepared to wait out their tormentors. If we take this pledge seriously, as we must, some of the hostages may not be coming back. The alternative is always worse. Ransom may free one hostage, but it invariably buys another. • — ^_ ..i^^.,— Passive resistance need not be another option. We are hardly helpless. If the President beUeves that Iran controls the fate of our hostages, and his payment of ransom answers that, he should instruct his national-security staff to make a Ust of things that we could do to harm Iran. The President should select from the list, and should act. Then he should teU Iran, quietly and through back channels, that the pain wiU stop when our hostages come home. This could begin with the President canceling the scheduled repatriation of $485 miUion in Iranian assets seized in the wake of the 1980 hostage affair. Without action, that money wiU be in the ayatollah's hands by the end of next week. The other real issue is the progresive breakdown of our foreign-poUcy machinery. How is it that a willful Uttie band of adventurers could have bypassed the entire foreign-affairs team, the secretary of state, the secretary of defense, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff? There are many other recent examples of breakdown and paralysis. In the aftermath of the Iceland summit meeting, warring factions in the Pentagon and the State Department have brought arms-control poUcy to gridlock. The Atlantic alliance is now under attack by Europeon leftists, exploiting uncertainties created by the President's casual proposal to withdraw our nuclear deterrent from that continent. Closer to home, Mexico, caught in a downward spiral of debt and depression, is ignored by aU save troublemakers like Sen. Jesse Helms. There is Uttle prospect that the President himself wiU ever take direct charge of foreign poUcy, nor would it necessarily be a good thing if he were to do so. But only the President can estabUsh clear Unes of direction and responsibiUty. Someone must speak definitively throughout the world for the United States. It matters Uttle whether that person is in the White House basement, in Foggy Bottom or elsewhere. That is the President's choice. What matters is that someone speak and act with authority. None of this suggests that Congress is equipped to draw the Unes or to run the President's foreign policy for him. The President, by act or omission, has created this mess. It is for the President to clean it up. For far more than his own sake, we must aU hope that he succeeds. The innocent also go to trial by Nat Hentoff Special to the News Editors'Note: Nat Hentoff writes a nationally syndicated column, "Sweet Land of Liberty," which deals primarily with First Amendment issues. This article was distributed hy the First Amendment Center of the Society of Professional Journalists. The presumption of innocence, rumored to be the cornerstone of our system of justice, is actually as hard to find as a manual typewriter. Before trial, and sometime even before an indictment, prosecutors orchestrate press conferences at which the defendant's alleged crimes are so vividly detailed that he appears already to be on the way to the slammer. For instance, Rudolph Giuliani, the triumphant U.S. attorney for the southern district of New York, called in the eager press one day to announce the indictments of a number of alleged chief executive officers of La Cosa Nostra, his performance was so dramaticaUy compelling, a sardonic defense attorney later told him that "the theme music from The Godfather' kept coming into my head as you were speaking." Throughout the country, many prosecutors also put defendants through what is called in the trade a "prep walk." The prosecutor, again before trail, alerts television stations when to bring in their cameras to get to some "eyewitness shots" of the alleged malefactors. Und : such circumstances, even Mother Teresa would look extremely suspicious, especially if her hands were cuffed behind her back. A few prosecutors, however, insist on an extremly bare-bones approach to any pretrial pubUcity that comes out of their offices. There is Charles Hynes, for example. New York's special state prosecutor who investigates corruption throughout the criminal justice system. One of his current cases has greatly intrigued and angered may New Yorkers. It concerns charges that a sizeable number of poUce officers in a Brooklyn precinct stole and sold drugs, took bribes from drug dealers and did some other steaUng on the side. Hynes has held no press conferences on the case. Nor have there been any leaks to the press from Hynes' office. His staff knows that a leaker w;iU be both fired and prosecuted. The mayor of New York, Ed Koch, who once pubUcly called a close associate a crook before the latter was even indicted, has tried to cajole Hynes into joining him and the poUce commissioner for a press conference on the charges against the men in blue in Brooklyn. Hynes declined the honor. In an article in the New York Law Journal on Law Day, Hynes tried to explain his exotic ways: "On the basis of my many years' experience as a special state prosecutor, assistant district attorney and defense lawyer, I no longer beUeve that it is appropriate for a prosecutor to hold a pre^s conference to announce the arrest or indictment of an accused person if the presumption of innocence is to be protected... The only pubUc disclosure concerning an accused person wiU be the name, age and borough residence of such person, his or her occupation and the text or substance of the charges contained in the pubUcly filed indictment or other accusatory instrument." Moreoever, when a group of corrections officers was indicted not long ago, the spare, printed announcement from Hynes' office noted that an indictment is only a document that starts a criminal proceeding. It is not, he emphasized, evidence of guilt. Obviously, says Hynes, the press can plumb its own channels of information about the accused, but he figures that his responsibiUty is to not use the clout of his office to put more of a burden on the defendant than the facts of the case themselves. There was a time Hynes did hold press conferences; when, in the mid-1970s, he prosecuted a number of nursing-home operators on charges that shocked even New Yorkers. I asked him why he changed his mind. "I was in private practice afterwards," he said. "I defended a guy m New Jersey. He was the worst victim I'd seen of predudicial pretrial pubUcity. The prosecutor held prejudicial press conferences; and there were leaks from the grand jury to the press." The case involved alleged bribery, and was ^v;entually dismissed, but Hynes never forgot what all that pubUcity had done to his cUent. He pointed out recentiy that during one year in the New York City courts, 4,700 persons who had been indicted on fel(my counts were acquitted or had their cases dismissed. Hjmes asks about the effect on their reuputation "if their arrest or indicment has been highly pubUcized," but hardly as much attention, if any, is given to their walking free. The Claus von Bulows, he notes, get redemptive pubUcity, but lots of cleared defendants do not. Hynes, by the way, has an 80 percent conviction ratp after trial. • • [ • ^lU,Jl.iJljU, mm

PAGE 5

• • • • • • w ei' Yieuipeinl Page 4 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada I .HENDERSON MMMI MDusrwM crwrr* [H0I\/IE NEl/lfS ^wmtm^ mt>^wi mr*m tm COmmymTr $ mwtPM^H i% 2t mmm* *t uamt MIKE O'CALLAGHAN Publisher PAROLYN O'CALLAGHAN Co-PublUher Thursday, January 1, 1987 Support sober driving A bad case of cynicism T y;-i^.. ...;'Happy New Year. For moat of us, today will be a happy occasion. It's the beginning of a new year. Many will take this time to vow to do things differently in 1987. Such vows are conmionly called New Year's Resolutions. There will be those who are not as fortunate as most of us. For some, the day will dawn in agony and misery; for others, it will not dawn at all. We're speaking of those who were involved in traffic accidents over the holiday period. The news reports this morning will rather coldly present statistics on the numbers of persons injured or killed in accidents on New Year's Eve. It's safe to say that alcohol will be related as a contributing factor in the majority of incidents reported. When will we have had enough? It's true th^l|uch organizations as Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) and Students Against Drunk Driving (SADD) have raised the level of pubhc consciousness concerning the problem. Overall, flgures indicate that deaths due to driving under the influence are down this year. Are we fmally beginning to come to our senses? Are we finally reaUzing that the jovial drunk behind the wheel is no longer the life of the party? Perhaps we are at last beginning to admit that there is a problem with those who drink and drive. Perhaps-rbut it will need constant reinforcement if it is to be a success. Teenagers lead the Held in traffic deaths and injuries caused by alcohol. The popular Friday night kegger parties in the desert do nothing to teach responsibiUty. Even worse eu-e the parents who allow such kegger parties in their homes. While their own child may not have to drive home, the others do. Such parties give teenagers the tacit signal that it's O.K. to drink and drivejust don't have an accident. Poppycpck! There isn't a drunk on the road that wishes to have an accident. Many do make it home in safety. The true figures would probably amaze most of us. But it's a numbers game and for some, the numbers run out. The result is tragedy for not only the driver and family but for victims and their families as well. Nevada can be proud of its tough drunk driving laws. The slap on the wrist punishment is now largely a thing of the past here. Those who play alcohol roulette must be prepared to pay the price if detected. Some say the present law is too tough. They argue that those who are arrested for drinking and driving without causing an accident shouldn't be so severely punished. Again, poppycock. ^._-i What would th^ey recommend to make believers out of those who tempted cruel fate and fortunately escaped? As for New Year's resolutions, we would recommend a vow to support the drive against drinking drivers aU year long. Experience shows it can bring good results. ~"" by Richard Cohen Washington—On April 14, U.S. warplanes bombed Libya, killing 37 persons, among th^m a 15-month-oId girl named Hana, reportedly Moammar Gadhafi's adopted daughter. The attack was in reprisal for the bombing days earlier of a West German discotheque frequented by U.S. servicemen. One was killed. — Following the disco bombing, Bob Woodward of the Washington Post reported what the President had alluded to: The United States had intercepted messages from the Libyan Embassy in East Germany telling Libyan authorities that they "will be very happy when you see the headUnes tommorrow." Case closed. But is it? At the time, President Reagan seemed to personify the American rage at Gadhafi. The Libyan leader had exulted in the deaths of innocents in massacres at the Rome and Vienna airports and had reportedly financed several terrorist operations. The administration's case seemed convincing and its reprisal, really an act of war, seemed above moral reproach. Few quibbled when the President called Gadhafi the "mad dog of Uie Middle East." Since the spring, though, much .has changed. Libya, no matter what its sins, seems abnost inconsequential compared to the real thugs of the Middle East. In two separate trails—one in London, the other in West BerUn—Syria was imphcated in two terrorist incidents. The first was the attempt to place a bomb on an El Al plane heading to Israel by way of London. The second was the bombing of the German-Arab Friendship Society in Berlin that injured 14 persons. No mention of Libya was made at either trial. The American people now know, also, that some of the case against Libya consisted of "disinformation" leaked by the administration and unwittingly pubUshed by the press. We know, too, that it was not Libya that controlled the fate of American hostages in Lebanon, but Iran. We were also told in a report by.the Miami Herald, that U.S. officials held Iran responsible for the bombing of both the Marine barracks and the U.S. Embassy in Beirut. In both incidents, the loss of hfe was horrendous. Cynicism is the rust of democracy. One of the truly awfiil impUcations of the current Iran/contra scandal is that we can Sound, honest work in government not exception by Guy Shipler The end of every year brings an end to eras as well. The most visible ending eras are those in government. They usually stop at the request of voters who, for one of a number of reasons, have decided ^not always gentiy) on a fateful November Tuesday that it's time for a change. For most defeated elected officials that change takes place in conjunction with the new year. A mere handful of poUticians can service the electorate's unnerving change of mood and serve for as long as they want. In fact, those who can decide voluntarily to hang it up are so few in number that they could form a club which would be notable for being among the most exclusive of all. And if such a club were formed for Nevada's elected officials who decided to call it quits, its president should be WiUiam Swackhamer. For the retiring secretary of state has been a pubUc servant for Nevada for 40 years—a period of time which is one for the record books in anybody's poUtical diary. But it started almost by accident. Young Bill Swackhamer grew up in Battie Mountain, where his family owned and operated a grocery store. "My father was a well-known, wellliked and well-respected citizen," he said in an interview the other day. "So when Ihe leader of the local Democratic Party asked me to be a candidate for the state assembly in 1946, I figured it was because of my father, not me. And when I got elected," he added with a chuckle," I felt that my assumption had been correct." Still, since he managed to convince the voters in his area to keep him in the assembly for the next quarter of a century, it couldn't have been entirely due to the reputation qf his father. Moreover, in Canon City Swackhamer became an increasingly influential political force, not only for his constituency but for the state as a whole. Hia Assembly colleagues in both parties respected his legislative abilities and his fair approach to the increasingly difficult problems that arose with the state's growth during the years of his service. And his own party twice elected him speaker of the Anembly, a post he held for two regular and three special sessions of the Legislature. It became clear that only something beyond the control of anybody would finally defeat Bill Swackhamer. That something turned out to be the wrenching impact of reapportionment. As a result of the change in the size and scope of his district, he lost his bid for reelection in the 1972 election. But for Swack, that was just the end of one era. Another began the next year when Governor Mike O'Callaghan appointed him to fill the job of secretary of state, vacated by the retirement of another longtime Democratic record-holder, John Koontz. Since that is an elective office, Swack had to run statewide in the next election. He didn't have his father^ reputation to help him, but it was hardly necessary. His own reputation as a distinguished public servant had become so strong throughout Nevada that neither reapportionment nor poUtical opposition could stay him. Not only did he never again taste defeat; he always won big. As a matter of fact, in 1974 he had a larger plurahty than any other elected official—including Nevada's popular governor, Mike O'Callaghan. He won by the same kind of formidable landshdes the next two times around. The most encouraging thing about these victories lies in the fact that they came about as a result of sound, honest work rather than the kinds>€^f show-biz personality glamor so effective in the case of Ronald Reagan. Surely there's nothing wrong with the latter, especially since it works like the charm it inherentiy is. But sometimes that bright light overshadows the substance, and the average person may be unaware of the great value a dedicated political figure has to his constituency. More than praise for politicians we hear derision, contempt, and charges that all they do is feed at the pubhc trough. And so when a man like William Swackhamer sets the kinds of records he has for honesty, hard work, knowledge of government and contributions to the common weal, we say that he's the exception. We complain that Swack represents and endangered species in politics, that others in government with such qualities don't exist in enough numbers to count. Wrong. We think that way because most good people, as Swack has done, rely on their competency and have not time or inclination to become exhibitionists. We don't see much from those who quietly try to do their job, so we don't know that such exist, and mentally write off all politicians as deadbeats. But the fact is that most who get into the unrewarding field of government are anything but deadbeats. They may not attain the prominence or acheive as much as Swack, but they deserve far more credit than they ever get. Being of them, so does Swack. not beUeve our own government. The list of lies—and they are that—is getting longer and longer, and foremost among them was the repeated declaration that the United States would never pay ransom for hostages. We did just that and did it repeatedly. Another lie was that if the United States possessed hard information that other countries were engaged in terrorism, they would get a dose of what Libya got. "We have made it plain that if we have the same kind of irrefutable evidence with regard to other countries, they'll be subject to the same treatment," the President said on May 7. The information Unking Iran to the kidnappers of American hostages'was so irrefutable that we tra4ed arms for their release. When it comes to information—irrefutable or otherwise—I have none to contradict what the President said following the bombing of Libya. But as one who approved of that raid, I have the sinking feeUng that I was in some sense taken—that the administration arbitrarily substituted Libya for Iran when, • foUowing the hijacking of a TWA flight to Beirut, it realized that Tehran and not Tripoli was the real paymaster of Middle East terrorists. Maybe we bombed Libya because it, almost alone among terrorist nations, was not holding American hostages. Or maybe Gadhafi lost a daughter because we were attempting to send a message not tb him—but to the AyatoUah: In violation of our own laws, we might try to assassinate a foreign lead(er. I don't know. I do know that I no longer have the confidence in our government I once had. And I have to tell you that I had to ask Woodward, an extremely careful and savvy reporter, if his story about the BerUn to TripoU intercepts was not itself the rotten fruit of a disinformation campaign. He did not think so. He said he had confidence in his sources, but acknowledged that the Iran disclosures had to raise some doubts. No ore has the same confidence in administration statements they once had. Cynicism—not any foreign-poUcy setback—may well be the worst consequence of the current scandal. By playing cute with the American people, by saying one thing and doing another and by using "disinformation," the Reagan administration has weakened the fiber of the very democracy it was trying to protect. On April 14, the United States kiUed a child named Hana. Once I thought the bombing that caused her death was justified. Now I am not so sure. Are you? Second-hand smoice Good reasons to tighten restrictions on smoking to protect nonsmokers have been marshaled in th^||nnual smoking report of Surgeon General C. Everett Koop. For the first time since smoking was made an issue by a surgeon general in 1964, the new report focuses on the effect of passive smoke on non-smokers. The f indings*which are supported by extensive scientific research, are appalling. The National Academy of Sciences estimates that 2,400 new cases of lung cancer each year among nonsmokers can be attributed to environmental smoke—a greater number than aU the new cancer cases that can be attributed to other dangerous pollutants in the general environment, Koop reported. The report also confirmed an earUer finding of the National Academy of Sciences that there is an elevated risk of respiratory infections among children Uving in a home where tobacco smoke is present. "It is now clear that disease risk due to inhalation of tobacco smoke is not solely Umiled to the individual Who is smoking, but can also extend to those individuals who inhale tobacco smoke in room air," Koop said. "Involimtary smoking can cause lung cancer in nonsmokers." Worse, the research has found that many carcinogens and toxins are present in greater quantities in so-called "sidestream" smoke from a burning cigarette than in the "mainstream" smoke that is actuaUy inhaled by the smoker. The report confirms the wisdom of regulations already in effect to protect nonsmokers, but also demonstrates the inadequacy of many existing protections. "I'd like bans wherever bans are possible," Koop said, and he is right. There are three obvious areas for priority attention. All smoking should be prohibited from: —Enclosed pubUc places, including maUs, lobbies, corridors, shops, terminals, bars and restaurants, unless the separation of smokers assures a completely smoke-free area for nonsmokers. —Work places where it is not possible in any other way to assure a smoke-free environment for nonsmokers. —Commercial airplanes and buses, because it has already been demonstrated that mere segregation of smoking passengers does not adequately protect nonsmokers. Notwithstanding the fact that 11 of 13 recent studies of the dangers of tobacco smoke showed the risk also to be shared by nonsmokers, the Tobacco Institute dismissed the surgeon generals findings as lacking a scientific basis. That sort of posturing is persuading fewer and fewer Americans, who appear more impressed by the statistics; 300,000 amoking-related deaths each year, 15 percent of the total deaths ill the nation. Loe Aageles limes Your Yieui Thursday, January 1, 1987 Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Page 5 VFW honors seniors Editor On Friday, Dec. 26, the VFW Post 3848 in Henderson wished local seniors a warm hoUday by sponsoring "Senior Citizen Day." In honor of the seniors, the post held a shrimp dinner with all the trimmings. There was no charge for the feast which was followed by dancing to the accompaniment of the "Sensational Memrys Easy Listenin' Country Music Band." The event was brought to Ufe by the VFW Post .3848 who wished to express their sincere appreciation to the entire community of Henderson for their generous support which had been shown throughout 1986. Mike Scarpelli Editors note: The Home News would like to take this opportunity to apologize to the members of Post 3848 and to the senior citizens who missed the event. The release sent in was misplaced and was not printed. Truth is an American weapon Good deed penalized Dear Editor Happy holidays to me: This morning, Dec. 20,1986, I took an elderly lady, who is in her late seventies, to the airport to fly to Reno so she could spend the hoUdays with relatives. She told me which airline, at which we arrived, going inside only to discover it wasn't the one her ticket was for. So we loaded up and away to the right one. We arrived at 11:22 her plane is to leave at 11:30. There are no checkers outside to receive her, the only people, are two poUceman standing near, so I carry her suitcases inside, then show her the escalator. I returned to my vehicle at 11:28 only to find a $20 parking ticket which was written at 11:25. Has chivalry and the act of the "Good Samaritan," become illegal? Leon Bell by Cal Thomas The Reagan administration shot itself in the mouth when it tried to explain that a Ue by another name is no he at all. ~^ The administration appeared to be getting off the hook by persuading the public that a proposal to launch a disinformation program campaign through the press against Libya's Muammar Quaddafi was merely the suggestion of a low-level operative. But then it made the mistake of trying to justify the idea of using the press to spead untruths, even while denying it had done so. First, Secretary of State George Shultz appeared to confirm press reports that the administration had tried to unsettle Col. Quaddafi, even to the point of creating a cUmate for a miUtary coup, by pL nting false accounts of planned terrorists acts and a possible U.S. miUtary response. While Shultz said he knew of no decision to Ue to the press—a reassuring statement—he went on to say, "I think that if there are ways in which we can make Quaddafi nervous, why shouldn't we? That is not deceiving you, but using your predictable tendencies to report things that we try to keep secret, so we'U label it a big secret and you'U find out about it and you'll report it." Send us your views A later and not so noble stretching of the truth occurred during the Vie^am War. In 1971, the Nixon administration, in the Pentagon Papers case, went to court in an attempt to block pubUcation by The New York Times and The Washington Post of government documents which, among other things, proved the American people had on more than one occasion been deceived by their own government concerning-the conduct of the war. In his opinion concurring with the Supreme Court majority that freed the newspapers to pubhsh the documents. Justice Hugo Black said, "Only a free and unrestrained press can effectively expose deception in government. And paramount among the responsibiUties of a free press is the duty to prevent any part of the government from deceiving the people ..." The sometimes arrogant press occasionaUy deserves a comeuppance that forces it to drink from the weU of humility, but not in this case. At stake here is the credibiUty of both the press and government. Consider this. The omsbudsman for The Washington Post, in writing about this incident, reported that the newspaper received more complaints for challenging the government with the story about deception than it did for having been guUible in the first place. Truth has always been America's greatest weapon, and honor her strongest shield. Attempts to get Col. Quaddafi manipulating the press is the stuff of the Third Reich and the Soviet Union. Rotten as Col. Quaddafi is, a disinformation campaign only makes us smeU like him. It isn't worth it. (Cal Thomas is a nationaUy syndicated columnist. This article, which appeared in The Washington Times, was distributed by the Washington First Amendment Center of the Sigma Delta Chi Foundation.) He needs room to clean up the foreign-policy mess he made Don't shackle the President by Bruce Babbitt With its usual sense of theater, Washington has set the stage for a riveting national drama. Heroes and vilUans have been cast and their scripts made ready, even as the curtains rise on the first of a long succession of hearings. This prolonged self-flageUation may turn out to be almost as damaging to the national interest as the remarkable events that brought it on. The Iran-contra story has what insiders call "legs"—the incremental disclosures could well go on for months, demor^zing our aUies and detracting from the President's capacity to govern. Tp what end? The main point of the exercise, so far as Congress is concerned, cannot be the discovery and punishment of crime. We wiU have an independent counsel for that. The congressional agenda appears instead to be a reassertion of legislative primacy in the conduct of foreign-affairs; Some want to subject the President's national-security adviser to congressional confirmation. Others want new disclosure laws or a larger congressional role in foreign initiatives. These are not, I submit, appropriate answers to our troubles. We do "not need new shackles on the presidency. Compared to any Western Equivalent, it is shackled quite enough. And no new Umitation can prevent a President from getting into mischief; it can only weaken his conduct of government, for good or ill. What we do need is a clear vision of what we stand for in the world. Only the President can provide it. One thing that we stood for, or so we thought, was an unyielding refusal to compromise with hostage-takers. It turns out that this was too good to be true. We must make it true again. As Americans, we must accept a difficult reaUty. There are times when the national interest is undermined by the compassionate instinct to spring hostages at any price. It happened in the case of Nicholas Danilof f, used by the Soviets to stampede an unprepared President into a premature summit that broke up in confusion and acrimony. It has now happened again in the case of Americans held hostage in Lebanon by forces sympathetic to Iran. Henceforth the head must rule the heart. No matter how much we feel for our hostages, we must be prepared to wait out their tormentors. If we take this pledge seriously, as we must, some of the hostages may not be coming back. The alternative is always worse. Ransom may free one hostage, but it invariably buys another. • — ^_ ..i^^.,— Passive resistance need not be another option. We are hardly helpless. If the President beUeves that Iran controls the fate of our hostages, and his payment of ransom answers that, he should instruct his national-security staff to make a Ust of things that we could do to harm Iran. The President should select from the list, and should act. Then he should teU Iran, quietly and through back channels, that the pain wiU stop when our hostages come home. This could begin with the President canceling the scheduled repatriation of $485 miUion in Iranian assets seized in the wake of the 1980 hostage affair. Without action, that money wiU be in the ayatollah's hands by the end of next week. The other real issue is the progresive breakdown of our foreign-poUcy machinery. How is it that a willful Uttie band of adventurers could have bypassed the entire foreign-affairs team, the secretary of state, the secretary of defense, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff? There are many other recent examples of breakdown and paralysis. In the aftermath of the Iceland summit meeting, warring factions in the Pentagon and the State Department have brought arms-control poUcy to gridlock. The Atlantic alliance is now under attack by Europeon leftists, exploiting uncertainties created by the President's casual proposal to withdraw our nuclear deterrent from that continent. Closer to home, Mexico, caught in a downward spiral of debt and depression, is ignored by aU save troublemakers like Sen. Jesse Helms. There is Uttle prospect that the President himself wiU ever take direct charge of foreign poUcy, nor would it necessarily be a good thing if he were to do so. But only the President can estabUsh clear Unes of direction and responsibiUty. Someone must speak definitively throughout the world for the United States. It matters Uttle whether that person is in the White House basement, in Foggy Bottom or elsewhere. That is the President's choice. What matters is that someone speak and act with authority. None of this suggests that Congress is equipped to draw the Unes or to run the President's foreign policy for him. The President, by act or omission, has created this mess. It is for the President to clean it up. For far more than his own sake, we must aU hope that he succeeds. The innocent also go to trial by Nat Hentoff Special to the News Editors'Note: Nat Hentoff writes a nationally syndicated column, "Sweet Land of Liberty," which deals primarily with First Amendment issues. This article was distributed hy the First Amendment Center of the Society of Professional Journalists. The presumption of innocence, rumored to be the cornerstone of our system of justice, is actually as hard to find as a manual typewriter. Before trial, and sometime even before an indictment, prosecutors orchestrate press conferences at which the defendant's alleged crimes are so vividly detailed that he appears already to be on the way to the slammer. For instance, Rudolph Giuliani, the triumphant U.S. attorney for the southern district of New York, called in the eager press one day to announce the indictments of a number of alleged chief executive officers of La Cosa Nostra, his performance was so dramaticaUy compelling, a sardonic defense attorney later told him that "the theme music from The Godfather' kept coming into my head as you were speaking." Throughout the country, many prosecutors also put defendants through what is called in the trade a "prep walk." The prosecutor, again before trail, alerts television stations when to bring in their cameras to get to some "eyewitness shots" of the alleged malefactors. Und : such circumstances, even Mother Teresa would look extremely suspicious, especially if her hands were cuffed behind her back. A few prosecutors, however, insist on an extremly bare-bones approach to any pretrial pubUcity that comes out of their offices. There is Charles Hynes, for example. New York's special state prosecutor who investigates corruption throughout the criminal justice system. One of his current cases has greatly intrigued and angered may New Yorkers. It concerns charges that a sizeable number of poUce officers in a Brooklyn precinct stole and sold drugs, took bribes from drug dealers and did some other steaUng on the side. Hynes has held no press conferences on the case. Nor have there been any leaks to the press from Hynes' office. His staff knows that a leaker w;iU be both fired and prosecuted. The mayor of New York, Ed Koch, who once pubUcly called a close associate a crook before the latter was even indicted, has tried to cajole Hynes into joining him and the poUce commissioner for a press conference on the charges against the men in blue in Brooklyn. Hynes declined the honor. In an article in the New York Law Journal on Law Day, Hynes tried to explain his exotic ways: "On the basis of my many years' experience as a special state prosecutor, assistant district attorney and defense lawyer, I no longer beUeve that it is appropriate for a prosecutor to hold a pre^s conference to announce the arrest or indictment of an accused person if the presumption of innocence is to be protected... The only pubUc disclosure concerning an accused person wiU be the name, age and borough residence of such person, his or her occupation and the text or substance of the charges contained in the pubUcly filed indictment or other accusatory instrument." Moreoever, when a group of corrections officers was indicted not long ago, the spare, printed announcement from Hynes' office noted that an indictment is only a document that starts a criminal proceeding. It is not, he emphasized, evidence of guilt. Obviously, says Hynes, the press can plumb its own channels of information about the accused, but he figures that his responsibiUty is to not use the clout of his office to put more of a burden on the defendant than the facts of the case themselves. There was a time Hynes did hold press conferences; when, in the mid-1970s, he prosecuted a number of nursing-home operators on charges that shocked even New Yorkers. I asked him why he changed his mind. "I was in private practice afterwards," he said. "I defended a guy m New Jersey. He was the worst victim I'd seen of predudicial pretrial pubUcity. The prosecutor held prejudicial press conferences; and there were leaks from the grand jury to the press." The case involved alleged bribery, and was ^v;entually dismissed, but Hynes never forgot what all that pubUcity had done to his cUent. He pointed out recentiy that during one year in the New York City courts, 4,700 persons who had been indicted on fel(my counts were acquitted or had their cases dismissed. Hjmes asks about the effect on their reuputation "if their arrest or indicment has been highly pubUcized," but hardly as much attention, if any, is given to their walking free. The Claus von Bulows, he notes, get redemptive pubUcity, but lots of cleared defendants do not. Hynes, by the way, has an 80 percent conviction ratp after trial. • • [ • ^lU,Jl.iJljU, mm

PAGE 6

^ INift • Htndtrsan Nmt Ntwi. Minderson, Nevada Thursday, Jaaiuuy 1, 1967 QREEN VALLEY NEWS City park director: River Run park space not adequate by Scott Dickensheats Hom§ N§W9 Staff Writer Tha park space allotsd in the proposed Rivar Run development "doas not meat any standards I'm familiar with," said Henderson Parks and Recreation Department director Dundee Jones Monday. The S67-acre Rivar Run residential propoaal calla for about 13 acres of park space. Seven •eraa will be acijacent to a proposed elementary school site, three acres will be across the street from thet, and a "rim park" abng the edge of the Pittman Wash will add another three acres. Pittman Waah cuts through the development. Jones said the park doesn't conform to National Recreation and Park Associatibn standards on either a percentage of total acreage basis or a population basis. Nflw Officer named for Green Valley Homes Inc. and American Mevada Jordan Primack haa been named senior vio president of Green Valley Homes, Inc., and vice president of residential operations for American Nevada Corp,, aooording to Mark Fine, president of American Nevada Corp. In his new poaltion, Primack will direct the dally operationa of Oreen Valley Homes, the homebuilding division of American Nevada Corp., overall developer of the master planned community of Green Valley. He will also coordinate homebuilding activities for ANC. "We are extremely pleaaed to have a person of Jordan's caliber join us," Fine laid. "His knowledge and expertise in the homebuilding industry are invaluable, and hia reputation speaks for itaelf. Jordan brings many innovative concepta to the Southern Nevada homebuilding market." A fourth generation homebuiUar, Primack has worked in the induatry since he joined the family buainess 30 years ago. For 14 years, prior to accepting his current post, he was executive vice president of P.W.P. Development Co., Inc., in Denver, a family-owned hcniebuilding company. His responsibilities included the entire spectrum of homebuilding, from land acquisition through completion and delivery of the home. While in Colorado, he was an active and prominent member of Denver's homebuilding community. He received recognition as one of only approximately 200 National Association of Home Builders members qualified and accepted into the Institute of Residential Marketing. In 1981, he was named Home Builder "Man of the year" by the Home Builders Association of Metropolitan Denver. He also received several awards for "Major Achievement for Marketing Excellence" fh)m the Aaaociation's Sales and Marketing Council. Primack'a numeroua positions, with the Home Builders Association for Metropolitan Denver included vice president and secretary, and member of the board of directors for five years. ^ As a member of the National Aaaociation of Home Builders '^plke" Club (recruiting division). he was recognized aa the top "Man of the Year" in both 1977 and 1979 in Denver. In Denver, he was among the top ten all-time membership recruiters, with approximately 200 "Spike" credita. In 1983-84, he served on the board of directors of the Colorado Aaaociation of Housing and Building. He also aerved for five years aa an alternate Director 8f the National Association of Homebuiklars. Jordan Primack His many community activities included a four-year membership on the board of directors and vice presidency of the Easter Seal Society of Colorado, as well as coaching youth soccer and Little League baseball. Primack holds a BS degree from the University of Colorado's School of Business where he majored in accounting and minored in marketing and finance. Primack said that Green Valley Home projects currently underway include The Village Oreen, an attached home community priced from the low |80's; Fox Ridge Estates, a single-family customquality community ranging from the $120' to the $170's, and the new single-family home community of Fox Ridge Terrace, now building its first phase, priced from the low $100*8 to the mid-$130'8. "Even though I'm a newcomer to Nevada, 1 am already a strong believer in the state's growth and future," Primack said. The opportunities are limitless. I live in one of our own Green Valley communities and my family and I find all the amenities of maater-planned Green Valley extremely appealing." •06 luohinan llvd. Suit* 107 Ses-Mor ....BouldvrClty PRII nCKIT MUVIRY lHONI 14 HOURi Mon Fri (am to930pm •SalSim to 4pm •10S,000 mifhl InwjrtnM rail with any tlrtliw tlckcl purshaMd §MJOY WALT IHBNtY WOULD fMMI M^* on • Onil to Nassau and Out-Island than raturn to oontral Florida for a fyn-flllad days at Olsnay World PItg. Inahidasi •Hotel Aeeomodsllens •Osr Nentsi •Admission i Tour of NASA Kennedy Space Canter •3 Day World Pass I nVMI WWeW 999 WfMfl SISVV 90 dOUM# OOMIfMIMy. CAU NOW FOM OtTAiLl iNirMftroMJM iM mwfSff am AOAnom Lain Tshoa .•144Mpp, Fark City J^iiOH ^„^ ItMintooat tprlnga y.M%%** pr p.^ Valt —•l2iM p sMox Jaekaon Hola ^i r^ •4it^ prn AN pBol t aisi *(aiCMp Jaekaon Hole-7 Nlghta) include roundtrip alrfwa, I nIgMa aseomodations (baasd on doubts iiaiipinay). I or 4 day Ml tlokata. IOAA MNTAl CAN at AMUNOBD KM AS LOW AS "They're talking *bout 2502 units Oiomes in River Run). Multiply that times three and you have roughly 8,000 people. Do you think (13 acres) is adequate?" The Green Valley neighborhood, he said, needs a facility along the lines of O'Callaghan Park or Morrell Park. O'Callaghan Park, Jones noted, is about 17.6 acres, or 24 acrea when combined with the adjacent Faye Galloway Elementary School open space. Morrell Park is 16 acres, or about 23 with nearby Robert L. Taylor Elementary School facilities. "We need some 20 acre sites," Jones said, "instead of a lot of little five acre sites." Currently in Green Valley, there is only the five-acre Foxridge Park, with a new elementary school next to it. Also in the works is a five-acre Pardee Park in their Green Valley South development. "We need at least an O'Callaghan Park or Morrellsize park in Green Valley." Also proposed for River Run is a 2.6-acre private club, with a variety of recreational facilities. At a recent Henderson Planning Commission meeting, Jones urged American Nevada to make the club public, "l don't believe in the private club," he said Monday. Nor doea he believe in American Navada's attempt to have Pittman Wash declared as public open space, saying it "isn't fair." Tm not derogatory about the project," he said, saying he was concerned only with the park situation. He mentioned the search for a location to build a sports complex. He said it was a fin^ idea, but it still won't addreas the park needs of the Green Valley community. "It will be strictly ballparks and soccer fields." The main obstacle to creating an O'Callaghan-size park in Green Valley is the cost of the land. City planner Lavert Lucas has previously estimated that purchaainf a suitiible park As for a future communitysite could cost Qie city millions size park in Oreen Valley, of dollars. Maintenance costs Jones said, "I am not that opdrive the price tag higher. timiatic." ATTEND CHURCH SUNDAY IKMSOMDIY. Dr. Randy Staiiton li proud to snnounos tho oponing of ths %li ANIMAL ^.dP^ CARE CLINIC 700 Nsvsds Hwy. M0N-FRI...,8 AM,-6;30PM. SAT 9AM.-1 P.M. Appointments 294-0001 24 HOUR IMIRQINCY tlRVICI 204-0001 eHXttTMM ICiWeE SfiMCES nr Ohmn Chfw iMfM MD Is. r*i Si La* vtsM nwtt JS4.3049 Church & Sundsy Schoo* 10 ^.^A Wed. Evening Meeting 8 P.M. REAOINQ nOCM 1111 LM VMM BhiS.se. SinK4lSI fUEAOINQ ROOM HOUM: MON -ns I A.M>4 PU MT 11 AM.-SRM. SUN. I RM.-4 P.M. QaliyYour Custom Framers Browsers Welcome J 1229 Arizona St. Boulder City 293-3958 M-F 10-6 SAT 10-4 y Natural Qaa. • A Natural Oat fumaca htats tha whoia houat faatar. II NATUrULOAa FUW4ANCB DflYIR RANQi HOrWHTlR HtAiriR • A Qaa Rang* providta Instant on^natant off. InHnlttly vaHabIa htat. • A Qaa Hot Watar Haatar faaturtt fattar Raoovary TIma. ..is mora tconomleal. • Clothss Drying in a Qas Cloihos Dfyar is faatar. • I • / • I • I • • I I Come Join Us At The 1^ HAIRATHEDOGTHATBITCHA PARTY • Swim longsr, anjoy your SPA mors with QAt hosting. CP NATIONAL aito iMiiovta that theae oomforta and convenlancaa should be...AFFORDABLE. • I N you shift tttal Swught csN us. Asi| about CP Nalientft nnams pragism. It you M wnodttmo or SuHdtng. new Is the lime (0 msM ttial MglvoNlcisney hailing 4i NflTIONflL lOS Maiaat Btfaai JANUARY 1 10 A.M. TILL ? WATCH THE PLAYOFFSI 2 T.V.'o, No Waiting^ .^ ^ 'am..:^i,.

PAGE 7

^ INift • Htndtrsan Nmt Ntwi. Minderson, Nevada Thursday, Jaaiuuy 1, 1967 QREEN VALLEY NEWS City park director: River Run park space not adequate by Scott Dickensheats Hom§ N§W9 Staff Writer Tha park space allotsd in the proposed Rivar Run development "doas not meat any standards I'm familiar with," said Henderson Parks and Recreation Department director Dundee Jones Monday. The S67-acre Rivar Run residential propoaal calla for about 13 acres of park space. Seven •eraa will be acijacent to a proposed elementary school site, three acres will be across the street from thet, and a "rim park" abng the edge of the Pittman Wash will add another three acres. Pittman Waah cuts through the development. Jones said the park doesn't conform to National Recreation and Park Associatibn standards on either a percentage of total acreage basis or a population basis. Nflw Officer named for Green Valley Homes Inc. and American Mevada Jordan Primack haa been named senior vio president of Green Valley Homes, Inc., and vice president of residential operations for American Nevada Corp,, aooording to Mark Fine, president of American Nevada Corp. In his new poaltion, Primack will direct the dally operationa of Oreen Valley Homes, the homebuilding division of American Nevada Corp., overall developer of the master planned community of Green Valley. He will also coordinate homebuilding activities for ANC. "We are extremely pleaaed to have a person of Jordan's caliber join us," Fine laid. "His knowledge and expertise in the homebuilding industry are invaluable, and hia reputation speaks for itaelf. Jordan brings many innovative concepta to the Southern Nevada homebuilding market." A fourth generation homebuiUar, Primack has worked in the induatry since he joined the family buainess 30 years ago. For 14 years, prior to accepting his current post, he was executive vice president of P.W.P. Development Co., Inc., in Denver, a family-owned hcniebuilding company. His responsibilities included the entire spectrum of homebuilding, from land acquisition through completion and delivery of the home. While in Colorado, he was an active and prominent member of Denver's homebuilding community. He received recognition as one of only approximately 200 National Association of Home Builders members qualified and accepted into the Institute of Residential Marketing. In 1981, he was named Home Builder "Man of the year" by the Home Builders Association of Metropolitan Denver. He also received several awards for "Major Achievement for Marketing Excellence" fh)m the Aaaociation's Sales and Marketing Council. Primack'a numeroua positions, with the Home Builders Association for Metropolitan Denver included vice president and secretary, and member of the board of directors for five years. ^ As a member of the National Aaaociation of Home Builders '^plke" Club (recruiting division). he was recognized aa the top "Man of the Year" in both 1977 and 1979 in Denver. In Denver, he was among the top ten all-time membership recruiters, with approximately 200 "Spike" credita. In 1983-84, he served on the board of directors of the Colorado Aaaociation of Housing and Building. He also aerved for five years aa an alternate Director 8f the National Association of Homebuiklars. Jordan Primack His many community activities included a four-year membership on the board of directors and vice presidency of the Easter Seal Society of Colorado, as well as coaching youth soccer and Little League baseball. Primack holds a BS degree from the University of Colorado's School of Business where he majored in accounting and minored in marketing and finance. Primack said that Green Valley Home projects currently underway include The Village Oreen, an attached home community priced from the low |80's; Fox Ridge Estates, a single-family customquality community ranging from the $120' to the $170's, and the new single-family home community of Fox Ridge Terrace, now building its first phase, priced from the low $100*8 to the mid-$130'8. "Even though I'm a newcomer to Nevada, 1 am already a strong believer in the state's growth and future," Primack said. The opportunities are limitless. I live in one of our own Green Valley communities and my family and I find all the amenities of maater-planned Green Valley extremely appealing." •06 luohinan llvd. Suit* 107 Ses-Mor ....BouldvrClty PRII nCKIT MUVIRY lHONI 14 HOURi Mon Fri (am to930pm •SalSim to 4pm •10S,000 mifhl InwjrtnM rail with any tlrtliw tlckcl purshaMd §MJOY WALT IHBNtY WOULD fMMI M^* on • Onil to Nassau and Out-Island than raturn to oontral Florida for a fyn-flllad days at Olsnay World PItg. Inahidasi •Hotel Aeeomodsllens •Osr Nentsi •Admission i Tour of NASA Kennedy Space Canter •3 Day World Pass I nVMI WWeW 999 WfMfl SISVV 90 dOUM# OOMIfMIMy. CAU NOW FOM OtTAiLl iNirMftroMJM iM mwfSff am AOAnom Lain Tshoa .•144Mpp, Fark City J^iiOH ^„^ ItMintooat tprlnga y.M%%** pr p.^ Valt —•l2iM p sMox Jaekaon Hola ^i r^ •4it^ prn AN pBol t aisi *(aiCMp Jaekaon Hole-7 Nlghta) include roundtrip alrfwa, I nIgMa aseomodations (baasd on doubts iiaiipinay). I or 4 day Ml tlokata. IOAA MNTAl CAN at AMUNOBD KM AS LOW AS "They're talking *bout 2502 units Oiomes in River Run). Multiply that times three and you have roughly 8,000 people. Do you think (13 acres) is adequate?" The Green Valley neighborhood, he said, needs a facility along the lines of O'Callaghan Park or Morrell Park. O'Callaghan Park, Jones noted, is about 17.6 acres, or 24 acrea when combined with the adjacent Faye Galloway Elementary School open space. Morrell Park is 16 acres, or about 23 with nearby Robert L. Taylor Elementary School facilities. "We need some 20 acre sites," Jones said, "instead of a lot of little five acre sites." Currently in Green Valley, there is only the five-acre Foxridge Park, with a new elementary school next to it. Also in the works is a five-acre Pardee Park in their Green Valley South development. "We need at least an O'Callaghan Park or Morrellsize park in Green Valley." Also proposed for River Run is a 2.6-acre private club, with a variety of recreational facilities. At a recent Henderson Planning Commission meeting, Jones urged American Nevada to make the club public, "l don't believe in the private club," he said Monday. Nor doea he believe in American Navada's attempt to have Pittman Wash declared as public open space, saying it "isn't fair." Tm not derogatory about the project," he said, saying he was concerned only with the park situation. He mentioned the search for a location to build a sports complex. He said it was a fin^ idea, but it still won't addreas the park needs of the Green Valley community. "It will be strictly ballparks and soccer fields." The main obstacle to creating an O'Callaghan-size park in Green Valley is the cost of the land. City planner Lavert Lucas has previously estimated that purchaainf a suitiible park As for a future communitysite could cost Qie city millions size park in Oreen Valley, of dollars. Maintenance costs Jones said, "I am not that opdrive the price tag higher. timiatic." ATTEND CHURCH SUNDAY IKMSOMDIY. Dr. Randy Staiiton li proud to snnounos tho oponing of ths %li ANIMAL ^.dP^ CARE CLINIC 700 Nsvsds Hwy. M0N-FRI...,8 AM,-6;30PM. SAT 9AM.-1 P.M. Appointments 294-0001 24 HOUR IMIRQINCY tlRVICI 204-0001 eHXttTMM ICiWeE SfiMCES nr Ohmn Chfw iMfM MD Is. r*i Si La* vtsM nwtt JS4.3049 Church & Sundsy Schoo* 10 ^.^A Wed. Evening Meeting 8 P.M. REAOINQ nOCM 1111 LM VMM BhiS.se. SinK4lSI fUEAOINQ ROOM HOUM: MON -ns I A.M>4 PU MT 11 AM.-SRM. SUN. I RM.-4 P.M. QaliyYour Custom Framers Browsers Welcome J 1229 Arizona St. Boulder City 293-3958 M-F 10-6 SAT 10-4 y Natural Qaa. • A Natural Oat fumaca htats tha whoia houat faatar. II NATUrULOAa FUW4ANCB DflYIR RANQi HOrWHTlR HtAiriR • A Qaa Rang* providta Instant on^natant off. InHnlttly vaHabIa htat. • A Qaa Hot Watar Haatar faaturtt fattar Raoovary TIma. ..is mora tconomleal. • Clothss Drying in a Qas Cloihos Dfyar is faatar. • I • / • I • I • • I I Come Join Us At The 1^ HAIRATHEDOGTHATBITCHA PARTY • Swim longsr, anjoy your SPA mors with QAt hosting. CP NATIONAL aito iMiiovta that theae oomforta and convenlancaa should be...AFFORDABLE. • I N you shift tttal Swught csN us. Asi| about CP Nalientft nnams pragism. It you M wnodttmo or SuHdtng. new Is the lime (0 msM ttial MglvoNlcisney hailing 4i NflTIONflL lOS Maiaat Btfaai JANUARY 1 10 A.M. TILL ? WATCH THE PLAYOFFSI 2 T.V.'o, No Waiting^ .^ ^ 'am..:^i,.

PAGE 8

rarrrm ^WMB ^^ Pag I Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Thursday, January 1, 1987 Thursday, January 1, 1987 Henderson Home News, HenderMn, Nevada Page t Senior Center highlights by thnma Swinaey Senior Center Pablidst There is so much to say about the last two weeks, that I must just tell you that they have been almost the best Christmas season of my many years. If you ask, I will be glad to give you details. But I have to mention my deep appreciation to the Division of Aging and Southwest Airlines for the chance to have the trip to Los Angeles, to Patricia Morgan and Rene Germanier for the article and photo. Many people have mentioned it. While offering thanks, 1 have such a long list from the center. Iliere were the Centel Singers, especially Nancy Faster and Debbie Harding for the animation of the Tw^dve Days of Christmas." The Expkirer Scouts and Bill Randall of the LDS Church, Henderson West Stake, who did such a great job delivering the Christmas ba^ets on Saturday before Christmas. They brought a lot of happiness. We sure enjoyed the pre-Christmas decorating party and that good aoup and sandwich supper that Edna and her helpers gave us. We also have received candy, baked goodies and many lovely cards for all to enjoy. Doris Van Beek says thanks to everyone for all their kindness and remenlberances to her. And I want to express everyone's grateful thanks to Edna Deardoff and the kitchen staff for the wonderful brunch on Saturday morning. Wasn't that a delicious treat? We were thrilled to see Betty Lewison, her brother, daughter and the granddaughter, Melissa. Those of us who took advantage of the excellent shrimp dinner given by the VFW, Friday evening had an opportunity to visit with Betty a little more. That meal was another fme gift from a great group. Thanks to everyone who worked so hard on it. Did yo(i get to the concert in the center Sunday? I missed it, but 1 hear it was really beautiful. The Parks and Recreation IDepartment have these greatmusicians for all to enjoy twice every month, on the second and fourth weeks, at 2:30 p.m. That is a nice way to spend Sunday afternoons. Also check with them for all the new classes they are starting this month. Call 565-2121 for information or stop in the gynmasium building for a brochure. Speaking of the gymnasium, don't let this first week go by, without coming to exercise next Tuesday at 11 a.m. Don't make a resolution, just show up every Tuesday and Thursday and see how much better you will feel. These half-hour sessions are especially designed for seniors, but they would b$ good for any body. Also this year would be a great time to start a new hobby. How about a painting class with Dan Gianos, on Monday at 1 p.m.? He. is an experienced artist, and the cost is just a dollar for supplies. We should be getting back to regular activities next week, with Wednesday bridge, and Thursday bingo after lunch. Last Friday the winner of the door prize was Lela Buescher. If you would like a chance, put your name in the can everyday when you have lunch, and stay Friday until 12:30 p.m. for the drawing. Senior Center services, ciasses Listed are the on-going servi^ and classes offered by the Henderson Senior Citizens Center on the Civic Center site at 201 Lead Street in Room 7. The center is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Phone 565-6990 for more details. Classes Mondays from 1-3:30 p.m. art classes for all ages are offered with a $1 donation requested for supplies purchase. Wednesday from 1-4 p.m. open Bridge games are played with adults 55 or older and instruction can be provided. "Riere are no charges. Thursday a 9 a.m. knitting and crocheting class is offered along with Pinochle class at the same time. A plastic needlepoint class is offered at 1 p.m. All Thursday classes are offered to seniors at no charge. Services Monday through Friday employment services are offered to seniors age 60 and older at no charge. The first Tuesday of each month free blood pressure readings are offered to seniors at the center. All day Wednesday (9:30 ajn. to 4 p jn.) and a half-day Thursday (9:30 a.m. to noon) a Social Security representative is available at the center to answer question from all ages. There is no charge and no appointment is necessary. Twice a month assistance from the Senior Law Practice is available to seniors 60 and older. A donation is suggested and appointments should be made by contacting Doris Van Beek at the center. IjBure hope you enjoyed the New Year's Eve party. Thsjik Edna for all her efforts on our behalf for it and for everything we have had extra all last year. She sure can get it d^ne! Next week's menus, Jan. 5 through Jan. 9 follow: Monday: spaghetti with meat, mixed vegetebles, tossed salad, garlic bread and pears. Tuesday: liver and onions, stewed tomatoes, tossed salad, buttered noodles and oatmeal bars. Wednesday: barbecue chicken, spinach cranberry cabbage perfection salad, celery sticks and vanilla pudding. Thursday: Meat balls, creamed potatoes and peas, tossed salad, cinnamon apple slice and peaches. Friday: Macaroni and cheese, muffuis, green beans, carrot raisin salad and fresh fruit. Coffee, tea, and low-fat milk are available daily. Thought for the New year: When you count all the blessings of last year, don't forget to give thanks to Him who made them possible, and Traise the Lord!" Special: An extra thank you note to our own Henderson Home News. I hope everyone kept the Christmas Day issue, if they didn't get to give it the time it deserved during the holdiay. It was a work of art, even to the advertisemente. I particularly loved the story of the Little Matoh Girl. It used to be one-ofmy favorites and this is the first time I have seen it published in a long time. Many of the brief items were very interesting and the old stories are always new. Book of James study begins The congregation of the Southing the Christian life," at 9:30 a.m. side Christian Church begins the reading of the earliest book of Christianity, the book of James, written about 44AD, by the oldest of the Lord's brothers on Jan. 1. The minister, Joel Rivers will preach from the portion of scripture read each week through the entire New Testament. His first message is Tractical lessons on livon Jan. 4. Terry Chitwood will lead the service at the piano and the organ. The Southside Christian Church is currently meeting in the Davis Paradise Valley Chapel at 6200 South Eastern Avenue, one and one-half miles south of Tropicana Avenue. For more information call 458-2731. 4 SEASONS CLEANERS n JL ^2-50 ..ch riCLEAN PRESS ONE PRICE FOR ANY THREE OR MORE GARMENTS PROCESSED IN OUR PLANT BEST PERFORMANCE AND VALUE IN HOME SATELLITE TV OVER 100 CHANNELS AND WITH OUR STARCAST SYSTEM THIS MONTH YOU CAN ENJOY 031 SPORTINa EVENTS, 1,409 MOVIES, 255 SPECIALS And It is like that every month if you own a Starcast Satellite System. Ask anyone that owns one about the vast programming on satellite TV. -: TUES NITE SaAod Buffet 2.49 • peatuffig Fned Shrimp Pasta wiih Sealood. 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The closest thing to perfection in the satellite industry Is the Starcast 8' perforated dish and its ideal shape for receiving C-band as well as K-band signals. It's everything you ever hoped for, all in one perfectly matched system. And it leaves nothing to be desired. ONLY $2a499 INSTALLED SoM wparaUly 11,691 \n%MM \ FREE DRAWING Win (n Etcon' oi Pas*porl' ridar dticcior Irofn Cincinnili Microwave. Juti come into our Sunsel showroom .tpr Our tree ditwirtg-no h drawing wiff> ba riM on Oecamber 34 at 3 PM. You 00 not need to be present lo win. 'Etcort rated at the mduatry leader by Car and Driver magaima. And what Old Car and Dri4er say about Piaspon? Passport it a winner You could be a winner, too Jutl come out to our thowroom and try for our tree drawing. aNCINNATIMICROWWE COMMUNICATIONS 458-0144 OPEN Mon.-Fri. 10-7 Sat. 10-5 VwCkmQioiccbiSatdhicTclnisioit. STARCAST AND CINCINNATI MICROWAVE COMMUNICATIONS, ONE SUNSET WAY. HENDERSON, NEVADA 6901S NEXT TO ETHEL MS Cnama inig i i. <• MM OI limie 1 Starcast TheOearChacehiSaklkk'Beviskin • SPORTS Lines from the lanes by Ruth Soehlke Home News Correspondent Moonlight Bowl pots increase: The Henderson Moonlight Bowl offers a great opportunity for some lucky bowlers to win colored head pin strike pots which have ballooned to $250 and $140 for this Saturday's 8 p.m. session. Phone 565-7712 and pay $6 entry fee when you sign up and just see what happens. The big jackpot combination came up twice last Saturday but was missed both times. Southern Nevada ABC Senior Singles: The Showboat Lanes are holding the Men's Senior Singles tournament on March 21 and March 22 with an entry fee of $20. There are four divisions and a handicap of 80 percent of 220. Reserved entry closing date is Feb. 13 and the tournament closing date is March 6. Entries can be obtained at Henderson Bowl. Southern Nevada Bowling Association Tournament: The 29th annual tournament of the Southern Nevada Bowling Association will be held at the Showboat Lanes, Feb. 21,22,28 and March 1. Reserved entries at $12 per bowler per event, plus $5 all events, must be in by Jan. 31. Tournament closing date is Feb. 7. Sunday Night Mixed: C&RAuto Sales in the lead with 80 wins. Matt Mooney led with 205-538, Paul Nyquist 529, Jim Corbishley 202-518, Fred Wold 519, Bob Conklin highgame 217-514. Linda Bender led the league with a 206-557, Bonnie Musselman 506. Henderson Senior Citizens: Congratulations to Rod Rodery on rolling an all-spare game. Harvey Spittell 208-560, Tom Davis 218-514, Ken Lloyd 201, Chuck Curtis 200. Dec. 15 the first half winning team is still Sookees Kookees with 70 wins. Jim Byrne 214-572, Harvey Spittell high game 226-540, Sookee Musilino 535, Floyd Williams 520, John Dromrecki 509, Blanch Woodward 203. Henderson Eagles: Wes Duncan was high man Dec. 15 with 208-202-558, Boyd Alexander high game 216-542, Dale VanVliet 201-542, Stan Brown Jr., 202-538, Clay OUver 517, Kip Pinkham 202-514. Dec. 22 team no. 1 emerged the wirmer of the first half. Rupert Chandler led with 203-577, Corky Rmindy 221-561 for high game, Garry Abbs 532, Kelley Roundy 203^30, Wes Duncan 529, Rick Roundy 507, Terry Lund 503. Powder Puff: Ben Stepman Motors back in the lead with 33 wins, also took high game with 771, El Torito Cafeled in series with 2170. Marianne Belger high with 211-552, Ruth Soehlke 518, Delia Inglis 511, Patti Lundy high game 223-511, 247 hep game, Linda Mogar 510, Patsy Prestwood 510. Jeannette Merrell and Delia Inglis tied for handicap series at 589. Tuesday Handicappers: Ruby Hawkins led Dec. 16 with 605, 625 hep, Betty Tillery 500, Stephanie Joyner 212. Dec. 23 Barbara Grogan led in all categoreis with 217-555, 245-639 hep highs, Sandy Coe 200-538. Clarence Simpson: Dec. 16 Gordon LaPointe wa& high man with 237-623, Lou Roelfs 218-202-610, Rick Whitaker 211-204-601. Dan Briely 234-584. Stan Brown, Jr., 201-200-579, Boyd Alexander 203-572, Morris Seguin 204-568, Art Pappas 208-563, Bob Howard 205-562, Mike Wages 205-562, Al Norton 210-560, Ivan Beavor 554, Lawrence Bradley 208-546, Red Neumair 209-545, Ron Tackett 202-537, Dale Stoddard 534, Craig Spittell 533, Paul Montoya 203-531, Dennis Luby 526, Mike Laskowritz 220-518, Shannon Cardueci 212-518, Harv Spittell 201-518, Bobby Springer 202-516, Herbert Stowell 514. Dee Wages 513, Tom Havener 511, Jan Mussebnan 510, Barry Ivens 509. Ron English 506, Lyle Thomas 504, Mark Carlton 503, Butch Dawes 502. First Federal Savings tied with Springer Plumbing at 40 wins. Ron Dixon on the roll with 237-232-211 for a big 680, Dan Briley. also consistent with 222-221-206-649, Tom Havener 225-224-731, Craig Spittell 212-211-203-626, Bob Howard high game of 247-611, Don Brovra 233-211-606, Lyle Thomas 224-218-601., Larry Kyes 2314-601. Jan Mussebnan 204-202-596, Bruce Tull 234-576, Ken Sheldon 220-570, Stan Brown, Jr., 200-569, Bill Robison 208-206-5678, Tom Sullivan 210-567, Tom Drake 563, Jeff Rlnker 200-561, Tom Soehlke 239-560, George Tucker 560, Bill Yates 215-558, Art Pappas 209-551, Harv Spittell 206-543, Mike Wages 231-541, Jim Tury 206-540, Gary Bondurant 212-539, Ivan Beavor 214.-534, Stan Brown. Sr., 533, Jim Quadlin 533, John Selby 212-531. Mitch Lutz 531. Ron English 201-530. Keith Farmer 520, Les Fulton 519, Shannon Cardueci 202-518. Al LoweU 212-516, Mel Collier 201-516. Mark Carlton 201-506. Ray Tennant 218-501. Vic Alliss 200-501. Henderson Housewives: Eldorado Casino leads with 41 games won and rolled the high team series 1819, Gold Casters Jewelry 677 high team game. Ruth Soehlke led with 207-200-650 hep series, 587, Lola Kirk 522. Cathy TaUman 519, Jody Eighmy 502. Wendy May high game 215. 270 hep. Leona Nowak and Ethel Pfeiffer each converted the 2-10 split. See lines page 11 • -. '*-* "\",*'* '^^^Mi*''* • V *.' ^^ ^* ,. *f :*. .*^^j^POST-GAME CONGRATULATIONS-The Junior Bantam Nevada team defeated a team from New York 41-0 in the Holiday Bowl at the Silver Bowl. Young football players enjoy Silver Bowl thrill TOUCHDOWN CATCH-This catch by Nevada's Frank Zento capped the scoring Saturday in the youth Holiday Bowl. by Paul Szydelko Home News Sports Editor The Southern Nevada Youth Football Conference hosted the "Hohday Bowl" Saturday at the Silver Bowl. In the first of what is hoped to be an annual event, the Southern Nevada Junior Bantam All-Stars beat a team from the New York youth football conference 41-0. In the second game, the Las Vegas Falcons (Pee Wee and Junior Midget) beat a team from Sagemont, Houston, Texas. 10-6. Roscoe Baltimore, SNYFC President, said a lack of communication resulted in the first game mismatch. The weight limit for the New York team \ was 135 pounds, and 156 pounds for the Las Vegas team. "We had totally incorrect information. We could have put xtp a similar-sized team to make it more competitive." Some 300 people attended the event, Baltimore estimated. Despite problems in scheduling, no PA announcer or scoreboard operator, and the weight mismatch, Ba{tl' more termed the Holiday Bowl a success. ~ \ The UNL V coaching staff ^ tended and was "quite rect^ tive to what we were do^xg with the local kid8,'*BflltiiMtt_:i^ said. J:^ "Not only will this enhance the image of Las Vegaii*^ terms of youth football buHi : will lay the groimdwork for \ local youths to participate m interstate sports activiti(%liationwide," Baltimore said "The kids enjoyed the opportunity to play in that type of facility.. The local kids were ecstatic." trikes The Year in Review T^ • .•#' The year 1986 will be remembered as a year of triumph for the very old, tragedy for the very young. Legendary figures won legendary events one more time. Forty-six-year old Jack Nicklaus stormed from behind at Augusta to win the Masters; he wore the famous green jacket his sixth time. Fifty-four-year old Bill Shoemaker briUiwitly steered Fernando from last place to win the Kentucky Derby. It was his third triumph at cherished Churchill Downs, his first since 1965. Teams steeped in heavy tradition won championships: the Boston Celtics won the NBA championship and the Montreal Canadians won the Stanley Cup. Youthful entries met with early deaths. The USFL, after three years of spring football, won a $3 award in a suit against the NFL. To keep the league afloat, owners were hoping for $1.69 biUion. The biggest headline of the year perhaps went to Len Bias, the 22-year-old All-American forward from Maryland who died from a cocaine overdose two days after being drafted by the Celtics and signing a big shoe contract. Don Rogers, the 23-year old starting safety for the Cleveland Browns, died just eight days later of cocaine poisoning. Banned from their sports for accumalated drug-related transgressions were Michael Ray Richardson, John Drew and Steve Howe. Youths who inspired us with their brilliance instead of sickened us with their stupidity were Michael Tyson, who at age 20, became the yoimgest heavyweight champion; eighteen-yearold Boris Becker won his second consecutive Wimbledon championship. Roger Clemens, 24, won the Cy Ypung Award and the MVP award pitching in venerable Fenway Park. He struck out 20 Seattle Mariners April 29 for a major league record. Winning 14 consecutive games to open the season, he started the All-Star Game and pitched three perfect innings, throwing 21 strikes out of 25 pitches. The young Chicago Bears, with old Soldiers Field their home, mauled the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XX, 46-10, and talked of a dynasty. ]n memorable, weD-played championship series, the New York Mats beat the Houston Astros and the Boston Red Sox beat the California Angels. In a poorly played but no less memorable World Series, the Mets came back to beat the Sox in seven games. ^In 1986, sports fans marveled at the continued excellence of Larry Bird, Wayne Gretzky and Martina Navratilova. When we watch these three, we are possibly watching the best not only for our time, but for all time. The unflappable Bird won his third straight MVP award; in Game Six of the NBA championship, he scored 29 points, had 12 assists, 11 rebounds and three steals; he sank 18 of ^ three (toint attempts, including a streak of tt: of 12, at the All-Star Game's long-distai^ shootout. Like Bird, Gretzky has the rare ability to nuk^ the others around him far better. Winnertif seven straight MVP awards, the 25-year old ^, monton Oiler has won six consecutive scoriag titles. If he had not scored one goal this pftsl season, he still would have won the scoring ti^ tie on his assists alone. Filling out this trio of undisputed greats who were in their prime in 1986 is Navratilova, who won her fifth consecutive Wimbledon, her thiinl U.S. Open. These champions are true role models of spaHi we don't hear too much of their off-field acy tivities but we appreciate their striving tfo^ perfection. What makes them special is thlM they have attained it oonaisteatly througk tj^ yean ^umiiiiQ

PAGE 9

rarrrm ^WMB ^^ Pag I Henderson Home News, Henderson, Nevada Thursday, January 1, 1987 Thursday, January 1, 1987 Henderson Home News, HenderMn, Nevada Page t Senior Center highlights by thnma Swinaey Senior Center Pablidst There is so much to say about the last two weeks, that I must just tell you that they have been almost the best Christmas season of my many years. If you ask, I will be glad to give you details. But I have to mention my deep appreciation to the Division of Aging and Southwest Airlines for the chance to have the trip to Los Angeles, to Patricia Morgan and Rene Germanier for the article and photo. Many people have mentioned it. While offering thanks, 1 have such a long list from the center. Iliere were the Centel Singers, especially Nancy Faster and Debbie Harding for the animation of the Tw^dve Days of Christmas." The Expkirer Scouts and Bill Randall of the LDS Church, Henderson West Stake, who did such a great job delivering the Christmas ba^ets on Saturday before Christmas. They brought a lot of happiness. We sure enjoyed the pre-Christmas decorating party and that good aoup and sandwich supper that Edna and her helpers gave us. We also have received candy, baked goodies and many lovely cards for all to enjoy. Doris Van Beek says thanks to everyone for all their kindness and remenlberances to her. And I want to express everyone's grateful thanks to Edna Deardoff and the kitchen staff for the wonderful brunch on Saturday morning. Wasn't that a delicious treat? We were thrilled to see Betty Lewison, her brother, daughter and the granddaughter, Melissa. Those of us who took advantage of the excellent shrimp dinner given by the VFW, Friday evening had an opportunity to visit with Betty a little more. That meal was another fme gift from a great group. Thanks to everyone who worked so hard on it. Did yo(i get to the concert in the center Sunday? I missed it, but 1 hear it was really beautiful. The Parks and Recreation IDepartment have these greatmusicians for all to enjoy twice every month, on the second and fourth weeks, at 2:30 p.m. That is a nice way to spend Sunday afternoons. Also check with them for all the new classes they are starting this month. Call 565-2121 for information or stop in the gynmasium building for a brochure. Speaking of the gymnasium, don't let this first week go by, without coming to exercise next Tuesday at 11 a.m. Don't make a resolution, just show up every Tuesday and Thursday and see how much better you will feel. These half-hour sessions are especially designed for seniors, but they would b$ good for any body. Also this year would be a great time to start a new hobby. How about a painting class with Dan Gianos, on Monday at 1 p.m.? He. is an experienced artist, and the cost is just a dollar for supplies. We should be getting back to regular activities next week, with Wednesday bridge, and Thursday bingo after lunch. Last Friday the winner of the door prize was Lela Buescher. If you would like a chance, put your name in the can everyday when you have lunch, and stay Friday until 12:30 p.m. for the drawing. Senior Center services, ciasses Listed are the on-going servi^ and classes offered by the Henderson Senior Citizens Center on the Civic Center site at 201 Lead Street in Room 7. The center is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Phone 565-6990 for more details. Classes Mondays from 1-3:30 p.m. art classes for all ages are offered with a $1 donation requested for supplies purchase. Wednesday from 1-4 p.m. open Bridge games are played with adults 55 or older and instruction can be provided. "Riere are no charges. Thursday a 9 a.m. knitting and crocheting class is offered along with Pinochle class at the same time. A plastic needlepoint class is offered at 1 p.m. All Thursday classes are offered to seniors at no charge. Services Monday through Friday employment services are offered to seniors age 60 and older at no charge. The first Tuesday of each month free blood pressure readings are offered to seniors at the center. All day Wednesday (9:30 ajn. to 4 p jn.) and a half-day Thursday (9:30 a.m. to noon) a Social Security representative is available at the center to answer question from all ages. There is no charge and no appointment is necessary. Twice a month assistance from the Senior Law Practice is available to seniors 60 and older. A donation is suggested and appointments should be made by contacting Doris Van Beek at the center. IjBure hope you enjoyed the New Year's Eve party. Thsjik Edna for all her efforts on our behalf for it and for everything we have had extra all last year. She sure can get it d^ne! Next week's menus, Jan. 5 through Jan. 9 follow: Monday: spaghetti with meat, mixed vegetebles, tossed salad, garlic bread and pears. Tuesday: liver and onions, stewed tomatoes, tossed salad, buttered noodles and oatmeal bars. Wednesday: barbecue chicken, spinach cranberry cabbage perfection salad, celery sticks and vanilla pudding. Thursday: Meat balls, creamed potatoes and peas, tossed salad, cinnamon apple slice and peaches. Friday: Macaroni and cheese, muffuis, green beans, carrot raisin salad and fresh fruit. Coffee, tea, and low-fat milk are available daily. Thought for the New year: When you count all the blessings of last year, don't forget to give thanks to Him who made them possible, and Traise the Lord!" Special: An extra thank you note to our own Henderson Home News. I hope everyone kept the Christmas Day issue, if they didn't get to give it the time it deserved during the holdiay. It was a work of art, even to the advertisemente. I particularly loved the story of the Little Matoh Girl. It used to be one-ofmy favorites and this is the first time I have seen it published in a long time. Many of the brief items were very interesting and the old stories are always new. Book of James study begins The congregation of the Southing the Christian life," at 9:30 a.m. side Christian Church begins the reading of the earliest book of Christianity, the book of James, written about 44AD, by the oldest of the Lord's brothers on Jan. 1. The minister, Joel Rivers will preach from the portion of scripture read each week through the entire New Testament. His first message is Tractical lessons on livon Jan. 4. Terry Chitwood will lead the service at the piano and the organ. The Southside Christian Church is currently meeting in the Davis Paradise Valley Chapel at 6200 South Eastern Avenue, one and one-half miles south of Tropicana Avenue. For more information call 458-2731. 4 SEASONS CLEANERS n JL ^2-50 ..ch riCLEAN PRESS ONE PRICE FOR ANY THREE OR MORE GARMENTS PROCESSED IN OUR PLANT BEST PERFORMANCE AND VALUE IN HOME SATELLITE TV OVER 100 CHANNELS AND WITH OUR STARCAST SYSTEM THIS MONTH YOU CAN ENJOY 031 SPORTINa EVENTS, 1,409 MOVIES, 255 SPECIALS And It is like that every month if you own a Starcast Satellite System. Ask anyone that owns one about the vast programming on satellite TV. -: TUES NITE SaAod Buffet 2.49 • peatuffig Fned Shrimp Pasta wiih Sealood. Baked and Fried Fish and Much More KISO INCLUDED ''BulM Your Own Sundae Bar" Top on your Dinner Buffet 7 nrtes a week wttt> a Fabulous Sundae made with Soft Ice Cream & Your Favorite Topongs. >••••••••••••••••••••••• SHOWTIME AND THE MOVIE CHANNEL FOR ONE YEAR WITH THE PURCHASE OF YOUR STARCAST SYSTEMS A VALUE OF S)86 00 FREE DESCRAMBLER mU WITH 1HE PURCHASE OF OUR STAfKAST TV SYSTEM You wiN r*c)v V\% Cn*nn*i Mitiw VKMO Clp^•> II A $400.00 Dollar Value YOURS FREE Starcast STR500 Satellita Receiver, the brains of this sophisticated system. The Starcast receiver has it all, including our patented PlcturePlus circuitry. Snapshot Memory, Parental Lock, full function remote control. Audio handles not one, not tvi/o, but all three stereo formats. And for the well-equipped, connections are available for stereo system plus VCR, descrambler and even UHF TV hookup. LED display is all inclusive and lets you know exactly which function is functioning. The closest thing to perfection in the satellite industry Is the Starcast 8' perforated dish and its ideal shape for receiving C-band as well as K-band signals. It's everything you ever hoped for, all in one perfectly matched system. And it leaves nothing to be desired. ONLY $2a499 INSTALLED SoM wparaUly 11,691 \n%MM \ FREE DRAWING Win (n Etcon' oi Pas*porl' ridar dticcior Irofn Cincinnili Microwave. Juti come into our Sunsel showroom .tpr Our tree ditwirtg-no h drawing wiff> ba riM on Oecamber 34 at 3 PM. You 00 not need to be present lo win. 'Etcort rated at the mduatry leader by Car and Driver magaima. And what Old Car and Dri4er say about Piaspon? Passport it a winner You could be a winner, too Jutl come out to our thowroom and try for our tree drawing. aNCINNATIMICROWWE COMMUNICATIONS 458-0144 OPEN Mon.-Fri. 10-7 Sat. 10-5 VwCkmQioiccbiSatdhicTclnisioit. STARCAST AND CINCINNATI MICROWAVE COMMUNICATIONS, ONE SUNSET WAY. HENDERSON, NEVADA 6901S NEXT TO ETHEL MS Cnama inig i i. <• MM OI limie 1 Starcast TheOearChacehiSaklkk'Beviskin • SPORTS Lines from the lanes by Ruth Soehlke Home News Correspondent Moonlight Bowl pots increase: The Henderson Moonlight Bowl offers a great opportunity for some lucky bowlers to win colored head pin strike pots which have ballooned to $250 and $140 for this Saturday's 8 p.m. session. Phone 565-7712 and pay $6 entry fee when you sign up and just see what happens. The big jackpot combination came up twice last Saturday but was missed both times. Southern Nevada ABC Senior Singles: The Showboat Lanes are holding the Men's Senior Singles tournament on March 21 and March 22 with an entry fee of $20. There are four divisions and a handicap of 80 percent of 220. Reserved entry closing date is Feb. 13 and the tournament closing date is March 6. Entries can be obtained at Henderson Bowl. Southern Nevada Bowling Association Tournament: The 29th annual tournament of the Southern Nevada Bowling Association will be held at the Showboat Lanes, Feb. 21,22,28 and March 1. Reserved entries at $12 per bowler per event, plus $5 all events, must be in by Jan. 31. Tournament closing date is Feb. 7. Sunday Night Mixed: C&RAuto Sales in the lead with 80 wins. Matt Mooney led with 205-538, Paul Nyquist 529, Jim Corbishley 202-518, Fred Wold 519, Bob Conklin highgame 217-514. Linda Bender led the league with a 206-557, Bonnie Musselman 506. Henderson Senior Citizens: Congratulations to Rod Rodery on rolling an all-spare game. Harvey Spittell 208-560, Tom Davis 218-514, Ken Lloyd 201, Chuck Curtis 200. Dec. 15 the first half winning team is still Sookees Kookees with 70 wins. Jim Byrne 214-572, Harvey Spittell high game 226-540, Sookee Musilino 535, Floyd Williams 520, John Dromrecki 509, Blanch Woodward 203. Henderson Eagles: Wes Duncan was high man Dec. 15 with 208-202-558, Boyd Alexander high game 216-542, Dale VanVliet 201-542, Stan Brown Jr., 202-538, Clay OUver 517, Kip Pinkham 202-514. Dec. 22 team no. 1 emerged the wirmer of the first half. Rupert Chandler led with 203-577, Corky Rmindy 221-561 for high game, Garry Abbs 532, Kelley Roundy 203^30, Wes Duncan 529, Rick Roundy 507, Terry Lund 503. Powder Puff: Ben Stepman Motors back in the lead with 33 wins, also took high game with 771, El Torito Cafeled in series with 2170. Marianne Belger high with 211-552, Ruth Soehlke 518, Delia Inglis 511, Patti Lundy high game 223-511, 247 hep game, Linda Mogar 510, Patsy Prestwood 510. Jeannette Merrell and Delia Inglis tied for handicap series at 589. Tuesday Handicappers: Ruby Hawkins led Dec. 16 with 605, 625 hep, Betty Tillery 500, Stephanie Joyner 212. Dec. 23 Barbara Grogan led in all categoreis with 217-555, 245-639 hep highs, Sandy Coe 200-538. Clarence Simpson: Dec. 16 Gordon LaPointe wa& high man with 237-623, Lou Roelfs 218-202-610, Rick Whitaker 211-204-601. Dan Briely 234-584. Stan Brown, Jr., 201-200-579, Boyd Alexander 203-572, Morris Seguin 204-568, Art Pappas 208-563, Bob Howard 205-562, Mike Wages 205-562, Al Norton 210-560, Ivan Beavor 554, Lawrence Bradley 208-546, Red Neumair 209-545, Ron Tackett 202-537, Dale Stoddard 534, Craig Spittell 533, Paul Montoya 203-531, Dennis Luby 526, Mike Laskowritz 220-518, Shannon Cardueci 212-518, Harv Spittell 201-518, Bobby Springer 202-516, Herbert Stowell 514. Dee Wages 513, Tom Havener 511, Jan Mussebnan 510, Barry Ivens 509. Ron English 506, Lyle Thomas 504, Mark Carlton 503, Butch Dawes 502. First Federal Savings tied with Springer Plumbing at 40 wins. Ron Dixon on the roll with 237-232-211 for a big 680, Dan Briley. also consistent with 222-221-206-649, Tom Havener 225-224-731, Craig Spittell 212-211-203-626, Bob Howard high game of 247-611, Don Brovra 233-211-606, Lyle Thomas 224-218-601., Larry Kyes 2314-601. Jan Mussebnan 204-202-596, Bruce Tull 234-576, Ken Sheldon 220-570, Stan Brown, Jr., 200-569, Bill Robison 208-206-5678, Tom Sullivan 210-567, Tom Drake 563, Jeff Rlnker 200-561, Tom Soehlke 239-560, George Tucker 560, Bill Yates 215-558, Art Pappas 209-551, Harv Spittell 206-543, Mike Wages 231-541, Jim Tury 206-540, Gary Bondurant 212-539, Ivan Beavor 214.-534, Stan Brown. Sr., 533, Jim Quadlin 533, John Selby 212-531. Mitch Lutz 531. Ron English 201-530. Keith Farmer 520, Les Fulton 519, Shannon Cardueci 202-518. Al LoweU 212-516, Mel Collier 201-516. Mark Carlton 201-506. Ray Tennant 218-501. Vic Alliss 200-501. Henderson Housewives: Eldorado Casino leads with 41 games won and rolled the high team series 1819, Gold Casters Jewelry 677 high team game. Ruth Soehlke led with 207-200-650 hep series, 587, Lola Kirk 522. Cathy TaUman 519, Jody Eighmy 502. Wendy May high game 215. 270 hep. Leona Nowak and Ethel Pfeiffer each converted the 2-10 split. See lines page 11 • -. '*-* "\",*'* '^^^Mi*''* • V *.' ^^ ^* ,. *f :*. .*^^j^POST-GAME CONGRATULATIONS-The Junior Bantam Nevada team defeated a team from New York 41-0 in the Holiday Bowl at the Silver Bowl. Young football players enjoy Silver Bowl thrill TOUCHDOWN CATCH-This catch by Nevada's Frank Zento capped the scoring Saturday in the youth Holiday Bowl. by Paul Szydelko Home News Sports Editor The Southern Nevada Youth Football Conference hosted the "Hohday Bowl" Saturday at the Silver Bowl. In the first of what is hoped to be an annual event, the Southern Nevada Junior Bantam All-Stars beat a team from the New York youth football conference 41-0. In the second game, the Las Vegas Falcons (Pee Wee and Junior Midget) beat a team from Sagemont, Houston, Texas. 10-6. Roscoe Baltimore, SNYFC President, said a lack of communication resulted in the first game mismatch. The weight limit for the New York team \ was 135 pounds, and 156 pounds for the Las Vegas team. "We had totally incorrect information. We could have put xtp a similar-sized team to make it more competitive." Some 300 people attended the event, Baltimore estimated. Despite problems in scheduling, no PA announcer or scoreboard operator, and the weight mismatch, Ba{tl' more termed the Holiday Bowl a success. ~ \ The UNL V coaching staff ^ tended and was "quite rect^ tive to what we were do^xg with the local kid8,'*BflltiiMtt_:i^ said. J:^ "Not only will this enhance the image of Las Vegaii*^ terms of youth football buHi : will lay the groimdwork for \ local youths to participate m interstate sports activiti(%liationwide," Baltimore said "The kids enjoyed the opportunity to play in that type of facility.. The local kids were ecstatic." trikes The Year in Review T^ • .•#' The year 1986 will be remembered as a year of triumph for the very old, tragedy for the very young. Legendary figures won legendary events one more time. Forty-six-year old Jack Nicklaus stormed from behind at Augusta to win the Masters; he wore the famous green jacket his sixth time. Fifty-four-year old Bill Shoemaker briUiwitly steered Fernando from last place to win the Kentucky Derby. It was his third triumph at cherished Churchill Downs, his first since 1965. Teams steeped in heavy tradition won championships: the Boston Celtics won the NBA championship and the Montreal Canadians won the Stanley Cup. Youthful entries met with early deaths. The USFL, after three years of spring football, won a $3 award in a suit against the NFL. To keep the league afloat, owners were hoping for $1.69 biUion. The biggest headline of the year perhaps went to Len Bias, the 22-year-old All-American forward from Maryland who died from a cocaine overdose two days after being drafted by the Celtics and signing a big shoe contract. Don Rogers, the 23-year old starting safety for the Cleveland Browns, died just eight days later of cocaine poisoning. Banned from their sports for accumalated drug-related transgressions were Michael Ray Richardson, John Drew and Steve Howe. Youths who inspired us with their brilliance instead of sickened us with their stupidity were Michael Tyson, who at age 20, became the yoimgest heavyweight champion; eighteen-yearold Boris Becker won his second consecutive Wimbledon championship. Roger Clemens, 24, won the Cy Ypung Award and the MVP award pitching in venerable Fenway Park. He struck out 20 Seattle Mariners April 29 for a major league record. Winning 14 consecutive games to open the season, he started the All-Star Game and pitched three perfect innings, throwing 21 strikes out of 25 pitches. The young Chicago Bears, with old Soldiers Field their home, mauled the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XX, 46-10, and talked of a dynasty. ]n memorable, weD-played championship series, the New York Mats beat the Houston Astros and the Boston Red Sox beat the California Angels. In a poorly played but no less memorable World Series, the Mets came back to beat the Sox in seven games. ^In 1986, sports fans marveled at the continued excellence of Larry Bird, Wayne Gretzky and Martina Navratilova. When we watch these three, we are possibly watching the best not only for our time, but for all time. The unflappable Bird won his third straight MVP award; in Game Six of the NBA championship, he scored 29 points, had 12 assists, 11 rebounds and three steals; he sank 18 of ^ three (toint attempts, including a streak of tt: of 12, at the All-Star Game's long-distai^ shootout. Like Bird, Gretzky has the rare ability to nuk^ the others around him far better. Winnertif seven straight MVP awards, the 25-year old ^, monton Oiler has won six consecutive scoriag titles. If he had not scored one goal this pftsl season, he still would have won the scoring ti^ tie on his assists alone. Filling out this trio of undisputed greats who were in their prime in 1986 is Navratilova, who won her fifth consecutive Wimbledon, her thiinl U.S. Open. These champions are true role models of spaHi we don't hear too much of their off-field acy tivities but we appreciate their striving tfo^ perfection. What makes them special is thlM they have attained it oonaisteatly througk tj^ yean ^umiiiiQ

PAGE 10

Pag* 10 Hcnderion Home Newf, HenderMB, Nevada Thunday, January 1, 1967 FROM CURTIS^ CORNE R by Joey Curtis Pint and foremost a very happy New Years to each and everyone of you out there reading this column. Last year was a great one for boxing in many respects. In no particular order Marvelous Marvin Hagler established even more as one of the greatest middleweight champions of all time. Michael Spinks proved it was no fluke that a former light heavyweight worU champion can move up in weight to become a heavyweight world champion by beating Larry Holmes for the second time. And Mike Tyson burst onto the boxing scene as one of the most exciting youngsters, and now one of the most exciting champions. In a long, long time by KOlng ahnost everybody on his way to a heavyweight world championship. So what does 1987 have in store for boxing fans? Vm not making "predictions," that's not my style. But I can make a few "educated gueases" at what will probably take place in the world of boxing for this new year. First, look for several members of "The Class of '84" that is the Americans who won gold medals at the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles to get world title shots. Among them are Henry Tillman, who is set to fight Evander Hollyfield for the WBA cruiserweight championship now that he got past Stanley Ross the day after Christmas in their bout at the Sahara. That Tillman-Hollyfield fight is set says Top Rank promoter Bob Arum for Feb. 14, Valentines Day up in Reno. One note of interest with that fight is that both TiUman and Hollyfield are Olympic medal winners but neither in the 195 pound division. Tillman won as a 200 pound heavyweight while Hollyfield won his in the 176 pound light heavyweight divison. Another olympian who may get a titie shot is welterweight Mark Breland. 'This unbeaten youngster has been generating lota of interest ever since his amateur days, even before he won ah Olympic gold medal. That was practially expected, almost icing on the cake. But I feel hell get his shot at a 147 pound crown to complete his journey. And the middleweight picture will be interesting after the Hagler-Sugar Ray Leonard fight. No one really knows for sure who'll win or what the winner will do, keep flghting or retire regardless of whether it's Hagler or Leonard. Finally, the heavyweight picture will take on a new look with the completion of the Unification World SeHes at the Hilton. The semi*final fight set for March matches up Tyson, the WBC champion against James "Bonecrusher" Smith, the WBA champion. After that the winner takes on IBF champion Michael 9|)lnks for all-the marbles. Who the new unified champion will take on next is what makes this division of interest. There's some good young talent out there like Razor Ruddock and yet another Olympic gold medalist in TyreU Biggs. And there's always Jerry Cooney plus unbeaten Tony Tucker who's yet to get a title shot at all. There's plenty of other things that'll make boxing in 1987 a year to remember. What will they be? We'll all have to wait and find out as they take place and that's half the fun isn't it? FinaUy, don't forget the Showboat swings into action with the fu^t fight card of the year on Friday the 9th with a monthly ESPN, Top Rank ahow. The featured attractions are a pair of world-ranked junior middleweights in Tommy Ayers of Cincinnati and Lupe Aquino of California in two 10 round clashes. It starts at the usual time of 6 p.m. and still costs the same prices of $10 and $16. More on this card on my column next week. Big league all stars outshine Japanese by Akitaka Nakajima Staff Writer from Mainichi Sbimbun American baseball is vastly superior to the Japanese game. ; The seven game Super Series here last November between U.S. ; major league all stars and a Japanese all star team was a total : mismatch. Worse yet, the Japanese club complacently accepted its inferiority. We knew about the U.S. players' power and speed. But the fans expected our batters to blast some home runs, too. And Japanese pitchers, with their breaking stuff and great control, were supposed to cool off the visiting sluggers. But the ; big leaguers outhit, outpitched, outfielded and outsmarted the ; Japanese team. T^e visitors led in home runs, 19-2, and runs scored, 64-21. The Japanese all stars barely salvaged one win, and that on scratch hits. They were so completely outclassed that they might : as well have lost every game. Professional baseball here has : plenty to think about during the Hot Stove League. ': "I was with the U.S. all stars during the entire tour. They • were gentlemen and professionals," sayi Naoki Tomii of Seibu j Travel. "Many previous U.S. teams were tourists first and ballplayers second." But according to Tomii, the 1986 visitii|Miii equal to one percent (I'^f) "f the ticket price which you can ue lovtanlii a tour or cruiae with one of the following operalori: AMERICAN EXPRESS TOURS CARAVAN TOURS CARNIVAL CRUISES C.'K lints iniemSiont Ajsocnt'cxi CSi8SIT Let UK handle yoUr travel arrannement...Your next vacation may be free. SoMthtrn Nevada'l Bu$ineu Travtl £x|Wr>l ^V^' THAVELJTOLU • • • VICE. INC. 644 t. Sahara Ave. 734-8987 2620 Oraan Valley Pliwy. 488674 111 Water St., Henderion 868-6431 (UNIVIRSfIL Flamingo Hilton 796-7001 Ui Veiaa HlHon 7171900 IF YOU'RE TRANSFERRED... If you're transferred to a job in another city, what will you do about your house? The answer is not so cut and dried as you might think. It's smart to discuss your options with a real estate professional who follows the market. The most obvious solution might be to sell here and buy there, but that may not be your best choice economically. If, for instance, you think you' might be transferred back here within a few years, or thah your employment picture might change, it may make sense to keep your house and rent it out while you're away. Look at market condition around your old house and in your new location, if you sell high and must buy low, you may leave yourself liable to a big tax bite; if you buy a more expensive home, any capital gain is deferred. If you decide to keep your home and rent It out, you will need to have the help of an ex,. perienced real estate" manager. • Whether you sell the house or keep it, you'll get dependable service from the realty experts at QARGIS REALTY, 160 EAST HORIZON. HENDERSON, NEVADA 89016, 564-6968. 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PAGE 11

Pag* 10 Hcnderion Home Newf, HenderMB, Nevada Thunday, January 1, 1967 FROM CURTIS^ CORNE R by Joey Curtis Pint and foremost a very happy New Years to each and everyone of you out there reading this column. Last year was a great one for boxing in many respects. In no particular order Marvelous Marvin Hagler established even more as one of the greatest middleweight champions of all time. Michael Spinks proved it was no fluke that a former light heavyweight worU champion can move up in weight to become a heavyweight world champion by beating Larry Holmes for the second time. And Mike Tyson burst onto the boxing scene as one of the most exciting youngsters, and now one of the most exciting champions. In a long, long time by KOlng ahnost everybody on his way to a heavyweight world championship. So what does 1987 have in store for boxing fans? Vm not making "predictions," that's not my style. But I can make a few "educated gueases" at what will probably take place in the world of boxing for this new year. First, look for several members of "The Class of '84" that is the Americans who won gold medals at the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles to get world title shots. Among them are Henry Tillman, who is set to fight Evander Hollyfield for the WBA cruiserweight championship now that he got past Stanley Ross the day after Christmas in their bout at the Sahara. That Tillman-Hollyfield fight is set says Top Rank promoter Bob Arum for Feb. 14, Valentines Day up in Reno. One note of interest with that fight is that both TiUman and Hollyfield are Olympic medal winners but neither in the 195 pound division. Tillman won as a 200 pound heavyweight while Hollyfield won his in the 176 pound light heavyweight divison. Another olympian who may get a titie shot is welterweight Mark Breland. 'This unbeaten youngster has been generating lota of interest ever since his amateur days, even before he won ah Olympic gold medal. That was practially expected, almost icing on the cake. But I feel hell get his shot at a 147 pound crown to complete his journey. And the middleweight picture will be interesting after the Hagler-Sugar Ray Leonard fight. No one really knows for sure who'll win or what the winner will do, keep flghting or retire regardless of whether it's Hagler or Leonard. Finally, the heavyweight picture will take on a new look with the completion of the Unification World SeHes at the Hilton. The semi*final fight set for March matches up Tyson, the WBC champion against James "Bonecrusher" Smith, the WBA champion. After that the winner takes on IBF champion Michael 9|)lnks for all-the marbles. Who the new unified champion will take on next is what makes this division of interest. There's some good young talent out there like Razor Ruddock and yet another Olympic gold medalist in TyreU Biggs. And there's always Jerry Cooney plus unbeaten Tony Tucker who's yet to get a title shot at all. There's plenty of other things that'll make boxing in 1987 a year to remember. What will they be? We'll all have to wait and find out as they take place and that's half the fun isn't it? FinaUy, don't forget the Showboat swings into action with the fu^t fight card of the year on Friday the 9th with a monthly ESPN, Top Rank ahow. The featured attractions are a pair of world-ranked junior middleweights in Tommy Ayers of Cincinnati and Lupe Aquino of California in two 10 round clashes. It starts at the usual time of 6 p.m. and still costs the same prices of $10 and $16. More on this card on my column next week. Big league all stars outshine Japanese by Akitaka Nakajima Staff Writer from Mainichi Sbimbun American baseball is vastly superior to the Japanese game. ; The seven game Super Series here last November between U.S. ; major league all stars and a Japanese all star team was a total : mismatch. Worse yet, the Japanese club complacently accepted its inferiority. We knew about the U.S. players' power and speed. But the fans expected our batters to blast some home runs, too. And Japanese pitchers, with their breaking stuff and great control, were supposed to cool off the visiting sluggers. But the ; big leaguers outhit, outpitched, outfielded and outsmarted the ; Japanese team. T^e visitors led in home runs, 19-2, and runs scored, 64-21. The Japanese all stars barely salvaged one win, and that on scratch hits. They were so completely outclassed that they might : as well have lost every game. Professional baseball here has : plenty to think about during the Hot Stove League. ': "I was with the U.S. all stars during the entire tour. They • were gentlemen and professionals," sayi Naoki Tomii of Seibu j Travel. "Many previous U.S. teams were tourists first and ballplayers second." But according to Tomii, the 1986 visitii|Miii equal to one percent (I'^f) "f the ticket price which you can ue lovtanlii a tour or cruiae with one of the following operalori: AMERICAN EXPRESS TOURS CARAVAN TOURS CARNIVAL CRUISES C.'K lints iniemSiont Ajsocnt'cxi CSi8SIT Let UK handle yoUr travel arrannement...Your next vacation may be free. SoMthtrn Nevada'l Bu$ineu Travtl £x|Wr>l ^V^' THAVELJTOLU • • • VICE. INC. 644 t. Sahara Ave. 734-8987 2620 Oraan Valley Pliwy. 488674 111 Water St., Henderion 868-6431 (UNIVIRSfIL Flamingo Hilton 796-7001 Ui Veiaa HlHon 7171900 IF YOU'RE TRANSFERRED... If you're transferred to a job in another city, what will you do about your house? The answer is not so cut and dried as you might think. It's smart to discuss your options with a real estate professional who follows the market. The most obvious solution might be to sell here and buy there, but that may not be your best choice economically. If, for instance, you think you' might be transferred back here within a few years, or thah your employment picture might change, it may make sense to keep your house and rent it out while you're away. Look at market condition around your old house and in your new location, if you sell high and must buy low, you may leave yourself liable to a big tax bite; if you buy a more expensive home, any capital gain is deferred. If you decide to keep your home and rent It out, you will need to have the help of an ex,. perienced real estate" manager. • Whether you sell the house or keep it, you'll get dependable service from the realty experts at QARGIS REALTY, 160 EAST HORIZON. HENDERSON, NEVADA 89016, 564-6968. We're open 7 days a week to better serve you. ; MLUNO FREMONT COINCOJNC. /4 %itm fb Stut ^^Mf M^EBUy SCRAP 60L0 PAYINd JOP PRICES ....CASHI 4t00 BoiiMir HiK (NMT DMtX Inn Rd) ^(2-1469 Western Health Care Products Inc. OXYGEN MEDICAL DIABETIC OSTOMY INCONTINENT Supplies & Equipment (702)565-1800 1433 N. Boulder Hwy., P.O. Box 102S Henderaon, NV 89016 24 Hour Emergtncy Sffvlct Availabit (702)735-1183 fJHl Inturancf Billing Avillable FREE DELIVERY To Home S Office "We Are Trained and Ready to Handle Ail of Your nUedical Needs." DIAHTIC EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES aiUOOSi MONITORS Qlucochek Aocuchek QhJCOioan INSULIN INJICTORS Syringes Mdij3tor II 4 LV WE CARRY ALL DIABETIC SUPPLIED FREE PATIENT TRAINING WITH PURCHASE OF ANY DIABETIC MONITOR ^(CaU for Appointm9fH) OtTOMYSUPPUU •OUIM HOLLISTIR UMTiO 8WIIN COLOftJ^ BAND Free Consultation with our RN Bnterootomai Therapist With Purohiso of SuppNoa

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// Pag• 12 Henderson Home New*. Henderson, Nevada Thursday, January 1, 1986 Thursday, January 1, 1987 • JV'.-..vM,--' ttti>o •j'>it,K ? FOLLOW THE TRACKS ^ #% M % TO THE f0LO^0 RAILROADAV^ PASS tr HOTEL ^ AND CASINO t, {Ir>'.!;> %/ftZ* KOTEL & CASINO '.: Celebration Ian. 8-9, 87 iw>.^; *^kMdin464i'^ '*7tem4t€uut ^uu4t" ^04$te/4wuf ^P%<^Hi ^e^w Missiles from page 7 Cameron is a member of Scout Troop 44, Scoutmaster Dennis Groft. He is the son of Steve and Gayle Halversen. That is a great achievement and parents and friends are proud of Cameron. Skiing: Group of Henderson skiers enjoyed a few days last week at Brianhead in Utah. They were Marianne Belger with son and daughter. Jimmie and Mamie, Tony Leonard, Keith Cramer, Marc Bower, Tina Hamilton, Rick Bennett, Tammy Gillard and Gary Thompson. Couple came home with some minor injuries. signs of a good time (they will tell you!) Home for the Holidays: Twins, Rennie and Ronnie Miller are visiting their parents. Dr. Harold and Laura Jean Miller. Ron and wife Tammy and little Brasrton Joshua are here from Moscow, Idaho, where they are going to school. Tandy's parents Harrison and Barbara Stanton also live in Henderson. Rennie and wife Lohra Lee are also attending college. Miller family traditionally spend Christmas at Mt. Holly in Utah, a family holiday in a wintery, white setting. In the News: Saw where Hendersonian Stephen Eugene Phillips, son of Joseph H. and Shirley M. Phillips, was married to Bridget Jane Bilbray, daughter of Congressman James H. and Michaelene Bilbray of Las Vegas. They were married at Guardian Angel Cathedral by the Reverand Dan Nolan. The bride is a 1978 graduate of Gorman High School and the University of Arizona. The groom graduated from Basic High School in 1978 and is a graduate of UNLV. Both are currently employed by the Clark County School System. They are making their home in Las Vegas. Visit Home Town: Roland and Janice Phillips along with children, Terry Von, Tammy Pearl and Victor Roland, were all "home" for thie holidays to visit family and many friends. The Phillips' Uved here for many years, but are now Uving in Utah. Friends and neighbors were glad to see them again. „ -^ Capricorn: The Capricorn (bom between Dec. 22 and Jan. 22) are helped to make the season. Especially want to say congratulations said to be seldom flamboyant, somewhat cool and aloof, a person who to Homer and Carol Englestead who won First Place for Outdoor City, NV 89005. They need them and would appreciate it. Visiting: Montez Black, long time resident of Henderson.^iad some special visitors recently. The were Janiel and Norma Leavitt. Hope they enjoyed our bright sunshine. From California: Sam and Eleanor Davis had some special CSiristmas guests at their house. Eleanor's parents, Ehner and Othelia Stockton from Sacramento were here for the hoUdays. They enjoyed a really great family hoUday. Other Out-Of-Town Visitors: Previous resident, Dennis Bowman visited his family (the Haags and Shepherds) recently. Dennis and Vonnie live in Montana, but Dennis is presently working in San Bernardino, Calif., akid took the opportimity to visit while this close. Great to see him again. Dan Christensen, son of Steve and Jeannie Chrjstensen, who also used to live here and attended Basic High School as well as worked at the local Albertson store, was visiting from Beaver, Utah. Tall young man now. Nita C!ook, Lola Irons' mom has been here from Provo. We sort of claim her for our own here in Henderson. Colorado Guests: Amy and Bob Dickinson had some guests lastweek when Dean and Audrey Gent of Craig, Colorado stopped for awhile. Know they enjoyed the beautiful and unique Santa Claus collection Amy has in her home as well as the great weather. The Christmas Week: The last week of 1986 was a beautiful one weather-wise. All over town there was evidence of Santa's visit and gifts left under gaily decorated trees. All along our street could be heard the cosmic sound of the 'laser war" games, new roller skates rolled down the paved walks with their new owners, four-wheelers crossed the desert areas and new bikes gleamed as manjyiew owners learned to ride. VCR's were busy showing favorite tapes, great perfume arpma permeated the air, new sweaters, gowns, jewelery were in evidence everywhere. And most important was the feeling of love and happiness over it all. Do beUeve that many saw the gleaming star of Bethlehem in their mind's eye. Decorations: Special congratulations goes out to aU the beautiful homes decorated for the holiday season. They were spectacular and has the capacity for hard work and patience people who dress conservatively but very well; can wear solid gold jewelery well and have strong wants and goals in life. The January flower is the carnation and the birthstone of the Capricorn is the Garnet or the White Onyx. Lucky numbers are 2, 8 and 9. Colors are black and green. ^^ Some well known Caprjcoms, both living and dead, are Joan Baez, Humphrey Bogart, Spain's Juan Carlos, John Denver, Marlene Dietrich, Faye Dunaway, Nancy Lopez, Dolly Parton, Elvis Presley, Martin Luther King and Sissy Spacek. If you are a Capricorn, have a happy birthday whoever and whereever you are. • Special: There are a lot of special people all around us and I know it would take up all of this issue of the JVews to list them. And yet there would always be one more, and one more Say, like Beth Weideman and her dear sisters. Homer and Carol Englestead and the beauty of their Christmas Ughts and decorations (and many other things, too). Mavis Bennett with her great heart and strength and love of others, coupled with a drive to share and help everyone. All those patient folks who manned the Salvation Army donatioi stations to remind us that others need our help. Our doctors, nurses, teachers, public officials (that we seldom appreciate, I think), firemen, police officers, maihnen and women, newspaper people and oh so many more. Amy and Bob Dickinson and their wonderful "Santa Land." Oh, there are.so many special people in our town to call neighbor and friend. Henderson is special. Christmas Cards: Oh, again speaking of Christmas cards! When you've gone over those you've received and maybe cried a tear or two—of happiness, of course, they why don't you bundle up all those cards of a religious nature and mail them to St. Jude's, P.O. Box 985, Boulder Lighting. Home: Kevin Stoker, son of Kenneth and Leila Stoker came home for the Christmas Holiday. While here he drove to Junction, Utah, to get his grandparents, Lloyd and Hazel Stoker and bring them to 'Henderson to share in Christmas at the Stokers; Resolutions: Someone shared this with me so please let me share it with you. I will do more than belong I will do more than care I will do more than beheve I will more than be fair I will do more than forgive I will do more than dream I will do more than teach I will do more than earn I will do more than give I will participate I wiU help I will practice I will be kind I will %get I will work I will inspire I will enrich I will serve 10-4 and have a good one in 1987. (Jan. 1 through Jan. 8). January 1 Anniversaries: ifiv_._^Bob and Lou Anne Young; Roy and Kathryn Sneed January 2 Marian and Colleen Walker; Daniel and Vemea Walker January 3 Raymond and Phyllis Pulsipher January 4 Danny and Dell Hill January 5 Donita and Stan Holland; Clell and Mildred Covington; Helmuth and Lydia Mettler. January 6 Beverly and Weston Herschi HendariMi HMM Newt, HMUtenaB. Itataia Pli IS January 8 Bill and Sandra Kay Serecky Birthdays: Jan. 1 through Jan. 8) January 1 Charlotte Jordan, Terry Lynn Call, Beamell Lamb, Lewis Pssples, (^arie Atkin, Lisa Parry, Ronald Maurer, Marda Benge, Roy Die, Ramon Troy Smutz, Sandra Harvey, Charles Benion Brown, Scott Ssnders, politico J.D. Salinger 69, Barry Croldwater 79, band leader Xavier Cugat 88, actor Dana Andrews 79, actor Frank Langella 48, ecoaooust Eliot Janeway 75. January 2 Terry Atkinson Mather, Arlene Anderson, Pink Shinsel, Tonya Maestas, Sherrie Lynneze,' Shsrie Paez, Violet W. Gallachw, Jennifer Barber, Jana D. Niccum, Dorothy Bickle, Billie Joyce Adams, scienoe fiction writer Isaac Asimov 68, Opera star Renata Tebaldi 66, singers Julius La Rosa 58, Robert Miller 52, television evangelist Jim Bakker 49. Jsnuary 3 Rhett Kirk, Donna Taylor, Justin Hamberlin, Joe Peterson, Patty Adamson, Sue Ebert, Barbara Lefler, Carol Hobbs, Nichole (Tfark, Charles F. Henry, Virgil McKinney, Nichole Germanier, comedian and pianist Victor Borge 79, actress Victoria Principal 38. consumer reporter Betty Fumess 73. sportscaster Hank Stram 65, actors Dataey Cobnan 56, Jesse White 69, Eddie Egan 58, Mel Gibson 32, author Betty Rollin 52, singer Stephen Stills 43. singer Maxene Andrewa:90. January 4 Frank Huntsman. Tom Mathews, Steve Millet, Gordon Brooke, Joseph W. Ebert, Teresa Leming, Betty Golden, Dan Pearson, ABefe Richards, Twila Higgins, Jasmin M. Jones, GorDon Henry, Margaret Holder, William Weber, Amber Lynne Kozlowski, Jennifer Nelion, Melanie Blair. actress Dyan Cannon 51, actress Jane Wyman 74, fist"^ bara Rush 58, actors SterUng Holloway 83, Sorell Booke 58, boxing great Floyd Patterson 53, Opera star Grace Bumbry 47, Maureen Reagan (daughter of President) 47, football coach Don Shula 58. January 5 Brett Taylor Bennett, Tracey Groft, Amy Barber, Pamela Braun, Alvin Johnson, Kent Carr. Debbie Peeples. Elmer Madsen, Barbara Harris, Darlene Hirschi, Tina Tunnell, Stephen D. Wolser, Vance Miller, William J. Murphy, Kim Roundy, Donald Martin, Verl Famsworth, Andrew Mitchell, Brian Carter. Scott MiUet, Juan Carolos of Spain 50, pohtico Walter Mondale 60, actress Diane Keaton 42, actor Robert jDuvall 57. dan cer Alvin Alley 67^ actress Pamela Sue Martin 35, football coach Chuck Koll 56. JSnuary 6 Janet Barton Bennett, Jack Rincon, Josh Bowen, Jennifer Mayes, Meridee Lines, Galen Bigler, Aaron Blackburn. George Zahovetz, Karen Dewey, Alexis Adamson, Romona Whitmore, Rulon Gardner, Jay Lundberg, Carmen Pulsipher, Wendy Hess, Adam Medlin, Albert Jarvis Robers, Roy Bigler, James Maurer, golf great Nancy Lopez 31, actor Danny Thomas 74, actresses Bonnie Frankliii 44, Sylvia Syms 54, comedian Joey Adams 77, actress Loretta Young 75, singer Earl Scruggs 64, actor Vic Tayback 58. automaker John Z.peLorean 63. January 7 Dennis R. Law. Kerry Marshall, Donna Goldston, Karolyn Stewart, Rischelle Purcell, Sandi Murphy, Brian D. Pulsipher, Donna Seegmiller. Robert ifCdams, Jr., Slade Baldwin. Chad Murray. Joseph Bonfiglio, Winona Shinost, Sandi Dennett, Elizabeth Ruth Abbott, Dustin Alan Pattchett, singer Kenny Loggins 40, cartoonist Charles Adams 76, author William Peter Blatty 60, baseball great Tony Conigliaia:d3, newsman Douglas Kiker 58, song writer Leona Williams 45. ^ January 8 Dorothy Clark, Virginia Dodd, James Danie Short, Glenn Tharp, Ricahrd Murphy, Theresa Leigh Hardy, Mkel Lee Morrison, V^ue Lee Tyler, Don Dixon, Chris Sinanian, Soris Spencer, Earaey GclOez, Adam Brimhall, James H. Price. Preston Goodman, LaRue Snnth, singer David Bowie 40, comedian Soupy Sales 62, Elvis Presl^in Memory), actress Butterfly McQueen 78, actress Yvaette MiiUtBux 49, actor Jose Ferrer 76, Larry Storch 65, Ron Moody 64, newsmen Sandy Vanocur 60 and Charles Osgood 55, singer Shirley Bassey 51. Henderson City Council Agenda PUBLISHED: JANUARY 1, 1987 HENDERSON HOME NEWS AGENDA Tuesday, January 6, 1987 6:45 P.M. COMMITTEE MEETING COUNCIL CHAMBER HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL 243 WATER STREET I. CALL TO ORDER II. CONFIRMATION OF POSTING, ROLL CALL III. ACCEPTANCE OF ACfENDA IV ITEMS OF BUSINESS' 1. BILL NO. 627 Z-17-86 CITY OF HENDERSON-" AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE NO. 404 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 22SOUTH, RANGE 62 EAST, M.DJB. & M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM R-3 (LIMITED MULTIRESIDENCE DISTRICT) AND R-1 (ONE FAMILY RESIDENCE DISTRICT) TO R-1 (ONE FAMILY RESIDENCE DISTRICT)." 2. BILL NO. 628 ELECTION WARDS-AN ORDINANCE OF THE HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL REPEALING ORDINANCE NOS. 886 AND 954 IN THEIR ENTIRETY AND SETTING FORTH A NEW ORDINANCE ESTBLISHING THE WARDS WITHIN THE CITY OF HENDERSON. NEVADA, ACCORDING TO POPULATIONS AS, DETERMINED BY THE LAST PRECEDING NATIONAL DECENNIAL CENSUS CONDUCTED BY THE BUREAU OF CENSUS OP THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AS PROVIDED IN SECTION 1.040, ARTICLE 1, OF THE HENDERSON CITY CHARTER; AND OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELATED THERETO. V. ADJOURNMENT. PUBLISHED: JANUARY 1, 1967 HENDERSON HOME NEWS AGENDA Tuesday, January 6, 1987 7K)0 P.M. REGULAR MEETING COUNCIL CHAMBER HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL 243 WATER STREET I. CALL TO ORDER II. CONFIRMATION OF POSTING, ROLL CALL. INVOCATION, PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE III. ACCTPTANCE OF AGENDA IV. CONSENT AGENDA-Mayor Keetersoa to read the itema of^tiie Consent^Ageoda offering anyone present an opportunity to remove any itema for discussion. 1. MINUTES-Committee and Special Meeting December 16, 1986. 2. AUTHORIZATION to go to bid on the pipeline connecting Reeervoir 17 and Reaervoir 1. 3. REJECT bida for purchaae of the Black Mountain Top Site and AUTHORIZE negotiations for leaaing acreage through the uae of an outaide conanltant. 4. AWARD aoaed Circuit Televiaion Syatem for Jail Security to Electronic Specialist, Inc. in the amaaut of $27,892.06 5. AUTHORIZE purchaae of Telewave aateaaa combiner/multieoupler equipBMBt froan Frontier Radio, Inc. in the amount of $16,681.39 to be funded from Communications Upgrade Project Account 68-21-50-7482. 6. AWARD bid for oommerical riding, rotary lawnmower to C.R. Jaeechke. Inc. in the amount of $18,528.00 to be funded from Account No. 51-4S4)l-7003. 7. AWARD Contract No. 86^*04. Meoa Pump Station, to the toweat reapoaaible bidder. 8. ADOPT of new Street and Highway Priority list. 9. REQUEST for adjustment to water bill at 414 Dogwood Street-Virginia Kelliher. 10. ORDER of Vacation-Coogan Drive. 11. RTC Cooperative Agreement No. 139<^harle8ton Boulevard. 12. PURD Agreement—Momingside, Green Valley Investments. 13. PURD Agreement—Arroyo Grande Adult Mobile Home Estates, Arroyo Grande Development Co. 14. APPLICATION for locksmith and aafe mechanics license for A&W Locksmith and Fire Equipment, Steven Weintraub. 15. PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDATIONS-December 18, 1986 Z-3-86 ANC, INC. a) Request from American Nevada Corporation for a Zone Change on 102 acres more or leas from C-V (Civic District) to R-E (Ranch Estates Diatrict) to make the land compatible with surrounding land uae patterns, located in portion of Section 21 and 22, Township 22 South, Range 62 Eaat. aouth of Lake Mead Drive and west of Gibeon Road. MP-2-86 ANC, INC. 6) Request from American Nevada Corp. Inc. to consider approval of a Master Plan for land uae and modification of standard atreet croaa aections on 567 JS acres more or less generally located aouth of the Union Pacific Railroad tracks at Green Valley Parkway in the Green Valley neighborhood and to consider the adoption of City policy on a dty-wide trail system and adoption of a City policy to acquire Pittman Waah aa public open space. MSH-2-86 ANC, INC. c) Request from American Nevada Corp. to adopt proposed street right-of-way realignments for Windmill Lane and Valle Verde Drive into the Master Streets and Highways Plan of the City of Henderson Comprehensive Plan. Z-1986 ANC, INC. d) Request from American Nevada Corp., and Green Valley Aaaociates, Ltd. for a Zone Change from M (Industrial Diatrict), MP (Industrial Park Diatrict), TR (Mobile Home Park Residence District), C2 (General Commercial District), and R-1 (One Family Residence District) to R-1 (One Family Residence District), R-2 (Two Family Residence Diatrict), C-1 (limited/Neighborhood Commercial District) and CV (Civic Diatrict) •n 567.5 acres more or leas to accomodate a master plan for RIVER RUN generally located aouth of the Union Pacific Railroad tracks at Green 'Valley Parkway. PUIV6-86 TM-14-86 U.S. HOME e) Requeat from U.S. Home Corp. for Planned Unit Residential Development and Tentative Map Review of LAKE RIDGE ESTATES, conaiating of 111 loU (single family detached homes on compact lota) on 24.06 acree more or less with a denaity of 4.6 dwelling unite per acree in a R-1 (One Family District generally located north of Warm Springe Road and eaat of Valle Verde Drive. VI. CITIZEN'S CONCERNS: Items diacuaaed cannot be acted upon at this meeting, but can be referred by Council to the next Regular Meeting for consideration. V. UNFINISHED BUSINESS: 1. APPOINTMENT TO PARKS AND RECREATION BOARD-one vacancy. 2. REQUEST waiver of ordinance eatabliahing the 1500 foot Tavern rale. Betty Redmon at 1963 Boulder Highway. 3. BILL NO. 627 Z-17-86 CITY OF HENDERSON-" AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE NO. 404 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 62 EAST, M J).B. M.. CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA. PROM R<3 (LIMITED MULTIRESIDENCE DISTRICT) AND Rl (ONE FAMILY RESIDENCE DI8TRICT)T0 Rl (ONE FAMILY RESIDENCE DISTRICT." (Fbal actkm) 4. BILL NO. 628 ELECTION WARDS-AN ORDINANCE OF THE HtNDBMON CITY COUNCIL REPEALING ORDINANCE NOS. 886 AND 964 IN THEIR ENTIRETY AND SETTING FORTH A NEW ORDINANCE E8TABUSHING THE WARDS WITHIN THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA, ACCORDING TO POPULATION AS DETERMINED Efj^THE LAST PRECEDING NATIONAL DECENNIAL CENSUS CONDUCTED BY THE BUREAU OF CENSUS OF THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AS PROVIDED IN SECTION 1.040, ARTICLE 1, OF THE HENDERSON CJlTY CHARTER; AND OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELA1XD THERETO. (Final action) 5. CITY HALL-City Hall/Library-Diacuaaioii/ActioB. VI NE!W BUSINESS' — 1. LEGISLATIVE PACKAGE-Joint Package of Nevada League of Cities/Clark County/City of Henderson. 2. RES. Z-3-86 ANC, INC.-" A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON COMMITTING THE GFtY COUNCIL TO REZONE CERTAIN PROPERTY WITHIN THE ^^TY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON. DESCRIBED AS PORTIONS OF SECTIONS 21 AND 22, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH. RAMSE 62 EAST. MJ>.M.. CLARK COUNTY. NEVADA. FROM CV tC^K DISTRICT) TO R-E (RANCH ESTATES DISTRICT)." 3. RES. Z-l ANC. INC. RIVER RUN-" A RESOLUTION OFBIE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON COMMITTING THE CITY COUNCIL TO REZONE CF"TA1N PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS f^ TIONS OF SECTIONS 3, 8, and 17, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RAIfQE 62 EAST, M.D.B. & M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM M (INDUSTRIAL DIStRICT), MP (INDUSTRIAL PARK DISTRICT), TR (MOBILE HOME PARK RESIDENCE DISTRICT), C-2 (GENERAL COMMERICAL DISTRICT). CV (CIVIC DISTRICT), AND R-1 (ONE FAMILY RESIDENCE DISTRICT) TO R-1 (ONE FAMILY RESIDENCE DISTRICT), R-2 (TWO FAMILY RESIDENCE DISTRICT), Cl (LIMITED/NEIGHBORHOOD COMMERCIAL DISTRICT, AND CV (CIVIC DISTRICT)." 4. RES. NLC-A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OP "ME CITY OF HENDERSON EXPRESSING ITS SUPPORT OF THB^ITY OF LAS VEGAS TO BRING THE NATIONAL LEAGlPDP CITIES 1987 CONVENTION TO LAS VEGAS. 5. RES. LID 862 SUPPLE. INITIAL RES.-A RESOLUTION AAfBMDING AND SUPPLEMENTING RESOLUTION NO. 1187 AOOPTBD ON DECEMBER 2.1986 BY THE ADDITION OF ATHENS AVBHVE TO THE PROPOSED LOCAL IMPROVEMENT DISTIICT N(KH2 WITHIN THE CITY OP HENDERSON. NEVADA AND T03t CREATED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CITY CHARTER AHD THE CONSOLIDATED LOCAL IMPROVEMENTS LAW AND XLL LAWS AMENDATORY THEREOF AND SUPPLBMENTAt THERETO; AND PROVIDING THE EFFECTIVE DATE Hra^F. 6. BILL NO. 30 PARKS-"AN ORDINANCE AMENDING TICLE 8, CHARTER 8.99, SECTION 8.99.030 OF THE HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE, PROHIBITED CONDUCT GENERALLY, BY>DING TWO NEW SUBSECTIONS (g) AND (k). CONCERNING GUSSS BEVERAGE CONTAINERS AND PUBUC PARK POSTED CL06^ TIMES, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO." (Retarto Committee) VII. SET COMMITTEE MEETING. VIII. ADJOURNMENT. Agenda DeadHue All Iteuia for hMlnaion oa the COBMU Jaaoarjr 20. 1W7 must be aubaaittad, in wtMaf. M later than Thursday. January 8,1987 at 4-09 PJI. to tke Caty Clark's Office. Aay its4a iMsivsd after the above dirte wW OB the MXt Cky CouacH for the Maatii^lrf beplaM ^

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// Pag• 12 Henderson Home New*. Henderson, Nevada Thursday, January 1, 1986 Thursday, January 1, 1987 • JV'.-..vM,--' ttti>o •j'>it,K ? FOLLOW THE TRACKS ^ #% M % TO THE f0LO^0 RAILROADAV^ PASS tr HOTEL ^ AND CASINO t, {Ir>'.!;> %/ftZ* KOTEL & CASINO '.: Celebration Ian. 8-9, 87 iw>.^; *^kMdin464i'^ '*7tem4t€uut ^uu4t" ^04$te/4wuf ^P%<^Hi ^e^w Missiles from page 7 Cameron is a member of Scout Troop 44, Scoutmaster Dennis Groft. He is the son of Steve and Gayle Halversen. That is a great achievement and parents and friends are proud of Cameron. Skiing: Group of Henderson skiers enjoyed a few days last week at Brianhead in Utah. They were Marianne Belger with son and daughter. Jimmie and Mamie, Tony Leonard, Keith Cramer, Marc Bower, Tina Hamilton, Rick Bennett, Tammy Gillard and Gary Thompson. Couple came home with some minor injuries. signs of a good time (they will tell you!) Home for the Holidays: Twins, Rennie and Ronnie Miller are visiting their parents. Dr. Harold and Laura Jean Miller. Ron and wife Tammy and little Brasrton Joshua are here from Moscow, Idaho, where they are going to school. Tandy's parents Harrison and Barbara Stanton also live in Henderson. Rennie and wife Lohra Lee are also attending college. Miller family traditionally spend Christmas at Mt. Holly in Utah, a family holiday in a wintery, white setting. In the News: Saw where Hendersonian Stephen Eugene Phillips, son of Joseph H. and Shirley M. Phillips, was married to Bridget Jane Bilbray, daughter of Congressman James H. and Michaelene Bilbray of Las Vegas. They were married at Guardian Angel Cathedral by the Reverand Dan Nolan. The bride is a 1978 graduate of Gorman High School and the University of Arizona. The groom graduated from Basic High School in 1978 and is a graduate of UNLV. Both are currently employed by the Clark County School System. They are making their home in Las Vegas. Visit Home Town: Roland and Janice Phillips along with children, Terry Von, Tammy Pearl and Victor Roland, were all "home" for thie holidays to visit family and many friends. The Phillips' Uved here for many years, but are now Uving in Utah. Friends and neighbors were glad to see them again. „ -^ Capricorn: The Capricorn (bom between Dec. 22 and Jan. 22) are helped to make the season. Especially want to say congratulations said to be seldom flamboyant, somewhat cool and aloof, a person who to Homer and Carol Englestead who won First Place for Outdoor City, NV 89005. They need them and would appreciate it. Visiting: Montez Black, long time resident of Henderson.^iad some special visitors recently. The were Janiel and Norma Leavitt. Hope they enjoyed our bright sunshine. From California: Sam and Eleanor Davis had some special CSiristmas guests at their house. Eleanor's parents, Ehner and Othelia Stockton from Sacramento were here for the hoUdays. They enjoyed a really great family hoUday. Other Out-Of-Town Visitors: Previous resident, Dennis Bowman visited his family (the Haags and Shepherds) recently. Dennis and Vonnie live in Montana, but Dennis is presently working in San Bernardino, Calif., akid took the opportimity to visit while this close. Great to see him again. Dan Christensen, son of Steve and Jeannie Chrjstensen, who also used to live here and attended Basic High School as well as worked at the local Albertson store, was visiting from Beaver, Utah. Tall young man now. Nita C!ook, Lola Irons' mom has been here from Provo. We sort of claim her for our own here in Henderson. Colorado Guests: Amy and Bob Dickinson had some guests lastweek when Dean and Audrey Gent of Craig, Colorado stopped for awhile. Know they enjoyed the beautiful and unique Santa Claus collection Amy has in her home as well as the great weather. The Christmas Week: The last week of 1986 was a beautiful one weather-wise. All over town there was evidence of Santa's visit and gifts left under gaily decorated trees. All along our street could be heard the cosmic sound of the 'laser war" games, new roller skates rolled down the paved walks with their new owners, four-wheelers crossed the desert areas and new bikes gleamed as manjyiew owners learned to ride. VCR's were busy showing favorite tapes, great perfume arpma permeated the air, new sweaters, gowns, jewelery were in evidence everywhere. And most important was the feeling of love and happiness over it all. Do beUeve that many saw the gleaming star of Bethlehem in their mind's eye. Decorations: Special congratulations goes out to aU the beautiful homes decorated for the holiday season. They were spectacular and has the capacity for hard work and patience people who dress conservatively but very well; can wear solid gold jewelery well and have strong wants and goals in life. The January flower is the carnation and the birthstone of the Capricorn is the Garnet or the White Onyx. Lucky numbers are 2, 8 and 9. Colors are black and green. ^^ Some well known Caprjcoms, both living and dead, are Joan Baez, Humphrey Bogart, Spain's Juan Carlos, John Denver, Marlene Dietrich, Faye Dunaway, Nancy Lopez, Dolly Parton, Elvis Presley, Martin Luther King and Sissy Spacek. If you are a Capricorn, have a happy birthday whoever and whereever you are. • Special: There are a lot of special people all around us and I know it would take up all of this issue of the JVews to list them. And yet there would always be one more, and one more Say, like Beth Weideman and her dear sisters. Homer and Carol Englestead and the beauty of their Christmas Ughts and decorations (and many other things, too). Mavis Bennett with her great heart and strength and love of others, coupled with a drive to share and help everyone. All those patient folks who manned the Salvation Army donatioi stations to remind us that others need our help. Our doctors, nurses, teachers, public officials (that we seldom appreciate, I think), firemen, police officers, maihnen and women, newspaper people and oh so many more. Amy and Bob Dickinson and their wonderful "Santa Land." Oh, there are.so many special people in our town to call neighbor and friend. Henderson is special. Christmas Cards: Oh, again speaking of Christmas cards! When you've gone over those you've received and maybe cried a tear or two—of happiness, of course, they why don't you bundle up all those cards of a religious nature and mail them to St. Jude's, P.O. Box 985, Boulder Lighting. Home: Kevin Stoker, son of Kenneth and Leila Stoker came home for the Christmas Holiday. While here he drove to Junction, Utah, to get his grandparents, Lloyd and Hazel Stoker and bring them to 'Henderson to share in Christmas at the Stokers; Resolutions: Someone shared this with me so please let me share it with you. I will do more than belong I will do more than care I will do more than beheve I will more than be fair I will do more than forgive I will do more than dream I will do more than teach I will do more than earn I will do more than give I will participate I wiU help I will practice I will be kind I will %get I will work I will inspire I will enrich I will serve 10-4 and have a good one in 1987. (Jan. 1 through Jan. 8). January 1 Anniversaries: ifiv_._^Bob and Lou Anne Young; Roy and Kathryn Sneed January 2 Marian and Colleen Walker; Daniel and Vemea Walker January 3 Raymond and Phyllis Pulsipher January 4 Danny and Dell Hill January 5 Donita and Stan Holland; Clell and Mildred Covington; Helmuth and Lydia Mettler. January 6 Beverly and Weston Herschi HendariMi HMM Newt, HMUtenaB. Itataia Pli IS January 8 Bill and Sandra Kay Serecky Birthdays: Jan. 1 through Jan. 8) January 1 Charlotte Jordan, Terry Lynn Call, Beamell Lamb, Lewis Pssples, (^arie Atkin, Lisa Parry, Ronald Maurer, Marda Benge, Roy Die, Ramon Troy Smutz, Sandra Harvey, Charles Benion Brown, Scott Ssnders, politico J.D. Salinger 69, Barry Croldwater 79, band leader Xavier Cugat 88, actor Dana Andrews 79, actor Frank Langella 48, ecoaooust Eliot Janeway 75. January 2 Terry Atkinson Mather, Arlene Anderson, Pink Shinsel, Tonya Maestas, Sherrie Lynneze,' Shsrie Paez, Violet W. Gallachw, Jennifer Barber, Jana D. Niccum, Dorothy Bickle, Billie Joyce Adams, scienoe fiction writer Isaac Asimov 68, Opera star Renata Tebaldi 66, singers Julius La Rosa 58, Robert Miller 52, television evangelist Jim Bakker 49. Jsnuary 3 Rhett Kirk, Donna Taylor, Justin Hamberlin, Joe Peterson, Patty Adamson, Sue Ebert, Barbara Lefler, Carol Hobbs, Nichole (Tfark, Charles F. Henry, Virgil McKinney, Nichole Germanier, comedian and pianist Victor Borge 79, actress Victoria Principal 38. consumer reporter Betty Fumess 73. sportscaster Hank Stram 65, actors Dataey Cobnan 56, Jesse White 69, Eddie Egan 58, Mel Gibson 32, author Betty Rollin 52, singer Stephen Stills 43. singer Maxene Andrewa:90. January 4 Frank Huntsman. Tom Mathews, Steve Millet, Gordon Brooke, Joseph W. Ebert, Teresa Leming, Betty Golden, Dan Pearson, ABefe Richards, Twila Higgins, Jasmin M. Jones, GorDon Henry, Margaret Holder, William Weber, Amber Lynne Kozlowski, Jennifer Nelion, Melanie Blair. actress Dyan Cannon 51, actress Jane Wyman 74, fist"^ bara Rush 58, actors SterUng Holloway 83, Sorell Booke 58, boxing great Floyd Patterson 53, Opera star Grace Bumbry 47, Maureen Reagan (daughter of President) 47, football coach Don Shula 58. January 5 Brett Taylor Bennett, Tracey Groft, Amy Barber, Pamela Braun, Alvin Johnson, Kent Carr. Debbie Peeples. Elmer Madsen, Barbara Harris, Darlene Hirschi, Tina Tunnell, Stephen D. Wolser, Vance Miller, William J. Murphy, Kim Roundy, Donald Martin, Verl Famsworth, Andrew Mitchell, Brian Carter. Scott MiUet, Juan Carolos of Spain 50, pohtico Walter Mondale 60, actress Diane Keaton 42, actor Robert jDuvall 57. dan cer Alvin Alley 67^ actress Pamela Sue Martin 35, football coach Chuck Koll 56. JSnuary 6 Janet Barton Bennett, Jack Rincon, Josh Bowen, Jennifer Mayes, Meridee Lines, Galen Bigler, Aaron Blackburn. George Zahovetz, Karen Dewey, Alexis Adamson, Romona Whitmore, Rulon Gardner, Jay Lundberg, Carmen Pulsipher, Wendy Hess, Adam Medlin, Albert Jarvis Robers, Roy Bigler, James Maurer, golf great Nancy Lopez 31, actor Danny Thomas 74, actresses Bonnie Frankliii 44, Sylvia Syms 54, comedian Joey Adams 77, actress Loretta Young 75, singer Earl Scruggs 64, actor Vic Tayback 58. automaker John Z.peLorean 63. January 7 Dennis R. Law. Kerry Marshall, Donna Goldston, Karolyn Stewart, Rischelle Purcell, Sandi Murphy, Brian D. Pulsipher, Donna Seegmiller. Robert ifCdams, Jr., Slade Baldwin. Chad Murray. Joseph Bonfiglio, Winona Shinost, Sandi Dennett, Elizabeth Ruth Abbott, Dustin Alan Pattchett, singer Kenny Loggins 40, cartoonist Charles Adams 76, author William Peter Blatty 60, baseball great Tony Conigliaia:d3, newsman Douglas Kiker 58, song writer Leona Williams 45. ^ January 8 Dorothy Clark, Virginia Dodd, James Danie Short, Glenn Tharp, Ricahrd Murphy, Theresa Leigh Hardy, Mkel Lee Morrison, V^ue Lee Tyler, Don Dixon, Chris Sinanian, Soris Spencer, Earaey GclOez, Adam Brimhall, James H. Price. Preston Goodman, LaRue Snnth, singer David Bowie 40, comedian Soupy Sales 62, Elvis Presl^in Memory), actress Butterfly McQueen 78, actress Yvaette MiiUtBux 49, actor Jose Ferrer 76, Larry Storch 65, Ron Moody 64, newsmen Sandy Vanocur 60 and Charles Osgood 55, singer Shirley Bassey 51. Henderson City Council Agenda PUBLISHED: JANUARY 1, 1987 HENDERSON HOME NEWS AGENDA Tuesday, January 6, 1987 6:45 P.M. COMMITTEE MEETING COUNCIL CHAMBER HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL 243 WATER STREET I. CALL TO ORDER II. CONFIRMATION OF POSTING, ROLL CALL III. ACCEPTANCE OF ACfENDA IV ITEMS OF BUSINESS' 1. BILL NO. 627 Z-17-86 CITY OF HENDERSON-" AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE NO. 404 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 22SOUTH, RANGE 62 EAST, M.DJB. & M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM R-3 (LIMITED MULTIRESIDENCE DISTRICT) AND R-1 (ONE FAMILY RESIDENCE DISTRICT) TO R-1 (ONE FAMILY RESIDENCE DISTRICT)." 2. BILL NO. 628 ELECTION WARDS-AN ORDINANCE OF THE HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL REPEALING ORDINANCE NOS. 886 AND 954 IN THEIR ENTIRETY AND SETTING FORTH A NEW ORDINANCE ESTBLISHING THE WARDS WITHIN THE CITY OF HENDERSON. NEVADA, ACCORDING TO POPULATIONS AS, DETERMINED BY THE LAST PRECEDING NATIONAL DECENNIAL CENSUS CONDUCTED BY THE BUREAU OF CENSUS OP THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AS PROVIDED IN SECTION 1.040, ARTICLE 1, OF THE HENDERSON CITY CHARTER; AND OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELATED THERETO. V. ADJOURNMENT. PUBLISHED: JANUARY 1, 1967 HENDERSON HOME NEWS AGENDA Tuesday, January 6, 1987 7K)0 P.M. REGULAR MEETING COUNCIL CHAMBER HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL 243 WATER STREET I. CALL TO ORDER II. CONFIRMATION OF POSTING, ROLL CALL. INVOCATION, PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE III. ACCTPTANCE OF AGENDA IV. CONSENT AGENDA-Mayor Keetersoa to read the itema of^tiie Consent^Ageoda offering anyone present an opportunity to remove any itema for discussion. 1. MINUTES-Committee and Special Meeting December 16, 1986. 2. AUTHORIZATION to go to bid on the pipeline connecting Reeervoir 17 and Reaervoir 1. 3. REJECT bida for purchaae of the Black Mountain Top Site and AUTHORIZE negotiations for leaaing acreage through the uae of an outaide conanltant. 4. AWARD aoaed Circuit Televiaion Syatem for Jail Security to Electronic Specialist, Inc. in the amaaut of $27,892.06 5. AUTHORIZE purchaae of Telewave aateaaa combiner/multieoupler equipBMBt froan Frontier Radio, Inc. in the amount of $16,681.39 to be funded from Communications Upgrade Project Account 68-21-50-7482. 6. AWARD bid for oommerical riding, rotary lawnmower to C.R. Jaeechke. Inc. in the amount of $18,528.00 to be funded from Account No. 51-4S4)l-7003. 7. AWARD Contract No. 86^*04. Meoa Pump Station, to the toweat reapoaaible bidder. 8. ADOPT of new Street and Highway Priority list. 9. REQUEST for adjustment to water bill at 414 Dogwood Street-Virginia Kelliher. 10. ORDER of Vacation-Coogan Drive. 11. RTC Cooperative Agreement No. 139<^harle8ton Boulevard. 12. PURD Agreement—Momingside, Green Valley Investments. 13. PURD Agreement—Arroyo Grande Adult Mobile Home Estates, Arroyo Grande Development Co. 14. APPLICATION for locksmith and aafe mechanics license for A&W Locksmith and Fire Equipment, Steven Weintraub. 15. PLANNING COMMISSION RECOMMENDATIONS-December 18, 1986 Z-3-86 ANC, INC. a) Request from American Nevada Corporation for a Zone Change on 102 acres more or leas from C-V (Civic District) to R-E (Ranch Estates Diatrict) to make the land compatible with surrounding land uae patterns, located in portion of Section 21 and 22, Township 22 South, Range 62 Eaat. aouth of Lake Mead Drive and west of Gibeon Road. MP-2-86 ANC, INC. 6) Request from American Nevada Corp. Inc. to consider approval of a Master Plan for land uae and modification of standard atreet croaa aections on 567 JS acres more or less generally located aouth of the Union Pacific Railroad tracks at Green Valley Parkway in the Green Valley neighborhood and to consider the adoption of City policy on a dty-wide trail system and adoption of a City policy to acquire Pittman Waah aa public open space. MSH-2-86 ANC, INC. c) Request from American Nevada Corp. to adopt proposed street right-of-way realignments for Windmill Lane and Valle Verde Drive into the Master Streets and Highways Plan of the City of Henderson Comprehensive Plan. Z-1986 ANC, INC. d) Request from American Nevada Corp., and Green Valley Aaaociates, Ltd. for a Zone Change from M (Industrial Diatrict), MP (Industrial Park Diatrict), TR (Mobile Home Park Residence District), C2 (General Commercial District), and R-1 (One Family Residence District) to R-1 (One Family Residence District), R-2 (Two Family Residence Diatrict), C-1 (limited/Neighborhood Commercial District) and CV (Civic Diatrict) •n 567.5 acres more or leas to accomodate a master plan for RIVER RUN generally located aouth of the Union Pacific Railroad tracks at Green 'Valley Parkway. PUIV6-86 TM-14-86 U.S. HOME e) Requeat from U.S. Home Corp. for Planned Unit Residential Development and Tentative Map Review of LAKE RIDGE ESTATES, conaiating of 111 loU (single family detached homes on compact lota) on 24.06 acree more or less with a denaity of 4.6 dwelling unite per acree in a R-1 (One Family District generally located north of Warm Springe Road and eaat of Valle Verde Drive. VI. CITIZEN'S CONCERNS: Items diacuaaed cannot be acted upon at this meeting, but can be referred by Council to the next Regular Meeting for consideration. V. UNFINISHED BUSINESS: 1. APPOINTMENT TO PARKS AND RECREATION BOARD-one vacancy. 2. REQUEST waiver of ordinance eatabliahing the 1500 foot Tavern rale. Betty Redmon at 1963 Boulder Highway. 3. BILL NO. 627 Z-17-86 CITY OF HENDERSON-" AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE NO. 404 BY AMENDING THE ZONING MAP TO RECLASSIFY CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS A PORTION OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 62 EAST, M J).B. M.. CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA. PROM R<3 (LIMITED MULTIRESIDENCE DISTRICT) AND Rl (ONE FAMILY RESIDENCE DI8TRICT)T0 Rl (ONE FAMILY RESIDENCE DISTRICT." (Fbal actkm) 4. BILL NO. 628 ELECTION WARDS-AN ORDINANCE OF THE HtNDBMON CITY COUNCIL REPEALING ORDINANCE NOS. 886 AND 964 IN THEIR ENTIRETY AND SETTING FORTH A NEW ORDINANCE E8TABUSHING THE WARDS WITHIN THE CITY OF HENDERSON, NEVADA, ACCORDING TO POPULATION AS DETERMINED Efj^THE LAST PRECEDING NATIONAL DECENNIAL CENSUS CONDUCTED BY THE BUREAU OF CENSUS OF THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AS PROVIDED IN SECTION 1.040, ARTICLE 1, OF THE HENDERSON CJlTY CHARTER; AND OTHER MATTERS PROPERLY RELA1XD THERETO. (Final action) 5. CITY HALL-City Hall/Library-Diacuaaioii/ActioB. VI NE!W BUSINESS' — 1. LEGISLATIVE PACKAGE-Joint Package of Nevada League of Cities/Clark County/City of Henderson. 2. RES. Z-3-86 ANC, INC.-" A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON COMMITTING THE GFtY COUNCIL TO REZONE CERTAIN PROPERTY WITHIN THE ^^TY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON. DESCRIBED AS PORTIONS OF SECTIONS 21 AND 22, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH. RAMSE 62 EAST. MJ>.M.. CLARK COUNTY. NEVADA. FROM CV tC^K DISTRICT) TO R-E (RANCH ESTATES DISTRICT)." 3. RES. Z-l ANC. INC. RIVER RUN-" A RESOLUTION OFBIE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON COMMITTING THE CITY COUNCIL TO REZONE CF"TA1N PROPERTY WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF HENDERSON, DESCRIBED AS f^ TIONS OF SECTIONS 3, 8, and 17, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RAIfQE 62 EAST, M.D.B. & M., CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA, FROM M (INDUSTRIAL DIStRICT), MP (INDUSTRIAL PARK DISTRICT), TR (MOBILE HOME PARK RESIDENCE DISTRICT), C-2 (GENERAL COMMERICAL DISTRICT). CV (CIVIC DISTRICT), AND R-1 (ONE FAMILY RESIDENCE DISTRICT) TO R-1 (ONE FAMILY RESIDENCE DISTRICT), R-2 (TWO FAMILY RESIDENCE DISTRICT), Cl (LIMITED/NEIGHBORHOOD COMMERCIAL DISTRICT, AND CV (CIVIC DISTRICT)." 4. RES. NLC-A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OP "ME CITY OF HENDERSON EXPRESSING ITS SUPPORT OF THB^ITY OF LAS VEGAS TO BRING THE NATIONAL LEAGlPDP CITIES 1987 CONVENTION TO LAS VEGAS. 5. RES. LID 862 SUPPLE. INITIAL RES.-A RESOLUTION AAfBMDING AND SUPPLEMENTING RESOLUTION NO. 1187 AOOPTBD ON DECEMBER 2.1986 BY THE ADDITION OF ATHENS AVBHVE TO THE PROPOSED LOCAL IMPROVEMENT DISTIICT N(KH2 WITHIN THE CITY OP HENDERSON. NEVADA AND T03t CREATED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE CITY CHARTER AHD THE CONSOLIDATED LOCAL IMPROVEMENTS LAW AND XLL LAWS AMENDATORY THEREOF AND SUPPLBMENTAt THERETO; AND PROVIDING THE EFFECTIVE DATE Hra^F. 6. BILL NO. 30 PARKS-"AN ORDINANCE AMENDING TICLE 8, CHARTER 8.99, SECTION 8.99.030 OF THE HENDERSON MUNICIPAL CODE, PROHIBITED CONDUCT GENERALLY, BY>DING TWO NEW SUBSECTIONS (g) AND (k). CONCERNING GUSSS BEVERAGE CONTAINERS AND PUBUC PARK POSTED CL06^ TIMES, AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO." (Retarto Committee) VII. SET COMMITTEE MEETING. VIII. ADJOURNMENT. Agenda DeadHue All Iteuia for hMlnaion oa the COBMU Jaaoarjr 20. 1W7 must be aubaaittad, in wtMaf. M later than Thursday. January 8,1987 at 4-09 PJI. to tke Caty Clark's Office. Aay its4a iMsivsd after the above dirte wW OB the MXt Cky CouacH for the Maatii^lrf beplaM ^

PAGE 14

mmmi Sportsmen's news Page 14 Henderson Home News and Boulder Cl(y News Thuraday, January 1,1986 *^i !i* : (oidellnes by Jim Ooff Home Ntwt Correspondent After setting home for two weekends and not fishing I couldn't stand It any longer. On Saturday morning, I checked the fishing chart which allowed the prime fiahing time at 8:30 a.m. Although that time of the morning is atill awf^ cold, my father-in-law. Bob Ward, and 9yaalf filled our thermoeea and arrived at the Vegas Wash launch framp gt 8 a.m. >^ Aa I turned the key to start the motor, nothing happened, dead ; battary. After checking battery connectori, everything seemed OK! Ulan I fbund the problem. I had lefl my LCD fishing graph on from I the laat trip. After switching batteries, we were on our way. We had i atopped at the tacklrahop and picked up a doaen four inch live minI nowa on the way to the lakb. i Bob prefers Minnowa, while my choice for winter fishing for Stripers ..." 'Get hooked on fishing, not drugs' groups message is Jigging Spoons. Winter time is when you must depend on your fishing graph. Unless you just want to go out there and hope. My confidence level is much higher when I can see fish on the graph. Past experience has proven at this time of year most of the Stripers will hold on the ends of the far reaching points where they drop off into the main lake channel. We graphed the main channel for approximately a half mile with no fish. We returned back to the Marina and started moving up the channel again, except this time we would cut out of the channel and head up the points reaching into the main channel. On the second point we found Stripers on the ridge of the point in 100 feet of water. The fish were in a school of bait on the structure. We both dropped Jigging Spoons down and had a double hook up. For the next two hours we caught fish on that point. The school would move up and down the ridge from 100 feet to 50 feet following the bait. After two hours and about 10 Stripers in the pound and a half to three pound range, the Hsb left the structure. We had a light chop on the water during that time. They seemed to quit when the wind stopped and the lake turned slick on the surface. We zig-zagged back and forth across the main channel checking points approximately fifteen minutes later we found a large school on the ridge of another point on the opposite side of the channel. This was a larger school and we had several double hook ups. Instead of just jigging up and down, we would drop our jigs to the bottom and reel u fast as possible approximately 20 feet up then drop it back down. Some fish would hit the jig on the fast retrieve and some would hit it on the fall. Bob caught eight fish on minnows; all of mine came on one-and-one-half ounce Silver Spoons. By 11:30 a.m. we were limited out and continued to catch and release fish. After about 9:30 a.m. long sleeved flannel shirts were all you needed to keep warm. We were home by 1 p.m. and had a nice fish fry that night to top off an excellent day of winter fishing. On Febraury 7 and 8, we will once again be putting Christmas trees into Lake Mead out of Calville Bay. This will be the third year for this project. We have placed approximately 20,000 trees into the lake for Bass habitat. If you have been fishing Lake Mead, now is the time to help put something back. We need vdunteers for this project again this year. Last year approximately $80,000 in materials and labor were donated. This amount was used to qualify for federal matching funds of up to $260,000. If you can help, call me in the evenings at 566-8396 or Don Solberger at Sunset Tackle, Monday through Friday, 6 a.m. to noon and sign up for the work project. Keep your hooks sharp' and good fishing! I I /Dniga are everywhere I kwk, : and many kkU who use drugs don't •rsalim how great it is to get out :and fish and be turned on by cat: diing flsh, or juat enjoying the outI doora," writea Matthew Deakins, a il4*year*ip..n-'-ACSAA offers annual ski reports The California State Automobile Association (AAA) is obaervinf ita thirtieth year of providing dt^jkaila on aki conditions and jaaather information to winter aporta fans. A daily recorded telephone sumtery of skiing and weather confitiona in the Sierra Nevada is ilrailable by calling (415) M4-6440. '3Baporta arc prorided 24 houra l4ay, with an update each weekiiy morning by 10 a.m. "^IQeven of the ski areaa on the Brat 1966 CSAA ski reports are included in thia year's Ski Phone. nooeer rseorta are Laaeen Park, (fofar Bowl, Donner Ski Ranch, ti^uaw Valley, Sierra Ski Ranch, (MfB Ridge, Badger Pass, MamiQOth Mountain, Mt. Rose, Heaven\f Valley and Echo Summit. -:t)ther ski resorts currently Mporting to CSAA are Alpine Maadows, Boreal, Homewood, ^e Mountain, Kirkwood, Mt. IWM, Northatar, Sierra Summit, fti Incline, Tahoe Donner, Bear ^Qllley Nordic, Tahoe Nordic, llQral Gorge, Eagle Mountain Nordic, Mt. ShaaU Ski Park and ^fda Springe. "^ the mkl-19S0B, akiing wu a fihaillion-doUar busineaa in and Nevada, whara more eMxke4ialf milMon aUers laing wintar aporta fadhtiaa. of building aome of the ski ranged from 1750,000 to KidUUbn doUara. :|k>me large reeorta reportedly gCaiid between $150,000 and It60,000 annually, (ftmportant to the economy of the state is the snow itself. One good snow crop may exceed in value all of the gold ever taken from the Sierra foothills," the CSAA magacine, MotorUad, stated in the mid-1960s. "Nevada and northern and central California have as complete facilities for the enjoyment of See ski page 15 IP WATIR SKI LOST SUMMER 'I ORANGE & BLUE DOUBLE BOOT CUSTOM MADE OmRINO $100 RIWARD (714) 7g1-2067 S'S'S'$'S'S'$'$'$' J>> h The Best /of the' New V Year!, Holiday guests from out-oftown...? Ugly Duckling has a solution for your multiY> Saturday, January 24, 1987 2 P.M. OPUS DANCE ENSEMBLE Friday, Februaiy 13, 1987 8 P.M. SCOTT KRITZER Claatical Guitarist Saturday, March 21, 1987 8 P.M. EILEEN HAYES & MADELENE CAPELLE, Light Opera Friday, May 15, 1987 8 P.M. ELISSA STUTZ Pianist Saturday, Juno 20, 1987 8 P.M. WARBURTON FAMILY Biutgrass Society i^ # X^^ <. ^ n ie' U^^'^^' 530 a Bldr. Hwy. HflDd. • 566-19S2 itM^y 8hoppi> Mi ^ N: \ Tickets, series or individual, are on sale January 1, 1987 at the following locations: The Burk Gal'ry — Boulder City Nevada United Drug — Boulder City KNPR-Radio, Las Ve Individual. $5 each 388. ^^I^ Series $25 5 concerts ALL PERFORMANCES WILL BE IN THE BOULDER CITY HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM For a tax deductible contribution, please consider the following categories of contributors. For each category, you will recieve two tickets (Spring Concert Series only) for each concert and your names will be printed in the program. SPONSOR $50 00 • 199.00 DONOR 200.00 • 399.00 PATRON '.400.00 • 999.00 BENEFACTOR 1,000.00 and up. The gpring Conccfl Sriw it mwto potubtt >n pad. by „',' I grnt from Iht Ntvtd* Slal* CouncH on Ihi Arl|, wi • tht Nlional Endowm*nl For th Artt. t tle organizations. The donations were made possible through the proceeds from the Bemie Buckley Memorial Ciolf Tournament held every year by Teamsters Local 995. Shown above, left to right, are the recipients of the donationa with Peniiy Poa tbe Clown, manager of Special Children's Clinic Kareti Harbaught, Santa Steve Burma and Mrs.Si^ta May Bums, both Teamsters Local 995 reprsentatives, Bill Berry, American Cancer Society, Linda Smith with Oppo^ tunity Village, president of Teamsters Local 995 Cliff Norton, Spedal ChUdren's Clinic Sande Scherer, Tom Kerefick with Nathan Adelson Hospice, secretary-treasurer of Teamsters 995 Dick Thomas, and Ann Johnson of Western Counseling. Ski from page 14 winter sports as will be found anywhere in this country," the CSAA publication added. "And thanks to good highways and effective snow clearance, these facilities are easily accessible by automobile. With modem roads leading into and through the mountain areas, the ever-increasing population of California's valleys is no more than a half-day's drive from snow sports," Motorland stated. Ski lifts in those days included rope tows, T-bars, J-bars, trams and single and double chair lifts. -In the mid-1950s, double chair lifts cost as much as a half-million dollars to construct. In 1956, CSAA provided information on ski resorts and accommodations in the annual winter sports booklet, and is still offering annual booklets. In the mid1950s, skiers paid About $3.50 for an all-day lift ticket at niiany ski resorts. Double rooms in the ski lodges ranged from $5 to $20, with cots in a dormitory costing around $3. Ski areas offered experienced ski instruction, with up to 12 instructors available on busy weekends at some ski resorts. A full calendar of ski events included obstacle races, rope races, egg slaloms, club competitions, interscholastic races and championships in downhill, slalom, crosscountry and jumping. One of the big races of the 1956 season was the Snowshoe Thompson Memorial Cross-Country competition, arming the 100th anniverary of Thompson's delivery of mail via skis. In 1866, John (Snowshoe) Thompson used hand-made skis as he began carrying the mail between PlacerviUie, Calif, (then known as Hangtown) and the Carson Valley area of Nevada (then called the Utah Territory). A Norwegian immigrant, Thompeon had learned to ski in his native country. He^de his California skis from 10-fodt oak planks. After foiu* years of ski delivery, Thompson began using sleighs for the trips. He is known for helping to keep communication open across the Sierra for a total of 20 years. Motorland traced the history of skiing in California back to 1850 when miners at La Porte, on the fork of the Feather River, had ski competitions. ^* • *. • > • a JAN. 1—21 LARRY COLLINS i PAM TILLIS JAN. 22FEB. 11^ AMERICAN MADE BANI THE CANNONS uk HOMEOWNER LOANS ^5,000x0^250,000 .s;. Navada First Thrift tju ^fidyfiilttlff homtownar loan can provide the cash you need...(1sTAND2NDS) • TAX ADVANTAGE The new tax law permits you to deduct your Interest on your home loan, but not on most other consumer debt. A good tax break that gives you dollars you can put to good use. • FAST — Most home loans are approved within a few days after receipt of your application. • GUARANTEED RATE •> The rate we promised at time of approval is the rate you pay. Not H morel NEVADA FIRST THRIFT, m, HENDERSON 65 WM Lake Mead Dr. BSB-eSST QuyOarda, MMMgw J(^,lx)ve, 'l.ife,1.aiighter! To say we're happy with your patronage is an understatement! You've been great, friends! Thank you for a wonderful year. Dr. Whitmoyer, Dr. Zehner and the entire staff of BOULDER ANIMAL HOSPITAL Pizza inn 894 S. Boulder Hwy./HENDERSON 564-5551 1901 N. Decatur Blvd • Las Vegas 646-0066 DINE IN FREE DELIVERY TAKEOUT r I $9.99 MEAL DEAL I This coupon good lor two mtdlum pizzas with up to two I toppinot for only S0 99. PrtMnI Ihlt coupon with gust chtck. 1 Not valid with dalivary, atuffad 2 plua p) or any othtr offar. Valid I at partlcipatino Pizza Inna I Ixplratlon: 1/7/37 COOF v 16" LARGE PIZZA i^aasa & 1 Topping Thin Crust $5.99 DINE IN • TAKE OUT Not valid with daiivary, atulfad pizza pl or any othar offar. Valid al parttcipfting P>^'* '"na Exolration: 1/7/87 C00£ x riHN 1/1 jiMSTPiiza inn^ JL^ EfeSftJStt jJI^kf^JSRmJ^ 15 PIECE Chicken Family Basket. FOR ONLY 04 O QQ \ REG $1695 N> I O.aJJ I includes: 1 Lg. Maahad Pot.. 1 | Mad. Gravy. 1 Lg Cola Slaw, 6 Orange Honay noils. Not valid | with any othar oflar. Valid at par• licipating Pizza '"is. • ExDiration: 1/7/87 CODE V • MMN —'• • 1/1 'LIMITEO DELIVERY AREAS

PAGE 15

mmmi Sportsmen's news Page 14 Henderson Home News and Boulder Cl(y News Thuraday, January 1,1986 *^i !i* : (oidellnes by Jim Ooff Home Ntwt Correspondent After setting home for two weekends and not fishing I couldn't stand It any longer. On Saturday morning, I checked the fishing chart which allowed the prime fiahing time at 8:30 a.m. Although that time of the morning is atill awf^ cold, my father-in-law. Bob Ward, and 9yaalf filled our thermoeea and arrived at the Vegas Wash launch framp gt 8 a.m. >^ Aa I turned the key to start the motor, nothing happened, dead ; battary. After checking battery connectori, everything seemed OK! Ulan I fbund the problem. I had lefl my LCD fishing graph on from I the laat trip. After switching batteries, we were on our way. We had i atopped at the tacklrahop and picked up a doaen four inch live minI nowa on the way to the lakb. i Bob prefers Minnowa, while my choice for winter fishing for Stripers ..." 'Get hooked on fishing, not drugs' groups message is Jigging Spoons. Winter time is when you must depend on your fishing graph. Unless you just want to go out there and hope. My confidence level is much higher when I can see fish on the graph. Past experience has proven at this time of year most of the Stripers will hold on the ends of the far reaching points where they drop off into the main lake channel. We graphed the main channel for approximately a half mile with no fish. We returned back to the Marina and started moving up the channel again, except this time we would cut out of the channel and head up the points reaching into the main channel. On the second point we found Stripers on the ridge of the point in 100 feet of water. The fish were in a school of bait on the structure. We both dropped Jigging Spoons down and had a double hook up. For the next two hours we caught fish on that point. The school would move up and down the ridge from 100 feet to 50 feet following the bait. After two hours and about 10 Stripers in the pound and a half to three pound range, the Hsb left the structure. We had a light chop on the water during that time. They seemed to quit when the wind stopped and the lake turned slick on the surface. We zig-zagged back and forth across the main channel checking points approximately fifteen minutes later we found a large school on the ridge of another point on the opposite side of the channel. This was a larger school and we had several double hook ups. Instead of just jigging up and down, we would drop our jigs to the bottom and reel u fast as possible approximately 20 feet up then drop it back down. Some fish would hit the jig on the fast retrieve and some would hit it on the fall. Bob caught eight fish on minnows; all of mine came on one-and-one-half ounce Silver Spoons. By 11:30 a.m. we were limited out and continued to catch and release fish. After about 9:30 a.m. long sleeved flannel shirts were all you needed to keep warm. We were home by 1 p.m. and had a nice fish fry that night to top off an excellent day of winter fishing. On Febraury 7 and 8, we will once again be putting Christmas trees into Lake Mead out of Calville Bay. This will be the third year for this project. We have placed approximately 20,000 trees into the lake for Bass habitat. If you have been fishing Lake Mead, now is the time to help put something back. We need vdunteers for this project again this year. Last year approximately $80,000 in materials and labor were donated. This amount was used to qualify for federal matching funds of up to $260,000. If you can help, call me in the evenings at 566-8396 or Don Solberger at Sunset Tackle, Monday through Friday, 6 a.m. to noon and sign up for the work project. Keep your hooks sharp' and good fishing! I I /Dniga are everywhere I kwk, : and many kkU who use drugs don't •rsalim how great it is to get out :and fish and be turned on by cat: diing flsh, or juat enjoying the outI doora," writea Matthew Deakins, a il4*year*ip..n-'-ACSAA offers annual ski reports The California State Automobile Association (AAA) is obaervinf ita thirtieth year of providing dt^jkaila on aki conditions and jaaather information to winter aporta fans. A daily recorded telephone sumtery of skiing and weather confitiona in the Sierra Nevada is ilrailable by calling (415) M4-6440. '3Baporta arc prorided 24 houra l4ay, with an update each weekiiy morning by 10 a.m. "^IQeven of the ski areaa on the Brat 1966 CSAA ski reports are included in thia year's Ski Phone. nooeer rseorta are Laaeen Park, (fofar Bowl, Donner Ski Ranch, ti^uaw Valley, Sierra Ski Ranch, (MfB Ridge, Badger Pass, MamiQOth Mountain, Mt. Rose, Heaven\f Valley and Echo Summit. -:t)ther ski resorts currently Mporting to CSAA are Alpine Maadows, Boreal, Homewood, ^e Mountain, Kirkwood, Mt. IWM, Northatar, Sierra Summit, fti Incline, Tahoe Donner, Bear ^Qllley Nordic, Tahoe Nordic, llQral Gorge, Eagle Mountain Nordic, Mt. ShaaU Ski Park and ^fda Springe. "^ the mkl-19S0B, akiing wu a fihaillion-doUar busineaa in and Nevada, whara more eMxke4ialf milMon aUers laing wintar aporta fadhtiaa. of building aome of the ski ranged from 1750,000 to KidUUbn doUara. :|k>me large reeorta reportedly gCaiid between $150,000 and It60,000 annually, (ftmportant to the economy of the state is the snow itself. One good snow crop may exceed in value all of the gold ever taken from the Sierra foothills," the CSAA magacine, MotorUad, stated in the mid-1960s. "Nevada and northern and central California have as complete facilities for the enjoyment of See ski page 15 IP WATIR SKI LOST SUMMER 'I ORANGE & BLUE DOUBLE BOOT CUSTOM MADE OmRINO $100 RIWARD (714) 7g1-2067 S'S'S'$'S'S'$'$'$' J>> h The Best /of the' New V Year!, Holiday guests from out-oftown...? Ugly Duckling has a solution for your multiY> Saturday, January 24, 1987 2 P.M. OPUS DANCE ENSEMBLE Friday, Februaiy 13, 1987 8 P.M. SCOTT KRITZER Claatical Guitarist Saturday, March 21, 1987 8 P.M. EILEEN HAYES & MADELENE CAPELLE, Light Opera Friday, May 15, 1987 8 P.M. ELISSA STUTZ Pianist Saturday, Juno 20, 1987 8 P.M. WARBURTON FAMILY Biutgrass Society i^ # X^^ <. ^ n ie' U^^'^^' 530 a Bldr. Hwy. HflDd. • 566-19S2 itM^y 8hoppi> Mi ^ N: \ Tickets, series or individual, are on sale January 1, 1987 at the following locations: The Burk Gal'ry — Boulder City Nevada United Drug — Boulder City KNPR-Radio, Las Ve Individual. $5 each 388. ^^I^ Series $25 5 concerts ALL PERFORMANCES WILL BE IN THE BOULDER CITY HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM For a tax deductible contribution, please consider the following categories of contributors. For each category, you will recieve two tickets (Spring Concert Series only) for each concert and your names will be printed in the program. SPONSOR $50 00 • 199.00 DONOR 200.00 • 399.00 PATRON '.400.00 • 999.00 BENEFACTOR 1,000.00 and up. The gpring Conccfl Sriw it mwto potubtt >n pad. by „',' I grnt from Iht Ntvtd* Slal* CouncH on Ihi Arl|, wi • tht Nlional Endowm*nl For th Artt. t tle organizations. The donations were made possible through the proceeds from the Bemie Buckley Memorial Ciolf Tournament held every year by Teamsters Local 995. Shown above, left to right, are the recipients of the donationa with Peniiy Poa tbe Clown, manager of Special Children's Clinic Kareti Harbaught, Santa Steve Burma and Mrs.Si^ta May Bums, both Teamsters Local 995 reprsentatives, Bill Berry, American Cancer Society, Linda Smith with Oppo^ tunity Village, president of Teamsters Local 995 Cliff Norton, Spedal ChUdren's Clinic Sande Scherer, Tom Kerefick with Nathan Adelson Hospice, secretary-treasurer of Teamsters 995 Dick Thomas, and Ann Johnson of Western Counseling. Ski from page 14 winter sports as will be found anywhere in this country," the CSAA publication added. "And thanks to good highways and effective snow clearance, these facilities are easily accessible by automobile. With modem roads leading into and through the mountain areas, the ever-increasing population of California's valleys is no more than a half-day's drive from snow sports," Motorland stated. Ski lifts in those days included rope tows, T-bars, J-bars, trams and single and double chair lifts. -In the mid-1950s, double chair lifts cost as much as a half-million dollars to construct. In 1956, CSAA provided information on ski resorts and accommodations in the annual winter sports booklet, and is still offering annual booklets. In the mid1950s, skiers paid About $3.50 for an all-day lift ticket at niiany ski resorts. Double rooms in the ski lodges ranged from $5 to $20, with cots in a dormitory costing around $3. Ski areas offered experienced ski instruction, with up to 12 instructors available on busy weekends at some ski resorts. A full calendar of ski events included obstacle races, rope races, egg slaloms, club competitions, interscholastic races and championships in downhill, slalom, crosscountry and jumping. One of the big races of the 1956 season was the Snowshoe Thompson Memorial Cross-Country competition, arming the 100th anniverary of Thompson's delivery of mail via skis. In 1866, John (Snowshoe) Thompson used hand-made skis as he began carrying the mail between PlacerviUie, Calif, (then known as Hangtown) and the Carson Valley area of Nevada (then called the Utah Territory). A Norwegian immigrant, Thompeon had learned to ski in his native country. He^de his California skis from 10-fodt oak planks. After foiu* years of ski delivery, Thompson began using sleighs for the trips. He is known for helping to keep communication open across the Sierra for a total of 20 years. Motorland traced the history of skiing in California back to 1850 when miners at La Porte, on the fork of the Feather River, had ski competitions. ^* • *. • > • a JAN. 1—21 LARRY COLLINS i PAM TILLIS JAN. 22FEB. 11^ AMERICAN MADE BANI THE CANNONS uk HOMEOWNER LOANS ^5,000x0^250,000 .s;. Navada First Thrift tju ^fidyfiilttlff homtownar loan can provide the cash you need...(1sTAND2NDS) • TAX ADVANTAGE The new tax law permits you to deduct your Interest on your home loan, but not on most other consumer debt. A good tax break that gives you dollars you can put to good use. • FAST — Most home loans are approved within a few days after receipt of your application. • GUARANTEED RATE •> The rate we promised at time of approval is the rate you pay. Not H morel NEVADA FIRST THRIFT, m, HENDERSON 65 WM Lake Mead Dr. BSB-eSST QuyOarda, MMMgw J(^,lx)ve, 'l.ife,1.aiighter! To say we're happy with your patronage is an understatement! You've been great, friends! Thank you for a wonderful year. Dr. Whitmoyer, Dr. Zehner and the entire staff of BOULDER ANIMAL HOSPITAL Pizza inn 894 S. Boulder Hwy./HENDERSON 564-5551 1901 N. Decatur Blvd • Las Vegas 646-0066 DINE IN FREE DELIVERY TAKEOUT r I $9.99 MEAL DEAL I This coupon good lor two mtdlum pizzas with up to two I toppinot for only S0 99. PrtMnI Ihlt coupon with gust chtck. 1 Not valid with dalivary, atuffad 2 plua p) or any othtr offar. Valid I at partlcipatino Pizza Inna I Ixplratlon: 1/7/37 COOF v 16" LARGE PIZZA i^aasa & 1 Topping Thin Crust $5.99 DINE IN • TAKE OUT Not valid with daiivary, atulfad pizza pl or any othar offar. Valid al parttcipfting P>^'* '"na Exolration: 1/7/87 C00£ x riHN 1/1 jiMSTPiiza inn^ JL^ EfeSftJStt jJI^kf^JSRmJ^ 15 PIECE Chicken Family Basket. FOR ONLY 04 O QQ \ REG $1695 N> I O.aJJ I includes: 1 Lg. Maahad Pot.. 1 | Mad. Gravy. 1 Lg Cola Slaw, 6 Orange Honay noils. Not valid | with any othar oflar. Valid at par• licipating Pizza '"is. • ExDiration: 1/7/87 CODE V • MMN —'• • 1/1 'LIMITEO DELIVERY AREAS

PAGE 16

Pag* It HcBderion Home Newt and Boulder Ctty Newi Thursday, January 1, 1987 'Desk Set' to be presented at Clark County Library Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn provide classic sparring of wits in the romantic office comedy, "Desk Set," to be presented on Friday, Jan. 9 at 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. at the Clark County Library auditorium at 1401 E. Flamingo Road. Their first film together, "Desk Set" set the pace for four following films and established them as an enduring romantic screen duo. Directed by Walter Lang, the fihn also co-stars Gig Young and Joan Blondell. The Library's Classic Images Film Series, exhibiting awardwinning romantic duo films from the 19308 through the 19608, will next feature the classic, "An Affair to Remember" on Friday, Jan. 23. The films are free and open to the public. s NEVADANS PROTEST—Senator-elect Harry Reid, left, shows Department of Energy secretary John Herrington his anti-repository letter to the President. The letter, initiated in July, opposes the location of a high-level nuclear waste repository in Nevada. Reid told the secretary that Nevadans are patriotic and support a strong national defense, "but we've done naore than our fair share." More than 33,000 Nevadans have signed the letter, which confirms they are "unaltefably opposed to the disposal of any high-level nuclear waste in Nevada, now or in the future, under any circumstances." As Herrington looks at the letter and a sample of the signatures, Reid stands next to a pile of the signature sheets on his desk. Herrington will now present the letter and signatures to the President. IRS extends hours for telephone assistance Internal Revenue Service District Director Jesse A. Cota announced extended hours for telephone taxpayer assistance effective December 29. Beginning Monday, Dec. 29, Nevada taxpayers can call the toll fie number 1-800-424-1040 for assistance in tax matters from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Friday. V "This service will be provided on a year-round basis, not just during the returns filing period," said Cota Cota advised that taxpayer account information will also be available during those hours so. people who have questions about their payments or tax bills can also receive assistance. "The expanded hours for taxpayer assistance was made to offer better service to taxpayers who have had difficulty getting help in the past," Cota said. "We know there have been a lot of people who couldn't get through on calls made during regular businsM hours. We can reach out to more people by adding on these extra hours of service." ^OOP^jp,Sundays m-^^fflnday^ The Sun NigHtJ^ esToney-S^ts' January*' Four Queens '^Hickory Dic^ry Dock. ,. RemodeCity SaCe On ACC CCothity In Stock MOTHER GOOSE SHOP JAN. 2 THRU WED. JAN. 7 5 DAIS ONLT ALL^ SALE ITEMS FINAL 293-2502 KITRON AT BOUUNm CITY LOCATION 334} I tANONILl • > STT? CWMfll or Dl t MMMn.l 0CN TUl 1} AM 1440 N tAITIRM • %*% tM rNONT or WOMOCMWORLO O^N TH } AM MM S JONCI • MI (M' AT tmiNO MTH • OWN TtLl 1} AM tMl t tUMUT • MMIM 0J$ITI lUNSCT PAMR OKN TI1.1 1} AM 34( A M NClltl • 4Sf I7| AT ITIWAUT • OWN TM.I 1} AM ss • •owocii NWT • M MMI AAT ctwrkw mwoiwtowl I MIQ r CHCTINNf • I4t-(l W CMfTENNC JONES D t4M NtVAOA MWT K }*4 IM' wnT TO wAtfriius riTNttt D irj E TWAIN • 7M MM IN THE TWAIN n.AZ* OefN Till U AM D 4r}S f CRAIC • 14) TTME MEAN NflllS • O^EN Till f} AM D tMS E LAKE MEAD • 4}| TTME 1 MH.E E W NlUIS E $7U E. BOmOCn MWT • 4S-TYMt OPtN TILL 12 A M 1.59 .^ DURACILL*UTTIRIES Ipk. 9 volt, 2-pk C, 0 ex AM. iO. TO t2,l 4-pk. "AA" 1.99, M*. tl.4* ^"""BHRBBBWCSH^^'"" ,i,,,,,ii ^,, „,„ DAISrMATCH ORADI 1.1'S 100O car box REO. S1.49 xmr AahfhMh1.99 FLOATING UNTiRN Yes, IMt 6 volt lantm noots REO. S3>49 wucwwweawii! ^;*' i) A>1 TAl ceiT I •AllON Tu nun 4-PK. LIOHT BULM OR 4' FLUORISCiNT TUBI i Bulbt: 40.6O.750f 10O wott | ~-\£^ —gBSnCSBTiW j -^*isj 1-9AL MTICNAII Pf AK ANThFRf IZI IM. Iff •All 3.24 IfMTI Pit "*IIPN.$M ,Yl^ FOR^l •UTANIIIOHTIR WH^ odluttabi* fk9m ft virtM fuM laval. no. M LIMIT 6 HAND Hf 10 SPOniOHT PIUQI into CCK lighter outtat OPEN NEW YEAR'S DAY 10:00 A.M. TO 6:00 P.M. 884 60ULDER HWY., HENDERSON 565-5933 AUTO DEPT. 8:30 a.m. • 9 p.m. Men. • Sat. 565-7255 9 a.m. 6 p.m. Sun. Features Thursday, January 1, 1987 HenderBon Home Newt and Boulder City New* Paf 17 (ear DeUie Letters to Deborah White Dear Debbie: I am 34 and my sister is 35. Ever since we wiere little, we have done things differently with our lives. I chose to marry in my early 20s, worked a year and then stayed home to raise children. I have three beautiful children who are everything to me. My sister is a professional career woman, has seen the world and has had many loves in her Ufe. She has always tried to make me feel like I was missing out on life, marrying when I did, and having children. Honestly, I have never regretted the life I chose, nor envied her for a minute. My sister seemed so happy with her life until she hit 35! She is now in a panic, feeling her biological time clock for having a baby is quickly ticking away. Her whole tune about what is important in life has suddenly changed. She is consumed with the idea of possibly not being able to have children because it may be too late; it's all she can talk about. I feel like saying "I told you so." Do you have any advice on what to tell my sister and others in similar situations! L.G. Lubbock, Texas Dear L.G.: It is a fact that infertility and pregnancy complications increase with age, but many of the conditions that make women over 30 who are considering pregnancy afraid can and do occur at any age. One's chances for complications only increase slightly with age. Look at the statistics. Professionals in the field of infertility estimate that six percent of women are unable or have trouble conceiving between the ages 25 and 29,15 percent at 30 to 34, 30 percent at 35 to 39, and 64 percent at 40 to 49. Statistically, 70 peroei^^t of all women in your sister's age bracket have no trouble concei^ng. Tell your sister not to be in such a panic. Life cannot unfold for her if she is desperate and obsessed. She has time left. "^ If she wants more information on infertility for women over 30, she can write the organization, REPfi.LVE (P 0. Box 474, Belmont. Mass. 02178.) Dear Debbie: I am the mother of two young children. My husband's sister never married and is quite a bit older than I am. Whenever she comes to visit, she takes it upon herself to severely discipline my children as though the way 1 handle situations is not adequate. My poor children are shocked by her stern, dictatorial reactions to their behavior and are confused. This really bums me up that she feels it's her place to discipline my children the way she does, especially when I do not feel they deserve it. Really, Debbie, my children are quite well behaved, normal children. But not only that, I feel she is questioning my competence as a mothtf. My husband never sees what goes on (because she never does it in front of ^im) and he thinks I'm overreacting. How should I hanile the situation the next time it comes up? ir Mother Knows Best Dear Mother: ~ If your sister-in-law never displays her discipline practices in fro&t of your husband, then you may be dealing with underlying jealousy and hostiUty towards you, and this is how she deals with it. Your husbands needs to tell her that if she feels there is a problem with the children, he would appreciate her saying something to one of you first. Explain to her you want to be united in your discipline so as not confuse the children and cause any unnecessary tension in the family. Hearing it from her brother will be much more effective than hearing it from her sister-in-law at this stage. Unfortunately, some people beUeve it is always within their rights to control and discipline others no matter what the situation. Send your questions to: Dear Debbie c/o The McNaught Syndicate, Inc., 537 Steamboat Road, Greenwich, CT 06830. 1986, McNaught Syndicate This ureek's horoscope by Salome Editors Note: This weeks horoscope is from December 28 through January 3, 1987. Weekly Tip: Don't depend on resolutions; look for real solutions instead. Aries (March 21-April 19) A new aspect enters the picture as the new year begins. Business success builds as you make needed adjustments in answer to this. Taurus (April 20-May 20) A shift in working procedures eases pressures. Don't put off making the change too long. The sooner the better for everyone. Gemini (May 21-Jun§ 20) What seems to be a series of disappointing turns of event may simply be delaying tactics on the part of those who aren't sure what you want. Cancer (June 21-July 20) Temper your expectations before they get out of hand. Demanding that those who made promises keep them immediately could backfire. Leo (July 21-Aug. 22) Calls to friends you haven't seen during the holidays is a good way for you big Cats to chase the post gala blahs. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Time to tote up the past years efforts and look forward to the new year's challenges. Personal situations require more attention than you expected. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) New opportunities make* new demands on yom* energies. Fortunately, you won't have to feel as if you're drowning under pressure. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Kin can cause some concern regardless of what you try to do for them. Continue to be supportive, but prepared to have to make adjustments; Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) That old job problem seems to be rejjurring. This time handle things without involving as many people. Go directly to the persons who can help. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Make this'a healthy new year. A thorough medical checkup is a good way to start the year. Minor problems can be treated before they become serious. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Personal relationships could be in for a rocky ride. Smooth things over as much as you can before they get too rough to haridle. Pisces (Feb. 19-March. 20) Cotmt your blessings and then go ahead and count on those good friends who won't desert you in time of need. 1986, McNaught Syndicate Onee oifer lijiifly by Carolyn Drennan Bishop Home News Correspondent The other day, I discovered my driver's license was missing. I was aghast. So was the officer who'd asked to see it. Possibly because of all those crime movies 1 like to watch, I immediately envisioned a scenario that featured me shackled hand and foot and allowed only one phone call to the outside world. I was deciding who I would call when the officer said, "Calm down, Maam. I stopped you because your left tail light is burned out." When I arrived home, my husband said the same thing. "Calm down," he said. "Retrace your Learn legislative process at library How does a state bill move through the legislature? Whom does one call to find out a bill's current status? And how does NELIS, the Nevada Legislative Information System work? Find out at the Clark County Library's Legislative Hotline Workshop Wednesday, Jan. 7 at 10 a.m. and again at 2 p.m. The two hour orientation, which is co-sponsored by the Nevada Library Association and the Nevada State Library and Archives will be conducted by Nevada State Reference Librarian, Leshe Hester. The program is free and open to the public but pre-registration is required. Call Conununity Relations at 733-3620 or 3621. steps. Where were you the last time you jshowed your license?" "You've got to be kidding," I snapped. "I don't let just anyone see it! If you must know, my picture resembles a blob of ectoplasm wearing glasses." Since the staff at the Department of Motor Vehicles had already viewed me in my amorphous state, I called them for advice. It turned out the situation would be remedied if I brought along my birth certificate and visited their office. "Be certain you follow the black line," I was cautioned. I duly arrived. Sure enough, the black line was there. So were dozens of people. All standing on my black line! I recall reading somewhere that waiting in line raises the blood pressure and lowers one's resistance. Maybe that's why I developed a nervous tic in one eye. At any rate, the woman in front of me suddenly grabbed her husband, pointed at me and hissed, "Don't pay any attention, Harry! From the looks of her, she'd flirt ith a fence post!" An hour later, I reached the photographer'who snapped my picture before I'd reached a sitting position. As I was handed the finished photo, Harry and his wife peered over ray shoulder. Together, we studied my portrait. Sure enough, one eye lid was cocked rakishly while the other was sunk at half-mast. I popped it quickly into my wallet. With any luck at all, only my photographer and of course, Harry and his wife, will ever see it! Wi Need insurance for your home, car, life, boat or RV? Dale Johnson Kent Johnson CaUus! We have the right coverage for all your needs /lllstale' AllMU Inuraaee Conpur Aiisuic Lib InsuniKtCocipujr Nonl)bniak.IUiaas 30 Water St. Suite D Henderson, Nevada 564-7775 Capture the Colors of Christmas I COUPON 1 I KODAK PROCESSING SPECIAL MAGNA PRINTS FOR THE PRICE OF j (REGULAR...OR I |2 REQUUR PRINTS FOR THE PRICE OF 1 { Coupon Vbd Thioufti 1-9-87 BASiCPHOfO Our 19 Water St. •565-7627 Inventory Clearance Sale is Still On OCMING UNTO CAESARS George Carlln I* Jan 1-4 Well-designed, qualily-constructed homes, with your choice ol 2, 3-or-4 t^edroonns Very convenient location in a safe, friendly neighborhood, and you con enjoy the best o< both Hendefsor> and las Vegas with all of the activities at Lake Meod just a short drive away These distinctive single-family honnes start ot only $61,950 for the 2 bedroom rrxxJel; $66,950 for 3 bedrooms; and just $72,950 for 4 bedrooms. Conr>e by WOODf^DGE ESTATES and let us show you these charming homes. You won't want to leave! All of tftese outstanding custom features are included in your low purchase prtco: Misslon tile roof, 2 full baths, block wall, front lorKJscaping, oak cabinet in kitchen and baff, ceromic file entries and stxswers, tireploces in most models. 564-7833 ^ f^^^ g% RXED 30 YEARS FHA-VA WOQDRIDGE ESTATES SAIES OFFICE OPEN WED .IN DtBECnONS TAKf BOUlOf B HIGMyiAT PAST lAItt MtAT >v ^

PAGE 17

Pag* It HcBderion Home Newt and Boulder Ctty Newi Thursday, January 1, 1987 'Desk Set' to be presented at Clark County Library Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn provide classic sparring of wits in the romantic office comedy, "Desk Set," to be presented on Friday, Jan. 9 at 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. at the Clark County Library auditorium at 1401 E. Flamingo Road. Their first film together, "Desk Set" set the pace for four following films and established them as an enduring romantic screen duo. Directed by Walter Lang, the fihn also co-stars Gig Young and Joan Blondell. The Library's Classic Images Film Series, exhibiting awardwinning romantic duo films from the 19308 through the 19608, will next feature the classic, "An Affair to Remember" on Friday, Jan. 23. The films are free and open to the public. s NEVADANS PROTEST—Senator-elect Harry Reid, left, shows Department of Energy secretary John Herrington his anti-repository letter to the President. The letter, initiated in July, opposes the location of a high-level nuclear waste repository in Nevada. Reid told the secretary that Nevadans are patriotic and support a strong national defense, "but we've done naore than our fair share." More than 33,000 Nevadans have signed the letter, which confirms they are "unaltefably opposed to the disposal of any high-level nuclear waste in Nevada, now or in the future, under any circumstances." As Herrington looks at the letter and a sample of the signatures, Reid stands next to a pile of the signature sheets on his desk. Herrington will now present the letter and signatures to the President. IRS extends hours for telephone assistance Internal Revenue Service District Director Jesse A. Cota announced extended hours for telephone taxpayer assistance effective December 29. Beginning Monday, Dec. 29, Nevada taxpayers can call the toll fie number 1-800-424-1040 for assistance in tax matters from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Friday. V "This service will be provided on a year-round basis, not just during the returns filing period," said Cota Cota advised that taxpayer account information will also be available during those hours so. people who have questions about their payments or tax bills can also receive assistance. "The expanded hours for taxpayer assistance was made to offer better service to taxpayers who have had difficulty getting help in the past," Cota said. "We know there have been a lot of people who couldn't get through on calls made during regular businsM hours. We can reach out to more people by adding on these extra hours of service." ^OOP^jp,Sundays m-^^fflnday^ The Sun NigHtJ^ esToney-S^ts' January*' Four Queens '^Hickory Dic^ry Dock. ,. RemodeCity SaCe On ACC CCothity In Stock MOTHER GOOSE SHOP JAN. 2 THRU WED. JAN. 7 5 DAIS ONLT ALL^ SALE ITEMS FINAL 293-2502 KITRON AT BOUUNm CITY LOCATION 334} I tANONILl • > STT? CWMfll or Dl t MMMn.l 0CN TUl 1} AM 1440 N tAITIRM • %*% tM rNONT or WOMOCMWORLO O^N TH } AM MM S JONCI • MI (M' AT tmiNO MTH • OWN TtLl 1} AM tMl t tUMUT • MMIM 0J$ITI lUNSCT PAMR OKN TI1.1 1} AM 34( A M NClltl • 4Sf I7| AT ITIWAUT • OWN TM.I 1} AM ss • •owocii NWT • M MMI AAT ctwrkw mwoiwtowl I MIQ r CHCTINNf • I4t-(l W CMfTENNC JONES D t4M NtVAOA MWT K }*4 IM' wnT TO wAtfriius riTNttt D irj E TWAIN • 7M MM IN THE TWAIN n.AZ* OefN Till U AM D 4r}S f CRAIC • 14) TTME MEAN NflllS • O^EN Till f} AM D tMS E LAKE MEAD • 4}| TTME 1 MH.E E W NlUIS E $7U E. BOmOCn MWT • 4S-TYMt OPtN TILL 12 A M 1.59 .^ DURACILL*UTTIRIES Ipk. 9 volt, 2-pk C, 0 ex AM. iO. TO t2,l 4-pk. "AA" 1.99, M*. tl.4* ^"""BHRBBBWCSH^^'"" ,i,,,,,ii ^,, „,„ DAISrMATCH ORADI 1.1'S 100O car box REO. S1.49 xmr AahfhMh1.99 FLOATING UNTiRN Yes, IMt 6 volt lantm noots REO. S3>49 wucwwweawii! ^;*' i) A>1 TAl ceiT I •AllON Tu nun 4-PK. LIOHT BULM OR 4' FLUORISCiNT TUBI i Bulbt: 40.6O.750f 10O wott | ~-\£^ —gBSnCSBTiW j -^*isj 1-9AL MTICNAII Pf AK ANThFRf IZI IM. Iff •All 3.24 IfMTI Pit "*IIPN.$M ,Yl^ FOR^l •UTANIIIOHTIR WH^ odluttabi* fk9m ft virtM fuM laval. no. M LIMIT 6 HAND Hf 10 SPOniOHT PIUQI into CCK lighter outtat OPEN NEW YEAR'S DAY 10:00 A.M. TO 6:00 P.M. 884 60ULDER HWY., HENDERSON 565-5933 AUTO DEPT. 8:30 a.m. • 9 p.m. Men. • Sat. 565-7255 9 a.m. 6 p.m. Sun. Features Thursday, January 1, 1987 HenderBon Home Newt and Boulder City New* Paf 17 (ear DeUie Letters to Deborah White Dear Debbie: I am 34 and my sister is 35. Ever since we wiere little, we have done things differently with our lives. I chose to marry in my early 20s, worked a year and then stayed home to raise children. I have three beautiful children who are everything to me. My sister is a professional career woman, has seen the world and has had many loves in her Ufe. She has always tried to make me feel like I was missing out on life, marrying when I did, and having children. Honestly, I have never regretted the life I chose, nor envied her for a minute. My sister seemed so happy with her life until she hit 35! She is now in a panic, feeling her biological time clock for having a baby is quickly ticking away. Her whole tune about what is important in life has suddenly changed. She is consumed with the idea of possibly not being able to have children because it may be too late; it's all she can talk about. I feel like saying "I told you so." Do you have any advice on what to tell my sister and others in similar situations! L.G. Lubbock, Texas Dear L.G.: It is a fact that infertility and pregnancy complications increase with age, but many of the conditions that make women over 30 who are considering pregnancy afraid can and do occur at any age. One's chances for complications only increase slightly with age. Look at the statistics. Professionals in the field of infertility estimate that six percent of women are unable or have trouble conceiving between the ages 25 and 29,15 percent at 30 to 34, 30 percent at 35 to 39, and 64 percent at 40 to 49. Statistically, 70 peroei^^t of all women in your sister's age bracket have no trouble concei^ng. Tell your sister not to be in such a panic. Life cannot unfold for her if she is desperate and obsessed. She has time left. "^ If she wants more information on infertility for women over 30, she can write the organization, REPfi.LVE (P 0. Box 474, Belmont. Mass. 02178.) Dear Debbie: I am the mother of two young children. My husband's sister never married and is quite a bit older than I am. Whenever she comes to visit, she takes it upon herself to severely discipline my children as though the way 1 handle situations is not adequate. My poor children are shocked by her stern, dictatorial reactions to their behavior and are confused. This really bums me up that she feels it's her place to discipline my children the way she does, especially when I do not feel they deserve it. Really, Debbie, my children are quite well behaved, normal children. But not only that, I feel she is questioning my competence as a mothtf. My husband never sees what goes on (because she never does it in front of ^im) and he thinks I'm overreacting. How should I hanile the situation the next time it comes up? ir Mother Knows Best Dear Mother: ~ If your sister-in-law never displays her discipline practices in fro&t of your husband, then you may be dealing with underlying jealousy and hostiUty towards you, and this is how she deals with it. Your husbands needs to tell her that if she feels there is a problem with the children, he would appreciate her saying something to one of you first. Explain to her you want to be united in your discipline so as not confuse the children and cause any unnecessary tension in the family. Hearing it from her brother will be much more effective than hearing it from her sister-in-law at this stage. Unfortunately, some people beUeve it is always within their rights to control and discipline others no matter what the situation. Send your questions to: Dear Debbie c/o The McNaught Syndicate, Inc., 537 Steamboat Road, Greenwich, CT 06830. 1986, McNaught Syndicate This ureek's horoscope by Salome Editors Note: This weeks horoscope is from December 28 through January 3, 1987. Weekly Tip: Don't depend on resolutions; look for real solutions instead. Aries (March 21-April 19) A new aspect enters the picture as the new year begins. Business success builds as you make needed adjustments in answer to this. Taurus (April 20-May 20) A shift in working procedures eases pressures. Don't put off making the change too long. The sooner the better for everyone. Gemini (May 21-Jun§ 20) What seems to be a series of disappointing turns of event may simply be delaying tactics on the part of those who aren't sure what you want. Cancer (June 21-July 20) Temper your expectations before they get out of hand. Demanding that those who made promises keep them immediately could backfire. Leo (July 21-Aug. 22) Calls to friends you haven't seen during the holidays is a good way for you big Cats to chase the post gala blahs. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Time to tote up the past years efforts and look forward to the new year's challenges. Personal situations require more attention than you expected. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) New opportunities make* new demands on yom* energies. Fortunately, you won't have to feel as if you're drowning under pressure. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Kin can cause some concern regardless of what you try to do for them. Continue to be supportive, but prepared to have to make adjustments; Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) That old job problem seems to be rejjurring. This time handle things without involving as many people. Go directly to the persons who can help. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Make this'a healthy new year. A thorough medical checkup is a good way to start the year. Minor problems can be treated before they become serious. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Personal relationships could be in for a rocky ride. Smooth things over as much as you can before they get too rough to haridle. Pisces (Feb. 19-March. 20) Cotmt your blessings and then go ahead and count on those good friends who won't desert you in time of need. 1986, McNaught Syndicate Onee oifer lijiifly by Carolyn Drennan Bishop Home News Correspondent The other day, I discovered my driver's license was missing. I was aghast. So was the officer who'd asked to see it. Possibly because of all those crime movies 1 like to watch, I immediately envisioned a scenario that featured me shackled hand and foot and allowed only one phone call to the outside world. I was deciding who I would call when the officer said, "Calm down, Maam. I stopped you because your left tail light is burned out." When I arrived home, my husband said the same thing. "Calm down," he said. "Retrace your Learn legislative process at library How does a state bill move through the legislature? Whom does one call to find out a bill's current status? And how does NELIS, the Nevada Legislative Information System work? Find out at the Clark County Library's Legislative Hotline Workshop Wednesday, Jan. 7 at 10 a.m. and again at 2 p.m. The two hour orientation, which is co-sponsored by the Nevada Library Association and the Nevada State Library and Archives will be conducted by Nevada State Reference Librarian, Leshe Hester. The program is free and open to the public but pre-registration is required. Call Conununity Relations at 733-3620 or 3621. steps. Where were you the last time you jshowed your license?" "You've got to be kidding," I snapped. "I don't let just anyone see it! If you must know, my picture resembles a blob of ectoplasm wearing glasses." Since the staff at the Department of Motor Vehicles had already viewed me in my amorphous state, I called them for advice. It turned out the situation would be remedied if I brought along my birth certificate and visited their office. "Be certain you follow the black line," I was cautioned. I duly arrived. Sure enough, the black line was there. So were dozens of people. All standing on my black line! I recall reading somewhere that waiting in line raises the blood pressure and lowers one's resistance. Maybe that's why I developed a nervous tic in one eye. At any rate, the woman in front of me suddenly grabbed her husband, pointed at me and hissed, "Don't pay any attention, Harry! From the looks of her, she'd flirt ith a fence post!" An hour later, I reached the photographer'who snapped my picture before I'd reached a sitting position. As I was handed the finished photo, Harry and his wife peered over ray shoulder. Together, we studied my portrait. Sure enough, one eye lid was cocked rakishly while the other was sunk at half-mast. I popped it quickly into my wallet. With any luck at all, only my photographer and of course, Harry and his wife, will ever see it! Wi Need insurance for your home, car, life, boat or RV? Dale Johnson Kent Johnson CaUus! We have the right coverage for all your needs /lllstale' AllMU Inuraaee Conpur Aiisuic Lib InsuniKtCocipujr Nonl)bniak.IUiaas 30 Water St. Suite D Henderson, Nevada 564-7775 Capture the Colors of Christmas I COUPON 1 I KODAK PROCESSING SPECIAL MAGNA PRINTS FOR THE PRICE OF j (REGULAR...OR I |2 REQUUR PRINTS FOR THE PRICE OF 1 { Coupon Vbd Thioufti 1-9-87 BASiCPHOfO Our 19 Water St. •565-7627 Inventory Clearance Sale is Still On OCMING UNTO CAESARS George Carlln I* Jan 1-4 Well-designed, qualily-constructed homes, with your choice ol 2, 3-or-4 t^edroonns Very convenient location in a safe, friendly neighborhood, and you con enjoy the best o< both Hendefsor> and las Vegas with all of the activities at Lake Meod just a short drive away These distinctive single-family honnes start ot only $61,950 for the 2 bedroom rrxxJel; $66,950 for 3 bedrooms; and just $72,950 for 4 bedrooms. Conr>e by WOODf^DGE ESTATES and let us show you these charming homes. You won't want to leave! All of tftese outstanding custom features are included in your low purchase prtco: Misslon tile roof, 2 full baths, block wall, front lorKJscaping, oak cabinet in kitchen and baff, ceromic file entries and stxswers, tireploces in most models. 564-7833 ^ f^^^ g% RXED 30 YEARS FHA-VA WOQDRIDGE ESTATES SAIES OFFICE OPEN WED .IN DtBECnONS TAKf BOUlOf B HIGMyiAT PAST lAItt MtAT >v ^

PAGE 18

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmrmmmmmmmmm ?•!• 18 Hendcnon Home Newt and Bovlder City Newt %fA\ o^N di§esl by Sell Orovi Editon Note: Soap Qpsni Dl§mi •oimiuuriMs prognuni alnd the WMk of Doc 22 throogli Doe. 28. AXt My CUUm: Nina and Cliff were wed. Palmer got out of his wheelchair to walk Nina down the aisle. Natalie was blamed after nuurk burglarized Palmer's mansion. Phoebe caught Nina's bouquet. Coming: A penniless, homeless jobleoa Erica makes a desparate dedaioo. Another World: Felicia and Rachel both confessed strong feelings for Mitch. The jury was still out over Brittany's fate. Mac went to see Roae after finding a bracelet Mitch had given Rachel. The Northwoods Inn became a raging inferno. Coming: M.J.'s mystery man fflaJcM another move. At n* World Turtu: Frannie became more convinced that ahe was on the trail of a secret that might change her life. Seth was concerned about her. Duncan made a breakthrough in the mystery. Coming: Lisa faces some new facts about her life. Capitol: Kelly had an emotional setback. Mark worried that Clarissa might find out more than he wants her to know. Jordy worried that he might be thinking too much about Nicole. Coming: Sam takes action that perplexes Trey and Myma. DaUat: Clayton vowed revenge while Miss Ellie asked her sons to help calm her husband. J.R. got frightening news about B.D. Calhoun. Donna returned to Dallaa with a dedaion about her marriage to Ray. Coming: J.R. takes steps to fight B.D.'s threat. Daja Of Our LIvea: Mitch told Robin that either she sleep with him as man and wife or the marriage was over. Kim asked Neil to help force Emma to reveal where Andrew is: Kayla and Patch exclumged Xmas gifts. Coming: Enuna starts to talk. Falcon Crvat: Lance's attempt to win control of the New Olobe backfired. Melissa demanded that lance move out. Emma brod^t Karlotti home to trace Wayne's spirit. Angela began to suspect banM framed her. Coming: Eouna's feelings for Karlotti grow; Maggie faces danger. Oanoral Hoapltal: Alan was devastated when Jimmy Lee turned up with Charity and Jonah. Lucy learned Buss had no alibi for the night Ted Holmes was killed. Duke agreed to turn state's evidence. Coming: Duke and Anna face a surprise early in the new year. Guiding Light: A new mystery surrounded Dinah's background. Reva came to terms with the changes in her life. Alex had another secret aboutthe nude painting. Coming: India reveals another motive for her actions. Knota Landing: Lilimae found drugs in Olivia's car after the accident, but was able to hide them from the police. Mack was shocked when he learned Anne was alive and well. Gary learned that Jill had been lying to him about Peter. Coming: Peter feels trapped. Loving: Jim and Shana planned to marry outside the church after the Biahop refused to take his case to Rom6. Nick was furious when Trisha refused his gift of a mink coat. Cecilia was upset to learn Steve knew she tore up Triaha's letter. Lottie recalled Eban's threats. Coming: Ava stumbles onto a mystery. Ona LHa To Uva: Tina, overcome by the gas she turned on during her phony suicide attempt, was rushed to the hospital. After firing Clint, Vickie asked Tom to help her run the newspaper. Kate and Cord foimd the treasure on the remains of Devil's Claw which was now owned by Pamela. Coming: Clint's efforts to reconcile with Vickie takes an unexpected turn. Rjan'a Hopm Siobhan told Joe she was prepared to tell Max who he ia. Joe revealed that Max was really Overlord. Lizzie admitted killing Harlan when he tried to sexually assault her after she accused him of killing her mother. Coming: Max begins to suspect Siobhan is hiding something from him. Santa Barbara: Qina was struck by lightining and had a dream that could change her life. A hoUday rift between Eden and Cruz caused new problems for them. Ex-con Gusjiras angry with Caroline for neglecting their daughter Alice. Caroline was afraid Gus would tell Alice who she really is. Coming: Lionel unwittingly causes problems for Caroline. Search For Tomorrow: Lisa was startled to find a doubfe for Travis traveling with her. They both felt attracted to each other. Hogan and Patty were married. Wilma and David reconciled their differences. Bela was overjoyed to learn Sunny was really pregniuit this time. Coming: Jo has some new ideas for the future. The Young A The Reatieea: Paul was eager to run down a possible lead to George although neither the Veteran's Administration or Social Security had records on him. Jack and Brad continued to get on each other's nerves. Coming: Jill's plans to surprise Kay surprise her instead. 1986, McNaught Syndicate In old Scotland, Parliament passed a law torfoidding any ntan to turn down aglrl who proposed to him on Leap Year, under penafty of a MOO fins. .THOUSANDS OF YARDS ON SALE !• HAPPY ^ ENTIRE STOCK CORDUROr ^ ENTIRE STOCK moms ENTIRESTOCK / SWEATSHIRT #A FL££C£ PRINTS '^ ENTIRESTOCK mi usum FABRICS JANUARY 1 Om ENURE 5I0CK PAITERNS SPECIAL GROUP lUFRaANDFUT LACEtlRIMSl SPECIAL GROUP 4I"T054"WIK SCUDS AND PHINTS DRAPERY FABRICS PRINHD DRAPERY REMNANTS i(io'/,conoN rT0S4"WIDE \, / IIMIMWIIH fABRiC PURCHASE ENTIRESTOCK • FLANNEL PRINTS • SLEEPWEAR FUNNEL • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • iiniii • REMNANTS! SOUOSl PRINTS 77(5 j ^44 I I YARD I YARD • • • • • nWMMMI CNMSTIUS NOnOliSJiND TRIMS /2OFF MKItMlllliaH l\l uu U h m U v^ SHOPATANYOFTHESELOaTIONSi ll971N.DiCAnfflATW.UKEIEAO l3387&J0NE$ilTSPnilQITN. I2)20LBONA1IUATEA$TEI flE H n782E.FlAMIM0ATUIIDHIU HOURS: MON.-FRI. 9:30-9 SAT. 9:30-6 SUN. 12-5 Thnniday, January 1, 1986 Haaderion Han* Nawt ia4 BavMar air Nawa Ptfa If 'Nevada Historical Society's "This Was Nevadii" series Portends of a dry future, New Year's, 1918 by PhilUp I. Earl Nevada Hiatorlcal Society Publidat Nevadans had good reason to be of good cheer during the holiday •eason in 1918. The Great War had come to an end six weeks earlier and the first soldiers were beginning to return home from basea and training camps around the country. Those citizens who had survived the flu epidemic were particularly grateful for the good fortune wliich had Ipared them and their families, but all was not ^ell in the state. On Nov. 5, six days before the armistice in Europe, Nevada voters approved an initiative prohibition measure outlawing the manufacture, sale, gifting, transportation of or possession of "malt, vinuous or spiritoUs liquors, and other intoxicating drinks, mixtiu-es or prepara* tions." The act filled some thirteen pages in the statute book and gave hope to those Nevadans who had been involved in the crusade against the "Demon Rum," but others had-tiuestions as the holiday season approached. Could liquor purchased prior to the effective date of Dec. 18 be served to guests in the home? Could liquor for personal consumption be kept at home? Could it be carried in a hip flask outside the home? Could housewives purchase, keep and use vanila and lemon extracts containing alcohol? And what about perfume? Could physicians prescribe liquor for medicinal purposes? These questions would be endilessly debated and litigated over the next fifteen years, but most drinkers were taking no chances, stocking up their larders in anticipation of a long dry spell ahead. By Dec. 18, most saloonkeepers had aokl out their reserve stocks and twenty of Reno's Hfty-eight saloons had closed thair doors. Others were renovating to become restaurants, serving only raspberry syrup drinks, coffee, tea and water. The Reno brewing company had come out with "Sierra Beverage," a "near beer" containing lees than one-tenth of one percent alcohol, but Attorney General George Thatcher filed suit on Dec. 18 to test the law and stop production of even that innocuous brew. Although Thatcher was uphekl by the Nevada Supreme Court a few weeks later, the beverage was available over the hoUdays. On Dte. 22. John Swiasig and CM. Donnell were arrested in Reno for can^g hip flasks on the streets. Convicted in Justice Court the next day, they had their attorney bring their cases to District Court on Mypeal. They contended that the Justice of .th Peace had exceeded his authority under the law and that the atate had gone beyond its police powers in allowing the Initiative prohibition act to become la^ Judge George Bartlett disagreed, ruling on Dec. 31 that the act Was constitutional in eyery respect. That evening, a hundred and fifty couples turned out for the Elks Club dance in Reno^ toasting the new year with water, "punchleas punch" and raspberry soda flavored with vanila extract. The Truckee River froze up solid for the fii'st time in ten years on Dec. 30. Several hundred skaters came out that day and Reno's city electrician strung lights along the walls of* the river downtown to facilitate night skating on New Years Eve. Some 3,000 spectactors and skaters were on hand for the informal ice carnival that night, bringing in the New Year with cheers, noisemakers and confetti, but drinking no toasts since word of Bartlett's decision earlier in the day had spread through their ranks. In a manner of speaking, the 1918 holiday was a portend of the future. Communities which had relied upon saloon license fees for revenue were either beginning to consider new sources of funds or making plans to cut services and employees. Indeed, the state itself was due to lose out on liquor excises and fees for dealer permits. State Treasurer Ed Mally projected the deficit at $76,000 annually, an amount which would require a property tax assessment increase of $17,000,000 to make up the shortfall according to Controller George A. Cole. Reports were meanwhile coming in on the first arrests for bootlegging and sale of illegal liquor. Attorneys were smiling to themselves, anticipating a flood of new clients. Many Nevadans wre just plab upset, amongst them an old-timer who was interviewed as follows in the Nevada Miaiag Preea: "This here prohibition may be all right for the weak and wobbly but it don't make no hit with me. Here's Christmas two days off and the town like a graveyard. No sociability, no nothin' Oh yes, sure. I got some in my room, little bit of everything, but what's the fun of sittin' in a hotel room swigging booze? Y' can't even give a swaller to a friend 'thout layin' y'rself open t' bein' pinched. Me, I like to slip one foot 'long the footrail, hook an elbow over the bulge on the front of the bar, and swap yams, especially this time o' the year. Take a fellow with "bout three shots 0' Old Crow or Hermitage undwr his belt an' hell tell y' a lot a' things he never would spill 'thout the aid uv a little Oil a' Joy. An' what's Christmas 'thout Tom and Jerry? J'st answer me that! You'n me's been used to th' conviviality uv a barroom since we cud remember anything. Any he-man wants his liquor, and me, I ain't got no use fer sissies!" Small business wori(sltop sclieduled Opening a new business in today's market requires knowledge in accounting, legal matters, finance, organization and planning before opening the. doors. The Small Business Administration and Clark County Community College are co-sponsoring a pre-business workshop at the Cheyenne Campus, Ja;i. 9, from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in room 1068. Professionala in law, advertising and accounting will discuss business planning, legal aspects of a business, marketing and advertising, the new tax reform act and small business administration programs. Registration fee for the workshop is $10. Nevada, I remember, I remember. The state where I was bom. That used to be so wringing wet. And is now so forlorn. The pungent sagebrush that 1 knew. Aroma of the pines. That later on were mixed with brew And later still with wines. From the famed old International To the good old Riverside; From the sandy shores of Glenbrook Down to Carson, open wide. From Pioche to Winnemucca, It was heaven, just to think. That it now is really arid And a man can't get a drink. From Bob Preston's down to Drysdale's Clear from Elko to Barooch, The prospector must noW wander Without anything like hooch. Farewell Shades of Palaces and Northerns, And the gulch called Stingaree, And the Idler and the Mohawk, Still they call this country free. I remember down in Goldfield, At the Montesuma when The gang would all foregather, \ And we'd fill 'em up again. Can you see them Bryanizing In the Big Casino? Say! Or count the tongues that hang a foot Down old Moana way? ^ ITemember, I remember, The state where I was born. Where now there is a sacrilege; The kibosh on the corn. -'^Where first I saw the light of day, I hoped my dying breath Would go, but I can't have my way; Who wants to choke to death? Checks totaling more than $14,000 await 10 "iost workers" The United States Department of Labor appealed to the public to help it locate 10 "lost workers" in Nevada so it can give them back paychecks totaling more than $14,000. The department can't deliver the checks because the workers' current addresses are unknown. The money represents back wages the Labor Department recovered on the workers' behalf from Nevada employers who failed to comply with the minimum wage and overtime requirements of the federal Fair Labor Standards Act. The current minimum wage is $3.36 an hour, and the law requires that overtime at the rate of timeand-a-half be paid for all hours worked over 40 in a workweek. Herbert Goldstein, regional head of the Wage-Hour Division here, appealed to the public and the news media to help locate the workers. The problem is these people left their jobs, and left their employers no forwarding addresses, before we could deliver them their back paychecks, Goldstein explained. "These people earned this money, and the Labor Department wants to do everything it can to see that these people get paid." Gokistein said any worker whose name appears on the list below should contact the Labor Department immediately. Workers should write: Guy Guerrero, Wage-Hour Division, United States Depart-^ ment of Labor, 450 Goklen Gate Avenue, room 10353, San Francisco, Calif. 94102. Or, they may telephone (415) 556-3592. Some local members on the list of workers and their former employers follows: The Coachman's Inn, Las Vegas: Edwin C. Bennett, William Malmquist. Imperial Palace Casino, Las Vegas: Clayton Beever, Debra Nicholas Kisner, Yvonne E. Brown Whitson. Kathleen K. BJornson, D.D.S. is pleased to announce the relocation of her office to 2581 N. Qreen Valley Parkway BIdg. A Ste. 408 Henderson, Nevada^ 89018 New offic* hours — Call for appointment 458-2929 ,AIHOtf,Co ^ Announces ^r^ MEMBERSHIP ^ DUIVS For Month of January ieS7 Only •1M MttsHM fes (nirmaily •tM) MIS isl Mentti's 4uei FbR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT: 501 COUNTRY CLUB DR... .HENDERSON, 905-7933 BOULDER lULLS 1303 Darlana Way Boulder City QuM Btnnity, y§t only mlnut§ away from It alll $64,900 to $69,500 For disoount Info, or sppt., Mil (702) 293-7778 Villa Del Prado ^ PHASE 4 r^ SEMI-CUSTOM HOMES PICK BUIR REAITYJ 3 i 4 BEDROOM HOMES MODELS OPEN DAILY NOON TILL 4 P.M. Take Buchsnan to Adams to MODEL... OFFICE 619 OTONO 293-2171 mmm Muai. .Ts HERE WE COME HAWAH One Free Si^tt Up Per Dflcy 7 NIGHTS IN HAWAH F OR % Round trip Airfare via Wide Body Jet including meal and beverage service. Welcome service and flower lei greeting Round trip tranefera between airport and hotel • i *Pree use of Rent-A-Car for 1 day W^ CA5H AND HAWAH DRAWING FEBRUART l5t, 1987 5:30 $200*00" 6:00 Hawaii 6xiQ $200*00 MutI • • PrtMHrt to Win — On* ffkm Pf Porten ^ItMifrt Holiday FMIWS* ^HI-A 9iipeaipiilPiMlPiiiiiP

PAGE 19

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmrmmmmmmmmm ?•!• 18 Hendcnon Home Newt and Bovlder City Newt %fA\ o^N di§esl by Sell Orovi Editon Note: Soap Qpsni Dl§mi •oimiuuriMs prognuni alnd the WMk of Doc 22 throogli Doe. 28. AXt My CUUm: Nina and Cliff were wed. Palmer got out of his wheelchair to walk Nina down the aisle. Natalie was blamed after nuurk burglarized Palmer's mansion. Phoebe caught Nina's bouquet. Coming: A penniless, homeless jobleoa Erica makes a desparate dedaioo. Another World: Felicia and Rachel both confessed strong feelings for Mitch. The jury was still out over Brittany's fate. Mac went to see Roae after finding a bracelet Mitch had given Rachel. The Northwoods Inn became a raging inferno. Coming: M.J.'s mystery man fflaJcM another move. At n* World Turtu: Frannie became more convinced that ahe was on the trail of a secret that might change her life. Seth was concerned about her. Duncan made a breakthrough in the mystery. Coming: Lisa faces some new facts about her life. Capitol: Kelly had an emotional setback. Mark worried that Clarissa might find out more than he wants her to know. Jordy worried that he might be thinking too much about Nicole. Coming: Sam takes action that perplexes Trey and Myma. DaUat: Clayton vowed revenge while Miss Ellie asked her sons to help calm her husband. J.R. got frightening news about B.D. Calhoun. Donna returned to Dallaa with a dedaion about her marriage to Ray. Coming: J.R. takes steps to fight B.D.'s threat. Daja Of Our LIvea: Mitch told Robin that either she sleep with him as man and wife or the marriage was over. Kim asked Neil to help force Emma to reveal where Andrew is: Kayla and Patch exclumged Xmas gifts. Coming: Enuna starts to talk. Falcon Crvat: Lance's attempt to win control of the New Olobe backfired. Melissa demanded that lance move out. Emma brod^t Karlotti home to trace Wayne's spirit. Angela began to suspect banM framed her. Coming: Eouna's feelings for Karlotti grow; Maggie faces danger. Oanoral Hoapltal: Alan was devastated when Jimmy Lee turned up with Charity and Jonah. Lucy learned Buss had no alibi for the night Ted Holmes was killed. Duke agreed to turn state's evidence. Coming: Duke and Anna face a surprise early in the new year. Guiding Light: A new mystery surrounded Dinah's background. Reva came to terms with the changes in her life. Alex had another secret aboutthe nude painting. Coming: India reveals another motive for her actions. Knota Landing: Lilimae found drugs in Olivia's car after the accident, but was able to hide them from the police. Mack was shocked when he learned Anne was alive and well. Gary learned that Jill had been lying to him about Peter. Coming: Peter feels trapped. Loving: Jim and Shana planned to marry outside the church after the Biahop refused to take his case to Rom6. Nick was furious when Trisha refused his gift of a mink coat. Cecilia was upset to learn Steve knew she tore up Triaha's letter. Lottie recalled Eban's threats. Coming: Ava stumbles onto a mystery. Ona LHa To Uva: Tina, overcome by the gas she turned on during her phony suicide attempt, was rushed to the hospital. After firing Clint, Vickie asked Tom to help her run the newspaper. Kate and Cord foimd the treasure on the remains of Devil's Claw which was now owned by Pamela. Coming: Clint's efforts to reconcile with Vickie takes an unexpected turn. Rjan'a Hopm Siobhan told Joe she was prepared to tell Max who he ia. Joe revealed that Max was really Overlord. Lizzie admitted killing Harlan when he tried to sexually assault her after she accused him of killing her mother. Coming: Max begins to suspect Siobhan is hiding something from him. Santa Barbara: Qina was struck by lightining and had a dream that could change her life. A hoUday rift between Eden and Cruz caused new problems for them. Ex-con Gusjiras angry with Caroline for neglecting their daughter Alice. Caroline was afraid Gus would tell Alice who she really is. Coming: Lionel unwittingly causes problems for Caroline. Search For Tomorrow: Lisa was startled to find a doubfe for Travis traveling with her. They both felt attracted to each other. Hogan and Patty were married. Wilma and David reconciled their differences. Bela was overjoyed to learn Sunny was really pregniuit this time. Coming: Jo has some new ideas for the future. The Young A The Reatieea: Paul was eager to run down a possible lead to George although neither the Veteran's Administration or Social Security had records on him. Jack and Brad continued to get on each other's nerves. Coming: Jill's plans to surprise Kay surprise her instead. 1986, McNaught Syndicate In old Scotland, Parliament passed a law torfoidding any ntan to turn down aglrl who proposed to him on Leap Year, under penafty of a MOO fins. .THOUSANDS OF YARDS ON SALE !• HAPPY ^ ENTIRE STOCK CORDUROr ^ ENTIRE STOCK moms ENTIRESTOCK / SWEATSHIRT #A FL££C£ PRINTS '^ ENTIRESTOCK mi usum FABRICS JANUARY 1 Om ENURE 5I0CK PAITERNS SPECIAL GROUP lUFRaANDFUT LACEtlRIMSl SPECIAL GROUP 4I"T054"WIK SCUDS AND PHINTS DRAPERY FABRICS PRINHD DRAPERY REMNANTS i(io'/,conoN rT0S4"WIDE \, / IIMIMWIIH fABRiC PURCHASE ENTIRESTOCK • FLANNEL PRINTS • SLEEPWEAR FUNNEL • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • iiniii • REMNANTS! SOUOSl PRINTS 77(5 j ^44 I I YARD I YARD • • • • • nWMMMI CNMSTIUS NOnOliSJiND TRIMS /2OFF MKItMlllliaH l\l uu U h m U v^ SHOPATANYOFTHESELOaTIONSi ll971N.DiCAnfflATW.UKEIEAO l3387&J0NE$ilTSPnilQITN. I2)20LBONA1IUATEA$TEI flE H n782E.FlAMIM0ATUIIDHIU HOURS: MON.-FRI. 9:30-9 SAT. 9:30-6 SUN. 12-5 Thnniday, January 1, 1986 Haaderion Han* Nawt ia4 BavMar air Nawa Ptfa If 'Nevada Historical Society's "This Was Nevadii" series Portends of a dry future, New Year's, 1918 by PhilUp I. Earl Nevada Hiatorlcal Society Publidat Nevadans had good reason to be of good cheer during the holiday •eason in 1918. The Great War had come to an end six weeks earlier and the first soldiers were beginning to return home from basea and training camps around the country. Those citizens who had survived the flu epidemic were particularly grateful for the good fortune wliich had Ipared them and their families, but all was not ^ell in the state. On Nov. 5, six days before the armistice in Europe, Nevada voters approved an initiative prohibition measure outlawing the manufacture, sale, gifting, transportation of or possession of "malt, vinuous or spiritoUs liquors, and other intoxicating drinks, mixtiu-es or prepara* tions." The act filled some thirteen pages in the statute book and gave hope to those Nevadans who had been involved in the crusade against the "Demon Rum," but others had-tiuestions as the holiday season approached. Could liquor purchased prior to the effective date of Dec. 18 be served to guests in the home? Could liquor for personal consumption be kept at home? Could it be carried in a hip flask outside the home? Could housewives purchase, keep and use vanila and lemon extracts containing alcohol? And what about perfume? Could physicians prescribe liquor for medicinal purposes? These questions would be endilessly debated and litigated over the next fifteen years, but most drinkers were taking no chances, stocking up their larders in anticipation of a long dry spell ahead. By Dec. 18, most saloonkeepers had aokl out their reserve stocks and twenty of Reno's Hfty-eight saloons had closed thair doors. Others were renovating to become restaurants, serving only raspberry syrup drinks, coffee, tea and water. The Reno brewing company had come out with "Sierra Beverage," a "near beer" containing lees than one-tenth of one percent alcohol, but Attorney General George Thatcher filed suit on Dec. 18 to test the law and stop production of even that innocuous brew. Although Thatcher was uphekl by the Nevada Supreme Court a few weeks later, the beverage was available over the hoUdays. On Dte. 22. John Swiasig and CM. Donnell were arrested in Reno for can^g hip flasks on the streets. Convicted in Justice Court the next day, they had their attorney bring their cases to District Court on Mypeal. They contended that the Justice of .th Peace had exceeded his authority under the law and that the atate had gone beyond its police powers in allowing the Initiative prohibition act to become la^ Judge George Bartlett disagreed, ruling on Dec. 31 that the act Was constitutional in eyery respect. That evening, a hundred and fifty couples turned out for the Elks Club dance in Reno^ toasting the new year with water, "punchleas punch" and raspberry soda flavored with vanila extract. The Truckee River froze up solid for the fii'st time in ten years on Dec. 30. Several hundred skaters came out that day and Reno's city electrician strung lights along the walls of* the river downtown to facilitate night skating on New Years Eve. Some 3,000 spectactors and skaters were on hand for the informal ice carnival that night, bringing in the New Year with cheers, noisemakers and confetti, but drinking no toasts since word of Bartlett's decision earlier in the day had spread through their ranks. In a manner of speaking, the 1918 holiday was a portend of the future. Communities which had relied upon saloon license fees for revenue were either beginning to consider new sources of funds or making plans to cut services and employees. Indeed, the state itself was due to lose out on liquor excises and fees for dealer permits. State Treasurer Ed Mally projected the deficit at $76,000 annually, an amount which would require a property tax assessment increase of $17,000,000 to make up the shortfall according to Controller George A. Cole. Reports were meanwhile coming in on the first arrests for bootlegging and sale of illegal liquor. Attorneys were smiling to themselves, anticipating a flood of new clients. Many Nevadans wre just plab upset, amongst them an old-timer who was interviewed as follows in the Nevada Miaiag Preea: "This here prohibition may be all right for the weak and wobbly but it don't make no hit with me. Here's Christmas two days off and the town like a graveyard. No sociability, no nothin' Oh yes, sure. I got some in my room, little bit of everything, but what's the fun of sittin' in a hotel room swigging booze? Y' can't even give a swaller to a friend 'thout layin' y'rself open t' bein' pinched. Me, I like to slip one foot 'long the footrail, hook an elbow over the bulge on the front of the bar, and swap yams, especially this time o' the year. Take a fellow with "bout three shots 0' Old Crow or Hermitage undwr his belt an' hell tell y' a lot a' things he never would spill 'thout the aid uv a little Oil a' Joy. An' what's Christmas 'thout Tom and Jerry? J'st answer me that! You'n me's been used to th' conviviality uv a barroom since we cud remember anything. Any he-man wants his liquor, and me, I ain't got no use fer sissies!" Small business wori(sltop sclieduled Opening a new business in today's market requires knowledge in accounting, legal matters, finance, organization and planning before opening the. doors. The Small Business Administration and Clark County Community College are co-sponsoring a pre-business workshop at the Cheyenne Campus, Ja;i. 9, from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in room 1068. Professionala in law, advertising and accounting will discuss business planning, legal aspects of a business, marketing and advertising, the new tax reform act and small business administration programs. Registration fee for the workshop is $10. Nevada, I remember, I remember. The state where I was bom. That used to be so wringing wet. And is now so forlorn. The pungent sagebrush that 1 knew. Aroma of the pines. That later on were mixed with brew And later still with wines. From the famed old International To the good old Riverside; From the sandy shores of Glenbrook Down to Carson, open wide. From Pioche to Winnemucca, It was heaven, just to think. That it now is really arid And a man can't get a drink. From Bob Preston's down to Drysdale's Clear from Elko to Barooch, The prospector must noW wander Without anything like hooch. Farewell Shades of Palaces and Northerns, And the gulch called Stingaree, And the Idler and the Mohawk, Still they call this country free. I remember down in Goldfield, At the Montesuma when The gang would all foregather, \ And we'd fill 'em up again. Can you see them Bryanizing In the Big Casino? Say! Or count the tongues that hang a foot Down old Moana way? ^ ITemember, I remember, The state where I was born. Where now there is a sacrilege; The kibosh on the corn. -'^Where first I saw the light of day, I hoped my dying breath Would go, but I can't have my way; Who wants to choke to death? Checks totaling more than $14,000 await 10 "iost workers" The United States Department of Labor appealed to the public to help it locate 10 "lost workers" in Nevada so it can give them back paychecks totaling more than $14,000. The department can't deliver the checks because the workers' current addresses are unknown. The money represents back wages the Labor Department recovered on the workers' behalf from Nevada employers who failed to comply with the minimum wage and overtime requirements of the federal Fair Labor Standards Act. The current minimum wage is $3.36 an hour, and the law requires that overtime at the rate of timeand-a-half be paid for all hours worked over 40 in a workweek. Herbert Goldstein, regional head of the Wage-Hour Division here, appealed to the public and the news media to help locate the workers. The problem is these people left their jobs, and left their employers no forwarding addresses, before we could deliver them their back paychecks, Goldstein explained. "These people earned this money, and the Labor Department wants to do everything it can to see that these people get paid." Gokistein said any worker whose name appears on the list below should contact the Labor Department immediately. Workers should write: Guy Guerrero, Wage-Hour Division, United States Depart-^ ment of Labor, 450 Goklen Gate Avenue, room 10353, San Francisco, Calif. 94102. Or, they may telephone (415) 556-3592. Some local members on the list of workers and their former employers follows: The Coachman's Inn, Las Vegas: Edwin C. Bennett, William Malmquist. Imperial Palace Casino, Las Vegas: Clayton Beever, Debra Nicholas Kisner, Yvonne E. Brown Whitson. Kathleen K. BJornson, D.D.S. is pleased to announce the relocation of her office to 2581 N. Qreen Valley Parkway BIdg. A Ste. 408 Henderson, Nevada^ 89018 New offic* hours — Call for appointment 458-2929 ,AIHOtf,Co ^ Announces ^r^ MEMBERSHIP ^ DUIVS For Month of January ieS7 Only •1M MttsHM fes (nirmaily •tM) MIS isl Mentti's 4uei FbR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT: 501 COUNTRY CLUB DR... .HENDERSON, 905-7933 BOULDER lULLS 1303 Darlana Way Boulder City QuM Btnnity, y§t only mlnut§ away from It alll $64,900 to $69,500 For disoount Info, or sppt., Mil (702) 293-7778 Villa Del Prado ^ PHASE 4 r^ SEMI-CUSTOM HOMES PICK BUIR REAITYJ 3 i 4 BEDROOM HOMES MODELS OPEN DAILY NOON TILL 4 P.M. Take Buchsnan to Adams to MODEL... OFFICE 619 OTONO 293-2171 mmm Muai. .Ts HERE WE COME HAWAH One Free Si^tt Up Per Dflcy 7 NIGHTS IN HAWAH F OR % Round trip Airfare via Wide Body Jet including meal and beverage service. Welcome service and flower lei greeting Round trip tranefera between airport and hotel • i *Pree use of Rent-A-Car for 1 day W^ CA5H AND HAWAH DRAWING FEBRUART l5t, 1987 5:30 $200*00" 6:00 Hawaii 6xiQ $200*00 MutI • • PrtMHrt to Win — On* ffkm Pf Porten ^ItMifrt Holiday FMIWS* ^HI-A 9iipeaipiilPiMlPiiiiiP

PAGE 20

I Pace MHenderioB Home Newi and Boulder City Newi wmmmmmmm Thursday, January 1. 1987 =" "^c^ w^ w^^ Redeem Your Proctor & Gamble Coupons At Your Local Albertsons Store. Ultra Pampers 66 CT. • 48CT. • 32CT. • 28CT. Uquid Cascade Bold 3 Liquid Detergent 64 OZ. mn^' 80 OZ Scope Moutt^wash 32 OZ. 1 Zest Bath Soap 4 PACK iiulaei|jjggi#jiaeif .*: "^ 64 r"HH'' III ^ OP. Folgers • Electric Perk • Regular • ADC 16 OZ. Crest • Pump 4.6 Oz. • rube 6.4 Oz. Era Plus S,6iOZ. Dawn Liquid Dist) Detergent 22 OZ. T.r|,.v -flC ;:^':Pringles Regular Potato Chips 7.5 OZ Always • Super 26 Ct • Maxi 30 Ct • Maxi Plus 26 Ct. Mini Pads 30 CT. $2.88 Panty Liners 26 CT. $1.88 Jif Peanut Butter Citrus Hill Orange Juice 12 OZ. 18 OZ. Pepto BIsmol Secret • Regular • Unscented • Powder Fresh 2 0Z. Roll-On • Regular • Unscer)ted • Powder fresh 1.25 OZ. Preil Normal to Oily Hair • Liquid 16 Oz. • Concentrate 7 Oz. EA.i • Regular • Ur)scenfed • Powder Freth 40Z. Bounce Fabric Softener 40 CT. Albertsons' Prices Effective Friday, January 2 Thru Tuesday, January 6,1987. Thursday, January 1, 1987 ^ START YOUR Handerion Hama Nawt and B—ldw City Ntws Paga tl avy^^^^5>v • • • • Albeitsons raDy"q'it 1987 Oy Alh^rtso" s lie An Riqhis RescwrH' \ oi*um. WHOUSAUtiANO wsnrunoMS 3 0A Raised Glazed Donufs^""^'^ Ofl Cinnamon Sugar •jrO CakeDonut$ on. Pricmt Effmcttv Friday, Jan 2 Thru HMnMCtoy, Jon. 7, 1987. Albertsons' %! Os^fn^M tMT t/f Awvf%MW s. tnc AAHAmUTY foc/i (X N)*M oAwlkari AMM M rulpatf to 6 rwdVy ovoMM* Mr ••<• or Mtow Ww MIMCMCir 11% ttTn/e to 9tee on MRVMIMBPWV VBOV OF •• ON* or MM* a atM QiSDt • M reetobiermemmitmee* MnoiA #

PAGE 21

I Pace MHenderioB Home Newi and Boulder City Newi wmmmmmmm Thursday, January 1. 1987 =" "^c^ w^ w^^ Redeem Your Proctor & Gamble Coupons At Your Local Albertsons Store. Ultra Pampers 66 CT. • 48CT. • 32CT. • 28CT. Uquid Cascade Bold 3 Liquid Detergent 64 OZ. mn^' 80 OZ Scope Moutt^wash 32 OZ. 1 Zest Bath Soap 4 PACK iiulaei|jjggi#jiaeif .*: "^ 64 r"HH'' III ^ OP. Folgers • Electric Perk • Regular • ADC 16 OZ. Crest • Pump 4.6 Oz. • rube 6.4 Oz. Era Plus S,6iOZ. Dawn Liquid Dist) Detergent 22 OZ. T.r|,.v -flC ;:^':Pringles Regular Potato Chips 7.5 OZ Always • Super 26 Ct • Maxi 30 Ct • Maxi Plus 26 Ct. Mini Pads 30 CT. $2.88 Panty Liners 26 CT. $1.88 Jif Peanut Butter Citrus Hill Orange Juice 12 OZ. 18 OZ. Pepto BIsmol Secret • Regular • Unscented • Powder Fresh 2 0Z. Roll-On • Regular • Unscer)ted • Powder fresh 1.25 OZ. Preil Normal to Oily Hair • Liquid 16 Oz. • Concentrate 7 Oz. EA.i • Regular • Ur)scenfed • Powder Freth 40Z. Bounce Fabric Softener 40 CT. Albertsons' Prices Effective Friday, January 2 Thru Tuesday, January 6,1987. Thursday, January 1, 1987 ^ START YOUR Handerion Hama Nawt and B—ldw City Ntws Paga tl avy^^^^5>v • • • • Albeitsons raDy"q'it 1987 Oy Alh^rtso" s lie An Riqhis RescwrH' \ oi*um. WHOUSAUtiANO wsnrunoMS 3 0A Raised Glazed Donufs^""^'^ Ofl Cinnamon Sugar •jrO CakeDonut$ on. Pricmt Effmcttv Friday, Jan 2 Thru HMnMCtoy, Jon. 7, 1987. Albertsons' %! Os^fn^M tMT t/f Awvf%MW s. tnc AAHAmUTY foc/i (X N)*M oAwlkari AMM M rulpatf to 6 rwdVy ovoMM* Mr ••<• or Mtow Ww MIMCMCir 11% ttTn/e to 9tee on MRVMIMBPWV VBOV OF •• ON* or MM* a atM QiSDt • M reetobiermemmitmee* MnoiA #

PAGE 22

• Wl^^^p^ ^mmi^^ ^^i^^ i wm • p ,^i Pift tS Henderson Homt News and Boulder City News 1987 BUSINESS PROFILES REVIEW KIIP AND USE "RIAOKR AD$ THIS SBCTION PREPARED AND COPYRIGHTED 1987 iv DENNIS M. KASUM. Thfl opinions •xprtMd In the following ndvortlitmonte are puroly the views of the Editors of the Buslnese Profiles Review and not necessarily those of this newspaper" fir Kayem Korrals Classic Egyptian Arabians "Ktvin A Marlias Mott Ownrt and Traintrs" In Clark County, and indaad in the sntlra atata of Nevada, roundly respectad for their knowledge and ability in Arabian iioraa bNMUnf and tndning U KAYEM K0RKAL8 CLASSIC EGYPTIAN ARABL^NS, located at 58S1 W. Waahbum Road in Laa VMM, pbooa 646-8848. Ktvia A MarilM baVabMn involved with boraaa for over IB jrear* and bava produced ehampionahip horaea for th* ahow ring. Throufffa tliair aiptrianoe in thla fiald, thay have learned Juat exactly what type of alra it takea to brsad a colt that hM Uu charactariatio* you are looking for. Iliay ar th* ownar/trainara of Maoho REA, the 1986 Nevada State Champion atalUon, whoae sirs Is Ansata Ibn Sudan, the 1971 U.S. National Champion. Kevin k Marila* will be more than happy to diacuae any questions you might have about bringing your mare to foal. Thla complete stable fMturae training for outaide Arabiana aa well as expert grooming and much more. Wa, tha aditora of tbia 1987 Review of Busineea Leaders, are more that pleaaed to bring to the attention of our raadera this wall raapaetad stable and their keen abilities in horse breeding and training. Without hesitation we give our complete recommendation to KAYEM KORRALS CLASSIC EGYPTL\N ARABIANS. "Thtir Cuatomara Recommand Thaml" Gracious living can be your* wh*n you have tha experU at CARECRAFT POOLS, serving all of Clark County, phone 363-9690, install a beautiftil swimming pool on your property. The owner. Don Sainsbury, has 17 year* of expertiae in deaign & construction. He values quality over volume, keeping his business of a manageable sixe so thst he can maintain, personal supervision over all construction. State Contractor's Ucense ||I19670. CARECRAFT POOLS is the local authorised dealer for the fine San Juan Piberglaaa Poola and Omega Vinyl Lined pools. These pools are famous for their quality, design & durability. BMt th* (ummer rush! Oive Don a call today and let him explain the many aixea, designs, and price rangea he offers. We think ytfull be amaiad how sffordsbly you can have CARECRAFT POOLS completely install a family sisad pool equipped with all the wtras that make it complete in every way. ) Not only will a pool add much enjoyment and health f\il exercise to your living, but it groatly adda to the value of your home and property. Tha deaignera of this 19R7 Review of Leading Business commend this dealer and contractor on hia fme reputation foik-honest business dsalings snd his beautiful, quality pools! Computer World "Your full range of homo and bualnaaa computar ayatama" Thinking about buying a personal computar, but afraid of getting an expensive toy inatead? Let the trained computer profssaionala at COMPUTER WORLD in Las Vsgas. phone 798-1377, show you how reasonably priced a personal computer can be. The word "^rsonal," whan used with computers, has s special meaning since every individual's neada are different. Chria Coffin, the manager, and Steve Schmitt, the aasiatant managar are experta at COMPUTER WORLD and will tak* the myatsry out of shopping for s microcomputer for you. Whstever your needs and whatever your budget, Chris and Steve will tailor a personsl computer snd software package that will help you do your tsxes, balance your checkbook, write letters, sand mailings and get information. Family buaineases can always make use of a computar. Needless to My, children also enjoy computers. COMPUTER WORLD features the well-known Commodore and Atari 530 and 1040 ST computers, as well u a full Un* of aoftwar* that is helpful to all member* of the house. COMPUTER WORLD also provides special training clasaas. Th* •ditor* of this 1987 Review believe that if you're considering new computer or additions to your present systam, you should coataet COMPUTER WORLD, 4110 South Maryland Parkway, Suite #33 in Las Vegas. Decatur Equipment Rentals "Qordy Lapolnta, Managar" Aa the cost of purchasing tools and equipment continues to climb, more ind more contractors and do-it-youn*lfrs ar* baginning to realise thst they can save substantially by renting what they need at DECATUK EQUIPMENT RENTALS, located at 3448 8. DMtur Boulevard in Las Vegaa, phone 871-657S or 871-3016. DECATUR EQUIPMENT RENTALS is a leading residential and commercial equipment rental specialist in this area. Every conceivable tool and type of equipment is available for rent there, including cement mixers, dump trucks, tractors, trailers, floor sandars. painting equipment, air compressors, pool pumps, garden equipment, furniture dollies, snd hundreds of other itams. DECATUR EQUIPMEMT RENTALS prideB itself in offering large varietiea of quality equipment for rent at reasonsble rata*. For their customer's convenience, they are open Monday through Saturday from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and Sunday* from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. You can always expect prompt, excellent service from their knowledgable, friendly personnel. Th* aditor* ol this 1987 Review commend the msnagement and staff of DECATUR EQUIPMENT RENTALS for it's fine service to th* people of this community. UORDY LAPOlNTE attd his staff wish all our reader* the finest and happiest of Holiday Ssasons, as well as a praspsrous NEW YEAR! T Dr. Terry H. Leavitt Podiatrist "Tha Foot Spaclailat for Complata Family Foot Cara" "Paopl*'* f**t must not be neglected," saya Dr. TERRY H. LSAVriT, s raapected Podiatriat in Lu Vegu. "T^par foot car* is ju*t aa es**ntial to good health as care of the eyes and teeth." Survey of Podiatrists (they are the specialists who treat foot ailmenta) have shown that many painful foot afflictiona with which people suffer through life are actually started in childhood. An annual foot check-up would do much to prevent serious foot disorders later. Dr. TERRY H. LEAVITT, D.P.M.. is a Family Podiatrist, offering complete and gentle Podiatric care for infants through adulU. With new medical techniques that are virtually pain-free, INGROWN TOENAILS can be cured for life in moet oaaes. Treatment for BUNIONS, CORNS snd CALLOUSES, BONE SPURS and KfX)T and ANKLE INJURIES (including SPORTS INJURIES), TREATMENT OF DISEASES and SURGERY OF THE FOOT are all provided here. Most treatment procedures can be performed quickly and efficiently in the doctors office and eliminates costly hospital stays. We, th* aditors of this 1987 Review of Community Leaders, are deUghted to recommend that you visit Dr. TERRY H. LEAVITT for an examination. His office is conveniently located in the Valley Professional liuilding at 2960 8. Maryland Parkway, Suite 18, in La* Vagaa, phone 733-4664. Moat insurance accsptad. Oinvenient parking HANDICAP ACCESS. Western Truck Parts "Laa Oaloar, Branch Managar" Headquarter* In this ar*a for an excellent aelection of new and rebuilt car and truck parts in WESTERN TRUCK PARTS. This leading part* house is located at 4978 Industrial Road in Las Vegas, phone 736-2960. Here they feature the fineet in name brand auto and truck parts and after-market equipment for both the buying public and service technicians. FRAM FILTERS have Joined the family of other fine product* in the ALLIED AUTOMOTIVE GROUP, including BENOIX HEAVY VEHICLE PARTS, BENDD( HYDRAULIC BRAKE PARTS. BENDDC FRICTION MATERL\L, AUTOLTTE SPARK PLUGS, and many other critical parta for your oar or truck. Through their policy of offering fineat quality, guaranteed producta at reaaonabi* pricea, this busines* has Mtabllah*d itMlf as one of the leaders in their field. Th*y anpby helpful, knowkdgwble peraonnel who can quickly help you lelect the right part for your needs, saving your valuable time. Th* *dltor* of Uii* 1987 Buain*** Profll** Review are happy to commend thia fine parta house for their fina raputation and honaat affbrt* in thair *arvice to people of thl* ar*a, and we auggeat to our readers that they make WESTERN TRUCK PARTS thair headquarters for all suto and truck parta and equipment. VISION RLD "Your Quallflad Optlclana ~ Jim & Marlann Tlndall" FINALLY! An optical diapenaary wbar* you can really gat excited about aelecting eyawear. At VISION WORLD, located at 4300 Meadow* Une in the Meadows Mall (acroM from Broadway) in Las Vegas, phons 878-6738, they provide fsahionable eye care combinad with a thouaand ways for you to look good! Not long ago, an optical shop wss considered s necessary evil, a place where one visits after being ordered by their eye doctor to fulfill n*ed. Today, VISION WORLD haschanged all that with fashionable syewear Han jrou can (hop for daaigner eyawear, coordinating fashion with function from the practical to Ui* extravagant, fraturing quality manufaeturars who are recongniaed for quality and attractiveness! At VISION WORLD you can **l*ct from hundrad* of high faahion, high quality frame* and be aasurad of a perfect fit and aaactinff ians faMcation. Tha optician* h*ra, Jim and Mariano Tlndall, ar* experts with over 37 years combined experience, snd tkalr pride ahow* in a*ry patf of ayaiUaa** they diapana*. Expart repair and adjuatmenta ar* offered and they ar* alway* happy to diaoua* your optlMrMadal OBOtactt aia avaiiabla thrasuh the ConUct Lam Cnter next door. Wa, th* adlton of thia 1IS7 Haviaw of Community Leader* in Bu*ina*( and Profeaeion* command theM optician* far thatr aapati kiiowladtsaiila guidanea, and on thair faahionabla, quality eyawear. Stacom Profettlonal Consultants "Th ••Milltt k Closd-Clreult TV Sptelallatt" Tlw amrM (br MigiaaariQi, draftinf and dMlgn of MtaUita and C.A.T. V. Syataou for oaw and *ai*ting faeilitiM an at STAOOM, tha raoraWGNAl CONSULTANTS, phooa 7Be-97T. HM OWMT, Caa Sbafhar. la • prnfbaiinoal gonaultaat with ovor 90 year* axperianc* in advance itage* of engineering and mana|*iMMt Ha hM baw tntniM with loma of tiu Urfsr ooattaeta in this arM and parionally ovaraae* each m tract to anaur* axoallant wor^ STAOOM PROraSfitONAL QONSULTANTB aia known for thair doaad circuit "EyM in the Skies" in both vivid color and MMohlM. Thay BPICIALIZK IN VERY SENSITIVE LOW UGHT CAMERAS for Casinos. Banks, Large Homa*, Convanienca Mofw, Induatry aad all coaunarda] applioationa (*pecirie*tions to .04 LUX-seeing in simost total darkn***!). la addition to maintaaanoa oontracta for eamaras in the Caainoa, as well as rebuilding, radaeigning and upgrading, STACOM PROraSSIONAL CONSULTANTS alao provide TIME LAPSE VCRs that go up to 940 hours plsying time! Fbr ViVM CflMvltlpg and advlea, anginaaring snd deaign, management, faaaibility studie*, CA TV S.M.A.T.V,. M.A.T.V., C.C.T.V., alerawiM, tarraatrlai latorflnmca (TT), and antanna deaign, contact STACOM PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANTS at MHO PtrMiM Raad. MM A-lli, LM VagM, phone 73-9787 Wt kw tf thatr rnatottal In tUa flald and giva STACOM PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANTS our unoonditional endan*ment li thta IMT Rarlow af BuiiMM Laadara! ThwrMlay, Junary 1.1987 One Wjy IHoblle Home Sales This Arm, located at 1011 Athol Av*. in Hendereon. phon* (MS-SOM. la haadquartar* for all type* of mobile home*. Thay offar mobil* hom** which ar* triad and proven beat for comfort, baauty, durability and anorgy effidaney. The own*r, Alan Fairbaim, Invitas you to stop in and wlahaa all 1MPPY NEW YIARI" Donald C. Hayhurst, M.D. Th* hiatory of Hypnoaia began thouaanda of yean ago and ita biftmy is rich with achievament*. Today, Hypnoai* i* an efftctlv* tool of th* medical and dental society and is accepted by tha American Medical A**ociatlon. Somewhere in every family in America, ther* can be found a worthwhile use for Hypnoais. HypnooThsrapeutlc tachnlqua* applied by an axparienced Hypno-llierspist can help overcome the problems relsted to oboaity and weight control; by use of Hypnotic suggaftion, individuals regsin control of their will power and self-control and ultimately, their esting habita. Smoking, fingemail biting, addictive drinking, gambling, bad-wetting, and other uncontrollable habita ar* corrected with Hypno-Therapy. Hypno-Analyais, coupled with childhood age regreasion, help* reveal underlying traumatic experience, often the root of probl^fhs causing "road-blocks" to a happy and full adult development. Reliving thesa exparienoe* whil* In a ralayad state of Hypnoaia ultlmataly fraaa an individual of morbid faara, phobia*, apaoeh impedimanta, miffnlna, aasual dyafunctlon, Insomnia, pain-control, dapraMion, and afflotional aad payehoaomatlc problam*. Th* *ditorlal staff of thia 1987 Buainaas Profiles Review ae pleased to have this opportunity to mike public our full reoommsndatlon of DONALD C. HAYHURST, M.D. and auggait to the poopla of thia araa that th*y contact him to answer any questions partalnlng to th* many uae* ot Hypnoai*. Calhoun Construction Co. Tim Calhoun — "Your Paraonal Contraotor" Now I* the time to (top contemplating alteration work in your home or office and iu*t pick up th* phone and call CALHOUN CONSTRUCTION CO. in Henderson, phone 664-8183. Thia contractor la well r!ognls*d In this arta for hia fine ektllad work and reasonsble rataa. No matter what you n**d to have done, whether it's just a simple panel job or you need your *ntlre Interior redone, thi* contractor haa th* exparianoe and ability to handle the job properly. He make* a point of only hiring well-qualified craftsmen to aaalst him and you can be assured of a beautifully flniahed job, carried out with only high quality materials, and completed in th* ihort**t time poasible st realistic prices. Ths writing staff of this 1987 Business Profiles Review takes plessur* in recommending thia fins contractor to our many readers and suggest that you remember to call CALHOUN CONSTRUCTION CO. for a job well done. Tim Calhoun and hia crew would like to tak* this opportunity to wlah everyone In the community a happy, prosparoua New Year! A-Able Roofing & iUlalntenance "27 Ysar* Ep*rlna* In tin Roofing Field" A good roof Is an all-lmporUnt factor In ths protection of your bulUing investment and a Arm well known for the installation and maintenance of all types of roofs is A-ABLE ROOFING k MAINTENANCE in Las Vegas at 412 S. 6th, phone 386-1981. Your roof repreeents only about 3 per cent of your building investment. Yet, it* valu* is out of all proportion to iU coat; for a roof acto as a guardian of your building and all its contenU, Just u you take inventory of any poaaeasions periodicallv, so you should check your roof. Let these roof specislists examine your roof. They msy find defects thst can eaaily be remedied, but which, if neglectad, might soon dangeroulaly weaken your roof. Or again they may discover thst your roof is so badly worn that it needs a new covering to protect it and to prevent s costly leak. They are the hot built-up roof specialiata, in addition to offering cedar, tile and shake roofing. They slso spaclalite in wsterproofmg. This 1987 Review edition and iU compilera are pleased to recommend A-ABLE ROOFING ft MAINTENANCE to our readers ss one firm who does th* job right at an honest price!! The folks at A-ABLE ROOFING A MAINTENANCE would Uke to wiah everyone a -HAPPY NEW YEAR!" Henderson Day Care Center If you've boan wanting to take a job, but the problem of flnding a rsputabla day care center for your children haa held you back, contact the HENDERSON DAY CARE CENTER located at Caae k Parkway In Henderson, phone 660-9384. The writers of thla 1987 Review command thia facility for its creative curriculum. —Las Vegas Business College "Barbara Paulua — Ownar" LAS VEGAS BUSINESS COLLEGE la located at 3917 W. Waahlngton Avenue in Las Vegss, phone 647-3446. This is the only private buainess college in Clark County that offers associate degrees. The college guarantees lifetime job placement assistance, and offers iU studenta th* opportunity to come back and bruah up on courses free. This institutiom offers sn eiduoational training built upon modem ideas where service i the wstchword st all times. Thay are dedicated te educational excellence and more. An lnv**tm*nt in college la an Investment in yourself that will pay real dividends in futur* years. To get anywhere in this modem age one must have an education. The achool is approved for Veterans and flnsnciai aid ia available to qualified appUcante. They specialiss in computer, programming, bookkeeping, shorthand, aecretarial, word processing, typing, court reporting, business management, and soles msrketing. Iliey have been a leader in advancing the educational level of thl* area. GradUataa from thia colltg* are ilway* in demand by buaineaa and profsaaional firm*. The LAS VEGAS BUSINESS COLLEGE la one of the leading achools of higher education. We, the Editor*, take pleasure in this 1987 Review in pointing to this collage a* one of your leading educations centers. Clearwater Pooi Service -^ "Family Ownad and Oparatad by Bob and Mallaaa Jonaa" Residential and commercial swimming pool owners in this area are fortunate to have tha CLEARWATER POOL SERVICE located in Boulder City, phone 394-1714. Thia company is completely equipped to give regular cleaning and maintenance service including acid washes and all types of repairs to your pool. They offer thla sarvic* on a weekly or monthly bsaia, or you can have them come out anjrtime you desire. Thay carry s complete Una of chemicals, replacement filters and other pool nscestitiee and make sure your pool Is clean, and saniti^ te swim in. Bob and Mali*** have ov*r 10 year* of experience in pool care, and you can count on them to keep your pool in tip top ahape, with *verything working properly, and healthful to swim In. "" In thia 1987 Buainea* Profiles Review, we, the authors, Uka pleuur* in pointing to ths fine business policies of the CLEARWA"!^ POOL SERVICE and make the suggsation that our readers raly on them to affectively handle their pool aervice and maintananoc. A.H.Ms Home Care "Pat Barratt R.N., Diraotor of Profaaalonai Sarvloaa" People throughout thia area have relied on AH M. HOME CARE located st SSOtT W. Sahara, Suite 8E in Laa Vegas, phone 873-8383, for many years of nurses, home health aids, and companiona. Each caa* ia con*id*red individually snd their placemente ensurs thst you hsve just the right person for ths job. They sre unique in offering the only enteroatomal therapy (oetomataa) in a home setting. All personnel from A.H.M. HOME CARE are qualified and experienced, and they have that special knack of knowing and responding to the naada of your loved one. Wa Invite you to contact tha qualified, health care profaaaionals at A.H.M. HOME CARE. A.H.M. Medical Supplies "Stava Qradwall — Qanaral Managar' Whan someone I* in need of hoapital aquipman t auch a* wheelchair*, hospital beds, walking aids or r*piratory therapy equipment, they often rely on A.H.M. MEDICAL SUPPLIES located at 3S26 E. Lake Mead In North Las Vegas, phona 649-6390. Through the desire of A.H.M. MXOICAL SUPPLIES to stay the leader in the field, they k**p themi*lv** *cquaintad with all the lateat develepmenta, offering thair cuftomer* the flne*t materials snd service. (They are the leaders In respiratory **rvice*, featuring portable oxygen, (Ntygan concentratora, liquid oxygen, and oxygen therapy). A.H.M. MEDICAL SUPPLIES alao aupplia* phyaicians and hospitala with a complete line of medical diagnostic equipment and physical therapy aids. They feature technical support by trsined profeaalonals to keep your equipment in peak condition, offarin^ Doth repair and calibration aervlcea. A friendly staff of qualified personnel are always on hand to help you find Just the right equipmant or suppliai, and to sufg*t the proper method* or u*ag* of th* piece of aquipmant you need. Let A.H.M. MEDICAL SUPPLIES handle your Madleaid, Medicare, or private Insuranoa billing for you. It la without haaitatien uat th* compiler* of thi* 1987 Business Profilaa Review suggest to all our reader* that thay oontact A.H.M. MEDICAL SUPPLIES for all thair home healthcare needs. Advanced Business iVIachlnes Las Vegas, Inc. "Mr. Kirk Norman Oensrsl Mansgtr''^ Th* modem buaina**parson of today regarda tha new electronic cash regiaters and computers system*provided by ADVANCED BUSINESS MACHINES LAS VEGAS, INC. aa one of thir bigger beneflte for computing ths many compUcatad dataila of avaryday bualnaaa. The exparta to aee In thi* area for these modem business mschines are at ADVANCED BUSINESS MACHINE LAS VEGAS, INC., located at fi087 S. ArviUe, Suite C, in Las Vegas, phone 367 0787. They offer complete cash register systems for point of sale and inventory control, u well u hotel front deek systems and the popular NCI slectronie scsles. Thair qualified account *i*cutivea are fully trained to analyie your cash regiater needs, and will gladly counasl you on the benefito of th* fine machin** they handle. Sale*, rental and leasing plans are available u well aa profaeaional service and th* neceaaary supplies to operste the equipment after you have made your purchaae. For your convenience, ADVANCED BUSINESS MACHINES LAS VEGAS. INC haa a modern showroom with many models, known for thair high-speed, troubla-fre* operation on display and svailabia for demonstration Ths writer* of thla 1987 Raviaw of Leading Businesses, tafcs this opportunity to command the staff snd msnagsment of ADVANCED BUSINESS MACHINES LAS VEGAS, INC. for their fine servic* snd quslity electronic cash regiater systems, snd suggest that you see them firtt for all your cash register n*ds! Boulder City Care Center "tuaan Cabral — Admlnlatrator with a raputation that time and afrvica have built, the BOULDER CITY CARE CENTER ia loeilad at 601 A4am* Blvd., In Bouldar City, phona 303-8181. Thay offar ear* for *ick, invalid, and convalaacing patianU through th* caraful *up*rvi*ion of skillad parNUMl, Thair patianta ar* carad for with the help of licenaad nuraaa, 34 hour* s day Ths aditor* of thia 1987 Bualnaaa ProfUa* Raviaw suggest to our rasder* thst thsy ramemhar the name BOULDIR CITY CARE CENTKR for th* finaat and friandliaat care availabls. We commend them for thair efforta to serve* th* people o&Clark County to tha beat of thair ability. \ Las Vegas Auto Upholstery "Tony 01 • ellonls snd Pit Manxl, Owners" For fi naat q uality custom auto and truck upholatery at wholesale prioei we highly recommend you call LAfl VIOA0 AUTO UPHOUrrtRY at 9030 Oontract A venu* (Near tha comer of Charlacton and Moha ve) in Lu Vegss, phons 3f8-ft810 for a fr** aatimats. LAS VEGAS AUTO UPHOUfTERY *p:ialita* in superb, profsaaional upholatery for all vahicles, snd faattir* a daasUng array of fabric aamplaa to choea* from, to giv* a truly custom look, without baahlog your budgst! Outstandiof worknaoahip, quality fabric, aad reputation far work that s p eak* for Itaalft, plu* illscount prleaa ara why w* ( mend LAS VIGAS AUTO UPHOUmWY. Call than today. W* knew yowll be glad you did! D • •! ThnnMlay, Jannaiy 1,1967 HendarMB ROOM News mi Bal4r CUjr r:^ 1987 BUSINESS PROHLES REVIEW KIIP AND USI "RiAOIR AOt •QUf S lCnOW W IPAitIO AND OOP YWIOHTjD 1M7 lY MNNit M. KASUMa Tha opMana axpcaaaad In tha foNowing advartiaafliafita ava pufaiy tha vlawa of tha IdHon of tho lualnaaa Proflloa Plovlow and not naeoaaarlly thoaa of thla Halstead Construction Supplies^ "Rlek Hunt, Mansger" Thia area's headquarter* for tha flnast in gun nails, hanger*, staple* and other cooatruction hardware and auppliea ia HALSTEAD CONSTRUCTION SUPPLUS, located at 4011 Spring Mouatain Road in Laa Vega*, phona 362 1418. HAUTXAD CONSTRUCTION SUPPUXS providaa tha araa with raparior quality bulk nail*, hangers, gun naila, (taplaa, • taal fab, and other hardwai*. and alao **Ua and sarvic** power and hand tool*. Builder* in th* araa have oa(n* to d*pend on HAIilTEAD CONSTRUCTION SUPPLIES for thair excellent aalections of cooatruction need*, prompt, helpful earrlce, and reliability in delivarhig tha ptoduete they need, whan they need tham, at a r**K>nable price. Contractor* in this araa hav* com* to know that thia ia a fom from which they can mpect the finaat in oonatruction suppll**. Their outatanding reputation la your asturanoe of the higheat quality at all timea. The aditor* of thia 1907 Buaineaa Profilaa Review wiah to call to tha attention of our reader* the important part that thia firm ia taking in the buihiing pw grae of our community. It is with great plaaaure that wa recommend thia firm, their service and producta to all our nader*. Remember tha name HALSTEAD CONSTRUCTION SUPPLIES, we know youl^ be glad you didi The Waterbed Shed "Portha REST of Your Ufa" For the *l*ep you've alway* dnamad of, stop in at THK WATERBSD SHED at 4973 South Maryland Parkway, in the Camelot Shopping Center, phona 798-88M or 8140 Waet Charleatoa. acroaa from Red Rock Thaeters, phone B70-183S, THE WATERBED SHED is fsfflily owned and oparatad since 1977. so you know you can count on them for quality sarviee, aad promised delivery. If within 14 days you find the aama name brand for LESS, they will refund the difference in caah. Juat a few years ago, waterbeda ware thought to be a paasing fad. Today the new generation watarbeda look identical to oonventiooal bed* and blnul into any atyle of dacor. Watarbeda are aweeping the country aad are definitely here to *tay. THS WATERBED SHED featune tha Uteet in waterbed fumitur* and acceeeorlee. ReMrdlae* of whether you need a waterbed, a waterbed f^ame, beater or liner, you will find what you're kmking for at THE WATERBED SHED. They offer complete peckagaa from a baaic aystam to th* moat luxurioua, at very reaaonabia prioae. ... Buaineaa Profilaa Review proudly take* thia opportunity to reoofaia* tha ownara, Dale and Laalia Howard, and applaud them for their honeety and fair busineea daalinp. Prime Cable Service "Faaturing Naw Sarvicaa Starting January 4, 1987!" PRIME CABLE, serving the Henderson, Green VaUey, Boulder City and Laa Vagaa areaa, your local cable a*rvic* for Entertainment, Variety, Convenience and much, much more! When you conaidtr th* benefita. we think youll agree that PRIME CABLE ia poadbly tha beat dollar-forHiollar Entertamment value anywhere! .,,, PRIME CABLE brings the exciting world of entertainment into your home with live apwta action, Moekbuater moviaa. ehUdren programa and film claasica. Starting January 4,1987, their basic cable aervice will feature over ao channala. including k>cal ehaanels, MTV, Nickdodeon, Lifetime, Health Networii, TBN, CNN, and SupeietatioB* WGN-Chicago, WTBS-Atlanta aad WOR-Nw York for only S10.96 a month! To expand your service to include ESPN-The Sporta Network, Naahvilk Network, USA, FNN and Video Hita One. The Diaoov*ry Channel and QVC Home Shopping Network, order Baaic and Expanded aervice for only $17.96! Other peckagaa include the premium movie channels HBO. Cinemax, Disney, Showtime, Playboy, The Movie Channel, Bravo and American Movie Claaaica. Call for information. In Henderson/Green Valley, phone 665-8868, Boulder City, phone 294-0960, and Laa Vegu. phone 383-4000. The Editor* of thi* 1987 Review of Community Leader* believ* PRIME CABLE truly haa SOMETHING FUN FOR EVERYONE! We urge you to contact thia fme Cable TV Company aoon for the beat in Entertainment, Moviaa, Sporta 4 Spedalal George Carlln headlines Caesars Palace showroom Comedy star George Carlin steps into the Gaesars Palace showroom spotlight for cocktail shows Jan. 1 through Jan. 4, Carlin, whose wacky wisdom ranges from the obvious ("Mice have no shoulders.") to the philosophical ("How does a cat know which part of his body to wash net?") has been a network television star for 25 years. Now recognized as a multi-talented performer, Carlin says he still feels like a kid in a candy store. "To choose among scting, writing, touring and recording would be impossible," he says. "So I do them all." His newest feature fUm with Bette Midler and Shelly Long is scheduled for release Jan. SO. Titled "Outrageous Fortune," it is the story of two rival females who become unlikely friends while traveling cross-country. George portrays a bumsd-out hippie who gets caught up in their adventure and saves the day for the two women. George Carlin The new movie will be Carlin's fourth; others were "With Six You Get EggroU," "Americathon" and "Car Wash." A guest host of Johnny Canon's Tonight Show" more than 30 times, Carlin has also made numerous appearances on "Late Night With David Letterman," and has starred in five cable television specials. His own Carlin Productions has produced three highly rated shows for Home Box Office, one a situation comedy (which he wrote) and two specials. Carlin boasts 13 comedy record albums. His latest, "Playin' With Your Head," was released on his own label. Eardrum Records. And he's written a book, "Sometimes a Little Brain Damage Can Help," with plana for a second volume in the works. On stage at Caesars, Carlin will perform at 10 p.m. nightly except Saturday, when shows are scheduled at 8:30 p.m and 11:30 p.m. For reservations phone 731-7333. Judical college courses slated at UNLV About 40 judges from 21 states will be attending two couTMB on the UNLV campus Jan. U through Jan. 16 presented \n Ihe National Judicial College, headquartered in Reno. The oounea are Advanced Computers in Courts and Traffic Court Proceedings. Tbe nationally prominent faculty and lecturers for the courses oome from eight states: Judge Arthur Jackson from Dayton, Ohio; Dr. Thomas Canfiekl fhnn liootroae, Cob.; attorney Dwight Qark ftram San Frandsoo; Judge Karl Grube from St. Petersburg, Fla.; Judge Edwin Presley from Fort Worth; Robert Reeder from Evanston, HI.; Joe Jordan from San Rafael, Calif.; Mary Lu Holter form Baltimore and Dr. Melvin Pohl from Las Vegas. The judge-participants attending the courses are from Arizona, California, Illinois, Indiana. Iowa. Kaoaaa, MiasiaBipiii, Missouri, Nebraska. Nevada. New Jersey. Ohio, Penneylvania, South Carolina, South Dakoto. Texas, Utah • nd Wisconsin. Ihe course on Advanced Computvl in Courts demoostratas the latest twhniq^t** in oomputeriied court management systems. The course on Traffic Court ProBudget cuts eyed for DAV ceedings brings together the nation's leading experts, discussing traffic law, court practices and procedures that confront the judges of America who sit in what is truly the "peoples' court" in all 60 states, the Traffic Court. The Naiiooal Judkial GoUefs, sffiliated with the Anurioaa Bsr Association, is the leading judicial sducatioo and training institutioD inthenatkm. "Turning away America's wartime disabled veterans from the Veterans Adndnistration health care they need, and they've more than evned, is the Office of Management and Budget's answer. to s balanced budget," DAV officials charged recently. "At the same time, America's sickset and poorest vetorans would have the door to VA health care Hammed in their face if OMB's budget cuts prevail." The remarks, made by Kenneth G. Musselmann, National Commander of the Disabled American Vetwans (DAV), came in responae to OMB's plan to cut $928 million fron) the VA health care budget for fiscal year 1988. OMB is alao setking an immediate $160 million cut from VA health care for the present fiscal year, bringing the total to more than 91 billion in the near term. Those kinds of cuta, which would restilt in the loss of more than 9,000 VA medical care jobs and the drastic curtailment of services nationwide, "refutes America's sense of duty to her wartime disabled veterans and repreeento a fundamental failure of OMB to consider the wishes of the citizens it serves," Mussehnann said. Musselmann's comments were echoed by key veterans' programs leaders on Capitol Hill in the veterans' program arena: The Congress is not going to let OMB cut a billion dollars out of the VA budget. It's as simple as that," said Congressman G.V. "Sonny" Montgomery (D-Miss), who is expected to repeat as Chairman of Uie house Veterans' Affairs Onmiittee during the 100th Congress. "OMB, once again, has made recommendations that ignore the express wishes of Congress. We, in turn, have a fundamental duty in this instance to ignore OMB's recommendations." Senator Alan Cranston (DCalif.), who is expected to serve as Montgomery's counterpart in the Senate, said "OMB seems determined to sulamit a fiscal 1988 budget that is just as outrage9U8ly bad and unfair to veterans as the Administration's fiscal 1987 budget was." That budget was. soundly defeated by (Congress, with proposed deep cuts in a variety of VA services restored in both the Houae and Senate. VA Administrator Thomas K. Tumage appealed .OMB's plan, noting that such cuts "would seriously damage the VA's ability to meet its mission." According to the DA Vs Musselmann, "OMB's budget recommendations reflect the Agency's continuing contempt for America's dissbled veterans. Moet reBrMit HMlth SorMnlng : MAMMOQIUM AND IILP tfUAtT EXAM : art. ways to spot IfMtl Ciqoir lAfttaY CALLUtTOOAY 754*'04 i^EVADA BREAST aNTER 2IdlE.Flimin|oRoacl 734-8104 w^m. cently, OMB rejected VA plans to pay profoundly deaf veterans disability compensation conunensurate with their loss of hearing. Even ^ugh both VA officials and the Congress agree a serious disparity exists in the compensation psid tUs category of vets, OMB flatly rejected it The federal funds involved were small but the impact wouU have been greet on this smsll number of disablsd veterans who've also earned the right to lead quality livee." sAasAueuvionG^tt. OPPORTONITY VILUIOE Visit 0PP0RTUNI1Y VIUASeS Thrift Store & Boutique 12 W. Pacific 564-7128 In The New Holiday Theatre Rocky Sennes' R0I4RING REVUE $7.95 m per perton f^ g/ plui In INCLUDING TWO DRINKS 2 Shows Nightly 9 & 11:30 p.m. Dark Sundays • Call 369-5222 larjiMry 14 I"* .itul 17 SAMMY DAVIS JR. lu(.S|)(.M.il*>h(vvsNi^fiflv ')\ll:{n|) $1495 .^ IN( IUI)IN(. IVVO DKINKS HOLIDAY CASINO '% -y^ofejAcuj Svvyv lli'l .(IIMI-OulMili \(.il • 5 p.m. SessionDine Out With Scan MondOYi January 5th 7 p.in. Session $10,500 Bingo Spectacular $1000.00 Hardway $500.00 Hardway $500.00 Hardway $500.00 Hardway $1000.00 Hardway /g\ $500.00 \C/ Hardway /5\ $500.00 Vs^ Hardway (^ $500.00 ^ riordway $500.00 /^ $500.00 Hardway vly Hardway g N $500.00 (^ $1000.00 ZJ Hardway V5^ Hardway /4^ $3000.00 KZ) CoveroU $5.00 per card. $15.00 minimum. One seat per person. Aggregate pay. -9 p.m. SessionDouble Pay $300.00, $200.00. or $100.00 Ouaranteed Coverall $1000.00 Any color card HDTIL, Q/OCBLIKQHALL aad BOVUIIO CXHTBl louktor WgliwaT IMIif loidMFaid • 4M-7777 Another fine Boyd Group hotel *•

PAGE 23

• Wl^^^p^ ^mmi^^ ^^i^^ i wm • p ,^i Pift tS Henderson Homt News and Boulder City News 1987 BUSINESS PROFILES REVIEW KIIP AND USE "RIAOKR AD$ THIS SBCTION PREPARED AND COPYRIGHTED 1987 iv DENNIS M. KASUM. Thfl opinions •xprtMd In the following ndvortlitmonte are puroly the views of the Editors of the Buslnese Profiles Review and not necessarily those of this newspaper" fir Kayem Korrals Classic Egyptian Arabians "Ktvin A Marlias Mott Ownrt and Traintrs" In Clark County, and indaad in the sntlra atata of Nevada, roundly respectad for their knowledge and ability in Arabian iioraa bNMUnf and tndning U KAYEM K0RKAL8 CLASSIC EGYPTIAN ARABL^NS, located at 58S1 W. Waahbum Road in Laa VMM, pbooa 646-8848. Ktvia A MarilM baVabMn involved with boraaa for over IB jrear* and bava produced ehampionahip horaea for th* ahow ring. Throufffa tliair aiptrianoe in thla fiald, thay have learned Juat exactly what type of alra it takea to brsad a colt that hM Uu charactariatio* you are looking for. Iliay ar th* ownar/trainara of Maoho REA, the 1986 Nevada State Champion atalUon, whoae sirs Is Ansata Ibn Sudan, the 1971 U.S. National Champion. Kevin k Marila* will be more than happy to diacuae any questions you might have about bringing your mare to foal. Thla complete stable fMturae training for outaide Arabiana aa well as expert grooming and much more. Wa, tha aditora of tbia 1987 Review of Busineea Leaders, are more that pleaaed to bring to the attention of our raadera this wall raapaetad stable and their keen abilities in horse breeding and training. Without hesitation we give our complete recommendation to KAYEM KORRALS CLASSIC EGYPTL\N ARABIANS. "Thtir Cuatomara Recommand Thaml" Gracious living can be your* wh*n you have tha experU at CARECRAFT POOLS, serving all of Clark County, phone 363-9690, install a beautiftil swimming pool on your property. The owner. Don Sainsbury, has 17 year* of expertiae in deaign & construction. He values quality over volume, keeping his business of a manageable sixe so thst he can maintain, personal supervision over all construction. State Contractor's Ucense ||I19670. CARECRAFT POOLS is the local authorised dealer for the fine San Juan Piberglaaa Poola and Omega Vinyl Lined pools. These pools are famous for their quality, design & durability. BMt th* (ummer rush! Oive Don a call today and let him explain the many aixea, designs, and price rangea he offers. We think ytfull be amaiad how sffordsbly you can have CARECRAFT POOLS completely install a family sisad pool equipped with all the wtras that make it complete in every way. ) Not only will a pool add much enjoyment and health f\il exercise to your living, but it groatly adda to the value of your home and property. Tha deaignera of this 19R7 Review of Leading Business commend this dealer and contractor on hia fme reputation foik-honest business dsalings snd his beautiful, quality pools! Computer World "Your full range of homo and bualnaaa computar ayatama" Thinking about buying a personal computar, but afraid of getting an expensive toy inatead? Let the trained computer profssaionala at COMPUTER WORLD in Las Vsgas. phone 798-1377, show you how reasonably priced a personal computer can be. The word "^rsonal," whan used with computers, has s special meaning since every individual's neada are different. Chria Coffin, the manager, and Steve Schmitt, the aasiatant managar are experta at COMPUTER WORLD and will tak* the myatsry out of shopping for s microcomputer for you. Whstever your needs and whatever your budget, Chris and Steve will tailor a personsl computer snd software package that will help you do your tsxes, balance your checkbook, write letters, sand mailings and get information. Family buaineases can always make use of a computar. Needless to My, children also enjoy computers. COMPUTER WORLD features the well-known Commodore and Atari 530 and 1040 ST computers, as well u a full Un* of aoftwar* that is helpful to all member* of the house. COMPUTER WORLD also provides special training clasaas. Th* •ditor* of this 1987 Review believe that if you're considering new computer or additions to your present systam, you should coataet COMPUTER WORLD, 4110 South Maryland Parkway, Suite #33 in Las Vegas. Decatur Equipment Rentals "Qordy Lapolnta, Managar" Aa the cost of purchasing tools and equipment continues to climb, more ind more contractors and do-it-youn*lfrs ar* baginning to realise thst they can save substantially by renting what they need at DECATUK EQUIPMENT RENTALS, located at 3448 8. DMtur Boulevard in Las Vegaa, phone 871-657S or 871-3016. DECATUR EQUIPMENT RENTALS is a leading residential and commercial equipment rental specialist in this area. Every conceivable tool and type of equipment is available for rent there, including cement mixers, dump trucks, tractors, trailers, floor sandars. painting equipment, air compressors, pool pumps, garden equipment, furniture dollies, snd hundreds of other itams. DECATUR EQUIPMEMT RENTALS prideB itself in offering large varietiea of quality equipment for rent at reasonsble rata*. For their customer's convenience, they are open Monday through Saturday from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and Sunday* from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. You can always expect prompt, excellent service from their knowledgable, friendly personnel. Th* aditor* ol this 1987 Review commend the msnagement and staff of DECATUR EQUIPMENT RENTALS for it's fine service to th* people of this community. UORDY LAPOlNTE attd his staff wish all our reader* the finest and happiest of Holiday Ssasons, as well as a praspsrous NEW YEAR! T Dr. Terry H. Leavitt Podiatrist "Tha Foot Spaclailat for Complata Family Foot Cara" "Paopl*'* f**t must not be neglected," saya Dr. TERRY H. LSAVriT, s raapected Podiatriat in Lu Vegu. "T^par foot car* is ju*t aa es**ntial to good health as care of the eyes and teeth." Survey of Podiatrists (they are the specialists who treat foot ailmenta) have shown that many painful foot afflictiona with which people suffer through life are actually started in childhood. An annual foot check-up would do much to prevent serious foot disorders later. Dr. TERRY H. LEAVITT, D.P.M.. is a Family Podiatrist, offering complete and gentle Podiatric care for infants through adulU. With new medical techniques that are virtually pain-free, INGROWN TOENAILS can be cured for life in moet oaaes. Treatment for BUNIONS, CORNS snd CALLOUSES, BONE SPURS and KfX)T and ANKLE INJURIES (including SPORTS INJURIES), TREATMENT OF DISEASES and SURGERY OF THE FOOT are all provided here. Most treatment procedures can be performed quickly and efficiently in the doctors office and eliminates costly hospital stays. We, th* aditors of this 1987 Review of Community Leaders, are deUghted to recommend that you visit Dr. TERRY H. LEAVITT for an examination. His office is conveniently located in the Valley Professional liuilding at 2960 8. Maryland Parkway, Suite 18, in La* Vagaa, phone 733-4664. Moat insurance accsptad. Oinvenient parking HANDICAP ACCESS. Western Truck Parts "Laa Oaloar, Branch Managar" Headquarter* In this ar*a for an excellent aelection of new and rebuilt car and truck parts in WESTERN TRUCK PARTS. This leading part* house is located at 4978 Industrial Road in Las Vegas, phone 736-2960. Here they feature the fineet in name brand auto and truck parts and after-market equipment for both the buying public and service technicians. FRAM FILTERS have Joined the family of other fine product* in the ALLIED AUTOMOTIVE GROUP, including BENOIX HEAVY VEHICLE PARTS, BENDD( HYDRAULIC BRAKE PARTS. BENDDC FRICTION MATERL\L, AUTOLTTE SPARK PLUGS, and many other critical parta for your oar or truck. Through their policy of offering fineat quality, guaranteed producta at reaaonabi* pricea, this busines* has Mtabllah*d itMlf as one of the leaders in their field. Th*y anpby helpful, knowkdgwble peraonnel who can quickly help you lelect the right part for your needs, saving your valuable time. Th* *dltor* of Uii* 1987 Buain*** Profll** Review are happy to commend thia fine parta house for their fina raputation and honaat affbrt* in thair *arvice to people of thl* ar*a, and we auggeat to our readers that they make WESTERN TRUCK PARTS thair headquarters for all suto and truck parta and equipment. VISION RLD "Your Quallflad Optlclana ~ Jim & Marlann Tlndall" FINALLY! An optical diapenaary wbar* you can really gat excited about aelecting eyawear. At VISION WORLD, located at 4300 Meadow* Une in the Meadows Mall (acroM from Broadway) in Las Vegas, phons 878-6738, they provide fsahionable eye care combinad with a thouaand ways for you to look good! Not long ago, an optical shop wss considered s necessary evil, a place where one visits after being ordered by their eye doctor to fulfill n*ed. Today, VISION WORLD haschanged all that with fashionable syewear Han jrou can (hop for daaigner eyawear, coordinating fashion with function from the practical to Ui* extravagant, fraturing quality manufaeturars who are recongniaed for quality and attractiveness! At VISION WORLD you can **l*ct from hundrad* of high faahion, high quality frame* and be aasurad of a perfect fit and aaactinff ians faMcation. Tha optician* h*ra, Jim and Mariano Tlndall, ar* experts with over 37 years combined experience, snd tkalr pride ahow* in a*ry patf of ayaiUaa** they diapana*. Expart repair and adjuatmenta ar* offered and they ar* alway* happy to diaoua* your optlMrMadal OBOtactt aia avaiiabla thrasuh the ConUct Lam Cnter next door. Wa, th* adlton of thia 1IS7 Haviaw of Community Leader* in Bu*ina*( and Profeaeion* command theM optician* far thatr aapati kiiowladtsaiila guidanea, and on thair faahionabla, quality eyawear. Stacom Profettlonal Consultants "Th ••Milltt k Closd-Clreult TV Sptelallatt" Tlw amrM (br MigiaaariQi, draftinf and dMlgn of MtaUita and C.A.T. V. Syataou for oaw and *ai*ting faeilitiM an at STAOOM, tha raoraWGNAl CONSULTANTS, phooa 7Be-97T. HM OWMT, Caa Sbafhar. la • prnfbaiinoal gonaultaat with ovor 90 year* axperianc* in advance itage* of engineering and mana|*iMMt Ha hM baw tntniM with loma of tiu Urfsr ooattaeta in this arM and parionally ovaraae* each m tract to anaur* axoallant wor^ STAOOM PROraSfitONAL QONSULTANTB aia known for thair doaad circuit "EyM in the Skies" in both vivid color and MMohlM. Thay BPICIALIZK IN VERY SENSITIVE LOW UGHT CAMERAS for Casinos. Banks, Large Homa*, Convanienca Mofw, Induatry aad all coaunarda] applioationa (*pecirie*tions to .04 LUX-seeing in simost total darkn***!). la addition to maintaaanoa oontracta for eamaras in the Caainoa, as well as rebuilding, radaeigning and upgrading, STACOM PROraSSIONAL CONSULTANTS alao provide TIME LAPSE VCRs that go up to 940 hours plsying time! Fbr ViVM CflMvltlpg and advlea, anginaaring snd deaign, management, faaaibility studie*, CA TV S.M.A.T.V,. M.A.T.V., C.C.T.V., alerawiM, tarraatrlai latorflnmca (TT), and antanna deaign, contact STACOM PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANTS at MHO PtrMiM Raad. MM A-lli, LM VagM, phone 73-9787 Wt kw tf thatr rnatottal In tUa flald and giva STACOM PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANTS our unoonditional endan*ment li thta IMT Rarlow af BuiiMM Laadara! ThwrMlay, Junary 1.1987 One Wjy IHoblle Home Sales This Arm, located at 1011 Athol Av*. in Hendereon. phon* (MS-SOM. la haadquartar* for all type* of mobile home*. Thay offar mobil* hom** which ar* triad and proven beat for comfort, baauty, durability and anorgy effidaney. The own*r, Alan Fairbaim, Invitas you to stop in and wlahaa all 1MPPY NEW YIARI" Donald C. Hayhurst, M.D. Th* hiatory of Hypnoaia began thouaanda of yean ago and ita biftmy is rich with achievament*. Today, Hypnoai* i* an efftctlv* tool of th* medical and dental society and is accepted by tha American Medical A**ociatlon. Somewhere in every family in America, ther* can be found a worthwhile use for Hypnoais. HypnooThsrapeutlc tachnlqua* applied by an axparienced Hypno-llierspist can help overcome the problems relsted to oboaity and weight control; by use of Hypnotic suggaftion, individuals regsin control of their will power and self-control and ultimately, their esting habita. Smoking, fingemail biting, addictive drinking, gambling, bad-wetting, and other uncontrollable habita ar* corrected with Hypno-Therapy. Hypno-Analyais, coupled with childhood age regreasion, help* reveal underlying traumatic experience, often the root of probl^fhs causing "road-blocks" to a happy and full adult development. Reliving thesa exparienoe* whil* In a ralayad state of Hypnoaia ultlmataly fraaa an individual of morbid faara, phobia*, apaoeh impedimanta, miffnlna, aasual dyafunctlon, Insomnia, pain-control, dapraMion, and afflotional aad payehoaomatlc problam*. Th* *ditorlal staff of thia 1987 Buainaas Profiles Review ae pleased to have this opportunity to mike public our full reoommsndatlon of DONALD C. HAYHURST, M.D. and auggait to the poopla of thia araa that th*y contact him to answer any questions partalnlng to th* many uae* ot Hypnoai*. Calhoun Construction Co. Tim Calhoun — "Your Paraonal Contraotor" Now I* the time to (top contemplating alteration work in your home or office and iu*t pick up th* phone and call CALHOUN CONSTRUCTION CO. in Henderson, phone 664-8183. Thia contractor la well r!ognls*d In this arta for hia fine ektllad work and reasonsble rataa. No matter what you n**d to have done, whether it's just a simple panel job or you need your *ntlre Interior redone, thi* contractor haa th* exparianoe and ability to handle the job properly. He make* a point of only hiring well-qualified craftsmen to aaalst him and you can be assured of a beautifully flniahed job, carried out with only high quality materials, and completed in th* ihort**t time poasible st realistic prices. Ths writing staff of this 1987 Business Profiles Review takes plessur* in recommending thia fins contractor to our many readers and suggest that you remember to call CALHOUN CONSTRUCTION CO. for a job well done. Tim Calhoun and hia crew would like to tak* this opportunity to wlah everyone In the community a happy, prosparoua New Year! A-Able Roofing & iUlalntenance "27 Ysar* Ep*rlna* In tin Roofing Field" A good roof Is an all-lmporUnt factor In ths protection of your bulUing investment and a Arm well known for the installation and maintenance of all types of roofs is A-ABLE ROOFING k MAINTENANCE in Las Vegas at 412 S. 6th, phone 386-1981. Your roof repreeents only about 3 per cent of your building investment. Yet, it* valu* is out of all proportion to iU coat; for a roof acto as a guardian of your building and all its contenU, Just u you take inventory of any poaaeasions periodicallv, so you should check your roof. Let these roof specislists examine your roof. They msy find defects thst can eaaily be remedied, but which, if neglectad, might soon dangeroulaly weaken your roof. Or again they may discover thst your roof is so badly worn that it needs a new covering to protect it and to prevent s costly leak. They are the hot built-up roof specialiata, in addition to offering cedar, tile and shake roofing. They slso spaclalite in wsterproofmg. This 1987 Review edition and iU compilera are pleased to recommend A-ABLE ROOFING ft MAINTENANCE to our readers ss one firm who does th* job right at an honest price!! The folks at A-ABLE ROOFING A MAINTENANCE would Uke to wiah everyone a -HAPPY NEW YEAR!" Henderson Day Care Center If you've boan wanting to take a job, but the problem of flnding a rsputabla day care center for your children haa held you back, contact the HENDERSON DAY CARE CENTER located at Caae k Parkway In Henderson, phone 660-9384. The writers of thla 1987 Review command thia facility for its creative curriculum. —Las Vegas Business College "Barbara Paulua — Ownar" LAS VEGAS BUSINESS COLLEGE la located at 3917 W. Waahlngton Avenue in Las Vegss, phone 647-3446. This is the only private buainess college in Clark County that offers associate degrees. The college guarantees lifetime job placement assistance, and offers iU studenta th* opportunity to come back and bruah up on courses free. This institutiom offers sn eiduoational training built upon modem ideas where service i the wstchword st all times. Thay are dedicated te educational excellence and more. An lnv**tm*nt in college la an Investment in yourself that will pay real dividends in futur* years. To get anywhere in this modem age one must have an education. The achool is approved for Veterans and flnsnciai aid ia available to qualified appUcante. They specialiss in computer, programming, bookkeeping, shorthand, aecretarial, word processing, typing, court reporting, business management, and soles msrketing. Iliey have been a leader in advancing the educational level of thl* area. GradUataa from thia colltg* are ilway* in demand by buaineaa and profsaaional firm*. The LAS VEGAS BUSINESS COLLEGE la one of the leading achools of higher education. We, the Editor*, take pleasure in this 1987 Review in pointing to this collage a* one of your leading educations centers. Clearwater Pooi Service -^ "Family Ownad and Oparatad by Bob and Mallaaa Jonaa" Residential and commercial swimming pool owners in this area are fortunate to have tha CLEARWATER POOL SERVICE located in Boulder City, phone 394-1714. Thia company is completely equipped to give regular cleaning and maintenance service including acid washes and all types of repairs to your pool. They offer thla sarvic* on a weekly or monthly bsaia, or you can have them come out anjrtime you desire. Thay carry s complete Una of chemicals, replacement filters and other pool nscestitiee and make sure your pool Is clean, and saniti^ te swim in. Bob and Mali*** have ov*r 10 year* of experience in pool care, and you can count on them to keep your pool in tip top ahape, with *verything working properly, and healthful to swim In. "" In thia 1987 Buainea* Profiles Review, we, the authors, Uka pleuur* in pointing to ths fine business policies of the CLEARWA"!^ POOL SERVICE and make the suggsation that our readers raly on them to affectively handle their pool aervice and maintananoc. A.H.Ms Home Care "Pat Barratt R.N., Diraotor of Profaaalonai Sarvloaa" People throughout thia area have relied on AH M. HOME CARE located st SSOtT W. Sahara, Suite 8E in Laa Vegas, phone 873-8383, for many years of nurses, home health aids, and companiona. Each caa* ia con*id*red individually snd their placemente ensurs thst you hsve just the right person for ths job. They sre unique in offering the only enteroatomal therapy (oetomataa) in a home setting. All personnel from A.H.M. HOME CARE are qualified and experienced, and they have that special knack of knowing and responding to the naada of your loved one. Wa Invite you to contact tha qualified, health care profaaaionals at A.H.M. HOME CARE. A.H.M. Medical Supplies "Stava Qradwall — Qanaral Managar' Whan someone I* in need of hoapital aquipman t auch a* wheelchair*, hospital beds, walking aids or r*piratory therapy equipment, they often rely on A.H.M. MEDICAL SUPPLIES located at 3S26 E. Lake Mead In North Las Vegas, phona 649-6390. Through the desire of A.H.M. MXOICAL SUPPLIES to stay the leader in the field, they k**p themi*lv** *cquaintad with all the lateat develepmenta, offering thair cuftomer* the flne*t materials snd service. (They are the leaders In respiratory **rvice*, featuring portable oxygen, (Ntygan concentratora, liquid oxygen, and oxygen therapy). A.H.M. MEDICAL SUPPLIES alao aupplia* phyaicians and hospitala with a complete line of medical diagnostic equipment and physical therapy aids. They feature technical support by trsined profeaalonals to keep your equipment in peak condition, offarin^ Doth repair and calibration aervlcea. A friendly staff of qualified personnel are always on hand to help you find Just the right equipmant or suppliai, and to sufg*t the proper method* or u*ag* of th* piece of aquipmant you need. Let A.H.M. MEDICAL SUPPLIES handle your Madleaid, Medicare, or private Insuranoa billing for you. It la without haaitatien uat th* compiler* of thi* 1987 Business Profilaa Review suggest to all our reader* that thay oontact A.H.M. MEDICAL SUPPLIES for all thair home healthcare needs. Advanced Business iVIachlnes Las Vegas, Inc. "Mr. Kirk Norman Oensrsl Mansgtr''^ Th* modem buaina**parson of today regarda tha new electronic cash regiaters and computers system*provided by ADVANCED BUSINESS MACHINES LAS VEGAS, INC. aa one of thir bigger beneflte for computing ths many compUcatad dataila of avaryday bualnaaa. The exparta to aee In thi* area for these modem business mschines are at ADVANCED BUSINESS MACHINE LAS VEGAS, INC., located at fi087 S. ArviUe, Suite C, in Las Vegas, phone 367 0787. They offer complete cash register systems for point of sale and inventory control, u well u hotel front deek systems and the popular NCI slectronie scsles. Thair qualified account *i*cutivea are fully trained to analyie your cash regiater needs, and will gladly counasl you on the benefito of th* fine machin** they handle. Sale*, rental and leasing plans are available u well aa profaeaional service and th* neceaaary supplies to operste the equipment after you have made your purchaae. For your convenience, ADVANCED BUSINESS MACHINES LAS VEGAS. INC haa a modern showroom with many models, known for thair high-speed, troubla-fre* operation on display and svailabia for demonstration Ths writer* of thla 1987 Raviaw of Leading Businesses, tafcs this opportunity to command the staff snd msnagsment of ADVANCED BUSINESS MACHINES LAS VEGAS, INC. for their fine servic* snd quslity electronic cash regiater systems, snd suggest that you see them firtt for all your cash register n*ds! Boulder City Care Center "tuaan Cabral — Admlnlatrator with a raputation that time and afrvica have built, the BOULDER CITY CARE CENTER ia loeilad at 601 A4am* Blvd., In Bouldar City, phona 303-8181. Thay offar ear* for *ick, invalid, and convalaacing patianU through th* caraful *up*rvi*ion of skillad parNUMl, Thair patianta ar* carad for with the help of licenaad nuraaa, 34 hour* s day Ths aditor* of thia 1987 Bualnaaa ProfUa* Raviaw suggest to our rasder* thst thsy ramemhar the name BOULDIR CITY CARE CENTKR for th* finaat and friandliaat care availabls. We commend them for thair efforta to serve* th* people o&Clark County to tha beat of thair ability. \ Las Vegas Auto Upholstery "Tony 01 • ellonls snd Pit Manxl, Owners" For fi naat q uality custom auto and truck upholatery at wholesale prioei we highly recommend you call LAfl VIOA0 AUTO UPHOUrrtRY at 9030 Oontract A venu* (Near tha comer of Charlacton and Moha ve) in Lu Vegss, phons 3f8-ft810 for a fr** aatimats. LAS VEGAS AUTO UPHOUfTERY *p:ialita* in superb, profsaaional upholatery for all vahicles, snd faattir* a daasUng array of fabric aamplaa to choea* from, to giv* a truly custom look, without baahlog your budgst! Outstandiof worknaoahip, quality fabric, aad reputation far work that s p eak* for Itaalft, plu* illscount prleaa ara why w* ( mend LAS VIGAS AUTO UPHOUmWY. Call than today. W* knew yowll be glad you did! D • •! ThnnMlay, Jannaiy 1,1967 HendarMB ROOM News mi Bal4r CUjr r:^ 1987 BUSINESS PROHLES REVIEW KIIP AND USI "RiAOIR AOt •QUf S lCnOW W IPAitIO AND OOP YWIOHTjD 1M7 lY MNNit M. KASUMa Tha opMana axpcaaaad In tha foNowing advartiaafliafita ava pufaiy tha vlawa of tha IdHon of tho lualnaaa Proflloa Plovlow and not naeoaaarlly thoaa of thla Halstead Construction Supplies^ "Rlek Hunt, Mansger" Thia area's headquarter* for tha flnast in gun nails, hanger*, staple* and other cooatruction hardware and auppliea ia HALSTEAD CONSTRUCTION SUPPLUS, located at 4011 Spring Mouatain Road in Laa Vega*, phona 362 1418. HAUTXAD CONSTRUCTION SUPPUXS providaa tha araa with raparior quality bulk nail*, hangers, gun naila, (taplaa, • taal fab, and other hardwai*. and alao **Ua and sarvic** power and hand tool*. Builder* in th* araa have oa(n* to d*pend on HAIilTEAD CONSTRUCTION SUPPLIES for thair excellent aalections of cooatruction need*, prompt, helpful earrlce, and reliability in delivarhig tha ptoduete they need, whan they need tham, at a r**K>nable price. Contractor* in this araa hav* com* to know that thia ia a fom from which they can mpect the finaat in oonatruction suppll**. Their outatanding reputation la your asturanoe of the higheat quality at all timea. The aditor* of thia 1907 Buaineaa Profilaa Review wiah to call to tha attention of our reader* the important part that thia firm ia taking in the buihiing pw grae of our community. It is with great plaaaure that wa recommend thia firm, their service and producta to all our nader*. Remember tha name HALSTEAD CONSTRUCTION SUPPLIES, we know youl^ be glad you didi The Waterbed Shed "Portha REST of Your Ufa" For the *l*ep you've alway* dnamad of, stop in at THK WATERBSD SHED at 4973 South Maryland Parkway, in the Camelot Shopping Center, phona 798-88M or 8140 Waet Charleatoa. acroaa from Red Rock Thaeters, phone B70-183S, THE WATERBED SHED is fsfflily owned and oparatad since 1977. so you know you can count on them for quality sarviee, aad promised delivery. If within 14 days you find the aama name brand for LESS, they will refund the difference in caah. Juat a few years ago, waterbeda ware thought to be a paasing fad. Today the new generation watarbeda look identical to oonventiooal bed* and blnul into any atyle of dacor. Watarbeda are aweeping the country aad are definitely here to *tay. THS WATERBED SHED featune tha Uteet in waterbed fumitur* and acceeeorlee. ReMrdlae* of whether you need a waterbed, a waterbed f^ame, beater or liner, you will find what you're kmking for at THE WATERBED SHED. They offer complete peckagaa from a baaic aystam to th* moat luxurioua, at very reaaonabia prioae. ... Buaineaa Profilaa Review proudly take* thia opportunity to reoofaia* tha ownara, Dale and Laalia Howard, and applaud them for their honeety and fair busineea daalinp. Prime Cable Service "Faaturing Naw Sarvicaa Starting January 4, 1987!" PRIME CABLE, serving the Henderson, Green VaUey, Boulder City and Laa Vagaa areaa, your local cable a*rvic* for Entertainment, Variety, Convenience and much, much more! When you conaidtr th* benefita. we think youll agree that PRIME CABLE ia poadbly tha beat dollar-forHiollar Entertamment value anywhere! .,,, PRIME CABLE brings the exciting world of entertainment into your home with live apwta action, Moekbuater moviaa. ehUdren programa and film claasica. Starting January 4,1987, their basic cable aervice will feature over ao channala. including k>cal ehaanels, MTV, Nickdodeon, Lifetime, Health Networii, TBN, CNN, and SupeietatioB* WGN-Chicago, WTBS-Atlanta aad WOR-Nw York for only S10.96 a month! To expand your service to include ESPN-The Sporta Network, Naahvilk Network, USA, FNN and Video Hita One. The Diaoov*ry Channel and QVC Home Shopping Network, order Baaic and Expanded aervice for only $17.96! Other peckagaa include the premium movie channels HBO. Cinemax, Disney, Showtime, Playboy, The Movie Channel, Bravo and American Movie Claaaica. Call for information. In Henderson/Green Valley, phone 665-8868, Boulder City, phone 294-0960, and Laa Vegu. phone 383-4000. The Editor* of thi* 1987 Review of Community Leader* believ* PRIME CABLE truly haa SOMETHING FUN FOR EVERYONE! We urge you to contact thia fme Cable TV Company aoon for the beat in Entertainment, Moviaa, Sporta 4 Spedalal George Carlln headlines Caesars Palace showroom Comedy star George Carlin steps into the Gaesars Palace showroom spotlight for cocktail shows Jan. 1 through Jan. 4, Carlin, whose wacky wisdom ranges from the obvious ("Mice have no shoulders.") to the philosophical ("How does a cat know which part of his body to wash net?") has been a network television star for 25 years. Now recognized as a multi-talented performer, Carlin says he still feels like a kid in a candy store. "To choose among scting, writing, touring and recording would be impossible," he says. "So I do them all." His newest feature fUm with Bette Midler and Shelly Long is scheduled for release Jan. SO. Titled "Outrageous Fortune," it is the story of two rival females who become unlikely friends while traveling cross-country. George portrays a bumsd-out hippie who gets caught up in their adventure and saves the day for the two women. George Carlin The new movie will be Carlin's fourth; others were "With Six You Get EggroU," "Americathon" and "Car Wash." A guest host of Johnny Canon's Tonight Show" more than 30 times, Carlin has also made numerous appearances on "Late Night With David Letterman," and has starred in five cable television specials. His own Carlin Productions has produced three highly rated shows for Home Box Office, one a situation comedy (which he wrote) and two specials. Carlin boasts 13 comedy record albums. His latest, "Playin' With Your Head," was released on his own label. Eardrum Records. And he's written a book, "Sometimes a Little Brain Damage Can Help," with plana for a second volume in the works. On stage at Caesars, Carlin will perform at 10 p.m. nightly except Saturday, when shows are scheduled at 8:30 p.m and 11:30 p.m. For reservations phone 731-7333. Judical college courses slated at UNLV About 40 judges from 21 states will be attending two couTMB on the UNLV campus Jan. U through Jan. 16 presented \n Ihe National Judicial College, headquartered in Reno. The oounea are Advanced Computers in Courts and Traffic Court Proceedings. Tbe nationally prominent faculty and lecturers for the courses oome from eight states: Judge Arthur Jackson from Dayton, Ohio; Dr. Thomas Canfiekl fhnn liootroae, Cob.; attorney Dwight Qark ftram San Frandsoo; Judge Karl Grube from St. Petersburg, Fla.; Judge Edwin Presley from Fort Worth; Robert Reeder from Evanston, HI.; Joe Jordan from San Rafael, Calif.; Mary Lu Holter form Baltimore and Dr. Melvin Pohl from Las Vegas. The judge-participants attending the courses are from Arizona, California, Illinois, Indiana. Iowa. Kaoaaa, MiasiaBipiii, Missouri, Nebraska. Nevada. New Jersey. Ohio, Penneylvania, South Carolina, South Dakoto. Texas, Utah • nd Wisconsin. Ihe course on Advanced Computvl in Courts demoostratas the latest twhniq^t** in oomputeriied court management systems. The course on Traffic Court ProBudget cuts eyed for DAV ceedings brings together the nation's leading experts, discussing traffic law, court practices and procedures that confront the judges of America who sit in what is truly the "peoples' court" in all 60 states, the Traffic Court. The Naiiooal Judkial GoUefs, sffiliated with the Anurioaa Bsr Association, is the leading judicial sducatioo and training institutioD inthenatkm. "Turning away America's wartime disabled veterans from the Veterans Adndnistration health care they need, and they've more than evned, is the Office of Management and Budget's answer. to s balanced budget," DAV officials charged recently. "At the same time, America's sickset and poorest vetorans would have the door to VA health care Hammed in their face if OMB's budget cuts prevail." The remarks, made by Kenneth G. Musselmann, National Commander of the Disabled American Vetwans (DAV), came in responae to OMB's plan to cut $928 million fron) the VA health care budget for fiscal year 1988. OMB is alao setking an immediate $160 million cut from VA health care for the present fiscal year, bringing the total to more than 91 billion in the near term. Those kinds of cuta, which would restilt in the loss of more than 9,000 VA medical care jobs and the drastic curtailment of services nationwide, "refutes America's sense of duty to her wartime disabled veterans and repreeento a fundamental failure of OMB to consider the wishes of the citizens it serves," Mussehnann said. Musselmann's comments were echoed by key veterans' programs leaders on Capitol Hill in the veterans' program arena: The Congress is not going to let OMB cut a billion dollars out of the VA budget. It's as simple as that," said Congressman G.V. "Sonny" Montgomery (D-Miss), who is expected to repeat as Chairman of Uie house Veterans' Affairs Onmiittee during the 100th Congress. "OMB, once again, has made recommendations that ignore the express wishes of Congress. We, in turn, have a fundamental duty in this instance to ignore OMB's recommendations." Senator Alan Cranston (DCalif.), who is expected to serve as Montgomery's counterpart in the Senate, said "OMB seems determined to sulamit a fiscal 1988 budget that is just as outrage9U8ly bad and unfair to veterans as the Administration's fiscal 1987 budget was." That budget was. soundly defeated by (Congress, with proposed deep cuts in a variety of VA services restored in both the Houae and Senate. VA Administrator Thomas K. Tumage appealed .OMB's plan, noting that such cuts "would seriously damage the VA's ability to meet its mission." According to the DA Vs Musselmann, "OMB's budget recommendations reflect the Agency's continuing contempt for America's dissbled veterans. Moet reBrMit HMlth SorMnlng : MAMMOQIUM AND IILP tfUAtT EXAM : art. ways to spot IfMtl Ciqoir lAfttaY CALLUtTOOAY 754*'04 i^EVADA BREAST aNTER 2IdlE.Flimin|oRoacl 734-8104 w^m. cently, OMB rejected VA plans to pay profoundly deaf veterans disability compensation conunensurate with their loss of hearing. Even ^ugh both VA officials and the Congress agree a serious disparity exists in the compensation psid tUs category of vets, OMB flatly rejected it The federal funds involved were small but the impact wouU have been greet on this smsll number of disablsd veterans who've also earned the right to lead quality livee." sAasAueuvionG^tt. OPPORTONITY VILUIOE Visit 0PP0RTUNI1Y VIUASeS Thrift Store & Boutique 12 W. Pacific 564-7128 In The New Holiday Theatre Rocky Sennes' R0I4RING REVUE $7.95 m per perton f^ g/ plui In INCLUDING TWO DRINKS 2 Shows Nightly 9 & 11:30 p.m. Dark Sundays • Call 369-5222 larjiMry 14 I"* .itul 17 SAMMY DAVIS JR. lu(.S|)(.M.il*>h(vvsNi^fiflv ')\ll:{n|) $1495 .^ IN( IUI)IN(. IVVO DKINKS HOLIDAY CASINO '% -y^ofejAcuj Svvyv lli'l .(IIMI-OulMili \(.il • 5 p.m. SessionDine Out With Scan MondOYi January 5th 7 p.in. Session $10,500 Bingo Spectacular $1000.00 Hardway $500.00 Hardway $500.00 Hardway $500.00 Hardway $1000.00 Hardway /g\ $500.00 \C/ Hardway /5\ $500.00 Vs^ Hardway (^ $500.00 ^ riordway $500.00 /^ $500.00 Hardway vly Hardway g N $500.00 (^ $1000.00 ZJ Hardway V5^ Hardway /4^ $3000.00 KZ) CoveroU $5.00 per card. $15.00 minimum. One seat per person. Aggregate pay. -9 p.m. SessionDouble Pay $300.00, $200.00. or $100.00 Ouaranteed Coverall $1000.00 Any color card HDTIL, Q/OCBLIKQHALL aad BOVUIIO CXHTBl louktor WgliwaT IMIif loidMFaid • 4M-7777 Another fine Boyd Group hotel *•

PAGE 24

t^m^mmmmmmmmmmmwmmmmmm9mm>mm • • • • • • • ^^^^^^^P^^p^^s^^p^i^pppppppp^pp^p^pppppippp^pppp^pPiiPI i^pi^i^iPiPli^W^ Pag* t4 Henderson ROOM Newi and Boulder City News Thursday, January 1, 1987 Las Vegas Opera Company presents Richard Strauss' 'Salome' by Judith Markham Laa Vagaa Symphony Publldat Maestro Virko Haley will conduct the Laa Vegas Qpera €ompany'8 1987 opera performance of Richard Strauss' "Salome," featuring an array of .stellar international artists, including stage director Bodo Igess, soprano Nancy Shade as Salome, mezzo-soprano Barbara Confad as Heriodias, tenor Jerold Norman as Herod, bass-baritone Stephen dwne aa Jokanaan, tenor John Duykers as Narraboth. Production by Rober Oswald, costumes by Anibal Lapiz of Cobn Theatre, Buenos Aires. The performance is scheduled for 8 p.m., Jan. 8, at Artemus Ham Concert Hall. Tickets are available at the Symphony office. For more information call 739-3420 or 736-6656. Cast of iatematlonal stage director and opera stars Stage director Bodo Igess of the Metropolitan Opera was bom in Amerstardam, where he studied drama, musicology and stage direction. In 1955 he became the assistant of Franco Zeffirelli at the Holland Festival. In 1968 he came to New York for further study in stage direction at the Juilliard School of Music and he was appointed assistant stage director en the faculty there in 1959. On an international basis Igesz has held positions at the Salzburg Featival, Holland Festival, Edinburgh Festival, and the MetropoUtan Opera. In addition he has directed productions with several opera companies including the Hooston Grand, Philadelphia Opera, Santa Fe Opera, Tulsa Opera, Pittsburgh Opera, Cincinnati Opera, San Diego Opera, New Orleans in productinis including Carmea, Lucia di Lammermoor, Cenenatola, Eugene Oaegia, La Bobeme, Ariadne, Salome and Magic Flute. Forthcoming engagements include La Traviata, LaForza del Deatino and Rigoletto. 'Salome," soprano Nancy Shade, performing the title role, familiar and loved by Las Vegas audiences she returns for the 1986-87 Symphony's opera production. Highlights of Shade's current season in Europe include Strauss' Salome with Linz opera. Berg's Lu7u with Luxembourg Radio Orchestra, the world premiere of Zender's Stephen Climax, with Frankfurt Opera, Stockhausen's Moments in concerts in Strausbourg and for the opening night of the Lille Festival, songs and chamber music of Ernst Krenek in Vienna in honor of Krenek's 85th birthday. Other highlights of current season include two productions for Lyons Opera: the French premiere of Zinmierman's Die Soldaten, The Merry Widow, Manon Leacaut, La Boheme and the new production oilQuattro Ruategbi at Munich Opera; performance of Wooldridge's fve Italian Songa with the Halle Orchestra in Manchester; the world premiere of Ward's AbelardandHeloise, AUano'a Resurrection with Cincinnati Opera; and concerts with the symphonies of Chicago, New Mexico and Worchester. Shade has appeared at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Soprano Nancy Shade Brussels Opera, Hamburg State Opera, New York City Opera, Holland Festival, Avignon Opera, with the Paris Radio Orchestra and in Spain. She made her South American debut in 1981 in Caracas, in Hoffman. Shade was seen and heard nationwide over the PBS-Television Network in a tribute to Richard Rogers with the Boston "Pops" Orchestra. She is a scholarship winner to Indiana University and is a First Prize Winner in the Metropolitan Opera National Auditions. Story Synopsis Salome, a musical drama in one act by Richard Strauss is based on the play by Oscar Wilde, the German text is by Hedwig Lachmann. The first performance was held in Dresden, Loenighches Opemhaus on Dec. 9, 1905, and the^first American performance was at the Metropolitan Opera House, Jan. 22, 1907. The fuet performance of Salome was an international triumph, despite the anxieties that had accompanied the production. The subject itself and its sickening finale, to say nothing of Salome's "Dance of the Seven Veils," made the censor's intervention all too likely. Casting, too, was fraught with problems. The intrinsic difficulties of the leading role, added to the composer's insistence on a voice that would not be drowned by the orchestra, caused the choice to fall on Marie Wittich, a sturdy Wagnerian soprano, as different from the lithe princess of Wilde's imagination as anyone could be. The famous dance was performed by a professional dancer. All the same, there were 38 curtain calls for singers, conductor and Strauss himself. Herod, Tetrarch of Judaea, is feasting with his court in the palace of Tiberias on the Sea of GaUlee. From the terrace Narraboth, the captain of the Guard (tenor), gazes at the Tetrach's beautiful stepdaughter, Salome (Shade), with whom he is in love, and ignores the warnings of the Page (contralto) who loves and admires him. Salome comes out to look at the moonhght and to escape the noise and vulgarity of the banquet and hears the voice of Jokanaan (John the Baptist), imprisoned by Herod in a cistern beneath a grill, announcing the coming of the Messiah. Fascinated, she asks to see him and when the guard refuses for fear of disobeying the Tetrarch's orders, she promises to love Narraboth if he will do what she asks. The prophet emerges and denounces Herod and his wife. Salome's mother, Herodias who has married her dead husband's brother. Salome is filled with desire for him. When he tells her to leave everything and seek the Son of Man, she only answers, "Who is he, the son of Man? Is he as beautiful as thou art?" and sings ecstatically of his beauty and of her desire to kiss his mouth. Narraboth, unable to bear it, kills himself, but she barely notices him. Jokanaan curses her when he realizes that she is the daughter of Herodias and descends once more to his dungeon. Herod comes out of the palace. His lust for Salome provokes a quarrel with Herodias, who demands the death of Jokanaan for his insults to her. Herod holds him in awe, considering him to be a holy man, and the Jews come forward to dispute for and against his teachings. In need of diversion, Herod begs Salome to dance. At first unwilling, she consents when Herod promises her anything she desires. The dance finished, she lies stretched out for an instant on the cover of the well, then throws herself into Herod's arms and demands the head of Jokanaan. His desire for her gives way to abhorrence, but he agrees at last. From the cistern, the executioner hands up the head on a silver dish and she seizes it in a frenzy of joy. He who has despised her love must now accept it; she who had craved for him can sate herself kissing his mouth as Igng as she pleases. Sick with horror, the King shouts to the guards to kill her and she is crushed to death beneath their shields. Allied Arts calendar lists cultural events Dance Master tap class by Gregory Hines to benefit Simba Studios at 3 p.m., Jan. 4 at the Tomorrow Dance Studio, 4350 Arville (between Flamingo and Tropicana); for intermediate and advanced level. The fee is $15 and $5 to observe. Pre-registration is required. Call La Verne at 367-6788 or 367-3443. Film "Throne of Blood," Akira Kurosawa's version of "Macbeth," in Japanese with English subtitles. International Film Series at 7 p.m., Jan. 6 at the Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 South Brush. The speaker is Wayne Tanaka. Admission is $1. Call 386-6383. 'Desk Set," starring Spencer Tracy and Katherine Hepburn, Classic Images Film Series at the Clark County Library Auditorium at 3 p.m. and 8 p.m., Jan. 9 at 1401 E. Flamingo. Admission is Free. Call 733-7810. Literature Great Books Discussion Group; topic: "When We Dead Awaken: Writing As Revision" by Adrienne Rich (Norton reader p. 428); open to the public; please read selection in advance at 7 p.m., Jan. 9 at the Clark County Library conference room at 1401E. Flamingo. Call 733-7810. Music James Toney, organ, Sherrie Lee, vocals, and Prince James, tenor saxophone, at Alan Grant's Monday Night Jazz at the Four Queens at 9:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Jan. 5. Recorded for later broadcast over KNPR 89.5 FM. Call 386-4011. Jimmy Cook, tenor saxophone,. Jazz at the Hob Nob at 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. Jan. 6 at 3340 South Highland Drive. Call 734-2426. "Salome," with Nancy Shade as Salome, directed by Bodo Igezs, presented by the Las Vegas Opera Company at 8 p.m., Jan. 8 at the Artemus W. Ham Concert HaU at UNLV. Call 739-3420. Wladimir Jan Kochanski, pianist at 3 p.m. Jan. 11, Charleston Heights Arts Center at 800 South Brush. Tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for students, senior citizens and handicapped. Call 386-6383. Theatre Community Drama Workshop on Mondays from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Sam's Town Western Emporium. Call 458-0069. "Side by Side by Sondheim," by Stephen Sondheim presented by Las Vegas Little Theatre at 8 p.m., Jan. 9,10,15,16,17 and 2 p.m,. Jan. 11,18 at UNLV's Grant Hall Theatre. Reservations are advised. Call 731-5958. Theatre Arts Group Workshop; exercises in the Stanislavski system at 7:30 p.m. Thursdays at Bah Hai, Trade Winds Room, 336 East Desert Inn Road. Call 877-6463. Nevada Musical Theatre Guild Workshop; voice, stage direction and set design with Ben Loewy at 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays, at 1671 Sandalwood Lane. Call 739-8688. Visual Art "A Season in Bronze," nine realistic, life-sized bronze sculptures by J. Seward Johnson, Jr.; Groen Valley Parkway, Green Valley. Runs through Feb. 28. Cidl 4584856. 14MU Wf T /^tfff ^ pain t in g rUrh P/Mmty Cnmrnunity CoUagB Artapace Gallery; John Rogers, pexntingi, Upstairs Gallery; through Jan. 30. Call 64a060. John Patterson, oil paintings. Reed Whipple Cultural Center Art Gallery, 821 Las Vegas Boulevard North. Runs through Jan. 14. Call 386-6211. Nevada Waterookv Society, an annual exhibition at the Clark County Library Main Gallery at 1401 E. Flamingo. Runs through Jan. 16. Call 733-7810. Entry forme are now available for the Northeastern Nevada Museum's 13th statewide touring photography exhibition, "Nevada 87." Deadline for entriee is Jan. 19,1987. For entry forms write to the Museum, P.O. Box 2560, Elko, Nv. 89801, or call 1-738-3418. Pasha Rafat, printmaker, presents new work at Charleston Heights Arts Csnter, 800 South Brush. Runs Jan. 4 through Feb. 4. Opening reception: 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Jan. 4. Call 386-6383. "Neo-Neolithic," shaped acryUc paintings of the past and future by Rod Beasley, A. A. Gallery Gallery, 5213 W. Charleston. Runs through Jan. 23. Call 877-6847. Patty Clyne, oil paintings. Las Vegas Art Museum Main Gallery, Hinson C!ole, acrylic paintings, Nevada GaUery; Jan. 4 through Jan. 28. Opening reception: noon to 3 p.m. January 4. Call 647-4300. "People Having Fun," photographs by Joyce Young, UpstairsDownstairs Gallery, Clark County Library, Jan. 4 through Jan. 30. Opening reception at 3 p.m. Jan. 4. Call 733-7810. Last week for Las Vegas Invitatioiial featuring Mike McCollum, Kathleen Peppard, Cory Roth, AUied Arts Gallery, 3207 Va Las Vegas Blvd. So., extended through Jan. 9. Call 731-5419. Las Vegas Billboard Project and Gallery exhibition featuring the works of Barbara Kruger, presented by the Nevada Institute of Contemporary Art, Alta Ham Fine Arts Gallery, UNLV, Jan. 5 through $oeial Seenriif notes Feb. 6. Opening reception from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Jan. 12. Call 739-3237. National Art Competition, open to all media, to be held at the Jerry Solomon Gallery in Los Angeles. $6,000 in cash, purchase prizes and awards. Work to be juried by slides by a distinguished panel of judges. Deadline is April 2, 1987. For applications write to Metro Art, PO Box 286rH, Sc^sdale, N.Y, 10583. Embroiderers' Guild of America monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 6 at First Western Bank, Rainbow and Flamingo. Call 293-4539. Japanese floral design classes, presented by the Nevada chapter of Ikenobo Ikebana, every Thursday at 6 p.m. Call 642-1920. Avoid scheduling conflicts with your aits events by checking with the Allied Arts computerized calendar at 731-5419. Call the same number to join Allied Arts Council and start receiving Arts Alive, the Southern Nevada Magazine of the Arts. For 24-hour arts information, call the KNPR ArtsUne at 458-ARTS. Medicare hospital insurance deductible explained by Steve Gillis Assistant District Manager Social Security Administration Questions and Answers Q. I am scheduled to go into the hospital for major surgery in January. My doctor tells me I will probably have a lengthy hospital stay and then may hav6 to go into a skilled nursing faciUty. Can you tell me how much the Medicare hospital insurance deductible will be in 1987? Also, what will the daily co-insurance amounts be? A. The Medicare hospital insurance deductible will be $520 in 1987. Hospital insurance will pay for all other covered services for the first 60 days of inpatient hospital care. For the 61st through 90th day of inpatient hospital care, hospital insurance will pay for all covered services except for $130 a day. If you should need to be in the hospital for more than 90 days in a benefit period, you can use some or all of your reserve days. Hospital insurance will pay for all covered expenses except for $260 a day for each reserve day you use. If you need skiUed nursing facility care after your hospital stay, hospital insurance will pay for all covered services for the first 20 days and all but $65 a day for up to 80 more days. Q. I've heard that the cost-of-Uving increase in Social Security benefits will ony be about 1.3 percent this year. I've also heard that the Medicare medical insurance premium is going up by $2.40 in 1987. Since I get a very small Social Security check, this means the premium increase will be more than my benefit increase. Isn't there something in the law to prevent this situation? A. Yes. Under the law, the increase in the Medicare medical insurance premium cannot be more than the dollar amount of the costof-hving increase in Social Security benefits. If your monthly Social Security check is less than $231, the increase in your medical insurance premium will be limited to the dollar amount of your benefit amount of your benefit increase. People whose Social Security checks are $231 or more, however, will pay the full $2.40 increase in the medical insurance premium because the 1.3 percent benefit increase for them will amount to $3 or more. Q. My father is paying a premuim for the hospital insurance part of Medicare because he wasn't entitled to it when he reached 65. He also has Medicare medical insurance and pays the monthly premium for it. He said he heard that the premiums are going up next year. What will the amount be? A. Starting with January 1987, the monthly premium for Medicare hospital insurance will be $226. The basic premium for the medical insurance part of Medicare will increase to $17.90 a month. Q. When I was 66,1 wasn't eUgible fw Medicare hospital insurance and couldn't afford to buy it so I just enrolled in medical insurance. I want to buy the hospital insurance part now. Do 1 have to enroll at a certain time? Also, will I have to pay a penalty for enroUing late? A. You can sign up for Medicare hospital insurance during a general enrollment period—Jaduary 1 through March 31 each year. The basic monthly hospital insurance premium will be $226 in 1987. You will have to pay a surcharge for enrolling late, but a change in the law earlier this year hmits the surcharge. Under the old law, a person had to pay a 10 percent surcharge for each year that he or she enrolled late. Also, the surcharge was appUed to the premium indefinitely. Under the new law, a single 10 percent surcharge will be assessed, and you will only have to pay it for twice as long as you were late enrolling. For example, if you enroll two years late, you will only have to pay the 10 percent surcharge for four years. Q. I retired in June of this year. I understand that half of my Social Security benefits may be taxed. Will I receive anything from Social Security showing how much I received in benefits during 1986? A. Yes. You will receive a statement of your benefits sometime in January. It is a Social Security Benefit Statement, Form SSA-1099. It will also show the total amount of your benefits for 1986 as well as any deductions for things like Medicare premiums. Q. I'm planning to retire in early 1987. Is it true everyone has to pay taxes on their Social Security beneHts. A. Most people do not have to pay any tax on their Social Security beneflts. If your total income plus one-half of your annual Social Security benefits does not exceed certain base amounts your Social Security benefits are not taxable. These amounts are $32,000 for married couples filing jointly, zero for a married taxpayer filing a separate return who did not Uve apart from his spouse during all of the year, and $25,000 in all other cases. Q. My husband and I get an SSI check of $504 a month. We Uve -in a $200-a-month apartment now, but have a chance to move into an apartment in a Federal housing program and pay only $125 a month. If we move, will our SSI check be reduced. A. No, there won't be any effect on your SSI check, but don't forget to give your new address to Social Security. Q. My son is planning to buy a new car and wants to give me his old one. Although it would be nice to have a car, I don't want to take it if it means my SSI check will be reduced. Will they? A. It depends on the value of the car. If its current market value is $4,500 or less, there will be no change in your SSI checks. If the value of the car is more than $4,500, check with the Las Vegas Social Security office about the effect it will have on your checks. For more information, please call 388-6314. In North Las Vegas, please call 388-6681. More Boulder City news .4^ Thursday, January 1, 1987 Henderson Home News and Bevlder City Newt Page tf A workman is sinuBtlBd by morning ight as the Raioad Pass HaM and Casino sign is comfMBd SAFETY AWARDS—Superintendent Jerry D. Wagers (shown holding award) presented the Lake Mead National Recreation Ajinual Safety Award to the warehouse crew. The Annual Safety Award is presented to the area that has the best safety record during the year. In winning the safety award the warehouse crew unproved their safety performance from last year. National Park Service Photo. HONORED—Boulder City Councilman Jon Purler, wearing liis hat as a member of the Lias Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority Board, presented an award to Minneapolis travel wholesaler Warren Phillips of MLT Vacations during the recent gathering of 600 travel agents from around the country at the bas Vegas Convention Center. Porter congrntnlated Phillips for bringing more than 170,000 visitors to Las Vegas during the past year. Shown from left to right are: from MLT; Gene Sawinski, Beverly Sawinski, Porter, Phillips and Pat Wisnewski and Sue Clemens also of MLT. Photo by Laa Vagaa Newa Bureau Boulder Disposal to pick up Christmas trees Boulder Disposal will be picking up discarded Christmas trees as a service to residents. Owner Jim Slade aaka that small to medium trees be placed with other material slated for the regular pickup day. Those discarding large trees six feet or more in height are asked to please call 293-2276 Friday to request tree removal. Slade says a special truck will attempt to meet all requests on that day. If this is not possible, callers will be informed of the day tO; place their tree for pickup. The service is being provided to prevent a recurrence of a problem last year when some NEW ARRIYALS at the Boulder City Hospital, Inc. Six babies were bom at Boulder City Hospital, Inc. between Dec. 12 andTkc. 24. Dec. 12: Becky and Steven Greer, Boulder City, girl and Amber and Wade Blake, Las Vegaa, girl. Dec. 17: Debra Diaz and Henry Falvey, Henderson, boy. Dec. 19: Mary and Darwin Thompson, Las Vegas, girl. Dec. 20: Brenda and David; Larsen, Henderson, boy. Dec. 24: Carol and Rodney Hickman, Boulder City, boy. Howard advises'Don't become a DBR-(Damaged Beyond Repair)' At New Life Foundation in Boulder City, author Vemon Howard's title for talks this week will be "Don't become a DBRDamaged Beyond Repair," with appUcation to II Thesaalonians 2:12. New Life iimer-development classes are conducted Wednesday and Friday evenings at 7 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday mornings at 7. Sponsors invite all newcomers to come to their first class where politeness, responsibility and a: cheery outlook are emphasized I Call 293-4444 in advance for directions to meetings and further details. New Life has no membership. Everyone comes and goes astheiy. please. All donations and ao>^ tivities are voluntary. Informal dress is suggested. Free Bible study The Bible in one year A program of study which covers the Bible in one year is now offered to the community. It is intended for those who have no or little knowledge of the Bible and for those who would like to refresh their memory an4 place what they already know in perspective. This program, sponsored by Grace Community Church will be presented without any denominational bias; the course will keep strictly to the text of the Bible and seek the original meaning. The major themes and key verses of each book of the Bible will be discussed, students will be welcome to give their own input. The leader of the program is Mr. Russ Grater, a long time resident of Boulder City, with a deep interest in Biblical Archelogy and BibUcal studies. He has taught Adult Bible classes for many years. He will be assisted as needed by other members and staff of the churph. The class will start Monday, Jan. 5 at 7 p.m. in the social room of Grace Community Church, 1150 Wyoming. There will be no charge, the course is offered as a service to the pubhc; students, however, are expected to provide their own Bible and note books. Any version is accepted and from the variety of versions the translation and interpretation difficulties will be pin pointed (it must not be forgotten that the original languages of the Bible are Hebrew and Greek). The number of students is limited, for registration call the church office, 293-2018. Everyone is welcome. Comment period extended for review of draft revised rules and regulations on the Reclamation Reform Act Commissioner of Reclamation C. Dale Duvall announced recently that the period for review and comment on rules and regulations to implement the Reclamation Reform Act. (P.L. 97-293. Oct. 12, 1982) has been extended for 30 days. Duvall said this action was taken in responseHo comments received at public workshops and hearings on the Reform Act held throughout the Reclamation West and in Washington, D.C., from November 19 to December 19, 1986. Revised draft rules and regulations and notice of public workshops and hearings were published in the Federal Register on November 7, 1986. A Federal Register notice is being prepared to extend the review and comment period from Jan. 6, 1987, to February 5, 1987. Written' comments on the proposed rules should be submitted no later than Feb. 5, 1987, to PhiUip T. Doe, Bureau of Reclamation, E & R Center, Code D-410. P.O. Box 25007, Box 25007, Denver, Colorado 80225. Grace Community Circles meet The Circles of the Women's Association of Grace Community Church will meet Wednesday, Jan. 7. The schedule is listed. Circle Hostess 9:30 a.m. Deborah Mildred Neumair, 624 Paloma Dr., 293-1810 Dorcas Ruth Reed and Margaret Hunt, 501 Ville Dr., 293-1557 Esther Eleanor West, 315 Utah, 293-2610 Rebecca Madelaine Garrett, 628 Avenue K, 293-2839 1:15 p.m. Martha Alma Stice and Florence Beley, Social Rooms, 293-1542 Mary Dores Donaldson, 625 Mt. Ebert, 293-2372 Ruth Birdina Bradshaw and Ruth Bell, 1306 Elsa, 293-4653 7:30 p.m. Naomi Jackie McWhorter, 1324 Pinto Road, 293-2862 All women of the community are welcome to attend any of our Circle meetings. trees were left in back yards and alleys, presenting a tire hazard to the area. Following a discussion of the problem with BC Fire Chief Robert Sears, Slade scheduled the service and extra pickup offering. Ringing in the New Yew Many European countries blow trumpets to the four corners of the' world at New Year'i. As the stroke.^ of twelve nears, four trumpeters' climb to the dominatitig tower of tht town, then they play a hymn like Martin Luther's, "A Mighty Fortress is our God." Vfn. \

PAGE 25

t^m^mmmmmmmmmmmwmmmmmm9mm>mm • • • • • • • ^^^^^^^P^^p^^s^^p^i^pppppppp^pp^p^pppppippp^pppp^pPiiPI i^pi^i^iPiPli^W^ Pag* t4 Henderson ROOM Newi and Boulder City News Thursday, January 1, 1987 Las Vegas Opera Company presents Richard Strauss' 'Salome' by Judith Markham Laa Vagaa Symphony Publldat Maestro Virko Haley will conduct the Laa Vegas Qpera €ompany'8 1987 opera performance of Richard Strauss' "Salome," featuring an array of .stellar international artists, including stage director Bodo Igess, soprano Nancy Shade as Salome, mezzo-soprano Barbara Confad as Heriodias, tenor Jerold Norman as Herod, bass-baritone Stephen dwne aa Jokanaan, tenor John Duykers as Narraboth. Production by Rober Oswald, costumes by Anibal Lapiz of Cobn Theatre, Buenos Aires. The performance is scheduled for 8 p.m., Jan. 8, at Artemus Ham Concert Hall. Tickets are available at the Symphony office. For more information call 739-3420 or 736-6656. Cast of iatematlonal stage director and opera stars Stage director Bodo Igess of the Metropolitan Opera was bom in Amerstardam, where he studied drama, musicology and stage direction. In 1955 he became the assistant of Franco Zeffirelli at the Holland Festival. In 1968 he came to New York for further study in stage direction at the Juilliard School of Music and he was appointed assistant stage director en the faculty there in 1959. On an international basis Igesz has held positions at the Salzburg Featival, Holland Festival, Edinburgh Festival, and the MetropoUtan Opera. In addition he has directed productions with several opera companies including the Hooston Grand, Philadelphia Opera, Santa Fe Opera, Tulsa Opera, Pittsburgh Opera, Cincinnati Opera, San Diego Opera, New Orleans in productinis including Carmea, Lucia di Lammermoor, Cenenatola, Eugene Oaegia, La Bobeme, Ariadne, Salome and Magic Flute. Forthcoming engagements include La Traviata, LaForza del Deatino and Rigoletto. 'Salome," soprano Nancy Shade, performing the title role, familiar and loved by Las Vegas audiences she returns for the 1986-87 Symphony's opera production. Highlights of Shade's current season in Europe include Strauss' Salome with Linz opera. Berg's Lu7u with Luxembourg Radio Orchestra, the world premiere of Zender's Stephen Climax, with Frankfurt Opera, Stockhausen's Moments in concerts in Strausbourg and for the opening night of the Lille Festival, songs and chamber music of Ernst Krenek in Vienna in honor of Krenek's 85th birthday. Other highlights of current season include two productions for Lyons Opera: the French premiere of Zinmierman's Die Soldaten, The Merry Widow, Manon Leacaut, La Boheme and the new production oilQuattro Ruategbi at Munich Opera; performance of Wooldridge's fve Italian Songa with the Halle Orchestra in Manchester; the world premiere of Ward's AbelardandHeloise, AUano'a Resurrection with Cincinnati Opera; and concerts with the symphonies of Chicago, New Mexico and Worchester. Shade has appeared at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, Soprano Nancy Shade Brussels Opera, Hamburg State Opera, New York City Opera, Holland Festival, Avignon Opera, with the Paris Radio Orchestra and in Spain. She made her South American debut in 1981 in Caracas, in Hoffman. Shade was seen and heard nationwide over the PBS-Television Network in a tribute to Richard Rogers with the Boston "Pops" Orchestra. She is a scholarship winner to Indiana University and is a First Prize Winner in the Metropolitan Opera National Auditions. Story Synopsis Salome, a musical drama in one act by Richard Strauss is based on the play by Oscar Wilde, the German text is by Hedwig Lachmann. The first performance was held in Dresden, Loenighches Opemhaus on Dec. 9, 1905, and the^first American performance was at the Metropolitan Opera House, Jan. 22, 1907. The fuet performance of Salome was an international triumph, despite the anxieties that had accompanied the production. The subject itself and its sickening finale, to say nothing of Salome's "Dance of the Seven Veils," made the censor's intervention all too likely. Casting, too, was fraught with problems. The intrinsic difficulties of the leading role, added to the composer's insistence on a voice that would not be drowned by the orchestra, caused the choice to fall on Marie Wittich, a sturdy Wagnerian soprano, as different from the lithe princess of Wilde's imagination as anyone could be. The famous dance was performed by a professional dancer. All the same, there were 38 curtain calls for singers, conductor and Strauss himself. Herod, Tetrarch of Judaea, is feasting with his court in the palace of Tiberias on the Sea of GaUlee. From the terrace Narraboth, the captain of the Guard (tenor), gazes at the Tetrach's beautiful stepdaughter, Salome (Shade), with whom he is in love, and ignores the warnings of the Page (contralto) who loves and admires him. Salome comes out to look at the moonhght and to escape the noise and vulgarity of the banquet and hears the voice of Jokanaan (John the Baptist), imprisoned by Herod in a cistern beneath a grill, announcing the coming of the Messiah. Fascinated, she asks to see him and when the guard refuses for fear of disobeying the Tetrarch's orders, she promises to love Narraboth if he will do what she asks. The prophet emerges and denounces Herod and his wife. Salome's mother, Herodias who has married her dead husband's brother. Salome is filled with desire for him. When he tells her to leave everything and seek the Son of Man, she only answers, "Who is he, the son of Man? Is he as beautiful as thou art?" and sings ecstatically of his beauty and of her desire to kiss his mouth. Narraboth, unable to bear it, kills himself, but she barely notices him. Jokanaan curses her when he realizes that she is the daughter of Herodias and descends once more to his dungeon. Herod comes out of the palace. His lust for Salome provokes a quarrel with Herodias, who demands the death of Jokanaan for his insults to her. Herod holds him in awe, considering him to be a holy man, and the Jews come forward to dispute for and against his teachings. In need of diversion, Herod begs Salome to dance. At first unwilling, she consents when Herod promises her anything she desires. The dance finished, she lies stretched out for an instant on the cover of the well, then throws herself into Herod's arms and demands the head of Jokanaan. His desire for her gives way to abhorrence, but he agrees at last. From the cistern, the executioner hands up the head on a silver dish and she seizes it in a frenzy of joy. He who has despised her love must now accept it; she who had craved for him can sate herself kissing his mouth as Igng as she pleases. Sick with horror, the King shouts to the guards to kill her and she is crushed to death beneath their shields. Allied Arts calendar lists cultural events Dance Master tap class by Gregory Hines to benefit Simba Studios at 3 p.m., Jan. 4 at the Tomorrow Dance Studio, 4350 Arville (between Flamingo and Tropicana); for intermediate and advanced level. The fee is $15 and $5 to observe. Pre-registration is required. Call La Verne at 367-6788 or 367-3443. Film "Throne of Blood," Akira Kurosawa's version of "Macbeth," in Japanese with English subtitles. International Film Series at 7 p.m., Jan. 6 at the Charleston Heights Arts Center, 800 South Brush. The speaker is Wayne Tanaka. Admission is $1. Call 386-6383. 'Desk Set," starring Spencer Tracy and Katherine Hepburn, Classic Images Film Series at the Clark County Library Auditorium at 3 p.m. and 8 p.m., Jan. 9 at 1401 E. Flamingo. Admission is Free. Call 733-7810. Literature Great Books Discussion Group; topic: "When We Dead Awaken: Writing As Revision" by Adrienne Rich (Norton reader p. 428); open to the public; please read selection in advance at 7 p.m., Jan. 9 at the Clark County Library conference room at 1401E. Flamingo. Call 733-7810. Music James Toney, organ, Sherrie Lee, vocals, and Prince James, tenor saxophone, at Alan Grant's Monday Night Jazz at the Four Queens at 9:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Jan. 5. Recorded for later broadcast over KNPR 89.5 FM. Call 386-4011. Jimmy Cook, tenor saxophone,. Jazz at the Hob Nob at 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. Jan. 6 at 3340 South Highland Drive. Call 734-2426. "Salome," with Nancy Shade as Salome, directed by Bodo Igezs, presented by the Las Vegas Opera Company at 8 p.m., Jan. 8 at the Artemus W. Ham Concert HaU at UNLV. Call 739-3420. Wladimir Jan Kochanski, pianist at 3 p.m. Jan. 11, Charleston Heights Arts Center at 800 South Brush. Tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for students, senior citizens and handicapped. Call 386-6383. Theatre Community Drama Workshop on Mondays from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Sam's Town Western Emporium. Call 458-0069. "Side by Side by Sondheim," by Stephen Sondheim presented by Las Vegas Little Theatre at 8 p.m., Jan. 9,10,15,16,17 and 2 p.m,. Jan. 11,18 at UNLV's Grant Hall Theatre. Reservations are advised. Call 731-5958. Theatre Arts Group Workshop; exercises in the Stanislavski system at 7:30 p.m. Thursdays at Bah Hai, Trade Winds Room, 336 East Desert Inn Road. Call 877-6463. Nevada Musical Theatre Guild Workshop; voice, stage direction and set design with Ben Loewy at 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays, at 1671 Sandalwood Lane. Call 739-8688. Visual Art "A Season in Bronze," nine realistic, life-sized bronze sculptures by J. Seward Johnson, Jr.; Groen Valley Parkway, Green Valley. Runs through Feb. 28. Cidl 4584856. 14MU Wf T /^tfff ^ pain t in g rUrh P/Mmty Cnmrnunity CoUagB Artapace Gallery; John Rogers, pexntingi, Upstairs Gallery; through Jan. 30. Call 64a060. John Patterson, oil paintings. Reed Whipple Cultural Center Art Gallery, 821 Las Vegas Boulevard North. Runs through Jan. 14. Call 386-6211. Nevada Waterookv Society, an annual exhibition at the Clark County Library Main Gallery at 1401 E. Flamingo. Runs through Jan. 16. Call 733-7810. Entry forme are now available for the Northeastern Nevada Museum's 13th statewide touring photography exhibition, "Nevada 87." Deadline for entriee is Jan. 19,1987. For entry forms write to the Museum, P.O. Box 2560, Elko, Nv. 89801, or call 1-738-3418. Pasha Rafat, printmaker, presents new work at Charleston Heights Arts Csnter, 800 South Brush. Runs Jan. 4 through Feb. 4. Opening reception: 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., Jan. 4. Call 386-6383. "Neo-Neolithic," shaped acryUc paintings of the past and future by Rod Beasley, A. A. Gallery Gallery, 5213 W. Charleston. Runs through Jan. 23. Call 877-6847. Patty Clyne, oil paintings. Las Vegas Art Museum Main Gallery, Hinson C!ole, acrylic paintings, Nevada GaUery; Jan. 4 through Jan. 28. Opening reception: noon to 3 p.m. January 4. Call 647-4300. "People Having Fun," photographs by Joyce Young, UpstairsDownstairs Gallery, Clark County Library, Jan. 4 through Jan. 30. Opening reception at 3 p.m. Jan. 4. Call 733-7810. Last week for Las Vegas Invitatioiial featuring Mike McCollum, Kathleen Peppard, Cory Roth, AUied Arts Gallery, 3207 Va Las Vegas Blvd. So., extended through Jan. 9. Call 731-5419. Las Vegas Billboard Project and Gallery exhibition featuring the works of Barbara Kruger, presented by the Nevada Institute of Contemporary Art, Alta Ham Fine Arts Gallery, UNLV, Jan. 5 through $oeial Seenriif notes Feb. 6. Opening reception from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Jan. 12. Call 739-3237. National Art Competition, open to all media, to be held at the Jerry Solomon Gallery in Los Angeles. $6,000 in cash, purchase prizes and awards. Work to be juried by slides by a distinguished panel of judges. Deadline is April 2, 1987. For applications write to Metro Art, PO Box 286rH, Sc^sdale, N.Y, 10583. Embroiderers' Guild of America monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 6 at First Western Bank, Rainbow and Flamingo. Call 293-4539. Japanese floral design classes, presented by the Nevada chapter of Ikenobo Ikebana, every Thursday at 6 p.m. Call 642-1920. Avoid scheduling conflicts with your aits events by checking with the Allied Arts computerized calendar at 731-5419. Call the same number to join Allied Arts Council and start receiving Arts Alive, the Southern Nevada Magazine of the Arts. For 24-hour arts information, call the KNPR ArtsUne at 458-ARTS. Medicare hospital insurance deductible explained by Steve Gillis Assistant District Manager Social Security Administration Questions and Answers Q. I am scheduled to go into the hospital for major surgery in January. My doctor tells me I will probably have a lengthy hospital stay and then may hav6 to go into a skilled nursing faciUty. Can you tell me how much the Medicare hospital insurance deductible will be in 1987? Also, what will the daily co-insurance amounts be? A. The Medicare hospital insurance deductible will be $520 in 1987. Hospital insurance will pay for all other covered services for the first 60 days of inpatient hospital care. For the 61st through 90th day of inpatient hospital care, hospital insurance will pay for all covered services except for $130 a day. If you should need to be in the hospital for more than 90 days in a benefit period, you can use some or all of your reserve days. Hospital insurance will pay for all covered expenses except for $260 a day for each reserve day you use. If you need skiUed nursing facility care after your hospital stay, hospital insurance will pay for all covered services for the first 20 days and all but $65 a day for up to 80 more days. Q. I've heard that the cost-of-Uving increase in Social Security benefits will ony be about 1.3 percent this year. I've also heard that the Medicare medical insurance premium is going up by $2.40 in 1987. Since I get a very small Social Security check, this means the premium increase will be more than my benefit increase. Isn't there something in the law to prevent this situation? A. Yes. Under the law, the increase in the Medicare medical insurance premium cannot be more than the dollar amount of the costof-hving increase in Social Security benefits. If your monthly Social Security check is less than $231, the increase in your medical insurance premium will be limited to the dollar amount of your benefit amount of your benefit increase. People whose Social Security checks are $231 or more, however, will pay the full $2.40 increase in the medical insurance premium because the 1.3 percent benefit increase for them will amount to $3 or more. Q. My father is paying a premuim for the hospital insurance part of Medicare because he wasn't entitled to it when he reached 65. He also has Medicare medical insurance and pays the monthly premium for it. He said he heard that the premiums are going up next year. What will the amount be? A. Starting with January 1987, the monthly premium for Medicare hospital insurance will be $226. The basic premium for the medical insurance part of Medicare will increase to $17.90 a month. Q. When I was 66,1 wasn't eUgible fw Medicare hospital insurance and couldn't afford to buy it so I just enrolled in medical insurance. I want to buy the hospital insurance part now. Do 1 have to enroll at a certain time? Also, will I have to pay a penalty for enroUing late? A. You can sign up for Medicare hospital insurance during a general enrollment period—Jaduary 1 through March 31 each year. The basic monthly hospital insurance premium will be $226 in 1987. You will have to pay a surcharge for enrolling late, but a change in the law earlier this year hmits the surcharge. Under the old law, a person had to pay a 10 percent surcharge for each year that he or she enrolled late. Also, the surcharge was appUed to the premium indefinitely. Under the new law, a single 10 percent surcharge will be assessed, and you will only have to pay it for twice as long as you were late enrolling. For example, if you enroll two years late, you will only have to pay the 10 percent surcharge for four years. Q. I retired in June of this year. I understand that half of my Social Security benefits may be taxed. Will I receive anything from Social Security showing how much I received in benefits during 1986? A. Yes. You will receive a statement of your benefits sometime in January. It is a Social Security Benefit Statement, Form SSA-1099. It will also show the total amount of your benefits for 1986 as well as any deductions for things like Medicare premiums. Q. I'm planning to retire in early 1987. Is it true everyone has to pay taxes on their Social Security beneHts. A. Most people do not have to pay any tax on their Social Security beneflts. If your total income plus one-half of your annual Social Security benefits does not exceed certain base amounts your Social Security benefits are not taxable. These amounts are $32,000 for married couples filing jointly, zero for a married taxpayer filing a separate return who did not Uve apart from his spouse during all of the year, and $25,000 in all other cases. Q. My husband and I get an SSI check of $504 a month. We Uve -in a $200-a-month apartment now, but have a chance to move into an apartment in a Federal housing program and pay only $125 a month. If we move, will our SSI check be reduced. A. No, there won't be any effect on your SSI check, but don't forget to give your new address to Social Security. Q. My son is planning to buy a new car and wants to give me his old one. Although it would be nice to have a car, I don't want to take it if it means my SSI check will be reduced. Will they? A. It depends on the value of the car. If its current market value is $4,500 or less, there will be no change in your SSI checks. If the value of the car is more than $4,500, check with the Las Vegas Social Security office about the effect it will have on your checks. For more information, please call 388-6314. In North Las Vegas, please call 388-6681. More Boulder City news .4^ Thursday, January 1, 1987 Henderson Home News and Bevlder City Newt Page tf A workman is sinuBtlBd by morning ight as the Raioad Pass HaM and Casino sign is comfMBd SAFETY AWARDS—Superintendent Jerry D. Wagers (shown holding award) presented the Lake Mead National Recreation Ajinual Safety Award to the warehouse crew. The Annual Safety Award is presented to the area that has the best safety record during the year. In winning the safety award the warehouse crew unproved their safety performance from last year. National Park Service Photo. HONORED—Boulder City Councilman Jon Purler, wearing liis hat as a member of the Lias Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority Board, presented an award to Minneapolis travel wholesaler Warren Phillips of MLT Vacations during the recent gathering of 600 travel agents from around the country at the bas Vegas Convention Center. Porter congrntnlated Phillips for bringing more than 170,000 visitors to Las Vegas during the past year. Shown from left to right are: from MLT; Gene Sawinski, Beverly Sawinski, Porter, Phillips and Pat Wisnewski and Sue Clemens also of MLT. Photo by Laa Vagaa Newa Bureau Boulder Disposal to pick up Christmas trees Boulder Disposal will be picking up discarded Christmas trees as a service to residents. Owner Jim Slade aaka that small to medium trees be placed with other material slated for the regular pickup day. Those discarding large trees six feet or more in height are asked to please call 293-2276 Friday to request tree removal. Slade says a special truck will attempt to meet all requests on that day. If this is not possible, callers will be informed of the day tO; place their tree for pickup. The service is being provided to prevent a recurrence of a problem last year when some NEW ARRIYALS at the Boulder City Hospital, Inc. Six babies were bom at Boulder City Hospital, Inc. between Dec. 12 andTkc. 24. Dec. 12: Becky and Steven Greer, Boulder City, girl and Amber and Wade Blake, Las Vegaa, girl. Dec. 17: Debra Diaz and Henry Falvey, Henderson, boy. Dec. 19: Mary and Darwin Thompson, Las Vegas, girl. Dec. 20: Brenda and David; Larsen, Henderson, boy. Dec. 24: Carol and Rodney Hickman, Boulder City, boy. Howard advises'Don't become a DBR-(Damaged Beyond Repair)' At New Life Foundation in Boulder City, author Vemon Howard's title for talks this week will be "Don't become a DBRDamaged Beyond Repair," with appUcation to II Thesaalonians 2:12. New Life iimer-development classes are conducted Wednesday and Friday evenings at 7 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday mornings at 7. Sponsors invite all newcomers to come to their first class where politeness, responsibility and a: cheery outlook are emphasized I Call 293-4444 in advance for directions to meetings and further details. New Life has no membership. Everyone comes and goes astheiy. please. All donations and ao>^ tivities are voluntary. Informal dress is suggested. Free Bible study The Bible in one year A program of study which covers the Bible in one year is now offered to the community. It is intended for those who have no or little knowledge of the Bible and for those who would like to refresh their memory an4 place what they already know in perspective. This program, sponsored by Grace Community Church will be presented without any denominational bias; the course will keep strictly to the text of the Bible and seek the original meaning. The major themes and key verses of each book of the Bible will be discussed, students will be welcome to give their own input. The leader of the program is Mr. Russ Grater, a long time resident of Boulder City, with a deep interest in Biblical Archelogy and BibUcal studies. He has taught Adult Bible classes for many years. He will be assisted as needed by other members and staff of the churph. The class will start Monday, Jan. 5 at 7 p.m. in the social room of Grace Community Church, 1150 Wyoming. There will be no charge, the course is offered as a service to the pubhc; students, however, are expected to provide their own Bible and note books. Any version is accepted and from the variety of versions the translation and interpretation difficulties will be pin pointed (it must not be forgotten that the original languages of the Bible are Hebrew and Greek). The number of students is limited, for registration call the church office, 293-2018. Everyone is welcome. Comment period extended for review of draft revised rules and regulations on the Reclamation Reform Act Commissioner of Reclamation C. Dale Duvall announced recently that the period for review and comment on rules and regulations to implement the Reclamation Reform Act. (P.L. 97-293. Oct. 12, 1982) has been extended for 30 days. Duvall said this action was taken in responseHo comments received at public workshops and hearings on the Reform Act held throughout the Reclamation West and in Washington, D.C., from November 19 to December 19, 1986. Revised draft rules and regulations and notice of public workshops and hearings were published in the Federal Register on November 7, 1986. A Federal Register notice is being prepared to extend the review and comment period from Jan. 6, 1987, to February 5, 1987. Written' comments on the proposed rules should be submitted no later than Feb. 5, 1987, to PhiUip T. Doe, Bureau of Reclamation, E & R Center, Code D-410. P.O. Box 25007, Box 25007, Denver, Colorado 80225. Grace Community Circles meet The Circles of the Women's Association of Grace Community Church will meet Wednesday, Jan. 7. The schedule is listed. Circle Hostess 9:30 a.m. Deborah Mildred Neumair, 624 Paloma Dr., 293-1810 Dorcas Ruth Reed and Margaret Hunt, 501 Ville Dr., 293-1557 Esther Eleanor West, 315 Utah, 293-2610 Rebecca Madelaine Garrett, 628 Avenue K, 293-2839 1:15 p.m. Martha Alma Stice and Florence Beley, Social Rooms, 293-1542 Mary Dores Donaldson, 625 Mt. Ebert, 293-2372 Ruth Birdina Bradshaw and Ruth Bell, 1306 Elsa, 293-4653 7:30 p.m. Naomi Jackie McWhorter, 1324 Pinto Road, 293-2862 All women of the community are welcome to attend any of our Circle meetings. trees were left in back yards and alleys, presenting a tire hazard to the area. Following a discussion of the problem with BC Fire Chief Robert Sears, Slade scheduled the service and extra pickup offering. Ringing in the New Yew Many European countries blow trumpets to the four corners of the' world at New Year'i. As the stroke.^ of twelve nears, four trumpeters' climb to the dominatitig tower of tht town, then they play a hymn like Martin Luther's, "A Mighty Fortress is our God." Vfn. \

PAGE 26

^^ww iVPan^" '^^v^^ammm Page M Htodcraon Home Nwi and Boulder City Win Animals, ^eo^b and tieahh 7 Thundigr, Januaijr 1,1987 Traveling with pets by Tim Frana D.V.M. Home Newt Correapondent Traveling with peta can poae a dilemma for their owners. Many animals do not handle traveling well. There are things to be aware of when moving a pet over long distances. The type of transport influences what will be involved. For instance, if you are planning to travel by airplane, bus, train, or boat, you will need a haalth cartiflcate and proof of current rabies vaccination. Additionally, it ia highly recommended that the other vaccinations be booatered. These are available through your veterinarian. You will also need a cage of the right aiae for your animal. A cage should be large enough for your pet to stand without crouching and wide enough for it to turn around. Any larger will add unnecessary bulk. If you are concerned about transport facilities and conditions, ask. It is your right. Some transportation companies will allow you to keep your pet with you provided the cage can be stored under the seat. If you are traveling by car, you will be in charge of the transport conditions. If an animal is used to riding in a car, there may be no problems. Most animals, however, will become anxious after extended periods on the road. It ia beet to have some form of restraint available in case it becomes necessary. Animala need frequent rest stops. Every three hours or so stop, let your animal stretch making sure that it ia leaahed. Water should be available throughout the trip. Some animals are very susceptible to motion sickness; therefore, food should be kept light. Tranqu^izers and car sickness pills are available and necessary in some cases. Older pets are more likely to undergo stress during transport, especially if separated from the owner. If a pet ia suffering from a medical problem, on medication and needing tranquilizers, it is best to have a thorough exam performed prior to transport. A note about heartworms. This is a mosquito transmitted disease. It is very common in many areas of the world. If you are traveling to a heartworm infested region, you should protect your pet with a heartworm preventative. It should be started thirty days prior to transport. Consult your veterinarian for details. It is easy to forget the pets in the chaos of moving or vacation, but thinking about their needs may avoid many problems. LP gas product safety warning issued Adminiatrator of the Nevada State Manufactured Housing Division Wayne Tetrault advises that Honeywell, Inc. has issued a safety warning and recall on certain LP gas control valves it manufactured and sold from 1966 to 1972. These valves are used in a variety of LP gas heating systems including central furnaces, boilers, unit heaters, conversion burners, and room heaters. Honeywell warns that after a period of time the valve may start to leak, allowing LP gas to accumulate which could cause an explosion and fire. If anyone's LP gas heating system was manufactured between 1966 and 1972 and has a Honeywell control valve you should check the model number on the control valve. The letter(s) and fu^ four numbers of the defective model numbers are C8133 V4113 VBIU V7281 V8n3 V8141 VM133 C6134 V4129 V5116 V7283 V8129 V8146 VS8137 VS8138 V4139 V8138 V8189 If the Honeywell control is one of these model numbers call Honeywell toll free at 1-800-328-8194. Honeywell will arrange for the replacement of the defective valve without charge. SUSC offers tour of American southwest CS6133 V4135 V5118 V7284 V8135 V8169 VS8138 CS6134 V4136 V5134 V8136 V8184 VS8140 V4139 V6182 V8137 V8188 VS8193 V4146 V6184 V8138 T6114 Tsns V4186 V5189 V8139 V4188 V8189 A circular tour of the American Southwest designed to combine historical and natural history highlights of the expansive Four Comers region is being offered through the Southern Utah State College Division of Continuing Education. A $50 deposit is required by Jan. 15 to insure space on the nine-day tour that starts March 16 when \MD8 leave Cedar City for Flagstaff, Ariz., with stops at Pipe Springs National Monument^ Lee's Ferry, Sunset Crater and the Lowell Observatory. Ttut trip ends March 24 with the ride from Page, Ariz., to Cedar City by way of Lake Powell and Gloi Canyon Dam. During the days in between, tour participants will visit Rainbow Bridge and tour Lake Powell by boat, and th^ have an opportunity to take the Sandia Mountain tram ride, the longest in the U.S. They'll also visit Aooma, the oldest dty in the United Statea, kk through art museums in Santa Te and stop at the Atamc Bomb Museum in Loa Alamos. Tour participants will travel, through aome of the country's most spectacular geology with stope at the Petrified Forett National Park, Natural Bridges National Monummt and the Gooseneckaof the San Juan. And, tbe/ll sample the historic wealth of the area by way of the SanU Fe Trail and the Dominquai Eacalante and John Wealey Powell expaditiona. The fourstate route will wind throu^ countiy inhabited by the ancient Anaaui and wiD cross Mooument Valley and the lands of todajr'B Navqo and Hopi nations. A stop wiD abo be made at either Veitle National Park or Hovenweep National Monument. The trip costs $395 per person (add $80 for single room occupancy), which includes transportation, lodging and two dinner meals. Physical science credit is available for an additional $20 recording fee. Additional information about the tour can be obtained from Professors Kennedy and Heath at SUSC in care of physical adencea department, Ceidar City, Utah 84720, telephone (801) 686-7900. Quadrantid meteor shower visible Januarys This year, the Quadrantid meteor shower will be at its peak of activity on the night of Jan. 3 and 4. For observers away from dty > lif^ts, aa many aa 60 meteors per hour can be visible after midnight under a clear, dark aky. lUa shower haa been known to produce over 200 meteors per hour. Tlw meteors are raiwl and the bri^ter ones often appear to fragment or expk]de.iMetieorB can appear anywhere in the sky. However, if one traces the path of each meteor backwards, the patha will all cross in the oonstellatioQ of Bootes. The shower gets its name from the now obsolete conctellation of Quadrana Muralia (Hie Mural Quadrant) that occupied a part of the aky that is now the border between Draco, Bootes and Hteules. The best time to observe the shower is between midni^t and dawn. While binoculars might be useful to observe the persistent traila left by brighter meteors, optical aids are generally not uaeful in observing meteors because they restrict your field of view. PUuMtarinm news Currently showing at the Planetarium is the multi-media experience "Death of the Dinosaurs." For many people, dinosaurs exiataa hazy images from textbooks or tacky old horror fllms. "Death of the Dinosaurs" portraya dinosaurs in a vivid and sdentificaUy accurate manner. Beginning with an overview of the development of the dinosaur family, the ahow soon ttmia to the varioua ideaa that have been proposed for the mass extinction of these andent creaturea over 65 million years ago. This program will continue through January 10. Planetarium performances are on Thursday through Saturday at 6:30 and 8 p.m. A matinee performance ia presented at 3:30 on Saturday afternoon. The theater will be cloaed on New Year's Day. General admiasion ia $2. A discount a^pkiaaion of $ 1 is available for children, students, seniors, military and the handicapped with Uie preaentation of appropriate W. Reservations are recommended for groups of ten or more. Call 643-6060, ext. 326 weekdays frO}n 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Reaervations will be held until ten minutea prior to show time. All performances begin on time and there is no late seating. On dear evenings, a telescope will be available for viewing after the 8 p.m. performance. Current targete for the telescope indude Jupiter and Mars. The moon is also viewed when available. The Planetarium is located at Clark County (Community (Allege in North Las Vegaa at 3200 E. Cheyenne Avenue. From 1-15, take Cheyenne Avenue east about one mile to the coUege. The Planetarium is just inside the south entrance to the building. Use the parking lot dosest to (^eyenne Avenue. Unusual art exhibit to be sliown "I do work that's comfortable for black widow spiders to live in," says artist Walter McNamara. Walt and Mick, On the Strip in Las Vegas will feature mixed media work by Walter McNamara and Mick Sheldon at the Allied Arts Gallery from Jan. 12 through Feb. 4. A meet-the-artists reception will be held Monday, Jan. 12 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. McNamara, curator of the Sheppard Fine Arts Gallery at the Univenity of Nevada, Rio, wUl exhibit worka made primarily of wood and bonaa. Hia souroea for imagery range flrom Uluaiona to flf ties rocket ships to art hiatory puns. Ha is noted for tranafonning A "minimum of materiala for a maximum of maaning." McNamara ia alao known for ia impeccable craftamanahip. It haa been said that he could teach an Oregon cabinetmaker about wood. However, according to him, his work is finished before it's started. To him, the scavenged pieces of raw wood suggest the fmiahed wnrk, even before be cuts, carvea and smoothly reveals it to the rest of us. Mick Sheldon was bom and raised in Reno the son of a toy atore owner. He received is B.A. in fme arta from the University of Nevada, Reno and hia M.A. in fme arta from (/alifomia State University, Davis. He is the first Nevada artist in six years to be choaen to r epr ese n t NwnKla in the regkmal juried ahow sponsored by the Western States Art Foundation; hia work ia cur rsotly a part of the Third Waatwn States Biennial Exhibitioo whk^ pnmisrsd at the Brooklyn Muaeum last June. At Allied Arts, Shekion will exhibit mixed madia electric flaaa aasamblagaa that have the k>dc of something "mined rather than built." The figurss within these self-illuminated enameled pine boxes are wired and glued together llita of detritua with amaU jars for heads." The worka are marhaniied, with moving objecta and imagea and flaahing lights. ; What's Your Opinion? ; 117711111777777 777 7 77 7171777777777 717177.11111 Do you agTM with mott AiMrksnt whm it coniM to Amariet'i postal Mrvy Americans feel they deserve it. Tha first public zoo in tha U.S. was tht Philadalphia Zooieglcal Oardcni, Phllsdtlphlt, P*., which opened in 1874. LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE APPUCATION FOR PERMI8BI0NT0CHANOETHE POINT OP DIVERSION ANDPLACBOFUSEOFA PORTION OFTHBPUBUC WATERS OF THE STATE OP NEVADA HERETOFORE APPROPRUTED AppHcatioa No. 80MM NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, tkat m the Sted day of Oetobar, 19M, William O. •ad Kami Zick Ooff of Las Vagaa, Nevada, made appUeatioB to the SUta Eagiiiasr of Narada for panniaaiea to diaage the poiat of divsraioB •iidplMofiiMofO.(M16ei3., a portloa of water karotoforr appropriated nnder Psnnit NaSOMS. Watar wm bedlvsrted frn aa uadargfoaad aoores located witkia the SE^ NWM, Sw;tioa as, T.2S8., R.61E, MJ)JB. A M., dr at a point fron which tha NV4 eorosr of aald Section 33 bears N. 20 S6' 42' E., a distaaca of 2.400.71 feet. Watar wlU be need for irrigatioB aad do m aatic porpoaee fnm January let to Deomibar Slat of each year. Hia esiatlag pofat of divardoa waa from aa andargroand aooree witUa tha NWVi NW Vi Sectioa 2. T.20S., R.61E, MJ)3.4M..aratapaiatfmB -HtOOOIba. batwaaa poiata ud of saidT^aeMwMkiaatwaatyaQiaUe which the NW Sectioa 2, baara N. 860 49'13' W., a diataaoa of 033.43 faet. Sigaed: Pater G. Morroa, P.E. SUto Eaghiaer Data of flrat pnbUcatioii Dec 11.19i6 Data of laat pnbUcatioa Jaa. 8.IM7 B-Dae.ll,18,2S,19i6.Jaa.I, 8.1987 DISTRICT COURT CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA Eleaa Vitaalla Ibarra. PlalaUff, Alberto Ibarra, Dafeadaat. Caae No. D89128 SUMMONS NOnCEI YOU HAVE BEEN SUED. THE COURT MAY DECIDE AGAINST YOU WITHOUT YOUR BEING HEARD UNLESS YOU RESPOND WITHIN aO DAYS. READ THE INFORMATION BELOW. TO THE DEFENDANT: A dvil Ccnplalat haa bean filed by the phrfatiff ivainat yoa for the relief eat forth ia the Complaiat. TUa ia aa action to diaaolvo the beads of aMtrisMay now aad harstofore exiatiag betweea the Plaiatift aad Dafeadaat. 1. If yea iatead to dafsad tkta lawaait, wltUa d^ra after thU Swaacaa ia aarved oB jroa exclnaive of tha day of aarvica, yon most do tha foUowlag. a. FUa with the Clark ot tUa Coort, wboea addraaa IS ahowB bakiw, a fonaal wilttaa raapoaaa to tha Complaiat la •eoordaaca with the rvlea of the Coort. b. Serve a copy of year raapoaaa npoa the attoraay wboea aaoM and addraas ia shewa below. 2. Ualeaa you respond, yoar defaalt will bs eatarad upoa appUeatlaaoftheplaiatiffaad thia Coart auy eater a Jndr meat igaiBat you tar the relief dyiaadad la the Coaplalat. which eoald raealt hi the tdifaig of aMBCjr or propwtjr or other raMaf ra^aaa t ad la tha Coaalalat 1 If jraa hitaad t aaak tha advlaaafaa attoraay la thla • at*, yoa ahoahi do aa praaiptly a that year riipiaai may be filed aa time. liMHd at dbaatlaa of: EDWARD WBINSTCIN, CHARTERED —iMVuaiBsriivsiiBislk Laa Vai. Nevada 19104 Attaraav far PWatiff LORIITA BOWMAN, CLERK OP COURT By: WANDA LOPEZ DEPUTY CLERK Date SEP 1988 (DISTRICT COURT 8BAU Coaaty C aarthaaaa MO Soath Third Straat Laa Vagaa, Nava^ 89158 H4)a(.4,lUi.lt.JM.1.1988 LEGAL NOTICE Tha eoataata of UaH L22, aadsr tha aaasa of Brace Tall, 219VaaWiaMa,Haadsraaak Nevada will be aoM at aactioa to aaUafy reat la'arrears. Whirlpool retrlgaratcr. hoeaeboM ItaaM, aportiag gooda, BJacaUaaeoaa. Sak will be keU oa Jaaaary 15,197 at 9 a.ai. CASH ONLY. We reaarre tha right to Ud. Marker Plaaa Boat 4 Mial Storage 807 Cadis HeadarsoB, Nevada 89016 H-Jaa. 1, 6, 8. 13. 1967. BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OP NEVADA NOTICE OF APPUCATION Aaappttcatiaa,Uaartifladaa Docket No. 86-125S, haa baaa filed with the PahHe Sarvlee ConadaakaiofNevMiarCamndaakM"! by Great BarrierCorp dba AUatato Towfaig for aatharity to aail aad traMfar and of T J Aatoawtive lac dba Oapaadable Towiag Capaay to pnrchaaa aad acqabe cartiflcate CPC A-3296. The eartifleato aathorisaa traaaportatioa la tow car aarvtc* of wrecked or diaablad vehiclsa with tow car vehicle groaafa aa aaladaa weight of laaa thaa LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OP APPUCATION FOR PERMISSION TO APPROPRUTE THE PUBLIC WATERS OF THE STATE OF NEVADA Piled: Dae. 3,1968 Applicatloa No. 80188 Notice la barahy givea that oa the 30th day of Saptembar, 1986. Raby DriUlag Compaay of Glllatta. SUte of Wyoodag. asade appUcatloa to the SUte Eaglaesr of Nevada Ifor parmiaalea to appropriate Ctt of a aacead foot of the pabBc watara of tha StaU of Nevada. Diversfaw U to be Blade from aa aadergnwad aooroa at a poiat located withia tha SWV. NEV4 Sectioa 36, T.17S., R.70E., MJ).B.&M., orata poiat froai which the E>/< coraar ot aald Sacttoa 36. bears 8.52<>16'00'E.,adUtaaceof 1314.0 feet. Water will be naad for aiialag wid'nilllag purpoaea from Jaaaary IsttoDecsmbarSlst ot each year. Date of flrat Pabllcatioa Dae 11, 1986 Date of laat Pablicatioa Jaa. 8,1987 Sigaed: Petar G. Moma, ?X. Stote Eagiseear B-Dee 11,18, 26, 1966, Jaa 1, 8, 1967 BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA NOTICE OF APPUCATION Aaapplieath,ldaBtifladaa Docket No. 86-124S, haa been niad with the PuhUe Service Commiaaioe of Nevada r'Conmiaaioa") by Tha City of Headeraon, Clark Conoty, Nevada for authority to coaatnict a now aigaaliaMi, at grade, railroad eroeaiag, over tha Unkm Padfic lUilroad, at Oreanway Road a^ sUadaate the eiiatiag oaaigBaliied iToaaiag at Major Avaaus approxlBMtely 1200 feat to the Northwaat. Tha propoaed Graeaway Road Croaalnga Buaber will be No. 13.70, the eroeaiag Bombara of the aaa^ eat exiatiag pabUc ooadm are HoriaoB Drive. No. 14.53 and Pacific Avaane No. 12.71. TheappllcaUoaiaoafUlat the of flcse of the CoBiBdaakm, Capitol Complex. Kipksad BuildlBg, 506 East Kiag Street, Carsoa aty, Nevada 89710 aad the Bradley Buildlog, 2801 EM Sahara Avenue, Laa Vegaa, Nevada 89158. latareatad aad affected partiea auy oomaieat hi writing to the CoauBiaaioa aad nie appropriate Proteate aad/or Petitioas for Leave to latervaae at ite Caraoa City offloaa oa or bafors Jaaaary 14,1987. By tha Coauaiadoa, WILLIAM H. VANCE, Commlaaioa Secretary Dated: Caraoa City, Nevada Decamhar 23,1986 (8EAU H-Jaa. 1,1987 radias of Laa Vagaa, Nevada; aad bs t weia psirta aad placaa withia a eae haadred aad aeveatyfhss (175) mile radiaa oa the othsr. TheiVplicadaaiaoaifilaaBd avaUahleforpahUcvtewi^at the of fleas of the Coaaadaaioa. Capitol Complaa. Uakaad Boildiag, SOS Eaat Kiag Street, Caraoa City, Nevada 89710 aad the Bradlay BoiUfaig, 2801 East Sahara Avaane. Laa Vegaa. Nevada 891S8. latsraated aad affected par tise may eoauMat la writiag aad file appropriate Protests aad/or Petitioaa for Leave to laterveae at ite Caraoa City otflcaa oa or before Jaaaary lil987. By the Commlaoka. WILLIAM H. VANCE, Commlaaioa Sacretary Dated: Caraoa City, Nevada December 24.19S6 (SEAU H-Jaa. 1,1967 BIDS WANTED FOR HIGHWAY IMPROVEMENT NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed propaaala will be reeaivad by the Diraetor of tha Departmeat of Traiiapartatloa of tha Stato of Nevada at the Diatrict I Headqaartera, 1200 North Main. Laa Vagaa, NV 89101. antil and opaaed at 140 pja.. hieal time, oa Jaaaary 15, 1967 for Coatraet No. 2176, Project No. 8PF-096-2(5), eoaatmeUoa ot a portkm ot the PriMry Highway Syatea OB US 96 la Laa Vsgaa at tha Joaaa Boalevard laterehaaga, Clark Cooaty, a laagth of 0.038 ailaa. SPECIFIC DESCRIPTION OF WORK COVERED BY THIS CONTRACT CONSISTS OF REPAIRING EXPANSION JOINTS ON AN EXISTING INTERCHANGE STRUCTURE The mlalmam WH* to ba paid oa thU oeatraet ahaU be aa datarmhMd by tha Secaetary of Labor or the State Ubor Commleatoaer aad are aet forth la the coatraet doeaflseate. EmpktymeBt Uate BMy bs obtaiaad from tha local office of tha Nevada Employaaaat Saeority Dapartaaeat at 136 South 8th Stieet, Laa Vagaa, NV 89101. Plaaa aad apacifloatloaa may be azaodaed aad porckaaed at the of flee of the aadsraigoad. Noo4dddiag docnmoa to may alao be eramlaad or par c h a aed at ths DapartBMat of TraaaportadoB District Oftleeaia Sparka aad Laa Vagaa, Nevada. Additkmally, pkaa aad apedflcatkMM may be euuaiaad bat BOt parchaaed at the offkaa of tha Aaaoeiated Gaaaral Coatraetora Of AaMrica, 1135 S.W. Tampla Street, Salt Lake aty, Utah, 84110; aad 600 Rytead Street, Salto 300, Rawi, Nevada, 86602; at the otfles of tha F.W. Dodge Compaay, 1850 Beat Fbadago Road, Saite 107, Laa Vagaa, Nevada. 89101, at the offloa of Daily Padfle Baildar, 348017th Straat, Saa Fraadaca, CaUtaraia, 94110; aad at tha efflaa of the Coaatrocthia Notebook. 3131 Msada Avsaaa, Laa Vagaa, Nevada, 80101. Plaaa, farm af propaaal, wmtratt aad apaaMeaHwm may he aaaawd by prawiaMfled bidders thrMh the office ot the • Bdaraigaed. A fee of Twaaty Dollars (UOM) la raqataad tar the porohaaa af each cepy of with prapaaal farm. Pkaa, staaaaal f< fa faadwiliha BMaasaat beam tha afthe Dapartmaat of Traaapartadaa aad maat ba aesampaalad by % Ud bead, a MTtlflad cheek, a eaahiar'a dtock, ar eaah la tha oasooat el flva pweaat %) of Ud. Bifht ia foaarvod to rajaot aay ar aU Uda. Caattactaia dsahtlaB ta Ud w this wwh, if aet alraady qoaHflad aad tha Suto Law, aUJUMa wUh dw Dt p a rt mi a t af TrawpartadM at Canaa O^, Nevada, aat latar thaa fivo Wdaysprisrta tha data far apaatNial>iIaa. 1, 8, 16, 1967 Legal Notlca "BIG JOHNS" BLET8CH AUTO WRECKING 4 TOW 1631 FOOTHILL DRIVE BOULDER CITY, NEVADA 89000 (702) 2934661 Doc 15,1906 Tha toUowiag vahidaa wiU ba aoM at anetioa oa Jaa. 2,1967, M A.M. at Big John 4 Soaa Inc., 1631 Foothill Drive, Boulder City. Nevada 89005. We raoerve the right to bid. 1977 Chevy VINf: iq67U7L607784 Ucaoae: HSA016 New Mexico Legal Owoar Paul Unaoa, 2331 Calle Luminoeo, Santo Fe, New Mexico 87501. RegiatrndOwaeruMME i^ 1971 DateoB ^ VINI: PL510904942 Uceaae: 289KAA Texaa Legal Owaer JaoMO R Houae, 745 Belvedere, Beeamoat, Texaa 77706 Registered Owaer: SAME 1964 Volvo 28' Box VINI: VB3L06B14EB026272 Uceaae: 3MA911 Arisoaa Legal Owner Brookholkm Natioaal Bank AMT, nil Weet MoeUagbird Lena, Dallaa, Texaa 76247 Regiatered Owner: Vector IBduatriae laoorporated. 3906 E. Roasr, Phoeaix.Ariaoea 88040 Big John 4 Soaa lac. reasrvae the right to hid. H-Dec 23,25,1986, Jan. 1,1967 DISTRICT COURT CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA DINA WELLING, PUiaUff, JERRY D. WELLING. DefeBdaat. Caae No. D90605 Dept. No. XI Docket No. S SUMMONS NOTICE! YOU HAVE BEEN SUED. THE COURT MAY DECIDE AGAINST YOU WITHOUT YOUR BEING HEARD UNLESS YOU RESPOND WITHIN 20 DAYS. READ THE INFORMATION BELOW. TO THE DEFENDANT: A dvU Complaint haa boea filed by the pldntitf agaiaat you for the rsliat aet forth In the Complaiat. Thia is aa action to dissolve ths bonds of matrimoay aow aad hsretofora exiatiag betweea the Plaiatift aad Dafeadaat. 1. If you ioteod to defead thia lawault. withia 20 daya after Uda Snmmoaa ia served oa yon ezdudve ot the day of eetvios, you must do the toUowlag: a. File with ths CIsrh ot thia Coart, wboea addreea b abowa behiw, e formal writtea raapoaaa to tha Compldat la accordaoca with the mlae ot ths Court. b. Serve a copy of your raspoase apoa tha attoraay whoae aame aad addraaa te ahown below. 2. Ualaes you reepond, your default will ba eatered upoa applleaUoa of the plaiatift aad thia Court may eater a Jadr ment agalBat you for the relief damoodad la tha Coaphdat, wUch eoald rcealt la thrtohiag of BMBsy or property or other raUet reqaeoted ia the Complaiat. 3. If yoa iatead to aaek the advice of aa attaray la tUa autter, you ahaald da ao promptly eo that your reepatme auy be filed oa dme. leaaad at dtractioa of: EDWARD WEINSTEIN, CHTD. laOl Laa Vagaa Blvd. Seath Las Vagaa, Nevada 80104 Attoraay far FlUadff LORITTA BOWMAN, CLERK OF COURT By: MICHELB FROMM DEPUTY CLERK Dato NOV 18 lOM (DISTRICT COURT SEAL) Coaaty Coarthooae aOO Booth Third Otraat Laa Voaaa, Nevada 80186 HDac-jlT, It, I5,JM. 1,1068 Thnndoy, Junary 1, 1987 HoBdorooB HwM Nowt aai BovMor aur Nowf ftfi If vaJKmmni&(B^. PRAYER OF APPLICATION 18 ^ Holy SpMt, Hily Splrtt you iio HU ai pitMini ptoMS ol isodi, io I (8h oktoin my jod. Youn^glvinBliisOMiM glhteloigiviondforJMol tvil ofointt 818 ofld In oil liKtanMofniyMi, Youora with fiw. I wont In ihh short wDvtr to rtionk You foroNthngi, ondtocsnfinn ones ogoin Ihot I nsi^ wont to be ssporatMJ from You. Even in spits of oil motsflol illusions, I with to bo with You in ststnd gloty. Thank You for your niMiy towon nn and niim. Ths pinon must soy this praysr for thiM (omscutivs days, latir 3 doys Iho nivor nquostid will bo grontid, svon if it oppioii dlffi(ult. This proyir must bi pubfeshid immidkitily oftir ths proyir is grontod without mifltlon of the favor, only ths initlais shall oppsor at tht bottom RC GOOD NEWS ^. New Auto Detail Shop-right In your area' Quality at fair prices. "WE DO ANYTHING ON WHEELS" Waoh 4 Shine them up. Free Estimates SUNSHINE AUTO DETAIL 1641 E. Sunset Road (Sundance Plaza) Open 7 days a weak 361-0772 ELECTRIC PRINTING CALCULATOR. HERMES 320 Almoat aaw. Sacrifice for S130. 293-OW. BC. WANTED: Usl car or truck. Price raagc $100 to 1600. Fiiar-uppar OK. No Juak! Call 5044059. STORAGE FOR RENT AU aiaca-Feacad Raaidaat Maaager Near Saaiet k Mouatala Vieta 4a8-3W0 j I • • WASHBRmRYBR good coad. 30 day warranty 8125 Ea. 2084447. EC. KitchenettesAdulta only. No pata. Wcatam Inn, 294J>898 or 293-2044 Antique Olympic cook atova, axe. condition. 1^00. CaU aftar 6 p.m 904-7066 f 1404 Wyoming St. Weal^jays, 5pm to 9 p.m Saturday. 8 a m to 9 p m Sunda, 9 a m. to 2 p.m. 294-0084 B.C. Water, Water Everywharo. but none • nitable for cooldna or Drinking. Now ChBr/02000 U the answer. Reyersa OsaM>> • ia haa 3 iystama ia one PorUble unit that saU on the aink or counter, Cost about 10c per gallon. U.S. O^armant apont milUona aaalsHng in tha development of it. (Saa the movia 7!Iaie Bomh in our tap watar.l CaU for app't, ba safe, have your watar tested now.M4-1648. Five yr. warranty. Free, No ObUgation. Ona boy'a 20' bike, lUte new. Gail 565-7302. PRICE WAR:: Half price! Flaahina arrow signs S339: Lichtrd. nonarrow S.329! Unlighted S269: Free letters: See locally. Factorv: 1(8001 423-016.1. anytime. SECOND HAND STORE. Fumiturt, new A uaad A misc. We repair aU makes k moaela of rafriaeratioa. Service caU 120. Guarantee 30 days. Buy ft eeU aU marchaadiae, BUmar'a 27 Army St., Headersoa, Nv W4-7367. NOmf OPEN FOR SALES MOBILE HOMES Hardware & glass for window and doors. Energy Saving Windows BOULDER OUttSWORKS 1304 Nsvodo Highway (Across from McDonalds) 1-702-M4-142S PEARLS RESTRUNG: Your precious family hcirlooma restored at Gold Caatera Jewelry. Mon.-Fri 9-5, Sat. 10^. 23 Army St. Hdn. All ateel buildinga. Brand new. Last chaace for '86 prlcea ft inveatmant Tax credits. 50X75, 50X100, 100X200 and more. Call Clint, 303-759-3200. Sale enda 12/23. NEED CASHIII Would sell our recently acquired Creative Touch sewing machine (Fashion Machine, Singer) 1036. $30a Worth over 1500. Or would sell Chevy pickup w/aice rims (bad motorl S700. Or construction flat bed heavy duty truck— offer. CaU M4-1347. Solid Oak Kneehole desk, 4 drawer, leather insert writing pad. Like new. > $160. Weatbend room humidifier, 22X22X12. Walnut finish. $20. Sears Treadmill, manual, uphill. Odometer & Speedometer, walking or Jogging. Used twice. tl25. Call 451-3341 after 3:30 pm. For sale: Cabinet dlaplsy, doors, executive desk. Etc. Located at 520 W. Sunset Rd. Ste. 16. Open 7 am to 3:30 p.m. 564-3661. DO YOU NEED, Investments, Mutual Funds, GNMAS7 Call PRUDENTIAL BACHE. 2941045. BC Cash for good running work truck. Must be very reaaonable, or can be donated to Betty Honn'a Non-profit animal adoptiona. 1986 Blue Book tax deduction. Needed now for hauling food for anhnals daUy. Complete information, Pb 3612484 or 361-5137 BOAT FOR SALE: 1973, 21' Cuddy Day Cruiser Skv,455.01da.Eny.Jet, 1985 Trailer 16,500. 293-7086. After 4 PM BC. JACUZZI WHIRLPOOL SPAS authorized dealer. Silver State Pool & Spa. 1321 Nevada Highway. 293-4960. BC. SINGER I'ORtABLE SEWING MACHINE $25. 2 Yr. guarantee. Sorenaon'a SOO Hotel Plata. 293-3770. BC. HAPPY NEW YEAR FAVA FAMILY From Your Loving Sailor ORGAN Electric Lowrey, Excellent Cond. 1300. 293-4491. BC. WOMINtMMJI I truDY iNTmMNOMfNATIONAk s.m.l7lAdsmvd. Nwma. If yau ars s aaw-. aaaiar la BaiMdar Cily, aamaalnahsnsi mMnatM>77Ta. MUSIC ft ART GIFT CERTIFICATES avaUable far the New Year. Voiea ft Plaao tat sale: lUcoadltloaad refrigerators, raages. washers, dryers, etc. 90 day warranty. Alsa baylag lata model apBMaBosa,_Bssdlng rspalr. PICTURE FRAMINdQuaUty wark-raaaoaabhpfleaa-Uthographspoatcrs-Buy, Sell, Trade Art. Art ixchaafa 444 Hotel Plasa. (Across From Boulder Dam Hot4BaUBdEd8are.) 2984I7I. BC. 8AVi ALUMINUA^ lTBM8,oaaa. etc. Scrap Copper, Batteries. Motors ete. to raiaa moaey for aawaated aalnala. Tax dednetl* ble. laformation .W-2484. For sale: Steel crate, 10X8X24. Panel Uned, $1,500. 564^106. Custom drspea, gold w/green ft gold valance. $350. Couch ft love aeat, $125. 2 end Ubiee, $30. Organ $350. 565-0875. TRI-CHEM DISCOVERY TOYS Suianne Welnich, 293-0060 Henderaon and BC. 2X4 Conatructlon cut firewood. $46 truckload. 5654)113. ALOE VERA NECTAR BY FOREVER LIVING. 100% StabaUaed with Natural Cranberry aad Apple Coaeaatrata. UAPataatod. No water added. 564-1648. Eleven Ft. WUaon SateUite Diah ft Poet. No Electronics. $600 or beet. Call Jack 293-2959. After 4 P.M. Dally, Ml day Sat, ft Sun. BC. COUCH. CHAIR ft Ottoman, Table for sale. 293-4527. After 8 PM. BC. Two matching green velvet chairs, very good condition. $50 each. Shetland Electric Broom, $20. Like new. Aleo, small Biaaell carpet sweeper. CaU 565-8396. New ft uaed Satellite equipment, ealea ft repaira. 4 yeare exp. Sidekick Satellite, Residence 294-1996. Bueineaa ft recorder 5654S677. BC. GOVERNMENT JOBS $16.0406M,2a0/yr.Now Hiring. CaU 1-805487 •6000lDxt. R-5695 for currant federal Uat, WAITERS ft WAITRESSES: Vale Hotel now aoeapting appUcationa. Expariance neceeBC. Nevadk Highway. R-E-U-M-B-fi Composed Edited Typed Oulck and RaaaOaable Bee'e Bueineaa Svc. la "the VlUage" I 527 Hotel Plaaa Ave CJ Boulder City. NV 890M| 2l:U61 NEED people to train ft place in computer r ration. No feel 2001 Flamingo, Ste 111 from 8 am to 3 pm. NATIONAL FIRM SEEKS ENERGETIC SALESPERSON FOR MARKETING IN HEALTH SPA FIELD. CALL 1-8006217213 Operator 13. Part time teller wanted. Average 14 to 16 hre wkly. 18.50 hr. Apply "bounty Union. 202 W. Pacific, Clar'k County Cr s and aak for Jeanne. BS/P[jOyM AUIaon's Place, Ladiee Apparel, management poaitlon available. At leaet 1 yr retail experience neceeeary. Apply at 888 S. Boulder Hwy or caU for Interview, 565-7370. THE NEVADA ARMY NATIONAL GUARD IS CURRENTLY LOOKING FOR TRUCK DRIVERS. IF YOU ARE BETWEEN THE AGES OF 17 AND 34. WE WILL TRAIN AND PAY YOU WHILE YOU LEARN. FOR INFORMATION ABOUT OUR TRAINING AND JOINING THE NEVADA ARMY NATIONAL GUARD CALL CHUCK, AT 885O303. Wanted. Houeekeeping, Non smoker. Apply Neyada Inn. 1009 Ne Highway. BC. BARTENDERS Vale Hotel aow accepting appUcations, experience necessary. Apply in per eon. 704 Nev. Hi BC. TYPIST: $500 weeklv at homcl Information? Send etamped self addressed envelope to Stephens Asaoc., 1270 S 8th Place. Dept B, Laa Vegas. Nev 89104. HELP WANTED Smai afternoon Boulder City Motor route. Must have dependalbe vehicle. Call after 6, 564-1546. HELP WANTED large am, motor route In BC. Must have dependable vehicle. Good pay. Call after 6. 564-1548. COCKTAIL WAITRESSES Vale Hotel now accepting BppUoationa experience necessary. Apply In peraon. 704 _Nev. Highway. BC. HEALTH CARE PERSONELL. Experienced R.N.s, L.P.N.e, Home Health Aides, Live-in Companions, Homemakers, needeil. CaU MEDIVI8IT 87M031. Mon-Fri. 94 EOE. I y ev. ( HAIRDRESSER WANTEP WITH CLIENTELE Halritaga •tylind Parior 311 WATIII8T. AMMV In pirMl NURSES AIDES experieacedesifadbutwiU train faU or part time. Boulder City Care Ceater. 2US16I. EOE/MF/HV. BC COMMERCIAL AGENTS Jeniin's Rialty has openings for two Salts Agents, to work In tlie Commerical Division. Applicants,must havi 4 years experience or hold 0 61(1 Designation. Contact Ken Proctor at 564-3333. 1-^ FC BOOKKEEPER THRU FS Public Accounting, Experience Preferred But Not Mandatory, Non-Smoker Year-round Position, Startina Feb. 1. Send Resume and Salary Req. to: RW Boi 69 B.C. S9005 ABTHllITIBf IkavehadHfarMysara, Now I have aow. HaM TrsataMitCaat,Caatla SMUaoaaaaradtadoelor'afoas/isMDiMten • as it la tkeir practiee witk aaaallsat rssaha. Gaafutaa Itallaf at ^^ hattsrlasie CaU U Harwood's appUaaaaa. itt K. Lake Maad!W4.|tl0. AiiiVbULn^iSSr WITH A DIWOUNG Ifaawh^aUtryAlAaoaf Msadofa ara Taas., 10 WMsBsiisl&aHCTasa. SJOpikGablLWad., 8>ai.ltlLssadsUM HAk FRAYSR or APPLICATION i tki Ha(r SpMk. Hcljr SfWl jrm k • • hmllnifcl—i.pniMnllrMfc M I • • • aattb mt tmL Van lw firt IM Ite DIlM |tft I* (•tfl** n4 tofM ifl ITII tgil m M4 la tU iHlMwn •( ajr Nik VM m vttk M. I ul la lUi tteft rv t Uaak Yaa to iH Iklasa. m* I* •aanrai MM aaata tlM I an *ul u h u pa f t n ^ IrMa Yaa. EvM la iflu •( all aulwlal ilia• kH. I vlak U ka ahk Yaa la alar aal f larr. Tkaa VteJSt jraw aw ey laa4 • • aa4 aiaa. lia ranaa • aal tajr Mm praftr (or Ihraa ca •anihra itft, a/tar ) 4ayi Ua f av naaaalad will te gnmui, avaa U U awaan Mincalt Tkia ptarrf • aal te |nUlaka4 kaaMStoialr ahaa Ite IMIW la snaM arllkaal • aaUaa at ite faaaa. aM Ite l HWi m-i a Ite hatiaiB. AlltLINES NOW HliT INQ Flight Attendaate. Agente, Maebaaiee, Customer Servles. Salaries to MOK. Batry Uvsl positioBs: Csll 1-eOS687-0000 Ext. A-tm. OlenHsUaNorsinfHome. OeMTtfRN, part time weekaade. LPN part tlmeStoll.Nureealde part time, 11 to 7. Jaaltor needed, part time. Two poaltkme avaUable, Ufht ft heavy work. CaU 864-6719, ask Tor Wendy. UAiitbiiiMUi4lMANICURIITNBEDID. people latarsstad la advaaesmaat. Worh aith NKEDBDiHOUSEidlllt*J R-CHILD CAKE ERSON. Mature Adult W/referaaoea. 5 dsjrs. 2H0766 Aftar 6 ^ PM. BC. RN, part time and on call. Nurse aide, oa call-all ehlfU. Voluataars to help w/actlvttiee for reeideau. Glen HalU Nurslaj Home. 8664741 Loving Care fer yoar ohiwraa la my hosM. Very experleaeed. RaferaMsa. CaU Cheri 56M600, ON SABATICAL. WIU housa^t far vaa aU sr portloa of Jsa. thru Juae. ExeeU. la f sre a ess. Contact ASAP-Caral Hammoad, 876 CUff Dr. La|ttBa Beach, (3a. HOUSE CLEANING. RaUable k thorough. For the Hdn, BC Green VaUeyaraaa. CaU 866-8061 for reaaoaable k depaodable services. Private room k care for elderly In family home. Reasonable rates. 864-2417. YOU^O MOTHER offers plaatyofTLC.7daysa wk—reaaoaable rates. Naacy, 664-7278. MATURE, depeadable, hoaeot lady wUl eleaa your bouse. IT. aa hour. Raferaaeea. 86U781 Home Laundry ft | Honaaolaaaliig Sanrlec —LowMt Jtatee— call 564.3927 -TWFer ynr diild, my lienw. Hovi SlwifPt coni, hwllh cord t nfMMKH. PlNtt caH mm RELtABLk BABYilT TER FOR faU part time ehlldrea. Drop-Ins weleoma. Ileferenaoa. 6 yrs. Exp. Aaytliae a9M674"Wy. BC. • 'T^ii\.yj'ii: LOST: White male foodie. About 10-yrs-old. 866-1278. m LOST Mole PdtliwM. tM w/Usdi IKS. turn ti "tiHk" MInlni rises Frf^qr VMnlty ifdiimlitr. iffMM,pliM ii 564-6719 HHWiit Lorreine'i Pet Sitting Service, Loving car§ while you 'm away. I 'II can for your peta in thair fan)lllar home aurroundings whila you vacation or work. Bonded. Call Lorraine McLean. 293-3431. 000 OROOMW0 emM OaH Now 9er AppolntnMMil IdiMir ki\m$[ Hoi^Hil 293-3744 OaMM Hurttay iipwanjao Otaonw coexn irmiu BIMK and Buff e \N9eka old Just right for ChriitmM can 4tMtOI IT MT-mt Attar > p.m. BABYSITTING IN MY HOME dsvs Mim thru Fri. ages 0 to 8 yeare. Referaneee 293-2749. BC. ^ Sunset-Green Valley nnry, quality chUd eare in happy home. Nete Mack Area. 24 hre.-7 days. Reaepaable drop la rateaidiMeOO. I wiU clean your house to your paraoaal eatiefectioW. Please call SftfOlOO. Babyaittlag—my home near Fay UaUoway. CaU 864-8087. MAID ESPECIALLY FORYOU.Houeeeleaaing. Reaaonable. Depea_dable,CaU296-1917.TBC. BAfiYlfrYiSoT my hone. 14 hrs. Aay age, hot maala, feaesd yard and play area. g64ae. WILL DO IRONING 293-3388. BC. ARE YOU LOOKING FOR WORK TO BE DONE? Well, I'm look, tag for work to do. I do Juat alioat aaythiag in or arouad the home aad yard. I cut down trees, trim hatflee, work on flowera, ae well ae Interior-exterior painthai. I oven do wioMwel Call after 6 PM 294-1378, 293-1716 Aek for Peter. WE ARE JUST TW() BIO PUPPIES that aeed a lot of love. 8 noath old EaaUah poiatar male and 7 month old hueky ehepherd mix feimale. Both puppiee aeed reepoaeible homee. CaU 2U-9224 BC. Aolmal Control. Por rent: Steal corrale w/autoraatie waterers k shade oovera. Ltohted areBa,i78aio.a6W10e. Betty koan'a Aalmal Aaoptloa aeeapta aawaated pata by appointmeat OWLY. 361-2484 FREE-ADOPTASAVE A PET (CATS k DOGS). 293-8673. ^ Free KitUae: Call 866-1206. 4-YR-OLD. buff colored female cocker epanlei needs loving Dome 293-9224. 9Mo.-old black lab.'spayed female aeeoa a home wllUai to train A disdplbie thie pedfgree lab. 398-9224. Deaperataly nate anwantad freeser meat, dog 4 eat food, hay, etraw, ate. Tas dadaeUble. Nl-2464 Blcaeet little Afrieaa BataH to tha daaart. Lioaa, Tlgara. baata, wolveo, aMmkoya, ate. MAY t HELP YOt; Olf YOUR DOO OR CAT SPAYED OR NIUTIRED rOR A GRACIOUS DISCOUNT? 3614673. BC. Aayttee. SeooadhaMlpetafaradapttoa, daUy. Doas, sato. Utteas, pappAs, ate. Betty Ifoaa's AalMi AdoptioB. 86I-2464. Deer Hunters elaailM your deep ftaaaa—donate aU uawaatadaiaat, fish, ete to Betty Hoaa's Aataal Adaptioa. 86M464, Taa DeducUble. RED FEMALE DACH8UND 3 Yrs. old, Asking 880. 2 Feaials 8iameeeUttsaa,10-wk8old 838 ea. CaU Paula 293-2666. BC. FEMALE CALICO CAf needs a loving hams. TUa 3-yr.-old oat has slat of personaUty. 298-9224. $$CASH PAID$$ hr HI Call 388.9909 1040 S. Moin il Im yegti, Nev. • • • GARAGE SALki Sat iaa 3,6to8im.lslse,lfas stove, VW portable TV, mlae goads. 69 Lowery, 8664418. rv4<, ABB, eappari paiat dlspeossr, palat shaksr, cooler sappUaa, aleetriesl fittlMS, iwlswmBmiaBhlBi^slsa traaie eaaf NORCaaTf iaaiaa HowToDoSomitliIng About Drunk Driving Bvtry 20 minutei on Bverifi another l|f ii tragically loit itaeeuM of • drunk driver. Drunk drivlni coiU ui SOO.OOO icoldenU • year, and 35,000 ncedlcu deatht. It adda hundredi of mlUiom of dolkin to the Insuranct premiuma wt all pay. • omethinf muat b done. New approaohei arc attacklni tha problem at lU aouree: tha attitudea ot potential offandara and of aoclaty at lar|a. Drlnklnf bcfora driving mutt beeome a iocial ttlgma, inatead of a aoclally acceptable form of homicide. There are aifna that thia ebanfe in attitude la beginninf to take ahape. Aad there are wayi that sU af ue-fovemmenta, community groupa, eoneemed Indivlduaia-ean help the ehange happen faaler. PouaAMalawUulW^ HSMd A mSr Hwy! Plaaae eaU 461-6606. Laett Small dark gray short batted pappy. Abaat 10' taU. NsSas "Grsyslraks." ^fbar CkUd's Ptt-Rawwif itob. SSm IMS KAWAMKI KK'IMM •1,4Mr \ n Seivalfaa Arm/ 1 aeede flaatten. 1 loMealer /IhrnflbeMidlhn.Aek*v| |fMpafesli^4dNreaM. jr Mm Ml Md eaa| ]ast m 8176. BC. laeeUaatlaeaMforhaaM aaaembly Work. Por lafa call 804446-1700. Dept PB64. A report from the Inauranca Information Inatitute. Drunk Driuinf: A KilUr Wt CM atop, eaplslni whet each of u can do in the llfcor-dHth kettle agalnat drunk dHvlng. For a (Ne eopjr, write: tnauranee Information Inatltute, 110 WlUla Street, lot q.Nsw York, NY lOOH. The praperty sad assusity lasurenee Indastry ia helpbig. As • fliet itap. It be* SMHflibled the (kets we aaed to know shodt wfclsli preventive masAirae work, and wbleh one* dan't. • ^\

PAGE 27

^^ww iVPan^" '^^v^^ammm Page M Htodcraon Home Nwi and Boulder City Win Animals, ^eo^b and tieahh 7 Thundigr, Januaijr 1,1987 Traveling with pets by Tim Frana D.V.M. Home Newt Correapondent Traveling with peta can poae a dilemma for their owners. Many animals do not handle traveling well. There are things to be aware of when moving a pet over long distances. The type of transport influences what will be involved. For instance, if you are planning to travel by airplane, bus, train, or boat, you will need a haalth cartiflcate and proof of current rabies vaccination. Additionally, it ia highly recommended that the other vaccinations be booatered. These are available through your veterinarian. You will also need a cage of the right aiae for your animal. A cage should be large enough for your pet to stand without crouching and wide enough for it to turn around. Any larger will add unnecessary bulk. If you are concerned about transport facilities and conditions, ask. It is your right. Some transportation companies will allow you to keep your pet with you provided the cage can be stored under the seat. If you are traveling by car, you will be in charge of the transport conditions. If an animal is used to riding in a car, there may be no problems. Most animals, however, will become anxious after extended periods on the road. It ia beet to have some form of restraint available in case it becomes necessary. Animala need frequent rest stops. Every three hours or so stop, let your animal stretch making sure that it ia leaahed. Water should be available throughout the trip. Some animals are very susceptible to motion sickness; therefore, food should be kept light. Tranqu^izers and car sickness pills are available and necessary in some cases. Older pets are more likely to undergo stress during transport, especially if separated from the owner. If a pet ia suffering from a medical problem, on medication and needing tranquilizers, it is best to have a thorough exam performed prior to transport. A note about heartworms. This is a mosquito transmitted disease. It is very common in many areas of the world. If you are traveling to a heartworm infested region, you should protect your pet with a heartworm preventative. It should be started thirty days prior to transport. Consult your veterinarian for details. It is easy to forget the pets in the chaos of moving or vacation, but thinking about their needs may avoid many problems. LP gas product safety warning issued Adminiatrator of the Nevada State Manufactured Housing Division Wayne Tetrault advises that Honeywell, Inc. has issued a safety warning and recall on certain LP gas control valves it manufactured and sold from 1966 to 1972. These valves are used in a variety of LP gas heating systems including central furnaces, boilers, unit heaters, conversion burners, and room heaters. Honeywell warns that after a period of time the valve may start to leak, allowing LP gas to accumulate which could cause an explosion and fire. If anyone's LP gas heating system was manufactured between 1966 and 1972 and has a Honeywell control valve you should check the model number on the control valve. The letter(s) and fu^ four numbers of the defective model numbers are C8133 V4113 VBIU V7281 V8n3 V8141 VM133 C6134 V4129 V5116 V7283 V8129 V8146 VS8137 VS8138 V4139 V8138 V8189 If the Honeywell control is one of these model numbers call Honeywell toll free at 1-800-328-8194. Honeywell will arrange for the replacement of the defective valve without charge. SUSC offers tour of American southwest CS6133 V4135 V5118 V7284 V8135 V8169 VS8138 CS6134 V4136 V5134 V8136 V8184 VS8140 V4139 V6182 V8137 V8188 VS8193 V4146 V6184 V8138 T6114 Tsns V4186 V5189 V8139 V4188 V8189 A circular tour of the American Southwest designed to combine historical and natural history highlights of the expansive Four Comers region is being offered through the Southern Utah State College Division of Continuing Education. A $50 deposit is required by Jan. 15 to insure space on the nine-day tour that starts March 16 when \MD8 leave Cedar City for Flagstaff, Ariz., with stops at Pipe Springs National Monument^ Lee's Ferry, Sunset Crater and the Lowell Observatory. Ttut trip ends March 24 with the ride from Page, Ariz., to Cedar City by way of Lake Powell and Gloi Canyon Dam. During the days in between, tour participants will visit Rainbow Bridge and tour Lake Powell by boat, and th^ have an opportunity to take the Sandia Mountain tram ride, the longest in the U.S. They'll also visit Aooma, the oldest dty in the United Statea, kk through art museums in Santa Te and stop at the Atamc Bomb Museum in Loa Alamos. Tour participants will travel, through aome of the country's most spectacular geology with stope at the Petrified Forett National Park, Natural Bridges National Monummt and the Gooseneckaof the San Juan. And, tbe/ll sample the historic wealth of the area by way of the SanU Fe Trail and the Dominquai Eacalante and John Wealey Powell expaditiona. The fourstate route will wind throu^ countiy inhabited by the ancient Anaaui and wiD cross Mooument Valley and the lands of todajr'B Navqo and Hopi nations. A stop wiD abo be made at either Veitle National Park or Hovenweep National Monument. The trip costs $395 per person (add $80 for single room occupancy), which includes transportation, lodging and two dinner meals. Physical science credit is available for an additional $20 recording fee. Additional information about the tour can be obtained from Professors Kennedy and Heath at SUSC in care of physical adencea department, Ceidar City, Utah 84720, telephone (801) 686-7900. Quadrantid meteor shower visible Januarys This year, the Quadrantid meteor shower will be at its peak of activity on the night of Jan. 3 and 4. For observers away from dty > lif^ts, aa many aa 60 meteors per hour can be visible after midnight under a clear, dark aky. lUa shower haa been known to produce over 200 meteors per hour. Tlw meteors are raiwl and the bri^ter ones often appear to fragment or expk]de.iMetieorB can appear anywhere in the sky. However, if one traces the path of each meteor backwards, the patha will all cross in the oonstellatioQ of Bootes. The shower gets its name from the now obsolete conctellation of Quadrana Muralia (Hie Mural Quadrant) that occupied a part of the aky that is now the border between Draco, Bootes and Hteules. The best time to observe the shower is between midni^t and dawn. While binoculars might be useful to observe the persistent traila left by brighter meteors, optical aids are generally not uaeful in observing meteors because they restrict your field of view. PUuMtarinm news Currently showing at the Planetarium is the multi-media experience "Death of the Dinosaurs." For many people, dinosaurs exiataa hazy images from textbooks or tacky old horror fllms. "Death of the Dinosaurs" portraya dinosaurs in a vivid and sdentificaUy accurate manner. Beginning with an overview of the development of the dinosaur family, the ahow soon ttmia to the varioua ideaa that have been proposed for the mass extinction of these andent creaturea over 65 million years ago. This program will continue through January 10. Planetarium performances are on Thursday through Saturday at 6:30 and 8 p.m. A matinee performance ia presented at 3:30 on Saturday afternoon. The theater will be cloaed on New Year's Day. General admiasion ia $2. A discount a^pkiaaion of $ 1 is available for children, students, seniors, military and the handicapped with Uie preaentation of appropriate W. Reservations are recommended for groups of ten or more. Call 643-6060, ext. 326 weekdays frO}n 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Reaervations will be held until ten minutea prior to show time. All performances begin on time and there is no late seating. On dear evenings, a telescope will be available for viewing after the 8 p.m. performance. Current targete for the telescope indude Jupiter and Mars. The moon is also viewed when available. The Planetarium is located at Clark County (Community (Allege in North Las Vegaa at 3200 E. Cheyenne Avenue. From 1-15, take Cheyenne Avenue east about one mile to the coUege. The Planetarium is just inside the south entrance to the building. Use the parking lot dosest to (^eyenne Avenue. Unusual art exhibit to be sliown "I do work that's comfortable for black widow spiders to live in," says artist Walter McNamara. Walt and Mick, On the Strip in Las Vegas will feature mixed media work by Walter McNamara and Mick Sheldon at the Allied Arts Gallery from Jan. 12 through Feb. 4. A meet-the-artists reception will be held Monday, Jan. 12 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. McNamara, curator of the Sheppard Fine Arts Gallery at the Univenity of Nevada, Rio, wUl exhibit worka made primarily of wood and bonaa. Hia souroea for imagery range flrom Uluaiona to flf ties rocket ships to art hiatory puns. Ha is noted for tranafonning A "minimum of materiala for a maximum of maaning." McNamara ia alao known for ia impeccable craftamanahip. It haa been said that he could teach an Oregon cabinetmaker about wood. However, according to him, his work is finished before it's started. To him, the scavenged pieces of raw wood suggest the fmiahed wnrk, even before be cuts, carvea and smoothly reveals it to the rest of us. Mick Sheldon was bom and raised in Reno the son of a toy atore owner. He received is B.A. in fme arta from the University of Nevada, Reno and hia M.A. in fme arta from (/alifomia State University, Davis. He is the first Nevada artist in six years to be choaen to r epr ese n t NwnKla in the regkmal juried ahow sponsored by the Western States Art Foundation; hia work ia cur rsotly a part of the Third Waatwn States Biennial Exhibitioo whk^ pnmisrsd at the Brooklyn Muaeum last June. At Allied Arts, Shekion will exhibit mixed madia electric flaaa aasamblagaa that have the k>dc of something "mined rather than built." The figurss within these self-illuminated enameled pine boxes are wired and glued together llita of detritua with amaU jars for heads." The worka are marhaniied, with moving objecta and imagea and flaahing lights. ; What's Your Opinion? ; 117711111777777 777 7 77 7171777777777 717177.11111 Do you agTM with mott AiMrksnt whm it coniM to Amariet'i postal Mrvy Americans feel they deserve it. Tha first public zoo in tha U.S. was tht Philadalphia Zooieglcal Oardcni, Phllsdtlphlt, P*., which opened in 1874. LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE APPUCATION FOR PERMI8BI0NT0CHANOETHE POINT OP DIVERSION ANDPLACBOFUSEOFA PORTION OFTHBPUBUC WATERS OF THE STATE OP NEVADA HERETOFORE APPROPRUTED AppHcatioa No. 80MM NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, tkat m the Sted day of Oetobar, 19M, William O. •ad Kami Zick Ooff of Las Vagaa, Nevada, made appUeatioB to the SUta Eagiiiasr of Narada for panniaaiea to diaage the poiat of divsraioB •iidplMofiiMofO.(M16ei3., a portloa of water karotoforr appropriated nnder Psnnit NaSOMS. Watar wm bedlvsrted frn aa uadargfoaad aoores located witkia the SE^ NWM, Sw;tioa as, T.2S8., R.61E, MJ)JB. A M., dr at a point fron which tha NV4 eorosr of aald Section 33 bears N. 20 S6' 42' E., a distaaca of 2.400.71 feet. Watar wlU be need for irrigatioB aad do m aatic porpoaee fnm January let to Deomibar Slat of each year. Hia esiatlag pofat of divardoa waa from aa andargroand aooree witUa tha NWVi NW Vi Sectioa 2. T.20S., R.61E, MJ)3.4M..aratapaiatfmB -HtOOOIba. batwaaa poiata ud of saidT^aeMwMkiaatwaatyaQiaUe which the NW Sectioa 2, baara N. 860 49'13' W., a diataaoa of 033.43 faet. Sigaed: Pater G. Morroa, P.E. SUto Eaghiaer Data of flrat pnbUcatioii Dec 11.19i6 Data of laat pnbUcatioa Jaa. 8.IM7 B-Dae.ll,18,2S,19i6.Jaa.I, 8.1987 DISTRICT COURT CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA Eleaa Vitaalla Ibarra. PlalaUff, Alberto Ibarra, Dafeadaat. Caae No. D89128 SUMMONS NOnCEI YOU HAVE BEEN SUED. THE COURT MAY DECIDE AGAINST YOU WITHOUT YOUR BEING HEARD UNLESS YOU RESPOND WITHIN aO DAYS. READ THE INFORMATION BELOW. TO THE DEFENDANT: A dvil Ccnplalat haa bean filed by the phrfatiff ivainat yoa for the relief eat forth ia the Complaiat. TUa ia aa action to diaaolvo the beads of aMtrisMay now aad harstofore exiatiag betweea the Plaiatift aad Dafeadaat. 1. If yea iatead to dafsad tkta lawaait, wltUa d^ra after thU Swaacaa ia aarved oB jroa exclnaive of tha day of aarvica, yon most do tha foUowlag. a. FUa with the Clark ot tUa Coort, wboea addraaa IS ahowB bakiw, a fonaal wilttaa raapoaaa to tha Complaiat la •eoordaaca with the rvlea of the Coort. b. Serve a copy of year raapoaaa npoa the attoraay wboea aaoM and addraas ia shewa below. 2. Ualeaa you respond, yoar defaalt will bs eatarad upoa appUeatlaaoftheplaiatiffaad thia Coart auy eater a Jndr meat igaiBat you tar the relief dyiaadad la the Coaplalat. which eoald raealt hi the tdifaig of aMBCjr or propwtjr or other raMaf ra^aaa t ad la tha Coaalalat 1 If jraa hitaad t aaak tha advlaaafaa attoraay la thla • at*, yoa ahoahi do aa praaiptly a that year riipiaai may be filed aa time. liMHd at dbaatlaa of: EDWARD WBINSTCIN, CHARTERED —iMVuaiBsriivsiiBislk Laa Vai. Nevada 19104 Attaraav far PWatiff LORIITA BOWMAN, CLERK OP COURT By: WANDA LOPEZ DEPUTY CLERK Date SEP 1988 (DISTRICT COURT 8BAU Coaaty C aarthaaaa MO Soath Third Straat Laa Vagaa, Nava^ 89158 H4)a(.4,lUi.lt.JM.1.1988 LEGAL NOTICE Tha eoataata of UaH L22, aadsr tha aaasa of Brace Tall, 219VaaWiaMa,Haadsraaak Nevada will be aoM at aactioa to aaUafy reat la'arrears. Whirlpool retrlgaratcr. hoeaeboM ItaaM, aportiag gooda, BJacaUaaeoaa. Sak will be keU oa Jaaaary 15,197 at 9 a.ai. CASH ONLY. We reaarre tha right to Ud. Marker Plaaa Boat 4 Mial Storage 807 Cadis HeadarsoB, Nevada 89016 H-Jaa. 1, 6, 8. 13. 1967. BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OP NEVADA NOTICE OF APPUCATION Aaappttcatiaa,Uaartifladaa Docket No. 86-125S, haa baaa filed with the PahHe Sarvlee ConadaakaiofNevMiarCamndaakM"! by Great BarrierCorp dba AUatato Towfaig for aatharity to aail aad traMfar and of T J Aatoawtive lac dba Oapaadable Towiag Capaay to pnrchaaa aad acqabe cartiflcate CPC A-3296. The eartifleato aathorisaa traaaportatioa la tow car aarvtc* of wrecked or diaablad vehiclsa with tow car vehicle groaafa aa aaladaa weight of laaa thaa LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OP APPUCATION FOR PERMISSION TO APPROPRUTE THE PUBLIC WATERS OF THE STATE OF NEVADA Piled: Dae. 3,1968 Applicatloa No. 80188 Notice la barahy givea that oa the 30th day of Saptembar, 1986. Raby DriUlag Compaay of Glllatta. SUte of Wyoodag. asade appUcatloa to the SUte Eaglaesr of Nevada Ifor parmiaalea to appropriate Ctt of a aacead foot of the pabBc watara of tha StaU of Nevada. Diversfaw U to be Blade from aa aadergnwad aooroa at a poiat located withia tha SWV. NEV4 Sectioa 36, T.17S., R.70E., MJ).B.&M., orata poiat froai which the E>/< coraar ot aald Sacttoa 36. bears 8.52<>16'00'E.,adUtaaceof 1314.0 feet. Water will be naad for aiialag wid'nilllag purpoaea from Jaaaary IsttoDecsmbarSlst ot each year. Date of flrat Pabllcatioa Dae 11, 1986 Date of laat Pablicatioa Jaa. 8,1987 Sigaed: Petar G. Moma, ?X. Stote Eagiseear B-Dee 11,18, 26, 1966, Jaa 1, 8, 1967 BEFORE THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION OF NEVADA NOTICE OF APPUCATION Aaapplieath,ldaBtifladaa Docket No. 86-124S, haa been niad with the PuhUe Service Commiaaioe of Nevada r'Conmiaaioa") by Tha City of Headeraon, Clark Conoty, Nevada for authority to coaatnict a now aigaaliaMi, at grade, railroad eroeaiag, over tha Unkm Padfic lUilroad, at Oreanway Road a^ sUadaate the eiiatiag oaaigBaliied iToaaiag at Major Avaaus approxlBMtely 1200 feat to the Northwaat. Tha propoaed Graeaway Road Croaalnga Buaber will be No. 13.70, the eroeaiag Bombara of the aaa^ eat exiatiag pabUc ooadm are HoriaoB Drive. No. 14.53 and Pacific Avaane No. 12.71. TheappllcaUoaiaoafUlat the of flcse of the CoBiBdaakm, Capitol Complex. Kipksad BuildlBg, 506 East Kiag Street, Carsoa aty, Nevada 89710 aad the Bradley Buildlog, 2801 EM Sahara Avenue, Laa Vegaa, Nevada 89158. latareatad aad affected partiea auy oomaieat hi writing to the CoauBiaaioa aad nie appropriate Proteate aad/or Petitioas for Leave to latervaae at ite Caraoa City offloaa oa or bafors Jaaaary 14,1987. By tha Coauaiadoa, WILLIAM H. VANCE, Commlaaioa Secretary Dated: Caraoa City, Nevada Decamhar 23,1986 (8EAU H-Jaa. 1,1987 radias of Laa Vagaa, Nevada; aad bs t weia psirta aad placaa withia a eae haadred aad aeveatyfhss (175) mile radiaa oa the othsr. TheiVplicadaaiaoaifilaaBd avaUahleforpahUcvtewi^at the of fleas of the Coaaadaaioa. Capitol Complaa. Uakaad Boildiag, SOS Eaat Kiag Street, Caraoa City, Nevada 89710 aad the Bradlay BoiUfaig, 2801 East Sahara Avaane. Laa Vegaa. Nevada 891S8. latsraated aad affected par tise may eoauMat la writiag aad file appropriate Protests aad/or Petitioaa for Leave to laterveae at ite Caraoa City otflcaa oa or before Jaaaary lil987. By the Commlaoka. WILLIAM H. VANCE, Commlaaioa Sacretary Dated: Caraoa City, Nevada December 24.19S6 (SEAU H-Jaa. 1,1967 BIDS WANTED FOR HIGHWAY IMPROVEMENT NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Sealed propaaala will be reeaivad by the Diraetor of tha Departmeat of Traiiapartatloa of tha Stato of Nevada at the Diatrict I Headqaartera, 1200 North Main. Laa Vagaa, NV 89101. antil and opaaed at 140 pja.. hieal time, oa Jaaaary 15, 1967 for Coatraet No. 2176, Project No. 8PF-096-2(5), eoaatmeUoa ot a portkm ot the PriMry Highway Syatea OB US 96 la Laa Vsgaa at tha Joaaa Boalevard laterehaaga, Clark Cooaty, a laagth of 0.038 ailaa. SPECIFIC DESCRIPTION OF WORK COVERED BY THIS CONTRACT CONSISTS OF REPAIRING EXPANSION JOINTS ON AN EXISTING INTERCHANGE STRUCTURE The mlalmam WH* to ba paid oa thU oeatraet ahaU be aa datarmhMd by tha Secaetary of Labor or the State Ubor Commleatoaer aad are aet forth la the coatraet doeaflseate. EmpktymeBt Uate BMy bs obtaiaad from tha local office of tha Nevada Employaaaat Saeority Dapartaaeat at 136 South 8th Stieet, Laa Vagaa, NV 89101. Plaaa aad apacifloatloaa may be azaodaed aad porckaaed at the of flee of the aadsraigoad. Noo4dddiag docnmoa to may alao be eramlaad or par c h a aed at ths DapartBMat of TraaaportadoB District Oftleeaia Sparka aad Laa Vagaa, Nevada. Additkmally, pkaa aad apedflcatkMM may be euuaiaad bat BOt parchaaed at the offkaa of tha Aaaoeiated Gaaaral Coatraetora Of AaMrica, 1135 S.W. Tampla Street, Salt Lake aty, Utah, 84110; aad 600 Rytead Street, Salto 300, Rawi, Nevada, 86602; at the otfles of tha F.W. Dodge Compaay, 1850 Beat Fbadago Road, Saite 107, Laa Vagaa, Nevada. 89101, at the offloa of Daily Padfle Baildar, 348017th Straat, Saa Fraadaca, CaUtaraia, 94110; aad at tha efflaa of the Coaatrocthia Notebook. 3131 Msada Avsaaa, Laa Vagaa, Nevada, 80101. Plaaa, farm af propaaal, wmtratt aad apaaMeaHwm may he aaaawd by prawiaMfled bidders thrMh the office ot the • Bdaraigaed. A fee of Twaaty Dollars (UOM) la raqataad tar the porohaaa af each cepy of with prapaaal farm. Pkaa, staaaaal f< fa faadwiliha BMaasaat beam tha afthe Dapartmaat of Traaapartadaa aad maat ba aesampaalad by % Ud bead, a MTtlflad cheek, a eaahiar'a dtock, ar eaah la tha oasooat el flva pweaat %) of Ud. Bifht ia foaarvod to rajaot aay ar aU Uda. Caattactaia dsahtlaB ta Ud w this wwh, if aet alraady qoaHflad aad tha Suto Law, aUJUMa wUh dw Dt p a rt mi a t af TrawpartadM at Canaa O^, Nevada, aat latar thaa fivo Wdaysprisrta tha data far apaatNial>iIaa. 1, 8, 16, 1967 Legal Notlca "BIG JOHNS" BLET8CH AUTO WRECKING 4 TOW 1631 FOOTHILL DRIVE BOULDER CITY, NEVADA 89000 (702) 2934661 Doc 15,1906 Tha toUowiag vahidaa wiU ba aoM at anetioa oa Jaa. 2,1967, M A.M. at Big John 4 Soaa Inc., 1631 Foothill Drive, Boulder City. Nevada 89005. We raoerve the right to bid. 1977 Chevy VINf: iq67U7L607784 Ucaoae: HSA016 New Mexico Legal Owoar Paul Unaoa, 2331 Calle Luminoeo, Santo Fe, New Mexico 87501. RegiatrndOwaeruMME i^ 1971 DateoB ^ VINI: PL510904942 Uceaae: 289KAA Texaa Legal Owaer JaoMO R Houae, 745 Belvedere, Beeamoat, Texaa 77706 Registered Owaer: SAME 1964 Volvo 28' Box VINI: VB3L06B14EB026272 Uceaae: 3MA911 Arisoaa Legal Owner Brookholkm Natioaal Bank AMT, nil Weet MoeUagbird Lena, Dallaa, Texaa 76247 Regiatered Owner: Vector IBduatriae laoorporated. 3906 E. Roasr, Phoeaix.Ariaoea 88040 Big John 4 Soaa lac. reasrvae the right to hid. H-Dec 23,25,1986, Jan. 1,1967 DISTRICT COURT CLARK COUNTY, NEVADA DINA WELLING, PUiaUff, JERRY D. WELLING. DefeBdaat. Caae No. D90605 Dept. No. XI Docket No. S SUMMONS NOTICE! YOU HAVE BEEN SUED. THE COURT MAY DECIDE AGAINST YOU WITHOUT YOUR BEING HEARD UNLESS YOU RESPOND WITHIN 20 DAYS. READ THE INFORMATION BELOW. TO THE DEFENDANT: A dvU Complaint haa boea filed by the pldntitf agaiaat you for the rsliat aet forth In the Complaiat. Thia is aa action to dissolve ths bonds of matrimoay aow aad hsretofora exiatiag betweea the Plaiatift aad Dafeadaat. 1. If you ioteod to defead thia lawault. withia 20 daya after Uda Snmmoaa ia served oa yon ezdudve ot the day of eetvios, you must do the toUowlag: a. File with ths CIsrh ot thia Coart, wboea addreea b abowa behiw, e formal writtea raapoaaa to tha Compldat la accordaoca with the mlae ot ths Court. b. Serve a copy of your raspoase apoa tha attoraay whoae aame aad addraaa te ahown below. 2. Ualaes you reepond, your default will ba eatered upoa applleaUoa of the plaiatift aad thia Court may eater a Jadr ment agalBat you for the relief damoodad la tha Coaphdat, wUch eoald rcealt la thrtohiag of BMBsy or property or other raUet reqaeoted ia the Complaiat. 3. If yoa iatead to aaek the advice of aa attaray la tUa autter, you ahaald da ao promptly eo that your reepatme auy be filed oa dme. leaaad at dtractioa of: EDWARD WEINSTEIN, CHTD. laOl Laa Vagaa Blvd. Seath Las Vagaa, Nevada 80104 Attoraay far FlUadff LORITTA BOWMAN, CLERK OF COURT By: MICHELB FROMM DEPUTY CLERK Dato NOV 18 lOM (DISTRICT COURT SEAL) Coaaty Coarthooae aOO Booth Third Otraat Laa Voaaa, Nevada 80186 HDac-jlT, It, I5,JM. 1,1068 Thnndoy, Junary 1, 1987 HoBdorooB HwM Nowt aai BovMor aur Nowf ftfi If vaJKmmni&(B^. PRAYER OF APPLICATION 18 ^ Holy SpMt, Hily Splrtt you iio HU ai pitMini ptoMS ol isodi, io I (8h oktoin my jod. Youn^glvinBliisOMiM glhteloigiviondforJMol tvil ofointt 818 ofld In oil liKtanMofniyMi, Youora with fiw. I wont In ihh short wDvtr to rtionk You foroNthngi, ondtocsnfinn ones ogoin Ihot I nsi^ wont to be ssporatMJ from You. Even in spits of oil motsflol illusions, I with to bo with You in ststnd gloty. Thank You for your niMiy towon nn and niim. Ths pinon must soy this praysr for thiM (omscutivs days, latir 3 doys Iho nivor nquostid will bo grontid, svon if it oppioii dlffi(ult. This proyir must bi pubfeshid immidkitily oftir ths proyir is grontod without mifltlon of the favor, only ths initlais shall oppsor at tht bottom RC GOOD NEWS ^. New Auto Detail Shop-right In your area' Quality at fair prices. "WE DO ANYTHING ON WHEELS" Waoh 4 Shine them up. Free Estimates SUNSHINE AUTO DETAIL 1641 E. Sunset Road (Sundance Plaza) Open 7 days a weak 361-0772 ELECTRIC PRINTING CALCULATOR. HERMES 320 Almoat aaw. Sacrifice for S130. 293-OW. BC. WANTED: Usl car or truck. Price raagc $100 to 1600. Fiiar-uppar OK. No Juak! Call 5044059. STORAGE FOR RENT AU aiaca-Feacad Raaidaat Maaager Near Saaiet k Mouatala Vieta 4a8-3W0 j I • • WASHBRmRYBR good coad. 30 day warranty 8125 Ea. 2084447. EC. KitchenettesAdulta only. No pata. Wcatam Inn, 294J>898 or 293-2044 Antique Olympic cook atova, axe. condition. 1^00. CaU aftar 6 p.m 904-7066 f 1404 Wyoming St. Weal^jays, 5pm to 9 p.m Saturday. 8 a m to 9 p m Sunda, 9 a m. to 2 p.m. 294-0084 B.C. Water, Water Everywharo. but none • nitable for cooldna or Drinking. Now ChBr/02000 U the answer. Reyersa OsaM>> • ia haa 3 iystama ia one PorUble unit that saU on the aink or counter, Cost about 10c per gallon. U.S. O^armant apont milUona aaalsHng in tha development of it. (Saa the movia 7!Iaie Bomh in our tap watar.l CaU for app't, ba safe, have your watar tested now.M4-1648. Five yr. warranty. Free, No ObUgation. Ona boy'a 20' bike, lUte new. Gail 565-7302. PRICE WAR:: Half price! Flaahina arrow signs S339: Lichtrd. nonarrow S.329! Unlighted S269: Free letters: See locally. Factorv: 1(8001 423-016.1. anytime. SECOND HAND STORE. Fumiturt, new A uaad A misc. We repair aU makes k moaela of rafriaeratioa. Service caU 120. Guarantee 30 days. Buy ft eeU aU marchaadiae, BUmar'a 27 Army St., Headersoa, Nv W4-7367. NOmf OPEN FOR SALES MOBILE HOMES Hardware & glass for window and doors. Energy Saving Windows BOULDER OUttSWORKS 1304 Nsvodo Highway (Across from McDonalds) 1-702-M4-142S PEARLS RESTRUNG: Your precious family hcirlooma restored at Gold Caatera Jewelry. Mon.-Fri 9-5, Sat. 10^. 23 Army St. Hdn. All ateel buildinga. Brand new. Last chaace for '86 prlcea ft inveatmant Tax credits. 50X75, 50X100, 100X200 and more. Call Clint, 303-759-3200. Sale enda 12/23. NEED CASHIII Would sell our recently acquired Creative Touch sewing machine (Fashion Machine, Singer) 1036. $30a Worth over 1500. Or would sell Chevy pickup w/aice rims (bad motorl S700. Or construction flat bed heavy duty truck— offer. CaU M4-1347. Solid Oak Kneehole desk, 4 drawer, leather insert writing pad. Like new. > $160. Weatbend room humidifier, 22X22X12. Walnut finish. $20. Sears Treadmill, manual, uphill. Odometer & Speedometer, walking or Jogging. Used twice. tl25. Call 451-3341 after 3:30 pm. For sale: Cabinet dlaplsy, doors, executive desk. Etc. Located at 520 W. Sunset Rd. Ste. 16. Open 7 am to 3:30 p.m. 564-3661. DO YOU NEED, Investments, Mutual Funds, GNMAS7 Call PRUDENTIAL BACHE. 2941045. BC Cash for good running work truck. Must be very reaaonable, or can be donated to Betty Honn'a Non-profit animal adoptiona. 1986 Blue Book tax deduction. Needed now for hauling food for anhnals daUy. Complete information, Pb 3612484 or 361-5137 BOAT FOR SALE: 1973, 21' Cuddy Day Cruiser Skv,455.01da.Eny.Jet, 1985 Trailer 16,500. 293-7086. After 4 PM BC. JACUZZI WHIRLPOOL SPAS authorized dealer. Silver State Pool & Spa. 1321 Nevada Highway. 293-4960. BC. SINGER I'ORtABLE SEWING MACHINE $25. 2 Yr. guarantee. Sorenaon'a SOO Hotel Plata. 293-3770. BC. HAPPY NEW YEAR FAVA FAMILY From Your Loving Sailor ORGAN Electric Lowrey, Excellent Cond. 1300. 293-4491. BC. WOMINtMMJI I truDY iNTmMNOMfNATIONAk s.m.l7lAdsmvd. Nwma. If yau ars s aaw-. aaaiar la BaiMdar Cily, aamaalnahsnsi mMnatM>77Ta. MUSIC ft ART GIFT CERTIFICATES avaUable far the New Year. Voiea ft Plaao tat sale: lUcoadltloaad refrigerators, raages. washers, dryers, etc. 90 day warranty. Alsa baylag lata model apBMaBosa,_Bssdlng rspalr. PICTURE FRAMINdQuaUty wark-raaaoaabhpfleaa-Uthographspoatcrs-Buy, Sell, Trade Art. Art ixchaafa 444 Hotel Plasa. (Across From Boulder Dam Hot4BaUBdEd8are.) 2984I7I. BC. 8AVi ALUMINUA^ lTBM8,oaaa. etc. Scrap Copper, Batteries. Motors ete. to raiaa moaey for aawaated aalnala. Tax dednetl* ble. laformation .W-2484. For sale: Steel crate, 10X8X24. Panel Uned, $1,500. 564^106. Custom drspea, gold w/green ft gold valance. $350. Couch ft love aeat, $125. 2 end Ubiee, $30. Organ $350. 565-0875. TRI-CHEM DISCOVERY TOYS Suianne Welnich, 293-0060 Henderaon and BC. 2X4 Conatructlon cut firewood. $46 truckload. 5654)113. ALOE VERA NECTAR BY FOREVER LIVING. 100% StabaUaed with Natural Cranberry aad Apple Coaeaatrata. UAPataatod. No water added. 564-1648. Eleven Ft. WUaon SateUite Diah ft Poet. No Electronics. $600 or beet. Call Jack 293-2959. After 4 P.M. Dally, Ml day Sat, ft Sun. BC. COUCH. CHAIR ft Ottoman, Table for sale. 293-4527. After 8 PM. BC. Two matching green velvet chairs, very good condition. $50 each. Shetland Electric Broom, $20. Like new. Aleo, small Biaaell carpet sweeper. CaU 565-8396. New ft uaed Satellite equipment, ealea ft repaira. 4 yeare exp. Sidekick Satellite, Residence 294-1996. Bueineaa ft recorder 5654S677. BC. GOVERNMENT JOBS $16.0406M,2a0/yr.Now Hiring. CaU 1-805487 •6000lDxt. R-5695 for currant federal Uat, WAITERS ft WAITRESSES: Vale Hotel now aoeapting appUcationa. Expariance neceeBC. Nevadk Highway. R-E-U-M-B-fi Composed Edited Typed Oulck and RaaaOaable Bee'e Bueineaa Svc. la "the VlUage" I 527 Hotel Plaaa Ave CJ Boulder City. NV 890M| 2l:U61 NEED people to train ft place in computer r ration. No feel 2001 Flamingo, Ste 111 from 8 am to 3 pm. NATIONAL FIRM SEEKS ENERGETIC SALESPERSON FOR MARKETING IN HEALTH SPA FIELD. CALL 1-8006217213 Operator 13. Part time teller wanted. Average 14 to 16 hre wkly. 18.50 hr. Apply "bounty Union. 202 W. Pacific, Clar'k County Cr s and aak for Jeanne. BS/P[jOyM AUIaon's Place, Ladiee Apparel, management poaitlon available. At leaet 1 yr retail experience neceeeary. Apply at 888 S. Boulder Hwy or caU for Interview, 565-7370. THE NEVADA ARMY NATIONAL GUARD IS CURRENTLY LOOKING FOR TRUCK DRIVERS. IF YOU ARE BETWEEN THE AGES OF 17 AND 34. WE WILL TRAIN AND PAY YOU WHILE YOU LEARN. FOR INFORMATION ABOUT OUR TRAINING AND JOINING THE NEVADA ARMY NATIONAL GUARD CALL CHUCK, AT 885O303. Wanted. Houeekeeping, Non smoker. Apply Neyada Inn. 1009 Ne Highway. BC. BARTENDERS Vale Hotel aow accepting appUcations, experience necessary. Apply in per eon. 704 Nev. Hi BC. TYPIST: $500 weeklv at homcl Information? Send etamped self addressed envelope to Stephens Asaoc., 1270 S 8th Place. Dept B, Laa Vegas. Nev 89104. HELP WANTED Smai afternoon Boulder City Motor route. Must have dependalbe vehicle. Call after 6, 564-1546. HELP WANTED large am, motor route In BC. Must have dependable vehicle. Good pay. Call after 6. 564-1548. COCKTAIL WAITRESSES Vale Hotel now accepting BppUoationa experience necessary. Apply In peraon. 704 _Nev. Highway. BC. HEALTH CARE PERSONELL. Experienced R.N.s, L.P.N.e, Home Health Aides, Live-in Companions, Homemakers, needeil. CaU MEDIVI8IT 87M031. Mon-Fri. 94 EOE. I y ev. ( HAIRDRESSER WANTEP WITH CLIENTELE Halritaga •tylind Parior 311 WATIII8T. AMMV In pirMl NURSES AIDES experieacedesifadbutwiU train faU or part time. Boulder City Care Ceater. 2US16I. EOE/MF/HV. BC COMMERCIAL AGENTS Jeniin's Rialty has openings for two Salts Agents, to work In tlie Commerical Division. Applicants,must havi 4 years experience or hold 0 61(1 Designation. Contact Ken Proctor at 564-3333. 1-^ FC BOOKKEEPER THRU FS Public Accounting, Experience Preferred But Not Mandatory, Non-Smoker Year-round Position, Startina Feb. 1. Send Resume and Salary Req. to: RW Boi 69 B.C. S9005 ABTHllITIBf IkavehadHfarMysara, Now I have aow. HaM TrsataMitCaat,Caatla SMUaoaaaaradtadoelor'afoas/isMDiMten • as it la tkeir practiee witk aaaallsat rssaha. Gaafutaa Itallaf at ^^ hattsrlasie CaU U Harwood's appUaaaaa. itt K. Lake Maad!W4.|tl0. AiiiVbULn^iSSr WITH A DIWOUNG Ifaawh^aUtryAlAaoaf Msadofa ara Taas., 10 WMsBsiisl&aHCTasa. SJOpikGablLWad., 8>ai.ltlLssadsUM HAk FRAYSR or APPLICATION i tki Ha(r SpMk. Hcljr SfWl jrm k • • hmllnifcl—i.pniMnllrMfc M I • • • aattb mt tmL Van lw firt IM Ite DIlM |tft I* (•tfl** n4 tofM ifl ITII tgil m M4 la tU iHlMwn •( ajr Nik VM m vttk M. I ul la lUi tteft rv t Uaak Yaa to iH Iklasa. m* I* •aanrai MM aaata tlM I an *ul u h u pa f t n ^ IrMa Yaa. EvM la iflu •( all aulwlal ilia• kH. I vlak U ka ahk Yaa la alar aal f larr. Tkaa VteJSt jraw aw ey laa4 • • aa4 aiaa. lia ranaa • aal tajr Mm praftr (or Ihraa ca •anihra itft, a/tar ) 4ayi Ua f av naaaalad will te gnmui, avaa U U awaan Mincalt Tkia ptarrf • aal te |nUlaka4 kaaMStoialr ahaa Ite IMIW la snaM arllkaal • aaUaa at ite faaaa. aM Ite l HWi m-i a Ite hatiaiB. AlltLINES NOW HliT INQ Flight Attendaate. Agente, Maebaaiee, Customer Servles. Salaries to MOK. Batry Uvsl positioBs: Csll 1-eOS687-0000 Ext. A-tm. OlenHsUaNorsinfHome. OeMTtfRN, part time weekaade. LPN part tlmeStoll.Nureealde part time, 11 to 7. Jaaltor needed, part time. Two poaltkme avaUable, Ufht ft heavy work. CaU 864-6719, ask Tor Wendy. UAiitbiiiMUi4lMANICURIITNBEDID. people latarsstad la advaaesmaat. Worh aith NKEDBDiHOUSEidlllt*J R-CHILD CAKE ERSON. Mature Adult W/referaaoea. 5 dsjrs. 2H0766 Aftar 6 ^ PM. BC. RN, part time and on call. Nurse aide, oa call-all ehlfU. Voluataars to help w/actlvttiee for reeideau. Glen HalU Nurslaj Home. 8664741 Loving Care fer yoar ohiwraa la my hosM. Very experleaeed. RaferaMsa. CaU Cheri 56M600, ON SABATICAL. WIU housa^t far vaa aU sr portloa of Jsa. thru Juae. ExeeU. la f sre a ess. Contact ASAP-Caral Hammoad, 876 CUff Dr. La|ttBa Beach, (3a. HOUSE CLEANING. RaUable k thorough. For the Hdn, BC Green VaUeyaraaa. CaU 866-8061 for reaaoaable k depaodable services. Private room k care for elderly In family home. Reasonable rates. 864-2417. YOU^O MOTHER offers plaatyofTLC.7daysa wk—reaaoaable rates. Naacy, 664-7278. MATURE, depeadable, hoaeot lady wUl eleaa your bouse. IT. aa hour. Raferaaeea. 86U781 Home Laundry ft | Honaaolaaaliig Sanrlec —LowMt Jtatee— call 564.3927 -TWFer ynr diild, my lienw. Hovi SlwifPt coni, hwllh cord t nfMMKH. PlNtt caH mm RELtABLk BABYilT TER FOR faU part time ehlldrea. Drop-Ins weleoma. Ileferenaoa. 6 yrs. Exp. Aaytliae a9M674"Wy. BC. • 'T^ii\.yj'ii: LOST: White male foodie. About 10-yrs-old. 866-1278. m LOST Mole PdtliwM. tM w/Usdi IKS. turn ti "tiHk" MInlni rises Frf^qr VMnlty ifdiimlitr. iffMM,pliM ii 564-6719 HHWiit Lorreine'i Pet Sitting Service, Loving car§ while you 'm away. I 'II can for your peta in thair fan)lllar home aurroundings whila you vacation or work. Bonded. Call Lorraine McLean. 293-3431. 000 OROOMW0 emM OaH Now 9er AppolntnMMil IdiMir ki\m$[ Hoi^Hil 293-3744 OaMM Hurttay iipwanjao Otaonw coexn irmiu BIMK and Buff e \N9eka old Just right for ChriitmM can 4tMtOI IT MT-mt Attar > p.m. BABYSITTING IN MY HOME dsvs Mim thru Fri. ages 0 to 8 yeare. Referaneee 293-2749. BC. ^ Sunset-Green Valley nnry, quality chUd eare in happy home. Nete Mack Area. 24 hre.-7 days. Reaepaable drop la rateaidiMeOO. I wiU clean your house to your paraoaal eatiefectioW. Please call SftfOlOO. Babyaittlag—my home near Fay UaUoway. CaU 864-8087. MAID ESPECIALLY FORYOU.Houeeeleaaing. Reaaonable. Depea_dable,CaU296-1917.TBC. BAfiYlfrYiSoT my hone. 14 hrs. Aay age, hot maala, feaesd yard and play area. g64ae. WILL DO IRONING 293-3388. BC. ARE YOU LOOKING FOR WORK TO BE DONE? Well, I'm look, tag for work to do. I do Juat alioat aaythiag in or arouad the home aad yard. I cut down trees, trim hatflee, work on flowera, ae well ae Interior-exterior painthai. I oven do wioMwel Call after 6 PM 294-1378, 293-1716 Aek for Peter. WE ARE JUST TW() BIO PUPPIES that aeed a lot of love. 8 noath old EaaUah poiatar male and 7 month old hueky ehepherd mix feimale. Both puppiee aeed reepoaeible homee. CaU 2U-9224 BC. Aolmal Control. Por rent: Steal corrale w/autoraatie waterers k shade oovera. Ltohted areBa,i78aio.a6W10e. Betty koan'a Aalmal Aaoptloa aeeapta aawaated pata by appointmeat OWLY. 361-2484 FREE-ADOPTASAVE A PET (CATS k DOGS). 293-8673. ^ Free KitUae: Call 866-1206. 4-YR-OLD. buff colored female cocker epanlei needs loving Dome 293-9224. 9Mo.-old black lab.'spayed female aeeoa a home wllUai to train A disdplbie thie pedfgree lab. 398-9224. Deaperataly nate anwantad freeser meat, dog 4 eat food, hay, etraw, ate. Tas dadaeUble. Nl-2464 Blcaeet little Afrieaa BataH to tha daaart. Lioaa, Tlgara. baata, wolveo, aMmkoya, ate. MAY t HELP YOt; Olf YOUR DOO OR CAT SPAYED OR NIUTIRED rOR A GRACIOUS DISCOUNT? 3614673. BC. Aayttee. SeooadhaMlpetafaradapttoa, daUy. Doas, sato. Utteas, pappAs, ate. Betty Ifoaa's AalMi AdoptioB. 86I-2464. Deer Hunters elaailM your deep ftaaaa—donate aU uawaatadaiaat, fish, ete to Betty Hoaa's Aataal Adaptioa. 86M464, Taa DeducUble. RED FEMALE DACH8UND 3 Yrs. old, Asking 880. 2 Feaials 8iameeeUttsaa,10-wk8old 838 ea. CaU Paula 293-2666. BC. FEMALE CALICO CAf needs a loving hams. TUa 3-yr.-old oat has slat of personaUty. 298-9224. $$CASH PAID$$ hr HI Call 388.9909 1040 S. Moin il Im yegti, Nev. • • • GARAGE SALki Sat iaa 3,6to8im.lslse,lfas stove, VW portable TV, mlae goads. 69 Lowery, 8664418. rv4<, ABB, eappari paiat dlspeossr, palat shaksr, cooler sappUaa, aleetriesl fittlMS, iwlswmBmiaBhlBi^slsa traaie eaaf NORCaaTf iaaiaa HowToDoSomitliIng About Drunk Driving Bvtry 20 minutei on Bverifi another l|f ii tragically loit itaeeuM of • drunk driver. Drunk drivlni coiU ui SOO.OOO icoldenU • year, and 35,000 ncedlcu deatht. It adda hundredi of mlUiom of dolkin to the Insuranct premiuma wt all pay. • omethinf muat b done. New approaohei arc attacklni tha problem at lU aouree: tha attitudea ot potential offandara and of aoclaty at lar|a. Drlnklnf bcfora driving mutt beeome a iocial ttlgma, inatead of a aoclally acceptable form of homicide. There are aifna that thia ebanfe in attitude la beginninf to take ahape. Aad there are wayi that sU af ue-fovemmenta, community groupa, eoneemed Indivlduaia-ean help the ehange happen faaler. PouaAMalawUulW^ HSMd A mSr Hwy! Plaaae eaU 461-6606. Laett Small dark gray short batted pappy. Abaat 10' taU. NsSas "Grsyslraks." ^fbar CkUd's Ptt-Rawwif itob. SSm IMS KAWAMKI KK'IMM •1,4Mr \ n Seivalfaa Arm/ 1 aeede flaatten. 1 loMealer /IhrnflbeMidlhn.Aek*v| |fMpafesli^4dNreaM. jr Mm Ml Md eaa| ]ast m 8176. BC. laeeUaatlaeaMforhaaM aaaembly Work. Por lafa call 804446-1700. Dept PB64. A report from the Inauranca Information Inatitute. Drunk Driuinf: A KilUr Wt CM atop, eaplslni whet each of u can do in the llfcor-dHth kettle agalnat drunk dHvlng. For a (Ne eopjr, write: tnauranee Information Inatltute, 110 WlUla Street, lot q.Nsw York, NY lOOH. The praperty sad assusity lasurenee Indastry ia helpbig. As • fliet itap. It be* SMHflibled the (kets we aaed to know shodt wfclsli preventive masAirae work, and wbleh one* dan't. • ^\

PAGE 28

wwm Page t Henderson Home Newt nnd Boulder City Newt Thursday, January 1, 1987 Thursday. January 1, 1987 I ?: § I I I -mtiJIllilittr Would like to bay a home w/little or no down. Would consider making up back paymts. Confldential. 294-1238. MOBILE HOME FOR SALE IN BOULDER CITY PARK carpet, $10,500. BC TRAILER 10X50 ne very nice Call 293^1008. si EXECUTIVE CUSTOM HOME W THIS 2 STOflV 4 BEDROOM PARADISE FEATURES: • Family ^ room ^hnfoA burning flraptace • Gourmet Kitchen w/oak floors ^ and taWnett • Sparkling pool, spa, cabanna r—^—--^ S -l-Bar-B^. •Surrounded by over an acre of hiah ^ landscaping. Just one block to golf course pro ^ shop. Yours for $175,000. ^ CALL MANNY s 293-5757 or 294-0870 ^ COLDWEUL BANKER -ANCNOR REALTY 4 ^^ < ^ < / ^ ^4^2B ^%^^^ < ^ < J 4 4ft Own Vour Own Home— This lovely patio home has three bedrooms, 1 75 bath, nicely landscaped. 1 car garage, covered by buyers prolec tions plan" Low down, assume a $521 00. PITI mort gage paymenli Call Ellie or Fred tor the particulars 564 156 or 564-6969 160 B. H4B.NV (70S)S4969 GEl Everything You Always Wanted— plus more' A super custom home 4 bedroom, 2 5 baths 2 fireplaces, extra large • room for oHice or hobbies, solar healed pool and spa, on an hall acre in Section 19 Call lor an appointment with Mac or Lucy ^_. n 160 E. HeriaM W. Hda. NV (70a>S64^6 Great Vlm Of The Lights— From the balcony of Itiis lovely 3 bedroom 2V? bath, custom home located on 'V ao^ot Formal dining roorrf large country kitchen has a breaklasi bar and custom cab/) bth, cool, satellite, furn. Hdn area. 565-7451. Excellent location overlooking valley, 3,400 sq. ft. custom family home. Many features. Horse property, 1 acre for large corrals. Etc. 639 Orleans. Hdn. 564-3526. THREE BDRM 2 bath, desert landscaping. R\ parking. $84,9i90. 2934630. BC. OK you Wheeler Dealers See this nice home with very lair price ol $53 500 & bring oiler 2 Cliolc* Lots on access road across Irom Saleway Shopping' Zoned Duplexi Comm'l Lot in heavy trattic area Owner is easy to deal with 4 Ready' Available now m great loca lion' Only $39 000 lor 6OXt00 lully block lenced & cozy dbl wide mobile coach 2>/2 yr Old home. 2 bdrms, IVi bth w/2 car garage, auto opener. Ceiling fans in both bdrms. Upgrade window coverings & carpet. $68,000. Call 564-6510 or 5641955. Leave message if no answer. HOME FOR SALE: 3 bdrm, 1,700 sq. ft. Fireplace, spa mature landpc^aping. Many upgrades. 1409 Esther Dr. Call 293-5496 eves for appt. B,C [ 4PLEX 2 BEDROOMS 2 BATHS EACH ] Three Years New Great Investment For Sate by Owner (213)-828-3775) After 6 p.m. FOR SALE, RENT OR LEASE WITH OPTION TO BUY by owner. Condo, 2 bdrm, 1*4 ba. Adult community. $49,950. Call 293-2367. BC. 2.S A. Sec. 4. Owner must selli Bnng an oHer Price reduced We Invtta All to visil our New Conmiercial OMalon located at 219 "B • Water St 219 Water Henderaoo 664^333 Who sells more homes? TheCENTURY 21* system sells more homes, finds mure homes and delivers more successful transactions every day than anyone else in the wrorld. So whether you're looking to buy or sell, call our office today. Put Number I 10 %M>rii for ycM.* OntuD^ AM REALTY LTD. WHMn ftovada (7U) SW-11M Ouiet8>aicoaH-mwi '-^. Mlaaion Hllto Speclal-You will love this custom three bedroom, 2 lull bath home with a 2 car garage on a large corner lot Home has Iqipial dining room, lamily room and sunken living room with fireplace All lor only $99,900 Please ask lof Sharon Kozar 5656620 K 160 E. HorisM Dr. IMm. NV (702)564^969 Bank Repoa & consignmenta. Let us find you a home today. Call One Way Mobile Home _Salea 5wi060. ^^ 24X60 Mobile Hmne! Lovely 3 bdrm, 2 bth, large screened in porch, nice awnings. 10 mi South of Las Vegas in small park. Children bussed to Henderson. Call 361-6089 for appt. Reasonably priced NEED TO SELL YOUR HOUSE? WE WILL BUY IT NOW! 293-1613 G.A. "Curly" Smith, lac % BUM Par A Family Excitingly dsdgnad living room commands admiration and respect lor this tfiarp ranch Myte. 3 bedroom. 2 balh home. Happy living starts beta kx you and your lamily All this oomtort to under $65,000 Let us tal you more today Call now SK 1106 Put Number 1 towork for your Giiluiy^ MAMALTVLTO. •M t. BeuMsr Hy Han^naM. NWMM MOlf HMn Nma* (7) m-IlM jmiMiP1niiHnrni HANDS TIED FOR LACK Of CASH? INSTANT CASH 1st., 2nk. 736-1871. MOBILE HM. FOR SALE. Moore's Adult Pk. 8X32 W/storage shed. Perfect for 1. $5,500. Space rent $110. per Mo. 293-4851. BC. Plica Rsducad on Boulder Hvy Property formerly 84 Lumber Comm'l Depi Many Commsrlcal Locations on Lake Mead Boulder Hwy Nellis Blvd Please call our New Commercial Division for all your Commercial, Industrial and large Investment parcels BY OWNER 4 bedroom, 1% bath, 2 car garage, fenced backyard Garden plot and fruit trees. Assumable FHA loan, $84,000 11 Eba Way. B.C. 293-3062 EKCsptlonal— Upgraded properly with large RV parking area, security bars and gates, sunporch and 2 pafios. J bedrooms. 2 bath located in Highland Hills, automatic sprinklers and beautilul lawn ornaments Call Fred or Ellie, 564 1568 or 564-69691 160 E. H4B.NV (70atf44^99 SI Dr. DESERT SHADOWS DOLL HOUSE 2 bdrm, 1 bath, block wall. Auto garage door. Front sprinklers. $57,800. Call Donna RANCHO VISTA REALTY, Realtor 798-5700. Must seU: By owner, 4 plex, Pittman. Approx. $100 negative. $134,000. Ph 702-895-1965. FREE MARKET ANALYSIS OF your property. Also Property management available. Call Anita, Realtor, Hyde and Associates. 2932144. New custom home between Hdn & BC View of the city. Vi acre, 3 bdrm, 2 bth. Walk-in pantry, fireplace, 2 car garage, energy efficient. Zoned for horses. $89,900. Owner 648-1351 or 564-5576. 4 plex for trade. Would like to trade Hdn 4 plex for Condo. Approx. $25,000 equity. Positive cash flow. 87^6435 eves. WANT TO KNOW what your property ia worth? Free market analysis. CaU ROGER 293-^, Realtor, Coldwell Banker/An'hor Re alty. NEW QUALITY BUILT HOMES for sale in Henderson. OwnerBuilder FHA approved. Selling below appraisal of $58,000. State money available. 3 bdrm, 2 bth. garage, & covered patio. Range, diahwasher & disposal also included. Go out Bldr Hwy to Major. Turn Left on Major to Forest, turn right on Forest to BeU. CaU K& M Contracting Inc. at 871-4888 until 8 p.m. Lie. No. 0018298. Near Qolf Course t ever so nicei 3 bdrm —2 bath— fireplace on '/? A lot. Great Buy! Private Spa! Enpy the summer all winter—large 2 story home—V2 A Lot Lots ol Sq R Take Over FHA Loan w/little down—3 bdrm—2 bth—large patio Highland Hills '$67,900 Owner Anxious! and Lender Rapos Buy tomorrows security lor your family today' Investors vnelcome New "Free" list and information lor all areas Vacant and we have the keys. Some fixers, others ready to move into Down payments as little as (500 Don t delay Call 565-1166 Put Number 1 towork for you.* Ontui^ MA MUU.TY LTD. BMt. H#fiosrMn, Ngvidi M018 fne)iw-iiM AMMMe9HM6)-1MOI8M ^OME FOR TRADE: By owner in Santa Clara, Utah, for one in BC Custom Bit., Spanish, 2,500 sq. ft. 3 BDRM., 2 Ba., Lovely V* Acre lot, quiet area. Smaller Hm. wanted. 801-6280777. Or Box 223, S.C, Ut. 84765. LAKEVIEW TOWNHOUSE 2 bdrm. Best View! $74,950 OWC $5,000/DN. S650 Anxious. 294-1471. BC. Looking For A Good Buy? Don't Bid Bllndlll I Have The Kaya And A Computsrlzad Uatl Low, Low Downs, Easy Terms. Call QARQIS REALTY'S Rapo Expert toflay. WENDY DAVIS 564-6969 Home 565-6987 fTJ Beapor 364-6449 |A 160 E. Horiaoa Dr. Hdb. NV (702)564-6969 A WISH FOR ALL OF OUR FRIENDS, BOTH PRESENT AND FUTURE: MAY 1987 BRING YOU GOOD HEALTH. GOOD LUCK, AND MUCH HAPPINESS AU THE YEAR LONG! ,^ HAPPY NEW YEAR!! (U^ CUSTOM 2 story, 4 bdrm, 3ba.,2,500sq.ft,Viacre lot. Priced below appraisal. 293-3582. BC For sale:'/acre. Sect 27 on Quarterhorse. Ellsberg Realty, Call Char 565296. Sharpe Townalta Shows owners pride Large lot for RV parking, three bed room. 1 bath with covered patio and sloreage shed mature landscaping all on automatic sprinklers for easy care Assumable loan $49,500 Please ask lor Sharon Kozar 565^20 1601. H4LNV (703)5644969 Or. A_ REALTY, LTD^ 565-1166 or 5654181 Office Home VALUE PACKED UNDER $60,000 BE SURE TO "ASK FOK HECKY" 932 GREENVILLE DON'T JUDGE THIS BOOK BY ITS fOVER. 3 bdr, l'/4 bath, nice garage conversion for added living area. Iar({e lot, nice neighborhood, MOTIVATED SELLER WILL CONSIDER ALL OFFERS! 131 CONSTITUTION 3bdr,30X14addedfamily room with fireplace, 3 car carport, storage area, formal dining with built in hutch, LISTED BELOW APPRAISALl 126 MAPLE. JUST LISTED, AND PRICE ALREADY REDUCED! Comfortable 3 bdr., IV: bath, fireplace, RV parking, covered carport with storage area, landscaped, large kitchen all appliances included! EASY BUYING TERMS!! 102 DOGWOOD 3 bdr., 2 bath, 132X85 comer lot, garage/workshop, mature landscaping, $1.00 DOWN VA BUYER WELCOMED! A good real estate investment! 226 VALLEY FORGE 3 bdr, 1 • /: bath, large lot, covered parking with storage area, fireplace, breakfast bar, SELLER MOTIVATED! Assume, Low Interest with Low Down Payment. Area of increasing value! 136 ASH REDUCED TO RIDICULOUS! SELLER NETS $0.00 3 bdr, with work shop, fenced back yard, covered front porch, LEASE WITH OPTION TO BUY to Take over Existing no qualifying loan with minimum down payment. 245 KIRK large 2 bdr., garagef added swamp cooler, excellent location minutes from the lake, new linoleum in kitchen and bath, nice back yard, TRANSFERRED SELLER MUST SELL Affordable monthly payment with LOW LOW DOWN PAYMENT, no qualifying! 529INNESS. .. 3-year-old U.S. built home, 2 bdr, great floor plan with fireplace, 2-car garage. Covered patio, storage area, pantry, balanced power, IN EXCELLENT CONDITION SELLER NEGOTIABLE! 332 VAN WAGENEN 1 bdr studio, great for those quick trips to Vegas, excellent rental potential. Designated parking area, no maintenance yard, CONDO LOVERS PRICE! 909 MAJOR... 3 bdrm, 1 '4 bth, enlarged living rm, garage, Passive Solar System, country kitchen w/dining area. WRITE YOUR OWN TERMS. Perfect for the Growing Family. CALL BECKY PANTUSO ••565-8181* Who s Selling Henderson? We Areill HIGHLAND HILLS 118 Glen Oak 4 bdr., nice neighborhood 72,000 103 Glen Oak Large patio, great view 74.500 710 Greenway 1,883 aquare feet, price reduced 79,890 743 Willow Completely fenced, nice 3 bdr. 81,500 702 Greanway Mr*. Clean lives here, immaculate 84,900 618 Fembrook 2 story, beauty with spa 87,000 420 Golden Valley Pool, 4 bdr., all terms available 95,000 364 Summerland Beautiful pool, 4 bedroom 95,000 MODERATE PRICE 9437 S. Las Vegas Blvd. Paradise Spa, priced to sell $34,000 55 Magnesium Room to grow 42,999 248 Meyers 2 bdr., garage, easy terms 52.500 121 Conatitutlon Clean, large living room with fireplace 53,500 506 Sailers 55,000 464 Federal Tract 2, 3 bdr. 52,500 54 Lowary 2 bdr., 2 bath, 16X24 guest house 58,500 2Uth 3 bdr., with pool 59,000 409 Foreat 3 bdr., block fence, price reduced 59,000 217 Valley Forge Painted, fixed up, easy move-in 59,900 246 Fullerton Super nice 4 bedroom 64,500 532 Barrett Good price, 4 bedroom 65,000 138 Ivy Cute and nice, lovely pool 65,900 305 W. Basic Assume low down, easy payments 67,000 261 Princess Ann Ct. Near echoola and shopping 69,000 271 WInona Beautiful 3 bdr., 3 bath 69,900 2249 Marlboro 2241'Marlboro 578 Chelaea 736 Greenway ~^ 300 E. Deiamar 160 Kimberiy 1211 SanU Vnez 632 Robin Lane 526 Fairway GREEN VALLEY Single family 3 bdr, 2 bath, motivated 2 slory, price reduced-ia^e site 2 story, beauty park Ilka yard CUSTOM Best buy, 2,200 aquare feet of living space Large family room—comer lot Oak cabineta Ranch home with view Beautiful inaide, pool Perfect for entertaining 85,000 102,000 110,000 79,500 105,000 108,000 113,000 129,000 179,000 274 Nava|o Section No. 27 Section No. 4 Section No. 32 Section No. 16 Section No. 19 Water Street Lake Mead 2 bdr., MOBILE HOME with addition 39,000 LAND % acre, utilities, view 15.000-15,500 1 acre comer tot 20,000 5 acre. Investors apaclai 37,000 5 acre, look to the future 70,000 V^ acres, 2.5 acres A larger parcels Cell for prices COMMERCIAL Comer site, large tot 62,500 INDUSTRIAL 2acrea 65,000 CALL TODAY FOR MORE INFORMATION INTERESTED IN A OOVERNMSNT OWNED HOMETTT CallS64>2516 THK PROPEBTY PEOPLE AT SEALTY 800BNIHEBSON REALTY TODAYIII REALinf^ HENDERSON 18 Wtr St 564-2515 SASS^ % I ?: REALESTATI EiceUent Income for part 'lime home asaembly work. For info, call 312-741-8400 Ext, lan X. HenderioB HooM Newt vU iMildor City Nt Paf* <| PROPDrrv MANAOEMKNT AVALULf TMCO OP TRYINOTOCOUeCTVOOR RENTS AND MAINTAIN YOUR RENTAL PROPorrrr OAROIS REALTY HA8 raOPERTY MANAOEMENT PEOPtETOTAKETMEA<. 0RAVATI0NFOIYOU,AND MAKE YOUR MVESTMENTA JOY INSTEAD OF A HEADACHE. MONTHLY ACCOUNTING OF COLLECTIONS AND DISBURSEMENTS. CALL MAC OR LUCY FOR MIKNHUTION. M 160 E. Horiao* Dr. HAi. NV (7fl2)S66.6969 2 bdrm apt, S275. $200 depoait. No pets. No kids. Mature adults. Ph' 565-0746. For sale or rent: 2 bdrm house, new roof & cooler. Large shed. 60X401ot. Fenced back yd. Prefer older or retired couple. Call 565W70. Henderson Pondo, studio sice, fni^ihefl, fedced yd. Very^tlean, f275 plu8deposit:<564-1509or 452-4884. 2 bdrm, IVi bth, waaher/ dryer. 521 Seller Place. $450 mo. 451-8220. AvaiUble 12/31/86. LOW DOWN!!! 2 & 3 bedroom homes, fenced yoid & best of all you get it for $50,600. OntuiK Call Jeanette Duncan for details 458-8715 or 565-1166 Property management by professionals. Specially trained CENTURY 21* Property Management Professionals can take the worries out of managing your investment property. Give us a call today. Put Number I to wofk far yoM.* AA NULTV LTD. SMS. wiMtNMstfi fret) sssiiies FOR RENT: Kitchenettee. $40 wk. UUlitiea pd. Shadv Reat Motel 565-7^8 Hdn. A Customized Home At Price You Can Affordi— You ve always warned a protesSKyialy decorated home'' This one IS wailing lor you—4 bedrooms. 175 baths, decorated beautilully All appliances including washer, dryer and water conditioner Located m Highland HillS. ol course' Call Mac or Lucy to see this beauty 160 E. Hd.NV (708)564.6969 Dr. ^^HBHBHpMiaHi APT FOR HINT 2 bedroom Ail Ektm with sKurity systtm $340 month Plin dtpoiits S64-1031 M5-3e77 4 BDRM. Lewis Hm. Avail. 2/1 pet okay, dep. required 293-3761. Eves Only. Tedd^'a Kitchenettee, Just bnng your toothbruah. PRIVATE ROOM $160 a mo. 293-1716. For sale by owner, 3 bdrm, 2 bth, pool & spa. Block walls, landscaped yard. Assumable loan, located in Highland Hills. $81,000.564-2186. 4 bdrm home for sale. Basic High Area. Call 454\m. • MOBILE HOME FOR SALE. Center of City in adult park. Call 293-3555. BC. VIEW LOTS Custom home lots overlooking the future Las Vegas Lakes. $16,000 to $20,000. Low down, easy terms. Call Craig, Land" CO. Nevada 736-8886. • Would like to buy a home w/little or no down. np back pjmta. ConfidenUal. 294-1238. BC. OfFICE/RETAIL SPACE For loose. Approx. 84i sq. ft. to. Fint Western Plan, 1000 Nevodfl Hiwy, B.C. $480-$550 mo. For sale: 8X45 Trailer House. Call 565-9712. WEEKLY KITCHENETTES: S66-7929. TOURISTS & LOCALS: Studio rooms ia lovely private Inn. Walldng distance to alL No cooking. Daily $25. Weekly $100 Monthly ratea available. Deposit required. 564 -6888. FOR RENT. \-2A bdrm traUm.$60to$105wk 56&<784 or 565-714L FOR RENT BC Indua. Pk., New commerdal/mfg. space. Call John 293-4661. BC y Bob Olsen Realty M h & Insurance Inc. f^ >>is_ M m ReMltor—MLS 6 Water St.. Htadmnoa 664-1831 m. MISH A GEM IN THE DESERT-Beantiful view of the Valley on Black Mountain, this custom home has everything with Vi acre lot, 3 Br. 2Vi bath, dream kitchen. Freshly redecorated inside and out. Only $119,500. Good terms. TRAILER LOT WITH CADILLAC OF MOBILE HOMES, very nice and nice price. CaU today. Trailer haa 3 Br. 2 baths, aluminum solar screens etc. Many extraa. SMALL CASH BUYS THIS ONE; low, low down or small eaah and pay on t&ne. Tract 12 Home. RV Parking, auiMrt, awnings. CaU for detaUa. ONLY $35,000. SeUing f ^ appraised price. SmaU cottage right downtown vacant. Good for retired, or young ambitions couple. 3 Br. Home, will discount for caah sale-Needa TLC. 2 BR 1 BATH TOWNHOUSE-Neat and pretty. This homelf weU kept. INDUSTRIAL LAND-and HIGHWAY FRONTAGE. FIXER UPPER-3 Br. $35,000. ExeeUent TemaHoOM Only -Law DowB. PRIDE OF OWNERSHIP Origiaal ownera—beaatifnUy aaaintained, 3 Br., Many extraa. Only $68,000. • Allots SnVMS TM MMOnON AHA IM M TlAlf FOUR BDRM Lewis Home. Avail 2/1. Pet OK. Dep required 2 9S-3761 evee oa fy. BC. 2 bdrm, 1 bth honae in Henderson. Ungraded, very comfortable. Fully fenced yd. Close to shopping & schools. $425 mo. plus $100 security. 5644)666 eves. ADULT APARTMENTS At Low As $340 mo. FumtofMd 564-6952 NENtAtl Ne Service f%t To Tefwntal Homas available in Henderson, Qreen Vellay & Boulder City 1 teSreema from t22S I Beerooew nvni S3aS S Setffoome from S400 4 Betfroonw tfon S475 Call or nop by today 565-1166 Put Number 1 towork for you.* Houae for rent: Major & Bldr. Hwy. 3 bdrm, 1, bth, fireplace, pool. S600' mo. $250 cleaning deposit, $250 Security. You j)ay util. Ph 2BSBM., 1 BAmAPTS. Only $285 nflPw/lew depoaits. Sect. 8 welcome. CaU 664-3477 or 646-5600 FURNISHED one bedroom mother-in-law quarters. 294-0763. BC. 2 bdrm, dining rm, fireplace, sprinkler system. $475. mo. $300 depoait. Avail Dec. 15. Ph 461-6262. CAtSTILIAN ARTS. Very Nice 2 Bedrooms $410 Monthly 294-1220 831 Ave. A Boulder City FOR RENT: Sm. unfnrniahed 2 Bdrm. Honae. $460. Mo. 293^968 or 293-2336. BC. KirCHENETTES Weekly rates etarting from SBO, maid aenriee weekW.iitapld,iaalnBC Cheyroa, 801 Nev. Hwy.. 29S.16S1. BC 0-F-FI-C-E S-P-A-C-E Available $160 & up... (UtUitias ineloded) Uptown Boulder City in "the ViUaga" 626 Hotel Plasa (Avenue C) 2934U61 $265 mo. 1 bedrm apt, clean, new & quiet. Ideal for fixed inoonie seniors, or fixed income. Sunset Circle apts. 565-1686 For rent: 3 bdrm, Tropicana Square condo. Avail NOT. 1. Ph 565-6763, or Beeper 381-3813. OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT aporax. 860 sq. ft. 300 Mo. $160 aec. Fumltlid Unfumlthd Apirinmnts 2 Bedroom 2 Pods-Washing Machine Hookup NO PETS Cablo Avollablo Children Welcome We Welcome Section Eight APARTMENTS AVAILABLE 1, 2, 3 bed r oo m ooito For iiifoniiati< ploue call M at 293-1615 or 294^77 Our Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.in. M-S. ICA^biAUeUAHni MUmiAPTg ProfOMkMMHy managod l>y WESTMINSTER 00. A Wayaihauaaar Co. APARTIilNTt SSS-90S1 205 Randy Way Hondoraonjllav. cleaning CaU CONDO FOR RENT •Adults, •All appllaiieos fumlshod 293-7778 BC HENDBRSON PLAZA APTS. 730 CMitcr St. Hendvraon, Nvada, 565-7512 2 tKinn., unfurnltlMd, pool & play yard. Ntar schools A shopping. Fi'aa Cabia TV. from $305 month depo. $100 deponotrefnndabie. 299^034. BC. FREE MARKET ANALYSIS OF your property. Abo PropertY management available. Call Anita, Realtor, Hyde and Associates. 2932144 DESERT INN MOTEL nice clean rooma, starting at $76 wk. Maid service, color TV. Alao Utchenettea avail. 293-2827. 800 Nevada Highway. BC. N m GARREH-GREATER NEVADA PROPERnES, INC. 554 Nevada Highway 293-3333 THE FULL SERVICE REALTY MLS 623 CALIFORNIA ST.-Tri-Plex, good income property. $89,000. 821 UTAH, 2 Bdnn.-l Ba./Acro88 from 7-Eleven & Park. $63,000. 1413 GLORIA LN Lewis Home, 4 bdrm, 2 ba., 2 car garage. Price now $84,500. SEARCHLIGHT COMMERCIAL PROPERTY-Water on proper-i ty, lOQX 160, priced at $33,500.' *Will consider trade. A Boat—RV-or Land? Bring Offer. SERVING BOULDER CITY RESIOENTIAL-WKO i COMMERCIAL-PROP. MANAGEMENT SINCE m? APPRAISALS-NOTARYI ONLY $82,5001 One bedroom furnished DUPLEX at 525 & 527 Ave L. Lots of parking & POOL. Many amenities plus great tenantsi** ADULT LIVING IN PARK SF^ f). Ready for move in. Ask about the "Express Loan" availablel P30V.Veator property. 1303 Darlene #104B. $60,000 LA DOLCE VITA Tr^ • jO\S> 4eeds Quick Salel DUPLEX at 636 & 638 Avenue M has been reduced to $64,500.** LOW DOWN PMT-Low monthly pmU. 4 bdrm, 2 ba. home. Just reduced. Great home for large family. 512 Fifth St. $79,500. NEAR GOLF COURSE, $119,000! Owner will help flnance. Fantastic landacaping. 982 El Camiiio** LOW MAINTENANCE YARD & home at 666 Mt Bona in Lake Mountain. Generoua parking** POOL & TENNIS COURT at Lake Terrace. Panoramaic Lake View. Split level townhome. $126,500** READY FOR MOVE IN at 627 Mt. View of Lakel $139,600** Hunter. All-adult living at ita flneat. CUSTOM BUILT & awaiting your choice of carpet, appliances, etc. 4 bdrm, 4 flreplaces, 3 balconies and FANTASTIC LAKE VIEWII! 937 Woodacre** ***Piek np free broclinra.at property BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME: Almost ^ of an acre in Oaremont Heighta where yon will have a UNPARRELLED PANO^kAMIC VIEW OF THE LAKE 4 VALLEY. Abaolutely a "one of a kind" offered at $170,000. WE HAVE SEVERAL CUSTOM HOME LOTS availabltrfs: j>urcha8e in Lake Terrace, Lalw Mead View, B-Hlll, Henderaon and Laa Vegas. HENDERSON $26,000 PRICE REDUCTION. Miaaion Hilla home ith 4 car garage, fenced 1 acre let, endoeed patio wHh q>a, horse corrals and much morel Now only $99,000; over 1500 aq ft • 3 bdraall Tarl Cowan, Br^ar Darwin BiUe. aalaa/real aatate aoctioBecr Mary Board. Reaideatial Specialist EUea Strambcrg, Manager 404 NeTMia Hwy, Boldar aty, NV 89006 CALL 24 HOURS 293-HOMEM8-46I3 .293-1499 .389-6319 239-7254 .293-1968 B^ For rent: Immediate poeaession, 2 bdrm, 1 bth house. Area of E. Tropicana& Nellis. $450 per mo. plua depoait. CaU Al at Jensen's Realty, 564-3333 or 564-2722^ Unf. Apta. Henderson, Central heat/air, 1 bdrm, $200 mo. 2 bdrm, $260 mo. No pete. 564-3204. For rent: 2 bdrm, fenced yd, central air & heat, $406 mo. Deposit $300. Avail Jan 1. Ph 451-6262. Apt. for rent. 2 bdrm, 471 Jefferaon. Ph 564-7934. COMMERCIAURESIDENTIAL For Rent/Lease Drive by 900 Buchonan and see this unique property with commerciol and residential oil on one site!! ENVIRONS REAin INC. 404 Nevada Hwy. 293-4663 /(rUIITIC CITY APMtTMENTS Quality apartmanta in Handarson w/drapaa, carpata, appllancaa, cantral haat & AC. Waahar/dryar avallatila. $270per month. Furnished studio Apartmenl w/all utilities paid. 5M-70M $100 Diaconnt, 2 bdrm, 1 WANTED 3 or 4 BDRM. bth apt. Starting at HM. TO RENT OR $315 mo. Studioa LEASE. $600460.730available, $226 mo. 6674. Aak for Dale or 564-2361. Barbara. OntunC, Boulder 416 NEVADA HIGHWAY. BOULDER CITY, NEVADA (702) 293-3232 1966 Century 21 HM} EsUte Corporation aa tmatee for the NAF.* aod"*trademariu of Centory 21 Real Ertate Corporation. Equal Hoodag Opportaaity.a EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED pSij^ BOULDER CITY HOMES MILLION DOLLAR VIEW OF LAKE MEAD from 10 ROOMS in this beautiful one of a kind unique hi^oric home. Thia home was built for the visiting dignataries during the building of Hoover Dam—very well preserved and UPGRADED with ail copper plumbing, central air and heat, 800 amp and most probably more electric service, all walls 8 inches thick, lota of original wood doors, hardwood inlaid floor—A HOUSE COLLECTQRS DREAM-$495,000. Shown by appointment only. VIEW OF LAKE MEAD-POOI ^v'^JZZI-overlookiiig Lake Mead and the Mountains. Spanisl^Q^^iumpstone, 3 bdrm, 2 full baths, roman tub, large open rooi^VERY CUSTOM home for $164,500. MARINA HIGHLANDS, 3 bdrm, 2 baths, SLUMPSTONE contraction, custom drapes, ceramic tiled counters in idtchen, Jenn air stove, builtin microwave, tub AND sunken tub in M/bath, EXCELLENT condition only $145,000. EXTRA LARGE FAMILY HOME-5 plua bedrooms, in cnl de sac, with $12,000 down yon can take over FHA loan. MAKE AN OFFER. $115,000. THREE BEDROOM l>/> baths, garage haa FRONT and BACK door, OVERSIZED, Private back yard, Ben Franklin stove in family room, alley access, only $84,500. PERFECT STARTER HOME, 3 bdrm, I'A bath, walking distance to EVERYTHING, central heat and air, ASSUMABLE FHA loan all for $76,500. COMPLETELY UPGRADED Laketree Con'do-CUSTOM OAK Kitchen, ceramic tiled floors, 2 bedroom-, V/t baths, 2 car garage, COVERED Patio, EVERYTHING at your fingertipa in community pool, rec hall, RV storage. Inaide & OUTSIDE water are even included in aaaociation fee (only $60 month.) ASSUMABLE loan with no qualifying, ONLY $86,900. TWO bedroom, IV4 bath LAKETREE condo, immaculate iaaide aad out, Existing FHA loan ia ASSUMABLE, thia one'a an END niiit, $81,900. LA DOLCE VITA condo, split entrance, 2 bdrm, IV1 bath, INDOOR utility room, flreplace, quick sale and occupancy available with exiating ASSUMABLE loan, $67,000. UNOBSTRUCTED VIEW OF LAKE MEAD, aU adult Lake Mountain Estates, top of the line SILVERCREST "CHALET" model, fireplace, outdoor heated spa overlooking the Lake, 24'X24' garage, 270 sq ft covered patio, plua 64' covered carport, compare with new model-this ia priced at ONLY $134,900. MAINTENANCE FREE YARD-Lake Mountain Eatatea, 2 bdrm, V/t bath,carport, VIEW of LAKE, cathedral ceOing-buUtin breakfast nook, ready for immediate occupancy, ONLY $97,600. MOBILE HOME I >^#>-BOULDER CITY We have TWO mobile hoar^QVA&able. Valley View Eatatea lotia priced at $36,000 if aale ia c(P,^eted before JANUARY 1987, for only $35,000. The lot in COTOUMIO Eatatee ia VACANT aiad ready far yea to move your own Unit in, lot ia large enough for DUe wkle aad liated at $40,000—make an offer. PRICED RIGHT IN HENDERSON, 3 bdrm, IH bath, large 2 car garage. Comer lot, back yard is endoaed with Blodi Walla, wrought iron gatea lead to oversixed RV parking, covered patio. Fireplace, aee thia one at $82,760. WE GET RESULTS! PUT NO. 1 TO WOMR PON VOM aa* aNke mm^mtrntu mmm apaMM JANICICRAWF0ftO,OirMr SIMITB p€lCI> l#vNAnrAT| BVHMfa*ea e*eaa*aae*eeaa*aeea*aee* MINIMI IK DA VIS* •••**eaj>eeee*aafr ••••••••••••••• DUNNE VANA8SB. 7 'i

PAGE 29

wwm Page t Henderson Home Newt nnd Boulder City Newt Thursday, January 1, 1987 Thursday. January 1, 1987 I ?: § I I I -mtiJIllilittr Would like to bay a home w/little or no down. Would consider making up back paymts. Confldential. 294-1238. MOBILE HOME FOR SALE IN BOULDER CITY PARK carpet, $10,500. BC TRAILER 10X50 ne very nice Call 293^1008. si EXECUTIVE CUSTOM HOME W THIS 2 STOflV 4 BEDROOM PARADISE FEATURES: • Family ^ room ^hnfoA burning flraptace • Gourmet Kitchen w/oak floors ^ and taWnett • Sparkling pool, spa, cabanna r—^—--^ S -l-Bar-B^. •Surrounded by over an acre of hiah ^ landscaping. Just one block to golf course pro ^ shop. Yours for $175,000. ^ CALL MANNY s 293-5757 or 294-0870 ^ COLDWEUL BANKER -ANCNOR REALTY 4 ^^ < ^ < / ^ ^4^2B ^%^^^ < ^ < J 4 4ft Own Vour Own Home— This lovely patio home has three bedrooms, 1 75 bath, nicely landscaped. 1 car garage, covered by buyers prolec tions plan" Low down, assume a $521 00. PITI mort gage paymenli Call Ellie or Fred tor the particulars 564 156 or 564-6969 160 B. H4B.NV (70S)S4969 GEl Everything You Always Wanted— plus more' A super custom home 4 bedroom, 2 5 baths 2 fireplaces, extra large • room for oHice or hobbies, solar healed pool and spa, on an hall acre in Section 19 Call lor an appointment with Mac or Lucy ^_. n 160 E. HeriaM W. Hda. NV (70a>S64^6 Great Vlm Of The Lights— From the balcony of Itiis lovely 3 bedroom 2V? bath, custom home located on 'V ao^ot Formal dining roorrf large country kitchen has a breaklasi bar and custom cab/) bth, cool, satellite, furn. Hdn area. 565-7451. Excellent location overlooking valley, 3,400 sq. ft. custom family home. Many features. Horse property, 1 acre for large corrals. Etc. 639 Orleans. Hdn. 564-3526. THREE BDRM 2 bath, desert landscaping. R\ parking. $84,9i90. 2934630. BC. OK you Wheeler Dealers See this nice home with very lair price ol $53 500 & bring oiler 2 Cliolc* Lots on access road across Irom Saleway Shopping' Zoned Duplexi Comm'l Lot in heavy trattic area Owner is easy to deal with 4 Ready' Available now m great loca lion' Only $39 000 lor 6OXt00 lully block lenced & cozy dbl wide mobile coach 2>/2 yr Old home. 2 bdrms, IVi bth w/2 car garage, auto opener. Ceiling fans in both bdrms. Upgrade window coverings & carpet. $68,000. Call 564-6510 or 5641955. Leave message if no answer. HOME FOR SALE: 3 bdrm, 1,700 sq. ft. Fireplace, spa mature landpc^aping. Many upgrades. 1409 Esther Dr. Call 293-5496 eves for appt. B,C [ 4PLEX 2 BEDROOMS 2 BATHS EACH ] Three Years New Great Investment For Sate by Owner (213)-828-3775) After 6 p.m. FOR SALE, RENT OR LEASE WITH OPTION TO BUY by owner. Condo, 2 bdrm, 1*4 ba. Adult community. $49,950. Call 293-2367. BC. 2.S A. Sec. 4. Owner must selli Bnng an oHer Price reduced We Invtta All to visil our New Conmiercial OMalon located at 219 "B • Water St 219 Water Henderaoo 664^333 Who sells more homes? TheCENTURY 21* system sells more homes, finds mure homes and delivers more successful transactions every day than anyone else in the wrorld. So whether you're looking to buy or sell, call our office today. Put Number I 10 %M>rii for ycM.* OntuD^ AM REALTY LTD. WHMn ftovada (7U) SW-11M Ouiet8>aicoaH-mwi '-^. Mlaaion Hllto Speclal-You will love this custom three bedroom, 2 lull bath home with a 2 car garage on a large corner lot Home has Iqipial dining room, lamily room and sunken living room with fireplace All lor only $99,900 Please ask lof Sharon Kozar 5656620 K 160 E. HorisM Dr. IMm. NV (702)564^969 Bank Repoa & consignmenta. Let us find you a home today. Call One Way Mobile Home _Salea 5wi060. ^^ 24X60 Mobile Hmne! Lovely 3 bdrm, 2 bth, large screened in porch, nice awnings. 10 mi South of Las Vegas in small park. Children bussed to Henderson. Call 361-6089 for appt. Reasonably priced NEED TO SELL YOUR HOUSE? WE WILL BUY IT NOW! 293-1613 G.A. "Curly" Smith, lac % BUM Par A Family Excitingly dsdgnad living room commands admiration and respect lor this tfiarp ranch Myte. 3 bedroom. 2 balh home. Happy living starts beta kx you and your lamily All this oomtort to under $65,000 Let us tal you more today Call now SK 1106 Put Number 1 towork for your Giiluiy^ MAMALTVLTO. •M t. BeuMsr Hy Han^naM. NWMM MOlf HMn Nma* (7) m-IlM jmiMiP1niiHnrni HANDS TIED FOR LACK Of CASH? INSTANT CASH 1st., 2nk. 736-1871. MOBILE HM. FOR SALE. Moore's Adult Pk. 8X32 W/storage shed. Perfect for 1. $5,500. Space rent $110. per Mo. 293-4851. BC. Plica Rsducad on Boulder Hvy Property formerly 84 Lumber Comm'l Depi Many Commsrlcal Locations on Lake Mead Boulder Hwy Nellis Blvd Please call our New Commercial Division for all your Commercial, Industrial and large Investment parcels BY OWNER 4 bedroom, 1% bath, 2 car garage, fenced backyard Garden plot and fruit trees. Assumable FHA loan, $84,000 11 Eba Way. B.C. 293-3062 EKCsptlonal— Upgraded properly with large RV parking area, security bars and gates, sunporch and 2 pafios. J bedrooms. 2 bath located in Highland Hills, automatic sprinklers and beautilul lawn ornaments Call Fred or Ellie, 564 1568 or 564-69691 160 E. H4B.NV (70atf44^99 SI Dr. DESERT SHADOWS DOLL HOUSE 2 bdrm, 1 bath, block wall. Auto garage door. Front sprinklers. $57,800. Call Donna RANCHO VISTA REALTY, Realtor 798-5700. Must seU: By owner, 4 plex, Pittman. Approx. $100 negative. $134,000. Ph 702-895-1965. FREE MARKET ANALYSIS OF your property. Also Property management available. Call Anita, Realtor, Hyde and Associates. 2932144. New custom home between Hdn & BC View of the city. Vi acre, 3 bdrm, 2 bth. Walk-in pantry, fireplace, 2 car garage, energy efficient. Zoned for horses. $89,900. Owner 648-1351 or 564-5576. 4 plex for trade. Would like to trade Hdn 4 plex for Condo. Approx. $25,000 equity. Positive cash flow. 87^6435 eves. WANT TO KNOW what your property ia worth? Free market analysis. CaU ROGER 293-^, Realtor, Coldwell Banker/An'hor Re alty. NEW QUALITY BUILT HOMES for sale in Henderson. OwnerBuilder FHA approved. Selling below appraisal of $58,000. State money available. 3 bdrm, 2 bth. garage, & covered patio. Range, diahwasher & disposal also included. Go out Bldr Hwy to Major. Turn Left on Major to Forest, turn right on Forest to BeU. CaU K& M Contracting Inc. at 871-4888 until 8 p.m. Lie. No. 0018298. Near Qolf Course t ever so nicei 3 bdrm —2 bath— fireplace on '/? A lot. Great Buy! Private Spa! Enpy the summer all winter—large 2 story home—V2 A Lot Lots ol Sq R Take Over FHA Loan w/little down—3 bdrm—2 bth—large patio Highland Hills '$67,900 Owner Anxious! and Lender Rapos Buy tomorrows security lor your family today' Investors vnelcome New "Free" list and information lor all areas Vacant and we have the keys. Some fixers, others ready to move into Down payments as little as (500 Don t delay Call 565-1166 Put Number 1 towork for you.* Ontui^ MA MUU.TY LTD. BMt. H#fiosrMn, Ngvidi M018 fne)iw-iiM AMMMe9HM6)-1MOI8M ^OME FOR TRADE: By owner in Santa Clara, Utah, for one in BC Custom Bit., Spanish, 2,500 sq. ft. 3 BDRM., 2 Ba., Lovely V* Acre lot, quiet area. Smaller Hm. wanted. 801-6280777. Or Box 223, S.C, Ut. 84765. LAKEVIEW TOWNHOUSE 2 bdrm. Best View! $74,950 OWC $5,000/DN. S650 Anxious. 294-1471. BC. Looking For A Good Buy? Don't Bid Bllndlll I Have The Kaya And A Computsrlzad Uatl Low, Low Downs, Easy Terms. Call QARQIS REALTY'S Rapo Expert toflay. WENDY DAVIS 564-6969 Home 565-6987 fTJ Beapor 364-6449 |A 160 E. Horiaoa Dr. Hdb. NV (702)564-6969 A WISH FOR ALL OF OUR FRIENDS, BOTH PRESENT AND FUTURE: MAY 1987 BRING YOU GOOD HEALTH. GOOD LUCK, AND MUCH HAPPINESS AU THE YEAR LONG! ,^ HAPPY NEW YEAR!! (U^ CUSTOM 2 story, 4 bdrm, 3ba.,2,500sq.ft,Viacre lot. Priced below appraisal. 293-3582. BC For sale:'/acre. Sect 27 on Quarterhorse. Ellsberg Realty, Call Char 565296. Sharpe Townalta Shows owners pride Large lot for RV parking, three bed room. 1 bath with covered patio and sloreage shed mature landscaping all on automatic sprinklers for easy care Assumable loan $49,500 Please ask lor Sharon Kozar 565^20 1601. H4LNV (703)5644969 Or. A_ REALTY, LTD^ 565-1166 or 5654181 Office Home VALUE PACKED UNDER $60,000 BE SURE TO "ASK FOK HECKY" 932 GREENVILLE DON'T JUDGE THIS BOOK BY ITS fOVER. 3 bdr, l'/4 bath, nice garage conversion for added living area. Iar({e lot, nice neighborhood, MOTIVATED SELLER WILL CONSIDER ALL OFFERS! 131 CONSTITUTION 3bdr,30X14addedfamily room with fireplace, 3 car carport, storage area, formal dining with built in hutch, LISTED BELOW APPRAISALl 126 MAPLE. JUST LISTED, AND PRICE ALREADY REDUCED! Comfortable 3 bdr., IV: bath, fireplace, RV parking, covered carport with storage area, landscaped, large kitchen all appliances included! EASY BUYING TERMS!! 102 DOGWOOD 3 bdr., 2 bath, 132X85 comer lot, garage/workshop, mature landscaping, $1.00 DOWN VA BUYER WELCOMED! A good real estate investment! 226 VALLEY FORGE 3 bdr, 1 • /: bath, large lot, covered parking with storage area, fireplace, breakfast bar, SELLER MOTIVATED! Assume, Low Interest with Low Down Payment. Area of increasing value! 136 ASH REDUCED TO RIDICULOUS! SELLER NETS $0.00 3 bdr, with work shop, fenced back yard, covered front porch, LEASE WITH OPTION TO BUY to Take over Existing no qualifying loan with minimum down payment. 245 KIRK large 2 bdr., garagef added swamp cooler, excellent location minutes from the lake, new linoleum in kitchen and bath, nice back yard, TRANSFERRED SELLER MUST SELL Affordable monthly payment with LOW LOW DOWN PAYMENT, no qualifying! 529INNESS. .. 3-year-old U.S. built home, 2 bdr, great floor plan with fireplace, 2-car garage. Covered patio, storage area, pantry, balanced power, IN EXCELLENT CONDITION SELLER NEGOTIABLE! 332 VAN WAGENEN 1 bdr studio, great for those quick trips to Vegas, excellent rental potential. Designated parking area, no maintenance yard, CONDO LOVERS PRICE! 909 MAJOR... 3 bdrm, 1 '4 bth, enlarged living rm, garage, Passive Solar System, country kitchen w/dining area. WRITE YOUR OWN TERMS. Perfect for the Growing Family. CALL BECKY PANTUSO ••565-8181* Who s Selling Henderson? We Areill HIGHLAND HILLS 118 Glen Oak 4 bdr., nice neighborhood 72,000 103 Glen Oak Large patio, great view 74.500 710 Greenway 1,883 aquare feet, price reduced 79,890 743 Willow Completely fenced, nice 3 bdr. 81,500 702 Greanway Mr*. Clean lives here, immaculate 84,900 618 Fembrook 2 story, beauty with spa 87,000 420 Golden Valley Pool, 4 bdr., all terms available 95,000 364 Summerland Beautiful pool, 4 bedroom 95,000 MODERATE PRICE 9437 S. Las Vegas Blvd. Paradise Spa, priced to sell $34,000 55 Magnesium Room to grow 42,999 248 Meyers 2 bdr., garage, easy terms 52.500 121 Conatitutlon Clean, large living room with fireplace 53,500 506 Sailers 55,000 464 Federal Tract 2, 3 bdr. 52,500 54 Lowary 2 bdr., 2 bath, 16X24 guest house 58,500 2Uth 3 bdr., with pool 59,000 409 Foreat 3 bdr., block fence, price reduced 59,000 217 Valley Forge Painted, fixed up, easy move-in 59,900 246 Fullerton Super nice 4 bedroom 64,500 532 Barrett Good price, 4 bedroom 65,000 138 Ivy Cute and nice, lovely pool 65,900 305 W. Basic Assume low down, easy payments 67,000 261 Princess Ann Ct. Near echoola and shopping 69,000 271 WInona Beautiful 3 bdr., 3 bath 69,900 2249 Marlboro 2241'Marlboro 578 Chelaea 736 Greenway ~^ 300 E. Deiamar 160 Kimberiy 1211 SanU Vnez 632 Robin Lane 526 Fairway GREEN VALLEY Single family 3 bdr, 2 bath, motivated 2 slory, price reduced-ia^e site 2 story, beauty park Ilka yard CUSTOM Best buy, 2,200 aquare feet of living space Large family room—comer lot Oak cabineta Ranch home with view Beautiful inaide, pool Perfect for entertaining 85,000 102,000 110,000 79,500 105,000 108,000 113,000 129,000 179,000 274 Nava|o Section No. 27 Section No. 4 Section No. 32 Section No. 16 Section No. 19 Water Street Lake Mead 2 bdr., MOBILE HOME with addition 39,000 LAND % acre, utilities, view 15.000-15,500 1 acre comer tot 20,000 5 acre. Investors apaclai 37,000 5 acre, look to the future 70,000 V^ acres, 2.5 acres A larger parcels Cell for prices COMMERCIAL Comer site, large tot 62,500 INDUSTRIAL 2acrea 65,000 CALL TODAY FOR MORE INFORMATION INTERESTED IN A OOVERNMSNT OWNED HOMETTT CallS64>2516 THK PROPEBTY PEOPLE AT SEALTY 800BNIHEBSON REALTY TODAYIII REALinf^ HENDERSON 18 Wtr St 564-2515 SASS^ % I ?: REALESTATI EiceUent Income for part 'lime home asaembly work. For info, call 312-741-8400 Ext, lan X. HenderioB HooM Newt vU iMildor City Nt Paf* <| PROPDrrv MANAOEMKNT AVALULf TMCO OP TRYINOTOCOUeCTVOOR RENTS AND MAINTAIN YOUR RENTAL PROPorrrr OAROIS REALTY HA8 raOPERTY MANAOEMENT PEOPtETOTAKETMEA<. 0RAVATI0NFOIYOU,AND MAKE YOUR MVESTMENTA JOY INSTEAD OF A HEADACHE. MONTHLY ACCOUNTING OF COLLECTIONS AND DISBURSEMENTS. CALL MAC OR LUCY FOR MIKNHUTION. M 160 E. Horiao* Dr. HAi. NV (7fl2)S66.6969 2 bdrm apt, S275. $200 depoait. No pets. No kids. Mature adults. Ph' 565-0746. For sale or rent: 2 bdrm house, new roof & cooler. Large shed. 60X401ot. Fenced back yd. Prefer older or retired couple. Call 565W70. Henderson Pondo, studio sice, fni^ihefl, fedced yd. Very^tlean, f275 plu8deposit:<564-1509or 452-4884. 2 bdrm, IVi bth, waaher/ dryer. 521 Seller Place. $450 mo. 451-8220. AvaiUble 12/31/86. LOW DOWN!!! 2 & 3 bedroom homes, fenced yoid & best of all you get it for $50,600. OntuiK Call Jeanette Duncan for details 458-8715 or 565-1166 Property management by professionals. Specially trained CENTURY 21* Property Management Professionals can take the worries out of managing your investment property. Give us a call today. Put Number I to wofk far yoM.* AA NULTV LTD. SMS. wiMtNMstfi fret) sssiiies FOR RENT: Kitchenettee. $40 wk. UUlitiea pd. Shadv Reat Motel 565-7^8 Hdn. A Customized Home At Price You Can Affordi— You ve always warned a protesSKyialy decorated home'' This one IS wailing lor you—4 bedrooms. 175 baths, decorated beautilully All appliances including washer, dryer and water conditioner Located m Highland HillS. ol course' Call Mac or Lucy to see this beauty 160 E. Hd.NV (708)564.6969 Dr. ^^HBHBHpMiaHi APT FOR HINT 2 bedroom Ail Ektm with sKurity systtm $340 month Plin dtpoiits S64-1031 M5-3e77 4 BDRM. Lewis Hm. Avail. 2/1 pet okay, dep. required 293-3761. Eves Only. Tedd^'a Kitchenettee, Just bnng your toothbruah. PRIVATE ROOM $160 a mo. 293-1716. For sale by owner, 3 bdrm, 2 bth, pool & spa. Block walls, landscaped yard. Assumable loan, located in Highland Hills. $81,000.564-2186. 4 bdrm home for sale. Basic High Area. Call 454\m. • MOBILE HOME FOR SALE. Center of City in adult park. Call 293-3555. BC. VIEW LOTS Custom home lots overlooking the future Las Vegas Lakes. $16,000 to $20,000. Low down, easy terms. Call Craig, Land" CO. Nevada 736-8886. • Would like to buy a home w/little or no down. np back pjmta. ConfidenUal. 294-1238. BC. OfFICE/RETAIL SPACE For loose. Approx. 84i sq. ft. to. Fint Western Plan, 1000 Nevodfl Hiwy, B.C. $480-$550 mo. For sale: 8X45 Trailer House. Call 565-9712. WEEKLY KITCHENETTES: S66-7929. TOURISTS & LOCALS: Studio rooms ia lovely private Inn. Walldng distance to alL No cooking. Daily $25. Weekly $100 Monthly ratea available. Deposit required. 564 -6888. FOR RENT. \-2A bdrm traUm.$60to$105wk 56&<784 or 565-714L FOR RENT BC Indua. Pk., New commerdal/mfg. space. Call John 293-4661. BC y Bob Olsen Realty M h & Insurance Inc. f^ >>is_ M m ReMltor—MLS 6 Water St.. Htadmnoa 664-1831 m. MISH A GEM IN THE DESERT-Beantiful view of the Valley on Black Mountain, this custom home has everything with Vi acre lot, 3 Br. 2Vi bath, dream kitchen. Freshly redecorated inside and out. Only $119,500. Good terms. TRAILER LOT WITH CADILLAC OF MOBILE HOMES, very nice and nice price. CaU today. Trailer haa 3 Br. 2 baths, aluminum solar screens etc. Many extraa. SMALL CASH BUYS THIS ONE; low, low down or small eaah and pay on t&ne. Tract 12 Home. RV Parking, auiMrt, awnings. CaU for detaUa. ONLY $35,000. SeUing f ^ appraised price. SmaU cottage right downtown vacant. Good for retired, or young ambitions couple. 3 Br. Home, will discount for caah sale-Needa TLC. 2 BR 1 BATH TOWNHOUSE-Neat and pretty. This homelf weU kept. INDUSTRIAL LAND-and HIGHWAY FRONTAGE. FIXER UPPER-3 Br. $35,000. ExeeUent TemaHoOM Only -Law DowB. PRIDE OF OWNERSHIP Origiaal ownera—beaatifnUy aaaintained, 3 Br., Many extraa. Only $68,000. • Allots SnVMS TM MMOnON AHA IM M TlAlf FOUR BDRM Lewis Home. Avail 2/1. Pet OK. Dep required 2 9S-3761 evee oa fy. BC. 2 bdrm, 1 bth honae in Henderson. Ungraded, very comfortable. Fully fenced yd. Close to shopping & schools. $425 mo. plus $100 security. 5644)666 eves. ADULT APARTMENTS At Low As $340 mo. FumtofMd 564-6952 NENtAtl Ne Service f%t To Tefwntal Homas available in Henderson, Qreen Vellay & Boulder City 1 teSreema from t22S I Beerooew nvni S3aS S Setffoome from S400 4 Betfroonw tfon S475 Call or nop by today 565-1166 Put Number 1 towork for you.* Houae for rent: Major & Bldr. Hwy. 3 bdrm, 1, bth, fireplace, pool. S600' mo. $250 cleaning deposit, $250 Security. You j)ay util. Ph 2BSBM., 1 BAmAPTS. Only $285 nflPw/lew depoaits. Sect. 8 welcome. CaU 664-3477 or 646-5600 FURNISHED one bedroom mother-in-law quarters. 294-0763. BC. 2 bdrm, dining rm, fireplace, sprinkler system. $475. mo. $300 depoait. Avail Dec. 15. Ph 461-6262. CAtSTILIAN ARTS. Very Nice 2 Bedrooms $410 Monthly 294-1220 831 Ave. A Boulder City FOR RENT: Sm. unfnrniahed 2 Bdrm. Honae. $460. Mo. 293^968 or 293-2336. BC. KirCHENETTES Weekly rates etarting from SBO, maid aenriee weekW.iitapld,iaalnBC Cheyroa, 801 Nev. Hwy.. 29S.16S1. BC 0-F-FI-C-E S-P-A-C-E Available $160 & up... (UtUitias ineloded) Uptown Boulder City in "the ViUaga" 626 Hotel Plasa (Avenue C) 2934U61 $265 mo. 1 bedrm apt, clean, new & quiet. Ideal for fixed inoonie seniors, or fixed income. Sunset Circle apts. 565-1686 For rent: 3 bdrm, Tropicana Square condo. Avail NOT. 1. Ph 565-6763, or Beeper 381-3813. OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT aporax. 860 sq. ft. 300 Mo. $160 aec. Fumltlid Unfumlthd Apirinmnts 2 Bedroom 2 Pods-Washing Machine Hookup NO PETS Cablo Avollablo Children Welcome We Welcome Section Eight APARTMENTS AVAILABLE 1, 2, 3 bed r oo m ooito For iiifoniiati< ploue call M at 293-1615 or 294^77 Our Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.in. M-S. ICA^biAUeUAHni MUmiAPTg ProfOMkMMHy managod l>y WESTMINSTER 00. A Wayaihauaaar Co. APARTIilNTt SSS-90S1 205 Randy Way Hondoraonjllav. cleaning CaU CONDO FOR RENT •Adults, •All appllaiieos fumlshod 293-7778 BC HENDBRSON PLAZA APTS. 730 CMitcr St. Hendvraon, Nvada, 565-7512 2 tKinn., unfurnltlMd, pool & play yard. Ntar schools A shopping. Fi'aa Cabia TV. from $305 month depo. $100 deponotrefnndabie. 299^034. BC. FREE MARKET ANALYSIS OF your property. Abo PropertY management available. Call Anita, Realtor, Hyde and Associates. 2932144 DESERT INN MOTEL nice clean rooma, starting at $76 wk. Maid service, color TV. Alao Utchenettea avail. 293-2827. 800 Nevada Highway. BC. N m GARREH-GREATER NEVADA PROPERnES, INC. 554 Nevada Highway 293-3333 THE FULL SERVICE REALTY MLS 623 CALIFORNIA ST.-Tri-Plex, good income property. $89,000. 821 UTAH, 2 Bdnn.-l Ba./Acro88 from 7-Eleven & Park. $63,000. 1413 GLORIA LN Lewis Home, 4 bdrm, 2 ba., 2 car garage. Price now $84,500. SEARCHLIGHT COMMERCIAL PROPERTY-Water on proper-i ty, lOQX 160, priced at $33,500.' *Will consider trade. A Boat—RV-or Land? Bring Offer. SERVING BOULDER CITY RESIOENTIAL-WKO i COMMERCIAL-PROP. MANAGEMENT SINCE m? APPRAISALS-NOTARYI ONLY $82,5001 One bedroom furnished DUPLEX at 525 & 527 Ave L. Lots of parking & POOL. Many amenities plus great tenantsi** ADULT LIVING IN PARK SF^ f). Ready for move in. Ask about the "Express Loan" availablel P30V.Veator property. 1303 Darlene #104B. $60,000 LA DOLCE VITA Tr^ • jO\S> 4eeds Quick Salel DUPLEX at 636 & 638 Avenue M has been reduced to $64,500.** LOW DOWN PMT-Low monthly pmU. 4 bdrm, 2 ba. home. Just reduced. Great home for large family. 512 Fifth St. $79,500. NEAR GOLF COURSE, $119,000! Owner will help flnance. Fantastic landacaping. 982 El Camiiio** LOW MAINTENANCE YARD & home at 666 Mt Bona in Lake Mountain. Generoua parking** POOL & TENNIS COURT at Lake Terrace. Panoramaic Lake View. Split level townhome. $126,500** READY FOR MOVE IN at 627 Mt. View of Lakel $139,600** Hunter. All-adult living at ita flneat. CUSTOM BUILT & awaiting your choice of carpet, appliances, etc. 4 bdrm, 4 flreplaces, 3 balconies and FANTASTIC LAKE VIEWII! 937 Woodacre** ***Piek np free broclinra.at property BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME: Almost ^ of an acre in Oaremont Heighta where yon will have a UNPARRELLED PANO^kAMIC VIEW OF THE LAKE 4 VALLEY. Abaolutely a "one of a kind" offered at $170,000. WE HAVE SEVERAL CUSTOM HOME LOTS availabltrfs: j>urcha8e in Lake Terrace, Lalw Mead View, B-Hlll, Henderaon and Laa Vegas. HENDERSON $26,000 PRICE REDUCTION. Miaaion Hilla home ith 4 car garage, fenced 1 acre let, endoeed patio wHh q>a, horse corrals and much morel Now only $99,000; over 1500 aq ft • 3 bdraall Tarl Cowan, Br^ar Darwin BiUe. aalaa/real aatate aoctioBecr Mary Board. Reaideatial Specialist EUea Strambcrg, Manager 404 NeTMia Hwy, Boldar aty, NV 89006 CALL 24 HOURS 293-HOMEM8-46I3 .293-1499 .389-6319 239-7254 .293-1968 B^ For rent: Immediate poeaession, 2 bdrm, 1 bth house. Area of E. Tropicana& Nellis. $450 per mo. plua depoait. CaU Al at Jensen's Realty, 564-3333 or 564-2722^ Unf. Apta. Henderson, Central heat/air, 1 bdrm, $200 mo. 2 bdrm, $260 mo. No pete. 564-3204. For rent: 2 bdrm, fenced yd, central air & heat, $406 mo. Deposit $300. Avail Jan 1. Ph 451-6262. Apt. for rent. 2 bdrm, 471 Jefferaon. Ph 564-7934. COMMERCIAURESIDENTIAL For Rent/Lease Drive by 900 Buchonan and see this unique property with commerciol and residential oil on one site!! ENVIRONS REAin INC. 404 Nevada Hwy. 293-4663 /(rUIITIC CITY APMtTMENTS Quality apartmanta in Handarson w/drapaa, carpata, appllancaa, cantral haat & AC. Waahar/dryar avallatila. $270per month. Furnished studio Apartmenl w/all utilities paid. 5M-70M $100 Diaconnt, 2 bdrm, 1 WANTED 3 or 4 BDRM. bth apt. Starting at HM. TO RENT OR $315 mo. Studioa LEASE. $600460.730available, $226 mo. 6674. Aak for Dale or 564-2361. Barbara. OntunC, Boulder 416 NEVADA HIGHWAY. BOULDER CITY, NEVADA (702) 293-3232 1966 Century 21 HM} EsUte Corporation aa tmatee for the NAF.* aod"*trademariu of Centory 21 Real Ertate Corporation. Equal Hoodag Opportaaity.a EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED pSij^ BOULDER CITY HOMES MILLION DOLLAR VIEW OF LAKE MEAD from 10 ROOMS in this beautiful one of a kind unique hi^oric home. Thia home was built for the visiting dignataries during the building of Hoover Dam—very well preserved and UPGRADED with ail copper plumbing, central air and heat, 800 amp and most probably more electric service, all walls 8 inches thick, lota of original wood doors, hardwood inlaid floor—A HOUSE COLLECTQRS DREAM-$495,000. Shown by appointment only. VIEW OF LAKE MEAD-POOI ^v'^JZZI-overlookiiig Lake Mead and the Mountains. Spanisl^Q^^iumpstone, 3 bdrm, 2 full baths, roman tub, large open rooi^VERY CUSTOM home for $164,500. MARINA HIGHLANDS, 3 bdrm, 2 baths, SLUMPSTONE contraction, custom drapes, ceramic tiled counters in idtchen, Jenn air stove, builtin microwave, tub AND sunken tub in M/bath, EXCELLENT condition only $145,000. EXTRA LARGE FAMILY HOME-5 plua bedrooms, in cnl de sac, with $12,000 down yon can take over FHA loan. MAKE AN OFFER. $115,000. THREE BEDROOM l>/> baths, garage haa FRONT and BACK door, OVERSIZED, Private back yard, Ben Franklin stove in family room, alley access, only $84,500. PERFECT STARTER HOME, 3 bdrm, I'A bath, walking distance to EVERYTHING, central heat and air, ASSUMABLE FHA loan all for $76,500. COMPLETELY UPGRADED Laketree Con'do-CUSTOM OAK Kitchen, ceramic tiled floors, 2 bedroom-, V/t baths, 2 car garage, COVERED Patio, EVERYTHING at your fingertipa in community pool, rec hall, RV storage. Inaide & OUTSIDE water are even included in aaaociation fee (only $60 month.) ASSUMABLE loan with no qualifying, ONLY $86,900. TWO bedroom, IV4 bath LAKETREE condo, immaculate iaaide aad out, Existing FHA loan ia ASSUMABLE, thia one'a an END niiit, $81,900. LA DOLCE VITA condo, split entrance, 2 bdrm, IV1 bath, INDOOR utility room, flreplace, quick sale and occupancy available with exiating ASSUMABLE loan, $67,000. UNOBSTRUCTED VIEW OF LAKE MEAD, aU adult Lake Mountain Estates, top of the line SILVERCREST "CHALET" model, fireplace, outdoor heated spa overlooking the Lake, 24'X24' garage, 270 sq ft covered patio, plua 64' covered carport, compare with new model-this ia priced at ONLY $134,900. MAINTENANCE FREE YARD-Lake Mountain Eatatea, 2 bdrm, V/t bath,carport, VIEW of LAKE, cathedral ceOing-buUtin breakfast nook, ready for immediate occupancy, ONLY $97,600. MOBILE HOME I >^#>-BOULDER CITY We have TWO mobile hoar^QVA&able. Valley View Eatatea lotia priced at $36,000 if aale ia c(P,^eted before JANUARY 1987, for only $35,000. The lot in COTOUMIO Eatatee ia VACANT aiad ready far yea to move your own Unit in, lot ia large enough for DUe wkle aad liated at $40,000—make an offer. PRICED RIGHT IN HENDERSON, 3 bdrm, IH bath, large 2 car garage. Comer lot, back yard is endoaed with Blodi Walla, wrought iron gatea lead to oversixed RV parking, covered patio. Fireplace, aee thia one at $82,760. WE GET RESULTS! PUT NO. 1 TO WOMR PON VOM aa* aNke mm^mtrntu mmm apaMM JANICICRAWF0ftO,OirMr SIMITB p€lCI> l#vNAnrAT| BVHMfa*ea e*eaa*aae*eeaa*aeea*aee* MINIMI IK DA VIS* •••**eaj>eeee*aafr ••••••••••••••• DUNNE VANA8SB. 7 'i

PAGE 30

• > > ^ p p-F-^^^^^^i^^^ ^^ I I II I I P i W^^^i^P^PPPP Fagt N HtndtrMa Hem* Nwt and BtuMer City Ntwi ThurMUjr, Juuary 1,1987 • MMb A CUfTOM f AINTtNQ. TlffrlNQ WALLPAPni{!^,AND CABMIT RiriNltHWO latMtorftbMriSi.llMM*Htol>miwiiMteLD>y Hmimm tfH fir wt. 2 •Ik, •Mirity • • •jrtM. PtiMd yd w/Bl^* af all yoKf ttwTpiTBa*!*!? HwyHHd>.8AMar Bookkeeping Tax Service 564-9008 Ri^ AL 4 bdm. 2 bath, 2 Jear laran. M75 mo. poraw-^.Bc. DTPARTI BC iPARTMBNT. Compteteiy fara. iael. iaaphoaa. 1350 per mo. laitldi. aU. OiUy 6 Mo. kkai ra^iilred. poadble Nmaaaat qaartora. Caatraliy located wfehia walldat diataaoe oCaU Biida. Pair teak aaa f A laterviow call 4M1. RBi^ABLB PBMALE RSOMMATE WANT>HRaat,^UtiUtiee. Cill bafort 3 PM lM)187. BC. Hoaan for raat: 9 bdrm, MOO mo. 1180 dopoalt. 5O140. Conplata Laadacaping A Spriafclara ayatema Lawn tfleaaup. Rock A Daaart Undacapo, Trao removal A prualag. Pniitt'aLaadacapiagA SpriaUoro, 458-9M3 or 4M-T962. Uc. 0016880. AUTO REPAIR Bob from Ed'a Auto Rapalro ia BOW rvBaiaf Mobile Bxpreaa Auto Ilapair.24hnaarvice.7 daya a wk. Reaaoaable rataa. Ph 56-9e94, Beepar 381^639. BRICK-BLOCK CUSTOM WORK Nevada Lie 24144 14 yra eiparieaoe PI>atfT74 HardworUBg family aua will do yard work, auaHJ labor A odd Joba.Neadaiaoaoy.CaU Earl. 8644406. WHY DRIVE TO VEGAS? Wa curry a largo oeioctioa of parta for major homo appliaaooa. Ed Harwood'a AppUaaoaa, 118 E.Lafca Mood. 864-2210. i^Rwaaai ^ lanoaai i^M Plaatt ^fm bMoKat lfl-0121 YOU NAMI IT, WI'LL 00 IT. REIIOINTIAL A COMMIRCIAL •Addltiont, •Remodal or •Repair Lie. No. 144M. Ph. a>3-4at4 jSnTsALVATiON ARMY IS IN iBBPenATeNeeD OF FURNITURS m)CL0THt8. FLBASeCALL THE SALVATION ARMY PICKUP AT S49-1974'8^. ^ Par your aampleto Iowa ear* eoU rONDEBOSA LAWNiSRYICS oy, aia M i wmii aBwp.gwianiMc u i. t Thnraday. January 1,1987 Headcrtan HaaM Nawa aad Baaldar City Nawa n-if MO AVI. B. BOUUMR OITV, NV MmoMm Meroiv siRViei • • NIOR emUNB OMCOUNT AVAILABU 24 HR. emtRoeNCY senvices 293-4240 PAINTING and PAPERHANQING INTERIOR DECORATING If you'ra tirad of "Just a Paint Job" •Call TNI DieORATORt We guarantee to please you Call 564-8501 BOULDER CONCRETE WANTB TO Mnr ALL YOUR CONCRrTE NBEDt Fon met nnmATa AND QUALITY WORKMANSHIP CAU MKK CA8MY BOULDER CITY 298-1871 i HOWARD HELDERLEIN CONSTRUCTION Commerdal-Raaident-Remodala and AddiUona 102I01S 666-0874 (p^ •INDUSTRIAL •COMMERCIAL •RESIDENTIAL PORTlll • UCTMC INC. 24 HR EMERGENCY 293-7766 STATE CON. 112162 AVI. B., BOULOiR CITY, NV Where Should You Go To Purchase A Recreational Vehicle For The Least Amount of Money? WeH Alfii ^^ Sunland RV Center 3333 E. FREMONT • 457-8046 Present this ad to salesman at time of purchase & receive a special reward. Henderson residents only. • lanoAnupNONB • XTaiMiON nrrAixBOT You supply ttie phone. I supply the rest. Cost is less than Phope Co. Former phone cornpany installer, VEHICLES DAVrS CNIMNEY SIfEEF We specialize in Sweeping, Rspdr woric, Painting of stoves, all mointenance of your fireploce. Senior Citizen Discount. Spark ortestors Installed Free w /purdiose. It's that time of the year ogoin so give us a call. Happy Holidays. UC # 3112 S64-6971 1980-100 Yamaha Endura. 5654W6S. 72 VW Beetle, 81,000 or make offer. Coll Gen, 585-7468. 73 Caprice Claaoic good tranaportation. Call before 2 p. m. 564-758 7 83 Yamaha lOOZX dirt bike 8700 or beat offer. 5644654. 1980 SUZUKI RM 80, Runa great, axcell. Cond., very dean, $300 or Beet. 293-5820 After 4 PM. BC. Luxury car, 76 Buick LTD. 2 door Landau, original condition. Private party. 81,496.2934027 BC. VAN FOR SALE, 1978 Ford, 84,500 or beet offer. One Ton, cuatomized. 7022971620. 1986 Niaoon 4X4.9,800 mi. $9,800 FIRM. Call between5A7pm.56425. 1986 Nieaan Pickup, fiberglaoa aheU, Uke new. $6,200. 2934)667. BC. 1980 Datenn 210 Station Wagon, engine & body in good cond., 293-7515., After 5:30. $1,600 BC. ^ Chryaler 300 1960. Aa 5654)621. Automatic, ie, $495. PAINTER-PAPERHAN6ER 26 Yean Experience Havt Uught Paper Han^ig Cloaaes-Ovcr IS yrs. Unioo. Have worked lo( the Rich k Famona. Yoa by the maUrial-I'U Furniah Labor. Platae Call Fred s6s-yysi BouLoeR BieeTRie \Jimui'BtM'\imtU Ue. No. 1S1S7 CtN ^3-4St FOR SALE Europeon Wall Unit, 3 units, vety aood condition $400.00 Microwave Oven-Sanyo -Excellent condition -$80.00 firm Quasar VHS, Excellent condition $200.00 firm CALL S65-1959 IS IT TRUE YOU CAN BUY JEEPS FOR $44 through the U.S. Government? Get the facta today! Call 1.312742-1142. 1986 Colt VisU Wagon. Air, cruioe & much more. ExceUent car. $7,100. Call29M332. 75 VW Camper Van, runa great, $3,500 or beat offer. 565-9376. 1977 Volare Woson, parU for Bal e. 565-5415. .72 BAJA 1600 dual port. Runs good. Nice interior. $1,650. 293-5393. BC. 19n DATSUN B 210, interior new, eng. in great ehape. Needa body work. $700. 293-2310. BC. USED AUTO PARTS. .2934661. Let ua do the calling m our New Satellite Computer all atatee and Canada. BIG JOHN A SONS, Foothill Dr. B.C. VOLVO 1971, 4 dr. Neede much work. Beat offer. 564-7402. 24 Ft Reinell. flying bridge. 1979. Sleeps 4, excellent conitttion. Low houre, tandem wheel trailer. $12,000 FIRM. Ph 5654084 after 5 pm A weckenda. 1980 Buick Regal Limitedi SUver, Clean W/newV-6 Engine under warranty, auto trona., Pow ateering, brokea, & windows. Tilt wheel, climate control, AMI FM Casoette. $3.296. 294-0670. BC. 79 Ford Granada $1,250. 90,000 Mi. 4 dr., VS. 2 934269. BC. For aole 72 Dodge Colt aUtion wagon. 66 Ford Pickup truck' 69 Fiat Conpe, Make offer. 564-1881 Aek for Judy or 565 4)8 09After 5 p.m. EMISSION CONTROL CHECK STATION. 293466L Big John and Sona, Foothill Dr. BC 75 BUICK OPEL fuel injection, good cond. $800 after 4. 293-7912 BC. DICK BL AIR R£ ALT S33 NEVADA HWY., BOULDER CITY no^ 293-2171 VftHdURdCALL• eb llalr, Broker .....JtS-tM* Polly OHiray.~~~_Jf >-eai$ CMaUaa AaUaie nS-atU lick Meyaiha Paal Ryaa. •ethAMwerU. JM3-1014 MOBILE HOMES IN Moore'a Mobile Home Park-8'X28' with tip-out OASIS Park model Air cond. & Heat ADULTS ONLY $5,900. ASTEALl For retired couple. 10X50 MobUe Home in beautiful perk oetting. PRICED FOR QUICK SALE $ 8.500. 31' RAMBLER TRAVEL TRAILER FOR SALE. Neat A dean. Located in Moore'a trailer pork $6,600. ConUct ua for detaila. UNOBSTRUCTED VIEW LAKE MEAD 2,200 sq. ft. EXCEPTIONAL MODULAR HOME-2 bedrm, 2>/! ba., 1 cor gar., aun porch, all built ina. Pool & rec hall priviiegee incL $155,000. RENTALS READY TO RELAX? Then thia ia for YOU 2 bedrm., 2 be. Moi>ile home with Snnporch A more. FURNISHED-MOVE IN NOW $800./mo. ADULTS ONLY-2 bdrm, 2 be. Condominium—no peta cloee to ahopping etc. $435.00 AVAIL. BY DEC. 16 ground Qoor, COMMERCIAL ESTABLISHED RETAIL BUS. ONLY ONE OF irS KIND $87,600. EXCELLENT OFHCE LOCATION 560 Sq. Ft. UTILITIES INC.. 8360 ap. WELL ESTABLISHED BUSINESS FOR SALE BELOW MKT. PRICE. CALL FOR DETAILS. YOU DON'T HAVE TO BE A BBAUTIICIAN to own tUa wU oatabiiahed BEAUTY SALON ONLY 821X100 CALL FOR DETAILS. LAND LAKEVIEW LOT-Approximataly .18 acre 864.900. SEVERAL CHOICE LOTSOVERLOOKING LAKE MEAD PRICED FROM 846,000. CALL aad eelaet YOUR CHOICE NOW. LAIOB CUSTOM BLOG. 8IT1S WITH EXCELLENT VIEWS OP BOULDER CITY A VALLEY-PRICEO FROM 846.000. ItgWTAL IWfORMATIONl TOLL PREEI! 1-800-626-8910 Exi. E41 SINCERITY AND INTEGRITY IS OUR SPECIALTY, FIVE BEDROOMS All the amenities + room for everyone— LARGE BEDROOMS, apadous formal A bformal dining rooma, room for pool table. Sewing & Utility room & more. RV PARKG, POOL, SPA. LOW MAINT. $207,600. FOUR BEDROOMS CUSTOM LANDSCAPING, RV PARKG, FRUIT TREES, 2 covered patloa 2 car gar. $105,300. GREAT VIEW-LAKE MEAD, ezoeptkmal back yard with WATERFALL, pond. SPA, CUSTOM ALL THE WAY-$236.500. CUSTOM HOME on B.C. GOLF COURSE, SWM. POOL, SPA, 3,300 oq. ft. of CLASSLGE. LOT COUNTRY CLUB ATMOSPHERE $289,000. POOL, SPA, GREENHOUSE, FRUIT TREES, RV PARKG. 2>/t ba. PRICE REDUCED JUST FOR YOU $117,900. CaU quick. GREAT VIEW-LAKE AND MOUNTAINS Pool, Spa CUSTOM HOME $290,000. THREE BEDROOMS LOVELY CUSTOM HOME quiet Cul de Sac-2 FULL BATHS, 2 car garage $110,000. MOVE IN BEFORE CHRISTMAS! Nice family home w/eaay maint. yarda. Formal L.R. W/F. P. Spacioua Utchen, 2 bath, 2 car garage. 8104,900 SPECTACULAR PANORAMIC VIEW OF LAKE MEAD 3Vi bath. 21X23' A/C workshop, 23'X59'X13Vi' RV GARAGEDen or Uvrfai nudd qutre. indoor apa, oatalUte TV. irXW aw. pool ahoffU bd. ct.. 9 hole putting eoaree. AND MUCH MUCH MORE prox. 4.200 sq. ft. of home. $926,000. TWplPPIQfMit RECENLTY REMODELED-aU aew Blee-' trie, carpeting, raaf, atoaoe exterior PRICED TO SELL 869.800. STARTER HOME, Central A/C, New paiat A Carpet 882,000. CONDOMINIUMS, APT8, TRIPLEX PIXER-UPPBE 1-2 be*aB n^t, S-11 NEED A CAR? New ia town? Old In Town? No Credit? Short time on the Job? Only $100. $200, $300. or $400 down! Need an automobile to gel around? Contact ua. We approve our own coatracta. Inatant delivery. We will pick you up A bring you to our car lot. Juat telephone 564-6909, NEVADA AUTO SALES. 1813 N. BIdr. Hwy, Henderaon. Nev. One block south of Sunaet Blvd. k BIdr. '-Hwy. 67 Ford truck. V4 ton; UtuT ty bed. 3 ap. 666-9683 or 566-7998. 1979 Ford, 9 pass. Sta Wagon. 1 owner. Eng & interior & exterior like new. Yellow/brown. Low mileage, new tires. Call 565-7302. One new radiator, fita Plymouth, Dodge or Chryaler. Call 565-7302. 1972 VW VAN, Back Bed. LookaGood,WeU Maintained. $1,450.293-7067. BC. JR 50 SusuU for sole 1985. 2934}928. $300. n MERCURY Marquia Wagon and 67 Fury III Wagon. 565-7998. A MEMBER OFTHE SEARS RNANCIAI. NETWORK i COLDUieLL $ BANKGRQ ANCHOR REALTY, INC. REALTORS RANCHO & OAKEYI 2,904 S.F. of great living! Giant family room w/wet bar, stone fireplace, 2'/4 baths, large inside laundry room. Kitchen upgraded and tiled. Fireplace with view from living room and dining room. Block walled patio and pool area. $136,500. approiaed! ENTERTAINERS PARADISE! Cuatom 4 bedroom on over 1 acre, featurea gourmet kitchen with aolid oak cabinets. Sparkling pool and cabana. Coll today for appt. to aee! $175,000. THREE BEDROOM LEWIS located eeteblished area! Houae showa like new, call to see this one today! $64,500. Seller related to Broker. NEAR PAHRUMP! OWNER WILL CARRY THE CONTRACT! 20X55 mobile on 2'/i acrea. 1 acre fenced. 40X40 garage, baa own well and pump, 80 treea on property all have timed sprinklers. $60,000. Call Katie! Realtor. STARTER HOME, 3 bedroom with open fireplace between living and family rooma. Cloee to shopping, schools and banka. $59,500. SEARCHLIGHT! 14X70 Fleetwood expanded | to 26X70. Situated on 12 loU apprx. .6 acrea. Mobile featurea 4 bedroom, 3 full betha, oeporaU family room and morel Aaking $150,000. LOCATED NEAR SHOPPING, SCHOOLS. Three bedroom with extra large master suite, living room is expanded but retains a one car garage. Nice sized lot and has exiating aasumable FHA loan. $74,500. LIVE NEAR WAYNE NEWTON'S ESTATE! Three bedroom, 2'/i baths, large rock fireplace in living room. Additional .39 acre adjoining lot included in price. $118,t)00. Appraiaed! THREE BEDRM, IV* bath with aoeumable FHA loan. $10,000 down owner will carry 2nd. R4 property, large lot 100X136 to build more uniU 868,600. I VIEW OF LAS VEGAS VALLEY! 2A acre [ 4iarcel in ctutom home area. Call for directiona \to aee! $44,700.00 PBPPERTREE CONDO kiesitad near Qraaa Valley. Two bedroom and never been lived lat Oroat view.) priced to aeU S68.900. NICE CORIVER LOT goee with thia neat 3 bedroom home! Greet for amoll family or retired couple. Lot is zoned C-2 for future use if wanted., $56,900. GREEN VALLEY-1 yr old 3 bedroom, 2'/i baths, 2 story with 10 yr Home Warranty included. CoU TODAY for APPT! $96,000. SPACIOUS 2 bedraom in Carmarlo Perk area. TUa one ia really aharp and great for that retired conple that wont lanior rooms! 874.500. PROPERTY MANAGEMENT DEFT-WE GIVE RENTAL ASSISTANCE CALL US ON THOSE HUD PROPERTIES. 22 e. BiBie Rd., HtndMiQii, Ntvada 19018 (702) 5644303 CALL 24 HRS. < TOLL FREE 1-80(M5S-1860. EXT. SIO INSURANCE TOO HIGH? Too Many Tickets? SR-22 Naadad? Call Morrow Liauraooe Agaoey GrMi VaUy 461-6633 We honor all advertised special air, cruise and package tares. For information. Phonp ***^" K Wk Hid Ir. Ibn An M M Irii | SIOMS WHmi 565-0262 Vflfae laaeoaa by SpedeMot \ teacher. Sing for career, phyeical tborapy, coafidenoe, voice hnprovement or for enjoyment. All ageeetartingfrom 8 yre to 80 plua. Ph Flo Raymond M684a9. PICTURE FRAMINOQualitv work-reeoonoble pnoea-Uthograiriispoaters-Boy, StO, Trade Art. Art Ekt^anga 444 Hotel Plosa. (Aeroee From Boulder Dam Hotel, Behind Edgara.) 293-0172. BC. InsuranoB SfliM kiaumnoe geolaCy Provides traning end excellent commssiona. Qrow wKh us( CAU 565-9311 Mnaical Vocal, piano, or Forvoorcharch, iaatMB, dub, or fanetfcm.Flo 66664BB. Plaao leeeoaa-AM to your Ufe. All agaa atortimi at 7 yra 4 ap. Ph Flo RaymoBd, Villa Hermosal! Family Section 2 bedroom 1 batti $9,950 GIngerwoodI! 2 bedroom, 24X40 $28,500 B.C. Mobile Horn* Salt Price Raductlonll Lewis 4 bedroom, 2 t)ath reduced to $89,500!! Office or Retail $325 per month. Downtown Boulder City Lake View 3 bedroom, $74,500 Large lot •:< Dom Ralty 1610 Nev. Hwy. 293-1613 B.C. .:J:< 293-6014 A ASSOCIATET 1325 Ariaona Street 'Boulder City, 89005 HOMES-LAND-BUSINESS INVESTMENT CONSULTANTS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT BOULDER CITY BOULDER SQUARE CONDO. Lovely, 1 bdrm, first floor unit. Priced at $49,500. HOME WITH CLASS 800 Avenae K. Lovely three bedroo m apgraded concrete brick home, corner lot with RV parking. Won't last long at 879.000 LOWEST PRICE ON GOLF COURSE 977 El Camino, 3 bdrm, 2 btb, faidoer qw. wet bar. 2 car garage all for 8130.00a ALMOST NEW CUSTOM Relax on tiled patio overlooking Lake Mead. Amenitiea Indude reverse osmoaia water syatem. intercom, buil-in microwave. Satellite dieh, 896 aq. ft. garage + separate workshop, RVparldng, Uundry Rm., 2 bdrm, 2yi bth. $168,000 SPECTACULAR LAKE VIEW Yea thia view ia unobatructable, 2 fireplacea, 4 bdrms, 2'/t batha, room to expand. Oversized 3 car garage with 12' ceiling. Take a good look at thia one of a kind. Spedal $165,000. ^ 1324 APPALOOS rN^lge 4 bdrm, 2 foBL rma, tovely hmcCf'iMia Offer. REAL SLEEPER! Next to new golf cooree eubdivioion. Over L800 oq. ft 3 bdrm, 2W bath w/2 car garage, large kit w/roea for largeat RV yon have. IMoed 8119,600. OOMMERCULBUlLDINGv/Xretidletarea A Uving ult apataira 8119,000. 1014 KEYS DRIVE proatlgloaa honae wMaw of lake, 2 bdraa, 2Vi bth, over 2JI00 af., kivoly pool A spa, 8250,000. 1522 MANCHA 4 b*-^^ bth, fine 2 etory home, located t'^C\M'^ of Boaldar CSty golf courae 814T9T 1133 ENDORA 4 BAaa. 2M bth, Dd Prado 2 atory home w/qnaUty ezpaaaloa. Over 2,500 of., has deck, waterfall aad Oak pomL ExqoUU home 8114.60a Call for FREE MARKET ANALYSIS of your hoaaa. For Reat Caateaa HoMa! OB Golf Cawae, B-lIOlfioa88B0tal AaiUHyde LiadaKarfi Bob Laagavia Aatboay Wbrti Barton

PAGE 31

• > > ^ p p-F-^^^^^^i^^^ ^^ I I II I I P i W^^^i^P^PPPP Fagt N HtndtrMa Hem* Nwt and BtuMer City Ntwi ThurMUjr, Juuary 1,1987 • MMb A CUfTOM f AINTtNQ. TlffrlNQ WALLPAPni{!^,AND CABMIT RiriNltHWO latMtorftbMriSi.llMM*Htol>miwiiMteLD>y Hmimm tfH fir wt. 2 •Ik, •Mirity • • •jrtM. PtiMd yd w/Bl^* af all yoKf ttwTpiTBa*!*!? HwyHHd>.8AMar Bookkeeping Tax Service 564-9008 Ri^ AL 4 bdm. 2 bath, 2 Jear laran. M75 mo. poraw-^.Bc. DTPARTI BC iPARTMBNT. Compteteiy fara. iael. iaaphoaa. 1350 per mo. laitldi. aU. OiUy 6 Mo. kkai ra^iilred. poadble Nmaaaat qaartora. Caatraliy located wfehia walldat diataaoe oCaU Biida. Pair teak aaa f A laterviow call 4M1. RBi^ABLB PBMALE RSOMMATE WANT>HRaat,^UtiUtiee. Cill bafort 3 PM lM)187. BC. Hoaan for raat: 9 bdrm, MOO mo. 1180 dopoalt. 5O140. Conplata Laadacaping A Spriafclara ayatema Lawn tfleaaup. Rock A Daaart Undacapo, Trao removal A prualag. Pniitt'aLaadacapiagA SpriaUoro, 458-9M3 or 4M-T962. Uc. 0016880. AUTO REPAIR Bob from Ed'a Auto Rapalro ia BOW rvBaiaf Mobile Bxpreaa Auto Ilapair.24hnaarvice.7 daya a wk. Reaaoaable rataa. Ph 56-9e94, Beepar 381^639. BRICK-BLOCK CUSTOM WORK Nevada Lie 24144 14 yra eiparieaoe PI>atfT74 HardworUBg family aua will do yard work, auaHJ labor A odd Joba.Neadaiaoaoy.CaU Earl. 8644406. WHY DRIVE TO VEGAS? Wa curry a largo oeioctioa of parta for major homo appliaaooa. Ed Harwood'a AppUaaoaa, 118 E.Lafca Mood. 864-2210. i^Rwaaai ^ lanoaai i^M Plaatt ^fm bMoKat lfl-0121 YOU NAMI IT, WI'LL 00 IT. REIIOINTIAL A COMMIRCIAL •Addltiont, •Remodal or •Repair Lie. No. 144M. Ph. a>3-4at4 jSnTsALVATiON ARMY IS IN iBBPenATeNeeD OF FURNITURS m)CL0THt8. FLBASeCALL THE SALVATION ARMY PICKUP AT S49-1974'8^. ^ Par your aampleto Iowa ear* eoU rONDEBOSA LAWNiSRYICS oy, aia M i wmii aBwp.gwianiMc u i. t Thnraday. January 1,1987 Headcrtan HaaM Nawa aad Baaldar City Nawa n-if MO AVI. B. BOUUMR OITV, NV MmoMm Meroiv siRViei • • NIOR emUNB OMCOUNT AVAILABU 24 HR. emtRoeNCY senvices 293-4240 PAINTING and PAPERHANQING INTERIOR DECORATING If you'ra tirad of "Just a Paint Job" •Call TNI DieORATORt We guarantee to please you Call 564-8501 BOULDER CONCRETE WANTB TO Mnr ALL YOUR CONCRrTE NBEDt Fon met nnmATa AND QUALITY WORKMANSHIP CAU MKK CA8MY BOULDER CITY 298-1871 i HOWARD HELDERLEIN CONSTRUCTION Commerdal-Raaident-Remodala and AddiUona 102I01S 666-0874 (p^ •INDUSTRIAL •COMMERCIAL •RESIDENTIAL PORTlll • UCTMC INC. 24 HR EMERGENCY 293-7766 STATE CON. 112162 AVI. B., BOULOiR CITY, NV Where Should You Go To Purchase A Recreational Vehicle For The Least Amount of Money? WeH Alfii ^^ Sunland RV Center 3333 E. FREMONT • 457-8046 Present this ad to salesman at time of purchase & receive a special reward. Henderson residents only. • lanoAnupNONB • XTaiMiON nrrAixBOT You supply ttie phone. I supply the rest. Cost is less than Phope Co. Former phone cornpany installer, VEHICLES DAVrS CNIMNEY SIfEEF We specialize in Sweeping, Rspdr woric, Painting of stoves, all mointenance of your fireploce. Senior Citizen Discount. Spark ortestors Installed Free w /purdiose. It's that time of the year ogoin so give us a call. Happy Holidays. UC # 3112 S64-6971 1980-100 Yamaha Endura. 5654W6S. 72 VW Beetle, 81,000 or make offer. Coll Gen, 585-7468. 73 Caprice Claaoic good tranaportation. Call before 2 p. m. 564-758 7 83 Yamaha lOOZX dirt bike 8700 or beat offer. 5644654. 1980 SUZUKI RM 80, Runa great, axcell. Cond., very dean, $300 or Beet. 293-5820 After 4 PM. BC. Luxury car, 76 Buick LTD. 2 door Landau, original condition. Private party. 81,496.2934027 BC. VAN FOR SALE, 1978 Ford, 84,500 or beet offer. One Ton, cuatomized. 7022971620. 1986 Niaoon 4X4.9,800 mi. $9,800 FIRM. Call between5A7pm.56425. 1986 Nieaan Pickup, fiberglaoa aheU, Uke new. $6,200. 2934)667. BC. 1980 Datenn 210 Station Wagon, engine & body in good cond., 293-7515., After 5:30. $1,600 BC. ^ Chryaler 300 1960. Aa 5654)621. Automatic, ie, $495. PAINTER-PAPERHAN6ER 26 Yean Experience Havt Uught Paper Han^ig Cloaaes-Ovcr IS yrs. Unioo. Have worked lo( the Rich k Famona. Yoa by the maUrial-I'U Furniah Labor. Platae Call Fred s6s-yysi BouLoeR BieeTRie \Jimui'BtM'\imtU Ue. No. 1S1S7 CtN ^3-4St FOR SALE Europeon Wall Unit, 3 units, vety aood condition $400.00 Microwave Oven-Sanyo -Excellent condition -$80.00 firm Quasar VHS, Excellent condition $200.00 firm CALL S65-1959 IS IT TRUE YOU CAN BUY JEEPS FOR $44 through the U.S. Government? Get the facta today! Call 1.312742-1142. 1986 Colt VisU Wagon. Air, cruioe & much more. ExceUent car. $7,100. Call29M332. 75 VW Camper Van, runa great, $3,500 or beat offer. 565-9376. 1977 Volare Woson, parU for Bal e. 565-5415. .72 BAJA 1600 dual port. Runs good. Nice interior. $1,650. 293-5393. BC. 19n DATSUN B 210, interior new, eng. in great ehape. Needa body work. $700. 293-2310. BC. USED AUTO PARTS. .2934661. Let ua do the calling m our New Satellite Computer all atatee and Canada. BIG JOHN A SONS, Foothill Dr. B.C. VOLVO 1971, 4 dr. Neede much work. Beat offer. 564-7402. 24 Ft Reinell. flying bridge. 1979. Sleeps 4, excellent conitttion. Low houre, tandem wheel trailer. $12,000 FIRM. Ph 5654084 after 5 pm A weckenda. 1980 Buick Regal Limitedi SUver, Clean W/newV-6 Engine under warranty, auto trona., Pow ateering, brokea, & windows. Tilt wheel, climate control, AMI FM Casoette. $3.296. 294-0670. BC. 79 Ford Granada $1,250. 90,000 Mi. 4 dr., VS. 2 934269. BC. For aole 72 Dodge Colt aUtion wagon. 66 Ford Pickup truck' 69 Fiat Conpe, Make offer. 564-1881 Aek for Judy or 565 4)8 09After 5 p.m. EMISSION CONTROL CHECK STATION. 293466L Big John and Sona, Foothill Dr. BC 75 BUICK OPEL fuel injection, good cond. $800 after 4. 293-7912 BC. DICK BL AIR R£ ALT S33 NEVADA HWY., BOULDER CITY no^ 293-2171 VftHdURdCALL• eb llalr, Broker .....JtS-tM* Polly OHiray.~~~_Jf >-eai$ CMaUaa AaUaie nS-atU lick Meyaiha Paal Ryaa. •ethAMwerU. JM3-1014 MOBILE HOMES IN Moore'a Mobile Home Park-8'X28' with tip-out OASIS Park model Air cond. & Heat ADULTS ONLY $5,900. ASTEALl For retired couple. 10X50 MobUe Home in beautiful perk oetting. PRICED FOR QUICK SALE $ 8.500. 31' RAMBLER TRAVEL TRAILER FOR SALE. Neat A dean. Located in Moore'a trailer pork $6,600. ConUct ua for detaila. UNOBSTRUCTED VIEW LAKE MEAD 2,200 sq. ft. EXCEPTIONAL MODULAR HOME-2 bedrm, 2>/! ba., 1 cor gar., aun porch, all built ina. Pool & rec hall priviiegee incL $155,000. RENTALS READY TO RELAX? Then thia ia for YOU 2 bedrm., 2 be. Moi>ile home with Snnporch A more. FURNISHED-MOVE IN NOW $800./mo. ADULTS ONLY-2 bdrm, 2 be. Condominium—no peta cloee to ahopping etc. $435.00 AVAIL. BY DEC. 16 ground Qoor, COMMERCIAL ESTABLISHED RETAIL BUS. ONLY ONE OF irS KIND $87,600. EXCELLENT OFHCE LOCATION 560 Sq. Ft. UTILITIES INC.. 8360 ap. WELL ESTABLISHED BUSINESS FOR SALE BELOW MKT. PRICE. CALL FOR DETAILS. YOU DON'T HAVE TO BE A BBAUTIICIAN to own tUa wU oatabiiahed BEAUTY SALON ONLY 821X100 CALL FOR DETAILS. LAND LAKEVIEW LOT-Approximataly .18 acre 864.900. SEVERAL CHOICE LOTSOVERLOOKING LAKE MEAD PRICED FROM 846,000. CALL aad eelaet YOUR CHOICE NOW. LAIOB CUSTOM BLOG. 8IT1S WITH EXCELLENT VIEWS OP BOULDER CITY A VALLEY-PRICEO FROM 846.000. ItgWTAL IWfORMATIONl TOLL PREEI! 1-800-626-8910 Exi. E41 SINCERITY AND INTEGRITY IS OUR SPECIALTY, FIVE BEDROOMS All the amenities + room for everyone— LARGE BEDROOMS, apadous formal A bformal dining rooma, room for pool table. Sewing & Utility room & more. RV PARKG, POOL, SPA. LOW MAINT. $207,600. FOUR BEDROOMS CUSTOM LANDSCAPING, RV PARKG, FRUIT TREES, 2 covered patloa 2 car gar. $105,300. GREAT VIEW-LAKE MEAD, ezoeptkmal back yard with WATERFALL, pond. SPA, CUSTOM ALL THE WAY-$236.500. CUSTOM HOME on B.C. GOLF COURSE, SWM. POOL, SPA, 3,300 oq. ft. of CLASSLGE. LOT COUNTRY CLUB ATMOSPHERE $289,000. POOL, SPA, GREENHOUSE, FRUIT TREES, RV PARKG. 2>/t ba. PRICE REDUCED JUST FOR YOU $117,900. CaU quick. GREAT VIEW-LAKE AND MOUNTAINS Pool, Spa CUSTOM HOME $290,000. THREE BEDROOMS LOVELY CUSTOM HOME quiet Cul de Sac-2 FULL BATHS, 2 car garage $110,000. MOVE IN BEFORE CHRISTMAS! Nice family home w/eaay maint. yarda. Formal L.R. W/F. P. Spacioua Utchen, 2 bath, 2 car garage. 8104,900 SPECTACULAR PANORAMIC VIEW OF LAKE MEAD 3Vi bath. 21X23' A/C workshop, 23'X59'X13Vi' RV GARAGEDen or Uvrfai nudd qutre. indoor apa, oatalUte TV. irXW aw. pool ahoffU bd. ct.. 9 hole putting eoaree. AND MUCH MUCH MORE prox. 4.200 sq. ft. of home. $926,000. TWplPPIQfMit RECENLTY REMODELED-aU aew Blee-' trie, carpeting, raaf, atoaoe exterior PRICED TO SELL 869.800. STARTER HOME, Central A/C, New paiat A Carpet 882,000. CONDOMINIUMS, APT8, TRIPLEX PIXER-UPPBE 1-2 be*aB n^t, S-11 NEED A CAR? New ia town? Old In Town? No Credit? Short time on the Job? Only $100. $200, $300. or $400 down! Need an automobile to gel around? Contact ua. We approve our own coatracta. Inatant delivery. We will pick you up A bring you to our car lot. Juat telephone 564-6909, NEVADA AUTO SALES. 1813 N. BIdr. Hwy, Henderaon. Nev. One block south of Sunaet Blvd. k BIdr. '-Hwy. 67 Ford truck. V4 ton; UtuT ty bed. 3 ap. 666-9683 or 566-7998. 1979 Ford, 9 pass. Sta Wagon. 1 owner. Eng & interior & exterior like new. Yellow/brown. Low mileage, new tires. Call 565-7302. One new radiator, fita Plymouth, Dodge or Chryaler. Call 565-7302. 1972 VW VAN, Back Bed. LookaGood,WeU Maintained. $1,450.293-7067. BC. JR 50 SusuU for sole 1985. 2934}928. $300. n MERCURY Marquia Wagon and 67 Fury III Wagon. 565-7998. A MEMBER OFTHE SEARS RNANCIAI. NETWORK i COLDUieLL $ BANKGRQ ANCHOR REALTY, INC. REALTORS RANCHO & OAKEYI 2,904 S.F. of great living! Giant family room w/wet bar, stone fireplace, 2'/4 baths, large inside laundry room. Kitchen upgraded and tiled. Fireplace with view from living room and dining room. Block walled patio and pool area. $136,500. approiaed! ENTERTAINERS PARADISE! Cuatom 4 bedroom on over 1 acre, featurea gourmet kitchen with aolid oak cabinets. Sparkling pool and cabana. Coll today for appt. to aee! $175,000. THREE BEDROOM LEWIS located eeteblished area! Houae showa like new, call to see this one today! $64,500. Seller related to Broker. NEAR PAHRUMP! OWNER WILL CARRY THE CONTRACT! 20X55 mobile on 2'/i acrea. 1 acre fenced. 40X40 garage, baa own well and pump, 80 treea on property all have timed sprinklers. $60,000. Call Katie! Realtor. STARTER HOME, 3 bedroom with open fireplace between living and family rooma. Cloee to shopping, schools and banka. $59,500. SEARCHLIGHT! 14X70 Fleetwood expanded | to 26X70. Situated on 12 loU apprx. .6 acrea. Mobile featurea 4 bedroom, 3 full betha, oeporaU family room and morel Aaking $150,000. LOCATED NEAR SHOPPING, SCHOOLS. Three bedroom with extra large master suite, living room is expanded but retains a one car garage. Nice sized lot and has exiating aasumable FHA loan. $74,500. LIVE NEAR WAYNE NEWTON'S ESTATE! Three bedroom, 2'/i baths, large rock fireplace in living room. Additional .39 acre adjoining lot included in price. $118,t)00. Appraiaed! THREE BEDRM, IV* bath with aoeumable FHA loan. $10,000 down owner will carry 2nd. R4 property, large lot 100X136 to build more uniU 868,600. I VIEW OF LAS VEGAS VALLEY! 2A acre [ 4iarcel in ctutom home area. Call for directiona \to aee! $44,700.00 PBPPERTREE CONDO kiesitad near Qraaa Valley. Two bedroom and never been lived lat Oroat view.) priced to aeU S68.900. NICE CORIVER LOT goee with thia neat 3 bedroom home! Greet for amoll family or retired couple. Lot is zoned C-2 for future use if wanted., $56,900. GREEN VALLEY-1 yr old 3 bedroom, 2'/i baths, 2 story with 10 yr Home Warranty included. CoU TODAY for APPT! $96,000. SPACIOUS 2 bedraom in Carmarlo Perk area. TUa one ia really aharp and great for that retired conple that wont lanior rooms! 874.500. PROPERTY MANAGEMENT DEFT-WE GIVE RENTAL ASSISTANCE CALL US ON THOSE HUD PROPERTIES. 22 e. BiBie Rd., HtndMiQii, Ntvada 19018 (702) 5644303 CALL 24 HRS. < TOLL FREE 1-80(M5S-1860. EXT. SIO INSURANCE TOO HIGH? Too Many Tickets? SR-22 Naadad? Call Morrow Liauraooe Agaoey GrMi VaUy 461-6633 We honor all advertised special air, cruise and package tares. For information. Phonp ***^" K Wk Hid Ir. Ibn An M M Irii | SIOMS WHmi 565-0262 Vflfae laaeoaa by SpedeMot \ teacher. Sing for career, phyeical tborapy, coafidenoe, voice hnprovement or for enjoyment. All ageeetartingfrom 8 yre to 80 plua. Ph Flo Raymond M684a9. PICTURE FRAMINOQualitv work-reeoonoble pnoea-Uthograiriispoaters-Boy, StO, Trade Art. Art Ekt^anga 444 Hotel Plosa. (Aeroee From Boulder Dam Hotel, Behind Edgara.) 293-0172. BC. InsuranoB SfliM kiaumnoe geolaCy Provides traning end excellent commssiona. Qrow wKh us( CAU 565-9311 Mnaical Vocal, piano, or Forvoorcharch, iaatMB, dub, or fanetfcm.Flo 66664BB. Plaao leeeoaa-AM to your Ufe. All agaa atortimi at 7 yra 4 ap. Ph Flo RaymoBd, Villa Hermosal! Family Section 2 bedroom 1 batti $9,950 GIngerwoodI! 2 bedroom, 24X40 $28,500 B.C. Mobile Horn* Salt Price Raductlonll Lewis 4 bedroom, 2 t)ath reduced to $89,500!! Office or Retail $325 per month. Downtown Boulder City Lake View 3 bedroom, $74,500 Large lot •:< Dom Ralty 1610 Nev. Hwy. 293-1613 B.C. .:J:< 293-6014 A ASSOCIATET 1325 Ariaona Street 'Boulder City, 89005 HOMES-LAND-BUSINESS INVESTMENT CONSULTANTS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT BOULDER CITY BOULDER SQUARE CONDO. Lovely, 1 bdrm, first floor unit. Priced at $49,500. HOME WITH CLASS 800 Avenae K. Lovely three bedroo m apgraded concrete brick home, corner lot with RV parking. Won't last long at 879.000 LOWEST PRICE ON GOLF COURSE 977 El Camino, 3 bdrm, 2 btb, faidoer qw. wet bar. 2 car garage all for 8130.00a ALMOST NEW CUSTOM Relax on tiled patio overlooking Lake Mead. Amenitiea Indude reverse osmoaia water syatem. intercom, buil-in microwave. Satellite dieh, 896 aq. ft. garage + separate workshop, RVparldng, Uundry Rm., 2 bdrm, 2yi bth. $168,000 SPECTACULAR LAKE VIEW Yea thia view ia unobatructable, 2 fireplacea, 4 bdrms, 2'/t batha, room to expand. Oversized 3 car garage with 12' ceiling. Take a good look at thia one of a kind. Spedal $165,000. ^ 1324 APPALOOS rN^lge 4 bdrm, 2 foBL rma, tovely hmcCf'iMia Offer. REAL SLEEPER! Next to new golf cooree eubdivioion. Over L800 oq. ft 3 bdrm, 2W bath w/2 car garage, large kit w/roea for largeat RV yon have. IMoed 8119,600. OOMMERCULBUlLDINGv/Xretidletarea A Uving ult apataira 8119,000. 1014 KEYS DRIVE proatlgloaa honae wMaw of lake, 2 bdraa, 2Vi bth, over 2JI00 af., kivoly pool A spa, 8250,000. 1522 MANCHA 4 b*-^^ bth, fine 2 etory home, located t'^C\M'^ of Boaldar CSty golf courae 814T9T 1133 ENDORA 4 BAaa. 2M bth, Dd Prado 2 atory home w/qnaUty ezpaaaloa. Over 2,500 of., has deck, waterfall aad Oak pomL ExqoUU home 8114.60a Call for FREE MARKET ANALYSIS of your hoaaa. For Reat Caateaa HoMa! OB Golf Cawae, B-lIOlfioa88B0tal AaiUHyde LiadaKarfi Bob Laagavia Aatboay Wbrti Barton

PAGE 32

^^"^^^ • ^^^^ • ^"^ • • ^mt^i^tm^^^m^^^^Kmmm Pat• St Henderson Home News and Boulder City Newa Thursday, January 1,1987 SISMONEV;SAVN. ffi?^ rz-n rr^ The ilrii • -•.• ^.,. •rV'>-'^1?^^85WWWW^^ • ITY CARPETS for LESSl ON ALL CARPET ^AS NEVER BEFORE! \^?'i 100% DUPONT NYLON HEAVY PLUSH VENUS BY GALAXY All new, 20 Decorative Colors ONLY ^'^ 99 SQ. YD.y ^100% DUPONT DACRON BY EVANS & BLACK AND FAMOUS FARE Many fabulous colors to choose from ONLY 99 SQ. YD.y 100% DUPONT NYLON BREAKTHRU BY COLUMBUS All New, 20 Beautiful Colors ONLY N 1 ^,v ^'X. 100% DUPONT NYLON BARN BY CABIN CRAFT MANY ATTRACTIVE COLORS TO CHOOSE FROM ONLY SQ. YD. WE DON'T MEET PRICES... WE BEAT EVERYBODY'S PRICES SUPER PLUSH, SCULPTURES, SHADES, MULTI-COLORED MANY EXCITING COLORS TO CHOOSE FROM ALL AT CLEARANCE SAVINGS! / \ NO JOB TOO SMALL OR TOO LARGE-ONE ROOM TO A FULL HOUSE OF CARPET 100% DUPONT NYLON BY WORLD -MEET FHA QUALIFICATIONS ONLY SQ. YD. FINANCING AVAILABLE HURRY! CALL NOW FOR ESTI MATES 90 DAYS SAME AS CASH ON APPROVED CREDIT CALL TODAY-OR COME ON IN! 384-8551 105 W. Charleston BM. • "" ^;| < II .; r'''Ti • ^^t'^ -!^^^?^^^§r?!^'sl5! OPEN EVENINGS & FREE PARKING 'J. MON.-FRI. 9 TO 9 • SAT. 9 TO 6 • SUN. 11 TO 5 ^^ :^'j<-.*> iSifJv^ i-k I r!^ h New Year's baby delivered wit|i helj) from New Year's nurse Z8-90-I0 C0Cfr6 VD 98-IC-/0 3AV 01 i 3J-N0ya A3-IUI wiijoyD IV OlVd VWOl ZGZ NilV AVa NEW YEAR'S BABIES-AngeUca Lynne Seger and delivery room nurse Lin Mathewson were both New Year's Day babies. Seger, along with her^mother Raya (left) were Nevada's first birth of 1987. by Katherine E. Scott W8 Staff Writer 8 baby of the new lark County, and e state of Nevada, t St. Rose de Lima st one minute after ^ Jan. 1. Angelica Lynne Seger was also the first child for Henderson residents Raya and Anthony Seger. / There was some confusion in the first few hours of this year as to who the official New Year's baby was, since another child was bom at University Medical Center in Las Vegas four minutes later. The radio station was announcing that UMC had it," remarked labor and delivery nurse Linda 'Tin" Mathewson. "I called them up and told them, "You know, Rose de Lima is in Clark County.'" Mathewson, who has been with the hospital some seven years, was a New Year's Day baby herself. She was'-bom 3:20 a.m. in South Bend, Indiana during the 19408. However, she was the second child in the city, born about an hour after the first. The new mother mentioned Mathewson "was great through the whole thing." She added she was especially helpful with her breathing during labor. She ^so'thanks the help of her doctftr, Joel Bower. Raya noted she and Anthony e^e long-jtime Henderson residents. The 19-year-old rnl^^J^ lived here since she WM a yigar old. Anthony, 23, has lited'.here soipe 15 years. Raya at^n^ed Basic High School in the clas Of 1986. They live S^ th^ Townsite neighborhood,%nd Anthony is a cook at the Rainbow Club, Raya commented that although their baby's due date was Jan. 8, "I'd been in and out of the hoq)ital since Christmas Eve with false labor." She added that was when she began to believe their baby would be the first of the new ^^ear. Sht iptnt 12 hours in tlw hospital Qaiataua Eve, tim was hospitaKnd o& Quiatnus for three days. The day after New Year's the young parents were not MM what gifts they would receive for having the Hrst baby of the year, Traditionally the new parents are treated to a variety of gifts from businesses inwlved with children, plus free dhmers from restaurant*. Raya mentioned Angelica 'Is real tiny. My husband's eyes she's going to have, but d^% Sebabypaf2 HENDERSON NEVADA'S INDUSTRIAL CENTER votam, 3Mth Ediuon HendersoD, Nevada WE COMMUNITY'S NEWSPAPER 2St 22 Water St. 564-1881 'f'"'^*' •'"' • "y 1987 Railroad Pass Hotel's grand opening Thursday, Friday Ushering in a new year and new era for Henderson, Railroad Pass Hotel and Casino will celebrate the grand opening of its new five-story hotel Thursday and Friday. Another VIEW by John Dailey Home News Editor Should pubhc business be negotiated privately? Increasingly in Nevada, elected pubhc officials are saying yes to this question, almost always against the spirit of the state's Open Meeting Law, if not its specific provisions. There has been a constant battle by the press to have negotiations performed by any governmental entity governed under some provisions of the law. Usually these negotiations involve legal settlements or possible civil suits where the city or county involved stands to lose a lot of money, The entity's ,^ counsel says the attorney-client privilege must be preserved and thus the public is barred from negotiations. Often, the pubhc is left in the dark when issues are settled and not made pubhc. Who is the client/ anyway? We're asked to beheve it is not us, the taxpayers, but our elected representatives, who might not have our interests at heart in light of their pohtical future. Who will get the blame for the colossal judgment leveled against the county over their wastewater treatment lawsuit? Two who hired out-of-state lawyers and voted to go to court have already been re-elected. See Another View paSl? Historically denied incorporation to gaming-free Boulder City, the county's oldest casino and its new 120-room hotel sets a number of Henderson firsts: the first multi-storied conomercial building in the city, the {'vest hotel with more than 100 rooms and the first gaming fullservice (lodging, restaurants and gambling) operation. The property became incorporated to the city as part of expansion plans by its newest owners, who purchased the Pass in October 1985. Management annoimced plans to buUd the five-stoiy kotelftlcms^with' a number of other expansion and improvement projects to the gaming and dining areas. Incorporation within Henderson was necessary to pro• vide needed utilities and municipal services to the property. Among other improvements to the now 40,000 square foot facihty were expansion of the restaurant and buffet dining See opening page 2 NEW HOTEL-Featured in Railroad Pass Hotel and Casino's grand opening celebration this Thursday and Friday Talks with union begin today City presses wage freeze by Scott Dickensheets Home News Staff Writer Representatives from the city of Henderson will sit down with representatives of Teamster Union Local No. 14 today and tomorrow in an attempt to iron out contract disputes. The two-day mediation is the next to last step in the effort to solve disagreements over proposed wage freezes and other "money items." The union represents blue collar, supervisory and clerical-technical personnel. According to city manager Gary Bloomquist, the proposed wage freezes were recommended by a compensation study performed last year. In the study, Henderson was compared to ten other cities, contrasting jobs and salaries. ,Jim Wilkerson, secretarytreasurer of Teamsters Local No. 14, who is handling negotiations for the union, Monday said the union had doubts about the quaUty of the stidy. "We reaUy question whether the study w as well done," he said. "It was not an in-depth study of all job classifications." One example, Wilkerson said, was the study's recommendation that one supervisory position be paid less than the positions beneath it. He added that during a recent Governor's board hearing on the matter, the union pointed out the inadequacies of the study. The wage freeze will have larger effects than the city is indicating, Wilkerson added. He said that of 46 clericaltechnical workers, 33 would receive no pay increase under the proposed contract. Fifteen of 17 sujaervisory personnel would not receive increases, and 58 of 65 blue collar workers would also not receive an irtcrease. "Some of the freezes last as long as three years," he said. The union, Wilkerson, said has traditionally negotiated on the city's ability to pay. This year, he added, no one is questioning their ability to pay. Bloomquist, in a Dec. 28 Home News article, siid the city has also proposed a five percent compensation reduction, due to Henderson's four day cork week. Wilkerson countered by saying that prior to instituting the shorter week, the union received a six percent increase. In 1982, WUkerson said, they gave back five percent in return for the four day week. Hender son workers, he said, only work two hours less than before. "We've always had super relationship with the city of Henderson," he said. "But it seems they've broken down in .the last year. Employees are starting to Ceel like they're numbers on a board. When you have that kind of attitude,it's going to affect production." If no solution arises from the mediation, the final step will be binding arbitration. Bloomquist defended the study, saying it was performed by a competent firm. The vaHety of job titles, classifications and duties comphcates such a study, he said, but added, "As far as I'm concerned, it's an accurate study and I have no probto n defending it." ,_ is the property's oew five-story, 120-rooin hotel photographed above. Long struggle taking shape u. ^. by Scott Dickensheets Home News Staff Writer Local developer Richard MacDont^^ says he's been working on his proposed MacDonald Ranch so long he feels Uke "Captain Ahab with Moby Dick." Many times larger than the legendary white whale, MacDonald Ranch is a proposed 3,210-acre mixed residential, commercial, business and recreational development MacDonald is seeking to establish South of East Lake Mead Drive. The acreage includes some hillside property among the small mountains behind Black Mountain. The view afforded by these hillsides is a major asset to the project, MacDonald said. "This is unique. There is no other site in the whole valley, thlf I Ibniow of, iJiat actually has mountainside property." Upscale housing will take up a large percentage of the hillside areas. MacDonald, in an interview last week, id he is plauiag to enlnoe strict restde&sns OS AuiMiag in the hills. "In California ynnH •peopie taking bulldozers and pushing dirt over the side," he said. "You won't have any of that here. Anytime the natural landscape is disturbed you have to replace it. That way you don't mar the land." Atop several of the hills will be restaurants. MacDonald said hilltop restaurants are popular in other southwestern cities but haven't been tried here. A western-style rib and steak place—"where you walk in with a tie and they cut it off and pin it to a wall; really laid backhand a Mexican restaurant are planned, as well as a special outdoor diner. Wrapped around the bottom of the hUls will be a golf course, 27 holes in all. The^&ssorss, MacDonald said, will be another major selling point for the project. MacDonald Ranch is divided roughly in three. Phase one will be developed in the center of the property, and will consiA mostly of starter homes, along with some of the hilUde homes. Vbamtwklht emlbmt